Skip to main content

Full text of "Don't forget me Mary songster [microform]"

See other formats











IP 



'•9 



> .. 



LOVE LETTERS 



8SS 

BnekHM 
Eii*kl]«i 



PRICQB 25 OENTSt 

_„ . ormora pnCaand rMUty UiMi lora. Tberohno a o M tri. 

Um lore of MioUier. niere la no hliclie* gift from on* hanuui beinc to aaoUMr 

lore. The tttft and Um pooearion are troa aanctiflera a< Ufa. ajid aboaU ba worn aa 

I jewala, wtthoat atfactatton and witliout taahfulaaaa. For thla reaaon ihare ia 

to ba aahamad of la » kure lettar, prorlded It ba ^eara. A calebratad wrilar 

onoa aald taM " to wrltaagoad lore lettar, 70a mual be- 




gin without knowlnir what 70a are BOing to mr, 1 
flnlali without knowfiiB what you hare aaid." The re- 
mark la to aoroa extent correct, •• the true aecret of all 
iiiini raafiil tottei^n-ritintr Ilea In tlie oower of eonveTlnir 
tha Uioushta, feelinga, and dealrea of the writer to hia or 
her oorreapondent. Such a letter would undoubtedly ra- 
nect the atate of the writer's heart, •gltated and dla- 
ordered by tlie tumuttuoua Ihroba of paarion; but, aa tha 
zeal of young peraona generally , in nuitteraaiteotlng tha 
heart, U rerr not to untmn discretion, ezpreaiion would 
■inoonactuualy be given to abanrd aiid fooUah proteatap 
i tlona, or to extraragaut and romantlo adulation of tha 
' oMeot of attachment. 

To obviate thla tendency, lore and oonrtahlp lettera 
fhould beaii index of tin 'trriter'a good aenae and judg* 
ment aa well as Uie state of the affections, and iherefora 
regard should be had In the compoeitlon uf them, aa wail 
as in an other letters, to propriety of diction, correotnees of taste and purity of style. 
«Totdlng the boinbatit and affectation and morbid sentimentalism which too f requeatly 
aharacterixea eplstlea on these suhiects. And though In persons of reflnemant and edu- 
eatloaan honorable attachment will suffice to promnt Ita candid expreasion, there ara 
maaty persona not poaaaaaed of these advantagea, to whom correspondence is aiwaya ai^ 
•ended with ooiiaiderable difficulty. To all auch the aeries of Letters contained in thla 
book, ia which delicacy of feeling and the warmth of espn-ssion suited ( u thesubject hava 
beau carefully blended, will be found an Important aid in acquiring facility and aeen- 
tmcy in the art of Letter- Writing. It also contains tlie Art of Secret Writing, tha LaiW 
gnage of Love Poetlcaliy Portrayed, and Slmplilled Rules of Grammar. I>rice 28 Ota* 
par copy. aFBCiAlr-Flve coptoa for tL Get four of your friends to club In with yon m 
ilasntsaach, making (1 in all, and thereby get your own book free of charge. 

ADDRBBS ALL ORDERS DIRKCT TO 

H. J. WEHMAN. 130 & 132 Park Row, New York. 



'--->^>WEHMANS SELECTION OF x^ 

POPULAR DIALOGUES 



PRICE 25 CENTS. 






Thla book, the first of the aeriea, contalna a large nnmbaPoCtlia 
flneat dlaloguea in nur language. Adajpted for Parlor Elntertala- 
menta. Social Oatherings, School ExMUttona, etc. Many of the 
dialogiiea In this book are new and orlKinaJ and cannot be found ia 
any otiier book. Great care has been taken in the preparation of 
thia book— our chief aim being to insert tlie "liftings" from the 
** whole fl4'Kl " of Popular DIaloguee, suitable for public and private 
reelb.1. Price T^IMl^Jjr-PJVIC Qf NJTP PfJJ^.'Pl'.kyj'^ 



ppat-pakl. Bpbci. 
16 ceiitM eacli 



making 



feur of your cneiida t<> club in with you at 



ling $1 in all^aiid thereby get your own book free 
of chante. Clean and unused 17. 8. poatage atainps, of any denomi- 
nation, taken same as ca>h. In sending silver, be Mire to wrap a 
email piece of newspaper around It, to prevent It from taaruig 
through tlie envelope. Send greenbacks for large amounta If not 
inconvenient to you. Any five Twentyflv* 0«nt Books 
on this pace for 1 1. 

ADDRESS ALL ORDERS DIRECr TO 

H. J. WEHHMN, 130 & 132 Park Row, New York 



WEHMAN'S 
SELECTION OF 



POM RECIIAl 



^*f^ ISTo. 3. -m^ 



PRICE as CENTS. 



A Ohriatraas stoty 
Avid Kobln Qrajr 
A visit to Bamura's 
Age of man and woman 
Alageiid of Bregens 
Aeataatrophe 
Barbara Frtetchie 
Black horse and his rider 
Bald-headed man 
Brter rose 
Blacksmith's story 
Broken promise 
Bivouac of the dead 
Baby's kiss 
BaUa of Shaiidon 
Ciiater's lastcharoa 
Oaoch, the piper 
Ooalaof Ore 
Correct curd 
Countersign 
Der dog und der lobetar 
Drunkard 

Dutchman and the ravea 
Dandy Filth 
Down in the mine 
Dar Saveadropper 
Dog and the tramp 
Der shplder und der flj 
■ducatloQ 



OOITTHSITTS 

Face a«rain*t the pane 

Floo<l of death 

Faces In the lire 

Flying Jim's last leap 

Gone with a handsomer man 

Green Mountain juntioe 

Horatius at the bridge 

Hang's visit to der " Garden" 

Inch Cape bell 

It's ever so far away 

In the Shipka Pass 

In the Dime Museum 

I'll lake what father takea 

King Robert of Sldly 

Kit Carson's ride 

Kentucky belle 

Lettar of death 

Love In the kitchen 

liookout Mountain, IMS— 

Mizi>ah (Beutelshach, UW 

yjf 'y, the inald of the Inn 

H Hiity's hnrxe 

Mhdem belle 

Milton's laat poem 

Our folks 

Old man goes to town 

Oor ships at sea 

Only a clown 

Old Tobaccvbox 

Oor mlnister^i sermoa 



Papat latter 
Pat's reason 
Pilot's story 
Religious card-ptajer 
Rural musingB 
Railroad crossing 
Schlovser'arlde 
Spartaons to the gladiaton 
Smitinir the rock 
Sprig of green 
Btation-maater^ stoiT 
SoMler (ramp 
8aci ilegioua gameaten 
Sworn. ff > 

Story of Dencon Brown 
Stran.'w's bocdry 
Sl^rv of a new bat 
Speak treiitly 
Toumaint L'OuvertOre 
Ticket o' leave 
Unknowa speaker 
Vntanten- organiat 
Village blacksmith 
WoBilertnl conntrr 
Woodman, spare that tree 
Wlltage PliicVichmidt 
Woman's riithtB 
What Intemperance doaa 

PRIOI as^KNTS. 



■r Any fhr« as-0«nt Books on this pas* for ONI DOLLAR. .M 

ADDRESS ALL ORDKR8 DIRSCT TO 

I. X WEHMAN, 130 & 132 Park Row. New TorL 



WEH M \NS rj OOK O. 



ART^SCiENCES BOXING 



PRICE 85 OEWTSe 

tkla book b designed to meet tlie wants of all tlMsawbo may dtttn ts iMfB 
o "take hia own part'' when awalkirt — Ite It either for plaaanrable pasMma m 



■s.- 




aatoral desire to develop the moaelaa or to i 
power to raaent an affront or iuparj. A flill I . 
•^- - - ruii kid down It 

plateatlMratt 




may go 
«oma Ineontaot, 11 
attitude far btow.fd 
A vohuninooa out-J 

bar who liave eaterst. ~- ,_-,..■ . __ _ r-i^- 

(heir proweaa, and who hava left their fanpreas >BttM 
WorifiS history, ia alao appen<led, fm ayyplaa of wlMg 



baa been and may 



^^^{heff^ of a targe ¥■■•• 
[the gladiatorial arena to preve 



"yS^" 



aeueved by 



r^ 



yoar own book free of charge, 
iifitlfrn, tnk e n samtt aa itiah 



training and expOTtanoaL The foregoing ami 
the life and faattiea of aoma of the moat noted l 
SsM, tnehidinit the grsat Oorbatt^ammn light, 
alao oootalna the •'London Prfaa-RlagRalea" an4 
tbe-BerisadQaeenaberryBalaa.'' Priee 98 0«ntS 
par copy, by mail, poal^paid. 8rsoiAi.-nire Bon f ii 
fM'tt/ detfowofyoorfrtafidatochib in wlth^ 
a* K cenU each, making f I in all, and thereby g«l 
Clean and unuaad u. a poatage atampa, of any daoosil- 



ADORX88 ALL ORDERS DHUDOT 10 



H. J. WEHIUN. 130 & 132 Park Row. New Tort. 



-^WEHMAN'S NEW BOOK OF r . 

RIDDLES ^CONUNDRUMS 



PRICE 25 CENTS. 




This book contalna tha "sifUnBs" from ths 
"whole field " of Riddl!* and Conundmma, alnng 
with a k>t of recent, flratclass prodnetioas. IS 
It can be founa curious, potEling and uleaMa| 
Riddles and Conuadmma— to suit every i»aaeoc 
feeling, sentiment or humor. A capital boek flor 
end men in mini<rel entertalnnienta, as it oontalM 

Snastloiis aitd answers tlist will invailably ** brine 
own a house." With the aid of thla book, yoneaa 
** hold your own " with those who are connnnally 
"spriiiKtng old chestnuts" on to yoo— yea. nu^ 
terlal with which to "crnali " or s U enea would-be 

Sniisiers. It contains Riddles and Ooa«ndma« 
Ikat will keep the whole eontlnent 
then they'll fanve to give ^m up hair 
fact, it contalna the tiest and largest 
Rldoleo and Cunnnii in iii a ever aold 
price. Price TWBNTY-FIVK CI 
', iKHtpald. Sracuir-n 



taBM 

>rinc I 



2?py*. 




. /.by mall, i><m p a id . SracuL— live ooii&alor 
$l,_Oet four of your frirnds to cluli in with ya« 
al Keents eaeh, making gl in all, and thereby gsf 
your oara bonk ft«e of charge. Clean and nnoMd 
U. a. postage stamps, of any denoniUiaikn, takar 
aame as oaaJi. In sending silver, be sure to wm- 
nsmall pteoe of newspaper around it, to prevent 
from tearing through the envelope. Sand gre* 
backs for large amounts if not inconvenient . 
yoo. Any fivs Twenty-five Cent Book* 
on this page for 91. 

ADDRESS ALL ORDERS DIRECT TO 

H. J« WEHMAN, 130 & 132 Park Row, New Yort 



. ' WEHMAN'S ". 

Business LETTER Writer 



PRICE 25 CENTS. 

TUa book la designed to meet the wants of all tboaa who are seeUag a flr 

em Letter- Writer, as it contains a large variety of carefuUy-aelectad specimen] 

Letteca; alao a large number of Legal and Mercantile Forms used in Boainaaa— 

Artlclea of Co-Partiierahlp, Mottoe of DlsaolaMea. 
Form of an AiarfgnmeiU, AcknowledgBseat «2 
Deed, BUI of Salit, Power of Altwrney,Jadgaaaat 
Note, Form of an Order, Partnership fliiiiieiiwl, 
any many others too nomeroos to mention; alan 
the Art of Secret Writing, Bnaineaa Law* JM 
Mazimafur Buslnem Men and MeroanlUa ^bkra> 
viatlons. In iJiort, in tha pagea of this book era 
eet iorth BusineM Fbrma, Stylea and Tnrhnlfnll 
tien to aid the Inexperienced in the routlaa ct 
oominercial intercotirae, adopting the nialaart 
terms consistent with the atndlous iiffUliaimi 
which Is rigorously demanded in commercial M> I 
ters. Kvetj position in life demanda letter-wH^ 
Ing. A letter is the grvat link batwaen nariBlt 
and chililren, between lovers, between nl «■ J^^ 
while in huaineKa relations it makes fnrfnnaa or 
mars them. Irrespective of their magiiltoda and 
impiiitance, commercial tninsactioaa are fliia>i 
tally begun, continued and ended by eorraa 
pondence. Letter-writing, in general, is not aa 
easy task to the great majority, and hoainesa kS" 
ters are still more dililciUt, from the faet thai 
greater tnterests nre involved, and reaolts of film 
or loas nre dependent upnn them. Letter- wrwic 
■an aeeompUanmeat whieh every one ahonkl strive to aoquire. It is not <nily asafaC 
but very dedrsble and neeeaaary In famlllariiing the mind with businea hahtts aad 
nmttera cormected therewith. It also stimulates the mental aapaclty and devdopaa th« 
inteUect. It would take pa«re upon page to explain ful^y the merits and uaafnlnaaaaC 

this book. In order'- '^ ' .. - .. ^ _ — 

le the prti 

Any Ave TwentjrflveOent Books on t'hTs' pace tor tTs 




have maile the price very low, naniely: TWiNTT>nVK OKNTB per eopy, 
mail, po^-pald. Bpacial.— Five copiea fur #1. Get four of yuur trienda to einb In m 
yoo attfteentaeaeh, maktngM In all, and thereby get your own buok Cren of ehgi 



ADDRESS ALL ORDERS MRBOT TO 



ehai8»- 



H. J. WEHMAN, 130 & 132 Paik Row. New TorL. 



._..., 1^ 



DON'T FORGET ME, MARY! 



Song and Chorus. 




Tempo di Valse. 



mm^ 



-(S»- 



-T 



-<^- 



-G>- 



t: 



-I — 



— ^- 






Words and Music by J. P. Skelly. 



-4 



:=p=4 



1. They kissed and part - ed at 

2. The ship went sail - iug far 

3. At home his Ma - ry fond 



-^ 



the 


j,'ate, 


A 


lass 


and 


lov - 


ing 


a - 


way 


Thro' 


wild 


and 


an - 


Rry 


ly 


waits 


Her 


lov - 


er's 


glad 


re 



swam. 



wave 



izz*z:4: 



^- 



turn,.... 



He 
With 

Still 



1= 



Pi 



q=4 



:q=P= 



-& 



12?': 



:4 



was 


to 


sail 


the 


sea 


a 


way, 


They 


might 


lU)t 


gal - 


lant 


heart 


the 


Siiil 


- or 


lad 


Saw 


near 


a 


hop - 


ing, 


long - 


i»g, 


day 


by 


day 


Her 


heart's 


re 






-+ 



^-s^i= 



meet a 
sail - or's 
ward to 



gain... 
grave, 
earn... 



The 
A 

8he 



I 



-<$'- 



-I 



r--^: 



-ust 



love that bloomed in 
. dark - some night, no 



land 



^- 



— I .__ 



--A-- 



ZlZt 



% 



:4 



-\ 1 

Ma - ry's heart Shone thro' her ra - di - ant 



-7^ 



-&- 



±: 



ni 



sight, — For death he 



does not know that Jack's warm hand Will uev 



er 



had 
clasp 



RO 

her 



eye,, 
fear, . 



own 



,... 



:±: 



zt: 



8he 

And 

At 



i 



-&- 



\¥- 



-t: 



-|- 



-&- 



heard her lov - er's 
as he sank lie • 
night in dreams she 



raXL. 



-I — ~ 



-t: 



—I- 



:4 



~q: 
— i- 



12^ 






ten - der 
neath the 
eem's to 



-I 

plea While whisper - ing sad "good 

foam His voice rose sound - ing 

hear His voice in lov - ing 



~4 



.^_.. 



bye!", 
clear:., 
tone !.. 



^- 



CHORUS. After third verse sing Chorus pianissimo. 
a tempo. 

--1 




Don't 



While 



sail the 




-^- 






-&- 



ry, Wher - ev 



:4 



-9~ 
er 



-0- 



:1: 



-^ 



Mzi^—^ 



i^- 



raay 



be,. 



I: 



I 



:^: 



-1^- 



:4 



Keep your heart in glad 



1— 

ness. 



:i 



zust 



--X 
Jt 



~^: 



-^- 



■-t 



_^_.. 



zit: 



-*— *- 



Ten - der, warm and true, . 




=^ 



Don't for 



±: 



get 



/T\ 



r^lZsTZZ. 



'^- 



-A- 






:t: 



me. 



Ma 



ry, 



I'll 



think 



of 



■X 



^ZIZU^l 






:4 



=^- 






none but 



you. 






Copyright, MDCccxciii, by Henry J. Wbhman. 



\ The complete Words and Music of this Song can be had for 40 cents per copy, of any Music Dealer in the 
'United States or Canada; or from the FubUsher, HENBY J. WEHMAN, 130 & 132 Park How, New York. 



'1 



J 



m 



LATEST PARODIES ON POPULAR SONGS. 



Parody on; 
AFTER THE BALL. 



By "Dublin." 



8«nd for Free Cat&lofpie of Ronsr Book», Letter Writers, Pream Rooks, Fortune Tellenk 

Trick Rookii, Keoitation Bookg, Penny Kallads. Call nooks, Joke Books, Sketch 

Bookx. Stump St>ee<'heH, Irish S.int? [tookx. Cook llookD, Hooks of Ainuao- 

ment, etc., to Henry J. Wfhiiiaii. i:io & 132 I'urk How. New York. 



A rognish maiden nat on a yoimc nianV knee, 
A»kcd him a question, "Am I too free?" 
"Are you not tliirgty, <lo yon drink l)eert" 
" Ilave you no wliiekere, why are you here?" 
This wan a iioaer, here was a ro. 
The youth whh confused, hut alie must know; 
"Give me tlio prowlef, I'll tell you all," 
And faithful be weiii after a ball. 

CnoBUS. 

After tlie hall is over, over the fence has gnne. 
After the show is over, after the star has gone; 
Many a lieart is achini; afier sin iry fall. 
Many a dollar has vanished after a ball. 

Lightly the dancers tripped in the hall room. 
Sweetly the Iiai.'pi|>c8 played out of tune; 
Up came my darling, smiling, ulone, 
" Fetch ine a lohster, or chicken iione." 
Wlien I came back, how strange it seems. 
Another hud brought her a big plaie of licans; 
She was false as her bang, that's all. 
I rushed out madly after a ball. 

From that time I vowed, dear, I'd never wed. 
Or wear anything but clothes until she is dead: 
And now you know why, you've heard me explain, 
I don't wear whiskers, (he rea><on is plain. 
Last week came a letter, but I only litu^i. 
My heart it is broken, will you take half? 
Then the roguish maiden sjie knew it all. 
They went out together after a hull. 



Parody on: 

DAISY BELL. 



' _ ' By W. H. Courtney. 

Bend for Free Catalofrne of fionpr Books, I.etter Writers, Pream Books, Portuno T^len^ 
Trick Books, Keoitation Hooka, Penny Ballatl.s, Call Books, Joke Uooks, Sketch 
Books, Stump Si>eeehes, Irish Sonif Books, Cook Hooks, Books of Amuse- 
ment, etc., to Henry J. Welini.tn, 130 <& 132 I'urk Uow. Nbw York. 



I have landed here in town from Daisy, Daisy, 
Driven from home all on the account of my Daisy Bell; 
Whether she loves me or loves me not, sometimes it's liard to tell. 
Yet 1 am longing to gel rid of heautiful Daisy Bell, 

• ,-: Chorus. 

Daisy. Daisy, give me a rest, do; 

I'm half crazy, Irying to leave you. 

It was not a stylish marriage, I did afford a carriage; 

But go back, sweet, on the seat, in that country town of yonrs. 



I will go "wandering" as I diil liefore, Daisy, Daisy 
"Tramping" away down the road of life to leave mj 



When liome again, I can hoth despise, society and girls as well; 
There's no " bright life " in a daiMSling home of beaulif 



y Daisy Bell. 
Is as well; 
liful Daisy Bell.— CAoru*. 



I will send to yon by express or mail a daisy, daisy. 
Money to keep yon well, so you can live, sweet lilile Daisy Bell. 
I would rather be miles from you, I think, then if you don't do well 
Catch some jay and use him, my beautiful Daisy Bell.— C'Aoru«. 



Pa rod y on: 

The Man that Broke the Bank at Monte Carlo. 



By W. H. Courtney. 



8end for J'ree Catalojru© of Soncr Books, letter Writers, Dream Books, Fortune Tellers, 
Trick Books, Keoitation Books, Fenny Ballads, Call Rooks, Joke Books, Sketch 
Books, Stump Speeches, Irish Souk Books, Cook Uooks, Ik>oka of Amuse- 
ment, etc., to Henry J. Wuhman, 130 & 132 Pork Kow, New York. 



I've just dropped off a freight train from tlie world's fair sunny shore. 

I to the world's fair went, just to spend a few cents; 

A buncoer smiled upon roe as he did upon all jays. 
And then I had no money, I had to tramp- 
Yes, then I had no money, I had to tramp. 

Chorus. 
As I walked along the railroad track with an independant air, 
Yoa could hear the people declare, "He looks like a millionaire"; 
You could hear them say, " He's counting the ties"; 
You could see them wink the other eye 
, At the jay that got broke at the world's fair. 

I sleep In a loft till after lunch, and then my daily walk 
Back to my conntry town is one grand triumphal march, 
Observed by the policeman with the keenness of a hawk, 
I am a sample from the great world's fair- 
Yes, he's a sample from the great world's t&\t.— C/wrus. 



Parody on: 
DAISY BEL L . 

By-DubUn." 



Send for Free Catalofnie of Sons Books, Letter Writers, Dream Books, Ftortune Tellers, 

Trick R<K>kn, Keoitation Books, Penny Ballads, Cull Rooks, Joke Books, Sketch 

Books, Stump S|>ee<'h)-s, Irish Soni; Itook^, Cook Houks, Books of Amuae- 

ment, etc.. to Heury J. Wuhman, 130 & 132 Park Kow. New York. 



There is some flour within my heart, Mnzie, Mazic, 
Caused by an effort on your part, you dizzy, crazy belle; 
Those biscuits you made were nice and hor, yet hard it ia to tell, 
And harder still to digest the lot, oh, lovely crazy belle. 

Chorus. 
Mazle, Mazie, for goodness sake now do 
Give up making liisciiits, and you'll never rue; 
Don't think that I'm a savace, give me corn beef and cabbage. 
It ia a treat, 'tis very sweet, and just the thing for two. 

We'll go as a team when we are wed, Mnzie, Mazie, 

And not eat those biscuits, but instead, my dizzy, crazy belle. 

We'll peddle them for pa|)er weights; tliev will do for that quite well. 

And be much lighter for us, my dear, my lovely crazy belle.— Vhorui. 



I will stick to you through thick and thin, Mazie, Mnzie; 
When 1 am out you can let me in, dear little crazy belle; 
I'll ring yuu up when I reach the door, and if I don't do well 
When 1 am soaked, you can ring me out, my darling crazy belle.- 



- Cfioivs. 



Parody on : 

THE PARDON CAME TOO LATE. 



By " Dublin." 



1 



Send for Free Cataloflrae of Sonir Books, Letter Writers, Dream Books, Fnrtnne Tsltoni 

Tliek Hooks, Keoitation B(M>ks. Penny Ballads, Call R<K>ks. Joke Books. Sketch 
Books. Stump Si>eeches, Irish Sung Books, Cook Hooks. Books of Amuse- 
ment, etc., to Henry J. Wehmaii. 190 A 132 Park Kow. New York. 

A black-haired dnde from Erin's shore married was to be. 

But alas! the night before the Jay he went on a spree. 

" Deserted! " was the cry of all, lie surely should be shot; 

But Mary wed the other chap, and Michael she forgot. 

The lonely one was in a cell, oh, hard indeed it is lo tell: 

The judge let him off, oh, cruel fate, when Charley came he was too late. 

Chorus. 

The wedding took place in the evening, Mickey was spending the day 
'Mid the echoes of snoring boozers, while Mary was passing away 
Into the arms of Pat Casey, the man that he did hiite. 
A tear from his eye dropped into the rje— |ioor Mickey came too late. 

And 'round the barroom many times the story he will tell: 
How his mother dear had struck it rich, of the luck that her l>efell; 
Five thousand dollars she had won in policy that day. 
And he had gone to cash it in, and dallied on tlie way. 
And when the truth came out, of course, Mrs. Casey wanted a divorce- 
Sad indeed is Casey's fate, he wishes Mick had not been too late.— t'Aorr/*. 



^ » » 



Parody oni 

TWO LITTLE GIRLS IN BLUE. 



By W. H. Courtney. 



Send for Free Catalofrue of Sonir Books. Letter Writers. Dream Books, Fortune Tellers, 
Trick Rooks, Keoitation Books, Penny Ballads, Call Books, Joke B<K>ks, Sketch 
Books, Stump S|iee<'hes. Irish Soni; Hooks, Cook Books, Books of Amuse- 
ment, etc., to Henry J. Wehman, 130 & 132 Park Kow. New York. 



.] 



Two old tramps gazed in a restaurant at a table filled w ith food. 

His pard then asked him the reason why they could not get something, too; 

"Come in," he said, " I will tell them, pard, a story that will look true," 

But at the door my pard and I only met two little cops in blue. . 

Refrain. '' 

Two little cops in blue, pard, two little cops In blue. 

They were officers, we were brothers and learned to hate the two; 

And one little cop in blue, pard, who changed my brother's heart. 

Became his protector; I managed the other one, and now we have drifted apart. 

We were sent to lall by the judge on a charge that no one knew: 

We thought of liberty, escape we might, the chances they were few. 

My fancy proved a very good plan, yes, we were to escape for true; 

We scaled the wall, but on the street met those two little cops in blue.— Cfiortu. 



/ 



—He: "How many men Lave you kissed In the three months 
I have been away?" 

She: "You misjudge me entirely, sir. Do you suppose I am 
such a cold-blooded, calculating creature as to have kept count? " 



— " Oh, is there nothing," exclaimed the lady in the fur jacket, 
" that can uplift our servant girls? " 
"The coal oil can," answered the lady in the yellow buskin. 



— There is one thing the hard times do not bother— the grip. 
It comes to all, the prince and pauper, millionaire and beggar, 
wageworker and capitalist. 



&^ 



HAVE YOU SEEN HER? 



I 



.A<>i 



I 



Words by George Cooper. 
Tempo di Valse. 



rl 



^^ 



1. Have 

2. Have 
8. Have 



'^- 



'-T 



you 
you 
you 



seen 
seen 
seen 



-^1 



'^- 



her? She's the 
her ? You can 
her ? She the 



:zst 



Music by Geo. C. Edwards. 



i^ 



:^ 



t 



fair 


est 


lit - 


tie 


girl 


in 


all 


the 


tell 


her 


„V 


the 


sun - 


shine 


m 


lier 


treas - 


ure 


my 


heart 


for - 


ev 


er- 



I 



V- 



world, 
face; 
more. 



'^- 



q: 



;!•- 



-^- 




She's 


a 


beau 


ty! 


she's 


the 


rar - est ! 


She's 


a 


Not 


• ,a . 


maid 


en 


can 


ex 


eel ber 


In 


her 


And 


to 


know 


her 


IS 


. ' ' 0^ 


pleas - ure; 


She's 


the 




-(2- 



z-^z 



rose 


with 


dew 


iin - 


pearled. 


There's 


a 


win - 


niug 


love 


- 11 - 


ness 


and 


ffraco. 


There 


are 


girls 


of 


girl 


that 


I 


u - 


dore. 


An - 


y 


home 


her 



--&- 



1-q:: 



way a - 

wealth , and 
smile would 



li 



-<9- 



:t: 



I 



=i:: 



bout her, 


That 


I 


nev 


er 


saw 


be 


fore, 


splen - dor, 


But 


I'd 


rath 


er 


have 


one 


smile 


bright - en, 


As 


the 


stars 


the 


sky 


a 


bove; 



i-Ji: 



Oh! I 

From the 

She was 



I 



V- 



-G- 



'^- 



X- 



:t: 



^- 



X-- 



±\ 






:T 



would 


not 


be 


with 


- out 


her 


And 


I 


love 


her 


girl 


so 


good 


and 


ten - 


der 


That 


I 


think 


of 


sent 


my 


heart 


to 


light • 


■ en 


With 


the 


bless 


mg 



±: 



/^ /T\ n\ 



-(- 



'■m-^- 



more and more... 
all the while., 

of her love.... 



REFRAIN. 



1^^ 



Have 



:=1= 



1- 



I^ 



q: 



— I- 



122: 



you seen her? Have you seen her? 



nn: 



■i9- 

Slie's 



the 



dar 



=^ 



hng girl 



for 



I 



■^- 



::i: 



-&- 



me. 



She's 



the neat - est, 



She's 



H 



It: 



the sweet - est, 



— q: 



-G- 



-I — 



iizzi 



And our wed • ding 



I 



t- 



1 



soon will 



be. 



r7\ 



ad lib. 



S>- 



t 



::i- 



-<&- 



-fij- 



-(Sf- 



-zji •-. 



a 



Oh, boys. And 

Copyright, mdcccxciii, by Henry J, Wbhhan, 



D.8. al Fine. 
our wed - ding soon will be. 



The complete Words and Music of this Song can be had for 40 cents per copy, of any Uuslc Dealer in the 
United States or Canada ; or from the Publisher, HENRY J. WEHMAN, 130 & 182 Park Bow, New York. 



-i j/ 



THE DYING GIRL'S MESSAGE. 



BALLAD. 



Words by A. H. Noe. 

Andante con espressione. 

: — ^ -N — N — ^ Ny 



Music by J. P. Skelly. 




H- 



i-i=it 



^ 



-?- 






'1 



^ 



r^z=? 



1. Raise the 

2. How he 

3. (ihul - ly 

4. Tell him 



win- dow hij^h - er, 

gaineil my youui^ :if 

I <> - Law the 

that it is ix 




inotli -er, . 
fvv • tioll, 
sum iiions 
tok - eu 



:^-a'^: 



air can nev - er hurui me now, 

vow-inj? ill most ten - der tone 

t«> a bright aiMi Ik'I - ter land, 

of for - give-ness and of i)euce — 



Let the 
That he 
Where no 
Harlc! I 




P 



— ^-- 



N- 



IV^^-J^ 



-f^fHi 



i^=i^ 



breeze blow in up - on me, it will 

would tor - ev - er ^uanl me, were my 

hearts are won and hro - ken, but all 

hear his voice, it jkiss - eth ; will this 



eool my fe - vered brow; 

heart but his a - lone ; 

form a hap - py band; 

an - guish nev - er cease? 



S<»on death's strugjrles will be 
You re - mem - l)er how I 
Do n«»t chide him, moth -er, 
Hark! I hear his foot-stepa 





^ 



V- 



' ^- 



V.- 



-^ 



:?=:?: 



=^-zjr_-:z^: 



-f: 



o - ver, 
trust - ed, 
dar - ling, 
com in"?— 



s<Mtn \>v 

how mv 

tlio' my 

no, 'lis 



stille<l this ach 
tlHiUirlits were all 
form you se»' 
but the rust 



ing 

of 

no 

ling 



heart, But I have a dy - ing 

him^ Draw the cur- tain hi^h - er, 

more; (Jrieve not, think me on - ly 

trees; Strange how my dis - or - dered 



nies-sage I would 
moth - er, for the 
wait- ing for you 
fan - cy caught hia 







give 
light 
on 
foot- 



1 






#~ 


_•?_ 


■ 1 1 i ,. 


m 








■^-- 



V- 



^ m " '^ 


p 


-w-v- 


^ t~ 


^ k' 



l>e 
is 

the 
full 



fore 

grow 

oth 

ou 



we 

- ing 

- er 
the 



jKirt : I^ay my head uj) - on your Im>8 

dim. Need I tell V(»u how he left 

shore. J)o not chide liim, moth-er, dar 

breeze. 1 am cold now,cU»sc the win 



om. 


fold me 


clos 


- er, moth - er. 


me, 


cold - ly 


put - 


ting me a- 


linK, 


tho' you 


imss 


me from your 


dow, 


fold me 


clos 


■ er— kis8 me, 



I 



I: 



-H 



-^-^- 

1^-v 






:U- 



-+- 



dear, While I breathe a nume long 
side, How he wiXK-d and won an - 
side, I for - K've him. and I 

too ; Joy ! what means tliat burst of 



SI - 
otb 
wish 
mu • 



-t 
lent, 

■ *'«•, 
him 
sie? 



^=5 



in thy 
and now 
joy with 
'tis the 



«r 



s- 



lov 
as 



It 



3^a 



fond and 
claims her 
her to 
}Sav-i« air's voice, 



ing ear; 

his bride? 

his bride; 

I know; 



Mother, 

Life has 

Take this 

iSee Him 



I 



I: 



--N- 



>- 



^i?^ 



■N- 



V ^— 



f- 



there 


is 


one — 


vou 


know 


him 


been 


a 


wea 


■ 'y 


bur - 


den 


ring 


from 


otr 


my 


tin - 


K*'r, 


wait - 


ing 


to 


re - 


ceive 


me ' 



oh, T 

since those 


<'an - 
hours 


not 
of 


speak 
deep - 


his 
est 


name, 
woe— 


where he 
«>h, how 


placed 
great 


it 
a 


long 
bliss 


a - 
to 


li?e 



You re- 
Wipe these 
Give it 
Moth - er, 




rail. 



-i^-.f:-:^^^=zi^: 



i 



mem 


- her 


how 


he 


sought 


me. 


how 


with 


lov 


- i"g 


words 


he 


came. 


cold 


drops 


from 


my 


fore - 


head, 


thev 


are 


deat h 


marks 


well 


I 


know. 


to 


him 


with 


a 


bless - 


•»>?, 


that 


111 


•ly 


- ing 


I 


be - 


stow. 


meet 


your 


child 


m 


Heav - 


en, 


one 


mon» 


kiss, 


and 


then — 


gooa 


- bye. 



Copyright, MDCccLxxxv, by Hbnrv J. Wbhman. 

Tho complete Words and Mnsic of this Song can be had for 40 cents per copy, of any Music Dealer in the 
United States or Canada; or from the Publisher, HENRY J. WEHMAN. 130 Sl 132 Park Bow. New York. 



"^.-■-'*. 






THE MAN THAT BROKE THE BANK AT MONTE CARLO. 



1 1 



^oderaio. 




— N-— =^= — ^-— =A 

! 1 1 1_ 

— # # 0- 



WritKen and Composed by Fred. Gilbert. 



ih: 









f- 



1. I've just got here, thro' Pa - ris, from the sun - ny south -em shore; I to 

2. I stay in - doors till af - ter lunch, and thrn my <hii - ly walk To the 



3. I 



pa 



tron - ized the 



ta 



bles at the Mon - te Cur - lo hell. Till they 






Pi 




— N- 



A N- 






— I- 



^^ 



:=^^_N — K — ^ 

—I — J ) 1- 

-# — # — m — #- 



Mon - te Car - lo went, just to raise my win -tor's rent; Dame 
great Tri-um-plial Arch is one grand tri - um-phal march. Ob 

had - n't got a sou for a Chris-tian or a Jew; 8o 



For- tune smiU'd up 

serv'd by each ob 

I quick - ly went to 



■ 




-V- 



-t- 



V— 



i: 



if*^ 






"— ^- 



-h 



—^- 



K —^ — N ST 

— 1\ — i — -1-^— — ^- 



on me as she'd nev - er done l>e - fore. And I've now such lots of mon - ey, I'm a 

serv - or with tlie keen-ness of a hawk, I'm u mass of mon - ey, lin - en, silk and 

Pa- ris for the charms of mad'-moi - selle, Who's the load -stone of my heart what can I 



k\ 




gent... 
starch. 
do, 



Yes, I've 
I'm a 
When with 



now such lots of mf)n - ey, I'm a 
mass of mon - ey, Un - en, silk and 
twen - ty tongues she swears that she'll be 




CHORUS. 

M 1st timep, 2nd time/. 



:-N 



-hV 
—I — 



— r- 



As 



walk 



gent... 
starch, 
true.... 






a - long the Bois Boo - long With an 



m 



de - pen - dent 



H 




±: 



air. You can hear the girls de - clare— "He must be a Mil - lion- aire!" You can 



jL^' ^ P * P P P P f ■"• m m- m 


m a m P m 


P : fc- : tr- t tr tr-ii_f__ [r- j^— f. i^ 


1 , _| V- 4 — 



hear them sigh, And wish to die. You can see them wink the 



oth 



er eye At (he 




man 



that broke the Bank 



The complete Words and Music of this Song can be had for 40 cents per copy; or the above and any 
two other songs words and music for $1.00, by addressing HENBY J. WEHMAN, Publisher, 130 & 132 
Park Row, New Yprk,- ;■'•.; ;■ ■ : v.> ' ,- .v,. -^ ■.■':■■' ';^'"'':Z' r. ■''':,/:': : 



k^ 






'. 'I 



AFT ER N INE. 

Oopjrlgbt, 18*3, b7 CbM. K. HaiTia. 
All rigbu reaerred. 



Tb* 



Words and Mnrie of thia Sonir will be sent to unr addren, poBt-pald, on receipt of W 
tta; or Uila aiid uit two other Songa for One Doiuu*. by Henry J. Wehman, 130 A US 
nurk Bow, New York. Poatace Btampa taken aame as oaah for all our gooiB. 



. 



■•.I 



:; 



.( • 



Words and Hualoby Cbas. K. Harria. Arranged by.Louls Relnhard. 



I'm fond of a stroll on a prominent street 

After nine, after nine; 
What strange things we see and what people we meet 

After nine, after nine. 
Give me your attention, I'll not make it long, 
I'll tell you some facts In a topical song, 
Tiie tilings ttiat occur in life's migtity throng 

After nine, after nine. 

Chorus. 
After nine, when mama's asleep, 
Georgie will come Katie's comp'ny to keep,^ 
And Durn all tbe gas while papa's asleep. 
After nine, after nine. 

A large dry-goods box on the street yoa will ace* 

After nine, after nine: 
Ton pass it by quickly and innocently, 

After nine, after nine. 
A big night policeman patrolling his beat. 
Will glance very sharply at each one he'll meet. 
But wlien the coast's clear in that box he will sneak. 

After nine, after nine. 

Chorus. 

After nine, when all is serene, 
A fight in progress, no cops to be seen. 
The poor man's sleeping and thinks it a dream. 
After nine, after nine. 

A bald-headed man will go to a show. 

After nine, after nine; 
He admires the ballet from the front row. 

After nine, after nine. 
He writes to the fairy, " your face I adore, 
I'll meet you, my loveid one, at the stage door;" 
Ue meets her and finds she is just fifty-four. 

After tune, after nine I 

Chorus. 
After nine, when all is serene, 
fio paint or powder on that face to be seen. 
The fairy's a grandma 'tis plain to be seen. 
After nine, after nine. 

A married man wishes to go to a ball. 

After nine, after nine; 
Bis dear wife, you know, suspects nothing wrong. 

After nine, after nine. 
He makes an excuse, and his wife takes it In, 
There's a light in her dark eye bodes no good to *»'"», 
And off to the ball be goes with a grin, 

Atter nine, after nine. 

Chorus. 

After nine as soon as its late. 
Dear little wife for her hubby will wait. 
And with a shovel she greets her dear mate. 
After nine, after nine. 

There's the young man you meet who's always dead broke 

After nine, after nine; 
His money is gone, and his watch is in soak, 

After nine, after nine. 
You say to him kindly, "O where have you been? 
Come, make me your confidant; what have you seen}" 
He answers " I've played but a game on thegreeu 

After nine, after ume." 

Chorus. 
" After nine no money I've got. 
My head is aching, I wish I was shot; 
The fellow I played with scooped a jack pot, 
After nine, after nine." 

The tomcat will sing in a voice very clear, 

After nine, after nine, 
A beautiful song called "Maria, I'm here," 

After nine, after nine! 
He stands 'neaih your window without fear or dread; 
You feel very sleepy, you'd fain go to bc-d; 
You don't get much slumlMsr but a serenade instead, 

.'iter mue, after nine. 

CaoBua. 
After nine, when tbe world is at rest, * 
That is the time that Tom sin^s the best. 
You fire a bootjack, he won't take a rest. 
After nine, after nine. 



— The Young Minigter. — Dcacou Goode — Our young minister Is 
rather prosy, isn't he? Deacon Grimm — He is that. I think his 
hearing must be impaired. Deacon Qootle — His liearing? His 
speech, you mean. Deacon Grimm— No, Lis hearing — if he thinks 
he Leard a call from tlie Lord to preach. 



«i;':^■^^ 



HE WHISTL ED U P A TUNE. 

Copyrigtat, 1893. by Spauldlng A Korodor. 
All rights reserrsd. 



d 



The Words and Music of this Sontr will be sent to any address, post-paid, on receipt of 40 
centsi or tliia and any two other SonKS for One Dollar, by Henry J. Wehman, 130 AISS 
Park Kow, New York. Poatage Stampa takeu aame aa oaah for all our goods- 
Words and Music by Lew H. CarroU. 



I knew a little fellow once, who couldn't speak a word. 
And when he necd«d something done or wanted to be heard. 
He bud the most peculiar way that one could e'er construe. 
To tell you what ue'd like to have, tbe only tlihig he'd do: 

RxnuiN. 

Was to whistle np a tune {whU(le), then we'd answer very soon (wMttUy 
When we found out what he meant, all he wanted would be sent, 

Juft because we trit-d to please him night and day. 
For he was a darling boy (whutle), he was papa's pride and joy (whistle)/ 
As around the house he'd stroll in a manner odd and droll, 

Uc would whistle in his own peculiar way. 

Jrtke Johnson's little babv-bov wonld scream and cry each night, 
Until the soothing syrup had De<-n brought within its sight; 
The kid was bawling loud oae night to bring the l>ottle Iwck, 
Jack got up in bis stocking feet and stepped npon a tack. 

Rkpkain. 

Tlienhe whistled up a tnne (whUtU), as he tried to find the spoon (ythittU); 
"I will find it soon," said Jake, naver thinking a mistake 

Would be liable in darkness more than day; 
'Twus the castor oil lie found (whUtle), gave tbe kid about a pound {whitUtii 
\Vheu the doctor said he'd die, Jakey winked the other eye, 

As he whistled iu his own peculiar way. 

A bashful fellow got a job in Macy's dry-goods store. 

Behind the hosiery counter he sold stockings by the score; 

And all went well until one day, while ho was ill at ease, 

A lady cumu to him and said, " Show me some stockings, please." 

Retrain. 
Then he whistled up a tune (whittle), and he acted like a loon (whistle); 
" Here's a lovely pair of red, what's the price of those?" she said. 

" Seven-fifty, they're a bargain for to-day." [(whittle) 

Then she mui mured, "thcycomehigh" (u'/ii*<fc); "but you're tall," was his reply 
" I will call again," said sue; ' ' pleased to have yoa, ma'am," said he, 

As he whistled iu his own peculiar way. 



* « ^ 



No, 'Arry, Don* t Ask Me to Marry. 

CopyritsUt, 1893, by Francis, Day A Hunter. Kngllah copyright secured. 
All rights reserred. 



OTie Words and Musio of this Bonpr will be sent to any address, post-paid, on reoeipt of 40 

Oents: urtliisandany twootli«'r9<>nflrn f'>rOne Dollar, by Henry J. Wfliinan. I30&U3 

l^k Uuw, New York. I'uiitaKe Stamps taken same as cash (or all our guuds. 

Words by Harry CastUnir. Music by Oeo. Le Bruno. 

It's no use, 'Arry, trying to coax me on, 

I've said "No," and I meant it, straight I do; 
I've thought it over many nights alone, 

I'm certain every word you sixike was tme. 
It ain't that I dislike you I refuse, 

For you're the only cove I know is good; 
Don't think too bud of me for saying " No," 

And take it with a good 'art, as yoa should. 

Chorus. 
No, 'Arry, don't ask me to marry, oblige me and let me be, 
I've got my mother, my sister and brother, at 'ome depending on me; 
There's the ring yon gave mc a year ago to-day. 
Take it back, 'twill remind yon of me when yoa are mllea away. 

You said, last night, you'd go away from here. 

Pluck up, don't be a silly little lay; 
For if you join the army, 'Arry, dear, 

You might get both your legs clean blown awaj. 
On crutches you'd look very funny, straight, 

And not the sort of man I'd wish to w^; * 
But there, I'm only larking with you, mate. 

In fact I'm very nearly off my 'ead.—CAoru«. 

We ain't engaged, bnt we'll be chnmmy bUII* 

And sociable, just as we used to be; 
I'll alius have a drink with yer, I will, 

When you're broke course you'll 'ave one 'long o' me. 
But what's the use of you a-going away. 

Fur seven years you must be off yer crust, 
'Cos if you've made your mind up not to stay, 

Why don't yer try tbe— well, melieher fustf— CAorttf. 

If we got spliced, then what would mother dor 

There'd be no one to keep her, and she's low; 
And there's my little crippled brother, too, , ,' ; 

I couldn't see him want a crust, yon know. 
You said you'd take 'em with us, bye and bye. 

Those words of yoarn they made my 'art feel glAd; 
I know your 'art is good enough to try. 

But, obi that takes a lot of doing, ladl— CAortM. , : 



—At the Chrysanthemum Show. — He — I did not expect to see 
you here. She— Why didn't you? He — Isn't a rose out of place 
at a chrysanthemum show? : r .; ' .;■/.: , • 



i 



li 



i 



_i 



DID YOU NOTICE IT? 

TOPICAL SONG. 



Words by Ge^rqe Cooper. 
Tempo di Valse. 

5 



E^=^ 



-^ 



3 



t 



'^'- 



1. All the pa - i>er8 each day are di - lat - iug 

2. Now the Preach - ere are all the while preach - ing 

3. When you call on the girls neat and pret - ty, 

4. Now some <lea - cons who act most se - date - ly, 

5. There's Bob lu - ger - soil spouts his o - pin - ions 



Music by J. P. Skelly. 



— h- 



t 



^^ 



How in Pol - i - 

Of the ver - y 

A nd their " dads " are 

And run down 

And tells us, 



tics 

great 

a- 

the 

as 



1 



i 



:T 



^- 



peo - 
e - 

sleep 

Dra 
if 



pie 

vils 

sjife 

ma 

he 



:1: 



— q: 



—&- 



go 
of 

and 

as 

just 



~T 



^ 



Ir 



'^- 



wrong; And the fact tht-y 

gold; And all o - ver 

sound, While you're chat - ting 

bad, — Though, at home, tiiey'ro 

knew,... There are no flre 




so 


oft - 


en 


are 


stat - 


JnRi 


the 


land 


thoy 


are 


teach - 


mg 


a - 


way. 


ver - 


y 


wit - 


tv, 


de - 


mure. 


and 


so 


state - 


iv, 


and 


brim - 


stone 


do 


- mm - 


ions 



i 



:t: 



-+- 



That, in 


time, 


it 


be - 


comes 


an 


old 


Tliat the 


rich 


man 


can't 


en - 


ter 


the 


And there's 


no - 


bod 


-.1 


pry - 


ing 


a 


Witli 


fa - 


ther 


fea - 


tures 


so 


And of 


dol - 


lars 


he 


rakes 


in 


a 



%-- 



song., 
fold !.. 
round,, 
sad, — . 
few!... 



!^- 



-^--=F- 



Tho' some who're ac - 
They'll spout all they 
How oft - en they'll 
Yet when to a 
He laughs at the 




cused nmy be hon - est; 
like, and for - ev - er, 
scream, if so hap - py 
"show "you oft rat - ly 
or - tho - dox par - sons, 



Yet 


oth - ers are 


aw - ful - 


Iv 


And 


tell UH wliat 


tliey tliink 


is 


To 


press their soft 


lips you 


in 


With 


friends, how it 


makes vou 


all 


And 


says what they 


1 (reach is 


a 



fly;". 

best;.... 

sist ! 

stixre,.... 
lie; 



And 

But 

But 

For 

He 



i 



t 



-(-■ 



-I — 
-I — 



±: 



those who would like 
tho' they are aw - 
tell me, you in - 
in the front row, 

wears that you can't 

CHORUS. 



-s^- 



to be "hon -est," — 
ful - ly clev - 
no - cent "chap 
at the bal 
find a Dev - il,— 



er,— 

p - py,"- 

- let.— 



i 



IF 



£^5 



Did 



ypu 



¥- 



no - tice 



it? 



-¥ 



1=3 



T 



Did 
Did 
Did 
Did 
Did 



you 
you 
you 
you 
you 



% 



¥ 



Did 



h 



-h 



t: 



no - tice they like "boo 
no - tice they "feath-er 
no - tice they like to 
no - tice the dea - cons 
no - tice, he don't care 



P- 



dle" 

their 

Ikj 

all 

to 






you 



no 



tice 



it? 



PI 



pie? 

nest?".. 
ki&sed ?. 
there?., 
try? 



Keep your 



i 



:t 



t=q: 



-^ 



eyes wide a - wake as you go ;. 



:^-3^ 



=^- 



at 



-¥ 



:l=^= 



And you'll no - tice it, 



^ 



sure - ly 



P 



-^~ 



M 



no - tioe 



;|j 



-h 



:t: 



--:\: 



tt.- 



1 — 

If you don't you are aw - ful 

Copyright, MDcccLxxxvi, by Henry J. Wehman. 



ly 



-7^ 



??-' 



m 



Slow ••••••••tff §•••••••• 



' The complete Words and Music of this Song can be had for 40 cents per copy, of any Music Dealer in the 
United States or Canada; or from the Publisher, HENRT J. WEHMAN, 130 & 132 Park Sow, New York. 



'«L 






■/\_/N- /"^ A 



HE ART S. 

Copyright, 1893, by Joseph FUnner. 



All rigbta reserved. 



The Wordd kiid MaMe of Ihi* Sonpr will tx* sfiit t<> any addrem, potit-pald, on Moelpt of 10 
certa; or tlila and aiijr two other Sunits for Une Dollar, by Henry J. Webinan, 130&1SS 

Pftrk Kow, New York. Postace Stamps takeu same as caab (or all our goodii 



Worda and Music by Cbas. K. Harris. Arranged by Jos. Claoder. 

Would I could hut read your heart. 

And see what'8 written there; 
Could 1 use Bome bidden urt, 

JuBt to learn how much you care; 
Could I only read your heart, 

And see if you retain 
The love vou vowed would ne'er depart 
* Through euushine and rain. 
Do not be ani^ry with me, loved one, 

For the words that pained you so; 
It was my love for you, my darling, ' 

It was my pride whicli dealt the blow; 
Let rac look into thy heart. 

And fin<t reflected there 
The image which will ne'er depart, 

And the love which is so rare. 

CHORua. 
Hidden rtorieB, hidden treasures, has thy heart concealed; 
Would I ever be contented if it«< treasures %vere revealcdT 
Wondering if your tlioiiuhts are with me as in the days of yore, 
If I could but read and tl&d it mine for evermore. 



Olhcre may more charming be. 

Famed for their wit and grace. 
But none will more couBtant be — 

True love lies not iu a face. 
Often in a lonely hour 

My thoughts they turn to thee. 
As, oh, BO sad, I ofttime wonder 

If you ever think of me. 
Oil. why are you so long in coming. 

Making my life so long an<i <lrear, 
Would that I could but read your heart, love. 

And Bet at rest this trembling fear. 
1 know that you were ever true, 

I pleaded not iu vain. 
But lime has sped never to return 

With its pleasures uud its pain.— CAortM. 



The Widow's Plea for Her Son. 

Copyright, lg93,l>y LuuU H. Kosa &Co. 
All rights reserved. 



The AVords and Music of this Bong will be sent to any addrem, poll^paid, on receipt of 10 

cents; or this and any two other SouKB for One Dollar, by Henry J. Wehman, 13()<tl32 

rark Bow, New York. Postage Stamps t&keu same as caab (or all our goods. 



Compoved by Lewis Hall. 



I Strolled into a coart-hou:<e not many miles from here, 

A lioy stood in the prisoner's dock, his mother she was near; 

The boy was quite a youngster, but he hud gone astray. 

And from his master's cusli box he liad taken some coin away. 

The lioy addressed Ills Honor, while the tears ran down his check. 

Siiid lie, " Kind sir, will you allow my mother there to speaU?" 

Ilis ilouor then consented, while the boy hung down liis head, 

And turniug to the jurymen, these words Lis mother said: 

Cnonus. 
Remember, I'm his mother, aud the prisoner there's my son. 
And, gentlemen, remember, it's the first crime that he's done. 
Don't send my boy to prison, for that would drive me mad; 
Remember, I'm a widow, and I'm pleading for my lad. 

The lawyer for the prosecution at the widow commenced to frown, 

And })olitely usked Ills Ilouor if he'd order her to sit down. 

He said it was disgraceful, and a gross insult, indeed, 

Hix Honor to sit on that bench and allow that woman to plead. 

The widow's eyes flaxbed fire, and her cheeks turned deadly pale; 

She said, " I'm here to try and save my offspring from the jail. 

Altlio' my boy is guilty— 1 own his crime is bati. 

But who's there that's more fit to plead tliun a mother for her lad?" 

Cnonus. 
Remember, I'm his mother, and the prisoner there's my son. 
And, gentlemen, rememl>cr, it's the first crime that he's done. 
Don't send my boy to prison, for that would drive me mad; 
liemember, I'm a widow, aud I'm pleading for my lad. 

Tlic judge then addressed the prisoner, and these words to him did Bay: 

" I'm sorry to sit on tliiw bench, and see you here to-day. 

I will not blight your future, but on your crime I frown. 

For I can't forget that I have pot some children of my own. 

I therefore will discharge you "—and the court then gave a cheer — 

" But rememl>er that it's chiefly through your widowed mother there. 

I hope you'll prove a comfort, and no more make her sad. 

For she has proved there's no one clinga like a mother to her lad." 

Cborcb. 

Remember, she's his mother, and the prisoner there's her«oD, 
And, gentlemen, rememlier, it's the first crime that lie's done. 
Don't send her hoy to prison, for that would drive her mad; 
Reineiul>er, she's a widow, iind she's pleading for her lad. 



TOM AND TLL GO TOO. 

Copyright, 189$, by Spaulding A Komder. 
All rights reserved. 



Tb« Wnrdfl and Miixtc of tlftfl Song will l>e sent to any addrMS, poat-pald. on receipt of M 

cento, or tliiHitriil any two other SuntfH for One Doflar, by Henry J. Wenman, ISO ^ US 

f ark How, New York. Postage Stamps taken aame as caab (or aU our coods. 

Words and Music by Chas. Qrabam. 



Before the grim old judge they etood, a mother, girl and bby. 

The father faced his children aud his wife; 
He said that she had wronged him tho' she once had been his joy. 

He sought a separation there for life. 
The judge said, I will partyoa for your hearts are strangers now. 

The boy can with bis mother always stay. 
And if the girl is willing she can with her father go. 

The littie daughter then began to say: 

Rkfrain. 

Sly home will be with mother, for I'll never have another. 
If I should leave her now what would ehe do; 

I love you, dad, sincerely, and my mother just as dearly. 
Take mother home, then Tom and I'll go too. 

The father tho't of happy days before the babes were bom» 

Before estrangement, jealousy and pride. 
The promises and vows he made upon their wedding moro. 

The loving woman who became his bride. 
The loyalty of childhood proved that ehe was faithful still. 

Upon her good name there was not a stain ; 
The veil was torn asunder aud they never will forget 

The words that made them man aud wife again: 



KEEP THE HOME TOGETHER. 

Copyright, 1893. by Spauldlng ft Komder. 
All righta reserved. 



The Words and Mnxio of this Sonpr will lie sent to any addrexa, post-paid, on r-H-elpt of 40 

cento; or this and any two other .SonKS for One Dollar.by Henry J. Wehnian, IJU&ISS 

rark Uuw, New York. Postage Stamps taken same as cash (or all our goods. 

Word* and Music by Chas. Graham. 

An only son was seated at the bedside of his dad. 

And down his boyish cheeks the tears had started; 
The father feebly said: my boy, remember when I'm dead 

Your poor old mother will be broken hearted; 
'Tistheii she'll need your aid, my boy, so act the noble man, 

Wiicn I am laid to rest upon the heather; 
Then be a credit to her, lielp her every way you CAD, 

To prosper aud to keep the home together. 

Chorus. 
Keep the home together, John, and keep a heart that's willlnfr. 
For when the home is gone, you know, a man's not worth a shilling; 
Fortune may not favor you, but wait for brighter weather. 
And lielp your dear old mother, John, to keep the home together. 

Don't leave the little homestead, John, the place we've had for years, 

Its every nook and corner has a story; 
The morning we were wed, my boy, your mother to me said 

The little cottage was her earthly glory. 
Mixfortuiic may coufront you, but be fearless to the end. 

You'll get along though cloudy \v& the weather; 
Your two sweet little sisters ou your mother will depend. 

Be kind to them aud keep the home together. 



.■'■ ■'^'.'■:^..• 



I 



I LOVE YOU IN S PITE OP ALL. 

Copyright, 1893, by Cbas. K. Harris. Entered at StaUoners' Hall, London. 
All rights reserved. 



The Wordsand Music of tlilnSong will lie sent to any addresn, post-paid, on receipt of M ' 

ceiiisi or tliiii ond any two other Sonfrs for One Dollar, by Henry XWebmaii, 130 * ISS 

Park Itow, New York. Postage stamps taken same as cash (or all our goods. 

Worda and Music by Chas. K. Hai ria Arranged by Fred. Slmonson. 

Down by a shndy brook, by a swift running stream. 

Sat a maid and her lover, both happy as a dream. 

All nature seemed at rest, as the birds Bang their lay, 

He told her that be loved her, called her his Queen of MsT. 

Neither in their trysting, saw a maiden fall, 

A girl who also loved him, loved him the best of all. 

*' I love you best of all, better than all this world." 

Those were the words were spoken, those were the words she heard. 

'* With your dear arum about me, I care not what befallp. 

Surely, dear, you will nut doubt me, I love you best of all." 

She wandered from her home, this maiden all forlorn. 
In her heart kept the secret of a love left unborn. 
She came upon these lovers, unconscious of her woe. 
And heard him say " I love yon," just as she turned to go. 
She would keep her secret, which no time could pall. 
Her heart was almost breaking, she loved in spite of alL 
"I love you best of all," etc. 

Long, weary days have passed to the sweet little maid, 
Who has had manly suitors, but to all she says nay. 
Mo one else will she wed, Blie knows her heart is gone 
To one who will never love her, he weds to-morrow mora. 
Seated iu the arbor his words she now recalls. 
Yet in her heart she loves him, loves him iu spite of all. 
"1 love you best of all," etc. 



:-•. 



A 



''.•■'•■■■■ 



SOME OTHER GIRL SHALL WEAR THE RING. 



BALLAD. 



Words by M. M. Lane. 



Allegretto. 

I Li. 




1. Come, my 

2. Go a 

3. Tho' my 



fond 

way 

clothes 



one, 
you 
are 



come, 
sau 
poor 



my 

cy 

and 



4. Then the sail - or proud - ly 



loved 
sail 
rag 
an 



one, 

or, 

Red, 



-h 



Come, 
Please 
Said 



Arranged by J. P. Skelly. 



-f- 



my 

re 

the 



dear one, 
mem - l>er 
sail - or. 



swered: "Do you think that 



close to 

what you 

with heart 

I am 



,'i 




:t: 




me. 


Will 


you 


wed 


a 


jol 


- ly 


sail 


or 


Who 


has 


are, — 


You're 


in 


sad 


need 


of 


a 


tail 


or, 


You're 


a 


sore. 


I 


have 


sil - 


ver 


in 


my 


pock 


- et 


And 


i)right 


mad, 


Thus 


to 


wed 


with 


a 


poor 


maid 


en 


When 


a 




just come 


from 


sea? 


poor young 


Jack 


- tar. 


gold I've 


in 


store 


for - tune's to 


be 


had? 



—I 

-y— 

Pret 
Do 



ty 

nnt 



When she 
I will 



■-t 



maid 

ask 

thiiH 

cross 



-4^ 



--.il-: 



en, pn^t - ty 
nie n<)w to 

had heard liim 

the bound - ing 



i 



I: 



-r- 



maid 
wed 
an 
o - 



-1 

011, 

swer, 
cean, 




* 



A true 

For I'll 

Kneel - ing 

And my 



heart 

ne'er 

at 

gold 



to 

do 

his 

and 



you 
such 
feet 
sil 



I 
a 

she 
ver 



bring,— 
thing, 

fell, 
bring, 



Tell 

For 

Kay 

And 



me 
a 

some 



i 




sweet - ly, lit - tie 

poor and rag - ged 

"still I true - ly 

tru - er - heart - ed 



maid 
sail 
love 
maid 



en, 

or 

you, 

en 



f 



Will you wear for me 

I will nev - er wear 

Yes, I love you and 

Shall then wear the wed 



opyright, mdccclxxxvi, by Hr.<Rv J. Wehman. 



-^-- 



the ring? 

the ring, 

right well!" 

ding ring!" 



i 



The complete Words and Music of this Song can be had for 40 cents per copy, of any Music Dealer in the 
United States or Canada; or from the Publisher, HENBY J. WEHMAN, 130 & 132 Park Bow, New York. 



THE DYING GIRL'S MESSAGE. 

Copyrigbt, MDCXXUtXXV, by Henry J. Wehman. 



The Words and Hasic of thia SonK will be sent to any addrem, post-paid, on receipt of iO 
. or tlila and any two other SonKa for One Dollar, by Henry/. Wehman, ISO^ft 13S 



cents; _^ 

Park Row, New fork. 



Postage stamps taken i 



) as cash for all our goods. 



Warte hy A. H. Noe. Itnsic by J. P. Skeliy. 

Raise (he window higher, mother, air can never hnrm me now; 

Let ihe breeze l)low in upon me, it will cool my fevered brow. 

Moon death's struggles will be over, soon lie siilled ihis achiuK hearti 
I But i have a dyiug message I would give before we part: 
\ Lny my head u|k>u your bosom, fold me closer, mother, dear, 
/ While I breathe a name long silent, in thy fond uiid loving ear. 
) Mother, there is one— you linow him— oh, I cannot sptak his name, 
^ You remember how he sought me, how with loving words he came. 

I How lie gained my yonng affection, vowing in most tender tone 

) That he would forever guard me, were myTieart but his alone; 

) You remember how I trusted, how my thoughts were all of him— 

( Dritw the curtain higher, mother, for Ihe llpht is growing dim. 

) Need I tell you how he left me, coldiv putting me aside, 

) ilow he wooed and won another, an^ now claims her as his bride? 

( Life Ims been a weary burden since those hours of deepest woe — 

) Wi|>e these cold drops from my forehead, tliey ore dt-ttib warlts well I know. 

I 

) Gladly I obey the summons to a bright and better land, 

] Where no hearts are won and broken, but all form a liappy band. 

( Do not chide him, mother, darling, though my form you see no more; 

) Grieve not, think me only waiting for you ou the other shore. 

) Do not chnle him, mother, <larling, though you miss me from your side; 

< I forgive hiin, and I wish him joy with her so soon his bride. 

j Take this ring from off my finger, where he placed it long ago; 

) Give it to liim with a blessing, tltat, in dying, I bestow. 

\ Tell him that It is a token of forgiveness and of peace— 

^ IlarkI I hear his voice, it passeth; will this anguish never cease? 

1 Uark! I hear his footsteps coming— no, 'lis but the rustling trees; 

) 8irauge how my disordered fancy caught his footfall on the breeze. 

■( 1 am cold now, close the window, fold me closer— kiss me, too. 

) Joy! wliat meaus that burst of music? 'tis the Saviour's voice, I know; 
See Uim waiting to receive me! oh, how great a bliss to die— 
Mother, meet your ctiild iu heaven; one more kiss, and then— good-bye. 



Since My Mot her's D ead and Gone. 

Copyright, MDCCCLXXXVl. by Henry J. Wehman. 

The Words and Manic of this Hontr will be sent to any address, post-paid, on rpopipt of M 

cents, or this and ttiiy two other Sonjcs for One Dollar, l>y Henry J. Wehman, l30<klSS 

Park Uuw, Mew York. Postage Stamps taken same as cash fur all our goods. 



Words and Music by J. P. PkeUy. 



In that dear old village churchyard, there I see a mossy mound. 
That is wliere my mother's sleeping in the cold itiid silent ground; 
Gently waves the weepiug willow, birds their warble slug at dawn, 
But my licart is sad and lonely since my mother's dead and goue. 

Chorus. 

In that dear old village churchyard oft I stray with heart forlorn. 
For there's no one left to love me since my mother's dead and gone. 

I was young, but I remember well the night my mother died. 

When I watched lier spirit fading, till she called me to her side; 

Saying, "Darling, I must leave you, angel voices guide me on; 

Pray that we may meet iu heaveu, when your mother's dead and gone.— Chorus. 

Oft I wander to that churchyard, flowers to plant with tender care 

Ou the grave of my dear mother— darkness finds me weepiug there. 

Looking at the sky above me, waiting for the heavenly dawn. 

There ia no one left to love me siuce my mother's dead aud gone. — Chorus. 



AFTER THE BALL. 

Copyright, tan, by ObM. K. Harris A Oo. 



; -^ -I," '■'; f 



ExcluslTe permission to pubUah the words of this song. All rights reserred. 

lite Words and Miinlc of this Ronir will be sent to any address, poat-pald. on recrlpt 

cents; ortlila and any two other Sunjrs for One Dollar, by Henry J. Wehman. laoft 

Park Uow. Mew Yorlc Postage Stamps taken same as cash Cor all o«ir good*. 

Words and Mosla by Chas. K. Harris, 



of«» 

la 



A little maiden climbed on an old aiau'a knse. 
Begged for a story — *' Do, nncle, please. 
Why are you single; why live alone? 
Have you no babies; have you no home?'* 
" I had a BweetlieHrt, years, years ago; 
Where she is now, pet, you will soou know. 
List to the story, I'll tell it all: 
I believed her faithless after the bail." 

Cborub. 
After the ball Is over, after the break of mom; 
After the dancers' leaving, after the stars are gone- 
Many a heart is aching, if you could read them all; 
Mauy the hopes that have vauished after the ball. 

"Bright liglits were flashing In the grand ball-room. 

Softly the music, playing sweet tunes. 

There came my sweetheart, my love, my own — 

' I wish some water, leave me alone.' 

When I returned, dear, there stood a man. 

Kissing my sweetheart as lovers cnn. 

Down fell the glass, pet, broken, that's all. 

Just OS my heart was, after the ball.— C'Aort<«. 

Long years have passed, child: I've never wed; 

True to my lost love, though she is dead. 

She tried to tell nie, tried to explain; 

I would not listen, pleadings were vain. 

Cue day a letter came from that man — 

He was her brother— the letter ran. 

That's why I'm lonely, no home at all; 

I broke her heart, pet, after the ball."— CA«>rti«. 



i>* ■ 



THE VOLUN TEER ORGANIST. 

Copyriglit. 1(93, by Spauldlng A Korader. 
All rights reserved. 



"Hie Words and Music of this Song will be sent to any address, post-paid, on receipt of M 

cents; or this and any two other Souks for one Dollar, by Henry i. Wehman, ISO A W 

Park How, New York. Postage Stamps taken same as cash for all our goods. 

Words by Wm. B. Olenroy. Huslo by Henry Lamb. 



said: 



OH, P ROMI SE ME. 

Copyright, 1«89, by O. Schlrmer. 



All rights reserved. 

The Words and Mnsio of this Song will be sent to any address, post-paid, on receipt ofM 

cents; or this and any two other Sonss for One Doflar, by Henry J. Wehman, 130 AMS 

Park Bo w. Mew Yorlc. Postage Stamps taken same as cash fur ali our goods. 



Words by Clement Scott. Music by Reginald De Koven. 

Oh, promise me that some day you nud I 

Will lake our love together to some sky. 

Where wc can l)e alone aud faith reuew. 

And find tlie hollows where those flowers grew; 

Those first sweet violets of early spring, 

Whlcli come iu whisi>erg, thrill us both, and Sing 

Of love unspeakable that is to be— 

Oh, promise me, oh, promise me. 

Oh, promise me that you will take my hand. 
The most unworthy iu this lonely laud. 
And let me sit beside you, in your eyes 
Seeing the vision of our paradise; 
Hearing God's measagc, wliile the organ rolls 
Its mignty music to our very souls; 
No love I^SB perfect than a life with thee— 
Ob, promise me, oh, promise me. 



The preacher in the village church one Sunday morning 

"Our organist is ill to-day, will someone play instead?'' 

An anxious look crept o'er the face of every person there. 

As eagerly they watched to see who'd fill the vacant chair. 

A man then staggered down the aisle whose clothes were old and torn; 

How strange a drunkard seemed to me in church on Sunday momi 

But as he touched the organ keys without a single word, 

The melody that followed was the sweetest ever heard. 

RXTRAIN. 

The scene was one I'll ne'er forget as long as I may live. 
And just to see it o'er again all earthly wealth I'd give; 
The congregation all amazed, the preacher old and gray. 
The organ and the organist who volunteered to play. 

Bach eye shed tears within that church, the strongest men grew pole. 

The organist in melody had told his own life's tale; 

The sermon of the preacher was no lesson to compare 

With that of life's example who sat in the organ chair. 

And when the service ended not a soul bad left a seat, 

Excpt the poor old organist, who started toward the street; 

Along the aisle and out the door he slowlv walked away. 

The preacher rose and softly said: " Good brethren, let ug proj."— Jf^oin. 



TWO LITTLE GIRLS IN BLUE. 



Copyright, 1S93, by Spauldlng A Komdsr. 



All rights reeerred. 

The Words and Mnnie of this Song will be sent to any address, post-paid, on receipt of «• 

cents; or this and any two other Sontrs for One Dollar, by Henry J. Wehman, 130 A ISt 

Pork How, Mew York. Postage Stamps taken same as cash for all oar goods. 

Words and llusio by Chas. Oraham. 

An old man gazed on a photograph In the locket he'd worn for years; 
Ills nephew then asked him the reason why that picture had caused him tears, 
"Come, listen," he said, "I will tell you, lad, a story that's strange but true— 
Your faMier aud I at the school one day met two little girig in blue. 

RXFRAIN. 
Two little girls in blue, lad, two little girls in bine; 
They were sisters, we were brothers, and learned to love tbe two. 
And one little girl in blue, lad, who won your father's heart. 
Became your mother; I married the other, bat we bare drifted apart. 

"That picture is one of those girls," he said, "and to me she was once a wife; 
I thought her unfaithful, we quarreled, lad, and parted that nigbt for life. 
My fancy of jealousy wronged a heart, a heart that was good and true. 
For two better girls never lived tban tbey, tboee two little girls in bine."— Jl^^; 



* \ 



I.'.'.- 



fc 



T 




•■■ '-i '■ ■ 









.ik 



To the Memory oj the Lost. . ? 

BELLEVILLE CONVENT FIRE. 



Words by John Fletcher. 
A ndante con moto. 




— h- 



-nH^- 



1. Kind friends give at - ten - tion to what I 

2. Near thir - ty dear souls from the earth took 

3. Let us men - tion this pure soul who went with 

4. When the dread cry of "fire," was heard loud in 



Music by Ned STRAiOHii 



^ 



--4^: 



re -late, And ev - 

tlieir llifrht, Tn that ill - 
the rest, To tliat sweet land 



V 



the air, Fond 



fa 



f 



er 


re - mem - ber 


those 


fat - 


ed eon - vent 


on 


land 


a - hove to 


be 


thers 


and moth - ers 


were 




poor chil - dren's fate, 

that fa - tal night, 

there ev - er blest, 

seen ev - *ry - where. 



In 


full health and vig - or 


thev 


And 


fa- thers and moth -ers 


are 


The 


brave ho - ly moth - er 


from 


A 


las, when the fire - men 


ar 



re- tired for the night, Not 

now left to mourn. Their 

the rooms would not go, Al - 

rived 'twas too late, For 




^^ 



J^T-- 



think - ing of fire 

chil - drcn, who had 

though twice be - fore 

all those poor chil 



that 


soon 


raged 


with 


its miglit. 


The 


bet 


- ter 


nev 


- er 


been born — 


A 


she 


had 


been 


down 


be - low. 


A 


dren. 


had 


met 


their 


sad fate. 


\\c 



rooms 

girl 

brave 

know 



and 

at 

her 

they 



—- f- 



:|i 



the 

tlie 

■ o - 

liave 



hall - ways were 
win - dow 8t^)od. 



me, 

gone 



she 
to 



stood 
a 



* 



Si 



.5! 



ft 



\- 



H- 



# 



i_JL. 



--N 



— N- 









cloud - ed with smoke. When the dear lit 

three sto-ries high, "Oh, save me! 

true to her post. When she saw that 

far bet -ter shore, Where the death deal 



tie 


ehil - dren 


from slum 


- lH>rs 


a - 


woke, 


They 


dear 


moth - er," 


in vain 


she 


did 


cry. 


Just 


tlie 


eliil - dren 


would sure 


- Iv 


be 


lost, 


Slie 


ing 


fire - fiend 


Ciin reach 


tliem 


no 


more. 


Let us 










— ^ — ^_^ — y 

rushed to the windows, 'twould make bnvveheartssigh 
tiien an ex - plo-sion, we grieve to re - late, 

rushed up the stair- way with i>it - i - ful cry, 
hoi)e we will meet them all, up there, a - gain, 



CHORUS. 



P^di=£^ 



:^ 



No 



one 



to 



PV 


w 


\ m \ w 


__p 




"i - \ . -^ ;> . 


m 


^ ' \ 



_^ % 

-^— ^ 

To s(H> those while faces at tlie 
And all in tliat eon vent liad 
While praying to (Jod with her 
Where there's no more sorrow, no 



1- 



help 



them, no 



;ft: 



~^ -N 



3: 



window so high, 
met their sa«l fate, 
children to die. 

angdisli, or pain. 



one 



to 



Idess, 



i 



n\ 



'-^ 



No one to save them, in their sad dis - tress, 



It was 



s 



I: 



*: 



^ 



V- 



— 1 — 



t 



V- 



in 



JJelle - ville Cit 



sad 



— \- 



^ 



grief did a - bound. On the night that the con - vent was burned to the ground. 

Copyright, mdccclxxxv, by Henry J. Wehman. 

The complete Words and Music of this Song can be had for 40 cents per copy, of any Music Dealer in the 
United States or Canada; or from the Publisher, HENBY J. WEHMAN, 130 & 132 Park How, Now York. 




A Mother's Appeal to Her Boy. 

Copyright, 1889, by Ueo. M. Klenk & Co. 



The Words and Miii'ic of tliln ^tng will be sent to any address, post-paid, on receipt of 40 

C«ntsi or this anil nnv t"0 oilier Suii(;8 forUnu Dollar, by Henry J. Wehnian, 130A 13^ 

{"aik Uow, New York. I'oataKe Stamps taken same as cash for all our goods. 



Words by Julian Holmes. Music by Henry F. Smith. 



A mother wns bidding Kood-bye to her boy, 

lie was i;<)iiig to leave her timt morn; 
Twas hard to depart from the ones that he loved. 

And the humble cot where he was born. 
He treasured the parting advice that she gave. 

With the love that a mother can feel; 
- . In vain lie endeavored his tears to restrain, 

As he heard his fund mother's appeal: 

Chorus. 
** faithful and fearless, devoted and true; be manly In sorrow or Joy; 
In trials remember 'tis durtiest ere dawn," was a mother's up|>eal to ner boy. 

The years glided by, and he wandered afar. 
Often lilie a lone exile he'd roam; 
- In moments of sorrow his heart would be cheered, 
«. When he thought of his mother at home. 

filic always said, " Boy, never vieid to detipair. 
There's no pleasure without Its alloy;" 
■ ... They never more met, but he never more forgot 

The appeals she made to her boy.— C/iarus. 



THE GOLDEN WEDDING-. 



CopyrlKht, 188S, by K. Bardinc. 



Till Words and Music of this Song will be sent to anv address, post-paid, on receipt ufiO 

leiits: or tills and any two other Sougs for Une Dollar, by Henry i. Wehman, IMft ISt 

Park How, New York, fostage stamps taken saiue as cash (or all our goods. 



THE IRI SH J UBILEE. 

Copyright, 1890, by H. W'itmark <t Suns. 



The Wnrdii nnd Music of tlils Unng will be Rent ti> any adilreHs, pnKt-pald,on receipt of 40 

centH. or thin and any t wool In r Souks for One Dollar, by Henry J. We)iiiiuii,13(i<V 132 

fark Kow. New York, rostage Stamps tukeu same as cash fur all oor gooUn. 

Words by J. Thornton. Music by Chas. Lawlor. 



Oh, a short time ago, boys, an Irishman named Dohcrety 

Was elected to the Senate by a very large majority. 

He felt BO elated that he went to Deuuis C'uesidy, 

Who owned u bar-room of a very large capacity. 

He said to C'ussidy : " Go over to tlie nrewer 

For a thousanil kegs of lager beer and give it to the poor. 

Then go over to the butcher-shop and order up a ton of meat. 

Be sure and see the boys and g*'''^ have all they want to drink and cat; 

8enil out invitations in twenty different laiiguugcs. 

And don't forget to tell them to bring their own saiidwicheo; 

Tliey've made me tlieir Senator, and so, to show my gratitude, 

They'll have the fluest supper ever given in this luttitude — 

Tell tliem the mut<ic will l>e furnished by U'Rallerty, 

Assisted on the l)ag-pipes by Felix Mct'afferty; 

Whatever the expenses are, remember I'll put up the tin. 

And any one wlio doesn't come, be sure and do not let him in." 

Caesidy at once sent out the invitations. 

And everyone that came was a credit to their nations; 

8onie cunie on bicycles, lM.-ciuise they hud no fare to pay. 

And those wlio diiln't come at all made up their minus to stay away; 

Two-by-lhree they marclied in the dining hall — 

Young men and old men, and girls that were not men at all. 

Blind men and deaf luen, and men who had their teeth in pawn. 

Single men, double men and men who hud their glasses on; 

Before many minutes nearly every cimir was taken, 

'Till the front rooms and niushrooms were packed to suffocation; 

When everyone was seated, tlicy started to lay out the feast; 

C'assidy said, rise up and give us each a culvc of yeai<t; 

He then suiil, us niunuger he would try and fill the chair; 

We then sat down and we ItM^ked at llie bill-of-furc; 

There was pigs-head and gold-ttxh, mockingbirds and ostriches. 

Ice cream and cold cream, vusalinc and sandwiches. 

Bluefish, green-fish, fish-hooks and partridges. 

Fish-balls, snowbails, cannon-balls and cartridges; 

Then we eat out-nieul till we could hardly stir about; 

Ketchup and hurry-up, sweet-kroiit and soiir-krout, 

I)refsed beef and nuked beef, and beef w ith all its drcssci on. 

Soda crackers, fire-crackere, limburger-cheese with tresses on, 

Beefsieukt- und mistakes were down on the bill-of-fure; 

I{oai<t-rilis und spare-ribs, and ribs tliat we couldn't spare, 

Kciudeer and suuw-deer, dear me and antelope; 

And the women eat so-niui'hmellon, ihe men said they canlalo|)c; 

Ked herrings, smoked herrings, herrni's from old Erin's isle, 

Bologna and fruit-cake, and sausages a half-a-mile; 

There was hot-corn and cold corn, corn-sulve and honeycomb. 

Heed-birds, reud books, scu-liass and sea-foam. 

Fried liver, baked liver, Carter's little liver pills. 

And every one was wondering who was going to pay bills. 

For desert we had tooth-picks, ice-picks and skinping-ropc. 

And washed them all down with a big piece of shaviug-soap; 

We eat everything that was down on the bill-of-fare, 

Then looked on the buck of it to sec if any more wns there; 

Then tlie band pluyed, liorn-pijies, gus-pi|ies, and Irish reels. 

And we danced to the music of ''the wind that shakes the barlcy-flclds," 

Then the piper pluyed old tunes and spittoons so very fine 

Ttmt in came Peiiivr Ueidseck und handed him a glass of wine; 

They welted the lliH>r till they could l>e heard for miles around; 

When Gallagher was in the«ir, his feet was never on the ground: 

A fine lot of dancers you never set your eyes upon. 

And those who couldn't dunce at all were dancing with their slippers on; 

Some danced jig-step, door-steps and highland llings. 

And Murpliy took his knife out and tried to cut a pigeou-wiu^; 

When the dance was over, C'assidy then told us 

To Join hands together and sing this good old chorus: 

(AFTKn LAST VKRSK.) 

Should old acquaintance be forgot, wherever me mav be. 
Think of the good old times we had at the Irish jubilee. 



As sung by Mr. John Walsh. 



This mornine at breakfast I said to my wife. 

But one golden wedding we see in a life; 

'Tis now fifty years since the clergyman said 

In that clear, ringing voice: Witli this ring I thee wed. 

So it is, so it is, said my dear old wife Jane, 

Let us have our old wedding day over again; 

Off we went to the church with our cheeks all aglow. 

And the same love at heart as wc had jreuiB «go. 

Chorus. 
Oh, for the golden visions, oh, for the crimson glow. 
Oh, for the golden day dreams fifty years ago. 
Oh, for the fairy voices and the songs we used to sing, 
Telling of heavenly joys, my boys, found In • wedding ring. 

The service was ended, wc passed through the door ' 

And into the buttercup meadow once more; 

I pliickedJane a bunch and she asked for a pin, 

Whicli I gave and she fastened them under her chin. 

We strolled by the stream, then our footsteps retraced, ,, 

And mv arm slyly stole round the old ludy s waist; 

I gave her a squeeze, but she did not cry, oh, ■• 

As she did about two score and ten years %go.—C' horut. 

Wc reached the old homestead and then went inside. 
But no bouquet awaited the bridegroom and bride; 
My thoughts wandered back to the hour of my joy. 
When I o|^>ened my arms for my dear baby boy. 
The happiness heaven has promised to men 
Can not l>e compared to my happiness then; 
It seemed the whole world was without an alloy, 
I'd no eyes, I'd no thought that were not for my boy. 

Sfoken— My mind conjured up Ihe old scene in an instant. I can see him 
uow as 1 saw him then, standing ut the cottage door, wishing his mother goo<l- 
bye and saying: "Good-bye, Father, my country requires soldiers to sustain 
her honor. You would not have me called a coward and a traitor." That was 
ilie very lust time we ever saw the poor boy again alive. As I thought of it, 
the tears ran down my silly old cheeks, and I felt two loving arms steal around 
my neck, and that dear old voice that had cheered ni« ou through all these 
years, murmuring:— C'AortM. , 



I 



BETWEEN LOVE AND DUTY. 



Copyright, 1891, by H. Wltmark * Sons. 



Tlie Words and Music of this Song will be sent to any address, post-paid, on receipt of M 

vents; urtlilsandauy two other Sours for Une l>olIar, by Henry J. Wehman. 130 ft 13t 

I'ark Ituw, New York. Postage Stamps taken same ascash for all our goods. 

Words by Charles WUllams. Music by Leo Drydau. Arranged by O. M. Roaenberg. 

At his {)08t the soldier's standing, "duty" tells him he must stay; 
True love's calling over vonder, which command must he ot>ey r 
Little Nell, his wife, is dying— why, oh, why's his lot so hard? 
Like u dream, perchance, siie'll vanish, wliite he's standing here on guard, 
itliuding tears his eyes are filling as he thinks, what shall I do? 
Stick to iiost and lose my darling, without one fond, last adieu f 
Though lie's proved himself a hero, with the foe stood face to face; 
Now to leave would mean dishonor, on bis good name bring disgrace. 

Chorcs. 

lie stands between love and duty, fighting the bitter fight: 

Ills lieait Is torn with anguish between the wrong and right; 

Hut the soldier's love St ill remains the same, his conn try's cuuse he'd ne'er shame, 

Bui wife comes first, and who can blame f he stands between love and duty. 

In a far-off country mansion sits a woman worn and old, 
"I'is, alas I the old, old story that has been BO often told; 
Mother's love and l)oyhood s downfall, he has brouglit disgrace and shame; 
She knows lie's a thief, an outcast, having forged his father's name; 
Tliough degraded, she'll protect him— yes, protect him with her life- 
First, because she is u mother; secondly, she is a wife. 
Now the stern, old father enters, " Where's my one-time son," says he. 
She who never yet deceived him, head bowed down in grief, we see. 

Chorus. 
She stands between love and duty, fighting the bitter fight; 
Her heart is torn with anguisii between tlio wrong and right; 
The mother's love still remains the same, altho' she feels her darling's shame. 
She shields her sou, and who can blamef she stands between love and duty. ' 

The hour's midnight, all is silent in a peaceful village street; 

Heedless of the dismal darkness, walks a policeman on his beat: 

Soon tlie sound of hurried footsteps breaks the stillness of the night. 

" Who goes there? " and then a {>oliceman slops a burglar's hurried flight; 

Then ensues u fearful scuffle, soon he has the burglar fast. 

*' Who isthisr- my brother Iteubenl " the p'iicemau cries with face aghast. 

" Let mo go, Jack," pleads the burglar, " let me go and I'll repeat; 

You know it will kill poor mother if to prison I was sent." 

Chorus. 
He stands between love and duty, fighting the bitter fight: 
His heart is torn with anguish between the wrong and right: 
But brotherly love still remains the same, altho' tie fesis the disgrace and shame, 
Be sets him free, and who can blamef be stands between lore and datjr. 



.- - •:(. 



y< 



^ii' 



■•;:=a 



SINCE MY MOTHER'S DEAD AND GONE. 



SONG AND CHORUS. 



Andante moderato. 



ESEtEEE^t 



1. In 

2. I 

3. Oft 






that dear old vil 
was young, but I 



:=i: 



-<5' 



lago cliurch - yard, 
re - mem - ber 



I wan - der to that chureh - yard, 



Words and Music by J. P, SkellT, 

-rN-^ic 



H-^ 



-H 




There I see a nioas - y 

Well tlie niiTiit my moth - er 

Flow'rs t«> plant with ten - der 



m 



-G- 



mound, 
died,— 
care 



5^— 



That 

When 

On 



18 
I 

the 



where 

watched 

grave 



my 

her 

of 



moth 
sj)ir 
my 



1- 



=T 



ers 

it 

dear 



nU'ep 

fad 

moth 



G- 



er — 



-*— 




-G' 



the c<L)ld and si - lent ground, 
she called me to her side, 

Dark - ness finds me weep - ing there. 



Look 



ing 



at 



Gen 


- tly 


waves the 


weep 


- >"g 


Say - 


>»f,', 


"dar - ling, 


I 


must 



the sky a - 




fe=fe-- 



# 



t; 



i^i 



low, 

you, 

me. 



Birds their war - ble sing 

An - gel voi - ces guide 

Wait - ing for the heav'n 



at dawn, 

me on,— 

ly dawn ; 




But 

Pray 
There 



my heart is sjid and 
that we may meet in 
is no one left to 



Since my moth-<'r's de-^J and gone! 
When your nu>tli-«'r's d'-ul an«l gone!" 
Since my moth-er's dead and gone! 



CHORUS. 




yard, 



\ 



N 



I 



fes 



Oft 



r y I 



i-tn 



-&- 



-^- 



stray with heart for - lorn; 



For 



■^ 



there's no one left 



m 



to 



s=^ 



X.-- 



me. 



rit. con espressione. 



m 




— — 


N 


-^ 




W i 


m 


m 




s 


J 


w 


< 


m 


m 




1 


— t^ 


-M 






— '^ — 



Since my moth - er's dead 

Copyright, MDCCCLXXXVI, by Henry J. Wbhman. 



/TN 



-(5?- 



and 



gone! 



I 



The complete Words and Music of this Song can be had for 40 cents per copy, of any Music Dealer in the 
United States or Canada ; or from the Publisher, HENBY J. WEHMAN, 130 8c 132 Park Bow, New York. 



;j>---'-Jm>^K:y 



\u 



'V 



THE BR OKEN HOME. 

Copyright, I89I, by Frank Harding. 



The Worda and Muilo of thit Song will be sent to any addresa, post-paid, on receipt of 40 

centH; or this and anr two other Songs for One Dollar, by Henry J. Wehman, l!IO<t 1S2 

I'aric Row, New Yorlt, Postage JStanipn taken same as cash for all our goods- 



Words and Music by Will H. Fox. 



' 



The chnrch-beUs they were ringing, the clioir was sweetly singing. 

In a far New England villaKe, just two short years ago; 
The flowers they were blooming:, the birds iu tree-tops tuning — 

Two hearts had l)ecn united, fair Lilliau and Joe. 
Tlie husband he toiled daily and happy was their lot; 
llu loved his wife and baby; his vows he ne'er forgot; 
One day a former sweetheart came, and, finding liini away. 
Through flattery and promises Joe's love was led astray. 

Cbobus. 

There's her picture on the table, there's a baby in the cradle. 

There's a husband crying bitterly alone. 
There's no wife's voice to cheer, in his sorrow to be near— 

What was Paradise is now a brolceu Lome. 

His eyes are dim with weeping, yet faithful watch he's keeping 
O'er liis precious little tit-asure, for whom his heart doth moan; 

Forgetting all dishonor wliich slie had brought upon her, 
For baby's sake he'd gladly forgive if she'd come home. 

Oh, why do people falter and lose all self-respect 

For vows made at tiie altar, and make their lives a wreck? 

These (juestioiis Joe has asked hiuiseif, with heart heavy as lead. 

And baby's emilc prevents him from being numbered with the deAd.— Chorus. 



THE PICTURE THAT IS TURNED 
TOWARD THE WALL. 



Copyright, 18t)l, by M. Witniark &Sons. 



The Words and Music of this Song will be sent to any addresH, post'pald,on receipt of 40 

cents; or tins and any two other Songs for One liolfnr, by Ilfniy J. Wehman, I30<1-1.T^ 

I'ark Huw, Mew York, f uHlugb Stamps taken same as cash fur all uur goods. 



Worda and Music by Chas. Oraham. 



Far away beyond the glamor of the city and its strife 

There's a (luiet little homestead by the sea. 
Where a tender, loving lassie used to live a happy life. 

Contented in her home as she could be; 
Not a shadow ever seemed to cloud the sunshine of her yonth, 

And they thought no sorrow could her life befall. 
But she left them all one evening, and their sad liearts knew the trath 

When her father turned her picture to the wall. 

Refrain. 

There's a name that's never spoken and a mother's heart half-broken. 
There is just another missing from the old home, that is all; 

There is still a memory living, there's a father unforgiving, 
And a picture that is turned toward the wall. 

They have laid away each token of the one who ne'er retnms, 

Ev'ry trinket, ev'ry ribbon that slie wore; 
Tho' it seems so long ago now, yet the lamp of hope still bums. 

And her mother prays to see her child once more; 
Tho' no tidings ever reach them what her life or lot may be, 

Tho' they eumctimes think she's gone beyond recall. 
There's a tender recollection of a face they never see 

In the picture that is turned toward the wuU.—Jle/rain, 



COMRADES. 



Written and Composed by Felix HcOlennon. Arranged by E. Jonghmana. 

The Words and Music of this Song will be sent to any address, post-paid , on receipt of 40 ' 

cents; or this and any two other Songs for (.)ne Dollar, by Henry J. Wehman, 130 & 133 

Park Kow, New Xork. Postage Stamps taken same as cash for all our goods. 



We from childhood played together, my dear comrade Jack and I; 
We would flght each other's battles, to each other's aid we'd fly; 
And, in boyish scrapes and troubles, you would find us everywhere; 
Where one went the other followed, naught could part as, lor we were 

■ '' Chorits. : v.; 

Comrades, comrades ever since we were boys. 

Sharing each other's sorrows, sharing each other's Joys: 

Comrades when manhood was dawning, faithful wbate'er might betide, 

When danger threatened, my darling old comrade was there by my side. 

When just budding into manhood, I yearned for a soldier's life; 
Night and day I dreamed of glory, longi'u: for the battle's strife; 
I said, "Jack, I'll be a soldier, 'ueath the red, the white and blue; 
Good-bye, Jack I " said he, "no never! If you go, then I'll go too '"~- Chorus. 

I enlisted. Jack came with me, and ups-and-downs we shared: 

For a time our lives were peaceful, but at length war was declared; 

KiiKJaud'e flag had been insulted, we were ordered to the front. 

And the reg'meut we belonged to had to bear the battle's bruut. — Chorus. 

In the night the savage foemen crept around us as we lay. 

To our aims we leaped and faced them, back to back we stood at bay; 

As I fought, a savage at me aimed his spear like lightning's dart. 

But uy comrade sprang to save me and received it m hisueart.— CAoru«. 



T A-RA-RA BOO M-DER-E. 

Copyright, 18»1, by Willis Woodward ^t Co. Entered at Stotioners' Hall, London. 

The Words and Music of this Song will be sent to any address, post-paid, on receipt of 40 

cunts; or this anil any two other Sutigs for Un« Dollar, by Henry J. Wehman, 130 & 1S2 

Park Kow, New York. Postage Stamps taken same as cash (or all our gooda 



Twelve Months Ago To-Night. 

Copyright, 1889, by Harding Brothera. 

The Worda and Music of this Song will l>e sent to any address, pos^paid, on receipt of 40 

cents; or this and any two other Songs for One Dollar, by Henry J. Wehman, 130 A 132 

Park Itow, New York. Postage Stamps taken same ascash for all our goods. 



Worda by J. F. Mitchell. Music by Will H. Fox. 



-. 



Twelve months ago this very night 'midst loving friends I sat. 

And 'round the board went laughter, jest and song; 
We thought not of the future, for tliere lived iu every heart 

The present of a manliomi pure and strong; 
We drank to wives and sweethearts and to friends across the sea, 

For everything was rosy-hued and bright; 
Nut a shadow of a sorrow came between us and our joys. 

In our happiness twelve moutlis ago to-night, 

CaoKus. 

- Then where are the boya who vowed eternal friendship? 
Good-natured fellows, with spirits gay and bright; 
Where are the ones who sang the songs of gladness. 
And spent an hour in Paradise twelve mouths ago to-nightf 

Twelve months ago this very night in friendship's name we met 

To taste the sparkling escence of the vine; 
We toasted lovely woman for her purity and worth. 

And wished that she were never less divine; 
And— oh, the pleasant stories, the laughter and the wit. 

That woke the sleeping eclioes of delight. 
As we shook hands with each other, and we sang of " Aald Lang Syne," 
. When we parted friends twelve months ago to-night. 

Refrain. 

One little year has told Its tale, for men will ever roam; 
Some of them lie in foreign lands, while others sleep at home; 
But still my heart goes back again, in sorrow and delight, 
To friends I had and joys I knew twelve months ago to-night. 



Written by Henry S. Sayara. 

A sweet Tuxedo girl you see. 
Queen of swell society, 
Fond of fun as fond can be. 
When it's on the strict Q. T.; 
I'm not too young, I'm not too old. 
Not too timid, not too bold. 
Just the kind you'd like to hold. 
Just the kind for sport I'm told. 

Chorus. 
Ta-ra-ra boom-der-e, ta-ra-ra boom-der-e, 
Ta-ra-ra boom-der-e, ta-ra-ra boom-der-e, 
Ta-ra-ra boom-der-e, ta-ra-ra boom-der-e, 
Ta-ra-ra boom-der-e, ta-ra-ra boom-der-e. 

I'm a blushing bnd of innocence. 

Papa says at big expense; 

Old maids say I have no sense; 

Boys declare I'm just immense; 

Before my song I do conclude, 

I want it strictly understood, 

Tho' fond of fun, I'm never rude; 

Tho' not too bad, I'm not too good.— CAortM. 

Encore Verses (By Lew Hawkiu). 

I'll sing a little song. It won't take long; 
If I sing it wrong why ring the gong. 
Then I will say to you. So long. 
And start at once for old llong Kong. 
Then a tear to my eye 'twill surely bring; 
And I'll call you a saucy tiling, 
Then for the patrol you all may ring. 
And hear the copper sweetly sing:— CAortlf. 

Played a little poker the other Bight 

With a jay I thought I had all right. 

The hand I held was out of sight; 

I held them close, I held them tight. 

The hand I held contained four kings; 

I bet all my stiill on the pretty things. 

But the Kul>e at me four aces flings; 

Ue cop|)ed my stuff and gently sings:— CAoTM. 

A lay came in from Buffalo, 

Who long had let his whiskers grow; 

They were white as the driven snow; 

They were great for the wind you know. 

Be was no Yank; he was a Jew; 

He sold old clothes in Kalamazoo; 

Be was fond of music tliat was new. 

So the wind played this as it passed throngh:— CAoriM. 

I called on my uncle at his farm; 

Of course, to call there was no harm; 

But the country has for me no charm. 

In weather cold or weather warm. 

My uncle has a goat, a lively flea. 

But the goat and I could never agree; 

As he chused me up against a tree. 

Be sang this song as he gave it to me:— CAorttf. 

In '92 there'll be a race. 

With Ben and Grover to set the pace; 

I wonder who will get the place; 

For the White-house chair there'll be a chafl«, . / 

But a horse may win that comes from Maine, *' ~ 

A horse who's been out In the rain; 

A candidate he'll be again, I: S ■ 

So you want to look out for old Jim Blaine.— CAonw. 



i 



'W' 



1 



A\ 






■ V ".■: ,:; ■' t- 



!^ 



DAR'S A NEW MOON IN DE SKY. 









Allegretto. 




-h 



1. De ju - bl - lee am 

2. Dem Brook - lyn cars won't 
8, Jay Qould will now shell 



JUBILEE SONG. 



::iv 



H- 



com - in' 
lose dar 
out his 



Words and Music by George Lester. 



^EE^ 



on, — Dar's a 
grij), — Dar's a 
cash,— Dar's a 



now- 
new 
new 



iM(K)n 
moon 
moon 



-+- 



in 
ill 
in 



'JL 



I 



de 
de 
de 




sky! 


De 


days of troub 


- le 


sky! 


Mad 


dogs won't take 


a 


Bky! 


De 


streets will all 


be 



-^ — 



^E^ 



now am k*'"^', — Dar's a 

Par - is trip, — Dar's a 

paved wid hash, — Dar's a 



-A 

— I- 



i-»- 



lunv m<K)n 
new Mioon 
new mcKHi 



in 
in 
in 



de 
de 
de 



m 



V- 



E=5: 



sky! 


Dca wake 


up to 


de 


sky ! 


Bob In - 


ger - soil 


will 


sky' 


We'll git 


dat luck 


- y 






bless - ed time, — Dar's a 
jine de church, — Dar's a 
uum - ber shore, — Dar's a 



;|e 



new 


moon 


in 


de 


new 


moon 


in 


de 


new 


moon 


in 


de 



m 



^fM 



sky! 


Oh, 


don't you hear dat 


sky! 


De 


deb - bel he'll be 


sky! 


Just 


play "four-leb - en 



^7\ 



•-* 



t- 






joy - l)ell chime? — Dar's a 
ia de lurch, — Dar's a 
for - ty - four ! " — Dar's a 



N- 



new moon 


in 


de 


sky! 


new m<M)n 


in 


de 


sky! 


new moon 


in 


de 


sky! 



1 



CHORUS. 



"V ~^ — P 


. -] 


IV 


!». "^ 


m ^ '•^ 


1^~l 


^-^^^ 


t t 


^ 


1 


m • 


-P- 


I 


^ 


r^ 


^ 


1* • ', 1 


'^ * m 




» 




J ' • 




m 


W-^ 


9 


^ 




_tzz 


w 


V 


b^ 


* 


y 


-i- -J 



Wid milk 



and hon - ey 



all 



de 



land 



am 



gwine to 



flow! 



De 



P 



jtJL^ 



poor 



Eft 



-y- 



am gwine up top, 



-^■- 



an 



de 



--V- 



rich take seats 



#2 
be 



low! 



De 



i 



^=j^ 



days 



ob 



wor - ly 



—ML It^_ jp_ 



now 



% 



from 



dis 



yere chile 



:=|: 



will 



fly- 



De 




heart 



am 



light, 



-S- 






-V- 



iJH 



1— 

=it: 



^: 



I 



I see to - night Dar's a new moon in 

Copyright, MDCCCLXXXVi, by Hbnrv J. Wbhman. 



de 



sky! 



The complete Words and Music of this Song can be had for 40 cents per copy, of any Music Dealer in the 
United States or Canada; or from the Fubliaber, HENBY J. W£HMAN, 130 & 132 Park Bow, New York. 



- PATSY BRANNIGAN. 

Copyiight, IMl, by Will H. Kennedy, Agent Entered at SUlionera' Hall, London. 

The Wurila and Slimle of this Sonir will be sent Co any address, poatpald.uii receipt i>r 40 

oentB; orthiiaiid any two other Boii^g for One Dollar, by ileury J. Wehman.lSOit I3'i 

Parle Row, New Vorlc. fostaKe SCanips taken Baiiie as uaali for all uur ifooda. 

Words and Music by Uarry Kennedy. 



f .■ 



My SOD is a great politician, 

be works on the big boulevard: 
They Bay that he soon will he alderman. 

For now he's the boss of the ward. 
Some day he'll be running for President, 

His equal, sure, never was seen. 
And if he gets into the White House chair. 

He'll paiut it an Emerald green. 

Chorus. 
And his name is Patrick Brannigan; 
Do you know liim, boys? (*Who?) Patsy Brannlgan; 
He's a thirty-second cousin to U'Lannigau, 
They're both from the County Tyrone. 
He's a regular lully-cooler at a christening; 
Are you list'uliig, boys? (♦What?) at a christening 
He's a hoop-de-duodle-do, he can skip the tra, la, loo. 
Do you know liim, boys? (*VVhot) Putsy Brauuigan. 

Ee'8 the pet of the giris In the neighborhood. 

And when he's a-pussing them by. 
You'll hear them all murmur, ohi ain't be nice; 

We'll meet hi tlie sweet bye and bye. 
And when he's elected as alderman. 

He'll get all the boys out of juil; 
Tliere's never a judge within twenty miles 

Would dare refuse Braunigan's bail.— 6'Aorutf. 

After alderman then he'll be governor, 

As President next lie'll sasshay; 
Be'll bring over Ireland to Sandy Hook, 

And anchor it outside the bay. 
On the greenbacks he'll then have his photograph; 

He'll have newspapers all printed green; 
Hy own brother Dan shall be New York's Mayor, 

And I'm to be ould Ireland's queen. — C'Aorut. 



* Wlio and what are to be gpoken. 



■* »^ 



DAI SY B ELL. 

Copyrigbt, IIK, by T. B. Harms & Co. Entered at Stationers' Hall, London. 
. All rights reserved. 



Tbe Words and Music of this Son;; will be sent to any address, post-paid, on receipt of 10 

cents: or thin and anv two other SuniTfl for One Dollar, by Henry J. Wehman, 130<tin 

tWk Uuw, Mew York. Postage Stamps taken same aa cash for all our good*. 



Written and Comp'iaed by Harry Dacre. 

There is a flower within ray heart, Daisy, Daisy! 

Planted one dav hv n plancini' dar' 3' ..tvd t>y Daisy Bell; 
ivh^fi- , g^j, loves ine or 10. co me not/ sometimes it's bard to tell. 

Yet I am longing to share the lot of beautiful Daisy Bell. 

CnoRtrs. 
Daisy, Daisy, give me your answer, do! 

I'm half rriizy, ill for the love of you! 
It won't be a stylish marriage— I can't afford a carriage— 

Bnt you'll look sweet on the seat of a bicycle built for two. 

We will go "tandem" as man and wife, Daisy, Daisv! 

"Ped'ling" away down the road of life, I and my DaiKy Bell! 
Wlien the road's dark we can both despise p'licemcn and " lamps " ns well ; 

There are "bright lights" in the dazzling eyes of beautiful Daisy Bell.- Chorus. 

I will stand by yon in "wheel" or woe, Daisy, Daisy! 

You'd be the l)ell(e) which I'll ring, you know, sweet liitle Daisy Bell; 
You'll take ihe " lead " in eacti " trip " we take, then if I don't lio well 

I will permit you to use the brake, my beautiful Daisy Bell.— 6' Aoru«. 



HAVE YO U SE EN HER? 

Copyrijftit, MDCCCXCIII, by Henry J. Weiiman. 



THE PARDON CAME TOO LATE. 



Copyrlcht, ISU, by WUUs Woodward A Co. 



Tlie Words and Hnaie of this Honer will be sent to any address, post-paid, on receipt of 40 ' 

cents; or this and any two other BonRs furUne Dollar.by Henry J. Web man, 13U it 133 

Park Huw, New York. Postage Stamps taken same aa cash for all our goods. 



Words and Music by Paul Dresser. 



A fair-haired boT in a foreign land at sunrise was to die; 

III a prison-cell ne sat alone, from his heart there came a sigh; 

Deserted from the ranks, they said, the reason none could say; 

They only knew the orders were that he should die next day; 

And as the hours glided bv, a messenger on wings did fly 

To save this bo> from such a fate— a pardon, but il came too lato. 

CHORns. 
The volley was ired at sunrise, just after break of day. 
And while the echoes lingered, a soul had passed away 
Into the arms of his Maker, and there to hear his fate; 
A tear, a sigh, a sad "good-bye "—the pardon came too late. 

And 'ronnd the camp-fire burning bright the story then was told; 

How his mother on a dyin(^-i)ed called for her son so bold; 

He hastened to obey her wish, was captured on the way; 

Hhe never saw her boy so fair — he died at break of day; ' 

And when the truth at last was known, his innocence at once was shown. 

To save from such an unjust fate a pardon sent, but 'twas too late.— 67fon<«. 



My Sweetheart's the M an in the Moon. 

Copyright, 1892, by Frank Harding. Entered at SUUoners' Hall, Loudon. 



Tba Words and Music of this Souk will be sent to any address, post-paid, on receipt of 40 
centa; or this and anv twuutlier Souks for One Dollar, by ilenry J. Wehnian,lSO<t 1S8 ' 
farkKow, New York. Postage stamps taken same as cosli for all oar Koods. 



Worda and Muaic by Jamea Thornton. 



Everybody has a sweetheart underneath the rose. 
Everybody loves a body, so the old song goes; 
I've a sweetheart, you all know him just »c „ell asme. 
Every evening I can see him shortly afUr tea. 
Chords. 

Ky sweetheart's the man in the moon, 

I'm going to marrv him soon; 

'Twoiild All me with blls& Just to give him one kiss, 

But I know that a dozen I never would miss, 

I'll go up in a great big balloon 

And see my sweetheart lu the moon, 

Tkeu behind some dark cloud where no one is allowed 

I'll make love to the man in the moon. 

I have often wondered wliere he spends his time all day. 
Perhaps he has another sweetheart many miles away; 
Maybe some sweet, dark-haired maiden daily he does woo, 
But as long as 1 don't catch him I'll believe him true. 

Chorus. 
Last night while the stars brightly shone. 
He told me tlirough love's telephone, 
That when we were wed he'd go early to bed, 
And never stay out with the boys, so he said. 
We are going to marry next June, 
The weddini; t^kes place in the moon; 
A sweet little Venus we'll fondle between us. 
When I wed my old man in the moon. 



MOLLY AND I AN D THE BABY. 

CopyrlBht, 18i»2, by Will H. Kennedy, Agent. Entered at StaUonenj' Hall, lA^ndon. 
The Words and Music of Uils Song will be sent to any address, poet-paid, on receipt of 40 

goods. 



} 



„, Ji^ 



, ..v .. u.uo n*iu M.uni«. i/i Mtio i.^VfiiK "i" "^ SCii,. i« *^"J aUUFVBB, pOSt^pOlU, On TV 

cents; or this and any two other Songs forOue Dollar, by Henry J. Wehniaii, 13u"<ft 138 
Park Kow, New York. Postage Stamps Ukon aaine aa cash fur all uur gi 



The Words ami Music of this gone can be had at any Musir Slore in the United 

Htates and Canada— price 40 centa, or will be sent to any address 

on receipt of price, by Henry .1. Wehmaii, 130 & 1.12 Park Kow, 

New York.— ('atttlogiie of Five Thousand Songs Free. 



Words by George Cooper. Mualc by Geo. C. Edwards. 



Have you seen herf She's the fairest little girl in oil the world; 
She's a beauty, she's the rarest, she's a rose with dew impearled. 
There's a winning way about her that I never saw before; 
Oh, I wouldn't be without her, and I love her more and more. 

Refrain. 
Have yon seen her? Rave you sren her? She's the darling girl forme; 
She's the neatest, she's the sweetest, and our wedding soon will he. 

Have yon seen her? Yon can tell her hy the snnshine in her face; 
Not a maiden can excel her in her loveliness and grare. 
There are girls of wealth and splendor, bnt I'd rather have one saiile 
From tlie girl so good and tender that I think of all the while.— AV/ntJ/*. 

Have yon seen her? She's the treasure of my heart for evermore, 

And to know her Is a pleasure; she's the girl that I adore. 

Any lionie her smile would brighten, as the stars the sky above; 

She was sent my heart to ligb'^n with the blessing of her \o\e.— lie/rain. 



Words and Mualc by Harry Kennedy. 

I've a nrat lillle cottage, and in it does dwell 

Molly and I and the baby; 
And I'm sure that for comfort no king can excel 

Molly and I and Ihe buby. 
My dear little Molly is just twenty-three, 
Tlie buhy's turned one, iind between you and me. 
We're the nicest young family you ever did see, 

Molly and I and the baby. 

Chorus. 

Molly, Molly, always so jolly. 

Always laughing, chock full of glee. 

Living as happy as happy can be, 
Molly and 1 and the baby. 

Now wo care not for riches or palaces grand, 

Molly and I and the baby; 
For I'm sure we'd not change with tlie best lu the land, 

Molly and I and the baby. 
When I get home from work with my babe on my knee, 
I sit in my arm-ciiair, wliile Molly makes tea, 
Tlien we dine at a table that only seats three, 
Molly and I and the baby.— C'A07-tt». 

Every bright Sunday morning to church we will go, 

Molly aud I and the baby; 
As we walk down the street all the people they know 

Mollv and I and the baby. 
Now Molly's a girl that you'd all like to meet. 
Her ways are so charming, her smile is so sweet; 
If yoQ chance to be our way, just drop iu and greet 

Molly and I and the baby.— c'AortM. 



/ 



WEHMAN'S COLLECTION OF SONGS. 



'Webman's Collection of Songs. 



PUBLISHIO QUARTIRLY- 

UXnjAXl, AFBJL, iXTLT ABP O0TOBB& 



ALBERT WKH1IA5, BnOB. 

' SOBMBimoii Phcs— 40oMit*per7««r,iaMlTaiiM. 

t 

CLCB BaXB: 

(To one addrMi or to dUEmnt sddnaei.) 

lire ooplM, on« yetu- , $IM. 

Ten copies, one year 

Fifteen copies, one jnt* 

or AAmrtUIng tmtitm made tTxnrn nn ■ppnnatlon 

t^ When you subci Ibe, be •are to state what number 
1 70a want yoor nibscription to begin with, otlierwtae we will 
I Mgin wllb the current number. 

tW All back namberg of this publication constantly on 
I kaad, and can be prouured from us at 10 cents per copy, by 
I Mail, port-paid. 

or AH mantiscrlpts of sooira. cic, for pobUoaUon most 
I M sent subject to approval, wttii •ofllcient pootage for reply 
[ or return of such manuscripts, but, under noclrcamstanoes, 
I vill we hold ouraelres responsible for the return of rejected 
[ or nnavallable manuscripts. We will, however, nndertako 
to return such manuscripts at your risk it sufficient poatace 
I bo aent to pay return charges. 

AOtOnm aU oonamnnlcatlo&s to tbe pnbUihn', 

HKNRY J. WIHMAN, 

i P, Oe Box 1 883. 1 30 Park Row, New York. 



WEHMAirS 



WITCHS 



Dream Book and Fo rtune Teller. 

FBICE 35 C ENTS, by m ail, post-paid. 

OM ARRA, the Qneen of Witches, was tbe most noted 
GCTsy of mode m tim es; she gires you the key to unlock 
the future, and makes ewry per- 
son theL- own Fortune Teller. It 
teaches you how to know the Sez 
o( Children before Birth; to know 
how coon you will Marry, and what 
For(kne_yoa will bawe, who your 
Futorsr Bbuta*^ or vrltSDU. be: 
the LoTcr^cbinn, or old Witdkar 

1 True Method of Telling Fortunes 
by toe Orounds of a Tea or Coffee 
Cup; to know If yo'ir Love of a 
person will be Uutuali Fortune 
Telling by Cards. IttellotlieNum- 
ber ofwlves or Husbands you will 
have; how to Wi Ite Love-Letters 
Secret!}-, so that thev may not be 
Dl«-overed. The old Witch can 
bring you Oood or Evil Fortune. 
Don't spurn her and you can Control others and Find Lost 
or Hidden Treannree. She la PowMfuL Price, by mall, 
post-paid, only TWiNTYsTtvl CENTS per copy 
hilver or postage ataiSpS). SpbcuIi— FTve copies for $1. 
Get (our of your ttktaaa to club invllh yoo at 16 osra 
each, maUng $X In all, and thereby get 7«w.«va book 
tx*»UtlmMW». AdAressaU orders direct to ^^'"^ — ^ •) 




I jK. J. WEHUAN, 130 Park Bow. NgwlYor k 
Wehinaii*« Selection 'of 



AUTOGRAPH ALBUM VERSES 



PBIOS 2B CENTS, by mail, post-paid. 

A ehokio collection of comic and sentimental Terses, 
•ompiled by Carrie L. Wehman, expressive of almost every 
phaae of human feeling, such as love, friendship, admir»- 

tiou, respect, good wishes, 
etc., suitable for writing 
in autograph-albums. No 
gentleman, younir, mid- 
oie-sged or old, can go at 
all into society without 
having some fair lady's 
"Book of Autographs" 
plumped into his hands. 
Be feels that to refuse 
would stamp him a " mean 
axM) selfish perstm." He 
cannot be a gentleman. In 
the best meaning of the 
tei-m, while possessing 
such deqiicaMe traits of 
character, tlierefore he 
must comply with their 
requests in this direction. 
Ijeft to hinuult, he would 
probably write "himself 
down a Idockhead." But 
this book wiU help him 
out<tf thedllemnuk Here 
to write at once— 
Prioa 




bs will find something approjH^Oe 

whether humqrou^jr or sentunentaUy inclined. 



▼WKfTY-FIV* CKNTS ^<ibi)y, by nUlLpost. 
mU. BriOAL-nve Books for fl. Get four ot jam 
trlands to club hi with you at 16 cents each, making (1 la 
ali. Mid tbarsby get your own book free of obaig*. 

A iMwiaaonteiidirBCttft 
I B. 9. WEHXAH, 180 Park Uow, New Yosk 



Wthaamn'M Vow Book of, 



TRICKS 



AND KHTB IIOQUIS TS' 6DIDE. 

PBIOX 25 CSSTS, by xnaH, poat-paid. 

mis Is the latest and best best 1 >ook published on Trloka. 

Vantrlloqulamt Saeohd-Slsht and FlreaUta 

ffl••ln•rt•m. it is Uustrated with nearly 100 ann«T- 
rs. niehistruetions for perfoming are so plainly giren 
tbat any ehlld. with a little practice, oan do uiein, as they 
only require •Impl* appa- 
ratua. ^* ^'U n>euBk>n a few 
of uie ti-ioks in this book.— How to 
eat a peck uf shavings and chaaM 
them into a ribbon— How to mako 
a dime pass through a table — Hoir 
to make lire bum under water — 
How to put a ring through your 
oheiA and then bring it on a stick 
—How to make a loaf danee who* 
it is baking in the oven— Sow to 
cut off a chicken's bead wltbovt 
killing it— How to mako ioe 1a 
Bummer— How to change water 
into wine— A lamp that will bom 
for a year— How to cut off yoor 
nose — How to make flrsnosC 
paper— How to eat tow and set it on 
nre in your mouth- How to pro- 
duce a mouse from a pack of caitis— How to tell the number 
any person tliinksof— How to tell in ad vanoea card sheeted 
by any one^How to tell if a person is in love— How to re- 
move a man's shirt without taking off his coat or Tert 
How to hold a glass of water upside down without stalling 
it-How to become a VentrlllKIUlSt, and ISO .other 
equally astonishing tricks, etc. Old and young should not 
fail to iretthishiithlyamuslngand wonderful book. Price, 
by rMSTpoet-pSd. oiUy TWINTY-FIVKCENT^ 
per copy (silver or postage stamps.) 8p*ciUy-=Flve copies 
Jor tL Get four of your friends to club in with you at 86 
cents each, making $: in all, and thereby get your own 
book free <^ charge. Address all orders direct to .^ 

H. J. WEHMAN, 180 Park Bow, New York 




THE MYSTERY OF 



LOVE 



Courtship an d Marria ge Explained 

PEIOE S5 CENTS, by mail, post-paid. 



kb» How Maidens may baqoma Haopy 

I and BaorMiors beeoma Happy Mua* 

. m a brief space of time and by easy methoda 



. It exjdalns Hi 
Wtvaa, 
DanaSf ....... _. . . _ 

Also containing Complate Directions for De- 
olarlna Intentlonat Aooeptlns Vowst and 
RetalninE Afreotlona* both Before and After 
Marrlase. IncludlitgalVeatiseof the Etiquette of 
MarrlaKel describing the invitations, the Dresses, the 
Ceremony, and ths proper behavior of both Bride and 
Bridegroom, whether In Publlo.or, behind the 
Nuptial OuHfaln. » also tells plainly how to begin 
courting; tbaway to get over basbfuluees; the war to " sit 
tip " J too vay to find the soft spot iu a sweetheart's breast; 
the way to write a lo\ e letter; the 
way to easily win a girl's consent; 
the way to pop the question to 
her; th« way "to do up things ". 
before and after an engagement; 
tl>e way to receive and the way to 
decline an offer; the way to "give 
the mitten " genteely; the way to 
make yourself agreeable during 
an engagement; the way bridee- 
maids and groomsmen should 
dress and penonn their duties; 
the way yon should act and the 
things you flhooid do at a Wed- 
ding and Wedding Receptions; 
tliefnrnitnre|d«coration8, and be- 
havior In the Bridal Cliamber; the 
wuy to make Wife and Husband 
"real luwpy." This is just the 
book that has long been wanted. Itspeaks in plaiu, honest 
words, revealing knowledge tiiat «vei7i>odv ought to 
know, npoii subjiscts of as vital import to all as the very 
air we breathe. Neither those already married, nor tho«e 
contemplating tbe tying of the eouminial knot, can afford 
to be another day wlihout a knowledge of the many mys- 
terious things that are so truthfully and vividly explained 
In this work. It Is Just the very tr ti a ti s n to be in the hands 
of every Youns Bachelor or Malden« every 
Marrleo Man or Womant every Widow 
or Widowers Youns or Old. lu addition to 

the above tt auo oontolns the langaage of Flowers, 
Husband's Commandments, Wife's Commandments, Ver- 
sions of Lowe, Dining Table and Window Signaling, Poet- 
ag»-8tampFlirtation,anda|p«atdealofthe "choloesflore 
poetryever . - - . ^ . . . 

iium in the 

cannot glean _ 

will enoghten them on all points of Courtsiiip and Mar- 
riage, as well as tlieir ancillary duties, pleasures and obll- 
gatiooK Tills is the most complete, and by far tlie most 
raluidrie work that has ever been brought out on this alt- 
Important subject. We beg of yon, therefore, not to con- 
found it wiOi any of the worthless books heretofore issued, 
but remember the title, TBK HTsraRT or Lotb, Cockt 
SHIP AND MiBSiAoa ExFi.AiKKi>. Price 28 Cents per 
copy, by mail Doet-pald. Spbciai^— Five books fur gl. Get 
four of your friends to club in with you at 25 cents eaeh^ 
making $1 in all, and thereby get yoor o%n book fre6 ot 
tdiarge. Address all orden to 

H. J. WEHKAN, 180 Park Sow, N. Y. City. 




A rompleta OataJogne of all our 
Oboda mallea Frsa on appllcatloBa — - 



WBHMAIPS Oif: 



DANCING 



Master and Call Book.i 

PBICB 2& GBNTSiWmail, 

An tha ngaw of tto OanuM aad 

Rtahtona htoWalts. Booad or 8qiau« ^ 

Europe or Amarioa. Tb* aotbor Imm made this book mt 
simple and plain that aar oiiUd eaa, by reading IL baeaM ] 
an export in dancing wWMOt the aid of a t sa oh s ^ pal 
other took oe danonc will compare with this. Aa the i 
latest and fasiilooabte daaess am minutely deseribad tm I 
Illustrated figures from Ufa, explaining podtlo n s in nMM i 
dances, e s., and thM iiiljlmil 
m Uiod enablaa persons to laaia i 
tb.waJtaby pra&oina a a vssy I 
ttMaaad you wfil >a«* a» | 




difllenlty ia Boqolring it. 

forthaorgMiiBsiaottaad m , 

iasato(bailsjiartles,etc A&iSm 
In ragard to the setsction of maiig 
for balls, privata parties, ete. Oa , 
Qallii«, ^attonal Guard Qfoa- 1 
driUsTtha Ptadn Qoadrille, tt» 1 
IsuMOra, tbe Saiainga 
the cJartonlans. tte 
QoadrlB^ the Prinee Imp 
QnadriBe, the Walts ( 
Hoa 1 and «, tbe OUda 

the Glide Oaiedoaians, tbe 

aian TarieUes, the London Polka , 
Quadrille. QuadilUs FigurM— I 
Tbe Basket Figure, the Star Flgure/the March Figurs. IkS 1 




Maroli. Quadrl&e or Sqau«1>ances, Erplanatino of Qua- 
drille Steps and Movements, Illustrations of Five rndlliaa 
in Dancing— Points on Round Danoes. the Pidka, tti 
Walts, the Modem Plain Wails, flMdeVPUta, ttnPsS ] 
Maaourlca, the Eni(^erbooker. ate Newport, tke Ta 
vtenne, Dani^ Danue, the Baeanak «M Wave, S 
mian, or Heel and Toe Polka, tae Oaloi*, tlia Boh 
tlie Deux Temps, tbe SiaiMenne. Tlie Osnaaa— 16 

gvlng the Names and Full Dassripttoa oif each. 1 
r '• - • - - - 




post-paid. SPBOlair— Five Books for 
Uiends to club in with you at B oe« 
all, and thereby get your own book fire* of 
AddrsasallocdendawSM 

H. J. WEHXAN, 180 Park Sow, 



N four oc Foag 
l^iaakt^^S/ 



WEHMAirs NEW BOOS 

-ON- 

ETIQUETTE 



-A2!n>- 



POLITENESS 



PBIGE 35 CENTS, by maH, post-paid. 

At last it is within the reach of everr on* to 



at a trifling oust, a complete haad-liook of 
Politeoens that has no peer in this country or Eiipopa. 1 
This book has none nf the aacientor " backnumtor ** sng^ ' 
gestions on tliis all-important subject whici), I regretca | 
say, so mn ny other high-priced books contain in a markaS ' 
a«gree. It is not a ^hashed-un" or "take" aditto^ ( 
but a flrst-closs, complete hand-book oa a subject thM 
comes next iu rank to cleanliness— in fhct, a nraeOeal ia- 1 
structor ill the artof etiquette and poilteneasof tbe prssaaS , 
time. Oood manners ix, as almost eveiylxxly knows, a I 
very essential factor in helping any one to attsLi and ooa^ 1 
mand the respect of everyboSF < 
with whom he comes in oontaoU- 1 
nwle or femaia, young or <M. 
This lK>ok gives a thorougk oa- 1 
Dlanatlon of the deportment oC 
both males and females. Itteacbaa I 
a person bow to be courteous M , 
all and still possess a certala I 
amount of dignity and aeU-res|i«ea 
It teaches now to act in aay 
emergeucy, or eotor any soels^ 1 
without emltarraasment, aud haw 
to avoid iitoorreet aaid Tu|pw I 
habits in tbe street, at home, «r la 
society. It teaches you how ts ■• | 
behave tliat your aocMar wHl fg , 
courted and sought after oy a m y 1 
one. By acting upon the adviag < 
given in this boolc. von can t 




aeeea into any family in America, and then yon 
nothing but opportunity to dlstingnish yonrsstf. _ 
short, it Is the best and most oompfebenare tiisiflss oa 
tlie subject of Etiquette and PoliteneiS. Abstract of eoa- 
tents. How to enter a room and how to leave It^How ta 
to accost or notice ladies or gentlemen on the street— How 
to di«HS well, and yet not garisaiy— Bow to give aad ra- 
oeive introductions— What kind of cards to have, and bov 
to present or send them— Tlie proper mode of idving pro- I 
•ents— How to diake hands and bid good-bye—Bow to ba- 1 
gin, conduct, and end a converaatinn— How to aoeompaay ' 
acquaintances on the promenade— Bow to seek a partnar I 
iu tbe dance, and hnw to decline an lirvltation-Bow ta ' 
behave at dinners, ehherashostcM' guest— How to bsihava | 
duringoourtsliipandmarriage— Howto*'playtliealtaiilo'* , 
Btchureh,atpartius,etc.,etc. Price TWCNTV-FIVS I 
CENTS per copy, by mail, po^^ w id. Spbuiai.— nv* , 
copiesrortl. G^fourof rour friends to clabia with yoa I 
at K oents each, making (1 iu aU, and thereby get 70 — 
owa book frsa eC charge. AddrsssaUordcta <toeett» 

H. J. WEHKAN, 180 Park Bow, Vvw Toik^ 






A Coatpleto CatelAffve af mtLomr) 
Gaoda Bkailed Praa oh applleatloaa 



h.M iSii f\ost Popular Soo^s 



The Dying Girl's Message . . . ' . 40c. 

Words by A. H. Noe. Music by J. P. Skelly. 

Sweet Dreams of Mother and Home . . . 40c. 

Words by Geo. Coopeu. Music by J. P. Skelly. 

They Can't Keep the Workingman Down . . 40c. 

I^^K^oefted "to -tine XCnlglits or X.ia.'kdoz* or Ajnn.&jrioeL. 

Words and Music by John Fletcher. 

Don't Forget Me, Mary , . . . 40c. 

Words and Music by J. P. Skelly. 

Have You Seen Her? . . . . 40o. 

Words by Geo. Cooper. Music by Geo. C. Edwards. 

Belleville Convent Fire . . . 40a 

Words by John Fletcher, Music by Ned Straigkt. 

Some Other Girl Shall Wear the Ring , . 40c. 

Words by M. M. Lane. Music by J. P. Skelly. 

Dar's a New Moon in de Sky ; - -^-,^r^^^^^ 40c. 

Words and Music by Geo. Lester. •' 

Did You Notice It? . . . . , 40c. 

Words by Geo. Cooper. Music by J. P. Skelly. 

Angel Mother Waits for Me * . . . 40c. 

Words by Geo. Cooper. Music by J. P. Skelly. 

Since My Mother's Dead and Gone . . . 40c. 

v4:v Words and Music by J. P. Skelly. 
«3>B FOR SAU: AT ALI, MUSIC STORES, s-s* 

Henry J. WEHMAN, Publisher, 



12S W. IWIadison Street, 
CHICAGO. 



130 & 132 Park t^oui, 
HEW YOt?K- 



I'i