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Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current.html 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


The Calendar is an official University document defining academic programs and regulations. 
It is accurate as of December 1, 2019 *. It includes all items approved at Senate up until 
September 13, 2019. 


General Information 


¢ University Overview 


Academic Calendar 


Academic Regulations 


Admission 


Awards 


Classification of Students and Registration 


International Program 


International Students 


Policies and Procedures 


Postdoctoral Fellows 


Student Services 


« Thesis Regulations 


Faculties 
« Faculty of Arts and Science 
e Gina Cody School of Engineering and Computer Science 
e Faculty of Fine Arts 
e John Molson School of Business 


¢ School of Graduate Studies 


Archives 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


e Archived Calendars 


* The University Senate reserves the right to modify the academic programs and regulations at its 
discretion after the posting date of the Calendar. In addition, the University reserves the right to 
modify the published scale of tuition and other student fees at any time before the beginning of an 
academic term. The most current information is available from the School of Graduate Studies. 
Moreover, the information contained in the Calendar or any other University document related to 
academic programs and regulations is subject to verification and correction by the School of 
Graduate Studies. 


© Concordia University 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/academic-calendar/current-academic- 


calendar-dates.html 


Academic Calendar Dates 


Summer 
Registration 


Summer Term 2019 


Refer to the Graduate Registration Guide for exact dates of registration and the non-standard 
registration and withdrawal deadline dates. 


May 2019 

Sun, May 5 Examinations end 

Mon, May 6 Classes begin, First-term and two-term summer session courses 

Mon, May 13 Last day to add two-term and first-term Summer Session courses 

Mon, May 13 Deadline for withdrawal with tuition refund* (DNE deadline) from two-term and first-term 
Summer Session courses 

Mon, May 13 Deadline for withdrawal from program for Summer Session 

Mon, May 13 In Progress deadline to submit coursework to professors for Winter 2019 courses 

Mon, May 20 Victoria Day, University Closed 

June 2019 

Mon, Jun. 3 Last day for academic withdrawal from first-term Summer Session courses (/1 DISC) 

Sat, Jun. 15 Last day to apply for re-evaluation of courses ending in April 2019 (/3 and /4) 

Mon, Jun 10 Spring Convocations 

Wed, Jun. 19 Last day of classes for first-term Summer Session 

Thu, Jun. 20 Examinations begin, first-term summer session finals 

Thu, Jun. 20 Mid-term break for two-term Summer Session begins 

Mon, Jun. 24 Féte Nationale, University closed 

Tue, Jun. 25 Examinations end, first-term summer session finals 

Tue, Jun. 25 Mid-term break for two-term Summer Session ends 

Wed, Jun. 26 Classes begin, second-term Summer Session 

July 2019 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


Mon, Jul. 1 


Wed, Jul. 3 


Wed, Jul. 3 
Mon, Jul. 15 


Sun, Jul. 14 


Mon, Jul. 15 
Wed, Jul. 24 
August 2019 
Thu, Aug. 1 


Sun, Aug. 4 


Mon, Aug. 12 
Tue, Aug. 13 
Wed, Aug. 14 


Mon, Aug. 19 


Fall/Winter 
Registration 


September 2019 


Sun, Sep. 1 


Mon, Sep. 2 
Tue, Sep. 3 
Tue, Sep. 3 


Mon, Sep. 16 


Mon, Sep. 16 
Mon, Sep. 16 


Mon, Sep. 16 


Canada Day, University closed 


Deadline for withdrawal with tuition refund* from second-term Summer Session courses (/1 
DNE) 


Last day to add second-term Summer Session courses 
Last day for academic withdrawal from two-term Summer Session courses (/1 DISC) 


Last day for initial doctoral thesis submission to the Thesis Office for students who have 
applied for Fall graduation 


Last day to apply for Fall graduation 


Last day for academic withdrawal from second-term Summer Session courses (/1 DISC) 


Last day to apply for Quebec Resident status for Summer Session 2019 


Deadline to submit electronic Master thesis to department for Spring convocation; consult with 
your department 


Last day of classes for two-term and second-term Summer Session 
Make-up day for classes scheduled Monday only during two-term summer session 
Examinations begin, two-term Summer Session finals 
Examinations end, two-term Summer Session finals 
Fall Term 2019 


Refer to the Graduate Registration Guide for exact dates of registration and the non-standard 
registration and withdrawal deadline dates. 


Last day for final electronic submission of thesis through Spectrum, the Concordia Repository, 
for students who are graduating in the Fall Term 


Labour Day, University closed 
Classes begin, Fall Term 
Late registration and course change period begins 


Deadline for withdrawal with tuition refund* from two-term (/3 DNE) and Fall-term courses (/2 
DNE) 


Last day to add two-term (/3) and Fall-term (/2) courses 
Deadline for withdrawal from program for Fall Session 


In Progress deadline to submit coursework to professors for Summer 2019 courses 
Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


October 2019 
Tue, Oct. 1 


Mon, Oct. 14 


November 2019 


Mon, Nov. 4 


Fri, Nov. 8 


Mon, Nov. 18 


December 2019 


Sun, Dec. 1 
Mon, Dec. 2 
Tue, Dec. 3 
Thu, Dec. 5 
Thu, Dec. 19 


Mon, Dec. 23 
to Sun, Jan. 5 


Fall/Winter 
Registration 


January 2020 
Mon, Jan. 6 
Mon, Jan. 6 
Wed, Jan. 15 
Mon, Jan. 20 
Mon, Jan. 20 
Mon, Jan. 20 
Mon, Jan. 20 
February 2020 


Sat, Feb. 1 


Last day to apply for re-evaluation of courses ending in August 2019 (/1) 


Thanksgiving Day, University closed (see December 3, 2019) 


Last day for academic withdrawal from Fall-term courses (/2 DISC) 


Last day to register with the Access Centre for Students with Disabilities (ACSD) and receive 
exam accommodations for the Fall 2019 final exam 


Fall Convocations 


Last day to apply for Quebec Resident status for Fall Term 2019 
Last day of classes, Fall Term 

Make-up day for classes scheduled on Monday, October 14 
Examinations begin 

Examinations end 


Holiday period, University closed 


Winter Term 2020 


Refer to the Graduate Registration Guide for exact dates of registration and the non-standard 
registration and withdrawal deadline dates. 


Classes begin, Winter Term 

Late registration and course change period begins 

Last day for students to apply for Spring graduation 

Deadline for withdrawal with tuition refund* from Winter-term courses (/4 DNE) 
Deadline for withdrawal from program for Winter Session 

Last day to add Winter-term courses (/4) 


In Progress deadline to submit coursework to professors for Fall 2019 courses 


Last day to apply for re-evaluation of courses ending in December 2019 (/2) 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


Tue, Feb. 11 


Mon, Feb. 24 
Fri, Feb. 28 
March 2020 
Sun, Mar. 1 


Wed, Mar. 4 


Mon, Mar. 23 
April 2020 
Wed, Apr. 1 


Wed, Apr. 1 


Thu, Apr. 9 
Fri, Apr. 10 
Sat, Apr. 11 
Sun, Apr. 12 
Mon, Apr. 13 
Tue, Apr. 14 


Thu, Apr. 16 


Last day for initial doctoral thesis submission to the Thesis Office for students who have 
applied for Spring graduation 


Mid-term break begins 


Concordia President's Holiday, University closed 


Mid-term break ends 


Deadline to submit electronic Master thesis to department for Spring convocation; consult with 
your department 


Last day for academic withdrawal from two-term (/3 DISC) Winter-term (/4 DISC) courses 


Last day to apply for Quebec Resident status for Winter term 2020 


Last day for final electronic submission of thesis through Spectrum, the Concordia Repository 
for students who are graduating in the Spring Term 


Last day of classes, Winter Term 

University closed (see April 14, 2020) 

University closed (see April 14, 2020) 

University closed 

University closed 

Make-up day for classes scheduled on April 10 and 11 


Examinations begin 


* Tuition refund only applies to diploma, certificate, independent, visiting, and qualifying programs. 


© Concordia University 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


Concordia University 


http:/Awww.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/academic-regulations. html 
Academic Regulations 


Academic Year 


The academic year begins with a Summer Session (May to August) followed by a Regular Session 
(September to April). 


Summer Session: 


The Summer Session covers all courses offered from the beginning of May and the end of August. 


Regular Session: 

The Regular Session is divided into a Fall Term (September to December) and a Winter Term 
(January to April), each of 15 weeks’ duration, including an examination period. The Academic 
Calendar at the beginning of this publication contains precise dates for the beginning and end of 


classes. 


Residence 


Minimum Residence for Doctoral Degrees. The minimum residence requirement for a doctoral 
degree is 6 terms (two years) of full-time graduate study beyond the master’s degree, or the 
equivalent in part-time study, or 9 terms (3 years) of full-time graduate study beyond the bachelor’s 
degree for those students who are permitted to enroll for doctoral studies without completing a 
master’s degree. It should be understood that this is a minimum requirement, and that a longer 
period may be necessary in order to complete all the work that is required for the degree. In special 
circumstances, departments may permit or require candidates to spend a period of time in residence 
at another institution, subject to the approval from the School of Graduate Studies. When such 
arrangements are made, it is understood that the candidate will be engaged in full-time study, and 
that the institution will be able to provide appropriate supervision and research facilities. In all cases, 
candidates for a doctoral degree from Concordia University must complete at least two years of 


graduate study at this university, including the final year of the required residence period. 


Minimum Residence for Master’s Degrees. The minimum residence requirement for the master’s 
degree is 3 terms (one year) of full-time study, or the equivalent in part-time study. This requirement 
must be met regardless of the amount of graduate work previously completed in any other program 
or at any other university. Certain master’s programs require longer periods of minimum residence. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


Time Limits 


Students who exceed the time limit as outlined below will be withdrawn from their program. Under 
exceptional circumstances a time limit may be extended upon the recommendation of the Graduate 


Program Committee and the approval of the Dean of Graduate Studies. 


Duration of Programs. It is expected that full-time students will complete the requirements for most 
doctoral degree programs within 12 terms (4 years). The expected time to completion for a 
master’s/magisteriate degree for full-time students is 6 terms (2 years) and the diploma and 


certificate is 3 terms (1 year). In the case of the MFA, the expected time to completion is 8 terms. 


Time Limits for Doctoral Degrees. All work for a doctoral degree must be completed within 18 
terms (6 years) of full-time study or 24 terms (8 years) of part-time study from the time of original 


registration in the program. 


Time Limits for Master’s/Magisteriate Degrees. All work for a master’s/magisteriate degree for 
full-time students must be completed within 9 terms (3 years) from the time of initial registration in 
the program; for part-time students the time limit is 15 terms (5 years). In the case of MFA, the time 
limit for full-time students is 12 terms (4 years); for part-time students the time limit is 15 terms (5 


years). In the case of the EMBA, the time limit for full-time students is 6 terms (2 years). 


Time Limits for Diploma Programs. All work for a diploma program must be completed within 6 
terms (2 years) from the time of initial registration in the program for full-time students; for part-time 
students the time limit is 12 terms (4 years). In the case of the Diploma in Clinical Psychology, the 
time limit is 9 terms (3 years) for full-time students; for part-time students the time limit is 15 terms (5 


years). 


Time Limits for Graduate Certificate Programs. All work for a graduate certificate program must 
be completed within 6 terms (2 years) from the time of initial registration in the program for full-time 
students; for part-time students the time limit is 9 terms (3 years). In the case of UNIT, the time limit 


for full-time students is 5 terms. 


Time Limits if transferring from a PhD to Master’s in a similar area of research would be granted 
a time limit based on the expected completion (4 years), less the number of years spent in the PhD 


program, or 2 years, whichever is greater; or the equivalent for part-time study. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


Time Limit if transferring from a Master’s to a Diploma in a similar area of study would be 
granted a time limit of 2 years, less the number of years in the Master’s, or 1 year, whichever is 


greater; or the equivalent for part-time study. 


Time Limit if transferring from a Diploma to a Master’s in a similar area of study would be 
granted a time limit of 3 years, less the number of years in the Diploma; or the equivalent for part- 


time study. 


Academic Standing 


The academic progress of graduate students is assessed at the end of every term. To be considered 
in good standing, students in doctoral programs must maintain the F Rule, C Rule and an 


Assessment Grade Point Average (AGPA) of at least 3.00 based on a minimum of 12 credits. 


Students in master's, graduate diploma and graduate certificate programs must maintain a minimum 
GPA of 2.70. 


For program specific requirements, please refer to the Program section of the Calendar. 


Independent and Visiting students are only subject to the F Rule. 


F Rule 


Graduate students who receive a failing grade in the course of their studies will be withdrawn from 
the program unless continuation in the program is requested by the student’s program or Faculty 
and approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies. If withdrawn from program, students may apply for 
re-admission (see Withdrawal for Academic Reasons. Students who receive another failing grade 


after re-admission will be withdrawn from the program and will not be considered for re-admission. 


C Rule 


Graduate students who receive more than one C grade during the course of their studies will be 
withdrawn from the program unless continuation in the program is requested by the student’s 
program or Faculty and approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies. Course-based programs in the 
John Molson School of Business do not have a C Rule. Individual programs may have more 
stringent regulations; students should check their program's entry or with the Graduate Program 


Director. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


10 
Students who have been withdrawn may apply for re-admission (see Withdrawal for Academic 


Reasons in Graduate Admission section). Students who receive another C after re-admission will be 
withdrawn from the program and will not be considered for re-admission. Students should refer to 


the section on Academic Standing in their program’s calendar entry. 


Assessment Grade Point Average (AGPA) 


The academic progress of graduate students is monitored at the end of every term. To be 
considered in good standing, students in doctoral programs must maintain an Assessment Grade 


Point Average (AGPA) of at least 3.00 based on a minimum of 12 credits. 


Students whose AGPA falls below 3.00 are considered to be in poor standing. Students whose 
AGPA falls below 3.00 for any two assessment periods are considered to be in failed standing. 
Individual programs may have more stringent AGPA regulations; students should check their 


program’s calendar entry or with the Graduate Program Director. 


Students in master’s, graduate diploma and graduate certificate programs must maintain a minimum 
GPA of 2.70 during their program of study in order to be considered in good academic standing. 
Students whose AGPA falls below 2.70 are considered to be in poor standing. Students whose 
AGPA falls below 2.70 for any two assessment periods are considered to be in failed standing. 
Individual programs may have more stringent AGPA regulations; students should check their 


program’s calendar entry or with the Graduate Program Director. 


Students in qualifying programs or concurrent qualifying programs in undergraduate courses will be 
assigned a grade in accordance with the undergraduate grading system for undergraduate courses. 
For all courses a B grade is required in order to ensure that the minimum standards of the graduate 
grading system are maintained. In addition, students must meet specific program requirements for 


good academic standing. 


GPA Graduation Requirement 


In order to graduate, students in doctoral programs must have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.00. 
Students in master's, diploma and graduate certificate programs must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 2.70 in order to graduate. Individual programs may have more stringent regulations; students 


should check their programs’ regulations or with the Graduate Program Director. 


Thesis Supervision 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


11 
Students who do not have a supervisor when required by their program will be withdrawn from that 


program. Students may request to be allowed to remain registered in the program after this point for 


a maximum of four months in order to secure a new supervisor. 


Graduation Application 


Degree, diploma, and certificate candidates who expect to complete their program requirements in a 
particular term must apply to graduate by filling out the online Graduation Application Form. The 


form should be completed by January 15 for spring graduation and July 15 for fall graduation. 


Note: In programs requiring a master’s or doctoral thesis, there are deadlines for thesis submission 
which must be met if a student is to graduate at a particular graduation. These deadlines are 


outlined in the Academic Calendar. 


Credit System 


Concordia University has adopted a system of assigning credits to the components of its graduate 
programs. This system was recommended by the Conseil des Universités du Québec for 
implementation in all the universities of the Province of Québec. The fundamental concepts in this 
system are defined in the Rapport du Conseil des Universités sur les Dipl6mes Universitaires. The 
credit base takes into account the total activity of the student in terms of lectures, seminars, 
conferences, laboratories, studio or practice periods, practica, and research, including, where 
appropriate, the number of hours of personal work required, as estimated by the university. A credit 
is considered to represent a minimum of 45 hours devoted by the student to an educational activity 


as described above. 


Language of Instruction 


While the language of instruction in Concordia University is normally English, students have the right 
to write their assignments and examinations in French. It must be understood, however, that in a 
case where a professor cannot read French, the assignments and examinations must be read by 
another professor, with possible disadvantages and delays for the student. Students are advised to 
enquire of the instructor at the beginning of the course whether assignments and examinations 
written in French will be read personally by the professor. Notwithstanding the above, language and 
literature departments may require assignments and examinations to be written in the language 


being studied. 


Grading System 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


The grades and other notations described and defined in this section are those used for the 
evaluation of graduate courses and certain other graduate degree and diploma components. Some 
programs have academic regulations supplementing these definitions and descriptions. Such 
additional regulations define what is required in terms of grades for a student to be considered in 
good standing in a program. Refer to the relevant program section of this calendar and, where the 
academic regulations for a program have not been stated, consult the Graduate Program Director. 
Grades used for graduate courses or courses taken as part of a graduate program are A+, A, A-, B+, 
B, B-, C, Pass, F, Fail, Fail/Absent (F/ABS), Audit , In Progress (IP) and In Progress Extension 
(IPE). 


The weight accorded to the various elements of the performance of each student is at the discretion 
of the instructor or instructors responsible for the course. At the beginning of a course the instructor 
will provide students with the evaluation scheme in writing. The scheme cannot be altered without 


appropriate notice. 


1. Each doctoral and master’s program has a rule which limits the number of C grades a student 
may obtain, and still meet the degree requirements. Diploma and Certificate programs also limit 


the number of C grades a student may obtain. (See C Rule above). 


2. Fail or F describes work below the acceptable standard in a course. When a student receives a 
Fail, F or a Fail/Absent (F/ABS) grade in any course taken as part of a graduate program, it is the 
responsibility of the department or Faculty to recommend to the School of Graduate Studies 


whether or not the student should be permitted to continue in the program. 


3. Fail/Absent (F/ABS) is used when the instructor at the end of the course has not received the 


required work and has not granted an extension of the deadline. It is a permanent grade. 


4. Using the grade point equivalents listed below, grade point averages are calculated and used to 
measure academic achievement: A+ = 4.30, A = 4.00, A- = 3.70, B+ = 3.30, B = 3.00, B- = 2.70, 
C = 2.00, Fail = 0, F=0 and Fail/Absent (F/ABS) = 0. 


5. Audit is the grade assigned to courses that are not taken for credit and which do not count 
towards the completion of a program. A course taken for this grade must be so designated at the 
beginning of the term. Students may audit a graduate course with permission of the Graduate 


Program Director of the program in which the course is offered, once the director is satisfied that 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


13 
the student is qualified to take the course. Auditing students are expected to attend class, but are 


not required to complete assignments or write examinations. 


. The /n Progress (IP) notation is used when a student, who has completed a substantial portion of 
the course, cannot complete the course in time for reporting grades due to circumstances 
beyond their control. This notation may be assigned only to individual students, not to entire 
classes. The /P notation is only used in combination with a valid course grade (e.g. “B/IP”, 
“F/IP”). The grade is assigned on the basis that the missing work is graded as zero and 
included in calculating the overall grade. Students must complete courses with /P notations by 
the DNE deadline of the following term or the Fall DNE deadline for Summer term courses (see 
Academic Calendar for precise dates). If the course is not completed, the /P notation will be 
removed at the DISC deadline and an /NC notation will be recorded along with the grade and the 
grade will become the permanent grade. If the course is completed after the DNE deadline the 
grade will not be changed (e.g. “B/INC’, “F/INC”). The Incomplete (/NC) notation is used to 
indicate that the student did not complete the required work for the course. 


Under exceptional circumstances an additional period of In Progress Extension (/PE) may be 
granted. Requests for an /PE notation should be submitted as a student request, supported by 
relevant documentation including confirmation of the instructor's support for a further extension 
prior to the DNE deadline. 


In-Progress Leave (IPL) is an administrative extension to indicate the student is on a Leave of 
Absence and the /P or /PE grade reporting deadline is extended until the end of the leave. 


In-Progress (IPM) is an administrative notation to indicate the student has been granted an 


exceptional extension until a specific date to complete the work. 


Either graduate programs or the School of Graduate Studies may prevent/remove course 
registrations on the basis of outstanding /P/IPE notations on the student record. 


Grades with /P, /PE, [PL or IPM notations are not included in GPA calculations. 
Grades with an INC notation are included in the GPA calculations. 


Students will be required to complete the course(s) with /P/IPE notations by the DNE deadline 


following their return from Leave. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


Academic Term 


IP Deadline for 
student to submit 
outstanding work 


IP Deadline for 
professor to 
submit final grade 


IPE Deadline for 
student to submit 
outstanding work 


14 


IPE deadline for 
professor to 
submit final grade 


Summer DNE of Fall Term DISC of Fall Term December 15 of Fall End of Fall Term 
Term 
Fall DNE of Winter Term DISC of Winter April 15 of Winter End of Winter Term 
Term Term 
Winter DNE of 1S Summer DISC of Summer August 15 of Summer — End of Summer 


Term Term Term Term 


7. Accepted (ACC) or Rejected (REJ) is the final grade given to a thesis or thesis-equivalent. Under 


exceptional circumstances, the School of Graduate Studies can apply a grade of F. 


8. Pass or Fail is the final grade normally given to comprehensive examinations, internships and 
language proficiency examinations. Students who fail a comprehensive examination may be 
permitted to sit for a second examination. Students who fail a language proficiency examination 


may be permitted to make no more than two further attempts to satisfy the requirement. 
In addition, the following are notations which are not grades: 


1. Discontinued (DISC) is used to indicate that the student withdrew from the course in question 
before the withdrawal deadline. The notation appears permanently on the student record and 
official transcript. It carries no grade point value and does not count in assessments of academic 


standing, but does count towards a student's status (i.e. full- and part-time). 


2. Medical (MED) is used on students’ records to indicate that long-term illness has rendered it not 
possible for the student in question to complete the academic requirements of a given course or 


activity. It is a permanent notation; it has no grade point equivalent. 


3. No Credit (No-Cr) indicates that a student has not fulfilled the requirements of the course. This 
notation is limited to the Diploma in Chartered Professional Accountancy program, which is 
recognized as a qualification to write the Common Final Examination (CFE). A student receiving 
a No-Cr notation must take the tutorial section of this course in the next term in which the course 


is offered. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


15 
4. Pending (PEND) is used when a grade has not been reported at the time of production of a 


transcript. 


5. Replace (REPL) indicates that the credit earned for this course cannot be retained because it will 
be replaced with another course as specified by the program. The grade will contribute to the 
CGPA. 


6. Must Repeat (MREP) indicates that the credit earned for this course cannot be retained because 
it is a repetition of a course, or of similar course material, already completed. The grade will 
contribute to the CGPA. 


7. Valid (VALD) identifies a new course with the same course name and number as other courses 
previously enrolled in. It is not considered as a repetition. The grade and credit will contribute to 
the CGPA. 


In cases where the original grade is not calculated correctly, the final grade can be altered. 


Grade Submission Deadlines 


All final grades for all courses are required to be submitted no later than seven calendar days after 


the University’s last scheduled final examination. 


Supplemental Examinations 


Graduate students are not permitted to write supplemental examinations. 


Comprehensive Examinations 


Comprehensive examinations are under the auspices of individual programs and students are 
advised to consult with their Graduate Program Director concerning program regulations. While the 
School of Graduate Studies’ general regulations permit a student to write comprehensive 
examinations a second time, individual programs may have a more stringent regulation in this regard 
(i.e., not permitting a second writing) and students should verify this with the program. 
Comprehensive examinations are graded as Pass or Fail. In cases where two attempts are 
permitted, an initial grade of fail is not reported on the student’s academic record or academic 


transcript. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


16 
Note: Unless expressly permitted by the instructor, the possession of electronic communication 


devices is prohibited during examinations. 


© Concordia University 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/graduate-admission.html 


Admission 


All graduate programs offered by Concordia University, except for the Individualized Program (INDI), 
are attached to one of the three Faculties or to the John Molson School of Business. The Individual 
Program (INDI) is attached to the School of Graduate Studies. All graduate programs are under the 
general supervision of the Council of the School of Graduate Studies and its chair, the Dean of 


Graduate Studies. 


A listing of all current degree programs and fields of advanced study is provided in the Programs 
section. The degree programs are described fully in the Calendar’s Faculty sections: Faculty of Arts 
and Science, Gina Cody School of Engineering and Computer Science, Faculty of Fine Arts, John 
Molson School of Business, and the School of Graduate Studies. Existing degree programs are a 
reflection of research interests, of the professors and researchers on staff, and of the needs of the 
community served by the University. Inquiries concerning these degree programs should therefore 


be sent to the relevant program. 


In conjunction with the degree program, the Dean of Graduate Studies is responsible for ensuring 
the quality of the admission of students to the doctoral, master’s, diploma and certificate programs of 
the University. Admission is based on an assessment of the student’s qualifications for the proposed 
program of study and entails specific credit, residence, course, thesis, and examination 


requirements, which vary from program to program. 


The Application Process 


Applicants to graduate programs should apply online; more information is available on the Graduate 
Studies website. 


Applicants may apply as full-time or part-time students; refer to Student Classification for more 


information. 


Admission Application Deadlines 


Admission Application Deadlines vary depending on the degree program. Applicants should contact 
the degree program to which they are applying for specific admission deadlines. Applicants should 


arrange for all required documentation to be in the appropriate office by the deadline. Please note 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


that many programs only admit new students for the term which begins in September. 


New students (applying for admission to a Master’s or Doctoral program) are now automatically 
considered for all Entrance Awards; there is no separate application process. Refer to Awards page 


for further information. 


Graduate Application Fee 


There is a $103.50 (Canadian) application fee per application. The fee is payable on-line by Visa, 
MasterCard, or international Wire Transfer. This application fee is not refundable under any 
circumstances, nor can it be used towards tuition. It is not transferable to a session other than that 


for which the student is applying. 


Admission Requirements 


Applicants to Concordia University must meet the minimum university requirements to be considered 
for admission. Some degree programs may have additional or stricter requirements. These 
requirements are detailed in the degree program’s calendar section and applicants should review 
this information. The minimum requirements to be considered for admission to graduate studies at 


Concordia are listed below. 


Concordia University evaluates international degree equivalencies and Canadian equivalencies 


upon receipt of an application. 


Academic Requirements 


To be considered for admission to Doctoral-level studies, the applicant must have completed a 


master’s/magisteriate degree (or equivalent) with high standing. 


To be considered for admission to Master-level studies, the applicant must have a 
bachelor’s/baccalaureate degree (or equivalent) with high standing (e.g., with honours, or the 


Concordia equivalent of a GPA of at least 3.00 on a scale of 4.30). 


To be considered for admission to most graduate diploma or graduate certificate-level studies, the 
applicant must have completed a bachelor’s/baccalaureate degree (or equivalent) with the 


Concordia equivalent of at GPA of at least 2.70 on a scale of 4.30. 


Some degree programs may have additional, or higher, academic requirements. Applicants should 


review the Calendar program section of the degree program in which they are interested. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


Language Proficiency Requirements 
English is the main language of instruction at Concordia University. Applicants who meet one of the 


following three conditions will be exempted from the English language proficiency test requirement: 


¢« Completion of a minimum of three full- years of study at the undergraduate or graduate level at 


an accredited university in one of the following countries; 


« Completion of a Quebec Diploma of Collegial Studies (DEC) and a university degree at a 


Quebec university; 


« For JMSB applicants applying to the professional programs, a minimum of three years’ full-time 


work experience in an English milieu, and a successful personal interview. 


Applicants, regardless of citizenship, who do not meet one of the three conditions outlined above 
and whose primary language is not English, will be required to provide proof of English proficiency 


prior to their admission to Concordia University. 
The following are Concordia University’s accepted tests and required minimum scores: 


Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) 


« The minimum acceptable internet-based TOEFL score for programs in Arts and Science, Fine 
Arts and the School of Graduate Studies: 90 with at least a score of 20 in each of the four 


components (some graduate programs may require higher scoring). 


« The minimum acceptable internet-based TOEFL score for programs in John Molson School of 


Business: 95 with at least a score of 20 in each of the four components. 


« The minimum acceptable internet-based TOEFL for programs in the Gina Cody School of 
Engineering and Computer Science: 85 with at least a score of 20 in each of the four 


components. 
International English Language Testing System (IELTS) 


¢ The minimum acceptable IELTS score for programs in Arts and Science, Fine Arts and the 
School of Graduate Studies: 6.5 with at least a score of 6.5 in each of the four components 


(some graduate programs may require higher scoring). 


« The minimum acceptable IELTS score for programs in John Molson School of Business: 7.0 with 


at least a score of 7.0 in each of the four components. 


¢« The minimum acceptable IELTS score for programs in the Gina Cody School of Engineering and 


Computer Science: an overall score band of 6.5. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


20 
Test results that are more than two years old at the time of application will not be accepted. 


In all cases, the University reserves the right to require a language proficiency test if it is 


deemed necessary. 


Please refer to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency 


requirements, including additional acceptable tests and related scores. 


Permanent Code 


The ministére de |’Education, du Loisir et du Sport (MELS) requires all registered students to have a 


“permanent code” (a unique identifying number) which is assigned by MELS. 


Applicants who do not provide a valid code with their application must apply for one upon receiving 
admission to Concordia University. Information on how to apply for a permanent code and a link to 


the on-line “Permanent Code Data Form” can be found at the Permanent Code website. 


Students who do not submit or apply for a permanent code will be charged a permanent code 
surcharge. 


Academic Success & Integrity Module (ASIM) 


To be permitted to register for future courses, all graduate students must complete the Academic 
Success & Integrity Module before the DNE deadline of the first term of admission. Students who 
fail to submit the ASIM online module will be blocked from registering for the following academic 


term(s) and from making changes to their current registration until the module is completed. 


Prerequisite Courses 


Applicants who are deficient in certain courses may be required to take prerequisite courses either 
as an Independent student or as a student in a Qualifying Program. Refer to Independent Students 


and Qualifying Programs. 


Students taking prerequisite courses are charged tuition and other fees on a per credit basis for 
these courses. See Tuition & Fees. 


Transfer Credits and Exemptions 


Student may be entitled to transfer credit from previous studies to their new program and/or be 


exempted from certain courses. Refer to Transfer Credits and Exemptions for additional information. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


21 


Qualifying Program 


Depending on the degree program and on the number of courses required, prerequisite courses 
taken in a Qualifying Program may be taken prior to admission into a graduate program or 


concurrently with the graduate program. 


Qualifying Program (prior to admission to a graduate program): Applicants who have completed 
an undergraduate program leading to a bachelor’s degree, but whose preparation is inadequate for 
direct admission to a graduate program, may, upon recommendation by a department, be permitted 
to register for a Qualifying Program of advanced undergraduate or graduate studies. Students 
admitted to a Qualifying Program take undergraduate or graduate courses as preparation for 


application to a graduate program. 


« The minimum qualifications for entry into the Qualifying Program are as follows: at least 24 
course credits in the proposed field of study as determined by the program; at least a B average 
in these courses (B- for Diploma and Graduate Certificate courses), with no grade lower than C; 


and at least a C average in their final two undergraduate years. 


¢ Qualifying Programs consist normally of four or five senior undergraduate courses. In certain 
exceptional cases, students may be required to take more than this number, and spend more 


than one full year as qualifying students. 


¢ Qualifying students must have their program of study approved by the relevant Graduate 


Program Director prior to each registration period. 


¢ Satisfactory completion of the courses taken in a Qualifying Program does not guarantee 
automatic admission to a graduate program. Students must apply, or reapply, for admission to 
graduate studies during or after the Qualifying Program. Their applications are considered along 
with all other applications received at that time, and do not take priority over those of other 


applicants who may be better qualified. 


« Students taking prerequisite courses are charged tuition and other fees on a per credit basis. 


See Tuition & Fees. 


Qualifying Program (concurrent): Students admitted to a graduate program and a concurrent 
Qualifying Program are required to complete prerequisite courses at the same time as they complete 
their Graduate Program requirements. The Qualifying Program normally does not exceed 12 credits 


but may consist of graduate and/or undergraduate courses. 


« A student who does not successfully complete a concurrent Qualifying Program within the first 
three terms will be blocked from future registration. Standard ‘May Continue’ or ‘May Not 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


22 
Continue’ Student Requests will apply. 


The prerequisite courses are completed in addition to the regular graduate program and form 


part of the student’s degree requirements for graduation. 


The prerequisite course(s) must be completed during the first year of study in the graduate 


program. 


Any grade lower than a B in a course from a Qualifying Program is considered a failure. 


Qualifying students must have their program of study approved by the relevant Graduate 


Program Director prior to each registration period. 


Students are charged tuition and other fees for the prerequisite courses in addition to fees 


charged for the student’s graduate program of study. See Tuition & Fees. 


A student who does not successfully complete a concurrent Qualifying Program within the first three 
terms will be automatically placed on academic probation. Standard ‘May Continue’ or ‘May Not 


Continue’ student requests will apply. 


Top 


Deferment of Admission 


Applicants who are admitted into the program but wish to defer their admission due to extenuating 
circumstances, such as non-processed visa (Supporting documents may be required), may, at the 
discretion of the Department, be granted this request once within one year. Applicants should 
consult their Department, as deferrals are not accepted by all programs. The request to change 


(defer) admission __can be found in the Forms for Students section. 


Fast Track to PhD Programs 


Fast Tracking describes a process whereby exceptional students are admitted to PhD programs 


without a master's/magisteriate degree in the same discipline. 


Students who follow this process must show high academic performance or potential, evidenced by 
an outstanding GPA, appropriate research publications in the field of study, a research topic at the 
master's/magisteriate level which is advanced enough for a doctoral thesis proposal, or other similar 


demonstrations of achievement. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


23 
Students who are accepted for accelerated admission and who are currently registered in a 


master's/magisteriate degree program, can enter directly into the PhD program without completing 


all of the master program requirements. 


In some cases, an outstanding student who holds a bachelor's degree can progress directly into a 


PhD program. 


Internal Transfer 


Students currently in a degree program may choose to transfer from one program to another (e.g. 
from a Master of Arts in Judaic Studies to a Master of Arts in Philosophy, or from a Master of 


Engineering in Mechanical Engineering to a Master of Applied Science in Mechanical Engineering). 


A request to transfer from one degree program to another is considered to be a new application. 
Students who wish to transfer degree programs must submit an on-line application, along with the 
required application fee. Documentation showing professional and educational achievements 


outside of Concordia must be submitted if they have not already been provided. 


Withdrawal for Academic Reasons 


Students who are withdrawn for academic reasons, will not be eligible to reapply for at least three 
terms. To qualify for admission, students are required to submit an application and meet competitive 


admission criteria. 


Re-Instatement of Withdrawn Students 


Students who withdrew or have been withdrawn from a graduate program for non-academic reasons 
(e.g. non-continuous registration) may wish to submit a Student Request form requesting re- 


instatement to the program. Refer to the Classification and Registration for more information. 


© Concordia University 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


24 


Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/graduate-registration.html 


Classification of Students and Registration 
Classification of Students 


Independent Students 


Applicants who do not have the minimum qualifications for direct admission into a degree program 
may request to take courses as an independent graduate student. Likewise, graduate students who 
are enrolled in degree programs but who wish to take courses outside their degree requirements 
may request to take undergraduate courses as independent undergraduate students or graduate- 


level courses as independent graduate students 


Independent graduate students enroll in a particular graduate course, without being admitted to the 


degree program which offers the course. 


Normally, independent graduate students take no more than the equivalent of two graduate courses 
per term, and no more than the equivalent of four graduate courses from the courses of any 


graduate degree program up to 12 credits. 


Only applicants who have the qualifications for admission to the course in question will be given 
permission to take the course. In every case, permission of the Graduate Program Director and/or 
Faculty Student Affairs Office must be obtained. Meeting the minimum requirements of an individual 
course does not guarantee entry to that course, as preference will be given to degree program 


students. 


Independent Graduate Students are subject to the fees and regulations applicable to such 


categories of students. 


Credits earned by independent graduate students may be considered for transfer credit in the event 
that the students are subsequently admitted to a graduate degree program. Please note that 


financial credit will not be awarded however. 
An independent graduate student who receives an F grade is no longer allowed to continue studies. 
Graduate independent students are eligible to audit courses. Refer to the section on Auditing 


Students 
Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


25 


Visiting Students 


Graduate visiting students are graduate students from other universities who have been authorized 
by their home universities to take graduate courses at Concordia University. They are subject to the 
regulations of Concordia University. 


Graduate students from other Québec universities must submit requests for courses through the 
Inter-University Agreement (INTU/CREPUQ) process. 


Graduate students from Canadian universities outside of Québec must complete the Graduate 
Transfer Agreement between Canadian Universities (CAGS) form or obtain a letter (or form) of 
authorization from their home university. This document must be submitted to the degree program 


offering the course in which they are interested. 


Graduate students from universities outside of Canada must contact Concordia International if their 
home university has an exchange agreement with Concordia. They will be considered as Visiting 

Exchange students. If no exchange agreement exists, the student must obtain a letter of permission 
from their home university stating which courses they are permitted to take. The students must also 


provide information on their home university, official transcripts and immigration documents. 


Auditing Students 


Auditing students are graduate students who, with the permission of the Graduate Program Director 
and/or Faculty Student Affairs Office of the program in which the course is offered, may attend a 
class that is not a requirement of the student’s program. There is no credit value assigned when 
courses are audited and students are not required to complete assignments or write examinations. 


Refer to Tuition and Fees for detailed information on the financial implications. 


Student Classification: Full/Part- Time Status 


Graduate Certificate and Diploma Programs 
Students in a graduate certificate or diploma program are considered to be full-time students if they 


register for 9 or more credits in a term. 


Students who do not fall in the situations as describe above, are considered to be part-time 


students. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


26 
Master’s and Doctoral Programs 


Students in master’s or doctoral degree programs are accepted as full or part-time students at the 
time of admission. These students are considered to be full or part-time according to their status at 
admission, regardless of the actual amount of credits for which they register. Their classification will 


change only if they submit a request to change their status. 


MBA students enrolled in the Executive MBA program and the Investment Management MBA 
program are considered full-time students as they have to follow an established schedule of courses 


per term. 


Master of Business Administration (MBA) program students are considered full-time if they register 
for a minimum of 12 credits in each of the Fall and Winter terms. Part-time MBA students are 
permitted to register for a maximum of 6 credits in each of the Fall and Winter terms and a minimum 


of 12 credits in the academic year. 
Independent Graduate and Visiting students are considered to be part-time students. 


Visiting Exchange students are considered to be full-time students. 


Service Requests 


Applications from full-time or part-time students for exceptions to academic regulations or related 


matters should be submitted by the student through the Service Request system. 


To submit a Service Request, the student must access their Student Center, next click on the “Self 


Service” drop-down menu, select “Research Activities” and then “Service Request”. 


A statement from the student confirming support for the request submitted with relevant supporting 
documentation should be included with the request. A request is not deemed to be approved until 


authorized by the School of Graduate Studies. 


Changes to Student Classification: Full/Part-Time Status 


Requests for changes to student classification (from full-time to part-time or vice-versa) must be 
submitted prior to the DNE deadline of a given term. Students must submit a Service Request for a 
change in status .Achange of student classification may have implications for students receiving 
loans, bursaries, or awards; students should check the regulations associated with their loans, 
bursaries, or awards. International students must retain the status as indicated on their Study 
Permit/CAQ. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


27 
Changes to a student’s classification may also affect the student’s time limit and/or their payment 


schedule. 
Registration 


Most programs currently offer web registration. In these programs, it is the student's responsibility to 


add, change or drop their courses on-line, by the deadlines indicated in the Academic Calendar. 


Students in programs not offering web registration must contact the Graduate Program Director in 


order to add, drop or change their course(s). 


All students are responsible to verify on MyConcordia that their registration has been processed and 
that the course registration appears on their student record. Any errors or omissions must be 
addressed prior to the registration deadlines of the term in question. 


Registration for a Course(s) 


It is the student’s responsibility to ensure that course registrations have been processed and/or 


requested from their program by the deadline dates listed in the Academic Calendar. 


If not officially registered in a course, students are not entitled to attend the course or to receive 
grades for any completed work. Refer to the Academic Calendar for a detailed list of deadline dates. 
Late registration for a Course(s) 


If, due to extenuating circumstances, a student could not register by the registration deadline dates, 
they must submit a Service Request for late registration . In such cases, a student may attend 
classes until they receive a decision. Late registration is allowed only in special circumstances, with 
the approval of the Graduate Program Director and the School of Graduate Studies. Service 


requests for late registrations must be supported by appropriate documentation. 


Students will incur a late registration fee when they register on, or after, the date that classes 


Officially begin across the University. 


Withdrawing from Course(s) 


Withdrawing from a course leads to either a Did Not Enter (DNE) or a Discontinued (DISC) notation. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


28 
It is the student’s responsibility to meet all deadlines and follow all necessary steps to withdraw from 


a course(s), or from the University. Not attending classes or informing an instructor of the intent to 
withdraw does not constitute official withdrawal. It is not mandatory for an instructor to provide 
students with any evaluation or feedback of their progress in a course before the withdrawal 
deadline. Students who do not properly withdraw before the published deadlines will receive failing 


grades. 


Did Not Enter (DNE) 


A DNE means that the student has officially withdrawn from the course. The DNE’d course(s) will be 
removed from the student’s academic record, and will not appear on the record. Refer to Tuition and 
Fees for detailed information on the financial implications and the Academic Calendar for deadline 


dates. Non-standard DNE dates are available through the Graduate program office. 


Discontinued (DISC) 


A DISC is an academic withdrawal from a course. This means that the student is still registered in 
the course, but no longer has to attend classes or complete the course work. The student will not be 
academically penalized (i.e. receive a failed grade). A DISC notation is permanent and appears on 
the student transcript next to the relevant course. Failure to comply with the DISC withdrawal 
deadline results in the course(s) in question being graded Fail, F, or Fail/Absent (F-ABS). Refer to F 
rule for academic standing. Non-standard DNE dates are available through the Graduate program 


office. 


Withdrawal from Program or from the University 


Students who wish to withdraw from their program or from the University must do so by the DNE 
deadline and include the reason(s) for withdrawing. A Service Request for withdrawal from 

program must be completed and submitted. It is the student's responsibility to ensure that they 
have DNE’ed their courses by the deadline for the withdrawal to be effective for the beginning of 
term. If the withdrawal from program request is submitted after the DNE deadline, it will be effective 
the beginning of the following term. If the student does not wish to complete their course(s), it is their 
responsibility to ensure they have withdrawn from their courses by the DISC date. Failure to comply 
with the DISC withdrawal deadline results in the course(s) in question being graded 


Fail/F/Fail/Absent (F-ABS). The student’s record will reflect “withdrew from program’. 


Refer to Tuition and Fees for detailed information on the financial implications. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


29 


Continuing In Program (CIP) Registrations 


(for students in master’s or doctoral programs) 


After a student's first registration has been processed, the registration system will consider master 
and doctoral students to be continuing in their program when they are not otherwise registered in 
academic courses. Students who are still within their program time limit but are not registered in 
course credits, will be identified as “Continuing in Program” on their student record. This notation is 
an academic notation and not a registration for academic credit. Students with a CIP notation will be 
charged either tuition or a Continuation fee. Refer to the Tuition and Fees for detailed information on 


the financial implications. 


Students who are not registered for courses in the first term of admission must get approval from the 


School of Graduate Studies for a CIP notation, through the submission of a Service Request. 


The notation on the student record will show Continuing in Program (CIP) or Time Limit Extension 
(TLE), respectively, unless replaced by a course registration. The CIP is an automatic process. 


Should a student subsequently register for courses, the automatic CIP will be removed. 


Automatic CIPs will occur for returning students only if there are no restrictions on record (e.g. 
academic, financial, expired time limits). Students will be withdrawn from their program if the 


automatic CIPs cannot be processed each term. 


Time Limit Extension Registrations 


Students who have exceeded their time limit and have been granted a limit extension will 
automatically be registered in “Time Limit Extension” (TLE) by the system until they have reached 
their program time limit extension. If a course is registered, the TLE notation is replaced with the 


course. Refer to Tuition and Fees for detailed information on the financial implications. 


Withdrawal from Program due to Lack of Registration 


Graduate students in Master’s and Doctoral programs will be withdrawn from their program if course 
registration or academic course notation (CIP/TLE) cannot be processed each term due to any 
outstanding admission, immigration documents, unpaid accounts, missing progress report, 


outstanding Academic Success Integrity Module, or poor academic standing. 


Graduate students in Diploma and Graduate Certificate programs will be withdrawn once their time 


limit has expired. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


30 
Refer to the sections on Continuing in Program (CIP) Registrations as well as Re-Instatement of 


Withdrawn Students. 


Lapsed Student Status 


Independent graduate students and graduate visiting students who have not registered for courses 
for three consecutive terms or more will have their student status lapsed and must submit an 


authorization to register as a non-degree student 


Inter-University Agreement (INTU/CREPUQ) 


Québec universities have agreed to permit the transfer of academic credits between them using the 
CREPUQ/INTU Registration system. Using this system, Concordia students may take courses at 
another Québec University (the host university) and the credits will be transferred back to Concordia 


to be used to meet the requirements of their degree. 


Up to a maximum of 6 credits may be transferred in any one year. In exceptional cases, a student 


may be authorized to take up to 12 credits at another university. 


The host university has the right to accept or refuse a request for registration from a student in 
another university, in any of the courses or programs which it offers. Students are subject to the 


rules and regulations of the host university. 
Eligible students 


Only students enrolled in a degree program are eligible to register under the Inter-University 
Agreement. Authorization for a Concordia graduate student to register at another university must be 
given by the student’s Graduate Program Director, the Dean of Graduate Studies, and the Office of 
the Registrar. Only students in good academic standing will be approved to register under the Inter- 
University Agreement. In addition, in order for students to be approved, their admission file must be 
complete and finalized. Concordia students wishing to take a course at another university cannot 


have an outstanding account balance. 
Eligible Courses 


The agreement normally covers only graduate degree students and graduate-level courses, and is 
intended to include only those courses not given at the home university which fit a student’s program 
requirements. In exceptional cases, graduate students may be authorized to take undergraduate 


courses to meet the requirements of a concurrent qualifying program. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


31 
Transfer of Grades 


The grades achieved at other institutions for courses taken under the Inter-University Agreement will 
be recorded on Concordia records and transcripts using a conversion table _. These grades will be 
included in the calculation of grade point averages in the same manner as any grade achieved in a 


course taken at Concordia and subsequently transferred into the student's program. 
Payment of Courses 


Payment for the courses is due at the student’s home university. Refer to Tuition and Fees. Any 


additional costs (i.e. lab materials) are payable to the host university. 
Registration/Cancellation of Courses 


All requests for registration and/or cancellation of courses are done through the CREPUQ website. 
Students are responsible for accessing the CREPUQ website to check the status of their request on 
a regular basis. Requests go through several stages of processing and e-mails will not necessarily 


be sent to update the student on the status at each stage. 
Deadlines 


Requests for registration or cancellation of courses at other universities must be submitted by the 
deadline of the host university. Students are advised to inform themselves of the host university’s 


deadlines, since they may be different from Concordia’s. 


Students should refer to the CREPUQ website for detailed information. 


Financial Implications 


Refer to Tuition and Fees for detailed information on the financial implications related to late 


registration, DNEs, DISCs Continuation fees or TLEs. 


Student Portal (www.MyConcordia.ca) 


Students can access information concerning their personal class schedule, current course grades, 
account balance, tuition and enrolment receipts for educational tax credit, loans and bursaries, 
personal book list, permanent code status and registration dates on their student portal. Students 
can also update their mailing address(es) and e-mail address(es) on the student portal; students are 


responsible for ensuring that the contact details listed are current. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


32 
Tuition and other fees are automatically assessed and charged to the student’s account once a 


student has registered in a course(s) or has a Continuing in Program (CIP) or a Time Limit Extension 
(TLE) academic notation on their student record. The student’s account balance is available on the 


student portal. Refer to Tuition and Fees for detailed information. 


Within Minimum Residence 


All master’s and doctoral programs have a minimum residence requirement of at least three terms 
for master’s degrees and six terms for doctoral degrees. This is the minimum period of time which 
must elapse between a student's initial registration in the program and the student’s graduation. 


There is no minimum residence requirement for diploma and certificate programs. 


Leaves of Absence from Program 


Graduate students who wish to temporarily discontinue their studies for a few terms may request a 
leave of absence from their program through a Service Request. Before requesting a leave, 
students should confirm with their Graduate Program Director and supervisor that all required 
components of their degree programs will be available when they return. The beginning and end of a 


leave should coincide with the beginning and end of an academic term. 


Leaves are granted only to students in good academic standing. Refer to the relevant Academic 


Regulations section. 


Students cannot be on Leave in terms where a course with a DISC notation appears since a 
discontinued course is still considered as a registration. Refer to the Withdrawal from a course or 


courses section. 

No changes to the student’s academic status will be made during a leave. 
Students may not graduate with a Leave of Absence in their graduating term. 
Time Limit & Other Deadlines 


While on Leave without access, Leave with access or Parental Leave, the student’ program time 
limit will be extended by the period of the leave. All deadlines for work in progress will be extended 


by the period of the leave. 


Top 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


33 
Access to University Services 


During a leave of absence (of any type), students are not entitled to take courses, write exams, 
submit outstanding work and/or request guidance on thesis and research work. However, they may 
have access to some university services depending on the type of leave they request. There are 


three types of leaves available to students and one administrative leave: 


Types of Leaves & Fees 


Leave without access: During a leave without access, a student will not have access to library, 


university or student services. No fees will be charged. 


Leave with access: During a leave with access, a student will have access to library, university and 
student services. Leaves with access are granted only under exceptional circumstances. A flat 


service fee of $150 per term will be charged. 


Parental leave: All graduate students are entitled to parental leave of up to three consecutive terms 
during their program of study on the occasion of the birth or adoption of a child. The student will 
have access to library, university and student services. Students holding a Concordia Fellowship will 
receive a deferral of their fellowship for the period of leave. In the case of other fellowships, the 


regulations of the granting agencies will apply. No fees will be charged. 


Required Administrative Leave: Students who are removed from studies resulting from expired 
Study Permits/CAQs, a delay in requesting reinstatement into the university or other administrative 
issues will be assigned a required administrative leave of absence from their program. A student will 
not have access to library, university or student services. No fees are charged. A Required 


Administrative Leave will not extend a student’s program Time Limit. 


Except for Parental leave, students are normally permitted only a maximum of three terms of leave 
(with or without access) during their program of study. Leaves beyond three terms are only approved 
on an exceptional basis and with supporting documentation. Parental leave can be requested on the 


occasion of each birth or adoption of a child. 


Awards, Loans, Bursaries 


A leave from a program of study may have implications for students receiving awards, loans or 


bursaries; students should check the regulations associated with their awards, loans or bursaries. 


Medical Coverage 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


34 
« While on an approved leave of absence Canadian students do not pay fees for the Student 


Health and Dental Plan. Therefore, they are not covered by (insured under) this insurance plan. 


« International student’s medical coverage is dependent on their registration status and therefore 
medical coverage may be cancelled. Please visit the International Students Office for information 
regarding Health Insurance eligibility. In addition, since the visa status of international students 
may possibly be affected by a leave of absence, it is very important that these students visit the 
International Students Office for additional information. 


Applying For a Leave 


With the exception of the Required Administrative Leave, students apply in advance through the 
Student Request process, prior to the DNE deadline. Students must see the Graduate Program 
Director in their program in order to initiate a Student Request. Students must specify the reason for 
the Leave and provide supporting documentation; for example, a request for leave for medical 


reasons must be supported by an original medical certificate. 
End of a Leave 


Once a student's leave is over, the student will be considered as continuing in their program. 
Students in master’s and doctoral programs will receive a Continuation in Program notation on their 
record and be charged accordingly. Diploma and Certificate students will only be charged once they 


register for courses. 


Exemptions 


Depending on the policy of the degree program, students may be granted an exemption from a 
required course in their program curriculum. Students who are granted an exemption must replace 
the exempted course with another course in order to fulfill the credit requirements of the program. 


This replacement course must be selected in conjunction with their Graduate Program Director. 


Students who have been granted an exemption for a course cannot subsequently take that course 


for credit toward the graduate certificate, diploma or degree. 


Transfer Credits 


Students may transfer credits from previous studies completed within the past five years to their 
current program. The credits must have been earned for graduate-level studies, and they must not 


have been used as part of a completed Master or Doctoral degree. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


35 
Credits earned from a completed graduate Certificate or Diploma may be eligible for transfer. 


Students should contact their department for eligibility prior to submitting a Service Request. 


Requests to transfer credits must be approved by the students’ degree program and the Dean of 
Graduate Studies. Transfer credits must normally be requested in the student’s first term of 


admission. Students are encouraged to read their program’s calendar section for further information. 


As part of a service request to transfer credit, students must provide official transcripts showing that 
they have completed the course. The grade and number of credits they received for the course must 
appear on the transcript. The transcripts must be accompanied by official course descriptions for the 
relevant courses. In addition, the transcripts must show that the students have withdrawn from the 


Master or Doctoral program from which the requested credits are being transferred. 


Transfer credits to programs requiring a minimum admission GPA of 3.00 will be permitted only if the 
final grade for the course is B or better. Transfer credits to programs requiring a minimum admission 


GPA of 2.70 will be permitted only if the final grade for the course is B- or better. 


The grades associated with transfer credits do not appear on the students’ transcript and therefore 
will not affect their Grade Point Average. The two exceptions to this rule are credits transferred from 
previous studies at Concordia University and credits for courses taken under the Inter-University 
Agreement (INTU/CREPUQ). 


Courses taken previously at Concordia and courses taken under the Inter-University Agreement will 
appear on Concordia records and transcripts, under the new program, along with the grades 
associated with the courses. The transferred grades and credits will be included in the calculation of 


students’ grade point averages. 


The grades for INTU courses will be recorded using a conversion table that can be accessed at the 


Registrar's website 


Re-Instatement of Withdrawn Students 


Students who have been withdrawn from a graduate program by the University for non-academic 
reasons (e.g. non-continuous registration) may wish to submit a Student Request for reinstatement 
to the program. Students must see the Graduate Program Director in their program in order to 
initiate a Student Request. This request is to be submitted for consideration during the same term in 


which the student was withdrawn. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


36 
Students who withdrew from their program for non-academic reasons, and who are still in 


good academic standing according to the regulations of the university may request to be reinstated 
into their program. The request for reinstatement must be for an academic term no later than one 


year (3 academic terms) after the term of withdrawal. 


© Concordia University 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


37 


Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/thesis-regulations.html 
Thesis Regulations 


Thesis 


A thesis is the final report on a comprehensive research program that meets accepted scholarly 
criteria and is of a cohesive, unitary character. All written components of a thesis must meet the 
scholarly requirements of the research discipline and be formatted in accordance with the Thesis 


Preparation Guide 


If it is necessary to include non-text materials in a thesis, the content must conform to standard 
usage in the student’s field of research, and be in a format that allows for submission via Spectrum: 


Concordia University’s Research Repository. 


The student’s supervisor shall fully inform the student of any and all contractual obligation(s), as they 


may pertain to the student, which may affect the public defence and/or publication of his/her thesis. 


Thesis Submission 


In order to meet a particular graduation date, a student must submit his/her thesis to the Thesis 
Office at any time before the specified deadline set out in the Academic Calendar. It should be noted 
that some programs have established deadlines earlier than those of the Thesis Office. The initial 


submission of the thesis to the Thesis Office begins the official examination process. 


A thesis submitted to the Thesis Office must be ready for formal evaluation according to 
requirements set out in the Thesis Preparation Guide — . Any deviations from the stated 


requirements must have prior written approval of the Dean of Graduate Studies. 


The student’s supervisor shall review the thesis before the initial formal submission to the Thesis 
Office. In the event that the student and supervisor cannot reach an agreement on the readiness of 
the thesis for submission, the Graduate Program Director and the Dean of Graduate Studies may be 
required to arbitrate. Although it is not recommended, the student has the right to defend his/her 


thesis without the supervisor’s approval. 


Thesis Not Written in English 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


38 
At Concordia, theses are normally written in English. However, a student who intends to submit their 


thesis in French must inform their supervisor when submitting the thesis topic for the supervisor’s 
approval. In the event that a student wishes to submit his/her thesis in a language other than English 
or French, where the program does not have prior approval, the thesis supervisor must make such a 
recommendation, with an appropriate justification, to the Graduate Studies Committee when the 
student’s thesis topic is submitted for approval. The decision of the Departmental Graduate Studies 
Committee on such a recommendation shall be communicated to the Thesis Office. Students in the 


MA Hispanic Studies program may write their thesis in Spanish. 


A thesis written in a language other than English or French must include a comprehensive summary 
of its contents. This comprehensive summary/description must be written in English or French and 
appear after the abstract. The summary must be between 3-6 pages for master's and 10-20 pages 
for doctoral as appropriate. Students in the MA Hispanic Studies program may write their thesis in 


Spanish and must also include a summary in English or French. 


Joint Programs 


The PhD programs in Administration, Art History, Communication, and Religion must adhere to the 


thesis requirements and guidelines at Concordia. 


According to the signed agreement(s) as detailed in the Thesis Preparation Guide __, students in the 


co-tutelle and Algant programs must satisfy the thesis requirements/guidelines of both universities. 


Examination of Thesis 


Doctoral Thesis 


The doctoral thesis examination is the culmination of the student’s program. It exposes his/her 
research and thesis to scholarly criticism and gives the student the opportunity to defend it. The 
thesis defence is an oral examination conducted by the Chair of the Examining Committee who shall 
be the Dean of Graduate Studies or his/her delegate. Any member of the University can attend a 
doctoral defence. Contractual and/or legal obligations may necessitate that all participants to a 


thesis defence sign an undertaking of confidentiality. 


The Examining Committee consists of at least five (5) members. At least one (1) must be from 
outside the student’s department but from within the University (external-to-program examiner) and 
one (1) from outside the University (external examiner). In programs where there is a Thesis 


Supervisory Committee, any or all members of this committee may be named as members of the 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


39 
Examining Committee, subject to the practices of the relevant program. The student’s supervisor(s) 


must be a member of the Examining Committee. Co-author(s) of work included in the thesis cannot 


serve as an examiner for that thesis except for the supervisor(s). 


The student’s program is responsible for ensuring that the proposed date of the thesis defence is 
agreeable to all members of the Examining Committee prior to submitting the Doctoral Thesis 
Examination Committee Form — . An electronic copy of the thesis and the approved Doctoral Thesis 
Examination Committee Form must be submitted to the Thesis Office no later than six (6) weeks 
(eight (8) weeks for Engineering) prior to the date of the defence. An electronic copy of the thesis 
remains with the School of Graduate Studies, where it is made available for examination by any 
member of the University. Contractual and/or legal obligations may necessitate that all participants to 


a thesis defence sign an undertaking of confidentiality. 


Questions on a thesis by members of the University, other than those on the Examining Committee, 
must be submitted in writing to the Dean of Graduate Studies no later than seven (7) days prior to 


the date of the thesis defence. 


The relevant Graduate Studies Committee renders a decision on whether the student has fulfilled 
the requirements of the doctoral degree based on the Examining Committee Report and its own 
records of the student’s progress in his/her assigned program of study. Where the relevant Graduate 
Studies Committee has assessed that the student has fulfilled the requirements of the doctoral 
degree, it shall request that the Dean of Graduate Studies recommends to the Council of the School 
of Graduate Studies that the doctoral degree be awarded. The Council of the School of Graduate 
Studies shall make a recommendation to Senate for the awarding of the doctoral degree. Once such 
a recommendation has been passed by Senate, the electronic version of the thesis may be made 


available to the public via Spectrum: Concordia University’s Research Repository. 


At any time, the Dean of Graduate Studies may bring before the Council of the School of Graduate 


Studies any matter that may affect the acceptance of the thesis or the award of the doctoral degree. 


Procedures related to presentation, question period and deliberations of the defence can be found in 


the Thesis Preparation Guide 


Master’s Thesis 


The Graduate Studies Committee of the student’s program, in consultation with his/her supervisor, 
appoints an Examining Committee. The Examining Committee consists of a minimum of three (3) 
and a maximum of five (5) members. The student’s supervisor(s) must be a member of the 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


40 
Examining Committee. Students in the Individualized Program must have one (1) external member 


from outside the university on their Examining Committee. Co-author(s) of work included in the 
thesis cannot serve as an examiner for that thesis except for the supervisor(s). The Examining 
Committee for students in the Master in Applied Science (MASc) programs in Engineering must 


have one (1) University member that is external to the student’s program or department. 


Unless otherwise agreed, the defence is generally scheduled by the student’s program within two (2) 


to five (5) weeks from the initial submission of the thesis depending on the program’s regulations. 


The defence is normally an oral examination conducted by an Examining Committee and chaired by 
an individual who shall be appointed by the Graduate Studies Committee. Prior to the date of the 
defence, each member of the Examining Committee must submit the completed Examiner’s 
Evaluation of a Master’s Thesis _ to the Chair. Any member of the University can attend a master’s 
defence. Contractual and/or legal obligations may necessitate that all participants to a thesis 


defence sign an undertaking of confidentiality. 


Procedures related to presentation, question period and deliberations of the defence can be found in 


the Thesis Preparation Guide 


Decision 


The decision of the Examining Committee is based both on the thesis and on the student's ability to 
defend it. At the PhD defence, an Oral Presentation Form must be completed and signed by the 
Chair. It is the responsibility of the Chair of the Examining Committee to ensure that an Examining 
Committee Report is prepared and signed by all members of the Examining Committee before 
this Committee adjourns. The Examining Committee Report must include the written reports of 
absent and dissenting Examining Committee members. It is the responsibility of the Chair of the 


Examining Committee to report to the Dean of Graduate Studies on the conduct of the examination. 


The Examining Committee can render one (1) of four (4) decisions, subject to a vote of majority. 


Members of the examining committee may not abstain from voting. The thesis can be: 
1. accepted as submitted which may include editorial or formatting corrections; 


2. accepted with minor modifications defined as corrections which can be made immediately and to 


the satisfaction of the supervisor; 


3. accepted with major modifications: the Examining Committee Report _ shall include a precise 
description of the modifications along with a date for their completion of no more than six 


months. The Examining Committee shall examine the modified thesis and by majority vote 
Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


41 
determine if the modifications specified in the Examining Committee Report have been 


completed to the Examining Committee’s satisfaction. If they have, the thesis may be accepted 
and the supervisor will confirm the Examining Committee’s approval to the Thesis Office. It is not 
necessary for the Examining Committee to reconvene. If the Examining Committee is not 
satisfied that the specified modifications have been made, then the Examining Committee must 
reconvene to decide if the thesis is rejected or an additional period of modifications is to be 
granted. The Chair shall report in writing to the Dean of Graduate Studies the outcome of the 


Examining Committee meeting; or 


4. rejected: such a thesis may be re-submitted only once, in revised form; such a re-submission can 
only be made six (6) months or more from the date of the Examining Committee report. Formal 


re-submission of a thesis follows the same procedure as an initial submission. 


If the Examining Committee is unable to reach a decision concerning the thesis at the time of the 
defence, it is the responsibility of its Chair to determine what is required by the Examining 
Committee to reach a decision; make the necessary arrangements to fulfill any requirements of the 
Examining Committee; and promptly call another meeting and inform the student that the Examining 
Committee’s decision is pending. The student is not normally required to be present at the second 


meeting of the Examining Committee. 


Final Submission of Thesis 


The primary goal of Concordia University is the dissemination of knowledge. To achieve this goal, 
the university makes all theses available to the general public via Spectrum, the Library Repository. 
Spectrum is a widely indexed, searchable database and its contents are readily available to the 
public via the internet. 


A student must submit the final version of the thesis electronically, using Spectrum. The final version 
of the thesis must include any required modifications requested by the Examining Committee and 
any revisions requested by the Thesis Office. The student is responsible for the final electronic 


submission of his/her thesis. 


Upon final submission of his/her thesis, a student shall be deemed to have granted the University a 
non-exclusive, royalty-free license to reproduce, archive, preserve, conserve, communicate to the 
public by telecommunication or on the internet, loan, and distribute the thesis worldwide for non- 
commercial purposes, in any format. Please refer to the University’s Policy on Intellectual 


Property 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


42 


Deferment 


If there is a good reason for delaying public access to a thesis, an approved embargo may be placed 
on the publication of the thesis. The deferment is for up to two (2) years but under exceptional 

circumstances may be renewed. The abstract and bibliographic information is not embargoed and is 
therefore still available to the public. In the event of a deferment, it is understood that the University’s 
license to communicate, loan and/or distribute shall only take effect as of the expiry of the deferment 


period. Please refer to the University’s Policy on Intellectual Property 


Copyright Regulations 


Members of the Concordia community are users of copyrighted materials and, as such, are subject 
to copyright legislation. Compliance with the Copyright Act and the University’s Policy on Copyright 
Compliance is a student’s responsibility. Failure to comply with the Copyright Act is a violation of 
federal legislation and may result in legal repercussions and/or disciplinary or other action by the 
University. Beyond any legal responsibility, a student must consider his/her ethical obligations to 


respect intellectual property rights. 


© Concordia University 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


43 


Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc.html 


Faculty of Arts and Science 


Applied Human Sciences 


Department of Applied Human Sciences Website 


Master/Magisteriate 

« Human Systems Intervention MA 
Graduate Diploma 

« Youth Work Graduate Diploma 
Biology 


Department of Biology Website 


Doctor/Doctorate 
e Biology PhD 
Master/Magisteriate 
« Biology MSc 
Graduate Diploma 
¢ Biotechnology and Genomics Graduate Diploma 
Chemistry and Biochemistry 


Department of Chemistry Website 


Doctor/Doctorate 
« Chemistry PhD 
Master/Magisteriate 
e Chemistry MSc 
Classics, Modern Languages and Linguistics 
Department of Classics, Modern Languages and Linguistics Website 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


Master/Magisteriate 
e Hispanic Studies MA 


Communication Studies 


Department of Communication Studies Website 


Doctor/Doctorate 

« Communication PhD 
Master/Magisteriate 

e Media Studies MA 


Graduate Diploma 


« Communication Studies Graduate Diploma 


Economics 


Department of Economics Website 


Doctor/Doctorate 

e Economics PhD 
Master/Magisteriate 

e Economics MA 
Graduate Diploma 

e« Economics Graduate Diploma 
Education 


Department of Education Website 


Doctor/Doctorate 
e Education PhD 
Master/Magisteriate 
e Applied Linguistics MA 
« Child Studies MA 


e« Educational Studies MA 


44 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


45 
e Educational Technology MA 


Graduate Diploma 

« Adult Education Graduate Diploma 

¢ Instructional Technology Graduate Diploma 
English 


Department of English Website 


Doctor/Doctorate 

e English Literature PhD 
Master/Magisteriate 

e« English MA 
Etudes francaises 


Department of Etudes francaises Website 


Master/Magisteriate 
« Litteratures de langue francaise MA 
e Traductologie MA 

Graduate Diploma 
¢ Traduction, dipl6me 

Graduate Certificate 


e Microprogramme en didactique et linguistique pour l'enseignement du frangais langue seconde, 


certificat 
¢ Technologies de la traduction, certificat 
Geography, Planning and Environment 


Department of Geography, Planning and Environment Website 


Doctor/Doctorate 
« Geography, Urban and Environmental Studies PhD 


Master/Magisteriate 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


46 
e Environmental Assessment MEnv 


¢ Geography, Urban and Environmental Studies MSc 
Graduate Diploma 

« Environmental Assessment Graduate Diploma 
Health, Kinesiology and Applied Physiology 


Department of Health, Kinesiology and Applied Physiology Website 


Doctor/Doctorate 

¢ Health and Exercise Science PhD 
Master/Magisteriate 

e Health and Exercise Science MSc 
History 


Department of History Website 


Doctor/Doctorate 
e History PhD 
Master/Magisteriate 
e History MA 
Humanities 


Department of Humanities Website 


Doctor/Doctorate 
e Humanities PhD 
Journalism 


Department of Journalism Website 


Master/Magisteriate 
e Digital Innovation in Journalism Studies MA 


Graduate Diploma 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


47 
e Journalism Graduate Diploma 


¢ Visual Journalism Graduate Diploma 
Mathematics and Statistics 


Department of Mathematics and Statistics Website 


Doctor/Doctorate 

« Mathematics PhD 
Master/Magisteriate 

« Mathematics MA/MSc 

e Teaching of Mathematics MTM 
Philosophy 


Department of Philosophy Website 


Master/Magisteriate 
e Philosophy MA 
Physics 


Department of Physics Website 


Doctor/Doctorate 

e Physics PhD 
Master/Magisteriate 
e Physics MSc 
Political Science 


Department of Political Science Website 


Doctor/Doctorate 
e Political Science PhD 
Master/Magisteriate 


¢ Political Science MA 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


48 
« Public Policy and Public Administration (MPPPA) MA 


Psychology 


Department of Psychology Website 


Doctor/Doctorate 

e Psychology PhD 
Master/Magisteriate 

e Psychology MA 
Graduate Diploma 

¢ Clinical Psychology Graduate Diploma 
Religions and Cultures 


Department of Religions and Cultures Website 


Doctor/Doctorate 
« Religion PhD 
Master/Magisteriate 
« Judaic Studies MA 
e Religions and Cultures MA 
School of Community and Public Affairs 


School of Community and Public Affairs Website 


Graduate Diploma 
« Community Economic Development (CED) Graduate Diploma 
« Développement économique communautaire (DEC), dipl6me 
Sociology and Anthropology 


Department of Sociology and Anthropology Website 


Doctor/Doctorate 


« Social and Cultural Analysis PhD 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


Master/Magisteriate 
e Social and Cultural Anthropology MA 
¢ Sociology MA 

Theological Studies 


Department of Theological Studies Website 


Master/Magisteriate 


« Theological Studies MA 


49 


© Concordia University 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


50 


Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/ahsc-ma.html 


Human Systems Intervention MA 


Admission Requirements 


Candidates must have the following: 


1. At least two years of full-time work experience. Preference will be shown toward applicants who 


have work experience that is directly related to their learning goals in the program. 


2. Completion of a bachelor's degree with a minimum B average or a cumulative grade point 


average of at least 3.00. 


3. Successful completion of a one week residential Basic Human Interaction Laboratory and have 
written documentation from laboratory staff that they have competency in interpersonal 


interaction and facilitation. 


4. Aclearly delineated career intention concerning the development of intervention expertise for a 


particular domain of professional practice. 


5. Be capable of undertaking all core courses of the first year in the scheduled sequence of the 


program. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


The Graduate Program Director may require a demonstration of English language competencies for 


international students or students educated abroad. 


Requirements for the Degree 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


51 
1. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits. 42 credits 


will be in required coursework, including 15 credits of project work. The remaining 3 credits are to 
be completed within or outside the department. Courses that are taken to complete entrance 
requirements to the program may not be counted toward the program's 45 credits. In exceptional 
cases, students who produce evidence of successful performance (B grade or better) in 
compatible coursework at other institutions may be permitted transfer credit. A maximum of 9 


credits in transfer courses will be permitted. 


2. Coursework. The program is divided into two sections of coursework, with Year | establishing 
the prerequisites for Year II. In addition, students will have a minimum of 3 credits of elective 


coursework to complete their degree requirements. 


Year | provides students with fundamental understanding and frames of reference regarding 
learning and change processes of persons and groups, steps in the intervention process, ethical 
principles, and research methods. These fundamental understandings are then deepened 
through application in practice-based courses of Year II. The Master's Project is intended to 


promote an integration of concepts and practical experience. 


Year | constitutes the first phase of the program. Year II and the Elective Coursework is more 


individually-tailored, and constitutes the second and subsequent years, when necessary. 


YEAR I: Total of Required Credits: Year | =18 credits. 
YEAR II: Total of Required Credits: Year Il = 24 credits. 


Elective Coursework: Required credits from Years | and II comprise 42 of the 45 credits in this 
MA program. Students must complete an additional 3 credits of coursework to satisfy degree 


requirements. These three credits of coursework may be taken in Year | or Year Il. 


3. Course substitution. Students may be exempted from certain courses on the basis of course 
work completed prior to entry into the program. A maximum of 9 credits of transfer credits will be 


permitted. These credits will be counted toward the required 45 credits in the program. 


4. Residential Laboratories. Students will be required to participate in two week-long residential 


laboratories for which expenses for accommodation, meals and program related fees will be the 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


52 
responsibility of the students. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Course Load for Full-Time Students. The normal course load for full-time students will be a 
minimum of 18 credits per year. A student may not register for more than 27 credits per year 


without permission from the AHSC Graduate Program Director. 


2. Course Load for Part-Time Students. Students will only be admitted to the program on a full- 
time status for the first year. With explicit permission of the AHSC Graduate Committee, a 
student may continue on a part-time basis following the first year of study. Part-time status is 


defined as enroling in less than 8 credits per semester. 


3. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 
detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


Program Specific Requirements. A minimum grade of B is required in each course. 
4. Residence. The minimum residence is one year (3 terms) of full-time study. 


5. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


6. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 2.70. 


Courses 


Core Courses 


AHSC 610 Group Process Intervention (3 credits) 

This course is oriented to the theory and practice of intervention in small groups. The course 
involves participation in a small group laboratory through which students’ experiences are integrated 
with conceptual frameworks, including theories of group development and leadership. Ethical issues 


in group processes will be considered. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


53 
AHSC 620 Learning and Individual Change Processes (3 credits) 


This course will examine research and theory of individual learning and change which involves 
cognitive, affective and behavioural components. Intervention with an emphasis on a normative re- 
educative approach to facilitating learning and change will be emphasized. Illustrative intervention 
cases will be examined to identify essential qualities, underlying assumptions about learning and 


change in the context of human systems, and implications for the role of the intervener. 


AHSC 631 Research Methods (3 credits) 

This course examines research methods involved in action research and other applied field 
perspectives. Methods applicable at all stages of the research process include the literature review, 
defining the purpose of study, design of quantitative and qualitative research tools, data gathering, 
qualitative and quantitative data analysis, and reporting and communicating research results and 
recommendations. 


Note: Students who have received credit for AHSC 630 may not take this course for credit. 


AHSC 632 Planning Human Systems Intervention (3 credits) 

This course examines the design and implementation of intervention programs from a systems 
perspective based on organizational theories, needs assessment, theories of learning and change, 
and group processes. It builds on basic concepts of organizational dynamics and effective human 
systems. Emphasis is on understanding organizational and group processes, development of 
planning skills, and making strategic choices. Interventions are framed in the context of collaborative 
action research with participant involvement at all stages including problem analysis and definition, 
generating and selection intervention strategies, action planning, implementation, and project 
evaluation. 


Note: Students who have received credit for AHSC 630 may not take this course for credit. 


AHSC 660 Philosophy and Ethics of Intervention (3 credits) 

This course will review the philosophical underpinnings of intervention in human systems with an 
emphasis on a normative re-educative approach. It will address core values and ethics imbedded in 
change efforts, as well as examining the philosophical roots of different traditions of change 
methodology. It will consider the philosophical implications of change agents functioning as 
consultants rather than experts and as process rather than content specialists. It will consider ethical 
and philosophical aspects of power, strategy, and conflict, among other issues associated with 


intervention. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


54 
AHSC 670 Consultation Methods (3 credits) 


The course will examine current models of consultation. It will enable students to establish effective 
client-consultant relationships based on collaborative approaches to entry, diagnosis, planning, and 
implementation. Ethical concerns for consultation will be integrated with discussions of methodology. 
Through observation and analysis of student-designed interventions, the course will provide 
experience-based learning and feedback. Special attention will be given to considerations of power, 


conflict, decision-making, negotiation, problem-solving, planning, and strategy. 


AHSC 680 Facilitating Individual and Group Learning Processes (6 credits) 

Prerequisite: Completion of Year | coursework (AHSC 610, 620, 631, 632, 660, 670). 

This course will focus on interventions at the individual and group levels. Client-centred models of 
working in groups to achieve learning and task objectives will be reviewed. Issues of design, 
planning, and implementation of learning programs for individuals and groups, including attention to 
power, problem-solving, decision-making and conflict management will be examined in a laboratory 


setting where students will plan and conduct a group learning program under supervision. 


AHSC 685 Coaching Interventions and Processes (3 credits) 

This course develops professional understanding of theories and methodologies relevant to 
individual coaching processes in the functioning of groups, organizations and communities. 
Emphasis is placed on the development of competencies in executive, managerial and employee 
coaching. Course content encompasses phases of the coaching process, communication 
methodologies, obstacles and barriers to change, individual change models, strategic individual 
interventions, dealing with resistance, philosophy and ethics of coaching, and coaching structures. 


Practical components are integrated into the course. 


Elective Courses 


AHSC 675 Introduction to Open Systems Theory (3 credits) 

This course introduces the socio-ecological version of open systems theory (OST) and practice with 
a particular focus on the Search Conference, the Participative Design Workshop, and Unique 
Designs. OST was developed to promote and create change toward a world that is consciously 
designed by people, and for people, living harmoniously within their ecological systems, both 
physical and social. Students learn how to design and implement interventions in organizations, 
communities and larger social systems. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this course under an AHSC 681 number may not take 


this course for credit. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


55 
AHSC 681 Special Topics (3 credits) 


Topical seminars will be offered to provide perspectives about current intervention themes. These 
may complement students’ programs, but will not constitute part of the required curriculum. 
Examples include: emerging trends in organizational development; strategic planning models; the 
use of self as an instrument of change; intercultural issues in intervention; appreciative inquiry; 


complexity theory. 


AHSC 682 Special Topics (6 credits) 


Same as AHSC 681 when a second special topic is offered in the same term. 


AHSC 695 Independent Study | (3 credits) 
Students may pursue studies in areas of specialized professional interest related to the graduate 


program or as a means of strengthening understanding of the core areas of the graduate program. 


AHSC 696 Independent Study II (3 credits) 
Students may pursue a second area of specialized professional interest related to the graduate 


program or further develop understanding in the core areas of the graduate program. 
Project 


AHSC 698 Master’s Project (15 credits) 

Prerequisite: Completion of AHSC 680. 

Students must demonstrate their ability to conduct a complete intervention to effect change in a 
human system as the principal consultant in a collaborative relationship with a client representing 
that system. The project includes contracting with the client, gathering and analyzing data, 


implementing relevant intervention activities, and evaluating the intervention as well as their role. 


© Concordia University 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


56 


Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/ahsc-dip.html 


Youth Work Graduate Diploma 


Admission Requirements 


The minimum requirement for admission is a Bachelor’s/Baccalaureate degree with a minimum GPA 
of 3.00 and two letters of recommendation. Required prerequisites at the undergraduate level 
include at least three credits in adolescent development and three credits in social science research 
methods. Evidence of some volunteer or work experience with children or youth is required, and 
both a letter of intent and interview are required for admission. Candidates must be aware that a 


Police Check is required prior to an internship placement. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Diploma 


Credits. A fully qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 33 credits. In cases where 
cross-listed courses at the undergraduate level have already been completed, the candidate is 


required to select electives from a pre-approved list in order to fulfill the 33-credit requirement. 


1. All students must take 24 credits: AHSC 510, AHSC 520, AHSC 522, AHSC 525, AHSC 527, 
AHSC 530, AHSC 540, AHSC 565. 
Students who have received credit for courses with similar content at the undergraduate level 
may be required to substitute up to six credits of program electives from the following: AHSC 
512, AHSC 513, AHSC 551, AHSC 560, AHSC 598 or AHSC 599. All substitutions must be 


made in consultation with the program advisor. 


2. All students must take AHSC 533, and AHSC 537 or AHSC 538 chosen in consultation with the 


program advisor. 


Academic Regulations 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


57 
1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


3. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 2.70. 


Courses 


Required Courses 


AHSC 510 Advanced Research Methods in Youth Work (3 credits) 

This course reviews approaches to applied research that are applicable to youth work practice. 
Students compare a range of methodological approaches, explore definitions of evidence-based 
practice and learn techniques for collecting, analyzing and disseminating qualitative and quantitative 
data. Students undertake an applied research project, relevant to an area of practice or programs of 
intervention with youth. Emphasis is placed on ethical issues, developmentally appropriate research 


practices, and accountability. 


AHSC 520 Psychoeducation and Youth Work Ethics in Practice (3 credits) 

This course provides an introduction to applied ethics in youth work with a focus on the Code of 
Ethics of the Ordre des psychoéducateurs et psychoéducatrices du Québec. lt also reviews the 
policy, legislative and organizational contexts of the practice of psychoeducation and youth work, 
and considers the ways in which models of ethical decision making inform practice. Topics include 
confidentiality and information sharing in inter-professional contexts, balancing issues of control, 
empowerment and education, developing critical reflexivity, and appreciating the complexities and 


dilemmas inherent in youth work practice. 


AHSC 522 Fundamentals of Child and Youth Care Work (3 credits) 

This course provides students with an understanding of the scope and status of child and youth care 
work, sensitizes them to the necessary competencies and daily challenges of this work in a range of 
settings, and reviews relevant theory. Intervention planning in the context of psychoeducation and 


relational child and youth care work is emphasized. 


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AHSC 525 Individual and Group Intervention with Youth (3 credits) 


Prerequisite: AHSC 522 previously or concurrently. 

A main focus of this course is to develop skills in relationship building and communication with 
youth. A micro-skills approach is introduced, as well as principles of group leadership and crisis 
intervention with youth. Principles of reflexive youth work, including developmentally-informed group 


leadership, are also covered. 


AHSC 527 Advanced Youth Work Intervention: Case Management and Supervision (3 credits) 
Prerequisite: AHSC 525. 

This course explores the fundamental concepts and theories of case management and supervision 
as applied to youth work practice. Topics include supervisory relationship and process issues, self- 
care, ethical and professional considerations, leadership and mentoring relationships, multi- 
disciplinary teams and teamwork, managing change, debriefing in response to a crisis and 
developing, implementing and monitoring effective and collaborative case plans with young people 


and their families. 


AHSC 530 Community Youth Development (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: AHSC 525. 

This course explores both historical and contemporary foundations of non-formal, community-based 
youth development in Canada and internationally. It focuses on creating opportunities for youth to 
engage with individuals, organizations and institutions at the community level. Various community 
youth development models are explored in-depth with practical applications for community-based 
youth programs, including life skills, assets, resiliency, and ecological models. Emphasis is placed 


on research, theory and practice applied in community youth development environments. 


AHSC 540 Mental Health and Addictions: Youth Work Perspectives, Policies and Practices (3 
credits) 

Prerequisite: AHSC 525. 

This course explores the precursors, presentations, nature and impacts of mental health concerns 
and addictions for youth, their families, and within communities. Students have the opportunity to 
develop, and apply within the classroom, knowledge and skills related to addictions and mental 
illness prevention, assessment and intervention, and mental health promotion. Topics include an 
introduction to adolescent psychopathology; diagnosis, assessment, and current policy and 
practices in relation to the current edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American 
Psychiatric Association (DSM); the uses of standardized testing to evaluate 


adaptation; psychopharmacology; suicide; evidence-based and alternative treatment interventions 


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(e.g., psychoeducational approaches; dialectical behaviour therapy);ethical and legislative 


considerations; and the roles/responsibilities of youth workers in the inter-professional and 


community care of adolescents with mental health and/or addictions concerns. 


AHSC 565 Parent-Child Relations (3 credits) 

This course provides an advanced understanding of parenting theories, research, and applications 
in the context of parent-child relations over the life span. Topics include parenting rights and 
responsibilities, parenting practices and programs, high-risk parenting, issues in the transition from 


parenting children to parenting adolescents and parental assessment. 


Elective Courses 


AHSC 512 Sexuality in Human Relations (3 credits) 

This course provides students with knowledge of physical and psychosocial aspects of sexuality in 
relationships through life and specifically during adolescence with an examination of values, 
attitudes, and issues related to the development and expression of sexuality. Topics include gender 
identity development, fuzzy identities, teen pregnancy, family, cultural and media influences; 
historically and culturally based attitudes; prevention and sexually transmitted diseases; self- 
perception and identity in sexuality; sexual diversity; and emotion and sexuality. The course aims to 


foster respect for persons and diversity. 


AHSC 513 Family Communication (3 credits) 

This course is an examination of patterns, effective approaches, and issues in communication 
among persons in primary partnerships and families with adolescents. It also explores topics such 
as diversity in forms of “family,” decision-making, problem-solving, power relations, gender issues, 
managing differences in expectations, and the influences of cultural, social, and economic contexts. 
Interventions for youth work practice designed to enhance communication and strengthen the 


parent-youth bond are explored. 


AHSC 551 Counselling Skills and Concepts (6 credits) 

This course advances students’ understanding of core counselling theories and develops an 
understanding for theoretical and value frameworks of the youth work therapeutic relationship. It 
fosters the application of essential helping skills for relational practice within youth work settings. 
Skill areas include attending skills, such as attending to nonverbal behaviour, reflection of content, 
reflection of feeling, paraphrasing and summarizing, empathy, selfdisclosure; and influencing skills, 
such as interpretation and analysis. Also highlighted are ethical issues, attention to cultural 


differences, and practitioner reflexivity. 


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AHSC 560 Health Promotion (6 credits) 


This course helps students to develop intervention skills and theoretical understanding in the area of 
health promotion across the lifespan. It is of particular interest to youth work students whose career 
interests involve lifestyle planning, health and wellness promotion, and stress management with 
young people. A holistic approach including cultural and developmental understandings are 
discussed in relation to the following topics: health and wellness, stress and illness, psychological 
and physical self-appraisal processes, psychosomatic processes and disorders, understanding 
addictions and their management, interventions to promote health and wellness, behavioural 


self-management, and issues in medical/psychological health compliance. 


AHSC 598 Special Topics in Youth Work (3 credits) 
Specific topics for this course and prerequisites relevant in each case are stated in the Graduate 
Class Schedule. 


AHSC 599 Independent Study (3 credits) 
Prerequisite: Permission of the Department. 
Students work on topics in consultation with a study supervisor. The study may include readings, 


field studies, and/or research. 


Fieldwork 


AHSC 533 Internship | in Youth Work (3 credits) 

Prerequisites: AHSC 522, 525. 

This entry-level internship in youth work is designed to provide an opportunity for a first field 
experience that promotes integration into a clinical or normative youth work setting. A major focus is 
on participatory observation. Students are required to participate in a field placement one day per 
week, for a total of 100 hours in settings such as schools, community organizations, hospitals, or 


rehabilitation centres. The site is selected in consultation with the Graduate Program Director. 


AHSC 537 Internship Il in Youth Work (6 credits) 

Prerequisites: AHSC 533 and 12 credits completed in youth work with permission of the Department. 
This 220-hour internship is designed to provide a supervised apprenticeship in either a clinical 

or normative youth work setting that builds on the student’s previous courses. The focus of this 
internship is that the student fully assumes all the duties and responsibilities of a youth worker in the 
same site selected for the first internship. The student’s work is supervised and evaluated by an on- 


site field supervisor. 


OR 


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AHSC 538 Extended Internship in Youth Work (9 credits) 


Prerequisites: AHSC 533 and 12 credits completed in youth work with permission of the Department. 
This 320-hour internship is designed to provide a full-time supervised experience in either a clinical 
or a normative youth work setting and requires additional hours to assist the student in building 
his/her application for licensing. The focus of this internship is that the student fully assumes all the 
duties and responsibilities of a youth worker in the same site selected for the first internship. The 


student’s work is supervised and evaluated by an on-site field supervisor. 


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Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/biol-phd.html 


Biology PhD 


Admission Requirements 


Applicants should have an MSc degree in life sciences and will be assessed by the departmental 
Graduate Studies Committee on the basis of undergraduate and graduate grades, letters of 
reference and research ability. Applicants should have at least a B average overall. Prior to final 
acceptance, the student must have a thesis supervisor chosen by mutual agreement among the 
student, the Graduate Studies Committee and the potential supervisor. Students will normally be 
accepted only for full-time study. Students with a Master's degree from a foreign university will 
normally not be directly admitted into the PhD program, but will be accepted into the Master 
of/Magisteriate in Biology program. They will, however, on demonstration of the ability to complete a 


PhD, be eligible to transfer to a PhD as described below. 


Students registered in the Master of/Magisteriate in Science in Biology who demonstrate exceptional 
potential for independent research and have attained an A- average in graduate courses in the 
program may request to transfer to the PhD program during the first six months of the second year 
of enrolment. The transfer must be approved by the student's supervisory committee and the 


departmental Graduate Studies Committee. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate entering the program with a master's degree is required to 
complete a minimum of 90 credits. Students transferring from the MSc program will be required 
to complete 90 credits in addition to the course requirements for the Master's program (9 credits). 
Students may be required to take up to 12 credits, at the graduate or advanced undergraduate 
level, in addition to the above. These courses may be required to strengthen understanding of 
peripheral areas or of the student's area of specialization. The additional course work may be 


assigned as an admission requirement or following the BIOL 850 - Research proposal and 


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qualifying exam. 


2. Courses. To graduate, students must meet the following requirements: 


1. 


3 credits from BIOL 616, BIOL 670, BIOL 671 or any of the Advanced Topics or Reading 
Courses listed at the end of the Biology calendar entry. Other courses in the list may be 
chosen upon recommendation of the supervisory committee and the Graduate Program 


Director. 


. BIOL 801 - Pedagogical training 
. BIOL 802 - Research seminar 
. BIOL 850 - Research proposal and qualifying exam 


. BIOL 890 - Research and thesis 


3. Research Proposal and Qualifying Exam. The examining committee consists of the student's 


supervisory committee plus two additional members of the Department of Biology and is chaired 


by the Graduate Program Director. The student is evaluated on the basis of the quality of the oral 


and written presentations of the proposal and on responses to questions from the examining 


committee. These questions extend into general areas as well as focusing directly on the thesis 


topic. The examining committee assigns one of the following three grades: 


1 


2. 


PASS: The student is admitted to candidacy for a PhD in Biology. 


CONDITIONAL PASS: The student is admitted to candidacy but is required to complete at 
least one additional course. This grade is assigned only if the background preparation of the 


student is judged to be insufficient. 


. FAIL: The student must withdraw from the program. 


If the examining committee judges that the proposal has weaknesses that can be corrected 
with minor revisions, it may suspend assigning a mark for a period not exceeding three 


months. The revised proposal then is assigned one of the three above grades. 


. Thesis. A major portion of the PhD program involves the planning and execution of 


innovative and original research under the direction of a supervisor. It is expected that this 
research should result in publication in reputable journals, on which the candidate is the first 
author and the major contributor of ideas and experimental data. The thesis will be examined 


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by a Thesis Examining Committee and will be defended orally. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 
detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 
Program Specific Requirements. Students must obtain an assessment grade point average 
(AGPA) of 3.00 based on a minimum of 6 credits. 


2. Residence. The minimum residence requirement is two years (6 terms) of full-time study beyond 


the master’s degree, or three years (9 terms) of full-time study beyond the bachelor’s degree. 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 
Limit requirements. All work for the doctoral degree must be completed by the end of the fourth 
calendar year following the year of admission to candidacy, defined as successful completion of 


the Research Proposal and Qualifying Exam (BIOL 850). 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.00. 


Courses 


BIOL 801 Pedagogical training 
Candidates are required to give four lectures (normally 75 minutes each) to undergraduate classes. 
Two lectures are in introductory level courses and two in advanced undergraduate courses. Tutorials 


are provided to introduce students to teaching methods. The course is marked on a pass/fail basis. 


BIOL 802 Research seminar 

Students are required to give one seminar to the Department based upon their research project. 
Normally the seminar is given in the second or third years of residency. Seminars are graded on a 
standard scale (A+ to F). The grade is based upon the presentation, content, and the student’s 
ability to answer questions. The grade is assigned by the Graduate Program Director in consultation 


with the candidate’s supervisory committee and other faculty members present at the seminar. 


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BIOL 850 Research proposal and qualifying exam (6 credits) 


The student prepares a written research proposal based upon the research topic chosen for thesis 
research. The proposal is prepared in consultation with the supervisory committee and contains a 
literature review, a progress report and a detailed description of future experiments. The proposal 
should demonstrate a good understanding of the background of the project, the questions to be 
answered, and the experimental approaches needed to answer these questions. Both the written 
proposal and an oral summary of the proposal are presented to the examining committee within one 


year of entry into the PhD program. 


BIOL 890 Research and thesis (75 credits) 


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Concordia University 


http:/Awww.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/biol-msc.html 
Biology MSc 


Admission Requirements 


The admission requirement is a BSc degree or equivalent with specialization in biology with good 
standing (B average) from a recognized university. Exceptionally, applicants not meeting the GPA 
requirement may be admitted on the basis of outstanding academic letters of reference, good 


performance and high standing in advanced courses or exceptional research experience. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits. 


2. Courses. Three 3-credit courses (9 credits), to be chosen in consultation with the candidate's 


advisory committee. 


3. Thesis (BIOL 696, 36 credits). The thesis will be examined by a committee composed of the 
student's supervisory committee plus a third examiner chosen at the discretion of the Graduate 
Program Director. An oral examination chaired by the Graduate Program Director or his/her 
designate will be conducted before the examining committee to test the student's ability to 
defend the thesis. 


4. Seminars. Each student is expected to attend and participate in departmental seminars. In 
addition, students will be required to present a short (20-30 minutes) seminar to the department 


on their research once during their residency, normally on completion of their first year. 


Academic Regulations 


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. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


— 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Residence. The minimum residence requirement is one year (3 terms) of full-time study. 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 2.70. 


5. Progress Report. Each student’s progress is formally evaluated by the student’s advisory 


committee every six months and a report is submitted to the Graduate Program Director. 


Courses 


The content of the following courses will vary from year to year and will reflect the interests of the 
department and the instructor in the course. Not all courses will be offered in any given academic 
year. Details of the courses to be given together with their respective course contents will be 


available at the beginning of the academic year. All are one-term 3-credit courses. 


The following reading courses are designed to meet special needs of students in their areas of 
research, and involve the presentation, discussion and critical analysis of information from current 


journal articles. 


BIOL 601 Readings in Ecology and Behaviour | 
BIOL 602 Readings in Cell and Molecular Biology | 
BIOL 606 Readings in Organismal Biology | 

BIOL 607 Readings in Ecology and Behaviour II 
BIOL 608 Readings in Cell and Molecular Biology Il 
BIOL 609 Readings in Organismal Biology II 

BIOL 612 Advanced Topics in Evolution 

BIOL 613 Advanced Topics in Behavioural Ecology 
BIOL 614 Advanced Topics in Ecology 

BIOL 615 Advanced Topics in Animal Biology 


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BIOL 630 Advanced Topics in Bioinformatics 


BIOL 631 Advanced Topics in Biotechnology 

BIOL 632 Advanced Topics in Cell Biology 

BIOL 635 Advanced Topics in Molecular Genetics 
BIOL 640 Advanced Topics in Plant Biology 

BIOL 680 Advanced Topics in Biology 

BIOL 685 Advanced Topics in Microbiology 

BIOL 696 Master’s Research and Thesis (36 credits) 


The following courses in Biochemistry may be taken for credit in the program. 


CHEM 670 Selected Topics in Biochemistry and Biophysics 
CHEM 671 Structure and Function of Biomembranes 

CHEM 673 Neurochemistry 

CHEM 677 Enzyme Kinetics and Mechanism 

CHEM 678 Protein Engineering and Design 


BIOL 616 Current Advances in Ecological Research 

This course is given in alternate years and reviews selected areas of current research in ecology, 
evolution and behaviour through critical analysis of recent publications. Topics vary from year to 
year, and are determined in part by the interests of the students. Material covered may include 
papers published in refereed journals, monographs or books on specialized topics, or new textbooks 
covering advanced topics in a relevant area. Students are responsible for giving class presentations 
of selected material, leading class discussions, and submitting critiques and answers to assigned 
essay questions. Grading is based upon class participation, oral presentations and written work. 


Lectures only. (No laboratory component). 


BIOL 622 Advanced Techniques in Ecology * 

This course introduces students to a variety of techniques of experimental design, data collection, 
and quantitative analysis. Students participate in a series of modules, each of which presents 
experimental and analytical techniques appropriate for one area of modern research in ecology, 
behaviour, or evolution. Some modules require students to collect and subsequently analyze original 
data from field or laboratory settings. Modules and their contents may vary from year to year. 


Tutorials and laboratory. 


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BIOL 623 Advanced Applied Ecology and Conservation * 


This course applies principles of ecology at the individual, population, community and ecosystem 
level to identify and solve practical environmental problems. Topics include pollution, climate 
change, and farming, harvesting renewable resources, designing nature reserves and conserving 


bio-diversity. Lectures and tutorials. 


BIOL 624 Advances in Decomposer Communities and Nutrient Cycling * 

This course examines the role of the microbial community in the fundamental processes of 
decomposition and nutrient cycling. We discuss the role of microbes in the breakdown of organic 
molecules and the release and transformation of mineral elements. Emphasis is placed on the 
interactions between decomposition and on the interactions between bacteria, fungi, and the 


microbes in the maintenance of nutrient cycles. Lectures and laboratory. 


BIOL 633 Advanced Immunology * 

The role of the immune system in maintenance of body homeostasis will be presented with particular 
reference to cells and tissues of the immune system, their organization as well as their structural and 
functional relationships. Topics include: maturation and differentiation of B and T lymphocytes; 
structure and properties of antibodies; immune responses to antigens; genetic aspects of antibody 
synthesis; immunological considerations in AIDS, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. Lectures and 


seminars. 


BIOL 634 Advanced Cell Biology * 

Lectures dealing with selected topics in mammalian cell biology. These include introduction to the 
elements of cell biology. Introduction to the elements of cell culture with reference to the growth and 
function of non-differentiated and differentiated cells. Control of cell cycling under normal and 
abnormal states, mechanisms of peptide and steroid hormone action with emphasis on intracellular 
signaling pathways. The control of gene transcription and detailed analysis of the effect of host cell 


factors on virus replication. Lectures only. 


BIOL 660 Advanced Plant Biochemistry * 
Biochemical study of the natural constituents and secondary metabolites unique to plants. Their 
biosynthesis, biotransformations, and functions in plants, as well as their economic and 


pharmacologic importance are stressed. Lectures only. 


BIOL 661 Advanced Tissue Culture * 
This course looks at plant-growth regulators, nutritional requirements, and other factors necessary 


for in-vitro culturing of plant cells and tissues. The course also discusses methods available for 


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nuclear transfers and the propagation of transformed plants. Lectures only. 


BIOL 670 Scientific Communication 

This course is offered every other year and is open to all graduate students in Biology or by special 
permission from the instructor. It is designed to present the requirements for publishable scientific 
writing, successful research proposals and the presentation of oral papers at scientific meetings. 
The course emphasizes good writing habits, focuses on the importance of thought, the conciseness 
of statements and clarity of exposition. The course combines lectures, group discussions, 
workshops and oral presentations. Marks are based on a number of written assignments, oral 


presentations as well as participation in class. 


BIOL 671 Scanning Electron Microscopy * 

This course is given alternate years in the Summer session and explains both the theory and 
practice of instrumentation and methodology. Students learn to operate the Scanning Electron 
Microscope (SEM) and ancillary equipment such as sputter-coater and the critical point drier. Hands- 
on learning experience is stressed to acquire familiarity with special techniques. Instructions cover 
three aspects: instrumentation, specimen preparation (fixation and drying), and specimen mounting 


and coating. Tutorials and laboratory. 


BIOL 687 Advanced Molecular Genetics * 
This course concentrates on basic microbial and molecular genetics, introducing isolation and 
characterization of mutants, methods of mapping mutants, transposons, episomes, and recombinant 


DNA techniques. Lectures and conferences. 


BIOL 688 Advances in Biological Regulatory Mechanisms * 
This course examines the molecular basis of the control of metabolic pathways with an emphasis on 
procaryote systems. The course concentrates on the analysis of the rationale of experimentation 


used to elucidate these regulatory mechanisms. Lectures and conferences. 


BIOL 689 Advanced Techniques in Molecular Biology * 
Theory and practice of modern experimental procedures of molecular biology, including use of 
restriction enzymes, gene cloning, and hybridizations, DNA sequencing, site-directed mutagenesis, 


and the use of bacteria and phage in biotechnology. Laboratory and tutorials. 


BIO 690 Advanced Gene Structure * 
This course deals with gene regulation in eukaryotes. Topics covered include transcription, transcript 


processing, translation, and post-translational processes. Lectures only. 


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* Course descriptions listed here correspond to undergraduate course descriptions except for BIOL 


616 and 670 which are not available to undergraduate students. It is understood that an instructor 
who grants written permission to register in the course as a graduate student will require extra work 
from the students for graduate credit. These courses are open to doctoral students only under 


exceptional circumstances. 


© Concordia University 


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Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/biol-dip.html 


Biotechnology and Genomics Graduate Diploma 


Admission Requirements 


To be considered for admission, students must hold a BSc degree from an accredited university with 
at least fifteen credits in courses at the 200 or 300 level in the following subjects: genetics, cell 
biology, molecular biology, biochemistry, and 3 credits of laboratory in one or more of the previous 
subjects. In addition, applicants should have obtained an undergraduate grade point average (GPA) 


of 3.00 (on a scale with a maximum of 4.30). 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Diploma 


1. Credits. Students are required to complete a minimum of 30 credits, comprised of 24 credits of 
course work and a 6-credit research project. Of the 30 credits required, 21 are designated as 


core. 


2. Courses. Credit courses for the diploma program are listed below. All courses are 3 credits 


unless otherwise indicated. 
Core Courses (21 credits) 


BIOL 510 Bioinformatics 

BIOL 511 Structural Genomics 

BIOL 512 Functional Genomics 

BIOL 515 Biotechnology and Genomics Laboratory 

BIOL 516 Project in Biotechnology and Genomics (6 credits) 
PHIL 530 Ethical, Legal and Social Implications of Biotechnology 


Elective Courses (9 credits) 


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73 
BIOL 521 Industrial and Environmental Biotechnology 


BIOL 523 Agriculture and Agri-Food Biotechnology 
BIOL 524 High-throughput Instrumentation 

BIOL 525 Biological Computing and Synthetic Biology 
CHEM 678 Protein Engineering and Design 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


3. Graduation Requirement. To graduate, students must have completed all course requirements 


with a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.00. 


Courses 


BIOL 510 Bioinformatics 

Prerequisites: BIOL 367 or equivalent; COMP 228 (System Hardware) or permission of the Diploma 
Program Director. 

This course provides the tools for life scientists to interpret and analyze biological sequence data. It 
provides a general overview of the growth in availability of genetic information. The course covers 
the genetic databases; the rapidly-increasing number of genome databases, including the human 
genome database; the sequence homology search engines and search algorithms; software for the 
identification of structural sequence components; and the determination of evolutionary relationships 


between sequences. 


BIOL 511 Structural Genomics 
This course provides an overview of genome analysis including: cloning systems; sequencing 
strategies; methods of detecting genes and approaches to mapping genomes. It covers the theory 


and design of the different approaches, and the analysis of genomic data generated from them. 


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74 
BIOL 512 Functional Genomics 


This course focuses on the functional analysis of expressed genes and their products. Course 
content includes the construction and screening of normalized cDNA libraries, analysis of expressed 
sequence tags (ESTs), functional analysis by gene knock-outs, localization of gene products by 
gene knowk-ins, transcription profiling, systematic identification of proteins, and functional analysis 


of proteins by detection of protein-protein interactions. 


BIOL 515 Biotechnology and Genomics Laboratory 

This is a hands-on course on techniques used in biotechnology and genomics. Experiments 
conducted in this course include separation and mapping of high molecular weight DNA fragments, 
shotgun sequencing, ESTs sequencing, protein production in bacteria and fungi, functional analysis 
of protein products, protein arrays, and in vivo detection of protein interactions. This course incurs 


an additional fee to cover laboratory supplies and equipment. 


BIOL 516 Project in Biotechnology and Genomics (6 credits) 

Prerequisites: BIOL 466; BIOL 368; or permission of the Diploma Program Director. 

Each student conducts a project under the supervision of a faculty member at Concordia or other 
research institutions affiliated with the program. The project topic requires approval by the course 
coordinator. The project can be taken over an 8-month (10 hours per week) of a 4-month period (20 
hours per week) at Concordia or other approved institutions or companies. The project will be 
chosen from one or more of the following fields: biotechnology, genomics, bioinformatics, and high- 
throughput experimentation. The nature of the project can be research, development, or application. 
A student who is working full-time or part-time can pursue the project in his/her place of employment 
subject to approval. (Approval will only be given to projects which are clearly demonstrated to be 
independent of the regular work requirement). At the end of the project, the student is required to 
submit a report on the results of the project and present the results publicly in the form of a scientific 


poster or a short talk at a scheduled Genomics/Biotechnology Research Day. 


BIOL 521 Industrial and Environmental Biotechnology 

Prerequisites: BIOL 511; BIOL 512. 

This course provides an in-depth evaluation of current biotechnology tools used in pharmaceutical 
and forestry industries, and in environmental remediation. New technologies and genomic 


approaches that can be applied to these processes are also discussed. 


BIOL 523 Agriculture and Agri-Food Biotechnology 
Prerequisites: BIOL 511; BIOL 512. 


This course provides an overview on the use of biotechnology in agriculture and in the agri-food 


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industry. Plant genomics and genetic manipulation of plants are emphasized. Also discussed are 


biotechnology methods used in reducing agricultural pollutants and converting agricultural surplus to 


energy. 


BIOL 524 High-throughput Instrumentation 

Prerequisites: BIOL 511; BIOL 512. 

This is a hands-on introduction to high-throughput instruments used in biotechnology and genomics. 
Students are exposed to capillary electrophoresis-based DNA sequencing, microplate-based PCR 
reactions and purification of PCR products, construction of DNA chips, microarray scanning, and 


liquid handling robotics. Enrolment in this course is restricted to ten students. 


BIOL 525 Biological Computing and Synthetic Biology 

This is an interdisciplinary course offered to students who are either in Biology or Electrical and 
Computer Engineering programs. Students are introduced to the emerging field of synthetic biology 
and learn to design computational machines that can be implemented in biological media. The term 
is divided into two phases. In Phase I, Biology students learn basic computer hardware and software 
concepts, while Engineering students are introduced to gene structure and recombinant DNA 
technology. In Phase II, all students learn the principles and various applications of cell-based 
computational machines. Students work in teams to create a project proposal to describe the design 
of a computational machine using gene regulatory networks. A project is required. 

Note: Students who have received credit for COEN 6211 or for this topic under a BIOL 631 or COEN 


691 number may not take this course for credit. 


PHIL 530 Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications of Biotechnology 

Prerequisite: BIOL 367 or permission of the Diploma Program Director. 

This interdisciplinary course examines some of the ethical, legal, and social implications of recent 
developments in biotechnology, genomics, and bioinformatics. Students explore current debates 
about biotechnologies in the fields of agricultural biotechnology, global development, and 
environmental risk. Issues such as commercialization and intellectual property, the role of media and 
public perceptions of biotechnologies, and social responsibility and policy formation are also 


addressed. 


© Concordia University 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


76 


Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/chem-phd.html 


Chemistry PhD 


Admission Requirements 


The normal requirement for admission is a Master of Science degree in Chemistry with high 
standing from a recognized university. Comparable qualifications in biology or biochemistry are also 
acceptable for applicants wishing to do graduate studies in biochemistry. Upon recommendation by 
full-time members of the faculty of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, students enrolled 
in the Master of Science (Chemistry) program at Concordia University who have completed a 
minimum of 6 credits of graduate level course work and who have shown themselves to be 
outstanding through performance in research may apply for permission to proceed directly to 
doctoral studies without submitting a master's thesis (fast-tracking). Outstanding students who have 
maintained a grade point average of greater than 3.50 in their last two years of study and those with 
external scholarships (NSERC, CIHR, FQRNT) may also apply to the PhD program directly (fast- 


tracking) from their BSc program. 


It is also possible to carry out PhD studies on a CO-OP basis with the collaboration of an employer. 
A CO-OP graduate student conducts research of interest to the employer, normally in the employer's 
laboratory, but directs the project toward a thesis topic acceptable to the department at Concordia 
and under the guidance of an academic supervisor in the department. The student will spend one 
term, normally with the support of an employer, gaining experience teaching in undergraduate 
laboratories and participating actively in the departmental seminars. This program will be available in 
areas of chemistry and biochemistry where the Department has the resources to provide a suitable 
academic co-supervisor. It is a condition of the program that the employers agree to the publication 


of thesis results. Prospective applicants should contact the Department for further details. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A candidate entering the doctoral program with a master's degree is required to 


complete a minimum of 90 credits. A candidate entering the doctoral program under accelerated 
Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


77 
admission (fast-tracking) from the BSc program is required to complete a minimum of 9 credits 


from graduate courses listed under Topics in addition to the regular 90 credits; a candidate 
entering the doctoral program under accelerated admission (fast-tracking) from the MSc program 
is required to complete a minimum of 3 credits listed under Topics in addition to the regular 90 


credits. 


2. Courses. The following are required of fully-qualified students: 


a. 6 credits from courses listed under Topics, in the general field of the student’s research 


project. 


b. CHEM 896: Research Proposal and Comprehensive Examination (9 credits). 
A student in the doctoral program is required to present a progress report on his/her research 
and on future research plans. The presentation should reflect the student's awareness of 
current research in his/her field and demonstrate an ability to carry out a significant research 
problem and provide a rational approach to its solution. The student's knowledge and 
understanding of fundamental chemical and biochemical principles will also be examined. 
The student is expected to complete CHEM 896 within 18 months of admission directly into 
the PhD program, or within 28 months of admission via the MSc stream. In exceptional 
circumstances the department may permit an extension of time for completion of this course. 
The CHEM 896 Examining Committee assigns one of the following two grades: (a) PASS - 
the student is admitted to candidacy for a PhD degree in Chemistry; (b) FAIL - the student 


must withdraw from the program. 


(o) 


. CHEM 856: Doctoral Research and Thesis (72 credits). 


d. CHEM 668: PhD Research Seminar (3 credits). 
The course is designed to give students practice at communicating and defending their thesis 
research topic in a professional forum, and should successfully inform an audience of 


chemists and biochemists. 


e. With permission from their supervisory committee students are allowed to substitute graduate 
level courses from other departments relevant to their research problems, or professional 
development (e.g., selected MBA courses) as partial fulfillment towards their degree 


requirements. 


3. Thesis. Students will work on a research topic under the direction of a faculty member and 


present an acceptable thesis at the conclusion (CHEM 856 - Doctoral Research and Thesis). 


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78 
Students may submit a manuscript-based thesis following the guidelines outlined in the section 


on Thesis Regulations in this calendar. In addition, a public oral examination will be conducted to 


test the student's ability to defend the thesis. 
4. Seminars. Each student is required to attend and participate in departmental seminars. 


5. Cross-Registration. Students may, with the permission of their supervisory committee, cross- 


register for courses falling in the Topics categories in other Quebec institutions. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 
detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 
Program Specific Requirements. Students must obtain an assessment grade point average 
(AGPA) of 3.00 based on a minimum of 6 credits. 


2. Residence. The minimum period of residence is two years (6 terms) of full-time graduate study 
beyond the master’s degree or three years (9 terms) of full-time graduate study (or the equivalent 
in part-time study) beyond the bachelor’s degree for those students who are permitted to enrol 
for doctoral studies without completing a master’s degree. It should be understood that this is a 
minimum requirement, and that a longer period may be necessary in order to complete all of the 


work that is required for the degree. 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 3.00. 


Courses 


Specific course offerings in subject areas listed under Topics will generally vary from year to year, 
depending on the availability of faculty and the requirements of graduate students in the program. In 
the MSc program, every student must complete CHEM 666 (Seminar); in the PhD program CHEM 


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79 
668 (Seminar) and CHEM 896 (Research Proposal and Comprehensive Examination) must be 


completed by every student. 


Courses are worth 3 credits unless otherwise indicated. Over the next few years the department will 
offer a selection of courses from those listed below. Additional Selected Topics courses may be 
offered in a given year, and these will be identified by different subtitles. Further information on 
Selected Topics courses will be available from the department at the beginning of each academic 


year. 


Topics in Analytical & Bioanalytical Chemistry 


CHEM 610 Selected Topics in Analytical Chemistry 

This course explores themes within the area of Analytical Chemistry. 

Note: The content will vary from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course, provided the course content has changed. Changes in content will be indicated by a letter 
following the course number, e.g. CHEM 610A, CHEM 610B, etc. 


CHEM 612 Analytical Separations 

Prerequisite: CHEM 218, 312, or equivalent. 

High performance liquid separations on an analytical (non-preparative) scale are surveyed. 
Fundamental separation mechanisms and application of the techniques are discussed. Emphasis is 
placed on separations of biologically relevant analytes which include peptides, proteins and nucleic 


acids. Lectures only. 


CHEM 614 Modern Aspects of Practical Mass Spectrometry 

Prerequisite: CHEM 494 or equivalent, previously or concurrently. 

Theoretical and operational aspects of modern mass spectrometry are discussed in a number of 
formal lectures and training sessions. All students must carry out an independent mass spectrometry 
project on their molecules of choice. Projects can be selected from all areas of chemistry, 
biochemistry or biology including the “omics” sciences (e.g., proteomics, metabolomics). 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a CHEM 630 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


Topics in Bioorganic & Organic Chemistry 


CHEM 620 Selected Topics in Organic Chemistry 
This course explores themes within the area of Organic Chemistry. 
Note: The content will vary from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 


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course, provided the course content has changed. Changes in content will be indicated by a letter 


following the course number, e.g. CHEM 620A, CHEM 620B, etc. 


CHEM 621 Physical Organic Chemistry 

Prerequisite: CHEM 222, 235; CHEM 324 or 325; or equivalent. 

Determination of organic reaction mechanisms using kinetics, activation parameters, acid-base 
catalysis, Bronsted catalysis law, solvent effects, medium effects, isotope effects, substitutent 


effects, and linear free energy relationships. Lectures only. 


CHEM 623 Organic Synthesis 

Prerequisite: CHEM 222, 235, 324, or equivalent. 

This course is concerned with synthetic strategy and design. It provides an introduction to advanced 
synthetic methods and reagents, involving heteroatoms such as sulphur, phosphorus, tin and 
selenium, as well as an overview of the uses of protecting groups in organic chemistry. The concept 
of retrosynthesis and a few asymmetric reactions are discussed using syntheses of natural products 


from the literature as examples. Lectures only. 


CHEM 625 Nucleic Acid Chemistry 

Prerequisite: CHEM 221, 222, 271, or equivalent. 

This course introduces students to various topics in nucleic acid chemistry. The topics include 
nomenclature, structure and function of RNA and DNA; techniques and methods to investigate 
nucleic acid structure; DNA damage and repair; interaction of small molecules and proteins with 
nucleic acid; oligonucleotide-based therapeutics (antisense, antigene, RNAi); synthesis of purines, 
pyrimidines and nucleosides; and solid-phase oligonucleotide synthesis. Lectures only. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a CHEM 620 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


CHEM 626 Reactive Intermediates 

Prerequisite: CHEM 324, 325, or equivalent. 

This course offers an introduction to reactive intermediates with an emphasis on structure and 
stability as found in modern (physical) organic chemistry. While the focus is on radicals and 
carbenes, carbocations are discussed near the end of the term. The material covered is relevant to 
chemistry and biochemistry. Lectures only. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a CHEM 621 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


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81 
CHEM 627 Supramolecular Chemistry 


Prerequisite: CHEM 324 or 325; CHEM 335; or equivalent; or permission of the Department. 

This course reviews some fundamental aspects of synthetic and biological supramolecular chemistry 
and nanotechnology. Topics covered may include supramolecular forces, ion binding and ion 
channels, molecular recognition, self-assembly (meso-scale and molecular-scale), organometallic 
supramolecular chemistry, dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC), and foldamers. Lectures only. 
Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a CHEM 620 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


Topics in Physical Chemistry 


CHEM 630 Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry 

This course explores themes within the area of Physical Chemistry. 

Note: The content will vary from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course, provided the course content has changed. Changes in content will be indicated by a letter 
following the course number, e.g. CHEM 630A, CHEM 630B, etc. 


CHEM 631 Computational Chemistry 

Prerequisite: CHEM 234, 241, 333, or equivalent; or permission of the Department. 

This course presents the concepts, tools, and techniques of modern computational chemistry, and 
provides a very broad overview of the various fields of application across chemistry and 
biochemistry. The course is divided into two parts: 1) Molecular structure, which covers molecular 
mechanics and elementary electronic structure theory of atoms and molecules; and 2) Chemical 
reactivity, which covers applications of quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics techniques to 
studies of chemical reactions. The applications discussed include organic molecules and their 
reactions, peptides and proteins, drug design, DNA, polymers, inorganics, and materials. The course 
includes a practical component where students acquire hands-on experience with commonly used 


computational chemistry computer software. Lectures and laboratory. 


CHEM 632 Non-equilibrium Thermodynamics 

Prerequisite: CHEM 234 or equivalent. 

In this course, the basic concepts of classical (equilibrium) thermodynamics are first reviewed, 
followed by an introduction to statistical thermodynamics which gives a unified method of treating 
transport processes. At this point, the Boltzmann distribution function is derived, which leads to the 
statistical interpretation of entropy. Other important thermodynamic functions such as the partition 
function, the partition function for large ensembles and the Sackur-Tetrode equation are examined. 


The course also addresses non-equilibrium thermodynamics in the linear domain. The relations 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


82 
describing the production of entropy in irreversible processes due to heat transfer, charge transfer, 


change of volume, and chemical reactions are examined. The establishment of flux equations and 
the use of the Onsager reciprocal relations are then applied to the description of a variety of open 


systems. Lectures only. 


CHEM 633 Quantum Mechanics in Chemistry 

Prerequisite: CHEM 333, 431/631, or equivalent. 

This course includes a thorough review of basic quantum mechanics in both the Schroedinger and 
Heisenberg representations, electronic structure theory, symmetry and group theory, interaction of 
matter with light, quantum scattering, the path integral formalism, quantum theories of chemical 
reaction rates, time-dependent approaches to spectroscopy, wave packet propagation, correlation 


functions and dynamics processes, and density matrices. Lectures only. 


CHEM 635 Interfacial Phenomena 

Prerequisite: CHEM 234, 235, or equivalent. 

This course examines the physical chemistry of interfaces including surface and interfacial tensions, 
the absorption of surface active substances/surface excess properties, and surfactant self-assembly. 
Topics covered may include Gibbs and Langmuir monolayers, micelle formation, emulsions, foams, 
surfactant liquid crystals, layer-by-layer polymer self-assembly, and biological membranes. 
Techniques for characterization and applications (biological and industrial) of these systems are 
addressed. Lectures only. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a CHEM 630 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


CHEM 638 Physics and Chemistry of Solid State Electronic Materials 

Prerequisite: CHEM 234, 333, or equivalent. 

This course essentially explores how electrical conductivity is influenced by the nature of the 
chemical bonding in these solid-state materials. The course provides an introduction to solid-state 
structures and then goes on to explore band theory, the central model used to describe electrical 
conductivity in the following three categories of electronic materials: conductors, semiconductors, 
and insulators. Finally the course explores the extension of the band model to interpret electrical 


conductivity in molecular semiconductors and charge-transfer complexes. Lectures only. 


Topics in Bioinorganic & Inorganic Chemistry 


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83 
CHEM 640 Selected Topics in Inorganic Chemistry 


This course explores themes within the area of Inorganic Chemistry. 

Note: The content will vary from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course, provided the course content has changed. Changes in content will be indicated by a letter 
following the course number, e.g. CHEM 640A, CHEM 640B, etc. 


CHEM 643 Organometallic Chemistry 
Prerequisite: CHEM 324, 341, or equivalent. 
This course covers the structure and properties of organometallic compounds, their main reactions 


and their application in catalysis and organic chemistry. Lectures only. 


CHEM 644 Physical Methods in Chemistry 

This course provides an in-depth evaluation of the different methods used in modern physical 
chemistry such as laser, microwave, FT-IR, electron spin resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance, x- 
ray photoelectron, x-ray diffraction and fluorescence, Auger eletron, Mossbauer, and gamma-ray 
spectroscopic analysis, as well as scanning probe microscopy and mass spectrometry. Lectures 


only. 


CHEM 645 Bioinorganic Chemistry 

Prerequisite: CHEM 241, 271, or equivalent. 

Role of metals in biochemical systems. Essential trace elements, zinc enzymes, oxygen transport 
and storage, metalloproteins and biological electron transfer, structure-function relationships in heme 
enzymes, nitrogen fixation; model compounds for metalloproteins and metalloenzymes. Lectures 


only. 


CHEM 646 Industrial Catalysis 

Prerequisite: CHEM 234, 235, or equivalent. 

Basic and recent concepts in catalysis are described with particular emphasis on heterogenous 
catalysis. The technical, economic and environmental aspects of industrial catalysis are covered. 
The processes to be studied are chosen from the petroleum industry, the natural gas and coal 
processing industry, and the production of thermoplastics and synthetic fibres. The course ends with 
a rapid survey of problems associated with the treatment of industrial pollutants and with catalytic 


converters. Lectures only. 


Topics in Multidisciplinary Chemistry 


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CHEM 650 Selected Topics in Multidisciplinary Chemistry 


This course explores themes within the area of Multidisciplinary Chemistry. 

Note: The content will vary from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course, provided the course content has changed. Changes in content will be indicated by a letter 
following the course number, e.g. CHEM 650A, CHEM 650B, etc. 


CHEM 651 Nanochemistry 

Prerequisites: CHEM 217, 218, 221, 222, 234, 235, 241, or equivalent. 

This modular course covers the areas of production, characterization and applications of nanoscale 
structures and materials. Each module is taught by a different professor as well as guest lecturers. 
Topics may include (but are not limited to): size dependent properties, synthesis of organic and 
inorganic nanostructures, self-assembled structures, chemical patterning and functional 
nanopatterns, biomaterials. Nanometer scale fabrication techniques such as lithographic methods, 
nano-stamping and patterned self-assembly are discussed. Modern analysis techniques such as 
atomic force microscopy and electron microscopy, which are used to map and measure at the single 
molecule level are introduced. Applications such as photonics, optical properties, biodetection and 
biosensors, micro- and nano-fluidics, nanoelectronics and nanomachines are presented. The course 
includes a term project carried out using the nanoscience facilities held in the department research 


labs. 


CHEM 658 Aquatic Biogeochemistry 

Prerequisite: CHEM 217, 218, 312, or equivalent. 

The major aim of this course is to present a quantitative treatment of the variables that determine the 
composition of natural waters. Chemical equilibrium is the central theme of the course, but 
consideration is also given to kinetics, steady-state and dynamic models. Related themes include 
global chemical cycles, air and water pollution, as well as current research topics in water chemistry 
and chemical oceanography. Lectures only. 

Note: Students who have received credit for CHEM 618 or for this topic under a CHEM 610 number 


may not take this course for credit. 


Topics in Biochemistry 


CHEM 670 Selected Topics in Biochemistry and Biophysics 

This course explores themes within the area of Biochemistry and Biophysics. 

Note: The content will vary from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course, provided the course content has changed. Changes in content will be indicated by a letter 
following the course number, e.g. CHEM 670A, CHEM 670B, etc. 


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CHEM 676 Structure and Function of Biomembranes 


Prerequisite: BIOL 266, CHEM 375, or equivalent. 

Examples from the current literature are used to discuss what is known about how the membranes 
of biological organisms are assembled and the roles that these membranes play in a number of 
important processes. Emphasis is placed on the transport of proteins to and through biomembranes 
and the roles that membranes play in metabolite and ion transport. Where applicable, the 
significance of these processes is illustrated by examining the roles of membranes in health and 
disease. Lectures only. 


Note: Students who have received credit for CHEM 671 may not take this course for credit. 


CHEM 677 Enzyme Kinetics and Mechanism 

Prerequisite: CHEM 271, 375, or equivalent. 

This course explores steady-state kinetics, including such topics as the use of initial velocity studies 
and product inhibition to establish a kinetic mechanism; nonsteady-state kinetics, isotope effects, 


energy of activation, and the detailed mechanisms of selected enzymes. Lectures only. 


CHEM 678 Protein Engineering and Design 

Prerequisite: CHEM 271, 375, or equivalent. 

This course examines the principles behind protein design, how techniques of protein engineering 
are used, and the methods used to assess protein properties. Examples include studies of protein 


stability, structure-function relationships, and applications to drug design. Lectures only. 


Topics in Instrumentation 


CHEM 690 Selected Topics in Instrumentation 

This course explores themes within the area of Instrumentation. 

Note: The content will vary from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course, provided the course content has changed. Changes in content will be indicated by a letter 
following the course number, e.g. CHEM 690A, CHEM 690B, etc. 


CHEM 691 Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy 

Prerequisite: CHEM 222, 393, or equivalent. 

This course is designed to provide the background in magnetic resonance theory necessary to 
understand modern high-resolution NMR experiments and instrumentation. The basic theory in the 


introductory section also applies to electron spin resonance (ESR). Relaxation and through-bond 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


86 
and through-space interactions, and experiments to investigate them are considered. Spin 


manipulations and behaviour in multiple-pulse, Fourier transform NMR techniques used for common 


spectral editing and two-dimensional experiments are discussed. Lectures only. 


CHEM 692 Experimental Protein Chemistry 

Prerequisite: CHEM 477 or equivalent or permission of the Department. 

This “hands on” course introduces students to the common techniques used to study the structure 
and function of proteins and other macromolecules. Techniques covered include circular dichroism 
spectroscopy, fluorescence, UV/Vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, 
isothermal titration microcalorimetry, analytical ultracentrifugation, and protein crystallization/X-ray 
crystallography. The course includes theory, applications of the technique to the study of protein 
structure and function, and basic practice experiments to become familiar with the instrument and 
data analysis. For some of the techniques covered hands-on use will be limited. Each student is 
required to carry out a project on his/her own protein of interest. Each participant asks a specific 
question about a protein and then uses the techniques covered in the course to address the 
question. Lectures and laboratory. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a CHEM 690 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


Theses, Seminars, Comprehensive Exam and Special Courses 


CHEM 667 PhD Literature/Topic Seminar 
CHEM 668 PhD Research Seminar 
CHEM 856 Doctoral Research and Thesis (72 credits) 


CHEM 896 Research Proposal and Comprehensive Examination (9 credits) 


© Concordia University 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


87 


Concordia University 


http:/Awww.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/chem-msc.html 


Chemistry MSc 


Admission Requirements 


The admission requirement is an honours or specialization degree in chemistry or biochemistry or its 
equivalent. Comparable qualifications in related areas such as biology or physics may also be 
acceptable. Qualified applicants requiring prerequisite courses may be required to take up to two 
such courses in addition to their regular graduate program. Applicants with deficiencies in their 
undergraduate preparation may be required to take a qualifying program. This does not apply to 


International Students. 


Candidates for the master's degree may register on either a full-time or a part-time basis. It is also 
possible to carry out MSc studies on a CO-OP basis with the collaboration of an employer. CO-OP 
MSc graduate studies are arranged as a form of a full-time or part-time program where the student 
conducts research of interest to the employer, normally in the employer's laboratory, but directs the 
project toward a thesis topic acceptable to the department at Concordia and under the guidance of 
an academic supervisor in the department. The student will spend one term, normally with the 
support of an employer, gaining experience teaching in undergraduate laboratories and participating 
actively in the departmental seminars. This program will be available in areas of chemistry and 
biochemistry where the department has the resources to provide a suitable academic co-supervisor. 
It is a condition of the program that the employers agree to the publication of thesis results. 


Prospective applicants should contact the Department for further details. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits. 


2. Courses. The following are required: 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


88 
a. 6 credits from courses listed under Topics, in the general field of the student's research 


project; 


b. Another 3 credits from courses listed under Topics, outside the student's research project, 


acceptable to the supervisory committee; 
c. CHEM 655 - Master's Research and Thesis (33 credits); 


d. CHEM 666 - MSc Seminar (3 credits). 
This course provides an opportunity for the student to prepare and present materials 
concerning their current research problem in an area of chemistry or biochemistry to a critical 
audience. It is designed to give students practice at communicating and defending their ideas 
on a research topic in a professional forum, and should successfully inform a broad audience 


of chemists and biochemists. 


e. With permission from their supervisory committee, students are allowed to take graduate 
level courses from other departments relevant to their research problems, as partial fulfillment 


towards their degree requirements. 


3. Thesis. Students will work on a research topic under the direction of a faculty member and 
present an acceptable thesis at the conclusion. CHEM 655 - Master's Research and Thesis will 
be examined by the student's supervisory committee before being accepted by the department. 
Students may submit a manuscript-based thesis following the guidelines outlined in the section 
on Thesis Regulations in this calendar. In addition, an oral examination will be conducted before 


a committee of the department to test the student's ability to defend the thesis. 
4. Seminars. Each student is required to attend and participate in departmental seminars. 


5. Research Areas. Areas for possible research are listed before the Doctor of/Doctorate in 


Philosophy section. 


6. Cross-Registration. Students may, with the permission of their supervisory committee, cross- 


register for courses falling in the Topics categories in other Quebec institutions. 
Academic Regulations 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


89 
. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


— 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 
Program Specific Requirements. Students must obtain an assessment grade point average 
(AGPA) of 2.70 based on a minimum of 6 credits. 


2. Residence. The minimum residence requirement is one year (3 terms) of full-time study, or the 
equivalent in part-time study. The degree can normally be completed in two years (6 terms) of 


full-time study. 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 2.70. 


Courses 


Specific course offerings in subject areas listed under Topics will generally vary from year to year, 
depending on the availability of faculty and the requirements of graduate students in the program. In 
the MSc program, every student must complete CHEM 666 (Seminar); in the PhD program CHEM 
668 (Seminar) and CHEM 896 (Research Proposal and Comprehensive Examination) must be 


completed by every student. 


Courses are worth 3 credits unless otherwise indicated. Over the next few years the department will 
offer a selection of courses from those listed below. Additional Selected Topics courses may be 
offered in a given year, and these will be identified by different subtitles. Further information on 
Selected Topics courses will be available from the department at the beginning of each academic 


year. 
Topics in Analytical & Bioanalytical Chemistry 


CHEM 610 Selected Topics in Analytical Chemistry 

This course explores themes within the area of Analytical Chemistry. 

Note: The content will vary from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course, provided the course content has changed. Changes in content will be indicated by a letter 


following the course number, e.g. CHEM 610A, CHEM 610B, etc. 
Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


90 
CHEM 612 Analytical Separations 


Prerequisite: CHEM 218, 312, or equivalent. 

High performance liquid separations on an analytical (non-preparative) scale are surveyed. 
Fundamental separation mechanisms and application of the techniques are discussed. Emphasis is 
placed on separations of biologically relevant analytes which include peptides, proteins and nucleic 


acids. Lectures only. 


CHEM 614 Modern Aspects of Practical Mass Spectrometry 

Prerequisite: CHEM 494 or equivalent, previously or concurrently. 

Theoretical and operational aspects of modern mass spectrometry are discussed in a number of 
formal lectures and training sessions. All students must carry out an independent mass spectrometry 
project on their molecules of choice. Projects can be selected from all areas of chemistry, 
biochemistry or biology including the “omics” sciences (e.g., proteomics, metabolomics). 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a CHEM 630 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


Topics in Bioorganic & Organic Chemistry 


CHEM 620 Selected Topics in Organic Chemistry 

This course explores themes within the area of Organic Chemistry. 

Note: The content will vary from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course, provided the course content has changed. Changes in content will be indicated by a letter 
following the course number, e.g. CHEM 620A, CHEM 620B, etc. 


CHEM 621 Physical Organic Chemistry 

Prerequisite: CHEM 222, 235; CHEM 324 or 325; or equivalent. 

Determination of organic reaction mechanisms using kinetics, activation parameters, acid-base 
catalysis, Bronsted catalysis law, solvent effects, medium effects, isotope effects, substitutent 


effects, and linear free energy relationships. Lectures only. 


CHEM 623 Organic Synthesis 

Prerequisite: CHEM 222, 235, 324, or equivalent. 

This course is concerned with synthetic strategy and design. It provides an introduction to advanced 
synthetic methods and reagents, involving heteroatoms such as sulphur, phosphorus, tin and 
selenium, as well as an overview of the uses of protecting groups in organic chemistry. The concept 
of retrosynthesis and a few asymmetric reactions are discussed using syntheses of natural products 


from the literature as examples. Lectures only. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


91 
CHEM 625 Nucleic Acid Chemistry 


Prerequisite: CHEM 221, 222, 271, or equivalent. 

This course introduces students to various topics in nucleic acid chemistry. The topics include 
nomenclature, structure and function of RNA and DNA; techniques and methods to investigate 
nucleic acid structure; DNA damage and repair; interaction of small molecules and proteins with 
nucleic acid; oligonucleotide-based therapeutics (antisense, antigene, RNAi); synthesis of purines, 
pyrimidines and nucleosides; and solid-phase oligonucleotide synthesis. Lectures only. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a CHEM 620 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


CHEM 626 Reactive Intermediates 

Prerequisite: CHEM 324, 325, or equivalent. 

This course offers an introduction to reactive intermediates with an emphasis on structure and 
stability as found in modern (physical) organic chemistry. While the focus is on radicals and 
carbenes, carbocations are discussed near the end of the term. The material covered is relevant to 
chemistry and biochemistry. Lectures only. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a CHEM 621 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


CHEM 627 Supramolecular Chemistry 

Prerequisite: CHEM 324 or 325; CHEM 335; or equivalent; or permission of the Department. 

This course reviews some fundamental aspects of synthetic and biological supramolecular chemistry 
and nanotechnology. Topics covered may include supramolecular forces, ion binding and ion 
channels, molecular recognition, self-assembly (meso-scale and molecular-scale), organometallic 
supramolecular chemistry, dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC), and foldamers. Lectures only. 
Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a CHEM 620 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


Topics in Physical Chemistry 


CHEM 630 Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry 

This course explores themes within the area of Physical Chemistry. 

Note: The content will vary from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course, provided the course content has changed. Changes in content will be indicated by a letter 
following the course number, e.g. CHEM 630A, CHEM 630B, etc. 


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CHEM 631 Computational Chemistry 


Prerequisite: CHEM 234, 241, 333, or equivalent; or permission of the Department. 

This course presents the concepts, tools, and techniques of modern computational chemistry, and 
provides a very broad overview of the various fields of application across chemistry and 
biochemistry. The course is divided into two parts: 1) Molecular structure, which covers molecular 
mechanics and elementary electronic structure theory of atoms and molecules; and 2) Chemical 
reactivity, which covers applications of quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics techniques to 
studies of chemical reactions. The applications discussed include organic molecules and their 
reactions, peptides and proteins, drug design, DNA, polymers, inorganics, and materials. The course 
includes a practical component where students acquire hands-on experience with commonly used 


computational chemistry computer software. Lectures and laboratory. 


CHEM 632 Non-equilibrium Thermodynamics 

Prerequisite: CHEM 234 or equivalent. 

In this course, the basic concepts of classical (equilibrium) thermodynamics are first reviewed, 
followed by an introduction to statistical thermodynamics which gives a unified method of treating 
transport processes. At this point, the Boltzmann distribution function is derived, which leads to the 
statistical interpretation of entropy. Other important thermodynamic functions such as the partition 
function, the partition function for large ensembles and the Sackur-Tetrode equation are examined. 
The course also addresses non-equilibrium thermodynamics in the linear domain. The relations 
describing the production of entropy in irreversible processes due to heat transfer, charge transfer, 
change of volume, and chemical reactions are examined. The establishment of flux equations and 
the use of the Onsager reciprocal relations are then applied to the description of a variety of open 


systems. Lectures only. 


CHEM 633 Quantum Mechanics in Chemistry 

Prerequisite: CHEM 333, 431/631, or equivalent. 

This course includes a thorough review of basic quantum mechanics in both the Schroedinger and 
Heisenberg representations, electronic structure theory, symmetry and group theory, interaction of 
matter with light, quantum scattering, the path integral formalism, quantum theories of chemical 
reaction rates, time-dependent approaches to spectroscopy, wave packet propagation, correlation 


functions and dynamics processes, and density matrices. Lectures only. 


CHEM 635 Interfacial Phenomena 
Prerequisite: CHEM 234, 235, or equivalent. 
This course examines the physical chemistry of interfaces including surface and interfacial tensions, 


the absorption of surface active substances/surface excess properties, and surfactant self-assembly. 


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Topics covered may include Gibbs and Langmuir monolayers, micelle formation, emulsions, foams, 


surfactant liquid crystals, layer-by-layer polymer self-assembly, and biological membranes. 
Techniques for characterization and applications (biological and industrial) of these systems are 
addressed. Lectures only. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a CHEM 630 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


CHEM 638 Physics and Chemistry of Solid State Electronic Materials 

Prerequisite: CHEM 234, 333, or equivalent. 

This course essentially explores how electrical conductivity is influenced by the nature of the 
chemical bonding in these solid-state materials. The course provides an introduction to solid-state 
structures and then goes on to explore band theory, the central model used to describe electrical 
conductivity in the following three categories of electronic materials: conductors, semiconductors, 
and insulators. Finally the course explores the extension of the band model to interpret electrical 


conductivity in molecular semiconductors and charge-transfer complexes. Lectures only. 


Topics in Bioinorganic & Inorganic Chemistry 


CHEM 640 Selected Topics in Inorganic Chemistry 

This course explores themes within the area of Inorganic Chemistry. 

Note: The content will vary from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course, provided the course content has changed. Changes in content will be indicated by a letter 
following the course number, e.g. CHEM 640A, CHEM 640B, etc. 


CHEM 643 Organometallic Chemistry 
Prerequisite: CHEM 324, 341, or equivalent. 
This course covers the structure and properties of organometallic compounds, their main reactions 


and their application in catalysis and organic chemistry. Lectures only. 


CHEM 644 Physical Methods in Chemistry 

This course provides an in-depth evaluation of the different methods used in modern physical 
chemistry such as laser, microwave, FT-IR, electron spin resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance, x- 
ray photoelectron, x-ray diffraction and fluorescence, Auger eletron, Mossbauer, and gamma-ray 
spectroscopic analysis, as well as scanning probe microscopy and mass spectrometry. Lectures 


only. 


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CHEM 645 Bioinorganic Chemistry 


Prerequisite: CHEM 241, 271, or equivalent. 

Role of metals in biochemical systems. Essential trace elements, zinc enzymes, oxygen transport 
and storage, metalloproteins and biological electron transfer, structure-function relationships in heme 
enzymes, nitrogen fixation; model compounds for metalloproteins and metalloenzymes. Lectures 


only. 


CHEM 646 Industrial Catalysis 

Prerequisite: CHEM 234, 235, or equivalent. 

Basic and recent concepts in catalysis are described with particular emphasis on heterogenous 
catalysis. The technical, economic and environmental aspects of industrial catalysis are covered. 
The processes to be studied are chosen from the petroleum industry, the natural gas and coal 
processing industry, and the production of thermoplastics and synthetic fibres. The course ends with 
a rapid survey of problems associated with the treatment of industrial pollutants and with catalytic 


converters. Lectures only. 


Topics in Multidisciplinary Chemistry 


CHEM 650 Selected Topics in Multidisciplinary Chemistry 

This course explores themes within the area of Multidisciplinary Chemistry. 

Note: The content will vary from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course, provided the course content has changed. Changes in content will be indicated by a letter 
following the course number, e.g. CHEM 650A, CHEM 650B, etc. 


CHEM 651 Nanochemistry 

Prerequisites: CHEM 217, 218, 221, 222, 234, 235, 241, or equivalent. 

This modular course covers the areas of production, characterization and applications of nanoscale 
structures and materials. Each module is taught by a different professor as well as guest lecturers. 
Topics may include (but are not limited to): size dependent properties, synthesis of organic and 
inorganic nanostructures, self-assembled structures, chemical patterning and functional 
nanopatterns, biomaterials. Nanometer scale fabrication techniques such as lithographic methods, 
nano-stamping and patterned self-assembly are discussed. Modern analysis techniques such as 
atomic force microscopy and electron microscopy, which are used to map and measure at the single 
molecule level are introduced. Applications such as photonics, optical properties, biodetection and 
biosensors, micro- and nano-fluidics, nanoelectronics and nanomachines are presented. The course 
includes a term project carried out using the nanoscience facilities held in the department research 


labs. 


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CHEM 658 Aquatic Biogeochemistry 


Prerequisite: CHEM 217, 218, 312, or equivalent. 

The major aim of this course is to present a quantitative treatment of the variables that determine the 
composition of natural waters. Chemical equilibrium is the central theme of the course, but 
consideration is also given to kinetics, steady-state and dynamic models. Related themes include 
global chemical cycles, air and water pollution, as well as current research topics in water chemistry 
and chemical oceanography. Lectures only. 

Note: Students who have received credit for CHEM 618 or for this topic under a CHEM 610 number 


may not take this course for credit. 


Topics in Biochemistry 


CHEM 670 Selected Topics in Biochemistry and Biophysics 

This course explores themes within the area of Biochemistry and Biophysics. 

Note: The content will vary from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course, provided the course content has changed. Changes in content will be indicated by a letter 
following the course number, e.g. CHEM 670A, CHEM 670B, etc. 


CHEM 676 Structure and Function of Biomembranes 

Prerequisite: BIOL 266, CHEM 375, or equivalent. 

Examples from the current literature are used to discuss what is known about how the membranes 
of biological organisms are assembled and the roles that these membranes play in a number of 
important processes. Emphasis is placed on the transport of proteins to and through biomembranes 
and the roles that membranes play in metabolite and ion transport. Where applicable, the 
significance of these processes is illustrated by examining the roles of membranes in health and 
disease. Lectures only. 


Note: Students who have received credit for CHEM 671 may not take this course for credit. 


CHEM 677 Enzyme Kinetics and Mechanism 

Prerequisite: CHEM 271, 375, or equivalent. 

This course explores steady-state kinetics, including such topics as the use of initial velocity studies 
and product inhibition to establish a kinetic mechanism; nonsteady-state kinetics, isotope effects, 


energy of activation, and the detailed mechanisms of selected enzymes. Lectures only. 


CHEM 678 Protein Engineering and Design 
Prerequisite: CHEM 271, 375, or equivalent. 


This course examines the principles behind protein design, how techniques of protein engineering 


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are used, and the methods used to assess protein properties. Examples include studies of protein 


stability, structure-function relationships, and applications to drug design. Lectures only. 


Topics in Instrumentation 


CHEM 690 Selected Topics in Instrumentation 

This course explores themes within the area of Instrumentation. 

Note: The content will vary from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course, provided the course content has changed. Changes in content will be indicated by a letter 
following the course number, e.g. CHEM 690A, CHEM 690B, etc. 


CHEM 691 Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy 

Prerequisite: CHEM 222, 393, or equivalent. 

This course is designed to provide the background in magnetic resonance theory necessary to 
understand modern high-resolution NMR experiments and instrumentation. The basic theory in the 
introductory section also applies to electron spin resonance (ESR). Relaxation and through-bond 
and through-space interactions, and experiments to investigate them are considered. Spin 
manipulations and behaviour in multiple-pulse, Fourier transform NMR techniques used for common 


spectral editing and two-dimensional experiments are discussed. Lectures only. 


CHEM 692 Experimental Protein Chemistry 

Prerequisite: CHEM 477 or equivalent or permission of the Department. 

This “hands on” course introduces students to the common techniques used to study the structure 
and function of proteins and other macromolecules. Techniques covered include circular dichroism 
spectroscopy, fluorescence, UV/Vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, 
isothermal titration microcalorimetry, analytical ultracentrifugation, and protein crystallization/X-ray 
crystallography. The course includes theory, applications of the technique to the study of protein 
structure and function, and basic practice experiments to become familiar with the instrument and 
data analysis. For some of the techniques covered hands-on use will be limited. Each student is 
required to carry out a project on his/her own protein of interest. Each participant asks a specific 
question about a protein and then uses the techniques covered in the course to address the 
question. Lectures and laboratory. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a CHEM 690 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


Theses, Seminars, Comprehensive Exam and Special Courses 


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CHEM 655 Master’s Research and Thesis (33 credits) 
CHEM 666 MSc Seminar (3 credits) 


© Concordia University 


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Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/span.html 


Hispanic Studies MA 
Note: Admissions have been suspended. 


Admission Requirements 


The normal requirement for admission into the MA is an Honours or Specialization in Spanish, or 
equivalent degree with a minimum GPA of 3.30 on a 4.30 scale; official transcripts; curriculum vitae; 
three letters of reference; statement of purpose in English or French; oral and written competence in 
Spanish and English or Spanish and French. Applicants must submit a 5-minute voice sample in 
Spanish in an audio file (mp3, iTunes, or wma) and a 1000-word writing sample in Spanish. All 


applications will be reviewed by the Graduate Studies Committee. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 
and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 


Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Residence. The minimum residence requirement for the Master of/Magisteriate in Arts (Hispanic 


Studies) is three terms (one year) of full-time study, or the equivalent in part-time study. 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


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4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have accumulative GPA of at 


least 2.70. 


Courses 


Students are required to complete 18 credits of coursework. The following core courses are required 


(six credits): 


SPAN 601 Discourse Analysis and Research Methods (3 credits) 
SPAN 603 Introduction to the Pedagogy of Spanish (3 credits) 


Twelve credits of elective courses may be chosen from the following list: 


SPAN 605 Independent Study (3 credits) 

SPAN 621-630 Topics in Applied Linguistics and the pedagogy of Spanish (3 credits) 
SPAN 631-640 Topics in Spanish Translation (3 credits) 

SPAN 641-650 Topics in Critical Thinking and Theory (3 credits) 

SPAN 651-660 Topics in the Subject and Identity (3 credits) 

SPAN 661-670 Topics in Exile and Marginality (3 credits) 

SPAN 671-680 Topics in History of Ideas in the Hispanic World (3 credits) 

SPAN 681 Research Seminar (3 credits) 

SPAN 698 Topics in Current Research (3 credits) 


Note 1: Subject matter in “topics” courses varies from term to term and from year to year. Details of 
the courses to be given together with their respective course contents will be available at the 


beginning of the academic year. 


Note 2: In consultation with the Graduate Program Director, students may replace up to 6 credits of 
reading courses, or credits at the graduate level in another discipline. Permission of the Graduate 
Program Director of the respective program must also be granted. Interdisciplinary courses, where 
relevant to the student’s program, may include courses at the graduate level in the Departments of 
Communication Studies, Education, English, Etudes francaises, Philosophy, Sociology and 
Anthropology, and Religions and Cultures. Approval of courses from these departments will be 


sought on a per-case basis. 


Note 3: Students who wish to concentrate in Pedagogy or Translation may take six credits at the 


graduate level in the department relative to their concentration. 


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Twenty-seven credits in: 


SPAN 694 Thesis Proposal (3 credits) 
SPAN 695 Thesis (24 credits) 


OR: 


SPAN 682 Research Paper I (12 credits) 
SPAN 683 Research Paper Il (15 credits) 


Course Descriptions 


SPAN 601 Discourse Analysis and Research Methods (3 credits) 

This course is designed to provide both a broad theoretical introduction and concrete practice in the 
research and analysis of literary and cultural texts. Students consider, critique, and incorporate 
theory and criticism into the articulation and elaboration of an analytical essay. They also implement 
fundamental research practices such as performing bibliographical searches and documentation; 
implementing narrative, argumentative, and persuasive rhetorical strategies; and, finally, developing 


a rigorously defended and coherent argument. 


SPAN 603 Introduction to the Pedagogy of Spanish (3 credits) 

In this course, students learn and implement important aspects of teaching methodology and 
techniques. Opportunities for observation of Spanish classes are provided. Students apply the 
techniques learned in micro-teaching and peer teaching exercises. Assignments include lesson 
planning and the evaluation of teaching performance. This course will be offered in the first semester 
of every year. In order to integrate practice into the curriculum, an effort will be made to offer 


students an opportunity to teach an Introductory Spanish language course. 


SPAN 605 Independent Study (3 credits) 
Under the supervision of a faculty member, the student undertakes research in a defined topic 
related to the student’s interest and the faculty member’s field of specialization. A final research 


paper is required. 


SPAN 621-630 Topics in Applied Linguistics and the Pedagogy of Spanish (3 credits) 
The courses in this area address different theoretical aspects of Spanish pedagogy, such as learning 
theories, curriculum planning, interlanguage development, the teaching and learning of phonology, 


phonetics, grammar, and vocabulary acquisition. 


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SPAN 631-640 Topics in Spanish Translation (3 credits) 


Courses in this thematic area will explore different theoretical aspects of translation, such as 
languages in contact (bilingualism, interpretation, Chicano/a literature, contrastive grammars), 
diachronic and synchronic linguistic variation and its representation in time and space, as well as 


provide students with the opportunity to practice their translation skills. 


SPAN 641-650 Topics in Critical Thinking and Theory (3 credits) 

Through the study of cultural discourses of the Hispanic world, this thematic area aims to improve 
the understanding and praxis of rational analysis and argumentation, as well as to examine the 
intimate relationship between linguistic/language theory and cultural analysis. Topics may include 
rhetoric, pragmatics and hermeneutics, as well as the analytical practices of a number of linguistic 


and literary theorists. 


SPAN 651-660 Topics in the Subject and Identity (3 credits) 

This area examines the artistic, literary and philosophical conceptualizations of subject and identity 
in the Hispanic world, including the problematics of gender, the (visual) image, the gaze, the body, 
etc. Topics may include the image of the gendered subject, analyses of dramatic works and film, the 
‘visibility’ of the subject in the media, literature and/or paraliterature of a period and/or geographical 


area. 


SPAN 661-670 Topics in Exile and Marginality (3 credits) 

This thematic area examines exile as an epistemological, ontological, aesthetic, linguistic and 
political category within the Hispanic world. Courses may concentrate on writers and/or artists in 
exile, political and national identity, as well as gender issues in different eras and geographical 
spaces. Topics may include the examination of discourses of crisis in different eras: modernization; 


testimonio literature; the boom; the Chicano world and its reality; postmodernism/colonialism. 


SPAN 671-680 Topics in History of Ideas in the Hispanic World (3 credits) 

This area examines the philosophical and ideological bases of artistic expression in the Hispanic 
world, in its European, American and Asian contexts. Topics may include the Caliban/Ariel 
dichotomy in Latin America, the rhetoric of independence and revolution, modernity/postmodernity. 


Poetic and essayistic discourses of Spain and Spanish America form the corpus for this area. 


SPAN 681 Research Seminar (3 credits) 


Students meet with peers and faculty for discussion and presentation of their current research. 


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SPAN 682 Research Paper I (12 credits) 


Under the supervision of a faculty member, students undertake a substantial research project, to be 


completed by the preparation of a research paper. 


SPAN 683 Research Paper Il (15 credits) 
Under the supervision of a faculty member, students undertake a research project, to be completed 


by the preparation of a research paper. 


SPAN 694 Thesis Proposal (3 credits) 

Under the supervision of a thesis supervisor, the student writes a proposal presenting a research 
topic, whose overall goal is to demonstrate that the student is capable of undertaking an 
independent research project. In the proposal, the student provides: 1) the linguistic, cultural or 
literary phenomenon or corpus to be studied; 2) a critical and theoretical framework for the study; 
and 3) a preliminary bibliography. This proposal is submitted to the thesis director and Graduate 
Program Director for consideration. 


SPAN 695 Thesis (24 credits) 
The thesis consists of the formulation and presentation of the research results. Each thesis is 
examined by a committee consisting of the student’s supervisor and at least two other scholars from 


the department and/or scholars from relevant disciplines in other departments or institutions. 


SPAN 698 Topics in Current Research (3 credits) 
When offered, content will depend on the theme designated by the program.Students may re- 
register for this course, provided that the course content has changed. Change in content will be 


indicated by the letter following the course number. 


© Concordia University 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


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Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/coms-phd.html 


Communication PhD 


Admission Requirements 


Applicants must have a Master of/Magisteriate in Arts in Communication or its equivalent. Applicants 
are selected on the basis of the excellence of their past academic records. Applicants must include a 
thoroughly articulated outline of a research project with their application. 
Admission Criteria 

« Excellence and pertinence of academic background. 

« Promise as a scholar. 

« Relevance of proposed research to the program. 

¢ Feasibility of proposed research in terms of material and faculty resources. 

¢ Ability to understand English and French. 

« Availability of a faculty member to direct the applicant. 
While there are no fixed quotas, admission is limited by the availability of the program's faculty to 


supervise students. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Language Requirements. Applicants should have a level of competence that would allow them to 
read technical material and follow lectures and discussions in English. Students may participate in 


discussions, write reports, examinations and theses in English or French, as they choose. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A fully qualified candidate entering the program with a master's/magisteriate degree is 
required to complete a minimum of 90 credits. These are apportioned as follows: courses and 


seminars, 18 credits; doctoral examination, 3 credits; thesis proposal, 6 credits; and thesis, 63 


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credits. Typical progress in the program consists of: 


Year 1 


o Courses: Integrative Seminar: COMS 800 (3 credits), plus three elective courses (9 credits). 


Year 2 
° Doctoral Examination: COMS 815 (3 credits). 


© Doctoral Pro-Seminar: COMS 835 (3 credits), and one additional elective course from among 


the program's offerings (3 credits). 


Year 3 
© Doctoral Thesis Proposal: COMS 890 (6 credits). 


o Doctoral Thesis Research: COMS 896 (63 credits). 


. Courses. All students must enrol in COMS 800 Integrative Seminar in the first term of Year 1; 
COMS 835 Doctoral Pro-Seminar (3 credits); and enrol in seminars and courses from among 
the program's offerings for a total of 21 credits.Students are required to choose a thesis director 


before the end of their third term in the program. 


. Supervision. 
Students are assigned an academic advisor when they first register. Students are required to 


choose a thesis director before the end of their third term in the program. 


. Doctoral Examination. Students must successfully pass an examination based on the student's 
research areas and interests. The committee for the examination is composed of three 
professors, including the student's supervisor. Under normal circumstances, students enrol in the 
Doctoral Examination in Year 2 of the program. Normally, the written portion of the examination is 
defended orally by no later than the end of the Fall Term in Year 2. It is compulsory to finish the 
examination before registering in the COMS 835 Doctoral Pro-Seminar. It is also compulsory to 
finish the examinationbefore completing the thesis proposal. Students who fail this examination 
are permitted to take it a second time in the following term. Students failing a second time are 


obliged to withdraw from the program. Students should consult the program regarding specific 


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examination procedures and requirements. 


. Doctoral Pro-Seminar. In order to promote the growth of an intellectual community within the 
program, students are required to register in the theory and research pro-seminar known as the 
Doctoral Pro-Seminar. Students registered in this seminar engage in research design by 
workshopping their thesis proposals through iterative presentations with seminar participants, 
and through multiple written drafts. Students are then required to present a first draft of their 
thesis proposal. Students typically register in the Doctoral Pro-Seminar in Year 2 of their studies. 
It is compulsory to finish the COMS 815 Doctoral Examination before registering in the 


Doctoral Pro-Seminar. 


. Thesis Proposal. In the term following the completion of course work (usually the sixth term) 
students should submit a thesis proposal to their thesis director. Students must have completed 
the doctoral examination before registering for the thesis proposal. The thesis proposal should 
be completed within three years of the student's first enrolment. The proposal must be defended 
orally before a committee of three professors appointed by the program. Students must 
demonstrate the viability of their project and their capacity to undertake doctoral thesis research. 
The proposal may be accepted, returned for modifications, or rejected. The rejection of a 
proposal results in the student being withdrawn from the program. A student whose proposal is 


accepted is admitted to candidacy for the PhD. 


. Thesis Research. All degree requirements, including the thesis, must be completed within six 
years of the student's first enrolment for full-time studies and eight years for part-time studies. 
The thesis must be based on extensive research in primary sources, make an original 
contribution to knowledge, and be in an acceptable literary form. For purposes of registration, 
this work is designated as COMS 896 Doctoral Thesis Research. 


The doctoral thesis is based on extensive primary research; the goal is to make an original 
contribution to knowledge. The traditional research thesis is ideally no less than 225 pages and 
no longer than 350 pages. It must be written in an acceptable literary form and represent a 
contribution to theoretical or empirical knowledge in the field of communication. Students also 
have the possibility to produce a research—creation thesis which is to meet the same standards 
of rigour as the traditional research thesis. The research-creation thesis includes a practical 
component of creation or innovative production in the field of media/communications or 
digital/computerized communications, as well as a written component of approximately 150 


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pages demonstrating the contribution to the advancement of knowledge in the field. A digital 


reproduction of the practical component must be attached to the manuscript at the time of 


submission. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Residence. The minimum period of residence is six terms including two summer terms of full- 


time study, or its equivalent in part-time study. Of this, three terms must be taken consecutively. 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 3.00. 


Courses 


Core Courses 


COMS 800 Integrative Seminar (3 credits) 

This course proposes to engage first-year students in an epistemological conversation concerning 
different approaches to the conceptualization of communication and to the range of research 
problematics elaborated in the field and in the program. The expected outcomes include: a broad 
understanding of the relations between different domains within the discipline; the ability to 
recognize the links between epistemological assumptions, theory construction, the formation of 
research problematics and methodological approaches; a familiarization with the main fields of 
strength within the program; and the development of the ability to engage in dialogue with 


colleagues in different domains of research. 


COMS 835 Doctoral Pro-Seminar (3 credits) 


Note: Students who have received credit for COMS 830 may not take this course for credit. 


Elective Courses 
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COMS 805 Research Workshop (3 credits) 


This research workshop is supervised by the student’s thesis director and is intended to respond to a 
particular need unfulfilled by the program. It can take various forms, namely a directed readings 
program, a specific project within a research group, an elective course (including a masters level 
course) or a research or creation internship. The research workshop must be defined in a specific 
agreement between the thesis supervisor and the student, which is approved by the program 
director and added to the student’s file. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a COMS 805 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


COMS 822 Advanced Seminar in Research Methods | (3 credits) 

This course provides an in-depth analysis of methodological problematics. Major contemporary 
methods of analysis are considered. Possible themes include research design, data-gathering 
techniques and instruments, and qualitative or quantitative procedures for data analysis. Specific 


topics may vary from year to year. 


COMS 823 Advanced Seminar in Research Methods Il (3 credits) 
Students who have registered for COMS 822 must register for COMS 823 when taking a second 
Advanced Seminar in Research Methods course. 


* Topics vary and are determined by the Joint Program Committee. 


COMS 841 Cultural Industries (3 credits) 

This course examines commodification and industrialization processes as well as the dissemination 
and consumption of culture within contemporary social formations, while focusing on one or more 
sectors of the cultural industries. The analytical approach considers themes such as characteristics 
of merchandising cycles, work and market organization, symbolic and cultural specificity of cultural- 


industries products, and relationships between technological innovation and cultural form. 


COMS 842 Media Reception (3 credits) 

This course examines media reception. It explores different theoretical and methodological 
approaches to the study of individual group practices and cultural consumption. The course looks at 
case-study material drawn from specific media or media genres (e.g. popular music, soap operas, 
children’s programming). The seminar considers such approaches as media ethnography, focus- 
group research, audience research, life histories, and other context specific micro-social 


approaches. 


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COMS 843 Communication Policy (3 credits) 


This course examines the history and development of state intervention and regulation of the media. 
It may focus on communication policy nationally or internationally. The course considers such issues 
as the role of public policy in the development of public media and the public sphere, models of 

regulation and deregulation, the relations between regulatory agencies and interest groups, and the 


position of communication policies within larger governmental structures. 


COMS 844 Uses of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) (3 credits) 
Observing usage of information and communication objects and technical devices allows us to 
understand the effect of technologies within society. This course explores different theoretical and 
methodological approaches pertinent to analyzing ICT usages. With respect to course discussions 
and papers, particular attention may be paid to the interaction between user and technical device; 
articulation between artifact user and creator; usage situation within the organizational context; 
embedding of political dimensions in technological design; usage micro-situations and macro- 
sociological issues. Some major research traditions may be introduced, namely, dissemination of 
artifacts, sociotechnical innovation, common practices and significations, pragmatic approaches, 


social and socio-political appropriation of usages. 


COMS 851 Speech Communication (3 credits) 
This course examines discourse as action. Forms of discourse considered may range from 
interpersonal communication to public address. Possible theoretical approaches include 


ethnomethodology, conversational analysis, rhetorical theory, and performance studies. 


COMS 853 Discourse and Representation (3 credits) 
The course examines discourse with respect to representation. It focuses on the structuring of 
knowledge and identity within sign systems. Emphasis may range from the cognitive and 


psychological to the social and cultural. 


COMS 854 Discourse within Social Formations (3 credits) 
This course examines discourse as social mediation. Possible themes include the interrelation of 
power and knowledge, the organization of culture through signifying practices, and the production of 


discourse and social institutions. 


COMS 861 Organizational Culture (3 credits) 
This course examines how cultural analysis can be brought to bear in understanding organizational 


life. To this end, a range of theoretical approaches are drawn upon, including conversational 


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analysis, ethnography, ethnomethodology, symbolic interactionism, enactment theory, and socio- 


linguistics. Aspects of organizations such as norms, rituals, folklore, traditions, common ideals, 


ideologies, shared symbols, core values and interaction are given particular attention. 


COMS 864 Communication and Change in Organizations (3 credits) 

This course addresses a major question within organizations at both theoretical and practical levels. 
It focuses on issues of innovation or transformation in an organizational framework using various 
approaches (functionalist, critical, post-modern, constructivist, interpretative). This perspective is 
pertinent for analyzing the context and process of change within cultural or development 


organizations as well as private, public or charitable undertakings. 


COMS 873 Identities and Cultural Exchange (3 credits) 

Within the context of electronic, information, and market-globalization forces, traditional geopolitical 
borders have become porous and easily penetrable. This course focuses on the hybrid identities 
emergent and negotiated from cross-cultural engagements and transnational communication at the 
beginning of the 21st century. Curricular materials include theoretical readings, case studies, and 


audiovisual materials focused on bridging cultural and political gaps. 


COMS 874 Globalization of Communication (3 credits) 

This course examines the emergence of a global communication system. Possible topics include 
international information flow, the circulation of communication products and communication issues 
as they are reflected in international accords and debates, and the role of media in issues of cultural 


development, democratization, and resistance to globalization. 


COMS 875 Technology and Organization (3 credits) 

This course analyzes and critiques various theoretical approaches which account for the relationship 
between technology and organization. It also provides the grounds for a communicational reflection 
on phenomena associated with the presence of information and communication technologies within 


organizations. 


COMS 876 Media Technology as Practice (3 credits) 
This course examines relationships between theory and practice in the work of individuals and 
groups of media practitioners across a range of genres and working contexts. Analysis can focus on 


the organization of the workplace, the creative process and social forces influencing media praxis. 


COMS 877 International Communication and Development (3 credits) 
This course traces the history of the different paradigms related to communication and development. 


It proposes a critical analysis of the theoretical perspectives suggested in both Southern and 
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Northern contexts. The topics considered include Canadian and foreign institutions, policies, and 


programs, the role of international fora, as well as globalization and development. Case studies may 


focus on a specific region of the world. 


COMS 878 Communication, Conflict and Peace (3 credits) 

This course examines the various ways in which discourses of war, conflict, and peace are 
constructed and relayed through the mass media and other forms of technologically-mediated 
communication. In particular, how do the inherent properties of different modes of communication 
intersect with larger discursive formations to reproduce dominant definitions and unquestioned 
categories of social knowledge related to issues of peace and conflict? What role do the media play 
in shaping our understanding of war and warfare? How does the internet contribute to promoting 
both conflict and peace? How is peace represented as an end state that is desirable; for whom is 
peace being constructed; and what are the kinds of actions being promoted or encouraged in the 


name of peace? 


COMS 879 Human-Computer Interactions (3 credits) 

This seminar examines human-computer interaction models and research in various fields of media 
communication; virtual worlds, e-commerce, distance education, sharing of knowledge and 
resources, adaptive technologies, systems intelligence and customization. Other topics include 


principles of interface design and assessment in cognitive ergonomics. 


COMS 880 Communication Networks and Organization (3 credits) 

This course examines and analyzes communication networks in a constructivist perspective with 
respect to two main “social-networks” traditions (anthropological and structural). It considers 
communication networks according to the themes explored by scholars in the field such as diffusion, 
social support and capital, organizational phenomena, social movements or ICTs. The seminar also 
includes methodological aspects of the study of communication networks, their emergence, and their 


transformation. 


COMS 882 Communication, Democracy and Power (3 credits) 

This course considers the communicative structure and performance of democracy within modern 
society. Attention is paid to the discursive resources available to perform and affect democracy, the 
constitution of democratic agents, the role of media in constituting and maintaining a public sphere, 
communicative strategies, norms of regulation and power, the performance of difference and various 


aspects of public culture. 


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COMS 883 History and Historiography of Media and Culture (3 credits) 


This course examines the development of communication technologies and the media in 
comparative and historical perspective. Themes of time, space, place and power and their 
reconfiguration in relation to media and communication are given particular attention. Class 
members are encouraged to think about how they might engage in research on the history of media 
as part of their dissertation projects. To this end, historiographical issues are examined throughout 
the course, along with methodological consideration given to how one works with documentary and 


archival records. 


COMS 884 Cultural Theory in Communication Studies (3 credits) 

This course introduces students to cultural studies and its entwinement with the development of the 
field of communications. Key readings in Marxist approaches to culture, British Cultural Studies, and 
its US and Canadian variants are covered in the first half of the course. The remaining weeks 
expand the national and conceptual specificity of the “cultural studies tradition.” Topics include 


cultural and representational politics, issues of identity, resistance, hegemony, and ideology. 


COMS 885 Popular Culture (3 credits) 

This course focuses upon the political dimension of popular culture and the intellectual challenges it 
poses to scholarship. It concentrates upon the conceptual and historical aspects of the study of 
popular-cultural forms, their production and consumption, as well as their assessment. The course 
introduces key ideas and issues in popular-cultural studies, beginning with the rise of interest in 
mass culture during the late-19th and early-20th centuries. It also encounters modes of examining 
and understanding popular texts and sites of popular consumption. Issues of subjectivity, community, 


ideology, cultural hierarchies, and mass society are addressed. 


COMS 886 Alternative Media (3 credits) 

This course examines the array of alternative communication practices that inform social 
movements emerging from the margins. It focuses on the conditions of their effectiveness and 
mechanisms that facilitate or impede their success, such as the external social forces that influence 


their cooptation, commodification and evacuation of revolutionary potential. 


COMS 887 Strategies and Styles in Communication (3 credits) 

This course considers the strategies and styles of communication as intentional symbolic activity. 
Communication is examined as a practice that responds to and transforms situations and contexts. 
Emphasis is placed on the form, manner, and consequences of such practices, as well as on the 


major paradigms informing different approaches to the study of discourse and mediated messages. 


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COMS 888 Discourses of the Body (3 credits) 


Critical theorists have identified the body as a site of competing and multiple discourses. The course 
examines some of the ways in which different bodies have been constructed in the media and how 
these both constrain and provide latitude for the expression of identities. A central area of inquiry is 
the context of the historical and contemporary terrain that informs the expression and categorization 


of these identities. 


COMS 889 Theories of Organizational Communication (3 credits) 

This course surveys and juxtaposes how some of the main approaches to organizational studies 
have dealt with issues related to communication. Paradigms considered may include scientific 
management, human relations, cybernetics, political economy, rational decision making, cultural 
studies, feminism, and post-modernism. An effort is made to examine how these various approaches 
emerged historically in relation to shifting patterns of power, inequality, and technological change. 
Issues such as the nature of bureaucracy, domination and resistance, systematically distorted 


communication, and public relations/external communication are addressed. 


COMS 891 Communication Technologies and Society (3 credits) 

This course introduces students to and contextualizes the main paradigms with respect to research 
on social, economic and cultural aspects of information and communication technologies. Critical 
analysis focuses on their epistemological assumptions and premises, main categories of analysis, 


and privileged issues. Attention is paid to the political economy of the information system. 


COMS 892 Epistemology and Methodology of Media Creation (3 credits) 

This seminar seeks to develop a position of poiesis (production) and to differentiate it from the 
position of aisthesis (reception). In order to define the multiple aspects of media creation, the 
following themes are discussed: creationistic accounts and theses; the spectacle as ritual, 
achievement and imitation of reality; agents, machines and living organisms; functions of 
transmitting information and storytelling. Operational concepts considered may include granularity, 


linearity, interactivity, diegesis, spatialization, indexicalization and enunciation. 


COMS 893 Advanced Seminar in Special Topics in the PhD in Communication (3 credits) 
This seminar permits the in-depth examination of particular special topics in media and 


communication. Topics vary from year to year. 


Examinations and Thesis Work 


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COMS 815 Doctoral Examination (3 credits) 


COMS 890 Doctoral Thesis Proposal (6 credits) 
COMS 896 Doctoral Thesis Research (63 credits) 


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Concordia University 


http:/Awww.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/coms-ma.html 


Media Studies MA 


Admission Requirements 


Normally the candidate must have a bachelor's degree in communication (or equivalent in a cognate 
area) with a minimum of 3.00 GPA. Experience in media or a media-related field is an asset. 
Qualified applicants requiring prerequisite courses may be required to take up to 12 credits in 
addition to and as part of the regular graduate program. Applicants with deficiencies in their 
undergraduate preparation are normally required to take qualifying course(s) as deemed appropriate 
by the program. Credits allowed for previous graduate work must be determined by the department 


and the university prior to entry to the program. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. Fully-qualified candidates are required to complete a minimum of 45 credits, including 


the three core program courses. 


2. Courses. COMS 600 Communication Theory (3 credits) is required for all students in the first 
year of the program. Students may enter one of the four options I, Il, Ill or IV outlined below. 
Students elect an option after their first term of study with permission of the program director. 
The Research-Creation Thesis (option III) is restricted to students with adequate and appropriate 


media experience. The program does not provide media training. 
Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


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2. Residence. The minimum residence requirement is one year (3 terms) of full-time study, or the 


equivalent in part-time study. 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have completed all program 


requirements and attained a cumulative GPA of at least 2.70. 


Master of/Magisteriate in Arts with Thesis (Option I) 


Candidates are required to take the following: 


1. 9 credits: COMS 600 - Communication Theory; COMS 605 - Media Research Methods I; COMS 


694 - Thesis/Research Creation Thesis Proposal; 
2. 3 credits: COMS 610 - Media Studies Seminar; 


3. 12 credits, chosen in consultation with the student’s faculty advisor and approved by the 
department's graduate studies committee. If approved by the department’s graduate studies 
committee, and with the permission of the department concerned, up to 3 of these credits may 


be taken in cognate graduate courses offered by other departments in the university; 
4. 21 credits, COMS 695 - Thesis. 


Master of/Magisteriate in Arts with Courses (Option Il) 


Candidates are required to take the following: 
1. 6 credits: COMS 600 - Communication Theory; COMS 605 - Media Research Methods |; 
2. 3 credits: COMS 610 - Media Studies Seminar; 


3. 36 credits, chosen in consultation with the student’s faculty advisor and approved by the 
department's graduate studies committee. If approved by the department’s graduate studies 
committee, and with the permission of the department concerned, up to 9 of these credits may 


be taken in cognate graduate courses offered by other departments in the university. 


Master of/Magisteriate in Arts with Research-Creation Thesis (Option III) 


Candidates are required to take the following: 


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1. 9 credits: COMS 600 - Communication Theory; COMS 605 - Media Research Methods I; COMS 


694 - Thesis/Research Creation Thesis Proposal; 
2. 3 credits: COMS 610 - Media Studies Seminar; 


3. 12 credits, chosen in consultation with the student’s faculty advisor and approved by the 
department's graduate studies committee. If approved by the department’s graduate studies 
committee, and with the permission of the department concerned, up to 3 of these credits may 


be taken in cognate graduate courses offered by other departments in the university; 
4. 21 credits, COMS 697 - Research-Creation Thesis. 


Master of/Magisteriate in Arts with Major Research Paper (Option IV) 


Candidates are required to take the following: 
1. 6 credits: COMS 600 - Communication Theory; COMS 605 - Media Research Methods |; 
2. 3 credits: COMS 610 - Media Studies Seminar; 


3. 21 credits, chosen in consultation with the student’s faculty advisor and approved by the 
department's graduate studies committee. If approved by the department’s graduate studies 
committee, and with the permission of the department concerned, up to 9 of these credits may 


be taken in cognate graduate courses offered by other departments in the university; 


4. 15 credits, COMS 698 - Major Research Paper. 


Courses 


All courses are worth 3 credits unless otherwise noted. 


COMS 600 Communication Theory 
This seminar studies and evaluates the major historical and contemporary approaches to 
communication theory. The following approaches are covered: Processes and Effects, 


Functionalism; Symbolism and Cultural Studies; Institutional Studies and Political Economy. 


COMS 605 Media Research Methods | 

Prerequisite: COMS 600 previously or concurrently. 

This seminar prepares students to critique literature from any of the major research traditions; to 
make basic connections between epistemology and problems of basic communication research; to 
be able to identify the research method most appropriate to personal areas of interest; to design a 
basic research project. 


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COMS 606 Media Research Practicum 


Prerequisite: COMS 605 and permission of the Graduate Program Director. 

This course is an individual research practicum offered on a tutorial basis under faculty supervision. 
It may be used to develop advanced skills in a particular media research methodology. For students 
enrolled in the research-creation thesis or thesis options, this course is used to develop the analytic 


or creative research program necessary to accomplish the thesis. 


COMS 608 History of Media 

Prerequisite: COMS 600 previously or concurrently. 

This seminar examines the development of communications technology and the media in a 
comparative and historical perspective. Topics include the transition from orality to literacy, the print 
revolution, the rise of new image technologies and the mass press in the nineteenth century, 
electronic media and the modern nation-state, global information, and the emergence of a world 


media system. 


COMS 610 Media Studies Seminar 

This full-year course meets monthly to introduce students to issues of professionalization, careers in 
Media Studies research and practice, applying for funding, publication and dissemination of 
research, and presentations of ongoing faculty research and research-creation. An annual 
December colloquium for the presentation of second-year thesis and research-creation work is held. 


Required for first-year students, and recommended for continuing students. 


COMS 614 News and Public Affairs 

This seminar examines the principles and discourses of news and public affairs media. The truth- 
value of news and public affairs programming is considered in the light of selectivity of reporting, 
changes in news formats, and the emergence of “infotainment.” Topics may include institutional 
structures, organizational routines, ideologies, and norms of representation that influence the 
construction of the news. 

Note: Students who have received credit for COMS 611, 612 or 655 may not take this course for 


credit. 


COMS 622 Media Law 
This seminar examines legislation relevant to the creation and distribution of media products. Topics 


may include copyright, libel, freedom of expression and censorship, privacy and contracts. 


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COMS 624 Media Management 


The course is designed to provide participants with a practical and theoretical understanding of such 
aspects of management in the media enterprise as: leadership styles; goal setting; strategic 
planning; labour relations; ethics; budget control; communications consulting; and effectiveness 
evaluation. During the course, participants examine various practices and problems in media 
management. The course begins with an analysis of management theory and relates to media 
institutions organizations. In addition, the program provides for advanced study of the social and 
cultural implications of communications and informations media, and of the analysis of the theory 


and professional practices of mass media institutions. 


COMS 627 Political Economy of Communication 

This seminar focuses on issues and problems related to media and cultural industries. Special 
attention is given to the production and distribution of cultural commodities. Topics for examination 
include the question of media ownership, the role of state agencies in media systems, and the 
economics of media institutions. 


Note: Students who have received credit for COMS 626 may not take this course for credit. 


COMS 628 Organizational Communication 

This seminar considers major approaches to organizational communication, particularly as they 
relate to media enterprises. Various paradigms are considered both as theoretical frames and as 
forms of social practice that have emerged in relation to shifting patterns of power, inequality, and 
technological change. Topics may include communication networks, organizational culture, the 
nature of bureaucracy, systematically distorted communication, gendered communication, the impact 


of new communication technologies, and patterns of organizational domination and resistance. 


COMS 630 Communication, Development, and Colonialism 

This seminar focuses on theoretical, and political issues related to interpersonal and mediated 
communication in developing areas. Topics may include: the forms of colonialism (neo- and post-) 
cultural domination, participatory development, women and minority constituency groups, 


sustainable development, and globalization. 


COMS 632 Media and Contemporary Culture 

This seminar investigates the influence of contemporary media systems on cultural values. Special 
attention is given to the question of consumption of popular culture and to recent developments in 
cultural theory. Topics may include: media constructions of nation and identity, media consumption 


patterns, political culture, popular and entertainment culture. 


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COMS 634 International Communication 


This course explores the manner in which culture, ethnicity and other factors interact and are 
transformed through the international flow of information, images, and technologies. The 
international relationship between media, communication institutions, and constituency groups is 
considered. Topics may include: the analysis of genres and images, issues of cultural and media 
imperialism, the global information infrastructure; national sovereignty perspectives, and 


international broadcasting. 


COMS 635 Feminist Theory and Media 

This seminar examines concepts and principles from feminist theory in relation to the study of media 
and communication. Topics may include: theories of gender, sex and sexuality, psychoanalytic 
theory, materialist cultures, bodies and geographies, technologies, and visual cultures. 


Note: Students who have received credit for COMS 642A may not take this course for credit. 


COMS 636 Ethics and Media 

This seminar examines concepts and principles from ethical theory in relation to the study of media 
and communication. Possible topics include the ethical implications of media practices, the 
responsibility of media producers and audiences, the relationship of ethics to the pragmatics of 
communication, ethics and ethos, and the ethical implications of technology. 


Note: Students who have received credit for COMS 620 may not take this course for credit. 


COMS 640 Directed Study 
Students may enrol in a directed study under faculty supervision in order to undertake a specialized 
study of theoretical or research-related topics. Permission of the Graduate Program Director is 


required. 


COMS 642 Special Topics in Media Studies 
This seminar permits the in-depth examination of particular special topics in media and 


communication. Topics vary from year to year. 


COMS 644 Media Policy 

This seminar studies particular sectors of media policy and regulation in Canada. The policy sector 
under discussion may change from year to year and both historical and contemporary issues are 
examined. Topics may include: broadcasting, film, satellite and cable distribution, multiculturalism, 


northern and remote access, telecommunications, and the internet. 


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COMS 646 Alternative Media 


This seminar explores various alternative and resistant practices to mainstream media, including 
community radio and television, artists and community video, independent film, underground/pirate 
media, the internet, and other emergent cultural forms. Topics may include: practices and theories of 
the alternative, methods of critical analysis, media monopolies, democracy and resistance, cultural 


imperialism, culture jamming, and the possibilities of new technology-based forms. 


COMS 652 The Canadian Documentary 

This course examines non-fiction film, television and other media in Canada. Materials considered 
may include the documentary work of the National Film Board, independent film and video, and 
television docu-drama. These are examined from a variety of perspectives such as history, form and 


textuality, institutional analysis, and culture. 


COMS 656 Forms and Genres in Communication 

This seminar examines specific patterns in cultural forms and texts. Attention is paid to the 
production, consumption, and textual attributes of genres. Topics vary from year to year, and may 
include a focus on advertising, public advocacy, documentary, popular music, situation comedy, or 


feminist feature film. 


COMS 660 Definitions and Futures of Media and Technology 

This seminar explores the social, cultural, and psychological aspects of media and technology. 
Media are considered as both containers and expressions of culture. In addition, this seminar 
focuses on the impacts of new technologies and media. Topics may include the interaction of media 
and culture, the role of technology in the development of human consciousness and values, and the 
future of media in the light of emergent technologies and practices. 

Note: Students who have received credit for COMS 643 or COMS 658 may not take this course for 


credit. 


COMS 662 Theories of Representation and Interpretation in Communication 

This course examines discourse and media texts as forms of representation. Representation is 
considered in terms of both figure and argument. The course also presents theoretically-informed 
approaches to the interpretation and criticism of discourses and media texts. Possible theoretical 


approaches include rhetoric, semiotics, hermeneutics, and speech-act theory. 


COMS 670 Directed Study 
Students may enrol in a directed study under faculty supervision in order to undertake a specialized 


study of theoretical or research-related topics. Permission of the Graduate Program Director is 


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required. 


COMS 680 Aesthetics and Media 

This seminar examines concepts and principles from aesthetic theory in relation to the study of 
media and communication. In addition to considering general aesthetic principles, the course may 
focus on particular aural or visual media. Topics may include the relationship of medium to aesthetic 
form, aesthetics and reception theory, aesthetics and ideology, the mass reproduction and 


distribution of aesthetic objects, and the aesthetics of new media. 


COMS 684 Media Research Laboratory 

This production-based seminar explores the intersections of analog, electronic and digital media with 
a special emphasis on their convergence. Topics may include digital imaging, multimedia information 
design and programming, three dimensional media, virtual reality, world-wide-web, hypertext and 


hypermedia publishing. 


COMS 694 Thesis/Research-Creation Thesis Proposal 

Prerequisite: COMS 600, 605, 610, plus 12 elective credits. 

Under the direction of a supervisor, the thesis or research-creation thesis topic and research plan 
are put into a formal proposal and submitted to a proposal committee and the Graduate Program 
Director for approval. Proposals must be defended by the end of the third term for students to 


continue in either the Thesis or Research-Creation Thesis option. 


COMS 695 Thesis (21 credits) 

Prerequisite: COMS 694. 

The thesis is researched and written in the Fall and Winter of the second year of study. It is 
submitted in written form and is between 20,000 and 25,000 words in length. The thesis format must 
be commensurate with Graduate Studies regulations and in a format stipulated by the rules of the 
Thesis Office. The thesis submission normally follows the graduate academic calendar dates. The 


thesis is defended in an oral examination. 


COMS 697 Research-Creation Thesis (21 credits) 

Prerequisite: COMS 694. 

Specifically designed for students with significant media production experience. During the Fall and 
Winter of the second year of study, students choosing Option III undertake a Research- 

Creation Thesis that deploys one or more media forms. The Research-Creation Thesis is comprised 
of an original media production or prototype in any genre, and a 10,000 word document comprising 


a literature and media review, a theoretical and methodological contextualization, a critical reflection 


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on the research-creation and its outcomes, and other areas of analysis as deemed necessary by the 


student and the student’s Thesis Committee. The thesis submission normally follows the graduate 


academic calendar dates. The thesis is defended in an oral examination. 


COMS 698 Major Research Paper (15 credits) 

Prerequisite: COMS 600, 605, 610, plus 21 elective credits. 

The Major Research Paper is an extended essay/project equivalent to 10,000 words on a topic 
chosen in consultation with a full-time faculty member. The Major Research Paper may commence 
from topics and materials from previous courses, it may involve a sustained literature review of a 
specific issue or problem, or it may be a thematic investigation of a topic pertaining to media or 
communication studies. With permission of the supervisor and the Graduate Program Director, the 
Major Research Paper may include a research-creation component. This course is available only to 
those registered in Option IV, is normally taken in term five, and may not be taken concurrently with 
other courses. 


Note: Students who have received credit for COMS 695 or 697 may not take this course for credit. 


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Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/coms-dip.html 


Communication Studies Graduate Diploma 


Admission Requirements 


Entry into the program is based on a careful assessment of the individual backgrounds and goals of 
applicants who possess a bachelor's degree (or equivalent) with high standing from a recognized 
institution in a field other than communication. Applicants are required to submit a letter of intent of 
no more than 600 words outlining their background, academic and work experience, and career 


goals. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Diploma 


1. Credits. Fully-qualified candidates are required to complete a minimum of 30 credits. 


2. Courses. All candidates are required to take 18 credits in core courses, and 12 credits in 
elective courses chosen in consultation with the Diploma Program Director. Core courses are 
COMS 505, COMS 506, COMS 510, COMS 562, COMS 569, and COMS 570. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


3. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 2.70. 


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Courses 


All courses are 3-credit, one-term courses unless otherwise stated. 
Core Courses (Group A) 


COMS 505 Introduction to Communication Theory and History 

This seminar offers an introduction to communication theory, by situating media theories and 
technology in their historical and cultural contexts. Through lectures, discussions, and selected 
readings from the works of key theorists, this course explores and evaluates major historical and 


contemporary approaches to communication theories. 


COMS 506 In the Field: Methods in Communication Studies and Practice 
Prerequisite: COMS 505. 
This course offers an introduction to communication research methods and provides an 


interdisciplinary approach to the interaction of media, technology, culture, and society. 


COMS 510 Graduate Diploma Seminar 

This full-year course meets bi-weekly to introduce students to the following topics: communication 
organizations and their public identities, internships and professional development opportunities, 
emerging trends in communications research methods and practice. Representatives from industry 
and faculty are invited to discuss their work and future trends in media studies and practice. This 


course is graded on a pass/fail basis. 


COMS 562 Media Production: Sound 

This course is designed to provide the student with a basic working knowledge of audio systems, 
both natural and electronic, to understand the various affective and psychological qualities of sound, 
and how sound may be structured into imaginative aural form. Lectures and Laboratory: average 6 


hours per week. 


COMS 569 Media Production: Moving Images 

This course provides a foundation in the creative, critical and technical aspects of moving images, 
including an introduction to non-linear editing software. 

Note: Students who have received credit for COMS 567 (Television) or COMS 568 (Film) may not 


take this course for credit. 


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COMS 570 Media Production: Intermedia 


This course provides an introduction to new and developing digital technologies (primarily computer- 
based media) through historical, theoretical, and critical perspectives on media, culture, and society 
and includes basic concepts in software operating systems, communication design and digital media 


creation. Lectures and Laboratory: average 6 hours per week. 


Elective Courses (Group B) 


A selection from the following courses will be offered. Information about the particular offerings in a 


given year is available from the Department. 


COMS 507 Advanced Scriptwriting for Media 

Prerequisite: Submission of a sample of creative writing by June 30 and subsequent approval by the 
instructor. 

This course provides an in-depth approach to writing for specific media. Emphasis is placed upon 
structure, story-telling, research, and the interplay of character and action. Different paradigms for 


both fiction and non-fiction are considered. 


COMS 512 Discourses of Dissent 

This course examines the forms and tactics of public discourses directed toward social change. 
Forms of public discourse that may be considered include speech, images, audiovisual works, as 
well as web-based sites or forms of communication. Emphasis is placed upon political protest, 
conflict and controversy, and mobilization. Themes explored include the development of speaking 


positions, the use of unconventional tactics, and the appropriation or rejection of received values. 


COMS 513 Cultures of Production 

Drawing on a range of recent field studies exploring the creative workplace (e.g. television 
production, the fashion industry, ad agencies, graphic design companies, the music business), this 
course frames commercial cultural production as a site of active agency, negotiation, and constraint 


through readings, discussion, and the design and execution of field research projects. 


COMS 514 Production Administration 

This course focuses on the language, skills and strategies necessary for producing media projects 
and events. Administration, organization, permits and permissions, fundraising, liability and 
contracts, team building, distribution and writing are just a few of the areas that are examined as 


students learn the skills necessary to be a producer. 


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COMS 516 Advanced Topics in Documentary Film and Video 


This course provides an in-depth study of selected film and video documentary genres. Specific 


topics for this course will be stated in the Class Schedule. 


COMS 518 Cultures of Globalization 

This course examines the significance of communication technologies to the process of 
globalization, which has increased and accelerated the movement of people and commodities 
across the world. The resulting transnational networks of cultural, economic, political, and social 
linkages and alliances are considered, as is the role of media in engendering new forms of 


community and identity. 


COMS 519 Communications and Indigenous Peoples 

Focusing on Canadian First Peoples territories in the North and South, as well as selected 
circumpolar regions, such as parts of Australia and other areas of the world inhabited by indigenous 
peoples, this course examines from a global perspective the historical, theoretical, and cross-cultural 
content and contexts of aboriginal media and financing, audience research, product development, 
distribution issues, and policy formation. Broadcasting, print, and digital media case studies and 


materials are central components. 


COMS 521 Communication Technologies and Gender 

Feminist theories of communication technologies are used to critique the impact and meanings of 
these technologies in various spheres of cultural activity. Topics include the mass media, 
technological mediations in organizations and institutions, and the re-articulation of domestic and 
public spaces, such as the Internet and the World Wide Web. Special attention is paid to these 
electronic and digital technologies - or new media - and the communicational and representational 
possibilities they enable or foreclose. The class is conducted as an intensive seminar. Completion of 


a prior course in women’s studies or gender studies at the university level is recommended. 


COMS 522 Perspectives on the Information Society 

This course critically examines the political, social, and ethical dimensions of the information society 
within Canada and throughout the world. The development of the information society is placed in a 
socio-historical context. The significance of information and communication technologies is 


considered and the role of global information and communication policies is examined. 


COMS 523 Media Art and Aesthetics 
This course examines the aesthetic principles pertinent to the analysis and creation of works within 


communication media. Topics may include the field of perception, the role of cognition, the elements 


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of composition, and the interplay of form and meaning. Both the static and dynamic aspects of visual 


and aural elements are considered. 


COMS 524 Alternative Media 

This course examines various alternatives to mainstream media. These alternatives may include 
community radio and video, independent film, the internet, and other emergent cultural forms such 
as the pastiche and parody of “culture jamming”. The concepts of mainstream and alternative are 


explored and the relationship between alternative media and social practices is considered. 


COMS 525 Media Forecast 

This course examines trends in film, sound, television, and other media for future applications. The 
course includes theory of media effects. Representatives from industry and government are invited 
to discuss future trends in media utilization. The course demands a theoretical and practical model 


for original or novel use of a medium or media mix. 


COMS 532 Communication, Culture and Popular Art 

This course offers an advanced examination of popular culture. With attention to such phenomena 
as hit films and television shows, stars, fans and pop art, this course focuses on the formation of 
hierarchies of value in cultural forms. This course examines how some cultural products come to be 
celebrated while others are dismissed. It also considers social and political consequences of 


divisions of high and low culture. 


COMS 533 Semiotics 

This course provides a detailed introduction to the semiotics of communication. The course 
considers the formal characteristics of signs and codes and examines how signs or texts produce 
meaning. Central to this course is the notion that sign-systems are fundamental to the production of 
knowledge and ideology. The course proceeds through lectures, an analytical reading of assigned 


texts, and student discussion and presentations. 


COMS 534 Advanced Topics in Film Studies 
Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under COMS 517 may not take this course for 


credit. 


COMS 535 Communications, Development and Colonialism 
This course discusses the role media can play in indigenous and international development. The 
concept of development communications is examined in the context of debates within neo-colonial 


and post-colonial theories. 


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COMS 537 Race, Ethnicity and Media 


This course addresses practical and theoretical issues of race and ethnicity that have become focal 
points for current debates in public cultural expression and media studies. The following themes are 
discussed: cultural/racial difference and its implications for media studies; the (mis)representation of 
multicultural and multiracial minorities in mainstream and alternative media; questions of access to 
arts and other cultural funding sources; implications of employment equity legislation in light of 
media budget cuts; and cross-cultural awareness programs vs. anti-racist training for media 
professionals. Theoretical readings which frame issues of cultural and racial representation are an 


integral part of this course. 


COMS 538 Organizational Communication 

This course considers major approaches to organizational communication in relation to shifting 
patterns of power, inequality and technological change. Topics include communication networks, 
organization culture, bureaucracy, systematically distorted communication, gendered 
communication, the impact of new communication technologies, and patterns of organizational 


dominance and resistance. Case studies of particular organizations are examined. 


COMS 539 Political Communication 

The relationships between forms of communication and political structures and processes are 
examined. Topics include freedom of expression, the role of communication in mediating conflict, the 
place of deliberation and debate in democracy, political campaigns and advertising, and the 


relationship between styles of communication and models of governance. 


COMS 540 Acoustic Communication and Design 

This course investigates contemporary theories of acoustic communication and design, such as 
Attali’s concept of noise, Schaeffer’s theory of the sound object, Schafer’s concept of soundscape, 
Chion’s cinema for the ear, and Augoyard’s repertoire of sound effects. Students engage in critical 


analysis of selected sound texts from various media. 


COMS 541 Sexuality and Public Discourse 

This course analyzes and explores the ways sexuality circulates in, and as, public discourses. 
Through a variety of conceptual formations and critical conceptualizations of ‘the public’ and 
‘sexuality’, this course analyzes conceptually and critically how sexuality and the notion of the public 
are mutually constitutive. The seminar is interdisciplinary and draws upon works in feminist studies, 


queer theory, political philosophy, history, cultural studies and communication theory. 


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COMS 542 Advanced Topics in the Photographic Image 


This course explores the themes and concerns associated with particular photographic practices. 
Through class discussion, visual materials, readings and writing projects, students develop a critical 


understanding of the history, language and aesthetics of the photographic image. 


COMS 543 Film Criticism 
This course provides an introduction to the assumptions, methodologies, and vocabularies implicit in 


important schools of popular and academic film criticism. 


COMS 544 Reception Studies 
This course examines recent theory and research trends in the area of media reception studies and 
audience agency. Topics may include discursive, institutional, observational and ethnographic 


approaches through readings, discussion, and the design and execution of field research projects. 


COMS 545 Television Studies 
This course examines recent research focusing on television. Topics may include technological and 


industrial changes, audience activity, new genres, and representational conventions. 


COMS 546 Rhetoric and Communication 

This course focuses upon communication as persuasive or as producing identification. Emphasis is 
placed upon the role of communication in civic affairs. Classical and contemporary approaches to 
rhetorical theory and criticism are examined. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a COMS 530 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


COMS 547 International Communication 

This course explores historical and current parameters of international communications within the 
context of current global shifts in power/knowledge relations. Discussion topics are selected from 
among the following: key development and neo-colonial theories, cultural/media imperialism, 
globalization, the UN infrastructure, the Right to Communicate debates, national sovereignty issues, 
international broadcasting, cross-cultural audience reception research and effects theories, 
telediplomacy, the World Wide Web and the Internet, women as an international constituency group, 


and others. 


COMS 548 Media Policy in Canada 
This course acquaints the student with the historical development of media policy in Canada. It 


examines the government regulation of media as well as the strategies that have been put in place 


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to foster and guide the development of media and cultural industries. It also considers the present 


state of broadcasting, telecommunications and internet policies in Canada, focusing on current 


problems and exploring alternative solutions. 


COMS 553 Communication Ethics 

This course allows students to confront issues of creative responsibility and ethical dilemmas in 
media practice. Emphasis is placed upon the relationship between production and theory at the level 
of ethical responsibility. Specific issues include ethical theories as applied to media, communication 
and information; the relationship of human values and technologies of information reproduction; the 
possibilities of critical media practice; identification of challenges emerging from experience in 


Communication Studies. 


COMS 561 Communicative Performances and Interventions 

This course examines how media can be used in order to intervene in social and cultural issues. 
Emphasis is placed on the performative character of interventions: they occur at a particular time 
and in a particular place, they are addressed to and seek to move particular audiences. Topics may 
include the history of performance strategies, the social and political character of aesthetic 


interventions, and the forms of such performances in relation to various media of communication. 


COMS 580 Selected Topics in Communication Studies 


COMS 583 Internship in Communication Studies 

This course makes it possible for students to observe, study and work in the communications media 
field of their choice under the supervision of a Communication Studies faculty member and a media 
professional in the field. Permission of the Graduate Program Director is required. 

Note: There is no remuneration for students participating in internships, which involve 120 hours on 


site. 


COMS 585 Directed Study in Communication Studies 
This course may be repeated as COMS 586. 
Students may enrol in a directed study under faculty supervision in order to undertake a specialized 


study of research-related topics. Permission of the Graduate Program Director is required. 


COMS 586 Directed Study in Communication Studies 
Prerequisite: COMS 585. 
Students may enrol in a directed study under faculty supervision in order to undertake a specialized 


study of research-related topics. Permission of the Graduate Program Director is required. 


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COMS 598 Advanced Topics in Communication Studies 


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Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/econ-phd.html 


Economics PhD 


Admission Requirements 


A Master of/Magisteriate in Arts in Economics from a recognized university with a cumulative GPA of 
3.50 or equivalent. Students with a high standing in a master's degree or equivalent in other fields, 
such as commerce, mathematics or business administration from a recognized university may be 
admitted, subject to satisfactory completion of qualifying requirements, if necessary. Students with a 
BA (honours) or equivalent with high standing in economics may apply for admission directly to 
doctoral studies. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


GRE. While writing the GRE is not required, such scores certainly enhance an application for 
admission and especially for funding. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate entering the program with a master's degree is required to 


complete a minimum of 90 credits. 


2. Courses. All PhD candidates must take ten one-term graduate courses (30 credits) selected 
from the Departmental offerings, six of which must be ECON 612 - Microeconomics I, ECON 613 
- Microeconomics II, ECON 615 - Macroeconomics |, ECON 616 - Macroeconomics II, ECON 
680 - Econometric Theory | and ECON 681 - Econometric Theory II, plus four program electives. 
A recognition of past graduate work as partial fulfillment of the course requirements for the PhD 
degree is at the discretion, and subject to the approval of, the Graduate Program Director and 
the Dean of Graduate Studies. (See the regulation concerning transfer credits in this calendar.) 
Note: If students have taken courses that are required for the PhD program as part of their MA 
studies, they must substitute them with a maximum of three directed research courses and 


electives in order to complete the 30 credits required in the PhD program. The directed research 


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courses are chosen in consultation with the thesis supervisor; they are graded pass/fail and are 


comprised of independent research work carried out under the direction of the thesis supervisor. 


3. Research Seminar. All candidates must take ECON 806 - Doctoral Research Seminar (6 
credits) requiring the presentation of a paper. This seminar is intended to aid in the development 


of a doctoral thesis proposal. 


4. Comprehensive Examinations. All candidates must pass three examinations (6 credits) in the 
areas of: Microeconomic Theory, Macroeconomic Theory and Econometrics. Each of these 
examinations is set, read and marked by members of the Department. These examinations must 


be passed before a student enrols in ECON 806. 


5. Fields of Specialization. Each PhD student must have 2 fields of specialization, either as part of 
the degree of MA or within the students' PhD program. In order to do this the student must 
successfully complete 2 courses from the sequences offered in any of the following fields: 
Economic Development; Financial Economics; Industrial Economics, International Economics; 
Labour Economics; Public Economics; or 3 courses in one of Econometrics, Macroeconomics or 


Microeconomics. 


6. Language Requirement. PhD candidates must pass an examination in French. International 
students may, with the approval of the Department, replace French with another language in 


which there exists a sufficiently large economics literature. 


7. Thesis. A candidate who has passed the PhD comprehensive examinations must submit in 
writing to the Graduate Program Director a detailed proposal of a thesis topic. Candidates 
proceed to work on the thesis (48 credits) only after obtaining approval of the topic from both the 


Graduate Studies Committee in the Department and the thesis supervisor. 
Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 
detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


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2. Residence. The minimum period of residence is two calendar years (6 terms) of full-time 


graduate study beyond the master’s degree, or three calendar years (9 terms) of full-time 
graduate study beyond the bachelor’s degree for those permitted to enrol for doctoral studies 
without completing a master’s degree. A period of full-time study, allowed or required by the 
Department to be spent at another institution with adequate research facilities, may be offered 
towards partial fulfillment of the residence requirements for the degree of PhD at Concordia 
University. In each case, the Department must obtain approval of the Council of Graduate 
Studies. 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 3.00. 


Courses 


All courses are one-term, 3 credit courses. 

ECON 805 Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (6 credits) 
ECON 806 Doctoral Research Seminar (6 credits) 

ECON 807 Doctoral Thesis (48 credits) 


ECON 814 Workshop in Advanced Economic Theory 

Prerequisite: Permission of the department. 

The workshop is designed for PhD students who have successfully completed their comprehensive 
examinations and have expressed an interest in Economic Theory. The course involves lectures by 
participating faculty members and continues with presentations by students. These presentations 
may involve the student’s own work or an already published paper of great importance to the 
literature. Topics vary from year to year, with some years devoted to micro-topics and others to 
macro-topics. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this course under ECON 614 may not take this course 


for credit. 


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ECON 817 Advanced Macro Theory 


Prerequisite: ECON 616. 

The course deals with the New Classical and New Keynesian macroeconomics, rational 
expectations and disequilibrium approaches. Emphasis is placed on model solution techniques, 
optimal control theory, and stochastic processes. Recent developments in empirical estimation will 
also be dealt with. 

Note: Students who have received credit for ECON 617 may not take this course for credit. 


ECON 858 Montreal Natural Resources and Environmental Economics Workshop 
Prerequisite: Permission of the department. 

This workshop, which is organized through the Centre Interuniversitaire de Recherche en Economie 
Quantiative (CIREQ), is intended for researchers and doctoral students in economics throughout 
Montreal who are interested in resource and environmental economics. The types of topics that may 
be dealt with, at an advanced level, are the economic theory of sustainable growth, green 
accounting, sunk costs and production constraints in natural resource exploitation, the irreversibility 
of environmental investment decisions, measures of biodiversity and their implications, the optimal 
order of extraction of natural resources, intertemporal depletion of spatially distributed nonrenewable 
resources, property rights and natural resource exploitation, applications of differential games to 
natural resource and environmental economics, and other related topics. The workshop is led by a 
team of researchers comprising professors from McGill University, Concordia University, Université 
de Montréal and HEC Montréal who will actively participate in each meeting. A regular and active 
participation is expected of the doctoral students and other researchers who would like to join this 


work group. 


ECON 878 Workshop in Labour Economics 

Prerequisite: Permission of the department. 

The course covers topics related to specifying and estimating static and dynamic models of 
individual choice concerning education, occupation, labour supply, marriage, fertility, and 
immigration. Emphasis is placed on policy evaluation methods. The course covers both structural 
and nonstructural approaches. For each topic, theory, econometrics and applications are discussed. 
The course concludes with presentations by students of their on-going thesis work. The course is 
restricted to PhD students who plan to write a thesis in the field of labour economics. There is no 
textbook for this course. Instead, the course uses journal articles extensively to supplement the 


topics covered in the workshop. 


© Concordia University 


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Concordia University 


http:/Awww.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/econ-ma.html 


Economics MA 


Admission Requirements 


An honours degree in economics, from a recognized university, or the equivalent, with a cumulative 
GPA of 3.00 is required. An applicant may be required to take up to 12 prerequisite undergraduate 
credits in addition to, but as part of, the regular graduate program. Some applicants may be required 


to pass a qualifying program, as a condition for entry into the regular MA program. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


The Economics Co-operative Program is offered to those enrolled in an MA Program in 
Economics. The academic content of the Co-operative Program is identical to that of the regular 
program, but three Study Terms are interspersed with two Work Terms. Students are supervised 
personally and must meet requirements specified by the Faculty of Arts and Science, the School of 
Graduate Studies and the Institute for Co-operative Education. As employment opportunities 


primarily exist in the Canadian public sector, the program is presently restricted to Canadian citizens. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits. 


2. Courses. A fully-qualified candidate is required to take three 3-credit courses ECON 612 - 
Microeconomics |, ECON 615 - Macroeconomics | and ECON 680 - Econometric Theory | and 


five additional 3-credit courses selected in consultation with the Graduate Program Director. 


3. Research Paper. Each student must write a research paper (ECON 703, 21 credits) 
demonstrating an application of knowledge in a particular area of economics. The topic of the 
research paper must be approved by the Graduate Program Director and a full-time member of 
the Department who is prepared to act as supervisor. The research paper is prepared under the 


guidance of the supervisor who must approve and recommend the final version for examination 


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by an independent member of the Department appointed by the Graduate Program Director. 


4. Fields of Specialization. Each MA student is required to complete one field of specialization by 
successfully completing 2 courses from the sequences offered in any of the following areas: 
Econometrics, Economic Development; Financial Economics; Industrial Economics; International 


Economics; Labour Economics; Macroeconomics; Microeconomics; Public Economics. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Residence. The minimum residence requirement is one year (3 terms) of full-time study, or the 


equivalent in part-time study. 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, a student must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 2.70. 


Courses 


Graduate courses offered by the Department of Economics fall into the following categories: 


ECON 610-619 Economic Theory 

ECON 620-629 Economic Development and Planning 
ECON 640-645 Financial Economics 

ECON 656-658 Public Economics 

ECON 660-669 International Economics 

ECON 670-674 Industrial Economics 

ECON 675-679 Labour Economics 

ECON 680-689 Econometrics 

ECON 690-693 Mathematical Economics 


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Elective Courses 


A selection from the following courses will be offered each year. Information about the particular 
offerings in a given year is available from the Department. All courses are one-term, 3 credit 


Courses. 


Economic Theory 


ECON 612 Microeconomics | 

Prerequisite: ECON 501 and 525; or equivalent. 

This course is devoted to modern consumer and producer theories. Consumer theory is presented 
first, and at some length, due to its inherent importance, as well as the overlap between the methods 
and results in this area and in producer theory. Producer theory is dealt with next. In this section of 
the course, the similarities and differences between these two important building blocks of modern 


microeconomics are emphasized. 


ECON 613 Microeconomics Il 

Prerequisites: ECON 612 and 614. 

This course covers a number of topics in microeconomic theory. Main topics include general 
equilibrium theory and welfare economics, topics in the theory of information, contracts and 


principal-agent problems, and selected topics in game theory. 


ECON 614 Game Theory 

Prerequisite: ECON 612. 

This course offers an in-depth coverage of some important topics in mostly non-cooperative but also 
cooperative game theory. Although formal reasoning, precise definitions and proofs are part of the 
course, emphasis is placed on the importance and use of the various concepts in economics. Main 
topics include Nash equilibrium and subgame perfection, correlated equilibria, rationalizability, zero 
sum games, repeated games, (perfect) Bayesian Nash equilibrium, core Shapley value, bargaining 


problems, and stable sets. 


ECON 615 Macroeconomics | 

Prerequisites: ECON 503 and 525; or equivalent. 

The objective of this course is to introduce students to advanced theories and mathematical tools for 
rigorous analysis of various macroeconomic issues. Topics covered include consumption, 
investment, inflation and economic growth theories including Solow, Ramsey-Cass-Koopmans, and 


endogenous growth models. 


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ECON 616 Macroeconomics Il 


Prerequisite: ECON 615. 
This course studies various issues in macroeconomic theory within a dynamic general equilibrium 
framework. Topics covered vary from year to year. However, the first part of the course is usually an 


initiation into useful techniques such as dynamic programming and the numerical methods. 


ECON 618 Monetary Economics 

Prerequisite: ECON 615. 

This course includes the theory of money, monetary policy, payment systems, and banking. Among 
the available models, there will be a particular focus on the New Keynesian model as a framework to 
analyze monetary policy. Alternative models of money, such as search-theoretic models, are also 
studied. 


ECON 619 Political Economy 

Prerequisites: ECON 614 and 615. 

This course studies how conflicts of interest are resolved through political institutions in democratic 
countries. In the first half of the course, tools and models that are useful in the analysis of voting and 
elections, bargaining in legislatures, and special interest politics are studied. In the second half, 
these tools are applied to examine: (1) how macroeconomic polices are made through the political 
process; (2) why inefficient policies may be chosen in the end; and (3) how constitutions (indirectly) 


shape public policy and consequently the economic outcomes of nations. 


Economic Development and Planning 


ECON 620 Development Planning | 

Prerequisites: ECON 501, 503 and ECON 525; or equivalent. 

This course deals with the main consistency models used in development planning. Aggregate 
macro-models, extensions of two-gap models and multisectoral consistency models are studied in 
detail. On the basis of case studies, special attention is given to the building of such models, to their 
limitations for policy users and to their possible improvement in the case of limited statistical 


information. 


ECON 621 Development Planning II 

Prerequisites: ECON 501, 503 and 525; or equivalent. 

The main purpose of this course is the study of aggregate and disaggregate optimization models 
applied to development planning. The theoretical discussions are complemented with the use of 


these models to study different policy issues. 


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ECON 622 Economic Development 


Prerequisites: ECON 501, 503 and 525; or equivalent. 

Modern theories of economic development are presented. Topics include microeconomic reform and 
transition in developing economies, income inequality and enterprise and, foreign investment and 
technology flows as a means to development. In addition, analytical techniques used in the study of 


structure and functioning of developing economies are presented. 


ECON 623 Growth and Development 

Prerequisites: ECON 501, 503 and 525; or equivalent. 

This course examines a series of models that are relevant to the study of economic growth and 
development. These two issues are studied from a macroeconomic perspective; that is, emphasis is 
placed on highly stylized models characterized by rational decision making within a dynamic 


environment. 


ECON 624 Topics in Economic Development 

Prerequisites: ECON 501, 503 and 525; or equivalent. 

Why are some countries poor and others rich? What can account for cross-country differences in 
fertility and mortality rates? In gender gaps, civil war, and school attainment? Why did the industrial 
revolution start in Europe? Why did Europe colonize the rest of the world, rather than the other way 
around? Why are some former colonies (e.g., U.S., Canada) so much richer than others (e.g., India 
and Zimbabwe)? This course presents research which addresses these issues. While emphasis in 
on theoretical research where overlapping-generations models are used to generate multiple steady- 


state equilibria, empirical work is also examined. 


Financial Economics 


ECON 642 Financial Economics | 

Prerequisites: ECON 501, 503 and 525; or equivalent. 

This course is the first of a two course sequence in financial economics, and is intended to provide 
an introduction to contemporary theoretical and empirical modeling in financial markets. The course 
provides a foundation for more advanced work in financial economics while allowing students 
without an exceptionally strong mathematical background to become familiar with the discipline. 
Theoretical topics include measures of risk aversion, stochastic dominance, individual portfolio 
choice under uncertainty, the capital asset pricing model (CAPM), and the arbitrage pricing theory 
(APT). Empirical topics include tests of CAPM and the APT, the efficient markets hypothesis, 


performance evaluation, and event test methodology. 


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ECON 643 Financial Economics Il 


Prerequisites: ECON 642 and 680. 

This course is the second of a two course sequence in financial economics, and is intended to 
provide an introduction to several advanced topics in theoretical and empirical financial economics. 
Theoretical topics include the valuation of state contingent securities, dynamic asset pricing, and 
continuous time methods. Empirical topics include the time-series properties of returns, traditional 
structural estimation of asset pricing models of maximum-likelihood (ML) and the generalized 
method-of-moments (GMM), calibration and simulation, variance bounds tests, and an introduction 


to empirical methods for continuous time models. 


Public Economics 


ECON 656 Public Finance: Expenditure 

Prerequisites: ECON 501 and 525; or equivalent. 

This course deals with welfare economics and the role of the government in supplying goods. The 
principal topics are the optimal supply of public goods, voting mechanisms and models of preference 
revelation, consumer’s surplus, externalities in production and consumption, optimal pricing models, 
the theory of clubs, inequality, cost-benefit analysis, federalism and federal-provincial relations in 


Canada. 


ECON 657 Public Finance: Taxation 

Prerequisites: ECON 501 525; or equivalent. 

This course analyzes both the descriptive and normative effects of alternative taxation policies on 
economic behaviour. In the descriptive part it deals with work-leisure choice, saving decisions and 
the incidence of the corporation income tax. The normative part deals with the optimality issues of 


income and commodity taxation. Emphasis is given to both analytical and policy considerations. 


ECON 658 Environmental Economics 

Prerequisites: ECON 501, 525; or equivalent. 

This course deals with the inter-relationship between economics and the physical environment. The 
objective is to depict the problem of environmental quality as an economic problem. The course 
focuses on the use of concepts and instruments derived from public finance for the resolution of 


environmental issues. Numerous case studies are discussed. 


International Economics 


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ECON 661 International Trade 


Prerequisites: ECON 501, 525; or equivalent. 

This course provides a systematic treatment of neo-classical international trade theory, including the 
theory of comparative advantage, the theory and practice of commercial policy, trade and welfare, 
and customs union theory. The course emphasizes the interaction of trade theory with policy 


questions. 


ECON 662 International Monetary Economics 

Prerequisites: ECON 501, 503 and 525; or equivalent. 

This course deals with the specific issues resulting from balance of payments and exchange rates 
adjustments for open economies. Topics covered in this field include monetary and fiscal policies for 
external and internal balance, the international transmission of disturbances and adjustments 
mechanisms, the current account, international capital flows, the foreign exchange markets and the 


international monetary system. 


Industrial Economics 


ECON 673 Industrial Organization 

Prerequisites: ECON 501, 525; or equivalent. 

This course surveys economic models of industrial behaviour. Topics covered include theories of 
oligopoly, effects of potential entry, product differentiation, advertising, technological change, vertical 


integration, monopoly and merger issues. 


ECON 674 Economics of Regulation 

Prerequisites: ECON 501, 525; or equivalent. 

This course examines economic theories of regulation as applied to monopolized and competitive 
industries, together with their policy implications. Topics covered include natural monopoly, 
contestable markets, effects of “traditional” regulation (such as rate of return and Ramsey pricing), 
together with an examination of recent theories of optimal regulation under asymmetric information. 
Topics in the regulation of industries include minimum quality standards, licensing, and predatory 


business practices. 


Labour Economics 


ECON 677 Labour Economics | 
Prerequisites: ECON 501, 525; or equivalent. 
This course covers selected topics in the field of labour economics. The focus of the course is on 


microeconomic analyses and issues. The emphasis is on the application of some of the ideas from 
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the theories of information, uncertainty, and incentives to the understanding of labour markets and 


institutions. Topics covered include wage and wage differentials, discrimination, human capital, life- 
cycle models of labour markets, effects of asymmetric information, self-enforcing implicit contracts, 


efficiency wage models, principal-agent problems, team production and tournaments. 


ECON 678 Labour Economics II 

Prerequisites: ECON 612 and ECON 680. 

The main objective of this course is to examine a relatively small number of topics in modern labour 
economics and, ultimately, their empirical and econometric application. The topics covered include 
static and dynamic models of labour supply, dynamic models of job search and job matching, 
econometric analysis of labour market transition data, unemployment insurance, and unemployment 


theories. 


Econometrics 


ECON 680 Econometric Theory | 

Prerequisites: ECON 521 and 525; or equivalent. 

The general aim of this course is to discuss some of the fundamental methods of econometrics and 
their theoretical justification. The course begins with a mathematical and statistical review and 
moves on to a thorough discussion of the general theory of least squares (including instrumental 
variables) and maximum-likelinood, their justification and associated tests of significance. 
Applications include linear, single-equation and simultaneous equations models, some non-linear 
models, and specification analysis. Students are expected to undertake various exercises, including 


computer-based applications. 


ECON 681 Econometric Theory Il 

Prerequisite: ECON 680. 

This course covers advanced topics in estimation and inference in non-linear econometric models 
including asymptotic theory, generalized method of moments, quasi-maximum likelihood, simulation 
based methods, non-parametric and semiparametric estimation, bootstrap methods and robust 


estimators. 


ECON 682 Applied Econometrics: Time-Series 
Prerequisite: ECON 680. 


This course provides an introduction to statistical techniques for analyzing time-series data. Topics 


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include Box-Jenkins methodology, spectral analysis, forecasting, tests for unit roots, multivariate 


time-series analysis: vector autoregressions, causality, co-integration, and nonlinear time-series 


models such as ARCH models. 


ECON 683 Applied Econometrics: Microeconometrics 

Prerequisites: ECON 680 or equivalent, and one successfully completed graduate level course in 
econometrics, or permission of the instructor. 

This course provides an introduction to statistical techniques and practical aspects of 
microeconometric analysis. Topics include binary response models, censored and truncated 
regression models, analysis of categorical survey data, instrumental variables, treatment effects, 
panel data models with fixed and random effects, analysis of transition data, estimation by 


simulation, and estimation of dynamic programming models. 


Mathematical Economics 


ECON 690 Mathematical Economics 


Research, Theses, and Preliminary Examinations 


ECON 694 Reading Courses in Economics 
With the permission of the Graduate Studies Committee a supervised reading course in a 


specialized area in which no course is offered by the Department. 


ECON 695 Seminar in a Special Topic 

Recent Special Topics have included: ECON 695C: Monetary Economics; ECON 695D: Game 
Theory; ECON 695E: Workshop in Advanced Economic Theory; ECON 695G: Applied Industrial 
Organization; ECON 695H: Empirical Trade; ECON 695J: Political Economics; ECON 695K: Natural 


Resources and Environmental Economics Workshop. 


ECON 703 Master’s Research Paper (21 credits) 


Cognate Courses 


In addition, graduate students in economics may be permitted to register for a limited number of 
courses offered in the MSc program in the John Molson School of Business. In all such cases, prior 


permission of the Department of Economics and the John Molson School of Business is required. 


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http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/econ-dip.html 


Economics Graduate Diploma 


Admission Requirements 


To be considered for admission, applicants must hold an undergraduate degree with a cumulative 
GPA of 3.00 or the equivalent. In addition, they must have earned sufficient credits in economics and 
basic statistical and mathematical methods to cope with graduate level courses in economics. In 
exceptional cases, and at the discretion of the Graduate Program Director, an applicant who has not 
yet satisfied this Arts and Science prerequisite may be admitted, providing that the missing courses 
are included in the student's program in addition to the normal course requirements for the diploma. 
The grading scheme for diploma courses will be the scheme applicable to graduate courses (i.e., the 


passing grade is B-). 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Diploma 


1. Credits. Candidates are required to complete a minimum of 30 credits. No more than 12 credits 


can be earned as pro-tanto credit for previous work. 


2. Courses. Credit courses for the diploma program are listed below. Up to 6 credits may be 
earned in the category of cognate courses (see Class C). Each student's program of study must 


be approved by the Graduate Program Director. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


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2. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


3. Graduation Requirement. To graduate, students must have completed all course requirements 


with a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.70. 


Courses 


ECON 501 and ECON 503 are compulsory core courses for all students. A minimum of six credits 
must be taken from Class B. The remaining credits may be selected from Class A and/or Class B 


and/or Class C with no more than six credits taken from Class C. 


Class A Courses (3 credits each) 
The 500-level courses have a 3-credit value and are cross-listed with the undergraduate 400-level 


courses. 


ECON 501 - Advanced Microeconomic Theory 

ECON 503 - Advanced Macroeconomic Theory 
ECON 509 - History of Economic Thought | 

ECON 510 - History of Economic Thought Il 

ECON 513 - Economic Growth and Fluctuations 
ECON 514 - Economic Development: Policy Analysis 
ECON 521 - Econometrics | 

ECON 522 - Econometrics Il 

ECON 523 - Applied Econometrics 

ECON 525 - Mathematics for Advanced Study in Economics 
ECON 532 - Monetary Theory 

ECON 533 - Financial Economics 

ECON 536 - Economics of Taxation 

ECON 537 - Economics of Public Expenditure 

ECON 542 - International Economics: Trade Theory 
ECON 543 - International Economics: Finance 

ECON 550 - Economic History 

ECON 561 - Industrial Organization 

ECON 562 - The Corporate Economy 

ECON 563 - Economics of Regulation 


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ECON 564 - Game Theory, Information, and Economic Modelling 
ECON 565 - The Economics of Professional Sport 

ECON 581 - Labour Economics 

ECON 582 - Economics of Personnel and Industrial Relations 
ECON 583 - Employment, Earnings and Labour Market Policies 
ECON 585 - Health Economics 

ECON 591 - Environmental Economics 

ECON 593 - Regional Economics 

ECON 595 - Economics of Transportation and Communications 
ECON 596 - Natural Resource Economics 

ECON 597 - Income Distribution and Economic Inequality 
ECON 598 - Advanced Topics in Economics 

ECON 599 - Advanced Topics in Economics 


Class B Courses (3 credits each) 


All 600-level courses offered in the Department of Economics. 


Class C Courses (3 credits each) 


All master-level courses offered in the John Molson School of Business. 


Course Descriptions 


ECON 596 Natural Resource Economics (3 credits) 


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This course focuses on the problems of the finiteness of the natural resources base in Canada and 


in the world, and on an analysis of the demand for and supply of natural resources and energy. The 


course also discusses the economic aspects of a selected group of conservation measures 


(financial incentives, reallocation of property rights, regulation). 


Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a ECON 598 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


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Education PhD 


Admission Requirements 


The normal requirement for admission is a Master of Arts degree in Education, Applied Linguistics, 
Child Studies, Educational Studies, or Educational Technology, with high standing, from an 
accredited university. Applicants with a Master's degree in a related field or discipline, such as 
psychology, sociology, anthropology, adult education, and human resource development, 

are considered. Applicants from other disciplines might be offered conditional admission which may 


include fulfilling prerequisite courses. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 90 credits. 


2. Orientation. Each candidate is assigned an interim research supervisor and a supervisory 
committee. This interim supervisory committee consists of three members of the faculty, 
including a research supervisor. This supervisory committee advises the 
student on courses to take, including prerequisite courses where necessary (to be determined no 
later than the first two weeks of the student's first term), and arranges for the comprehensive 
examination. At this time the membership of the student's interim committee is replaced by 


a dissertation committee of the student's choice. 


3. Courses. Each candidate is required to complete the following: 
a. EDUC 806 - Quantitative Methods (3 credits) 
b. EDUC 807 - Qualitative Methods (3 credits) 


c. EDUC 808 - Reporting Research (3 credits) 


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d. EDUC 809 - Advanced Issues in Education (3 credits) 


e. 9 credits of elective courses 


oh 


EDUC 890 - Comprehensive Examination (12 credits) 

Each candidate must successfully complete EDUC 890 before being admitted to candidacy 
for the degree. The comprehensive consists of a written and oral examination that tests the 
candidate on both general and area specific research. After successfully completing the 


comprehensive examination, the student is admitted to candidacy for the degree. 


g. EDUC 891 - Doctoral Proposal (9 credits) 


Note: the proposal is accepted only after the student is admitted to candidacy. 


h. EDUC 895 - Doctoral Dissertation (48 credits). 
A doctoral thesis is expected to make an original contribution to knowledge, and be 


presented in acceptable literary form. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Residence. The minimum period of residence is two years (6 terms) of full-time study beyond 
the master’s degree, or the equivalent in part-time study. A minimum of one year of full-time 


study is highly recommended. 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


4. Graduation Requirement. To graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.00. 


Courses 


Required Courses 


Each course is worth 3 credits unless otherwise indicated. 


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EDUC 806 Quantitative Methods 


Prerequisite: ETEC 641, or CHST 605 or permission of instructor. 

This course builds students' capacity to conduct quantitative research in education at the doctoral 
level. It covers all topics related to experimental and quasi-experimental design and the application 
of univariate statistics to educational research problems. In doing so, the course addresses the basic 
theory underlying quantitative approaches, selection of an initial research question, the types of 
questions best suited to quantitative methods, managing and analyzing quantitative data, external 
and internal validity, reliability and objectivity. This course also provides opportunities to analyze 
quantitative data. 


Note: Students who have received credit for EDUC 802 may not take this course for credit. 


EDUC 807 Qualitative Methods 

This course builds students’ capacity to conduct qualitative research in education at the doctoral 
level. It covers various types of qualitative research, such as ethnography, case studies, content 
analysis, and naturalistic observation. In doing so, the course addresses the basic theory and 
philosophy underlying qualitative approaches, selection of an initial research question, the types of 
questions best suited to qualitative methods, managing qualitative data, qualitative data analysis, 
and assuring the credibility and trustworthiness of qualitative data. 


Note: Students who have received credit for EDUC 802 may not take this course for credit. 


EDUC 808 Reporting Research 

This course prepares students to report their research to various stakeholders of educational 
research, including funding agencies, other researchers, journal editors, policy makers, and the 
public. Students prepare various research-related documents, and provide peer reviews. 


Note: Students who have received credit for EDUC 800 may not take this course for credit. 


EDUC 809 Advanced Issues in Education 

This seminar explores one or more complex issues of education that has implications for Applied 
Linguistics, Child Studies, Educational Studies, and Educational Technology. During the course, 
students explore the research and popular literature on the topic, critically examine the 
epistemological, sociological, and theoretical bases of the literature, and relate the lessons learned 
to their own proposed research projects. 

Note: Students who have received credit for EDUC 801 or EDUC 805 may not take this course for 


credit. 


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EDUC 890 Comprehensive Examination (12 credits) 


EDUC 891 Doctoral Proposal (9 credits) 
EDUC 895 Doctoral Dissertation (48 credits) 


Area Tutorials 


The content and format of an area tutorial may vary from year to year, depending on the number of 
students and the availability of faculty members. All area tutorials involve directed reading, research, 


seminar presentations, and discussion sessions on selected topics within that problem area. 


Area tutorials offered by the Department of Education fall into the following categories: 


EDUC 810-824 Educational Technology Area Tutorials 
EDUC 825-839 Child Studies Area Tutorials 

EDUC 840-854 Educational Studies Area Tutorials 
EDUC 855-869 Applied Linguistics Area Tutorials 


Each course is worth 3 credits unless otherwise indicated. 


EDUC 810-824 Educational Technology Area Tutorials 

Area tutorials in Educational Technology are selected from topics related to the application of 
technology to education and training. These include Human Performance Technology (HPT); theory, 
development and research in educational media; distance education; educational cybernetics, 


systems analysis and design; and human resources development. 


EDUC 825-839 Child Studies Area Tutorials 

Area tutorials in Child Studies are selected from topics that focus on children’s typical and atypical 
learning and development (e.g., social or cognitive development), in a variety of settings and 
contexts (e.g., early childhood environments, schools, after-school programs, recreation and 


community settings, families and peers, special education environments). 


EDUC 840-854 Educational Studies Area Tutorials 

Area tutorials in Educational Studies consist of philosophical, historical, social psychological, 
sociological and anthropological aspects of education locally, nationally, and internationally. These 
may include, but are not limited to, comparative study or early childhood education thought and 
practice, multicultural education, policy and practice in diverse school settings, curriculum issues 
and indigenous knowledge, mediated learning environments, curriculum theory, moral education, 


issues of difference in sexual orientation, class, race, and gender. 


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EDUC 855-869 Applied Linguistics Area Tutorials 


Area tutorials in Applied Linguistics consist of a variety of topics related to second-language learning 
and teaching. More specifically they may focus on interlanguage development; teaching of 
pronunciation; role of routinization in language acquisition; acquisition of second language 


vocabulary; teaching and learning of second language phonology. 


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http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/apli-ma.html 
Applied Linguistics MA 
Admission Requirements 


Applicants are selected on the basis of their past academic record, competence in written and 
spoken English, letters of recommendation, and experience teaching a second or a foreign 
language. To be accepted into the program, a student is required to have an undergraduate degree 
with a minimum GPA of 3.00 (B average). An academic concentration in second language 
acquisition, applied linguistics, pedagogy, education, or related discipline and at least one year of 
professional experience in the field of second language teaching and learning or related areas are 


desirable. Knowledge of a second language is an asset. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 
and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits. 


2. Courses. Students may select one of two options, thesis or without thesis, outlined below. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Residence. The minimum residence is one year (3 terms) of full-time study, or the equivalent in 
part-time study. 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


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4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 2.70. 


Master of/Magisteriate in Arts with Thesis 


All students must: 1. take APLI 604, APLI 621, APLI 660 (9 credits); 2. take 3 credits from each of 
the three clusters (9 credits); 3. take 6 additional credits from any of the clusters, electives, or 
courses approved by the Graduate Program Director; 4. write a thesis proposal, APLI 690 (3 
credits); 5. write a thesis, APLI 691 (18 credits). Up to 9 credits from other departments or 


universities may be credited toward the degree. 
Master of/Magisteriate in Arts without Thesis 


All students must: 1. take APLI 604, APLI 621, APLI 660 (9 credits); 2. take 6 credits from each of 
the three clusters (18 credits); 3. take 6 additional credits from any of the clusters, electives, or 
courses approved by the Graduate Program Director; 4. write an extended essay, APLI 696 (12 


credits). Up to 9 credits from other departments or universities may be credited toward the degree. 


Courses 


Core Courses 
All students must take the following core courses: APLI 604, APLI 621, APLI 660. 


APLI 604 Applied Language Studies (3 credits) 

This course examines the different theoretical concepts and methods used to analyze and describe 
the linguistic structure of language, and explores ways in which these can be applied to the teaching 
of second languages. The course introduces students to the key concepts that characterize the 
different components of language, namely phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics, within an 
approach that recognizes that languages can be affected by the social, psychological, and pragmatic 


aspects of human behaviour. 


APLI 621 Issues in Second Language Acquisition (3 credits) 

Research in second language acquisition (SLA) is surveyed in this course. Students read, critique, 
and discuss a number of research reports and survey articles on topics including research 
techniques in SLA, individual differences believed to affect success in second language learning 


(e.g., age, motivation), the systematicity of learner language (interlanguage, developmental 
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sequences), the influence of learners’ first language on the structure of their interlanguage, the 


development of general theories of SLA. The course concludes with a discussion of SLA research 


carried out in classroom settings. 


APLI 660 Research Methods | (3 credits) 

The principal aims of the course are to enable students better to evaluate reports of empirical 
research in the language sciences and to plan limited studies of their own. Emphasis is placed upon 
the logic of research designs, the nature of scientific proof, and the assumptions underlying data 
analytic procedures. Case studies of published research, readings and lectures illustrate the 


concepts of data, scales, models, sampling, theory, description, estimation and significance testing. 


Cluster Courses 


Thesis students take a minimum of one course from each cluster; non-thesis students take a 


minimum of two courses from each cluster. 


Cluster A: Focus on Theory 


APLI 623 Sociolinguistic Aspects of Bilingualism and Multilingualism 

This course is an introduction to educational and sociolinguistic issues affecting the promotion and 
maintenance of individual and societal bilingualism, multilingualism, and multiculturalism. The 
societal consequences of being multilingual and multicultural and the perspectives of both students 
and educators in multilingual/multicultural language classrooms will be examined. 


Note: Students who have received credit for APLI 642 may not take this course for credit. 


APLI 624 Psycholinguistic Aspects of Second Language Acquisition 

Prerequisite: APLI 660 (previously or concurrently). 

This course examines issues in second language acquisition and bilingualism/multilingualism from a 
cognitive (psycholinguistic) perspective. The aim of the course is to familiarize students with basic 
psycholinguistic concepts of language representation and use, focusing on the learning of different 
aspects of language, the role of attention and memory in language acquisition, the development of 
language comprehension and production skills, and the cognitive consequences of 
bilingualism/multilingualism. Throughout the course, emphasis is given to understanding research 
methodologies used in psycholinguistic investigations. 


Note: Students who have received credit for APLI 642 may not take this course for credit. 


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APLI 626 Variationist Second Language Acquisition 


The acquisition of a second language is a process that is inherently variable due to factors such as 
the influence of the learner’s first language, the target language, extralinguistic variables, and other 
factors. This course examines the interplay of these variables, focusing on current research in 
variable second language acquisition and on the pedagogical implications and applications of this 
knowledge for second language teaching. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under an APLI 651 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


APLI 627 Individual Differences in Second Language Acquisition 

The course provides an overview of learners’ individual differences in cognitive, social, affective, and 
motivational variables and the role of those differences in second language teaching and learning. 
Course topics may include language aptitude, motivation, learning and cognitive styles, personality, 
and language learning strategies. The course offers a research-based framework for understanding 
how individual differences impact language learning for different learners in various learning 
contexts. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under an APLI 651 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


APLI 634 Cross-Linguistic Influence 

Prerequisite: APLI 604. 

This course provides an overview of different perspectives that have been taken on the ways 
previously learned languages affect the learning of subsequent languages. Topics include: the 
contrastive analysis and error analysis approaches; avoidance; markedness; selective, bidirectional, 
and conceptual transfer; and factors affecting cross-linguistic influence among trilingual and 
multilingual speakers. Throughout the course, the implications for language teaching of the 


theoretical perspectives and empirical findings are considered. 


Cluster B: Focus on Language 


APLI 601 Phonological Aspects of Second Language Acquisition 

Prerequisite: APLI 604 (previously or concurrently). 

This course is an introduction to second language phonology, with emphasis on how theoretical 
knowledge and research can be applied to the teaching of pronunciation in traditional and computer- 
based environments. This course familiarizes students with the English sound system and 
associated phonetic phenomena, research in the development of second language phonology, and 


key concepts in phonemic representation, production and perception. 


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APLI 610 Teaching and Learning Second Language Vocabulary 


Prerequisite: APLI 604 (previously or concurrently). 

The course provides an overview of research perspectives on second language vocabulary 
acquisition. Topics include the characteristics of lexis, the structure of the mental lexicon, implicit and 
explicit learning, and issues in assessment. The course also outlines a research-informed approach 
to instruction: in addition to examining both old and new techniques for teaching vocabulary, it 
explores developments in corpus linguistics that are relevant to vocabulary instruction and materials 


design. 


APLI 616 Pedagogical Grammar 

Prerequisite: APLI 604 (previously or concurrently). 

This course surveys the theoretical and empirical literature related to the teaching and learning of 
grammar in second language classrooms. Topics include the nature of pedagogical rules, the use of 
metalinguistic terminology, teachers’ knowledge and beliefs, learner characteristics, task types, and 
sequencing. Students also study a grammar structure in depth for which they subsequently develop, 


pilot, and critically evaluate a set of instructional materials. 


APLI 636 Language Awareness 

This course focuses on current research and practice in language awareness relating to language 
teaching and learning for a variety of learners in different contexts. Topics may include the learning 
of first, second and additional languages, language teaching methodology, language teacher 
education, attitudes towards language, cross-linguistic and cross-cultural awareness, and critical 
language awareness. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on both the theoretical and 
practical implications of language awareness. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under an APLI 651 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


APLI 643 Pragmatics and Second Language Acquisition 

The course provides an overview of pragmatics, which includes topics ranging from reference, 
implicature, presupposition, speech acts, information structure, and conversational structure. The 
course also provides a research-informed approach to the study of these topics in second language 
learning contexts, exploring developments in second language research that are relevant to the 


understanding of pragmatics. 


Cluster C: Focus on Pedagogy 


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APLI 625 Second Language Speaking and Listening 


The course provides an overview of several topics in second language listening and speaking such 
as fluency, formulaic language, strategies, and inferencing. The course provides a research- 
informed approach to second language listening and speaking, exploring trends in second language 


acquisition research and pedagogy that are relevant to the understanding of skill development. 


APLI 630 Second Language Syllabus Design and Curriculum Planning 

The aims of the course are to examine the evolution of the syllabus in second language teaching 
and to consider issues related to the development, planning and implementation of language 
programs in a range of educational settings. Topics include the history of second language teaching; 
current issues in pedagogical practice; assessment of student needs; and the design, sequencing, 
and evaluation of language teaching materials. 


Note: Students who have received credit for APLI 638 may not take this course for credit. 


APLI 635 Language Assessment 

The course provides an overview of theory and research that informs language testing. Students 
explore historical developments in language assessment as well as current trends. The course 
enables them to critically evaluate a range of test types including standardized placement 
instruments, diagnostic tests, progress/achievement measures, and non-traditional assessment 
techniques. Students are guided in designing sample tests; they are also familiarized with 


established methods for analyzing test items and interpreting results. 


APLI 644 Technology in Language Learning 

This course explores theoretical and applied issues related to the use of technology in second 
language learning and teaching. The principal aims of the course are to enable students to critically 
evaluate existing instructional uses of technology and to design methodologically sound technology- 
based materials for second language teaching. Emphasis is placed on developing skills needed for 


the integration of instructional technology into second language instruction. 


APLI 646 Literacy (3 credits) 

This course examines the development of reading and writing abilities in a second language, 
including the connections between the two. It discusses literacy issues pertaining to different age 
groups and proficiency levels, including university students acquiring advanced academic writing 
skills. Throughout the course, the implications for language teaching of the different theoretical and 


empirical findings will be considered. 


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APLI 647 Supervision of Practice Teaching 


This course is designed for students who have some ESL teaching experience and a particular 
interest in working in the field of teacher training. The course has both a practical and a theoretical 
component. In the practical component, students observe and assist novice ESL teachers; in the 


theoretical component, students meet weekly in an academic seminar. 


Elective Courses 


Each year the department offers a selection of courses from those listed below. All courses are 


worth 3 credits unless otherwise noted. 


APLI 641 Research Methods II 

Prerequisite: APLI 660. 

The principal aims of the course are to enable students to evaluate the statistical information 
provided in reports of empirical research in the social sciences and use statistics in small scale 
studies. Emphasis is placed upon the logic of statistical tests, the assumptions underlying their use, 
and the interpretation of the results. The course also includes basic elements of data analysis and 
synthesis in research employing qualitative methodologies. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under an APLI 651 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


APLI 651 Special Topics in Applied Linguistics 
This course provides an advanced treatment of specialized literature in an area of Applied 


Linguistics. 


APLI 671 Reading Course in Applied Linguistics | 

APLI 672 Reading Course in Applied Linguistics II 

APLI 673 Reading Course in Applied Linguistics III 

APLI 674 Reading Course in Applied Linguistics IV 

APLI 675 Reading Course in Applied Linguistics V (6 credits) 


Thesis 


APLI 690 Thesis Proposal (3 credits) 
APLI 691 Thesis (18 credits) 
APLI 696 Research Paper (12 credits) 


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Child Studies MA 


Admission Requirements 


Applicants will be selected on the basis of past academic records, letters of recommendation, field 
experience, and the relevance of their proposed research to the areas of specialization of program 
faculty. To be accepted into the program, a student is required to have an undergraduate degree with 
a minimum of a B average and a significant concentration in child studies, education, or related 
discipline. In addition, at least one year of professional experience in the field of child care, 
education, or related areas is desirable. Bilingualism is an asset, but not a requirement. The 
equivalence of foreign degrees is assessed by the School of Graduate Studies, and is determined 
by consideration of the total length of program study (primary through university) as well as the 


quality and content of post-secondary study and its relevance to this program 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 
and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A fully qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits. 


2. Courses. Students may enter either the thesis or internship program outlined below and must 
complete CHST 600, CHST 603, CHST 605, CHST 606, and CHST 608 as the core segment of 


their program. 
Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


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2. Residence. The minimum residence requirement is one year (3 terms) of full-time study, or the 


equivalent in part-time study. 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


4. Graduation Requirement. To graduate, students must have completed all course requirements 


with a cumulative GPA of at least 2.70. 


Master of/Magisteriate in Arts with Thesis 


1. Core Courses. CHST 600, 603, 605, 606, and 608 (15 credits). 


2. Elective Courses. A minimum of 9 credits from CHST 610, CHST 614, CHST 618, CHST 620, 
CHST 622, CHST 624, CHST 630, CHST 632, CHST 640, and CHST 650 chosen in consultation 


with the student’s advisor. 


3. Thesis Proposal. CHST 697 (3 credits). 


4. Research and Thesis. CHST 698 (18 credits). 


Master of/Magisteriate in Arts with Internship 


1. Core Courses. CHST 600, 603, 605, 606, and 608 (15 credits). 


2. Elective Courses. A minimum of 12 credits chosen from CHST 610, CHST 614, CHST 618, 
CHST 620, CHST 622, CHST 624, CHST 630, CHST 632, CHST 640, and CHST 650 chosen in 


consultation with the student’s advisor. 


3. Internship Seminar & Field Placement. CHST 695 (9 credits). 


4. Internship Report. CHST 696 (9 credits). 


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Courses 


The following courses are offered: 
Required Courses 


These courses are required of all students and form the foundation for further courses in the 


program. 


CHST 600 Advanced Child Development 

This course presents an overview of the theories that have helped to shape the field of child 
development. The impact of various theoretical approaches (e.g., psychoanalytic, cognitive, 
behavioral, social) is examined by providing perspectives on issues of both historical and 


contemporary importance. 


CHST 603 Seminar: Issues in Child Studies 
This course provides students with an overview of the field of child studies. Students are introduced 


to diverse issues through the work of program faculty, invited scholars and student initiatives. 


CHST 605 Quantitative Methods of Inquiry 

This course introduces students to the philosophy, principles, and techniques in quantitative inquiry 
in the social sciences. Specifically, it focuses on the main quantitative methodologies of inquiry that 
are necessary for conducting research and interpreting data in child studies. The course covers 
techniques for addressing quantitative research questions in the field, including gathering, 
organizing, analyzing, and communicating data. Statistical techniques that are commonly used to 
address such questions are covered, with appropriate computer software for key methodologies. 
Laboratory work is provided to give students practical experience with such software. 


Note: Students who have received credit for CHST 607 may not take this course for credit. 


CHST 606 Qualitative Methods of Inquiry 

This course introduces students to the philosophy, principles, and approaches in qualitative inquiry in 
the social sciences. Specifically, it focuses on the main methodologies of inquiry that are necessary 
for conducting and interpreting qualitative data in child studies. The course covers techniques for 
addressing qualitative research questions in the field, including gathering, organizing, analyzing, and 
communicating data. Appropriate methods for the coding and analysis of qualitative data are 
covered, with laboratory work to support students’ practical experience with qualitative data. 


Note: Students who have received credit for CHST 607 may not take this course for credit. 


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CHST 608 Field Observations 


Prerequisite: CHST 605 and CHST 606, or equivalent. 

This course addresses a range of observational techniques for observing children in their natural 
environments (e.g., running records, time and event sampling, rating scales). Students learn to use 
a variety of observational methods, analyze the information, and write reports. Students spend 
approximately 2-3 hours weekly in an appropriate setting to conduct the observations. 

Note: Students who have received credit for CHST 604 may not take this course for credit. 


Elective Courses 


These courses focus on (a) the child and (b) the wider community. They are offered on a rotating 


basis with the exception of CHST 630 which is offered every year. 


CHST 610 Applied Cognition and Learning 

This course provides an overview of the ways in which cognition has contributed to the 
understanding of how children engage in the content of school subjects, such as mathematics, 
science, literacy and history. Topics include general cognitive processes, such as memory, transfer, 
metacognition, and expertise, as well as those related to learning in specific content areas. The 
course examines ways in which theory and empirical findings can and have informed instructional 


practice. 


CHST 614 Social Processes 

This course addresses issues regarding the development of critical social processes in the life of the 
child, which have implications for later functioning. Topics include the importance of early emotional 
development (e.g., attachment, temperament, emotional regulation) for social interaction, peer 
relations (e.g., friendships, bullying and victimization, prosocial behaviour), the development of self 


and social understanding, the role of play in development, and gender roles and socialization. 


CHST 618 Childhood Settings 

This course examines a variety of extra-familial settings in which children and families function (e.g. 
child care, kindergarten, elementary school, after school programs, recreation programs, hospital 
settings, programs for children with special needs). Various aspects of these programs are examined 
such as mission statements, program philosophy, training requirements, regulations, and 
professional development requirements. Methods to evaluate the quality of the settings are 
presented. Students learn to analyze a specific program of their choosing and write a case study 


report. Guest lectures and field trips to different types of settings may form part of the course. 


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CHST 620 Children’s Play: From Theory to Practice 


This course introduces students to the topic of play with an emphasis on relating theory to practice. 
Historical and modern theories (e.g., psychoanalytic, cognitive, and social cognitive) of play are 
discussed. Various definitions and types of play that emanate from theoretical approaches and 
different approaches to measuring play are covered, as well as the relationship between children’s 
play and domains of development and culture, and curriculum and teaching. Issues related to 


designing developmentally appropriate play spaces and materials are examined. 


CHST 622 The Family 

This course addresses major theoretical perspectives on family functioning and the nature of 
parenting (e.g., transitions to parenting, attachment, child rearing styles, parenting children with 
special needs) and family relationships (e.g., parent-child, sibling, grandparents). Issues related to 
the modern Canadian family are also discussed (e.g., single and adolescent parents, divorce and 


remarriage, parental employment, child care, transition to school, and diversity of family lifestyles). 


CHST 624 Curriculum Models in Childhood Settings 

This course examines principles and models of curriculum in relation to a range of early childhood 
settings, including daycare, after school programming, kindergarten, and elementary school. The 
focus is on analyzing current curriculum models from different perspectives as well as identifying and 
discussing issues related to curriculum design and implementation. Student interests and areas of 
study are taken into account in the selection of the readings, interactive curriculum materials, and 
resources. 


Note: Students who have received credit for CHST 601 may not take this course for credit. 


CHST 630 Issues in Education: Language, Literacy, Numeracy, and Scientific Reasoning 
In this course, students reflect on specific aspects of cognitive development and their impact on 
education. Topics are offered on a rotating basis and may include the development of language, 
literacy, numeracy and/or scientific reasoning. The literature on selected topics is examined, with 


particular emphasis on both classic and current research. 


CHST 632 Issues in Inclusive and Special Education 

This course examines theoretical issues in inclusive and special education and focuses on 
educational practices that provide all children with equitable access to learning. Curricula, policies 
and practices in educational settings are analyzed and provide students with an in-depth 


understanding so as to meet the needs of diverse learners. 


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CHST 640 Special Topics in Child Studies 


Note: Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for 
this course provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the 
letter following the course number, e.g., CHST 640A, CHST 640B, etc. 


Note: For elective course descriptions and further information regarding thesis and internship 


guidelines, consult the Guide to the MA in Child Studies available from the Department of Education. 


Directed Study Course 


CHST 650 Directed Study 
Students may enrol in a directed study under faculty supervision in order to undertake specialized 
study of theoretical or research-related topics. Permission of the Graduate Program Director is 


required. 
Internship Option 


CHST 695 Internship Seminar and Field Placement (9 credits) 

Prerequisite: CHST 605 and CHST 606, or equivalent. 

The internship is designed to provide students with the opportunity to investigate an applied problem 
or topical issue in child studies. Course requirements include a seminar in both terms. In the first 
term, students are required to keep a journal, conduct on-site observations, and formulate a written 
proposal for the internship project. In the second term, students will conduct their project and 
maintain their journal. Students are required to spend a minimum of 75 hours in the field placement 


in the first term and an additional 125 hours (minimum) in their second term. 


CHST 696 Internship Report (9 credits) 
The final report is a detailed record of the internship project and includes a description and analysis 
of all work produced for the field placement. In addition, all instruments, curricular materials, journal 


entries, and other supporting documents are included in the final report. 


Thesis Option 


CHST 697 Thesis Proposal (3 credits) 
Under the supervision of a thesis supervisor, the student writes a proposal presenting a research 
topic; the overall goal of which is to demonstrate that the student is capable of undertaking an 


independent research project. 


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CHST 698 Research and Thesis (18 credits) 


The thesis consists of the formulation and presentation of the research results which are then 
defended before a committee consisting of the student’s supervisor and at least two other scholars 


from the department and/or scholars from relevant disciplines in other departments or institutions. 


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Concordia University 


http:/Awww.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/estu-ma.html 


Educational Studies MA 


Admission Requirements 


For entry into the program, a first degree with a minimum GPA of 3.00 (B average) is required with 
an appropriate concentration in a field of study relevant to Educational Studies. The applicant should 
also have a minimum of two years professional activity in education or an undergraduate record 
which includes at least three courses in education, each with a grade of B or better. Qualified 
applicants who fail to meet the criteria outlined may be required to take up to 12 undergraduate 
credits in addition to the regular graduate program, or, as appropriate, a qualifying program. (See 


section on Qualifying Students). 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 
1. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate must complete a minimum of 45 credits. 


2. Courses. These vary according to the thesis and directed study options (see below). 


The degree requirements (45 credits) can be met by the successful completion either of course 
work and a thesis in an approved area, or of more extended course work and ESTU 692 
Directed Study (with Extended Essay or Research Project). The choice of a thesis or directed 
study option is normally determined at an early stage in the student's program. A tentative 
detailed outline of the proposed research topic must be submitted with the application for 
admission to the program. A student who completes a thesis or a directed study is normally 
required to defend it in an oral examination. Proposed research topics in both options must be 


approved by the graduate Educational Studies Committee. 


Academic Regulations 


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. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


— 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Residence. The minimum residence requirement is one year (3 terms) of full-time study, or the 


equivalent in part-time study. 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 2.70. 


Master of/Magisteriate in Arts with Thesis 


Students take eight 3-credit courses plus ESTU 690: Thesis and Tutorial (21 credits). In consultation 


with their academic advisor, students must normally take at least two core courses (see below). 
Master of/Magisteriate in Arts with Directed Study 


Students take eleven 3-credit courses plus ESTU 692: Directed Study (with Extended Essay or 
Research Project) (12 credits). In consultation with their academic advisor, students must normally 


take at least four core courses (see below). 


Concentration in Adult Education. In either the thesis or directed study option, students may 
complete a concentration in Adult Education. As part of the required core courses, students must 
take ESTU 670 (3 credits) and three 3-credit courses chosen from adult education topic courses (i.e. 
ESTU 671-677 below). 


Courses 


Courses listed indicate the full range of offerings. They are offered subject to the availability of 
faculty, and (with the exception of a minimum of six core courses) not all in a given year. All are 3- 


credit (one-term) courses unless otherwise indicated. 


Core Courses 


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Specific topic areas of study include: Issues of Difference: Gender, Class and Race; politics and 


education; class, culture and education; educational problems in historical and philosophical 
perspectives; minority status and learning; literacy; inter-cultural and cross-cultural education; school 
and society; curriculum, popular culture and education; and comparative and intercultural education. 
Courses listed indicate the full range of offerings. They are offered subject to the availability of 
faculty and (with the exception of a minimum of six core courses) not all in a given year. All are 3- 


credit (one term) courses unless otherwise indicated. 


ESTU 601 Philosophical Issues in Educational Research 

There are a number of important philosophical questions that lie behind the everyday practice of 
education research. The questions include: What does it mean to say that research in education is 
“scientific”? Is science (and, by extension, educational research) really value neutral and objective? 
What kinds of education research should count as legitimate? In the first part of the course, various 
definitions of science, for example, those of Karl Popper and Thomas Kuhn, and some influential 
critiques of the scientific enterprise are examined. In the second part of the course, some of the 
ongoing debates about appropriate research methods in education are analyzed. 

Note: Students who have received credit for ADIP 501 or ETEC 507 or ETEC 607 may not take this 


course for credit. 


ESTU 611 Philosophical Perspectives in Education 

This course is a forum for common inquiry and reflection upon issues that have deep significance for 
our lives as human beings, students, and educators. Some emphasis is placed on gaining an 
understanding of historically significant philosophical positions and their application to problems of 
teaching and education. However, the primary focus is on cultivating a desire and commitment to 
engage in philosophical thinking as it applies to matters of concern to teachers and teaching. The 
course is premised on a number of questions. These include but are not limited to: What is 
education? How do we understand education in its moral, ethical and spiritual dimensions? What 
role does education play (or have the potential of playing) in personal and social transformation? 


What is effective teaching and how can we cultivate the courage to teach effectively? 


ESTU 612 Historical Perspectives in Education 

This course acquaints students with a broad historical approach to a variety of significant 
educational issues. The emphasis will be placed on the examination of a number of critical 
components of modern educational thought and practice (comprising e.g., alternative schools of 
educational thought, politics and education, the changing curriculum, or the organization of 


schooling) as seen and presented in historical perspective. 


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ESTU 613 Anthropological Concepts and Methods in Education 


The course introduces the students to qualitative methods in educational research. The first purpose 
is to review studies of education which utilize anthropological concepts and/or methods. The second 
purpose is to examine the three principal foci of qualitative research in the area: a. schools and their 
relations with the socio-cultural milieu in which they exist; b. the description and analysis of 
classroom processes; c. the study of individual pupils and educators. The third purpose is to assess 
the strengths and weaknesses of studies focusing on these areas. This includes describing and 
discussing some of the systematic methodological biases apparent in the literature and suggesting 


directions for future research. 


ESTU 614 Social Psychological Foundations of Education 

The course provides a basic understanding of the ways in which psychologists examine and analyze 
human behaviour, collect and interpret data, develop theories and form generalizations. It is not 
intended as a general survey course in the area of educational psychology. Several topics in an area 
will be studied in order to exemplify the methods and techniques employed in the psychological 


analysis of behaviour in educational settings. 


ESTU 615 Introduction to Research in Education 

By providing an overview of the commonly used research methods in education today, students gain 
the knowledge required to critique research that is reported in the education and social science 
literature. Topics include the nature of educational research, the different qualitative and quantitative 
research approaches, types of data collection, and knowledge of research ethics. Students gain 


experience in developing a research statement and writing a research proposal. 


ESTU 635 Studies in Educational Change 

This course is concerned with the investigation and comparison of problems of education in the 
context of time and society. Concentrating on concrete “case studies” chosen from the 19" century 
and the contemporary period, it focuses on the principles on which systems of education are 


constructed, and their change or retention, in the broad socio-economic and ideological context. 


ESTU 644 School and Society 

This course is concerned with the family, the educational system, the economy and the polity, and 
with the relations between them. The main concern is with social institutions and the socialization 
process with which they are involved. Particular emphasis will be placed on the social class 
differentials in the conditions of socialization and educational opportunity, and on social class 


differentials in educational achievement. 


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ESTU 670 Adult Education as a Field of Study 


This course is designed as a survey at an advanced level, of the theory and practice of adult 
education through an examination of the existing literature. Emphasis will be placed on helping the 
student gain knowledge, understanding, and a critical perspective of the following: aims; history and 
philosophy; needs and characteristics of adult learners; functions and skills of adult education 
practitioners; settings, agencies and program areas; and planning and evaluation in adult education. 


A Canadian and Quebec perspective will be emphasized. 


Topic Courses 


ESTU 602 Educational Theory 

ESTU 603 The Philosophy of the Curriculum 

ESTU 604 Philosophy of Education 

ESTU 606 Study of a Philosopher of Education 

ESTU 608 Selected Area of Education 

ESTU 620 History of Canadian Education 

ESTU 631 Anthropology and Education | 

ESTU 632 Anthropology and Education Il 

ESTU 633 History of Educational Ideas 

ESTU 640 Sociology of Education 

ESTU 641 Topics in Sociology of Education Il 

ESTU 642 Selected Topics in Educational Problems 
ESTU 643 The Education of Immigrants and Minorities 
ESTU 645 Curriculum Theory 

ESTU 648 Politics and Education 

ESTU 650 Social Psychology of Education 

ESTU 653 Psychology of Education 

ESTU 671 Adults as Learners 

ESTU 672 Facilitating Adult Learning 

ESTU 673 Administration of Adult Education Programs 
ESTU 674 Evaluating Adult Learning Projects 

ESTU 675 Concepts and Values in Adult Education 
ESTU 676/ADIP 597 Adult Education | - Selected Topics 
ESTU 677/ADIP 598 Adult Education II - Selected Topics 


General Courses (All Options) 


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ESTU 680 Reading Course 


ESTU 681 Reading Course 
ESTU 682 Reading Course 


Thesis and Directed Study 


ESTU 690 Thesis and Tutorial (21 credits) 
ESTU 692 Directed Study (with Extended Essay or Research Project) (12 credits) 


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Concordia University 


http:/Awww.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/etec-ma.html 
Educational Technology MA 


Master of/Magisteriate in Arts with Thesis 


This option is divided into two areas: Area | (Research and Development of Educational Technology) 


and Area II (Production and Evaluation of Educational Materials). 


Admission Requirements 


Entry into the program is based on the individual backgrounds of applicants, who should possess a 
bachelor's/baccalaureate degree with at least a major or the equivalent in any subject. An average of 
at least a B in the major or equivalent is required. Students from the Diploma in Instructional 
Technology (who have not graduated from the Diploma) may apply for admission with advanced 


standing. A maximum of 15 credits may be transferred. An interview may be required. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A fully qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits. 


2. Courses. The individual course of study is decided in consultation with the student's academic 


advisor, although certain courses are required of all students. 


1. Core Courses. ETEC 613 (3 credits), ETEC 640 (3 credits), ETEC 641 (3 credits) and ETEC 
650 (3 credits). 


2. Elective Courses. 15 credits chosen from the list of courses which follows under Elective 


Courses, in consultation with the advisor. 


3. Thesis (Area I). Students must complete ETEC 795 (3 credits) and ETEC 796 (15 credits), 


comprising a written thesis proposal, a thesis and an oral defence. 


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4. Thesis-Equivalent (Area Il). Students must complete for ETEC 795 (3 credits) and ETEC 
796 (15 credits), comprising a written thesis-equivalent proposal, a thesis-equivalent and an oral 
defence. Students are required to produce educational materials to achieve specific objectives 
(e.g., an educational television production or a computer-based instructional program) and their 


evaluation. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Residence. The minimum residence requirement is one year (3 terms) of full-time study, or the 


equivalent in part-time study. 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 


least 2.70. 


Master of/Magisteriate in Arts without with Internship 


Admission Requirements 


Entry into this program is based on the individual backgrounds of applicants, who should possess a 
bachelor's/baccalaureate degree with at least a major or the equivalent in any subject. An average of 
at least a B in the major or equivalent is required. Students from the Diploma in Instructional 
Technology (who have not graduated from the Diploma) may apply for admission with advanced 
standing. A maximum of 15 credits may be transferred. However, no financial credit will be given. An 


interview may be required. 


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175 
Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 


their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A fully qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits. 


2. Courses. The individual course of study is decided in consultation with the student's academic 


advisor, although certain courses are required of all students. 


a. Core Courses. ETEC 613 (3 credits), ETEC 640 (3 credits), ETEC 650 (3 credits) and ETEC 
651 (3 credits), and ETEC 671 (3 credits), ETEC 672 (3 credits), or ETEC 673 (3 credits). 


b. Elective Courses. 12 credits to be chosen from the list of courses that follows under Elective 


Courses, in consultation with the advisor. 


3. Internship. ETEC 791 (15 credits). ETEC 791 normally consists of an extensive activity 
(minimum 675 hours) in the university or in the field. The experience will vary with the interests of 
the student and the opportunities available. The objectives are: to apply skills acquired in 
program courses; to obtain more "real world" experience with the actual practice of educational 
technology; and to undertake a synthesizing process which combines the subjects studied 
separately within the program in a single undertaking. Students may need to fulfill French or 
other language training when undertaking an internship or a field experience. Language 
competencies are determined and assessed by the hosting organization; it is the student's 


responsibility to attain the competency level required. 


4. Internship Report. ETEC 792 (3 credits). The internship report will address both the 
scholarly/academic and professional practice aspects of Educational Technology. Typically 
10,000 or more words in length, the report should contain at least two parts: 1. A detailed 
description of the Internship II activities, utilizing a case study format; including relevant 
references to the literature. 2. A conclusions and recommendations section which outlines what 
was learned, what one would do differently, and what potentially generalizable principles one 
might recommend to fellow educational technologists encountering similar circumstances. The 


student completes the internship by disseminating the experiences detailed in the report in a 


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public presentation. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Residence. The minimum residence requirement is one year (3 terms) of full-time study, or the 


equivalent in part-time study. 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 2.70. 


Courses 


The master’s level courses offered in educational technology fall into the following categories: 


ETEC 600-609 Philosophical and Theoretical Foundations of Educational Technology 
ETEC 610-619 Psychological Aspects of Educational Technology 

ETEC 620-629 Communication Theory 

ETEC 630-639 Development and Evaluation of Curriculum and Educational Materials 
ETEC 640-649 Research Methodology for Educational Technology 

ETEC 650-659 Instructional Design and Performance Technology 

ETEC 660-669 Educational Computing 

ETEC 670-679 Management of Performance and Improvement 

ETEC 680-689 Distance Education and E-Learning 

ETEC 690-699 Field Experience and Research in Educational Technology 

ETEC 790-799 Thesis and Internship in Educational Technology 


Core Courses 
Thesis/Thesis-Equivalent: ETEC 613, 640, 641, 650, 795 and 796 (15 credits) 


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Internship: ETEC 613, 640, 650, 651, 671, 672, or 673; ETEC 791 (15 credits), 792 


ETEC 613 Learning Theories (3 credits) 

The primary goal of the course is for students to develop a critical understanding of classic and 
contemporary theories of learning, such as behaviourism, cognitivism, neo-cognitivism, and socio- 
constructivism as they inform instructional practice. Secondary course goals include enhancing 
students’ abilities to: a) read and evaluate the primary literature in the area; b) present and write 
within the discipline; c) evaluate applications of theory to practice; and d) collaborate professionally 


including via computer conferencing. 


ETEC 640 Research Methods | (3 credits) 

This course provides an introduction to research methodologies germane to the field of educational 
technology. Students acquire competencies in analyzing, synthesizing and evaluating empirical 
research that employ quantitative, qualitative and mixed methodologies. Special emphasis is placed 
on acquiring skills to critique and review literature in educational technology. 


Note: Students who have recieved credit for ETEC 548/648 may not take this course for credit. 


ETEC 641 Research Methods Il (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: ETEC 640. 

The principal aims of the course are to enable students to evaluate the statistical information 
provided in reports of empirical research in the social sciences and use statistics in small scale 
studies. Emphasis is placed upon the logic of statistical tests, the assumptions underlying their use, 
and the interpretation of the results. The course also includes basic elements of data analysis and 
synthesis in research employing qualitative methodologies. 


Note: Students who have received credit for ETEC 548/648 may not take this course for credit. 


ETEC 650 Fundamentals of Instructional Design (3 credits) 

This course introduces students to instructional design, which refers to both the systematic process 
for preparing learning materials as well as to the theories and principles that guide that work. 
Working on a real-world project, students directly engage in the process and prepare an instructional 
program. 


Note: Students who have received credit for ETEC 512/712 may not take this course for credit. 


ETEC 651 Fundamentals of Human Performance Technology (3 credits) 
Prerequisite: ETEC 650. 
Building on the base of instructional design, this course introduces human performance technology 


(HPT). HPT is a set of principles and methods for identifying and solving problems that cannot be 


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solved through instructional programs alone. Working on a real-world project, students design a 


variety of non-instructional interventions. 


Note: Students who have received credit for ETEC 512/712 may not take this course for credit. 


ETEC 671 Administering Educational Technology Groups (3 credits) 

This course prepares students to integrate into the real-world practice of educational technology and 
to eventually assume leadership positions in organizations. Through readings, experiential learning 
activities, and other assignments, this course introduces students to the basic themes of 
administering educational technology groups: (a) business management—successfully competing 
for work and resources needed to complete it; (b) project management—planning work and 
overseeing its progress; and (c) people management—establishing and managing expectations of, 
and relationships with, members of the group. 


Note: Students who have received credit for ETEC 591/701 may not take this course for credit. 


ETEC 672 Project Management (3 credits) 

This course focuses on project management and its application to the fields of education and 
training. Special attention is placed on the different components of a project, but reviews of project 
management as a discipline, a process and a system are also undertaken. Following the 
established methodology proposed by national and international project management organizations, 
this course introduces the processes, skills, techniques and software tools required to effectively 
manage a project. Specific educational examples and cases of real-life projects are included in the 
course to describe how project management techniques can be used in education and training. 


Note: Students who have received credit for ETEC 594/704 may not take this course for credit. 


ETEC 673 Consulting Skills for Educational Technologists (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: ETEC 650. 

This course prepares educational technologists to adopt the consultative approach that is central to 
the profession. Specifically, this course develops the key competencies needed in consultative work 
in schools, higher education, workplace learning groups and non-profit organizations. These 
competencies include building awareness of the client organization, supporting clients in making 
effective choices, developing agreements with clients that include the scope, schedule and budget of 
projects, managing project communications and changes throughout a project, and interacting 
effectively with clients. 

Note: Students who have received credit for ETEC 573 or for this topic under an ETEC 593/693 


number may not take this course for credit. 


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ETEC 791 Internship (Non-Thesis Option) (15 credits) 


ETEC 792 Internship Report (Non-Thesis Option) (3 credits) 
ETEC 795 Thesis Proposal (3 credits) 
ETEC 796 Thesis or Thesis-Equivalent (15 credits) 


Elective Courses 


The department currently offers the courses listed below. Each course is worth 3 credits unless 
otherwise indicated. The pattern of courses offered may vary from year to year. Detailed information 


on the courses offered in a given year is available from the department. 


ETEC 607 Philosophical Issues in Educational Research 

Note: Students who have received credit for ADIP 501 or ESTU 601 or ETEC 507 may not take this 
course for credit. 

ETEC 621 Educational Cybernetics 

Note: Students who have received credit for ETEC 506/606 may not take this course for credit. 
ETEC 635 Principles of Educational Message Design 

ETEC 636 Evaluation in Education and Training 

ETEC 637 Educational Gaming and Modelling 

ETEC 652 Knowledge Management 

Note: Students who have received credit for ETEC 567/667 may not take this course for credit. 
ETEC 660 Introduction to Educational Computing 

ETEC 662 Social Technologies and the Sociocultural Aspects of Learning 

ETEC 665 Introduction to Digital Media in Education 

ETEC 666 Comtemporary Use of Simulation in Training and Education 

ETEC 669 Designing and Developing Interactive Instruction 

ETEC 676 Human Resources Development 

ETEC 680 Global Perspectives in E-Learning 

Note: Students who have have received credit for ETEC 555/655 may not take this course for 
credit. 

ETEC 681 Fundamentals of Distance Education 

Note: Students who have received credit for ETEC 592/702 may not take this course for credit. 
ETEC 690 Field Experience (for Option A-Thesis/Thesis-Equivalent only) 

ETEC 691 Advanced Readings and Research in Educational Technology | 

ETEC 692 Advanced Readings and Research in Educational Technology II 

ETEC 693 Special Issues in Educational Technology 


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Cognate Courses 


Graduate students in educational technology may be permitted to register for up to two elective 
courses (6 credits) offered in other graduate programs. In all such cases, prior permission of the 
Graduate Program Director is required. 


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Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/adip-dip.html 


Adult Education Graduate Diploma 


Admission Requirements 


For admission, a Bachelor's/Baccalaureate degree or equivalent is required. Entry into the program 
is based upon an assessment of the background and skills of the individual applicant. Applicants 
should be actively involved in some area of adult education or have the equivalent of one year's 
experience in the field, (for example, as group leader, trainer, nurse educator, volunteer worker, 


administrator in an academic institution, business, industry, government or community organization). 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Diploma 


1. Credits. Fully-qualified candidates are required to complete a minimum of 30 credits. 


2. Courses. All candidates are required to complete the following courses: ADIP 500, 585 and 586 
and 
3 credits chosen from ADIP 501, 511, 512, 535, and 
3 credits chosen from ADIP 513, 514, 515, 544, and 
9 credits chosen from ADIP 510, 520, 530, 533, 540, 541, 542, 550, 551, 570, 572, 588, 589, 
590, 597, 598, and 6 credits chosen from another graduate program, in consultation with the 
graduate program director or student advisor. 
In special circumstances students may, in consultation with the graduate program director or 
student advisor, individualize their program of study within the standards set out by the School of 
Graduate Studies. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


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2. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


3. Graduation Requirement. To graduate, students must have completed all course requirements 


with a cumulative GPA of at least 2.70. 


Courses 


Courses in the following list will be offered in fall, winter and summer terms, depending upon 


demand and availability of faculty. Courses are worth 3 credits. 


ADIP 500 Adult Education in Québec as a Field of Study 

ADIP 501 Philosophical Issues in Educational Research 

Note: Students who have received credit for ESTU 601 or ETEC 507 or ETEC 607 may not take this 
course for credit. 

ADIP 510 Adult Education in Québec and Canada 

ADIP 511 Educational Problems in Philosophical Perspective 
ADIP 512 Educational Problems in Historical Perspective 

ADIP 513 Anthropological Concepts and Methods in Education 
ADIP 514 Social Psychological Foundations of Education 
ADIP 515 Research Issues and Methodologies in Education 
ADIP 520 Adults as Learners 

ADIP 530 Roles and Competencies of Adult Educators 

ADIP 533 Facilitating Adult Learning 

ADIP 535 Studies in Educational Change 

ADIP 540 Introduction to Research in Adult Education 

ADIP 541 Designing Adult Learning Projects 

ADIP 542 Evaluating Adult Learning Projects 

ADIP 544 School and Society 

ADIP 550 Reflective Practice | 

ADIP 551 Introduction to Administration of Adult Education Programs 
EDUC 553 Education in Québec 

ADIP 570 Workshops for Adult Educators 

ADIP 572 Concepts and Values in Adult Education 


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ADIP 580 Reading Course 


ADIP 581 Reading Course 

ADIP 588 Advanced Topics in Adult Education 
ADIP 589 Advanced Topics in Adult Education 
ADIP 590 Issues in the Practice in Adult Education 


ADIP 585 Integrative Internship | 

Prerequisite: Students must have completed at least 15 credits in their program of study, including 
ADIP 500 Adult Education in Quebec as a Field of Study. This course is associated with, and 
normally represents, a prerequisite for Integrative Internship II. 

Integrative Internship | is designed to allow students to build on their acquired knowledge, skills, 
values and attitudes through interaction with a chosen education environment. The first Internship 
requires students to select, contact and establish a working relation with an organization which offers 
educational activities to adults in their community. A supervised Special Project for an adult 
education provider is initiated. At this stage, the emphasis is on observation and information 


gathering, in preparation for taking on a more active role in Integrative Internship II. 


ADIP 586 Integrative Internship Il 

Prerequisite: ADIP 585. 

This internship is designed to extend the student’s personal aims and philosophy of adult education 
arrived at in Integrative Internship | by completing a supervised Special Project in an approved adult 
education facility, where supervision is provided by a member of a host institution in consultation with 


the professor. 


ADIP 593 Practicum | 

Prerequisite: At least 18 credits in the Diploma in Adult Education Teacher Certification Option Il. 
This course is designed for students who possess a Provincial Teaching Authorization or are 
currently working in adult education in the Quebec school system. Students enroling in this 
practicum are expected to have completed courses in theoretical and conceptual content in the field 
of adult education. This practicum provides an opportunity in which they can apply this knowledge to 
their classroom teaching experience. 

Note: Upon presentation of a statement from the school authority attesting to the satisfactory 
performance in an adult education classroom for a minimum of four months, a student may be 


exempted from this course. 


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ADIP 594 Practicum Il 


Prerequisite: ADIP 593. 

This course is designed for students who possess a Provisional Teaching Authorization or are 
currently working in adult education in the Quebec school system. Satisfactory classroom 
performance in the student’s subject matter specialty is judged on the basis of reports from the 


school principal, mentors chosen from the teaching staff, and a supervisor from the University. 


ADIP 597 Adult Education | - Selected Topics 
Cross-listed: ESTU 676. 


ADIP 598 Adult Education Il - Selected Topics 
Cross-listed: ESTU 677. 


© Concordia University 


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Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/etec-dip.html 


Instructional Technology Graduate Diploma 


Admission Requirements 


Entry into the program is based on the individual backgrounds of applicants, who must possess a 
bachelor's degree with at least a major or the equivalent in any subject. The program is open to full- 


time and part-time students without preference. An interview may be required. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Diploma 


1. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 30 credits. 


2. Course requirements will generally be completed in one year, including a summer term, or the 


equivalent. 


3. Courses. All candidates are required to take ETEC 513, ETEC 550, ETEC 551; and ETEC 
571, ETEC 572, or ETEC 573 for a total of 12 credits, plus a minimum of 18 credits selected from 


the elective courses. 


4. Research papers, essays, examinations or preparation of audio-visual materials may be required 


as part of the work for individual courses. 


5. Language Competency Requirement for All Students. French or other language 
requirements for students undertaking a field experience are determined and assessed by the 


hosting organization. It is the student's responsibility to attain the competency level required. 


Academic Regulations 


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1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


3. Graduation Requirement. To graduate, students must have completed all course requirements 


with a cumulative GPA of at least 2.70. 


Courses 


A number of courses selected from the following list will be offered in either summer, fall or winter 


terms. 
Required Courses 


ETEC 513 Learning Theories (3 credits) 

The primary goal of the course is for students to develop a critical understanding of classic and 
contemporary theories of learning, such as behaviourism, cognitivism, neo-cognitivism, and socio- 
constructivism as they inform instructional practice. Secondary course goals include enhancing 
students’ abilities to: a) read and evaluate the primary literature in the area; b) present and write 
within the discipline; c) evaluate applications of theory to practice; and d) collaborate professionally 


including via computer conferencing. 


ETEC 550 Fundamentals of Instructional Design (3 credits) 

This course introduces students to instructional design, which refers to both the systematic process 
for preparing learning materials as well as to the theories and principles that guide that work. 
Working on a real-world project, students directly engage in the process and prepare an instructional 
program. 


Note: Students who have received credit for ETEC 512/712 may not take this course for credit. 


ETEC 551 Fundamentals of Human Performance Technology (3 credits) 
Prerequisite: ETEC 550. 
Building on the base of instructional design, this course introduces human performance technology 


(HPT). HPT is a set of principles and methods for identifying and solving problems that cannot be 


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solved through instructional programs alone. Working on a real-world project, students design a 


variety of non-instructional interventions. 


Note: Students who have received credit for ETEC 512/712 may not take this course for credit. 


ETEC 571 Administering Educational Technology Groups (3 credits) 

This course prepares students to integrate into the real-world practice of educational technology and 
to eventually assume leadership positions in organizations. Through readings, experiential learning 
activities, and other assignments, this course introduces students to the basic themes of 
administering educational technology groups: (a) business management—successfully competing 
for work and resources needed to complete it; (b) project management—planning work and 
overseeing its progress; and (c) people management—establishing and managing expectations of, 
and relationships with, members of the group. 


Note: Students who have received credit for ETEC 591/701 may not take this course for credit. 


ETEC 572 Project Management (3 credits) 

This course focuses on project management and its application to the fields of education and 
training. Special attention is made on the different components of a project, but reviews of project 
management as a discipline, a process and a system are also undertaken. Following the established 
methodology proposed by national and international project management organizations, this course 
introduces the processes, skills, techniques and software tools required to effectively manage a 
project. Specific educational examples and cases of real-life projects are included in the course to 
describe how project management techniques can be used in education and training. 


Note: Students who have received credit for ETEC 594/704 may not take this course for credit. 


ETEC 573 Consulting Skills for Educational Technologists (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: ETEC 550. 

This course prepares educational technologists to adopt the consultative approach that is central to 
the profession. Specifically, this course develops the key competencies needed in consultative work 
in schools, higher education, workplace learning groups and non-profit organizations. These 
competencies include building awareness of the client organization, supporting clients in making 
effective choices, developing agreements with clients that include the scope, schedule and budget of 
projects, managing project communications and changes throughout a project, and interacting 
effectively with clients. 

Note: Students who have received credit for ETEC 673 or for this topic under an ETEC 593/693 


number may not take this course for credit. 


Elective Courses 


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The department currently offers the courses listed below. Each course is worth 3 credits unless 


otherwise indicated. The pattern of courses offered may vary from year to year. Detailed information 


on the courses offered in a given year is available from the department. 


ETEC 507 Philosophical Issues in Educational Research 

There are a number of important philosophical questions that lie behind the everyday practice of 
education research. The questions include: What does it mean to say that research in education is 
“scientific”? Is science (and, by extension, educational research) really value neutral and objective? 
What kinds of education research should count as legitimate? In the first part of the course, various 
definitions of science, for example, those of Karl Popper and Thomas Kuhn, and some influential 
critiques of the scientific enterprise are examined. In the second part of the course, some of the 
ongoing debates about appropriate research methods in education are analyzed. 

Note: Students who have received credit for ADIP 501 or ESTU 601 or ETEC 607 may not take this 


course for credit. 


ETEC 521 Educational Cybernetics 

Note: Students who have received credit for ETEC 506/606 may not take this course for credit. 
ETEC 535 Principles of Educational Message Design 

ETEC 536 Evaluation in Education and Training 

ETEC 537 Educational Gaming and Modelling 


ETEC 540 Research Methods | 

This course provides an introduction to research methodologies germane to the field of educational 
technology. Students acquire competencies in analyzing, synthesizing and evaluating empirical 
research that employ quantitative, qualitative and mixed methodologies. Special emphasis is placed 
on acquiring skills to critique and review literature in educational technology. 


Note: Students who have received credit for ETEC 548/648 may not take this course for credit. 


ETEC 541 Research Methods Il 

Prerequisite: ETEC 540. 

In this course students develop a proposal, design a pilot study to investigate a research problem, 
and later analyze the data. Projects may use quantative or qualitative methodologies. 


Note: Students who have received credit for ETEC 548/648 may not take this course for credit. 


ETEC 552 Knowledge Management 
Note: Students who have received credit for ETEC 567/667 may not take this course for credit. 
ETEC 560 Introduction to Educational Computing 


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189 
ETEC 562 Social Technologies and the Sociocultural Aspects of Learning 


ETEC 565 Introduction to Digital Media in Education 

ETEC 566 Comtemporary Use of Simulation in Training and Education 

ETEC 569 Designing and Developing Interactive Instruction 

ETEC 576 Human Resources Development 

ETEC 580 Global Perspectives in E-Learning 

Note: Students who have received credit for ETEC 555/655 may not take this course for credit. 
ETEC 581 Fundamentals of Distance Education 

Note: Students who have received credit for ETEC 592/702 may not take this course for credit. 
ETEC 590 Field Experience 

ETEC 593 Special Issues in Educational Technology 


© Concordia University 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


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Concordia University 


http:/Awww.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/engl-phd.html 


English Literature PhD 


Admission Requirements 


Applicants are assessed by the Department of English's Graduate Committee on the basis of 
undergraduate and graduate transcripts, letters of recommendation, research ability, and a letter of 


intent. The following criteria serve as admission requirements: 


« Excellence and pertinence of academic background (applicants should have a GPA of 3.5 or 


above) from a recognized university 
« Master's in English or equivalent (see *** below) 
« Promise as a scholar as demonstrated by letter of intent and submitted writing sample 
« Relevance of proposed research to the program 
« Feasibility of proposed research in terms of material resources including faculty supervision 
« Applications will be considered for either full-time or part-time study 


*** In exceptional circumstances, outstanding students who have completed 18 credits of course 
work in English Literature at the master's level may be admitted into the PhD program before 


satisfying the remaining master's requirements. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 
Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A fully qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 90 credits. 


2. Courses. (19 credits). Doctoral students are required to take 19 credits of coursework to include 
ENGL 800 - Pro-Seminar |: Theory, ENGL 801 - Pro-Seminar II: Methodology, ENGL 802 - 


Professional Development Workshops (1 credit) and 12 credits from the selection of Studies 


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courses. A minimum of three of the 12 credits must be pre-20th Century. 


3. Field Examinations. ENGL 891 - The Major Field Examination | and ENGL 892 - The Sub-Field 
Examination II. Students are required to complete two written Field Examinations during the 
second year of their program. The supervisor and at least one other faculty member in a relevant 
field adjudicate each Field Examination. Each exam comprises five questions. Students are 
required to respond to three questions. Questions are distributed one week in advance of the 
scheduled examination. Each exam is held on campus for four hours without notes or other 
additional materials. The exams are assessed by the supervisor on a pass/fail basis in 
consultation with at least one other faculty member in the Department with related expertise in 
the area. In the case of a "fail," the student has until the end of the tenth term to obtain a "pass," 


whether in the initial or another Major Field or configuration of the Sub-Fields exam. 


Field Examinations Reading Lists 

°o Medieval Literature 

o Renaissance Literature 

o Restoration and 18th-Century Literature 

o 19th-Century Literature 

eo 20th-Century and Contemporary Literature 
o American Literature 

°o Canadian Literature 

o Post-Colonial Literature 


o Literary Criticism/Theory 


4. Thesis proposal and oral presentation. ENGL 890 - Thesis Proposal. Students are admitted to 
candidacy for the PhD upon acceptance by their advisory committee of the written thesis 
proposal and its successful oral presentation. Students typically complete one Major Field 
Examination in an area related to the thesis topic. The oral examination of the written thesis 
proposal normally takes place in the term following the writing of the second Field Examination. 
The written proposal is normally 4,500 words in length with an additional five pages for a 


bibliography. 


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192 
5. Thesis. ENGL 895 - Thesis Research. Doctoral students must submit a thesis based on their 


research and defend it in an oral examination. 


6. Language Requirement. Students are required to demonstrate reading knowledge of a 
language other than English, a language of demonstrated relevance to their program of 
research. Language testing occurs once each term, and students are expected to pass the 


language requirement by the end of their second year in the program. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Residence Requirements. The minimum required residency is six consecutive terms (including 


summers) of full-time study, or the equivalent in part-time study. 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 3.00. 


Courses 


Core Courses 
Course Work: PhD students are required to take two 3-credit Pro-Seminar courses 


ENGL 800 Pro-Seminar I: Theory (3 credits) 

This course is an advanced survey of literary theory, considering those thinkers whose work has 
been particularly influential for the discipline’s understanding of the nature and function of literature 
and its production. Figures to be studied may include Aristotle, Sidney, Nietzsche, Althusser, Lacan, 


Derrida, Barthes, Foucault, Deleuze, Irigaray, McLuhan, Badiou, Zizek, and Kristeva. 


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ENGL 801 Pro-Seminar Il: Methodology (3 credits) 


This course considers literary research under the aegis of a current or emergent methodological 
paradigm in the field e.g. Book History, Media Studies, Digital Humanities, Poetics, Psychoanalysis, 


Affect Theory, or Neuroaesthetics. 


ENGL 802 Professional Development Workshops (1 credit) 

The Department holds a series of workshops with the aim of introducing doctoral candidates to 
pertinent research, teaching, and professional expectations and enhancing career development. In 
order to graduate, all doctoral candidates must attend these workshops before the end of the sixth 
term. Master's students are also strongly encouraged to attend the relevant sessions since they are 
a constitutive component of graduate formation. If a student has attended a given workshop during 
his/her master's degree, he/she is exempted from that workshop. 

Workshops are led by faculty members and organized by the Graduate Program Director on a 
monthly basis in anticipation both of key dates during the PhD program (e.g. external grant 
application due dates) and the future professional life of the doctoral candidate (e.g. academic job 


interviews). The course is graded on a pass/fail basis. 


ENGL 890 Thesis Proposal (6 credits) 
Students are admitted to candidacy for the PhD upon acceptance by their advisory committee of the 
written thesis proposal and its successful defence. The oral examination of the written thesis 


proposal normally takes place in the term following the writing of the field examinations. 


ENGL 891 The Major Field Examination I (6 credits) 

This course focuses broadly on the candidate’s primary area of specialization, covering major 
authors, genres, and issues and the pertinent canonical texts therein, in order to consolidate the 
necessary background knowledge for advanced literary research and teaching at the university 
level. In the examination, candidates are expected to demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of the 
designated field as well as an original, critical understanding of the field and its constitutive 

texts. The Department has established reading lists in nine broad areas of specialization that cover a 
variety of periods, nations, and subjects. These basic lists may be modified to suit the interests of 
individual candidates. A substitution of 20 per cent is permitted for all reading lists for the purposes 
of tailoring the lists to the interests of the student. Such substitutions are to be determined by 
agreement between the student and the student's supervisor and are subject to approval by the 


Graduate Program Committee. 


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194 
ENGL 892 The Sub-Field Examination Il (6 credits) 


This course is designed to cultivate a more specific area of inquiry that may include a body of literary 
texts in combination with readings in a particular set of methodological or theoretical problems to the 
end of developing a viable doctoral topic and composing a thesis proposal. The Sub-Field 
Examination list is established by the candidate in consultation with the doctoral supervisor and 
comprises approximately 60 items that are seen as directly relevant to the field in which the 
dissertation is oriented. It is divided into three sections: 1) approximately 20 literary texts; 2) 
approximately 20 theoretical/methodological texts; 3) approximately 20 texts drawn from adjacent 
and/or ancillary fields. By “text,” it means the number of poems or articles deemed by field 
specialists as sufficiently representative of an author's work or period. A text cannot appear twice on 
any of the lists, including that of the Major Field. The lists and texts are not exhaustive, but are 


meant to provide the student with the necessary initiation to sub-fields that help to clarify the 


direction and goals of the dissertation. 


ENGL 895 Thesis Research (53 credits) 


Doctoral students must submit a thesis based on their research and defend it in an oral examination. 


Studies Courses (12 credits) 


ENGL 801-804 
ENGL 601-604 
ENGL 605-609 
ENGL 610-614 
ENGL 615-619 
ENGL 620-624 
ENGL 625-629 
ENGL 630-634 
ENGL 635-639 
ENGL 640-644 
ENGL 645-649 
ENGL 650-654 
ENGL 655-659 
ENGL 660-664 
ENGL 665-667 
ENGL 668-669 
ENGL 685-689 


Independent Study in English Literature 

Special Topics in English Literature 

Studies in Early English Literature and Medieval Literature 
Studies in Renaissance Literature 

Studies in Restoration and Eighteenth Century Literature 
Studies in Nineteenth Century Literature 

Studies in Twentieth Century Literature 

Studies in Poetry 

Studies in Drama 

Studies in Fiction 

Studies in the History of Ideas 

Studies in Shakespeare 

Studies in American Literature 

Studies in Canadian Literature 

Studies in Post-Colonial Literature 

Studies in Literary Criticism 


Studies in Selected Areas 


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© Concordia University 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


196 


Concordia University 


http:/Awww.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/engl-ma.html 


English MA 
Note: Admissions to Option B has been suspended. 


Admission Requirements 


The Master of Arts program, with the exception of the Creative Writing option, requires an Honours 
degree or its equivalent in English with a minimum of a B+ (3.30 GPA) average. The Creative Writing 
option requires a major in English Literature or its equivalent with a minimum of a B+ (3.30 GPA) 
average. Information regarding the portfolio submission can be found at the English Department 
website. Applicants who lack one or two courses (12 credits or less) towards equivalency of an 
Honours degree, but who are otherwise well qualified, may be admitted with the provision that they 
take additional undergraduate courses as part of their master's program. Applicants requiring three 
or more courses (more than 12 credits) to complete the Honours equivalent will be required to take a 
qualifying program of prescribed undergraduate courses, and reapply to the master's program after 
successful completion of this course work. Applicants should feel free to consult with all members of 
the English Department about the program. Specific matters should be addressed to the Graduate 


Program Director or to the Graduate Program Assistant. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 


Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Residence. All options have a minimum residence requirement of three terms of full-time study 


or the equivalent in part-time study. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


197 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 2.70. 


Master of/Magisteriate in Arts — English Literature with Research Essay (Option A) 


This option gives the student the opportunity to study English literature in a range of periods and 
subjects. Emphasis rests on course work, the seminar format of which encourages discussion, 
debate and collaboration. A fully qualified candidate takes a minimum of twenty-one 600-level 
course credits. In these courses the student is trained in academic research methods, gains 
knowledge to interpret literary texts and assess scholarship in particular fields, and applies these 
skills in graduate research papers. A fully qualified candidate is required to take a minimum of six 
credits from any courses designated by the Graduate Committee as fulfilling the "Period" 
requirement, and a minimum of three credits from any courses designated as fulfilling the "Theory" 
requirement. This option requires the preparation of an annotated bibliography of approximately 
three thousand words (ENGL 693) preliminary to a research essay of approximately ten thousand 
words (ENGL 694). The bibliography requires the approval of the Graduate Committee before a 
student is permitted to proceed with the research essay. Both are supervised by a member of the 
department. The bibliography must be submitted to the Graduate Committee by 15 September of the 
second year. The research essay is submitted by 1 February for spring graduation and 15 June for 
fall graduation. The research essay is assessed by the supervisor and one other member of the 
department. 


Master of/Magisteriate in Arts — English Literature with Thesis (Option B) 


This option involves course work and intensive research on an original topic, approved by the 
Graduate Committee. In this option, a fully qualified candidate is required to take a minimum of 21 
credits at the 600-level including a minimum of six credits from any courses designated by the 
Graduate Committee as fulfilling the "Period" requirement, and a minimum of three credits from any 
courses designated as fulfilling the "Theory" requirement. A candidate electing the thesis option 
must satisfy the Graduate Committee of the viability of the topic and secure a member of the 
department to supervise the thesis. The English Department cannot guarantee the availability of a 


supervisor on every possible topic. The candidate will make an oral defence of the thesis. Theses 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


198 
must be submitted to the department by May 15 for Fall graduation and by February 1 for Spring 


graduation. For specific information concerning thesis proposals a student should consult the 
departmental guidelines. University regulations regarding the thesis may be found in the thesis 
section of this calendar. For purposes of registration, this work will be designated as ENGL 690 - 
Thesis. 


Master of/Magisteriate in Arts in English — Creative Writing (Option C) 


To elect this option a candidate must have applied specifically for the Creative Writing option. A fully 
qualified candidate will take a minimum of 12 600-level credits from the regular academic course 
offerings, and 12 course credits in creative writing drawn from courses numbered ENGL 670-674 
(ENGL 670 and ENGL 671 are Creative Writing courses). Only six credits of creative writing 
workshop (from ENGL 672, 673 or 674) may be elected in any year. A creative writing thesis of book 
length, the proposal of which requires approval by the Graduate Committee, must be submitted to 
the department by May 15 for Fall graduation and by February 1 for Spring graduation. For purposes 
of registration, this work will be designated as ENGL 692 - Creative Writing Thesis. 


Creative Writing Option students may NOT substitute creative writing courses for any of the required 
12 course credits of academic credits. 


Note: In addition to the regulations governing the examination of master’s theses outlined in this 
calendar, the Department of English has specific procedures for thesis examinations. Students 
should consult the Graduate Program Director for details. 


Courses 


Descriptions of all Department of English graduate courses can be found at the Department of 


English website. English graduate courses are offered in the following topic areas: 


ENGL 600-604 Special Topics in English Literature 

ENGL 605-609 Studies in Early English Literature and Medieval Literature 
ENGL 610-614 Studies in Renaissance Literature 

ENGL 615-619 Studies in Restoration and Eighteenth Century Literature 
ENGL 620-624 Studies in Nineteenth Century Literature 

ENGL 625-629 Studies in Twentieth Century Literature 

ENGL 630-634 Studies in Poetry 

ENGL 635-639 Studies in Drama 

ENGL 640-644 Studies in Fiction 


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199 
ENGL 645-649 Studies in the History of Ideas 


ENGL 650-654 Studies in Shakespeare 

ENGL 655-659 Studies in American Literature 

ENGL 660-664 Studies in Canadian Literature 

ENGL 665-667 Studies in Post-Colonial Literature 

ENGL 668-669 Studies in Literary Criticism 

ENGL 670-674 Seminars in Creative Writing: Prose Fiction, Poetry and Drama 
ENGL 678-679 Studies in Selected Areas 

ENGL 685-689 Studies in Selected Areas 


Please note that in courses where a Special Subject is listed, this Special Subject is a subtitle, and 
may change from year to year. Consequently, when students repeat a course number in subsequent 
years, but with a different subtitle, they are in fact engaged in a course with completely different 


content. The credit value attached to a course number may likewise change from year to year. 


Note: Courses in Creative Writing are normally available only to students admitted into the Creative 
Writing option. Occasional exceptions in special circumstances are made for entry by students in the 


academic options. Such entrants require the prior approval of the Graduate Program Director. 


Independent (non-degree) students require the permission of the Graduate Program Director to take 
a course and they must possess the same kind and quality of academic background and preparation 


as required of students admitted to the MA program. 


Studies in Selected Areas 


ENGL 678 Selected Area | 


Creative Writing Tutorial (one-term, 3-credit course). 


ENGL 679 Selected Area Il 

Creative Writing Tutorial (two-term, 6-credit course). The Creative Writing tutorials may be elected 
only by students in Option C. They are designed to accommodate candidates whose genre (e.g., 
poetry or drama) is not offered during a given academic year. Candidates wishing to enrol in ENGL 
678 or 679 must submit a request to the Graduate Committee. Approval will in part depend upon the 
availability of resources and whether the Graduate Committee deems it beneficial for the student to 
undertake a tutorial course rather than a regularly scheduled course. Tutorial courses will be 


considered only exceptionally and for very able students. 


ENGL 685 Selected Area Ill 


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ENGL 687 Selected Area IV 


Bibliography and Research Methods in English. An introduction to scholarly research in English 


(one-term, 3-credit course). 


ENGL 688 Selected Area V 


Reading Course (one-term, 3-credit course). 


ENGL 689 Selected Area VI 

Reading Course (two-term, 6-credit course). After completing at least a third of the course credits 
(transfer credits excluded), a student may submit a request to the Graduate Committee for 
permission to take up to 6 credits in a reading course to be provided through a tutorial arrangement. 
A reading course will be permitted only when the proposed general subject area has not been 
available during the span of the student’s program and where the Graduate Committee is satisfied 
that it is beneficial for the student to take a reading course rather than a regularly scheduled 
graduate course. Reading courses are approved only exceptionally and only students who have 
demonstrated a capacity for independent work and a very high calibre of academic performance will 
be considered. This applies to both ENGL 688 and ENGL 689. 


Thesis, Bibliography and Research Essay 


ENGL 690 Thesis (24 credits) 


ENGL 692 Creative Writing Thesis (21 credits) 


ENGL 693 Bibliography (6 credits) 

The annotated bibliography constitutes a preliminary phase of the research essay. A student must 
successfully complete the annotated bibliography before producing the research essay. The 
approximate length of the annotated bibliography is 3,000 words and is supervised by the supervisor 


of the research essay. The bibliography is assessed on a pass/fail basis. 


ENGL 694 Research Essay (18 credits) 
Prerequisite: ENGL 693. 
A research essay of approximately 10,000 words is supervised by a member of the department and 


assessed by another faculty member acting as reader. The essay is assessed on a pass/fail basis. 


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Concordia University 


http:/Awww.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/flit-ma.html 
Littératures de langue francaise MA 


Note: Admissions have been suspended. 


Les étudiantes et étudiants a temps plein réaliseront normalement leur cycle complet d’études en 
deux ans et les étudiantes et étudiants a temps partiel disposeront d’un maximum de cing années. 
Le nombre total de crédits est de 45 : 6 crédits de séminaires obligatoires, 9 crédits de séminaires 
géneéraux, 6 crédits pour la présentation du projet de mémoire et 24 crédits pour la réalisation du 


mémoire. 


Les étudiantes et étudiants a temps plein suivent normalement trois séminaires par session; les 
étudiantes et étudiants a temps partiel suivent un ou deux séminaires par session pendant quatre 
sessions. Le projet de mémoire doit étre déposé immédiatement aprés la fin de la scolarité, pour les 
étudiants a temps plein, et au maximum deux ans apres l’inscription au programme pour les 
étudiants a temps partiel. Il peut prendre soit la forme d’un mémoire (Option A) soit la forme d’un 
projet innovateur de diffusion (Option B) choisi par le candidat ou la candidate en fonction de son 


expérience, de ses études antérieures ou de son intérét propre. 


Conditions d'admission 


Pour étre admis a la maitrise en litteratures de langue frangaise, la candidate ou le candidat doit étre 


titulaire de l'un des dipl6mes suivants : 


« Baccalauréat spécialisé (ou « Honours ») en littératures de langue frangaise ou dans une 


discipline connexe, avec une moyenne générale de 3,00 (sur 4,3); ou 


« Baccalauréat avec majeure en littératures de langue francaise ou dans une discipline connexe, 


avec une moyenne générale de 3,00 (sur 4,3); ou 


« Baccalauréat avec une mineure en littératures de langue francaise couplée a une majeure dans 
une discipline connexe avec une moyenne générale de 3,00 (sur 4,3). Dans ce cas, quelques 


cours de propédeutique devront étre envisagés. 
La demande d’admission doit s’accompagner des piéces suivantes : 
1. Les relevés de notes officiels des universités frequentées. 


2. Trois lettres de recommandation. 


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3. La lettre de présentation. 


4. Un curriculum vitae. 

5. Un échantillon d'écriture en frangais. 
La sélection des candidatures est effectuée sur la base des éléments suivants : 
1. Le dossier universitaire du candidat ou de la candidate. 

2. Les réalisations du candidat ou de la candidate. 

3. La lettre de présentation. 

4. Les lettres de recommandation. 


5. Une entrevue qui vérifiera l’intérét de I’étudiant ou l’etudiante pour ce programme. 


Durée des études 


La durée des études est d’un minimum de trois sessions a temps plein. 


Rendement académique 


Voir la section Academic Standing de I'Annuaire pour la Réglementation universitaire. 

Toute note inférieure a C constitue un echec. Obtenir deux C constitue également un échec. Le 
comité d’études supérieures du département revoit annuellement le dossier de tous les étudiants et 
étudiantes et peut exiger que ceux et celles dont les résultats ne satisfont pas aux normes du 


département (moyenne générale de 2,70) se retirent du programme. 
Exigences du programme 
Tout candidat doit obtenir un minimum de 45 crédits. 


Le choix du directeur de mémoire doit idéalement étre fait a la fin du premier session d'études pour 


les étudiants a temps plein, et apres trois séminaires pour les étudiants a temps partiel. 


Le projet de mémoire doit étre déposé au plus tard une session apres la fin de la scolarité pour les 


étudiants a temps plein et a temps partiel. 


Le projet de mémoire sera accepte ou refusé. En cas de refus, I'étudiant ou l'étudiante bénéficiera 


d'un délai de trois mois pour soumettre une version remaniée de son projet. 


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Structure du programme 


Tous les étudiants et étudiantes sont tenus a 15 crédits de séminaires, 6 crédits de presentation de 


mémoire et 24 crédits de these (mémoire ou réalisation médiatique en diffusion littéraire). 
Maitrise en littératures de langue frangaise, avec mémoire (OPTION A) 


45 crédits : 
« 15 crédits de séminaires 
¢ 6 crédits pour la présentation du projet de mémoire devant le comité des études supérieures 
« 24 crédits pour le mémoire 
Répartition des 15 crédits de séminaires : 
« 6 crédits de séminaires obligatoires 
¢ Qcrédits de séminaires de domaines généraux 
Maitrise en litteratures de langue francaise, avec mémoire sous forme de réalisation 
médiatique en diffusion littéraire (OPTION B) 
45 crédits : 
¢ 15 crédits de séminaires 


¢ 6 crédits pour la présentation du projet de mémoire sous forme de réalisation médiatique devant 


le comité des études supérieures 


« 24 crédits pour la réalisation du mémoire sous forme de réalisation médiatique en diffusion 


littéraire, tel qu’il a été approuve par le comité des études supérieures 
Répartition des 15 crédits de séminaires : 
¢ 6 crédits de séminaires obligatoires 


¢ Q9crédits de séminaires de domaines généraux 


Séminaires 
Séminaires obligatoires 


FLIT 600 Méthodologie (3 crédits) 


FLIT 601 Theories littéraires (3 crédits) 
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Séminaires de domaines généraux * 


FLIT 605 Littérature et discours (3 crédits) 

FLIT 614 Littérature et technologies (3 crédits) 

FLIT 617 Textes et images (3 crédits) 

FLIT 619 Littérature et société (3 crédits) 

FLIT 620 Tutorat en littérature (3 crédits) 

FLIT 621 Tutorat en littérature (3 crédits) 

FLIT 622 Séminaire avancé en littérature, langue et traduction (3 crédits) 
Co-listé : FTRA 622. 

FLIT 630-639 Séminaire avancé en littératures francophones (3 crédits) 
FLIT 640-649 Séminaire avancé en littérature québécoise (3 crédits) 
FLIT 650-659 Séminaire avancé en écritures contemporaines (3 crédits) 


FLIT 660-669 Séminaire avancé en littérature frangaise (3 crédits) 
Autres exigences 


FLIT 690 Présentation du mémoire (OPTION A) (6 crédits) 

FLIT 691 Présentation du mémoire incluant une réalisation médiatique (OPTION B) (6 crédits) 
FLIT 692 Mémoire (OPTION A) (24 crédits) 

FLIT 693 Mémoire incluant une réalisation médiatique (OPTION B) (24 crédits) 


*Les séminaires de domaines généraux peuvent étre suivis dans un autre département de 
l'Université Concordia ou dans d’autres universités, avec l’accord du directeur ou de la directrice du 
programme de deuxiéme cycle en littérature et celui du département concerné. Pour les deux 
options, un maximum de trois crédits de séminaires non obligatoires peut étre remplacé par une 
lecture dirigée aprés l’obtention de la permission du directeur ou de la directrice du 2° cycle de 


littérature. 


FLIT 600 Méthodologie (3 crédits) 

Dans ce séminaire, |’étudiante ou |’étudiant apprend a formuler des problématiques et a discuter 
d’hypothéses de recherche. Les étudiants se familiarisent également avec les outils de recherche 
bibliographique imprimés et informatiques, les regles de présentation de la bibliographie et les 


principaux types de productions écrites liées a la critique littéraire. 


FLIT 601 Theories littéraires (3 crédits) 
Ce séminaire permet a I’étudiante ou a |’étudiant d’approfondir sa connaissance de 


diverses théories littéraires, en tenant compte des approches les plus classiques comme des plus 
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récentes. Le séminaire vise également a explorer le passage de la théorie a la pratique dans 


l'analyse des textes. 


FLIT 605 Littérature et discours (3 crédits) 
Ce séminaire s’intéresse a l’interaction dynamique de la littérature avec les diverses formes de 


discours en circulation dans l’espace social. 


FLIT 614 Littérature et technologies (3 crédits) 
Dans ce séminaire, on réfléchit a impact des technologies sur la littérature. On y étudie les formes 
littéraires et artistiques nées de I'évolution récente des dispositifs de lecture et d’écriture, ainsi que 


les modes de diffusion inédits qui en découlent. 


FLIT 617 Textes et images (3 crédits) 

Ce séminaire est, pour |’étudiante ou |’étudiant, l'occasion d’étudier les rapports entretenus 

entre texte et l'image entendus dans leur sens large. Dans ce séminaire seront abordés des textes 
qui incorporent le visuel ou qui en dépendent, comme les textes littéraires illustrés et les bandes- 


dessinées. 


FLIT 619 Littérature et société (3 crédits) 
Ce séminaire est, pour I’étudiante ou |’étudiant, l'occasion de refléchir a la sociologie littéraire, 
aux rapports entre l’ceuvre et son public ou encore aux divers contextes de production, de diffusion, 


de réception ou de conservation du texte littéraire. 


FLIT 620 Tutorat en littérature (3 crédits) 


FLIT 621 Tutorat en littérature (3 crédits) 


FLIT 622 Littérature, langue et traduction (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 622. 

Le séminaire avancée de littérature, langue, et traduction vise a parfaire les connaissances de 
l’étudiante et de |’étudiant dans un domaine littéraire, traductologique ou linguistique spécifique 
envisagé sous un angle théorique, historique ou social. Pour animer ce séminaire, il sera fait appel 
aux professeurs du département en fonction de leur spécialité. Le sujet particulier du séminaire sera 
annoncé chaque fois que le séminaire sera donné. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FLIT 616 ou FTRA 616 ou FTRA 622 ne peuvent 


obtenir de crédits pour ce cours. 


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FLIT 630-639 Séminaire avancé en littératures francophones (3 crédits) 


Ce séminaire avancé vise a parfaire les connaissances de |’étudiante et de Il’étudiant par une 


analyse en profondeur d’une thématique et d’un corpus particulier des litteratures francophones. 


FLIT 640-649 Séminaire avancé en littérature quéebécoise (3 crédits) 
Ce séminaire avancé vise a parfaire les connaissances de |’étudiante et de I’étudiant par une 


analyse en profondeur d’une thématique et d’un corpus particulier de la littérature québécoise. 


FLIT 650-659 Séminaire avancé en écritures contemporaines (3 crédits) 
Ce séminaire avancé vise a parfaire les connaissances de |’étudiante et de I’étudiant par une 


analyse en profondeur d’une thématique et d’un corpus particulier des écritures contemporaines. 


FLIT 660-669 Séminaire avancé en littérature frangaise (3 crédits) 
Ce séminaire avancé vise a parfaire les connaissances de |'étudiante et de I'étudiant par une 


analyse en profondeur d'une thématique et d'un corpus particulier de la littérature frangaise. 


FLIT 690 Présentation du mémoire (Option A) (6 crédits) 


FLIT 691 Présentation du mémoire incluant une realisation médiatique (Option B) (6 crédits) 


FLIT 692 Mémoire (Option A) (24 crédits) 


FLIT 693 Mémoire incluant une réalisation médiatique (Option B) (24 crédits) 


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Concordia University 


http:/Awww.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/ftra-ma.html 


Traductologie MA 


La maitrise en traductologie comporte deux options. L’option A, a visée professionnelle, s’adresse 
aux étudiantes et aux étudiants qui ont réalisé leurs études antérieures dans une discipline autre 
que la traduction et offre une formation accelérée dans ce domaine. L’option B, a visée théorique, 
est axée sur |’étude interdisciplinaire des rapports entre culture, langue et traduction (méthodologie 
de la recherche, histoire et critique de la traduction) et se concentre tout particulierement sur les 


composantes structurelles, systemiques et organisationnelles des processus de traduction. 


Maitrise en traductologie (professionnelle - sans mémoire) 
Option A 


Le Département d'études frangaises offre un programme de 2° cycle a visée professionnelle : la 


maitrise en traductologie, sans mémoire, option A. 
But du programme 


Cette option offre une formation accélérée en traduction aux étudiantes et aux étudiants qui ont 
réalisé leurs études antérieures dans une discipline autre que la traduction. Ils deviendront ainsi des 


langagiers professionnels efficaces et reconnus. 


Conditions générales d'admission 


Les candidates et les candidats devront détenir un baccalauréat ou un dipl6me d’études supérieures 
dans un domaine autre que la traduction et suivront au besoin une propédeutique. Les candidates et 
les candidats devront posséder les compétences linguistiques nécessaires a la traduction (maitrise 
de la langue d’arrivée, compréhension fine de la langue de départ), avoir un excellent dossier 
universitaire (moyenne générale de 3 sur 4,3) et démontrer des aptitudes pour la traduction. Les 
candidates et les candidats devront préciser dés l’entrée au programme s’ils travailleront vers le 


frangais ou vers l’anglais. 


La demande d’admission doit s’accompagner des piéces suivantes : 


1. trois lettres de recommandation; 


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2. une lettre de présentation ou la candidate ou le candidat décrit sa formation et son expérience 


ainsi que ses attentes a l’égard du programme; 
3. des relevés de notes officiels de l’université ou des universités frequentées. 
La sélection des candidatures est effectuée sur la base des éléments suivants : 
1. le dossier universitaire de la candidate ou du candidat; 
2. les lettres de recommandation; 


3. un examen d’admission qui sert a verifier les competences linguistiques et culturelles de la 


candidate ou du candidat. 


Rendement académique 


Voir la section Academic Standing de l'Annuaire pour la Réglementation universitaire. 

Toute note inférieure a C représente un échec. Le comité des études supérieures du Département 
revoit le dossier de chaque étudiante et de chaque étudiant tous les ans et peut exiger que celles et 
ceux dont les résultats ne satisfont pas aux normes du Département (moyenne générale de 2,70) se 


retirent du programme. 


Durée des études 


La durée des études pour les étudiantes et étudiants a temps plein est d’un minimum de trois 
sessions et d’un maximum de neuf sessions a partir de la date d’inscription. Pour les étudiantes et 


étudiants a temps partiel, le maximum est de quinze sessions. 
Exigences du programme 

Toute étudiante ou tout étudiant doit obtenir un minimum de 45 crédits. 
Structure du programme 


Séminaire théorique obligatoire : 3 crédits 
Séminaires théoriques a option : 9 crédits 
Cours de traductique : 3 crédits au choix 


Cours et séminaires pratiques de traduction : 30 crédits 


Bloc A (3 cr. obligatoires) 


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FTRA 600 Meéthodologie générale de la recherche en traduction (3 crédits) 


Bloc B (9 cr. au choix) 


FTRA 601 Courants contemporains en traductologie (3 crédits) 
FTRA 602 Histoire générale de la traduction (3 crédits) 

FTRA 603 Contextes socio-politiques de la traduction (3 crédits) 
FTRA 610 Lecture critique de traductions (3 crédits) 

FTRA 622 Littérature, langue, traduction (3 crédits) 


Bloc C (3cr. au choix) 


FTRA 636 Informatique et traduction (3 crédits) 

FTRA 638 Initiation au sous-titrage (3 crédits) 

FTRA 652 Traduction assistée par ordinateur (TAO) et post édition (3 crédits) 
FTRA 655 Gestion de projets (3 crédits) 

FTRA 658 Pratique de la localisation (3 crédits) 

FTRA 668 Web, technologies, traduction : théories et critiques (3 crédits) 


Bloc D (30 cr. obligatoires) 


FTRA 611 Terminologie et mondialisation (3 crédits) 


FTRA 612 Traduction avancée en sciences humaines et sociales (F) (3 crédits) 
ou 


FTRA 613 Advanced translation in social sciences and the humanities (A) (3 crédits) 


FTRA 614 Traduction littéraire avancée (F) (3 crédits) 
ou 
FTRA 615 Advanced literary translation (A) (3 crédits) 


FTRA 623 Traduction scientifique et technique du frangais a I|’anglais (3 crédits) 
ou 


FTRA 624 Traduction scientifique et technique de Il’anglais au frangais (3 crédits) 


FTRA 625 Traduction commerciale et juridique du frangais a l’anglais (3 crédits) 
ou 


FTRA 626 Traduction commerciale et juridique de |’anglais au frangais (3 crédits) 


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FTRA 629 Révision et correction en traduction (A) (3 crédits) 


ou 


FTRA 630 Révision et correction en traduction (F) (3 crédits) 


FTRA 631 Initiation a la traduction générale (A) (3 crédits) 
ou 
FTRA 632 Initiation a la traduction générale (F) (3 crédits) 


FTRA 633 Aspects théoriques et pratiques de la terminologie (3 crédits) 


FTRA 634 Traduction littéraire de l’anglais au frangais (3 crédits) 
ou 


FTRA 635 Traduction litteraire du frangais a l’anglais (3 crédits) 


FTRA 647 Traduction économique du frangais a l’anglais (A) (3 crédits) 
ou 


FTRA 648 Traduction économique de I’anglais au frangais (F) (3 crédits) 


Maitrise en traductologie (théorique - avec mémoire) 
Option B 


Le Département d’études frangaises offre un programme de 2° cycle a visée théorique conduisant 


au doctorat : la maitrise en traductologie, avec mémoire option B. 
But du programme 


Cette option offre une formation poussée favorisant la réflexion et l’acquisition de connaissances de 
pointe en traductologie aux étudiantes et aux étudiants qui ont réalisé leurs études antérieures en 
traduction ou dans une discipline proche de la traduction. Ces étudiants peuvent ainsi devenir des 


langagiers professionnels et poursuivre leurs études au doctorat. 


Conditions générales d'admission 


Les candidates et les candidats devront détenir un baccalauréat spécialisé (ou « Honours ») en 
traduction, un dipl6me d’études supérieures en traduction, ou encore un baccalauréat ou un dipl6me 
d'études supérieures dans un domaine pertinent a la traduction. Ils devront posséder les 


compétences linguistiques nécessaires a la traduction (maitrise de la langue d’arrivée, 


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compréhension fine de la langue de départ), avoir un excellent dossier universitaire (moyenne 


générale de 3 sur 4,3) et démontrer des aptitudes pour la traduction. La direction du programme 
pourra exiger qu’une candidate ou qu’un candidat suive au besoin une propédeutique. 
La demande d’admission doit s’accompagner des piéces suivantes : 

1. trois lettres de recommandation; 


2. une lettre de présentation ou la candidate ou le candidat décrit sa formation et son 


expérience dans les domaines langagiers ainsi que ses attentes a l’égard du programme; 
3. des relevés de notes officiels de l’université ou des universites frequentées. 
La sélection des candidatures est effectuée sur la base des éléments suivants : 
1. le dossier universitaire de la candidate ou du candidat; 
2. les lettres de recommandation; 


3. un examen d’admission qui vérifie les compétences linguistiques et culturelles de la candidate 


ou du candidat. 


Rendement académique 


Voir la section Academic Standing de I'Annuaire pour la Réglementation universitaire. 

Toute note inférieure a C représente un échec. Le comité des études supérieures du Département 
revoit le dossier de chaque étudiante et de chaque étudiant tous les ans et peut exiger 

que celles et ceux dont les résultats ne satisfont pas aux normes du Département (moyenne 
générale de 3,0 sur 4,3) se retirent du programme. 


Durée des études 


La durée des études pour les étudiantes et étudiants a temps plein est d'un minimum de trois 
sessions et d'un maximum de douze sessions a partir de la date d'inscription. Pour les étudiantes et 


étudiants a temps partiel, le maximum est de quinze sessions. 


Exigences du programme 


Toute étudiante ou tout étudiant doit obtenir un minimum de 45 crédits. 


Structure du programme 


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Toute étudiante ou tout étudiant est tenu a 15 crédits de séminaires, a 6 crédits de présentation du 


projet de mémoire et a 24 crédits de mémoire. 


Séminaires obligatoires : 9 crédits 
Séminaires a option : 6 crédits 
Projet de mémoire : 6 crédits 


Mémoire : 24 crédits 
Séminaires 


Les cours obligatoires sont des séminaires de fondement théorique et d’histoire de la traduction. Les 
cours au choix sont des séminaires spécialisés dans le domaine sociocritique et des séminaires de 


traduction en littérature et en sciences humaines. 
Séminaires obligatoires (9 cr.) 


FTRA 600 Meéthodologie générale de la recherche en traduction (3 crédits) 
FTRA 601 Courants contemporains en traductologie (3 crédits) 
FTRA 602 Histoire générale de la traduction (3 crédits) 


Séminaires au choix (6 cr.) 


FTRA 603 Contextes socio-politiques de la traduction (3 crédits) 

FTRA 610 Lecture critique de traductions (3 crédits) 

FTRA 612 Traduction avancée en sciences humaines et sociales (F) (3 crédits) 
FTRA 613 Advanced translation in social sciences and the humanities (A) (3 crédits) 
FTRA 614 Traduction littéraire avancée (F) (3 crédits) 

FTRA 615 Advanced literary translation (A) (3 crédits) 

FTRA 622 Littérature, langue, traduction (3 crédits) 

FTRA 680 Tutorat en littérature (F) (3 crédits) 

FTRA 681 Tutorial in literature (A) (3 crédits) 

FTRA 682 Tutorat en traduction (F) (3 crédits) 

FTRA 683 Tutorial in translation (A) (3 crédits) 

FTRA 684 Tutorat en linguistique (F) (3 crédits) 

FTRA 685 Tutorial in linguistics (A) (3 crédits) 

FTRA 698 Etude d’un sujet particulier / Special Topics (3 crédits) 


Autres exigences (30 cr.) 


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FTRA 686 Projet de mémoire (6 crédits) 


FTRA 692 Mémoire (24 crédits) 


Nota : Les étudiantes et les étudiants admis en maitrise peuvent béneficier d’une aide financiére 
pendant la durée de leurs études, sous la forme d’assistanats de recherche ou d’enseignement. Ces 
aides varient selon les années et les étudiantes et étudiants intéressés doivent se faire connaitre 


aupres de la direction du programme une fois admis. 


Cours et séminaires 


FTRA 600 Meéthodologie générale de la recherche en traduction (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 500. 

Ce séminaire examine les principales méthodes et approches appliquées a |’étude de la 

traduction. Il trace l’6mergence de la discipline autonome de la traductologie ainsi que ses liens 
actuels avec d’autres sciences humaines et sociales. A l’issue du séminaire, I’6tudiante ou 

l’étudiant a une vue d’ensemble de la théorisation en traduction, ce qui lui permet de se spécialiser 
en connaissance de cause dans un domaine spécifique, en élaborant une problématique particuliére 
cohérente avec les visées du programme et en empruntant les outils de recherche pertinents. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 500 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


Cours. 


FTRA 601 Courants contemporains en traductologie (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 539. 

Ce séminaire aborde les tendances qui marquent I’actualité de la recherche en traductologie. Sont 
explorées les nouvelles pratiques de la traduction et Il’évolution des cadres conceptuels qui 
permettent de penser le transfert linguistique et culturel. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 539 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


cours. 


FTRA 602 Histoire générale de la traduction (3 crédits) 

Ce séminaire est une introduction a I’histoire générale de la traduction, notamment (mais non 
exclusivement) en Occident, ainsi qu’a l’évolution des approches historiographiques. Une vue en 
coupe est présentée a travers des thematiques permettant de dégager le rdle historique joué par les 
traducteurs comme acteurs sociaux proches des pouvoirs en place ou critiques de ces pouvoirs. 
L’accent est mis sur la créativité des traducteurs a certaines €poques clés de contacts entre des 
cultures. Le séminaire peut aborder certains domaines précis de la traduction et des travaux menés 


a des périodes historiques et dans des aires géographiques données. 


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FTRA 603 Contextes socio-politiques de la traduction (3 crédits) 


Co-listé : FTRA 553. 

Ce séminaire examine les situations sociales et politiques qui influent sur le travail 

pratique des traducteurs et la réception des traductions. Sont étudiés, par exemple,le cas des Etats 
bilingues ou multilingues, l'évolution des politiques linguistiques et leurs repercussions sur la 
traduction, les rapports entre les langues majoritaires et minoritaires, les effets de la migration sur 
les sociétés de plus en plus hybrides et les marchés nouveaux de la traduction. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 553 ou FTRA 550 ne peuvent obtenir de 


crédits pour ce cours. 


FTRA 610 Lecture critique de traductions (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 540. 

Ce séminaire propose une étude critique des traductions de l'anglais au frangais et du frangais a 
l'anglais effectuées a travers l'histoire, en tenant compte de la diversité des visées esthétiques, des 
différentes strategies de traduction, ainsi que des contraintes socio-politiques ou institutionnelles. 
L’accent est mis sur l'étude des « grandes traductions » dans les cultures d’expression anglaise et 
frangaise. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 540 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


Cours. 


FTRA 611 Terminologie et mondialisation (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 534. 

Préalable : FTRA 533. Le cours porte sur certains points fins en terminologie et en terminographie 
modernes : synonymie, marques sociolinguistiques, néonymie, normalisation et internationalisation. 
ll traite spécifiquement du réle de la terminologie dans la gestion de l'information unilingue et 
multi-lingue dans les entreprises et dans les organismes nationaux et internationaux. L’aspect 
pratique prend, entre autres, la forme de rédaction de rapports de recherche et I’utilisation d’outils 
terminotiques. (F/A) 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 534 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


cours. 


FTRA 612 Traduction avancée en sciences humaines et sociales (F) (3 crédits) 

FTRA 613 Advanced translation in social sciences and the humanities (A) (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 542 ou 543. 

Ce séminaire pratique et théorique aborde plusieurs domaines des sciences humaines et sociales, 
notamment la sociologie, la psychanalyse, la théorie féministe. L’étudiante ou |’étudiant produit un 


commentaire analytique sur ses choix de traduction en s’efforgant de théoriser sa pratique de 


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traducteur-traductrice. Le séminaire FTRA 612 a l’anglais comme langue de départ et le francais 


comme langue d’arrivée (F); le seminaire FTRA 613 a le frangais comme langue de départ et 
l'anglais comme langue d’arrivée. (A) 
N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 542 ou FTRA 543 ne peuvent obtenir de 


crédits pour ce cours. 


FTRA 614 Traduction littéraire avancée (F) (3 crédits) 

FTRA 615 Advanced literary translation (A) (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 544 ou 545. 

Ce séminaire pratique et théorique analyse, a partir de theories littéraires contemporaines, un 
échantillon de textes a traduire. L’étudiante ou I’étudiant produit un commentaire analytique sur ses 
choix de traduction en s’efforgant de théoriser sa pratique de traducteur-traductrice. Le séminaire 
FTRA 614 a l'anglais comme langue de départ et le frangais comme langue d’arrivée (F), le 
séminaire FTRA 615 a le francais comme langue de départ et l'anglais comme langue d’arrivée. (A) 
N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 544 ou FTRA 545 ne peuvent obtenir de 


crédits pour ce cours. 


FTRA 622 Littérature, langue, traduction (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FLIT 622. 

Le séminaire avancée de littérature, langue et traduction vise a parfaire les connaissances de 
l’étudiante et de |’étudiant dans un domaine littéraire, traductologique ou linguistique spécifique 
envisagé sous un angle théorique, historique ou social. Pour animer ce séminaire, il sera fait appel 
aux professeurs du département en fonction de leur spécialité. Le sujet particulier du séminaire sera 
annoncé chaque fois que le séminaire sera donné. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 616, FLIT 616 ou FLIT 622 ne peuvent obtenir 


de crédits pour ce cours. 


FTRA 623 Traduction scientifique et technique du frangais a l’anglais (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 513. 

Initiation aux differents problemes de la traduction dans les langues de spécialité scientifiques et 
techniques (frangais-anglais). Le cours est divisé en deux ou trois parties, chaque partie 
correspondant a un domaine spécialisé en traduction (A). 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 513 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


Cours. 


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FTRA 624 Traduction scientifique et technique de Il’anglais au frangais (3 crédits) 


Co-listé : FTRA 514. 

Initiation aux differents problemes de la traduction dans les langues de spécialité scientifiques et 
techniques (anglais-frangais). Le cours est divisé en deux ou trois parties, chaque partie 
correspondant a un domaine spécialisé en traduction (F). 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 514 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


Cours. 


FTRA 625 Traduction commerciale et juridique du frangais a I’anglais (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 515. 

Initiation aux differents problemes de la traduction dans les langues de spécialité de l’'administration, 
du commerce et du droit (frangais-anglais). Le cours est divisé en parties, chaque partie 
correspondant a un domaine spécialisé en traduction (A). 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 515 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


cours. 


FTRA 626 Traduction commerciale et juridique de l’anglais au frangais (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 516. 

Initiation aux differents problemes de la traduction dans les langues de spécialité de l’'administration, 
du commerce et du droit (anglais-frangais). Le cours est divisé en parties, chaque partie 
correspondant a un domaine spécialisé (F). 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 516 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


Cours. 


FTRA 629 Révision et correction en traduction (A) (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 529. 

Ce cours aborde les différentes méthodes de révision et de correction de textes rédigés ou traduits 
en anglais; il sensibilise les étudiantes et étudiants aux aspects humains et techniques du métier de 
réviseure et de réviseur; on touche aussi aux problemes de |’évaluation de la qualité des traductions 
(A). 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 529 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


Cours. 


FTRA 630 Révision et correction en traduction (F) (3 crédits) 
Co-listé : FTRA 530. 
Ce cours aborde les différentes méthodes de révision et de correction de textes rédigés ou traduits 


en francais; il sensibilise les étudiantes et étudiants aux aspects humains et techniques du métier de 


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réviseure et de réviseur; on touche aussi aux problemes de |’évaluation de la qualité des traductions 


(F). 
N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 530 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


cours. 


FTRA 631 Initiation a la traduction générale (A) (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 531. 

Ce cours vise a initier les étudiantes et étudiants aux outils notionnels et linguistiques nécessaires 
pour traduire efficacement des textes d’ordre général. Il leur presente aussi les tapes du processus 
de la traduction et les familiarise avec les outils de travail de la traduction. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 531 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


Cours. 


FTRA 632 Initiation a la traduction générale (F) (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 532. 

Ce cours vise a initier les étudiantes et étudiants aux outils notionnels et linguistiques nécessaires 
pour traduire efficacement des textes d’ordre général. Il leur presente aussi les tapes du processus 
de la traduction et les familiarise avec les outils de travail de la traduction. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 532 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


Cours. 


FTRA 633 Aspects théoriques et pratiques de la terminologie (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 533. 

Principes généraux de la terminologie; distinction entre langue générale et langues de spécialité; 
rapport entre documentation et terminologie; analyse terminologique; terminologie de traduction; 
supports terminographiques traditionnels et/ou informatisés; terminologie et aménagement 
linguistique. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 533 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


cours. 


FTRA 634 Traduction littéraire de l’anglais au frangais (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 504. 

Sensibilisation aux problemes spécifiques a la traduction littéraire. Travaux pratiques : traduction de 
textes de genres variés (F). 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 504 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


Cours. 


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FTRA 635 Traduction litteraire du frangais a l’anglais (3 crédits) 


Co-listé : FTRA 501. 

Sensibilisation aux problemes spécifiques a la traduction littéraire. Travaux pratiques : traduction de 
textes de genres variés (A). 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 501 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


cours. 


FTRA 636 Informatique et traduction (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 536. 

Ce cours porte sur la langue de |’informatique, la théorie et les concepts fondamentaux qui s’y 
rapportent. Il comporte des exercices de traduction et une initiation aux outils informatisés pour les 
traducteurs : Internet, bases de données, systémes de traduction assistée,utilitaires. (F/A) 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 536 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


Cours. 


FTRA 638 Initiation au sous-titrage (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 538. 

Ce cours a pour but d’initier les étudiantes et étudiants a la traduction audiovisuelle, en particulier au 
sous-titrage. Il comporte un volet théorique, avec lectures et analyses, ainsi qu’un volet pratique ou 
sont traités les principes et les conventions du sous-titrage, les aspects techniques et les genres 
cinématographiques. Sont aussi abordées la traduction de la voix hors-champ et les techniques 


d’accessibilité tels le sous-titrage pour malentendants et l’audiodescription. 


FTRA 647 Traduction économique du frangais a l’anglais (A) (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 547. 

Sensibilisation aux problemes que pose dans le domaine de I’économie la traduction du frangais a 
l'anglais. (A) 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 547 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


cours. 


FTRA 648 Traduction économique de |’anglais au frangais (F) (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 548. 

Sensibilisation aux problemes que pose dans le domaine de I’économie la traduction de l’anglais au 
frangais. (F) 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 548 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


Cours. 


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FTRA 652 Traduction assistée par ordinateur (TAO) et post édition (3 crédits) 


Co-listé : FTRA 552. 

Préalable : FTRA 536 pour le dipl6me en traduction. 

Ce cours permet d’analyser les aspects morphologiques, lexicaux, syntaxiques et semantiques des 
systemes de traduction automatisée. L’étudiante et I’étudiant apprennent a appliquer les concepts 
analysés a un systeme commercialisé. Ils font des exercices simples de programmation portant sur 
des problémes linguistiques; ils utilisent des outils de gestion et de traduction pour le materiel a 
localiser a l’aide de logiciels de localisation, de logiciels de terminologie et de mémoires de 
traduction. Ils eévaluent et apprennent a réviser les sorties d'un systeme de traduction automatique, 
tout en mettant l'accent sur le contrdéle de la qualité. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 552 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


cours. 


FTRA 655 Gestion de projets (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 555. 

Ce cours traite de la gestion des projets de traduction/localisation multilingues, depuis la création de 
offre de services, jusqu’au contréle de la qualité et de la livraison, en passant par la résolution de 
problemes et la gestion en situation de crise. Il comprend une partie théorique et des mises en 
situation. Les étudiantes et étudiants se familiarisent avec l’évaluation des ressources (humaines et 
mateérielles) nécessaires pour exécuter le travail, |'élaboration d’échéanciers et le suivi du budget. Ils 
apprennent a gérer les ressources affectées aux projets afin de pouvoir respecter le mandat qui leur 
est confié. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 555 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


cours. 


FTRA 658 Pratique de la localisation (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 558. 

L’étudiante et I’étudiant apprennent dans ce cours les stratégies de localisation et les processus de 
localisation; la localisation de logiciels et de localisation de sites Web; les acteurs dans les projets 
de localisation; la situation et le travail du traducteur dans les projets de localisation; les types de 
fichiers a localiser : ressources, code source, fichiers d’aide, guides imprimés, matériel marketing; 
les types de logiciels localisés : logiciels systeme, logiciels de gestion, logiciels client, logiciels 
multimédia, logiciels Web. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 558 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


Cours. 


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FTRA 668 Web, technologies, traduction : théories et critiques (3 crédits) 


Co-listé : FTRA 568. 

Ce séminaire examine de fac¢on critique les pratiques contemporaines issues de la mondialisation et 
du monde numérique affectant les technologies, le Web multilingue et la traduction. Entre autres 
aspects, sont examinés les enjeux culturels, sociaux, techniques et idéologiques. Le séminaire 

met l'accent sur la traduction et la communication mondiale. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 568 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


cours. 


FTRA 680 Tutorat en littérature (F) (3 crédits) 
FTRA 681 Tutorial in literature (A) (3 crédits) 
FTRA 682 Tutorat en traduction (F) (3 crédits) 
FTRA 683 Tutorial in translation (A) (3 crédits) 
FTRA 684 Tutorat en linguistique (F) (3 crédits) 
FTRA 685 Tutorial in linguistics (A) (3 crédits) 


FTRA 698 Etude d’un sujet particulier / Special Topics (3 crédits) 
Ce cours pourra porter sur tout sujet en littérature, traduction ou linguistique qui ne figure pas déja 
au programme. Le but du cours est de favoriser une approche pluridisciplinaire et de permettre 


l'innovation pédagogique. 
Autres exigences 
FTRA 686 Projet de mémoire (6 crédits) 


FTRA 692 Mémoire (24 crédits) 

L’étudiante ou I’étudiant pourra choisir d’étudier un sujet particulier en littérature, traduction ou 
linguistique, sous la forme d’un tutorat. Les tutorats devront étre approuveés par le comite d’études 
supérieures et dépendront des aptitudes et intéréts de |’étudiante et de |’étudiant ainsi que de la 


disponibilité et des compétences du professeur concerné. 


Nota : Les étudiantes et étudiants admis avant 2002-2003 et qui ont préféré rester dans |l’ancien 
programme peuvent suivre FTRA 690 (21 crédits) a condition d’avoir satisfait aux exigences de 


l'ancien programme. 


© Concordia University 


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221 


Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/ftra-dip.html 
e e A 
Traduction, dipl6me 


Conditions générales d'admission 


Baccalauréat ou dipl6me equivalent dans un domaine autre que la traduction. Dans tous les cas, la 
moyenne générale obtenue sera d'au moins 2,7 (sur 4,3). La sélection des candidatures est 
effectuée sur la base des documents suivants : un examen écrit, trois lettres de recommandation, le 


dossier universitaire, une lettre de présentation et, au besoin, une entrevue. 


Rendement académique 


Voir la section Academic Standing de I'Annuaire pour la Réglementation universitaire. 

Toute note inférieure a C constitue un echec. Obtenir deux C constitue également un échec. Le 
comité d’études supérieures du département revoit le dossier de chaque étudiante et de chaque 
étudiant tous les ans et peut exiger que ceux et celles dont les résultats ne satisfont pas aux normes 


du département (moyenne générale de 2,7 sur 4,3) se retirent du programme. 


Durée des études 


Les 33 crédits du programme peuvent étre effectués en une année (3 sessions) ou a temps partiel. 
Pour étre admissible a un stage de formation, I’étudiante ou |’étudiant doit avoir suivi 12 crédits en 
traduction pragmatique, 3 crédits en terminologie et avoir obtenu une moyenne générale cumulative 


d’au moins 3,3 soit Bt. 


Exigences du programme 


Toute étudiante ou tout étudiant doit obtenir 33 crédits. 
Cours 
1. Cours obligatoires (18 crédits) 


FTRA 501 Traduction littéraire du frangais a l’anglais (3 crédits) 
ou 


FTRA 504 Traduction littéraire de l’anglais au frangais (3 crédits) 


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222 
FTRA 532 Initiation a la traduction générale (F) (3 crédits) 


FTRA 533 Aspects théoriques et pratiques de la terminologie (3 crédits) 


FTRA 536 Informatique et traduction (3 crédits) 


FTRA 500 Méthodologie générale de la recherche en traduction (3 crédits) 
ou 

FTRA 539 Courants contemporains en traductologie (3 crédits) 

ou 

FTRA 540 Lecture critique de traductions (3 crédits) 

ou 

FTRA 549 Sociologie de la traduction littéraire (3 crédits) 


FTRA 529 Révision et correction en traduction (A) (3 crédits) 
ou 


FTRA 530 Révision et correction en traduction (F) (3 crédits) 


. Cours en option (15 crédits) 


15 crédits choisis parmi les cours suivants : 


FRAA 523 Rédaction Il (3 crédits) 

FTRA 513 Traduction scientifique et technique du frangais a Il’anglais (3 crédits) 
FTRA 514 Traduction scientifique et technique de Il’anglais au frangais (3 crédits) 
FTRA 515 Traduction commerciale et juridique du frangais a l’anglais (3 crédits) 
FTRA 516 Traduction commerciale et juridique de l’anglais au frangais(3 crédits) 
FTRA 517 Stage de formation du frangais a l’anglais | (A) (3 crédits) 

FTRA 519 Stage de formation du frangais a l’anglais Il (A) (3 crédits) 

FTRA 520 Stage de formation (F) (6 crédits) 

FTRA 521 Stage de formation (A) (6 crédits) 

FTRA 522 Stage de formation de Il’anglais au frangais | (F) (3 crédits) 

FTRA 526 Stage de formation de Il’anglais au frangais Il (F) (3 crédits) 

FTRA 527 Travaux dirigés (A) (3 crédits) 

FTRA 528 Travaux dirigés (F) (3 crédits) 


FTRA 534 Terminologie et mondialisation (3 crédits) 


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FTRA 538 Initiation au sous-titrage (3 crédits) 


FTRA 542 Traduction avancée en sciences humaines et sociales (F) (3 crédits) 
FTRA 543 Advanced Translation in Social Sciences and the Humanities (A) (3 crédits) 
FTRA 544 Traduction littéraire avancée (F) (3 crédits) 

FTRA 545 Advanced Literary Translation (A) (3 crédits) 

FTRA 547 Traduction économique du frangais a l’anglais(A) (3 crédits) 

FTRA 548 Traduction économique de I’anglais au frangais (F) (3 crédits) 

FTRA 552 Traduction assistée par ordinateur (TAO) et post édition (3 crédits) 
FTRA 553 Contextes socio-politiques de la traduction (3 crédits) 

FTRA 555 Gestion de projets (3 crédits) 

FTRA 558 Pratique de la localisation (3 crédits) 

FRAA 598 Etude avancée d’un sujet particulier (3 crédits) 

FTRA 598 Etude avancée d’un sujet particulier (3 crédits) 


Liste des cours 


FRAA 523 Redaction Il (3 crédits) 

Ce cours vise l’approfondissement des compétences rédactionnelles par l’'apprentissage de 
techniques de recherche documentaire et de synthese textuelle, et par I’écriture de textes combinant 
ces techniques comme le compte rendu critique, le dossier ou le texte de vulgarisation. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FRAN 503 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


cours. 


FTRA 500 Méthodologie générale de la recherche en traduction (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 600. 

Ce séminaire examine les principales méthodes et approches appliquées a |’étude de la 

traduction. Il trace l’6mergence de la discipline autonome de la traductologie ainsi que ses liens 
actuels avec d’autres sciences humaines et sociales. A l’issue du séminaire, I’6tudiante ou 

l’étudiant a une vue d’ensemble de la théorisation en traduction, ce qui lui permet de se spécialiser 
en connaissance de cause dans un domaine spécifique, en élaborant une problématique particuliére 
cohérente avec les visées du programme et en empruntant les outils de recherche pertinents. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 600 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


Cours. 


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FTRA 501 Traduction litteraire du frangais a l’anglais (3 crédits) 


Co-listé : FTRA 635. 

Sensibilisation aux problemes spécifiques a la traduction littéraire. Travaux pratiques : traduction de 
textes de genres variés (A). 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 635 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


cours. 


FTRA 504 Traduction littéraire de l’anglais au frangais (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 634. 

Sensibilisation aux problemes spécifiques a la traduction littéraire. Travaux pratiques : traduction de 
textes de genres variés (F). 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 634 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


Cours. 


FTRA 513 Traduction scientifique et technique du frangais a l’anglais (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 623. 

Initiation aux differents problemes de la traduction dans les langues de spécialité scientifiques et 
techniques (frangais-anglais). Le cours est divisé en deux ou trois parties, chaque partie 
correspondant a un domaine spécialisé en traduction (A). 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 623 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


Cours. 


FTRA 514 Traduction scientifique et technique de Il’anglais au frangais (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 624. 

Initiation aux differents problemes de la traduction dans les langues de spécialité scientifiques et 
techniques (anglais-frangais). Le cours est divisé en deux ou trois parties, chaque partie 
correspondant a un domaine spécialisé en traduction (F). 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 624 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


cours. 


FTRA 515 Traduction commerciale et juridique du frangais a l’anglais (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 625. 

Initiation aux differents problemes de la traduction dans les langues de spécialité de |’administration, 
du commerce et du droit (frangais-anglais). Le cours est divisé en parties, chaque partie 
correspondant a un domaine spécialisé en traduction (A). 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 625 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


cours. 


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FTRA 516 Traduction commerciale et juridique de l’anglais au frangais (3 crédits) 


Co-listé : FTRA 626. 

Initiation aux differents problemes de la traduction dans les langues de spécialité de l’'administration, 
du commerce et du droit (anglais-frangais). Le cours est divisé en parties, chaque partie 
correspondant a un domaine spécialisé (F). 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 626 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


Cours. 


FTRA 517 Stage de formation du frangais a Il’anglais | (A) (3 crédits) 
FTRA 519 Stage de formation du frangais a I|’anglais II (A) (3 crédits) 
FTRA 520 Stage de formation (F) (6 crédits) 

FTRA 521 Stage de formation (A) (6 crédits) 

FTRA 522 Stage de formation de Il’anglais au frangais | (F) (3 crédits) 
FTRA 526 Stage de formation de Il’anglais au frangais Il (F) (3 crédits) 
FTRA 527 Travaux dirigés (A) (3 crédits) 

FTRA 528 Travaux dirigés (F) (3 crédits) 


FTRA 529 Révision et correction en traduction (A) (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 629. 

Ce cours aborde les différentes méthodes de révision et de correction de textes rédigés ou traduits 
en anglais; il sensibilise les étudiantes et étudiants aux aspects humains et techniques du métier de 
réviseure et de réviseur; on touche aussi aux problemes de |’évaluation de la qualité des traductions 
(A). 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 629 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


Cours. 


FTRA 530 Révision et correction en traduction (F) (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 630. 

Ce cours aborde les différentes méthodes de révision et de correction de textes rédigés ou traduits 
en francais; il sensibilise les etudiantes et étudiants aux aspects humains et techniques du métier de 
réviseure et de réviseur; on touche aussi aux problemes de |’évaluation de la qualité des traductions 
(F). 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 630 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


Cours. 


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FTRA 531 Initiation a la traduction générale (A) (3 crédits) 


Co-listé : FTRA 631. 

Ce cours vise a initier les étudiantes et étudiants aux outils notionnels et linguistiques nécessaires 
pour traduire efficacement des textes d’ordre général. Il leur presente aussi les tapes du processus 
de la traduction et les familiarise avec les outils de travail de la traduction. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 631 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


Cours. 


FTRA 532 Initiation a la traduction générale (F) (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 632. 

Ce cours vise a initier les étudiantes et étudiants aux outils notionnels et linguistiques nécessaires 
pour traduire efficacement des textes d’ordre général. Il leur presente aussi les tapes du processus 
de la traduction et les familiarise avec les outils de travail de la traduction. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 632 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


cours. 


FTRA 533 Aspects théoriques et pratiques de la terminologie (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 633. 

Principes généraux de la terminologie; distinction entre langue générale et langues de spécialité; 
rapport entre documentation et terminologie; analyse terminologique; terminologie de traduction; 
supports terminographiques traditionnels et/ou informatisés; terminologie et aménagement 
linguistique. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 633 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


Cours. 


FTRA 534 Terminologie et mondialisation (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 611. 

Préalable : FTRA 533 ou |’équivalent. 

Ce cours porte sur certains points fins en terminologie et en terminographie modernes : synonymie, 
marques sociolinguistiques, néonymie, normalisation et internationalisation. Il traite spécifiquement 
du rdle de la terminologie dans la gestion de |’information unilingue et multilingue dans les 
entreprises et dans les organismes nationaux et internationaux. L’aspect pratique prend, entre 
autres, la forme de rédaction de rapports de recherche et l'utilisation d’outils terminotiques. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 611 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


Cours. 


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FTRA 536 Informatique et traduction (3 crédits) 


Co-listé : FTRA 636. 

Ce cours porte sur la langue de |’informatique, la théorie et les concepts fondamentaux qui s’y 
rapportent. Il comporte des exercices de traduction et une initiation aux outils informatisés pour les 
traducteurs : Internet, bases de données, systémes de traduction assistée, utilitaires. (F/A) 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 636 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


Cours. 


FTRA 538 Initiation au sous-titrage (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 638. 

Ce cours a pour but d’initier les étudiantes et étudiants a la traduction audiovisuelle, en particulier au 
sous-titrage. Il comporte un volet théorique, avec lectures et analyses, ainsi qu’un volet pratique ou 
sont traités les principes et les conventions du sous-titrage, les aspects techniques et les genres 
cinématographiques. Sont aussi abordées la traduction de la voix hors-champ et les techniques 
d’accessibilité tels le sous-titrage pour malentendants et l’audiodescription. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 638 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


cours. 


FTRA 539 Courants contemporains en traductologie (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 601. 

Ce séminaire aborde les tendances qui marquent I’actualité de la recherche en traductologie. Sont 
explorées les nouvelles pratiques de la traduction et I’évolution des cadres conceptuels qui 
permettent de penser le transfert linguistique et culturel. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 601 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


Cours. 


FTRA 540 Lecture critique de traductions (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 610. 

Ce séminaire propose une étude critique des traductions de l'anglais au frangais et du frangais a 
l'anglais effectuées a travers l'histoire, en tenant compte de la diversité des visées esthétiques, des 
différentes strategies de traduction, ainsi que des contraintes socio-politiques ou institutionnelles. 
L’accent est mis sur l'étude des « grandes traductions » dans les cultures d’expression anglaise et 
frangaise. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 610 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


cours. 


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FTRA 542 Traduction avancée en sciences humaines et sociales (F) (3 crédits) 


FTRA 543 Advanced Translation in Social Sciences and the Humanities (A) (3 crédits) 
Co-listé : FTRA 612 ou FTRA 613. 

Ce séminaire pratique et théorique aborde plusieurs domaines des sciences humaines et sociales, 
notamment la sociologie, la psychanalyse, la théorie féministe. L’étudiante ou |’étudiant produit un 
commentaire analytique sur ses choix de traduction en s’efforgant de théoriser sa pratique de 
traducteur-traductrice. Le séminaire FTRA 542 a l’anglais comme langue de départ et le francais 
comme langue d’arrivée (F); le seminaire FTRA 543 a le frangais comme langue de départ et 
l'anglais comme langue d’arrivée (A). 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 612 ou FTRA 613 ne peuvent obtenir de 


crédits pour ce cours. 


FTRA 544 Traduction littéraire avancée (F) (3 crédits) 

FTRA 545 Advanced Literary Translation (A) (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 614 ou FTRA 615. 

Ce séminaire pratique et théorique analyse, a partir de theories littéraires, contemporaines, un 
échantillon de textes a traduire. L’étudiante ou I’étudiant produit un commentaire analytique sur ses 
choix de traduction en s’efforgant de théoriser sa pratique de traducteur-traductrice. Le séminaire 
FTRA 544 a l’anglais comme langue de départ et le frangais comme langue d’arrivée (F); le 
séminaire FTRA 545 a le frangais comme langue de départ et l’anglais comme langue d’arrivée. (A) 
N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 614 ou FTRA 615 ne peuvent obtenir de 


crédits pour ce cours. 


FTRA 547 Traduction économique du frangais a l’anglais (A) (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 647. 

Sensibilisation aux problemes que pose dans le domaine de I’économie la traduction du frangais a 
l'anglais. (A) 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 647 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


cours. 


FTRA 548 Traduction économique de |’anglais au frangais (F) (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 648. 

Sensibilisation aux problemes que pose dans le domaine de I’économie la traduction de l’anglais au 
frangais. (F) 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 648 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


cours. 


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FTRA 549 Sociologie de la traduction littéraire (3 crédits) 


Ce séminaire applique la méthode sociologique a la traduction des genres et des discours de la 
littérature. Peuvent étre éetudiés des corpus divers (roman, poésie, theatre, par exemple) traduits de 
l'anglais en frangais et du frangais en anglais. Seront examinées, par exemple, les théories de 
Pierre Bourdieu, de Niklas Lunhmann ou de Bruno Latour. Le séminaire est l'occasion d’une remise 
en question des notions de source et de cible en traduction. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 541, FTRA 611 ou FTRA 619 ne peuvent 


obtenir de crédits pour ce cours. 


FTRA 552 Traduction assistée par ordinateur (TAO) et post édition (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 652. 

Préalable : FTRA 536 pour le dipl6me en traduction. 

Ce cours permet d’analyser les aspects morphologiques, lexicaux, syntaxiques et semantiques des 
systemes de traduction automatisée. L’étudiante et I’étudiant apprennent a appliquer les concepts 
analysés a un systeme commercialisé. Ils font des exercices simples de programmation portant sur 
des problémes linguistiques; ils utilisent des outils de gestion et de traduction pour le materiel a 
localiser a l’aide de logiciels de localisation, de logiciels de terminologie et de mémoires de 
traduction. Ils evaluent et apprennent a réviser les sorties d'un systeme de traduction automatique, 
tout en mettant l'accent sur le contrdéle de la qualité. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 652 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


Cours. 


FTRA 553 Contextes socio-politiques de la traduction (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 603. 

Ce séminaire examine les situations sociales et politiques qui influent sur le travail 

pratique des traducteurs et la réception des traductions. Sont étudiés, par exemple, le cas des Etats 
bilingues ou multilingues, l'eévolution des politiques linguistiques et leurs repercussions sur la 
traduction, les rapports entre les langues majoritaires et minoritaires, les effets de la migration sur 
les sociétés de plus en plus hybrides et les marchés nouveaux de la traduction. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 550 ou FTRA 603 ne peuvent obtenir de 


crédits pour ce cours. 


FTRA 555 Gestion de projets (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 655. 

Ce cours traite de la gestion des projets de traduction/localisation multilingues, depuis la création de 
loffre de services, jusqu’au contréle de la qualité et de la livraison, en passant par la résolution de 


problemes et la gestion en situation de crise. Il comprend une partie théorique et des mises en 


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230 
situation. Les étudiantes et étudiants se familiarisent avec l’évaluation des ressources (humaines et 


matérielles) nécessaires pour exécuter le travail, |'élaboration d’échéanciers et le suivi du budget. Ils 
apprennent a gérer les ressources affectées aux projets afin de pouvoir respecter le mandat qui leur 
est confié. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 655 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


Cours. 


FTRA 558 Pratique de la localisation (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 658. 

L’étudiante et I’étudiant apprennent dans ce cours les stratégies de localisation et les processus de 
localisation; la localisation de logiciels et la localisation de sites Web; les acteurs dans les projets de 
localisation; la situation et le travail du traducteur dans les projets de localisation; les types de 
fichiers a localiser : ressources, code source, fichiers d’aide, guides imprimés, matériel marketing; 
les types de logiciels localisés : logiciels systeme, logiciels de gestion, logiciels clients, logiciels 
multimédia, logiciels Web. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 658 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


cours. 
FTRA 559 Stage en gestion de projet (6 crédits) 

FTRA 560 Stage en gestion de projet | (3 crédits) 
FTRA 561 Stage en gestion de projet Il (3 crédits) 


FRAA 598 Etude avancée d’un sujet particulier (3 crédits) 
N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi un sujet particulier en FRAN 598 ne peuvent obtenir 
de crédits pour le méme sujet en FRAA 598. 


FTRA 598 Etude avancée d’un sujet particulier (3 crédits) 


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http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/fraa-cert.html 


Microprogramme en didactique et linguistique pour 
l'enseignement du frangais langue seconde, certificat 


Conditions générales d'admission 
Les résidents du Québec, les étudiants canadiens et les étudiants internationaux qui: 


1. possédent un baccalauréat en éducation, avec une moyenne générale de 3,00 (sur 4,3), et 
souhaitent obtenir une formation en enseignement du FLS soit pour perfectionner leur pratique, 


soit pour entreprendre une réflexion théorique ; ou 


2. possédent un baccalauréat dans un autre domaine (linguistique, littérature, traduction, études 
frangaises ou autres), avec une moyenne générale de 3,00 (sur 4,3), et cherchent soit une 
formation spécialisée menant au marché du travail, soit une formation plus théorique menant au 


programme de maitrise. 


Lors de la soumission du formulaire de demande d'admission de l'Université Concordia, le candidat 
doit : 


« déposer les relevés de notes officiels des universités fréequentées ; 
¢« soumettre son curriculum vitae et une lettre d'intention ; 


e posséder une excellente connaissance du francais et une maitrise suffisante de l'anglais. II est 
possible qu'un test de frangais soit administré aux étudiants ayant effectué leurs études dans 
une université non francophone. Les demandes sont examinées par le directeur du programme, 
et les candidats sélectionnés peuvent étre interviewés avant qu'ils ne soient officiellement 


acceptés. 


Détenir un baccalauréat ne donne pas automatiquement droit a l'admission. Chaque demande est 


étudiée individuellement par le Comité des études de 2e cycle du Département. 


Exigences du programme 


Un candidat qualifié est tenu de compléter un minimum de 15 crédits, y compris un stage 


d'observation. 


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232 


Durée des études 


La durée des études pour les étudiants a temps plein est de deux sessions débutant a l'automne. Pour les étudiants a 
temps partiel, le maximum est de quatre sessions débutant a l'automne. 


Rendement académique 


Voir la section Academic Standing de I'Annuaire pour la Réglementation universitaire. 


Cours 


FRAA 500 Didactique du frangais langue étrangére et seconde 

FRAA 501 Théories linguistiques pour l'apprentissage et l’enseignement des langues 
FRAA 502 Technologies de l'information et de la communication (TIC) et enseignement du 
FLS 

FRAA 510 Stage d'observation 


FRAA 522 Questions actuelles en linguistique frangaise 


L’étudiant peut, avec une permission spéciale du directeur du programme et du Département 
d’éducation, remplacer un cours du microprogramme par un cours du programme de maitrise 
en Applied Linguistics du Département d’éducation, soit FRAA 522 par APLI 610 (Teaching and 
Learning Second Language Vocabulary), soit FRAA 502 par APLI 644 (Technology in Language 


Learning). 


Nota : Le microprogramme ne donne pas accés a une autorisation d’enseigner au Québec. En 
revanche, il permettra aux étudiants de compléter leur champ de compétence par une formation a 


portée didactique. 
Liste des cours 


FRAA 500 Didactique du frangais langue étrangére et seconde (3 crédits) 

Ce séminaire vise a présenter les principaux courants en didactique du frangais langue étrangére et 
seconde et leurs fondements théoriques. En se basant sur les théories de l’apprentissage, les 
étudiants analysent en profondeur chacun des principaux courants didactiques en apprenant a 
discerner ce qui les différencie, les rapproche ou les oppose. Ce séminaire leur offre les outils 
nécessaires pour faire un choix didactique éclairé en fonction de l'apprentissage visé. lls y ont 
l'occasion d’animer un atelier de conversation aupres d’apprenants allophones pour pouvoir faire 
des liens entre leurs nouveaux acquis et la réalité de l’enseignement-apprentissage, et ce, sous la 


supervision d’un professeur. 


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233 
FRAA 501 Théories linguistiques pour l'apprentissage et l’enseignement des langues (3 


crédits) 

Ce séminaire améne les étudiants a faire le lien entre les théories linguistiques et les applications a 
l'enseignement et a l’apprentissage du frangais langue seconde. II permet aux étudiants de jeter un 
regard critique sur les principaux courants en linguistique appliquée a l’enseignement des langues et 
de se sensibiliser a des questions fondamentales qui se posent du point de vue de l’enseignant et 


de l’apprenant respectivement. 


FRAA 502 Technologies de l'information et de la communication (TIC) et enseignement du 
FLS (3 crédits) 

Ce séminaire vise a transmettre aux étudiants l'ensemble des compétences nécessaires a la 
réalisation de ressources interactives tirant pleinement profit des potentialités offertes par les TIC 
(apprentissage collaboratif, multimédia, parcours d'apprentissage personnalisés, etc.). Au moyen de 
la conception de matériel pédagogique en ligne (exerciciels, plateformes de formation ouverte et a 
distance), les étudiants voient comment optimiser l'apport des TIC a l'acquisition de la langue cible 
ou a l'évaluation des acquis; intégrer les fondements théoriques et pratiques acquis dans les autres 
séminaires et repondre pleinement aux besoins des apprenants (que ces besoins soient formatifs ou 
sommatifs) tout en évitant les ecueils didactiques ou techniques que la réalisation de ce type de 


ressources peut comporter. 


FRAA 510 Stage d'observation (3 crédits) 

Ce cours permet aux étudiants de réaliser leur stage d'observation en enseignement du frangais 
langue seconde dans le cadre d'un cours universitaire. Au cours de ce stage, les étudiants 
analysent les moyens pédagogiques utilisés au niveau universitaire. Les stagiaires observent les 
activites d'enseignement, l'organisation et la prise en charge de la classe et ils font un retour critique 


sur leur expérience pratique a partir des observations faites dans le milieu de stage. 


FRAA 522 Questions actuelles en linguistique frangaise (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FRAA 422 

Ce cours propose |’étude d’un sujet particulier du domaine de la linguistique. Plus précisément, ce 
cours aborde des questions qui peuvent étre rattachées au domaine de |’énonciation, de la 
sociolinguistique, des politiques linguistiques, du traitement automatique du langage ou d’autres 
domaines de recherche en linguistique. Des présentations théoriques, des ateliers d’observation ou 
des exercices d’application permettent aux étudiants de mieux cerner la problématique abordée. 
N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FRAA 422 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


cours. 


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Concordia University 


http:/Awww.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/ftra-cert.html 


Technologies de la traduction, certificat 


Conditions générales d'admission 


Pour étre admis au programme, un candidat doit détenir un BA en traduction, spécialisation ou 
majeure ; un DESS en traduction ; une MA en traductologie ; un BA dans une autre discipline avec 
experience en traduction ; ou une MA dans une autre discipline avec expérience en traduction. La 


sélection des candidatures est effectuée sur la base des éléments suivants : 
- Etude du dossier 
« Lettre de présentation 


ll est aussi possible d’exiger une propédeutique a tout candidat qui n’a pas de base ou d’expérience 


en traduction. 


Rendement académique 


Voir la section Academic Standing de I'Annuaire pour la Réglementation universitaire. 


L’étudiant doit obtenir 15 crédits. Toute note inférieure a C constitue un échec. L’obtention 

de deux C peut conduire a |’expulsion du programme. 

Durée des études 

Les 15 crédits au programme peuvent étre effectués a temps plein (trois sessions) ou a temps 
partiel (neuf sessions maximum). 

Cours 


Cours obligatoires (12 crédits) 


FTRA 536 Informatique et traduction (3 crédits) 
FTRA 552 Traduction assistée par ordinateur (TAO) et post édition (3 crédits) 
FTRA 558 Pratique de la localisation (3 crédits) 


FTRA 568 Web, technologies, traduction : theories et critiques 


Cours en option (3 crédits) 


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236 
FRAA 532 Ecriture pour le web (3 crédits) 


FTRA 538 Initiation au sous-titrage (offert aux deux ans) (3 crédits) 
FTRA 555 Gestion de projets (3 crédits) 
FTRA 556 Programmation en localisation (offert aux deux ans) (3 crédits) 


FTRA 598 Etude avancée d’un sujet particulier / Special Topics (3 crédits) 
Liste des cours 


FRAA 532 Ecriture pour le Web (3 crédits) 

Préalable : Autorisation de la direction du certificat. 

Ce cours vise a familiariser l’6tudiante ou |’étudiant aux techniques d’écriture pour le Web et aux 
technologies associées a ce média. Il permettra de mieux comprendre ce que I’hypertexte et |’écrit 
sur Support numérique impliquent du point de vue du traitement de l’information et des spécificités 
linguistiques et ergonomiques. Il vise a initier l’etudiante et l’étudiant a la création et a la traduction 


de pages et de sites Web. 


FTRA 531 Initiation a la traduction générale (A) (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 631. 

Ce cours vise a initier les étudiantes et étudiants aux outils notionnels et linguistiques nécessaires 
pour traduire efficacement des textes d’ordre général. Il leur presente aussi les tapes du processus 
de la traduction et les familiarise avec les outils de travail de la traduction. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 631 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


Cours. 


FTRA 532 Initiation a la traduction générale (F) (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 632. 

Ce cours vise a initier les étudiantes et étudiants aux outils notionnels et linguistiques nécessaires 
pour traduire efficacement des textes d’ordre général. Il leur presente aussi les tapes du processus 
de la traduction et les familiarise avec les outils de travail de la traduction. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 632 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


Cours. 


FTRA 536 Informatique et traduction (3 crédits) 
Co-listé : FTRA 636. 
Ce cours porte sur la langue de |’informatique, la théorie et les concepts fondamentaux qui s’y 


rapportent. Il comporte des exercices de traduction et une initiation aux outils informatisés pour les 


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237 
traducteurs : Internet, bases de données, systémes de traduction assistée, utilitaires. (F/A) 


N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 636 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


cours. 


FTRA 538 Initiation au sous-titrage (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 638. 

Ce cours a pour but d’initier les étudiantes et étudiants a la traduction audiovisuelle, en 
particulier au sous-titrage. Il comporte un volet théorique, avec lectures et analyses, ainsi 
qu'un volet pratique ou sont traités les principes et les conventions du sous-titrage, les 

aspects techniques et les genres cinématographiques. Sont aussi abordées la traduction 

de la voix hors-champ et les techniques d’accessibilité tels le sous-titrage pour 

malentendants et l’audiodescription. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 638 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


cours. 


FTRA 552 Traduction assistée par ordinateur (TAO) et post édition (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 652. 

Préalable : FTRA 536 pour le dipl6me en traduction. 

Ce cours permet d’analyser les aspects morphologiques, lexicaux, syntaxiques et semantiques des 
systemes de traduction automatisée. L’étudiante et I’étudiant apprennent a appliquer les concepts 
analysés a un systeme commercialisé. Ils font des exercices simples de programmation portant sur 
des problémes linguistiques; ils utilisent des outils de gestion et de traduction pour le materiel a 
localiser a l’aide de logiciels de localisation, de logiciels de terminologie et de mémoires de 
traduction. Ils evaluent et apprennent a réviser les sorties d'un systeme de traduction automatique, 
tout en mettant l'accent sur le contrdéle de la qualité. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 652 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


cours. 


FTRA 555 Gestion de projets (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 655. 

Ce cours traite de la gestion des projets de traduction/localisation multilingues, depuis la création de 
loffre de services, jusqu’au contréle de la qualité et de la livraison, en passant par la résolution de 
problemes et la gestion en situation de crise. Il comprend une partie théorique et des mises en 
situation. Les étudiantes et étudiants se familiarisent avec l’évaluation des ressources (humaines et 
matérielles) nécessaires pour exécuter le travail, |'élaboration d’échéanciers et le suivi du budget. Ils 


apprennent a gérer les ressources affectées aux projets afin de pouvoir respecter le mandat qui leur 


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238 
est confié. 


N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 655 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


cours. 


FTRA 556 Programmation en localisation (3 crédits) 

Préalable : FTRA 552 ou FTRA 558. 

L’étudiante et I’étudiant se familiarisent dans ce cours avec l’environnement informatique : ils se 
familiarisent avec l’intégration et le partage des ressources d’un (et avec un) logiciel (d’une page 
Internet) et avec les restrictions liées au systeme d’exploitation; ils ont un apergu du fonctionnement 
d'un logiciel (rédaction, compilation, exécution), d’un programme informatique : variables, données, 
contrdle; d’un langage de programmation : structure, manipulation des chaines d’entrée et de sortie, 
du code « source » d’un programme informatique (ou site Internet) a localiser, des chaines (des 


messages) a traduire. 


FTRA 558 Pratique de la localisation (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 658. 

L’étudiante et l’étudiant apprennent dans ce cours les stratégies de localisation et les processus de 
localisation : la localisation de logiciels et la localisation de sites Web; les acteurs dans les projets de 
localisation; la situation et le travail du traducteur dans les projets de localisation; les types de 
fichiers a localiser : ressources, code source, fichiers d’aide, guides imprimés, matériel marketing; 
les types de logiciels localisés : logiciels systeme, logiciels de gestion, logiciels clients, logiciels 
multimédia, logiciels Web. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 658 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


cours. 


FTRA 568 Web, technologies, traduction : théories et critiques (3 crédits) 

Co-listé : FTRA 668. 

Ce séminaire examine de fag¢on critique les pratiques contemporaines issues de la mondialisation et 
du monde numérique affectant les technologies, le Web multilingue et la traduction. Entre autres 
aspects, sont examinés les enjeux culturels, sociaux, techniques et idéologiques. Le séminaire 

met l'accent sur la traduction et la communication mondiale. 

N.B. : Les étudiantes et étudiants qui ont suivi FTRA 668 ne peuvent obtenir de crédits pour ce 


Cours. 


FTRA 598 Etude avancée d’un sujet particulier / Special Topics (3 crédits) 
© Concordia University 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


239 


Concordia University 


http:/Awww.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/geog-phd.html 
Geography, Urban and Environmental Studies PhD 


Admission Requirements 


The normal requirement for admission into the PhD is a Master of Arts or a Master of Science in 
Geography, Urban Planning, Environmental Science, or a related field of study from a recognized 
university. Applicants are selected on the basis of a sound academic record, strong letters of 
recommendation, and a convincing statement of purpose which clearly describes their academic 
interest in the program and intended area of research. In addition, admission is contingent on the 


availability of an appropriate faculty member in the Department to serve as supervisor. 


Upon recommendation by full-time members of the faculty of the Department of Geography, 
Planning and Environment, students registered in the Master of Science in Geography, Urban and 
Environmental Studies at Concordia University and who have shown themselves to be outstanding 
through performance in research may apply for permission to proceed directly to doctoral studies. 
Students transferring from the MSc program will be required to complete 90 credits in addition to the 
MSc required courses HENV 605 or HENV 610 plus HENV 615. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Courses. All students must take the following: 
9 credits: HENV 801, HENV 802, HENV 805. 
6 credits in elective courses chosen from: HENV 605, HENV 610, HENV 620, HENV 625, HENV 
630, HENV 635, HENV 640, HENV 645, HENV 650, HENV 655, HENV 660, HENV 665, HENV 
670, HENV 675, HENV 680, or HENV 690. 


2. Thesis Proposal. HENV 810 (3 credits). 


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240 
3. Comprehensive exam. HENV 885 (6 credits). 


4. Research and Thesis. HENV 895 (66 credits). 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 
detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 
Program Specific Requirements. Students must obtain an assessment grade point average 
(AGPA) of 3.00 based on a minimum of 6 credits. 


2. Residence. The minimum period of residence is two years (six terms) of full-time graduate study 
beyond the master’s degree or three years (nine terms) of full-time graduate study (or the 
equivalent in part-time study) beyond the bachelor’s degree for those students who are permitted 


to enrol for doctoral studies without completing a master’s degree. 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 
Limit requirements. The expected time to completion for this program is between three and four 


years. 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 3.00. 


Courses 


Required Courses 


HENV 801 Pedagogical Training (3 credits) 

The objective of this course is to ensure that all PhD students acquire strong teaching and other 
communication skills which are useful for both academic and non-academic positions. Candidates 
are required to attend a seminar in university teaching in collaboration with the Centre for Teaching 
and Learning Services of Concordia University. Following the successful completion of this seminar, 
candidates are required to give four lectures (normally 75 minutes each) to undergraduate classes. 


The course is graded on a pass/fail basis. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


241 
HENV 802 Experiential Learning (3 credits) 


The objective of this course is to ensure that all students acquire some practical experience in their 
field of research. Candidates are required to work for a minimum of 200 hours (either full-time or 
part-time) in either the private sector in a field relevant to their doctoral research, in a research 
laboratory based outside Concordia University, in a non-profit organization or in the government. The 


course is graded on a pass/fail basis. 


HENV 805 Research Proposal Seminar (3 credits) 

Conceptual and methodological frameworks related to human interventions in the environment in the 
built, social and natural environment are examined through various student presentations and 
exchanges on their research topic. This course includes completion of the oral presentation of the 


research proposal. 


HENV 810 Thesis Proposal (3 credits) 

Students are required to select their research topic and formulate a thesis proposal under the 
supervision of a thesis supervisor and with input from a supervisory committee. The written proposal 
includes a sound rationale for the proposed research, a detailed description of the research design 
and methodology, and a comprehensive literature review. The thesis proposal is assessed by the 


supervisory committee and approved by the Graduate Program Director. 


HENV 885 Comprehensive Exam (6 credits) 

The comprehensive exam is prepared in consultation with the supervisory committee and aims to 
ensure that the student has a sound knowledge of three areas of concentration within his or her field 
of research. The examining committee consists of the supervisory committee plus one additional 
member of the Department of Geography, Planning and Environment and is chaired by the Graduate 
Program Director. The student is evaluated on the quality of the written and oral responses to 


questions. 


HENV 895 Research and Thesis (66 credits) 
A major portion of the doctoral program involves the planning and execution of innovative and 
original research under the direction of a supervisor or two co-supervisors. The thesis is examined 


by a Thesis Examining Committee and is defended orally. 


Elective Courses 


HENV 605 Advanced Qualitative Research Methods (3 credits) 
This course considers some of the foundational theories that inform contemporary research in the 


fields of Human Geography and Urban Studies. It also explores a spectrum of qualitative research 
Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


242 
paradigms, theories and advanced methodologies relevant to social science. of qualitative research 


paradigms, theories and methodologies relevant to social science. 


HENV 610 Advanced Quantitative Research Methods (3 credits) 

This course considers experimental design and advanced data analysis methods in Geography and 
Environmental Sciences. The course focuses on statistical analysis of quantitative data, using the R 
programming environment. Specific topics include data exploration and plotting,advanced statistical 


tests, linear regression, statistical model selection, non-parametric tests and mixed effects models. 


HENV 620 Sustainable Transportation (3 credits) 

This advanced seminar explores the different elements of what is broadly known as sustainable 
transportation. It considers the importance as well as the negative impacts of transport systems, and 
how these are described and captured methodologically. Of critical importance is the intimate link 


between land-use and transportation systems. 


HENV 625 Sustainable Resource Management (3 credits) 

This seminar examines the impact of human activities on natural resources. Topics such as 
integrated management and exploitation practices, biodiversity and conservation, focusing 
particularly on forest and water resources from physical, chemical, biological, socio-economic, and 


technological perspectives are investigated. 


HENV 630 Theories of Society and Space (3 credits) 

Human Geography is informed by a range of theories that have developed inside and outside the 
discipline. This course introduces students to some of the most influential of these theories as well 
as to theoretically-informed geographical literature. While students are exposed to foundational 
theories, the course focuses on critical geographical work that seeks to interpret the present 


moment. 


HENV 635 Spatial Analysis (3 credits) 

This course examines analytical methods for handling specifically spatial data, where the 
arrangement of observations in space is thought to be of significance. The emphasis is on the 
choice and application of appropriate methods for the analysis of various types of data that are 
encountered in Geography, Planning, and Environmental Studies. Procedures for analyzing spatial 
distributions of phenomena, temporal dynamics and change are examined in relation to 


Geographical Information Systems (GIS) tools and statistical techniques. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


243 
HENV 640 (Re)shaping the City (3 credits) 


By relying on an array of theoretical formulations informed by political economy, economic 
geography, urban morphology, urban sociology, anthropology and ecology, this seminar explores 
various social processes that contribute to the shaping and reshaping of our cities’ material and 


spatial forms. 


HENV 645 Behaviour and the Urban Environment (3 credits) 

This course provides a basic understanding of the relationship between people and the urban 
environment. The focus is on the collective and individual responses of people to the built or 
designed environment, and the way in which these responses can be used to guide projects, plans 
and policies. The basic studies for the location of commercial facilities and the modelling of human 


spatial behaviour are introduced. 


HENV 650 The Political-Economy of the City (3 credits) 

This course explores the implications of economic globalization and neoliberalism for urban life in 
late capitalist (post-1970s) period. Drawing on literatures from the fields of planning, geography, and 
political economy, it focuses on how urban policies and services are being restructured and how 


these changes affect different social groups. 


HENV 655 Environmental Modelling (3 credits) 

The different approaches to modelling the bio-physical, built or human environment are examined. 
The conceptualization of simple models to examine how human interventions affect the environment 
is investigated. Different modelling approaches such as system models, computer visualization and 
simulation are covered. Students develop a model scheme related to their thesis topic. Lectures and 


laboratory. 


HENV 660 Climate Change and Sustainability (3 credits) 

This seminar examines the interface between climate science, and the demands and challenges of 
developing sustainable human societies. Class discussions are oriented around current literature 
on topics such as the potential impacts of climate change on vulnerable communities, strategies to 
enhance resilience and increase global equity in climate mitigation efforts, and opportunities to 
develop sustainable energy systems. The course also includes quantitative analysis and 


visualization of spatial change datasets. 


HENV 665 Special Topics Seminar (3 credits) 
This course is designed to meet the special needs of individual graduate students. Topics vary to 


permit investigation of current and developing theories and research areas. Content involves 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


244 
presentation, discussion, and critical analysis of information from relevant scientific literature. The 


course will also take advantage of visiting expertise. 


HENV 670 Environmental Governance (3 credits) 

This course examines the principles, practices and institutions involved in environmental 
conservation and management as well as the sustainable exploitation of natural resources. Topics 
include sustainability, the precautionary principle, social capital, adaptive capacity, common property 
resource theories, deliberative democracy, environmental justice and environmental conflict 
resolution. Attention is given to issues of scale, particularly the mismatch of spatial, temporal and 


functional scales that characterize unsustainable management and use practices. 


HENV 675 Community-Based Conservation (3 credits) 

This course addresses the question of community participation in conservation and development 
initiatives. Focusing on the particular experience of local communities, it presents participatory 
concepts, principles, tools, and processes that have practical application to a broad range of 
contexts and settings. 

Note: Students who have received credit for GEOG 607 may not take this course for credit. 


HENV 680 Advanced Seminar in Environmental Science (3 credits) 

This course provides an overview of current research in environmental and related scientific 
disciplines. The course involves seminars, presentations, and critical analysis of scientific literature, 
including discussion of cutting-edge research topics in fields such as ecological restoration, 
biodiversity, climate change, renewable energy, food and water security, and natural resource 


conservation. 


HENV 690 Seminar in Social and Cultural Geography (3 credits) 

This seminar introduces students to some important contemporary geographical approaches and 
topics in the study of society and culture. Specific themes may include globalization, migration, 
multiculturalism and diaspora, marginality, policing and imprisonment, and social movements. To 
provide a broad understanding of these themes, the course emphasizes analyses that draw upon 


geographical concepts of space, place, identity, and power. 


© Concordia University 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


245 


Concordia University 


http:/Awww.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/geog-menv. html 


Environmental Assessment MEnv 


Admission Requirements 


The normal requirement for admission to the MEnv in EA is a Bachelor’s degree in an appropriate 
discipline in Arts or Science from a recognized university with a minimum GPA of 3.30 on 4.30. 
Applicants are selected on the basis of a sound undergraduate academic record and strong 
language skills in English and/or French which allows them to secure an internship, which is a 
requirement of the program. Students who lack appropriate preparation in Ecology or Geographic 
Information Systems, Physical Geography or Statistics are required to take preparatory courses 
such as BIOL 205, Introduction to Sustainability; a 300-level physical geography course; GEOG 362, 
Statistical Methods; or GEOG 363, Geographic Information Systems. Those lacking a social science 
background may be required to take GEOG 355, Resource Analysis and Management, or a similar 


course. 


Students admitted to the Diploma in Environmental Assessment (DEA) may subsequently apply, in a 
future admission cycle, to the Master of Environment (MEnv), if they have maintained a minimum 
CGPA of 3.30. A new application is required, with three letters of reference from current or recent 
professors. Courses taken in the Diploma with a grade of B+ or better may be transferred to the 
MEnv degree after admission. The Graduate Committee assesses the new applications with the 


other applications for the cycle. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Courses. All students must take the following: 


1. Compulsory Courses. All students must take 21 credits: ENVS 601, ENVS 608, ENVS 652, 
ENVS 653, ENVS 664, ENVS 668. 


2. Elective Courses. All students must take 6 credits from: BIOL 618, ECON 659, ENVS 604, 
ENVS 605, ENVS 620, GEOG 620, HENV 610, HENV 625, HENV 655, HENV 660, HENV 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


246 
670, HENV 675, HENV 680. 


2. Internship and Report. ENVS 696 (18 credits) 
To enter the internship students must have completed the prescribed 27 credits of course work, 
must have achieved an overall GPA of 3.30 or higher, and must have demonstrated language 


proficiency as required by the internship host. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Residence. The minimum period of residence is two terms of full-time study or the equivalent in 


part-time study. 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 2.70. 


Courses 


Required Courses 


ENVS 601 EA: Concepts, Principles and Practice (6 credits) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the EA Graduate Program Director. 

This course aims to provide students with theoretical and practical knowledge related to 
environmental assessment and its role in project planning and policy development. The evolution of 
environmental assessment (EA), its current practices and functions, and future 

directions arediscussed. The roles and components of EA and EA procedures in Canada (at both 
the federal and provincial levels) are emphasized. Guest speakers, regular readings and in-class 


discussions supplement the lectures. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


247 
ENVS 608 Getting Ready for the EA Internship (3 credits) 


Prerequisite: Permission of the EA Graduate Program Director. 

Students gain an understanding of the internship process and acquire information necessary to 
prepare for the work involved in securing an internship. Workshops on professional development 
help students prepare for and secure internship placements, and enhance their report writing and 
oral presentation skills. The course includes four workshops: 1) Internship requirement and timeline, 
2) Resumé writing and interview techniques, 3) Writing of final report and preparation for oral 
presentation, and 4) Basic concepts of project management. Students are required to assess the 
written internship reports and oral presentations of their peers. The course is graded on a pass/fail 


basis. 


ENVS 652 Data Collection and Analysis for EA (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the EA Graduate Program Director. 

This course focuses on methods and issues in data collection and analysis appropriate for impact 
prediction in the abiotic, biotic and built environment, including air, surface and ground water, soil, 
landscape, biodiversity, noise, cultural and socio-economic conditions. 


Note: Students who have received credit for ENVS 662 may not take this course for credit. 


ENVS 653 Geographical Information Systems for EA (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the EA Graduate Program Director. 

This course examines the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) in Environmental 
Assessment (EA), particularly focusing on the role of GIS in the analysis of environmental data and 
in decision-making processes. Topics covered include data acquisition, multi-criteria decision 
analysis, fuzzy sets and interpolation techniques. The course comprises lectures, lab exercises and 
case study analysis. The instruction is built around a series of practical exercises mainly using 
industry-standard GIS software. The objective of the course is to provide a sound theoretical and 
practical background in the use of geospatial technologies for EA applications. 


Note: Students who have received credit for ENVS 663 may not take this course for credit. 


ENVS 664 Field Course in EA (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the EA Graduate Program Director. 

The goal of this course is to expose students to practical issues related to Environmental 
Assessment (EA). The course comprises: (1) in-class preparation meetings followed by (2) a one- 
week in-field experience. During this week, students meet practitioners and individuals from local 
communities, industries and/or governments involved in EA. Through these interactions, students 
are exposed to a diverse range of perspectives and experiences related to EA. The course is 


validated through an assessment of the knowledge acquired during the trip. Students are 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


248 
responsible for the cost of food, accommodation and transportation associated with the one-week 


field trip (cost varies depending on destination). 


Note: Students who have received credit for ENVS 662 may not take this course for credit. 


ENVS 668 Indigenous Peoples and Environmental Assessment (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the EA Graduate Program Director. 

Development projects are often located on or adjacent to Indigenous territories with significant 
impacts on their lands, lives and cultures. As such, Indigenous peoples require unique consideration 
within EA frameworks which should respect Indigenous and treaty rights, including international 
commitments (e.g. UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples) and court rulings related to: 
(1) Free, Prior, and Informed Consent (FPIC) for development proposed on Indigenous lands; and 
(2) the inclusion of Indigenous knowledge and perspectives in decision-making. This seminar course 
surveys recent developments in these areas and explores the potential of EA to contribute to 


reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Canada (and elsewhere). 


Elective Courses 


BIOL 618 Ecology for Environmentalists (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the EA Graduate Program Director. 

This course discusses the principles of the ecology of individuals, populations, communities and 
ecosystems and the effects of environmental disturbances ranging from immediate pollution to long- 
term climate change. 

Note 1: Students who have received credit for BIOL 508 may not take this course for credit. 


Note 2: Students registered in a graduate program in Biology may not take this course for credit. 


ECON 659 Economics for Environmentalists (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the EA Graduate Program Director. 

This course considers one of the most serious problems facing our global civilization: the on-going 
conflict between economic activity and the bio-physical world upon which all human activity 
ultimately depends. The course explains the basic theoretical framework most economists use to 
describe economic activities and the relationship between these activities and the natural world. 
Understanding the logical apparatus of economics theory shows why market forces and 
environmental integrity are often in conflict and why economic arguments dominate environmental 
policy debates at both national and international levels. 

Note 1: Students who have received credit for ECON 559 may not take this course for credit. 
Note 2: Students registered in programs in Economics, or programs in the John Molson School of 


Business, may not take this course for credit. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


249 
ENVS 604 Environmental Law and Policy (3 credits) 


Prerequisite: Permission of the EA Graduate Programme Director. 

This course introduces students to environmental law and policy at the international, North American 
and regional levels with an emphasis on Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) as a tool for 
promoting environmentally sound and sustainable development. The course provides an overview of 
issues such as environmental security, Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA), banking and 
environmental finance, access to justice in environmental decision making, climate change, 
biodiversity, and green growth. The role of international organizations and Multilateral Environmental 


Agreements (MEAs) is given particular attention. 


ENVS 605 Environmental Standards (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the EA Graduate Program Director. 

This course provides an overview of the International Standards Organization (ISO) standards and 
guidelines for industry to implement a sound Environmental Management System (EMS). These 
guidelines are outlined in a series of publications designated as ISO 14000. Topics covered will 
include: the evolution and benefits of EMS, the ISO 14001 principles, integration between ISO 9001 
and 14001, the registration process, auditing an EMS, life cycle assessment, and environmental 
labelling. Upon successful completion of the course, students are encouraged to pursue formal 
accreditation. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under an ENVS 505 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


ENVS 620 Advanced Topics in Environmental Assessment (3 credits) 

This course focuses on selected topics within the discipline. Topics vary to permit investigation of 
current and developing theories and research areas. 

Note: The content will vary from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course, provided the course content has changed. Changes in content will be indicated by a letter 
following the course number, e.g. ENVS 620A, ENVS 620B, etc. 


GEOG 607 Indigenous Peoples and the Environment (3 credits) 

This course provides an extended, in-depth exploration of the relationships and roles of Indigenous 
peoples with respect to their traditional territories and natural resources. Indigenous ontologies and 
epistemologies are highlighted in addition to Indigenous aspirations and approaches for use and 
stewardship of the environment. The course examines theoretical and case-study literature, with a 
broad regional focus on Aboriginal peoples in Canada while also drawing from comparative 


international experiences of Indigenous peoples. 


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250 
GEOG 620 Special Topics in Geography (3 credits) 


This course focuses on selected topics within the discipline. Topics vary to permit investigation of 
current and developing theories and research areas. 

Note: The content will vary from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course, provided the course content has changed. Changes in content will be indicated by a letter 
following the course number, e.g. GEOG 620A, GEOG 620B, etc. 


HENV 610 Advanced Quantitative Research Methods (3 credits) 

This course considers experimental design and advanced data analysis methods in Geography and 
Environmental Sciences. The course focuses on statistical analysis of quantitative data, using the R 
programming environment. Specific topics include data exploration and plotting, advanced statistical 


tests, linear regression, statistical model selection, non-parametric tests and mixed effects models. 


HENV 625 Sustainable Resource Management (3 credits) 

This seminar examines the impact of human activities on natural resources. Topics such as 
integrated management and exploitation practices, biodiversity and conservation, focusing 
particularly on forest and water resources from physical, chemical, biological, socio-economic, and 


technological perspectives are investigated. 


HENV 660 Climate Change and Sustainability (3 credits) 

This seminar examines the interface between climate science, and the demands and challenges of 
developing sustainable human societies. Class discussions are oriented around current literature on 
topics such as the potential impacts of climate change on vulnerable communities, strategies to 
enhance resilience and increase global equity in climate mitigation efforts, and opportunities to 
develop sustainable energy systems. The course also includes quantitative analysis and 


visualization of spatial change datasets. 


HENV 655 Environmental Modelling (3 credits) 

The different approaches to modelling the bio-physical, built or human environment are examined. 
The conceptualization of simple models to examine how human interventions affect the environment 
is investigated. Different modelling approaches such as system models, computer visualization and 
simulation are covered. Students develop a model scheme related to their thesis topic. Lectures and 


laboratory. 


HENV 670 Environmental Governance (3 credits) 
This course examines the principles, practices and institutions involved in environmental 


conservation and management as well as the sustainable exploitation of natural resources. Topics 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


251 
include sustainability, the precautionary principle, social capital, adaptive capacity, common property 


resource theories, deliberative democracy, environmental justice and environmental conflict 
resolution. Attention is given to issues of scale, particularly the mismatch of spatial, temporal and 


functional scales that characterize unsustainable management and use practices. 


HENV 675 Community-Based Conservation (3 credits) 

This course addresses the question of community participation in conservation and development 
initiatives. Focusing on the particular experience of local communities, it presents participatory 
concepts, principles, tools, and processes that have practical application to a broad range of 
contexts and settings. 

Note: Students who have received credit for GEOG 607 may not take this course for credit. 


HENV 680 Advanced Seminar in Environmental Science (3 credits) 

This course provides an overview of current research in environmental and related scientific 
disciplines. The course involves seminars, presentations, and critical analysis of scientific literature, 
including discussion of cutting-edge research topics in fields such as ecological restoration, 
biodiversity, climate change, renewable energy, food and water security, and natural resource 


conservation. 


Internship and Report 


ENVS 696 Internship and Report in EA (18 credits) 

Prerequisite: Completion of all course work (27 credits), a minimum GPA of 3.30 and permission of 
the EA Graduate Program Director. 

This internship is a 4-month placement in industry, government, and non-government where EA 
work is being undertaken. It is intended to maximize the educational experience and bridge the gap 
between what employers consider necessary job skills and what the university considers 

essential knowledge. Students prepare an internship report and present it orally. 

Note: Students are assisted in their efforts to obtain a relevant placement by the Internship 


Coordinator. Placements must be approved by the EA Graduate Program Director. 


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http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/geog-msc. html 


Geography, Urban and Environmental Studies MSc 


Admission Requirements 


The normal requirements for admission into the MSc (Geography, Urban and Environmental 
Studies) are a minimum GPA of 3.30 in a BA or BSc in Geography, Planning, or Environmental 
Science, or an equivalent degree in a related field of study from a recognized university. Applicants 
are selected on the basis of a sound undergraduate academic record, strong letters of 
recommendation, and a convincing statement of purpose which clearly describes their academic 
interest in the program and intended area of research. In addition, admission is contingent on the 
availability of an appropriate faculty member in the Department to serve as supervisor. Some 
applicants with deficiencies in their undergraduate preparation may be required to take a qualifying 
program. Others may be required to complete certain prerequisite courses in addition to the regular 


graduate program. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Courses. All students must take the following: 
9 credits: HENV 605 or HENV 610, HENV 615, HENV 685. 
6 credits in elective courses chosen from: GEOG 620, GEOG 625, HENV 620, HENV 625, 
HENV 630, HENV 635, HENV 640, HENV 645, HENV 650, HENV 655, HENV 660, HENV 665, 
HENV 670, HENV 675, HENV 680, HENV 690. 


2. Thesis. HENV 695 (30 credits) 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


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2. Residence. The minimum residence requirement is one year (three semesters) of full-time 


graduate study, or the equivalent in part-time study. 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 2.70. 


Courses 


Required Courses 


HENV 605 Advanced Qualitative Research Methods (3 credits) 

This course considers some of the foundational theories that inform contemporary research in the 
fields of Human Geography and Urban Studies. It also explores a spectrum of qualitative research 
paradigms, theories and advanced methodologies relevant to social science. of qualitative research 


paradigms, theories and methodologies relevant to social science. 


HENV 610 Advanced Quantitative Research Methods (3 credits) 

This course considers experimental design and advanced data analysis methods in Geography and 
Environmental Sciences. The course focuses on statistical analysis of quantitative data, using the R 
programming environment. Specific topics include data exploration and plotting, advanced statistical 


tests, linear regression, statistical model selection, non-parametric tests and mixed effects models. 


HENV 615 Research Proposal Seminar (3 credits) 

This seminar provides an opportunity to extend, deepen, and apply the conceptual and 
methodological frameworks presented in the core and elective courses, through a combination of 
classroom discussions and attendance at departmental research seminars. Students are taught 
research and presentation skills and are guided through the process of preparing their thesis 
research proposal. Students need to submit a written research proposal to their thesis research 


supervisor(s) as a requirement for this course. 


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HENV 685 Thesis Proposal (3 credits) 


Students are required to select their research topic and formulate a research proposal under the 
supervision of a thesis supervisor and with input from a thesis committee. The written proposal will 
include a sound rationale for the proposed research, a detailed description of the research design 
and methodology, and a comprehensive literature review. Students are also required to present an 
oral presentation of their proposal to the Department. The thesis proposal must be formally 
approved by the thesis committee and the Graduate Program Director before research activities can 
begin. The thesis proposal should be completed before the end of the second semester of residency 


in the Program and after a minimum of 6 credits in the Program have been taken. 


HENV 695 Thesis (30 credits) 

Students are required to demonstrate their ability to carry out original, independent research. The 
thesis, which will be researched and written under the direction of a supervisor and thesis 
committee, should normally not exceed 100 pages. Upon completion of the thesis, the student will 


be required to defend his/her thesis before an external examiner and his/her thesis committee. 


Elective Courses 


GEOG 620 Special Topics in Geography (3 credits) 

This course focuses on selected topics within the discipline. Topics vary to permit investigation of 
current and developing theories and research areas. 

Note: The content will vary from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course, provided the course content has changed. Changes in content will be indicated by a letter 
following the course number, e.g. GEOG 620A, GEOG 620B, etc. 


GEOG 625 Directed Studies (3 credits) 
With written permission of the graduate program director, a student studies a particular field or topic 
relating to geography, urban or environment studies. A detailed outline of the proposed study, 


approved by a study supervisor is required. 


HENV 620 Sustainable Transportation (3 credits) 

This advanced seminar explores the different elements of what is broadly known as sustainable 
transportation. It considers the importance as well as the negative impacts of transport systems, and 
how these are described and captured methodologically. Of critical importance is the intimate link 


between land-use and transportation systems. 


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HENV 625 Sustainable Resource Management (3 credits) 


This seminar examines the impact of human activities on natural resources. Topics such as 
integrated management and exploitation practices, biodiversity and conservation, focusing 
particularly on forest and water resources from physical, chemical, biological, socio-economic, and 


technological perspectives are investigated. 


HENV 630 Theories of Society and Space (3 credits) 

Human Geography is informed by a range of theories that have developed inside and outside the 
discipline. This course introduces students to some of the most influential of these theories as well 
as to theoretically-informed geographical literature. While students are exposed to foundational 
theories, the course focuses on critical geographical work that seeks to interpret the present 


moment. 


HENV 635 Spatial Analysis (3 credits) 

This course examines analytical methods for handling specifically spatial data, where the 
arrangement of observations in space is thought to be of significance. The emphasis is on the 
choice and application of appropriate methods for the analysis of various types of data that are 
encountered in Geography, Planning and Environmental Studies. Procedures for analyzing spatial 
distributions of phenomena, temporal dynamics and change are examined in relation to 


Geographical Information Systems (GIS) tools and statistical techniques. 


HENV 640 (Re)shaping the City (3 credits) 

By relying on an array of theoretical formulations informed by political economy, economic 
geography, urban morphology, urban sociology, anthropology and ecology, this seminar explores 
various social processes that contribute to the shaping and reshaping of our cities’ material and 


spatial forms. 


HENV 645 Behaviour and the Urban Environment (3 credits) 

This course provides a basic understanding of the relationship between people and the urban 
environment. The focus is on the collective and individual responses of people to the built or 
designed environment, and the way in which these responses can be used to guide projects, plans 
and policies. The basic studies for the location of commercial facilities and the modelling of human 


spatial behaviour are introduced. 


HENV 650 The Political Economy of the City (3 credits) 
This course explores the implications of economic globalization and neoliberalism for urban life in 


late capitalist (post-1970s) period. Drawing on literatures from the fields of planning, geography, and 


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political economy, it focuses on how urban policies and services are being restructured and how 


these changes affect different social groups. 


HENV 655 Environmental Modelling (3 credits) 

The different approaches to modelling the bio-physical, built or human environment are examined. 
The conceptualization of simple models to examine how human interventions affect the environment 
is investigated. Different modelling approaches such as system models, computer visualization and 
simulation are covered. Students develop a model scheme related to their thesis topic. Lectures and 


laboratory. 


HENV 660 Climate Change and Sustainability (3 credits) 

This seminar examines the interface between climate science, and the demands and challenges of 
developing sustainable human societies. Class discussions are oriented around current literature 
on topics such as the potential impacts of climate change on vulnerable communities, strategies to 
enhance resilience and increase global equity in climate mitigation efforts, and opportunities to 
develop sustainable energy systems. The course also includes quantitative analysis and 


visualization of spatial change datasets. 


HENV 665 Special Topics Seminar (3 credits) 

This course is designed to meet the special needs of individual graduate students. Topics vary to 
permit investigation of current and developing theories and research areas. Content involves 
presentation, discussion, and critical analysis of information from relevant scientific literature. The 


course will also take advantage of visiting expertise. 


HENV 670 Environmental Governance (3 credits) 

This course examines the principles, practices and institutions involved in environmental 
conservation and management as well as the sustainable exploitation of natural resources. Topics 
include sustainability, the precautionary principle, social capital, adaptive capacity, common property 
resource theories, deliberative democracy, environmental justice and environmental conflict 
resolution. Attention is given to issues of scale, particularly the mismatch of spatial, temporal and 


functional scales that characterize unsustainable management and use practices. 


HENV 675 Community-Based Conservation (3 credits) 
This course addresses the question of community participation in conservation and development 


initiatives. Focusing on the particular experience of local communities, it presents participatory 


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concepts, principles, tools, and processes that have practical application to a broad range of 


contexts and settings. 
Note: Students who have received credit for GEOG 607 may not take this course for credit. 


HENV 680 Advanced Seminar in Environmental Science (3 credits) 

This course provides an overview of current research in environmental and related scientific 
disciplines. The course involves seminars, presentations, and critical analysis of scientific literature, 
including discussion of cutting-edge research topics in fields such as ecological restoration, 
biodiversity, climate change, renewable energy, food and water security, and natural resource 


conservation. 


HENV 690 Seminar in Social and Cultural Geography (3 credits) 

This seminar introduces students to some important contemporary geographical approaches and 
topics in the study of society and culture. Specific themes may include globalization, migration, 
multiculturalism and diaspora, marginality, policing and imprisonment, and social movements. To 
provide a broad understanding of these themes, the course emphasizes analyses that draw upon 


geographical concepts of space, place, identity, and power. 


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Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/geog-dip.html 


Environmental Assessment Graduate Diploma 


Admission Requirements 


A Bachelor's degree in an appropriate discipline in Arts or Science is required. Students who lack 
appropriate Ecology, or Geographic Information Systems, Physical Geography or Statistics are 
required to take preparatory courses such as BIOL 205, Introduction to Sustainability; a 300-level 
physical geography course; GEOG 362, Statistical Methods or GEOG 363, Geographic Information 
Systems. Those lacking a social science background may be required to take GEOG 355, Resource 


Analysis and Management, or a similar course. 


Students admitted to the Diploma in Environmental Assessment (DEA) may subsequently apply, in a 
future admission cycle, to the Master of Environment (MEnv), if they have maintained a minimum 
CGPA of 3.30. A new application is required, with three letters of reference from current or recent 
professors. Courses taken in the Diploma with a grade of B+ or better may be transferred to the 
MEnv degree after admission. The Graduate Committee assesses the new applications with the 


other applications for the cycle. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Diploma 


Credits. A fully qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 30 credits as follows: 


1. Compulsory Courses. All students must take 15 credits: ENVS 601, 
ENVS 652, ENVS 653, ENVS 668. 


2. Elective Courses. All students must take 15 credits from: BIOL 618, ECON 659, ENVS 
604, ENVS 605, ENVS 620, ENVS 664, GEOG 620, HENV 610, HENV 625, HENV 655, HENV 
660, HENV 670, HENV 675, HENV 680. 


Academic Regulations 


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1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


3. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 2.70. 


Courses 


Required Courses 


ENVS 601 EA: Concepts, Principles and Practice (6 credits) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the EA Graduate Program Director. 

This course aims to provide students with theoretical and practical knowledge related to 
environmental assessment and its role in project planning and policy development. The evolution of 
environmental assessment (EA), its current practices and functions, and future 

directions arediscussed. The roles and components of EA and EA procedures in Canada (at both 
the federal and provincial levels) are emphasized. Guest speakers, regular readings and in-class 


discussions supplement the lectures. 


ENVS 652 Data Collection and Analysis for EA (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the EA Graduate Program Director. 

This course focuses on methods and issues in data collection and analysis appropriate for impact 
prediction in the abiotic, biotic and built environment, including air, surface and ground water, soil, 
landscape, biodiversity, noise, cultural and socio-economic conditions. 


Note: Students who have received credit for ENVS 662 many take this course for credit. 


ENVS 653 Geographical Information Systems for EA (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the EA Graduate Program Director. 

This course examines the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) in Environmental 
Assessment (EA), particularly focusing on the role of GIS in the analysis of environmental data and 
in decision-making processes. Topics covered include data acquisition multi-criteria decision 
analysis, fuzzy sets and interpolation techniques. The course comprises lectures, lab exercises and 


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case study analysis. The instruction is built around a series of practical exercises mainly using 


industry-standard GIS software. The objective of the course is to provide a sound theoretical and 
practical background in the use of geospatial technologies for EA applications. 


Note: Students who have received credit for ENVS 663 may not take this course for credit. 


ENVS 668 Indigenous Peoples and Environmental Assessment (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the EA Graduate Program Director. 

Development projects are often located on or adjacent to Indigenous territories with significant 
impacts on their lands, lives and cultures. As such, Indigenous peoples require unique consideration 
within EA frameworks which should respect Indigenous and treaty rights, including international 
commitments (e.g. UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples) and court rulings related to: 
(1) Free, Prior, and Informed Consent (FPIC) for development proposed on Indigenous lands; and 
(2) the inclusion of Indigenous knowledge and perspectives in decision-making. This seminar course 
surveys recent developments in these areas and explores the potential of EA to contribute to 


reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Canada (and elsewhere). 


Elective Courses 


BIOL 618 Ecology for Environmentalists (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the EA Graduate Program Director. 

This course discusses the principles of the ecology of individuals, populations, communities and 
ecosystems and the effects of environmental disturbances ranging from immediate pollution to long- 
term climate change. 

Note 1: Students who have received credit for BIOL 508 may not take this course for credit. 


Note 2: Students registered in a graduate program in Biology may not take this course for credit. 


ECON 659 Economics for Environmentalists (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the EA Graduate Program Director. 

This course considers one of the most serious problems facing our global civilization: the on-going 
conflict between economic activity and the bio-physical world upon which all human activity 
ultimately depends. The course explains the basic theoretical framework most economists use to 
describe economic activities and the relationship between these activities and the natural world. 
Understanding the logical apparatus of economics theory shows why market forces and 
environmental integrity are often in conflict and why economic arguments dominate environmental 


policy debates at both national and international levels. 


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Note 1: Students who have received credit for ECON 559 may not take this course for credit. 


Note 2: Students registered in programs in Economics, or programs in the John Molson School of 


Business, may not take this course for credit. 


ENVS 604 Environmental Law and Policy (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the EA Graduate Programme Director. 

This course introduces students to environmental law and policy at the international, North American 
and regional levels with an emphasis on Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) as a tool for 
promoting environmentally sound and sustainable development. The course provides an overview of 
issues such as environmental security, Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA), banking and 
environmental finance, access to justice in environmental decision making, climate change, 
biodiversity, and green growth. The role of international organizations and Multilateral Environmental 


Agreements (MEAs) is given particular attention. 


ENVS 605 Environmental Standards (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the EA Graduate Program Director. 

This course provides an overview of the International Standards Organization (ISO) standards and 
guidelines for industry to implement a sound Environmental Management System (EMS). These 
guidelines are outlined in a series of publications designated as ISO 14000. Topics covered will 
include: the evolution and benefits of EMS, the ISO 14001 principles, integration between ISO 9001 
and 14001, the registration process, auditing an EMS, life cycle assessment, and environmental 
labelling. Upon successful completion of the course, students are encouraged to pursue formal 
accreditation. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under an ENVS 505 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


ENVS 620 Advanced Topics in Environmental Assessment (3 credits) 

This course focuses on selected topics within the discipline. Topics vary to permit investigation of 
current and developing theories and research areas. 

Note: The content will vary from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course, provided the course content has changed. Changes in content will be indicated by a letter 
following the course number, e.g. ENVS 620A, ENVS 620B, etc. 


ENVS 664 Field Course in EA (3 credits) 
Prerequisite: Permission of the EA Graduate Program Director. 
The goal of this course is to expose students to practical issues related to Environmental 


Assessment (EA). The course comprises: (1) in-class preparation meetings followed by (2) a one- 


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week in-field experience. During this week, students meet practitioners and individuals from local 


communities, industries and/or governments involved in EA. Through these interactions, students 
are exposed to a diverse range of perspectives and experiences related to EA. The course is 
validated through an assessment of the knowledge acquired during the trip. Students are 
responsible for the cost of food, accommodation and transportation associated with the one-week 
field trip (cost varies depending on destination). 


Note: Students who have received credit for ENVS 662 may not take this course for credit. 


GEOG 607 Indigenous Peoples and the Environment (3 credits) 

This course provides an extended, in-depth exploration of the relationships and roles of Indigenous 
peoples with respect to their traditional territories and natural resources. Indigenous ontologies and 
epistemologies are highlighted in addition to Indigenous aspirations and approaches for use and 
stewardship of the environment. The course examines theoretical and case-study literature, with a 
broad regional focus on Aboriginal peoples in Canada while also drawing from comparative 


international experiences of Indigenous peoples. 


GEOG 620 Special Topics in Geography (3 credits) 

This course focuses on selected topics within the discipline. Topics vary to permit investigation of 
current and developing theories and research areas. 

Note: The content will vary from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course, provided the course content has changed. Changes in content will be indicated by a letter 
following the course number, e.g. GEOG 620A, GEOG 620B, etc. 


HENV 610 Advanced Quantitative Research Methods (3 credits) 

This course considers experimental design and advanced data analysis methods in Geography and 
Environmental Sciences. The course focuses on statistical analysis of quantitative data, using the R 
programming environment. Specific topics include data exploration and plotting, advanced statistical 


tests, linear regression, statistical model selection, non-parametric tests and mixed effects models. 


HENV 625 Sustainable Resource Management (3 credits) 

This seminar examines the impact of human activities on natural resources. Topics such as 
integrated management and exploitation practices, biodiversity and conservation, focusing 
particularly on forest and water resources from physical, chemical, biological, socio-economic, and 


technological perspectives are investigated. 


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HENV 660 Climate Change and Sustainability (3 credits) 


This seminar examines the interface between climate science, and the demands and challenges of 
developing sustainable human societies. Class discussions are oriented around current literature on 
topics such as the potential impacts of climate change on vulnerable communities, strategies to 
enhance resilience and increase global equity in climate mitigation efforts, and opportunities to 
develop sustainable energy systems. The course also includes quantitative analysis and 


visualization of spatial change datasets. 


HENV 655 Environmental Modelling (3 credits) 

The different approaches to modelling the bio-physical, built or human environment are examined. 
The conceptualization of simple models to examine how human interventions affect the environment 
is investigated. Different modelling approaches such as system models, computer visualization and 
simulation are covered. Students develop a model scheme related to their thesis topic. Lectures and 


laboratory. 


HENV 670 Environmental Governance (3 credits) 

This course examines the principles, practices and institutions involved in environmental 
conservation and management as well as the sustainable exploitation of natural resources. Topics 
include sustainability, the precautionary principle, social capital, adaptive capacity, common property 
resource theories, deliberative democracy, environmental justice and environmental conflict 
resolution. Attention is given to issues of scale, particularly the mismatch of spatial, temporal and 


functional scales that characterize unsustainable management and use practices. 


HENV 675 Community-Based Conservation (3 credits) 

This course addresses the question of community participation in conservation and development 
initiatives. Focusing on the particular experience of local communities, it presents participatory 
concepts, principles, tools, and processes that have practical application to a broad range of 
contexts and settings. 


Note: Students who have received credit for GEOG 607 may not take this course for credit. 


HENV 680 Advanced Seminar in Environmental Science (3 credits) 

This course provides an overview of current research in environmental and related scientific 
disciplines. The course involves seminars, presentations, and critical analysis of scientific literature, 
including discussion of cutting-edge research topics in fields such as ecological restoration, 
biodiversity, climate change, renewable energy, food and water security, and natural resource 


conservation. 


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Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/exci-phd.html 


Health and Exercise Science PhD 


Admission Requirements 


A research MSc in science subjects (e.g., Exercise Science, Kinesiology, Physiology, Biology, 
Chemistry and Biochemistry, Psychology, or Physics) from a recognized university is required to be 
admitted to the PhD program. Applicant selection is based on a superior academic record at the 
undergraduate and master's level, an established publication record, a detailed and convincing 
statement of purpose that clearly describes their academic interest in the program, and strong letters 
of recommendation. In addition, admission is contingent on the availability of an appropriate faculty 
member in the Department to serve as supervisor. Before final admission, applicants are required to 
find a faculty member to supervise their work. Applicants with a BSc Honours and published results 
are also considered. Those applicants may be required to complete additional courses. Upon 
recommendation by full-time faculty members of the Department of Health, Kinesiology and Applied 
Physiology, students registered in the MSc in Exercise Science at Concordia University who have 
completed 12 credits from the MSc program and who have shown themselves to be outstanding 
through performance in research may apply for permission to proceed directly to doctoral studies 
without submitting a master's thesis (fast-tracking). 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate entering the program with a master’s degree is required to 


complete a minimum of 90 credits. 


2. Courses. To graduate, students must meet the following requirements: 
6 credits: HEXS 801 Scientific Communication and Pedagogy in Health and Exercise Science (3 
credits), HEXS 820 Special Topics in Health and Exercise Science (3 credits). 


6 credits chosen from HEXS 810, 811 or 812 Advanced Topics in Health and Exercise Science. 


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3. Comprehensive Exam in Health and Exercise Science. HEXS 850 (6 credits). The examining 


committee consists of the student’s supervisory committee and is chaired by the Graduate 
Program Director. The student is evaluated on the basis of the quality of the oral and written 


presentations and on the responses to the questions from the examining committee. 


4. Research Proposal in Health and Exercise Science. HEXS 851 (3 credits). Students are 
required to write a research proposal describing a series of projects leading to the production of 
new knowledge from hypothesis-driven data acquisition and experimental inquiry. A supervisory 
committee including the supervisor and three additional faculty members (often the same as the 
comprehensive examination) with varied expertise related to the thesis topic is formed to guide 
the student with the production of the proposal. The proposal is presented in written form to the 


committee, and in oral form to the committee and department. 


5. Research and Thesis in Health and Exercise Science. HEXS 890 (69 credits). Students are 
required to write a PhD research thesis, consisting of the production of new research knowledge 
from hypothesis-driven data acquisition and experimental inquiry. The research project should 
involve the integration of knowledge from the health sciences.The thesis is examined by a Thesis 


Examining Committee and is defended orally. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 
detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 
Program Specific Requirements. Students must obtain an assessment grade point average 
(AGPA) of 3.00 based on a minimum of 6 credits. 


2. Residence. The minimum residence requirement is two years (six terms) of full-time study 
beyond the master’s degree, or three years (nine terms) of full-time study beyond the bachelor’s 
degree. 


3. Time Limit. All work for the doctoral degree must be completed by the end of the fourth calendar 
year following the year of admission to candidacy, defined as successful completion of the 
Comprehensive Exam in Health and Exercise Science (HEXS 850) and the Research Proposal 


in Health and Exercise Science (HEXS 851). Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for 


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further details regarding the Time Limit requirements. 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.00. 


Courses 


HEXS 801 Scientific Communication and Pedagogy in Health and Exercise Science (3 credits) 
This course meets the needs of graduate students in developing adequate skills to communicate 
scientific information efficiently to different interest groups, such as grant adjudication committees, 
the general public, or undergraduate and graduate students in an academic setting. It serves in 
developing scientific communication skills by focusing on written and oral presentation skills, aimed 
at the scientists, students, or lay public. Faculty members from the department and selected guests 
provide information and applications on successful approaches to reach each of these groups. On 
the pedagogical side, it includes the development of course objectives and a course outline, along 
with preparing and presenting a lecture at the undergraduate level. It also involves presentation, 


discussion, and critical analysis of information from current scientific journal literature for scientists. 


HEXS 810 Advanced Topics in Health and Exercise Science: Physiology Module (3 credits) 
This course examines the fundamental mechanisms and the functional control of specific systems of 
the body. A detailed analysis of the system, including the molecular and systemic aspects of the 
given system is addressed. This course focuses on recent research outcomes and new issues in 
molecular and systemic physiology. The course content varies depending on the specific system 
studied. 


HEXS 811 Advanced Topics in Health and Exercise Science: Intervention Module (3 credits) 
This course examines concepts in the rehabilitation process from exercise adherence to tissue 
healing, and introduces students to various exercise protocols specific to the selected area of study. 
Students learn how to implement safe and effective rehabilitation protocols to address dysfunction 
and functional recovery. This course focuses on recent research outcomes and new issues in 
rehabilitation specific to prevention, assessment, and rehabilitation of injuries. The course content 


varies depending on the area of rehabilitation. 


HEXS 812 Advanced Topics in Health and Exercise Science: Population Health Module (3 
credits) 


This course surveys the health-related aspects of exercise, physical activity, and physical fitness 


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from a population health perspective. Topics include current debates in biomedical ethics, health 


policy, as well as, methods and concepts in behavioural and environmental determinants of activity 


and fitness. 


HEXS 820 Special Topics in Health and Exercise Science (3 credits) 

This course provides students with flexibility to address a specific area of specialization in Health 
and Exercise Science. This can be a reading course organized by the supervisor, a course chosen 
from the list of Advanced Topics courses, or a similar-level course from another department or 
institution, while being related to a specialization in Health and Exercise Science. The course is 
chosen in consultation with the student's supervisory committee. The course can be internal or 
external, and provides students with the capacity to specialize even further in relation to their 


research project. 


HEXS 850 Comprehensive Exam in Health and Exercise Science (6 credits) 

The comprehensive exam is given by an examination committee composed of selected faculty 
members, at the end of the first year of study. The committee includes the supervisor and three 
additional faculty members with varied expertise related to the thesis topic. The examination 
committee identifies selected readings for the student. The student is expected to prepare for both a 
written and an oral examination. The body of knowledge for the comprehensive examination is 
defined by the committee in the form of advanced book chapters and other scientific readings. The 
written exam comes first, composed of five (5) questions asked by the committee, in the form of 
argumentative essays written in the span of two weeks; following a satisfactory evaluation of this 
work, the student is convened to the oral part, comprising a series of questions coming from the 
panel concerning the written answers or additional aspects coming from the readings. The student 
has to successfully pass the comprehensive examination in order to progress to the proposal, 


usually the following term. The course is graded on a pass/fail basis. 


HEXS 851 Research Proposal in Health and Exercise Science (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: HEXS 850. 

Students are required to write a research proposal describing a series of projects leading to the 
production of new knowledge from hypothesis-driven data acquisition and experimental inquiry. A 
supervisory committee including the supervisor and three additional faculty members (often the 
same as the comprehensive examination) with varied expertise related to the thesis topic is formed 
to guide the student with the production of the proposal. The proposal is presented in written form to 
the committee, and in oral form to the committee and department. The course is graded on a 


pass/fail basis. 


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HEXS 890 Research and Thesis in Health and Exercise Science (69 credits) 


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Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/exci-msc. html 


Health and Exercise Science MSc 


Admission Requirements 


The admission requirement is a BSc in Exercise Science or related field of study, which includes 
Kinesiology, Physiology, Psychology, or Biology. If an applicant has a degree in another area, 

their academic record is examined to determine if a core deficiency exists in the student’s previous 
undergraduate background, otherwise qualified candidates may be required to take up to 12 


undergraduate credits. 


Applicants are selected on the basis of past academic record, letters of recommendation and 
relevance of proposed research to the expertise of the department. Enrolment in the Master’s 


program is limited in part by the availability of research supervisors. 


For certain kinds of research, a professional certification (e.g., CATA, FKQ, CSEP, or certification in 


other health related disciplines) could be an asset for acceptance into the program. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 
Requirements for the Degree 
1. Credits. A fully qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits. 


2. Courses. Students must complete four 3-credit courses (EXCI 610, 612, 624, 626). 


3. Thesis. (EXCI 670, EXCI 680, or EXCI 690 - 33 credits). Prerequisite: EXCI 626. In addition to a 
written final thesis, a public oral examination is conducted to test the student's ability to defend 


the thesis. 


Academic Regulations 


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1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 
Program Specific Requirements. Students must obtain an assessment grade point average 
(AGPA) of 2.70 based on a minimum of 6 credits. 


2. Residence. The minimum residence requirement is one year (three terms) of full-time study, or 


the equivalent in part-time study. 


3. Time Limit. Students are encouraged to complete the program within 2 years. Those who do not 
complete the MSc program within two years must submit a formal request for an extension to the 
Graduate Program Director before they can maintain their registration in the program. Students 
who exceed a two-year time period may not be guaranteed funding. Part-time students may 
apply to the program based on the availability of faculty supervisors. It is recommended that part- 
time students complete the degree within 5 years. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page 


for further details regarding the Time Limit requirements. 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 2.70. 


5. Progress Report. Each student’s progress is formally evaluated by the student’s thesis 


supervisor every six months and a report submitted to the Graduate Program Director. 


Courses 


For the MSc program, every student must complete the following courses 


EXCI 610 — Statistics and Research Design (3 credits) 
EXCI 612 — Laboratory Techniques (3 credits) 

EXCI 624 — Special Topics Seminar (3 credits) 

EXCI 626 — Thesis Proposal (3 credits) 

EXCI 670 Thesis (33 credits) 

OR 

EXCI 680 — Thesis (Athletic Therapy) (33 credits) 

OR 


EXCI 690 — Thesis (Clinical Exercise Physiology) (33 credits) 
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Master of/Magisteriate in Science (Health and Exercise Science) (45 credits) 


Year | 

Fall (6 credits) EXCI 610 (3 credits), 624 (3 credits) 

Winter (6 credits) EXCI 612 (3 credits), 626 (3 credits) 

Year Il 

33 credits EXCI 670 (33 credits) or EXCI 680 (33 credits) or EXCI 690 (33 credits) 


Course Descriptions 


EXCI 610 Statistics and Research Design (3 credits) 

This course provides students with a background in statistics and experimental design. Students are 
exposed to a variety of experimental designs applicable to the exercise sciences. The course covers 
the application of statistical concepts in consideration of specific experimental design methods. A 
number of parametric and non-parametric statistics are introduced for hypothesis testing, with the 


opportunity to apply relevant knowledge using various statistical software packages. 


EXCI 612 Laboratory Techniques (3 credits) 

The course provides a theoretical awareness of measurement principles and offers practical 
experience in applying techniques common to advanced research methodologies in exercise 
science. The potential topics to be covered are geared towards the requirements of the individual in 
the areas of exercise physiology and athletic therapy. These may include such topics as data 
acquisition and analysis, electromyography, blood flow methodologies, spectrophotometry, 


pulmonary gas exchange, motion analysis, and tissue histochemistry. 


EXCI 624 Special Topics Seminar (3 credits) 

This course is designed to meet the special needs of graduate students in the exercise science 
areas of concentration specific to athletic therapy and clinical exercise physiology. Topics vary within 
the domain to account for investigation of current and developing theories. The course involves 


presentation, discussion, and critical analysis of information from current scientific journal literature. 


EXCI 626 Thesis Proposal (3 credits) 

This course provides students with the opportunity to choose a research topic and formulate a 
research proposal under the supervision of a thesis advisor. The proposal should include a literature 
review, rationale, hypothesis, and methodology including the planned research design and data 
analysis. Students are required to present a seminar in the Department on their research prior to the 


presentation of their proposal to the thesis advisory committee. 


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EXCI 670 Thesis (33 credits) 


Prerequisite: EXCI 626. 
Students are required to demonstrate their ability to carry out independent research which reflects a 
scientific approach. In addition to a written final thesis, a public oral examination is conducted to test 


the student's ability to defend the thesis. 


EXCI 680 Thesis (Athletic Therapy) (33 credits) 

Prerequisite: EXCI 626. 

Students are required to demonstrate their ability to carry out independent research which reflects a 
scientific approach. In addition to a written final thesis, a public oral examination is conducted to test 


the student's ability to defend the thesis. 


EXCI 690 Thesis (Clinical Exercise Physiology) (33 credits) 

Prerequisite: EXCI 626. 

Students are required to demonstrate their ability to carry out independent research which reflects a 
scientific approach. In addition to a written final thesis, a public oral examination is conducted to test 


the student's ability to defend the thesis. 


EXCI 698 Selected Topics in Exercise Science (3 credits) 


This course explores themes within the area of Exercise Science. 


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http:/Awww.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/hist.html 


History PhD 


Admission Requirements 


The normal requirement for admission to the PhD is a Master of/Magisteriate in Arts degree in 
History, with high standing, from a recognized university. Applicants should understand that 


admission is contingent on a superior academic record, strong references, and a convincing 


statement of purpose which clearly describes their professional goals and intended area of research. 


In addition, admission is contingent on the availability of an appropriate faculty member in 


the Department of History to serve as supervisor. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 


their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 


to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate entering the program with a master’s or magisteriate degree 


is required to complete a minimum of 90 credits. 


2. Courses. (18 credits). During the first two years of their program, doctoral students must register 


for HIST 889 Doctoral Seminar (6 credits). This seminar complements students’ individualized 
tutorial preparation for comprehensive exams and facilitates their preparation of the thesis 
proposal by offering a forum for faculty guidance in and peer discussion of matters of scholarly, 
pedagogical, and professional practice. Subjects to be addressed include study and writing 
strategies for comprehensive exams; thesis topics and proposal-writing; research methods and 
resources; and professional skills. The seminar meets bi-weekly during the fall and winter terms. 
In addition, doctoral students are required to take 12 credits of 800-level courses, consisting of 
two 3-credit reading courses in the student's minor comprehensive fields and a 6-credit reading 
course, HIST 878, in the student's major comprehensive field. HIST 878 includes an explicit 
course-preparation component, where the student prepares an annotated syllabus for an 
undergraduate lecture course encompassed by the major field. In exceptional cases, students 
may, with permission of the graduate program director, do three credits of course work at an 


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equivalent level in another discipline. 


. Comprehensive Examinations. (12 credits). Early in their first term in the program, and in 
consultation with the GPD, new PhD students form an advisory committee of three faculty 
members to assist in the selection and preparation of comprehensive fields. In the first year of 
their program, students take reading courses with the supervisors of each of the three fields, 
which prepares the students to complete the full requirements of each field's preparation over the 


following terms. 


Subject to the availability of appropriate faculty members, the Department of History is normally 
prepared to supervise comprehensive examinations in a range of broadly defined geographical 
and chronologically limited fields, as well as in thematic fields, as suits the student's program. 
Example of fields recently supervised include: History of Canada since 1867; History of France 
since 1789; History of Haiti from 1801 to 1986; Labour History. For other fields available, 


applicants may consult the faculty research pages of the department's website. 


The major field will be that in which the student’s proposed doctoral thesis 


falls. Normally students choose at least one field defined in specific geographical terms. 


Any student may offer one examination in a related discipline when approved by the History 
Graduate Committee and by the appropriate faculty member and/or program administrator in that 


discipline. 


The preparation of a comprehensive field should give students sufficient background to teach at 
an introductory level and/or do advanced research in the field. Although the requirements may 
vary from one field to the next, a core reading list of 50 to 100 titles per field is suggested as 
reasonable. The reading list for a field is be drawn up by the professor in consultation with the 
student in the context of the reading courses associated with the field taken in the student's first 


year, and once established, both must agree to any significant changes. 


The examinations are normally scheduled by the end of the fourth term (or fall of the second 
year) of the student's program. The comprehensive examinations consist of take-home 
examinations in three selected fields, each is completed over a 72-hour period. These written 
examinations are normally completed within a three-week period. If successful, they are followed 
by an oral examination, involving all three examiners,normally held within two weeks of the last 
written comprehensive. The purpose of the oral comprehensive is to allow the doctoral student 
the opportunity to explain or expand on parts of the written examinations which professors found 


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inadequate or unclear, as well as to allow for more general discussion among the examiners and 


the student as a group of historians. 


4. PhD Thesis Proposal Preparation and Colloquium. HIST 885: PhD Thesis Proposal and 
Colloquium (6 credits). Following the successful completion of the comprehensive exams, 
students prepare a written thesis proposal for the approval of the internal members of their thesis 
committee. The thesis proposal should describe and justify the intended topic, explain its place in 
the historiography of the field, discuss the intended research methods, and identify the source 
requirements including their availability. Students are normally expected to submit and defend 
their thesis proposal by the end of the fifth term of their studies. When the written proposal is 
approved the student presents an oral colloquium about the proposal to the department. When 


the proposal and colloquium requirements are satisfied, the student is admitted to candidacy. 


5. Thesis. HIST 890: Thesis Research (54 credits). Doctoral students must submit a thesis based 
on their research and defend it in an oral examination. A doctoral thesis in history is expected to 
be based on extensive research in primary sources, to make an original contribution to historical 
knowledge, and to be presented in an acceptable literary form. The PhD thesis should normally 


run to no more than 400 pages including all critical apparatuses. 


6. Language. Doctoral candidates are required to demonstrate their ability to read and translate 
historical material in one modern language other than English. In addition, students may elect, or 
may be required, to demonstrate competence in a second language. Language examinations, 
which are normally given twice a year, are administered by the department. Dictionaries are not 


allowed in writing the exam. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Residence. The minimum period of residence is six terms (including summer terms) of full-time 
graduate study beyond the master’s or magisteriate degree, or nine terms of full-time graduate 
study beyond the bachelor’s degree for those students who are permitted to enrol for doctoral 


studies without a master’s or magisteriate degree, or the equivalent in part-time study. 


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3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 3.00. 


Courses 


Most graduate seminars and tutorials are one term in length. The content of these courses varies 


from term to term. Students should consult the department for more detailed information. 
Research, Theses, and Comprehensive Examinations 


HIST 877 Comprehensive Minor Field Tutorial (3 credits) 

Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the letter 
following the course number, e.g. HIST 877A, HIST 877B, etc. 

HIST 878 Comprehensive Major Field Tutorial (6 credits) 

HIST 880 Comprehensive Examinations (12 credits) 

HIST 885 PhD Thesis Proposal and Colloquium (6 credits) 

HIST 889 Doctoral Seminar (6 credits) 

HIST 890 Thesis Research (54 credits) 


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Concordia University 


http:/Awww.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/hist-ma.html 


History MA 


Admission Requirements 


The normal requirement for admission into the MA is an honours degree in history or its equivalent. 
Applicants should understand that admission is contingent on a sound undergraduate academic 
record, strong letters of reference, and a convincing statement of purpose which clearly describes 
their academic interest in the program and intended area of research. In addition, admission is 
contingent on the availability of an appropriate faculty member in the Department of History to serve 
as supervisor. Some applicants with deficiencies in their undergraduate preparation may be admitted 


into a qualifying year program. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits. 


2. Residence. The minimum residence requirement is one year (three terms) of full-time study, or 


the equivalent in part-time study. 


3. Language. All MA students must demonstrate their ability to read and translate historical 
material in an acceptable language other than English. Language examinations, which are 
normally given twice a year, are administered by the department. In addition, a reading 


knowledge of French may be required in some seminars. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


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2. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


3. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 2.70. 


Master of/Magisteriate in Arts (History) 


1. Courses. (15 credits). All students must take 15 credits of 600-level courses including HIST 
600 The Nature of Historical Knowledge (3 credits); and HIST 601 Historical Research Methods 
(3 credits). Students are normally encouraged to incorporate breadth in their course selection. In 
exceptional cases students may, with permission of the GPD, do three credits of course work at 


an equivalent level in another discipline. 


2. Thesis. HIST 685: MA Thesis (30 credits). The thesis is a work of primary research that normally 
runs to 18,000-24,000 words (about 60-80 pages), exclusive of footnotes and 
bibliography. Prepared under the supervision of one or more faculty, it must be defended orally 


before a committee of three History faculty including the supervisor. 


Courses 


Most graduate seminars and tutorials are one term in length. The content of these courses varies 


from term to term. Students should consult the department for more detailed information. 


HIST 600 The Nature of Historical Knowledge (3 credits) 

This course examines the history of the discipline and the nature of historical knowledge, as well as 
contemporary debates about the meaning and practice of history. The content varies from term to 
term depending on the instructor(s). The material covered may include the following: research tools 
(e.g. library resources, the archives and the Internet), major approaches to history (e.g. Marxist, 
Annaliste, feminist), the debate about objectivity and truth in history, public history (history in film, 


television, schools, museums), and the impact of postmodernism on historical practice. 


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HIST 601 Historical Research Methods (3 credits) 


This course guides students in the intial stages of developing an MA thesis topic and elaborating a 


substantial research proposal. 


European History 


HIST 610 Selected Topics in European History (3 credits) 


Canadian History 
HIST 620 Selected Topics in Canadian History (3 credits) 


United States History 
HIST 630 Selected Topics in US History (3 credits) 


Latin American and Caribbean History 


HIST 634 Selected Topics in Latin American and Caribbean History (3 credits) 


Asian History 
HIST 638 Selected Topics in Asian History (3 credits) 


Middle Eastern History 
HIST 642 Selected Topics in Middle Eastern History (3 credits) 


African History 
HIST 646 Selected Topics in African History (3 credits) 


History of Genocide and Human Rights 
HIST 650 Selected Topics in the History of Genocide and Human Rights (3 credits) 


History of Gender and Sexuality 
HIST 660 Selected Topics in the History of Gender and Sexuality (3 credits) 


Public History 
HIST 665 Selected Topics in Public History (3 credits) 


Selected Areas of History 
HIST 670 Selected Topics in History (3 credits) 
HIST 679 Tutorial in a Selected Area of History (3 credits) 


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Research, Theses, and Comprehensive Examinations 


HIST 685 MA Thesis (30 credits) 


© Concordia University 


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Concordia University 


http:/Awww.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/huma.html 


Humanities PhD 


Admission Requirements 


The normal requirement is a Master of Arts or Master of Fine Arts with high standing from a 
recognized university. The Humanities Program Committee reviews the applicant's academic 
background, portfolio (for research-creation applicants), and research or research-creation 
proposal in order to determine whether a) the applicant's project is truly interdisciplinary and 

falls within the scope of available faculty and facilities at Concordia, and b) the applicant'srecord 
indicates that they are likely to excel in a demanding program that requires rigorous engagement in 


more than one discipline. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Fields of Study. Students in the Humanities PhD program identify the three fields that inform 
their interdisciplinary project: a major field and two minor fields. A “field” is defined as a 
recognizable and coherent segment of a discipline, and in some instances may 


itself be interdisciplinary. 


2. Advisory Committee. Prior to admission into the program, applicants form an advisory 
committee composed of three faculty members — a major field Supervisor and two minor field 
advisors — chosen from faculty members in departments that correspond to the three fields 
informing the student’s interdisciplinary project. In consultation with the student, the 
advisory committee determines the student’s program of study. Where the need for access to 
such resources as equipment, materials, or space arises for applicants seeking to pursue 
research-creation projects, they must discuss such needs with their prospective supervisor at the 


time of application. 


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3. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 90 credits. These are 


apportioned as follows: minimum course requirements, 18credits; three comprehensive field 
examinations, each examination worth 3 credits; thesis proposal (with defence), 6 credits; 


thesis, 57 credits. 


4. Courses. Students are required to take two 3-credit core seminars in their first year: HUMA 888 
and HUMA 889. The remaining 12 elective course credits are chosen in consultation with the 
student’s advisory committee. The following may be used as elective courses: graduate courses 
at the 600 level or higher offered by departments in areas relevant to the student’s program of 
study; 3-credit directed study courses; may also include HUMA 887 (Special Topic). A directed 
study course provides students with the opportunity to pursue advanced and focused work with 
individual faculty members in the fields that constitute the students’ program of study. Directed 


study courses (3 credits) are designated HUMA 884 followed by the course topic. 


5. Comprehensive Examinations (HUMA 891, 892, 893). Upon completion of the required 
coursework, students take three comprehensive field examinations before proceeding to the 
thesis proposal stage. Each examination is set and marked by the student’s advisor in that field. 
For students pursuing a research-creation project, one of the comprehensive examinations is a 
studio examination attended by all three advisors and chaired by the program director. The three 


comprehensive field examinations are designated: 


HUMA 891 Comprehensive Examination Major Field (3 credits) 
HUMA 892 Comprehensive Examination Minor Field | (3 credits) 
HUMA 893 Comprehensive Examination Minor Field Il (3 credits) 


6. Thesis Proposal with Defence (HUMA 894). Upon completion of the required coursework and 
three comprehensive field examinations, students are admitted to 
candidacy following acceptance by their advisory committee of the written thesis proposal and its 
successful oral defence. The thesis proposal should be integrative in character, bringing the 


student's three fields to bear on the thesis project and laying the groundwork for the thesis. 


7. Thesis (HUMA 895). A doctoral thesis should be based on extensive research in primary 
sources, make a significant and original contribution to knowledge, and be presented in a 
manner that conceptually and formally accords with scholarly standards. Students may produce 


a research-creation thesis with the approval of the student’s advisory committee and the 


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Humanities Program Director. In accordance with the thesis guidelines of the School of Graduate 


Studies, a research-creation thesis normally comprises two synthesized components: a creative 
production component (which may be presented in a variety of media, communicative, or 
performative platforms) and a written scholarly component. The written scholarly component of 
the research-creation thesis should demonstrate substantial knowledge of the relevant scholarly 
literature, consider methodological issues, and present a contribution to knowledge. In addition, 
the research-creation thesis must demonstrate knowledge of prevailing practices and precedents 
in the practical field of activity in which the creative production component situates itself, and 


may reflect on the production process. 


8. Language Requirement. Prior to submission of their thesis, doctoral candidates are required to 
demonstrate an ability to read and translate scholarly material in at least one language (other 


than the language of their thesis) relevant to their studies. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Residence. The minimum residence requirement is two years (6 terms) of full-time study, or the 


equivalent in part-time study. 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 3.00. 


Courses 


Required Courses 


HUMA 888 Seminar in Interdisciplinary Studies | (3 credits) 
A required core seminar to be taken by all students within their first year in the program. This 


course engages with theories and methods of interdisciplinarity germane to the humanities, social 
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sciences and fine arts, including those pertinent to research-creation. Its objectives include 


enhancing awareness of the role of conceptual frameworks and institutional practices in the shaping 
of interdisciplinary scholarly and creative explorations, and providing students with opportunities to 
begin pursuing theoretical and methodological issues vital to their individual interdisciplinary 
projects. 


HUMA 889 Seminar in Interdisciplinary Studies Il (3 credits) 
A required core seminar to be taken by all students within their first year in the program. Each year a 
different topic or approach is selected with the aim of exploring how it is pursued and challenged 


across disciplinary boundaries. 
Elective Courses 


HUMA 884 Directed Studies (3 credits) 
A directed study course provides students with the opportunity to pursue advanced and focused 
work with individual faculty members in the fields that constitute the student's program of study. 


Directed study courses are designated by the course topic. 


HUMA 887 Advanced Seminar in Special Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies (3 credits) 

This seminar examines in-depth special topics in interdisciplinary studies. 

Note: The content varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may reregister for this 
course, provided the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the course 
topic following the HUMA 887 course title. 


Comprehensive Examinations and Thesis 


HUMA 891 Comprehensive Examination Major Field (3 credits) 
HUMA 892 Comprehensive Examination Minor Field | (3 credits) 
HUMA 893 Comprehensive Examination Minor Field II (3 credits) 
HUMA 894 Thesis Proposal with Defence (6 credits) 

HUMA 895 Thesis (57 credits) 


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Concordia University 


http:/Awww.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/jour-ma.html 


Digital Innovation in Journalism Studies MA 


Admission Requirements 


The normal requirement for admission into the MA is an undergraduate degree with a minimum GPA 
of 3.00 on a 4.30 scale. Applicants should understand that admission to the program is contingent 
on a sound undergraduate academic record, strong letters of reference, and a convincing statement 
of purpose which clearly describes their academic interest in the program and intended area of 
research. Applicants who do not meet the standards for admission may be required to complete a 
qualifying program of up to 12 undergraduate credits in addition to the regular graduate program. 


For the qualifying program a minimum grade point average of 3.00 (B average) is required. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A fully qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits. The 


requirements include three core program courses. 


2. Courses. Students are required to complete 15 credits of coursework, as well as one of the 


three options for research requirements listed below. The following core courses are required: 


JOUR 601 Critical Approaches to Journalistic Thought (3 credits) 
JOUR 604 Research Methods for Journalism (3 credits) 
JOUR 605 Digital Innovation in Journalism (3 credits) 


Choose two of the following elective courses: 

JOUR 502 Introduction to Reporting (3 credits) 

JOUR 503 Introduction to Visual Journalism (3 credits) 
JOUR 511 Introduction to Multimedia (3 credits) 

JOUR 523 News and Feature Photography (3 credits) 


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JOUR 603 Political Economy of Journalism (3 credits) 


JOUR 610 International Journalism (3 credits) 

JOUR 620 Journalism Ethics and the Law (3 credits) 

JOUR 630 Mediating Diversity through Audio Story-telling (3 credits) 
JOUR 640 Textual Approaches to Journalism (3 credits) 

JOUR 642 Special Topics in Journalism Studies (3 credits) 

JOUR 645 Directed Study (3 credits) 


* With the permission of the department, up to six elective credits may be taken in 600-level 


courses offered by other departments. 


3. Research Requirements and Options. 


Option A. 

JOUR 650 Journalism Readings and Proposal (6 credits) 
JOUR 691 Thesis (24 credits) 

OR 

Option B. 

JOUR 650 Journalism Readings and Proposal (6 credits) 
JOUR 693 Research-Creation Thesis (24 credits) 

OR 

Option C. 

JOUR 694 Essay (18 credits) 

12 additional course credits in consultation with the student’s faculty advisor and approved by the 


Department’s MA program director. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Residence. The minimum residence requirement is one year (3 terms) of full-time study, or the 


equivalent in part-time study 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


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4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 2.70. 


Courses 


JOUR 502 Introduction to Reporting (3 credits) 

This is a comprehensive lecture/laboratory course which lays the foundations for the writing and 
reporting demands of journalism. Students are introduced to the salient features of print and 

digital formats, and receive assignments in information-gathering and writing both in class and in the 
field. 


JOUR 503 Introduction to Visual Journalism (3 credits) 

This workshop course lays the foundation for the visual aspects of journalistic story-telling. Working 
with digital, single-lens reflex cameras, students acquire fundamental skills for the practice of visual 
journalism, becoming familiar with a variety of aesthetic, technical, ethical and theoretical concerns 


involved in the visual production of meaning. 


JOUR 511 Introduction to Multimedia (3 credits) 
This course is an introduction to the use of technology across audio and visual news platforms, 
including audio, visual and digital equipment and software. Students learn the necessary 


professional, technical and aesthetic skills to produce editorially sound audio and visual stories. 


JOUR 523 News and Feature Photography (3 credits) 

This workshop course covers a range of journalistic topics — hard news, general news, features, 
arts, sports — to emphasize the thematic particularities of visual story-telling. The course requires 
students to consider and incorporate the narrative and representative dimensions of visual 


journalism through a variety of assignments. 


JOUR 601 Critical Approaches to Journalistic Thought (3 credits) 
This course introduces students to a scholarly critique of journalism, both as a practice and as an 
institution. Students examine specific readings from an overlapping social, political and economic 


context to consider the role of journalists as cultural producers. 


JOUR 603 Political Economy of Journalism (3 credits) 
This course considers journalism through its organization as a cultural industry and critically 
evaluates journalism’s economic structures and the impact those structures have on journalism 


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practice. Topics may include media economics, free-market theory, media ownership, the role of the 


government and the role of organized labour. 


JOUR 604 Research Methods for Journalism (3 credits) 

This course examines a variety of research methods commonly used in the production and study of 
journalism, from both qualitative and quantitative perspectives. Emphasis is placed on primary 
sources, access to information requests, and electronic databases with a goal of helping students 


develop their own research practice. 


JOUR 605 Digital Innovation in Journalism (3 credits) 
This course offers lectures and workshops in digital innovation and web design, with a focus on 


design features related to journalism production and news platforms. 


JOUR 610 International Journalism (3 credits) 
Prerequisite: JOUR 601 previously or concurrently. 
This course examines journalism as a cross-cultural and global practice, addressing such issues as 


media representation, multiculturalism, globalization and international news flows. 


JOUR 620 Journalism Ethics and the Law (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: JOUR 601 previously or concurrently or permission of the program director. 

This course examines the journalist's responsibility in terms of both ethics and the law. It introduces 
students to a representative cross-section of ethical theories and codes and takes an intensive look 


at the most common legal issues affecting the practice of journalism. 


JOUR 630 Mediating Diversity through Audio Story-telling (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: JOUR 601 previously or concurrently or permission of the program director. 

The course is an experiential workshop that blends journalism theory and practice. Students function 
both as reporters, in order to learn the skills necessary to produce robust audio stories, and digital 
researchers tasked with examining diversity and media representation issues arising in class to 


explore journalism’s mediating function in society. 


JOUR 640 Textual Approaches to Journalism (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: JOUR 601 previously or concurrently. 

This course concentrates on journalism’s use of all forms of language, from written text to sounds 
and images. Drawing from the literature on linguistics, semiotics, textual and discourse analysis, 
students consider ways in which journalists, through their use of language to describe and depict 


people, events, institutions and ideas, become implicated in the news they report. 


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JOUR 642 Special Topics in Journalism Studies (3 credits) 


This seminar permits the in-depth examination of particular special topics in digital innovation in 


journalism studies. Topics vary from year to year. 


JOUR 645 Directed Study (3 credits) 
Prerequisite: Permission of the MA Program Director. 
Students may enrol in a directed study under faculty supervision in order to undertake a specialized 


study of theoretical or research-related topics. 


JOUR 650 Journalism Readings and Proposal (6 credits) 

Prerequisite: JOUR 601. 

In consultation with the faculty advisor, the student reviews relevant literature pertinent to the 
research topic and writes a thesis proposal demonstrating knowledge based upon the review of the 


scholarly literature. 


JOUR 691 Thesis (24 credits) 

Prerequisite: JOUR 650. 

The thesis is researched and written under the direction of a supervisor. Upon completion, it is 
submitted to the student’s Thesis Committee. The thesis is defended in an oral examination before 


the Thesis Committee. 


JOUR 693 Research-Creation Thesis (24 credits) 

Prerequisite: JOUR 650. 

The Research-Creation Thesis is specifically designed for students with media production 
experience who wish to complete an original media production using a suitable media platform, 
complemented by a text of approximately 10,000 words comprising a literature and media review, a 
theoretical and methodological contextualization, and a critical reflection on the project and its 


outcomes. 


JOUR 694 Essay (18 credits) 

Prerequisites: JOUR 601, 604, 605. 

Students produce an essay on a research topic developed in consultation with a faculty member 
that explores a specific issue relevant to journalism studies. The final essay must be evaluated by a 
second faculty member. The essay's length is approximately 40 pages, which does not include a 


bibliography. The course is normally taken in term five of the students’ degree. 


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Journalism Graduate Diploma 


Admission Requirements 


Entry into the program requires a bachelor's degree or equivalent in a field other than journalism 
from a recognized university with a minimum GPA of 3.00. However, students who have graduated 
with a Journalism degree in a language other than English may also be considered. Applicants are 
required to submit a letter of intent together with the application which should be about 600 words 
outlining the student's background, academic and work experience, and aspirations in journalism. 
Qualified applicants may be interviewed. Students should be aware that written assignments in 


workshops are in English. 


Although it does not determine acceptance, applicants are advised that a working knowledge of 
French is important. Normally the program is taken full-time and completed in one year 
(three terms). 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Diploma 


1. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 33 credits. 


2. Courses. All students are required to complete 33 credits in the following sequence: 


Summer Term (9 credits) 

JOUR 501 Research Methods for Journalism 
JOUR 502 Introduction to Reporting 

JOUR 511 Introduction to Multimedia 


Fall Term (12 credits) 
JOUR 500 Critical Approaches to Journalism 
JOUR 504 Intermediate Reporting 


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JOUR 530 Advanced Radio News 


JOUR 536 Advanced Video Journalism 


Winter Term (12 credits) 
JOUR 510 Web Editing and Page Design 
JOUR 513 Journalism Ethics and the Law 


And two of the following courses: 

JOUR 505 Advanced Reporting 

JOUR 508 Research Project 

JOUR 528 The Digital Magazine 

JOUR 532 Documentary Video and Radio 
JOUR 542 International Journalism 
JOUR 566 Photojournalism 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


3. Graduation Requirement. To graduate, students must have completed all course requirements 


with a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.70. 


Courses 


JOUR 500 Critical Approaches to Journalism (3 credits) 
This course introduces students to a scholarly critique of journalism, both as a practice and as an 
institution. By interrogating specific readings, students are encouraged to consider the journalist as a 


cultural producer operating within overlapping social, political and economic contexts. 


JOUR 501 Research Methods for Journalism (3 credits) 
This course introduces students to research methods with a focus on primary sources, such as 
official documents, legal and financial records, access to information requests, electronic databases, 


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as well as in-depth interviews. These methods are treated as both sources of story ideas and as 


essential elements of good reporting. 


JOUR 502 Introduction to Reporting (3 credits) 

This is a comprehensive lecture/laboratory course which lays the foundations for the writing and 
reporting demands of journalism. Students are introduced to the salient features of print and 

digital formats, and receive assignments in information-gathering and writing both in class and in the 
field. 


JOUR 504 Intermediate Reporting (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: JOUR 502. 

This course is intended to consolidate the reporting and writing skills learned during the summer. 
Through lectures and laboratory work, students expand their knowledge of information-gathering 


and writing techniques, including short deadline news reporting and feature writing. 


JOUR 505 Advanced Reporting (3 credits) 
This workshop offers students the opportunity to perfect their reporting and writing skills and to 


undertake long form writing projects, ranging from beat reporting to magazine writing. 


JOUR 508 Research Project (3 credits) 
The project is to be a comprehensive study and report on some area of modern media practice, or 
on the interaction of media and society. The subject and method must be approved in advance by 


the instructor of the course. 


JOUR 510 Web Editing and Page Design (3 credits) 
Prerequisite: JOUR 501. 
This course offers lectures and workshops in web editing and page design. Specific focus is given to 


design features related to journalism production and news platforms. 


JOUR 511 Introduction to Multimedia (3 credits) 
This course is an introduction to the use of technology across audio and visual news platforms, 
including audio, visual and digital equipment and software. Students learn the necessary 


professional, technical and aesthetic skills to produce editorially sound audio and visual stories. 


JOUR 513 Journalism Ethics and the Law (3 credits) 

This course examines the journalist's responsibility in terms of both ethics and the law. It introduces 
students to a representative cross-section of ethical theories and codes and takes an intensive look 
at the most common legal issues affecting the practice of journalism. 


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JOUR 528 The Digital Magazine (3 credits) 


This course requires students to produce the Department’s Digital Magazine. The course replicates 
the working conditions and journalistic experience of a digital newsroom. Students are expected to 
work in editorial teams to create current and update multimedia content throughout the term. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a JOUR 525 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


JOUR 530 Advanced Radio News (3 credits) 
This is a workshop course in which students function as reporters, writers, news readers and editors 


in order to learn the skills necessary to produce daily newscasts. 


JOUR 532 Documentary Video and Radio (3 credits) 
This workshop allows students to perfect their skills in long format public affairs broadcasting 
in sound and pictures. Students learn the fundamentals of documentary production including story 


developments and treatment,cinematographic style, interviewing, editing and presentation. 


JOUR 536 Advanced Video Journalism (3 credits) 
This course gives students the opportunity to perfect their skills in writing and reporting for video 


journalism and producing news and public affairs programming. 


JOUR 542 International Journalism (3 credits) 
This course examines the way journalism is practiced in a selected country or tradition. The focus of 


the course may change from year to year. 


JOUR 566 Photojournalism (3 credits) 

Using digital cameras and technology, students perform a variety of exercises and assignments to 
help them master the techniques used in planning, taking, and laying out news photographs. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a JOUR 525 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


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Visual Journalism Graduate Diploma 


Admission Requirements 


The normal requirement for admission into the graduate Diploma is an undergraduate degree with a 
minimum GPA of 3.00 on a 4.30 scale. Some experience in journalism, photojournalism or a media- 
related field is considered an asset. Applicants should understand that admission is contingent upon 
a sound undergraduate academic record, strong letters of recommendation, and a convincing letter 

of intent, which clearly describes their interest in the program. Students should be aware that course 
instruction and assignments are in English, and although it does not determine acceptance, 


applicants are advised that a working knowledge of French is important. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Diploma 


1. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 33 credits. 


2. Courses. All students are required to complete 33 credits in the following sequence: 


Summer Term (9 credits) 

JOUR 501 Research Methods for Journalism 
JOUR 502 Introduction to Reporting 

JOUR 511 Introduction to Multimedia 


Fall Term (12 credits) 

JOUR 500 Critical Approaches to Journalism 

JOUR 523 News and Feature Photography 

JOUR 527 Elements of Lighting for Visual Journalism 
JOUR 536 Advanced Video Journalism 


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Winter Term (12 credits) 


JOUR 513 Journalism Ethics and the Law 
JOUR 535 Documentary and Photographic Series 


And two of the following courses: 

JOUR 503 Introduction to Visual Journalism 
JOUR 507 Basics of Digital Imaging 

JOUR 508 Research Project 

JOUR 521 Visual Story-Telling 

JOUR 528 The Digital Magazine 

JOUR 531 Visual Journalism Photo Editing 
JOUR 532 Documentary Video and Radio 
JOUR 537 Visual Journalism Portfolio 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


3. Graduation Requirement. To graduate, students must have completed all course requirements 


with a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.70. 


Courses 


JOUR 500 Critical Approaches to Journalism (3 credits) 
This course introduces students to a scholarly critique of journalism, both as a practice and as an 
institution. By interrogating specific readings, students are encouraged to consider the journalist as a 


cultural producer operating within overlapping social, political and economic contexts. 


JOUR 501 Research Methods for Journalism (3 credits) 
This course introduces students to research methods with a focus on primary sources, such as 
official documents, legal and financial records, access to information requests, electronic databases, 


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as well as in-depth interviews. These methods are treated as both sources of story ideas and as 


essential elements of good reporting. 


JOUR 502 Introduction to Reporting (3 credits) 

This is a comprehensive lecture/laboratory course which lays the foundations for the writing and 
reporting demands of journalism. Students are introduced to the salient features of print and 

digital formats, and receive assignments in information-gathering and writing both in class and in the 
field. 


JOUR 503 Introduction to Visual Journalism (3 credits) 

This workshop course lays the foundation for the visual aspects of journalistic story-telling. Working 
with digital, single-lens reflex cameras, students acquire fundamental skills for the practice of visual 
journalism, becoming familiar with a variety of aesthetic, technical, ethical and theoretical concerns 


involved in the visual production of meaning. 


JOUR 507 Basics of Digital Imaging (3 credits) 

This workshop course introduces students to the fundamental concepts of editing news 
photographs. Working with actual news photographs and editing software, students learn to weigh 
aesthetic and technical considerations with the ethical and theoretical aspects involved in the visual 


production of meaning. 


JOUR 508 Research Project (3 credits) 
The project is to be a comprehensive study and report on some area of modern media practice, or 
on the interaction of media and society. The subject and method must be approved in advance by 


the instructor of the course. 


JOUR 511 Introduction to Multimedia (3 credits) 
This course is an introduction to the use of technology across audio and visual news platforms, 
including audio, visual and digital equipment and software. Students learn the necessary 


professional, technical and aesthetic skills to produce editorially sound audio and visual stories. 


JOUR 513 Journalism Ethics and the Law (3 credits) 
This course examines the journalist's responsibility in terms of both ethics and the law. It introduces 
students to a representative cross-section of ethical theories and codes and takes an intensive look 


at the most common legal issues affecting the practice of journalism. 


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JOUR 521 Visual Story-Telling (3 credits) 


This workshop introduces students to the dynamic and aural elements of visual story-telling in the 
context of multi-platform journalism. Students acquire technical skills of video and sound capture 


through instruction that brings to bear aesthetic, ethical and theoretical considerations. 


JOUR 523 News and Feature Photography (3 credits) 

This workshop course covers a range of journalistic topics — hard news, general news, features, 
arts, sports — to emphasize the thematic particularities of visual story-telling. The course requires 
students to consider and incorporate the narrative and representative dimensions of visual 


journalism through a variety of assignments. 


JOUR 527 Elements of Lighting for Visual Journalism (3 credits) 
This workshop course introduces students to lighting techniques for both still photography and video 
story-telling. Students learn to weigh technical and aesthetic aspects of lighting with the ethical and 


theoretical dimensions involved in the manipulation or alteration of the shooting environment. 


JOUR 528 The Digital Magazine (3 credits) 

This course requires students to produce the Department’s Digital Magazine. The course replicates 
the working conditions and journalistic experience of a digital newsroom. Students are expected to 
work in editorial teams to create current and update multimedia content throughout the term. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a JOUR 525 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


JOUR 531 Visual Journalism Photo Editing (3 credits) 

This advanced workshop course covers the decision-making process for news, magazine and online 
photography, treating photo editing as a collaborative element of visual journalism. Moving beyond 
aesthetic and technical aspects, it situates editing within the larger context of news production, such 


as collaborating with reporters, editors and photo editors in the story-telling process. 


JOUR 532 Documentary Video and Radio (3 credits) 
This workshop allows students to perfect their skills in long format public affairs broadcasting 
in sound and pictures. Students learn the fundamentals of documentary production including story 


developments and treatment,cinematographic style, interviewing, editing and presentation. 


JOUR 535 Documentary and Photographic Series (3 credits) 
This advanced workshop course concentrates on the photo story, the editorial essay and the 
documentary essay. The course emphasizes pre-visualization, planning, logistics and realization as 


well as optimizing series for newspaper, magazine and online publications. 
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JOUR 536 Advanced Video Journalism (3 credits) 


This course gives students the opportunity to perfect their skills in writing and reporting for video 


journalism and producing news and public affairs programming. 


JOUR 537 Visual Journalism Portfolio (3 credits) 
This advanced capstone workshop focuses on students creating professional portfolios, helping 


them create and establish their individual brands as professional visual journalists. 


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Mathematics PhD 


Admission Requirements 


Candidates will be selected on the basis of their past academic record, letters of recommendation 
and the relevance of the proposed area of research to the areas of specialization of the Department. 
The normal requirement for admission to the program is a MSc degree, with high standing in 
Mathematics or an allied discipline from a recognized university. Exceptional candidates who have 
successfully completed one-year's study at the Master's level may, upon approval by the Graduate 
Studies Committee, be exempted from the required completion of the Master's degree and admitted 


directly into the PhD program. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. Students must complete a program of 90 credits, consisting of the following 


components: 
a. Comprehensive examinations (12 credits); 
b. Six courses or seminars (18 credits); 


c. Thesis (60 credits). 


2. Comprehensive Examination. The comprehensive examination is composed of the following 


two parts: 


Part A (6 credits) 

This is a written examination, consisting of two parts. The first part of the Comprehensive A 
examination is to test the candidate's general knowledge of fundamental mathematical concepts. 
It will normally be completed within one year (3 terms) of the candidate's entry into the program 
or the equivalent of part-time study. The second part of the Comprehensive A examination tests 


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the candidate's knowledge of topics in his or her area of specialization. The material will be 


chosen from the list of course descriptions given by the Graduate Studies Committee in 
consultation with the candidate's research supervisor and the student's Advisory Committee. 


Candidates are allowed at most one failure in the Part A examination. 


Part B (6 credits) 

The Comprehensive B examination is an oral presentation of the candidate's plan of his or her 
doctoral thesis in front of the student's Advisory Committee. It is normally taken within two-three 
years of the candidate's entry into the program (or the equivalent of part-time study) and at least 


one year before the expected completion of the thesis. 


3. Thesis. Concurrently with the preparation for the Part B exam, the students will be engaging in 
their research work towards the dissertation. After submitting the doctoral thesis, the candidate is 
required to pass an oral defence of the thesis. The doctoral thesis must make an original 
contribution to mathematical knowledge, at a level suitable for publication in a reputable 


professional journal in the relevant area. 


4. Average Time to Completion. Normally a student completes all requirements for the degree, 
except for the thesis, within two years of entering the program. The normal period for completion 
of the program, for a student already holding the equivalent of an MA/MSc degree, is three to 


four years. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Residence. The minimum period of residence is two years of full-time graduate study, beyond 
the MA/MSc, or the equivalent in part-time study. (A minimum of one year of full-time study is 


normally expected). 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


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4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 


least 3.00. 


Courses 


Elective Courses 
Number Theory and Computational Algebra 


MAST 830 Cyclotomic Fields (3 credits) 
L-series, Dirichlet theorem, Gauss sums, Stickelberger theorem, class groups and class number, 


circular units, analytic formulae. 


MAST 831 Class Field Theory (3 credits) 
Local and global class field theory, ideles and adeles, reciprocity laws, existence theorem. 


MAST 832 Elliptic Curves (3 credits) 
Introduction to elliptic curves over finite fields, local and global fields, rational points, Mordell-Weil 


theorem, formal groups. 

MAST 833 Selected Topics in Number Theory (3 credits) 

MAST 834 Selected Topics in Computational Algebra (3 credits) 
Analysis 

MAST 837 Selected Topics in Analysis (3 credits) 

MAST 838 Selected Topics in Pure Mathematics (3 credits) 
Mathematical Physics and Differential Geometry 


MAST 840 Lie Groups (3 credits) 

The mathematical theory of Lie groups and introduction to their representation theory with 
applications to mathematical physics. Topics will include classical Lie groups, one-parameter 
subgroups, Lie algebras and the exponential mapping, adjoint and coadjoint representations, roots 


and weights, the Killing form, semi-direct products, Haar measure and decompositions such as 


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those of Cartan and Iwasawa. The theory of unitary representations on Hilbert spaces. Physical 


applications of compact Lie groups (such as SU(2) and SU(3)) and non-compact groups (such as 


the Lorentz and Poincaré groups). 


MAST 841 Partial Differential Equations (P.D.E.’s) (3 credits) 

Introduction to the mathematical theory of P.D.E.’s, including applications to mathematical physics. 
Topics will include Sturm-Liouville systems, boundary value and eigenvalue problems, Green’s 
functions for time-independent and time-dependent equations, Laplace and Fourier transform 
methods. Additional topics will be selected from the theory of elliptic equations (e.g. Laplace and 
Poisson equations), hyperbolic equations (e.g., the Cauchy problem for the wave equation) and 
parabolic equations (e.g., the Cauchy problem for the heat equation). Links will be made with the 


theory of differential operators and with analysis on manifolds. 


MAST 851 Differential Geometric Methods in Physics (3 credits) 
Manifolds, differential systems, Riemannian, Kahlerian and symplectic geometry, bundles, 
supermanifolds with applications to relativity, quantization, gauge field theory and Hamiltonian 


systems. 


MAST 852 Algebro-Geometric Methods in Physics (3 credits) 
Algebraic curves, Jacobi varieties, theta functions, moduli spaces of holomorphic bundles and 
algebraic curves, rational maps, sheaves and cohomology with applications to gauge theory, 


relativity and integrable systems. 


MAST 853 Gauge Theory and Relativity (3 credits) 
Yang-Mills theory, connections of fibre bundles, spinors, twistors, classical solutions, invariance 
groups, instantons, monopoles, topological invariants, Einstein equations, equations of motion, 


Kaluza-Klein, cosmological models, gravitational singularities. 


MAST 854 Quantization Methods (3 credits) 
Geometric quantization, Borel quantization, Mackey quantization, stochastic and phase space 


quantization, the problems of prequantization and polarization, deformation theory, dequantization. 


MAST 855 Spectral Geometry (3 credits) 
Schrodinger operators; min-max characterization of eigenvalues, geometry of the spectrum in 
parameter space, kinetic potentials, spectral approximation theory, linear combinations and smooth 


transformations of potentials, applications to the N-body problem. 


MAST 856 Selected Topics in Mathematical Physics (3 credits) 


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MAST 857 Selected Topics in Differential Geometry (3 credits) 


Dynamical Systems 


MAST 860 Differentiable Dynamical Systems (3 credits) 

The study of dynamical properties of diffeomorphisms or of one-parameter groups of 
diffeomorphisms (flows) defined on differentiable manifolds. Periodic points, the non-wandering set, 
and more general invariant sets. Smale’s horseshoe, Anosov, and Morse-Smale systems, general 
hyperbolic systems, the stable manifold theorem, various forms of stability, Markov partitions and 


symbolic dynamics. 


MAST 861 Absolutely Continuous Invariant Measures (3 credits) 

Review of functional analysis, Frobenius-Perron operator and its properties, existence of absolutely 
continuous invariant measures for piecewise expanding transformations, properties of invariant 
densities, compactness of invariant densities, spectral decomposition of the Frobenius-Perron 
operator, bounds on the number of absolutely continuous invariant measures, perturbations of 


absolutely continuous invariant measures. 


MAST 862 Numerical Analysis of Nonlinear Problems (3 credits) 

Continuation of solutions, homotopy methods, asymptotic stability, bifurcations, branch switching, 
limit points and higher order singularities, Hopf bifurcation, control of nonlinear phenomena, ODE 
with boundary and integral constraints, discretization, numerical stability and multiplicity, periodic 
solutions, Floquet multipliers, period doubling, tori, control of Hopf bifurcation and periodic solutions, 
travelling waves, rotations, bifurcation phenomena in partial differential equations, degenerate 


systems. 


MAST 863 Bifurcation Theory of Vector Fields (3 credits) 
Local and global bifurcations. Generalized Hopf bifurcation and generalized homoclinic bifurcation. 
Hamiltonian systems and systems close to Hamiltonian systems, local codimension two bifurcations 


of flows. 


MAST 865 Selected Topics in Dynamical Systems (3 credits) 


Statistics and Actuarial Mathematics 


MAST 871 Advanced Probability Theory (3 credits) 
Definition of probability spaces, review of convergence concepts, conditioning and the Markov 


property, introduction to stochastic processes and martingales. 


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MAST 872 Stochastic Processes (3 credits) 


Stochastic sequences, martingales and semi-martingales, Gaussian processes, processes with 


independent increments, Markov processes, limit theorems for stochastic processes. 


MAST 873 Advanced Statistical Inference (3 credits) 

Decision functions, randomization, optimal decision rules, the form of Bayes’ rule for estimation 
problems, admissibility and completeness, minimax, rules, invariant statistical decisions, admissible 
and minimax decision rules, uniformly most powerful tests, unbiased tests, locally best tests, general 


linear hypothesis, multiple decision problems. 


MAST 874 Advanced Multivariate Inference (3 credits) 
Wishart distribution, analysis of dispersion , tests of linear hypotheses, Rao’s test for additional 
information, test for dimensionality, principal component analysis, discriminant analysis, Mahalanobis 


distance, cluster analysis, relations with sets of variates. 


MAST 875 Advanced Sampling (3 credits) 
Unequal probability sampling, multistage sampling, super population models, Bayes and empirical 
Bayes estimation, estimation of variance from complex surveys, non-response errors and 


multivariate auxiliary information. 


MAST 876 Survival Analysis (3 credits) 
Failure time models, inference in parametric models, proportional hazards, non-parametric 


inference, multivariate failure time data, competing risks. 


MAST 877 Reliability Theory (3 credits) 
Reliability performance measures, unrepairable systems, repairable systems, load-strength reliability 
models, distributions with monotone failure rates, analysis of performance effectiveness, optimal 


redundancy, heuristic methods in reliability. 


MAST 878 Advanced Risk Theory (3 credits) 
Generalizations of the classical risk model, renewal processes, Cox processes, diffusion models, 


ruin theory and optimal surplus control. 


MAST 881 Selected Topics in Probability, Statistics and Actuarial Mathematics (3 credits) 


Seminars 


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MAST 858 Seminar in Mathematical Physics (3 credits) 


MAST 859 Seminar in Differential Geometry (3 credits) 

MAST 868 Seminar in Dynamical Systems (3 credits) 

MAST 889 Seminar in Probability, Statistics and Actuarial Mathematics (3 credits) 
MAST 898 Seminar in Number Theory (3 credits) 

MAST 899 Seminar in Computational Algebra (3 credits) 


Thesis and Comprehensive Examinations 


MAST 890 Comprehensive Examination A (6 credits) 
MAST 891 Comprehensive Examination B (6 credits) 
MAST 892 Doctoral Thesis (60 credits) 


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http:/Awww.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/mast-ma-msc.html 


Mathematics MA/MSc 


Admission Requirements 


Applicants must have a Bachelor's degree with Honours in Mathematics, or equivalent. Qualified 
applicants requiring prerequisite courses may be required to take up to 12 undergraduate credits in 
addition to and as a part of the regular graduate program. Promising candidates who lack the 
equivalent of an Honours degree in Mathematics may be admitted after having completed a 


qualifying program. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits. 


2. Courses. Students may enter one of the two options below. The choice of the option, the 
selection of the courses and the topic of the thesis, must be approved by the Graduate Program 


Director. 


3. Course Load. A full-time student will take at least two courses during the first term. A part-time 
student will normally take one course during the first term. The course load during subsequent 


terms will be determined by the Graduate Program Director, in consultation with the student. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


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2. Residence. The minimum residence requirement is one year (3 terms) of full-time study, or the 


equivalent in part-time study. 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 2.70. 


Master of/Magisteriate in Science/Arts with Thesis (Option A) 

Candidates are required to take six 3-credit courses, or equivalent, and MAST 700. 
Master of/Magisteriate in Science/Arts without Thesis (Option B) 

Candidates are required to take ten 3-credit courses, or equivalent, and MAST 701. 


Courses 


The Master of Science/Arts courses offered by the Department of Mathematics and Statistics fall into 


the following categories: 


MAST 650-654 History and Methods 

MAST 655-659 Topology and Geometry 

MAST 660-669 Analysis 

MAST 670-679 Statistics and Actuarial Mathematics 
MAST 680-689 Applied Mathematics 

MAST 690-699 Algebra and Logic 

MAST 720-729 Statistics and Actuarial Mathematics 


The course content will be reviewed each year in light of the interests of the students and faculty. In 


any session only those courses will be given for which there is sufficient demand. 


History and Methods 


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MAST 651 The Contributions of Mathematics to Intellectual Life (3 credits) 


This course examines several major mathematical advances over the centuries in the historical and 
intellectual contexts of the day and also focuses on the developments of a particular branch of 
mathematics over the more recent past. Examples may include recent advances in number theory 


and geometry leading to a proof of Fermat’s Last Theorem and applications of number theory to 


cryptography. 


MAST 652 Topics in Research in Mathematics Education (3 credits) 

The general aim of this course is to acquaint students with research problems in mathematics 
education and ways of approaching them (theoretical frameworks and research methodologies). 
Note: The content varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course provided the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the title of the 


course. 


MAST 653 Topics in the Foundations of Mathematics (3 credits) 

This course focuses on foundational issues and developments in mathematics, with topics chosen 
from particular branches of mathematics, e.g., geometry (Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries; 
comparison of Euclid’s “Elements” with Hilbert’s “Grundlagen der Geometrie”, etc.), or logic 
(evolution of logic from Aristotle to Boole; Hilbert’s program; Godel’s Incompleteness theorems, etc.). 
It may also look at foundational problems in mathematics suggested by physics and other sciences. 
More general, philosophical, epistemological and methodological questions about the nature of 
mathematics may also be chosen as topics for the course. 

Note: The content varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course provided the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the title of the 


course. 


MAST 654 Topics in the History of Mathematics (3 credits) 

This course may focus on a particular epoch and place in the history of mathematics (e.g., Ancient 
Greek, Indian and Chinese mathematics; the development of mathematics in Europe in the 17th to 
19th centuries, etc.), or on the history of a particular area of mathematics (history of geometry, 
algebra, analysis, number theory, etc.). Aspects related to the history of approaches to teaching 
mathematics may also be addressed. 

Note: The content varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course provided the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated bythe title of the 


course. 


Topology and Geometry 


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MAST 655 Topology (3 credits) 


Topological spaces. Order, product, subspace, quotient topologies. Continuous functions. 


Compactness and connectedness. The fundamental group and covering spaces. 


MAST 656 Differential Geometry (3 credits) 

Mappings, functions and vectors fields on R", inverse and implicit function theorem, differentiable 
manifolds, immersions, submanifolds, Lie groups, transformation groups, tangent and cotangent 
bundles, vector fields, flows, Lie derivatives, Frobenius’ theorem, tensors, tensor fields, differential 
forms, exterior differential calculus, partitions of unity, integration on manifolds, Stokes’ theorem, 


Poincaré lemma, introduction to symplectic geometry and Hamiltonian systems. 
MAST 657 Manifolds (3 credits) 

MAST 658 Lie Groups (3 credits) 

Analysis 

MAST 661 Topics in Analysis (3 credits) 


MAST 662 Functional Analysis | (3 credits) 
This course will be an introduction to the theory of Hilbert spaces and the spectral analysis of self- 
adjoint and normal operators on Hilbert spaces. Applications could include Stone’s theorem on one 


parameter groups and/or reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces. 


MAST 663 Introduction to Ergodic Theory (3 credits) 
This course covers the following topics: measurable transformations, functional analysis review, the 
Birkhoff Ergodic Theorem, the Mean Ergodic Theorem, recurrence, ergodicity, mixing, examples, 


entrophy, invariant measures and existence of invariant measures. 


MAST 664 Dynamical Systems (3 credits) 

An introduction to the range of dynamical behaviour exhibited by one-dimensional dynamical 
systems. Recurrence, hyperbolicity, chaotic behaviour, topological conjugacy, structural stability, and 
bifurcation theory for one-parameter families of transformation. The study of unimodal functions on 
the interval such as the family Fr (X) = rx (1-x), where 0 <r <4 .. For general continuous maps of the 


interval, the structure of the set of periodic orbits, for example, is found in the theorem of Sarkovskii. 


MAST 665 Complex Analysis (3 credits) 
Review of Cauchy-Riemann equations, holomorphic and meromorphic functions, Cauchy integral 


theorem, calculus of residues, Laurent series, elementary multiple-valued functions, periodic 
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meromorphic functions, elliptic functions of Jacobi and Wierstrass, elliptic integrals, theta functions. 


Riemann surfaces, uniformization, algebraic curves, abelian integrals, the Abel map, Riemann theta 
functions, Abel’s theorem, Jacobi varieties, Jacobi inversion problem. Applications to differential 


equations. 

MAST 666 Differential Equations (3 credits) 
MAST 667 Reading Course in Analysis (3 credits) 
MAST 668 Transform Calculus (3 credits) 


MAST 669 Measure Theory (3 credits) 
Measure and integration, measure spaces, convergence theorems, Radon-Nikodem theorem, 
measure and outer measure, extension theorem, product measures, Hausdorf measure, L°-spaces, 


Riesz theorem, bounded linear functionals on C(X), conditional expectations and martingales. 
Statistics and Actuarial Mathematics 


MAST 670 Mathematical Methods in Statistics (3 credits) 

This course will discuss mathematical topics which may be used concurrently or subsequently in 
other statistics stream courses. The topics will come mainly from the following broad categories; 1) 
geometry of Euclidean space; 2) matrix theory and distribution of quadratic forms; 3) measure theory 
applications (Reimann-Stieltjes integrals); 4) complex variables (characteristic functions and 
inversion); 5) inequalities (Cauchy-Schwarz, Holder, Minkowski, etc.) and numerical techniques 
(Newton-Raphson algorithm, scoring method, statistical differentials); 6) some topics from probability 


theory. 


MAST 671 Probability Theory (3 credits) 
Axiomatic construction of probability; characteristic and generating functions; probabilistic models in 
reliability theory; laws of large numbers; infinitely divisible distributions; the asymptotic theory of 


extreme order statistics. 


MAST 672 Statistical Inference | (3 credits) 
Order statistics; estimation theory; properties of estimators; maximum likelinood method; Bayes 
estimation; sufficiency and completeness; interval estimation; shortest length confidence interval; 


Bayesian intervals; sequential estimation. 


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MAST 673 Statistical Inference Il (3 credits) 


Testing of hypotheses; Neyman-Pearson theory; optimal tests; linear hypotheses; invariance; 


sequential analysis. 


MAST 674 Multivariate Analysis (3 credits) 

An introduction to multivariate distributions will be provided; multivariate normal distribution and its 
properties will be investigated. Estimation and testing problems related with multivariate normal 
populations will be discussed with emphasis on Hotelling’s generalized T? and Wishart distribution. 
Other multivariate techniques including MANOVA; canonical correlations and principal components 


may also be introduced. 


MAST 675 Sample Surveys (3 credits) 
A review of statistical techniques and simple random sampling, varying probability sampling, 


stratified sampling, cluster and systematic sampling-ratio and product estimators. 


MAST 676 Linear Models (3 credits) 

Matrix approach to development and prediction in linear models will be used. Statistical inferences 
on the parameters will be discussed after development of proper distribution theory. The concept of 
generalized inverse will be fully developed and analysis of variance models with fixed and mixed 


effects will be analyzed. 


MAST 677 Time Series (3 credits) 

Statistical analysis of time series in the time domain. Moving average and exponential smoothing 
methods to forecast seasonal and non-seasonal time series, construction of prediction intervals for 
future observations, Box-Jenkins ARIMA models and their applications to forecasting seasonal and 
non-seasonal time series. A substantial portion of the course will involve computer analysis of time 


series using computer packages (mainly MINITAB). No prior computer knowledge is required. 
MAST 678 Statistical Consulting and Data Analysis (3 credits) 
MAST 679 Topics in Statistics and Probability (3 credits) 


MAST 720 Survival Analysis (3 credits) 


Parametric and non-parametric failure time models; proportional hazards; competing risks. 


MAST 721 Advanced Actuarial Mathematics (3 credits) 
General risk contingencies; advanced multiple life theory; population theory; funding methods and 


dynamic control. 


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MAST 722 Advanced Pension Mathematics (3 credits) 


Valuation methods, gains and losses, stochastic returns, dynamic control. 


MAST 723 Portfolio Theory (3 credits) 


Asset and liability management models, optimal portfolio selection, stochastic returns, special topics. 


MAST 724 Risk Theory (3 credits) 


General risk models; renewal processes; Cox processes; surplus control. 


MAST 725 Credibility Theory (3 credits) 
Classical, regression and hierarchical Bayes models, empirical credibility, robust credibility, special 


topics. 


MAST 726 Loss Distributions (3 credits) 
Heavy tailed distributions, grouped/censured data, point and interval estimation, goodness-of-fit, 


model selection. 


MAST 727 Risk Classification (3 credits) 


Cluster analysis, principal components, discriminant analysis, Mahalanobis distance, special topics. 


MAST 728 Reading Course in Actuarial Mathematics (3 credits) 


MAST 729 Selected Topics in Actuarial Mathematics (3 credits) 


Applied Mathematics 


MAST 680 Topics in Applied Mathematics (3 credits) 


MAST 681 Optimization (3 credits) 

Introduction to nonsmooth analysis: generalized directional derivative, generalized gradient, 
nonsmooth calculus; connections with convex analysis. Mathematical programming: optimality 
conditions; generalized multiplier approach to constraint qualifications and sensitivity analysis. 
Application of the theory: functions defined as pointwise maxima of a family of functions; minimizing 
the maximal eigenvalue of a matrix-valued function; variational analysis of an extended eigenvalue 


problem. 


MAST 682 Matrix Analysis (3 credits) 
Jordan canonical form and applications, Perron-Frobenius theory of nonnegative matrices with 


applications to economics and biology, generalizations to matrices which leave a cone invariant. 


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MAST 683 Numerical Analysis (3 credits) 


This course consists of fundamental topics in numerical analysis with a bias towards analytical 
problems involving optimization integration, differential equations and Fourier transforms. The 
computer language C++ will be introduced and studied as part of this course; the use of “functional 
programming” and graphical techniques will be strongly encouraged. By the end of the course, 
students should have made a good start on the construction of a personal library of tools for 


exploring and solving mathematical problems numerically. 


MAST 684 Quantum Mechanics (3 credits) 
The aim of this course is two-fold: (i) to provide an elementary account of the theory of non- 
relativistic bound systems, and (ii) to give an introduction to some current research in this area, 


including spectral geometry. 


MAST 685 Approximation Theory (3 credits) 


MAST 686 Reading Course in Applied Mathematics (3 credits) 


MAST 687 Control Theory (3 credits) 
Linear algebraic background material, linear differential and control systems, controllability and 


observability, properties of the attainable set, the maximal principle and time-optimal control. 


MAST 688 Stability Theory (3 credits) 


MAST 689 Variational Methods (3 credits) 


Algebra and Logic 


MAST 691 Mathematical Logic (3 credits) 


MAST 692 Advanced Algebra | (3 credits) 
Field extensions, normality and separability, normal closures, the Galois correspondence, solution of 


equations by radicals, application of Galois theory, the fundamental theorem of algebra. 


MAST 693 Algebraic Number Theory (3 credits) 
Dedekind domains; ideal class groups; ramification; discriminant and different; Dirichlet unit theorem; 


decomposition of primes; local fields; cyclotomic fields. 


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MAST 694 Group Theory (3 credits) 


Introduction to group theory, including the following topics: continuous and locally compact groups, 
subgroups and associated homogeneous spaces. Haar measures, quasi-invariant measures, group 
extensions and universal covering groups, unitary representations, Euclidean and Poincaré groups, 


square integrability of group representations with applications to image processing. 


MAST 696 Advanced Algebra Il (3 credits) 


MAST 697 Reading Course in Algebra (3 credits) 


MAST 698 Category Theory (3 credits) 


MAST 699 Topics in Algebra (3 credits) 


Thesis and Mathematical Literature 


MAST 700 Thesis (27 credits) 


MAST 701 Project (15 credits) 
A student investigates a mathematical topic, prepares a report and gives a seminar presentation 


under the guidance of a faculty member. 


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Concordia University 


http:/Awww.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/mast-mtm.html 


Teaching of Mathematics MTM 
Note: Admissions have been suspended. 


Admission Requirements 


A Bachelor’s degree with a minimum GPA of 3.00, an interest in the teaching of pre-university 
mathematics, as well as an adequate mathematical background including courses equivalent to: a) 6 
credits in statistics-probability; b) 6 credits in advanced calculus; c) 6 credits in linear algebra and d) 
3 credits in differential equations or algebraic systems. Candidates must be able to demonstrate 
their capacity for graduate level work in some academic field, not necessarily mathematics. 
Candidates will normally be interviewed to ensure their suitability for the program. Applicants with a 
deficiency in their academic background may be required to take up to 12 undergraduate credits in 
addition to or as a part of the regular graduate program. Promising candidates who lack the 
requirements for admission may be considered after having completed a qualifying program. 
Applicants without teaching experience may be admitted to the program provided they satisfy the 


Graduate Studies Committee of their potential for teaching or for educational research. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits. 


2. Courses. 
Students may enter one of the three options below. The choice of the option, the selection of the 
courses and the thesis or project topic must be approved by the Graduate Program Director. 
Besides the courses listed in the present section, Master/Magisteriate in the Teaching of 
Mathematics (MTM) students may take any MAST 600 or higher level course offered in the MSc 


program, subject to the Graduate Program Director’s approval. Students aspiring to become 


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College mathematics teachers upon graduation will be encouraged to take at least three MSc 


mathematics courses. 
1. Thesis Option: MATH 602, 647, 654 and eight additional 3-credit courses. 
2. Project Option: MATH 602, 603 and eleven additional 3-credit courses. 


3. Course Option: Fifteen 3-credit courses. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Residence. The minimum residence requirement is one year (3 terms) of full-time study, or the 


equivalent in part-time study. 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 2.70. 


Courses 


MTM courses fall into six categories: 

1. Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME): MATH 630, 649. 

2. Didactics of Mathematics (DM): MATH 624. 

3. Information and Communication Technology (ICT): MATH 633, 634, and 639. 
4. Research in Mathematics Education (RME): MATH 641, 642, 645, and 646. 


5. Mathematics content courses (MC): MATH 601, 613, 616, 618, 621, 622, 625, 626, 627, 637, 
640, and 648. 


6. Thesis or Extended Project (T/P): Seminar MATH 652; Reading courses MATH 602 and 647; 
Extended Project MATH 603, and Thesis MATH 654. 


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Each year the Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers a selection of the following courses. 


Courses are worth 3 credits unless otherwise indicated. 


MATH 601 Topics in Mathematics 
Note: The content varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course, provided the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated bythe title of the 


course. 


MATH 602 Readings in Mathematics Education | 
This reading course is closely related to the project or thesis. The outcome is a section of the 


literature review chapter, related to the domain of research that is the focus of the project or thesis. 


MATH 603 Extended Project (9 credits) 
A student investigates a mathematics education topic, prepares a report, and gives a seminar 


presentation under the guidance of a faculty member. 


MATH 613 Topics in Number Theory 

Topics are chosen from the area of Number Theory. 

Note: The content varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course, provided the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated bythe title of the 


course. 


MATH 616 Linear Algebra 
This course is an extension of undergraduate courses in linear algebra, covering a selection of 
topics in advanced linear algebra (e.g. from the theory of general vector spaces, linear and 


multilinear algebras, matrix theory, etc.) 


MATH 618 Topics in the Application of Mathematics 

Topics are chosen from the area of the Application of Mathematics. 

Note: The content varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course, provided the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated bythe title of the 


course. 


MATH 621 Geometry 
The course offers an insight into Euclidean and Non-Euclidean geometries. 


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MATH 622 Abstract Algebra 


The course looks at objects such as numbers, polynomials, matrices or transformations from an 
algebraic-structural point of view. The course may aim at proving such “famous impossibilities” as 
squaring the circle, duplicating the cube, trisecting an angle or solving a polynomial equation of 


degree 5 or more by radicals. 


MATH 624 Topics in Mathematics Education 

This course is an overview and critical analysis of theories and technologies of mathematics 
teaching. Applications of the theories to studying and/or developing teaching situations or tools for 
specific mathematical topics are examined. 

Note: The content varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course, provided the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated bythe title of the 


course. 


MATH 625 Topology 


The course develops elements of the theory of topological spaces and their transformations. 


MATH 626 Analysis | 

The course is an extension of undergraduate courses in mathematical analysis in the real domain 
(Analysis I, Il; Real Analysis; Measure Theory). Students may substitute this course with any of the 
MAST 660-669 courses in the MA/MSc program. 


MATH 627 Analysis II 
The course is an extension of undergraduate courses in mathematical analysis in the complex 
domain (Complex Analysis I, Il). Students may substitute this course with any of the MAST 660-669 


courses in the MA/MSc program. 


MATH 630 Topics in the Psychology of Mathematics Education 

This course studies epistemological, cognitive, affective, social and cultural issues involved in 
mathematics. 

Note: The content varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course, provided the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated bythe title of the 


course. 


MATH 633 Applications of Technology in Mathematics Curriculum Development 
This course is an overview of the impact of information and communication technology on curricula, 


textbooks and teaching approaches. 


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MATH 634 Computer Software and Mathematics Instruction 


This course is an overview and critical evaluation of computer software designed for use in 


mathematics instruction. 


MATH 637 Statistics and Probability 
This course discusses theoretical and applied aspects of statistics and probability. Students may 
substitute this course with any of the MAST 670-677 courses in the MA/MSc program. 


MATH 639 Topics in Technology in Mathematics Education 

This course involves the elaboration, experimentation and critical analysis of individual projects of 
integration of ICT in mathematics education. 

Note: The content varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course, provided the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated bythe title of the 


course. 


MATH 640 Topics in Logic 

Topics are chosen from the area of Mathematical Logic. 

Note: The content varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course, provided the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated bythe title of the 


course. 


MATH 641 Survey of Research in Mathematics Education 


This course is an overview of recent results in mathematics education research. 


MATH 642 Research Methods for Mathematics Education 
This course is an overview of qualitative and quantitative methods in mathematics education 


research. 


MATH 645 Topics in Mathematics Education Research 

This course is an overview of research literature on a chosen topic or issue in mathematics 
education. 

Note: The content varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course, provided the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated bythe title of the 


course. 


MATH 646 Research Internship 
Students conduct a pilot study or participate in a research project as a research assistant under the 
supervision of a senior researcher. The outcome is a written report of the study. 


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MATH 647 Readings in Mathematics Education Il 


The course is closely related to project or thesis writing. Its outcome is a section of the literature 


review chapter, focused on the student’s particular research question. 


MATH 648 Topics in the History of Mathematics 

Topics are chosen from the area of the History of Mathematics. 

Note: The content varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course, provided the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated bythe title of the 


course. 


MATH 649 Heuristics and Problem Solving 
This course examines cognitive processes, tools and strategies involved in solving mathematical 


problems. 


MATH 652 Seminar in Mathematics Education 
This course is primarily a thesis or project preparation seminar but it is open to students in the 
Course Option as well. The research related to students’ research projects is presented and critically 


evaluated. 


MATH 654 Thesis (15 credits) 
Students are required to demonstrate their ability to carry out original, independent research. The 
thesis is researched and written under the direction of a supervisor and thesis committee. Upon 


completion of the thesis, the student is required to defend his/her thesis before the thesis committee. 


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Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/phil.html 


Philosophy MA 


Admission Requirements 


An honours degree in philosophy, or its equivalent. Qualified applicants requiring prerequisite 
courses may be required to take up to 12 undergraduate credits in addition to and as a part of the 
regular graduate program. Applicants with deficiencies in their undergraduate preparation may be 


required to take a qualifying program. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits. 
2. Options. Students may enter one of the two options, A or B, outlined below. 


3. Cross-registration. Graduate students in philosophy at Concordia University may take for credit 
the equivalent of 6 credits at the Université de Montréal, McGill University, or the Université du 
Québec a Montréal. Courses taken elsewhere may be accepted as credit for one graduate-level 
course in the Department of Philosophy. Permission for such a substitution must be granted by 
the Graduate Program Director in the Department of Philosophy, and approval from the other 


university or department involved must be obtained. 


Master of/Magisteriate in Arts with Research Paper (Option A) 


Candidates are required to take the following: 


1. Courses. 18 course credits, with the following distribution requirement: (a) at least three credits 
in history of philosophy; (b) at least three credits in aesthetics, moral philosophy, or social and 


political philosophy; (c) at least three credits in metaphysics, epistemology or philosophy of 


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science. 


. Research Paper. Students write one major research paper (PHIL 693) on a topic to be 
determined in consultation with a faculty member, who serves as the supervisor. The student's 
proposal for the research paper is vetted by the Philosophy Graduate Studies Committee, and 
should be submitted before May 1 of the first year of full-time study, or the second year in the 
case of part-time study. A research paper is expected to consider all of the relevant scholarship 
pertaining to its argument and to make an original contribution to knowledge. An oral defence of 
the research paper is required before an examining committee consisting of the supervisor and 
one other professor chosen by the Graduate Program Director in consultation with the 


supervisor. The Research Paper is graded Accepted or Rejected. 


Master of/Magisteriate in Arts with Thesis (Option B) 


Candidates are required to take the following: 


1. Courses: 18 course credits, with the following distribution requirement: (a) at least three credits 
in history of philosophy; (b) at least three credits in aesthetics, moral philosophy, or social and 
political philosophy; (c) at least three credits in metaphysics, epistemology or philosophy of 


science. 


. Thesis. Students write a thesis (PHIL 696) on a topic to be determined in consultation with a 
faculty member. The thesis is written under the guidance of a member of the Department. The 
student's research proposal is vetted by the Philosophy Graduate Studies Committee, and 
should be submitted before May 1 of the first year of full-time study, or the second year in the 
case of part-time study. A master's thesis in philosophy is expected to make an original 
contribution to knowledge. An oral defence of the thesis is required before an examining 
committee consisting of the supervisor and two other professors chosen by the Graduate 
Program Director in consultation with the thesis supervisor. The thesis is graded Accepted or 


Rejected. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


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324 
2. Residence. The minimum residence requirement is one year (3 terms) of full-time study, or the 


equivalent in part-time study. 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 2.70. 


Courses 


All courses are worth 3 credits unless otherwise noted. 
A. History of Philosophy 


PHIL 607 Kant 
This course studies Kant and his work in its historical context, such as the Critique of Pure Reason 


or other texts of Kant. 


PHIL 609 Selected Topics in the History of Philosophy 

Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the letter 
following the course number, e.g. PHIL 609A, PHIL 609B, etc. 


PHIL 612 Ancient Philosophy 

This course studies the texts central to the development of ancient philosophical thought, such as 
works by Plato and Aristotle. 

Note: Students who have received credit for PHIL 601 or PHIL 602 may not take this course for 


credit. 


PHIL 613 Medieval Philosophy 

This course analyzes and discusses texts central to the development of medieval philosophical 
thought, in the Arabic and Latin traditions. Works by Avicenna, Averroes, and Thomas Aquinas are 
studied. 


Note: Students who have received credit for PHIL 604 may not take this course for credit. 


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PHIL 614 Modern Philosophy 


This course studies central problems of 17th- and 18th-century European philosophy, from Bacon 
and Galileo at the beginning of the Scientific Revolution, through continental Rationalism (e.g., 


Descartes and Leibniz), to Hume and the legacy of British Empiricism. 


PHIL 615 19th-Century Philosophy 
This course studies the work of 19th-century philosophers in their historical context, such as Goethe, 


Schelling, Herder, and Hegel. 


PHIL 616 Selected Topics in the History and Philosophy of Science 

Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the letter 
following the course number, e.g. PHIL 616A, PHIL 616B, etc. 


PHIL 617 Origins of Analytic Philosophy 

This course provides an analysis of some of the central philosophical works in the analytic tradition 
from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Works by central figures such as Frege, Russell, 
Wittgenstein or Carnap are covered. 


Note: Students who have received credit for PHIL 663 may not take this course for credit. 


PHIL 618 Origins of Continental Philosophy 

Students study the sources of contemporary continental European thought in the 19th century and 
early 20th century, which are traced to German Idealism and Romanticism, Marxism, and early 
phenomenology. Authors studied may include Kant, Fichte, Schelling, Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard, 
Nietzsche, and Husserl. 


Note: Students who have received credit for PHIL 662 may not take this course for credit. 


B. Aesthetics, Moral Philosophy, or Social and Political Philosophy 


PHIL 621 Value Theory 
Students examine a topic in value theory, such as the exploration of different conceptions of well- 


being, the good, or of virtues. 


PHIL 623 Issues in Ethical Theory 
Students analyse central theories in normative ethics such as consequentialism, deontology, and 


contractualism; and in meta-ethnics such as realism, relativism, and moral nihilism. 


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PHIL 624 Moral Problems 


Students investigate one or more approaches to difficult moral problems that confront us today, such 
as the need to find appropriate responses to war, revolution, tyranny, terrorism, global poverty, 


violence against women, and abortion. 


PHIL 625 Aesthetics 
This course examines central problems in the history of aesthetics and the philosophy of art, 
including the nature of beauty, the sublime, and the ontology of a work of art; or a study of a single 


text or author, such as Aristotle’s Poetics or Kant’s Critique of Judgment. 


PHIL 626 Political Philosophy 

This course investigates central theories in political philosophy, concerning distributive justice, the 
theory of just war, democracy, civil disobedience, freedom of speech, responsibilities to future 
generations, human rights, global justice, multiculturalism, liberalism, socialism, anarchism, or 


feminism. 


PHIL 627 Marx 

Students study central works by Karl Marx. The course may also address important interpretations 
of Marx’s work, such as those developed by Analytic Marxists, Sartre, Althusser, Lukacs, or the 
Frankfurt School. 


PHIL 628 Philosophy of Law 

This course studies a central issue in philosophy of law, such as personality, property, rights, 
interpretation, responsibility, and punishment; or the jurisprudential perspective of such figures as 
Hart, Dworkin, Alexy, Luhmann, Weinrib, Waldron, Greenberg, Finnis, and Murphy. 


Note: Students who have received credit for PHIL 675 may not take this course for credit. 


PHIL 631 Theories of Justice 
This course examines important philosophical contributions to debates about justice, such as 


distributive justice, political justice, human rights, global justice, and inter-generational justice. 


PHIL 632 Environmental Philosophy 
This course provides an analysis of the basic assumptions underlying one or more philosophical 
views of the natural world, such as ethical, aesthetic and ecofeminist theories as well as the theory 


of deep ecology. 


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327 
PHIL 633 Selected Topics in Value Theory 


Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the letter 
following the course number, e.g. PHIL 633A, PHIL 633B, etc. 


C. Metaphysics, Epistemology or Philosophy of Science 


PHIL 634 Selected Topics in Epistemology 

Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the letter 
following the course number, e.g. PHIL 634A, PHIL 634B, etc. 


PHIL 641 Philosophical Foundations of Biology (3 credits) 

This course helps students critically engage biology’s philosophical foundations. Topics typically 
include the nature of scientific reasoning, testing, and evidence in biology; how best to discover, 
define, and apply biological concepts; and how to structure the aims of biology to fit our diverse and 


changing societies. 


PHIL 643 Selected Topics in Metaphysics 

Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the letter 
following the course number, e.g. PHIL 643A, PHIL 643B, etc. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a PHIL 640 or PHIL 642 number may 


not take this course for credit. 


PHIL 644 Philosophy of Science 

This course provides an analysis of philosophical issues raised by science, such as those 
concerning scientific evidence, concepts, theories, and explanation; or the intersection with ethical 
and social problems. 


Note: Students who have received credit for PHIL 650 or 657 may not take this course for credit. 


PHIL 645 Philosophy of Mathematics 
This course investigates some of the central issues and theories in the philosophy of mathematics 
such as logicism, intuitionism, or formalism. Other topics may include the nature of mathematical 


truth or the ontology and epistemology of mathematics. 


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328 
PHIL 646 Philosophy of Language 


Students analyse some aspects of the philosophy of language, such as the nature of meaning, the 
relation between language and thought, or the relation between language and the world. 


Note: Students who have received credit for PHIL 651 may not take this course for credit. 


PHIL 647 Philosophy of Mind 

Students investigate central issues in the philosophy of mind, such as the architecture and 
modularity of the mind, the mind-body problem and mental causation, or the metaphysics and 
function of consciousness. 


Note: Students who have received credit for PHIL 664 may not take this course for credit. 


PHIL 648 Philosophy of Social Science 

Students study methods of various social and human sciences and the differences in aims between, 
for instance, understanding, explaining, experiencing, and being liberated from oppression. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a PHIL 655 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


PHIL 649 Phenomenology 

Drawing from classical and recent phenomenlogical philosophy, students study selected central 
figures such as Husserl, Heidegger, and issues such as meaning, the body, temporality, and 
phenomenological reduction. 


Note: Students who have received credit for PHIL 668 may not take this course for credit. 


PHIL 652 Selected Topics in Logic 

Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the letter 
following the course number, e.g. PHIL 652A, PHIL 652B, etc. 


Note: Students who have received credit for PHIL 611 may not take this course for credit. 


PHIL 656 Selected Topics in Analytic Philosophy 

Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the letter 
following the course number, e.g. PHIL 656A, PHIL 656B, etc. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under PHIL 666 may not take this course for 


credit. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


329 
PHIL 658 Selected Topics in Continental Philosophy 


Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the letter 
following the course number, e.g. PHIL 658A, PHIL 658B, etc. 


PHIL 659 Selected Topics in Metaphysics, Epistemology, or Philosophy of Science 

Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 
course provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the letter 
following the course number, e.g. PHIL 659A, PHIL 659B, etc. 


To be classified each year by the Graduate Program Director: 


PHIL 672 Tutorial 
PHIL 678 Topics in Current Research 
PHIL 698 The Teaching of Philosophy 


Research Paper and Thesis 


PHIL 693 Research Paper (27 credits) 
PHIL 696 Thesis (27 credits) 


Cognate Courses 


Students may enrol in certain courses in the Departments of Education, Political Science, and 
Religions and Cultures with permission of the Philosophy Graduate Program Director and the 


second department involved. 


© Concordia University 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


330 


Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/phys-phd.html 


Physics PhD 


Admission Requirements 


The normal requirement for admission is a Master of Science degree in Physics with high standing 
from a recognized university. Meritorious students enrolled in the Master of Science program in 
Physics at this university who have completed all requirements except for the thesis may apply for 


permission to proceed directly to doctoral studies without submitting a master's thesis. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate, entering the doctoral program with a master’s degree, is 


required to complete a minimum of 90 credits. 
2. Courses. The candidate is required to take the following: 


a. 9 credits chosen from PHYS 601, 602, 603, 609, 636, 637, 639, 642, 644, 646, 648, 649, 
660, 663, 665 and 679. 
Students may, with permission of their supervisor, substitute up to two courses from the 
following list: 
CHEM 620 Selected Topics in Organic Chemistry 
CHEM 630 Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry 
CHEM 677 Enzyme Kinetics and Mechanism 
CHEM 678 Protein Engineering and Design 
CHEM 690 Selected Topics in Instrumentation 
CHEM 692 Experimental Protein Chemistry 
MAST 689 Variational Methods 
MAST 694 Group Theory 
MAST 840 Lie Groups 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


(o) 


331 
MAST 841 Partial Differential Equations (P.D.E.'s) 


MAST 851 Differential Geometric Methods in Physics 
MAST 854 Quantization Methods 

MAST 855 Spectral Geometry 

MAST 856 Selected Topics in Mathematical Physics 
MAST 857 Selected Topics in Differential Geometry 


. PHYS 861: Doctoral Seminar on Selected Topics | (3 credits), in which the candidates must 


present a pedagogical talk on a topic from physics to an advanced-level undergraduate 


student audience. 


. PHYS 862: Doctoral Seminar on Selected Topics II (3 credits), in which the candidates must 


present a talk related to their thesis research to a critical audience. 


. PHYS 870: Comprehensive Examination and Research Proposal (6 credits): The purpose of 


this course is to satisfy the department that the student is sufficiently prepared, in terms of 
background and ability, to pursue the research required for a PhD. Each student is required 
to prepare a written project in his/her field of research. The topic is general, and not part of 
the thesis work. The oral examination is based on the contents of this report. The Graduate 
Program Committee appoints an examination committee in consultation with the thesis 
supervisor. The supervisor is responsible for the subject chosen and also acts as a member 
of the examining committee for the oral presentation. The comprehensive examination must 
be completed within four months after the candidate's initial registration in the PhD program. 
The grade for this course is a Pass or Fail. In case of failure in the first attempt, only one 


more attempt is allowed to take place. 


. PHYS 890: Doctoral Research and Thesis (69 credits): A student who has passed the 


comprehensive examination is admitted to candidacy for the PhD degree. The student is 
allowed to continue working on a research project under the direction of a faculty member of 
the department only after passing the comprehensive examination. The research is in areas 
which reflect the interests of the faculty and the facilities of the department. The thesis must 
make a distinct and original contribution to knowledge, and be presented in acceptable 


literary form. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


332 


Academic Regulations 


1. 


Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 
detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 

Program Specific Requirements. Students must obtain an assessment grade point average 
(AGPA) of 3.00 based on a minimum of 6 credits. 


. Residence. The minimum period of residence is two years (6 terms) of full-time graduate study 


beyond the master’s degree, or the equivalent in part-time study, or three years (9 terms) of full- 
time graduate study beyond the bachelor’s degree for those students who are permitted to enrol 


for doctoral studies without completing a master’s degree. 


. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 


least 3.00. 


Courses 


All courses are worth 3 credits each unless otherwise specified. The graduate courses offered by the 


Department of Physics fall into the following categories: 


PHYS 600-609 Topics in Quantum and High Energy Physics 
PHYS 630-639 Topics in Condensed Matter Physics 

PHYS 640-649 Topics in Theoretical Physics 

PHYS 660-669 Topics in Biomedical Physics 

PHYS 670-679 Topics in Applied Physics 


Topics in Quantum and High Energy Physics (600-609) 


PHYS 601 Advanced Quantum Mechanics | (3 credits) 


This course reviews the mathematical foundations of quantum mechanics, Heisenberg, 


Schroedinger, and interaction representations; time-dependent perturbation theory and the golden 


rule; collision theory, Born approximation, T-matrix and phase shifts; angular momentum theory: 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


333 
eigenvalues and eigenvectors, spherical harmonics, rotations and spin, additions theorems and their 


applications. 


Note: Students who have received credit for PHYS 612 may not take this course for credit. 


PHYS 602 Advanced Quantum Mechanics II (3 credits) 

The following applications are examined: non-relativistic theory - systems of identical particles, 
second quantization, Hartree-Fock theory, as well as path integral formulation of quantum 
mechanics; relativistic theory: Dirac and Klein-Gordon equations, positron theory, propogator theory 
and their applications; field quantization, radiative effects, Dirac and Majorana spinors, Noether’s 
theorem. 


Note: Students who have received credit for PHYS 613 may not take this course for credit. 


PHYS 603 High Energy Physics (3 credits) 

This course discusses symmetries and groups; antiparticles; electrodynamics of spinless particles, 
the Dirac equation and its implications for the electrodynamics of spin 1/2 particles. A general 
discussion of loops, renormalization and running coupling constants, hadronic structure and partons, 
is used to introduce the principles of Quantum Chromodynamics and Electroweak Interactions. The 
course concludes with an exposition of gauge symmetries, the Weinberg-Salam model, and Grand 
Unification. 


Note: Students who have received credit for PHYS 616 may not take this course for credit. 


PHYS 609 Selected Topics in Quantum or High Energy Physics (3 credits) 

This course reflects the research interests of the physics faculty in quantum or high energy physics 
and/or those of the graduate students working with them. 

Note: Students who have taken the same topic under PHYS 615, PHYS 618 or PHYS 619 may not 


take this course for credit. 


Topics in Condensed Matter Physics (630-639) 


PHYS 636 Condensed Matter Physics | (3 credits) 

Review of electron levels in periodic potentials, various band-structure methods, Thomas-Fermi and 
Hartree-Fock theories, screening, anharmonic effects crystals, inhomogeneous semiconductors, p-n 
junctions, transistors. Dielectric properties of insulators, ferroelectric materials. Defects in crystals. 
Magnetic ordering, paramagnetism, diamagnetism, ferromagnetism, phase transitions, 


superconductivity. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


334 
PHYS 637 Condensed Matter Physics Il (3 credits) 


This course provides a review of the phonon modes and electron band structure of crystals. It covers 
a selection of modern quantum condensed-matter topics which may include Hartree-Fock, 
mesoscopic quantum transport theory (quantum dots, 1D systems, 2D systems), superconductivity, 
the quantum Hall effects, weak localization, and current research topics. Students further develop an 


in-depth knowledge of the course material through an individual project. 


PHYS 639 Selected Topics in Condensed Matter Physics (3 credits) 
This course reflects the research interests of the physics faculty in condensed matter physics and/or 
those of the graduate students working with them. 


Note: Students who have received credit for PHYS 635 may not take this course for credit. 


Topics in Theoretical Physics (640-649) 


PHYS 642 Statistical Physics (3 credits) 

This course covers statistical concepts, probability, Gaussian probability distribution, statistical 
ensemble, macrostates and microstates, thermodynamic probability, statistical thermodynamics, 
reversible and irreversible processes, entropy, thermodynamic laws and statistical relations, partition 
functions, Maxwell's distribution, phase transformation, Maxwell-Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein and 
Fermi-Dirac statistics, quantum statistics in the classical limit, black-body radiation, conduction 
electrons in metals, interacting particle system, lattice vibrations, virial coefficients, Weiss molecular 
field approximation. 

Note: Students who have received credit for PHYS 654 may not take this course for credit. 


PHYS 644 Advanced Classical Mechanics and Relativity (3 credits) 

This course covers generalized coordinates, Lagrange’s equations, method of Lagrange multipliers, 
variational formulation, Hamilton’s equations of motion, canonical transformations, Hamilton-Jacobi 
theory, special theory of relativity, Einstein’s axioms, Lorentz transformations, form invariance and 
tensors, four-vectors, gravity. 


Note: Students who have received credit for PHYS 658 may not take this course for credit. 


PHYS 646 Electrodynamics (3 credits) 
This course covers the electrostatic boundary-value problem with Green’s function, Maxwell’s 
equations, energy-momentum tensor, guided waves, dielectric wave-guides, fibre optics, radiation 


static field, multipole radiation, velocity and acceleration field, Larmor’s formula, relativistic 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


335 
generalization, radiating systems, linear antenna, aperture in wave guide, scattering, Thompson 


scattering, Bremsstrahlung, Abraham-Lorentz equation, Breit-Wigner formula, Green’s function for 


Helmholtz’s equation. Noether’s theorem. 


PHYS 648 Non Linear Waves (3 credits) 

Linear stability analysis and limitations, modulated waves and nonlinear dispersion relations, 
Korteweg-de Vries, sine-Gordon, and nonlinear Schrddinger equations. Hydro-dynamic, 
transmission-line, mechanical, lattice, and optical solitions. Applications in optical fibres, Josephson 


junction arrays. Inverse scattering method, conservation laws. 


PHYS 649 Selected Topics in Theoretical Physics (3 credits) 
This course reflects the research interests of the Physics faculty in theoretical physics and/or those 


of the graduate students working with them. 


Topics in Biomedical Physics (660-669) 


PHYS 660 Chemical Aspects of Biophysics (3 credits) 

This course examines several aspects of the stability of protein structures including bonding and 
nonbonding interactions, energy profiles, Ramachandran plot, stabilization through protonation- 
deprotonation, interaction of macromolecules with solvents, the thermodynamics of protein folding, 
and ligand binding. The Marcus-theory of biological electron transfer is discussed. The course also 
introduces the students to several modern biophysical techniques such as electronic spectroscopies 
(absorption, fluorescence), X-ray absorption spectroscopy, NMR and EPR spectroscopy, IR and 
Raman spectroscopy, circular dichroism, and differential scanning calorimetry. Students further 


develop an in-depth knowledge of the course material through an individual project. 


PHYS 663 Quantitative Human Systems Physiology (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: Open to all Science and Engineering program students. 

This course addresses important concepts of quantitative systems physiology and the physical 
bases of physiological function in different organ systems. The student becomes familiar with the 
structure and functional principles of the main physiological systems, and how to quantify them. 
These include the nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory and muscular systems. Important biophysical 
principles and quantitative physiological methods are presented. Topics may include the biophysics 
of muscle contractions, fluid dynamics in the cardiovascular system, respiration gas exchange and 
neuronal communication, and how the biophysics of neuronal communications can be used to image 
brain activity. Students develop in-depth knowledge of how to apply these principles to a specific 


system through an individual project. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


336 
PHYS 665 Principles of Medical Imaging (3 credits) 


Prerequisite: Open to all Science and Engineering program students. 

This course aims to introduce the physical principles associated with important medical imaging 
techniques used in medicine and in neuroscience research. The objective is to cover the whole 
imaging process in detail starting from the body entities to be imaged (e.g. structure, function, blood 
flow, neuronal activity), to the physical principles of data acquisition and finally the methods used for 
image data reconstruction. Important imaging modalities such as X-ray and computer tomography, 
magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine, ultrasound, electrophysiology and optical imaging 
techniques are presented. Students develop an in-depth understanding of how to apply this 


knowledge for a specific imaging modality through an individual project. 


Topics in Applied Physics (670 - 679) 


PHYS 679 Selected Topics in Applied Physics (3 credits) 
This course reflects the research interests of the Physics faculty in Applied Physics and/or those of 


the graduate students working with them. 


Seminar, Thesis, and Comprehensive Examination 


PHYS 861 Doctoral Seminar on Selected Topics | (3 credits) 
Students must present one pedagogical seminar on a topic from physics to an advanced-level 
undergraduate student audience. This course is evaluated on a pass/fail basis. No substitution is 


permitted. 


PHYS 862 Doctoral Seminar on Selected Topics Il (3 credits) 
Students must present one seminar in their current research area to a critical audience. In addition, 
students are required to attend and participate in all departmental seminars. This course is 


evaluated on a pass/fail basis. No substitution is permitted. 


PHYS 870 Comprehensive Examination and Research Proposal (6 credits) 


PHYS 890 Doctoral Research and Thesis (69 credits) 
Note: Students admitted prior to 1997-98 should register for PHYS 850 (70 credits). Students 
admitted after summer 1997 will register for PHYS 850 (66 credits). 


© Concordia University 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


337 


Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/phys-msc.html 


Physics MSc 


Admission Requirements 


Applicants must have an honours degree, or its equivalent in Physics. Qualified applicants lacking 
prerequisite courses are required to take undergraduate courses (up to 12 credits) in addition to the 
regular graduate program. Applicants with deficiencies in their undergraduate preparation may be 


required to take a one-year qualifying program before admission to the MSc program. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits. 
2. Courses. The candidate is required to take the following: 


a. 9 credits chosen from PHYS 601, 602, 603, 609, 636, 637, 639, 642, 644, 646, 648, 649, 
660, 663, 665 and 679. 
Students may, with permission of their supervisor, substitute up to two courses from the 
following list: 
CHEM 620 Selected Topics in Organic Chemistry 
CHEM 630 Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry 
CHEM 677 Enzyme Kinetics and Mechanism 
CHEM 678 Protein Engineering and Design 
CHEM 690 Selected Topics in Instrumentation 
CHEM 692 Experimental Protein Chemistry 
MAST 689 Variational Methods 
MAST 694 Group Theory 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


338 
b. PHYS 760: MSc Seminar on Selected Topics (3 credits). Students must give one seminar in 


the field of their research. 


3. PHYS 790: Master’s Research and Thesis (33 credits): The thesis must represent the results of 
the student's original research work undertaken after admission to this program. Work previously 
published by the student may be used only as introductory or background subject matter. The 
thesis is examined by a departmental committee. An oral examination is conducted to test the 


candidate's ability to defend the thesis. 


4. The thesis may be based on a study of a significant problem in physics or a research project 
conducted as part of the student’s employment. Permission to submit a thesis in the latter 
category is granted in the event that: 


a. the student’s employer furnishes written approval for the pursuit and reporting of the project; 


b. the student has research facilities which, in the opinion of the physics graduate studies 


committee, are adequate; 


(o) 


. arrangements can be made for supervision of the project by a faculty member of the 
Department of Physics; 


d. in all but exceptional cases, the student has direct supervision by a qualified supervisor at the 
site of the student's employment. The supervisor must be approved by the physics graduate 
studies committee. A written working agreement between the supervisor and the university 


are required; 


e. the proposed topic for the thesis, together with a brief statement outlining the proposed 


method of treatment, is approved by the physics graduate studies committee. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Residence. The minimum residence requirement is one year (3 terms) of full-time study, or the 


equivalent in part-time study. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


339 
3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 2.70. 


Courses 


All courses are worth 3 credits each unless otherwise specified. The graduate courses offered by the 


Department of Physics fall into the following categories: 


PHYS 600-609 Topics in Quantum and High Energy Physics 
PHYS 630-639 Topics in Condensed Matter Physics 

PHYS 640-649 Topics in Theoretical Physics 

PHYS 660-669 Topics in Biomedical Physics 

PHYS 670-679 Topics in Applied Physics 


Topics in Quantum and High Energy Physics (600-609) 


PHYS 601 Advanced Quantum Mechanics | (3 credits) 

This course reviews the mathematical foundations of quantum mechanics, Heisenberg, 
Schroedinger, and interaction representations; time-dependent perturbation theory and the golden 
rule; collision theory, Born approximation, T-matrix and phase shifts; angular momentum theory: 
eigenvalues and eigenvectors, spherical harmonics, rotations and spin, additions theorems and their 
applications. 

Note: Students who have received credit for PHYS 612 may not take this course for credit. 


PHYS 602 Advanced Quantum Mechanics II (3 credits) 

The following applications are examined: non-relativistic theory - systems of identical particles, 
second quantization, Hartree-Fock theory, as well as path integral formulation of quantum 
mechanics; relativistic theory: Dirac and Klein-Gordon equations, positron theory, propogator theory 
and their applications; field quantization, radiative effects, Dirac and Majorana spinors, Noether’s 
theorem. 


Note: Students who have received credit for PHYS 613 may not take this course for credit. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


340 
PHYS 603 High Energy Physics (3 credits) 


This course discusses symmetries and groups; antiparticles; electrodynamics of spinless particles, 
the Dirac equation and its implications for the electrodynamics of spin 1/2 particles. A general 
discussion of loops, renormalization and running coupling constants, hadronic structure and partons, 
is used to introduce the principles of Quantum Chromodynamics and Electroweak Interactions. The 
course concludes with an exposition of gauge symmetries, the Weinberg-Salam model, and Grand 
Unification. 


Note: Students who have received credit for PHYS 616 may not take this course for credit. 


PHYS 609 Selected Topics in Quantum or High Energy Physics (3 credits) 

This course reflects the research interests of the physics faculty in quantum or high energy physics 
and/or those of the graduate students working with them. 

Note: Students who have taken the same topic under PHYS 615, PHYS 618 or PHYS 619 may not 


take this course for credit. 


Topics in Condensed Matter Physics (630-639) 


PHYS 636 Condensed Matter Physics | (3 credits) 

Review of electron levels in periodic potentials, various band-structure methods, Thomas-Fermi and 
Hartree-Fock theories, screening, anharmonic effects crystals, inhomogeneous semiconductors, p-n 
junctions, transistors. Dielectric properties of insulators, ferroelectric materials. Defects in crystals. 
Magnetic ordering, paramagnetism, diamagnetism, ferromagnetism, phase transitions, 


superconductivity. 


PHYS 637 Condensed Matter Physics Il (3 credits) 

This course provides a review of the phonon modes and electron band structure of crystals. It covers 
a selection of modern quantum condensed-matter topics which may include Hartree-Fock, 
mesoscopic quantum transport theory (quantum dots, 1D systems, 2D systems), superconductivity, 
the quantum Hall effects, weak localization, and current research topics. Students further develop an 


in-depth knowledge of the course material through an individual project. 


PHYS 639 Selected Topics in Condensed Matter Physics (3 credits) 
This course reflects the research interests of the physics faculty in condensed matter physics and/or 
those of the graduate students working with them. 


Note: Students who have received credit for PHYS 635 may not take this course for credit. 


Topics in Theoretical Physics (640-649) 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


341 
PHYS 642 Statistical Physics (3 credits) 


This course covers statistical concepts, probability, Gaussian probability distribution, statistical 
ensemble, macrostates and microstates, thermodynamic probability, statistical thermodynamics, 
reversible and irreversible processes, entropy, thermodynamic laws and statistical relations, partition 
functions, Maxwell's distribution, phase transformation, Maxwell-Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein and 
Fermi-Dirac statistics, quantum statistics in the classical limit, black-body radiation, conduction 
electrons in metals, interacting particle system, lattice vibrations, virial coefficients, Weiss molecular 
field approximation. 


Note: Students who have received credit for PHYS 654 may not take this course for credit. 


PHYS 644 Advanced Classical Mechanics and Relativity (3 credits) 

This course covers generalized coordinates, Lagrange’s equations, method of Lagrange multipliers, 
variational formulation, Hamilton’s equations of motion, canonical transformations, Hamilton-Jacobi 
theory, special theory of relativity, Einstein’s axioms, Lorentz transformations, form invariance and 
tensors, four-vectors, gravity. 


Note: Students who have received credit for PHYS 658 may not take this course for credit. 


PHYS 646 Electrodynamics (3 credits) 

This course covers the electrostatic boundary-value problem with Green’s function, Maxwell’s 
equations, energy-momentum tensor, guided waves, dielectric wave-guides, fibre optics, radiation 
static field, multipole radiation, velocity and acceleration field, Larmor’s formula, relativistic 
generalization, radiating systems, linear antenna, aperture in wave guide, scattering, Thompson 
scattering, Bremsstrahlung, Abraham-Lorentz equation, Breit-Wigner formula, Green’s function for 


Helmholtz’s equation. Noether’s theorem. 


PHYS 648 Non Linear Waves (3 credits) 

Linear stability analysis and limitations, modulated waves and nonlinear dispersion relations, 
Korteweg-de Vries, sine-Gordon, and nonlinear Schrddinger equations. Hydro-dynamic, 
transmission-line, mechanical, lattice, and optical solitions. Applications in optical fibres, Josephson 


junction arrays. Inverse scattering method, conservation laws. 


PHYS 649 Selected Topics in Theoretical Physics (3 credits) 
This course reflects the research interests of the Physics faculty in theoretical physics and/or those 


of the graduate students working with them. 


Topics in Biomedical Physics (660-669) 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


342 
PHYS 660 Chemical Aspects of Biophysics (3 credits) 


This course examines several aspects of the stability of protein structures including bonding and 
nonbonding interactions, energy profiles, Ramachandran plot, stabilization through protonation- 
deprotonation, interaction of macromolecules with solvents, the thermodynamics of protein folding, 
and ligand binding. The Marcus-theory of biological electron transfer is discussed. The course also 
introduces the students to several modern biophysical techniques such as electronic spectroscopies 
(absorption, fluorescence), X-ray absorption spectroscopy, NMR and EPR spectroscopy, IR and 
Raman spectroscopy, circular dichroism, and differential scanning calorimetry. Students further 


develop an in-depth knowledge of the course material through an individual project. 


PHYS 663 Quantitative Human Systems Physiology (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: Open to all Science and Engineering program students. 

This course addresses important concepts of quantitative systems physiology and the physical 
bases of physiological function in different organ systems. The student becomes familiar with the 
structure and functional principles of the main physiological systems, and how to quantify them. 
These include the nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory and muscular systems. Important biophysical 
principles and quantitative physiological methods are presented. Topics may include the biophysics 
of muscle contractions, fluid dynamics in the cardiovascular system, respiration gas exchange and 
neuronal communication, and how the biophysics of neuronal communications can be used to image 
brain activity. Students develop in-depth knowledge of how to apply these principles to a specific 


system through an individual project. 


PHYS 665 Principles of Medical Imaging (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: Open to all Science and Engineering program students. 

This course aims to introduce the physical principles associated with important medical imaging 
techniques used in medicine and in neuroscience research. The objective is to cover the whole 
imaging process in detail starting from the body entities to be imaged (e.g. structure, function, blood 
flow, neuronal activity), to the physical principles of data acquisition and finally the methods used for 
image data reconstruction. Important imaging modalities such as X-ray and computer tomography, 
magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine, ultrasound, electrophysiology and optical imaging 
techniques are presented. Students develop an in-depth understanding of how to apply this 


knowledge for a specific imaging modality through an individual project. 


Topics in Applied Physics (670 - 679) 


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PHYS 679 Selected Topics in Applied Physics (3 credits) 


This course reflects the research interests of the Physics faculty in Applied Physics and/or those of 


the graduate students working with them. 
Seminar, Thesis, and Comprehensive Examination 


PHYS 760 MSc Seminar on Selected Topics (3 credits) 

Students must give one seminar in the field of their research. In addition, full time students must 
participate in all seminars given in the department, and part time students must attend, during their 
studies, the same number of seminars that are normally given during the minimum residence 
requirement for full time students. The course in evaluated on a pass/fail basis. No substitution is 


permitted. 


PHYS 790 Master’s Research and Thesis (33 credits) 


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Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/poli-phd.html 


Political Science PhD 


Admission Requirements 


Admission to the PhD in Political Science requires a Master of/Magisteriate in Arts in political 
science, political studies, international relations, public policy, or another relevant field from an 
accredited university. A superior academic record and strong references are both essential; 
professional work experience will be taken into consideration. Applicants are selected on the basis 
of past academic record, letters of recommendation, statement of purpose, writing sample, and the 
relevance of their proposed research to the research expertise in the department. Enrolment in the 


PhD in Political Science is limited in part by the availability of research supervisors. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A fully qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 90 credits. In order to 
fulfill the requirements of the program, students will select two areas of specialization. The 
requirements are 21 credits of course work, 12 credits in the form of two comprehensive exams, 


3 credits of thesis proposal, and 54 credits of thesis. 


2. Courses (21 credits). All candidates must take seven 3-credit courses as described below: 


All students will select two areas of specialization (for example Canadian Politics and 
International Politics). Course work is divided into core courses and elective courses. Each 


student will take: 


o 2 core courses, one in each of the two chosen areas of specialization (POLI 801-805 


Advanced Seminars); 


o 2 elective courses, one in each of the same two chosen areas of specialization (POLI 811- 
815); 


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© 1 core course in public policy (POLI 805), where public policy is one of the two chosen areas 


of specialization, the elective course is to be selected from a third area; 
° 1 elective course from any area of specialization or a cognate course in a related field; 


o 1 methods course (POLI 844). 


3. Comprehensive Examination (12 credits in the form of 2 comprehensive examinations). All 
candidates are required to write two 6-credit comprehensive exams in their two areas of 
specialization, so that they are deemed competent to teach at the university level in these two 
areas. For each area of specialization there will be a written exam and an oral defence of the 
exam within three weeks of writing the former. Students must pass the written exam to move 
forward to the oral exam, but can still fail an exam with an incompetent oral performance. If either 
part (written or oral) is failed, the student will be permitted one re-take of the entire exam both 
oral and written. If the student then fails either the written or oral part, the second failure will 


result in the student being withdrawn from the program. 


4. Thesis Proposal (3 credits). After completion of the course work and comprehensive exams, the 
candidate with the concurrence and assistance of the Graduate Program Director finalizes 
the supervisory committee, consisting of the principal supervisor(s) and at least two other 
members of the department. Students are required to complete and defend their thesis proposal 
before the supervisory committee in a meeting chaired by the Graduate Program Director. The 
thesis proposal will include a literature review and a fully justified research agenda. In cases 
where the supervisory committee is not satisfied with the proposal, the student can resubmit and 
re-defend. A second unsatisfactory proposal would result in the student being withdrawn from the 


program. 


5. Thesis (54 credits). Doctoral students must submit a thesis based on their research and defend 
it in an oral examination. A doctoral thesis should be based on extensive research in primary 
sources, make an original contribution to knowledge, and be presented in acceptable scholarly 


form. 


6. Language Requirement. PhD candidates must demonstrate an ability to conduct 


research either in French or in a language (other than English) required in their area of research. 


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Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Residence. The minimum period of residence is two calendar years (6 terms) of full-time 


graduate study beyond the Master’s degree or the equivalent in part-time study. 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 3.00. 


Courses 


The Department offers graduate courses in the following five core fields: 
« Comparative Politics 
¢ International Politics 
« Canadian and Québec Politics 
« Political Theory 
¢ Public Policy and Administration 
Core Courses 
POLI 801 Advanced Seminar in Comparative Politics (3 credits) 


This course is a survey of the field of comparative politics at an advanced level. It examines major 


theories, concepts and methods of comparative political analysis. 


POLI 802 Advanced Seminar in International Politics (3 credits) 
This course is a survey of core concepts of international politics at an advanced level. It examines 
major theoretical perspectives and their application to historical and contemporary international 


issues. 


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POLI 803 Advanced Seminar in Canadian and Québec Politics (3 credits) 


This course is a survey of the field at an advanced level. It presents a discussion of contemporary 


issues and controversies in Canadian and Québec politics. 


POLI 804 Advanced Seminar in Political Theory (3 credits) 
This course is a survey of leading research in political theory and political philosophy, including the 


history of political thought, normative political theory and contemporary political thought. 


POLI 805 Advanced Seminar in Public Policy and Public Administration (3 credits) 
This course surveys several theoretical models and paradigms of public policy and public 


administration. It examines critically the intellectual and ideological traditions of policy analysis. 


POLI 844 Research Design (3 credits) 
This course explores differing research philosophies, the principles of research design and research 
strategies. It also considers philosophical critiques of different approaches and practical aspects of 


conducting research. 


Elective Courses 


POLI 811 Special Topics in Comparative Politics (3 credits) 


Topics vary from year to year. 


POLI 812 Special Topics in International Politics (3 credits) 


Topics vary from year to year. 


POLI 813 Special Topics in Canadian and Québec Politics (3 credits) 


Topics vary from year to year. 


POLI 814 Special Topics in Political Theory (3 credits) 


Topics vary from year to year. 


POLI 815 Special Topics in Public Policy and Public Administration (3 credits) 


Topics vary from year to year. 


POLI 898 Directed Studies (3 credits) 
Prerequisite: Permission of the PhD Committee. 
This special reading course is designed to explore topics and themes relevant to a student’s doctoral 


research. 


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Comprehensive Exams 


POLI 885 Comprehensive Exam (6 credits) 
POLI 886 Comprehensive Exam (6 credits) 


Thesis 


POLI 889 Thesis Proposal (3 credits) 
POLI 890 Thesis (54 credits) 


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Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/poli-ma.html 


Political Science MA 


Students entering the MA in Political Science are required to complete a graduate thesis. 


Admission Requirements 


An undergraduate honours degree or the equivalent is required with a minimum GPA of 3.30. 
Students who do not have the necessary background in political science, as well as in the 
concentration which they have chosen, may be required to take specific undergraduate courses in 
addition to the regular program. In certain cases, applicants may be required to complete a 


qualifying program in order to be eligible for admission to the graduate program. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A fully qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits. 


2. Core Courses. All students must complete one 3-credit core course in their area of 
concentration, chosen from the following: POLI 603 (International Relations Theory), POLI 626 
(Seminar in Comparative Politics), POLI 632 (Seminar in Political Theory), POLI 636 (Theories of 
Public Policy and Public Administration), POLI 638 (Seminar in Canadian and Quebec Politics). 


In addition, students are required to take one 3-credit course from the following: POLI 601 
(Research Design) or POLI 644 (Research Methods). 


3. Concentration Courses. Two 3-credit courses chosen from the subfield in which the student 
intends to write a thesis. Students can write a thesis in the following subfields: Public Policy and 
Administration, Canadian and Quebec Politics, International Politics, Comparative Politics, and 


Political Theory (6 credits). 


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4. Approved Elective and Cognate Courses. Two 3-credit courses chosen from any of the 600- 


level courses in political science, or from cognate courses offered in related disciplines. For 
cognate courses, approval of the Director is required. In some cases approval for registration in 


cognate courses must be obtained from the department involved (6 credits). 


. Thesis Proposal. POLI 694. This course is a directed study involving a comprehensive 


understanding of the literature in the area of research directly relevant to the thesis topic under 
the direction of a faculty supervisor. The written assignments involve a comprehensive literature 
review, annotated bibliography and research design that culminate in a thesis proposal 
presented in an oral defence before the thesis supervisor and two faculty members in the 


graduate program (3 credits). 


. Master’s Thesis. POLI 696. Students are required to demonstrate their ability to carry out 


original, independent research. The thesis, which is researched and written under the direction of 
a supervisor and thesis committee, is defended before the student's thesis committee (24 
credits). 


Academic Regulations 


1 


. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 
Program Specific Requirements. Students must obtain a assessment grade point average 
(AGPA) of 2.70 based on a minimum of 12 credits. 


. Residence. The minimum residence requirement is one year (3 terms) of full-time study, or the 


equivalent in part-time study. 


. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 


least 2.70. 


Courses 


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All courses are one-term, 3-credit courses unless otherwise indicated. Some sections of some 


courses may be offered in French. 


Core Courses 


Students must take one of the following five courses: 


POLI 603 International Relations Theory 

POLI 626 Seminar in Comparative Politics 

POLI 632 Seminar in Political Theory 

POLI 636 Theories of Public Policy and Public Administration 
POLI 638 Seminar in Canadian and Quebec Politics 


Students must take one of the following two courses: 


POLI 601 Research Design 
POLI 644 Research Methods 


Concentration or Elective Courses 


Public Policy and Administration 


POLI 600 Public Policy and the Governmental Process in Canada 
POLI 604 Comparative Public Policy 

POLI 605 Environmental Policy and Governance 

POLI 607 Ageing and Public Policy 

POLI 610 Economic Policy After Keynes 

POLI 612 Public Policy and Business Cycles 

POLI 617 Knowledge in International Relations 

POLI 618 Canadian Public Administration 

POLI 622 Comparative Public Administration 

POLI 624 Public Administration of Intergovernmental Affairs 
POLI 628 Ethics and Values in Public Policy Making 

POLI 630 Organization Theory 

POLI 634 Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation 

POLI 635 Biotechnology, Agriculture and Food Policy 

POLI 636 Theories of Public Policy and Public Administration 
POLI 645 Indigenous Peoples and the State 


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POLI 648 Feminist Critiques of Public Policy 


POLI 652 Science, Technology and Power 
POLI 683 Special Topics in Public Policy and Administration 
POLI 695 Directed Studies 


Canadian and Quebec Politics 


POLI 600 Public Policy and the Governmental Process in Canada 
POLI 606 Policy Making and the National Purpose in Canada 
POLI 607 Ageing and Public Policy 

POLI 611 Judicial Politics and Policy 

POLI 613 Political Socialization: A Comparative Perspective 
POLI 615 The Politics of Citizenship in Canada 

POLI 618 Canadian Public Administration 

POLI 624 Public Administration of Intergovernmental Affairs 
POLI 634 Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation 

POLI 638 Seminar in Canadian and Quebec Politics 

POLI 645 Indigenous Peoples and the State 

POLI 658 Authors of the Political Imagination 

POLI 684 Special Topics in Canadian and Quebec Politics 
POLI 695 Directed Studies 


Comparative Politics 


POLI 604 Comparative Public Policy 

POLI 613 Political Socialization: A Comparative Perspective 
POLI 621 Political Leadership and Decision Making 
POLI 622 Comparative Public Administration 

POLI 626 Seminar in Comparative Politics 

POLI 629 Critical Perspectives in Development 
POLI 637 Democracy and Regime Change 

POLI 643 Rational and Public Choice 

POLI 649 Gender and Global Politics 

POLI 657 Nationalism and Ethnicity 

POLI 681 Special Topics in Comparative Politics 
POLI 695 Directed Studies 


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International Politics 


POLI 603 International Relations Theory 

POLI 605 Environmental Policy and Governance 
POLI 608 Globalization and Regional Integration 
POLI 614 Political Economy of Advanced Industrial Nations 
POLI 616 Theories of Foreign Policy 

POLI 617 Knowledge in International Relations 
POLI 619 International Peacekeeping 

POLI 646 History of Thought in Political Economy 
POLI 647 International Human Security 

POLI 649 Gender and Global Politics 

POLI 659 International Organizations 

POLI 662 International Political Economy 

POLI 687 Special Topics in International Politics 
POLI 695 Directed Studies 


Political Theory 


POLI 623 Ethics, Morality and Justice 

POLI 625 Policy Discourse of Biotechnology 

POLI 628 Ethics and Values in Public Policy Making 
POLI 631 Political Texts 

POLI 632 Seminar in Political Theory 

POLI 646 History of Thought in Political Economy 
POLI 654 Concepts of the State 

POLI 658 Authors of the Political Imagination 

POLI 685 Special Topics in Political Theory 

POLI 695 Directed Studies 


Thesis Proposal and Thesis 


POLI 694 Thesis Proposal (3 credits) 
POLI 696 Master’s Thesis (24 credits) 


Course Descriptions 


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All courses listed are one-term, 3-credit courses unless otherwise indicated. Some courses are 


offered in French. 


Political Science 


POLI 600 Public Policy and the Governmental Process in Canada 

The course is designed to familiarize students with the structures and processes of policy-making in 
Canadian government. Particular attention is given to theories of public policy, the role of key 
institutions and agencies in the formulation and analysis of policy, and recent organizational 


developments in the executive-bureaucratic arena. 


POLI 601 Research Design 

This course explores differing research philosophies, the principles of research design and research 
strategies. It also considers philosophical critiques of different approaches and practical aspects of 
conducting research. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 685 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


POLI 603 International Relations Theory 

This course explores the major theories, approaches and contemporary debates within international 
relations theory. Topics include the development of realism, liberalism, constructivism and critical 
approaches. Major aspects of international relations theory, such as security, political economy, and 


international organization, are also explored. 


POLI 604 Comparative Public Policy 
This course analyses policy development in industrialized countries. It focuses on various areas 
such as economic, education, fiscal and social policies. Moreover, this course examines 


contributions that address methodological issues related to comparative research. 


POLI 605 Environmental Policy and Governance 

Students in this seminar course conduct a theoretical and empirical survey of contemporary 
approaches to environmental policy development and implementation at various levels of 
governance, including municipal, national and international. Case studies may include toxic waste, 
oceans management, the impact of trade agreements, biodiversity conservation, and climate 


change. 


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POLI 606 Policy Making and the National Purpose in Canada 


This course focuses upon the American challenge to Canadian independence in the economic, 
cultural, defence and other spheres, and examines policy initiatives taken by Canadian governments 


and the various proposals advanced by nationalist groups to meet this challenge. 


POLI 607 Ageing and Public Policy 

Substantial improvement in health, hygiene and working conditions combined with declining fertility 
rate is creating an important demographic shift. As a result, the number of individuals aged 65 and 
above is expected to double by 2031. This has multiple policy and political consequences across 
industrialized countries. The object of this course is to analyze this demographic shift from a 
comparative perspective. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 681 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


POLI 608 Globalization and Regional Integration 

A study of the long range historical tendencies towards large and complex interdependent 
organizations in the post industrial world. These trends juxtapose the regional confederation of the 
European community as well as the rising trade blocs of North America and the Pacific, with the 


development of a single political economic and cultural super-system of global scope. 


POLI 610 Economic Policy After Keynes 
This course introduces students to the controversy surrounding the economics of Keynes and the 
implications of his work for the current problems of unemployment and growth. Interpretations of 


Keynes are explored in the context of the current eclipse of Keynesianism in public policy circles. 


POLI 611 Judicial Politics and Policy 

This course considers the increased policy-making functions of Supreme Courts in systems that 
have statutory and entrenched bills of rights. By focusing on the interaction between courts and 
legislatures, and the increasing use of litigation strategies by interest groups, the implications of 


public policy in a rights context are examined. 


POLI 612 Public Policy and Business Cycles 
This course explores the public policy of managing the business cycle. The emphasis is on both the 
theoretical literature associated with modern notions of managing the economic cycle and on applied 


case studies. The focus is both Canadian and comparative. 


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POLI 613 Political Socialization: A Comparative Perspective 


The course presents an overview of the central concepts and theories used in political socialization 
research. Students learn about the major sources of political opinions, attitudes and values. This 
course also investigates how political socialization is used in practice in Canadian politics and within 
several other sub-disciplines of political science. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 683 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


POLI 614 Political Economy of Advanced Industrial Nations 
The course provides an overview of the scholarly debate and research on political economy issues 


considered central to an examination of the political economy of advanced countries. 


POLI 615 The Politics of Citizenship in Canada 

This course examines key debates in the study and practice of citizenship in Canada. It explores the 
different forces which are transforming our understanding of citizenship, including globalization, 
nationalism, welfare state reform, international migration, and multiculturalism. Topics include 
citizenship and social exclusion; social rights and the welfare state; and economic citizenship, 
employment and social identity. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under POLI 685J may not take this course for 


credit. 


POLI 616 Theories of Foreign Policy 

This course explores the major international and domestic determinants of foreign policy. Principal 
topics include the influence of the international system, geography, leadership, regime-type, 
transnationalism and non-governmental organizations on foreign policy. Rather than focusing on any 
particular country, the course draws upon the experiences of a variety of Western democratic states 
utilizing case studies of American, British, French and Canadian foreign policy to illustrate and 


evaluate course themes. 


POLI 617 Knowledge in International Relations 

This course examines the creation and use of expertise in policy-making, including questions of 
knowledge construction, the sway of science versus norms on decision-makers, and the impact of 
bureaucratic processes on the quality of policy. Alternative conceptions of knowledge and its effects 
on decision-making from political science, sociology, economics, and psychology are applied to 
issues including national security, environmental politics and economics. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 687 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


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POLI 618 Canadian Public Administration 


Discussion is directed towards an understanding of public administration in the Canadian federal 
setting. Some of the main problems of public administration are related to important changes which 


have taken place over the last twenty years and which are continuing to take place. 


POLI 619 International Peacekeeping 

This course is a seminar on the theory and practice of multinational peace and stability operations. 
The course covers theoretical perspectives on peace operations; the origins and evolution of peace 
operations, with particular focus on the expansion and transformation of peace operations since the 
end of the Cold War; the organizational and international politics of peace operations; causes of 
peace operations’ success and failure; problems of managing and coordinating actors involved in 
peace operations; and prospects for organizational learning and reform. The course examines 
specific cases of peacekeeping, peacebuilding and peace enforcement. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 687 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


POLI 621 Political Leadership and Decision Making 

This course considers the ways political actors attempt policy and institutional changes through an 
examination of leadership skills and decision making styles. It considers the philosophical treatments 
by Plato and Machiavelli and the relationship between morality and leadership by analyzing modern 
leadership within a constrained constitutional context. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under POLI 687M may not take this course 


for credit. 


POLI 622 Comparative Public Administration 
A comparative study of the public administration systems in various western countries with emphasis 


on a comparison vis-a-vis the Canadian federal system. 


POLI 623 Ethics, Morality and Justice 

This course focuses on the essential political concepts of ethics, justice and morality which underlie 
and motivate almost all political activity. The course explores both ancient and contemporary 
perspectives on the meaning of these concepts and examines the problems and theoretical 
challenges that arise when a definitive notion of justice is used to assess or generate public policy. 
Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 685 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


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POLI 624 Public Administration of Intergovernmental Affairs 


This course deals with intergovernmental affairs that have become a significant part of the policy 
process in many countries. An analysis of power relations in the federal state, both in institutional 
and societal terms, will be a primary focus of this course. The Canadian case will serve as the main 


area of inquiry. 


POLI 625 Policy Discourse of Biotechnology 

This course examines the philosophical, political, and theoretical counsel to policymakers and 
broader public discourse surrounding the development and implementation of new laws and 
regulations pertaining to issues in advanced biotechnology, such as cloning, stem cell research, and 
psychopharmacology. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 685 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


POLI 626 Seminar in Comparative Politics 

This course is a survey of the field of comparative politics. It examines major theories, concepts and 
methods of comparative political analysis. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 681 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


POLI 628 Ethics and Values in Public Policy Making 

This course provokes critical thinking on value judgements underlying policy-making and familiarizes 
students with practical measures available for promoting integrity in public institutions. Students 
examine the principles underlying ethical standards, various professional codes of ethics, issues 
such as potential conflicts between personal convictions and public duties, and the ethical 


responsibility of public officials and civil servants in democratic societies. 


POLI 629 Critical Perspectives in Development 

This course examines key debates surrounding the concept and the politics of development in the 
‘less developed’ world with a particular emphasis on institutional structures, such as the state, the 
market and non-governmental organizations, through which development has been pursued. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under POLI 687K may not take this course for 


credit. 


POLI 630 Organization Theory 
This is a seminar in organization theory, an interdisciplinary field concerned with the sources, 


determinants, functions, and effects of complex organizations. The course focuses on political 


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organizations and the political effects of organizations by reviewing the historical development of 


organization theory and considering how current debates help us understand the nature and 
functions of organizations in the twenty-first century. Topics include the nature and sources of formal 
organizations; organizational structure; organizational decision-making; organizational culture; 
organizational reliability and failure; and the interaction between organizations and their 


environments. 


POLI 631 Political Texts 

The course is an intensive study of a text by a major author such as Plato, Machiavelli, Hobbes, or 
Nietzsche. Students systematically explore the issues and problems raised by the text and the 
interpretive traditions that follow from it. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 685 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


POLI 632 Seminar in Political Theory 

This course is a survey of leading research in and approaches to political theory and political 
philosophy, including the history of political thought, normative political theory and contemporary 
political thought. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 685 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


POLI 634 Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation 

This course focuses upon methods of assessing consequences of public policies. The main purpose 
of the course is to allow students to survey evaluation research in political science and to present 
research designs that will enable them to make plausible assumptions about the outcome of 


governmental programs in the absence of experimental control. 


POLI 635 Biotechnology, Agriculture and Food Policy 

The purpose of this course is to explore the ethical and policy dilemmas that rapid scientific and 
technological advances in biotechnology pose for issues of agriculture and food security. The course 
focuses on Canadian policy within a comparative perspective and examines alternative policy 
responses, such as found in the US, EU and developing countries. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 685 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


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POLI 636 Theories of Public Policy and Public Administration 


The course explores the diverse intellectual and ideological origins of Public Administration and 
Public Policy. The focus is on the comparative and critical analysis of the theoretical models under 
study. Students are encouraged to think analytically and to apply theoretical frameworks to their own 


empirical enquiries. 


POLI 637 Democracy and Regime Change 

This seminar examines the various definitions and understandings of democratic and authoritarian 
regimes and the principal moments of regime change (breakdown, transition, post-transition, and 
consolidation). It focuses on institution-building, the actors involved in the process of regime change 
and the political economy of transitions. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under POLI 687B may not take this course for 


credit. 


POLI 638 Seminar in Canadian and Quebec Politics 

This course is a survey of the field at an advanced level. It presents a discussion of contemporary 
issues and controversies in Canadian and Quebec Politics. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 683 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


POLI 643 Rational and Public Choice 

This course deals with understanding the micro-analytical foundations of individual and group 
behaviour in political life. It introduces students to the main concepts, theorems and their 
applications in positive analytical politics including game theory, spatial modeling and institutional 
analysis. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under POLI 687C may not take this course for 


credit. 


POLI 644 Research Methods 
This course introduces students to the logic and methodology of Political Science research and 


public policy analysis. 


POLI 645 Indigenous Peoples and the State 

This course examines the political and administrative context in which Indigenous Peoples and the 
state coexist as well as the tensions between European and Indigenous modes of governance. It 
focuses on the evolution of institutions and policies regulating this relationship, and the governance 


strategies developed consistent with Indigenous traditions. The Canadian case serves as the focus 


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but other countries may be considered. 


Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under POLI 683M may not take this course 


for credit. 


POLI 646 History of Thought in Political Economy 
This course presents a survey of the major ideas which have shaped the various approaches to 
political economy from the classical theorists to twentieth century thinkers. The historical and 


contemporary influence of these ideas on public policy is evaluated. 


POLI 647 International Human Security 

An introduction to the growing literature and controversies surrounding the concept of ‘human 
security’ in international politics, applied specifically to the Canadian foreign policy context. 
Examined actors include states, non-governmental organizations, international institutions, and ‘civil 
society’. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under POLI 6870 may not take this course for 


credit. 


POLI 648 Feminist Critiques of Public Policy 

This course provides an in-depth examination of feminist and critical perspectives of public policy 
and administration. The course seeks to examine the ways in which social location is implicated in 
(and mediated by) public policy theory and practice. Specific topics may include the state of 
bureaucracy, state-society relations, public policy discourses, structures, processes and outcomes, 
and substantive issue areas, such as body politics, social and economic policy, and the labour 
market. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 683 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


POLI 649 Gender and Global Politics 

This seminar focuses on the intersection of the global and the local through different methodological 
and theoretical approaches to the study of gender. Drawing from texts from the fields of comparative 
politics, international relations and sociology, the course exposes class participants to different 
scholarly treatments of gender and politics especially as these treatments have evolved in a post- 


Cold War era of increasing globalization. 


POLI 652 Science, Technology and Power 
This course introduces students to the growing field of science policy analysis. It provides an 


overview of the theoretical approaches and analytical tools used in the area and critically discusses 


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various policy mechanisms now in place as well as current and emerging issues. 


POLI 654 Concepts of the State 

This course examines several of the most significant attempts made by modern political thinkers to 
answer the question, “What is the modern state?” It addresses both the historical emergence of the 
modern state and the various ways that this emergence has been theorized. Special emphasis is 
placed on the differences and interconnections between historical, theoretical, and practical 


questions. 


POLI 657 Nationalism and Ethnicity 

This seminar discusses the nature, dynamics and consequences of nationalism. The emphasis is 
placed on presenting and discussing various theoretical understandings of identity and nationalist 
mobilization. It examines conceptual issues relating to the study of nationalism, namely the nature, 
origins and characterizations of nations and nationalism and the strategies for regulation of 
nationalist conflict. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under POLI 687H may not take this course for 
credit. 


POLI 658 Authors of the Political Imagination 
This course examines a broad range of literary and non-literary genres for their potential to inform 
and redirect the political imagination. The seminar adopts a broadly comparative perspective on 


literature, culture, politics and individual motivation. 


POLI 659 International Organizations 

This course explores the role of international organizations, institutions and regimes in world politics. 
The course covers intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations as well as informal 
institutional arrangements. It surveys theoretical debates regarding the origins, dynamics, and 
significance of international organizations, and examines their role in areas such as international 
security, international political economy, and regional integration. The course also considers debates 
over democratic accountability within international organizations and the efficacy of global 
governance. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 687 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


POLI 662 International Political Economy 
This course covers theories from macroeconomics and international relations and their application to 


major historical and contemporary events in the evolution of the global political economy. Topics 


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363 
include international trade and finance, economic development,regional integration and 


globalization, North-South relations, the emergence of multinational corporations, and international 
organizations such as the World Bank, IMF, WTO, OECD, and UNCTAD. 


POLI 681 Special Topics in Comparative Politics 


POLI 683 Special Topics in Public Policy and Administration 


POLI 684 Special Topics in Canadian and Quebec Politics 


POLI 685 Special Topics in Political Theory 


POLI 687 Special Topics in International Politics 


POLI 694 Thesis Proposal (3 credits) 

This course is a directed study involving a comprehensive understanding of the literature in the area 
of research directly relevant to the thesis topic under the direction of a faculty supervisor. The written 
assignments involve a comprehensive literature review, annotated bibliography and research design 
that culminate in a thesis proposal presented in an oral defence before the thesis supervisor and two 


faculty members in the graduate program. 


POLI 695 Directed Studies 


Independent study in the area of concentration. 


POLI 696 Master’s Thesis (24 credits) 
Students are required to demonstrate their ability to carry out original, independent research. The 
thesis, which is researched and written under the direction of a supervisor and thesis committee, is 


defended before the student’s thesis committee. 


Cognate Courses 


Students may enrol in cognate courses in the John Molson School of Business and in the 
Departments of Communication Studies, Economics, Education, and Sociology and Anthropology in 
the Faculty of Arts and Science. Permission of the Graduate Program Directors of both the Master 
of/Magisteriate in Arts (Public Policy and Public Administration) and the second department is 


required. 


© Concordia University 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


364 


Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/poli-mpppa.html 


Public Policy and Public Administration (MPPPA) MA 
Options 


Option A. Courses Only 
Option B. Internship 


Upon application, students enter Option A (MPPPA with Courses only). Once admitted to the 
program, students have the opportunity to transfer to Option B (MPPPA with Internship). To enter the 
Internship option students must complete the prescribed coursework and normally achieve a 
minimum GPA of 3.30. 


Admission Requirements 


An undergraduate honours degree or the equivalent is required. Students who do not have the 
necessary background in public policy and public administration may be required to take specific 
undergraduate courses in addition to the regular program. In certain cases, applicants may be 
required to complete a qualifying program in order to be eligible for admission to the graduate 


program. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A fully qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits. 


2. Core Courses. All students must complete two 3-credit core courses, POLI 636 - Theories of 
Public Policy and Public Administration, and POLI 644 - Research Methods. 
In addition, students in Options A or B must take one of the following five courses: POLI 600 or 
POLI 604 or POLI 618 or POLI 622 or POLI 624. 


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365 
3. Language Requirement. Students in the Master of/Magisteriate in Arts (Public Policy and Public 


Administration) Option B Internship are expected to demonstrate an ability to read and 


understand literature relevant to their field in French. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Residence. The minimum residence requirement is one year (3 terms) of full-time study, or the 


equivalent in part-time study. 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 2.70. 


Master of/Magisteriate in Arts (Public Policy and Public Administration) 


Option A (Courses Only) 


1. Core Courses. POLI 636, 644, and one of the following five courses: POLI 600 or 604 or 618 or 
622 or POLI 624 (9 credits). 


2. Concentration Courses. Four 3-credit courses chosen from the subfield of Public Policy and 


Administration (12 credits). 


3. Approved Elective and Cognate Courses. Four 3-credit courses chosen from any of the 
following subfields: Canadian and Quebec Politics, Comparative Politics, International Politics, 
Political Theory, or POLI 601 - Research Design, or from cognate courses offered in related 
disciplines. For cognate courses, approval of the Director is required. In some cases approval for 


registration in cognate courses must be obtained from the department involved (12 credits). 


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366 
4. Extended Research Essay. POLI 691. The Extended Research Essay is a directed study 


supervised by a faculty member with whom a student completed a course in their area of 
concentration. Requiring additional research, this degree requirement builds on a term paper 
submitted at the graduate level in a concentration course and is considered to be a significant 


revision and extension of that paper, with an extensive bibliography (12 credits). 


Master of/Magisteriate in Arts (Public Policy and Public Administration) 
Option B (Internship) 


Language Requirement: All Option B candidates must pass an examination in French based ona 
test administered by the Department. This exam consists of translating a passage of literature, 


relevant to the field, from French into English. 


1. Core Courses. POLI 636, 644, and one of the following five courses POLI 600 or 604 or 618 or 
622 or 624 (9 credits). 


2. Concentration Courses. Three 3-credit courses chosen from the subfield of Public Policy and 


Administration (9 credits). 


3. Approved Elective and Cognate Courses. Two 3-credit courses chosen from the following 
subfields: Canadian and Quebec Politics, Comparative Politics, International Politics, Political 
Theory, or POLI 601 - Research Design, or from cognate courses offered in related disciplines. 
For cognate courses, approval of the Director is required. In some cases approval for registration 


in cognate courses must be obtained from the department involved (6 credits). 


4. Internship with Research Paper. POLI 693. The internship is a four-month job placement in 
either the public or private sector. Under the direction of a faculty supervisor, the student 
prepares an original, theoretical work that comprises a series of policy recommendations that 


contribute to the policy process in Canada (21 credits). 


Courses 


All courses are one-term, 3-credit courses unless otherwise indicated. Some sections of some 


courses may be offered in French. 


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367 
Core Courses for students in Options A and B 


POLI 636 Theories of Public Policy and Public Administration 
POLI 644 Research Methods 


Students must also take one of the following five core courses: 


POLI 600 Public Policy and the Governmental Process in Canada 
POLI 604 Comparative Public Policy 

POLI 618 Canadian Public Administration 

POLI 622 Comparative Public Administration 


POLI 624 Public Administration of Intergovernmental Affairs. 


Public Policy and Administration 


POLI 600 Public Policy and the Governmental Process in Canada 
POLI 604 Comparative Public Policy 

POLI 605 Environmental Policy and Governance 

POLI 607 Ageing and Public Policy 

POLI 610 Economic Policy After Keynes 

POLI 612 Public Policy and Business Cycles 

POLI 617 Knowledge in International Relations 

POLI 618 Canadian Public Administration 

POLI 622 Comparative Public Administration 

POLI 624 Public Administration of Intergovernmental Affairs 
POLI 628 Ethics and Values in Public Policy Making 

POLI 630 Organization Theory 

POLI 634 Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation 

POLI 635 Biotechnology, Agriculture and Food Policy 

POLI 645 Indigenous Peoples and the State 

POLI 648 Feminist Critiques of Public Policy 

POLI 652 Science, Technology and Power 

POLI 683 Special Topics in Public Policy and Administration 
POLI 695 Directed Studies 


Canadian and Quebec Politics 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


POLI 600 Public Policy and the Governmental Process in Canada 
POLI 606 Policy Making and the National Purpose in Canada 
POLI 607 Ageing and Public Policy 

POLI 611 Judicial Politics and Policy 

POLI 613 Political Socialization: A Comparative Perspective 
POLI 615 The Politics of Citizenship in Canada 

POLI 618 Canadian Public Administration 

POLI 624 Public Administration of Intergovernmental Affairs 
POLI 634 Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation 

POLI 638 Seminar in Canadian and Quebec Politics 

POLI 645 Indigenous Peoples and the State 

POLI 658 Authors of the Political Imagination 

POLI 684 Special Topics in Canadian and Quebec Politics 
POLI 695 Directed Studies 


Comparative Politics 


POLI 604 Comparative Public Policy 

POLI 613 Political Socialization: Comparative Perspective 
POLI 621 Political Leadership and Decision Making 
POLI 622 Comparative Public Administration 

POLI 626 Seminar in Comparative Politics 

POLI 629 Critical Perspectives in Development 
POLI 637 Democracy and Regime Change 

POLI 643 Rational and Public Choice 

POLI 649 Gender and Global Politics 

POLI 657 Nationalism and Ethnicity 

POLI 681 Special Topics in Comparative Politics 
POLI 695 Directed Studies 


International Politics 


POLI 603 International Relations Theory 

POLI 605 Environmental Policy and Governance 

POLI 608 Globalization and Regional Integration 

POLI 614 Political Economy of Advanced Industrial Nations 
POLI 616 Theories of Foreign Policy 


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POLI 617 Knowledge in International Relations 


POLI 619 International Peacekeeping 

POLI 646 History of Thought in Political Economy 
POLI 647 International Human Security 

POLI 649 Gender and Global Politics 

POLI 659 International Organizations 

POLI 662 International Political Economy 

POLI 687 Special Topics in International Politics 
POLI 695 Directed Studies 


Political Theory 


POLI 623 Ethics, Morality and Justice 

POLI 625 Policy Discourse of Biotechnology 

POLI 628 Ethics and Values in Public Policy Making 
POLI 631 Political Texts 

POLI 632 Seminar in Political Theory 

POLI 646 History of Thought in Political Economy 
POLI 654 Concepts of the State 

POLI 658 Authors of the Political Imagination 

POLI 685 Special Topics in Political Theory 

POLI 695 Directed Studies 


Research Design, Extended Research Essay, Internship with Research Paper 


POLI 601 Research Design (3 credits) 
POLI 691 Extended Research Essay (12 credits) 
POLI 693 Internship with Research Paper (21 credits) 


Course Descriptions 


All courses listed are one-term, 3-credit courses unless otherwise indicated. Some courses are 


offered in French. 


Political Science 


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370 
POLI 600 Public Policy and the Governmental Process in Canada 


The course is designed to familiarize students with the structures and processes of policy-making in 
Canadian government. Particular attention is given to theories of public policy, the role of key 
institutions and agencies in the formulation and analysis of policy, and recent organizational 


developments in the executive-bureaucratic arena. 


POLI 601 Research Design 

This course explores differing research philosophies, the principles of research design and research 
strategies. It also considers philosophical critiques of different approaches and practical aspects of 
conducting research. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 685 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


POLI 603 International Relations Theory 

This course explores the major theories, approaches and contemporary debates within international 
relations theory. Topics include the development of realism, liberalism, constructivism and critical 
approaches. Major aspects of international relations theory, such as security, political economy, and 


international organization, are also explored. 


POLI 604 Comparative Public Policy 
This course analyses policy development in industrialized countries. It focuses on various areas 
such as economic, education, fiscal and social policies. Moreover, this course examines 


contributions that address methodological issues related to comparative research. 


POLI 605 Environmental Policy and Governance 

Students in this seminar course conduct a theoretical and empirical survey of contemporary 
approaches to environmental policy development and implementation at various levels of 
governance, including municipal, national and international. Case studies may include toxic waste, 
oceans management, the impact of trade agreements, biodiversity conservation, and climate 


change. 


POLI 606 Policy Making and the National Purpose in Canada 
This course focuses upon the American challenge to Canadian independence in the economic, 
cultural, defence and other spheres, and examines policy initiatives taken by Canadian governments 


and the various proposals advanced by nationalist groups to meet this challenge. 


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POLI 607 Ageing and Public Policy 


Substantial improvement in health, hygiene and working conditions combined with declining fertility 
rate is creating an important demographic shift. As a result, the number of individuals aged 65 and 
above is expected to double by 2031. This has multiple policy and political consequences across 
industrialized countries. The object of this course is to analyze this demographic shift from a 
comparative perspective. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 681 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


POLI 608 Globalization and Regional Integration 

A study of the long range historical tendencies towards large and complex interdependent 
organizations in the post industrial world. These trends juxtapose the regional confederation of the 
European community as well as the rising trade blocs of North America and the Pacific, with the 


development of a single political economic and cultural super-system of global scope. 


POLI 610 Economic Policy After Keynes 
This course introduces students to the controversy surrounding the economics of Keynes and the 
implications of his work for the current problems of unemployment and growth. Interpretations of 


Keynes are explored in the context of the current eclipse of Keynesianism in public policy circles. 


POLI 611 Judicial Politics and Policy 

This course considers the increased policy-making functions of Supreme Courts in systems that 
have statutory and entrenched bills of rights. By focusing on the interaction between courts and 
legislatures, and the increasing use of litigation strategies by interest groups, the implications of 


public policy in a rights context are examined. 


POLI 612 Public Policy and Business Cycles 
This course explores the public policy of managing the business cycle. The emphasis is on both the 
theoretical literature associated with modern notions of managing the economic cycle and on applied 


case studies. The focus is both Canadian and comparative. 


POLI 613 Political Socialization: A Comparative Perspective 
The course presents an overview of the central concepts and theories used in political socialization 
research. Students learn about the major sources of political opinions, attitudes and values. This 


course also investigates how political socialization is used in practice in Canadian politics and within 


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several other sub-disciplines of political science. 


Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 683 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


POLI 614 Political Economy of Advanced Industrial Nations 
The course provides an overview of the scholarly debate and research on political economy issues 


considered central to an examination of the political economy of advanced countries. 


POLI 615 The Politics of Citizenship in Canada 

This course examines key debates in the study and practice of citizenship in Canada. It explores the 
different forces which are transforming our understanding of citizenship, including globalization, 
nationalism, welfare state reform, international migration, and multiculturalism. Topics include 
citizenship and social exclusion; social rights and the welfare state; and economic citizenship, 
employment and social identity. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under POLI 685J may not take this course for 


credit. 


POLI 616 Theories of Foreign Policy 

This course explores the major international and domestic determinants of foreign policy. Principal 
topics include the influence of the international system, geography, leadership, regime-type, 
transnationalism and non-governmental organizations on foreign policy. Rather than focusing on any 
particular country, the course draws upon the experiences of a variety of Western democratic states 
utilizing case studies of American, British, French and Canadian foreign policy to illustrate and 


evaluate course themes. 


POLI 617 Knowledge in International Relations 

This course examines the creation and use of expertise in policy-making, including questions of 
knowledge construction, the sway of science versus norms on decision-makers, and the impact of 
bureaucratic processes on the quality of policy. Alternative conceptions of knowledge and its effects 
on decision-making from political science, sociology, economics, and psychology are applied to 
issues including national security, environmental politics and economics. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 687 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


POLI 618 Canadian Public Administration 
Discussion is directed towards an understanding of public administration in the Canadian federal 


setting. Some of the main problems of public administration are related to important changes which 


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have taken place over the last twenty years and which are continuing to take place. 


POLI 619 International Peacekeeping 

This course is a seminar on the theory and practice of multinational peace and stability operations. 
The course covers theoretical perspectives on peace operations; the origins and evolution of peace 
operations, with particular focus on the expansion and transformation of peace operations since the 
end of the Cold War; the organizational and international politics of peace operations; causes of 
peace operations’ success and failure; problems of managing and coordinating actors involved in 
peace operations; and prospects for organizational learning and reform. The course examines 
specific cases of peacekeeping, peacebuilding and peace enforcement. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 687 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


POLI 621 Political Leadership and Decision Making 

This course considers the ways political actors attempt policy and institutional changes through an 
examination of leadership skills and decision making styles. It considers the philosophical treatments 
by Plato and Machiavelli and the relationship between morality and leadership by analyzing modern 
leadership within a constrained constitutional context. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under POLI 687M may not take this course 


for credit. 


POLI 622 Comparative Public Administration 
A comparative study of the public administration systems in various western countries with emphasis 


on a comparison vis-a-vis the Canadian federal system. 


POLI 623 Ethics, Morality and Justice 

This course focuses on the essential political concepts of ethics, justice and morality which underlie 
and motivate almost all political activity. The course explores both ancient and contemporary 
perspectives on the meaning of these concepts and examines the problems and theoretical 
challenges that arise when a definitive notion of justice is used to assess or generate public policy. 
Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 685 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


POLI 624 Public Administration of Intergovernmental Affairs 
This course deals with intergovernmental affairs that have become a significant part of the policy 


process in many countries. An analysis of power relations in the federal state, both in institutional 


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and societal terms, will be a primary focus of this course. The Canadian case will serve as the main 


area of inquiry. 


POLI 625 Policy Discourse of Biotechnology 

This course examines the philosophical, political, and theoretical counsel to policymakers and 
broader public discourse surrounding the development and implementation of new laws and 
regulations pertaining to issues in advanced biotechnology, such as cloning, stem cell research, and 
psychopharmacology. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 685 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


POLI 626 Seminar in Comparative Politics 

This course is a survey of the field of comparative politics. It examines major theories, concepts and 
methods of comparative political analysis. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 681 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


POLI 628 Ethics and Values in Public Policy Making 

This course provokes critical thinking on value judgements underlying policy-making and familiarizes 
students with practical measures available for promoting integrity in public institutions. Students 
examine the principles underlying ethical standards, various professional codes of ethics, issues 
such as potential conflicts between personal convictions and public duties, and the ethical 


responsibility of public officials and civil servants in democratic societies. 


POLI 629 Critical Perspectives in Development 

This course examines key debates surrounding the concept and the politics of development in the 
‘less developed’ world with a particular emphasis on institutional structures, such as the state, the 
market and non-governmental organizations, through which development has been pursued. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under POLI 687K may not take this course for 


credit. 


POLI 630 Organization Theory 

This is a seminar in organization theory, an interdisciplinary field concerned with the sources, 
determinants, functions, and effects of complex organizations. The course focuses on political 
organizations and the political effects of organizations by reviewing the historical development of 
organization theory and considering how current debates help us understand the nature and 


functions of organizations in the twenty-first century. Topics include the nature and sources of formal 


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organizations; organizational structure; organizational decision-making; organizational culture; 


organizational reliability and failure; and the interaction between organizations and their 


environments. 


POLI 631 Political Texts 

The course is an intensive study of a text by a major author such as Plato, Machiavelli, Hobbes, or 
Nietzsche. Students systematically explore the issues and problems raised by the text and the 
interpretive traditions that follow from it. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 685 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


POLI 632 Seminar in Political Theory 

This course is a survey of leading research in and approaches to political theory and political 
philosophy, including the history of political thought, normative political theory and contemporary 
political thought. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 685 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


POLI 634 Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation 

This course focuses upon methods of assessing consequences of public policies. The main purpose 
of the course is to allow students to survey evaluation research in political science and to present 
research designs that will enable them to make plausible assumptions about the outcome of 


governmental programs in the absence of experimental control. 


POLI 635 Biotechnology, Agriculture and Food Policy 

The purpose of this course is to explore the ethical and policy dilemmas that rapid scientific and 
technological advances in biotechnology pose for issues of agriculture and food security. The course 
focuses on Canadian policy within a comparative perspective and examines alternative policy 
responses, such as found in the US, EU and developing countries. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 685 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


POLI 636 Theories of Public Policy and Public Administration 

The course explores the diverse intellectual and ideological origins of Public Administration and 
Public Policy. The focus is on the comparative and critical analysis of the theoretical models under 
study. Students are encouraged to think analytically and to apply theoretical frameworks to their own 


empirical enquiries. 


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POLI 637 Democracy and Regime Change 


This seminar examines the various definitions and understandings of democratic and authoritarian 
regimes and the principal moments of regime change (breakdown, transition, post-transition, and 
consolidation). It focuses on institution-building, the actors involved in the process of regime change 
and the political economy of transitions. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under POLI 687B may not take this course for 


credit. 


POLI 638 Seminar in Canadian and Quebec Politics 

This course is a survey of the field at an advanced level. It presents a discussion of contemporary 
issues and controversies in Canadian and Quebec Politics. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 683 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


POLI 643 Rational and Public Choice 

This course deals with understanding the micro-analytical foundations of individual and group 
behaviour in political life. It introduces students to the main concepts, theorems and their 
applications in positive analytical politics including game theory, spatial modeling and institutional 
analysis. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under POLI 687C may not take this course for 


credit. 


POLI 644 Research Methods 
This course introduces students to the logic and methodology of Political Science research and 


public policy analysis. 


POLI 645 Indigenous Peoples and the State 

This course examines the political and administrative context in which Indigenous Peoples and the 
state coexist as well as the tensions between European and Indigenous modes of governance. It 
focuses on the evolution of institutions and policies regulating this relationship, and the governance 
strategies developed consistent with Indigenous traditions. The Canadian case serves as the focus 
but other countries may be considered. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under POLI 683M may not take this course 


for credit. 


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377 
POLI 646 History of Thought in Political Economy 


This course presents a survey of the major ideas which have shaped the various approaches to 
political economy from the classical theorists to twentieth century thinkers. The historical and 


contemporary influence of these ideas on public policy is evaluated. 


POLI 647 International Human Security 

An introduction to the growing literature and controversies surrounding the concept of ‘human 
security’ in international politics, applied specifically to the Canadian foreign policy context. 
Examined actors include states, non-governmental organizations, international institutions, and ‘civil 
society’. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under POLI 6870 may not take this course for 


credit. 


POLI 648 Feminist Critiques of Public Policy 

This course provides an in-depth examination of feminist and critical perspectives of public policy 
and administration. The course seeks to examine the ways in which social location is implicated in 
(and mediated by) public policy theory and practice. Specific topics may include the state of 
bureaucracy, state-society relations, public policy discourses, structures, processes and outcomes, 
and substantive issue areas, such as body politics, social and economic policy, and the labour 
market. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 683 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


POLI 649 Gender and Global Politics 

This seminar focuses on the intersection of the global and the local through different methodological 
and theoretical approaches to the study of gender. Drawing from texts from the fields of comparative 
politics, international relations and sociology, the course exposes class participants to different 
scholarly treatments of gender and politics especially as these treatments have evolved in a post- 


Cold War era of increasing globalization. 


POLI 652 Science, Technology and Power 
This course introduces students to the growing field of science policy analysis. It provides an 
overview of the theoretical approaches and analytical tools used in the area and critically discusses 


various policy mechanisms now in place as well as current and emerging issues. 


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POLI 654 Concepts of the State 


This course examines several of the most significant attempts made by modern political thinkers to 
answer the question, “What is the modern state?” It addresses both the historical emergence of the 
modern state and the various ways that this emergence has been theorized. Special emphasis is 
placed on the differences and interconnections between historical, theoretical, and practical 


questions. 


POLI 657 Nationalism and Ethnicity 

This seminar discusses the nature, dynamics and consequences of nationalism. The emphasis is 
placed on presenting and discussing various theoretical understandings of identity and nationalist 
mobilization. It examines conceptual issues relating to the study of nationalism, namely the nature, 
origins and characterizations of nations and nationalism and the strategies for regulation of 
nationalist conflict. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under POLI 687H may not take this course for 


credit. 


POLI 658 Authors of the Political Imagination 
This course examines a broad range of literary and non-literary genres for their potential to inform 
and redirect the political imagination. The seminar adopts a broadly comparative perspective on 


literature, culture, politics and individual motivation. 


POLI 659 International Organizations 

This course explores the role of international organizations, institutions and regimes in world politics. 
The course covers intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations as well as informal 
institutional arrangements. It surveys theoretical debates regarding the origins, dynamics, and 
significance of international organizations, and examines their role in areas such as international 
security, international political economy, and regional integration. The course also considers debates 
over democratic accountability within international organizations and the efficacy of global 
governance. 

Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 687 number may not take this 


course for credit. 


POLI 662 International Political Economy 
This course covers theories from macroeconomics and international relations and their application to 


major historical and contemporary events in the evolution of the global political economy. Topics 


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379 
include international trade and finance, economic development,regional integration and 


globalization, North-South relations, the emergence of multinational corporations, and international 
organizations such as the World Bank, IMF, WTO, OECD, and UNCTAD. 


POLI 681 Special Topics in Comparative Politics 


POLI 683 Special Topics in Public Policy and Administration 


POLI 684 Special Topics in Canadian and Quebec Politics 


POLI 685 Special Topics in Political Theory 


POLI 687 Special Topics in International Politics 


POLI 691 Extended Research Essay (12 credits) 

The Extended Research Essay is a directed study supervised by a faculty member with whom a 
student completed a course in their area of concentration. Requiring additional research, this degree 
requirement builds on a term paper submitted at the graduate level in a concentration course and is 


considered to be a significant revision and extension of that paper, with an extensive bibliography. 


POLI 693 Internship with Research Paper (21 credits) 
The Internship is a four-month job placement in either the public or private sector. Under the 
direction of a faculty supervisor, the student prepares an original, theoretical work that comprises a 


series of policy recommendations that contribute to the policy process in Canada. 


POLI 695 Directed Studies 


Independent study in the area of concentration. 


Cognate Courses 


Students may enrol in cognate courses in the John Molson School of Business and in the 
Departments of Communication Studies, Economics, Education, and Sociology and Anthropology in 
the Faculty of Arts and Science. Permission of the Graduate Program Directors of both the Master 
of/Magisteriate in Arts (Public Policy and Public Administration) and the second department is 


required. 


© Concordia University 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


380 


Concordia University 


http:/Awww.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/psyc-phd.html 
Psychology PhD 
Specific Information about all Programs 


Admission Requirements 


Admission to the PhD degree requires a master's degree in psychology or its equivalent in a closely 
related discipline. Admission to the PhD degree (Research and Clinical Training Option) requires 

that applicants have completed specific Psychology undergraduate courses required by federal and 
provincial licensing bodies, including an empirically based undergraduate thesis or its equivalent, as 


well as master's-level courses in Psychology specified by the program. 


Admission to the MA (Research Option) requires an undergraduate degree in psychology ora 
closely related discipline. Applications from students with non-psychology degrees are evaluated to 
assess whether they are sufficiently prepared for graduate studies in Psychology. Admission to the 
MA (Research and Clinical Training Option) requires an honours undergraduate degree in 
psychology or its equivalent. In addition, applicants must also have completed specific 
undergraduate courses required by federal and provincial licensing bodies, including an empirically 
based undergraduate thesis or its equivalent. Students who are lacking up to three of these courses 
may obtain the equivalency for the missing credits by taking appropriate undergraduate and/or 


graduate courses during their degree. 


Enrolment in these programs is limited in part by the availability of research supervisors and, for the 


Research and Clinical Training Option, by space in that option. 


Applicants are selected on the basis of past academic record, letters of recommendation, the results 
of the Graduate Record Examination (optional, but highly recommended), and the relevance of their 
proposed research to the research expertise of the faculty. Students successfully completing their 
master's program in psychology at Concordia University need submit only an application form and 
letters of recommendation when applying for the doctoral degree. Psychology graduate courses are 
not open to graduate-level independent students, except in specific circumstances as defined by the 


department. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


381 
Upon recommendation of their thesis supervisor, students enrolled in the Master of Arts 


(Psychology) program at Concordia University who have completed a minimum of 12 credits of 
graduate level course work and who have shown high academic performance and potential through 
performance in research may apply for accelerated admission to doctoral studies without submitting 
a master's thesis. Approval for accelerated admission must be obtained from the student's thesis 
committee and the graduate admissions subcommittee by August 15 to allow entry into the PhD 
program in the Fall term. Students in the Research Option who obtain accelerated admission are not 
required to take the elective course (chosen from PSYC 700, PSYC 716, PSYC 721, PSYC 724, 
PSYC 725, PSYC 726, PSYC 727or PSYC 734) as part of their MA coursework. Students in the 
Research and Clinical Training option may not obtain accelerated admission to the PhD program 
from MA Year I, but may apply for accelerated admission, upon recommendation of their thesis 


supervisor, from MA Year Il. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Language Requirements. Although no formal language courses or examinations are required, 
students intending to work in Quebec are strongly encouraged to develop a working knowledge of 
French. Students who plan to seek admission to the Order of Quebec Psychologists (OPQ) are 
advised that Article 46 of the professional code of the Province of Quebec states that a working 


knowledge of French is required for professional certification. 


Undergraduate Teaching. Students are encouraged to take opportunities to assist in 
undergraduate teaching. The department treats such teaching as part of the student's learning 
experience. Discussion of aims and techniques as well as advice and criticism are parts of the 


training that students obtain as teaching assistants. 
Colloquia. All students are expected to attend departmental colloquia. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Residence. The minimum residence requirement is two years (6 terms) of full-time study beyond 


the MA degree, or the equivalent in part-time study. 


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382 


2. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 90 credits, including 


Core courses and elective Options. 


3. Core Courses: 


a. 


(o) 


Students are required to complete PSYC 801 (3 credits), PSYC 802 (3 credits), PSYC 880 (0 
credits); PSYC 890 (60 credits); and 6 credits chosen from PSYC 721, 722, 724, 725, 726 or 
727 (6 credits). 


. Comprehensive Examination. Students are required to write a comprehensive examination 


(PSYC 880) within 12 months of being admitted for the degree. The examination is in two 
parts, one dealing with general issues and the other with the candidate’s area of 


specialization. 


. Thesis. The research is undertaken within one or more of the areas of research 


specialization of the department (Behavioural Neuroscience, Clinical and Health Research, 
Human Development and Developmental Processes, and Cognitive Science) under the 
supervision of a faculty member. The thesis is expected to make a significant contribution to 
the advancement of knowledge. The content and form of the thesis must be approved by a 
departmental committee prior to submission to the School of Graduate Studies. For purposes 


of registration, this work is designated as PSYC 890 Research and Thesis (60 credits). 


Research Option (18 credits): 


In addition to the core courses, students select from the following sets of courses for a maximum 
of 18 credits: 


a. 


b. 


PSYC 844, 845, 846 or 847 (3 to12 credits). Each 3-credit seminar may be taken up to 4 


times as an elective option provided the topic differs. 


PSYC 700, 701, 714, 716, 721, 722, 724, 725, 726,727, 734, 850, or 851 (6-15 credits). 
Special Topics seminars PSYC 721, 722, 724, 725, 726, and 727 may be taken multiple 


times as an elective option provided that the course content has changed. 


Research and Clinical Training Option (18 credits): 


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383 
In addition to the core courses, students select from the following sets of courses for a maximum 


of 18 credits: 


a. PSYC 823, 824, or 825 (3 credits); PSYC 834 (3 credits); PSYC 835, 836, or 837 (3 credits); 
PSYC 841, 842, or 843 (3 credits); PSYC 838, 839, or 840 (3 credits); and PSYC 885 (3 


credits). 


b. At least one adult and one child client must be seen in the required practicum courses ((APC 
Practicum II or Ill, Extramural Practicum 1). All students following the Research and Clinical 
Training Option are expected to attend case conferences at the Applied Psychology Centre 


training clinic. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 
Limit requirements. In the case of the Diploma in Clinical Psychology, the time limit is 9 terms (3 


years) for full-time students; for part-time students the time limit is 15 terms (5 years). 


3. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 3.00. 


Courses 


The following are 3-credit courses unless otherwise indicated. 


PSYC 700 Psychopathology 

Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in behaviour disorders or equivalent. 

This seminar deals with historical and current approaches to the study of behaviour disorders and 
problems of life adjustment in both adults and children, including critical evaluation of empirical 
findings in selected areas. Classification systems, including the current revision of the APA 
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, are critically reviewed. Students with credit for PSYC 660 or 860 


may not take this course for credit. 


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384 
PSYC 701 Models of Assessment | 


Prerequisite: PSYC 700; Co-requisite: PSYC 706 or permission of the Director of Clinical Training. 
Focusing on cognitive and ability testing of children and adults, this course stresses the conceptual 
bases of ability testing, research results and their implications for test interpretation, and strengths 
and limitations of current test batteries for children and adults. Specific course content includes: a) 
measurement theory, including issues of test construction, reliability, validity, and evaluation; b) 
appropriate use and interpretation of specific cognitive assessment batteries (e.g. the Wechsler and 
Stanford-Binet scales for children and adults); and c) special assessment issues, including the 
testing of minorities and assessment-related ethical problems. A practicum in assessment 


techniques (PSYC 706) is typically taken in conjunction with this course. 


PSYC 714 Central Topics in Psychology (6 credits) 

This general seminar deals with basic theoretical and research issues in Psychology. Topics are 
drawn from a wide range of areas in Psychology including perceptual and cognitive processes, 
learning, motivation, and psycho-pathology. Issues are considered with respect to developmental, 
physiological and social approaches. Students who have received credit for PSYC 602 may not take 


this course for credit. 


PSYC 716 Advanced Human Development 

This seminar on theory and research focuses on human development and developmental 
processes. Subject matter will vary from term to term and from year to year. Students may re- 
register for this course, provided that the course content has changed. Change in content will be 


indicated by the letter following the course number. 


PSYC 721 Special Topics Seminar 

This seminar provides an advanced treatment of specialized research literature in an integrative or 
selected area of psychology outside the department’s major areas of specialization. It may be 
offered as a seminar, tutorial or directed reading course, or in any other format, subject to approval 
of the program director. Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may 


register for this course multiple times provided that the course content has changed. 


PSYC 722 Focused Topic Seminar (1.5 credits) 

This seminar provides an advanced treatment of specialized research literature in a selected area of 
psychology. It may be offered as a seminar, tutorial or directed reading course, or in any other 
format, subject to approval of the program director. Subject matter varies from term to term and from 
year to year. Students may register for this course multiple times provided that the course content 


has changed. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


385 
PSYC 724 Special Topics in Clinical and Health Psychology 


This course provides an advanced treatment of specialized research literature in an area of clinical 
and/or health psychology. It may be offered as a seminar, tutorial or directed reading course, or in 
any other format, subject to approval of the program director. Subject matter varies from term to term 
and from year to year. Students may register for this course multiple times provided that the course 


content has changed. 


PSYC 725 Special Topics in Cognitive Science 

This course provides an advanced treatment of specialized research literature in an area of cognitive 
science. It may be offered as a seminar, tutorial or directed reading course, or in any other format, 
subject to approval of the program director. Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to 
year. Students may register for this course multiple times provided that the course content has 


changed. 


PSYC 726 Special Topics in Human Development 

This course provides an advanced treatment of specialized research literature in an area of human 
development and developmental processes. It may be offered as a seminar, tutorial or directed 
reading course, or in any other format, subject to approval of the program director. Subject matter 
varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may register for this course multiple times 


provided that the course content has changed. 


PSYC 727 Special Topics in Behavioural Neuroscience 

This course provides an advanced treatment of specialized research literature in an area of 
behavioural neuroscience. It may be offered as a seminar, tutorial or directed reading course, or in 
any other format, subject to approval of the program director. Subject matter varies from term to term 
and from year to year. Students may register for this course multiple times provided that the course 


content has changed. 


PSYC 734 Multivariate Statistics 

Prerequisite: PSYC 601. 

Building upon material presented in PSYC 601, this course covers latent variable analyses and 
multivariate procedures, including factor analysis, structural equation modelling, multiple group 


models, and multilevel modelling. 


PSYC 801 Research Seminar | 
A seminar attended by all doctoral students in which specific research proposals and related 


theoretical issues and methodological problems are presented for discussion by students and 


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386 
participating faculty. 


PSYC 802 Research Seminar Il 
A continuation of PSYC 801. 


PSYC 823 APC Practicum Ill: General 

Prerequisite: PSYC 708 (or 709 or 710), 711 (or 712 or 713). Prerequisite or Co-requisite: PSYC 
834, 835 (or 836 or 837), and permission of the Director of Clinical Training. 

Advanced students are expected to begin to define clinical interests and treatment methods 
consonant with their career goals. They receive the appropriate clinical experience and supervision 
in this practicum (e.g., working with children, adolescents, adults, working with clients who present 


particular types of problems). 


PSYC 824 APC Practicum Ill: Adult 

Prerequisite: PSYC 708 (or 709 or 710), 711 (or 712 or 713). Prerequisite or Co-requisite: PSYC 
834, 835 (or 836 or 837), and permission of the Director of Clinical Training. 

Advanced students are expected to begin to define clinical interests and treatment methods 
consonant with their career goals. They receive the appropriate clinical experience and supervision 
in this practicum working with adult clients, e.g. working with a particular orientation and/or with 


particular types of problems. 


PSYC 825 APC Practicum Ill: Child 

Prerequisite: PSYC 708 (or 709 or 710), 711 (or 712 or 713). Prerequisite or Co-requisite: PSYC 
834, 835 (or 836 or 837), and permission of the Director of Clinical Training. 

Advanced students are expected to begin to define clinical interests and treatment methods 
consonant with their career goals. They receive the appropriate clinical experience and supervision 
in this practicum working with child clients and families, e.g. working with a particular orientation 


and/or with particular types of problems. 


PSYC 826 APC Practicum IV: General 
Prerequisite: PSYC 823 (or 824 or 825) and permission of the Director of Clinical Training. 
This course is a specialized practicum for advanced students involving clinical experience under 


supervision. 


PSYC 827 APC Practicum IV: Adult 
Prerequisite: PSYC 823 (or 824 or 825) and permission of the Director of Clinical Training. 
This course is a specialized practicum for advanced students involving clinical experience with adult 


clients under supervision. 
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387 
PSYC 828 APC Practicum IV: Child 


Prerequisite: PSYC 823 (or 824 or 825) and permission of the Director of Clinical Training. 
This course is a specialized practicum for advanced students involving clinical experience with child 


clients under supervision. 


PSYC 834 Advanced Clinical Seminar | 

Prerequisite: PSYC 711 (or 712 or 713), 708 (or 709 or 710), and permission of Director of Clinical 
Training. 

This seminar provides an advanced treatment of issues in current psychological theory and research 
that are relevant to clinical practice, e.g., causal models and their assumptions, legal and ethical 
issues, Classification by state, trait, and situational context; brain-behaviour relations. The aims are 
to foster in students a) regular review of clinically relevant literature; b) a critical perspective 
regarding current clinical practices; and c) guidelines and criteria for optimal assessment and 


treatment decisions tailored to the needs of clients. 


PSYC 835 Advanced Clinical Seminar II: Adult 

Prerequisite: PSYC 834. 

The seminar provides an advanced analysis of issues in the assessment and treatment of behaviour 
disorders in adulthood. Prototype cases are presented for illustrative discussion of particular clinical 
issues, e.g. indicators of risk for suicide, homicide, and psychosis; imagery and dreams in 
psychological treatment; stress-related physical disorders; anxiety-spectrum disorders; treatment for 
couples, families, and groups. Assessment and treatment approaches to particular disorders are 


compared with reference to etiological assumptions and levels of inference. 


PSYC 836 Advanced Clinical Seminar II: Child 

Prerequisite: PSYC 834. 

The seminar provides an advanced analysis of issues in the assessment and treatment of behaviour 
disorders in children in a developmental context. Prototype cases are presented for illustrative 
discussion of particular clinical issues, e.g. stress-related physical disorders; family therapy; child 


abuse; age-related symptom expression and variability; non-verbal therapies. 


PSYC 837 Advanced Clinical Seminar II: General 
Prerequisite: PSYC 834. 


This seminar is a blend of issues examined in PSYC 835 and 836 (see above). 


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388 
PSYC 838 Extramural Practicum II: General 


Prerequisite: PSYC 708 (or 709 or 710), 711 (or 712 or 713), and permission of the Director of 
Clinical Training. 

This course is a senior extramural practicum, done under qualified supervision in an applied setting 
approved by the department’s practicum committee, e.g. hospitals, clinics, schools, community and 


rehabilitation centres. 


PSYC 839 Extramural Practicum II: Adult 

Prerequisite: PSYC 708 (or 709 or 710), 711 (or 712 or 713), and permission of the Director of 
Clinical Training. 

This course is a senior extramural practicum with adult clients, done under qualified supervision in 
an applied setting approved by the department’s practicum committee, e.g. hospitals, clinics, 


schools, community and rehabilitation centres. 


PSYC 840 Extramural Practicum II: Child 

Prerequisite: PSYC 708 (or 709 or 710), 711 (or 712 or 713), and permission of the Director of 
Clinical Training. 

This course is a senior extramural practicum with child clients done under qualified supervision in an 
applied setting approved by the department’s practicum committee, e.g. hospitals, clinics, schools, 


community and rehabilitation centres. 


PSYC 841 Extramural Practicum Ill: General 
This course is a senior extramural practicum, done under qualified supervision in an applied setting 
approved by the department’s practicum committee, e.g. hospitals, clinics, schools, community and 


rehabilitation centres. 


PSYC 842 Extramural Practicum Ill: Adult 
This course is a senior extramural practicum with adult clients, done under qualified supervision in 
an applied setting approved by the department’s practicum committee, e.g. hospitals, clinics, 


schools, community and rehabilitation centres. 


PSYC 843 Extramural Practicum Ill: Child 
This course is a senior extramural practicum with child clients, done under qualified supervision in 
an applied setting approved by the department’s practicum committee, e.g. hospitals, clinics, 


schools, community and rehabilitation centres. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


389 
PSYC 844 Clinical and Health Research Area Seminar Il 


This seminar provides the opportunity for faculty and students working in clinical and health 
psychology to present and discuss their current research. 

Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may register for this course 
up to 4 times provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the 
letter following the course number, e.g. PSYC 844A, PSYC 844B. 


PSYC 845 Cognitive Science Area Seminar Il 

This seminar provides the opportunity for faculty and students working in cognitive science to 
present and discuss their current research. 

Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may register for this course 
up to 4 times provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the 
letter following the course number, e.g. PSYC 845A, PSYC 845B. 


PSYC 846 Human Development Area Seminar II 

This seminar provides the opportunity for faculty and students working on human development and 
developmental processes to present and discuss their current research. 

Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may register for this course 
up to 4 times provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the 
letter following the course number, e.g. PSYC 846A, PSYC 846B. 


PSYC 847 Behavioural Neuroscience Area Seminar Il 

This seminar provides the opportunity for faculty and students working in behavioural neuroscience 
to present and discuss their current research. 

Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may register for this course 
up to 4 times provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the 
letter following the course number, e.g. PSYC 847A, PSYC 847B. 


PSYC 850 Practicum in Research Techniques (3 or 6 credits) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the PhD Program Director. 

This practicum is designed to give students the opportunity to develop their research skills by such 
activities as learning new experimental and technical approaches, developing instruments or 
computer programs to support research, developing expertise in advanced statistical methods, or 


other equivalent activities. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


390 
PSYC 851 Teaching of Research Techniques 


Prerequisite: Permission of PhD Program Director. 

This practicum is designed to train students in the teaching of research techniques. Under 
supervision, the student is responsible for training an apprentice in specialized experimental skills 
or research techniques that may include advanced statistical methods, or other equivalent activities. 
Prior to beginning the work, students submit a detailed outline of the planned teaching activities 


to be approved by the program director. 


PSYC 880 PhD Comprehensive Examination (non-credit) 


PSYC 885 Predoctoral Internship 

Prerequisite: PSYC 835 (or 836 or 837), 823 (824 or 825), and permission of the Director of Clinical 
Training. 

The pre-doctoral internship consists of the equivalent of 12 months full-time employment under 
qualified supervision in an applied setting approved by the department's internship committee. The 
internship is usually done after completion of course requirements, and after data collection and 


analysis, and a draft of the doctoral thesis have been completed. 


PSYC 890 Research and Thesis (60 credits) 


© Concordia University 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


391 


Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/psyc-ma.html 
Psychology MA 
Specific Information about all Programs 


Admission Requirements 


Admission to the PhD degree requires a master's degree in psychology or its equivalent in a closely 
related discipline. Admission to the PhD degree (Research and Clinical Training Option) requires 

that applicants have completed specific Psychology undergraduate courses required by federal and 
provincial licensing bodies, including an empirically based undergraduate thesis or its equivalent, as 


well as master's-level courses in Psychology specified by the program. 


Admission to the MA (Research Option) requires an undergraduate degree in psychology ora 
closely related discipline. Applications from students with non-psychology degrees are evaluated to 
assess whether they are sufficiently prepared for graduate studies in Psychology. Admission to the 
MA (Research and Clinical Training Option) requires an honours undergraduate degree in 
psychology or its equivalent. In addition, applicants must also have completed specific 
undergraduate courses required by federal and provincial licensing bodies, including an empirically 
based undergraduate thesis or its equivalent. Students who are lacking up to three of these courses 
may obtain the equivalency for the missing credits by taking appropriate undergraduate and/or 


graduate courses during their degree. 


Enrolment in these programs is limited in part by the availability of research supervisors and, for the 


Research and Clinical Training Option, by space in that option. 


Applicants are selected on the basis of past academic record, letters of recommendation, the results 
of the Graduate Record Examination (optional, but highly recommended), and the relevance of their 
proposed research to the research expertise of the faculty. Students successfully completing their 
master's program in psychology at Concordia University need submit only an application form and 
letters of recommendation when applying for the doctoral degree. Psychology graduate courses are 
not open to graduate-level independent students, except in specific circumstances as defined by the 


department. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


392 
Upon recommendation of their thesis supervisor, students enrolled in the Master of Arts 


(Psychology) program at Concordia University who have completed a minimum of 12 credits of 
graduate level course work and who have shown high academic performance and potential through 
performance in research may apply for accelerated admission to doctoral studies without submitting 
a master's thesis. Approval for accelerated admission must be obtained from the student's thesis 
committee and the graduate admissions subcommittee by August 15 to allow entry into the PhD 
program in the Fall term. Students in the Research Option who obtain accelerated admission are not 
required to take the elective course (chosen from PSYC 700, PSYC 716, PSYC 721, PSYC 724, 
PSYC 725, PSYC 726, PSYC 727or PSYC 734) as part of their MA coursework. Students in the 
Research and Clinical Training option may not obtain accelerated admission to the PhD program 
from MA Year I, but may apply for accelerated admission, upon recommendation of their thesis 


supervisor, from MA Year Il. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Language Requirements. Although no formal language courses or examinations are required, 
students intending to work in Quebec are strongly encouraged to develop a working knowledge of 
French. Students who plan to seek admission to the Order of Quebec Psychologists (OPQ) are 
advised that Article 46 of the professional code of the Province of Quebec states that a working 


knowledge of French is required for professional certification. 


Undergraduate Teaching. Students are encouraged to take opportunities to assist in 
undergraduate teaching. The department treats such teaching as part of the student's learning 
experience. Discussion of aims and techniques as well as advice and criticism are parts of the 


training that students obtain as teaching assistants. 
Colloquia. All students are expected to attend departmental colloquia. 


Requirements for the Degree 


Research Option 


1. Residence. The minimum period of residence is one year (3 terms) of full-time study, or the 


equivalent in part-time study. 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


393 
2. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits consisting of 


course work and thesis as follows: PSYC 601 (3 credits); PSYC 644, 645, 646, or 647 (3 credits); 
PSYC 714 (6 credits); 3 credits selected in consultation with the thesis supervisor from among 
PSYC 700, 716, 721, 722, 724, 725, 726, 727 or 734; and PSYC 690 (30 credits). 


3. Thesis. The student must submit a thesis on a topic relating to one or more of the areas of 
research specialization of the department (Behavioural Neuroscience, Clinical and Health 
Research, Human Development and Developmental Processes, and Cognitive Science) chosen 
in consultation with his or her thesis supervisor. Topics must be approved by a committee of the 
department. The thesis shall be read and graded by the student's thesis director and by at least 
two other scholars, one of whom may be an outside examiner. For purposes of registration, this 


work is designated as PSYC 690 - Research and Thesis (30 credits). 


4. Thesis Examination. The student must defend the thesis and demonstrate knowledge of the 


field in which the thesis falls in an oral examination before a committee of the department. 


Research and Clinical Training Option 


1. Residence. The minimum period of residence is one year (3 terms) of full-time study, or the 


equivalent in part-time study. 


2. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits consisting of 
course work and thesis as follows: PSYC 601 (3 credits); PSYC 644, 645, 646, or 647 (0 credits); 
PSYC 700 (3 credits); PSYC 714 (6 credits); PSYC 734 (3 credits); and PSYC 690 (30 credits). 


Students in this option will concurrently complete the courses indicated under Diploma in Clinical 


Psychology. 


3. Thesis. The student must submit a thesis on a topic relating to one or more of the areas of 
research specialization of the department (Behavioural Neuroscience, Clinical and Health 
Research, Human Development and Developmental Processes, and Cognitive Science) chosen 
in consultation with his or her thesis supervisor. Topics must be approved by a committee of the 
department. The thesis shall be read and graded by the student's thesis director and by at least 
two other scholars, one of whom may be an outside examiner. For purposes of registration, this 


work is designated as PSYC 690 - Research and Thesis (30 credits). 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


394 
4. Thesis Examination. The student must defend the thesis and demonstrate knowledge of the 


field in which the thesis falls in an oral examination before a committee of the department. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 
Limit requirements. In the case of the Diploma in Clinical Psychology, the time limit is 9 terms (3 


years) for full-time students; for part-time students the time limit is 15 terms (5 years). 


3. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 2.70. 


Courses 


The following are 3-credit courses unless otherwise indicated. 


PSYC 601 Statistical Analysis and Experimental Design 
A detailed consideration of selected issues in Psychological statistics. Topics include parametric and 


non-parametric techniques, analysis of variance, power of statistical tests, and hypothesis testing. 


PSYC 644 Clinical and Health Research Area Seminar | (non-credit) 
A seminar in which current research of faculty and students in clinical and health psychology is 


presented and discussed. 


PSYC 645 Cognitive Science Area Seminar | (non-credit) 
A seminar in which current research of faculty and students in cognitive science is presented and 


discussed. 


PSYC 646 Human Development Area Seminar I (non-credit) 
A seminar in which current research of faculty and students in human development and 


developmental processes is presented and discussed. 


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395 
PSYC 647 Behavioural Neuroscience Area Seminar | (non-credit) 


A seminar in which current research of faculty and students in behavioural neuroscience is 


presented and discussed. 
PSYC 690 Research and Thesis (30 credits) 


PSYC 700 Psychopathology 

Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in behaviour disorders or equivalent. 

This seminar deals with historical and current approaches to the study of behaviour disorders and 
problems of life adjustment in both adults and children, including critical evaluation of empirical 
findings in selected areas. Classification systems, including the current revision of the APA 
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, are critically reviewed. Students with credit for PSYC 660 or 860 


may not take this course for credit. 


PSYC 714 Central Topics in Psychology (6 credits) 

This general seminar deals with basic theoretical and research issues in Psychology. Topics are 
drawn from a wide range of areas in Psychology including perceptual and cognitive processes, 
learning, motivation, and psycho-pathology. Issues are considered with respect to developmental, 
physiological and social approaches. Students who have received credit for PSYC 602 may not take 


this course for credit. 


PSYC 716 Advanced Human Development 

This seminar on theory and research focuses on human development and developmental 
processes. Subject matter will vary from term to term and from year to year. Students may re- 
register for this course, provided that the course content has changed. Change in content will be 


indicated by the letter following the course number. 


PSYC 721 Special Topics Seminar 

This seminar provides an advanced treatment of specialized research literature in an integrative or 
selected area of psychology outside the department’s major areas of specialization. It may be 
offered as a seminar, tutorial or directed reading course, or in any other format, subject to approval 
of the program director. Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may 


register for this course multiple times provided that the course content has changed. 


PSYC 722 Focused Topic Seminar (1.5 credits) 
This seminar provides an advanced treatment of specialized research literature in a selected area of 


psychology. It may be offered as a seminar, tutorial or directed reading course, or in any other 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


396 
format, subject to approval of the program director. Subject matter varies from term to term and from 


year to year. Students may register for this course multiple times provided that the course content 


has changed. 


PSYC 724 Special Topics in Clinical and Health Psychology 

This course provides an advanced treatment of specialized research literature in an area of clinical 
and/or health psychology. It may be offered as a seminar, tutorial or directed reading course, or in 
any other format, subject to approval of the program director. Subject matter varies from term to term 
and from year to year. Students may register for this course multiple times provided that the course 


content has changed. 


PSYC 725 Special Topics in Cognitive Science 

This course provides an advanced treatment of specialized research literature in an area of cognitive 
science. It may be offered as a seminar, tutorial or directed reading course, or in any other format, 
subject to approval of the program director. Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to 
year. Students may register for this course multiple times provided that the course content has 
changed. 


PSYC 726 Special Topics in Human Development 

This course provides an advanced treatment of specialized research literature in an area of human 
development and developmental processes. It may be offered as a seminar, tutorial or directed 
reading course, or in any other format, subject to approval of the program director. Subject matter 
varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may register for this course multiple times 


provided that the course content has changed. 


PSYC 727 Special Topics in Behavioural Neuroscience 

This course provides an advanced treatment of specialized research literature in an area of 
behavioural neuroscience. It may be offered as a seminar, tutorial or directed reading course, or in 
any other format, subject to approval of the program director. Subject matter varies from term to term 
and from year to year. Students may register for this course multiple times provided that the course 


content has changed. 


PSYC 734 Multivariate Statistics 

Prerequisite: PSYC 601. 

Building upon material presented in PSYC 601, this course covers latent variable analyses and 
multivariate procedures, including factor analysis, structural equation modelling, multiple group 


models, and multilevel modelling. 


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Clinical Psychology Graduate Diploma 


The Diploma in Clinical Psychology provides students enroled in the MA in Psychology (Research 
and Clinical Training Option) with clinical coursework and practica qualifying them for further clinical 


training provided in the PhD in Psychology (Research and Clinical Training Option). 


Admission Requirements 


The Diploma in Clinical Psychology is open only to students enrolled in the MA or PhD in 


Psychology (Research and Clinical Training Option). 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Language Requirements. Although no formal language courses or examinations are required, 
students intending to work in Quebec are strongly encouraged to develop a working knowledge of 
French. Students who plan to seek admission to the Order of Quebec Psychologists (OPQ) are 
advised that Article 46 of the professional code of the Province of Quebec states that a working 


knowledge of French is required for professional certification. 


Undergraduate Teaching. Students are encouraged to take opportunities to assist in 
undergraduate teaching. The department treats such teaching as part of the student's learning 
experience. Discussion of aims and techniques as well as advice and criticism will be involved as 


part of the training that students obtain as teaching assistants. 
Colloquia. All students are expected to attend departmental colloquia. 


Requirements for the Diploma 


1. Credits. (30 credits) Students are required to complete 30 credits as follows: 


2. Courses. Requirements for the Diploma in Clinical Psychology consist of 10 courses. PSYC 
701, 702, 703, 704, 705, 706, 707, 720 (24 credits); PSYC 708, 709, or 710 (3 credits); and 


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PSYC 711, 712, or 713 (3 credits). 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 
Limit requirements. In the case of the Diploma in Clinical Psychology, the time limit is 9 terms (3 


years) for full-time students; for part-time students the time limit is 15 terms (5 years). 


3. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 3.00. 


Courses 


The following are 3-credit courses unless otherwise indicated. 


PSYC 701 Models of Assessment | 

Prerequisite: PSYC 700; Co-requisite: PSYC 706 or permission of the Director of Clinical Training. 
Focusing on cognitive and ability testing of children and adults, this course stresses the conceptual 
bases of ability testing, research results and their implications for test interpretation, and strengths 
and limitations of current test batteries for children and adults. Specific course content includes: a) 
measurement theory, including issues of test construction, reliability, validity, and evaluation; b) 
appropriate use and interpretation of specific cognitive assessment batteries (e.g. the Wechsler and 
Stanford-Binet scales for children and adults); and c) special assessment issues, including the 
testing of minorities and assessment-related ethical problems. A practicum in assessment 


techniques (PSYC 706) is typically taken in conjunction with this course. 


PSYC 702 Models of Assessment Il 

Prerequisite: PSYC 701; Co-requisite: PSYC 707 or permission of the Director of Clinical Training. 
This course is a continuation of Assessment I, and focuses on the measurement of behaviour 
related directly to personality and/or behaviour disorders in both adult and child populations. 
Interviewing, projective techniques and structural (quantitative) tests of personality such as the 


MMPI and CPI are included. The course stresses the evaluation of assessment procedures in terms 


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of reliability and validity issues, and focuses on the selection and use of assessment procedures for 


specific types of prediction. The course also stresses the integration of assessment procedures into 


treatment planning and evaluation. 


PSYC 703 Psychological Treatment I: Foundations and Systems 

Prerequisite: PSYC 700. 

Models of psychological intervention with both adults and children are examined with respect to: a) 
theoretical formulations and etiological assumptions; b) treatment objectives and strategies; c) 
issues related to the application of these models; d) the efficacy of treatment procedures, including 
general issues in outcome research. The major emphases are on behavioural and psychodynamic 


approaches. Among other topics, the ethics of therapeutic interventions are discussed. 


PSYC 704 Psychological Treatment II: Empirically Supported Interventions 
Prerequisite: PSYC 703. 


A continuation of PSYC 703. Psychological Treatment I: Foundations and Systems. 


PSYC 705 APC Practicum | 
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: PSYC 700 and permission of the Director of Clinical Training. 
Students participate in case supervision, observe and/or assist with clients in therapy, and attend 


case conferences at the Applied Psychology Centre (APC). 


PSYC 706 Assessment Practicum | 

Prerequisite or Co-requisite: PSYC 701, 705 and permission of the Director of Clinical Training. 

This course focuses on the practical applications of the material discussed in Models of Assessment 
| (PSYC 701). Students administer intellectual tests under supervision. Techniques for 
administration, interpretation and report-writing of specific test batteries suitable for adults and 


children are stressed. 


PSYC 707 Assessment Practicum Il 

Prerequisite: PSYC 706, Co-requisite: PSYC 702, and permission of the Director of Clinical Training. 
This course focuses on the practical applications of the material discussed in models of Assessment 
Il (PSYC 702). Students administer personality tests under supervision. Techniques for 
administration, interpretation and report writing of specific assessment test batteries suitable for 


adults and children are stressed. 


PSYC 708 APC Practicum Il: General 
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: PSYC 703, 704, 706, 707 and permission of the Director of Clinical 


Training. 
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The focus of this course is the practical applications of the material discussed in Models of 


Assessment II and Models of Behaviour Change | and II PSYC 702, 703 and 704. Students are 
responsible for the assessment and treatment of selected clients of the Applied Psychology Centre 


under faculty supervision. 


PSYC 709 APC Practicum II: Adult 

Prerequisite or Co-requisite: PSYC 703, 704, 706, 707 and permission of the Director of Clinical 
Training. 

The focus of this course is the practical applications of the material discussed in Models of 
Assessment II and Models of Behaviour Change | and II PSYC 702, 703 and 704. Students are 
responsible for the assessment and treatment of selected adult clients of the Applied Psychology 


Centre under faculty supervision. 


PSYC 710 APC Practicum II: Child 

Prerequisite or Co-requisite: PSYC 703, 704, 706, 707 and permission of the Director of Clinical 
Training. 

The focus of this course is the practical applications of the material discussed in Models of 
Assessment II and Models of Behaviour Change | and II PSYC 702, 703 and 704. Students are 
responsible for the assessment and treatment of selected child clients of the Applied Psychology 


Centre under faculty supervision. 


PSYC 711 Extramural Practicum I: General 

Prerequisite: PSYC 701, 702, 703, 704, 706, 707 and permission of the Director of Clinical Training. 
A four-month extramural practicum done under qualified supervisors in an applied setting approved 
by the department’s internship committee, e.g., hospitals, clinics, schools, community and 


rehabilitation centres. 


PSYC 712 Extramural Practicum I: Adult 

Prerequisite: PSYC 701, 702, 703, 704, 706, 707 and permission of the Director of Clinical Training. 
A four-month extramural practicum with adult clients, done under qualified supervisors in an applied 
setting approved by the department’s internship committee, e.g. hospitals, clinics, schools, 


community and rehabilitation centres. 


PSYC 713 Extramural Practicum |: Child 
Prerequisite: PSYC 701, 702, 703, 704, 706, 707 and permission of the Director of Clinical Training. 


A four-month extramural practicum with child clients, done under qualified supervisors in an applied 


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setting approved by the department's internship committee, e.g., hospitals, clinics, schools, 


community and rehabilitation centres. 


PSYC 720 Seminar on Ethical and Professional Issues 

Prerequisite or Co-requisite: PSYC 834 or permission of the Director of Clinical Training. 

In this biweekly seminar, ethical and professional issues in clinical psychology are considered 
through case presentations by students, faculty and guest clinicians. The ethical principles of 


national accrediting bodies and of the Order of Psychologists of Québec are reviewed. 


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http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/reli-phd.html 


Religion PhD 


This degree is offered conjointly with the Département des sciences religieuses of the Université du 
Québec a Montréal and the Faculté de théologie et de sciences religieuses of the Université Laval. 
There are five areas of concentration: theories of religion, history of religions, contemporary religious 
phenomena, Judaic studies, and comparative religion and ethics. A student chooses to register in 
one of the three universities on the basis of the match between faculty expertise and the student’s 
specialization, and is subject to that university’s regulations. Each student is graduated by the 
university of their registration. The joint degree provides a context for collaboration between the 
three departments, with some exchange of faculty for teaching and direction. There are two required 


doctoral seminars one of which is common to students at all three universities in alternate years. 


The doctoral program in Religion at Concordia places strong emphasis on a comparative approach. 
The comparative study of religion incorporates a number of different but related inquiries, including: 
examination of the inter-relations between religious beliefs and practices; analysis of religions as 
social and cultural phenomena and of cultures and societies insofar as they have been influenced by 
religious traditions; study of inter-relations between religions and human values; investigation of 
religious ethics; as well as analysis of social issues from the perspective of religious values. These 
studies are comparative insofar as particular expressions of religions and ethics are viewed as 
unique but historically situated realities which often can best be understood by making formal or 


informal comparisons with other comparable realities. 


Although the requirements are fundamentally the same in all three universities, the remainder of this 


section applies only to students registered at Concordia. 
Admission Requirements 
A Master of Arts in Religion, or equivalent, with high standing from a recognized university. 


The Department will consider the application of students to the PhD program for entry without 


completion of the master's degree if the following requirements are met: 


« the student has completed 18 credits of graduate level course work in Religion with high 
standing; 


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the student is recommended by full-time members of the faculty of the Department of Religions 


and Cultures; 


the student has acquired a breadth of knowledge in the study of Religion through course work or 


scholarly or professional experience; 


the student has demonstrated her or his ability to do independent graduate-level research in 


religious studies, and has demonstrated the ability to produce an original analysis of her/his 


research (in the form of research papers, conference papers, or publications); 


the student has a well-formed and focused research plan that will serve as a basis for her/his 


doctoral research. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Transfer Credits. See Transfer Credits in Graduate Admissions section. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 90 credits. 


2. Doctoral Seminars. All candidates must register for RELI 890 (6 credits) in their first or second 
or equivalent year of study. This seminar will deal with general and methodological issues in the 
study of religion. It will be held in common with UQAM and Université Laval; discussion and 
readings will be both in English and in French. In the first or second or equivalent year of the 
program, the student will register as well for one of the following seminars according to their 
specialization: RELI 891, Religions and Cultures Doctoral Seminar (6 credits), or RELI 892, 
Judaic Studies (6 credits). 


3. Courses. A student is required to register for a minimum of 18 credits of directed reading. These 
courses are offered according to the resources of the department and the needs of the students. 
They are grouped into RELI 800-818 (Topics in Judaic Studies) and RELI 820-839 (Topics in 
Religions and Cultures). Some of the courses at the Master of Arts level are open to PhD 


candidates, with the requirement of additional work and higher standards of performance. 


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4. Comprehensive Examination. Graduate students in Religion at the doctoral level are expected 


to pursue a program of independent study and research in their chosen field. After course work is 
completed, all candidates must take RELI 860: Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (15 
credits). The comprehensive examination will consist of three written exams followed by an oral 
examination which reviews these exams. In most cases, two of these written exams focus on 
topics from two distinct religious traditions; the third written exam will be on a topic related to a 
student’s proposed thesis. One of the three exams should include a focus on theory and 
methodology. Credits are not distributed among these four examinations. For purposes of 


registration, this work will be designated as RELI 860 and is graded as pass/fail. 


5. Thesis. Each candidate will prepare a doctoral thesis which is to be an original contribution to 
scholarship. Although the topic should be provisionally chosen and serve as a coordinating factor 
throughout the student’s doctoral program, a written proposal must be formally submitted and 
approved by the Graduate Studies Committee after the successful completion of the 
comprehensive examination. For purposes of registration, the thesis will be designated as RELI 
870: Doctoral Thesis (45 credits). 


6. Language Requirement. Students must achieve an acceptable command of the classical and/or 
modern languages appropriate to their area of specialization. Specific requirements in terms of 
numbers of years of study and examinations or other demonstrations of competence are 
established in consultation with the Graduate Program Director and the thesis supervisor. 
Students are also expected to be proficient in the language or languages of the primary sources 
relevant to their thesis research. All Canadian students are required to demonstrate a working 
knowledge of both English and French. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Residence. The minimum period of residence is two years (6 terms) of full-time graduate study 
beyond the master’s degree, or the equivalent in part time study, or three years (9 terms) of full- 


time graduate study beyond the bachelor’s degree. 


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3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have satisfied all degree 
requirements and have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.00. 


Courses 


Since the topics of elective courses are subject to modification according to student enrolment and 


demands, no course list is provided in this calendar. 


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http:/Awww.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/reli-judaic-ma.html 


Judaic Studies MA 


Students apply to the guided research project (GRP) option. Once admitted to the program, students 
have the opportunity to transfer to the thesis option. To enter the thesis option students must 


complete 9 credits and normally achieve a minimum GPA of 3.70. 


Admission Requirements 


The normal minimum requirement for admission to the MA program in Judaic Studiesis a BA or 
equivalent with high standing in Judaic Studies, Religious Studies, or a discipline in the Social 


Sciences, Humanities, or Fine Arts. 


Applicants with deficiencies in their undergraduate preparation may be required to take a qualifying 
program. Qualifying program students in the Department of Religions and Cultures must complete 
their program with a minimum GPA of 3.50 with no courses graded lower than a "B+" to be 


considered for admission to the graduate program. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 
Transfer Credits. See Transfer Credits in Graduate Admissions section. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits. 


2. Program Options. All students enter in the guided research project option, and later have 


the opportunity to apply for the thesis option. 


3. Language Requirement. Normally, students acquire knowledge of Hebrew or another Jewish 
language either before or during the program. In addition, if the candidates’ research 


necessitates knowledge of another classical or modern language, the Graduate Studies 


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Committee may require proficiency in that language. Specific requirements are established in 


consultation with the Graduate Program Director. Students who intend to pursue graduate 
studies at the PhD level are especially encouraged to gain proficiency in the language or 


languages of the primary sources relevant to their proposed research. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Residence. The minimum residence requirement is 3 terms of full-time study, or the equivalent in 


part-time study. 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have satisfied all degree 


requirements and have a cumulative GPA of at least 2.70. 


Master of/Magisteriate in Arts (Judaic Studies) with Guided Research Project Option 


1. Core Course. RELI 6001 Method and Theory in the Study of Religion (3 credits). 


2. Elective Courses. Five 3-credit courses (15 credits). Courses are grouped into RELI 6012-6018 
(Topics in Judaic Studies) and RELI 6002-6008 (Topics in Religions and Cultures) and selected 
in consultation with the Graduate Program Director. Normally students may not take more than 
two 3-credit courses outside the Department. With the permission of the Graduate Program 
Director, up to six credits may be taken from courses offered by other departments or other 


universities. 


3. Guided Research Project Proposal. RELI 6040 (3 credits). Students must submit a guided 
research project proposal on a topic chosen in consultation with the GRP supervisor and the 


proposal must be approved by the Graduate Program Director. 


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4. Guided Research Project. RELI 6041 (24 credits). 


This may take one of three forms: 


i. Substantial Academic Research Paper. Students complete a major research 
paper (normally in their third or fourth term) under the supervision of a faculty 


member, in which they develop themes or subjects engaged in coursework. 


ii. An Artistic Production. These projects entail creating art or an artistic performance that 
reflects fluency with the rituals, practices, and cultures of particular communities that the 


student has studied. Projects can address and respond to issues facing these communities. 


iii. A Technical Project. Projects in this area focus on the acquisition and demonstration of 


technical skills related to the study of religions and cultures. 


Master of/Magisteriate in Arts (Judaic Studies) with Thesis Option 


1. Core Course. RELI 6001 Method and Theory in the Study of Religion (3 credits). 


2. Elective Courses. Three 3-credit courses (9 credits). Courses are grouped into RELI 6012-6018 
(Topics in Judaic Studies) and RELI 6002-6008 (Topics in Religions and Cultures) and selected 
in consultation with the Graduate Program Director. Normally students may not take more than 
one 3-credit course outside the Department. With the permission of the Graduate Program 
Director, up to three credits may be taken from courses offered by other departments or other 


universities. 


3. Thesis Proposal. RELI 6050 (3 credits). Students must submit a thesis proposal on a topic 
chosen in consultation with the thesis supervisor and the proposal must be approved by the 


Department's Graduate Studies committee. 


4. Thesis. RELI 6051 (30 credits) The thesis is a work of primary research that normally runs to 
18,000-24,000 words (about 60-80 pages), exclusive of footnotes and bibliography. Students are 
expected to have the requisite language skills to undertake their proposed research. Prepared 
under the supervision of a faculty member, the thesis is defended orally before a committee 
comprised of the Graduate Program Director, the faculty supervisor, and one additional member 


of the Religions and Cultures faculty. 


Courses 


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Required Course 


All students must take RELI 6001 Method and Theory in the Study of Religion (3 credits) 


RELI 6001 Method and Theory in the Study of Religion 

This course provides students with an understanding of the major approaches to the academic study 
of religion. It introduces students to key theories of religion as a social and cultural phenomenon, as 
well as contemporary methodologies and the ways in which they colour, control, and reflect the 
representation of religious experience and expression. Students develop a critical theoretical 
orientation for their research and a familiarity with the skills that they apply in their coursework and 
final project. 


Note: Students who have received credit for RELI 609 or 610 may not take this course for credit. 


Electives 


Candidates for the Master of Arts in Judaic Studies may select courses from those listed below as 
well as those offered by the Master of Arts program in Religions and Cultures. Courses are selected 
in consultation with the Graduate Program Director. Students in the guided research project option 


select five (5) elective courses and students in the thesis option select three (3) elective courses. 


RELI 6012 Jewish Texts and Literature: Interpretation and Reception 

This course analyzes the sacred texts of Judaism and its interpretation through the ages. It enables 
students to comprehend the historical contexts and transitions of text as shifts and adjustments 
prevail. Topics may also include contemporary literature and popular transmissions of foundational 


texts into the present. 


RELI 6013 Canadian Jewish Studies 

This course covers the history, literature and ethnography of Canada's Jews. Exploring both the 
experiences and expressions of Canadian Jewry, the course examines lived religion and scarcely 
explored communal documents. Students are exposed to a variety of methodological approaches, 


such as literary criticism, ethnography and historiography. 


RELI 6014 Jewish Philosophy and Ethics 
This course examines Jewish philosophy in various historical periods. Topics may include ethics, 
metaphysics, cosmology, Jewish thought post-Holocaust, and reflections on the State of Israel. The 


course may focus on select Jewish thinkers or particular philosophical corpora. 


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RELI 6015 Material and Popular Culture in Judaism 


This course explores the study of Jewish history and communities through material and popular 
culture. Topics may include the production and use of objects, images, ornament, iconography, 
epigraphy, and sacred space, art, film, and music. It considers how attention to material and popular 


culture allows for a nuanced understanding of the complexity and variety of Jewish cultures. 


RELI 6017 Jewish Communities in Historical and Regional Contexts 

This course examines Jewish communities in particular historical and cultural regions, notably the 
Middle East and Israel, North America, and Eastern Europe. It emphasizes how Jewish communities 
have interacted with outsiders, constructed intercommunal boundaries, responded to patterns of 
migration and immigration, and been shaped by changing social and political circumstances in these 


particular locations. 


RELI 6018 Jewish Community Engagement 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Graduate Program Director. 

In this course, students work in a local Jewish community organization or institution in order to apply 
their training in religions and cultures to address real-world problem solving around religious 
tolerance, diversity, or issues of social justice. Examples include, working as a religious educator 
inside or alongside a particular religious community; organizing and supporting grassroots of Jewish 
communities, or organizations working with these, in regards to social issues, such as sustainability, 


racism and Islamophobia, anti-Judaism, disability, LGBTQ, or Indigenous rights. 
Guided Research Project Option 


RELI 6040 Guided Research Project Proposal (Judaic Studies) (3 credits) 

The proposal for the guided research project (GRP) is 2,500-3,000 words in length. The GRP 
proposal outlines the nature of the student’s project, whether a research paper, artistic or technical 
project. It outlines how the project is connected to a student’s coursework, career or academic goals 
and the timeframe in which they complete the project. It includes a bibliography of at least ten 
academic sources, and any primary materials (such as editions of critical texts), which the students 


use. 


RELI 6041 Guided Research Project (Judaic Studies) (24 credits) 

The guided research project (GRP) is 11,000-12,500 words (about 40-50 pages) in length, exclusive 
of footnotes and bibliography. The GRP is usually undertaken in a student’s third or fourth semester 
(after the completion of coursework). This research paper develops themes or subjects with which 
the student engaged in his or her coursework. Students in the MA in Judaic Studies write on an 


aspect of Jewish history or culture. 
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Thesis Option 


RELI 6050 Thesis Proposal (Judaic Studies) (3 credits) 

The proposal for the thesis is 2,500-3,000 words in length. A thesis proposal outlines the student’s 
proposed research project, locates their research in relation to existing scholarship, clarifies their 
methodology and research questions, and includes a bibliography of at least ten academic sources, 


and any primary materials (such as editions of critical texts), which the students use. 


RELI 6051 Thesis (Judaic Studies) (30 credits) 

The thesis is 18,000-24,000 words (about 60-80 pages) in length, exclusive of footnotes and 
bibliography. The thesis provides an opportunity for the student to both demonstrate their historical 
and cultural knowledge and depth of understanding of a particular subject in the study of religions 
and cultures. Students in the MA in Judaic Studies write on an aspect of Jewish history or culture. 
Students also demonstrate facility with one or two methodological approaches studied in the course 
of their program and illustrate their capacity to apply the approaches to a particular problem or issue 
in religious studies. Thesis writers have the requisite language skills to undertake this more rigorous 


type of research, for instance, Yiddish or Hebrew. 


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http:/Awww.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/reli-ma.html 


Religions and Cultures MA 


Students apply to the guided research project (GRP) option. Once admitted to the program, students 
have the opportunity to transfer to the thesis option. To enter the thesis option students must 


complete 9 credits and normally achieve a minimum GPA of 3.70. 


Admission Requirements 


The normal minimum requirement for admission to the MA program in Religions and Cultures is a 
BA or equivalent with high standing in Religious Studies, Judaic Studies or a discipline in the Social 


Sciences, Humanities, or Fine Arts. 


An undergraduate degree in religious studies or Judaic studies, or its equivalent. Qualified 
applicants requiring prerequisite courses may be required to take up to 12 undergraduate credits in 
addition to and as a part of the regular graduate program. Applicants with deficiencies in their 
undergraduate preparation may be required to take a qualifying program. Qualifying program 
students in the Department of Religions and Cultures must complete their program with a minimum 
GPA of 3.50 with no courses graded lower than a "B+" to be considered for admission to the 
graduate program. Qualifying students must reapply to the MA program on completion of their 


qualifying program. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Transfer Credits. See Transfer Credits in Graduate Admissions section. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits. 


2. Program Options. All students enter in the Guided Research Project option and later have 


the opportunity to apply for the Thesis option. 


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3. Language Requirement. Normally, students acquire knowledge of the classical and/or modern 


languages appropriate to their area of specialization. Specific requirements are established in 
consultation with the Graduate Program Director. Students who intend to pursue graduate 
studies at the PhD level are also encouraged to gain proficiency in the language or languages of 


the primary sources relevant to their proposed research. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Residence. The minimum residence requirement is one year (3 terms) of full-time graduate 


study, or the equivalent in part-time study. 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have satisfied all degree 


requirements and have a cumulative GPA of 2.70. 


Master of/Magisteriate in Arts (Religions and Cultures) with Guided Research Project Option 


Candidates are required to take the following: 


1. Core Course. RELI 6001 Method and Theory in the Study of Religion (3 credits). 


2. Elective Courses. Five 3-credit courses (15 credits). Courses are grouped into RELI 6012-6018 
(Topics in Judaic Studies) and RELI 6002-6008 (Topics in Religions and Cultures) and selected 
in consultation with the Graduate Program Director. Normally students may not take more than 
two 3-credit courses outside the Department. With the permission of the Graduate Program 
Director, up to six credits may be taken from courses offered by other departments or other 


universities. 


3. Guided Research Project Proposal. RELI 6020 (3 credits). Students must submit a guided 


research project (GRP) proposal on a topic chosen in consultation with the GRP supervisor and 
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the proposal must be approved by the Graduate Program Director. 


4. Guided Research Project. RELI 6021 (24 credits). 


This may take one of three forms: 


i. Substantial Academic Research Paper. Students complete a major research paper (normally 
in their third or fourth term) under the supervision of a faculty member, in which they develop 


themes or subjects engaged in coursework. 


ii. An Artistic Production. These projects entail creating art or an artistic performance that 
reflects fluency with the rituals, practices, and cultures of particular communities that the 


student has studied. Projects can address and respond to issues facing these communities. 


iii. A Technical Project. Projects in this area focus on the acquisition and demonstration of 


technical skills related to the study of religions and cultures. 


Master of/Magisteriate in Arts (Religions and Cultures) with Thesis Option 


Candidates are required to take the following: 


1. Core Course. RELI 6001 Method and Theory in the Study of Religion (3 credits). 


2. Elective Courses. Three 3-credit courses (9 credits). Courses are grouped into RELI 6012-6018 
(Topics in Judaic Studies) and RELI 6002-6008 (Topics in Religions and Cultures) and selected 
in consultation with the Graduate Program Director. Normally students may not take more than 
one 3-credit course outside the Department. With the permission of the Graduate Program 
Director, up to three credits may be taken from courses offered by other departments or other 


universities. 


3. Thesis Proposal. RELI 6030 (3 credits). Students must submit a thesis proposal on a topic 
chosen in consultation with the thesis supervisor and the proposal must be approved by the 


Department's Graduate Studies committee. 


4. Thesis. RELI 6031 (30 credits). The thesis is a work of primary research that normally runs to 
18,000-24,000 words (about 60-80 pages), exclusive of footnotes and bibliography. Students are 
expected to have the requisite language skills to undertake their proposed research. Prepared 
under the supervision of a faculty member, the thesis is defended orally before a committee 


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comprised of the Graduate Program Director, the faculty supervisor, and one additional member 


of the Religions and Cultures faculty. 


Courses 


Required Course 
All students must take RELI 6001 Method and Theory in the Study of Religion (3 credits). 


RELI 6001 Method and Theory in the Study of Religion 

This course provides students with an understanding of the major approaches to the academic study 
of religion. It introduces students to key theories of religion as a social and cultural phenomenon, as 
well as contemporary methodologies and the ways in which they colour, control, and reflect the 
representation of religious experience and expression. Students develop a critical theoretical 
orientation for their research and a familiarity with the skills that they apply in their coursework and 
final project. 

Note: Students who have received credit for RELI 609 or 610 may not take this course for credit. 


Electives 


Candidates for the Master of Arts in Religions and Cultures may select courses from the courses 
listed below, as well as those offered by the Master of Arts program in Judaic Studies. Courses are 
selected in consultation with the Graduate Program Director. Students in the guided research project 
option select five (5) elective courses and students in the thesis option select three (3) elective 


courses. 


RELI 6002 Texts, Literature, and Interpretation 

This course analyzes literature or sacred writings in their historical context. It addresses 
contemporary literature and popular written media, or alternatively, focuses on foundational corpora 
of a community. Emphasis is placed on familiarizing students with literary and textual critical 


approaches to the materials under study. 


RELI 6003 Ethnography and Lived Traditions 

This course familiarizes students with theoretical approaches drawn from anthropology and 
ethnography to the study of religions and cultures. It focuses primarily on contemporary forms of 
lived religion, and examines topics such as mission and conversion, ritual practice, sacred space 


and pilgrimage, constructions of public and private, and conceptions of the secular. 


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RELI 6004 Ethics, Philosophy, and Worldviews 


This course examines ethical, philosophical, and natural scientific approaches to religious studies. 
Topics may include religious ethics, constructions of the sacred, the self and the body, cosmology 
and metaphysics, religion and the natural world as well as the evolutionary and cognitive study of 


religion. 


RELI 6005 Material and Popular Culture 

This course explores how the history of religions can be understood through material and popular 
culture. Topics may include the production and use of objects, images, ornament, iconography, 
epigraphy, and sacred space, art, film, and music. It considers how attention to material and/or 


popular culture can enhance the study of religious and cultural concepts and practices. 


RELI 6006 Women, Gender, and Sexuality 
This course familiarizes students with perspectives on gender and sexuality within particular cultural 
contexts and/or religious traditions. It also introduces students to theoretical approaches drawn from 


feminist, gender, and/or queer studies. 


RELI 6007 Regional and Intercultural Studies 

This course focuses on a particular historical and cultural region, for instance, Tibet/East Asia, 
South Asia, the Middle East, or North America. Its goal is to give students a nuanced and deeper 
understanding of an area of the world. Courses emphasize the coexistence and interdependence of 
traditions and communities over time, migration and immigration, responses to and conceptions of 


difference, and responses to changing social and political circumstances. 


RELI 6008 Community Engagement 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Graduate Program Director. 

In this course, students work in a local community organization or institution in order to apply their 
training in religions and cultures to address real-world problems solving around religious tolerance, 
diversity, or issues of social justice. Examples includeworking on programming with Concordia’s 
Multi-faith and Spirituality Centre; working as a religious educator inside or alongside a particular 
religious Community; organizing and supporting grassroots efforts related to ethics and social justice, 


such as sustainability, racism and Islamophobia, disability, LGBTQ, or Indigenous rights. 


Guided Research Project Option 


RELI 6020 Guided Research Project Proposal (Religions and Cultures) (3 credits) 
The proposal for the guided research project (GRP) is 2,500-3,000 words in length. The GRP 


proposal outlines the nature of the student’s project, whether a research paper, artistic or technical 
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project. It outlines how the project is connected to a student’s coursework, career or academic goals 


and the timeframe in which they complete the project. It includes a bibliography of at least ten 
academic sources, and any primary materials (such as editions of critical texts), which the students 


use. 


RELI 6021 Guided Research Project (Religions and Cultures) (24 credits) 

The guided research project (GRP) is 11,000-12,500 words (about 40-50 pages) in length, exclusive 
of footnotes and bibliography. The GRP is usually undertaken in a student's third or fourth semester 
(after the completion of coursework). This research paper develops themes or subjects with which a 


student engaged in his or her course work. 


Thesis Option 


RELI 6030 Thesis Proposal (Religions and Cultures) (3 credits) 

The proposal for the thesis is 2,500-3,000 words in length. A thesis proposal outlines the student’s 
proposed research project, locates their research in relation to existing scholarship, clarifies their 
methodology and research questions, and includes a bibliography of at least ten academic sources, 


and any primary materials (such as editions of critical texts), which the students use. 


RELI 6031 Thesis (Religions and Cultures) (30 credits) 

The thesis is 18,000-24,000 words (about 60-80 pages) in length, exclusive of footnotes and 
bibliography. The thesis provides an opportunity for the student to both demonstrate their historical 
and cultural knowledge and depth of understanding of a particular subject in the study of religions 
and cultures. Students also demonstrate facility with one or two methodological approaches studied 
in the course of their program, and illustrate their capacity to apply them to a particular problem or 
issue in religious studies. Thesis writers have the requisite language skills to undertake this more 


rigorous type of research, for instance, Sanskrit, Yiddish, Hebrew, Arabic, or Greek. 


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Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/scpa-ced.html 


Community Economic Development (CED) Graduate 
Diploma 


Admission Requirements 


To be admitted into the program, applicants will generally be expected to have completed an 
undergraduate degree with a GPA of 2.70 and must be able to read, write, and express themselves 


in either English or French. 


Each applicant's background, practical experience and learning goals will be fully considered. 
Applicants are required to submit a two-to-four page personal statement in which they outline their 
particular field(s) of interest, their strengths and weaknesses, what they expect or hope from their 
studies, how these expectations tie into their personal or professional goals, and what they expect to 


contribute to a better understanding of CED. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that their 
knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer to 
the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements and 


exemptions. 


Requirements for the Diploma 


To obtain the Graduate Diploma in CED, students will have to obtain a minimum of 30 course credits 
and a minimum GPA of 2.70. Courses offered by the program are divided between required core 
courses, open sessions, a project, as well as elective courses. A typical progression through the 


program takes one year (three semesters): 


Fall Semester: three required courses (9 credits) and one open session (1 credit); 


Winter Semester: two required courses (6 credits), first four months of the student’s project 


course (3 credits), and one open session (1 credit); 


Summer Semester: two elective courses from the areas of concentration (6 credits)*, the last four 


months of the student’s project course (3 credits), and one open session (1 credit). 


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* Students may take either two courses (Part | and Part Il) in a single area of concentration, or one 


course (Part |) in two areas of concentration, subject to available resources. (All Part Il courses 


require successful completion of Part | in the same area of concentration). 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


3. Graduation Requirement. To graduate, students must have completed all course requirements 
with a cumulative GPA of at least 2.70. 


Language of Courses 


Students are required to have an excellent knowledge of written and spoken English or French. This 
program alternates annually between English (years 2010, 2012...) and French (years 2011, 
2013...). Students must be able to express themselves in the language in which courses are offered. 


They can submit written work in either language. 


Courses 


Required Core Courses 


SCPA 501 Introduction to Community Economic Development (3 credits) 

This course provides an overview of CED. It traces the historical and intellectual roots of CED as 
well as critically situates CED in the context of theories of community, local and regional 
development. Students are provided with basic tools of macro-economic analysis and policy 
evaluation as it relates to the practice of CED. This course focuses on the institutional environment 
in which CED initiatives operate to identify the potential and the limitations of local, community- 
based development strategies. Special focus is given to the perspectives of CED arising out of the 
feminist movement, cultural communities, Aboriginal communities, the popular sector and other 


social change movements. 


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421 
SCPA 502 Comparative Approaches and Models in CED (3 credits) 


This course focuses on the objectives of CED by examining the various strategies and diversity of 
models of CED practices in Quebec, as well as many found elsewhere in Canada, the United States, 
in Europe and in southern hemispheric countries. The differences in organizational structures and 
empowerment processes, as well as their social, cultural and economic context is studied and 


evaluated, mainly through case studies of selected communities. 


SCPA 503 Fundamental Skills for CED Practice (3 credits) 

This course focuses on helping students acquire a working knowledge of the practical skills required 
for building community economic capacity. This includes developing tools to map the material, 
environmental and human resources within communities. This course assists students in designing 
socio-economic indicators and a framework for evaluation of CED initiatives and strategic planning. 
Students are encouraged to identify, as soon as possible, how the use of such skills can be 


incorporated into either a CED project or an internship within a CED initiative. 


SCPA 504 Community Organizing and CED (3 credits) 

This course focuses on helping students acquire a working knowledge of the practical skills required 
in community organizing and capacity building for individual and community empowerment within a 
CED context. The course explores the role of popular education in community mobilization and 


collective action, and delves into the strategies, tactics and techniques of community intervention. 


SCPA 505 Social Enterprise Development and Social Entrepreneurship (3 credits) 

This course provides a framework for business development within a CED perspective. Basic tools 
for enterprise development, including comprehensive business planning, data evaluation, financial 
analysis, and forecasting are to be integrated into a social and ethical framework to maintain the 
democratic objectives of CED. Students develop skills in evaluating a successful commercial 


venture within the context of these larger objectives. 


Project 


SCPA 510 CED Field Project - Part I (3 credits) 

SCPA 510 structures the Field Project. It introduces students to tools that can be used to design and 
implement their projects. During this course, students begin to implement their plan with the host 
organization. Assignments are based on the integration of the tools with the work undertaken in the 
field project. 


Note: This course is part of the requirement that students complete a two-semester field project in 


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422 
some aspect of community economic development. This project is selected and negotiated by the 


student with a community organization and addresses a particular challenge raised within this 


setting. 


SCPA 511 CED Field Project - Part II (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: SCPA 510. 

Students continue their field project for a second term within the framework of this course. They 
build on the practice of the previous term and advance it to reach the objectives established with 
their host organization. This course aims to strengthen the student’s skills in the critical evaluation of 
practice. Students examine their practice and the reasons for its success, as well as examine 
strategies for overcoming the barriers they faced. This course offers a framework for the final written 
report required of students, to be both shared with their host organizations and submitted for the 


course. 


Areas of Concentration: Elective Courses 


Areas of concentration are identified according to CED practices in order to help students choose 
elective courses relevant to their fields of professional specialization or of personal interest. Students 


will have indicated their priority areas of concentration on their application for admission form. 


Up to five areas of concentration are offered, resources permitting, in a given year. The areas are: 
financing CED initiatives; housing, land use, and urban planning from a CED perspective; 
communications, technology and CED; international development and CED; Aboriginal CED. 


Courses corresponding to these areas of concentration are the following: 


SCPA 508 Financing CED Initiatives: Part | (3 credits) 

This course examines the roles which can be played by both traditional (banks) and non-traditional 
(community loan funds) financial institutions in supporting CED initiatives. Special emphasis is 
placed on exploring alternative financial CED structures. Skills are developed to understand and 
generate financial planning, as well as investment decisions in traditional and non-traditional 


enterprises. 


SCPA 509 Financing CED Initiatives: Part Il (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: SCPA 508. 

This course uses a case study approach to critically examine and evaluate existing alternative CED 
initiatives in Canada and the US. This may include on site visits, interviews and occasional guest 


lecturers. 


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SCPA 515 Housing and Land Use from a CED Perspective: Part I (3 credits) 


This course examines the institutional, economic, political, and environmental factors which affect 
land policy, and the development of affordable housing. It identifies public and private financial 
sources and various forms of ownership models including community land trusts and housing 
cooperatives, among others. Among the skills developed are those related to market analysis and 


housing needs assessment, site selection and control, and preparing housing projects. 


SCPA 516 Housing and Land Use from a CED Perspective: Part Il (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: SCPA 515. 

This course uses a case study approach to critically examine and evaluate existing housing projects, 
affordable housing and land policy based on a selection of experiences in the U.S. and in Canada. 


This may include on site visits, interviews and occasional guest lecturers. 


SCPA 522 Communications, Technology and CED: Part I (3 credits) 
This course explores issues related to information management, analysis and dissemination using 
different vehicles available including mass media, the Internet, and other new technologies as they 


emerge. Basic computer literacy is required. 


SCPA 523 Communications, Technology and CED: Part Il (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: SCPA 522. 

This course equips practitioners with skills required to share and diffuse CED practices across 
communities that work in isolation and helps to develop the skills required for communities to use 


the new technologies and resources necessary for development purposes. 


SCPA 529 International Development and CED: Part | (3 credits) 

This course explores community-based economic development approaches in countries of the 
South within their socio-political and historical context. Many economic initiatives in the North have 
borrowed from these experiences. The course explores the advantages and disadvantages of 
importing and exporting development models and practices and equips the students with the skills to 


evaluate the appropriateness of CED models and how to adapt the models, wherever required. 


SCPA 530 International Development and CED: Part II (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: SCPA 529. 

This course explores existing North/South networking and collaboration by identifying non- 
governmental organizations, community groups and social movements which are working together 
to develop CED strategies in their respective countries. Discussion is encouraged through class 


seminars and occasional guest lectures. 


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SCPA 536 Aboriginal CED: Part I (3 credits) 


This course assists participants in exploring specific issues related to Aboriginal community 
economic development in particular settings (on reserve, urban, rural and northern communities), 
and addresses challenges common to Aboriginal CED. The course assists participants in exploring 
historical and contemporary relationships between Aboriginal communities and the predominant 
cultural and economic forces, and compares traditional Aboriginal organizing and economic 


practices with the new approaches being proposed by CED. 


SCPA 537 Aboriginal CED: Part Il (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: SCPA 536. 

This course uses a case study approach to evaluate one or more community economic development 
strategies applied within an Aboriginal community. A historical overview of this experience outlines 
the cultural and political context which has shaped these strategies as well as their results. CED 
approaches are examined in the context of this individual experience. This course may include on 


site visits and guest lecturers. 


Open Sessions 


SCPA 543 A-Z Open Sessions (1 credit each) 

The themes and content of the various open sessions are determined at the beginning of each 
academic year. Three open sessions are offered every year (1 credit each for a total of 3 credits). 
Possible topics may include: feminist approaches to CED, lobbying decision-making bodies, 
consensus management, coalition-building, and using the internet for community development 


purposes - as well as topics related to current events. 


© Concordia University 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


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Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/scpa-dec.html 


Développement économique communautaire (DEC), 
dipl6me 
Conditions d'admission 


De facgon générale, pour étre admis au programme, il faut avoir obtenu au préalable un diplome 
universitaire de 1er cycle avec une moyenne générale d’au moins 2.70. Il faut aussi pouvoir lire, 


écrire et s’exprimer correctement en anglais ou en frangais. 


Les antécédents et les objectifs d’apprentissage de chacun-e des candidat-e-s seront étudiés a 
fond. Les candidat-e-s doivent soumettre une déclaration personnelle de deux a quatre pages dans 
laquelle ils/elles décrivent leurs champs d’intérét spécifiques, leurs forces et leurs faiblesses ce 
qu’ils/elles espérent obtenir de leurs études, comment ces attentes sont liées a leurs buts 
personnels ou professionnels, et en quoi ils/elles comptent contribuer a une meilleure 


compréhension du DEC. 


Le Diplome de 2e cycle en DEC respectera tous les autres critéres établis par I’Ecole des études 


supérieures. 


Présence requise. Les cours sont offerts une fois par mois pendant un long week-end durant les 


trois trimestres consécutifs du programme. L’option a demi-temps est également disponible. 


Exigences du programme 


Pour obtenir le Dipl6me de 2e cycle en DEC, les étudiant-e-s doivent cumuler un minimum de 30 
crédits avec une moyenne générale de 2.70. Les cours du programme sont répartis entre cours 
obligatoires, cours optionnels, sessions ouvertes, et un projet d’intervention. Un parcours typique se 


fait en un an (trois trimestres): 
¢ Trimestre d’automne : trois cours obligatoires (9 crédits) et une session ouverte (1 crédit); 


« Trimestre d’hiver : deux cours obligatoires (6 crédits), les quatre premiers mois du projet (3 


crédits) et une session ouverte (1 crédit); 


« Trimestre d’été : deux cours correspondant au champ de spécialisation optionnel (6 crédits)*, les 


quatre derniers mois du projet (3 crédits) et une session ouverte (1 crédit). 


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426 
“Les étudiant-e-s peuvent prendre deux cours dans un champ de spécialisation (Partie | et Partie Il) 


ou un cours (Partie |) dans deux champs de spécialisation, selon les ressources disponibles. (Pour 
s’inscire dans les cours de la Partie Il, il faut avoir complété avec succés la Partie | du méme champ 


de spécialisation). 


Les étudiant-e-s doivent maintenir une moyenne générale minimum de 2.70 pendant la durée du 


programme. 


Langues d’enseignement 


Les étudiant-e-s doivent maitriser le frangais ou l'anglais a l’oral comme a |’écrit. Le programme est 
offert alternativement en anglais et en frangais. Les cours se donnent en anglais durant l'année 
inaugurale du programme (automne de |l’an 2008), puis en frangais l'année suivante, et ainsi de 
suite. Les cours du programme seront donc offerts en frangais a l’automne de l’an 2011, 2013... Les 
participant-e-s doivent s’exprimer couramment dans la langue d’enseignement utilisée durant 
l'année ou leur programme se donne. Ils/Elles peuvent soumettre leurs travaux écrits en frangais ou 


en anglais. 


Rendement académique 


Voir la section Academic Standing de l'Annuaire pour la Réglementation universitaire. 
Durée des études 


Les 33 crédits du programme peuvent étre effectués en une année (3 sessions) ou a temps partiel. Pour étre admissible a 
un stage de formation, I’étudiante ou I’étudiant doit avoir suivi 12 crédits en traduction pragmatique, 3 crédits en 
terminologie et avoir obtenu une moyenne générale cumulative d’au moins 3,3 soit Bt. 


Cours 


Cours obligatoires du tronc commun 


SCPA 501 : Introduction au développement économique communautaire (3 crédits) 

Ce cours offre une vue d’ensemble du DEC. II retrace I’historique et les fondements intellectuels du 
DEC et situe le DEC par rapport aux théories du développement communautaire local et régional. 
Le cours fournit également aux étudiant-e-s des outils de base pour l’analyse macro-économique et 
pour I’évaluation des politiques sociales relatives a la pratique du DEC. Ce cours se concentre sur 
l'environnement institutionnel dans lequel les initiatives de DEC opérent afin d’identifier le potentiel 


et les limites des strategies de développement axées sur les communautés locales. Une attention 


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427 
particuliére est portée aux perspectives de DEC émanant du mouvement féministe, des 


communautés culturelles, des communautés autochtones, du mouvement populaire et d’autres 


mouvements de changement social. 


SCPA 502 : Approches comparatives et modéles de DEC (3 crédits) 

Ce cours se concentre sur les objectifs du DEC en examinant les diverses stratégies et les différents 
modeéles de pratique de DEC au Québec, ainsi qu’ailleurs au Canada, aux Etats-Unis, en Europe et 
dans les pays de I’hémispheére sud. Des études de cas de communautés sélectionnées sont 
principalement utilisées afin d’étudier et d’évaluer les differences existant au sein des structures 
organisationnelles et des processus d’empowerment, ainsi que leur contexte social, culturel et 


économique. 


SCPA 503 : Compétences de base en DEC (3 crédits) 

Ce cours aide les étudiants et étudiantes a acquérir une connaissance d’usage des compétences 
pratiques requises pour batir la capacité de prise en charge économique d’une communaute. Ceci 
comprend I’élaboration d’outils permettant d’inventorier les ressources mateérielles, 
environnementales et humaines au sein d’une communauté. Ce cours aide aussi les étudiants et 
étudiantes a élaborer des indices socio-économiques ainsi qu’un cadre d’évaluation des initiatives 
de DEC et de la planification stratégique. Les étudiant-e-s sont encouragé-e-s, le plus tot possible, a 
identifier comment ils/elles pourront inclure ces compétences dans un projet de DEC ou un stage a 


l'intérieur d’une initiative de DEC. 


SCPA 504 : Organisation communautaire et DEC (3 crédits) 

Ce cours permet aux étudiant-e-s d’acquérir une connaissance d’usage des compétences pratiques 
nécessaires pour maitriser l’organisation communautaire et pour développer |’empowerment des 
individus et des communautés dans un contexte de DEC. Ce cours explore le réle que joue 
l'éducation populaire dans la mobilisation des communautés et dans I’action collective, et 


approfondit les tactiques, stratégies et techniques de |’intervention communautaire. 


SCPA 505 : Développement d’entreprises sociales et entreprenariat social (3 crédits) 

Ce cours propose un cadre de référence pour le développement d’entreprises selon une perspective 
de DEC. Des outils de base pour le développement d’entreprises, incluant le développement de 
plans d’affaires complets, |’évaluation de données, l’analyse financiére et l’élaboration de prévisions, 
seront intégrés dans un cadre social et éthique afin de préserver les objectifs démocratiques du 
DEC. Les étudiant-e-s développent les compétences requises afin d’évaluer le succés d’une 


entreprise commerciale en tenant compte du contexte global de ces objectifs. 


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Projet 


SCPA 510 : Projet en DEC. Partie | (3 crédits) 

En suivant le programme a temps plein, les participant-e-s devront, une fois les trois premiers cours 
principaux du trimestre d’automne completés, entreprendre un cours de projet de deux trimestres 
dans un domaine du développement Economique communautaire relié a leur spécialisation ou a 
champ d’intéréts. Ce projet peut se dérouler au sein du milieu de travail ou de bénévolat du/de la 


participant-e. 


Le projet pratique constitue une occasion pour les participant-e-s de faire face - de maniére 
participative - a un défi particulier qui les passionne et qui est per¢u comme important par 
l’organisme au sein duquel le projet se déroule. Les participant-e-s devront faire appel a leurs 
forces, leurs expériences passées, et leurs talents, tout en tenant compte de leurs objectifs 
d’apprentissage. Tous les participantes et participants devront assumer la responsabilité de définir, 
chercher et négocier leurs projets pratiques par eux-mémes, avec, bien sur, l’appui du programme 


de dipléme de 2° cycle en DEC. 


SCPA 511 : Projet DEC. Partie Il (3 crédits) 

Préalable : SCPA 510. 

Dans la deuxiéme partie du cours, les participant-e-s analyseront de fagon critique leur progres au 
sein de leurs projets respectifs, et redigeront un rapport final resumant et évaluant le projet et les 
expériences que celui-ci les a amené-e-s a vivre. Ce projet permettra de verifier les compétences 
acquises et de valider les idées et theories apprises dans une situation réelle. Des practicien-ne-s 


de DEC sont invité-e-s a participer a ’évaluation des résultats du projet. 
Domaines de spécialisation : cours optionnels 


Les domaines de spécialisation sont identifiés selon les pratiques de DEC de facon a aider les 
étudiant-e-s a choisir des cours optionnels adaptés a leurs spécialités professionnelles ou leurs 
intéréts personnels; le choix de domaine de spécialisation est spécifié dans la demande 


d’admission. 


Jusqu’a cing domaines de spécialisation sont offerts chaque année. Les domaines identifiés sont: le 
financement des initiatives de DEC; le logement, l'aménagement du territoire et l'urbanisme dans 
une perspective de DEC; les communications, la technologie et le DEC; le développement 


international et le DEC; le DEC en milieu autochtone. 


Les cours qui correspondent a ces domaines de spécialisation sont les suivants: 


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429 
SCPA 508 : Le financement des initiatives de DEC. Partie | (3 crédits) 


Ce cours permet d’étudier les réles que peuvent jouer les institutions financiéres traditionnelles (les 
banques) et non traditionnelles (les associations communautaires de prét) pour soutenir les 
initiatives de DEC. Une attention particuliére est portée a I’étude des structures financiéres 
alternatives de DEC. Les compétences requises afin de comprendre et d’initier la planification 
financiére ainsi que la prise de décision quant aux investissements dans les entreprises 


traditionnelles et non traditionnelles sont également développées. 


SCPA 509 : Le financement des initiatives de DEC. Partie Il (3 crédits) 

Préalable : SCPA 508. 

La seconde partie de ce cours empruntera une approche d’étude de cas pour examiner de fagon 
critique et évaluer des initiatives originales de DEC au Canada et aux Etats-Unis. Cela pourrait 


comprendre la visite de sites, des entrevues et des conferences occasionnelles. 


SCPA 515 : Logement et aménagement du territoire dans une perspective de DEC. Partie | (3 
crédits) 

Ce cours examine les facteurs institutionnels, economiques, politiques et environnementaux qui 
influent sur la politique d’aménagement du territoire et la création de logements a prix modique. II 
décrit aussi les sources financiéres publiques et privées ainsi que diverses formes de propriété, y 
compris les fiducies foncieéres communautaires et les coopératives de logement. Il permet d’acquérir, 
entre autres, des compétences en analyse du marché, évaluation des besoins en logement, 


sélection et contréle des sites, et préparation de projets domiciliaires. 


SCPA 516 : Logement et aménagement du territoire dans une perspective de DEC. Partie II (3 
crédits) 

Préalable : SCPA 515. 

Ce cours se fonde sur des études de cas américaines et canadiennes afin d’effectuer un examen 
critique et une évaluation de projets domiciliaires existants, du logement a prix modique et de la 
politique d’aménagement du territoire. Il pourrait comprendre des visite de sites, des entrevues et 


des conférences occasionnelles. 


SCPA 522 : Communications, technologie et DEC. Partie | (3 crédits) 
Ce cours explore les questions li¢es a la gestion, a l’analyse et a la diffusion de l'information par 
differents moyens, y compris les médias de masse, Internet, et les technologies en €mergence. Les 


participant-e-s doivent posséder des connaissances de base en informatique. 


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SCPA 523 : Communications, technologie et DEC. Partie Il (3 crédits) 


Préalable : SCPA 522. 

Ce cours dote les praticien-ne-s des compétences nécessaires pour diffuser largement les pratiques 
de DEC dans des collectivités qui travaillent souvent dans l’isolement, et pour leur transmettre les 
compétences dont elles ont besoin afin d’utiliser les nouvelles technologies comme instruments de 


développement. 


SCPA 529 : Développement international et DEC. Partie | (3 crédits) 

Ce cours examine les approches communautaires de développement Economique des pays du Sud 
dans leur contexte socio-politique et historique. De nombreuses initiatives economiques du Nord 
s’inspirent de ces expériences. Le cours explore aussi les avantages et les désavantages de 
importation et de l’exportation de modeéles et de pratiques de développement, et permet d’acqueérir 


les compétences nécessaires pour évaluer l’a-propos de modéles de DEC et les adapter, au besoin. 


SCPA 530 : Développement international et DEC. Partie II (3 crédits) 

Préalable : SCPA 529. 

La seconde partie de ce cours explore les réseaux et la collaboration Nord-Sud en identifiant les 
organismes non gouvernementaux, les groupes communautaires et les mouvements sociaux qui 
travaillent ensemble pour formuler des stratégies de DEC dans leur pays respectif. On encourage la 


discussion par des séminaires et des conférences occasionnelles. 


SCPA 536 : Le DEC en mileu autochtone. Partie | (3 crédits) 

Ce cours aide les participant-e-s a étudier des enjeux spécifiques liés au développement 
économique autochtone, en particulier le contexte (réserve, milieu urbain, rural ou nordique), ainsi 
qu’a affronter des défis frequents en DEC autochtone. Le cours étudie également les rapports 
historiques et contemporains entre les communautés autochtones et les forces culturelles et 
economiques prédominantes, et compare les pratiques organisationnelles et économiques 


traditionnelles avec les nouvelles approches que propose le DEC. 


SCPA 537 : Le DEC en mileu autochtone. Partie II (3 crédits) 

Préalable : SCPA 536. 

Ce cours utilise une approche d’étude de cas pour évaluer une ou plusieurs stratégies de 
développement économique communautaire en contexte autochtone. Un survol historique de cette 
expérience dessine le contexte qui a fagonné ces stratégies autant que leurs résultats. Les 
approches de DEC sont examinées dans le contexte de cette expérience particuliére. Cela peut 


comprendre la visite de sites et des conférences occasionnelles. 


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Sessions ouvertes 


SCPA 543 : A - Z Sessions ouvertes (1 crédit chacune) 

Les themes et contenu des diverses sessions ouvertes sont déterminés au début de chaque année 
académique. Trois sessions ouvertes sont offertes chaque année (1 crédit chacune sur un total de 3 
crédits). Voici quelques-uns des sujets possibles : les approches féeministes en développement 
économique communautaire, le lobbying auprés d’instances décisionnelles, la gestion consensuelle, 
et la formation de coalitions et l'usage d’internet dans un but de développement communautaire - de 


méme que des sujets liés a l’actualité. 


© Concordia University 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


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Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/socianth-phd.html 


Social and Cultural Analysis PhD 


Admission Requirements 


The normal requirement for admission to the PhD in Social and Cultural Analysis is a Master 
of/Magisteriate in Arts in sociology or in anthropology, with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.00, from 
a recognized university. A superior academic record and strong references are both essential. The 
intended area of research is also a factor as admission is contingent on the availability of an 
appropriate research supervisor. Applicants who do not have the required background in either one 
of the disciplines are required to take courses (undergraduate or graduate) before being admitted 
into the program. The number of credits required varies depending on the student's personal 


background but are limited to no more than 24 credits. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 90 credits. 


2. Required Courses (12 credits). Students are required to take SOAN 800 (6 credits), 820 (3 
credits) and 840 (3 credits). 


3. Elective Courses (6 credits). Students may choose two 3-credit courses from the list below. 
Note: Doctoral students are asked to perform at a higher level as leaders in class discussions 


and are given more in-depth work in the form of papers and oral presentations. 
Anthropology 


ANTH 600 Identity and Difference 
ANTH 601 Decolonizing Anthropology 
ANTH 610 Ethnographic Research and Ethics 


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ANTH 620 Writing Ethnography 


ANTH 630 New Directions in Anthropological Research 
ANTH 640 Special Topics | * 
ANTH 641 Special Topics II * 


Sociology 


SOCI 602 Issues in Classical Sociological Theory 
SOCI 603 Issues in Contemporary Sociological Theory 
SOCI 612 Quantitative Research Design and Methods 
SOCI 613 Qualitative Research Design and Methods 
SOCI 620 Population and Society 

SOCI 622 Studies in Race and Ethnicity 

SOCI 625 Sociology of Culture 

SOCI 626 North American Societies 

SOCI 627 Social Movements and Social Change 
SOCI 632 Sociology of the Family 

SOCI 633 Sociology of Knowledge 

SOCI 635 Gender Studies 

SOCI 637 Development 

SOCI 638 The City 

SOCI 639 Social Problems 

SOCI 640 Community Studies 

SOCI 642 Studies in Governance 

SOCI 644 Sociology of the Body 

SOCI 645 Sociology of Men 

SOCI 646 Globalization 

SOCI 647 Democracy and Citizenship 

SOCI 648 Health, Illness and Medicine 

SOCI 649 Media and Communication 

SOCI 652 Self and Subjectivity 

SOCI 653 Intellectual Biography 


* Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 


course provided that the course content has changed. 


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4. Comprehensive Examinations (12 credits). All candidates are required to write two 6-credit 


comprehensive exams (SOAN 850 and 860). The topics for these exams are set at the end of 
the first year or beginning of the second year, and the exams completed within the second year 
of the program. Each comprehensive exam is assessed by a committee of three faculty 
members drawn from the two disciplines, and formed in consultation with the 


student's supervisor. 


5. Thesis Proposal (3 credits). A candidate who has passed the comprehensive examinations 
must then submit a thesis proposal to the Graduate Program Director and the thesis committee 
(selected in consultation with the GPD). This proposal is explained to, and defended before the 


thesis committee. If accepted, this constitutes the completion of SOAN 870 (3 credits). 


6. Thesis (57 credits). The candidate who has passed the PhD comprehensive examinations and 
the thesis proposal proceeds to the final requirement. The thesis is expected to make an original 
contribution to knowledge, to be based on primary sources and to be presented in an acceptable 
literary form. The thesis demonstrates knowledge of theories and methods associated with each 
discipline. The thesis is normally no more than 400 pages in length in total. Subject to the 
approval of the GPD and the thesis committee, a component of the thesis can take the form of a 
film or CD Rom. 


7. Language Requirement. Given that the bulk of the literature in the two disciplines is written in 
English and French, reading assignments are given in both languages. Students are required to 
work towards reading proficiency very quickly. Upon completion of their coursework, students are 
required to demonstrate reading proficiency in both languages before being permitted to begin 
the thesis portion of their program. The proficiency level is verified through the administration of a 
translation test at the end of the coursework period. 

In addition, students whose research topic requires the knowledge of a third language are 
expected to take the necessary courses and demonstrate proficiency in that language before 


embarking on their research. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


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2. Residence. The minimum period of residence is two calendar years (6 terms) of full-time 


graduate study beyond the Master’s degree or the equivalent in part-time study. 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 3.00. 


Courses 


Required Courses 


SOAN 800 General Seminar (6 credits) 

This course focuses on orientating the common epistemological interests of sociological and 
anthropological approaches to social and cultural analysis in the four areas of specialization. In order 
to maximize interdisciplinary coverage, the seminar is led by two faculty members, one trained in 


sociology and one in anthropology. 


SOAN 820 Professional Development 

This course is designed as a seminar in which guest speakers orally present the results of their work 
and practical information on various professional skills (professionalization). Students are exposed 
to a variety of research conducted in the two disciplines and acquire communication and teaching 
skills necessary for working in the real world (defined as both academic and non-academic). 
Students learn how to present research results to a variety of audiences, how to address issues 
related to university teaching, and how to deal with ethical issues in the research context. The 
course is graded as Pass/Fail. It is mandatory for all students in the program. Each week, students 


must submit a written report on the presentation of the previous week. 


SOAN 840 General Seminar 

Designed as a preparation to the research involved in the thesis, the second general seminar 
focuses on the development of writing and research capacities, preparing research proposals, 
addressing issues in theory and method in relation to various topics, covering literature reviews. One 


faculty member is responsible for this seminar. 


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436 
SOAN 850 Comprehensive Exam | (6 credits) 


SOAN 860 Comprehensive Exam Il (6 credits) 


Towards the end of their first year in the program, and in consultation with their thesis supervisor, 
PhD students form an advisory committee of three faculty members, including their supervisor, to 
assist in the preparation of the comprehensive exams (6 credits each). A core reading list consists of 
approximately 25 titles for each exam. The ultimate goal of the exams is to establish a candidate’s 
academic specialization. After completing the exams, students should have acquired sufficient 


background to teach a course and/or conduct advanced research in the area. 


The examinations normally take place before the end of the student’s second year in the program. 
Each exam takes the form of a written essay (20-25 pages) that the student has three weeks to 
write. The student’s advisory committee members evaluate the exam as earning a grade of pass or 
fail. To constitute a successful exam, it must receive a grade of pass from all three members of the 
committee. Students who fail one of these exams are allowed to take it for a second time during the 


following term. A second failure leads to the student’s withdrawal from the program. 


SOAN 870 Thesis Proposal 

A candidate who has successfully completed the course requirements and the comprehensive 
exams must submit a thesis proposal to the Graduate Program Director and the thesis committee. 
The thesis committee, selected in consultation with the GPD, is composed of three members 
representing both Sociology and Anthropology. It may be the student’s initial advisory committee. 
The thesis proposal should describe the topic of the thesis, situate it in the relevant literature, and 
discuss the intended research methods. The written version of the proposal is approved by the 
members of the thesis committee and followed by an oral defense before the committee members. 


Following this, the PhD candidate is invited to present his thesis proposal in a departmental seminar. 


SOAN 890 Thesis (57 credits) 

Doctoral candidates submit a thesis based on their research and defend it in an oral examination. 
The thesis is expected to make an original contribution to knowledge, to be based on primary 
sources and to be presented in an acceptable form. The thesis should normally be no more than 400 


pages in length (or equivalent if a non-literary format is used). 


© Concordia University 


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Concordia University 


http:/Awww.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/socianth-ma. html 


Social and Cultural Anthropology MA 


Admission Requirements 


An undergraduate degree with honours or specialization in anthropology or joint specialization in 
anthropology and sociology, with a grade point average of 3.00 (B average) is required. An 
undergraduate degree with a major in anthropology, with a grade point average of 3.00 (B average) 


is considered, provided that the background preparation is acceptable. 


Applicants who lack certain prerequisite courses may be required to take a qualifying program of up 
to 12 undergraduate credits in addition to the regular graduate program. For the qualifying program 
a grade point average of 3.00 (B average) is required. 


Applicants with deficiencies in their undergraduate preparation may be required to take up to 24 


undergraduate independent credits. 


Applications to the program must be accompanied by a preliminary statement (roughly 500 words in 


length) of the student's intentions regarding research, fieldwork and thesis. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits. Additional 
courses may be taken from outside the program, subject to the advice and approval of the 


student's supervisor or the Graduate Program Director. 


2. Supervision. Students are assigned an interim advisor upon admission. Students in the thesis 
option must select their permanent advisor by the beginning of the second term, along with a 
second committee member. Their thesis is evaluated by the two-person committee and a third 
examiner. Students in the non-thesis option select a permanent advisor by the beginning of the 


second term, and their final research papers are evaluated by the advisor and a second 


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438 
examiner. 


3. Language Requirement. A working knowledge of English and French is recommended, 
although written work may be submitted in either language. Where appropriate, students are 
encouraged to acquire competence in the language of the community they choose to study; this 
may be achieved in the context of ANTH 640. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Residence. The minimum period of residence is two calendar years (6 terms) of full-time 


graduate study beyond the Master’s degree or the equivalent in part-time study. 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 
Limit requirements. The thesis option is designed to be completed in two years. The non-thesis 


option can be completed in 12 months. 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 2.70. 


Master of/Magisteriate in Arts in Social and Cultural Anthropology with Thesis (Option A) 


Courses. Students must satisfactorily complete the following program: ANTH 600, 601, 610, 620, 
630, 660 , 690, 691 (6 credits), 692 (18 credits). 


Thesis. Students enrolled in the thesis option are required to demonstrate their ability to carry out 
independent ethnographic field research. The thesis proposal, ANTH 690 serves as the basis for the 
elaboration of the written thesis, ANTH 692. The student then orally defends the thesis before an 


examining committee. The thesis may be written in either English or French. 


Master of/Magisteriate in Arts in Social and Cultural Anthropology without Thesis (Essay - 
Option B). 


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439 
Courses. Students must satisfactorily complete the following program: ANTH 600, 601, 610, 630, 


660, 693, 694 (6 credits), 695 (15 credits) and 6 credits of electives. 


Essay. ANTH 695 (15 credits): Students are required to write the essay under the supervision of one 
faculty member and are evaluated by two faculty members, including the supervisor. The essay 
proposal (ANTH 693) serves as the basis for theEssay (ANTH 695) which can be either a literature 


review of a substantive nature, or a report on empirical research. 


Note 1. All students are required to plan courses related to their own interests with the help of 
advisors. 

Note 2. All students are required to take 3 credits of SOCI elective studies. 

Note 3. No more than 3 credits of elective studies taken outside the Department of Sociology and 


Anthropology may be credited towards the degree. 


Courses 


All courses listed below are worth 3 credits unless otherwise noted. 


ANTH 600 Identity and Difference 


This course explores the processes of social differentiation and identification. 


ANTH 601 Decolonizing Anthropology 
This course examines the roots of anthropological theory in Western culture and the decolonization 


of anthropology since the 1960s. 


ANTH 610 Ethnographic Research and Ethics 
This course explores the methods used to gather ethnographic material and the ethical dynamics of 


the fieldwork encounter, and the duties of the anthropologist as cultural mediator. 


ANTH 620 Writing Ethnography 
This course examines a range of methods and styles for presenting ethnographic material, from 


ethnographic realism to fiction, and encourages further experimentation. 


ANTH 630 New Directions in Anthropological Research 
This course explores emergent concepts, methods and topics in anthropology. Content changes in 


accordance with the research focus of the professor leading the course. 


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440 
ANTH 640 Special Topics | * 


This course, selected in consultation with the student’s thesis supervisor, may be taken from a 


cognate discipline. 


ANTH 641 Special Topics II * 
This course, selected in consultation with the student’s thesis supervisor, is offered as the occasion 
arises, for example, when a faculty member returns from the field, or when a visiting professor is in 


residence. 


ANTH 660 Professional Development Seminar 

This seminar is designed to help students develop the professional skills needed to pursue a career 
in research, practice or teaching. Students are exposed to a variety of research approaches through 
presentations by a diversity of faculty researchers. This seminar takes place every two weeks over 


the course of the Fall and Winter semesters. Credit for this course is obtained on a pass/fail basis. 


ANTH 690 Thesis Proposal 


The student develops a research proposal under the direction of his/her thesis supervisor. 


ANTH 691 Fieldwork: Stage (6 credits) 
The fieldwork requirement, which may last from 3-4 months, involves undertaking research in a 
community which differs in important respects from the student's community of reference, and 


collecting ethnographic data. This research forms the basis of the student's thesis. 


ANTH 692 Thesis (18 credits) 

The thesis is required to demonstrate that the student has been able to carry out independent field 
research. It should be a work of near publishable quality. The thesis is evaluated by the student’s 
Thesis Committee and one other faculty member. The student is also required to defend the thesis 


orally before the above-mentioned examiners. 


ANTH 693 Essay Proposal 
Students develop a research proposal under the direction of their supervisor, including a preliminary 


reading list. 


ANTH 694 Bibliographic Research (6 credits) 
Students spend two to three months reviewing the literature (which may include both academic and 


grey literature sources) on their proposed topic. The review forms the basis of the students’ essay. 


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ANTH 695 Essay (15 credits) 


The essay is written under the supervision of one faculty member and is evaluated by two faculty 
members, including the supervisor. It can either be a literature review of a substantive nature, or a 
report on empirical research. Students are expected to submit work of publishable or near 


publishable quality. The appropriate length of the essay is approximately 40 pages. 


* Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this 


course provided that the course content has changed. 


© Concordia University 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


442 


Concordia University 


http:/Awww.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/soci-ma.html 
Sociology MA 


Admission Requirements 


An undergraduate degree with honours or specialization in sociology, with a grade point average of 
3.00 (B average) is required. An undergraduate degree with a major in sociology, with a grade point 
average of 3.00 (B average) will also be considered provided that the background preparation is 
acceptable. Applicants with degrees in cognate disciplines with higher grade point averages will also 


be considered. 


Applicants who lack certain prerequisite courses may be required to take a qualifying program of up 
to 12 undergraduate credits in addition to the regular graduate program. For the qualifying program 


a grade point average of 3.00 (B average) is required. 


Applicants with deficiencies in their undergraduate preparation may be required to take up to 24 


undergraduate independent credits. 


Applications to the program must be accompanied by a preliminary statement (roughly 500 words in 


length) of the student's intentions regarding research and thesis. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits. Additional 
courses may be taken from outside the program, subject to the advice and approval of the 


student's supervisor or the Graduate Program Director. 


2. Supervision. At the beginning of the first term of full-time or part-time study, the student is 
assigned an interim advisor for the duration of the first term. At the beginning of the second term 
in the case of full-time study, or the equivalent in terms of part-time study, the student must select 


a permanent thesis supervisor and a second faculty member to serve on the Thesis Committee. 


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443 
Members of the Thesis Committee evaluate the thesis. The thesis will be examined by an 


Examining Committee, composed of the thesis supervisor and the second committee member, 
and a third faculty member chosen in consultation with the Graduate Program Director. The 
responsibility for the composition of the Thesis Committee rests with the student in consultation 


with and subject to the approval of the Graduate Program Director. 


3. Language Requirement. A working knowledge of English and French is recommended although 


written work may be submitted in either language. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Residence. The minimum period of residence is two calendar years (6 terms) of full-time 


graduate study beyond the Master’s degree or the equivalent in part-time study. 


3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 2.70. 


Master of/Magisteriate in Arts in Sociology with Thesis (Option A) 


Courses. Each student must satisfactorily complete the following program: SOCI 602, 603, 612, 
613, 660, 690; a course in the area of research (3 credits); one elective course (3 credits), SOCI 691 
(21 credits). 


Thesis. SOCI 691 (21 credits): Students enrolled in the thesis option are required to demonstrate 
their ability to carry out independent research which reflects a scientific approach. The thesis 
proposal, SOCI 690 (prepared within the confines of the thesis tutorial) will serve as the basis for the 
elaboration of the actual thesis, SOC! 691. This will take the form of a written thesis (21 credits) of at 
least article length. The student will then orally defend the thesis before an examining committee. 


The thesis may be written in either English or French. 
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444 
Master of/Magisteriate in Arts in Sociology without Thesis (Essay - Option B) 


Courses. Each student must satisfactorily complete the following program: SOCI 602, 603, 612, 
613, 660, 695 (18 credits) and 12 credits of electives. 


Essay. SOCI 695 (18 credits): The essay is written under the supervision of one faculty member and 
is evaluated by two faculty members, including the supervisor. It can either be a literature review of a 
substantive nature, or a report on empirical research. Students are expected to submit work of 
publishable or near publishable quality. The appropriate length of the essay is approximately 40 


pages. 


Note 1. All students are required to plan courses related to their own interests with the help of 
advisors. 
Note 2. No more than 6 credits of elective studies taken outside the discipline may be credited 


towards the degree. 


Courses 


All courses listed below are worth 3 credits unless otherwise noted. 


SOCI 602 Issues in Classical Sociological Theory 

This course is designed to examine selected classical texts and analyze the work of recent 
interpreters and critics. During this course, we will endeavour to develop our critical understanding of 
the classics. In addition, we will strive to create an awareness of the diversity of readings of classical 
texts that will enhance our ability to make further critical appropriations, revisions, and uses of the 


classical tradition. (3 credits) 


SOCI 603 Issues in Contemporary Sociological Theory 

This course is an in-depth study of issues in contemporary sociological theory. It is designed to 
foster awareness of the plurality, diversity, and divergence among contemporary readers and 
readings of current texts. The focus is on critical analysis of major writings representing diverse 
theoretical orientations in recent sociology. Attention is given to fundamental assumptions and to 


practical implications of given orientations and styles of sociology. 


SOCI 612 Quantitative Research Design and Methods 
This course explores quantitative research design and methodology as a whole process, from 
conceptualization to research questions, methods, data analysis, and results dissemination. Topics 


include data structures and their relation to theory; data collection; access to and use of large data 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


445 
sets; coding and validity and reliability issues; statistical techniques as generalized linear models; 


linear and logistic regression. Students apply various methods to read data. Ethical issues are also 


considered. 


SOCI 613 Qualitative Research Design and Methods 

This course explores research methodology, design, analysis and dissemination. Topics include 
focus groups, participant observation, open-ended and structured interviewing, content and 
discourse analysis, life histories and historical analysis. Analysis will also explore approaches to 
coding qualitative data and the links between data and conceptual and theoretical categories. Ethical 


issues as well as issues of researcher safety in the field are considered. 


SOCI 660 Professional Development Seminar 

This seminar is designed to help students develop the professional skills needed to pursue a career 
in research, practice or teaching. Students are exposed to a variety of research approaches through 
presentations by a diversity of faculty researchers. This seminar takes place every two weeks over 


the course of the Fall and Winter semesters. Grading for this course is obtained on a pass/fail basis. 


SOCI 690 Thesis Proposal 


The student develops a research proposal under the direction of his/her thesis supervisor. 


SOCI 691 Thesis (21 credits) 

Students enrolled in the thesis option are required to demonstrate their ability to carry out 
independent research which reflects a scientific approach. The thesis proposal, SOCI 690 (prepared 
within the confines of the thesis tutorial) will serve as the basis for the elaboration of the actual 
thesis, SOCI 691. This will take the form of a written thesis (21 credits) of at least article length. The 
student will then orally defend the thesis before an examining committee. The thesis may be written 


in either English or French. 


SOCI 695 Essay (18 credits) 

The essay is written under the supervision of one faculty member and is evaluated by two faculty 
members, including the supervisor. It can either be a literature review of a substantive nature, or a 
report on empirical research. Students are expected to submit work of publishable or near 


publishable quality. The appropriate length of the essay is approximately 40 pages. 


Selected Topics 


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446 
The offerings for the following courses will be reviewed each year in light of the interest of students 


and faculty members. Five elective courses are offered each academic year from the list given 
below. Courses numbered “700” are advanced studies and normally will be conducted on a tutorial 
basis. The corresponding 600-level course is a prerequisite to the 700-level course. All courses 


listed below are worth 3 credits unless otherwise noted. 


SOCI 620/720 Population and Society 
SOCI 622/722 Studies in Race and Ethnicity 
SOCI 625/725 Sociology of Culture 

SOCI 626/726 North American Societies 
SOCI 627/727 Social Movements and Social Change 
SOCI 632/732 Sociology of the Family 
SOCI 633/733 Sociology of Knowledge 
SOCI 635/735 Gender Studies 

SOCI 637/737 Development 

SOCI 638/738 The City 

SOCI 639/739 Social Problems 

SOCI 640/740 Community Studies 

SOCI 642/742 Studies in Governance 
SOCI 644/744 Sociology of the Body 

SOCI 645/745 Sociology of Men 

SOCI 646/746 Globalization 

SOCI 647/747 Democracy and Citizenship 
SOCI 648/748 Health, Illness and Medicine 
SOCI 649/749 Media and Communication 
SOCI 652/752 Self and Subjectivity 

SOCI 653/753 Intellectual Biography 


Additional Topics, Thesis, and Essay 


SOCI 601 Topics in Advanced Theory 

SOCI 611 Topics in Advanced Methodology 
SOCI 650/750 Special Topic in Sociology | 
SOCI 651/751 Special Topic in Sociology Il 
SOCI 691 Thesis (21 credits) 

SOCI 695 Essay (18 credits) 


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© Concordia University 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


448 


Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/theo.html 
Theological Studies 


Admission Requirements 


A solid undergraduate preparation with a range of competence similar to that demanded of Major 
students at Concordia, and a minimum B average in their undergraduate studies. Qualified 
applicants requiring prerequisite courses may be required to take up to 12 undergraduate credits in 
addition to and as a part of the regular graduate program. Admission into the program is on 


recommendation of the Graduate Studies Committee. 


Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that 
their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer 
to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements 


and exemptions. 


Language Requirements. Thesis proposals which depend on special linguistic skills will be 


accepted only from students competent in the appropriate languages. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A fully qualified candidate is required to complete 45 credits. 


2. Students may enter one of the two options, A or B, outlined below. 


Academic Regulations 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 


detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 


2. Residence. The minimum residence requirement is one year (3 terms) of full-time graduate 


study, or the equivalent in part-time study. 


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449 
3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time 


Limit requirements. 


4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at 
least 2.70. 
Option A: MA with Thesis 


Required courses: THEO 603 Method in Theology (3 credits), THEO 604 Theological 
Hermeneutics (3 credits), THEO 605 Methods in Biblical Studies (3 credits), THEO 690 Annotated 
Bibilography and Thesis Proposal (6 credits). 


Electives: 9 credits from THEO 620-675. 
Thesis: THEO 697 Thesis (21 credits). 
Option B: MA with Applied Project in Theology 


Required courses: THEO 603 Method in Theology (3 credits), THEO 604 Theological 
Hermeneutics (3 credits), THEO 605 Methods in Biblical Studies (3 credits). 


Electives: 18 credits from THEO 620-675. 


Research: THEO 691 Research Paper (9 credits), THEO 692 Applied Project in Theology (9 


credits). 


Courses 


The required THEO 603 and THEO 605 will be offered in alternate years. THEO 604 will be offered 


every two years or as needed. 


The courses offered are one-term, 3-credit courses unless otherwise indicated. A list designating 
which specific courses are to be offered in any given year, with description of content, will be 


compiled and distributed prior to registration. 
Topic Courses 
Topics in Scripture 


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450 
THEO 621 Old Testament | 


THEO 623 Old Testament Il 

THEO 627 Questions in Old Testament Research 
THEO 629 Intertestament Studies 

THEO 631 New Testament | 

THEO 633 New Testament Il 

THEO 635 New Testament Ill 

THEO 637 Questions in New Testament Research 
THEO 639 Biblical Studies 


Topics in Church History 


THEO 641 History | 

THEO 643 History Il 

THEO 645 History III 

THEO 647 Research in History of Christian Thought 
THEO 649 Questions in Christian Worship 


Topics in Theology 


THEO 651 Theology | 

THEO 653 Theology II 

THEO 655 Theology III 

THEO 657 Questions in Theological Research 
THEO 661 Ecclesiology | 

THEO 663 Ecclesiology II 

THEO 664 Ecclesiology Ill 

THEO 667 Research In Ecclesiology 

THEO 669 Theology & World Religions 


Topics in Christian Ethics 


THEO 671 Ethics | 
THEO 673 Ethics Il 
THEO 675 Issues in Ethical Research 


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451 
THEO 603 Method in Theology (3 credits) 


This course introduces students to theological method: the questions, insights, and philosophical 
presuppositions that determine theological frameworks with some attention to modern systematic 
theology and Christian ethics. Students acquire a differentiated appreciation for the types of 


theology, the scope of distinct theological fields, and their research horizons. 


THEO 604 Theological Hermeneutics (3 credits) 

This course introduces students to the notion of church as interpretative community, and to 
experience diverse ways of utilizing this notion. Students develop an understanding of the basic 
principles of theological hermeneutics (the science or theory of interpretation), including a survey of 


the history of the disciple from early times up to present day. 


THEO 605 Methods in Biblical Studies (3 credits) 

This course focuses on tools and methods employed in biblical studies and ancient literature related 
to the Bible (up to 600 CE). Synchronic and diachronic approaches are discussed but the course 
focuses primarily on diachronic methods (form and genre criticism, comparative method, etc.) 


Students are trained to develop skills in analyzing texts using biblical methods. 


THEO 690 Annotated Bibliography and Thesis Proposal (6 credits) 

The annotated bibliography and thesis proposal constitute preliminary phases necessary for the 
writing of the MA thesis. The annotated bibliography and thesis proposal are supervised by the 
supervisor of the thesis and are assessed on a pass/fail basis. 


Note: Students who have received credit for THEO 685 or 695 may not take this course for credit. 


THEO 691 Research Paper (9 credits) 
The guided research project involves the preparation of a substantial research paper. It may be 
prepared in conjunction with any seminar course but will be separate from the basic course 


requirements. 


THEO 692 Applied Project in Theology (9 credits) 

The aim of this course is to give the student the opportunity to engage in critical theological reflection 
by frequenting a milieu where theological interpretation occurs on a regular basis (e.g. a local parish, 
a confessional school, a religious formation program like the Christian Training Program, religious 
programming in the media, etc.) in order to assess the theological models presupposed in the 


activity studied. The practicum will include a 3 credit reading component related to the field of study. 


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452 
THEO 697 Thesis (21 credits) 


The thesis shall consist in the presentation of the research results. Each thesis shall be examined by 
a committee consisting of the student’s supervisor and by at least two other scholars from the 
Department. The remaining regulations concerning the thesis examination are in accordance with 


the School of Graduate Studies (See Thesis Regulations). 


Cognate Courses 


With permission of the Graduate Program Director up to 6 credits may be chosen from graduate 
offerings in other Departments at Concordia or other universities. Permission of the graduate director 


of the respective program must also be granted. 


© Concordia University 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


453 


Concordia University 


http:/Awww.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/encs.html 


Gina Cody School of Engineering and Computer 
Science 
Engineering and Computer Science Programs 
Gina Cody School of Engineering and Computer Science Website 
« General Requirements for All Programs 
¢ Doctor of/Doctorate in Philosophy 
« Master of/Magisteriate in Applied Science 
« Master of/Magisteriate in Engineering 
Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering 


Department of Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering Website 


Doctor/Doctorate 
¢ Building Engineering PhD 
¢ Civil Engineering PhD 
Master/Magisteriate 
¢ Building Engineering MASc 
¢ Building Engineering MEng 
« Civil Engineering MASc 
« Civil Engineering MEng 
« Construction Engineering and Management MEng 
e Environmental Engineering MEng 
Graduate Certificate 
« Building Engineering Graduate Certificate 
« Environmental Engineering Graduate Certificate 


Centre for Engineering in Society 


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454 
Centre for Engineering in Society Website 


Graduate Certificate 
e Innovation, Technology and Society Graduate Certificate 
Chemical and Materials Engineering 


Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering Website 


Doctor/Doctorate 
« Chemical Engineering PhD 
Master/Magisteriate 
« Chemical Engineering MASc 
Graduate Diploma 
e Chemical Engineering Graduate Diploma 
Graduate Certificate 
e Chemical Engineering Graduate Certificate 
Concordia Institute for Information Systems Engineering 


Concordia Institute for Information Systems Engineering Website 


Doctor/Doctorate 
¢ Information and Systems Engineering PhD 
Master/Magisteriate 
¢ Information Systems Security MASc 
¢ Information Systems Security MEng 
¢ Quality Systems Engineering MASc 
¢ Quality Systems Engineering MEng 
Graduate Certificate 
« 3D Graphics and Game Development Graduate Certificate 
e Service Engineering and Network Management Graduate Certificate 


Electrical and Computer Engineering 
Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Website 


Doctor/Doctorate 

¢ Electrical and Computer Engineering PhD 
Master/Magisteriate 

e Electrical and Computer Engineering MASc 

¢ Electrical and Computer Engineering MEng 
Mechanical, Industrial and Aerospace Engineering 


Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Aerospace Engineering Website 


Doctor/Doctorate 

« Industrial Engineering PhD 

e Mechanical Engineering PhD 
Master/Magisteriate 

e Aerospace MEng 

¢ Industrial Engineering MASc 

e Industrial Engineering MEng 

e Mechanical Engineering MASc 

e Mechanical Engineering MEng 
Graduate Certificate 

e Mechanical Engineering Graduate Certificate 
Engineering Courses 

¢ List of Engineering Courses by Topic Area 

e Engineering Course Decriptions 
Computer Science and Software Engineering 


Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering Website 


Doctor/Doctorate 


¢« Computer Science PhD 


455 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


456 
¢ Software Engineering PhD 


Master/Magisteriate 
« Applied Computer Science MApCompSc 
¢« Computer Science MCompSc 
¢ Software Engineering MASc 
e Software Engineering MEng 
Graduate Diploma 
« Computer Science Graduate Diploma 
Computer Science Courses 


« List of Computer Science Courses by Topic Area 


© Concordia University 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


457 


Concordia University 


http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/encs/engineering-programs.html 
Engineering Programs 


General Requirements for All Programs 


Degrees 
¢ Doctor of/Doctorate in Philosophy 
« Master of/Magisteriate in Applied Science 


« Master of/Magisteriate in Engineering 


Proficiency in English 


Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that their knowledge of English 
is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer to the Graduate Admission 


page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements and exemptions. 


In addition to the general admission requirements, the Gina Cody School (GCS) may require 
applicants to write the Engineering Writing Test (EWT) as a condition of admission to all graduate 
programs in Engineering and Computer Science. Depending on the result, students may be required 


to complete remedial English language courses in addition to their program requirements. 


Engineering Writing Test (EWT) 


The Engineering Writing Test examines students’ ability to provide reasoned assessment of a short 
technical composition in English or French, and their ability to provide a qualitative account of 
quantitative or graphically presented data. The test is offered a number of times throughout the year. 


Based on their performance in the test, students may be asked to take remedial courses. 


Academic Regulations 


All students registered in a Gina Cody School graduate degree program are assessed at the end of 


each academic term. This assessment is based on: 


1. courses for which a grade point value has been assigned subsequent to their admission to their 


program, or in the case of reinstated students, subsequent to their reinstatement, and 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


458 
2. other degree requirements, for which no grade point value is assigned, such as doctoral 


seminars, comprehensive examinations, doctoral research proposals and theses which are 


graded on a pass/fail or equivalent basis. 
Standings of students are determined as follows: 


1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a 
detailed review of the Academic Regulations. 
Degree Specific Requirements. PhD program: Students must obtain an assessment grade 
point average (AGPA) of 3.00 based on a minimum of 8 credits. A maximum of one grade below 


B is permitted. 


2. Graduation Requirements. To be considered for the award of a graduate degree, students in 
Certificate, Diploma, and Master programs must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.70, and 
students in the PhD programs must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.00. 

Students must have satisfied all degree requirements of their program of study and obtained the 
required minimum cumulative grade point average based on all courses credited towards the 
degree. These courses must be taken at Concordia subsequent to first registration in the 
program, or credited to Concordia from other universities in accordance with credit transfer 
regulations in the graduate calendar. 


In the case of PhD students, a maximum of one grade below B is permitted. 


Doctor of/Doctorate in Philosophy 


The Doctor of/Doctorate in Philosophy program leads to the highest degree offered by the Gina 
Cody School and is designed to provide students an opportunity to obtain the greatest possible 
expertise in their chosen field through intensive research. Advancement of analytical and/or 
experimental knowledge through a combination of specialized courses and a research thesis under 
the supervision of an experienced researcher forms the main component of the doctoral programs. 
Where possible, research of interest to industry is encouraged. The objectives of the PhD program is 
to educate highly qualified researchers required for the expansion of fundamental knowledge and 
technological innovation through research and development, as well as the needs of institutions of 


higher learning. 


Admission Requirements 


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459 
To be considered for admission on a full-time basis, applicants normally must hold a master’s degree 


or equivalent with high standing in engineering or computer science, or in a cognate discipline. 
Holders of a bachelor’s degree will, in general, be considered for admission to a master’s program 
only. After completion of a minimum of two terms of full-time study, they may, upon application, be 


considered by the GCS Graduate Studies Committee for admission to a PhD program. 


To be considered for admission on a part-time basis, applicants must hold a master’s degree with 
high standing in engineering, computer science or a cognate discipline. Applicants should 
understand that admission is contingent not only upon a superior academic record, but also on the 
availability of a research supervisor, of relevant programs of study and research, as well as 
adequate laboratory and library facilities. Where applicable, an ability to write programs ina 
standard computer language will be assumed. Students lacking this skill will be required to register 


for appropriate courses. 


Requirements for the Degree 


1. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate entering the doctoral program with a master’s degree is 
required to complete a minimum of 90 credits. A candidate admitted beyond the bachelor’s level 
is required to complete a minimum of 106 credits. Candidates admitted with a master’s degree in 
a cognate discipline, or if they need additional knowledge in an area pertinent to their research, 
will, in general, be required to complete more than the minimum number of credits. Students may 
not credit any undergraduate equivalent course towards the requirements of a 90-credit or 106- 
credit PhD program without the permission of their supervisor and of the Graduate Program 


Director. 


2. Residence. For candidates admitted with a master’s degree, the minimum period of residence is 
two years of full-time study or the equivalent in part-time study. Part-time students may be 
required by the GCS Graduate Studies Committee, upon the recommendation of the supervisory 
committee, to carry out a portion of their research on a full-time basis. Where a candidate has 
been admitted with a bachelor’s degree, the minimum period of residence is 36 months of full- 


time study after completion of the bachelor’s degree. 


3. Transfer Credits. Students may be granted transfer credit for courses taken in approved 
graduate studies prior to their entry into their program. A course submitted for transfer credit 


must be appropriate to the student’s program of study at Concordia University. An application for 


Winter 2020 Graduate Calendar 


460 
such credit will be considered only at the time of admission. 


. Courses. Students admitted on the basis of a master’s degree will normally be required to 
complete a minimum of 12 credits in course work. A student admitted on the basis of a 
bachelor’s degree will normally be required to complete a minimum of 28 credits in course work. 
Students must also successfully complete the PhD seminar ENCS 8011 (2 credits). Each 
student’s program must be approved by a supervisory committee consisting of three members of 
faculty, including the student’s research supervisor. This supervisory committee will also arrange 
for the student’s comprehensive examination, the presentation of the doctoral research proposal, 


and thesis evaluation. 


. Comprehensive Examination. Students must take a comprehensive examination, ENCS 8501, 
which may be bot