Skip to main content

Full text of "Report of the Department of Marine and Fisheries (Fisheries), for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1901."

See other formats


1-2 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 A. 1902 

THIRTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THK 

♦ 

DEPARTMENT OF MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1901 

FISHERIES 

PRINTED BY ORDER OF PARLIAMENT 




OTTAWA 

PRINTED BY S. K. DAWSON, PRINTER TO THE KING'S MOST 

EXCELLENT MAJESTY 
1902 

[No. 22—1902] 



1-2 EDWARD VII. 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



A. 1902 



To His Excellency the Right Honourable Sir Gilbert John Elliot, Earl of Minto, 
Governor General of Canada. 

May it please Your Excellency : 

I have the honour to submit herewith, for the information of Your Excellency and 
the Legislature of Canada, the Thirty-Fourth Annual Report of the Department of 
Marine and Fisheries, Fisheries Branch. 

I have the honour to be, 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

JAMES SUTHERLAND, 

Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 

Department of Marine and Fisheries, 

Ottawa, January 22, 1902 



1-2 EDWARD VII. 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



A. 1902 



ALPHABETICAL JNDEX 



TO THE 

FISHER TES REPORT 



1901. 



A 

' Acadia,' D.G. cruiser 

Antigonish County, N.S., overseer's reports 

Anticosti Island, lobstei fishery, &c 

Areas — extent of water 

Armstrong, Win., hatchery officer, Newcastle, Ont. . . 

Associations of Bait Freezers 

Aylmer Lake, P. Q 



B 



Bait, cold storage of xxiv, 222 

Black Bass, breeding and transportation of xxxiii, 231, 234, 237 

Bay View lobster hatchery 257 

Behring Sea Question, remarks xi 

Sealing Fleet of 1900 and 1901 xi, 176 

Catch of Seals 1900 and 1901 xi, 177 

Belliveau, A. H., Inspector's reports xxxii, 191 

Bertram, A. C, Inspector of Cape Breton Island, reports xxviii, 35 

Biological Marine Station ix 

Bona venture County, P.Q 184, 190, 194 

Bounties Fishing regulations 10 

M Statement of claims received and paid 1900 12 

M General remarks 15 

• ii Statement of claims received and paid since 1882 . 10 

•i Statement of all vessels receiving them, 1900 19 to 34 

British Columbia, Reports on fisheries by Inspector C. B. Sword 172 

Report on fish culture m ■■ 230 

Seal catch, 1900 and 1901 177, xi 

H List of Salmon canneries and pack of 1900-1901 xxxvi, 175 

ii Statements of catch and fishing material 178, 181 

•i Expenditure 2,4 

Bureau, Fisheries Intelligence xxvi 

ii Detailed report on, by Mr. Maekerrow 288 

ii Report on cod, herring, lobsters, mackerel, salmon, squid, &c 289 to 327 



Page. 

268 
44, 57 
138, 320 
xxii 
251 
xxiv, 222 
193 



ii .1/- 1 Rl VE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

C 

Pauk. 

Campobello's Fish Fair 101 

Cape Breton Island. (See Nova Scotia District No. 1) 35 

,, Fisheries officers' reports. 38 

ii Fisheries Intelligence Bureau reports 304 to 31(5 

Capital invested in the fisheries of Canada xiii, xiv 

Catellier, L. N., report on fish culture - ... . 248 

( !anso x, 288 

Chapman, R. A., Inspector, N.B., reports xxix, 104 

Charlotte County, N.B., reports of overseers 101, 109 

Coast — extent of Canadian coast line xii 

Cod, remarks on ... .36, 46, 182, 291 

Colchester County, N.S., Overseer's report . . . . 44 

Cruisers, Canadian list of, stations ... 2(58 

Culture of fish. (Sec ' F '). 

' Curlew ', D.G. cruiser |. f. Z: ■..£... H 268, 275 

Cunningham, F. H., Inspector of hatcheries, report 236 

Cumberland County, N.S 44,60 

D 

Digby County, returns 76, 78, 290 

Dunn, Capt. E. of Dominion cruiser 'Petrel' 283 

Duncan, A. G., Inspector, Ont xxxiv, 145 

E 

Expenditure xii, 1 

ii Subdivision by provinces 2 

ii Fish culture 4 

n Fisheries protection service 5 

ii Comparative statement 8 

Export of fish from Canada . . xix 

F 

Fish Culture , : . . '± WM xxv 

Report on, by Prof. E. E. Prince 228 

Breeding of trout . i . . : : . ! ... 228 

Transportation of live bass to B. C 234, 238 " 

Be New hatcheries 37, 229 

I. Reports of officers in charge of hatcheries 239 

.1 List H H .1 . . xxviii 

ii Hacheries in British Columbia 239 

H H Nova Scotia 241, 257 

i. ii New Brunswick 242, 244 

Quebec 248,250 

Ontario 251,253 

ii H Manitoba " 256 

n Expenditure 3 

H Oysters cultivation. (Sec letter ' O ') 

Fisheries Protection Service.. , xxvi 

H Report on, by Commander O. G. V. Spain 268 

ii Cruisers, their captains and stations 26S 

ii Expenditure £ 



IXDEX 



iii 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



F — Continued. 

Page. 

Fisheries Protection Service Modus vivcndi licenses 269 

List of U.S. fishing vessels entering Canadian ports 271 

n Reports from captains of cruisers 275 

Fish fair at Campobello, N.B 101 

Fishery officers, staff xxvii 

M Intelligence Bureau. (See letter ' B '.) 288 

ii Bounties. (See letter ' B ' . 10 

.1 Statistical statements. (See letter ' S '). 

ii Season of 1901, remarks on xxviii 

Finlayson, Alex., hatchery officer at Magog 250 

Ford, L. S. , Inspector, report 4G 

Fraser River, B.C., Hatcheries 239 

Fraser, J. F., report on bait storage 222 

Fry, distribution of : 234 

ii Recapitulation since 1873 232 

Fundy Bay, its fisheries 98 

G 

Gaspe County, P.Q , 184, 190, 190 

Gloucester County, N.B., returns 116, 118 

Gourdeau, F. Lt. Col. Deputy Minister's Report ix to xxxii 

Grand Manan fisheries .. 102, 318 

Granite Creek hatchery 239 

Guysborough County, N.S 45, 62 

H 

Halifax County, N.S., reports 45, 66, 290 

Harrison, Chas., Fishery officer in B.C 286 

Hatchery, new . . 229 

ii Report on. (.See also Fish culture) 229 

Herring, remarks on 36, 43, 99, 183, 187, 288 

Hockin, R., Inspector, reports xxix, 41 

I 

Intelligence Bureau. (See letter ' B ') 288 

Inspectors of Fisheries, list of. xxvii 

i, ii Reports from. (.Sec each Province) xxviii 

Inverness County, N.S., Overseer's reports 39, 50 



K 

Kemp, Ernest, oyster export's report 

Kent County, N.B., returns 

Kent, ('apt. W. H., cruiser ' Kingfisher", report 

' Kingfisher' D.G. cruiser 

Knowlton, C. T. r Capt. of the 'Osprey' 



258 
lie. lis 

278 
208, 278 
280 



IV 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



La Have, N.S., fishing fleet.. . . 
Lake Superior 

M Huron 

ii Erie .... 

H Ontario 

„ of the Woods 

ii Memphremagog 

ii others in the Eastern Tps 

Lobsters, Remarks on 

H Hatchery, N.S 

Lunenburg, fishing fleet 

„ County, returns. . 



Page. 

295 

146 

148 

152 

154 

143, 146 

193 

193 

xv, 43, 46, 105, 183, 190, 288 

257 

....... „' 295 

82, 293 



M 

Magog Hatchery 

.. and Memphremagog Lakes 193 

Marine Biological Station report • ix 

Magdalen Islands ■ 184 > 185 ' 32f> 

May, Capt. Geo. M., of the ' Constance ' 282 

Mackerel, remarks on ; 43, 47, 183, 288 

Manitoba Lake 164 > 16(5 

Manitoba, report and statistics of Fisheries by Inspt. W. S. Young 163, 166 

Margaree hatchery, C.B 37 

Massawippi Lake '• " 

Matheson, J. A., Inspt. P. E. I. reports xxx, 131 

Megan tic Lake •"• , . - v : . . v. 193 

Miles, H. S., Insp. N.B., report xxx, 106 

Miller, E. W., Inspector, N.W.T., reports .. xxxv, 167 

Miramichi Hatchery, N.B., report 244 

Mowat, Alex., hatchery officer at Restigouche 246 

Moisie and Miugan divisions 325 

McCluskey, Chas. Hatchery officer and report 242 

Mackerrow, A. D. Intelligence Bureau , ' 288 

McPherson, A. J. Overseer, Lake Winnipegosis 164 



N 



Nepigon Lake, Ont l4& > 14 j 

New Brunswick, Report on District No. 1, by Insp. J. H. Pratt xxix, 98 

„ ,, 2 ii R. A. Chapman xxiv, 104 

3 H. S. Miles xxx, 106 

Synopsis of Fishery Overseers' reports 101,107 

Statistics of Fisheries District No. 1 109 

„ ii No. 2 114 

No 3 122 

„ Recapitulation of Yield and Value of fish 129 

„ „ Fishing: Materials 130 

List, of Vessels receiving bounties 28 

,, Movements of Fish, Intelligence Bureau 318 

Newcastle, Ont., hatchery, report . ■ 251 

N.W. Territories, Report by Inspector E. W. Miller xxxv. 167 

,, Statistics of fisheries, &c ... 171 

North Shore Division, P.Q., reports 184, 200 

Northumberland County, N.B., returns 116-118 



INDEX v 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



Page . 

Ontario, remarks on fisheries 143 

H statistics of Fisheries 146 to 161 

it statement of fishing materials 16? 

Overseer's reports. (See each province and district). 

Oyster culture, by Mr. E. Kemp xxvi, 258 

H remarks on 38, 106, 132 

Ogden, Alfred, hatchery officer, N.S 241, 257 

' Osprey ' Dominion Cruiser 268-280 

Ottawa hatchery 253 



P 

Parker, Wm., hatchery officer, Sandwich, Ont . 254 

Pelagic sealing xi 

' Petrel ' Dom. Cruiser in Ontario 283 

Pictou County, N.S., reports 45, 71 

Prince Edward Island, Report on fisheries, Inspector J. A.. Matheson 131 

n Statistics of Fisheries 133 

H •■ Fishing Material 142 

n Intelligence Bureau Reports 316 

Prince, Prof. E. E., Commissioner, report on Fish Culture 228 

ii ■■ Marine Biology ix 

Pratt, Capt. J. H., Inspector, N.B., reports xxix, 98 

Protection Service (See letter 'F.'), 268 



Q 

' Quadra ' D. G. Str. of B. C 285 

Quebec, Reports on the Gulf St. Lawrence, by Dr. Wm. Wakeham xxxi, 182 

I. H South Shore, by Dr. Lavoie xxxii, 187 

,. it Inland division, by A. H. Belliveau xxxii, 191 

ii Synopsis of overseers reports 184 

it Statistics of Fisheries for Gulf Division 194 

.1 ii M Inland Division 216 

ii Recapitulation of yield of fisheries 220 

I. n Fishing Materials 221 

n Intelligence Bureau reports 321 



B 

Revenue, statement of . 7 

ii Comparative statement of 9 

Report of Deputy Minister ix 

Reports of Inspectors. (See also each province) xxviii 

Restigouche hatchery 246 

ii County returns 116 

Regulations re bounties .... 10 

Russian Arbitration xii 

Richmond County No. 3 overseer's reports 40, 52 



22-a| 



vi 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

S 

Page. 

St. Louis Lake xxxiii, 192 

St. Francis Lakes. . . xxxiii, 192-193 

St. John River, districts N.B 107, 122 

Sandwich hatchery 254 

Salmon, remarks on xxxvi, 37, 42, 47, 172, 182 

Seals Behring sea, remarks xi, xxxvi, 177 

Selkirk, hatchery, Manitoba 256 

Shad, remarks on 42, 104, 107 

Sheasgreen, Isaac, Officer Miramichi hatchery 244 

Shelburne County returns 86 

Sword, C. B., Inspector of B.C., reports. . . xxxvi, 239, 172 

Sheppard, O. B., Inspector, Ont xxxiv 

Spain, O. G. V., Commanding Fisheries Pro. Service. 268 

Staff, Outside officers xxvii 

Statistics of Fisheries (See each province). 

Statements recapitulating the value of fish since 1870 xxiii 

ii •■ Fishing gear , xiv 

n ii Number of fishermen xvii 

n the catch of fish in detail. (See each province). 

Storage of Bait frozen xi, 222 



Tadoussac hatchery report .. . 248 

Tom cod, remarks on 191 



United States, list of fishing Vessels calling at our ports 271 

n m Modus Vivendi licenses 269 



Value of Fisheries. (Sec also each province) xviii 

Victoria County, N.S. Overseers' reports 40, 54 



w 



Walbran, J. T., Capt. of Cuiser 'Quadra ' . 285 

Walker, John, hatchery officer report 253 

Wakeham, Wm., M.D., reports xxxi, 182 

Westmoreland County, N.B., returns 116, 118 

Winnipegosis Lake 164, 166 



Y 



Yarmouth County returns 

Young, N.S., Inspector, Manitoba 



88, 303 
xxxv, 163. 256 



12 EDWARD VII. 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



A. 1902 



REPORT 

OF THE 

DEPUTY MINISTEE. 



To the Honourable 

James Sutherland, 

Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the annual report upon the transactions of the 
Fisheries branch of the Marine and Fisheries Department, embracing the fiscal year 
ending on June 30 last. That part of the report with reference to Fish Culture, yster 
Culture, Bait Cold Storage, Fisheries Protection Service, Intelligence Bureau and 
Behring Sea, comprises the whole calendar year 1901, while the Fishing Bounties and 
statistics of fisheries, as usual, cover only the previous year. However, the preliminary 
reports of our various inspectors give a fair idea of the fishing operations and the state 
of the fisheries in the different provinces for the year just closed. 

No change has taken place since my last report, respecting the system of fishery 
protection between the Federal and Provincial authorities, as defined in the judgment 
of the Lords of the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council in May, 1898. 

Special reports by Professor E. E. Prince, Commissioner of Fisheries, treating of : — 

1. The Protection and Planting of Predaceous Fish ; 

2. The Aim and Basis of Fishery Regulations ; will be published as a supplement 
to this report. 

The Commissioner also publishes as Appendix 12, his usual report on Fish Culture 
operations during the season 1901. 

MARINE BIOLOGICAL STATION. 

After carrying on its work for two years at St. Andrews, N.B., the Marine 
Biological Station was moved to Canso, N.S., early during the season, and the staff have 
been engaged in important fishery and scientific investigations at that great centre of 
the maritime fishing industries. 

The Board of Management, at their annual meeting in Ottawa, in January, decided 
that as the researches commenced in Passamaquoddy Bay had been carried to a fair 
state of completion, it was in the public interest that other urgent fishery problems, on 
some part of the coast further north, should engage the attention of the scientific staff. 
22 — ii 



X 



MA RINK AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

There were many reasons for locating at Canso during the present year (1901). 
Not only is it the centre of considerable and varied fishing industries, and affording 
therefore unusual facilities for securing abundance of interesting and valuable material 
for study ; but it forms, as it were, a connecting link between the fishing industries 
and the marine fauna of the southern waters of the Dominion, as found in Passamaquoddy 
Bay, and the more northerly fisheries and fauna of the Gulf of St. Lawrence proper. 

The staff have had every reason to be satisfied with the decision reached by 
the Board. It was a somewhat perilous task to tow the station, placed upon its 
capacious scow, from St. Andrews, across the Bay of Fundy and up the coast 
of western Nova Scotia to the Strait of Canso. Commander. Spain, when the 
matter was brought before him, most willingly agreed to do anything in his 
power to ensure the safe conveyance of the floating station from the New Brunswick 
location to the proposed site on the coast of eastern Nova Scotia. It was, how- 
ever, a somewhat hazardous undertaking, as the distance is much greater than 
the station is ever likely to traverse at a single trip again, and the exposed 
nature of the coast and the unfavourable time of the year (early spring), combined to 
make it a notable excursion for a craft not built for long voyages. Thanks to the 
skill and characteristic energy of Capt. J. H. Pratt, of the Dominion cruiser, Curlew, 
to whom Commander Spain committed the task of towing the station, the trip was 
completed with safety, and on arrival at Canso was at once beached and placed in 
position at the east end of the town of Canso. 

For nearly five months continuous investigation was carried on, the whole of the 
laboratory tables being at one time or other occupied by investigators of scientific 
standing and repute. A new beam trawl was tried on several occasions in Chedabucto 
bay by the kind assistance of the Messrs. Whitman & Co., who allowed their steam tug 
to be utilized on these and on other occasions during the summer. Tow-netting was also 
actively carried on in the waters adjacent to the station, and dredging, line fishing and 
other methods of testing the neighbouring sea and of procuring specimens for study 
were adopted. The experiments with dynamite, intended to show accurately what the 
effect of the explosive is upon schools of fish, and other important lines of work were 
actively pursued, and a most valuable and interesting summer's work was accomplished, 
upon which detailed reports will, in due course, be presented. 

Professor Prince, the director, spent some weeks at the station continuing some 
special researches commenced the previous year, but the main part of the summer's 
work was superintended and personally carried on by the assistant director, Professor 
Ramsay Wright, who spent the whole of the season at the station. Dr. Stafford again 
undertook the duties of curator, and with unremitting zeal aided the workers, and at 
the same time pursued special investigations. 

During the season the tables were occupied and work carried on at sea or upon 
shore by the following staff : Professor Ramsay Wright, Professor A. P. Knight 
Professor A. B. Macallum, Professor Fowler, Dr. Joseph Stafford, Mr. C. McLean-Fraser, 
Mr. Geo. A. Cornish and Dr. Linville, of New York, and as already stated, Professor 
Prince, Commissioner of Fisheries, conducted some fishery investigations at the station. 

Valuable additions to the equipment of the station were made, and the library 
received a fine series of scientific memoirs and papers, procured from Germany through 
Professor Wright. The station, now that it is in full and active operation, finds itself 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

somewhat cramped by its limited means, but the printed series of papers recently 
issued, dealing with fishery and marine biological subjects, will indicate the varied and 
substantial character of the work accomplished in this promising domicile of science. 
During the season, the staff were continually indebted for ready advice and practical 
help to the Messrs. Whitman & Co., of Canso. To Mr. Edward Whitman especially, 
as also Mr. Clem. Whitman, the station owes much of the success which has attended 
its work at Canso during the season of 1901, and the season of 1902 at the same place 
promises to be of increased interest and importance. 

THE BEHRING SEA QUESTION AND PELAGIC SEALING. 

This question being still within the scope of the Joint High Commission for the 
consideration of points of difference between Canada and the United States, and there- 
fore being for the time removed from the ordinary channel of diplomatic correspondence, 
no change has taken place in its standing as an international issue. 

The industry is still proceeding under the regulations reached by the award of the 
arbitrators at Paris in 1893. 

The sealing fleet during 1901 aggregated 39 vessels, representing 2,791 tons, register. 
The crews comprised 443 whitemen and 465 Indians, employing 139 boats and 226 
canoes. 

These 39 vessels were so distributed at different times during the season that 37 of 
them participated in the North American coast fishery, 26 in the Behring Sea fishery, 
8 in the Japanese coast fishery, and 8 in the vicinity of the Russian seal islands. 



The catch is divided as follows ; — 

North American coast, including Indians coast catch 8,533 

Japan coast t 2, 1 30 

Vicinity of Russian islands 3,397 

Behring Sea 10,362 



Total 24,422 



Although the catch is comparatively small, the sealers report that the seals do not 
appear to be any scarcer, but it is more difficult to approach them than in former years. 

The quality of the skins secured was generally good and they were sold at the 
annual sale in London to advantage, the amount realized from the skins sent to the 
British market being about $350,000. 

It is noticeable that the sealers are again exploiting the waters of the Asiatic side 
of the North Pacific Ocean on the Japan coast and in the vicinity of the Russian Seal 
Islands, a branch of the seal fishery which during the past few years had been practi- 
cally abandoned. 

No complaints have been made of any violations or transgressions of the law by the 
sealers this year, and no complications have arisen. 

It is also gratifying to be able to state that there has been an absence of disaster 
to the sealing fleet, and no loss of life has been reported. 
22— bJ 



xii MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

ARBITRATION OF SEIZURES OP SEALING VESSELS BY RUSSIA IN 1892. 

There is no change in the position of this question, and although it has continued 
to form the subject of diplomatic correspondence no agreement has yet been reached as 
to the precise terms of reference of the claims to the arbitrator. 

GENERAL STATISTICS OF FISHERIES. 

EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE. 

The details of the total expenditure for the different fisheries services during the 
last fiscal year amounting to $491,569, form the first appendix of this report. This 
amount comprises, fisheries proper, $111,760; fish-culture, .$68,961 ; fisheries protection 
service, $124,211 ; miscellaneous expenses, $27,833, and the $158,802 distributed as 
fishing bounties. 

The total sum received during the same period as revenue from fishery licenses, 
fines, &c, in the different provinces is given at $88,145, including the modus vivendi 
licenses granted to the United States fishing vessels ($98,178). 

A comparative statement of all expenditure and revenue for the last fourteen years 
concludes this appendix. 

FISHING BOUNTIES. 

• 

For the season of 1900, the sum of $158,802 was paid as fishing bounties to the 
deep sea fishermen of the Maritime provinces. Of this amount $68,721 was divided 
amongst the crews of 802 fishing schooners and the balance shared by 22,031 boat fisher- 
men. These different amounts entailed the payment of 13,776 claims. 

For the last year, Nova Scotia received about two thirds of the bounty fund, 
amounting to $101,448 ; Quebec, $33,203 ; New Brunswick, $13,562, and Prince Island 
$10,589. 

For the last nineteen years, the distribution of the fishing bounties to the deep-sea 
fishermen of the Maritime provinces would aggregate a sum of over $3,000,000. 

EXTENT OF COAST. 

The fisheries of Canada are the most extensive in the world comprising an immense 
sea-coast line, besides innumerable lakes and rivers. The eastern sea-coast of the Mari- 
time provinces from Bay of Fundy to the Straits of Belle Isle exceeds 5,600 miles, while 
the western coast of British Columbia is given at 7,180 miles, that is more than double 
that of Great Britain and Ireland. 

While the salt-water in-shore area, not including minor indentations, cover more 
than 1,500 square miles, the fresh water area of the part of the great lakes within 
Canada is reckoned at 72,700 square miles, not including the numerous lakes of Manitoba 
and the North-west Territories all stocked with excellent species of food fishes. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



xiii 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

CAPITAL INVESTED IN THE FISHERIES OF CANADA AND NUMBER OF FISHERMEN. 

The following table shows that over 80,000 men were engaged during the season of 
1900 in our fishing industry, using boats, nets and other implements, aggregating a value 
of $10,990,125. About 1,200 schooners, manned by over 9,200 sailors, besides 71,859 
other fishermen, using 38,930 boats and 6,295,000 fathoms of nets, all found employment 
in this vast industry. 

The lobster plant alone is valued at $1,419,100, comprising 919 canneries, dispersed 
on the seaboard of the Maritime provinces. No less than 18,200 persons were engaged 
in this preserving branch of the industry. 

The salmon canning industry of British Columbia in 1900, comprising seventy-one 
establishments, valued at $1,420,000, gave employment to 19,787 persons. 

The sealing fleet in the same province for the year 1900 consisted of 37 schooners, 
114 boats and 316 canoes, valued at $147,200, and manned by 1,052 sailors and hunters. 



xiv 



MA RIXE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



O 

h-i 



< 
O 

- 



o 

o 
— 



-a 

eS 


ce 
O 

«+H 

c 
H-3 

CO 

3 

-o 

3 



60 

_= 

co 
Op 



'■a 

CD 
eS 

c 

a> 

Is 
a, 

cS 

O 



e3 
O 

-a 



o 
■8 

of 

CP 

of 
-t= 
eS 
O 

cq 



O) 

CO 
DO 

0) 
bO 

•I-H 

J3 

GO 

o 

OP 
J3 

> 

CP 

o 

1-4 



- z 

- g 

£ < 



CM 
© 

X" 



•xg aaq^o pu« 'sasnoq 
a^ouis pire aoi 'saazaajj 
jo anpsA aqruunxoaddy 



X 

= 


o 

CM 
i-H 


© 

x_ 


CM 

© 


© 


© 

X 
CO 


eo 


5? 


© 

cc 
CO 


X 


I ~— 

X 

© 


T-H 

© 

CO 


cm" 








cm" 




o 
t~ 
I- 


m 
m 

X 


© 
cj 


© 


- 
© 


m 
©__ 


524, 


©" 


X 

T— 1 


© 


© 
-r 


© 

CM 

1—1 



lutqd jajsqcj jo snpsA 



X 

© 

m 


© 


r 

m 


© 


CD 

m 
© 


© 

CO 


CO 
CM 


©" 
CM 
i-l 



'spuBJU 'sjia.tt. 'sjau de.i; 
pue puriod jo aiq«A 



cc 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


X 


X 


I-H 




m 


in 


© 


TP 


© 


CO 




■<s< 


© 


cc 


CO 


m" 




x~ 


CC 






-r 


CM 


i-H 


cc 




CM 




CM 


CC 













r. 



- 

Jc 
< 

CQ 

:- 

z £ 

- f- 

3 



•anp? A 



© 
© 

I-H 


2 


CM 
CO 




i-H 


X 
©^ 


© 

X_ 


©" 

in 

m 


© 
m 
t— 


in 
cc 


© 

iH 


■>*< 

CM 


CM 


of 

CM 



•sraoqj'Bj 



If 
t~ 

o 


i-H 
X 
I-H 


© 
© 


cc 
cc 
eo 


© 
in 


© 
© 
© 


CM 

r 

eo 


x" 

X 


© 


— 


t-T 

CM 
CC 


© 
© 


cc" 
CM 
X 


cc" 
in 

I-H 



o 
- 



© 
i-H 

CM 

CM 
— 
cc 



CM 

in 

t- 
o 

CM 



© eo 



i— i © © © 



— 

CM — 

CC 



uaqran 



© 


© 


© 


eo 








cc 


X 


X 




© 


eo 










cm" 




i-T 


-H 











a: 
- 

co 

a 



© 
— 

© 



© 
© 



m 
cc 



© © 
m © 
x © 



© © © © 
x © in © 
in ©__© — 

cm" ©"o" x" 

Cl ?] M 
CM tH CC — 



o 
m 



— 

© 

CM 



© © 
i-H CM 



i-H CM 
© CO 1C - j 



2; 

H 

a 

H 
PS 
ao 



© 
© 

CO 



in 

in 



o 
x 
■*" 



cc 
© 



■M 
X 



x 



CM CM 



■sjassaA 



© 

i-H 

X 

m" 



© 

x 
© 



© © © 



— T © Tf i-H 



K 

O 

I— t 

> 

o 
- 



o 



o 
> 

O 



c 



— i— i 
- 



5= 

CD 



3) 
O 

c 



O 
-= 

cu 

3 



g 
eg 
- 

— 

c 

eS 
OS 
— 



C3 

3 



in 
c-i 



© 



© 

in 
c 



© 



© 
1-H 



© 



© 
x 

in" 
z 



in 
© 

51 



X 
— 

CO 



s 

© 

X* 
CO 



© 

CI 

cc 







CD 


© 


CM 




— c 


eo 






© 


i- 


in 


X 


CO 


— IC 


■M 


© 


•aSBauo^ 


(i,0 


©_ 




© 


eo 
i-T 


rrcc* 


W_ 
iH" 


co 




CM 

















o 
o 
s 

03 
o 

T3 

a 

ao ?3 
a - 

il 



a-s 1 



CM 
i— i 
CM 



CO 


© 


© 


m 


CM_ 


00 










eo 


o 


CM 


© 


I-H 


CM 







7J 
© 



O 



_ TJ 

— — u 

©= = 

r^'Jl'Jl 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



O 

H 
< 

P 
H 

o 

P3 



o 
o 
os 



c3 
E3 
eS 
O 



i-l 

GO 

D 

d 



CD 

+3 

CO 

O 

h-! 

CP 

-a 

+3 



K 
H 

00 



jo anie A j^ox 



© 
CM 



CO 
X 
CO 

CO 

c 

lO 



CO 



© 

lO 
CC 

o 
© 

CO 



in m «o 

t— 

31 S (O 

irf" oo" 
© 

X 



© 
© 



© 

CO 
in" 

TP 

© 



H 



•9AIJY .to qsa.i j 



i~ © in © 

© CM CO CO 
rH t- rl 



S © 
Q CO 



© 
CO 



© 
co 



m 

CM 
© 



00 


CM 


f-i 


CO 


TP 


CM 




t~ 






Tp" 


tp 


© 


TP 


© 


TP 


-p 


01 



m 
o 
co^ 

©* 
© 



•SU13Q 

■qi-x jo -o^ 



© 

CO 

co" 
co 



© 
CC 

co" 
■co 



CO 
CM 

: i 



co 
c 



- 1 

CM 
© 



lO CM CM i-l 



© 
© 

co" 
TP 
in 



jo anji3 A p^ox I 



© 

B 

to 
in 



© 



co 



© 

in 

-T 

x" 
© 

CM 



CO 

© 
co" 

CM 



TP 
© 



© 
i— I 
TP 



•""['■A 



CO 


© 


m 




oo • 


CM 




tp 


© 


t- 


1- 




CO 


CO 


CO 


€© ©" 


<n" 


J* 


co" 


tp" 


CO 


(M 




© 


TP 


CM 


rH 




00 



Eh 







225,785 
144,460 
103,805 
50,676 


524,726 


•saiaauutiQ 
' jo jsqmn^ 


t- © © 

t*- CO TP lO 

CM CM CM »— ( 


© 

OS 


-iag suosaaj jo igqnmj - 


6,447 
5,440 
3,184 
3,134 


18,205 



•sdTJJX 

jo laqtntiNj 



CM 


i-l 


t- 


in 


I - 


© 


rH 


X 


© 




i-l 


© 


x" 


co" 


cm" 


TP" 


© 


TP 


© 


CO 


© 


CM 


CO 


r-l 



in 
co 
© 

cm" 

X 
CO 



50 



12 



xvi 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Comparative Table showing Number, Tonnage and Value of Vessels and Bjats 
engaged in the Fisheries of Cinada, together with the Value of Fishing Materials 
employed, from 1879 to 1900. 



Year. 



1879... 
1880... 
1881... 
1882... 
1883... 
1884... 
1885... 
1886. . . 
1887... 
1888... 
1889... 
1890. . . 
1891... 
1892. . . 
1893... 
1894... 
1895... 
1896... 
1897... 
1898. . . 
1899... 
1900. . . 



Vessels. 


Boats. 


Value 
of Nets and 
Seines. 


Value or 
other 


Total of 
Capital 
Invested. 


No. 


Tonnage. 


Value. 




Value. 


Fishing Ma- 
terial. 


1,183 


43,873 


$ 

1,714.917 


25,616 


$ 

854,289 


988,698 


$ 

456,617 


4,014,521 


1,181 


45,323 


1, 814.68S 


25,266 


716,352 


985,978 


419,564 


3,936,582 


1,120 


48,389 


1,765,870 


26,108 


696.710 


970,617 


679,852 


4,113,049 


1,140 


42,845 


1,749,717 


26,747 


833,137 


1,351,193 


823,938 

* 


4,757,985 


1,198 


48,106 


2.023,045 


25,825 


733,186 


1,243,366 


1,070.930 


5,120,527 


1,182 


42.747 


1,866,711 


24.287 


741,727 


1,191,579 


1,224,646 


5,014,663 


1,177 


48,728 


2,021,633 


28,472 


852,257 


1,219,284 


2,604,285 


6,697,459 


1,133 


44,605 


1,890,411 


28,187 


850,545 


1,263,152 


2,720,187 


6,814,295 


1,168 


44,845 


1,989,840 


28,092 


875,316 


1,499,328 


2,384,356 


6,748,840 


1,137 


33,247 


2,017,558 


27,384 


859,953 


1,594,992 


2,390,502 


6,863,005 


1,100 


44,936 


2,064,918 


29,555 


965,010 


1,591,C85 


2,149,138 


6,770,151 


1,069 

1 


43,084 


2,152,790 


29,803 


924,346 


1,695,358 


2,600,147 


7.372,611 


1,027 


39,377 


2,125,355 


30,438 


1.007,815 


1,644,892 


2,598,124 


7,376,186 


988 


37,205 


2,112,875 


30,513 


1,041,972 


1,475,043 


3,017,945 


7,647,835 


1,104 


40,096 


2,246,373 


31,508 


955,109 


1.637,707 


3,174,404 


8,681,557 


1,178 


41,768 


2,409,029 


34,102 


1,009,189 


1,921,352 


4,099,546 


9,439,116 


1,121 


37,829 


2,318,290 


34,268 


1,014,057 


1,713,190 


4,208,311 


9,253,848 


1,217 


42,447 


2,041,130 


35,398 


1,110,920 


2,146,934 


4,527,267 


9,826,251 


1,184 


40,679 


1,701,239 


37,693 


1,128,682 


1,955,304 


4,585,569 


9,370,794 


1,154 


38,011 


1,707,180 


38,675 


1,136,943 


2,075,928 


4,940,046 


9,860,097 


1,178 


38,508 


1,716,973 


38,538 


1,195,856 


2,162,876 


5,074,135 


10,149,840 


1,212 


41,307 


1,940,329 


38,930 


1,248,171 


2,405,860 


5,395,765 


10,990,125 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



xvn 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

Comparative Table showing the number of men employed in the Fishing Industry 

since 1879. 



Year. 



1879. 

1880. 

1881. 

1882. 

1883. 

1884. 

1885. 

1886. 

1887. 

1888. 

1889. 

1890. 

1891 . 

1892 

1893. 

1894. 

1895. 

1896. 

1897. 

1898 
• 

1899 
1900. 



Number of 

Persons 
in Lobster 
Canneries. 



13,030 
14,175 
15,165 
16,548 
18,708 
18,205 



Number of 

Men 
in Vessels. 



8,818 

8,757 

8,359 

8,498 

9,966 

9,968 

9,539 

8,927 

8,911 

9,574 

9,621 

8,726 

8,66(5 

8,330 

8,899 i 

9,525 

9,804 

9,735 

8,87!) 

8,657 

8,970 

9,205 



Number of 
Men 
in Boats. 



Total 
Number of 
Fishermen. 



52,577 

51,900 

50,679 

52,785 

52,259 

51,854 

53,282 

53,073 

55,247 

53,109 

55,382 

55,000 

56,909 [ 

55,348 I 

58,854 

61,194 | 

61,530 

65,502 

70,080 

72,877 

70,893 

71,859 



61,395 
60,657 
59,056 
61,283 
62,225 
61,822 
62,821 
62,000 
64,158 
62,683 
65,003 
63,726 
65,575 
63,678 
67,753 
70,719 
71,334 
75,237 
78,959 
81,534 
79,893 
81,064 



Total 
Number of 

Persons 
in Fishing 
Industry. 



84,364 
89,412 
94,124 
98,082 
98,601 
99,269 



xviii 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



VALUE OF THE FISHERIES. 



The total value of the catch of fish in Canada for the year 1900 amounts to 
$2 1,557,639, being a decrease of $334,067 as compared with the previous yield. This 
amount, which has oniy been exceeded in 1S99 and 1897, is over one million dollars 
above the average of the last ten years, and is subdivided by provinces as follows : 



Provinces. 


Value of 
Fish. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 




$ 7,809,152 
4,878,820 
3,769.742 
1,989,279 
1,333,294 
1,059,193 
718,159 


$ 461,548 


8 335,254 
350,14!! 

257,153 










36,144 




Prince Edward Island 


15,548 
95,248 


Manitoba and North-west Territories 



As may be noticed, there has been a falling off in three provinces and an increase 
in the fisheries of the other four provinces. The principal fluctuation is the surplus 
given by Nova Scotia which may be exclusively attributed to the large catch of mackerel 
off its shores. The considerable diminution shown in the provinces of New Brunswick 
and British Columbia is ascribed to the comparative failure of the herring industry in 
the Bay of Fundy district in the former, and to the shortage in the salmon pack of 
Fraser river district, B.C., in the latter case. 

The features of these various fluctuations and other important matters are fully 
explained by our different inspectors in their respective reports, forming appendices 
three to ten of this publication. 

The figures given above do not comprise the large quantities of fish consumed by 
the Indian population of British Columbia, and of the remote parts of the North-west 
Territories, where fish form their staple food. 

The following statement shows the relative values of the principal kinds of com- 
mercial fishes (above $100,000) for the year 1900 as compared with that of the previous 
year. 



Kinds of Fish. 



Value. 



Salmon . . 

Cod 

Lobsters . 
Herring . 
Mackerel . 
Whitefish 

Trout 

Haddock 

Hake 

Smelts . . . 
Halibut. . 
Sardines. . 
Pickerel . . 
Pollock .. 
Sturgeon 
Oysters . . 
Alewives . 

Eels 

Tom cod . , 



8 3,893,217 
3,614,775 
3,055,350 
1,853,237 
1,549,448 
705,323 
657,248 
COS, 067 
520,504 
475,004 
405,963 
308,021 
243,749 
216,250 
205.662 
167,680 
162,014 
125,454 
124,538 



Increase. 



8 183,298 



Decrease. 



747,754 
52,161 



33,341 
130,753 



67,972 
5,628 
26,706 
15,874 
1,405 



s i;40.Sl>3 
140,198 

310,813 



217.282 
78,544 
75,302 



201.219 
30,945 
26,836 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



xix 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

The quantity of fish used as bait is valued at $396,487, that of fish oil at $208,778, 
while the fur seal skins of British Columbia have realized $562,845. 

A glance at the above table will show that the increases and decreases are about 
evenly divided in the different species mentioned. The most accented fluctuations are 
the increase of nearly 50 per cent in the catch of mackerel, especially felt in the 
Northumberland Strait, and the falling off in the salmon pack in British Columbia of 
over half a million dollars. Notwithstanding this decline, salmon still heads the list, 
with cod as a close second. 

The lobster industry not only holds its own but shows an increased value of nearly 
$200,000. This improvement cannot be ascribed to the packing industry which 
remained stationary, but to the steady growth of the live lobster trade with the United 
States markets, chiefly from the western counties of Nova Scotia. It is an ameliora- 
tion which should be encouraged as only large lobsters are wanted for this special 
branch of the industry on foreign markets. With the present mode of rapid transio at 
our disposal, there seems no good reason why live or fresh lobsters should not be distri- 
buted on the markets of all our chief inland cities and towns. 

The comparative failure of the Bay of Fundy herring in 1900, explains the deficit 
of half a million dollars above noticed in the aggregate values of herring and sardines. 

The halibut fishery is still progressing, especially in the Pacific water -, where their 
yield is valued $130,000 more than the previous one. 

Of the fresh water species, whitefish and trout are by far the principal kinds. 
While the former shows an increased value of $50,000, the latter has fallen off by 
over $200,000. 

Of the other fluctuations, might be mentioned the large increase in sturgeon and 
caviare of $67,000 over the value of the previous season. 

From the year 1869 to 1900 inclusive, the five principal commercial fishes have 
yielded the following enormous values : — 

Cod $121,137,901 

Salmon 62,996,388 

Herring 62,518,153 

Lobsters , 62,265,477 

Mackerel 41,232,875 



EXPORT OF FISH. 



During the last fiscal the value of the fish including fish oil and marine animals 
exported from Canada to foreign countries was $10,720,352. 

Details of these fish exports will be found in the annual report of the Department 
of Customs for 1901. 



XX 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Statement of the production of each Branch of the Fisheries 



No. 



<J 

10 
11 
12 
13 

14 



15 

16 
17 
18 
19 

20 

21 

22 
23 
24 

25 
26 

27 

28 
2!) 
30 

31 

32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 



Kinds of Fish. 



Nova Scotia. 



Quantity. Value. 



i Cod, dried Cwt. 

\ ii tongues and sounds Brls. 

( Haddock, dried Cwt. 

-! « fresh Lbs. 

.i smoked (finnan liaddies) ■■ 

/Hake, dried Cwt. 

\ ti sounds Lbs. 

Pollock Cwt. 

Tom cod or frost fish Lbs. 

Halibut M 

Flounders ■■ 

Salmon, preserved in cans 

•i fresh ii 

ii smoked ■■ 

I- pickled Brls. 

ii drv salted Lbs. 

Trout . ... ii 

Ouananiche n 

Whitefish >i 

Smelts ii 

Oulachons (in B.C.) ■■ 

( Herring, salted Brls. 

' ii fresh Lbs. 

*| ii smoked ■■ 

1. ii kippered Cans. 

f Sardines, preserved 

1 „ Brls. 

Shad ii 

Ale wives u 

Pike Lbs. 

Maskinonge m 

J Eels, salted ... Brls. 

\ ii fresh Lbs. 

Perch it 

Pickerel n 

Bass (sea) i 

n (achigan) u 

/Mackerel, salted Brls. 

\ ii fresh Lbs. 

/ Sturgeon « 

t ii caviare ". ■■ 

/ Lobsters, canned " 

\\ ii fresh or alive Cwt. 

Oysters Brls. 

Clams H 

Squid n 

/Coarse and mixed fish n 

1. ii ii Lbs. 

Home consumption (not included above) 

Fur seal skins (in B.C.) * No. 

Hair n - n 

Belugas (white whales^ <■ 

Fish oil Galls. I 

Fish used as bait Brls. 

Fish used as manure and guano n 

Totals 



511,315 
890 1 
87,964 
4,650,750 
1.437,550 
161,726 
51,549 
88,581 
236,420 
1,639,501 
1,020, (3S5 
6,160 
511,604 
9,038 
155, 



2,285,200 
8,900 
263,892 
139,523 
86,253 
3(53,883 
25,774 
177,162 
11,821 
163,950 
51,034 
924 
102,321 
1,807 
2,325 



New Brunswick. 



British 



Quantity. 



Value. Quantity. 



109,200 



10,920 



335,830 

82,732 
3,055,240 
749,800 



19,291 

330^928 
30,552 
14,996 



85,947 
183 
7,108 
571,900 
806,600, 
29,350 
26,612i 
19,544 
1,877,500 
91,100 
125.900 
10,600 
1,223,650 
1,100 



343,788 
1,830 
21,324 
17,157 
52,140 
06,038 
13,306 
39,0881 
93,875 ! 
9,110 
6,295 
1,590 
244.730 
220 



5,485 



232,600 



7.863,050 



23,260 



393,152 



1,750 
11,923 



17,500 
47,692 



2.364 23,640 



10.100 



1,005 



57.442 
3,224,972 



861,630 
386.996 



5,2(53,780 
169,195 
1,855 
1,827 
5,351 
5S.432 
378,500 



1,052,754 
845,975 
7,420 
8,322 
21,404 
116,864 
7,185 



24 



360,431 
103,858 
110.610 



29 



108,128 
155,787 
55,305 

r, 809, 152 



181,696 
3,723,500, 
6,039.000 
228,200 
1,870,000 
101,116 
6,383 
26,500 



4,261,000 

29,113^440 
1,728,000 
301,000 
4,950 
5,700,000 
339,750 



86,500 
1,399,100 

726,784 ^ 

37,235 J- 1,145,000 
132,7801 J 

22,820 

93,500 
200,445 

63,830 25 
10(1,002 



2,245 22,450 



30,000 
140,000 
327,000 



1,500 
7,300 
32,760 



1,430 
786,000 
10.000 
350 
2,038,692 
19.729 
19,240 

1,104 
6,195 
199,500 



21,450 
94.320 
700 
175 
407,738 
98,645 
76,960 
67,486 
4,416 
12,390 
5,970 



77 



110 



53,(130 
ss. S23 
101,300 



105,000 
1,500 



3,000 



504,000 



35,523 
7.825 



16,089 
138.334 
50,650, 

3,769,742' 



128,100 
2,000 



* Add 20 sea-otter skins, §8,000. 



t Dulse. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

in the different Provinces of Canada for the Year 1900. 



XXI 



Columbia. 



Quebec. 


Ontario. 


P. E. Island. 


Manitoba 

AND 

N. W. Territories. 


Value. 



Quantity. 


Value. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


$ 

27,425 


196,666 
290 
2,286 
29,200 


A 
* 

i e9,uo4 
2,900 
6,858 
876 




$ 


3b,3o2 
163 
b,o35 
4,625 


$ 

153,408 
1,630 
19,905 
139 




$ 










































738 


l,ODl 






10, ZOO 

31,000 


OA O 1(1 

34, 342 
15,500 































780,000 
190,028 


18,340 
i n fin*) 






1 A ArXA 

l(i,uoO 
o,500 


502 
850 






213,050 




































172.800 693.707 


138,741 














30,100 
49,500 
228,000 
33,975 








500 


100 






581 


8,715 






















446,687 
75,000 
50,600 

460,400 


44,669 
7,500 
4,048 

23,020 


o,47/, 093 


531,854 


40,700 


4,070 


170,000 


8,500 




2,711,258 


216,055 






9,704,400 


485,220 


4,325 
71,360 

48,350 


704,325 


35,216 










43,744 
2,064,960 
112,900 


174,976 
20,650 
2,258 


1,031 A 
7,971,738 




4,126 
159,435 


oO, 004 

469,110 


1 At) nt/i 

4,691 












































4,692 
192 


14,076 
2,273 














250 






3 

2,080 


30 
8,320 














330,550 
47,650 
206 
1,153,091 
427,700 
352,111 


1 9 field 

I. i. 111 

2,859 
2,060 
69,185 

1 o OOI 

II, $Sl 
It ,ovo 


1,285,838 
405,826 


51,433 
24,350 


l,ob2,300 


31,246 








551 


5,5io 






43,490 
1,110,117 

2,605,618 


2,609 
33,303 
130,281 












48,000 
2,952,100 


960 
88,563 
















114,895 
7,951 


9,192 
119,265 


374,712 


29,977 










3,613 
96,600 


54,195 
11,592 










52^573 
45,380 






5,250 
750 


504,899 

' 1,022, 106 
80 


30,294 

204,421 
400 


876,212 
90,761 


1,039,500 
17,500 


61,790 
8,750 






2,223,712 
135 
17,825 
1,420 
622 
203 


444,742 












12,000 
22,500 






71,300 
4,120 
2,488 
406 
















5,044 
665 
2,676,200 


20,176 
1,330 
30,652 










38,700 
26,20) 
365,000 
562,845 
5,869 








2,556,837 


51,918 


2,159,200 
428,800 


28,842 
4,288 






25J62 
168 
146.317 












32,203 
672 
43,895 
67,354 
31,465 






85 


170 














35,227 






18,131 
23,341 
2,185 


5,439 
35,012 
2,185 






44,903 
62.930 










6.000 










1 










4,878,820 




1,989,279 




1,333,294 




1,059,193 




718,159 









No. 



1 

2 

3 

4 
5 
6 
7 

8 



9 
10 
11 
12 
13 

■14 

15 

16 
17 
18 
19 

20 

21 
22 
23 
24 

25 
26 

27 

28 
29 
30 

31 

32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 



XXII 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

RECAPITULATION 
Of the Yield and Value of the Fisheries in the Dominion of Canada for the Year 1900. 



Kinds of Fish. 



Cod, dried Cwt. 

ii tongues and sounds Brls. 

Haddock, dried Cwt. 

ii fresh Lbs. 

n smoked — (finnan haddies) " 

Hake, dried. Cwt. 

M sounds ... Lbs. 

Pollock Cwt. 

Tom cod or frost-fish Lbs. 

Halibut " 

Flounders n 

Salmon, preserved in cans 

H fresh ii 

ii smoked n 

n pickled Brls. 

ii dry, salted Lbs. 

Trout ii 

Ouananiche 

Whitefish ■. » 

Smelts ii 

Oulachons (in B.C.) 

Herring, salted Brls. 

ii fresh Lbs. 

ii smoked ■■ 

■I kippered Cans. 



Sardines, preserved. 



Brls. 



Shad 

Alewives. . . 

Pike 

Maskinonge 
Eels, salted . 
ii fresh . 



Lbs. 

Brls. 
Lbs. 



Perch 

Pickerel 

Bass (Sea) 

ii (Achigan). 

Mackerel 

n fresh 



Sturgeon 



caviare . 



Lobsters, preserved in cans. 
ii fresh or alive 



Brls. 
Lbs. 



Cwt. 



Oysters Brls. 

Clams 



Squid 

Coarse and mixed fish . 



Brls. 
Lbs. 



No. 



Home consumption, not included above 

Fur seal skins in B.C 

Hair u » 

Beluga skins (white whales) n 

Sea-otter skins . No. 

Fish oil _ Galls. 

Fish used as bait Brls. 

H ii manure and guano n 



Total for 1900. 

1899 



Quantity. 



897,765 
1,526 

103,993 
5,256,475 
2,3u4,150 

207,077 
109,161 

108,125 
2,903,970 
(•,.190,129 
1,146,585 
29,130,200 
4,156,961 
311,638 
5,686 
5,700,000 

6,816,030 
75.000 
12,466,258 
9.500,105 
1,399,100 
344,867 
18.429,548 
7,501,700 
228,200 

1,870,000 
105,808 

8,353 
40,503 
3,178,688 
453,476 
5,366 
1,196,581 

1,615,817 
6,055,829 
337,600 
489,607 
70,436 
4,107,572 

2,535.611 
110.111 

10,548,290 
189,139 

41,920 



12,121 
84,845 
8,374,237 



35,523 
Ivi, 773 
168 
20 

706,609 
260,925 
279,025 



Value. 



3,599,515 
15.26m 



311.979 
157,695 
138,393 



465,924 
51,580 



2,913,858 
658,592 
32,227 
60,540 
228,000 



1,379,470 
300,913 
150,034 
22,820 



93,500 
214,521 



53,660 
71,794 



1,056,540 
492,908 



150,607 
55,055 



2,109,655 
945,695 



169,690 
150,767 



Total Value. 



3,614,775 



608,067 



520,504 
216,250 
124,538 
405,963 
57,329 



3,893,217 
657,248 
7,500 
705,323 
475.004 
71,360 



1,853,237 



308,021 
83,883 

162,014 
95,901 
27,209 



125,454 
48,594 

243,749 
33,765 
39,169 



1,549,448 



205,662 



3,055,350 
167,680 
102,428 
48,484 



320,457 
369,288 
562,845 
38,381 
672 
S,000 
20S.77S 
396,487 
145.605 



21,557,639 
21,891,706 



Decrease 



334,067 



SESSIONAL 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 
PAPER No. 22 



xxiii 



m 
-G 

3 
o 

u 
tw 

"3 

CL, 

5 
o 

o 

CO 

oT 

> 

• i-l 

m 



O 

o 

as 



o 

-1-2 

O 

CO 



CO 
CD 

2 'I 
p _3 



eS 
T3 

I i 

HO 




eS 



03 h 2 



Wo 

O 



o 



o-rt-r. -r © twNcswoioHS 

co" ©"©"nTcm" cm" x"cm" t--"cN"iff x" co"cm" oo" 
jC ? I X © co CO ~ — A . - -r co — - i — 
-HHHrtNWCONl»N»«S!SS 



03 
C 



OXNCCHlOtl"*LOi-NI>C'*X Z t t lO * X W i- ' i— L~ 
r-T r-T i-T r-T i-T i— " i— T r-Teo" CO 60* Cm" ■■«" CO" I©" co" lO TjT 



l-H'rHi— l^i— I^H^CM^iCM^r-li— ' rM i-H i— I i— I 



I - 

© 
£ 

©' 

ID 

r-T 

I — i 



ao 

CD 

t-T 

CO 

CM 



CO 
CO 

s 

if 

Iff 

CO 



N'JiMHt-.l'OiWNMHWt-.n'liNXORtONCXOXW'tMIMN* CM 
CK JO » O CM^r-icM CM tH C5 ©^t- ©__© CCa0iHCOe0rH^O5Tt<CDC5W^CN I O 

-* eo »" eo" ©" eo" t-f oo" x" o" n" of m" t-T co* cm iff r-T ©" oo" cjf co" ef^of^io^ofc^cTeo 
a c. c c * o m k * r -t o c-i « w n m n a c o t c. o x o x « en fo 

ff)HWCl'1<-l<tr).cOMtLO»CHM1iLOXOOXOtO»iO'-N'1 , lOC<: 



CO 
CO 



ce 



+3 

a 



°1 

co 

CD CP 

go 

> 2 
2~ 

CD to 

> -£ 

-1-3 C 

o a, 



CD 



CD 



cd 



. a 
a 

«< 

CO 

cu 

. —I 

s- 

CD 
CO 

CD 
^3 



CD 

"3 

Is 

o 
Eh 

CD 

a 
to 

i" 

o 
W 

X 



o 
co 

<D 
3 

<y 



T3 

c3 

m ■ — ' 



o 
a 

■A 
> 



H CI C» t O C. X t> L- CC « CS ^ H O N t» N -t J5 CO (N C C C H< H O - 

l* n x c - i" . 1 1" ? if: hc. - ; x o h q n n w c x w h t n t- 

OOrtlOON'OHSSJCOLOSlO'l'CClOOHHONCtCCOiNOfHfl 

co' o r-T ce" co" No"t"o'HH cc" ■£ ~? c:" ' r-3" co" o" co" >o oo co" oo' co' i>T io t--T i-T co" oj 

ON C) C r. C5CD tO N CO G N-wOOS H ^< t^O t-.H O CO H OCO N M ',- OX 

cm" cm" cm" cm" cm" cm" 



C- CM ~ O ~ C5 CD CO CM CO iffl !>• CO C2 i— i O t— ri O CO H © CO CM CO CC IO 

© co eo cc to © to eo <» co t- oi i-i co i>- 1- t- oo oo ce © cm cm eo oo © t- 1>- os 

r-T r-Tl-T r-T r-r©fc4" N'cN'cM" CM'rH - CM" i-fi-Tr-Tr-i" t-T i-TrH CM CM" Cm" C-f r-T cm" i-T iH i-T 



c3 

c 



lOCOt^-l-CO-* , >— lC5©t^OOC5©i— iCDCM©O5COCOOC'0CCOCOC". CUO CO 
a!SN»«^OMC5XfflriCOj:«COCOOMinfflWCC(N'?©-tc5 
ICS 00 05,05 ©^M^CO^C^CN CO CO -)< Cl-f"CC-*Hr-i|^30COl^00r-iC;C-5CO>-H 

t>T co" CO" CO" ©" CM" to to tO of O CO' r-T t~T co' CO" i-T CC" OC." CO" of CO" CC? Tt<" ©" co" of 

ocoe!ffls9t | osiooi-x©.'*wi>.Mf nscoHSNos^ffl 
-?if>NTft~x-i , seiXNONHO««OfjHHHCc!e'.ooo 



CO CO 
CO CO 



— 71 -f 

lO CD — 
-f CO ( - 



i" cr. © cm rt< Oi ■* i-h t- i~ co ( 
*o co Oj 1 

CO CO CM L- 



t— i irr to to to 

CO CO CO CO oc 
i-l i-l Oi CM SO 



t~— CO CO to - 1 

cqiocooo-tcoc. xeooxinTticffiNOtiOOr: - . 

05 i-h CO to C— Oi r-i i— t-^ © tH l- © © CO O CM CO Tt" Ci 
HH CM" ?f CN i-T CM" CM" CM"CM"c4'co"co"co"^^"co"CM"co"cM"co"co"co"^"^Tt<'co' 



CO CO 



iO © 

CM CO 

Tf © 



© •- 

•<flZ. 



lC5»CCMi—l©CO©t^i-l CM 00 ■*05CMCMCM©eM-*©-<* , ©t^i-110CD'« , 'tiCM 
M CO O O if) ifi O M O » 1- t--t^CMCD00COCM-*©CMt^G0CO©-5-CO©m 

« ocflxc oo co^o^o t^Tti eo t^o co t- © ■* co^ncohxcoocih 
' co" t>T -cm" co" of t-T r-T cm" i—" -r" i-T of co" co* iff of i^f co" co" i-T ©" t--T t^T co © ©" co" i>T of 

— t— lO CM CO iC5 © i-i CO 00 © OC —i i-l -t< CO — -t" © i— OC CM -f © 

o;^ o — _io © if: rH t~ cm cm r-i co t - cm ~r co x co © © co u< if: cm © © cm co oo 
co"co"cb"io"co" o ©"iff co"cD"t^tCco"oo"x"x"t--*©"©*t-"©"©"©"©"©'x"L-"t--*i'-" 



ifO 
CO 

1-1 

©" 

OS 
CM 

©" 
© 



© 
© 

©" 
1- 



© 

CM 



00 

■* 

co" 
1— I 
© 

©" 
© 



eo 
- 

to 

iff 



00 
CM 



03 

CO 

>* 



r — cm co f if. ■- t- r 

t— I— C — t — 1— I — I — t — 

IXXXXXXXX 



©c — oi co t iO c i- x r. o in ;i co t o c: s x 3 o 
i - x x x x x x x -/: r_ v: © © © © © © © © © © o 
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx© 



o 



xxiv 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

BAIT COLD STORAGE. 

Reference was made in previous reports to the inauguration of a system of bait cold 
storage, and the leading features of this system were thus summarized : 

1. Formation of Fishermen's Bait Associations at the various fishing centres. 

2. Incorporation of the associations formed under special Acts passed by the local 
legislatures of the Maritime provinces. 

3. Erection of bait freezers under the superintendence of skilled foremen provided 
by the department. 

4. Audit of the accounts by one of the officials and the payment of 50 per cent of 
the cost by the department. 

5. Practical explanation of the method of freezing and storing fish frozen for bait. 

6. Provision of suitable forms for returns to be made to the department showing 
daily the amount of fish received and issued and the temperatures maintained. 

7. Payment of a bonus of $5 per ton for bait frozen up to 20 tons, on the certificate 
of an inspector. m 

The cooperative cold storage work, undertaken by the department and the fisher- 
men of the Maritime provinces, for the purpose of providing a supply of bait during 
periods of scarcity has been continued during the past year with success. 

The operations have been confined to the provinces of Nova Scotia and Prince 
Edward Island, under special Acts passed by the legislatures of these provinces. An 
Act has also been passed by the legislature of New Brunswick, permitting the free 
incorporation of Fishermen's Bait Associations. Arrangements were made to erect 
freezers at several points in this province, notably at Caraquet, but they were not 
carried out. The legislature of the province of Quebec did not deem it advisable to 
pass a special act for the free incorporation of Bait Associations, and in consequence, it 
was impossible to organize associations to build bait freezers in this province. It is to 
be hoped during the coming session of this local legislature, that the benefits of this 
system will be recognized and provision made for its extension into Quebec. 

The plan adopted for the aid of the fishermen in this important matter of providing 
a constant bait supply, has been devised on the principle of bearing equally with 
them the necessary expenditure for construction and equipment, overseeing as far as 
possible, that no mistakes are made in operating, but leaving the internal affairs and 
management solely under the control of a local board of directors. 

Nineteen freezers have been erected, thirteen of which operated during the past 
fishing season. The bait freezers constructed have a combined storage capacity of 
470 tons of bait. Those operated this season had storage capacity of 330 tons and in 
all 156 tons of bait were frozen, or, on an average, 47 per cent of their total capacity 
was utilized. Inverness County, C.B., and Prince County, P.E.I., contain the largest 
number of freezers, viz, three each. Antigonish, Guysborough and Shelburne Counties 
in Nova Scotia, contain two each, while one freezer has been erected in each of the 
counties of Kings, P.E.I., Victoria, Cape Breton, Richmond, C.B., Halifax, Yarmouth 
and Digby in Nova Scotia. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



XXV 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

The method of carrying on the work has been outlined under the heads of forming 
Fishermen's Associations ; incorporating the same ; erection of bait freezers ; explana- 
tion of methods of freezing ; provision for returns of bait frozen and payment of bonus 
of $5 per ton. 

The work during the past season has been carried out under the above arrangement, 
special emphasis being laid on the ' Explanation of methods of freezing.' Trained men 
who have been employed in the commercial freezers at Canso were secured and sent to 
the various freezers for a period of a week or ten days, when they were receiving bait, 
and this arrangement has proved very satisfactory. 

Of the thirteen freezers operated during the past season, six were entirely success- 
ful in fulfilling their object, viz., those at Frog Pond, Alberton, Ballentyne's Cove, Bay- 
field, Sambro and Lower East Fubnico. Five were less successful, viz., Port Hood Island, 
Whitehead, Port Beckerton, Gabarus and Clarke's Harbour, while two must be counted 
as failures, Souris, P.E.I., and Port La Tour, N.S. There is no reason, however, why 
the seven latter named freezers should not be equally as successful in the future as the 
first named ones have been in the past. 

In every case, the freezers have performed their work with satisfaction, the bait 
fish being well frozen and, when the storage rooms have been attended properly, have 
kept in good condition. 

The work undertaken by the department has attracted the attention of the Govern- 
ments of Newfoundland and France. At the request of the Honourable the Minister 
of Marine and Fisheries of Newfoundland, full information and plans were forwarded to 
that colony. The French ship Islay called at several points on Prince Edward Island 
during the past summer for the purpose of investigating the operation of the bait 
stations in that province. 

From its inception, the bait cold storage work has been favourably commented on 
in the Maritime provinces and during the past season the interest taken in it has not 
decreased. 

Further information as to the operations at each bait station will be found in 
Appendix No 1 1 of this report. 

FISH CULTURE. 

The Fish-culture report for the year 1901 by Professor Edward E. Prince, Commis- 
sioner of Fisheries for ms Appendix 12 of this publication. It embraces a general review 
of the operations carried on during the year including not only the capture of parent 
fish, collection of ova, the incubation and planting of the fry of various fashes of econo- 
mic importance, but also the experimental scheme for introducing the black bass of 
Ontario into the waters of British Columbia and the North west Territories. 

During the year, no less than 203,540,000 fry were hatched in Government 
hatcheries and distributed in Canadian waters. About half of these fry were lobsters, 
the balance cansisting of salmon, great lake trout and whitefish. 

Professor Prince calls attention to the fact that owing to special circumstances 
three of the hatcheries could not be operated, but the work in the remainino twelve 



xxvi 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

hatcheries was so successfull that the total output of fry was far in excess of the average 
and has only been exceeded in five previous years. 

The building of three new hatcheries, one in the province of Quebec (at Gaspe), 
one in the province of Nova Scotia (at N. E. Margaree), and one in British Columbia, 
on the Skeena River, are referred to and the completion of the Granite Creek Salmon 
Hatchery, on Shush wap Lake, near Sicamous, B.C., is mentioned as a notable feature 
in the year's fish culture work. During the present fall (1901) the tanks of the new 
hatchery have been filled with an enormous supply of sockeye eggs in splendid condi- 
tion. Thus the operations in the various hatcheries have been sustained with charac- 
teristic success and activity, and public interest in the work was never more general 
or more intense. 

OYSTER CULTURE. 

As an annex to the Fish culture appendix will be formed a full report of last 
season's work on the cultivation of oysters by Mr. E. Kemp, the department's expert. 

Mr. Kemp devoted most of the summer in examining the condition of oyster 
areas in Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island, with a view to preparing favourable 
grounds for the planting of oysters. 

At page 266 of this report will be found a recapitulation table showing the oyster 
production of the Dominion for the last twenty-five years, representing an aggregate 
value of nearly four million dollars. 

FISHERIES PROTECTION SERVICE. 

The report of the operations of the Fisheries Protection Service during the season 
of 1901, by Commander 0. G. V. Spain forms Appendix 13 of this volume. It is 
pleasing to note that this service has again been carried on without accidents and in a 
very satisfactory manner. 

The fleet of cruisers consisted of the same ships as last year, viz. : the Acadia, La 
Canadienne, Curlew, Osprty, Kingfisher, Constance, Stanley and Petrel. The latter 
cruising in the Ontario great lakes and the others in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and off 
the Atlantic coast. The steamer Qua'ira was also partly emplo} T ed for the protection 
of our fisheries off the British Columbia coast. 

The number of United States fishing vessels taking advantage of the modus vivendi 
licenses was 82 and the amount received therefrom was §9,445. 

A glance at the long list of foreign fishing schooners calling at our ports, shows of 
what importance these harbours are to them. 

At the end of the season, Commander Spain and his officers devoted much time to 
the protection of the lobster industry, and any traps found in use during the close season 
were seized and destroyed. 

FISHERIES INTELLIGENCE BUREAU. 

A full report of the Intelligence Bureau service, which also comes under the 
control of Commander Spain, by the officer in charge at Halifax, forms an annex to 
Appendix 13. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



xxvii 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

Compilations of the various reports of 53 stations now dispersed on our Atlantic 
coast are daily sent to Halifax and then wired to the principal fishing localities of the 
provinces. 

THE FISHERIES STAFF. 

The outside staff of fishery officers connected with this deparment during the last 
calendar year aggregates 848 men, including the crews of the fisheries protection fleet. 

These officers were dispersed as follows : — 

Ontario 3 

Quebec 12 

Nova Scotia 61 

New Brunswick 30 

Prince Edward Island ... 5 

Manitoba 5 

North-west Territories 7 

British Columbia. . 10 

Fishery guardians employed in 1901 295 

Officers and crews of the fisheries protection fleet 420 

Total 848 



The following are inspectors of fisheries in the different provinces of the Dominion : 



Name. 



Bertram, A. C . . 
Hockin, Robt 

Ford, L. S 

Pratt, J. H., capt 

Chapman, Robt. A . . . . 

Miles, H. S 

Matheson, J. A 

Wakeman, Wm., M.D 
Lavoie, N., M.D 

Belliveau, A. H 

Hurley, J. M 

Sheppard, O. B 



Duncan, A. G 



P. O. Address. 



Extent of Jurisdiction. 



Young, W. S 

Miller, B. W 

Stewart, Theophilus 
Sword, C, B 



North Sydney, N.S 
Pictou, N.S 

Milton, N.S 

St. Andrews, N.B. . 
Moncton, N.B 

Oromocto, N.B. 

Charlottetown 
Gaspe Basin, Que. . 
L'Islet, Que 

Ottawa 

Belleville 



Toronto, Ont 



Marksville, Ont 



Selkirk, Man 

Qu'Appelle, N.W.T. 

Dawson City 

N. Westminster, B.C. 



District No. 1. — Cape Breton Island. 

District No. 2. — Cumberland, Colchester, Pictou, Antigon- 
ish, Guysboro Halifax, and Hants counties. 

District No. 3. —Lunenburg, Queen's, Shelburne, Yar- 
mouth, Digby, Annapolis and King's counties. 

District No. 1. — The counties of Charlotte and St. Sohn. 

District No. 2. — Restigouche, Gloucester, Northumberland, 
Kent, Westmorland and Albert counties. 

District No. 3. — King's, Queen's, Sunbury, York, Carleton 
and Victoria counties. 

Prince Edward Island. 

Lower St. Lawrence River and Gulf. 

That portion of Quebec, south of River St. Lawrence and 
north and east of and including county of Bellechasse. 
Province of Quebec, north of River St. Lawrence and west 
from and including River Saguenay, and the portion 
south of River St. Lawrence which lies west and south 
of the county of Bellechasse. 
That portion of Ontario east of the western boundary line 
of the counties of Durham, Victoria and Haliburton, 
including Lake Scugog and the eastern boundary of 
Muskoka and Parry Sound districts. 
That part of the province of Ontario west of the eastern 
boundaries of the county of Ontario, and the districts 
of Muskoka and Parry Sound along the Mattawa and 
Ottawa Rivers, and northward along the north-eastern 
boundary line of said province to James Bay. 
That portion of Ontario lying west and north of Lake 
Nipissing, the Rivers Mattawa and Ottawa and the 
north-east boundary line of the province to James Bay, 
embracing Nipissing, Algoma, Thunder Bay and Rainy 
River districts, Lake Superior and such portions of 
Lake Huron and Georgian Bay as lie adjacent or 
opposite to the part of Ontario above described. 
Province of Manitoba. 
All the North-west Territories. 
Yukon district, N. W. Territories. 
Province of British Columbia. 



XXV111 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

The following; are the officers in charge of the Government Fish Hatcheries : 




Armstrong, Wm. 
Parker, Wm . . . 
Walker, John . 
Finlayson, Alex . 
Catell'ier, L. N . . . 
Lindsay, Robt. . . 
Mow at, Alex 
McCluskey, Chas 
Sheasgreen, Isaac 

Ogden, A 

Sword, C. B. .... 
Young, W. S . . . . 
Kem]j, Puniest . . 



Officer in charge of Government Fish Hatchery. . . . 

ii " 

■I " . . . 

ii n . . . . 

ii " 

H ii . . . . 

ii ii . . . 

' i ii . . . 

ii ii 

ii Government Lobster Hatchery. 

ii Government Fish Hatchery . . . 

ii ii 

ii Oyster Culture 



Newcastle, Ont. 
Sandwich, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Magog, Que. 
Tadoussac, Que. 
Gaspe Basin. 
Campbellton, N.B. 
Grand Falls, N.B. 
South Esk, Miramichi, 
N.B. 

Bedford Basin, N.S. 
Pictou, N.S. 
New Westminster, B.C. 
Selkirk, Man. 
Ottawa, Ont. 



PRELIMINARY REPORTS ON THE FISHING SEASON 

OF 1901. 

Herewith appended are the preliminary reports on the fishing operations of the 
season just closed, received from our different inspectors in their respective districts. 

NOVA SCOTIA. 

Inspector A. C. Bertram, of Sydney, C.B., reports as follows on the fisheries of the 
Cape Breton district for 1901 : — 

The statistics for the fishing season just closed will give a decreased catch in nearly 
all important branches of the fishing industry In some remote districts, however, there 
is an average catch in commercial fish, but those districts are in the coastal waters, far 
from the busy mining operations, railway construction, &c. There is no indication in 
any sections of the coastal waters surrounding this island that fish are scarcer than in 
previous years, on the contrary, cod, salmon and mackerel have been more plentiful, but 
owing to the development now going on in coal mines, iron and steel plant construction 
and operation, the quarrying of limestone and the building of new railway lines, as well 
as the increased number of men employed on the Intercolonial railway road-bed during 
this season, the falling off in the catch of fish for 1901 can alone be attributed to fisher- 
men abandoning the prosecu tion of the fishery for other less uncertain employment. 

There is every probability of the live lobster industry being more vigorously prose- 
cuted next season than in the past, as the price for the canned article rules low and 
many canners lost money last year. The cause of the fall in the price of preserved 
lobsters is owing to over production, the markets abroad being overstocked. 

A drouth extending over fourteen weeks prevailed during mid-summer, which 
caused salmon and trout to remain in the tidal waters, but when heavy rains occurred 
during the latter part of September and October salmon ascended to the upper waters 
of the rivers in large numbers. The close seasons were well observed during the 
year. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



xxix 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

Inspector Robt. Hockin, of Pictou, reports a shortage in all the important branches 
compared with last year, and the yield of all the fisheries will probably be under the 
average of that of the past twelve years. The lobster fishery shows a falling off of about 
10 per cent. The cod fishery in the eastern part of the district was better than last 
year, but in the western or Margaret's Bay portion, there was so great a decrease that 
the yield will be 15 per cent less than last year. While the catch of mackerel in the 
season 1900 was the largest during the past twelve years, this season's will only be about 
one-half of last season's, but it will be about an average of that of the past twenty 
years. The hake and haddock fisheries show a slight decrease, but there was an unusu- 
ally lai-ge catch of pollock, an increase of 75 per cent. The herring fishery shows a 
decrease of about 40 per cent. The returns of halibut are only 50 per cent of that of 
last year. The shad fishery was a failure and the catch not more than 10 per cent of 
1900. The smelt fishery is not a very important one and the shortage will not be 
great. The salmon fishery alone shows an increase over the catch of last year of say 
10 per cent. The other fisheries show about an average yield. 

NEW BRUNSWICK. 

Inspector J. H. Pratt, of St. Andrews, reports that the past season has been quite a 
successful one for the fishermen of his district. The total value of catch will show quite 
an increase over that of I 900. This is attributed in a large measure to the immense 
school of sardine herring vhat entered St. Andrews Bay during the latter part of the 
summer, and remained there till November. The other parts of the district will also 
show a marked improvement. Quite an increase will also be noticed in the catch of 
cod and haddock. A surprisingly large catch of pollock is reported by the fishery officers 
at Grand Manan and Campobello, which was due not only to the fact that pollock were 
more plentiful than they have been for many years, but that more men were engaged 
in this fishery. The slaughter of pollock by the use of dynamite at Grand Manan, by 
an increased number of vessels this season, was an unfortunate but important factor in 
the unusually large catch. 

The lobster fishery will yield about the same as in 1900, and it is beyond a doubt 
that in Charlotte County the lobsters are becoming less each year, although the amount 
of lobster fishing gear is annually increasing. The adoption of the 10^ inch law, as in 
St. John County, is advocated by the large majority of the fishermen, and there is no 
doubt that this change is now an absolute necessity. The catch of lobsters in the 
latter county will show about the same as last season. 

Salmon will show an average catch not only in the St. Croix River but among the 
net fishermen of the Bay of Fundy. 

The canning of the several kinds of fish is becoming quite an industry among the 
fishermen of the Bay of Fundy, and the number of cases of canned sardine herring put 
up will show a large increase. 

Many hundreds of barrels of clams were exported from our numerous beds, and it 
seems that in the near future some measures will have to be adopted in order to save 
this valuable fishery from entire ruin. 

Inspector R. A. Chapman, of Moncton, A r .£., says that the aggregate catch will be 
again larger than that of the previous year. More salmon have been taken at all the 



XXX 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

principal fishing districts than in 190C, these fish had much difficulty in reaching the 
spawning grounds last fall owing to very low water. Spring herring for food, bait, &c, 
were caught in the usual large quantities, many of which were smoked in large smoke 
houses recently erected at Point au Chene, Bay Verte, &c. Fall herring on the Cara- 
quet Miscou banks were also very plentiful, and a large catch secured which sold 
readily at paying prices. The catch of codfish is somewhat in advance of that of last 
year, and, prices being good, it was an exceedingly profitable season for those interested 
in this fishery either as fishermen or dealers. The take of oysters outside of those fished 
on the reserve in Shediac last year will exceed that of 1900 ; of hard shell clams 
(quahogs) large quantities were raked in Buctouche and Cocagne, even exceeding 
somewhat the take of the previous year, and now with the Order in Council giving the 
local officers power to prevent any encroachment upon the oyster beds, this fishing can 
be safely prosecuted. The clam canning establishment at Inkerman, Gloucester County, 
has considerably increased its output. More smelts were taken than ever before. I 
believe the aggregate will reach fully 8,000,000 lbs. (4,000 tons), the benefits of this 
fishery to the people can hardly be overestimated. Mackerel were abundant early in the 
season but were of an inferior quality ; later when fat and good they were scarce. The 
catch of lobsters has again fallen off except in parts of the Straits of Northumberland, 
where it is believed they are getting some help from the Pictou hatchery and one or 
two other places. I believe the only way to remedy this would be to establish hatch- 
eries, say at Shemogue, Westmorland County, and on the north side of Shippegan Island, 
Gloucester County, where large fishing is done in each case in the immediate vicinity, 
and where I have no doubt 400,000,000 fry from both establishments could be turned 
out yearly, and if even 5 per cent of these matured it would give more than double 
the quantity now caught on our coasts from Quebec to Nova Scotia. 

The catch of other kinds of fish was about an average one, except of bass, which is 
again smaller. Prices of all kinds of fish have been good, making it a profitable year for 
all concerned. 

Inspector H. S. Miles, of the St. John River district, states that the fishing industry 
in his district during the season just closed has been most satisfactory to all parties 
concerned. Although there was a slight falling off in the catch of shad and alewives on 
account of continued high gales prevailing at the time, they are said to be the most 
numerous in the St. John river and its tributaries, however the decrease was so slight 
that very few complaints were heard. The salmon fishermen on the St. John river in 
King's, Queen's and Sunbury counties were all satisfied with their catch. In York 
county complaints were heard that few salmon were taken in comparison to other years, 
however they were as cheap in Fredericton last summer as on former occasions and the 
supply always was in excess of the demand. Salmon in the upper St. John, in Car- 
leton and Victoria counties, were numerous in the past year and reports say that they 
went up the different tributaries in large numbers this fall, especially the Tobique river- 

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND. 

Inspector J. A. Matheson, of Charlottetown, P.E I., says the fisheries for the season 
have been fairly sustained in seme sections, in others a shortage is noticed. In Prince 
and Queen's counties the oyster catch has been about up to former years. A leady 
market and good prices were obtained throughout the season, which was satisfactory to 
shippers and fishermen. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER xxxi 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

The mackerel catch shows an increase, and fishermen look forward to an improve- 
ment in this branch. 

Lobsters have fallen a little short, but not sufficient to cause alarm. 

Herring were not as plentiful as in former years. All other kinds of fish were in 
fair supply. 

In King's county lobsters were in excess of last season. Mackerel not so plentiful ; 
quite a falling off in codfish and hake, especially in Murray harbour district, principally 
caused by not having been prosecuted to the same extent as in former years through the 
demand for labour in building a branch railway in that locality, and also at the iron 
and steel works at Sydney. But, on the whole, the season was well up to the expecta- 
tions of the employer and employed. 

QUEBEC. 

Commander Wakeham, officer in charge of the Gulf oj St. Lawrence Division, reports 
that the returns for 1901 will show a considerable increase in the total value over that 
for 1900. This will be due entirely to the greatly increased yield of the salmon and 
cod fisheries. The lobster and fat herring i eturns show a considerable decrease. 

On that part of the north shore of the Gulf west of Natashquan, the yield from ihe 
salmon net fishery on the sea coast and in the estuaries, was phenomenally great. Over 
most of the coast of Gaspe and Bonaventure the fishing was fair, slightly below an 
average, while on the lower north coast, from Blancs Sablons west to Natashquan, the 
catch was poor. 

The summer cod fishing all over the Gulf was one of the best we have ever had. 
Fish were well inshore and unusually abundant, while the weather was fine. On the 
Labrador, in June and July, for the third season in succession, heavy field ice drove in 
through the Strait of Belle Isle, and hung about the shore as far west as Harrington, 
greatly interfering with the fishing, but whenever they could be got at through the ice, 
fish were taken in the trap nets. The fall cod fishing was a complete failure owing to 
heavy weather and a scarcity of herring, the usual fall bait ; but so abundant was the 
summer cod fishing, which begins with June and ends with August, that the returns 
will show one of the best fisheries we have ever had in spite of the fact that dogfish did 
a great deal of damage during the summer and that practically nothing was done in the 
fall. Prices paid were above the average and fishermen have made a good season. 

Herring were as abundant as ever during the spring spawning season, but after- 
wards seemed to have backed off' shore, and very few fat summer or fall herrin<* were 
taken anywhere along the coast. This failure has been quite seriously felt by our 
fishermen, as salted fat herring forms the staple food of the people during the winter. 
The lobster fishing continues to fall off, and in spite of the lengthened season and a 
reduction in the legal size, a very serious decrease will be shown by the returns. 
Mackerel were abundant at the Magdalen Islands all through the season, but the price 
was low and the fishing was not prosecuted with any very great energy. The fall smelt 
fishing in Gaspe Bay was about an average. Owing to the mildness of the season the 
first catch of smelt did not reach New York in very good order. When the weather 
got cooler and fish were coming into the bay more abundantly, the steamer Admiral 
stopped running and the fishing came to an abrupt conclusion. 



xxxii 



MA BINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Inspector N. Lavoie, M.D., of L 'Islet, reports as follows : — The principal kinds 
of fish frequenting the waters of this district are cod, herring, salmon, eels, sardines, 
shad, sturgeon, pickerel, whitefish, &c. The yiold of the fisheries for the year 1901 
has been satisfactory. Cod, which, for many years past, had completely deserted 
the upper shores of the county of Gaspe, has again made its reappearance in 
sufficient numbers to warrant a hope that former abundance will again revive- 
This happy result is, undoubtedly, due to the disappearance of white whales from 
these waters. Herring was abundant everywhere, and large quantities were pickled 
or used fresh, as bait or manure. Owing to improved modes of fishing and the more 
general use of gill nets, fishermen are enabled to secure better catches than in former 
year.-*. Salmon fishing, which is reported as so productive around Gaspe and along the 
coast of Bay des Chaleurs, gave only middling results. Some stations did well ; others 
poorly. It is stated that 208 salmon were killed with the fly in Ste. Anne des Monts 
River, and 80 in Matane River. Metis River is reported as being well stocked with 
fish. Cape Chatte River was not leased, and as a consequence, I apprehend, much 
poaching was carried on there. No reliable information could be had of the quantity of 
trout caught in the inland lakes, but it must have been large. Sardine fishing was a 
comparative failure ; the statistics showing only 244,000 lbs. against 360,000 in 1900. 
Bar fishing was more remunerative than last year ; the statistics showing an increase of 
about 6,000 lbs. Shad fishing was a failure. About twenty-two white whales were 
killed at River Quelle ; ten more than last year. The skins sold for three dollars ; and 
the oil fetched twenty-two cents a gallon. It is reported that eighteen seals were 
killed at River du Loup ; seven at Bic ; and twenty at Cr ne Island. Eel fishing 
shows a decline of nearly 50 per cent. 

During two months of the year, May and June, I am engaged in supervising the 
lobster canneries ; that portion of the coast extending from Maguasha to Gaspe Basin, 
issuing canning licenses, distributing labels and seeing generally that the law is strictly 
complied with. I have never met with better disposed people ; always pleased and 
even anxious to help the department and its officer in every way. Not a single com- 
plaint reached me during the whole season ; not a violation of the law came under my 
notice. These facts speak volumes for the mens' honesty. Although the number of 
traps and canneries has more than doubled within the last twenty years, the production 
failed to keep pace with this increase, so much so, that the profits have fallen off in 
such a manner as to render the business unprofitable. There were, this year, 29 can- 
neries in operation ; the pack amounted to 3,778 cases, against 3,862 in 1900, and 4,164 
in 1899. Again, in 1880, with about half the number of traps and canneries, the yield 
amounted to 9,345 cases. During that year, some fishermen caught as much as 50,000 
lbs. of lobsters with only 45 to 50 traps. Owing to the above facts, which cannot be 
gainsaid, it is evident that measures of some kind are necessary, if this valuable 
industry is to be sived from total extinction. What these measures should be, I am 
unable, at present, to determine. Some parties suggest a total cessation of canning for 
five years ; others favour a further shortening of the fishing season, or curtailment of 
the number of traps, &c. It will be for the department to consider these alternatives, 
so as to determine what had better be done for the preservation of this fishery. 

Inspector A. II. Belliveau who has charge of the inland division of Quebec states 
that as far as he can judge from his few visits to the principal fishing centres of his 
district the yield of fish during the season of 1901 will be much inferior to the previous 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



xxxiii 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

one. The better grades of fish are steadily falling off and the catch now chiefly consists 
:>f coarse fish. This depletion can be safely ascribed not only to overfishing in the past, 
but to the indiscriminate use of small meshed gear capturing young immature fish, unfit 
for food. 

Lakes St. Francis and St. Louis will henceforth receive better protection, as netting 
of all kinds has been prohibited therein for a period of two years. The same restriction 
is also applied to all the beautiful lakes of ^the eastern townships, thus facilitating the 
duties of the local officers in enforcing these fishery regulations in that neighbourhood. 
Unfortunately a few netting permits were granted last summer in some of the best 
fishing lakes in the vicinity of Sherbrooke. This retrograde step will have a bad effect 
on the residents around these and other lakes, as it will further induce them to poach, 
justifying their action by the thought that they might as well fish as others. 

To make this prohibition of all nets thoroughly efficient, they should be liable to 
confiscation on sight whether wet or dry, wherever found by an officer, but I fear such 
a step would be beyond our Act. 

Mr. Belliveau says that most of the remarks in his report (p. 191) apply to this 
season as well as to the former. 

ONTARIO. 

Inspector J. M. Hurley, of Belleville, reports as follows on the fisheries of Eastern 
Ontario district : — 

The forty-three local overseers in my division are all deeply interested in carrying 
out the regulations, and studying the habits of fish in their respective localities, at the 
same time advising the fishermen to adhere closely to the fishery regulations. 

In the Bay of Quinte district no nets of any kind were allowed in the waters during 
the months of J uly, August, and the first two weeks of September of this year. Several 
fishermen who disregarded the instructions of the local overseer had their seines and 
nets confiscated. All admit now that it is the right thing to do and consequently fish 
were more plentiful this fall than in several years past, as no nets were allowed in 
the Bay of Quinte during the sporting season while visitors were camping and angling, 
Bass and maskinonge were plentiful in Bay of Quinte and Trent River districts. In 
Crow Lake near Marmora several parties landed maskinonge weighing from 30 to 35 lbs. 
I saw one that veighed 44 lbs. caught between Massassaga Park and Ox Point, an old 
ground which has been fished for upwards of a century. 

The Bay of Quinte bass breeding pond has proved a great success. The handling 
and transportation of live fish, by the officer of your department was also very successful, 
thousands of these bass being carried safely for hundreds of miles with comparatively 
small loss. 

The trout fishing in the numerous small lakes, of my division, was very good, 
especially in Charleston, Marmora, Sydenham and other lakes along the Rideau River. 
St. Ola is the centre of several lakes where trout are also plentiful. Tourists have 
found good fishing with their up-to-date tackle for fishing in deep water. 

With the exception of sturgeon which are almost extinct, all kinds of fish are on 
the increase. Pike especially so in the Bay of Quinte district. 

22— d 



xxxiv 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Nearly all the fish caught from Brighton to the head of the St. Lawrence (about 
one hundred miles), are shipped fresh to United States cities at fair prices, while every 
town and city on the Canadian side are furnished with fish from Manitoba, Georgian 
Bay or from the eastern provinces. 

Inspector 0. B. Shepperd, of Toronto, says that the catch of commercial fish in his 
division has been an average one, with the exception of herring and blue pickerel which 
has been exceptionally good. In the Lake Huron and Georgian Bay district, the trout, 
whitefish and yellow pickerel have been rather below the average of the last two years, 
while herring and blue pickerel have been considerably above. In the Lake Erie dis- 
trict the catch of whitefish shows a considerable falling off, and the trout practically 
nil, while the herring, both in quantity and size, have increased over last year. In Lake 
Ontario district the catch has been below the^ average in all kinds of fish, but especially 
in trout and whitefish. 

During the summer I visited all the important fishing stations in my division, and 
found the law being fairly well observed, except in the Georgian Bay district, where 
illegal trap net fishing is being done to an alarming extent. The Provincial Govern- 
ment is doing something to stop the practice, but should, in my opinion, take 
more drastic measures than are taken at present to prevent it. I have visited a great 
many of the inland waters and made a careful study of the line and rod fishing, and am 
pleased to be able to say that they are holding up fairly well, and if proper care and 
protection is given, will continue to do so. I consider the inland fisheries or angling 
fisheries a most important one, as this is what brings the thousands of strangers to our 
shores, who spend large amounts of money among all classes. Every pound of fish that 
is caught by the angler or sportsman represents at least twenty times the value of the 
same number of pounds dealt with commercially. This part of our fisheries should be 
carefully guarded and properly protected, so that it will not deteriorate. The one great 
menace to the inland fisheries in my division is the rapid increase of the German carp- 
It is rapidly spreading over nearly all the waters, both inland and international, and I 
would advise that any and every means possible should be at once taken to prevent further 
increase. If drastic measures are not at once taken in this respect, the damage to our 
fisheries will be irreparable. The sturgeon, one of the most valuable fish in Canadian 
waters, is becoming scarcer every year. It can still be secured in some of the northern 
waters, and I would strongly recommend the transplanting of the parent fish to 
congenial waters, where they were formerly found (as they are very tenacious to life 
this could easily be done) and have them properly protected for a few years. If this 
were done I am satisfied the small cost incurred would be repaid a thousandfold. 

Inspector A. G. Duncan, in charge of the western district of Ontario, saj'S that he 
visited last summer the most important fishing points of this district, and found that there 
has been a good deal of illegal fishing carried on with trap nets and seines east from St. 
Joseph Island to Bustard Islands and Badgely Island. There will be a good increase 
especially in whitefish in the above grounds over the previous one. To a great extent 
this increased catch of whitefish may be ascribed to the illegal use of seines in the above 
locality. From Sault Ste. Marie west to Pilot Harbour on Lake Superior, the catch of 
trout compares well with that of previous years ; up to September 1 it promised to be 
larger than in 1900, but after that date we had a succession of storms that made it 
impossible to fish regularly. In that locality whitefish will yield less than in 1900^ and 
seems to be decreasing each year. Fish dealers informed me that these two kinds of 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



XXXV 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

fish are about the only ones they handle. This due to the fact that fishing in Lake 
Superior on the east coast is all deep water fishing, and these are the only kind of fish 
found in deep water. 

I would recommend that some steps be taken to establish a fish hatchery at Sault 
Ste. Marie, where it could restock the waters of Lake Huron, Georgian Bay and Lake 
Superior, and it is possible the city would furnish free water, as such an institution would 
be a great attraction in the town. 

MANITOBA. 

Inspector W. S. Young, of Selkirk, says when all the fishery returns are in, they 
will show an increase over the year 1900; while the catch of n-hitefish will not give 
much of an increase, pickerel, tullibee and catfish will show a very large surplus over 
last report. Catfish heretofore have not been caught here to any great extent, owing to 
the low price paid for them. The best price the fishermen could get was half a cent to 
one cent per pound, during last year the price averaged from 2| to 3 cents per 
pound. The most of these fish are caught with hook and line in the Red River, and at 
the mouth of the above river in Lake Winnipeg. The half-breeds catch the most of these 
fish, and are making a good living out of the industry, which is a blessing to them, as 
they are enabled to buy flour and clothing for themselves and families. The cause of 
the demand for these fish is due to the falling off in the catch in the Mississippi river, 
as the most of these fish are shipped to that district. The tullibee catch has been the 
best for some years, and when the returns are in they will show a very large increase 
over the previous one. The next annual report will show a considerable value of fish 
over that of the previous year, which will bring it near the half million mark. With 
proper regulations for the protection of the fisheries in this province and enforcement, 
there is nothing to fear from depletion. The season's operations have been successful, 
both for the fishermen and the companies engaged. 

NORTH-WEST TERRITORIES. 

Inspector E. W. Miller, of Qu'Appelle, says : — In general the Territorial waters have 
continued in excellent condition throughout the year and fish are reported plentiful in 
all districts. The catch of fish, however, will not be up to the average of former years. 
This is mainly due to two causes. In the settled districts farming operations have been 
so crowned with success as to prevent much resort to the fisheries, more remunerative 
employment being obtainable. In the northern districts the Indian and half-breed 
population, who generally more or less depends on fish for their livelihood, have found 
game more plentiful than usual. Along the Saskatchewan river especially the great 
abundance of muskrats has afforded very profitable occupation. 

In the Edmonton district most of the lakes are now found again well stocked with 
fish, the reports from Lac la Biche, Lac St. Annes, and Pigeon lake being most encour- 
aging. Both there and in the Prince Albert district, a high stage of water prevailed 
throughout the year, and many of the lesser lakes have gained considerably in volume. 
The sturgeon fishery at Cedar lake was closed for the summer season ; the catch last 
winter was fairly good, and it will be exceeded during the present season, as the fish are 



xxxvi 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

reported very plentiful. At Lake Winnipegosis fishing was carried on vigorously 
throughout the winter and summer seasons. This is at present the only territory 
where whitefish and pickerel are fished for export on an extensive scale, and the opera- 
tions are being carefully observed, so that the lake shall not be overfished. 

The large rainfall has much improved the condition of the smaller lakes in Assini- 
boia, and fish are reported more plentiful in most. There is still, however, a deficiency 
of whitefish in some lakes once noted for their large output of that species.- Long lake 
is in specially good condition. High water in the spring prevented the illegal fishing 
generally prevalent at that season, and no serious infractions of the regulations were 
reported. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Inspector C. B. Sword, for British Columbia, states that the amount of salmon 
preserved in 1901 exceeds by nearly 200,000 cases the pack of 1897, the largest previously 
recorded, the total pack for this year being 1,224,491 cases. One-half of this increase is 
owing to the larger pack on the Eraser river obtained from the phenomenally large run 

of sockeyes (0. Nerka). 

In 1900, when the total pack of sockeye was only 413,802 cases, there were 193,046 
cases of the less marketable varieties, cohoe, spring, humpbacks and dog salmon, put up. 
In 1901 the total pack of these was only 78,360 cases. This smaller pack was chiefly 
owing to there being enough of sockeyes to fill the cans provided, but partly also to the 
fear of the canners that with the heavy pack of sockeyes there might be difficulty in 
finding a market for the cheaper varieties. The heavy run of sockeyes in 1901 occasioned 
also a heavy pack on Puget Sound, and the British Columbia canners complain that while 
they paid lOf cents for fish to the gill net fishermen, their rivals on the Washington 
side were permitted to use traps and purse seines and secured their fish at a much lower 
price, the consequence being that while the present prices in the London and Liverpool 
markets would leave a profit to the Puget Sound canners, the British Columbia pack 
could not be sold except at a loss. There has been an increase of 2,981 barrels of salt 
salmon over the amount put up in 1900. The pack of dog salmon salted is 5,426,207 
pounds, against 5,700,000 pounds in 1900. The amounts both of pickled and dry salted 
salmon put up in 1901 were affected by a shortage in the supply of salt. The returns 
for fresh salmon show an increase of over 400,000 pounds, the total being 2,142,805 
pounds in 1 901. 

Sturgeon again shows a decrease, yielding only 65,000 pounds, against 105,000 in 
1900. Halibut shows an increase, the return being 5,701,000 pounds in 1901, against 
4,261,000 pounds in 1900, 

Seal fishery. — The Collector of Customs at the port of Victoria reports the catch of 
fur seals for 1901 as 24,422, at a value of $15 each, as against 35,523 in the previous 

season. 

CONCLUSION. 

A perusual of the above concise reports from our inspectors will give a fair impres- 
sion of the principal fluctuations of the various species in the different provinces during 
the season just closed, as compared with the previous yield of fish published in detail in 
this report. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



xxxvii 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

In the Maritime provinces, the catch, though an average one, will not be up to 
that of 1900. The falling off is more noticeable in the Cape Breton districts, where the 
development of other more permanent industries has recently attracted many who 
formerly sought the sea for a livelihood. Unfortunately the extraordinary capture of 
mackerel in the Northumberland Strait in 1900, the best in twelve years, was not 
repeated last season and only an average quantity was secured. However, the aggregate 
fishery production in New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island will, no doubt, exceed 
that of the year before. The Bay of Fundy herring fisheries were more productive 
than in 1900. The Gulf of St. Lawrence fisheries, especially the salmon on the north 
shore, will be above the average. 

The inland districts, from Quebec to the Rockies, will hold their own in fishery 
matters, excepting perhaps in the North-west Territories, where a falling off is antici- 
pated. In British Columbia, probabilities and conjectures make way to established 
facts, especially concerning the salmon industry, which this year eclipses by far the 
phenomenal output of 1897. No less than 58,785,000 cans of salmon were preserved 
there'in 1901 ; besides 9,155,200 pounds of salted and fresh salmon. Unless the minor 
branches of fisheries have utterly failed, which is not likely, as halibut also shows a 
large improvement, British Columbia will in our next report supersede old Nova Scotia, 
which has always headed the list of fisheries. 

With such figures in evidence it is safe to estimate that the aggregate value of 
Canada's fishery production for 1901 will be the largest in its records, exceeding twenty- 
three million dollars. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

F. GOURDEAU, Lt.-Col., 

Deputy Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 



22— 



v. 



1-2 EDWARD VII. 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



A. 1902 



APPENDIX No. i. 



EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE. 



The total expenditure for all Fisheries services, except Civil Government, for the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1901, including Fishing Bounty, amounted to $491,569, 
being within the appropriation by $69,342. 

The total net fisheries revenue, during the same period, from rents, license fee, fines 
and sales, including the modus Vivendi licenses to United States vessels, amounted to 
$88,145. 



Service. 



Fisheries 

Fish-breeding 

Fisheries protection service . 

Fishing bounty 

Miscellaneous expenditure. . 




111,760 67 
68,961 40 
124,211 21 
158,802 50 
27,833 79 



Total , 491,569 57 



115,000 00 
77,500 00 
154,297 50 
160.000 00 
54,113 90 

560,911 40 



The details of the above will be found in the Auditor General's report under the 
proper headings. 

In addition to the above, the following summary shows the salaries and disburse- 
ments of fishery officers in the several provinces, together with the expenses for main- 
tenance of the different fish-breeding establishments throughout the Dominion. 



Expenditure. 



% cts. 



3, 

28, 
35, 
7, 
2, 

6. 

17, 
1, 
1, 



819 57 
934 03 
452 51 
730 69 
934 03 
669 74 
351 39 
886 36 
159 85 
117 49 



Amount. 



111,760 67 



Service. 



Fisheries, Ontario 
1 1 Quebec. 



ii New Brunswick 

ii Nova Scotia 

,i Prince Edward Island. 

n Manitoba 

i. North-west Territories 

ii British Columbia 

ii Yukon 

General account 



Total 



22—1 



2 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

This expenditure by provinces is subdivided as follows : — 

EXPENDITURE. 



Onta rio. 


$ cts. 


$ cts 


Disbursements of officers 


3,241 05 

385 92 






192 00 








Total 




3,819 57 


Quebec. 






2,820 00 
3,820 80 
6 16 
















Total 




6,652 96 


New Brunswick. 






19,292 13 
8,954 00 
206 38 
















Total 




28,452 51 


Mora ocotia. 




Salaries of officers 


19,799 14 
15,753 09 
178 46 








Miscellaneous 




Total 




35,730 69 


Frxnce. Edward Island. 




Salaries of officers 


5,156 92 
2,746 71 
31 10 








Miscellaneous . . 








Total 




2,934 03 


Manitoba. 






1,894 71 
647 03 








^Miscellaneous 


128 00 








Total 




2,669 74 


North-west Territories. 






5,669 25 
2,777 79 
4 35 








IVIiscellaneous 












6,351 39 


British Columbia. 






9,452 38 
3,140 47 




Disbursements of officers 








Total 




17,866 51 


Yukon. 




Salaries of officers , 


1,150 00 
9 85 










1,159 81 
1,117 49 


General account 








Total 




111,760 67 







EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE 




3 


SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 






FISH-BREEDING. 






Service. 


Expenditure. 


Amount. 




t cts. 

1,679 03 
3,952 55 
5,621 83 
3,406 04 
5,858 29 
737 85 
5,216 46 
1,971 22 
4,063 27 
1,582 19 
2,703 35 
3,272 94 
1.648 01 
4,174 53 
5,160 33 
16,061 76 
1,851 75 


% cts. 














1 -r Q SiTlf* 




■ i \lncrocr ■■ 




■ ■ RaH Fnrn ■ . 




■ ■ rta V VlPW •• 




<■ (.)iilnt't j Kacs T^nnfl rt q t"f i nt»T*\ T 




■ • A F l vu n ) l l n n tf»Vit>T*v 




• • Ssl" .IftnTi R l v*j1* hatpnprv 




!• n rfl «;pr Kivpl 1 ■• 




• i S^plL'ii'Lr 












Oeneral account 








Total 




68,861 40 


SALARIES, ETC. 


Nciccustle Hatchery. 


S cts. 


$ cts. 




650 00 
3,302 55 




Miscellaneous expenditure 








Total 




3,952 55 


Sandwich Hatchery. 




Miscellaneous expenditure 


900 00 
4.721 83 








Total 




5,621 83 


Ottawa Hatchery. 






800 00 






879 03 








Total 




1,679 03 


Tudousmc Hatchery. 




Salaries 


650 
2,756 












Total 




3,406 04 


Gaspe Hatchery. 








5,858 29 


Magog Hatchery. 






420 00 
317 85 












Total 




737 85 


22-H 





MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



FISH-BREEDING— CWinucd. 



Restigouche Hatchery. 



Salaries 

Miscellaneous expenditure . 



Total . 



Bedford Hatchery. 



Salaries 

Miscellaneous expenditure 



Total . 



Bay View Hatchery. 



Salaries 

Miscellaneous expenditure. 

Total . 



Miramichi Hatchery. 



Salaries 

Miscellaneous expenditure. 

Total 



St. John River Hatchery. 



Salaries , 

Miscellaneous expenditure 



Total 



Selkirk Hatchery. 



Miscellaneous expenditure . 



Frascr River Hatchery. 



Salaries 

Miscellaneous expenditure. 



Total . 

Miscellaneous expenditure. 

Miscellaneous expenditure 

Miscellaneous expenditure . 
General account 



Quinte Bass Pond. 



Mar gar ce. 



Granite Creek. 



$ cts. 

800 00 
4,410 4(1 



450 00 
1,521 22 



450 00 
3,613 27 



850 00 
1,853 35 



600 00 
2,672 1)4 



S50 i hi 
798 01 



$ cts. 



5.216 46. 



Total 



68,061 40 



EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

FISHERIES PROTECTION SERVICE-1900-1901. 



Steamer ' Acadia.'' 



Wages of officers and men. 

Provisions 

Fuel. . 

Repairs 

Miscellaneous 



Total 



Steamer 'La Canadienne.' 



Wages of officers and men . 

Provisions 

Fuel 

Repairs 

Miscellaneous expenditure . 



Total 



Steamer ' Curiae.' 



and men. 



Wages of officers 

Provisions 

Fuel. 

Repairs • 

Miscellaneous expenditure. 

Total 



Steamer ' Petrel.' 



Wages of officers and men. 

Provisions 

Fuel 



Repairs 

Miscellaneous expenditure. 

Total . 



Steamer 'Constance. 



Wages of officers and men. 

Provisions 

Fuel 



Repairs 

Miscellaneous expenditure. 

Total 



Schooner ' Osprey.' 



Wages of officers and men . 

Provisions 

Fuel 



Repairs 

Miscellaneous expenditure. . . 

Total 



Schooner ' Kiw/fiisher.' 



Wages of officers and men . 

Provisions 

Fuel 

Repairs 

Miscellaneous expenditure. 



Total. 



$ cts. 

7,931 G7 
2,584 80 
3,280 14 
9,412 75 
4,010 45 



6,959 03 
1,227 26 
2,525 85 
3,346 77 
2,199 53 



6,584 59 
2,326 21 
1,984 56 
3,252 71 
3,036 41 



6,606 
1,698 
1,127 
777 
1,094 



35 
67 
32 
57 
60 



6,490 02 
1,917 94 
2,663 75 
7,421 22 
1,932 53 



3,720 45 
2,248 59 
31 58 
1,236 07 
975 94 



3,205 86 
1,445 24 
88 87 
1,109 77 
711 7 1 



$ cts. 



28,219 81 



16,258 44 



17,184 48 



11,304 51 



20,425 46 



8,212 63 



6,564 48 



6 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

FISHERIES PROTECTION SERVICE-1900-1901— Concluded. 



' Stanley. ' 



$ cts. 



Wages of officers and men. 

Provisions 

Fuel 



Repairs 

Miscellaneous expenditure. 

Total. 



2,142 19 
1,137 75 
1,000 07 
58 66 
118 67 



Wages of officers and men . 

Provisions 

Fuel 



Repairs 

Miscellaneous expenditure . 



Total . . 

Construction of new steamers . 
Fisheries Intelligence Bureau . 
General account 



■Brant: 



185 00 
600 54 
122 10 
286 59 
89 32 



Less amount paid by Customs Department for steamer Constance. 

Net total 



MISCELLANEOUS EXPENDITURE. 



Miscellaneous. 



S cts. 



Building fishways 

Legal and incidental expenses 

Canadian fisheries exhibit 

Expenditure in connection with the distribution of fishing bounties. 

Surveys of oyster beds, 

Issuing licenses to United States fishing vessels ... 

Cold storage 

Balance for counsel fees — Behring Sea Commission 

C. C. Carlton, refund of duties on fish and oil 



479 45 
1,143 90 
1,011 24 
4,821 21 
3,380 87 

423 90 
12,674 72 
3,690 00 

208 50 



Total. 



27,833 79 



EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

Statement of Fisheries Revenue paid to the credit of the Receiver General of Canada,. 

for the Fiscal Year ended June 30, 1901. 



Ontario, rents, license fees, fines, &c. 

Quebec ■■ 

Nova Scotia » 

New Brunswick n 

P. E. Island 

Manitoba ■■ 

N. W. Territories n 

British Columbia ■■ 

Yukon Territory m 

Less— Refunds 



Licenses to U.S. fishing vessels 
Net Total 



S cts- 
717 35 
4,738 92 
6,595 94 
10,150 40 
1,525 30 
1,103 00 
816 55 
52,960 35 
406 00 



79,013 81 
47 20 



78,966 61 
9,178 50 



88,145 11 



8 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Comparative Statement of Expenditure and Revenue of the 



u 

1 



1 Ontario 

2 Quebec 

3 New Brunswick 

4 Nov a Scotia 

5 Prince Edward Island.. 

6 Manitoba &N. W. Territories. 

7 British Columbia 

8 Fish-breeding and tishways. . . 

9 Fisheries Protection Service. 
10 Miscellaneous 



Totals 

Fishing bounties. 



1887-88. 


1888-89. 


1889-90. 


Expendi- 
ture. 


J-%rt> > "11 Lit". 


Expendi- 
ture. 


Xitr * trii Utr. 


Expendi- 
ture. 


T? p VPT1 11 f> 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 


$ cts 


i 19,860 52 
13,463 37 
20,533 20 
18,308 02 
3,402 51 
2,816 64 
3,661 83 
41,082 04 
77,102 98 
13,498 56 


18,251 25 
5,394 99 
7,625 64 
3,905 44 


19,264 98 
12,991 63 
20,298 00 
20,201 09 
3,746 69 
2,848 16 
4,333 63 
41,315 12 
69,693 82 
10,912 18 


24,266 06 
3,380 79 
8,282 88 
2,744 23 
140 00 


14,539 87 
9,070 94 
14,914 95 
17,395 -24 
3,113 21 
3,604 70 
3,634 41 
39,126 91 
64,434 66 
9,313 92 


23,666 96 
5,409 81 
8,834 35 
5,424 95 
302 88 


819 25 
6,934 55 


848 00 
6,416 00 
352 50 


794 00 
11,367 50 




1,176 38 













213,729 67 
163,757 92 


42,931 12 


205,605 30 
149,990 63 


46,440 46 




178,748 81 
149,999 85 


56,976 83 









11 

12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 



General Account Fisheries. . . 

Ontario 

Quebec 

New Brunswick 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Island 

Manitoba 

North-west Territories 

British Columbia 

Fish-breeding. 

Fisheries Protection Service 
Miscellaneous 



Totals 

Fishing bounties. 



1894-95. 



21,938 56 
12,459 34 
21.370 94 

23,555 38 
3,796 58 

6,178 71 

6,218 74 
39,730 93 
100,207 29 
24,619 86 



260,076 33 
160,089 42 



33,211 60 
8,836 18 

11,170 36 
7,075 07 
3,312 30 

2,458 80 

23,517 25 



89,581 56 



1895-96. 



24,917 48 
11,870 43 
20,526 56 

23.049 41 
3,555 87 

6,915 20 

6,226 77 

38.050 41 
102,021 72 

20,203 25 



257,237 10 
163,567 99 



35,681 68 

8.160 98 
10,696 88 

6,180 93 

2.161 85 

2,256 69 
26,410 75 



91,549 76 



1896-97 



2,198 47 
21,592 40 
12,910 80 
21,671 92 
23,682 33 

3,744 

1,908 

2,181 

8,841 
27,330 73 
99,357 01 
62,777 30 



36 
1 1 

58 
64 



32,814 66 
7,876 12 
10,110 77 
5,239 55 
| 2,032 25 
1,719 00 
344 13 
39,888 82 



289,197 01 
154,389 77 



100,025 30 



EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE 9 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

Fisheries Department, from July 1, 1887, to June 30, 1901. 



1800-91. 


1891-92. 


1892-93. 


1893-94. 


1 

2 
3 
4 

K 

6 
7 
8 
9 

10 


Expendi- 
ture. 


Revenue. 


Expendi- 
ture. 


Revenue. 


Expendi- 
ture. 


Revenue. 


Expendi- 
ture. 


Revenue. 


| cts. 

15,540 30 
10,(566 98 
16,082 77 
17,844 19 
3,242 25 
3,609 03 
4,220 53 
39,496 45 
83,050 16 
13,382 28 


$ cts. 

26,517 70 
3,642 14 
7,193 69 
5,582 65 
667 00 
1,234 00 

12,859 02 
1,286 50 
1,934 49 


% cts. 

15,155 83 
10,! 117 36 
15,707 98 
18,755 86 
1,835 65 
3,593 43 
6.15S 17 
43,957 74 
93,3:17 40 
17,449 06 


<$ cts. 

25,368 90 
4,742 76 
6,334 83 
3,357 42 
166 00 
1,079 00 
8,192 48 
178 00 


$> cts. 

20,116 91 
11,761 34 
15,721 05 
19,444 22 
2,847 60 
3,932 96 
5.490 60 
47,322 49 


!5> Cts. 

30,623 09 
7,471 70 
7,831 53 
6,782 02 
304 10 
1,661 68 

40,264 00 


$ cts. 

22,634 37 
11,692 82 
18,522 94- 
20,420 81 
3,078 55 
5,331 29 
5,283 21 
45,024 67 
115,147 59 
34,892 19 


eg CtS. 

28,632 82 
7,211 82 
8,333 24 
5,296 27 
980 15 
926 99 
25,337 90 








100,602 14 










207,234 94 
165,967 22 


60,917 19 


226,928 48 
156,892 25 


49,719 39 


334,044 70 
159,752 15 


94,938 12 


282,028 44 
158,794 54 


76,719 19 










1897-98. 


1898-99. 


1899-00. 

* 


1900-01. 


11 

12 
13 
1 \ 

15 
16 
17 
18 
L9 
20 
21 
22 


2,389 66 
19,239 34 
11,140 16 
17,063 58 
21,683 91 
6,775 78 
1,206 26 
2,324 66 
8,50S 79 
28,002 32 
101,807 96 
59,919 56 




2,632 12 
11,784 22 
11,350 27 
22,922 50 
25,348 11 
6,832 85 
1,883 37 
4,065 68 
8,459 47 
34,522 57 
105,133 27 
23,207 73 




652 41 
3,804 94 
5,452 41 
21,659 94 
27,461 91 
7,364 30 
1,723 59 
3,848 25 
13,662 17 
38,070 12 
97,370 11 
31,125 67 




1,117 49 
3,819 57 
7,934 03 
28,452 51 
35,760 39 
7,934 03 
2,669 74 
6,251 39 
17,886 36 
68,961 40 
124,211 21 
27,833 79 




30,574 57 
7,571 15 
5,317 08 

11,511 85 
2,707 57 
1,515 00 
393 87 

47,864 75 


5,830 85 
6,287 71 

10,430 08 
6,668 22 
2,242 24 
1,537 85 
150 50 

45,801 75 


794 12 
2,543 04 

12,015 27 
5,494 49 
2,207 12 
2,028 00 
1,522 50 

53,195 35 


717 35 
4,738 92 

10,150 40 
6,595 94 
1,525 30 
1,103 00 
1,222 55 

52,960 35 
























2S0,061 98 
157,504 00 


107,455 84 


427,599 16 
159,459 00 


76,949 20 


411,717 35 
160,000 00 


79,799 89 


332,767 07 
158,802 50 


79,013 81 







10 



MARIKE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



APPENDIX No. 2 

FISJHINQ BOUNTIES. 

The payments made for this service are under the authority of Act 54-55 Vic, cap. 
42, intituled : ' An Act to encourage the development of the sea fisheries and the building 
of fishing vessels,' which provides for the payment of the sum of $160,000 annually, 
under regulations to be made from time to time by the Governor General in Council. 

REGULATIONS. 

The regulations governing the payment of fishing bounties are as established by the 
following Order in Council dated December 10, 1897. 

Order in Council. 

At the Government House at Ottawa. 

Friday, the 10th day of December, 1897. 

Present ; 

His Excellency the Governor General in Council. 

His Excellency, in virtue of the provisions of ' The Bounty Act, 1891 ', 54-55 Vic, 
toria, chapter 42, and by and with the advice of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada 
is pleased to order that the regulations governing the payment of fishing bounties 
established by order of the Governor in Council dated August 24, 1894, shall be 
and the same are hereby rescinded, and the following regulations substituted therefor : — - 

1. Resident Canadian fishermen who have been engaged in deep-sea fishing for fish 
other than shell-fish, salmon and shad, or fish taken in rivers, or mouths of rivers, for at 
least three months, and have caught not less than 2,500 pounds of sea-fish, shall be 
entitled to a bounty ; provided always, that no bounty shall be paid to men fishing in 
boats measuring less than 13 feet keel, and not more than 3 men (the owner included), 
will be allowed as claimants in boats under 20 feet. 

2. No bounty shall be paid upon fish caught in trap-nets, pound-nets and weirs, nor 
upon the fish caught in gill-nets fished by persons who are pursuing other occupations 
than fishing, and who devote merely an hour or two daily to fishing these nets but are 
not, as fishermen, steadily engaged in fishing. 

3. Only one claim will be allowed in each season, even though the claimant may 
have fished in two vessels, or in a vessel and a boat, or in two boats. 

4. The owners of boats measuring not less than 13 feet keel which have been 
engaged during a period of not less than three months in deep sea fishing for fish other 
than shell-fish, salmon or shad, or fish taken in rivers or mouths of rivers, shall be 
entitled to a bounty on e^ch such boat. 

5. Canadian registered vessels, owned and fitted out in Canada, of 10 tons and 
upwards (up to 80 tons) which have been exclusively engaged during a period of not less 
than three months in the catch of sea-fish other than shell-fish, salmon or shad, or fish 
taken in rivers, or mouths of rivers, shall be entitled to a bounty to be calculated on the 
registered tonnage which shall be paid to the owner or owners. 

6. The three months during which a vessel must have been engaged in fishing, to 
be entitled to bounty, shall commence on the day the vessel sails from port on her fish- 
ing voyage and end the day she returns to port from said voyage. 



FISHING BOUNTIES 



11 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

7. Owners or masters of vessels intending to fish and claim bounty on their vessels 
must, before proceeding on a fishing voyage, procure a license from the nearest Collector 
of Customs or Fishery Overseer, said license to be attached to the claim when sent in 
for payment. 

8. Dates and localities of fishing must be stated in the claim, as well as the quan- 
tity and kinds of sea-fish caught. 

9. Ages of men must be given. Boys under 14 years of age are not eligible as 
claimants. 

10. Claims must be sworn to as true and correct in all their particulars. 

11. Claims must be filed on or before November 30 in each year. 

12. Officers authorized to receive claims will supply the l'equisite blanks free of 
charge, and after certifying the same will transmit them to the Department of Marine 
and Fisheries. 

13. No claim in which an error has been made by the claimant or claimants shall 
be amended after it has been signed and sworn to as correct. 

14. Any person or persons detected making returns that are false or fraudulent in 
any particular will be debarred from any further participation in the bounty, and be 
prosecuted according to the utmost rigour of the law. 

15. The amount of the bounty to be paid to fishermen and owners of boats and 
vessels will be fixed from time to time by the Governor in Council. 

16. All vessels fishing under bounty license are required to carry a distinguishing 
flag, which must be shown at all times during the fishing voyage at the main-topmast 
head. The flag must be four feet square in equal parts of red and white, joined diagon- 
ally from corner to corner. Any case of neglect to carry out this regulation reported 
to the Department of Marine and Fisheries will entail the loss of the bounty, unless 
satisfactory reasons are given for its non-compliance. 

JOHN J. McGEE, 

Clerk of the Privy Council. 

The bounty for the year 1900 was distributed on the basis authorized by the 
following Order in Council. 

At the Government House at Ottawa, 

Monday the 21st day of January, 1901. 

Present : 
His Excellency in Council. 

His Excellency, in virtue of the provisions of the Act 54-55 Victoria, chapter 42, 
intituled : 'An Act to amend chapter 96 of the Revised Statutes, intituled an Act to 
encourage the development of the Sea Fisheries and the building of fishing vessels,' and 
by and with the advice of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada, is pleased to order 
that the sum of one hundred and sixty thousand dollars payable under the provisions 
of the said Act shall be distributed for the year 1900-1901, upon the following basis, 
and the same is hereby ordered accordingly : 

Vessels : The owners of vessels entitled to receive bounty shall be paid one dollar 
($1) per registered ton, provided, however, that the payment to the owner of any 
one vessel shall not exceed the sum of eighty dollars ($80) and all vessel fishermen 
entitled to received bounty, shall be paid the sum of .$6.50 each. 

Boats : Fishermen engaged in fishing in boats, who shall also have complied with 
the regulations entitling them to receive the bounty, shall be paid the sum of Three 
dollars and fifty cents (.$3.50) each, and the owners of fishing boats shall be paid one 
dollar ($1.00) per boat. 

JOHN J. McGEE, 

Clerk of the Privy Council. 



12 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII.. A. 1902 

There were received for the year 1900, 13,771 claims, a decrease of 122 compared 
with the year 1899- 

The number of claims paid during the year was 13,776, being an increase of 148 as 
compared with the previous year. This includes a number of claims held over from 
1899. 

There were 868,721 in bounties paid to vessels and their crews, and $90,081.50 
to boats and boat fishermen, making the total bounty paid during the year 1900-1901, 

8158,802.50. 

The number of vessels which received bounty during the year was 802, the total 
tonnage being 26,639 tons, showing an increase of 13 vessels and 100 tons, as compared 
with the previous year. 

Bounty was paid on 12,974 boats, and to 22,031 boat fishermen during the year, 
being an increase of 135 boats and 293 fishermen, over 1899. 



Detailed Statement of Fishing Bounty Claims received and paid during the year 1900. 



Province. 



Nova Scotia 



New Brunswick 



Prince Edward Island. 



Quebec. 



County. 



Annapolis 

Antigonish 

Cape Breton 

Cumberland 

Digby 

Guysborough 

Halifax 

Inverness 

King's 

Lunenburg 

Pictou 

Queen's 

Richmond 

Shelburne . 

Victoria 

Yarmouth 

Totals 

Charlotte 

Gloucester 

Kent 

Northumberland 

Kestigouche 

St. John 

Totals 

King's 

Prince 

Queen's 

Totals 

Bona venture 

Gaspe . . 

Rimouski 

Saguenay 

Totals ... 

Grand totals . . . 



Number 


Number 


Number 


of Claims 


of Claims 


of Claims 


received. 


rejected. 


paid. 


131 




131 


122 




*133 


a An 


19 







1 

l 


A 

•x 


-too 


D 




1,082 


4 


*1.075 


1,517 


8 


1,509 


420 


1 


*427 


55 


6 


*50 


1,032 


2 


1,030 




1 Q 


Lt 


170 


2 


168 


819 


3 


*818 


619 


1 


*621 


370 


1 


375 


200 




206 


7,484 


66 


7,452 


428 


1 


*429 


352 




*353 


61 




61 


7 




7 


1 




1 


55 


2 


53 


904 


3 


904 


538 


6 


*555 


456 


17 


*490 


125 


] 


124 


1,119 


24 


1,169 


859 


3 


•864 


2,554 


3 


*2,564 


69 


29 


40 


782 


3 


*783 


4,264 


38 


4,251 


13,771 


131 


*13,776 



*Notf. — The number of claims paid include several applications for previous years, which explains the 
ifference between claims paid and claims received, after deducting those rejected. 



FISHING BOUNTIES 13 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

Detailed Statement of Fishing Bounties paid to Vessels in each County for the Year 

1900. 



Province. 


County. 


Number 

, of 
Vess' Is. 


Tonnage. 


Average 
Tonnage. 


Number 
of 
Men. 


Amount 
paid. 


Prince Edward Island. 


Annapolis 

Antigonish 

Cape Breton 

Cumberland 

Digby 

Guysborough 

King's 


13 
1 

15 
2 
58 
28 
58 
25 
2 
170 


304 
10 

254 
34 
1,734 
685 
1,425 
331 
33 
12,540 


23 38 
10 

16 53 
17 

29 89 

24 46 
24-57 
13 24 
16 50 
73 76 


78 
3 
61 
6 
475 
150 
340 
124 
5 

2,717 


<$ cts. 

811 00 
29 50 
650 50 
73 00 
4,821 50 
1,660 00 
3,635 00 
1,137 00 
67 00 
30,200 50 


Shelburne 

Victoria 

Yarmouth 

Totals 

* 

Charlotte 

Gloucester 

Kent 


9 
48 
57 

2 
37 


136 
1,370 
1,902 
22 
1,694 


15 11 

28-54 
33 36 
11 

4578 


38 
337 
541 
7 

470 


383 00 
3,560 50 
5,418 50 
67 50 
4,749 00 


525 


22,474 


42 61 


5,352 


57,263 50 


40 
184 


651 
2,162 


16-27 
1175 


146 
707 


1,600 00 
6,759 00 


Northumberland 

St. John 

Totals 

Prince 

TVitnlu 


4 
1 

5 


49 
26 
81 


12 25 
26 

16 20 


14 
4 
19 


133 00 
52 00 
204 50 


234 


2,969 


12 68 


890 


8,748 50 


21 
7 
1 


559 
161 
17 


26 62 

23 

17 


122 
25 
6 




1,376 50 
323 50 
56 00 




I Ol 


w50 41 


loo 


1, ( OO 00 
















4 


109 


27 25 


20 


239 00' 


Saguenay ... 

Totals 

Grand totals 


10 


350 


35 


56 


714 00 


14 


459 


32 78 


76 


953 00 


802 


26,639 


33 21 


6,471 


68,721 00 



14 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Detailed Statement of Fishing Bounties paid to Boats in each County for the Year 
1900, showing also total amount paid to Vessels and Boats for the Year. 













Total 




County. 


Number 


Number 


A mount 


Bounty paid 


Province. 


of 


of 


. V 1 11 V_l 1 t lib 


to Vessels 




Boats. 


Men. 


J >aid. 


and Boats in 













1900. 











$ cts. 






Annapolis 


118 


188 
193 


776 00 


1,587 00 




Antigonish 


132 


807 50 


837 00 




Cape Breton 


423 


743 


3,023 50 


3,674 00 




Cumberland 


2 


5 


19 50 


92 50 




Disrbv 


392 


717 


2,901 50 


7,723 00 




Guysborough 


1,047 


1,652 


6,829 00 


8,489 00 




Halifax 


1,451 


1,932 


8,213 00 


11,848 00 




Inverness 


402 


842 


3,349 00 


4,486 00 






48 


71 


296 50 


363 50 




Lunenburg 


800 


1,004 


4,374 00 


34,574 50 




Pictou 


17 


30 


122 00 


122 or 




Queen's 


159 


281 


1,142 cO 


1,525 5( 




Richmond , .... 


770 


1,169 


4,861 50 


8,422 00 






564 


£64 


3,938 00 


9,356 50 




Victoria. . . 


373 


591 


2,441 50 


2,509 00 






169 


2(53 


1,089 50 

• 


5,838 50 




Totals 


6,927 


10,645 


44,184 50 


101,448 00 


New Brunswick 


Charlotte 


389 


609 


2,520 50 


4,120* 50 




Gloucester 


169 


387 


1,523 50 


8,282 50 




61 


99 


407 50 


407 50 




Northumberland 


3 


8 


31 00 


164 00 




Restigouche 








52 00 




St. John 


48 


81 


33i 50 


536 00 




Totals 




670 


1,184 




4,814 00 


13,562 50 


Prince Edward Island. .. 




534 


790 


3,299 00 


4,675 50 






483 


1,127 


4,427 50 


4,751 00 






123 


281 


1,106 50 


1,162 50 




• Totals 


1,140 


2,19b 


0,000 00 


i n son aa 
10,589 00 


Quebec . . 


Bona venture 


864 


1,533 


6,229 50 


6,229 50 




2,560 


5,091 


20,377 50 


20,616 50 






40 


54 


229 00 


229 00 




Saguenay 


773 


1,326 


5,414 00 


6,128 00 




Totals 


4,237 


8,004 


32,250 00 


33,203 00 




Grand totals 


12,974 


22,031 


90,081 50 


158,802 50 



FISHING BOUNTIES 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



15 



GENERAL STATISTICS. 

The fishing bounty was first paid in 1882. 

The payments were made each year on the following basis : — 

1882, vessels $2 per ton, one half to the owner and the other half to the crew. 
Boats at the rate of $5 per man, one-fifth to the owner and four-fifths to the men. 

1883, vessels $2 per ton, and boats $2.50 per man, distributed as in 1882. 

1884, vessels $2 per ton, as in 1882 and 1883. 

Boats from 14 to 18 feet keel .$1 00 

do 18 to 25 do 1 50 

do 25 feet keel upwards 2 00 

And boat fishermen $3 each. 

1885, 1886 and 1887, vessels $2 per ton as in previous years. Boats measuring 13 
feet keel having been admitted in 1885, the rates were: — Boats from 13 to 18 feet keel, 
$1 ; from 18 to 25 feet keel, 81.50; from 25 feet keel upwards, $2, and fishermen $3 
each. 

1888, vessels $1.50 per ton, one half each to owner and crew. Boats, the same as 
in 1885, 1886 and 1887. 

1889, 1890 and 1891, vessels $1.50 per ton as in 1888. Boats $1 each. Boat 
fishermen $3. 

1892, vessels $3 per ton, one half each to owner and crew. Boats $1 each. Boat 
fishermen $3. 

1893, vessels $2.90 per ton, paid as formerly. Boats $1 each. Boat fishermen $3. 

1894, vessels $2.70 per ton, distributed as in previous years. Boats $1 each. Boat 
fishermen $3. 

1895, vessels $2.60 per ton, half each to owner and crew. Boats $1 each. Boat 
fishermen $3. 

1896, vessels $1 per ton, which was paid to the owners, and vessel fishermen $5 
each, clause 5 of the regulations having been amended accordingly. Boats $1 each, and 
boat fishermen $3.50 per man. 

1897, vessels $1 per ton, and vessel fishermen $6 each. Boats $1 each, and boat 
fishermen $3.50 per man. 

1898, vessels $1 per ton, and vessel fisherman $6.50 each. Boats $1 each, and 
boat fishermen $3.50 per man. 

1899, vessels $1 per ton and vessel fishermen $7 each. Boats $1 each, and boat 
fishermen $3.50 per man. 

1900, vessels $1 per ton, and vessel fishermen $6.50 each. Boats $1 each, and 
boat fishermen $3.50 per man. 

Since 1882, 15,445 \essels, totalling a tonnage of 556,027 tons, have received the 
bounty. The total number of vessel fishermen which received bounty is 118,336, being 
an average of nearly 8 men per vessel. 

The total number of boats to which bounty was paid since 1882 is 264,377, and the 
number of fishermen 490,984. Average number of men per boat, 2. 

The highest bounty paid per head to vessel fishermen was $21.75 in 1893 ; the 
lowest 83 cents, while the highest to boat fishermen was $4, the lowest $2. 

The general average paid per head is $4.92. 



16 



MAUIXE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



Comparative Statement by Provinces for the Years 1882 to 1900, inclusive, showing : — 
(1) Total number of Fishing Bounty Claims received and paid by the Department 
of Marine and Fisheries. 



Vkak. 



1882. 

1883. 

1884. 

1885. 

1880 . 

1887. 

1888. 

1889. 

1890. 

1891. 

1892 

1893. 

1894. 

1895. 

189(5. 

1897 . 

1898. 

1899. 

1900. 



Totals 155,875 154,579 



Nova Scotia. 



— 

CD 
> 

CD 
CJ 

CD 

- 



(5,730 
7,171 
7,007 
7,64(5 
7,639 
8,262: 
8, 481 1 
8,816 
9,337 
10,242 
8,272 
7,926. 
8,(540 
8,835 
8,597 
8,450 
8,446 
7,894 
7,484 



* — ' 



6,613 
7,076 
(5,930 
7,599 
7,702 
8,227' 
8, 429 1 
8,523 
9,429 
10,063 
8,186 
7,*44 
8,600 
8,825 
8,562 
8,418 
8,347 
7,754 
7,452 



New 
Bednswick. 



P.E. Islam.. 



CP 

> 

CO 
CJ 

- 



1.257 
1,693 
1.252 
1.609 
1,767 
1,975 
2,065 
2.428! 
2,522 
2,831 
1,067 
967 
925 
979 
1,137 
1,042 
934 
849: 
904 



"2 
'3 
- 



1,142 
1,579 
1,224 
1,588 
1,763 
1,958 
2.026 
2,392 
2,469j 
2,084 
1,001 
881 
911 
975| 
1.064 
991 
917 
825' 
904 



> 

'I 
o 

CD 



1,169 
1,138 

923 
1,117 
1,131 
1,201 
1,153 
1,211 
1,352 
1,482 
1,065 
1.027 

983 
1,009 
1,111 
1,175 
1,143 
1,016 
1,119 



28,203 26,694 21,525 



'5 



1,100 
1,1^6 

885 
1,025 
1.080 
1,126 

834 
1.511 
1,257; 
1,446 
1.051 
1,012 

963' 
1,0251 
1,120 
1.171 
1,145 

947 
1.169 



Quebec. 



— 

CO 

> 
'Z 

CJ 

CD 

- 



3,162 
3,602 
3.470 
3,943 
4,275 
4,138 
4,328 
4,664 
4,,s60 
5,108 
4,425 
4,059 
3,948 
3,904 
4,366 
4,180 
4.171 
4,134 
1.264 



20,973 78,986 



- 



3,117 
3.325 
3,429 
3,912 
4,355 
4.105 
4,310 
4,652 
4,804 
4,913 
4,204 
3,898 
3.S76 
3,955 
4,229 
4,149 
4.0! 12 
4,102 
4,251 



Total. 



— 

> 

CJ 

cd 
03 



12.318 
13,604 
12,652 
14,315 
14,812 
15,576 
16,027 
17,119 
18 071 
19,663 
14,829 
13,979 
14.496 
14.727 
15,211 
14.^47 
14,(579 
13,893 
13,771 



77,678 284,5^9 



'3 



11,972 
13,086 
12,468 
14,124 
14,900 
15,416 
15,599 
17,078 
17,959 
18,506 
14,442 
13,635 
14,350 
14,780 
14,975 
14.729 
14,501 
13,628 
13,776 



279,924 



(2) Number of vessels, tonnage and number of men which received Bounty in each year. 



Nova Scotia. 



New Brunswick. P. E. Island. 



Quebec. 



Total. 



Year. 


No. of 
Vessels. 


CD 
bD 
cS 

q 
a 
o 


No. of 

Men. 


No. of 
Vessels. 


Tonnage. 


No. of 

Men. 


No. of 
Vessels. 


CD 

be 

S3 

= 
O 
EH 


No. of 

Men. 


No. of 
Vessel.-,. 


CD 

to 

03 

a 
a 
o 


No. of 

Men. 


m 
'ai 

CD 
DO 

O oi 

6> 


CD 
bo 
c3 

5 
= 
o 
- 


No. of 

Men. 


1882.... 


588 


22,841 


5,343 


120 


2,171 


531 


15 


389 


74 


63 


2,210 


538 


786 


27,611 


6,486 


1883.... 


700 


29,788 


6,238 


126 


2,102 


496 


16 


450 


66 


62 


2,236 


443 


904 


34,576 


7,243 


1884.... 


700 


29,828 


6,327 


139 


2,289 


560 


16 


582 


92 


56 


1.965 


382 


911 


34.664 


7.361 


1885 ... 


629 


27,709 


5,897 


128 


2,120 


496 


19 


597 


113 


55 


1.791 


317 


831 


32,217 


6,823 


1886.... 


562 


25.375 


5,022 


145 


2,628 


520 


32 


1,071 


215 


52 


1,730 


320 


791 


30,804 


6.H77 


1887.... 


566 


24,520 


4,900 


154 


2.SS9 


563 


38 


1,677 


338 


54 


1,883 


334 


812 


30,969 


6,135 


1888.... 


589 


26,008 


5,450 


150 


2,545 


544 


37 


1.245 


246 


51 


1,842 


388 


827 


31,640 


6,631 


1889 


597 


27,123 


5,684 


153 


2..V90 


565 


35 


1,274 


239 


48 


1.729 


330 


833 


32,716 


6,818 


1890.... 


540 


23,955 


4,935 


133 


2,129 


447 


32 


1,002 


203 


34 


1,182 


220 


739 


28,268 


5,805 


1891.... 


527 


22,780 


4,618 


124 


2,051 


411 


27 


778 


155 


27 


924 


168 


705 


26,533 


5,352 


1892.... 


507 


22,279 


4,611 


108 


1,683 


343 


30 


983 


139 


23 


803 


159 


668 


25,748 


5,252 


1893.... 


536 


23,195 


4,780 


210 


2,922 


634 


27 


910 


151 


32 


952 


179 


805 


27,979 


5.744 


1894.... 


602 


24,735 


5,077 


238 


3,189 


7i'l 


21 


594 


114 


38 


1,066 


178 


899 


29,584 


6,090 


1895.... 


603 


25,018 


5,184 


238 


3,107 


764 


27 


769 


129 


39 


1,262 


173 


907 


30,156 


6,250 


1896.... 


553 


23,415 


4,607 


250 


3,337 


800 


23 


656 


114 


36 


1,143 


144 


862 


28,551 


5,665 


1897.... 


507 


21,323 


4,829 


239 


3,079 


816 


20 


490 


109 


24 


833 


116 


790 


25,725 


5,870 


1898.... 


508 


20.S68 


4,840 


239 


3,155 


859 


24 


561 


125 


16 


524 


77 


784 


25,108 


5,901 


1899... 


519 


22,538 


5,323 


238 


3,131 


885 


15 


373 


76 


17 


497 


78 


789 


26,539 


6,362 


1900... 


525 


22,474 


5,352 


234 


2,969 


890 


29 


737 


153 


14 


459 


76 


802 


26,639 


6,471 


Totals . 


10,858 


465,772 


99,017 


3,366 


50,086 


11,845 


483 


15,138 


2,854 


741 


25,031 


4,624 


15.445 


556,027 


118,336 



FISHING BOUNTIES 



17 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

(3) Number of Boats and boat fishermen which received Bounty in each year. 



Year. 



1 SSL' 

1883. 

1884. 

1885. 

1886. 

1 ss7 . 

1888. 

1889. 

1890. 

1891 

1892 

1893. 

1894. 

1895. 

1896. 

1897. 

1898. 

1899. 

1900. 



Nova Scotia. 



No. of 
Boats. 



Totals 143,825 



6,043 
6,458 
6,257 
6,970 
7,140 
7,662 
7,840 
7,926 
8,886 
9,525 
7,679 
7,308 
7,956 
8,222 
8,008 
7,911 
7,872 
7,235 
6,927 



No. of 
Men. 



12,130 
13,553 
12,669 
13,396 
13,351 
13,997 
14,115 
14,118 
15,738 
16,552 
12,307 
11,748 
12,899 
13,106 
12,454 
12,542 
12,438 
11,305 
10,645 

249,063 



New Brunswick, 



No. of 
Boats. 



1,024 
1,453 
1,086 
1,460 
1,618 
1,804 
1,876 
2,237 
2,324 
1,928 
893 
671 
661 
737 
814 
752 
678 
587 
670 



23,273 



No. of 
Men. 



2,530 
3. 3i I! I 
2,505 
3,254 
3,567 
3,994 
4,148 
5,032 
5,242 
4,126 
1,765 
1,314 
1,281 
1,434 
1,553 
1,351 
1,237 
1,027 
1,184 



49,853 



P. E. Island. 



No. of 
Boats. 



1,087 
1,098 
869 
1,006 
1,048 
1,088 
797 
1,475 
1,192 
1,383 
1,021 
985 
913 
998 
1,095 
1,151 
1,121 
932 
1,140 



20,399 



No. of 
Men 



3,070 
3,106 
2,346 
2,606 
2,547 
2,711 
2,141 
3,568 
3,024 
3,427 
2,047 
1,962 
1,813 
2.141 
2,126 
2,147 
2,199 
1,710 

2, ins 



Quebec. 



No. of 
Boats. 



3,071 
3,226 
3,344 
3,857 
4,303 
4,051 
4,259 

u;<)2 

4,766 
4,865 
4,181 
3,866 
3,821 
3,916 
4,189 
4,125 
4,076 
4,0X5 
4,237 



No. of 
Men. 



5,716 
6,1 xx 
6,416 
7,485 
7,981 
7,550 
7,852 
8,807 
9,241 
9,402 
7,693 
7,245 
7,139 
7,877 
7,68S 
7,572 
7,627 
7,696 
8.004 



Total. 



No. of 
Boats. 



11,225 
12,275 
11,556 
13,293 
14,109 
14,605 
14,772 
16,240 
17,168 
17,701 
13,774 
12,830 
13,351 
13,873 
14,106 
13,939 
13,747 
12,839 
12,974 



No. of 
Men. 



23,446 
26,156 
23,936 
26,741 
27,446 
28,252 
28,256 
31,525 
33,245 
33,507 
23,812 
22,269 
23,132 
24,558 
23,821 
23,612 
23,501 
21,738 
22,031 



46,889 76,880 145,179 264,377 1490,984 



(4) Total Number of men receiving Bounty in each year. 



Year. 



1XX2, 

1883. 

1884 

1885. 

1886 

1887. 

1888 

lxx9 

1890 

1891 

1892. 

1893. 

1894 

1895 

1896. 

1897. 

1898 

1X119 

1900 



Totals . 



Nova Scotia. 



New 
Brunswick. 



No. of Men. No. of Men. 



17,473 
19,791 
18,996 
19,293 
18,373 
18,897 
19,565 
19,802 
20,673 
21,170 
16,918 
16,528 
17,976 
18,290 
17,061 
17,371 
17,278 
16,628 
15,997 



348,080 



3,061 
3,805 
3,065 
3,750 
4,087 
4,557 
4,692 
5,597 
5,689 
4,537 
2,108 
1,948 
2,002 
2,198 
2,353 
2.167 
2,096 
1,912 
2,074 



61,698 



P. E Island. 



No. of Men. 



3,144 
3,172 
2,438 
2,719 
2,762 
3,049 
2, 3! Ml 
3,807 
::.U27 
3,582 
2,186 
2,113 
1,927 
2,270 
2,240 
2,256 
2,324 
1,786 
2,351 



49,743 



Quebec. 



No. of Men. 



6,254 
6,631 
6,798 
7,802 
8,301 
7.XS4 
8,240 
9,137 
9,461 
9,570 
7,852 
7,424 
7,317 

S.050 

7,832 
7,688 
7,704 
7,774 
8,080 



149,799 



MA KIKE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

(5) Total annual payments of Fishing Bounty. 



Year. 


Nova Scotia. 


New Brunswick. 


P. E. Island. 


Quebec. 


Total. 




S cts. 


$ cts. 


S cts. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 


1S8° 


106,098 72 


16,997 00 


16,137 00 


33,052 75 


172,285 47 


1883 


89,432 50 


12,395 20 


8,577 14 


19,940 01 


130,344 85 


1884 


104,934 09 


13,576 00 


9,203 96 


28,004 93 


155.718 98 


1885 


103,999 73 


15,908 25 


10,166 65 


31,464 76 


161,539 39 


1886 


98,789 54 


17,894 57 


10,935 87 


33,283 61 


160,903 59 


1887 


99,622 03 

* 


19,699 65 


12,528 51 


31,907 73 


163,757 92 


1888 


89,778 90 


18,454 92 


9,092 96 


32,858 75 


150,185 53 


1889 


90,142 51 


21,026 79 


13,994 53 


33,362 71 


158,526 54 


1890 


91,235 64 


21,108 33 


11.686 32 


34,210 72 


158,241 01 


1891 


92,377 42 


17,235 96 


12,771 30 


34,507 17 


156,891 85 


1892 


109,410 39 


10,864 61 


9,782 79 


29,694 35 


159,752 14 


1893 


108,060 67 


12,524 09 


9,328 62 


28,320 72 


158,234 10 


1894 


111,460 03 


12,690 80 


7,875 79 


28,040 18 


160,066 80 


1895 


110,765 27 


12,919 32 


9,285 13 


30,598 27 


163,567 99 


1896 


98,048 95 


13.. 602 88 


9,745 50 


32,992 44 


154,389 77 


1897 


102,083 50 


13,454 50 


9,809 00 


32,157 00 


157,504 00 


1898 


103,730 00 


13,746 00 


10,188 00 


31,795 00 


159,459 00 


1899 


106,598 50 


13,514 50 


7,822 00 


32,065 00 


160,000 00 


1900 


101,448 00 


13,562 50 


10,589 00 


33,203 00 


158,802 50 


Totals 


1,918,016 39 


291,175 87 


199,520 07 


591,459 10 


3,000,171 43 



FISHING BOUNTIES 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

List of Vessels which received Fishing Bounty for the Year 1900. 



19 



PROVINCE OF NOVA SCOTIA. 
ANNAPOLIS COUNTY. 



C 



Name of Vessel. 



80093 
111526 
88396 
107291 
36569 
107478 
83461 
42089 
85682 
83253 
100314 
107293 
90658 



Anna K 

Annie May 

Brant 

Elva J . Hayden 

Hope 

Jessie C 

Josie L. Day 

Lily 

Malapert 

Rescue 

Sea Fox 

S. V. H 

Whistler 



Port of 
Registry. 



St. John, N.B .. 

Digby 

Windsor 

Annapolis .... 

Halifax 

Digby 

ii 

St. Andrews 

Digby 

Annapolis 

Yarmouth 

Annapolis 

St. John, N.B .. 



be 

£ 
o 
H 



14 
11 
12 
65 
34 
10 
16 
10 
23 
17 
19 
49 
24 



Name of Owner 
or 

Managing Owner. 



Edward Fales. . . 
David Sabeau . . 
Amos B. Lewis.. 
David Hayden.. 
Elias Hudson. . . 
Lewis Sabeau . . . 
Albert Coates . . 
James Aldred . . . 

Wm. Ellis 

Josiah Burrell . . 
Israel W. Banks 
J ohn S. Hayden 
Lewis R. Morris 



ANTIGONISH COUNTY. 



90642 



Komaroff . 



Yarmouth . 



10 



John Brow. 







<d 
'i 

(4-1 ^ 


Residence. 


6 






. ^ 


5 3 

O 






c a 










< 








$ cts. 


Margaretsville . . 


4 


40 


00 


Port Lome 


4 


37 


00 




4 


38 


00 


Lower Granville. 


15 


162 


60 


Parker's Cove. . . 


6 


73 


00 


Port Lome 


2 


23 


(Ml 




6 


55 


00 


Margaretsville . . 


2 


23 


00 


Victoria Beach. . 


8 


75 


(10 


Clementsport 


5 


49 


50 


Port Lome 


4 


45 


00 


Victoria Beach. . 


15 


146 




Clementsport. . . . 


3 


43 


50 



Harb'r auBouche 



29 50 



CAPE BRETON COUNTY. 



100389 
100221 
100372 
85381 
107372 
75571 
100383 
85382 
83306 
88463 
92600 
107358 
107360 
100566 
107358 



Annie F 

Baleka 

Betsy Jane 

Champion 

Emerald 

Fanny 

Florence L 

G. H. Marryatt 

L O. N. A 

Maria 

Merit 

Olive A 

Ovands 

Rob S. 

Victoria 



Sydney 


13 


Halifax 


31 


Sydney 


11 




19 




15 




16 


Sydney 


10 




24 




26 




14 


Sydney 


13 




19 




11 




21 


Sydney 


11 



John Farrell 

Philip Berge 

Samuel Moore. . . 
John Williams. . . 
Ephraim Burke. . 
W. J. Christie.... 



Chas. Pike 

Harry McDonald . 

Alex. LeBlanc 

Robert B. Spencer . 
Patrick Campbell.. 
Ambrose Forward. . 



Main-a-Dieu 


5 


45 


50 


North Sydney . . 


8 


83 


00 


Little Bras d'Or. 


4 


37 


00 


Louisburg .... 


4 


45 


00 




6 


54 


00 


North Sydney . . 


5 


48 


50 


Little Bras d'Or. 


5 


42 


50 


North Sydney . . 


* 


24 


00 




2 


39 


00 


Little Glace Bay 


3 


33 


50 


Little Bras d'Or. 


4 


39 


00 


Port Morien 


3 


38 


50 


Main-a-Dieu 


3 


30 


50 


Lingan 


6 


60 


00 


Little Glace Bay 


3 


30 


50 



CUMBERLAND COUNTY. 



59375 
100746 




St. Andrews .... 
Windsor 


19 
15 


Abner Neves 


W. Apple River. 
Parrsboro' 


2 
4 


32 00 
41 00 












DIGBY COUNTY. 


1 


1 











90660 
88598 
94696 



Alice May * Yarmouth . 

St. John . . 



Alph B. Parker 
Annie M. Sproul. . . Digby. 

Crew not entitled to bounty. 

22-2£ 



18 
47 
70 



Chas. H. Bailey IWestport. 

Charles Teed Freeport. . 

Holland Outhouse Tiverton.. 

Orbin Sproul Digby... 



4 


39 00 


9 


76 50 


12 


125 00 


16 


174 00 



20 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

List of Vessels which received Fishing Bounty, &c. — Nova Scotia — Con. 

DIGBY COUNTY— Concluded. 



— 

5 



1D0547 
94698 
!)4704 
74331 
103181 
107474 
103749 
77740 
L(i7(i04 
94707 
107475 
75757 
74329 
100891 
100315 
80798 
77963 
90436 
94835 
1074S0 
100544 
77786 
11 km nil 
111525 
88587 
77957 
59388 
85690 
100487 
107605 
107479 
88583 
103184 
107477 
100574 
92640 
80794 
85533 
100895 
94825 
,s3132 
100319 
100539 
85558 
100609 
94694 
103711 
94832 
100811 
100548 
88264 
75595 
103704 
100543 



Name of Vessel. 



Port of 
Registry. 



B and C 

Carrie H 

Charles Haskell .... 

Condor 

Curlew 

Dorothy 

Emerald 

Elmer . 

Emma D 

Ernest F. Norwood 

Ethel May 

Etta. , 

Fairy Queen 

Fleur de Lis 

Freddie A 

Freddie G 

Freeman Colgate. . . 

Genesta 

Georgie Lin wood . . 
Uattie & Eva. . 

Helen Maud 

Hesperus 

Isma 

James W. Cousins. . 

Jessie May 

Kedron 

Letitia 

Lora T 

Mabel B 

Mabel M 

Marguerite 

Mary Odell 

Mayflower 

Maiidie Ellen . . . 
Melrose ... ...... 

Minerva 

Minnie C 

Minnie C 

New Home 

On Time 

Restless 

Rob Roy 

Rowena 

S. A. Crowell 

Swan 

Utah and Eunice. . . 

Venite 

Venus 

Vesta Pearl 

Violetta 

Walter J. Clarke. . . 

West Wind 

Whisper 

W. Parnell O'Hara 



Digby 



Weymouth . 
Digby.... 



ho 
£ 
5 

H 



Weymouth . . 
Yarmouth .. 

Digby 

St. Andrews . 
Barrington . . 
Digby 



Halifax. 
Digby . . 



Yarmouth .... 

Digby 

St. Andrews . . 
Digby 



Weymouth 

Digby 

Yarmouth . 
Shelburne . 

Digby 

Lunenburg 

Digby. . . . 
Yarmouth . 
Weymouth 
Digby 



Yarmouth . . . 
Digby .... 
Yarmoiith . . . 
Shelburne . . . 

Digby 

Yarmouth . . 
St. Andrews. 
Digby 



Yarmouth 
Digby 



14 

20 

67 

11 

63 

59 

29 

15 

20 

79 

16 

17 

13 

17 

10 

18 

26 

32 

25 

11 

26 

17 

31 

80 

14 

22 

10 

15 

57 

20 

24 

14 

26 

14 

71 

80 

18 

12 

31 

19 

25 

11' 

10 

23 

56 

33 

16 

42 

40 

11 

20 

25 

31 

79 



Name of Owner 
or 

Managing Owner. 



Loran Perry 

Elmer Gower 

Howard Anderson . . . 

Howard Titus 

Joseph F. Milberry.. . 

M. G. Crocker 

John H. Syda 

Norman Apt 

Frank S. Doucett. . . . 

Joseph E. Snow 

Reuben E. Hudson . . . 

Clarence Webber 

Wallace Coggins 

Chas. W. Pyne 

Norman Gregory . . 

George Gower 

Stewart Hicks 

George Denton 

Herbtrt Johnstone. . . 

Edwin Haines 

Chas. McDormand . . . 

John A. Powell 

Stewart Hicks 

Joseph F. Milberry.. . 
Larion P. Robicheau. 

Isaiah Kinghorn 

Peter H. Belli veau . . 
Judson D. Thurber. . . 

M. G. Crocker 

Leazine Boudreau. . . . 

Orbin Snroul 

John T.'Therrio. . . 

G. C. Stevens 

Leander Hudson 

Augustus Haycock. . . 

E. C. Bowers 

L. H. Outhouse 

Edwin Haines 

Moses Thibaudeau . . . 

Henry Glavin 

Charles Shaw 

Moses T. Theriault. . . 

Warren Snow 

Wallace Gower 

Milton Haines 

Edwin Haines 

Stephen A. Doucette. 

Edwin Haines 

Churchill Sollows 

Bernard Longmire ' 

John W. Ellis 

George Post 

Wm. McGrath 

Wm. Snow 



Residence. 



Freeport . 
Westport . 
Digby 
Westport 
Digby 
Freeport . 
Digby 



Salmon River, 
Digby... 



Westport .. 
Westport . . . 
Little River 

Digby 

Westport . . 



Digby. . . . 
Freeport . . 
Westport . 



Cape Cove . 

Digby 

Meteghan . 
Freeport . . . 

Digby 

Westport. . 



Tiverton.. 

Freeport 

Church Point. 

Westport 

Centreville . . . 
Meteghan 
Smith's Cove. , 

Westport 

Freeport 



Cape Cove. 
Freeport . . . 
Tiverton .. . 
Digby 



CD 
U 

o 

.8 
o a 

ft 



Digby 

Meteghan . ... 

Digby 

Belliveau's Cove. 
Freeport 



o 
8 

15 
5 

14 

16 
6 
8 
6 

14 
5 
6 
5 
3 
4 
7 

10 

13 
7 
4 
7 
2 

11 
7 
5 
4 
4 
7 

12 
4 
9 
6 
8 
4 

16 

16 
5 
6 

10 

5 
7 
7 
3 
!l 

12 
9 
8 

14 
7 
7 
6 
9 
9 

18 



"5 

'5 



o o 



S cts. 

46 50 
72 00 
164 50 
43 50 
154 00 
163 00 
68 00 
67 00 

59 00 
170 00 

48 50 

56 00 

45 50 
36 50 

36 00 
63 50 
91 00 

116 50 

70 50 

37 00 

71 50 
30 00 

102 50 
125 50 

46 50 
48 00 
36 00 

60 50 
135 00 

46 00 

82 50 
53 00 
78 00 
40 00 

175 00 
184 00 

50 50 

51 00 
96 00 
51 50 
70 50 

57 50 
29 50 
81 50 

134 00 
91 50 

US DO 

133 00 
85 50 
56 50 
59 00 

83 50 
89 50 

196 00 



GUYSBORO COUNTY. 



90866 
107992 
90426 



Alice 

Alice J. Davis 
Amanda .... 



Lunenburg 

Canso.. 

Barrington 



12 

20 
38 



Herbert O. Rudolph. 

Edward Hearn 

F. H. Hawes 



Beckerton 
Canso 



3S 00 
65 50 
90 00 



FISHING BOUNTIES 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

List of Vessels which received Fishing Bounty, &c. — Nova Scotia — Con. 

GUYSBORO COUNTY— Concluded. 



21 



a. 



41771 
103321 
107993 

83180 

94963 
107996 
100815 

85569 

57715 
100835 
107995 

75577 
103859 
100446 
100450 
103323 
100241 
100231 

75892 
111471 

74139 
100444 
100448 
107994 
107991 



Name of Vessel. 



Atalia. . . ... 

Christie Campbell. 

Florence May 

Friend 

Golden Seal 

Green Linnet 

Happy Home . 

Jessie B 

John Lawrence . . . 

Lottie B. 

Maggie M. F 

Mary Ann Bell . . . 

Mary May 

Minnie May 

Minto 

Nita 

Pansy 

Peari 

Peter Mitchell 

Quickstep 

Sadie 

Stella May 

Surprise 

True Love 

Two Brothers 



Port of 
Registry. 



Guysboro 

Port Hawkesb'ry 

Canso 

Halifax 

t» 

Canso 

Barrington 

ii 

Halifax 

Lunenburg . . 

Canso 

Lunenburg 

Halifax 

Canso ......... 

It : . 

Pt. Hawkesbury. 

Halifax 

n 

Pt. Hawkesbury. 

Arichat 

Halifax 

Canso 



eg 
= 



34 
55 
11 
17 
32 
12 
10 
36 
23 
12 
15 
33 
23 
12 
18 
22 
32 
17 
26 
80 
44 
12 
15 
10 
14 



Name of Owner 
or 

Managing Owner. 



Jesse M. Hunson 

Thomas H. Peeples 

WentworthG. Mathews 
Thurlo Munroe . ... 
Edward B. Pelrine. . . . 

John D. Ryan 

Samuel Snow 

Hubert Richard 

Henry A Richard 

Robert Mathews 

James Fitzgerald 

Joseph O'Neill . 

Benjamin David 

Wra. L. Dort 

Wm. O'Hara 

Lewis Maguire 

George Pace 

Martin Meagher 

Michael Power 

J. W. Sproul i 

Joseph Fougere 

James Meagher 

John J. Meagher.. . . 

David Walsh 

Frederick Jello 



Residence. 



o 

"3. I 

6 a 



Mulgrave . . . 
H . . . 

Canso 

White Head . 
Larry's River 

Canso 

White Head . . 
Charlo's Cove. 

Queensport.. . . 

ii . . . 
Auld's Cove . . 
Port Felix 
Sandy Cove. . . 

Canso 

Mulgrave 

Marie Joseph . 

Canso 

Mulgrave 

Canso 

Larry's River. 
Canso 

ti 

ii 

Port Felix 



4 
1 

5 
6 
6 
5 
5 
5 
8 
6 
5 
5 
8 
5 
6 
1 
8 
3 
2 

13 
7 
4 
4 
2 

■ 7 



■ 3 



$ cts. 

60 00 

61 50 

43 50 

56 00 
71 00 

44 50 
42 50 
68 50 
75 00 
51 00 
47 50 
65 50 
75 00 
44 50 

57 00 
28 50 
84 00 
36 50 
39 00 

164 50 
89 50 
38 00 
41 00 
23 00 
59 50 



HALIFAX COUNTY. 



100846 
107313 
103507 
90495 
103858 
94662 
90493 
103537 
1IH7-21 
94643 
100819 
103852 
59484 
90481 
85738 
107320 

967*5 
92564 

100247 
100259 
80996 
97088 
107319 
100228 
103544 
88220 
90489 
107983 
100216 
107654 
04665 
1005X0 



Albatross 

Alice A 

Annie . .*. 

Annie S 

B. & B. Holland. 
Bessie Florence . 

Black Prince 

Bonacord 

Brilliant Star . . , 
Carrie M. C . 
David James. . . 

Dawn 

Day Spring 

Ella D 

Emma F 

Eva Gertrude. . . 

Eva M. B 

Evangeline 

Fairy Queen . . . 

j Florence G 

Gertie Belle 

< Jlendale 

: Globe 

I Golden Dawn 

, Grace D 

Grandee 

|Greenleaf 

John J. Hayes. . 

Katie M 

Lottie May 

Louis Luby 

Maggie E. C 



Lunenburg 
Halifax. . , 

M . . . . 

It . . . . 

II . . . . 

It . . . . 

II . - . . 

II . . . . 

II . . . . 

Lunenburg 
Halifax... 

it . . . . 

ii . . . . 

ii . . . . 
Lunenburg 
Halifax. . . 

ti . . . . 

it . . . . 

it . . . . 

Guysboro.. 
Lunenburg 
Halifax. . . , 

ti . . . . 

ii . . . . 

it . . . . 

ii 

Sbelburne . 

Halifax 

Lunenburg 

Halifax 

Lunenburg 



26 
16 
16 
34 
26 
12 
18 
12 
3(5 
39 
27 
13 
36 
32 
13 
34 
45 
23 
11 
15 
15 
38 
32 
46 
10 
14 
45 
56 
il 
40 
41 
20 



John Sullivan 

Alexander Fillis 

Charles Covey 

J. J. Scott 

Richard Holland 

Chas. W. Twohig.... 

George Julien 

Jas. W. Smith 

Peter Hartlin 

Simeon Coolen 

John C. Martin .... 

T. & J. Parker 

George L. Baker 

Archibald Darrach, sr. 

Eliza Cook 

Andrew Sullivan 

Daniel Bonang, et al . . 

Lewis Murphy 

Geo. H. Nickerson 
Caleb Gray 



Simeon Conrod et al.. 

Charles W. Hart 

Edward Conrod et al. 

James Maryatt 

John P. Slaunwhite. . 
Angus Julien et al . . . 

Edward Hayes 

Charles Nelson 

George Schnair 

Simon Lapierre et al 
David Covey 



Herring Cove. . . 


7 


71 


50 


W. Chezzetcook. 


3 


35 


50 


Indian Harbour. 


3 


35 


50 


East Dover .... 


5 


66 


50 


Portuguese Cove 


8 


78 


00 


Pennant 


4 


38 


00 


W. Chezzetcook. 


3 


37 


50 


Sambro 


2 


25 


00 


East Jeddore.. . . 


8 


88 


00 


Hubbard's Cove. 


12 


117 


00 


Ketch Harbour . 


7 


72 


50 




2 


26 


00 


West Jeddore. . . 


1 


42 


50 


Herring Cove. . . 


11 


103 


50 




3 


32 


50 


Herring Cove . . . 


11 


105 


50 


W. Chezzetcook. 


5 


77 


50 


Pleasant Harb'r. 


5 


55 


50 




3 


30 


50 


it 


5 


47 


50 


Eastern Passage. 


3 


34 


50 




13 


122 


50 




10 


97 


00 


E. Chezzetcook.. 


11 


117 


50 




3 


29 


50 


Terence Bay . . . 


4 


40 


00 


11 


116 


50 


Herring Cove . . . 


11 


127 


50 




3 


30 


50 


Pennant 


10 


105 


00 


W. Chezzetcoko. 


5 


73 


50 


Hagget's Cove . . 


7 


65 


50 



22 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



List of Vessels which received Fishing Bounty, &c. 

HALIFAX COVNTY— Concluded. 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
-Nova Scotia — Con. 





■6 






'£ 




ft 




p 




Residence. 


o 


c g 




6 


|J 






<«: 




■ 






cts. 


vV . Chezzetcook. 


i* 


120 


50 




4 


40 


00 


FT! T> 

lerence Bay. . . . 


6 


29 


50 


TT * /~1 _ 

Herring Cove. . . 


o 

8 


70 


00 


i > 


7 


64 


50 


TT IT 


o 


31 


50 


Ferguson's Cove. 


rj 
1 


77 


50 


T ) 

Pennant 


4 


37 


00 




Q 


32 


50 


Pennant 


*> 


53 


00 


Li. VV . btiip Harp. 


2 


27 


00 


"ITT i T"v 

West Dover .... 


7 


64 


50 


Indian Harbour. 


i 

l 


24 


50 




6 


67 


00 


v^iaiii xraruour. . 


Q 
o 


57 


50 


Indian Harbour. 


5 


46 


50 


Clam Harbour. . . 


4 


38 


00 


Boutilier's Cove. 


7 


59 


50 


Spry Bay 


4 


61 


00 


Ship Harbour. . . 


4 


40 


nil 


Herring Cove. . . 


11 


114 


50 


Sarhbro 


3 


31 


50 


West Dover. . . . 


4 


40 


00 


Sambro 


4 


38 


00 


W. Chezetcook. . 


16 


169 


00 


Terence Bay 


6 


55 


00 



Name of Vessel. 



Maggie May 

Mary E 

May 

Meta 

Myrtle M. Gray.. . 

Nellie D 

Nettie M. G 

Neva 

Nina 

Primrose 

Progress 

R. Beatrice 

Rising Dawn ... . 

Rising Sun 

Saint Agnes 

Sarah M. W 

Seaflee, 

Twilight 

T. W. Smith 

Uganda 

Venture 

Violet. 

Water Lily 

Willetta. 

Willie H. Crosby. 
Zephyr 



Port of 
Registry. 



a; 
to 

p 
o 
Eh 



Halifax ] 62 

Halifax 



Shelburne 
Halifax. . . 



14 
10 
18 
19 
12 
32 
11 
13 
14 
14 

Lunenburg 19 

M 18 

Halifax 28 

38 
14 
12 
14 
35 
14 
43 
12 
14 
12 
65 
16 



Name of Owner 
or 

Managing Owner. 



Jeremiah Fillis et al 
Andrew Twohig . . . 

Edward Little 

James Reno 

James Gray 

James Crooks 

Mathew Lynch .... 
Ephraim Marryatt. 
Ingraham Stevens. . 

Angus Gray 

David Richardson . 

James Morash 

Frederick Boutilier. 
Richard Christian. . 
E. & S. Homans . 
Hezekiah Wambolt. 

James Stevens 

Ainsley Hubley . . 
Charles Beaver. . . . 
Jas. B. Stoddard . . . 
Edward Dempsey. . 
James H. Smith. . 

Albert Lant 

Joseph Gray 

James Julien et al 
Robert Slaunwhite 



INVERNESS COUNTY. 



Belle Cote 


6 


49 


00 


Port Hastings . . 


5 


70 


50 


Eastern Harbour 


5 


43 


50 


Little Ri ver .... 


4 


36 


00 


Eastern Harbour 


4 


37 


00 


it 


5 


49 


50 




5 


43 


50 




5 


43 


50 


Belle Cote 


6 


52 


00 


Back Settlement 


5 


42 


50 


Eastern Harbour 


5 


44 


50 




6 


58 


00 




6 


50 


00 




5 


44 


50 




4 


36 


00 




5 


43 


50 




4 


36 


00 


Little River. . . 


6 


50 


00 




7 


65 


50 


Eastern Harbour 


5 


42 


50 


Grand Etang. . . . 


5 


44 


50 


Seaside 


3 


37 


50 


Eastern Harbour 


4 


38 


00 


Little River 


5 


42 


50 




4 


37 


00 



71302 
103322 
96778 
103313 
103325 
103542 
96774 
103317 
103312 
103316 
103315 
103318 
96775 
96779 
96771 
96777 
103314 
96769 
69125 
103326 
!M"»770 
96962 
103329 
96773 
96776 



I Alice 

;Bonnie Brier Bush 

i Campania 

Catherine 

Elizabeth Ann . 

Emma Brow 

Florence 

Flying Star , 

Laura 

Laura 

Lillie 

Little Heir 

Louise 

Majestic 

Marie 

Marie Joseph . 

Mary 

Mary Lambert. 

May Flower 

Mizpah 

O. L. B 

Sunrise 

Saint Helier 

Virgin 

Willie B 



Charlottetown . . 
Port Hawkesb'ry 



Yarmouth .... 
Port Hawkesb' 



10 
38 
11 
10 
11 
17 
11 
11 
13 
10 
12 
19 
11 
12 
10 
11 
10 
11 
20 
10 
12 
18 
12 
10 
11 



Pepin Chaisson 

R. J. McDonald . . . 
Robin Collas & Co. 
Severin F. Chiasson 
David Bourgeois . . 
Simon Bellefontaine 



Medrick Aucoin 
Ubald Bourgeois 

P. Fiset.... 

Michael Maillet. . . 
Simon Bellefontaine 
Robin Collas & Co . 

John Roach 

Victor Roach 

Paul J. Aucoin.. . . 
Charles L. Chiasson 
Hyacinthe Chiasson 
George Le Brun . . . 
David Chaisson. . 
Duncan J. Gillis . . 
Robin Collas & C... 
Michael J. Ramard. 
John F. Roach 



FISHING BOUNTIES 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

List of Vessels which received Fishing Bounty, &c. — Nova Scotia — Con. 

KING'S COUNTY. 



23 



D 
fit 

s 

s 
'3 

c 


Name of Vessel. 


Port of 
Registry. 


Tonnage. 


Name of Owner 
or 

Managing Owner. 


Residence. 


N. of Crew 
paid. 


Amount of 
Bounty paid. 
















S cts. 


83261 


Economist 


Digby 


14 


Jesse Parker 


Hall's Harbor. . , 


2 


27 00 


94756 


*Sarah E. Ells.... 


St. John 


19 


Leonard Houghton. . . . 


n ... 


3 


40 00 



LUNENBURG COUNTY. 



Lunenburg 


6 


73 00 


'i 


17 


190 50 


Middle La Have 


17 


190 50 


Lunenburg 


17 


190 50 


ii .... 


17 


190 50 


Getson's Cove. . . 


15 


153 50 


Lunenburg 

Vogler's Cove. . . 


20 


210 00 


17 


184 50 


Lunenburg 


17 


190 50 


.i .... 


17 


190 50 




17 


190 50 


Lunenburg 


17 


190 50 


Parks Creeks . . . 


8 


132 00 


Lunenburg 

Ritcey's Cove. . . 


20 


210 00 


17 


190 50 


Lunenburg 


18 


197 00 


n .... 


17 


190 50 


Park's Creek.... 


8 


132 00 


Lunenburg 


17 


190 50 


Mahone Bay .... 


17 


190 50 


Lunenburg 


17 


190 50 


n 


16 


184 00 




17 


190 50 


Middle La Have 


14 


150 00 


Lunenburg 


17 


190 50 


Mahone Bay. .. 


t 


80 00 




11 


128 50 


Park's Creek'.'.'.". 


15 


1£9 50 


Pleasantville-. . . 


14 


151 00 


Lunenburg 


18 


197 00 


Lower La Have. 


18 


197 00 


Middle La Have 


20 


210 00 


Ritcey's Cove. . . 


17 


190 50 


Lunenburg 


15 


177 50 




17 


190 50 




19 


203 50 


Lunenburg. . . . 


17 


190 50 


Getson's Cove. . . 


21 


216 50 


La Have 


17 


190 5o 


Mahone Bay .... 


17 


190 50 


17 


190 50 


ii 


13 


164 50 




14 


171 0o 


Lunenburg 

Vogler's Cove. . . 


8 


77 00 


5 


59 5o 


Lunenburg 


17 


190 50 


Conquerall Bank 


17 


182 50 


Lunenburg 


15 


172 50 






16 50 


Lunenburg 


£ 


190 5o 


Mahone Bay .... 


18 


197 0o 


Tancook 


2 


23 0o 


Ritcey's Cove . . . 


17 


190 5o 


Mahone Bay .... 


17 


190 oo 



100839 A.calia 

107 953 lAhava 

107644 Albertha ... 

94783 Alaska 

107657 Alcaea 

100489 Algoma 

107124 Alma Nelson 

107955 Annie C. Hall. . . 

103799 Arbitrator 

100172 Arcana 

103495 Athlon 

100170 Atlanta 

103745 Avis 

111412 Baden-Powell 

103501 Barcelona 

103755 Basil M. Geldert. . . 

107130 Beatrice L. Corkum 

103430 Beluga 

103503 B. G. Anderson .... 

100838 Blanche A. Colp.. . . 

103421 Blenheim 

94782 Bona Fides 

96828 Bonanza 

100848 Britannia 

100571 Britannia 

94645 C. A. Chisholm... 

94658 C. A. Ernst 

97084 Calla Lily 

103427 Cambrian 

103502 Carlraine 

97081 Carrie 

107115 Cayuga 

100579 Citizen 

90869 Clara E. Mason ... 

103415 Clarence Smith ... 

107122 Collector 

103759 Columbia 

107966 Companion 

100834 Comrade 

100159 jC. U. Mader 

107112 Daisy Linden ... . 

88355 iD. A. Mader . . . 
111405 iDeeta M 

90855 Delta 

!K)834 Diego 

97089 Dictator 

107649 I). M. Owen 

107962 Edward Roj 

83308 Ella ' 

107127 Ellen L. Maxner. . . 

103424 Elva M 

103492 Emily L 

107123 Emulator 

88356 | Energy 

* For 1899. 



Lunenburg. 



Shelburne . 
Port Medw 
Lunenburg. 



34 
80 
80 
80 
80 
56 
80 
74 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
59 
80 
80 
57 
62 
60 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
25 
27 
80 
72 
75 
10 
80 
80 
10 
SO 
80 



Nathan Silver. . . . 

G. A. Smith 

Amiel Corkum .. .. 
Benj. Anderson . . . 
Alexander Knickle. 
Jeffrey Publicover . 
J. Wm. Young. . . . 



Christian Geldert. . 

Alex. Knickle 

Freeman Conrad. . . 
Freeman Anderson. 
Albert V. Conrad . . 
Jessen Anderson . . 

John M. Ritcey 

Robert Geldert .... 

Wm. C. Smith 

Albert V. Conrad . . 

Thomas Hamm 

C. U. Mader 

Charles Smith 

J. J. Rudolph 

H. W. Adams 

Lambert Lohnes . . . 



Abraham Ernst. 



Alvin Himmelman 



Simon Hirtle 

Murdock McGregor. 



Wm. C. Smith.... 
W. N. Reinhardt,. 

J. A. Silver . 

Jeffrey Publicover 
W. N Reinhardt. 

C. U. Mader 

Abraham Ernst. . 

C. U. Mader 

John McLean. . . . 
E. F. Z wicker... 



J. Norman Raf use . 

Wm. C. Smith 

Jennis C. Hanson. . . 
H. W. Adams.. . . 
C. U. Mader 



C. 



t Crew not entitled to bounty. 



24 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

List of Vessels which received Fishing Bounty, &c. — Nova Scotia — Con. 

LUNENBURG COUNTY — Continued. 



— 

a 
5 

'3 



94659 
100151 
103429 
103743 
111406 
111401 

97083 

00582 
103753 

90836 

lo.srr-L' 

100850 

imisol' 
Ki7!i:.,s 

100488 
107110 
107951 
103744 
107041 
1079G5 
107659 
107128 
107956 
L00490 
107116 
96830 
103414 
103401 
107646 
100164 
100837 
107960 
107969 
107970 
111401 
107114 
111410 
96838 
94788 
94780 
103202 
107126 
96827 
96833 
107660 
107129 
103760 
107113 
101 1*30 
83316 
103420 
103509 
07100 
100162 
107120 
103425 
107652 
107967 
100849 
107650 
100153 
107111 
11408 



Name of Vessel. 



'Enterprise. ....... 

[Erminie 

Fern 

Flo F. Mader 

Flora W. Sperry. . 
Frances Willard . . 

Garland 

;G. A. Smith 

Gladys B. Smith . . 

Gleaner 

|Glyndon 

Grace 

Grenada 

Guardian 

Gurnet 

Harold J. Parks . . 

Harry Lewis 

Harry Smith 

Hattie L. M. ... 
Hazel B. Mosher. . 

Hilda C 

Huron 

lona .... 

Irene M. B 

Ivy 

J. A. Silver 

Jeanie Myrtle 

Jennie May 

Jessie L. Smith . . . 

J. H. Ernst 

J. M. Young 

J. W. Mills 

Kandahar 

Karmoe 

Kimberley 

Klondyke 

Kuvera 

La France 

Laura C. Zwicker. 

Lawrence 

L. B. Ourrie 

Lena F. Oxner 

Leopold 

L. E. Young. . . . 
Lila D. Young. . . . 
Lilla B. Hirtle 

Lillian 

, L. Morton 

Lorraine C 

Lottie ... 

Luetta. 

Maggie E. Z 

: Maggie M. W. . . . 

i Magic 

'Madeira ... 

Majestic 

Mascot 

May Myree 

Merl M. Parks. . . . 

Mildred 

Milo 

Millie Mace 

Mindoro 



Port of 
Registry. 



Lunenburg.. 



Port Med way. 
Lunenburg. . . . 



bo 

as 



c 
H 



80 
80 
70 
80 
80 
80 
51 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
56 
80 
80 
80 
80 
72 
80 
80 
80 
66 
12 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
76 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
60 
64 
80 
80 
70 
80 
45 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 



Name of Owner 
or 

Managing Owner. 



Andrew Ross 

Thomas Hamm 

Edmund Walters 

C. U. Mader 

John D. Sperry 

Wm. C. Smith 

John D. Sperry. 
G. N. C. Hawkins 

Benj. C. Smith 

Wm. C. Acker 

Titus Wentzel 

Daniel Getson 

S. Watson Oxner . . . 

Reuben Ritcey 

Alvin Creaser 

L. B. Currie 

Wm. C. Smith 

Henrv Wilson 

P. B.' Zwicker 

Thomas Hamm 

S. Watson Oxner .... 

Henry Wilson 

Murdoch McGregor. . 

Eli Ernst 

Joshua Ernst.. 

Charles L. Silver. . . . 

John M. Ritcey 

Martin B. Westhaver. 

James Romkey 

S. Watson Oxner 

J. Wm. Young 

Jacob Hilts 

Wm. C. Smith 

Ainmon Ritcev 

C. U. Mader./ 

James Richard 

James Young. 



jS. Watson Oxner. . . 
Joshua E. Backman. 
Abraham Ernst. . .. 

L. B. Currie 

James W. Geldert . 
Howard Wynacht. . . 
Benjamin Anderson. 

John B. Young 

Benj. Anderson 

Elias Richard, Sr.. . . 

Ado in Selig 

Henry Wilson 

Samuel E. Teel 

Isaac Mason 

Emanuel Zellars . . . 
Howard Wynactit . . . 

John D. Sperry 

Theophilus Creasor. . 
Reuben Ritcey . 
Charles Hewett.. 
Elias Richard, Sr.. . 
James Wamback .... 
Abraham Ernst. . . . 

J. Wm. Young 

Wm. C. Smith 

Isaac Zink 



1 


T! 


IS 






'3 










Residence. 


h 


Ǥ 








S 5 






c 


O CO 






Q 


a 








< 




Middle La Have 


18 


197 


00 


Lunenburg 


17 


190 


50 


Middle La Have 


17 


180 


50 


Mahone Bay. . . . 


20 


210 


00 


Petite Riviera. . . 


17 


190 


50 


Lunenburg . ... 


16 


184 


00 


Petite Riviere . . 


10 


116 


00 


Lunenburg 


17 


190 


50 


19 


203 


50 




15 


177 


50 


Ritcey's Cove. . . 
Getson's Point . . 


17 


190 


50 


17 


190 


50 


Ritcey's Cove. . 


15 


177 


50 


17 


190 


50 


10 


121 


00 


West Dublin . . . 


17 


190 


50 


Lunenburg 


21 


216 


50 




17 


190 


50 


Mahone Bay . . 


17 


190 


50 


Lunenburg . . 


17 


182 


50 


ii .... 


19 


203 


50 


N .... 


16 


184 


00 


Ritcey's Cove. . . 


17 


190 


5o 


Mahone Bay . . . 


13 


150 


50 




3 


31 


50 


Lunenburg .... 


17 


190 


50 


Ritcey's Cove. . . 


17 


190 


50 


Lunenburg 


16 


184 


00 


Lower LaHave. . 


20 


210 


00 


Lunenburg 

1! 


17 


190 


50 


17 


190 


50 


Indian Point. . . . 


17 


186 


50 


Lunenburg .... 
Ritcey's Cove. . . 


17 


190 


50 


17 


190 


50 


Main me Bay ... 
Getson's Cove. . . 


17 


190 


50 


18 


197 


00 


Lunenburg 


19 


203 


50 


17 


190 


50 


" 


17 


190 


50 


Mahone Bay .... 


20 


210 


00 


West Dublin 


17 


190 


50 


Lunenburg 


17 


190 


50 




17 


190 


50 




17 


190 


50 




20 


210 


00 




21 


216 


50 


Getson's Point. . 


19 


203 


50 


Vogler's Cove . . . 


13 


144 


50 


Lunenburg 

Vogler's Cove. . . 


16 


168 


00 


19 


203 


50 


Lunenburg . . . 


18 


197 


00 






180 


50 




17 


190 


50 


Petite Riviere. . . 


10 


no 


00 


Ritcey's Cove. . . 


20 


210 


00 


ii ... 


17 


190 


50 


Lunenburg 

Getson's Point . . 


19 


203 


50 


19 


203 


50 


Park's Creek .... 


17 


190 


50 


Mahone 


18 


197 


00 




18 


197 


00 




18 


197 


00 


Ritcey's Cove . . . 


17 


190 


50 



FISHING BOUNTIES 



25 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



LUNENBURG COUNTY — Concluded. 



-Nova Scotia- 


-Co 


n. 








IS 






'5 

& 


n 

a 




ft 


t< ►> 






o 




Residence. 


o 











§ 5 
oCC 






d 


S 








< 








$ ets. 


ITT T TT T7* ' 

W.LaHavefcer y 


7 


711 


Rn 


Lunenburg 


21 




RO 


ii ... . . 


18 


1 07 

1 ot 


n<> 


Ritcey s Cove . . . 


18 


1 Q7 
Iji 


nn 


Bridgewater .... 


It 




Rn 


Lunenburg 

ii . » 


15 


177 




1 Q 
1» 


107 

Lot 


nn 




19 




Rn 




19 


203 


50 


rentzbettlement 


9 


i in 

-LIU 


Rfl 


Lunenburg 


17 


190 


in 


Mahone Bay .... 


1 O 

13 




Rfl 


Lunenburg 


17 


i Qn 


Rfl 


17 


i on 


Rfl 


West Dublin. . . . 


2 


31 


on 


Lunenburg 


17 


ion 


R0 


TT 1 J _1 

Park s Creek. . . . 


L 


190 


50 


,\1 iodic Lia Have 


14 


1 4*1 

L~tO 


nn 


Park s Creek. . . . 


17 


i on 


ra 


Bridgewater . . 


1/ 


i on 




TT j. O ii! 

Fentz Settlement 


16 


1fi9 


00 


Ritcey s Cc ve . . . 


18 


1 07 


1 If 1 


M ... 


1 o 
JO 


107 
iff 


00 


Lunenburg 


17 


i on 


"0 




1 Q 


107 


00 


TIT 1. T> 

JVlahone Bay . . . 


15 


1 77 
J- It 


"in 


Lunenburg 


17 


i on 


Rn 


a i; j ii t _ Tj„.. 

Middle La Have. 


14 


1 49 


nn 


Lunenburg 

AT j. ' ) TT * 

Martin s Kiver. . 


17 


i on 


Rfl 

•Jv 


10 


14n 


no 




It 


190 


50 




o 


32 


50 


Ma hone Bay. . . . 


1 

10 


164 


50 


Lunenburg 


14 


171 


00 




17 


190 


50 


i.fl n T TT h 

Middle La Have. 


18 


195 


00 


Lunenburg 


17 


190 


50 


Petite Riviere. . . 


17 


190 


50 


Lunenburg 


17 


190 


50 


n .... 


4 


38 


00 






132 


no 


tti l *n 

Pleasant ville. . . . 


21 


216 


5(» 


if 1_ t> 

Mahone Bay .... 


17 


190 


50 


Lunenburg . ... 


lb 


197 


on 


Ritcey s Cove. . . 


17 


190 


50 


Lunenburg 


15 


177 


50 


Mahone Bay .... 


17 


186 


50 




19 


203 


50 


Middle La Have. 


18 


197 


00 


Lunenburg 


17 


190 


r.n 


Middle La Have. 


18 


197 


00 


Lunenburg 


17 


190 


50 


Dayspring 


19 


203 


50 



o 



Name of Vessel. 



103412 
107952 
107121 
■ 103757 
103422 

92632 
107961 
103758 
107968 
100485 

92636 

88342 

94786 

94779 
100245 
100836 
107642 
103747 
107655 
111402 
100483 

94774 
107959 
107653 

96834 
107647 
107125 
100572 
100471 

88349 
107963 
111413 
100165 
107167 
103500 
107648 
111407 
103754 
107651 
103199 
100575 
107957 
103742 

97098 
103417 

83164 
107964 
111409 
103504 
100152 
111403 

96829 
107645 



Minnie B 

Minnie M. Cook.. 

Minto 

Minnie J. Heckman 

Mischief 

Monarch 

Monitor 

Muriel 

New Era 

Nightingale 

Nonpareil 

,Nova Zembla 

Ontario 

O. P. Silver 

Oracle 

Panama 

i Pa via 

.Perfect 

'Premier 

Protector 

Puma 

Puritan 

Reliance 

Renown 

Robert F. Mason . . 

Roc ... 

Roma 

Rowena 

Secret 

Senovar 

Shamrock 

Sigdrifa 

Snow Queen . 

St. Clair 

St. Helena 

St. Vincent . . . 

Strathcona . . ... 

Talmouth 

Torato 

Trilby 

Tyler 

Ungava 

Unique 

Urania ... 

Uruguay 

Valiant 

Vernie May 

Victoria 

Viking 

Werra 

Willis C 

Wisteria 

Yosemite 



Port of 
Registry. 



Lunenburg 



Halifax . . . 
Lunenburg 



be 

C3 

a 
s 

c 

EH 



25 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
52 
80 
79 
80 
80 
18 
80 
80 
54 
80 
80 
58 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
51 
80 
80 
80 
13 
67 
80 
80 
78 
80 
80 
80 
12 
54 
80 

so 
80 
80 
80 

71 ; 

80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 



Name of Owner 
or 

Managing Owner. 



Phineas Richard 

Win. C. Smith 

Daniel Zmk 

Anthony Heckman. . 
Thomas A. Wilson . 

Allan R. Morash 

J. Jos. Rudolph 

E. ¥. Z wicker 

Howard Wynacht. . . 

John Haughn 

E. F. Zwicker 

C U. Mader 

Thomas Hamm 

Charles L. Silver. . . . 

Daniel Wolfe 

Henry Adams 

James Wamback . . . 
John Schmeisser 
James Wamback 
Thomas A. Wilson . . 

Simon Pentz . 

Theophilus Creasor. . 

Artemaa Zink 

Wm. C. Smith 

Martin Mason 

C. U. Mader 

E. F. Zwicker 

Wm. Schmeisser 

John B. Young . . 

Nathan Hiltz 

Alexander Knickle . . . 

Wm. Westhaver 

C. U. Mader 

Charles Smith 

Howard Wynacht. . . 
Edmund Walters . . . 
Freeman Anderson. . , 

John D. Sperry 

J. Wm. Young 

Nathan Levy 

W. A. Zwicker 

Wm. Cleversey.. 

Abraham Ernst 

Daniel Heisler 

Daniel Lohnes 

Thomas A. Cook 

Abraham Ernst 

W. N. Reinhardt 

Amiel Corkum 

E. F. Zwicker 

Amiel Corkum 

Freeman Anderson. . . 
Kenneth Silver 



QUEEN'S COUNTY. 



100007 
83134 
103174 
103191 



Icelda . . . 
Infant. . 
I una. . . . 
Jennie B 



Shelburne . 
Lunenburg 
Liverpool. . 



19 I John E. McDonald 

15 Wm. Wagner 

15 Robert Smith 

13 Lawson Vogler .... 



Port Jolly . . . 
Summerville . 
Hunt's Point 
Port Jolly. . . 



51 50 
41 00 
47 50 
39 00 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
List of Vessels which received Fishing Bounty. &c. — Nova Scotia — (Jon. 

QUEEN'S COUNTY -Concluded 



= 



O 



Name of Vessel. 



54132 
54833 
61916 
103194 
10060S 



Port of 
Registry. 



John Franklin . ... Halifax 



News Boy 
Only Son . 

Oressa 

Vesper . . . 



Liverpool 
ii 

Liverpool. 
Shelburne 



S3 

a 
a 
o 
H 



Name of Owner 
or 

Managing Owner. 



18 
16 
16 
10 
14 



Residence. 



Andrew McNutt iLiverpool 



Alexander Shankle 
Wm. A. Conrad 
Joseph Hagan . . 
Oren Huskins. . . 



Port Mouton. 
Liverpool . . . 
Hunt's Point 
Summerville . 



■i 
e 
u 

Ojri 

O ft 

d 



ft 

o >. 

ll 

-5 



$ ets. 

37 50 
42 00 
42 00 
36 00 
46 50 



RICHMOND COUNTY. 



36474 
88456 
77544 
111472 
103463 
94680 
75561 

.vn.-ii; 

74100 
72061 

88462 
SS599 
88513 
96764 

i03470 
85560 
85689 
46294 
S3135 
88454 

103458 
88467 

103469 
38516 
61615 
88455 
96763 

103467 
72071 

103532 
38522 
8538S 

100380 

103462 
7204S 
74365 
54139 
61630 
72067 

100477 
69193 

103461 

103464 
92599 

103460 
71034 
38523 
57662 



Alexander Eraser. 

Alice May 

Alpha 

Annie May 

Annie May 

Bonnie Glen 

Boreas 

British Lady 

Candid 

C. P. M 

Fannie S 

Guide 

Ida 

Ida C. Stafford 



Lunenburg. 
Arichat . . . 



Halifax . . . 
Lunenburg. 
Halifax. . . . 
Arichat. . . . 



Halifax 

Sydney 

Hawkesbury 



Ida M. Burke I Arichat 



Jacques 

JamesBeckwith.. . 

Janett 

J. B. M 

Jubilee 

K. McKenzie 

Katie 

Katie B 

Lady of the Lake. 

Laura Cox 

Laura Victoria. . . . 
Lelia Linwood 

Lizzie May 

Lumen Diei .... 

Maria A 

Mary 

Mary Alice 

Mary D 

Maud 

Neptune 

Nova Stella 

Ocean Belle 

Olive J 

Philomene D 

Pilot 

Star 

St. Lidwina 

St. Patrick 

Thistle 

Two Brothers 

Vanguard 

Victoria 

Village Bride 



Yarmouth . 
Halifax. . . 



Arichat. 



Guysboro . 
Arichat. . . 



Halifax. . 
Arichat. 
Halifax. , 
Sydney. . 
Arichat. 



Halifax. 



Arichat. . . . 
Lunenburg. 

Hnlifax 

Arichat. . . . 



Sydney 
Arichat. 



Halifax. 



32 
39 
42 
17 
11 
17 
41 
19 
23 
22 
28 
38 
11 
54 
16 
58 
31 
32 
20 
34 
17 
11 
16 
26 
19 
39 
67 
12 
20 
22 
23 
21 
27 
16 
26 
53 
20 
57 
22 
42 
33 
11 
27 
11 
18 
51 
24 
24 



Samuel Sampson 

Wm. I. LeVesconte. . . 

n . . . 

.lames Monbourquette. 

Placide Dugas 

Xavier Marchand 

John Colford 

Albert Joyce 

Desire Burke 

Alexander Burke . 

Andrew Fougere 

Edward Poirier 

Isiah LeBlanc 

Robert Murray 

Samuel P. Burke 

Frederick Poirier 

D. T. Leslie .. 

John B. Girroir. 

John Landry 

Arthur Poirier 

James Barrow 

Henry LeLacheur 

John Burke 

Peter Landry 

Alex. E. Morrison 

Henry McDonald 

Wm. 1. LeVesconte. . . 
Abram Fougere, jr. . . . 

Urbain Sampson 

John Walker 

Isaiah Boudrot 

Edward Malcom 

Simon Deveaux . 

Henry Duon 

Henry Sampson. . . . 

Leon Poirier 

Isidore Fougere 

John J. Malcom 

John Pelham 

Wm. Proctor 

David Goyetche 

Alexander Peters 

Thomas Clannon 

tt. Monbourquette .... 

Maurice Peters.. 

Thomas Boudrot . . . 

Henry Burke 

John D. Malcom 



jRiver Bourgeois. 



jRock Dale 

River Bourgeois 
iPetit de Grat. . 
Port Richmond.. 
Riv. Inhabitants 
River Bourgeois. 



Goulet 

Little Bras d'Or. 
Port Richmond.. 

St. Peters 

D'Escousse 

Spry Bay 

| West Arichat . . . 
Petit de Grat.. . . 

D'Escousse 

L'Ardoise West. 

Martinique 

River Bourgeois. 

St. Peters 

D'Escousse 



River Bourgeois. 



Basin Riv. Inh. . 
River Bourgeois. 
Port Malcom.. . . 
Little Bras d'Or. 

Arichat 

River Bourgeois. 
D'Escousse ... . 

Poulamond 

Port Malcom. . . . 
Janvrin Island. . 
Ri>\ Inhabitants 
Cape Auguet. . . . 

L'Ardoise 

Lower L'Ardoise 
L'Ardoise West. 
Lower L'Ardoise 
Petit de Grat . . . 

St. Peters 

Port Malcom.. . . 



10 
10 
6 
3 
5 
6 
9 
1 
7 
ti 
9 
11 
5 
9 
4 
15 
5 
6 
5 
10 
6 
2 
6 
5 
14 
12 
15 
4 
6 
2 

7 
5 
6 
3 
7 

16 
7 
9 
5 
7 
8 
4 

10 
4 
6 
6 
6 
5 



97 00 
104 00 
81 00 

36 50 
43 50 
56 00 
99 50 
25 50 
68 50 
61 00 

86 50 
109 50 

43 50 
112 50 

42 00 
155 50 

63 5» 

71 00 

52 50 
99 00 

56 00 
24 00 

55 00 

58 50 
140 00 
117 00 
164 50 

38 00 

59 00 
35 00 
68 50 

53 50 
66 00 
35 50 
71 50 

157 
65 
115 50 

54 50 

87 50 
85 00 

37 00 
92 00 
37 00 

57 00 
90 00 
63 00 

56 50 



00 

50 



FISHING BOUNTIES 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

List of Vessels which received Fishing Bounty, &c. — Nova Scotia — Con. 

SHELBURNE COUNTY. 



27 









■6 


Residence. 


is 

3) 
U 

O 


D 

a 


- 

>> 

«3 

S3 








S 




. * 

Pi 


aw 






•< 








$ 


cts. 


Port Saxon 


6 


54 


00 


Bear Point 


7 


60 


50 


Lr. Jordan Bay. 


22 


223 


00 


Lock port 


21 


216 


50 


Locke port 


20 


L'Hl 


00 


Little Harbor. . . 


9 


86 


50 


Coffins Croft. . . . 


7 


57 


50 


Shelburne 


17 


190 


50 


Clark's Harbour. 


12 


102 


00 


Baccaro 


5 


42 


50 


W. Green Harb'r 


5 


43 


50 




8 


78 


00 


Barrington 


16 


153 


00 


U.Woods Harb'r 


5 


52 


50 


N. E. Harbour. . 


9 


92 


50 


Lockeport . . . 


4 


37 


00 


U.Woods Harb'r 


3 


30 


50 


N. W. Harbour. 


7 


65 


50 


Lockeport 


9 


98 


50 


L. Woods Harb'r 


6 


61 


00 


Cape Negro 


9 


85 


50 


Sandy Point 


22 


223 


00 


Barrington, 


10 


93 


00 


Lockeport 

Barringt'n Head 


5 


47 


50 


8 


72 


00 


Shag Harbour . . 


4 


42 


00 


Lockeport , .... 


8 


81 


00 


U. Port La Tour. 


6 


50 


00 


Lockeport 


20 


210 


00 


Cape Negro 


8 


69 


00 


Sandy Point' . . . 


20 


210 


00 


Lockeport . . . 


5 


46 


50 


Shelburne 


21 


216 


50 


U. Port La Tour. 


5 


45 


50 


Black Point . . . 


5 


44 


50 


Lockeport 


22 


223 


00 


N. E. Harbour . . 


9 


1 ir> 


50 


Cape Negro 

Forbes' Point. . . 


5 


46 


50 


4 


36 


00 


Osborne 


9 


138 


50 


Shelburne 


7 


65 


50 


Carleton Village 


4 


38 


00 


Port Saxon .... 


6 


56 


00 


Port Le Herbert 


4 


36 


00 


Sandy Point .... 


23 


229 


50 




6 


57 


00 


Atwood Brook . . 


2 


24 


00 


Centerville 


4 


36 


00 


N. E. Harbour. . 


7 


69 


50 


Lockeport 

Forbes' Point. . . 


22 


223 


00 


6 


50 


00 


North East Point 


5 


52 


50 


Red Head 


6 


63 


00 


Ingomar 


6 


56 


00 


U. Port La Tour. 


17 


190 


50 


Shelburne ... 


7 


67 


50 


U. PoitLaTonr. 


G 


54 


00 



B 

5 

'5 
£ 




94632 
97034 
103793 
103792 
100620 
100617 
90655 
107984 
100813 
107053 
103186 
96970 
100605 
103063 
103118 
83492 
103053 
103060 
96976 
103789 
77603 
103795 
107054 
85476 
83255 
90645 
100818 
90647 
103790 
85566 
94941 
73967 
107981 
90438 
94661 
107982 
51972 
103796 
103712 
83493 
83434 
103177 
100606 
103175 
103800 
90439 
li)0K2<i 
103706 
53551 
103783 
90433 
90648 
96961 
77744 
90430 
103183 
75722 



Name of Vessel. 



A. C. Greenwood. . . 

A. D'E 

Agatha 

Alice M. Gordon. . . 

Alina 

Altona 

Annina 

Aroma 

Blanche.. 

Bonnie Lin 

Brittania 

Charlie Richardson. 

Dawn 

Defender 

Delia F. Tarr ... 

Dessie 

Eddie C 

Edith M 

Edith . . 

Effie B. Nickerson.. 

Eldon C 

Etta Vaughan 

Favourite 

Flettwing 

Floyd 

Fly 

Geneva Ethel 

Hattie Emeline .... 

Helene 

J. Lyons 

John Pumey 

Katie. 

Kestrel 

Lark 

L. C. Tough 

Lottie A. Burns. . . . 

Lydia Ryder 

Mabel Den vers 

Marguerite 

Mary C 

Mary May 

Mayflower 

Myra Louise 

Myrtle 

Nellie I. King 

Oscar F 

Ranger 

Regine 

Roving Bird 

Springwood 

Ste. Anne 

Stranger 

Tivoli 

Whip-poor Will 

Will Carlton .. . 

Wren 

Yuba 



Port of 
Registry. 



bo 

a 

o 
EH 



Shelburne 
Yarmouth 
Shelburne 



Shelburne . 

ii 

Yarmouth . 
Shelburne . 
Barrington 

M 

Shelburne . 



Barrington . . 
Yarmouth . . . 
St. Andrews. 
Liverpool . . . 
Yarmouth . . . 



Shelburne . 
ii 

Barrington 
Shelburne 
Barrington 
Shelburne . 
Annapolis.. 
Yarmouth . . 
Barrington 
Yarmouth . 
Shelburne . 
Barrington 
Shelburne . 
Liverpool . 
Shelburne . 
Barrington 
Shelburne . 



Yarmouth . 
Liverpool . 
Shelburne . 

Barrington 
Shelburne . 



Barrington 
ii 

Yarmouth . 
Halifax . . . 
Shelburne . 
Barrington 
ii 

Shelburne . 



Barrington 
Shelburne . 
Yarmouth . 



15 
15 
80 
80 
80 
28 
12 
80 
24 
10 
11 
26 
49 
20 
34 
11 
11 
20 
40 
22 
27 
80 
28 
15 
20 
16 
29 
11 
80 
17 
80 
14 
80 
13 
12 
80 
57 
14 
10 
80 
20 
12 
17 
10 
80 
18 
11 
10 
24 
80 
11 
20 
24 
17 
80 
22 
15 



Name of Owner 
or 

Managing Owner. 



Howard Chetwynd .... 
J ames Stoddart ..... 
John H. Thorbourne. . 

Enos Churchill 

Churchill Locke 

Austin Swansburg 

George Pike 

John A. McGowan. . . . 

John F. Duncan 

Norman Madden 

Ross Enslow 

John B. Harding, sr.. 

A. N. Smith 

Davis Jeffrey 

E. P. Greenwood 

Eugene Locke 

R. H. Nickerson 

George Hagar 

Enos Churchill 

T. L. Nickerson 

Knowles Thomas 

B. P. Thorbourn 

Samual S. Atwood 
Edward A. Capstick . . 
Alfred E. Shepard 

Wm. Wickens 

Hugh Mc Alpine 

Charles A. Reynolds . . 

Churchill Locke 

W. H. Nickerson.. 

George H. King 

Churchill Locke 

George A. Cox 

John Ross 

Thomas Swain 

Wm. McMillan 

E. P. Greenwood.. 

Alexander Smith 

Alexander Abbott 

John M. Harding 

Adam J. Firth 

Avard Hamilton 

Arthur H. Perry 

Wm. E. Wolfe 

George H. King 

Clarence H. McKay. . . 

Freeman Atwood 

Luther McComiskey.. 

King Perry 

Wm. McMillan 

H. A. Nickerson 

Robert Atkinson 

Win. J. Doane 

J. P. Littlewood 

James Snow 

Wm. McCarthy 

Josiah S. Nickerson . . . 



28 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

List of Yesseis which received Fishing Bounty, kc. — Nova Scotia — Con. 

VICTORIA COUNTY. 



i 



5 

'5 



!I704('» 
107351 



Name of Vessel. 



Fredona 

Wilfred Laurier. 



Port of 
Registry. 



Liverpool . 
Sydney ... 



tlD 
cj 
P 
C 

o 
Eh 



Name of Owner 
or 

Managing Owner. 



Residence. 



12 
10 



Dan Buchanan. 
Dan McLeod . . 



Eel Cove ...... 

South Ingonish 



u 
D 

c & 



3 
4 



93 

° >, 

a = 

o o 

<1 



$ cts. 

31 50 
36 00 



YARMOUTH COUNTY. 



80647 
04980 
88267 
S5536 
94977 
103066 
sr>i;s3 
97036 
90654 
94972 
90885 
100327 
Si 1643 
S5554 
103717 
103709 
80614 
103718 
S0632 
ss.v.m; 
107337 
103057 
111523 
90659 
90892 
111521 
88589 
83254 
75724 
100323 
100313 
88597 
100330 
90896 
85559 
90882 
90X97 



Annie M. Bell Yarmouth 

Aurore 

Bessie May St. J ohn. 

Circassian Yarmouth . 

Civilian 

Eddie J 

Edith L Digby 

Eva Yarmouth 

Flora 

Florence 

Georgina 

Hattie 

Hazel Dell 

Hazel Glen 

Henry L. 

Lizzie E 

Louise 

Lucy 

Lumen 

M. A. Louis 

Marguerite 

Mayflower 

Mildred P Digby. 

N. A. Laura Yarmouth. 

Nellie 

Retta E Digby. 

Sanford Yarmouth. 

Seafoam Annapolis 

Sea Foam Yarmouth . 

Senora 

Souvenir 

Uncle Sam 

Viola Pearl 

Wapite ... .... 

Willie F 

Will O'the Wisp.. 
Wrasse 



64 
80 
23 
80 
80 
23 
16 
10 
64 
11 
80 
11 
80 
80 
10 
14 
80 
10 
30 
64 
57 
12 
11 
59 
59 
10 
20 
28 
75 
80 
71 
80 
23 
80 
12 
51 
56 



David D'Entremont. . . 

Leon D'Eon 

Roland Sholds 

A. F. Stoneman & Co. 

Henry S LeBlanc 

Luxime D'Entremont.. 

James Adams 

Abijah Rankin 

David D'Entremont. . . 

Marc Boudreau 

Henry Lewis 

Robert Ellen wood 

James Amiro 

H T. D'Entremont . . 
A. C. D'Entremont . . 

Ernest J. Ellis 

J. H. Porter & Co 

A. F. D'Entremont . . 

J. H. Porter & Co 

A. F. Stoneman & Co. 
L. P. D'Entremont . . 

Nathaniel Pierce 

James Haskell 

Julien D'Entremont. . 
J. H. Porter & Co. . . . 

Calvin Sollows 

Samuel N. Perry ..... 
J oseph L. Amiro . . . 

J. H. Porter & Co 

Marc A. Surette 

Louis D'Eon 

G. D'Entremont .... 

Harvey Goodwin 

A. F. Stoneman & Co 

Riley Haskell 

A. F. Stoneman & Co 



West Pubnico. . . 


18 


181 


00 


it . . 


18 


197 


00 


Charlesville 


1 


29 


50 


Yarmouth 


23 


229 


50 


West Pubnico. . . 


20 


210 


00 


ii . . 


10 


88 


00 


Port Maitland. . 


6 


55 


00 


Lower Argyle. . . 


3 


29 


50 


West Pubnico. . . 


20 


194 


00 


Tusket Wedge. . 


7 


56 


50 


j Yarmouth 


22 


223 


00 


ii .... 


3 


30 


50 


West Pubnico. . . 


20 


210 


00 


L. E. Pubnico . . 


21 


216 


50 


West Pubnico. . . 


3 


29 


50 


Port Maitland. . 


6 


53 


00 


Tusket Wedge. . 


20 


210 


00 


West Pubnico. . . 


2 


23 


00 


Tusket Wedge. 


6 


69 


00 




18 


181 


00 


West Pubnico. . . 


17 


167 


50 


Charlesville 


3 


31 


50 


Port Maitland . . 


2 


24 


00 


West Pubnico. . . 


16 


163 


00 


Tusket Wedge.. 


15 


156 


50 


|Port Maitland . . 


3 


29 


50 


ii . . 


6 


59 


00 


L. E. Pubnico. . 


11 


99 


50 


Tusket Wedge.. 


17 


185 


50 


West Pubnico. . . 


22 


223 


00 


ii . . 


16 


175 


00 


East Pubnico. . . 


21 


216 


50 




9 


81 


50 


Yarmouth .... 


22 


223 


00 


Port Maitland . . 


6 


51 


00 


Yarmouth 


19 


174 


50 


ii 


18 


173 


00 



PROVINCE OF NEW BRUNSWICK. 
CHARLOTTE OOUNTY. 



103124 
107439 
107913 
107603 
103127 
64011 
107911 
103114 



AddieB St. Andrews 13 

Arminta I m .... 15 

Arnold B „ .... 10 

Augusta Evelyn . . Weymouth i 29 

Avis C. Tobey St. Andrews. ... 13 

Bee n .... 18 

Bertie ■■ .... | 13 

Edward Morse ., ... I 32 



Arthur Ramsdell Whitehead Isl'd 

Hemon E. Guptill Grand Harbour 

Henry H. Cheney. ... n 

James Scovil !Flagg's Cove. . . 

Jesse Guptill Whitehead Isl'd 

Sherman Lawson. . Flagg's Cove. . . 

Judson L. Guptill, jr. . Grand Harbour 
Alexander Calder Campo Bello. . . 



1 


19 50 


1 


21 50 


2 


23 00 


7 


74 50 


4 


39 00 


3 


37 50 


3 


32 50 


10 


97 00 



FISHING BOUNTIES 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

List of Vessels which received Fishing Bounty, &c. — New Brunswick — Con. 

CHARLOTTE COUNTY— Concluded. 



29 



u 



9 

£ 



59391 
92516 
83202 
80S03 
88276 
92511 

107915 
97146 

107432 

107910 

107437 
83463 

103119 

103997 
77766 
88273 
59342 
77965 
92514 

107438 
9251o 

107904 
75591 

107909 
88287 

107433 
59387 

107440 
88282 

103125 
77969 

107917 



Name of Vessel. 



Port of 
Registry. 



Eliza Ann 

Emma 

Enchantress 

Exenia 

Falcon 

Fleet Wing 

Freddie L 

Free Trade 

Golden Rule 

I Grace and Ethel.. 

Hat tie L 

Havelock 

Hortense 

Jessie James 

Laconia 

Lillian E 

Lizzie S. McGee. 

Lydia B 

Maggie J ane 

Minnie H 

I Pearl 

Quoddy Queen . . . 

Rise and Go 

,S. B 

(Satellite 

Sir John 

Telephone 

Three Links . 

Veritas 

Virgin Queen 
Wave Queen. . 
I Zelma 



St. Andrews 



Windsor .... 
St. Andrews 



Shelburne . . 
St. Andrews 



s 
s 



Eh 



Name of Owner 
or 

Managing Owner. 



Residence. 



12 
22 
10 
18 
12 
11 
15 
10 
49 
16 
12 
33 
15 
11 
15 
13 
14 
18 
10 
11 
18 
13 
16 
12 
26 
11 
19 
12 
10 
16 
11 
17 



John Wills 

Walter Calder, sr 

Peter Dixon, sr 

Wm. F. Parker 

John F. Cronk 

Aid in McFarland 

Charles E. Leighton. . 

L. C. Watt 

Mariner Calder, et al. 

Robert Ingersoll 

F. A. Cheney 

Wm. J ames ........ 

Wm. J. Morse 

Lewis Frankland 

John Dixon, sr 

S. L. Dakin 

Andrew McGee 

John M. Calder 

John Thomas 

Chester Frankland . . 
Martin Eldridge .... 
Harrington Guptill. . . 

William Sirls 

Shadrach Bancroft. . . 

Simon Brown 

Hiram Morse 

James Brown, jr., 3rd 

Robert A. Main 

Simon Leonard 

Nelson Morse 

Hiram W. Foster. . . 
Henry Frankland 



Whitehead . . 
Welshpool. . . 
Flagg's Cove. 
Beaver Harbour 
Flagg's Cove. . . 

ii . . 

Grand Harbour 
Flagg's Cove. . . 
Wilson's Beach. 
Woodward's C'v 
Grand Harbour 
Wilson's Beach. 
White Head Is. 
White Head... 
Flaggs Cove . . 
Beaver Harbour 

Back Bay 

Welshpool 

Flaggs Cove. . . 
White Head Is. 
Beaver Harbour 
White Head Is. 
Wilson's Beach. 
White Head Is. 
Wilson's Beach. 
White Head . . . 
Wilson's Beach. 
Woodwards Cove 
Leonardville . . 
White Head Is. . 
Grand Harbour. 
White Head Is. . 



<D 
it 

tt- ■ 

z 5 
. z. 

o 

2 



1 

4 
3 
4 
4 
3 
1 
1 
14 
5 
3 
5 
4 
2 
3 
2 
3 
2 
3 
4 
3 
3 
7 
3 
5 
3 
4 
3 
1 
4 
4 
4 



S cts. 

18 50 
48 00 

29 50 
44 00 
38 00 

30 50 
21 50 
16 50 

140 00 
48 50 

31 50 
65 50 
41 00 
24 00 
34 50 
26 00 
33 50 
31 (Ml 
29 50 



37 
37 



00 
50 



32 50 
61 50 
31 50 
58 50 

30 50 
45 00 

31 50 
16 50 

42 00 
37 no 

43 HO 



GLOUCESTER COUNTY. 



103009 
72099 
103081 
100984 
103279 
97194 
103763 
103071 
103073 
92419 
100960 
1009X7 
96739 
103085 
1009*3 
61431 
72079 
100975 
100299 
103589 
100909 
1037*0 
1007*0 
1009** 
100774 



Adeline Gladys. 

Adelina 

Albatross 

Alice 

Alice Maud. . . 

Alika 

Alouette 

Anglesea 

Anna 

Anna 

Annie M 

Arabi 

Argeline 

Argentina 

jBee 

Bee 

Betsv 

Big Bear . . . 

Blanchard 

Blenheim 

Bluenose 

Britannia 

Britannic , 

[Caesar , 

: Calliope 



Chatham 



12 
12 
13 
11 
10 
12 
10 
12 
11 
12 
11 
12 
14 
12 
11 
11 
13 
10 
12 
13 
11 
13 
12 
10 
12 



J. N. LeBouthillier. . 
Clement Lanteigne. . 

Thomas Ahier 

! Joseph J. Doiron Caraquet. 

Robin, Collas & Co. . . 

Lange Paulin Lameque. 

[Thomas Ahier Shippegan. 

Hy. LeBouthillier. ... Caraquet.. 
W. S. Loggie & Co. . . . Chatham.. . 

Docithe Chiasson Lameque.. . 

W. S. Loggie & Co. . . . Chatham.. 

Philip Rive Caraquet.. 

Octave Paulin [ n 

iRobin, Collas & Co. ... I n 



; Paul Noel Lameque. 

Wm. Fruing & Co. . . . Shippegar 



Robin, Collas & Co. . 
it 

Joseph Sewell 

; Wm. Fruing & Co 
Colson Hubbard.. 
Philip Rive 



4 


38 00 


4 


38 00 


3 


32 50 


4 


37 00 


4 


36 00 


5 


44 50 


4 


36 00 


4 


38 00 


5 


43 50 


4 


38 00 


3 


30 50 


3 


31 50 


4 


40 00 


3 


31 50 


2 


24 0C 


3 


30 50 


4 


311 (10 


3 


• :.o 


4 


3* no 


4 


39 00 


3 


30 50 


3 


32 50 


3 


31 50 


3 


29 50 


3 


31 50 



30 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

List of Vessels which received Fishing Bounty, &c. — New Brunswick — Con. 

GLOUCESTER COUNTY— Continued. 



— 

5 

• 



Name of Vessel. 



Port of 
Registry. 



103271 
103585 
100784 
100789 

96730 
101000 
103083 
100916 
100971 
100913 
100915 
103076 

92412 
103948 
100999 
100998 
103590 
100293 

96737 

96723 
100911 
100786 
103776 
100772 
100787 
100905 
103001 
103077 
100298 

61445 

96736 

61405 
100782 
100912 

85699 
100778 
100993 
100954 
100919 
100968 
103766 
103282 
100964 
100910 
107775 
100992 

92418 
100790 
103086 
100956 
100991 
107771 
103950 
103765 

61425 
100903 
103939 
100906 
103779 
103931 

96724 
103281 
103289 



Celia 

Cerdric . 

Charlotte 

Chazalie 

Christina 

Condor 

Corsair 

Cygnet 

Cyprian 

Daffodil 

Dawn 

Dipper 

Dollie Dutton. 

Dora 

Dove 

Eagle 

Eliza 

Eliza 

Elmina 

Emma 

Emperor 

Empress 

Esk. 
Estelle 
Ethel. 
Evangeline 
Falcon 
Fame. 
Fisher. 
Flavie . 
Fly. 
Fly 
Flying Foam 

Foam 

Four Sisters.. 

Gainbetta 

Garfield.. 

Gazelle 

Gazelle 

Gem 

Genesta 

Gilknockie . . . 

Gladstone 

Gleaner 

Gold seeker . . , 
Great Mogul. 

Grip 

Guiding Star 

Gypsy 

lHaroldX.. . 
Hercules .... 

| Heron 

Hibernia .... 
Hirondelle. 

Hope 

Hope 

Hope 

j Hotspur 

Ibis 

Irene 

Isabel 

•Japan . 

Mersey Lily . . . 



Chatham 



bo 

X 

I 



11 
14 
13 
11 
11 
10 
10 
12 
10 
10 
12 
12 
13 
12 
11 
10 
13 
15 
11 
15 
10 
12 
14 
13 
11 
10 
10 
10 
12 
13 
14 
11 
12 
10 
10 
13 
10 
10 
12 
11 
12 
11 
10 
13 
13 
11 
12 
11 
20 
12 
10 
13 
10 
11 
13 
12 
11 
10 
11 
12 
11 
11 
12 



Name of Owner 
or 

Managing Owner. 



Dominique Gallien. 

Philip Rive 

Robert Young ... . 



Robin, Collas & Co. 
Thomas Ahier ... . 

II .... 

Robin, Collas & Co. 

Elie Sivret, 

Thomas Ahier 

Robin, Collas & Co. 
W. S. Loggie & Co. 

John Jones . 

Peter Fiott 

Thomas Ahier 



Residence. 



Caraquet 



Shippegan . 
Caraquet.. . 



Shippegan. . . . 

Caraquet 

Chatham . 

Little Lameque. 

Caraquet 

Shippegan 



C.Robin, Collas & Co, 

Robert Young 

Jacques Noel , 

Sebastien Noel 

Thomas Ahier 

Robert Young 



Philip Rive 

Robert Young 

Philip Rive 

Thomas Ahier 

|W. S. Loggie & Co. . . . 
Joseph J.Chiasson 

Theophile Duguay 

Wm. Fruing & Co . . . 
Alex. McLaughlin . . . 

Robert Young 

Thomas Ahier 

Marcil Caron 

Colson Hubbai'd . . 

Philip Rive 

Colson Hubbard 

C. Robin, Collas & Co. 
ti ii . . . 

Thomas Ahier 

Robert Young 

Philip Rive. 

Luke Lanteigne 

Peter Fiott 

Philip Rive 

Gervais Chenard ... 

Robert Young 

W. S. Loggie & Co.... 

Philip Rive.......!!." 

Wm. Fruing & Co 

n ii . . . . 

Thomas Ahier 

C. Robin, Collas & Co. 

Robert Young 

Charles Real, jr 

Philip Rive 

Wm. Fruing & Co 



Robert Young 
Thomas Ahier 



Caraquet . 



c J? 

.p-l 

O £ 

O 



Lameque 

Little Lameque, 

Shippegan 

Caraquet 



Shippegan 

Chatham 

Little Lameque, 

Lameque 

Shippegan 

Tracadi e 

Caraquet 

Shippegan 

Caraquet 



Chatham.. 



Caraquet.. . , 
Shippegan . . 



Caraquet. 



Little Shippegan 

Caraquet 

Shippegan. . . . 



Caraquet.. . 
Shipp9gan . 



.12 
«« - 

£ r 

o S 
£« 





$ cts. 


A 
4 


or nft 

6 1 00 


Q 
O 


66 OU 


A 

4 


on a/i 


A 

4 


*3'7 AA 
Ol UU 


Q 

o 


on sn 


•) 


AO PLfl 

4z 00 


Q 

o 


on Kf\ 
Z\) 00 


O 


44 OU 


A 

4 


Oil fifi 

6o UU 


Q 
O 


on Kf\ 
1\3 OU 


A 

4 


oo UU 


Q 
O 


61 00 





45 50 


A 

4 


OO UU 


5 


4o 00 


A 

4 


Oft f\f\ 

oo UU 


A 

4 


OA f\(\ 

6x UU 


Q 

o 


Qy* EA 

o4 OU 


4 


Q>7 f\f\ 

ot UU 


A 

4 


41 UU 


A 

4 


o/; nn 
OO UU 


Q 

o 


Ol EA 

61 OU 


A 

4 


40 UU 


A 

4 


OA AA 

6v UU 


6 


qa ern 

oU OU 


Q 

6 


JM oU 


4 


OCt AA 

oo 01* 


6 


on tA 

oo 


A 

4 


OO AA 

oh 00 


i 

4 


on AA 

oy oo 


A 

4 


4 a AA 

40 00 


A 

4 


OT AA 

3/ 00 


o 
O 


Ol EA 

ol 50 


4 

4 


OO AA 


4 


36 00 


3 


32 50 


3 


29 50 


5 


A A EA 

42 50 


4 


38 00 


4 


37 00 


3 


31 50 


o 

6 


30 50 


3 


29 50 


4 


39 00 


3 


32 50 


4 


37 00 


4 


38 00 


4 


37 00 


5 


52 50 


3 


31 50 


4 


36 00 


4 


39 00 


4 


39 00 


4 


37 00 


3 


32 50 


4 


38 00 


3 


30 50 


4 


36 00 


4 


37 00 


4 


38 00 


4 


37 00 


4 


37 00 


3 


31 50 



FISHING BOUNTIES 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

List of Vessels which received Pishing Bounty, &c. — New Brunswick Con. 

GLOUCESTER COUNTY — Continued. 



31 



u 

£ 

[3 
"3 
5E 
C 



Name of Vessel. 



1C0959 
100965 
103949 
100981 
103288 
107774 
103283 
103089 
103003 
100951 
107773 
109972 
100902 
100980 
100955 
107779 
72100 
103278 
100292 
100295 
103084 
100781 
100957 
103768 
107777 
103088 
61447 
100779 
100300 
100785 
88669 
100970 
103284 
103004 
103005 
100297 
100776 
103778 
103777 
103674 
96740 
96732 
72076 
100904 
100979 
103287 
100775 
103272 
100952 
103078 
97191 
103946 
103587 
100908 
100773 
103273 
96727 
74401 
100907 
103010 
103584 
100959 
100914 



John B 

Josephine 

Kingfisher 

Kite 

Kite 

Klondyke 

Koh-i-noor 

Lady Maud. . . 

Lark 

Leo 

L'Etoile 

Lizzie D 

Lord Stanley . . 

Lynx 

Majestic 

Marie 

Marie 

Marie Celia 

Marie Joseph . . 
Marie Louise . . 
Mary Emma. . ' . 
Mary Louise. . . . 

Mary R 

Mayflower 

May Flower 

Max 

Merida 

Mermaid 

Mikado 

Midnight 

Morning Star . . . 

(Nellie 

| Normandy 

| Oriole 

lOsprey 

Palma 

Patrick 

Pelican 

Penguin 

| Petrel 

Providence 

: Providence ... . 

Providence 

P. T. S 

| Ranger 

1 Raven 

Red Gauntlet . . . 
Red Weasel.. .. 

Replevin : 

Reward 

Rita 

Robin 

Romulus 

Rosalie 

Rupert 

Russell 

Ryse . 

Sara 

Sarah 

Sarah B 

Saxon 

Sea Bird 

Sea Flower 



Port of 
Registry. 



Chatham 



0) 

be 

as 

c 
s 

o 
Eh 



11 

11 

13 

11 

10 

14 

13 

11 

10 

13 

15 

11 

10 

11 

10 

15 

11 

13 

12 

18 

11 

11 

12 

13 

11 

10 

13 

11 

13 

12 

12 

11 

11 

11 

10 

14 

11 

13 

13 

12 

13 

11 

12 

11 

10 

11 

11 

11 

10 

13 

12 

12 

18 

10 

12 

10 

11 

11 

10 

10 

13 

10 

11 



Name of Owner 
or 

Managing Owner. 



W. S. Loggie&Co... 

Philip Rive 

Wm. Fruing & Co 

C. Robin, Collas & Co 

Thomas Ahier 

Peter Fiott 

Philip Rive 



Residence. 



Thomas Ahier , 

Hy. Lanteigne 

Prudent Gallien. . 

Robert Young 

Wm. Fruing & Co 

C. Robin, Collas & Co 

Colson Hubbard 

Gaspard Savoy 

Onesime Chiasson 

P. D. Blanchard ... 

Lazare Gauvin 

Joseph A. Paulin 

Wm. Fruing & Co 

Colson Hubbard 

W. S. Loggie&Co.... 
C. Robin, Collas & Co. 

Octave Benoit 

Maxime Cormier 

Andre D. Ache 

Colson Hubbard 

C. Robin, Collas & Co. 

Robert Young 

Gustave Gionet 

Dominique Gallien 

Philip Rive 

Thomas Ahier 



Chatham 
Caraquet. 



Shippegan . 
Caraquet.. . 



Shippegan . 
Caraquet . . 



Shippegan 
Caraquet . . 



Shippegan . . 

Lameque 

Caraquet 

Little Lameque . 
Caraquet 



Chatham 

Caraquet 

Little Lameque. 

Caraquet 

Lameque 

Caraquet 



Oliver Duguay 

Philip Rive 

Wm. Fruing & Co. 



St. Rose. . . 
Caraquet . 

ii . . 
Shippegan 



Lameque . . 
Caraquet . 
Shippegan . 



Thomas Ahier 

Prospere Albert 

Joseph L. Robicbaud. . 

Thomas Ahier 

J. N. LeBouthillier . . . 
C. Robin, Collas & Co, 

Thomas Ahier 

Philip Rive 

A. E. Windsor 

C. Robin, Collas & Co. 

James DeGrace 

C. Robin, Collas & Co. 

Peter FiottF! 

W. S. Loggie&Co... 
Edward LeBouthillier 

Philip Rive 

John M. Ward. . . . 

Luc S. Ache 

Nazaire Noel 

Robert Young 

J. N. E. Lanteigne. . . . 

Philip Rive 

W. S. Loggie & Co. . . . 
C. Robin, Collas & Co. 



Caraquet . . 
Shippegan 



Caraquet 



Shippegan . 
Caraquet . . 
i Miscou 
Caraquet . . 
Shippegan . 
Caraquet . . 



Chatham 
Caraquet 



Miscou 
Lameque . 



Caraquet 
it 
ii 

Chatham 
Caraquet , 



o — 



C3 



o o 









$ cts. 


4 


37 00 


4 


37 00 


4 


39 00 


4 


37 00 


4 


36 00 


4 


40 00 


4 


39 00 


5 


43 50 


5 


42 50 


4 


39 00 


4 


41 00 


4 


37 00 


3 


29 50 


3 


30 50 


5 


42 50 


4 


41 00 


4 


37 00 


4 


39 00 


4 


38 00 


4 


44 00 


4 


37 00 


4 


37 00 


4 


38 00 


3 


32 50 


4 


37 00 


4 


36 00 


4 


39 00 


3 


30 50 


4 


39 00 


4 


38 00 


3 


31 50 


4 


37 00 


3 


30 50 


3 


30 50 


4 


36 00 


5 


46 50 


3 


30 50 


4 


39 00 


4 


39 00 


4 


38 00 


4 


39 00 


4 


37 00 


3 


31 50 


4 


37 00 


3 


29 50 


4 


37 00 


4 


37 00 


4 


37 00 


4 


36 00 


4 


39 00 


4 


38 00 


3 


31 50 


4 1 


44 00 


4 


36 00 


4 


38 00 


4 


36 00 


4 


37 00 


4 


37 00 


3 


29 50 


4 


36 00 


4 


39 00 


3 


29 50 


4 


37 00 



32 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

List of Vessels which received Fishing Bounty, &c. — New Brunswick — Con. 

GLOUCESTER COUNTY- Concluded. 



■— 

B 

Is 

'3 
■E 



K.0!i(>] 
96731 
100961 
100788 
100963 
103087 
100982 
103767 
103193 
103008 
107776 
103772 
103947 
103006 
103762 
100986 
103761 
100777 
96738 
103082 
100918 
103583 
103285 
103274 
103775 
100995 
100966 
103588 
96735 
100953 
100973 
103079 
100920 



Name of Vessel. 



Sea Flower. . . . 

Sea Star 

Silver Moon.. 
Sir Charles 

Stanley 

Stanley 

Snowdrop 

Stella Maris.. . . 

Startle 

St. Joseph 

St. Peter 

Surprise 

Swallow 

Swallow 

Swan 

Swift 

Swing 

Teutonic 

Three Brothers 

Thrush 

Tickler 

Two Brothers . 

Valkyrie 

Vesuvius 

Victoria 

Voltaire 

Von Moltke. . . 

Vulture 

White Fish . . . 
White Wings . 
World's Fair. . . 

Wren 

Zephyr 



Port of 
Registry. 



be 

c3 

C 

o 
H 



Chatham.. 



Chatham 12 

13 
14 
11 
11 
10 
11 

I 19 

Halifax 11 

12 
12 
10 
13 
11 
14 
11 
11 
11 
12 
10 
12 
11 
12 
10 
16 
10 
11 
13 
12 
10 
11 
11 
12 



Name of Owner 
or 

Managing Owner. 



Robert Young 

Joseph M. Savoy 

W. S. Loggie & Co..., 

Robert Young 

Philip Rive 

Joseph Bodin 

C. Robin, Collas & Co 

Luc Friolet 

Theotime Blanchard. . . 
Adolphe Ache 



Thomas Blanchard . 

Peter Fiott 

Thomas Ahier 



Fabien G. Chiasson . . 
Agapit A. Albert. . . 

Colson Hubbard 

Chas. S. Hachey 

Thomas Ahier , 

C. Robin, Collas & Co 
W. S. Loggie & Co. . . . 

Philip Rive. 

George Maillet 

W. S. Loggie & Co ... . 
Philip Rive 



W. S. Loggie & Co. 
Joseph L. Savoy . . 
Robert Young .... 



Thomas Ahier 

C. Robin, Collas & Co. 



Residence. 



Caraquet.. . 
Shippegan . 
Chatham . . 
Caraquet . 



Miscou. . 
Caraquet. 

H 

ii 

Lameque. 



Mizzonette. 
Caraquet. . . 
Shippegan . . 



Little Shippegan 
Cai'aqnet 



Shippegan. 
Caraquet. . . 



Shippegan . 
Chatham.. . 
Caraquet. . . 



Chatham. 
Lameque. 
Caraquet. 



Shippegan . 
Caraquet.. . 



o 



o r7 z 
o — 




-us 

3 S 
p 3 
3 



8 cts. 

38 00 

39 00 
46 50 
30 50 

37 00 
23 00 
43 50 
45 00 
30 50 

38 00 

38 00 

29 50 

39 00 
37 00 

40 00 

37 00 

30 50 
43 50 

38 00 

29 50 

31 50 

30 50 

31 50 
36 00 
42 00 

36 00 

37 00 
45 50 

38 00 
29 50 
37 00 
37 00 
31 50 



NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY. 



96725 
100969 
92420 
83096 


Bessie T 

John Bull 

Mary Louise 

St. Patrick 


Chatham 

ii 

ti 

ii 


10 Donald Loggie 

10 (James Anderson . . . 

13 Donald Loggie 

16 Ijohn White 


Church Point. . . 

H ... 

ii ... 
Upper Neguac . . 


2 
4 

3 
5 


23 00 
36 00 
32 50 
41 50 


RESTIGOUCHE COUNTY. 


94959 


Winnie G. S 


Lunenburg 


26 


Donald McGregor. 


Dalhousie 


4 


52 00 



ST. JOHN COUNTY. 



SS2:»3 
S3205 
77783 
83426 
52159 



E. B. Colwell 
Elsie. .. 
Lost Heir. . . 

Louisa 

Mary E 



St. John 
Windsor, 
St. John 



19 
10 
15 
16 
21 



Addison Thompson 
Wm. A. Hampton , 

Henry Alston 

Birstall Hargrove. . 
Fred. Buchanan . . . 



Dipper Harbour. 
St. John, East. . 

Pisarinco 

Dipper Harbour. 
St. John 



51 50 
29 50 
34 50 
42 00 
47 00 



FISHING BOUNTIES 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

List of Vessels which received Fishing Bounty, &c. — Con. 



33 



PROVINCE OF PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND. 

KING'S COUNTY. 



u 

■a 

a 

3 

J? 

-i-H 

o 

•£ 
c 



92675 
100445 
S3196 
83196 
66749 
107190 
100691 
100691 
75552 
75566 
75481 
94670 
69105 
74054 
100696 
100696 
64869 
7416(1 
107189 
75895 
904SS 



Name of Vessel. 



Can't Help It* 

Carrie O 

Ethel Blanche* . . . 

Ethel Blanche 

Flash* 

France and Russie 
Frances E.Willard' 
Frances E. Willard 
Hannah Eldridge . . 

Julia A 

Julia Ward* j 

Katie A. Burns . . . ! 
Lady of the Lake . . 
| Laura E. Douglas*. 
Marion Emerson* . . 1 
Marion Emerson . . | 
Sarah L. Oxner .... 

|Sea Bird 

Sea Pearl 

Two Brothers . . . 
Wave 



Port of 
Registry. 



Pictou. 
Canso . 
Pictou . 



bo 

c3 

c 

O 

H 



Name of Owner 
or 

Managing Owner. 



Residence. 



Halifax 

Charlotte town 
Pictou 



Charlottetown . 



Halifax 



Barrington 
Pictou 



Halifax 

Charlottetown 



40 
12 
17 
17 

24 
27 
23 
23 
57 
15 
39 
36 
20 
39 
30 
30 
34 
20 
11 
26 
19 



John Herring. . . . 
Albert McLeod. . 

George Dunn 

Neil C. Penny 

Joseph Lane 

Simon Cheverie. . 
Benj. H. Herring. 



Murray Har. S. . 



Souris, East . . . 

Souris 

Murray Har. S. 



Henry Dicks Georgetown 

Gabriel Billard ! Beach Point .... 

Thomas Roberts | Murray Harb. ,S. 

Joseph White [ „ 

Samson Bowdridge ! Beach Point. . . . 

John Dicks [Georgetown 

Reuben Cahoon I Murray Harb.,S. 

M , II 

Edward Delory Georgetown . . . 

Phillip Strickland . . Cape Bear .. 
Augustine Boudreau . . Lower Montague 

John Gosbee Murray River. . . 

James Delorey Georgetown 



- 



- 

— — 

S's 



9 
4 
6 
4 
6 
6 
5 
3 
7 
4 
9 
9 
6 
5 
9 
9 
5 
4 
5 
5 
2 



PRINCE COUNTY. 



'3 

o >, 

£ I 
5 5 
gPQ 



$ cts. 

103 00 
38 00 
59 00 
43 00 
66 00 
66 00 

58 00 

42 50 
102 50 

41 00 
102 00 
94 50 

59 00 
74 00 
93 00 
88 50 
66 50 
46 00 

43 50 
58 50 
32 00 



71310 
103771 
92473 
103592 
94992 
96926 
88518 



Black Watch . . . 
J. Anny ....... 

Lucy Louise 

Rosamond * 

Sarah P. Ayer.. . 

Sea Foam . 

W. F. Elizabeth, 



Charlottetown . 
Chatham . ... 
Charlottetown . 



Sydney 



23 
12 
19 
18 
64 
15 
10 



John Poirier 

James Roach 

Michael Lynch 

John Champion 

John W. Skerry 

Roderick McDougald 



Alberton 


4 


49 


00 


Tignish 


5 


44 


50 


Malpeque 


4 


45 


00 


Tignish 


t 


18 


00 


Alberton 


7 


109 


50 




3 


34 


50 


Port Hill . 


2 


23 


00 



QUEEN'S COUNTY. 



92166 



G. H. Gardner:.., Charlottetown.. 



17 E. Marshall, jr. 



North Rustico 



* For 1899. 

t Crew not entitled to bounty. 



56 00 



22—3 



34 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII 

List of Vessels which received Fishing Bounty, &c. — Con. 



A. 1902 



PROVINCE OF QUEBEC. 
GASPE COUNTY. 



1) 

Jo 


- 

"3 

se 
o 



103934 
85399 
193148 

94675 



Name of Vessel. 



Diamond Jubilee 
Minnie May .... 
River Pride 

Success 



Port of 
Registry. 



New Carlisle . . 
Magdalen Isl'ds. 

Gaspe 

Halifax 



St 
oS 

c 
a 

o 
Eh 



Name of Owner 
or 

Managing Owner. 



32 
10 

52 

15 



Residence. 



- 



* T3 
r - 



— 

'5 



D. Hatton & Co Montreal 

Charles Cormier Amherst 

Alexander & Le Mar- 

quand [Point St. Peters. 

R. J. Leslie. ! Halifax 





| cts. 


5 


64 00 


4 


36 00 


9 


110 50 


2 


28 00 



SAGUENAY COUNTY. 



85756 
80754 
69382 
75445 

103358 
75680 
80753 

107231 
92334 
66727 



Aristile 

Eugenie 

Marie du SacreCoeur 

Phoenix 

Romeo 

Sea Star 

Stella Marls 

Ste. Anne 

Ste. Marie 

Willow 



Quebec j 19 

ii ^ 

Gasne 46 

., 28 

„ 22 

52 

„ 51 

„ 13 

„ 53 

Halifax 18 



Phileas Yezina 

Andre Vigneau 

Alexandre Turbis . . . 
Napoleon Scherrer . . 

Louis Pineau 

Fidele Cormier 

Louis Cummings 
Magloire Chouinard . 
Pierre Ouelette 



St. Michel 


2 


32 


00 


Esquimaux Pt. 
ii . . 


7 


93 


50 


10 


111 


00 


ii . . 


7 


73 


50 


Bic 


2 


35 


00 


Esquimaux Pt. . 


6 


91 


oo 




10 


116 


00 


Manicouagan . . . 


3 


32 


50 


Quebec 


6 


92 


00 


'St. Thomas .... 


3 


37 


50 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— NOVA SCOTIA 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



35 



APPENDIX No. 3. 

NOVA SCOTIA. 

District No. 1. — Comprising the four counties of the Island of Cape Breton. 
Inspector A. C. Bertram, North Sydney, C.B. 

District No. 2. — Comprising the counties of Cumberland, Colchester, Pictou, 
Antigonish, Guysborough, Halifax and Hants. 

Inspector Robert Hockin, Pictou. 

District No. 3. — Comprising the counties of King's, Annapolis, Digby, Yarmouth, 
Shelburne, Queen's and Lunenburg. 

Inspector L. S. Ford, Milton. 

DISTRICT No. 1. 

ANNUAL REPORT ON THE FISHERIES OF CAPE BRETON ISLAND, 1900. 

North Sydney, C.B., December 31, 1900. 

To the Dominion Commissioner of Fisheries, 

Department of Marine and Fisheries, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report of the fisheries for 
the year 1900, of District No. 1, comprising the four counties of the Island of Cape 
Breton, together with statistical tables showing in detail the catch of each kind of fish 
in each section and county, the total value of said catch, as well as the number of people 
employed in the work, and the classification and value of materials used ; also, a brief 
synopsis of the fishery overseers' reports. 

At the outset I regret to have to report a decrease in the value of the total catch 
of 8228,322. The value of the catch of the previous year was $1,300,409, and that of 
1900, $1,072,087. This decrease is made up by the returns from the counties of Cape 
Breton, Inverness and Richmond. 

The following table will show more clearly the increase and decrease in each 
county : — 



County. 


Value. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


1899. 


1900. 




S cts. 

387,260 00 
311,898 75 
473,880 04 
127,370 85 


{ cts. 

260,105 95 
225,081 48 
456,444 20 
130,455 30 


$ cts. 


I cts. 

127,154 05 
86,817 27 
17,435 84 


Inverness 




Richmond 




Victoria 


3,084 45 






1,300,409 64 


1,072,086 93 




231,407 16 
3,084 45 




Decrease 








228,322 71 


I 







22-3$ 



36 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

The kinds of fish, which make up the total decrease in the returns from the whole 
island are pickled salmon, herring, mackerel, lobsters (in shell), cod, haddock, pollock, 
smelts, oysters and squid. The cause of the marked decrease in the fisheries in Cape 
Breton, and I may add, in Inverness and Richmond counties as well, is owing to the 
drain on the fishing districts as a result of the construction of the Dominion Iron and 
Steel plant in Sydney, as well as the additional employment given in the coal mines this 
year in Cape Breton county, besides the construction of the railway in Inverness county 
and development of the mines there. Hundreds of men who formerly were engaged in 
fishing were employed a good part of the fishing season at good wages at the works above 
referred to. Not only were hundreds of Cape Breton fishermen employed at these works, 
but some three thousand fishermen from Newfoundland were also given employment 
here. As the iron and steel plant construction is about through, many of the fishermen 
employed will no doubt return to their respective districts to again engage in the prose- 
cution of the fisheries. 

I find in the four leading branches of the fisheries, viz.: lobsters, cod, mackerel and 
herring that thei'e is a decrease this year in all excepting canned lobsters. The fact 
that there were six more canneries engaged this season than last, accounts for the in- 
creased pack of 183,828 pounds. I may add here that in the majority of the districts 
of the costal waters, lobsters were as plentiful as during any one of the three previous 
years. 

COD. 

The falling off in the codfishery is greater than any other branch, being 23,900 
cwt., the returns from each of the four counties showing a decreased catch. In the 
early part of the summer, cod, as is invariably the case in recent years, are scarce in 
the inshore waters, but in the autumn months these fish come inshore, particularly in 
the costal waters from St. Anns Bay to Cape St. Lawrence, Victoria county. On this 
stretch of coast, during the month of December, the waters are literally alive with 
these fish, and the fishermen, in a few hours fishing, when weather permits, fill their 
boats. Their presence this autumn in such large numbers is no doubt owing to the 
large run of squid, which preceeded the cod. As codfishery will be continued during 
the month of January in the costal waters in Victoria county, when weather permits, 
the returns next year for this county should exhibit a large increase in this branch. 



MACKEREL. 

There is also a decrease in pickled mackerel of 1,670 brls. The falling off in this 
branch has occurred in the autumn fishery. On their journey south these fish kept out 
in deep water. The United States mackerel fleet fared very poorly on the Cape Breton 
coast this fall. Scarcity of fish was the reason given by American seiners, many of 
of the vessels leaving our coast with less than a third catch. 



HERRING. 

In herring there is a decreased catch of 8,900 barrels of pickled, and 244,660 lbs. 
in smoked and fresh. This decrease has again occurred in the mid-summer run. This 
run of herring, as is well known, are large and fat, and when well cured are equal to the 
Labrador herring of years ago in size and flavour. The spring run of herring are small 
and are largely used for bait, particularly lobster bait. Attempts were made by some 
vessel fishermen to throw seines on certain spawning grounds in June when these fish 
were spawning, but having learned of this I personally notified the captains of the ves- 
sels of the consequence if they threw a seine, which they did not do. 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— NOVA SCOTIA 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

SALMON. 



37 



In this branch there is an increase in fresh, canned and smoked of 92,052 lbs., 
while there is a falling off in pickled salmon of 860 brls. The increase in the fresh 
and the falling off in pickled salmon is owing to the increased demand for the fresh 
article for the freezers. The fishermen obtain a better price from the owners of freezers 
than from the fish merchants, who buy these fish to pickel. There is an opening for 
freezers in Ingonish and Aspy Bay, where enough salmon and mackerel, as well as hali- 
but for two freezers, can be had during the fishing season. There is also a good market 
abroad for this class of fish, besides the growing market in Cape Breton for fresh fish, 
as a result of the increased population in the Sydneys and in the mining towns. 

HALIBUT. 

The increase of 50,294 lbs. in this branch may be attributed to the more vigorous 
prosecution in consequence of the demand in the local markets for fresh halibut. This 
branch should be more vigorously prosecuted in the future as a result of increased local 
demand for the fresh article. The statistics this year show an increase in all branches 
of fresh fish as a result of the increased population in the Cape Breton county towns. 



VESSELS AND BOATS. 

In 1899 there were 102 vessels and 523 men engaged in the prosecution of the 
fisheries, against 108 vessels and 656 men this year. There is, however, a decrease in 
both the number of boats and men. In 1899 there were 3,252 boats employed and 
6,244 men, as compared with 3,010 boats and 5,790 men this year. The increase of six 
in fishing vessels is a favourable feature of the fisheries in this district, and it is to be 
hoped an increase will occur every year, as vessels can reach the outside well fished 
banks and engage in the prosecution of the fishery when small boats cannot go out 
owing to rough weather. With the vessels it is a case of going outside of the Canadian 
inshore waters and competing with fishermen of other countries in the fish wealth, while 
the inshore waters are given a chance. There is no doubt there is more money for the 
fishermen in vessel fishing than in boat fishing, besides less labour. 



BAIT. 

The bait question is being solved by the department's system of establishing 
freezers in different fishing districts. The department in thus assisting in the establish- 
ment of ' bait freezers ' is rendering good service to the country and it is hoped the 
fishermen will do their part. They will be the principal gainers, as the success of the 
department's efforts to assist them will depend on their efforts to assist themselves. 

NEW FISH HATCHERY. 

The work of construction of the new fish hatchery on the Margaree River has com- 
menced, and this hatchery, when completed, promises to be one of the best equipped in 
Canada. The salmon spawn for this hatchery will be taken from the midsummer run of 
parent fish caught in the Margaree and Little River Cheticamp, and the salmon hatched 
out in this hatchery will largely be used to stock these two rivers from which the 
heaviest drain of any rivers in Cape Breton occurs every year, as a result of gill-net 
fishing in the costal and tidal waters adjacent to these two rivers. 

There are two runs of salmon entering the Margaree and Little rivers in Inverness 
county. The first run make their appearance after the middle of June and the second 



38 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

run first appear in September. The first run under our present salmon regulations are 
the commercial fish. The salmon fishing season expires before the September run of 
salmon make their appearance. It is therefore the first run of salmon which should be 
captured to supply the hatchery with spawn, being the commercial run of fish so called. 
The fall or September run, is usually twenty-five per cent greater than the midsummer 
or our present commercial run. This, T think, is owing to the stocking of the rivers 
from the Sydney hatchery which took its spawn from the fall run of salmon. The close 
season for salmon gill-net fishing begins on August 15. The September run, therefor, is 
of no commercial value, while these fish which spawn later are good food fish in 
September. I would therefore recommend that in the tidal waters of Margaree and 
Little rivers, net fishing be prohibited until August 20, and one month be allowed inside 
to gill-net fishing in these waters until September 20. 

OYSTERS, 

The oyster beds of Malagawatch and River Dennis Basin are much in need of 
attention, as the beds apparently are becoming extinct. I am of the opinion that the 
wash from the now cultivated and fertilized farms adjacent these grounds is carrying 
deleterious matter to the beds to their injury. Mr. Kemp, the expert, upon investigation, 
I have no doubt, could determine the cause of these once prolific beds becoming extinct. 
These beds were, years ago, extensively fished and their product found its way to the 
towns and cities of the provinces, as well as to St. Johns, Nfld., and St. Pierre, Miq. 
Now the local demand cannot be supplied so limited is this fishery. 



SYNOPSES OF FISHERY OVERSEER'S REPORTS FOR THE 
ISLAND OF CAPE BRETON, 1900. 

Overseer A. R. Forbes, of North Sydney, reports an increase in mackerel, herring 
and lobsters over last season and a decrease in cod, haddock, hake and pollock. 
Lobsters were plentiful and the weather during the season was all that could be 
desired. Herring, mackerel and halibut met with ready sale. The regulations were 
well observed. 

Overseer Murdo McLean, of Jacksonville, reports an increase in herring in his 
division. The regulations were well observed. A greater quantity of fish was used for 
home consumption than heretofore. 

Overseer John McLean, of Gabarus Lake, reports a good catch of herring, mackerel 
and lobsters, which he attributes to fine weather during the respective seasons. Cod 
and haddock show a decrease caused by stormy weather during the autumn months. 

Overseer John McCuish, of Bateston, reports a marked decrease in all branches of 
the industry in his district this season with the exception of lobsters. This decrease he 
attributes to scarcity of bait more than to a less vigorous prosecution of the industry. 
No abuses exist in this district and the regulations were well observed. About ten per 
cent of the total catch was used for home consumption, the balance being exported to 
Canadian markets. 

Overseer M. JR. Mclnnis, of Amaguades Pond, in his report notes a decrease in 
lobsters owing to a scarcity of these fish and a less vigorous prosecution of the industry. 
Other branches show an increase over the previous year. About sever. ty-five per cent 
of the total catch was exported to Canadian markets ; the balance was used for home 
consumption. The close seasons have been well observed. 

Overseer C. E. Bees, of Port Morien. — The statistics of this officer show a consider 
able increase in salmon, lobsters and mackerel, while there is a falling off in cod, 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— NOVA SCOTIA 3& 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

haddock, pollock and halibut. The cause of the decrease he attributes to a less vigorous 
prosecution of the industry than formerly. Close seasons were well observed. About 
20 per cent of fish taken was exported and the balance used for home consumption. 



INVERNESS COUNTY. 

Overseer D. F. McLean, of Port Hood, reports a decrease in salmon, mackerel, cod, 
haddock, hake, alewives and squid, and an increase in lobsters, trout and smelts. The 
decrease is principally due to a less vigorous prosecution of the industry. The violent 
storms in September and October did much damage to boats and fishing gear and thus 
effected the catch to some extent. About 30 per cent of the fish taken in his district 
was used for home consumption and the remainder exported to foreign countries. No 
abuses exist in his district, and the several close seasons were well observed. A bait 
freezer is in course of construction at Port Hood Island, which will doubtless prove 
quite a boon to fishermen in that locality. 

Overseer J. B. McLellan, of Kingsville, reports a decrease in all branches of the 
fisheries in his district this season. This decrease was due to scarcity of fish. The total 
catch, with the exception of a small portion of herring sold to fishing vessels for bait, 
was used for home consumption. No illegal fishing came to his notice, the guardians 
employed in his district having taken the utmost precautions to guard against such. 

Overseer Lewis McKeen, of Mabou. The returns for the district over which this 
officer has supervision show a considerable increase in salmon, herring and mackerel. 
The cause of this increase may be attributed more properly to the fact that these fish 
were found plentiful than to vigorous prosecution of the industry. Lobsters show a 
falling off as compared with 1899. This may be accounted for by the fact that the 
season was late in opening owing to the presence of drift ice on the coast. The price of 
lobsters, however, ruled higher than in previous years, which made up for the poor 
catch this season. The regulations were well observed. No abuses exist in his district. 
The total catch of fish taken in his district was used for home consumption, with the 
exception of lobsters which were shipped to Halifax. 

Overseer Angus Mcintosh, of Pleasant Bay, reports an increase in salmon, cod and 
mackerel, and a decrease in lobsters. The cod fishery is not prosecuted to any great 
extent in his district, and the total catch is used for home consumption. The decrease 
in lobsters he attributes to a less vigorous prosecution of the industry than formerly, 
there being one factory less in operation than in the previous year. The close seasons 
were well observed. The total catch of mackerel was shipped to the United States, 
while lobsters and salmon were sold in Canada. 

Overseer Wm. Aucoin, of Cheticamp, reports a decrease in the fisheries of his dis- 
trict this season owing to a less vigorous prosecution of the industry. The fishermen 
are now turning their attention to other and more remunerative pursuits. Stormy 
weather also interfered with the fisheries this season, especially in the case of the 
lobster industry. About 75 per cent of the total catch was disposed of in Canada, the 
balance being used for home consumption. The close seasons were well observed. 

Overseer Albert Ingraham, of N. E. Margaree, reports that the close seasons were 
strictly observed in his district, as well as the Sawdust Act. He recommends that a 
larger number of guardians be employed during the coming season in order to protect 
the salmon fishery, now that the new hatchery is under course of construction, and 
salmon will be required for breeding purposes. 

Overseer A. A. Chisholm, of Margaree Forks, shows a decrease in cod and lobstersr 
and an increase in salmon, mackerel, hake and halibut. The total catch, with the 
exception of about 30 per cent, was shipped to Canadian and American markets. The 
close seasons were well observed, and the guardians employed rendered efficient service. 



40 



MARINE AXD FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

RICHMOND COUNTY. 

Overseer D. R. Boyle, of West Arichai, reports an increased catch of salmon, herring, 
mackerel, lobsters, fresh and smoked haddock, pollock, eels and squid, and a decrease 
in cod, haddock (dried), hake and alewives. The decreases, which occur chiefly in dried 
fish, such as cod and haddock, he attributes to the largely increased quantities of the 
fresh article disposed of. The increase in lobsters is owing to the reduction in the size 
limit, and the fact that the run of lobsters along the coast was of a much larger size 
than usual. With the exception of smelts and live lobsters, which were exported to the 
United States, all the fish was sold in Canadian markets. About ten per cent was 
consumed at home. Close seasons were well observed. 

Overseer Arch. Morrison, of Cannes, reports a decrease in the catch of all kinds of 
fish in his district, with the exception of lobsters. This industry proved more remune- 
rative than in past years, both with regard to quantity caught and prices obtained. 
The short catches in other branches he attributes to scarcity of fish. Ninety-five per 
cent of the total catch was sold in Canada and the remainder used for home consump- 
tion. No abuses exist and the close seasons were well observed. 

Overseer Arthur Brymer, of Loiver U Ardoise, returns a decrease in herring, lobsters, 
cod and haddock, and an increased catch of mackerel, halibut and pollock. The halibut 
and pollock industries received more attention from the fishermen this season, there 
being a better market for these fish than formerly, and this fact doubtless accounts for 
the increased catch. The lobster fishery was also more vigorously prosecuted on account 
of the high prices prevailing for these fish. Close seasons were well observed. A large 
percentage of the total catch was exported to Canadian markets. 



VICTORIA COUNTY. 

Overseer W. R. Mojfatt, of Gape North, reports a decrease in nearly all branches of 
the industry with the exception of salmon and herring. He attributes this falling off 
to a less vigorous prosecution of the industry than formerly. Many of the fishermen 
have abandoned their calling to secure employment at the iron and steel works under 
course of construction at Sydney. Herring were moi'e plentiful than for many previous 
years. About 95 per cent of the total catch of all kinds of fish for his district was 
exported to Canadian and American markets and the balance used for home consump- 
tion. Close seasons were well observed. 

Overseer D. P. Montgomery, of Xeils Harbour. — The returns of this officer exhibit a 
decrease in herring and mackerel over the previous year and about an average catch in 
other branches. Dogfish interfered with the prosecution of the industry to some extent. 
No abuses exist and the close seasons were observed. About 90 per cent of the total 
catch is sold in Canada. 

Overseer Alex. Morrison, of Wreck Cove, reports an increase in mackerel, herring and 
lobsters, while there is a falling off in the codfishery. This falling off he attributes to 
the fact that fishermen who previously engaged in this industry turned their attention 
this season to lobster fishing, as this branch proved more remunerative than in past 
seasons. The total catch of lobsters and salmon were shipped to Halifax. Of the 
other branches, about one half the catch was used at home. Close seasons were well 
observed. 

Overseer Angus McLean, of Ingonish. — This officer's returns will exhibit a decrease 
in herring, mackerel, cod and haddock. The decrease in the above named branches is 
principally due to a less vigorous prosecution of the industry than formerly, fishermen 
this year turning their attention to other pursuits. Lobsters show only an average 
catch. About 5 per cent of the total catch is used for home consumption, the remainder 
is exported to Canadian markets. 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— NOVA SCOTIA 



41 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

Overseer Ghas. McRae, of Middle River, reports a slight decrease in all branches of 
the industry this season owing to a less vigorous prosecution. Storms also did con- 
siderable damage and interfered with the fisheries. Sixty per cent of the total catchis 
disposed of in Canada and the balance used for home consumption. No abuses exist 
and the close seasons were well observed. 

Overseer Duncan Gillis, of Baddeck, reports an increase in the total value of fish 
taken in his district this season, caused by an increased catch of salmon, herring and 
cod. Mackerel and lobsters exhibit a decrease. About 30 per cent of the total catch 
was used for home consumption. No abuses exist and the close seasons were well 
observed. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

A. C. BERTRAM, 

Inspector of Fisheries. 



DISTRICT No. 2. 



ANNUAL REPORT ON THE FISHERIES OF DISTRICT No. 2, NOVA SCOTIA, 
COMPRISING THE COUNTIES OF ANTIGONISH, COLCHESTER, CUM- 
BERLAND, GUYSBOROUGH, HALIFAX, HANTS AND PICTOU. 



Pictou, Nova Scotia, January 2, 1901. 



To the Dominion Commissioner of Fisheries, 
Ottawa. 



Sir, — I have the honour to submit my annual report of the fisheries of District 
No. 2, Nova Scotia, together with tabulated returns showing the increase or decrease of 
of each kind of fish. 

The estimated value of the total catch for the past season is $2,112,022, as com- 
pared with the estimated value of the catch for the season 1899, $1,721,734, showing 
an increase of 8390,288, or nearly 23 per cent over the value of that year. This 
increase is chiefly attributable to the very large catch of mackerel in some parts of the 
district. 

The following table shows the estimated value of several years' catch since the year 
1890, when this district was allotted to me : — 



n, 
i, 
i, 

i, 
i, 
i, 
l, 
i, 
i, 
i, 

2, 



453,015 
640,912 
357,208 
427,605 
510,900 
429,782 
245,463 
461,327 
456,271 
721,735 
112,022 



1890. 

1891 . 

1892. 

1893 

1894 

1895. 

1896. 

1897. 

1898. 

1899. 

1900. 



Showing that the results of last season's fishing has been 34 per cent better than the 
average of the past ten years. 



42 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Of the anadromous fishes the reports show that of salmon there is an increase of 
24 per cent ; shad, a decrease of 42 per cent ; smelts, an increase of 3 per cent, and 
ale wives, an increase of 27 per cent. 

Of the deep-sea fishes, the catch of halibut show an increase of about 1^ per cent j 
cod, a decrease of about 20 per cent ; haddock, an increase of about 17 per cent ; hake, 
an increase of about 10 per cent, and pollock, a decrease of about 33 per cent 

Aggregating the catch of the whole cod family and comparing it with last year s 
(and this because of the fact that the average fisherman rarely can give the quantities 
of each of the different kinds he has caught), there is a decrease of about 1 1 per cent. 



SALMON, 



The conditions of this fishery in this district are peculiar, because that a portion of 
the district is on the Atlantic coast, another on the Straits of Northumberland, and a 
third on the Bay of Fundy. There have been times when there has been a decrease in 
some parts and an increase in others, but this season there appears to have been an 
increase in the catch over the whole district — on the Atlantic coast, of 80 per cent ; on 
the Straits of Northumberland, of 20 per cent, and on the Bay of Fundy, of 10 per cent. 
In my report of the season of 1896, T noted the fact that the rivers during the months 
of October and November of that year had been kept brimful owing to the heavy rains, 
and that the spawning salmon could not easily be molested, and it was expected the 
results would be beneficial to the future of the fishery. For the protection of the parent 
fish when in the rivers for spawning purposes, we have to rely upon the energy and 
faithfulness of the guardians appointed to patrol the rivers. The persons who are likely 
to violate the regulations are those living near the river, and as the fish do not ascend 
many of the rivers until the close season, they do not participate in any resulting increase 
by the protection of the fish, hence the guardians work in an adverse community. 
Nevertheless there are frequent indications of activity and honest effort upon the part 
of such officers. Nets are seized and convictions obtained against offenders by their 
evidence. 



SHAD. 



This fishery exhibits fluctuations which are of a puzzling character without any 
known change in the conditions regarding their spawning or capture. The returns for 
the past twelve years give the following figures as the catch for each season : — 

Barrels. 

1889 535 

1890 750 

1891 1,178 

1892 1,811 

1893 746 

1894 981 

1895 1,185 

1896 %m. 

1897 1,382 

1898 2,777 

1899 3,208 

1900 ... 1,375 



a decrease of about 43 per cent, and if the fish are estimated at $10 per barrel, a loss 
compared with 1899 of $18,000 to the counties of Cumberland, Colchester and Hants, 
in this district (for these fish are chiefly taken in the Bay of Fundy). It will be seen, 
however, that the catch is an average one of the past twelve years, but at the same time 
is much smaller than the reported results of this fishery twenty -five to thirty years ago. 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS- NOVA SCOTIA 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

ALEWIVES. 



43 



From the counties of Cumberland and Guysborough there are reports of an increased 
catch. They are said to have been very plentiful at the head of the Bay of Fundy. 
The returns from the Straits of Northumberland are about the same as last year. 



SMELTS. 

Judging from the returns, the quantity of these fish taken was in excess of last 
season. Owing, however, to the unusually mild weather prevailing during the season, 
they could not be marketed in good condition and prices were not remunerative. 



HERRING, 

The catch of herring has been larger by twenty-five per cent than that of last year, 
but is under the average of the past twelve years by about 14 per cent. The question 
is discussed as to the advisability of setting apart a portion of the coast waters in the 
vicinity of Fishermans Harbour and Port Beckerton. It is argued that in September 
large quantities of herring are taken which are full of spawn, and that there should be 
no nets set in this area at that time. I think it will be found, that herring taken at 
any part of the coast about that period are in the same condition, and that if there be a 
close season it should apply to the whole coast. One question for examination is whether 
at that period of the year, herring are to be found more plentiful at the place mentioned 
than at other parts of the coast. Another is whether these fish frequent the same places 
for spawning purposes, or do they deposit spawn just where they happen to be at the 
ripening period. I have understood that such is the case and that no particular portion 
of the coast can be said to be a spawning resort more than other localities. 



MACKEREL. 

The reports show a phenomenally large catch of these fish, being equal to 43,600 
barrels, about 170 per cent of an increase over the catch of last year, which was about 
an average catch of the past twelve years. This increase is largely owing to the unusual 
catch in Margarets Bay, Halifax County, where more of these fish were taken than have 
been caught during the past twenty-five years. On other parts of the coast good catches 
were made, better than last year, but nothing like the quantities obtained in that 
locality. 

LOBSTERS. 

The value of the reported catch of lobsters is just about the same as that of last 
year. There was a slight increase of about 2 per cent over that of last season from 
nearly all of the counties interested in this fishery. The returns are better, that is to 
say, from Halifax and Guysborough on the Atlantic, Antigonish, Pictou and Colchester on 
the Straits of Northumberland have all had better catches than last year, but Cumber- 
land County officials report a decrease equal to about 15 per cent. It is to be noted 
that in seasons when the catches from Pictou and Antigonish were less than average, 
that from Cumberland was more. This season the converse is true. One of the over- 
seers lately appointed, Mr. Campbell, in Cumberland County, who has had years of 
experience as a lobster packer, urges that some measures be adopted for the preservation 
of spawn lobsters other than the present methods. There is a penalty for having spawn 
lobsters in possession, not exceeding one hundred dollars, but it would require an officer 
present at every factory every day to prevent violations, and Mr. Campbell's proposition 
to have the eggs preserved and developed in hatcheries, and the fry placed back into the 



44 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

ocean to take its chances for life, I believe to be worthy of serious consideration. I have 
for years believed that this is the best thing that can be done for the fishery in view of 
our present fishing season, and especially if eggs can be incubated at a cost not exceeding 
two dollars per million. During the past season the lobster regulation regarding time 
limits have been well observed, excepting on that part of the coast bordering on the 
province of New Brunswick, and convictions have been obtained in two eases there and 
the parties fined forty dollars each. Upon the Atlantic coast, where formerly much 
illegal fishing existed, there is now practically none, the suspected violators are under 
five, and if means can be devised to secure convictions in their cases, they will be dealt 
with severely. Four parties were sent to jail, not having paid their fines for violation 
of these regulations and it is hoped that these examples will have a deterring effect. 

The experiment of freezing fish for bait, which has been begun at Whitehead, 
Beckerton and Sambro, in this district, and also at Cape George, will be watched with 
interest. It is argued by some that when herring are on the shore, deep-sea fishes, cod, 
haddock, etc., will take no other bait ■ that the same holds good when squid is abundant, 
and that when neither are present, there are no deep-sea fish either, that therefore the 
results from freezers, so far as bait is concerned, is problematical. 

Fish-ways are required in a number of dams in the district which have been 
previously reported. Two serviceable structures were completed during the past sum- 
mer — one at Ingram River and one at Ship Harbour River. The last, however, has not 
been inspected yet, but I hope to do so as soon as the gaspereaux appear. 



SYNOPSIS OF OVERSEERS REPORTS. 



Overseer McAdam, of Antigonish County, says that salmon, mackerel and lobsters 
were more plentiful than the previous year, but owing to the scarcity of bait the cod, 
haddock and lake fishing were not prosecuted as vigorously as would have been done 
had bait been available. The freezers at Cape George, it is hoped, will provide sufficient 
bait when it cannot be obtained otherwise. Close seasons were well observed, 
guardians rendering efficient service. One infraction only of the fishery laws came to 
his notice, but he could not procure sufficient evidence to convict. The fish way at 
Fraser's Mills, South River, is not in a satisfactory condition. 

Overseer J. W. Davison, of Colchester County, says the catch of shad was the 
smallest that has been taken for many years. In former times he has reported as many 
as 5,000 barrels ; last season's catch was only 269. He claims that the falling off is 
because the shad are not protected during spawning season ; that the present close sea 
son from Friday evening until Monday morning is useless, for when you get shad up in 
a small river the use of large nets for three or four days each week must result in 
enormous destruction, and unless the close season extends during the whole spawning 
time it is useless. The salmon fishery was satisfactory, being 17 per cent over last year 
and 214 per cent over 1898. This increase attributes to the disposition of the people to 
obey the season regulations. 

Overseer James R. Mother, of Hants County, joins with Overseer Davison in com- 
plaints of the inadequacy of protection afforded the spawning shad, which appear in 
May, and great numbers caught before reaching the spawning resorts. He proposes a 
close season until June 20, and that all weirs and seines set for shad be compelled to 
open their gates between Friday night and Monday morning. 

Overseer John Campbell, of Cumberland, says lobsters have been scarce in the 
district as compared with other seasons. The bottom that is fished over is mostly mud 
and sand, which lobsters frequent at shelling time. Some packers favour a later season 
than the present which ends July 10. Lobsters generally are becoming scarcer owing 
to the immense amount of gear used over the whole coast, and also to the fact that by 
reckless men, as many in the business are, the law is not well observed, especially with 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS—NOVA SCOTIA 



45 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

regard to the preservation of the berried female. Many fishermen who are desirous 
of preserving the fishery are yet careless about returning those fish to the sea, feeling 
sure that they will be caught and used by those who are indifferent and the shells 
burned to prevent detection. There seems to be a need of some method of securing the 
spawn of berried lobsters. Cheap hatcheries should be maintained and an inducement 
offered to save the spawn. Part of the expense could be met by an additional license 
tax, for it would be no injustice to factories or fishermen to have to bear part, as it 
would be for their benefit. The result of the smelt fishery was about the same as last 
year, but very much less than formerly. Like the lobster they are more vigorously 
fished for. The gaspereaux fishing is rapidly becoming scarcer owing to the rivers being 
obstructed by dams. The lobster fishery season regulations were generally well observed. 
Two or three cases of infraction came to his notice and some of the parties had been 
convicted and fined. 

Overseer Joseph Davis says, during the season for catching lobsters the weather was 
favourable and high prices were received. Salmon were plentiful. Herring scarce but 
of very superior quality, and they brought a better price. The season has been a fairly 
prosperous one and the law has been well observed. Only two violations came to his 
notice ; both offenders were fined. 

Overseer David Reid, Guysborough County, St. Mary's District, says the salmon 
fishery is slightly in the increase over 1899. Splendid catches of herring were taken, 
especially at Drumhead, Fisherman's Harbour and Beckerton. The cod fishery was 
below last season, owing to rough weather in the autumn months. The guardians were 
active in the discharge of their duties, however. No violations were reported to him. 

Overseer Gaston, of Halifax, says the season was a very prosperous one for the 
fishermen. The close season was well observed, only one case of illegal fishing came to 
his notice, and proceedings were taken against the offender and he was convicted and 
fined. There were three fish-ways in his division all in need of repair. 

Overseer George Rowlings, of Halifax, says that in the cod fishery the boat fishermen 
did not do nearly so well as last year, owing to the rough weather during the autumn. 
There was an increase in the alewives, but it was observed that although there are large 
lakes at the head of Petpeswick and Chezzetcook rivers, and there are no obstructions 
in the rivers, but no alewives entered them. The department is having a canal built at 
the entrance of Porter's lake for navigation purposes, which, when completed, the lake 
should abound with gasperaux as it formerly did, but owing to the inlet from the sea 
being frequently closed at spawning times, the fish are scarce. The close season, 
especially with regard to lobsters, has been well observed. Fishermen do not seem to 
have any disposition to violate the law as they did a few years ago. At the same time, 
he urges the patrol of the coast by a steamer, as the only practical way of maintaining 
the law. Fish-ways should exist in the dam on the Lawrencetown river which is 
frequented by salmon trout and alewives, but it is completely obstructed by this dam. 
A new dam has been built at the head of the tide at Ship Harbour with a fish-way in it. 

Overseer Wm. Kennedy, West Halifax, remarks the very large catch of mackerel in 
Margaret's Bay. These fish are taken largely by seines. During the fishing season a 
lookout is kept for signs of mackerel, and when they are in the bay the seine is partly 
run out. A watchman is stationed in a suitable place, who uses a water-glass and 
watches the movement of the fish along the bottom. As soon as a favourable opportunity 
is afforded, the seine is paid out round a school and the lot of fish secured. Sometimes 
very large hauls are made. Owing to the great quantity of the fish taken, the prices 
realized were not equal to previous years. He notes the completion of a fish-way at 
Snake Lake dam, Ingram river. Another is wanted at Boutelier's dam, Nine-mile river. 

Overseer A. J. McDonald, Pictou East, says spring herring were very plentiful. 
The lobster factory which had been operated at Lismore in 1899 was closed during the 
season of 1900. The close seasons were well observed and the rivers faithfully protected 
by the guardians. Some poachers were seen in disguise in Barney's river, but they 
escaped arrest and identification. 



46 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Overseer Nathaniel Forbes says that the several close seasons were well observed. 
The lobster regulations coming in force for the first time, setting a time limit for the 
putting out of traps, was found to have been violated by one of the packers setting his 
traps too soon, but in view of recent legislation, he was cautioned to remove them and 
did so after some hesitation. The Sunday law which requires that all nets, whether 
under license or not, shall be so raised or adapted for the free 1 passage of fish from 
Saturday night until Monday morning, was found to have been violated. Five nets 
were seized and confiscated. The fish-gate on the east branch of St. Mary's is in good 
repair and kept free from rubbish. The rivers were full of water this fall owing to 
frequent rains and therefore favourable for the salmon fishery. 

I have the honour to be, sir, your obedient servant, 

ROBERT HOCKIN, 

Inspector of Fisheries. 

DISTRICT No. 3. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE FISHERIES OF DISTRICT No. 3, COMPRISING 
THE COUNTIES OF KING'S, ANNAPOLIS, DIGBY, YARMOUTH, 
SHELBURNE, QUEEN'S AND LUNENBURG. 

To the Dominion Commissioner of Fisheries, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report on the fisheries of 
district No. 3, Nova Scotia, together with statistical tables showing in detail the fish 
caught in each section during the past year. I am pleased to report an increased value 
in the aggregate of nearly $300,000. 



COD. 

This important branch of the fisheries, though actively prosecuted, shows a decrease 
of $80,000. It is not difficult to explain this falling off. While the bank fishermen 
have done fairly well, the shore fisheries in many places show a marked decline. One 
cause maybe the increased demand for lobsters, for as a rule all other fishing is neglected 
during the lobster season. Another reason is the scarcity of bait, not only for the use 
of fishermen, but the bait that induces the cod and haddock to visit our coast. It is a 
notable fact that cod feed largely on the small fish that ascend and descend our rivers 
yearly for spawning, and it needs no logic to show that the inshore fisheries depend to a 
larger extent than people are inclined to credit, on the free passage of such fish to their 
spawning grounds. Even mackerel have been found in the fall full of the young 
' gaspereaux' about two inches in length, caught in the estuaries of the rivers. The 
cordon or dog-fish of our coast is a source of loss and annoyance to our fishermen, and if 
some means were found to make them of commercial value, such as a bounty to manu- 
facture of phosphate manure, it would doubtless remove the pest from our shore. 



LOBSTERS. 

Following closely in value the cod family, lobsters show an increase catch of $313,161 
over that of 1899. This increase is made up by seventeen more canneries using 22,559 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS—NOVA SCOTIA 



47 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

more traps, and 416 more men engaged in the industry than last year. Last year, the 
value of lobsters shipped fresh in shell was .$459,195, this year ,$747,890, showing an 
increase for 1900 of .$288,695. Of lobsters canned last year the value was $254,919, 
and this year $279,985, an increase of over $25,000. This increased catch does not of 
necessity mean that the fish are increasing at that rate, as will readily be seen by the 
larger number of traps and men engaged in the business. At the same time, it is 
wonderful to see how they do hold out despite the suicidal attempts of some of the 
fishermen to drive them out of our waters. 

MACKEREL. 

This branch of the fishery shows a marked increase of $225,000. This increase was 
confined almost exclusively to the counties of Digby, Yarmouth and Lunenburg. Why 
they steered clear of Shelburne and Queen's needs investigation. I think in the near 
future the Departments of Fisheries of Canada and the United States will be found 
taking into consideration some method to stop this wholesale destruction of mackerel on 
their way to their spawning grounds in the fall. 

SALMON. 

Salmon show a decreased value of over $3,000. This valuable fishery needs more 
protection than it has at present. The regulations governing this fishery are neither 
practical nor profitable, and it is to be hoped they will soon be thoroughly investigated 
and improved. In the meantime the salmon ascending our rivers run the gauntlet from 
which few escape. If fishing of all kinds were stopped from sea to lakes, Saturday, 
Sunday and Monday, this valuable fishery would, in my opinion, soon show a marked 
improvement. It is a well known fact that more fish are killed above tidal waters on 
Monday than on any other day of the week. The reason is obvious. The absence of 
nets and the quiet of Sunday permit them to get to the falls. Give them Monday free 
from molestation and the question of breeding will be settled. 

HERRING. 

These fish show a decreased catch of nearly $5,000. This fishery seems to be 
declining year by year, and, as they are largely used for bait, such decline should be 
seriously considered. 

While haddock fishing shows a decrease, halibut has an increase. 

TROUT. 

Show an increased value of about $1,000. It is practically impossible, for obvious 
reasons, to estimate or in any way secure the number and value of trout caught in our 
streams. As long as they were considered as sport for the local fishermen and home 
consumption, they grew and multiplied, but since they became of commercial value and 
were exported to the United States, all sorts of traps and illegal appliances are used to 
destroy them. Unless some stringent measures are taken in the near future, there will 
be few left even for sportsmen. All other kinds of fish have been an average catch. 
Fishermen, as a rule, have done well financially, and with the later arrangements for 
freezing bait, they can hopefully look forward to the fisheries of Nova Scotia as a 
permanent business. 

1 am, sir, your obedient servant, 



L. S. FORD, 

Inpector, District No. 3. 



48 



MARINE AXD FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



O 

53 

o 

• 1—1 

U 



m 
o 

Eh 

m 
»— i 

Eh 

<3 

Eh 

m 

03 
H 

m 

GO 

I— I 

I 

1—1 

Eh 

o 

D 
w 

< 
> 
O 

J? 



*3 



43 
_= 

Cfl 

3 

ce 
o 

as 

• *H 

o 

O 
_3 

le 

>d 

1% 
5 "~ 

. s- 

zi 

■ - w° 

_ 

4> O 

- o3 

r o 
X g 

^> > 

if ^ 
O 

CD 
O 
Pi 

• rH 
> 

o 

w 
Oh 



o 



M O 
© 

PQ 



3 

> 



_ & 

§ Q 

c3 O 

§ a 

O I-H 

= 
3 

0) 
J3 

-P 

SO 

a 

• .—i 

o 

GO 



■n 

O 

3d 
3 



3 

a 

s 

o 

s. 

<o 

a. 




•.laqiunj^ 






•sqj 'suua ui 
pjAjasajd 's-ia^qoq 


© 
o 

•f 

X 
CO 














CO 

© 

CO 

© 
— 


CO f © © • 
© © © X 
CI CI ©X 

» ec © so 


f — 

A — 

? i r. 
© f 


CO 

.-. 

i 

IO 


*pq 

'pd4[B8 '[aaa^onj^ 
















- 

CO 


OOOHC) 
X © CO © 
CO T 


O CO © 
CO — CI 


L0 

© 
©. 


, 1 

& 


•sqi 

'qsaij 'pja^ouft 


s © 
o © 

- c 

— ci 












© 
© 

CO 




© © 
© © 
© © 

CO © 
i— CI 




© © 
— - 

CO • 


o 

1C1 
CO 


t— i 

o 

03 


«h 

•p.ijiorus 'Siiuaaji 


o 
© 
























© 
© 
© 


•sqj 'qsa.ij 'Suuiajj 


© 
© 
© 
t- 
co 












© © 
© - 
en © 
— 


© © 
© © 
© © 

© IC 




© 

• © • • 

• © • • 
. © . . 

I-H • • 


© 

©. 

CO 


■spq 
'pa^pss 'Joiiujajj 


h'Ocohmcnoci-'; © — © ir. 

Cl © — i-h t^ — r^t^r; 
— — * 


CO © © © 
i— © CI T 
r- Tf CO 


00 
X 

© 


•spq'pa:qi3s'uomp3g | 


























: : | » 


•sqt 

'pajjouis 'noaq«g 




























• © 

■ iH 

• CO 


© 

— 

CO 


•sq[ 'qsaaj 'tiouqug 


© © 
© © 

o in 








• © © 

• ■ © - 
■ ■ I - © 

• • CO 


© CO IT. © © © 
© x .-©.©© © 
© co © ci © ci © 

f CO — ( CO t— i CO 

• 


iO 
CO 
— 

I-H 

CO 




00 

% 

S3 
— 

- 


•anp3 A 


©©©n — triMt^irsic 

* — . ?q 
— 












© CO in 
ir: co — 

CO 


© 

CO 
CO 


\raqamfj 


i— ) i — t—\ i^t 












~ - X 

CO i- CO 


X 
CO 


DQ 

<D 

3 




ooo»otu:iioeooo8csos 
s. x © — © © © -1 cr. ~ cc i~ -r x ~ c ^r; 
a- c ?i :i - ►siiNNaicxN m — 

^- © CO COt—-* iH ■ 


CO 

CO 
CO 




©©©©ro-j , coec©©ir:©©©e':©©©'«i< 
© — © T-i — k © -r © © ©©©©—. ~ © © 
x © ir. ir. x n — — x ri © .~ i~ — © c ri 

Tf<M Ht- c © CI t— SO ft— OKM 
IM iH 


00 

o 
© 

t— 


•jaqams^ 


O(N00)a©T-<©e<l©©>QQ©frtir3©©t- 

HioNf)HT-.-jir.-*ootoooc ic ia ki 

C<1 <MrHC<3-rS<lT-Ji 


io 


DO 
< 

o 
PQ 

z 
«^ 

35 

H 

31 

m 
!> 

£5 
r. 


a3 

pq 


uapi 


© OC © © © id © CO Tf* X CO © © 00 CO £*~ © CO 

© co c: co i-i .— i so so ?i © — © ^: l~ cin-r 


X 
CO 




mioc-©©x©x©©co©©ooc©©t— x 
M ci © © © — © o -r x x c l- ?i t— c i- f 

NCriM nNtM-iaNC.^ — © X 

W H CM rH r-t 


© 
c— 

CO 


•jaqiuns^ 


COC0,-lt— r-ISNll-t-eNlf— H©o©©coir:©co 
r^NCir-. — — ci — i- ci rc © CI T CI cc 

rH 


© 
© 

L0 


• 

s 


naj^ 


X X 

X 












© 

• CO 










IC © 
iH 




CO 


•aiquA 


c r 

K © X 
W CO CO 












© 

IC 
00 




© 
© 

■CO 


© 
— 
© 




© © 
© © 
SO CI 
i-H 




© 

X 


•aSuunoj, 


© © 

DC © 
CO 












CO 




1— 1 


CO 
CO 




-. 1 - 

IH CO 




I-H 

■* 


uaqumtf j « « 
















I-H 


CO 




i-l CO 


1 CO 



© 
© 



r. ^ 3 < J - y. - - - - - S - D /. - - 



•jaqum^ 



I - X © © — 01 CO 



■ UO © t~ X © 



- 



o 
■f 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS—NOVA SCOTIA 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



w J . 

< 3 3 w 



T-HCMCOTHin©t~x©©i-HiMcoH* , m©i~x© 

_ 1— ' T-< T — It— It- It— Ii — It- I r- lr- 1 

m©©G©©©©©©©©©©©©©©© 

t~ & owoocooofowooi r — m x © o 

ooooiNMeoiOiHiniOi-icoinosoccNTtic 

© X X i—i — ~ : CO \z ~ ~ 1 m y" — © y -s, CO 
riv. r.r-ni-y. ; ;itt. CNr-iiCKC C 

ic x ?! *i ri t-^t-T© T-^-t* c r o cm*©* c^icTcTic* 

CM <NtPCMt-hcO,-It-Ht— 1— 



m 



- 

•■c 
- 1 



as c 

- 1 
- 



© 
© 

CO 



•SIJBS 4 [TO l|SI£ 



© 
lO 

co 
-ir 



e -c i- n » o o i s o o t - o k o a n 

.«r-r.r-T-C.;)«;CNn © X T-H 
CM t-H 1— I CO Tt< © CM 



©©©X©©©CM©©©t-I©©©© 

kh .— oi i— x co © ~ -r o i oi © — ic 

-I- O t M t X - Xt-i 



■f 
X 
X 
7 I 



X 
© 
© 



•sf.iq 'qsu 
paxiui puu asjuoQ 












• © 

■ CM 










© 

CM 

l 


- S{jq 'pmbg 












■ - 

• CO 


• © 

■CM 




• t—i 


lO X CO 
t-H tt CO 


i-H 
© 

CM 


•sqi 'qsy 
+ sojj jo poo UIOJ, 














• © 

• © 




















© 
© 


•sq[ 's.wpunoijf 














■ © 

■ © 

• CO 




















© 

© 
CO 


•sjjq *spg[ 




©©cm©i~xxco 

nH lO r— I t— 1 












T-H 


CM 

in 

i-H 


"S[jq 'rveajad 

-S'c3 JO S9AIM.9IY 






© • x © in • 


© 

in 




© -f 
1-H 




co o 

CM 


© 
1- 
T-H 




© 
© 
© 

T-H 




© © © © © © 
© © © © © ~ 
Nests i- x m 

T— 


© 
© 
© 
© 

T— 1 
















15500 








© 
© 


© © © • 
© © © • 

rH © m • 


















009T 




13300 










© © 
r © 

© X 

m 






m i— © © © © 
co .— © © © © 

CO CO 1— ~ © © 

x © © 

t-l 1-H 


CM 

m 
i - 

© 

© 




• in 












- - 1 - 
•—1 c-i 




cm x co © m © 

1—1 © 1 V 

»n 


in 
© 


•sqi 'spunos 'a>p:jj 


© 

(M ■ 






























© 
© 

CM 




CO • 

CM • 
























CO ■ 






T-H 

CO 


•+M0 
'p3Up '^OOpp'Bff 


• 

-r ■ 












© © © • 

1- i— X. 




i-<OS©©inoO 1 © 
CO -r -f x i-H I CO 

X T-H 1 CO 
1 t-H 


•sqi 

'usa.ij 'jpoppuff 














© © 

CM OS ■ 
t-H 


c s 
— t- 

CM © 






© ~ 
' — © 

• o © 

• T-H t-H 


© 

Tfi 

o 


•sjjq 'spunos 
puv sanSuo 4 'poQ 


© ■ 
— ■ 






















© 

T-H 



s 

•I 

s 
o 



-(© 

o 
o 
m 

> 
o 

55 



=9 



■Jj 



CD 
3 

ci 

t> 

— 

OS 



3 

CD 

tfi 

"S 

o 
a 

H 
W 

Pi 



•2 



•}A\0 'paiJp 'pOQ 



X i0 i~ 

x -- 



~ o x - 

© x © m 



t>- IC © CO T-H 



: ; c i- : o .o i- ooco 
o © -r © i~ — i.o ci i- — oi co 



© f — i~ — . 

CM f— i CM 



© CO CO 
O! 



•?avO '[[aqs 
in qsdji 'araijsqo'j 















(H 




— 


1 




«5 
u 
a. 

<5 



© 

CM r- 



; - _ 

• o - o 

• 01 CO CI 



• © 
■ -r 



> C3 
11 



zn T3 



eS 



r. 



4) 
> 

WW 



- - = 



CO 



: 

- — - 



: t-- j 

■ P tt o 

■ 'XI— g 
' I — s 

'. ~ cs be 
-" 5 oS-S 



. CB 
^i 

• 3 

•l-J 



(3 



^ — ^ 



_2 >. ~ ; 



be 



- 

— 49 

T3 



ofl ^ 
H r5 



pq — ou » « 



- ; 

— .h ^ 



•jaqtnnx 



x V. a < * " 

— I co — . - 



if g ic 
- nr tj* -.- 



4H - 



S bc'5 

z m £ S 

r. c — ? i :o — 



_ X 



t 3 o 



© I - 'X — 



co 
© 

m 

Hf" 



in 



o 



00. 



50 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 





H CO t LO IS N X O! O H M Mi t lO O t» CC O! O H N M -t O 




m qsa.ij 'saaisqo-"]; 






• • ■ © lO >-h m 


CO 
CO 

to 


•sf}] 'siibo ui pa.v 
-.i is.wd 'saaisqorj 


45024 

12960 

20472 
18096 


14554 
2448 


■CMCC©C©CO©©©CC 

• i-* CO "1* X CO O * CN 
■HHXNCONMCOK 

• © ©. © >fi O CM CO CO CO 

• CM CM CO i-( i-H 


250834 


•spq 


©©©©©©©©©© 

iH CM 


• t>.00 


• CO tO © -f © lO tO r-l o 

■CM tr CM -H © CO © © 

■ CN rH rH 


to 
© 

CM 
rH 



•sq t 



c 

(30 
P 



©©©©©©©©©© 
©©©©©©©©©© 

o x ci oi -r w h rf o 

r-l CM 



© 

■ © 



•s ql 

•qsaaj 'Sin.uajj 



c © © © © © © © © © © © © ©■ 
©©©©©©©©© ©©©oo 

©©©©©© O © © © © CM rH 
COCM©©©COCMrHCMrH©© 
lO © O 
CO rH 



© 

m 

CO 
CM 
CM 



©©©©©©©©©©ifl©©©© 
© CO O -f CM O © O O lC O CM CM 
CO i-H HWna r-i 



• © © © © © o © 
■ o e c h s id m 

1— I O CO rH -*i 



I 3 



si.iq'pacqus uoinfeg 



• © 
■ co 



•sqj 'suud ui pa 
-Ajasajrt 'uoiupjg 



© 

■ © 

■ © 



© 
:-. 

CO 
t - 
© 



K r. 
<j -J 

03 



'qsaaj 'uoiuiug 


• • ©•©©•■• © 

■ m • © in • • © 

• • • • to t— • • • to 


© 
© 


H- ©©©©©©© 

CO ■ © © © © © © © 

• co ■ m © to co 1 © © o 

• CO • rH © CM -T rH CM -* 
■ rH ■ CO 


•># 

CO 

m 

CO 

to 


■f. 
H 


•anj-e/^ 


©©©©©©©©©©COCMhh 
tOCOOtDOMIOOXOfOO 
(yg, CM rH rH rH i— 1 CM r- 1 


• © 

■ CO 




© © © © © © 

• • © m © © -r m 

• • m co <m -t> t-- 


CO 
CO 

-f 


uaqum^ 


OOOOOlOOOlOOOJNN 
CO CM CM CO CM 01 CN in CM 01 CM rH 
rH 


■ t— 




• ■!ONHHOiO 

• • CO CM rH CM CO 


t- 
© 
to 



03 



•anpj A 



<^c^o^o«oo»c: in w<©o©~ini>. ©.©©><©>©©'© 

© © © © -r © © © © © CC -T Ol © -f -H rH CM lO O -P © © 
O W O t- N Q CO 1> O lO O N CO H H 35 rH rH © CO © OJ 
CO rH CO CM CO CM 



CO 
CM 



■suioqiuj 



©©©©©©©©©©©©© ©©©©-*o©©©t-m© 
©©©©©©© © © © in co © co © in © rH co co © ©■ co © © 
o o ) » c o o O) o io is «o i- x co CO H h — f 

©rHrHOarHCMrHOlr-irHinCO rH CO IO H CO LO 



•jaqum^f 



©00©©©©©©©Tff©0"l©int^©r-l©©©CML-©© 
©-H©t-COt^-*t^tOlCCCCCCOrHrH CM N C) tO O CO fl~. H 
CO CM rH rH rH rH 



01 

© 



CO 

© 



to 

Eh 

d 

Q 

< 

CO 
1-3 

w 

to 

CO 
Ed 

> 







©OlO)©©©©inOCMI^C3©'* l COCM©'* , CO-*©COCO©. © 

©cocmt^oi cm co oioirHCo© in CMrHrH©co in -Hoco-t>©oc 

rH rH CM CM rH rH rH 


I 


Boats. 




©©©©©©©©©©-pco©©mcNiom©©©©©©© 

0«HH<iOOOOinOiOXCOHNN10COf3HOCOO« 
gts, f CM rH CM rH CO CM CM CM CM CO O -tr CN rH l£5CNCOOSCO©-*CNt- 
w rH CO' rH rH rH 1— 1 


©i 

CM 
I- 

rH 




■jaqum^ 


CN©C0O>©in©CC©l--©CN©TrCNCR©©t-t---©t-~©CMr-'H* 
© rH MHNHOIHHI-OIMH ■* H H N CO Ol ■* IQ 






uaj\r 


to • • 






• .to... torn 

© 

• • rH 


rH 
■ • rH 


-f 

CO 


CO 
73 

a; 


•8tii«A 


© 






' 1200 

3700 
200 


© 
• © 

■ ■ m 


0019 


r> 


•aSraiiuoj^ 


co • ■ 

rH • • 






- • t- • CO CM 

• CO l--rH 

CM 


• • CO 
■ • CN 


00 

© 

CO 




•.laqum^ 


rH • ■ 






• • T-l COr-4 

CM 


: :« 


CO 
CM 



CO 

H 

O 

IH 
« 

Eh 

CO 



6 



o 

C oS 



|P3 
I « 
&5 

cb cr t . b- ^ " ^ 



m 

rj 

e3 



33 



8 J 

r-O 



33 

s 
o 

Ph 

CD 
& 
09 
O 
TJ 
C 
OS 



> 
03 



O 'C rg 



•jaqum^j; 



c be C 

oS 5 cc 

PHrJX^r-JQ^flH^^^ 
~i-H CNM^ir5tCt^COC35©r-ICMCOTflin©l>CO©. 



C 13 

o cz; 
o « 
J= o 



OS >> c 
^ C3 • H 

13 n ° 

Or5^ 

Sol 

* a b 

= oS-^ 
fS *J 

13~r9 P- 

os £-u 



P 9 

m Cv 

03 to 

5=3' 
IS 



3 



9 cs 



eS 03 



S rC 
CS >H 

« o m 
CO £ 
o„ « 

13 S ^ 

is t. J; 



© — CM 
? I 0*1 1 



co m 

Ol CN CM 



FISHERY 



INSPECTORS' REPORTS-NOVA SCOTIA 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



< W ^ j 

h 3 < 2 



©©©© — ©©©©©©© 10©©©©© ©ln^er^t— 3^.-*. 

(? i « r l <r i c J.'* °° 00 i>»h(»o b cco! in co n oo S So § s 

jgrt^NlOUirt -f rH lO CO*m rH i-5" C<5 C<f •^Cio'co"-)^!^ o"m" 
^ rH rH "f CO rH rH <M 



00 

© 

iff 
SO 

so 



- 

-H O 

33 



-uujy stj qsi^ 



■spq 

'jlttq SB 'qSljl 



QOOOOlOOOmmOi— IOOO 



sjpjS '[io qsij 



©©©©©SO©©©©©©©©© 
O !M M W m rn H t C C N C C L-. 
(0 



sqjq 'qsu paxim 
put; aSJTJOQ 



■B[jq 'pinbg I 



© O © 10 10 — Cl-CC 
lO i— I rH i— ( SO 



JO 'poQ UIOJ, 



• SI aq 'spa 



"sq{ 'ss-eg 



•S[.t(('tlt!d.I9(lS'Bj3 



o 

SO 



© so 



ONL- 



© co 
© 



r-i SO rH 



sqi 'siqaing 



©ooopooooo 

©X©©©©©©©© 

rHK-Or-rrCt 



5C 

i. 

O 



z 



•sqi '4no.(x 



©©©©©©©©©© 
©10C0©©©©©© 5 



•sqi 'qnqq^H 



•s qI 

'spunos 'a^^H 



© r © 



'paiip 'a^H I 



c © © © 

o 

SO 



■!}A\0 pOUp 

'^ooppupf 



o © o © 

© CO CO (M 
© 



~. — Z ' z 
n N rH H M 



qsa.ij'^ooppttjj 



©©©©©©©© 2© 
©©©©©©OO©© 



"S[jq 'spunos 
^> sanSuoj 'po;j 



■ © 

■ © 



X © © o © © 
• ~. © o CO -rr © 

■ © CO !M 



CO 

© 



© © lO © © © ~f © m 
L- rt rH © r-l 



<NlCOC0©©t~©© © 
t^- OMOlOMOO ri 
© CO © CO CO © © 
CO rH CO 



© © 

T— -f 



© © © © 
© © © © 
o © © © 

CO IO S-l © 



© © © © 
©in © © 

i-O 01 © © 

r-l X 



© © 

01 i~ 



• ~. © 

CO rH 



© © o 

O CI 



^avo 'paup'poQ 



© © © © O © © © O © © -rr © © © 

9 oir. ci r-cc t ci jut r. «<n wo 



• so © © © m co © 
■ co so © © co x o 

CONr-HnH 



© 

CO 



■ X © © © in CO © 

■ C X O lO lO M 



SO 
H* 
© 



© © m 

H< CO 



- 
© 



© 
© 



CO 



i © 

I rH 
CO 



© in in 
so © 



© 
© 

rH • Tjt 



©©©©©© 

© © © © in © 
x © © m © in 

SO r-l rH CO rH 



Tt< • © © © X © 

■ © o rH © m 

• CO rH nW 

© © © • in od ~ 
©o © hn ■ 

CO CO CO ■ rH so • 

©"in o © © x © 

© © © © i.O © © 
rH L — © 01 © 

o w © m t~ © © 
r- — m H" x -r © 
r-i so t- m o-i m 

© © : : '■ '■ ~ 
© © .... 

X © 

CO 

X © O N CI n lO 
SO rH 



3 

J3 



o « 



T3 



"3 02 



PQ 

hV-1 

s 

cS 

01 



CJD 
P 
O 

<D 
Pi 
S3 

Q 

"2 

> 



■■=-.5. | ^ 

T C'J S t u i s 

o • 



a be c 

cj eS c3 
'3 Or 



T3 «3 



of a 

r2^ » 

o 



* S 3 
>> a-c 

® 9 c 

_ 03 C3 

a> . o 

: x - 

e3 ' 



22— 4J 



•jaquin^ | 



p H i-3roi-H'^i_qo > ja J p H ^£g 
rHCOe<5"* , io»t«.oosft©rHcoco'*<»a© 



ri be -3 _ ^ 

H'^'C w r-t U 

'••HoaoH 



t^ 2 i- 

o ri 



l-.»010HN 
r-i rH r- CO SO SO 



co in 

CO CO CO 



© 
© 



- 

I- 

so 



CO 



X 

so 



© 

X 

© 

10 



© 

CI 

© 
© 



CO 
X 



CO 



■ X 
o 



so 
© 

Ol 
CO 



© 

in 

Cl 

© 



CO 

in 



©o©t^©o©inin © 

m rH © ■H" © O © rH so m 

T— ©CX©--<rHTtl rH 

HNhH rH © 



o 
Eh 



MAIiIXE AXD FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., 



— -t co — i- © i - x © © i— oo co 



'[[aijs in qsajj 'sja^sqoi 



© 


O O • • 




c 




i-H 








o 








i-H 


CO 


tH 








co 



•sqi 'su«o 



© 

X 

co 

CO 

o 



CO © 
3! X 
L^- 
iff t- 
CO iH 



— 

CO 

o 



~. ci ic ic 

■ CSHNH 



"8qi 'qsAij '[aaa^o'Gj^ 



c 
o 



o o 

- z 

L- 01 



— 


ooo 




z - 


© 


. © 


o 




- z. 


© 


o 


o 


©. © 53 ■ • • 


. . . o 




© 


iff 










CO 






© 




t~ 








CM 



CO MNt 
■ ©. — . i - -r 

■CO Iff T C5 
• t— ■ © t - CO 
- CC © -3" 



© - 

iff © 
iff 



ci 
i—i 
© 
-if 

CI 



r iff c 

i- CC CO 

co © ci 

CI 



o 

o 



. - ~ ~ 

t- © © 

Iff Z 
CO © 
iff 



© 
01 



1-1 

© 



T CI 1^ O C O O - i.. — r. I' 
X iff 01 — 01 01 © © — i— i-i iff 
— 01 — 



iff 
— 



•tqaq 'pajjus 'nonq«g | 



•sqj 'sireo 



© 
© 



■sqj 'ijsaaj 'uorapsg 



© 
© 

iff 
co 



© © © 
© © © 
— x — 



Ol 

i— i 
© 
© 
-r 
i— i 
© 
— 
iff 



© 
co 
-f 
- 



© 

CO 

© 



© 
© 



ff 
ff 



on 
< 



ta 

% 




m 


© 

CO 


© © © ■ -iff • -iff © © © 
© iO X • • i-- • • -f © © 0-1 
CO iff o • • - • Ol T — 
,— • • i — 


© 
T 


© 
— 

© 


o3 
S* 


•jaqarajj j 


© 
in 
i— i 


iff CO © ■ -iff ■ - iff © © GO 
CHH • • ■ ■ i— ' T T © 
(M i-l i-l • • 


t»i 


Ol 
© 


00 


•3iqi3 ^ 




© 
© 


iff©©©©©©©©©©© 

ci © © oi © © © © x co t~ © 

t^. iff x -r "f co iff t i-iooi 

x © "*i -r o i — — x 


© 
© 

— 


lO 

iff 

Ol 
iff 


<D 






© 
© 

iff' 

1— 1 


©©©©©©©©©.©©© 
i~ © iff © cc oi 5 x oi © If '©' 

©. CO © Ol CO 01 © — i— © Iff iff 
i— CO i-l © 


© 
© 
l- 


2 

©. 

T-l 


3 


■jaqiimv^ 




© 
iff 
I- 


X©iffiQ iff ©©©©«©© 

X> Iff I - CO © © © © © © 

X © iff ©. 01 I- © 

i-l CO 


© 


© 
— 








<M 


C0©lff-fXiff©©©©l.-© 

— CO CO - 01 © X Ci t~ © — 

OI i-i i-i i— OI © 


S 


iff 

2: 

co 


Boats. 


•3rqT? A 




ff 
© 

CM 


— — oi h iff oi tr. © — '© 'o oi 

01 — l-H i-i i-l © 


© 
iff 
© 
i— i 


© 

CO 
Ol 

© 

— 



< 
o 
pq 



< 



a 

as 
x 

> 

O 
i5 



•jaqums^ 



iff 



— © — © — ©.© C © © :c 
© X Ol — CO r-i 10 © O) iff X © 
r~ rH CO 



iff 



•U3J^ 


© 00 ■ © iff • iff © 
CO iH ■» CIO ■ Oliff 
i— 1 • 




• T-l 

• Tl< 


© 

CO 
CO 


•aiq^A 


© © ■ © © © 
Iff iff • iff © O 
If, Q<\ r-i iff Ol X 
95 i— r-l ■COi-i^i 


© © 
© © 
© — 

Ol Ol 




3475 


22935 


•aSuuuo^ 


co t- • oi © © 

© X ■ © t ~ iff 
rH ■ CO CO 


© <M 
-0 — 
r-i CO 




• f— • 

• © 

• l-H 


o 


•jaqinti-^ j "* w : cccoo 


CD X 




• to • 1 Ol 



X 

o 
■s. 

p 



•5 1 



— 

r-l 

T»l 

o 

- 



— - 

I — 

rT 



s 

D 

<H— 

CB 

= © 
© - 



5 oj g 
^ © 5 



=5 " > 
— - 

O a> aj 

ill 



= ■ >M >■ 



■ — « * ^ c 



ID 



- - 



o 



■.Mi|iiniX 



rH Ol CO t)< iff © X © © rH CO CO 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— NOVA SCOTIA 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

■joqnm^j 



o 



© 



X 



©0»0©00000>C - 
NOMOi.SJ-O^t 

i— o © i~ in ic: x -h — in 
r. c x o c n t n ;i 
ei pi csTeo ■— ' — ' — ' x' 

CNN CM ^h^- 



© 

CO 

to 
cc 

(M 



© 

© 



00 
X 



1~ 



_ i /- 

g § o 



•s[tq ■q.i'BCi sb qsij 



x 



©©©©©©©OOOtH 
C O M C-l X N H th I . _. 

i— © <o i-h 



© 
— 
- 1 



5 1 

CM 



■S[[T!2 'Ifo 'qsitf 



eo 



©10©©©0©© 

33. c ; : ; - - 

so t- CI — CM 



■Bpq 

'qag paxira puv as.icoQ 



i" 3 i" 

© .-: t— 
ci co <m 



•spq 'pxnbg 



© © © t— 
m o r-i ec 



•an 

'qsij !}sgij .10 poo tuoj, 



•sqi 'araptmojjj 



I 



© 3 = © 

© © — © 

— 3 © © 

o m — t — 

© © CI T 



i3 — ~) X 
© X CI X 



spq 

'lujaiadsuS .10 saATJcvajy 



© 

CM 



X X IT 

© r- r- 



•sqi 'liuux 



m 
C 
2 



S 8 

© ■ its 



■sqi 'J»qu«H 



t- © © © 
© 3 ~ © 

i-* CO — 3 
CI t— 



X 50 ~. 8 1 

I - © 3. — 

© L— CI 



•sqi 'spunos 'aifBjj 



CM 



X c i 
IQ 



■^M3 'p-jup 'ajp^H 



© 



x © m 
x 



■saippisq uen 
-uy pajfoina 'jpoppejj 



© 

3 
3 

X 



•}a\o 'paup *>[noppi3jj 



in © 

© <M 
© © 



© 



© 



3 3 

O © 
CI © 
CM IQ 



© 
CI 

©. 



© 

CI 



3 

©. 

lO 

co 

CI 

© 



z — 

CO m 



© 

X 



© 
© 



© 
1— I 

ICS 



X co 
t- © 



© 
© 



© 

EN 



© 
© 
© 

X 



© 
3 



lO 



© © 

© 3 
3 © 



3 
© 
3 
© 



© 
© 
© 
© 



3 
- 



© 
© 



i.C X © 
i-H CM 



CM 



O 
i-l 

m 



■ © 3 
• © lO 



© © 
3 C: 
Ifi 



" © CO © © © © © 
■ © i— i O © © © O 

- CM <M CMrtr-H 



•sq[ 'qssjj '3popp«H 



© 
© 
© 



© 3 © 
© 3 3 
CO CI © 
■— ■ © r~ 

CO 



■spq 'spunos 
pin? satiSuoj 'poQ 



iC © X 



© CI 
X 1-H 



© 

i-i in 

CO 



© 

3 

CI 



© 
© 



© 

© 
© 

X 
CM 



3 © 
© 3 
CI L- 



© 
- 



© 
X 



© 
© 
© 



© © 
3 3 

ic ^: 

3 X 



© 3 

© © 

© © 

-n o 
© 



© 
© 

© 



3 IC 

x 

- I T I 



© © 
05 CO 



© 
© 



CI 



r. 

CM 



i!C X 
CI 3. 



© X 
© 



© 
© 

© 

c 

X 



© © 

CO CO 

t~ I— 

JM_ 

© © 

2 £ 

© © 

© © 

Cl CM 



X 

© 



z 

© 



X CO 
CO 



© 



<3©X©©©~3©©© 

— © X 3 - 3 i* it lO © CM 
© -T 10 i~ © i~ i— — CI — © 

— CM CO 



© lO 

in cm 

CM i-h 



CI 
X 
cc 
:-. 
C5 



es 

ri 
OS 



3 



O 


- 



1J 



"3 



3. ^ ^ 33 ' 



s 



: 22 



c 

cS 

O 
o 

'5-9 



Q 



. . C3 
• • O 

: :« 

: = s 
: © 

. O 33 

;sj 
ill 



CO 
o . 



Qi O 



•.lr>qillti\ 



2 . 
— : i 



~d a ° 



23.3 

p 



25 



33* 2 
> CO 

- - 



o 



| o ct > h £ h 
! 3. B S : 

C0^1ft«6t~.OOC3JOr-ICMCO 



33 ■- 

tl <J -3 ? i 
f 



- — 



54 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



8 
© 



•■— i 

4-3 

O 

o 

02 

> 
o 

Z 

i 



o 
=3 

JS 

to 

■ FF 

ft 

=4-1 

o 

■*-> 

s 

3 

g> 

03 

f=5 

£3 

e3 

of 

cS 
O 

« 

d 

c3 



03 

to 
to 

03 



c*H 

o 

03 



cj 
l> 

a 

c3 

03 

to 

c3 
C 
- 
O 

H 

03 

fQ 

g 
5 

03 

fCS 

to 
c 

•F* 

c 

fC 

co 

M 

D 
H 



K 
co 



a: 
5 



to 
- 



CO 



rH « S -t l: C l- ISIHN CO -P ICS to 



O in 00 e© tO O Ifl M C J: X 
O tO I- 01 1C I - FHC3N--1 
<M fi N(N 



■sq[ 'qsa.ij 'Siiuaajj 



© © 

© © 

© io 

co © 



O © © 

X © 



© © 

-1- IC 

© 



■ © © 
3 © 
- - 

■ CO o 



© 
© 
-r 



© 



CO 

© 



■ © © © © © 

© © © © © 

© © (M X CO 

• TH CO rH X 

MH Ol 



© © 
© © 

iO CO 
X © 



© 
- 

CM 



© © .~ 

© lO © 



X X X © © i" hh 

©. •© © © i4 t- m 



ri h- 
I- CO 



©. 
-H 



•S[.I([ 'pa^JBS 'UOUqi3g 




CM 
— 




© © © © lO CM • 
ITS rlH 






© 
© 


111 p3AJ9S3J(i 'aOOq«g 




to 

1 - 

i— i 
















© 
1— 

rH 


•sqi 'qsajj 'uouqBg 


— © 

© rH 

© CO 
lO © 






© 
© 
© 
O] 

rH 




© © © © © 
© © © © © 
© © CI i-i t- 


© 
© 

m 

CO 


© 
H 

55 

-r 


Trawl.s. 


•an t B A 




MO © CO © 
CN T CM -f lO 
rH 




s© m to co cm © 

CM I— © -r OH 

rH CM 


© 

© 


•jaqumN^ 




a e ci H c 




X CO t— Ti C— CO 
f- CO CM rH rH 


© 
© 
rH 



a> 



© i(0 © © X © © 

© ic © tji cm © -r 

CM 01 X CI fh CO -f 

rH Wr- 



© © © © I - CO © © >c 
O toco© t~- © ~r x i- 

©X©01f- -f r- rn r-i 



CO 
CM 



© 

x 



= © © X © © 

© x -r ci © x 
i - 1— cm io i - co 

© CO — r- 



© © — © © 

co oo c m 

H IC H N S 

CO O) 10 CO 



CO 01 CO 01 
© rH © -H 



: i 
in 
© 



■jaqum^j 



" fh © C CM CM © © 
LO lO X f- 01 iO — 



.o © oi © in 

© X CO O- CO 
rH CM r- 



CI © 

X 01 



l - X 

CO 01 



- 1 

CO 



o 
pa 

a 

55 



K 
cc 
x 
S3 

!> 



to 

FF 



T T CM 1© I- lO © T CM X © CM t— rH CO I 
t- tD rH rH rH tO CO t- I- -r © CM CM CO i 



c3 
3 

PQ 



Mn I B A 



CM CM © © © © © © © © © I- t- © ©. © 

© ©. © X f- i0 CO cot-©. ©O h« coo 

o © -r fh f- oi ci t co co © 01 co rH ci h 

CO rH 



CO 

© 
© 



•.1.11(11111 \J 



L- © if. © f- lO 

CO © CC fiIIf- 



cu 

> 







. CO ■ 


. . .© . 


© 


•en[B A 


m : 






© 
1- 



•aSrcuuoj, 



•jaqum^ 



■A 

D 

- 
-_ 

V. 





- a, 



WPh 



® 5 <s 

_>-• / = 

03 r>> ^ S — 

> f-" ^ > - 3 



E-i 

© 

cu 

- > 
d ^ 

^ Cu 



co 
© 
in 



" ; - 

ri io " 



r. j 

1 =" 5 1 



bo 

s 

p 

ci 
CD 

-a 



® s - — ©: ~ © . 



33 

O 
— 

F^ 

o ■ 

0) 



§ Q f? i Y. 



- ^ 



> , — ~ 

5-t1f5 



■.wquui \^ 



■ c I 



CO -t 10 



© i 



2 ^ 
H S is s y 

h -pq pq eg -x 



o 
EH 



X ©. © 



£ -/ Zi kSOQ 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— NOVA SCOTIA 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



so co -r m co i~- 



■/. * o H ? | 



_' E M . 

- - - 

3 -J < X 



O lOOOOOO 

co o x m ■* t» o 

i-H CO ia Oi C IN —i 

1- 1 1- c: « t o 

t— cm oc •* eo iO o 

;6" cfiTaTirSN-fco ci" 

1—! SO 



o o 



© © © © © CO 
^ CCJ3N t- O 



i - t i x co * — i tto t-~c^ 

-r-r^-t-© cow — -f 

t-- CO © i-H W r- 1 CO S<] CO 

•co r-Tco co" i-T icTr- T r-Ti-T 

i-H i-i JO 



O 
CO 

w 
-r 

o" 

CO 



a g 

^- 
P4 



o c<t © 
i-i — co 
i-i o 



• © 

• CM 



CO i-i CO © 
i-H CM 



c~ so © 

X> CO CO »-i i-H 



© © © 1C 

CO TON 
.-H © — SO 



© W © © ■** 



•CCO C-fCOSO ©CO F-r-H © 
SO i-H S) i-H CO SO -~ 



© X — 

© 

SI 



■J. 

fa 



31 



■spq 

M|slj paxrni put; osjboq 












SO CO iOh i- IE 
• ^ © i-i CO SO CO 
1— ~. 


il4S| 


•sjaq 'pmbg 




© © SO 
rH 


© • 
© • 
SO ■ 


• © © • • • 

• lO © - • . . . 




•ijsu ^so.ij jo poounvL 


















© c © 
© © © 

•CO i-i • . 
CO CO 


o 

CO 

m 


















© co 
W CO 


■ ■ 




•qsgSoQ 


o c 
c © 
1.0 © 
© as 

00 














. ! 


© 

CO 

eo 



■spq 'spa 






















© © m i-H © 
"f* -i 


CO 
00 


■spq 

'(VBdJddSKf) .in S^ATAVaiY 






















© co © it> co 

CO i— 


m 
<c 


■sqi 'siptug 






















© © © © 
© c m c 

© -f t- -r 

SO l-H 


m 
m 


•sqi '^nojx 






























© 
© 


sqj e ?tiqn«H 




c 
© 

m 

T-H 














© 












4500 




CO l- 
iH 






© 
1— 


















c 

CO 


•ja\o 'paup '3>[BJJ 


i-H • 






>a 

CO 














© 


•^a\o 'pai-ip 'jjooppnjj 


SO 
CO 


137 
200 




© CCS c -r X 
© CO CO i-H c- 


- 

in 




co 




so 

CO 

in 
i-i 


■ja\o 'paup 'poQ 


c 

so 

CO 


C C J~ C i~ C lO SI © -p I - X SI SI 

1 - c c co © i - co in co e» ic — o sa •* 

© 00 C<5 1— CO SO COST. CO i-H 
i-H -f H 11 


-r 

CO 

l-H 

1-1 


•^a\d 

'{pus in usa.ii 's.w^sqcj 








© CO CO 

co co eo • 


© 
— 


•sq{ 'sireo 
ui p^A.iasajd 'saajsqo'j 


14304 

20352 
28224 
4944 




00 • © rr 
O • -1 -r 
© SO i-H 
© ■ X ~. 
if i-i 






CO 
l-H 
CO 

-f 
I— 





ok 




• o 


























a 


si 






*■> 




V 





o 



o o 



c 
a 

ao 

- 

s 

•5 f 



— 



0J 

o 
D 



3j C 
• > C 
. •— *i 

■- £ 



on 

. C 
. O 
C 
B 

■a 

— 



• T ' ti 



Sal 

IS a 
® 



: 

•5.1 • 
■ =- 

— T - X L- ' 1 

' 5 2 — ^ U "5 

; « a to u - a) 

' ^ i 

— n — 7w ^ 



: ce 
• o 
"2 



9J r- 3 ,r-3-5> 



•.i-»i|ii[ii^ 



- — 

OS'S 

- - 
— s I 



^1 J3 T- Cv 



co >*• in -c l - x 



; zi. zz r. r. - 
'■ % - a jcj ehrl 

*; — r— fc* r- ' 

50 §05 
— y. f. S. 7. 
r. cs — s 1 co 



• o 

J<! 

• o 

• — 

- 

- s c 

5 — is DQ 
> i " s 

* 5 'rrt « 

n — — 

CC — «J 

- 5 cs 
2-1 S 

-r i-'j c 



■ o 

It; 
. s 

■ <v 

1« 

- 



OS 



56 MARIKE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

RECAPITULATION 



Of the Yield and Value of the Fisheries of the Island of Cape Breton for 

the Year 1900. 



Kinds of Fish. 


Quantity. 


Kate. 


"IT 1 

\ alue. 








S cts. 


8 cs. 


Salmon, fresh . . . 


Lbs. 




20 


30, ( 3o 80 


ii preserved .... 




.>. — >4 


A IX 

10 


1 OO 1 A 

488 10 


ii smoked . 




oi a 
J10 


1 1 OA 

20 


A O Ai i 

42 00 


ii pickled ... 


Brls. 


1 XX 

loo 


15 00 


O Oil~ AA 

2,32o 00 


Herring, pickled .... 


„ 


20, 755 


4 00 


ivi.OJO 00 


H fresh or frozen 


. Lbs. 


1 AOO 1 ill 

1,08J, 14ii 


01 


10,821 40 


M smoked 




1 U lA 

'. M Ml 


A AO 

U 02 


1 O AA 

In 00 


Mackerel, fresh 




140. M9 


A "1 O 
1- 


I " 1*01 oo 

I I ,021 f>b 




Brls. 


o XXii 

8, ooo 


1 X AA 

lo 00 


1QQ o 1 A AA 

12N,o40 00 




Lbs. 


1 Ov" — I f 

l,oN ,i 14 
l>. J4o 


A OA 

10 


27 1,542 8> 


n fresh in shell 


. Cwt. 


5 00 


ol,zli 00 


Cod, dried 




<ix o i ■ x 
()0,8oO 


1 AA 

4 00 


Ol * *"» 1 1 *i i i iA 

zoo. 400 00 


H tongues and sounds. . 


Brls. 


oaa 
_'l II 1 


1 A AA 

10 00 


O AAA AA 

J, 000 00 


Lbs. 


OO" 1 OA 
111 , 1J0 


A AO 


a Q1 O /iA 

b.flo BO 


ii dried 


Cwt. 


1 O OCR 

lo.zuo 


O AA 

o 00 


OA TAX A/ ■ 

oivyo oo 




Lbs. 


OA Ai lA 

80,0' to 


A Ai? 

0b 


A OAA AA 

4,800 00 




Cwt. 


X oi A 


o ox 

z zo 


11 7 1.) 17 X 

11,742 (0 




T 1 


O Of* A 
1,11 ill 


50 


1 191 ~ A 

L,lo4 00 


Poll nek 


Cwt 


T A lit' 

i ,4I») 


AA 

1 00 


1 1 AOO AA 
14,'.lo2 00 




Lbs. 


OA'i A — O 


A 1 A 

o io 


20,347 90 


Trout 




OI AOA 

zi.y»o 


A 1 A 
10 


•i i no aa 
1, il'b 00 






77^080 


05 


3 854 00 




Brls. 


2,571 


4 00 


10.2S4 00 




Lbs. 


100 


05 


5 00 






906 


]i 


9,660 00 


Oysters ... 




286 


4 00 


1,444 00 


Flounders 


Lbs. 


607,200 


05 


30.360 00 


Torn Cods 




XT OAA 


A AX 
UO 


O 0£A AA 

J, N ill 1 II I 




Brls. 


2,221 


4 00 


8,884 00 


Coarse and mixed fish 




12,536 


2 00 


25.072 00 




Galls. 


35,114 


30 


10,534 20 




Brls. 


12.443 


1 50 


18,664 50 
9S6 50 






1,973 


50 


Dogfish 


Lbs. 


38,500 


01 


385 00 


Total for 1900 








1,072,0S6 93 
1,300,409 64 


1899 















Decrease 








228,322 71 









STATEMENT 

Showing the Number and Value of Fishing Vessels, Boats, Nets, <kc, in District 

No. 1 Of Nova Scotia, for the Year 1900. 



108 vessels, 2,304 tons 

3,010 boats 

17,395 gill-nets, 351,066 fnth'ms 

4 seines, 810 fathoms 

3 trap-nets 

1,967 trawls 

31 wiers 

77 smelt nets 

13,926 hand lines 



Value. 



37,765 
58,201 
120,658 
1,200 
1,500 
13,076 
620 
573 
8,300 



Total. 



241,893 



80 lobster canneries . 
160, S53 lobster traps 



27 freezers and ice houses. . . . 
992 smoke and fish houses . . . 

281 piers and wharfs 

70 tugs, steamers and smacks. 

Total value . 



Value. 



4*. 785 
83,169 

7.49.3 
36.12S 
64.262 
10.440 



T. .tal. 



131,954 



118,325 
492.172 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— NOVA SCOTIA 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



5' 



-r3 

o 

■c 

•r-H 

o 
c 



05 

> 
a 



eg 



go 

3 O 

w r— c 
® i- 

CD 
• C ' 

O ^ S 

Jz; 

r— i y 

„«8 

•j -1 co 
rH • 
•P o cj 

Q »-o 

1 o 

I 

= o 

O ^£ 

> > .S 
O ° £ 



a 

ci 



= 55 



sc 

cS 

c 
d 
o 
rH 

g 
5 

52 



s 



^3 
x 

K 

D 

Ea 



■jaqamjrj 


iH oi co "* m 




UI p9AJ9S 

-aarl 'sa^sqorj 


7 I — X X — 

m oi x -f oi 

L- OI I- CC CC 

if c: c i- c 

CO 1-1 — n CO 


co 

CC 

10 
1— 1 


© 

1— 1 
CO 


cc 


•spq 'pa:}p;s 


- is i- o r. 
-r — . x co 


w 

CO 

to 


m 

CO 


fe 

o 


•sqj 'qsaij 

'ia.xa>[ouj^ 


1 1-11 

1 1 <s 

7700 

i960 


110778 


CO 

oi 


CO 

g 


•sqi 

'qsajj 'SaiiiajJ 


• • 
• • • • 
m • • ■ • 
ifes - 




in 




in 




•qaq 'pa 
-ips 'Siiujajj 


00000 

INCCCCO 
O CO CO CC CO 


fr- 
ee 


r 
© 

m 
fr- 




•sqi 

'qsa.ij 'uouqvg 


© ■ © 
00a • © 
© b- • 

i— 1 CO n ' CC 

1—1 1—1 • 




CO 
CO 


• © 
i~ 

CO 



■jaqiunj^ ; 



- 



cc 



CC 

<; 

Q 



CC 
-5 
K 

03 
CC 
B 

!> 







© m © © © 


m 








/. X CC iC cr — 


CO 




DC 


•anp3 A 


CM CO — 


00 




"? 











<3 
u 

- 



■aaqcan £j 



-1 x cr. c x 

— "TCI 



- 



•3tipJ A 



CM © © © © I CM 

35© ©in © -* 

cm fr- © co r~ © 

-Mr- i—l I CC 



01 



•suioq5«j[ 



co x © cr © 

S3HOOC 
© 1— 1 CO CC X 
CC CO SO fH CO 



CO 

in 



•jaqani ^ 



© m o 1- cr. o 

X CO CO CC 1-1 CO 
01 — r-i i-H fr- 



ci 
I o 



•uaj\T 



© 10 co m in 
cr. 1 - t — r o 



an 
co 
CO 



•anpjA 



© © o © o 
•se- 1- if in m © 

SNXCNO 



CC 

1-1 
1-1 

CO 



uaquiu^ 



i— i0 CO t~ © 

1 — © in cm co 



CC 

-f 
7 1 



'■'"FA 



© 
in 



c 

!> 



•aSuuuoj, 



uaquins^ 



01 
42 



cr i£ 



16 



60-- 
= -= 

< z 
c : 
— T. 

7. ~L 

o S «" ^j.t* 

CO — 1} 1) H 

-- «SS - 
^ -re < o> ^£ 
73 rc C" S 



cr 

m 



^2 s> 



T3 co t, 3 „ p 
; ^ 1 ■■ ? 

O QM CO 5 

-1/ 3, t£/ S OV 

-= w 3. > 
=: y s. ~< 



■A 
> 



•jaqruil\ 



— 01 CC — iC 



6© 



x in 1 ^ -r — 
cr 1 - — . if cm 

•'. X X CO 

1 - — ' cr" i - 1 

■— i-i CM i-H 



X 
— 

CC 





•*[jq 'a.mu 


1 © in © © © 
in 1— 1 'cr 1-1 

i-H CM rH 


m 
t~ 
in 


1 — 

00 

CM 




•epq 
'c)lT!qsi; qsi ^ 


; CO © in © 'O 
if O i-l CO fr- 
ee CO CO 

1 i-H 


1 w 

CO 

© 

01 

1 


1 cO 
© 
© 

1 co 




•snea 

( nn ust j 


— © © © © 

CO 1-1 © © © 
01 CM CO X 


if 
O 
i— 1 


CM 
© 
~f 




•spq 
( t|S'Lf paxtru 
puu asjBOQ 


z in © 
co Tf 




m 
fr™ 


© 
10 
1-1 




•sjjq 'pmbg 


TT • CO O 


CM 
CM 


X 

00 




'sjapuno^ 


CO 01 CM 1— 


in 

CM 


in 

CM 

ai 

ri 


i-H 

00 

in 


r. 


l a 1 

'sja^s^Q 


' 5b 








© 
00 


© 


5 


•spq 'spa 


s — 

T 








© 
■<f 


rr 

CO 
If 


g 


sqi 'ssBg 


cr cr 
.-. r 

CM CO 
CM 


r - 

© iO 
© CO 


cr 
© 

X 
CO 


© 

X 
CO 




*s[jq ' ■ jtlsS 
jo sa.UAvajy 


© m 

1-1 CM if 


CM 


CM 
00 


X 
CM 
CO 




•sq[ 's^ptag 


© © 
O © 
iO © 

1—1 








© 
- 
in 
n 
1— t 


. 

fr- 

m 




•sqi '^o.ix 


© © 

c; © 
CO © © 


© 
© 


© 

© 
1—1 


© 
© 
— 




■sqi 'spunos 


O © © © 
© m © © 

01 1-1 O © -r 

CO 


cr 

H 

in 


in 
t- 
in 
0-1 




•i)A\o 'pai.ip 
'ajp3 H 


X © © © © 

f '0 cr © © 

co m 

'i-H 


00 
© 

CO 

ri 



© 

CO 
O 




'paijp 

'jJOOpp'BJJ 


m cm m 
-1 cm 




lO 
fr- 
rH 




fr- 
01 

CO 


t— 1 

00 

© 




■c)AV0 

'pai.ip 'poQ 


1— ' CO © © 

CC CO T © l~ 

CM CO 


© 
fr- 


CC 

fr- 
© 

CO 



- Ci 
3 it 
C t- 



jj ft 

■SO 
5£ ■_ 



'■SCO ■ § 

--i :.-g 

21 ;! 

a _aT^ be 

EC S ? I 

? §4 

J -V^ so J- 
- cj 3^ 2 

% 5= ur 

.2 § 3 ~ 



QQ 

Is 

3 



: « S 
>» cr -■- 
- ^ _ - 

■o - - F 

7: — — be 
O " *^ •_— 



rC 



■jaqumy 



- ■- V. /. ~, 

— r 1 co — . -. 



0/ 



- 

> 



58 



MA1HXE AX It FISHERIES 



1-C EDWARD Vil., A. 1902 



S 



c3 

•l-H 
O 

o 
02 

> 
o 



CO 



co 

CD 



33 

O" 

T3 
C i 

ci 

■e 

<E 

cS 
O 

S3 
ci 



CP 

to 

HI 

CD 
> 

O 

<D 

> 
a 

03 
CD 

to 
ce 
a 
c 
o 
EH 

s-T 

CD 



3 

CD 



60 

o 



S5 
B3 
D 
r-i 

a 



- 

r. 



03 
O 

— r. 
< - 

a < 



>6 
2 p 



•^avo 'paup '>poppt'ij 






~ -x. 

01 






X 
CM 


00 


•sqj 'qsajj 'jpoppuH 






1800 
200 






ooos 


© 

CO 


•;.\\o 'paup 'poQ 






© © 

CO CM 






© 

T— 1 


00!) 


•sqf 'sura 
ut pa.uasa.id 'saa^sqorj 


CM 
CM 

i- 

CO 








<M 
CM 
t— 
CO 
CO 


T 

CO 


•sq| 'pajfoms 'JSuu-iajj 


© o 
e — 

• • © 

• • CM i—* • 




© 
© 

CO 


© 


■sq[ 'qsajj 'Siiuaaji 


• © © 

■ •©© ■ 

• © © • 

• ■ CM CM • 

■ 




© 
© 
© 


© 
— 


•sjaq 'pampas 'J3ai.ua f[ 




■ i—l 




1C0 
l-H 


© 



•sqi 'qsaaj 'uouifcg 



© CM © © © 
© >0 © © rf 
© X © CM l~ 
•~. © X ~. © 

HH CO CO 



X 

© 

CM 
CM 



•anp: v 



© 

x 
■ x 



5? 



•scaoqip?^ 



■ © 

■ © 

■ CO 



© 

■ 05 



•aaqranx 



© © 
© 



~ 1 

00 



© PJ 



- I 



- - 

•MO] 



I 

CO 



© © oi -r oi 
oi ~ co — .0 — 

oei 



X 
CO 



c3 
O 

pa 



" 3n r B A 



~ cr — r — 

© © T 01 CO O 

f o CI ^ c 



oo 



•jaqtuuNj 



CO C X t Cl Cl 
C 1 ~ Ol 01 



03 
E- 

05 



tO CJ 
CB 1) 

K EC 



CD 

to 



w s 

O 3 



- - 

So 



3. b-v:- 

/: = — r 

v. rw i r h 



O 

EH 



Cfl 

<v 
p 

Is 



•jaqmuv^ 



oi : 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS- NOVA SCOTIA 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

•aaqran | 



i— ?~i — i- © 







3D 


© o o © © © 




© 






© © © © © c; 




© 


< _ 




o 


© © CO CO © CO 
N ^ S W X ~ 




to 




< | 






n 














cToeo'efoi't-r 




f" 















00 



O 

02 



g 



•S[jq 'air.UEUi st! qsij 


© 

(M 
r- i 












© 

CO 
i-H 


© 
© 


•sjjq 'ciinq sb qsT,j 






© 








© 

CM 


00 


•sn«a '[to qsi^ 






© ~ 
-r — 

1— 1 






© 
lO 


lO 




co 

ce 

CO 












CO 

© 

CO 


CO 

© 

1—1 


•sjjq -stnurQ 










© 

co 




© 
CO 


© 
© 


•sq{ 'ss«g 




0001 




© 
© 

CO 




© 
- 

CO 
1—1 


© 

CO 
iH 


•srjq 

'r.Bajadsnf) jo saAi.ttajy 


© 
© 










© 
© 

CO 


© 
© 
CO 
iH 




© 

© ■ 

CO • 

t> • 
1-1 • 










0081 I 


© 
— 



•STjq 'pcqg 


© CO © © CO 
• © CI © i— © 


CO 


© 
© 

CC 


•sqi 'ino.ij, 


©©©©©© 

CO JOSiC 

— co © © © ci 
i-i CO f 


- 
© 


© 


•sqi ^nqxpsH 






© 
© 
— 

CO 


• 


© 
© 

CO 


© 

1— 1 
CO 








lO 




»c 


© 

iH 


•javo 'pai.'P ' a> l R H 






CO 
iH 




CO 
iH 


t~ 

CO 



/. 
Eh 

o 

— 

cs 
Eh 



I 



_ I 

3? St 

- CC 

_£= — 

CI 



; c 

3 



r-2 © 
** — 



.2 o 

I — I 43 
I* hi 



0> © 

OS r. ■ 



- — 

1 O 0) 43 

: :: : 

. h j e 



•loqruu^ 



tiVC 



MARIS E AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII 



-jaqnmj^ 

•}M0 'p-)Up 'pOQ 



'ipqs in i[Kr».ij 'siaijsqo'j 



so 



•sqj 'siiTto 

Ul p3AjaS3Jd 'HJ>i;sqo r J 



* o 
© © 

CO 



• © 



s © 

■— r 

■M Iffl 



o 
Vc 



' sc ll 'pa>Ioius 

'uouqug 



•sqj 'qsajj 'nooqug 



© © 
© l " 



O © © C ~ -f 

rr CO CM CC iC CM 



r- ' 

(M 



SO 
CO 



: i 



© 
© 

CC 



© 
© 



© 
© 
x 
© 



© 



© 



- 

© 



x 



© 
© 

CO 

1- 



© 
© 
© 



3 ! § 

iC © 



© 

CM 



~ - © ~ LO © 

© O ~ X i— I o 



© 

© 

CN 



S — C: ~ 
C G N O 
CN r- r- 



© 

n c~ 



i © 



© 
c 



o — 
o © 
© © 

© 



© I © 

© © 

X I co 

r* i CN 



cs m ua 
o w 

— 



o 
a 



K 
CO 

> 



IS © <c © © c © © 
l~ 01 -r x IO X <-0 T 



CC 



-T 
— 

CO 



O t — 
CO — 



© © © © © © © © 

I" — CC -T © ~ ~ © 

CO — CC 71 — -r - : t— 
iO 



•jaqum^ 



i- — 
l - c 
■ r 



in X in © h cc CC 

CC t- iH 



IN 
CO 



© © t- c © 7i 71 x 71 71 



co 

CO 



— — — c c c © © m i- © 

cc in ri 71 ri m 71 © cm 7i i- 



[-CCIrtnr, — th CC 



-r 

i£5 



© © © i n in © © © -t> h t-i 
m © 71 t— 



x 

CM 
CN 



-..npj A 



■jaqum^ 



© 
© 

CO 



m 
cc 



5C CJ 



1 .'• 



s 



c3Ph 



5 > 

- rv 

5 oT o 



S g-2-S 



p 



— » Orl,"-> l_j •-' Qj a K 



■* o c 



r— 71 CC f IS © CO © © rH 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS -XO VA SCOTIA 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

•jsqranjj | 



s 



c3 

• rH 

O 
O 

m 

> 
o 

55 



=3 



. — 



: f 13 W 
H - < r. 
C < - 



ere — = = 
ooooooooooo 

t M r. n - ■- x -.r O x 
«ox<9 lO ~ — © — . ~3 -r 

00 © -f rH CO -T 1-4 rH 

© -r 



o © © © © o i~ T 1 1~ © 
nh?h:hn ,-h .— 



X 

© 



SO 



© 

K 



5C 

H 
O 

-H 

K 
- 



K 

3 
s 



to I 



a 
- 

- t 



5 s 



— 

5C — 



— - - 

o 0) -h? -. 



2i 



t. s x a 5 - - - 



- 



t-- 

co 



DO 
— 

— 

ft, 




- - 

C 3 

- :-. 

rH 


















© 
© 
CO 
— t 


029 




X i- 
I- CI 

SO X 
iH Tl 






O 
CM 












X 

© 

T 


CM 
© 

© 


'sjpjS 'po qsij 












O 














CC 

r— 


1 

o 


'qsi{ p^xuu put; aajBog 






















© 


CO 
OS 


•sqj 

'qsu ^sojj jo poo uio^ 




© 
© 
© 




— — 

c^ — 












o 
r 

CC 
Tl 
rH 


m 

rH 

© 


»q[ -Jdpuncn^ 










© © © © 
© © © = 
<- — X X 

rH CI 


r ~ 

~ 9 


© 

cr 
-r 
t— 


© 

CC 




z: 

CO 


<M 

es 












CM 
— 


CO 

© 
cc 


H^q 'spa 


iO 


© in 

r^ (M 


© 

rH 






rH |© 


© 
© 


•s-q{ 'ssisg 




O © 

CN O 
X 














m 

rH 


CI 

in 
i — i 


•sljq 

'nfeaaadsef) jo e&aimo[v 


■ © o © m o 
• cc -r c X c- i 
<M Tl © 










I O 
! cc 

: rH 
1 1-H 


o 
-r 
t— 
■* 


•sqj 'sipm^ 


© © © © © 
H ~ 3 — © 
C — CO ■©© 
— i~ ~. 01 -r 
cc t- • — 












© 
= 

CC 

rH 
•T 
1-H 


o 
© 
© 


•s[jq 'p«qs 


■ ■ ■ m • © 

■• : : : : M 












lO 

r 

cc 


© 
in 

cc 



O 

03 
3 










x c-i ci l- 5i in 


© 
— 

r" 


— 

rf 


Val 




•;.wo '^oonod 


• 

; : 




-P © © © cc © 
i - n o cc 


© 

m 
i— 


CM 
rH 
CC 


■ — ' 




•^.w.) 'paup 'ajj'Bjj j : : 




© • • © • © 
o • • cc • © 

■ ■ • rH 


© 

l-H 


o 
© 
-r 






■}.«0 'p-ilJp 'HOOppBfJ 






©©mo • © 
-rcici- • — 


© 
— 
I-H 


© 

CC 


u.anl 




•sqj 'qsajj 'jfooppujj 






© ■ ■ J © 

© • ■ © r 
x — ri 
C5 • ■ i-H 


© 
Z 
rH 

iO 


CO 

in 

l-H 



r3 £ 



■jjqinn^ 



— ci :c -r ir. vr t~ x © © r- 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



s 



c3 
•>— i 

o 
o 
w 

> 
o 



co 

C 
CO 

CD 



- 

o? 

S3 
b8 

d 

t/T 

CD 

of 

c3 
O 

m 

a 



CD 
CO 
£/> 

CD 



CD 

Is 
d 

c3 
CD 

tc 

c3 
C 
C 

o 
Eh 

fcT 

CD 

X> 

B 

CD 

bts 

a 

o 
— 

CO 

7. 
CS 
D 
H 
K 



< 
— - 



< 



c5 



x. 



1-2 EDWARJ VII., A. 1902 

i-i<NC0"*^©t>-x©©i— icMco-PLS©L~x©©i^cMco-iiiS©t~x© 



Trawls. 


Muni a 


c*ONoeoe 

K C N n M r- — i-P 


cm -j< cm t- oi x in Xr-^r.f s-M-io^SJ 

« M M N O H t i-l K H TO rn TP D 

— 1-H 


•Jdqnin\i 




— .- : -. — - i x 

i— i CM 


lOOOlOMONOOOlONHOCOlSifiOOSO 

- i: t ^ ; c ?i o r- it :i u c ^ 

1— i T-1 71 


iS 

to 

p l 




























© •©©©©© 
© • © o © © — 

CO • 00 CO © X © 
CD 71 CM 


= c s c 
© -r © © 
— ~ - 

CM i— i i— i 


- 
H 


•jaqiuns^ 


























CM ■ CM i-H IS © © 
iH 


O0 i-l CM CM 




■an[B y 


o 
o 




O 
CM 
i—i 










OOOOOOt-OOOOOOOOlO 
fNOClSCMNiPOCCCOC;! • 

n ra cc x re c :i x o t n • 

i-i |H CM 


Seine: 


•suioq!} , e l j[ 


O 

1— 




o 

CM 
i—i 










oooooooooooccooo • 

OMOOinOKXOOIMlOfVfl-r 




•jaqnin^j 


CM 












i-<^©,©o»st^r^©©cM-t>7i©cNCM 

tl C CO H C IS t t- 



CO 



•' m l l: A 



©©o©©©©© 
o o to o « c x 

i— 71 71 IS f 



w © © © © © S — ©©©©t~©COiH©©©lS© 

c l" ; l>; c : r. c i" o h c o o o ?: h :i c c ^ ?) 
1 1- c l- r - : l - : r. r. c c r. : i - i - - 



©•©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©© 

~ J ; ^ ^ ' ' fi h S ^ fi ^ S ; r x ; 5 x c 5 ^ f. r. '3 5 ri r 

r- CM i 1 71 rH CM — i-i 



•jaqnmjvj 



~ ~ t~ ~ ,-. ~ S. ~ ~ ~ — ~ S- ~ i~. ~ ~ ~ 
-r f x i • x x r: ; - x : i : cr co : 



©CM© CM— iifXKS-t 



O 



63 

X 
CC 



GO 



OOOOOlOOOiOOCX010C001QO»t^OOCPi-ii 

~. X « [ - t C « iC t « K t TX ^-©i" -r — ■ S 7 1 ' 

i—l i— I i— l i— I i— CM 



i i—i IS o © 



Miqi: A 



i— — iS CM i-i r- CM CM © 



■jaqranj^ 



cno^i-c^ c-coi - ; c c c i i: c c c - cri-i 
i"*t»MWt o ;i t -t r. « is »s © © © -t< o io -i*< <N © ■ 

i— i—l i— I CM 



© w © cm 

■ © CM -*• 





•U3J\r 




00 • • 


• ->s 






■ rf CO 

• 1-1 1— 


CO i-l 
CM i-i 


t~ ■ 


• i—l • • IfS 


ssels. 


•aiqu A 




© 

00 • • 


© 
IS 

■ • rH 






© © 

i~ -r 

CM i-l 


- z 

© -r 

^ 


© • 
© ■ 
CM • 
bi • 


• © • © 

• © ■ ■ © 

• CM • • © 

• i—l • ■ 


> 






© • • 

00 • • 


• • iH 
• i—i 






•©00 
• I- IC 


IS CM 


IS 

00 • 
CM ■ 


• © • -iH 
CM • ■ — 




•jaquin^ 




!— 1 ■ • 


■ • l-H 






• CM CM 


CO CM 


CM • 


■ CM • -i-l 



s 
o 

^5 



Cu 



bo 

it 

CD 

& 

C 
cS 

>> 
r. - 

W -J 

— 

^ S 
■g >i 

1^ § 

ifM 

■ :~ - 

■ '- E 



> 
o 

at 



h » R« "'D h d 3 . > > ^ . ~ cc w t. , v o a; 



o 

— 3 

ei O 



CO .— 



= s J 

~ '~ - 

~-zl 



= _ 



6 

T3 



> 6S 

O CP 

- 5 



•jaqum^j 



i-l CM CO -f IS © l ~ X © © i-i CM CO -f iS © X © © 
i— — — i— r~ — — — —— — Tl 



. — -M 

ri cm 



5 *2 : ? «* 5 

— - y~ - A 

f- -r i- © x © 
CM CM CM CM CM ?1 



CM 71 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS — XO VA SCOTIA 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



O H C4 N ^< lO CO 
CO CO CO CO CO CC 

O tO © © © © <M 
rr — ; CI X X cc n 

CI rH -T CM Cl CC rH 



© 

© 
-r 



© 00 © © © 00 © i H 

:-: :i -r t - h i cc 

I £3 



c © 
© © 

Cl -P 



© © 

© !- 



© © © 

© © cn 
-r i~ t- 



© - - 

Tier 

rH CI CM 



© 



I— 

© 
CI 



in 
© 
© 
X 



j CO 



© © © © © © c 

© © © © X © X 

-f- r- © © -P CC CC 

x ci ic -p cc © ci 



CM 

m 
© 



24000 
6000 


© © © © © 
© © © © © 
© © © © X 
© -P © X © 
Hh rH 


£> 

35 
© 

CC 


© © © © X o © 

© © © © © © -r 
ci cc x t— -p ~. cc 

rH 


© 
-p 

in 

rH 


00 © O © © 1"-© 


GO 
id 
© 
CM 








© © © © © © c 

>C Cl © © Cl © X 
©.[-—© © -f L- 
rH rH rH rH 


CM 
TP 

o 
m 


© © © © -P © © 
IQ -P t - UC iC t P 


CO 

— 

Cl 
CI 








CM 




• © 

• rH rH 


CO 


© 

CI 




■ © © 
p © 

: r^ CC 


© 
~) 

Cl 
CM 


© 
CC 




1- iC 

• TP Hf 
rH 


1 - 
© 


rH 




■ <M CO 


CM 
CO 



c 

eel 



01 

o 



■ — ■ 

03 



■T3 H 



64 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Return Showing the Quantity and Value 



Kinds 



Name. 



Guysborough Count j. 



l;Ecum Secum 

2 Marie Jospph 

3 Liscombe Spanish Bay 

and Gegoggin 

4 St. Mary's Bay & River 

5! Wine Harbour 

Indian Harbour & Lake 
7 Holland's Harbour and 

Indian River 

8|PortBeckerton 

9|Fishernian's Harbour.. 

10 Country Harbour and 
Isaacs Harbour and 
River 

11 Drum Head 

12 Seal Harbour 

13 Coddles Harbour 

14} New Harbour ... . .... 

15lToi Bay 

lOILarry's River 

lTlCharle's Cove 

18 Cole Harbour 

19 Port Felix 

20, Whitehead 

21 Raspberry and Dover. . 

22 Cariso & Canso Tittle. . 

23 Fox Island Main 

24 Half Island Cove 

25 Philip's Harbour .... 
2G Queensport 

27 Peas Brook 

28 Halfway Cove 

29 Sandy Cove and Cook's 

Cove 

30 Guysborough and Man- 

chester 

31 Ragged Head 

32 St. Francis. 

33 Oyster Ponds 

34 Sand Point 

35 Steep Creek 

30 Mulgrave& Aulds Cove 



C3 



500 
120 

3200 
050(1 
2000 



150 



u 

H ° 

m 



.id 
O 



c3 



100 



180 
500 



! 2( » i 
300 
400 



3000 
900 
800 

pioo 

400 
7000 
2000 

200 



1000 



Totals 



Values $ 



13000 
7000 



400 



400 
500 



1000 



500 . 



51270 2000 



10254 



080 



436 



130 



a; 



bo 



- 



be 
B 



152 
160 

175 
120 
318 
330 

A 

620 1 
536 



511 
776 
348 
291 
682 
191 
605 



524 

56l| . . . 
792 30000 
712 60000 
145 20000 
198 70000| 

25' 12000 ' 
319 14000 

93 11000 
209 301)00 
111 12000 
212 ( 10000 

177 7000 



100 

85 
202 
168 
200 



30000 
13200 
S'OOOO 
119825 
21000 
37200 
15900 
30000 
18000 
30000 



300(10 

57300' 
3001144000 
100: 27300 



30000 
12000 
43000 
24900 
30*00 
150000 
372000 



o 
03 



n 

u .. 

B — 

v. s 

; '- 



48 

SE 

5c 
s 

o 



x 



o c — 
U U 



3 56736 
5 27360 

6 

40 



10 34704 
20 20784 



15 
5 
4 
6 
62 
26 
370 
139 
122 
214 
200 



24528 

54576 
25200 
22' i Ml 
25248 

57408 



27450 
92160 
501138720 
233438732 

36, 

100 

20 
40 
18 
16 



60000 02 



26 
20 
44 
10 
43 
130 
300 



81008 



11249 534000 1122025 2433 



44996 



5346 



134715 3G495 



20832 



901028 



6 6432i 66 
18 34464 272 



390 



290 
100 



52 

540 
123 



170 

ii7 



10 

452 
1237 



91) 



250 
352 

400 
40 
51 

35] 

27! 
210 
86 



116 
175 
240 
210 
320 
271 
782 

1007 
280 

1412 

1052 
404 

4790 
34 
399 
181 
571 
156 
127 

191 

179 
53 

112 
17! 
26 
1!' 

28 



10 

22 
25 
37 
102 
71 
374 
609 
538 
998 
583 
48 
1348 
11 
68 
96 
90 
78 

178000 100 



13 
4 



40000 
17000 
18 1900000 
1100 
18000 
14000 
7000 
0000 



30O0O 

looo 



3031115203 42 



180204 19650 60812 420 



o 



— 

53 

- 



23 
35 

52 
10 

8 



30 
11 



91 

80 
43 
4S 
28 
13 
5 
2 



2215100 5757 



66453 



17271 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS—NOVA SCOTIA 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 
of Fish, kc. — Nova Scotia — Continued. 



65 



of Fish. 



~ 01 

-3.2 
o *c 

.-e-c 

H 



o 
u 

X 



u 
o 

i— I 

O 



3 



200000 



2 
435 



18 
15 

25 
2 



14 



110: 9 



31 .. 
441 I'd 



1057 



22 



242 


10 


8 




40 


10 


18 


4 


4 




7 




117 




2 




30 




20 





7 
43 
30 
53 
120 
418 
330 
412 
77 
583 
1188 
105 
2000 
10 
32 
2 
87 
37 
Gl 



2000 
800 



3 

O 



500 
160 



3225 1000 
300 2800 
4500 150 

300: 350 

200 900 

1200 

200 . . . . 



xn 



01 

u 

0) 

a 

00 

cS 

a 

O 
m 
01 

IE ,Q 
3 



400 5 
350 10 



1500 
1000 
300 
2000 



3000 
2350 
1200 
600 
2000 
2450 400 
6568 600 



2532 
100 
4556 
2200 
80 
300000 



60 



4 104 

78 
1 
1 



6 
23 
4 



300 
600 
200 



1000 
1700 



1600 



4000 



40 
100 



5 
10 

6 



12 
10 
8 
15 

5 



?00 



200000 2570 89 5889 340421 



12000 15782 



44 11778 



34041 



9000 



L1360 20150 



1 136 



1008 



12 
36 
81 



59 
15 



5 
3 
27 

67 

116 
91 
155 
131 
14 
8 
3 



1057 
122S 



- 



01 



10 
15 

20 
15 
5 
10 

5 
10 
4 



10 
8 
6 
12 
30 
4 
10 
5 
7 
50 
50 
70 
90 
1 
2 
2 
3 



10 



11 

S3 
73 
O 



o 

— 

t-l . 

O 02 

o „ 

m 



800 
750 

1200 
800 
650 
700 

500 
1200 
800 



1000 
15()o 

1200 
1000 
2000 



13 



11 

7 

9 
2 
4 

5 



499 



11000 



7000 
40O) 



4S I 1 ooo 



4990 90 



550 



25100 
1255 



30 

10 
600 
500 
200 
11 
70 
9 
100 

40 



1624 



6490 



01 J3 

£.2 



: ■ 

Q 



'4 

I 

2 

3 

1 

7 
4 



40 
50 
54 
28 
90 
70 
30 
400 
12 
19 
10 
22 
11 
60 

10 

100 
17 
20 
18 



loci 



2122 



d 
be 



o 



275 
300 

380 
50 
60 
40 

25 
200 
so 



110 

200 
200 
195 
300 
700 

1100 

1100 
400 

1600 

1900 
300 
23000 
40 

1000 
150 

1000 
100 

4000 

300 

500 
200 
350 
40 
42 
30 
30 



c3 

m 

03 



500 

380 

730 
350 
20(i 
400 

215 
420 
320 



300 
400 
300 
290 
500 
500 
150 
750 
180 
1000 
1500 
3000 
9000 
20 
500 
40 
41 
30 
200 

200 

180 
100 
140 
100 
107 
101 
50 



h 
S3 

a 

oi 



25 
120 

190 
100 



110 

90 



80 

180 
90 
70 
80 



190 



90 



300 
460 



470 



270 



90 



40297 23194 3005 



12087 34790 1503 



18 



Total 
Value 
of all 
Fish. 



ID 

2 

3 

2 



4,806 1 
11,812 2 



18,761 
9,180 
2,998 
3,010 



1,063 7 
13,046 8 
9,332 9 



9,279 10 

5,213 11 
17,168 12 

8,790 13 
11,067 14 
10,597 15- 
15,808 lft 
26,149)17 

7,816 18 
29,749 195 
43,958 20 
49,353;21 
209,320[22 

6,050 23 
12,027 24 

4,32125 
20, 651 '26- 

4,494 27 
13.314 28 



14,592 29 

8,915;30 
3,133 31 
9,J78|32 
5,076 33 
0,023 34 
23,027 35 
55,541 30 



711,117 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



usqmnjij 






r. c r- m n - o 


© t- X 


— — 


i-h cm 


« 






1— ( I-H i— 1 i-H 1— 1 i— 1 


1— 1 r-< i-H 


i-H cm 


CM CM 


7 1 




•fll 


o 


o ■ 


© • 


• OC 


■ 


<M 


•sqi 'subo 
uc pa.\aasajd 'saa^sqo'j 


• cp 

• IM • • 


• CM 

• i— 1 ■ 


mi;;.; : 


h£ . 


• cc 

- 1-H 


■ ^ 


■* 


. iji • • • 


• >a ■ 

• rH 


CC 


. <CSI - 


• <N 


• CM 

• <M 


CC 

c5 



•sjaq 'pa^i^s qa.ia^ou]^ 



©©©©©©©©©©©©©© — 
©©©©©©©©©©©©©© cc 

© O O — O — — 'C © CM Ifl <C CI S 

ci ^t- i-i ir cc ^h i-i i-i 



•sqj 'qsa.ij qaaaipttTC 



© © © © © — ©©©©©©©© © 

©©©©©©©©©©©©©© i© 

c©©©©©©©.-. ©©©©© <n 

- C O C " ?] M f C C "t W i-t CC 
© © © CC © — — © i© © 
C I CC CC CI .-i — 



c 
»© 



IOC*'* 
— — ci cs 



X 
X 



•sqj 'pa^oius 'Saixiajj 



© © © ■ o 

© © © • © 

© © © t- 

'-Mi-' • 



■ © 
• © 
© 



•sqj 'ipuj 'Suuaapj 



©©©©©©©©©©©©©© 
©©©©©©©©©©©©©© 

t - © c i c i < c x ©. © i r ci — © 



© © 
© ~ 
c © 



p © 
© © 

© 1© 



©©©©©©©©©©©©in© 

© ©©©©©©©© <-©©!- — 



© 



lO N X e N N 
■— © 3! © t- © 

ic ci 



•§qj 'pa^omss 'uouqug 



©©©©©© 
©©©©©© 

C C © CC t~ i— 



•sqi 'qsajj 'nonqug 



is 
u 
H 



s 

'33 
02 



0) 



c3 




in 

OC 



r. 
O 

s 

E-i 

cc 



©©©©©©©©©©©©©© l© l© © 

©©©©©©©©©©©©©© t— C! © 

© © i- ci ri © cc © i© t- x cc © i" w ic 

r-Hr-Nt- — 



ie © © © © © © © © © i- © o © 

CC © © © iC © © i" © © x © t— iC 

:i t m k ^ t m x l* © ci ci 



uaqranvj 



t~ © © I" ©©©:*©©©© © 

— ci ci — — 



© 
1G 



•atqu A 



\iaqum 



© = 
© © 



7 ] © 



©©©©©©©©©©©©©© 
©©©©©©©©©©©©©© 
ci — © ci cc © © © © i© © i© © © 

r>tHi-SS-?lp-HNNMM 



•Braom^ 



©©©©©©©©©©©©©© 
©©©©©©©©©©©©©© 
:i n x x c n ic ci x © © 
© ci ri : i XNr- i-i i-i ci cc 



■joqnm^J 



(NJJMKXOMOfNOOlDOO 

© ci ci cc x ci — — — ci t — 



' dn l' c A 



©©©©©©©©©©©©©x © -r © 

©©..-©©©©©©©©©©?! © © ~l 

'f= x © x <--.©© ri © i - © . - x i - — i - ^ ^: 

i-Nr-HriTMr-MMJ) 



ri © 



• © © 

• © © 



© © © 
i© © © 



o 



© © © 
© © M 



•sniom'Bji 



©©©©©© 
fi ?i © <~ ~ 



©©©©©©© 

© © © © © o © 



© ©©©©©© © 

© ©xx-r©© © 

iO x x — © © -r x 

TI* -T CC © i* © — - © 

C-J — - i— 1 



uaqumx 



•U9PJ i 



©©©o ©©©©©©©©© © 
© i© © o © © © © i- © i* © © -r 
©i©©cct~-xccrJcccccci— 

53 

©©©©©©©©©©lOOO©' 
© © © I - i© © ■— M © © t- cc i- -r 
— :'. :C IMO1C0 — — 



© 
© 



CI 



© © x cc -r © 

l~ X © © X © ; 

CC i— I i-H 1 



CI IC © © — © 
— i-i © cc •fl- 



ee 
— 



©©©©©©©©©©©©©© 

©■-©i.C ©©©©©©©©©© 
© CM !© i~ © © © © © © X O O 
HHif CI C<) CM i— li— I 



iO © I- © © © 
t~ © © x -r — 
H Ni X © 



■jaqumx 



©©©©©©©© i-C ©©©©;". 
CM CC © X <C i.C X — -J" © — © CC C I 
HHt CM l-H I-H 



© — IO t~ © 
i— I CM -f T l~ 



CM 
X 



— X © © © © CI CC © i- © © © 

— ■— CM — CC CM i-H .— i- 



•aiq« A 



ri cc 



© 
© 



OiHHHXHh»OOCi5HO 
Tl f © CI © CI i- © X -r -M © CC t- 

— 



•j.tqmns^ 



H N f - O - t l- Cl - - L" r- o 



»1 
g 

I 

I 



-Jl 



<0 

1 1 



:w 



DC 



bn 5 



§ • 



> 

- _ 



1 I 



. Si 

. u 
. c 

4) 

; s 
1-3 



-c: 
- 



i- i- 

t- CM 



© © 
© 

s - 
© ci 



Mi.C 
© X 
CI 



© 

© 
cc 



— .© 













O 




-r 











XH^OhPPli^PhjcW 



fill's |l 



r. - 
"3 — 



N O O 

^"S 2 



>■> — a 



Maqmn<^ 



— ci cc — i© © t~ x © © — c i cc — I© 



— — C) CI 



CI cc 
Kl CI 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— NOVA SCOTIA 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



f LO 
Tl Oi 


55 


t- 

Ol 


00 
Ol 


© 


© iH 
ro :-. 


CM 
CO 


CO 
CO 








CO 

-* 

(M 


© 
© 
-r 

00 

CO 


00 
lT. 


© 
■* 


— X 

im •© 
f co 

— X 

-r x 




00 
X 

© 

[- 


© 

01 
lO 

© 

X 


c 

1^1 

© 


X N 
1 - OI 




© 


00 
00 

-H< 


00 


X CO 


<M 


© 

cm 


© 

<M 

I — 

CM 


in 

CO 

i~ 
■* 




5 
■* 
~f 
i—i 

r}< 

1-H 


X 
CM 




© 
© 

© 
1—1 


— 

SM 




© 

o 

© 
— 


in 

-r 
© 
— 


-r oi 
-r — 

i—i o 


Ol 
lO 


© 
1-1 


1—1 

o 

1-H 


1- 

I- 


IM ^ 




CO 

o 
1-1 


CO 
T 

CM 
CO 

— 


CM 
CM 

m 








X 

-r 


© 
© 








X 

© 
— 


© 

35 




© 
© 

-r 




00 
-r 


© 

in 
CO 








00 

© 

i-H 


© 
CO 


. . CM 
iH 


o 

X 

"*< 




<M 


m 

CO 
01 
f- 1 


: 




© 
CM 


© 
© 












o 

1-H 

CO 






1-H 


iH 












3 1 : 


O • 
j ~ 




© 

in 




<M 




© 
I— 1 


© 

X 


in 
- 

X 

© 


• 
. 

: 


- — 

Ol • 




© 

00 




i-l 
1-H 
f 




© 

X 


IS 


CO 




CM • 




— 




o 




i-H 


t~ 


1-H 

CO 


• 

: 


— co 


CO 

© 

CO 


i—i 

lO 


© 
— 


© 
© 

00 


X CO 
© iH 




1 

CO 


t-. 
£- 

CM 
O 
CO 


• 


- © 

O 5-1 

55 o 

DC 01 


© 

X 


© 
1J1 
© 


© 
© 


© 

in 


© © 
— X 

"!* 


© 
X 
1—1 


© 
© 

X 


= 

Ol 
y—* 

X 
CO 
CO 




2 5? 


© 
■ — 


Ol 
in 
— 


tO 
X 

■* 


X 
01 
CM 


01 — 

CM 




CO 


r~ 
iS 




rH lO 
i- 1 CO 


— t- 
-f 


© 
— 


!>. 




IS 
— 


00 


TP 

CO 


— . 

1 




© 

1 — — 

Ol O 


lO 
lO 


GO 
00 


— 

in 


o 

lO 
CI 


1 - -r 


■* 

CO 


T— 1 

t~ 


X 

o 

CO 
CO 




— S 


0-1 
CO 


00 
CO 


lO 
t- 


o 


- :-. 


© 

1-H 


© 


i-H 

© 

CM 


• 


© • 






CO 

1-1 








■ 






© • 
3 

in • 






© 
© 

— 

H 








■ 


© 

o 

CM 
X 

CO • 










Tfl 

© 










CO 

:-. 
© 
— 


: 


n ■ 














: 1 


s 





— 



■ a. 1 
— 

■ 
X 



— 

00 ' r— (S 



3} X 



5 - 



-Z- , 5"? .5-= :J 



- 



^2 « 
H > 



■r - -J. i - = 

e1|h§-2E§|3|41|6|^ 

— — /. /. — _ ^ 



— .-. VI I- X © © —01 CO 
C I 01 01 CM 01 Ol CO COCO CO 

22— H 



68 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



CQ 
Eh 

O 

D 

a 
c 

BS 

Ph 



(- <! O " 



■spq 'anraisra sb qaijj 



'S[jq 'ireq si; qsi^ 



h n m lo o i> oo ei o h n m * w © t~ cc 

1— I I— I rH 1— I i— I t— I 1— I 1-H 1-H 



Cl Cl Cl 



15 O © lO "t o h » M O OO O M N 

coHooHncioteccoo^ON 
M « « n N f <M H o © eo co i< ©_ 

to" © cm" ©~ ©~ oo © oo ©~ © od t>T ©~ 

CO CC CM CM i-l O CM rH ■* CM CM b- CM 



© O0 
OS CM 
O H 



■ © 



© • © 

i-H • t- 



OlOOOOOOiOOSOCOO 
© CM © CO © t~ © CM © rH i— I CC 1-1 H 
r^HN CM i-H CM 



©©©©©©©©©©©©©© 
©©©©©©©©©©©©©© 
C0©©rH©COl^ClClrH © © 



CO © 
CC HP 
CM 



© c © © © m 

CM OiOOOH © 

© m c i cm in 



CO f 
C I C I 



© © © tp © © coco 

CO CO — ' Cl i-H © (MO 

CO CO C I 1" © lO © CO 

i-5"co"i>r© T^irT iocm 

CM i-H i-h 



© 



co© in in oo co m co in co 

lO a rH n t H i— ' 

CO i— I i— I 



© o 
~h fc- 

CM 



g 



c3 

•I-H 
H-=> 

o 

o 

W. 

> 
o 



J3 

cc 

• rH 



05 
^3 

'ci 

r> 

T3 
S3 

• — < 

hJ 

a 

c3 
3 

o* 

CP 

St) 

a 

o 

CO 

55 
03 
& 
H 
W 



■spq 

'qsij paxiua piu: osauoQ I 
•sjjq *pmbg I 



©©©©©©©oo© 

© © © CO © © Cl Cl 
1— I CO Cl i-H 



• © 

■ CO 



"©©©O© lf5 ©©©©©©©© 
tffi^HCCHOrHi'MIMOOCl-f 



■sq] 

'qsg i^ojj Jto poo raox 



©©©©©©©©©© © © © © 
©©©©©©©©©©©©©© 

© © © 01 © © l- © © CO © © t- © 
C CI O H C tl CO rH Cl CM 



©©©©©©©©©©©©©© 
©©©©©©©©©oo©©© 
oot>nci9ooooooNa 

CO© C (M N H -t d 



© © ©©©■©©© © © 

©'© © © © ©1 ©© ©© 

©O © 1C © © © o ©© 

©CO OfcoiOCO ©CM 



•sj.iq S'.iriisA'( ) 



03 

Q 



•spq 'sUTB[Q I 



© © L- 
CO -f 



■ O O O O O LO lO 1Q O LO 

■ © lO <N © iH <N i-H <M 



• S1 jq 'spg; 



© © CI Cl CO t- CI tH 



© CO 



>0 •* Ci t- OS © 



•spq 



iO©t.O©©©©©1 , ClCl©i-H© 
CO Cl rH © Cl rH rH i-H i-i 



Cl t- © CI CI CC 

IM Cl 



Tf< © 
© 





008 
OOSI 

ooot 

00Q9 

0001 
0008 
0006 


•sqi '^noax 


© © io • • • 55 © ■ •• © © co-©©©io-c- 


•sqi '^nqqtJjj 


©©©©©©©©©©©©© o © © o © © © ©© 

.©©©©©© O ©©©©©© Cl © CC t— *-H Cl © © © Cl 
■ ©©©©©©©-P-*-"©©© CM © COrtCl©CO© CMiO 
■T-PCOCICICICICI ©lO© © t^COCMClCO CM 

i-i as ta 




10©©©©©©©0©©©©© ©1—1 C r< Cl lO M lO© 
1~.©©©©©©©©©CO©C50 i— ICO i-H©lO'*©- H 1CCM 
ri-fTfHWHNHOO (M i-l rH iH CO 
i-H i-H 


•sq^ 'spimos 'a>[^jj 


o©iq©©©©c:© • •© • ■ 

CM lO t- CO © O © © © ■ ■ © • • 
i-H © H * • • Cl 

i-H ..... 




lO 

■-)< 




_ t « i . — . . 


©©©©©©©©©©©© •© 
SOOOOOOOOfflrlO i-H 




© C 
© 





•sq[ 'satpp«q ubu 
-ng pa^oms 'jjooppujj 



■^aid 'paup '^oopp^H 



©©©©©©©©©© 

©©©Tf>©©©-ir©rH 

i-H i—i co iro i— 1 1— i i— i 



CO CO 

© 1-1 



© © cc © oo o 

Hao>!B13t> 
CO i-l 



© © 

TT i-l 



•sqt 'qsa.ij '^ooppujj 



©©©©©©©©©©©©© © 

© © O © © © © © © CC © © © © 

© © 25 ©©©.©.© in © © © © © 

MH ei-iNHNH-tCOO 
iH © Cl CO 



s^aq 'spunos 
pire sanSuo!) 'poQ 



CO CO ©© UO ©© i-H CM rH • © r-1 -f rH 



• © 
© 

• © 

• CO 



•}mo 'paup 'poQ 



©©©©©©© ©©©©©©© ©•* 
© © © © © © © © © © © © © © © 

CO *H © O © © I- © © © © Cl 
I-l Cl CM rH i— I -t"Cl H — t 



CHrtNfO CMC1 
Cl©CO-l^X© »OCO 
© rH-Cl CO © VH 



'qaqs ui 'qsa.ij 'saajsqoq 



©©©©©©©©©©©©©© 

© 1-- © © © © © Cl Cl n H CO 

io co io m -* rH 



•CO ■ rH © 
■ CC • © Tf 
CO ■ CO o 



s 

r-^J 



0> 



* a 

be C3 
t- o 

rO^W^ 

O tj 2 J) O 



o 
u o 
<v S 

O U 



_ > ■ <B~ci 

5r 3 s di OrC 
SO > r3 

5 £ _ tie c t- 
Ph a; w Ph ffi fa CQ 



: g £ 

■ s o 

■ +j « 

. gs ca 

: b S 
: c« s 



: ^ 
•o 



•aaqum^j 



rH CM CO -"J 1 lO © t~ CO ©© i-h CM CO O © t- 



. . . 5 

: :=i 

. ■ ^ Si 

• • x * 
rSrM-SH 

lm 

ca 2 *? 3 

00 © © rH CM CO 
i— i i— I Cl Cl Cl Cl 



;t3 

■ s 

■ * 

' u 

: a 
. o 

; M 
u 

eS 



■ tH 

• 3 

• O 
rQ 

' b 

• eS 



r?Q ^ 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS—NOVA SCOTIA 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



in 

0<1 


© 


t- 

(M 


00 
!N 


© 


© rH 

CO CO 


CM 
CO 


CO 
CO 






687 


— . 

OS 


i— 1 

CO 


x 
t- 

rH 


~ . 
rH 

t- 


TP © 

m © 
"* © 


IM 
rH 


© 

rH 




CO 
IM 
t»i 


CO 




rH 


© 


00 

T-l 


i-h"c0~ 
rH CI 




00 
rH 




00 
<M 
© 




in 

00 


00 
CM 
rH 


© 
© 
iH 


© 

rH 


c © 
TP © 

rH (M 




© 
© 
rH 


<N 

in 

rH 


© 

00 

1 — 






TP 
rH 


© 
CO 


00 
tH 


O (M 




rH 

rH 


CO 
IM 
rH 

IM 


m 
oo 

rH 

CO 


to 

tH 


IN 


Tt< 

(M 


© 

CO 


rH 

00 
<N 


lO CO 
X M 


t~ 
CO 


rH 
rH 


© 
CO 
© 
TP 
rH 


© 
rH 

IM 
rp 




in 

© 
© 


© 
© 
© 
rH 




IN 


IN 


CO 


© 






IM 


© 

© 
in 


© 

o 
© 

IM 




o 
© 
© 

m 


— 

m 

X 
IM 


o 
o 

X 

7-1 


C 
© 
© 












• 


© 

in 

00 


in 

(M 
© 


:::::::: 


m 












I- 


:-. — 


<M 


CO 


00 
-p 


o 


co 






00 










TP 

IM 
rH 


© 

-P 

IM 
H 




r— 

© 

T 


X 
X 

© 

rH 




© 
© 

oi 

(M 


© 




© 
© 




Si 


© 
© 
-r 


• © 

• © 

• (M 




© 
© 

rH 


© 
CO 
i— i 


CO 
H 
I- 


© 
© 

tH 


© 

© 
CO 
CO 


© 
© 
Ol 


© 

rH 

N 


© 

© 

CO 


© © 

TP lO 

TP rH 




© 
IM 
rH 

M 


X 

© 
© 
M 
N 


© 
rH 

© 
iM 


















00 

T— t 


rH 

(M 


rH 


o 
© 


rH 

IM 


© ■* 
iH 






<M 


Tp 
TP 

o 


CI .... 

1—1 • ■ 


rH 

o 

iM 
IM 


© 

iM 
rH 
rH 








© 








* 

. ■ 

: 


© 
-r 
© 

in 


CO 

m 

CO 
rH 
rH 


• • 


© 
c 
© 
© 

rH 


© 
© 



TP TP 
rH <N 



© 



CO 



rH I CO 
rH 

TP TP 
IM I t~ 



© I © 
© CO 
© CO 



- 



© 

© 



t - X 

t~ rH 

rH CO 



© 
01 



© 

TP 



© 
© 
-P 



01 X 
- 1 X 



X 
X 



TP 
I- 



X 

H- 

00 
CO 



© 

CO 

in 



© © CO © © X 

© oi in oi rn i - 

CO © © Tp © 



X 

m 
oi 



0-7 I © 

- 1 



- 1 

© 



© 



. C 
-. 
H 



H _C 



3W 



a 

a 



- 

: 
CO 

T3 



"h rt rl! £ 

*gH g 

->- h . j» =S.c 

7 ^ 2 ?~. 



^ - 



si 



m © tn. 
0101 CI 



•r t; 

£ s 

as « 

" '"SC'C t ■ ^ ^ 

rUrHjlll 



O J 3 

H > 



00 
01 



r. 

01 



© — 01 

CO CO CO 



co 

CO 



70 MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Return showing the Number, Tonnage .and Value of Vessels and Boats, Nets, &c, 



li 

CO 
- 

s 
l 

2 
3 
4 


District. 


Boats. 


Fishing Gear or Materials. 


© 

a 

& 

12 
13 

8 
25 


0) 
2 
■ — i 

03 

P> 


© 


Gill Nets. 


Seines. 


Weirs. 


fi 

<D 
rO 

H 
p 


m 

O 
^3 


p 
"<3 
t> 


ti 

SO 
XI 

a 


QQ 

S 

-c 

+3 


p 


CD 


CO 


Hants County. 


$ 

69 
65 
185 
710 


12 
13 
9 
32 


15 
13 

8 
32 


285 
250 
2550 
4900 


$ 

Kil 

75 
285 
800 






$ 




s 


Shubenacadie to Grand Lake 














1 


1100 


200 


5 
5 


370 
400 




Totals 








58 


1029 


66 


68 




7985 


1261 


1 


1100 


200 


10 


770 

















































u 

50 

l 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 


■ 

Districts. 


Fishing Vessels and Boats. 


] 

G 


^ishim; Gear or 
Materials. 




Vessels. 


Boats. 


ill Nets. 


Trawls. 


m 

-= 

to 
O) 

§ 

s 

eS 
02 


,3 

TJ 
OO 

QC 

bC 
_C 
'£ 

00 

w 


c 

eo 

g 


CO 
be 
oj 

s 

(3 
O 

EH 


oo 

_3 

"cS 


% 


h 

9 

B 

P 


ao 
P 

i> 


ao 


ao 
£> 

e 

p 


£ 

JS 

+3 
Pm 


ao 
s 

"3 

> 


^° 

cp 
r*, 

3 
1 


CD 
_P 

> 


Pictou County. 










151 
72 
10 
34 
12 
10 
14 
6 


3655 
2160 
250 
410 
235 
138 
310 
94 


154 
98 
12 
40 


128 
39 
20 
68 


3800 
820 
400 
2495 
1082 
1723 
978 
398 


$ 

870 
210 
100 

1202 
550 

1803 
457 
276 




$ 
30 


3500 




3 


49 1300 


6 


Central Division 






3 
20 


15 
40 


5190 
3700 
11700 
5300 
2300 


30 
20 

* 

12 












Merigomish Island 










12! 23 
12| 34 
15 26 
7 13 












1 
4 


20 
50 






















Totals 


















3 


49 


1300 


6 


309 


7252 


350 


351 


11696 


5468 


32 


155 


31690 


13<, 


























6338 


556 





























FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— NOVA SCOTIA 71 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

and the Quantity and Value of all kinds of Fish, &c— Nova Scotia — Continued. 



Kinds of Fish. 



43 

CO 



= 

o 



a 



2325 
1250 
1600 
2075 

7250 

1450 



Is 

CO 

s-. 

D 



CP 

o 



be 



CP 



u 

ID 



O 

Q 



300 



9 

30 



300 





44 



44 



170 



o 

M 
a 

<—• 

o 



11) 



19 

38 



o 



:o 



£ 

ft 

CO 

03 
til 

u 
O 

CO 
CD 
> 



CO 



is -3 

CD ,5 



500 




1000 


4 


400 


92 


5200 


105 


7100 


201 


710 


2010 



3500 



3500 



175 



54 
80 
20 
10 



164 

656 



CO 

- 



u 

go 

a 

O 



500 

1550 75 
. ... 100 



2050 175 



205 350 



Si 

cd 

a 

3 



O 

o 



C ■- 1 



Total 
Value 

of 
Fish. 



2000 



2000 



100 



1500 



1500 



75 



$ cts. 

731 00 
760 00 
2,271 00 
2,225 00 



5,987 00 



a> 

- 



CD 



"S 

s 

CD 

X 



10000 

28900 

5100 
8400 

52400 
524 



Kinds of Fish. 



cd 
£ 



T3 

CD 



C3 

CO 



cd 



CD 



CD 

CO 
CD 

ft 

^ CO 
CO _C 
' — • 

cu „ 
-3 cS 



CO 

a> . 
o w 

h3 



4IMKI 



.277248 
! 162336 



4200 

7600 
4000 



2 17424 
. . 14448 



19800 
2376 



29376 



2 500832 



30 100167 



o 

xT 

"S 
XJ 

xT 
o 
O 



30 
i20 
150 
750 



50 



20 

52 



145 
580 



o 
xT 

XJ 

-a 

S3 



-a 

a 

3 

O 

CO 
CD 

03 



150 



15 
32 



197 
444 



300 



60 

360 
180 



CO 



O 
— 



a 

CO 



200 6000 



3000 
600 



400 
400 
100 



4700 



200 

2500 
1200 



470 



< 11)00 



495 



CD,n 



25 



27 
108 



cu 



j2 



g 

s 
o 



II! 



50 
7 



55 
22 



144 



1440 



25 
3 



28 



56 



O 



CO 

X! 



si 



o3 
be 



03 



CO 



3 
C 

03 



CO 

eS 

CO 



20' 



200 



220 
880 



16 



20 1200 
...I 200 



30 100 
150 



136 
30 



50 1816 



15 2724 

I 



920 
550 



60 



1530 



765 



Total 
Value 

OF 

Fish. 



$ cts. 

59,886 00 
33,042 00 
2,298 00 
5,967 00 
3,980 00 
4,507 00 
8,119 00 
1,115 00 



u 

CD 

e 



118,914 00 



72 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



RECAPITULATION 



Of the Yield and Value of the Fisheries in District No. 2, Nova Scotia, with 
Comparative Statements of the Increase or Decrease for the Years 1899 and 1900. 



Kinds. 



Salmon, fresh Lbs. 

M preserved in cans n 

ii smoked ■■ 

Herring, salted Brls. 

ii fresh Lbs. 

n smoked n 

Mackerel, fresh u 

ii salted Brls. 

Lobsters, preserved in cans . . Lbs. 

H fresh in shell Cwt. 

Cod, dried n 

ii tongues and sounds Brls. 

Haddock, fresh Lbs. 

ii dried Cwt. 

ii smoked finnan baddies Lbs. 

Hake, dried Cwt. 

ii sounds Lbs. 

Pollock Cwt. 

Halibut.. . Lbs. 

Trout ii 

Shad Brls. 

Smelts Lbs. 

Alewives or gaspereaux Brls. 

Bass Lbs. 

Eels Brls. 

Clams, in shell n 

Oysters ■■ 

Flounders Lbs. 

Tom cod or frost fish n 

Squid Brls. 

Coarse and mixed fish n 

Fish oil . . .... Galls. 

Fish used as bait Brls. 

H products used as manure ■■ 

Seal skins . No. 

Total for 1900 



Quantity in 
1900. 



203,750 
2,906 
6,128 
27,185 
753,000 
544,500 
2,575,003 
30,779 
2,476,138 
13,374 
55,010 
109 
2,433,200 
N.093 
210,000 
10,403 
7,850 
11,841 
576,059 
42,920 
1,375 
223,250 
3,312 
8,675 
878 
1,049 
1,569 
130,525 
95,900 
2,146 
2,188 
56,119 
33,721 
8,102 
18 



Hate. 



$ Cts. 

20 
15 
20 

4 00 
01 
02 
12 

15 00 
20 

5 00 
4 00 

10 00 
03 

3 00 
06 
2 25 
50 
2 00 
10 
10 

10 00 
05 

4 00 
1C 

10 00 



2 00 
4 00 
05 
05 
4 00 
2 00 

30 

1 50 

50 

1 25 



Totals. 



52,750 
436 
1,225 
108,740 
7,530 
10,890 
309,000 
461,685 
495,226 
66,870 
220,040 
1,090 
72,996 
26,079 
12,600 
23,406 
3,925 
23,682 
57,606 
4,292 
13,750 
11,162 
13,248 
867 
8,780 
2,098 
6,276 
6,526 
4,795 
8,584 
4,376 
16,834 
50,586 
4,051 
22 



Quantities. 



2,112,023 



Increase. Decrease 



52,812 



1,094 



1,V| U 

8,313 




1,201,300 


538,800 


199,756 


28,469 
117,218 




2,391 
13,279 




23 

451,050 

59, 500 ' 
1,217 




4 




1,407 
6,214 




6,589 

' 10,167 
6,000 
730 


4,685 




2,185 

996' 
108 


151 

51,125 


44,310 
2,181 
5,215 




1,508 
5,685 


1,587 


18 





FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— NOVA SCOTIA 



73 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



RECAPITULATION 



Showing the Number and Value of Fishing Vessels, Boats, &c, in the District No. 2, 
Province of Nova Scotia, for the Year ending December 31, 1900. 



Material. 



08 fishing vessels (2,535 tons).. . 

5, 734 fishing boats 

27,048 gill nets (726,109 fathoms 

780 seines (56,681 fathoms) 

72 tra p nets , 

42 weirs , 

149 smelt nets 

8,720 hand lines 

2,710 trawls 



127 lobster canneries (1,774 hands) 
334,955 lobster trap 



57 freezers and ice houses.. . 
1,977 smoke and fish houses. 

976 wharfs and piers 

72 tugs, steamers, smacks.. 



Total value. 




62,790 
108,898 
167,998 
59,837 
20. sa;, 

5,230 
2,420 
4,449 
14,601 



119,450 
208,912 



26,855 
75,398 
66,661 
39,420 



Total. 



447,058 
328,362 

208,334 



983,754 



Comparative Statement of the Value of the Fisheries in each County of District No. 2, 

Nova Scotia, for the years 1899 and 1900. 



County. 



Antigonish . . . 
Colchester. . . 
Cumberland . . 
Guysborough . 

Halifax 

Hants 

Pictou 



Totals. 



Net increase. 



Value in 
1899. 


Value in 
1900. 


Increase. 


$ 

83,161 
50,975 
128,149 
608,749 
732,678 
12,916 
105,112 


$ 

74,648 
44,135 
128,799 
711,117 
1,028,423 
5,987 
118,914 


$ 




650 
102,368 
295,745 


13,802 


1,721,740 


2,112,023 


412,565 
22,282 






390,283 







Decrease. 



8,513 
6,840 



6,929 



22.2S2 



74 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



NOVA SCOTIA- 



Return showing the Number, Tonnage and Value of Vessels and Boats, Nets, 

Nova Scotia, 



a 

V. 



Districts. 



Annapolis Count p. 



1 Margaretville 

2 Point George . 

3 1 Port Lorne. " 

4 Hampton 

5 Phinny and Young's Cove 

6 Parker's Cove 

7 Hilsburn's and Delap's Cove 

8 Victoria Beach 

9 Thome's Cove 

10 Clementsport 

11 Annapolis to County Line 

12 Lequille River 

13 *Round Hill River 

14 Inland Lakes 



Fishing Vessels and Boats. 



Vessels. 



- 



be 

c 
s 
o 
H 



Totals . 
Values 



12 



24 300 



50 



800 



16 300 
71 2000 



41 



207 



1000 
1000 



5400 



c 

a> 



i 

12 



4 
40 
17 
10 



Boats. 



- 

g 
3 



8 
10 
12 
13 



3 
i— i 

> 



150 
200 
300 
300 



20 500 
25 000 
20 400 

goo 



10 

8 
25 



00 150 



200 
200 



s 

s 



8 
15 
30 
20 
30 
40 
30 
50 
12 
14 



Fishing Gear 

OR 

Materials. 



3450 249 



Kinds of Fish. 



Gill Nets. 



g 
5 



15 
20 
25 
20 
30 
30 
50 
50 
20 
20 
50 



c3 
> 



— 

33 
- 



a 

o 



c3 



2000 800 
1800 700 
2000 800 . 
2000, 800 . 
250(1 1000 
3000 1500 



330 



sou 
1800 
500 



17900 



400 

500 
60 500 
. ... 500 
.... 400 



.3 -O 



a 



= 



T3 

S3 

O 



X 



700 300 2500 200 
800 400 2000 417 



559 .... 
300 ... . 
400 
300 
20ii . 
80 ... . 



40 4000 



120 
95 
300 
275 
250 
300 
280 
200 
18 



7200 5900 2496 
1180 9984 



-a 



2 IS _T 



500 
300 
550 
500 
475 
350 
400 
3950 



4000 1838 730O 



80 9190 29200 



*Hook and line fishing. 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— NOVA SCOTIA 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



75 



District No. 3. 



etc , and the Quantity and Value of Fish caught in District No. 3, Province of 
for the Year 1900. 




24 
240 



1)00 
1400 
1700 
1500 
1000 
1000 

900 
3000 



800 



12200 



366 



is 
o 



o 
o 



110 
175 
210 
GOO 
900 
950 
800 

2500 
90 

1000 



o 



112 
118 
240 
400 
900 
880 
1000 
3800 
400 
450 



7335 8300 



22005 18675 



Kinds of Fish. 



Fish 
Products. 



CD 

as 
X 



o 
o 



P 



p 
o 



•a 

ess 

a; 



a 
f. 



100 
110 
125 
200 



85 
60 
95 
175 



400 200 
350| 300 
500| 350 
3000 2200 
100; 90 
200 100 



5085 



2542 



3655 



7310 



300 
7600 

785 



81583 



869 



800 
300 
700 
8000 



9800 



980 



40 



40 
400 



1000 



1000 



50 



- 



5-5 



900 
200 



. . 1000 

3|.... 
4 



1100 



110 



70 



1000 



a 
a 

a> * 

03 JO 

o 



1500 



1500 



50 3000 



eg 

be 
o 



150 
175 
195 
200 

250 



c3 



^3 



25 
30 
35 
45 
50 



200 40 
300 | 45 
1000] 110 
25 
25 



200 



2670 



801 



110 
120 
125 
110 
25 
35 
40 
30 
20 
20 



430! 635 



645 317 



Total 
Value 

OF ALL 

Fish. 



3 



*> cts. 



4,906 
5.678 
7,681 
7,982 
10,287 
9,902 
9,634 
39,720 
1,537 
5,794 
3,770 
180 
190 
800 



50 
00 
30 
50 
50 
50 
50 
00 
50 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



108,064 30 



1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
& 
7 
& 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 



MA It IX E AXD FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



uaqmn \^ 



. c t- k t o ti k x r. o ^ ti r. -t o ->r 

HHwHrrwH ^ r- M II « Tl M M N CM 



•sqj 'i|sajj 'jjooppKjj 



O lo t— i- — © © ; - c i — x ©■ © © : -r — ; l X X -p — • — X 
CM CM t-i H H X r- pp © i— r-i i— t~ r- © 

IN i-l <M (Mi—— i-H 



•sj.iq s patios 

pill? sailSllO^ 'pOQ 



■f i— i— i i—i 



•;avo 'paup 'poQ 



©©•©©©©©©© ©©©io©©©©lo©©©©lo©©x© 
r. c ; r i" -r c r. 1 1- s - i- -f c : c c. rn" c ~ M -p © M pp 

O N S5 ^< S O M H O H r. ?) t M l- C CO © r— SO r— .0 X 

t>- -p <M © © is 



'{[aqs ui qsaaj 's.ia^sqo'j 



1- © 10 © © © © 

M O K C. 1" S 1C 
©CM 

O -P >M 

CO 



© © © © © © © -P © © © © . - 1 . - Z 
© © lo pp © 01 © 10 © © CO i0 t— © r- co 
K c: X t N « O f 113 « so 1— it)< 



•sq[ 'sireo 
at paA.iasa.id 'sjajsqoi 



© 


■ © © • • 


• • © 


© 


© © • • 


• © 


■ ■ '2 


• © © • • 




• . . 'cm 


• © © • ■ 









•sq[ 'qsajj 'jaja>pi3j^ 



© 
© 
© 
pp 



© ■©©»©©© © © 

© ■ 10 © © © © © ■ lO © 

-CO © © © © © • 1— © 

H 'NOMK O • rH 



© LO © © © © © © lO © © 

©01©©© 'OOIOHOC 

CO — © © 00 ■ © ©. © 01 01 CO 

— fr- t- ■ © © -f- rH 



•sqj 'payouts 'Sniiiag 


4500 




■ © 

.... O 
- .. . . O 

• Ol 












© © 

© lO 
C CO 

10 

(M 










•sqj 'ijsaji 'Suiaaajj 


20000 
1000 
8500 
0500 

S 1 

18000 
300000 
300 
10000 
15000 
12000 

21 M H 11 1 
1 1 0000 


© © © © 

© © LO © 

M © © © 
01 © 01 


© © © © © 
lO © 01 ©. — 
1— 1 1— t rH 


© C 
© © 
©. lO 
© © 
CO -* 


© © © 
© © © 

© -P st 

lO 


•S(jq 'paap?s 'Suujajj 


© © 

© i0 

1-1 






















L* 




• © 








•sq[ 'qsaaj 'uouqtig 


© © 
© © 

© rH 


© © © © 
© © © © 

1— Hn 
































j Weirs. 


•anp3 A 


© © 
^ © © 
w Cm M 

!—• 


© © © © « 

© LO © © O 
CO — I M LO 


© 
© 

CO 




m 

Ol 








© © 1- © © 

LO © t>- lO IO ■ 

© LO 

— 


© 
© 

CM 




•jaquin^ 


©1 Ol 


WnHClH 






pH 








X C H H H ■ 


I-H 




Seines. 




© © 
99 © CO 


©©©©©©i.O 10 
3I010100 LO t- t- 
CO 1-1 1-1 01 M (M CM 


© ~ 

— i~ 

CO 


© © © . X © • • 
© © lO • <N IT5 • • 
© LO * 

i—l • • 










© id 

© rH 
X rH 


©«©©©©©© 
CM©ClXXrH©© 

rH i— 1 i-H r— CM SO — 


© © 

© 

CM 


© © © ■ © *o • ■ 

© © © 01 I- ■ - 

" © ■ 1-1 ■ • 








■jaqiun^ | 




T-l CO 


O © CO • CO CM • • 
1— 1 • • 









•anpj A 



© © Hp: © X Cl Cl X © UO 
lOClH0C"Hl-OOf 
■THH 1-1 SO r-COM 



©L0©©©L0©lOCM©X©© 

■ © © lo co -v pp co x © -p © 10 

rH © lO »0 r— r— 



01 



•suioq^i:^ 



©©©©©©©©©© ©©©©©©©©©©©©© 

© ci x t- 01 hi -p © -r © -r x © 01 © lo co © © 10 lo .0 © 

L0-r©c0t^©CMC0if5© • CM t~ © i— 01 CO Cl CO -r M ■— © ©. 

1— rH K NCI 



uequm^ 



lo —1 -y ,0 © ci ci x t~ x ci ©. © © © © x © lo ci x -p © 

NNMr-iKL'tiHHCIf • pH SO ©. HOI — irlH Cl SO 



■u.ijv; 



© -P © © -P © X M X X -P X © 01 01 © © X 01 M © © -T © X LO tC 
LOrHr-ii-iClCl 1-1 r- "rf< tH CM © rH © © npir- 1 rH CM CO I.M Cl 



o 

P3 



•anp3 A 



©©©©©©©©©©©■0©©©©©©©©©©l0lOlolo© 

©X01©X.O©-PpP©lOC1X©X©lO©lO''J'-P-PC1 — CIClr- 
©CMC0M-P©rHCMCOCMCMCMl^LOrH©L0i-iCMC<lCMCMLO©rHC0-P 
i-H CO CM CO 



Maqiunsj 



UOt~XL0OlS0PP©©PPt~PrSCrH©XXPp©©XXCMCML0'PP©> 
CM HH CM rHlO-rJi-Tp ,_| CM ,— rt 



•ua K 



ci 

X 



ID 



•aiq« A 



-p 

CO 
Cl 



•aStfuuojj 



CM 
rH 

X 



uaqum^ 



© 

CM 



© © 
© © 



© • © © 

CO —01 



CO 



© © 
© © 
© © 

CO CM 



LO >0 
CM © 
CO -P 



CO Tt< 



/. 
E- 
O 

r-l 

as 

r- 



s 

5 



> 
'2 



- >>"h 

J a) 



> * * o > 

o >.> a o 

— _P ^3 dO 



> 
o 
s 



- > 



- - 



- - - 



uaqum\; 



• ■c 

rHCMSOTf<»0«Ot^X©©i-"CMCO-^<lf5i©t-X OS © rH CM SO -p LO © t - 
r-rHrHrHrHr- — r-rHrHCMCM(MClCMClCMC4 



E 
o 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS-NOVA SCOTIA 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



» © g 
co co co 
cm -~D -r 
t- cm -v 

CO CM 




co 
er 

CO 

I- 

r—< 


1 2 

55 

! 




O 
CM 
i—l 


1 s 

1 ^ 


oq 1— 10 
co c~ 


t— 

CO 

t- 
t- 


CO 

I—l 
.— < 

^ 




1—1 

r-t 


01 

CO 

m 


CM 




O 

LO 
CO 


cr 

r~ 

C2 


000 

CON 
O " t- 

HXr- 




O 
O 


1 i"- 1 
CO 

CO 

— 




CO 
IO 
co 

"O 


CO 


© c 
CO — 
cc co 
co © — 
co n 


CO 
O 
i-H 

S5 
5c 


i 5 
co [ 




»C5 
CM 





pH 




O 
CO 


—1 


CM 

CM . 


• . 
■ O • 

• • 


i ■ 

CO 1 • 

w 1 . 


: w : Ife 






co 
in 






10 

CO 

co 

CO 




• • • 1 1 


O IQ 1C 1 

— t- CO 

1-i 1-1 


1 - 

01 

m 




000 
co m n 

a 

1—1 



1— t 

CM 




wow 

CO CO 


CO 

(- 

CO 1 




i— 01 


•3 

CO 


— 1 


000 
1- r— 
— 1- cm 


CO 
CO 



01 




X CO CM 

CM 


-f 




• IO CM 
■ iH CM 


1 





O O 
■ O O 
• CO c 


CO 

a 
5 


• <ft 
■ co 


-4 1 




2<x Sauloierville 

29 Mett phan 3 

30 Cape St. Mary's .... 4 

Valuos $ 

— 



78 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



^3 

«s 

S 

s 

o 



o3 

■H 

o 
o 
m 

o3 
> 
O 



o 



co 

£ 

O 

CD 
3 



T3 
C 

CD 



-PS 

O* 

C 

CD 



to 
a 

o 

CO 

S5 
03 
O 
H 

a 



•aaqumx 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

< H M t L~ C N X C5 O H M « C 3 N X ?. O H ^1 » t in 'O N 
rHHHHHHHr-HHCqNW CM !M CM CM CM 



- z 7 

o 



a: 
g 
o 

= 

50 



•sj.iq '^req su qst ^ 



•sqva qio qsi ►£ 



•sjjq 

'qsy paxrai puu asauoQ 



•spq 'pmbg 



•sqj 'sjapuno[j 



•s[.iq 'spa 



•sjjq 'sotbjq 



•sq[ 'ssug 



•s[.iq 

'msajadstsS jo saATAiajy 



x 

co 
— 

Ee, 

C 



5-. 



•sqj 'ajpnig 



•s[.iq 'puqs 



•sqi '*noji 



•sqj ';nqn«H 



•sq[ 'spunos 'ajpjjj 



•j wo 'paup '^»>[^H 



•sqj 'saippcq cnra 
-ug papain's '^aoppvjj 



•}.wo 'paup '>(oopp«j{ 



©©©©©in©e©©©©©©©m©m©©©©©©©©© 
^SHNMMKOOSfflWOXNiSNlOr-ileOt-.OCOr-l-.K 

iiXNCi'OiNOrHOHX'fi-it'Oc.i.iONtccMcmHc; 

tMOMtBttNNHlsesi-ttMNC 1 : cc ^ c ''l — 10 L ~ l ~ 00 3* >0 <C fH © 

of to x" o i c~ cm ©~ o" o" -p ©~ ©~ tsT TjTto erf t- to tjT r-Teo" cxf ief T-Tia tp 

H TfCOH «1Q CI 1-1 © Ol-C) IN r-l 

-r i— i cm 



. _ r ~ © © ©o©in©©©©©©©©©©©© 

0©©0©©©©©©t~©©©©©©©©00»QC 
— — n O O O C ©•© CO ICS CO i— < IC 

ii» »-~> ,— , rv-i —l 



© © 

© © L_l w w ' W V W W I 

c -p co i* i- © © — . io © 
© 1-1 © — 1— © 



© X © 

co 



©©lO©©©©©©©©©©©© — © — ©©©' — © 
OCJIOOCO'tiOOCCMLOOC'COOCOlCCO 
© CO -1-1 CQ CO CO © CM © CM CM tP H lO © O CO CO CM CM 
CM 



©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©© 
c o c c o c o lc: c c o c c c o o s c c c s c e 

OClTH^OCl^CO^OClCL-LlOMrH-r-r-r. 

x te co cm i-i uo © tp 



— - © © © © ©©©©©©©© © © © © © © in IT. 
O © © IS © © i-O © © © i- © © © © © © © tC CM CM CM I 
© CM -P -1 -P io CM © © ITS CO © CM © © IO n 
CI © CO CO 



© 
© 



© 1- 



©©©©©©©©©C©©©©©©©©©©©©'© 
© © © © iO ©©©©©©©©©©©©©©© O © © 
lo -r i-i co © co - © i.o x i - © © i- i-o - i- i - co — co © 

O i-i i-i i-i i i-i © i-i 



© 
© 

O) 



© 
© 
© 



© 
© 
© 

fl 



© 

lO 

o 



© © iO © 

© © i-i w 

© CO 



© © © 

n tp — 



© © iO lO © 
C« i-l 



lO 
• CM 



© © 

CO © 



© © © 
© © © 

lO © it" 
CM if CO 



CO X CM i— 
i CO lO CM 



© © 
© © 
© = 



lO iC X 
CO i-1 



■ © © © 
• © m © 

■ o © 



© © © © © iO 
© © © 1-0 ~ CM 
C C. Nr-C C 

x co TP m 

X 



©©©©©©©©©©© 

© © © © © i.O © © c © © 
CO © © I- X CO i0 iO © © lO 

— 1-1 © © 1— 

CO CO CM 



• © ICS 

© co 

• T(" 



to © 

© IT 



oooioooh © © ©©©©Tf©©©©©©©irs 

iS O l> X H M iCt C. ©©©©XC0©©O©lOCM 
1 - © CMt^TfCO CO CO CM © CM © © © CM n 
i-H ICS H © © 



© © © co in cm 
o in co ir © x 
in tp cm 



SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOC 
© © io © © © © jo © © in © © © io © © in 
in -p x cm m © i-H ri © m -p io o © -p © © i 

CO 01 CM i— CC CM CO CM CM 



©©©©©CO©©©©0©tM©©n©i 
© iO X iO iO -f © X © © © © 01 © © — © : 

01 oi © oi t- © cm h -i co i-0 co oi © m i>- © 

CO i—l CO TP CM CO i—l n X -P © 

■-I CM t- 



© © 

i-0' © 

© .n 
© © 
© 

Gi 



© © z 

© © © 

© © © 

i-H i-0 o 



© 
© 
o 
© 



© i.O 10©©©© ©©©©©©©© © 
Oil- — ©©CO— '-P©©iO©©©©© 
ii © © CM O) ii CO © ~. i~ iO © © — 
OI CM i-1 TP CO t— 



© -p 



© o 
— © 



rr. 

o 

5 
fr- 
ee 



s 



»5 



• > 

Cn C 

- iH Cv 



o 

is > 

cu ^3 ■ 



— T3 



S ? > § cS s? 

i - -J - ^ T 



J3 

be 



• ^ — — : do 

o ^ s 53 ^ - 



i- pi 



•jnqiunx 



—I cm co -p in © 



NCOOOHClCC^l^ONXCC - CMCOtP 
HHnHrtrH--Hir-C)MClNN 



1 „ C5 

* = p 

— 5 

<~ -T r- 

01 CM CM 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS—NOVA SCOTIA 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



00 C5 © 

© © © © " 

i~ © O C 

© TP -»> © 

-f" ■ — i © 

31 © CO X 



1Q 



CO 
00 



co 





97375 


t~ 

00 

© 

X 

<* 




m 

© 
CI 


m 

35 

co 

CO 




© 

W 

m 


tn 

CO 
CO 

© 
1-1 


• an 

: :,j 


© 
O 

O 
f 
CO 


T— 1 

OO 
Tt* 

gig 


© 

CO 

© 
© 
© 




© 
- 1 

oi 


© 




© 
© 
© 
-r 

<N 


CO 

© 

i — 




Oa 
© 

iH 


© 

OS 

c 
— 


i— 01 


m 
i- 
co 


& 


© 
o 




m 

!M 


(M 




© 
© 


-f 

01 




© 
C 

s 

53 


© 


: : : -IS 
• : : • | 


© 




o 
t~ 

CO 


in 

CO 


•29 


lO 
-f 

oj 


CO 
N 


CO © © 
— 01 


«o 

I— 1 

ir; 
m 

CO 


O 
C 




© 
O 

CO 


1 

X 




© 

o 

CO 
I— 1 


-r 

CO 



,jn - 

V. 5 



© i © 
o x 



x 

01 



in 



CO 



lO 

© 
© 
© 



- 

■is §/-Si 

-J: ~~ - 

ago* 1 ! 

X © © 
01 01 CO 



80 .1/ tRINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Return showing the Number, Tonnage and Value of Vessels and Boats Nets, 



Si 

■- 
-- 



- 

ft 



Districts. 



King's County. 



1 Avonport and vicinity. 

2 Gaspereau n 

3 Starr's Flats 

4 Kingsport 

5 Blomidon 

6 Baxter Harbour 

7 Halls Harbour 

8 Huntington Point 

9 Chip Brook 

10 Black Rock 

11 Harbourville 

12 
L3 



Kishini; Vkssels and Boats. 



Vessels. 



— 

s 

- 



01 

SF 

c 
= 

H 



14 



350 



a 

3) 



Boats. 



Si 

s 

g 
5 
ft 



> 



13 



200 



Morden 

Scott's Bay . 

Totals. 



16 
12 
2 

5 
6 
8 
4 

5 



160 
120 

40 
100 
120 
100 

80 
100 



5 
38 

3 
7 
32 
24 
4 
10 
12 
16 
8 
10 



Fishixc; Gear or Materials. 



Gill Nets. 



-5 
ft 



13 



30 
24 

4 
10 
12 
16 

8 
10 



Seines. 



o 



1700 



700 



900 
75i i 
120 
300 
360 
480 
210 
300 



480 
375 
60 
150 
180 

L»(MI 

120 
150 



3 
ft 



O 
— 
-us 



14 350 3 71 1080 175 127 5210 2415 



245i> 



> 



825 



Trap 

Nets. 



25 



> 



155 



3 2450 825 25 155 



Values 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— NOVA SCOTIA 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

&c, and the Quantity and Value of all Fish, &c. — Nova Scotia — Continued. 



81 



Kinds of Fish. 



= 



2500 



10000 
9000 
5000 
4000 
3000 
1500 
4000 
200 



bo 

"fi 
s- 

ep 

a 



60 

St 
m 

w 



2500 



39200 



7840 



250 .. 
150 .. 

60 .. 

40 .. 
150 .. 
240 1 . , 

200!.. 

150 . 



1240 2500 



4960 25 



T3 

O 

M 
o 



50 
S 



5000 



9000 

75000 
40000 
20000 
16000 



165000 



3300 



•J 
u 

CD 



^3 
O 

O 



X 
IS 

u 



o 
o 



46 



250 
90 
50 
50 
90 
160 
140 
100 



976 



3904 



60 
75 
25 
40 
60 
70 
40 
60 



430 



13 



o 

-a 

a 
o 

T3 
c3 

X 



190 
100 
40 
60 
30 
48 
30 
75 



O 



23 



573 



1719 



175 
90 
25 
30 
90 
40 
80 
25 



578 



115t ; 



s 
Is 

- 



200 
400 



150 



750 



75 



3 

o 



450 
1400 



1850 



185 



u 

XI 

m 



125 



55 
10 

5 



68 



263 



2630 



- 

0i 



cS 



> 



500 



Fish Products. 



to 



o 



40 



500 



2000 



40 



12 



■~ 



CO 



190 
60 
30 
50 
75 
80 
50 

100 



635 
952 



a> 

St 

S 

s 



CO 

cS 



30 

"46 

30 
40 

150 
75 
20 
50 

100 
60) 
50j 
75 



720 



360 



Total 
Value 

of ALL 
Fish. 



1,540 
2,640 
570 
115 
195 
5,281 
3,381 
1,865 
1,541 
3,494 
3,076 
2,926 
2,504 



St 

- 



on 
00 
00 

llll 

00 
80 
75 
75 
l'ii 
30 
10 
20 12 
30 13 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
L0 
11 



29,131 40 



22—6 



82 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



^3 

S 

g 
o 



+3 

o 
o 
m 

> 
o 



of 
© 

go" 
-u 
c3 
O 

PQ 

d 

en 

03 
CP 



C*H 

o 

© 
s 

l> 

d 
cS 

c 
d 

o 

E-t . 
tT 

a 

-a 
a 

•rH 

o 

-d 

03 

S5 
« 

D 
EH 
H 

Pi 



09 



03 

c 



03 
►J 
< 

s 

63 
Eh 
< 

=5 
O 



<3 
g 

3 

03 
»— I 

Ph 



03 
Eh 
«! 
O 

pq 

Q 

03 
J 
W 
03 
03 
H 

> 

55 
3 

03 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 





hnm-iocnccooh cm co -r ia 

T— T-H T— I T"H t-h t-H 


■spq 

'pa^s '[a.ia>p\:T^ 


©©©©©© o o © © o o o o o 

©©©©©©©©©©© © IO © co 

r - ■/. ? i z s z x r i — x - - — -.- 
win- H H i-H i— 


© 

X 
T-H 


© 
© 
CM 

in 
© 

CM 


•sqi 

'qsaaj 'pud^o^'j^ 


© © © © © © « © © (N © © © © © 
C O K O N C 31 rt O © © © © 
f t N H ttJ< CO CO © 

t-H i-H 


lO 
tM 
OS 
© 
JO 


CO 

CO 

© 


•sqj 'qsa.ij 'SuiJjajj 


• © © © © © © 

© © © © © © 

© • © W © © © 

t-h . t-H <M 00 ITS 


18100 


T-H 
00 
T-H 


•si.iq 

'paupjs 'Sui.uajj 


ClOONONOOOiCO © © © © 
CI -f t-h i— © 01 © t-h © © © © o 

HKO co o e N N 

T-H 1-H 


Hf 

CM 

H*< 


© 

© 

CO 
CO 

t-H 


•sq t 

'pasfonis 'uonrpjg 


© © 

© © 

■ • • • tO ~H 


© 

m 


© 

© 

T— I 


© 

t-H 

CM 


' SC U 'qSEUJ 'UOUtfBg 


©O©©© in © © © © © 

■t c ; o x ■ © © m © © © 

T-H t-h tH t-h CI -f © © 

O CO 


4500 
1000 


m 
■f 

00 

m 

l-H 


© 

T-H 

CO 



is 



© 
© 



© © 

© © 

© C -T 

b- t-H CM 

CM CM 



© 

cc 



in 



•jaqum 



© 



© © 

© CO 

I- 



- I 

CO I 



CD 
-4-3 




©©©©©©©©©©© 

OOOOOOOOOQOC 

cfc cm © x cm -t- cm m © m 

CM CM t-h © 


8 

CM 

T— 


© 


© 
© 

o 


© 

in 


© 

00 




0) 


•anpj A 


CM 


T-H 


CM 




Tra] 


uaquin^ 


t— © rf CM ■* CI t— CO X t-H O 
HH CM 


in 


© 


© 

CI 


© 

T-H 


CM 
tH 





©©©©oooooo© © © © © 

©©©©©©©©©©© © m © © 

m x x x © x in x © © © cm cm © © 

© -H- t-H CM TF CO CO T-H 



© I 
O 

in 
© I 

CO I 



•stuoq^'j 



©©©©©©©©©—© © © © © 

©©o©©©©©©©© © © © © 

t- © © © x m © © © t- © in m -v 

CM CM CM t— t CO < — I — 



in 



uaqmn^ 



-f © X X X ©— <- © 01 
CM CM CO i— CM CI 



T-l I 

CM I 



01 



•aiqu A 



©©©©©©©©©©© © 

©©©mx©©©~ ©© © 

fiONr- Tt«x©ininc<iin © 

HCl t— T-H Tf rf 



© © © 

© © © 

co io m 

© t e 

CM CM t-H 



© 
CO 

in 

CM 



•smoqiuj 



©©©©©©©©©©© © 

©OOOOOOOOQO © 

u"i O H O O O C C O X o © 

© © CI — ntC«l-rOD IO 



© © © 

© © © 

© © © 

© © 

TJI Tfi CM 



in 

00 



uaquin^ 



i- OIOIOOOOIQIOOO 

ci © © t~ m © in ci t~ © © 

CO m T-H T— CM (M T-H CO © 



© 
in 



© © © 

co io m 

© -f © 

CM CM t— I 



CO 



c i~. — ~ r — — z 

© co co m co -f x © © cm 

tH T-H CM t-H 



© 
CI 



in 

CO 



to 
— 

in 



c3 
O 



•atq« A 



©©in©©©©©©©© © © © © 

© © © CO © © © © © © © © t-H © T)H 

t^L' »-Tt<Cl-t < ©X©CO't l © t-h CO X 

cii— cm coco rH©eo 



in 
in 
— 

CO 



•jaquinx 



1 1>. co mm © © © © © © 

i©CO-HC0Tt'C0'©-HrCl© 

i T-H T-H CM 1— I 



© 
T-H 

CI 



© H*t 

1^ CM i-H 

in ia th 



x 
© 

CO 
CI 



'"•'IV 



> 



•aiqu A 



•aSmuioj^ 



■aaqmn^j 



03 
Eh 
O 

t-H 

Eh 

03 



HO 

s 

iO 

S 
g 



"© Cj 
■- & 

y. ©^ 



- 

> 
o 

o 

U ; 
~ is 

_= 



C2 

"© : 

t-H 

M ■ 

S 2 6 

®^ S o > 

c = 



© 
© 
-r 



© Hfl CO 

CM t— — 
CM © t- 



I CO 
© 



© 
© 
© 

to 
© 



m © © 
ox© 

© T- © 

t-H CO CM 
CO CM 



i- 

co 
© 



© 
© 

CM 



© 

© 
© 



Tf © 

© CI 

CM © 

m 



I CO 
00 
00 

I -f 

I T-H 



m 

Cl 



HJI 



CO 
© 



© 



CO 



— 

a 

>- 

m 

a- ^ 



= ■© 

^ a 

c5 



X tH 
"J 



• > 



- HJ 
© 4i 
? U 

s -- 



- > 

C. -H 

•- — 



3 

6 

o 



>. - 

«H 

© '2 

ll 

— - 



c5 

HH> 

EH 



5 t5 t-H Ph 



■jaqiun x 



T-HCMCO-H<m©l^X©©T-HCM 



FISHERY INSPECTORS 1 REPORTS—NOVA SCOTIA 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

•jaqumx; 



HflKtCSINWKOH CXI 
rH rH rH 



ooooooomo 

1O1OOCOOONO 

cD^toeooacoicxNcq 
n n o co a c h m c 

co ©~ cm sf b-T t>T cm o~ 

HCO^HHHWHfC 



< 3 

o < 



o o 

O in 

Si lO 
I- © 

o — . 

-rH rf 



© 

o 



cm 

rH 

CO" 
CO 
(M 



© 
b- 



© 



© 
© 



rH rH CI 

Hj* CO 

© -r © 

©" oT sT 

cm m co 

m 



b- 
© 

co" 
© 
in 



spq 

'ajrurein su qs[ 


o© ©•© 

I-* CO • ... 


© 

00 


© 

CM 


•Sfiq '^req st? qsi^j 


oooceiooooeo © oo © cm 

CONwOlOCOCOCOO © rH cq rH 
© L~ rH CO rH © IS OS 
rH 


© 
© 
CO 
th 


© 

O 

© 


•S[[bS 'no qsij 


®©©m©©©©©©© © © oo © 

tCiTC-JDClOC ChO © © © © 
CO CM rH CM © CO © J S K 

hp -* 1 i» in 

rH 00 t- 


CO 
rH 

© 

00 
rH 


■* 

b- 

CM 

■HH 

lO 


•sqi 'qsg 
p9xuu puu asxeoQ 


O O O O O l!5 o o o c o © 
© © b- © b- t~ © X © CO b- rH 
■'■ — CO © CM r- 

r - ' rr rH 






O 
l>- 

Si 


© 

■Si 
Si 


•spq 'pinbg 


© CM ~ CM © 
lOHNriH 
CM rH 


lO 
SM 


in © © © 

CO rH b- -rf< 






H« 

00 
lO 


© 

co 

CO 
CM 


■sq[ 'qsg 
^saij .10 poo uioj. 




© 
© 


1450 
600 

400 
(iOO 
700 


© 
© 

CM 
TP 


© 

rH 

CM 


•sqi 's-iapunojj 


oopoooooooe © 
©©©©©©©©©©© © 

© © © lO © b- © © © © © © 
OOWNHHOiOOriO 00 
© © IM CO in 








© 

© 
00 

O0 

TH 

CM 


© 

rH 
HH 
CM 
rH 


■Bpq 'spa 


CMOCM©COCO(M-.©© 0C Iffl © lO 
rH r- - rH CO rH H N H 


rH 

in 

rH 


© 
rH 

m 

rH 


•spq 'sureiQ 




•© ■NfiKH-OlOO 00' 
■ rH • rH rH 










X 
© 

in 


•sjjq 'xuuai 




CM '00 
rH • 




• ■ © © 

• • © CM 

• • rH 








© 

-HH 
rH 


z 

© 
3 



x 



o 

oo 

5 



•sqi 'seeing 



•sqi 'qnqquH 



"!pS\0 'jfOOIIOJ 



•sqi 'spunos 'ajpjjj 



•!)avo 'p9up 'e^H 



•sqi 'saippisq crenug 
pajjoms 'jpopp^jj 



'paup 'jpoppujj 



•sqi 

'qsaij '^oop[j«jj 



•sjaq 'spunos 
pms sanSuo^ 'pog 



•;mo 'psup 'poQ 



ni qsaaj 'sas^sqo^ 



•sqi 'suuo ai 
p9.\j3S8Jd 'saaisqbq; 



CO © 
rf- © 



CM 



© 
© 

CM 



© 

© 
© 



© 
© 
© 



© 
© 
© 
b- 



Z 

m 
oo 



~©m©b-10©mWlOOOlO 
© rH rH rH HP CO © HH b- CM 



© 

© 
© 

CO 



© 
© 



© 
© 
b- 



© 
br 



© I CO 

CO © 

- r. 

© I b- 

b- i 



© 
© 

CM 



© 
© 



CO 



© 
© 



00 
CO 

© 



© • ....©.. ta 

b- ©•■ b- 

~© © © © : ■ • © © lO © ©" 

C C O « • • • © rH b- © 

CO • • • rH rH CO 

'oomiowK ©©'©©© © 

©©COCM H O O H O b- 

rH rH CM CM 



© 
CO 



© 
© 
© 



lO I CO 

h« ; b- 



© 



© 

00 
CO 



- 



© 

CO 



© 
© 

TH 



© 

CO 



io i m 

rH rH 

© © 

© 00 



© 



• © CM 

• o 

CM 



© © © 

© © © 

© ' CM © 

© co m 

O • rH 



© CM © 



© 
© 



CI 



i © 
I in 
in 
oo 
I © 



- 

c 
: i 



CO 



©©©©X©©©©©© © © © © 

QOOlOrlHQQOOO © © © © 

in©w co©mm© © © © © 

rH HHH C CI © b- 



© 
© 

CO 



TP 
I - 

© 

CM 



© 

00 

t - 
- 



© -b-©CM©©CMCMX© 
rH ■ j-t t-{ CM rH rH rH 



r- 



f- 



22—6^ 



•j^qumvj 



s 
E? 



© 
© 



© 

■H- 



in 
— 
in 



x 

■ m 

• Hf> 



o o 

r^O 



tO 5S 

o " 

r3rd 



T3 

5 3 
C 



in 

CM 
b- 
CI 



S X i 



S 1-2 ?H 
S-b^S tip" 



c3 

T3 
C 

eg 
>> 

- 



© TH 

CO © 

© 00 

© 00 

CO rH 



*o 
« c 

eg 

3 

1 - 
II 



•'B • a 

:.s : o 
•P o 

: o 



00 
CM 
© 
© 
CO 



= 2i s r^J.^.£P5i^pH - 

rX^Hr^MPq^rgPUgs t-3 



2 



i-icNeOH»<in©b-.co©©rHCM 



r-3 PL, 



- | 

eg D 



O 



eg 
r> 



CO 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., 



7. 

o 

CD 

Q 
S5 



Eh 
< 

a 

Q 
55 
<! 

K 
C5 

CJ 

K 

03 



03 

Eh 

<: 
o 
M 

Q 

< 
a 

K 
03 
03 
H 

> 

g 

5 

03 



\iaqran\- 



•sqj ; qsaaj 'nouqi3g 



o c 3 
r- t- i— o 

Sf T-IH 



s> 
e 
'S 
02 



• o o 

■ o o 

■ t- T-l 



•sinoq^ej; 



o © 

• © © 

■ TP r+ 



•jaqiiiu^ 



•sq[ 'qsaaj 'jajajpBj^ 




• © 
■ o 

CO 














© 
o 

CO 


© 

© 

CO 


•sqj 'pajjouis 'Suuaajl 




• © 

• o 

• 5 

• IN 














= 

8 


o 

TP 


•sqj 'qsaaj '3uu.iajj 




• © 

• © 
■ O 

• OS 














© 
© 
o 

cs 


o 

OS 


•s[aq 'pa;,p:s 'Suuaajj 


»n 

TP 
TP 


■ -OOONCCiO 

• i-t t-H tp im 25 




3042 


GO 

© 

T-H 

(M 
l-H 


•Sqj 'pajjouis 'norapjg 


moo • • 






© 
© 

l-H 


O 

CO 

CO 



CO 

— 



- 
- 



s 
3 



to 



•8iqTJ A 



© © 
-t> © 
o 



■ONflOOOOO 
>©-P©GC©GC-P© 
•TpTPCOGCin-P©<M 



TP 



•suioqi^^ 



O© CONCOOOO 

© © • X cc © i- © © © © 

OlO • t-H CO i-l © i-i GC TP lO 

IM • lO TP L~ CM t-h M t- 



GO 

X 
M 
CO 



•laqmnjj 



© © 

TP CO 



•OOOlOOCOL- 
•©"-P-PCOt~©'G0CM 
• (M (M t-h IM 



© 

i— I 

CO 







•U9 K 



i~. M © CO -P X TP CM CO t- t- 

TP 



•anpj A 



©©©©©©©©©©© 
^ go t— ♦ t~- tp io ia t>- co 



r; 

B 1 

X 



03 



uaqranx 



03 
r> 

s 

Eh 

03 



s 



«3 

a 
"8 
- 

o. 

_r: : 

-2 



■ — ~ 
. pi" 



_ S 
F S- 

O -o 



. 

— — - 

H 13 
— 



•jaquin SJ 


tPtPO©OCV1©©©©GC 
©IM iOCO-PT-HTPMCO 
i-l 


TP 

CO 

TP 






•uaj\[ 


; 


■ • t~ 


• l-H TP CS • 

• IM 






1-1 

TP 






•anp3 A 


m : 


• • © 

• • © 

■ • TP 


■ © © O • 

• © © © • 

• © 1C GO • 

• (M 






3700 






•aihmuox 




. . TP 
• -eo 


CO t~ <M • 
• O i-H CO • 






© 

CO 
T-H 







o 
c-i 



33 

> 



l2n O — H l_I 



a 5 "S 



UH : — ^ C 

— — _ _ 



°i°KS c 



T3 
c3 



03 . 

.= > ■ 



•jaqiun^ 



T-HIMCOTP»a©t-G005©l-H 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— NOVA SCOTIA 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



85 



Total 
Value 

OY ALL 

Fish. 


S o o © © © o O © © o © 

U lO© © lO lO © © 00 © o 

N t> S L"; M I W t IM o o 
■r h- x © : f- X t - X r~ © i - 
95 x n f o o ^ m * 

i*rf cm' ^©'xi-*' -i-" ■*!<''©" i-T 

1-1 CM X rH O 


208,104 70 


•o$l 'suijjs psag 








SO .... . 










_ ■ oo ' s Fq '^l^q qsijf 

CC ri ■ 








• • • © © © © 






© 

CO 

rH 


lO 

OS 
r— 



suvS 'po qsi£ 



©in © © © © 
© cm © © cm cm 

(M CM i-i CM 



W 



o 

so 



co 
& 

i 



B 1 



© 

I- 

CM 



•81*1 

'qsu paxrai piic asj^oQ 




















o 


© 
rH 


•sjjq 'spa; 


rH CO in 
i-( 


















H* 

CM 


© 

CM 


•spq 

'ri'gajdds'BQ jo s3alu3[y 


© x © m 

f « XIM 
i-H OI T 
















Oi 
X 
X 


© 

in 
in 

CO 


•sqi 'siqarag 


800 
2400 




















© 

8 

CO 


© 
© 

rH 


•S[jq 'ptjqg 




i— i 




















rH 


© 
— 


•sqj 'inojj, j 


- : : 

m © © 

CM J" © 
O. i—l 












© 
© 

[- 

CM 


© 

in 
© 


m 

HH 
© 


■sqi 'qnqqBjj 








© © © © 
© in © © 

© CM © CM 

— 










© 
m 
f 


o 
•* 


•^a\o 'Jtoojpj; ' 








lOioiaoocsw 

CO CM i—i CM X rH i—* 




CO 

© 

CM 


© 
© 


•ijavo 'paup '^oopp^jj 








rH © © in © O CM 
-f m CM CO rH 
rH rH 




CO 
© 


© 
© 

CM 
rH 


•!Lwo 'pai-ip 'poQ 


CO 

■* 
eo 




©©©©©©© 

© © i n ■ - © © m 

CO CO f t>- CO rH 




CO 

© 

m 

CM 


CM 
rH 
© 
© 
rH 


'Ijaqs ui qsajj 'sjajsqcyj 






©©©©©© • 
©©©©©© • 

© CM © © © © • 
r- f 1 X - 




30100 


150500 


ui paA.ias9.id 'saa;sqorj; 








• © CM © ■* . 
■HK-flN • 
■ CM CO rH m • 

• © CO rH -rji • 

• co in 




b- 

CM 

55 


17855 


•sjjq 'pampas qaaa^ouj^ 


rH 

CM 




in © © 

© CO © 
rH 


■ © CO 

■ CM 




CM 
rH 
CO 


© 

X 

© 

-3" 



•jaqtun^ 




86 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VI!., A. 1902 



3 

g 
•<s> 

g 



e6 
•i-i 

->-> 
O 

o 

> 
o 



rc 

CO 



c*H 
O 

© 

la 
t> 

a 

OB 
0> 



-*3 

fl 

cS 
3 

O" 

of 

• rH 

o 
r£5 

a 

o 
M 

OS 
03 
» 







uaqumsj 


rH r- IHih,- IHHr 1 








•^mo 'paup 'pOQ 


©oinooooooooooooom 

■*X>05"*-*c5OOOOOOOOOOt>- 
« - f f O lO !• O C t! f o o o r. I 

rH H M C ffl 51 H 51NH 


© 

OS 
CO 

in 
© 


© 
© 

in 

© 
c 1 














■%/AO 

qjaqsuiqsaaj 'saa^qorj 


ooooooiooooeoooooo 
ooioioionxttoioooooocc 

OSO'*NN«H , OiOaOOflO © o 
HNH to k h C CO h 

rH rH 


© 

X 

rH 

X 

<* 


© 
© 

HH 

CM 
-H 

CM 




•sqj 'subo 
in paAjasaad 'sja^sqoq; 


• • • cm -oc 

■ • ■ CO 

■ • ■ - © ■ e 

• ■ • -co ■ © 1- 

■ • • • rH ■ t- 


X -V ■ © X CO ■ © 
© © ■ t~ X © • © 

-f -r • iff -h -OS -cm 

CO © • CM L- ■ © ■ © 
in rH • © • rH ■ rH 
rH • rH 


CM 
rH 

m 

hh 
CO 

rH 


CO 

© 

© 

CO 


o 






CONIMMXNO 
H CM i— rH rH CO 




in 

rH 


in 
co 


•spq 'pampas qaaa^o^j^ 






rH 


rH 


OB 

Q 
A 

M 


•sq[ 'qsajj 'ja.ia>iouj\[ 


250 

"150 
200 
270 
1200 
1500 


SOOO 

1100 

5000 

' 1400 
700 


© 
© 

TH 


CM 
t~ 

CO 




•sqj 'qsaaj 'Suuaajj 


© 

■ • • CO© 

■ • • • © 

■ • • ■ i-H rH 




© 
© 
© 

CO 


© 

CO' 




•spq 'pa^p;s 'Suuaajj 


©©©©©iff ©iff ©©©©©©©©© 

oocoamoNONCincoooiQioiQ 

OS * t» K C O ffl H H ffl H O N lO W H 
-H rH TP CO 


© 

X 
rH 


© 

© 

CO 
© 


* 


•=qi 'qsaaj 'aora[Bg 


©•'©©©©lO © 

© • • Ol © © Iff CM © 

tH • • H CO © CM <M 00 

rH 




CO 


CO 


w 
o 

3d 


m 


•an FA 


©®©0©1£5©©©©©C©©©©© 

© in © x 10 x © © © © © © © © © © co 

^ rH CO CM rH CO CM ~H rH rH rH ©X t-Ht-h 


© 

£H 
TH 

f 




J 5 
5 5 


ill Net 


•siuoqji;^ 


©0©©©©0©©©000©0©0 
OOOHOHOQOCOdOOSCO 

c - n n l-: c 3 in o c c l": c 
© © © x © cm 1- 01 © i- r- © m iff -f t~ 

CM rH rH rH CM rH CM r- C. C H h H 


© 

CM 

© 

CM 

m 

CO 




co S 


a 


•jaqums^ 


©©©t~©t~©©mm©©©©cMco© 

© L— -H iff r- © © © © T © CO CM X X CM 

cm ® 1- oi © -r x -f © in © x in 

CO rH 


10 
© 

rH 
rH 





co 
& 
<J 
O 

PQ 

c 

S5 

os 

hJ 

H 

CO 

50 

H 

i> 

o 
g 

£ 

03 



•uaj^ 



lO iff c o O O O C C C C O C C O C • 
CO CM CM © rH t~ CO © t~ X ?0 i~ t^- m © © 

HHHH CO rH COH 



X 



o 
PQ 



©m©©©©©©©©©©©©©©© 

C r~ © © in X © © © © © © © © © © © 

oi rH © i~ ~v -f © 1- © © x © © © co in hh 

HnmHHHflnfflHS © HH 



in 
c 
m 

HH 



•jaqum \j 



oinsoiscooe © in in © © © in m © 

(M iff iff iff iff "P © © I — X 01 © iff -f X © 
rH rH © CO 



- 



-ua H 



f[»ct iff Ol © © © iff © © 01 © © 

tH CM Ol © CO CO n Iff 01 -H Ol 



•anpj A 



©©©©©©©©©©©©©©© 
iff © © m © © © © © © © o © © © 

r. 00 e « o o iff x iff c o Li o 

CM rH LO Iff - lO Hf rj- -H rH rH 

CM CO 



0) 



■aStmuo^ 



©mr^cM©©t^©iffin©©© © © 

iff © rH rH © © © rH X -T Ol -1" Ol Iff m 
rH iff rH X rH t-< 



uaqum^ 



©COrHrHt^rHinHHHHCMrHinCMCOCO 



u 
s 

o 

hO 
Sh 

c3 



OS 
Eh 



S 

s 



0) 



o 

525 



85 W 



T3 



o o 



£ H 

r.i^»p 

S § 43 x 

13 c o § 
csO a, 



o o 
PhP-: 



ca 
u 

a 

FH * 



ttCrC CS-Sr^ ^~HH? <C 



- — — 

^ ^ 3 

s o 



eo 
--. 



- 
z 
— 



CO 
:ff 
CM 



X 
iff 



o 
H 



o5 
> 



c3 



^ *— X S CJ H. ftj 

cj "ffr-rH-^'E Mi. $ « 

- ■? 3 i c o ts^j u * o ce cj o 



aqumjsj; 



CMCO-HO©t-X — ©r-(MCOrt<in©[- 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— NOVA SCOTIA 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



h n m t i t- x ^ ; r- n k ^ 10 ; s 



is © is is © © *s © © © © © © © © © © 
c l-« co o oi Dor-.ctrco-ros 

N K t ». O C C r. N L - N C C C K N 
w n C lO s e S O C O C 1 O « r- to O M 

» so ©' as t^is~-3 r ©*'is~©r©~i--rco ©"oTofr-T 

i-HH l© 1—1 f 1—1 CM i— IN NCCNr- 1 
i— I i— i CM 



© 

eo 

IO 

x 
© 



© 

00 



8 

s 

o 



c6 

• l-H 

o 
o 
m 

> 

o 



o 

■3 

>r-t 

P-. 



CO 

0) 

> 

- 

GO 



*3 

d 

eg 

s 

G? 

d 

• f-H 

M 

CD 
d 

'Se 
o 

CO 

« 

H 
H 



•S[.iq 'jiBq SB qsij; 



lOOCOOOt-lO©©©©©©©©! 
01 'S © © IS © 01 © © © © © © © © © ; 
H r- H C W ? i C » » C IS •* © ' 
HfH-. O i-l r-f 



2: 

c 

00 

z 



•sjpjS '{to qstj 



©©©©isco©©iO©©©©©© 
: so^i-L-'sccsscoionc 
j:ccMtinN?iJ3 © © h i-i x 

t— CO CN 



•spq 

'qsy paxim pus as.iBOQ 



■spq "pmbg 



X © lO IS CO CO © 
CM i—l 



•sq t 

'qsy usoji jo poo moj 



oooooo©© 
cm © © © © © © © 
w c -r - o o o t 

CO CN HH 



•sqi 'siapimoj^ 



©©©©©© 
oooooo 

• i- — CN X © 1-0 
■HMH 7— 



•spq 'spa 



■spq 

'riBajadSBS JO 88AL»9fy 



io soocioi 

CN © CO -f t>- CM 

Tfl l— I 



I >o 

CM 



•sqi 's^ping 



■oooooo 
©©©©©© 

■ CI X H CO IE C 



■sqi '^nojx 



©©©©©©© 

• © © i© © © c © 
■ © CN CM © CN © IS 
•i-l t- i-l l-H 



IC 

© 
r. 
© 

CM 



© 



CM 

o 



© 
© 
— 

:o 



© 

is 

CM 
CM 



•sqi '}nqqBH 



© © 
© © 
i© © 



CM 
CM 



X 
CO 

— 

CM 



© OI Ol lO © © iS © © © IS © © © © © 

t- -f co co cm -r © is © i© t~ © © © © © 

^-CMO"! CHHt O r- © CO CO 
T—i CO rH 



CO 
X 



IO 

CN 



CM 

© 



© 

CM 



IS 
— 

CM 



X 
T 



IS 
© 
-f 



© 
? I 

IS 



© 

X 
IO 



© 



IO 
CM 
CM 



01 

CO 
CM 



X 
CO 

•© 
'© 



co 

l-H 

o 

GO 



•ja\.o 'patjp 'a^Bjj 



• lO 

• CM 



•sqi 

'saxppBq nBimypa^ouig 



© 
■ © 

• CO 



■!JM0 'paup '^DOppBJJ 



© 
■© 



© 

r 

CC 



loooooococissoeoo. 

© © t— IS Ol © rt< © IS t— i© © © © © © CM 
r-CU-NMMSH O O C- CO CN 

CO 01 —i 



© 

X 



•sqj 'qsajj '>poppBH 



©cooooooo©oo©©c© 

QOOOOOOOOOIOOOOQQ 
O C! c -t O M O d O O H O C IS » IS 

Hi-Hr-CC MH t- I— 



•sjjq 'spunos 
puB sanSuo} 'poQ 



CN CN i— < i— I X CO IS 



UO 
CO 



© 

CO 



CO' 

© 



Ol I © 
CO Ol 
CO 



m 

O 



o 



T3 • • 



a 



&5 



cf +- © ~ 
J ? - ? >. to 

V - ~ — cc © 



O ^ CB — 

"la g i 

P hr, C 3h S ^3 Mi 

- 2- tx k ■ 



. O . <D 

. CC . rj 

. W . S 

^ - • J2 

• -C © ^ 



C5 

o 



. - cl 



•5^ 



•jacjtunsj 



"3 cc M« h CC - ©-©^^ 

^c-car^cjcsc 

■Jl - w P- ^ - 

rH CNe<S^*ic5«ot»00C:©'— Mco-fiS©i- 



SI S S S u 9 ; 



DO 

_£E 35 

-U l-H 

o « 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII. 



•jaqum^ 



HflCCtiOfflNXOlO 



X 

GO 



o 



S5 

I— I 



oo 
< 
- 

H 
H 
< 



O 
« 

w 

» 

oo 



oo 
Eh 
< 

o 
PQ 

o 

< 

oo 
►J 

63 

00 

oo 
w 

!> 

O 
Sc 

l-H 

a 

oo 



'p9IJp 'pOQ 


o © © © © © 
©©©©©© 
© © © © © 3 
cc © T-i <M t>. 

T— 1 T— I TH 




© 

in 

CM 


© 

lO 
CO 


© 
© 
■* 
t~ 

r* 


qjaqs ui qsaaj 'sja^sqoi 


© © © © © © 

© © © o © © 
oewt»oc 

00 ON 




© 
© 
CO 


© 

m 

t>. 

i-H 


© 

in 

CM 
t— 

00 


•sqj 'suuo 
ui paAJ9saad 'saa^sqorj 


100000 
8000 


© © 
© © 
© © 

in © 

rH © 

<M (M 




© 
© 
© 
© 

m 

rH 


© 
© 
© 

CC 

© 


© 
© 
© 

CO 

T— 1 




©©©©©© 
©©©©©© 
© © © m © © 
© in © o © 

tH 








© 
© 

in 

© 

CM 
CO 


© 

00 
rH 
O 
CO 


•sqj 'pajjoius 'Suuaajj 


■ © • 

■ in ■ 

■ 1Q • 
• rH • 










© 
in 
in 

rH 


CO 


•sq[ 'qsajj 'Jgui.ua jj 


290000 
30000 
1400 










321400 


■* 

rH 

<M 
CO 


•suq 'pacqus ' Jgui.ua jj 


© © © in © © © 
m in © t~ © m in 

HNWOOHWH 
iH 




© 
© 
rH 


m 

rH 

CO 


© 
© 

CM 
rH 



•sqj 'qsexf 'norafeg 



H 



•anp? A 



uaqum^r 



©m © 

© CM © 
©CO © 

rH CO 


200 
1250 


© ■ 

O • 
. CO . 


in 

CM 
© 


m 
cc 

CO 
rH 


© © © 
© © © 
© © i~. 

fllOO 

l-H 


© © 

• c © 

• m © • 

;NH • 




© 
© 

CM 




CM CO 


■ rH rH • 




rH 





•anpj A 



©©©©©©©©©© 
min©inocM©oo© 
cf, in oo cm cm t- i>- © © in © 

W CM rH © 



© 

© 

oo 



•suioqfjuj 



©©©©©©©©©© 
©©©©©©©©in© 
f ciewosoooH 

© rfiT-HCOCO©COC v lCM 

T— I © 



© 

m 

CO 

i - 



uaqtun^ 



©mmm©m©©©e 
cC"crCM-rincc©in©<M 

CM rH rH CC rH rH rH 



O 

pq 



001OI0M1Q00OOO1O 
CM 



© 
IT. 
CM 
ro 



m I 



•anp; A 



©©©©©©©©©© 

© © © © CO © © CM rH 

o io o io o io n n th n 



•jaqums^ 



cot--t^oo©m©m©m 
mcMSMcMminin-^cqco 

CM 



© 

ft 
IC 



0) 

> 



CM © 
■* CM 



' dU I' B A 



© © 

in © 
© © 

r- 01 



•9.8'BUUOJ j 



t^CM 
© X 

m 



uaqiunsj 



co 

Eh 

O 

l-H 

S3 
EH 

oo 



g 
5 



s 

o 



■ T3 

a 

t*PH 



• CO o 

• CO © 
■ 01 



© © 

in © 

CO 00 

in © 
• CM 



rH © 
© © 

OS CM 



1 

be 



S-.S - 

n- -~ CJ CB r^; 



05 

> 

o 

5 
- 



- 
© 

m 



© 

m 



© 

CO 



o 

'- 



> 



5 CD 



uaqum^ 



- be 

rHCMCO->tim©f~00©.© 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— NOVA SCOTIA 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



HNMi'lOt01>W05 



* S i • 
3 j < g 
o < r 



oooooooooo 
oooooooooo 



t— O CO i— I t— © IN i 

c; w h d oo 



< m 

CO 



o 
o 

IN 
© 

CO^ 

© 



CO 
EH 

CO » 
O 



•sjjq 'ajiureui si? qsi^ 



© © o © 
© m r~ © 

CO m CM IN 



IN 
CO 



CM 
© 
© 



•spq '^ruq sb qsij 



in 

t- 

IN 



■sjp?S '[TO qsij 



© © © 
e © © 

© t-CN 



©©©CO© 
© © in © 05 © 
HH«H CM 



CO 
IN 
CO 



© © 
© © 
-r © 

IN rt 



:-. 
r. 



© 
— 

IN 



•spq 

'qstj paxiui pire ssjuoq 



© © © 
© in © 

in in 



© ~ 
in © 

m 



•spq 'pinbg 



m © 

CN CM 



■sqi 

'qsg iso.ij jo poo moj^ 



X 

to 



o 

Q 

s 

I— « 



•sq{ 'saapunoj^ 



© 

CM 



•S[jq 'spa 



■spq 

'uBS-iadsuS jo 88AiM.ajy 



•sqi 's^puig 



© 
© 
© 

CN 



■sqi '^nojx 



© 
© 
© 

CO 



© m 
m cm 



© © © 
© © © 
© © © 
in cm © 
© 



© in m in 

-t CO IN rH 



© © © 
© © © 

© m in 

CM CN © 



•sqi 'inqq^H 



© © © © © 
© © © © © 

t- Ol CO CM © 

m cm m co 



© © © © 

o © © in 

© © CO 



•!}M0 JlOOnOJ 



© © © m © © 
© in © cm © © 
© co cm m 

© r-i »H 



•^a\o 'paup 's^H 



© © 
© to 
© 



•sqy 'sajpp'cq ireuuy 
paifouis '^oopp^jj 



© © 
c © 

IO o 
CO o 



• © 

■ IN 



■^a\o 'paup ^popp'Bjj 



© © © in © 

© OirlHO 

in cm t-h co co 

CO • fH 



•sq| 'qsaji '^ooppujj 



© © 
© © 
© m 

~ CM 

m t- 



•sjjq 'spunos 
pu'B sanSuoi 'poQ 



- 
- 

CM 



© 

N 



© 

© 
CO 

— 

© 

CO 



c 
- 

IO 

CO 



CM 
-r 
CO 



- 
z 

1 1 



2 



t - 



© 



c 
r. 



© 
-r 

00 



© 

m 



© 
© 

© 



© 

m 
© 



© 

CM 



in 
co 
c 
- 
: i 



© 
© 



x 
t - 



in 
in 



© 
z 

IC 
CO 



z 

CN 
ifi 

2 



IC 

r. 



CM 
CM 



in 
© 

CO 



z 



co 

B 

t— < 

a 

H 
r. 



Si 
S 

5 



s 
o 

p 



4) 
bo 
~r 

o> 



S CU COr^ 



O c! 



O 



CD 



r. „ - C£ 



HflCOf lOONXCRO 



90 MA PxINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

RECAPITULATION 

Of the Yield and Value of the Fisheries in District No. 3, Province of Nova 

Scotia, for the Year 1900. 



Kinds of Fish. 



Salmon, fresh 

ii smoked 

Herring, salted 

ii fresh 

ii smoked 

Mackerel, fresh 

ii salted 

Lobsters, canned 

ii fresh in shell 

Cod, dried 

ii tongues and sounds 

Haddock, dried 

n fresh 

n smoked finnan baddies 

Hake % 

ii sounds 

Pollock 

Halibut 

Trout 

Shad 

Eels 

Smelts .... 

Alewives 

Bass (sea) 

Clams 

Flounders 

Tom cod , , 

Squid 

Coarse and mixed fish 



Fish oil 

Fish as bait 

ii as manure. 
Seal's skins 



Lbs. 

Brls. 
Lbs. 



Brls. 
Lbs. 
Cwt. 

Brls. 
Cwt. 
Lbs. 

Cwt. 
Lbs. 
Cwt, 
Lbs. 

Brls. 

Lbs. 
Brls. 
Lbs. 
Brls. 
Lbs. 

Brls. 

II 

Lbs. 

Galls. 

Brls. 



Quantity. 



Total for 1900 
1899 

Increase 



94,175 
2,700 
34,792 
1,220,100 
204,400 
503,120 
18,107 
1,399.928 
149.578 
450. 440 
581 
66,006 
1,990,430 
1,147,550 
146,104 
41,430 
69,274 
859,963 
44,300 
375 
520 
85,500 
6,040 
1,325 
778 
282,960 
83,320 
984 
43.708 
340,000 
269,198 
57,691 
100,535 
6 



Rate. 



20 
20 

4 00 
01 
02 
12 

15 00 
20 

5 00 
4 00 

10 00 

3 00 
03 
06 
2 25 
50 
2 00 
10 
10 

10 00 
10 00 
05 

4 00 
10 
8 00 
05 
05 
4 00 
2 00 
02 

30 

1 50 

50 

1 25 



Value. 



S cts. 

18,835 00 
540 00 
139,168 00 
12,201 00 
4,088 00 
60,374 40 
271,605 00 
279,985 60 
747,890 00 
1,801,760 00 
5.810 00 
198,018 00 
59,712 90 
68,853 00 
328,734 00 
20,715 00 



Total. 



87,416 00 
6,800 00 



S cts. 

19,375 00 

155,457 00 
331,979 40 
1,027,875 60 
1,807,570 00 

326,583 90 

349,449 00 
138,548 00 
85,996 30 
4,430 00 
3,750 00 
5,200 00 
4,275 00 
24,160 00 
132 50 
6,224 00 
14,148 00 
4,166 00 
3,936 00 

94,216 00 
80,759 40 
86,536 50 
50,267 50 
7 50 



4,625,042 60 
4,325,453 00 

299,589 60 



« 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— NOVA SCOTIA 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

RECAPITULATION 



91 



Of the Value of Fishing Vessels, Nets, &c, in District No. 3, Nova Scotia for 

the Year 1900. 



Material. 



351 fishing vessels (21,225 tons) 

6,022 ii boats 

532 ii dories 

26,930 gill nets (715,748 fathoms). . 

265 seines (28,160 fathoms) 

193 trap-nets 

weirs ■ 

smelts nets 

trawls 

hand lines 



100 
16 
3,219 
4,861 



70 lobster canneries 
203,161 traps, &c. 



160 freezers and ice houses . . 
1,397 smoke and fish houses . . 
465 piers and fishing wharfs 
69 fishing tugs or smacks . . 



Total 



Value. 



847,085 
135,120 
6,308 
159,270 
47,233 
70,835 
18,040 
682 
68,532 
16,790 



57,550 
138,642 



15,270 
79,285 
103,720 
38,335 



Total. 



1,369,895 
196,192 

236,610 
1,802,697 



Number of persons employed in the fisheries of the same district. 

Men in fishing vessels 4,529 

ii boats 6,497 

Hands in lobster canneries 2,675 

Total 13,701 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



Eh 

< 

P 
H 

Ph 

< 
O 
H 



+3 



© 
CO 

3 

6 

CO 

13 

• l-l 
Si 

© 
o3 

a 
— 

CO 



n 
■— 

o 

© 

3 
'eg 
t> 

-a 

£2 

eg 



o 
o 
o 



■43 © 

CS 

3 © 

2 5 
-d.fl 

eg O 
„ O 

S & 

o 03 

pq > 
o 

eg 

O 



© 

CO 
CO 

© 

> 

o 



© 
© 

a 
• — > 

> 

o 

- 



3 O 

a 

eg 

© 

eg 

a 
a 
o 

© 



3 
© 

C 

O 

W 

GO 



CD 
< 



— 



00 

E- 
<! 
O 
- 

Q 
S5 
<! 



CO 

co 
O 



x 



5z 



01 



53 

S5 



c3 

o 



0) 



•jaqiunsj 



1-2 EDWARD VII. 

te-ini-offlNccsiOr-iMn tcoNX 



A. 1902 



■en ICA 



M CO H O CO Oi O C LO 

CM TJ< TJ< 00 ^» 



oot»cN©e»eet--i-<.ft 
n o r ; s wo 

t»t»HH CM CM 



• O 

o 



■jaqum^ 



o o 
© o 
— co 



© o 

iH O 

co is 



uaqums^ 



© IS 
© 

ec — 
t- co 



is © © ■ © -1 © © 

ce-ix oshio 

r-«o • 01 eo 

N11 • © t-i cm 

i-l • © 



Cl 
© 



CM CM © © © t~ IS 
CO CM Ci -00 CO l~ 
1— t~ • © CO CM 



00 



esc; 
© -. © 

© 00 ON 
CM © 
1— i 



© 1- © © 
01 © iS © 
HOtH 

X ^ 

^- CO 



X © 
co co 



© © © © © © 
© © X © © © 

•— 1— 1 -r © is © 

cm ■>*< cm -* t- 

CM 1-1 CM 



o 



CM tt — 



X 
© 
CI 



x is © © © 
is cm © © 

<o © 



■CQooia 

© TT — lS CO 
CO CM ^ 
CM 



© CO f O CO 
CM 



C<i©-*Ot-i-ICO©TH iS © -f © © 



© t oi co © x x ri cm oi -r cm oi -r is 1— © © 
cocoi-icNx-'* , t~isiSi-'iot~iscNON©''f , x 
co cm is t-i ©co t~-<fi-i 



X©©0MCOlS©©©lS©©©©©X©© 

iSfHeofi-NNxccoHHOONia 
c h ; rn t x r. - r. c c. : cue x * rc 
N«r.H-.or]xxt--t-HOSKNK 

t^- © CO CM t— ! CM © CO i-l 1— CM X CO U3 © 
r- CO CO —I CO 



■jaquins^; 



1CX1— H C N ffl C CC X O CC 1» l!5 « » o 

ice©!— CMeo©CN-t"ic:-.rirceot~cNt^^ioo 

- C. I- " I- x — 1- CO CO X — re :c Cl 

MHCr- .C~. © 1— CO 



X © ICC i— X X X X 1-1 © © © — '~. © © r- 10 

eo©f!-<co©coicc©©»rc-t , ©t^T)<.— 1x10 

1— ©©©COCOCO©© CO CM X — Ottt- 
1 1 CM CM CM 1— ' CM 



OS©©C0©»CC©SMX©CM©©©l.0C;iO© 
CC © HX t -C NC] iC LCCC X O Cl C X 
S M W O - CC f Ld O Cl t LC C X IS IS 
CMt~©©C0CMlSOC0i— t^C0©i— COlO-^"© 
— 1-1 i-l IO CO CM-^IO 



•jaqran^j 



© T1 i~ CO © ~. X CO — X © © CM 1-1 X -T i-i © 

©-ro©i»"t^CM — ©io©is-rt~©coco© 
iSt^CMlOCM^CMCM© KrHf co-<r©is; 
1-1 CM CM CM i-l 



CO 

a 

D 

o 

o 



s 

o 



- 5 



— 
be 
s 



i£© 



:© o3 



- 



□ 

a 53 5- >>- x k s R 

*3 60® aj-2 

I o S SP-2 = = = s 



•jaquin^ 



C0-*'lO©C^X©©r-CNC0-*lS©b-.X 



C] 

X 

r 



10 

EC 

■ s 

00- 



— 



•© 

Cl 



t - 



CO 
CM 

© 

CM 
CC1 



CO 
CO 



CM 
Cl 

© 

CO 



© 
© 





© -r © © -r 
-r co © 1— 

1— 1 1— i CO 


lS © © 
© 01 
1-1 T 


«o©iocoaoi-ico© 
©.01 © -r co © 

Ift «C -9< 

CM 


© 
i—l 

X 
O 


•arqr? A 


© © lO © © 
CO © CO © 

© ^ © t- 1-1 

X © CM 
CM 


© © © 
© © IS 
X CM CM 
CM X 
CM CO 


© ©' © © *S © © © 

©©©iocs©©© 
co -r © co © i" t^- 

1-1 © © — CO CO © 

1ft © 

©1 


© 

t~ 

© 




HXlSOH 
TfHt IS r-t 
■"*< CO 

H 


1ft t~co 

CO © CO 
X © 
iH 


©[^-^■^•CO©!— © 
© f 1— xcoco© 
CM X X CO t>- 
i-H CM i—i 


© 

© 

CM 


•jaquin^vj 


lOXNWH 
CM CM l» 


CM CM © 
CO © 


COCMCMi-ICO©X© 
— © © Cl 


1ft 
1ft 



o 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— NOVA SCOTIA 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



t5 

s 

© 



o 
■3 

"3 

■ rH 
- 

HI 
-J 
c3 



6C 
C 

J3 

33 

• — i 

o 
js 

c3 
t> 

H3 

C 

eS 

>> 

-1-3 

• — 

•+3 
C 

c3 
3 

G> 
-a 

© 
S 

s 

o 

-S 

c 

O 
S3 
W 



uaqmnj^ 



tH t— I tH t— It— It— IHr- Ir I 



g 

X 

oo 



Ed 

00 
P 

CO 

« 

o 

H 

X! 



« 

s 

E-i 

o 



05 

a ~ 



' an FA 



6oB a 
a c372 



1SOOO 

O t~© ON 
© CM 



r. 



t^lO CM © 
HHO 



_ - - 



o © o t~ 

CO tH tH 
CO CO © CO 
t-00 CO t*< 



© CO W 



• o o 

• ~r co 

• cc o 

• CM tH 



CO 

-9" CM 



• © 

• © 

• CO 



© CM ©, 

© r— © 

CO CO © 
© lO Tt« 
•<*< tH 



CC CC CO 
CO CO 
CO © 



©m © © 

© CO © © 
-f 00 in © 
Hfll>N 



© 

CM 


■ t- 

• t~ 

• in 

• H< 


• © © m © 
- © © © in 

■ CM © CO -f 
•CO CO © 

■ CM CNtH 


T-H 


• 


• CO C- t— 
■ © © tH 



CM 



S 3 



owcoffliomwcoot-oioooooo 

00 © iO © O in CO -f CM CO © © © in t-. © © 
CO©CNin©rri00CMm tH©CO©©C5-H<t- 
lOONNHr- I tH © t« CO CO Tfi 

tH -H "*i CM tH CM CM 



uaqnin^ 



©CMl^H^©tHH^CNtHCNtH©CM-'t'tHCNH<«*l 
CCCOiHHTfOKS TH-^t^OOlOOO©© 
CM CM CM tH tH 00 00 tH CM CO ^( 



2 1 

® a hh 

«B 03HH 
LI 



m © © © © © 

'tH CO © © © © 

cm t>- in © © 

CM tH CM tH tH 



•jaqran^r 



1OQ0MHHO5 



© o 
© in 
© m 

tH CO 

CM 



in cm 

CM CM 



Eh 
< 
'- 

PS 
H 
Eh 
as 
M 
O 
— 



pa^ojdraa spireqjo -o^ 



OtfCOWHOMSlO 

©cooot^oco-fin© 
rf eo © tH ih co m CO 



° 8n I B A 



©©moo©©mcMin 

CO00©00~H©COCN00 

t^oo©"*icocoincMm 

lOViONHIMlQOX 
CM CM CM tH CM © CO 



vraqum^ 



tHin©t^©©©in© 
ao*neowM9 
co co © cm oo © © m © 
©C5tHco©t*<©in© 

T Tf m tH CM ti CM 00 



a 
a 

O 



•anp3 A 



©©in©©© mo© 

lCt»'JOOONOlO 
u © -t> 00 OO CM © © Tfi 

^ tj<coinin©cMCM© in 

HHH CM CO tH 



•aaqum^ 



COt^©©©-"»<tr~CMCM 
tH CM CM CM CO CO CM 



00 

5 
< 

W 
Eh 
<! 

O 
« 

w 
C5 
a 
g 

s 

oo 



T3 

e 

w 



HCOtf CiNLOHWCO 
©OOt^COCMCMOOCO© 

© in © ih © © 

tH CO CM CM CM 



m © m © o © © 
co © oi in © © © 

• © Hj< CO © "tf 00 t>- 
lOH CM CO 



• CO © t~- CO CO 00 
■ tH t>- CM tH tH 



00 -f 

00 © CO 
CO 00 



© in m 

© CM t- 

© © 00 

© in co 

CO CM 



© © f 
© © t- 

t ~ © CM 

t-t~© 

■* CO 



oo m tH © 

1<MHI> 



© © © © 
m © oo © 

CO c © i- 
© rj< CM CM 
© CO 



© © © © 

© 00' tH © 

CM © CM m 
CO tH X 0) 
t-i tH © CO 



in © © 
t~ © © 
co in co 

CO tH CO 
CO tH 



©CM © 
CM 



© © © © 
in in in © 
ih m cm co 

CM CM 00 © 



tH CM tH 



©m©oomin©CM 
-*m©comco©cM 

CO 00 tH © CO CO 

h< co m tH 



•.equina 



OiO[«H900MO 
©in©©CMCM©©CM 
tH-^<©©C0 HlOCO 
CO "V -P tH CO -f 



s 



© co m in 

CO CO tH 
tH TJI 



•aaquiti]^ 



© CM *f i 
CM CO CM 



•aiqBA 



Maqum^ 



■r. 

K 
M 

Eh 
55 
Co 
O 

O 



B 
O 



© © © in 
© © © CM 

tH -P Tfl 



cMin©oo©in-HH© 

IO O N CC lO h> iO tf 
CO © tH t— t-- 00 CO 

>h cm m co 



© © 
© © 

HH 



00 Tf 

CM 



PQ 



ft > 

Oh 



§.5 
S o 
o o 



5 » 

O <D 
'Z - 



o 

u 

O X 

CO 



© © © 
©>n © 

CO CO H" 

cm in © 



oo t~ © 

tH CO 



aj-a 
£ a 



a 'a 



© © 
© 



1C 

© 



00 
00 



© tH CO CM t-H 

CM tH 
CM 



CO 

CC 
-T 
CO 
CI 



CM 
CM 



00 

c 

35 



© 
© 
CO 



© 

CM 
© 

© 



-r 
-r 
Tl 



CO 
CM 

© 

CO 



Oi 
00 

© 



m 
x 

m 

CM 
CM 



I- 

CM 



- 

co 
in 

3S 



I- 

© 

m 

CO 



m 

© 
co 



71 
H/l 
CM 



© 

CO 
M 
CM 



CO 



o 



■jgqmnjsj; 



a^ S.| e.^.Sg § « oj 

a a ph q x o'g r> 

HNWfL0C0NXC5OHiNC0-fL0C0t-M 



a o 



94 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



t3 
g 
o 



o 

l-H 

H 
< 
h, 

H 



S 

s 
e 

© 



•3 
eg 

• r-H 

-H> 

o 
o 

02 

> 
O 

s+H 

O 

CD 
O 

G 

> 
O 

Si 

Ph 

CD 

'o 

ft 

CD 

J3 
-is 



O 

Ph 
-d 

GO 



fi fa 

l-H " 

Ph 



09 

CD 



-t3 

d 

3 

o* 

PI 
c3 

to 
- 

• i-H 

CD 

-a 
a 

ft 
O 

-a 

CO 

P3 
D 

H 



•.iaquiii^[ 



T-HCicoTfis©t^x©©T-HOTfis©t-x© 



•spunog 



rq 



OMtS 

O I - © 

<M CI 



O 



• cc m 
ci 

CM 



■pauQ 



rtXOCSMOCS 
CO O © t O H OO t- 2 
if) O CO i-H IS © 
CM CM IS 



•saippujj we\i 
-mj; pacing 



o 
o 



-2 



© O 
- z 

o o 
o o 

O l-H 

CI 



•pauQ 



ONHCOSXONH 
K C5 X tO fl « rt lO 
CC CM © IS CO t-H t~ -f 
nMNH IS CM 



•usaa^ 
i 



fi 
hI 



° S 

t- i-- o 
Tf CM tt 
IS © rH 

T-H rH 

CM 



O 

O 



•spunog 
ptre sanSnoj, 



COCCH 



© o © o 
© © © © 

— i— rH O 

CM IS IS t-h 

I-H T-H 

CM CM 
CM 



■ CM fc- 
• -f © 



© in © 
© X c 
CO © © 

ic © 

CO 



t— © © 

OS © lO 



cc is 

CO 



■ © 
• in 



■ cc 

CM 



© 
— 

— 

IS 



is ■ © c 

© • © CO 
IS ■ t~ 



© • © © 
© • © © 

© ■ CO IS 
CO 



.« © CO IO CO © © 
■ CC iS t-h © i— CI 

• CC CC IS © Tf CO is 

• tO © OS <© 



© © © © 

■ © © CO IS 

• 01 CC Tf IS 

■ CM CO CO 

• I-H © © 



-f © 

■ CM CM 



c © 

IS © 
-f is 
CO CM 
MCI 



- IS • CI i— 

• © • CO -H/ 

• cc 



•pauQ 



ft 
O 



CO © 
© IS 
IS l-H 



CM 

CO CO 
CO t» 



Tf © CC i-H 
( CM i 



©©-fCClSTflS©t^©TfCO©© 
©lSrH©XTfrf©©t>.t~in©lS 
iH CI CI I-H CC t- © © © CO CC 

IS CO C~ t~ © CM IS © 

l-H CO Tf L— © Tf 

CI 



X 

-r. 

o 
so 

a 

S3 
1—1 

w 



!h 

0) 



r«3 

o 



ft 
o 



I- CO 

to CO 

l-H © 

CM 



CO © 

© © 

CC 
CO 



-i : :i 

t~C0 CM 
© CI 
cc © 



- f. I- 

O CO © 
T-H CO i-H 



m paAjasajj 



3 

Hi 



CM CM © © 01 C CC © 
t-H CC IS i-H CO CM © CM CM 

iscci-HCM©r^©©is 

©0©-HHX©©T-H© 
CO<S©^iSCO©©CO 
IS CM -f i-H t— I CO©-* 



•paipjg 



IS © t— I ~f tO 

© ~ © © © 

© CM t-h i—i to 



•qsajj 



^2 



© -H< O © CO 

If © © © 

-if CO CC CO t"— 

is © -r © © 

CO © T-H l-H 



© cc © 

IS CC CM 
Tf t~ 
C I I - 



© iO © 
©CM © 

-)>©-# 

l~ CM 

01 T-H 
T-H If 



tC © © t-H 

Ht- © co is 

IS i-H -f Hf 

© X t- 

C0 t-H 



© © CM © 
I*" t- 1— I © 

tO CM IS © 

Tf © Tf< CO 

IS X CO b— 
t-H -If © 



© CM IS 
CO i-i T-H 
© CO i-H 

l- 



IS © © © 
CM © C~ O 
© © t~ iS 
© CC © © 
O t-H CM 



•pa>[0uig 



be 



a; 

X 



•qsaa^ 



fi 

Hi 



QOOOOOOO© 
© IS 1 © © © © © © © 
©C0©CliS©©©lO 
CMCMlSi-HlSTfOl-^Tf 
|>C1 KH IS CO © 

© CM T-H IS l-H 



• c © © © © © 

• © © © © © c 

• T-H O T-H © © -f 

• © CI X © CC t-h 

• © t-H CM 

CO CO 



x©©i-Hiniois©co©©©is©f<M©is 

OOtCJONHLOf CC©t~HfClif-ft^ 
— ^ rr^ ?H5fH^if>3 —^^fdd ts_ c^> rfi t-h 



. ^< X 
IS X i-H tH 



© CI CI 
T-H CO 



J-H^fClCMt~©X-H 
CM rH Tf CC © CO 



•pa^omg 



o rH 



fi 

- 



• © © X 

■ © x -r 

•IS © © 



o 



c3 



•pa^ug 



: © I- © 
CO CI © 



ui paAJasajj; 



^3 

hq 



• X 

• © 



© © 

C I- 



© Q 
IS IS 

© © 



© 

CI 



© 

IS 
IS 
I - 
CO 

Tf 



X 



© 

iS 

© 

IS 

© 
If 



© 
© 

X 



IS 
T-H 

CO 



iS 



in 



© 
© 



•qsajtf 



fi 
h5 



is-*©©©d©©x©o©ocis©isis 

CCC0©-H©©Ot^HflS©©©©HfO©CM 
-HiSi-H©l^CCXCl©Cl©©©ClXlS©© 
HCOtOiKOHHt-NHOHClCiHMO 
CO© f COHHISH CO CO t— i CM 



© 

X 
CO 

© 

CI 
IS 



CM 

Tf 

Tf 

I- 

IS 



CI 

© 
-f 

CM 
CI 



HH • 


CO 


© ■ 
© 

© • 


© © 

• • © r 

• ■ )S © 

• -co© 

CO 

■ ■ IS 


008 
OOZOT 


© © © 

© IS © 

© x © 

Tf t-H IS 

CC 

i-H 


© © 

© • IS 
© • IS 

(M ■ T-H 


© 
© 

X 

© 



CM 
IS 
IS 

© 

K 



CI 
CO 

CM 
X 



X 
CO 

© 

© 

IS 
1C 



© 



— 
s 



a 

o 

o 



c 

o 

u 



i O.S h a, s. 
a jH Z o cu ¥ 
c - 



•fi 



■V 9 



SO 

u 



« S i^O-S -° ' 



o 



© fi 

« C ^ ^ he OJ S fi S 

a > 2.Sb'3 § s^e 5 « S.SP.s s ^ * S 



o 
H 



uaqum^ 



T-HCMCCil , O©t^X©©i-HClC0TflS©t^X 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



i^o 

g 

o 



43 



+3 
O 
O 
02 

> 
o 

55 



© 
c 

•i-H 

> 
O 
u 

an 

j© 



© 

-*3 



CO 

O 
3 

O 
u 

Pm 

CO 

S3 

cC 

co 

• t-4 
ft 

O 

03 
© 



£3 
c3 
3 

G? 

"a 
a 

ci 

CO 

C 

• t-H 

© 

-a 

60 
C 

& 
o 
js 
w 

sz 

as 
D 

W 
Ph 



■jaqurnjsj 



CO 

: — 

"3 :=! 
% < 



"inX©©©©C©©©©©in©0©©© 
HO'*'*cer<NHtJ: C" v O HHOHSW 

©~ iato<»'& -r co i-T oo io x~ x~ i-T o? to cc" -r © 

N o r. N f Tl « 'N i— © -f cm © — — t - 

cm cm -f ih hi>o i— — cc c n x i.: 



6 



50 

o 

CO 



s 

o 

O 



H 

O 

- = 

CO 



.2 I 



oc 

a 



- a j" S p x : - x ; 
r - ~ cr, i x _2 ri 5 — >.,, 



cc 



- 1 



© 
* 



■sai^g feag 


is 








CM 




Brls. 


CO ■ 

t- ■ 

© • 
tH • 


i- © © i~ CM 
l-M C 3 t~ 
CnCiJCO 

I-H CC 1-1 


o in m o o 

CC CC -t CM o 
iC X :c c~-f 

l-H b- 


• m 

• CM 

• CC 
I-H 


r 

i-H 

CO 

o 

1-H 
1-H 





-r©©-rcc©x-T-# •©©mo©©«o»Q 

XHNNS O i •00-*COt©COi-leOCN 

JS (MCCinrHCM CO CM ■ t- CM -ti X t-h 
55 CM - CM CM 


X 

m 

CO 

cc 
© 

H 


•no M s ?i 


■ ooaioHHOCNffi -ooooccmmo 

J£ XHCO-fLT-fC^CC ■QMOfHNOO 

— © o © nch ci o © ^ — — . — cc 
c3 © oo © cr. — ©ti - cm-* © ©cr. 
rh i-H if i-H • in oo cm 

w !-H 


rH 

CC 

© 
© 

CC 




© co in w to 

m CM CC CC H* 
_S »-H CM t-H 
-% r^ « i-H 
hH H 


© i— i in • cc © m 

-f © © © l-H 

o © m oo 

l-H T— T 

CO 


in in eo © 
i— © 

© Tf< 

«* CM 


CM 

ec 
m< 

CO 
lO 


■pmbg 


X i-H CM © CM CM 

72 © -r i-h © cm 

JS. cm © in m 
W 


■ -f © • 

■ CM © • 

• © o • 

• T-H 


•© 

• CM 

• CM 


— 

00 

m 


r? © 

m cm 

l-H 


iH 

in 
cc 
m 


•qsij ^sojj jo poQ raox 


Lbs. 

400 
400 
51100 
5300 


© © © © 

3 c c © 

cc i^ © m 

— cm in 


1000 
4200 


- ~ 

CM © 

© m 

© CO 

© 


CM 
T 

CC 
CM 


•saapimou 


© • © 
© • © 

rf. CC • © 


o 

CM 
© 
i-H 
1 — 


© © © © 
— — c r 

Tt< © m © 

HO! 1 


• © • © 

■ © • © 

■ © -00 

• -r -co 

• CM ■ ■* 

■ CM 


z - 
© © 

r-i © 

00 CM 


in 

CO 

© 
© 

CM 
© 

T— 




_5 .cc cc©cccm -in •© • • 

"C ■ ■ i— X - -C ~. • CM • • • ■ 
nQ ■ — -i-H CM © -CM-- 




in 

m 

00 


■spa 


JO CMtCinCC© 10©it< ■ -V l~ © Hf 

"2 1Q i-H i-H 00 w © CM • •<* © 'COION 

PQ t-H CM lO tr- ■ i— i-H •— l-H 


Tjl 

© 

cc 

TI 




to © -OOOOlOOO • t— t-H 

-r m • <* tc oi ■ © • t- 




l - 

CM 
00 
iH 


■ss^g 


Lbs. 

' "ioo 

.3800 
1300 
1525: 




© 
m 

• © 

• CM 


225! 




© 
© • 
i-H 
© 
i-H 



S hr. ^ C 0) (B 



iHCMicc-*o©t^ooo>©i-ieMeo-*inte[^oo 







© 


© 


l r 


m 


7 


© 




t>- 


— 








© 


© 




m © 


CC 




CD 








in 


X 


© 


00 


m ~. 




CM 






© 


— 


X 


if © 


CM 




lirl; 


iH 


CM 


5 

E 1 








— 

H 


© TT 

T-H 








— 

i — 


iC 


tH 


00 


tT © 

iH tH 


© 
rH 
iH 






© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© © 




— 








© 


= 


© © 


© 










r 


>n 


© 


© 


















© 


© © 


CC 






in 


— 




— 








« T^H 


j 5 














© 


00 




o 


00 


X 






— 




© ? 1 


CO 














CC — 


m 






i—i 


! 1 


CM 








— 


1-1 CM 








CM 




— 




eo 


X 
CO 
















© 


IC 




© 




© 


tH 


:c 




— 




© 




Bri 












00 


- 




— 

CM 




— 




CM 








in 
t- 

l-H 










© 


© 


© 




© 






© 






© 


z 


© 


© © 


© 




no 




X 


.© 


© 




in 


X 


'© ^C 


© 


— 


Z 






- 


IC 


m © 


© 


•anojx 


^3 












c 


•© 


T— 




1 - 


00 


t - 


00 




— 


cm m 


CM 








— I 








— 


rH 








CO 


' — 






CM © 


© 




















l-H 
















iH 


© 






































iH 






CM 


z 


1^ 


© 




© 




T-H 00 








IC 




© 


© 


in © 


i-H 






in 


- ! 




= 






— 


CM © 






X 


— 


>- 




in 


X ?) 


© 




to 




© 




in 






-r 


~r © 








cc 


I — 






cc ■* 


in 


•^iiqqBjj 


43 


© 




l"^ 

SB 


— 




CI 


— 


© © 

-f Cl 






CO 


: i 

© 




© 




t~ © 

rf CM 


© 

CO 




Hi 
















CC CM 








— 








CM 


© 






































t-H 






in 


— 


© 


© 






© 


© CM 










X 


os 




© m 


iH 








cc 


- 


CO 






iC 


X 


— 




in 


— 


I - 


CC 


© 


T- cc 


X 


•^oonoj 


et 


© 


00 


r. 

IC 








r— 


X I - 

in m 






© 
:c 


m 


in 


©. 


! 1 


cc © 

X © 


in 

X 




O 






















eo 








CM 


X 



96 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— NOVA SCOTIA 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

RECAPITULATION 



Of the Yield and Value of the Fisheries of the whole Province of Nova Scotia for 

the Year 1900. 



Kinds of Fish. 



Salmon, fresh Lbs. 

u preserved " 

it smoked " 

pickled Brls. 

Herring, salted " 

ii fresh Lbs. 

ii smoked » 

Mackerel, salted Brls. 

fresh Lbs. 

Lobsters, preserved in cans i 

n fresh or alive Cwt. 

Cod, dried . ■ ■ • » 

ii tongues and sounds Brls. 

Haddock, dried Cwt. 

fresh Lbs. 

1. smoked finnan haddies n 

Hake, dried Cwt. 

ii sounds Lbs. 

Pollock • • • • Cwt. 

Halibut Lbs. 

Trout 

Shad Brls. 

Smelts Lbs. 

Alewives Brls. 

Lbs. 

Brls. 



Eels .., 
Oysters. 
Clams 



Flounders Lbs. 

Tom cod or frost fish " 

Squid Brls. 

Coarse fish « 

„ Lbs. 

Fish oil Galls. 

„ as bait Brls. 

ii manure " 

Sealskins No. 



Total for 1900 
1899 

Increase. 



Quantity. 



$ cts. 

511,604 
6,160 
9,038 
155 

82,732 
3,055,240 
749,800 

57,442 
3,224,972 

5,263,780 
169,195 

571,315 
890 

87,964 
4,650,750 
1,437,550 

161,726 
51,549 

88,581 
1,639,501 
109,200 
1,750 
385,830 
11,923 
10,100 
2,364 
1,855 
1,827 
1,020,685 
236,420 
5,351 
58,432 
378,500 

360,431 
103,858 
110,610 
24 



Rate. 



$ cts. 

20 
15 
20 
15 00 

4 00 
01 
02 

15 00 
12 

20 

5 CO 

4 00 
10 00 

3 00 
03 
06 

2 25 
50 

2 00 
10 
10 
10 00 
05 

4 00 
10 

10 00 
4 00 



05 
05 
4 00 
2 00 
02 

30 

1 50 

50 

1 25 



Value. 



$ cts. 

102,320 80 
924 10 
1,807 00 
2,325 00 



330,928 00 
30,552 40 
14,996 00 



861,630 00 
386,996 28 



1,052,754 40 
845,975 00 



2,285,260 00 
8,900 00 



263,892 00 
139,522 50 
86,253 00 



363,882 75 
25,774 50 



116,864 00 
7,185 00 



Total Value. 



$ cts. 

107,376 90 

376,476 40 
1,248,626 28 
1,898,729 40 
2,294,160 00 

489,667 50 



389,657 25 
177,162 00 
163,950 10 
10,920 00 
17,500 00 
19,291 00 
47,692 00 
1,004 50 
23,640 00 
7,420 00 
8,322 00 
51,034 00 
11,821 00 
21,404 00 



124,049 00 
108,127 70 
155,787 00 
55,305 00 
29 50 



7,809,152 53 
7,347,603 92 

461,548 61 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS — XO VA SCOTIA 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



97 



RECAPITULATION 



Of the Value of all 



Fishing Material in 



the whole 

the Year 1900. 



Province of Nova Scotia for 



Articles. 



Value. 



OCX 

14,766 
71,373 
1,049 
268 
173 
242 
7,896 
37.507 



fishing vessels (26,064 tons). 

ii boats 

gill nets (1,792,923 fathoms) 

seines (85,651 fathoms) 

trap nets ... 

weirs 

smelt nets 

trawls 



hand lines. 



277 lobster canneries. 
698,972 1 1 traps .... 



244 freezers and ice-houses.. . . 

4,366 smoke and fish-houses 

1,722 piers and wharfs (fishing). 

211 tugs and smacks 

532 dories 



Total value of fishing capital invested. 



$ 

947,640 
302,219 
447,926 
108,270 
93,170 
23,890 
3,675 
96.2011 
29,539 



225,785 
430,723 



49,620 
190,811 
234,643 

88,195 
6,308 



Number of persons employed in the fisheries of Nova Scotia, 1900. 

Men in fishing vessels 5,816 

» boats 19,396 

Persons employed in lobster canneries 6,447 



Total 31,659 



22—7 



98 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWAhJ VII., A. 1902 



APPENDIX No. 4. 
NE\Y BRUNSAVICK. 



District No. 1, comprising the county of Charlotte. — Inspector J. H. Pratt, 
St. Andrews. 

District No. 2, comprising the counties of Restigouche, Gloucester, Northumber- 
land, Kent, Westmorland and Albert. — Inspector R. A. Chapman, Moncton. 

District No. 3, comprising the counties of St. John, King's, Queen's, Sunbury, 
York, Carleton and Victoria. — Inspector H. S. Miles, Oromocto. 



District No. 1. 

REPORT OX THE FISHERIES OF DISTRICT No. 1, NEW BRUNSWICK, 
COMPRISING THE COUNTY OF CHARLOTTE, FOR THE YEAR 
1900, BY INSPECTOR JOHN H. PRATT. 

St. Andrews, N.B., December 31, 1900. 

To the Dominion Commissioner of Fisheries, 

Ottawa. 



Sir, — I have the honour to submit herewith my twelfth annual report, on the 
fisheries of District No. 1, New Brunswick, which comprises the county of Charlotte, 
and the Chiputneticook Lakes, forming a portion of the boundary line between New 
Brunswick and the adjoining State of Maine. I also inclose tabulated statements 
showing the value and catch of fish in the several sub districts, together with a synopsis 
of the officers' reports, which you will find contain many very interesting facts, con- 
cerning the sea and inland fisheries. In order to better understand the fluctuations of 
the catches of this district more clearly, I think it advisable to insert here their values 
for the past ten years : — 



Total for 

1S91 SI, 279,977 

1892 863,465 

1893 771,182 

1894 1,118,477 

1895 . 968,203 



Total for 

1896 .81,108,701 

1897 870,287 

1898 1,145,361 

1899 1,216,394 

1900 638,890 



It is a source of regret for me to report such a decrease in the catch and value for 
the past season, so p3rceptible in the accompanying returns. While some branches of 
the fishing industries were fairly successful, the principal industry of the Bay of Fundy, 
the hen-ins fishery, yielded very poor returns throughout the entire season. For instance, 
take the fisheries of the island of Grand Manan, for some unaccountable reason, not at 
present apparent, the value of the island's total catch this past year was but 8167,689, 
while the value of the previous catch for the season of 1899 was over half a million 
dollars, an immense decrease for one district alone, and nearly all in the herring fishery. 
Then notice the catch in St. Andrews Bay, with a decrease of nearly 8100,000, allowing 
to a decline in the herring catch. 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— NEW BRUNSWICK 



99 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

The usual ingenious theories have been advanced to account for this decrease in 
catch, and one of the prevailing ideas, which finds general acceptance among numerous 
intelligent fishermen, holds that dynamiting for pollock at Grand Manan is wholly 
responsible for the diminished schools of herring playing in shore during the past season. 
However, strange to say, the fishermen in this district do not by any means feel despon- 
dent over the poor returns, but feel certain that the coming season of 1901 will amply 
compensate them for the shortage of the past season. It has been noticed by the 
experienced fishermen, and it is generally believed to be correct, that a poor season is 
invariably followed by one of the opposite nature, and it is very much to be hoped that 
our fishermen will not be disappointed in their belief. One of the signs that fishermen 
believe in the foregoing is to be noticed in the increased number of applications for new 
sardine herring weirs to be erected during the coming season, although the number of 
weir licenses issued in the season just closed exceeded that of any previous season. 
Although I spent considerable time this past year on the Nova Scotia and Cape Breton 
coasts, endeavouring to prevent the United States mackerel schooners from poaching 
within our territorial waters, still, I was enabled to give satisfactory attention to the 
enforcement of the various laws governing the fisheries of this district. 

Some poaching was attempted on the Grand Manan spawning grounds during the 
annual close season there, but, owing to the energetic movements of the local officer, 
the poachers operations were very quickly frustrated. The energy displayed by the 
numerous sardine factories in the adjoining State of Maine, in order to secure small 
herring for the operation of their factories, assisted our weir owners very much from a 
financial standpoint, especially the weir owners who had not entered into any contract 
to sell their catch at the regulation price of $4 per hogshead. The Eastport Syndicate 
factories and the numerous factories opposed to the syndicate, competed merrily at times 
when small herring were scarce, and our weir owners, who were reaping the benefit, 
enjoyed this competition hugely. One morning at a weir in the Magaguadavic River, 
I was a witness to as much as 822.75 per hogshead being paid for the catch of one of 
the weirs located there. These fancy prices, I regret to say, are not paid very often. 

An increase of over $50,000 will be noticed in the value of fishery material used, 
which was rendered necessary by the increased number of new weirs erected this season, 
and the seines, boats, &c, required to operate each weir. 



HERRING. 

This fishery is the leading industry in my district and attracts the attention of 
nearly all the fishermen for their annual income and support. The failure of the other 
branches of the fisheries in this district would only cause a slight ripple of disappoint- 
ment, but the failure of herring to strike inshore causes a blow to be delivered that 
shakes every portion of the district. The herring failure this year has been discussed 
in all its various bearings, but, as usual, without any satisfactory solution of the causes 
of their appearance in such diminished numbers. A large element of doubt must always 
remain with reference to the causes that lead to the movements of fish life, but the 
discussion of those causes will always yield ample opportunities for the interchange of 
opinions. The fishermen feel that after a life-long study of the herring question in the 
Bay of Fundy, that these fish will manage to preserve themselves notwithstanding the 
terrible slaughter being made on them to satisfy the demands of the human race. It is 
sincerely to be hoped that they are correct in their conclusions on this subject. Should 
sardine herring strike in through this coming season, it promises to be of great benefit 
to our weir owners. Quite a number of new sardine factories have been erected in the 
State of Maine in opposition to the sardine syndicate at present controlling the sardine 
supply, and they will endeavour by every means in their power to break down the 
controlling power of the syndicate. This competition to procure the raw material will 
naturally benefit our weir holders, and although it may mean the extinction of some of 
the contending factories, it will be the exact opposite for our fishermen, and we fervently 
trust that this competition may not terminate for many years. 

22— 7^ 



100 



MA RINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

I presume that the figures of the sardine industry in the State of Maine for the 
past year showing number of cases packed, values, &c, would be of interest. Nearly 
all our sardine herring are exported to this state for manufacture and are given in their 
official reports as the product of American fisheries. Eight hundred and fifteen thousand 
and sixty cases of sardines were packed during the year, averaging 100 cans to each case, 
having a value of $2,932,434. This pack and value is considerably less than that of 
1899. There are seventy-nine of those sardine canning factories in the State of Maine, 
giving employment to nearly 8,000 employees, and distributing among this number 
wages aggregating nearly $800,000. 



POLLOCK. 

The methods employed by many avaricious fishermen this year on the pollock 
grounds at Grand Manan have been the subject of much sharp and bitter criticism all 
through the maritime provinces. I refer to the killing of them by exploding dynamite 
cartridges in their midst, by which means, no doubt, half of the fish are lost to the 
fishermen by their not coming to the surface after the explosion. A law should be 
enacted prohibiting the landing of fish killed by dynamite, and also the fitting out of 
boats for this unpopular method of fishing. It is the unanimous desire that this 
dynamiting should be stamped out completely, and it seems that a law as outlined above 
would be effective. Notwithstanding the large number of quintals taken by the 
employment of this nefarious method of dynamiting the schools, and the catch also by 
the old-time methods employed by law-abiding class of fishermen, a decrease of about 
4,000 quintals will be noticed in the returns when compared with the returns for last 
season. 

SALMON. 

A considerable increase may be noticed in the catch of salmon, the past season being 
an exceptionally good one for the anglers, especially those fishing in the waters of the 
St. Croix River, where your departments efforts in retaining the services of the two 
guardians for such a lengthy period each season, is meeting with the success it merits. 
Good signs of salmon ascending through the fish-ways at St. George are quite in evidence 
each season now, and there is no doubt, with the exercise of constant vigilance this river 
will become stocked with this most toothsome fish. 



LOBSTERS. 

A decrease of nearly 3,000 cwt. is to be noticed, I regret to say, in the lobster catch, 
and the pack of the canned article by the several factories, will also show a decrease. 
Poor fishing was reported by the majority of those engaged in the fishery, although the 
same amount of gear was used as in previous seasons. It seems to be beyond question 
that more restrictive measures will have to be adopted, in order that this fishery will be 
kept from becoming worthless to those prosecuting it. It is hoped by the vast majority 
of the fishermen in this district that your department will change the present size limit 
to ten and one-half inches. 

C 3D. 

A decrease of over 1,500 quintals will be noticed in the catch of cod, due mainly to 
less men being engaged in this fishery, a large number of them having turned their 
attention to the weir fishery. 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS -NEW BRUNSWICK 101 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

HADDOCK. 

About $7,000 will be noticed as the decrease in the value of this fishery, when com- 
pared with that of last year, although this falling off can not be attributed to any scarcity 
in the schools of this fish, but simply to a less vigorous prosecution of this fishery, by 
fewer men being engaged in it. During the month of December a number of men and 
vessels were employed in this fishery in the channel between Grand Manan and Canipo- 
bello, and by the well deserved success they met with it was quite evident that this and 
other Jine fish had not deserted our shores, as some persons would have us believe. 

CAMPOBELLO'S FISHERIES ASSOCIATION. 

The annual exhibition and aquatic sports of this society were held at Welshpool, 
Campobello, on October 18, and were full of interest to the large number of people who 
were so fortunate as to be present. I had the honour of being appointed as one of the 
judges for the sailing regatta and the races were started from the stern of the Curlew 
by the starting gun on board. It was a pleasure to be ordered there and the association 
officers treated me, as an official representative, with the greatest courtesy. In one of 
the buildings the numerous exhibits of fish were laid in a most inviting manner before the 
public gaze, and won well deserved approbation. Handsome money prizes were awarded 
to the successful competitors. It was a revelation to the attending strangers, to see the 
handsome sloop rigged boats that competed in the principal boat race. Outsiders 
generally have but a faint idea of the excellent vessels used by the fishermen in Passama- 
quoddy waters. The annual dinner of the society took place in the evening at the Owen 
Hotel, followed by the annual ball, which was very largely attended by the representative 
people of the county and of the neighbouring states. 



SYNOPSES OF FISHERY OFFICERS' REPORTS. 

Guardian Hall of St. George, who has control of the important fish-ways on the 
Magaguadavic River, states : that frost fish and alewives have been very abundant 
during the past year. Trout also have been plentiful and Lake Utopia was visited by 
sportsmen from many United States cities, all having effected good catches. More 
salmon were seen in the river than during any previous year, although none were taken. 
The fish-ways are all in good condition, except the one at upper falls, which needs look- 
ing after. 

Overseer Todd, who has charge at St. Stephen of the important salmon fishery of 
the St. Croix River, says that the increase in the number of salmon ascending the river 
is plainly evident to the most ordinary observer. This owing wholly to the efficient 
protection given by the two night guardians there under his direction, who efficiently 
prevent illegal fishing on the Canadian side of the boundary line. 

Guardian McLaughlin, who looks after the fisheries of Lake Utopia, and the other 
lakes in this vicinity, in his annual report states that trout have been very plentiful, and 
satisfactory catches have been made by the numerous sportsmen visiting the lakes and 
streams in the vicinity of St. George. Smelts, frost fish, and alewives, have been very 
plentiful in their season, and salmon have been very plentiful on the Pocologan River. 
They enter this river about August 20, and, no doubt, numbers of them are taken 
illegally. The river being quite a distance from here, he could not devote as much time 
in protecting it as he would like. 

Overseer Campbell, of St. Andrews, states that he regrets that his returns show quite 
a decrease in the value and catch. There were twenty more weirs fishing than in 1899, 
and still the catch was not much more than half that of the previous year. Herring- 
were plentiful but too small for sardines. He believes that this sardine industry is destroy 



102 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

ing the herring fishery. There have been no net herring for some years, but plenty of 
britt, and if, as Prof. Prince says, none of the herring canned in the State of Maine 
have ever spawned, it is only a question of time when the herring fishery will be done. 
There has been some line fishing, but not as good as in 1898 and 1899. The lobster 
fishing is about done, which is attributed to taking lobsters smaller than 10i inches, and 
also fishing for them during the winter. 

There was considerable illegal fishing during the season, both torching and seining 
which can only be stopped by having a force on the grounds at all times. The lobster 
catch in the bay which fifteen years ago amounted to 600 tons, is now only about ten 
which is ascribed to winter fishing. 

Overseer Lord, who has control of the fisheries of West Isles, states that britt, and 
undersized herring were very plentiful this season, but gave no value to the fishermen. 
Herring suitable for sardine herring show a decrease both in quantity and value. They 
seem to be getting scarcer each year, and a number of weirs not catching enough to 
pay for expenses of repairing. Some think as their was so mauy britts there will be 
plenty of herring next year, but the fish are becoming scarcer each year. There was no 
herring smoked in this district last year. The lobster catch in this division will show 
a decrease, which is probably to be attributed to the large number of men being engaged 
in it. 

Guardian McLean, who controls the district from L'Etang to the Magaguadavic 
River, states that the catch of line fish for the year has been about the same as last 
year, with prices about the same. The lobster fishing was good, more men and more 
traps were employed at it. Pollock, hake and cod fishing have been good, but the prices 
have not been as good as formerly, which I think, is due to the fact of the Porto Rico 
markets being in the hands of the United States government. There was a large school 
of sardine herring as in former years, but rather too small for sardine purposes, but only 
about half a catch was made when compared with previous years. An increase was 
made in the pack in the sardine factory located in this district, over 8,000 cases being 
put up. 

Guardian Cross, located at Beaver Harbour, sta tes that on the whole the fishermen 
have not done as well as last year, and cannot account for the fact of herring becoming 
scarcer each y p ar, and believes it must be owing to so many small ones being taken from 
the weirs for lobster bait. Quite a trade in clams and dulse is being developed in his 
district, and many also are engaged in dragging for scallops, which are canned. 

He thinks it would be a good idea to have a close season for clams and scallops, to 
save them from extinction. The lobster catch fell off this year and there is not the 
slightest doubt they are becoming scarcer. Line fishing fell off this year, owing to the 
difficulty in securing bait at times, and also to the fact that there were not so many men 
engaged in it, but he believes the fish were just as plentiful as ever. Pollock in large 
numbers were very often found in the weirs. No large herring have been taken of late 
years, only what have been caught at the Wolves, and there is no doubt the taking of 
small herring is injuring the catch of the large. Clams have increased, and more of them 
have been handled than in previous years, and he can also say the same of scallops. 

Overseer Fraser, of Grand Manan, leturns only about half a catch of fish of all 
kinds in comparison with that of the previous year, but with reference to the herring 
catch it was considerably less than half of that taken in 1899. He cannot give any 
correct cause for this decrease, but it is a well known fact that each kind of fish is 
becoming scarcer year by year. The line fishermen complain that the dynamiting 
seriously injures their fishing, and they give as a reason that when a charge has been 
exploded anywhere within their vicinity, they would be unable to hook any more fish. 
There is no doubt this killing of fish by dynamite is very injurious to the fisheries, and 
if this slaughter is allowed to continue the results will be ruinous. If a law is not 
enactel preventing this harmful method from continuing, a greater number will provide 
themselves with a dynamite outfit. He suggests that vessels be prohibited from carry- 
ing this outfit, as the best means to break up the practice. 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS- NEW BRUNSWICK 



103 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

A large decrease in the catch of pollock will be noticed for the reason that none 
were taken in the weirs as in previous years. The price received for them was some- 
what higher. The prices quoted for fish of each kind, are, with very few exceptions, 
the same as last year. A gratifying advance was noticed in the prices paid for boxes of 
bloaters, which advanced from 60 to 90 cents per box. This officer suggests the enact- 
ment of a law requiring all nets to be taken from the water at sunrise and not set again 
till sunset. He also suggests a more stringent protection of the spawn fish during the 
close season. The placing of some restriction on the taking of britt by the weirs, which 
was carried on the past season to a ruinous extent, is absolutely necessary. Large 
quantities of those small fish were taken and sold for lobster bait, and it required from 
fifteen to twenty five of them, by actual count, to balance in weight one mature herring. 
A number of the weirs, principally a few in Seal Cove, made very good hauls of herring 
suitable for smoking which were sold in Lubec and Eastport, more being realized there 
than the people of the island would pay. The close seasons were not properly observed, 
though he did all in his power to enforce same. 

, Overseer Savage, of Campobello, in his report for the year states, that pollock made 
their appearance early in J une in large schools and the catch was much larger than that 
of last year. Although very few were caught in weirs, the price paid was fair. Line 
fish of the different kinds, yielded an average catch, with prices ruling somewhat lower 
than the prev.ous year. The catch of lobsters will show an increase, owing partly to 
their being more numerous on the ground and to the fact of unusually good weather 
prevailing during the spring months. Good prices were paid for canning purposes and 
also for shipment in a fresh state. Herring were scarcer than previous year. There 
was a large run of very small herring during the summer months, but they were too 
small to be of any commercial value. Large herring of the size caught in gill nets were 
almost a failure. He attributes to a very large extent the scarcity of fish this season, was 
almost entirely owing to the dynamite pollock fishing at Grand Man an, which was 
carried on outside the three mile limit, but perhaps in foggy weather, closer in shore. 
Fishermen differ in their opinions regarding the scarcity of some kinds of fish, but, no 
doubt, the great amount of fishing done both off shore and inshore tends to make all 
kinds of fish scarce. He believes that the fishery regulations have been as well observed 
as usual. 

Guardian Conrad, of St. Croix, who patrols the Chiputneticook lakes, running be- 
tween New Brunswick and the State of Maine, in his report states that he met with 
considerable difficulty in endeavouring to enforce the fishery regulations on those lakes. 
There is a determined class of poachers who reside on the American side, who will em- 
brace every opportunity to set their nets on the Canadian side, where the fishing is very 
much superior to that on the United States side. The different kinds of fish found in 
the lakes, black bass, white perch and pickerel, are still quite plentiful, and a good 
angler, under good conditions, can easily hook 200 lbs. per day. 

( 'kief Boatman, Silas Mitchell, patrolling the fishing grounds in Quoddy River, op- 
pose Eastport. reports that very little trouble was experienced in keeping the Ameri- 
can fishermen from poaching on the Canadian side of the boundary line, as they are be- 
coming better acquainted with the fact that the Canadian fishery laws will be strictly 
enforced against them. Follock made their appearance on the fishing grounds in the 
Quoddy River about the middle of May and lasting till about the middle of Septem- 
ber. The catch was good during this time and the total for the season was quite large. 
The catches of haddock, cod and hake, in the 'North Channel ' that is, between Grand 
Manan and Campobello, during the month of December, have been exceedingly 
good. 

I have the honour to be sir, 

Your obedient servant. 



JOHN H. PRATT, 

Inspector of Fisheries. 



104 



MA BINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



DISTRICT No. 2. 

REPORT ON THE FISHERIES OF DISTRICT No. 2, NEW BRUNSWICK, 
COMPRISING THE COUNTIES OF RESTIGOUCHE, GLOUCESTER, 
NORTHUMBERLAND, KENT, WESTMORLAND AND 
ALBERT, FOR THE YEAR 1900, BY INSPECTOR 
R. A. CHAPMAN, MONCTON. 

Moncton, N. B., Jan. 2, 1901. 

To the Dominion Commissioner of Fisheries, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit my report of the fisheries in District No. 2, of 
the province of New Brunswick, consisting of the counties of Restigouche, Gloucester, 
Northumberland, Kent, Westmorland and Albert, for the year 1900, with tabu- 
lated statement, giving the products and values by districts and counties, together with 
an estimate of the capital employed in the prosecution of these fisheries. 

The returns referred to show an increase in the aggregate value of fish taken over 
that of 1899 of $204,280, the values for the two years being : 

For 1899 $2,595,024 

" 1900 , 2,799,304 

which is somewhat better than I expected when I wrote my preliminary report, and 
with the high prices prevailing for fish of all kinds it has certainly been a good year 
for all concerned in the business. I would now beg briefly to refer to the several lead- 
ing kinds of fish caught. 

SALMON. 

The catch is a little larger than last year and fly fishing was reported good on all 
the streams, showing that the spring run of fish had succeeded in ascending in large 
numbers, the spawning grounds were also well stocked with parent fish last fall, which 
is regarded as favourable for coming seasons. 



SHAD. 

The catch has been very small in the Bay of Fundy, and no better can be expected 
until these fine fish are protected during their spawning season, which I have referred 
to so often. 

HERRING 

Were, as every year, abundant in the spring and the usual large quantities taken. 
Parties from Charlotte County have and are erecting smoke-houses and curing consider- 
able quantities of them. This business is open to unlimited possibilities. The fall 
herring, on the banks between Caraquet and Miscou, were unusually plentiful the past 
season, and large quantities of fine fish taken which were sold at good prices. 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— NEW BRUNSWICK 



105 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

MACKEREL. 

Nearly three times as many of these fish were caught as in 1899, they being very 
plentiful on many parts of our coasts early in the season, and some immense catches 
were made. Tinkers or small fish having swarmed along our shores for the past few 
years and should lead to good fishing for some time to come. 

ALEWIVES, 

% 

As usual, were in large numbers in several of our rivers last spring and might ha?e 
been taken in large quantities, but little attention appears to be given to this fishery. 



COD. 

The catch slightly exceeds that of last year and would have been much larger only 
for the storm in September, referred to in my preliminary report, when so many vessels 
and lives were lost. Prices were good, and it has been a profitable year for those 
engaged in this very important fishery. 



BASS. 

The quantity taken is again falling off, and another close time on the Miramichi 
River may be necessary to restore this fishery again. At any rate, hook and line fishing 
should be prohibited during the spawning season, as these fish mature slowly. 



TROUT. 

Both sea and lake trout are caught in many different places in considerable 
quantities. A number of clubs are formed who lease the streams and lakes and give 
some protection thereto. The catch appears to be increasing. 

SMELTS. 

The quantity of smelts taken is upwards of 800,000 pounds more than in 1899, 
which was previously the largest on record. The importance of this fishery can hardly 
be overestimated, and it is now proved conclusively that there is no danger of overfishing. 
Many years ago, before they had a commercial value, large quantities were taken in the 
spring for manure, &c, and this when they had come into the rivers to spawn. This, 
of course, now is all stopped. The present winter the weather from the first has been 
extremely favourable, and such large quantities have been caught that prices have gone 
down, and there is no talk of extension of the season as heretofore. The totals for 1901 
will, consequently, be still larger than for 1900. 



LOBSTERS. 

With more factories and gear of all kinds the pack is considerably below that of 
last year. The high prices prevailing is stimulating this fishery, I am sure, beyond what 
it reasonably can bear, and it is hard to tell what is best to be done to prevent its 
gradual extermination. Fall fishing, I believe, would do it, as this would give all the 
female fish a chance to spawn. But those interested will not agree to this change for 



106 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

several reasons, prominent among which is the stormy weather prevailing during that 
season of the j ear. If hatcheries were established at different points along our coaBts, 
they would, no doubt, be of great help, and this might save what is of such vast 
importance, as this fishery capitalized at four per cent is worth, in my district, about 

$10,000,000. 

OYSTERS 

Show a somewhat larger catch than in 1899, due partly to the opening of the 
reserve in Shediac and partly to the high prices prevailing, which stimulated those 
engaged in this industry to greater exertions. In my report of 1898, I referred to the 
necessity of an examination of the Caraquet beds, which do not produce at all what 
they did years ago, and which, I believe, are becoming covered with mud and sediment. 
This could probably be overcome by dredging. At any rate, a close examination by the 
oyster expert, Mr. Kemp, would be worth making. 

I have reports from only three or four of the local officers, and these contain no 
matter not covered by my own report. 

I have the honour to be, sir, your obedient servant, 

R. A. CHAPMAN, 

Inspector. 



DISTRICT Nc. 3. 



REPORT OF THE FISHERIES OF DISTRICT No. 3, OF NEW" BRUNSWICK, 
COMPRISING THE COUNTIES OF ST. JOHN, KING'S, QUEEN'S, SUN- 
BURY, YORK, CARLETON AND VICTORIA, FOR THE YEAR 1900, BY 
H. S. MILES, INSPECTOR. 

Oromocto, January 1, 1901. 

To the Dominion Commissioner of Fisheries, 

Ottawa. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit my report on the fisheries of District No. 3, 
New Brunswick, for 1900, also statistical returns showing the quantities of fish taken 
and their value, which, when compared with that of the preceding year, shows an in- 
crease, as follows : 

St. John County, 1899 $238,635 75 

1900 258,464 75 



Increase $19,829 00 

River Counties, 1899 $69,971 50 

1900 73.0S3 00 



Increase 



$3,111 50 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS—NEW BRUNSWICK 



1C7 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

SYNOPSES OF FISHERY OFFICERS' REPORTS. 

Overseer O'Brien, of St. John County, in his annual report, states that the season 
just closed was a successful one for the fishermen. Early in the seasen alewives were 
scarce, but on May 15, they struck in and were taken in great quantities for two weeks 
by both weir and net fishermen. 

SHAD 

Shows a smaller catch than usual, resulting from over fishing, which might be in part 
prevented by prohibiting their being taken when returning from the spawning beds, as 
they are then unfit for use. 

SALMON. 

There were less salmon than usual taken by the boat fishermen in the bay, but in 
the weirs along the south shore the catch was particularly good. Grilse were mote 
numerous than for twenty years. Trawling for cod, hake and haddock was good, and 
the ready market made the fishermen feel happy. 

The catch of lobsters was a little short on account of the regulation measurement 
of not less than 10h inches being enforced. The Fry Island weirs did not go into the 
Eastport syndicate and kept the price of herring up, otherwise they would not be worth 
catching. The young herring were used for lobster bait and sardines. A considerable 
quantity of eels were taken and shipped fresh in ice to the States, where a fair price 
was obtained, but generally speaking this industry is only a one man business. The 
greatest difficulty is experienced in enforcing the Sunday close time, and for violations 
ten parties were fined. 

H. S. Parlee, guardian at Sludhohn, King's County, reports a careful observance of 
the fishery laws and regulations in his district. 

M. G. Jenkins, guardian at Kars, King's County, reports that the fisheries carried 
on in his district have been strictly according to law ; he has not heard one complaint 
from any one in his district. 

K. C. Foster, guardian, Upperton, King's County, reports a careful enforcement of 
the regulagtions preventing the escape of sawdust into the various rivers and streams 
in his district. No illegal fishing was permitted. 

Jonah Keith, guardian, Havelock, King's County, reports a large run of shad in 
Canaan River last spring. Law well observed in his district. 

Michael Brown, guardian, Westjreld, King's County, reports a successful salmon 
and shad fishing season, also a careful observance of the regulations. 

W. U. S. Gamblim, guardian, Pearsonville, King's County, says he had much dif- 
ficulty in a proper or satisfactory enforcement of the sawdust regulations. The angling 
for trout was good and sportsmen were many. 

Overseer I. J. Hetherington, oj Queen's County, reports the catch of salmon much 
above the general average. Shad too was vigorously fished throughout the season, and 
although there were no heavy runs at one time, yet industry had its reward, and a good 
yield was obtained Alewives were abundant, but less than usual were taken on account 
of the high wages paid for less disagreeable work. Other fish, including lake herring, 
trout, pickerel and eel were about as usual. It seems that the fishermen now realize 
that the strict observance of the laws are to their advantage, so no seizures or fines were 
necessary for their enforcement. The usual number of guardians were employed this 
season. 

Overseer Cecil F. McLean, of Sunbury County, reports an increase in the catch of 
alewives, shad and pickerel over any former year. Salmon also were more plentiful than 
for some time past, but, owing to the high water, less were taken. He thinks an efficient 
fish-way should be put in the dam at Hartts Mills, above which are excellent spawning 
grounds in North Oromocto Lake. 



108 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Guardian C. II. Turney, of Burton, Sunbury County, reports two violations, which 
were satisfactorily settled. 

Overseer Robert Orr, of York County, reports that he devoted all his time to the 
fisheries on the St. John River and South-west Miramichi, also north branch of South- 
west Miramichi in Carleton County. He found great difficulty in preventing poaching 
of all kinds, but thinks with the assistance of the six guardians given him, a fair pro- 
tection was afforded on the Miramichi River. In the St. John River, the constant run 
of logs prevent the setting of nets above tidal waters until late in June, after which a 
careful lookout has to be maintained. During the heavy freshet in September, a great 
run of salmon successfully made their way to the spawning grounds on the Tobique. 

Guardian McEiven, Upper Miramichi, in Carleton County, says that salmon were 
more plentiful on the spawning beds than they had been for the last ten years. On the 
night of October 20, the river froze hard enough to carry a horse, and so afforded 
protection to the salmon on the bars and cut short the work of the guardians. The 
inspector made two trips over river this season, spending in all about ten days on river. 

Carleton County (note by Inspector), I have no overseer in this county. The usual 
number of guardians were in service on St. John River and Miramichi, no complaints 
were made by guardians and the laws were well observed. 

Overseer Leonard Wilson, Victoria County, reports plenty salmon and says that the 
guardians should be appointed not later than May 15, otherwise net fishing will be done. 

Overseer Hector Nadeau, Jor the Madaicaska district, reports as follows : — It is 
impossible for me to compare accurately the catch of the last year with that of previous 
years, as I have no figures to go by, this being my first year as an overseer. Judging, 
however, from surrounding circumstances, I infer that the amount received from this 
busine-s by the population of this county, must be getting smaller every year. This is 
likely a result of saw-mills being allowed to dump sawdust and mill refuse into the 
different streams, but principally into the St. John River. Ten years ago trout and 
whitefish in quite large quantities could be taken out of the waters of the St. John, 
anywhere between Grand Falls and the St. Francis River, but to-day a fisherman 
returning home after a few hours' fishing must consider himself lucky if one or two 
fishes (small at that) adorn the inside of his basket. Grand River, in the parish of St. 
Leonard's, is not now the fisherman's paradise it used to be. This, I think, is principally 
due to the all-summer drives which have taken place on that stream for the last twenty 
years. 

Green River is fished to excess, and as it is one of the many streams in this county 
which has no special guardians, our friends from across the international boundary and 
a few of our own people are in the habit, I am told, of using explosives and other illegal 
means of fishing. This stream should be protected. 

Madawaska River is well looked after on the New Rrunswick side of the line, but 
on the Quebec side, I have been told by eye witnesses that some nights this autumn as 
many as twenty lights could be seen on the river at the same time. Another guardian 
should be appointed to look after that part of the river, as the present one has, I under- 
stand, no time to give it his attention. 

Baker Brook has no fish now to speak of, but the lakes (which are in the province 
of Quebec) that empty into it, used to be full of trout, whitefish, toque, &c, but they 
are now fast losing their finny population for about the same reasons as given re Green 
River. Baker Brook and those lakes should be guarded. The catch at Baker Lake seems 
to be getting smaller every year. There was only one fine collected this year from a 
gentleman from Fort Kent, Maine. This fine was for $20, and made poachers give 
Baker lake a wide berth this year. There are no fish-ways on any of the dams in this 
county, and I do not think they are needed. 

I have the honour to be, sir, your obedient servant, 

H. S. MILES, 

Inspector. 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— NEW BRUNSWICK 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



d 



o 

of 
0/ 



to 
a 

00 



O 
O 



> 



1 s 

c3 



r- th 



T3 



co 



S5 



PQ 

PQ £ 
c 

c3 

© ° 

CO CD 

°S 

« .. 

3 CD 

> rS 
in 

— . ce 



ci 



*4— 

op o 

P-l ° 

O 

a 



-C 

-u 

6C 

a 

"£ 
o 

h3 

73 

OS 
H 

a 
P5 



B5 



03 



o 
PQ 



oo 
►J 
w 



c 

5S 

K 

00 







rH CM CO iO © 




eirs. 




© o m O © O 
© O OI © CO' © 

w t~ co r-i on 00 © 
co 01 -r co 


l 65710 




vraqumjj 


t~0© ©©rH 

io n n io f a 


OI 
© 

CO- 



© m © © © © 

Mi ICS © CM CO O 
33 « (N H « (M t- 
r-i CO H 



CO 
OS 

I IO 



lO 00 © CM CO IO 
Ol © OI rH CM t- 
CM HH ■ 



CO 
01 

© 



•an [ii A 



© © m © © © 

CM CM © © © 
Cf : ~* OI -t< (39 © -f 
w CO C- CM © rH m 



© 
01 





© © © © rH © 


rH 




— — 01 t— © 


co 




HKHH CM 


CM 






rH 



l~ rH © © © © 

io is> t- Tt< o: 



Hr 

CO 



•on^A 



I 



■* © © © o © 
io © © io © m 

CO lO H O if ■* 



■SEnoq^Bjj 



© in © © in © 

f CO CM CM 00 IO 
CO rH CM CM rH 



© IO CM CO CM © 
HMHNOJLO 
rH -JH 



00 
O 

s 

E-i 

00 



tog 
G Cv 
- -- 

±J w -W 

o o o> 

»f ^HH'«^ 

3 9 S 
J rJ ^ 'j; c ? 



a 

*3 oS 



39 



© 

CM 
© 



CO' 

t-- 





•uaj\[ 


m © cc -t< t- © 
© o © rfi m 

rH CO r- rH CM 


© 
~f 

rH 


Boats. 


•anpsA 


© © © © t- © 
OI © © © rH © 

^ co *o in —h in co 

m 


78537 






© © OC CM CO © 
O O © i.O L - © 
— OI 01 01 rH CM 


CO 
CO 
OI 






m >o © Tt< 

rH rH © rH 
rH 


m 
oc 

CM 


CD 

CO 
CO 




1000 
1100 
450 
275(H) 
4200 
1600 


© 

m 
oo 
m 

CO 


<D 
r> 




© CO t~ 00 00 -f 
© © rH O0 0-1 L~ 
X CM 


CO 
CO 




•jaqiun^ 


CO -f CM © 00 CO 
IO 


I- 



o 
— 



•jaquin ^ 



r- oi co -r m © 



110 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD Vil., A. 1902 



^3 

s 



M 

o 

» I— I 

03 

a 

CD 



CO 
• *H 

EH 
O 

Is 
c 

. I—* 

c 

3 

<y 

CO 

d 
o 

CO 

H 
K 



ueqinn^ 



l CM CO i TP lO © t~ 00 



•sqj 'spnnos '^^i^H 



•sqj 'srfipp«q 
urag psoitis '^ooppTjjj 



•}a\o 'paiap '>[ooppujj 



■S{aq 

'ipqs in qsaij 'sutbjq 



■spq 'pa[[9qs 'staiqQ 



50 

l-H 

c 

50 



•sitbo 'pauirco 'snrejQ 



•^a\o 'paup 'p°0 



•}A\0 

•paqs ui qseaj 'sja^sqo^j 
•sqj 'sireo 



•sq[ 'pauurco 'p.w^o'Bj^ 



•sqj 'pa^oais 'Suijj^jj 



■sqi 

' udzo.i j.ioqsaij 'Suuaa jj 



•suuo 

in peAjasaad 'sdojpog 



•sqj 'qs9.ij 'uouqcc; 



50 

E-i 

o 

« 

s- 

50 



O © © © -1- © 

co co i-h © © © 

«LOO 



© © oi © 

© IT! © © -f 

X • CO <M t~ i-l 

01 ■ -1 f 



© © © © CN CO 
© © O Tf © H 
X CN CO © 10 rH 
CN Tf Tf 



© © 

• © © 

• © © 

• IG X 

• t- 



© © 

© S 

CN 00 



■ Tf CN 
. -f H 



C C - - 

5 © O © 

© © © © 

© iC CO 
© tP CN 
r-J WH 



© • © 
© • © 

O • ■ CN 



- 



©©©Of© 

iO © © © lO © 
CN X rH CO tO CO 



© C © © © © 
TP © © Tf © U0 
OONMOC 
CO CN CO 



■ © X 
CN © 
t~ © 

■ CN X 

■ if CM 



• © 

• © 

■ Z 

■ LO 



UO 
X 



So 

g 

i 

a 



8 



- ~ ~ 

© © C 
© © © 
IG X — 
i-i CO rH 

01 



■ © 
© 

iO 

■ CM 

■ © 
• CM 

co 



© lG © id 

— oix 

CN 



'> Irk 



^0 ~ 



S o o 



CO 



*f 

X 
X 
X 



CN 
iO 

: i 

co 



CN 



© 
© 



© 

© 
© 

CO 
X 



CO 

© 
- 



© 

OS 
t- 



U0 
CO 



X 

© 



CN 
lO 
© 
© 



© 
© 
C" 

co 



©. 

CO 

© 



CM 

lO 
OS 

© 



© 
© 

UO 



© 
© 

CM 



© 

© 



© 
© 

CM 

© 

01 



© 
co 
:-. 

co 



© 

o 

Ol 



© 

x 

X 
01 



iO 

X 
CO 



o S 

„ g 

SUM'S 



o 
EH 



•jaqumv^ 



l CM CO -<f lO © X 



FISHERY INSPECTORS REPORTS— NEW BRUNSWICK 



IONAL PAPER No. 22 





r-l<MCO-^mtCt^X 


Total 
Value 

OB' ALL 

Fish. 


Jg oooooooo 

cn 10 t4 ic" t-T oo o" i-T 
* h a c 10 o 

t— i i— 1 r" 


in 
to 

© 

as 

00 

00 
CO 
to 


•o^j 'sui^s [Bag 




IO 








o 


on 
E- 

Q 

q 

« 
Ph 

35 

fa 


•s[jq 'ajnireui sb qsi^j 




© 
© 


• © 

• o 

• © 

• CM 


• i- m 

• O CM 

rH 




c 

00 

in 

CM 


•»-[jq '^ruq sb qsij[ 




m 

CM 
-f 

CO 


• © © X © 
© © CO © 
© CO © © 

H W H H 




CO 
© 

© 


•sipjS '[io qsi^ 




©©©©©© 
© © © © to © 

© © i— W X © 

1—1 




© 
© 
© 

in 

CM 


K inds of Fish, 


■spq 

'qsi4 pawn pu« 9S.ii!OQ 


o 














© 
CM 


•sjaq 'pmbg 










© 
CM 
i— 1 






CM 
»—l 


•sqi 

c(so.ij ao poo raox 


© 

o 
25 












© 
© 
© 

CO 


© 
© 

in 

CO 


■sqj 'sjapunojjj 




© 
© 


© 
© 
© 






© 
© 
© 

CM 


© 
o 
© 
1— 1 

rH 


■suuo 

'paAjassjd 'sauipjisg 




00001 

000008 

000000T 










© 
© 
© 
© 

00 
i-H 


•SLiq 'sauipittg 


32 "* to 

• t- OS 01 
■ CD O CO 

• iH CO CO 


to © 

ro © 
-f © 

CO © 
1—1 




rH 

m 
© 


•o^j 'sireo 
'paiaddiJi 'Saujajj 


• © 

• o 

■ cxi 

■ CO 


© 

■ © 
• ■ © 

• m 

■ lO 

.—I 








© 
© 

CM 
X 
CM 
- 1 




© 
Q 
© 

m 












© 
© 

in 


•sqi 

'uazojj jo qsaJi 'poQ 






© © 
© 5 
= © 
© m 

— '3 








© 
© 

in 


•s[jq 

'mjajadsBf) 10 S3AiAV9|y 


o 

o 

<N 












© 

o 

CM 


•sqi 'spaing 


O 

o 

© 
I- 




© 
© 
© 
CM 


© © © 
© in © 

CO © 
CO 


© 

CO 
CO 
rH 


•sqi 'aopa 




© 
© 

m 

CM 


■ © 

• © 

• © 

• m 








© 
© 

m 
© 
© 


•sqi '?noax 


o 
o 
o 

© 




© 
O 
© 




© 
© 
© 
© 


© 
© 
© 

X 
rH 


•sqi 'qnqip!H 








© 
© 
© 

CM 








© 
© 
© 
© 
CM 


Districts. 


Charlotte Count}/. 
St. Stephen and vicinity 


> 

& 
a 

- 

C 

a 

a 
- 


! L'Etansr to St. Georsre 


c 

a 

- Z 

4i 

GC 

4- 

a: 
c 

a 
tt 

3 S- 
C 

4^ 
■f. 


r 

— 

— 


c 
t 
c 

•_ 


a 
a 
r. 

i— i 

- -u 

00 

2 


> 
• — 

' s 
"> 

- 

c3 
CO 
Si 
s- 
C 
09 

X 


) 

Tf 


tr 





112 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



RECAPITULATION 



Of the Yield and Value of the Fisheries in District No. 1, Province of New Brunswick, 

for the Year 1 900. 



Kinds of Fish. 


Quantity. 


Price. 


Value. 








§ cts. 


§ cts. 




T Kc 


3,850 


20 


770 00 






28,800 


15 


4.320 00 




T Ko 


2,500 


15 


375 00 






3,386 


4 00 


13,541 00 




T Ko 


3,262,500 


01 


32,625 00 






2,167.000 


02 


43,340 00 




Cans 


228.200 


10 


22.K20 00 






97,541 


2 00 


195,082 00 






1,810,000 


05 


90,500 00 




T ko 


99,552 


20 


19,910 40 






9,539 


5 00 


47,695 00 






3,309 


4 00 


13,236 00 


m fresh or frozen 


Lbs. 


75,000 


04 


3,000 00 




Brls. 


3,571 


1 00 


3,571 00 






1,084 


7 00 


7,588 00 






Co. 520 


10 


6,052 00 




Lbs. 


571,900 


03 


17,157 00 


ii dried i.-. 


Cwt. 


1,063 


3 00 


3,189 00 


Finnan haddies, smoked 


Lbs. 


000 




4 QSO 00 


n M canned 


Cans 


•? COO 


10 


360 00 




Cwt. 


12,005 


2 2o 


27,011 25 




Lbs. 


13,252 


50 


6,626 00 




Cwt. 


18,884 


2 00 


37,768 00 




Lbs. 


20,000 


10 


2,000 00 






18.000 


10 


1,800 00 






13,350 


05 


667 50 




Brls. 


250 


4 00 


1,000 00 




Lbs. 


5,000 


05 


250 00 






11,900 


05 


595 00 






3.500 


05 


175 00 




Brls. 


129 


4 00 


516 00 






20 


2 00 


4 1 


Fish oil 


Gall. 


25,0(50 


30 


7,518 00 




Brls. 


9,793 


1 50 


14,689 50 






2.5S0 


50 


1,290 00 




Cans. 


2,000 


12 00 


240 00 




Lbs. 


5,000 


12 00 


600 00 




No. 


5 


4 00 


20 00 




Lbs. 


99,500 


06 


5,970 00 


Tnt.n.l value nf oa.trh for 1300 








638.890 65 








1,216,259 95 
















577,369 30 







FISHER Y INSPECTORS' REPORTS-NEW BRUNSWICK 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



113 



RECAPITULATION 



Showing the Number and Value of Vessels, Boats, Nets, Weirs, &c, engaged in the 
Fisheries of District No. 1, New Brunswick, for the Year 1900 




76 
1,233 
773 
394 
623 
392 
26 
1,542 
12 
19,461 
8 
755 
227 
24 
5 
2 
4 
1 
6 
70 
70 
40 



Fishing vessels (tonnage 
boats 

Gill nets, (21,620 fathoms) 
Weir seines, (12,181 fathoms) 

Trawls 

Weirs 

Snjelt nets 

Hand lines 

Lobster canneries 

ip traps 

Freezers and ice houses 

Smoke and fish houses 

Piers and wharfs 

Tugs and smacks 

Sardine factories 

Clam canneries 

Kippered herring factories. . . 

Fish guano factory 

Fish curing ., " 

Weirs scows 

Pile drivers 

Fish presses . . 



Total value of material . 



35,850 00 
78,537 00 
7,749 00 
26,415 00 
5,964 00 
165,710 00 
252 00 
1,085 00 
29,000 00 
16,610 00 
5,650 00 
140,460 00 
38,740 00 
12,300 00 
41,000 00 
600 00 
10,000 00 
5,000 00 
3,000 00 
4,000 00 
5.500 00 
3.000 00 



S 636,422 00 



22—8 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



DO 



PS 
K 
H 
<! 

PS 

o 

PS 

< 
a 

O 

C5 

3 

50 



uaqum^ 



( cm 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

i-i cm eo i-h cm co -t> 



C 3 
O 1C 
IO CD 

00 tH 



© 

jo 



•■iaqum^j 



o 

l^CM 



© © © 

© © © 

WlOH 



© © o 

© © © 

x © © 

~ © X 



HlOCO 

ia t- co 



© © © 
woo 

CM CM -r 



© 
© 

X 
I- 

IO 



x 



© © 
© © 

IT. Z 

© o 

CM 



© © © © 

cocio 

CM X. CM ~ 
CO CO 



© © © © 
© © © © 
© © © © 
IO © IO l- 
-r t- co 



- 

t— 

jo 



© © 
© © 
t~ © 
t- x 



- 

M 
CO 
CM 



t~ © 

CO CO 



© © © © 
© © © © 

S J-O -f X 
C C X ?1 



© © © © 

© © 1-0 X 

to OS O0 JO 



© 
© 

in 
x 

CO 

ri 
r. 



© © © © 
© © © © 



s 



© © © © 

© © CM © 

X X CM CO 



© 

CM 



© - 

© 

CO 


© 

IO 
CO 


© © © © 

© © © IO 
X © T X 


0018 


o © © © 

© ojo 

«10HH 


© 

-© 

rH 


© © 
© © 
I- © 


4700 


!I800 
KiOOO 

0200 
19000 


© 
© 
© 
f— ( 
jo 


t- OO iH 


© 

© 

JO 

CM 



so 

<; 
o 



2 
< 



CO 

co 

!> 

2 
3 

co 



cS 
O 

m 



•uaj\[ 



•jaquins^ 



co — 



© 

CO 
CM 



CM JO 



© © © © 

DHIOH 
CM CM t— * t— i 



© 



> 



•aguuuojQ 



■aaqrans^ 



© 
« 

JO 



© © © 
© — co 

"*< CM 



CM 



© © © 
© © © 
© JO © 
X © CO 
-T CO 



- © 

X CM 



X 

"CM 



X -* IO 
CO CM 



JO 
t~ 

CO 
CM 



© © 

JO 



— CM CM 
CM CM © 



© 

CM 



CO 
EH 

u 

PS 



3 

o 



■2 1 



s 



■jaqumv^ 



-- c 

g s 

= o 

> 5 
o £ 
- T 

n CM 



c3 
O 



E3 fl 
5 'J 

-e i 

-* cc 

^ — r. 



1 3 B-l 



s 

fO 

g 



jo A3 

u be 

" 2 



a, cs - a 

i s s - 

-'^r.r. 

i— CM CO -f 



^> gl 
o 3 S f 

" ~ -© J3 

^ x c -x 

t-h CM CO 



O 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— NEW BRUNSWICK 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



rH CM CO 


T 


rH CM CO rH 








14000 
13000 
3000 


© 
© 
© 
- 

CO 


© © © • 

© © m • 
1C © © • 

ffl«H • 


© 
in 

© 

T—t 




117500 


© © «o 

IQ ICS © 
CO CM 


lO 

© 
so 


© © CM 
CO O CO • 

rH 


CM 
rH 

CM 




m 
© 

CM 
CM 


© © © 
- © © 

io ia S 

<H5DO0 
<M rH 


© 
© 
© 


© © © © 
© © © © 
© © © © 

CO GO CM CO 
rH 


© 
© 

© 
© 
CM 


© 
© 
© 


© 
© 
rH 

CM 
X 
CO 


1 KiOOO 
05000 
24000 


205000 


© © © © 

© © c © 
© in © t- 

x © m co 

CM rH 


© 

© 
CM 
7 

m 


© 
© 

X 

rH 


© 
© 

X 
CM 
i— l 


© o © 
© © © 
ao ia t~ 

ICS i—l 


© 
© 

CO 


© © © © 

m © © rH 

© th CO CM 


© 
m 

rH 


© 
i— 1 


b- 

X 
X 
rH 


© © © 

o © © 
O X t 


© 
i— i 


© © © t>- 

CM © IQ © 
t- l>- CM 


CO 

t~ 
1— 1 


00 


o 
in 
© 


© © © 
© © © 

HOC 

© -r 54 

1—1 !— I 


© 
© 
i— t 

CO 
CO 


12000 

or 

4000 
2200 


© 
© 

t- 

CM 


© 
© 

CM 


137200 


-N © © 

© 00 © 
CO OS 


TP 

X 

© 
1—1 


m m © Tt< 

© t*— © CO 

CO CO CM 


rf 

© 


TP 


t- 

rH 
t- 
Hf< 


eo • 


CO 




• 




"t)< 

in 


00Q 


© 

© 
ICS 








© 
m 
o 

Tf 

© 


© 

(M . . 


© 

CM 








7 1 

CM 

in 

CM 


rH • 


T-H 








rt< 
?H 
CM 



as 
6 



o 

| g * 

9 O f 

| 5 I 

rH CM CO 



=5> 

g 

I 



CO 

'a 
o 



>> 

(H 

3 

as 

CO 

a 

es 

3 

O 
*j 
o 

e 

o 



o 
H 



a 



CD 

. - . 1 ■/. 

I Si 5 

~ X ±i g 
2 •£ 5 

JO = X - 

— 7 l CO — 



s 
s 

<3 



22—8 



116 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWAKD VII., A. 1902 



- 



1 IX! | 


1-H (M 




HCOWt 




r-i CM CO 




•sq[ '^nojx 


O O 
© P 

c © 

to 


r. 

s 

to 

iH 


© © © © 
© © © P 
© © © © 


© 
© 
© 

oc 

CN 


© © © © 
© c © © 
© © © © 
© CI to t- 
1— 1 


© 
o 
© 
© 

CO 


•sq[ '!)nqipH 






1000 
30000 
11000 
20000 


© 
r. 
© 

CI 

© 


1500 
2000 


© 
© 

to 

CO 


"sqj 'spanos '8>p3jj 






• © © © 

■ © © © 

■ ICS <N in 

■ 1— ' CJ 


© 
o 

CI 

CO 






• 4 a\d 'peiap 'ax^H 






© © © 

5 © © 

■ © CM to 
rllMH 


© 


© © ■ - 
© © - ■ 


CO 1 


'paup 'noopp-Bjj 










. o • ■ 

• to • ■ 
■ iH 


© 

*cs 
1-1 


°sjjq 'spunos 
pire s3u3uo + 'poQ 






© © © 

• cc co to 


© 

© 






•%iao 'paiJP 'P°0 


■ © 
• 


© 
i-l 


© © © © 
© t- © © 

to CJ © to 

CI co ©. i— 

CM 


© 

CM 
© 
b- 


© © © • 
© © to ■ 

© CM i-l • 
CM 


© 

to 

CO 
CM 






to 
CO 


© © to © 
:icxio 

r- 1 CM i-H i— 1 


to 
to 


© © 

ci to 

1-1 r-l 




= 

I- 

CM 


•sqj 'sireo 
UI p3A.I8S8.ld 'saa^sqcxj 


■ © 

■ © 

■ to 

• <M 

• CM 


o 
r 
© 

CM 


© © © © 

to C to © 
cm cn © 

T— t CO 00 CO 

T—i CO 


© 
CN 
© 

GO 
© 


© © 
© © 
© © 

CO © 
Tf to 




© 
© 

CO 
CO 
OS 



■spq 'p&tfBS q8.i8}puj\[ 








© © © © 1 

CM i— i-H — 




© © • • 

CO © • • 
1—1 • • 


© 

CO 

1—1 


•sqj 'IJS8IJ 'pjiMpuj^ 








2000 
15000 
1 1000 
15000 


© 
© 

© 
© 


© © © • 

c © © 

© © © ■ 

CI © i-i • 

© 

CO 


303000 


•sq{ 'payouts 'Suuaajj 


: : 

; ■ 






© • 
© • 

© • 

CO 








© 
© 

© 

CO 


© . . . 

© . . ■ 

CM • • • 


© 
© 
© 

CM 


■sqj 'qssjj 'Suiaaajj 


© 

■ © 

• © 

• © 

■ CO 


© 
© 
© 
© 

CO 


© © © © 
© © © © 
© © © © 
© © — © 
to to to -r 


© 
© 
© 

1—1 
© 

1-4 


13000 
10000 


© 
© 
© 

CO' 
CM 


•S[jq 'p8^p3S 'SUI.U9JJ 


• © 

• to 

• to 

■ r-> 


© 
to 
to 
H 


© © © © 

© © © © 
-r © © © 
to c © © 
i-i -f iH 


© 
© 


© © to 
© © CM • 
© © 
to CO 


to 

CN 

© 

00 


•sqj 'payouts 'uouqug 








© 
© 

to 






© 

to 




: : : 1 




•sqj 'streo 
Ul p8AJ3S9jd 'aomfeg 








© 
© 

CO 


• • © 

• • c 




© 
© 

CO 

© 

1— 1 










•sqj 'qsaaj 'uoiupjg 


50500 
147000 


© 
© 
to 
t- 

i-i 


© © © 
© © © 
to to © 
-r © to 

t— i— < CO 

CM 




© 
© 

© 

CI 
CO 


© = © © 
© © © © 
to © © © 
to CI © © 

CO © ©. X 


350500 



a 

CO 



03 



c ix 



.22 » js 

|g H 
: _^ 



' — > 



* 5 =%i 
i. — — "© 

- " - 

° ? s 3 
+= s §,« 
ir? 

5- r^- 

e3 



03 
O 



s 

>3 



3 

4 



• cu 

• > 

'■x 



•aaqiun^; 



I CM 



« ; r 4 

O 3 3 

^ ©- tC = 

/ _ — — 

33 e3 B Cs, 

i. - c .cr 

» 03 S J3 

i-( CM CO 



a> 
> 



. . o 

: 
; 

- 8 3 
!"«*> 

■ d * 



o 
H 



1; cs_© ; 



n CM CO 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS-NEW BRUNSWICK 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



r-i CO 10 




rH <M CO 




rH 




© o © 
oco 

N 01 i— 
CO CO CO 

rH 


o 

o 

00 

1— 1 


© © © © 
© © © © 

oioop 

O N ^ ?1 


O 

O 

1G 
CD 


© 

o 

00 


114000 



o 
© 

5C 
lO 



ic 



© © 
© © 

CO X 

CO T- 



© 

CO 
CO 



© © © 
© © © 

© 01 H 
CO 


© 

© 
CO 


© ■ 


© 

CM 




© 

CO 

© 


© 

p 
CO 
iH 






© 

•— • 

CI 
rH 








© 

CO 
rH 


OC 






00 
rH 




' 1 

: 1 : 


00 
t~ 


© © © 

Tt< © © 
© 1—1 1— 1 
1—1 


© 

OC 


© © • • 


© 

OS 


© 
© 

rH 


© 
© 

© 

00 


© © © 

to to 

CO rH 


© 

1Q 


© © © 

co 55 © • 
i— i i—i • 


1 1 

o 

1 CM 




© 

r^ 
rH 
■* 


© 5 © 

© © — ' 
T IS 3! 
© -f © 

CO rH 


© 
00 
i-i 


© © © • 

Ol © © 

© oc • 
© T 

-r co 

01 lO 


© 

01 
CO 

55 
t- 




© 
T 
H 

CO 

© 


© © © 

SO© 
HIOCQ 


© 


© © © 

© 01 rH • 

00 


1 © 

CO 

1 N 




© 

CO 

1*1 

r— 


C 


© © 
© © 
© © 
© & 


© 
© 
© 

© 


© © © 
© © © • 
© © © 

© M rH ■ 
CM 


© 
© 
© 

CO 
CM 




© 
© 
© 
© 

t- 








• 
• 

: 


© © © • 
© © © 
© © © • 
© © © 
i— © © 
CM © • 

"* : 


© 
© 
© 
© 
rH 
CM 
■* 


: 
: 


© 
© 

CV 
■* 
CM 
-rf 


© © © 

© £ © 

CO CO i-i 


© 
© 

© 
© 


© © © 
© © © 
© © © 

© © -* ■ 

to © 


© 

IC 
i— 1 


© 
© 
© 

CO 


© 
© 
© 

-r 


© © © 

lO. © © 

© © © 

IC 01 © 
1— I— 1 


© 

© 

CO 
CO 


© © © © 
© © © © 

rH 


© 
© 
i—< 

S 


© 
© 

CM 


CO 

© 
© 

rH 


CO 




© 










: 
* 


© 
© 

rH 


© 
© 

CO 




© 
© 

CO 












© 
© 
© 
© 
rH 


© 
© 

r. 

CO 




© 
© 

55 


© 
© 

01 

CM 


• © 
■ © 

• CO 


© 
© 
01 
IC 


© 
© 
© 

CO 


© 

© 

© 

Ol 

© 



HO 

I* 



■8 



.-©5 5; 
[3 go 

5£c3 



no 



o 



3 

S 

E 
o 



rt 



-c 

eS 

5 
o 

5 
- 



- — 

4> 



o 



■3 -g 
.£ t 



-i. - r. - 

rH CM CO -rf 



a 



118 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 







1-H IN 














J K >J . 


© 1-H 
I - i-H 

T}- |> 


. — 

— 


-f i.O •* © 

5P 00 IN 

i ~ i /. ~. 
OStM 
HtHf) 


1-H 


- TO © © © 

o © © 
© © ta t?i 


*o 

CO 




jl P »-3 W 
Ei ~ < so 

C < r J -1 


1 - 


00 


oo" 

X 

© 


CQt-Teo© 

CM © ©. O 

rtHH 


CO 

ta 




'juqmna 'sui^s juag 




: 
• 




© 






<E 

& 
o 
P 
C 


"s\l<\ 'dJllU'BUl SB tfiSI^J 


© = 

IN © 


© 

01 
<N 


© © © © 
© C © © 
© © © © 

1— rH 


© 
© 

e§ 


© © © ■ 
© © © ■ 
© © © • 

i-H ta oi 


© 
© 

© 

X 


o 
as 
Pm 

s 

CO 


■sjjq '}iuq su qsi 


© © 

1~H © 


© 


© © © © 

© ; — © © 

<N © © © 
rH X 01 t- 


g 
oi 

00 
rH 


© © © 
© © oq 
© © 
© 3 
i-H 


© 

© 

ta 

1-H 




■8[[«8 t jio qsi^ 


■ © 


© 

(M 


© © © © 
ir. © © © 
oi © oi © 

© (N l— 

1-H 


© 

(M 


© • 

© . . . 

Tj< • • • 


© 
© 




•SI.KI 
I I 

'qsq paxiut puB esa-eog 


© • 


© 

oo 


© © © © 
© © © © 

:-. ~> ta ta 


© 
© 

ta 

IN 


• © • 

■ © ■ ' 

•CO 


© 

© 
CO 




•spq 'piubg 






© © o © 
— © oi oi 
-* 


lO 

o 








•sqi 

'nsn 1SOJI JO POO UIOT 


© © 
© © 
© © 
© rj 

IN 


© 
© 

IN 


© © © © 
ooo<o 

N rH 


© 
© 
© 

i-H 
TP 


41000 

looooo 

1200000 
2000 


© 

" 1 

CO 

rt 1 




•sq[ 'sa8puuo{jj 


© © 
© © 
© © 
© 01 
CO 


g 

© 

eo 


© © © © 
— © © © 

©. © -f 

rn jq 


© 
© 

-P 


■ © 

• © - 

'. © . ■' 

• rH • • 


© 
© 


Fish. 


•sqaq 'sjw^sXq 






© © ■ 

© 

• i-H 


t — 

i-H 


55 ir: co ■ 


© 
© 
© 
© 

1-H 


O 

00 


•s^jq 'spg 


)- © 


© 


© © © © 
CI 1 © © 

co oi — 


© 

© 


in © ia © 

iliSINO 
CO 


© 


Q 

55 

M 

M 


•s[jq 'sure[Q 






i-H r? ^ 


© 
© 


© © © 
© © o ■ 

CO —1 


© 




•sqi 'ss'eg 






© © © © 


© 
© 


© © © © 
© © © © 
5 = 2 = 

1-H 


© 

© 

O 
Ol 




•sjjq 

'ti'eajads'BS jo sa.UAvapy 






. . © . 
■ © 

■ -CM • 


© 
— 

1-H 


© © © © 
© © © © 

i-H c<i tj< ac 


© 1 
1 1 




•sq! 's^arag 


© © 

z © 
t- © 

© IS 

B <M 
i-H 


© 

00 

o 


CCCO 
00 © 2 


© 
© 

HT 

© 
© 
1—1 


© © © 
c © © 

© © © 

OiOO ■ 
1- © r-. ■ 

1—C ■ 


§ 1 
| 

o 

CO 
CO 




•tqjq 'puq S 






■ -25 • 


© 

1C 


© © © © 

i— s © 


© 
ta 
© 

rH 



-3 

| 

e 

o 

I 

M 

o 

• I-H 

02 
Pi 

CD 

I 

•3 



GO 
O 

0) 

13 

C3 
hJ 

• rH 
— 

c 

c3 

o? 

CO 

-a 

H-3 

be 

'£ 

o 
-a 

09 

55 
OS 

H 
H 



03 
Eh 
O 

CS 



6 



s 
o 

.5% 



.2 « 

-- 

el 



■5 ~ 

- be 

4-3 1 

x - — x 

- — 

c '-h 

" 5 § - 

- 2 S S 

i) 3 - 1 



C 



"T c* "5 



s 

6 

§ 

5- 
g 



*3 



o 

"2 

e3 



O 



S s S I 

ac CT 2 — . 
I S S j, 
E* b B..E? 
<^ c5 c3 J= 



2-O-C J3 



•aaquin^ 



I <N 



i-H CM 00 



i— (M CO •<»• 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS-NEW BRUNSWICK 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



i-h cm co 




H Cl CC ^ 




rH 




1000 
^ in m 


© 

o 


© © © © 
© IM iH CO 
~f © © © 


© 
1Q 
CO 


in 

CO 

[ — 


© 

CO 


of t-Tio" 

IM H 


o" 
© 

m 


©~-r of ©~ 

CM IM © rH 
CO IM rH 


t~ 
t- 

©> 


©" 


OS 

© 
cm" 


GO ■ • 


00 


• • 00 • 


00 




M 


© © © 
© © © 

(M O (M 


© 
© 

© 

1— 1 


© © © • 
© © © ■ 
© © © • 
© © IM • 
CO r-l 


© 
- 
© 

IM 
■HH 




© 

00 
OS 


© © © 
C © © 
C OH 
N ^1 r-l 


© 
© 


© © © 
© © © • 
© l- © ■ 
© M CO 
0) i-i 


© 
© 

m 
in 

CO 




© 

CO 

© 
in 


© © © 
© © lS 
i-h i-H 


© 

in 

IM 
<M 


• © © 

• • © © 

• • i— 1 i—l 


© 
© 

IM 


© 
m 


© 

CO 

00 

IM 


o © © 
© © © 


© 
© 
© 
* 1 


8 : : : 

IO • • • 


© 
© 


© 


© 

CM 

m 
in 


© • • 




. . o • 

: ; m : 


© 
© 

m 




in 
© 


115000 
125000 
60000 


© 

© 
© 
© 
© 

CO 


15000 
10000 
10000 
3000 


1 

00 
CO 


© 
© 
© 
© 

CO 


© 
© 
© 

00 
rH 


24000 


© 
© 

■rfl 

IM 


■ • © ■ 

• • © 

• • © 

■ rH • 


© 
© 
© 

rH 




© 
© 
© 

rH 
i-H 


© © © 

f C<1 X 
HCO H 


© 
(M 
T 
© 


© © © • 
© © o ■ 

1C rH i—l • 
rH 


© 

m 
t~ 
i— i 




© 

IM 
© 
rH 


© © © 
iH © 




OOlQlO 
© Hf CO IM 


© 

CO 


© 

•<J< 


m 
© 

OS 


© © © 
-rr © © 
rH C © 

© 


© 

iH 

CO 
iH 


© © © 
© © m • 
© 1— 

CO 


© 
in 

rH 

CO 




© 
© 
r— 

CI 

IM 


19300 
1600 
1300 


© 
© 

IM 
IM 
(M 


© © o 
© © © 
© © © ■ 

rr M CM • 


© 
© 
© 

00 


© 

TP 


© 
© 

© 

00 

CO 


© © © 
cm © - 

CO T»< <M 

rJ 


© 


© © © • 

© CM © 
l£S rH W • 


© 

cm 

00 




© 

m 


© © © 
© © © 

© © © 
CO © © 
© iT. T 
CJOH 


© 
© 
© 

(M 
© 
© 
rH 


See • 
© © © • 
© © © • 

© LO oo - 

© T-H 


© 
© 
© 
© 

CO 

rH 


© 
© 
© 

IM 


© 

© 

© 
>* 

00 

i~ 


O • - 

o • • 
I— 1 • • 


m 
in 
i— < 


• • c © 

• • © © 
■ o o 

• • rH 


© 
© 
© 

CM 


© 
© 

<M 


m 
in 
© 



o 



3 



t-3 

. o 

§1 g 

~ Q tt 
JZ ~ - 

~ a 2 

■r 3 C 
ITU _ 



5 >> 



o 
H 



c3 



o 
C 
o 



-3 "3 
c 



o 
Eh 



eS 

-4H 

Q 

a 

c3 



I 



rH CI CO 



I g 6 
— C i :o — 



no 

»«o 



- 

c3 



eS 
o 

© 

§ 

© 

on 
o> 
TJ 
3 
o 
c 



120 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



RECAPITULATION 



Of the Yield and Value of the Fisheries in District No. 2, New Brunswick, for 

the Year 1900. 



Kinds of Fish. 


Quantity. 


T , ' 

rrice. 


IT 1 

V alue, 








$ cts. 






Lbs 


nnn OAA 

:izo,njo 


A OA 
U ZU 


1Q1 1 (\f\ 


ii preserved in cans 




1 A Oftft 

10, out) 


A 1 ."^ 

10 


1 !\Qft 


■ i HiYinlrpfi 




1 1 AA 


A OA 

zu 




T-TprritiO" ^nlt.pfl 


Brls 


i v£i aox 
1 / 1), UZO 


\ Art 
4 00 


i \Jt , i uw 


ii frpsh 


Lbs 


il'l AAA 

401.000 


A A1 
01 


4,t)JU 






1 ■)!•) ft ft ft 

4,1:42,000 


A AO 
UZ 


OA OA n 

o4, o4U 




Brls. 


1 A QA 


1 k aa 
10 00 






Lbs. 


770 AAA 

779,000 


A 1 O 

U 1Z 


QQ 4 Oft 

yo,4oll 






1 A*} A 1 IA 

l,9o!l, 140 


A OA 
ZO 


OOT QOQ 




Cwt. 


1 "I 1 A 

4, 110 


K AA 

O 00 




Cod 




Oft ' AA 

bO, i V)0 


4 Oi l 


QOQ I fin 




Brls. 


178 


10 00 


1,780 




Cwt. 


1,350 


3 00 


4,050 


Hake 




9,380 


2 25 


21,105 




Lbs. 


13,3(30 


50 


6,680 






71,100 


10 


7,110 


Trout 




114,000 


10 


11,400 


Shad 


Brls. 


4,or)5 


10 00 


40,550 




Lbs. 


7,849,700 


05 


392,485 




Brls. 


5,440 


4 00 


21,760 




Lbs. 


318,600 


10 


31,860 




Brls. 


22,790 


2 00 


45,580 


Eels 




1,965 


10 00 


19,650 






60,000 


05 


3,000 




.. Brls. 


19,240 


4 00 


76,960 




Lbs. 


114,000 


05 


5,700 






1,874,000 


05 


93,700 




Brls. 


975 


4 00 


3,900 






5,520 


2 00 


11,040 




Galls. 


28,370 


30 


8,511 




Brls. 


75,630 


1 50 


113,445 






98,720 


50 


49,360 






72 


1 25 


90 


Totals. 1000 








2,799,304 


n 1899 






2,595,024 
204,280 















FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— NEW BRUNSWICK 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



121 



RECAPITULATION 



Of the Number and Value of Vessels, Boats, Nets, Traps, &c., engaged in the Fisheries 

in District No. 2, New Brunswick, in the Year 1900. 



Material. 



214 fishing vessels (2,522 tons) 

4,717 " boats 

712,800 fathoms gill nets 

2 mackerel trap nets 

280 trawls 

350 bass nets 

2,205 smelt nets 

5,020 hand lines 



225 canneries . . . 
217,400 lobster traps. 



213 freezers and ice houses . 
473 hsh and smoke houses . 

53 piers and wharfs 

72 tugs and smacks 

794 smelt shanties 



Totals . 



Value. 



94,550 
137,2fi0 
382,100 
3,000 
1,300 
1,850 
117,500 
3,475 



115,460 
196,100 



59,550 
43,050 
19,150 
25,000 
11,910 



Total. 



741,035 
311,560 

158,660 
1,211,255 



122 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



CO 
O 

o 

••■ 1 
S-H 

CQ 



M 
o 

E-H 

03 
pq 



— 

60 
3 

c3 
« 

O} 

£ 

CM 

o 

3 

Ej 
c3 

-M O 

3 o 

c3 O 
3 i-i 

_ c« 

CV QJ 

c -S 

c3 

r w 
o O 



a3 O 



25 



03 

o 
oq 

C 



o 

03 
3 

> 



m 

p 

u 
pq 

55 



o 
_3 

'> 
O 
- 

Ph 



13 . 

- J? 

s>« 
a - 

o >r 
H P 

tT 
o 

a 

3 

0) 
J3 

C 

• FN 

O 

t/3 

!zi 
03 

H 
W 

P5 



o 

03 

C 



a; 
►J 

s 

o 
cs 

<! 

O 

o 
g 

£ 

93 



33 
Eh 

<! 
O 

PQ 

a 

< 

03 
►J 
63 

03 
oc 
K 

> 

£ 

03 



uaqum |sj 



•sqj 'qsaaj 'qoaa^ 



•sqj 'pa^oius 'Suu.iajj 



•spq 'pa^ps 'Suuaajj 



o 
S 
© 
3 
« 

CM 

"moo 

T i— I 1— i 



s 

CO 
CM 



in 

oo 

00 



o 
o 

w 



o 
o 
o 

© 

co 



c 
o 
5 

© 
co 

CM 



in 

00 
CO 



•sqj 'qsaaj 'uouquc; 



- - c c z. 


o 


o o o o o o 


© 


o 


O © Q C: O 


o 


© © © © © o 


© 


© 


CO to O CJ X 


© 


©TOO©© 


"H« 


© 


O JO O CO fc— 


in 


© -f cc © © © 


CO 


©. 


I— 1 ^H CO tH 


T— I 


CM t-H 


00 


as 




<M 






CM 



•aiqtJA 



© 

© 
CM 



•jaqums^ 



oo 

CM 



Z 

z 

CM 
O0 



CI 



H 



•arqv A 



© © © © © 
c : o o o 
© © CO CO 

CO »-H i— < 



© 

1Q 
CO 
t- 



uaqnin^ 



lC © O 1C iO 
01 © CO -s> HP 



— 



•3tqB A 



© • © © 

co • oo 

CO ■ CD © 

— ■ -r 



Cj 

a 

32 



•suioq^t;^ 



00 

CO CO 



© 
■ © 

• CO 



uaqum^ 



oo 



S l 



© 

oo 

CO 



CO 
IM 



?] 

00 



© 
1Q 
CO 



in 
— 



S 

CM 



© 

V. 
CO 
CM 



OC 
CM 



03 



•an[B A 



© c © © o 
o o © © o 

© CM © ~ © 

© co co m cc 

© CO Tf< 



© © © © in © 
- — r — t~ in. 

^f< CO CO hJ. 



1C 

?) 
r 
r 

CO 



in 

CI 

CM 
3C 
CI 
CO 



•sinoqiej 



© © © c © 
©©©=;© 

© CM © © © 

© co © m © 

© © Tt< 



- 
z 

C ] 

- 

CO 
CM 



© © © © © © 
© © © © © © 

© © © © o m 

X CO © rH 



© 

o 
o 



CI 

in 
in 
w 



•jaquin^ 



© CM © © O 

(M CO © m CM 



CI 
01 

I - 

CO 



© © o © m m 

© O i CO CM CM © 

© x -r ri 



© 



© 
X 

in 



•uaj\[ 



© © © © © 

© CO CM © X 
•HHH 



CO 
00 
OC 



© f © © © © 

© >— 01 f © © 
CO -f i— l CM 



CM 



si 
C 

PQ 



■an t B A 



© © © © © 
© © o © © 
oi x © in © 

© © © CM 



CO 
CM 



© m © © © © 
© © © © © o 

© — Ol T CO h*« 

atonei 



in 

in 

CO 



in 
o 



•jaqran^j 



o oo o m o 
co © co -r 

CM 



© © © © © 
O O © Ol CO © 
i-l CM i-H 



iO 

© 



•uaj\[ 



to © © 



•anpj A 



© © © 
o © © 
ceo 



•aiTiuuoj, 



•jaqiun^ 



03 
Eh 
O 
<-* 

(S 

H 

03 



s 
g 

-si 
o 



as 



s- 

S SH 

o S 

O ¥ 



in 
co 



© 
© 

co 



s 

S 



c 
H 



00 

o '-3 

2 « i- 
fi a s 



© © 
© © 

Tf 00 



© 



3 

CI 



8 



© 
c; 

ci 



CM 



© 



O 



c3 
O 

C 

e3 



be S ^ « 

•S § § s g.« 



•jaqumjj 



i-h cm co hj. o 



© 1^ Xl © © «-H 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— NEW BRUNSWICK 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

•jaqran^r 



tONXOOH 



■. o a 

EH < ^ 
> < 



© © © © m 

© © © in <N 

HOiOMH 
X © t~ © O 

©"©"-* tt"cO~ 
IS CO CM CM 1-1 



© © © © © © 
i-l ti X © © © 

© co m cm x © 
t— co co i-^oq^tp^ 

t>T so x* r-T co" in 

HH CM 



© 




© 


t- 


CO 


fc- 


X 




© 




CO 


l-T 




CO 




CO 



s 6 g 
^5 



— c 
z — 
z -r 

CO 



- 
© 



© 
: i 



© 

CO 



r. 



D 

E- 
W 

P3 



•spq 

'qsg paxira puB asieoQ 



© m © © © © 

1-i Tt< ?© © © 
i-l MHfl 



© 



so 



fe- 
ci 



"A 



c © © 
IOH • © 
CM i—l -CO 



SO 
© 



•^mo 'paup '3>CBJJ 



© © © © «a 

1^ © CM © X 

TT © © X © 



•saipp'eq ireu 
-uy pa^oiu's 'jpopp'ejj 



© 
© 
© 
© 

x 



_ 

z 

X 



•;mo 'paup 'jjooppuH 



in m © © in 

05MSO» 
© Tf co 
CM 



in 

© 



•sqj 'q saj J 'uoaSarqg 



'epq 'spunos 
put? sanSuo^ 'doq 



© 
© 
© 
© 



■:ja\o 'paup 'poQ 



x © © © © 

© X © © CM 

CM ~f CM i—l © 



'l[aq« ui qaajj 's.wjsqo^j 



© © © © © 

© © © CM © 

-r x cm m i— ' 

CM i-H i-l 



z 

00 

c 

X 



t- 



&3 



si u 



3 

o 



EC * 

etc 



o 
H 



A. I 



11 



. — X ^ 



to 



3 

"ec £ § M 2, 3 

.5 § S S §.2 



© 
© 

s 
© 

X 



o 
EH 



•j.Kpuns^ 



ih cm co m 



© t~X © © rH 



1C 

in 

EC 



•*suq 'sauipjBg 


in 
i - 




© 
© 
m 

CO 




3575 


:::::: 




|3575 


•spq 'spa 


CM 
rH 








© 

CM 
i-H 


© © © o o © 

O "*< C-5 CM i-l rH 


© 
© 
rH 


© 

X 
CM 


•sqj 'pja^oij 














© x © © cm o 

CM CM CO rH 


© 


~ 

O 
© 
rH 
















rH 


i—l 


•sqj 'ssvq 














© 

© 


© 
© 
© 
© 


© 
© 
© 


•sqj 'pa^otus 'saAmajy 


© 

. © 

m 
in 
© 

rH 








© 

in 
m 
© 

!—< 


© © © © © 
© © © © © 

i— 1 rH i—l CM rH 


© 
CO 


© 
© 

CO 

t~- 














rH 


•suq 

'nuaa'Bds'BS jo sa.uMajy 


© 

© 
1— I 








© 

© 
1—1 


© © © © © in 
© © © <n © cm 
tcont 

rH i— 1 


in 
© 

CO 


r- 

rr 
© 
© 


"ON '4 saj J 'P B HS 










■ 


600 
300 
400 

500 


© 
- 

X 
CO 


© 
© 

X 
CO 


•sun l pT?qg 


© 

m 


m • 

CM ■ 




© 

© 


© © m © © o 

© S © © CO CM 

ft- TT 


- 
© 

i-H 


© 
© 

CM 
CM 


•sqi 'jnojx 














© © o © © © 
©©©©©© 
©©©©©© 

CXHOOiO 
CM CO i—i CM 


© 
© 
© 


© 
© 
© 
© 

rH 



© 
© 



in 
© 
© 



© 
© 
© 
© 
x 

© 
© 



z 



x 
© 
© 



© 
x 
© 



cS 
■1J 

o 
c 

ai 



124 



MARINE AXD FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



RECAPITULATION 



Of the Yield and Value 
the Year 1900. 



of the Fisheries in District No. 3, New Brunswick, for 



Kinds of "Fish. 



Salmon, fresh Lbs. 

Herring, salted Brls. 

M smoked Lbs. 

White perch " 

Lobsters, fresh or alive Cwt. 

Cod . . . . \ 

Tongues and sounds Brls. 

Sturgeon Lbs. 

Haddock..... Cwt. 

Finnan haddies. Lbs. 

Hake , Cwt. 

Pollock " 

Trout Lbs. 

Shad Brls. 

Shad, fresh No. 

Alewives Brls. 

Smoked alewives Lbs. 

Bass, sea Lbs. 

Pickerel h 

Eels. Brls. 

Sardines » 

Caviare Kegs. 

Coarse fish Brls. 

Bait , 

Oil Galls. 




Value. 



299,000 
1,385 
230,000 
30,000 
6,080 
1,098 
5 

10,000 
4,695 
780,000 
7,965 
r.tio 
100,600 
2,290 
3,800 
19,941 
173,900 
9,000 
141,000 
280 
3,575 
5 
655 
3,400 
200 



$ cts. 

20 

4 00 
02 
05 

5 00 
4 00 

10 00 
07 

3 00 
06 
2 25 
2 00 
10 

10 00 
10 

4 00 
02 
10 

05 
10 00 

1 50 
35 00 

2 00 

3 00 
30 



$ cts. 

59,800 00 
5,540 00 
4,600 00 
1,500 00 
30,400 00 
4,392 00 
50 00 
700 00 
14,085 00 
46,800 00 
17,921 25 
1,320 00 
10,060 00 
22,900 00 
380 00 
79,764 00 
3,478 00 
900 00 
7,050 00 
2,800 00 
5,362 50 
175 00 
1,310 00 
10.200 00 
60 00 

331,547 75 



RECAPITULATION 

Of Number and Value of Vessels, Boats, Nets, &c, engaged in the Fisheries in 
District No. 3, New Brunswick, for the Year 1900. 



Materials. 




9 fishing vessels (206 tons 

1,100 ., boats 

355,200 fathoms gill nets 

28 seines (2,380 fathoms) . 

245 trawls 

42 weirs 

156 canoes 

10,000 lobster traps 

59 ice houses 

107 smoke houses 

73 piers and wharfs 

8 steamers and smacks . . 



4, 
11, 
328 
6, 

18, 
1, 
10, 



$ cts, 

700 00 
955 00 
225 00 
120 00 
35(1 no 
200 00 
560 00 
000 00 



8 
43 
39, 

4. 



600 00 
600 00 
100 00 
000 00 



513.410 00 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— NEW BRUNSWICK 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



- 

Is 



SB 

a 

rd 

tn 

«rH 



w C75 
05 r- 1 

e8 

• rH 

hJ 

s O 

?1 



a 



S3 

rH 



cspq 

o © 

cqjz; 
To 

c3 



r2 g 

05 .3 

00 o 

> Ph 

© rQ 

0) - 

■ ■ • <-* 

t> £> 

Hp 

fl rS 

a 

CP ^H 

c 5 
e S 

O co 

§3 S 

-2 -8 

S ri 

- .a 

0) 

rG 

43 



-3 

CP 
CO 

S3 



.5 £ 

O 

-a 

CO 

o 

M 

H 
< 

1-3 

D 
Eh 
>— i 
ft. 

•< 
O 

w 



H « K i" O C N K CT. C H w w •« 



J 

■< 

r- 

S5 
W 

2 



« 

o 

55 

a 

32 



CO 

"S 



•siuoq're i? £ 



0) 



Weirs. 


•aiqu A 












18200 








© 

rH 

t— 
lO 
CC 
rH 


© 
rH 

© 
CO 
00 
rH 


•jaqum\r 












• CM • 








<M 
CO 


-r 

CO 

-* 


Trawls. 






o © 

© CO 


• © 

• lO • 

• CO • • • • 

. . . . . 




■H< 

CO 
C5 
JO 


14614 


•jaqran^[ 




© © 

r- • t- 

CM • 


. m . . 

CM • • 






CO 
CM 
© 


1148 



CO 
JO 
CM 
CO 



© 

in 



CM 
0-5 



© © © © © © © © © © © jo © © 

©©©©©©©©©©©I^Of 
in S © © © © CM © IS JO © CM t~ t~ 

© CM t~ © © rH © CO © ~f t~ 

CN CM JO -T CM X 7-1 t-i 
rH rH CM 



© 

OC 



•suioq^'Bj 



©©©©©©©©©©©© ©© 

© © © © © © © © © © © © © CM 

niseofixnoccooiote 

©OOCOIOOOrHOOOt— COCO rH rH 
CM CO X © IS X rH CM rH CM 
CM r- CM CM 



© 

CM 
© 
© 

x 
© 



•aaqum^ 



t~©©©©©(M©©©©©XCO 
© © CM © © i-i CM © © © © CM t— 
rH © rH © O t~ © © t CM t~ 
© CM CO rH CO 



jo 
o 

7 1 



CC 

< 
O 



!z; 
<! 

to 

W 



g 

a 

to 



oooct.xc;;t;cc:f 

IO O CO O CO X © rH CM ~f © © © 
Kr-Cl-I- CC CO -f r- CM 

KHr-H i— 



m 
jo 



O 



©©©c©©©©io©©©©t— 
cocccooooooooocc 

t HOMh X © CO rH CM 00 

m CM CO CM <M t - 



CM 

in 
I- 
I- 
in 

C I 



•jaqcnn^ 



©in©-1"Tj<'r)<CO©l % -©©©©CO 

co in i~ cc t~ -f o c © cm co © co 

CM I- © © © •>3< r- 01 r- CM 



© 
in 
© 



CO 

> 



co 
g 

c 
o 



2 a, - 



O 03 
v r CU 

cc 

C.r5 



4J S 



— 

s 





in © © co • 

01 CM 


in ■ 

CO • 


CN 


in 

X 
CM 


1080 


■enrBA 


500 
00500 
3050 
500 


• © • 

• © • 
m ■ 

• CO • 


© © • ■ - 
© © • ■ • 

-r x • • 


.35850 


§ 
i— 

in 

CO 

rH 


•aSruuox 


X iCC © c 
CM © ~. 1 

CO 
CM 


© 

• rH 


© © 

CM ■* 


© 

CO 
CO 
rH 


00 

in 
© 

T 


•joqmrijfj 


T-i & T-i 
© 

CN 




r— r— 


© 


© 

o 

CM 



o 

F-H 



•t. ■ _ 

it CD . 



■'-1 



■iaqtan^i 



I-HMeO^lO^t^OOOOrHCMCO -T 



126 



MARINE A1SID FISHERIES 



■a 

rG~ 

CO 

•s 

O 

CD 
J3 

"cS 

l> 

e 



c3 
3 

c 

-T3 
S3 
c3 

co 

(B ^ 

O <u 

pq § 

CO 

CD 2 
Is g 

CD 

CO 

C 

d 
o 
H 

tT 

CD 

a 

3 

125 

CD 

CJO 

a 

'$ 

o 

CO 

O 

•— * 

H 
<j 

H 

< 

Pmj 
■< 
O 

w 



CO 



W 

oc 

65 



63 
to 
& 

CO 

w 
Pi 
t> 
Eh 
X! 

s 

Eh 
O 



65 
< 
hi 

PM 

P3 
63 
Eh 

co 
m 
o 



Pi 

<: 
w 

o 

65 



SB ^ 

co <! 

Pi 

O 



•.wqmn^j 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



cu 

B 
B 

o 



o o © o © 

© © © 50 5 
© lO © OC lO 
HHlOWOO 
lO i-H i— I CM 



CM t~ © tO lC 
OHIO* 



b 



C 

c3 

a 



•anruA 



• O O lO O 

■ © CI 00 © 

• © co 

■ CM 



• © © © © 

■ © © 00 T 

• CO CO i-H CM 

• CO i-l 



-t-> 

£ 
co 



© © © © © 

lO © © © lO 
H^XOH 
© OS I^O © 
r-H lOKH 



•jaqum^ 



■f Tp © lO CM 
© © © rH 
i-H <M CO © <M 



CO 
63 
ih 
Eh 
65 
1= 
O 

o 



B 



P Sh5 



s 

CIS 



B 
J3 





•anpj A 


© © © © © 
© © © © © 
m »h © © © © 

CO H CO l- CN 
CD i-H TP iO 


• © 

■ © 

• © 

• © 

■ i-H 






• © 

• 1-H 

•© 

• © 

• 1-H 


© 

i-H 
L - 

CM 
CM 
CM 


ED 
ft 














Tra 


•jaqum^j 


4100 

85300 
15300 
52700 
00000 


10000 






19461 


246861 



Tugs, 
Steamers 

and 
Smacks. 


•3iH«A 


© © © © © 
© © © © © 

9& lO O © © © 
CO O © 00 CM 


o • ■ 
o • 

© • • 

TP • • 




- © 

• © 

• CO 

• CM 

• rH 


41300 


■aaquinjsj 


Tp in CO CO CM 

TP rH 


CO ■ • 




TP 

• CM 


© 

rH 


Pier 8 
and 
Wharfs. 


■9nreA 


~ © 

© © 
CM © 
© 
rH 


750 
8200 


39100 


38740 


06696 


* I AO TTU1 VT 


7-H TP 
1-H 


© oo 

CM i-H 


so . , 
I- • • 




• t- 

• CM 

• CM 


CO 

m 

CO 


Smoke 
and Fish 
Houses. 


*aii it \ 


©©©©©©©©©©© 
O C O O « O UO 3 O O ■ 
g£ O-PlOCCCO © © © CO I— ■ 
CO CM CO 00 © i-H 
HH TP 


' ' 140400 


227110 


•jaquin^j 


COt-©t~lOTH©eO©©iO 
rH CO (M 51 © 1-H CM 
1-H i-H rH 


"755 


1338 


Freezers 
and Ice 
Houses. 


•anp3 A 


©©©©© •©©©©© 

© © © m © © © © o o 

© C75 IO © IC ■ O H LO CH- 
© IO -P rH ■ © rH 
rH i-H CM 


• © 
■ 

• © 

• in 


73800 


uaquni 


lO © rH © IO • © C32 © lO m 
rH lO 'O H 1 - CO rH 


: x 1 g 
: | « 


•paAojd 
-uia spui?i[ jo jaqumj^ 


CM © © © © • ' 
CO TP © iO • • • 

CO © t— 
rH i-H rH ■ • • 




• CM 

• TP 
■ IO 


© 

TP 
Tp 

O 



s 



-H 

TP 



r- 

co 

CM 



in 

TP 



CM 
© 
lO 
© 



CM 



co 

CM 
CM 



cS 

TH 
O 

Eh 



CD 

h o 



•jaqum^i 



ZC ^ PI 
B TH S 

bug 2 •i='e'o-. < "B3 ■ -5 3 

II § gS| ; b « a g-g.l * 

rHCMCO-*m©t^X©©i-HCMCOTp 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS-NEW BRUNSWICK 



IONAL PAPER No. 22 

•jequmjj 



I 



O 



•sqj 'qsaij 'uotuj^g 



■sqj '4nqiiBH 




© © © 

© m © 
cm co in 
c© 














20000 


91100 


•;avo '^oohoj 












© 
© 










■* 

X 

• X 

• X 

• l-H 


in 

OS 

T-i 


•sqj 'sptmos 'a>[ujj 




© 
© 

CN 

CO 


3 

in 
















• CN 

• in 

■ CN 

• CO 

• l-H 


CN 

^H 

© 
© 

CN 


•^a\o 'paup 'e^'cjj 




© © © © 

© © © 01 

CO CO 


m 
© 












lO 
© 
© 
CN 


© 

in 

CO 

© 

CN 


'satppi3i{ uuuug pajjouig 










© 

© 

© 

X 
1 - 












© 

CO 
X 


© 
© 
© 

CO 

X 


•^a\o 'paup 'j(0OppT3J£ 






© © 
in © 

i-l CN 




i " 

© 
© 












CO 

© 
© 

7—1 


X 

© 

l-H 


■sqj 'qsajj '^ooppufj 


























© 
© 
© 

i-H 
1 - 


§ 

© 

i-H 

in 


•sj.iq 'spunos 
pue sanSuoj 'poQ 




© 
© 
1—1 


X 

^h 


















CO 
X 

l-H 


*^a\d 'paup 'poQ 


©©©©OCX 

-c* t-- o "i* © e © 
h cn co » i-h © 
-fin -h 










© 

CO 
•CO 


© 

i-H 

O 
CO 


'[jaijs in ijsa.ij 'saa^sqoq; 


mo©©© 

WCt-lQO 
CM © CN •<}• IQ 
IM 


© 

X 

© 

CD 












© 

CO 

m 


© 

CN 

© 


•sqj 'suuo 
at paAaasaad 'saa^sqo'j 


22600 
618020 

1)3600 
418600 
786320 
















CN , CN 

in 1 © 
o ; © 

© X 
© 1 CO 

© 

CN 


•sjjq 'paiircs 'raaaMOBTvr 




© © © © 

X CO © CO 
l-H OS CN 


















© 
CO 

i-H 


•sqi 'qsaaj '[aaajp'ej^ 




© © © © 

© c © © 

© © © © 

© CO CO 
"f © © CM 
CO •* 
















© 
© 
© 


© 
© 
© 
© 

X 


•sqj 'pajjouis 'Jknuajj 




© © 
© © 
© © 

© CN 
CO 


© 
o 
© 
© 

l-H 

CN 

-CK 


© 
© 
© 
© 
CO 
CN 












- 
© 

© 

l-H 

CN 


© 
© 
© 
© 

CO 
CO 


•sqj 'qsajj 'Simjajj 


©©©©©© 
© © o © © © 
poo©©© 
© t-i co © Tt< co 
co © cn © m 

i-l l-H 














3262500 
3723500 


*S[iq 'pa^us 'Suu.iajj 


©©me©©©© 
IO o « o o c o o 

i-i Tf< X CO © 
t- CO o 










© 

X 
CO 
CO 


CO 

© 
© 

l-H 
X 
l-H 


•sqi 'pa^oras 'aotujBg 




© 
© 
in 


© . . . 
© • • • 

-5 . . . 












s 

i-H 
l-H 


•sq[ 'strco 
ui paAaesajd 'uouq'Bg 




© 
© 

CO 

© 


© • 

o • ■ • ■ 

CO ■ • • • 












© 
© 

co 
© 

i-H 



©©©©©©©©©©©©©© 
©©©©©©©©©©©©©m 
m©m©cN©©©-f©e©©x 
t~©©©ocoin©"»<co©©©co 

© CN in CN i-H CN if i-H 

i-H CO CO CN 



© 
71 



co 
a 

S 

55 

o 
U 



•aaqiiin^ 



.= _ 

OJ 

1 - 



T3 

: c 
: cs 
<— • 
• ti 



o 



o a; 



7 r — 1' r 



_ s S 5 S 



O 



128 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



s 

8 
© 



M 

o 

• l-H 

02 

B 
m 

S5 



•a 

CO 

•iH 



CD 
> 

a 

c3 

Oh, 

— 

<y 

CD 

h=5 

c 

• rH 

o 

O 

l-H 

■< 

J 

P 

H 

hH 

Ph 

«i 

o 
H 



•jaqum\; 



r- 1 i-h ,— I r-4 — 



p 

< i 

EH 



o 



"oooooomooooooio 
o © © © © © t- © © © © © © co 

HtlOOCSOtriTfcCOOOO 
(J5 H N O * ffl Ct W lO N X O Si 
rH i-H^CO O CO N t N CO CO H X 'O X 

t>T cc -f iri" t-T so erf t-^ co" x" r-T co" in" oo" 

00 CC CO © t- OHH CM CO 
© O ift © ON CO 



so 



p 

n 



•s t .iq 

'nBaaadsuS jo sa.\iAvajy 



•sqj 'spaing 



■ Sl jq 'p-eqg 



CXOlOOfCMlO^WNHH 

© "«< T* CO l-H 



• © © © © © © © 

■ © c © © © © © 
■©©©©©©© 

• © 00 © © CM lO O 

• CM CM CO TH rH 



© © © © © • © 

© © © © © • © 

© © Ol © TJ1 • © 

00 © CM 00 ■ OS 

co m im 
cm 



© © © © CO©©©©©10© 

© © CM CM • L— © © © 1Q C5 (M O 

CM in © O0 -f HH CO CM CM 

rH rH i-H -CO HH 



© © © © C © 
© 5 © © © © 
t- © © © © © 

»-h -r © cm © ti 

x © in © co 
m © co co h 

l-H CO' H rH 



© 

CM 
Hfi 
t- 

co 

CO" 



•jaquinu 'sui>[s j«ag 


• CO 00 GO ■ 

m ■ • 


















•spq 'ajniTBiu SB qsijj 


'©©©©© 

CM © © © © • 

cm © © m © • 

00 00 © CM • 
CO r-l 














© 

CO 
o 

CM 


© 
© 
CO 
l-H 

© 


•s[jq 'uruq si; qsja 


410 
18200 
15020 
6500 
35500 

3400 












CO 

© 


88823 


•S{[eS '[to qsij 


© © © © © © © 
cm m © in © in © 

-f f CM CM CM 

m cm 

CM 












© 

CO 

z 

in 

CM 


© 

CO 

© 

CO 

in 


■spq 

'qsi) paxuu puB asjBOQ 


o © © © © © 
X © Z OJ © O 

in co © m 

CM CM 


© in 
th -cr 
i— i 


CO © 
i-H i— 


© © 

~ CM 

CM 


m 
© 

T— 1 


•spq 'pmbg 


• m • © © • 

■ lO -CM © • 

• • IC • 














© 
CM 
r-l 


-r 

© 

rH 

rH 


•sq[ 

'qsij ^so.ij 10 poo uio^ 


22000 
141000 
1343000 
300000 
38000 
30000 














© 
© 

in 

CO 


1877500 


•sqi 's.iapunojj; 


32000 
47000 
10000 
24000 
1000 
















— 

tH 
I— 1 


© 
© 
© 
in 

CM 


•spq 'sraiqQ 




6050 
450 
13140 
3150 
















m 
in 

CO 
-H 


27445 


•s[aq 'sio^s^q 




1070 
10000 
6420 
1750 


















19240 


■sjjq 'sauipxcg 










m 
t~ 
in 

CO 










l-H 
H* 

m 

© 
++ 


CO 
rH 
rH 

© 
i — 



in 
-r 

CM 
CM 



c 
— 



© 
© 
i - 

CM 
CO 



CO 
CO 

m 

CM 



© 
i- 
© 

CO 
© 
X 

c- 



• ©cin©©©©©m©©in • im 

• moin©©cM©m©©cocM • I t 

©rH©CM©-*l^ -J< • I CO 

rH 01 ■ I © 



©©©©©© 

© o © © © © 
© © © m in © 
co co © x © oo 

rH CM CO r-l rH 



50 

H 

rH 

fH 

z 
& 
o 
O 



cc 

O cv • 

c: -in 



. s 

-in -H> 



© © © © © © © 
© © © O © © © 
© © CO © © © © 
CXHOOIOX 
CM CO rH CM rH 



© 
© 

CM 
CO 
CM 



Z O 



"be cj 
a 



C !s s- o =3 

3 O t3fr-lHa 



cS 

o 



•aaqum^j 



rHCMCO-C»mCOt~X©©rHCMCO^f 



© 
© 
© 

©" 
rH 

X 



a 

eg 

© 
© 
© 

©" 
© 
4- 



CJ 



T3 
CD 
hV! 

o 



© 
© 
in 

m" 
© 



CD 
eg 



O 



to 

CO 



CD 
> 

a 

eg 

c 

o 

OJ 

be 



02 



© 
© 
© 



T3 

eg 



O 
r5 



h3 
cj 

OJ 



© 
© 
© 

©" 
CO 

T3 

eg 



O 
r^ 

c 



H 
H 
O 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— NEW BRUNSWICK 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



129 



RECAPITULATION 

Of the Yield and Value of the Fisheries of the whole Province of New Brunswick, 

for the Year 1900. 



Kinds of Fish. 



Cod, dried Cwt. 

Cod tongues and sounds Brls. 

Haddock, dried Cwt. 

ii fresh Lbs. 

n smoked (finnan haddies) n 

Hake, dried Cwt. 

ii sounds Lbs. 

Pollock Cwt. 

Tom cod or frost fish Lbs. 

Halibut ii 

Flounders „ 

Salmon, fresh n 

n preserved in cans 

ii smoked T 

Trout, fresh i 

Smelts ii 

Herring, salted Brls. 

M fresh Lbs. 

ii smoked n 

ii kippered, cans « 

Sardines Brls. 

n preserved in Cans 

Shad Brls. 

Ale wives 

Eels , n 

Perch Lbs. 

Pickerel i 

Sea Bass n 

Mackerel, fresh 

ii salted Brls. 

Sturgeon Lbs. 

n caviare Kegs 

Oysters Brls. 

. Clams ii 

ii preserved Cans 

Scallops Lbs. 

Squid Brls. 

Lobsters, preserved in cans Lbs. 

M fresh in shell. Cwt. 

Coarse and mixed fish Brls. 

Fish as bait m 

Fish as manure . n 

Fish oil Galls. 

Dulse .Lbs. 

Seal skins No. 



Quantity. 



Price. 



85,947 
183 

7,108 
571,900 
866,(500 

29,350 
26,612 

19,544 
1,877,500 
91,100 
125,900 
1,223,650 
10,600 
1,100 

232,600 
7,863,050 

181,696 
3,723,500 
6,639,000 

228,200 

101,116 
1,870,000 

6,383 
26,500 
2,245 
30,000 
146,000 
327,600 
786,000 
1,430 

10,000 

5 

19,240 
27,445 
60,520 

31,300 
1,104 
2,038,692 
19,729 

6,195 
88,823 
101,300 
53,030 
99,500 
77 



Total for the year 1900. 

, 1899. 



ii it 



Decrease . 



cts. 

4 00 
10 00 

3 00 
03 
06 

2 25 
50 

2 00 
05 
10 
05 
20 
15 
20 

10 
05 

4 00 
01 
02 
10 



Value. 



$ cts. 

343,788 00 
1,830 00 



Total Value. 



21,324 00 
17,157 00 
52,140 00 



66,037 50 
13,306 00 



244,730 00 
1,590 00 
220 00 



726,784 00 
37,235 00 

132,780 00 
22,820 00 





200,444 50 
93,500 00 


05 


10 00 




4 00 




10 00 
05 




05 
10 




12 
15 00 


94,320 00 
21,450 00 


07 

35 00 


700 00 
175 00 


4 00 






56,739 00 
6,052 00 


10 


15 




4 00 




20 
5 00 


407,738 40 
98,645 00 


2 00 




1 50 




50 




30 




06 





cts. 



345,618 00 



90,621 00 



79,34.> 50 
39,088 00 
93,875 00 
9,llo 00 
6,295 00 



246,540 00 
23,260 00 
393,152 50 



919,619 00 



293,944 50 
63,830 00 
106,002 00 
22,450 00 
1,500 00 
7,300 00 
32,760. Oa 



115,770 00 



875 00 
76,960 00 



62,791 00 
4,695 00 
4,416 00 



506,383 40 
12,390 00 

138,334 50 
50,650 00 
10,089 00 
5,970 (JO 

no oo 

3,769,742 40 
4,119,891 20 



350,148 80 



22—9 



130 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



RECAPITULATION 



Of the Fishing Vessels, Boats, Nets, and other Materials used in the whole Province 

of New Brunswick, for the Year 1900. 



Articles. 



299 fishing vessels (4,058 tons) 

7,050 fishing boats 

1,089,G20 fathoms of gill nets 

14,561 n seines 

2 trap nets .... 

2,231 smelt nets 

350 bass nets 

434 weirs ... 

1,148 trawls 

6,562 hand lines 



237 lobster canneries 
246,861 ii traps 



5 sardine canneries . 

12 other fish preserving establishments 

1 guano factory 

40 fish presses 

280 freezers and ice houses 

1,338 smoke and fish houses 

353 fishing piers and wharfs 

104 tugs and. smacks 

156 fishing canoes , 

70 scows for weirs 

70 pile drivers 

794 smelt shanties 



Tnt.al 




$ CtS. 

135,100 00 
257,752 00 
718.074 00 
32,535 00 

3,000 00 
117.752 00 

1,850 00 
183,910 00 
14,614 00 

4,560 00 



144,460 00 
222,710 00 



41,000 00 
13,600 00 
5,000 00 
3,000 00 
73,800 00 
227,110 00 
96,990 00 
41,300 00 
1,560 00 
4,000 00 
5,500 00 
11,910 00 



Total. 



$ cts. 



1,469,147 00 
367,170 00 



524,770 00 



2,361,087 00 



Number of Persons Employed in the New Brunswick Fisheries : — 

Men employed in fishing vessels. ... 1,080 

M ii ii boats 11,559 

Persons n lobster canneries 5,440 



Total 18,079 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS-PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



131 



APPENDIX No. 5- 

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND. 

REPORT ON THE FISHERIES OF PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND FOR THE 
YEAR 1900, BY INSPECTOR J. A. MATHESON. 



Charlottetown, P.E.I., January 2, 1901. 

To the Dominion Commissioner of Fisheries, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit my report of the fisheries of this province for 
the year 1900, together with a synopsis of the reports of the overseers, the statistical 
tables, and the usual comparative statements. 

The returns show an increase in the value of fish taken last year of $15,551. 

Total for 1899 , . $1,043,646 

" 19C0 1,059,197 

LOBSTERS. 

I regret having to report a decrease in the catch of lobsters. Although the number 
of traps and factories has increased, the pack has run short to the extent of nearly 
850,000. 

On the south side the fish were satisfactory in size, but on the north, they were not 
only scarce, but small. 

HERRING. 

This fish was quite plentiful, and sufficient quantities were secured for bait. 

COD. 

Cod fishing commenced about May 20, and large quantities of good sized fish 
were taken with trawls. 

Fishermen at Nail Pond and at Skinner's Pond derived a great advantage over other 
sections in being able to procure bait from cold storage, a freezer having been erected 
in that locality, which is highly appreciated by the fishermen. The heavy storm on 
September 12, when several Caraquet boats and crews were lost off Tignish, broke up 
the fall fishing, otherwise the catch would have been much larger. 

MACKEREL. 

I am pleased to report that this fish has apparently returned to this coast, after an 
almost complete absence for several years. Large schools appeared about July 20, and 
remained about two weeks, during which time some good catches were made. Fisher- 
men are looking forward to a recurrence of the large catches of former times. 

22—9^ 



132 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



OYSTERS 

This fishing was about an average one in Prince County. It now looks as if, under 
proper protection, the catch can be maintained in Richmond Bay which contains the 
principal beds. As anticipated in last year's report, the placing of special guardians at 
the different landings in Prince County for preventing the landing of undersized fish 
has had very beneficial results. In Queen's County, the catch has fallen off about 33 
per cent in the last year. I would recommend that North and West Rivers be closed 
for a year or two. 

Smelt fishing was not quite as good as usual. 

Trout fishing was well up to the average. 

OVERSEERS' REPORTS. 

Overseer Davison, of Prince County, reports an increase in herring, cod, eels and 
mackei'el, the latter especially being more plentiful than for several years. He attributes 
the increase in cod to the fact that fishermen were enabled to procure bait from the 
freezers. In this county the decrease in the lobster catch was due to overfishing. 
Eighty-five per cent of the total catch was exported to Ontario, United States and even 
to Europe, and the remainder was used for home consumption. 

Overseer James A. McCormack, of King's County, reports a decrease in the lobster 
catch on the north side. This he attributes to the prevailing north winds which pre- 
vented the boats from fishing. Herring was n3t fished for with the usual vigour, owing 
to the lack of demand occasioned through vessels not seeking bait as in former years. 
Lobster-packers are well satisfied with the present opening season and wish the regula- 
tions strictly enforced. 

I have the honour, to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

J. A. MATHESON, 

Inspector of Fisheries. 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



H W « Tf c t- X C C H M X t c c s /. 



X 

£ 

o 

03 



X 

c 



CD 



•sqj 'qsai J 



cos 

• © O -T 

• O ~. M 
X — 

• rf" CO 



_g 

'— 
- 

CO 



- = 3 
■ i- or 
• i-l co 











© 


o 
o 

CO 


"Sqj 'SUT3D 


o«;ioor.iia ■ 
t - Tl c-i t> r T 1 .* 


-TOO 

w:it 

XHO 

re ro i— i 
i - :-. T I 


■ 50 I 4 

■ - 1 

• — co 

■ CO *T 

• tO r- 

i-l 


1007400 


ca 

C5 
"* 

s 


•sqjq 'p«H*g 


ni-Nxt o :i 

OOf TH • lO -10 


c r — 

(M !M 


IS »o 


CO 

CD 


© 

f 

IN 



- 



CO 
X 



z 



<M 
i — 
CO 



- ; 

: /- 

C CO 



c - 



(M 



oou-co — ooooxoo 
,-. c ~ i - ■ ~. i - - z s - z 

O lO lO CO XXO CN IM 





e o 
© = 




O 
© 
L — 






© 
© 
CO 


© 
.-. 

IM 




c : 

in t- 
i— co 

1— 




© 

o 
m 






© 

CM 

H 


2 


•aaqiunx 


iH CO 










1— 1 





CO 



to 

o 

X 



P3 



as 



0) 

5? 



■3iqT3 A 



or-.'- c '- o <~ - c 
r-xxoxNr-c 
©t^cocot :iri: 



•sraoqjuj; 



ocoooL-jrooo 
oacNxxcTO 

i— — CO CO r-l IM 



•aaqum\; 



c ?i n x a o e e o 

O /t-XMTXHO 

IM r— 1— I — 



ic 

CO 



IM 



Nl-.00"fSOO 

oo © c> im 



i - 

~ 

ao 



cioooooon 

© X O O © CO © t- 
CN CO IM IM © i-l 
CO i— I i— i i— I 



-r go o © c 01 

i-l GO CO O — ~ to 



© 
t- 
— 



C 
- 



<; 

- 

pa 

05 
X 



a 

05 



■-occ.HOXxoesoc : — 1 ~ ~ 1 
-riXi'Ofi-NOS £- co im cm t-> t~~ oo 

NH i-H i-l CO i— CM i-lM 



IM 
— 

M 



i - 
i - 

— 

CO 



N'*t-OHNM'*00'l"0»OOOCiC 
O •© ICi © -T CN SN i-l G> OC i— r- rH n CO -t" 



© 

o 

(M 



•aihmnox 



•jaqiun^ 



x 
b 

H 

ca 

Q 



S § to o 



+3 

= 7, 



— g 



>.© 

- z. 



- ■ - - -- 

i- M 



■|~ to! I £ ^-^- 5 S 



„ — - 

- ' !2 

•a % "oo _ 
.° e i< B 
(— I— d o 



co 
oq 



CO 



" 1-H CI f CO " I S - I - X 3! O 1-1 :m 



CO rn > 
i O (9 



*? z. 

-i c eh 



o 

EH 



la 




r. 








© 




IM 





X 



184 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



"3 

g 

s 



c3 
i— i 

CQ 
1— I 

f-. 

eg 

H 

a> 
o 

PL. 

I 

I 

d 

w 

• r-t 

CM 

o 

•ft 

a 

c3 
3 

<y 

S3 

• i— i 

o 

05 
P 
H 
H 



•.wqum^ 



o < 
H 



©OOOOOiCOOOlO© 
OQr.iai-ft^rtOlSSOO 



§8 



ONW»M»H»N3HfflOJOC 
l-Htf!OHIMCOHW«H^ 

s»Tfc»cirsr ©" cjf eo ^"of ©eo'tCcNf co 

* 



© © 
© © 

© IQ 
CM t~ 
© in 

©'cm" 

CM 



© © 

CM CO 

I- t- 

CM CM 
CM E— 

<x<o 

i— CM 



© 

© 
CO 

cm" 



•sjaq 'aanuntu su qsi^j 





©ico©o©©in©© 


»oo 


■ © © © 


r- 


«e 




© X © © t - © © T-H © © 


m t- © 




CO 




OHOtlOiO'fONW 


01 © to 


CO t> 


| 
H 


CO 


•sj.iq ':jreq qsijj 


NHHH CM 






© 

CM 



• © 

• in 

• CO 



•s[[bS '[to qsij; 



OMOt 
© X -f X 
© CO i—l © 

CO 



w 

00 



35 

Q 

5 



•spq 'qsu 

paXTUI pUB 8SJB0Q 



•spq 'pinbg 



•spq 'saajs^o 



•spq 'spa 



jo saAiMapy 



•sqj 'ftfprag 



© 

© 



•spq 'pnqg 



•sqi '^nqquH 



© = 
5 © 



01 



' sr ll 'spunog 



© © 
© © 

in to 



OOOU5IB 
lO X © iH CM 

CM CM 



© © © © ec 
io © © © © 



© 

HO 



■ CO »Ti 
CO 



© © © © © © 
© © © © © © 
rH © © © © © 
-f © T © T CO 
CM rH 



•%M.O 'p8T.IQ 



© © © © 

© © eo ic 

© CM © 



44 

o 
o 

cs 
EC 



© © 

i.O © 
CM 



•sq[ 'qsaj^ 



O 

O 



•s[.iq 'spunos 
pun senSuoj, 



•qMO 'pauQ 



©©TOO 
© W CM i-H CO 

O CO Clt rH 
CM IS r- 



50 



I 
6 



5. 



£ — 



in 



© © © CO © 
i0 © © CO 
t- r- © 



T3 O 



CO 



in 

© 



©CM © 
© 01 t-i 
NHH 



^c-es-— ti a : s J 



60 d c S y " 



© © 



1C 



X 



X 



© © © I o 

— © O I CM 

© © © t~ 

© © © I N 

CO -f I © 



a _oo ^ 

cj t) rj C| 



CO 
X 

- 1 

CM 



z 



CM 

o 



r-lCMCO-f , m©t>-X©©i— ISMCO'f'iO©^* 



© 
© 



© 

00 



© 
f 

in 



z 
s 

CI 



© 

X 
X 

©. 



© 

CO 



z 
© 

CM 



— 

CM 
Z 

o 



© 

CO 

© 



CO 



X 

r 

CM 
JO 

m 



Is S 

O .« 



in 

o 



a 
cr 



x> 
a 

© 
© 

71 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS -PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



<D 
O 

a 



m 

CM 

o 



•?M0 

'spanos :$> satiSuoq 'poQ 



O iO 
10 CM 



•^a\o 'p9up 'poQ 



o o 
= o 

O X 

55 I— < 



'j[aqs in qsaaj 'saaqsqo r j 



o 
55 



o o 

CM i-l 



00 



Q 



m p9AJ9S9Jcl 'sjoisqoi 



tONGllO 
*OQNCC 

ID t3 i 1 C. H 



•S[jq l p9^p3S 'pj9>{0KJ\[ 



o o 
© o 

CO f 



o 
5 
o 
o 



■ © 

• o 

• CO 



o 



o 

• o 

• o 

■ CO 



o o o 
— o o 
o o o 

O i-H 

01 f 



'SJJq 'p9^p3S 'SUI.I.19JJ 



©poo o 
o © © © o 

COHHlfl 
HW CO 



30 

3 



85 
< 

< 
H 

a 
x 



•9np? A 



■ o 
• — 



TO )q?'B l J 



• o 

■ IO 



•aaqran^ 



■ o 

■ in 

• 0) 



o 

CM 



•an^A 



z - - 

5oe 

CM O i-H 
CM i-l 



0J 



•staoin'Bj; 



© © «o 

O © 01 
O X' i-i 
t ~ jo 



•jgquniN^ 



OOlO 
O CM i-l 
CO i-H 



O Tf 

to © 



X 



© 
© 



CO 



CM 
00 

© 



© 
© 
© 



© 
© 



8 
© 



© 
© 



© o 
-r N- 



2 2 
© © 



© © 

01 ^ 



© 
© 
© 



© 

1—1 
© 



© 

CO 
© 



© 
© 
CM 

CO 



© 
© 



© 

CM 
© 



i-0> 
© 
© 
■f 



CM 

© 

CO 



iO 

© 
© 



so 

< 

O 

P5 

85 

I 

so 



© © © © © © © © © © 

■<f CO © © © co © cc 

rlH CM Ol i-H 



•31ll«A 



opooo©©©©© 
coooocoeoi- ©■ 

O i- N m CO H O N t 
(M CM CM CM i-l 



ci 



laqmn^ 



©©©©O©C0©-t>© 
X> t~ Ol © © CO © CO -f 



CO 

Iffl 



s 

M 

30 



i 

Of 



^ri I 3 " 



a 



. fa 
= - 

PP.S 



^ £ . — DO 

il *~ O 



c3 



OS 







00 

> 



00 



•J.iqUHl ^ 



£ « S o !? p£3 S = 3 rt 



136 



MAKIXE AXD FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 







t- -j: c. ~ 




CNNV CT. 


~ ~ - s. - 


o 


co x m x s 

X u- X X — 

l- ; r. u 


t- 


Z ! ~ * ~ c 




tt"© CJ cm* — r 
C t n : 1 lZ 




~ N ~ CO 


CO 

gn 



s 
s 



-tf 
a 

I— I 

to 
- 

I 

K 

a> 
o 

a 

•I-H 
- 



•9 

of 
— 

o 

- 



cc 
C 

% 

■— 

C 

(D 
D 

t> 

T3 
C 

» r-t 

c 

c3 
3 



O 
_= 

iz; 

• — % 

— 

C5 



J H 5 . 

< s 5 = 

r- - < r 

°< < ~ 

— ^ Z — 



•asquinu 'suijjs "Bag 



■S[jq '}icq su qsij 



"S".iq 'pmbg 



•sqi 

•qsy jsojj jo poo mox 



s 



SO 
5S 



■sjaq 'saajsAQ 



noaj. 



•sqi ';nqi|i:jj 



•}a\o 'p3iap 'ajfejj 



•;aio 'poup 'spoppiijj 



•sq| 'qsejj '^oopp'Bjj 



s 

cc 



C i~ ~ ~ — 
— ~ cc 



o s c 
— o ~ 

co cm co 



r - 

cm r 



: z 



z — 
z — 

•z cc 



■ o 
• - 

■ lO 



- w 



z z 



z ta 

© CM 

is 



s 

3 



s 
Of 



CM CN 



CP 
> 

- 



•staq 'spg; 


cc 


■ CC ' ■ - 


dZ O 
CN — 






CO 




o o 

CM CM 


■ — — • 








O 

ri 

CO 


o 

X 
<M 
rH 


•spq 

'ra'9.wdsi?.3 jo saAiAvajy 


- ~ 

c — 

1— I 


"IT! 






o 
c 


cr. 

iH 


Z 

rH 
L~ 


•sqi 's^ping 


- ~ — Z: ~ Z - 

- ~ ~ c - — c 
c c c c = c r 

- z ic 3 r 

Tjt CN , 




(MIOIMM 


5. 
— 


36 

CN 



o 
x 



— . 



o 

X 



lO 



CM X 



z 

LZ 



z 
z 



cr 
-r 



i - 
o 



o 
I- 
z 



o o 

i-l 



•-r 

32 



O 
X 



IC 



x 

D 

g 
> 



2 == 



~^%vz 5 Ci 

■2t ^i^^ 



■jaqnmfj 



FISHER? INSPECTORS' REPORTS-PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



^3 

g 

S 
o 



•3 

l 

i— i 

m 

rH 

eg 

•d 

m 

O 

a 

fi 



of 

O 
CP 

CI 
c3 



03 

co 

cc 

03 
> 



03 
3 

r— i 

c3 
t> 

d 

c3 

03 

tc 

ci 

d 
d 

s-T 

03 

S 
d 

03 
42 

60 

d 

O 

CO 

K 

O 
Eh 

P3 



•jaqum^r 


i-Ncc -t c i t>ooc; o 

rH 




•sqj 'suuo 
ui paA.iasa.id 's.iaqsqo'j 


CN©©"*©©"*©©^ 

y n uo x od r- <m m 

C M X H X V C C Cl C 
inCNCO©COt~CCT<C0CO 
I— 1 l-H 


00 


oo 

N 
0? 
Tf 
l-H 




© 

l-H 


W 

a) 


•spq 'pa^us '[aaajpuj^ 


OiAOOlOOOOOO 
CHtOKXONOe 
i-H (NtHCN 


© 
© 

© 


© 
© 
■* 
Tt< 








i-H 


Kinds of 


•sqi 'qsa.ij 'Siiuaajj 


c — - — ... 

© © © © 

z - - ~ 

fflNMO 

HHHQ 


90000 1 

1 


© 
© 
OS 


•sjaq 'pacUBS 'J^uijaejj 


oooooooooo 
©©©©©©©m©© 

ONOlOOO(OH!D5N 
i-H i-i CM i-H CN 


© 

CM 


© 
© 
© 

CO 




•sqi 'qsaaj 'uouqug 


© • • • 


© 
© 

in 


© 
© 
i-H 



•an t BA 



CN © © © © © © © © © 

w o-H*coco©comcococo 

CN 



•jaquin ^ 



©>©©lO©©©©©© 

h f ^ w r. i- l- k n m 

CM 



CN 
CO 



Fishing Gear or Mate 




•an^ A 


© © © © • © • 

qt, GC IO CO CO -00 • 






© 
OI 

TP 






•jaqum^j 


© o o © ■ © • 
05 CN i— -f -r ■ 






© 






00 

a> 
3 


•anps A 


©©©©©©©©©© 
© © c oi o © © © o © 

k CC © TP © i— I CC © CM - - CO 
^ i-H CN t— i CM rH CO i-H t-^ 


18180 






•SU10l{J'B i J 


eoecccsooo 

©01©-r©©©-;o© 
CC CO X © t- © 01 TP © CN 
l-H 


© 

CD 
© 
© 






uaqum^j 


©©©©©©©©©© 

ciocioeoooo 

C0rHTfC0COCO©OlC0rH 


3030 






Fishing Vessels and Boats. 


Boats. 




w©oe©©©©©© 

CO © 01 © © CN © CM in © 
HHWrtHClKHH 


m 

CN 

i- 

l-H 






•anp3 A 


©©©©©©©©O© 
© © © © © © © © TP W 

m © © © © i— © © cc -r 

w i-H i-H CN CO CO O l CN 


© 
CO 
t~ 
l-H 






•jaqtun^ 


©©O©©©©©©© |CD 

© it: co x x i.o © © t~ co -hh 

rH i-H i—i 1 CO 






Vessels. 


•uaj\[ 


in 


• -IO -CD • 
. • CN • -p • 






CO 

t~ 






•an[BA 


© 
© 




© 
' P 


7000 






© 
© 

l-H 








© 
oi 




• © 

• 3 

• CN 


• © • 

• © 

•CO • 






© 

t-H 

© 






•jaqnm^j 


l-H 




■ O 


•OS • 






m 

rH 







cc 

r- 
— 

cs 
■- 

■f. 



1 



n 1 



c 
3 
Oh 

CD 

Pi 



£ r. h 
Ph 



o 

43 



4J 



5 C3 

bc^ cc 
c* 



•J.tqnm^ 



T3 52, |m 

???E=E= 2 § 5 § 
-/ - < a § g^^w 

r-iCNeOTOCOt-.OOOJ© 
•• 



E0 
CO 

ce z 
Eh > 



138 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



•jaquiufj 



.-i oi co i~ — i~ x © o 



^3 

s 



s 

© 

CD 



-3 
i— i 

02 
l— i 

H 

o> 
o 

g 

P4 



o 

of 

o 
3 
~C 

O 

u 
Oh 

J3 
aj 
« i— i 

pC| 

C 

c3 

-C 

CO 

• — H 



CD 



-k3 

C3 
c3 
3 

o* 

fl 

ce 

co 
■"is 

3 

CD 



c 

•CM 

O 
h3 

to 

to 

& 

a 
P3 



J K J . 

< ^ = 
E- - < sc 



iS ©©©©©©©©©© 

*. ; ti h o 'i : o -i h 
; c t ; c i- n c it n 
w Hcr.-t-f : c r. cn — . co 

iff cn~ x" i 6" ©' x cT co" t>T cn* 

frlWB'fKtlHHH 



r 
© 

o 

CO 
CO 

CO- 
CM 
CO 



•Stilus pjag 



r. 

E- 

b 
s 
p 
o 



•sj.iq 'aimreni SB qsijj 



•spq 'pv.(\ sv. i\si ji 



•s\\v.S 'ip qsitf 



poo 

CN r-l — < 

000 • o o 

ocooooe 'On 

H r- H r- M K H - 

©©ocoooooo 

© © lO lO © © lO 1C © ©' 
O) — H r-i CM CO -f Ol CO Tf CM 

©©OOOOOOOO 

ooooQOpiooe 

O iO N L* C) C C Cl M 't 
CO HMH 



in 
— 



© 

© 



CM 
CI 



in 

CI 

CM 



CO 



in 
CO 



•spq 

'qsu paxira pui3 asi'BOQ 



© © © 



■s]jq 'pmbg 



© © © © c © o 

S OI © CN 01 © CN 



'qsu 4 soaj .10 poo moj, 



© © © © © © © 
© in © uz © © © 
h t— i -r oi h 



lO 
i-O 



r— 

CO 



© © 

CN 



© 

OS 



5 



"sj.iq saa^SiCo 


• © • 










© 
© 
— 


■sjjq 'sutbjq 


© © © 

t - X rt 

-r 


IC ■ © 
rH ■ r-l 


•CO © 
01 r-l 


© 

CN 

co 


© 
X 
-P 

CM 


•sj.iq 'sjajj 


in in tp 


© © lO 

r- 01 — 


© o 


1 © 
1 


•spq 

'ri'eaaads'By ao saAiA\a[y 




- - 

T ■ SO 


© 

T" 
r— 




© 
-r 

CN 


O 
© 

as 


•$q\ 's^auig 


©©©©©©© 
©©©©■©©© 

00 © © © X © © 
KHH Ni-i 


© 

© 
rH 




© 
© 
© 
© 
r-l 


© 

CO 
1Q 





1000 
4000 
401 to 
1000 
1000 


12000 
1000 
4000 
2000 


30000 
3000 


sqi , +nqH'BH 






© • 
© 


© 

g 


© 


•sqi 'spunos 's^bjj 


©©©©©©© 
©©©©©©© 

© lO CM 00 lO © Ol 
O 1— 1 1—1 1— 1 -r 




1000 


2.VJO0 


© 
© 
© 

CM 

TT 




O © © © © © © 
© LCO © © tCO © © 
1-0 t ~ © -f 1 - © — 
CN I- 




O 
— 


12000 


— 

CO 
X 
CN 


•ja\d 'poup '^oopp'Bjj 


© • © O 


© © lO © 1-0 
© lO 01 LO CM 


i.O 
CO 


O 
© 


•spq 'spunos 

puu s^nSuoi 'poQ 


O -f © 
r-l rH 


© 1.0 • -p CD 

TP rH • 


X 

as 


— 

X 

© 


• 4 avo 'paup 'poQ 


O©©©©©©©©© 
©C©iO©©©©lC© 
©O©t^-©©©i©t-i0 
•H» l~ rH 


IC 

1— 1 


© 

CO 
© 



as 
Eh 

5 

EH 

IH 





1 
s 



• — " — ' CQ 



0! • • ■ X S • • ■ 
E« S O* = g g_ * r« 

S E5 o |j 



so 

o 

CH 



3 
> 



>-■ ZZ " !3 

^ cj C t h 



•jaqiunx 



■ CM CO •»*■ O < 



S 3 6« 

2 ci C is 
I - X © © 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS—PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND 



139 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



PS 

— 

E- 
< 

33 
O 



o 

o 
g 

X 

30 



■jaqtun^ 



r- cm co 



•anp; A 



CC tO 35 



35 
35 



uaqiun^ 



rH m © 

tO lO tO 



CM 

GO 



9) 



l I*A 



© o cr 
cm — o 



CM 
CM 
CM 



\iaqum\^ 



rH CM 

CM 



CO 

CM 



CP 

c 

"3 



■8tlPB A 



•suioqiu^j 



uaqumjsj 



o o 

OS CO 
CO 



- 
z 

-r 



o © 
CM ■» 
© CM 
rH CM 



CM 
CO 



c . -. I - 

* x f x 



CM 
30 



01 



•suioq^B^ 



©CM© 
tO to -f 
CO T. 1 
!S r- CM 



CM 
CO 

o 



i 



31QC 
CO CO t>- 



o 
o 



3D 
EH 

< 

O 
Q 



GO 

K 



■uaj^ 



LO © Tf< 
CM "rf CM 
SCrl 
rH rH CM 



K3 
35 
GO 



C3 

o 

- 



•snpA 



oct> 

C!OS 
CO tO rH 
t— CM -f 
rH rH CO 



to 



■isfqiatifj 



tO CO rn 

•>* in co 
r. i.o - 



55 
CO- 
CM 



nan 



to 



•atiT« A 



© 
© 

i© 



0) I 



•a^euuojL 



•-o 

r- 1 
© 



uaqtun^ 



00 
Eh 
O 



© 

00 
CO 



o 



• >. 
•e c 
S - s 

- ~- 

60 S 3 

— ■ — 



o 

rH 



•jaqum 



rH CM CO 



to 



•jaqiun 







•jeqnm 


| r- CM CO 






-a 

s « 

£. <* i 
hc^: - 

(5 i £ 
H | ^ 




8 






© 
© 

O - 


co 

&3 

(53 
K 


•aaqum^[ 


CO 






CO 


IB 
co 

S5 

H 

so 


go 




© iO © 
© CO 
■•/-- tO rH "TJ* 
39 CM t~ 
CM 


© 
CM 
© 

CO 


•jaqum^ 


© © lO 
rH ^H 


rH 

CO 


XTURES 


Smoke 
and 
Fish Houses. 


•anp3 A 


© 


© 
rH 

© 

rH 


© 

CO 
CO 


S3 

§ 

X 


•jaqiun^ 


rf< 
CM 
rH 


rH 

CO 


IO 

m 

rH 


Eh 

o 


Freezers 
and 
Ice Houses 


■atiiB A 


© 
© 

^C^ 


© 
r 
© 

CO 


X 
© 




•jaquinjsj 


CM 


rf 


© 




•paAxifduia 
spunq jo jaqran sj 


© © rf> 
HC N 
r^C -r 

rH rH 


rH 

CO 


Louster Plant. 


00 

~ 


•anpA 


© © LO 
-f o © 
•r. C5 O CM 
*•*«©© 

io to 


LO 

to 

rr 

to 

— 


u 
H 


Maquin 


lO © CM 

© S t- 
io © 
t - 1 - to 

XNK 


rH 

CM 
© 
CO 


00 

.* 
°£ 

CD 


•aiqB A 


© O © 
-f t- C5 

„ t)< to to 
^ X 1 - t - 

CO CM CO 


LO 
© 
X 

© 

rH 




fl 
fl 

cS 

D 


•aaquin^j 


O CO X 
IO © CM 
— 


© 

CM 


3d 

«s 

E3 
W 

Eh 
<! 


00 

a 


•anp3 A 


© iO CO 
CM CM O 
CO rr O 


X 
OJ 
CM 
CO 


5 
« 

H 

a 


H 

cS 

a 


•jaqum^j 


CO CO X 
CM © O 
CO X 
CM rH 


X 

[Z. 
X 
T 


tc 
4a 


•an t B A 


© © t- 

CI co to 


t- 

H 

CO 

-r 


= 

CO 


rS 

CD 

a 

<— 

CO 


•jaqumx 


© CM t~ 
-f -P © 
rH 


o 

tH 



on o 

'bo® g 
fl ®.g 



140 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



< 

o 

C3 



c 

I— I 

M 



•3A\0 'paup 'pOQ 



ui qsaaj 'sad^sqo^ 



•sqj 'qsajj 'Siiujajj 



•spq 
'paipjs 'Suuaajj 



sq| 'qsajj 'uouipjg 



E- 

5= 
D 
C 

O 



•jaqmnv^ 




•sqi 'inojj, 


30000 
10700 


40700 


•sqi 'inqrjBH 


coo 
© © c 

o c o 

1H © 


© 
© 

00 


•sqj 'spanos 'a>p?jj 


o ■ © 

o • o 

CM ■ 00 

m ■ o 

<N • 


31000 


■;a\o 'paup 'ajp^H 


12600 
430 
2233 


CO 

to 

CM 

m 
1-1 


'paup '>{DOppT3JJ 


o © © 

CM O i—i 

co o co 

CO 


1Q 
CO 

© 
© 


•sqj'qsaji'ipoppujj 


• in © 

■ IM © 

• JO iH 

• <N CM 


CM 

© 
-r 


•s[.iq 'spunos 
ptre sanSuo^ 'poQ 


COfiO 
OS lO i— 1 


CO 

© 

H 



C © CM 
© © IS 
i~ X © 
© I— T 1 



■ ta © 
• i - © 



© 
© 

to 



• X 
T. ' r- £ 

be Z 
a 2-5 
;i - — 



cm 
o 

CO 
00 
CO 



to 
CO 



© © © 


© 


© O i— 


1-1 


© © — 1 
© — - 1 


rH 




05 © i— 


2 


CO 




- z — 


TP 


tO © rH 


© 


CI CO i-H 


© 


C. C. t— 


O 
CO 





© 

to 



o 

EH 



•sqi 'sireo ui 
pa a jasajrl 'si&isqbrj 


x ■* © 

Tf © © 

tp co ~r 

© OS t - 

t-H © © 

t~-p © 

rH 


2223712 


•spq 
pa^fBS 'laaajfouj^; 


© © CO 
© © m 
© © © 

rH rH 


3613 


•sqi 

qsaaj 'i9Ja^0Bj\[ 




© © 

co co 

rH X 


o 

© 
© 



•jaqum^ 



I CM CO 



1-2 EDWARD VlL, A. 1902 

■jaqmu^j 



rH 5-5 CO 



K 
D 
h3 

<! 

r> 

►J 
•< 
r- 
O 



M 

so 

fa E 



jg © m o 
t3 © »n ~~ 

© co © 

© CO © 

66 cc t-h eo 

CO CO*C-f 
CI © t- 
Cflf 



•o^j 'suij{s pjag 



m © 

-f TP 



30 
EH 

o 
p 
a 
o 
« 
Pm 

a 

05 

t-H 



•spq 
'aanutfiu st3 qsi^j 



iqjq '^iBq sv qsi^j 



© © rH 

© O © 

© x CO 

<M © 



•sjpjg 'po qsij 



© © rH 

2 © x 

CO t-- © 

© cm in 



•spq 'qsn 

paxUU pu'B 9SJBOQ 



in 
o 



O 

cc 

a 
M 



•s t jq < P T?qg 



Eh 

z 

13 

c 
o 



00 



•aaqumvj 



tic a; _ 
C * .5 

— ci :c 



in 
in 



co 



3! 

>o 



m 
x 



m in in i m 

01©© co 

CM TP "P | rH 

rH I <M 



CO 
CO 
CM 



CO 
rH 

X 



C 

CI 



•spq 'pinbg 


© Ol © 

© rH Ol 
rf t-h 


IN 
CM 
© 


•sqi 'qsu 

%soi} jo poo tuox 


10000 
50 

....... 




© 

in 
© 
© 

rH 


•spq 'sja^s.^o 


40 
4100 
136S5 


m 

CM 

co 
fc— 
i— i 


•spq 'sareiQ 


© o 

01 Ol 
© CO 




© 
© 


•sxiq 'spa 


T)> © l-H 

I - © T- 

CO rH 


rH 

lO 

to 


•qsnq 'sSoqun^) 


• • © 
© 


1200 


•sjaq 'n^a 
-jads^S jo saAiAvajy 


err 

rH © in 

CM I- 
I-H 


© 

X 

© 

CM 


•sq^ 's^piug 


10600 
496000 
197725 


704325 



o 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— PRINCE EDWARD ISLAXD 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



141 



RECAPITULATION 



Showing Yield and Value of the different Fisheries in the Province of Prince 

Edward Island during the Year 1900. 



Kinds of Fi*h. 



Salmon, smoked Lbs. 

Herring, salted Brls. 

.i fresh Lbs.. 

Mackerel, fresh " 

M salted Brls. 

Lobsters, canned Lbs. 

ii fresh Cwt. 

Cod, dried . ti 

ii tongues and sounds Brls. 

Haddock, fresh Lbs. 

n dried Cwt. 

Hake, dried ■■ 

ii sounds Lbs. 

Halibut , n 

Trout m 

Shad Brls. 

Smelts Lbs. 

Alewives Brls. 

Quahogs Bush. 

Eels Brls. 

Clams ii 

Oysters n 

Tom cod , Lbs. 

Squid Brls. 

Coarse and mixed fish 

Fish oil Galls. 

Fish for bait Brls. 

Fish as manure Tons. 

Seal skins No. 

Total 



Quantity. 



Price 



Value. 



500 
35,664 
469,110 
96,600 
3,613 
2,223,712 
135 
38,352 
163 
4,625 
6,635 
15,263 
31,000 
8,500 
40,700 
3 

704,325 
2, "80 
1,200 
551 
940 
17,825 

IK. 1 15" 

622 
203 
18,131 
23,341 
2,185 
85 



$ cts. 

20 

4 00 
01 
12 

15 00 
20 

5 00 
4 00 

10 00 
03 

3 00 
2 25 
50 
10 
10 

10 00 
05 

4 00 
3" 

10 00 
4 00 
4 00 
05 
4 00 
2 00 

30 

1 50 

1 00 

2 00 



I cts. 

100 00 
142,656 00 
4,691 10 
11,592 00 
54,195 00 
444,742 40 
675 00 
153,408 00 
1,630 0" 
138 75 
19,905 00 
34,341 75 
15,500 00 
850 00 
4,070 00 
30 00 
35,216 25 
8,320 00 
360 00 
5,510 00 
3,760 00 
71,300 00 
502 50 
2,488 00 
406 00 
5,439 30 
35,011 50 
2,185 00 
170 00 

1,059,193 55 



142 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



RECAPITULATION 



Showing the Number and Value of Vessels, Boats, Nets, Lobster Canneries, Traps, &c, 
used in the Fisheries of the Province of Prince Edward Island, Season, 1900. 



Articles. 



19 fishing vessels, (750 tons) . . 

2,330 fishing boats 

5,105 gill nets, (103,720 fathoms). 
12 seines, (3,260 fathoms) . 

231 trap nets 

762 trawls 

195 dip nets 

195 smelt nets 

4,87g band lines 



240 lobster canneries. 
302,117 lobster traps 



G freezers and ice houses . 
155 smoke and fish houses . . 

31 piers and wharfs 

3 steamei-s and smacks. . . 



Total value. 



Value. 



13, 
64, 
31, 
4, 

2. 
9, 

4, 
3, 



$ cts. 

850 00 
167 00 
182 00 
300 00 
220 00 
091 00 
390 00 
317 00 
298 00 



103,805 00 
164,645 00 



6,800 00 
3,350 00 
30,205 00 
500 00 



Total. 



$ cts. 



132,815 00 
268,450 00 

40,855 00 



442,120 00 



Number of persons employed in the fisheries of Prince Edward Island- 
Men in fishing vessels 99 

,i i. . boats - 4,895 

Persons in lobster canneries 3,184 



Total 8,178 



FISHERY STA TISTICS- ONTARIO 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



143 



APPENDIX No. 6. 

ONTARIO. 

GENERAL REMARKS. 

Last year in this province 1,893,000 fathoms of gill neb, 471 pound nets, 499 hoop 
or fyke nets, 95 seines, 107 dip nets, 3 machines, and several thousand baited hooks were 
used. 

This occupation has given employment to 2,502 men, 91 tugs and 1,187 boats. 
An estimated capital of $789,042 is invested in the industry. 

The aggregate catch amounts to 25,698,591 pounds, which shows a decrease as 
compared with last year of 1,789,888 pounds, and is valued at $1,333,293.82. 

While there has been a considerable falling off in our principal food fishes — the 
whitefish, lake trout, herring and pickerel, there has been a marked increase in the 
quantity of the coarser varieties taken. 

As has been reported, if the fisheries in the Lake of the Woods are ever depleted 
by over-fishing, the blame will certainly be more easily laid against the State of Min- 
nesota than the province of Ontario, as, until last year, licenses on the American side 
were issued indiscriminately, with very few provisions attached, and at a fee of only 
810 per pound net, as compared with the policy pursued by the Canadian authorities 
of limiting the number of licenses, and the higher fee of $50. There were something 
over 250 pound net licenses issued on the American side, while but 34 were issued on 
the Canadian side. 

There can be but little doubt that the past year has in many places been the most 
unfavourable in years for fishing operations, owing to the heavy storms which have 
visited our lakes, and the shortage in most places is in a large measure attributed to 
this cause. Particularly was this the case on Lake Erie and the Georgian Bay, where 
the results to the fishermen, not only from the diminution of the catch, but on account 
of the destruction of nets and other gear, were most disastrous. 

Another cogent reason given for the shortage from the Georgian Bay and Lake 
Superior is, that owing to the large quantity of frozen fish held over from the previous 
year, fishing operations in these waters were not prosecuted so vigorously nor so late 
as in former years. 

The unfavourable weather also made it practically impossible for the fishermen to 
take advantage of the extension of the open season which was granted, and on the 
whole it is doubtful if the results of such extensions are not rather a detriment than a 
benefit. 

A new species of herring was last year reported in Lake Ontario, being thought to 
be a cross between the blue-backed herring and the cisco. The species is said to be 
increasing, and it is believed will ultimately be as numerous as the cisco of former 
years. It is larger than the cisco, and is said to command a better price in the 
market. 

It will also be noticed that the quantity of sturgeon is largely in excess of that 
taken last year. In Lake Erie, where for many years there has been a gradual decrease, 
there is this year an increase of over 26,000 pounds, the total catch being 169,025 
pounds. This fish has greatly increased in value, not only on account of the demand 
for its flesh, but more particularly from the caviare prepared from its eggs, and the 



Note. — In these remarks on the Ontario fisheries reliance has been largely placed upon the published 
Provincial reports. 



144 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

taking of radical measures. for the prevention of its extinction has been suggested. On 
the other hand, the fishermen allege that it is most destructive of the eggs of other fish, 
and that gallons of freshly absorbed spawn have been taken from a single sturgeon. In 
that case it is a question whether it is expedient that any steps should be adopted in the 
direction of protection. 

VIOLATIONS IN THE GEORGIAN BAY. 

The past year has been no exception to its predecessors as to the amount of illegal 
fishing carried on in these waters, and perhaps no other waters in the province have 
been subjected to so much vigilance and assiduous attention on the part of fishery officers. 
One hundred and nineteen trap nets, and many yards of illegally fished gill nets, have 
been lifted. The trap nets have been invariably destroyed, as being an implement of 
capture prohibited bv the Fisheries Act of the Dominion. Where the gill nets are of a 
mesh which is authorized by the department, these nets are sold where possible, and the 
amounts received therefor placed to the credit of the treasurer of the province. 

COMMERCIAL FISHERIES. 

For many years our great lake fisheries have contributed a considerable portion of 
the fish food not only of the people of our own province but of the neighbouring republic. 
Perhaps 95 per cent of the whole catch is consumed in the United States. If there is 
one industry in the province more than another that deserves protection and attention, 
it is this great fishing industry, as it afiects most vitally not only the present 
population, but future generations. The hatcheries are doing a great work towards 
replenishing the drain upon the whitefish and the lake trout, no fewer than 98,625,000 
fry having been deposited in Ontario waters this year ; The view that the introduction 
of such vast quantities of artificially hatched fry renders unnecessary legal close seasons 
finds favour in many quarters, and the suggestion that such enactments should be 
abolished is supported by the policy adopted very largely in the United States' portions 
of the great lakes. Canadian fishermen complain that our laws compel them to cease 
fishing operations whereas the States bordering on the great lakes either have no such 
prohibitory regulations or they make no effort to enforce them. The considerations 
based upon these facts have frequently had such weight that the November close season 
has been frequently curtailed and our fishermen have thus continued fishing for ten or 
fifteen days after the close season, by law had commenced. Thus vast schools of spawn- 
ing fish have been taken especially whitefish just as they approached the spawning 
beds. This destruction of breeding whitefish must, to a large extend, render ineffec- 
tual the efforts to increase the supply by artificial propagation. Of course the capture 
of fish at any time lessens the total number in any given area ; but when the capture 
is made just about spawning time untold millions of eggs ready to be deposited are 
taken and destroyed, and the fry which would be hatched from such eggs had protec- 
tion been afforded, would have helped to replenish the waters in the future. 

In spite of all such unfavourable circumstances the fishermen generally regard the 
planting of whitefish as highly beneficial and they would strongly favour the enforce- 
ment of close seasons if the United States authorities did the same. 



FISHER r INSPECTORS' REPORTS -ONTARIO 



145 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

A. G. Duncan, Dominion fishery inspector for Western Ontario, states that he 
noticed a great deal of destitution and depravity amongst the Indian residents of the 
Nepigon district, owing, in his opinion, to the want of employment to enable them to 
secure the necessaries of life. Game is becoming scarce and difficult to obtain ; they 
depend a great deal on fish ; some of them had potatoes, but few had anything to buy 
flour or clothing with. At their request, he recommends that Lake Nepigon be leased 
to some reliable person who would guarantee to employ them to fish or buy their fish. 
If this were carried out, he feels certain that a great deal of distress among the Indian 
population would be relieved. 

Mr. D uncan deplores the fact that most of the fisheries of his lar°*e district are 
controlled by a powerful syndicate of United States citizens, who keep the earning rates 
of our Canadians at the minimum. He even recommends the appointment of a commis- 
sion to inquire into this alleged injustice to the bona fide British subjects. He is of 
opinion that all fishing tugs in our waters should be captained and manned by Canadians 
and that steam-lifting gear be done away with. By employing foreign crews it enables 
them to land Canadian catch in their own ports without reporting. Besides, this 
syndicate have their establishment at Sault Ste. Marie, on the Michigan side, where 
Canadian officers arei debarred inspection and where none of our people are employed. 
The supplying of nets by this rich and obnoxious syndicate to our fishermen seldom 
turns to their advantage, as the cut rates in fish leaves a very small balance to the 
individual fisherman at the end of the season. The result is that, in order to live, they 
fish many more nets than licensed for. He regrets to see the perilous toil of our fisher- 
men wasted for the benefit of foreign capitalists. 

He has notified the mill-owners of Manitoulin Island to desist from throwing saw- 
dust and rubbish in the waters of that locality. 

Value of the Ontario Fisheries from 1870 to 1900, inclusive. 



1870 . . . 
1871 . . 
1872 . . 
1873 . . 
1874 . . . 
1875 . . 
1S7C . . 
1877 . . . 
1878 . . 
1879 . - 
1880 . . 
1881 . . 
1882.. , 
1883 . . . 
1884 . . 

IKS;-,. 

iss<; . , 



Years. 



Value. 



Years. 



264,982 


1887 . . 


193,523 


1888 


267,633 


1889 


293,091 


1890 


446,267 


1891 


453,194 


1892 


437,229 


1893 


438,223 


1894 . . 


348,122 


1895 


367,133 


1896 


444,491 


1897 


509,903 


1898 


825,457 




1,027,033 


1900 


1,133,724 




1,342,692 




1,435,998 





Total . 



Val 



v.e. 



531,850 
839,869 
963,123 
009,637 
806,389 
042,198 
694,930 
659,968 
584,473 
605,674 
289,822 
433,631 
477,815 
333,293 



33,501,368 



22—10 



146 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD Vil., A. 1902 



ONT 



Return of the Number of Fishermen, Tonnage and Value of Tugs, Vessels and Boats, 

caught in the Province of 



3 


- 



Districts. 



Fishing Materials. 



Tugs or Vessels. 



Si 

to 

s 



Lake of the Woods and Rainm 
Hiver District. 

Lake of the Woods 

Eagle Lake 

Lake Minnetakie. 



Totals . . 
Values. 



Lake Nipigon District 



Lake Supei ior District. 



Thunder Bay 

Michipicoten Harl .our .... 

Little Gros Cap 

Indian Harbour 

Lizard Islands 

Point Mamanse 

Batchewana Bay 

Goulais Bay and Parisian 
Island 



Totals. 



Values 8 



93 

be 

CS 

fi 
a 
o 
H 



> 



62 



62 



An gling 



92 



II 6 
3 17 



12 



115 



4,250 



4,250 



13 



Boats. 



c 



93 
3 

"a 

> 



a 

93 



13 



13 

2 
6 



21 



and tr oil i ng 



16,000 



2,000 
C.111,0 



24,000 



26 



4 

12 



42 



625 
190 
550 



1,365 



26 
4 

13 



43 



Gill-nets. 



Pound 
nets. 



93 





20 

3 
5 



28 



44 2,685 



11 
71 



225 
200 
500 
75 



625 
600 



4,910 



64 
7 
4 

18 

2 



T3 
u 



S3 
> 



93 

a 

— 

S5 



05 
> 



22,200 2,200 30 3,500 
1,000 1 75.. 
5,000 250 . . 



28,200 2.545 30 



15 
22 



132 



259 
12 
11 
19 
2 
24 

102 

11 
440 



258.000 
12,500 
10,500 
20,000 
1,600 
24,000 

102,000 

11,000 



439,600 



3,500 



16,125 21 
625 6 
525 . . . 
1,000 ... 

80, ... . 
1,200 
8.200 



41,725 
1,200 



500 



28,255 



5! 1,000 



1,500 



37 



45,425 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— ONTARIO 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



147 



ARIO. 



the Quantity and Value of all Fishing Materials ; also the Kinds and Quantities of Fish 
Ontario, during the Year 1900. 



Kinds of Fish. 



he 
C 



03 



^2 



03 



102,576 
10,000 
5,000 



16,518 
1,000 
400 



117,576; 17,918 



9,406 



89,000 



300 



172,191 
20,000 
3,189 
16,800 
172,000 
8,530 
9,036 

59,800 



89,000 461,546 



1,780 36,924 



1,791 



15,200 



O 



03 



03 



70,180 30,319 
5,000 ... . 
400, 12,000 



50 



*552,783 
4SO.000 
9,075 
79,800 
121,000 
66,052 
2,873 

20,130 



1,331,703 



133,170 



75,580 



3,779 



2,000 



42,319 



1,693 



03 
50 
= 
Z 



15 



15 
90 



s 

o 

03 

be 
u 

s 



52,334 



52,334 



3,140 



4,000 



40,306 



40,3011 



2,015 



2,184 



3,640 



5,824 



233 



11,629 



450 
1,200 



13,279 



796 



03 
03 



3 



4,662 



4,662 



280 



CJ3 

a 



72,835 



72,835 



m 

03 

m 

O 
O 

a 

T3 . 

03 05 



11,415 



11,415 



1,456! 228 



853 



853 



117 



03 
■~ 

<S 
• (-, 

P> 

a 



6,773 



6,773 



3,386 



1,162 



45 
120 



1,327 



663 



* 251 brls. salted trout. 



03 

m 



135 



135 



108 



Total 
Value. 



$ cts. 

23,178 90 
1,150 00 
940 90 



25,269 80 



1,808 00 



76,742 04 
49,600 00 
1,162 62 
9,324 00 
25,860 00 
7,287 60 
1,058 68 



03 
,0 

S 
P 



7,074 60 8 



178,109 54 



22— 10 J 



148 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Return of the Number, Tonnage and Value of Vessels and Boats, and the Quantity 



Fishixg Materials. 



- 



Districts. 



Lake Huron — North Channel. 



1 Tenby Bay 

2 Hilton 

3 McBeths' Bay 

4 Tliessalon and Bruce Mines. 

5 Blind River 

6 Spragge 

7 Johns Island 

8 Aird Island , 

9 Darche Island , 

10 Newport , 

11 West Bay 

12 Kagawong 

13 La Cloche Island 

14 Little Current 

15 Gore Bav 

16 Cape Roberts 

17 Meldrum Bay 

18'Cockburn Island 

19 Green Island 

20 Burnt Island 

21' Duck Island.... 

22 South Bay Mouth 

23 Fitzwilliarn Island 

24 Squaw Island 

25 Killarney 

26 Bustard Island 



Totals. . 
Values 



Tugs or Vessels. 



s 



1 



ID 

bo 
ci 
C 
C 

o 
H 



> 



20 



22 



9 
5 
19 



10 
20 
16 



23 
30 



39 
10 



35,000 



2,500 
2,000 



1,000 
1,500 

3,839 



2.500 
3,000 
4,500 



6,500 
9,000 



14,000 
' 2,500 



215 87,839 



s 

<D 



- 



3 



13 
12 



12 
4 



95 



1 
4 
1 
2 
2 
3 
6 
1 
1 

10 
4 

11 
6 

25 

19 



109 



Boats 



<D 

- 



140 
100 
125 



100 
200 



100 
125 
475 



100 

500 
75 
225 
200 
275 
650 
100 
100 

1,000 
525 

1,225 
690 

2,085 

2,135 



11,250 



Gill-nets. 



Pound 
nets. 



T3 
u 

93 



5 
3 
4 
2 
6 
8 
2 
2 
16 



12 
49 

36 



196 



15 
12 



25 



26 



1 

12 



19 

30 
6 
6 
80 
100 
45 
125 
92 
81 

681 



6,000 
900 



> 



12,000 
12,000 



40 
20 



as 



800 
800 



24,000 



24,600 



1,000 
12. mi to 



is. .-,im I 
30,000 
6,000 
6,000 
83,000 
96,000 
47,000 
126,000 
91,500 
SI, l 



1,600 
1,100 



45 

800 



677,500 



1,55(1 
2,500 
400 

too 

5,550 
8,600 
2,600 
10,200 
6,850 
7,440 



15 



10 
4 

13 



51,295 72 



450 



800 



750 
1,500 
450 



1,500 
4)566 



900 
600 
2,0(X> 



500 



13,950 



* In Xo. 1 add 75 lbs. Bass and 140 lbs. Maskinonge. 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— ONTARIO 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

and Value of Fish, &c., in the Province of Ontario— Continued. 



149 



Kinds of Fish. 



be 

S3 



(ill 



125 



18 
17 



400 
12,000 
40,221 
2,000 
3.300 

OO ( „HI 

6,000 
4,000 
28.000 
20,000 
19,000 
69.945 



18,000 

X>,000; 

19,000 
103,651 
2,000 

15.000 
149,204 
101.000 
4,000 
193, 200 
L'4'.'.uno 

98,000 



225.^ 1, 2*28,921 



004 
5,000 
111.352 
4,335 
3,500! 
104,335 
13,005 
2,000 
23,000 
10,000 

4H.I MM) 

12,390 



8,100 

30.000 
151,000 

80,021 
3,000 
230,000 

85,000 
127,000 

78,000 
190,500 
175,000 

85,000 



902 



98,313 



to 

1 
— 

O 

% 


Pike, Lbs. 


0B 

c 

IS 

be 

-*-> 
0Q 


Percli, lbs. 


DD 

OS 
O 


Mixed .-mil coarse fiBh, 
lbs. 


— 

n 

•rH 

> 
63 




500 


7,024 
1,000 






















in i mi i 

1 1 K 

MO 

38,407 

1 7 1 i(\t 1 
1 i .'"HI 

96,321 
























331 
000 
331 

993 


4,651 

C\ AAA 

1 J I'M 




JOll 

1 ,6oo 




465 




1 290 




























18,000 


2,000 


10.000 









1 AAA 
1,000 








58,941 


6,139 


29,o0o 




1,107 




2,9o0 


21.000 
24.000 
4,000 
10,445 


500 


3,700 
10,000 








370 
1,000 


















0,028 








602 












000 
5,000 










20.000 










500 

























1,200 
77.000 
45,000 














12,000 
40,000 


18.000 
9,000 


600 


900 
2,800 


000 
15,000 


1,800 
900 






490,660 


71,518 


130,098 


600 


12,538 


15,000 


12.94S 


24,833 


2,860 


7,806 


18 


251 


312 


6,474 



Total 
Value. 



S cts. 



320 
156 
1,960 
14,375 
3,071 
2,156 
16,511 
8,161 
520 
4,540 
4,680 
5,520 
13,296 
500 
3,727 
9,900 
16,820 
18,449 
400 
94,236 
22.'i.-iS 
L'l I.MS 
8,120 
34,578 
43,778 
21.510 



1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 



36 
40 

llll 

13 
75 
00 
75 

27 | 8 

00 9 

00 10 

no n 

00 12 

45 13 

00 14 

00 15 

00 10 

00 17 

11 is 

00 19 

nil -_>n 

32 21 

00 22 

00 23 



00 
00 
00 



24 
25 

20 



300,259 54 



150 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Return of the Number of Tonnage and Value of Tugs, Vessels and Boats, and the 



a 



Districts. 



Georgian Bat/ Division. 



Parry Sound ... 

Point au Baril 

Waubaushene 

Victoria Harbour 

Midland 

Penetanguishene 

Collingwood 

Owen Sound 

Colpoys Bay to Tobermory. 

Totals 



Value $ 



Lake Huron (proper.) 

Cape Hurd to Southampton 

Southampton to Goderich 

County of Huron, including Grand 
Bend division. 

Township of Bosanquet 

ii Plympton 

H Sarnia 



Totals 
Value. 



Fishing Material. 



Tugs or Vessels. 



— 

5 
p 



17 



bo 
cS 
S 

a 
o 
H 



12 

5 
4 



133 
82 
10 



246 



124 
15 

22 



0) 

s 
> 



3500 
1000 
sou 



12 

3 
3 



3(MM 10 
10000 
4000 



29 
26 



51(200 



81 



15500 
1200 

3000 



161 19700 



30 
6 



42 



Boats. 



u 



6 
6 
6 
6 
11 
6 
22 
25 
26 



114 



28 
6 

11 
13 

8 

30 



96 



> 



X 



500 
550 
600 
600 
1000 
400 
2500 
1235 
965 



8350 



12 
12 
12 
12 
22 
12 
44 
44 
53 



Gill Nets. 



S. 



223 



2250 
450 

1065 
831 
480 

1400 



6476 



61 
11 

24 
27 
10 
41 



174 



56 18000 
200] 108000 
loOOO 
15000 
30000 
14000 
324000 
148600 
165300 



30 
30 
60 
28 
600 
300 
275 



1559 



250 
60 

50 
35 



18 
413 



s3.sooo 



246400 15400 
60330 3700 

49000 ' 3000 
36700 3165 



18000 



410430 25445 



Return of the Number of Tonnage and Value of Tugs, 



g 



Districts. 


Fishinc; Materias. 


Boats. 


Gill Nets. 


Seines. 


Number. 


1 

Value. 


Men. 


Number. 


Yards. 


Is 

> 


Number. 


- 

> 


Men. 


Lake St. Clair. 
River St. Clair 


11 

22 
59 


$ 

234 
274 
2479 


27 
93 
101 


*2 
*21 
*2 




$ 

10 
105 
10 


10 


799 


540 
787 
1440 


Thames River. 




24 1703 
18 1879 


Lake St. Clair and Detroit River. . . 




92 


2987 


221 


25 




125 


52 


4381 


2767 













































* Dip nets. 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— ONTARIO 151 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

Quantity and Value of all Fish, &c., in the Province Of Ontario — Continued. 



Kinds of Fish. 


Total Value 


05 
— 

- 
1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
9 
8 

1 

2 

3 
4 
5 
6 


Herring, salted. 


00 

3 

h 
»*- 

be 
C 

M 


_= 

at 
tC 
05 

49 

IS 


O 
u 

H 


u 
o 

p 

Ph 

o 
% 

i. 


o5 

S 


o 

s> 

be 

U 
3 
49 


o 

<D 

£ 


00 

--c 

49 

s 


rd 

CO 

. iH 

2 go 

i — 

X 


05 

49 
i— 1 

o3 

EO 

GO 

■U 
+-> 
. — i 


05 

49 

00 
49* 

s 

o 

H 


05 
U 

.5 
> 

03 

o 


brls. 


lbs. 


lbs. 

61413 
42000 

7200 
15000 
30000 

7000 


lbs. 

35655 
108000 

5000 
20000 
60000 

fiOOO 


lbs. 

3639 
33000 
38400 
70000 
40000 
7100 
1900 


lbs. 

4240 
8000 
6350 
5000 
2000 
3750 



lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


bbls. 
16 


bbls. 


lbs. 


8 cts. 

8,990 09 
ib,3l0 00 

3,812 50 

8,642 00 
14,900 00 

1,665 00 
40,804 72 
60,518 28 
15,810 00 






"550 
15O00 
2000 






9000 
8875 
4600 


35* 
' 100 

00 




10* 
"80 


104 

300' 


1500 
200 


27000 
2864 






79367! 281580 
32200 567350 


28356 


3700 




500 


7 
21 


17 
94 
110 


647(i 


205 




138900 












3700 






- 




426* 


30764 


274180 


1222485 


194039 


29340 


45906 




22975 


134£ 


531* 


8176 




1706 


615 


21934 


122248 


9703 


1174 


2754 


111 


. . . 


459 


1345 


5315 


4088 


171,452 59 


291* 
57 


31400 


14600 
1300 

4834 
3950 
21 

144<l 


666700 
82500 

99870 
16409 
35 
111S 


200 




6000 


5000 




2000 


pkts. 
or*bl. 

3 
10 


pkts. 
or*bl 

746 
794 

66 


680 


74.277 00 
12,602 00 

13,927 47 
16,716 40 
2,687 04 
13,412 61 




23941 
21334 
6750 
104158 


30580 
87269 
42397 
121105 

281551 




7299 
87269 

3538 
43743 


4421 
5381 
65 
2798 


2343 
790 

412 


11700 
8050 
1814 
4136 


729 
8726 

353 
4374 


8 












15 
















371* 


187583 


26154 


866632 




147849 


17005 


3545 


27700 


13 


1606 


14862 




148(1 


3752 


2092 86663 


14077 




8871 530 


71 


554 


65 


8030 7431 

) 


133,622 52 



Vessels and Boats, and the Quantity and Value of all Fish, &c. 



Kinds of Fish. 






1 [erring, fresh. 


1 

Whitetish. 


to 
to 

83 

w 


Pickerel or Dore. 


Pike. 1 


Maskinonge. 


a 

o 

35 

tx 
5 

49 

32 


Perch. 


Tullibee. 


Catfish. 


j Mixed and 

Coarse Fish. 

1 


Caviare. 


Total Value 


| Number. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


8 cts. 




3500 






113247 


300 




33250 


700 




200 


10872 


3325 


9,644 29 


1 






34064 


3071) 




25 


200 


KldO 


LMSl 


82974 




3,596 84 


2 


6442 


20721 


3913 


44878 


15536 


3428 


73383 


19903 


10500 


49203 


293652 


7338 


21,326 75 


3 


9942 


20721 


3913 


192189 


18912 


3428 


10C658 


20803 


11500 


51584 


387498 


10063 










199 


1658 


313 


9009 


756 


206 


6399 


624 


690 


1032 


7750 


5332 


34,567 88 





152 



MARIXE AXD FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



HN«tc-i-'/ son 



05 
-H» 

V 



3 
O 
5h 



ooaoo 

o t- co oo is 
eo c- eo t>- 1- 

T— I 10 1-1 



HO X C N 



© S 



co ■ • © © © co »o »o © *o 

in • o 2 Si CO CO Si X CO 
5C HI- f O 00 C C-l 

• CM fN CM Ci i-i r- 



0) 



c 
o 



•sp.re A 



oc 



©©©©©©©© 

CO 000300(010 
O O O CO -# O 00 -* 1 
NIONCC -"OOKSN 
CO CO CO Si CO if 



JlOOXiSO'tO 
CO CO «ott 



lO W t— lO WNnOOSH 
Hl5*«HXNWHrtfl 



s 

03 



O 



O M O O O C O Q CO O 
t-OXLOOOIXNC^HO 

ooi- | oooot--toiois<Mir'co 



»i-!<0!OiHrte<3CSN9>l* 
-rf O i-i i-i CO rH i-l i-l 



a- 

s 

to 
bp 

Eh 



uaqiuiix 



IM 
00 



00 
CM 



rji 

CO 



o 

la 



- 

CO 



00 

— 



*H 

Oi 

CO 



CO 



X 
rr 





-re t~ oi 
i—i i—i 


<M 




OI © iro 

i—l rH 


© 

© 




* 

2200 
i)000 
14400 


O 
© 
fc— 

to 
1-1 




o o o • 
© © © 
©or • 
-r x co • 


© 
© 

CO 
to 




it X -r -r 

CM Si © 00 
i — 1 






© 

T OI ■ 


© 
CO 



CO 



as 



8 



-4-1 

13 6 
PhO 



o 
Ph 

CO 

o 



0) 

> 
T3 

ci z « 

w O c3 

d cS 
.5-p 6c 

5.53S 

r^ *C 1 

■£ 5 3 5 



s * *<8 s. 



'g-B ll - 

' I - S ci O - 



32 

o 
Eh 



j-sqmu^ 



ri Ol CO it C to N » C O H 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS—ONTARIO 
ESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



riN«fOOt-!»r.OH 

T-l I-H 



KQCOHWriHON-CIK' 

(M 07 IM 10 CO c-q X -V © CO CO 
ff.^WOOO)NHQ'*N 

go" in ' x~ x" oo <m~ ©" t>T i -T 



oo 
t-. 

o 



CO 



O O l-CO 
35 © W © rH 
© lO <M 00 O 
rtHNHH 



IM -# 


• CO 


00 


© 


OS rH 


■ CO 


© 




rH CM 


• 00 


-HI 


CM 


01 i-l 


• -f 


CO 
rH 


OO 



•sqi 

'qsy asauoo puu paxij^ 



c o o -t q o o o -t n h 

rtl80n<S01*HON!S 
— X CO COHNK rH 



00 I O 



© 

lO 



CO 



o 

00 



■sqi 'qsg^o 



^ CO N LO lO O ID Ol N 
CM in O © © CM rH © CM 
© CO CO CM rH O (M rn 
O CO in N't rH 



■* I 00 

© in 
© © 



e i 

rH 



CO 



C ■ © CO rH © © m CO CM © 

©oc'COinrH©-Hcoinooi^ 
-rccr--©©<M©M-Pr^© 
n « c 1 ; x © rH cm 

01 CO © CO © rH © rH (M 



© 

CO 

t- 



•sqj 'uoaSan^g 



© rH © © . 


• rH © 


• IM 


m 


owt-w* • 


• Hf -* 


• GO 


CI 


I- H C 0> rH • 


• © rH 


CO 


© 


CO!(M00lO • 


• rH CM 


• CO 


32 


rH rH CM rH rH • 


• IM rH 


• -f 


© 

rH 



CM 
"*< 
X 
s 

CM 



•pqi 'a^ij 



© © CO 
Ol rf CO 
CO CM 
CO CM (M 
CM Hf 



■ oo co rt co in 

• rH CO l~ rH CO 
' © © CO -tfi rH 

© CO CM rH 

• © CM 





in 


x 




x 


X 


rH 


CM 


IM 


CO 


00 





•sqi 'qseaj 'Sauaag 



© -p m cm 
m -f © © co 
i- cm © x m 

Nt-HOOO 
© -f © rj. -M 

CM in X CM 
CM i-h 



•sqj '8.10(2 JO P JaJ I !(I 


iOXCOCMCM-*COt^in©CO 

©©©inrH©m©i^t^co 
HHjioosoonsOHffi 

mCM©CM-fCML^rHCMl^CM 

in-*rt<©iMrHinxiM 

CM O rH 


1218171 


r. 

© 

© 
© 


•sqj 'ss'Bg 


© • © i-h © co © x 

rH •©co©Xin©co 

CO •© CM rHrHX©X 

■ rH CM -f rH 

■ rH rH 




X 

-H 

© 

CO 


CM 
rH 
© 
CO 




• ■ • CM t— 

... CM 


' i523 
100 


© 

rH 


© 
© 
© 
CM 


© 
© 

CM 


i 


m © © x x 

CM © © © X 
CM -Hi co CO © 
tS«WCJ 

rn in co x o 


• • © © © o 

• • © CM CM © 

• ■ © © t~ id 

• • CM T © 

• -SlOiH 


40142:. 


32114 



o co © cm © 
cm © in co cm 
m © x hj> 

CM CO © © t^- 

-H © © © 
CM -f rH 



:-. 

CO 
I- 

m 

CM 
IC 



IS 
- 
CO 



a; 
g 
o 

H 

& 

OS 



r§"S 

-, s 

- 5 



o 

be 
C 



W 5 C « 



s 5: 



e3 

if 
e3 



S o 0-1 K 

> C O o 
C -w 

Q-^T3 a. 

8,2 ■£ i I £ 

a §3-° c +3 5 

§ |-OPL,43-grO 

.•|_« | O bpMo 

3 6 b X >» fn . 
3 O c3 c3 - 



c3 

-H> 

o 
H 



•jaquinj^ | 



rH<MC0rfin©l— X©©' 



151 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



o 



o 

e3 

a 
O 

o 
o 

S3 

•r-l 
> 

c 

Sh 

-a 

+3 



o 

•8 

00 
• ~H 

o 
cu 

3 



73 
S3 

a 

c3 
3 

O" 

CD 

-a 

73 

e8 
af 
e8 

o 
M 

73 
C 

ci 

90 

SJO 
3 
EH 

o 

CP 

s 
la 
> 

73 

a 

o3 

u 

cu 

£ 

3 

CD 

rC 

-t3 



as 

CD 
H 
Si 

?3 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

I— IC5CO'*lOCCt-COCT>Or-iCNeOTj'10COt— OO 



CO 

— 

c 
o 

w 



M 

a 

a 

o 

— 

I 

30 



W iH c co <M irno 
oi o iH to 10 i— so 



3 

x 

-f 



CM — 3 3 -f i- — 

n r. r- t co 



co 

ao 

CM 



OOOOOO©OiC0 3 o 
MTt(O\0c5oOa005HC 

th oi 3 co -* 1 



© O OO OOOOOOQ 
©33333333 ^ C 

co oi in loioooooffio 
oi c-i i-h tj- x co 



i~ i- co x co o 3 x i~ 3 -r 

CM HtS t O 



o x ■ -f 3 

OCDOCOO 

01 3 iH 3 co 



00 

:: 

CO 



3 3 3 3 3 
C K ClCO 
lO 3 -r 3 3 
- X C C] CO 
05 r-i i-l 



00 
CM 
3 
— 



CO 3 O CO O 
CO CM i— CO 



CO 
CO 
O 



CO TP iO CM 3 i— 3 t— CO L~ 01 3 01 3 3 iTl O 
CM i-l i-l CO -P CM CO-f-Tt^fCOCM 



co 

3 
— 



' 8U I B A 



O 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 i-O iT. i~ LO 01 3 3 CO 0) CO 
HXSSOOe 3 t-t-NN-lIOXMC: 
>T3.tH iHCOCOO«0(N03rHlQCOCDCO<M»OCO 



1 fa 

i o 



CO 



3 

H 



•.laqum^ 


coiacocM3coi~ircco-<*''*'Ooe<iir;t~t— to 

i-i — ^-i-i i— 1 CM CO CO CO — CM i-H 


3 
CO 
CM 




00 


CO O • • • 


i—i 






i-H ■ • ' 


CM 












. o • 
. - o ■ • 
• • 3 • • 
..-)<.. 

s& . : 


© © • • • 

© o ■ ■ - 

!OS • • ■ 

• • ' - • I-i-'* 


s 

CO 
CO 



•aSBuuoj, 



cn 
i— i 

Q 



g 

© 

S3 

c 



- — 

it _ 



T 3 
-* 1 



- ' 



T3 
S 

- 

- 

C 

3 

= * — 

-Si,., 



01 
3 



3> 



CD 
- 

5 a >> 

p4.3 -t^> 

, S3 CJ'S 

"1 =' ? 
sS s3T3 

>■— = 
- - 3 " 
— s3 "3 

C — +j 

S3 ^ ^ v T. 

J = t - 

<b a ? Bjsii 



-s. 
O 

H 



Jos" 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS-ONTARIO 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



S© 



" © © t~ © © _ OOCOXOOO»«t-tO'* 

■tMNC!c:HNiow*noo^ic: co 3 o: 
m icTon r-Teo" o<fco~© m~o<f»£5 <m" 



GO 
CO 

t~ 

Of 

00 



•sqi 'aa^iABQ 



■ o ■ 


■ m 


. o ■ ■ ■ 


•••©■•• 


" 92 ' 


• CM 




...©... 








• . .<N ■ • • 



© 



•sqi 'qsgciuQ 



© © o 
Tire 
— x 55 

SN 



© H © © 

r © r z 

co io © CO 

w H f H 



© 



fa 
O 

00 

Q 



•sqi ';noj£ 



6 

r" 



co © © © © 
© co © in © 
© m oq © x 
co in co © 

CM 



a 



;T3 

• 0) 



y - - 



o e 



L_ - 

- - 

tJTJ.9 



a 

3*S§ ,H 'C5S 



o c 



5 

.— +^ 
»'5 



■ — 

;• - = 



a o 
_ 



o » — 

C 1 - ^ 



•- s O cj o 

- - w - - 



+3 to 

a o 



•jequm^j 



i-i oi co m © t- v. © r — o i co -f in © t- co 





© ~ 

© 01 • 
33 i—l • 
t— 


© 
© 
© 


o © © © © © 
in © co co © in 
© ~t< co © co in 
© -f t- 


© © © © © 

-TO©©© 

© © © o © 

O © rH © 
HH Ol 


© 

Ol 

i-H 

© 

oq 

H 


10330 


•sqi 'qsa.ii 'Suu.isjj 




© © © 
= T. ~ 
© © [- 
-r t- 

m oi 


©©1-H©©©©© 

01 T CO © © © © O 
© © CO © CO © X CI 
-f 01 c- -r t-i i— co oi 
i— 1 Ol TP -t> IM h 

— i—i in i-H 


419 
500(1 
L»(iL>5 
1700 




1094475| 


© 

X 
X 

H 

Ol 


•S[.iq 'ponies 'Suujr)]-[ 






















CO 








CO 
Ol 



X 
© 
- 

© 



•sqi 'spa; 




• © CS 

• X © • 

© 






© © 

• co © 


m © © co © 

~H © © © 
l-H © X 1— © 

i-i o co 

Ol 03 


© 

© 

H 

01 


H 

in 
© 


m 

CM 


•sq{ 'aoeSjaqg 




© ■ 
in • • 
x • • 


© 

to 

CM 


© • 
© ■ 






• © © • 

• 01 o ■ 

© • 

CM . 


- - 

© © 

© 01 
i-H X 


© 
H 
X 
X 
H 


© 

oq 

H 


•stll 'sSuoui^suj^ 




















© 
© 

in 

CO 




© 
© 

m 

H 




© 
© 
© 

m 


© 
© 
CO 


-s qi '^TcE 














©©©t~©co©©.©m© 
© m © oq in © © ti -r oi © 
oq oi m x oi © ~t> oi © h 

H C-*»iON3:i 

OQ H Ol CO i— 1-H 
i-H 


CO 
CO 
CM 
CO 
CM 


CO 

© 

Ol 

© 


•sqi '9JO(j jo [aiajpig 




© © 
o © ■ 
iff © 
in H 

1-H 












r 




© © © © 
CO © © © 

© m © i-H 

Ol CO 
i-H 




© 
L- 
Ol 
-f 
CO 


1-1 
I- 

H 


■sqi 'ss^g 












© - - 

in in oi 

t~ CO 

CO 




© © 
z ,- 

© T 










© 

^H 

m 


X 
CO 



co © © © 

CO © © © 

-f © h in 
in co oi © 



© t~ © © © © © 
© x © -r in © © 

ffllS^MHNlO 
t~ CO Tf< Ol © -f I- 
CO i-H © r-^ 

m i-H 



© © 

o in 
© co 



H © © © © © © © 
© "f © © © © -f 
© © © i-H 01 Ol Ol 
ftXMlOCl 
© Ol t- CO CM 



© 


OS 




X 




X 


i-H 




© 


© 


© 




CO 


Tfl 


01 




Ol 


H 


t~ 





oq i <o 

h in 

x I co 

t>- i m 

© I 

CM 



©©©©x©co©in©©-f 
inm©©©©©x©o©© 
-f © t- 1~ © in Hti io m co © 
cm co-*oit^-t<©co 
i-H © © m i-H 



CO 
X 
01 



in 
x 



X 

© 
© 
•© 



C S3 

Eh > 



156 



MARIXE AXD FISHERIES 



© 



o 



© 
o 

•i— i 
> 
o 
- 

PL, 

© 
-to 



06 

« i-H 

O 
3 



-to 
3 

<y 

40 

£2 

^ 

06" 
-lO 
c3 
O 

CQ 

S3 
s9 

06 

sc 

3 

=4-1 

o 

05 
3 

la 
> 

CJ 
eS 

u 


B 
s 

0) 

A 

o 
55 

E3 

H 
S 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



h n « t c m t- x r. c 



c o 

r r i 



X X 



X 

o 



- - ~ ■-: 




CO O • 


t- 


• 


to 


= 




• - 00 









• • O 














p 





x= - 



t- 71 S --Z. X 
CT. ^- T 



o ~ 
— c 

10 



•jaquin 



~ — - 

~ 7- 5 
_. _ _ 



-r o X 
Jl o 



— 

< 
- 



S — — L~ — 

[ - . * i—i 1— I (M 



O 



•an[B A 



:c — X C c 
S: : — — O — lO 
ir. ?Z lOriN 



•jaqum^j 



Si ti — ci ri 
cc ■ — 



•ua K 



o 

if 

H 



•aSimiioj^ 



■jaqnm^j 



oc 
s- 

— 

= 
& 

x 



c 



C<3 



r ; — 

o o >c 
x vr i - 



— 

CO 



iC 
CC 



CM 



1- 

c 
a 
: 

O 
>> 

§ 

- i 



1- 

- — 



- 1 — 



5 

o 

c3 



X I oc 



CM 



S 



CO 



O 

B 

Q 

bC 



s 

>. 



.S - 
- rS 



o 

- 



x 
i) 
3 

•—I 

> 



. - - = 3 - ^ i • 

> a U— = 5c 5' 
;r - bog 3 S 
:q= S * = = 2-=. 

- - - 
._: - - 



— M r: — 1- t - x ~. c 



Maqamj^ 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS—ONTARIO 



IONAL PAPER No. 22 

•.laqumjsj; 



HjiMtcesxeio 



O < 



oo ia -f in cm oo © co -t> 
f~ © © i—i is cc t — r cm -* 

© O t— C- CO -f rH CO CO CM 
HHMH 



in 

CO 



cm c © © -r 

IO CO CO L— rH 
rH rH CM rH 
CM »0 



1C 
CO 



© 

00 

cc 



•sq T 



eiejooot-©© © cm 

0©3:©©rH:r:-T©-t- 

co©©cocot^©ooo© 

© 0C CO © CM CC CM m rH 

© rH i— CM -H 



I 1 



C I 
CO 
rH 
tH 



O rH CM CO 
© © CM f 
© © © t— 
O © CO 

-1" -r 



© © © 

© rH in 
O iOO 
CI I - — 



■sqi 'qojaj 



CO ©. 

t- © 



lO © -t< © © 

l~ rH m © CM 
X N H lO r)i 



K 
fa 

c 

35 
£ 

r2 



•sq[ 'spg; 



© CO rH 




©SO 


© 


- I 


© rH 


CO • 


O 00 


CO 


o 


1-H 1Q 




• X © 


lO 


rH 






rH • • 


CM 





I 



■Sq\ '8SuOUl5fST3J\[ 



r«l 

© CO CM © © 
CM lO CO © CO 
lO ©. © © 
r- CO CM f 
CM © 



co in in 

CM CO CM 
rH © 



© © © © ' 


CO 


-f 


rH © m © ' 


-H 


CO 


rH in © CO • 
CM t- © • 


CM 


CO 




c- 


© rH rH ■ 


CO 


CM 


co 





HHOOHQ0 

© lO © C-1 lO © 
00 CO rH »n © © 
CM © rH CM CO 



-. 

X 
CO 



X 

CM 
C I 



— . 

CO 

r. 

00 
CO 



cc 
© 

C i 



CM 
CM 
3S 



in 

CO 

1- 



35 

»n 



CO 
CO 



© 

© 

CO 

© 



© o 

t- CM 

HH O 
rH Id 



© © © © CM 

© © © in c0' 
© o cm m 

rt< lO rH 
CO rH 



•sq[ 'sseg 



© © in rH 
© © l- m rH 

© © CO 

© -H 



•Jl 

Eh 
O 

►H 

« 

Eh 

03 



C 

s 

o 
O 

>> 

*r , 

be cu 

^§ 

-CO 

S r" 

«8 S 
C a) 

§•3 

K cS 

go* * 
cS 



© © © 

©in © 

© CM 
CM CO © 

oat- 



t>5 

a 



© 


CM 


-H 




00 


in 


© 


CO 






© 


tH 


o 


© 


in 


CM 


t- 


© 


CM 


CM 


CO 





.£ 
a 

3 

O 

O 

a 
o 

CJD 
_S 

T3 
3 



ce o i ■ 



o 

O «' 
•® 

a 3 v 

, H ? 

4V-EO fi fl'fi 
Su cS 05 - 
X H 



go 4) 



Ofl btn OO 

. . tx g 3 a ts 

S 3 ~ O.- ^ 

, . *J - 3 

*-r- <b - - 

Qg^C-lr^ S 

m © t>. x o © 

_H 



00 



3— 3 

O 0< 3^ <D 
— <C & t. 

Euhh'Ohh 

r- 0) CO -H 



158 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Recapitulation of the number of fishetmen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels 



Fishing 



s- 
9 
— 





DlSTKICTS. 



3 
4 

5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

in 



Lake of the Woods and Rainy 
River District 

Lake Nepigon and Thunder 
Bay District 

Lake Superior 

Lake Huron (North Channel) 

Georgian Bay 

Lake Huron (proper) 

River St. Clair 

Thames River 

Lake St. Clair and Detroit 
River 



Tugs or Vessels. 



2 



be 
C3 

C 

a 
o 
H 



Lake Erie and Grand River.. 

11 Lake Ontario. ...... 

12|Frontenac County 

13 Leeds County 

14 Grenville, Dundas, Stormont 

and Glengarry Counties. . . 

15 Prescott, Russell and Carle- 

ton Counties 

16 Renfrew County 

17 Nipissing District 

18 Peterborough County 

19 Lake Scugog and Victoria 

County 

20 Lake Simcoe and Tributaries 

21 Muskoka District, Grey and 

Wellington Counties 



Totals. 



12 
22 
17 



18 



91 



(52 



115 
215 
246 
161 



466 
62 



12 



<D 

!> 



4,250 



24,000 
89,839 
50,200 
19,700 



56,300 
6,300 



13 



42 
95 
81 
42 



90 
21 



2,000 



1,339 252,589 



36 



4-Ju 



Boats. 



CD 

2 



21 

+50 
71 
109 
114 
96 
11 
22 

59 



> 



1,365 

750 
4,910 
11,250 
7,750 
6.476 
234 
274 

2,479 



218 ( 17,616 

269i 10.845 
69 596 
32 311 



12 
16 
12 



1,187 



48 

500 
105 
750 



58 



66,317 



a 



23 

75 
132 
196 
223 
174 
27 
93 



^2 



28 



101 

394 



440 
681 
1,559 
413 
*2 
*21 



*2 

r *7i 

I 458 
463i 1,083 
70| 11 
51 



13 
15 
24 



2,082 



4 
20 
108 



Gill-nets. 



28,200 



639,600 
677,500 
838,900 
810,430 



301.590 
462,810 
5,800 
600 



900 
681 
18,000 



<v 
> 



2,545 



28,255 
51,295 
86,512 
25,445 
10 
105 

10 

3551 
21,734 f 
23,381 

607 

52 



1,000 



4.812 3,786,011 



90 
116 
648 



40 



240,720 



*Dip nets. fCanoes. 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— ONTARIO 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

and boats, the quantity and value of all fishing materials for the year 1901. 



159 



Material. 



Seines. 



u 



i—" 
> 



1,425 
799 
1,703 

18 1,879 
28 7,700 
3,635 



615 
540 
787 

1,440 
2,049 
965 



Pound-nets. 



a 



30 



> 



Hoop-nets. 



S 
P 



37 
72 



63 



11 

258 



3,500 



45,425 
13,950 



12,450 



17,141 6,396 471 



1,925 
84,251 



70 



283 
67 
63 



jr 
!> 



S cts. 



Night lines. 



z i 

ii 



150 00 1,500 



161,501 



*1 

5 



499 



2,911 00 

200 00 

4,369 00 
1,143 00 
1,236 00 



3 

03 
> 



S cts. 



50 
100 00 



20 00 



18,000 

10,900 

2,950 
75 
950 

5,700 

1,720 
600 
7,500 



Other Fixtures used 
in Fishing. 



Freezers and 
ice-houses. 



u 



8 
3 
16 
18 
2 



180 00 

768 00 

33 50 
2 00 
9 50 

73 00 

17 00 
12 00 
75 00 



> 



4,500 



2,660 
400 
1,945 
2,540 
280 



79 22,240 



Piers and 
wharfs. 



u 

— 



-- 

> 



2 
5 
11 

' 2 
21 



2,500 



61 
1 



5,989 
15 



85 
900 



1,000 
750 
950 

"lO 
40 

10 
1,800 
950 



10,129 00 49,895 1,185 00 199 41,554 



49 



8,010 



J:3 Fishing Machines and 61 Spears. 



i 

8 

9 

10 

11 
12 
13 

14 

15 
16 
17 
18 

19 
20 

21 



160 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Recapitulation by Districts of the kinds and 



District. 

6 
s 



1 Lake of the Woods and 
Rainy River District 

2 Lake Nepigon and Than 
der Bay District 

3 Lake Superior 

4 Lake Huron (North 

Channel) 

5 Georgian Bay 

6|Lake Huron (proper 
7 1 River St. Clair. . . . 
8 
9 



10 

11 
12 
13 
14 



15 

16 
17 
18 
19 

20 

21 



and De- 
< 4 rand 



Thames River. 
Lake St. Clair 
troit River. . . 
Lake Erie and 

River. 

Lake Ontario . ... 

Frontenac County 

Leeds County .... 

Grenville, Dundas, Stor 
mont and Glengarry 

Counties 

Prescott, Russell and 

Carleton Counties 

Renfrew County 

Nipissing District 

Peterborough County. . . 
Lake Scngog and Vic- 
toria County . ....... 

Lake Sinicoe and Tribu- 
taries 

Muskoka District, Grey 
and Wellington Coun- 
ties 



Totals. 
Values . 



bo 
C 

- 

u 

X 

brls. 



225A 
426A 
3714 



ho 
u 

0) 

X 

lbs. 



811,000 



30,764 
187,583 
3,500 



1,03H 



4,120 



6,442 

6,525,733 
1,094,475 
7,188 
150 



<s 

lbs. 

117,570 

300 
461,546 

1,228,921 
274,180 
26,154 



IS 

brls. 



20,721 

401,425 
129,120 



9,587 



1,000 
15,000 

1,316 



7,971,738 



159,435 



2 

6,153 



134A 



42 



o 



lbs. 

17,918 

15,200 
1,331,703 

1,584,748 
1,222,485 
866,632 



T3 



C 

H 
brls. 



2,066 
60,084 
8,300 
8,020 



800 
15,600 

554 



2,683,058 
214,645 



141 



1,410 



51 
3)666 
14,320 
24,300 

1,166 



5,159,993 



515,999 



251 



531 

803 



1,585* 
15,855 



M 
lbs. 



50 



75 



3,913 

37,648 
5,470 
6,000 
4,667 



s 
o 

A 

u 
o 

"a! 
■— 

v 

o 

■£ 

lbs. 

75,580 

2,000 
40,306 

496,606 
194,039 
281,551 
113,247 
34,064 

44,878 

1,218,171 
34,270 
9,360 



870 


1,470 


55 
14 


5,025 


4,009 
35,500 


52,000 


193,750 


200 


70,200 


14,550 



732 



374,712 



29,977 



2,605,618 



130,281 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— ONTARIO 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

quantities of Fish caught during the Year 1900. 



a; 
it 
C 

o 



- 

L 

lbs. 

42,319 

4,000 
5,824 

71,518 
20,340 



lbs 



15 



140 



300 
3,070 

15,536 

821,884 
232,330 
42,861 
9,351 



1,100 

2,520 
651 
3,068 



3,428 



5,000 
i23 

635 
25 



160 



110 

62,500 

317,050 



0/ 



a> 



lbs. 



lbs. 



lbs. 
4,662 



— 



a, o 
y. 



600 

3, 700 1 

17,665 

700 

200 1,000 

19,903 10,500 

712 



lbs. 
72,835 



12,538 



3,545 
200 
2,181 



lbs. 
11.415 



o 

<x> 
to 



X 



lbs. 
52,334 



853l 13,270 



15,600 
22,075 
27,700 
10,872 
82,974 



40,951 
100 
513 



4 

36 



800 
1,086 



694,739 
283,671 
4,789 
991 



16,800 . . . . 



1,285,838 405,826 



51,434 



24,340 



43,490 



2,609 



875 
210, 
154 
1,500 

80,420 



1,110,117 



16,874 



33,304 1,012 



49,203 293,652 



47,904 
267, Q 12 
45,065 
40,001 



622 
3,743 



2,000 
17,510 
4,950 



570,109 



11,402 



559,768 
722,300 
69,359 
48,902 



3,000 

0.860 
860 
2,747 
18,000 

22,840 

45,000 



1,042 . 



130,098 
45,906 

147,840 
33,250 
25 

73,383 

169,025 
18,816 

"l'526 



23,353 

632 
2,700 
164,036 



1,969,710 876,212 



39,394 52,57; 



12,948 
8,176 

14,862 
3,325 



16,498 
1,779 

i52 



2,130 

39 
270 
15,144 



90,761 
45,380 



161 




300,259 54 
171,452 59 
133,622 52 
9,644 29 
3,596 84 



7,338 21,326 75 



31-1,059 
82,788 17 
6,078 35 
3,565 91 



2,764 09 



84 lu 



11 
12 
13 



14 



715 84 15 
352 94 16 
18,487 47 17 
10,478 00 1 18 



30,340 16 
12,328 50 

244 68 



1,333,293 82 



19 

20 

21 



135 Sturgeon bladders. 



22—11 



162 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWAKD VII., A. 1902 



STATEMENT 



Of the yield and value of the Fisheries of the Province for the year 1900. 



Kind of Fish. 


Quantity. 


Price. 


Value. 












S cts. 


S cts. 






bbls. 


141 


10 00 


1,410 00 






lbs. 


2,683,058 


08 


214,644 64 






lbs. 


7,971,738 


02 


159,434 76 






bbls. 


1,0314 


4 00 


4,126 00 


Trout 






1,585| 


10 00 


15,855 00 






lbs. 


5,159,993 


10 


515,999 30 


Bass 






374.712 


08 


29,976 96 


Pickerel 






2,605,618 


05 


130,280 90 


Pike 






1, 285,838 i 


04 


51,433 54 








405,826 


06 


24,349 56 








876,212i 


06 


52,572 75 








90,761 


50 


45.380 50 








135 


80 


108 00 


Eels 






43,490 


06 


2,609 40 








1,110,117 


03 


33,303 51 








570,109 


02 


11,402 18 








1,969,719 


02 


39,394 38 


Tullibee 






16.874 


06 


1,012 44 


Total 










81,333.293 82 









RECAPITULATION 



Of all fishing tugs, boats and nets, &c, employed in the Province for the year 1900. 

Articles. Value. 

91 tugs, 1,339 tonnage (420 men) I 252,589 

1,187 boats (2,082 men) 66,317 

3,786,011 yards gill-nets number 4,812 240,720 

95 seines, 17,141 yards 6,396 

471 pound nets 161,501 

499 hoop nets 10,129 

97 dip nets 535 

49,895 hooks on set lines 1,185 

199 freezers and ice houses 41,554 

49 piers and wharfs 8,010 

3 machines 45 

61 spears 61 



Total 



8789.042 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— MANITOBA 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



163 



APPENDIX No. 7. 



MANITOBA. 



REPORT ON THE FISHERIES OF MANITOBA BY INSPECTOR 
W. S. YOUNG, FOR THE YEAR 1900. 



Selkirk, Sept. 13, 1901. 

To the Dominion Commissioner of Fisheries, 
Ottawa. 



I have the honour to submit the following table of statistics showing the yield and 
value of the fisheries, the number of fishermen, boats, nets, &c, and the quantity and 
value of fish caught in the lakes of the province of Manitoba for the year 1900. 

As I was only recently appointed to the position of inspector, my facilities in these 
few months for a comprehensive view of the industry have been limited. 

As will be found by comparison with the report of my predecessor for the previous 
year, there is a considerable increase in the quantity and value of fish caught during 
last year. It is true there is also an increase in the number of boats, nets, <kc, and a 
consequent increase in the tonnage of fishing tugs. 

There were no heavy losses and the season's operations as a whole were very 
successful and profitable, both to the fishermen employed and the companies engaged in 
this important industry. The fish seem to have been more plentiful than usual. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant. 

W. S. YOUNG, 

Inspector of Fisheries. 



22— Hi 



164 



MA JUNE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Overseer A. J. McPherson, Dauphin, Manitoba, reports as follows on the fisheries of 
Lake Winnipegosis and the west side of Lake Manitoba : 

Lake Winnipegosis — This season's catch on an average has been a good one, and 
fish have been on the market in good condition. There has been very little waste fish 
on the fishing grounds. This is accounted for by the better class of boats that has been 
put on these lakes, and one new ' steamer ' that was put this year on Lake Winni- 
pegosis which alone is capable of handling two cars of fish each trip without towing any 
barges. The markets have been good throughout the season. Prices ranging from one 
and a half to four and a half cents per pound were paid by the buyers for whitefish. 
Coarse fish was also in better demand this season than they have ever been before. On 
these lakes, 1 suckers ' have been bought up by the buyers and shipped out, which has 
a good effect on the fishing grounds, as it has a tendency to keep the water clean of dead 
fish and fishermen will get their coarse fish off the ice, which has always been a source 
of trouble to them, and has been the cause of spoiling some of the best fishing grounds 
on these lakes. 

Pickerel and pike realized good prices this season, and were very plentiful in the 
southern end of the lake, and most of the fishermen do their winter fishing for them, 
which, I am of the opinion, is the best thing that can be done for this lake, as it gives 
whitefish a better chance. The latter fish are improving in this lake every year. 

A great many fishermen are of the opinion that the department ought to put in 
some fry in this lake in return for the ova that was taken out for two years for the 
Selkirk hatchery. By keeping the Dominion Bay closed for a breeding ground, and 
by carefully looking after this lake, there is no danger of depleting it for years to 
come. 

Lake Manitoba. — The fishing has improved in this lake for the last two years- 
The reason for this, as explained by the fishermen, is that it has been kept cleaner of 
dead fish, sawdust and rubbish by the removal of the saw-mill near the River Fairford. 
It is very important that the rivers running from one lake to another should be clean 
and free from dead fish and offal. Two new ice-houses were erected at the south end 
of the lake this year, and it will require a little better looking after next year as fishing 
will be more active. 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' RETORTS— MANITOBA 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



•jaqums^ 



C 

H 

so 
D 



Si 



o 



® S3 cS 



■5 £ 

is © 

^ © CO 

89 O T- 1 



•jaqum\; 



a> o » i 

S S3 O 



•an t «A 



© © 

© © 

© in 
© 



© 

CM 



S i 



•jaqumx 



SO -f 

00 



SC 

5 



S 



"3 . 



S3 

'5 

'SI 



o 
pq 



6C 



•ai»l*A 



© 
© 

CO 



■jaqmn^j 



•an t «A 



© 

00 



© 
© 



CM © 

:o ~ 



uaqum ^ 



CO 



- 



CO 



CM 
3! 



•anpA 



© 

m se 



© 
© 
© 



X 



© © 

° = 

O) © 

I- CM 

IS 



© 
© 



© 



uaqmu 



© 

© 

7-5 



Z 

CM 



•trapj 



cc 

01 



r 

x 



© . 00 

© © 
cm i in 



•anpA 



T-H © 

© i-l 

CO 



© 
— 



•jaqumv; 



© .n 



CM 



CO 

1-1 

CM 



•uajAi 



•anpA 



© 
© 



m 

CO 



uaquniN^ 



CC 

gs 
o 

2 

£- 



CM 

to 



7' 
CM 



© 
© 



CM CO 
t- CM 
T-H O 



I- I CM 



7. 



cS 
C 
JS 
■S- 



- 



S3 
D 
-33 



OS 
C 



U 45 l-U 



3 a: 



tx 

— 

'2 
S3 



d3 

: 

9 



to" O 

x Eh 



0) 

s 



£ - £ 



-3 



■ 01 CO 



166 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



< H 

H -5 
< 



O 

•iH 

2 



rd" 

m 



O 

0) 
3 

IS 

> 

a 

-ts 
d 
cS 

s 

0> 

a> 
-a 

--a 

fco 
d 

• r— I 

o 
rd 

d 
d 

S3 



x 

03 
»h 

HH 



32 

c 

s2 



•sqi '[a.w>ioij 



•sqi 'pacqns 'qsijajiq ^ 



co 
o 

s 

E-i 

DO 



CO 

t- 

CO 
I— I 

co 



© 
© 

© 

o 



© 
© 

00 
00 
OS 

co" I 

CM 



© 
© 

OS 

■* 
t- 

lO 

10 
Ht" 



© © 

© o 

'J" © 

CO rr 

1C o 

CM i-H 



© 
© 

■HH 



© 
© 



oc 

CO 



c 
© 
© 



© 
© 

m 

CO 
CM 



© 

00 
CM 



s 

cS 
bo 

CO 

& 

"8 
c 



o3 
O 

m 

T3 
C 

cS 

a 

s- 



m 

Q 



sqi'uopdumsuoQ auiojj 


© © 
© © 

oc © 
25 cm 

t- lO 
CM r-l 




© 
© 

00 
00 
CM 
-H* 


00 

oc 

CM 
"* 


•sqi 'sa^apiof) 


S : § 

• CC 
CO • CO 


© 
© 

CM 


CM 
L~ 


•sqi 

'qsif 8SJBO0 pire p9^'}K 


10fi400 
110000 
25000 


241400 


■* 
rH 

•HH 

CM 


■sqi 'qsm^O 


© 
© 

00 
rH 




© 
© 

00 
I— ( 


CM 
CO 

ia 

id 


•sqi 'aaqinnx 


0082 
00008 
00G9T I 


© 
© 

CM 

© 

CM 


■* 

00 

© 

rj> 


•sqi 'qojaj 


© 
© 
© 

00 




© 
© 
© 

CO 

■HH 


© 
© 
CS 


•Sqi '8.1131 A «Q 


© 
© 

io 

rH 




© 
© 
io 

t — 

I— 1 


© 

t— 

00 


•sqi 'uoaSaing 


© 
© 

55 
i— i 

00 
OS 






© 

rH 

CO 
© 


© 

© 

00 
00 

to 




304300 
140000 




© 
© 

CO 

-r 


© 

X 
CO 
CO 



s 
£ 

in 

CM 
-> 



lO 
I 00 

to 



© 
© 

CO 

-f- 

CO 

ir: 



— 

CM 
OS 
CM 



r 

x 

CO 
CM 



© 
— 



c 

CO 



a 
s 

cS 



be 

09 

a 

"8 
c 



cS 

c 



> 



* s £ 



CO 
cS 



cS 
r^ 



-.laqum^ 



CM co 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS- NORTH WEST TERRITORIES 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



APPENDIX No. 8. 
NORTH-WEST TERRITORIES. 

Qu'Appelle, N.W.T., January 2, 1901. 

To the Dominion Commissioner of Fisheries, 

Ottawa. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the following report on the fisheries of the North- 
west Territories for the year 19C0. 

The rainfall during the year was again above the average and was exceptionally 
heavy in the northern Alberta and Saskatchewan districts. This has had an excellent 
effect on the lakes and rivers, though the disturbance of the fishery grounds made the 
fishing more precarious during a portion of the year. A great many of the smaller lakes 
materially raised their water levels and many where fish had become extinct, owing to the 
low water, have been restocked. In both spring and fall spawning was much earlier than 
usual owing to the peculiar season. About eight millions of whitefish fry were procured 
from the Selkirk hatchery and placed in the QuAppelle, Crooked and Round lakes. 

The regulations have been well observed in general and the advantages of close 
seasons are now fairly well comprehended. There were thirteen convictions in Assini- 
boia for illegal fishing, but in no instance was the culprit a licensed fisherman. In 
Alberta the high water prevented in a great degree the illegal taking of fish by traps in 
the streams and the infractions on the lakes were but trivial. 

The Saskatchewan valley fisheries were much interfered with by the heavy floods 
which prevailed throughout the summer. A phenomenal abundance of muskrats, however, 
absorbed the energies of those who usually resort to the fishery for their livelihood and 
has prevented the hardships which would probably otherwise have followed. 

The Cedar Lake sturgeon fishery was opened in the winter months only. The 
results of this course have been satisfactory, the fear of depletion being removed and 
profitable employment afforded to the resident Indian and half-breed fishermen, to whom 
only licenses are issued, during the hardest season of the year. 

The winter fishery in the Edmonton District was very good, but during the summer 
the heavy rains, coupled with the issue of half-breed scrip, considerably lessened the 
amount of fishing done in that season. The rapidly increasing settlement of this section 
will necessitate the employment of more local guardians in the near future. 

The only export business in fish from the North-west Territories this year has been 
carried on at Lake Winnipegosis. Attention has been called to this district by the 
Canadian Northern Railway and the early catches in these almost virgin waters attracted 
many fishermen to the lake from other points. Under the supervision of a special over- 
seer a most successful fishery has been made, the number of licenses issued being care- 
fully regulated and due preference given to the older settlers and permanent residents. 

LONG LAKE. 

Overseer Foster reports a smaller catch than for some years, attributed to the number 
of men engaging in the fishery being considerably less. Eleven licenses and four free 
permits to needy Indians were issued. The fish were very plentiful and in excellent 
condition and no sickness amongst them was reported throughout the year. On account 
of the small catch prices were high. Fish not disposed of in the immediate vicinity 
were marketed at Regina and Moosejaw. Little fishing was done except in the winter 
season. Two nets were seized and two men fined for illegal fishing. The lake main- 
tained the level gained in the previous year and the supply of fish is apparently in- 
creasing. 



168 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

qu'appelle lakes. 

Guardian Leader reports a full catch of pike, pickerel, tullibee and coarse fish but 
a diminution in that of whitefish. Few of the fishermen are supplied with suitable boats 
for reaching the grounds to which the whitefish resort in summer. The destruction of 
spring spawning fish in the creeks was much less this year than in former years, owing 
to the spring freshet coming very early. The whitefish taken were mostly of small size 
but many of the tullibee weighed as high as four pounds. No difficulty is experienced 
by the fishermen in disposing of their catches, the balance not consumed at home being 
readily marketed at the neighbouring towns. Two persons were fined for fishing in the 
close season, but the regulations were well observed by the regular fishermen both white 
and Indian. The dam and fishway at Katepwe have been maintained in good condition, 
but require considerable watching during the run of fish to prevent their abuse as fish- 
traps. About six millions of whitefish fry from the Selkirk hatchery were placed in 
these lakes in the spring, from which good results are looked for later on. 

CROOKED AND ROUND LAKES. 

Guardian Fitzgerald reports these lakes to be in excellent condition as regards the 
state of water, the heavy rains in the fall having had good results^ Good catches of 
pike and pickerel were made, the hook and line fishery by the Indians being specially 
successful. The amount of whitefish caught remains, however, only nominal. An 
attempt at restocking the lakes with fry from Selkirk was made this spring, but unfort- 
unately the shipment did not stand the long journey well and only a small percentage 
was placed in the lake in a healthy state. Two illegal nets were seized and six per- 
sons were successfully prosecuted for constructing fish traps on the river. The con- 
struction of a good dam at the outlet of Round Lake has been pressed on the attention 
of the North-west Government, and if made would much help the fishery. 

MOOSE MOUNTAIN LAKES. 

The appointment of Guardian Pou-ell in this district has had a very beneficial effect 
in preventing the illegal netting done in the previous seasons. Two persons were fined 
for this offence. These lakes are much resorted to by summer visitors and excellent 
sport is afforded by the pickerel, about 3,000 of which were taken by hook and line. 

EDMONTON DISTRICT. 

Overseer Harrison Young reports that the lakes in his district are as a whole in a 
satisfactory condition. The issue of scrip to the half-breeds has materially lessened the 
amount of fishing done by them, and the exceptionally heavy rains have had a good 
effect in raising the level of the water thus permitting fish to pass freely from previously 
isolated lakes. There have been but few infractions of the regulations by the resident 
fishermen ; nets were seized in five instances, but no prosecutions were instituted. At Lake 
La Biche, fish were very plentiful and much larger than last year. The half-beeeds resident 
round this lake caught all the fish they wanted during the summer months, and did not 
have to set more than one net per family to do so. They all now appreciate the value 
of a close season. At Lake St. Anne's there has been a great rise in the water level, the 
fish have left their former feeding places and the fishermen had difficulty in locating the 
new grounds. The visit of the scrip commissioners prevented much fishing being done 
in December here. Fish are reported as plentiful as ever at White Whale Lake, but for 
some reason are of very poor quality this year, watery and tasteless. Lake la Nonne has 
not hitherto been much resorted to, but a settlement of half-breeds has recently been made 
and a guardian during the close season will be required next year. Pigeon Lake still 
continues to hold its own, and the quality of the fish is excellent. Very high water has 
had the same effect as at St. Anne's in altering the fishing places. Exceedingly bad 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— NORTH- WEST TERRITORIES 169 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

roads due to heavy rains interfered with the summer marketing of fish so that few men 
were fishing through the summer, but the winter catch was good. With regard to 
coarse fish in the many creeks and small lakes in this district, the low water of previous 
seasons had caused considerable scarcity, advantage having been taken to take the fish 
by traps. This year, all streams were filled bank high and could not easily be shut up 
and the destruttion of fish was not large. The evil is, however, a growing one, and with 
the increasing settlement of the country must be coped with by the appointment of 
local guardians. 

BATTLEFORD. 

Guardian Gagne reports that his efforts to prevent the placing of dams and traps 
in the Battle River have had a good effect this year, and the damage done by such 
illegal practices has been trifling. The catch at Jackfish Lake was good and its white- 
fish seem to be increasing in quantity and improving in quality. Turtle Lake was not 
much resorted to this season, and fish are reported still scarce there. Considerable fish- 
ing was done at Cold Lake, where the whitefish are exceptionally fine. 

PRINCE ALBERT. 

Overseer Robertson reports having visited all the important points in his district 
during the year and that the regulations were well observed. The Saskatchewan River 
fisheries are operated during the summer low water, this year, the river was in flood so 
continued, that the catch was extremely small. 

The Green Lake fishery was also a failure, the whitefish being observed to leave 
the lake in shoals early in September, though its waters were in excellent condition and 
some three feet higher than in the previous year. Most of the residents went to Dog 
Lake for the winter fishery, where a full supply was forthcoming. At Isle la Crosse 
and Lake le Rouge the supply of fish is still amply sufficient for local needs though the 
consumption of fish is very large. No fishing was done by the Indians at Fort la Corne 
owing to the high stage of the river. At Crooked Lakes there is a good supply of pike, 
pickerel, and mullet and the surrounding district being now well settled, a good deal of 
angling is done. 

Red Deer, Trout, and Candle Lakes are without doubt the most important and 
available lakes in the district for fishing to be carried on for other than purely local 
needs. The season, however, is regarded as opening too late as now fixed, for the car- 
rying on of a profitable industry though the prospect of the opening up of a shorter 
route to market is likely to lead to the formation of a local company to engage in the 
business if an earlier opening of the fishery is conceded. 

GRAND RAPIDS. 

Overseer McKay reports that the Cedar Lake fisheries have been kept under care- 
ful supervision during the year no fishing for sturgeon was allowed throughout the 
summer and the regular fishermen were then mostly employed in the Lake Winnipeg 
fishery. Licenses for th. winter fishery were confined strictly to residents, half-breeds and 
indians. No fish were marketed from this district except sturgeon, which were bought 
by the Dominion Fish Co., at Grand Rapids. The overseer reports that fish of all kinds 
are as plentiful as ever and that there is no need to fear the depletion of the waters 
under present conditions. The great abundance of rauskrats in the lower Saskatchewan 
Valley has much diminished the amount of fishing done during the year by the native 
population. There were rumours from time to time of fishing being done by outside 
unlicensed fishermen, but careful investigations showed these to be unfounded. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

ERNEST W. MILLER, 

Inspector of Fisheries. 



170 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



+3 

m 

I 

U 

o 

© 

43 
4i 

-a 

- 

o 



© 
"3 

§ ° 

CO cs 
43 



S3 
. © 

© 

© J3 

JS 

u 

^£ 

3 02 
r <D 

to 

03 43 
-ts .pH 

Ct> rH 

tTE-i 

e3 
O 

pq 
a" 

a 

t-l 

CD 



© 



55 



« 

D 




r © © © - © © 

opoSooo 




© 

© 


-J 

< 

-J 


43 


o o o © © © © 

1" m 'J" © Ti in © 
CiClCCHHCOiO 




© 
r-l 




sefrH cm'co" -ft- ©" 
CM H h c: 

r— 




262, 


5 

H 











•J} 



^■3 





•sqi 


85000 
5000 
40000 
10000 
50000 
180000 
ICOOOOO 


1370000 


13700 






57000 
20000 

25000 
50000 


© 
© 
© 

CM 

o 

I-H 


3040 


ISH. 




4000 
2000 
42000 
10000 


© 
© 

o 


© 
© 
© 




03 




80000 
5000 
75000 
15000 
43000 
150000 
750000 


1118000 


© 
© 

CO 
CM 
CM 


Kin 




© •©©©©© 
© -©poo© 
© ■©©©©© 

lO • CC X t— m © 
© -CO /" i— o 

m 


© 
© 
© 

t- 


© 

CO 




■sqi '^ojj, 


35000 

25000 
10000 
100000 


170000 


© 
© 

in 

CO 






28000 
1000 
378000 
47000 
198000 
180000 
3000000 


3832000 


i 

T-H 

© 

T— 




3D 




©©©©©© • 

— © IT. © © © • 
„ C.r-l>lOtOO ■ 


© 
m 
t~ 




< 


ill Net 




©©©©©© 
© © © © © © 

iC lC 1C © © iC 
rH 


© 
© 
© 




<! 






©©©©©© • 


© 

CM 

m 

T-l 




(HING 1 






in © © © © © • 

CM Nrt • 


© 
© 






00 




© © in © © © • 
© © CM © 10 © 
m 00 m t- CM © -r< ; 


in 
o 
© 










© © © © CO © 

O CM CO CM © -* 1 • 
rH 


CO 

m 

CO 





- _S — — cS 

3 =<- r 



— ^; "© rs t. t- - 

- - ^, Kji - * - - - 'y 

_ r-n — ■ — ■ ' - 



vreqratifj 



»— cm co -r in © t- 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— NORTH-WEST TERRITORIES 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



171 



RECAPITULATION 

Op the Yield and Value of the Fisheries of Manitoba and the North- west 

Territories, for the Year 1900. 



Kinds of Fish. 



Whitefish, salted Lbs. 

■I fresh i 

Trout 

Pickerel » 

Pike .i 

Sturgeon " 

ii caviare ■■ 

Perch it 

Tullibee ■■ 

Catfish • i 

Goldeyes ■■ 

Coarse and mixed fish i 

Home consumption (not itemized) . . n 

Total for 1900 

1899 



Increase. 



Rate. 



I cts. 

05 
05 
05 
03 
02 



50 
02 
02 
03 
01 
01 
01 



Quantity. 



28,800 
9,675,600 
170,000 
2,952,100 
1,562,300 
1,039,500 
17,500 
48,000 
356,200 
184,400 
7,200 
1,611,400 
428,800 



Value. 



1,440 
483,780 
8,500 
88,563 
31,246 
61,790 
8,750 
960 
7,124 
5,532 
72 
16,114 
4,288 



718,159 
622,911 



95,248 



RECAPITULATION 

Of the Number of Fishing Tugs, Boats, Nets, kc, used in Manitoba and the North- 
West Territories, for the Year 1900. 



Articles. 



22 Fishing tugs (1,523 tons). . 

571 " boats 

1720 gill-nets (153,200 fathoms). 

192 fathoms of seines 

2 pound -nets 

106 freezers and ice houses 
38 piers and wharfs 



Total . 



Value. 



128,100 
21,065 
22,620 
180 
300 
118,400 
10,615 

301,280 



172 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



APPENDIX No. o. 
BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

ANNUAL REPORT ON THE FISHERIES OF BRITISH COLUMBIA FOR 
THE YEAR 1900, BY INSPECTOR C. B. SWORD. 

New Westminster, B.C., February 7, 1901. 

Dominion Commissioner of Fisheries, Ottawa. 

Sir, — I have the honour to inclose statistical report of the fisheries of British 
Columbia for the year 1900, also returns of the packs of the various salmon canneries, 
as well as the report of the fur-sealing catch. 

SALMON. 

On the Fraser River this year the run of sockeye salmon (0. Xerka) was the 
poorest known for several years, the pack only amounting to 170,889 cases, as against 
486,409 cases in 1899, and" about 240,000 cases in 1898. On Puget Sound where the 
packers depend almost wholly on Fraser River fish for their sockeye pack, the estimate 
for this season is 228,704 cases, as against 497,700 cases in 1899, and 244,000 cases in 
1898. 

The estimated pack for Puget Sound for this season is given as 



Sockeyes 228,704 cases. 

Red Spring 29,983 

Cohoes 118,174 

Humpbacks (0. Gorbusche) n 

Chums (i.e. Qualo) or dog-salmon (0. Keta) 55,170 h 



432,031 „ 

less than one half of last year's pack. 

Of the total pack for British Columbia, 606,530 cases, there were, 

Sockeye 413,802 cases. 

Spring 17,125 n 

Cohoes 43,484 i,i 

Humpbacks 12,267 

Dog-salmon 119,852 m 



All the humpbacks (0. Gorbuscha) and dog-salmon (0. Keta) canned were packed in 
the Fraser River district, these, with cohoes raising the returns for that district to 
331,361 cases. 

In addition to the small run of sockeyes, the pack suffered to some extent from the 
labour troubles in the early part of the. season, a strike among the fishermen preventing 
any fishing being done for about two weeks. 

Judging from the catches in the traps on the United States side of the line during 
these two weeks, the loss to the pack for the year could not have been very large, while 
there can be no doubt that a much larger number of fish were enabled to reach the 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— BRITISH COLUMBIA 



173 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

spawning grounds than would otherwise have done, a result which in such a season as 
last, must be regarded as a considerable set-off against the loss caused by the strike. 

The northern fisheries do not seem to have suffered from a deficiency in the run of 
salmon, the returns showing as follows : 

1900. 1899. 1898. 

Skeena River ..... 135,424* 122,903 105,362 

Rivers Inlet 91,587 83,628 90,440 

Naas River 20,200 19,442 20,000 

The value of the canned salmon is estimated on the same basis, *4.80 per case as in 
the previous year. This is less than the price at which sockeye salmon sold this year, 
but as the total returns include 193,046 cases of other salmon which were sold at lower 
rates, the total may be taken as fairly accurate. 

The shipment of salmon salted in barrels shows an increase to 4,750 barrels, as 
against 3,450 in 1899. 

Shipments of dry salted qualo or dog salmon (O. Keta) amounted this year to 
5,700,000 pounds, as against 3,000,000 pounds in 1899, and 4,000,000 pounds in 1898. 
Taking into account the large number of these salmon, 6,340,000 pounds, put up in 
cans, in addition to those dry salted, we have a very gratifying addition to our fishing 
returns, when we consider that up to 1898 these fish were, with the exception of those 
consumed by the Indians, thrown away as worthless. 

The amount of salmon shipped in a frozen condition (included under the heading 
'fresh ') shows 550,000 pounds, as against 800,000 pounds in 1899. This decrease is 
accounted for by the small catch on the Fraser river, a new company on the Skeena 
being credited with shipments to the amount of 100,000. 

Notwithstanding the decrease last year, there is every reason to expect a large 
development in the immediate future in the business of shipping fresh salmon in a 
frozen or chilled condition. The competition for salmon among the packers was very 
keen, and a very large number of applications for permission to use seines at various 
points were made to the department. 

Five applications for license to use seines in the Straits of San Juan de Fuca, on 
the south-west coast of Vancouver Island, were granted, the applicants expecting 
to be able thus to intercept the schools before they reached the traps on the United 
States side of the line. From the nature of the locality, and to give every opportunity 
to fairly test the suitability of this seining ground, these licensees were allowed to use 
seines 200 fathoms long, being double the regular length. Only two of the licensees 
utilized the permission granted, the result being a complete failure. In would appear that 
while in some years the schools pass close enough to the shore to be taken with the drag 
seine, this is by no means uniformly the case, and the runs this year were so poor that 
it is doubtful whether, even had the fish come close in, the seines could have been pro- 
fitably operated. Of course, under different conditions, it is quite likely that the 
experience of this season might be reversed. 

The demand for dog salmon, or qualo, occasioned the shipment of a considerable 
quantity of this fish, dry salted, from the Queen Charlotte Islands, and there is every 
probability that in the coming season, not only these outlying islands, but many inlets 
and streams hitherto untouched on all parts of the coast will be fished, to supply the 
constantly growing demand. 

The two fishery cruisers which it is proposed to build will be fully employed, and 
a large increase in the staff of guardians will also be required. 



STURGEON. 

The falling off in the catch of sturgeon still continues, the returns showing only 
105,000 pounds, as against 268,500 pounds in 1899. There were only 23 licenses taken 
out last year, against 88 in 1899, and 164 in 1898. 

Note. — This increase in the pack of canned salmon at Skeena river is in addition to the increase of 
1,000 barrels salted and 100,000 pounds frozen salmon shown in the returns from that locality. 



174 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

A few illegal lines were seized and I have reason to believe that some of these are 
still being used, the scarcity of sturgeon has, however, had most to do with the decrease 
in their use. 

HALIBUT. 

The total of the halibut catch this year, 4,261,000 lbs., shows a very satisfactory 
increase. The catch of the New England Company, the largest dealers in this fish, being 
50 per cent above their capture in 1899. This company operates mainly on the banks 
of Queen Charlotte Islands and it is probable that during the coming season we may 
have again to record a large increase in the catch as the market for this fish is improving 
and other firms are likely to go into the business on a large scale. 

GUANO, &c. 

The returns show a smaller amount of guano (200 tons) made in 1900 than in 1899 
(550 tons). This is accounted for by the smaller catch of salmon on the Fraser River 
and the consequently smaller supply of offal for the oil factory. The same cause accounts 
for the smaller return (128,100 galls.) of fish oil in 1900 (the amount in 1899 being 
145,200 galls.). The decrease from this cause in the latter article was, however, 
partially made up from other sources, dogfish, &c. We may confidently anticipate a 
steady increase taking one year with another in both these products. 

CLAMS, CRABS, &C. 

It will be observed that for the first time in these returns there are entries for 
canned clams (3,500 cases) and canned crabs (1,000 cases). Both of these are new 
industries in which the parties putting up these articles expect a great development. 

There is also an entry of 20,000 lbs. salted roe. This means the utilization of the 
roe of the canned salmon formerly thrown away but now salted and finding a market in 
Japan. 

With the exception of the sturgeon fishing and the salmon catch on the Fraser 
River every item shows an increased development of the fishing industries of the pro- 
vince, and while there does not seem much reason to expect any recovery in the sturgeon 
fishery, the smallness of the salmon catch on the Fraser River may be attributed to one 
of the fluctuations to which this fishery is so liable and should not preclude us from 
expecting a satisfactory pack next year which is the year of the quadrennial large run. 

I have the honour to remain, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

C. B. SWORD, 

Inspector of Fisheries. 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— BRITISH COLUMBIA 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



175 



A. — Schedule of Salmon Canneries operated in British Columbia, Season of 1900, with 

Number of Cases packed by each Cannery. 



Owners or Agents. 



Cleeve Canning Co. . . 

Burn & Walker 

F. Boutilier & Co. . . . 

Jas. Anderson 

Lam Tung & Co 

A. B. C. Packing Co. 



Name of Cannery. 



Victoria Canning Co . 



United Canneries Co. 



Canadian Canning Co . 



Turner, Beeton & Co. 



J. H. Todd & Sons 



Brunswick Canning Co. 



Cleeve 

Premier 

Boutilier 

St. Mungo No. 2. . 

Westminster 

Birrells 

Wadham 

British American.. 

Canoe Pass.. 

Phenix 

Brittania 

Delta 

Harlock 

Wellington 

Industrial 

Scottish Canadian . 
Gulf of Georgia . . . 

English Bay 

Star 

Vancouver 

Fraser Ri ver 

Terra Nova 

London 

Fishermans 

Beaver 

Richmond 

Brunswick No. 1 , 
No. 2.. 

Lion Island 

Dea's Island 

Currie's 

Anglo-American . 

Albion 

Canadian Pacific. 

Bain's 

Colonial 

Westham Island . 

English 

Imperial 

Lighthouse 

Atlas 

Great Northern . 



A. Ewen & Co 

B. C. Canning Co 

Currie & Mc Williams 

Anglo- American Packing Co. 
Albion Island Canning Co . . . 
Canadian Pacific Packing Co.. 
Pacific Coast Canning Co. . . . 

Columbia Packing Co 

McDonald Bros 

Jt H. Hume & Co 

R. Ward & Co 

Walter Morris. 

R. Houston & Co 

Great Northern Canning Co . . 

Alliance Canning Co I Alliance 

Provincial Canning Co Provincial 

Dinsmore Island Canning Co. . .Dinsmore 

Acme Canning Co !Acme 

Welch Bros J Keltic 

Greenwood Canning Co greenwood 

Wadhams & Sons Wadhams 

A. B. C. Packing Co Good Hope 

B. C. Canning Co Victoria 

Brunswick Canning Co Brunswick III . 

Vancouver Packing Co Vancouver 

Victoria Canning Co (Wannock 

R. Draney Namu 

J. Clayton Bella Coola 

United Canneries Co Princess Royal.. 



District. 



Fraser River. 



River's Inlet . . 



B. C. Canning Co. 

Victoria Canning Co 

R. Cunningham & Sons. 

P. Herman & Co 

Carlisle Canning Co 

Wallace Bros 

Turner, Beeton & Co. . . . 
A. B. C. Packing Co. (2) 

Victoria Canning Co iNorth Pacific and B.A. 

W. Morris (2) Naas River 

S. A. Spencer Alert Bay 

Clayoquot Fish Co Clayoquot 

Total number of 48-lbcases 



Windsor 

Standard 

Skeena 

Anglo- Alliance 

Carlisle 

Claxton 

Inverness 

Lowe Inlet .... 



Skeena River 



Locality. 



Packed 
in 

48-lb. Cases. 



New Westminster. 



Ladner's. . . 
Canoe Pass. 



Steveston . 



Ladner's. ...... 

Port Guichon. 



New Westminster. 
Steveston 



English Bay. 
Steveston 
North Arm . . 



Steveston 

Port Guichon. . . . 
Lulu Island. ...... 

North Arm 

Steveston 

Canoe Pass 

New Westminster. 

Dea's Island 

Westham Island . . 

Canoe Pass 

Westham Island . . 
Lulu Island 



Canoe Pass. 
Steveston . . 



English Bay. . . 
North Arm. . . . 



River's Inlet 



Namu Harbour 

Bella Coola 

Princess Royal Island 
Skeena River 



. . Lowe Inlet. 

Naas River. 

No. 9 District Alert Bay . . 
No. 10 n Clayoquot . . 



8 843 

I, 175 
5,450 

11,000 

5,555 

3,165 
10,710 
1,597 
4,193 
2,910 
2,018 

5,959 
2,632 
20,386 
18,041 
15, 264 
11,083 
4,900 
4,000 
7,005 
4,155 

8,400 
2.700 
2,166 
9.650 
6,105 
4,552 
27,870 
3,827 
8,036 
4,527 
12,312 
15,019 
5,190 
8,763 
3,143 
10,321 
4,437 
5,684 
5,770 
5,892 
10,500 
5,763 
6,103 
4,540 
15,900 
13,858 
L3,550 

II, 030 
7,408 

12, 150 
9,300 
4,750 
3,341 
15,000 
12.000 
15.: 

10,000 

11,369 
11,505 
15,075 
44,975 
10,856 
20,200 

9,£ 

7,602 



606., 530 



176 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

B- — Bbitish Columbia 



— 



23 
17 
22 

4 
34 
24 
29 

!1 
28 

1 

3 
37 
25 

8 
18 
20 
14 
21 
32 
31 

2 

23 
12 
26 

5 
11 
13 
36 
19 
16 
10 
38 

7 
30 

6 
35 
27 



Vessels. 



[asters. 



lAinoko 

Allie I. Alger . . . . 
Annie E. Paint .. . 

Arietis 

Aurora 

Beatrice 

Borealis 

Carlotta Gv Cox . . 
Carrie, C. W..... . 

City of San Diego. 

:Diana 

'Director 

Dora Sieward 

E. B. Marvin 

Enterprise 

Favorite. . 

Geneva 

Hatzic 

Ida Etta 

Libbie 

Mary Taylor 

Minnie 

Ocean Belle 

Ocean Rover 

Otto 

Penelope 

Sadie Turpel 

Saucy Lass 

Teresa 

Triumph 

Umbrina 

Venture 

Vera 

Victoria 

Viva 

Walter L. Rich . . . 
Zillah May 



G. Heater 

W. E. Baker 

J. W. Anderson & E. G. Macaulay 

W. Heater 

F. Hackett 

A. St. Clair 

T. Harold 

C. LeBlanc 

R. E. McKeil 

H. Blackstad 

A. Nelson ' 

M. F. Cutler 

H. F. Sieward 

C. Campbell 

V. Gullin J. Bishop 

L. McLean 

W D. Byers 

J. Daley 

D. Martin 

C. Hackett 

W. O'Leary 

J. G. Searle 

R. O. Lavender 

F. Cole. 

I. F. Gosse 

A. McDougall 

John Bishop 

W. Hateran 

G. Myer 

W. Cox 

H. V. Hughes, J. W. Peppitt. . . 

J. Anderso.n 

M. Ryan 

R. Balcam 

D. McPhee 

J. Haan.. 

W. Munro 

Indian Catch 



Totals 2,641 



Crews. 



Boats. 



Tons. 












43 


DO 
~?. 


00 


00 
CD 
O 








o3 


= 






— 


O 

PQ 


O 


75 


6 


25 


2 


12 


75 


8 


23 


2 


11 


82 


7 


25 


2 


12 


86 


6 


30 


2 


15 


40 


19 




5 




66 


5 


20 


2 


10. 


47 


7 


16 


2 


8 


76 


25 




8 




92 


9 


24 


2 


12 


46 


19 




5 




50 


21 




6 




87 


8 


29 


2 


14 


94 


10 


24 


3 


12 


96 


8 


26 


2 


13 


69 


9 


20 


2 


10 


80 


5 


32 


1 


16 


92 


01 

31 




9 




72 


7 


32 


2 


16 


69 


6 


18 


2 


9 


92 


8 


24 


2 


12 


43 


21 




6 




46 


7 


13 


2 


6 


87 


26 




8 




56 


5 


" 16 


2 


8 


86 


6 


28 


2 


14 


70 


6 


24 


2 


12 


56 


7 


20 


3 


10 


38 


5 


10 


1 


5 


63 


7 


21 


2 


10 


98 


9 


32 


3 


14 


99 


8 


27 


3 


13 


48 


6 


6 


3 


3 


60 


21 




6 




63 


6 


20 


2 


io 


92 


6 


31 


2 


14 


84 


7 


14 


2 


7 


j 66 
.... 


7 


16 


2 


8 












2,641 


384 


646 


114 


316 



Total 37 schooners in the sealing industry. 



FISHERY 1XSPECT0RS' REPORTS -BRITISH COLUMBIA 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 
Sealing Report, 1900. 



177 



British 
Columbia Coas: 
Catch. 



388 
196 
251 
430 
119 
147 
179 
271 
159 
335 
234 



252 
234 
234 
368 
304 
171 
206 
118 
387 
138 
299 



172 
154 
49 
21 
153 
220 
382 



354 
110 
317 

55 
222 



fa 



135 
192 
488 
386 

90 
148 

69 
291 

99 
182 
446 



533 
420 
315 
341 
342 
257 
159 
75 
541 
141 
436 



Vicinity Cop- 
per Island. 



Behrixu Sea. 



151 
78 
32 
23 
437 
229 
320 



455 
183 
435 
47 
327 



7.62C ! 8,809 



- 



105 



29 



39 



35 



134 



223 
404 
116 
285 
5 
168 

77 
215 
280 
218 
116 
290 
287 
195 
285 
167 
315 
232 
223 
203 

61 



27 
170 
302 
300 
105 

55 

55 
239 
375 

56 
218 
178 
231 
362 
137 



74 7,175 



- 



333 
431 
291 
261 

17 
24 1 

96 
396 
324 
152 
212 
445 
344 
261 
326 
186 
393 
426 
305 
225 
167 



306 
326 
331 
307 
287 
136 
385 
393 
340 
48 
340 
369 
418 
237 
280 



10,338 



Totals. 



1,079 
1,223 
1,146 
1.3112 
375 
707 
421 
1,173 
862 
951 
1,008 
735 
1,416 
1,110 
1,160 
1,062 
1,354 
1,086 
893 
621 
1,156 
279 
1,068 
496 
956 
839 
473 
235 
1,030 
1,081 
1,423 
104 
1,367 
S4o 
1,401 
701 
966 
1,364 



35,523 



T3 

G 
09 
i. 

- 



45 



Remarks. 



Wrecked. 



22 



12 



178 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



•jraqranjj 



•sqi VqiFH ' 



©©©©©©©©©© 
cooooooooo 

OOOOOOOOOO 
OOlOtDOlOlOMOOt'; 
15 N lO •* M M H O i— 

co 



o 

© 

o 

o 

X 



a 

33 

H 



o 

33 



© © © © © 
© © © © © 
S © © © 35 

o m in m 

t>- C3 I- CI 



•sqj 'pejjoras 'uouip3g 



OICOO 

c i S 5 § 
x m w 



■sqj 'paqtis A'jp 'uouqt:g 



o 
o 
© 
© 
© 
I- 



•sj.iq 'pajjus 'uouqrag 



" © © roc 
ocroo 

CM 



■q[-gf 'pauireo 'uompig 



— t~ © © 

oxxs 
co in ci ci 

HHfOC 

co © -r 01 

CO i-l 



• © 

■ © 

• © 

■ CM 



©CO© 

© © © © 
© © © © 
© m in in 

CO C? CI 



© © © © 
© © © © 
•n © m © 
m m t- © 



© © © © 

© m in in 

rH CI 01 b- 



■sanyj 



■ani* A 



©©©©©mm©o© 
© © in m © i- t- © © in 
© i-i ri m ci co o © ci 

CO i-l CI C3 



• 9 11 \V.\ 



C5 

a 
< 

M 

X 

33 



0) 
B 



© © © in © © © © © 
©©© • t~ i© © © © in 
■ co tp cm © o co 



a? i— i - in 



•suioq^u^ 



© © © 
© © © 
-r x © 



■©©©©■©© 
.-©©©©© 

■ el co cc © © as 

^ rH 



01 



:m { v A 



-t- © © i- .--©.-"©© © 

IS O l» N C N C U5 r 

m©occxmxcoci© 
I- 1 © © 1-1 



•suioqjvj 



© ©©©©©©©© 
©©©o©©o©m 
ciOLir.coi-ot- 

© © © CM CI CI in CO <N 

co 35 rH 



33 
<! 

o 

w 

c 
< 

73 

a 

33 



c3 

o 
pq 



SMHiJOCOOOO 

ci © ci -r © © © © © © 

1^ O TC -t< rH HnH 
CO CI CI 



•anpj A 



© © 

CI © 
CI CO 

cm 



©©©©©©©© 
x ci © in © © © in 
x © is i- c x o ci 

t HK- t HN 

CM 



•jaquin^ 



rH O 

r~ © 

co 



co cm © m © © in m 
« cc n « x n o 



© 
§ 

rH 

© 

CI 



© 

© 

CO 

r— 

C3 



© 
© 
r 

© 



© 

o 



8 

c 

A 
?! 



© 
© 

X 

? 1 



© 



© 
© 



© 

CO 



z 
© 
© 
© 
© 

m 



© 
© 
r 

x 

CI 
CI 



© 

1C 



© 

CO 

m 
© 
© 
© 



CO 



© 

CI 



© 

CM 
© 



© 
iC 
— 



r. 
© 
© 

© 
© 



© 

m 
x 



X 

I- 

© 



© 
: i 

CO 

— 





rH © CO CO 
CO CO 

rH 




HHO 
© CM rH 

CM 


in 
t- 




' 3n p?A 


© © © © 
© © © © 

efc © in r- i- 

X if CI 
CI f CO 
CM 




© © © 
© © i-0 

x 

CO rH 
rH 


© 
in 
© 
in 

CI 
CO 




■jaqiunv^ 


CM rH rH 
in rH rH 




I - CO 


X 

m 

rH 




. . . 




... • 



En 
o 

E- 

33 



r. 



S'h 
r. 1 
c3 > 

U -rH 

In - 



^ ?3 
S 
1 i 
- ;- 

7 x 



v -5 



- - = 

- '-• - 
-- - •_ 



o 



o 
o 

^ © ® 
— - i' 



W 0) 
a? H 



o 



c3 
> 



rHCMC0TfO©t^X©© 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— BRITISH COLUMBIA 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



O 

H 



• OOlOOOOOOOO 

ooHNiooeoiooH 

« CS 8) CJ N O 3 ffl N S 
^ t- CM O t~ rt< -!• rH © 

©"©"e^r-To"©! tfiTo'cs'cr 
CO lO © -* rH to eo to 

CM -* l> rH rH 



■sqj 'pa^pjs 'ao.i uouipjg 



© 
z 
© 
© 

CM 



•sqj 'a.ituAieQ 



© 
© 

in 



•such 'oramS ' l l SI j[ 



© 
© 

CI 



z 
z 
z 
z 

CM 



© 
© 

in 



r 

I 



X 

on 



O 

co 
Q 
25 

5 



'sqj 'pa^oins 'Suujajj 



© 

© 
© 
to 



OOOOOOO 

© © © © © - 



o m in in © © © 

CM CM CM i-H in CM -if 
CM 



1 



•sqj 'pampas 
pus qsaai 'suijjajj 



©©©©©©©©©© 

©©©0©©0©©0 
©©©©©©©©©© 
COlOlOOlOOOOO 

co c-j im m i-H ci 

CO 



i* 5 



z 

z 
= 

m 

-t- 

CO 



O 

5 

fr- 
ee 



0> 0) 



^2 



1| 

r- a g 

S $ o 

J *> 

W O cS g o 

■_t O ° u 



22- -12* 



■.wi|um^ 



WH > CS § o 

si-el s, 

' eo us <o t» 



» 3 

o ao 

Sir ^ ° 

« (8 a; 
*'EPh 
© o 
s o a 

Ov- cS 

> 



o 



m 

CI 

w 
© 
od 

00 



© 
© 
© 

CM 



© 

in 



© 
© 

© 
to 



•siyeS 'po qstj 


©©©©©©©©©© 
©©©©©©©©©© 
©into©©©©©©© 

IBS) i— 1 © (M tO to tO (M 
CO CO i-H rH rH 


128100 


35227 






© 


© 




CM 


© 
© 








CO 


•sm^s qrcas-arejj 


©CO©©©©©©© 

© © t- in © © © o © in 
o © ci t- © © m co co c-i 

<M CM 


m 

CM 
00 

t-7 


OS 

© 

oo 

m 



•sqj 't(su pa j joss y 


1(10000 
1500 
2000 


© © © © © © 
© © © © © © 
© © © © © m 
o in © o oo t— 
rn cq rH m 

CM 


© 
© 
© 

rf 

CO 

-r 


24200 


•sqi 'pnqg 


© 
© 
© 
in 
















© 
© 
© 

in 


c 

o 


*m 'npis 








© m in 

Tfl © l-H 










© 
© 
CM 
l-H 




© 
© 
© 

o 

rH 






©©©©©© 
©©©©©© 
in © © © © © 
in © co © oi to 

rH rH in 

CO 


548500 


m 

CM 
"tl 
t~ 
CM 


•sq T '^nojx 


© © © © 

© © m © 
© m cm © 
m cm i-H 

85 

rH 




© © © © 
© © © © 
© © © © 

© © in © 

HlB i-H 

I- 1 


© 
m 

© 

CO 
CO 


m 
© 

CO 

eo 


•sqi ipuig 


© 
© 
© 
•n 
if 










6500 
35000 




© 
© 

© 

CO 


m 

CM 
CO 

•* 


•sqj 'pa>[ouis 'suoqo'Bpo 


© 
© 
in 

CM 


1000 
20000 




© o 
© © 
© © 

Cl <M 






© 
© 

rH 

CO 
CM 


© 

rH 

GO 
CM 


•sjjq 'pa^pjs 'suoqoupio 


in 

CM 


© © 

Cl © 

© © 


© © 

© m 

CO 






m 
© 

Cl 
CM 


© 

in 
© 

CM 


•sqj 'qsa.ii 'suoqo'BpiQ 


© 
© 
© 

i 


60000 
400000 

120000 
100000 




© 
© 

© 
CO 
© 


© 
© 

in 
so 
■* 



© 
© 
© 
© 



© 

m 

CO 
00 
CM 



> 



© © © © © 
© © © © © 

© © © © © 
© © © © © 
m o © © © 

cfcf irfcf in" 

CM CO rH © 
CO 



• © 

© Cl 

05 O 

SrS 
rrt * 

u S3 

.2 I 



So 



CO 



CO 



-3S32 

H S (h 
g fi C 

o o ~ 

CD 05 g 
03 S V s 

© © ta 03 '^3 

m © jz r^ 
mH50 O H 



180 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



RECAPITULATION 



Of Yield and Value of the Fisheries of British Columbia for the Year 1900. 



Kinds of Fish. 



Salmon, canned (29,113,440 cans) 48 lbs. cases 

„ salted Brls 

m dry salted Lbs 

ii smoked . , ". " 

ii fresh . '. ii 

Sturgeon , ■■ 

Caviare " 

Halibut n 

Herring » 

Oulachons n 

Smelts ii 

Codfish ii 

Trout. 
Skill . . 
Shad. 



..; Brls. 

Lbs. 

Sea otter Skins. 

Hair seals " 

Fur seals " 

Mixed fish Lbs. 

Fish oil Galls. 

Fish guano Tons . 

Salted roe Lbs. 

Oysters " 

Shrimps and prawns ■■ 

Clams, canned Cases. 

Crabs, ■■ ■ 

Fresh clams and mussels 

ii crabs and abelonies 

Estimate of fish not included in above 



Total . 



Quantity. 



606,530 
4,950 
5,700,000 
301,000 
1,728,000 
105,000 
1,500 
4,2fil,000 
1,145,000 

86,500 
548,500 
339,750 
120 
5,000 
20 
7,825 
35,523 
484,000 
128,100 
200 
20,000 



3,500 
1,000 



Price. 



$ cts. 

4 80 
10 00 
04 
10 
10 
05 
50 
05 
03 & 10 

05' 
05 
10 

10 00 
05 
400 00 
75 

15 00 
05 

271, 

30 00" 
10 



10 00 
10 00 



Value. 



$ cts. 

2,911,344 00 
49,500 00 
228,000 00 
30,100 00 
172,800 00 
5,250 00 
750 00 
213,050 00 
48,350 00 
71,300 00 
4,325 00 
27,425 00 
33,975 00 
1,200 00 
250 00 
8,000 00 
5,868 75 
562,845 00 
24,200 00 
35,227 50 
6,000 00 
2,000 00 
12,000 00 
5,000 00 
13,500 00 
10,000 00 
9,000 00 
22,500 00 
365,000 00 



4,878,820 25 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— BRITISH COLUMBIA 181 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

Capital in Fishing Plant and Material in British Columbia Fisheries, 1900. 



Vessels, Boats, Canneries, &c. 



Fisheries — 

Vessels 

Boats 

Scows, &c 

Gill-nets, fathoms . . 

Seines 

Lines, honks, &c . . . . 
Salmon canneries . . . 
Cold storage plants . 

< )il factories 

Salteries 



For Sealing — 

Vessels (actually engaged) 

Boats 

Canoes 



Total . 



Number. 



158 
5,113 



Sll, 550 
11,450 



71 

7 
2 
2 



37 
114 
316 



Value. 



Total Value. 



$ cts. 



325,050 00 
314,320 00 
17,750 00 
608,909 00 
17,175 00 
10,200 00 
1,420,000 00 
87,500 00 
35,000 00 
4,000 00 



120,000 00 
11.400 00 
15,800 00 



$ cts. 



2,839,904 00 



147,200 00 



2,987,104 00 



Hands employed in fisheries, boats and canneries 19,787 

n vessels 475 

Sailors and hunters sealing (whites) 386 

ii (Indians) 646 

21,294 



182 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



APPENDIX No io. 

QUEBEC. 

REPORT ON THE GULF OF ST. LAWRENCE FISHERIES FOR THE 
SEASON OF 1900, BY FISHERY OFFICER WM. WAKEHAM, M.D., COM- 
MANDER OF " LA CANADIENNE." 

Gaspe Basin, January 2nd, 1901, 

To the Dominion Commissioner of Fisheries, 

Ottawa. 

Sir, — I have the honour herewith to submit the annual report of the Fisheries of 
the Gulf Division, province of Quebec, for the past year, together with synopsis of 
the reports of the overseers, and the usual statistical totals showing the yield and values 
in detail for the various subdivisions 

As was foreshadowed in the preliminary statement published in last year's report, 
the returns show an increase in value of $122,013 over those of 1899. This is due 
to an improvement in the catch of cod, mackerel, smelts and seals. The salmon fishery, 
which I had expected to have been better than that of 1899, really showed a decrease of 
over 100,000 lbs. Fishing practically closed with the middle of September, as after the 
gale of the 13th of that month, with its accompanying loss of life and property, very 
little was done. Many of the boats which were destroyed were not replaced, and fish- 
ermen were generally nervous about going any distance off shore. 

COD. 

This fishery, which usually furnishes about half of the value of the yield in the 
division, shows an increase of about 12,000 cwt. This improvement was due to a good 
summer's fishing on the south coast. On the Labrador the presence of heavy field ice 
in June and July, all along shore and among the islands, practically prevented any fish- 
ing. The fish were there in abundance, but it was impossible to set out any nets for 
their capture. After the disappearance of the ice with the end of July a fair amount 
of fishing was done by the local inhabitants with the hook and line, but by this time all 
the vessels had left the coast for the outer Labrador. As this makes the fourth year in 
succession during which the vessels have done nothing, it is safe to say that we will see 
a very small fleet on the Labrador next year. 

SALMON. 

This fishery shows a decrease of about 100,000 lbs. ' £ The failure was confined to 
the south shore or the Gulf, as on the north shore the returns show a considerable in- 
crease. The failure was due entirely to weather conditions, the fish did not, as usual, 
remain any time along the coast, or in the estuaries, but proceeded directly into the 
rivers. The weather during June and July was cloudy, with frequent showers. This 
favoured the angler, and as a result of this, coupled with a greatly increased number of 
fish in the rivers, we had perhaps the best angling season on record. On the north shore 
both anglers and netters had good fishing. 



FISHER Y INSPECTORS' R EPOR TS— Q UEBEG 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



183 



HERRING. 

The returns show a slight increase in this fishery, although the catch was unevenly- 
distributed. On the Labrador nothing whatever was done, but along the River St. 
Lawrence, and shore of the Gulf from Cape Chatte to Cape Rosier, the catch was 
above the average,while further on, along the southern coast of Gaspe and Bonaventure, 
the yield of fat herring — those taken in the late summer and fall — was not by any means 
as good as it usually is. Spring herring were everywhere abundant on the usual spawn- 
ing grounds. 

MACKEREL. 

The catch of mackerel, now confined entirely to the Magdalen Islands, shows a 
slight increase. These fish were abundant about the islands in the fall, but because the 
price had fallen, the fishery was not prosecuted with any vigour. A few small schools 
of mackerel were reported as hiving bsen seen between Cape Chatte and Godbout, but 
except at the Magdalen Islands, only an odd mackerel was taken here and there about 
the coasts of the mainland. 

LOBSTERS. 

The Lobster pack continues to show a decrease in spite of the fact that under the 
new regulations we are fishing through a considerably longer season. This, of course, 
really means nothing, as with one exception all the larger canneries regularly close 
down when about half the season has expired. 

At Anticosti, Mr. Menier is preparing to go extensively into the business of lobster 
packing. His men are putting up a model cannery at Fox Bay. The machinery for 
making and sealing the cans will be driven by steam power, and the building will be 
lighted by electricity. The lobsters, which will be caught by small parties of fishermen, 
stationed along both shores of the island, will be brought alive to the cannery in welled 
vessels, and those from the more distant points in steam vessels. Fishermen are now 
being engaged in Gaspe and Nova Scotia to proceed to the island in the early spring of 
1901, and inducements are being held out to them to settle on the island, where it is Mr. 
Menier's intention to prosecute the cod, herring and turbot fisheries which abound about 
the island. The general direction and management of all this has been placed in the 
hands of Mr. Doggett, of Nova Scotia. 



SMELTS. 

The statistics of the smelt fishery show a gain of about 60,000 pounds. During 
October, when the fishery begins in Gaspe Bay, the weather was cool, so that the fish 
then taken, which are the first to reach the New York market, got there in good order, 
and commanded a high price. 

SEALS. 

The seal hunt, which has been gradually abandoned by those who formerly carried it on 
in vessels fitted out at the Magdalen Islands and Esquimaux Point, shows a very consider- 
able gain in 1900. The catch for 1899 only amounted to 4,145 seals, nearly all of which 
had been taken on the Labrador, or shot on the ice off Point des Monts, while that for 
the season now being reported on amounts to 25,729. This considerable gain occurred 
at the Magdalen Islands. The ice on which the seals are pupped in March was driven 
by favourable winds on the Magdalen Island shores, permitting the people to reap quite 
an abundant harvest in the shape of pelts and oil. For a few days, while the winds 
held the whelping ice on shore, men, women and children were engaged in the work of 
killing, scalping and hauling the pelts on shore. 



184 



MAXIXE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Bait, was fairly abundant throughout the season, and, with very few exceptions, 
the fishing regulations were strictly observed. At the Magdalen Islands a number of 
lobster traps, being fished out of season, were destroyed by crews sent out from the 
ship. 

I beg to append synopses of the reports of some of the local fishery overseers : — 



SYNOPSES OF REPORTS OF SOME OF THE LOCAL OVERSEERS. 

Bonaventure Subdivision. — Officer George Forrest reports a diminution of about 
one-fifth in the yield of the fisheries in his division, the principal failure was that of the 
salmon net fishery. Cod fishing was also below the usual average. This was mainly 
due to a scarcity of bait in the late summer and fall. Herring was abundant in the 
spring, but scarce all through the rest of the season. The lobster pack shows a slight 
increase, with the same number of canneries and traps. Fishery regulations were 
closely observed. 

Port Daniel Subdivision. — Officer F. X. Chappados reports a slight decrease in the 
catch of cod, due to the rough weather in September and October. The salmon fishery 
was slightly better than that of the preceding season. Spring herring was scarce in Port 
Daniel Bay and at 1 Anse a Gascon, but fall herring — those taken in the fall — were 
more abundant. The lobster pack continues to decrease. 

Gaspe' Bay Subdivision. — Officer Walter Langlois reports a slight increase in the 
yield of the salmon net fishery. The herring fishery shows an improvement of about 
1,200 barrels. Cod fishing began on the 22nd May, and the yield was good up to the 
middle of September, when a heavy gale did a great deal of damage along the coast, 
particularly at Point St. Peter, where a clean sweep was made of boats and fishing 
stages. The fishermen of this Cove are particularly anxious that the attention of the 
government should be called to their need of a breakwater, as a very extensive fishery 
is carried on at Point St. Peter, and this is by no means the first occasion on which 
their boats and stages have been destroyed. The lobster fishery shows a constant 
decrease. The smelt fishing was good No mackerel was taken in Gaspe Bay this 
season. 

Mont Louis Subdivision. — Officer Louis Letourneau reports that there was no 
lobster fishing in his division this year. The catch was so insignificant the year before 
that it was impossible to get men to fish for them. Salmon net fishing was poor. 
The rivers were high when the fish struck the coast and they ran right up at once. 
Anglers, however, did well. Cod fishing was good all through the season, from June 
to November. The white whales, which frequently chase the cod away during the fishing- 
season, did not visit the coast this year. Herring struck a little later than usual, but 
remained on the coast all through the season. They were more abundant in the western 
part of the division than toward the east. A good many more fishermen were engaged 
in this fishery than usual, and more care seems to have been given to the packing 
and curing of the fish. No mackerel w r ere taken, and the fishery for turbot, as well as 
halibut, was not a success. This was due to the constant strong currents in the river. 
These fish are taken in 60 fathoms and over. The fishery regulations were every- 
where well observed. 

Magdalen Islands South — Officer J. A. Chevrier reports that in March a large 
number of seals were killed on the ice all around the islands except at Amherst, where 
the winds were not favourable. Herring struck a few days earlier than usual, and for 
several weeks were taken in great abundance, many cargoes were sold to foreign vessels 
for food and bait purposes. There does not seem to be the slightest diminution in the 
abundance of these fish. Spring mackerel struck in unusual abundance, and an extra- 
ordinary catch was made, and high prices paid the fishermen, unfortunately for the local 
merchants the price fell before the fish could be marketed, so that considerable losses 



FISHERY 1XSPECT0RS' REPORTS- QUEBEC 



185 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

were made. The fall fishery was limited, the price being low, fishermen devoted their 
attention rather to the cod fishery. Lobster fishing about Amherst Island does not show 
any decrease, but at Grindstone the failure continues. Many are of the opinion that 
the open season of fishing should be divided in two halves, the first to close about June 
15, the second to open on August 1, and to continue until October 1. Several parties 
were fined for fishing out of season. Local fishermen complain that their nets are 
frequently carried away or torn by vessels passing in and out of the bay. They claim 
that foreign fishing vessels should either remain outside of Pleasant Bay altogether— or 
if they come inside that they should remain there, and visit their nets in boats as do the 
resident fishermen. Mr. Chevrier has many times represented these complaints, he 
also claims that no nets should be allowed to be set after August 1, that is when the 
resident fishermen do their hand and line fishing for mackerel. 

Magdalen Islands North — Officer Procul Chevrier reports that the spring hunt on 
the shore ice for seals was an unusually good one, 9,400 seals having been killed and 
landed in his division. Though the prices now paid for skins and oil are much lower 
than they formerly were, yet this unusual spring harvest was a godsend to the people. 
Herring struck about April 18, an enormous catch was made, and many cargoes were 
sold to vessels from the maritime provinces and the L^nited States. The lobster fishery 
continues to show a decrease, and this in spite of the fact that ten new canneries were 
opened in the division. The spring mackerel fishery was good, but the price paid for 
fall mackerel was low. Mr. Che\ rier found a number of lobster traps set illegally, 
during some of his visits — he destroyed them without having been able to find out who 
owned them; otherwise the regulations were well observed. 

Pointe des Monts Subdivision. — Officer N. A Comeau reports salmon fishing with 
nets a good average catch ; fish were late in striking the coast, owing to the general 
lateness of the season, and the great quantity of snow in the interior causing the rivers 
to remain high. Probably owing also to this fact the fly fishing was much above the 
average, especially in the Trinity River, where the season was the best on record. Trout 
appeared to be scarcer than usual, this may have been due to the fact that passing up 
with the high water they escaped observation. Cod were late in coming, only a few 
being taken before August, after this date they were, however, abundant, but especially 
squid was plenty — the cod fishing therefore shows an increase of nearly two-thirds over 
the previous season. Herring were abundant from Point des Monts west to Manicouagan, 
but scarce east of Point des Monts. Halibut shows a slight increase and the fish were 
much larger than of late years. Smelt were abundant, though but few were taken, as 
there are no facilities for shipping them to market in the late fall. No mackerel were 
taken, though a few schools were seen off shore. One small lobster cannery was 
operated at Cowees — the proprietor reports lobsters has been scarce. White whales were 
extremely abundant during the whole season, fishermen attribute the scarcity of herring 
below Point des Monts to the presence of these mammals. Taken as a whole the 
ret urns show a considerable increase in value. The regulations were well observed and 
no complaints were made. 

Moisie Subdivision. — Officer Theotime Migneault reports that salmon fishing began 
on the 23rd May and ended on the 16th July. The fishery was a good one, though the 
season was a poor one for netting, as the waters were too high and the currents too 
strong to keep nets out, not 10 per cent of the salmon that entered Moisie River were 
netted, 236 fish were taken by the anglers. The cod fishery was good, it began with 
August and continued up to the 12th October. Herring missed entirely, the fishermen 
attribute this to the great abundance of squid, and the white whales. One Gloucester 
vessel called here halibut fishing, but on being warned not to set his trawls within the 
three mile limit he sailed away. The salmon net regulations were strictly enforced and 
observed. 

Mingan Subdivision. — Officer George DuBerger reports that 17,467 cwt. of cod 
were taken by the shore fishermen in his district ; this represents a fair fishery. The 
salmon net fishery in the St. Johns tributary was good, almost 40,000 lbs. being taken, 



186 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

this in spite of the fact that for two weeks the fishermen were unable to get their nets 
out owin» to the high water of the river, during all this time salmon were passing up in 
"reat numbers. Sportsmen did well, 61 fish being taken in Jupitagan, 75 in Mingan, 
170 in Romaine, while Mr. Hill and party took 200 in the St. John. 

Natashguan Subdivision. — Officer John W. Scott reports that the seal hunt made 
in the ice by the vessels from Natashguan was a failure, only ] 20 seals being killed, 
this was due to rou^h weather and the scattered condition of the ice. The salmon net 
fishery show a decrease of 5,000 lbs., this was due to the high water in the river which 
made it impossible to set out nets until the 18th June, by which time a large proportion 
of the fish had passed up, the sea coast nets did well. The cod fishery was good, their 
bein» an increase of 2,300 cwt. over the catch of 1899. The lobster pack shows a 
slight falling off, though the number of traps fished this year was much greater than in 
any previous season. 

The whole of which is humbly submitted. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

WM, WAKEHAM, 

Officer in charge of the Gulf Fislteries 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



REPORTS- 



QUEBEC 



187 



REPORT ON THE FISHERIES ON TBE SOUTH SHORE FROM LEVIS TO 
BAIE DES CHALEURS, BY INSPECTOR N. LAVOIE, M.D. 

LTslet, Que, January 15, 1901. 

To the Dominion Commissioner of Fisheries, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — In transmitting the fishery statistics for the year 1900, of that part of my 
district extending from Levis to Cape Chat, I beg to offer a few general remarks on the 
fisheries of our coasts. 

I regret to state that although eel and bar fishing may have proved pretty fair at 
certain places, such as Levis, Beaumont, St. Michel and St. Valier, the catch of other 
fish proved almost a complete failure. In some localities, the decrease will amount to 
about seventy-five per cent as compared with last year. At Trois-Saumons and L' Islet, 
the disappearance of small fish has completely discouraged the fishermen, so much so that 
on a distance of four miles on each side of the river of Trois-Saumons where there used 
to be formerly seven fisheries, there is not a single one now. Fishermen attribute their 
failure to sawdust and rubbish from the mills on Trois-Saumons River. As the bottom 
of these fishing grounds is composed of mud, it is natural that sawdust should more 
firmly adhere to it than if it were formed of rocky bottom. I was told that at several 
places, sawdust is several inches thick, and there can be no doubt that if such is the 
case, the disappearance of the fish is due to this cause. 

The eel fisheries down here have sensibly decreased during the past few years. This 
is due to the improvements in the large fisheries of Levis, Beaumont and St. Michel. 
These fisheries have, so far, proved very remunerative and it may be that this has some- 
thing to do with the run of eels on the part of that coast. With favourable winds and 
other lucky circumstances, a good catch may now and then be recorded among the brush 
fisheries, but this is an exception. 

Barfish were most abundant on the grounds around Crane and other adjacent 
islands. Sportsmen were delighted. It is alleged that over 100 barrels of barfish were 
caught on these grounds, with hook and line, during the past season. 

Twelve seals were killed by people from Crane Island. 

Cod. 

The oldest fishermen all agree that cod has never been so abundant as now for the 
past fifty years. This is easily accounted for by the enormous quantities of squid and 
herring which has frequented this part of the coast during the whole season. The total 
catch will amount to 3,446 drafts against 3,118 last year ; an increase of 328 drafts. 
As already stated, bait in the shape of squid and herring was abundant the whole season 
round, and the weather proved all that could be desired. 

Owing to the want of competition, prices are not so high as last year ; the usual 
rate being from three dollars to three dollars and a half. 

However, this still leaves a fair margin in the hands of the fishermen, owing to the 
large increase in the catch. 

Herring fishing. 

The great success experienced in this fishery last year, induced many people to 
believe that it would be again profitable this season. However, these expectations 
were not realized in many cases. There are indeed some localities, such as Riinouski, 
Ste. Luce, River Ouelle and Green Island where the catch was good, but everywhere 
else it was almost a faillure. The statistics will show a falling off of nearly 2,000,000 



188 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

pounds in the catch of herring for the past two seasons. The total yield this season 
was hardly 2,000,000 pounds, while last year it amounted to six and seven million 
pounds, and perhaps more. The cause of failure is ascribed to the frequent and long 
continued easterly gales which destroyed most of the best brush fisheries of this division 
from River du Loup to Ste. Flavie. 

Eel fishery. 

This fishery, which yielded 112,090 pounds in 1899, from St. Jean Port Joli to 
Ste. Flavie, will not, this year yield more than 40,789 pounds. The brush fisheries of 
St. Jean Port Joli, St. Koch, Ste. Anne, Riviere Ouelle which used to catch eels by 
the thousand, will not produce more than 200 or 500 each. 

Sardine fishery. 

Had it not been for an accidental run of sardines which occurred during the last 
days of October, and at a time when it was least expected, this fishery would have been 
a total failure. As it is, a great number of fishermen missed this stroke of good fortune 
owing to their neglect to repair their fisheries in time, but several others who were more 
careful, reaped a rich harvest. The localities where fishing was most successful were 
Ste. Luce and Rimouski. The statistics will show 2,640 barrels, against 1,833 in 1899. 

Salmon and Trout fishing. 

Salmon fishing will show an increase of 6,532 pounds over the catch of last year, 
beim 15,942 pounds against 9,410. The most favoured localities were Green Island, 
Ste. Luce and St. Denis. In other places, the catch amounted to 100 or 500 pounds. 
Taken as a whole, this fishery was not a success. 

The catch of trout amounted to 3,625 pounds, only 25 pounds of which were caught 
on the river shores, the balance being taken in the interior lakes of St. Simon, St. 
Fabien and St. Mathieu. Lake St. Mathieu now belongs to Mr. Tobin, M. P. He 
keeps a large staff of experienced guardians on the numerous small lakes of his seigniory 
for the purposes of preventing poaching and illegal fishing. . 

Sturgeon and Shad. 

Although the catch of sturgeon is apparently on the increase, it is far from yielding 
a fair revenue to the fishermen. In 1890 the catch is given at 12,297 pounds, while 
this year it will reach 66,699. Kamouraska and the River Ouelle were the most 
favoured localities. » 

Shad will show only 3,692 pounds, against 4,820 in 1899. This is the whole catch 
of the seventeen localities which I visited. 

Porpoise Fishing. 

This fishery, which in years past was so popular and so remunerative in some 
localities, such as River Ouelle, has sadly come down, so much so that for a number of 
years it has hardly paid for the outfit. The owners, however, still cling to hope, always 
expecting a fortune in the success of a new season. There were only twelve porpoises 
killed at River Ouelle this season, the same number as in 1899. The price of oil was a 
little higher, having increased from 28 to 32 cents. Those twelve porpoises yielded 
45 barrels of oil, or 1,125 gallons. At Trois Pistoles six porpoises were killed, yielding 
about 560 gallons of oil. At Cap a l'Orignal it is reported that sixteen seals were killed, 
yielding 48 gallons of oil. 

During the months of July, August and September, hardly a fish was caught in this 
part of my division. Bad weather is blamed for this unsatisfactory state of things. 
Easterly gales of long standing completely wrecked the brush fisheries, and this explains 
how the statistics will show but a small quantity of mixed fish, far below that of 1899. 
The catch of this season will barely amount to 344,000, against millions of pounds last 
year. The number of brush fisheries was about the same as in 1899, but if what I 
heard is true, this number will considerably be reduced in certain localities next season. 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS-QUEBEC 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

Comparative Statement of the Yield of Lobsters in the Divisions of Gaspe and 
Bonaventure during the Years 1899 and 1900. 



189 



Locality. 



1900. 

Belle Anse 

Bois Brule 

Anse Brillante 

Bois Brule 

Corner of the Beach . 
Perce 



Cape Despair 

Little River East.. 
Little River West. 

tl II 

Little Pabos 

Grand Pabos 

Anse aux Gascons . 
Newport Point.. . . 
Newport 



Port Daniel. 



Port Daniel West . 

Shiga wacke 

Port Daniel West. 

ii ii 
Hopetown 



New Carlisle . . . 
Bonaventure . . . 
Caplin River . 
Carleton 



Totals . 



1899. 



Belle Anse . 
Bois Brule . 



Brillant Cove. 
Corner of the Beach . 

Malbaie 

Perce 



Cape Despair 

Little River East.. 



Little River West 



Grand River 

Little Pabos 

Grand Pabos 

Newport 

Port Daniel 

Port Daniel West 



Hopetown 
New Carlisle.. 
Bonaventure . . 
Caplin River.. 

Carleton 

Newport 



Owner. 



Hoegg & Co 

White & Hipson. 

Leggo Bros 

J. P. White .... 

O. Mabee 

J. W. Windsor 
Chas. Robin.. . . 
J. W. Windsor . 
J. Alexander. . . . 

Loggie 

J. Alexander . . . 

J. Legouffe 

P. Hurley 

J. Alexander . . 
Chas. Robin . . 
E. LeMarquand 
J. W. Windsor . 

Hoegg & Co 

K. Suili van .... 
Alexander Bros. 



P. Day 

H. Journeau. . 
J. Alexander 
Hoegg & Co.. . 
Th. Foreham 
Hoegg & Co.. . 
J. P. Windsor. 
B. Leclerc 



Totals . 



Hoegg & Co 

P. J. White 

Leggo Bros 

White & Hipson. 

0. Mabee 

Alexander 

1. W. Windsor . 

Chas. Robin 

J. W. Windsor. . 
J. Alexander . . . 



Soucey 

Loggie. ....... . 

J. Legouffe 

P. Hurley 

Chas. Robin 

Hoegg & Co ... . 

A. Sullivan 

Alexander Bros. 

Hoegg & Co 

H. Eoreham 

Hoegg & Co 

J. P. Windsor. . 

B. Leclerc 

E. LeMarquand. 
J. W. Windsor . 



Traps. 


Men. 


Girls. 


Flats. 


Cases. 


2,300 


15 


7 


17 


230 


900 


11 


12 


4 


121 


350 


4 


5 


4 


36 


750 


4 


9 


5 


173 


750 


9 


18 


3 


180 


2,000 


23 


8 


10 


133 


1,300 


16 


7 


7 


159 


4,000 


47 


20 


20 


300 


1,500 


18 


15 


15 


95 


800 


9 


13 


4 


75 


2,000 


23 


12 


10 


140 


1,000 


10 


15 


6 


100 


35 


4 


5 




56 


700 


24 


19 


15 


60 


1,800 


21 


18 


8 


218 


1,100 


11 


12 


4 


69 


2. 


30 


19 


9 


200 


•' r.tui 


30 


20 


20 


250 


"'350 


4 


3 


3 


40 


1,500 


23 


15 


10 


160 


2',000 


23 


18 


18 


170 


390 


4 


5 


4 


35 


400 


6 


4 


3 


26 


300 


3 


3 


2 


35 


2,500 


39 


21 


23 


254 


1,800 


18 


8 


18 


193 


1,100 


8 


7 


4 


115 


1,000 


11 


7 


4 


66 


420 


4 


3 


2 


25 


37,545 




452 


328 


242 


3,714 


2,400 


19 


20 


5 


270 


900 


9 


12 


4 


100 


300 


3 


4 


3 


35 


600 


5 


5 


5 


116 


780 


6 


14 


3 


166 


950 


8 


8 


5 


52 


1,600 


18 


12 


8 


220 


1,500 


14 


12 


7 


173 


2,500 


27 


20 


20 


560 


1,000 


12 


13 


15 


50 


2,000 


20 


10 


5 


200 


800 


14 


12 


10 


200 


1,500 


18 


4 


14 


150 


300 


4 


6 


4 


85 


800 


8 


14 


4 


123 


1,200 


12 


15 


6 


90 


i >\jw 


4 


8 


2 


122 


2.(Mi0 


14 


I? 


7 


116 


2,500 


30 


20 


20 


350 


460 


3 


4 


3 


30 


1,600 


15 


15 


25 


170 


2,000 


28 


25 


25 


324 


1,800 


7 


6 


15 


120 


Odd 


8 


6 


5 


82 


1,000 


8 


8 


5 


57 


400 


3 


4 


3 


26 


1,100 


4 


15 


4 


25 


1,600 


18 


16 


6 


253 


35,090 


339 


325 


228 




4,165 



New license. 



New license. 



190 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Remarks on the Lobster Industry of Gaspe" and Bonaventure Counties. 

In order to present the matter in a clear and concise shape, I have prepared the 
above schedule, showing the yield of the lobster fishery in 1900 and 1899, together with 
such other information relative to the industry as I could procure. While there was, 
at the beginning of the season an actual increase of nearly 2,500 in the number of traps, 
the number of cases packed shows a considerable falling off; no less than 451 cases, as 
compared with 1899. This, I consider, should not be ascribed to a scarcity of lobsters 
frequenting the grounds, so much so as to the damage done to fishing traps and other 
gear by gales and storms during the months of May and J uly, as well as the cold weather 
which prevailed during the whole month of May and the early part of June. The loss 
experienced by each cannery has already been described in my progress reports ; it is 
therefore unnecessary to return to the subject. Had it not been for these unfortunate 
occurrences, I entertain no doubt that the total catch would have shown twenty-five per 
cent better, making the number of cases packed this season at least 500 larger than last 
year, and this too with no increase in the number of canneries. 

One pleasing feature to notice is the alacrity with which people submit to the 
regulations enacted for the protection of this valuable industry. During a whole season's 
intercourse with fishermen and canners, I met with nothing but courtesv and willing 
compliance. In this connection I may mention the fact that the regulation forbidding 
the setting of traps in waters less than two fathoms deep was religiously observed, as 
you have already been apprised by my progress reports. The regulation relative to the 
minimum size of lobsters was also strictly observed, and when visiting boats on their 
arrival, I never detected a single fish under 8 inches. As a matter of fact, lobsters 
were on an average of a larger size this year than usual ; very few fish measuring less 
than 10 inches and a good many over 15 and 16 inches. 

Females in spawn did not visit the grounds until the middle of June. The cold 
weather experienced during the whole month of May and the early part of June may 
have had some influence on their migration. 

The departmental reports for 1880 show a total lobster catch for the divisions of 
Gaspe and Port Daniel (fishing apparently not being carried on higher up than Port 
Daniel Bav) of 448,559 one pound cans, which being reduced to cases of four dozen each 
give a total of 9,345 cases against 3,714 in 1900. The figures for 1890 are not so dis- 
proportionate and the difference is less striking ; being only 4,387 cases in 1890, against 
3,714 in 1900. 

These figures, if correct, are certainly instructive. They show the heavy inroads 
made on the fishery since an enormous decrease of 5,631 cases occurs in the short space 
of twenty years. They would also go far to explain the heavy rise which has taken 
place in prices during the interval. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 
Your obedient servant, 



N. LAVOIE, 

Inspector of Fisheries. 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS—QUEBEC 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



191 



REPORT ON THE FISHERIES OF THE WESTERN DIVISION OF QUEBEC 
FOR THE YEAR 1900, BY INSPECTOR A. H. BELLIVEAU. 

Ottawa, 1st Feby., 1901. 

To the Dominion Commissioner of Fisheries, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — The district under my charge comprises all that part of the province of 
Quebec south-west of the Saguenay River and Bellechasse County. For the convenience 
of establishing comparisons in the yield of fisheries with those of former years, the old 
subdivisions are mostly adhered to, even when coming under different officers. 

In nearly every part of my large district, there seems to be a steady decline of the 
best grades of fish, the bulk of the yield now chiefly consisting of the coarse kinds. For 
instance, in the counties of Charlevoix and Montmorency, including the numerous weirs 
of the Island of Orleans, although (he aggregate value is even higher than the previous 
ones, eels constitute the principal item therein. In fact, it is asserted that shad, bass, 
whitefish and other good fishes have become so scarce that hardly any attempts are now 
made to capture them, the weirs being only set late in the season for the eel fishing. 
The season of 1 900 must have been a propitious and favourable one for that kind of 
fish, as the catch of eels proved a profitable one. 

The same remark could be applied to most of the other subdivisions. In the 
counties of Richelieu and Yamaska, the best fishing localities of lake St. Pierre, the 
catch is now chiefly made up of coarse and mixed fish, which exceeds three quarters of a 
million pounds in the latter county alone. Not only the valuable food fishes are getting 
scarcer, but even the coarse grades are gradually falling off in size as well as in quantity. 
So small are some of the immature fish now offered for sale on our public markets, that 
it seems a regrettable shortsightedness on the fishermen's part not to have liberated 
them alive when possible. Fishery regulations should specify a minimum length or 
weight of the different species which are worthy of protection ; but so long as immature 
fish will be tolerated on our markets, so long will quality be sacrificed to quantity by 
the improvident and needy fisherman. 

Naturally, as the size of fish declines, the mesh of the capturing implements 
decreases in proportion, hence the necessity of enactments restricting the size, use and 
limits of all such fishing gear. This specially refers to the above mentioned district of 
lake St. Pierre, around whose shore it is estimated, that there are over 3,000 hoop nets 
in use, half of which perhaps would fall below the former measurement of mesh. 

As nearly every fisherman in these localities is possessor of ten or fifteen of these 
verveux, (though paying license for a couple) he replaces the useless ones by new ones 
of as small a mesh as will be tolerated. Again, I strongly recommend that proper 
regulations be adopted to modify and regulate this popular mode of fishing. Were all 
licensed fishery apparatus so marked, it would very much facilitate the duties of the 
different fishery officers. 

While the catch of bass (achigan) in the whole inland district from Quebec City to 
the Upper Ottawa, is given at only 86,000 pounds, that of pickerel, pike, eels, perch, 
sturgeon and even catfish all exceeded 300,000 pounds, besides nearly 2,000,000 pounds 
of other coarse and mixed fish not itemized. The total fish yield of this district 
aggregates a value of nearly $170,000 being about as much as last year. 

In the statistical table, the Ottawa River subdivision shows a value of $24,300, 
which looks like an increase over the previous one, but it is not, as this amount includes 
value of the fisheries of Gatineau lakes and streams as tributaries of the Ottawa, and in 
fact, represents a decrease of about §6,000. 

There is also a considerable falling of in the St. Maurice division, owing to the poor 
catch of tom-cod in that vicinity. The shortage of this little frost fish was so much felt 
that the local shippers had recourse to the Miramichi district to supply the demand. It 



192 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

is to be hoped that the old time abundance of the tommy cod will again put in an 
appearance, as it is considered quite a boom in that locality, coming as it does at a time 
when other remunerative employment is scarce. 

W hen in Three Rivers, seeking information respecting this branch of the fishing 
industry, I was told of a certain party who had shipped several car loads of torn cod. 
Upon questioning the individual himself, I found out that it was true ; but that these 
frost fish had not all been caught in the vicinity; that they came mostly from Chatham, 
N.B., and of course had already been included in the catch of that district. 

It is most difficult to secure reliable data in such matters. Some fishermen are 
unwilling to give any real information, fearing increased taxation, others answer with- 
out reflection, at random, careless to deceive, and others with perceptible exaggeration 
one way or the other. When one computes a weekly catch of a few hundred pounds 
of fish, multiplied by four weeks, for six to nine months, the individual fishermen 
remain astounded at the result. I have met fishermen who when questioned about 
their season's catch of fish would say, 'I don't know, a few hundredweights, perhaps 
a couple of thousand pounds altogether.' Then by examining the books of the 
wharfinger of the locality I would ascertain that the same doubtful party had shipped 
as much as 1,500 lbs. of fish at one time to the Montreal market, and would average 
over 700 lbs. weekly, all during the navigation time, thus bringing his individual 
catch over 15,000 lbs., exclusive of the winter catch. Were it not to assort 
the different species, it would be easier to estimate the bulk of fish shipped to 
Montreal markets from the end of Lake St. Pierre to Lake St. Louis. Some better 
means of obtaining more reliable information from the indifferent fishermen should 
be devised for these inland divisions. However, even if the present figures are 
partly estimated, I am of opinion that in most cases they are still undervalued, 
as very often the catch of the amateur fisherman for domestic use is not included, 
that of licensed fishermen alone being collected. On another occasion I met a fisher- 
man on the Bonsecour market who admitted having about 2,000 lbs. of carp on 
that June day, and who disposed of it all at fair prices. Although somewhat preju- 
diced against all coarse fish in general, and of the sucker kind in particular, I found 
this large carp, locally named nez galeux, very palatable, so much so that I went to 
examine the means of their capture. This characteristic of scabby snout in the catos 
tomus communi, from which this species receives its local name, is only noticed in the 
male fish during their breeding season, after which it disappears. They are caught 
with seines in about 4 and 5 feet of water when approaching their spawning beds. The 
current being rather strong in the vicinity of St. Lambert, it requires five men to 
handle the seine, four of whom jump in the water at stated intervals as the seine is paid 
out, all helping the fifth to draw it in and throw the fish into the large flat boat used 
for that purpose. The fish are then liberated alive in a large reservoir near to shore, 
where they are held prisoners by a loose stone wall through which fresh water passes 
until the next market day. At this their spawning time, these carp are certainly good 
esculent fish and much in demand on the Montreal markets. After the 30th June 
none are caught or seen until the next spring. 

The question of prohibiting all netting in Lakes St. Louis and St. Francis, which 
are enlargements of the St. Lawrence, is under serious consideration. Such a measure, 
rendering any of the said fishing gear found in use liable to confiscation, would greatly 
facilitate the duties of the local officers. Although this apparently drastic measure 
would seem rather hard on a few regular fishermen who depend exclusively on this 
calling for a living, the general public would derive more benefit therefrom, and most 
of these interested parties could easily find other employment if they were only willing 
to work. Besides, night lines will not be included in the proposed prohibition, and 
many fishermen could secure fair catches by this mode of capture. 

It is to be hoped that the department will extend a similar prohibition to all the 
inland waters of the Eastern townships. Ot course no netting is at present allowed without 
licenses, but a general prohibition by Order in Council for a stated period would have 
a better effect, and would strengthen the hand of the conscientious officers to detect and 
punish poachers. The beautiful lakes of the eastern counties, all of comparatively easy 
access within a short radius of Sherbrooke, and near the boundary line of the United 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— QUEBEC 



163 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

States, have become attractive places of summer resort and sport. If proper protection 
be given to these numerous lakes, their popularity as sporting and resting places will 
yearly increase. 

Lake Memphremagog is without doubt by far the largest sheet of water in the 
townships, being thirty miles long by one to four wide. It divides the counties of 
Brome and Stanstead, extending from Newport in the State of Vermont to Magog at 
its outlet. A line of steamers run all summer between the two above mentioned towns 
facilitating trade and distributing tourists at the various resorts dispersed on both 
shores of this important lake. Besides the renowned lunge, pickerel, pike, bass and 
whitefish are found quite plentiful in Lake Memphremagog. I fear that of late years this 
lake has not received the protection that its fishing importance should entitle it to. 
There are still some poachers, especially in the proximity of unsettled parts of its shores,, 
and energetic guardians would be required to check and definitively master them. 

Little Magog Lake is a mere expansion of Magog River, the outlet of Lake Mem- 
phremagog into the St. Francis River. It is nevertheless nine miles long by over one 
wide. It used to be a very fishy spot. Perch, pike, pickerel, bass, lunge and even 
speckled-trout are still caught therein by the numerous visitors from the town of Sher- 
brooke, which is only four or five miles distant from this lake skirted all along by the 
Canadian Pacific Railway. 

Lakes St. Francis and Aylmer, although mere enlargements of the St. Francis 
River, are 15 and 8 miles long respectively by two or three miles wide. Though not 
far apart the larger lake is in Beauce and the other in Wolfe County. They still afford 
good fishing for maskinonge, dore, pike, bass and whitefish. There are no trout or 
lunge caught in these two lakes. No doubt some netting is still carried on for white- 
fish, &c, by the neighbouring settlers, and it is evident that this important part of the 
St. Francis lacks thorough protection. 

Lakes Massawippi in Stanstead, and Brompton in Richmond, are also two beautiful 
lakes renowned for their fisheries as well as their picturesque scenery. The former is 
about 9 miles long and very deep. Its principal fishes are the so called black salmon, 
bass, dore, pike and whitefish. In Lake Brompton, which is more shallow but longer 
than the other, we find lunge, speckled-trout, pike, whitefish and some eels. The shores 
around this lake are not so much settled as the others above mentioned, and consequently 
more advantageous to the poachers, who are thus better screened from observation. 
Brompton Lake is about 14 miles drive from Sherbrooke. 

Lake Megantic forms a part of the boundary between the counties of Compton and 
Beauce, and is only a few miles from the State of Maine. Although only twelve miles 
in length, owing to its indented shores, this lake has a coast line of about forty miles. 
It is the head of Chaudiere River, emptying itself in the St. Lawrence, near Levis. 
Fish are not so plentiful in Lake Megantic as formerly, but lunge, trout, bass and 
whitefish are still caught in fair numbers. The protection of this beautiful lake has 
been somewhat neglected of late, as there seems no particular guardian assigned for it 
at present. 

Should regulations be enacted for the better protection of these inland waters, the 
seizure of the prohibited implements should be permissible on sight, wherever found, 
whether recently in use or not. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. H. BELLIVEAU, 

Inspector of Fisheries. 



22—13 



194 



MA JUNE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



-ri 

o 

•1-1 

u 

-»© 

02 



CD 
O 
C3 
CD 
U 

* 

-r3 

02 

o 

<H-H 
i— I 

o 

I 

o 

H 
PQ 

H 
P 
G? 

O 

H 

O 

55 

> 
O 
P3 
Pk 



0> 



bd 
P 

c3 
O 

-a 

09 
• rH 



j3 
'cS 
t> 

C 

ctf 

l>» 

a 

a 

3 

<y 

<D . 

A O 

o 
r-H 03 

r-l 

* d 

^ a. 

■4-5 , 
0} — 

of 6 

-u CD 

pq g 

a: Cm 

co n 

0) u 

£> 



=+4 

o 



o 
a 



3 > 

-3 ° 
if * 



c 
c 

o 
H 

tT 

a> 

rQ 

s 

s 

too 
c 

'% 

o 
re 

02 

55 

05 

& 

H 

Ed 

03 



«3 



O 

« 
= 

— 



— 

x 
— 

> 



CO 

53 

O 

t3 
O 

rH 

C^ 

CO 

22 



•jaquinjj 



s 

00 



33 

c 

55 



03 
k-3 



S3 
EH 



O 
« 

Cj5 

55 

w 

23 



•sqi 'sinso 
u i pa a a a s 



■sqj 'parentis 

'Sut-uajj j 



'qsa-ij 'Suixiajj 



§ 

cm" 



•S[jq 
pajiBs'Saujajj 



o 
c 



•sqi 

'qsaaj uonq-Bt^ 



© 
© 

© 

CO 



•J9qum\£ 



" 8n l B A 



■suioqi^ 



•laqmnvj 



© 
© 
e 



c 
© 

o 



\iaqumjj 



© 

CO 



83 

s . 

35 05 
J5 B 

> 9 
e« 

55 p 

1< 



•uaj\[ 



© 



03 
O 

pq 



" an l l! A I m 



© 
c 



•jaqnms^ 



CM 



E- 

O 

35 



3 

£ 

s> 
a 
s 



A 
a 
3 

.1 

3 

as 



\iaqum\C 



o 
Ah 



53 

— 



00 



— 
— 

- 

CO 

X 
H 

> 

c 
pq 



• © • • © © • 

• CO ■ • © TT • 

• • 'inM • 




5 


lid - ; '. -*"--r ; 






©©©©©©© 
o o o o o o © 

© © © © © © 




8 


©~ Hi CO lO rt" 
I-I rH <M 




CO 

1- 



©©©©©©©© 
©©©©rrc©~ 
oooiooooo 

s<5 its cc" co s-i ©" o" ci" 
1-1 


(58,500 


o©©©©©«© 

■M -r r u~. © c M © 
ih -m — © © -r 


r 
-c 

o> 

fff 


© c © © o © © 

© © iO O © l£S © 
P3 ?1 * O N — 

Tr'od'cNro' ©r 

1—1 1—1 




m 

lO 

i— T 
an 








© © © © 
t © c 

CM CM 


© 

CO 

in 
i—' 








© Tj^ © 

CO <N 


© 



r © x o in © © © 
© © oi cm m © © 

— CM CO © 


O0 
CO 

m 




cm" 


©©©©©©©© 
t^co©co©©o© 

i-l CO © CO -f 


© 

CO 


rH r4 


CO* 


CM-^COi-H©©©© 
CO rH ■* 


r 



c = ©nr©©© r 

in © © © © © m © © 

^©X©CCO©T © 

CM^co'irf^i-Tin'oc co — ' 



©©©©©©©© 
© © © in © © © © 
cm © in © © © co © 

m" t - 1—" ?z cm' ©* i-T i - 



in 
© 

co" 
co 



o © © in © © o © 
© cm © co m in © 
ci re in — © ~ -r 



m © © © © © © © 
i-i oo © ©. m cm © m 

r- — c-i CO TJ« co 



m 
co 
- 1 

CO 



m 
esi 



©©in in©©©© i© 

-r © cm ci © in in © e>. 

©IM — ©'^■X-t"'^< © 

i-Ti-TcnT of co' co" inT 



I 



cNin©— im©©© 

— — 1-1 CM rH 



CO 



to 
> 

o 
a 

58 

c3 



bCycH 

rH CS 

So 



to 

- 



-~ . — i 

o 

awa >° « 
X 5 s 3 j J 

C; *— • r. -r 

— - - : a * 

r* X. - ^ X. Z. 



o 



— ri co in © oc 



cr 
c 
cS 

C 

'5 
- 

o 

S3 

03 
ft 

Oh 

c 

I— I 

-f. 

I— I 

> 

rH 

a 

i — . 
i— i 
02 

r2 



< 

H 
2i 
C 
- 



r- cm co -f m 



© 

© 



CO 

CM 



© © © 

© (M 30 
rH © 30 

cc"o"cm" 

CO 



© m cm m m 

CO CM i— © 1-5 



© © © © © 

ir. co © o 



- © © © c 

oa o in to a 

IC l H x 

rn'r-T HQ m" 



Ol 01 © CM 00 
if 0CICNO 



g cS d a, 
~~ 5- § 

: = Js a - 
1-uZx — a 



© 

© 

©" 
i- 



© 
© 

1C 



© © © © © 

cm m © oo m 

CM in r- rH 


© 
© 
in 


i-Tr-T 


co" 


© © • © © 
© © • © © 

Tf © • rr © 


660 


co" r-T ! x"in" 

. rH 


© 

IM 


© © « m © 

co m © cm m 
in co cm m 


in 
© 
if 


i-T 


co" 



m 
oi 

© 
© 



© © © © © 

X © O © l~ 
— CO rH O T 


1,600 


© IM © © © 

H Ol 1-H 


© 
© 


© © © in © 
-*> in oi © 
- ; k tN 

i-Trn'ofin" 


11,485 


© © © © © 
oo© © © © 
© Ol © C-) IC 

rH rH — CO 00 


15,580 


cm x ■* © m 

t^NXlSCl 
CM t}< 


© 
© 
© 


in co rH m in 
■© -r in © in 

rr Ol Ol 


CM 
00 
I — 



© 

X 



l—l 

in 



o 



— : i ro in 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— QUEBEC 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



195 



<» 
s 
e 

"Si 

s 
o 



o 
o 

<D 
O 

a 

•i— i 

> 
o 

Sh 

Oh 



■— 

o 

to 
© 



d 
<g 
s 

C 
a 

CO 

d 



to 
c 

o 
-= 

CO 

J5 
PS 

H 
a 

pa 



- 

= 

CD 
73 



pd £ 
.2 O 

— 

> 

- 
- 

co 
= 

o 

C 



r. 
- 



1— 










i © 

o — 






o 

09 CO 






in 

CM 




•suq 
ajrureui su qstj 


O 

o 
■5 




•suq '^i^q sb qsij 






'sjpjg 'po qsi j 












•sqi 'qsg 

!}SO.IJ JO pOO UIOJ, 


© 
c 
o 

©" 




•suq 'spa 


1 

-< 






o 
© 


7. 
— 


•sqj 's^prag 


© 
© 

CO 






c 
o 
o 


o 

oo 


•sqi 'mojj, 


00 


65 






M 


•sq T 'mqt^H 


; 




•+A\o'paup 'a^Bjj 






llMfl 

'paup '^ooppujj 


. 




-sqi 

'^OODI'VPU 






'suq 'spanos 
puesaiiSuo+'pog 






• + a\o 'paup 'poQ 






•+avo '[jaqs 
ai qsajj 'sja^sqorj 


© 

CO 



i-* n n ^ o s x 



© — i- x ii :i ; t~ 



z 

CO 



1 >— © co co © © © fi 

~- O t-- CM O Ol O -f CM 

co '— t~© -3""©"co"co" 

i- 1 CO CO © 



© © © © © © © © 
© © © © © © © © 
CMCO©©©©©:; 

of -r~ to i-T oo" ©* cm" )©" 

CM 



o 
S 



©©iOic©©©© 

lOC tO 



- 

r. 
© 



r. 
g 

— 

K 

/. 



g 

i 

s 

g 



o 

o 
be 



0J 

- 



22— 13^ 



•jaqtun*^ 



s 

IS 



cj 
m 

tic 



O 
— 

f. 

— 

Q 

pq 
- 

— 

as 
D 
Eh 

o 

pq 



X N IS H Q O C C 

n — !M cm i-i s © 
t- © 

cm" 

: '■ ■ • •ooa 

• • • -OHS 

©©©©©©©© 
©©©=3crc 

X — X — • i .- — 



[ - 



CO 



© 



© © © CO © 
C^ i-l 



c— 



~ - © 

' ■ • ~ = © 

;;;;••©= © 

• • • ■ , •— i 

OOOOSOOO I© 

i'Ix2?:o52 co 

cc" ©" CO I 

— n 



c ~ © - 

iS © © © 



1« IO • t— 
CO © • © 
• CM 



© 

to 



X 
CO 



CM CO © 
CM 



— 

© 

CM 



©©©©©©©— 
© © © © © O © 
lC00iT;©©C:t-© 

©"©" ©" 



© 

CM 



•CM © • CO I i-l 
•i-i CM 



©oir:©©©©© o 

COCOt^-©©©©© I o 

CM © Ol © © 

'-"CM ©" ©" 



•00 • 01 © © © 
— CM i-l 



CD 
> 
2 
O 

s 

s8 
eg 
— 

05 



■ 5) 
: a 
o 



. C3 
■ 

• S 

: * 

• C 

• O 

: s 



© 



o 



= - 



i— ICMC01 , lO©t^X 



3 
c3 
CD 
- 

- 

c5 



'5 
Ph 
o 

o 
cS 

1 

C 

09 

cS 

8s 

125 

O 
— 

— 



p 

cq 
D 
m 

h3 

i— i 

- 

Oh 
O 
- 



rH CM CO — 1C 



gecoo © 

© © © © © © 

rH 00 CM © r- X 

iT'.-; - 

C1CN-HS CM 

of oo"t>Tco"i-r 

>-H CO CO 



z z - z : 

©■©©©© 

Ol © Ol CO 13 



© 

0) 



© © © © © 

LO © © © lO 

r ci x — 



© 
© 
© 



© © c © © 

© © 1C © © 

— CO 01 c 

— ofco" 



© 

CO 



© © CM © © 
:-. ■'. — ~ .-. 

CM t 



Ol 
CM 



3 



oi © © © © 



© 

Ol 



© CM CM CM 
— ~ I 



© 
— 



© © © © © 
© X © © 
Nrtlfl © © 

r-Tr-T Co"irT 



© 

co 



3J & X ^ c 



o 
Eh 



i-i CM CO ^> 1C 



196 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Return showing the Number and Value of Vessels, Boats and 

County 

GRAND RIVER SUBDIVISION 



Districts. 



- 



Fishing Vessels and Boats. 



Vessels. 



— 

s 
= 



1' Newport 

2|Pabos 

31 Grand River 

4 Cape Cove 

5 Perce and Bonaventure Island. 

6| Corner of Beach 

7 Malbaie and Barachois 

8' Point St. Peter 



Totals 



> 



Boats. 



- 

S 



140 
57 
200 
13S 
143 
25 
123 



52 



ID 

"3 
> 



4500 
2865 
8000 
7625 
8120 
780 
5900 



52 1250 10 76 2950 



1250 10 902 40740 



c 



Fishing Gear or Materials. 



Gill Nets. 



= 



500 360 

147 113 
425 294 
422 4S0 
324 1 238 

50: 56 
243 225 

148 125 



2259 1891 



g 

3 
— 



7300 
299S 
6304 
10100 
4700 
1500 
4800 
2350 



40052 



3 

> 



Seines. 



03 



2880 3 100 70 

1498 5 166 185 

2756 3 90 70 

4926 5 150 115 

1678: 1 30 30 

850 9 250 210 

2150 20 248 375 

1150 4 100 120 



> 



17888,50 1134 



Trawls. 



S5 



120 
32 
77 
82 
10 



1175 321 



> 



1350 
320 
770 
820 
100 



3360 



GASPB BAY SUBDIVISION 



1 Chien Blanc to Sandy Beach. 
2jGaspe North and South 

3 Peninsula and Little Gaspe. . . 

4 Grande Greve to Ship Head . . 

5 Cape Rosier to Jersey Cove . . 

6 Griffin..... 

7 Big and Little Fox River 

8 Little Cape to Echourie 

9 Point Jaime to Fame Point . . 



Totals 



25S 


5116 


350 


210 


4200 


2100 




300 


200 




45 


900 


65 


100 


2000 


1000 




720 


480 




75 


1500 


150 


125 


2500 


1250 




60 


40 




73 


1460 


150 


60 


1200 


600 


? 


210 


140 




245 


4900 


390 


1U0 


2000 


11 too 


2 


60 


40 




120 


2400 


200 


125 


2550 


1250 


2 


60 


40 




205 


4100 


220 


210 


4200 


2100 


5 


150 


10U . . 


71 


1520 


80 


65 


1300 


650 


1 


30 


20 


46 


920 


60 


23 


460 


230 


















1138 


22816 


1665 


1018 


20410 


10180 


53 


1590 


106o 





FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS—QUEBEC 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

the Quantities of Fish, &c. — Province of Quebec — Continued. 



197 



of Gaspe. 

(Point Macquereau to Point St. Peter). 



a 

o 



03 

02 



4450 
16729 
3950 
700 
700 
13800 
10350 



5i)ii7!i 



u 



be 

a 

"2 
u 



Kinds of Fish. 



100 
291 
1040 
1238 
316 
100 
400 
125 



3610 



T3 

> 



a 

ft* 



25250 
7290 
4800 

29280 

14400 
S640 

16200 



105.S60 



T3 

o 
Q 



7200 
3325 
10750 
8890 
9294 
1600 
8870 
5860 



55789 



Cod, tongues and 
sounds, brls. 


Haddock, dried, cwt. 


Hake, dried, cwt. 


Halibut, lbs. 


Trout, lbs. 


00 

Si 

no" 

43 

0) 

s 

02 


15 

"l8 
10 

5 


280 
85 

225 
40 
55 


280 
25 
50 

"*5 






8400 
6400 
1500 






1000 
700 




















































48 


685 


360 


1700 




16300j 





S> 



3 



Fish Products. 



300 
120 
324 
360 
324 
60 
300 
200 



e3 
bjc 



o 

Xi 



3600 
1662 
5375 
4445 
4647 
800 
4435 
2930 



27894 



^2 



Si 



e3 



720 
332 
1075 
889 
924 
160 
887 
586 



5573 



a 

s 

^3 



500 
200 
600 
300 
250 
100 
100 
100 

2150 



Total 
Value. 



s> 
S 



$ cts. 

40,790 00 
21,475 65 
54,873 50 
51,055 00 
45,887 35 
12,058 00 
46,301 00 
26,548 00 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 



298,988 50 



(Point St. Peter to Fame Point). 



100 


1200 


240 


200 


22,225 00 


1 










11,450 00 


2 


50 


375 


75 


50 


10,382 00 


3 


90 


875 


175 


75 


13,282 50 


4 


250 


2850 


570 


150 


28,815 00 


5 


200 


2175 


435 




21,475 00 


6 


300 


3900 


780 


150 


39,046 00 


7 


120 


1000 


200 


50 


11,175 00 


8 


75 


750 


150 


65 


8,512 50 


9 


1185 


13125 


2625 


740 


166,363 00 





30000 
32500 
25000 
3000 



90500 



600 
25 
250 
890 
550 
400 
900 
480 
400 

4495 



14700 



3560 
5000 



780 



26440 



2400 



750 
1750 



2400 5700 
4350 
7800 
2000 
1500 



26250 



10 
7 
10 

3 
3 

33 



1500 
2(100 . 
4500 . 
3000 
3750 1 . 
1200 
1000 



650 
1000 
700 



16950 



2350 



95000 



95000 



198 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII, A. 1902 

Return showing the Number, Tonnage and Value of Vessels, Boats, &c, 

County of 

MONT LOUIS SUBDIVISION 



u 

= 



DlSTICTS. 



Fishing Vessels and Boats. 



Grand Etang to Chlorydorme. , 
Petite Anse to Fregate Point.. , 

Great and Little Vallee , 

Magdalen 

Manche D'Epee and Gros Male 
AnsePleureuse to Riviere a Pierre 

Totals 



Vessels. 



> 



u 

a 



368 



Boats. 



B 
( — i 

> 



52 1500 
95 1800 
55 
45 
35 
86 



r3:.(i 



Fishing Gear or Materials. 



Gill Nets. 



Men. 


Number. 


56 


95 


119 


180 


83 


115 


56 


60 


51 


35 


117 


145 


482 


630 



eg 

5h 



4500 
2775 
1500 
875 
3250 



15275 



Seines. 



CD 

1—1 

> 



1300 1 
2650 2 
1450 

900 

400 
27001 3 



9400 7 



o 



30 
80 
30 



90 



230 



03 
> 



60 
60 
40 



Trap 
Nets. 



100 



260 



> 



STE. ANNE DES MONTS SUBDIVISION 



1 

2 
3 
4 

5 












24 
10 

8 

129 
63 


288 
155 
108 
2800 
1340 


36 
17 
13 
186 

89 


25 
13 
9 
214 

80 


1150 

325 


690 
240 












Marsoui and Martin River . . . 
Cape au Renard and Anse a Jean 




























260! 178 
6370 4100 






































1370 


1325 












Totals 
























234 


4691 


341 


3U 


9475 


6533 
































MAGDALEN ISLANDS 


1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 


Entry Island 










8 
146 
126 
217 
42 
13 
3 


320 
5840 
2520 
i(ts;,o 
840 
260 
60 


16 95 
358 1815 
306 580 
604 175 
126 36 

30 11 
6| 4 


2720 
47800 
11600 
4230 
720 
220 
80 


570 
10890 

•J! II III 

1050 
180 

55 
25 












Amherst Island 


•_' 




550 


8 


8 


1200 


2400 






Allright M 


2 
1 

9 


1400 
500 
2000 












5 


590 


1760 










































Totals. 


2 


25 






13 






12 




550 


8 


555 


20690 


1446 2716 


67370 


15670 


1790 


4160 


3900 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— QUEBEC 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

and Kinds of Fish, <kc. — Province Of Quebec — Continued. 

Gaspe — Continued. 
(Fame Point to Riviere a Pierre.) 



199 



a 

o 

S 



120 
1400 

800 
1850 
1500 
4000 



fit 



T3 

0> 



be 

a 



CD 



300 
450 
400 
150 
200 
1470 



9670 2970 



CD 



CD 

o 
c3 



> 

St 

ce 

CO 

<p 



- •/ 





- 
- 



300 



300 



Kinds of Fish. 



Cod, dried, cwt. 


Cod, tongues and 

sounds, brls. 


Haddock, dried, cwt. 


Halibut, lbs. 


2760 


6 




1900 


3280 


13 




10000 


2160 


5 




7800 


680 


2 




4000 


950 


3 




1000 


1460 


6 




500 


11290 


35 




25200 



3 

O 



100 

800 
400 



1000 



2300 



Squid, brls. 


Coarse and mixed fish, 
brls. 


Fish oil, galls. 


Fish as bait, brls. 


Fish as manure, brls. 


200 




1380 


276 


125 


200 




1640 


328 


20') 


150 




1080 


216 


60 


50 




340 


68 


30 


50 




475 


95 


50 


75 




730 


146 


160 


725 




5645 


1129 


625 



o 

a 
3 



CD 



Total 
Value . 



% cts. 

14,274 50 
18,294 00 
12,548 00 
4,529 00 
5,540 00 
13,548 00 



68,733 50 



(Riviere a Pierre to Cape Chatte.) 



1700 


374 


800 


131 




240 


'7700 


4071 


4000 


870 


14200 


5686 



620 
190 
76 
2670 
920 



4476 



3482 
1200 
70 
10530 
16316 


























4000 
4600 

8600 






175 
200 










31598 




375 







310 
95 
38 
1335 

460 



100 
40 
35 
200 
100 



2238 475 



170 

350 



520 



4,907 20 
1,652 50 
1,334 90 
31,092 50 
10,914 60 



49,901 70 



SUBDIVISION. 





8o| 145 




25 
2990 
2876 
510 
281 
43 
47 


"5 
10 


430 
500 
75 
15 












18 
1100 

uioo 

225 
140 
25 
22 


60 
400 
1000 
1204 
11600 
150 
500 






2,690 40 
97.67S 00 
110,386 00 
75,633 90 
55,608 30 

6,919 30 
15,288 20 




2920 2950 
3600 2288 


122640 
145520 
103152 
154224 
4464 
65568 


4400 
5400 




75 
25 
2 
4 
8 






600 
1200 
400 
200 

i45 


1200 
131 KM) 

5000 
250 
1500 

550 










2500 
945 
433 
50 


2293 
128 
129 
18 


























































10528 


7951 


595568 


6772 


15 


1020 


9800 




114 






2590 


14914 


2545 


21500 


364,204 10 



200 



MA BINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Retukn showing the Number, Tonnage and Value of Vessels, Boats, &c, 

County of 

GODBOUT subdivision 



u 

JO 



District. 



County Saguenay. 
Tadoussac to Jambons . 



Fishing Vessels and Boats. 



Si 

a) 

JO 

s 

a 



Vessels. 



D 
bD 
tS 
S 

a 
o 
H 



55 



> 



1500 



3J 



Boats. 



280 



0) 



3500 



Fishing Gear or Materials. 



Gill Nets. 



0) 
JO 



OS 

£ 
o 

,£5 



188! 254 



la 



Seines. 



o 

JS 

-*^> 
d 



c3 



1U50!8200 2 160 150 



Trap 
Nets. 



s* 

£ 
3 



MOISIE SUBDIVISION 



1 












4 


180 


8 


6 


400 


350 


1 


80 


154 






2 


Seven Islands 


2 


66 


1400 


6 


26 


1430 


40 


20 


1510 


1240 


4 


203 


190 






3 




1 


12 


300 


3 


14 


1200 


28: 


42 


4400 


4300 


3 


150 


120 






4 






1 


30 


2 


2 


50 


50 














































Totals 


3 


78 


1700 


9 


45 


2840 


78 


70 


6360 


5940 


8 


433 


464 

























MINGAN SUBDIVISION 



River aux Graines to Thun- 
der River 

Dock Ridge Point and 
Jupitagan 

Magpie 

St. John River 

Longue Point, Mingan and 
Roniaine 

Esquimaux Point 

La Corneille 



Totals. 



IS 



223 



241 



300 3 



280M 



3100 



40 



43 



95 

15 
62 
66 

26 
95 
4 



363 



4700 

815 
1900 



226 
34 



2120 151 

1170 51 

8400 155 

200 6 



19305 



763 



2n 
10 



134 20 



20 

8 
15 
3 



96 



20001000 



750 
1500 
2 

1000 
600 
300 



SI 50 



500 
750 
1000 

500 
1300 
200 



810 

145 
300 
350 



1395 

225 
300 
350 



176 250 
450 450 



5250 58 2231 2970 



4 2000 



3 (500 
7 2600 



NATASHQUAN SUBDIVISION 



Watsheeshoo to Agwanus . . . 
Isle a Michon & Pashashaboo 
Natashquan Village, River 
and Harbour 



Totals. 



3 100 



3 100 



1500 



1500 



24 



24 



42 
4 

94 



2450 
250 

3900 



140 6600 



61 

8 

72 



141 



32 



104 



13(5 



1040 



690 



23801700 



3420 2390 



450 



600 
1050 



300 



400 



700 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— QUEBEC 201 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

and Kinds of Fish, &c. — Province Of Quebec — Continued. 

Saguenay. 

(Tadoussac to Jambons.) 



Kinds of Fish. 



Salmon, fresh, lbs. 


Salmon, salted, brls. 


Herring, salted, brls. | 


Lobsters, preserved in 
cans, lbs. 


Cod, dried, cwt. 


Cod, tongues and 
sounds, lbs. 


: | Haddock, dried, cwt. 


Halibut, lbs. 


Trout, lbs. 


Smelts, lbs. 


White whales, ( I'.ehm'a ) 
No. 


Squid, brls. 


Coarse and mixed fish, I 
brls. 


Fish oil, galls. 


Fish as bait, brls. 


Fish as manure, brls. 


Seal skins, No. 


Total 
Value. 


£ 
x> 
3 

i 


127000 




1116 


2000 


916 


10 


11000 


9000 


2500 


150 




10 


10100 


400 


350 


347 


$ cts. 
41,021 75 


(Jambons to Pigou). 


5100 
14000 
14Q000 








82 
735 
629 

35 


1 

12 
7 




400 
9500 
10200 
500 


132 










75 
655 
598 

60 


20 
125 
90 
20 




12 
53 
40 
10 


1,478 70 
7,316 25 
32,145 40 
250 50 


i 

2 
3 
4 




14 

25 












750 
























39 


















159100 






1481 


20 


20600 


882 






1388 


255 




115 


41,190 85 








1 


(Pigou to Watsheeshoo). 


2500 

2700 
7500 
39549 

9900 
300 
6000 


10 

8 






7200 

1097 
3000 
3430 

1540 
1200 


15 

3 
8 
10 

4 
12 




20700 

900 
2400 
1500 

6050 
5500 


3900 

700 
600 
4500 

2500 

1200 






117 

32 
36 
40 

28 
36 




5651 

864 
2512 
2733 

1390 
1070 


920 

409 
800 
843 

500 
750 




17 

7 
4 
6 

130 
90 


35,624 55 

6,127 45 
16,222 60 
24,581 70 

10,476 50 
25,032 50 
1,320 00 


1 

2 
3 
4 

5 
6 
7 










30 










130 


86400 






















289 












68449 


18 


160 


86400 


17467 


52 


37050 


13400 








14220 


4222 




254 


119,385 30 


(Watsheeshoo to English Point). 


11504 






17604 
10560 


1800 




25 


1000 


100 








160 


1800 


180 






14,336 60 
2,112 00 

26,350 00 


1 

2 

3 












18000 


30 


70 


4800 




25 


1200 


150 








120 


5000 


480 




120 








29504 


30 


70 


28164 


6600 




2200 


250 








280 


6800 


660 




120 


42,798 60 













202 



MA BINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWAKD VII., A. 1902 

Return showing the Number, Tonnage and Value of Vessels and Boats 

County of 

ROMAINE SUBDIVISION 



i 
- 
a 

3 



Districts. 



1 Kegashka River and Harbour 

2 Musquaro to Roinaine 

3 Wolf Island and Coacoachoo. . 



Fishing Vessels and Boats. 



Vessels. 



u 

CD 
,£3 

5 

3 



Totals. 



® 
be 
a 
a 
a 
c 
Eh 



3 
> 



20 500 



20 500 



Boats. 



X! 



3 

5? 



3 



81 400 
10 500 
10 300 



28 1200 



a 



Fishing Gear or 



Gill Nets. 



Seines. 



3 



Hi 12 
18 20 
25 10 



59 



o 
-=■ 
— 

- 



3 



3 



O 



> 



350 120[ II 501 50 
900 360 2 100 75 
300 150 1 200 150 



42 1550 



630 4 350 275 



ST. AUGUSTINE SUBDIVISION 



1, Wolf _ Bay to St. Mary's 

2 Harrington 

3 Little Meccatina and Whale Head. 

4 Mutton Bay 

5 Meccatina to Kekapoe 

6 St. Augustine 

7 Sandy Island to Chicatica 



Totals . 



13 


260 


12 


15 


750 


500 


1 


50 


40 


45 


900 


80 


10 


600 


L'l ,1 1 


10 


1300 


650 


35 


700 


54 


15 


1500 


600 


5 


150 


200 


40 


100') 


60 


20 


1800 


750 


16 


1000 


500 


25 


750 


38 


15 


1500 


750 


3 


100 


100 


I'll 


400 


70 


25 


-HIM, 


750 


5 


150 


150 


17 


340 


25 


15 


1500 


750 


4 


120 


120 


195 


4350 


339 


115 


11651 1 


4300 


4412870 
I 


1760 



BONNE ESPERANCE SUBDIVISION 



Nabitippi to Burnt Island 

Bonne Esperance 

Pidgeon Island to Salmon Bay. . . 
Little Fishery to Belles Amours . 
Bradore Bay to Blancs Sablons . . 



Totals 



25 
99 



2S7 
411 



400 3 
L'n, hi 20 



5500 31 



r9oo 



54 



32 


1280 


64 


6 


500 


400 


13 


670 


780 


58 


2560 


116 


10 


750 


500 


6 


550 


900 


80 


4000 


164 


Hi 


290 


255 


9 


903 


1240 


21 


885 


46 


5 


130 


120 


3 


270 


375 


95 


4200 


182 








11 


960 


1400 






.... 


286 


12925 


572 


31 


1670 


1275 


42 


3353 


4695 



ANTICOSTI 



1 Anticosti . 



43 



1600 



70 55 



1350 



675 7 



350 300 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— QUEBEC 203 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

and Fishing Materials, &c. — Province of Quebec — Continued. 



Saguenay. 

(Mont Joli to Coacoachoo). 



Materials. 


Kinds of Fish. 






Trap-nets. 


brls. 


brls. 


> 












to 


QQ 

"u 




Total 




Number. 

i 


Value. 


Salmon, salted, 


Herring, salted, 


Lobsters, presei 
cans, lbs. 


Cod, dried, cwt 


Cod, tongues a: 
sounds, brls. 


Halibut, lbs. 


CO 
jg 

a 

u 

H 


Fish oil, galls. 


Fish as bait, br 


Fish as manure 


Seal skins, No. 


Value. 


Number. 




$ 
























$ cts. 








20 






500 




2000 


1000 


280 


100 




10 


2,846 50 
5,729 25 
7,626 00 


1 


i 


"400 


25 




6000 


750 




1000 


1500 


485 


485 




25 


2 


1 


400 




24000 


50 




500 


470 


1490 




160 


3 





















2 


SOO 


45 




30000 


1300 




.3000 


3000 


1235 


2075 




195 


16,201 75 





(Coacoachoo to Chicata). 



8 
8 
10 
7 
1 
1 


2400 
2400 
2500 
2100 
250 
200 


36 
5 
32 
15 
50 
30 
28 






450 
3860 
2500 
4200 
2700 
2000 

500 






1500 


650 
4060 
3100 
4000 
3500 
2000 

500 


100 
400 
250 
600 
200 
200 
75 




65 
70 

200 
66 

532 
70 
20 


2,916 25 
17,996 50 
13,482 80 
19,591 50 
14,117 00 
10,187 50 

3,495 50 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 




2880 
6864 
1920 
1440 














750 












16 






2000 
7500 




3940 
















35 


9850 


196 


16 


17044 


16210 






11750 


17810 


1825 




1023 


81,787 05 



(Chicatica to Blancs Sablons). 



26 
12 
19 
4 

34 


4800 45 
3600 140 
6500, 56 
1200 10 
11400 21 






1690 




2000 
2200 

'466 


2000 
4900 
5655 
1030 
14850 


500 
100 
1200 

100 
1000 




175 

150 
1800 


9,203 75 
25,290 00 
27,036 50 

5,356 50 
48,560 00 


1 

2 
3 
4 
5 






5000 
5675 
1100 
9950 











40 

50 






95 


27500j 272 


90 




23415 






4600 


28445 


3800 




2125 


115,446 75 










ISLAND. 




20 


220 


3840oj 1150 


10 


3000 




1500 


800 


300 


50 


15,722 50 


1 



204 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



O 
i— i 

EH 
< 

EH 
i— i 

PH 

< 

P3 



o 
O" 

cm 
O 

© 
o 
a 

• rH 
> 

o 
rH 

Ph 

d 
o 

• rH 

CO 

• i— I 

> 

• 1-4 

Q 

cm 
i— i 



O 

.2 

I-H 

CD 

c2 O 



83 



a 

5 s 

— • =+H 

eg 

a 

c3 
cr 
a> 

ce 
o 

m 

C 



CD 

CO 
CO 
CD 



H 

Oh 

} — 

> 
O 



O 

!* 
Eh 

Z 
P 

o 



I CM TO 



> 



- 

CD 

2 

CP 

— 

o 
E 

— 

O 



E-i 



cS 
65 



to 



Weirs. 


















CD 

u 




m 


O lO 
w - 
1- — 

r-l CO 


o 
co 

© 


uequmjj 




Tf I— 

CO lO 

h r-i 


r— * 
CM 
-P 


Trap Nets. 




«© 










uaqum^j 












00 
CO 
_C 

'5 

CO 


•arqT^Y 




CO CO 
CO © 

Ifl TP 

CM rH 


T* 
Tp 
© 

CO 


■sraoqi'Bj; 




= c 
© 

co © 

CO rH 


© 

TP 


■jaqamj^ 




S3 © 
OS CO 


ia 

CO 

I-H 


CO 




OOlO 
O O X 

oo-* 

rr r- ~- 

۩ CO rH 


o 

X 
Tp 

TP 



CD 



stnoqiBj 



© © © 


© 


© LO X 


co 


io © m 


1—1 


LO CO lO 


TP 


CO i— 


X 



-S 



2 



63 

m 
r. 
'A 

> 



PS 





© lO © 


■* 




CO CO © 


t~ 


\iaquin\^ 


01 © 
CO 


r-l 




OiON 






01 0-1 X 


CM 




X t- 
pH 


CO 
01 




© © © 


© 




O © X 








© 




ICS IO 
rH rH 


© 
CO 




ITS CO Tp 


CM 




CM t- r- 


iH 


•jaqranx 


© w 

rH 


CO 
1—1 



CB 
> 



7: 

o 

■r. 
> 



co Sri .2 



p- 

CO 

Eh 
O 

>i 
EH 


O 

o 



HClMtlO 



Maqranvj; 



3 r £ 

bc> — 
'5 2 « 

3C B S-i 

- : : 
. pggQPn 

rH CM CO 



O 

EH 



: : • : : 1 








CO • • • • 
CO • • ■ • 


© 
© 
CO 
CO 


— 

en ... . 

pj ... . 


rH 

CO 


© 

• • c 
... o: 

CO 


© 
© 
© 

CO 


: : : :S 


CM 
rH 


lO © © ■ © 
t ^ CO CO ■ © 
rH © CM • rH 
rH rH • Tf< 


ICS 
ICS 

© 
© 


TP © © © 

CO © CO ■ © 

rH LO CM • t- 
rH rH • rH 


TP 

TP 


© CO t — ■ CO 
IO 1T0 • rH 


CO 
CM 
rH 


X © © CO © 
X X O CO t~ 
X i— -f lO CO 
t~ © © © LO 

HH 1— 


rH 

© 
© 

o 


CM © lC O © 
io t- r~ 
© -f 00 -rp CO 
© © LO © L~ 
-I- CM rH CO 


CM 

X 
ICS 
CM 

W0 


rH X © rH © 
© l-H CO "V —H 

X © © CO t~ 
rH rH CM 


© 
© 

ICS 

° 


© O CM -H so 
iro © X -r -r 
CM © Tp CO "TP 
CM i— ' rH 


CO 

© 
1— 1 
© 


© © © ^H © 

Th i— 1 lO © © 

Nxnoffl 

© CM -P © 
-rj> CM CM 


X 
CM 
© 
© 


CM X X tP IO 

© co © co in 

© CO CM lO 
rH 


© 
rH 
CO 


© • • -X 
rH 


X 

^H 


o • • -© 

S • ■ ics 
cm m 

l-H • • ■ 


- 

© 

X 
rH 


CM • • ■ ICS 
ICS - •■ CM 




rH ■ ■ -CM 


CO 


Magdalen Inlands 


rH CM CO ^i* ICS 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— QUEBEC 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



< 

o 
!* 

P 
O 

o 





s 

00 

eo ....... . 


= 

X 
CO 


00 

rH 


co 

rH 


... (M • 

OS • 

IM • 


C 1 

© 


Cl ■ 

Tj< • 


CM 

rf 


■ © ■ © © © 

• ■ © • © JO © 

• -CO • X X -O • 

• ■ CM • © b- • 

CM • 


40750 


• • b- • IM JO JO • 

■ • co as ■ 


© 

CO 

rH 


e-*oomoioo 
m co t- — i- cr, © © 


H. 
rn 
CO 
rH 
rH 


©cOi-h©©©co© 
co cc co ir. i~. i - t-. 
, r (M O M X K « 

Cl rH M CO 


© 
© 


N00001O<l"l'IMK 
lOrt -cPhH 


© 

00 

1 


©©©©©ooic 
— -f. irs © co © t- 
■M © CI K C « CI - 
30 10ON Ht< rH 


o 

CO 

o 
x 

CM 


ia -.c ia o i~ in t- m 
r. rj h t ii c c :: 

HCX J1HSHH 
rH 


© 
© 

CO 

Hf 


o tO !5 N lO h m 

i9t>5icctH«ia 

11 — I H 


© 
© 
fe- 


xxcOrH©©cq© 

iH b- rH CO O 


© 

rH 

CM 
CM 


©©m©©©in© 
© -r © © © in cm © 
o x co © c i cc © © 

CO Cl © © r-i "H- Cl rH 
rH rH 


^ 
CJ 
CO 
CI 

JO 


©inco©ooin©co 
x -r © — ci r. x — 

CM CO rH rH <M 


© 

CO 
CO 
rH 


X C5 CO HP H< HH . 
rf. Cl ■ JO • 


(M 

rH 


© © © © © ■ © 
© — © © © ■ © 

C N rH U - • © 

r- rH CO rH ■ b- 


| 1(>200 


O X rH © © • rH • 

in r- -f © cm • rH ■ 

CI rH • -f ■ 


JC 

© 

©. 


CO CO CO CO rH -CO ■ 


1 CM 
1 



r5 

c 

hH 
rH 



HH 
h-! 

P3 
O 
Pm 

fJ 

Eh 

O 

Q 



- r3 

- D 



i — ' a 



* Mis 8.8 

rHcNCO^lOCOb-OO 



o 

C-H 



rH CM CO 


■ ■ © 

• • CO 

• • CO 


© 

X 
CO 


• • cc 

• • rH 


X 
rH 


o © cm 

CO CO © 
© CO CM 
■H/ 1 CO 


br 

X 
JO 
X 


rH rH CM 

Cl CI HH 
T CO 


HH 

X 

b- 


= = 

■ © b- 

■ CO C 


© 
in 
© 

hh 

Hj< 


■ CM © 

■ r- CO 

rH 


rH 

JO 
rH 


Ht< JO r}< 
-* m rH 

© cc co 

CO CO i— 

rH 


CO 
rH 

rH 

CM 


© -H. b- 

b- -f © 
© b-l- 

rt> rr © 
rH 


rH 
rH 

JO 

© 

CM 


jn co © 

© Cl 00 


X 

© 
-f 


jn — © 

cc t~ © 

CO CO 

•_r 3: x 

HlCCI 


© 

rH 

X 

■* 

CO 
rH 


84130 
1 52582 
43300 


CM 
rH 

© 
© 

X 
CM 


Tf CO © 

b- © © 
— m b- 

T — 


© 
© 
JO 

rH 


b-CO © 

Cl © rH 
© r. Cl 

CM © Cl 


© 

© 
rH 
rH 


© b-© 
I - X Cl 
© Cl CO 

c ce ci 
co © in 


b- 
b- 

JO 
© 
b- 

rH 


CM r- © 

rH © X 
CC rH CO 
rH CO r-> 


1 04 

X 

© 


• X CM 
■ rH -V 
rH 


© 

rH 


• © © 

■ © © 

■ X Cl 

■ rH © 

rH 


© 
© 
© 

X 

rH 

1 


• b- lO 

• b- © 

© 


CM 
X 
© 


• CO CM 
CM 


JO 
CM 



a 

o 

9* 

3 S 

■"Or-. 

- ' - 

>-4> a, 

5 — s 

- J y 

- c« cS 

a •/ 

r- Cl CO 



C 

en 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 



•jaqumj^ 



O M g . 

as 







© © © 


© 




09 


© © © 


© 




43 


© OC © 






U 


© CO © 


CO 






Cft T-i CO 








©'■hTco" 








OS 










i-H 



03 

a 
3 

W 

OS 



OB 

09 
K 
« 



o 



6h 

S5 



'- o 

oo 0) S 

02 C 



•jaqtun^ 



00 

.S S 



' 9n l' B A I ^ 



1 



■o g 

02 ^3 



00 



03 



| IK 

H S 



•aaqum^; 



•paAojd 
-uia spuuq jo aaqtun^j; 



- 

© 
z 
z 

CM 



tC. Z 
I- i-l 

© t- 
© i-l 



m 

X 
CO 



CO o 

© Tfl 



X 

= 



o © 
© o 
CM © 



— 

CO 
CM 



© 

CO 



© 

CO 



i-i t - 

1-H © 
— CM 



00 

I- 

CO 



© © 

© CO 

© 

CO lO 



CO 
CO 
3! 



Ph 


ca 

b 

H 


•jaqum^r 


5500 
11100 


00991 


a 






: 




o 


neries. 




■ m © 
• cm in 


its 
t- 
© 

CM 












03 

a 


uaqransj 


• lO oo 


CO 
rH 


o 


Lines. 


•anp? A 


lO CO 

OC CO 

*^ iH i-i 
■ 


CO 
i-H 
t>. 

IM 


Fishing < }eab 
Materials. 


Hand 


•jaquinjj 


3171 
4210 


7381 


it Nets 


•anp3 A 


© © 

© in 
at i£S rH 

^ (M • 


© 
© 

CM 


09 

as 


uaqum^ 


© ■ CO 
ift • 


CO 



00 

£; 
O 



-Si 

3 £ § 

bC > M 

X S h 

« o o 



o 



rH CM CO 



© © © © © 


© 


© © © © © 


© 


<N CM in TP -rt< 






CO 


in o o x o 


rH 


©~in"or i-Tr4~ 


CO 


i-H © CM i-H © 


oo 


1-H rH 


CO 


• • © 


© 


• © 


© 


- • ■ • oc 


CO 


■ ■ CM 


CM 


... © 


© 


... -CM 


CM 



s 
s 

6 



Ph 

< 



Ph 
O 

H 

r? 

c 

o 



© © © 
© © © 

oo o © 

CO © CM 



© © © 
— © a 

© in © 

CO- l£S tr- 
CO i-H 



CO CM rt< 
i-H rH 



© © 
© 

lO CO 



co © © 
© © 

CM i— 



© © ifS 
CO © IM 


■ © 


lO 


• CO 


00 


-Tlr- 


• CM 


Tf 


OO 


■ © 


CO 




■ in 


© 


© © © 


■ »o 




© © lO 


• © 




I- -f CM 


• © 




t- CO 


■ iO 




rH 


• 00 


1-H 
rH 



© 


© 


© 


© 


CO 


© 


© 


rH 




CM 




i-H 




© 



© 
© 

© 

tr- 



io 
CM 



© 
z 



CM 



© 
CM 



© © © • 


i-H 


1-H 


c © © ■ 


-f 




CO CM CM • 


(M 


© 


CO CM 


oo 


CO 


CO 




^HH ■ 


© 


© 


rH i-H 


© 


CM 




rH 


1-H 


© © © © CO 


X 


© I - CO © S- 


■* 


t- CM t- © 


© 


1-H 


rH CM rH 






CO CM CM© 00 


© 


© 1C © © -K 


CM 


m m © © oo 


© 


CO 


CM 


CM 






1— 


© © 




© 


— © • • 




© 


CIO ■ ■ 

: : 






rr © ■ • 






rH • • 




rH 



00 

C 

c 

b • • * * 
oj • oo i—i 

"2 ~S « <J -o 

3 =T C .50 



O 



i-H CM CO TP O 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— QUEBEC 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



1-1 CM co tp in © t— X 



QOOOOOOO 
OOOOOOO© 

X C5 ih iC O 00 !C Q 
CC 00 TP CM © i-^CC_-* 

■* cm" co'cm" ift ©~©"tp' 

i-l i-( ip CM CM t- 


205,087 00 


























© © © © ■ © © © 

z ~ z z z z z 

co cc in co • © co in 

NO i-i CM 


© 
© 

X 

© 


CM rH O Oi 'XNH 
IH ■ O © 


CO 

in 
i— i 


© © © © • © © © 

z: ~ i~ — ■ m © © 
i—i — co co • x in io 


23000 


co o i-i © • t-o © 

TP X 'KTIiH 


CM 
© 
CM 


© © =; 

© © © 










© 
© 
iH 


© t-( i-H 

CM 










CM 
CM 



© • i— i © m co © 

m CM TP CM 


m 
tp 

r— 


© ■ -in © © © © 
ift • • cm m i-i m © 
• • oi © © in 
i—i 


m 

X 
if 
CO 


© • •©©©©© 
© • • in © cm © © 

i-H ■ • X © © H © 
■ ■nHtl H 

. . 


© 
© 


© ■ •©©©©© 
© • • © © i— IC — 
CM ■ • "if © i— i i—i CO 
■ F— 1 iH 


© 
© 

CO 


i-H • • © CO 00 i-H i-l 


© 

CM 


©©©©©©CM© 

© © co co -u> m © x 

H © i-l CO TP 


CO 

© 
1—1 


tP©CMtPCM©<MCM 
OXN-rHtti> 

K r- « C H t- M H 
i—l I-H 


4632 


■ © 

© 

1ft ■ 

...... ,_, 


© 
i—i 


CO 

; ; ; ; : " ; 


CO 



a a 



o5 
a - 
— » 
*i 5 

?3 5^ '" 



C 33 X 1 3 flj O 

; •— O r3 O * O S3 





H 



— cm co tp m © i - x 



1 
s 

S 



o 

I—I 
m 
— 

> 



P 
O 

Ph 

o 
Ph 

»J 

O 
H 

- 

<! 
PS 



i-H CM CO 


© © © 
© © © 


© 
© 


1 - t- t- 

CO CO X 
rH © 


1-H 

© 

Ift 


tp" coTm" 
tp X © 
i-i CO CM 


co" 

CO 


• © ■ 

• © ■ 

• X • 

: : 


- 

© 

X 
CM 


• © • 

• CM • 


© 
CM 


S©8 


© 


© © X 
© i-H © 
CM CM i-l 


TP 
i-H 

© 


CM i—l CO 

© in 


© 
i-H 

CM 


18385 
70700 
23600 


ift 
X 

I 

i-H 
H 


X Ift CM 
© 1- © 

CM CM CM 


Ift 
TP 
t» 


m © © 
© r 

CO c © 
CM i-H i-l 


1ft 
CO 

© 
. »ft 


© t^CM 
CO i-i CM 


1ft 
t~ 


X l-H Ift 
C~ 1— -TP 

CO © i-l 


TP 

CO 
I-H 

CO 


© in m 

CO X X 
CO -P 
© CO CO 

© 


© 
© 

CO 
© 


© m © 
© I-l t- 
© ip © 

© i-H © 
1-H i-H 
rH 


1ft 

X 

© 

TP 

CO 
rH 


m i-i © 
t — p © 
© © t~ 

CM CO CO 
iP 


© 

© 

Ift 


CO © © 
i— CM CM 

1-H 


© 
Ift 
i-H 


X X © 

i-H TP CO 
i-H © 
CM i-H 


CM 

X 
rH 
1-H 


7381 
12620 
4632 


CO 
CO 

© 

TP 

CM 


© © © 
m © — 
© r- in 

CM i-H 


© 

TP 
© 
TP 


CO TP CO 
Ift 1-H h- 


© 
TP 
1-H 



>, 
a 

3 

o 
O 



>. - 

CD C 

| SO 
*J g >» 

5 § §p 

- Z i. 

— - 1 CO 



■r. 

3 
o 



a! 

o 



208 



MA HIXE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD Vii., A. 1902 



o 



p-i 

< 
o 



s 
s 

• <^ 

g 

o 



o 
o 

OS 



- 

1 



CD 

u 
o 

o 

<D 
,Q 

<D 

a 

cm 
O 

• 

O 1 
- J 

2 : 

03 Ex) 
' 03 



> 

• i-H 

Q 
a 

o 



4-3 
— 

c3 
O 

CO 



CD 

cS 
> 

a 

c 

a 

o> 

• r-* 

CD 

-a 

o 
z 

:= 

o 
s 



H 

^" 
l> 

— . 

— ? 

05 



>* 
H 

55 

o 



-f. 



spq'pa^onis jo 



'qsa.ii 'uonqBg 



OiOO 

© io © 
© © 
© — © 
IC IC ?: 



Z 
O 

— 

— 

- 



X — — 



•jaqum^ I ^ N " 


1 


•}.w.o 
'paup 'ajp^H 




■ CO 
• CC 




00 

I- 

eo 


- 3^o 'paup 

'>p'oppvj-[ 





© cc 

71 CM 


i— i 

CC 


•sqj 

qsa.i^'^ooppT?u 




© 
© 

CN 
OS 
CM 




© 
© 

CM 
© 
CM 


■spq 
'apunos put; 
sauSucn 'poQ 




— © 


r~ 

CO 


'paup 'poQ 




© © 

LO CC 
© 0! 

- r 
— 


© 
x 

© 

CM 


•}avo 'naqs ui 
qsaji, 'saajsqoi 


© : 

CC LO 




© 

00 


•sqj 'SUBD 
ui paAJas 
-ajd 'sja^sqo r j 




© c 
r~ © 
71 ce 
— c 

CM fc- 


© 

CC 
OS 
I-H 

OS 


•sj.iq 'pa^p?s 
qaaajpuj^ 










•sqj 'pa^ouis 
'jSuuaajj 




o © 
c © 
— IC 
CC ■* 


© 
© 
© 


•sq t 

'qsa.ii '3ui.ua jj 


z © 
- ■-. 
7) s. 
f— cc 




© 
© 

LO 

© 


•s[aq 
paipjS'Suujajj 


© o © 
© — © 

CM CC 


© 
— 

© 



— - 1 C. — i - 



-r 



S 



O 

— 

C 

Q 



- 



■jaqiuu \^ 



• cm cc 



© • • 




© 


© • ■ 




© 


CC - • 




CO 


iTi ■ • 


• © 


in 


00 • • 




© 


© • • 






■ i — 








X .- 
~~ CC 


• lO 


I-H 


• 


CO 
— 


© © © 


CO Csl 


t ^ 


XOCiNN 

I- ci CM 


[ ^_ 


1Q 


. ~ — 


T © 




to CM i— 




© 






© © © 


• 00 


00 


©•<*<© 


• © 


© 


x — ■- 


■ s 


1—1 


i~ -j: 


■ iri 


00 


- -i 


■o 


CM 


' — 


b- 




■ 1—1 


i—i 










© 


















© in © © oo 


© 

X 


— r. t - x cm 


— ~ 




C-l 


m - ci l- : 


t— 




— 


CM 


: . : : . 




© © © © • 


© 


o t- — 

CO IG © 71 • 


-* 


© 


©oo: 




LO 


i" © 




© 
— 



Z go 
~. = 

; © ~ 
_ .5 ~ — 

g 5 5 a rf 

*J "j" S tc § 



DO 

"3 

o 
N 



i-i ci cc -r lo 



a 



< 
- 

- 

O 

tx 
Eh 

P 
C 

o 



r-C-l«itO!Ot»X | 








. .© . 

■ • • O ■ 




© 








© © CM • • 
— 71 L0 • • 


• © 
■ — 


CM 
© 


— X © © O — — IC 
© — f © cc 7i -r i— 
— © — -_7 CC — 
i-i fH CM 


- 

CC 

o 

X 
CO 








© • © if © 
© ■ ~ © — -r 
© • TP 1-1 © © 

71 ■ © Ji — C^ 
■ X CM CC — 


■ © 

■ © 

• X 

• CO 


X 

© 
© 

71 
© 
CM 






. . . . 


• 




: 




© — . r c © © c; 

C © t - ■ i— © 71 
— — CM 


1711 


• • X © L0 © CM © 

• ■ — cc -r © ci 

— 71 

; ; 


>-i 

X 



© © © -r 
© © — © 

© r cc 

i - — . x r. 

7) IC CO 71 



CO 

© 



cc 
o 



o 
Eh 



— 7 1 -7- 1 - © t - X 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS-QUEBEC 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



209 



o 

i—i 

> 
i— i 

Q 
Ph 
is 

o 
rH 

<1 

Eh 

O 
Eh 

a 



I CO CO 



t~co 

CO CO 



CO 
CO 

fc- 



rH iS O 
O I- 



© 
© 



CO 

oo 

CM 



© 

— 

CM 



t- — CM 

C CC c~. 



© 
© 

CM 



© t-- © 
X t^CO 
1~ l~ 

r — s 

CM © CO 



© 
© 
© 

co 
r. 



© 

00 






© 
00 


O 00 oo 

CO © © 

© — © 

r— t 00 CM 

OS cm © 

t^CM 


CO 

rH 

CM 
CM 
© 
rH 




rH 

© • 


7951 



© 
© 
© 
I- 



o 
s 
© 



© . . 


1 © 


© ■ • 






1 


© • • 




00 • ■ 


- 


© © 1-1 


© 


tooi-i 




lO CM t>- 




CO l-i-H 




CM 


CO 


- • i— I 


i— i 


• • 00 


00 


■ -iO 


lO 



O © CO 

-f o , 

CM © © CO 

HIQ-T © 

HCX CO 

i— 1 rH CO | © 

i 



0) 

>"£ » 
ss a, 3 

o.5 i 
W - w 

o 



o 



3 -c 



rH CI CO 

22— H 



210 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



O 

H 

< 

H 
Ph 

D 



g 



O 
o 

O 
I— I 

r* 

cS 
<D 

CD 

S- 

«2 
o 

rQ 

<D 

G? 

cm 
O 

> 

o 

u 
Ah 

O 
•i— i 

02 

•rH 

> 
•rH 

«rH 

3 

e 

CD 

+3 



- 

- 

O 

pq 

rH 

o 



o 
-El 



CD 

c3 
i> 

B 



H-> 

S3 
cS 
3 

O" 
ccT 
fl 

CP 

C 
Sh 

■ t-H 
r6 

o 

a 



r- CM CO 



■ © o © 

ffl © 55 © 



t- cm -f 

f^fiiCO CM CM 

m" to" co" 

71 © ~ 



© 
CO 

t>. 

CO 

co" 

05 
CM 



•S[jq 'a.m 


© © © 
© © © 

to © CM 
© i~ 


© 
© 






m 


•spq 




= © 

© so 
© © 

CO CO 


© 
in 
i—i 
© 


'liuq sn qsij 












© © 

to 
CM CO 
CO t~ 


10626 


■sitb3 '(to qsij 





•spq 
'qsg p8xuu 

PUB 8SJBOQ 



02 

K- ( 
rH 

o 

Q 
2; 

IH 



rH CM CO f m 




© © © © © 

m © o rH 


© 

00 


GO CO CO rH Tf 
X © CO © © 
© CO t— © CM 


© 
© 


co'co'x"©'"*' 
©©©■*© 

CM rH CO 


CO" 

TP 


21500 


21500 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



rHCMCO-r^lO©t^00 



© © m © m 

to -* 1 CM CM H* 

rH t^- © in m 

CM CM 



•s[jq 'pmbg 




i- C) 
CO (M 
i— l-» 


m 

00 


■sq\ 'qsy !(8cuj 
jo 'poo mo 


© © 
© © 

© X 

© ~v 

m 




© 
© 

00 

m 



•SUI>[S JO 'O^ I 

'apjq.w a^iqM ! 
jo 'uStqag I 



■spq 'spa 



m t- 

rH t>- 



CM 

© 



© © © 


© 


© © © 


© 


© - © 


© 


© © © 




© rH CO 




CO 


CO 


© © ■ 


© 


© © • 


© 


© CO • 


CO 


X I- • 


in 


CM • 


CO 



sqi '^nqquH 



v. 

c 



© 

in 



s 



© 

00 

in 
© 



co in © o tj< 

t~ CM CM t- rH 
in CM rH Tfl 



CM 



■tiooxe 

© CM CO © 
00 rH CD CM in 

co m cm cm 

CM rH 



CM 

© 



x in in 

X X CM 
C:Ht> 



o 



0) 

§■§ a 

ic> — 

x C « 

CO O O 



■jaqniu^j 



rH CM CO 



© © 
© © 

© in 
— © 



CO 



X 

© 

X 
CO 



© © © 
5 © © 

CO CO © 
CM CM X 



© 

© 
CO 



© 
in 

CM 
CO 



© © © X © 

© I -. © © © 
t^- © cm in x 

i— I CO 1ft rH © 
rH CM CO 



CM 
X 



S3 



o 
E-t 



s 
e 



h0 

O 

sz; 

O 

o 



inin©©inmin© 
t^xco©t^©t^in 


to 

to 


HOlOCOHSfflIM 
CM©X©©X^CM 
OrHCOtr^CMt^Tft-- 


-f 

to 
to 


rH rH ©r Of CO* rH Iff to" 
ft-VHflOHH 
rH rH 


473, 


t^torf<©meoto© 

rH in CM © CM CM to 
CO rH CM rH rH © rH 
rH CM 


4220 




© 

to 
© 


©toCM©toto©© 
© to CM © 01 © © 
'*CMCM©©XXX 
■* CM rH CO 


14037 


© x © © to © to © 

© X CM © CO r-i CO © 
r- CO CM X CM X to 
OHtfflHSXH 
rH rH rH CM 


X 
X 

■fl 

rH 

X 


©..©.... 
rH • -00 • . . . 
• -IM • • • . 


s 

CM 


■ © 

- ■ 00 

• CM • 


© 
X 

CM 






© 

to 

~ ; : ; : : : : 


© 

to 

rH 






© 

© 

to 

CM • 


© 
© 

to 
CM 



© CM © © © © © 

© x © m © m © 

— X — C I © I - © 

© CO CO i—i 



CM 
X 



© © © © © 

© © to © © 
© © © CM © 
rH © CM CO 
rH CM CO 



l CM CO • 



i to 



© 
to 

X 

© 



D 

o 
c 

5 s 



-H» 

O 

H 



O » «-5 3 « ?, 
Si '7. -Lt. -< 



rHeMCO-rfto©t^X 



FISHER Y INSPECTORS' REPORTS-QUEBEC 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



211 



rH co co 



© © m m 

CO 00 m © 



— — u- 

co i-H m 
co x"co* 

CO 

CI ~ — 



CO 
C5 

o 
id" 

-r 

CD 



o 

1—1 

r-l 

r-l 
A 
rXI 

o 
o 

o 
- 

C3 





O © 
O CO 
O CO 
rH ^ 

CO 


© 
CO 

t~ 

IQ 
CO 


54700 
<i580 
650 


o 

CO 
© 
rH 
CO 


© © t>- 
lO i— 1 CO 
r-l — 
CD f Tf 
CO i-l 


CO 

o 

© 

■rj< 


CD CO 00 
CO © x 
CD -f -r 
C — — 
t-H 1Q 00 


CD 
© 

CO 

** 

rH 


• lO © 

• t~© 

• CO CO 


IQ 
© 
© 



t>- X © 

© X 

x x c i 
co 



© 



54800 


- 
© 

X 

-r 

m 




• © 

• in 

• H 


© 

in 

rH 


CO Tf< . 
© rH • 
I— 1 ■ • 


© 
© 
CO 


© © © 

o © - 
© CO o 

CD rH CO 
Tf rH 
CO rH 


460400 


© © CO 

© w oo 

CO CI © 
ift CO CO 
CO rH 


CO 
CO 

in 

rH 

» 


© 00 © 

io -r o 

t^CO X 

co in © 
x t~ 


00 
X 

** 
© 

rH 



C 



5 : * -3 

1 si 5 
mow 

o 

rV, 

C 

o 

_o 

rH CO CO 

22—14^ 



212 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD Vil., A. 1902 



RECAPITULATION 

Statement showing the Yield and Value of the Fisheries of the Gulf Division, 

Quebec, for the Season of 1900. 



Kinds of Fish. 




Salmon, fresh in ice Lbs. 

ii salted Brls. 

Herring h m 

ii fresh . . . . Lbs. 

it smoked n 

Mackerel, salted Brls. 

Lobsters, canned Lbs. 

n fresh Cwt. 

Cod, dried u 

" tongues and sounds Brls. 

Haddock, fresh Lbs. 

n dried Cwt. 

Hake, u ■■ 

Halibut, fresh Lbs. 

Trout ii i 

Smelts ii n 

Eels Brls. 

Tommy cods, fresh Lbs. 

Squid , ... Brls. 

Coarse and mixed fish n 

Fish and seal oils ... Galls 

Fish as bait ... Brls. 

Fish as manure m 

Sealskins Pieces 

White whales, skins h 



Total for 1900 
,i 1899 



Increase for 1899. 



660,317 
581 
35,540 
80,500 
77,900 
7,951 
1,022,106 
80 

193,696 
290 
29,200 
2,286 
738 
164,848 
91,532 
460,400 
206 
54,800 
5,044 
665 
143,606 
44,903 
61,930 
25,729 
150 



Price. 



% cts. 

20 
15 00 

4 00 
01 
02 

15 00 
20 

5 00 
4 00 

10 00 
03 
3 00 
2 25 
10 
10 
05 

10 00 
05 



4 00 
2 00 

30 

1 50 

50 

1 25 
4 00 



Value. 



$ cts. 

132,063 40 
8,715 00 
142.160 00 
805 00 
1,558 00 
119,265 00 
204,421 20 
400 00 
774,784 00 
2,900 00 
876 00 
6,858 00 
1,660 50 
16,484 80 
9,153 20 
23,020 00 
2,060 00 
2,740 00 
20,176 00 
1,330 00 
43,081 80 
67,354 50 
30,965 00 
32,161 25 
600 00 



1,645,592 65 
1,523,578 95 



122,013 70 



* 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— QUEBEC 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



213 



RECAPITULATION 

Showing Number of Men, Vessels and Boats, and Value of Material Employed in 
Gulf Division, Quebec, Fisheries, Season of 1900. 



Description. 



29 
6,189 
280,012 
468 
151 
784 
18 
140 
24,63.3 
159 
134,985 
75 
745 
216 
20 



vessels of 982 tons manned by 160 men. 

boats fished by 11,030 men 

fathoms of gill net 

seines of 20,511 fathoms 

trap-nets 

trawls 



weirs 

smelt nets 

hand lines 

canneries employing 3,134 men and girls. 

lobster traps 

freezers and ice houses 

fish and smoke houses 

private piers and wharfs 

tugs and smacks 



Total. 



Value. 



$ cts. 

18,000 00 
179,577 00 
134,816 00 
21,913 00 
44,650 00 
8,587 00 
380 00 
4,940 00 
11,802 00 
50,676 00 
76,300 00 
5,035 00 
112,685 00 
61,400 00 
2,800 00 

733,561 00 



214 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Return of the Number of Fishermen, the Number of Boats, Nets, <fec, and tae 

Cape Chat to Levis, Province 



Fishing Material. 



u 



1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
Ki 
11 
L2 
13 
1 1 
15 
16 
17 
18 
in 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
2<i 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 



Districts. 



Capucins 

Petite Mechins 

Grands Mechins 

Ruisseau a Sem 

Grosses Roches 

Ste. Felicite 

Matane 

Riviere Blanche 

Sandy Bay 

Metis 

Ste. Flavie 

Ste. Luce 

Rimouski 

Sacre Coeur and Islet a Canuel 

Bic, Cap a 1'Orignal and Riviere Hatee. 
St. Fabien, St. .Simon and St. Mathieu. 

Trois Pistoles 

Isle Verte 

Cacouna 

Riviere du Loup 

St. Andre and Notre Dame du Portage. 

Kamouraska 

St. Denis 

Riviere Ouelle 

Ste. Anne de la Pocatiere 

St. Roch 

St. Jean Port Joli 

L'Islet.. 

He aux Grues and He aux Oies 

Cap St. Ignace 

St. Thomas 

Berthier 

St. Valier 

St. Michel 

Beaumont 

Levis and St. Nicholas 



Totals. 
Values 



Boats. 



- 



3 



15 
33 
29 
11 
39 
23 
25 
27 
75 
7 
11 
2 
8 
9 
3 
1 
9 
35 
11 
5 
9 
7 
8 
36 
8 
10 
20 
2 
5 
2 
6 
10 
9 
7 
9 
10 



536 



> 



210 
385 
310 
110 
460 
220 
305 
450 
1070 
100 
113 
20 
150 
200 
15 
5 
54 
1225 
55 
30 
118 
36 
48 
200 
40 
30 
60 
50 
25 
10 
30 
50 
115 
35 
45 
50 



6429 



a 



23 
40 
34 
13 
56 
34 
36 
28 
96 
10 
11 
19 
18 
9 
17 
5 
9 
42 
13 
5 
24 
8 
8 
46 
8 
10 
20 
2 
13 
2 
10 
10 
9 
7 
9 

10 



714 



Gill Nets. 



3 



13 
34 
39 
14 
45 
27 
33 
35 
140 

3 
11 

3 



18 
2 
1 



420 



a 
S 



340: 
880 
830 
350 ; 

1125; 
700 
805 
925 

3985 
75 
175 
75 



25 



175 
60 

no 



30 



1C665 



c8 
> 



170 
380 
480 
100 
550 
270 
350 
370 
1500 

40 
150 

60 



L0 



Eel Weirs. 



25 
7 
7 



15 



4484 



- 

J2 



a 
55 



16 
18 
11 
12 
5 
19 
35 
13 
5 
19 
9 
13 
18 
18 
16 
30 
16 
13 
15 
12 
40 
9 
7 
9 
8 



403 



> 



10" 

25 
175 



450 



766 
1045 
580 
380 
120 
380 
3185 
975 
450 
855 
1150 
950 
1250 
500 
688 
1948 
854 
665 
1S62 
925 
2192 
5250 
3750 
4400 
3060 



a 

o 
a 

m 



3i H i 
1740 



140 
'600 



1100 



1760 
320 
160 
rim 
300 
580! 



15 
60 
40 



1680, 500 
8022! 397 

138 .. 

170 128 

500 312 
1000 240 

500 2000 



38930 



160 
64 
64 
406 
296 
240 
360 

21390 

4278 



18n 
80 
21. Mi 

15" 

350 
1390 

7992 

479 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS-QUEBEC 215 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

Quantity of Fish Caught on the South Shore of the St. Lawrence River from 
Of Quebec, for the Year 1900. 



Kinds of Fish. 



u 



be 

a 
u 

- 



to 

03 



- 



39800 
18400 
649500 
324850 
250000 

"lOOO 
"320210 
108200 
24500 
45H0 
9500 
34000 
200000 



450 
700 
19320 
270 
260 
600 



1984460 
19S45 



21600 



1728 



300 



130 

lioo 



25 



351 hi 



20000 



101100 



20000 
75 
1000 
735 
2665 
1015 
1120 
1635 







250 
665 
50 
2570 
141 
360 
575 



35055 28245 4611 
3505 2260 230 



o 
so 



60 
500 



809 
5000 
60000 



103100 
7330 
5700 
11600 
340 
410 
1550 



1'.m;:;:i'.i 



11784 



a) 



2800 



2009 
900 



a 

to 

03 
U 
SO 



O 

O 



41000 
62100 
42100 
21100 
55000 
28800 
4000 
24700 
18200 







740 
30 
100 
2422 
6400 
3253 
6125 
5123 
11320 
20555 
11136 
6916 
47451 
50000 
47400 
41000 
119811 

385491 



23129 



297000 



14850 



3300 
3050 
1460 
2000 
4650 
4000 
2600 
1450 
2670 



03 

c 

- 



en 
C6 

03 
03 
~ 

O 

a 
s 

cS 

^3 . 

03 a, 



25180 



25 IS 



208 
5 
100 
10 
3 
316 
101 
2056 
85 
90 
893 
125 
500 



4492 



13476 



1100 
200 
1000 
62000 
1600 
1500 
1700 
2800 
5000 
2600 
1000 
3500 
3200 
820 
100 
16160 
127500 
28400 
5000 
4000 
1000 
1000 
10000 
1000 
1800 
1000 
1200 
1300 
1500 
615 
750 
2255 
850 
800 
1350 



Fish 
Products, 



o 
a 



08 
03 

~J1 



16 
t6 



tl2 



12 



295600 



2956 



33 



41 



cS 
Sjc 



90 
15 
80 
225 
120 
110 
125 
210 



■ 25 
560 



10 



1120 



20 



2710 



Total 
Value of 
Fish. 



813 



$ cts. 



3,180 
4,974 
4,573 
2.017 
5,863 
3,044 
4,618 
3,234 
6,948 
5,070 

Hi 14 
1,372 
10,377 
6,612 
3,524 

548 
1,519 
6,044 
9,362 

799 

498 
3,256 
1,184 
8,188 
2,205 

385 
1,317 

691 
2,867 
6,919 
1,033 
3,331 
5,816 

3. 1 !;-,(» 

2,690 
7,658 



135,381 42 



01 

— 

s 

- 



1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
1 4 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 



* 35,000 lbs. smoked herring. 

+ 18 belugas or white whales, S72. 



216 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Return of the Number of Fishermen, Value of Boats, Nets, &c, the Quantity and 

Ottawa, in the Province of 



Fishing Materials. 



En 

1 



3 



Districts. 



including 
and St. 



TNicolet County 

2 Yamaska County, 

Rivers Yamaska 
Francis 

3 Richelieu County 

4 n River 

5 Vercheres County 

6 Chambly and Laprairie 

7 Lake St. Louis 

8 • ii St. Francis 

9 Ottawa River and tributaries. . 

10 Lake Two Mountains 

11 Terrebonne and L'Assomption. 

12 Berthier and Maskinonge 

13 St. Maurice to Portneuf 
14 

15 



Lakes and streams in the East- 
ern Townships.. 

Missisquoi Bay and vicinity. . . 



Totals . 
Values. 



Boats. 



u 

s 



55 



75 
70 



3 

> 



440 



800 
775 
581 540 
20 160 
40 400 
65| 650 
221 340 
105'l800i 
113 2000 ; 



25 
70 
30 



250 
420 
450! 



60 



105 
75 

110 
30 
50 

115 
35 

100 

145 
50 
75 
80 



Gill Nets. 



u 



3 



45 



8 
15 
250 
75 

8 



5 

eg 
PR 



1000 



80 



60 



m 

S3 
> 



320 



10 



10 



150 25 
300 50 
8500 2500 



1200 
80 



275 
55 



Seines. 



S 
3 



O 



53 550 



6 

14 

2< 
( 

20 
15 



Hoop 
Nets. 



- 
> 



150 
420 280 



500 



TO 



10 

15 
7 



500 
270 
600 
450 



300 
330 
70 



450 
135 
400 
250 



£2 



40 



Night 
Lines. 



> 



a. 

£ 
3 



Eei 
Weirs. 



> 



200 301 60 



75 
125 
40 



Angling, trolling and night lines . 



400 3200 
200 1600 
80 410 
5 30 
3 15 



75 
20 



600 
160 



10 100 



758 



9125 



38 



1068 408 











11370 


3245 











14 1200 700 



3025 823 



200 


360 


100 


200 


16 


50 


12 


15 


25 


40 


40 


80 


20 


40 


150 


300 


100 


200 


35 


70 


100 


200 


20 


40 



6215 8481655 



> 



8 4500 



4500 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— QUEBEC 



217 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

Value of Fish, &c, in the Inland District 
Quebec, for the Year 1900. 



extending from Quebec City to Upper 



Kinds ok Fish. 



r I 



500 



400 

900 



•-c 

o 



3 

O 

EH 



500 . 



600 2000 



C3 



500 
800 



4000 88000 



400 
12100 

10300 

4000 



29900 
1794 



2000 



15400 
500 



23000 



1840 



726C0 
7000 
16500 

120000 



306 LOO 



30610 



1500 



7400 
3500 
7350 
2500 
4500 
7000 
2200 
40500 
2300 

500 
1 SI It. I 

600 

5000 



■- 



8000 



70000 
-,11201.1 
8800 
5500 
174IX) 
11300 
6500 
45000 
6900 
2500 
5600 
5900 



So 

3 

O 

a 
M 

00 

cS 



3000 1000 



60000 
55600 
22550 
23000 
29200 
14200 

6800 
47100 

9300 

3100 
21000 

3400 



5000 
5400 



41600| 27300 
39300 



80050 324500 



6932 16225 



325550 



13022 



3100 
600 

4500 

2500 
12600 

4500 
450 

8000 



e 

o 

m 



2000 10000 



47650 



2S59 



8400 
17300 
1950 
4500 
21500 
160600! 
12400 : 
56300 
6900 
700 
9000 
6500 



82400 
40600 
90500 
21600 
28400 
21900 

5000 
14800 

5200 

1100 
61800 

5000 

2800 



450 



308500 391100 427700 



u 

CD 
- 



soi ill 



7531 10 
56000 
23700 
27000 
89200 
37700 

7000 
27500 
39700 

4500 
20100 

2000 

10000 



18510i 23466 



12831 



o 



20110 



90300 
43300 



2300 
14400 
20000 

5800 
54200 
78400 
900 
65400 

soi ii i 

4000 



38! ii 



7780 



— 

00 
CD 

30 

u 

O 
o 

-a 
s 

03 

. 

- /- 

X XI 



115000 



510000 
200000 
60800 
61000 
203000 
176400 
15200 
ssooo 
83400 
19700 
130000 
12500 



72600 




17366 



26000 



Total 
Valu e . 



$ cts 
2,420 00 



21,677 
13,412 
8,796 
4,643 
10,470 
16,208 
2,445 
24,305 
5,514 
8,760 
10,681 



-- 

E 



2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
lo 
11 






17,742 00 
2,758 00 




26000 








168,835 00 





00jl2 
00 13 



14 

15 



t 



218 



MA RINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



NORTH SHORE OF THE ST. LAWRENCE FROM QUEBEC CITY TO 

THE SAGUENAY. 

Island of Orleans. — There are over one hundred weirs set around the shores of 
Island of Orleans. They are mostly built of wire netting and are valued at $12,000. 
Besides a few night lines these weirs constitute all the fishing gear of the locality. Of 
late years the spring caught fish have been so scarce that fishermen now only set their 
weirs late in the season, mostly for eels. The capture of shad, bass and pickerel has 
now become too insignificant to mention, and their catch is included in that of the 
mixed fish. On the other hand more eels were caught than before ; their yield is given 
at 260,000 pounds, that of coarse and mixed fish at 35,000 pounds. About 300 pounds 
of salmon were also caught in these weirs — The whole catch valued at SI 6,010. 

On the main shore of Montmorency County there are about thirty weirs valued at 
83,000. Eels here also are the principal kinds of fish, 80,000 pounds being secured, 
besides 2,000 pounds of trout and 5,000 pounds mixed fish, valued at $5,080 altogether. 

In Charlevoix County the seventy-five weirs are not so expensive as the above 
mentioned, but are mostly constructed with brushes called Jascines, and are only valued 
at $1,500. There are also four gill nets valued at $60. The yield of fish for this county 
is reckoned as follows : — 36,500 pounds of eels, 200 barrels of sardines, 25 barrels of 
herring, 1,700 pounds of salmon, 175,000 pounds of mixed fish, besides 1,000 barrels of 
fish used as manure, aggregating a value of $5,480. 

In Lake St. John District, comprising the upper waters of the Saguenay, the catch 
of fish is estimated as follows : — 10,000 pounds of salmon, 6,000 pounds of whitefish, 12,000 
pounds of trout, 75,000 pounds of ouananich, 23,000 pounds of pickerel, 5,000 pounds of 
pike and 40,000 pounds of coarse and mixed fish — In all representing a value of $12,930. 

The statistics on the coast from Tadoussac to Bersimis have been included in the 
Godbout district of the Gulf division. 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS-QUEBEC 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



219 



STATEMENT 



Of the Yield and Value of the Inland Fisheries of Quebec (exclusive of the Gulf 

Division) for 1900. 



Kinds of Fish. 


Quantity. 


Jrnce. 


V alue. 










S> cts. 


35 Cts. 






Lbs. 


OO, ovi) 


n on 


£ ATSi llfl 
0,0/ 8 UU 


Shad 






Of ,ovZ 


n ha 

U UO 


oz 






Brls. 




UU 


on Qi r; nil 
oZ, 310 UU 






.... . ■ UU3. 


1 <\Q.A ti n 


n m 

U Ul 


1 Q Q.AA AO 

iy,o44 ou 








oo,uuu 


fl9 

u uz 


7nn nn 
f uu uu 








tjyjj uuu 


08 


4 048 00 








355,155 


10 


35,515 50 








75,000 


10 


7,500 00 








114,895 


08 


9,191 60 








352,111 


05 


17,605 55 


Pike 






330,550 


04 


13,222 00 








47,650 


06 


2,859 00 






tl 


504 899 


06 


30 293 94 








427,700 


03 


12,831 00 


Eels 






1,153,091 


06 


69,185 46 






Brls. 


4,692 


3 00 


14.076 00 






Lbs. 


25,180 


10 


2,518 00 








297,000 


05 


14,850 00 






Bushels 


26,000 


60 


15,600 00 






Lbs. 


389,000 


02 


7,780 00 








2,287,200 


01 


22,872 00 






Brls. 


1,000 


50 


500 00 






No. 


33 


1 25 


41 25 






18 


4 00 


72 00 


Fish oil ... 




Galls. 


2,710 


30 


813 00 


TW.nl for 1900 








343,686 42 


11 

Decrease. 










429,555 36 
85,868 94 



















STATEMENT 

Showing the Fishing Material used in Quebec (exclusive of the Gulf St. Lawrence 

Division) for the Year 1900. 



Articles. 



1,294 Fishing boats 

832 Gill nets (22,200) fathoms) 
188 Seines (4,915 

823 Hoop nets . 

616 Brush or eel weirs 

25 N asses . 

878 Night lines 



50 Ice houses 



Total . 



Value. 



$ cts. 

15,554 00 
7,789 00 
3,055 00 
6,215 00 

59,930 00 
50 00 
1,715 00 



Total. 



$ cts. 



94,308 00 
3,000 00 

97,308 00 



220 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



RECAPITULATION 



Of the Yield and Value of the Fisheries in the whole Province of Quebec, for the 

Year 1900. 



Kinds of fish. 



Quantity. 



Salmon, fresh Lbs. 

n salted Brls. 

Trout Lbs. 

Ouananiche • " 

Whitefish n 

Smelts n 

Cod, dried Cwt. 

" (green). Lbs. 

,i tongues and sounds Brls. 

Haddock, dried Cwt. 

fresh Lbs. 

Hake, dried Cwt. 

Tom cod 

Halibut Lbs. 

Herring, salted Brls. 

ii fresh . Lbs. 

ii smoked ■ 

Sardines Brls. 

Shad Lbs. 

Bass (achigan) « 

Pickerel h 

Pike 

Maskinonge n 

Eels, fresh n 

" salted Brls. 

Perch Lbs. 

Sturgeon u 

Mackerel, salted Brls. 

Lobsters, canned Lbs. 

ii fresh Cwt. 

Squid Brls. 

Catfish Lbs. 

Coarse and mixed fish , n 

it H Brls. 

Fish as bait n 

n manure n 

Fish oil . Galls 

Seal skins No. 

Beluga or white whales skins n 



Total for 1900. 

1899 . 

Increase 



693,707 
581 

446,687 
75,000 
50,600 
460,400 
193,696 
297,000 
290 

2,286 
29,200 

738 



Rate. 



$ cts. 

20 
15 00 

10 
10 
08 
05 
4 00 
05 
10 00 

3 00 
03 

2 25 



190,028 
43,744 
2,064,960 
112,900 

4,692 
37,892 
114,895 
352,111 
330,550 
47,650 
1,153,091 
206 

427,700 
504,899 
7,951 
1,022,106 
80 

5,044 
389,000 
2,287,200 
665 

44,903 
62,930 
146,317 
25,762 
168 



10 

4 00 
01 
02 

3 00 
06 
08 
05 
04 
06 
06 

10 00 

03 
06 
15 00 
20 

5 00 

4 00 



Value. 



Total Value. 



$ cts. 

138,741 40 
8,715 00 



774,784 00 
14,850 00 
2,900 00 



6,858 00 
876 00 



174,976 00 
20,649 60 
2,258 00 



1 50 
50 

30 

1 25 
4 00 



69,185 46 
2,060 00 



204,421 20 
400 00 



22,872 00 
1,330 00 



$ cts. 



147,456 40 
44,668 70 
7,500 00 
4,048 00 
23,020 00 



792,534 00 



7,734 00 
1,660 50 
18,340 00 
19,002 80 



197,883 60 
14,076 00 
2,273 52 
9,191 60 
17,605 55 
13,222 00 
2,859 00 



71,245 46 
12,831 00 
30,293 94 
119,265 00 



204,821 20 
20,176 00 
7,780 00 



24,202 00 
67,354 50 
31,465 00 
43,894 80 
32,202 50 
672 00 



1,989,279 07 
1,953,134 31 



36,144 76 



FISHERY INSPECTORS' REPORTS— QUEBEC 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



221 



RECAPITULATION 



Op the Fishing Vessels, Boats, Nets, &c, in the whole Province of Quebec for the 

Year 1900. 



Articles. 


Value. 


xotai. 


29 fishing vessels (982 tons) 


$ 

18,000 
195,131 
142,605 

94 <1i;s 

44^650 
6,215 

60,310 
4,940 
8,587 

11,802 
1,715 
50 




7,483 t. boats 




19 4flrt trill no+a CW> 919 f a fVinm o \ 




656 seines (25,426 u ) 
















784 trawls 




24,633 hand lines 




878 night lines 










508,973 


159 lobster canneries 


50,676 
76,300 


134,985 I. traps . . ." . 






126,976 


125 freezers and ice houses 


8,035 
112,685 
61,400 
2,800 






20 tugs and smacks 






184,920 


Total 




820,869 







222 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

t 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



APPENDIX No. ii. 



BAIT COLD STORAGE. 



REPORT OF PROGRESS ON THE BATT STORAGE WORK IN 1901, BY 
THE SPECIAL OFFICER IN CHARGE, J. F. FRASER. 



New Glasgow, N.S., December 29, 1901. 



To the Dominion Commissioner of Fisheries, 

Ottawa. 

Sir, — As the end of the bait season is approaching, I beg to make the following 
report on the condition of the bait freezers, and the work under my charge in 
the maritime provinces. The cold storage work which has been done up to the present 
time, has been confined to the provinces of Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. 
The work in Prince Edward Island has been mainly at the western end of the province, 
while the work in Nova Scotia has been confined principally to the eastern end. An 
effort has been made from time to time, to extend the work into the province of New 
Brunswick, but heretofore without success. An association was formed at Caraquet, on 
Chaleur Bay, for the purpose of building a thirty ton freezer, but construction was not 
commenced. Arrangements were completed for the erection of freezers at Tracadie, 
Point Escuminac and Richibucto. Some difficulty has arisen at these points, and I am 
not sure that these freezers will be built. 

In the early stages of the work, Dr. Arthur Kendall, while inspector of bait 
freezers, visited the New Brunswick shore of the Bay of Fundy, including Grand Manan, 
but no definite arrangements have resulted up to the present time. 

Inquiries were received from the province of Quebec, including the Magdalen 
Islands, for the establishment of cold storage stations, both on the mainland and on the 
islands, but, owing to the fact that the local legislature of Quebec did not deem it 
advisable to pass, at its last session, a special act for the free incorporation of bait 
associations, as has been done in Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and New Bruns- 
wick, it has been impossible to organize any fisherman's bait associations in that province. 

The majority of bait association meetings will be held during the present month 
and some in the early part of January, when a final and detailed report can be made for 
the whole seasons operations. 

As an evidence of the success that has attended some of the freezers, application 
has been made to the department for extension of capacity. The extension to the Bay- 
field freezer is now under way, and an application has gone forward for a similar exten- 
sion to the Sambro freezer. The fishermen in these localities have stated, that at first 
they viewed the matter, more or less, as an experiment, and were not willing to embark 
heavily until they were assured of its success. 

Since forwarding my last report the following freezers have been completed : — 



Locality. 



Miminigash 

Cheticamp 

Eastern Harbour 
Petit de Grat. . . 



Province. 


County. 


Capacity. 






Tons. 

10 
20 
20 
20 


Nova Scotia. . . . 


Inverness 




Richmond 







BAIT COLD STORAGE 



223 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

Construction is under way at North Bay, Ingonish, Victoria Co., N.S., 20 tons 
capacity and an extension to freezer at Bayfipld, Antigonish Co., N.S. It is possible, 
that arrangements may yet be made, to build a 20 ton freezer at Port Maitland, in 
Yarmouth Co., and at New Haven, in Victoria Co. 

DETAILS OF NEW CONSTRUCTION. 

Miminigash, P.E.I. — This freezer is of the same size as the one built at Bayfield. 
The storage room is divided into two portions, however, which will enable it to be run 
more economically. The ice chamber has been enlarged and an additional ice storage 
has been placed in the freezing shed, for the supplying of ice for freezing the bait in the 
spring, without drawing on the main ice supply. The bait will be frozen in pans at 
this point. 

Gheticamp, C.B. — A 20 ton freezer has been completed at this point, and, having a 
few tons of ice available, some squid have been frozen as a test charge. 

Eastern Harbour, C.B. — This freezer has been completed, but the accounts have not 
yet been received. The size is the same as the Cheticamp freezer, 20 tons, but the 
material used in the construction is of a better quality, which will add slightly to the 
cost of the building ; it is expected, however, that the operating expenses will be rather 
less. These two freezers which were erected within a short distance of each other, should 
be of considerable benefit to the large fishing settlement of Cheticamp. I am of the 
opinion, that, by dividing the bait cold storage required between two freezers, that it 
will better serve the needs of the locality than by erecting one large freezer, as the fish- 
ing settlement is scattered for some distance along the shore. 

Petit de Grat, C.B. — A 20 ton freezer has been completed at this point and is 
provided with a full equipment of ice tools. A small stock of ice was cut last 
winter and held in temporary storage by the association, but sufficient provision was 
not made for keeping it and it is not expected that this freezer will operate until next 
year. 

FREEZERS UNDER CONSTRUCTION. 

North Bay, Ingonish, C.B. — A 20 ton freezer is now under construction at this 
point, and I expect it will be completed by the New Year. Ingonish is a good fishing 
locality, and, if properly managed, the catch should be materially increased. 

Bayfield (Extension), N.S. — Owing to the need of extending this freezer, the ice 
chamber of the original freezer is being converted into storage and freezing rooms, and 
a detached ice house is being built for the purpose of supplying ice for freezing and 
storing the fish frozen. This extension should be completed early in the new year. 

A feezer at Neil's Harbour, C.B., was constructed by private enterprise from plans 
furnished by the department, and in my report for last year I made mention of its 
operations up to that time. I am to-day in receipt of a letter from the owner, Mr. M. 
G. McLeod, of Baddeck, in which he says : 1 We have the cold storage at Neil's 
Harbour filled with herring we imported from Newfoundland. If we will only get fine 
weather now we will be sure of as many codfish as we can handle. December is always 
the best codfish month and the scarcity of bait the drawback.' 

The following detailed reports will give the results of the operations of the freezers. 
Where the annual meetings have been held the reports are more complete : 

Alberton, P.E.I. — The season at this station has been successful, and a marked 
improvement over last year. A small quantity of bait was stored, but has all been sold 
locally and to the Caraquet fishermen. The annual meeting should be held shortly, 
when I have been promised by the directors a detailed statement of the operations for 
the year. 

Frog Pond, P.E.I. — This was our most successful bait freezer last season, and was 
equally successful during the first half of the present year. The directors decided to 



224 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

freeze a smaller quantity of herring than had been frozen before, and for this purpose 
converted the freezing room into a small storage room by removing the cooling retorts 
from one side, the tish being pan frozen. Entering this room for bait twelve to fifteen 
times daily in July, they found it impossible to keep the temperature sufficiently below 
freezing, and their bait gave out. This proved a loss to them, but it should not have 
occurred. Had I been notified by telegraph I could have advised them and saved the 
bait. I do not anticipate a similar difficulty at this point again. The annual meeting 
will be held in a few days. 

Souris, P.E.I. — The work at this station this year has been a failure, and I do not 
at present foresee much hope of making it a success. It is true that the directors 
missed the first heavy run of fish (herring), and froze but few barrels. They found, 
however, that they could not dispose of this frozen bait to the fishermen, who were 
prejudiced agaiust it, and that the usual demand for bait from vessels was not forth- 
coming. T hope to attend the annual meeting this month, and after seeing the direc- 
tors will be able to give further particulars. 

Ballentyne's Cove, Antigonish County, U.S. — I have to report a successful season 
at this station, and the contrast is bright compared with last season. During that 
season, owing to the ice supply being insufficient, it was necessary to convert a quantity 
of bait to other purposes ; moreover, the fishermen complained of the quality of same 
(the bait), stating it was not satisfactory. This year every pound stored has been used 
with good results, and the fishermen are thoroughly satisfied with its quality. The 
fish obtained, that would not otherwise have been landed, is evidence of the benefit of 
the freezer at this point. The annual meeting will be held this month. 

Bayfield, Antigonish County, N.S. — Satisfactory results have been obtained at this 
station, so much so that the directors have asked the department and have been granted 
permission to extend the freezer, which extension is now under way and reference has 
been made to it above. On the 26th ult. I received the following letter from the presi- 
dent of the association, Mr. Charles L, Gass : 

' Our freezer worked in a very satisfactory manner during the past summer. As 
in all other things, the first year was more of an experiment than otherwise. With us, 
at the start, the fishermen were very doubtful as to the value of frozen bait, but when 
they had a trial of it they found it to be as good as a fresh caught article. In October, 
when there was no live bait to be had, boats which baited with 50 to 100 pounds from 
the freezer caught from 500 to 900 pounds of codfish at a setting ; this they could not 
have taken had there been no frozen bait. The freezer in future will prove of even a 
greater benefit to our fishermen.' 

Port Hood Island, Inverness County, C.B. — The spring run of herring at this point 
was small and few barrels were frozen, but, as at Souris, the fishermen did not use 
them. Later in the season, when the squid appeared, a quantity was frozen and used, 
proving good bait. On the whole, the results were neither satisfactory nor the reverse. 
Some trouble was experienced with the ice chamber, causing meltage of ice, which will 
be remedied before another season. 

The usual number of men did not fish at this station, which is considered a good 
one, the industrial development of Cape Breton having drawn many fishermen into 
other employments, railroad building and mining principally. I look forward, however, 
to more success here in the future. 

Whitehead, Guysborough County, N.S. — The experience here is almost a duplicate 
of that at Port Hood Island, except that the population is a purely fishing one and has 
not been drawn on by other occupations, as at Port Hood. 

Gabarous, C.B. — I advised the directors not to freeze herring, which appear first in 
Gabarous Bay, but to reserve their efforts for squid, which come later. This they did, 
freezing a quantity of the first run. These sold to vessels for $6 per barrel, netting 
the fishermen a good profit. Had they retained them for their own use, when bait 
became scarce, they would have been much more valuable. One man was reported to 
have caught $54 worth of fish with .$3 worth of bait. 



BAIT COLD STORAGE 



225 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

This association did not take the necessary precaution of covering its ice, and its 
lost will probably cause a deficit this year. The location is good and with careful 
management this freezer should be a success. 

Port Beckerton, Guysborough Co., N.S. — I am of the opinion that the situation at 
this station is not satisfactory, the shareholders are divided into several groups and are 
not working in harmony ; I do not see how success can be had until co-operation among 
the shareholders is attained. During the past season a quantity of bait and fish were 
frozen, and some bait used. More ice was lost, through neglect to cover properly, than 
was used. I have looked carefully into the fishing conditions at this point, and am 
convinced, that as soon as the freezer is in the hands of an undivided management and 
carefully run, it will prove its use to the fishermen. The population are dependant 
solely on the fisheries. They are building small vessels, to prosecute their calling, further 
off the coast, and the freezer is the one thing necessary. I hope for better results 
next season. 

Sambro, N.S. — I recently made an inspection of the freezer at this point and found 
everything in a thoroughly satisfactory condition. The association have now stored for 
winter fishing about 25 tons of squid, these have been crate frozen and are in excellent 
condition. 

The stock of bait in store at Halifax, is, I am informed, small, compared with that 
generally put up and the squid at Sambro will be very valuable to the fishing fleet at 
that point. This is the first freezer, which has been filled to the utmost capacity with 
bait, and the directors have asked for an extension of space. I am very glad that the 
matter has been so satisfactory at this point. It stands at the entrance to Halifax 
harbour, and it would be difficult to select a locality where favourable results would 
better advertise bait cold stqrage or unsatisfactory results condemn it, as at this place. 

Port La Tour, Shelburne, Co., N.S. — (30 tons capacity) The annual meeting of this 
association was held on the 29th ultimo, at Port La Tour, at the Odd Fellows Hall, and 
the directors presented a statement of the affairs of the association. The results for the 
year were unsatisfactory and the year ended leaving the association in debt, owing to 
the loss of their ice supply, due principally to the fact, that the bed of the ice house was 
not properly prepared by the foreman in charge of construction. The association, how- 
ever, delayed commencing building until the winter had set in and owing to the lateness 
of the season, in order to store ice, every effort had to be made to rush construction. 
The freezer is a 30 ton one and if properly managed cannot fail to be a benefit to the 
locality. This association is composed entirely of fishermen, and is the only bait asso- 
ciation that has not on its directorate one or more merchants or business men. At the 
annual meeting considerable difference of opinion was manifested among the directors 
and shareholders, as to the conduct of the business for the year. I am of the opinion 
that the management should be concentrated in the hands of one managing director, 
instead of being distributed among several, as it is here at present, and that greater 
harmony must exist among the shareholders at this point, before the freezer can prove 
the benefit it should. The location is a good one, the freezer is satisfactory, and time 
will demonstrate what can be done here. 

Clarke's Harbour, Shelburne Co., N.S. — (25 tons capacity.) The annual meeting 
at this point has not yet been held, but will be called shortly. The situation here is 
somewhat similar to that at Port La Tour, but not as pronounced. A quantity of bait 
has been frozen and used with excellent results, and a considerable loss of ice has taken 
place for tho same reason at Port La Tour. The directors are satisfied as to the 
ultimate benefit of the freezer, and I expect a letter to this effect. The ice chamber 
will be placed in good order, and arrangements made after the annual meeting to 
prepare for next season's work. The location here is good, as at Port La Tour the 
fishermen are industrious and energetic, and will undoubtedly make the most of this 
aid to their work. They expres the opinion that it is 'the handiest thing yet, and 
the bait is as good as if just caught." 

Lower East Pubnico, Yarmouth Co., N.S. — (50 tons capacity.) The season at this 
station has been very satisfactory, so far the only difficulty experienced has been to 
22—15 



226 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

-obtain suficient bait fish, but hopes are entertained that a supply may yet be available. 
Squid is reported plentiful at Port La Tour, and the president of this association, under 
xlate of November 30, writes : — 

1 1 have written Port La Tour to see if they can get us 40 tons or more of squid.' 

I am also in receipt of the following letter from Mr. H. T. D'Entremont, the 
president : — 

'L. E. Pubnico, Nov. 26, 1901. We had our freezer finished enough to put in our 
ice 300 tons, by the 15th February, and all completed by the 1st March. We expected 
to freeze 75,000 to 100,000.1bs. mackerel in May, but did not get any mackerel to speak 
of, only got 1,400 lbs. ; they were only worth about three cents in Boston, and sold 
them out of freezer at nine cents each, which would show the advantage of the cold 
storage plant, being able to procure fish when low, and holding them until the price 
advances or when there is a demand for them. There were very few herring caught in 
our immediate vicinity ; only froze about 75 brls. herring, most of which are in freezer 
for next spring's fishing. Have not been able to procure squid. Could sell 200 or 300 
tons of squid, if we could get them. Have every confidence in cold storage : it is one 
of the best things that the Government could do to help the fishermen. When plants 
are located along the shores, fishermen need lose no time in waiting for bait, and should 
be the means of a much larger catch of fish, which means a more profitable business. I 
am yet in hopes that we may procure squid to fill the freezer.' 

The ice supply has kept well at this point, and meltage has been light. About 
ten tons bait have been frozen to date. 

Sandy Cove, Digby Co., N.S.—(2Q tons capacity.) This freezer was completed in 
July last, a supply of ice was carried in temporary storage in the spring, and after- 
wards transferred to the ice chamber, but not in sufficient quantity to warrant the 
operation of the freezer this fall. It has a large ice house, two storage rooms, freezing 
chambers and full equipment of tools. 



REMARKS. 



Reviewing the season's operations, I wish to emphasize several points in the work- 
in<* of the bait cold storage proposition. The freezers themselves have given us no 
trouble. The fish have been well frozen and have kept in good condition. We have 
had difficulty in several places owing to an excessive meltage of ice. In two instances 
this may be attributed to the lack of proper care on the part of the constructing fore- 
man • in the other cases, it was largely due to carelessness on the part of the associations 
themselves, in not, after harvesting the ice, covering it with straw or sawdust. 

I have endeavoured to impress on the associations the necessity of using the utmost 
care to preserve their ice, as a failure of the ice supply, when bait is in the freezer may 
•entail a serious loss. 

It has been found in localities, that some of the fishermen shareholders do not put 
bait into the freezer on their shares, although knowing well that a scarcity will be felt 
iater. This may be partly attributed to the fact that when bait is plentiful, they will 
merely catch enough for their immediate requirements and devote their time to catching 
food fish. 

The directors under the general regulations are empowered to provide this quantity, 
but have generally no funds available for the purpose, and hesitate to incur the expense. 
Hence it often happens, that a small quantity of bait is stored, when a larger amount 
should be frozen. This a very important item as it costs practically as much to run a 
freezer for 5 tons of bait as it does for 20 tons. The fixed charges for ice and labour 
bein<* the same, while the charges for salt is nearly as much. The revenue of a freezer 
on the other hand, freezing charge and government bonus, is directly proportional to the 
amount of bait frozen and stored. 

I am satisfied that the fishermen, where they have had a chance to test the matter, 
appreciate the benefit of a freezer but I also think that it will be difficult to get them to 
■co-operate well enough together to make the business as great a success as it undoubtedly 
can be made. In the hands of ' one man ' management the freezers can be operated 



BAIT COLD STORAGE 



227 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

cheaper and more carefully looked after than by the present arrangement of a board of 
directors, and I am of the opinion that this will of necessity occur in many places. 

I am fully satisfied after an observation of two years, that the project of aiding 
the establishment of freezers for bait, has been of benefit to the fishermen and will be of 
much more advantage in the future. 

There is a side to the work which has not often been touched on, namely, the educa- 
tional phase of the question. That a strong prejudice has existed against the use of 
frozen bait around the shore of the Maritime provinces, no one can deny, who has any 
knowledge of the fishing communities around the coast. Wherever freezers have been 
erected and worked properly this prejudice has beenjremoved, and a feeling of confidence 
in the preserved bait replaced the feeling of distrust. 

I believe that when the time comes that the active work of aiding the fishermen in 
this matter, ceases, that the information gained should be published in convenient form, 
accompanied by plans of freezers of various sizes together with bills of material, and this 
phase of the work continued at small expense. 

It has been found that the fishermen in each locality, where the department's offer 
has been taken up, have endeavoured to erect as large freezer as their means would permit, 
and I have found in a number of cases that after the building was finished that either 
no funds were available for running expenses or that a deficit on account of construction 
resulted. This has crippled some of the associations operating this season for the first 
time. In nearly every locality the size of the freezer erected is larger than is sufficient 
to supply the needs of the shore fishermen, and the directors depend on supplying the 
bankers with bait. 

The surplus of bait over and above the needs of the locality, small as that might 
be, would suffice for but few vessels. Several bankers could take all the surplus bait 
from a medium sized freezer (20 tons). Many captains will hesitate about running into 
a port where such a freezer is, lest they be unable to get a baiting, preferring to take 
chances and spend more time endeavouring to get fresh bait. 

It appears that there are two distinct classes of fishermen who may be benefited 
by the bait cold storage depots ; first, the shore fishermen, and second, the bankers. I 
have found that the former are as a class slow to take up any new idea, usually distrust- 
ful of each other, which tends to prevent that hearty co operation necessary to the 
success of any joint stock enterprise. I have seen cases of fishermen, not shareholders 
in a freezer, who would refuse to buy frozen bait, when fish were plentiful and their 
neighbours were landing good fares, but preferred to waste valuable time endeavouring 
to find fresh bait when it was very scarce. Time will doubtless educate these to an 
appreciation of the usefulness of spending one dollar that they may earn five. 

The bankers on the other hand are more progressive, and do not as a rule, miss any 
opportunity of obtaining bait. 

I am of the opinion that smaller freezers than we have hitherto been building for 
the fishing settlements will best supply the shore fishermen, and that if an effort is to 
be made to supply the bankers, that very large bait freezers, having a capacity of 3,000 
or 4,000 barrels, should be erected at important bait points, such as Sambro and Canso. 

I think also that some modification of the existing regulations should be considered, 
looking to the establishment of bait freezers, whereby the management and control 
could be more concentrated, and at the same time the interests of the fishermen pro- 
tected. I have also found that statements, heretofore made, respecting the amount of 
time lost looking for bait, have not been exaggerated in the least, and that the freezers 
erected have partially filled a want and will continue to be increasingly useful in the 
future. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

J. F. FRASER 



22—15$ 



228 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VI!., A. 1902 



APPENDIX No. i2. 

REPORT ON FISH-CULTURE OPERATIONS IN THE DOMINION OF CANADA, 11. 

REPORT BY PROFESSOR EDWARD E. PRINCE, COMMISSIONER AND 
GENERAL INSPECTOR OF FISHERIES FOR THE DOMINION 
OF CANADA FOR THE YEAR 1901. 



Ottawa, December, 31, 1901. 

To the Honourable 

James Sutherland, 

Minister of Marine and Fisheries, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit my annual report on the fish breeding operations 
carried on at the various hatcheries under the department, during the year now ending. 
As the departmental officer in charge of the system of fish-culture pursued in Canada, I 
have the satisfaction again of calling attention to the highly successful results accom- 
plished. The statistical tables which follow on a subsequent page show that in five 
previous years only have these results been exceeded, and there is no reason to doubt 
that had certain untoward circumstances been avoided or overcome in the two western 
hatcheries the results this year would have even surpassed those of 1895, the first year 
in which the Dominion hatcheries were placed in my charge after the retirement of the 
late Mr. S. Wilmot. In that year, as I have before pointed out, the grand total 
of over 294,000,000 of fry planted was phenomenal, and under the varying condi- 
tions which surround artificial fish-culture, that enormous total can hardly be 
expected to be equalled, excepting at rare intervals. During the last five years the 
total results have, however, been specially satisfactory, and that satisfactory state of 
things has continued undiminished during the year now ending. 

Taking the work as a whole, the operations in the thirteen hatcheries reported 
upon in the following pages has been remarkable, not only for the quantity, but also the 
quality of the fry. I have received numerous unsolicited testimonies from parties 
present when fry were being planted, expressing extreme gratification at the healthy 
and vigorous character of the fry sent out in charge of the department's officers. The 
remarkably large output of fry is a matter for satisfaction, and is a proof of the efficient 
manner in which the incubation of the eggs was carried out and the care and intelligence 
the officers exercised in transhipping and distributing the fry. Judging from the 
numerous applications which are being received in increasing numbers from individual 
applicants and from clubs and public corporations in very widely separated parts of the 
Dominion, it is clear that the work of fish culture is regarded by the public as of the 
greatest importance and utility. The applications referred to have for their object either 
the restoration of waters depleted of their former abundance of fish, as for stocking new 
waters, or for introducing new kinds of fish into waters from which such fish have been 
hitherto absent although containing various native, and in most cases, valueless 
species of fish. 

The hatching of a new pacific kind of trout, viz., the valued and beautiful rainbow 
trout at the Bedford hatchery, Nova Scotia, in 1898 and 1899, has proved to be most 
successful, and the highly satisfactory result of planting these fish in certain waters is 
adverted to in the report by the officer, who had charge of this experiment. This year 
I authorized the procuring of a supply of the eggs of that species in British Columbia, 



FISH-CULTURE 



229 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

or failing that, of a supply of Steelhead salmon eggs, but in neither case were the efforts 
of our officers successful. During the coming year efforts will be renewed in this direction. 
Supplies of eggs from our own British Columbia waters could not be less successful, and 
perhaps would be even more so, than the eggs which have been procured from the 
United States for two years. During the early years of artificial fish-culture in Canada, 
much of the popular interest in its extension might be reasonably attributed to its 
novelty, and to the attraction possessed by an enterprise of this nature the unusual 
character of which raiely fails to possess importance in the public eye. But the period of 
such popularity has long since passed away, and the work of artificial fish-propagation does 
not claim attention and regard on the ground of its novelty, or of its untried possibilities. 
The undoubted benefits which have so largely accrued in the past, and which, in the 
future, are certain to be still more largely bestowed by a judicious adoption of its 
methods, are the grounds upon which the favourable opinion of the public is now based. 
The true place of fish-culture is not as a substitute for the natural propagation of fish 
in our lakes and rivers, but as a supplementary aid and support. If the natural mode 
of production be still fostered and guarded, and aided by the work of hatcheries, then 
the ample waters of our country will be able to yield more abundant supplies of fish, 
and thus in a very direct way the sporting and vast commercial resources of the Dom- 
inion will be amplified. The danger of putting all one's eggs in one basket may be very 
literally applied to fish-hatcheries when they are advocated as a complete substitute for 
the normal methods of Nature. To claim that close seasons, and the protection of 
spawning parent fish could be safely dispensed with were artificial hatching universally 
adopted is unwise and hazardous. A combination of both is a double guarantee of 
success and may without question be regarded as the surest means of expanding and 
increasing the fisheries. Unfavourable conditions may affect the natural spawning beds, 
and in that case the eggs placed in the incubation trays in the hatchery are preserved 
from such risk, and the resulting fry may be said to fill the vacancy, which would be 
seen three or four years later in a scarcity of adult fish, or on the other hand some 
accident may occur in the hatchery, the water supply may fail, the eggs may become 
'fungused,' and in that case the spawn deposited naturally will maintain the usual 
supply of fish for the future. But when both the hatchery and the spawning beds yield 
their quota of fry, the total result must be a substantial increase in the supply of fish, 
and the securing of that greater abundance which is the end and aim of all fish-culture. 
Representations have been more numerous this year than for many years, urging the 
extension of fish-culture operations in Canada. 

In the maritime provinces no less than five proposals for new hatcheries, not only 
for salmon, but for lobster breeding, have been strongly pressed. Three sites in Nova 
Scotia, one in Prince Edward Island, and one in Quebec or the Magdalen Islands, have 
also been specified ; while in Western Ontario at least four locations have been favoured 
for new whitefish and salmon- trout hatcheries. In Manitoba the erection of supple- 
mentary hatching establishments, in addition to the large whitefish hatchery at Selkirk, 
has been favoured, while in the North-west Territories, where no hatchery has yet been 
built, four points in widely separated localities have been suggested as good situations 
for the commencement of fish-culture establishments. Locations near Prince Albert, 
near Edmonton, near Calgary and near Banff, have been specified. On the Pacific 
Coast the feeling which has been entertained for many years in favour of additional 
salmon hatcheries has been very strongly expressed, and four localities have been urged 
as specially adapted for the purpose, and for securing ample benefits to the British Col- 
umbia salmon supply, viz. : Lowe Inlet, Rivers Inlet, northern part of Vancouver Is- 
land and Naas river. 

In deciding upon a location for a successful and satisfactory fish-hatchery, a num- 
ber of important points must be kept in view. Not only the necessary local require- 
ments of the establishment, such as an abundant supply of pure water, accessibility and 
nearness to the best planting grounds or areas to be stocked, but also a commensurate 
value and importance to the public of the results of such a public institution. A hatch- 
ery capable of benefiting only a few people, or a very limited area, would hardly be justifi- 
able under Dominion auspices. The reason being not merely the limited benefits re- 
sulting, confined (as it might be on the British Columbia coast) to one canning establish- 



230 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

ment or one firm and a few residents, but the fact that in such a case it is easy to secure 
a sufficiency of breeding fish, and the prosperity of the natural breeding grounds with- 
out the expense, trouble and expert knowledge involved in artificial fish-culture. No 
one who knows anything about the actual facts of the case can doubt that attempts to 
carry on artificial fish-hatching have frequently been a total failure on account of lack 
of knowledge on the part of the operators. Unless qualified and experienced men are 
available it is better to rely upon the natural methods of propagation, and afford ade- 
quate protection to a sufficient number of parent fish, both when resorting to the spawn- 
ing grounds and when actually engaged upon the breeding areas. There is, of course, 
an immense waste of eggs in natural spawning. Nature is prodigal in such matters, 
and has provided ample compensation in the production of a super-abundance of eggs 
and young, when there is no disturbance of the natural balance by man's interference. 
The vast armies of young fry produced by the most valued species of fishes, which are a 
familiar spectacle in our rivers, lakes and seas, are the natural safeguard against exter- 
mination. A mere fraction of these countless young fish will, as a rule, survive, but 
such a fraction is of sufficiently imposing dimensions to secure the continuance of the 
species. It has been a wise policy on the part of the Dominion government to combine 
fish-culture with efficient protection of the breeding fish on the spawning grounds. The 
hatcheries have thus been regarded, not as a substitute, but as a supplement to the nat- 
ural methods of multiplication among the finny tribes. 

That the public are alive to the great benefits of a wise and efficient system of 
scientific fish-breeding is evidenced, as I have already pointed out, in the widespread 
desire to see new hatching establishments built in localities more or less distant from 
those at present existing. An increased number of hatcheries implies greater results 
from the existing hatcheries. Four years ago I gave prominence in my report to the 
fact that every hatchery was bound to have good and bad seasons. By that is meant, 
as I explained in the report referred to, that the supply of breeding fish might be ample 
in some years, while in other years it might be altogether insufficient. There is no 
certainty in the abundance of parent fish which may be available for supplying eggs to 
the hatcheries. Even in seasons when female fish may be plentiful, the necessary number 
of male fish may be lacking, or the reverse may be the case, as indeed often occurs in 
salmon rivers, that the males are in excess of the female fish. These things are beyond 
control, but the evils may be overcome by relying upon an increased number of hatcheries, 
so that what is lacking in one hatchery may be supplied by another. A shortage of 
parent fish, and a defective supply of eggs, may be remedied by taking a larger number 
of fish at another hatchery, and securing an excess of eggs which can be transferred to 
the establishments requiring them. This has been the method so long adopted in the 
fish-culture operations under my supervision, that on the whole it may be said that the 
total failure of a hatchery for want of eggs in Canada has been a very rare occurrence. 
The present year, curiously enough, is an exception. The Fraser river hatchery, owing 
to a most remarkable shortage of parent salmon, was not in operation. Reliance had 
been placed by the officers in certain breeding localities which have rarely or never 
been known to seriously fail ; but the lack of fish was so serious that the small quota of 
eggs, as the officer in charge reports, was such that it did not justify keeping the 
hatchery open, and in the statistical table the few thousand of eggs secured are not 
recorded. 

The Gaspe hatchery was also not operated as it was intended to have the new 
building hastened in construction with a view to transferring a supply of eggs from 
another hatchery. It was not possible to have the new hatchery sufficiently advanced 
until the fall, when it began operations most successfully. A similar explanation applies 
to the Cape Breton establishment, and an extra supply of eggs was secured by my 
instructions to be sent from the Miramichi hatchery when the new Margaree building 
is ready to receive them. Of the Selkirk hatchery it may be said that while an ample 
supply of ova was reported by the officer lately in charge, these eggs did not do well 
during the process of incubation, and so serious was the proportion which failed to yield 
healthy normal fry, that the number planted was somewhat small in contrast to the very 
large output of former years. 



FISH-CULTURE 231 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

This somewhat unsatisfactory record of the three establishments referred to is 
counterbalanced by the eleven other hatcheries which present a most interesting and 
successful season's record, six of them showing a most decided increase over the very 
large and satisfactory output of last year. Newcastle, Tadoussac, Restigouche, 
Miramichi and Bedford showing a surplus of fry planted amounting to no less than 
3,146,000 over the year 1900. The output of fry, including lobsters, at the thirteen 
hatcheries in full operation, amounts to the enormous total of 203,540,000 which has 
been only exceeded in five previous seasons. This is 62,456,000 less, however, than last 
year, which was the highest on record since 1868, when fish-hatching under the depart- 
ment began, excepting the phenomenal year already mentioned on a prior page, when 
a little over 294,000,000 of fry were planted from the fourteen hatcheries in operation. 

In addition to the ordinary system of planting fish in shape of young fry hatched 
from artificially incubated eggs, the department has aided in the spread of useful species 
by planting adult or half-grown fish. T referred to an important departure in this 
direction in my report last year, and the details of the work in connection with the Bay 
of Quinte black bass pond, may be found in the report of Mr. F. H. Cunningham, the 
Inspector of Fish Hatcheries. I have in many previous reports emphasized the difficulty 
of hatching black bass bv the ordinary methods adopted in fish-breeding establishments. 
The use of jars, or of trays, or the adoption of other devices which ingenious fish-cul- 
turist have tried, inevitably result in too serious a loss of eggs to justify their continuance. 
Eggs must be kept scrupulously clean and well aerated, and sickly or dead eggs must be 
separated and removed. But this is practically impossible with glutinous eggs such as 
those of the black bass, hence I have advocated breeding ponds and inclosures where 
the parent fish can make their nests and rear and guard their young. I quote the 
following very apt remarks from the report of the Fish Culture Superintendent in the 
State of Wisconsin (1901), as it refers to certain features in black bass culture which 
deserve attention : — 

' The black bass, bullhead and catfish deposit their spawn and. unlike most other 
kinds, watch over it until it is hatched. When the young school rises, in the case of 
the black bass, the male fish guards and watches them, driving off all intruders that 
threaten to destroy his progeny. 

' Like all other spring spawning fish the black bass spawns in a rising temperature, 
and not until the water is above sixty degrees. After the spawning beds have been 
prepared, if there is a fall in the temperature of the water the bass will leave their 
beds and have been known in such a case to stay away from their spawning beds for 
several days or until there was a rise in the temperature of the water again. 

' The experience of fish culturists in trying to propagate them by artificial means 
teaches that the system to pursue in this work is to provide suitable breeding ponds 
where the bass can be under the constant observation of the person in charge of the 
work. The fish are permitted to spawn of their own volition and in their own way, 
though artificial nests have been provided in some instances. The Michigan Fish Com- 
mission find that they get better results from providing artificial nests or beds for the 
use of the bass in spawning. After the bass have spawned and the young are hatched, 
the parent fish &re removed from the breeding ponds ; but the young bass are permitted 
to remain until they are some two inches in length, when the water is drawn from the 
pond and the fish removed for planting in other waters. 

'The black bass are extremely predaceous at all ages, and no amount of food and 
painstaking care and attention will prevent them from devouring their smaller and 
weaker associates. They will persist in their cannibalism even under the exciting and 
unusual conditions attendant upon their transportation from the hatchery to distant 
waters fcr stocking purposes. On this account a large loss of young bass must always 
be expected by the fish culturist, for here the survival of the fittest, only, obtains.' 

It is clear therefore that the scheme often urged by parties not possessed of prac- 
tical and technical knowledge that these fish should be reared until they are half grown 
would defeat itself. Black bass should be shipped and planted as soon as possible after 
they begin to independently forage, and when the schools of fry about two inches long 
begin to disperse. This is the method I propose to carry out at the departmental pond. 



232 



MARINE AXD FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



FISH 

Statement showing the Places where and the Years in which the several Fish 

Establishment annually since they 



- 

= 
- 

'A 



Yv.ak. 



1808-73. 

1874 

31875 

4 1876.... 



5 
6 
7 



1877. 
1878. 
1879. 

8 1880 

9 188] . 
10 1882. 
1111883. 

12 1884. 

13 1885. 
It 1880. 



15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 



1887. 
1888. 
]ss;i 

1890. 

1891. 

is; i2. 

1893. 

1894. 

1895. 

ls'.tc. 

is! >7. 

1898 

1899. 

1900. 



29 1901 



Ontario. 



Newcastle. Sandwich. 



Totals. 



Fry. 

1,070,000 
350.000 
650,000 
700,000 
1,300,000 
2,605,000 
2,602,700 
1,923,000 
3,300,000 
4,841,000 
6,053,000 
8,800,000 
5,700,000 
6,451,000 
5,130,000 
8,070,000 
5,840,500 
7.730.000 
7,807,500 
4,823,000 
9,835,000 
6,000,000 
6,000,000 
5,200,000 
4.200,000 
4,325,000 
4,050,000 
5,175,000 
5,900,000 



Fry. 



8.000,000 
8,000,000 
20,000,000 
12,000,000 
13,500,000 
16,000,000 
44,000,000 
72,000,000 
37,000,000 
68,000,000 
57,000,000 
56,500,000 
56,000,000 
21,000,000 
52,000,000 
75,000,000 
44,500,000 
68,000,000 
47,000,000 
73,000,000 
61,000,000 
72,000,000 
71,000,000 
73,000,000 
90,000,000 
67,000,000 



Ottawa. 



Fry. 



136,450,200 1,282,500,000 



Quebec. 



Magog. i Tadoussac. j Gaspe. Restigouche. 



Fry. 



Frv. 



5,732,000 
7,043,000 
4,909,000 
6,208,000 
1.4sn, H ii i 

3,210,000 
3,950,000 
4,100,000 
3,020,000 
3,700,000 
3,450,000 
3,410,000 



53,213,000 



200,000 
975,000 
250,000 
100,000 
300,000 
1,400,000 
675,000 
3,475,000 
2,800,000 
2,875,000 
3,050,000 
2,400,000 
3,600,000 
2,035,000 
3,350,000 
3,400,000 
4,500,000 
3,100,000 
3.098,000 
3,099,000 
3,135,000 



48,177,000 



60,000 
150,000 
1,180,000 
707,000 
1,250,000 
1,155,000 
334,000 
660,000 
995,000 
985,000 
720,000 
1,627,000 
900,000 
850,000 
1,600.000 
1,700,000 
1,300,000 
624,000 
2,060,000 
1,975,000 
2,060,000 
2,500,000 
3,272,000 
2,200,000 
2,125,000 
1,400,000 
2,960,000 



37,349,000 



Frv. 



110,000 
50,000 

1,051,000 
650,000 

1,597,000 
730,000 
500,000 
530,000 
520,000 
859,000 
290,000 
576,000 
630,000 
800,000 
450,000 
80li,000 

1,000,000 
965,000 
910,000 
850,000 
675,000 
300,000 

1,100,000 



Fry. 



100,000 
600,000 
300,000 
600,000 
1,015,000 
1,470,000 
1,500,000 
740,000 
1,400,000 
300,000 
940,000 
660,000 
1,380,000 
1,500,000 
1,720,000 
1,280,000 
2,396,000 
1,750,000 
1,240,000 
883,000 
1,080,000 
2,885,000 
1,250,000 
2,100,000 
1,135,000 
2,025,000 
1,125,000 
1,750,000 



15,949,000 35,124,000 



FISH-CULTURE 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



233 



CULTURE 

Hatcheries have been erected ; also the number of fry distributed from each 
were built, including the year 1901. 



New Brunswick. 



Miran.ichi 



Fry. 



St. John 
River. 



Fry. 



60,000 
150,000 
60,000 
320,000 
665,000 
1,025,000 
805,000 
770,000 
640.000 
925.000 
795,000 
900, 000 ! 
945,000 
900,000 
1,290,000 
850.000 
1,022,000 
1,503,000 
1,310,000 
975,000 
1,010,000 
1,200,000 
1,430,000 
1,558,000 
1,557,000 
1,605,000 
1,620,000| 
1,800,000 ! 



27,690,000 



170,600 
50,000 

588,000 
72,600 

811.000 

155,000 
2,181,000 
2.479,000 
4,142,000 
3,570,000 
3,492,000 
3,165,000 
2,378,000 
3,299,000 
4,096,000 
4,060,000 
1,068,000 
4,155,000 
3,290,000 
3,980,000 
3,957,000 
3,605,000 



Nova Scotia. 



Bedford. Sydney. 



Fry. 



57,764,200 



395,000 
1,000,000 
1,400,000 
1,740,000 
730,000 
680,000 
850,000 
800,000 
1,000,000 
670,000 
950,000 
4,230,000 
4,390,000 
3,850,000 
3,860,000 
2,550,000 
2,620,000 
3,180,000 
3,805,000 
3,815,000 
4,225.000 
5,450,000 
3,000,000 
4,025,000 
3,970,000 
3,980,000 



Fry. 



315,000 
659,000 
853,000 
772,000 
1,179,000 
1,415,000 
1,559,000 
2,034,000 
1,953,000 
1,000,000 
690,000 

' 288,000 
195,000 
243,500 
496,000 



Lobster 
Hatchery, 
Bav View. 



Fry. 



67,175,000 13,652,500 1,157,300,000 



7,000,000 
63,500,000 
153,600,000 
160,000,000 
168,200,000 
100,000,000 
90,000,000 
85,000,000 
100,000,000 
120,000,000 
110,000,000 



P. E. 
Island. 



Dunk- 
River. 



Fry. 



500,000 
375,000 
1,000,000 
1,210,000 
1,000,000 
1.100,000 
400,000 
500,000 



British 
Columbia 



l-'raser 
River. 



Fry. 



1,800,000 
2,625,000 
4,414,000 
5,807,000 
4,419,000 
6,640,000 
3,603,800 
6,000,000 
5,764,000 
7,800,000| 
6,390,000 
10,393,000 
5,928,000 
5,850,000 
4,742,000 
6,200,000 



Manitoba 



Selkirk. 



Fry. 



14,500,000 
19,000,000 
4,500,000 



6,145,000 88,375,800 



9,000,000 
20,000,000 
32,000,000 



99,000,000 



Totals. 



a 



Fry. 



1,070,000 
510,000 
1,570,000 
9,655,000 
13,451,000 
27,042,000 
21,684,700 
21,013,000 
22,949,000 
55,859,000 10 
83,784,600 11 
53,143,000 12 
81,067,000 13 
76,724,00014 
79, 273,000; 15 
88,109,000116 
47,700,000117 
90,213,000118 
115,772,300 19 
135,959,500 20 
258,314,000 21 
254,919,000,22 
294,040,000123 
202,459,500 24 
198,859,00025 
192,477,000 26 
222,350,000 27 
265,996,000 28 
203,540,000 29 



3,119,704,200 



234 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

The completion of this pond, and the steps taken to secure supplies of black bass 
for transplantation, rendered possible the important scheme for introducing this valuable 
game fish into British Columbia, a brief resume of which T give on a subsequent page. 
Additional details of this trans-continental shipment are given in Mr. Cunningham's 
report. It may also be added that arrangements have been made for planting adult fish in 
certain lakes in the North-west Territories and in Nova Scotia, and in response to very 
urgent requests other projects of this nature are contemplated. 

Apart from this subsidiary fish culture work, the ordinary operations in the various 
hatcheries are given in tabulated form, as below : — 



Number of Hatchery. 



Bedford, N.S. 



Bay View, N.S 

Sydney, N.S........ 

Dunk river, P.E.I 
St. John river, N.B. 



Miramichi, N.B 
Restigouche, N.B. 

Gaspe, P.Q 

Tadoussac, P.Q . . . 



10 Magog, P.Q 



Newcastle, Ont. 

ii it . 

Sandwich, Ont . 
Ottawa, Ont 



Fraser river, B.C 
Selkirk, Man 



Totals 



Number of Fry 
distributed. 



780,000 
3,200,000 
110,000,000 



805,000 
2.800,000 
1,800,000 
1,750,000 



Number of 
Eggs sent 
to other 
Hatcheries. 



2,960,000 
2,950,000 
150,000 
35,000 
3,250,000 
1,650,000 
67,000,000 
2,350,000 
1,060, (XX) 



203,540,000 



450,000 



200,000 



1,400,000 
15,500,000 



17.550,000 



Number of 
Eggs received 
from other 
Hatcheries. 



3,400,000 



3,000,000 
250,000 



3,000,000 
150,000 



Species. 



Atlantic salmon. 
Lake whitefish. 
Lobsters. 



Atlantic salmon. 
Lake whitefish. 
Atlantic salmon. 



Lake whitefish. 
[Great lake trout. 
Speckled trout. 
3,500,000 Lake whitefish. 

Great lake trout. 

ILake whitefish. 



3,000,000 
1,250,000 



Great lake trout. 



17,550,000 



In my next annual report I anticipate being in a position to record the active and 
successful operation of the two new hatcheries in Cape Breton (North-east Margaree) and 
in British Columbia (Skeena River). The new Gaspe and Granite Creek, B.C., 
establishments are already at work, and each will be able to distribute in spring a 
substantial output of fry, Atlantic salmon in one case and Pacific salmon in the other 
case. 

An important experiment, following up an initial attempt at transporting black 
bass (in 1395) to the Pacific coast, was made this year under the immediate charge of 
Mr. F. H. Cuuningham, with the assistance of Mr. Wm, Parker and Mr. F. McCargar. 
In response to requests, which were repeated year after year for several years, the 
onerous task was undertaken of shipping a large quantity of black bass from Ontario to 
the Pacific coast. No less than seven points of distribution were decided upon, and in 
order to relieve the arduous labours of the officers accompanying the shipment, the local 
parties at each point arranged to await the train and to take over their quota of black 
bass, with the object of immediately planting them in the waters approved by the 
department. A special express car was fitted up with barrels, and an elaborate 
mechanical aeration system, and supplies of ice and fresh water were arranged for at 
appropriate points in the journey from Ottawa to Vancouver and Victoria. It had 
been arranged that the special car should be attached to the Imperial Limited train on 
October 1, but it was not found possible to start until October 2. The CP. R. agents 
at the various stopping places were fully instructed by the kindness of the railway 
authorities to render every assistance, and Mr. H. B. Spencer, of Ottawa, personally 



FISH-CULTURE 



235 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

took an interest in the arrangements, while the Dominion Express Company actively 
took steps to hasten the project, and the Ottawa agent, Mr. W. A. Clark, spared no 
pains in seeing that the car was ready and duly forwarded from the bass ponds to 
Ottawa, where it was attached to the C.P.R. train for British Columbia. The first 
quota of black bass fry was put off at Crane lake on the third day of the journey. The 
young bass were active and lively when handed to the care of Mr. D. H. Andrews, Crane 
Lake, and no doubt in these waters of the North-west Territories, about seventy miles 
east of Dunmore, they will establish themselves. Calgary was the next point decided 
upon to hand over a portion of the fry to the agent of Mrs. Westhead, of Buffalo Lake 
Ranch, near Lacomb, N.W.T. Unfortunately Mr. Willett, the agent, did not receive 
my wire in time to have all prepared, and the fry could not be left for the Lacombe 
waters. On Friday, October 5, a third shipment was to be put off at Banff for the 
waters of the National Rocky Mountains Park. Mr. Howard Douglas, superintendent 
of the park, had due preparations made, and the bass were safely handed over and suc- 
cessfully planted in the waters approved by this department. As in the case of the 
quota for waters between Calgary and Edmonton, so in the case of the barrels destined 
for Windermere Lake, North-east Kootenay, the wire and detailed letter addressed to 
Mr. Montizambert, who had made every exertion to secure an apportionment of the fry 
and was prepared to personally see to the reception of the fish, did not arrive in time, 
and as no arrangements had been made at the stopping place, viz. : Golden, B.C., the 
fish had to be carried further west. At Revelstoke, on the night of October 4, parties 
in Cascade City, B.C., had completed arrangements for receiving a quantity of fry for 
Christina Lake, to be planted in a suitable part of the lake near Robson. For some 
years Mr. Angus K. Stewart, of Greenwood, had urged this step, and Mr. G. C. Rose, 
secretary of the board of trade, also favoured the proposal, while Mr. R. E. Thick nesse, 
of Cascade City, B.C., actively aided in securing the promise of a portion of the black 
bass shipment. Thanks to these exertions and the capital arrangements made, the fish 
were successfully planted in Christina Lake. One or two subsidiary deposits of black 
bass had been contemplated, but could not be carried out, and the fish that still remained 
were carried to the terminus of Vancouver, taken by steamer across the Straits of 
Georgia to Victoria, where, in charge of Mr. C. B. Swor d, inspector of fisheries, they were 
placed in a healthy and vigorous condition in suitable lakes near Victoria on Saturday 
and Sunday, October 5 and 6. This remarkable and somewhat hazardous project was 
thus carried through to a successful termination, and while involving constant attention, 
and most exacting and laborious work on the part of the officers in charge of the fish, it 
establishes beyond doubt the feasibility of transcontinental shipments of this nature. It 
is necessary to add that the planting of a large quantity of fine healthy fish of a species 
famed for its game and table qualities, excited the liveliest interest, and was viewed with 
satisfaction and delight at every point where the various quotas were put off for imme- 
diate planting. The waters decided upon were all suitable, and sufficiently isolated to 
avoid risks of harm. The indiscriminate planting of so strong and voracious a fish as the 
back bass might have most undesirable and ruinous results. I have in another report 
dealt with the question of stocking waters with rapacious fish and its attendant dangers, 
but the details of the foregoing scheme had my most careful and strict attention, so that no 
fear of danger may be apprehended. That success and widespread satisfaction attended 
the carrying out of the project is proof of its wisdom and utility. The waters of the west 
which are suitable will be ere long well stocked, there can be no doubt, with the esteemed 
and valuable black bass of Eastern Canada. 

Considering the very limited appropriation which has hitherto sufficed to carry on 
fish culture work, it is surprising how much has been accomplished, but the urgent 
demands for its extension, for the carrying out of new stocking projects, and the adop- 
tion of schemes for introducing eastern species into western waters, can only be 
met by a largely increased expenditure, which will be amply justified by vaster benefits 
to the public. 

I have the honour to be, 

Your obedient servant, 

EDWARD E. PRINCE, 

Commissioner of Fisheries and General Inspector of Fisheries for Canada. 



.236 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



ANNEX A. 

Ottawa, December 31, 1901. 

Professor E. E. Prince, 

Dominion Commissioner of Fisheries, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit this my first annual report as Inspector of Fish 
Hatcheries for the Dominion of Canada. During the year I have visited nearly all the 
hatcheries in the Dominion, and beg to report as follows : — 

The system in vogue at the various establishments has been fully explained year 
after year in the annual reports of the department, so that a repetition seems hardly 
necessary, but a short description may not be out of place. 

The hatchery, situated on the Detroit river, at Sandwich, Ontario, is devoted 
exclusively to the hatching of whitefish, the parent fish being caught by the depart- 
ment's officers by means of seines, during the month of November, whilst ascending the 
river to the natural spawning grounds of Lake St. Clair. These fish are confined in 
crates until ready for spawning, after which they are liberated, and find their way back 
to Lake Erie. 

There appears to be, in some cases, a diversity of opinion as to the advisability of 
returning these parent fish to the water, it being considered that they should be disposed 
of ; but as the aim of the department in spending large sums of money every year is for 
the purpose of increasing the supply of fish, and not decreasing it, it would appear that 
this very aim should be a sufficient reason for the department's policy in connection with 
the management of this establishment. The year's operations have been very successful, 
and the work of the government is appreciated. 

The past season's work at the salmon-trout hatchery, situated at Newcastle, Ontario, 
is very gratifying. A larger percentage of eggs were hatched than usual, and the 
general management of the operations is a credit to the officer in charge. 

The parent fish are caught in the department's pound-nets operating at Wiarton, 
on the Georgian Bay, and after being stripped the fish are returned to the water. 

The hatchery at Ottawa, which also receives its quota of eggs from the fish caught 
at Wiarton, is filling the double role of exhibition and replenishing. The hatchery 
room is visited by large numbers of interested visitors every year, and affords the public 
a means of seeing something of the art of fish culture, and gives a general idea of the 
work performed at the various hatching establishments. This hatchery has been of 
great value to the waters adjacent to Ottawa. As an instance, I may mention the 
favourite resort of Charleston lake, which affords a splendid illustration of the depart- 
ment's operations. 

We now come to the Salmon hatcheries of the lower provinces. On the Restigouche 
river, at Flatlands, New Brunswick, is situated the most important and successful 
salmon hatchery. This is a new building, and has a capacity of 1,700,000 eggs. The 
parent fish are caught in the department's nets, operated under the supervision of the 
officer in charge of the hatchery. These fish are nearly all oaught during the month of 
June, and are confined in a retaining pond until ready for spawning, which is about the 
middle of October, after which they are released. The department's property shows 
evidence of great care, and the general management is perfectly satisfactory. 

At the salmon hatchery situated at South Esk, on the Miramichi river, the opera- 
tions are conducted in the same manner as at Restigouche. The past season has been 
very successful. The building is old : but during the year considerable repairs have 
been effected, so that everything pertaining to this establishment is in better running 
order than for many years. 



FISH-CULTURE 237 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

The salmon hatcheries situated at Grand Falls, New Brunswick, and Bedford, 
Nova Scotia, are supplied with eggs obtained from fish confined in a salt water pond, 
located at Carleton, opposite the city of St. John. The fish are purchased from bona fide 
fishermen, and confined in this pond until ready for spawning operations in the fall. At 
this point I think I may say the department has adopted a policy that meets with 
general satisfaction. The fish are caught by the actual fishermen, and if not purchased 
by the department, would be placed on the market ; but owing to the present policy, 
they are a means of increasing their species, and by being returned to the water, afford 
a second source of revenue to the fishermen. Both the hatcheries mentioned above are 
conducted satisfactorily. The grounds surrounding the Bedford hatchery are kept very 
neatly by the officer in charge, and being in full view of the railway, very complimentary 
remarks have been made on the general appearance of this establishment. 

A new salmon hatchery has also just been completed on the Margaree river, Inverness 
county, Nova Scotia. The site is one of the best, as fresh water is in abundance, and 
the parent fish can be captured right on the spot. A supply of semi hatched eggs will 
be laid down during the current season. A small house has also been erected on the 
grounds for the accommodation of the officer in charge. 

At Tadoussac the salmon hatchery is doing good work. During the year the road 
passing the government property has been repaired by the department, which was a 
much needed improvement to the hatchery. The operations are conducted in the same 
way as at Miramichi and Restigouche, the fry being distributed in the Saguenay and 
other adjacent waters. 

The department has also a small hatcheiy at Magog, Quebec, in which salmon- 
trout and whitefish are hatched, the eggs being supplied by the Newcastle and Sandwich 
hatcheries. This fall a small quantity of speckled trout eggs have been laid down, and 
are reported to be doing well. This hatchery has been of great service to lake Memphre- 
magog. 

The whitefish hatchery in Manitoba, situated at Selkirk, has not for the past few 
years been a success. Last season only a small percentage of the eggs were hatched out. 
The failure is due to several causes, one of which is the system of capturing parent fish 
by means of gill nets ; and again, the water supplying the hatchery is taken from the 
Red river, which is none of the best ; but the principal cause appears to have been the 
unripe condition of the eggs when laid down. This year a supply of eggs has been sent 
from the Detroit river, and were laid down in the hatchery in splendid condition, so 
that it is hoped better results will be reported next year. 

The operations at the lobster hatchery, situated at Bay Yiew, Nova Scotia, have 
again been very successful. During the past summer, the wharf, which has given con- 
siderable trouble, has been thoroughly repaired. 

A fresh water well has also been supplied, which should obviate, to a large extent, 
the past difficulty of supplying fresh water for the boiler. 

At Gaspe Basin, Quebec, the new combined salmon and lobster hatchery is about 
completed. This is one of the finest buildings owned by the department for fish cultural 
purposes, and should be the means of replenishing the lobster fishery on the Gaspe 
coast. 

In British Columbia a large salmon hatchery has just been completed at Granite 
creek, and reports of the first season's operations are very encouraging. 

I cannot close this report without referring to a new departure by the department, 
viz., the hatching of the small-mouthed black bass. For many years the department has 
been pressed to take up the hatching of sporting fish, and last year an experiment was 
tried by which parent bass were confined in a suitable pond and allowed to hatch 
naturally. This pond, situated on the Bay of Quinte, is about 100 feet square, and will 
provide spawning surface for about fifty parent fish. The water, which is cold and clear, 
is led to the pond from never-failing springs. The bottom of the pond descends by 
ledges, so that the depth of the water will vary from four inches in the shallow parts, 
to five feet at the deepest point. Last year a quantity of parent bass were placed in 
the pond and the results were very satisfactory. The establishing of this pond 
enabled the department to comply with the long standing and annual request of the 
residents of British Columbia and the North west Territories for a supply of black bass. 



238 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

The necessary authority having been obtained, a car was specially fitted in Ottawa and 
taken to Belleville, where the young bass, to the number of 3,000, were placed in barrels 
arranged to receive them. The actual trip commenced on Tuesday, October 1, and 
ended at Victoria the following Sunday. It is not necessary to enter into the details 
of this hard and anxious trip. It is sufficient to say that it was successful beyond all 
expectations. The actual loss did not exceed 100 fish from start to finish. 

I would urge very strongly the necessity for an extension of the department's fish- 
lireeding operations. It is true great strides in the way of additional buildings have 
been made during the past three or four years, but there is still a cry for a large 
establishment on the great lakes, which is worthy of favourable consideration. 

Under the present policy of our hatching operations being confined to certain 
commercial fish, the hatcheries are idle for some months in the year, and I would 
suggest that the hatching of sturgeon, pickerel, gray and speckled trout might be 
favourably considered. 

I may say in closing that the department has every reason to be satisfied with the 
efficient condition of the hatchery buildings and with the fish-breeding operations during 
the past year. Of course, the expense has been heavier than usual ; but good work has 
been done, and it is expected that results will be far in excess of the expenditure. 

Respectfully submitted, 

/ 

R H. CUNNINGHAM, 

Dominion Inspector of Fish Hatcheries. 



FISH-CULTURE 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



239 



ANNEX B. 

OFFICERS' REPORTS. 

1. — GRANITE CREEK HATCHERY, SHUSHWAP LAKE, B. C. 

New Westminster, B.C., December 27, 1901. 

Professor E. E. Prince, 

Dominion Commissioner of Fisheries, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I have the honour to report in regard to the various hatcheries in British 
Columbia that since my last report the new hatchery at Granite Creek, Shush wap Lake 
has been completed and is in operation for the present season. There has also been 
another hatchery built on the Lac Else River a tributary of the Skeena in Northern 
British Columbia, which, however, has not yet been completed, but should be ready in 
time for next season. 

This building is 72 feet long and 24 feet wide with 14 feet walls, and has 50 
hatching troughs 16 feet long. 

Owing to the inaccessibility of the location the cost of this building will consider- 
ably exceed the original estimate, and the operating expenses will also be greater than 
would otherwise be the case. 

With regard to the Fraser River Hatchery at Bon Accord, for the season 1900- 
1901 ; as I reported to you cn November 26, 1900, we were unable to secure sufficient 
ova to justify the expense of running the hatchery that season, and I have consequently 
little to report in regard to last season. The few eggs that were secured were placed in 
a suitable place to develop naturally. 

Condit ons this season were the very reverse. There has been a phenomenal run 
of salmon in the Fraser River and we have had no difficulty in securing an ample supply 
of ova for the hatchery. Owing to a misunderstanding between the workers at the 
spawning beds and the receiver at the hatchery we had over 10,000,000 ova in the 
hatching troughs, 4,000,000 more than had proved to be the capacity of the hatchery, 
but by cutting the troughs in two, and making a drop from the first to the second half 
we were able to reaerate the water and so increase the capacity of the troughs by being 
able to put the baskets closer together. The eggs of which there are now 9,500,000 in 
good condition in the troughs are looking well, and, while such a number of fry could 
not safely be carried in the troughs, even in their improved condition, we have provided 
ponds outside which will accomodate the surplus we have not room for in the building. 
I have every reason to hope that we will have an output this year, exceeding by 60 per 
cent any previous record. 

Granite Creek Hatchery. 

This hatchery was completed in February, 1901, and has since been under the 
charge of Mr. Roxburgh, formerly in charge of the hatchery at Bon Accord. Hs has 
been kept busy getting everything in order for the work, and notwithstanding the 
difficulties incidental to a new enterprise has been successful in getting in a good supply 
of ova. There have, however, been many unforeseen drawbacks. The water of the creek 
which seemed to the eye to be pure, was found, when turned into the troughs to carry 
with it a great deal of slimy sediment which proved to be a great fungus breeder, and 
gave great trouble. The eggs unexpectedly proved to be smaller than those of the 
sockeye taken at Morris Creek, and a good many were lost through passing through the 
meshes of the baskets. There were also a great many dead eggs in the female fish when 



240 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

spawned a number out of all proportion to our experience at Morris Creek. This 
increased the work of picking enormously, and the staff available were unable for some 
time to catch up with the work thus entailing further loss. 

The total number of eggs placed in the hatchery is estimated by Mr. Roxburgh at 
11,000,000, reduced to 8,000,000 after the baskets had been thoroughly cleared of the 
dead eggs. A large number of these were dead when taken from the fish, the balance 
being accounted for by the lack of a sufficient number of pickers to get the baskets 
cleared of the dead eggs before the fungus started. 

The first eggs were put into the hatchery on the 27th August, the final consign- 
ment being received on the 22nd September. 

The first fish hatched on the 23rd October, in 56 days, the balance from 5G to 62 
days. This is much sooner than our experience at Bon Accord, probably accounted 
for by the higher temperature prevalent when the eggs were in the troughs. I regret 
that from the record of temperatures having been omitted at the beginning of the 
season I cannot give the exact average. 

There have already been 1,500,000 matured fry planted out, and the balance will 
be ready to put out in five or six weeks. 

1,000,000 eggs were shipped to Tasmania on September 17 in care of Mr. Morton 
an officer of the Tasmanian government who writes me from Hobart Town on Novem- 
ber 2, that he had arrived there a week before and found about 50 per cent of the 
ezss in good condition, which, taking all the circumstances into consideration he con- 
sidered a very satisfactory result. 

528,000 eggs for New Zealand were shipped to San Francisco on October 12, in 
care of Mr. Robinson, from this office, and he was able to hand them over there to Mr. 
Lambson, the United States Superintendent in California who was to accompany them 
to New Zealand, in a very satisfactory condition. Q 

Rivers Inlet. 

As the various canners at Rivers' Inlet are very anxious to have a hatchery estab- 
lished there, even should it be at their own expense, I sent Mr. Williams who has been 
acting for several seasons as Fishery Guardian there, to examine, at the close of the 
season, Oweekeena Lake when the salmon were spawning, with a view to reporting on 
the best site for the required hatchery. His report on this subject has already been 
forwarded to you. 

During the present year a sum of $300 has been expended in removing obstacles 
to the ascent of the salmon in the Courtenay River, Comox, Vancouver Island ; a fur- 
ther sum of $100 being required to complete the work satisfactorily. 

The work contemplated on the North Fork of the Quesnelle River in Cariboo, with 
the same object, has not yet been done as it would cost considerably more than the 
$450 authorized. 

There are many other places throughout the country where moderate expenditures 
in this direction would be of great advantage. 

I have the honour to remain, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 



C. B. SWORD, 

Inspector of Fisheries. 



FISH-CULTUEE 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



241 



2. — BEDFORD HATCHERY, NOVA SCOTIA. 

Bedford, N.S., December 6, 1901. 

Prof. E. E. Pkixce, 

Dominion Commissioner of Fisheries, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, —I beg to submit a report of the operations at the Bedford hatchery for the 
season of 1901. 

Eggs were received from the following named places, and laid down in the trough* ■ 

November, 1900, Carleton, N.B., 600,000 salmon. 

March, 1900, Sandwich, Ont., 3,200,000 whitefish. 

April, 1900, Restigouche, N.B., 200,000 salmon. 
These were hatched and delivered as follows : 



Whitefish. 



Brazil lake. Yarmouth County, N.S 500 000 

Paradise lake, Annapolis County, N.S 500,000 

McPherson's Lake, Pictou County, N.S SOo'cOO 

Lochabar lake, Antigonish County, N.S SOo'oOO 

^Yilliam's Lake, Halifax County, N.S 200^000 

Lake Au Law, Inverness County, N.S 1,000,000 



Total 3,200,000 

Salmon. 

Nine Mile river, Halifax County, N.S 60,000 

Pennant river, Hafifax County," N.S 60,000 

Rawdon river, Halifax County, N.S 50^000 

Sackville river, Halifax County, N.S 50,000 

Cornwallis river, King's County, N.S 60,000 

Gaspereaux river, King's County, N.S Go'oOO 

Annapolis river, Annapolis County, N.S 60^000 

Carribou river, Pictou County, N.S 60,000 

Murray river, Prince Edward Island 50,000 

Bell river, Prince Edward Island 50,000 

Morrell river, Prince Edward Island 5o'oOO 

Cole Harbour river, Guysboro County, N.S.-. 60^000 

Goshen lake, Guysboro County. N.S 60,000 

New Horton lake, Albert County, N.B 50^000 



Total ... 780,000 



About June 20, 1900, some four dozen rainbow trout were caught in one of the 
lakes near Bedford. The average size and weight of these fish were, length 14 inches, 
weight 1 lb. 8 oz. each. The fry were planted from this hatchery in June 1899, which 
proves that the rainbow trout grow rapidly. 
22—16 



242 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

I regret to say that many of the fry planted by the Halifax fishing clubs were lost. 
About 40,000 were placed in Chocolate lake, which was afterwards drained for the pur- 
pose of constructing a dam, and all the fry either went to sea or were allowed to perish 
on the dry bottom of the lake. 

Another lot of 4,000 placed in a public lake, which has a large outlet to the sea, 
appear to have gone out as none have been seen this season. 

Rainbow trout should only be planted in land locked lakes, or streams between lakes 
having no large outlets, and great care should be taken not to grant applications for fry 
to be planted in any unsuitable waters. 

During the past season large quantities of salmon were seen in Bedford basin ; the 
quantity seems to increase every year. Many small fish of 3 lb. and 4 lb. weight were 
caught in mackerel nets. I do not know of any salmon nets having been set in the 
basin this year. 

During the heavy freshet of April last considerable damage was done to the mill 
flume from which the water supply is drawn for this hatchery, and in August last while 
the water was low in the river I had the flume thoroughly repaired with a good stone 
floor, (the old one was constructed of wood.) It should now last for many years. 

A new supply trough has been put into the hatchery to take the place of the old 
one, which was so old and tender that it was past repairing. 

I am, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

ALFRED OGDEX. 



3. — ST. JOHN RIVER HATCHERY, NEW BRUNSWICK. 

Grand Falls, N.B., December 27, 1901. 

Prof. Edward E. Prince, 

Dominion Commissioner of Fisheries, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I respectfully beg to submit my annual report on the operations and the work 
done and performed at the above named hatchery, under my supervision, for the year 
1901. 

It may not be necessary for me to again refer to the number of fish eggs that were 
laid down in this hatchery last year, as they were all mentioned in my report for the 
year 1900, all the ova in the house last year did remarkably well during the winter 
and hatched out a fair percentage of young fry last spring. 

The following distribution of the fry was made during the summer in a very satis- 
factory manner, with very slight loss of fry, as follows : — 

Whitefish Fry. 



Harvey lake, York County 320,000 

Lake George « 320,000 

LakeYohoe " . . 320,000 

Oromoctolake " 320,000 

Baldhead lake " 320,000 

Foster lake " 320,000 

Long lake, Victoria 240,000 

Baulieu pond " 240,000 

Pond at the hatchery, Victoria 400,000 

2,800,000 



FISH-CULTURE 243 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

Salmon Fry. 



St. Croix river, Charlotte County 120,000 

Skiff lake, Carleton County 120,000 

Tobique river, Victoria County 120,000 

Butler lake, King's County 40,000 

Salmon river, Victoria County. ... 80,000 

St. John river and Rapide des Femines Brook . . . 325,000 

805,000 



Grand total 3,605,000 



Soon after we finished planting the fry, we had the house overhauled and the 
neces-ary painting and varnishing done, and some necessary repairs about the hatchery 
were made, viz. : a new platform and steps at the hatchery door, and a new wastewater 
aqueduct was put in extending from the penstock to the outside of the building, some 
eighty feet long, also some other slight repairs were made. It may be necessary next 
summer to make some little repairs in the hatchery room floor, the interior of the 
hatching room requires to be whitewashed, tbe window facings and all the cornishing 
around the whole building is sadly in need of painting, and I would respectfully request 
you to have it ordered to be done during next summer. 

On the 28th October last, we went to Carleton, St. John west, to strip the salmon 
that were in the pond, there was a large quantity in the retaining pond but they were 
scarcely sufficiently ripe when we arrived, Mr. Alexander Mowat was on hand as usual 
and rendered good assistance in stripping the fish ; in fact Mr. Mowat and myself did 
the principal part of the work. I have no record of the number of salmon that were 
manipulated nor the quantity of the eggs obtained, as Mr. O'Brien seemed to take 
charge of all that. 

I got about 1,400,000 eggs for my share, they are looking quite healthy at present, 
there is considerable bad amongst them, but we are getting them pretty well cleaned 
out ; I am anticipating a good percentage of young fry next summer. Salmon have been 
quite plentiful in the St. John river the past season, and it is generally conceded that 
the artifici d hatching of salmon is the principal and only means of keeping up the 
supply in our rivers, notwithstanding the excessive fishing, both legal and poaching. 
The Superintendent of the Tobique River Salmon Club kindly furnished me with a 
report from their preserve; he states that the low water in the river prevented in a 
great measure the salmon from ascending the stream to their spawning grounds; he says 
the young smolts are very plentiful in the Tobique waters. The number caught by the 
members of the club was 193 salmon and 16 grilse, sixteen of tbe salmon weighed 20 
pounds each and over. The members passed a new by-law prohibiting any member 
catching any more than a certain number of salmon in each and every year on the 
spawning grounds thereby offering a greater facility for propagation. 

It is regrettable that the salmon in the main St. John river could not be 
better protected. I am informed that the poachers slaughter them continually. 

All of the foregoing respectfully submitted. 

I am, sir, your obedient servant, 

CHARLES McCLUSKEY, 

Officer in Charge. 



22— 



244 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



4. — MIRAMICHI HATCHERY, NEW BRUNSWICK. 

South Esk, N.B., December 30, 1901. 

Prof. Edward E. Prince, 

Dominion Commissioner of Fisheries, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I have the honour to present the annual report upon the operations at this 
hatchery during the year 1901. 

The results have been highly satisfactory, as a large number of fry were distributed 
in the Miramichi waters, and the supply of ova now in the hatching troughs consider- 
ably exceeds any number previously placed in this hatchery. 

Referring to my last annual report, it will be seen that the number of ova in the 
hatchery in the autumn of 1900 was 1,620,000. In addition to that number, 250,000 
were received from the Restigouche hatchery during the month of March, making a 
total of 1,870,000. The approximate loss during the period of hatching was 70,000, 
leaving a balance of 1,800,000 fry for distribution. This number was successfully 
planted in the following streams : — 

North-west Miramichi river and tributaries, Restigouche 



fry 230,000 

North-west Miramichi river and tributaries, Miramichi 

fry 400,000 

Main south-west Miramichi river, Miramichi fry .... 200,000 

Little south west Miramichi river " .... 500,000 

Sevogle river, Miramichi fry 260,000 

Renous river " 125,000 

Stewart's brook " 20,000 

Salmon river and Trout brook, King's Co., N.B 50,000 

Warren's Pond, Kensington, P.E.I 15,000 



Total 1,800,000 



The fry were distributed without any loss, and on every stream the most suitable 
localities were selected. The application of Mr. A. H. Love, of Kensington, P.E.I., 
was not tilled, as the applicant failed to meet the fry at Summerside, or leave instruc- 
tions regarding them, therefore, they were planted in Warren's Pond, where a small 
lot were also planted the year previous. The fishermen and anglers were much pleased 
with the manner in which this large number of fry were distributed, and the hatchery 
was visited by quite a large number of these gentlemen during the time of distribution 

Repairs. 

After the work of planting the fiy "was completed, the repairing of the hatchery 
and putting in a new supply pipe was commenced. Upon examination it was found 
that the greater part of the foundation and floor of the building were completelv 
decayed. All the old underwork was, therefore, removed and replaced with new sills, 
joists and flooring. The walls of the building were also decayed, and it was found 
necessary to replace the posts and studding, as well as the posts that support the upper 
flat. The plaster which had become loosened by the dampness, was entirely removed, 



FISH-CULTUBE 



245 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

and the walls covered with matched boards instead, which greatly improves the appear- 
ance of the hatching room, and also makes the building much warmer. As it was 
necessary to remove all the hatching troughs when repairing the floors and underwork, 
it was found that very few of them were fit for any further service, as they were badly 
decayed and worn out — therefore, a complete new outfit of troughs, waste tanks and 
pipes was put in. The supply tank was also repaired and strengthened, and the 
arrangement for conducting the water from the building was much improved. The 
whole interior, including walls, tanks, troughs and posts, was painted, and the inside of 
the troughs and the other fittings thoroughly varnished. On the whole, the hatching 
rooms and appliances are greatly improved in appearance and every other way. 

After completing the interior of the hatchery, the old wooden pipes that conducted 
the water from the supply dam, were taken up and replaced with an eight inch terra 
cotta pipe Formerly four three inch wooden pipes gave the supply, and as they were 
continually leaking, were a great sourse of trouble and expense. The work of putting 
down the new pipe was very difficult owing to the nature of the earth through which it 
is laid. The drain was continually filling with quick sand and water, which caused the 
work to proceed much more slowly than if ordinary conditions were met with. However, 
this new pipe is a great improvement on the old system and there is now a much larger 
supply of water than was given by the arrangement formerly used. 

Besides the repairs and improvements to the hatchery and the laying of the new 
supply pipe, considerable other work was performed on the outside appliances. The 
bottum of the supply pond was dredged, the dam strengthened and the embankments 
built up with earth and gravel about two and a half feet higher to prevent the water 
flowing over during the spring freshets. Considerable repairs were also put upon the 
retaining pond and dam. Several new pontoons for carrying parent fish were built, and 
also a scow about thirty feet long, for towing purposes. Altogether the hatchery and 
appliances were thoroughly overhauled and repaired, and everything put in as good 
running order as possible. Next year it will be necessary to expend a small amount on 
the outside of the building and surroundings. The front of the house will require 
painting and the fences about the place will have to be replaced with new ones. 

Procuring Parent Salmon. 

Operations for procuring the parent fish were commenced on September 16, and on 
the 18th the first fish were netted. Fishing was continued from that date until October 
14. The actual time the nets were in operation was only twenty-one days, and during 
that time 516 salmon were taken. This is Ihe largest catch of fish ever made for this 
hatchery in the same length of time. Of this number eighty-three females and forty- 
four males were taken in the set net on the Little South-west Miramichi, and 241 females 
and 148 males were obtained by seining in the pools on the North-west Miramichi. 
This made the total number placed in the retaining pond amount to 324 females and 
192 males. 

Collection of Ova. 

On October 24, the work of stripping the parent fish commenced. Previous to that 
date sixteen of the females were liberated, leaving a balance of 308. The collection of 
ova continued until October 30, when it was found that the fish still remaining in the 
pond were nearly all unripe. These were allowed to remain until November 4. In the 
meantime the assistant officer proceeded to Carleton pond, at St. John, to assist the other 
officers there, returning on November 3 with a shipment of 402,000 ova, for this 
hatchery. The manipulation of the fish remaining in the pond here, was then continued 
and completed on November 8, the total number of ova collected from the 308 fish being 
1,951,000. After these were all placed in the hatchery and the seasons operations 
closed, instructions were received to take charge of a shipment of ova that was intend- d 
for the new hatchery at Margaree, C.B., but as that hatchery was not yet in readiness 
for their reception, they were transferred here, and placed in the hatching troughs by 



246 



MAIUXE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

the assistant officer. This makes a total number of 2,908,000 ova, now in the hatchery. 
This is the largest number of ova ever carried here, but I feel confident that they can be 
safely cared for until the proper time for removal to Margaree arrives. Then fully a 
million can be transferred from here to the new hatchery. 

In conclusion, I may say that the operations during the past year have been very 
successful, and a Wge output of fry may be looked forward to next year. 

I am, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

ISAAC SHEASGREEN. 

5— RESTIGOUCHE HATCHERY. 

Flatlands, N.B., December 22, 1901. 

Professor E. E. Prince, 

Dominion Commissioner of Fisheries, 
Ottawa. 

Sib, — I beg to submit the following report in connection with the operations at the 
Restigouche Hatchery, during the past year, 1901. 

I am much pleased to be able to state that great success has attended every branch 
of the work. 

Some one million two hundred and ten thousand healthy, beautiful fry were dis- 
tributed in the Restigouche river and its tributaries, by the usual method of the floating 
crates. In addition to these, five hundred and fifty thousand semi-hatched eggs and fry, 
were transferred to the Nepisiguit river, and Miramichi and Bedford hatcheries, 
making a grand total of one million seven hundred and fifty thousand fry and live eggs, 
nursed and sent out from this hatchery during the past season. 

The time of distributing the fry from the new hatcher) 7 , is fully ten days later than 
was the case at the old Dee Side. This is caused by the cold spring supply brook taking 
its course almost entirely through forest, the snow is later in melting, consequently, 
advantageous to the planting of the fry, as the freshets, «fcc, are over. 

The season was most favourable for the setting of the government nets and capture 
of parent fish. One net took salmon as early as May 24, and the other on June 1. The 
retaining pond was at once made ready for the reception of the fish, and by July 10, 
both nets had taken three hundred and seventy-five very large salmon. As these were 
considered ample for the stocking of the hatchery, the nets were taken out a month 
before the season closed, and the men discharged. Another hundred salmon could have 
been easily taken, if required, as the licensed netters lower down took a great many fish 
after the government nets were taken up. 

The gathering of the fish together took place on October 18, when the males were 
selected and separated from the females, and the work of collecting the eggs began on 
October 20, and continued until November 10. Three hundred and seventy fish were 
manipulated- -two hundred and thirty females and one hundred and forty males — yielding 
two million three hundred and ten thousand eggs. These were packed in the hatchery 
trays and conveyed to the nursery by scow, and are in grand condition. The parent 
fish were again liberated and looked well. 

On October 28, in obedience to your instructions, I proceeded to St. John to assist 
in collecting the eggs at the Carleton pond. We handled upwards of 1,200 salmon, 
two-thirds females, yielding nearly 5,000,000 of beautiful eggs. After all the other 
hatcheries were given a full supply, a surplus of 700,000 still remained and were ordered 
to Restigouche, which I brought with me. These eggs are in perfect condition, and 
give the Restigouche hatchery a grand total of 3,010,000 at the present time. 



FISH-CULTURE 



247 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

The parent fish at the Carleton pond were in fine condition, and I can only repeat 
my former statement, viz., that there are no finer salmon than the St. John river salmon, 
and no better place in the world for impounding parent salmon than the Carleton pond. 
The facilities for getting the fish are all which can be desired. Fancy being able to pur- 
chase 1,200 salmon from a few weirs in the harbour, half a mile distant from the pond. 
Who can estimate the value or results of such a scheme 1 Here are 1,200 salmon yield- 
ing 5,000,000 of eggs, out of which eighty per cent of living fish are turned into the 
various rivers, throughout a large portion of the eastern part of the Dominion. 

The capture of ample supplies of parent fish is the most difficult and essential ques- 
tion with which we have to deal, and the success or failure of any given hatchery, must 
necessarily depend and be governed by the supplies of stock fish secured for it. It is 
not always convenient or possible to purchase supplies of stock fish, hence the great 
value of the Carleton pond. 

We have in times past experienced some diffiulty, in obtaining supplies of fish at 
the Restigouche hatchery. But by the purchase of certain licensed nets and the care- 
ful handling of the fish by our own employees, all difficulties have been overcome, and a 
fair supply always obtained. Yet there is fault found and certain amount of complaint 
among the anglers. The hatchery nets are the highest on the river, and they say if 
these fish were allowed to ascend the river, they would get them, or take a much larger 
number with the fly. This may seem a plausible argument from the angler's point of 
view, but the netters would be justified in using a similar argument, that they should 
not be under any restrictions but set nets indiscriminately. 



Completing the new Hatchery. 

A large amount of work was done during the season. The dwelling part of the 
building outside was papered, clapboarded and painted. The vacant space in the 
hatchery which has not been required until this year, was filled with troughs so that 
now there is a hatching capacity of three millions of eggs. All trays, troughs and 
plant were varnished, and outsheds and fence painted. The hatchery and all its 
appliances never were in a better condition to do excellent service for the rivers. Very 
little new plant will be required for another year. A few new distributing cans may 
be needed. I would again urge the importance of establishing a retaining pond at the 
hatchery, in order to retain and grow some of the fry until a few years old. This could 
be easily done at a small cost by using the surplus water. 

Regarding my inspection of the Margaree hatchery in Cape Breton, last July, I 
consider the site very acceptable. The hatchery is well situated, taking its supply of 
water from the river. The facilities for distributing, the fry are good and no difficulty 
can be experienced in getting stock fish, as a salt water retaining pond can be made at 
the mouth of the river, where supplies of parent fish can be purchased from the netters. 
Great results must necessarily follow from a hatchery so situated. 



General Remarks. 

Complaint is made by the anglers, that the fi-m are falling of. This is no new 
thing, and just so sure as the season is not favourable for fly fishing, all kinds of com- 
plaints are made. The past season was very early, and the anglers really had July 
fishing in June. There were no rains and the temperature of the river rose very high 
early In June, and salmon could be taken with a fly only in the large aerated pools. The 
reaches of the river which usually gives big scores, in the early season under ordinary 
circumstances, would not respond this year. But this does not prove that the fish were 
scarce, and all the information from guardians, scowmen and hunters, and from my own 
experience and knowledge, show that the opposite is the case, and that the fish are 
rather increasing. There have certainly been two good years in succession. 



248 



MAL'IXE AXD FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

I was in Metapedia, June 15, 1900, and four or five rods brought in thirty-one 
salmon, average weight 22 pounds for that day's fishing. About the same date and 
fifty miles higher up the river, at mouth of the Kedgewick, the lessee of a small piece of 
water was fast to twenty one salmon in six days, and the fishing all over the river was 
much the same. I may also mention a few of the scores which came under my notice 
for the past season. I heard of one club member taking seventy salmon, and he was 
not above Metapedia. A few of these may have been taken in the Cascapedia. The 
Sage party took about 130 salmon. The lessees of the Upsalquitch river captured 160 
salmon. The Roger, Brooks and Vanderbilt party at Kedgewick landed over 200 
salmon. Barrels of salted salmon came from there. Others made fine scores, and all 
information proves that the rivers were well filled with fish. 

I heard of some of the necters down the bay making big hauls, and I think some 
of the dealers of the locality could supply authentic information as to the catches among 
the netters. 

Regarding the future supplies of parent fish, if, in the opinion of your department, 
you think it desirable to yield to the wishes of some of the anglers, to have the present 
trap nets removed, I would suggest that a salt water pond be established below 
Pilhousie, and the stock fish obtained in some way, perhaps from the netters. This 
would not be impossible, and could be worked in the same mam er as the Carleton pond, 
St. John. 

I am, sir, your obedient servant, 

ALEXANDER MOWAT. 



6.— TADOUSSAC HATCHERY, QUEBEC. 

Tadoussac, December 12, 1901. 

Professor E. E. Prince, 

Dominion Commissioner of Fisheries, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — In accordance with the usual departmental rule, I have the honour to submit 
my annual report upon the operations carried on in the Tadoussac hatchery during the 
past year. The number of salmon eggs placed on our trays last fall was 3,350,000. 
From that crop of eggs 200,000 were packed in moss during the spawning time and sent 
to the Roberval hatchery lo be hatched there and distributed in the large rivers of the 
county of Lake St. John, by H. J. Beemer, Esq., proprietor of the Roberval hatchery. 
The salmon eggs in our Tadoussac hatchery kept well all winter, leaving 2,960,000 
salmon fry for the distribution in June last, and made as follows : — 



St. Marguerite river . 400,000 

Baude river 500,000 

Mowat's lakes 600,000 

Chisholm brook 500,000 

Fraisiere brook , 400,000 

A Mars river 200,000 

St. John river 200,000 

Murray river ... 100,000 

Jacques Cartier river 50,000 

Kenogami lake. ... 10,000 



2,960,000 



FISH-CULTURE 



249 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 2£ 

The distribution of salmon fry in the rivers tributaries of the Upper Saguenay 
River has been made with the assistance of the tug boat Forrest. Our salmon eggs 
hatched out this season at least fifteen days earlier than usual on account of an unusual 
early spring. As soon as the distribution was over the hatchery has been washed all 
over and all the trays varnished during the sum-ner. Our hatchery is in good working 
order and the outside of the building presents a good appearance, having been painted 
all over during the summer. The main road in front of the hatchery ground has been 
repaired, to the delight of the Tadoussac residents and the numerous visitors during 
the summer se.ison. 

Our salmon nets were set up in May for the capture of the parent salmon for breed- 
ing purposes. Five hundred and ten parent salmon were kept in the pond until ready 
to spawn at the end of October and beginning of November. From that number the 
300 female salmon gave us a crop of 3,150,000 eggs now deposited on the trays and 
looking quite well. The breeding room heated by two coal stoves keep a good regular 
temperature day and night. 

The salmon fishing has been abundant this season, one net fisherman, Mr. R. Bouli- 
anne of Pilot's Cove, taking in one tide 112 fine salmon, averaging 23 pounds each. All 
the net fishermen are quite satisfied of their regular good catches of salmon, and making 
great praise of the Tadoussac hatchery for so fine an increase of salmon. The depart- 
ment has given good reasons for not doing the work of finishing the dam of the salmon 
pond this year, but I hope something will be done for it next spring ; our pond is filling 
up with all kinds of dirt and getting very shallow. For that reason we have lost at the 
first ice on the pond, t.venty salmon caught under the ice at low tide. Every year after 
the spawning time is over and the wire net taken up, the parent salmon are at liberty 
to go out, but it takes many days before they all go out. At every tide a good many 
go out with the rising tide and come back to the pond with the falling tide. 
It is some of these, remaining in pond by a very cold night when ice formed 
all over, that have been caught that way in the shallow places of the pond. It is 
the first time that this thing has happened, the cold weather having set in so 
early this fall, but it must not be repeated, for we must do something to prevent 
it, and the first thing to do is the closing of the dam to keep more water in the pond 
at low tide. Your department is aware of the need of twenty-five more large cans for 
the distribution of the salmon fry. After many experiences made and explained to the 
officers of the department, I want those large cans made of heavy tin, nothing else ; the 
galvanized ones have proved poisonous to the salmon fry carried at long distances. It 
is possible that some water have more effect to dissolve the poisonous matter entering « 
in the process of galvanism. At all events the water of our artificial lake has that effect, 
and the transport of salmon fry at long distances must be avoided, by galvanized cans. 
I only used the twenty-five I bad on hand for short distances and I have never had any 
trouble with my tin cans. To show you the difference of cans, I have repeated many 
times this experience. I put fifty salmon fry in each can, a galvanized and a tin one 
without changing water, after sixteen hours the fry in the galvanized can are all dead and 
I have kept for two days the ones in the tin can and returned them to water in a healthy 
state. To cover the whole breeding room with the same trays received two years ago 
I want 250 more, the old wire ones are very unhandy for the reason that they have to 
be weighted with stone to keep them from floating it is always a great trouble in the 
washing of the eggs. As the applications for salmon fry are getting more numerous 
every year, I would advise your department to consider the applications only for the 
salmon rivers ; as we have no time to spare in the five weeks of our large distribution. 
It is impossible to keep the salmon fry after June, and very often the water of our 
shallow lake gets too warm by the end of June. The planting of the salmon fry in the 
Mowat Lakes having proved so efficient for the growing of the young salmon, it is my 
intention, for next spring, to plant some fry in two beautiful lakes of the purest water, 
having a fine discharge to the St. Lawrence by the Little Bergeronnes River. In those 
lakes is found a small fish known as fresh water smelts. This small fish, in large quan- 
tity will be a fine food for the young salmon. 

I have the honour to be, sir, Your obedient servant, 

L. N. CATELLIER. 



250 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD Vil., A. 1902 



7.— MAGOG HATCHERY, QUEBEC. 



Makog, December 11, 1901. 



Prof. E. E. Prince, 

Dominion Commissioner of Fisheries 
Ottawa. 



Sir,— I beg to submit herewith a report of the operations at this hatchery during 
the year 1901. On March 5, I received at Magog Railway Station, from Mr. Wm. 
Parker, 3,000.000 whitefish eggs, from Sandwich, Ontario, they arrived in very good 
condition and continued to do well during the period of incubation, the hatchery was 
in satisfactory working order excepting the floor, which is badly decayed, and there was 
a plentiful supply of the best of beautiful clear water. 

On May 18, I received instructions from the department to proceed to Newcastle, 
Ontario, and bring from that place, a shipment of salmon-trout fry to the Magog hat- 
chery, to be distributed in this district. I stai ted on the 20th for Newcastle, and arrived 
there on the 21st, returning to Magog on the 23rd with about 150,000 fry, and I am 
pleased to be able to say in excellent condition, the percentage of loss was so small as not 
to be worth mentioning. I had them for several days in the tanks in the hatchery 
before the first lot was planted. I might say here that the officers at Newcastle did 
everything in their power to facilitate my work, as well as the officials of the Grand 
Trunk Railway, besides the weather at the time was cool, and experience had showed me 
this condition of weather to be quite a consideration when one had to travel six or 
seven hundred miles by rail with a large shipment of tender fry, if the weather had been 
hot and sultry the result might have been very different in spite of the greatest care. 

Last year by instructions from the department to secure if possible forty or fifty 
thousand eggs of speckled trout, I proceeded to Sugarloaf Pond, and in ten days secured 
forty-five thousand eggs- I could easily have got fifty thousand if the pond had not 
frozen over ; the above number of eggs was laid down in the troughs in the hatchery in 
the best of condition and did extra well, hatching out in the end of April. The distri- 
bution of fry from the hatchery commenced on May 2 and continued until June 10, 
and was planted in good condition in the following waters : 



Salmon-trout. 



Lake Memphremagog, County Brome and Stanstead 

Lake Fortin, County of Beauce 

Lake Massawippi, County Stanstead 

Trouser Pond, County of Brome 

Oxford Pond, County Brome and Sherbrooke 

Huntingdon river, County Huntingdon 

Fin wick Lake, County of Richmond. 

Pirkins Pond, County of Richmond 



35,000 
25,000 
15,000 
10,000 
10,000 
25,000 
15,000 
15,000 



Total 



150,000 



White fish. 



Pirkins Pond, County Richmond. 

Lake Fortin, County Beauce 

Finwick Lakes, County Richmond 
Brome Lakes, County Brome 



50,000 
50,000 
50,000 
200,000 



FISH-CULTURE 251 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

Oxford Lakes, Counties Brome and Sherbrooke 450,000 

Key Pond, County Sherbrooke 300,000 

Massawippi Lake, County Stanstead 475,000 

Lake Megantic, County Megantic 250,000 

Lake Memphremagog, Counties Brome and Stanstead . . . 1,125,000 



Total 2,950,000 

Speckled Trout. 

East Halty Trout Pond, County Standstead 5,000 

Rock Pond, County Sherbrooke 10,000 

Castle Brooke, County Brome and Standstead 7,500 

Sugar Loaf Pond, County Brome 7,500 

Patterson Lake, County Three-Rivers 5,000 



Total 35,000 

Recapitulation. 

Sal mon Trout , . 150,000 

White fish 2,950,000 

Speckled Trout , 35,000 



Total 3,485,000 



On October 23, I received instruction from the department to proceed to St. John, 
N.B., and secure at Carlton Salmon Pond a shipment of salmon eggs for Magog hatchery. 
I left Magog on October 28 for St. John, returning to Magog with 376,000 eggs, which 
I placed in the troughs in good condition and which are doing well, with every prospect 
of a good yield next spring. 

Repairs. 

As has been already mentioned the floor of the hatchery is in a very bad condition, 
and some of the floor tanks are almost rotted down with dry rot, this should be repaired 
before another year's work is on. 

I am, sir, your obedient servant, 

ALEX. FINLAYSON, 

Officer in charge. 



8. — NEWCASTLE HATCHERY, ONTARIO. 

Newcastle, December 13, 1901. 

Prof. E. E. Prince, 

Dominion Commissioner of Fisheries. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit a report of the fish cultural operations carried on 
at this hatchery during the past year. 

The following schedule will show you the points of distribution, also the number and 
kinds of fry distributed and placed in each locality last spring. 



252 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Whitefish. 



Lake Ontario, Hamilton 200,000 

Toronto 300,000 

Cobourg 200,000 

" Consecon 250,000 

Georgian Bay, Collingwood 300,000 

Meaford 300,000 

Bay of Quinte, Belleville 300,000 

Picton 300,000 

Lake on the Mountain, Picton 200,000 

Lake Couchiching, Orillia ' 300,000 

Lake Simcoe, Barrie ........... 300,000 

Lake Huron, Southampton 300,000 



3,250,000 

Salmon-troui. 

Lake Ontario, Toronto 100,000 

Hamilton , 50,000 

Cobourg 50,000 

" Consecon...- 50,000 

" Kingston 50,000 

Bay of Quinte, Belleville 50,000 

Picton 50,000 

Georgian Bay, Collingwood 100,000 

" Meaford 50,000 

Wiarton 100,000 

Lake Couchiching, Orillia 50,000 

Lake Siincoe, Barrie 50,000 

Lake on the Mountain, Picton 100,000 

Charleston Lake 100,000 

Clear Lake 100,000 

Eagle Lake 100,000 

HyblaLake '. . . 50,000 

Five Lakes, Haliburton Co 100,000 

Five Lakes, Bay Quinte Ry 100,000 

Lake Huron, Goderich 100,000 

Lakes Quebec, per Mr. Finlayson . . 100,000 



Total distribution of salmon-trout 1,650,000 

Total distribution of whitefish 3,250,000 



Total distribution, Newcastle 4,900,000 



I beg to inform you that the fry were all in first class condition, and without a 
single exception were deposited in the different waters in the foregoing schedule with 
more than usual success. 

The Newcastle hatchery is in first class order, and I have endeavoured to keep it 
in good shape without any very material expense to the department, as we have done a 
great deal of the repairing that was required ourselves. We have laid a new iron pipe 
part of the distance from the dam to the hatchery and done the excavating ourselves. 
We have painted the troughs and the floor of the hatchery, and varnished all of our 
trays and boxes for shipping eggs, tfec. We have also invented a deeper tray for hatching 
and a tray which is perforated more than the old style of tray, and we find, after 
a thorough test, that it has returned us excellent results. We need about 300 more to 
carry on the hatching properly, and I am now negotiating to have them manufactured 
as cheaply as possible. 



FISH-CULTURE 



253 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

According to your instructions, I proceeded to Wiarton, Georgian Bay, October 1, 
with our assistants, to procure our usual supply of salmon-trout ova for this and other 
hatcheries. We succeeded in getting our nets set about October 22, and raised the nets 
on the 26th and secured about 50,000 eggs. 

After that date we had some very trying weather to encounter all through the 
balance of the season, which to a great extent retarded our operations. We have laid 
in port for four and five days at a time, it being impossible and dangerous to handle 
the nets, the sea running so high. But I am happy to say after due patience we 
succeeded in securing about 4,000,000, out of which I delivered to the Ottawa hatchery 
about 1,250,000, which leaves a balance in this hatchery of 2,750,000, in good condition 
and doing well. 

Our plant is in good condition in Wiarton, except one new net which we require 
for the next season. 

We were forced, through the very cold weather, to tie our pile driver and spawning- 
boat to the pier at Wiarton, but I have made arrangements to have them pulled out if 
the ice goes out before spring, if not I will be forced to leave them there until the spring. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

Wm. ARMSTRONG, 

Officer in charge. 



9. — OTTAWA HATCHERY, ONTARIO. 

Ottawa, December 10, 1901. 

Professor E. E. Prince, 

Commissioner of Fisheries, &c., &c. 

Sir, — I beg to submit my annual report of the operations carried on in the Ottawa 
fish hatchery during the year. 

. On November 9, 1900, were received from Mr. W. Armstrong, of the Newcastle 
hatchery, about 1,250,000 salmon-trout eggs which had been collected at Wiarton, Ont. 
Also in the month of February, 1901, I received from Mr. W. Parker, of the Sandwich 
hatchery, about 3,000,000 whitefish eggs. The eggs were in good condition when 
received. The fry hatched out in the months of April and May. The work of distribut- 
ing the fry was done by Mr. Andrew Halkett and Mr. A. M. Ross, of the Fisheries 
Department. 

I am pleased to say that the work was done in a very satisfactory and successful 
manner. 

The fry having been deposited in the following named waters : — 

Distribution of Salmon Trout. 



To Victoria Lake 60,000 

Ma=son " 40,000 

Rock " 100,000 

Lac des Sables 50,000 

Perth 30,000 

Three Rivers Lake 60,000 

Black « 60,000 

WhiteFish " 60,000 

Daly's " 100,000 



254 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



Raymond Lake, No. 16 & 17 50,000 

Barnet « 30,000 

Labelle " 50,000 

St. Francis « 50,000 

Fortune " 50,000 

St. Rock Lake (L'Islet) 50,000 

Lake No. 7 (Joliette) , 50,000 

St Gabriel 30,000 

Lakes in Prince Edward Island . 120,000 

Riviere du Loup '20,000 



Total 1,060,000 



Whitefish. 

To Eagle Lake 520,000 

Clear " 500,000 

Maskinono-e Lake 250,000 

Long " - 500,000 

Lac Trernblant , 1 80,000 

Coursolle Lake . ... 120,000 

Ste. Agathe " 280,000 



Total 2,350,000 



The hatchery is in good repair and condition for the work this year. 

I remain, sir, 

Your humble servant 

JOHN WALKER, 

In charge of Ottawa Hatchery. 



10.— SANDWICH HATCHERY. 

Sandwich, December 19, 1901. 

To Prof. E. E. Prince, 

Dominion Commissioner of Fisheries, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — In accordance with the rules of the department and in cpmpliance with your 
instructions I take pleasure in submitting my annual report of the work connected with 
the fish hatchery here under my supervision. 

According to last year's report this hitchery contained 100,000,000 whitefish eggs 
from which were turned out 82,000,000 young try and semi hatched eggs, which were 
disposed of as follows : — 

Eyed Eggs. 



Newcastle, Ont 3,500,000 

Ottawa, Ont , 3,000,000 

Magog, Que 3,000,000 

Bedford, N.S : , 3,000,000 

St. John, N.B. . 3,000,000 



Total 



15,500,000 



FISH -CULTURE 255 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

Young Fry. 

Point Edward, Lake Huron 4,000,000 

Belle Isle, Detroit river 3,000,000 

Fighting Island, Detroit river 4,000,000 

In bay below Fighting Island 4,000,000 

Stony Island, Detroit river 3,000,000 

Bois Blanc Island, Detroit river 6,000,000 

In lake below Bois Blanc Island 6,000.000 

Pigeon Bay, Lake Erie 5,000,000 

Bar Point, Lake Erie 3,000,000 

Colchester " 2,000,000 

Kingsville " 1,000.000 

Leamington « 1,000,000 

Rondeau " 1,000,000 

Port Stanley " 1,000,000 

Hamilton, Lake Ontario 1,000,000 

Niagara " \ 1,000,000 

Toronto " ' 1,000,000 

In river at hatchery 20,000,000 



Grand total 82,500,000 



The various consignments of eggs enumerated above were placed in the water at 
the points designated, in excellent condition. 

This fall we have secured and laid in the hatchery 100,000,000 whitefish eggs which 
are in good condition. 

In accordance with the wishes of the department, I have, also, in addition to the 
100,000,000 above named, secured and placed 30,000,000 whitefish eggs in hatchery at 
Selkirk, Man. 

The total catch of fish this autumn is accounted for as follows : — 



Liberated 12,670 

Sold 1,500 

Salted 100 

Lost. . , 125 

Used ..... 75 

Hotel Dieu (Hospital) 40 



Total 14,510 



The catch of Fish. 

According to reports from most reliable sources in numerous quarters, the catch 
of white fish in the Detroit river and neighbouring lakes has been unusually good, and 
from present indications will continue to improve and thereby become a source of profit 
and pleasure to those of our citizens who are engaged in the fishing industry of this 
Dominion, 

Repairs. 

In reference to necessary repairs I wish to report that the following repairs are 
required : A new foundation under the boilers and pumps, and also repairs be made to 
our troughs and tanks. I find that the two old rotary pumps are worn out, and under 
present conditions seriously impede the successful carrying on of the important work 
of the hatchery, I would, therefore, recommend that a new pump be purchased. 

I remain, respectfully, Your obedient servant, 

Wm. PARKER, Officer in charge. 



256 



MARINE AXD FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



11. — SELKIRK HATCHERY. MAN 7 ~0 ' \ 

r.ET.Ki: z, November 30, 1901. 

To Prof. Prince, 

Dominion Commissioner of Fisheries, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit to you my first report on the work of the insti- 
tution, which has been under my charge since my appointment as Inspector of Fisheries 
for this province. The period to which I refer, in very short, and I am not able, there- 
fore, to present a full and detailed account of the operations, which were largely carried 
on by my predecessor in office. 

As was pointed out in last year's report upon this hatchery, the season has very 
much to do with the success of the hatching of whitefish, and no doubt the best efforts 
of those engaged in the work of obtaining spawn, or of hatching it in the tanks of the 
fish-breeding establishments, may be baffled by unfavourable circumstances. Such cir- 
cumstances, dependent on the season, effect not merely the abundance of ova, but affect 
directly the quality of the eggs. The arrangements, which you sanctioned, for obtaining 
whitefish eggs on Lake Winnipeg, resulted in a large supply being steured, for the num- 
ber reported by the officer then in charge, showed a slight increase c f the total of the 
previous year, as given in his report for that year (1900) ; but it appears, that, owing to 
the immature nature of the eggs, and the fact that a large proportion seemed to be not 
properly fertilized, the loss during the months of incubation was serious and continuous. 
A peculiar tenacious matter collected upon the jars, which was said by some parties to 
be due to the bad quality of the water supplied to the hatching jars. Whatever may 
have been the cause at work the eggs did not do well, and the resulting fry were so dis- 
proportionately small in quantity, that the l'esults would hardly justify record in statist- 
ical tables for the year. The season's work cannot be said in any sense to have resulted 
in success. 

The amount of fry ready to be planted at the end of the incubation period has been 
variously estimated and the actual figures are not available. I am not able, in view of 
this uncertainty, to furnish numerically an estimate of the quantity. All that can be 
said is that a very small percentage of the eggs yielded fry and it is clear that some 
improved method of supplying healthy mature eggs, properly imprignated, must be 
adopted, if this splendid hatchery is to adequately benefit the fisheries of this province. 

The plan which for the season of 1901 you have sanctioned will for the present 
remove all difficulties. The eggs from the waters of Ontario now placed in the hatching 
trays here will yield fry, which there is every reason to believe will do well in the lakes 
of Manitoba. I understand that the introduction of voung whitefish into new waters ■* 
has generally had the most satisfactory results, and Ontario whitefish planted in millions 
in our lakes will still further benefit our fisheries and tend to improve the already excel- 
lent quality of Manitoba whitefish. 

I am, your obedient servant, 

W. S. YOUNG. 



FISH CULTURE 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



257 



12— BAY VIEW LOBSTER HATCHERY. 

Bedford, N.S., December 7, 1901. 

Prof. E. E. Prince, 

Dominion Commissioner of Fisheries, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I beg to submit my report of operations at Bay View Lobster Hatchery for 
the season of 1901. 

The spring opened earlier this year than for many years past, and the lobster fishery 
had an early start, therefore I was enabled to commence collecting eggs in boxes at the 
factories on May 7, and the 16th started the steam pump with 30,000,000 eggs in the 
jars. 

Collections of eggs were made daily (Sundays excepted) up to June 17, from around 
Pictou Island and along the coast north of Caribou 

The fry first appeared in the incubators on June 10, which was three days earlier 
than last year, and several days earlier than any previous year. 

One hundred and ten millions of fry were distributed in Pictou Bay, around Pistou 
Island, between White Sands, P.E.I., and in East Bay, Bras d'Or Lake, Cape Breton. 

On June 27, I took on board the steamer May Queen 6,000,000 of fry and arrived 
at East Bay at 9.45 o'clock on the following morning. 

During the entire passage I took the temperature of the water every half hour, or • 
about every i\ miles. I found that the temperature did not vary more than 2 degrees 
in the whole run oh' about 130 miles, the lowest temperature being at the southern 
entrance of the Strait of Canso, and the highest in the Bras d'Or Lake. 

I had constructed my distributing barrels with a wire gauze strainer running along 
the bottom of the barrel with a goose-neck shaped discharge pipe just below the surface 
of the water at the top of barrel. 

This arrangement permitted pure cold water to be constantly pumped, or poured 
into the barrel, forcing the warm water out without dipping or in any way injuring 
the fry. 

During the trip of thirty hours I did not see one dead lobster in the barrels, but 
they were as lively when planted in the Bras d'Or as when taken from the hatchery. 

Lobsters were larger and more plentiful this season than they have been for many 
years, and the packers have increased their facilities for extending the business by 
enlarging old factories and building new ones. 

Packers and fishermen speak in the highest terms of the good results of this 
hatchery, which, without doubt, is preserving and restoring the fishery. 

Early in J une the fresh water tank fell to pieces, and I had a new one constructed 
with the department's authority. 

During the dry season, in August, I dug a well, 18 feet deep, 11 ft. by 8 ft., which 
gave a supply of 300 gallons of water every twenty-four hours, while all other wells in 
the neighbourhood were dry, and the farmers were compelled to haul water a distance 
of two miles for their cattle. 

In October the wharf was thoroughly repaired. It is now in good condition, and 
should last for many years ; some </f the old top covering which is good for a year or 
two, was relaid, but new plank will have to be put down as required. 

The steam boiler was fitted with new connections, but a new smoke stack may be 
required next year. 

The necessary repairs about the hatchery for next season will be very light. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

ALFRED OGDEN. 

22—17 



258 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



ANNEX O. 

REPORT ON OYSTER CULTURE BY THE DEPARTMENT'S EXPERT 

FOR THE SEASON OF 

1901. 

Ottawa, December 31, 1901. 

To the Dominion Commissioner of Fisheries, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit to you my annual report of last season's work, 
which consisted chiefly in examining and reporting upon the condition of oyster areas 
in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island, some of which I have not had 
an opportunity of visiting before ; also in preparing grounds for planting oysters in 
Annapolis Basin. 

In Prince Edward Island the following places were visited : 

iVo. 1. Murray Harbour. — In June I visited and examined Murray Harbour 
oyster reserve, which had been prepared and stocked with young oysters from Curtain 
Island last year. 

I found the bed clean and looking in a healthy condition; the weed has not grown 
where it was removed. The oysters are all alive, with no mortality at all noticeable, 
and growing in a very satisfactory way. During last winter the oysters have thick- 
ened very considerably. They were at the time of examining the bed putting a new 
fin on the shell, which was very fragile, but thickens and hardens as the season 
advances, and I see no reason why this bed should not prove a success. I have not 
had an opportunity of visiting the area since, as my time has been otherwise engaged. 
There should be a responsible warden appointed who has a view of the grounds from 
his residence and owns a boat, so that if poachers were about he would have an oppor- 
tunity of ascertaining the names of the parties infringing the regulations. 

No. 2. Trout and Bidejord Rivers. — A petition having been forwarded to the 
department by a number of fishermen and residents of Lots 12 and 13 praying that 
certain oyster areas might be protected from mud diggers, and that certain other areas 
be defined where mud digging may be carried on without injury to the live oyster beds, 
I visited and examined the above localities in company with Inspector Matheson, and 
find ample mud, consisting of old beds which have been previously dug upon by the 
farmers, sufficient to last for a number of years if obtained in a systematic way. 

I do not consider the farmers give themselves sufficient time to examine the best 
ground to work upon. They wait until the ice is sufficiently strong, and then cut holes 
over an oyster bed and prod it with an iron rod. Not knowing the exact direction the 
bed runs, they place their digger in a bad position, often making much extra work for 
themselves besides the damage done to the bed, whereas if they took a boat during fine 
calm weather and sounded the river they would have a much better idea of the locality 
and quantity of mud there is in the river. 

The area allowed for mud digging in Trout River would be above a line drawn 
from Peter Miller's middle point to a point of land at the edge of Yeo's Portage road. 
This is a lower boundary line than [previously given, and incloses more area for diggers 
to work upon. 

In Bideford River the area above a line drawn from Bideford shipward to Colin 
McKay's Point, including Pawes' Creek, where there is an abundance of mud suitable 
for farming purposes. 

Last winter two diggers were working on a bed opposite Richards' wharf which 
was estimated to have yielded several hundreds of dollars worth of oysters the previous 



OYSTER CULTURE 



259 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

fall, and upon examination found that portion of the ground which was not disturbed 
literally covered with young growing oysters, and such areas as these I do not consider 
should be destroyed under any consideration. 

Below the above named boundaries, Bideford River may be called one large oyster 
bed, and to allow the diggers to work there would mean the destruction of the oyster 
* industry in that locality. It was from this river the oysters were selected that were sent 
to Paris which resulted in gaining the gold medal. It appears to me very forcibly, from 
information obtained, the farmers do not think of the injurious results of digging just 
where they choose, but is rather from a selfish motive, desiring to dig mud as close as 
possible to their own farms, and are dissatisfied if they have to haul it any distance, 
as they are unable to take as many loads as if they were digging near their own farms. 

The department have now taken further action in the matter and have laid off the 
above areas by an Order in Council which reads as follows : — 

' No person shall dig mussel mud in Trout River, Prince County, Prince Edward 
Island, excepting above a line drawn from Peter Miller's Middle Point to a point of 
land at the end of Yeo's Portage road. 

' No person shall dig mussel mud in Bideford River, Prince County, Prince Edward 
Island, excepting above a line drawn from Bideford Shipyard to Colin McKay's point 
including Pawes Creek.' 

No. S. Grand River. — I made several inquiries as to the closing of this area for one 
season on account of the large quantity of small oysters noticeable on my last visit. The 
information received from several residents who are actively engaged and otherwise inter- 
ested in the industry, are of the opinion that it would not be wise to entirely shut down 
the fishing privileges of this river as so many are entirely dependent on fishing oysters in 
this locality during the season, and it is a sheltered river to work in during windy and 
wild weather that many of the fishermen can earn a day's work when it is impossible to 
fish in the bay. They all come to the same conclusion : — (1.) That it would be advisable 
not to open this river for fishing before October 1, in each year. (2.) That no oysters 
less than three inches should be allowed to be landed, as the two-inch oysters which 
they claim is a legitimate size is far too small for market, that it spoils the sample and 
reduces the stock of growing oysters on their beds. (3.) That a patrol boat and other 
fishery officers should be on duty during the close season, as after lobster fishing closes, 
some men have very little to do, and there are persons who will fish oysters previous to 
the opening of the season and bed them until the season opens, this often causes a glut 
in the market, and it is only fair that all should start on the same footing. A patrol 
boat has since been engaged during the last close reason in the waters of Richmond Bay 
and I am informed has given satisfactory results. They consider, and I am also of their 
opinion, that if the above alterations were carried into effect the oyster fishery would 
prove satisfactory ; further reference to the above will be found later on in this report. 

No. If. North River. — On examining North River and Ellen's Creek, I commenced 
at the upper part of the former area and found some mud cuts just below or inside the 
boundary line, and on the tops of these beds found living oysters showing that the mud 
diggers had destroyed a portion of the bed by digging through it, and below this a coat- 
ing of mud was found over the deeper part of the beds, this might or might not have 
been caused through the sediment of the mud diggers, the beds appeared as if this 
sediment had not been there long. Lower down the beds were covered over with 
a growth of mussels, there was only one area of fair size where no mussels were 
found opposite Dr. J enkin's little creek, but from there to the bridge the area was thickly 
covered over with mussels completely covering the oysters that are growing there. I 
found several small oysters all over the area, but I have my doubts of this area ever 
being of much more value as an oyster growing ground, the mussels are very thick, and 
are growing fast, they collect so much sediment as to completely kill the oyster outright. 
These mussels would make a capital fertilizer, but I am of opinion the cost of catching 
them would be more than the farmer would care to pay for them. I did not notice 
more than half a dozen small star fish, these would be attracted by the large quantity of 
mussels growing here and would not injure the oysters. Under the above circum- 
stances I do not see that anything further can be done to this once valuable area, as the 

22— 17£ 



260 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

beds are in deep water, the channel narrow and intricate and the current is very strong 
which will not permit fishing only during slack water. The area on which no mussels 
exist should be preserved until the last and if no change occurs I do not see any reason 
from allowing the farmers to dig mud just above the bridge. 

Ellens Creek is an arm situated below the North river bridge and runs up among 
the flats, the upper part is very narrow and intricate and not much wider than the width 
of a boat at low water time as the surrounding flats run dry, but widening out to about 
30 or 40 feet where it connects with the North river. At the upper part the oysters are 
much scarcer than formerlv, and it has the appearance of the oysters dying through not 
being worked. Lower down the oysters are more plentiful, especially the small ones. A 
portion of this ground was leased to a Mr. Hughes, of Charlottetown, but I do not 
think anything has been done to improve the area. The ground was clean and a good 
current running through the channel, this is one area which if care and attention were 
given to it by any individual they might largely increase their stock, but as it is at pre- 
sent is of little value. 

In the Island of Cape Breton and Nova Scotia the following areas were examined : 

No. 1. Mira River and Catalone Lake. — In this river oysters were found to be 
growing above the Albert Bridge, which crosses the river six miles above the entrance. 
They are scattered along McDougle's shore, which is composed of a very rough, stony 
bottom and weeds growing very thick along the edges of the river. The water here is 
very brackish, as the river runs up about thirty miles above the bridge, with several 
streams running into it, and further up it is quite fresh and very soft. Under and 
around the bridge oysters are attached to both wood and stonework, also on the bottom 
which is composed of rough stones. There are large quantities of mussels growing in 
this river from the bridge down to the sea. Below the bridge off Burke's Point, 
McClennan's Point, Home's Point, McDonald's Point and Spencer's shore are a number 
of oyster beds where oysters are taken in fair quantities, the bottom consists of shells 
and gravel, but a large quantity of mussels and weeds are growing on the beds, and if 
these were removed w^ould be of great benefit to the oyster. 

At present these beds appear to be in a very dirty condition, owing to the amount 
of weeds and mussels growing on them. There is a very fair current of water running 
over these beds, which at times is comparatively clear. One thing particularly notice- 
able in this river is the quantity of oysters that grow on sticks and stakes that are 
placed for net fishing purposes, and any one could secure large quantities of young oysters 
in this way were they so inclined to devote their time to the industry. The shells of 
these oysters are thin and brittle and would not stand transit any distance. Between 
the brickyard and King's Island there is quite a bay or cove partly covered with a firm 
bottom with a growth of weeds, no oysters were found here. Lower clown on the 
opposite side of the river I examined Black Brook and found several oysters attached 
to sunken roots of trees and logs, the bottom of the river is soft and unfit for cultivating 
oysters. Oyster Cove is a bay with a very narrow entrance and scarcely any tide, the 
bottom is muddy and weedy but no oysters were found there. In some parts of the 
river the bottom is sandy with soft shell clams growing there, at other places the bottom 
is composed of soft mud. A few oysters are to be found above the Albert bridge, but 
as the water is nearly fresh they are of little or no value. The beds referred to below 
the bridge could be cleaned and improved by removing the weed and mussels from them, 
this refuse would make an excellent fertilizer for the farmer, provided they would take 
it away if it were placed on a scow. 

In Catalone Lake I found very few living oysters, the area is a large one of irregular 
shape, with several small islands scattered around ; the shores consist of rocks, stone 
and gravel, sloping off very gradually into deep water, where the bottom is covered with 
mud, the weeds are very thick around the shores. On nearly every one of the islands 
and points of land oyster shells were found, they had attached themselves to rocks and 
stones and have died there. The only place where I found any oysters alive was 
between the lower island and the mainland, these were in about eight feet of water, on 
a clean gravelly bottom, they were young and about two inches long. I examined the 
trestle work of the old bridge and did not find any indication of an oyster there, but on 
the approaches, which consisted of a stone foundation, were a number of oyster shells 



OYSTER CULTURE 



261 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

but no live ones ; small mussels and dead clam shells were found on the trestle work. 
The water was very fresh and brackish and very unpleasant to the taste ; there are a 
number of streams and brooks running into this body of water with only a small outlet 
which is often blocked up, the sea forcing a bar of sand and gravel across the entrance, 
this causes the lake to rise considerably by the fresh water running into it. The 
obstruction is caused by the building of the Sydney and Louisburg railway over the 
entrance leaving only a very small channel for the tide to run in and out, there is 
practically no rise and fall of tide in the lake, and the water remains stagnant. Origin- 
ally the entrance was much deeper and wider, allowing the salt water to penetrate and 
mix with the fresh water at the head of the lake, but now the greatest proportion of 
water is fresh, with very little salt water flowing into it. I attribute the causes of 
death to the oyster to the constantly increasing supply of fresh water, the lack of salt 
water and the continual blocking up of the entrance, causing stagnant water in the 
lake, and I do not see that anything further can be done to protect or prevent the 
oyster from becoming extinct in these waters. 

No. 2. Head of East Bay and adjacent pond . — Next T examined the head of East 
Bay between the two bridges. The lower bridge is composed of a long gravelly bar 
nearly one mile in length, extending diagonally from side to side with a channel in the 
middle where the bridge is spanned over the opening. On the east side of this bar 
large quantities of small oysters are to be found growing in from two to ten feet of 
water, when the bottom of the bay is reached, which is rather steep, the latter is cov- 
ered over with soft mud. 

The area of this pond or space between the bridges is about one mile long, and 
nearly half a mile wide, the bottom varies from about ten to fifteen feet deep, and con- 
sists of a sandy bottom in some places and mud of a soft nature in others. Over this 
whole area a large number of small beds are found, many of them being no larger than 
a row-boat, with clusters of very large oysters growing upon them, many of the oysters 
being a foot long. On the south west side is a large sandy flat covered with weeds and 
oysters of a smaller size scattered ever the whole area. At the western end of the pond 
oysters are found along both sides of the shore, also on some narrow ridges lying in 
about three fathoms of water, where large quantities of oysters have been taken, 
although they are scarce now. The whole of this area is covered with long eel-grass and 
sea- weed, which makes the bottom very dirty. It is necessary to have the whole of 
this weed removed to save the oyster beds, and it is really surprising to find so many 
live oysters where the bottom is so dirty, although there is a large number of dead 
shells on the beds. If more time and care had been devoted to these grounds the 
returns would have been much larger. Oysters were found attached to both bridges, also 
to trees and stumps which were found lying in the water. There is a large number 
of mussels growing around the lower bridge, also on some of the oyster beds. No oysters 
of any importance were found along the shores in the bay below the bridge. 

This weed could be removed and the ground cleaned by the use of rakes and 
dredges with the aid of a steamer. The bridge has no draw to it, which I consider 
it should have, as it debars small vessels from going any further up the bay, 
but an opening could be made, if the department should take any steps to have this 
area cleaned. The channel is also very shallow, but I think a steamer could be got 
through at high water. If this channel was deeper the beds would be much cleaner 
than they are at present, as the sediment would be carried off the beds by the current ; 
this is one reason why I attribute the beds being so dirty. Some fishermen have 
caught quite a lot of oysters here in past seasons, but they are much scarcer now than 
usual. Several Indians fish around these shores and pick up everything very clean, 
irrespective of size, which adds to the scarcity. It is sheltered from every wind that 
blows, and with a deeper channel and clean bottom, oysters ought to still grow in good 
quantities. 

Big Pond is situated further down the bay, and there I found a few oysters scat- 
tered all around the shores of this pond, which is about one mile long and a quarter of 
a mile wide. From the western end a long bar of coarse beach, which forms the outside 
boundary and runs in an easterly direction, where there is a large entrance on the east- 
ern side. The shore is very steep along this bar. On the inside the water is very 



262 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

shallow and the bottom flat, thickly covered with eel-grass and sea-weed. Oysters are 
caught here in shallow water, but very few are taken in a greater depth than five feet, 
and as the water deepens the mud becomes very much softer. The oysters found were 
of a fair size Both whites and Indians fish here ; the mode being by a dip-net, and 
now they are very scarce. It is my opinion that over- fishing is the cause of the deple- 
tion in this pond, and although larger quantities are reported as caught from Big Pond, 
yet that is only in name, as oysters taken from other areas are often sold as Big Pond 
oysters. The other ponds are very similar in their formation, although this is the only 
one which has an entrance, and I do not see that any further action can be taken here, 
as there is no area suitable for cultivation. 

Long Pond is about a mile below Big Pond, and upon examination I found oysters 
scattered all along the inside and at both ends to the outer side of pond. This area is 
about one mile long and a quarter of a mile wide. The middle of the pond is about 
four fathoms deep and is composed of soft mud, the outer side is formed of a very coarse 
beach thrown up by the action of the sea and is very narrow. The water of the bay is 
very shallow on the outside of this bar but is very steep on the inside and scarcely any 
oysters are found growing on its sides. 

At the south-west comer the flats run off for a considerable distance, it is muddy 
and eel-grass is growing on the bottom. The sides of the pond are composed of large 
stones, and on the eastern end there is a sandy and muddy flat with about ten feet of 
water over it. Fair fishing has been carried on in this pond in the past. At one time 
there was a channel running through the outside bar, but now it is closed up by the 
action of the sea. There is only one place where the water runs over the bar with not 
more than two feet at the most. The oysters are large and only a small quantity are 
taken each year. The Indians who have a reservation on the opposite side of the bay 
also fish here, chiefly with dip-nets. This is done in tine weather and as a rule they are 
picked up pretty clean. I do not see that any further action can be taken here as there 
is no entrance for a boat to get either in or out. 

Irish Cove Pond lies about three miles below Long Pond, and I found this area to be 
nearly half a mile long and about two hundred yards wide. The sea is encroaching all 
the time, throwing the bar in and closing up the western end. The length of this pond 
has decreased a quarter of a mile within the last sixteen years. The entrance is entirely 
blocked up and no boats can either get in or out, they all have to be hauled over the 
bar. The sea breaks over the bar in places with about eighteen inches water at high 
water time. On the inside of this pond we found it to be covered with young oysters 
lying from the shore-line to the mud, the width varying from ten to one hundred yards, 
the widest part being at the eastern end, and on the outside of the pond along the bar 
for about a quarter the length from the east end is covered with growing oysters ; 
further west the bar is very steep and no oysters are found. A few oysters were growing 
at the western end of pond, but these, I was informed, had been transplanted from 
eastern side of pond when small by Mr. Malcolm McLean, and are growing nicely. 
There is about four fathoms water in the middle of this pond, with a soft bottom. The 
flats on the eastern end run nearly to the middle of the pond and is of a sandy and 
muddy nature, oysters are growing thick here. Very few men fish in this pond and no 
Indians have done so up to the present. I consider this to be in a much better condition 
than either of the other ponds, and unless over-fished I see no reason why a constant 
supply may not be taken from this area each season. 

N~o. 8. Malagawatcht and Orangedale Bays. — A large area of ground near the head 
of Malagawatcht Bay comprising several acres situated on the eastern side of Lou's 
Island, and bounded on the*north by Shallop Island, the bottom consists of a mixture 
of sand, gravel and small stones, covered over with weed and eel-grass, sloping very 
gradually from the shore to a depth of ten or eleven feet water when the bottom 
becomes softer. There is a good current of water running over this area and oysters 
are found to be very thinly scattered around here. The place appears to be naturally 
suited for oyster growing, but the weeds are over-running the area and there seems 
to be a lack of shells on these grounds. 

Another smaller area was found on the southern side of Lou's Island and stretches 
into a bay towards Sandy Point on the mainland. The bottom is of a sandy nature, 



OYSTER CULTURE 



263 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

C overed with weed and eel-grass, with a few oysters scattered here and there. The 
°urrent is not so strong here as this area runs into a hollow of the land and the water is 
sluggish in its movements. 

At the head of Malagawatcht Bay, where the River Dennys empties itself, is 
another large area of firm ground off McLean's Point, the bottom is very flat, and of a 
sandy, stony and gravelly nature, weeds and eel-grass are growing here, stretching out 
from the shore to about ten feet water, several small oysters were found along the 
shore to about two feet deep, these oysters grow fast, but are picked up very clean in 
the fall of the year. Oysters are also to be found thinly scattered over the above area ; 
these grounds could be greatly improved if attended to. " ir " 

Two other areas at this end of the bay were found, one situated between McLean's 
Island and the mainland, the other off John McAuley's shore ; the soil is of a sandy 
nature, no shells noticeable, and covered with eel-grass, the bottom is comparatively 
even, the depth gradually increasing when it becomes much softer. 

At the lower part of the bay, near the Indian Reserve, there is another large flat 
area, the depth varying from five to eleven feet water, the bottom is composed of sand 
covered over with eel-grass ; little or no fishing is done here, as it is carried on in 
shoaler water. 

Just above the former area and below the burying grounds, is a bank or middle 
ground varying from five to eleven feet deep ; it is long but narrow, the bottom is firm 
and composed of sand, stones, gravel, and covered over with mussels and weeds'. This 
area is not suited for the cultivation of oysters on account of the large number of 
mussels which are growing here, and was previously examined when I was here before. 
A spit of land off Plaster Island was also examined, but was found to be too small, 
rough and unsuitable. 

One or two other areas were examined between islands around the boom, but the 
soil was found to be too soft and unsuitable for the cultivation of oysters. 

At the entrance of Orangedale Bay there is a middle ground, but the bottom is 
composed of large stones, and is not suitable for cultivating oysters, although a few are 
occasionally taken from here, but not in large numbers. 

The oysters in this locality appear to be scarce, and I am of the opinion it is caused 
through over fishing. The whites and Indians both fish in these waters, using both 
rakes and dip nets, and by the end of the season the oysters are fished up very clean. 

I am also of opinion the most suitable areas for cultivating are those on the 
eastern side of Lou's Island, and off McLean's Point at the head of the bay. 

Should the department take any further action in this matter, a number of small 
oysters could be picked up around the shores of some of the islands and deposited in 
deeper water, as many of them must perish during the winter months if left in such 
shallow water, but before transplanting them it is necessary to have the weed and eel- 
grass removed, and the bottom cleaned up generally. And after the area is cleaned, it 
would require a layer of shells to be placed over the grounds, and that appears to be 
the greatest difficulty, as there seem to be none in the locality. 

No. 4.. Nina's Basin, N.S.— About two miles below Kingsport, thera is a ridge 
running across the bay with about twenty fee 1 ; of water at low tide, deepening to thirty- 
five or forty feet. This is considered a good fishing ground with hook and line, and 
upon examination found the bottom to consist of a large mussel bed with spongy weeds 
or fungus, some small stones and a few scallops. The area clear of the ridge appeared 
to be of a firm, sandy bottom, with large stones scattered around. In the south 
channel leading to Wolfville, the water is deeper and the soil inclined to be softer, with 
a layer of mud on the surface. The same bottom is to be found above Kingsport 
wharf. About half a mile below the wharf, the bottom is of a hard, sandy nature with 
a few shells and small stones, and from three to six feet at low water spring tides. The 
low water mark extends a long way from high water mark, as there is a considerable 
rise and fall of tide (about 60 feet), the shore sloping very gradually. The soil is of a 
hard, sandy nature, mixed with a few small stones and shells, and lower down the bay 
there is a large area of flat and shelving rocks which extend to low water mark. 

Several kinds of shell-fish exist in these waters, viz. : mussels, winkles, whelks (long 
and round), hard and soft shell clams, razor fish, scallops, borer and crepedula, &c, 



264 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

besides weeds and sponges, but no sign or trace of an oyster was found. The water 
appeared rather salt, which I am inclined to believe is not very favourable to an oyster 
taken from where the water is much fresher, 

I met a gentleman in Kingsport (Mr. Ray, of Kentville) who was trying to catch 
the spat from oysters by artificial means, he placed some oysters during the month of 
May in a tank of water, adding fresh water each day, and having a quantity of shells sus- 
pended which he hoped the spat would attach themselves to, he watched them almost 
daily until the following September, and finding no spat he removed the oysters and 
found they had grown while in the tank. 

No. 5, Annapolis Basin. — On my arrival here I found some persons had been 
experimenting above the Narrows, at Annapolis, the oysters had grown for two seasons 
and on the third season they found a few crushed oysters, the others had disappeared, 
and on further inquiries from other sources found, that during a severe winter the ice 
would pile and become solid above the Narrows, which would settle on the shores and 
damage anything lying within two or three feet of low water mark, hence the result of 
the above experiment. 

I then examined around Goat Island and the flats below at the entrance of Moose 
or Clements port river. I found an area which I think would be suitable, situated 
between Clam shell reef and a spit which runs out from the north east spit of Goat 
Island which forms a deep bay, the bottom is of a sandy nature with fair quantities of 
clam shells scattered over the bottom with about four feet at low water time, the water 
was clear and the bottom could be distinctly seen in that depth of water. There is also 
another area suitable, off the western part of Goat Island between the ledges and Clam 
shell reef, the bottom is very firm and apparently free from silt, and is out of the 
strength of the swift current which runs in the channel but quite strong enough to keep 
the area clean. The flats which run off from the shore gradually deepen until they 
reach the channel and areas could be selected anywhere below Goat Island. I would 
also suggest at the mouth of Moose River as there is a stream of fresh water running 
out at low tide. The above mentioned areas are not oyster beds but simply a firm 
bottom, and although other kinds of shell-fish exist, it may not prove satisfactory or 
suitable for oyster growing. Shells would be tequired to be laid previous to planting 
which would form a foundation to place the oysters upon, also to act as spat collectors. 
These shells could be obtained from Clam shell reef which runs off Goat Island and dries 
at about half tide, and scows or boats would be required to remove them to the areas 
intended for planting. 

After submitting the above report of Annapolis Basin, I received further instruc- 
tions from the department to prepare areas for planting, and proceeded there as soon 
as possible to carry out the operations as suggested. 

I secured the services of a scow which was placed on Clam shell reef on the ebb 
tide and loaded with shells during low water and on the following tide it was hauled 
off with long warps to the site laid off on the north side of Goat Island between the 
north-east spit and Clam shell reef, and a thick coating of shells have been spread over 
the area. I had one or two favourable opportunities of examining and seeing the work 
which was in progress and was perfectly satisfied with the results of preparation. So 
far only one bed was prepared for planting on account of the lateness of the season, the 
same reason also prevented me from planting any oysters, but I do not consider this 
any drawback, as transplanting oysters late in the fall there is a large amount of risk 
with very little to gain, while if planted in the spring they have everything in their 
favour, with a rising temperature the oysters will start growing and become acclamatized 
before another winter sets in. 

The other areas were too far off to deposit the shells without the aid of steam 
power, and this I was unable to secure, and my time was fully occupied in preparing the 
above area. 

Change of Season. 

This year the close season for oysters was extended from September 16th to 23rd, 
and appears to have met with the general approval of all interested in the indus- 



OYSTER CULTURE 



265 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

try, as many fishermen have expressed a desire to have the fishing season made 
shorter, as about the middle of September the weather is generally fine and warm, the 
result is that large quantities of oysters are caught, the markets are glutted, the price 
falls, the fishermen have all the work and very little pay for the labour. The oysters 
too during the summer months grow very fast, the shells at the edges are thin and 
brittle, and the longer they can be left in the water the harder they become as the 
temperature decreases, they will also stand packing and transit much better. The 
oyster itself also improves the longer it is left after spawning and the water becomes 
cooler. 

Improvement of Oyster Areas. 

Nearly the whole of the oyster areas in the maritime provinces are termed natural 
beds, that is oysters are found growing on certain areas without the assistance of man, 
every one has the same right and privilege to fish upon these areas which are often 
deteriorated by over -fishing and other causes. 

It is public property so to speak and every one helps themselves without a thought 
or care of what becomes of these beds in the future, the demand is becoming greater 
each year for the oyster, and it is our duty to try and preserve these valuable areas as 
far as lies in our power. The shelling of private beds at the right season of the year 
enhances the value of the ground, and often these shells are found to be covered with 
oyster spat, which largely increases the stock on the beds. The oyster shell is the 
natural collector of the spat, and if a system could be adopted by which all the dead 
shells lying around our shores could be collected and piled in heaps, and at the com- 
mencement of the spatting season be deposited on the beds I am sure it would add 
largely to the stock already on the beds and tend to increase the size as well. If the 
fishermen would only co-operate and assist in collecting these shells I would respectfully 
suggest, that the department take part and spread the shells over areas in the locality 
where the shells were collected, and I feel sure the expense would be comparatively 
small considering the benefit the fishermen would derive in the future. It is a true 
saying that, what is everybody's business is nobody's business, but I think that such an 
arrangement could be made with the department, their officers and the fishermen, and 
probably after consideration some steps might be taken in this direction as it is of vital 
importance to the industry. 

Size limit. 

Another means of improving the stock sent to market is to increase the 
standard of size limit. I have so often reported to the department on this matter 
that I hope before another season opens the size limit for small oysters will be nothing 
less than three inches. By so doing it will improve the sample sent to market, and 
what is left on the beds will be fine material for the following season's catch. Unless 
the oysters are picked and selected the samples are found to be very small and have the 
appearance of their requiring another season's growth before they should be shipped. 
The small ones that are culled out are also wasted. This matter requires the depart- 
ment's serious consideration. 



266 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 




OYSTER CULTURE 



267 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

Steamer jor Oyster Culture. 

In last year's report I pointed out the desirability of having a suitable steamer 
built for the purposes of cleaning and examining the oyster areas existing in the lower 
provinces, As this area is a large one extending along the northern shores of New- 
Brunswick: and Nova Scotia, also Prince Edward Island and Cape Breton, it has for 
some years appeared absolutely necessary to have a steamboat that is suitable in every 
respect. My past experience of boats of this description has given me a good idea of 
what is actually required, and as the construction of a steamboat was officially santioned, 
instructions were given to have plans and specifications drawn up, tenders have been 
asked for, and after some correspondence with the New-Burrell-Johnson Iron Company, 
Limited, of Yarmouth, N.S., the contract has just been awarded to the above firm, and 
there is every certainty she will be completed about the middle of May in time for 
my next season's work. 

I have the honour to be, sir, your obedient servant, 

ERNEST KEMP, 

Oyster Expert, 



268 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



APPENDIX No. 13. 



REPORT OF TEE FISHERIES PROTECTION SERVICE OF CANADA 

FOR THE SEASON OF 1901 
By COMMANDER O. G. V. SPAIN. 



Ottawa, December 31, 1901. 

To the Honourable 

Minister of Marine and Fisheries, &c, &c. 

Sir, — I have the honour to report on the work of the Fisheries Protection and 
Fisheries Intelligence Bureau services, under my charge for the past season as follows : — 
The vessels comprising the fleet are shown in the following table : — 

Acadia, Commander O. G. V. Spain ; 

La Canadienne, Commander W. Wakeham ; 

Curlew, Captain Pratt ; 

Petrel, Captain Dunn ; 

Osprey, Captain Knowlton : 

Kingfisher, Captain Kent ; 

Brant, Captain McKinnon ; 

Stanley, Captain Brown ; 

Constance, Captain May ; 

Quadra, Captain Walbran. 
This last named vessel was employed, when occasion required, as a fishery protec- 
tion cruiser on the Pacific coast. 

This season, on account of the extra work in reference to patrolling, necessitated 
by the stringent enforcement of the lobster regulations in different localities, (there are 
now six different seasons for legally catching lobsters on various parts of the coast), the 
two vessels Minto and Brant were placed at my disposal for a short period, during the 
very busy time. 

The patrols of the different cruisers were generally as follows : — 

The Acadia patrolling the coasts of Nova Scotia, Cape Breton, Prince Edward 

Island and part of New Brunswick and Quebec, and as usual, generally superintending 

the fleet. 

La Canadienne. — This vessel works independently of the rest of the fleet, and was 
under the charge of Commander Wakeham. Her usual patrol was on the Labrador and 
Quebec coast. Commander Wakeham's report will be forwarded with that of the fishery 
inspectors. 

Curlew. — This vessel is employed in the Bay of Fundy and on the Nova Scotia 
coast, and has done excellent work in many ways. 

Petrel. — Again employed in Lake Erie. She has also been very serviceable on occa- 
sions, in assisting the lighthouse and buoy service. 



FISHER F PROTECTION SERVICE 



269 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

Osprey, — This schooner's station was altered for this season and she patrolled the 
Prince Edward Island and Cape Breton coasts, with headquarters at Souris and George- 
town. 

Kingfisher. — Stationed on the Nova Scotia and Cope Breton coasts, with head- 
quarters at Canso. Both these schooners have done good work. 

Brant. — This vessel has been principally engaged inputting a stop to illegal lobster 
fishing in Northumberland Strait and on the Prince Edward Island coast. 

Constance. — This vessel has been entirely under the control of the Customs 
Department, and I understand has most ably carried out her instructions in putting a 
stop to smuggling. 

A report of the details of the work of each captain will be found herewith, 
together with the more particular movements of the ship under his command. 

In addition to the above named cruisers, three tugs were again employed this 
year, the Davies, the Florence C. and Sea Bird. The first belongs to the department, the 
other two were chartered vessels. These patrol boats were commanded by experienced 
officers. The Davies from one of the cruisers, and the Florence C. and Sea Bird by 
their own captains. The Florence C. was attached to the Curlew for work, and the Sea 
Bird to the Kingfisher for some time, the Davies being employed mostly as an attendant 
on the Acadia. 

I found that fishermen obeyed the regulations for the protection of the lobsters 
much better than in previous years. This may be due to the very strict patrol that was 
kept up all around the coasts. 

My thanks are due to the captains, officers and men of the service, who have per- 
formed their arduous duties to my satisfaction. 

The season, taking it all round, has not been an eventful one, very few United 
States mackerel seiners being in North Bay, the captains of the cruisers understanding 
their work, and the Masters of fishing vessels fairly well understanding and obeying the 
rules, as to exactly what rights they have in our ports. 



Schedule of United States Fishing Vessels to which Licenses were issued under the 
Act entitled ' An Act respecting Fishing Vessels of the United States of America ' 
during the Year 1901. 



Name of Vessel. 



Salem, Mass 
Gloucester 



Samuel R. Crane 

Arbutus 

Admiral Dewey 

John L. Nicholson 

Columbia 

Essex. 

Valkyria 

Fern wood ! 

Winona 

Maggie and May 

Levanter 

L. A. Munroe 

Blue Jacket 

Win. E. Morrissey 

Senator Gardner. . 

Talisman 

Loring B. Haskell 

Parthia 

Maxime Elliott 

Mabel D. Hines IBeverly 

Margaret I n 



Port of Registry. 



Beverly 
Gloucester 



Boston 
Gloucester 



Tonnage. 



52 
86 
78 
92 
89 
84 

104 
96 
78 
88 
28 
84 
86 
93 
94 
88 
67 
77 
75 
92 

107 



Port of Issue. 



Yarmouth, N.S 

Halifax, N.S 

If 

Yarmouth, N.S 

ii .... 
Pubnico, N.S 

M ..... 
II .... 

Yarmouth, N.S 

ii .... 

Pubnico, N.S. . . . . . 

Tusket, N.S 

ti 

Yarmouth, N.S 

Shelburne, N.S. .. 
Digby, N.S. . . 
Tusket Wedge, N.S 

Lockeport, N.S 

Tusket, N. S 



Fee. 



$ ots. 

78 00 
129 00 
117 00 
138 00 
133 50 
126 00 
156 00 
144 00 
117 00 
132 00 

42 00 
126 00 
129 00 
i:;<.> 50 
141 00 
132 00 
100 
115 
112 
138 00 
160 50 



50 
50 
50 



270 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Schedule of United States Fishing Vessels to which Licenses were issued — Continued. 



Name of Vessel. 



Port of Registry. 



Tonnage. 



Belfast 
Gloucester 



Eleazar Boynton Gloucester 

Masconoma 

Helen F. Whitten.... 

Dora A. Lawson 

Thalia 

Margaret 

Shenandoah 

E. E. Wetherell 

Puritan 

Lizzie Maud 

EllaG. King 

W. H. Moody 

Josie M. Calderwood 

American 

C. W. Babson 

J. J. Flaherty 

John Nye Yjnehaven, _Me 

Alice R. Lawson. . . . 

A. E. Whyland 

Mystery 

Meteor 

Golden Hope 

Lizzie M. Stanwood 
Anna L. Sanborn . . . 

Ruth L. Martin Boston 

Patriot 'Gloucester 

Ella M. Goodwin . . 

Gloriana 

Marshall L. Adams 

Anglo Saxon 

Sea Fox 

Judique 

Frank G. Rich .... 
Edith M. Prior. . . 

Vigilant 

Joseph Rowe 

New England 

Irving Leslie 

Harry L. Belden Boston, 

Bohemia Gloucester 

Bucksport, Me . . 
Gloucester, Mass 



Gloucester, Mass 



Beverly 



Provincetown n 
Gloucester ■■ 
Provincetown ii 
Gloucester ■■ 
Booth Bay, Me.. 
Gloucester, Mass 



Bucksport, Me . . 

Mass 



M. B. Stetson 

Nereid 

Preceptor 

Epes Tarr Gloucester, Mass 

Virginia ■■ " 

Martha A. Bradly Eastport, Me. . . 

Elector . > Gloucester, Mass 

Lewis H. Giles 



Cosmos . 



South West 
Harbour 

Edith Emery Boston 

Tattler \ Gloucester 

Agnes 

Edward Trevoy 

A. S. Caswell 

Orpheus 

Oliver F. Kilham Salem 

Dido Provincetown 

Georgie Campbell Gloucester 

Emma and Helen 

Helen G. Wells 

Victor 



Total 



63 
67 
92 
93 
78 
79 
77 
81 
62 
48 
52 
48 
86 
99 
62 
124 
39 
85 
96 
89 
96 
75 
76 
17 
63 
58 
86 
76 
91 
72 
71 
89 
72 
78 
87 
97 
59 
71 
117 
86 
94 
69 
89 
48 
81 
53 
84 
94 

25 
86 
135 
75 
66 
46 
74 
43 
58 
78 
62 
66 
75 

6,296 



Port of Issue. 



Pubnico, N.S. . . 
Lockeport, N.S. 
Yarmouth, N.S. 
Liverpool, N.S. . 

Can so, N.S 

Shelburne, N.S.. 



Lockeport, N.S. 
Shelburne, N.S.. 



Halifax, N.S.. . 
Lockeport, N.S. 
Liverpool, N.S.. 
Pubnico, N.S. .. 



Yarmouth, N.S. 
Tusket, N.S.... 
Pubnico, N.S. .. 



Halifax, N.S....... 

Lockeport, N.S 

Yarmouth, N S 

Shelburne, N.S 

Arichat, N.S 

Amherst, M.I., Que. 
ii 

Canso, N.S 

Amherst, M.I., Que. 

St. Peters, N.S 

Canso, N.S 

Halifax, N.S 

Amherst, M.I., Que. 



St. Peters, N.S 

Canso, N.S 

Tusket. N.S 

St. Peters, N.S 

Halifax, N.S 

Port Hawkesbury, N.S. 

Yarmouth, N.S 

Canso, N.S 

Liverpool, N.S 

Lower Argyle, N.S 



Digby, N.S 

Canso, N.S 

Tusket, N.S 

Tusket Wedge, N.S. 
Canso, N.S 



Liverpool, N.S 

North Sydney, N.S 



Canso, N.S 

North Sydney, N.S. 



Fee. 



% cts. 
94 50 
100 50 

138 00 

139 50 

117 00 

118 50 
115 50 
121 50 

93 00 
72 00 

78 00 
72 00 

129 00 
148 50 

93 00 
186 00 

58 50 
127 50 
144 00 
133 50 

144 00 
112 50 
114 00 

25 50 

94 50 

87 00 

129 35 
114 35 
136 50 
108 00 
106 50 
133 50 
108 00 
117 20 

130 70 

145 70 

88 70 
106 50 
175 50 
129 00 
141 00 
103 50 
133 50 

72 00 
121 50 

79 50 
126 00 
141 00 

37 50 
129 00 
202 50 
112 50 
99 00 
69 00 

111 00 
64 50 
87 00 

117 00 
93 00 
99 00 

112 50 

£9,445 50 



Number of vessels 82 

Amount of tonnage 6,296 

Amount received for fees 89,445 50 



FISHERY PROTECTION SERVICE 



271 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

List of United States Fishing Vessels which have entered Canadian Ports from October 
31, 1900, to October 31, 1901 ; showing net tonnage, number of men on board and 
the number of times each Vessel entered the several Ports. 



u 
- 

£ 
a 

55 



Name of Vessel. 



1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35' 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53| 

g 

56 

57 

58 

59! 

60 

61 

62 



A. E. Whyland 

A. M. Nicholson. . . . 

A. S. Caswell 

A. T. Gifford 

Ada S. Babson 

Admiral Dewey 

Agnes 

Agnes G. Gleason. . 
Alice M. Parson 

Alice R. Lawson 

Alva 

American 

Amy Knight 

Anglo Saxon 

Anna.Sanbourne. . . . 
Annie E. Lane. . : . . 
Annie G. Quinn .... 
Annie Greenlow .... 

Annie Wesley 

Arbitrator 

Arbatus 

A rcadia 

Areola 

Argo 

Arthur Binney 

Arthur D. Storey. . . 

Askona 

A tlanta 

Belle Franklin 

Bertha D- Nikerson . 

Bertha May 

Kessie M. Devine.. . . 

Blanche 

Blue Jacket 

Bomehia 

Braganza 

Canopus 

Carleton Belle 

Caroline Vought 

Carrie C 

Carrie N. Balson 

Cecil H. Low 

Centennial 

Columbia 

Conductor 

Corona 

Corsair 

Cosmos 

D. A. Wilson 

Dawson City 

Declator 

Dido 

Dora A. Lawson 

Dreadnaught 

E. C. Hussey 

Edith Emery 

Edith L. Thomson . . 

Edith M. Prior 

Edward A. Perkins.. 
Edward A. Rich. . . . 

Edward Trevoy 

Effie M. Morrisey . . . 



to 

c 
c 

o 



= 

CD 



- 
-2 



3 



96 


20 


100 


20 


46 


17 


58 


16 


99 


22 


78 


18 


75 


18 


44 


15 


42 


16 


85 


18 


74 


18 


99 


18 


64 


19 


72 


18 


17 


12 


29 


15 


79 


18 


69 


18 


65 


14 


72 


18 


86 


18 


90 


19 


85 


18 


79 


18 


112 


20 


75 


18 


97 


18 


72 


18 


75 


16 


89 


21 


47 


16 


91 


18 


78 


17 


86 


18 


86 


17 


67 


16 


47 


16 


104 


22 


48 


16 


71 


16 


62 


18 


75 


14 


86 


17 


89 


19 


51 


14 


82 


20 


79 


18 


25 


12 


60 


17 


49 


18 


92 


20 


58 


16 


93 


20 


74 


19 


41 


18 


86 


16 


20 


7 


78 


19 


86 


18 


79 


16 


66 


16 


83 


20 



| Arichat. 


§ 

be 

' - 

- 

- 
- 


Q 

a 

cS 

o 


| Georgetown, P.E.I. 


| Halifax. 


Liscombe. 


Liverpool. 


| Lockeport. 


| Louisbourg. 


| Lunenburg. 


a 

>> 
- 

a 
~z 

— 

— 

z 


| Port Hawkesbury. 


| Port Hood. 


Port Mulgrave. 


Shelburne. 


: : : : | Souns, P.E.I. 


— ' 

- 

— 

— 

i 

9 


Yarmouth. 










2 
1 
2 
1 
1 


1 

i 


















1 
1 




1 










1 


9 
o 

z 
























2 






















1 
















1 
1 

1 
1 




4 












1 




























































1 
1 


















3 


3 
1 






















9 




2 


1 


1 

2 
1 
1 


1 




















Q 
O 














* ■ 






























4l . 


1 
1 
















2 






1 
5 




























• • 


n 




3 










































1 

J. 




















9 




2 


1 
















1 








1 










































1 
1 


















2 


1 


2 
1 




1 


1 




1 


1 

X 




1 


2 
















1 
1 


























1 








1 
2 
2 










1 




1 


1 

3 
2 








1 
























1 






































1 

1 






























1 




















2 


1 
1 




































1 




2 






















1 




































1 










































2 
1 












o 
o 

i 
























































3 
4 
















2 




•4 


i 














1 
















i 
i 




























1 

2 
2 


2 
























1 






















2 








9 
a 




1 




2 




i 


A. 




















1 






















1 


1 


1 

J- 

o 
o 

1 












A 






1 










1 






2 




1 
























2 






























1 




9 




















2 
























1 
1 


























































1 




























1 


















1 
1 


























1 










1 




1 


















1 


















































1 

i 






4 
























1 




1 
























i 




2 
1 
















1 








4 
1 

5 
2 








1 


























2 
3 
1 


1 
























2 






2 






1 




















1 













272 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

List of United States Fishing Vessels which have entered Canadian Ports from October 

31, 1900, to October 31, 1901— Continued. 



u 

CD 

s 

3 



03 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 
71 
72 
73 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 
80 
81 
82 
83 
84 
85 
86 
87 
88 
89 
90 
91 
92 
93 
94 
95 
96 
97 
98 
99 
100 
101 
102 
103 
104 
105 

lot; 

107 
108 
109 
110 
111 
112 
113 
114 
115 
116 
117 
118 
119 
120 
121 
122 
123 
124 
125 



Name of Vessel. 



Eleazer Boynton 

Electa A. Eaton 

Elector 

Elenora 

Eizabeth N 

Eleza B. Campbell . . 
Kliza H. Park.sLurst . 
Ella G. King. . .. 
Eella M. Goodwi'i 
Ellen F. Gleason .... 

Elise M. Smith 

Emma E. Wetherell. . 
Emma VV. Brown. . 
Emma and Ellen.. . 

Epes Tarr 

Essex 

F. W. Homans 

Fanny Hayden 

Fernwood 

Flaherty 

Florence 

Frank G. Rich 

George E. Lane 

George F. Edmunds. . 
Georgie Campbell. . . . 

Gladiator 

Gladstone 

Gloriana 

Golden Hope 

Golden Rod 

Gossip 

Grace Darling 

Grayling 

Harry L. Belden 

Harvard 

Harvester 

Hatti£ A. Heckman. . 

Hatie L. Trask 

Hatie M. Graham. . . . 
Hattie Weston ... 
Hattie and Lottie. . . . 

Hazel Oneita 

Helen F. Whittin 

Helen G. Wells 

Helen M. Gould 
Henry M. Stanley. . . 
Horace B. Parker 

Illinois 

Independence 

Indiana 

Iolanthe 

Irving Leslie 

James R. Clark 

Jennie B. Hodgdon . . 
John A. McGuire . . . 
John L. Nicholson . . . 

John M. Keen 

John Nye 

Joseph P. Johnson. . . 

Joseph Rowe 

Joseph W. Duffkin. . . 

Joesph Warren 

Josie M. Calderwood . 



CD 

to 

s 

o 



cd 



s 



u 

cd 

£ 
3 

is 



63 


18 


73 


14 


84 


18 


85 


17 


102 


20 


611 


18 


84 


18 


71 


18 


86 


20 


42 


16 


83 


20 


82 


16 


7-i 


16 


62 


18 


48 


15 


84 


17 


11 


17 


20 


13 


96 


18 


124 


22 


63 


14 


72 


16 


73 


14 


110 


19 


78 


20 


75 


18 


74 


15 


76 


18 


75 


18 


98 


18 


91 


20 


47 


14 


87 


19 


117 


20 


76 


19 


76 


20 


72 


20 


48 


13 


105 


19 


98 


21 


96 


17 


73 


18 


92 


19 


66 


18 


99 


21 


83 


18 


62 


20 


78 


20 


102 


21 


88 


22 


49 


14 


71 


17 


66 


16 


85 


20 


61 


17 


92 


18 


61 


14 


58 


14 


93 


18 


97 


16 


80 


19 


49 


11 


86 


20 



Arichat. 


Barrington. 


Canso. 


Georgetown, P.E.I. 


I Halifax. 


Lisconibe. 


Liverpool. 


— 

o 

— 


Li misl ii mrg. 


si 

3 
X. 
B 

CD 

a 

3 
, -i 
i— 


North Sidney. 


Port Hawkesbury. 


TZ 
O 

o 

= 

o 
— 


Port Mulgrave. 


<a5 
5 

a; 
& 
CO 


Souris, P.E.I. 


— 

CD 
— 

- 
> 


Yarmouth. 






2 




1 




2 








1 








i 




















1 












































2 


























1 


3 
















i 




































i 




















1 






































1 




1 








4 
















1 




1 
















4 






i 






1 




1 














1 






















1 




2 
























































1 




















■1 




2 








1 




































1 












1 




2 






1 






1 


















4 


1 




























l 






2 




1 












1 




































• 










l 




































l 






4 






1 










1 












































1 
















1 




2 
































1 












] 










































1 
















1 












































1 




1 








1 
























1 


























1 
































3 




1 














1 






3 












4 




2 




3 










2 


i 




2 












91., 




i 






1 




2 
























i 




















1 










1 






































1 






























l 


























1 






1 












l 




1 




1 
























1 




2 




3 


i 














4 


















1 


i 


































1 
































l 






































1 






































i 






























2 




1 
















1 


























1 














4 






1 
























2 




















2 




1 




1 












1 


















i 












4 






























1 


















1 






l 












1 






2 






















2 






















1 








2 














4 




















1 
















1 
















1 






2 






















2 












i 






























l 


1 
















1 
























1 
























al 














1 








1 






2 














1 


l 


































3 




1 
















1 


1 




1 










1 
















2 






































3 














l 


3 














1 






















l 






























1 


4 












2 









o 
H 



FISHERY PROTECTION SERVICE 



273 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



List of United States Fishing Vessels which have entered at Canadian Ports from 
October 31, 1900, to October 31, 1901, &c— Continued. 



Name of Vessel. 



5 
- 



126 Jubilee 

127 Judique 

128 J uniata 

129 Kearsarge 

130 Kentucky 

131 Latona 

132 Lavanter 

133 Lawrence A. Munro 

134 Lawrence Murdoch . 

135 Lemuel E. Spinney . 

136 Lena and Maud .... 

137 Lewis H. Giles 

13S Lizzie M. Stanwood 

139 Lizzie Maud 

140 Loring B. Haskell 

141 Lorna Doone 

142 Lottie G. Howard . . . 

143 Lottie G. Marchant . 

144 Lucille 

145 Lucinda I. Lowell. . 

146 M. B. Stetson 

147 |M. H. Perkins. 
148 
149 
150 
151 
152 
153 
154 
155 
156 
157 



M. S. Ayer 

Mabel D. Hines 

Mabel Leigh ton 

Madonna 

Maggie and May 

Manount 

Margaret 

Margett 

Marget Mather 

Marguerite 

158' Marguerite Haskins 

159 Marsala 

160 Marshall L. Adams 

161 Martha A. Bradley 

162 Martha D. Nickerson. . . . 

163 Mary A. Gleason 

164 Mary G. Rowell 

165 Mascanoma 

166 Matthew Keaney ...... 

167 Mattie Winship 

168 Maud M. Story 

1 ' >: » Maxime Elliott 

170 Meteor 

171 Minnie Davis 

172 Mist 

173 Mystery 

174 Nannie C. Bohlin 

175 Nellie Dixon 

176 Nellie M. Snow 

177 Nelson Y. McFarland . . . 

178 Nerrid 

179 New England 

180 Niagara 

181 Norman Fisher 

182|Norumbega 

183 Norvahoe 

184'Olga 

185 Oliver F. Killam 

186j01iver Wendell Holmes. . 

187 Oregon 

188;Orpheus 

22—18 



Net Tonnage. 


Number of Men. 


1 Arichat. 


s 

c 
— 

-A 
— 


o 

CO 

= 

Q 


1 Georgetown. P.E.I. 


Halifax. 


1 — 

_ 

f. 

- 


Liverpool. 


_ ~ 

z 


Louisbourc. 


- p< 
- 

z 

— 

— 


North Sydney. 


>> 

CO 

— " T 

5 \ 
= tr 

— — 

Z 

- - 


Port Mulerrave. 


3 <B 

a 
u 

1 
X 


Souris. P.E.L 


Whitehead. 


Yarmouth. 


DO 
CP 
• ^-i 
%-t 

c 

CD 
43 




87 


%i 






"J'- m 1 
J 






f 
a 


! ... 






J 










1 






7 


8£ 


2( 


> . . 




r 
i 


i 






c 










1 . 




■ 5 






1 


9 
1 


4£ 


1* 


























. 


j 








73 


17 










1 












1 






] 




1 




4 
7 

6 


91 


2C 


» • 




1 

J 








1 














T- 








71 


lfc 












A 

L . 


2 




















28 


12 
































7 


7 


84 


18.. 


1 
1- 


A 




1 








1 




1 














8 
1 


42 


12 .. 












I 






















92 


19 












1 






















1 


75 


17 








1 


1 








1 














3 


96 


18 .. 




Q 
O 


. 


1 


1 






•• 




2 














7 


76 


17 














2 


- 






1 














5 


1^ 


18 





_ 


1 

L 




1 


















1 








5 


67 


18 






o 

4 




1 
























1 


4 


48 


16 














2 




















1 


3 


56 


15 




.> 

& 
































2 


79 


17 


i 








1 












1 














3 


71 


17 






i 
l 








1 














1 








3 
3 
1 


77 


18 




























2 




1 




94 


16 










1 


























50 


13 














1 






















1 


76 


16 














1 














1 








2 


92 


18 






Q 
O 
















1 






1 








5 
1 


48 


14 
















1 




















79 


18 




























1 




1 




2 


88 


18 


















1 




3 


r 


. . 


i 


5 


43 


16 




























1 








1 


79 


18 


l 




1 
1 








4 










i .. 




2 






l 


10 
4 


107 


18 















1 








1 










66 


18 










1 


4 










i .. 




1 










81 


20 




1 








2 






















7 

3 


72 


18 




1 
1 








1 






1 

1 
















3 


54 


16 


















i 










1 








2 


91 


24 






A 
t 


1 


2 


























7 


72 


16 


3 




ft 










2 




l 








2 








l 


14 
1 


89 


17 






















1 












65 


16 














1 














2 








3 


126 


21 


































l 


1 


67 


18 






1 








1 























7 


66 


14 














1 














2 








3 


- ■) 

1 o 


15 














2 




















l 


5 


53 


16 






1 

1 










o 

_ 




















3 


75 


23 






o 








1 


1 




1 

l 
















6 
3 


96 


18 






Q 
O 






























26 


9 


































l 


1 


is 


16 






1 




1 


























2 


89 


18 






er 

D 






























5 
5 


96 


. 18 










2 




1 




2 


















68 


18 


































l 


1 


61 


16 






1 






















1 

Q 
O 








2 


65 


15 










1 
























4 
13 
8 


r,:i 


is 






4 




1 




2 


1 












2 








59 


18 






2 








4 








l 






1 








78 


18 






1 








1 
















i 






3 


52 


10 






2 








1 


1 


1 










2 








7 


91 


18 






















l 














1 


'.11 


20 














2 


1 










2 




1 




6 
3 


77 


18 










1 


















2 








13 


u; 




3 


2 






























5 


75 


17 






1 








1 






















2 


79 


I'.i 




























2 








4 


74l 


18 




J 2 










7 . 












1 








10 



274 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

List of United States Fishing Vessels which have entered at Canadian Ports from 
October 31, 1900, to October 31, 1901.— Concluded. 



u 
a 



P 



Name of Vessel. 



189 Parthia 

190 Patriot 

191 Pauline 

192 Pilgrim 

193 Pinta 

194 Polar Wave 

195 Preceptor 

196 Priscilla Smith 

197[Procyon 

198 Puritan 

199 Pythian 

200 Ralph F. Hodgdon 

201 Ramona 

202 Richard Wainwright. . 

203 Rigel 

204 Robin Hood 

205 Rozella 

2061 Ruth M. Martin 

207 |S. F. Maker 

208 S. P. Willard 

209 Samuel R. Crane 

210 Sarah E. Lee 

211 Sea Fox 

212 Senator 

213 Senator Gardener 

214!Senator Saulsbury 

215[Sheffeyld 

210 Shenandoah 

217|Slade Gordon 

21 8 1 Speculator 

219 'Stan wood 

220 T. M. Nicholson 

221lTalisman , 

222 Tattler 

223 Thalia 

224 Theodore Roosevelt 

225 Tidal Wave 

226 Titania 

227| Triton 

228jValkyria 

229, Vera 

230|Vesta 

231 ! Victor 

232 Vigilant 

233 Virginia 

234' Volant 

235 W. E. Morrisey 

236 W. H. Moody 

237 Walter M. Young. . . 

238 William H. Rider 

239 William Matheson .... 



Total. 



C 
C 

o 



77 

58 
51 
69 
68 
86 
89 
89 
85 
62 
66 
59 
58 
98 
87 
65 
34 
93 
78 
87 
52 
74 
71 
74 
94 
77 
61 
77 
88 
• 77 
76 
90 
88 

135 
78 
90 
66 
77 
67 

104 
77 
75 
75 
87 
81 
96 
93 
48 
86 
45 
72 

17790 



t-l 

s 



18 
18 
15 
11 
IS 

17 
18 
17 
18 
16 
16 
16 
16 
18 
18 
18 
11 
20 
18 
20 
18 
IS 
17 
18 
20 
18 
16 
19 
18 
18 
19 
21 
18 
22 
16 
18 
16 
18 
14 
18 
18 
16 
18 
18 
20 
18 
19 
18 
18 
16 
17 

4165 



| Ariohat. 


! : 1 Barrington. 


d 

CO 

a 

3 
5 


| Georgetown, P.E.I. 


| Halifax. 


o 

o 

" 
i — 


o 
o 

a.' 
J— 1 


1 Lockeport-. 


: | Louisbourg. 


| Lunenburg. 


a> 

P-> 
/ 

cj 

4-' 
t-i 

o 
2 


1 Port Hawkesbury. 


| Port Hood. 


| Port Mulgrave. 


Shelburne. 


| Souris, P.E.I. 


| Whitehead. 


| Yarmouth. 


Total entries. 




5 
14 

1 

1 

4 

1 

6 

1 

1 

5 

3 

1 

3 

5 

5 

9 

3 
28 

6 
10 

2 

3 

2 

3 

3 

1 

2 

9 

1 

g 

1 
1 
4 

6 
18 

1 

3 

8 

2 

5 

7 

6 

1 
13 

6 
10 

7 

5 . 
2 
3 
1 


3 




2 
1 




1 








3 


























































1 
















2 




2 
1 




















































3 




1 
















'_' 
































1 








































1 








1 










1 


1 




1 






1 






3 
















1 
1 




































1 
















1 
1 
4 
1 

1 

18 

' 4 












1 




1 






2 


















1 


















2 


3 






2 
2 
2 










1 




























3 


4 
1 




1 
1 


1 




1 












'2 


1 


i 

2 




] 






1 


1 


1 
































1 




i 


1 






1 
1 








































1 




1 
1 














1 






















1 












1 
1 






















2 
































4 




l 






3 














1 










1 
1 






























5 
1 
















1 






1 




















































, 1 
3 
1 












1 

5 
4 




























































2 


6 


2 


1 


















3 


1 




















2 










1 
1 






























2 
















3 
2 




2 






























2 


4 

1 












1 
























Q 
O 












1 


1 
2 












1 




1 




























1 


















2 
3 
1 
4 
2 




1 


i 


4 








1 
1 
1 




1 


4 






1 






















1 


6 






1 








1 








i' 




2 
1 
















1 
























1 


















1 




1 










1 






















1 

60 














17 


36 




o 
—i 


69 








n 


5 


3d 










2] 


60 


182 


43 


152 


53 


1 


12 


203 


3 


990 



FISHERY PROTECTION SERVICE 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



275 



OFFICERS' REPORTS. 

REPORTS OF CAPTAINS COMMANDING CANADIAN CRUISERS. 

CRUISER ' CURLEW '. 

St. John, N.B., December 31, 1901. 

Commander O. G. V. Spain, R.N., 

Commanding Fisheries Protection Service, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I have the honour to again submit to you my annual report on the various 
operations of this ship during the year just closed, which have extended over many hun- 
dreds of miles on the coasts of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. 
While life on ship board is presumed to be monotonous by those who do not choose the 
profession, the crew of this vessel will truthfully admit that monotony has not 
been experienced by them since the vessel has been in commission. One day we would 
be at St. Andrews, swinging to our anchors, and in response to telegraphic instructions 
from you, in a few hours we could be in sight of the Nova Scotia shore. 

We have visited almost every harbour on the coast from St. Stephen, New Bruns- 
wick, to Sydney, Cape Breton, and I might say, few indeed are the ports on the coast 
which have not been called at by this ship. 

While it must be admitted that there is considerable unpleasant duties to be carried 
out by us, still, on the other hand, there are numerous duties devolving on us that can 
be characterized as anything but unpleasant. A change from one to the other invari- 
ably lends a charm and excitement to the work that has many attractive sides to it. 

During the winter months, the ship was laid up at a dock in St. John, and during 
this time the boilers and machinery were overhauled and put in first class order by the 
engine room staff.- The hull and other necessary work around the ship was also carefully 
looked after, and any repairs required were carried out. I might state here that the 
bridge was enlarged to nearly double its former size, which we found of great benefit 
during the season. 

Orders were received from you to place the ship in commission on April 15 and 
with that end in view, work was rushed along and the ship was ready for sea on the date 
required. Some little delay was experienced in endeavouring to replaced the second 
engineer, who had abruptly resigned his position, and on the 16th we steamed outside 
St. John harbour and adjusted compasses, which was rendered necessary by the bridge 
being enlarged. 

The control of the valuable fisheries of St. John county having being added to my 
district in February last, we steamed to Quaco on the 17th inst., to instruct the officer 
there, and found that the lobster fishermen were arriving daily and locating themselves 
in the numerous camps, along the shore as far up the Bay of Fundy as Salmon river. 
The next few days were occupied in visiting the other fishery officers on the St. John 
county coast, instructing them regarding the management of the valuable lobster and 
-salmon fisheries under their charge. 

Arriving in Charlotte county waters on April 20, found an innumerable number 
of deep sea fishermen anxiously awaiting in the several villages our coming to receive 
their bounty cheques. This is one of the pleasant duties I am called upon to perform, 
as these cheques are issued at a time of the year when the fishermen's finances are 
generally at the very lowest. 

22— 18£ 



276 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

I found in all parts of Charlotte county weir repairing in progress, and many new 
weirs in course of erection. All the fishermen were looking forward to a prosperous 
season, and, owing to their extreme eagerness to secure desirable weir locations, I 
was compelled to settle innumerable unpleasant disputes among the enterprising 
claimants. On the United States side the numerous sardine factories were repairing 
their plants for the manufacture of the small herring into sardines, and, as the market 
was quite bare, were looking forward to an active and profitable season. This unusual 
activity on the American side, of course, had the effect of infusing new energy into the 
owners of weirs located on the Canadian side of the boundary line, and every one was 
anxiously looking forward for the appearance of the herring, which usually strike in 
about the middle of April. 

Much dissatisfaction was caused among the Bay of Fundy fishermen by the 
increased number of vessels that this season entered into the taking of pollock by 
exploding charges of dynamite among them. Fortunately this method of fishing is only 
practiced in one section of the Bay of Fundy, off White Head, Grand Manan. Those 
dynamiters made good hauls by this most destructive and wasteful practice, and it was 
carried on from April 15, when the schools of pollock were first sighted off Grand 
Manan, until the beginning of June. At this latter date the pollock had slowly worked 
from off shore in the waters known to the fishermen of the Bay of Fundy as the 
' ripplings,' to the inshore grounds inside of the territorial waters, and the fishermen 
then stopped the using of dynamite. There were many tempting opportunities offered 
for the use of explosives among the schools of pollock playing in the eddy of the ' Old 
Proprietor ' and other ledges, but the fishermen controlled their desires, evidently not 
wishing to have their boats confiscated and towed to St. Andrews. It is earnestly 
hoped by every person interested in our valuable fisheries and their preservation, that 
immediate action will be taken by the Fisheries Department with a view of having this 
vile practice discontinued. 

Just picture fifteen vessels, the number engaged at this kind of fishing this year, 
each vessel with from one to three boats busily rowing among the schools of pollock and 
exploding their charges of dynamite, and as they do not secure more than one-half the 
fish killed, or, as some assert, not more than one-third, you can form some idea of the 
immense destruction among the schools of fish. 

During the month of May we towed the Marine Biological Station scow from St. 
John to St. Andrews, where the station itself has been in operation for the past two 
years. Afterwards the station was firmly secured on the scow for its long tow to Canso 
almost four hundred miles away. 

On May 21 your orders were received to cruise on the Nova Scotia coast as the 
United States mackerel fleet were beginning to arrive there in their eager pursuit after 
this valuable fish. Some had already been taken previous to this date by our own 
fishermen in traps and nets, and the trap at Clark's harbour, Cape Sable is credited 
with having taken the first mackerel on the coast on May 13. 

At midnight on the *22nd we cruised across the Bay of Fundy and the next day 
called at Yarmouth to bunker ship. Rounding Cape Sable on the 24th, we put into 
Lockeport at noon, and it being the late Queen's birthday we decorated ship rainbow 
fashion in Her Majesty's remembrance. Liverpool was reached next day, where dense 
fogs delayed us till the 31st, when your orders were received to return to Quoddy and 
tow 'the Biological Station to Canso. 

Since the 13th inst., the schools of mackerel were gradually working along the coast 
in an easterly direction, and by the 25th, the coast fishermen as far as Canso, had their 
nets set awaiting their harvest, but the result of the shore fishermen's catch for the 
year was below the average, although the prices paid were fairly good. The usual num- 
ber of United States seiners frequented our coasts this spring, but the total catch was 
only fair and they remained a much shorter period than ether seasons. 

On May 31, we returned towards St. Andrews, calling into Yarmouth to bunker as 
usual, and on June 2 moored alongside of Biological Station, St. Andrews. Next 
morning in a strong gale, tested towing appliances by towing station to Campobello, and 
finding everything working satisfactorily, steamed next day across the Bay of Fundy to 
Brier island. The second day we succeeded in safely getting our tow around Cape 



FISHER Y PRO T EOT ION SER VICE 277 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

Sable and anchored in Shelburue. The next morning at daylight we made another start, 
and the breeze sprung up from the southwest, freshing during the day and raising up a 
nasty sea. At 10 a.m. off Liverpool, the towing gear on board the scow broke, but 
we succeeded, with little trouble, in picking her up again. At 2 p.m. off La Have the 
gear on scow broke again, and although a heavy sea was running, we managed to pass a 
hawser to her and steamed into Lunenburg to repair damages. 

A heavy sea and fog compelled us to put into Halifax on the 8th, but on the 11th 
the weather cleared up, and we proceeded towards Canso arriving there on the morning 
of the 12th, and we then placed the station in safe quarters. 

Leaving there next morning, Arichat was visited, and on the 15th we arrived at 
Louisbourg to bunker. Bunkers were filled on Monday the 17th and we returned westerly, 
visiting the several ports on our way. Port Le Hebert was visited on the 19th and 20th 
in order to examine harbour and report as to the advisability of placing a number of 
buoys on the shoals and ledges therein. St. Andrews was again reached on Sunday the 
23rd, and we resumed our usual work among the herring fisheries in the waters of Pas- 
samaquoddy bay. 

On July 1, Dominion Day, I took, as ordered by you, sixteen of the ships company 
with arras and gatling gun, up to St. George, and assisted in their celebration on that 
day, for which the celebration committee of that town tendered me a letter expressing 
their approbation. 

The member from St. John county to the Dominion Parliament, Colonel Tucker, joined 
our ship on July 5, at St. John, in order to examine into the herring and other fisheries 
of the Bay of Fundy, with a view to several proposed changes in regard to them. 
Colonel Tucker cruised with us over the district until the 21st, when he left the ship at 
St. John. He expressed the pleasure he had during his stay on board, and the large 
amount of valuable information that he acquired with respect to the Bay of Fundy 
fisheries. 

While cleaning boilers at Yarmouth on July 24, your telegraphic orders were 
received to proceed to Digby, and take the Governor General of Canada and Lady Minto, 
with their daughters and members of the suite on the Curlew to St. John. On Sunday 
p.m. the Vice-Regal party of twelve persous joined the ship, and we proceeded across 
the Bay of Fundy to St. John. We arrived there at 7 p.m., finding the town and 
shipping decorated in honour of our distinguished party, and thousands of the inhabitants 
waiting on the several wharfs, to give them an enthusiastic reception. 

On August 2, at St. Andrews, acting in co-operation with the reception committee 
of the town, we again had the honour of having on board the Vice-Regal party, for a 
cruise on the beautiful waters of Passamaquoddy bay, including a visit to the summer 
residence of Sir William Van Home, who courteously entertained us. During the after- 
noon we returned to St. Andrews, although Their Excellencies expressed their desire to 
proceed to St. John in the Curlew, but the appearance of fog rendered this impossible, 
and the party left by special train for St. John. 

Attending to our usual fisheries duties, including the cutting down of an illegally 
built weir in Lubec Narrows, occupied our time till the latter part of August, when 
rumours of poaching by Canadian vessels, on the Grand Manan spawning grounds, began 
to reach our ears. Attempts at poaching annually occur on these spawning grounds, 
and considerable strife and bad feeling occur among the fishermen in consequence. 
Warnings have been given to suspected poachers, and we have anchored on the grounds 
for various periods, but, during our absence from Grand Manan, this illegal work would 
be stealthily resumed. I decided the time had arrived when more stringent measures 
were necessary, and at midnight on August 31, we arrived off Seal Cove, and sending 
the small boats into the cove in the darkness, found seven vessels fishing illegally. Next 
day I towed them to St. Andrews, and they were all fined, besides losing their fishing 
gear and time. I feel certain this action will have a deterring effect. 

Issuing weir licenses, settling various fisheries disputes, <fcc, kept us busy till October 
4, when we left the waters of Quoddy, and proceeded along the south coast of Nova 
Scotia in order to be present at the annual sports of our service, to be beld at George- 
town, P.E.I., beginning on October 10. 



1 



278 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Arriving at that port on the 9th, we found the other cutters at anchor there, and 
all the crews anxiously looking forward to the various competitions, of skill, strength, 
and endurance. On the morning of the 10th, the rifle competition for the challenge cup 
took place, and this ship's rifle team did not meet with success, which did not surprise 
us, we having very little time for practice. However, we consoled ourselves with taking 
back to the shores of the Bay of Fundy, the silver cup offered as a prize for the five oared 
gig race and the substantial money prize that accompanied it. 

Our ship's company also picked up a fair share of prizes in the other events, and on 
the last evening at Georgetown they showed at the concert given by the fleet in the town 
hall, that their musical abilities were above the average. It is quite evident to the most 
ordinary observer, that these annual gatherings of the cruisers for athletic sports, are 
more enjoved and appreciated by all as each year rolls by, and encourages a spirit of 
competition among the ships companies, and its good results are quite perceptible. I 
have been present at numerous gatherings of seamen, and it cannot be denied that the 
physique and general abilities of the men gathered annually at Georgetown, can com- 
pare favourably with any gathering of seamen that I have been present at. 

After returning to the Atlantic coast from Georgetown, foggy weather set in, and 
putting into Arichat, boilers were scaled, and on October 20, we arrived at Louisbourg 
and bunkered. Returning to the westward on the 23rd, we called into numerous ports 
along the coast, and Yarmouth was reached on the 31st, were we filled the space in the 
bunkers and cruised towards St. Andrews via Brier island. 

Finding there a telegram from you to return to Nova Scotia immediately and meet 
you at Shelburne, where we arrived on November 7. With you on board we steamed 
to Halifax, returning again to the westward on Sunday the 10th, and met five United 
States seining schooners cruising off Chebucto Head with evidences around their decks 
that they had caught some mackerel very recently. 

Pasamaquoddy waters were again reached on the 15th, where numerous pressing 
fishery matters were attended to till the 20th, when in response to another telegram 
from you, that United States fishing vessels were reported poaching in the vicinity of 
Liverpool, N.S., we steamed there hurriedly. For several days we searched for evidences 
of poaching along the coast, but did not succeed in discovering any. Returning around 
Cape Sable for the last time in the year, we again bunkered at Yarmouth on the 29th, 
and at Letang Harbour on December 3, Senator Gilmour came with us to Grand 
Manan, where he presented medals and a go^d watch to several life savers there. 

The collecting of bounty claims, etc., was vigorously proceeded with till December 
24, when we steamed to St. John during a S.S.E. gale, and at sunset,'placing the ship 
out of commission, discharged the ship's company. On the 26th the ship was placed in 
her winter quarters, and the engineers and their staff proceeded with the repairs to the 
boiler and machinery. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

JOHN H PRATT, 

Commanding Curlew. 



North Head, N.B., December 20, 1901. 

Commander O. G. V. Spain, R.N., 

Commanding Fishery Protection Service of Canada, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I respectfully beg to present this, my annual report, covering the operations 
of the cruiser Kingfisher, engaged in the Fisheries Protection Service, under my com- 
mand for the present year. 



FISHERY PROTECTION SERVICE 



279 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

The cruising during the season has been confined chiefly to the Gulf of St. Lawr3nce. 
On May 16, 1901, after six days in fitting out the ship at Shelburne, we sailed east to 
Lunenburg, taking up station from Cape Sambro to Shelburne, with headquarters at 
Lunenburg. I cruised this station until June 4, during which time I sighted ten 
American seiners operating a long way off shore. We passed numerous schools of 
mackerel and herring near the shore. Herring were very plentiful on the coast, showing 
in large schools during the latter part of May. The fish were very fine quality, large 
and fat and a species of herring seldom seen near the coast. Fish of this kind are caught 
chiefly on the outer banks, and fishermen call them ' bank herring. ' The catch of lob- 
sters was limited on this ground, owing to the prevalence of easterly winds during almost 
the entire months of April and May, and which caused great destruction among the 
lobster traps along the coast. 

I left this station on June 4, for the east, arriving at White Head on the 5th, 
fishermen reporting lobster fishing fairly good and mackerel scarce. I visited Canso on 
June 6, found a few 'bankers' in part flying no bounty flags. On the 7th inst., sent 
my chief officer to visit the lobster canneries, and he made a seizure of small berried 
lobsters at Sproule's cannery, for which I imposed the customary fine. American seiners 
were reported doing fairly well off Canso— about June 5, some vessel reporting 200 to 
300 brls., although I cannot verify this statement, as, on account of the weather being 
fairly good, the seiners were not compelled to make frequent calls for shelter at any of 
our ports. On June 8, I left this port for Charlottetown, calling at Georgetown on the 
way, and arriving at Charlottetown on the 11th inst. While there the ship's company 
was measured for uniforms. A new water tank was also obtained ; the old one having 
given out entirely. I left that port on June 18, with instructions to take up station off 
East Point, P.E.I., and Cape Breton. I proceeded west through Northumberland 
Straits, around North Cape and East Point to Souris. The catch of lobsters had been 
good in this section, notwithstanding the enormous quantity of drift ice, kept in the 
gulf by the prevailing easterly winds. Three American seiners visited the gulf this 
season, only remaining two or three days, when they returned to their own coast, 
mackerel failing to school in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. On the 12th inst., I proceeded 
to Port Hawkesbury and hauled over on the marine slip on the 15th, to have the ship's 
bottom cleaned and painted. This was finished on the 17th, and on that day the ship 
was launched and made ready for sea. 

July 20, 200 brls. of fresh mackerel were shipped from Hawkesbury by the ss. 
Halifax, for Boston, all caught in the vicinity of the straits in nets. T remained at 
Hawkesbury until the 25th, when I proceeded to my station off Souris. On my arrival 
I continued to patrol the coast on north side Prince Edward Island and the north side 
Cape Breton. On July 31, we caught a few mackerel off East Point with hook-and-line, 
first catch of the season. About the middle of August mackerel were reported taking 
hooks freely at Magdalene Islands; the catch there was very good, some 10,000 brls. 
being obtained. 

Hake fishing was very good off Souris. The continued scarcity of bait made it 
very hard for the fishermen, as boats had to go to Canso for frozen squid, no bait being 
obtainable nearer. A few barrels of herring for bait were kept in the new freezer at 
Souris, but the fishermen claim the prices charged there were too high — more than they 
could afford to pay. 

On August 19, I attended the Georgetown Regatta, boats competing for the cup 
presented by His Honour Judge Hogston, of Charlottetown. The day was fine with a 
good breeze and a very pretty race resulted. 

On August 28, Souris Regatta took place, boats competing for the cup presented 
by the Souris Boating Club. This race was not particularly interesting on account of 
the wind being very light during the day. We had quite a number of visitors, among 
whom we had the pleasure of seeing Mr. A. W. Owen, Chief Accountant, Marine 
Department at Ottawa. We endeavoured that the Kingfisher give every assistance 
during the day to the club of which His Honour Judge Wayberton, of Charlottetown, 
Commodore. 

The remainder of August and September we patrolled the coast carrying out the 
lobster regulations. Some traps were seized for being fished in the close season. I 



280 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

may say the percentage of illegal fishing for Lobsters was much smaller that in previous 
years. The steam launch Davies, which was sent to me by your orders, proved most 
useful in enabling us to cover a lot of ground which could not have been done with a 
sailing vessel. 

The ship's company always look forward with much pleasure to the Annual sports 
which took place at Georgetown on October 10 and 11, under your direction. 
The prizes for rirle shooting consisted ( f one large cup open to all the ships of the 
service, also the smaller cup which is competed for only by the Acadia and the Kingfisher. 
It is gratifying to me to report that both these cups were captured by the Kingfisher. 
The boat race for the cup given by the citizens of Georgetown was won by the 
Curlew and was a most interesting race. 

By your orders we left Prince Edward Island for Sydney on October 21, via Bras 
d'Or Lakes — this being my first run through the lakes with the Kingfisher. We only 
remained at Sydney one day. We found the American seiners, six in number, were 
leaving for home, only one vessel having received a full fare, 380 barrels. These were 
taken by the gasoline steam schooner Victor. Two of this type of schooners were at 
Sydney, the other being the Helen Miller Gould which was burned in the harbour of 
North Sydney on the morning of October 25. While there I visited both these vessels 
and was very kindly received and given every particular in regard to their engines, 
speed, &c. A vessel like the Victor carries engines of 85 H.P. four cylinders, and the 
shaft is made of Tobin bronze 3J inohes in diameter. ' The propeller has three blades 
which are also made of Tobin bronze, two iron tanks of 500 gallons capacity contain 
gasoline. The ship will steam eight knots in calm weather with a consumption of eight 
to nine gallons per hour. Captain McFarlane informs me he caught many more fish by 
having steam to handle his vessel in calms. On October 24, in accordance with your 
instructions, I proceeded west through the lakes to Shelburne to obtain a new main- 
mast We arrived at Shelburne on the 30th, and paid the ship out of commission on 
November 2, after which I put in the new mast. At Shelburne by your authority some 
improvaraents were made in the accommodation of the vessel with which you are already 
familiar It became absolutely necessary to put in new rails and this was also done at 
the time, all of which I respectfully submit. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

W. H. KENT, 
Commanding Dominion Cruiser ' Kingfisher.' 



Shelburne, N.S., November 30, 1901. 

Commander O. G. V. Spain, R.N., 

Commanding Fisheries Protection Service of Canada, 

Ottawa. 

Sir,— I have the honour to forward you my annual report of work performed by 
the Osprey during the season just closed. 

In compliance with your instructions on April 17, I proceeded to Shelburne and 
after superintending the fitting, painting, &c, on the 22nd signed crew and placed 
ship in commission, but the weather being very stormy we were unable to get to sea 
until the 29th. On that date we cruised eastward and arrived at Halifax on the follow- 
ing day, where we signed another man, took in stores, and on May 4 proceeded cruising 
eastward along the coast, doing general fishery protection work, and arrived at Port 
Hawkesbury on the 7th, where we were detained until the 9th bv heavy north winds, 
with a large fleet of fishing and coasting vessels bound north, which date we proceeded 



FISHERY PROTECTION SERVICE 



281 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

and arrived at Pictou same night, and by your order the Osprey went to sea in charge 
of Chief Officer Graham on the 11th, and proceeded towards Magdalen Islands, to look 
after foreign bait seekers, while I was instructed to proceed to Halifax by railway to 
take Dominion government steamer Minto to Sable Island. The Osprey cruised under 
command of chief officer until June 4, on that date I joined her again at Port Hawkes- 
bury, and proceeded towards Charlottetown, and arrived at that place next morning. 
After having crew measured for uniforms, and taking in some stores, on the 7th went 
to sea cruising northward through the Northumberland Straits and down west end of 
Prince Edward Island, thence to Cape North, Cape Breton, where we got some very 
rough weather, during which David Creed, one of the seamen, was badly injured by a 
blow from a jib sheet, from which cause he lost one of his eyes. However, after a lot 
of rough usage we arrived at North Sydney on the 10th, and replenishing our somewhat 
diminished supplies, we again proceeded to sea on the 13th, cruising southward through 
Main a Dieu passage, then westward towards Canso, where, by your instructions, we took 
up our headquartei-s for mails and telegrams, cruising between Liscombe and Sydney. 
On July 1, we placed ship on marine railway at Point Tupper. After having ship 
cleaned and painted we proceeded and took same route, cruising as before, until by your 
further instructions we passed through St, Peter's canal, and came to anchor at south 
end of Campbell's Island on the 19th, and there awaited the arrival of the Vice Regal 
party, who came on board Monday 22nd. A guard of honour was formed up and a 
genera] salute was given, after which His Excellency inspected the ship's company, and 
expressed himself as being well pleased. We at once proceeded down the lake passing 
the Grand Narrows bridge with a fine breeze, and adding to my pleasure their excellen- 
cies expressed themselves as having enjoyed the run on our beautiful little ship, 
(using their words.) We arrived at Sydney the same night, and on 24th proceeded 
with Her Excellency and two daughters and yourself, entering lake same afternoon. The 
wind being light we transferred to the Acadia. This ship took them to Grand Nar- 
rows. We then proceeded and took up station duty as before until by your orders we 
arrived at Pictou on September 4. Chief Officer Graham was again sent to sea and to 
cruise ofl Canso as before, while I was placed in charge of the cruiser Acadia, for the 
run to Quebec and back to Port Hawkesbury, where we arrived on the 22nd. I joined 
my ship again on that day, and following day cruised south through the strait and took 
up my old station and cruising as before doing general fisheries protection work until 
October 9, when we arrrived at Georgetown, where the annual sports were held on the 
following dates, 10th, 1 1th and part of 12th. Everything passed off pleasantly. The 
cruiser Kingfisher capturing the fisheries protection cup. After which we returned 
to the station, and on the 28th, by your orders, changed to Cape Breton east coast, 
North Sydney headquarters, we cruised there until November 2. There being no United 
States seiners there, we cruised westward through the lakes and passed St. Peter's locks 
on the 4th, and worked our way westward calling at several ports along southern shore, 
and arriving off Devil's Island on the 8th, fell in with five United States seiners. 
Cruising with them till the evening we went into Halifax, leaving early next morning 
and cruised with the fleet until the 1 3th, when ourselves and four of the fleet lay at Halifax 
during a heavy south-east gale. When the weather moderated and the fleet went to sea 
we still continued to cruise with them until the last of them went west on the 18th. The 
fleet did not make any big catches and went home with from one to two hundred bar- 
rels each. We then took up headquarters at Lunenburg, and cruised East Mahone 
and St. Margaret's bays until 27th, on which date, by your order, we cruised westward 
and went into winter quarters at McLean's wharf, Shelburne, on the 28th, and on the 
30th, after stripping and mooring ship, and paying off crew, hauled down the ensign 
and pennant. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 



C. T. KNOWLTON, 

Commanding Cruiser 1 Osprey.' 



282 



MARIXE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Quebec, December 26, 1901. 

To Commander O. G. V. Spain, RN., 

Commanding Fisheries Protection Service of Canada, 

Ottawa. 

Sir, — In compliance with your instructions I have the honour to submit to you the 
following, which is a synopsis of the work performed by the cruiser Constance, under my 
command, during the present year just ended, 1901. 

On January 23, my chief and 2nd engineers, oiler and stokers began the work of 
overhauling the boiler and engine, to have all in readiness for the opening of navigation. 

February 11, Messrs. Davie & Sons began the work on the new construction to 
connect the turtle or forecastle deck to the wheel-house and the lowering of the bridge, 
under my supervision. 

March 16, the Constance was visited and inspected by the Deputy Minister of 
Marine and Fisheries and yourself, who approved of the manner in which the work was 
being conducted to the satisfaction of those interested in its structure. March 28, the 
Constance was towed from her winters quarters in Indian Cove to alongside of Davie's 
patent slip at Levis, for the better convenience of forwarding the work to a hasty finish. 

April 9. — The work carried on by Messrs. Davie & Sons during the past two 
months being completed, the Constance was at once put into commission. Officers and 
crew signed ship's articles, and the steamer was moved from Levis to the Louise Basin, 
Quebec, where we took in a full supply of coal, fresh water, provisions, &c, and on the 
afternoon of the 11th we left port for the gulf. 

For the convenience of the residents of the north shore and by the permission of 
the Honourable the Minister of Customs, I received on board, just before leaving port, 
several large bags of mail matter from the Quebec post office and delivered same at the 
respective post offices between G-odbout and Esquimaux Point, arriving at the latter 
named port at noon of the .15th, where I received instructions by telegraph from 
Inspector Jones to proceed at once to North Sydney, N.S., and to cruise in that vicinity 
until further advised. 

On receipt of this order we left Esquimaux Point at once, and the following night 
(16th) arrived off the entrance to Sydney ; but, owing to the large quantities of closely 
packed ice that extended for several miles off shore all along the coast, we were unable 
to make harbour, and next morning (17th), on account of strong easterly winds and 
threatening bad weather, we put into Louisbourg for shelter, where we remained for 
several days detained by easterly winds and gales, rain and fog. On the morning of 
April 25, we managed, after passing through miles of heavy scattered ice, to make an 
entrance to North Sydney harbour, and, as the weather permitted, we cruised in the 
vicinity of Cape North and Scatteri Island until May 9, when, by instructions received, 
we proceeded to Meat Cove and seized a whisky still from one John McLennan, leaving 
the prosecution for this offence to the Honourable the Minister of Inland Revenue. 

From May 10 to November 20, our cruise varied greatly, being kept constantly on 
the move about the coasts of the gulf, Prince Edward Island, the Magdalen Islands, 
the Nova Scotia coast, Tusket Islands, St. Mary's Bay and the Bay of Fundy. 

On this long line of coast work I must here state that the new addition to the turtle 
deck, which was built to cover in the gap between it and the wheel-house, proved of 
great value to the safety of the ship as well as to the comfort of those on board when 
exposed to the heavy seas of the gulf and along the Atlantic coast. It made a great 
change in the ship by throwing off the water coming over the bows in head seas, 
preventing the deck from being swept and the compartments from being flooded. 

On May 27, I was instructed to proceed to the Magdalen Islands to look out for a 
large three masted French schooner that was reported to be from St. Pierre Miquelon, 
and selling liquors to the inhabitants. We arrived at House Harbour next day (28th), 
and remained about the islands until June 2 investigating this case. The report was 
true regarding the schooner having been at Grand Entry Harbour, and other places, to 
purchase bait, but no proof could be obtained that spirituous liquors had been landed 
or purchased in trade for bait. Again on July 1, along with Preventive Officer Bourinot 
an investigation was held at Murray Harbour, P.E.I., regarding a report of smuggling 



FISHERY PROTECTION SERVICE 



283 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

at that port, but after a cai'eful and thorough inquiry no information could be confirmed 
against the accused. 

On September 16 and 17 we had the pleasure of being at Quebec and taking an 
active part in the naval parade and other demonstrations in honour of their Royal 
Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and York During October 16 and 17 
we arrived and anchored in Clarks Harbour, N.S.,with Mr. Fred. L. Jones, and others 
on board, who held an investigation into the looting of the British ship Drumalis, 
stranded on the S.W. shoals near Cape Sable, which resulted in the seizure of the 
schooner Hope by the Constance and several articles taken from the wreck, and found 
on the shore, under the provisions of the Customs Act, sections 193, 194, 196, 197 and 
217, and delivered same to the charge of the Collector of Customs at Barrington Passage 
to be held by him until further advised by the Honourable the Minister of Customs. 
December 3 we placed the Constance in the Louise Basin for the winter, paid off all 
officers and crew from further active service and left ship in charge of Michel Dickey, 
my chief steward, to act as watchman, until further advised by the department. During 
the last week that the crew were on board in port we had the fore peak, chain lockers, 
and every other available place under deck thoroughly ssraped clean of all rust and 
painted which was very much required for the preservation of the ship. 

In conclusion, wo boarded and searched all unknown, or suspicious, crafts that we 
came in contact with during our cruise, and covered 16,504 miles in distance made. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

GEO. M. MAY. 

DOMINION CRUISER ' PETREL.' 

Walkerville, December 14, 1901. 

Annual Report of the Cruiser ' Petrel' for the Season of 1901. 

Captain O. G. V. Spain, R.N., 

Commanding Fisheries Protection Service of Canada, 

Ottawa. 

Sir, — I have the honour to present to you the annual report of the above cruiser 
for the season of 1901, and as the work performed was varied, with your permission, I 
will give it in detail for your better information. 

The ship, which was laid up in Walkerville. was fitted out and placed in commis- 
sion on Saturday, April 13, and departed for Amherstburg, where thirty tons of coal 
were placed on board. On Monday, the 15th, was employed getting the gas-buoys ready 
for service, putting lamps on, &c. On the 16th both buoys were placed in position and 
the winter buoy taken in. 

On the 17th I seized eighty-nine American gill-nets, which were set in our 
waters. On the 19th the spar-buoy was placed on Grecian shoal. On the 20th the 
seized nets were spread out to dry by the crew on the piers and finally were bunched 
and stored. 

On the 25th I seized thirty-one American gill-nets set in our waters. On the 
26th the spar buoy was placed on North Harbour reef. 

On the 30th I seized fifty nine American gill-nets set well in our waters. 

On May 2 the crew were engaged drying the nets and placing them in stores. 

On May 14 the chief engineer of the department, Col. W. P. Anderson, came 
on board to inspect the light stations, I also took on board a lifeboat for Long 
Point. From that date until the 17th the following stations were inspected : Rondeau, 
Port Stanley, Port Burwell, West and East Long Point lights. Port Dover, Port Mait- 
land, Mohawk Island and Port Colborne, when Col. Anderson left the ship. On the 
way down the lifeboat was landed at Port Dover. 



284 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

On the 24th the ship was dressed but no salute was fired. On the 27th Col. 
Anderson came on board with a diver and assistant to locate the position for the Middle 
Ground lighthouse, but the weather would not permit any work until the 30th when 
the spot was located. On the 31st, Mr. Noble, who was in charge of the lighthouse 
crib, came on board and the Petrel accompanied the tug Home Rule and barge Owens, 
which had the crib in tow, most of the way. On June 1, the crib was placed in 
position, several of the crew of the Petrel worked all night loading the crib with stone. 
Col. Anderson left ship on the 3rd at Windsor. On the 4th three large spar-buoys 
were placed to indicate the extent of the shoalest portion of the Middle Ground Pelee 
passage, and on the same day I located the wreck of the ss. Specular. On the 26th 
I made a careful survey of the wreck, finding as little as eleven feet of water over 
portions of the steamer. I placed a black spar-buoy at the east end of it. 

July 1 the ship was dressed and a salute was fired of fifteen guns. The crew 
assisted the people of Port Dover celebrate the day, and received great praise for 
their exhibition of ritie, cutlass and physical drills, reflecting as it did great credit to 
their instructor, Sergeant Hessian. 

On the 8th, Mr. Fraser, the assistant engineer of the department, came on board 
and was conveyed to the south-east shoal lightship, which was successfully located 
by sextant angles on the 9th. On the afternoon of the same day, Mr. Noble was con- 
veyed to the old ' dummy ' crib, being accompanied by the chief engineer, Mr. 
Brown, to examine the old boiler. On the 10th Mr. Fraser left the ship. 

On the 30th, Judge Home, Mr. Cowan and party came on board at Amherstburg 
and were conveyed to Pelee island. On the way there and near Colchester light, I 
was signalled to by the ss. City of Mount Clements, which reported being disabled and 
having the submarine cable on board for Pelee island passage. She was taken in tow 
to the north dock Pelee island. I afterwards landed the judge and party at the west 
dock, returning to Windsor the same day. 

September 3 I seized twenty-one American gill-nets in our water near Long Point 
and containing a small catch of fish, principally herring. 

On the 10th, while lying at Port Colborne and visiting at a private house, I was 
requested by the customs officer to hold the American steamer Hartford for damaging 
a bridge, but before I could get my crew, the Americans cut their lines and got away. 
It would have taken about twenty minutes to get up steam and make chase, and as the 
Hartford was the speedier, I did not attempt to follow. 

From the 21st to the 28th I was away from the ship by your orders, re the Noble 
investigation. On October 10 received orders to convey Judge Home to Pelee 
island to hold Court of Revision, and on the 11th I returned to Windsor with him. 

On the 18th having been instructed to move the south-east shoal gas-buoy to end 
of cut near the Detroit river light, I took up the anchor and towed the buoy to Pelee 
island to properly ship the anchor. By this time a gale was blowing from the south- 
west and had to go to anchor. Did not reach Amherstburg until 6.35 p.m on the 19th. 
On the 21st, after exchanging old lamp for a new one, the buoy was placed where 
Hackett Bros, pointed out as the proper place. Angles were taken for the information 
of the chief engineer of the dep.rtment. Two bi'oken spar buoys were taken up for 
the Hacketts, who have no boat fit for the purpose. 

November 9th, King's Birthday, dressed ship and fired a royal salute. 

On the 13th took angles to locate the boundary line between the Bass islands and 
the Hen and Chickens, for the guidance of the fishermen, and placed a buoy. 

Eighteenth, I took on board a large spar-buoy which I placed in Q>\ fathoms water 
on the south east shoal, to mark the position of the vessel and to enable them to place 
it again in the spring. 

On the afternoon of the same day, I seized thirty-seven American gill-nets set 
in our water. The nets were obtained by grappling. On the 1 9th I seized fifteen 
American gill-nets, set in our water a short distance to the east of those seized the pre- 
ceding day. 

On the 21st, took in the middle ground gas-buoy, taking up its anchor which I left 
at Pelee island, towed buoy to Bois Blanc island, and gave it in charge of Hackett Bros, 
on the 22nd. On same day took up spar-buoy near the wreck of the Specular. On the 



FISHERY PROTECTION SERVICE 



285 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 

^7th I took up the three spar-buoys from the middle ground, also the one from North 
Harbour reef. I was unable to find the spar-buoy on Grecian shoal, which had evidently 
been cut down by some steamer, below the water. The buoys were given in charge of 
Hackett Bros. 

On the 29th I met Capt. Hackett, with the wrecked gas-buoy in tow, which I was 
intending taking in that day, I took it in charge, handing it over to Hackett Bros., and 
made a special report on the matter. On the 30th, having received a telegram instruct- 
ing me to assist Hackett in taking up the spar- buoys set along the dredged channel 
outside the Detroit river. I did so, taking up twelve of them. Most of them had beea£ 
cut down by steamers and were landed at Bois Blanc island. 

On December 6, by your orders, I took a party of gentlemen from Windsor to 
Amherstburg, thence to Pelee island, returning on the 8th. 

To conclude, I beg to report that although a larger number of nets were seized this 
year than last, I think the fishermen as a whole are more inclined to observe the law, 
at least while the Petrel is in commission, than formerly. They do not dispute the 
legality of the seizures, as in former years, and have frequently asked me to indicate the 
boundary line for them. 

The fishing on Lake Erie was very uneven. Off Port Maitland it was good most 
of the season, and Mr. Harris, of Port Dover, reported to me early in the fall, that his 
fishing had been 50 per cent better than any year since he has fished off Long Point, 
and I saw myself, eleven tons taken at one lift from a small gang of gill-nets near Pelee 
island, by one of our own fishermen. On other parts of the lake, the fishing was light 
during the whole of the year. 

You will kindly observe that a large amount of work was done by the Petrel for 
the marine branch of the department, and that the time was fully occupied, 14,132 
miles having been logged during the season. 

Trusting the foregoing report will meet with your approval. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

E. DUNN, 
Commanding Cruiser 1 Petrel.' 



D. G. S. ' QUADRA 

Victoria, B.C., December 26, 1901. 

Commander O. G. V. Spain R.N., 

Commanding Fisheries Protection Service of Canada, 

Ottawa. 

Sir, — The duties of the Quadra not in connection with lighthouse and buoy work, 
commenced this year with a cruise to Queen Charlotte islands to investigate the wreck 
of an unknown vessel which had been found by the Indians on the west coast. The 
wreck turned out to be that of the American ship Colusa, and had evidently been where 
found for more than twelve months. Whilst at Skidegate, Queen Charlotte islands, I 
examined two excellent salmon rivers from which the cannery, lately established there, 
were drawing at that early stage of the season (May) some splendid fish. The fish were 
small but of an excellent flavour, being in that respect more like British salmon than I 
have yet met with on this coast. Whether the whole of the streams and inlets on Queen 
Charlotte islands are frequented by this class of salmon, I am not at present prepared 
to say. Our next cruise was on fisheries service to Rivers Inlet, in the middle of what 
is generally considered