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ALPHABETICAL CATALOGUE 



-/m\. 



••^® OF <*<♦— 



REafATIONS 



CONTAINED IN 




'S RECITATIONS 



(10 C£NTS BACH 



.) 



NOS. 1 TO 5 INCLUSIi^E. 



W^ILLIAM W. DELANKY, PUBLISHEB, 



117 i=-a.isk: leo'^^r. ^te'^^t 



Cblld's Dr«aa of « SUr, ▲.•*.. M...^M..,.w.,.4|mi*>f 

Child ViolinUt. The m,»,.Jt^*mm^—^ 

Chine«« Excalfior, Tk« «>.<>w.«>»M«Mto<»V 

Chop Chow Chin ^^ .m..>*mot<'I 

ChrisUning. Tho ^...•wmt.*....'^ 

Chnttmas Day at Baldwin's ..y. 9 

Christmas Day at ths Workhomsa....... ^ I 

Chnrch RcTcries of a Schoolgirl.... .*..«*........n......S 

CmlWar » S 

Clear the Way , .^ 

Cleopatra Dying U 

Clink of the Ice. The < ,,..„ 4 

CoaUef Fire I 

Cceiir de Lien at the Orave of Hla F»Sb«r 6 

Oollier'e Dying Child, The 1 

Colomb S 

Columbia 6 

Coming Out of Eiity, The « 

Come S 

Conductor Bradley 6 

Coney Island Down der Bay ...2 

Confession. A .4 

Conscience and Future Judgment I 

Controlling Influence of Drink, The — 

Convict's Dream. The I 

Cop's Lament, The i 

Corns !• 

Countersifrn. The 1 

Country Store. The 4 

Cumberland, The .'i 

Curfew Must Not King To-night I 

Curious Poem. A 4 

Custer's Last Ch«rge b 

D 

Damon to the Syraousana 3 

Daschen on the lUiine 1 

Days Gone By 3 

Deadbesu S 

Deatlibed. The 3 

Deallibedof Benedict Arnold S 

Death of (iaudentit> S 

Death of Hofer. The 5 

Devil ana the Lawyers. The 4 

Did as His Mother Bade Him 

Disappointed Boy. A 2 

Disuppointmeiil«. 4 

Doesn't Know the Words 2 

Dog and the Tramp. The S 

Dog nnd der iiobster. Der 2 



1 



! 



- .' ■ A Book 

Xl. Ho. 

\broad Without Leave 4 

Aidress of Spotty cuss 2 

Ad Infinitum 4 

Afcall of a lial 2 

Aflliotion 2 

After the Battle 5 

After the Fourth of July 3 

Age of Man and \V<imau. The 1 

Alabama S 

Alderman Mc'iuirk's Address 2 

AldermaUK Rctrosjiect. The 5 

Ail for a Nouiinatioii 4 

Amen of tlic Itocks. The 5 

American Flag. The 5 

And the Baiiil Played 2 

And the Gang Drinks with Ton 2 

Annabel Lee 5 

Annie and Willie's I'rayer , 1 

Antonio (>rlhoni 5 

Antony and Cleopatru 1 

Apology to OReillv. The 4 

Arab's Farewell to Mis Steed. The 1 

Asleep at the Switch 1 

Athiest and the Acorn The 2 

At the Bar 5 

At the Morgne 6 

At the Opera 4 

At the Theatre S 

Auction Extraordinary 2 

Aunt Sophroiiia Tabor at the Opera. 4 

Avalanche. The 6 

Awake, Awake 6 

Baby, Der j 

Baby's Kiss. The \ 5 

Baccarat. 2 

Bachelor's Hall 4 

Bachelor's Soliloquy, The 4 

Bad Whiskey 2 

BaggHire Fiend. The 4 

Bill i more Belle, The J 

Baukrnpt's Visitor. The 5 

Banty Tim 3 

Barhiira Krietrhie 1 

Barbara Friefohie (German version) 2 

Barnn's Ijist Hniiquet. The 3 

Basebiill 2 

B.ittle Flag of ShenaudouU i 

Battle of Falling Wnteis 5 

Battle of Fontenoy, The '. 3 



Book 

Mo. 

Battle of the Baltic, The 6 

Battle Song of Labor. The 6 

Beautiful Snow I 

Bedbug. The 2 

Before the Ball 4 

Be Just nnd Fenr Not 6 

BeUof the Atlantic, The 6 

Bernardo and Alphouso i 

Bernardo Del Curpio 1 

Beinardo's Revenge 5 

Beth Gelert '. 1 

Betsy and I Are Out 1 

Betsy and I Hafe Bust Up * 

Betsy Destroys the Paper 1 

Bicycle and the Pup, The ' 

Biking Episode. A 4 

Bill Mason's Ride I 

BlUy K. Simes » 

Biiigen on the Rhine 1 

Biography 3 

Bivouac of the Dead. The. 1 

Black Regiment, The i 

Blue und the (Jray, The 3 

Bondage of Drink, The & 

Bootbl.iik.Tlie 1 

Boss Traiop, The 3 

Brave at Homo, The & 

Bravest of the Brave 4 

Bridge of thighs. The S 

Broken Promiwe. The , 1 

Brown' H .Mistake 4 

Burglar nnd the Editor. The * 

Burial of the Dane, The S 

c 

CiiUbre Fifty-four S 

Calling Him Down 1 

Candy Pull. The * 

Captain's Daughter. The 9 

Cardinal Wolsey on Being Cast Off by King Henry Til. ..5 

I'asal ianea 1 

r.n.-.-\ Bl the R.it 2 

Case.v's Tiible d Hole 2 

Cataf rrophe i 

t'tttiiiiic'8 Harangue to His .\rmy 3 

Cause 10 Kick 4 

Ciia(, that's Heen Over to Lunnon 4 

Charge t" the Ford. The 5 

t'liaii.'e of the Dutch Iirig»ile,_Tha 4 

Chaize of the Light Britade..". 1 

ChanesXII 3 



-J, .It--- »-. '^ 



>T<n^^BCIS53!^P^^9B 



3E 



d 



ALPHABETICAL CATALOGUE OF DELANEY'8 RECITATIONS. 



.-- ■ ■-. , " ■: "''. ■■ .■ Book 

■■-■■■ -■ ■■■■■ •■ ■■ ^o. 

Don't Be Tazln;f Mo * 

Uou't Marry a M&u to Save Him S 

Doorstep. Tho.. 3 

Dorking' Ni»;ln 1 

Dot Kaby ell Mine 2 

Dot Sti)p|)<>:n I'ony 2 

Dot Vat^r Mill i 

Downfall of i'olaaU, The 3 

DraftiU 3 

Draw I'okir 2 

Dreaiu of Eugcue Araiu, Tlie 3 

Dreams 1 

Drifteil Out to Sea 6 

Drink iuff ^-outf 2 

Driving Home the Cow» 3 

Drummer. Der 2 

Drummer Boy. Tlie 5 

Drummer'ii BriJe, The S 

Driinkaril'a Dream, A 5 

Dutchman and the Kuveu, The 2 

Dying Brifcanil. The 3 

Dying Ca'.iforiii'iti. The .* 3 

Dying Gladiator. The 3 

Dying Soldier. The 1 

Dying Street Aiat>. The 5 

Dying Umpire, The .' \ 

Dyln' Vwrda otlaaao i 



E 



Eaiy Retnedy. An 4 

Editor 8 MlKtake. The ^ 1 

Emperor Wang. The 2 

Engineer'a Story, The 5 

Entering lu 5 

£teru:tl Jumice 5 

Evening Idyl. An 4 

Ever So Long Ai{o 2 

Evolution of a Staieiman 4 

Emelsior 1 

E.\cel»iore Umpire, The * 

Exiloa, The 6 



F 



Face In the Moonlight 3 

Face on the Flour. The 1 

Factory GirlsLaat Day, The 1 

Faithful 1 

Fait hfnl Lovers, The 4 

Fallen 4 

False Friend. A 5 

Farewell, A 4 

Fast Freight 2 

Father .MoUoy 4 

Fe!on. The 1 

Field of Waterloo, The , 5 

Fireman. The 3 

Flivtlit of Xerxea, The S 

Foiled 4 

Fool »iih the Uan, The 2 

Forhiddeii SweeH 4 

Foreclomire of the Mortgage I 

Four Livf -1 5 

FreasRof Typography ■. 4 

Trom India 3 

Fulfllled Prophecy. A 4 

Futility of Fame, The i 



G 



Galley Slave. The ^ 

Gambler' s Wife. The 1 

Geuer»l John 2 

U«uerul Joseph Keed 5 

Geographii'a. I'oem 4 

< 1 eor !,■".■ W a»li 1 ngt J'n 2 

Georgia Voluiitiir, A S 

tietti'ig Ki-/tit I'p 4 

Giri I LovecS at School. The 1 

Gladiutor, Tii« 3 

GiadneM 3 

Oiovo and the Lion, The I 

(ioliKth and David 4 

Gone with a Ilandiioiner Man 1 

iio Vav. Bci-ky Mi;ier 2 

Granger and the (iambler, The 2 

(ireen .Mountain Justice, T.'ic i 

Guard's .story. The 5 

tiuilty, of Course 4 

Guilly or Kol Guilty 1 



H 



Haralet'i SoliloquT on Death ...3 

Hamlet to llis .Motlier 4 

lliind ttiat Kork« the World. The 3 

Hans' \ i«if to der tiard< n 'J 

Hr.-e ..f tlie Uo»l J 

Haiint-.l l":il.'»re. The 5 

H-'nr H.r Kiivinsr Now 2 

II em he :i rhin,.»., Th»- 2 

He r.ets t>heie Shr.st der Same 2 

He I>"il His Cians 4 

He .N.ver foM n Lie .' 4 

Her K.>Kv f'li.iir 2 

Hi-r I.i file Vail -e 4 

H' r Kover:* .. . 4 

H»-r«ie« f>f (;reece , 3 

Hir.. e.f the I'otumunp. The 5 

He .sleep>i in ih.> Vol Icy To-night 3 

He Worriedjj.Vbout It !.,..!!!!!."!. 2 



. Book 
Ko. 

High Private. The 4 

HiH GuileleaaLook 4 

II iH Love 2 

Homo Attrai'tion* 2 

lioratiut* at the Bridge... I 

Horn 1-1 '.s .Vent. The 3 

Ui>w t'oluiiibue Found .\merica 2 

UoA' He Saved St. .Mirhael's 3 

Mow .Mi( key <o>t Kilt iu Itie War 4 

How Kuby I'layed 2 

How Salvator Won 1 

How the liateu I'anie Ajar 3 

Mow to Cure h Cougii 4 

How to Get Itieh 2 

How to (io Out in New York 2 

How WeTri.'d to Whip the Teacher 2 

Human Aiu-tioii. Th-- ti S 

Huuchliai'ked ."^iuger. The 3 

Huktier Joe 4 



If 5 

I Kights MitSigel 1 

It Thiiigu Wa» Duly Sieh 5 

I'll Tai^e what Father Take! 3 

I Mui-t Be There ou .Sew Year's D»y 3 

In a Cellar in Soho 3 

In Arc.idy 3 

I undent of the French Camp 5 

Iu Fetters of Gold.. 8 

Inquiry. Tlie 3 

III Sihooldays 1 

In tlie Dark 2 

III the Fiomis j 

In the Miuiug Town j^ 5 

III the SliipL.i' l'a»s 3 

lri!.!i BriK-.ide iit 1-oiitenoy, The 3 

irHhuian s l.-ter. An 4 

IriKh Fhilo«r.|,her, The 2 

Kle of Bi>i'edom. The 4 

It R Kver So Far Away 4 

lis Very Like it 2 

I Wonder What They'll Do Next? 4 

1 Would Not Live AJway 1 



J.tcob Rand's Fame 4 

Jeiiuy Ma one i 

Jeiiter's Sermon, The 4 

Jim Biu>.li>o 1 

Joe 3 

Jolm Mavnard 3 

J>hn Siiliivati. .My Jo 2 

Joke. The.. ! 5 

Jolly Fat Friar. A 4 



K 



Katrina's Vinit to Ni-w York . 2 

Kearuev ut Seven l'in«S 1 

K***-iia:rs Charge 5 

Keiiy'8 Dream 2 

Killed Ml the Ford 5 

Kiiiz and ro«-t 1 

King a 1 icture. The 5 

Ki»iiiug on the Street 4 



Lady M.mid s Oath £« 

I.uiise/ Ku.re 4 

I..irry » ou the Force 4 

l.aKi'a I 

f.a.-t Hymn. The I 

t.)'>.l Look. A 3 

Lant Man. The 3 

I.;tugli 111 School. The 1 

Liirii'd Neg.'O. The 4 

I.i-avihg ihi' lloiiiesteail t 

I.octur;- on Deinperuiice 2 

I.ei'd:« Vawcob .Sirau«D 2 

I.enore 3 

Level and the Square. The 1 

Lii.erty F.nlighteus the World 2 

Life 3 



Mahoney'8 Fenian Cet 

iluiu Truck, or a Leap for Life. The 

.Maniac. The 

Mall of .Nerve. A 

.M:.n Waa .Made to .Mourn 

Mmi » itli a Krokrii Slio. string. The 

.Mi.ii Willi the Mu»ket. Tile 

Jlarc .Viiioiiy a i irigiual Oration 

.>li.rco Bo//.Hris 

.Marion H Dinner 

.Mary » Lumb on u New Principle 

MasBiiby 

.Maud Muiler 

-Muud .Mu..er in Dutch 

Mi.y Vuetu, riie 

.MiClonkej'H one e.veJ (joat 

.McCrackeU's Kiiiidle I'up 

.Me 1 1 in I y » H'Tbe i 

.M c« Jin ty'n Soli :oijuy 

.^loionig.ili* I lame Uog 

Mer( tiaiit and tlio Book Agent, The 

.Midnight Mui-a. The 

Mi;e>tone rile 

Mi.ler and the .Maid, The . 

.Mill River Kide 

MlueJakey 

M I iier K « ursi?. The 

.VJ iuot'H Ledge , 

.Miiislrera Curke. The , 

.MiH* Edith Hel|g ThinifS Along 

.Misa .Maloney <.>ues to ilie I'eutivt 

.Mi-ti Maloney on the Chines* v^iiestion 

Mietreas O'Kallerty ou the Womuu (Question. 

.Mi/pah 

M.iderii Belle. The 

.Modern Mag-j/.ine I'oem. A 

Mode»t Wit A 

.Mon.i .s W atiT* , , 

M'Mieyles.s Mail. The , 

Miiii'ifoni-ry duards of Bostiton. The 

Molli-r s Fool 

.M..ve on 

.Mr Billings of Louisville 

.Mr Murphy's Will 

Ml lea lies '» Six ner liog 

M'l e .stiioit on the Steamboat Deck 

.Miilliaiey ou KaselMiU 

M;ii«ic in Cair;i 

.My First C.ij.ir 

My Wl.e and Child 



Book 
Ho. 

2 

S 

1 

4 

3 

2 

» 

4 

1 

6 

3 

S 

3 

.......2 

S 

4 

J 

3 

2 

3 

4 

5 

2 

4 

6 

4 



5 

S 

4 

4 

2 

4 

6 

3 

3 

4 

3 

1 

3 

I 

4 

3 

J 

3 

2 

2 

S 

4 

» 



N 



Nail tlie Colors to the .Mast.. 

Namii:;; the Baby 

N..L;;iity l.iMl.- (iirl, A 

.''^ed lilUgwn\ r. I.ecupc 

.'vegtected Child. The 

N. ifro Io His liojf. A 

.Never live Tp 

.Seu- i':iur<-l! Oilman. The 

NrW l..<»'lilttvar. The 

.N'-w Year * itexolutiun. A. . 
Niglit Alter I'hriKtnias. The. 

.Nineteen Hundred. . . 

Ninety -eight 

NolK>dy 

Nol^ody'H Child 

Nobody .Mill- 

No Mortgiige on the Farm .. 

.No Sect III Heaven 

No Te^eplioiie in Heaven.... 
NuthiU' to Say 



o 



Lilebo.it. The b 

Life i« but a Game of Cards .' I 

Life BConlliut 5 

Li»;!itiiiiiL' rod DispeiiKer, The 4 

LigliiBo London. The I 

Lips that Touch Li()unr Will Never Touch Mine, The I 

Litile itnrefoot., :; 

I .:tleCiri Bearer. The 5 

Lit lie liiuve, riie .'. 

Li;'> Mei^ and I . . j 

Lilt'.e I'ai and the Parson 4 

Little T liinr* Tell, The 4 

Little Wo.. !.-« ; S 

Lisiiig nnri tto- Dead. The I 

LocliiiivTi- H KIde I 

l»cked ll;if 4 

I.on<' <;ra\ e. The .3 

Look Aloft.. T, 

Lwrrai II e 3 



M 



MacRenna's Dream 3 

Madame' s Child 1 

Uadman and the Razor, The 4 



Oak itO'l der Vine. Der 

Oftice .Seeker. The 

O'Gr.idi '» (Joat 

Oi! r.-i'liioned Ball Club, The 

Old >iri.uley 

OM >.;aid H l'la.^■ r. All 

O.d .Man at llie .MiMtel Church. The... 
Oiit .Man 111 ihe Siylith Church. The. 

Old Printer, The , 

Old Ax\ ing« 

o;.l-iiiue I iiriis (^town. The 

Old Wanderer. The 

One (JIaiM .More 

«.>:ie III B!iie and One in Gray 

One ol ttie Pack 

One Touch ot Nature 

Oii:\ ni I'iii 

Oi, !ii<' !;!i|i|>ahai<ii(>ck 

i> itelliy ii Bi'. > Ooat 

orgTin G' inder. The 

'Oxiier Joe 

Othello . , 

Our Miiiis'er'x .S-rnion 

Our .stiips Mt St-ii 

over the Illllf to the Poorhoose 

Over the Kiver 

Owl Critic, The 



I'addv and Ills Pig 

Pupa's Letter.. 

Pirodv on th.- Tramp. 
Parson Scow's Hint ., 
Parting I.overs. The. 
Pathetic Old .Man. A.. 






--:,Ji-'^ ---J; .tr- ■■ 



t 



ALPHABETICAL CATALOGUE OF DELANErS RECITATIONS. 



8 



Book 
No. 

P«t'» Mistake 2 

J'afs ReaEoii 2 

Pat 8 Ktfuiarkxon Cleopathrid's Needle 4 

I'iilter of <1«T Shiuifle, i>er 2 

Paul Ktvere ■» RiU-; 1 

I'aupvr !i Chiioiijias Eve, The 3 

I'aupers Revenge, A 6 

I'rrsi-vere 3 

PrriiiB'ciicy 2 

PIckot (iiiuiU. Tlie 1 

Pil ii iij' H L.uiidla'Jy 4 

Pliitoiiic 6 

Pira for the lloxer 3 

Please Di>ui Bell My Futher Rum 3 

Polisli Boy, The 1 

I'oivgl.t 2 

P(JOi- ilr. UcUuiin 4 

J'"l' 4 

Pride of Battery B, The 1 

Psalm ol Life. A 1 

Pugilists \Vli.) M. t. The ...........A 

Pu/zleii < 'ensile t.iiiiT. The 4 

Puzzled Uuitliiiiuu. Til* .*. . ] 4 



Q 



Queen of Pie.s .., 4 

yuit Your FuoUu' ."!!!'.!"!V.".*."".'.!!4 



R 



Railrond Crogsiutr The 4 

RaintHisv. The 3 

Raveu. Tile '.!]!.!..!.!.!...! 

ReaKoii. The 4 

Rei'ciiic-iliatiou. The i 1 

i:<.Ml-heu<t>-i) t.irl. The '...'.!!. '.'. .2 

Red KidiiiK liooil !.'!!!!!"..!.. S 

Ueliff of I.iiPknow. The "...3 

Religious Cjtro Player, The '.'.'.. '.'.'.'.'........3 

Reniovul. The ' 2 

KiohiimiKl ou the .luuies ." '_' i 

Rieuzi's AiMreS'* < 



iiiiiK Down the l)u)\i. I Cannot Play. . 1 

Riii^Oiit. Wild Bells '. .'.'.'..'.'.'.'.i 

Hoik of Aye* 5 

""K'T ."^\y^^[\\\'^'.']' i 

Roll Call. The 3 

hoiiiuuoe of a tiaiiiinnrk. The '..!!!!.'."!!!.'!.". .2 

Rouieo and Juliet " "2 

Rory of the Hill !...!!!"!.!!.!!.!!.!!!!!!. .3 

Rory'n KUsiiig School. '......'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 4 

Koiliiil the .Ni)v,. '.!.!!."!.!.' 2 

Rniueil Merih.«nt, The ■..'.........'..'....'.'.'. i 

Rule of <?oiitiHry, Tlie 3 

Rural .MiisingF '..!!!!!.. 2 

Rustic Maid, The i 



Sad Ch.insren in Twelve ■Moiishs 3 

Sail :'';iieof a I'olioeiuan. The '..'..'..'.'.'.'..a 

Sailor Boy's Dream, The .'.'.'.'.i 

Sailor's Story. '.\ 

Saiut aiifl ;h<- Smtter, The ........".. 

S.iuibo Waifhiiigrou s Viudioatioii ' ' 

Siindx of Oee, TUe '. 

Scandal [ 

Schiosser's Ride \ o 

Scliiieider'K I'.ov '....'."..!!!!!!!!! '.. '2 

Scliiie icier' s Ridi- "..'.!!" * 

Schoolgrirl'i' I.Ttor. A .'.'.'.'.'.'.'...'..'.'.. 2 

Scott .-xud t he Vet erun .'!..!!!!.!!!!..!!! 3 

Sella de Bauan '.'.'.'...'.". 4 

Seniiiiole'i- Repl>-, The 3 

Seven Ages of M-m '/.!!! !1 !!!'.". !!!!'.!!!!i 

sh.ti o . s L.nu.iit '.'...!!!!!! 4 

Shan;fliil{h Dau .....!!!!! 3 

Shelling I'eag '.'. 4 

Slieriiliiu'R Kile ..'!!!.!'! 1 

Ship of State. The "•!!!.'."..*!!'.'.!*. 3 

Shpider uml dev Pl5-, Der. '..'.". *> 

8h< lock to Antonio !!.'.....'!!.'.!'. 3 

Siego of .\ thione .!!..'.!.'.!.'.."'." 3 

Siguboard. The .!.!". !!.'!. 3 

Similar «'ase, A -. !..!."'.!.!!!. 4 

Simple Church. The V.'.V. 3 

Since Ciisey Siuggi-d the Ball.... 4 

Sinking of the Mcrrimac, The 5 



Book 
So. 

•Specially Jim , 2 

Spectre -M uleteer, The 4 

St erliug 8 Dream 2 

Siewari of the Sangupore, The , 4 

S;ory uf u .Sew Hat .' 2 

Story of i>eucoii Browu, The 4 

Siory of 'NiUety-eight S 

Siory of the Failtitul Soul, The 3 

Story of tile Little Rid Hin, The 4 

Siory of the Tramp S 

Stowaway. The 3 

St. Peter an<l the Mining Man 4 

Strausu'gBoedry 2 

SuilivHUa vs. Sy.vio Sylvetto 2 

Sunrise Never Failed Os Yet / 3 

Supi'0i<ing 4' 

Sii.-geon'ii Tale, The 5 

.Suoi'uious .Man. A .4 

Sword of Bunker UiU. The 1 

' • T ." 

Tale of Temptation 5 

T.-rr.ir. A 4 

That lli-auriful Snow (Parodv) 2 

Titat ilenllemaii from Boston Town 4 

That Vicious Uld Bucket 4 

T !iey bird Too Soon 4 

Three Fishers, The 1 

Three Prayers '. 3 

Three Wishes, The 4 

Tviasi, The 6 

Tom 5 

Tramp, The 1 

Trouble in the Choir 4 

True Faith 5 

True Tale of William Tell. The 2 

True to Krothtr Spt-ar 4 

Truth Freedom. Virtue 5 

Truth in Parent hesii .' 4 

'Twas .Not a Dream 2 

Two Beggars. The 5 

Two Bootblacks 4 

T wo < ; lassi-s. The 3 

Two Women 3 

Typewriter and Typewriter 4 



: ^ u .^ 

Uncle. The 3 

L'ucle Ike's Roosters •» 

I'ud der Vorld Slimiles Mit Y'ou 2 

I'lilluished Letter, The 6 

L'ntuowii Dead S 

L' ninade I i ay 4 

V 

Vagabonds. The 1 

Vassar College Triigedy, A 4 

Village Blaciismith, Tlie 3 

Virgitius 1 

Visit to Barnum's. A 2 

Volunteer Organii^t The 1 

\oiiug for School t^ouimittee 4 



Sin of Uniission. A. 

Sister and I .^i !.!."!.....! 3 

Sifter of Charity, The ".".!!!!.!!!!!."!!.!!5 

Smack in School. The '.V.!'.!.'!'..'.*.!.."!i!!!2 

Smiting the Rock !!!'.!!."!.'."!!!!!!! 'l 

8nee/:iug '.','.'. Z 

Soldier's Pnrdoii. The .'..!.! 

Soliloquy of Kmif Ru h.-»rd III 3 

Somebody » Darlin/ j 

Somebody's Dog 2 

Somebod y"g .Mo; her !.!..!...!! 1 

Some Motlier gChild ....6 

Some Simple Says ; 4 

Song of the Battle Flag ..i 

'Song of the Coldl.ug, The ' j 

Song of the Mystic .5 

Song of the Shirt X 

Song of the shoii. The .' 1 

Son's Wish. The , .'.....'... 2 

Sparticus to the Gladiators ...>,...,'.'.'.wl'.".*'!.'.'.'.'l 



\^ 



W.iitcr s Vision, The * 

W»U - 4 

Warned in a Dream 4 

Warren's Address 1 

W.iiiniiill.The 1 

Wiiy It is Sa'.d. The 2 

Welsh I. lassie. A 4 

We Heap what We Sow 1 

What Became of a Lie i 

What Biddy Said in the Police Court 4 

What I Live For 1 

What is Life? 1 

What is Time? 5 

What I Would Do for Her 2 

What's tlie Marter witli Kiiglishf 4 

What Water Will Do 2 

When tireek Me.ts Greek 4 

When .Mciiee 8 .Nine Played the .Ueta. 2 

Wh< n the Bahy Has a Cold 4 

WiMii the I.,aiup is Shattered 3 

. Where Man Should Uia 3 

Whi.h Shall It Be* 3 

Whistler. The ; 4 

Why Hank Was Not Hanged 4 

Why Should the Sjiirit of .Mortal Be Proud? 1 

Why the Mule Escaped 4 

Wicked Dog. The A 4 

Wickedest .M^n in Memphis. The 4 

Widder Green's Last Words 4 

Wi f .•' s Strategy 4 

Wi i Isge Plackschmidt, Der 2 

Witness. The 2 

Wives of W.-insl>erg. The 4 

Wolf at the Door. The ."5 

Wonjan'K Ki^'hti; I 

W.iiiKiir!< W;iiti!i^'. .K 5 

Woman's \Vii<'s 4 

Woodman. Spare that Tree i 



Book 
No. 

Wounded Soldier, Th« 1 

Wreck of the Hesperut, The 1 

Xerxes at the Hellespont 6 

Yacob's Dribulationa S 

Yallur Dog's Love for a Niggar, ▲ 1 

Yarn of the Nancy Bell 4 

Yellow haired Nellie S 

Young Tramp. Tlie 3 

Vou Put No Flowers on Uj Papa's Orava 1 

Yuba Dam t 

O 

«»" DELANEY'8 RECITATIONS— the best««lling 
book ou the market— Is issued yearly, and is for sale by 
the leading Newsdealers and Stationers in the L'uited 
Ttates and Canada at Ten Cents each copy. 

When unable to procure any copy of the book from 
your nearest dealer send direct to the publisher. 

W M. W. DKLANEY. 117 Park Row, New York. 




STANDARD SPANISH- EHGLISH 

AND ENGLISH-SPANISH 

jt Ji DICTIONAEY. ^ J« 

_ This reliable work com- 

piled expressly to meet the 
requirements of increasing 
intercourse and trade be- 
tween our Knglifh-speaking 
people and Spanish-speakintr 
countries. Xo care cr ex- 
pense h.is been spared in the 
coir.pilation of this work and 
avast amount uf Libor has 
been necessary to make this 
book the {.ufurior of all Span- 
ish Dictionaries heretofore 
issued. Tl e object of tliis 
work is to ^ive the Knclish 
traveler or worltman in Span- 
ish-spcakinff countries and 
the business man a reliable 
book of reference. It contains about 65,000 ■words 
in both languages and is up-to-date in every par- 
li.-u'ar. The illustration above gives a fair idea 
rf the style in which it is issued. Size, 6'^ x 4% 
inchts. Containing 405 papes. Round in extra 
l.cxible cloth, double index,- postpaid, 9I.OU. 
liound in Kubsia leather, douWe index, pubtpaid, 
• 1-30. 



" GUSHING " IN A NUTSHELL ^ 

This is the handiest 
book of Parliamentary 
law ever made. Evcrj' 
MAN and \soMA^ ana 
every boy and ciRi. in 
the United States 
should know sotr.ciliing 
of the Laws and Meth- 
ods that povern assem- 
blies. Tlicse arc days 
of Ci-fBs, SociRTirsand 
Organizations for all 
cons of purposes, So- 
ciAi., Political. Relig- 
lot« and Phii-akthropic. for Uusinessand I'leav 
ure, and he or she who cannot take an intellijicrt 

f)art in them is unfitted for the ordinary business of 
ife, and will miss some of its greatest pleasures. 
The Parliamentary Rules as embodied in "Cusit- 
I.NT," IN A Nl'tshell, arc the result of many years 
of Practical Experience. They arc necessary to 
facilitate the business of an organization and make 
its work effective. By following them confusion 
and ill-feeling arc avoided, each individual has his 
rights, and the ■will of the majority is reached. 
Without them a meeting becomes a mob. If a per- 
son is not a master of these rules he may carry this 
little btX'k in his vest pycket, and be able to refer 
to it on every conceivable point in the fraction oi a 
minute. Added to the book arc a Niodcl Constitu- 
tion and set of Bjr-Laws, so drafted that they may 
be modified to suit any character of organization. 
iiiT.n, 4ii xi'A inches. Bound in flexible ciutU, ^5 
CtM.j Russia leather, 36 CIS.) postpaid. 

AddreKs all ordi)> to 

\VM. W. KF.LANEY. 117 Park Row, New York. 




s^^ta 



.^.-^■,r>^.. 



S"5CEJfP:?t*.- — -J 



"GUSHING" BOILED DOWN 

An A B C Gaidc to Parliamentary Laiir. Based on the highest 
Snthoriut't^, aad adapted to gcuf ruJ uso. 

Ko poivon can be expected to know cverjihinr;, bnt every person ehonld 
know i»ouie things to euabit! hiiu to take a jMin lu ttie ordinary ailiiirsof life. 
In these daysuf c-lubM, ttooietloM, and orjsanixMtloUH for itorial, 
rcUsIonn, philaiitliropic, poiltlcal— uiBkoit, for -Ul sirtsof pur- 
poBcs-fu.-ue Liiowledsc of l^arliuiuontarjr l^aw in ii\'nA:i'.K']y 
esi-cniial to enable a man to hold hid own ainou;^ hm folluwe. 1J<' iiiny be aa 
ivi^easSulumon} as euir^i.'tious AlcxandtTj in^'Luiouatod. vij-oplai,3 
for promotini^; the W( If.ire and happiiiff sof uiaii, wiihoui a ki:oii'Icd^o 
of the rnlos tUatmusi: govern orKauizatioaauJ deli berai ion, his wis- 
dom and Ilia encrt'y Wiil be uiia\i»iii.blc aiid hii honest purposes come to 
liai;;;ht. Tliei?crHleN have beta universally adopted because they are 
Becoi^sury to fccllllate the pmcet diii^s, and make ors;uui:£ation 
eiTt^tive. Without thcnn an a-^oiia'.iou of men vvouid be a niire mob. ~It is 
only h" following thtiii etrictly tiuit coiitu.<ior\ csa be avoided, th^^ opinion ot 
the individual lii:desi>re--u>naud the will of the m;iJ!)rity reacU^'d. Next to 
possisrinf; a f nil know ledire of these ruii-s, thoe-stutial thini; ia t(>ha\e them 
et hai.d, In eo convenient a form that it can bo rcftrred to instantly. 
CL'SHING BOILKD DOWN is exactly what iswinted. Itcontaina 
the Comploto Farliameiitary Code, so ajran^-cd that one can fli;i 
theparlloiilariiifi>rn;atioi:iit!'ifvd!»atag!HiU'e, ATJiumb luUex 
makes It perfoctfor referruco, and it iseo eo:nii,i t. that it tan be c:irried :n 
the vest porkct. A mode! Conutitution and nuKi. ; jlyLaws are addi-d, which 
may be fnllowed or modified to BUit any charactiT of or-ranization. They all 
Bcyth's book fills a lonpr felt want. We puaranteo th .r.ii-h (>!itisf;;rt:on in every particular or money 
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Carpenter 




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Painter's Manual. 

— A complete practical gviAe to 
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- Laugh and fH Worfd Laughs wifh ' ^1 

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This collection of Humor !« by one of the Fob. 
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BAO SPELLS CUHED 

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^ar«^^ Original Dialogues- and 
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Tot8.~Comprisinj a va- 
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dialogues suitable to -hildrea 
from three »o ten years old, 
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Boards ssetfc 

Pajoei cover • aicta 

EXCELSIOR WEBSTER 

POCKET SPELLER & DEFINER 

Of the English lan- 
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25,000 words. This 
work gives the correct 
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in common use. Thp 
illustration gives a fail 
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the work, being espe- 
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Containitig 320 pages, double coltrmn, it 
weighs 2^ ounces, size, 5x2^ inches. 
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Vi. 




Address All Orders to WILLIAM W. DELANEY. S17 PARK ROW. NEW YORK- 



(' 



X 









", ■< "it.f 



■iwes^a^wafi* 



ll 



MORGAN'S 



FREEMASONRY 



PRIOC as CKIITS. 



CONTAININO tlie degrees of the Order con- 
ferred by i» Master's lodge, as written by 
Captain William Morgan. Ail the degrees 
conferred In the Hoval Arch Chapter and 
(irand Encampment of KMights 
Templar KiUghtn of the Red 
Cross, or the Christian Mark, 
and of the Holy Sepulchre: also 
of the eleven IneCriible degrees 
conferred In the T.<Klge of Per- 
fection, and the still higher de- 
grees of Prince of Jerusalem, 
Knights of East and West, Ven- 
erable Gnind Master of Sym- 
bolic IXKlge, Knights and Adepts 
of the Eagle or Sun, Prince of 
the Royal Secret Sovereign In- 
spector Oeneral. Revlseil and 
corrected to correspond with the 
most approved fonns and cere- 
monies of the various \odg«i« of 
Freemaeons throughout the United States. 
By George K. Crafts, formerly Thrice Puis.'»ant 
Grand Master of Manltou Council, New York. 
Printed on good.8ub.stantial Injok paper, from 
clear, readable type, and bound In iiHractlve, 
heavy. colored cover. Will be sent to any ad- 
dress, post-paid, upon I^ceipt of SG Cents. 



HELLER'S 




Ittkof 



MAGIC 



PRIOI 26 OCNTSi 




DROP. HELLER was. beyond doubt, one Of 
■^ themofft successful maglclauathat ever 
appeared before an audience. His tricks 
were original, and many of them were never 
executea by another. With the aid of tlUa 
book you can learn some of the best mugicai 
mysteries. They are carefully explained in 
detail, and fuiiy Illustrated, with seventy 
beautiful engravings, so that a child could 
perform them aftef a little practice. Follow- 
ing will be found a summary of part of the 
contents:— The Mysterious Glass Casket— The 
Magic Canis- 
ter-The Great 
Sack Trick — 
The Di.ssolvlng 
Flag and Can- 
dle — The Dls- 
solvlng Egg 
and Handker- 
chlef — The 
Mysterious 
Bran Bottle — 
The Passe- 
Passe Bottle— 
The Inexhaus- 
tible Bottle — 
The Myster- 
ious Watch 
Mortar — The Mysterious Card Table— The 
Magic HandkercTiief and Bottle— The Great 
Cannon Ball Trick The Magic Fl.sh Bowls— 
The Davenport Cabinet -The Jumping Card 
Box The Magic Dove and Wine Bottle — The 
Magic Lyre and Rising Cards— The Marvel- 
lous Chinese Ljintern Illumination — The 
Cagps of Enchantment —The Magic Demon 
Cover — The Mysterious Watch Box — The 
Magic Bundle of Wood— The Candle and Mys- 
terious Rlb»)on3-The Mysterious Flower Gar- 
den—The Magician's wonderful Drawer Box 
- The Mechanical (Thest of Drawers— Tlie In- 
exhaustible Box -The Magic Decanters and 
Mystic PynimUls. and a large number of 
otnersequallygooa. It also contains valuable 
hints and suggestions on Conjuring Tables— 
Conjuring Dress -Conjuring want.'v- Palming 
—Making up Programmes— Arranging Per- 
formances, etc.. etc. This work is a complete 
expose of the Wizard's Art, suitable for pub- 
lic or private entertainments, either for plea- 
sure or nrortt. If you desire to shine as a star 
at (lartfes. Instead of sitting like a drone or 
dummy, procure acopyof thistxjok and learn 
a few tricks, in a few nours. If you give It a 
little more time, vou can equal the great mas- 
ters of legerdemain. Sit down and write for 
a copy to-day. Price, by mall, post-paid* only 
T\VENTY-FIVE CENTS. 



BUCK ART 

OB 

MAOIO MAD&EASY 



Pri— lO 0«Rts« 



'I'HIS book contains a full and complete de- 
* scriptlon and explanation of all Kinds oC 

sleight-of-hand 
■ 1 *-*"'"■ conjur- 
ing with cards, 
coins, etc., as 
performed by 
the most cele- 
brated m a g 1 - 
clans and con- 
jurers, together 
with wonaerful 
experiments In 
magnetism, 
chemistry, elec- 
tricity and fire- 
works, so simpli- 
fied as to be 
adapted for 
amusement in 
the home circle. 
Everything 1 n 
this book is 
clearly ex - 

f)lalned and ful- 
y illustrated, so 
that the most In- 
experienced per- 
son can thor- 
oughly compre- 
^bend it and become a sncoessful performer, 
either for pleasure or profit. Well printed, on 
good quality of p a per, a nd bound in colored 
cover. Price ^BN CTBMTS, by mail, post- 
paid. 



WEHMAN'S 




BOOK ON 



XV Xd 



SHORT-HAND 



FRIOK 2B eCNTS. 




♦THIS is a work by Eliza B. Bums, President 
■ of tlie Phonic Shot t-hand Correstwnding 
Club, New York City. It coiitalns Pitman's 
Phonography in an Imprbved style, and the 
methods explained and illustrated are the 
latest, simplest and easiest to conceive. 
Nearly all liitflUgent young people desire to 
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corresponden c e 
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houses, and in 
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men usually em- 
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wholly upon a system that has been reduced 
to KVKRY-DAY PRACTirE. A person twelve 
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¥iper covers. Price, by mail, post-paid, only 
WENTY-FIVE CENTST *^'^*~*' 



Clean and nnased IJ. S. poetac* 
■temp* taken ■•me •■ rash. 



^ OAPTAIN WI»rS 

SWINIIVIINC 

INSTRUCTOR 



lO 



THI?! book contains all the practical and 
■ progressive swimming motions necessary 
for this life-saving and healthful sport. The 
illustrations (sixty in number) will t)e found 
Of exceptional value to leacners as well as 

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a limited knowp 
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Practice — Arti- 
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Kick -Tlie Arm 
Action — The 
Breast Stroke — 
The Side Stroke 
— The Racing 
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Back — Hand- 
over handSwlm- 
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^ently this publication is simply iuuispens- 
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colored covers. Price by mall, post-paid, only 
TEN CENTS. 




WCHMAirS 



PHOTOGRAPHY 

A HANIKBOOK OF INSTRUCTIONS 

— iH tme ART or — 

DRY-PUITE PNOTOORAFMY 

»»IOE a» O KIIT>. ^ 

•■•Um is ft series of practical lessons in pbo- 

■ tographv. In which the aim of tlie author. 

Prof. Williaiu (,'ushniK', Ph. D., Is to bring 

both theory and practice well within the com- 

Srehension of young people. It emt>racesall 
ae neces.sary instructions on the subject, 
and any lx)y or 
girl can learn 
from its con- 
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GOOD pictures; 
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geing manu- 
ctured by 
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made at home at little or no cost) , persons be- 
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could be more interesting. This book 1b com- 
plete in every particular, is rciXT nxus- 
TRATF.O, and for all practical purposes is eooal 
tothe largo and costly volumes now publlHied 
on the same subject. Among Its contents will 
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made -How to use a camera— Getting a focus 
— Go<xi and had aspects— Making ready for a 
shot -Making an exposure— The laboratOTy 
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Blue printer— Silver printing -A home-made 
photographic camera, etc. Sit down and send 




i pleasant! 

photographers, now Independent, commenced 
business In a very humble way. It is printed 
on a good quality of heavy paper, from clear, 
readable type, and bound In tiandsocne colored 
covers. Price, by mail, post-paid, 2 6 C enta. 



Address all orders to 



HENRY J. WEHMAN, Publisher, I08 Park Row, NEW YORK. 



OoPTriclit, 1M6, by Marjr Afrnea Hayes. 

Worda by Francii Harmon. Miulc by Mary A^nt!* Haym. 

BiMat mnalo pabllahed by The Harmnny Guild, ISl W. 38cli St.. New York. Price 60o. 

Tlie •)it>et mui-te can ^so b« obtained from the publrtier i<f thi« book. 

O have you seen the scorcher clown upon his shining wheel? 
Who owns the road and rules the town, with nickel, hose and steel? 
O have you heard his sprocket talk his tale about the gear? 
And have you met him in your walk, well bent from heel to ear? 

Refrain. 
O Scorcher, Mister Scorcher, If we are In your way, 
■■■■'■ Just ride ahead, we'll lie abed, that you may have full sway I . 
O Scorcher, Mister Scorcher, don't turn your wheel aside. 
We're on this earth to give you mirth, ride on, O bloomer's pride! 

O has he tossed you up and down, and bumped you sick and sore. 
Or roir«iM'ou ovf r on the ground, as madly on he tore? 
We are. you know, his ten -pins all. Just practice for his eye; 
His bike is but the skimniinsr ball, to win^ us on the tiy. — Jiefrain. 
We love the play called exerci.sp, and well the shining wheel. 
Remember tneii this song applies to hearts of hint and steel. 
That beat within the breasts^of some who love themselves alone. 
Who think It Is but Jolly fun to mingle us with stone.— Itefrain. 

My Southern Rose 

Cupyrittht, IMH), by The Herald Square Miiaic Co. EnKlish ci>pi right secured. 
Word! by Howard Qiahani. Hii-ic by Charles (^raiinm. 

Down In Tallahassee, where the gentle zephyr blows. 
In the sunny land of fruit and flowers; 

Just as twilight deepend, I beheld my Southern Rose % 

Ornamenting one of nature's bowers. 

Our acquaintance ripen'd soon from friendship into love- 
Never dying, quickly tho' it grows; 

And I'll trust her with ray heart just as an angel from above. 
For she's very little less, my Southern Rose. 

:':-■' Refrain. 

My Southern Rose, In sweet repose. 

From ev'ry stormy wind that blows; 
A shield for thee my love will be. 
And guard thee well through life, my Southern Rose. 

'''■~~" Sow the happy hours we silent come back to mem'ry dear. 
All her pretty smiles and winning ways; 
When I told her life without her would be cold and drear, 

Ask'd her to be mine ere many days. 
She, with downcast eyes, so sweetly, softly answer'd " j'es; " 
'. Then, to hide her blushes, sought repo.se 

In my arras, until I woke her with a fond and loving kiss, 
That united me and ray sweet Southern Rose.— /.'</■/ «i/(. 

True Love's Melody 

CopyriRTtit, IW7, by The llannony Oulld. 

Worda by Francis Harmon. Htnic by Mary Atrnes Hnyes. 

Sheet mtiale piibhshed by Thn Hiirmony Guild. ISl W. 3gi h 8t , New York. Price GOc. 

The sheet music van also be obtained from the pulilisher uf this book. 
The very stars you see to-night are looking down on me. 
May they to yon reflect the blight I know since you are free; 
Would they in turn show me your face, that I might therein see 
It had but lost one line of grace, through grief for love of me. 

Refrain. 
As distant as the very stars j-ou seem to-night to me. 
As chilling as the very winds from off the wintry sea. 
Yet I would bid your heart look back to love's sweet memory, 
Oh, sing with me again the chords of true love's melody. 

The very winds that kiss your cheek are ling'ring near rae now. 
May they to you in haste retreat, all ladened with this vow. 
That I shall know not rest nor peace till you are mine to dwell. 
For It was madness to release the one I loved so well.— Hefi ain. 



ffff^, 



OopyriKht, 189t, by M*rv Airnea Hayes. 

Words by Viola Yoerg Hiihiu by Mary ARiies Hayes 

Sheet muaic publiMhed by The Harmony Guild, 131 W 38tli St., New Yni U. Price 60c. 

The sheet music can alao be obtnlned by tiie publisher of this book. 

I'm In love with the sweetest, the dearest of girls. 
She's a gem among gems, and a pearl among pearls; 
-^ When I see her fair face I am filled with delight; 

And her eyes are so bright they have dazzled me quite; 

my heart she has won with her sweet, winsome ways, 
. And I long for the coming of bright autumn days; 

For a promise she gave that my dear wife she'll be 
When to town she returns, my sweet Marlon Lee. 

Refrain. 
Oh! Cupid, naught V Cupid: 'tis a shame the pranks he plays. 
With the coming of the roses and the drowsy summer claj's. 
Cupid, naughty Cupid, delicious are his smarts; 
But think of all the mischief he is causing with his darts. 

^ There's a dear little maid who lives over the way. 

From my window I see her sweet form twice a day; 
. In the morning 1 look through mv blind Just to see 
V If that dear little maiden is thinkin/ of me; 
• And though late in the evening when drawn Is her shade, 

1 can see, slyly peeping, that dear little maid; 

; Though, of course. In my heart only one face can be, 
:. And you know It Is that of my Marion Lee.— Refrain. 

': There's a Store In Broadway, you must know It quite well, 

, Where a tall, dark-eyed girl has sweet violets to sell. 

One must go there, of course, these sweet violets to buy, . ' . 
; But we'll say not a word of that Charming dark eye. 

:: Now the town, by the girls, all deserted Is, quite, 
And a roof-garden concert I"ll take In to-night; 
WJth that sweet dark eyed maid I will not lonely be, 
Tl'/ugh you know all my thoughts are with Marion Lee.— Rkfbaui. 

r . If our girls stayed In town all the sumraer, I'm sure ; < ■ 

We would find they'd be more than we well could endure. 
OJust think of those gay little trips to the beach, .'•••. 

Which would then be so tame, and qiilte out of our reach. •:•'■..', 
Now that dear little maid, who lives over the way, " , 

Went down to the beach with me only to<lay. ~* . 

We had fun, did you say? You must hush! Can't you see 
I'm so lone and so sad without Marion Lee.— RKritAiif. 



My Honolulu Queen 

. — OopyriKht, 18M, by Sol Bloom. 

; ■" < * Words by Jaa. O'Dea. Moalc by William H. Penn. 
.' ; Where the billows gaily roar, on the far-off sunny shore 
Of a famous island where it's always summer, 
A dainty girl of mine lives there In bliss sublime, 
■ ■ ; For natural grace and beauty she's a hummer; 

" And this 1 know for sure, I've got her heart secure, . '' .' 
- - For she's my Queen of Honolulu. • v ., '..'■■ 

Ohori'S. ' "' I 

For she's the belle of all the Honolulu ladles, . " I 

..'^- ' Just the sweetest ever wjis seen. | 

And although her face a dusky shade is, ' 

■ She is my Honolulu Queen. 

'Bout a half a score or more volcanoes siK)ut and roar, .' 

la that fair land among the palm-trees shady, 'J' 

■ ~ ' But none I've ever seen Is warmer than my queen, " ■ '■ 

For torrldness the limit Is this lady; i.; 

Now, if my plans don't fall, s(K>n o'er the seas I'll sail ■ ; * 

; -. ' To wed my Queen of Honolulu— C'/io»'.»-. . V; . ■; 

Legion of Light 

OopyriKht, IMW, by Mary Affnea Hayea. 

Words by Fruncis Hariiioii. Music liy Mary AKiies Hayea. 

Sheet music pulUished by The Harmony Guild, 131 W. S8th St , New York. Price Sto. 

The slieet mUHie of this song can ali>o be obtained f rum the publisher of thia book. 

Roll thy rivers out to sea, thro' the gulf, the bay, the sound, ^ 
Yet shall they return to thee, gaily circling 'round and 'round. 
Back they'll ride to Freedom's sun, back to hearths that valor woi^ . "' 
Ocean swell and ranks untold, love the freeman's brothtfrfold. 

Refrain. 

On, still on, for truth is might, legion of light, banded for right! 

First In peace and and last to war, fearless legion, hall I hurrahl 

To thy touch of highland scene, stretch of coast and waters blue. 
Dotted deep with gems of grgen, may we never bid adieu. 
From the home of ev'ry race,' fairest maiden's wit and grace. 
From the band of kindly heart, who could ask us to depart?— /?«/>-ain. 

Learn we but the quickstep tread of the Freeman's heritage, 

Hope shall hold erect her head, giving strength to youth and age. 

Who hath charm of rock and rill, ever rustling town and mill. 

With the bright-faced happy throng, like the land we praise in aong.— Rtf. 

The Sad Eviction 

-■; . . ; "J Copyright. 1899. by Helen Ilaab. 

Words by Fraii-m Harmon. Music by Hrieii Raah. 

Slieet music pulilislied by Th>- Hnrmnny Guild. 131 W. 38th Hi , New York. Price Ms. 

Tlie sheet niugic can also lie obtained from tiie pultliaher of tliis book. 

To-day I saw some household-ware piled on the stony street, 
Watched by two children, once quite talr, but now grown gaunt and weak; 
They saw at once the scene was new to me, a stranger there. 
And In this story, sad but true, they told how thoy had fared: ^ 

Refrain. 
" Father died to plant the Sutrs and Stripes on Cuban soil, 
' , Mother scarcely earns enough to keep us with her toll; : 

We can get no pension yet, our rent we could not meet, -^ l 

And this is why the landlord put us out upon the street." 

The children further said to me, "Our mother Is away. 

In search of shelter, where we three may rest at close of day, " 

She hopes to find a kindly few to give her some small aid; 

She will repay the favors due when pensioners are paid."— REF&Aiii. 

Oh, men who mould the law for us remember well this tale. 

Remember sorae may need a crust, who falter not, nor fall 

To sacrifice a life or home when bugles sound the call 

To scale the hill, to breast the foam, or for Columbia fall —Refrain. 

I Have Not Changed 

Copyrijfht. 1897, by The Harmony Ouild. 

Words by Kiaiicix Harmon. Muxio l>y Mar\ AKiies Hayea. 

Sheet miiHic puiiliHli.-il l>.v Tlif Hariiiimy Guild, 131 W. 3f*lli St , New York. Prtoe MO. 

The sheet music can also be obtained from the publislier of this book. 

Oh, love, I have not changed a thought. 
Thy silence hath no fancies wrougli^ 
That bid me for diversion seek. 
Or chide me for a life so bleak; 
Oh, no, tho' we are long estranged. 
My faith in thee hath never changed. 
Through all this sad and silent time, 
I My hoping heart hath called thee mine. 

Refrain. 
Tho' some hearts change when love's estranged, ' 

I shall remain, dear one, the same; j 

Tliro' tear and smile, thro' ev'ry trial, • 

. i,^ Een tho' in vain, I shall not change. 

Yet friendships new <Joth oft efface 

The tender lines that love hath traced, . • 

And thus should ab.sence bring to thee — > -'■ .' 

- . Sincere regret for vows to me, •. ■ ' 

That moment, love, thou art released "v" 

From pledges that would mar thy peace; ■ . 

•'■- When all the past seems naught to thee, - - ■' 

•• .- Sigh not, III grant thee liberty.— //«r»a«n. " ; '' 

Not even then would come to thee ' - • . '>^ 

One bitter word or sign from me; .:-,.J 

A J', even then, tho' more estranged, '"'!■- \ 

. "^ . 1 would. In truth, remain unchanged I .4 

■. ' ■ Then flee not, love, fiee not away, , '. . ', = 

. But reign supreme where faith holds sway. 
» '■.'■-<.:"-: No other heart shall olTer thee ' 

'. Such boundless love and loyalty.— ff</"ram. ' - 

T^e Words and Music of any of the above 
songs will be mailed to any address, post-paid, M 
receipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copies, your 
selection, for ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHMAN, 

108 Park Row, New York. Catalogue of all our publieatiMS auiM 

Free upon appllc a tioii. 




Don't Break Your Mother's Heart, 



»-Hh 



-i— € 



Copyilalit, I89H. I.v Tli« Adaiitii- MiiHie Co. 
WiM-tU and Miii<l'- l>> J liiinivQiiiulry' 

Twas on a street wliere (crowds resort, Jimoinf tlieni fwid and good, 
A fairlialrert lioy. lil.s iiiotlier's prUle, ninm a corner stood; 
Hts sister, passing, stopjM'd, surprLsed and vrrieved to see the trac^e 
Of reckless dissipjitlon tlii<l was on lier hrotlier's face; 
Oh. Tom, she cried, what liave ytni done? why cause this cruel blow? 
Where have you lieen thes^ many daysr pfx>r mother wants to know; 
Oh. hrother dear, come home to her liefore her hopes depart; 
She'd give her life for you, i'om, don't break your mother's heart. 

Refrain. 

Don't break vour mother's heart, Tom; let vice and crime alone; 

If vou'll hnt "do lier bidding, there'll be nothing to atone. 

Her words are for your welfare, so heed them from the start; 

Don't hreak your mother's heart,Tom,don't break your mother's heart 

Jnst then a jwliceman seized iX)or Tom, who forcibly rebelled, 

A cry: and as the crowd gave 'way, his mother Tom l)eheld. 

Oh, sir, she crie<1, don't take, my boy; he's guilty of no crime; 

It's not ttKj late to save him, sir; please let him go this time; 

The policeman's manly heart was touched, and to the boy said he; 

" I'll do it for vour mother, lad; her words have set you free." 

Tom grasped his si)<ter's outstretched hand and said, " I will ol)ey; 

Yes, mother, I'll go home now; you'll have no cause to s&y.—Uefrain. 

DOWN IN SMITH'S BACK YARD 

Copyright, 1899, by Tlie Atlantic MhkIc Co. 
WordgbyJaniPiJ Haiiie* Mua<o by J. W. Wheeler. 
Back from the noisv street, where the poor folks dwell. 
Life has its daily toil, happiness as well; 
One spot is known to all. for its lively fun, 
'Tls where the little ones n>eet to romp and run. 
' There's little Jimmy Burke, with his sister Sue, 
And all their little chums congiegate there, too. 
While Dan, the "Jolly Cop," when around on guard. 
Joins in the merriment down in smith's back yard. 

ClIORlS. 
Down in Smith's l»ack yard, down in Smith's back yard. 

Where the little children rally. 
Happy, gay anifl free, call around and see, 

Just across from Nolan's alley. 
Ihjwn in Smith's back yard, down In Smith's back yard, 
Kvry afternoon you'll Hnd them; 
Eagerly they wait, at the old red gate. 
For the fun in .Smith's back yard. 

Smiling from up al)ove, in the windows high, . 

Grown folks recall the da.vs now so long gone by; 

Should there a tight occur, mother Smith appears, 

Then laughter conies again, banishing the tears. 

One lad is in command, little Johnny Wood, 

For mother Smith has said " You must all t)e good." 

Tliev have the proper rules and a stem regani 

For "social etiquette down In Smiths back yard.— 6'Aor«#. 

MALONEY, J., THE WABBLER 

PopviiKlii. IS97, bv Tlie HHrm.ny Oiitid 

Wi>r.is li.v Kriiiii-in HnriiKiii. Musk" liy .Mury Airrif" Hi>»e". 

Slieet iiiiiNio piitMi^heil by Th« Muiiu-ny Ouil<t. 13J W Mtli St.. New York, t'rice Wo. 

'I lie ^ll<-ec iiiiirle can also l>e obtaiiieil from ilie publisher ut Uiia tKiok. 

Malonev has a bicycle, three months ago he got it. 
And now I'll favor any law to make Maloney stop It. 
For since lies riding evry day my heart is nearly broke. 
In fear hell wabble up behind and give each rib a jwke. 

Refrain. 

I wish you saw Maloney .Inst wabble on his bike. 

1 wi.sh you saw him steering the course he thinks Is right; 

I wish "you sjiw the wri'ckiige that marks his steaming wake. 

He makes the stoutest-hearte'! and fastest rider quake. 

Don't think he went unto a school to learn to mount and pedal. 

Or practiced in his own Iwick yard 'till he could win a medal. 

Oh. no. tint straightway to the road he wahbled on his wheel. 

Where nian and horse know very well Maloney's steed of steel.— /?«/"raJ«. 

Between the park and Boulevard he spends each afternoon. 

Where all he meets must skip and dancn. th<»' no one Plays a tune. 

For when thev see him wahhiing its a case of who'll be first. 

To get away from Jetrys wheel that's like a dragon cursed.— /?«// a in. 

You ought to see Miss Hlootner till with fear and indignation 

When J. Maloney's coming on with gait that knocks inflation 

From lung an<l tire of ev'ry make and ev'ry .<»ort of wheel. 

While all the horses are in knots and all the drivers squeal.— 7?«^»rtj/,. 

Maloney's fare Is filled quite thick with lace-work made of scratches. 
You'd think it was ,i patent l>o.K where loimgers scrajie their matches; 
Now If the wahblers and M. J. don't stop their crooked work, 
I'll have our own Assemblyman Just rule them oflf the turf.— //«/»ain. 



EILEEN, FOR THEE 



Sh". 



CopyrtKhf, J897, hy The Harmony Qulid. 
Words by FrHticin Haniioii. Mumc hy Mhi v Aui\e<t Hnyes. 
t Miiisic i.iilillalied hy The Harmony Ouild. 131 W. 38th St . NVw York. Price 60c. 
.> slii-et i>ius:o of tills •i>i>t( Cnii aNo l>e obtained froiii the publisher of tbia book. 

Beloved, I lingejed to night at the place 

Where we met, where we vowed, where we parted; 
I waited once more for a glimpse of your face. 

Then I roamed back to dream, heavy-hearted. 
I hojied at the tryst you wonid greet me again. 

To forgive evry word, I repented; 
But drear grew the night, yes, I waited in vain 

For the loved one who luis not relented. 

Rkkrain. 
No longer the same Is the old trvstlng place. 
Its light and its stiadows have lost evry grace. 
Since lonely I wander and whisper your name— 
Ah, yes, ana await yon In vain, all In vain. ^. 

Oh. why are you absent so long from tkat spot. 

Where you said jou would bring me no sorrow. 
And sincerely vow'd 'twould l>e our happy lot, . . . 

To be one until death's endless morrow. 
Say not you would stray far from love's constant flame. 

Or that beacon of hope you would smother; 
Oh, bid me not 'seek, nor await you in vaia, 

For I love yoa as loves not another. — //{^/ oil*. • ■• 



C.>p^ rttfht, 1H%. by Jam 
Word* by Jaiiiea J H>iiiea 



J llnlneil 
Mu-lc by J W. Whe«ler. 



The song-birds are tilling the air with their trilling. 

Wafting my messiige to Erin's loved sliore; 
When leaving the oldland I promised you. Eileen, 

That I should love you each day more and more. 
Faithful I've been to the promise I gave you. 

True as the rippling waters are clear. 
Ocean divides us, but not forever, 

Tho' distant from you. my heart still Is near; 
1 know tears are starting at first thought of parting 

From the old land for a home here with me; 
You gave me your word, love, and now I am waitlngf 

For your sweet self. Eileen, waiting for thee. 

For your sweet self, Eileen, waiting for thee. 

The birds' early greeting hut foretells our meeting:. 
Would their sweet music were that of your voice; 

I listen and fancy I hear your soft whisper 
That you are still the sweet girl of my choice. 
_ Faith and devotion are part of your nature. 
Sacred the vow you gave with your hand; 

Fondly I cherish heart's dearest treasure. 

Sweet tie that binds me to our native land. 
So answer their trilling, the song birds are willing; 

Tell them the day you are coming to me, 
Tis not far away, love, not long ril be waiting 

For your sweet self, Eileen, waiting for thee; 

Eileen, sweet Eileen, I'm waiting for thee. 

Christmas Bells Their Stories Tell 

Copvrisht, IMfl, by Sheeley * Lottrld^e i 

Written by Geoive Lottrlaxe. Compoae*! by Frank M. Sbeelej, Jr. 

Standing alone on a crowded street, 

U{K)n a Christmas night, ' 

Barefoot and cold 'neath the blinding sleet. 

Pale 'neath the street's lamp light, 
A little newsglrl to the passing throng 

Raises hi ' plaintive cry: 
A penny apiece are my papers, sir; 

Please, now, won't you buy* 
I'm hungry and ragged and blue with the cold, . 

Her simple story she tells, : 

But none reply to her plaintive cry, », 

None but the Christmas bells. 

CHORI'S. '. ■ ■ ■ '^ 

Ding, dong, ding, dong, Jo3'ous Christmas Itells, 
Ding, dong. ding. dong. of joys and sorrows tells; 
Left all alone In the streets, in vain to the crowd does she call. 
Stories of joy and of sadness, Christmas bells tell us all. 
She's left at last on the cheerless street. 

Crouched in a doorway nigh. 
Little hands numb with the biting cold, " - ,. 

No more we hear her cry. 
No more Is she seen on the busy street. 

With face so thin and white, . : 

The little newsglrl to a happy home • - 

She has gone to-night; 
An angel came thro' that crowded street 

And hush'd the tempest so wild. 
To heaven above, witli infinite love. 

It bore away the child.— C/(0»M». 

She Is Looking for a Loved One 

Copyright. 1H98, by Sheeler * Lottrldire. 
Wnrla by Oeorite LottiidKe. Mimic by Frank M. Shoeley. Jr. 

Down the street of a great city comes a woman old and gray, i 

Her footsteps slow and feeble, as she slowly picks her way. 

And at each one that she pa.s.ses she earnestly does gaze; , / 

She longs to see a dear, sweet face of those happy bygone days. 

CnoRirs. V 

She Is looking for a lov'd one that she has not seen for years, ; •>. 
Who ran away, one summer day. and left her there In tears; ' v 
She longs to see her daughter and take her home again, • ,' 

But her prayer remains unanswer'd, and she Is waiting all In vain. ' 

Many weary years she waited, and the teardrops oft would fall, [call; 
Praying her child, once so wayward, might hear hor dear old mother's 
And with features sad and careworn, so feeble, old and gray. 
She's looking for a dear, loved one,.ln the city far away.— C'/tor«^. ' ■' 

She WasSaved byHer Mother'sTears 

(>>pyilj?ht. 1W9. by Kldiard Rorvcti 
Woriln by Frank M Sheelej. Mu>lc bv Kicliard B"r.>ch. . . i 

Bv a cottage Stood a woman so feeble, old and gray, ' 

The bitter tears were trickling dowii l:er sad, wrinkled face, 
By her side there stood her daughter, her only joy and pride, 

"Who soon would wed and leave the dear old place; 
I only ask you. daughter, to look well before you leap, . ; |-. 

For remember all that glitters Is not gold. 
And tho' Tom may love you very dearly, still try and prove his love. 
Remember, dear, the words your mother told. 

Chorus. 
How many hearts are ofttlmes broken, many happy lives wrecked e&ch 
By a love vow so softly spoken, many, alas! are led astray; [day. 

So stay at home with dear old mother, comfprt her few remaining years, 
So she heedetl the prayer of dear mother and was saved by her tears. 

Fleeting j'ears, they have rolled onward, dear mother passed away. 

The man she loved was false, and to prison went one day. 
And her sweet love dream of long ago vanished like the mist, - -.^ 

On separate paths of life each went their way. 
And to the village church yard you ^v111 ofttlmes see her stray. 

And on a grave plant flowers wet with tears. 
And in fancy she can see her mother and hear her loving voice, J ■' 

And gentle words she sjKike In bygone years.— CAoth*. 







▼t»*T» 



The Words and Music of any of th^ above 
songs will be mailed to any address, post>paid, on 
receipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copies, your 
selection, for ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHMAN, 

108 Park Row, New York. Catalogue of ail our publieations mUled 

Free upon application. ^ ^ 



YOU DON'T STOP THE WORLD 

FROM GOING 'ROUND^ . 

CopTiiirht, IMt, liy Tbe Knickerbooker Xusic Co. 
-; .; Word* by Will J. HardmKU. Mu«c by Fred Hylandl. . - : V . 

.•■!■• That sral of mine she is a perfect lad V, 

.."•-;•.. If ever lady breathes the breath of life, ,' .. 

.' And some day when 1 dream three lucky numbers, . 
■' I hope to make that varnished belle my wife, ^ - 

: ■,- But with my cocoa pearl I mix with trouble; ' 

We have our little fallings out you see. 
And then I wants to paint the air bright crimson, 
-V , When she throws this awful big bum-shellat me. (Well) 

'.■: * Chorus. 

You don't stop the world from going 'rouiid. 
You would not be missed beneath the ground; •-•.*- 

I'll admit you're one high-stepper. 
But you're not as hot as pepper, 
, : Other bees with honey can be found (Well, I don't know). 

You don't weigh no fifteen hundred pounds; 
I dont see no chain that keeps me bound; 
You are all right but for money, 
Let me tell you. Mister Sonny, 
■ '. You don't stop the world from going 'round. . 

She tells me that my manners are perfection. 

And that my style is really sassashay. 
1 don't know what that means, and she don't either, 
That's why such things she always likes to say, 
\ ;,.- She tells me I was cut out for an artist; 
I guess they cut me from an eb'ny tree, 
But don't I get an appetite for trouble 
~ When that high-bred, toasted lUly says to me: {We\l).— C>ionii>. 

THE WIDOW'S DAUOHTER KATE 

Copyritflit, 1W7. by I. Wliiteson. Ferelgn copyrlRbt gecnred. _. 
.'->•' Word! and mHBic by Richard R. Haiich. 

A high-toned Irish lady is the widow of Jim O'Neal; 
And she has a precious treasure that I intend to steal. 
Tho' thieving's not my business, and tho' I'm not Insane, 
I'm under hypnotic influence, and therefore not to blame. 

Chorus. 
Two eyes 80 blue, a heart so true, a wealth of golden hair; 
And a form most perfect has this treasure rare; 
I've planned a deep conspiracy, and Just as sure as fate. 
The first chance I get I intend to steal the widow's daughter Kate. 

Somehow Katie learned my secret, and she whipered to me last eve 

That she'd Just as soon be stolen, providing I'm the thief. 

To a neat and cozy cottage I'll bear my prize away; 

In my heart I will keep her a prisoner, forever and a d&y.—Chotvt. 

HONEY, IS YER GWINE TO THROW 






:-^v 



Copyright, tW7, by 0«o. K.8cballer<& Co. International co|iyiiffht secured. : ,' 
Wordaby N. C. Heialer. Moaic by Geo E. Schalier. 

rse been pestered with a nigger that's a-foolln' 'round my Hannah, 

A bleached out yaller Alabama dude; 
He's been struttin' 'round the quarters with an overbearin' mannah. 

An' upon my gal's aflfections he's been tryin' to intrude. 
'Pears to me that gal is taken with his style, and thinks of shakin' 

Her baby with that coon to steal away; 
My love for her's so zealous, it makes me mighty Jealous, 

An" I look Into my Hannah's eyes an' say: 

^ Chorus 

I'just wants to tell you, honey. If you'se goin" to throw me down, 
rll tak« a great big gun an' institute a funeral in dlB hyar town. 
If you accepts dat yaller nigger, he'll iH? apt for to lose his life. 
And you'll be his widow on the day you become his wife. 

I have loved my Hannah dearly, an' perhaps I've loved her blindly. 

But now I wants to know it I'se her man; 
Since she's seen that other nigger, she's been treatin' me unkindly. 

An' the reason for her coolness I is boun' to understan'. 
Since that other coon's been sneakin' 'round, her love it seems to weaken. 

An' if I find she's gwine to throw me down, 
Tbe coons will hold a session in a funeral procession. 

To escort that nigger s carcass from the town.— r//o»v/». 

YOU USED TO LOVE YOUR DABY 

BETTER'N YOU DO NOW. 

• .- Words and music by L. O. De Witt. ." • 

• ■■/; 0*pyright, 18», by Recker, Vogler * Co. Eitirlish copyriglit secured. 

I'm a-havin' 'nufr trouble With ma family 'fairs 
For to drive most any man insane, 
• For I cant And out what IS causin' such a coldness 

From ma baby, ma 'Mandy Jane; 
. She used to love me truly, 
, .; 'Cause she done tole me so befC 
... An' when all dis trouble - ' , ^ 

'" A-comes a-sneakin' in ma do' 
;• ; I feel I'm 'titled to an explanation 
• ..■'. Why I'm caused so much vexation, • " 

So it's no mo' den right for me to say: 

.' ", ^^ Chorus. 

You used to love yer baby better'n you do now; 
.' ;. ' Say what's de tise of all dis yere continual row, 
' I've tried ma best for to treat you right, 

-/.'«-- But you done got actin' like you was white. 

You used to love yer baby better'n you do now. ' 

, :. Dont I tote you 'round to all de colored affairs? 

'...,•• Don't I do all any man can do? 

, Don't I come home early? Aint I reg'lar In ma habits? 
^ V Didn't I quit all ma crap games, too? 
Because you said you loved me; 

Just like you always used to do, , .- '^K-'^'\-"-u-''-.u'---- ^ 
But dar's happenin's lately - ^ ■ ' - • ■•' . 'V--' '■'■ 

That makes me b'leve you alnt so true,"-,-;',!^ ' -- ; v .- • 
An' I'm askin' you for an explanation. 
Why I'm caused so much vexation; 
An' I demand an answer when I aajz—r/utr'n: 



MY LOV£'S THE SAME 

Word* l.v Uoufr Hiirilliijr. Munlo 1>T Mrv Portrr. 
t'opjilglit, 1899, by KiiiCk«TboCkei MualcCo. 

- \ " The dear, dead past is ever in my heart, love, 

. V ' Where we oft roamed together, hand In hand. 

We vowed thro' life that we would never part, love. 

The happiest pair of lovers in the land: 
Thro' all these weary years of grief and vwln, dear. 

My love's remained the sjime as on that day, 
Tho I may never see your face again, dear. 
Believe me, I am truthful When 1 say: 

Chorus. • 

My love's tlie same, tho' years have fled, i 

'Twill ever be, tho' yours be dead, ' 

.-/ Tho" jou may never bear my name, . /. 

'^! • As in the past, my love's the same. 

Another came and won you from my side, dear. 

You said our dream was o'or that we must part, . - '•: 
I left you then in anger and in pride, dear, . ■ 

.. . And tried to tear your image from my heart; , 

In spite of all my efforts to forget you. 
My thoughts are all of vou, by night and day; ^ - 

- . Altho' my heart is filled with sad regret, dear, 

Tlie mem'ries of the past still bid me say :— t'A»»-M<. 

'TIS BEST FOR US TO PART 

Copyiljrht, lltW, l>y KiiK-k-rboclcer Mu»ir Co. 
Woi'dn by K<i(r«:r HardiiiK. Mu»io by Freil ll»Uiid». 

They were parting from eacli other, her heart was fllletl with pain. 

She thought, perhaps, that she would never see his face again; 

You say that you'll come back, dear Ned, to claim your bride some dav. 

And I will never cease, my love, for your return to pray. 

You tell me we're too poor to wed, to wait just one short year; 

1 trust that youll forgive me, Ned, but, oh, I sadly fear. 

You'll learn to love another in that land so far away; 

It grieves me, but I feel tis right these last sjid words to say: 

Chorus. 
'Tis best for us to part, I know, although my heart will break. 
There's nothing In this world that Id not do for your dear sake. 
Then clasp me in j-our arms once more, 'tis time for us to part, 
I'll keep the mem'ry of that kiss forever in my heart. 

They then parted, and he left her, in distant lands to roam. 

And tor awhile he often thought of her and honip. sweet home; 

In just one year he did return, but not to claim her hand; 

He'd learned to love another in that far-off distant land. 

He told her all the bitter truth, then to her the«»e words said. 

If you still lioUl ine to my vow, with you alone I'll wed. 

She gently took his hand in hers, then turned her head away. 

As tears of sorrow filled her eyes, he heard her softly say: - i fioru$. 

MY SUNNY SOUTHERN HOME -^ 

Copyrlicbt, IRM. by Kiilokei'(>ocl(er Music Co. Word* and mu'-ic l>y llotrui ilardiuc. 

I'm thinking of the day, when a boy I used to play. 

Along the Suanee River's shore. 
And my eyes oft All with tears, when I think of bygone years. 

And friends I loved in happy days of yore. 
There is no place on this earth, like the dear home of my birth. 

As o'er the world I ever sadly roam, 
Mem'ry's all that's left to me, yet I'd give the world to see 
The old folks in my sunny Southern home. 

Chorus. 
My home, mv home, iiiv dear old Sunny Southern home, -, 
Where the oriole and thrush 
Thrilled their says at morning's blush. 
In the woodland, near my sunny Southern home. 

My sweetheart Eulalia, dearer than life to me. 

Lies sleeping near the Suanee River's shore; 
1 am thinking of the day when I heard her sweet lips say, 

I love you, 1 am yours forevermore; 
Once again siie's by my side, and my heart Is filled with pride, 

As o'er the old plantation we ixjth roam. 
Then I wake to find it vain, and 111 never see again 

My sweetheart and my sunny Southern home.— Cfiwur. 

SWEET LENORE 

CopyrlKht. 18W. by Q«o. W Cl>rke. 
Word* and Mubic by Cliarle* Alibott aud Ha%ii H. J<ilius<>u. 

•• " One bright summer's eve, as I strolled by the sea 
With one whom I loved to have by my side. 
My heart^thrill?d with Joy as she whispered to me 

Of the daT drawing nearer, when she'd be my bride. 
The moon slowly uver the water did rise, 
• All nature seemed happy and gav, ■ " 

And as I gazed into her pretty blue eyes. 
These words to my sweetheart I softly did say: , . 

Chorus. 
Sweet Lenore, 'tis you I adore, ever I'm thinking of thee; 
-Whisper those sweet words o'er and o'er, and say that you really love me; 
Name the day when wedded we'll be, and from me you will ne'er part; 
And you will e'er be to me my own true wife and my sweetheart. 

The years quickly passed in our sweet wedded life; 

Our love still remained the same as of old, / 

Tho' we had grown gray without sorrow or strife; 

And it seemed as though our love would never grow cold. 
. ■'.; At twilight we'd stroll by the lonesome seashore. 

And watch the sun's last golden rays; 
I'd look to the sweet upturned face of Lenore, t 

And then to my darling t.^ese words I would B&j:—C''Oi<if. 
To-day all alone by the seashore I roam; 
■ , The shadows of evening silently fall; 

Lenore has passed on to her heavenly home. • 

And oh: how I long for the days past recall. ■ ■ 

. Tlie moon's soft l)eams play on the water again. 

The waves moan their SfVft plaintive lav; 
My thoughts now go back to the time that had been. 

When unto my darling these words I did say:— Chont. 

The Words and Music of any of tlie above 
songs will be mailed to any address, post-paid, on 
idceipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copies, your 
selection, for ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHMAN, 

108 Park Row, New York. Catalogue of all our publications mailed 

Free upon appiicatioa. 




MY OLD WESTCHESTER HOME 

AMONG THE MAPLES. 

Wordaaixl inngif by Wm B tiray. 
Copyright, IW, by Win. II. Grfty. EntereiJ at 8t«Uoiiir»' H»ll, L-vud-n. 

In an old Westcliestpr vIlliiKe, midst tlie towrinsr maple trees. 

The homestead sUinda. from wliere my mem'ry starts. 
In the twillKht oft I've wander'd, while the gentle eveniiijf breeze 

Seemed to whisper " these are nature's chosen parts," 
Willi the Klrl I've loved thro' life, then my sweetheart, now my wife. 

O'er the hills and thro' the valleys we would roam. 
In my heart there'll ever Mrin^r recollections free from strife, 

of my childhood and that old Westchester home. 

("HOKIS. 

In my old Westchester home, where ev'ry heart was kind and true, 

Wliere riiristian love and I'oiiur reijtned supreme. 
With a dear old mother's guidance, ouly happiness we knew, 
In that old Westchester liome among the maples. 
Many times my dad has told n»e. how a traitor years ago 

Mad planned a strugglinu nation to betray. 
But a young Westcht'ster ht-ro caught the .«(py sent by the foe. 

Though a fortune for his freedom he wouUf pay; 
When a child I've heard dad say. in his quaint old Yankee way. 

As lied take me In his arms at evenings gloom. 
That the path of truth and honor was the path we tread each day. 

Leading to and from that old Westchester home.— (V,o»</*. 

MAMIE TRACY 

Copyright, ISW, by Wm. B. Oi«y Entfrft at Stail<>i...r»' Hall, L,oiidnn, England 
Wordaand iiiiifiic by U'>grr HardiiitC- 

Mamie Tracy worked for Macy, 

Th«>' she was tit for a queen, 
I^arry Casey met Mamie Tracy 

When she was just sixteen; 
Mamie Tracy loved Larry Casey, 

But wlu'ii he asked her to wed 
She said. " Wait a year, we are too young 1 fear," 

Then Larry to Mamie said: 

Chorus. 
Mamie Tracy, tell me Mamie do. 
That .voii love me, .just as I love .you, so true. 
For I will never more contented be 
Until Mamie Tracy t)ecome8 Missus Casey and marries me. 

Mamie Tracy's not at Macy's, 

And all the neighlK)rs have said. 
Larry Casey and Mamie Tracy 

This year will surely wed: 
Kv'ry evening they go out walking, 

Happy as birds iii the spring, 
Soiiieliints she will s;i\ to his pleadings " Nay, nay," 

'I'lit'ii I.;trry Ihissontj will sing:- C'lufi'if. 

SWEET KITTY IVIAHONE 

Copyrlirht, 1R07. by Oon. E ScIihIIci it Co. liiiernaliuiiAl copyright wcured. 
\Viiril!< aii'l iiiiiKlu tiy n*"" Klirx" 

simre. in all County Kerry there's none ttiat's so merry 
k As my little fairy, my Irish colleen; 

She Is handsome and witty and. oh. she looks pretty. 
As she daiHvs and skips with the boys on the green. 
At night when I meet her. I go out to greet her 

All dre.ssed In my Ite.st, after taking my tay; 
Sim's as bright a.s'the Mowers after sweet sunny showers, 
Shure, my heart's in my mouth when I tenderly say: 

Cmoris. 
Oh. sweet Kitty Mahone. 
You've made liiy heart your own; 
If you'll return my love, from you I'll never part; 
I'll l)uy you a dress <»f the Emerald green 
To make you look pretty, my Irish colleen. 
For von are my own true love, the sunshine of my heart. 
Shme, ner waist Is so slender, her voice Is so tender. 

My heart I surrender, won by her bright smile; 
And to-night at yon loitage I've promised to meet her— 

I know 111 l>e welcomed in true Irish style. 
You know I'm not we.iithy, but work I'll get plenty— 

At g(xxl honest toll shure III work ev'ry day; 
Ev'ry sorrow will leave me when Kitty is near me. 
For her true love will cheer me as years pass away.— CAo>i/«. 

At the door of the cottage, where we met last evening, 

I asked my swet>t Kitty if shed l)e my wife; 
Shure. she looked in my eyes and she answered so sweetly, 

"All. yes, Barney, darling. I'll l)e yours for life." 
Tile day she tlien named when we twosliould be married; 

Next Sunday we'll kneel at the good clergy's feet; 
- When he nuts on the ring all my troubles will vanish. 

For with Kitty each hour of my life will l)e sweet.— CAotM*. 

When Billie and I Were Young 

C'iil>yright, 1897, by I. WhlteKoii F^irfiKii f-i'.vr'tfbt racured. 
Word* by L,oule BloKmr. Mualc l>y Tliri>. H. Nurtlirui>. 

When Billie and May and I were young. 

Wo playetl in the creek together; 
We romi>ed in the fields and tore our clothes. 

And were out in all sorts of weather. 
And Billie would say ' " You're the nicest girl 

In all of this world alone; 
Will you love me, Nell, just a little bit. 

When you are older grownf " 

C'HORrs. 
Billie and May and I were young, so many years ago. 
Over the hills and through the vales we wandered to and fro; 
Many the school house days we passed down by the village green, 
' Where BiUie and 1 played hook on the sly, alas: it is all a dream. 

But soon we were parted. Bill and I, 
Our youthful days had flown; 
> And I sailed o'er the seas to foreign skies, .• 

;. ■ In this world of strife alone; 

'• The old love was fickle and was not true, 

;.•'.■- -■ He married our comrade. May, . ' , 

; .. . With her golden hair and eyes of blue ■;. 

:- V She won his heart away.— t/ioxu. - 



Only 



a Flower that Slie Kissed 

Copyright. Itt7, by I. WliitMon. r<>r«lKD copyright MCiirMl. : {. . 



WurJt by Arthur J. Lamb. Music by O«o. Scbleitrai-th (Maywuod.) 



In fancy I can see her, as on that happy night 
When we had danced together, and dreamed of love's delight; 
And when 1 asked at parting: '' What shall love's token be? " 
She kissed this little nower, and gave it unto me. 

Chokits. 

Only a flower that she kissed long afi^; 

Only a faded violet; 

'Tls but a memory of when last we met. 

Only a flower that she kissed. 

Those happy days of courtship were ever days so fair. 

When love iiiade our lives happy and bright oeyond compare. ' 

And when I had to leave her, and came to say adieu. 

She said: " You have the flower that I gave unto you."—' Aon<«. 

I roamed through distant countries, and time sped fast away. 

But still, with her In memory. 1 lal)ored night and day; 

With riches, home returning, 1 came to claim a bride. 

When at her home they tolu me the girl I loved had died.— CA'T"*. 

MAMMY'S UHLE ANGEL BOY 

Copyrlifbt. inn, by I. Whit«son. Foreign copyright wcured. 
By MMDiinald Huhr. ^ 

Mammy's little pickaninny's gwine to sleep, 

Hush a-by. hush a-by; 
Doan' yo' hear de coon-dog bayin' loud an' deep? 

Hushaby, hush a-by; 
Hocktn-blrds am callfn', doan' yo' hear *em singt 
Pappy's gonea hunttn', an' a 'possum home '11 bring. 
Par Is watermelons coolln' in de shadders o' de spring, 

Husha pickaninny an' a by, by. 

Chorus. 
Yo' is mammy's little angel boy, 

Doan' cry, little babe, doan' weep. 
Mammy inus' make pappy's big co'n pone. 

When her plckanlnnny's fast asleep. 

Sweet pertaters bllln' an' a ham t)one to boot. 

Hush a by. hush a-by; 
Pappy's got a grave yard rabbit's left hind foot. 

Hush a-l)y, hush a-by; 
Husha pickaninny while de souf winds moan; 
Go to sleep, so mammy can go Ueb yo' alone. 
For she's goin' to make yo'r |>appy a bone. 

Hush a pickaninny an a by, by.— Cftoivr. 



('opyilgbt. III97. by 1. Wlilleauii. 
Will da by A. Aiiderauii. 



Foreign copyright oecurad. 
llual" by A. Sb>w. 



la. 



The other night in darktown, they gave a fancy ball. 

And Introduced a bran'-new dance, which captivated all. 

Old sway back Jones was prompter, and niggers near and far. 

All came to dance, and were entrancetl with the darktown rag-a-ma- 

"Ready, all, in the halll" sway-back Jones did call. 

Chorcs. 
S'lute your babies all, hot-foot it down the hall. 
Give your honey the Inside track. 
Now do the Palmer Hou.se coming back; 
And then the wenches chain, swing around again; 
Back to place, with due grace, ; 

That's the " Raga-ma la." ' 

Mis.s Suslhanna Johnstone was dancing with Jo Brown, 
Who only weighs some ninety-eight to her three hundred pounds; 
She sllpned and fell upon him, he grabbed ^is gun to shoot. 
When, like a flash, she made a dash for the razor In her boot. 
*■ Ready, all. in the hall! " sway-back Jones did call.— t'A/»i-«». 

The man who owned the building came In to get his rent. 
And swore he'd turn them all right out unless they paid each cent; 
They chucked him in the cloak-room, and tightly barred the door; 
Tied to a chair they left him there, then danced on as l)efore. 
" Ready, all, In the halll" sway-back Jones did call— C/t<yru>. I 

The Valley of the Old Shenandoah 

Words and music by L. O. De Witt. Oopyrighi, IIW, by Reeker, Vogler A Oa 

You ask me why I am so sad, Tom, 

And why my hair has grown so gray. 
While only two snort years ago, Tom, I 

My heart, like yours, was light and gay; ' 

The story is a simple one. that's oft l>een told before, . ._ 

A tale of love, too beautiful to la»t: • " 

Of a good, true-hearted maiden, - 

With a love cliicere and pure: ' 
Tho' now 'tis but a mem'ry of the past. 

Sweet mem'ry of the past. 

Refrain. 
For she sleeps In the valley of the old Shenandoah, 

Her dear angel face I'll see no more; 
And I think all the day. antl all night long I am dreaming 

Of my love in the valley of the old Shenandoah. 

You know that I went to the war, Tom, 

That we had many a trnttle^lay; i 

Well, they sent word to the folks at home. Tom, 

That I had fallen In the fray. 
The cruel news came like a snot to my poor little Nell. 

When I reach'd home with spirits bright and free, 
Then they told me of the message. 

And that Nell was lain at rest; 
Her tender heart had broken, all for me; 

She died, dear Tom. for me. 
And she sleeps In tlie valley, etc. 

The Words and Music of any of the abovt 
songs will be mailed to any address, post-paid, on 
receipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copies, your 
selection, for ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHMAN, 
108 Park Row, New York. Catalogue of ali our publications mailed 
Frot upon applicatieii. ^ 



■v.-"^ 




DAR'S NO GAL LIKE MY BAL 

CopyiiRbt, ItW, by L Whil«800. By Lawrence McDonald. 

I courts a colored lady. She's JuBt a little Shady, 

I lubs her dearly, corse I do; 
I Ifi her only nlgper. de rest dey cuts no flKger; 

She lubs me oh, indeed, I know she's true. 
When we goes out awalking. we sets dem all a-talklng, . . 

An' you can hear de coons all say: 
,^ " Oh, ain't she a peach, but she's clear out of reach, 

Fer She's done gib herself away." 

Choris. 
Dar is no ga\ like mah gal, I wants yo' all to know; . 
• ., Dar is no gal like mah gal, I'se gwine to tell yo' so; 

She am mah own warm baby, an' sweet as she can be; 
All de coons try to win her, but she lubs no nigger but me. 

She am ma yaller daisy, she's got the coons all crazy. 

And she am de belle for miles around; 
Dis gal she gits the cake when she does de Mobile shake. 

She's de talk of ail de coons in dis yere town. 
I'se won dis little missy, she is mah yaller sissy. 

An' no man can steal her away; 
When dey hear de news, won't de coons hab de blues, 

Fer next Sunday am de wedding day.— 6'//o/ "«. 

Pretty Smiling Ella 

Copyright, 1897, l>y I. Wliitegcn. Foreiirii topyi •til,t geciired. 
Words by EuKeue Rli'htcr. Music liy Mux I. Kincliel. 
Just picture a neat rustic cottage. 

Far out from the din of the town; * ^ " 
The home of a sweet, pretty maiden, 

■ ■ With soft curling tresses so brown; 

And she is the girl of my fancy, • 

■ ,'. To me she is more than my life. 

And tho' all the boys love her dearly. 
She's promised that she'll be my wife. 

Chorus. 
She's pretty smiling Ella, with tender laughing eyes, 

Iler ways are sweet and winning, I tell you she's a prize; 
SliH has a host of suitors, but tells them one and all: 

ill stand by Jim tliro' thick and thin, whate'er to him befall." 

" '"*r :;- Last evening I called on this maiden. 

And asked her if she'd name the day 
When proudly we'd walk to the altar; . 
I said there's no use to delay. 
_ I won't tell the answer she gave me, 

"* But I'll marry her all the same; 

I hone you'll all come to the wedding 
\ - Of me and my sweet blue-eyed dame.— CAottM. 

WHAT BROADWAY SAYS, GOES ! 

CupyrlKht. IK9;. i>) I. Wliitesun. Wmds and music by Loiiig Wealyn Joiiea. 

If you desire to be tumbled and tossed. 

And whisked and whirled. 
Throughout the haze and the maze 

Of the ultra-fashion world; 
If into Vanity Fair you are 

Anxious to be hurled. 
Then on the right " set " agree. 

Hunt up your pedigree, hurry, don't delay. 
When you are sure the blue blood 

Is aglistening in your veins. 
Don't think youre landed on top 

Without trouble, care or pains. 
For most important of things 

In all swelldom still remams. 
Dressed in your very best, ' . 

Looking your airiest, promenade Broadway. 

CHORrs. ^ 

New York town starts all the fads of fashion's season: 

Broadway's the judge that determines the " thing ' In clothes; 
When Broadway smiles, all vt the swells give thanks, with reason- 
Broadway governs tlie style.s, and what she says, go^'s: 

Though you may trace your ancestors 

To Briton, Rome or Gaul; 
Though you may have an acquaintance 

Witli Astors, one and all, • ' 

Though you have recently been 

To a Bradley-Martin ball. 
Still you are not quite so warm, 
I And you may come to harm, best not get too gay. 
Don't think that you can afford 

To neglect the public eye, 
For if you do, sure as fate, ' . , 

It will know the reason why. 
Take for your motto, . - 

"My darling old Broadway till I diel" ~, 

Mix in society, shun impropriety. 

Stick right on Broadway.— C//or»/«. 

Captain of the Band 

Copyright, 1897, by I. WhlteKni. Foreign copyriKht secured. 
WordM by WiU K. Haiiiilloo. Music by Roy L. Burtch. 

rm the major of this band, as you can plainly see; 

With boomtera and boomtera, they blow the guns for me. 

I'm an aristocratic man, of me they're all afraid. 

We're on our way, by the break of day, for the inaugural parade. 

Chorits. 

I'm the captain of this band, we are always in demand. 

Horns of papier mache they now have learned to play, 
. ' And I'm tlie captain of tliis band, to them I doflf my hat. 

If any one can beat my time, they can stand where I am at. 
I twirl my t)aton with ease, by a nail that's hidden from view. 
That's on the Q. T. you know, I shouldn't have told It to you. 
I haven't a word to say, for I'm a sight to see. 
For ease and grace I am first in the race, and you all can bet on me.— C%o. 

(E.NCORK Verse. > 
A mother one Fourth of July took her baby seeing the sights. 
Of candles, spin-wheels and things, with blue and red colored lights. 
A boy with a thing on a stick, imitating the young Davy Crockett. 
Let tne thing fly, struck the balM in the eye, 
And the mother will let the sky rock \t.—Ciunu$. •::•;. ,': 



Don't Know— Don't Care 

Copyright, 1897, by L WhltMon. Foreign copyriKht ii««ured. 
Words and musle by L<>ut« Wealyn Jones. 

Men makes Ob women's hearts a jest Ob dem; 
Coons, dey's prezactly like de rest ob dem; . ~ 

Gals, if yo' wants to get de best ob dem, 
:/ Jes' treat 'em as 1 did nia Jim. " • 

Dat Jim takes annoilder gal to Ctwney Isle, 
Treats her to wataJimillion by de pile; 
Nex' day he comes 'round wif dat same old smile. 
But dis is What I sajs to him: 

Chorvs. 
. , "Seems like dat I was right fo' to doubt yo". 
Don't care a continental about yo". 

Good coons, oh, dey is plenty wifout yo', 'njiost anywhere". 
. . - Don't dare to ebl)er darken ma doway; 

Ma way, yo" niggah, 'tain't like yo" way". 
No mattali where Itouts yo' go, jes' so yo' go 'way. 
Don't know— don't care!" 

. . Jim says he didn't mean me no ofTense; 

Says r'se a trifle shy wif conttdence; 
Says he would give as much as roty cenfs 

To win me back to him once mo-'. 
But I says: "Shucks, yo's not the only coon 1 
I'll hab annodder man surprisin' soon, 
'For de arisin" ob aniuxlder moon, 
' An' in his face I shut de do'.— t'/(or(/(t. 

WHEN THE GIRL THAT YOU LOVE 



\ 



«c 



99 



Copyi Wht, 1897, b> 1. Whlteson. K<ir<-ign copyright aerurfxl. \ 
Words by Wm. Fisher. Music by Tlie". H Nortlniip. 

There's nothing SO swtH?t in this world to hear. 

When the girl that you love says "yes." 
How sweet are tlie kisses, and oh. the caress. 

When the girl that you love says ""yes." 
'Tis said, with a sigli, there's a tear in her eye. 

And you can't say a word, though you try": 
But the bliss of that something you cannot exitress 

When the girl that you love says "'yes." 

Choris. 
When the girl that you love says "yes." 

And you linger ill a fond car»»ss. 
There's a tear-drop in each eye. 

With each kiss there comes a sigh. 
When the girl that you love says "yes." 

You picture the home with its warm fireside. 

When the girl that you love says "yes." 
Her dear words to cheer you when cares stirely prew. 

When the girl that you love sjiys " yes." 
But the years quickly Hy. and the last long go<Kl b\t». 

And you kit>s her s(")tt cheeks with a sigh; 
But you still feel that something of inflniu^ blis.s 

When tlie girl that yoii love s;iys " yes." 

Choris. 
- When the girl that you love says "yes," 

And you linger ill a fond caress. 
There's a tear-drop in each eye. 

With each kiss there conies a sigh. 
When the girl that you love says "yes." ' 

The Sweetest Little Trooper in the 



r' 



Copyright, 1898, by I. Whiieson. Word* ami music by Lawrence Mcltonald. 

I'm the sweetest little trooper in the army. 

Always s(» jolly and gay. 
I'm a winsome wee trooiier. a handsome wee trooper. 

With a cute and charming way. 
You lx>t I'm a winner, a cunning little sinner. 

Whene'er there's a heart at stake. 
With my roguish blue eyes, I capture the prize. 

And many a heart I break. 

Choris. 

I'm the sweet«.st little trooper In the army. 
Every day, when on p.arade, the girls all cry. 
As I march by, there he gfies, there he goes. 

The bravest little trooper in the army; 
Always looks so neat, with a heart .so brave and true. 
His life he'd give for you. 

He's the sweetest little trooper in the army. 

I'm the bravest little trooper in the army. 

You can hear every one say, 
I'm a gallant wee trooper, a fearless wee trooper. 

Always ready for a fray. 
When the war niigles blow, to the front III march and go.. 

Where duty and honor calls. 
With my life in my hand, I'll stand like a man. 

And fight for my country's caust. 

CHORI'S. 

I'm the sweetest little trooper In the army. 
Every day, when on parade, the girls all cry. 
As I march by. there he goes, there he goes. 

The bravest little trooper in the army; 
Always looks so neat, with a heart so brave and true, 
, His life he'd give for you. 

He's the sweetest little trooper In the army. 



.Q 






The Words and Music of any of the above 
songs will be mailed to any address, post-paid, on 
receipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copies, your 
selection, for ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHMAN, 

108 Park Row, New York. Catalogue of all our publications maileii 

Free upon application. 







YOU'RE ALL RIGHT I When Mammy Piits Her Piekaniiiiv 



\ 



BUT YOU CAN'T COME IN 

CopyrlBlit. It98, by Klurris A Fox. Word* by R. J. Morria. Music by RiirmII Fjs. 

A coon he had a yaller sral. and loved her dearly, too; 

He would r^ill around each ev'ninst and swear dat he'd be tnie. 

He bought her lots of presents and Rq.nandered all his money 
. ■ On dis little yaller ual he used to call his honey, 
:' But he met his iMXMloo in a game of craps one day: 

He went broke, not in troubU? and had to go away. 

And wlieii he ratne l>;ick lookluK for his honey gal one day. 

She ha<l aiiotlior man, and to that coon these words did say: 

Choris. 

You're all right, but you can't come In; 

You wa.s a real pood fellow when you had lots of tin. 

But while you'v»» been away, anotner man my heart did win. 

You're all right, iilggah, but you cant come in. 

: Dte coon for sjitlsfactlon now, he start<ed out one night. 
And brtjTiuht along his ra/or to carve lils man on sight. 
He went down to a cake walk, he knew his man would be there. 
An' when he saw dat niggah, to carve him he did prepare 
But the IWTmrers grabt>od l)ini and with lur.i cleano<l the floor, 

. They beat hlni something scand'lous, and Hred him out the door. 
They throw him down a flight of stalrH and kicked him on the shin, 
AiKi all joined In this little song, and sang these words to tilm: 

Chorus. 

Yon're all right, but you can't come In, 

You was a real ffcunX fellow till you got full of gin. 

When you start trouble here, why you have got no chance to win; 

You're all right, niggah, but you can't come In. 

MATILDA, WHAR'S YER GOON ? 

Copyriktht, mw. by A. M. Dall. Words and MiisJc by J. W. I^rman. 

I'Re In a heap ob trubble' 'cos I done gone lost ma man. 

An' why he lef" me In de lurch I does not understan": 

Dat nigger sncakd wldoiit a word, he neber said ' goodby," 

An' tho' he swore he'd stick ter me, he hooked It on de sly. 

At fust I thought dat he wuz on'y joking fer a bluff. 

But now 1 knows dat low down «"(K>ri done shotik me sho' enuff. 

In darktovvn I'm de laughing stock wheiielwr I goes out. 

An' when dey ketches sight ob me dey all t>egms ter shout: 

Rkfhain. 

Matilda, whar'syer coon? Will he come ba<'k soon? 
Don't yer thuik it's very wrong for yer honey to Btay so long? 
Since dat nigger went away yer watchln' fer him eb'ry day: 
He's done bin gone .since last new iniwn, Matllda,whar s yer coon? 

We used ter go out walkin' eb'ry night, an' Sundays, too. 
An' all de wenches In do town wuz feelln' mighty blue; 
It used ter make 'em Jealoiis fer ter see me take his arm. 
An" proudly walk l)eside ma (•<K)n. jes" like I owned a farm. 
But sence dat rascal sklpp'd de town, dey has de laugh on nie; 
I neber has a bit ob rest wherel)er I may l)e. 
As 8<jon as 1 go out o' doors I'm sho' ter lie waylaid. 
An' In my dreams mos' eb'ry night I heahs dls serenade: 

Rkfrain. 
Matilda, whar's yer coon? Will he come back soon? 
.'■ Don't ver think It's very wrong fer yer honey to stay so long? 
■ Since flat nigger went away yer watchln' fer him eb'ry day; 
He's done bin gone since last newmoon, Matilda, whar's yer coon? 

IF DAT'S YOUR DREAM, GOON, 

JUST WAKE UP 

OopyrlRht, imw, by Li'hnianii, Srlieu«r A Thom«a. Enftllsli copyrlslit urciired 
WortU by Andrew Sterllnfr. Miiiric by Harry Von Tllzer. 

A coon who thought he was a dead-swell sport 

Used to<'ome around tormentln' Mandy Brown. 
He was suth a fabricator, flat he used to agitate her 

Till one day she called him down. 
For the bluli he threw about de doiigh he never blew 

-Mid tho honeymoon they'll sj)end when they were wed. 
Used to makeher sad and tearful, 'cau.se he lied to her so cheerful; 

So one day to him she said: 

Chorus. 

"Ev'ry single night, when you creep Into bed. 

Funny money dreams go a i-reepln' thro' }'Our head; 

In your imagination you are flyin* mighty high; 

You'll fall clean out of bed .some night and Hud dat you are .shy. 

And owe j'ourself s^jme money, coon, instead. 

Believe me, Mist<T nigger, for I most sincerely hope 

You haven't been in Chinatown a-smoking dat cheiipold dope. 

You may think that you can con me'iwut de dough you'd spend upon me. 

When you couldn't tectl a bulldog nup. 

If dafs your dream, coon, just wake upl " 

He said: " I'll bring a lovely di'mond ring, 

There Is nuthln' that you couldn't have on earth. 
If you'll giv*' your hand In marriage, you can havea horse A carriage. 

I'll sj>end evt-ry cent I'm worth." 
But Miss Mandy said: Let me tell you on de dead. 

You'll come out of It all right, roon, t>ye and bye; 
You'll be sorry you awoke, sir, when you And you're stony broke, sir, 

Tlien he heara her softly cry: - Chorus. 

The Words and Music of either of the attove 
songs will b9 mailed to any address, post-paid, on 
receipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copies, your 
selection, for ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHMAN. 

108 Park Row. New York. Catalogue of al] our publications mailed 

Free upon application. n,; -^- .■ v'" 




Copyright, IIW. by Wm. B. Oi-ay. Entered at Stattonora' HaU. Loiidoa. 
Words and Miiato by Perrlii and W|a«. 

There's a darkey mammy down In old Virginia, 

Where the Ivy creeps around the cabin door. 
She has a pickaninny lK)y, who Is her only pride and Joy, 

And ev'ry day she loves her t>aby more and more. 
When the evening breeze In softness sighs around them. 
When the moonbeams mellow rays are o'er them shed. 
In a voice of love so clear, o'er and o'er these words hell bear. 
When mammy puts her pickaninny boy to bed. ... ■ 

Chorus. I ' 

"Bye, lo, bye, hush, my little tootsle, wootsie, cktse your clilna eyee; 

If you cry, your mammy's gwine to spank 3'ou, 
And give you to the l»ogle man to-morrow morning; 

Go to sleep, or .lackle Frost will surely bite you; 
Cover up your head, go to sleep, my l>aby, do," 

Cabin tolls, tliat day, are thro". 
When mammy puts her pickaninny boy to tied. 

Then this little coon would nestle In his cradle. 

While his nuimmy cooked the supper for his dad. 
But he soon would get a fright, l)egin to cry with all his might. 

And that would make his daddy very, very mad, 
Ttieii he'd tell him Wiat the bogie owl would eat him. j '• 

While his shiny eyes their frlght'nlng tears would af^ed. 
Then his tears would pass away when the.se words to him he'd say. 

As mammy puts lier pickaninny t)oy to bed.— r/iox/c. 

Those Cruel Words, "Good-Bye." 

CopyriKht, 1X99, by Win. n. Qnty. Enterwl at Stationery' Hall, London. 
Words and Music by J Fied Ilelt. 

You think It l)est we part. love, you and IT 

That I would soon forget you If I'd try? 

You do not know, dear, what you ask. 

You do not know how hard the task, 

Tlie love I bear for you can never die! 

I'm always happiest when you are nigh. 

Those golden moments, how tliey seem to fly. 

I'll cherish them until the last. 

Yet you wisli me to forget the |)a.st. 

And say to you tho.so cruel words, "good-bye." 

Chorus. 
"Oood-bye!" cruel worils, goo«l-bye! 
How maiiy loving hearts they've caused to sigh. 
When from one whom we love dear we are oft compelled to hear 
Those cruel, heartless, parting words, "g^ood bye!" 

Do you recall the day when first we met? 

Those happy Im)ui-8 we spent, can you forget? 

Twas then you promised that j'ou'd be 

As true as stars above to nie, 

I loved you then, dear one, I love you yet! 

You bid me go, but still you say not why. 

Nor U;ll me who's at fault, dear, you or I, 

But all that's left me. If we part. 

Are tears, regrets, a broken heart. 

And mem'ries of fnoee cruel words, " good-bye."— Ciiot^i*. 

Charlie's Sweetheart 

<^•^)^ riKlit, 18v;, by H»rry F. Cook. WoiJaniul Muatc by Harry F. Colt. 

When I was mamma's little darling, she held me on her knee; 

Now I am someone's sweetheart, he does the same to me. 

The lights In the parlor were dim as I sat on his knee. 

And he asked If his little sweetheart I would t)e. i 

It made mc feel, f)h, so very, very queer; 

It might have been different had mamma l)een near. 

Chorus. 

Oh, Isn't It nice, boys, yes. you all know; 

To be someone's sweetheart, to hug and kiss you so. 

The light In the parlor was dim, as I sat on his knee 

Listening to the sweet things he was sayltig tome. j 

It made me feel. oh. so very, very queer; 

It might have been different, had mamma been near. ^ 
Now there, dear, don't turnyoiir face t« the wall; 
I'll not give you away, Charlie, I'll not tell all. i 

The lights In the parlor were dim, as I sat on his knee, J 
Listening to the sweet promise you then made me. 
It made me feel, oh, so very, very queer: 
It might have been different had mamma been near.— CAo»»i«. 

Now Freddie dear says he'll have me. too, you see. 

And Charlie dear swears he can't live without me. 

The lights In the parlor were dim, as I sat on his knee, .1 

An<l proml.sed Charley his little sweetheart I would be. 

It made me feel. oh. so very, very queer; 

It might have been different, haa mamma been near.— CAortt*. 

SINGE MA PO' JOE'S GONE 

Co|>yri|;ht, IMM, by Lxlimann, Bcheuer 9c Tliontaa. 
Ry Samuel Labmaii. 

Ise a-gwine to tell you 'bout my po' Ixjy Joe. 

Dey done put him whar' I'll nebber see him mo'; 

For he's gone to Jine de angels, an' In heahen he will be. 

An' I'se a gwlne to Jlne him wen de goo*l Lord calls on me. 

He was de only pickaninny dat I hacT 

Now dey done took him an' Ise so awful sad. 

An' Wen I go whar' he used to play seems to me I hears him say: 

Chorus. 

Mammy, come to me. come to me. 
,. For Ise cotched a t)ee, cotched a bee. 

An' he's trying very hard to bite me. 

Mammy I'll do as you say an' let him free. 
All de little plckanlnnys lub'd my Joe. 
Dey alw.ays used to follow him whare'er he'd go; 
Dey would run around de hillside an' go flshln' In de branch. 
Den dey'd feed de ducks an' chickens an' de cows down on de ranch. 
But now It is so diff'rent. since ma po' chile's gone. 
De ole hou.se seems so empty an' de day seem long. 
An' w'en I go whar' he mied to play seems to me I hears him say:— tSko. 



The Darkey's Home, Sweet Home I I WISH I COULD SEE MOTHER HOW 



Cnpyriiclit. ISM. by Joa. IfniTta. W<>rl« and Hudc by Clias. E B«<-r. 

There's a spot In Alabama, where the birds sing all the day, . ' 

And nature seems to always be in tune; 
Where the darkies gather nightly in the good old-fashioned way. 

And trum the banjo neath the Southern moon. 
It Is there my heart is turning as I sit alone to-night, . ; ' 

■" The mem'ry brings the teardrop and a sigh, 
" r And I long to sit with Nellie by the little cabin white, ■■' j 
And live again those happy days gone by. 

Chorus. 
The honeysuckle twines around the dear old cabin door. 

But strangers tread the path we lov'd to roam. 
And tho' now I'm far away, fancy lingers evermore, 

■Round the darkeys home, sweet home. 

Ev'ry note from my old banjo takes me back to her again. 

In dreams I see the path we loved to roam. 
And my eyes are red with weeping and my heart is sore with pala; 

I long to see our humble little home. 
Near the cabin in the clearing there's a little mound alone. 

The breezes whisper softly as they blow, ; 

And the name of my dark Nellie is engraven on the stone, 

I placed it there just twenty years ago.— (A«»«#. 

SHE WAS BORH IH OLD VIROIHIA 

Uwd by permi«"l<>n of lAngborne Miuic Co. Copyright, 1»8. by J V LAn^honie. 
Words by J Vk-kery LaiiKborne. MuBic b.t Kubrrl E. Wliittemorr. 

You may all talk of your beauties, of the girls you've loved the best. 
But on a sunny Southern shore lived the one I loved so dear; 
Her e.ves were bright as dewdrops. and her cheeks blush'd like the rose; 
She was sweeter than the rarest flower that In any garden grows; 
I ttrst met her in the meadow— of course, by chance, you know. 
For the church path it runs through it, and there .she'd always go. 
Then when a few weeks later, as I wandered by her side. 
A kiss I pressed upon her lips, and asked her to be my bride. 

Chorus. 
She was born In old Virginia, she's a daughter of the South. 
With eyes just like her native skies, pearly teeth and tempting mouth; 
She was a dream of youthful beauty, and I'll love her evermore. 
For the fairest girl in all the world lived on old Vlrghiia's shore. 

MftH'' vt'ars have pa.s.'^ed since that day when she promised to be mine, 

Whife standing by the old church wall, the bells did sweetly chime. 

Then lite seemed bright and jojful with that dear girl by my side. 

For she had made me happy, when yes she softly sighed. 

But now alone as sad I stand in that same old churcn-yard. 

For my loved one she has passed away, and here lies t)eneath the sod, 

My love for her it is the same, I long for her dear face; 

I'll love her while life may last, no one can take her place.— 67(or»/». 

PROMISE THAT YOUIL WED ME 

Used by peniil'nion of Langborne Mu«ic Oa CopyrlKbr. 1898, by J. V. LaDgbonie. 
Words by deorire A. Norton. HukIc by Robt. E. Whlttemore. 

^ Hove a little maiden young and fair. 

Her voice is like a gentle summer breeze. 
For other girls, alas! I do not care. 
But her my one ambition is to please; 
- We quarreled, but 1 met her. beneath the starry skies; 
That she d forgive me not I was afraid; 
. But as I t»egged forgiveness, a light shone in her eyes. 
That encouraged me. and then to her I said: 

, : Chorus. 

Oh, my sweetheart. I love you. 
Give me your promise— darling, believe me, for I will be true; 

■ . ''.'■■ Don't cast me aside, dear, whate'er you may do; 

Promise that you'll wed me, for 1 love but you. 

Oh, tell me do yon love me as of old. 

Is there love in your pure heart for me? 
Sweetheart, as your little hand I hold. 

So you hold my future destiny; • 

Oh. do not keep me waiting, but whisper, " I love you." 

As I spoke thus, my sweetheart softly sighed; 
And as she gently whispered, in these words so sweet and true. 

To all my vows of love she then replied: 

Chorus. 
Oh, my sweetheart, I loVe you, 

I'll gladly wed you— dearest, believe me, I speak but those true. 
Sweet words that come in love from my heart; 
Wed me, and in life we nevermore shall part. 

SPORTING SAL 

I'wd by permianloii of Lanirb«riie Huidc Co. Cnpyriglit, 18M, by J. V. Langhoriie. 
WordR by J. V. Lanirlionie. Music by John J. Qi-af. 

Listen, coons, and about her I will tell, .i { 

■' De belle of the cake walk, she am dead swell, 

:' She am a trifle feverish, an' sure as yer lx)rn, 

, She's deonliest gal what for me Has a charm; 

Take warning, niggers, don't try to cut a dash, 
"* If yer gets ferniilyer, ccx)n. meat I will slash, 

;, . I'se a bad nigger when my blood gets warm. 

Keep away from Sportin' Sal, or I'll do yer harm. 

'■■'■■■: - Chorus."" . ■'" : 

; , . : My Sal, she am to me de dearest coon gal, 

■ My heart goes flip flop when at her I gits a sight; 

Niggers, dont pine for dis yeller gal of mine. 
.; ■ For I'se marryin" her one day next Tuesday night. 

- 'l irst met her in decern field. 

De kind moon lent us his bright light, 
. '^ An' though 1 am a little cloudy-colored, ,. 

" My Sally she am very bright, ' ' ; 

She was so sweet an enticing. 
As she was standin" right dere, 
i.'; • Bat words of luv I said to her, 

■■-,.. Wid none but ears of corn to hear.— C%orw», 

■ - At eVry dance around our town. 

■ ; '■• :> ; It am dead sure dat my Sal be found, 

y.''J' '/ De coons dey come from far and near ?■'.-;.".' .^v'-:'^':^ •■'. 

To see the togs what Sally do wear; ■ ;> .- .; -:;-.. ; ■" , . -.•■■ ^ 

Klondike diamonds are the go, ..':- "jr. ■ .:,',;... %■:■.■ ,;.- 

And dem Sal wears, do l)ecome her so, ' 

Dat when we whirl in airy maze. 
My Sportin' Sal am in a blaae.— (7 Aorta. 



CopyrtKbr, 1895, by Pole lUUfcbley. Word* sikI Mimic by Pole lUughlej. 

There's a moss-covered cot that is d • "er 

Than a mansion would l)e to me. 
'T was the home of my dear old molhei, 
i And the place I am longing to see; 

Poor mother has died since 1 left her, .•: 

She rests with the angels, I trow; ^ ; 

I know she is happy in heaven. 

How I wish I could see mother now. 

Chorus. 
I wish I could see mother now. as she once fondly kissed mv brow. [now. 
I'll meet her some day, in heaven I pray, how 1 wish I could see mother 

I remember the days of my childhood. 
And the pleasures 1 had when a boy. 
. . And the mem'ry of my dear old mother 

Brings back to me many a joy; 
In fancy I see at the window 
My de^r mothers fair wrinkled brow, 
; ' And I cherisli the advice she gave me. 

How 1 wish I could see mother now.— C/ioru*. 

Tis years since I left her to wander, 
" ■' Alone o'er this wide world to roam. 

How often I've wished for my mother. 

And a sight of that once dear old home; 
She told uie the day that I left her. 

To always be lionest and true. 
And reuieiiil)er, my bov. while you're wand'rlng. 

Your mother's the best friend to you.— tVt.« .,». 

You're All Right 

AS FAR AS YOUR MONEY GOES. 

Oipyriifht, 1896, by Harry r. Cook. Words uiid Music by Harry F. C.Mik. 

While strolling out the other niglit the sights; to see, 

I met a dashing girl, and this she said to me: "^ 

"Ah: there, my dear, will you go out just for a lark 

This pleasant evening, as I strolled on through the |>ark. 

Well take in the siglit.s, for everyoody knows 

You're all right as far as your money goes." 

Chorus. 

Boys, this is what she said to me in her winning way, 

" Remember when out for a lark, for pleasures you must pay. 

So cheer up. my lx»y, for ev'rylMxi.v knows 

Youre all right as far as ycur moiiey goes. 

■ Such sights did I see, and urh things did I hear, 
While going the rounds with this d.ishing dear. 
We wined and we <lliied. rA r.nch queer places did call. 
The wine, it flowed freelj-. so did whiskey and all, 
Such were the sights I ThIw, everylxnly knows . , 

You're all right as far as your money gi>es. — C//rt» '.«. 

I went rolling home with an elegant jag on. 

Got up in the morning with a double head on. 

Not a " nic " in my pocket to get a drink on. 

Not a friend to lend ine a dime on 

The rollicking good time I had. it plainly shows 

You're all right as far as your money goes. —c7/o»-w.. 

Now all you young men that are going out for a lark. 
Beware of this young blonde that j-oull meet in the park. 
While going the rounds, and the sights to see. 
She'll take you in tow and break you as she did me; 
It's one of the pleasures you pay for. everytKKly knows 
You're all right as far as your money goes.— 1'//(/» «'. 

PRETTY EYES OF BLUE 

- '- • - CopyilKl't. 1890, by Harry K C.«.k. By Harry F. Oook. 

Do you remember parting at the gate* pi-etty eyes of blue; 

And the promise then you made? 'twas: "l love you. I'll \n'. true." 

The stars were shining brightly, and the moon was smiling, too. 

As we stood at the gate, and I stole a kiss from you, 

Twas the happiest moment of my life, 'tis true, 

The sweete.st girl is my pretty eyes of blue. 

Chorus. 

I behold thee, 
eyes of blue. 
<th those golden tresses, 
i^ ^ of cherry hue. 
And press you to my heart, as in days of long ago. 

As we stood at the gate and I stole a kiss from you; 
'Twas the happiest moment of mv life, 'tis true. 
The sweetest girl is my pretty eyes of blue. 

Fond recollection brings to nie more dear, pretty eyes of blue; -. . 
And the songs you often sweetly sang to me long ago. 
As we strolled by the broqjtshie, and we courted in the t willeiit. 
For you and I were lovers then, as we walked side by Hide. 
Little did I think that we must part, 'tis true, « 

From you, my own darling, pretty eyes of blue.— C/<or«». 

Recall those unkind words, my own, my dear, pretty eyes of blue; 
That makes us strangers now. though once we were lovers true. 
The vow that thou hast broken dear, will surely break my he.art. 
And from you. my darling. I can never, never part, 
'Twas the saddest moment of my life, 'tis true, - . 

When we had parted, my pretty eyes of blue.— C//«>-»/«. 

The Words and Music of either of the above 
songs will be mailed to any address, post-paid, on 
receipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copies, your 
selection, for ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHMAN, 

108 Park Row, New York. Catalogue of all our publications mailed 

Free upon application. 



Oft in dreams 
And those prt 

How I long to sn 
And kiss those 




> 



-«*■■ - 



•v •> . _ ', — - 



* •'; .- ."' . , -< > 



..„• -f, , 



YOU'RE ALL RIGHT I When Mammy Putt Her Pickaninny 



BUT YOU CAN'T COME IN 

Copyrlaht, 1198, by Morria 4 Fox. Word* by R. J. Morria. Miialc by RiirmII Fjx. 

A coon he had a yaller sral. and loved her dearly, too; 

He would rail around each ev'ninpr and swear dat he'd be true. 

He bought her lots of pr»>sents and sq.uandered all his money 

On dib little yaller j;al he used tf) call his honey. 

But he niet his IkxhIoo (u a game of craps one day: 

He went broke, >:ot in trotihlc and had to go away. 

And wlieii he cam« hack lotiklng for his honey gal one day, 

Slie had anottier man, and to that coon these words did say: 

Choris. 

You're all right, btit you can't come in; 

Ycni was a real go«xl fellow when you had lots of tin. 

Bitt while you'v*^ been Jiway, anotnor man my heart did win. 

You're all rlnht, niggah, hut you can't come in. 

Dl8 coon for satisfaction now. he started out one night. 
And bPMight along his razor to carve his man on sight. 
He wunt down to a cake walk, he knew his man would be there. 
An' when he saw dat nlggali, to carve him he did prepare. 
But the lx>uncers grahl>ed him and with hini cleaned the floor. 
They beat him .something scandlous, and tln-d him out the door. 
They threw him down a flight of stairs and kicked him on the shin, 
And all Joined in this little song, and sang the.se word.s to him: 

Chorfs. 

You're all right, but you can't come In, 

You was a real go<Kl fellow till you got full of gin. 

When j-ou start trouble here, why ycu have got no chance to win; 

You're all right, niggah, but you c*n't come in. 

MATILDA, WHAR'S YER GOON ? 

Copyrlifht. IWW, by A. M. Hall. Words and Mimic by J. W. t«rman. 

I'se In a hefip ob trubble' 'cos I done gone lost ma man. 

An' why he lef me In de lurch I does not understan': 

Dat nigger sneak'd wtdoiif a word, he neber said ' goo«1by." 
• An' tho' he swore he'd stick tpr me. he hooked it on de sly. 
i At fust I thought dat he wux ony .joking fer a bluff. 
f But now I knows dat low down c(K)n done shook me sho' eniiff. 
i In darktown I'm de laughing stock wheneber I goes out. 

An" when dey ketches sight ob me dey all begins ter shout: 

Rkfrai.v. 

Matilda, whar's yer coon? Will he come back soon? 
Don't yer think it's very wrong for yer honey to stay so long* 
I Since tiat nigger went away yer watchin' fer him eb'ry dav: 

He's done bin gone since last new moon. Matilda. whar's yercoon? 

:■ We used ter go out walkin' eb'ry night, an' Sundays, too. 

An' all de wenches in <le town wuz feelln' mighty blue; 

It used ter make 'em jealous fer ter see me take his arm. 

An" proudly walk lieside ma coon, jes' like I owneil a farm. 
J But .sence dat rascal skippd ile town, dey has de laugh on me; 
j 1 neber has a bit ob rest whereber I may be. 
I As s<x)n as I go out o' doors Iin sho" ter l)e waylaid. 

An" In my dreams mos' eb'ry night I healis dls serenade: 

i Rkfrais. 

I Matilda, whar's yer coon? Will he come back soon? 

I Don't yer think it's very wrong fer yer honey to stay so long? 

Since aat nigger went away yer watchin' fer him eb'ry day: 
Hes done bin gone since last new moon, Matilda, whar's yer coon? 

» 

IF DArS YOUR DREAM, COON, 

JUST WAKE UP 

Copyrlffht, l*9fl, by I^'limanii, fv-lieiier 4 ThnniM. Knfrlliili copyright (rcured.- 

I Word* by Andrew Sterling. Mimle by Harry Von Tllzer. 

i A coc»n who thought he was a dead-swell sport 

Used to come around tormentin' Mandy Brown. 
f He was such a fabricator, dat he used to agitate her 
I Till one day she called him down, 
i For the bluff he threw atxjut de dough he never blew 
r .\nd the honeyn)o<ju they'll sj)eii(l when they were wed. 
r Use<l to niake*»pr sad and tearful, 'cause he lied to her so cheerful; 
. So one day to him she said: 

CHORrs. 

"Ev'ry single night, when you creep into bed. 

Funny money «lreains go a <'i'eepin' thro" your head; 

In your imagination you are flyin' mighty high: 

You'll fall clean out of IhhI .some night aiid And dat y^ou are shy. 

And owe yourself .some money. cot)n, instead. 

Believe me. Mi.ster nigger, for I most sincerely hope 

You haven't In-en in < 'hinatown a smoking dat cheap old dope. 

You may think that vouciincon me 'i)out deduugli you'd spend upon me. 

When you couldn't feed u bullilog imp. 

If dat's your dream, coon, ju.^t wake upl '' 

He said: " I'll bring a lovely di'mond ring. 

There is nuthin' that you couldn't have on earth. 
If yim'll give your hand In marriage, you can havea horse a carriage, 

I'll spend every cent I'm worth " 
But Miss Mandy said: Let me tell you on de dead, 

You'll come out of it all right, c«x)n, bye and bye; 
You'll lie sorry you awoke, sir. when you find you're stony broke, sir. 

Then he heard her softly cry: - Chorm. 

The Words and Music of either of the atrave 
songs will be mailed to any address, post-paid, on 
receipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copies, your 
selection, for ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHMAN, 

108 Park Row. New York. Catalogue of ail our publications mailed 

Free upon application. 




Copyright, INS. by Wm. B. QrAy. Entered at BUtlonora' HkU. LondoB. 
Word* and Miisto by Perrln and Wise. 

There's a darkey mammy down In Old Virginia, ... 

Where the Ivy creeps around the cabin door. 
She has a pickaninny boy, who Is her only pride and Joy, . . -; 

And ev'ry day she loves her t)aby more and more. 
When the evening breeze in softness sighs around them. 

When the moonl)eanis mellow rays are o'er them shed. 
In a voice of love so clear, o'er and oer these words hell hear. 

When mammy puts her pickaninny hoy to \xA. 

CHORfS. 

" Bye, lo, bye, hush, my little tootsle, wootsie, close your chliiA eyee; 

If you cry, your mammy's gwine to spank you. 
And give you to the liogle man to-morrow morning; 

Go to sleep, or Jackie Frost will surely bite you; 
Cover up your liead, go to sleep, my baby, do," 

CaWn tolls, that day, are thro'. 
When mammy puts her pickaninny boy to bed. 

Then this little coon would nestle In his cradle. 

While Ills mammy c(X)ked the supper for his dad. 
But he soon would get a fright, begin to cry with all hte might. 

And tliat would make his daddy very, very mad. 
Then he'd tell him that the bogie owl would eat him, 

While his shiny eyes their frlght'ning tears would s^ed. 
Then his tears would pass away when tl>ese words to him he'd say. 

As mammy puts her pickaninny boy to bed.— 6V(0i'/c. 

Tliose Cruel Words, "Good-Bye." 

Copyright, IXW, by Win. n. Oray. Entfrad at stationery' Hall, London. 
Words and Music l>y J Fied Heir. 

You think It liest we part, love, you and If 
That I would soon forget you If I'd try? 
You do not know, dear, what you ask. 
You do not know how hard the task. 
The love I b«ar for you can never dler 

I'm always happiest when you are nigh, - , 

Those golden moments, how tl»ey seem to fly, ■ '' ' 

I'll cherish them until the last. 

Yet you wish me to forget the past, 

And say to you tho.se cruel words, "goodbye." 

ClIORfS. 

"Good-bye!" cruel words, good-bye! 

How many loving hearts they've CAUsed to sigh. 

When from one whom we love dear we are oft comitelled to hear 

Those cruel, heartless, parting words, "goo<i bye!" 

Do you recall the day when first we met? 

Those happy hours we spent, can you forget? 

Twas then you promisetl that you'd be 

As true as stars a Nive to me. .- 

I loved you then, dear one. I love you yet! 

You bid me go. but still you say not why. 

Nor tell me who's at fault, dear, you or I, 

But all tliat's left me. If we part. 

Are tears, regrets a broken heart. 

And mem'riesof tnose cruel words. " good-bye."— C;A«»t/». 

Charlie's Sweetheart 

r.pvrlKlit, l«97, by Harry F. Ciiok. W..i d« and Music by Harry F. Cook. 

When I was mamma's little darling, she held me on her knee; 

Now I am someone's sweetheart, he does the same to me. 

The lights in the parlor were dim as I sat on his knee. 

And he asked If his little sweetheart I would be. 

It made me feel, oh, so very, very queer; 

It might have been different had m.amma been near. 

CHORfS. 

Oh, isn't It nice, boys, yes, you all know; 

To be someone's sweetneart, to hug and kiss you so. 

The light in the parlor was dim, as I sat on his knee 

Listening to the sweet things he was saying to me. 

It made me feel, oh, so very, very queer; 

It might have been different, had mamma been near. 

Now there, dear, don't turn your face to the wall; 
III not give you away, Charfie, I'll not tell all. 
The lights in the parlor were dim, as I sat on his knee. 
Listening to the sweet promise you then made me. * 

It made me feel, oh, so very, very queer: 
It might have been different had mamma been near.— CAor»<#. 
Now Freddie dear says he'll have me, too, you see. 
And Charlie dear swears he can't live without me. 
r The lights In the parlor were dim, as I sat on his knee. 
And promised Charley his little sweetheart I would be. 
It made me feel, oh, so very, very (jueer; 
It might have been different, had mamma been near.— C^fi/«. 

SINOE MA PO' JOE'S GONE 

CnpyrlKlit, IBM. by Lohmann. Bcbeuer ATlmmaa. ' .' 

Ry Samuel Labman. 

Ise a-gwlne to tell you 'bout my po' boy Joe. ■' ' 

Dey done put him whar' I'll nebber see him mo'; 

For he's gone to Jinede angels, an' in healien he will lie, ,. ■ 

An' Ise a gwine to jine him w'en de gooil Lord calls on me. 

He was de only pickaninny dat 1 had. 

Now dey done took him an' Ise so awful sad. 

An' w'en I go whar' he used to play seems to me I hears him say: * 

Chorus. 

Mammy, come to me. come to me. . . ' ,■ - ■■■,. 

For Ise cotched a bee, cotched a biee, ■' , *. . 

An' he's trying very hard to bite me. . • " 

Mammy I'll do as you say an' let him free. 
All de little pickaninnys lub'd my Joe. •_;,.- 

Dey always used to follow him whare'er he'd go; • •' • '■■•■'-■ 

Dey would run around de hillside an' go flshln' In de branch. 
Den dey'd feetl de ducks an' chickens an' de cows down on de ranch. 
But now it is so diff'rent, since ma iio' chile's gone. 
De ole house seems so empty an" de day seem long. 
An' wen I go whar' he used to play seems to me I bears blm say:— t^. 



• T^- 



The Darkey's Home, Sweet Home I I WISH I GOULD SEE MOTHER NOW 



C<>prr<i{)it. 18M. by Jds. IfniTia. W<>r<l« Kiid Huaic by ClmB. E B<t*-r. 

There's a spot in Aliibama, where the birds sing all the day, / 

And nature seems to alwavs be in tune: 
Where the darkles gather nightly in the good old-fashioned way. 

And trum the banjo neath the Southern moon. 
■ It is there my heart is turning as 1 sit alone to-night, - ' 

The mein'ry brings the teardrop and a sigh. 
And I long to sit with Nellie by the little cabin white. 

And live again those happy days gone by. 

CHORL'S. 

The honeysuckle twines around the dear old cabin door. 

But strangers tread the path we lov'd to roam. 
And tho' now I'm far away, fancy lingers evermore. 
Round the darkeys home, sweet home. 

; Ev'ry note from my old banjo takes me back to her again. 

In dreams I see the path we loved to roam. 
And my eyes are red with weeping and my heart is sore with pain; 

I long to see our humble little home, 
Near the caDiii in the clearing there's a little mound alone. 

The breezes whisper softly as they blow. 
And the name of my dark Nellie is engraven on the stone, 

I placed it there just twenty years ago.— (/ko»M*. 

SHE WAS BORN IN OLD VIROINIA 



Uaed by peniii'wton of Langbnriie Hoiilc Co. 
Wortls by J Viokeiy Laiiithorne. 



Copyriifht, 1TO8. by J V. Lantchoriie. 
Music li\ Uobtri E. Wbitieiiiorf . 



You may all talk of your beauties, of the girls you've loved the best. 

But on a sunny Southern shore lived the one I loved ."^o dear: 

Her eyes were bright as dewdrops. and her cheeks blush'd like the rose; 

She was sweeter than the rarest flower that in any garden grows; 

I ttrst met her in the meadow— of course, by chance, you know. 

For the church path it runs through it, and tliere she'd always go. 

Then when a few weeks later, as I wandered by her side. 

A kiss I pressed upon lier lips, and asked her to be my bride. ". 

CHORI'S. 

She was born in old Virginia, she's a dangliter of the South, 
With eyes just like her native skies, pearly teeth and templing mouth; 
She was a dream of youthtul beauty, and I'll love her evermore. 
For the fairest girl in all the world lived on old Virginia's shore. 

M.tnv voars have pas.<ed since that day when she promised to be mine, 

Whlfe standing bv the old church wall, the bells did sweetly chime. 

Then lite seemed bright and joyful with that dear girl by my side. 

For she had made me happy, when yes she softly sighed, 

But now alone as sad I stand in that same old church-yard. 

For ray loved one she has passed away, and here lies lieneath the sod, 

My love for her it is the same, I long for her dear face: 

111 love her while life may last, no one can take her plRce— Cfwrut. 

PROMISE THAT YOU'LL WED ME 

Used by p«nnimion of Langiiorne Muaic Oo. Coprilcchr. 1898, by J. V. Langbonie. 
Wordn by flDOine A. Norton. Hunic by Robt. E. Wblttemore. 
1 love a little maiden young and fair. 
Her voice is like a gentle summer breeze, 
V. For other girls, alas! I do not care, ■■^■■. 

But her my one ambition is to please; 
We quarreled, but 1 met her, beneath the starry skies; 

That she d forgive me not I was afraid: 
But as I begged forgiveness, a light shone in her eyes. 
That encouraged me, and then to her I said: 

Chorus. 
Oh, my sweetheart, I love you. 

Give me your promise-darling, believe me. for I will be true; 
Don't cast me aside, dear, whate'er you may do; 
Promise that you'll wed me, for 1 love but you. 

Oh, tell me do you love me as of old. 

Is there love In your pure heart for me? 
Sweetheart, as your little hand I hold. 

So you hold my future destiny; 
Oh. do not keep me waiting, but whisper, " I love you." 

As I sjKjke thus, my sweetheart softly sighed; 
And as she gently whispered, in these words so sweet and true. 

To all my vows of love she then replied: 

Chorus. . : 

Oh, my sweetheart, I love you, 

I'll gladly wed you— dearest, believe me, I speak but those true, 
' -■ Sweet words that come in lo%e from my heart; 
Wed me, and in life we nevermore shall part. 

SPORTING SAL 

Used by permission of lAntrlixnie Music Co. Cnpyriglit, 1808. by J. V. Langhoriie. 
Word* by J. V. Lanifliorne. Music by John J. Oraf. 

■ . : '.. Listen, coons, and about her I will tell, 

De belle of the cake walk, she am dead swell. 

She am a trifle feveri.sli, an' sure as yer born, :. 

She's de onliesl gal what for me Has a charm; 

Take warning, niggers, don't try to cut a dash. 

If yer gets ferinilyer, coon, meat 1 will slash, 

, I'se a bad nigger when my blooil gets warm. 

Keep away from Sportin' Sal, or I'll do yer harm. 

Chorus.^ ' 

My Sal, she am to me de dearest coon gal. 

My heart goes flip flop when at her I gits a sight; 
Niggers, don't pine for dis yeller gal of mine. 

For I'oe marryln' her one day next Tuesday night. 

I first met her in de corn field. 
De kind moon lent us his bright light. 
' ' An' though I am a little cloudj-colored, > •; 

My S>ally she am very bright, ■ .. 

'- She was so sweet an enticing, ■. , -. • 

• As she was standin' right dere, 

,- Bat words of luv 1 said to her, 

Wid none but ears of corn to hear— CT/>r»i». 

■,'■:■'■_-■ At ev'ry dance around our town, ., . 

;;•>/■ "-■; It am dead sure dat ray Sal be found, . -^' \ ' ' 

■'.•"'"^' ■ De coons dey come from far and near 

To see the togs what Sally do wear: - v r- .. 

Klondike diamonds are the go, .v'.-'. ^ . 

And dem Sal wears, do become her BO, 

Dat when we whirl In airy maze. 

My Sportin' Sal am In a blaae.— CAortM. 



. .- Copyriicbr, 1895, by Pole Itauftbley. WordDaiiJ lIURic by Tele KaOghlOf'. 

, ■: . There's a moss-covered cot that is d ■ "^r 

Than a mansion would be to me. 
• Twas the homeof my dear old motliei, r 

And the place I am longing to see; 
Poor mother has died since 1 loft her. 

She rests with the angels, I trow; 
1 know she is happy in heaven. 
How I wish I could see mother now. 

Chorus. 
I wish I could see mother now, as she once fondly kissed my brow, [now. 
I'll meet her some day, in heaven 1 pray, how 1 wish 1 could see mother 

I remember the day.s of my childhood. 

And the pleasures 1 had when a boy. 
And the merary of my dear old mother 

Brings back to me many a joy; 
In fancy 1 see at the window 

My dear mother's fair wrinkled brow. 
And I Cherish the advice she gave me. 

How I wish I could see mother now.— C/ioru$. 

Tis years since I left her to wander. 

Alone o'er this wide world to roam. 
How often I've wished for my mother. 

And a sight of that once dear old home; 
She told me the day that I left her. 

To always be honest and true. 
And remeinl)er, my boy. while you're wand'rlng. 

Your mother's the best friend to you. (/(.«/ '.V 

You're All Right 

AS FAR AS YOUR MONEY GOES. 

Copyright, 1898, by Harry V. Cook. Wordsuiul Music by lUrry F. (^M■lc. 

While strolling out the other nicht the sltfhts to set*, 
I met a dashing girl, and this she said t^t me: ' 

i' " Ah! there, my dear, will you go out just for a lark 

This pleasant evening, as I strolle<l on through the park. 
We'll take In the sights, for everytKxly knows 
You're all right as far as your monej goes." 

Chorus. 
Boys, this is what she said to me in her winning way, 
" Remember when out fcr a lark, for plea.sures you must pay. 
So cheer up, my boy. for ov'r.vlKxl.N knows 
Youre all right as far as your money goes. 

Such sights did I see, and uch things did I hear. 
While going the rounds with this dashing dear. 
We wined and we <lined. :\t r.uch queer places did call. 
The wine, it flowed freely, so did whiskey and all, 
Such were the sights I ;-.aw, everylxKly knows 
You're all right as far as your money" goes. — f,V//>/ ..«. 

1 went rolling home with an elegant jag on. 

Got up m the morning with a doiil-le head on. 

Not a 'nic'" in my pocket to get a drink on. 

Not a friend to leiul me a dime on 

The rollickinar good time 1 had. it plainly shows 

You're all right as far as your money goes.— c'Aon*'. 

- Now all you young men that are going out for a lark. 
Beware of this young blonde that you'll meet in the park. 
While going the rounds, and the sights to see. 
She'll take yon in tow and break you as she did me: 
It's one of the pleasures you pay for. everylxxly knows 
You're all right as far as your money goes.— 1'//(//..*. . ' 

PRETTY EYES OF BLUE 

Copyii»{l't.lW8, by Harry F C'"lj. By Harry F. Cook. 

Do you remember parting at the gate? pretty eyes of blue; 

And the promise then you made? 'twas: " 1 love you. I'll Ije true." 

The stars were shining brightly, and the moon was smiling, too. 

As we stood at the gate, and I stole a kiss from you, 

'Twas the happiest moment of my life, 'tis true, 

The sweetest girl is my pretty eyes of blue. 

Chorus. 

Oft In dreams do I behold thee, ' 

And those pretty eyes of blue. 
How I long to smooth those golden tres.ses, 
; And kiss those lips of cherry hue. 

And press you to my heart, as in days of long ago. 

As we stood at the gate and Istole a kiss from you; 
'Twas the happie.st moment of mv life, 'tis true. 

The sweetest girl is my pretty eyes of blue. 

Fond recollection brings to me more dear, prettv eyes of bine; 

And the songs you often sweetly sang to me long it go. 

As we strolled by the bnKikside, and we cciurted in the t wiligiit. 

For you and I were lovers then, as we walked .^ide hy siU'^, 

Little did 1 think that we must part, 'tis true. 

From you, my own darling, pretty eyes of blue— CAor»/». 

Recall those unkind words, ray own. my dear, pretty eyes of bine; 
That makes us strangers now, though oix'e we were lovers true. 
The vow that thou hast broken dear, will surely break my heart. 
And from you. my darling. I can never, never part, 
'Twas the saddest moment of my life, tis true. 
When we had parted, my pretty eyes of blue.— CVi<<;-»/«. 

The Words and Music of either of the above 
songs will be mailed to any address, post-paid, on 
receipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copies, your 
selection, for ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHMAN, 

108 Park Row, New York. Catalogue of ail our publications mailed 

Free upon application. 




fW- 



Tse 6wine to Make a Home for Baby g There's Always a Welcome at Home 



• 'opyrlKht, »09, >>v Botinell * L<>«niiiieypr. 
Word« hy Ben IjOw<>iim«)nr Murl<' li) OIUi BonnelL 

I asked her to marry, and my lady love said, 

" First make a Jiome for your Jwiby: " 
Then this funny thought coHies into my head, 

•Til win at the races, maylte." 
I t)etR on a horse that was made of tin. 

Says 1. mister horse, won't yon please and win; 
That blame, lazy horse, he never came In, 

To make a home for my baby. 

Choris. 
So I'se got to quit ray sporting. 
Just one girl I 11 be courting. 
Then when I'm her suiHiorting, 
Come and dine with nie; 
Perhaps you may tliink it funny, 
I'se gwine to save my mf)ney, 
I'se g wine to make a home for baby. 

I went 'round the city with a lot of the boys. 

Just after leaving my baby: 
They were singing songs and making a noise, 

VMCh one was praising his baby; 
A round of the drinks it did come quite high. 

The Iwys siiid to me, '• It's your turn to buy," 
I gave tlieni the laugh, and then I did cry, 

r»e making a home for my baby.— </;o/"». ' 

I went out a walking In the mellow moonlight. 

Thinking o' nothing hut baby: 
When long comes a wizard with eyes so bright. 

Forgot all about my baby: 
Says .she, 'M'ome with me, and the sights I'll show." 

I ought to kuow more than with her to go. 
Before we got through I spent all my dough, 
' I nee<ied It for my baby.— 6'/(0»m#. 

It's All Cone Now 

• '..pviiirlit. MD<'C''XC1V. l.y Hci.rv J WVIiiiini. 
Worclii Bin! M118IC hy Wnltpr V. K«*«-ii 

I often sigh for absent friends and wish thev would return, 
Theres some whoowt* me money, and for tfieni 1 sadly vearn; 
I sigh for luy bright dollars that once made my heart rejoice, 
I .spent about a tliousand once to cultivate my voice. 

CnoRcs. 
But it's all gone now. it's all gone now. 
Though once it .sounded strong when I sang a little song; 
And I've bf>en sold, for I caught a cold 
Drinking from wet glasse.s, so it's all gone now. 

My brother never went to schtjol and yet he knows a lot. 
For lie can cure the toothache or most any pain you've got; 
He never uses medicine to cure each little ill. 
A man who had the rheumatism came to brother Bill— 



And it's all gone now. 



ClIORlS. 

it's all gone now; 



Before I cilVe." said he, " why, yonll have to pay my fee.' 
Then he paid Bill quick, and he made the man kick 
A hole right through a window, and the ranks gone now. 

Moloney was a pugilist, and in a finish fight 
The other fellow landed on his forehead with his right: 
It raised a tumor, and he sent a df^'tor on tlie case; 
The do*'tor gave a salve to cure the tumor on his face. 

CHORI'S. 

Its all gtme now, it's all gone now; 

The Ti'MoR left his head, but there's two morf. there instead; 

Still he kept right on, from night till morn. 

To use the salve until hia face Is all gone now. 

I never was a drinking man, but one thing I uphold. 
That is to keep some whiskey 'round for fear of catching cold; 
I kept a lK)ttle in my room for many months, you see. 
Until a pnjhibitionist came there to room with me. 

Choris. 

And. it's all gone now. it's all gone now; 
He said he came to town Just to put the liquor down; 
And me he did convince that he's done it ever since, 
I'll swear I never touched it, but It's all gone now. 

Si Perkins came to town last week and tried to do the grand. 
Me s.iid. '"By Uosli. Ill see the sights as long as I can stand." 
He walked as far as Hest<>r Street and met a pretty maid. 
And in his purse he had two hundred dollars, so he said. 

CnoRrs. 
It's all gone now. it's all gone now; 

She treated him so nice.. coml)ed his whiskers once or twice— 
AikI Si. by Oosh. on<!e owiie«l a watch, 
.\ diamond ring and locket, but they're all gone now. 

I met an i>ld schoolmate to day who reallv made me stare. 
For he was quite baldheaded.thoimh he once harl l«ive|y hair; 
lie told me how he io.^t it. 'twas in childhood, so he sauf. 
To iiieiid lus pants behind, his mother stood him on his head. 

ClIORfS. 

It's all gone now. he's bald John now: 

He'd a rabbit painted there, and vou'd swear It was a uabx. 

But a cinch he's tjot, for when the weather's hot 

He paints a cobweb on to keep the flies off now. 

The Words and Music of either of the above 
songs will be mailed to any address, post-paid, on 
receipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copies, your 
selection, for ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHMAN, 

108 Park Row. Diew Yoric. Catalogue ot all our publications mailed 

Fret upon application. 




Cn\,^ .HKlit, MDCCCXrvil. >>y (Uiiiy J. Wrhiiian. Word* and Huaic l>\ I'uv* Marlon. 
A gir!. whose age was Just nineteen, left on the world alone. 
With a little babe clasped to her breast, thought of days now past* gone; 
Her first tew months were happy and then his love grew cola. 
He said, " I care for you no more! " the story ofttimes told. . , 

To her parents she had written, and soon came a reply, ' . 

As she gazed into baby's face, a tear liedimmed her eye; 
How well slie knew the writing from mother far away. 
With trembling hand she breaks the seal, this Is what it did say: 

Rkfrain. 

There's always a welcome at home. 

In the same place we still live alone. 

What's been done has pa.ssed. so no questions we'll ask; 

"iou know we think of you where'er you may roam; 
Your little room looks Just the same. 
If you love us you'll come back again. 
We'll l)e happy once more, as in nays of yore. 

There's always a welcome at home. 

How she had loved and trusted him— her trust he did betray. 

And cruelly he left her then, as near death's d<x)r she lay; 

The parents read the letter, and with grief near went wild. 

The answer was sent l>ack that night to the i)oor, deserted child; 

Verv early the next moniltig she took a west lK)und train, 

Anci vowed that nevermore she'd leave the dear old home again; 

The little babe wiis laughing, the mother's heart was gay. 

For close to It the letter lay, whose contents read this way:— /.'#/"> oln. 

We Both Have the Same Dear Mother 

CopyrlKht MDCXXXCVI, •>> Henry J. Weliinan. 
Word* by A. Warren. Mtlalc liy Emily Smith. 

Two brothers met by chance upon the street one Sunday morn. 
One was dressed in grandest style, the other was ragged and torn— 
"Is that you. Jack? " the iX)or man said, but he received a frown. 
" I know you not." the rich man said, "so please pass up or down." 
The j)oor man skxxI amazed, and at his brother gazed. 

Thinking whether he would go or stay. 1 

He heaven a heavy sigh, with teardrops In his eye-s, y 1 

Then, turning to his brother, he did say: ' 

CHORfS. 

" We both have the same dear mother, we lived In the same old horae,^ . 
Though our stern, old father once had cast you off to roam, — - '" ~' 
We all have our faults in life-time, withsorrows and troubles to smother: 
My brother you'll Iw, thro' eternity, we both have the same dear mother," 
The brothers stood some nioinents there, and then the rich one said: I' 
" I know you'll forgive me, for you are my brother Ned. 
But come now, Ned, and tell me true, how is our mother dear. 
And stern, old father whom I had not stvii for many years!" 
PfX)r Ned then heaves a sigh, with siwl tears in his eyes. 

And with an aching heart, he starts to say: 
" C»ur poor old father aiul dear mother are both dead," 
Two brothers were united there that day.- 6'//o/ •<». 

After Your Wandering, Come Home 

•y'wpyilKht, .MOCCCXCV, l>y Henry J Wrlunan u.,i(liian<l MuhIi- l.y Chan Oraliam. 

A Story's often told about a maiden, young and fair. 
Who through her love and pride had left her home; 
And for awhile her loving parents inis.sed their la.s.sle there. 

Not knowing where their wandering pet would roam; 
At last she sent a message from a town not far away. 

And there she got a letter from her Dad. 
"You cant be happy now." he said: "you will return some day. 
And make our hearts again feel light and glad." 

Rk>°rai.s. 
" After your wandering, come home!" 

That's what she read In the letter; 
" Why did you leave us alone? 
No one could love you better; 
Keep this In mind, little girl. 

No matter wherever you roam. 
There are hearts fond and true, that are waiting for you— 
After your wandering, come home!" 
Twas all l)ecause her father did not like the boy she loved; 

"Come home, " he wrote, " and you can marry Jack; 
I know he loves our Bessie, and a worthy lad he's proved; . 

He's only waiting till you come liack." 
One morning. In the summer, she became a happy bride: 

The old man was not sorry, after all; 
Tho' Bessie went away awhile, 'twas all thro' lovpand pride. 
And often they the tender words recall:— //</fain. 

THINKING OF ONE SHE LOVES 

OopyrlKlit. MlMX'CXiUV, l>y Hfiiry J Wehinafi. Entered at Siatlnners' Hall. LonUmi. 
W.'rda l.y Tt.iii Conley. Munic by Friii McOleiiiioii. 

In a cosy little parlor sits a maiden, young and fair. 

And her eyes with love are shining, brightly golden Is her hair. 

Knitting deftly with her tieedle. as the gloaming's drawing nigh. 

But of whom is she now tWnklng. as she breathes a tender sign? 

She is thinking of her laddl^; far away from her is he. 

For he is a gallant sjillor, and his home is on the sea. 

Day by day the maiden watches, from her iM>st she'll never stir. , 

For She knows the time Is coming when he 11 soon return to her. 

Choros. j 

Thinking of one she loves, dearer to her than life; ' 

How her heart yearns; when he returns, she'll be his own dear wlfei 
Praying that he'll lie safe, safe on the angry foam. 
Praying each night to Heaven al»ove, to send him back safely home. 

Well, the story is but simple, for. when little children, they 

Always played and romped together. In the sweetly, new-mown hay. 

Years rolled on, thev still were faithful, love's sweet passion on them grew 

And when he sjiile<I on the ocean, how he vow'd that he'd be true. * 

And the maiden still proved constant, as the weary years rolled by; 

Now she's waitlnir for hor lover, for the time Is drawing nigh. 

Hark: the clock is softly ticking, and she never hesitates. 

But she sits there in the parlor, and she watches, hopes, and waits.— f%o 

But one day, in early spring-time, there's a dear, familiar voice. 

And a step she hears approaching makes her eager heart rejoice; 

Then a sailor, brown and sun burnt, clasps his darling In his arms; 

On her lips he rains sweet ki.sses, and he soothes her fond alarms. 

They were married at the little village church upon the green, ■ "* 

It was but a simple wedding, but a happy, peaceful scene. '■}' " 

Now the maiden is contented, swiftly by the time does flit. 

But she always will remember wheii alone she UBed to sit.- CAorui, 



There'll Never Be a Girl Like You 

Oopriicht. MW, by Bowley, HaTlland ft Co. EiifflUh copyriKlit recnred. 
Br Karl Keiinett A Lyii Udall. 

I have known a score of maidens whom I thought were perfect quite. 

And some whom I deemed even something more; 
There was Rose and Kate und Molly, each in turn was my delight, 

For I thought each fairer than the one before. 
Although I loved them dearly and I love tham dearly still. 

And ever to their memory rm true. 
There's a diff'rent charm about you, and deny it tho' you will. 
There will never be a girl like you. 

Refrain. 
There may be girls as pretty. Just as witty and as smart; 
There may be girls as loyal, just as loving and as true. 
But there's something dear about you that has wiiisper'd to my heart. 
There will never, no tuere'll never be a girl like you. 
Tho' I cannot quite explain it, and 1 know not where It Ilea, 

Tls with you, love, wherever you may be; 
In the music of your laughter, in the shyness of your eyes, ^ 

For the pure and tender heart you gave to me. 
In years that lie before us. tho" we may drift far apart, 

Youll find me ever loving, ever true. 
And I never shall forget you, for I know within my heart 
There will never be a girl like you.— ^</'»ai«. 

TWO SWEETHEARTS OF MINE 

Oopyrlsht, 1M7, by J. C Qroene A Co. Word* by E P. Moran. Made by J. Frad Holt. 

A crowd of young fellows one night at a club 

Were telling of sweethearts they had; 
All of them jolly eroding one youth. 

And he ■eemed downhearted and sad. 
"Come, N«4,rWonH yo'h join us." his comrades then asked, 

" For s«reIS''B«aae girl has loved you; " 
Then raising his head, as proudly he said, 
" Why. boys, I'm In love with two." < , 

Chorcs. 
**One has hair of sllv'ry gray, the other just like gold, 
One Is gay and youthful, white the other's bent and old; 
But dearer than life are both to me, and from neither would I part. 
One is my mother, God bless her, I love her, the other is my sweetheart." 
^^ • My sweetheart, you see, is a poor working girl, 
But still I'm determined to wed; 
My father says, '• No. it can never be 80, 

Go marry an heiress Instead." 
I've won mother over, she knows how it is. 

When father met her she was poor; 
She says, " Ned, don't fret, she'll be your wife yet, 
... Father will consent, I am sure."— 1/»(»"». 

Since Mary Harris Went to Paris 

Oopyrlfbt, 1897, by SpauldinR <K Oray. Entered at Stationers' Hall, London. 
Wonis and Mnnlc by Wm. B nr»y. 

A girl named Mary Harris said She'd like to Visit Paris, 

And her father, who's a millionaire, said, " Daughter, we shall go." 
Both bright and happy-hearted they were when the ship departed 

For the land of sun and flowers, which Napoleon worshiped so; 
They hadn't been in Paris but a week, when Ml.ster Harris 

Said he thought it i)esjt for Mary if no longer there they'd stay; 
Directly home he brought her, Mary said he hadn't oughter, 

But the people in the village with a knowing twinkle say: 

Chorus. 
Since Mary Harris went to Paris, oh. dear me ! 
It seems so strange that such a change in her could bel 
Before she left she'd never heard the saying, glass of t)eer; 
But ask her now to have one, and she'll answer we muasieurl 
A girl named Kate McCarty with her sister gave a party. 

They invited Mary Harris, who had just returned from France. . 
They'd lots of fun and singing, and a shout of joy went ringing 

Thro' the house when Mary Harris said, " Suppose we have a dance." 
The girls began debating and. without a moment waiting, 

Marv started in to show them how to dance the French Quadrille; 
Then Kicking high and prancing round the room she went a-dancing, 
And though all this happened weeks ago, the folksare saying still:— cAo. 

I Can'l Give up My Rough & Rowd'ish 



Copyricbt, 1198, by Spauldlifr & Oray. Ent»red at Statiouen' Hall, London, Eoc 
Word* and mupic by 0«o. Qraham. 

My name is 'Rastus .Tohnson, I'm known for miles around 

As the very toughest nigger that is In this town; 

I raise all kmd of trouble at a picnic or a ball, 

I make all de coons stand back, for I can skeer dem all; 

When I gets arrested, one policeman can't take me. 

To get me to the station-house, it takes some two or three; ' ' 

And when dey puts me in der jail, why I don't feel so sore. 

For jail la just like home to me, for I've been dere before. 

Chorus. 
I can't five up my rough and rowd'ish ways; 
I suppose I'll be der same all of my days; 
Ana wherever I does go, de people dey all know 
I can't give up my rough and rowd'ish ways. 

I went to a camp meeting, it was the other night. 

And I only went dere just to raise a fight; 

De preacher he was preaching as hard as he could preach. 

When I took out my razor and cut ev'ry coon in reach. 

De brothers and de sisters, dey all hollered long and loud. 

When I sailed right In again and cleaned out de whole crowd; 

De preacher says: " Now, Johnson, why did you behave dat wayT " 

I only looked up at him, and dese words to him did a&y:—<Aoru$. 

The Words and Music of either of the aiwve 
songs will be mailed to any address, post>paid, on 
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selection, for ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHMAN, 
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i^p^k 



Rnw H< 



OLD JIM'S CHRISTMAS HYMN 

C.'i'} riitht. IM6. by BpntildlMir & riray. R.iteied at 8iatlon«n' Ball, Londo*. 

Word* »<iil Muxto I.} Wm. B. Oray. „^,.^ . ; • i. ' 

Old Jim was a chanicter, well known about the town. 

From singing in the village church he'd gained a great renown; 

To hear him sing each Sunday morn, to church the gotxi folks came. 

But soon he drifted downward to a drunkard's life of shame, [away, 

Though year* had passed since poor old Jim from church hjid strayed 

He told the parson he would sing that coming Christmas Day; 

When Christmas came within that church there sat in every seat 

A saddened heart when Jim arose and sang so soft and sweet: i 

Chorus. ^ I 

Rock of Ages, cleft for me, each eye with tears was dim; 
Rock of Ages, cleft for me, that was old Jims Christmas hymn. 
Christmas days will come and go, and so will Chri.stmas hymns. 
But never wiil there be a song to equal that of Jims; 
The song of - Rock of Ages " all thro' life had bef n his choice. 
For when a child 'twas taught him by his dear old mother's voice. 
Within those same old sacred walls, in Christian son^s of praise. ! 

His voice liad oft been heard before, since early chlldliood days. 
But sweeter tar than ever it was now to that great throng. 
When gathered therefon Christmas morn, to hear Jim sing his song:— Oho. 

THE BLAOK FOUR HUNDRED 

Copyrlffbt, 1IW7, by S|>auldin(r & Oray. Entered nt Stationers' Hull, London. 
Words and Huxic by IrvinK Junes. 

There's a club called Black Four Hundred, its composed of dead swell 

It's hotter than theSkidmore Guards, or the Order of Full Moons; [coona, 

You'll .see the latest styles and fashions when these coons parade, 

They lay all other coon clubs In the shade; 

You must wear pearls and diamonds if you want to l>e in line. 

You've got to be a hot coon, and your clothing must be line, . ■ 

And when those coons turn out on Emancipation Day, 

On the corners you will hear the wenches say: 

Chorus. 
See the Black Four Hundred a-coming down the street: 
Now, don't those coons look hot as along the street they trotT 
If you listen, you'll hear the kinkey-headed wenches say: 
The Black Four Hundred are on parade to-day. 

If you want to be a member, you must l>e an aristocrat. 

You must wear patent-leather shoes, and a great big beaver hat; 

For drilling and cake-walking, why, our equals can't be found. 

The white folks saj' we're the hottest coons in town; 

We're going to give a picnic and we're bound to have a crowd. 

Because both guns and razors on the grounds will be allowed; 

We're going to give a grand parade, quite early in the day. 

Upon Fifth Avenue you'll hear them say:— 67iW((*. 

EVERY DAY AT THE STATION 

Copyriirht, 1897, by Carleton, Cavanatrh & Co. Words and Music by Uuasle L. Uarls. 

At a little railroad station sits an old man ev'ry day. 

Waiting as tho' he expected some one from the far away. 

And at night he homeward totters, with a teardrop In his eye. 

To himself he sadly murmurs, she is coming bye and bye. 

Now bereft of all his reason, with a sister lives alone. 

When a young man made a fortune, built a mansion of his own; 

But his fondest hopes were shattered, wlien a message came one day. 

And the mem'ry haunts him ever, tho' he's feeble, old and gray. 

Choris. 
Every day at the station he waits and waits in vain. 
Watching the many faces that pass on every train; 
Who can it be that he sighs for from morniiig till eventide. 
Every day at the statior. he waits for a promised bride. 

Listen, I will tell the story, o'er and o'er it's told each day. 

How when young he loved a inai<lt'n, were engageti, the people say; 

On the morning of the wedding went to meet her at the train. 

But a message handed to him broke his heart and wrecked his brain; 

Thus it read: "The train has Ijeen wrecked that was bringing you your 

My God, have I lost my darllngi this the man then sadly cried, [bride." 

Back to home then kind friends led him, where the wedding feast was 

Ev'ry day since then he's waited at the station for the dead.— C'ho. [spread, 

MR. JOMMSON 

Copyriicbt, 1890, by Frank Hardintr. Wur<l8 aixl Muxic l>y lien K. Harney. 

T'other eb'ning when eb'rytlng was still, oh babe, 

De moon was climbin' down behind de hill, ^ \be; 

T'ought eb'rybody was a sound asleep. 

But a old man a Johnson was a on his beat, oh, babe. 

I went down into a nigger crap game. 

Where de coons were a-gambling wid a might and main; 

T'ought I'd a be a sport and be dead game; 

I gambled my money and I wasn't to blame; 

One nigger's point was a little, a Joe, 

Bettin' six bits t'a quarter he coirid" make de four; 

He made that point, but he made no more. 

Just den Johnson jump'd through de door. 

■ Chorus. 

Oh, Mr. Johnson, turn me loose. 
' Got no money but a good excuse; 

Oh, Mr. Johnson, I'll be good. 
• - Oh. Mr. Johnson, turn me loose; 
■ Don't take me to de calab<x)se; 

Oh, Mr. Johnson, I'll be good. 

Late de other eb'ning when the sun was down, oh, babe; 
I went down on old man Johnson's chicken farm, oh, babe; 
Climbed in the chicken loft on my knees. 
Was a half way a through when the chicken sneezed, oh, babe. 
I'll tell you. if you will only keep still. 
'Bout a mile and a half from Louisville; 
. I am so nerbotis dat I can't keep still, ^ ' . "• 

T^Tien I think about it I can feel a big chill. ., - 

A big black coon was a lookln' fer chickens. 
When a great big bull-dog got to raisin" the dickens; - - ; 
De coon got higher, de chicken got nigher, .>, ■ '" 

; - J***' <^®° Johnson opened up Are. :.; , 

Chorus. ■;• ^f ' 

, .' ::• I got no chance for to be turped loose, . ;='■ 

.--:'. Got no chance for a good excuse. 

w^ -.' : V. r Oh, Mr. Johnson, 111 be good; - 

'^. ■ ■'.'; ■ . ; -.■•".^ Aiid now he's plavin' seben eleben, 
• . ■- . -. ;- '.,'',\ 'Way up yonder in the nigger heab'a; 
Oa, Mr. Johnson made QUD good. 



twa^u^Mbkic 



■*v.; 



rse Gwine to Make a Home for Baby 

fopyrlRht, mtO. tiv Bunnell * I/infumeypr. 
Words by Ben Lowdim«>«r Miirli- li> Olt<> Ronnell. 

I asked her to marry, and my lady love said, 

" First niiike a lioiiie for your baby; " 
Then this funny thought coHies into my head, 

■' I'll win at the races, niayt)e." 
I bets on a horse that was made of tin. 

Says I, mister horse, won't yon please and win; 
That blame, lazy horse, he never came in. 

To malce a home for my baby. 

Choris. 

So I'se got to quit my sporting. 

Just one Kirl I 11 tie courtintj. 

Then when I'm lier sunnortinK, 
'■ Come and dine witli nie"; 

} Perhaps you may tliink it funny, 

II'sw KwlnV to save my nujiiev, 
r.se Rwine to malie a liome for baby. 

I went "round the city with a lot of the »)oy.s. 

Just after leaving my baity. 
They were sinning songs-and making a iioi.<W5, 

Eaoli cine was praising lils twiiiy; 
A round of the drinks it did come quite high. 

The Iwvs .saiil to me, '• Its your turn to buy." 
1 gave tliem the laugh, and then I did cry, 

Ise making a tionie for my iKiby. — (7(o/ ./». 

I went nut a walking in the mellow moonlight. 

Thinking o' nothing but baby: 
When long comes a wizard with eyes so bright. 

Forgot all about my bjiby: 
Says she, 'Come with me, and the sights I'll show," 

I ought to know more than with her to go. 
Before we got through I spent all my dough, 

I nee«ied It for my baby.— t'//OTM«. 

It's All Cone Now 

r..,.vil,jlit. MlX'Ci'XliV. Iiy Heiry J Wflmiiin 
, Woriln aixl Miioio l>y Walter I'. Kt-fii 

I often sigh for absent friends and wish thev would return. 
There's some wln» owe me money, and for tfiem 1 sadly vearn; 
1 sigh for my bright dollars that once made my heart rejoice, 
I spent atxiut a thousand once to cultivate my voice. 

ClIORtS. 

But it's all gone now. its all gone now. 
Though once it sounded strong when I .sang a little song; 
, And I've been sold, for I caught a cold 

Drinking from wwt gla.sae.s. so it's all gone now. 

My brother never went to school and yet he knows a lot. 
For lie can cure the toothache or most any pain you've got; 
He never uses medicine to cure each little ill. 
I A man who liad the rheumatism came to brother Bill— 

ClIORIS 

And it's all gone now. its all gone now; 

" Before I rilVe." .said he, " why, you'll have to pay my fee." 

Then he paid Bill quick, and he made the man kick 

A hole right through a window, and the pank's gone now. 

5Ioloney was a pugilist, and in a finish flght 
The other fellow laiuhnl on his forehead with his right: 
It raised a tumor, and he sent a dcx-tor on the case; 
The d(j<-tor gave a siilve to cure the tumor on his face. 

Choris. 
It's all gone now, it's all gone now; » 

The u'MoR left his hend. hut there's two more there instead; 
Still he kept right on. from ruglit till morn. 
To use the salve until his face Is all gone now. 

I never was a drinking man, but one thing I uphold. 
That is to keep some whiskey 'round for fear of catching cold; 
I kept a bottle in my room for many months, you see, 
'> Until a prohibitionist came there to room with me. 

Choris. 

And. it's all gone now. It's all gone now; 
He siiid he came to town Just to put the liquor down; 
Anil me he did convince that he's done It ever since. 
I'll swear I never touched it, but it's all gone now. 

SI Perkins came to town last week and tried to do the grand. 
He SHid, "By (Josh, III s»h! the sights as long as I can stand." 
He walked as far as Hester Street and met a pretty maid. 
And in his purae he had two hundred dollars, so he said. 

Chorus. 

, It's all gone now. It's all gone now; 

siie treated him so nice, coml)e«l his whiskers once or twice— 

And Si, by Oosh, once owiu»il a watch. 

.\ diamond ring and locket, but they're all gone now. 

I met an old schoolmate today who reallv made me stare. 
For he was quite biildheaded.thouirh he once had lovely hair; 
II- told me how ho lost it, 'twas in chlldhcKKl. so he saitf, 
Tu mend his pants behind, his mother stood htm on hi8 head. 

CMORf.<». 

It's all gone now. he's bald .lohn now: 

He'd a rabt)lt painted there, and you'd swear tt was a hark. 
hut a cinch he's got, for when the weather's hot 
' He paints a cobweb on to keep the flies off now. 



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There's Always a Welcome at Home 

(•^oi.. .•iiflit, MDCCCXi'VlI. Uj Henry J. Wv'hnian. Word* aod Music ^>^ I'uvm Marion. 

A gir", whose age was Just nineteen, left on the world alone. 
With a little babe clasped to her breast, thought of days now past* sone; 
Her first tew months were happy and then his love grew cold. 
He said, " I care for you no more! " the story ofttimes t<)Id. 
To her parents she had written, and soon came a reply, 
As she trazed into baby's face, a tear l)edimnied her eye; 
How well slie knew the writing from mother far away. 
With tremhiing hand she breaks the seal, this Is what It did say: 

Rkfrain. 

There's always a welcome at home. 

In the same place we still live alone. 

What's beext done has passed, so no questions we'll ask; 
■^'oii know we think of you where'er you may roam; 

■Your little room looks just the same. 

If you love us you'll come back again. 

We'll be happy once more, as In days of yore. 
There's alwa.v8 a welcome at home. 

How she had loved and trusted him— ner trust he did tietray. 

And cruelly he left her then, as near death's diwr she lay; 

The parents read the letter, and with grief near went wild. 

The answer was sent Uick that night to the poor, deserted child; 

Very early the next morning she took a westltound train. 

And vowed that nevermore she'd leave the dear old home again; 

The little biit)e wiis laughing, the mother's heart was gay, r 

For close to it the letter lay, whose contents read this way:— /.e/iain. [ 

We Both Have the Same Dear Mother 

CopyrlKht MDCCCXCVI, liy Henry J. WeluiiMi. 
WordH by A. Warren. Miinlc by Emily Smith. 

Two brothers met by chance upon the street one Sunday morn, ( 

One was dressed in grandest style, the other was nvgged and torn— 
"Is that you. Jack? " the poor man said, but he received a frown. 
" I know you not," the rich man said, "so please pass up or down." 
The poor man stciod amaze<l, and at his brother gazed. 

Thinking whether he would go or stay. 
He heave<l a heavy sigh, with teardrops In his eyes. 

Then, turning to his brother, he did say: 

CHORI'S. 

*' We l)Oth have the same dear mother, we lived In the same old home, , . 

Though our stern, old father once had cast you off to roam. 

We all have our faults in life-time, with sorrows and troubles to smother: 

My brother you'll l»e. thro' eternity, we Ixith have the sjime dear mother." 
The brothers stood some moments there, and then the rich one said: 
" I know you'll forgive me, for you are my brother Ned. 
But come now, Ned, and tell me true, how is our mother dear, I 

And stern, old father whom I had not seen for many years? " 
Poor Ned then heaves a siirh. with sjid tears in his eyes, | 

And with an aching heart, he starts to say: . i 

" f »ur poor old father and dear mother are both dead," 1 

Two brothers were united there that day.- 6'/'0/"». ' 

After Your Wandering, Come Home 

<'upy><ffht. MIKX'CXCV, by Henry J Wehmaii tt ..ids and Muiib' by Cha« Oraliam. 

A Story's often told alx)ut a maiden, young and fair. 

Who throuKh her love and pride had left her home; 
And for awhile her loving parents nii.ssed their la.ssie there. 

Not knowing where their wandering pet would roam; 
At last she sent a me.ssage from a town not far away. 

And there she got a letter from her Dad. 
" Vou cant be happy now." he said: "you will return some day. 

And make our hearts again feel light and glad." 

RErRAl.N. 

"After your wandering, come home!" 

That's what she read in the letter; 
" Why did you leave us alone? 

No one could love you better; 
Keep this in mind, little girl. 

No matter wherever you roam. 
There are hearts fond and true, that are waiting for you— 

After your wandering, come home I" 

Twas all t>ecau8e her father did not like the boy she loved; 

" Come home," he wrote, " and you can marry Jack; 
I know he loves our Bessie, and a worthy lad he's proved; 

He's only waiting till you come back." 
One morning, in the summer, she tiecame a happy bride: 

The old man was not sorry, after all; 
Tho' Bessie went away awhile, "twas all thro" love and pride. 

And often they the tender words recall:— //«riain. j 

THINKING OF ONE SHE LOVES 

OopyrlRht. MIMX^CXt^JV. by Hriiry J Weliinafi. Entered at Slatlonert' Hall, LoDdun. 
Word* l>y Tom Conley. Muxlc by Felix McOteiiiioii. 

In a cosy little parlor sits a maiden, young and fair. 

And her eyes with love are shining, brightly golden Is her hair. 

Knitting deftly with her needle, as the gloaming's drawing nigh. 

But of whom is she now tliinking, as she breathes a tender sight 

She is thinkiiur of her laddf^; far away from her is he. 

For he is a gallant sjillor. and Ills home is on the sea. 

Day by day the maiden watches, from her |)ost she'll never stir, , 

For she knows the time is coming when he 11 soon return to her. 

Chori'«. j 

Thinking of one she loves, dearer to her than life; ' . 

How her heart yearns; when he returns, she'll lie his own dear wife. 

Praying that he'll be safe, safe on the angry foam. 

Praying each night to Heaven al>ove, to send him back safely home. 
Well, the story Is but simple, for. when little children, they 
Always playe<l and romped together, in the sweetly, new-mown hay. 
Years roiled on, thev still were faithful, love's sweet passion on them "grew 
And when he sallecf on the ocean, how he vow'd that he'd lie true. ' 
And the maiden still proved constant, as the weary years rolled by; '| 
Now she's waiting for her lover, for the time is drawing nigh. 
Hark: the clock is softly ticking, and she never hesitates. 
But she sltJB there in the parlor, and she watches, hopes, and waits.— C/to' ' 

But one day. In early spring-time, there's a dear, familiar voice. 
And a step she hears approaching makes her eager heart rejoice; 
Then a sailor, brown and sun-burnt, clasps his darllna: In his arms; 
On her lips he rains sweet kisses, and he soothes her fond alarms. 
They were married at the little village church upon the green, - 
It was but a simple wedding, but a happy, peaceful scene. 
Now the maiden Is contente<l, swiftly by the time does flit. 
But she always will rememl)er when alone she used to sit.— CAorti^. 



There'll Never Be a Girl Like You 

Oopyricht. UW, by Howl«r , BaTiUind A Co EiiKlUh copyrifcht i>eciired. 
By Karl Keiinett & Uyi> UOkII. 

I have known a score of maidens whom I thought were perfect qult«. 

And some whom I deemed even something more; 
There was Rose and Kate and Molly, each In turn was my delight, 

For I thought each fairer than the one before. 
Although Iloved them dearly and 1 love them dearly still, 

And ever to their memory I'm true. 
There's a dlff'rent charm about you, and deny It tho' you wtll. 
There will never be a girl like you. 

Refrain. 
There may be girls as pretty, Just as witty and as smart; 
There may be girls as loyal, just as loving and as (rue. 
But there 8 something dear about you that has wlilsper'd to my heart. 
There will never, no there'll never be a girl like you. 
Tho' I cannot quite explain it, and 1 know not where It lies, , 

Tis with you, love, wherever you may be; 
In the music of your laughter, in the shyness of your eyes. - 

For the pure and tender heart you gave to me. 
In years that He before us, tho' we may drift far apart, .' 

YouU find me ever loving, ever true, "^ 

And I never shall forget you, for I know within my heart ' 

There will never be a girl like yon.— lie ft aiu. 

TWO SWEETHEARTS OF MINE 

Copyright, in7, by J. C Qr««ne * (^o. Word* by E P. Moran. Uuote by J. Fred HoU. 

A crowd of young fellows one night at a club 

Were telling oreweethearta they had; 
All of them Jolly excepting one youth. 

And he ieenKJd downhearted and sad. 
" Come, Nad, ^on'< yo'u loin us." his comrades then asked, 

"For s«ireT$^ine girl has loved you; " 
Then raising his head, as proudly he said, . 

"Why, boys, I'm in love with two." 

Chorcs. , ' 

" One has hair of sllv'ry gray, the other just like gold. 
One Is gay and youthful, while the other's bent and old; 
But dearer than life are both to me, and from neither would I part. 
One is my mother, God bless her, I love lier, the other is my sweetheart." 

My sweetheart, j'ou see, is a poor worlting girl, 

But still I'm determined to wed; - . 

My father says, " No, it can never be so. 

Go marry an heiress instead." 
I've won mother over, she knows how it t«. 

When father met her she was poor; 
She says, " Ned, dont fret, she'll be your wife yet, ' 

Father will consent, 1 am sure."— t7iw/». 

Sinee Mary Harris Went lo Paris 

Oopyrlgbt, 1897, by SpauldInK <)t Gray. Entered at Stationers' Hall, London. 
Words and Music by Wm. B Oray. 
A girl named Mary Harris said she'd like to visit Paris, 

And her father, who's a millionaire, said, "Daughter, we shall go." 
Both bright and happy-hearted they were when the ship departed 

For the land of sun and flowers, which Napoleon worshiped so; 
They hadn't been In Paris but a week, when Mister Harris 

Said he thought it liest for Mary If no longer there they'd stay; 
Directly home lie brought her, Mary said he hadn't oughter, . 

But the people in the village with a knowing twinkle say: 

Chorus. 
Since Mary Harris went to Paris, oh. dear me I 
It seems so strange that such a change in her could be ! 
Before she left she'd never heard the saying, glass of beer; 
But ask her now to have one, and she'll answer we mussieurl 

A girl named Kate McCarty with her sister gave a party, 

They Invited Mary Harris, who had Just returned from France. 
They'd lots of fun and singing, and a shout of joy went ringing 

Thro' the house when Mary Harris said. " Suppose we have a dance." 
The girls began debating and, without a moment waiting, 

Mary started in to show them how to dance the French Quadrille; 
Then Kicking high and prancing round the room she went a-dancing, 

Andtbougn all this liappened weeks ago, the folks are saying still:— C'Ao. 

f Can't fiiveupMy Rough & Rowd'ish 



Copyrlcht, lUt, by Spanldli'K A Gray. Entered at Statinnen' Hall, London, Eng 
Words and music by Geo. Graham. 

My name is 'Rastus .Tohnson, I'm known for miles around 

As the very toughest nigger that is in this town; 

I raise all kind of trouble at a picnic or a ball, 

I make all de coons stand back, for I can skeer dem all; 

When I gets arrested, one policeman can't take me. 

To get me to the station-house, It takes some two or three; 

And when dey puts me in der jail, why I don't feel so sore, 

For Jail l8 just like home to me, for I've been dere Iwfore. 

», CHORrs. 

I can't give up my rough and rowd'ish ways; 

^ I suppose I'll be der same all of my days; 

And wherever I does go, de people dey all know 
I can't give up my rough and rowd'ish ways. 

I went to a camp me'^ting, it was the other night, 

And I only went dere just to raise a fight; 

De preacher he was preaching as hard as he could preach. 

When I took out my razor and cut ev'ry coon in reach. • - 

De brothers ami de sisters, dey all hollered long and loud. 

When I .sailed right in again and cleaned out de whole crowd; 

De preacher says: " Now, Johnson, why did you l)ehave dat wayT " 

1 only looked up at him, and dese words to him did s&y.—rhorui. 

The Words and Music of either of the above 

songs will be mailed to any address, post-paid, on 

receipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copies, your 

selection, for ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHMAN, 

Row, HvM YoriL Catalogue ef all our publications malM 




W^'' 



OLD JIM'S OHRISTMAS HYMN 

0<>i>} ri|{ht, 1896, by SpnuldliiK A Gray. Enteied at Slationert' Ball, Loudon. 
Words aiut Music l.y Win. B. Gray. 

Old Jim was a character, well known about the town, - 

From singing in the village church he'd gained a great renown; 
To hear him sing each Sunday morn, to church the gotxl folks c^me. 
wot soon he drifted downward to a drunkard's life of shame. [away, 
Though year* had pas.sed since poor old Jim from church had strayed 
He told the parson he would sing that coming Christmas Day; 
When Christmas came within that church there sat in every seat , 

A saddened heart when Jim arose and sang so soft and swi>et : 

CHORrs. ~ I 

Rock of Ages, cleft for me, each eye with tears was dim; 
Rock of Ages, cleft for me, that was old Jims Christmas liyma. 
Christmas days will come and go, and so will Chri.-^tmas hymns. 
But never will there be a song to equal that of Jiiir.«<; 
The song of " Rock of Ages " all thro' life had been his choice. 
For when a child 'twas taught him by his dear old mother".>< voice, . 
Within those same old sacred walls, in Christian songs of jiralse. ^ 

His voice had oft Ijeen heard before, since early chlidhocxl days. 
But sweeter tar than ever it was now to that great throng. 
When gathered there|on Christmas morn, tohear Jim sing his song:— r7A«. 

THE BLACK FOUR HUNDRED 

Copyright, 1897, by Spaulding A Oray. Entoied at Stationers' Hall, London. 
Wurds and Muaic by Irv'liiK Jones. 

There's a club called Black Four Hundred, its composed of dead swell 
It's hotter than theSkidmore Guards, or the Order of Full Moons; [coooa, 
You'll see the latest styles and fashions when these coons parade. 
They lay all other coon clubs In the shade; 
You must wear pearls and diamonds If you want to be in line. 
You've got to be a hot coon, and your clothing must be fine. 
And when those coons turn out on Emancipation Day, 
On the corners you will hear the wenches say: - ■ 

Chorcs. 

See the Black Four Hundred a-coming down the street; 

Now. don't those coons look hot as along the street they trotT 

If you listen, you'll hear the klnkey-headed wenches say: 

The Black Four Hundred are on parade to-day. 

If you want to be a member, you must be an aristocrat. 

You must wear patent-leather shoes, and a great big t)eaver hat; 

For drilling and cake-walking, why, our equals can't be found. 

The white folks say we're the hottest coons In town; 

We're going to give a picnic and we're bound to have a crowd. 

Because Ixjth guns and razors on the grounds will be allowed; 

We're going to give a grand parade, quite early in the day. 

Upon Fifth Avenue you'll hear them say:— C/m;»(/». . - 

EVERY DAY AT THE STATION 

Copyrifclit, 1807, by Cai leton, CaTaoaeh A Co. Words and Music by Uuasie L. UaTls. 
At a little railroad station sits an old man ev'ry day. 
Waiting as tho' he expected some one from the far away. 
And at night he homeward totters, with a teardrop in his eye. 
To himself he sadly murmurs, she Is coming bye and bye. 
Now bereft of all his reason, with a sister lives alone, 
W' hen a young man made a fortune, built a mansion of his own; 
But his fondest hopes were shattered, when a message came one day. 
And the mem'ry haunts him ever, tho' he's feeble, old and gray. 

Choris. 
Every day at the station he waits and waits In vain. 
Watching the many faces that pass on every train; 
Who can it be that he sighs for from morning "till eventide. 
Every day at tJie statlor. he waits for a promised bride. 

Listen, I will tell the story, o'er and o'er It's told each day. 

How when young he loved a maiden, were engaged, the i)eople say; 

On the morning of the wedding went to meet her at the tr.lln. 

But a message handed to him broke his heart and wrecked his brain; 

Thus it read: 'The train has Ijeen wrecked that was bringing you your 

My God, have I lost my darling! this the man then sjidly cried, (bride" 

Back to home then kind friends led him, where the wedding feast was 

Ev'ry day since then he's waited at the station for the dead.— cVto. [spread, 

Ml?. JOMMSOM 

Copyriirht, 1896, by Frank Hardinir. Wurils ami Munc liy hen K. Harney. 

T'other eb'nlng when eb'rytlng was still, oh, L 
De moon was climbin' down behind de hill, oh, b.. «; 
T'ought eb'rybody was a sound asleep. 
But a old man a Johnson was a on his beat, oh, habe. 
I went down Into a nigger crap game, 
Where de coons were a-gambling wid H might and main; 
T'ought I'd a t>e a sport and be dead game; 
I gambled my money and I wasn't to blame; 
One nigger's point was a little, a Joe, 
Bettm' six bits t'a quarter he could make de four; 
He made that point, but he made no more. 
Just den Johnson jump'd through de door. 
CHORrs. 
- Oh, Mr. Johnson, turn me loose. 

Got no money but a good excuse; 

Oh, Mr. Johnson, I'll be good. 
Oh, Mr. Johnson, turn me loose; 
Don't take me to de calaboose; 
Oh, Mr. Johnson, I'll be good. 

Late de other eb'nlng when the sun was down, oh. babe; 

I went down on old man Johnson s chicken farm, oh, babe; 

Climbed in the chicken loft on my knees. 

Was a half way a through when the chlckeu sneezed, oh, babe. 

I'll tell you. If you will only keep still, 

'Bout a mile and a half from Louisville; - ■ ■ ..;; ' - ,• 

I am so nerbous dat I can't keep still, .: ' 

WTien I think about it I can feel a big chin, . , ■: 

A big black coon was a lookln' fer chickens. 

When a great big bull-dog got to raisin' the dickens; 

De coon got higher, de chicken got higher, /?.' 

Ju8t den Johnson opened up fire. ; . 

CHORrs. 
, ■'■:■ I got no chance for t^tte turped loose, 

: :., . Got no chance for a good excuse. ,- - .- 

^>, .-,...-• Oh, Mr. Johnson, 111 be good; 

■"■ ' -'-■. AJid now he's playin' seben eleben, -~ 

'way up yonder In the nigger heab'a; 
. . ' .' Ob, lir. Johnson made Eua good. 



L, 



y 



thK oriental pas-ma-la I She Rests by Hie Suwanee R'lYer 



OopTiiKbC, 1898, l>y Tuny Stanfovd. Wordf and llualc liy Toiiy SUnford. 
While In the Orioiit, on pleasure l)ent. 

My time I've spent to leiirn a dance; 
They twist their muscles so, tliey dolt slow, . - 

'Tis not for show, hut elejjance; 
First they trip up li^litly, then they bend back Rllghtly. 

Then they «l(?irle, uive a wi«Kle, just a little move, like thl», a 
Yountf men look dflinhted, old men get excited, "^ 

Witn a flurry, home they hurry. In a state of bliss. * 

Chorus. 
That's why I'm shy to do this naughty dance right here, f 

Because I think it makes you feel so queer; 
I may some day show you the style of Fatima; 
And then I'll dance the Oriental Pasma-la. 

A nibe from out of town, his name was 'Brown, 

He came around to see the fair; 
He saw the girls in tights, and other sights 

A man delights to see when there; 
When he saw this dancing, he felt so entrancinif. 

Spent his njoney, acted funny, swore he'd ne'er go home again 
'Till he learned each motion of this dance contortion, 

Now hb'8 sorry, for that worry made this rube insane.— C'Ao. 






CnpyriKhf. IIM, by Tony BUnfoi (.1 Word* and Mu>ic by Tnny Stanford. 
When a lad I've spent my day.s on a quiet old Southern place, 

'Way down in dear old Georgia far away. 
With my sweetheart on i)iy arm, we would walk around the farm. 

Or watch the Suwanee River on its way. 
Then my heart was young and gay, until one fatal day. 

My sweetheart died before our wedding morn. 
By the Suwanee she's at rest, 'twas the iilace she loved the best. 

Her cliildhood's home, wheie hhe was bred and boni. 

CHORrs. 
She rests by the Suwanee River, where the orange blossoms bloom. 
Where the air is always scented with magnolia's sweet perfume. 
Where the mocking-bfrds are singing in the treetopa all the day. 
She rests by the Suwanee River, far, far away. \ 

In my dfeams I often roam to that dear old Southern home, 

And wander to the spot where she and I 
Were oft seated side by side, where she vow'd to be my bride, '■'.■. 

Where first I saw the love-light in her eye. 
Then I find I am alone, my sweetheart she has gone 

To realms above, ne'er to return again. 
As I stroll along the shore, her lone grave I see once more, • 

And then my heart is filled with bitter pain.— C"A«/ "«. 



In the LiHIe Village Church -Tlrd I ALL I ASK OF YQ04E TRUE 

■■■ """^ ^■■■■w a ■■-«B^w 'w>-«>- WH .«..«. _ Copyright, 1898, by Tony SUnford. Word« and Mnsic by Tony SUnford. 



Copyright, IKSg. b.v K T. Paull. Worda and Mu«tc by Harry Jonan. 

Oftentimes my thoughts they wander to my happy boyhood days. 

Where I roamed alnjut the fields m childish glee, 
1 can ))icture in my memry, while in midst of childish pla.y. 

My mother when she used to call to me. 
And my father, I can see him as I did In daj's gone by. 

Many times I'd run to meet him on the way, 
Oh, how happy all did seem, Joy and bliss they reign'd supreme. 
In the homestead where I first saw light of day. 

. Refrain. 

Those were liappy days at home, where in childhood I did roam, 

Happy days that ne or will come again to me. 
The ones that I loved t>est are laid in peaceful rest. 
In the little village church-yard near the sea. 

Many times the tears are falling, and a sigh comes from my heart 

When the mem'ry of my parents conies to me. 
It is then I'm sad and lonely, and I deenly feel the dart, 

That heaven's Ik)w had sent unerringly; 
It's been years since last I wandered to the church-yard near the sea. 

It is there my mother and my father lie. 
And tho' I ain far away, I shall kneel and humbly pray, 

That I'm laid beside the old folks when I die.- /^<r'/ ain. 

Pictures from Life's Other Side 

CopyriRbt, MDUC(.'XCVI, by Ilrnry J. Webman. 
Wurd« and Music by diaries E. Baer. 
In the world's mighty gali'ry of pictures 

Hang the scenes that are painted from life; 
Tlie picture of love and of passion. 

The picture of peace ana of strife; 
The picture of youth and of beauty. 

Old age and the blushing .young bride. 
All hang on the wall, but the saddest of all 

Are the pictures from 111' s nherside. 

Chop.- 
'TiR a picture from II 'er side. 

Some one who fell l 'vay, 

A life has gone out Willi ..letlde 

That may have tMM'ii happy one day. 
Some poor old mother at home. 

Watching and waiting alone. 
Longing to hear from tho lovd ones so dear, 

Tis a picture from life's other side. 

The first scene Is that of a gambler. 

Who has lost all his money at play, 
Draws his dead mother's ring from his finger, 
"^ . She wore on her wedding day; 

His last earthly treasure he stakes It, 

Bows his head, that his shame he may hide. 
When they lifted his head they found he was dead, 

'Tis a picture from llfe'»«*her side.— C'Aoru*. 
The next tells a tale of two brothers. 

Whose paths in life dlff'rent ways led; 
The one was In luxury living. 

The other one begged for his bread; 
One dark night they met on the highway. 

"Your money or life: " the thief cried. 
And he took with his knife Ins own brother's life, 

'Tis a picture from life's other ^\Ci^—(Jhoi-u*. 

Tlie last Is a scene by the river. 

Of a heart broken mother and babe, 
'Neath the harlwr lights' glare stands and shivers. 

An outca.st whom no one will save; 
And yet she was once a true woman. 

She was somel)ody's darling and pride. 
God help her, she leaps, there l.s no one to weep, 

'Tl8 a picture from life's other side.— CAoj-t/i. 



DELEHANTY & HENCLEB'S 
SONG fc DANCE BOOK 

PRICE, 25 CENTS PER COPY. 

Containing an authorized and original collection 
of the songs, .song dances, and melodies, as sung 
and danced by Delehanty & Hengler. It also 
contains 21 plece.s, set to music, and arranged 
for tw^o voices. The whole Is prefaced by "Clog- 
Dancing Made Easy." With examples, set to 
music, by Henry Tucker. Price25cts., post-paid. 



/ 





rjir 



Copyright, 1898, by Tony SUnford. Wordu and Mnsic by Tony SUnford. 

In a palace, grand with splendor, sat a crowd one wlnt'ry night, 
They were merry, mirth and laughter seemed to l>e^thelr .sole dellg) 
'Mongst them was a handsome maiden, she wa^^est of them all; 
Still her heart was filled with sorrow, she wajyUMSEUt to fail. 
On the scene a young man entered, with )^|^^3H|HB/<tce, 
But It was changed to one of anguish, for siBI^^^^^Hm heart Grace; 
With tears in her eyes she pleaded, oh! forgr TCJ^^Bpg pray; 
But I thought you loved another, when softly WM|MBBB.i*ay: 

Chorus. *^'^*^«a • 

I forgive you, ray own sweetheart; well, I know I am to blame 

You will never hear reproaches, and 1 ofTer you my name; 

Let the past now be forgotten, we will start out life anew, 

I will be a model hust)and, all I ask of you be true. 

Years have passed since they were married, still their love remains the 
Since that wintry night he met her and l>estowedon her hlsname, rsame„ 
They are Just like two young sweethearts, tho' they're gettlngold Jt^ray; 
And their love Is growing stronger.jis It ages day by day. 
Soon they'll have another wedding, it will l)e the one of gold. 
They'll gather 'round them all their children, and this story will be told, 
How when young they lost each other, until, just by chance, one day 
In a palace grand he met her, and these worcfs to her did say:— 6'//o>-m«. . i 

IF YOU WERE ONLY BY MY SIDE 

Ooprrtsht, laM, by K T. Paall. Word* by Arthur Trcvelyan. Miwlo by E. T. PaoU. 

The days are so dreary, and I've been so weary, > 

Sweetheart, since you went away. 
Our quarrel has ended, the past can be mended, V 

And our hearts once more be gay. 
All seems so diflTrent, I want you back again. 

How I have missed you, no words can explain; 
. My love for you, love, will never, never wane. 

If you but Knew my heart Is true. *■■' 

CHORtS. 

If you were only by my side, perhaps I could explain: 

If you were only by my side, I might not plead In vain; 

In dreams I oft hear wedding bells, their pealing seems to say. 

Tho' you and I, love, are parted now, they'll ring for us some day. 

I love you sincerely, you know not how dearly; 

Sweetheart, say you love me yet; 
My life l8 so lonely, I want you, you only, 
- Say our parting you regret. 

Why do you doubt me, there must l)e some mistake, 
' Some one has wanted our love chain to break: 
Won't you believe me, and just for old love's sake. 
Say you will be still true to me.— t/Aof-w*. 

BACK TO THE ONLY GIRL I LOVE 

CopyrlKht, MDCCCXCVI. by Henry J Wel.man. 
Word* and Muni • by Harry S. Uillar. 

Sad was the hour that we parted, 

Wei! I remember tho day 
We quarreled, and then, liroken-bearted. 

We each then went our way; 
( But still she must think of me sometimes. 

She does not forget me, 1 pray. 
Our paths though apart, yet I feel In my heart 

She will take me back some day. 

Chorcs. 
Back to the only girl I love. 
Back to the one I think most of; 
Happy I'd be If I only could see 
My dear little, sweet little loved one. 
Even the stars all seem to say. 
There'll come a time not far away, 
So l)e of light heart, though now far apart. 
She'll take you back sf^me day. 

Too soon our dream It was broken; 

Oh, how my heart it did pain. 
And each tender, sweet little token 

She sent me back again; 
While weeks they have gone since we parted. 

And months, too, have passed on their way. 
No doubt she regrets, and the past, too, forgets. 

And win lake me back someday.— C'Aoru*. ^ 

The Words and Music of either of the aiNivt 
songs will be mailed to any address, post-pail's on 
receipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copies, your 
selection, for ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHIiAN, 

108 Park Row, New York. Catalogue of all our publications mallotf 

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THE ONLY GIRL I E'ER DID LOVE i Hcllo, Ma Babv 

Copyiicht, 1»», by Charles Coleman. ■ ^^ ^^ W ■ " ■ ^^ ^^^ ^^ •^^ W 



Copyiicht, 1(W, by Charles Coleman, 
Word! by M. A. Dilaon. Maslc by J. R MacDonald 

' There's a cottage far away, where sweet mem'rles often stray. 
The dear old home, the place where I was born, 
For dim fancy's sunlight plays still 'round boyhood's happy days. 
And pleasures thatr-I knew In life's fair morn. 
' My early love and fate was a charming Rlrl called Kate, _- 

To win her hand sincerely did I try, , .- • 

80 one day I f:ald to Kate, " Darling, will you be my mater " 
,, When I read my answer in her speaking eye. ■- • 

Rkfrain. V- "; 

My Katie was as true to me as woman e'er could be, 
Solovlng and so cheerful, and lier laugh rang merrily; 
It lingers with me even now. though she has gone above. 
For Katie was the only girl I e'er did love. 

She was queen of womankind, ^nd so pure In thought and mind, 
Oh, haa she lived to cherish our wee boy; •■ • 

■ Oft so fondly she would bless, with a mother's pride caress. 
And kiss him o'er and o'er again with joy. 
My heart is like to break for my dear dead darling's sake. 
Since she has gone forever from ray gaze; 
' , There's a dawn above I wait, where I'll And my loved one Kate, 
And I'll know again the Joys of other days.— V/</»aj»i. 

The Day Love Died 

CopyrlKht, 1896, by Auffusta Huwe Cliamben. 
Written and CompoMd by Aneuita Howe Ctaambera. ' ' . 
The spring in vernal splendor, now returns with lightsome tread, 

Ana mating birds still call from tree to tree. 
All nature smiles the same again, but, love, dear love, is dead, 

While phantom mem'ry walks alone with me. 
No flower that blooms but breathes again some sweetness of the past, 

A hidden pleasure or a buried bliss. 
A Story ending sadly with this sequel at the last, 
A broken promise and a fleeting kiss. • ■. - • " • / 

Refrain. 
. The day, the day love died, dear, my cheeks with tears were wet, 
>-.. J^'or love had conquered pride, dear, and lingered with regret. 
' ; W iiy did love ever leave me? faithful and true was 1; 

What Qan^tte wide world give me? since love, since love could die. 

Light hearts and lips around me throng, yet lonely still am I, 

The days like shirting shadows come and go. > .- 

I dream the broken dream again, then waken with a sigh. 

Once more life's pain and emptiness to know. 
Yet while love's last sweet number here dwells on the note farewell. 

And eyes be dim, I bless the day we met; 
No deep hipnotic slumber, dear, can hope to break love's spell. 

True nearts may bleed, but never can forget.— /;«//oin. 

Mister Doolin', Stop Your Foolln'. 

Copyright, 1899, by Cliarles Ooleinan. Words and Hosio by Ruatell Fox. 

There's a lot of speculation, and much Irish agitation. 

That's causing a sensation down at Brady's boarding-house; 
A star boarder named Tim Doolin' with the daughter has been foolln'. 

And Doolin's watched by Hennessy as puss would watch a mouse. 
Sure the daughter Mary Ann she's a-lookin' for a man. 

And Doolin' is the lucky one that has the inside track. 
Sure then Hennessy was ravin', said that Doolin' was decavin'. 

And Missus Brady, in this way, at Doolin' then got back. 

Refrain. 
Now, Mister Doolin', stop your foolin' with my Mary Ann; 

Sure yez nearly drove nie crazy since to court lier j-ou began; 
You settle up or settle down now. like a dacint man. 

For you'll nave to stop your foolin' with me daughter Mary Ann. 

Soon It got in circulation about Doolin's captivatin' 

Thlsproud Hibernian belle, her mother's jewel dear and pet. 
Then Tom Hennessy got madder when he found that Doolin' had her. 

And swore that he'd lick Doolin' and get Mary Ann back yet; 
To a picnic Tim took Ann. sure 'twas there the fight began. 

For Doolin' squared at Henne-ssy and knocked him down that day. 
There was talk, the nelghlx)rs stirred it— sure when Missus Brady heard It, 

She went for Mister DocWin' then, and In the same old w&y. —Betrain. 

JUST AS THE SUN WENT DOWN 

Parody— By De Witt Johnson. 

' ''■ After the heat of the sunshot rays, ^^^^^ .-',■- 
Just at the close of day. 

Tired and weary in a flelcU"' ■ C ' ' \ 

Two drunken bums lay. : 

One held a bucket of good old ale, V .. , 
One held a growler of beer, ' • .; • 

Thinking of times when champagne was the ran, ■ 

■ ■ And not of the beer that was near. 

- One thought of father and wished him good luck, - • .: 

» For they had seen better days; 

■, : There was a time when they had lots of tin, ' ' 

'•.■. , And got into these bad ways. ' 

." One took a swallow, then almost turned brown. 
For Into that can hopped a frog. 

■■~ He recognized the fact when he took that big smack, 

> Just as the beer went down . • : 

. ' ..~ After the beer had been down awhile ^ ' ■ ; 

..' In the abdomen of this said bum, ,'r; , • 

The other walked up and, with a smile, ^ j.' 

. ; ' • Said, " Old pal, you have struck a pun." ■ - ^^^ ^ 

-.,•. ' But, said the other, with a cry of hard luck, ~ ' . - 

; V What I'll need next will be props; •■ • 

... Don't you see, said the other, what a cinch you have struck, , 
• ■ Why not make beer out of its hops? .. "^' " 

: ' - One thought how that would be a dead easy lay, ^ - :•.-•;.., 

If it didn't require too much work, -.v -.4' 

And they immediately found that It worked to a " T,'-* ' •: ■'* 

And began working it that very day. 
Now these bummers are running a brewery of their own. 

And are doing the thing up browTT. 
They're making beer from this frog's hops, ,.., v .• 

/ Wiucb they struck while the sun went down. 



f-A 



Pauxidy— By Martin J. Kane, of ihe Mutual Wheelmen of G. N. T. 

I'se got a little clothing store, but Its on the bum, 
:. ;'-- Although I've got it heavily insured, ■ :'. • 

".' The policy must De renewed or out it will run, 

. . I'm getting crazy, it cannot be endured; - 

• ' .:'■- This mernlng everybody heard me yell ■-■■.." 

This afternoon dis policy does expire; ' w -■ 

My heart goes blankety blank when I hear a Iwll, 

Because I think It Is a fire. . ., . ' ■ ' 

Chori'S. ' "'■■ ' ■■'' "■'- - ■ 

. Hello, my Abe, I need some money; hello, my Insurance pal: 

Send me a policy by wire, my home will soon be a-flre; r -'" '. 

If you refuse me, Rebecca will lose me. 

Then she'll be all alone; '• 

O, Abe, send It, and I can burn my home. 

He never was at a telephone in his life before, "" 

And mixed things up. as you can Judge, 
The policy they sent him was 4-11-44— ;' 

From the 'phone he would not budge; , 

' He shook all over like an aspen leaf. 

And a salty tear came to his eye. 
But he soon was full of joy Instead of grief 

When he heard somebody cry: " - 

CHORCa. 

; Hello, my Isaac, du bist sehr fleisig, wle ist dein gescheft? 

I send you some policy by wire— it's a winner or I'm a liar; 
If you don't do it, den you will rue It, 

So you will then got left; •; 

O, Isaac, play it, und you don't need one lire. 

- •: ■ - i 

Copyright, 18»i, by Maurice A . Blrotbotte. Englinh copyright secured. -' 

, ■• Words by Qeorge Cooper. Music by Roliert Elm. 

How I love to greet her, after the day is done; 
'yj' Never maiden sweeter, smiles just like the sun; -, 

She's my village beauty, pleasant and kind and bright; "^^ *^ 

Full of love and dutj', alwaj-s my heart's deliifht. ;. ^' 

Chorus. .''...■-.•■• ,'"'.•■ 

I retty Dora Lee, queen of girls is she; 

Smiles on all who chance to call, but still she's true to me; 

Longer 111 not tarry, soon my pet I'll marry; 

What a darling wife will be my pretty Dora I>*e! 
Oft from school, together, proudly I saw her home; 
'Mid the summer weather, through the fields we'd roam; 
Then I learned to love her, tho' but a tinv boy; 
Thought the whole world of her, she was my only ioy. —Chonti. 
Just beyond the city lovingly we shall dwell, * 

. In our cottage pretty, down the rosy dell. 

Bells will soon be ringing, galls tx) all they'll say: 

Tls the morn that's bringing Dora's glad wedding day.— (}%«nM. 

I'LL MAKE THAT BIRL MY WIFE 

Copyri(rht, 1899, by Charles Coleman. Words and Music by Ueorge L. Ulefer. 

You are about to wed, my lad, a fond old mother said, 
'Twould please me l)e8t were you to choose some other girl Instead. 
The one that you have chosen, lad, her own folks now disown, 
'Tls rumored they have cast her off for reasons still unknown. 
Were j^ou to wed a girl like her and then unhappy be, 
'Twould break my heart, as well as yours, your saddened face to see. 
So take a mother's true advice, think well before you wed; 
He kissed her like a loving son, but firmly to her said: - • 

Ukkrain. 
Although her folks have cast her off, it still is my belief 
That she Is honest, pure and good. Ill shield her then from grief; 
I'll lead her to the altar, my vow I'll keep through life, 
Although the world may point with scorn, I'll make that girl my wlf«. 
She Is my world, this ^irl of mine, that I have sworn to wed, 
I'll make her loving heart my shrine whatever may be said 
And to our happy home you'll come on some fair future day. 
And learn, like me, to love the one from whom you turn away 
The mother dried her tear-dlmmed eyes and said, with teaming face, 
A noble heart like yours, my boj% could never court disgrace. 
Bring home the darll'- of your heart and name the wedding day, 
I'm sure she must be good and pure since I have heard you say.—Uefrain. 

THE BEAUTIFUL WATER LILIES 

Copyright, 1899, liy Clias G Miiinicli. Forelcn copyriglit secured. ,.,•-.'. 

VN'ords and music by riias. Q. .Miiiiiich. 

Come, my darling, let us wander to the forest by the brook. 
We'll stroll o'er hills and meadows 'till we reach yon shady no(A; 
We'll gather pretty wild flowers that grow along our way. 
And linger 'till the twilight shadows fall at close of day. 

Refrain. .;. 

: - . Oh, the beautiful white water lilies, '.; • 

Like diamonds now sparkling with dew; 
•; .. - Oh, the fragrant and golden eyed lilies, i 

: '- They're blooming, my darling, for yon; ' 

- , We'll row out upon the still waters; 

'. . We'll bid all the world then adieu; ;' "' 

.- '; .. We'llsingour love songs to the lilief?, .. . ■: :^' :' 

For I love no one, darling, but you. 
Do you recollect, my darling, of the grand old grape-vine swing. 
Where we used to sit and ponder, while the birds would sweetly sing. 
How we used to row upon the pond where the water lilies grow, 
. And dream of love at twilight In the happy long Ago —lu/rain. 

The Words and Music of any of the abov* 
songs will be mailed to any address, post-paid, on 
receipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copies, your 
selection, for ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHHAM, 

108 Park Row, New York. Catalogue of all Mr publications mailed 

FfM HfM appiiMtton. 




FAIR VIRGINIA, FROM VIRGINIA 

Cop7iisht. ISM. by Howley, Havlland A Co. Eii(rli*)> cnpyrlfrlit secured. 
By Raymniid A. Bioorne mid Ouwiu L. Davis. 

I've two sweethearts far away beneath the southern skies so blue. 

Where the old Potomac wends Its peaceful way; 
And my thoughts are always of them— yes, to them I'm ever true; 

For I love them both far more than I can say. 
Each bears the name " Virginia.' and the one's my mother state. 

The other Is the Kirl who waits for me; 
And my heart Is ttUed with souk, for I'm going back ere long 
To my homeland, and my bride that Is to be. 

Chorus. 
Fair Virginia, from Virginia. 
She's always been the sunshine of my life; 
' Her worth none can measure, but I know I own a treasure. 
When Virginia, from Virginia, Is my wife. 
Oft I call to mind our wand'rlngson the river's moonlit strand, 
And the whispered words of love beneath the trees; 
) While our eyes told In their glances tales? that lovers understand, 
' And our hearts were lighter than the evening breeze; 

'Twas hard to leave the loved ones, fair Virgieiia and my home— 

Tho' both are true to me, and I the same. 
But each pang and each regret, we will very soon forget. 
When Virginia, from Virginia, bears my name.— C'AoiM*. 

She's Cot My Eyes 

SHE'S IN MY DREAMS FOREVER 

CopyriKht, 18M, by Charles Coleman. 
Written uiid CompuRed by Auiruntu Ho»e CliHinti«rs. 

A maiden fair, with sunny hair and little tripping feet. 
Hath caught my lieart with winsome art and glances long and sweet. 
This airy sprite, with ciiarms bedlght, my ev'ry thought beguiles, 
Her witching ways are past all praise and heaven is in her smiles. 
It may be wrong, yet how I long her dainty hand to press. 
And Whisper how I love you so with gentle fond caress. 

Refrai.n. 
When she lofjks at me in such a way I can descrllw It never, « 
Sbe'8 got my eyes, she's from the skies, she's In my dreams forever. 
When she looks at me In such a way I can descrltie it never, 
She's got my eyes, she's from the skies, she's in my dreams forever. 
Whenever I this maiden spy awheel at startling pace. 
With twinkling eyes, like starry skies, she dares me to a race; 
I try in vain, with might ami main, her skill in speed to match. 
This little girl, with curve and curl. Is not an easy catch; 
She turns her head, I'm onward led. enraptured by the chance, 
That hope may And a hint that's kind in Just that backward glance.— i7</'. 

How shall I well the story tell of love too long delayed. 
Or, better still, how break at will tfte si)ell her eyes have made. 
Through cupld's craft and ciipid's shaft past hope and cure am I; 
Ye winds that seek and kiss her cheek, oh, tell me with a sigh. 
How more than dear, how sweet and near. In all Its girlish grace. 
With love untold 1 c<till must hold that little roguish face.— /^«/>atn. 

SWEET KITTY LEE 

Copyrlifht, 18W, l.j T-m n Gilliii Wordn and Music by Tom B QilUu. 
Music published l>v (> K. J hiiiiioii, «1X V. «otli Street, Cblcaso, III. 

The lights are all out and the army Is sleeping, 

Tlie night-bird calls low froin the palmetto tree. 
I think of the love that I have in my keeping. 

The love of my peerless, my sweet Kitty Lee. 
My heart beats for her with the deepest devotion. 

Faithful and true to my sweetheart I'll l)e. 
O, winds waft this message far over the ocean, 

And whisper it softly to sweet Kitty Lee. 

CHORI'S. 

The stars twinkle diral.v. the dark sky bends o'er me. 
My thouKhts picture scenes in the land of the free. 
I pray that kind heaven may safely restore me 
To my native country and sweet Kitty Lee. 

I'm on picket to-night, and by thought's necromancy 

I summon my sweetheart from over the sea; 
The shadows fall thick, and beside me I fancy 

I see the dear face of my sweet Kitty Lee. 
Eyes like the violet neath morning's nrst blushes, 
"Lips like the roses when kissed by the dew; 
" . * A voice that for sweetne.ss will rival the thrush's, 

. O, sweet, winsome Kitty, I live but for you.— C'Aotm*. 

Mamie Farrell 

, Copy ritfht, 1K99, by Charl<-8 Coleman. 

'■ Words by Lew Umber. Music by Ed. Uereau. 

I Of Winsome young belles in New York you may talk, 

\ You'll see them on Sunday while out for a walk, 

I There's one that I've met, and she's dearer to me 

' • Than name or fair fortune's smile ever could be. 
• . I take her to picnics, excursions as well, 

1 . With arm "round her waist, love's sweet story I tell, 

I : Her name's Mamie Farrell, the joy of my life, 

; J Before many days she'll be my little wife. 

Rkkrai.v. 
My girl, Mamie Farrell, works in Macy's dry goods' store. 
She's the idol of my neart. the one that I adore. 
When I've saved themoney and the summer months have flown, 
I'll marry Mamie Farrell then, and make her all ray own. 

The first time I met her I'll never forget, 
. , Her laughln^blue eyes they are haunting me yet. 
■' . Her form like a fairy's, her dimples so sly, 
; ; I cannot describe her however 1 try. 

. . ■,: We stood in the moonlight beside Mamie's gate, 
■ ■ And talked of the future until It was late. 

My heart beat with Joy tor a look that I knew, 

A gUoce Mamie gave me, then said I'll be VrM.—Rtfrain. 



I DON'T WANT NO JONAH 



Copyricbt. UW, by ilowley, Harlland <k Co. EnKlUh copyright secured. 
Words and Mii«ic by Hut(h Cannon. 

I was In a dice game the oWier night. 

Something going wrong, an" I wasn't right. 

Couldn't make a pass for to save my soul. 

Nigger right behind me Just as black as coal; 

I'm a kinder superstitious an" peculiar, I know; 

Dat nigger was a Jonah, an' I'll bet all my dough, 

I grabbed him by the collar an' I threw him out de crowd; 

I noller'd to dem niggers an' I hoUer'd mighty loud: 

Chorus. 
I don't want no Jonah hangin' 'round; 
I know dat 1 been hoodoo'a on dls ground; ■ 
I lost a silver dollar. 
An' I've got a right to holler, 
'Cause I don't want no Jonah hangin' around. 

In a poker game last Monday night 

I anted up my money, which I knew was right, 

Lost alx)ut a dollar, an' I didn't know why. 

Beside me was a hoodoo with a big cross eye; 

Oh, I got a certain reason an' I think 1 better leave, 

So give me l)ack my money dat you won dls eve. 

" we'll give you hack your money, but Just tell us why you paoM? " 

I told all de gang an' I told them Just because;— C'^'(»m«. 

Went to see my gal on a Fridav night, 

1 was a-feellng Jnst-a out a sight. 

Oot in de door, and would you b'lleve, 

A nigger had his arms around my little Eve, 

Then I told dat nigger if he didn't make a sneak. 

His fam'ly would be pricing blai k crape next week; 

He carved me wid a razor, an' I like to almost died; 

They threw me In an ambulance, an' then I loudly cried:— CAo»-i/». 

THE NEW YORK GIRL 

Copyright, IIM, by Howley, Haviland & Co. EnKlish .npyriglit secured. 
Wiirils by Thuriand Chattaway. Musi*- by Tliuiland (iiattanay and B«u M. Jerom*. 

You will And In ev'ry City and wherever you may go, ^ •*•'"" 

Pretty girls and girls of high degree, (know, 

With their smiles they're apt to charm you. and they're quick to let you 

They're Just as sweet as any girl co Jid l)e; 
You say you love them dearly, they may say the same of you. 

You think they are the best for liilles around. 
But you'll And you are mistaken, for in old New York, it's true, 

The Bweetest girls in all the world are found. 

Chorus. 
Up town, down town, on the streets and all around, 

Ev'ry where you go you're sure to find this pearl. 
Her style's the neatest, her smile's the sweetest. 

She is the dearest, the New York girl. 

There Is aomethlng In her manner- what It Is I can't explain; 

Something that Is sure to win your !ieart; 
You may roam the wide world over, > ou may seek, but all In vain; 

You'll never And a girl that's half so smart; 
Though others may seem dearer and to you may sweetly sing. 

'Tls Just a fancy that will pass away, ■. 

For the girl you'll love forever, and the one to whom you'll cling. 

Is born and bred in New Y-O R-K— C/(ww«. 

THE NIGHT THAT SHE PLAYED 

HER LAST PART j 

Copyrlfcht. 1899, by Charles Coleman. 
Wrttien by Auorusta Howe Chambers Composed by Charles Colsman. 1 

The dawn was dim and ghostly when a weary soul took flight. 

She died alone within an attic drear. 
For poverty had dwelt with her for years by day and night. 

Until her life she ended In «lespair. 
The sheriff called to dispos-sess her, but he found her dead. 

This woman who at first was known to fame. 
She'd been a footlight fav'rite once, or so the people said. 

An actress with a long forgotten name. 

She had played her last part in the drama called life. 

Then sought for the rest long denied: 
She had been a fond mother, a true faithful wife, 

Yet alone and deserted she died. 
The giants of loneliness, grief and despair 

Had knocked at the door of her heart; 
Her story she told In a letter and pray'r. 

The night that she pla.ved her last part. ' 

The evening came, the stores were bright, the rich exahanged their gold 

And people to the play-house thronged once more. 
But she slept on, her lines were said, her lips were pale and cold. 

And life's sad drama was forever o'er. 
Dishonor she had feared, and .shame, far more than even death. 

She left a letter speaking of her son. 
Which said that she wouldpray to God with last expiring breath, 

To care for still her helpless little one.— 6'//0) .,». 

Had she but known an liour l)efore that Just across the way 

A neighlwr waited all her wants to meet. 
She might have lived to happy be. to see a bcigbter day. 

Thus saved by human sympathy and sweet. 
A tribute from our hearts, these flowers above her bier we'll place, 

She honored well and loved her nolile art. 
Then calmly met grim death himself tar sooner than disgrace, ■ 

And played without a fear her llnal part.— 6'A<»»i#. 



The Words and Music of any of the above 
songs will be mailed to any address, post-paid, on 
receipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copies, your 
selection, for ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHMAN. 

108 Park Row, New York. Catalogue of all our publications mailed 

Fro* upon application. 




DEN WHAT YO' GWINE TER 007 

CopTriKbt, 1898, by William H. Hennamaii. 
■ > VVopd* and Music by Wm. H. Sewell. 

When yo' hab uh lot er trouble an' things go wrong. 

Den what yo' gwlne ter do? 
An' yo' hab uh ha'd time fuh tuh git uh 'long, 

Den what yo' gwine ter do? 
Hits 110 use ter fret an' git in er stew. 
JIs' think dat de sky 'bove de clouds am blue. 
An' t«r- morrow yer sky may be blue, too. 
Den what yo' gwine ter do? 
CuoRrs. 
Den what yo* gwine ter do? 
Den what yo' gwine ter do? 
' . Hits no use ter worry, 

Nur git in uh (lurry, 
.' Den what JO" gwine ter do? 

When de gals lose dar' tap' fuh eatin' Ice cream. 

Den what dey gwine ter do? 
When uh woman see uh nsouse an' she wouldn' Bcream, 

Den what she gwine ter do? 
When de gals (loan* hab no use fuh beaus, ,, • 

An' de beans tuh de gals no mo" propose. 
When folks doan' go tuh church ter doze. 

Den what dey gwine ter do? 

CnoRts. 
', Den what yo' gwlne ter do? -~ 

Den what yo' gwine ter do? 
- '■ '. • De millennium 

- . . Hab sho'ly come. 

Den what' yo" gwine ter do? 

When yo' takes yer wife fuh tuh see de play, "' • 

Den what .vo' gwine H-r do? ^ ' 

An' uh great big hat gits right m de way. 
Den what yo' gwine tt-r do? 

Yo' tells hull dat yo' gwine out tuh see uh man. 

An' you'll be right hack jls' 'soon 's yo" can. 

But she say now, honey, dat's uh mighty ole plan. 
Den what yo' gwine ter do? 

(^IIORIS. 

- ' " Den what yo' gwlne ter do? 

<,^_ Den what yo' gwli:e ter do? 

^ ,» Hits no Tiso tt»r fust', 

Kase yo' bouii' ter hab uh muss. 
Den what yo' gwine ter do? 

When yo' teach uh purty gal fuh tuh ride de wheel. 

Den what yo' gwine t«'r do? 
An' de wheel gib uh lurch an" de gal gib uh squeal. 

Den what yo' gwine ter do? 
Yo' puts yer a'm uh roun' huh liT wals'. 
Jls' full tuh keep huh funi fallln' out«r place. 
An' two ruby lips right dar befo' yo' face. 

Den what yo' gwine ter do? 

. Chorhs. 

^ . : Den what yo' gwine ter do? 

Den what yo" gwine ter do? 

1 done tole yo' dis. . ', 

■ Hits nice tuh steal uh kiss. 

Den what yo' gwine ter do? 

When de knees er yer trouses begin ter bag. 

Den what yo' gwine tor do? 
An' yer mudder'n law's tongue hab too much wag. 

Den what yo" gwlne ti'r do? - 

When yo"s bin tuh de lodge an" stays late at night. 
An' comes home an' fin's yo' wife ready tuh flght. 
Hits no use ter argy fuh tuh proove yer not tight, 

Den what yo" gwlne t«'r do? 

Choris. ■ ... • 

Den what .vo' gwine ter do? 
Den what yo" gwine ter do? 
• Oh, de lo'd uh massy. 
When yer wife gits sassy, 
.- Den what yo' gwine ter do? 

When yo' git outer work an' yo' ain' goter cent. 

Den what yo" gwine ter do? 
An' de lan'lo'd comes an' yo' can't pay de rent. 

Den what .vo' gwlne t«r do? 
If yer bes' gal leabs yo' fuh 'nudder moke. 
An' she hab nnflin" do wld yo" "kfise yo" dead broke, 
- An" yo" hab tuh put yer obercoat in tuh soak, 

Den what yo' gwlne ter do? 

Chorcs. 
Den what yo' gwlne ter do? 
Den what yo' gwine ter do? 
I axes yo', honey. 
When yo' got no money. 
What am yo' gwine ter do? 

Don't try ter stop uh train bv uh Btandin' on de crack. 

Den what yo' gwlne ter do? 
If uh mule kicks at yo' don't yo' try ter kick him back. 

Den what yo' gwine ter do? 
If yo' meets uh purty gal uh gwlne 'long de street, 
Dafs dress'd so nice an' looks so sweet, 
V . An' she Ilf's huh dress an' shows huh irr feet. 

Den what yo' gwine ter do? 

. . CuoRrs. 

Den what yo" gwine ter do? 
Den what yo" gwlne ter do? 
• -, • - Slie gibs yo" smile, 

Twould a saint beguile. 

Den what yo' gwlne ter do? ' 

If talkln' was mone.v, we could all buy fa'ms, 

» Den what yo' gwine tor do? 

When ba'gain counters done lose dere cha'ras, ' 

Den what yo' gwlne ter do? _ . '. 

If yer rldin" In uh ca' an' yo' gibs up yer seat 
V To un lady dat say, "thanky, suh," 80 sweet. • ■ .• 

You aiu so s'prised, 'tmos' knocks yo" off yer feet, - - 
' Den what yo' gwine ter do? 

^ ■'.':■:'>:■'■ --'-/^ .:• I Chorus. -^ .■'■.-■;•■ ^. -•:.;_-: 

'.•.•; :.. Den what yo' gwine ter do? 

Den what yo' gwlne ter do? • . r . 

;-.• When men put dar feet •■"..■'■.-■ 

'Cross de ca' fum seat tuh seat, ■ - \ , 
Pen what yo' gwine ter do? ■.'': .';'.' "^ 



Owlne ter take my gal tuh de ball tah-nlght. 

Den what we gwijie ter do? 
Gwine ter knock dem niggahs clean outer sight, 

Dafs what we gwlne ter do? 
Dar's Susie Snow an' bow leg' Jake, 
Dey say dey gwlne ter take de cake, . . 

When we gits up our hoofs t«r stmke. 

Den what we gwine ter do? 

Cnonrs. 
Den what we gwlne ter do? 
Den what we gwine ter do? 
We'll take dat cake. 
Or derell t)e an earf quake. 
Den what we gwlne ter do? 
'Fl had my way wld eb'ry big trus". 

Den what I gwlne ter do? 
I'd hammer an' hammer "til dey all done bus'. 

Dat"s what I gwlne ter do 
If j'o' puts yer money in de bank an' de bank bus'. 
An' yer bo'dln'-house lady refuse t»ih trus". 
Doan' go on uh tear, kase yo" on"y make it wuss. 
Den what yo' gwine ter do? 

CHoars. 
Den what .vo" gwlne ter do? 
Den what yo" gwlne ter do? 
Hit am no joke 
- Fuh tuh l>e dead-broke. 

Den what yo' gwine ter do? 

Some gals doan' know how tuh cook an" sew. 

Den what dey gwlne ter do? 
Bat eb'ry gal am boun' ter hab uh beau, 

Dat's what she gwlne ter do. 
If yo" meets uh purty gal an" yo" makes uh mash. 
An' yo' axes huh In run tuh hab some hash. 
An" when jt)' comes tuh pay, yo' hab no cash. 

Den what yo' gwlne ter do? 

Chorus. 

Den what jo" gwlne ter dof 
Den what yo' gwlne ter do? 
When yer sho't ob ready cash. 
An' yo' hab no wad tuh flash. 
Den what yo' gwine ter do? 



f 



Parody— By Andy Oaron. 

: Once I'd a dear little girlie, .' 

Only one, just the one; 
.■■• . She called upon me every evening. 
Just for fun. she takestho bun; 
She was cross eyed and knockneed and humpbacked, 

A wooden leg, a half a tree, 
If you listen for a while ' , 

I'll tell a few things about my girlie. 

CHORr.s. ] 

Just one dame, only just one dame. 

When I met her I'd money an<l lots of game; . I 

Tis a shame, she stole my watch and chain. 
I'd l)e in clover forever if she'd Ciime back ^aln. 
' Don't talk to me more alwut girlies, -^ 

With one leg. just one |)eg. 
I hugged her so tightly one evening, 
I ran a splinter in my finger, " , 

. She went to a restaurant on the Bowery, 
Near Canal, did this gal. 
And now she Is working for life "" 

:■-, At a hash house, is my old pal. 

Chorus. 
Just a half a girl, my head Is In a whirl. 
She's mashing potatoes, is this peg-legged gtrl; 
It takes an ostrich to dine where this girl of mine. 
Mashes potatoes forever with just one climb. 

Dat Little Yailer Gal 

CopyriKht. 1899, by William B. Hennaman. 
WordR and MurIc by Wm H. Sewell. 

,, She am de sweetes" .yailer gal, 

Wid Rich uh wlnnln' way, 
: - ' An' she's got dis nigger mixed up so; 

Dat I don' know night fum day. 
I"B axed her if she gwine ter hab me. 

An' nebt)er mo" tuh part. 
Kase dat little cupul lx)y dun stab me 
Right spang fru de heart. 

Chorus. 
, Dat little yailer gal, sweetes" yailer gal, 
• She bus' my heart wid cupld's dart, dat yailer gal; 
Dat little galler gal. sweetes' valler gal, 
I lubs her, 1 adores dat little yailer gal. 
De coons all swa'ra erroun' dat gal. 
Like bees erroun' de rose. 
" — An" de way she smashes niggers' hearts; 

De goodness on'y knows. . ". ., i 

^ Dem niggers sho'ly hab gone crazy, 

' • • Fo' dey all Is gwlne git lef. 

'_ . An' dey ain't uh gwine ter git muh daisy, 

Kase I wants dat gal muhsef.—^'Aot-Md. .' 

I's done got uh razor an' gun, 
■-. An' fo' dem coons I'll lay. j 

« * An' dar's jls' uh gwlne ter be some fun; 

Fo' dey all mus' stay away. 
I tole yo" dat I's bad when I's mad, . 

' Jls' .spllln' fur uh muss. 

An' I 'spec' I's got er carve dem coons bad, 
Kase I'll hab dat gal er bus'.— c/*oi»/#. 

The Words and Music of either of the above 
songs will l>e mailed to any address, post-paid, on 
receipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copies, your 
selection, for ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHMAN, 

108 Park Row, New York. Catalogue of all our puMieatiOAt NiaiM 

FfM upon application. 



. judidaiHMlMHH 




^ 



I LnvA bat Man I MY OLD NEW* hImPSHIRE HOiE 

I MB^^ ▼ ^^ m^^^mmi IWIwall I Copyrtsbt. ism. by th«:OrphMn Hu*le Pubtlthmg Co. 



CopTrlfcht, IRM, by Myll Brot. En«ll«h oopyricht taoured. 

Worda by Dmi. Packard. Hnslo by E. J. SImuM. .^ 

- For a handsome black man I have admiration. 

For him I'd run the shoes right off my feet, 
He was my honey boy and my heart would jump wtth Joy 

When Sunday niKht at church we used to meet. 
For he used to say I was his only baby; 

He was juggling with the truth, I will admit; 
I never see him now. but I'd love to, ril allow; 

Tho' I found he never cared for me a bit. 

Chorus. 

I don't care who knows it. I love dat man; 

You can see how much I shows it, I do love dat man. 

My p<K)r hearts a-breaking, much as it can. 

The reason dat I sigh and fret, is 'cause I love that man. 

He was kind to me when I was very lonesome. 

He called me all the pet names that he knew; 
He treated me so fair, with such tenderness and care. 

When he was with me I was never blue; 
But another wench stole from roe his affections. 

Now they say that she's a-gwine to change her name. 
He did me wrong, for sure, but my sick heart I can't cure. 

For I'll always love tiiat darkey just the same.— CAoT'M. 

IMY HONOLULU LADY 

CopjrlKht, 1898, by The 2>iio Mnnvam Mii8io Co. Enfclifih oopyrlglit lecured. 

Uied by petiiilMloii of Die Zeiio Mauvals Mudc Co. 

Words »iid Music by Lre Johnson. 

I'se done shook my Alabama gal for Honolulu Lou; 

My high-tone«l lady, she is a clreara. my Southern queeo, 

My Honolulu Lou. she'll soon be mine; 

I'll leave niv Mobile home, to Hawaii I will roam. 

To wed my Lulu; then we will return; 

Then I'll show dem coons and wenches style. 

And grace that Is divine. 

When we both pass down de line. 

CnoRCS. 
' She is my Honolulu ladv. she's ma baby; 

She ha.-* won my heart, "this choc'late-cullud daisy; 
She has distanced all the white gals and de wencnes. 
She's a Southern dream, my Honolulu lady. 

1 went down to a swell coon ball last night and took my bride; 

She set dem crazy, I led dat colored festival 

With Lulu t»y my side, my love divine. 

We cutde piiteon wing, de c<x)ns did sboat and sing 

When wo old the Honolulu Pasniala; 

T>en wc glide<l by de judge's stand, 

I )e ciKJii!* and wenches sighed 

When my Lou she took tlrst prize.— Chorui. ' 

TEACH OUR BABY THAT I'M DEAD 

Copyrlglit. 1897, by Fraiili K. Root ft Co. 
Words by Wm. H. Wlmloni. Hunlc by Still R. Haroourt 

With tearful eyes a mother stood before a prison cell. 
And in her arms she tightly clasp'd her baby to her heart; 

Her husband is a convict now. she came to say farewell. 
Ere from her side for years he must depart. 

He took her hand so tenderly, and begged her not to weep; 
'• Don't grieve, ray love," he sjud. " while I'm away: " 

He lookd upon their little child, who smiled in peaceful sleep. 
And then in anguish to his wife did say: 

Rekrain. 
" Teach our baby that I'm dead, and never, never let it know 
The dark disgrace I've brought to you, promise me before you go. 
God above will care for vou— oh. blame me not. my own." he said, 
" And when our baby asks for me, teach the little "one I'm dead." 

To save another I did wrong, and now to prison go: 

I to<jk the money from the bank— 'twas wrong, I know, 'tis true; 
I thought I could replace it soon, and none would ever know, 

I never dream'd I'd bring disgrace to yon. 
The rwrtlng momentcaiiie at last, he bade them both good-by. 

Her youthful heart was broken with despair, 
■ And as slu- turnetl to go away, his tears of anguish fell. 

Again these words he sadly uttered there:— ;;«/'» ain. 

SHE IS MORE TO BE PITIED THAN 



CopyrlKlir. 1898. by Win. B. Oiar. Entrred at 8t«Uou»r«' Hall. London. 
Words ami Music bj Win. B. Oray. 

At the old concert hall on the Bow'ry. 

"Hound a table were .seated, one night, 
A crowd of young fellows carousing. 

With them life .seemed cheerful and bright. 
At the very next taJ)le was seated 

.\ girl who had fallen to shame; 
All the young fellows Jeered at her weakness, 

'Till they heard an old woman exclaim: 

Choris. 
She la more to be pitied than censured. 

She IS more to be Iu-IjhhI than despised; 
She is <inly fi laHsie who ventured 

On life's stormy path, ill-advised; 
Do not scorn her with words fierce and bitter. 

Do not laugh at her shaine and downfall. 
For a moment just stop and consider 

That a man was the cause of it all. 

, There's an oId-fcishlone<l church 'round the comer, 

Where the netghlwrs all gathered one day. 
While the parson was preaching fi sermon .. ~ 

O'er a soul that had Just passed away, 
Twas this same wayward girl from the Bow'ry, 

Who a life of adventure had led— 
Did the clergyman jeer at her downfall? 

No, be asked for God's men-y and said:— CAotm. 



Copyrtsbt. 18M, by thelOrphsan Music Publishing Co. 
Words by Aodraw D. St«rlliiff. Music by Harry Ton TUmt. 
Far away on the hills of old New Hampshire 

Many years ago we parted. Ruth and I; 
By the stream where we wandered in the gloaming. 

It was there I kissed ray love a sad good-bye. 
She clung to me and trembled when I told her, 

And pleadingly she begged of me to stay; 
We parted, anal left her Droken-heartM, 

In the old New Hampshire village far away. 

RtrRAIN. 

Now the sunshine lingers there, and the roses bloom as fair. 

In the wlldwood, where together we would roam; 
In the village church-yard near sleeps the one I loved so dear. 
On the hins of my old New Hampshire home. 
In my dreams by the stream la.st night I wandered. 
Ana I thought my love was standing by my side; - 
Once again then I told her that I loved her. 

Once again she promised she would be my bride; 
And as 1 stooped to kiss her I awakened, 

I called her. but .she was not there to hear; 
My heart lies buried with her 'neath the willow, — 
the old New Hampshire home I love so Aear.—Chorui. 






■': 'i'^'V 



7n' 



Copyright, ISM, by Wm. R. Oray. Entered at Stationer*' Hall, Loudon. - 
Words and Music by (luasle L. Itavia. 

My mem'ry turns to schoollwy days and a charming little lass. 
Playmates were we together, and stood side by side in class. 
When school was out, wed start for home, but played along the way. 
Wed play " tag-catcher," and " I spy," then she would run and say: 

ClIORt'S. 

You're It, you're It, you're it, I spy you, Jimmy Green; 
You're it, you're it, you're it, you're caught, now don't be mean. 
Sometimes I'd make her anitry, she'd cry a little bit. 
But when we'd kiss and make up, I was always " it." 
The boys and girls are scattered now, who went to school with me. 
Some of them roam in foreign lands, while some sail o'er the sea. 
How many, many times I've stood to watch the children play 
That same old game of " I spy you," and hear them laugh and say^, _,-- 

IF NOT SWEETHEARTS, 

THEN LET'S BE FRIENDS. 

Copyrigbt, ItM, by Wm. B. Qray Entered at Stationers' Hall London, England. 
Words by Boiceit ft O'Brien. Music by Jamee B. Bradley. 

Such my desire to meet you. lovo, that I with eager transport fly. 
But why this long, unkind delay? Tell me. my love, oh, tell me why! 
It cannot txi that you have changed, you always seemed so good and true. 
But time has flown, no answer comes, still I am waiting, love, for yon. 
Oh, tell me, we shall meet again, and former vows of love renew. 

Chorus. 
If not sweethearts, then let's be friends. 

Friends, same as in the days of yore. 
Although 'twill bring sad memories. 
True friends we'll be. If nothing more. 

The Joy I from your presence feel, no power of language can express. 
Whilst your commanding smllesand voice unite with mutual aid to bless. 
Let me once more look In thine eyes, and once again my love caress, 
I love you so! 'twill break my heart If I should flnd you love me less, 
Say then, sweetheart, that you're still true, come to me, love! come and 

confess.— ' homt. 

GLORIOUS BEER 

Copyright, 1896, by Fraiiriii. Par ft Hunter. Envllsh rnpyrlirht s*cnr«d. 
Words by Steve LeirKett. Music by Will Goodwin. 

Now I won't sing of sherbet and water. 

For sherbet with beer will not rhyme; 
The worklngman can't afford champagne, 

It's a bit more than five cents a time; 
So I'll sing you a song of a gargle, 

A gargle that I love so dear; 
I allude to that grand institution. 

1 hat beautiful tonic called beer, beer, been 

Chorus. 
Beer, beer, glorious l)eer! , 

Fill yourselves right up to here; 
Drink a good deal of It. make a good meal of it. 

Stick to your old fashioned beer; 
Don't be afraid of it, drink tin you're made of it— 

Now, altogether, a cheer! 
Up with the sale of it, down with a pall of It, 

Glorious, glorious beer. 

It's the daddy of all lubricators. 

The best thing there is for your neck; 
Can be used as a gargle or lotion 

By persons of every sect. 
Now we know who the goddess of wine was. 

But was there a goddess of beer? 
If 80, let us drink to her health, boys. 

And wish that we'd just got her here, here, here:— CTlorw*. 
So up, up with brandies and sodas. 

But down. down, and down with the beer; ,, • 

It's good for you when you are hungry. 

You can eat it without any fear. 
8o sip up the beer while you're able. 

Of four-half lets hII have our fill; ■■ \ 

And I know you'll all join me In wishing 

Good luck to my dear Uncle Bin, Bill, Bill!— CTortw. 

The Words and Music of either of the above 
songs will t>e mailed to any address, post-paid, on 
receipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copies, your 
selection, for ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHMAN, 

108 Park Row, New Yorlc. Catalogue of all our publieations nuUM 

Free upon application. 



i 




MY SOUTH GA'LINA ROSE , 

Oopyiight, 1898, for all countriea, by Sydney P. HMrria. 

• • ,^,:.C.:. ;.~r ^^y Prince A HanU. • >. •. . . 

.";■■■ When yo' wondah why yo' feel 80 gay, ■ • - \ 

'■'b.-,- ,. , When j'o' heart am singln' all de day, 

"^J ■ '='^' • When yo' pulse am all a tingle, 

,• '"' '. . ■ An' yo'^ banjo full of jingle, 

•c ■; ' :, An' the months all melt air mingle into May; 

.*- : . - ' When yo' joy f'om morn to twilight's close, 

> ^;,' -'-•■" ■''■: When Jo' smile throughout yo' sweet repose, , - 

•■ • ;■ . Yo' will have to love a nlggah , •,. •. 

; -. . . Wld de puffec' face an' flggah ' ' "■'■■',- . . 

. . . . ■ - Of ma South Ca'llna Rose. ; ;, ', \ ; . ■' 

'■■■:■ ^ '■'-■ ■■'■'■ ■.-■- ■■'--' ' - Chorus. '>:■"''■':■':'.■ '^ 

For it's huh sugah kiss whah I flnda ma bliss, 
■" It's a way she laugh an' glance huh eye, ,. 

It's de toss in' head and an' de lips so red. 

An' de sassy style she hold huh self so high. 
It's a way she tease an' a way she please, ' . 

An' a shifty .step no othah nlgper knows; 
Oh, dah nevali was u flowah to be found In any bowah 
; . Like ma South Calina Rose.— [ZJaww.] 

Seems to me de sky's a richer blue. 
Seems to me dat evah friend am true, 
' , Dah's a beauty in de shivah 
' ' ' Of de moonbeams on de rlvah. 

An' de sunlight make me quivah through an' through; 
. - Dah's a cha'm In evah place I goes, 
..' Dah's de light In evah breeze 'at blows, 
. ■ ■- An" de reason am de neatness V • 

• An' deraptlvat In' sweetness , 

Of ma South Ca'lina Rose.— C/io»«». 

The Soldier's Bride 

,, Only a Sad, Sweet Memory. 

^^ "^ :, Copj-iight, 1897, by N. E. ByoTB. EnKllsh copyright secured. 

Words and Music by E. Nlnian. 

She was a soldier's sweetheart, pure as the morning dew, 

Home from the war to wed her, hastened the lover true. 

Back to the Held of conflict, duty bade him go; 

Kissing his bride, he whispered, " Soldiers must flght, you knowl " 

■\' -..■■•;■, /- Refrain. ., /. " '"-. -: 

Only a sad, sweet memory, darling, of bygone years, 
Only a dream of you, dear, kl.ssing away my tears; fUghtf 

" A soldiers bride should not weep," you said, but how can my heart be 
I've only a sad, sweet memory, darling, of you to night. 

Then came a tender mes.sage, saying his love was true. 

Borne by a wounded comrade, these were his words to you, •' :' 

" For our dear flag and fn-edora, love, I give my life. 

Shed not a tear, remember you are a soldier's wife."— /f</'roi»». 

Shout the Tidings, Cuba's Free 

Copyright. 1898, by N. E Byers. Words and Music by E. Ninlan. ; 

Shout aloud the joyful tidings over all the land. 
Poor Cuba has been rescued from the tyrant's hand; " " 
■ • The joyful tidings echo over land and sea, • 

' " Old Uncle Sam has set poor suff'ring Cuba free." ' 

CHORfS. 

Then shout the joyful tidings, sufif'ring Cuba now is free. 
Awake her .sleeping heroes with the shout of victory: 
They bought with blood her freedom, falt«red not the price to pay; 
Then shout the joyful tidings, suff'ring Cuba's free to-day. 

Lift on high the flag of freedom, let it proudly wave 
' ■ O'er ev'ry Cuban cottage, o'er the patriot's grave; 

Let tyrants fear and tremble wlien her flag they see. 

For Uncle Sam has set poor suff'ring Cuba free.— cW-Ji*. ' 

T TAKE HY LITTLE HOME 

Coiiyrtght, 1898, by N. E. Byers. Words and Music by E. Nlnian. 

Is it true, kind stranger, I have just been told 

That I will have to leave, this cottage has been sold. . 

Yes, the old log cabin; grandma, will be torn down. 

And here for myself 1 will build a home, the finest In the town. 

Rkfrain. 

Don't take my little home, sir, pity a mother, pray; 

Here I have lived since childhood, seventy years to-day. 

My heart will break with sorrow, from this dear place to roam; 

Don't turn me out in the street, kind sir, don't take my little home. 

Here we played in childhood, brother dear and I, 

Under the old oak tree, while summer days sped by; 

In the chimney corner, near the log tire bright. 

The cold winter days there we whlled away, slept In the loft at night.— Pef. 

In the village church-yard, "neath a crumbling stone, 

lA)ved onop have long \>epi\ sieepin;;, I am all alone; . ' 

From the scenes of childhood, never I thought to roam. 

For all la the world that is d<'ar to me Is this, my little home.— Eefrain. 

The Words and Music of either of ttie above 
songs will be mailed to any address, post-paid, on 
receipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copies, your 
selection, for ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHMAN, 

108 Pvk Row, New York. Catalogue of all our publications mailed 

Ftm upon applieayon. 



EVERY NIGHT I SEE THAT NIOOER 

STANDIN' 'ROUND. 

Oopyrifht, 1898, by T. B. Harms * Co. EnicUiili coiiyriglit aecnred. 
By Juavpb Hart & W. H. Hatclielte. 

The worstest nigger that I know steals and gets Into a row. 

Just because he's nuthin' else to do; 
He went down to a colored church, knocked the deacon off his perch. 

Just because he'd nuthin' else to do. 
JVent to a colored ball, one night, drew his razor, started a flght, 

Just because he'd nuthin' else to do; 
In a policv shopdid loudlyshout, "I'se gwine to clean dls 'ere place out!" 
Just because he'd nuthin' else to do. 

Chorus. 
Ev'ry night I see that nigger standin' 'round, hangin' 'round; 
Ev'ry night I see that nigger walkin' 'round, talkin' round; 
Ev'ry night I see that nigger standin' 'round, hangin' 'round. 
Just because he'd nuthin' else to do. 

One moonlight night he left his stoop to go and visit a chicken coop. 

Just because he's nuthin' else to do; 
Not a sound there could be heard, he said, " I'se gwlne to get that bird," 

Just because he'd nuthin' else to do. 
The man that owned thatcoop had a gun— Lordy, how that nig did rua 

Just because he'd nuthin' else to do; 
You see that bird was that man's pet . I 'specs that nigger's runnin' yet. 

Just because he'd nuthin' else to do.— c'Ao/ u*. 

Got shaking craps with a lot of coons up in Reuben Snowball's rooms. 

Just because he's nuthin' else to do; 
Those niggers wished he was in heaven, forcv'ry shake he shook eleven. 

Just l>ecause he'd nuthin' else to do: 
Won all they had, but had to cheat— niggers chased him down the street. 

Just because he'd nuthin' else to do; 
Thro' an alley, my I but it was funny. He siild, " I'll give you a run for 

Just because he'd nuthin' else to do.— C/ui «*-. f yer money ! " 




Copyright, 1896, liy T. B. Harms A: Co. EnKiiah copyi iglit secured. 
Words by Harry B. Suiitli. Muhic by LudwiK EiiKiaender. ' 
Bonjo"r.b<>njo"t,nte''catnai(tdei>.' 
■ '■■■ Get out, get out and hold him, you fool I 

Rejoiced to meet you all. I'm sure. 
Confound that pesk}', wretched mule. .vc 

Tho' I've been roaming in many a clime. 
And been away for a deuce of a time, , - 

. ■ • • ' 'Tis joy to see you, luy friends, once again, .. "- 

.- 'Tis joy to be home once more. 

Im deeply moved, I say I'm moved, extremely moved. 

Mv fort* is versatility, in Thespian facility; ^ 

Mv smiliDg Hftability to me wins ev'ry heart; 
I've" talents a variety, of startling contrariety; ■ '- 

r ve sampled ev'ry kind of trade and nearly every art; 
The bus'ness of a wizard I well know from '• A to Izzard "; 

O I ridicule all rivals, I can give them "cards and spades." 
1 once was a tragedian, a melancholy, seedy un- 
In fact, in me you clearly see a jack of all trades. 
Refrain. 
Behold in me the whole epitome of versatile felicity; 

My talent is no ordinary kind; 
I am a paragon l I am the only one : 
i I am a universal genius of gifts in multiplicity. 

My equal upon earth you will not find; 
For 1 am Tereschappe the magical. 
The comical, the tragical; 
Take off your hats to me. • r 

At prestidigitation I'm tlie wonder of the nation. 

Anything you like to something else with readiness I turn: 
My singing voice vociferous, wins jtosies odoriferous 

From ladies who adure me and for my affections yearn; 
I am a "record breaker " as a necnmiaiicing fakir. 

No large sleeves and no moustache I wear; I do not need their aids. 
In ballet dance fantastical, my logs are most elastical— 

In fact. In me you clearly see a jack of all trades.— y^c/roiw. 

THE ACTOR'S ROARDING HOUSE 

By William Jerome. Tune—" Hey, Rutie." 

I'll singyou of an actor's boarding-house that's run by a Dutchman, Her- 
It's No. 22 Great Jones, and the price i>er week Is just 6 iwnes. [man Kruse, 
It's run upon the just-out plan, by this Michael Pheana Dutchman. 
Who wants you to settle in advance, and so to beat him theres no chance. 
I'm up eleven llights of stairs, and in my room there are no chairs, 
No signs of ga.s or a candle light— in fact, my room Is out of sight. 
We sleep eleven in one Ijed, and in the morning six are dead. 
The first one up is the best one dressed, to-day I lost my coat and vest. 
Some other actor stole my shoes, and t(X)k them out to get some booze 
They feed on hash three times a day, and the serio-conilcs all chew hay. 
The house is full of mu.seum freaks, for a season of iust forty weeks. 
They are a dizzy Iwjking troupe, and the turtle boy fell In the soup. 
They all have English pugs to pet, and their picture s In the Police Gazett*. 
They say there's one "eiu mashed upon, but not on your life, says John 
They played Delaware and Water Gan, and other towns not on the map. 

Then comic songs all night they sing. 
And when thev hear the dinner bell, oh, how like Indians they do yell. 
Around the table sit in pairs, and read the gauzy biU oi fares, 
Oh the beefsteak it is awful tough, but at It we al! make a bluff. 
ToAiay I took a great big chunk to make some hinges for my trunk. 
The coffee it is awful weak, it hasn't strength enough to speak. 
With the butter it fought two rounds, but had to settle on its grounds. 
We had some st«ak called Laughelte. I ate some and am laughing yet. 
And then they gave me ox tall soup, made from the leg of old Bill's boot. 
But when they passed the custard pie, oh. me: oh. me! oh, me; oh, my I 
Upon my piece 1 found a hair, for things like that I did not care. 
But a boarder next to me named John, he ate the pie with jo jo's on. 
When we got thro" we said our prayers, and wish'd we could climb the 
We have a party every night.that always l)usts up In a flght. f gold'n stairs 
Pound parties are the fad, vou see. at the one la-st night they tx^unded me. 
Then Cnristmas was the game they played, with their stockings on a line 
1 had none, but to get a chance, uoon the line I hung my pants, [array'd 
Some got presents. oh„so flne: some son-of-a-gnn got into mine. 
Then to my room I bade retreat, and went to breakfast In a sheet. 
Ta-la-la-boom-de-rae, since it wj& enough for me. 
I'd Booner be In Kankakee. Ta-ta, ta-ta, boom-de-ree. 



...•'i' ■_. 



HI THERE ! RUBBER NECK I Do You Remember? 



( 'i>p> riKht. 1898, l>> Doylo A Re«d. 
Word! and Mukic by A. Huwdoii DoyI* aud C'liailea A. R«ed. 

Once I saw an eager crowil of many hundred people 
Watch a man who went to ttx the top of a church steeple. 
And of a sudden when the man looked like a little speck, 
Some smart Aleck in the crowd Just yelled out Rubber Neck! 

Chorus. 
Rubber Neck, Rubber Neck, you'll hear It ev'rywhere, ''^ 
If you stop to notice things, or should you chance to stare; 
Rubher Neck, Rubber Neck, your gazluK it will check. 
To have some crazy Yap yell out, HI there! Rubber Neck! 

Notice on a rainy day a lady neatly clad, 

Crossins o'er the muddy street, the walks are very bad. 

Some men who are just passing by will to each other beck, 

'Till some kid, with grinning face, will yell out Rubber Neck!— C%o. 

At a burlesque show one night the house was very packed. 
Front row seats with bald heads tilled, who rubt)er'd every act. 
They gazed with bulging eves, they did, the girls to try and vex, 
'Till the leading lady yeuea, oh, see the rubber necks.— 6'A(wu». 



(.'opynulir. I8'J8, by Cail KIsclicr By Kicbard Stahl. 

Mos' de months I disremember. but I always knows November; 

Yes, 1 alwavs knows November took the chair. 
An' I'm Shu' as dat I'm livin' dat its gettln' neah Thanksglvln", 

Dar'sa kleptomany^'r feelin" lii de air. 
Eb'ry night I dreams o' turkey till ma flngera get quite Jerky, 

Eb'ry night ma legs dey walk me hea' and dare. 
Turkey goiil)lers seem ter beckon, an' I ain't maself, I reckon, 

Foh' dares a kleptumanyen feelin' in de air. 

■ Hm: Hm: dat kleptomanyer feelin', 
Hm! Hm! comes always o'er me stealln'; 
Shu" when we stand on Jordan's strand. 
And when we land in Eden's land, 
St. Peterll have to keep his turkeys in his hand, 
Foh' dar's a kleptomanyer feelin' In de air. 
Says de preacher, don' go covet, "makes no dlff'rence how you love It, 

Bible -say regarding turkeys, don' you dare. 
But how kin a chile remember when it comes along Noveml)er, 

An" dat kleptomanver feellns In de air. 
Hits a dretrul. dreflful feelin' foh to have come o' yo' stealln". 

Hit's a sort o' stealin' feelin' an' a pair 
Of de fatter turkey's growln' am de only thing worth knowln' 
When dar s a kleptoraanyen feelm' In de air.— < Aw/**. 

As Long As It Pleases the Ladles 



lopyiluht 18M 
Words liy Cliuiles H'>yt. 



by Carl Flaelier. 

Alusic by lUchard Stahl. 



Rude men give me the guy as I go by. 
Crude men are Jealous of me, and I know why. 
Plain men gape with a smile at my dainty curls: 
Coarsp men laugh at my stvle, but It suits the girls. 

Chorcs. 
, . And as long as it plea-ses the ladles, the ladies, the ladles. 

As lung as it plea.«es the ladles. I care not what men may say. 
As long as it pleases the ladies, the ladies, the ladies. 
As long as it pleases the ladies. I care not what men may say. 

Rubies and diamond rings and costly pearls 

Are just the things that will always suit the girls; 

Girls all prize them most highly and can't get enough, 

Man, poor man. is the fool, hustling for the stnflf.— c'Aorui, 

Op'ra-house man (-(mies in to see the play. 

Vacant chair in front of him, nothing in the way; 

In comes lady fair, wearing hat three feet tall, 

Sits down In vacant chair, man can't see at all.— CAofti*. 

Man leans over and whispers In lady's ear. 

Asks her politely to please remove her headgear; 

She turns 'rouiyl with a scorn and says, very rude of you; 

Just pay attention to me and laugh when I ao—Chorm. 

Sweetheart Mine 

C .pviiRlil. 1«98. by Wlmlii.r MukIc Co 
' . Words by Oliver O'-llliia Muate by neo. CantUe. 

In a far-oflf. smiling valley, where the green-clad hills look down 

On the fairest liome In all that country side. 
Lived a tender little maiden fair, with laughing eyes of brown. 

Who promised long ago to be my bride; 
Oh: how pleasant are the memrles of those well-remembered hours. 

When arm in arm and heart to heart we strayed. 
Whilst the running brook below us seemed to murmur to the flow'rs 
The same sweet ."ong my voice to her conveyed. 

Refrain. 
Oh! sweetheart mine, dear sweetheart mine, 
I will love you while the stars above shall shine. 
For your loving eyes so tender and your sunny smile divine, 
Hiive won my heart forever, sweetheart mine. 

In ttiat far-off, smiling valley bloom the roses as of yore. 

But the sunshine has all vanisiied from the scene. 
For my sweetheart's laughing eyes of brown will sparkle nevermore. 

And nevermore she'll grace the village green. 
For they've laid her in her last long sleep, where falls the rain and dew. 

On the hlU.side where we often used to stray. 
And I see no joy in living, for my heart lies burled, too. 

With the form of her to whom I used to say:— i/a/Voin. 



DELEHANTY & HEN6LER*S 
SONG Re DANCE BOOK 

PRICE. 25 CENTS PER COPY. 

Containing an authorized and original collection 
of the songs, song dances, and melodies, as sung 
and danced by Delehanty & Hengler. It also 
contains 21 pieces, set to music, and arranged 
for two voices. The whole is prefaced by " Clog- 
Dancing Made Easy." With examples, set to 
music, by Henry Tucker. Price 2S cts., post-paid. 





Copyrlaht, 1«M, by Cail ridi«r. 
Word! and Uuaic by Richard SUtiL 

Do you remember? 'tis not long ago. 

When first you said " 1 love you so." 

Can time have changed the vows we th«n made, 

Do you remember, or la your love dead? 

In years gone by many a sigh 

Has pierced my heart, all for thee. 
Why then break now that sacred vow, 

Doest thou no longer love me? 
Why must I roam through life alone 

Without thee, my darling one. 

Chorus. 
Have you forgotten your promise? Am I no longer thine own? 
Let me Just once more embrace thee, come to the heart that la lone; 
Ever and always I'll love thee, ofttimes, you know, I hare said, [deadf 
One fond kiss was then your answer, do you remember? or is your love 
Life seems so dreary, so bitter and cold. 
Without one smile, like those of old. 
Soon all be o'er, to rest 111 be laid. 
Why should I linger when your love Is dead. 
Some day, maybe, there'll come to thee 

Thoughts of a bright, happy past; 
But, after all, why now recall 

Moments of oliss that not last! - 

Why should I try to tempt my fate 
When you say "It is too late."— CVkorwa 

The Languid Man 

Copy riKht. ISM. by Carl FlaliM-. 
Worda by Edmund Vance Cooke. Mualc by Rlobard Staht 

This life's a hollow bubble. 

Don't you know? 
A painted piece of twouble. 

Don't you know? 
We come on earth to cwy. 
We gwow oldeh and we sigh. 
Olden still and then we die. 

Don't you know? 
We wowwy thwough each day. 

Don't you know? ,. 

In a sort of, kind of, way. 

Don't you know? 
We are nungwy, we are fed. 
Some few things are done and said. 
We are tihed, we go to bed. 

Don't you know? 

Chorus. 
Don't you know, weally, sometimes I wondeb. 
If life Is life, or is only a blundeh. 
A twick of that devilish fellah down yundeh 

Who's fooling us all, don't you know? 
Life will be life, when we nevah need wowwy. 
Life will be life when we nevah need huhwy. 
When there's no fluhwy. 

But then we'll be dead, don't you know? 

It's all a howwld mix. 

Don't you know? 
Business, love and politics. 

Don't you know? 
Clubs and pa wtles, cliques and sets. 
Fashions, follies, sins, wegwets, 
Stwuggle, Ptwife and clgawettee. 

Don't you know? 
Politics? O, lust a lawk. 

Don't you know? 
Just a nlghtmaeh in the dawk. 

Don't you know? 
You pe'splah all day and night. 
And afteh all the fight. 
Why pehaps the wx)ng man's wight, 

Don't you know?— r7i(M-j<*. 

Love? O, yes ! you meet some gi'l. 

Don't you know? 
And you get In such a whl'l. 

Don't you know? 
That you kneel down on the floab. 
And imploah and adoah. 
And It's ail a Ijeastly boah ! 

Don't you know? 
Soclet* ? Is dwess. 

Don't you know? 
And a sou'ce of much dlstwees. 

Don't you know? 
To detehmlne what to weah. 
When to go and likewise wheah. 
And how to pawt youah halh. 

Don't you know?— t'Aoi-w*. 

So theah's weally nothing In it. 

Don't you know? 
And we live Just for a minute, 

Don't you know? 
For when you've seen and felt, 
Dwank and eaten, heahd and sme'.t. 
Why, all the cawds are dealt. 

Don't you know? 
You've one consciousness, that's all. 

Don't you know? 
And one stomach, aud It's small, 

Don't you know? 
You can only weah one tie. 
One eyeglass In youah eye, 
And one coffin, wnen you die. 

Don't you know?— 6'/'ort<#. 

The Words and Music of either of the above 
songs will be mailed to any address, post-paid,'on 
receipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copies, yoHr 
selection, for ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHMAN, 
108 Park Row, New York. Catalogue of ail our publications nailotf 
Frto upon application. , ,»^ ^ w — 




A^- 






pyHcht, 18W. h7 MtII Bros. EiiKlith onpyrlKlit securad. '.\'-\ ''/' / 
Woius and Music by Malcolm William". 

My gtrl ain't much tx) look at, she ain't no dream. 
She can't sing like an angel, Ann Ellzer Green, 
.-J But when she hears the "rag time " she cant keep still, 
, ' Her nerves commence ajumpin' she gets a chill— well, 
^ Her eyes begin a-shlnln', her cheeks get red, 

.:■'■ Her feet commence to shuffle, she shakes her head, ' ; 
And when she starts a-dancin' slie'8 the real thing; 
I can't keep 8tUl no longer, I got to sing:— Well— . 

Chorus. 
"^ My Ann Ellzer, she's a surpnser, a tantalizer, she's in the whirl. 
And I'll advertise her, ray Ann Ellzer, she is my "ragtime" girl. 
I took her to a partj' last Sunday night. 
Where all the coons were dancln', ended in a fight. 
There was a yeller feller from Thompson Street, 
Said that he had a baby no wench could beat— well, 
I l)et on Ann EUzer all that I had, -i 

WTien she got through a-dancin' that coon looked sad. 
He tried to grab the money. 1 carved him deep, 
I sang this song to him as he went to sleep:— well— Chorus. 

WHEN I RETURN WEIL BE WED 

Copyrlirht, 18M. by Edw. M. Koniiicky & Bro«. 

Blieet mutii! piihlixheit hy E<lvv. M. Koiiiiisky & Bros.. Troy, N. T. 

Words and music liy Stt'iie K»iilii«ky. 

It was Just l)efore the battle, the troops were ordered on, - 

And a soldier with his sweetheart by his side 
Were both praying for his safety and that he might soon return. 

And live 111 peace and comfort with his bride. 
They would soon have Ijeen wedded had he not been called to arms. 

And it made the parting all the worse to bear. 
But he said, " My country calls, so well l)e wed when I return. 
Let UB hope 'twill be the answer to our prayer." 

Chorus. 
" When I return we'll be wed," 

Those were the last words he said, • 

As he shouldered his musket and marched along. 

Perhaps to be soon with the dead, 
But her sweet smiling face cheerd him on. 
Though her heart sank within as he left. 
And long in her mem'ry there lived that farewell, 
"When I return we will be wed." 
li. the thickest of the battle, amidst the shot and shell. 

Stood the soldier with the bravest of the hrave. 
When upon them came an awful charj^e, and with the rest he fell. 

While struggling for his country's flag to save. 
As his comrades gathered 'round him, "tell my sweetheart " were his 

"Tell her gently, for ux) soon the news she'll learn," [words, 

And then, as his soul took flight, he whispered while they raised him up, 
"Tell her we'll be wed as soon as I return."— C/'or«#. 

WHEN A WOMAN LOVES 

Copyrlirkt. inn. by Philip Kuosei. Worilssiid Munic by Philip KusieL . 
Don't leave me, dear, in anger, for surely you'll regret, 

Now that my time is drawing to a close. 
How often have you told it. you loved none else but me. 

Tho' now your life is filled with bitter woee. 
All through our married life you've been the idol of my heart; 

Your love !ias l>een to me ray all in all. 
You surely must have loved me, or else I've been deceived. 
Tell me ere I go t)eyond recall. 

Chorus. 
For when a woman loves, how plainly does she show It, 

Nothing in this world can take her love away; 
She'll work for you, she'll beg for you, and yes I know she'd die for you. 
For when a woman truly loves her love will stay. 

When you had wealth and plenty, I entertained your friends. 

And made all men pay homage to your name. 
And after, when misfortune swept all your wealth away. 

You always found mv love was Just the same. 
None had a better right to make the man that I loved best 

Go forth and show that work was not a shame. 
Did I not also help you until I lost my health? 

Tell me that you love me just the same.- CAortM. 



Oopyriarht, 1898, by Lyon A Hoaly. 
Wrilteiiaiid Composed by B Gilbert. 

There's a pretty little gal all mine. 
She's 80 elegant and sweet all de time— 
Fer to marry her I'm slghin'. 
An' at times I feel as if I was a-dyln'. 
Now she lubs to hear me sing, yes she do — 
An' to play upon de banjo, too, 
Fer I've a song, a lubly song. 
Which I sings to her de whole day long. 
Refrain. 
Susie ue, do lub me true. 
Darky l)oy is berry fond of j'OU; 
Meet you. honey, m de mornin', 
- Wen de birds am all a-calUn' Susie- ue, mah Suste-ue. 
SuBie, usie, usle. usie-ue. 

Rao Chorus. 
Oh, Susie ue, do lub me true. 
Darky boy l8 very fond of you, • 

Meet yer, honey, in de mornin' 
Wen de birds am all a-callin' 
Susie ue. mah Susie-ue; 
Susie, usie, Susie usie-ue. '^ ■ 

'Mong de honeysuckle all day long. 

Hark! de bees are hummln' dere wild song— 

From de cabin comes loud singin'. 

Darkies voices thro' de old plantation rlngln", ... 

An' dere's gwlne to l)e some fun ober dere, 

Dat will make de odder nigger boys stare. 

For mas.'vis gwine ter make her mine; 

I'se so happy dat I can't help cryXnc:— Hefi ain. 

The Words and Music of either of the above 

songs will be mailed to any address, post-paid, on 

receipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copies, your 

selection, for ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHMAN, 

Park Klow, New Yoriu Catalogue of all our publications mailed 



BELLE OF HONOLULU 

CopyriKht, 1898, by J. Oonifraii. Eiit^r^il nt Slatioiiers' Hall, LoudOD, EOC. 
Woi'ilg and Music i>y Ijec Johnsuii 

A high-toned gal has won me, a l>elle of sweet sixteen. 

She is the swellest gal I've seen, this Honolulu hula queen. 

For style and grace ma lady is ev'rything that's swell. 

She is a dream, this Honolulu l)elle; 

When she goes by, the ladles sigli, de coons all wink deir eyes; 

And when ma gal goes down de line, the natives they all cry.* 




♦Spokew.- Well, what do they cry? (This can be introduced at ♦, before 
chorus, by orchestra or singer on stage, if desired.) 

Chorts. 
She Is a dream, ma Honolulu qiie<Mi, the sweetest girl that ever was seen; 
She is divine, this hula girl of mine, she is the belie of Honolulu. 

Next Blaster morn I'll wed her, this Oriental queen, I line. 

Den wedding bells will sweetly chime, and with ma bride I'll fall in 

All decked in orange blossoms, and silks and sjitins flue; 

She'll soon be mine, this hula gal divine; 

De choir will sing and chant a hymn when I put on de ring; 

And when I march out with ma bride, the natives they will sing: 

— Chorut. 
A high-toned girl has won me, a lielle of sweet sixteen. 

She IS the swellest girl I've seen, this Honolulu hula queen. 

For style and grace this lady is everything tliafs swell. 

She is a dream, my Honolulu belle: 

When she goes by the l:ulies sigh, the swells all wink their eyes; 

The natives shout when she go«'s out, and this Is what they cry: 

— Choru$. 
Next Eastern morn 111 wed her, this Oriental queen. 

Then wedding bells will sweetly chime, and with my bride I'll fall in 
All decked in orange blossoms, and silks and satins fine. (line, 

She'll soon be mine, this hula girl divine. 
The choir will sing and chant a hymn when I nut on the ring; 
And wlien I march out with ray bride, the natives they will sing: 

— Chorus. 

A Farmer Never Can an Actor Be 

Copyright, 1897, by Smith Piano Co. 
Words by Fietl Colin. M<imi- by John A Thomas. 

John Reuben from the country thought lied t(U.he City go. 

" I'm tired of the farm," said he, " Im going to join a show, 

A real live actor I will be, my fame it shall resound." 

" Oh, what a fool," the neighbors said, "no bigger can be found." 

So to an actor's boarding-house in the city Keiil)en went. 

The show-folks guyed him all day long, he didn't mind a cent. 

" Im looking for a good soubrette with me to do a tuni," 

They introduced him " Polly Jones," and from her he did learn: • 

ClIORfS. 

"First, you stand upon your he.id like this, • 

To the audience wave a little kiss. 
Waltz upon your ear, 'way back to the rear, 
— Turn a summersault, but don't you miss. 

Then you do the hut.schl kutchi dance. 
Make .a bow or two at every cliance. 
Tell a funny gag, and dance the buck and rag. 
That will be an act of which we can brag." 
Then she told him she would like to dine. 
Reuben says, " let's have a Iwttle of wine: " 
Then she blew him and made him spend his tin, 
'Till for the farm that jay did pine: 
On the train, next day, Reul»en did flee, 
" The old farm right quick Im going to see. 
Home is good enougli, but you bet she was hot stuff," 
A farmer never can an actor be. 

A short time after he got home, there came the county fair. 
And ev'ry farmer that could go, soon hurried to get there. 
Now Reuben he was one of them, he brought the folks down, too. 
And told them to enjoy themselves, while he'd the live-stock view. 
The gambling tent attracted him, he watched the wheel go "round, 
" That business Is an easy one, no better can be found." 
" A gambler I would like to lie, for that my heart do<'s yearn;" 
So he went up, spoke to the boss, and from him he did learn: 

CHORrs. 
" First, you get a sucker on the string. 

And to your room you him will bring. 
And then when you play, things win come his way. 

For a little while you let him win. 
Then when you think lie has won enough. 
Just you start to m*e a good big bluff. 
That's the way to win, to get all nis tin. 
For he'll weaken, and you get the stuff; 
Now I'll show you how the trick is done. 
We'll start a little game, but just for fun." 
Said Reuben, " don't j'ou fret, I'll make a little bet. 
If for my money I can get a run." 
Soon the jay he iield of aces three, 
" I'll bet you all I've got if you'll agree; " 
Then the gambler sliow'd a fiush, & i>oor Reuben made a rush— 
A farmer never can a gambler be. 

Now, Reuben got disgusted, "I'll settle and stay here. 

They can"t do me when I'm at home, there ain't no con. mnn near," 

A farmer I will live and dit*. for that is good enough. 

I'll raise my cows, and .sell my wheat, though country life is lough." 

Election time was coming near. ex<-itenient reigned supreme, 

For Congress they put Reuben up, he felt as in a dream. 

" Now there's the thing that I've longed for, I know not how to turn; 

And then he met Senator Smith, and from him he did learn: 

Choris. , . " 

"First, you've got the crowd to organiise,' 

In the papers you must advertise. 
Then you hire a hall, give the crowd a ball. 
Make them think on you there are no flies; 
Spend your money free at ev'ry place, 
- For the gang the growler always chase. 

Be up day and night, always keep in sight; ' •' ' 

Then you'll have a show to win the race." 
So poor Reuben hustled through the town, ' ". 

'Y'ou bet your life he done things good and brown; . ; r ■• 
His money it did flow, it was a holy show; -;^ . 

" Why, even his watch he put in pawn. :< 

Election day came, sunny, brignt and free, 
"This is the day on which 111 honored be." "'' 

That night, in a minute, Reuben found he wasnt in It; 
■ -■ A farmer can't a politician be. 



., ) 






COLLEGE CHUnS POREVER 

Copj right, 189S, b; M; II Bros. EiiglUh cnpjrriKbt necured. 
Words by Dan r»<-kar<l Mustc by Andrew Le R"C 

Old coUeRe chums sat together. telUng of days that had passed. 
Drinking good health to each other, vowing their friendship would last, 
When up jumped one of the gayest and said we won't say good-bye 
'Till we once more get together and give the old college cry; 
They made the old room ring again, with voices loud and clear, 
Thegood old college cry they gave, the one they loved so dear. 
Well always stand by each other, our friendship we'll ne'er sever. 
Remember that we will always be true college chums forever. 

CllORCS. 

College chums forever we will always be, 

Thousrli we're separated by a distant sea; 

If misfortunes coine, well always stand together, 

A-helping hand well always give, were true college chums forever. 

Ten years had pjissed when one evening, to the old room so much changed. 

Wandered in two college comrades, chums once united again. 

Stories they told to each other of jolly old times now past. 

'Twas in this room that we promised our friendship would always la.st; 

What has become of my old pai. Jack was a chum of mine; 

1 heard a story long ago, he was accused of crime. 

Rumor said that he stole money, well judge him guilty, never. 

Let us believe him innocent, we're college chums forever.- f^o»M». 

This IR the sad and last chapter, poor Jack a criminal he. 

Back to the same college campus, hoping an old chum to see; 

He is the last of his classmates, the others have passed away;. 

And in the old village tavern he thinks of a happy day; 

He was convicted of a crime, but he was iniKHent; 

He tried to shield a dear old ual, to pii.^on then was sent, 

8adly he thinks it all over, life is a vain endeavor, 

A shot then is heard, poor Jack he died, true college chums forever. 

— Choi lit. 

You Ain't de Man I Thought You Was 

Copyright, 1899, by Wni. D. Uiay. Entered at Statioiiera' Hall, London. 
Wotdc and Music by Lew Sully. 
I'm as gentle and as loving as can be, 

A perfect lamb, indeed I am. 
Bill I wants no coon a-trihlin' with me; 
^ When I lose my temper, goodness, but I'm bad; 

^ Mister Johnson courted me at)out a year; 

I loved him true, liii telling you; 
We were married, now liu sorry that! spoke- 
To tell the truth, he's always broke. 
He never has a dollar he can call his own; 
I has to buy iiiv chitUiiH and my bread: 
He got so bad 1 tlionu'ht Id Imtter turn him loose. 
So Monday night I went to hliu and said: 
CiioRrs. 
You ain't de man a dat I thought you was. 
We never could agree; 
■ Take all your old a cheap furniture. 
It wouldn't do for me. nohow, well-a, 
I've gone and ruined my appetite 

Eating vour cheap l)eef-stew; 
You may be a winner with the very common kind, 
But for me. coon, you won't do. 

Now a. Mister Johnson, take a tip from me. 

You'd l)etter go, so there's the dc>o'; 
I'm a bound to lose vou. coon— I must be free; 
' So a-pack your little grip and trot along: 

Doan' yon try and make blieve that you'll be good, 

Dat doesn't go with me no mo"; 
You've Ijeeii trifalin" atH»iit jes' long enough; 

You's got to move, and dafs no blutT. 
So take your linen duster and your seven dollar suit; 

1 wouldn't live with you another day. 
You never was congenial, alius like to fuss. 

You have been a failure, now I'm 'bilged to say:— C//<»'/«. 

IT DIDN'T TAKE LONG TO DO 

Copyright, 1^99, by Wm. B. Giuy. Entered at Stationer*' Hall, L'>ndon. 
Words and Mu?lc by Murray A l.eiirh. 

My mamma was always a woman with wonderful strength of mind. 
But poor old t>op was always a man who was bashfully inclined; 
They courted together for numy a ^ar. 

But she found to her dismay. 
He was far too shy his luck to tiy. 
So at last She had to say: 

CHORrs. 
• You are a long time, a long time thinking about the Job; 
You know that you want me for a wife. 
So let us get wed and settle for life. 

Poor father wa. so delighted, he did as she wanted him to; 
It took a long time to think aliout, , 

But it didn't take long to do. 
I am fond of riding a bike upon which I am often seen. 
But lately my dear mother-In law has l)een riding my machine; 
She went for a spin by herself in a dress. 

Which made peoi)le laugh and cough. 
But she rode so fast, I st(M)d aghast. 
And I cried "Oh, Ma, get off." 

ClIORlS. 

She was a long time, a long time thinking about the job* 

She reeled ann slipp«'(t and wobbled al)out. 

But how to get off she couldn't find out; 

She caromea against a lamp pot^t. and into the gutter she flew, 

It took a long time to think about. 

But it didn't take long to do. 

Mister Orcen has been a goo<l husband for many a year, j'ou see; 
He thinks his wife the ioy of his life, they're as happy as can be. 
There isn't a sign of a family yet. 

And how all tlie i)eople stared 
When Green brought a baby carriage home. 

Then the neighbors all declared: 

Choris. 
- ■ He's been a long time, a long time thinking about the Job, 
Perhaps he only wanted the thing 
For wheeling up home his wife's marketing; 
The lady at number twenty said: Mind, what I t«ll you Is true. 
It took a long time to think about. 
But It didn't take long to do. 



rSE DE LADY FRIEND DF Ml 



Copyright, 1899, by Wm. B. Oray. Entered at Stationers' Hall Loudon, EugUOb.^ 
Words by 8. B. Oaasin. Musln by Fred Uybutd*. 
Whenever I goes out dar's a sensation. 

All kinds of coons dey follow me around; 
-I done upset de colored population. 

For I'se de red-hot member of dis town, 
Dem low-down niggers try dere best to catch me, 

But they don't get from me no satisfaction; 
I turns on d»yn and say. In Just the pertest way, 
" I'se de lady friend of Mister 'Hastas Jackson.** 

Chorcs. 
I'se de lady friend of Mister 'RastuR Jackson, 

I'se superior in ev'ry tone and action. 
So done take <lls advice, witli me you cut no Ice, 

I'se de lady friend of Mister 'Rastus Jackson. 

I wouldn't give a snap of dis yere finger 

Fo" ev'ry ma.shin' nigger down de line, 
Dar's nothin' in a blutiQn' ev'ry sllnger. 

Who's shoutin' out "come seben" all de time, ' 
So you am all Just only time a-wastin'. 

In hov'rin' 'lound you'll get no satisfaction; 
I'll have you just to know dat bluffln' doesn't go, 
I "I'se de lady friend of Mister 'Rastus Jackson." 

CHORI'S. 

1 'se de lady friend of Mister 'Rastus Jackson, 

I'se superior In ev'ry tone and action, 
So done take dis advice, with me you cut no Ice, 

I'se de lady friend of Mister 'Rastus Jackson. 

'CINDY 

Copyright, 1899, by Wm. II. Unty. Entered at Stationers' Hall, London. 
Words by Lew Uockntuder. Music by Carl Carlton. 
I'se been payin' yo' my 'tentions for years, yo' must allow; 
I lubd yo' ev'ry minute, an' I'm gwine to tell yo' now 
Dat I ain't no coon from Klondike, but as poor off as 1 am, ^ 

I'se gwine to ask yo', 'Cindy dear, if I can be yo' manV 

CnoRrs. 

'Cindy, 1 lubs yo', babe, tell me dat yo' will be my real tblag^; ; 
'Cindy. I'se you slabe— oh. let me buy de wedding ring. 

Alter jii ft ehnri4t only. >H"tig by '' i'ldy. ,; 

Jasper. 1 kain't lub you; sabe yo' money, don't buy any ring; 
Ja.'iper, yo' won't do, 1 must gib yo' de aing-a-ling. < .-. 

Now, Miss 'Cindy, you can't lo^^e me, to win yo' I'se a-gwlne; j 

I know'd that you'd refuse me. hon". but you Jes' mus" l)e mine; . ^ 
I ain't de cheap coon dat I looks, got an oil-stove beats the band; 
In de bank Ise got a bunch of mon', guess dat'll win your hand. 

CHORfS. 

Cindy.— Jasper, I lubs you. bal)e, and I confess dat you's my real thing; 

Jaeper, I'se your slabe, now you go buy dat wedding ring. 
Chorcs {to be mnq a* a duel). 
CiNDV.— Jasper, ( lubs yo', babe, and I confess dat you's my real thing; 

Jasper, I'se yo' slabe, now you go buy dat wedding ilng. 
Jasper — Cindy, I luijs yo'. l)al)e, and I confess dat you's my real thing; 

'Cindy, I'se yo' slabe; now I'll go buy dat wedding ring. 

The Sign "To Let" 



CopyrlKlit, IK'JH, by Juiiie* J. Ilaliirii. , . j- 

Words by James J. lUiiK'x. Miixto bt J W. Wheeler. ' |.. 

Within a city palace home, among the rich and grand. 

Lived people of the swellest set. with wealth at their command. 

The father was a noted man, his riches made him vain; 

He prospered on the Stock Exchange, but yearned for greater gain. 

No warning had they of the crash that swept his wealtli away. 

Their jialac- home and all they had tl»*»y lost one bitter day. 

Their home is now among the ixxtr, in jioverty and debt. 

And when they pass the mansion by they see the sign " To let." 

Rkfrain. 
There's a sign "To let" In the window, 

Theie's a home no more filled with cheer. 
Where once there was wealth and pleasure. 

All is lonely, desj^ilcd .ind drear; 
There's a mother turned from her threshold. 

There's a sister pmlng away. 
While the sign "To let " In the window. 

They've seen since that fatal day. 

New troubles came from day to day to mortify their pride. 
The daughter was to .soon l>econie her titled suitor's bride, 
But when to him their story of misfortune had been told. 
He rruelly deserted her. he loved her for her gold. 
Tlifir mansion home is darkened now, where all was bright before. 
And people gaze in pity when they're passing bv Its door- 
Alas: that in this world of ours each joy brings Its regret. 
And that we find sad stories In the signs that read "To let." 

Refrain. 
There's a sign "To let" In the window. 

There's a home no morp filled with cheer. 
Where once there was wealth and pleasure. 

All Is lonely, despoiled and drear; 
There's a mother turned from her threshold. 

There's a slsterjilnlng awav. 
While the sign ""To let" In the window ' 

They've seen since that fatal day. ' ' 

The Words and Music of any of th« abovt 
songs will be mailed to any address, post-paid, en 
receipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copies, your 
selection, for ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHMAM, 

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...arid 



IN THE SHADOW OF THE PINES 

Pnbliahed by parmiMlon of Ijegti Brothers, 1006 Walnut Street. Kanau City. Uo., from 
whom the wurds and music can be ulitaiiiHd. .... 

Words by Haltlo Lummia. Muelc by Q O. Lang. '•-■'''^:: ' ''''-y-.y 

W« wandered In the shadow of the pines, my love and I, -:;;;:•: 

As the wind wiis blowing freshly from the sea; 
But a sudden fitful darkness stole across the summer sky. 

And a shadow came lietween my love and me. 
Some ha.sty words were spoken, and then, almost unawares, 

Hasty answers to unthinkiiiK anger led. 
And our heartsick, bitter longinpr. and our weep^jig, and our pray'rs 
' Ne'er can make those false and cruel words uusaid. 

Chorus. 
Come back to me, sweetheart, and love me as before. 
. '.-- Come back, back to me, sweetheart, and leave me nevermore. 
In life's dull pathway the sun no longer shines. 

' Come, love, and meet me in the Shadow Of the pines. . 
You took the ring I gave you, nor cast a glance at me 

As you held the jewel'd trinket In your hand; 
And then you turned and tossed it in the waters of the sea. 

Where the waves are splashing idly on the sand. 
You went your way, unheeding the tears I could not hide. 

You went vour way and not a word was said: 
But my stubborn heart was breaking underneath its mask of pride. 

And the pine trees sobbed In pity overhead.— C/torug. 
I wake from bitter dreaming but to call aloud your name; 

I sleep again to dream of you once more; 
_ And my stubborn pride has left me, I admit I was to blame. 

Forgive me, dear, and love me as before. 
For the future is o'ershadowed with the darkness of despair, 

In the skv of life love's sun no longer shines, 
And I'd give the whole world gladly once again to meet you there. 

Reunited In the shadow of the pines.— 6Vw>;m». 

I WANT A REAL COON 

• Copyriftlit, 18W, by Windsor Musle Co. 

Wordsby Aitliur J. I.umb. Music by Bernard Adier. 

Dar's a good-for-niithin" ragged coon comes 'roun' a-courtin' me, 
.^ And I'm 'most ashamed he has the cheek to call; 

~ -^os' he tries to put on heaps of style when he's a sight to see, 
»* s got nuthln' to his name, but lots of gall. 
I've a-told him-he will never do, he am not good enough. '- 

I've a-told liiin hes a would-be, nuthin' iuore. 
An' he knows I'm on to him, 'cos* he can't get in the swim. 
And dar's many a time I've told him at de door: 

Chorus. 
I want a real coon, handsome, genteel coon. 
Coon like mv own relations, I don't want no imitations. 
Some coon dat'a hauglity. swell dressed and sporty, 
A real coon dis gal am waitin' tor. 

Now I wants to have a real coon like the swell coons that I see, 

I've a-seen 'em at the theatre all life long; 
They will dance around upon the stage with clothes 'way up in G, 

An' they take me clear to heaben with a song. 
But the coons aroun' my neighborhood, they don't dress up a bit. 

Oh, compared to dem stage folks the rest are jays; 
80 I'm willln'. ebrv time, to give up my little dime, 

Jes' to watch the real coon with his winiiin' ways.— C%orw#. 



•_ ■ Copyright, 1807, by National Music Co. ., 

" AVords and Music by Freit H. Staiia. . -'; . 

When the sun sets in the West, ma honey Lou, 

That's the time I love thee l)est, ma honey Lou; 
When we're sitting in the gloom waiting for the silver moon. 

You makes mo a happy coon, ma honey Lou. 
When the birds have hushed their song, ma honey Lou, 

All the twilight shadows gone, ma honey Lou, 
When the moon so full and bright sheds its soft and mellow light. 

Then I loves you more each night, ma honey Lou. 

Chorus. 

Ma Lou, nia Lon, ma honey Lou, love me long and love me true, 

I love no one else but you, ma honey, ma honey, honey Lou. 

Say you love me, honey Lou, I want you, 'deed I do! 

My heart will surely break in two If I lose you, ma honey Lou. 

And last night I waited long, ma honey Lou, 

And I told the stars in song, ma honey Lou; 
How my heart would ever beat for my honey gal so sweet. 

And I lays it at your feet, ma honey Lou. . . 

80 then come to me to-night, ma honey Lou, 

In these arms 111 hold you tight, ma honey Lou; 
Come and look Into my eyes while the moon shines In the skies, 
. And I'll be In paradise, ma honey Lou.— 6'Ao/t/«. 

YOUR KEY DON'T FIT THIS LOCK 



Copy ritrht, 1898, by Windsor Music Co. 
Words by Fred J. Ilaniill. Music by Paul Cohn. 

My gal and I had trouble and I have been crossed double. 

Now some one took tlie lead from me, and I'm as dead as I can be; 
When I got home this morning, just as the day was dawning, 

I found a new lock on the door. I couldn't use my key. 
There ain't no use in weeping, when I looked up at my old home, 

I saw dat girl a peeping, and «he was not alone; 
Bays she, I'm too long standing, that coon you've been a-handlingj 

Can't jolly me no longer, so now listen while I say: 

Chorus. 
Your key don't flt this lock, you best move 'round the block. 
You broke your plate with me, black man, you I can't see; 
'■"■ . You fot your notice now, so don't you start no row. 

You ost your home, and your key don't flt this lock no more. 

^ou kn v you had a warning. I told you every morning, 

I wou.vin't stand your fooling, so now j'ou will have to leave, yes go; 
I used to love you truly, but you is bad, unruly, 

80 I have got to pass you up, I've got another bean. 
Now don't you get to talking and tell me what you're gwlne to do. 

For yon are from Mizzoura and I will soon show you; 
Bo. don't you start a-connlng this babe with any yarning, 

I'm sorry for you, nigger, out your key dont fit this lock.— Chorus. 



I've Scratehed You Off Ma Utl 

- Copyrlfirht, 1897. by E. T. Paul!. 

Words by Andrew B StrrliuK. Music by Harry von Tilser. 
Miss 'Liza Jackson used to be ma baby, yes, ma honey, I was her gent. 
She always was ma steady colored lady, all ma money on her I spent; 
But de other day I seen her wid a coon from Tennessee, 

I was gwine to pull ma razor, I was mad as 1 could be. 

I said, 'Liza, quit yer tritlln'. gal, for you belongs to me! ^ ' ' ' 

She turned her head and then she said: . •' • ' 

Chokus. . ■/ - 

Don't think you're de only oyster In the stew, ^^ -•;-::: 

There are other niggers just as warm as you; • • v '- 

You don't cut no ice. you never will be nnssed. 
Nigger, I am done with you, I've scratched you off ma list. 

Then out I flashed ma trusty nigger razor.see here,"Liza,you come wld me. 
Ma bluff it didn't even seem to raze her, she rol led her eyes, said, let me be; 
Mister Nigger, just you understand I'se sick and tired of you; 
I'se got another nigger, he has lots of money, too. 

She said, go about your business now, ma huckleberry do; • . ■• ' 

She turned away, I heard her ^ay.—c/iomg. 

WHAT REILLY LEFT BEHIND 

•- ; ;•' CopyHght, 1898, by E. T. Paull. ;■-.■,■•-•...•. ' . r 

■~ Words and Music by Rarry S. Miller. 

Shure It's little Widow Reilly in the other block above. 

Whose husband died a year ago to-<lay; 
She has suitors by the dozen that would take her hand and love 

But who's the one to win her none can say. 
There is Casey and McCarty, both clever men and hearty. 

And little Flynn, who's not a man at all; 
And there's more of them each evening that call on her so pleasing. 
And this Is how she showed her love tor all: 

Chorus. 
Tliere's Casey wears her husband's coat, the trousers flt McFee. 
Her husband's shoes were hardly used, and look well on Magee; 
The hat he wore was out of date, she gave It to O'Brien, 
And gave to me her heart, did she, that Reilly left l)ehind. 

Not a one of them are working, but are looking for a home. 

The widow owns her house and plot of ground; 
So now Casey and McCarty think they've won her for their own, 
. Bedad, they go and tell it all around. 
Now her husband's clothes they dress in, and none of them Is guee^ng. 

But each one thinks hes favored best of all; 
For she never told another of what^he gave the other. 

But this is how she showed her love for &ll:— C/iot-vt. 

HE'S GOIN' TO HAVE A HOT TIME 

Copyright, 1897, l.y E. T. I'anll. ' • -' ' • . 

Words by Harry 8. Miller. Musio by E. T. Paull. ' • '^ 

Dar's a heap ob constaration an' a lot ob argumation 

Among de colored people here ob late; 
Mister Johnson done come back, sir, from de Kloiidyke wif a sack, sir. 

An' gold enough to buy de Georgia State. 
Ail de niggers since am crazy. Mister Johnson am a daisy. 

An' just de warmest coon in town to-day; 
He has monev 'nougli for burnin', an' his mind to dat am turnln'. 
An' dls you hear 'most ebrybody say: 

Chorus. 
He's goin' to hab a hot time, Mi.ster Johnson, 

He's goin' to hab a hot time by-and-by; 
He done put in a year of freezin', dat am de very, very reason 
He's goin' to hab a hot time by-and-by. 

Dar was lots ob dissipation 'round de Johnson habitation, 

He was de prince ob all de colored clan; 
But one day he done took sick, sir. doctors come den mighty quick, sir. 

But couldn't save dat very reckless man. 
Den de good ole Parson Mason done an' tole his congregation >• 

To pray fo' brudder Johnson, who am gon'; 
Den he preached a little sermon 'bout de money he was burnin'. 

An' said, I'se glad he couldn't take it long.— V/iorue. 

Would You? Well, InaMlnuie 

. . ,- Copyright, 1898, by E T. Paull. 

Words and Music by llariy S Miller. 

If you met a pretty girl, one that set your head awhlrl, - 

Would'nt you do your very best to win it? 
If she'd slyly pass you by, wink her roguish little eye. 

Would you? well, In a minute. 

Chorus. 

Yes, von wmild. 'deed vou would do 'most anything you could, 
; . Just to ^' the little thing was really yours; 

Wouldn't you? yes, a'ou would, 'deed you would, • 

Don't tell me, I know you would. 

Just to say that she were only yours, you know. 
If you knew a little Miss, one that's never had a kiss. 

One of the kind that womlers what is in it: , " 

If she came to you, say now, kind of, well— 1 don't know how. 

Would you? well, in a minute.— CV-or««. 

If a widow young and sweet met yon smiling on the street. 

And says to you, how glad— ana then to dim it. 
Begs .your pardon, a mistake, but, of course, you're wide awake. 

Would you? well, in a minute.— C'Aorw*. 

When a maiden. Indiscreet, starts to cross a muddy street, • , 

Really her skirts she raises to begin it; 
And she stands ju.st where she's at, kind of, I don't care a rap. 

Would you? well, in a minute.— (/t<?r//<t. , .,'. 

Now I'm not a selHsh elf. if I do 8<ay so myself. 

Dearly I love the l)oys that's really in It; 
And there's lots of thorn for fair, should I say to him down there. 

Would you? well, In a minute.- 6V/on(». 

The Words and Music of either of the above 
songs will be mailed to any address, post-paid, on 
receipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copies, your 
selection, for ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHMAN, 

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_^ 



How'd You Like to Be the Iceman 7 I IF I THOUGHT YOU LOVED ME YET 



Copjrlaht. IIM. by Wn) B (inj. Entered at Stationer*' Hcit London. 
WorilK and Muaiu liy H«lf <t Moran. 
While BtrolllnfT up town the other day. 
Saw a brown stone mansion on my way, 
I stopped to admire, "twaa simplv divine. 
And couldn't help wlshlnjj that It whs mine; 
A servant came out, then I asked of him 
If Mister Vanderbilt was In, 
I tboHght It the house of a millionaire. 
But he told me that the Iceman resided there. 
CHORrs. 
How'd you like to be the Iceman? how'd you like to be the Iceman? 
■ The plumbers ain't In It, they froze them out. 

Each day with his wapon loaded down _ 

Full of ice he .-^tartH off for the town. 

At Johnsons cafi' a stop then he makes. 

Fills up tlie ice box witri enormous cakes; 

When ready to start and move on his way, 

He tells the lK).-is, ■' it's hot to day, " 

The boss. With a wink, siivs " what will It be? " 

" Well. I'll have a tin-roof cock tall, that just suits me." 

CHORfS. 
How'd you like to be the Iceman? how'd you like to be the Iceman? 
Drinking tlnroof cocktails, they're on the house. 

The Kroceryraan is just close by, ' 

And the iceman leaves him his supply. 

Then orders ten pounds of coffee that's ground, 

Ten pounds of his butter, thirty a pound. 

And ten fMiuiids of sugar, ten pounds of tea, 

" How many jwunds in all. " eavs he. 

The grocer then says •• forty pounds are there." 

"Well, here's forty ^wunds of Ice, 8<j that makes us square." 
Choris. 
How'd you like to be the Iceman? how'd you like to be the IcemanT 
They are like policemen, all on the beat. 

Before with his dally toil he's through. 

He will stop along Fifth Avenue, 

He Jumps from his wagon, ice in the hook. 

Then meets in the kitchen a big fat cook. 

Spread out on the tat>le, good things will lay. 

The Iceman knows the ctnik will .say, 

" Have dinner with me. for it's very fine." '^ ■ 

Now it's funny how he strikes there at dinner time. 

ClIORLS. 

How'd you like to be the Iceman? how'd you like to be the Iceman? 
Talk about high living, oh; what a cinch. 

If I'd Only Had My Razor in the War 

Copyriirht, 1898, by Wni. B. Gray. Kntrrfd at Statimirn' Hall. L.ondon. 
Word* iiy riiilander J.ilinsnn Music by Lnuia A. Leaure. 

I went and got enlisted, an' I went away ter light. 
But de Can'n he had notions an' he didn't treat me right. 
I hankered fo" ter meet dem yaller Spaniards face to face. 
To scatter 'em, an' sp.ttter 'em ((ermlssous 'round de place. 
But mall heart was broke by do way de Sergeant sitoke, 
He had me whar" his 'pinions was de law. 
Dem nlTes made nit» nervous, Imt I'd done a heap of service 
IX I'd only had mah razor in de war. 

cnoRfs. 

If I'd only had mah razor in de war. 

I'd carved an' slashed an' yelled, hip hip. hurrah. 

Dat gun I couldn't shoot, tiut Id made dem Spaniards scoot. 

If I'd only had mah razzor in ttu' war. 
Yer squints aloni; ttie barrel an" yer shoots a mile or so. 
Perhaps yer done hit sumpfln now, but how's yer gwine to know, 
De onliest assistance dat I c.ires for in a tlKht, 
Is a weapon dat you use do.se up, jus' so'ster steer It right. 
But mah heart was broke by de way de Sergeant spoke. 
He had me wliar" his pinions was de law, 
I's pnvlleiceil ter mention dat Id stopped dat whole contention 
If Id only had niuh razor In do war—c'iornt. 

A shootln' " Irons" pnrty when you're marching on parade. 
But when I's out fo' slaughter, wliy I wants my razor-blade, 
A liml)er twist er two Is all it takes to carve your foes, 
Dar ain't no doubt alx)ut it, 'case I've tried It and I know. 
But mah heart was broke by de way de Sergeant spoke. 
He had me whar his 'pinions was de law. 
'Mongst de wenches In St. Louie I'd be Just like Mister Dewey, 
If Id only had mah razor in de war.— t'Ao* «#. 

I'd Hate to Trust My Future Life 



Cnpyriffht, ItM, by Win. B. Gray. Entered at Siatlnnera' Mali, London. 
Word* and Mutic by Minnie Belle. 
There's a chocoUite-colored lady, called Angelina Oreen, 
And all the folks for miles aroutid declare she Is a queen. 
Whenever there's a pink tea, she's always counted In; 
If ohe attends a cake walk, that gal Is sure to win, 
A dusky Individual, who l)oasls about his style, 
W»nt to Miss .\ngelina Green, and with his broadest smile. 
Said he. "I lubs you. honey. I wants you for my bride," 
But dat poor coon near lost his breath when these words she replied: 

OnoRts. 
"See hero. Mister' .Jackson, now I knows you. 
Your vices are many, your virtues arti few. 
You trifle with the other gals, and make tticm all feel sad. 
I can .see by your eyes, man, dat your heart's bad; 
Youre certainly very coaxing, but you've got me greatly vexed. 
If I likes you one minute. I despises you the next. 
You're a natural-lK)rn deceiver, and you never could be true. 
So I'd hate to trust my future life with you." 

Poor Ebenezer Jack.»»on then telt so mighty blue. 
He was so disappointed that he didn't know what to do. 
Said he, "I'll drown my troubles, and ill! myself with gin. 
To get an awful "jag ''' on, he quickly started in. 
Said he, " There 11 l)e a hot time In (lis here town to-night," 
..And so there was, for every place he went he had a flght. . . 
At last he got arrested and sent up for a year, 
While be " does time " behind the oars, these words he seems to hear: 



CnpjrrlKht, IMS, by Wni. B. Gray. Entered at Biatluners' Hail, London. 

Wnrdt anil Uuiio br John U. Hnllnr. ■...■:'.,:-■.■•/.;' 

Last night as I Fit by the fireside, thinking of bygone dars. 
Scenes of the past rose before me, out of tne ttrellghfs blaze, 
I saw you In all your l)eauty. and a smile that seemed so true. 
It brought back. In all Its old time force, the love I once had for you. 

ClIORfS. 

Shall I no more hear your whisper, must I the old love forget. 

Life would be one endless sunshine, if I thought that you loved me yet. 

Your smile will now l>eam on another, surely he has your love, 

I hope that he will prove to you true as the stars above. 

You'll never know now I loved you, tho' you sent me off in scorn. 

As I sat beside the Are last night, raem'ry caused my heart to mourn. 

rnoRrs. 

Shall I no more hear your whisper, must I the old love forget. 

Life would be one endless sunshine if I thought that you loved me yet. 

And now when I think of the old times, that day when first we met. i 

Then when you whispered " I love you." that time I'll never forget, ' 
'Twas then that you vowed and promised that from me you'd never part. 
But the only things now left to me are tears and a broken heart. 

CHORrs. . I 

Shall I no more hear your whisper, must I the old love forget, 

Life would be one endless sunshine if I thought that you loved me yet. 

Wlien tlie Miglily Sliip Begins to Roil 

Copyright. IDM, by Wm. B Gray. Entered at Stalloner«'>iall, London. 
Word* and Music by QacBle I. Davla. 

There's a great big ship a-saUlng. and she's on the phantom sea, 

When the mighty ship liegins to roll; 
For some day siie's gwlne to anchor and take on board you and me. 

When the mighty ship l)egin8 to roll; 
When you cmms see her a l;indlng. you will all turn pale. 
Then you'll think of poor old Jonah, who was swallowed by the w>i«ie. 
You coons may all get seasick, that will be of noHvall, # !• 

When the mighty ship begins to roll. 

Crorfs. 

On the phantom sea she's sailing, from here to the skies. 
Any time you see her landing, 'twon't be no surprise. 
EVry day she makes a voyage, goes from pole to pole. 
Now don't 30U be so wicked, but be ready with your ticket. 
When the mighty ship begins to roll. 

Oh. the engineer Is reckless and they've got a reckless crew. 

When the mighty ship begins to roll; 
If she ever bursts a t)otler. you'll get cooked up In a stew. 

When the mighty ship tK'gins to roll. 
And they've got no life preservers, so your chance Is slim. 
Now old Satan lias a boat. tcM). and he keeps her in good trim. 
The phantom sea Is so wide that you darkies cannot swim. 

When the mighty ship l)eglns to roll.— 6'*o»"«. 

Now you all back-bite your neighbors and forget about the day. 

When the mighty ship begins to roll. 
And you sit up nights and gamble, but there's one time you won't play. 

When the mighty ship ttegins to roll. 
You learn that fiom the white man— yes, indeed, you do. 
That's the rea.non he's no l)etter. and he's just as bad as you. 
That day your nerve will fail you. and you'll find this all out, too. 

When the mighty ship lieglns to roll.— Cfiorut. 

HE DON'T KNOW WHERE HE'S AT 

Copyrlffht. 1898, by Win. B. Oray. Entei-ed at Statlonen* Hall, London. -| 

Word* and Munlc by Walter P. Keen. I 

Pat Duffy used to carry bricks 'till night from early morning. 

And all the gang around the works considered him their pride; 
They never thought the day would come when he would them be scorning. 

It hapjiened when out In the West his wealthy uncle died. 
He was the only relative of Millionaire McKlsky, 

Who left him all the fortune he had made by curing pork. 
Now Duffy Is a thoroughbred, and drinks champagne and whlskej. 

For since he got the money he Is acting like a gawk. 

CHORrs. 

His patent shoes have a ten-cent shine, his pants have got big creases. 
And with the sports he's right in line, when he goes to the races; 
His face gets red when a ilear old friend will holler, " Hellol Pat." 
Since Duffy's uncle left him the stuff, he don't know where he's at. " 

As soon as Duffy heard the news he slid right down the ladder, 

And with his lawyer got Into a cab and drove away; 
We thouKlit f«)r old acquaintance he'd return and make us gladdei;. 

By giving every man the price to drink and lose a day. 
But not a Duffy came again -In fact, he doesn't know us. 

For when we meet him walking up and down Fifth Avenue, 
He turns his head the other way. and that Is meant to show us 

That with his ancient cronies he wants nothing more to Ao.— Chorus. 



A waiter at Delmonico's told Dolan. of our party. I 

That all the swells are making fun of Duffy's funny breaks; 
He shoves his knife 'way down his throat, and when they laugh so hearty. 

The silly f(X)l don't tumble to the blunders that he makes; 
He's learning how to write, so he can sign his check for money. 

And In the park he drives a pair of trotters ev'ry day, 
And some one told the gang to day a story that is funny. 

He's changed his name from Duffy now, and calls himself Dufay. 

— ChOTHt. 






The Words and Music of either of the above 
songs will be mailed to any address, post-paid, on 
receipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copiot, your 
selection, for ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHMA^I, 

108 Park Row, New Yorlu Catalogue of all our publications 

Free upon application. 




MY CREOLE SUE 

Ooprrlirht, 18M, by Hainilt-n 8. Oortloii. Eniclish copyrtKbt twriu-^t. 
Vmi by perinlMlou uf Hainilton S. Ouid'<ii, 139 Fifth ATeiiiie, N. Y., |irice 60 centi. 

Wor(ta aiid lluxic by UiisnlH L. l>aTis. 

While to-nlffbt I sit reflecting over niem'ries of the past, 

My thouarhts turn to the Louisiana shore; 
There my neart first found lt« happiness, and may it ever last. 

Oh, tliat little girl I'll love foreverniore. 
Whene'er I think of angelsthen I seem to see her face, 

There never beat a heart so fond and trite; 
And when I left the sunny South, rl^ht there I left my heart, . ' 
She's the sunlight of my life, my Creole Sue. 

Chorls. - , . 

My Creole Sue, how I love you, 

1 love you still, and always will, • : : 

I sigh for you, I do, I do. 

And my thoughts are all of you, my Creole Sue. 
Throunrh life's Journey I have never seen a face to me so fair, 

I've never heard a voice that sound so sweet; 
And I oft' think of the moonlight nights that 1 spent with her there, 

For with her my happlnes-s was quite complete. 
A memory still haunts me, and no matter where I roam. 

Her words will llntrer In my ear through life; 
One night she whispered softly, " Oh, I love you. yes I do. 
And I promise you some day to be your wife! "— C7<riiM>. » • 

TWO LIHLE EYES OF BLUE 

Copyright, 1>96, by Broiler A SrIiUm. Ki<(rH!<h copyriKbt Beoured. 
WurdBkiid tluxic by Ei'iiest HiiKan. 

In a cottage so neat, where the roses alwund, 

Dwells a couple whose hearts beat as one; 
No happier fam'ly on earth can be found. 

Born to them is a dear little son; 
The husband comes home from his work In the night. 
He kisses his dear wife so true; 
- And then he sings gladly this ditty so bright. 

To baby with dear eyes of blue: . ., 

Chorus. , ■ 

Two little eyes of blue, peek-a-boo, I see you; 
Two little eyes of blue, 1 love you, yes, I do; 

S wo little eyes of blue, none on earth are so true, 
y own baby boy, you're my pride and my joy, my two little eyes of blue. 
'- , All sorrows and cares will soon vanish away, 

^ In the midst of their baby's sweet smiles; 
T^" And his childish prattle throughout the long day. 
■ " Their labor and toll soon bep:ulles. • 

See papa and baby roll over the floor, 

Lite playmates in their childish glee, 
As mamma plaj's peek-a-boo behind the door. 
Pa dances the boy on his knee.— rAo;i/f. 

SHE'S SOMEBODY'S MOTHER 

Copyright. 1897. by T. B. Harms * d. Entrli^li copyritflit secured. 
Curapoaed by « hai leg Lawler and Janit-s Blake. 

Standing at the crossing, waiting to pass on. 

She Is rudely Jostled by the busy throng; 

A sweet-faced little woman, so aeed and so gray, 

Not a hand in all the crowd to help her on her way. 

At last a young man whlsperd in accents soft and low, 

I'll help you cross the crowded street, ma'am, if you wish to go; 

He helped her o'er the crosslnpr, then with spirits light and gay. 

Returns to his companions, and unto them did say: 

Rkfrain. 
She's somebody's mother, boys, don't you know. 
Somebody's mother, so old and so slow: 
And wiio knows but some one, at some future day. 
May help my old mother when I'm far away. 

Down a street so crowded, on a summer's day. 

Wends a gray-halr'd woman slowlv on her way; 

But something seems the matter, for help she feebly callB, 

Suddenly she totters and upon the sidewalk falls. 

A crowd then quickly gathers, and some one's heard to say: 

A woman who's been drinking, but it happens ev'ry day; 

He little knew the story, or, in other words, he'd sav: 

She's some one's gray-halr'd mother Just fainted by the way.— 7?<r/". 






1 

; 



Love Me, Honey, Do 



Copyright, Ittt, by T. B Harma A C^. Eiiffll«h copyrlKht lecured. 
Worda and llu.oic by Richard Stahi. 

When de shades of night am fallin' 
An' de whlp-o-wills am callin', 

Love me, ma honey, do! -- 

When de darkies am a-singin' 
An' dem golden bells am nngin', _ 

Love me, ma honey, do ! 
When yer for de cake am walkin' 
An' dem nlggah girls are talkln', 
• An' a-tryin' for to make a mash on you; 

Don't forget your little 'ninny, 
. Bven tho' she's rather skinny. 
Love me, ma honey, do ! 
Choris. 
Bless dem lips, like cherries. 
Sweet as huckleberries; 
Come! jour own baby longs for you. 
. Why much longer tarry? 
. You 's de one I'd marry— 
< Love me, ma honey, "do ! 

Bless dem lips, like cherries, 
Sweet as huckleberries! 

Come! your own baby longs for you. 
Why much longer tarry? 
You's de one I'd marry— 
Love me, ma honey, do I 
When de moon thro' clouds am peepin'. 
An' de birds am all a-sleepin', 
Love me. ma honey, do! 
. '■ When de little stars am bllnkln' 
• Den of yous am fondly thlnkln', 

Lore me, ma honey, do! 
■. ;, W^hen a game of craps you's playln', 
.. '■• Eb'ry time for you I's prayin , 
; •' An' 1 know you likes yer little black-eyed Sue. 
Ton's her beau, her sweetei t honey. 
Even tho' you's got no money. 
Lore iu«, ma bon^, do\—Cfwrut. 



f ij- ,:: 



. X. 



You'll Always Hnd a Welcome f orYoi 

AT HOME, SWEET HOME 

Copyriirht, 1898, by E. T. Paull. Wordf and Mu«le by Sam K. AUmIk: ,; . 
A little maiden left her country home and father dear. 

It seemed that she was tired of village life; . - ' 

To wander In the city, far away from her dear home. " '- 

Where all on earth would turn from Joy to strife. 
But ere a few months had passed by one day there came a note. 

She had married one, but he had proved untrue; 
The old man sent this answer back, remember my last words, 
You,'H always find a welcome home for you. 

Chorus. 
\. Home, home, sweet home, that is tlie place we all love. 
My heart goes back to the scenes of my childhood days; 
No matter how humble, nor where on earth we roam. 
You'll always ttnd a welcome for you at home, sweet home. 

That little maid was sitting in her lonely room one night. 

Thinking what the end would bring for her. 
She now recalled the pleadings of her mother dead and gone. 

To stay at home ana comfort father dear. 
Alas, the old, old story. Just another broken heart, 

'Twas a sad mistake, that all her life she'll rue; 
She wrote again to father dear, the old man answered back, ♦ 

Come home, you'll find a woleoiue here for you.— C'/<or"». 

PICTURE EIGHTY-FOUR 

• . CopjrlKlit, I8»«. by The New York Mimic Co. .•- 

■ ' ■ ■ Words by Cliag. B. Ward. Munic by Qurnie L. Davla. 

On a pleasant day in summer, at the central station door. 

Stopped a carriage with a couple, out sight-seeing, nothing more; 

Ana the gray-haired sup'rintendent kindly showedthem through the nlace 

First of all the great rogues' gall'ry, where they gazed on many a race, 

Characters of all descriptions— some were famous men of crime. 

Some were dead and some at freedom, some of them were serving time; 

Some had stories interesting, ^s the man explained them o'er. 

But the woman fainted when slie gazed on picture eighty-four. 

'Twas the picture of her father, there among the men of crimes; 

Though now a man of honor, but this tells of other times. 

Now he lives in style and splendor, worth a million now or more. 

Still his picture's in the gallery, picture eighty-four. 

" Listen, I will tell the story." said the sup'rintendent then. 
"Though that picture's of your father, we have pictures of worse men. 
Men whose conscience know no limit, would do anything for j?old. 
Men with lives they do not value, child, the half has not l)een told. 
Once your father was a forjjer. forged a check, which brought him shame; 
Though this gall'ry holds his picture, 'tis knowji by another name. 
You were not born when this happened. It was many years ago. 
And the world is none the wiser, still it's picture eightj'-four." 

'Twas the picture of her father, etc. ,■■•.:'/::.■■. V 

Good Morning, Mister Policeman 

Copyricrht, HDCCCXCVII, by Henry J. Wehman. Word! and Hualc by CharlM QrataMn. 

He was a big policeman, a little maid was she. 
Going to school each morning. Just as happy as could be. 
His post was at the school-house, so tht^y were sure to meet. 
And the little scholar's greetings soon became to him a treat; 
He waited for her coming, so full of childish grace. 
He knew a pleasant smile lor him beamed on her sweet, young face; 
He felt his heart grow warmer, when he saw her far awav. 
Knowing well she'd run to greet him, knowing well these words she'd aayr 

Choris. 
Good morning. Mister policeman, I'm not afraid of vou. 
Because you wear braes buttons and a uniform of blue; 
My teacher says she likes you. because you are p<j kind: 
If children Just behave themselves, a good friend in you they'll find. 

One day the maid was missing-" Her birthday, praps." siiid he; 
" If that's whj' she stavs away, I hope she'll luippy be." 
Yet three days more passed slowly, she came not through the gates. 
And the big policeman then inquired of her amongst her mates. 
" We did not like to tell y«^u, " one brown-eyed lassie said, 
" But perhaps you'd bettear know the truth, sir— little May is dead." 
He turnd aside to hide a tear, sad was his heart that day. 
When he knew no more she'd greet him, and no more he d hear her say: 

- ' fiorut. 

My Old - Fashioned Girl 

Cnpyritflit. 1898, by U iti. n. Gray. Entered at Slatiunvi-s' llnll, l,uudun. 
Words i.y Httiry Duiikel. Mtulc by Fred H) lands. 

My girls an oW-fashioned girl— she says 

In society she's out of place, 
An old-fashlohed girl with womanly ways, , 

And a winscMne and womanly face; 
A girl who is ttinocent, modest and sweet, 
■ Who is sensible, earnest and true, 

, ■. The kind that'will surely Ije obsolete 1 

In another short year or two. . . 

' CH0RI'.S. 

She's only ah old-fashioned girl, you see, r 

And not ill the least up to date, 
. But she is the kind of a girl for me. 

The kind that I want for a mate. ' ' 

I know It is very old-fashioned to say . 

Your girl Is a saint from above. 
But I own I am proud of her old-fashioned way. 

And prou<J of her old-fashioned love. 

She's not a glH who aspires to fame. 
She does nojt ape man in her dress, ■• 

She does not read books that have a bad name, 
- Nor herald her views in the press; 

She doesn't uee slang or her manners forget. 
Nor loudly expound Woman's Rights; 

She shuns all, the fads of the fashionable set, • ■ 

And home IB her great delight.— C/(OrM«. .' % 

The Words and Music of either of the abovt 
songs will be mailed to any address, post-paid, on 
receipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copies, your 
selection, for ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHMAN, 

108 Park Row, New York. Catalogue of ail our publleations 

Free upon application. 



I 




GIMME MA MONEY 

Copyright, 1898, bj Geo. Willie & Co KngUah coprrlKht secured. , 
Word« and music ky Nathan Bivlns. 

Last niKht I went to a big crap game, 
How Uetii coons did eanible wtiz a sin and a shame. 
Coats and hats wuz layiir all over de floor. 
De house wuz crowded wld lots of toughs, 
• ■ Wid race horse touts wuz awful rough. 

One coon got broke, and dese the words he said: 

Rkfrain. 
Olmnie ma moticy, dotj't think you're funny, 
'Cause rnx a nigger— you dont cut no figure: 
I'm gambling for my Sadie, 'cause she's my lady, 
I'm a hustling co<in, and dat's Just what I am. 

From dere I goes to de Odd Fellows Hall, 

To have a g<xHl time and dat wuz all. 

Another crup game wuz going on among a lot of touts. 

I shoots two bits, dat's all 1 had; 

When 1 lost it, of course dat made me mad, 

"Stop dat music,'' 1 began to shout.— //e/rai//. 

On de floor I dropped a ten-dollar bill, 

A gal put her foot on't, her name wuz Llll, 

I says. Lady, will you please, mam, look out. 

She says, "^"oung man, if you get gay, 

1*11 have my friend to put you away. 

And to dis gal I could not help but snout:— ffeAoin. 

BRAVE DEWEY AND HIS MEN 

(DOWN AT MANILA BAY.) 

Copyrluht, 1888, by Dixie Muolo Co., N. Y. 
Word* by Vi F. Oakin. Music by Thos. M. Kane. 
A squadron lay at l)ivak of day with enemy in view. 
Each boat and tar had sailed afar a glorious deed to do. 
American ea<-h ship and man, fonglit that eventful fray! 
'Twas Dewey's fleet the foe did meet down at Manila Bay. 

OnoRis. 
Tlien raise a cheer all earth can hear, and three times three again. 
The noble.st tars who sail the sea, brave Dewey and his men." 
Tlien raise a cheer, all earth can hear, and three times three again. 
The noblest tars who sail the sea, brave Dewey and his men! 

A gallant dash, a roar, a crash, our guns spoke faultlessly, 
■ And Dewey brave quick orders gave, which made new history. 
At cannon's mouth our tars did shout. " Avenge the Maine to-day t" 
All Spain now weeps, four hundred sleeps down at Manila Bay.— ^'Ao. 

The Castile flag, that yellow rag. has dipped to rise no more. 

The strij>es aiiti stars, and our loved tars, are masters on the shore. 

Those heroes grand throughout the land are Idolized to-dayl 

Our foi's are slain, no more of Spain d(jwn at Manila Bay.— (fwr^is. 

THE HERO OF MANILA BAY 

Copyright, 1W8, by Tom J. QuiKley. 
WorUaand 31u»lo by Tom J. (julKley. 

You have heard of the world's great battles, 

And the ht-roes on land anil .sea; 
There are many whose names are mentioned 
Who have shown their bravery; 
But the greatest fl^tit in history was fought on the flrst of May, 
By Commodore (Jeorge Dewey, the hero of Manila Bay. 

CHORrs. 
Then let every American patriot his sincere homage pay. 
And sound his praises as he ou^rlit, for the man who led the way; 
For never was such a battle fought, or vlct'ry gained In a day. 
As the one by Commodore Oeorge Dewey, the hero of Manila Bay. 

Tho' his course was fraught with danger. 

And the enemy's guns in sight. 
Each moment might bring destruction, 
AS he sailed in the bay that night; 
When told of the desp'rate chances, he remembered the Maine and said: 
*• I must avenge our heroes; l order j'ou to steam ahead! " Chorus. 
Ah; no one can tell the horror 

And surprise at break of day. 
When the Spaniards siiw our navy 
Floating proudly on the bay. 
Then with a thund'rous rattle that terrible flght began; 
But Dewey crushed their forces witlMuit the loss of one brave man.— CHo. 

I LOVE HER JUST THE SAME 

Copyi Ight, 1896, by Chaa. K. Harris 
WoriMuiiil Mu.sic by Chag. K. Harria. 

Within an humble cottage sits a broken-hearted man. 
His little Kirl Is sobbing on his knee, 

A letter on the table tells tlie same ola, plaintive tale. 
She's left her home with all its povertj-. 

He holds his darling in his ann.s, looks at her tearful face: 

" Perhaps, my child, your mother's not to blame: 
The path to sin she's uikon, her loved ones are forsaken; 
t Don't cry, my dear, I love her just the sarae.'^ 

Chorus. 
" I love her, yes, I love her just the same. 

Although siie's fled and has disgraced my name. 
Though she's gone with another, she's still my baby's mother, 

And I love her, yes, I love her Just the same." 

The music's softly playing in a ball room, oh! so grand. 

The lights are ffashiiisr on tlio dancers fair; 
There's no thought of the "morrow in that gay and giddy crowd, 

Who.se heartle.ss laughter rings upon the air. 
Yet, tht-re is one amid the throng, who once was pure and true, 

But now whoso pallid face speaks of her shame: 
She's thinking of her loved ones, of b.-iby, home and husband; 

Win he forgive and love her just the sanw.— Choi ur. 

The father and his little girl crime to that citv grand. 

They searched for many day-, but all in Vtain; 
They're looking for a loved one. whom they never can Corget, 
' To bring her back to home and friends again. 

They hear a scream, what can it mean, the child cries out, " Mamma;** 

His wife Is kneeling at his feet in shame; 
She cries, "Oh. John, forgive mo; I know that I've been guilty; 

For baby's sake, please take me home again."— CAortM. -^ 



Sing Again tliat Sweet Refrain 



Copyright, IKM, by SpauldinK A Oray. Eotere<l at SUtlODtn' B*U> 

Words and Moalo by Quaaie L. DaTUk "•..:.• ;'..•■. ■. 

The music hall was crowded In a city o'er the sea, ; ' ' 

And brilliant lights were burning ev'ry where, ,r:-- 

The songs and witty sayings fllled the audience with glee. ' '•'■■ 

For tho minstrels from the sunny South were therel 
A minstrel sang a song about his old plantation home, " " ' 

Down upon the Swannee River far away: 
Then a gray-haired, aged darkey sat In sadness and in gloonir- 
He rose, and this Is what they heard him say: 

Rkfrain. 
Sing again that sweet refrain, " Dar's where the old folks fttay; " 
It takes me back to slav'ry days. In-fore I was sold away; 
Along de Swannee River banks, dar's where I used to roam- 
Nows r.se old and gray, and far away, " far from the old folks at home.** 

The minstrel sang the song again, and eyes grew dim with tears, 

The aged darkey sat with head bowed low. 
And something In his heart awoke, that slumbered there for years, . 

'Twas the memory of a mother long ago. 
Tlie play let out to loud applause, and wnen the curtain fell, 

The darkey slowly tottered on his way, 
Thinking of the sweet-voiced singer, and the song he'd sung so well. 

Thinking of the song that made him rise and s&y:—Hefiain. 



BACK TO THE ONLY GIRL I LOVE 

CopyrlRht, HDCCOXCVl. by Henry J. Wehman. .. i 

Word! and Husic by Harry S. Miller. I 

Bad was the hour that we parted, well I remeiiU)er the day 1 '^ 

W^e quarreled, and then, broken hearted, we each then wept our way. 
But still she must think of me sometimes, she does not forget me, I pray; 
Our paths though apart, yet I feel In my heart she will take me back 

Chorus. [some day. 

Back to the only girl I love back to the one I think most of; 
Happy I'd be If I only could see my dear little, sweet little loved one. 
Even the stars all seem to say, there'll come a time not far away. 
So t>e of light heart, tho' now far apart, she'll take you back Bome day. 

Too soon our dream It was broken— oh, how my heart It did pain. 
And each tender, sweet little token she sent me back again; [on their v» ay. 
While weeks they have gone since we parted.and months, too. have passed 
Ko doubt she regrets, and the past, too, forgets, and will take me back 

[some CL&y.— Chotiii. 

My Mother's Kiss Was the Sweetest 



CopyrlRht, 1800. by T. B. Harms A Co. 
Words and Music by Harry F. AUen. 

How well do I remember the years that have gone by. 

When a youth my pjiths were always strewn with DOwers; 
I never realized the future of sorrow and all care, 

That my mother would advise me everj' hour. 
When seated by her side life's story she would tell. 

She would tell me how In manhood I could fall; . . 

I would kiss those wither'd lips that I so long have missed, 
My mother's kiss was sweetest of them all. 

OnoRrrs 
You may kiss your wife, your child, your sister or your brother. 

They may all be sweet, but still for one you'll call; 
In sorrow or distress, I always will confess. 
My mother's kiss was sweetest of them all. 

Many times I think of mother sitting In that oaken chair. 

While the Are In the hearth was burning bright; 
I would It.sten with amazement to the stories sne would tell. 

And now fondly I would wish 'twas but to-night. 
It seems but like a dream since last dear mother I've seen. 

Her last words: " My boy, be careful, never fall .' " 
I kissed her then " goodbye" and she closed her loving eyes. 

My mother's kiss was sweetest of them sUl.—Chonig. 

WHAT YANKEE LADS WILL DO 

Co|ijrigbt, ISW, by Dtxie Music Co. 
Words by Edward F. OalTin. MukIc by Tbos. H. Kane. 

Ring out the martial summons throughout our land to-day; 
A nation's voice hath spoken, the blended blue and gray; 
Salute our starry banner, 'twas born of the heaven's blue; 
We'll teach the cruel traitors what Yankee lads will dol 
We'll teach the cruel traitors what Yankee lads will dot 

Chorus. -^ 

We goto flsrht the foemen, God speed the Gray and Blue; 
Our flag's unfurl'd, we'll show the world what Yankee lads wUI dol 
We go to Hght the foemen, God speed the Gray and Blue; 
Our flag's unfurled, we'll show the world what Yankee lads will do I 

The day has come for action, our wrath Is just and deep; 
We'll right the wrong we suffered, where martyr'd heroes sleep; 
They died at Freetlom's altar, uncnallong'd, brave and true: 
We'll show the Maine's destroyers what Yankee lads will dol 
We'll show the Maine's destroyers what Yankee lads will dol— C7U>. 

We're .sworn to sacred duty, our tars will sweep the sea; 

The Maine will be remember'd. G«xi frowns on treachery; . 

The long roll .sounds now, freemen, your glorious deeds renew; ■ I 

No flag of truce! show traitors what Yankee lads will dol 

No flag of truce I show traitors what Yankee lads will dol— Chorus. 



The Words and Music of either of the alMve 
songs will be mailed to any address, post-paid, on 
receipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copies, your 
selection, for ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHMAN, 

108 Park Row, New York. Catalogue of ail our publications 

Frto upon application. 




9- 



Oepir'cht, IM, by Buward A Oo. Entered at BUUonen' Hall, London. ^. 

Dy Harry Cm< ling and Win. B. Gray. . "" ' 

Of pretty ^Is the singers sing, and poets of tliem write^ 
But Jimmy Johnson has a girl who's simply " out of sight; " 
Indoors or out, he raves about their happy wedding day. 
And seated by her side each night, he'll take her hand and say: 

Chorus. 
Oh 1 Maggie Maguire, believe me, my girl, I adore yoa, 
My heart H all afire, and I'll do anything for you; 
Name the day, don't turn nieaway, I'm lonely when you roam, 
Say you'll be true and I'll marry you as soon as I buy the home. 

They often have a quarrel, just like others, her and Jim, 
And then for days slie'll pass him by, won't even nod to him: 
Somehow tliey always "make up," though when Jimmy to her brings 
▲ little present, which he gives, as pleadingly he sings:— CAotu*. 

MeSinty at the Living Pictures 

Oopyrlffht, ItM, by Spauldlnfc St Oray. Entered at SUtioners' Hall, London, Eng. 
Words and Music by Joe Flynn. 

Dan McGinty went into the opera Show 

tVith his old wife Mary Ann, 
And he took a front seat, near the middle aisle. 

Amongst the bald-headed clan; 
But he wasn't prepared for the sights he saw, ' . 

And he laughed with might and main 
: , When the living pictures came to v4ew, . ' 

_• Why he nearly went Insane. 
Chorus. 
When he saw the Sleeping Beauty, why he got such a shock 
You could hear his heart a-tlcklng like an eight-day clock. 
Then he danced and he pranced, and says he, " I've been to France, 

But that's the finest sight I ever saw; , 
Then his eyes bulged out, he began for to shout; 
The gallery boys they hollered, " Put that Zulu out." 
Then his wife grabbed his feet, pulled him under the seat. 
So he couldn't gaze upon the living pictures. 

Chorus. ' 

When the girl who posed as Venus, with her form so grand. 
You could near McGlnty holler 'way above the band. 
Then says he, " Mary Ann, you will t©»e j'onr old man 
> If yon don't be oufck and take nie out entirely; " 

When he saw the lady bathers, he jumped like a hare, '' 

Ttxook nine ushers for to hold him In his chair; 
Then he whispered, with a grin, " Mary Am., go take a swim 
With the lady bathers lu the living pictures." 

Chorus. 
When he saw the other picture we thought sure he would die. 
It was Adam and Eve gazing up to the sky. 
Then he hollered, "Mary, dear, oh, why did you bring me here, 

I can never love you now the way I used to; " 
Then he looked at Slother Eve, and loudly he bawled, . 
"Be golly, you'll be chilly when the snow does fall; " 
Then the ushers grabbed him nice, stuck his head in a pail of ice. 
Just to keep ^lim cool while at the living pictures. 

Chorus. - _ 

Then he leaped and he creeped, and he took another pe«p, .. ' 

And the way he carried on made the audience weep. 
Then his wife says, " Dan, do come home like a man, , 

If you must have living pictures, I will do them; ' 
But he didn't hear her speak, he was off in a trance, , 

Standing on a chair, doing the " Hoochy-Coochy " dance; 
When the last girl ;K)sed, why they had to turn the hose -. 

On McGlnty, when he saw the living pictures. 

Pat Malone Forgot fliaf He Was Dead 

, . ,, , CopjilBlit, 1«»S, l.y H. 'W. Petrie. 

- • Worili by Harry C. Clyde. Melody b.r Jaa. J. Swtwney. 

Times were hard in Irish town, ev'rything was going down. 

And Pat Malone was pushed for ready cash; 
He for life insurance sp«»nt all his money to a cent. 

So all of his affairs had gone to smash. 
But his wife spoke up and said: "Now, dear Pat, If you were dead. 

That twenty thousand dollars we could take." 
And so Pat lay down and tried to make out that he had died. 

Until he smelt the wlil.skey at the wake; 
Then Pat Malone forgot that he was dead; 

He raised himself and shouted from the bed: 
" If this wake goes on a minute, the corpse he must be in it; 

You'll have to get me drunk to keep me dead." 
Then Pat Malone forgot tliat he was dead; 

He raised himself and shouted from the bed: 
"If this wake goes on a minute, the corpse he must be in it; 

You'll have to get me drunk to keep me dead." 

Then they gave the corpse a sup, afterwards they filled him up. 

And laid nira out again upon the bed; 
Then before the morning gray ev'r%-bodv felt so gay. 

They all forgot he only played off dead. 
So they took mm from the bunk, still alive, but awful drunk. 

And put him In the coffin, with a prayer: 
But the driver of the cart said: "Bedad, ril never start 

Until I see that some one pays the fare." ^ 

Then Pat Malone forgijt that he was dead; 

He sat up In the coraii, while he said: 
• If you dare to doubt my credit, you'll be sorry that you said It; 

Drive on. or else the corpse will break your head." 

- ■ .Then Pat Malone forgot that he was dead; 

He sat up in the cofBn, while he said: 
• • "If yx)u dare to doubt my credit, you'll be sorry that you said it; 
Drive on, or else the cori«e will bre.ak your head." 

- So the f un'ral started out on the cemetery route, 
: > ■ And the neighbors tried the widow to console, 

^ - - .Till they stopped beside the base of Malone's last resting place, 
" V Andgently lowered Patrick in the hole. 
r ■' ■■-. Then Malone began to see. just as plain as one, two, three. 
That he'd forgot to reckon on the end; 
So, as clods began to drop, he broke off the cofSn top, ' 

And to the earth he quickly did ascend. 
Then Pat Malone forgot that he was dead, , . - 

And from the cemetery quickly fled; ' .... 

He came nearly going under; It's a lucky thing, by thunder. 

That Pat Malone forgot that he was dead. 
Then Pat Malone forgot that he was dead, ; ,, 

And from the cemetery quickly fled; :•!.'. ^:. 

Be came nearly going under; it'^s a lucky thing, X>y thnnder, 
Tbai Pat Ifalone forgot that he was dead. 



OH! PROMISE ME 

Copyriffbt, 1881), by Q. Schirtner. 

V _ Words by Clemen^ Scott. Music by Reginald De Korea. 

Oh, promise me that some day you and I ..«• , 
Will take our love together to some sky, :'• ■ • 
Where we can be alone and faith renew, 
; •• And find the hcaiows where those flowers grew; : . 

-■ Those first sweet violets of early spring, , ;' 

Which come In whispers, thrill us both, and sing 
Of love unspeakable ih.at is to be— 
J:' '.. Oh, promise me, oh, promise me. ,. 

Oh, promise me that you will take my hand, "^ 
The most unworthy in this lonely land, > 

And let me sit beside jou, in your eyes 
Seeing the vision of our paradise; 
' . Hearing God's message, while the organ rolls 

Its mighty music to our very souls, 
•. ' No love less perfect than a life with thee— . . 

Oh, promise me, oh, promise me. '■ . \ , 



Words by Mary Mark Lemon. Music by John W. Mullen. 

■ ■' After the day hap sung its song Of sorrow, '' 

, And one by one the golden stars appear, .. 

I lingered j^et, niiere once we met, beloved. 
And seem to feel thy spirit still is near. 
■ ■: The flowers have fled that blosKomed in that sprlnfeUda^ ' 
.- The birds are mute that sang their songs above. 
And tho' the yeaa-s have drifted us asunder. 
:"■'■■ Time cannot break the golden chain of love. 

Still we can love, although the shadows gather; . r" . , 

Still we can hope, until the clouds be past; 
Come to my heart and whl!?iier through the silence, 
" Hope on, dear heart, our lives shall meet at last." 

: . Sometimes my heart grows weary of its sadness, ' 

Sometimes my life grows weary of its pain. 
Then, love, I wait and listen for your whi.sper. 

Till fears depart and sunshine comes again. * 

It cannot be that we should part forever, . ' ., 

That love's sweet song is hushed for us alway; 
I hear it yet, although its theme be altered; 
' 'Twill reach thy heart, and bring thee back some day. 

Love, we can love, although the shadows gather, 
'; ' Still we can hope until the clouds be pa.'st; v 

Come to my heart and whisper through the silence, , -.. ■'':■ 
" Hope on, dear heart, our lives shall meet at last; ''■■■., . 
Hope on, dear heart, our lives shall meet at last." ,,.".-■ J 

COmE, PLAY WITH IME 

Copyri(rlit, 1896, by Francis, Day & Hunter. Enftlisb copj riirht Kcured. 
Words by G. P. Hawtrey. Music by Alfred Pliimpton. 

I have not been here very long, as yet I'm quite a stranger. 

And so to try an English song may seem, perhaps, a danger. 

One thing I ask, a favor slight. I hope you'll not refuse me. 

That if 1 don't pronounce it right, you kindly will excuse me. fme. 

I'm fond of games and romps, you see, I wish you'd come and play with 

Chorus. 

For I have such a way with nie, v 

A way with me. a way with me: 

I have such a nice little way with me, - 

Do not think it wrong. 
I should like you to play with me. 
To play with me, to play with me; 
I wish you d come and play with me. 

Play with me all the day long. 

I have a friend, a nice young man, who likes to linger near me. 
And when I told him of my plan, he said he'd come and hear me. 
He told me I need fear no friijht, that there would be no danger. 
He said the song would be all right, although I was a stranger; 
But now my friend I cannot see, he won't come out and play with me. 

Chorus. 

Tho' I have such a way with me, " .= ""' 

A way with me, a way with me; 
I have such a nice little way with me, 
■ . Do not think it wrong. '" 

He wont come out and play with me, ' 

And4)lay with me, and play with me; 
He won't come out and play with me, . .' 
Play with me all the day long. 

He promised he'd be in his place, he promised, too, to cheer me; 

He said that I should see his face, and know that he was near me; 

But courage! though he is not here, there is not any danger. 

You are my friends, I need not fear, although I am a stranger. 

A.hl there be is, my friend, I see— will you come out and play with me. 

'■ .;\ . • ■ : Chorus. ■ •: r; •.. -, v. 

For I have such a wav with me, ' ? : 

A way with me, a way with me: ; 

- . I have such a nice little way with me, .: . 

Do not think it wrong. 
Will you come out and play with me, 
' And play with me, and play with me; 

Will you come out and play with me. 
And play with me all the day long. 

The Words and Music of either of the abovo 
songs will be mailed to any address, post-paid, on 
receipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copies, your 
selection, for ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHMAN, 

108 Park Row, New York. Catalogue of ail our pubUcatioat 

Free upon application. 




/ 



WHY DON'T YOU WEAR 

YOUR WEDDINO RING? 

Copyright, 18M. l>v I,<-limonn. Sclieuer * Tlll>Illo^ Entril^li ooi.y right uscured. 
VVurtla b> Heiiiy 8iiiiun. Mu^lo by Samuel Lcbiiioii. 

They Ptood before the altar, a handsome youth and maid. 
The choir was siiiRin^ sweetly, as the chaplain slowly said: 
" You take this youthful maiden to he your lawful wife." 
He answered " yes, 1 ununise to »h> true to her throutfh life." 
They lived in perfect harmony, until a letter came. 
Which told how false he'd »>een t<> her; another lx)re his name. 
The weddinu ring she wore that day In shame she threw aside, 
• And when he .s;iw her Uithd in tears, in solemn voice lie cried: 

CiioRrs. 
Why don't you wear your weddinjj ring? now, sweetheart, do not cry. 
For somethhuf must have happened, love, to break our sacred tie; 
Replace it where its l)een before, for joy 'twill surely brinjj: 
Come, whisper, darliua, tell me true, why don't you wear th« rin^f? " 

She handetl him the letter, which caused this early strife; 

He gazed upon tlie writing, then, with joy, he told his wife: 

" Tis from your foriiier sweetheart, whom you dismissed in shame, 

So, mad with Jealous rage, he tried to win your love again." 

The tears of jov rolled down her face, " Now, darluiK, all is well; 

How 1 could ever doubt your love Is more than I can tell." 

He took the wedding ring again, as on that happy day. 

And placed it on her Hnger, for no more to her hell say:— r/<o»'<«. 

"OLD GLORY" WAVES ON HIGH 

Copyright. 18«l, liv I,»-liinaiiM, .Sclieuor * Thomas. English C''p\ rlgln wmired. 
Words '>■ iiif clMHi'iH l>> < »i U .lit. O. Ingeritoll. C<>nip<>w<l by Etiouard Heiiieuyl. 

Oh, flag of freedom grand: Oh, flag that freemen love l 
On land and sea we honor thee all other flags above; 
With loy we hall thy stars, unfurled in heaven's blue; 
For liberty was born with thee, thou flag of i)atriots true. 
With pride we follow thee, to nobly do or die. 
For right and liberty " Old Glory " waves on high. 

CnoRi's. 
All honored flag of stars! unfurl thy folds in freedom's sky. 
In light of peace, in cloud of war " Old Glory " waves on high. 

Unconquerd in thy might to stay the tyrant's hand: 

Where'er unfurled, o'er all the world the hope of freedom's landl 

Thy stars, that proudly gleam, we 11 gather to defend; 

And death to lilm those stai-s would dim. or freedom's banner rend. 

Oh, flag of truth and right, oppre.*5ion to defy, 

In majesty and ndght " Old tilory " waves on high.—Choms. 

She Was Bred in Old Kentucky 

Parixly— By Andy Garon. 
Oh, a tramp he stood one day by a cottage tcr away. 

And to him that day his hunger was something tierce. 
He had walked from door to door, he asked for bread and nothing more. 

So he knocked, and who should come but Mrs. Pierce, 
And he sprung his old, old Uile, as his fac; grew deathly pale. 

He said he would be satlstted with bread. 
And he thought he had her pat, but he was talking thro' his hat. 

For she handed him a dyspepsia cake and said: 

('Hours. 
We don't bake bread in old Kentucky, cause the rye and grass are blue. 

We make moonshine in this country, and we have good horses, too. 
We bake biscuits In old Kentucky, if yondige.st them you're very lucky. 
For there's no girl can cook like Sue. 
There'sa girl in old Kentucky, on whom a friend of mine got stuck. 

Her name was Susie, they called her Sue fur short. 
She was as tall as the grass so blue, that at)out the country grew. 

And her age, oh my, if you guessed it you'd have some sport; 
I called on her one day, when her mother was away. 

She was doing time in jail, so the neighbors said. 
And I can t tell you no lie. the poor girl commenced to cry. 
When I asked her history, and this is what she said: 

CnoRis. 
1 was bred in old Kentucky, 
I was pie in New Orleans, 
I was pork 111 Kansas City, 
And in Boston {Mvrk and Ijeans, 
I was beer In olil Milwaukee, 
And in St. I'anI I was very naughty, 
For there'.s no girl that's travelled like Sue. 

STORIES THAT MOTHER TOLD ME 

I'tti'Mly— H> Andy (Jui'on. 

My brain wanders back to the dark gloomy past. 

To the bum happy days of my childhood. 
My father was drunk In the path by the pool. 

That led to the siiloon called the Wildwooa, 
In nightmares I can see just as plain as can be. 

My fathers dear lace as he'd soak me, 
. His sweet voice galore 1 don't care to hear more. 

And the tales when a kid that he told me. 

Chorus. 
Stories of turnkeys and lawyers. 

He promised hed lie good. 
The stories ot the flnes that he'd have to pay. 

Or else saw a cord of wood. 
Stories of goblets and schooners. 
The kind that don't sail the sea, 
A man can get drunk upon water 
As well as on land, you can see. - 

The shipmates I knew, and the whole gallant crew, 
r Onour good ship the Maine were sleeping, 

■'i And as she lie there the flag she did l)ear, 

;. To assiiult it tlie Spaniards came creeping. 

So just about dawn their hatred did wrong. 

Believe me it cost them quite dearly. -^ 

For the sailors they killed a nation was thrilled, 
:^ And you've ail heard the story bout Dewey. 

\ ClIORfS. 

I >* stories of Dewey and Sampson, 

.' Tales of Admiral Schley, 

Tlie stories of IJeutenani Hobson 

/ J, ' .. ■ .' And his eight men who acted so sly, - 

; jV '. v. Stories of Morro Castle. 

< .J - ■' ... The fights on land and sea, 

• \ /.';-. In memory ever will liftger • ' ' 

I"' Tb« taeruea that set Cuba free. 



TELL MOTHER THAT I DIED A 

SOLDIER'S DEATH 

Oopyrlgbt, 1888, by E Lyona. Word* and Music bj Edmund Lotoml 

On that awful July day, down in Cuba far away, ' ; " 

Lay a soldier slowly breathing out his last; 
In the thickest of the ftght he had fought with valor's mlgtat. 

While the Spanish balls were falling thick and fast. 
Till at last one laid him low, just as cheers had let him know 

That the stubborn foe was conquered and had fled; 
And Ills comrades at his side heard with sorrow, yet with pride. 

These few words their brother st)ldler softly said: 
Good-bye, boys, tho' I must die, tell poor motlier not to cry. 

Tell her not to weep for me, fast came his breath; 
Tell her that her boy was true to the dear red, white and blue. 

Tell my mother that I died a soldier's death. 

Chorus. 

Far away on Cuban shore the hero sleeps foreverraore, [perfume. 

Around his grave In brightest bloom the wild flowers shed their sweet 
But back at home a mother's yearn goes out for one who'll ne'er retura, 
And while she loving vigil keeps her boy's at rest, the hero sleeps. 
All Is peace and joy to-day down In Cuba far away, . 

And the cruel din of war Is heard no more. 
But a mother's heart is sad, for she's waiting for her lad 

Who Is sleeping calmly on the Cuban shore. 
Gentle hands laid him away, at the closing of the day. 

In a spot made sacred now to sacred dead. 
When the long tattcx) was done, and the bugle call was blown. 

They remembered once again the words he said: 
Good-bye, boys, tho' I must die, tell poor mother not to cry. 

Tell her not to weep for me, fast came his breath. 
Tell her that her boy was true to the dear red, white and blue. 
Tell my mother that I died a soldier's death.— CV>o>'</<. 

"LET'S BE FRIENDS AGAIN." 

Bj Bdmund Lyons. PubUslied by the J. A. Bartlett Music Co., ProTldenoe, R. 1. 

Copyrighted, ISW. 

Long dreary years have passed, my love. 

Since last I saw your winning smile. 
And gazed into your eyes so true, ^^^ 

And read the love so free from guile; . ''^ 

In sweet content we wandered then 

Adown the blissful paths of youth. 
With hatid in hand and heart to heart. 

We dwelt in sweet and loving truth. 
Then came the dark and dreary day, 

The day when hearts were ruled by pride. 
And I would not the words unsay 

That drove you, darling, from my side. 
But now I know I was to blame. 

And humbly now your pardon crave, 
And ask again that you may give 

The love you once so freely gave. 

Refrain. 
Tlien come, love, let's he friends again, singing love's refrato. 

Loving as of yore, loving more and more. 
Love shall bind again hearts now rent In twain, 
Let's forget our blighted past, love, let's t>e friends again. 
Since then I've wandered far, my love. 

On oceans wide and foreign shore, 
And sought my wounded heart to soothe 

With beauty's balm and time's blest store. 
The love I thought by time to dim 

Time only strengthens more and more. 
And l)eauty pallet! at mem'ry's call 

Of her 1 loved In days of yore; 
Tliy face has never absent been; 

Thy voice I heard, tho' far away, , 

Tliy winning smile of happy youth 

Has lingered near me night and day. 
Until, at last, I've coiiio to thee. 

And humbly ask that you forget 1 

The sorrows that were caused by me. 
The words I now so much regret.— y/</raln. 

Dere's a Spaniard Lives Upstairs 

I'arody^Ily .Ainly G«r"ii. 

I'm working In a lunatic asylum, and I don't get very much pay, 
When a bughouse comes In here, he come here for to stay; 
I hate for to leave this place, I couldn't if I tried, 
,If I was to walk outside the door, right in again I'd be fired. 

Chorus. 
Oh, I'm going to leave this place. 
Or my name Is rain in-the face, 
Them lunatics make me tired. 

They imagine they own the place; 
They take me for a pug dog. 
And ask me for to bark, 
; A woman sat right on top of me, ;' 

And thought I was a bench In the park. 
I went to bed one night, I couldn't eat a bite, 
I thought I would lake a sleep, when a woman came In sight. 
She came right where I Uiy, and stabbed me witl a shears. 
And told me that I was her husband, and to come with her upeUUriw 

Chorus. 
Oh, I'm not going to leave this place, 

I could stay right here for years. 
Everything comes my way, 

At these maniacs I've no fears. 
I'll iHjt iKjfore I'm through, 

I'll be a son-of-a-gun, • 

If them Idiots get too gay with me, - . - ■ 
I'll put the asylum on the bum. 

The Words and Music of either of the alMve 
songs will be mailed to any address, post-paid, on 
receipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copies, your 
selection, for ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHMAN, 

108 Parlt Row, New York. Catalogue of all our publioatkHis MSlM 

Fro* upon applieatkHi. 




^^■^•>;■■ 



CAREY AND HIS FAIRY 

Copyiiitht. 1897. by The Haimony Ouild. * 

WorilH bv KisiicIh ilarimin. Mu«ic by H«-leii ltaal>. 
Sheet miiKic publlnhvd bv Tlif ilarinuii) Guild. 131 W. Stilh St , N'«w Yoi k. Price Wc 
Thesneet iiiiisio can also be ubtaiiird from the iiublislirr uf this book. 

Carey and his fairy are engajjed this many a day. 

But, on mv word, Tim Carey now is seeking for delay: 

For since the fairy's mother has hung up a certain face, 

Tim Carey is excited, and he'd like to quit the place. 

He thinks it Is a picture of some old relation near. 

Because it's like the fairy in a way that's very queer: 

He has a pain from moanint;, " Will my fairy grow like this? ' ■ 

And if she does, good-bye to all the hopes of married bliss." : 

Rekrain. 
. - I know friend Tim of old, I'm thinking he'll get iKJld. 

And some day there'll be troubles great in store: 
He'll carry in an axe, and when they turn their backs, 

He'll break that face and leave it on the floor, 
l-aith, alx)ut the crayon now ril tell you one and all, 
'Twas copied from a photo of the fairy in the fall, . . - 

The artist was a peddler, and v.'hat do you think he did? 
But drape the face In shadows blacker than a sooty lid, ' 

Where lines were curved he drew them straight, or short where they were 
He l)ent the face in places where there was no bend at all; fti*". 

He has the fairy |>eeklng thro' a crooked pane of glass. 
No wonder Carey's thinking he must break the pledge at Xsist.— lie f rain. 

Carey, mind, has courage when he's out u\h»\ a walk. 

Ay, with his little fairy, and lie's able then to talk 

About when they'll be wedded and sweet happy days in store; 

Bui quickly drops the sub.iect when he nears the fairy's door. 

For well he knows when once inside he'll see upon the wall 

That divil of a picture that will make his courage fall: 

He then grows dumb and hardened towards the fairy's winsome ways. 

And Carey's little fairy wonderS^'Why her Tim ([elays—Ue ft ain. 

Mother, Don't Cry 

Copyright. 1(W7, by The Harmony Ouild. 

Wordu by Ki-aiioi8 Harmon. Mimic b* Helen Raab 

Sheet music iiubliHhed by Thx Hmiiiouy Ouild. 131 W 38ih ft , New York. Piice 40c. 

The sheet iiiuvlc can alMo he (ibtaine'i f i uni the piiiilisher uf this bonk. 

Swift ran the tide to the ocean, under the great swaying dome, 
wifter the human commotion, passing froni workshop to home. 

- \'' V than ever the shlp-.sail, speeding in silence to sea, 

Uleaiila'2 a child's face, while this sad wail sounded her heart's agony: 

Refralv. 

- , Mother, don't cry; mother, don't sigh; 

Father will follow US home by and by; 
Please let him rest, he'll do his liest. 
Surely hell come with us— mother, don't cry. 

Hundreds and thousands passed onward, blind to the mother and girl, 
I^eading their wanderer homeward, out of temptation's mad whirl 
Though he may stagger and stumble, with a weak grasp on the rail; 
Thougho'erthehoarse sounding rumble echoed the little one's wail:— //«/". 
On struggled mother and wee one, on with their burden of care. 
No one would offer to help them, all lacked the courage to dare. 
Each one forgetting a brother, each one o'erlooking the child. 
Deaf to the sighs of the mother, and to that cry weird and wild:— /?«/". 

Many a true man is reeling close to destruction's dark brink. 
Over him secretly stealing, ruin that follows strong drink. 
Stranger, perhaps to your warning such a one would give more heed 
Than to a helpmate's sad mourning, an(!Khough his little ones plead: 

Do Ask Me Again 

Copyrlitlit. IHJT, liy The llarni'Mv Guild. 

Words liy Kihucis Hiirinoii. Music tiy Mary AirneK Hn.ven. 

Sheet music publislied by The Hai nioiiy Ouil.l. 131 W. 3«th St.. Ne» V-.rk. Price 50c. 

The sneei music can also lie <>l>taliied from (he |<ul)lislier of thlr book. 

My beau was long timid and I was too slow. 

That's why I'm now single. I'd have you all know, ». 

For John popped the question a fortnight ago. 

And foolishly I answered "No." 
I did not mean no, but he frightened me so. 
After years of long waiting it came like a blow; 
I thoiight him so bashful, but I was too slow. , 

Oh, why did I answer him "No." 

Chorus. 
And now I'm so sorry, do ask me again, ask me again; 
Johnnie, dear .lohnnie. oh, ask me again; 
I'll say " Yes " the minute you ask me again, ask me again; 
. Johnnie, dear Johnnie, do ask me again. 

John calls quite as often as ever l)efore. 
But now he 8 more bashful and this I deplore, 
<^ F»r I fear the question he'll pop nevermore. 

Oh, why did I answer him " No." 
I'm heartsick and sore, your advice 1 Implore, 
. .- Had I better say this to the man I adore: 

' " Dear John. I just blundered, do ask me some more, 
And this time I will not say "No."— CAo;m». 

^ Shame ! You Little Tattle-Tale 

Co|iyrl(rht. 1897. by The Harmony Guild. 

Words by Francis Hariiioii. Music by Mary Airues Hayes. 

Sheet music putdislied by The Harmony Guild, ISl w. 38«h St., New Voi k. Price 50c. 

Tlie sheet music can also be obtained by the publisher of this book. 

Mother says my name is Jane, surely she must know It; 
Yet I have another one, girls in school bestow it. 
'Tis. they say. because I tell ev'ry little thing, 
~ J In my ear the live-long day, this is what they sing: 

Rkfrain. 
Shame! you little tattle-tale, ev'rybody knows your name. 
You are such a real mean thiuff. you shan't join when we play ring. 
You tell tales on ev'ry one, spoiling all our romping fun; 
Qoand hide your face in shame! Tattle, Tattle-tale's your name. 

Though of them I do complain dally to the teacher, 
l^-. And although she keeps them In, they keep crying peacher. 

No one will leave me alone— 'pon my word 'tis so, 
.. j-^ Ev'ry one calls out to me, when I come or go: —lief rain. 

Secrets are not made to keep honestly and truly; v -^ ; 

Ev'ry single girl knows this, married ones do surely. 
Yet my playmates sav to me. " You have news for sale," 
Me they call that horrid name, "Tattle, Tattle-tale."— iie/Voin. 



WEIL HOLD THE PHILIPPINES 

CoftyriKht, 1899. by Helen lUab. 

Words by Fran"!* Harmon Music by Helen Kaah. 

Sheet musio published by The Harmony Guild. 131 W 3Sth St , New York. Pi ice Mb. 

The sheet music can also be obtained from the piiblitiher uf Una book. 

Whoever wins a fight, in love or war alike. ■'. 

Is entitled to the honor due success; 
In love to claim the maid, in war the foenian'8 blade. 

And the treasures the defeated may pos.se8S. 
So it is with Uncle Sam, he bade his valiant band 

To free the burdened isl.inders of Spain: 
Dewey won the Philippines, and the Yankee eagle screams, 

"The Philippines we'll hold for freediuu's reign." , 

Rkfrain. . } 

. The Yankee eagle screams, " We'll hold the Philippines, • . . 

That her jieople nevermore may t»e oppressed; " ; 

Our Hag shall ever wave, to free the true and brave, ' 

And our banner shall by noble deeds be lilessd. t 

Who mutters "Take it down " shall meet the freeman's frown, '■ 
And treral>le as the sword-hand takes the hilt : 
, The Yankee eajjle screams, " We'll hold the Philippines. 
Where tyrants reign our altars shall Iw built." 
The Philippines we'll hold, and nations Ki-owing liold 
• Will regret it if our sailor lK)ys they meet; 

Who have a taking way, a very raking sjiy. 

And perform their duty with a gallant ,sweep. 
"Yes, well free the Philippines." the Yankee eagle screams. 

They shall not hail this Aguinaldo king. 
And to all the |>eople there we shall over be most fair. 
To them the freeman's l>lessing8 we would l\rii\iz.—J{ffiahi. 

A Dead Fly Coon 



•V 



Copyi iirht, 1898, by Herald Square Mnsic Co. Wonts atid music li> Harr.\ Ko^rs. 

Now I'm a colored gentleman. 
As you can plainly see. 

Though some folks call me nigger- 
Yes, bntthat don't bother me; 

I know I'm not a white man, 
Tho' I hope to change some day. 

And when the white folks shout who Is dat c<x)n. 
Now dis is what 1 say: 

CnoRfs. ' 
My name's Pete Johnson, I can do a coon cake walk; 
My names Pete Johnson, and my education t.ilks. 
My style .iust shows you that I <lon't go around with gawks. 
For I'm no loon, hut a deadfly «-<Kin, and my name's Pete Johnson. 

Now when I'm walking on BroHilw.iy, 

In the daytime or the niirlit. 
And the wenches they cat<h sight of me • 

Their color all turns white. 
And when I do appmafl) them 
' ' In that ciion like cake walk style. 

Then they shout out. Nigger, what's your name. 

Then I shout with a smile: — < A<" "». 

You've heard of niggers »lone turn white, 
. ' . But none you never saw. 

But I'm the nig' that lick'd that i 

Spaniard on the upi>er floor, 
I couldn't .stand to see his ■ 

Nationality about. 
So I hit him and I turned him white. 

And then commenced to shout:— C'Ao»«#. 

Kindness Would Have Saved Her 

Copyriffbt, 1898. by The Herald Square Music Co. 
Words and Music l>y Clins. H Milton. 

A father was sitting l>eside his child, , 

Praying to Ood in heaven 
To bring back to life his own dear wife, : 

He never would leave her again; 
He could not see what the future would bring; 

He would have taken more care 
Of the poor wife at home, and child alone. ' . 

' Her troubles he'd never share; 

At last", in despair, she ended her life; 

The child tound her there in lied — 
Cried, Mamma, please wake! no answer came; 

And then to her Father she sai<l: 

~ CHORI'S. 

Oh, Papa, please wake Mamma, don't let her sleep so long; 
You know I'm very hungry, don't scold me if I'm wrong. 
Now. tell me why you're crying; why don't you answer, dear; 
Oh, please wake up my Mamma, for Papa dont seem to hear. 

He thought of the dear child she left behind. 

Calling for her dear mother; 
The stern voice of faith cried out too late— 

With KiNnNKSS vou woiLn havk savep her. 
Days that have past they will never return. 

Leaves fade and fall to the ground; 
There is many a life that fades away, 

That ne'er hears a loving sound. 
This lesson we learn each day of our lives, 

A kind word will always pay; 
Just think of the wife at home alone. 

And baby who heard Papa say: 

Chorus. 
No, Baby, I can't wake her— your Mamma she Is dead; 
■ The angels they have called her; alx)ve her spirit fled: 
'■': Now, tell me that you love me, from you III never part; 
,; Oh, please, don't take my baby, for that would break my heart. 

The Words and Music of any of the above 
songs will be mailed to any address, post-paid, on 
receipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copies, your 
selection, for ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHMAN, 

108 Park Row, New York. Catalogue of ail our publications maiM 

Free upon application. 




HOW I LONG TO SEE 

MY OLD VIRGINIA HOME 

Copyritrht, 1899, b7 BUrtin, JanMSft Co. 
Word* by D. A. Byron. Huilc by Harry Rteiner. - 

How I lonK to see my old Virginia home. 

The place where I s|)ent my happiest hours; 
By thfrSfrearn where I once loved to roam 

with mv darling Kose, the fairest of all flowers. 
But my love has passed away, the only girl I loved. 

But we shall meet on Judgment Day with angels fair above. 

Chorus. 
; But I'll never see my old home any more, 
. ' : Never wander in the gloaming as of yore, 

^ For the Hower that I lovetl is gone t)efore, 
! And those happy days will never come again. 

I had such a oleasant dream last night, 

i >r my old home I always loved so well: 
And my sweetheart who made life so bright. 

None but kindest words from her lips ever fell. 
But those haupv days are o'er, I wished my dream was true. 

And I conlu Hve those days again, the days I'll never rue.— Cfiorus. 

Cleopatra Jones 

ropyritrht. 1098. by tlie Qrand Piano Co. Coiiipcaed by E W. DuKtIn. 

There's a gal lives down the alley, an' she beats 'em all for style. 

She's ma Cleopatra Jones; 
When she loves dem odder nlggahs. she Jus' loves 'em for a while, 

Sweet Cleopatra Jones; 
She's ma copper colored honey, not too light nor not too dark; 
She's ma ever goo<l an" only one. the one 1 loves to spark; 
I've been often foc'd to pull «ia razor comln' tro' de park 

Wid Cleopatra Jones. 

Chorus. 

Cleopatra Jones, I really do love you, 1 do; 

Any cxlder niggah trifles, gets his heart mos" cut In two; 

Tell nie dat vo" loves dls niggah in yo' sweetest tones. 

You are ma only lump of sweetness, Cleopatra Jones. 

Ma only Cleopatra won a cake de odder night, 
/ Sweet Cleopatra Jones; 
■ Of course, some o4tder niggah had to go an' start a flght 
Over Cleopatra Jones: 
A great big i>op eyed niggah made a Ughtnln' rush for me. 
But I stopped his awful rushin' wid ma razor, don' you see! 
Den ma Cleopatra k)ved nie more, she couldn't let me l)e. 
Sw»'»'t Cleopatra Jones. - C'-o/'f.. 

AN AUTUMN DREAM 

Copyright. 1X95. by Hockett Br<ia.'Piiiit«nney Co. By Ella May Smith. 

We met t was In Septeml^ter, at the close of a perfect day; 

Ah. well do 1 remenilter, though time has passed away. 

The leavHS wern dropping one by one. 

The wfMxlblne turning red and brown, 

'Twas sunset in Its last red splendor Was It a dream? 

We loved 'twas In September, our path was strewn with flowers; 

Our pa.'ision was loves holiest gift, eternal hope was oui . 

We sum,' of roses whose sense 

Breathed ardent love Intense. 

Swef't words of love, how they ring Was It a dreamt 

We parted in Septeml>er, ah, day of grief and pain. 
Too whII do I remember, the meksage when it came. 



."Man's love is of man's life a part. 
'Tis woman's whole existence — 
I mourn for the love of a faithless heart. 



It was a dream. 



The Nigger Said Bah 

CopyiiBht, mw. 111 I.fliiiianii. Sdiriier A Thomai. 
WorilH ami Miiaic l>y Win A. Oe Monnt. 

'Way down South, in my home, whar' de niggers lib so flne, 
Stt-alin' all d^ chickens an' de sheep dat dey can And; 
Tell you 'Ikmu a coon named John.son, stole a lamb one day. 
He ha<l to get a lawyer or dey'd put dat coon away. 
De lawyer hf toM Johnson .jiist what he'd have to pay. 
An' when Iih went lH;fo' de judge Just what he'd have to say. 
De day it was app'lnteil, an' de judge was in his seat; 
De nigger must he tried fo' steaiin' white folks' mutton meat. 

Choris. 

"Bah, bah, bah!" Toeverything he asked him It was "Bah. bah, bah!" 

Just like a shf'ep go«'s " Bah! : : " "Bah, bah, bah!" 

An' when de Judge discharged htm. 

De niggtr walked out ob de court, sayin" "Bah, bah, bah!" 

Nigger walked out in de street, as big as any lord. 

Told his friends for miles around, an' how dem niggers roar'd. 

De c(M)n he ha<l his treasures hjd 'way underneath the bed; 

If ever dey had searched his liouse, dat coon 'ould sure <lrop dead. 

Next day de lawyer came 'round fo' money dat wass due; 

De coon had built a tire an' was c(K)kln' mutton stew; 

De lawyer asked fo' money dat was promised him next day; 

I>e nigger playeil off deaf and dumb, an' " Bah, bah " he did say. 

Chori-s. 
• Bah. bah, bah!" Toeverything he asked him it was" Bah, bah, bah!" 
Ju.st like a sheep goes " Bah! ! : ' " Bah. bah. bah! "' 
An' when de lawyer left him 
De nigger ate hi.s mutton stew, sayin" " Bah, bah, bah!" 

The Words and Music of either of the above 
songs will be mailed to any address, post-paid, on 
receipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copies, your 
selection, lor ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHMAN, 

108 Park Row, New York. Catalogue of all our pubileations malM 

FfM upon application. 




:-t- 



There May Be Others in This Wide World 

BUT THEY'RE SELDOM SEEN 

Copyright. UW, by John F. Morrlaaay. 
Words by Jack Morrisx^y Music by W. Keii<iall Hallowell. 

There Is a swell little maiden I adore, I adore; ... - . jv.. . 

"Mostev'ry evening together on love's wings we soar, -i. 

All of the boys are as jealous as can be, as can be. 
For this little girl is my sweetheart, and she lives 'cross the street from me. 

CHORrs. • T 

She Is not so handsome as some desire, " ' .<. ,: j. 

Her eyes so bright, her voice like a golden lyre. 
But to me my girl Is a i)erfect aueen; 
There may be others In this wide world, but they're seldom seem ■ 

On New Years day me and Mamie to the altar will go; 
On that day my little sweetheart will wed her beau; 
Now this day will be a happy one for me- yes, for me. 
Through life's stormy pathway together she will share all of It with me.— 

C/iottt*. 

HE WAS A SINGER 

CopyriKht, 18M, by The Grand Piano Co. W>ird>i and Music by W. A. Crauae. 

A poor old man with careworn face passed slowlv down the street, "^ 
Mansions stood on every side where wealth and fashion meet, 
'Twas New Year's eve and all was gay within a home that night; 
His thoughts returned to former years at that familiar sight; 
He paused a moment at the sound of singing sweet and low. 
Then Quietly drew near the door from whence the souiid did flow; 
It was a dear old loving sf)ng he sang In a bygone day; 
He was a singer of renown, but sadly went astray. 

Choris. . , 

He was a singer. In days long, long ago; 
His voice has lost its sweetness, his form is bending low- 
Many hearts were brightened with songs too sweet to last. 
He was a singer, but his day has passed. 

The singing ceas'd, applause rang thro' the mansion loud and clear. 

While Just outside the stranger stood and shed a silent tear. 

Two gentlemen alwut to leave ha<l steppd outside the door; ^ - 

He stood aside to let them pass, they ne er had met before: . ^^ "■. ' 

I love to hear the singing, sir. you won't object, I know: *" I 

I used to sing that same old song not many years ago; 

He told the storv of his life, when he had wealth and fame; 

They both recalled the stranger, when In sorrow told his name.— C%o. 

Remember, You Have a Brother 



>' .'" : 



Copyright, 189;, by Harry F. Coolt. By Harry F. Cook. 

The gallant knights of old. In armor bright. 
Pledged their words in honor for the rignt; 
Where truth and friendship entwine us all. 
Give a helping hand the ttrst to call. 
In want and distress, wherever you may be. 
Remember, you have a brother K. of P. 

Choris. 
You may travel this wide world o'er and o'er. 

And cross the ocean dark and deep; 
You may traverse the land far and near. 

From ocean to ocean's mighty span you'll hear 
A welcome call wherever you may be. 

Remember, you have a brother K. of P. „ 

When far away from loved ones and home. 
And among strangers In other lands you roam. 
You will always meet with a friendly hand 
To guide y(m on through this mighty land; 
Or In a foreign clime you may be. 
Remember, you have a brother K. of P.— CArt»-»/<. 

With extended hands of welcome we greet you, 

In friendship trusted, tried and true; 

With glad tidings of joy we'll meet vou. 

In sickness and In sorrow we're with you, too. 

To give a helping hand wherever you may be. 

Remember, you nave a brother K. of P.— C7u»»»M. . .^ 

IT IS THE SAME OLD STORY 

C pyrlKht, 11198, by Wm. A. Crauxp. Words and Miulc by Win. A. Crauaa. 

Twas at a pleasure garden. In the central part of town, 

A jolly crow(twere laughing, the curtain had rung down: 

They were drinking to the go«<l health of one and then the other. 

When suddenly a man sprang up. It was a woman's brother, 

" What brings you here, he said. In tears, " I thought you married. 

This Is no place for virtue, girl, 3 lieg of you to tell." 

Bhe lingered there In silence. In shame she bow'd her head; 

At last she gained the courage, and to him she softly said; 

Chorfs. 
"It Is the same old story, told o'er and o'er again; 
No need explain the details, John, 'twould only give me pain; 
I was happy once like you. with a sweetheart I thought true, 
A villain, you see, he was t« me, it is the same old story." 

"You left us, Nell, so happy, your heart w.is all aglow; 

Your many friends all miss you. they loved you so, you know; 

When mother got your letters with jov she read them there. 

To know her only daughter was free from want and care— 

You did not write the awful truth, you were Uxi proud, I see. 

But let the pa.><t be all forgot, and come back hom« with me." 

" No, John, I cannot face her. 'tis more than I can l>ear; 

You tell her when you meet again that .some day I'll be there."— C^wrm. 

When the sad news reached the mother, it pierced her loving heart. 

She longed to see her Nell once more before they two must part; 

One day she sent a message. Imploring her return: 

It read. " your mother's dying now, the cause you soon shall learn," 

But when she reached the mother's slde-alas, it was too late; 

" Forgive me, mother dear. " she cried; - 'twas I who caused your fate; 

Oh! speak to me, " she pleaded. " I've come back now to stay. ' . 

No answer came to welcome her, again we bear her say:— cAoriM. 



Nell. 



THEY NEVER MENTION YOUR NAME 

Copyright, 18»7, b.T StiTllnif A Von Tilwr Entrllnh copriiffht Mcar«<). 
Word* by Aodi-ew B. SiorlliiK. Music by Muiry vou Tllier. 

A lassie who had left her happy homestead long ago, . - 

While passing down a crowded street one day. 
Came face to face with one who In the past had loved her so. 

Her sweetheart from the village far away. 
She turned away to hide the tears; he said, don't shrink from me. 

You know that once we were engaged to wed . 
My mother and my father, Ned, she faltered tearfully 

T>o th<»y ever speak of me, and then he said: 

Chorcs. 
: _ , . .P>\ey never mention your name, 

Nell, since you left home so long ago, f 

,'?"''• They do not censure or blame, • 

' ■ . Nell, and they love you still, I know; 

' ■ Come back with me when I go. 

Don't let me plead in vain. 
- You'll be happy yet, theyll forgive and forget. 

If you'll only come home again 

lear Ned, she said, I long to see the old folks once again. 

To greet my dear old mother as of yore. 
But father, would he welcome me, my heart would ache with pain 

If ever be should turn me from his aoor. 
riltake you home as my wife, Nell, ho whispered, I love you; 

In spite of all, you're still my promised bride, 
• The past can be forgotten, we will start life o'er anew, ' ■ 

The old folks, too, would welcome you, he cried.— c'Aoitw. 

CAN YOU FORGIVE ME? 

Copyrigiit, 1897. hT CniivrilldntPd Munin Pub Am'n. Enirllab copjrlKhl secured. 
Worrta l>7 Maurice Shapiro. Muaic by 8. Farth. 

All alone within a church, an organist did play. 
Rehearsing tunes so sacred, new hymns for Christmas day, > 

But somehow there was sadness, as the music then rang out, 
The echoes seemed repeating in a pleading way cloud, 
fan you not forgive her, the one you once loved best. 
Can you not forget it, and grant her one request, 
Kor before him lay a letter, from her who did repent. 
And m melody he told the words of the message she had sent. 
>, Chorus. 

r- Can you forgive me, can you forget, 
■ Vj-loved you dearly; yes, I love you yet. 
- l^oiigh I have wronged you, caused you pain untold, 
Can you forgive me, and love me as of old? 

His head sank on the keyboard, the tears were falling fast, . <; 

He thought of wife and baby, a vision of the past. 

For she one day had left him, brought disgrace upon his name. 

Destroyed the home he cherished, until repentance came. 

Can you not forgive me, a voirnj rang out so wild. 

Can you not have pity upon me and our child? 

For at the church door stood his wife, she'd heard the sad refrain. 

One joyous cry, clasped to his breast, she did not plead In vain.— C/iorw. 

MISTER JOHNNY WISE 

Coi>yrlglit, 1808, br Con«->|ldnt^il Music Piib. Am'n. Enellib ooi>yrli;bt secured. 
Words by Byron S. Andrews. Music by Harry T. Von. 

I Will tell yon of a chap I know, you all must know him, too. 
At some time or another he has had his chance at you. 
He knows all kind of people and he Is so wondrous wise. 
He's an information bureau In disguise. 

If you're looking for a long-lost friend, and don't know where to go, 
Just meet this chap and ask him, he will put you right, I know. 
As an up-to-date directory he really takes the prize. 
He's the only thing that happened. Who? why Mister Jobmiy Wise. 

Chorus. 

Mister Johnny Wise, as you may surmise. 

Contradict him on your life, if you do 'twill end In strife. ■ ■ 

People at him cry, when he passes by. 

There's the man that knows it all. who? Mister Johnny Wise. 
You will And him at the race track, too, he's ready with his tip. 
On railroad trains or trolleys you can meet him every trip. 
He'll give you points on basebam-tell you who will win the game. 
Our next candidate for President he'll name. 

He's the man who first invented those great words, " I told you so," 
Spring something new, hell say, "Old man, I heard that long ago." 
And from politics and poker, down to baking pumpkin pies. 
You can't lose him for a minuto. Who? why Mister Johnny Wise.— rho. 

W MUST RESPECT DIS GOON 

.-.-■- Copyrlgbt, 1898, br the Orpbeaii Mtisic PubliKlilitK Co. . -.~ 

.>,■"..■■<■■■- Words anil Mu-ic l>y K. NaUes ■'•'..■-. 

..,-', Last night 1 went to Johnson's Hall, .-; ' 

„'. ■:-':••: De colored folks dey gave a ball; 

'■ ■■ Ob course I took mah Baby Sue, ■' .. 

An' I regret I did it, too. • ■,■■■. ^ 

A big, swell coon, from Tarrytown, 
' He stared at her an' hung aroun'; 

. '.•.'-- So all mah blood jumped to ma head, 

.:/,.:' I cleared mah throat an' loudly said: 

.•.'-.•■>■■. .■■'••'^■', Chorus. ■.•■.■'-"■ 

" ^ ' . .':: Don't yo' be hangin' 'roun' dis lady. 

Can't yo' see, man, dat she's mah Dabyf 
; • Dar'll be trouble soon, I bet you 1 

.•; i'-.;.f If 1 have fo' to call yo' down, 

if o' won't go l)ack to Tarrytown; 
<- Yo' must respect dis coon 1 

->",:; De music played a new cake walk, .- . 

.'.:':>.■■' '- V And dat big coon l)egan to talk; 
'"'.'' • He said he'd dance it wlf mah Sue, 

,...•' '/'./, But 'course dat bone I did not chew. 
..'..:. i; I walked wif her right up an' down, >v - " 

n, ->.-'• •' V And nebber heard anodcr soun'j . .' . 

He took his hat an' cane an' fled, 

Fo' he remembered dat 1 said:— CAonw. - , / = . 

, . At one o'clock I left de spot, ^"\- :.':"■■:-■':'■. ..' 

;."• .s. An' dat '8 de time de soup was hot; . :-' ■ ", ' : \ 

,>■■■: Aroun' de corner layed dat nig, '^ •- '>-,^: •"• 

He had a rfizor 'bout so big, ,- .: ' . " f. ',:"■■■ ■ 

But all de same I knocked him down, ■'■■■ '-V ► 

Jeet like a broom he swept de groun'; ' 

He Bwore he'd kill me yet some day. 
Bat die I said and walked away:— 6V<ona. 



THAT'S NO DREAM 

Oop) rlKbt, 1898. by CoDBoIldiited Music Pub. An'n. EiiKlUb coprriKht serured. 

Words by Andrew B. St>-r:inii. Mu»ic by Hsrry von Tilsfr. 

■ A maiden sweet lives down our Street, With eyes Of blue, ;; • 
'• With golden hair bevond comimre, and heart so true. 
She's my beau. Id liave you know, she loves me, too; 
.S Boys, It's no dream, she's my little sunbeam, 

And I don't mind telling you that . V ; 

Choris. " ■ . . •• 

I love Carrie, and Carrie loves me, I know; 

S<x)n we'll marry and happy well be, that's so. '■" 

Talk of love in a cottage, down by a stream. 
In a flat we will dwell, and have steam heat as well, boys, \ 

And that's no dream. I 

I've not much dnst, but still I've just enough for two, I 

'-'■ So can't you guess, she answered yes, I'll marry you, ■ ' . . 

By and by my girl and I some day will roam. 

Pick out a flat, and a swell one at that, 
'. Then won't it t)e home, sweet home, for-CToT"*. ", 

THE SHAMROCK 

The Emblem of Ireland. 

CopyrlKbt, 1898, by A. M. Manrlleld. . ' 

' Words by Frank Abbott. Mii*lc by Lonis Uaiirioe. 

. There's a sweet little leaflet, which poets have sung of. 

On history's pages its name may lie seen, 
.. TlB known as the symbol and loved as the emblem 
Of a dear little island all covered with green. 
It's good luck to find it, a pleasure to see it, 
.; An honor to wear It next true Irish hearts. 

Our forefathers wore It, their banners all bore it, 
ru love, I'll adore it till life from me part«. ~- . 

Chorus. 
The shamrock, the shamrock, 
' ' So modest and lowly, so pure and so holy, 
, 1 , The shamrock, the shamrock. 

My emblem and Ireland's, the shamrock. 
' ■ There's a sweet blue-eyed colleen who's won my affections. 
She's fair and she's Insh, what more can I say; 
She's wilful and trying, and sometimes she'll teaze me. 

But, bless her true heart, why that's only her way; 
I saw her last evening and asked her to give me 
. ..^ A token of love as .a link to our hearts. 

She took from her bosom and gave me a shamrock, 
I'll love, I'll adore her till life from me parts.- ( /<(Mt/f. . • ' 

MY HOME OF LONG AGO 

Copyright, 1898, by Consolidated Music Pub. Ass'n. English C"P> ■ iRlit tu cuifil 
Words by Maurice Shapiro. Music by Harry von TIiimt , ■ 

Last night I dreamt I saw again my home of long ago. 

The shady lane, the babbling brook, the valley and the hill, r 

The meadow and the cornfield, the valley and the hill. 

The same old trees and flowers all seemed to grow there still, 

I saw the little homestead, where as a child I used to play. 

The same old school-house down the road, the church across the way, ■ 

And in the village church yard, beneath a mould of clay. 

There lay the one that I loved best, near my old home far away. 

Chorus. 
My home, my dear old home; ray home, in days of yore; 
Sad recollections hover 'round me forevermore. 
And In my dreams I see again the place that I loved so. 
Where as a child I used to roam, my home of long ago. 

'Twae standing by the old school-house I saw Nell long ago, 
I loved her then, when first we met, 'twas there I told her so; 
The stream flows by the school-house, the birds sing just as cay; 
Their song has lost their sweetness since Nell has |»assed away. 
And in my dreams I saw her stand as she stood in davs gone by. 
The same old smile was on her face, the love light in fier eye; 
She told me that she loved me as on that summer day 
She promised that she'd be my wife, in the old home far away.— Cko. 

Have a Jolly Time 

Copyright, 1898, by Consolidated Music Tub Ass'n. English copyriglit secured. 
Words by Andrew B. Sterling. Mu«lo by Harry von Tilztjr. 
O'Grady gave a racket down In old Hlbernia Hall, 

His friends a.ssembled there from far and near; 
The admission cost them nothing, 'twas an invitation ball. 

The only thing they had to buy was beer. 
The fun was fast and furious, O'Grady was In line. 

Admiring friends were crowded all about. 
When Mike thought things were getting slow, he'd Jump upon the stage. 

And like an Indian he'd loudly shout: 

Chorus. 
Have a jolly time, dancing, prancing, •• 

Till the day Is dawning, have a jolly time, ■^. 

Reeling, spieling, won't go home till morning, " < 

Have a .lolly time, blow in every dime; ^ 

Don't you be a dunce, for you only live but once, ' j 

So have a jolly time. 

The evening wore away, Mike drank with all the friends he knew. 

Imbibed with some he never seen before. 
And he toasted dear old Ireland, sjxjke a word for Cuba, too. 

Shook hands with ev'ry lady on the floor; 
But Mike was only human, soon there was a grand collapse. 

The tide within his head was rising fast; 
And as he sank down on the floor, he feebly raised his head. 

And kept on yelling loudly. to the last:— (//iO/iM. . • "- 

The Words and Music of either of the abovo 
songs will be mailed to any address, post-paid, on 
receipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copies, your 
selection, for ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHMAN, 

108 Park Row, New York. Catalogue of all our publications mailed 

Free upon application. 




>\' '"■-';.■ 



-•>^- , 



TkeLaljvitlitbll^-IiiieM I By the Sad Sea Waves 



CnpyriMht. IMS. by Win. B. Ony. Entered at Bi*tlun«r«' Hall. London. 
WoriU and Btutic by Armatronc Broa. 



There's a wench that's raising Cain. 

And (ley rail her " Rag time " Jane; 
She's not the coons all hypnotized 

Around here, now that's plain: 
For she walks and talks ' Ragtime," 

Slie does the real coon-JIne, 
The nigs all sigh, you'll hear dem cry, 

When Jane comes down the Hue. 

Choris. 

"Here conies that lady with the rag time walk," 

You'll Iwar thenj coons all say. 
The lady with the Tag time" Uilk 

Is a coniin" down this way; 
She's got all the <(K)iis around Insane, 

They'v*' all got "rag time" on the brain. 
For a dead swt'll gal is 'Liza Jane, 

De wench with the •ragtime" walk. 

At a cake walk sUe e.xcels 

All the ntht'r coloied iH'lles; 
The wi'iiches hIacJi from lier get back. 

She captures all the swells: 
■When the colored l)elles turn out. 

She's the " Queen " without a doubt. 
As dark as night, dressed out of sight. 

You'll hear them coons all shout:— C/toru*. 







< » ^ 



CopyrlKtit. 1^98. by W^m. B. Uray. Entered a( Statlonera' Hall, London. 



Words by C. U. Cotee. Huoio by Bennett Scott 

1 » e » I 

In a little street. In a little town, not very far from here, 

A fellow and a girl made love, in manner rather queer. 

He called her 'duck," she called him "goose, " they got along all right, 

.\nd tills Is what the neighljors heard, from eight 'till twelve each night: 

CHORfS. 

Ki.>is your goosie woosie, kiss your goosle woosle, dol 
Then' I'll gt> home to b^\ at once and dream of you; 
Tlitii up went all the windows, and twenty voices said: 
•• For go«>«lnt'ss sake, kiss goosle, and we all can go to bed." 

Tliough the neighbors tried hard to stop the row. It wasn't any use. 
They said tluy'd like to roast the duck and drown the little goose. 
In rain «)r .shine t was just the same, they'd never soak or freeze. 
Between each thunderclap these words came floating o'er the breeze:— 

C/iorut. 

All the neighbors got out their guns and wrote In chalk upon the wall, 
•■ If you ilont leave at U'n to night, you will not leave at all." 
At half past ten iliat night two shots proclaimed the deed was done. 
And now two phantom forms appear and sing from twelve to one:- Cho. 



Who Will Marry Me? 

■ ^ » » I 

CopyrlKht. 1893, by llmii ft Co. 

I » e » I 

Words and Music by Chat. Robinson. 

m >^ — . 

My name's Daniel Mooney, don't think that 1 am looney, 

For the way 1 talks, I know. Is fooney; 
The reason why I'm glad, I've a letter from me dad. 

Who died ana left me all his money 
And w hen his will was read out, it told me what to do; 
If I would have his money. 1 wouhl have to marry, too; 
So I am liK)king for a lady who'll consent to marry me. 

And we'll sail for Ireland in the morning. 

* Chorls. 

n'ho is the laily now, where Is the l«t»y now, 
A'ho is the lady that's going to marry me? 
Come. come, answer quick, I will marry on the lick, 
.\nd sjtil for Dublin in the morning. 

See a Uulv sitting there, who I think is young and fair. 

If sheltonly wed me III l)e happy; 
III buv her diamond rings, lots of sllkaand other thing.% 

Kein"eml)er me heart goes wid me money; 
And when we're wed a year or so. a cradle we will btiy. 
To rock the t(X)tsy w(M»t"sv in that is, when he does cry. 
And if he grows to be a man. Just like his papa. 

We'll have wine and whiskey in the morning— Chom*. 

Now don't he ashame<l of me, I'm not handsome, you can see. 
But a truer husl)and, I'll swear, jou 'II ne'er get; 
» — I'll do the liest I can, alwaj-s t>e a solter man; 

When we get our money we'll buy a house and land; 
■ Well furnish up the parlor in the latest, grandest style. 
And then return to Ireland and stay there for a while. 
But when we do return again, I'll have you all to know. 
We'll have wine and sponge coke iu the morulug.— C/unu, 



Cop) rlKlit, 1805, by Frauds, Day A Hunter. 
All riKliUi rverrved. 



» > * 



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Words by lirster Barrett Music by Lester Tbomaa. 



In the glorious summer season ev'rybody takes a trip 
To the seaside for enjoyment, on the sands they gaily skip; 
Married men with wives and children, single johnnies on the raasli, 
Fretty girls w!io seek for husbands who have pockets full of cash. 

(^HORIS. 

By the sad sea waves, where the ladies are so charming. 

By the sad sea waves, in the glorious summer time; 

With their fetching smiles and dresses, rosy lips and golden tresses. 

Shady i-ooks and sly caresses, by the sa<l sea waves. ^ 

At a boarding house In Newport. Percy Vere met Gladys Gray, 
Soon he showed his fond affection, took her driving ev'ry day; 
By his tone he seemed a marquis, she had Jewels In galore. 
So they formed a love engagement, as they strolled along the sborei 

CHORfS. 

By the sad sea waves, every night he tofjk her strolling. 
By the sad sea waves, he would swear his heart was gone; 
She's the only girl he sings to, she's the girl he says nice things to. 
Promised lovely diamonu rings to, by the sad sea waves. 

When their holidays were over, and they had to say adieu. 
He to join his yacht at Brighton, siie tojfoln her papa, too; 
They agreed to write each other billet ooudlets ev'ry day. 
And when he'd M» mansion ready, they'd be married right away. 

ClIORl'S. 

From the sad sea waves back to bus'ness In the morning, -m 

From the sad s«'a waves to his humble " five a week; " 
In a cook shop he goes dashing, who should bring his plate "ruash in 
But the girl he had been mashing by the sad sea waves. 



The Song That Will Live 



eopyrlKht, ItH, by Francis, Day A Hnnt«r. 



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Words by Tom Browne. Music by Felix McQIennun. 



'Twas a glorious night, and the moon shone brightly. 

As around the camn-tlres the soldiers lay; 
Their hearts were bold, and they t>eat, ah. so lightly, 

Tho' they might l>e stilled in the coming fray. 
It was all in vain that thev courted slumber. 

So they 'rousd and sat there the whole night long. 
Telling tales and talking the old times over. 

When at last one sang them a sweet old song. 

Chorus. 

The song that will live forever, forever and for ay«! 
Ages may come and ages may go. the song shall llTe alway; 
while human hearts are t)eating on the land or foam, 
The song that will live forever Is "Home, Sweet Home I" 

I ■. 
As the words rang out In that far off wlldwood, ' ' 

Ev'ry warm, true heart breathed a silent prayer; 
For they thought of home, the dear home of their childhood. 

And the ones they lined, who were waiting there. 
Ah! they thought of parents, of wives and children. 

Sweethearts, friends and playmates across the foam; j 

They were brave men's tears in the husky voices, I 

As they joined the chorus of " Home, Sweet Home.— Choru*. 

Hark' what was that? A bugle call? To arras! to arms! to arms! 

Up sprang those gallant heroes then to face grim war's alarms; 

And fast they're battlingthere 'gainst death, mid bay'net, shotand shell; 

Where, Hghtiiigtotlie la.st,the gallant soldier singer fell, the soldier singer 

He hears the cry of " Victory! " and with his dying breath, [fell. 

He bids his comrades not to grieve for his, a soldier's death. 

•' Good bye," he cries, " Good-bye! I llvetl for those across the foam. 

For them I die! God bless them, boys, I've sung my last of homel "—Cho. 



The Words and Music of eiilMr of the above 
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DON'T WORRY DAD I ONLY A FADED RbSE 

*--^V-rl ^ Jl ▼ T V-r M'^m"^ A ^ M-^X ma.^' ■ copyright, ism, i-yA.lt, lUn»flel.i: BusltaheopyrlcbtMOured. 



FOR I AM COMING HOME 

Copyiigbl. ISM, bj A. M. Hanofleld. Entered at Stationers' Hall, London. 
By Win. 8. Eatren. 

In a crowded city street there stood an old gray-headed man, 

Confualon on his face was plainly seen. 
When starting off a few short steps he stops and looks around. 

As In his eyes the tears began to gleam; 
If I could only find her. In feeble voice he said. 

When 'round hlra then there stops the passers by. 
A girlish form push'd thro' the crowd, stepped to the old man's side, 

with arms around his neck, began to cry: 

Chorus. 
Don't worry, dad, for I am coming home, 

Your sad face tells me you have been alone. 
You've missed your darling Kate, 111 go back ere 'tis too late. 
Don't worry, dad, for I am coming home. 
Id a pretty country home strayed, free from guilt or guileful ways. 

Where naught but love across her young life fell. 
Till buddlTitf into womanhood the evil tempter came. 

She loved him not too wisely but too well; ' ' ' . 

One early morn she left them. It broke her mother's heart. 

Her father sought to find her in despair; 
When broken down from feebleness, the last hope nigh had flown. 
He heard his daughter's voice cry in his ear:— C'Ao>M«. 

IMY LITTLE PICKANINNY 

CopyrlKht, 18M, by A. M. Mani-ftflii. Eiiulixh onpyiiK>it Recured. 
Woidi and Music liy Will H Kpit. 
You'll hear de white folks tell about dere baby boy. 

Each say dere's is de finest in de laiid. 
But I'se a boy dat's Jus' as nice, he's my one joy, '. : 

He's black, but all do same he's just as grand. ' 

Each evening when my work is done I takes him on my knee. 

And sing for him a sweet rock-a-by. 
If that don't soothe him then I hugs him close to me. 

And sing for him dis little lullaby: 

Chorus. 
Loo, la Loo, my baby boy, now close yo' little eyes and go to sleep; 
■ r Daddy'l bring you some new toy, my little pickaninny sleep. 

A '-uti- and cunnin' little lad's dis boy of mine. 

His lips am sweet as honey on de comb. 
His eyes am brighter than ue stars do ever shine. 

And he's a ray of sunshine in our home. 
His daddy works de whole day long, then home does quickly come. 

To roll him 'roun' de floor in childish glee. 
And when he's tired out I takes him up and hum 

Dis lullaby, he nestles close to me.— thorn,. 



Copyrlirbt, MM, by A. M. Hausfleld. W'ui-ds l>y C. J. Hap|i. Music by J. B Cohen. 

Of all the girls in all the world there's but one girl for me. 
All call her sweet May Brady, for she's sweet as sweet can be. 
Whene'er the lads they try to win my sweetheart from my side, 
She smiles and gently tells them " nay," for she's my promised bride. 

Refrain. 

Sweet May Brady, my lady with heart so true. 

Eyes, so dancing and glancing, of deepest blue. 

Won't you name a day when we may marry, do! 

And money, I'll burn It, as fast as I earn It, sweet May, for you! 
Since from this precious little girl my happy fate I learned, 
I've saved my dimes and nickels, too, nor even pennies spurned. 
Until I now have quite enough to build a home for May, 
And Sunday next,while In the park,she'll nameour wedding day.— /?</■. 

EVERY DAY WILL BE SUNDAY 



C»pTriirbt, ISM, by A. M. Hangflelil. Eniilloh cnpyrlKht secured. 
Words and Mualc by Arthui- J. West and Cha«. Kohlnian. 

Last Sunday night with my sweetheart to a picnic I did go. 
All the boys from the neighborhood were also there you know. 
When the picnic was over, comln^r home all the boys did sing. 
To their sweethearts beside them this song in their ears would ring: 

Chorus. 

Ev'ry day will be Sunday by and by, 

We will both be happy, love, you and I, 

No one else will come between for your love to try, 

Ev'ry day will be Sunday by and by. 

'Most every boy has a sweetheart whom he dearly loves so well, 
Who takes her out ev'ry Sunday, and who always looks so swell. 
Then he asks her to marry, and gives her the engagement ring. 
When she speaks of the happy day, to her this song he will sing:— r^. 

THE FIRST TO CAST A STONE 



Copyrlciit, ISM. by A. M. Mansfield. Entered at 
Wores and Music by Ohai leu G 



Entered at ittationers' Hall, London. 
rahaiM. 



A Story from the Bible came to mind the other day. 

When I saw a crowd of people, as I homeward took my way. 

They gathered 'round a woman who was handsome, young and fair; 

I heard a man insult her, but she did not seem to care. 

TJiey say she was hia sweetheart. In the golden long ago. 

But In after years he'd parted from the girl who loved him so, 

Tho' he promised once to wed her, all his love to hate had grown. 

And I thought about the story of the first to cast a stone. 

Chorus. 
<Jk. Trusting in his word, believing he was true, . ; 

She became his sweetheart, tho' no one ever knew. 
Old friends pass her by. sorrow she has known. 
And he who should defend her, was the first to cast a stone. 

She stood within a doorway, and the scene I'll ne'er forget. 

In her eyes I saw forgiveness, you could see she loved him yet ■ : . o 

She mav have been a Magdalene, as I heard some one say, j "►' 

But some one has to answer for her on the judgment day. 

And when the mighty roll-call's over, when life's span Is past. 

He will find a retribution, for she loved him to the last. 

In the early years he wooed her. but she soon was left alone. 

And tho' helpless on the street, be was the first to cast a stone.— Cho. 



Copyrlgbt. ISM, by A. K. Manaflel.l. _ ^ 

Word* and Muaic by E. P. FaTor. 

An old man by the kitchen door sat reading one summer's day. 

While by his side, upon the floor, his nephew was at play. 

And as he slowly turned a page he heard a heavy sigh, ,' ; 

Forjfc"om the book, he qulcKly took a rose, all withered and dry, • 

*' Wnat Is the matter, uncle dear? what makes you look so sad? 

Have I done any wrong while here, please tell me if 1 have?" 

No, no, my chila. It is not you that makes me shed a tear. 

It is this rose, the thoughts of past, come, listen, the .story hear: 

'■I Refrain. 

• ' Tis only a faded rose, I know, to me, 'tis a precious gem. 
It takes me back to long ago, to j'ounger days again; 
I sought to win the hand of one, one I loved better than gold. 
But she was false, and all I have, is just this faded rose. . • 

It was the time when war broke out, said the old man to the lad, 

I to the front went, with a shout, the parting, too, was sad; , " 

Bhe gave me this rose, one* so fair, and with a look ot pain, . '" 

Said, take it, Ned, and we'll be wed, when you return again. 

The war was ended soon, my child, I came l«ick crowned with f:une; 

My heart was broken, I was wild, another her had claimed, 

That's why I'm single, live alone, no children at my knee. 

And just this rose is all I have, I hope she thinks of axe.—neft-aln. 

I'M LOOKING FOR A LOST ONE 

Copyright, 18M, by A. M. Hansfipld Knt'red at Stationers* Ball. Lon<li>n. 
Words and Muxic by W. S Estraii. 

To the prison gate there came one day an old gray-headed man. 
And asked permission that he might look o'er the prison clan. 
The warden kindly asked him what his mission there might lie, ^ 
Was he looking for a lost one, or just the sights to see? 
" My quest Is for a woman I've not seen for many j'ears, 
I've looked the wide world over," then his eyes filled up with tears, " 
The kindly warden's heart was touched - " in me will you confide? 
I'd like to hear your story," and the old man then replied: 

Chorus. 
" I'm looking for a lost one, whom I loved when but a boy, 
And just to see her face again would fill my heart with foy, 
'Tis many years since we have met, tho' time and ulace be strange, 
I'd know her if I met her, yes! I'd know her tho' sne's changed." 
The old man then proceeded with his story sadly told. 
For love of her in early youth lied hoarded up tils gold. 
To wed her in the village church had been his dream thro' life. 
And happy days he pictured when she became his wife. 
But his hopes were rudely broken by a note which simply read. 
" Good-bye, dear ones, don't grieve for me," and this is all it said: 
For anotner she had left us, and sorrow proved her fate. 
And then the old man rose and said while passing out the gate:— CAo. 

SAINT and SINNERS 

CopyrlKbt. IWH, by A. M Mamifleld. Entered al Statiunera' Hall. London. 
Words by Fred Brittun. Musie by Albert H. Mansfield. 

To a grand and stately church I sauntered Sunday morn at ten, • 

While the tiells atx)ve were chiming out their welrx)me to all men. 
When a poor, degraded, wietched-Tooking man, quite ill and worn, i 
Knelt beside me in that scene of luxury. • 

Down the aisle came straight an usher, pompous, dignified and stem, f 

To that poor old man who«e head was Dowed In prayer, » 

And he whispered harshly, " Go! this church is not for such as you," 

And this thought came to me as I lingered there: 

Chorus. 
Which was the sinner, and which was the saint? 

What would your answer be? 
The picture is one no beginner can paint, ' '''-. 

But an artist with fancy free. 
Is dame fortune whose smile places velvet on one. 
Whose frown turns the othei to tears, 
: ; Makes a saint of the sinner in splendor arrayed. 

But the other's sad tale seldom hears. 

Just outside the church I met the old man standlni; quite alone. 

And I spoke a word of friendly cheer in sympathetic tone. 

Then the story that he told now makes my indignation bum, 

'Twas the old one of a friend's duplicity. 

For In years gone by In business he'd been known successfully. 

But a scheming partner won his wealth away. 

Though he's under fortune's ban, his old partner was that man, . 

Who from church that morning ordered him away.— 6'Ao»'/#. 

DYE, DYE, MISTAH JACKSON 



Copyrlgbt. 18W, by A. M Hanxfleld. 
Words by Ed. Oardenier. 



, Luiidon. 



Entered at Siatiouers' Hall 
Music by Cbaa. Kublinan. 

I called at ma baby's house, 'twas on a Sunday night. 

When I peeked frew de windah pane, why I got an awful fright. 

I seen de wench what promised fo' ter marry me In June, 

She wuz spoonin' in de pariah wld a leinon-cullud coon. 

Den I got 'zasperated an' yanked de bell so hard 

Dat out come ma lady lub an' handed me a card. 

She slammed de doah right in ma face. It nearly. knocked me dead; 

I read de writin' on de card, an' dis Is what It said: 

Chorus. ;. 

Bye, bye, Mistah Jackson, I'se got annudder coon " 
Dat matches ma complexshun, I'se a high-class octoroon. 
Ob course it wouldn't matter if you 'd been a rauUatter, but as it Is you see. 
It's no use, cut loose! you're too black for me. 

'Twas mighty tantalizln' ter tink dat Hannah Brown 

She objected to ma cullah, and dPllb'rate frew me down 

Ma dandruff kep' a-rlsin', I wuz thirstln" fur de gore 

Ob dat low-down valler nigger, so I busted in de doah. - 

I wanted heaps of troubbel, was itchin' fur a fight, I 

I got it In a minute an' soon I wua a sight; " 

I landed in de guttah, as dey carted me away, 

De last ting I remembah wuz I heard Miss Hannah ssLj-.— Chonju. 

The Words and Music of either of the alwve 
songs will l>e mailed to any address, post-paid, on 
receipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copies, your 
selection, for ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHMAN, 

108 Park Row, New York. Catalogue of all our pul>UcatioM 

Fro* upon application. ; > 



1 




*TWAS in SEPTEMBER 

« ■ Cupyriirht. Itm. by WlndKor Muilc Co. Word* and Muslo by Oeo. C&nUie. 

:. 'Twas In Septeml)er, when leaves and flowers were falling. 
My love and 1 i>arted, parted for aye; 
^ Dark was that day. darker still my heart's forebodliifi^. 
But love, ever living, breath'd forth this lay: 

CHORrs. 
Farewell, dear heart, since we must parted be forevermore, 

My thonghts will turn to thee. 
Farewell, dear heart, farewell, dear love, 

1 love bnt thee, I love but thee. 
Ah, but when thou dreaniest, thou wilt dream of me. 

And when thou wakest thou wilt think of me. 
Farewell, my love, farewell, my love, farewell. 

When dreamint; thou wilt dream of me, 
Farewell, dear heart, farewell, farewell. 
Sprintf-time return.s, love, all hope ami life reviving, 

Eacn bird Is sinjring sweetly to his mate: 
Deep from each heart comes the thought of love's renewing. 
But mine, only mine, love, comes alftoo late.— C//on<». 

60 AND FIND YOUR SISTER, TOM 

• '»l>YiiK'>t. 1898. by CliarlesColfnian. 
WorU« l>y Ofoi'ito W. Cbuiice. Muaic by Charles Colenuui. 

A quiet country village In the far-off sunny South, 

A cottatfe holds within a shady dell. 
Where lived a maid with wavy hair, whose face was fair to see. 

The folks for miles around all loved her well. 
No ^^orrow ever seemed to mar the sun.shine of her life. 

Her smile was sweeter than the flowers of May. 
A stranger from the city came and lured her from her home, 

To brother Tom the mother then did aay: 

Kkfrain. 

Go and find your sister, Tom, and bring her back once more. 

Tell her that we've missed her as she ne'er was mlsi^ed before. 

Tell her that the roses bloom and birds sing Just as gay. 

Still honie dont seem the same to us since Bessie went away. 
He ft>und her in a citv strange, she had been cast away. 

Deserted by her huslKind, left to roam. 
Her thoughts were of the cottage still that stood down In the dell, 

or mother and the friends she'd left at home. 
He siiid to her, dear Bessie, I have come to bring you back. 

The past we'll think no more of, it is dead. 
Your pride it need not bar you, for your friends will love you still. 

So do come home for mother's .sake, who sskld:— lief txtin. 

Come Back to Your Mother, Madge 



Giifrllah oopyrUrht Mcnred. 
JanifBAlvlaFalineld. 



(.'oliTriKbt, 1897, t>y Nuiixiial Muaic Co. 
WorUs by SHiiiUfl I UhiiiuiiiI. MuhIc by , 

Friend Madge, your mother I have seen, I told her what you said; 

oii: if you could have with me l)een, and seen her bow her head. 

But wlien I said your health was poor, the tears ran down her face; 

The mother-love then banished, Madge, all thought of your disgrace; 

Vonr mother clasp'd me in her arms, and pressed me to her breast; 

To me who ne'er had mother known. It was a place of rest. 

I heard your mother pray to Oo<l, to ease your heart of pain, 

To turn you from your worldly ways and bring you home again. 

Refrain. 
Then come back to your mother, Madge, her dear heart pines for you. 
Oh! come and nestle In her arm.s. Just as you used to do. 
No love you'll rind like mother-love, no matter where j'ou roam, 
And,Madi;e.till you reach heaven above, you'll find no place like home 

Anu. Madge, the wild rose is in blixjm you planted by the door; 

Ive plucked a spray to send to you, that you may think of yore. 

Your mother's hearf.s ni«ih broken, Madge, her health Is failing fast; 

I heard the doctor say last night, not long was she to last. 

I trust these lines yoiir heart nmy touch, and ope love's fountain wide; 

And cause you to forsjike your ways ere sorrow may betide. 

Then come back to your childhood home; this, Madge, I bet! you'll do; 

Forgiven freely you will be, and joy will follow you— l>'efraiu. 

oh, Madge, yon can't guess who I met; 'twas j'our old lover, Ned; 

And when I told him you I'd seen, ho. with emotion, said: 

" Lou, If you ever write to Madge, just say I love her .still," 

When 1 ask'd him if he'd forgive, he answered, "yes, I will— 

For it was Madge who lit the flame which burns within my heart; 

1 don't care what the world mitjht say, I'll always take her part." 

And Ned said, vou he'd gladly wed; I'm sure he meant It, too, 

My letter to a close I'll bring, God bless you— your friend, Lon.—Rif. 

AMERICA'S PICKANINNY TWINS 

C-'pyrlKlit, 1898, by Jtio. I.. Miilrov. Woidxund Music by Jno. L. Molrojr. 

Down yondali, in the sutfUn oart of Oawnia, 

Whar de cotton an' de sugar cane does grow; 
Tha' was bawned a pair of little pickaninnies. 

And it's lest Njut sl.v or seven yeahs ago. 

.•^poAv/i— Yes, it is. .j;,*^. 

Tha' wa.s twenty-seven niKgahs in the family. 

Every one was named from Jeffeson to Jo, 
Then to name the kids ole niammv tried so mightily. 

But at la.st she said. I'll have to let It go. 
Spoken— Po' mammy! 
Not long ago she had a mighty gatherin', 
Massa .Johnson, Cook and Jackson all cum In. 
Then without a-half a-tryin". Mars' Jackson says. Aunt Dine, 
Wes a gwine to name the pickannmy twins. 

CHORia. 

Mars' Johnson named me Dewey, Mars' Jackson called me Miles, 
With white folks we je.st kills itw ith our new American styles; 
We're not like common niergahs, we weahs de swellest things. 
We're the Suthin bredded, fuzzy-headed, pickaninny twins, 

We's runned awav from home to ko a-travelln'. 

Were a gwlne to visit all the biggest towns; 
We will mimtle in the swellest ot society. 

And we'll have the b!ak fo' hundred show us 'round. 
.S>»Xy»i— 'Deed we will 
Now we's lookln' for two culleil gals of "bllities 

To walk fo' cakes an' cut de pigeon wins:; 
We will ovahlot>k their .sassafras proclivities. 

But for style they'll have to be tiie propah thing. 
Spok*»—iso lie. honey: 
Thar's gwlne to be a passemla this evenin'. 

An', of course, these kids am arwlne to take It in. 
All the coons will take a Ht, well make an awful hit, 

AS the patriotic pickamnny twins —r/»or'<«. 



'*■ 






BEFORE THE MAINE WENT DOWN 

OopyrlKbt. 189S, l>y (Miarlen Coleman. 
Word! by AuKUata Howe Cliaiiibeni. Muxlc by Cliarlea CulMBMl. 
The stars In heaven's blue flag of state shone oer Havana Bay, 
Where all, unwarned by treach'rous fate, our mighty cruiser lay. 
And maity sailors dreamed that night of fame and war's renown. 
Of laurels won where heroes flght before the Maine went down. 

Chorus. 
Before the Maine went down, mothers and matrons and sweethearta. 
In hamlet & village & town, prayed for and wrote to their darlings. 
Before the Maine went down, lettei-s came hack from the laddies 
Love-laden, home, swift o'er the foam, l)efore the Maine went down. 
In many homes each absent face shone In the flre-llght's gleam. 
Or crossed to seek Its vacant place, the threshold of some dream. 
But now a nation mourns their loss, brave heurts no fear could drowc. 
They died to save their country's cause, the night the Maine went down. 

— Chor»$. 

THE QUEEN OF MULBERRY BEND 

Copyrltcht. 1898, by A. M. liaiiaflcltl. Words and Music by W. Learey. 

There is a charming little girl the nelghlwrs all adore, 
A falr-halred little beauty, with lovers by the score. 
But I'm the one most favored, and on that you can depend. 
That the sweetest little girl of all is the Queen of Mulberry Bend. 

Chorus. 
Sweet little Katie Mahoney, she's not too proud or too toney, 
A queen In her set. Is my dear little pet, my sweet little Katie Mahoney, 
Fair as the fairest of flowers, many are the happy hours . [Bend. 
Together we'd spend, to wed her I Intend, my queen down in Mulberry 

We stroll out ev'ry evening to the pretty park, close by, . 

And listen to the music while the hours swiftly fly, . I 

The sweetest music to me was my own Katie's consent. 
For me to name the happy day of that important event.— CAo»-u«. 



1 



\ 




My Orange-Colored Yaller Gal 

Coi>yiiKbt, 1898, by Bjilclniore Uuaic Cu. Wurda and Music by Samuel I^pta. 

Dar am a gal in dis yer town who ma heart am yearning for. 

She am de only one I el)er lubb'd; 
She am a trifle shady, a real warm baby, —' 

I could eat her, yes I could; 
She am big and fat and sh(X)ts crap, you cant fool her on any game 

At the cake-walk she's de lielle; 
Dar's not a coon In town dat could Mallnda down, 
Hy orange-colored yaller gal. 

Chorus. 
Mallnda, will yon be mine, is what Tm gwine to say; 
If you'll only say de word your board I will pay; 
I drinks gin by de gallon, I likes ma watermelon. 

But I lubs ya best of all. my honey, 
I'll chop de wood and I will tote ya up de coal; 
I'll build yer de flres and de dinners I will boll; 

I'll gib yer all my money, won't yer be my honey. 
My orange-colored yaller gal. 

I'call'd on her de odder night a-feelln' kinder 'splclous. 

For I'se a very Jealous coon; 
Found my anticipation widout de least foundation, 

I guess I was too soon. 
She e am de sweetest and de neatest, she'm a red-bot member; 

She done sot my brain In a whirl. 
I want yer all to Know I'm gwine to propose ; 

To ma-a red-hot orange-colored yalier gal.— CAo»-M». \ 

AFTER THE WAR 

Copyrifrht, 18M, by Carl Ftscber. 
WoftU by Marlon ToniiK. Music by lllcliard Stahl. 

A widowed mother stands beside her dear and only son. 
The call "To armsl " has sounded loud and like a knell has rung 
Within the mother's anguished heart, for soon her boy must go. 
And by his shio's nun take his stand against the treacherous foe. 
With words of hope and comfort he strives her heart to cheer. 
Then, kissing her. he bravely cries, " Dear mother, have no feari " 
Your sailor boy will soon return, the battle's cry be o'er. 
With glory weUl come sailing home after the war. 

Chorus 
After the war Is over some hearts will throb with pain. 
Others with joy and gladness to meet loved ones again; 
Our heroes will live forever, their deeds are known afar, 
Ev'ry tongue sounds their praises after the war 

He takes his place on board the ship, all eager for the fray. 

Into the thunderous combat then they sail at break of day. 

The boatswain's whistle sounds th« call. "Clear ship for action! " 's beard; 

The boy steps bravely to hla gun and no one speaks a word. 

But calmly ne stands waiting for the brief and quick command. 

His only thought Is but to flght for his dear native land. 

He hears his mother's nightly prayer amidst the cannons' roar, 

" God bring him safely back to me " after the war.— Chonif. 

Life's tide Is ebbing fast away, death claims the widow's son. 

His comrades 'round hliu silent pray and cite his brave deed done. 

How, with a shattered, bleeding arm he nobly kept his stand. 

And when the foe rushed madly on had fouRnt them hand to band. 

And when one tore his country's flag down from the tall mast head. 

He'd stagirered o'er the blood-stalnea deck and struck the miscreant dead! 

That honored flag unstained and pure shall float forevermore 

In triumph o'er that hero's head after the war. . 

Chorus. ■ " . v .' 

After the war is over and battle-callts done, *'..»-. ;. .. 

Our heroes are returning with honor nobly won, ' '^ 

In freedom's cause their blood was shed, and the flag tliey adore 
Shall wave in triumph forever after the war. 

The Words and Music of either of the aiiove 
songs will be mailed to any address, post-paid, on 
receipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copies, your 
selection, for ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHMAN, 

108 Park Row, New York. Catalogue of all our publications naiM 

Free upon application. 



'*" 




/ 



MY HaUTIFUL IRISH WIO 

Copjrlgbt, UM, by T. B. Harma A Co. Ensliah copy riKht secured. 

— All riKhta reaerrrd. ■-..". ••-.'.. 

Words And Music by Ctiauncey Olcott. •"'"■.■' ;^- x 
We stAnd together, you and I, where we stood years ago, . ; '. 

Beneath the same blue Irish sky, our hearts with joy aglow, 
You promised, then, you would be mine. In all your charms arrayed. 
I'm here to claim you for my own, my pretty Irish maid. 

Chorus. 
Oh, my love, how I've waited and longed for you, dear; 

Time has not changed you, your beauty will never fade; 
I'm here to claim, love, your promise of long, long ago; 
You are to me, my own, my beautiful Irish maid. 
1 know the love you gave me then Is Just as fond and true, > 
Those eyes of yours speak hope again, sweet eyes of Irish blue. ? 

I know you'll keep your promise, love, tho' stars above may fade; 
Tliro' Htorm and shine I've come to you, my pretty Irish insLid.— Cho. 



r- 



Oopyrigbt, 1(86, by T. B. Harms A Oo. Eiigllsh copyright seenrvd. 

All riichta rewr^ed. 

Words by IlaKb Morton. UasIc by OustAve Kerker. 

My Molly has a naughty smile, ' '. 

My Molly is not free from guile; '" 

She keeps me on a string, ' . - 

And is always on the wing. 

Dancing 'round with other fellows all Jibe while. - . > <; 

Oh, Molly, with the ej'es of blue, •■'•: 

Now won't you l)e a good glrlf dol 

Tell the boys to go away, , . ■ 

Send them off and make them stay, < ~ ' 

And, Molly, I'll be true. 

I swear I will, to you. ■ - . 

Oh, Mollj', Molly, you dainty little dolly, . 

Doii't you ever stoop to folly. 

For to me you are divine. 
Molly, Molly, don't you ever let them Jolly you; 

My Molly, don't you ever slip your trolley, Molly mine. 

Chorus. : 

Molly, Molly, you dainty little dolly; 
Don't you ever stoop to folly. 

For to me you are divine. 1. ' 

Molly, Molly, don't you ever let them Jolly you; 

My Molly, don't you ever slip your trolley, Molly mine. 

I haven't got a Joy in life 

Since Molly will not be my wife; 

1 cannot sleep at night. - 

And I feel like getting tight; 

Oh, her cruelty it cuts me like a knife. 

Dear Moll.v, won't you love me? dol 

I'll stick to you my whole life through. 

Won't you not be quite so gay? 

Send those other " chaps " away. 

And, Molly, I'll be true. 

I swear I will, to you. 

Oh. Molly, Molly, you dainty little dolly. 

Don't you ever stoop to folly, , - . - 

For to me you are divine. 
Molly. Molly, don't you ever let them Jolly you; 

My Molly, don't you ever slip your trolley, Molly mine.— CTiorun. 

BETTER THAN COLD 

Copyright, 1896. by Charles K. Harris. All rights reserved. 
Words and Music by Charles K. Harris. 

In a Pullman palace smoker sat a numl)er of bright men. 

You could tell that they were drummers, nothing seemed to trouble them. 

When up spoke a handsome fellow, "Come, let's have a story, boys. 

Something that will help to pass the time away." 

"I will ten you how we'll manage,' said a bright knight of the grip, 

" Let us have three wishes something good and true; 
We will give friend Bob the llrst chance, he's the oldest gathered here "— 

Then they listened to a wish that's always new: 

/ " .. Chorus. ; ■, • 

. "Just to be a child again at mother's knee. 
Just to hear her sing the same old melody. 
Just to hear her speak in loving sympathy. 
Just to kiss her lips again, 
- Just to have her fondle me with tender care, ;. ' 

Just to feel her dear, soft Angers through my hair, : ' 
: There is no wish in this world that can compare, 
Just to be a child at mother's knee." 

There they sat, those jolly drummers, not a sound that moment heard. 
While their tears were slowly falling, there was no man spoke a word. 
For the memories of their cliildhood days had touched their dear kind 
When, as children, they had played at mother's knee. [hearts. 

Then at last the spell wa*" broken by another traveling man, 

"Your attention for a moment I do crave; 
I will tell vou of one precious thing, 80 tlear to one and all, 

'TlB a wish we long for to the very grave: 

V..V ■ Chorus. ■,■■■■' . •' ' 

. " / Just enough of gold to keep me all my days, 

> '1^^ Just enough with which some starving soul to save, • f ~ 

Just enough I wish to help me on my way, 
■<{ . Just enough to happy be, V~.. • 

. • Just enough to know I'll ne'er be poor again 
Just enough to drive away all sorrow's pain, 
■■';•: You may wish for many tilings, but all In vain, •' . 
Give to me what precious gold can buy." 

The conductor, passing through the train, stopped in the smoking-car; 

He had grown quite interested In the stories told so far— 

"Please excuse my interruption, but I listened with delight 

To your wishes, both of them so good and true; 

Yet there is a wish that's dearer, better far than glittering gold, 

Tlk>ugh a simple one perhaps you all will say, 
"TlB a longing that is in my heart eaci -moment of my life, 

'Tlfl a gleam of sunshine strewn acr 3 my way: 

^ ... -. Chorus. , ... 

,■',.... Just to open wide my little cottage door. 

Just to see ray baby rolling on the floor. 

Just to feel that I have something to adore, . . . . c ..- . ; ' .* -'i 

Just to be at home again, ■'■.■.-'■.■' :'^ ■■■'.' 

Just to hear a sweet voice calling papa dear, ".■-.-:'•'. 

Just to know my darling wife is standing near; '' ?.'■ ;y . 

You may have your gold your lonelv heart to cheer, '*', 

But mtakemy baby, wife and home." 



OLGOn'S IRISH SERENADE 

Copyright, UM, by T. B. Barms A Co. Euglish copyright sarored. 

..•-..■.•'■' All rights rcaerTed. 

."•■' ' ''■■ Word* and M'isic l.y Chaunoey Olcott 

:' Katy, my darling, alone I am waiting, / > :■ .> 

■. Waiting and watching alone by the stile, '" ' '" >. 

Why keep me here, while my heart Is Inside, dear? .- .• 
' So open your door, love, and give me your smile. 

You promised you'd meet me at eight, by the stile, dear, r- '. 

Where are you now, when your lover Is here* 
Oh. come to me quickly, my heart it is yearning, 
^ Yearning and waiting for you, Katy dear. . - . . 

• Ah, never fear, you'll be safe In my keeping, ■; 

I will guard o'er you, asleep or awake, 
Nothing can harm you while my love's around you; 

I'd lay down my life, Katy, for your dear .sake. 
As true as the stars keeping watch thro' the long itlght. 

Such will my faithful watch constantly l>e: 
To cheer you, to guide you O'er life's stormy ocean 
■ , Give me but that lot, and Joy waits for me. 

Let Me Take My Place at Home Again 

Copyright, MDCCCXCVI by Henry J. Wehman. 
Words and Music by Cliaa v. Long. 

In a cozy little cottage sat a couple old and gray, 

A Are in the hearth was burning bright, 
There a letter they were reading from their son who went astray; 

He left them on one cold and winfrv night: 
His companions, whom were evil, had him forge his father's name; 

The parent, in his anger, wished him dead; 
But the son had since repented, and this letter home had com«, 
. And to his wife these words the old man read: 

Chorus. ,x 

Let me take my place at home again. ► 

Back among the dearest friends of all. 
Back to mother's dear caress, and your old age I will bless. 
Then let me take my place at home again. 

Now the old man would not listen to the pleadings of his boy. 

The dear old mother's health soon gave away. 
For her heart was sadly pining for her son, her only Joy, 

Who left them In both sorrow and dismay; 
One night as they were sitting by their cozy fireside. 

The son was brought in pale and 111 from need. 
Then the father he forgave him, and with joy the mother cried, 

And now my lad no longer has to plead:— cA(/ru<. 



KATY MAHONE 

Copyright, ISM, by T. B. Harms & Co. English copyright vecured. 

All rights reserved. 

Words and Music by Chauncey Oicott 

In that little brown cottage that stands over there 

Dwells my sweet Kitty Mahone; 
With her beautiful nature and soul full of love. 

Oh, she has my heart alone. 
If ever you met her, oh, then you'd not blame me 

For loving her as I do. 
For who, in this world, has ever been known 

To resist love that's tender and true. 

Refrain. 
Oh, Katy Mahone, I'm yours alone; 

Why keep me waiting for you* 
Give me your heart, as well as your liand. 

And I'll keep it safe for you, Katy. 

Now, time may change all things, but never my heart. 

It will remain the same. 
And be not like the beautiful snow when it falls. 

To go with the very first rain. 
But more like the beautiful ivy that creeps. 

As around the old ruin It springs: • - 

Time cannot efface it, or lessen its love, ■ ' 

For the older the closer it clings.— /wrain. 



s^*^-^'' 



Copyright, 1881, by T. B. Harms A Co. Entered at SUtioners* Hall, London, Eng. 

All rights rewrved. 
Words by Hartley Campbell. Music by Wm. J. Scatilan. 
Oh, sweet are the flowers that bloom in dear Kerry, 
And pure are the waters that ki.ss her dear shore. 
But sweeter and purer— oh, yes. and more merry. 
Is the girl of my heart, my own Deellsh Asthore. 
Mavoumeen, my darling, are you thinking about me 

As I roam this world over a stranger to all? 
Whatever befall me, oh, Deelish. don't doubt me, 
. And some day, Mavourneen, I'll come at thy call. 

. - Chorcs. 

Mavourneen, my darling, are j-ou thinking about me 
- . As I roam this world over a Stranger to all? 

Whatever befall me. oh, Deellsh, don't doubt me. 
And some day, Mavourneen, I'll come at thy call. ' j^ 

- The days are so long, and the nights have no ending. 
Since I left thee and Erin, the land of my birth. 
Where the seas and the skies they forever are blending. 
And embracing the dearest green spot on earth. 
. . If I were to die in the midst of the ocean, 

/ And my body. Mavourneen. cast into the sea, 
■ .' Where'er you might be, sure I have a notion 

'Twould float back, my darling, to Erin and thee.— C/iarui. 



The Words and Music of either of the Bbow 
songs will be mailed to any address, post-paid, on 
receipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copies, your 
selection, for ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHMAfK, 

108 Park Row, New York. Catalogue of all our pubiieatioat naiM 

Frae upon application. \ A ' 




'TWAS IN SEPTEMBER 

• ' Cupyriirht. 1898. by WindNor Music Co. Worda and Muaia b; Q«o. CuitUa. 

' 'T was in September, when leaves and flowers were falling. 

My love unrt I iwirted, parted for aye; 
■ Dark was that da.y, darker still my heart's foreboding. 
But love, ever living, breath'd forth this lay: 

CHORfS. 

Farewell, dear heart, since we must parted be forevermore, 
■ • My thoughts will turn to thee, 

■ Farewell, ae.ir heart, farewell, dear love, 

1 love but thee, I love but thee, 
Ah, but when thou dreaniest, thou wilt dream of me. 

And when thou wakeHt thou wilt think of me. 
Farewell, my love, farewell, my love, farewell, 

Wlien dreuinin^ thou will dream of nic, 
Farewell, dear heart, farewell, farewell. 

Spring-time returns, love, all hope and life reviving, 

Each bird is singing .sweetly to his mate: 
Deep from each heart comes the thought of love's renewing. 

But mine, only mine, love, comes alTtoo late.— C/'0»-f/». 

60 AND FIND YOUR SISTER, TOM 

• '<>l>vili(lit, 18M, by CiiarlesCnlenian. 
WorUn l>y (Irui'ico W. Chance. Munic by Cbai lea Colenukii. 

A quiet country village In the far-off sunny South, 

A cottage holds within a shady dell, 
Where lived a maid with wavy hair, whose face was fair to see. 

The folks for miles around all loved her well. 
No sorrow ever seemed to mar the sunshine of her life. 

Her smile was sweeter than the flowers of May. 
A stranger from the city came and lured her from her home. 

To brother Tom the mother then did say: 

Kekrai.v. 

Go and find your sister, Tom, and bring her back once more. 

Tell her that we've missed her as she ne'er was ml8.sed before. 

Tell her that the roses bloom and birds sing Just as gay. 

Still home dont .seem the same to us since Bessie went away. 

He found her in a dt.v strange, she had been cast away. 

Deserted by her husband, left to roam. 
Her thoughts were of the cottage still that stood down In the dell, 

or mother and the friends she'd left at home. 
He Siild to her, dear Be.ssie, I have come to bring you back. 

The past we'll think no more of, it is dead. 
Your pride it need not bar you, for your friends will love you still, 

So do come home for mother's sake, who said:— //«/»atn. 

Gome Back to Your Mother, Madge 

('<>|iifri({»>t, 1897, by Nuiioiial Muaic Co. EiiKliah ""opyrieht necnred. 
Word!* by Sitiiiiii'l I OHiiiuiid MuhIc by Jamt-s Alvlit Pali Held. 

Friend Madge, your mother I have seen, 1 told her what you said; 

uii: if you could have with me l)een, and .seen her lx)w her head. 

But wlien I said your health was j)oor, the tears ran down her face; 

Tlie mother-love then banished, Aiadge, all thought of your disgrace; 

Your mother clasp'd me in her arms, and pressed me to her breast; 

To me who ne'er had mother known. It was a place of rest. 

1 lieard your motlier pray to Gotl, to ease your heart of pain. 

To turn you from your worldly ways and bring you home again. 

Rkfrain. 
Then come back to your mother, Madge, her dear heart pines for you. 
Oh! come and nestle In her arm.s, just as you used to do. 
No love youll rind like mother-love, no matter where you roam, 
And,.Madge,tillyou reach heaven above, you'll And no place like home 

And. Madge, the wild rose is In bloom you planted by the door; 

I've plucked a spray to send to you, that you may think of yore. 

Your mother's heart's nigh t)roKen. Madge, her health is failing fast; 

1 heard the doctor say last night, not long was she to last. 

I tru.st these lines your lieart may touch, and ope love's fountain wide; 

And cause you to forsake your ways ere sorrow may betide. 

Then come back to your childhood home; this, Madge, I beg you'll do; 

Forgiven freely you will be, and joy will follow you.—l.'ef'raiu. 

oh, Madge, you can't guess who I met; 'twas your old lover, Ned; 
And when I told him you I'd seen, ho, with emotion, said: 
'• Lou, if you ever write to Madtfe, just say I love her still," 
When I ask'd him if he'd forgive, he answered, "yes, 1 will— 
For it was Madge who lit the flame which burns within my heart; 
I don't care what the world mlu'ht say, I'll always take her part." 
And Ned said, you he'd gladly wed; I'm sure he meant It, too. 
My letter to a clo.se I'll bring, God bless you— your friend, Lou.— /?</■. 

AMERICA'S PICKANINNY TWINS 

C.pyrlnht. 1898, by Jiio. I.. Mnlior. Wo'dnund Music by Jno. L. Mttlroy. 

Down yoiulah, in the suthin oart of Gawgia, 

Whar de cotton an' de sugar cane dcH's grow; 
Tha' was bawiied a pair of little pickaninnies. 

And it's jest ■tM)ut six or seven yeahs ago. 

.SijoAvH— Yes, it is, .»i^' 

Tha' was twenty-seven niggahs in the family. 

Every one was named from Jeffeson to Jo, ' 

Then to name the kids ole mammy tried so mightily. 

But at last she said. I'll have to let It go. 
Sptiken—Pd' mammy! 
Not long ago she had a mighty gatherin', 
Massa .fohnson. Cook and Jackson all cum In. 
Then without a-half a tryin'. Mars' Jackson says. Aunt Dine, 
Wes a gwine to name the pickaninny twins. 

C'HORia. 

Mars' Johnson named me Dewey, Mars' Jackson called me Miles, 
With white folks we jest kills it with our new American styles; 
We're not like common niggahs, we weahs de swellest things. 
We're the Suthin bredded, fuzzy-headed, pickaninny twins. 

Wes runned awav from home to go a-travelln'. 

We're a-gwine to visit all the biggest towns; 
We will miiujle in the swellest o( society. 

And we'll have the biak fo' hundred show us 'round. 

.^/*'>(y». --'Deed we will. 

Now we's lookin' for two culled gals of 'Mlitles 

To walk fo' cakes an' cut de pigeon wing: 
We will ovahlook their sa.ssafras proclivities. 
But for style they'll have to be the propah thing. •• 

.S/^oAvw— No lie. honev: 
Thar's gwine to be a passemla this evenin'. 

An', of coiirse. these kids am Kwine to take It in. 
All the coons will take a tit, well make an awful hit, 
•^ AS the patriotic plckamnny twins— r/«rtr'/». 



BEFORE THE MAINE WENT DOWN 

Copyriifbt. 1M8, by Cbarlea Cnleiiian. 
Word! by Auicuata Muwe Cliaiiibeni. Munlc by Cliarlea CtitowwB. 

The Stars in heaven's blue flag of state shone o'er Havana Bay, 
Where all, unwarned by treach'rous fate, our mighty cruiser lay. 
And many sailors dreamed that night of fame and war's renown. 
Of laurels won where heroes flght before the Maine went down. 

Chorus. 
Before the Maine went down, mothers and matrons and sweethearts, 
in hamlet & village & town, prayed for and wrote to their darlings. 
Before the Maine went down, lettein came l>ack from the laddies 
Love-laden, home, swift o'er the foam, before the Maine went down. 

In many homes each absent face shone In the Are light's gleam. 
Or crossed to seek Its vacant place, the threshold of some dream. 
But now a nation mourns their loss, brave hearts no fear could drown. 
They died to save their country's cause, the night the Maine went down. 

— Chorut. 

THE QUEEN OF MULBERRY BEND 

CopyrlKht. IMM, by A. M. liaiiafleld. Worda and Uuaic by W. Lmtvj. 

There is a charming little girl the neighbors all adore, 
A fair-haired little beauty, with lovers by the score. 
But I'm the one most favored, and on that you can depend, ' 
That the sweetest little girl of all is the Queen of Mulberry Bend. _ 

Chorus. 
Sweet little Katie Mahoney, she's not too proud or too toney, 
A queen in her set. Is my uear little pet, my sweet little Katie Mahoney. ' 
Fair as the fairest of flowers, many are the happy hours , [Bend. 
Together we'd spend, to wed her I Intend, my queen down In Mulberry 
We stroll out ev'ry evening to the pretty park, close by, , 

And listen to the music while the hours swiftly fly, 1 

The sweetest music to me was my own Katie's consent. 
For lue to name the happy day of that important event.— CAot-i/*. 

My Orange-Colored Yaller Gal 

Copyright, 1898, by Baltimore Muaic Co. Words and Hualc by Samoel Lapln. 

Dar am a gal in dis yer town who ma heart am yearning for. 

She am de only one I eber lubb'd; 
She am a trifle shady, a real warm baby, "^ ; 

I could eat her, yes I could; 
She am big and fat and shoots crap, you cant fool ber on any game; 

At the cake-walk she's de l)elle; 
Dar's not a coon in t^>wn dat could Malinda down, -, - 
My orange-colored yaller gal. 

Chorus. 
Malinda, will yon be mine. Is what I'm gwine to aay; 
If you'll only say de word your l)oard I will pay; 
I drinks gin by ae gallon, I likes ma watermeloti. 

But I lubs ya l)est of all. my honey, 
I'll chop de wood and I will tote ya up de coal; 
I'll build yer de flres and de dinners I will boil: 

I'll gib yer all my money, won't yer be my honey. 
My orange-colored yaller gal. 

Ifcall'd on her de odder night a-feelln' kinder 'splcious. 

For I'se a very jealous coon; 
Found my anticipation wldout de least foundation, ■ 

I guess I was too soon. 
She e am de sweetest and de neatest, she'm a red-hot member; 

She done sot my brain In a whirl. 
I want yer all to know I'm gwine to propose 

To ma-a red-hot orange colored yaller gal.— CAo»-M#. 



I" 






AFTER THE WAR 

Copyiiffbt, 1898, by Carl Finober. 
Wonta by Marion Toung. Muaic by Kloliaxd SCabl. ' '' 

A Widowed mother stands beside her dear and only son. 
The call "To arinsl " has sounded loud and like a Knell has rung 
Within the mother's anguished heart, for soon her l)oy must go, 
And by his shio's sun take his stand against the treacherous foe. 
With words of hope and comfort he strives her heart to cheer, 
Then, kissing her, he bravely cries, " Dear mother, have no feari " 
Your sailor boy will soon return, the battle's cry be o'er. 
With glory we 11 come sailing home after the war. 

CHORCS 

After the war Is over some hearts will throb with pain. 
Others with joy and gladness to meet loved ones again; 
Our heroes will live forever, their deeds are known afar, 
Ev'ry tongue sounds their praises after the war 

He takes his place on board the ship, all eager for the fray. 

Into the thunderous combat then they sail at break of day. 

The boatswain's whistle sounds the call. "Clear ship for action! " '8 beard; 

The boy steps bravely to his gun and no one speaks a word. 

But calmly ne stands waiting for the brief and quick command. 

His only thought Is but to flght for his dear native land. 

He hears his mother's nightly prayer amidst the cannons' roar, 

" God bring hlra safely back to me " after the war.— Chonu. 

Life's tide is ebbing fast away, death claims the widow's son. 
His comrades 'round him silent pray and cite his brave deed done. 
How, with a shattered, bleeding arm he nobly kept his stand. * 

And when the foe rushed madly on had fought them hand to band. 
And when one tore his country's flag down from the tall mast-head. '■ 
He'd staggered o'er the blood-stained deck and struck the miscreant deai^ 
That honored flag unstaine<l and pure shall float forevermore 
In triumph o'er that hero's head after the war. 

Chorus. 
After the war is over and battle-call Is done. 
Our heroes are returning with honor nobly won. 
In freedom's cause their blood was shed, and the flag they adore 
Shall wave in triumph forever after the war. 

The Words and Music of either of th* altovo 
songs will be mailed to any address, post-paid, o« 
receipt of 30 Cents per copy, or 4 copies, your 
selection, (or ONE DOLLAR, by H. J. WEHMAN, 

108 Park Row, New York. Cataioflue of all our publications nmIM 

Froo upon application. 



■>-. 
t 



"-.ri.i:- 




^ MY BEAUTIFUL IRISH MAID 

CopjHgbt, MM, by T. B. Hamu A Co. EnslUh copyriKbt secured. 

All riKhta naerrnl. 

Words and Huaic bj Cliauncey Olcott 

We Stand together, you and I, where we stood years ago. 
Beneath the same blue Irish sky, our hearts with joy aglow. 
You promised, then, you would be mine, in all your charms arrayed. 
I'm here to claim you for my own, my pretty Irish maid. 

Chorus. 
Oh, my love, how I've waited and longed for you, dear; 

Time has not changed you, your beauty will never fade; . 
I'm here to claim, love, your promise of long, long ago; . 

You are to me, my own, my beautiful Irish maid. 

I know the love you gave me then Is Just as fond and true. 
Those eyes of yours speak hope again, sweet eyes of Irish blue. 
I know you'll keep your promise, love, tho' stars above may fade; 
Tliro' storm and shine I've come to you, my pretty Irish maid.— 6'*o. 



: Copyrigbt, ISM, by T. B. Harma ft Oo. English copyright secured. 
• ' All rlKbta reserved. , ' ,' 

..< Words by IIUKb Morton. Uuslc by Oustave Kerker. 

My Molly has a naughty smile. 

My Molly Is not free from guile; '^■', 

She keeps me on a string. 

And is always on the wing, ; 

Dancing 'round with other fellows all ^e while. 1 ; -i 

Oh, Molly, with the eyes of blue. 

Now won't j'ou be a good girlf do! 

Tell the boys to go away. 

Bend them off and make them stay. 

And, Molly, I'll be true. 

1 swear I will, to J'OU. 

Oh, Mollj', Molly, you dainty little dolly. 

Don't you ever stoop to folly, 

For to me you are divine. 
Molly, Molly, don't you ever let them Jolly you; 

My Molly, don't you ever slip your trolley, Molly mine. 

Chorus. 
Molly, Molly, you dainty little dolly; — : 

Don't you ever stoop to folly, r - 

For to me you are divine. 
""*' t Molly, Molly, don't you ever let them Jolly you; 

--— , My Molly, don't you ever slip your trolley, Molly mine. 
I haven't got a Joy In life .. . . 

Since Molly will not be my wife; . \ 

I cannot sleep at night. ."■.-•; 

And I feel like getting tight; ' ;>. 

Oh, her cruelty it cuts me like a knife. 
Dear Molly, won't you love me? do 1 
I'll stick to you my whole life through. 
Won't you not be quite so gay? 
Send those other " chaps " away. 
And, Molly, I'll be true, 
I swear I win, to you. 
Oh. Molly, Molly, you dainty little dolly. 
Don't you ever stoop to folly. 

For to me you are divine. 
Molly. Molly, don't you ever let them Jolly you; 
My Molly, don't you ever slip your trolley, Molly mine.— Chon(f. 

BETTER THAN COLD 

, .r. Copyrlgrbt, 1896. by Charles K. Harris. All lifrhta reserred. ; ., 

•'■'■' Words and Music by Charles K. Harris. 

In a Pullman palace smoker sat a number of bright men. 

You could tell that they were drummers, nothing seemed to trouble tbem. 

When up spoke a handsome fellow, " Come, let's have a story, boys. 

Something that will help to pass the time away." 

'■ I will ten you how we'll manage," said a bright knight of the grip, 

" Let us have three wishes something good and true; 
We will give friend Bob the first chance, he's the oldest gathered here "— 
Then they listened to a wish that's always new: 

CHORrs. 
■ "Just to be a child again at mother's knee, 
Just to hear her sing the same old melody, 
, . ; Just to hear her speak in loving sympathy. 

Just to kiss her lips again, 
i_ Just to have her rondle me with tender care. 

Just to feel her dear, soft fingers through my hair, '; 

:, '':' There is no wish in this world that can compare, 
. Just to be a child at mother's knee." 
There they sat, those jolly drummers, not a sound that moment heard. 
While their tears were slowly falling, there was no man spoke a word. 
For the memories of their childhood days had touched their dear kind 
W^lien, as children, they had played at mothers knee. [hearts. 

Then at last the spell was broken by another traveling man, 

" Your attention for a moment I do crave; 
I will tell you of one precious thing, so tlear to one and all, 
'Tls a wish we long for to the very grave: 

Chorus. i .. ■■ 

Just enough of gold to keep me all my days, 
: ,:l!:_' . Just enough with which some Starving soul to save, ■" 
'; Just enough I wish to help me on my way, , . "^ 

^, . Just enough to happy be, .' __^ 

:■;•.. Just enough to know I'll ne'er be poor again 
-.:' ■ Just enough to drive away all sorrows pain, • '. 

You may wish for many things, but all in vain. 
Give to me what precious gold can buy." 

The conductor, passing through the train, stopped In the smoking-car; 
He had grown quite Interested in the stories told so far— 
"Please excuse my Interruption, but I listened with delight 
To your wishes, both of them so good and true: 

Yet there is a wish that's dearer, better far than glittering gold, . r^/^ 
Though a simple one perhaps you all will say, .V 

Tls a longing that is in my heart each moment of my life, ', .: 

'Tls a gleam of sunshine strewn across my way: 

Chorus. ■ ■; '■''■.-'' ^^'i'''-' 

.".i. Just to open wide my little cottage door, • : '. • .; 
- V . -i jH8t to see ray baby rolling on the floor, 
* Just to feel that I have something to adore, % '.iv. .:•.!,-'- ■ 

Just to be at home again, . ' ., i • ' ■■ ' ' ■: ■ 

Just to hear a sweet voice calling papa dear, 
Just to know my darling wife is standing near; 
You may have your gold vour lonel v heart to cheer. 
But ril take my baby, wife and hoii)&" 



OLGOn'S IRISH SEREHADE 

Copyiiffht, ISH, by T. B. Harms ft Co. EuKlish copyright secured. 
All riiclits reeerved. 
•>. V-- Words and Music liy CbaUDoey Oicott. ■ . -. ■.^- 

o. .:':' Katy, my darling, alone I am waiting, • > ^ .;. 

• . Waiting and watching alone by the stile. 

Why keep me here, while my heart Is Inside, dear? 
SO open your door, love, and give me your smile. 
You promised you'd meet me at eight, by the stile, dear, ■= 
Where are you now, when your lover Is here? 
V, . Oh. come to me quickly, my heart It Is yearning, : . 

Y'earnlng and waiting for you, Katy dear. 

Ah, never fear, you'll hei safe In my keeping, : . ^ 

I will guard o'er you, asleep or awake, 
Nothing can harm you while m5' love's around you; 

I'd lay down my life, Katy, for your dear sak*'. 
As true as the stars keeping watcli thro' the long ulght. 

Such will my faithful watch constantly l»e; 
To cheer you, to guide you o'er life's stormy ocean 

Give me but that lot, and Joy waits for me. 

Let Me Take My Place at Home Again 

~ ■ '" Copyright, MDCCCXCVI. by Henry J. Wehman. 
Words and Music by Cliaa. V. Louk. 

In a cozy little cottage sat a couple Old and graj\ . . 

A fire in the hearth was burning bright. 
There a letter they were reading from their son who went astray; 

He left them on one cold and wintry night; 
His companions, whom were evil, had him forge his father's name; 

The parent. In his anger, wished him dead; 
But the son had since repented, and this letter home had come. 
And to his wife these words the old man read: 

Chorus. 
1 Let me take my place at home again. . 

Back among the dearest friends of all. 
Back to mother's dear caress, and your old age 1 will bless. 
Then let me take my place at home again. 

Now the old man would not listen to the pleadings of his boy, 

The dear old mother's health soon gave away. 
For her heart was sadly pining for her son, her only joy. 

Who left them in both sorrow and dismay; 
One night as they were sitting by their cozy fireside. 

The son was brought in pale and 111 from need. 
Then the father he forgave him, and with joy the mother cried. 

And now my lad no longer has to plead:— tA</r«». 

KATY MAHONEI 

Copyright, ISM, by T. B. Harms ft Co. English copyright «ecure<L 

■ ; All rights reserved. 

Words and Music by Chauncey Olcott 

In that little brown cottage that stands over there 

Dwells my sweet Kitty Mahone; 
With her beautiful nature and soul full of love. 

Oh, she has my heart alone. " 

If ever you met her. oh, then you'd not blame me 

For loving her as I do, 
For who, in this world, has ever been known 

To resist love that's tender and true. 

Refrain. 
Oh, Katy Mahone, I'm j'ours alone; - 

Why keep me waiting for you? 
:■'.'■ Give me your heart, as well as your hand. 
And I'll keep it safe for you, Katy. 

Now, time may change all things, but never my heart. 
It will remain the same. 
. > Ar>d be not like the beautiful snow when It falls. 

To go with the very first rain. 
But more like the beautiful ivy that creeps, =. 

...■ As around the old ruin it springs: ..--', 

Time cannot efface it, or lessen its love, • .. 

For the older the closer It clings.— /^«r»ain. 



I 



Copyright, 1881, by T. B. Harms ft Co. Entered at Stationers' Hall, Loodon, Eag. 

AH riichts reserved. 
Wonts by Bartley Campbell. Music by Wm. J. Scanlan. 
Oh, sweet are the flowers that oloom In dear Kerry, 
And pure are the waters that kiss her dear shore, 
But sweeter and purer— oh, ves, and more merry. 
Is the girl of my heart, my own Deellsli Asthore. 
Mavourneen, my darling, are you thinking about ma 

As I roam this world over a stranger to all? 
Whatever befall me, oh, Deelish. don't doubt me. 
And some day, Mavourneen, I'll come at thy call. 

Chorus. 
Mavourneen, my darling, are you thinking about me 

As I roam this world over a stranger to all* 
Whatever befall me. oh, Deelish. don't doubt me. 

And some day, Mavourneen, I'll come at thy call. ^ 

The days are so long, and the nights have no ending. 

Since I left thee and Erin, the land of my birth. 
Where the seas and the skies they forever are blending, 

And embracing the dearest green spot on earth. 
If I were to die in the midst or the ocean, 
/ And my body. Mavourneen. cast Into the sea. 
Where'er you might be, sure I have a notion 
'Twould float back, my darling, to Erin and thee— C/torm. 



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ANSLATED under our personal supervtalon Into the English Ian(?ua(;e, and pub- 
lished hy us for the first time. With exact copies of over One Hundred and 
Twenty-Five Seals, Sli^ns, Emblems, etc use*! by Moses, Aaron, Israelites, 
Egyptians, etc.. In th»'lr astonishing magical ancf other arts. Including the 
period of time covered by the Old and New Teatamenta This wonderful translation la 
of great Importance to the Christian, Deist, Jew or Gentile, Episcopalian or Roman 

Catholic, and dissenters of every denomination. The 
extracts from the old and rare Mosaic Books of the Talmud 
and Cabala are Invaluable. This IkjoIc gives the use of the 
Psalms for the Ixnlily welfare of man by the eminent trans- 
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ally known as the Five Books of Moses. It Is believed, and 
known to comparatively few, that there were two more 
books written by hlra. Known as the Sixth and Seventh 
Books of Moses. To these we wish to draw your attention. 
Writing, manuscripts, etc., of precious worth have existed 
for ages past that could be traced to the time of Moses, but 
few or these have been published, exceut in small fragments. 
This Is accounted for by the fact that the high priests, 
clergy, and heads of various religious bodies were unwilling 
that the i)eople should be given those deeper mysteries, 
being fearful of losing their hold on them. Another reason 
Is that It was feared the Information would be used for 
unlawful purposes. It Is scarcely possible that Moses con- 
fined his literature to the flrst five Ixxjks of the Bible, if we 
take Into consideration thelengthened period of his life and 
changes of his association. We And in Acts 7:-£i that Mos»»s 
was learned in wisdom of the Egyptians until his fortieth year. He acquired during 
his residence at the Court of Pharaoh many EgjTJtian arts in his constant Intercourse 
with learned men. He became adept in those magical arts practiced by them. We 
find in Exodus 7:11 Moses cast his rod Ijefore the King, whlih t)ecamo a serpent, 
Pharaoh .sent for his magicians, who also cast down flieir rods, which, by their 
enchantments, also became serpents. Few persons have not some belief in these 
strange and oftentimes unexplained Influences that seem to surround us through life 
for g(j<)d or evil, and It Is honestly thought that the study of this work, the Sixth and 
Seventh B*>oks of Moses, will Ije a source of happiness and prosperity to millions. The 
fanatlcmavsay that this publication will foster superstition, hut the enlightened and 
unprejHiUced will jierceive that the translation into the English language will certainly 
be more HerviceaDle than all previous productions, which were only circulated In 
al)stract form, and sold at extortionate prices. In regard to this edition, the so-called 
Sixth and Seventh Bfxjks of Moses, which have for several centuries attracted the popu- 
lar faith, are In accordance with an old minuscript and given word for word. We 
Guarantee that nt)t one syllable has been addeil. To the publishers of Germany must 
B given the credit of having, at an enortnous expense, collected these Invaluable man- 
uscripts documents, etc., from which this work Is compiled. It is fnmi the German 
translation that we nave produced the English edition of the Sixth and Seventh Books 
of Moses, In which Is given exact copies of all the original Illustrations as they existed 
on ancient imrchments, etc., explained in plain English language. The German work 
has for some time largely circulated In Germany and among the Germans In this 
country, and Is pronounced the most wonderful work ever published. So true Is this 
that many millions of Germans, and others of German education, never undertake any 
impc^jrtant step in life relating to finance, exchange, or health, without seeking from Its 
pages advice and guidance. Volume I of the Sixth and Sovuutii Books uf Muses as 
translated from the origiiuvl writings, contains all that 
Is embraced by the White and Black Art, together witb 
the ministering spirits which were hidden from David, 
the father of Solomon. First Seal, the Seal of Treas- 
ure.s. Sf-cond. the Seal of Fortune. Third, for Resjx'ct 
Affection, Admiration, etc. Fourth, Pleasures anc 
Health. Fifth, the Seal of Power, etc. Sixth, the Seal of 
Visions and Dreams. Seventh, Seal of Earth's Treas- 
ures. It also contains the fourGreat Divisions of the 
Spirits-Spirits of the Air, Fire, Water and Earth, with 
their \ises, powerful secrets.and full explanatory tablt-s. 
It gives the tables of Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, Sun, Mer- 
ctiry and Venus, each of which iK)sses«es special jtower, 
The;e Is given the exact engraving of the Magical Cir- 
cle, etc. The Magic of the Israelites is fully explained, 
giving a complete and valual>le history.witu more than 
100 Biblical references, such as second eight, healing the 
sick according to scriptural teachings, visions and 
dreams, spiritual and sensual affe<;tlon, elevation of 
will and higher vitality, the flery serpent, spurious 
prophets divine Inspiration and mesmeric clairvoyance, 
the dead working wonders, the Inherent power to Iteal 
disease, Simon ttie Sorcerer, and many otlier topics of 
great value are fully explained. Volume 11 of this wonder- 
ful work contains illustrations representing the signs used by the Israelites, such as the 
tjreast plate of Moses, magical laws of Moses, chalice of holiness, conjuration of Elea- 
7.or, the son of Aaron; breast plate of Aaron, citation of oermuthsal, dismission of 
Leviathan, Baalamis sorcery, conjuration of the la s of Moses, dlsmUsion of Moses, 
signs to l)e used, or the right and left aide; spirit In a pillar of burning Are, spirit app«'ars 
In a cloud, signs of frogs and pestilence, signs of cattle, black smalli)OX and hall, spirit 
in the burning bush, and the sUiff changed into a seriu'nt. These engravings are exact 
coplt's of tho.se by the Israelites and Egyptians to accomplish the designs for good or 
e«ll, and are separately explained. This ixxik has become enormously popular. Be- 
ware of humbugs. Volumes I and II l)ound together In one volume. Price reduced to 
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book full of the veryjuice and 
cream of fun. The oolrequies be- 
tween the end man and interlocu- 
tor are of the most ludicrous 
character and worth many times 
the price of the entire book. 
Well printed and bound in neat 
paper cover. Price, by mail, 
postpaid. Ten Cents. * 



< 



' 



KIRY J. WEIIML PyUiaiMr. 



Park Raw. lEW YORK. 



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•■*- - — 



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^^m^^H^^^^^^^^^^^^m 



WEIMMt SEUOTIOI OF 

Popular Recitations, No. I 



PRICE. 26 CENTS. 



CoBt«Bta or 

AitoepMtkai witch 

Anb'a fmrewell u> his iteed 

Anale utd Willie's prayer 

A yaller dorg,8 Iot« for a olg|ar 

Antony ftnd Cleopatra 

A roller-rlnit romaiiM 

Battle of Pontenoy 

Beautiful enow 

Bingieo on tta« BhliM 

BrIdK* .':..... 

Bartmra Praltchlfl 

Bitae>bali 

Corfew mnst not rioK to-night 

Chuee of the LJKbt BrIfpuM 

Der patter of tlie •lilagtai 

DyiD( Calif orniau .1 

Dot atappnm pony ] 

Dorkliia' nlghi 

Der haby 

Dot baby off mlna Z*^ :' ': 

Dyine Midler ' ' .' 

Daachen on theRlila* 

Kxcelsior : -; x 

Paat freight *. J,. 

Ghrtlty or not niltjr - ' •' 

Oambler'a wire " 

Gladiator 

How tha gates cam* ajar 

Hornet 'a neat 

Home attractions 

I moat b« there on New Tear'a Day 

I woald not live alway 

Irish pbiloaopher 

Jim Blndao 

Last hymn 

Laedle Tawoab Straaaa 

Life la bnt a game of cards 

LeTOl and the fqaare 

Llpa that tooch liqaor mntt never 

Laugh in achool (toneh mine 

Uttte Meg and I 

Moneyiaas man 

Mala stood oa tha steamboat deck 



thla Nnaabcr. 

Motlier'e fool 

Maud Mailer in Onteh 

Mias Maloner ou the Chlaesa qnestkm 

MahoneT'a Fenian eat 

No sect in heaves 

Nobody's mule 

Nobody's Child 

Old man in the model ehuek 

O'Reilly's billy goat 

Over the bills to the poor-hoosa 

Old saviDgs 

Old oaken bocket 

*0«tler Joe 

Only a girl 

Polish boy 

Peaae don't sell mj ttOm ram 

Bayen 

Richmflnd on the James 

Bory of the hill 

Romance of a hammock 

Sheridan's ride 

Somel>ody'e darling 

Somebody's mother 

Schneider's ride 

Bong of the ehIK 

Smack In school 

Shamns O'Brlea • 

Selineider's llUle bof 'y 

Twenty years ago 

Tramp 

That hired girt 

Virginias 

Wolf at tha door 

Why should the spirit of mortal be 

Which Bball it be (proad 

What I would do for her 

What is life 

What became of a He 

Wreck of the Heapems 

What I llm for 

When M<n3ee's nine played the Mets 

We reap what we sow 

Yea pat no flowera oa my papa's 

Yarn of the Nancy Bell Unt^e 

This Book will bo Mnt to taxj addraao by mail, poo^iMi^ on 
r eos U i t of 95 oanta in poat«|lB atomps. 



WEIMAI'S SELECTIOH OF 

Popular Rocitations, No. 3 



PRICE, 85 CENTS. 



, Ooatento 

Ask "nfw^^ 

A Chrlatmaa atory 

Anid Bobin Gray 

A visit to Barnnm's 

Age of man and womaa - :^ 

Alegend of Bregena 

A catastrophe 

Barbara Freltchle 

Black horae and bia rldar % . 

Bald-headed man 

Brier roae 

Blacksmith's story '. . !v 

Broken promise '' 'i 

Bivouac of the dead 

Baby's kiss 

Balls of Bhandoo r V W 

Onater'a laat chains 

Caoch, the piper >.,• ,'■{''■■ \l- i*'. 

Ooalaorira -'-■■■' ■■'.■/■i\-:^ 

OoBieet card 

Coanterslga '• fr:' 

Der d«g nod der lobster 

Drnokard 

Datcbman and the ravaa 

Dandy Fifth 

Down In the mine 

Der eavesdropper 

Dog and the tramp 

Der ahpider and der fly 

■ilBcaUon 

Face against the pans 

Flood of death 

Faces In the lira 

Flying Jin^ laat leap 

Gone with a handaomer bmb 

Greea Mountain Jnstlee 

Haratlaa at the bridge 

Hana'a vlait to der "Oardao** 

inch Cape bell 

Ifa ever ao far away 

latheShipka Pass 

la the Dime Muaeam 

I'll take what father takes 

Kag Robert of Sicily 



of thla Nornbor. 

Kit Caraou'a ride 

Kentocky belle 

Letter of death 

Love In the kitchen 

Lookout Mountain, 186S— Bentela- 

Mlapas [bach. 1860 

Mary, the maid of the Inn 

McGlnty'a horse 

Modern belle 

Milton's last poeas 

Oor folks '. 

Old man goee to town ->'<: 

Oor ships at sea / W 

Only a clown 

Old Tobacco-box 

Onr minister's sermoD 

Papa's letter 

Pat's reason 

Pilot's story 

Religions card-player 

Rural mualngs 

Railroad crossing 

Schloaser's ride 

Spartacoa to the gladlaton 

Smitinff the rock 

Sprig of greec 

Station-master's story 

Soldier tramp 

Sacrl legions gamestsr* 

Swore oft 

Story of Deacon Brows 

Strauss's boedry 

Story of a new bat 

Speak gently t^ 

Toossaint L'Onvrtnta ^ 

Ticket o* leave 

Unknown speaker 

Volunteer organist 

Village blacksmith 

Wonderful country 

Woodman, snare that trea 

Wiltage Plackachmidt 

Woman's rights 

What temperance does 



■EmMrS •ELCCTIOI OF 

Popular Rocitations, No. 2 



PRICE, 86 CENTS. 



Across the brM^ ke gooe 

Archie Deaa 

An Irlahman'a letter 

Atheist and aeora 

A last look 

Betsy and I are out 

Betay destroys the papw 

BeUy and I hafe boat np 

Banty Tim 

Brakeman at ehai^ 

Boee tramp 

Bed-bog 

«d whiakey 
mardo del Ckrpio 
Bootblack 

Burial of Sir John Moors 
BIH Maaon's ride 
Christmas day In fts «orkh< 
Caaey at the bat 
Calibre flfty-fonr 
Colllerldyteg child 
Coney laland down dar taf 
Convict's drsaa 
Charcoal man 
Dont be tastngaa 
Dying gladiator 
Drnnkard*a dream 
Dot vater-mlil 
Der drummer 
Dyln' vorda of Isaac 
Dot lambs TOt Mary kaf fot 
Drafted 
Diver 
Dude 

Der plumber 
Der oak and der Vina 
Face upon the floor x 
Foreciosnre of the morteafs 
FInman'a Wedding 
Go vay. Becky Miller 
How we tried to whip the teacliei 
How Micky got kilt ta the war 
Her lovera 

How " Ruby " played 
Ineraaae of erimej 

Thia Book wHl be aent to 
reoeipt of 85 



CoBtOBta oftlila Ifnmiber. 

Iriab wife 



\ 



In a cellar In Soke 

Kitchen clock 

Kisa In achool 

Kelley's dream 

KIsalitg in the alreet 

Liberty eBilgbtens the world 

Umy's ou the force 

Ma'e baby 

Mulcahey's aooner dog 

Montgomery Onarda of Boehton, Tks 

Mael2ne's child 

Man who rode to Oooemaagb, The 

Mnrillo'a trance ^ 

Monev mask 

Mona^a watera 

McGonigle'a game dog 

Monka' msgniflcat 

New cbnreh organ, Tbe 

Only a pin 

Oo the RappahaoBoek 

Orplian boy. The 

Pat's misUke 

Puzzled oensns-taker, Tba ^ 

Paul Revera'a ride 

Pride of Battery B, The 

Pauper's Christmas Bve, The 

Paa«l<^ Dutchman, Tbe 

Red Jacket, The 

Stowaway. The 

Sword of Bunker Hill, Hie 

Sullivana vs. Sylvio Sylvasto 

Sbacol>'8 lament 

Sitrn-board, The > 

Ship on fire. The ,-^ *■ 

Troth in parentbefla 

Wife'a dream. The 

Water-mill, The 

Woman is what man doth vike her 

WhiatieE. The 

Wake of Jim O'Hara, Tbe 

Widow Cnmmlskey, Tbe 

Tellow-kalred Nellie 

Tellow-haired laddie, Tbe 



•ay addreaa by audi, poa^oid, on 
ta in poataco atampai 



J 



WEHMM'S SEUeriON OF ° 

Popular Rocitations, No. 4 



price; 8S CENTS, 



GOBtenta of 

Address of Spottycos 

A deadly weapon 

A night with a ventrlioqalat 

And the band played 

A naughty littlO'Siil 

A ragTBd jacket 

A ventriloqulat on a atage-eoach 

Aox Itallena— At tbe Italian Opera 

Baccarat 

Black-eyed Suaaa 

Bine and the gray 

Borea 

Bridge-keeper's story 

Bridge of sighs 

Batiercups and daisies 

Caaey'a Ubie d' bote 

Charge of the Dutch Brigade 

Chioago 

Chnrcn reverlee of a achooigM 

Daya Rone by 

Death-bed of Benedict Anokl 

Death of Gandentia 

Death of Little Paul 

Dream of Bngene Aram 

Driving home the cowe 

Dot long-handled dipp* 

FIraman 

Piahin' 

Forty yeaia ago 

Granger and the gambler 

Gambler'a last deal 

Housekeeper's sollloqay 

How Colambns fonna Amerles 

How he saved St. Michael's 

Her easy chair 

He geta dhere slioat der same 

H»w Saivator won 

Hunch back alnser 

Iriah Bclioolmaaior 

Joalah Allen's wife at A. T. Stewart's 

Just do your best 

Katrina'a visit to New Tork 

King CaiiDte 

KlMiint; cup's race 

Lnnncliing of tbe ship 

Left 



tkia Itamber. 

Llfs-boat 

Light from over the raage 

Little Barafoot 

Lorraine 

Mary's lamb on a new principle 

Mary, Qnflen of Scotn 

Maod Mailer 

Mine moder-ln-lsw 

Minstrel's earse 

Mr. Murphy's wtt 

My lover 

Nlnety-«ifM 

No. B Coltect 

O'Orady's goat 

Old actor's story 

One tonch of Nats le 

Owl critic 

Paddy the pfper 

Phadrig Crohoora, or the IrlsI'Loeh- 

Poiygiot [Invar 

Belief of Lncknow 

Roger 

Sad fata of a pol'oemaa 

Scandal 

Shipwrecked 

ample atory of O. Washlngtoo 
mple church 
Siooz Chief's dAughter 
Slater and I 

Soliloquy of King Btchatd III , 

Son's wish 
Station agent's story 
Story of some bells 
Story of the faithful soni 
Swell in a honw-car 
To Bary Jade* 
True Uie at IfUllaB 1WI| 
Two glasses ^- ^ 

Uncle 

Vagabonds ( 

Vas marriage a failase 
Wamii'a addreea 
William Tall 
Witaeaa 

Yaweob'a dribalatlone 
Tonng tramp 



V 



KIBY J. 



PiibHtber, 



Row. NSW YORK