Skip to main content

Full text of "R.M. Kellogg's great crops of strawberries and how to grow them"

See other formats


Historic, Archive Document 

Do not assume content reflects current 
scientific knowledge, policies, or practices. 



4 



Our Guarantee 

WE GUARANTEE that all plants shipped to our customers are grown upon our own farms 
and under our methods of selection and restriction; that they are pure and true to name, 
and that a full count will in all cases be given. That the plants are freshly dug and care- 
fully packed in damp moss, and that they are securely crated or wrapped. (We never place any 
plants in cold storage, but they remain in the ground where grown until we dig them to fill the 
customer's order.) 

We also guarantee that every package is examined by a competent inspector, and that both 
plants and package must be in perfect condition before allowing them to leave our hands. 

Our plants are thoroughly and scientifically sprayed throughout the entire growing season, 
and we guarantee them to be absolutely free f rom all diseases and insects. Read the Michigan State 
Inspector's certificate: 

Certificate of Nursery Inspection No. 696 

This is to certify that I have examined the nursery stock of R. M. KELLOGG CO., Three Rivers, Mich., and 
find it apparently free from dangerous insects and dangerously contagious plant diseases. 

L. R. TAFT, State Inspector of Nurseries and Orchards. 

In short, we guarantee that every detail of the work of producing and shipping plants, so 
long as they remain under our control and observation, is perfectly carried out. We are exceedingly 
anxious that every customer shall realize his highest expectations in the direction of success with 
our plants, and we do everything in our power to assist him to attain this desired result. But we 
cannot and do not hold ourselves responsible for plants after our control ceases, and, of course, it is 
understood that when our plants are turned over to the transportation company we have no further 
control over therm Should they fail to arrive in good condition it will be due to improper handling 
or careless treatment while in transit. However, we have been growing and shipping strawberry 
plants for twenty -one years, and in few instances have plants failed to reach the purchaser in ideal 
condition; and our plants have gone to all parts of the United Ctates and the Dominion of Canada. 

With our careful methods of labeling plants it would seem quite impossible that a mistake 
should occur in the matter of varieties, but we guarantee plants to be true to label with the express 
understanding that if a mistake occurs, we are to be held responsible for no damages beyond the 
amount received for plants. 

The fact that we receive orders from the same customers year after year is the best evidence 
of our success in the work of delivering high-grade plants in perfect condition. In 1908 we shipped 
3,000,000 plants in excess of the highest record of previous years, and a large proportion of this 
increase came from customers who have used Kellogg's strain of plants for many years. 



Substitution 

THIS year we have an exceptionally large stock of plants which reaches the high-water mark of 
Kellogg quality, and we confidently expect to be able to supply the wants of all our customers. 
However, certain varieties always sell far in excess of other varieties, and this contingency must be 
reckoned with. When it comes time to ship your order, is it your wish, should we be sold out of any 
varieties that you have selected, that we substitute some other varieties of equal merit in their place? 
In making out your order be very explicit on this point. Flease note that at the bottom of the fourth 
page of the order sheet for 1909 is a blank space with dotted lines for your answer to this question. 
If satisfactory for us to substitute, write "Yes" on the dotted line. If not satisfactory, write "No." 
In the latter case we shall return your money for any varieties we are unable to supply. Rest 
assured that we shall substitute only when it is necessary to do so, even though you give us the 
privilege to substitute. We make this matter so clear as to avoid delays at shipping time, and any 
possible misunderstandings. 

If you have second choice as to varieties, please indicate what they are; this will aid us very 
much. In case you write neither "Yes" or "No" on dotted line, we shall understand it is your 
desire that we shall use our judgment in the matter. 



COPYRIGHT 1908 BY R. M. KELLOGG CO. 




s «^ X; j) r >t r-» — , ~ _ 



A Guide toYieton'* 5 * 



! It is the realization of one's brightest dream; it 
inspires and satisfies. It fills the world with radiance 
and makes life beautiful and sweet. Victory spells many 
another thing — it spells patience and endeavor; it spells 
intelligent effort and faithful performance; it speaks of 
duty done and of attention to infinite detail. But if all these 
are spelled out of Victory, it is the order of victory that is 
spelled out of them that is the more valuable and enduring 
because so dearly won. This book is a record of victory on the 
one hand and, like all true records of this kind, it is an inspira- 
tion and a guide to victory on the other. The triumphs of the 
Kellogg methods over old and obsolete ways of doing things, the 
steady and increasingly wonderful advance of the Kellogg ideas in the world of horti- 
culture, and the marvelous growth of the business of this company form a romantic 
and inspiring chapter in the history of American enterprise. The season of 1908 
witnessed an increase in the number of plants sold over any preceding year in the 
history of the R. M. Kellogg Co. in excess of 3,000,000, the total number sold last 
year being little short of 25,000,000 plants. And the outlook for 1909 is for the 
finest crop of plants ever grown in the history of the company; while from the busi- 
ness side it may be interesting to know that customers were filing orders for 1909 
delivery before the shipping season of 1908 had reached its close. 

But it is not the chief object of this book to set forth the strength of the R. M. 
Kellogg Co., or the glory of Kellogg Thoroughbred Strawberry Plants. It is to point 
out the way to success and prosperity to others by telling them in detail how victory 
in strawberry growing surely may be achieved; and to this end such a wealth of 
illustration has been provided as to make every lesson taught so clear, so graphic, that 
no one who will read the words and seek to comprehend the pictures but will be able 
to enter upon this most delightful and profitable line of horticulture in absolute con- 
fidence that success will crown his efforts. It is now and always has been the policy 
of this company to furnish its customers with the most complete instructions as to 
methods of handling the entire business of strawberry production and marketing. And 
though it is due to the splendid accomplishments of the Kellogg strain of plants in the 
fruiting bed that we occupy the high place in the horticultural world generally accorded 
this company, it is to the careful and thorough-going nature of the instruction and 
advice and the other aids we extend to grow- 
ers that we owe the extraordinary growth 
of patronage that calls for an annual output 
of plants of such magnitude as we have in- 
dicated. None may read the glowing letters 
of appreciation which have been selected 
from many thousands like them for publica- 
tion in this book, in which our patrons give 
testimony to their satisfaction and delight 
with our plants and gratitude for assistance 
rendered, or note the extraordinary views in 
fields and patches of our Thoroughbred 
plants grown under our direction, without 
being convinced that Kellogg plants and 
Kellogg methods, when intelligently used 
together, lead to certain and assured victory. 




Kellogg's Pedigree Plants Simply 
Wonderful 

TN a letter written us under date of January 22, 
^ 1908, Homer Cronk, of Colfax, Washington, says : 
" It is with pleasure that I write this letter, praising 
the work of the Kellogg Pedigree Strawberry Plants 
as compared with the performance of common stock. 
We received our first plants from you in the spring 
of 1904, and have had ample opportunity to observe 
their performance in the fruiting beds for three suc- 
cessive seasons. I can only describe it in a vague 
way by the one word Wonderful! As hundreds of 
your customers report, the berries are the wonder of 
the country — so large, so meaty, so rich and highly 
colored. What are my methods of marketing ? Well, 
I don't bother my head about that, except to pack the 
berries in the best and most attractive manner, name 
my price and deliver orders. All my berries are 
ordered over the telephone faster than they can be 
picked. My entire 1908 crop was engaged by an 
enterprising grocer of Colfax before the 1907 crop 
was more than two-thirds gathered." 



2 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 




Plant Breeding and Selection 

VXTE feel that it would be reflecting upon 
the intelligence of strawberry growers 
if we occupied large space in arguing the 
feasibility of improving plants by selection, 
because every intelligent fruit grower knows 
by experience that there is a great difference 
in plants and seeds. There was a time when 
it required a strong argument to convince the 
people of the merits of selection in both seeds 
and plants, and not until actual tests demon- 
strated the difference in favor of selected stock 
did the masses believe. 

For us to say that the Kellogg strain of 
Thoroughbred plants is superior to all 
others would be very acceptable to those who 
have tested the merits of our plants, but it 
might appear like boasting to those who are 



not acquainted with these plants, or who 
never have been so fortunate as to see our 
Thoroughbreds in fruit. And for the benefit 
of those who may be unacquainted with the 
Kellogg plants and the Kellogg way, we pub- 
lish just a few letters from old-time users of 
our Thoroughbreds which will be more con- 
vincing than anything we might say about 
ourselves. Read these letters ; they appear 
on different pages of this book. Such letters, 
coming from cultivators of the strawberry, 
should convince any interested person that it 
is economy to use plants which come from se- 
lected mother plants of known fruiting 
vigor. 

If you were going to plant tomato seed to 
grow plants for your own setting, would you 
not prefer the seed from a perfect specimen 



Don't try to learn through errors and losses what we have learned about strawberry plants during a quarter of a century 
of experiment and success. You get this knowledge in concrete form when you buy our plants. 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 



3 




The World's Champion Ear of Corn 



tomato, produced by a strong, healthy vine, 
and from a vine that produced all good to- 
matoes, than to take seed from an undersized 
tomato, grown on a weak and undeveloped 
vine, and one that produced only a few in- 
ferior tomatoes? 

And if you were going to plant potatoes, 
would you not rather have tubers which were 
taken from a strong hill that produced a 
goodly number of perfect tubers, than to use 
seed of unknown origin ? 

And if you were going to plant corn, would 
you not prefer an ear with a small cob, filled 
evenly with well-developed kernels from end 
to end, with a record back of it, than to plant 
seed from a nubbin ? 

The answer to these questions would be : 
Give us the best seed grown from ideal mother 
plants. The decision as to strawberry plants 
would undoubtedly be the same. In view of 
this fact we deem it unnecessary to occupy 
space in proving the superiority of strawberry 
plants which have been selected for a series of 
years with an aim to improve and strengthen 
the vigor of the plant, as well as quality and 
quantity of fruit, over plants which have been 
grown on the hit-or-miss plan. 

Did you ever watch an expert marksman 
use a rifle? He first decides upon the object. 
Then with steady nerve he aims at his object, 
and the gun is not discharged until the barrel 
is on a direct line with the object at which he 
is aiming. The Kellogg Company has a cer- 
tain object in view — the best strawberry plant, 
the highest quality of berries and the most of 
them, and, like the marksman, we are not aim- 
ing on the hit-or-miss plan. By using mother 
plants showing the most points of excellence, 
and from these selecting plants of the most 
ideal type, we have succeeded in developing 
a strain of thoroughbred plants which have 
won the world's highest fruiting record. 



We esteem ourselves especially fortunate in 
being able to present herewith two remarkable 
object lessons in breeding and selection — one 
drawn from the animal kingdom, the other 
from the vegetable kingdom. Through the 
courtesy of W. J. Gillett, of Rosendale, Wis., 
the well-known breeder of Holstein-Friesian 
cattle, we are able to present not only the 
world's most wonderful cow, considered from 
the viewpoint of yield of both milk and butter- 
fat, but are able also to present halftone en- 
gravings of the ancestors of Colantha -fth's 
Johanna. No one can study the conformation of 
these three ancestors of the world's champion, 
and note the extraordinary development in all 
of them of the dairy characteristics, without 
realizing at once that Colantha -fth's Johanna 
is the legitimate, aye, inevitable, product of 
such an ancestry. And the observer will note 
how these dairy characteristics are emphasized 
in succeeding generations, a fact indicating the 
progress made as the selection was carried on 
up to the wonderful consummation noted in the 
champion of the world. 

But quite as interesting is the result of 
breeding and selection revealed in the ear of 
corn shown herewith, and which is acknowl- 
edged by the world's greatest corn judges to 
be the finest and most perfect ear ever grown. 
It won the Allee trophy at the Iowa Agricul- 
tural contest in January, 1907, and so keen was 
the interest to secure it that the owner bid 
$150.00 for it in order that he might keep it 
for propagating purposes. The ear is 10^2 
inches long, 7j/$ inches in circumference at a 
line three inches from the butt, and 6j/g inches 
at a point two inches from the tip. It weighs 
19 ounces and carries 22 rows of kernels. 

Mr. Pascal, who grew this ear of corn, 
did not step at one bound into the front rank 
of corn breeders. He visited the International 
Livestock Show at Chicago in 1901, and com- 



Set out your plants promptly upon receiving them. Heel them in if you are compelled to do so, but get them into 
their permanent home at the earliest moment possible. 



4 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 




Interior View of Main Office of R. M. Kellogg Co. 

THIS illustration shows the main room of our office building and the force of clerks busied with the work of handling 
the enormous mail and recording the great number of orders that come daily. Beside this main room are rooms for 
the officers of the company and the stenographers, a large mailing room 24x60 feet, and another floor 24x60 for storing 
office stationery and filing records. The receipt of all orders is promptly acknowledged; should you fail to receive such 
acknowledgment within a reasonable time, write us so we may look it up at once. 



ing into contact with one of the men who has 
made corn improvement so important a work 
at the University of Illinois, he was led to en- 
gage in the work of corn-improvement. From 
that day he has been an enthusiastic and intel- 
ligent breeder, and no name stands higher on 
the scroll of those who have achieved things 
in this direction than that of D. L. Pascal, of 
DeWitt, Iowa. 

What Colantha 4th's Johanna stands for 
in the dairy world ; what the champion ear of 
corn stands for in the world of corn, Kellogg's 
Thoroughbred plants stand for in the straw- 
berry world. All three stand for progress and 
excellence and the world's uplift along their 
respective lines. All prove that selection and 
breeding lie at the very foundation of agri- 
cultural and horticultural success. Surely 
these object lessons are as valuable as they 
are convincing. 



A Typical Letter 



TN a letter written August 17, 1908, L. 
1 R. Walker, of Anderson, W. Va., thus 
expresses himself concerning Kellogg Thor- 
oughbred Pedigree plants. We quote: "Now 
as to pedigree plants, I will say I have tried 



plants from several other nurserymen under 
the same conditions which I have grown 
yours, and I am confident that I know the 
difference in value. I do not hesitate to say 
that one pedigree plant is worth more than 
one dozen plants such as are sold by others I 
have bought from, and the reasons are: 

"1. The Kellogg plants, with me, make 
from two to nine crowns before the runners 
start, while the other plants send runners be- 
fore the plants are able to support themselves. 

"2. The Kellogg plants send out strong 
runners, while the other kind send out weak- 
lings. 

"3. Then, at picking time — well, well! 
That is the time for the final test of the 
Kellogg plants. We get berries from other 
plants — an occasional berry and lots of 'knots'. 
This is my experience during six years of 
strawberry raising. 

"Another test of the value of Thorough- 
bred plants is the way they are received on the 
market. My berries have taken first place 
here. One merchant has given us an order 
for 200 bushels of our strawberries for de- 
livery next season. He said he did not know 
that such berries were raised until he got the 
fruit from me." 



Every year we start thousands of men and women on the right road to independence and prosperity. If you are ready 
to let us help you on the way, you may be sure we shall be glad to do so. Let us hear from you. 




A Kellogg straw- 
berry plant. Year's 
record: All the way 
from $400 to $1,500 
from a single acre. 



Good Ancestry is 
the Basis 
of Real Success 




Johanna Rue 2nd 

Dam of Sir Johanna, the Sire of Colantha 

4th's Johanna. Year's record: Milk, 18,289 
lbs.; Fat, 662 lbs. 



An Object Lesson in Breeding- 
and Selection 




"Blood" Tells 
in Plants Quite as 
Certainly as it 
Does in 
Animals 



Colantha 4th's Johanna 

The world's champion milch cow. Year's 
record: Milk, 27,432.7 lbs.; Butter fat, 
998.26 lbs. 

Note the distinctive dairy type of Colantha 4th's ancestors, and the extraordinary 
root and foliage development of the strawberry plant. 





Colantha 4th Colantha, Imported 

Dam of Colantha 4th 's Johanna. Year's Dam of Colantha 4th and Grandam of 

record: Milk, 14,951 lbs.; Fat, 577 lbs., Colantha 4th's Johanna, 
as a four-year-old. 



6 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 




Tickling the Soil on the Kellogg Farms 

THIRTY times during the growing season of 1908 these men and horses and Planet Jr. cultivators went up and down 
the mile-long rows, tickling the soil and making the plants laugh. A drought of five weeks' duration, with the 
thermometer registering as high as 98 degrees in the shade, did not create a lack of moisture in the soil, and two. inches 
under the dust mulch the soil was so thoroughly charged with moisture that a ball of earth could at any time be molded 
with the hands and the soil would "paste" when rubbed between the palms of the hands. And when the rains did come 
after that long time of dryness the plants were in prime condition to receive and assimilate the additional plant food 
made available by the moisture, and thus, through drought and rainfall, were the conditions maintained that insure con- 
tinuous and vigorous growth — another important point in favor of the Kellogg strain of plants. The portrait above the 
cultivating scene is that of Charles Walters, our farm superintendent. 



Short Talks for Busy People 



Enriching the Soil for Immediate Use. — 

If possible, manure the ground in winter. 
Spread over the entire surface. In the spring 
plow the manure under and thoroughly work 
it into the soil. If for any reason this work 
may not be done in winter or the early spring, 
then spread the manure after the ground has 
been plowed and work thoroughly into the soil 
before setting the plants. Should anything 
prevent this, the manure may be spread after 
plants are set. In this case scatter thinly be- 
tween the rows, following as soon as possible 
with cultivator which will mix the manure 
thoroughly with the soil. If manure may not 
be secured, plow the ground in the spring and 
harrow over once; then drill or scatter over 
the entire surface some complete fertilizer. 

Acid or Sour Soil. — Should your soil be sour 
or somewhat acid, drill in 1,000 pounds of 
agricultural lime to the acre, and work thor- 
oughly into the soil with harrow. We purchase 



our lime from Ohio & Western Lime Co., 
Toledo, Ohio. We have no interest but 
yours in giving this address, save to make cor- 
respondence unnecessary. Or 200 bushels of 
hardwood unleached ashes, per acre, applied 
in the same way, will serve the purpose. In 
fact we prefer the ashes to lime on account 
of the large percentage of potash they contain. 

Preparing Soil. — Plow just as early in the 
spring as your soil will permit. Early plow- 
ing saves many tons of moisture. Pulverize 
the soil as soon after plowing as possible — the 
same day it is plowed is the best. The har- 
rowing and fining of the soil will lock up and 
hold the moisture for use of the plants. Har- 
row the soil repeatedly until there is a mellow 
bed to the depth of the plowing. If the soil 
be sandy loam, or of loose character, run the 
roller over it until it is firmly pressed. If the 
soil is of clay or rather firm texture, roll very 
lightly, just sufficient to press down the sur- 



Not the number of plants, but the quantity of fruit — that is what counts. One hundred Thoroughbreds will give you 

better results than two hundred of the "other kind." 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 



7 




The Hoeing Brigade on the R. M. Kellogg Co. Farms 

THIS scene represents our hoemen, who diligently work ten hours each day from the time plants are set until October 
1st. Not a weed or spear of grass is allowed to grow among our Thoroughbreds. Sharp pointed hoes are used, which 
aid in loosening the soil immediately around the mother plant and around the runner plants. Soil is drawn with the 
hoe over the runner cords just back of the young plant, which encourages a large number of strong roots to start 
directly from the crown of the young plant. It also aids the young plant to take root quickly, so that it may become 
self-supporting. This keeps the mother plants strong and vigorous, which in turn insures strong, vigorous runner 
plants. Did you ever see a hundred acres of strawberry plants, with rows a mile long, without a spear of grass or a 
sign of a weed? If you didn't, come to Three Rivers in the growing season and let us show you. The portrait shown 
at the top of illustration is that of David Evans, foreman of the hoeing brigade. 



face. But no matter what the texture of the 
soil, there must be no clods. The finer it is 
pulverized the more sure will be victory. 

Marking for the Rows. — For this work use 
a light tool of some kind — something that will 
make a shallow mark, or merely an indentation 
in the soil, not a furrow. ( See illustrations on 
page 31). If horse cultivators are to be used,, 
make rows 42 inches apart and set plants 28 
inches apart in the row. Make rows straight 
in both directions and cultivate both ways un- 
til runners are well started. If hill system 
is to be followed, make rows 30 inches 
apart and set plants 12 inches apart in 
the row. If plants are set for home use, 
or for hand cultivation, and ground is limited, 
put plants in checks 24 inches apart each way. 
Cultivate both ways until runners are ready 
to layer; then place runners in direction you 
wish to have your rows run. Where plants 
are grown so close, they must be grown in 
either single or double-hedge rows. If ground 
is very limited in area, use hill system and put 
plants 15 inches apart each way, leaving a 
two-foot path every three rows for the pick- 



ers to walk in. This will make a path every 
three rows so that the berries may be picked 
without trampling the vines. 

Mating or Pollenizing. — Pistillate (female) 
varieties never should be set without bisexuals 
(male) varieties being set alongside of the fe- 
males. If some pistillate is your favorite, and 
you wish to make it your leader, set one row 
of bisexuals of earlier season than the pistil- 
late; then three rows of the pistillate; next, 
one row of bisexuals of later season than the 
pistillate. In other words, place three rows of 
pistillates between two rows of bisexuals of 
different seasons. 
(See illustration on 
page 37.) 

Pruning and Set- 
ting. — Before set- 
ting the plants, cut 
the roots back, leav- 
ing them from four 
to five inches long 
(see Figure 1) in 
the case of dormant Figure l 




We shall be glad to have each customer say when sending in his order just the date he would like to have his plants 

go forward. 



8 GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 




Scene in R. M. Kellogg Company's Packing-House at Shipping Time 

OUR packing-house presents a scene of great activity during the eight weeks of our shipping season. Seventy-five 
women count and tie the plants into bundles, and in each bunch insert a wooden label bearing the name and sex 
of the variety then being counted. The counters are instructed to put twenty-six plants in each bunch; and if any 
mistake is made in the count of your plants, please advise us and we will rectify it. 



plants. But should you defer setting until 
late in the season., when the plant has 
started new feeding roots, then merely cut off 
the tip ends of the roots, just enough to even 
them up. In setting, spread out the roots 
fan shape, place them straight down in the 
opening, hold the crown of the plant above the 
surface of the soil (see Figure 2). Press the 
soil firmly against the roots and draw the soil 

around the plants 
so that the crown 
will come just 
above the surface. 
( See Figure 3 ) . 

Preventing Pol- 
len Exhaustion. 

— Pinch or cut off 
all fruit stems on 
spring-set plants 
before buds open. 
Never permit a 
plant to bear any 
fruit the same sea- 
son in which it is set, unless you are in a climate 
where strawberries bear in the fall. In such a 
locality spring-set plants may safely be per- 
mitted to bear in the fall. 




Figure 2 



Cultivation. — Cultivate same day plants are 
set if possible, and follow soon after with hoe 
and loosen the soil around the plant to the 
depth of one inch. Cultivate every eight or 
ten days, and after each rain as soon as soil 
is in condition. When plants start making 
runners, have the cultivator tooth next to 
plants one inch shorter than the other teeth 
to prevent cutting roots. Keep plants free 
from weeds. Don't let runner plants set closer 
than six or eight inches to each other. Each 
plant must have 
ample room in 
which to build up 
its fruit-bud sys- 
tem, and all the 
roots must have 
room in the soil 
from which to 
feed. Keep soil 
around young 
plants loosened 
with a hoe; never 
allow crust to form 
around the plants. 

System of Grow- 
ing. — If plants are 
grown in hills no 

runners should be Figures 




Express orders for plants calling for more than 200 plants are packed in crates, and if a dibble is ordered it may be 

packed with the plants. 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 9 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 




Packing Kellogg's Thoroughbred Plants for Shipment 

THESE men have done this work for many years and thoroughly understand how to pack the plants so they will 
carry to destination, no matter how great the distance. Here every bunch is examined and must be in ideal condi- 
tion before it goes into the package. The first operation is the placing of damp spaghnum moss in the bottom of the 
box; then layers of plants alternating with layers of moss until the particular order is filled. Then the box is 
nailed up, stenciled and shipped at once. The work is done with the celerity which long practice gives, and the plants 
leave our hands in perfectly fresh condition. 



allowed to set. Cut off all runners under 
the hill system before young plants form. 
For single-hedge system allow each mother 
plant to make two runner plants. For 
double-hedge each plant should make from 
four to six runners. For narrow-matted row 
runners may be set until the plants stand 
twelve or fifteen inches wide in the row. But 
bear in mind that plants must in no case crowd 
one against the other. Whatever system you 
follow, single-hedge, double-hedge or narrow- 
matted row, all surplus runners should be cut 
or pulled off after the number of plants re- 
quired have been set. 

Spraying. — Fortunately there are few enemies 
of the strawberry. However, it is sometimes 
necessary to spray. Any insect that eats holes 
in the plants (see page 13) or weaves a web in 
the leaf, like the leaf -roller (see page 13 
also), is called a leaf -eating insect, and 
their operations may be checked by the use of 
arsenates. And if the leaves of the plants 
show spots or signs of curling, it is evident 
that a fungous disease — rust, blight, or mildew 
(see page 14), is present. Either of these 
may be prevented by the use of Bordeaux mix- 



ture. (For formulae, see "Leaf-chewing In- 
sects and Preventives," page 13.) 

Mulching. — Late in the fall, when growth 
ceases, and following the first light freeze, 
cover the plants and the ground between the 
rows with some mulching material. Wheat, 
oat, buckwheat or rye straw, marsh hay or 
coarse stable manure — any of these will serve 
the purpose. Millet, if cut when in bloom, 
also will serve as mulch ; so will sea-grass. In 
the South, where it is unnecessary to cover the 
vines themselves, pine needles make an ex- 
cellent material when put around the plants 
to keep the berries clean. Leave mulching un- 
disturbed until growth starts in the spring, at 
which time part the mulch directly over the 
rows and let the plants grow up through the 
opening. If at any time during the fruiting 
season growth of weeds or grass starts among 
the plants or between the rows, pull them up 
directly after a rain, or cut them out with 
broad sharp hoes, scraping the blade on the 
surface of the earth just under the mulching. 

Picking, Packing and Marketing. — If fruit 
is sold near home, allow berries to become 



Express orders for 200 or less are wrapped in waxed paper and rewrapped in heavy express paper. In this case the 

dibble is shipped in a separate package. 



10 GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 





Loading Express Car with Kellogg Thoroughbreds 

THE volume of shipments of strawberry plants from the Kellogg Farms from the beginning to the end of the shipping 
season scarcely is realizable without an object lesson. Every day we ship vast quantities by freight and by mail 
but by far the larger part of our orders go by express. The loading of an express car as shown above is a typical scene. 
During the season of 1908 we shipped thirty special express carloads; that is, thirty cars were furnished by the American 
Express Co. for our exclusive use. In addition to these special express cars, shipments were made on practically every 
train carrying express out of Three Rivers, from March 27 to the latter days of May — and there are eight trains daily. 
The number of plants shipped was approximately twenty-five millions. 



fully ripe. If fruit is to be shipped a long dis- 
tance, pick the fruit under-ripe. Let the dis- 
tance the fruit is to be shipped govern the de- 
gree of ripeness. Don't pull the berries, but 
pinch them off, leaving short stem on each one. 
Note the appearance of each of our more than 
fifty varieties as they appear at the top of their 
respective pages in this book, and you will ob- 
serve that each has a short stem. When pick- 
ing the berries, handle them as lightly and as 
little as possible. Don't pick when vines are 
wet unless absolutely necessary. Grade ber- 
ries while picking, putting fancy fruit in sep- 
arate boxes from the No. 2 grade. Be sure 
to have berries the same on top and bottom 
of the box. Arrange top layer evenly and at- 
tractively (see page 30). Pack in clean, 
neat boxes, and use full quart measure. Clean 
crates also should be used. Label each crate 
of fancy fruit. Make arrangements for mar- 
keting before berries are ripe. 

Renewing Old Bed. — After fruit is picked 
mow off the vines. For this work the hay 
mower, the scythe or the sickle may be used, 
depending upon the implement available. Cut 



the vines close to the ground. When dry, 
loosen mulching with fork or hay tedder, then 
burn over the entire field (see page 39), unless 
rain comes after plants are cut and new growth 
starts before the refuse becomes dry enough 
to burn. In such a case do not burn, but rake 
up the mulching, and all other refuse, in piles 
and haul aw T ay. After burning or cleaning off 
the patch, cut a furrow from each side of the 
row (see page 40). After this cultivate with 
five-tooth cultivator; then cross the rows 
with weeder or spike-tooth harrow. These tools 
loosen the soil in the rows and draw soil over 
the crown of the plants. (See page 40). 
After this cultivate the bed the same as in 
the case of new-set plants. You will observe 
that we recommend that the crowns of old 
plants be covered with soil after burning over 
and rows are narrowed down. This is be- 
cause the roots of old plants have become wiry 
and almost useless, and in order to encourage 
a new root system it is necessary that the 
crowm be barely covered with fine soil. In 
the case of newly-set plants the roots are 
young and are full of vitality, and from these 
will start feedins; roots. 



Our shipping season usually begins the last week in March and continues up to the 1st of June. We ship no plants at 

any other season to anybody anywhere. 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 11 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 




Our Insurance Against Insects and Plant Diseases 

THE work of spraying our plants goes on continuously from setting time until mulching time, using arsenate of lead 
and Bordeaux mixture. While the illustration shows but one sprayer, we have three large machines for this work. 
This year we sprayed our hundred acres of plants ten times, copper-plating every leaf as well as coating them with 
arsenate. Figure this up and you will see that it equals a thousand acres of spraying, and to do this required 450 barrels 
of spraying fluid. It is needless to say more than this about the health and cleanliness of Kellogg's Thoroughbreds. 
This is another reason why our plants are the least costly of all plants. 



White Grub. — After the white grub once at- 
tacks strawberry plants about the only thing to 
do is to dig down to the roots, find the grub 
and kill him. The wilting of the plant indi- 
cates that the white grub is at work on the 
roots. Generally this is too late to save the 
particular plant, but by killing the grub you 
prevent his further ravages. The underground 
habit of the grub makes it difficult to control, 
and for this reason we give you suggestions 
that, if carefully followed, will protect you 
from its depredations. Avoid setting straw- 
berry plants in freshly plowed timothy sod. 
The white grub delights to feed on the wiry 
roots of timothy. Blue grass and clover sod 
seem to be free, practically, from these pests. 
We have set many acres of strawberries in 
the spring on clover and blue-grass sod which 
was plowed the previous fall without expe- 
riencing any difficulty with the grub. Do 
not use manure that has lain in piles through- 
out the summer. Just such places is where 
the May beetle and June bug deposit their 
eggs, from which the grub is hatched. It will 
be safe to use such manure, however, if it is 
hauled out and spread over the ground during 



hard-freezing weather. Hogs and fowls given 
free access to the manure, and allowing them 
to follow after the plow when breaking up 
the ground, will prove helpful, as they are 
very fond of grubs and other underground in- 
sects. Fresh manure is safe to apply at any 
time so far as the white grub is concerned. 
Frequent rotation of crops and fall plowing 
also are preventives against grubs, and the 
more fowls that follow the plow the better. 

Black Ants. — The black ant itself does no 
particular injury to the strawberry, but their 
presence is an indication that the aphis (lice) 
is at work on the roots of the plant. The ants 
carry the lice from the roots of one plant to 
another, and while the lice suck the juice from 
the roots. and tender parts of the plants, the 
ants stay close by to get the honey-like sub- 
stance given off by the lice. Thorough cul- 
tivation will drive the ants to other quarters, 
as they do not enjoy working in freshly stirred 
or loose soil. Neither do they like to be dis- 
turbed in their work. By chasing away the 
ants you also rid your fields of the lice, as 
they cannot by themselves travel from plant 
to plant. In fact, thorough cultivation aids 



There never was a time when so much money was being made in strawberry production as now. It presents a field for 
enterprise and development, such as is offered by few lines of endeavor. 



12 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 





Gathering Berries in the Kellogg Experimental Plot 

WHEN you read the descriptions of each variety as they appear in this book, you get the exact performance of the 
plants as shown by results under actual tests in our own experimental plot. Here is where we put to a thorough 
test every variety listed in this book. In this way we can intelligently write a correct description of the variety as it 
approves itself. By this system we learn its ability as a fruiter, builder of foliage, drought resister, length of fruiting 
season ; its shipping quality, flavor and productiveness. We also test the several varieties as to their value as canners 
and in many other ways of preserving for winter. 



to discourage all kinds of insects, which adds 
another important item in favor of cultivation. 

We have endeavored, in the above brief 
paragraphs and more detailed articles, to make 
our methods so plain that even the novice may 
understand, and have used many practical il- 
lustrations to aid in this direction. If you will 
read the book carefully we are sure you will 
understand each feature of the work fully. 
However, if we have failed to make ourselves 
perfectly clear, or problems arise in your ex- 
perience that you feel you cannot solve, it will 
give us pleasure to answer questions and help 
you to do so. 

Grew Berries to Match the Pictures 
"DURT STONE of Lu Verne, la., writing under 
-° date of February 3, 1908, says: "Before fruiting 
your plants I had the idea that the pictures in your 
catalogue showed the berries extravagantly large. 
But last year I grew berries from Kellogg Thorough- 
bred plants and have changed my mind, as the berries 
I grew were as large as the pictures in your catalog." 

Showed His Pleasure in a Substantial Way 

WRITING under date of May 11, 1908, Clifford 
Ware of Salineville, Ohio, writes : "The straw- 
berry plants you shipped me April 29 were received 
May 1 in good condition. I never saw nicer plants. 
I am so well pleased with them T am sending you 
another order." 




Answering Inquiries From Our Customers 

HPHE above illustration is a scene in the private office of 
the Secretary and Treasurer of the R. M. Kellogg 
Company, with Mr. Burke dictating letters to a stenog- 
rapher. As nearly as it is possible to do so, all letters are 
answered within twenty-four hours after being received, 
and it is our aim and purpose that every question shall be 
carefully answered, so that the inquirer may be completely 
informed in the matter concerning which he has written. 
What this involves may be better comprehended when it 
is known that we frequently receive in one mail as high 
as fifteen hundred letters. During the busy season four 
stenographers and typewriters are kept busily at work tak- 
ing care of this vast correspondence. 



For more than twenty years we have been making friends all the continent over through the excellence of our plants 
and "square deal" methods. We should like to add your name to our list of friends if it be not already there. 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 13 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 




Mulching Breeding-Bed on the Kellogg Farm 

ONE of the important features of the work on the Kellogg farm, and one which has very large bearing upon the 
health and vigor of the plants, is the manner in which our plants are mulched. The above scene suggests what this 
work involves upon our 100 acres of Thoroughbred plants. The vast quantities of straw required to cover this great 
area with such thoroughness as we do the work makes a heavy drain upon the grain fields within a range of several 
miles about Three Rivers. Approximately 300 wagon-loads of straw such as shown above are required each autumn. 



Leaf-Chewing Insects and Preventives 

YITHENEVER holes appear in the leaves of 
"™ the strawberry plant you may know that 
some leaf-eating insect is present, and the 
plants should be sprayed at once with arsenate 
of lead. Formula — Take three pounds of ar- 
senate of lead and pour over it enough water 
to barely cover. Then 
crush the lead with a small 
mallet until it is thoroughly 
dissolved, gradually add- 
ing more water until about 
two gallons have been made. 
To this add enough water 
to make fifty gallons. One 
spraying usually will put 
the insect out of business. 
Or, take ten ounces of 
Paris green and over this T , is lsaf 3hov . 5 ri 
pour enough water to effect of leaf-chewing 

« . . insects. All insects of 

make a paste, and When this nature are de- 
thorOUghly "pasted" take stroyed by arsenates. 

two pounds of lump lime in a separate bucket, 
over which pour two gallons of hot water. 
When slaking stir to prevent burning. When 
slaked combine this solution with the Paris 
green paste. Stir until thoroughly incorporated 
and then add sufficient water to make fifty 




gallons. The lime neutralizes the acid in the 
Paris green, and thus prevents the burning of 
the foliage. Either of the poisons will kill 
the insects, but we prefer the arsenate of lead. 
Either of these solutions may be used in com- 
bination with Bordeaux mixture. 



Strawberry Leaf Folded by Leaf-Roller 

'"PHE leaf-roller is a small brownish cater- 
pillar, hatched from eggs laid by a red- 
dish-brown moth. They fold the leaf by bring- 
ing the upper surfaces to- 
gether, and fasten them by 
a silken cord. Usually 
there are three broods each 
season. The first hatches 
early in May; the second 
the latter part of July, 
and the third in Septem- 
ber. If spraying with ar- 
senate of lead or Paris 
green is thoroughly done 
before the leaves are fold- 
ed together, it will pre- 
vent any damage from the roller. Burning 
over the fruiting bed after berries are picked is 
a great preventive. 




Kellogg Thoroughbreds represent the "square deal." Treat them right and they never fail to give the most generous 

and profitable results. 



14 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 





Thoroughbreds in Oklahoma — Ninety Days After Setting 

THE owner of this patch, Will S. Guthrie, cashier of the Farmers State Bank at Oklahoma City, Okla., writes us as 
follows: "This photograph was taken July 5, 1908, just ninety days after the plants were set out. If there is any- 
thing in 'keeping the faith' with these splendid Pedigree plants, if there is anything in careful cultivation, this patch 
will discount anything in Oklahoma when it comes into bearing. Not a weed, not a spear of grass, not a rust spot, not 
an extra runner can be found — only three missing plants out of 550 — nearly a 100 per cent, stand. The very minute 
advisable after each rain found me on the ground with my wheel hoe — that dust mulch certainly does hold the moisture ! 
Being a banker, with very little opportunity for out-door exercise, I count every hour in this patch worth $5.00 to me 
in pleasure and health." 



We Aid Beginners to Succeed 

VVT'E ARE well aware that many people who 
™" receive our book and become interested 
in the subject of strawberry growing would 
like to engage in the work, but feel their lack 
of experience. To such friends we would 
give complete assurance that it is our highest 
purpose to aid them to win complete success. 
If you are one who finds himself in this situa- 
tion, you need not hesitate at all ; simply send 
us needed information concerning the size of 
your prospective patch, giving us its length 
and breadth, and we will advise you as to the 
number of plants required and, if you desire, 
will select an assortment of varieties that will 
exactly suit the requirements of your particu- 
lar locality. You know that a great deal 
depends upon getting well-developed plants 
and of the proper varieties as to whether you 
get the big red berries in large quantities. 

We shall advise you just how to set the 
plants to get the best results — will tell you 
how to mate them so that every bloom will be 
perfectly formed into a luscious berry. And 
if there is any other assistance required, sim- 
ply write and ask us questions and you will 



receive a prompt answer, explaining just how 
everything should be done. 

Strawberry production is the most profit- 
able work we know; and if you will give us 
a chance to do so, we shall be very glad to be 
of large service to you. 



Strawberry Leaves Showing Rust Spots 

and Mildew 
"V17"HEN you observe rust spots appearing 
* * on the leaves of your plants it is a warn- 
ing of the presence of rust. At first sight 
spray with Bordeaux 
mixture. Formula — Put 
four pounds of blue vit- 
riol into a coarsely woven 
sack; put 20 gallons of 
water in a barrel; fasten 
the sack so that the bot- 
tom of the sack contain- 
ing vitriol will rest upon 
the surface of the water. 
This will allow the air 
to come into contact with ^ * _ _ 

. • • i i • »ii t The spots on this leaf are 
the Vitriol and it Will dlS- caused by rust spots. 

solve very quickly. Now ^"tSSSZ***™ 




The lazy-man's patch is a poor place to look for thriving strawberries. Good plants, good soil and good care form a 

combination that always wins out. 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 



15 




Four Acres of Thoroughbreds that Yielded 53,000 Quarts 

THE above scene is a view in the strawberry field of O. J. Wigen, of Creston, British Columbia, who, writing under 
date of July 28, 1908, says: "Having just finished the marketing of 2,206 24-quart cases of strawberries from a little 
over four acres of ground set with your Thoroughbred Pedigree Strawberry Plants, I feel it my duty to let you know 
of the performance of your plants in this part of British Columbia ; and I would add that under a more perfect system 
than I have been able to follow this yield can be greatly increased." Mr. Wigen employs fifty Indians as pickers, and 
his situation is one of romantic beauty, reminding us of the pioneer days of long ago. To have grown more than 13,000 
quarts of strawberries to the acre is a feat worthy of special notice. 



put four pounds of lump lime into another 
barrel, over which pour enough hot water to 
cover. When slaking stir to pre- 
vent burning, and when thorough- 
ly slaked add enough water to 
make twenty gallons. When the 
vitriol and lime water are com- 
bined you have the Bordeaux 
mixture. But do not combine un- 
til ready to use. Bordeaux mix- 
ture is a preventive for all leaf- 
spots and mildew. If you have 
leaf-eating insects at the same 
time, you may add either Paris 
green or arsenate of lead to the 
Bordeaux mixture and spray with Shews effect 
the combination. When the leaves ° mi ew 
are affected with mildew they curl or roll up 
as though suffering for moisture. At first 
sight spray with Bordeaux mixture. 




Our Shipping Season. 

YVTE begin digging and shipping our plants 
in the latter part of March and continue 
the work until the latter part of May or the 
first of June. Our experience has been that 



the more nearly dormant a plant is the bet- 
ter it will carry to destination, and we there- 
fore advise our customers to have their plants 
come forward early in the spring, while they 
are still dormant, and, as soon as they ar- 
rive, to heel them in, if for any reason they 
cannot set them at once in their permanent 
place. We have often received plants of new 
varieties for testing purposes from the Pacific 
coast and Southern states in March, and have 
heeled them in and held them there for as 
long as five or six weeks, until our soil was 
ready for them; and in such cases have had 
every plant grow with wonderful vigor. Heel- 
ing-in, when properly done with dormant 
plants, is always successful (see pages 17-18). 

Of late years many of our customers in 
Northern states and in Canada have requested 
us to defer shipping their plants until the very 
last of May or first of June, because their 
ground would not be ready earlier. Now this 
is a mistake. It would be much better to al- 
low us to ship plants early and for the cus- 
tomer to heel them in immediately upon ar- 
rival. We have shipped thousands of orders 
the very last day of May and up into the early 
days of June, and with great success; but we 



None may read the voluntary tributes to Kellogg Thoroughbreds in this book that come from delighted customers and 
not be convinced that we do exactly as we say we will do in every particular. 




Frank C. Emerson's Patch of Thoroughbreds at Keene, N. H. 

TN SENDING us the photograph from which the above illustration was made, Mr. Emerson says: "Three years ago 
J- I received a copy of your 'Great Crops.' In forty minutes after receiving it I had read it through, and no one could 
tell me anything about raising strawberries — I had it down fine ! I ordered enough plants to set half an acre, but here 
my troubles began, and they did not end until the following spring. I did not give up, but took your book and read it 
as I should have done in the first place, with the result that from the present appearance of my field, it will require at 
least fifty pickers to handle my crop of berries." All our friends will find it worth while to read and read again the 
instructions given in this book. The matter is very much condensed, and we are sure the careful reader will find some- 
thing new in the way of instruction or advice every time he sits down with it and studies it with care. 



are sure that results would be better still if 
plants could go forward earlier. Let us say 
in this connection that no other nursery in 
the country can more successfully ship plants 
late than can ours, ( 1 ) because we are 
located in the North; (2) our plants are so 
mulched as to hold them dormant to the last 
possible moment, and (3) because of our per- 
fect packing methods. 

You may rest assured that no matter how 
late we are compelled to ship your plants, up 
to June 1, we shall use every precaution that 
will aid to deliver them to you in the best 
possible condition. But we urge early ship- 
ment because we sincerely desire that each 
customer shall attain the highest success pos- 
sible with our plants. 

But there is one thing we cannot and will 
not do — we will not ship plants to anybody, 
anywhere, for summer or fall setting. Our 
shipping season closes June 1, and all orders 
reaching us after that date will be returned 
or booked for shipping the following season. 
This is stated so positively because so many 
of our friends write pleading for us to break 
our rules and ship them plants for summer 



or fall setting. We refuse to do so because 
our plants are not sufficiently developed, and 
to set plants in summer or fall is not scientific 
horticultural practice. Please do not ask us 
to do what is impossible under the circum- 
stances. 

How Plants Feed 

AX/'HEN we stop to consider that more 
than 95 per cent of a strawberry plant 
is made up from the elements of the atmos- 
phere, we then wonder why such ideal soil 
conditions are of such great importance. If 
the atmosphere furnishes such a large per- 
centage of the plant's development, then why 
is it necessary to give any thought to soil 
preparation? The very poorest soil easily 
could contribute its small percentage to plant 
growth if the air would furnish the rest. 

This might be true if the roots and leaves 
and soil and atmosphere were not so much 
dependent one upon the other in order to 
get these percentages. The soil must be in 
a condition to make the bacterial germs com- 
fortable and to hold moisture to dissolve the 
soil materials. Under such conditions these 



Plants are always in good condition when they leave our farms, and you may be sure are freshly dug and properly 
packed. We do all we can to insure prompt and safe delivery. Beyond that point our responsibility does not extend. 




Thoroughbreds in Patch of J. B. Koupal, West Point, Neb. 

TTERE is a case where pluck and perseverance won success under difficulties. Mr. Koupal writes us that he received 
J- J- his plants April 8, and set them out on the 9th. Heavy frost on the 10th destroyed the leaves, and on the 18th a foot of 
snow covered them. Some of the plants failed, but he saved the best runners and layered them in the rows to fill 
vacancies and the result is the fine patch shown above, the photograph being taken about October 10. Gumption and 
stick-to-it-iveness go a long way in strawberry culture — just as they do in every other line of endeavor. 



little micro-organisms will properly prepare 
and separate the mineral matter from the 
soil which goes to make up the 3 to 5 per 
cent of the plant. 



When this so-termed plant food is prop- 
erly prepared it is absorbed by the roots; this 
crude material which is taken in by the roots 
passes upwards into the body of the plant; 




Heeling-in Plants— Showing Plants in Trench 

OHOULD plants arrive before you are ready to set them in their permanent place, dig a V-shaped trench in a shady 
*J place, open the bunches — one variety at a time — and place the plants closely together against one side of the trench, 
as shown in cut. You will note that the crowns of the plants come even with the surface of the soil and the roots hang 
straight down in the trench. When plants are placed in this manner, draw the soil from the opposite side of the trench 
up against the roots and press it firmly, as shown on page 18. 



Carefully read all instructions appearing on the order sheet before making out your order. 




Thoroughbreds on L. L. Allis' Sunshine Fruit Farm, Manhattan, Kans. 

WRITING under date of July 20, 1908, Mr. Allis says: "The strawberry plants shown in photograph are Kellogg 
plants, and I am certainly well pleased with them, as every one was strong and healthy and true to name. Out of 
the thousand plants I got of you I lost only 2^4 per cent, while out of the thousand plants I received from another 
party, I lost 750 plants, and was sorry, the next spring, that all of the latter had not died, for they were weakly and 
puny, and not one of them was true to name. All these plants were set in the same soil and received the same care. 
My Dunlaps certainly 'surprised the natives' as to size and flavor of fruit." 



from there the elaborated materials are re- 
distributed through all parts of the inner plant. 

While the roots are absorbing the sub- 
stance in solution, the leaves of the plants 
are absorbing the gases, chiefly carbon-diox- 



ide. From this invisible source the plant de- 
fives its carbon, which makes up nearly half 
its entire weight, aside from the water. 

Plant-food materials taken in by the roots 
and leaves cannot be used directly in the making 




Plants Properly Heeled-in to Hold Till Ground is Ready 

TT7HEN the trench is filled in with soil the plants will resemble those shown in this cut. Please note that the soil 
» » is pressed firmly all around the crowns of the plants which prevents air from drying out the roots. A label showing 
name of each variety should be placed at the end of the row as it is heeled-in. We often have kept plants in this manner 
for several weeks with entire success. In fact, it is better to have plants shipped while they are yet dormant and heel 
them in than it is to have them held at the nursery until ground is ready. Plants should be pruned before they are 
heeled-in. 



Don't be an average strawberry grower. Be the leader in your section. We will do all we can to help you to attain 

that honorable (and profitable) distinction. 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 19 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 




Thoroughbreds in the Home Garden of H. L. Gill, Schoolcraft, Mich. 

THE above illustration shows the farm garden strawberry bed of our customer, H. L. Gill, of Schoolcraft, Michigan, 
and we could scarcely select a more typical or more inspiring picture to indicate what our Thoroughbreds do in the 
family garden when set in good soil and given good cultivation. When Mr. Gill visited our farm he said he believed 
he had the finest family patch in the country and invited us to have a photograph made of it. As the illustration shows, 
we accepted the invitation of Mr. Gill; and ^e can hardly disagree with his estimate of the beauty of his rows of 
strawberries. And any farm home in this country can have its equal in beauty and productiveness. 



of plant tissues and in contributing to growth. 
They must be worked over or formed into 
organic compounds. This process of elabora- 
tion takes place in the green parts, chiefly in 
the leaves and in the presence of sunlight. 
When the food has been elaborated it can 
be utilized, through further changes, for the 
building of the tissues, and is distributed 
throughout all parts of the plant, even to the 
roots from whence part of it came. 

The process of changing the inorganic ma- 
terials into organic materials, or assimilation, 
takes place only in daylight, but the trans- 



fer and subsequent use of the elaborated food 
may take place more freely in darkness. So 
it comes that most of the growth of the plant 
is made at night. 

With this little knowledge of how plants 
feed it would seem that much depended upon 
the leaves of a plant, which, of course, is true ; 
but just allow something to go wrong in the 
soil and see how quickly the leaf will show 
it. Or let some tiny underground insect nib- 
ble upon the roots, or let some sucking insect, 
so small that it could scarcely be seen with 
the naked eye, stick its beak here and there 



Digging Plants on the R. M. Kellogg Co. Farm 

THIS scene represents one of the important features of our work of plant selection in the breeding bed. Only mother 
plants of highest quality are used, and from these the choicest of young plants are transferred to the propagating 
field, from which are grown the famous Thoroughbreds that are shipped to our customers the continent over. 



Send us a full report of your strawberry experience and, if you can do so, send us a photograph of your patch or field, 

showing just how the Thoroughbreds appear. 



20 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 




Couldn't Supply the Demand for Kellogg's Thoroughbred Berries 

JOSEPH D. MYER, of Kingman, Ind., writes us: "Am sending you photograph of the plants I bought of you. 
Ninety-eight out of every hundred plants grew and did well ; they were the admiration of all who saw them. I raised 
the finest berries I ever saw, and couldn't supply the demand for them at the patch. We had a 'full dinner pail' while 
they lasted." 



into the rootlets and extract some of the 
juices and see how quickly the leaf will show 
that something has gone wrong. Neglect cul- 
tivation and allow the moisture to escape 
through the packed, crusted surface and the 
leaf will show the results more quickly than 
the roots. Or just allow fungous spores or in- 
sects to destroy the leaf tissues and the roots 
will immediately make inquiry as to what 
has gone wrong with the leaf department. 
Just as soon as something goes wrong with 
the leaf the distribution of elaborated food 
ceases to be normal. Then the root must 
starve, even though it collects food. It does 
not matter how abundant the soluble plant 
food may be, the leaves must be in perfect, 
healthy condition to take care of the crude 
material as the roots send it up. Thus it 
will be seen that there must be perfect har- 
mony between the soil and the roots and fo- 
liage of the plant so that the plant may use 
the elements of the atmosphere and soil to 
get just the right percentage of each at the 
proper time in order to build up a perfectly 
balanced plant, uniform in all its parts. 



Strawberries and Chickens 

'TPHE man who is making a specialty of 
poultry or egg production is in a particu- 
larly advantageous situation to engage in 



strawberry production. The fertility supplied 
by his fowls can in no other way be turned 
to so profitable account as when used to fer- 
tilize the strawberry field. It is a matter of 
statistical record that strawberries yield the 
largest revenue to a given area of any crop, 
and when the soil is prepared for the plants 




Thoroughbreds in the Fields of S. H. Snyder, 
Waterloo, N. Y. 

"C*ROM Mr. Snyder comes the following: "i send you herewith a 
-■- photograph of my three-quarter-acre strawberry patch, from 
which we have just finished picking 3,600 quarts of fine fruit. These 
plants are Kellogg Thoroughbreds, and because I have grown from 
them the finest fruit, I am called the Strawberry King of Seneca 
County. The plants I purchased from you this spring (1908) are do- 
ing finely, and I shall want a still larger order in the spring of 1909." 



Fall setting of strawberry plants in northerly latitudes is always unwise and is bad horticultural practice. Don't do it! 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 



21 




Thoroughbreds Top the Market at Portland, Oregon 

THE above illustration is a view in the beautiful field of strawberries grown at Oregon City, Oregon, by A. H. Finni- 
gan. Not only is it a marvel of cultural excellence, but the fruit Mr. Finnigan sends from it to the Portland market 
is the top-notcher as to price. Writing under date of July 20, 1908, Mr. Finnigan says: "I enclose you a clipping from a 
local paper showing that I'm on top at last ! My berries sold in Portland all the season for 15 cents, when one could buy 
all he wanted of other kinds at three or four boxes for 25 cents. Kellogg's plants, high cultivation, good packing and a 
label that said something, put me in a class by myself. And better still, my berries are all engaged for next year!" 



by the use of chicken droppings, it is especially 
adapted to largest success in the way of quan- 
tity and quality of the strawberry yield. 

Many of our most enthusiastic customers 
tell us of the excellent way in which these 



two related lines — strawberries and chickens 
— work together. The strawberry season 
comes just at the time when the poultryman is 
required to give the least care to his stock, 
and can, therefore, devote his best energies to 




Layering Runners to Encourage Early Rooting 

TUST as soon as the young plants are formed we draw soil or lay a small stone on the runner cord just back of the 
•» node, or young plant. This holds it in place and encourages the roots to take immediate hold upon the soil, thus 
relieving the strain upon the mother plant, and at the same time it develops a stronger runner plant. It also fixes the 
plant just where you wish it to be in the row. 



Strawberry plants should be set in the spring as early as soil and weather conditions will permit. Never in the fall in 

northern latitudes. 



22 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 



r 



Sample and Aroma, with Jar of Sugar 

TTERE we show in most attractive manner how to serve strawberries for breakfast. The few berries shown upon the 
A - 1 large plate indicate something of the size of the berries which are produced by the Kellogg strain of Sample and 
Aroma. For many years we have been working with these two varieties and have built up a strain of pure-bred plants 
of great fruiting power. We have a large stock of these universally popular varieties and hope to be able to supply all 
of our customers with them. 



taking care of the strawberry crop. When 
one individual combines these two occupa- 
tions he has an all-year-round business which 
gives him a constant revenue. The demand 
for his poultry, eggs and strawberries is al- 



an eager market always awaiting his products 
and ready to pay high prices for them. 

Many a comfortable fortune has been made, 
and is being made, by those who employ this 
most effective combination, and we hope to 



ways greater than the supply, so that he finds see the number vastly increased. 




Our New Method of Marking Out the Rows 

AFTER we get the cowpeas, manure and soil thoroughly incorporated and pulverized to the depth of the plowing, we 
proceed to prepare for the marker. First goes the heavy steel roller, weighted down with big stones; following the 
roller is a leveling device which breaks up the smooth surface left by the roller and fills in the horse tracks and all other 
uneven places. This in turn is followed by a regular corn-planter, which makes the marks exactly four feet apart, and 
leaves a slight rise on the surface. After the field is marked in this way we go "crossways" with a six-wheel marker, 
with wheels twenty-eight inches apart, as shown on page 31. The plants are set at the intersections of the lines, which 
places them four feet by twenty-eight inches apart, allowing ample space to cultivate in both directions until runners 
start. 



When sending us a remittance examine it carefully before mailing. We are obliged to send back remittances ifor, 

correction every day during our busy season. 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW TfiEM 23 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 




An Ideal Strawberry Wagon 



THE wagon shown suggests a very important matter to the commercial strawberry grower. You will note that this 
wagon has shelves, which allows the grower to keep separate the cases containing different grades of berries. Placing 
the fruit on shelves, it may be shown to prospective buyers in a quick and satisfactory way. The wagon is equipped 
with good springs and the berries arrive at market in as good condition as they leave the field. 



Strawberries and Bees 

HpHE bee is a friend of the strawberry. She 
likes the white blossom and finds in its 
depths the nectar which she resolves into 
honey. In the securing of the sweet, her 



body is laden with the yellow pollen, and as 
she moves from bloom to bloom she scatters 
this pollen so that the pistils of the plant are 
fructified and made productive of more per- 
fect fruit and of larger quantities of fruit. 




Stevens' Late Champion and Brandy wine 

WHICH would you eat first — the banana, or the three big, luscious strawberries? Note the Stevens' Late Champion 
on the left — isn't it a beauty? And the Brandy wines to the right — they're as big as ap"ies. It takes the Kellogg 
strain to produce this kind. Purity and vigor are dominating qualities of our strain of these lwo noble varieties. 



Be sure and mulch your plants. Just after the first hard freeze is the time. Oat straw, wheat straw, sowed corn, 
sorghum pomace, marsh hay, or any similar material will serve the purpose. 



24 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 




S. E. Abbott Sold $200.00 Worth of Berries from this Quarter Acre 

THIS is an illustration of a quarter of an acre of Thoroughbreds at "Hillcrest," the rural home of S. E. Abbott, of 
East Aurora, N. Y. In mulching them both buckwheat straw and strawy manure were used. Mr. Abbott writes 
us that the yield from the patch was 1,560 quarts (not counting the large quantity of which no account was made), but 
adds : "Had I covered the entire field with buckwheat straw, I am confident we would have picked from 2,000 to 2,200 
quarts. The lowest sold for 10 cents and the highest 16 cents — an average of 12^ cents. All were sold in well-filled 
baskets and stamped 'Hillcrest Berries'." 




THE hill system simply involves the setting of mother plants as close as you wish them. The runners are pinched 
or cut off before the nodes are formed. When grown in this manner and the work is to be done by hand, the rows 
may be placed as close as twenty-four inches apart and the plants set twelve to fifteen inches apart in the row. 




THE single-hedge row is formed by allowing enough runner plants to set to make a continuous line of plants, and is 
a splendid method to follow. 

If you change your postoffice address please notify us at once so that next year's "Great Crops of Strawberries and How 

to Grow Them" may reach you promptly. 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 



25 





Spring-Set Thoroughbreds in the South 

THERE is no more doubt about the success of spring-set strawberry plants in the South than there is about the 
results of spring-setting in the North. From every state in the South come nattering reports of results received from 
our Thoroughbreds. The above illustration shows a field of them on the farm of E. W. Sluder, of Leicester, N. C, who 
writes us under date of August 28, 1908 : "I cannot say enough in regard to Kellogg's Thoroughbred strawberry plants. 
The patch shown in photograph was set with 700 of your plants, and from these I gathered 825 quarts of strawberries, 
which I sold for 10, 12 and 15 cents per quart. I shall always buy my strawberry plants of R. M. Kellogg Co." 



WHAT do you think of these? 
The berry in the bottom of 
the glass shows the great size of 
the berries produced by the Kel- 
logg strain of Bubach plants. If 
you would secure the pure, un- 
adulterated plants of this famous 
variety, send your order early. 
The other three berries are from 
our new introduction, the Long- 
fellow, the performance of which 
in our experimental beds during 
three years of testing assures us 
that we have here a variety of 
unusual merit, 
and we are sure 
that a trial will 
convince anyone 
that it possesses 
extraordinary 
qualities. 



Longfellow and Bubach 



26 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 




Bisexual (Male) Pistillate (Female) Bisexual (Male) 



HpHESE are the kind of blossoms produced by Kellogg's Thoroughbred plants. Well developed plants build up strong 
fruit-buds, which insure well developed blossoms with healthy pistils and large anthers, which furnish an abundance 
of fertile pollen. Note the flowers in the above illustration of the bisexuals and see the large center cones and the pow- 
erful anthers surrounding them. Such flowers, supported by strong plants, insure big crops of perfectly formed berries. 




The Double-Hedge Row 




The Narrow-Matted Row 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 27 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 




Downing's Bride and President 

NO TWO pistillates ever introduced give more universal satisfaction than Downing's Bride and President. The 
President produces just enough runners to give an ideal fruiting bed, which saves a large amount of labor for the 
grower. Downing's Bride makes a long runner and a very strong plant. Both of these varieties are exceedingly pro- 
ductive of just such berries as shown in the above illustration, and we hope that every grower will order enough of these 
varieties to test them and be convinced of their great value 

Plants for Testing 

jy/J ANY strawberry growers send us plants 
to test, and we are always glad to re- 
ceive them and give them the best of care, 
never forgetting that there are large possibili- 
ties in this line of work. From chance seed- 
lings have come some of the most delicious 
and beautiful of our fruits, and every grower 
owes it to himself and to the world to do 
what he may to advance the cause by such • 
work as this involves. Sometimes we get 
plants from growers who have failed to prop- 
erly indicate from whence they came. One 
day last season we received three packages, 



two of which bore no mark of identification. 
After some correspondence we succeeded in 
straightening the matter out — we think and 
hope. But the risk is too great. Alwa}^ in- 
dicate in plain letters on the package of plants 
full information, about as follows: "From 
John L. Smith, Jonesville, Mich., 25 'Beat- 
em-all' Strawberry Plants." Then, even 
though your letter be lost somewhere on the 
way, we shall know from whom and where 
the plants come, and the name of the variety 
which the originator has given it. And this 
will enable us to preserve records, so important 
in all experiments of this nature. 



You are particularly invited to send us a photograph of your field or patch. The best views are given places of honor 

in our catalogue. 



28 GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 





Glen Mary and Warfield 

TTERE are two of our old favorites, popular in every state of the Union and all over Canada. Warfield is shown in 
the cup, and indicates the type and size of berry produced by the Kellogg strain of Warfield plants. Our plants of 
this variety have made a fruiting record that we are proud of; and the plants for 1909 are the finest ever grown on the 
Kellogg farms. Glen Mary, at edge of cup, says more than we could do in many words. Our strain of Glen Marys 
grows in favor so rapidly that in the past it has been impossible for us to supply the demand. We have a large stock 
for 1909 and we hope to be able to fill all orders that come to us. 



Some Suggestive Figures 

'"PHE Kellogg farm consists of 220 acres of as fertile 
land as may be found anywhere. Each year we 
grow approximately 100 acres of strawberry plants. 
Placed in one continuous row they would extend from 
Chicago to Detroit, with 28 miles to spare ; we have, 
in other words, 292 miles of plants. 

Our cultivating brigade, with Planet Jr. culti- 
vators, went over the rows thirty times each way in 
the season of 1908, making the total distance traveled 
by men and teams 17,520 miles. This equals five 
trips from New York to San Francisco, with 1,165 
miles to credit on the sixth trip. 

We grow between 20,000,000 and 25,000,000 
plants, and 20,000,000 plants, placed two feet apart, 
will set 8,000 miles of plants. 

It requires 450 barrels of spraying materials, or 
22,500 gallons, to spray our plants each vear, and we 



use in excess of 2,000 tons of manure annually to 
fertilize the farms. In 1908 we paid $1,700.00 in 
freight bills on manure alone. 

To mulch our plants requires about 350 tons of 
straw each season, and it requires from thirty to forty 
tons of spaghnum moss to pack the plants we ship 
each year. 

To make our shipping crates we use more than 
one ton of 3-penny nails each season. 

Our postage bill reaches from $7,500 to $8,000 per 
annum. 

There are 151,363 acres of land in the United 
States devoted to strawberry production, on which 
257,427,103 quarts of strawberries are grown, or an 
average of about 1,700 quarts to the acre. Kellogg 
Thoroughbreds have produced in the states east of 
the Rocky Mountains 10,000 quarts to the acre, and 
on the Pacific Coast more than 15,000 quarts to the 
acre, or nearly nine times as many as the "average" 
plants have done. 



Please note that we never employ agents, nor do we allow commissions on plants sold. 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 29 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 




One of Many Clusters of Cardinals 



WHEN it comes to producing berries by the bunch, the Cardinal "takes the cake." It is a sight worth seeing when 
the Cardinal is in full fruit in our experimental bed, and as this variety has no particular choice of soil or locality, 
it will do just as well for you as it is doing for us. Its vigorous, healthy foliage makes it possible for this noble variety 
to bring every berry to perfection. The berries are dotted so thickly through the foliage that they lie on one another, 
and the rich cardinal red, set in the beautiful green of the foliage, makes a picture of rare attractiveness. The flavor of 
the Cardinal is delicious, and in productiveness it equals any variety on our list. We grow the Cardinal between 
Stevens' Late and Pride of Michigan. 



Don't set out your plants until your soil is made perfectly fine and, if manured, see to it that the manure is thoroughly 

incorporated with the soil. 



30 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 




A Box of Haverland Strawberries Properly Packed 

WE SHOW here the top layer of a box of Haverland strawberries packed and faced in a manner to command the top- 
notch price. To do the work in this manner requires but little trouble, and the returns are very large. Our strain 
of Haverlands has won a world-wide reputation ; and these plants are heavy producers of choice berries. 



The Professional Man and Strawberries 

HpO THE man of sedentary pursuits, re- 
maining at his desk through many hours 
of the day, there is no other occupation that 
gives greater promise of health and pleasure, 
to say nothing of possible profits, than straw- 
berry growing. And whether such a person 
is blessed with a generous area of fertile soil, 
or is limited to narrow confines at the rear 
end of a city lot, he may count with equal 
certainty upon the work to give him health 
and such delight as he will find in no other 
line of effort. It is the universal consensus 
that the strawberry patch is the most attrac- 
tive spot upon the home place. The flower 
garden is full of beauty and fragrance, and 
the vegetable garden has its elements of pleas- 
ure and promise, but the strawberry patch is 
not only a scene of beauty, but responds to 
man's natural demand in delicious edibles. 
In all the range of fruits nothing more amply 



fills ones ideal of gastronomic joy than does 
ripe, luscious, well-flavored strawberries. Out 
of our own experience, as well as from a 
countless number of enthusiastic letters that 
have come to us concerning this matter, we 
can confidently assure our friends of the pro- 
fessions that the keenest pleasure and zest of 
life awaits him who engages in the growing 
of strawberries. 



Women as Strawberry Growers 

t^VERY year adds a large number of 
women to our long list of strawberry 
growers, and none of the men we know who 
are engaging in the work finds more pleasure 
in it than do these sensible women who have 
learned to look out-of-doors for recreation and 
enjoyment. Nor is this all. Some of the 
women who are growing strawberries from 
our Thoroughbred plants are finding the oc- 
cupation one of very generous profit, and 



Keep the surface of the soil constantly stirred. Cultivation conserves moisture, keeps down the weeds, and brings new 
supplies of plant food to the plants and makes big crops of strawberries certain. 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 



31 




A Dish of Stevens' Late Champion 

THIS engraving is an exact reproduction of a photograph, and suggests the large size and fine appearance of the 
berries produced by this noble late variety. The productiveness, large size, fine quality and lateness of Stevens' 
Late Champion make it one of great profit to the commercial grower and a favorite for the family garden. 



many of them have found it profitable enough 
to withdraw from all other lines of work and 
engage wholly in the pursuit of growing high- 
grade strawberries for the market. The work 
is healthful, refined, inspiring, profitable. It 
calls for little manual labor that is beyond 
the physical strength of delicate women, and 
wherever heavy work is necessary men may 




Sled-Runner Marking Device 

THREE runners made from 2x4 scantling about two feet 
long and spiked to 1x4 boards attached to shafts, com- 
pletes the above device, which is one of the simplest and 
best markers for small growers of which we know. 



be employed to do it. The life is in the open, 
and the strawberry season is the most charm- 
ing of all seasons. It requires only energy, 
intelligence and a certain degree of skill in 
growing the fruit, and good common sense 
in marketing it, to insure success to any 
woman who enters upon this work. We have 
ample reason to believe that in no other di- 




A Six-Wheel Marking Device 

SIX iron wheels placed upon a section of gas-pipe to 
which are attached gas-pipe shafts. Wheels are held in 
place on the gas-pipe by lugs or heavy washers, and these 
are fastened to the gas-pipe by set screws. By loosening 
the screws the spaces between wheels may be gauged to 
any desired width. 



We send no plants to anyone anywhere C. O.D., nor do we ship plants until the full amount of their cost is in our hands. 



32 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 




Big Second-Crop Thoroughbreds from the Field of C. M. Peebles 

CM. PEEBLES, of Lake City, Iowa, sends us the above picture, and says: "Am sending you a photo of some of 
• your Senator Dunlap berries that are fine. Raised 1,050 quarts from a bed 4x5y 2 rods; 700 plants, second- 
year's crop." 




A Barrel of Kellogg Thoroughbreds 

MR. S. A. METCALF, of Galveston, Indiana, sends us 
a beautiful photograph from which the above half- 
tone engraving has been made, and in his letter says: "My 
crop of berries this year was very fine, and I won the 
reputation of having the finest berries on the Kokomo and 
Galveston markets. I sent some berries to Lafayette and 



Marion and received letters of congratulation concerning 
them, the writers asking how I could grow such fine berries 
in such dry weather. I replied that it was no trouble to grow 
big, red berries when Kellogg's Thoroughbred plants were 
used. To give you an idea of the abundant yield, let me 
say that Mrs. Cora Fresh picked 93 quarts, Mrs. Ella 
Loop picked 89 quarts, and Goldie Coulter (aged 15) 
picked 61 quarts, in just five hours and ten minutes. I 
have calls for lots of plants, but always refer them to you." 

Under the barrel system strawberries may be grown 
without a garden plot. Simply bore holes through the 
staves and fill the barrel with rich soil. Then set the 
plants in the top of the barrel, and in the holes in the 
sides, as shown in the illustration. Such a barrel makes a 
beautiful porch ornament or a fine feature on the lawn. 



rection may so large success be made by the 
woman who finds it necessary to support her- 
self and to rear her children, as in the pro- 
duction of high-grade strawberries. 

Any woman who would like to engage in 
this work, but is restrained from doing so be- 
cause of lack of experience, need not hesitate 
on that account. It is our pleasure to help 
all who desire us to do so to win large suc- 
cess in strawberry production. 



Why Kellogg's Strain of Plants Have 
Won World-Wide Reputation 

/ T^HEY have been selected from a strain of 
* mother plants of high fruiting power 
and great productiveness. 

They are at all times supplied with an 
abundance of moisture and plant food, which 



Send us your order as soon after this book reaches you as possible. It will be to your advantage in every way to be 

very prompt in this matter. 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 



33 




James H. Arnold of Kenyon, R. I., Says Thoroughbreds are No. 1 

TT7RITING under date of July 7, 1908, James H. Arnold, of Kenyon, R. I., says: "The photograph I am sending 
» " was taken from plants that I purchased from you. I can say they are No. 1 plants and that we have had a very 
successful season. Could not grow enough berries to supply the demand." 



insures continuous growth from the time of 
setting to the close of the growing season. 

They are cultivated and hoed continuously 
throughout the growing season, keeping the 
soil free from weeds and crust formation. 

Spraying is continuous throughout the en- 
tire growing season, using Bordeaux mixture 



and arsenates, which insures perfect health 
and vigor of plants. 

All fruiting buds are removed as soon as 
they appear. 

Greatest possible care has been given all 
mother plants to increase their fruiting power. 

They have been properly pruned at set- 
ting time to prevent any unnecessary check 
in growth. 

Runner plants are layered, as soon as they 
start, by placing soil on the runner cord di- 
rectly back of the young plant or node. This 
assists the young plant to take root quickly 
and encourages a full root system to start 
from the crown. 

The plants are well protected throughout 
the entire winter by a covering of straw, and 
in the following spring every Kellogg plant 
is in a strong and vigorous condition and 
ready to burst into immediate activity when 
set in its new home. 

In short, every detail known to scientific 
A Handful of Samples horticulture that will promote the develop- 

T uri71 . t • f c 11. j . . e rnent of the highest quality plant is faithfully 
tit. Kellogg strain of Sample plants produce berries of . . v 11 1 

enormous size and in great quantities. Our stock of Carried OUt On the Kellogg tarm. 
Sample plants is very large, but there is a great demand And these are the kind of plants that will 

for them, and your order should reach us early, so that we . . 
may reserve you some plants of this splendid variety. insure Victory. 

No other fertilizer will so quickly and so surely improve the mechanical condition of the soil as barnyard manure. It 

is nature's unfailing soil restorer. 




Where Kellogg's Thoroughbreds Thrive 

FROM all sections of the country come letters like the one we quote here: "Your 
splendid catalogue is at hand and I am greatly interested. Will your plants do well 
in this State, and do you have any difficulty in delivering them without injury?" 
Well, we prefer to let our old customers answer those questions, so from thousands of 
similar letters received this season we have selected the following: 



ARKANSAS— We received the straw- 
berry plants in good shape and are 
well pleased with them. Your 
friend, S. F. Mulkey, Hot Springs. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA— Plants ar- 
rived in good condition. Surprised 
and pleased to have plants come 
2,000 miles and every plant grow- 
ing. C. Hauser, Penticton. 

CALIFORNIA — The plants you ship- 
ped me on the 28th of March 
arrived the 4th of April. They 
were in fine condition after their 
long trip — do not believe one of 
them was injured. I am more than 
pleased with them, with their great 
healthy roots. They are all set out 
and are looking fine. James Miller, 
Dos Palos. 

CANADA — Received my strawberry 
plants in grand order, and will say 
I never saw such fine plants. Of 
the 1,500 plants all but six are 
growing finely. E. G. Stockwell, 
Leamington, Ont. 

COLORADO — The plants arrived in 
splendid condition. I thank you 
very much. John J. Huddart, 
Denver. 

CONNECTICU T— Plants arrived 
in good condition, and they r,re the 
finest, largest plants I ever saw. 
Clara A. Thayer, Ea*t Haven. 

FLORIDA — The plants as ordered 
reached here April 2, and I put out 
3,500 on Monday and the rest on 
Tuesday — and you never saw plants 
look better. They are all alive — 
very much! A. C. Pussey, Jack- 
sonville. 

GEORGIA— Plants received O. K. 
All set out and doing nicely. 

IDAHO — Strawberry plants are re- 
ceived in good condition. 

ILLINOIS— The plants arrived in 
the best of shape — never saw any 
to equal them. They have been in 
the ground one week today, and 
have made a growth of over two 
inches. It will be a pleasure to 
recommend your plants to all in- 
quirers. J. M. Stewart, Lewiston. 

INDIANA — Received the plants and 
am well pleased all around. Fin- 
ished setting yesterday, and it 
began to rain this morning. If you 
were here now to see them you 
would say "Wonderful!" Plants 
did not stop growing or wilt after 
setting. F. M. Moody, Deedsville. 

IOWA — Received my plants in fine 
condition. All are living and doing 
finely. Mrs. G. A. Ellis, Fred- 
ericksburg. 

KANSAS — We received the plants 
all right and set them out ; and 
they are looking fine. We are 
really surprised to see such large, 
beautiful plants — never saw such 
fine ones before. We thank you 
for your kindness and wish you 
much success. Mrs. T. C. Carson, 
Brighton. 

KENTUCKY— Received the plants I 
sent for O. K. All are set out and 
growing nicely. Jas. A. Lovell, 
Prestonville. 



LOUISIANA — Received strawberry 
plants in good order. They are 
the nicest plants I ever saw. J. 
Destruel, Abita Springs. 

MARYLAND— Plants came duly to 
hand. I am very much pleased 
with them, and wish to thank you 
for .your promptness in the matter. 
David Staudenmeyer, Baltimore. 

MAINE — Received the strawberry 
plants all packed in good shape, 
and wish to thank you for them. 
Albert J. Smith, Richmond. 

MASSACHUSETTS— Our order of 
plants arrived in good condition 
and was exactly as ordered. Please 
accept our thanks. Mrs. Ingram 
W. Isenhaur. 

MINNESOTA — Plants received in 
fine condition, and the plants are 
as fine as any I ever saw. You 
may look for a large order next 
spring. F. A. Helmuth, Wyoming. 

MISSOURI — Your shipment of 
strawberry plants arrived in fine 
shape — as fine plants as I ever 
saw. Many thanks. F. C. Huston, 
Nevada. 

NEBRASKA — Strawberry plants 
reached me in fine shape and I am 
very much pleased over same. I 
think they are as fine plants as I 
ever saw. They are all set out and 
look fine. W. J. Russell, McCook. 

NEW JERSEY— The strawberry 
plants reached me in excellent con- 
dition. Although I was led to 
believe from your catalogue that 
they would be above the average, I 
was hardly expecting to receive 
such healthy looking ones, with so 
enormous a root system. If my 
strawberries are not a success I 
certainly cannot blame you. R. C. 
Sheffield, Lakewood. 

NEW YORK— The strawberry plants 
came in fine condition. I set them 
at once, and every plant is growing 
finely. Much obliged for your care 
and promptness. J. H. Coe, Syra- 
cuse. 

NORTH CAROLINA— Received my 
plants all O. K., and they were in 
fine condition. I set them out and 
they have started to grow finely. 
I have the greatest prospects I 
ever had. Last year I beat the 
record in Leicester, and I am try- 
ing to do still better. People down 
here are finding out what good 
plants will do when well worked 
and properly looked after. E. W. 
Sluder, Leicester. 

NORTH DAKOTA— Plants received 
from you in 1907 are bearing and 
are doing fine. . . . R. M. Kel- 
log Co. is first in the United States 
in all that relates to strawberry 
plants. Mrs. S. J. Augustus, Calio. 

OHIO — I received my plants all O. 
K. — fine as I ever saw. I will 
remember you when I want more 
good plants. Willis Crow, Kitt's 
Hill. 

OKLAHOMA— The plants I ordered 
from you came in fine condition. 
They surely have splendid roots. I 



set out some plants from an Ohio 
firm ("choice plants" they called 
them) March 10 ; set out yours 
April 1. The former plants are 
only about three-fourths growing 
and are not very hardy looking, 
while yours are every one growing 
and are very vigorous ; and at this 
writing are as large again as the 
Ohio consignment. Can recom- 
mend you to my friends. Thad D. 
Rice, Hitchcock. 

OREGON — The strawberry plants 
arrived April 1 in fine condition. 
You have a splendid system of 
packing and I am well pleased 
with such large, well-rooted plants. 
I set them out at once, and at this 
date (April 13) they are all alive 
and growing well. L. A. Barker, 
Corvallis. 

PENNSYLVANIA— Received the 
strawberry plants in good condi- 
tion, and am very well pleased with 
them. Leo A. Haenn, Tanguy. 

RHODE ISLAND— Plants received 
on May 9; hoed on the 11th. Best 
rooted plants I ever set out. Every 
one is living. E. A. West, Wood 
River Junction. 

TENNESSEE— Received my straw- 
berry plants in good shape. Set 
them out at once. I believe I will 
not lose a single plant. John Hanks, 
Athens. 

TEXAS — My strawberry plants came 
all right and in fine condition. I 
did just as you advise, and they 
are now, every one of them, grow- 
ing nicely. They have bright green 
leaves on them already. I am very 
proud of my strawberry plants. 
You could not have sent any better 
put up. Mrs. E. C. Cook, McLean. 

UTAH — Strawberry plants arrived 
O. K. Have them all set out. They 
were in fine condition. Mrs. D. 
B. Topham, Ogden, Utah. 

VERMONT— Plants arrived April 
25. Were in a railroad wreck 
seven miles from here, but I set 
them out and they have come up 
in good shape. G. M. Farnsworth, 
North Bennington. 

VIRGINIA— The strawberry plants 
arrived last week in good condi- 
tion, and I was able to set them 
out at once. They were beautifully 
packed and are now looking fine. I 
am very well pleased. Mrs. M. F. 
Maury, Charlottesville. 

WASHINGTON — The strawberry 
plants received from you are all 
growing nicely — every one. It is 
possible to equal this record, but 
none can beat it. John O. Streeter. 

WISCONSIN— Plants received all 
O. K. They were fresh — didn't 
look so they had been out of the 
ground an hour. Thanks ! F. J. 
Coapman, Wyocena. 

WYOMING — Strawberry plants ar- 
rived today all O. K. Many thanks 
for prompt and careful attention. 
M. E. Butler, Casper. 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 35 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 





A Heaping Cup of Virginias 

WHO can look at this picture without wanting some of our Thoroughbred Virginias? If we could only show you the 
color, which is uniform from stem to tip, you would become as enthusiastic over this beautiful berry as we are. 
You can make no mistake in setting some Virginias. Twenty-five to fifty plants will prove to you their real worth. Get 
your order in early so that we may reserve you some of them. 




Nick Ohmer and Wm. Belt 

IT IS unnecessary for us to say anything about the size of the berries produced by our Nick Ohmer and Wm. Belt. 
The picture tells the story more eloquently than we could do it in words. So popular is our strain of these varieties 
that we have been unable to grow enough plants to supply the demand. We have a large stock this year and hope to 
disappoint none of our customers who order them. 

Should you receive your mail at more than one address, be sure to say when ordering plants just where we are to notify 

you at shipping time. 



36 GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 




Longfellow, B. (Male) 



MEDIUM EARLY. Bisexual. Here is a new vari- 
ety that is truly wonderful, and we have honored it 
by giving to it the name of America's most popular 
poet, and at the same time have described the form 
of the fruit itself, as the berry is indeed a Long- 
fellow. If it performs everywhere as it has done for 
three years in our breeding beds, this variety will be 
as popular among strawberry growers as is our great 
poet in the world of literature. The first year this 
grand variety had opportunity to prove its worth by 
actual fruit production was 1906. So wonderfully 
productive was it, so far in advance of other varieties 
we were then testing, that it attracted particular 
attention, and when the berries were tested for qual- 
ity they surpassed any strawberry we ever have 
sampled. In size the berry is large, the illustration 
above correctly showing both size and shape. In 
flavor it is very sweet; indeed, in all our experience 
never have we tasted a more delicious berry; and we 
do not believe there is any other variety, old or new, 
that will outdo it in productiveness. Foliage is a 
beautiful light green, very vigorous, and the runners 
are large, deep-rooted fellows, just the sort that thrive 
in a long drought. The plant opens a well-developed 
bloom, with large anthers full of rich pollen, and its 
long-blooming season makes it an ideal bisexual for 
mating purposes. Virginia and Longfellow, set side 
by side, will surely make a perfect combination. We 
do not hesitate to say that the Longfellow now prom- 
ises to come to the front more rapidly than has any 
recent new production. All who know this company's 
method know how conservative we are in introducing 
new varieties, but our confidence in the Longfellow 
leads us to urge every customer to test this invaluable 
variety for himself, as it has proved a winner of first 
quality upon our own farm. Remember that we never 
introduce a new variety until we have thoroughly 
tested it out on our own experimental plot and know 
whereof we speak. See illustration on page 25. 




Virginia, P. (Female) 



EXTRA EARLY. Pistillate. We take particular 
pleasure in introducing to our patrons this season the 
Virginia strawberry, which in many respects is the 
most remarkable variety we ever have propagated. 
The plant, the foliage of which is extra large and 
bright green in color, stands high, and its stems, 
strong and large, hold the berries pendant, as a tree 
holds up its fruit. One result of this is that the fruit 
is kept perfectly clean ; another is that each berry is 
sun-kissed at every angle and the delicious fruit is 
evenly colored over its entire surface. And such a 
color ! Ranging between scarlet and crimson, with 
top and tip identically of the same shade, and the 
form being that of the perfect strawberry with an 
obtuse point, the berry easily is one of the most beau- 
tiful ever originated. The fine color extends to the 
heart of the berry, giving to it an unusually rich and 
attractive appearance. In flavor the fruit is delicately 
tart and very rich, and its firmness marks it as an 
extra-good shipper. The plant is a very deep rooter, 
which, with its mass of foliage, makes a combination 
calculated to endure the most trying drought. The 
Virginia is exceedingly productive, and we consider 
ourselves very fortunate in being able to add to our 
list of extra-early varieties such a marvel of high- 
producing power and hardiness of bloom. We have 
been breeding the Virginia for two years, and from 
the way it has yielded on our farms we predict that it 
will become a universal favorite among strawberry 
growers. Do not fail to try some of the Virginias this 
season. See illustration on page 35. 



Finds Our Catalog Complete 

T H. MYERS of Ottumwa, Iowa, writes us as fol- 
• lows: "Your catalogue contains all the informa- 
tion anyone needs on the culture of strawberries. I 
have been nurseryman and florist, but now am out and 
away from all work." 



We make no exceptions to our rules; no reductions from our price-list. Each customer is treated in every way just 

as is every other. 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 



37 





August Luther, B. (Male) 

EXTRA EARLY. Bisexual. A bright colored, 
medium-large berry, round and full at the calyx, and 
tapering to an obtuse point. The seeds are set promi- 
nently upon the surface and are of a rich yellow, 
making a beautiful contrast to the bright-red fruit. 
The meat is wine color, and grows lighter as it 
approaches the center ; it is very fine-grained and of 
exceedingly mild and delicate flavor. The large 
calyx curls back toward the stem and is attached to 
the berry by a small neck that renders it easy to pre- 
pare them for the table. August Luther is popular 
because of its exceeding productiveness and the high 
quality of the fruit ; and both as a market and family 
berry it has added to its long list of friends and 
admirers each year of the ten in which it has been in 
our breeding beds. The care it has received in the 
way of making a selection from the most promising 
mother plants has made our strain of this variety one 
of the greatest favorites alike in field and in the 
market. 



Michel's Early, B. (Male) 

EXTRA EARLY. Bisexual. For eighteen years 
this variety has been in our breeding beds, and its 
popularity has steadily increased during all that long 
period of time. It grows a medium-sized berry, crim- 
son in color, which is almost even over the entire sur- 
face. In form there are variations, some of the 
berries being nearly top shape, while others are quite 
round, a difference, however, which adds to the beauty 
of the fruit when packed in boxes. Seeds are light 
brown save those on the tip end, which are of a bright 
yellow. Michel's Early has a rich but mild flavor. 
The meat is deep pink and solid throughout, and it is 
noteworthy as a shipper. The calyx is medium in 
size and stands up straight; foliage is light green and 
tall, with rather long leaves. This variety is a great 
runner maker, and where the runners are kept down 
closely, the plants develop a powerful crown and 
grow very large quantities of delicious fruit. As a 
pollenizer Michel's Early is very strong. 




Bisexual 



Pistillate 



Pistillate 



Pistillate 



Bisexual 



WE USE this illustration to make clear our method of mating plants. You will note that the first blossom to the 
left is a bisexual ; this is followed by three pistillates ; then another bisexual. Imagine that each of these blossoms 
represents a row of plants, and you will see that the three rows of pistillates come between two rows of bisexuals. One 
of the bisexuals should be a trifle earlier and the other a trifle later than the pistillates. This mating is necessary only 
when you wish to use pistillate varieties. Should you set no pistillates the bisexuals may be set alone. In other words, 
the pistillate does not increase the yield or quality of the bisexual, but the bisexual is essential to the pistillate. The 
bisexual plant produces flowers having both male and female organs, while the pistillate flowers have only female organs. 



Read every word in this book before ordering plants. Learn our terms, our guarantee, etc., and then you will be able 

to order intelligently. 



38 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 




Climax, B. (Male) 

EXTRA EARLY. Bisexual. A large dark-red 
berry, conical in shape, having a glossy surface. The 
Climax is one of the most prolific of fruiters, and com- 
bines excellence with quantity. The seeds are bright 
yellow except on the darker side, where they are only 
a trifle lighter than the berry; the dark extends to the 
very center of the berry, and the flesh is firm, rich and 
juicy. It is an ideal all-round berry, a favorite alike 
in the family garden and in the commercial field. 
When packed in the box the Climax is very attractive 
and upon the table is equally so. The calyx is small 
for so large a berry, and the plant stands erect and 
grows very tall. One excellent quality of this variety 
is the fact that it remains solid and in all respects in 
good condition for several days after ripening, which 
is of great advantage to the commercial grower. This 
is the fifth year that Climax has been in our breeding 
beds, and each year brings to it an army of new 
friends. 

An Endorsement That Money Could Not Buy 

EVERYBODY who knows A. I. Root of Medina, 
Ohio, or the great company of which he is 
founder and head, knows that all the money in the 
United States treasury at Washington could not buy 
from either an endorsement for a concern that was not 
strictly "on the square." That is why we are so proud 
of the following, which appeared in the February 1, 
1908, issue of Gleanings in Bee Culture, and which we 
take pleasure in reproducing entire: 

KELLOGG'S STRAWBERRY CATALOG. 

This is certainly a model catalog, gotten out by a model 
firm. It is something more than a mere catalog, for it con- 
tains a first-class treatise on strawberry culture, such as 
one would naturally expect to pay 25 cents for. In fact it 
looks more like a work on the culture of strawberries than 
a catalog. The berry business is particularly well suited to 
the temperament of the average bee-keeper, and no finer 
occupation can be found. A glance at this fine book will 
show this to be the case. It is handsomely gotten up, well 
printed and illustrated on good paper, and, all together, 
reflects credit on the business and enterprise of the firm 
getting it out. We believe any painstaking intelligent man 
could actually learn strawberry-growing from this so-called 
catalog, and we mean what we say. It is almost needless 
to add that the firm sending out such a book is reliable, 
prompt, and satisfactory in all its business relations. Write 




Excelsior, B. (Male) 



EXTRA EARLY. Bisexual. This is a dark-red 
berry, almost round in form, of medium size, and 
having small, dark seeds which give the fruit a bright 
and glistening appearance that is most attractive when 
they are packed in the box. The green calyx curls 
over the fruit in such a way as to make a fine con- 
trast. The meat is a rich red, a trifle lighter than the 
outer surface, and very solid, having a flavor rather 
tart, though extremely rich. Excelsior is famous as 
a canner because it retains its shape better than do 
most varieties after being cooked. Another strong 
point for the commercial strawberry grower is the 
fact that Excelsior is one of the best of shippers. Its 
form and color are retained for days after being 
picked, and it will stand a long journey without being 
affected. Such a combination of excellent qualities 
makes Excelsior a very profitable berry for the grower 
for market. Still another quality is the evenness of 
this fruit, which makes very little sorting necessary. 
This is the thirteenth year we have had Excelsior 
under our system of breeding. 



at once to R. M. Kellogg, Three Rivers, Mich., for a copy. 
Then take your time to make a selection of berry-plants. 
Study its wisdom on berry culture and you will not regret it. 

Good Plants Mean Good Fruits 

JACOB WEBB of St. Cloud, Minn., writing under 
date of January 8, says: "Just received your 
1908 book of "Strawberries and How to Grow Them," 
for which I thank you very much. This is the third 
one that has fallen into my hands, and to be without 
it would indeed be a severe blow to me in my work 
here for the state. I am the gardener in the Minne- 
sota State Reformatory, and your book is read by the 
inmates under me in this department and relieves me 
of the painful duty of showing them just hoiv to set a 
plant, or care for it afterwards. Since my work began 
here, a little over eighteen years ago, nothing has 
given me greater pleasure than the study of your 
publication. ... I wish you success from the bot- 
t©m of my heart, as I believe you to be surely an 
honest company and working for the interests of all 
the people, believing in the divine prophecy that 
whatsoever a man soweth that shall he also reap." 



All cost of carriage and customs duties on plants, as well as results of accidents of all kinds after they leave our hands, 

must be borne by the purchaser. 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 



39 




Lovett, B. (Male) 

EARLY. Bisexual. The berry of the Lovett is large 
and of deep crimson color. For the most part the 
berries are conical in shape with long points, but there 
are always a few broad, wedge-shaped specimens 
which only serve to increase their attractiveness when 
the two forms are properly arranged in the box. The 
flesh is a dark, rich red and very juicy, with just 
enough tartness to make it excellent for canning pur- 
poses. The seeds are bright yellow and extend well 
out from the surface, and add very much to the 
pleasing effect. The calyx is very small for so large 
a berry, and for the most part it lies flat upon the 
fruit, the rest of the calyx curling back toward the 
stem. As a shipper the Lovett has few superiors, and 
it holds its bright color for many days after picking. 
These good qualities, combined with its great produc- 
tiveness, have won for the Lovett a high standing 
among strawberry growers everywhere. The Lovett 
is a strong pollenizer. This is the seventeenth year we 
have bred this variety under our methods of selec- 
tion. 




Texas, B. (Male) 

EXTRA EARLY. Bisexual. This variety is a uni- 
versal favorite and produces very large crops of big, 
glossy, crimson berries, with a dark-red cheek. The 
surface is waxy, and when packed in the box the 
berries present a most attractive appearance. The 
seeds are bright yellow, and the combination of colors 
of the berry, combined with the bright-green caylx, 
partly drooping over it, gives to this fruit an attrac- 
tiveness so great as to command interest and favorable 
attention. The flesh of the Texas is very firm, and it 
is famous as a long-distance shipper; the meat is 
rich and juicy, the flavor being somewhat tart. To 
its other excellent qualities the Texas adds that of 
being a good canner. This variety thrives everywhere, 
and is at home in all soils and in all climates. It has 
been in our breeding bed for seven years, and we can 
recommend it without qualification as a market berry. 
One difficulty we have experienced has been to supply 
the demand for this variety, but an increased acreage 
assures us that we shall have an ample quantity this 
season. 



Experimental Fruiting Bed After Burning Over 

A FTER the straw has been loosened with the tedder and it has thoroughly dried, we go to the side of the field from 
** which the wind is coming and set the fire going. 



^LARK W. WILSON, of Canastota, N. Y., writing are easily worth the money. I know, because I have 
under date of May 9, 1908, says: "The shipment seen your plants grow and produce right beside other 
of your plants reached me safely last Thursday. They people's plants, and they beat the latter three to one." 



Don't stick the tips of the roots in the ground, leaving the crown and part of the roots exposed. 



40 GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 




Tennessee Prolific, B. (Male) 

EARLY. Bisexual. Tennessee Prolific yields a me- 
dium large berry, bright crimson in color, and for the 
most part rather long and corrugated in form. The 
seeds color up red as the berries ripen, and are quite 
prominent. The flesh is fine grained, well filled with 
juice, and a decided pink in color. This variety is 
popular as a canner, and its close-grained surface 
insures fine shipping qualities. It has a large calyx. 
Its name suggests its great quality, as it is an ex- 
tremely prolific variety, but to this quality it adds 
excellence of form and flavor. It is a strong producer 
of runners, and as a pollenizer ranks with the best. 
This is the twenty-first year we have had this variety 
under our methods of selection, and the longer. we 
propagate the variety the more completely are we 
satisfied with its general value, considered from the 
viewpoint of both the family garden and the commer- 
cial field. 



Splendid, B. (Male) 

EARLY TO LATE. Bisexual. The name of this 
variety is none too strong to characterize its excel- 
lencies, for it is indeed a splendid berry. Large, 
almost round, bright red in color, it is one of the most 
attractive berries imaginable when placed upon the 
market. The seeds are nearly the same color as the 
fruit. The berry is meaty, smooth and of melting 
texture ; the interior colors are very marked — around 
the edges bright red, which extends about one-third 
to the center, and from this down to the center a 
creamy white. The calyx is small, bright green, and 
spreads well over the ends of the berry. The foliage 
is of a spreading nature, and a dark glossy green, 
with rather a long leaf, having a polished surface. 
As a mate for pistillate varieties the Splendid is one 
of the leaders, as its flowering season is long, and 
every flower is full of strong pollen. This is the tenth 
year we have bred this great variety. 




m 



An Old Row After Narrowing Down 

AFTER the burning we hitch one horse to a breaking plow and throw a furrow from each side of the row into the 
center as shown at the left of illustration. This is followed in the same direction with a five-tooth cultivator, which 
levels down the ridge between the rows. Then we go crossways with a weeder which levels the surface and draws fine 
soil over the crowns of the plant as shown at right of illustration. 



Fine Plants and Big Yields 

WRITING under date of June 16, 1908, J. W. Mc- 
Clure, of Fremont, Neb., says: "The plants I got 
of you and set the fore part of last April are fine. The 
order was for 600, and today 580 are doing well. My 
Kellogg plants of one year ago are yielding a good 
crop." 



Thoroughbreds Grow Piles of Berries 

WRITING under date of June 15, 1908, E. L. Mor- 
ris, of Elwood, Ind., says: "I write to tell you 
what my plants ordered from you in 1907 have done. 
Such piles of berries I never saw before as there were 
on my plants this year. I took care of these plants 
from -start to finish acording to your instructions." 



Orders sent in after March 15 must be accompanied by full payment to insure proper place in our order books. 




Crescent, P. (Female) 

MEDIUM EARLY. Pistillate. The Crescent is an 
old standby, and enjoys universal popularity. For 
twenty-four years we have been propagating this great 
pistillate, and our strain is noted the country over for 
its strength and general excellence. The berries are 
medium size, with rather broad wedge shape, tapering 
to an obtuse point. The flesh is solid and close 
grained, thus making an ideal shipper. Seeds are 
bright yellow, running to brown on the darker side 
and extending prominently. It has a single calyx 
that spreads out straight, and its stem is slender and 
neat. The flesh of the berry is a rich red around the 
edges, shading down to a lighter color as it approaches 
the center. The fruit is very juicy and possesses a 
tart but delicious flavor. As a canner it ranks very 
high, and as a market berry it has few superiors, as 
it adds to its other fine qualities that of being a heavy 
producer. 

Dairying and Strawberries 

XjO OTHER fertilizer is of greater value 
^ than the droppings from highly fed dairy 
cattle, and the dairyman can add greatly to 
his income by growing an acre or so of straw- 
berries. Great quantities of the berries could 
be sold without a cent of additional expense 
by taking them to your regular milk custom- 
ers. And what more appropriate and sug- 
gestive sign could a dairyman have than 

STRAWBERRIES AND CREAM 

A great many women depend for their 
"pin" money upon some side line. Some 
farmers' wives use up the product of several 
cows and make and market butter to secure 
the cash they need. Why not use the fer- 
tilizer from the cow sheds to make a small 
piece of ground rich and productive and grow 
strawberries that will command the highest 
market price? Those who have tried this 
now make strawberries their principal product, 
and butter-making has become a side issue. 

Orders received after April 15, when accompanied by full 

regardless of speci 



Bederwood, B. (Male) 

MEDIUM EARLY. Bisexual. This variety grows 
in popularity, and during the twenty-two years of its 
selection and testing on our farm our confidence in it 
has steadily increased. Bederwood produces a me- 
dium-sized berry of delicate crimson color, with glossy 
surface and deep, yellow seeds. The flesh is red, 
shading down to a rich cream near the center. Its 
high color and delicious flavor make it especially 
attractive with high-class trade, and as a table berry 
it cannot be excelled. The housewife finds it to be 
one of the best varieties for preserving in different 
forms for winter use. The calyx is small, lying close 
to the fruit, and its whole appearance is neat and 
dainty. It is an exceedingly heavy producer and of 
fine form, which makes it popular among commercial 
growers everywhere. Famous for its long blooming 
season and its great strength in pollen, it stands 
among the leaders as a fertilizer for pistillates. 

There is less work and more pleasure in work- 
ing among the strawberries, and the profits 
from the same investment of time and labor 
are far and away in favor of the strawberry 
patch. 

Postage to Canada on Plants 

/CANADIAN friends will be glad to learn 
^ that we may now send them plants by 
mail at the same rates that are charged to our 
customers in the United States. Heretofore 
we have been compelled to ask our patrons in 
the Dominion to send us double the amount 
charged for the same service on this side of 
the border. Now we are advised by the United 
States Postal authorities that the rate has been 
made uniform with that charged in this coun- 
try. Please take notice, therefore, that when 
remitting for plants to go forward by mail 
to Canada, add at the rate of 25 cents to 
each one hundred plants ordered, or, in 
other words, the same amount that would be 
remitted were the plants to go to some des- 
tination in the United States. 

remittance, will be shipped according to date of receipt, 
al shipping dates. 



42 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 




Clyde, B. (Male) 

MEDIUM. Bisexual. This variety grows a very- 
large berry, conical in shape. One side is a bright 
crimson, the other a deep, rich cream, blended with 
just enough pink to make it delicately beautiful. The 
fruit is regular in form and even in season, thus mak- 
ing the sorting of berries a very simple matter. The 
seeds are deeply imbedded in the flesh, coming even 
with the outer edge very seldom. The flesh is of rich 
pink, fine in texture and of delicate flavor, and this 
fruit is famous for retaining its flavor when canned. 
Added to these excellencies are the splendid shipping 
qualities of this variety. Not only does the Clyde 
grow a very large and fine berry; its prolificness is 
one of its strongest points, and this, added to its other 
qualities, makes it one of the favorites with the com- 
mercial grower. It has a long fruiting season, extend- 
ing frequently from extra early to very late, and the 
fine fruit continues up to the final picking. This is 
the fifteenth year of selection and breeding of the 
Clyde on our farms, and the constantly increasing 
acreage attests its growing popularity. 



"Great Crops" as a College Text Book 

Tj^OR several years our annual "Great Crops 
A of Strawberries and How to Grow 
Them" has been used in the Agricultural 
Colleges of the country as a text book for use 
by classes in horticulture. Last year the num- 
ber of colleges using them was about thirty, 
and some of them requested and received as 
high as seventy-five copies of the book. We 
need not say that we are pleased to have the 
qualities of this book so highly appreciated by 
the men who are doing so much for advanced 
agriculture along all lines; it puts the stamp 
of approval of both the theoretical and the 
practical strawberry grower upon our meth- 
ods and instruction, and we have the satis- 




Wolverton, B. (Male) 

EARLY. Bisexual. The Wolverton is a large crim- 
son berry of the ideal strawberry shape, as is shown 
in the illustration herewith, but beautiful as it appears 
in the picture it is even more so in actual reality. The 
upper side of the fruit colors up quite red when fully 
ripe, and the seeds also are darker on the under 
side, where they remain bright yellow in color. These 
beautiful contrasting colors give to the fruit a very 
attractive appearance, and when packed in the box 
it presents an ideal picture. Not only is the Wolver- 
ton beautiful in appearance, but it also is one of the 
richest berries grown, has a fine-grained flesh, pink 
in color, and a flavor mild and of unusual delicacy. 
The calyx is a double one, very heavy, and droops 
over the berries in such a way as to make them par- 
ticularly tempting when served with stems. It can 
scarcely be excelled as an all-round berry. Wolver- 
ton has been in our breeding beds for nineteen years. 



faction of knowing that the principles this 
company has stood for in the face of fierce, 
and sometimes malignant, opposition, are now 
coming to be recognized as the only true basis 
for successful strawberry culture. In a note 
from Prof. F. C. Sears, of the Department of 
Pomology of the Massachusetts Agricultural 
Department, dated July 24, 1908, he kindly 
says: "I used your catalogs with my students 
last fall and found them very satisfactory in- 
deed." Kellogg ways and Kellogg plants may 
always be relied upon as the best. 



Knows Where to Get His Plants 

vy E. HERRICK, of Cattaraugus, N. Y., writes: "I 
• set 3,000 plants last spring from a cheap plant 
grower and practically every one of them died.^ I also 
set 5C0 of your Pedigree plants and every one lived. It 
was expensive, but I have found out where to get 
plants !" 



Carefully read all instructions appearing on the order sheet before making out your order. 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 



43 




Warfield, P. (Female) 

EARLY. Pistillate. The Warfield is favorably known 
from the Atlantic to the Pacific and from the Gulf to 
Hudson's Bay, and combines so many excellent quali- 
ties that it will be difficult to enumerate them all. It 
is a large, beautiful-shaped berry, with glossy dark- 
red exterior that does not fade or become dull after 
picking. This characteristic is continued even after 
it is canned, which is one reason for its great popu- 
larity the country, over as a canner. The flesh is a 
rich dark red clear to its center; it is very juicy and 
just tart enough to give it a fine relish. The neat, 
slender stem and green calyx join the berry in such a 
way as to form a short neck, which adds beauty to 
the fruit. As a shipper it has no superior, finishing a 
long journey with the same bright lustre that marked 
it when packed freshly from the vines. An early 
berry, the Warfield has a very long fruiting season, 
yielding a large picking every day for several weeks — 
another reason for its great popularity. It also is 
exceedingly productive. This is its twenty-second 
year of selection in our breeding beds. See page 28. 



Thoroughbreds Thrive Under Adversity 

C S. BROWN, of Greenacres, Wash., writes as fol- 
• lows: "Two years ago last spring I sent you an 
order for plants and among them were some Clydes. 
I set them out and gave them the best of care, but 
neglected to mulch them. The following March we 
had a three days' blizzard from the northwest and 
when it was over my strawberry bed looked as though 
fire had run over it. The consequence was I had very 
few berries. But I took good care of the bed all through 
the season and last winter I put on a mulch of half- 
rotted straw and did not remove it until the latter 
part of March. Now for results: I harvested the 
largest crop of berries for the amount of ground I 
ever grew, and I have been growing strawberries for 
twenty years or more. My patch contained just one 
acre, of which only one-eighth was Clydes; the bal- 
ance were not your Thoroughbreds, but were Van 
Demans and Drought Kings, and I sold 250 twenty- 
four-quart crates for $550. I sold forty crates off five 




Parsons' Beauty, B. (Male) 

MEDIUM. Bisexual. A general favorite because of 
its many excellencies. It makes a heavy yield of 
bright-red berries of mild and delicious flavor. As 
this fine flavor is retained after cooking, this variety 
is very popular as a canner. Its appearance com- 
mands immediate and favorable attention. Its seeds 
stand out upon the surface of the fruit more promi- 
nently than upon any other variety with which we 
are familiar, and the effect is very striking. The calyx 
is bushy and the stem is heavy. The foliage is up- 
right in form, with a rather long, dark-green leath- 
ery leaf. The plant makes very long runners. One 
of its strongest points is the fact that it is extra strong 
as a pollenizer. Another element in its favor is the 
fact that it succeeds in all soils and climates. The 
record it has made in the seven years it has been 
under our methods of selection and restriction leads 
us to recommend it with complete confidence to both 
commercial growers and for use in the family garden. 



rows 240 feet long of the Clyde variety. If the whole 
acre had been in your Clydes I would have had 320 
crates, so you see that would have made me more than 
$600 net to the acre. I presume more than 200 persons 
visited my patch and all declared that it beat anything 
they ever saw in strawberries. I expect to send you 
an order for 40,000 plants for next season." 

FARM JOURNAL 

1024 Race Street 

Philadelphia, Feb. 20, 1908. 

R.M. Kellogg Co., 

Three Rivers, Mich. 
"VX/T have a letter this morning from Thomas B. 
* * Magee, of Browning, Montana, in which he says: 
"I have derived great benefit from your advertise- 
ments, especially the R. M. Kellogg Co., of Three 
Rivers, Mich., whose Strawberry Book is worth a hun- 
dred dollars to anyone interested." With best wishes, 
Very truly, 

WILMER ATKINSON CO. 



Don't set plants in furrows; for then the dirt will wash down and smother the heart leaves. 



44 GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERR 

R. M, Kellogg Co., 




Haverland, P. (Female) 

MEDIUM. Pistillate. One of the most widely pop- 
ular of all the varieties, and after nineteen years of 
selection and restriction, having noted its performance 
year by year, as well as its increasing popularity in 
all sections, we can with absolute confidence recom- 
mend growers everywhere to give to this variety a 
large portion of space at their command. The Haver- 
land yields a long, large berry, bright crimson on the 
sun's side, shaded to a light red on the other side ; 
rather full and round at the stem end, gradually 
tapering to an obtuse point. The seeds are bright 
yellow and just prominent enough to increase the 
handsome appearance of the berry, over which the 
calyx gracefully falls. No other berry of our acquain- 
tance presents a more beautiful and tempting appear- 
ance in the box than does the Haverland. The foli- 
age is tall, of spreading habit, with a long, dark leaf. 
The Haverland makes strong productive plants which 
produce large crops under all conditions of soil and 
climate; indeed, so productive is it that the berries 
lie in windrows, and render picking a delight. See 
page 30. 



IES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

Three Rivers, Mich. 




Senator Dunlap, B. (Male) 

MEDIUM TO LATE. Bisexual. The name of this 
variety has become a household word wherever straw- 
berries are grown, and stands today as one of the 
most popular fruits in the world. This fact alone is 
sufficient evidence of its quality. Large and handsome 
in form, having a rich dark-red color, with, glossy 
finish, shading to deep scarlet on the under side, and 
prominent bright yellow seeds that look like gold im- 
bedded in highly colored wax, the Senator Dunlap is 
one of the most attractive berries upon the grocer's 
counter. One of its strong features is its uniformity 
in size and shape. Another is its great productive- 
ness. The flesh is bright red, exceedingly juicy and 
of delicate flavor. Its foliage is tall, bright green in 
color, upright, with a long leaf ; it develops an un- 
usually heavy crown system, frequently as many as 
fifteen to eighteen crowns being found in one hill. Its 
flowering season is very long, its bloom is exceedingly 
rich in pollen — in short, the Dunlap is an ideal 
variety. This is the eleventh year we have bred our 
strain of Dunlaps. See page 32. 



The Use of Commercial Fertilizer 

/ T N HE long and successful experience we 
have had in the growing of strawberries 
has convinced us that no fertilizer is more 
valuable in the thorough preparation of the 
soil than barnyard manure. When this is 
properly applied and thoroughly worked into 
the soil it seems to furnish the necessary plant 
foods and humus to satisfy the strawberry 
plant and cause it to produce abundantly the 
very choicest berries. However, we realize 
that in some sections of the country the scar- 
city of manure makes it impossible for some 
growers to get sufficient quantities of stable 
manure properly to enrich their soil, and for 
the benefit of such growers we give below a 
formula for commercial fertilizer best adapt- 



ed to the development of the strawberry — 3 
per cent nitrogen, 9 per cent potassium, and 7 
per cent phosphorus — which seems to be about 
the right proportion to insure big crops of 
choice fruit. This proportion may be obtained 
by combining ingredients as follows : 

For nitrogen use 100 lbs. nitrate of soda, or 75 lbs. sulphate of am- 
monia, or 250 lbs. cottonseed meal per acre. 

For potassium use 90 lbs. sulphate of potash, or 95 lbs. muriate of 
potash, or 400 lbs. kainit per acre. 

For phosphorus use 250 lbs. acid phosphate, or 250 lbs. dissolved bone 
per acre. 

If the grower wishes to use more than this 
amount per acre he may increase all the dif- 
ferent ingredients in the same proportion. 
This fertilizer should be applied in the spring 
after the ground has been plowed, and thor- 



The R. M. Kellogg Co. devotes its entire energies to the production of the best strawberry plants that can be grown, 
and has no other plants or bushes or trees of any sort to sell. 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 



45 




Glen Mary, B. (Male) 

MEDIUM. Bisexual. The demand for this variety 
grows by leaps and bounds, the reason for which is 
not far to seek when one comprehends its extraordi- 
nary qualities. The big, dark-red berries with their 
prominent seeds of bright yellow, lie in piles around 
the hills and form so tempting and attractive an 
appearance as to command immediate sale, and when 
the customer once has tasted of the juicy, rich and 
highly flavored fruit, the demand for more is inevita- 
ble. Delicious when served at table, it is equally 
noted for its fine canning and preserving qualities. 
As a shipper it is unexcelled, and for this reason is 
an especial favorite among the extensive growers of 
strawberries who ship their fruit long distances. An- 
other element of popularity is the fact that its roots 
are long and bring up moisture from great depths 
below the surface, thus making it an ideal variety in 
dry seasons, or in climates of limited rainfall. The 
foliage is extra large, growing upright and dark 
green in color. It should always be remembered, 
however, that Glen Mary is not strong as a pollenizer 
and should be planted near some other bisexual of 
even season. This is the twelfth year that Glen Mary 
has been grown under our methods of selection and 
restriction. See page 28. 



oughly harrowed into the soil before plants 
are set. If a light dressing of manure could 
be applied to the ground in the winter or 
spring and one of these combinations of com- 
mercial fertilizers worked into the soil before 
plants are set, you would certainly have the 
ground in splendid condition for best results. 



Pedigree Plants Yield Profit and Pleasure 

T T. CHAMBERLAIN, of St. Paul, Minnesota, in 
• sending to us an order for plants, writes as fol- 
lows under date of January 28, 1908: "It may be of 
interest for you to know that two years ago this spring 
I purchased from you a hundred plants. I do not 




New York, B. (Male) 



MEDIUM TO LATE. Bisexual. New York is a 
veritable giant in both fruit and foliage; the shape of 
the berry is varied, ranging from a top-shaped berry 
with rather a long point to the thick and broad form. 
The color of the fruit is bright blood red with shiny 
surface, and the seeds are of nearly the same color, 
and so deeplv imbedded in the fruit as to be almost 
invisible. The meat is of smooth texture, and the 
flavor is mildly delicate. In every sense the New 
York is a strictly fancy berry, and one of the most 
tempting and attractive grown. Its delicious flavor 
wins and holds a popularity which grows stronger 
with the years. It is a very prolific yielder, has a 
long season of ripening, and is one of the most profit- 
able varieties for commercial growers, considered 
from the viewpoints of the shipper and the grower for 
the home trade. The foliage is of upright habit, and 
affords ample protection for the great clusters of 
mammoth and beautiful berries. The variety is espe- 
cially strong as a pollenizer. This is the ninth year 
we have bred New York under our particular meth- 
ods, and we cannot too strongly recommend it to our 
customers as an ideal berry in every particular. 



think I lost a single plant by reason of any defect in 
the plant itself. I did lose two or three from grubs, 
but nearly the whole hundred lived and flourished. I 
followed your directions as to keeping the buds cut off 
the first summer. Last year they bore fruit and the 
crop to me was a wonderful one. They were greatly 
admired by my friends for their size, color and qual- 
ity. The bed was altogether about 20x33 feet in size. 
About half of it was an old bed where the plants had 
run together and the strawberries were not nearly 
equal to those from your vines. From the whole bed 
I gathered 144 quarts of berries. They were measured 
in a large tin quart measure, not in the ordinary mar- 
ket boxes. Some were picked from the vines and were 
not measured and therefore not counted in the above. 
I feel that you are fully carrying out your promises 
and statements as to the character of the berry plants 
which you sell, and that your description of the qual- 
ity of the berries is very accurate." 



Don't stick your plants down between clods or in clumps of manure. 



46 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 




Wm. Belt, B. (Male) 

MEDIUM TO LATE. Bisexual. Produces a large 
berry of extraordinary beauty. In color it is bright 
red, which extends to the heart of the fruit. The Belt 
is very rich, juicy and meaty, and in every way a 
desirable berry for table purposes. The yellow seeds 
of this variety make a fine contrast set in the beauti- 
ful, bright-red surface, creating a sparkling effect and 
making it particularly attractive when placed, neatly 
packed, on the market. The calyx is rather small for 
so large a berry. The foliage is unusually tall, and 
light green in color. The berries are arranged quite 
evenly throughout the vines, and for great product- 
iveness this great variety nears the limit. The Belt 
is an ideal pollenizer, and has a long blooming sea- 
son. The berry varies somewhat as to form, but the 
illustration shown herewith represents a typical Wm. 
Belt. We have had this variety in our breeding bed 
for thirteen years, and its strong points have been 
developed to perfection by the methods we employ in 
selecting from the healthiest and most vigorous 
mother plants. The Wm. Belt and Glen Mary make 
an ideal team in any field. See page 35. 



Built Up His Reputation on Kellogg Thoroughbreds 
"LJARRY M. CARSON, of Villisca, Iowa, writing 
under date of February 3, 1908, says: "We have 
a great reputation for fine strawberries to keep up, 
and we made it with Kellogg plants and by follow- 
ing Kellogg methods. One man agreed to handle our 
1907 crop of berries for us on a 15 per cent, commis- 
sion. When we took in our first picking we told him 
that part were to be sold at 15 cents per box and part 
at two boxes for 25 cents. He said, 'Can't do it; all 
the rest are selling for 10 cents and 12^ cents per 
box.' We took them into the store right next door and 
engaged the other man at the same terms we had 
offered the first man. The second man asked, 'Are 
they all like those on top ?' He was told to look and 
see. After looking at two or three boxes, he said, 
'Those are all right.' He then put them in the win- 
dow marked 'Carson's Berries,' and we went home. 
He sold them all in a little while and telephoned for 
more ; and each day of the season we had telephone 
calls and personal calls for more than we had to 
spare." 




Downing's Bride, P. (Female) 

MEDIUM TO LATE. Pistillate. One of the varie- 
ties that has the ideal combination of beauty, good- 
ness and productiveness. The fruit is a dark blood- 
red, which extends almost to the center, with just 
enough white at the heart to make a very tempting 
contrast. The seeds are golden and as shiny as if 
burnished. As a producer of large quantities of deli- 
cious fruit, Downing's Bride is excelled by few varie- 
ties, and the sight of the big shining berries lying in 
heaps all along the rows is one never to be forgotten. 
The foliage of this variety grows tall and has a large, 
dark-green leaf, which droops over and shades the 
fruit from the sun's direct rays. One advantage pos- 
sessed by Downing's Bride is that the berries remain 
on the vine in good condition for days after they are 
fully ripe, and they also keep a- long time after pick- 
ing. Downing's Bride forms an abundance of strong 
runners, and its productiveness and high quality on 
all soils and in practically every section make it uni- 
versally popular. We have been working on the 
Downing's Bride for seven years, and each year only 
increases our confidence in it as a safe and sure vari- 
ety for growers everywhere. See page 27. 



More Than $600 Per Acre 
TTNDER date of June 22, 1908, Mr. J. D. Alexander, 
of Fremont, Ohio, writes as follows: "My straw- 
berry harvest has just closed, and I have picked an- 
other bumper crop. One-sixth of an acre yielded 
1,024 quarts of fine berries which sold at top-notch 
figures, 2 cents more on the quart than other straw- 
berry growers got, netting us over $100. The most of 
our crop was sold right out of the patch. There were 
no objections to the price as soon as the people saw 
the berries. Our berries this year were the talk and 
wonder of this community. The plants you sent me 
this spring are growing so nicely, I just wish you could 
see them. I did not lose over 25 plants out of the 
1,100 you sent me, and since the number you sent me 
exceeded the number ordered, I do not consider that I 
lost any. It gives me pleasure to deal with men upon 
whom I can rely with implicit faith, and I hope our 
business relations will continue to be as pleasant as 
they have been in the past." 



Don't cultivate the plants in a half-hearted way. Scientists tell us plants have sense and know when they 

are well treated. 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 



47 




Lady Thompson, B. (Male) 
EARLY TO LATE. Bisexual. Lady Thompson grows 
a bright-red berry, shaped almost like a top, with the 
lower end somewhat obtuse — as perfect a strawberry 
form as one would wish for. In size the fruit is 
medium large ; the seeds are red, not very smooth, 
and give to the fruit a fine glossy effect. The berry 
is solid and meaty, pink in color, and is deliciously 
rich in flavor. The foliage is tall, grows upright and 
has a long light-green leaf. The double calyx opens 
closely over the berry and altogether the effect is an 
unusually pleasing one. The long fruit stems stand 
erect, holding the berries well up from the ground. 
This variety is a deep rooter and keeps on growing 
through a severe drought. Runners are long and 
abundant. This is the eighth year we have bred this 
variety, and every season serves to increase our opin- 
ion of the high value of the Lady Thompson, and the 
increased orders from our customers indicate that they 
confirm our view. 




Nick Ohmer, B. (Male) 

MEDIUM TO LATE. Bisexual. Noted for its 
unusually rich flavor, Nick Ohmer has justly become 
one of the most popular fancy strawberries wherever 
it has been grown. The berries are cone-shaped, very 
large, with flesh firm and of rich crimson color, shad- 
ing down to pink at the center. The larger share of 
the seeds are brown, with yellow fellows interspersed 
among them, the combination of color being especially 
beautiful and attractive, a fact which is increased by 
the green calyx that surmounts the berry. The foli- 
age grows tall, and has a dark-green leaf, somewhat 
crinkled. The fruit stems are long and stand up 
through the foliage, making easy work for the pick- 
ers. The bloom is large and is very rich in pollen. 
Possessed of these qualities, Nick Ohmer has become a 
general favorite, and in the eleven years we have 
bred this variety there has been a steadily increasing 
demand for it. Many of the large commercial grow- 
ers of fancy fruit make it their leader. See page 35. 



THE GEORGE BAUER BANK 

John F. Bauer Prest. 

Mancos, Colo., July 26, 1908. 

R. M. Kellogg Co., 

Three Rivers, Mich. 
T AM still harvesting strawberries, and fine ones, from 
my four-acre patch. My Parsons' Beauty has done 
wonderfully — they have yielded twice as much as any 
other of my fifteen varieties, besides being a beautiful 
berry and a good shipper. I have harvested more 
than two hundred crates of fancy berries and sold 
them at an average price of $3.50 a crate. Frosty 
nights killed the bloom this spring, and I was very 
much discouraged; and if I hadn't had Thoroughbred 
plants I wouldn't have had any fruit at all. Plants I 
received from you this spring — 32 varieties — are all 
growing and doing fine. Shall want more plants next 
spring. JOHN F. BAUER. 

Kellogg's Successful — Other Kind Failure 
E. LEITZELL, writing from Seville, Ohio, under 
■ " date of March 31, 1908, says: "Two years ago I 
decided to set out one acre of my little farm to straw- 
berries. I sent to you for about half my plants and to 
save money bought the rest of them nearer home. 
Suffice to say, the home plants were a total failure — 



the crop scant and the berries of a small and inferior 
quality. Both the Sample and Pride of Michigan 
from the Kellogg Co. retailed at 25 cents per quart 
throughout the entire season, and I never saw larger 
berries, and they certainly deserve the name of Pride 
of Michigan. The Samples were our canners and all 
the customers were well pleased." Mr. Leitzell proved 
his faith in our Thoroughbreds by ordering nearly 
10,000 plants for setting out in 190S. 

Thoroughbreds the Best Plants in the World 
WRITING under date of June 29, 1908, Fred H. 

Selph, of Nelson, Pa., says: "I am picking berries 
from a half-acre of land set with Kellogg Thorough- 
bred plants in the spring of 1907. We have already 
harvested 2,500 baskets, and there are six or eight 
hundred baskets more on the vines. We are very 
much pleased with this yield. We have been using 
your plants for five years and would not use any other 
plants. • I consider them the very best plants in the 
world !" 

Thoroughbred Plants Grow Rapidly 

TTERMAN VAN DER SCHUUR, of Cedar Rapids, 
la., writes: "I received 1,025 plants from you 
last spring, and never saw plants grow so rapidly. 
Am very much pleased with them." 



Don't throw ridges of dirt up against the plants when cultivating. 



48 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 




Thompson's No. 2, B. (Male) 



MEDIUM EARLY. Bisexual. Notable for the bright 
red berries which are produced by this variety in great 
quantities. High in color, rich in flavor, and extra- 
good shippers, the berries of Thompson's No. 2, al- 
though a comparatively new variety on our list, have 
commanded the admiration of all who have grown it. 
In addition to all these excellent qualities, this variety 
is extraordinarily strong as a pollenizer. With such a 
combination of excellencies it is not strange that this 
variety has so quickly won popular favor. The shape 
of the berry is almost globular, and presents a beau- 
tiful appearance in the box; the skin does not break 
easily in handling, and the fruit holds its color long 
after being picked. The foliage is a glossy dark 
green, the most beautiful we ever have seen, with a 
tissue so tough that it makes a strong resistance to all 
leaf spots, such as rust, mildew and blight. Its bright 
color and polished surface are retained throughout 
the season. This is the fourth year we have had it 
under our methods of selection and restriction, and 
we can heartily recommend our patrons to give this 
variety a thorough trial. 



Best Plants He Ever Saw 

Clifton, Idaho, Jan. 30, 1908. 

R. M. Kellogg Co., 

Three Rivers, Mich. 
J^NCLOSED find order for six thousand strawberry 
plants, also money order for $8. Will send bal- 
ance when plants are ready to ship. Those I received 
of you last year were the best plants I ever saw. Ship 
plants to Preston, Idaho, and oblige, 

Yours truly, 

W. H. GARNER. 

Stand Cold Weather Better Than Native Plants 

WRITING under date of May 30, 1908, A. A. Wall- 
vv ner, of Canby, Minn., says: "Plants came this 
spring in good condition, but we had a late and cold 
spring — it was frost and ice up to the 7th of May — 
so you understand it gave the plants a pretty hard 
trial, and a few of the plants have died out. Had 
these plants come from the local nurseries every one 
of them would have died. My neighbor got 100 plants 

from a nursery at M , in this state. He tells me 

that every last one of them died, while nearly all of 
mine are coming all right." 




Ridgeway, B. (Male) 



MEDIUM TO LATE. Bisexual. Round as a cherry 
and almost as smooth, the great load of big blood-red 
berries grown by the Ridgeway plants are among the 
most beautiful conceivable. The seeds are imbedded 
deeply in the flesh, and the combination of colors make 
a most attractive berry, the beauty of which is not less- 
ened when cut open and the tempting interior is seen. 
The meat is scarlet, with an oblong ring around the 
heart which is almost white. The calyx is small and 
droops over the berry, remaining several days after 
being picked. The foliage is of tall habit, with dark- 
green leaves, and the runners are very large, extend- 
ing out some distance before forming nodes for new 
plants. We have had Ridgeway in our breeding beds 
for twelve years, and its popularity has steadily in- 
creased during that time. 




Kellogg's Thoroughbreds Eighty-Two Days 
From Setting 



JOHN H. NEWLON, of Mansfield, Ohio, in a letter dated 
J July 17, 1908, says: "I am sending a photo of my 
strawberry patch. The plants I bought of you this spring 
and they were set out April 20. This photo was taken July 
11. All the plants save five are growing vigorously." 



Don't go deep or close enough to the plants to cut the roots when you are cultivating. 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 



49 




Miller, B. (Male) 

MEDIUM TO LATE. Bisexual. The Miller is one 
of the most popular berries for the family garden of 
its season. Great beautiful round berries of dark-red 
color, they please the eye at the first glance, and once 
their rich flavor is tasted they prove themselves an 
ideal fruit in every market. The meat of the Miller 
is of a smooth, melting texture, exceedingly rich, sweet 
and juicy. The productiveness of this variety, no less 
than its richness of quality, make it an ideal berry for 
home use and family trade. As a commercial berry 
it is too delicate for long-distance shipping, but no 
grower should fail to have some of this variety for his 
home use, and for his local market. The foliage is a 
light green, grows very tall and has extra-large coarse 
leaves. One strong point about the Miller is that it 
thrives everywhere, no matter what the soil or the 
climatic conditions. This is the eighth year we have 
had this variety in our breeding beds, and we do not 
hesitate to say that our strain of the Miller plant is 
without an equal. Do not fail to include some of this 
variety for home use when making your selection. 




Enormous, P. (Female) 

MEDIUM TO LATE. Pistillate. Enormous in size, 
it also grows enormous quantities of fruit, the big red 
berries growing so thickly that the vines are a mass of 
red. The berries are broad and wedge-shaped, with 
crimson colored surface, and dark-yellow seeds. The 
calyx is of light green, lying flat on the berry, and the 
stem remains green and fresh long after the berries 
are picked, thus aiding to retain a desirable appear- 
ance in the fruit long after the market is reached. The 
flavor of the Enormous is as excellent as its size is 
remarkable, and the meat is very juicy and rich. It 
is a popular variety for the family trade, and those 
who buy it once will buy it ever afterward. The 
foliage is very large, with broad, nearly round, light 
green leaf, and short, heavy fruit stem. This is the 
fourteenth year of selection and restriction in our 
breeding beds, and the fact that the demand for this 
variety grows with each succeeding year is the best 
evidence of its steadily increasing popularity. You 
will make a mistake if you fail to order generously of 
this most excellent variety. 



Found Cheap Berries Costly 
WRITING under date of February 19, 1908, W. O. 

Vanhorn, of Wathena, Kansas, says: "I want to 
tell you why I have not recently sent in my order to 
you for more of your good Thoroughbred plants. One 
of our berry men told me it was a mistake, all this talk 
about the breeding up of plants, and he induced me to 
try his plants. He had plants to sell from between the 
rows — little stunted plants. I set my patch twice 
from them, but did not get a stand, so I once more 
send to you for plants." 

Thoroughbreds Require No Expert to Grow 
Big Berries 

■D B. JENNINGS, of Cadillac, Mich., writes: "I 
hope ere another year passes on the wings of 
time to show to my neighbors and the world at large 
what can be grown from R. M. Kellogg Co.'s Pedigree 
strawberry plants. A man makes no mistake in pur- 
chasing your plants — there is no experimenting to be 
done, for you have worked twenty-five years along 
that line on scientific principles. It takes no expert to 



grow large berries if one will but follow the instruc- 
tion you give in your book, condensed as it is in a nut- 
shell. I wish you success in your good work." 

$78 from 1,000 Thoroughbreds 

p A. HESSELBERTH, Dana, 111., writes: "When 
•my plants bloomed this spring they were like a 
mass of snow. Everybody would make the remark 
that they never saw the like. You could see the blooms 
twenty rods away, and when the berries got ripe I 
filled up one of those big melon baskets which held 
fifteen quarts and took them to town. I asked a store- 
keeper to come out and look at them. He did so and 
asked me how much I wanted for them. I told him I 
wanted 15 cents a quart, and he gave me $2.25 for the 
basket of berries, and I went home rejoicing over my 
first sale from the thousand plants. We sold over 
$78 worth, besides what we used and gave away. I 
had berries that would measure six inches in circum- 
ference ; I never had any trouble in selling them, and 
never sold a box for less than 15 cents." 



Don't allow plants in your fruiting beds to mat thickly. 



50 GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 





Challenge, B. (Male) 

MEDIUM. Bisexual. This variety is very popular 
for those who grow strawberries for the family trade. 
The berry is extra large, but not so uniform and 
smooth as many other varieties. However, its great 
size, fine color and delicious flavor have won for it 
the admiration of growers everywhere Challenge has 
been grown and sold. Round in shape and cor- 
rugated, it has a rich dark-red color, the effect of 
which is heightened by bronze-colored seeds that look 
as if they had been polished, and when packed neatly 
in the box the Challenge is one of the most tempting 
strawberries grown. The flesh is deep crimson, very 
solid and rich. It is a strong shipper. Foliage is 
large, dark green, and spreads out well, giving every 
berry a chance to develop to full size. It is univer- 
sally successful, thriving in all soils and under all 
conditions of climate. To its other strong points it 
adds the invaluable quality of great productiveness. 
This is the seventh year of selection and restriction of 
the Challenge in our breeding beds. 




Klondike, B. (Male) 
MEDIUM. Bisexual. The Klondike deserves its 
name, for it has proved itself to be a veritable gold 
mine for those who grow this variety for market. Of 
beautiful and uniform shape, rich blood red^s to color, 
which extends throughout the entire berry, its fine 
appearance instantly wins for it an assured popularity 
in every market where it is exposed. As to flavor it 
cannot be said to be either sweet or sour ; it has a 
mild, delicious flavor unlike any other variety; and it 
is juicy withal. The calyx is small, curling back 
toward the stem. The foliage is light green, tall and 
compact, with medium sized leaves. Runners form 
abundantly, and plants grow large and develop as 
many crowns as any variety on our list. And as a 
heavy yielder it is certainly a wonder. This is the 
seventh year we have had the Klondike variety in our 
breeding beds, and we can advise our customers with 
even greater confidence than ever before to secure a 
generous number of them. 



M : 



Found a Weedless Farm 

RS. EMMA HEY, of Dixon, 111., who visited the 
Kellogg farm, wrote after her return home: "For 
many years I have dreamed of a weedless farm, but 
never expected to see one. The Kellogg strawberry farm 
comes very near being just that. I was also very much 
pleased with the evidence I saw on every hand of the 
painstaking care with which the smallest details were 
looked after, which would make the Kellogg plants 
the best, the purest and the most carefully packed and 
shipped in the world." 

Thoroughbreds Insure Fine Crop 

•pRED BEINDORF, of Litchfield, 111., says: "The 

5,000 plants I got of you look fine as silk. I am 

very well pleased with their appearance and I feel 
sure of a fine crop next year." 

The Kellogg Way Insures Success 

Q H. ASHWORTH of Humboldt, Ills., writing 
under date of January 15, 1908, says: "I have 
about 4,000 of the finest strawberry plants I ever saw, 

Don't let a bed of strawberry plants run wild after you have fruited it for several years. 

destroy insects. 



and I think the main reason is that they are Kellogg's 
Thoroughbreds, and that they have been handled in 
the Kellogg way. I want to tell you about an experi- 
ence of mine last year in which I think I rather got a 
joke on two of my brothers. I worked right along 
after fruiting in 1907 and kept my patch clean and 
covered with a dust-mulch. My brothers said that I 
was ruining my strawberries; that they would all die 
in August if I kept the weeds cleaned out. I saw their 
plants in October. The patch was full of weeds waist 
high and the strawberries were nothing but a solid 
mat of little weakly plants, while my plants were 
great big fellows of the healthiest kind, and they 
appeared to be looking at me as though they would 
say, 'You have been good to me, and I will pay you 
for it next July.' " 

Thoroughbreds the Wonder of Washington 
TT G. FULTON, of Charleston, Washington, writ- 
ing under date of May 21, 1908, says: "The 
berries I purchased of you last spring are a wonder 
to my neighbors here, and I hope to be able to start a 
berry ranch soon." 



Burn it off clean, which will 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 



51 




Arizona, B. (Male) 

MEDIUM EARLY. Bisexual. Arizona comes more 
nearly being an ideal "double-cropper" than any 
other variety on our list. The term "ever-bearing" 
is always a misnomer, but some varieties do develop a 
second fruit-bud system and under favorable climatic 
conditions yield a crop of berries both in the spring 
and in the fall ; and this Arizona frequently does. 
But aside from this desirable feature, it possesses 
merits so great that our friends of the northern lati- 
tudes have come to admire it greatly. It is a heavy 
producer of large-sized, deep-red berries, possessing a 
rich aromatic flavor. The foliage is dark green and 
of medium size. This is the seventh year we have 
had Arizona in our breeding beds, and we have care- 
fully employed mother plants for propagating pur- 
poses which show the strongest ever-bearing habit. 



Oklahoma Finds Thoroughbreds the Finest 

Y^RITING from Lahoma, Okla., under date of June 
1, 1908, Amos Stoalbarger says: "The plants 
received from you this spring are doing fine — didn't 
lose a single plant. The plants I got two years ago 
from you have borne two fine crops of fruit — the finest 
I ever saw." 

Not a Plant Lost in a Journey of 2,000 Miles 

HTHE wonderful endurance of Kellogg Thorough- 
bred plants is proverbial. Cable Hauser, of Pen- 
ticton, British Columbia, writes us of the plants shipped 
him in the spring of 1908 as follows: "Strawberry 
plants arrived in good condition, and I have them 
planted and all are doing well. I must say we are 
surprised and pleased to have plants come 2,000 miles 
and every one growing. You may look for more orders 
for plants in the spring of 1909." 

Thoroughbreds a Big Success in North Dakota 

/^\NCE in a while we get a letter from a customer in 
^ which it is asked if strawberries do well in the 
North. Evidently it is not generally known that the 
strawberry grows everywhere from the Arctic sea to 
Patagonia. The best answer we can give them is con- 
tained in such an experience as that reported by Mrs. 
S. J. Augustus, of Calio, N. D., who, writing us under 




Clark's Seedling, B. (Male) 

MEDIUM EARLY. Bisexual. This variety is a 
general favorite with the great commercial straw- 
berry growers on the Pacific Coast. It is a handsome 
berry, both as to form and color. The illustration 
above indicates its form, but no description can do 
justice to its deep, rich, red color, which extends clear 
to the center of the large and beautiful berry. It is 
famous both as a canner and shipper, and' ranges 
very high among the varieties that produce tremen- 
dous yields of fruit. The foliage is medium large, is 
dark green in color and makes very strong runners. 
Wherever Clark's Seedling is grown it always brings 
good prices, and we are confident that every grower 
who adds them to his list of varieties will be greatly 
pleased with the results. This is the fourth year of 
selection and restriction in our breeding beds, and the 
more extensive our acquaintance with this noble 
variety, the more enthusiastic do we become concern- 
ing it. 



date of July 22, 1908, says: "The strawberry plants 
I received from you last spring -(1907) are just bear- 
ing and are doing fine. The Senator Dunlap has given 
us some fine and delicious fruit — berries measuring as 
large as four inches, and quite as perfect as those 
shown in your fine pictures. The North Dakota peo- 
ple are glad to pay 25 cents a quart for home-grown 
strawberries. I have a large home fruit garden, but 
the strawberry patch is my favorite. I am glad to tell 
my friends that the R. M. Kellogg Co. is first in the 
United States in all that relates to strawberry plants." 

Plants and Principles Please Him 

T> \V. MARTIN, of Hannibal, Ohio, writing under 
JJ ' date of May 21, 1908, says: "Out of the 3,000 
plants, 'Thoroughbreds,' set this spring my loss so 
far, to the best of my knowledge, has not exceeded 
twelve plants. The remaining 2,988 plants are in fine 
condition, notwithstanding the unusually unfavorable 
weather conditions. The question most often asked by 
my friends is, 'Where did you get your plants?' I 
shall take great pleasure in recommending your plants 
and principles to my friends." 



Don't allow weeds and grass to make their home among your plants. 



52 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 




Pride of Michigan, B. (Male) 

LATE. Bisexual. From letters received from enthu- 
siastic customers about the wonderful productiveness 
and general excellence of the Pride of Michigan, we 
are led to believe that it is even a better variety than we 
ever have claimed it to be. These reports are coming 
from all parts of the United States and Canada, which 
shows that the Pride is a universal favorite. Custom- 
ers referring to the size of the berries compare them 
to peaches, and all refer in high terms to their 
delicious flavor and say they always top the market. 
The large flowers and mammoth anthers loaded with 
rich pollen impress everyone who sees it, while the 
size of the plant itself excels that of all other varieties. 
Another reason for the popularity of Pride of Michi- 
gan is the fact that it makes just enough runner 
plants to form an ideal fruiting row, which saves the 
grower many a hard day's work pulling runners. 
We might mention here that this is the reason why 
we find it necessary to hold the price of this variety 
up to $8.00 per thousand ; but all understand that it 
is not the cost of the plants that makes a variety 
cheap ; it is the quantity and quality of fruit they 
produce that counts. Calculating its cost on this 
basis, Pride of Michigan is the cheapest variety ever 
introduced. When we tell you that the acreage set to 
Pride of Michigan was large enough to produce more 
than a million plants, and that with that number we 
did not have enough to fill our orders, you will realize 
how universally popular is this extraordinary variety. 
This year we have set larger than ever, but even with 
this increase it will be necessary for your order to 
reach us early to insure your getting a share of them. 
The illustration above shows size and form of this 
berry. Its color is scarlet with bright-red cheeks; it 
is firm in texture, making it a splendid shipper, and it 
is one of the best keepers after picking we know. 
It is our proud distinction that the Kellogg Company 
are the introducers of this variety; and as this is the 
seventh year we have had it in our breeding beds, we 
have complete confidence that it is unexcelled by any 
other variety. 




President, P. (Female) 

VERY LATE. Pistillate. This variety is well worthy 
its name and stands easily in the front rank of Ameri- 
can productions. Beautiful in shape, with an unusual 
color of mottled pink and red which extends entirely 
through the berry, it is indeed a tempting sight when 
neatly packed in the box. The berry is almost round 
and every one of them has a dimpled end. The calyx 
is unusually small for so large a berry; the seeds are 
yellow and brown, adding a sparkling effect to the 
berry. The flavor of the President is very fine, and 
the flesh rich and meaty. It is served most attract- 
ively when placed upon the table with stems still 
remaining. The President makes a very large foliage, 
light green in color, and opens a larger bloom than is 
generally found on pistillate varieties. This is the 
sixth year we have bred this variety on our farms, 
and its strong points are more highly appreciated 
with each passing season. See page 27. 



Thoroughbreds Have Won His Confidence 
WESLEY C. WINE, of Milledgeville, 111., writes 
as follows under date of December 23, 1907: "We 
have bought plants of you, and have been so well 
pleased with them that we shall surely come again for 
another and a larger lot for 1908." 

What a Family Patch of Thoroughbreds Did 

T YMAN LEONARD, of Cooperville, N. Y., writes: 
"We can grow some berries here. From one plot 
30x35 feet I picked 403 baskets of Senator Dunlaps, 
and if I had taken care of them as I should I would 
have had 75 baskets more." 

Finds Our Catalogue an Inspiration 
TLJENRY F. DROESCH, of Chickasaw, Ohio, writes: 
"Your book on 'Strawberries and How to Grow 
Them,' was duly received and carefully perused. I 
declare it is very interesting and instructive. It is 
just exactly what I have so long wished for. I intend 
to make up a patch of strawberries next spring and 
this book is the guide for my plan." 



Don't take your plants from an old fruiting bed, as the insects and fungous spores are bound to go with the plants. 



GREAT CROPS 



OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 



53 




Cardinal, P. (Female) 

LATE. Pistillate. Here is a variety that no catalogue 
description ever has fairly represented, because it is 
impossible for any language to describe its many ex- 
cellent qualities. The Cardinal, like all other varieties, 
is not free from fault, but it is as nearly perfect as any 
variety we ever have worked with. We have fruited it 
two years under different methods, and at each fruiting 
time it has won the admiration and been the astonish- 
ment of all visitors to our experimental plot. We say 
that the originator of such a grand variety deserves to 
be pensioned. In vigor of plants and in productive- 
ness of big red berries it is a marvel. The fruit grows 
in clusters like cherries, as shown on page 29. The 
berries are very large and are of a deep cardinal red, 
with dark, rich flesh ; have a delicious flavor and are 
strong shippers. The experiment stations where it has 
been tested recommend Cardinal without qualification. 
It is doubtless one of the greatest late pistillates ever 
originated. It is a strong grower, with leaves of more 
than ordinary size and of tough tissue. It is not 
susceptible to any fungous spots, makes long, strong 
runners. Under heavy frosts at blooming time Cardi- 
nal has come through uninjured. Plants may be set 
three feet apart in the row, and they will easily fill in an 
ideal fruiting row. It has a very long fruiting season, 
and the last picking of the berries is just about as fine 
as the first. The Cardinal is at home in all parts of 
the country and takes first place wherever grown. If 
you would beat all records for large yields of the 
choicest berries, just set Cardinal in rows between 
Pride of Michigan, Stevens' Late Champion or Dor- 
nan. This is the third year we have had Cardinal in 
our breeding beds. Especial care is taken to select 
nothing but ideal mother plants, and our strain of 
Cardinals is pure, healthy and vigorous, and excep- 
tionally heavy fruiters. Like the Pride of Michigan, 
Cardinal is cheaper to the grower at $8.00 a thousand 
than are poorly developed plants as a gift. Last year 
the demand for this variety was so great that our 
entire stock was sold out before the order season was 
fairly begun; and we had a big stock of plants too. 
This year we have a very large stock of them, but 
orders for 1909 shipments began coming in for them 
before we were through shipping in 1908. We men- 
tion this so that you will be sure to get your order in 
early and we can reserve the plants for you. 




Stevens' Late Champion, B. (Male) 

LATE. Bisexual. This variety is correctly named, 
as it is certainly a champion among late fruiters. 
Stevens' Late is in full fruit when most varieties are 
through bearing, and berries are picked through a 
very long season. It is one of the most productive late 
varieties on the list. It is a splendid shipper, and a 
noble market berry. In form it is perfect, resembling 
Gandy in size, flavor and color. It is a rank, upright 
grower and apparently thrives everywhere. It is deep 
rooted, a strong plant maker and possesses great vital- 
ity. One fine feature of Stevens' Late is its strong 
fruit stems, which enable it to hold its fruit well up 
from the ground, keeping berries free from grit and 
sand. Its foliage is large and massive, and this, in 
connection with its late blooming, makes it free from 
danger of frost. This is the fourth year we have had 
the Champion in our breeding bed, and it has fruited 
three times in our experimental plot, yielding every 
time a great crop of the choicest berries. There is a 
great demand for late varieties ; especially those kinds 
that produce abundantly and are good shippers. The 
late berries bring the top-notch prices, and are the 
money makers. For this reason Stevens' Late is cer- 
tain to be as popular a variety as ever has been intro- 
duced. If you would see how a big dish of berries 
of this variety looks, turn to pages 23 and 31. 



Thoroughbreds the Only Plants for Him 

A SA O. PENCE, of Converse, Indiana, writing un- 
^ der date of July 13, 1908, says: "I got 5,000 plants 
of you a year ago last spring and set out just three- 
fourths of an acre of ground. I kept strict count of 
all I sold this season. It got so extremely dry that I 
think one-third of them dried up on the stems. I sold 
just $247 worth, besides we used lots of them. Thor- 
oughbred plants are the only plants. Everyone that 
saw the patch said it beat anything ever seen." 

Confident We Will Do Our Part 

TJNDER date of March 3, 1908, T. J. Reaston, of 
Weston, Ontario, writes us as follows: "I feel 
confident you will do your part, as the plants I got 
before were received in the best possible condition, 
and every one grew." 



We advise expressing plants in all cases where the number ordered is in excess of four or five hundred. It is not only 
safer and more expeditious than the mails, but is less expensive where a large number are ordered. 



54 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 



r 



mm 




Dornan, B. (Male) 

LATE. Bisexual. One of the noblest varieties of 
strawberries ever originated. It grows immense 
quantities of extra-large berries, and usually the shape 
is that shown in the illustration above. It is dark red 
on the outer side, shading to a bright red on the lower. 
The seeds are red and yellow, and the meat is deep 
pink, shaded down to almost a white center. It is one 
of the meatiest and the richest of berries, and its 
delicious sub-acid flavor makes it possible for the most 
pronounced dyspeptic to eat the fruit with impunity. 
No strawberry grower should fail to have a generous 
patch of Dornans. The foliage of this variety is 
dark green and has a waxy appearance, very large, 
vigorous grower and of upright habit. The roots go 
deeply down, bringing up plenty of moisture, and this 
quality, together with the great foliage which supplies 
a perfect shade, makes the Dornan a great favorite in 
sections where dry periods in the growing season are 
likely to occur. Dornan is invaluable as a pollenizer 
for pistillates. It has been in our breeding beds for 
ten years, and words cannot express too strongly our 
high appreciation of its splendid qualities. 



How to Get Nitrogen at Low Cost 

^^NE of the essentials to strawberry suc- 
cess is the presence of an ample supply 
of nitrogen in the soil. Nitrates of soda are 
expensive, costing, according to quantity pur- 
chased, from 4 to 5 cents a pound — and it is 
heavy stuff, too. But nature has given us 
a method of getting nitrogen into the soil at 
very little cost, indeed. 

Our forefathers used to follow nature's 
plan in this matter, but didn't know they 
were doing it. They used to wonder what 
it was in the clovers and vetches and peas 




Mark Hanna, P. (Female) 

MEDIUM TO QUITE LATE. Pistillate. One of 
the largest and most beautiful bright-red berries ever 
grown, made particularly attractive by its sparkling 
yellow seeds and light-green calyx. Its flesh is scarlet, 
rich and solid. The productive powers of this variety 
place it among the prize winners, and the size of the 
fruit, hanging in clusters like cherries, make it one of 
the most attractive varieties ever propagated. The 
flavor of this variety is a peculiar one, suggesting 
somewhat the cherry. The foliage grows tall, droop- 
ing over each side of the row and spreading apart 
in the middle of the row, thus allowing the great load 
of berries which grow in the center to color up evenly 
with those upon the outer edge. No extra care need 
be given this varietv in order to secure big crops of 
fancy berries. This is the sixth year of selection in 
our breeding beds, and every year the call for Mark 
Hanna is for an increased number. 



and beans that did the soil so much good. 
Modern science has told us why this is, and 
just how it is that these crops, which are 
called legumes or leguminous crops, renovate 
and strengthen the soil. These legumes have 
on their roots little tubercles or nodules, and 
in these tubercles are bacteria — more than a 
million in one tubercle no larger than a grain 
of wheat. These bacteria have the power to 
digest nitrogen and make it available as plant 
food, much as the bacteria in yeast transform 
the bread dough into food for humans. Now 
there is an inexhaustible supply of free ni- 
trogen in the atmosphere — twelve pounds to 
every square inch of earth — and through the 
legumes these bacteria have the power to 
draw in great draughts of this free nitro- 



Set out your plants promptly upon receiving them. Heel them in if you are compelled to do so, but get them into 
their permanent home at the earliest moment possible. 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 



55 




Beidler, P. (Female) 

MEDIUM EARLY. Pistillate. Beidler is one of the 
varieties that sell instantly on sight. When properly- 
packed in the box there are few strawberries that 
excel it in beauty. Very large as to size of fruit and 
yield, it is bright red in color, and in flavor is exceed- 
ingly rich, while the fruit is solid in texture, and of 
just the character that makes it an ideal shipper. 
Such a combination of excellencies has won for this 
variety great popularity among commercial straw- 
berry growers, and we enter upon the fourth year of 
propagating Beidler with renewed confidence in its 
value. The foliage is large, tall and healthy. The 
fruit stems are unusually powerful and keep the fruit 
well off the ground, — no light burden where such 
enormous yields of berries are the rule. We have 
found that Beidler and Thompson's No. 2 make an 
ideal combination, and we do not hesitate to urge our 
customers to give Beidler and its mate an extensive 
trial in their grounds, confident of their complete 
satisfaction with results. 



gen and transmute it into available plant 
food. So far as is known there is no other 
family of plants save the legumes that en- 
courages these bacteria. 

Therefore, the way to get nitrogen into 
your soil at the lowest possible price — a free 
gift, as it were, from bountiful and gener- 
ous nature — is to alternate your fields with 
legumes of some sort — cowpeas or field peas 
we recommend — and plow it all under in the 
fall after the whole mass of vines have be- 
come fibrous and the peas are ripe. This will 
fill your soil with two prime requisites — the 
element nitrogen and great quantities of vege- 
table matter; and decaying vegetable matter, 
as we have pointed out in the article on 
"Barnyard Manure for Strawberries," is one 
of the very first steps to success in crop pro- 
duction. Don't rush off and invest a lot of 
money in commercial fertilizers while re- 




Midnight, B. (Male) 

LATE. Bisexual. This variety is of distinct and 
striking individuality. The berry is broad and thick 
at the stem, tapering down to a fine wedge-shaped 
point. In color the fruit is pink, and the flesh always 
is white, having a texture similar in character to 
that of the white-meated peach. No richer or sweeter 
berry ever has been grown, and we recommend it 
especially for the family garden. We have named it 
Midnight because it is one of the very latest and pro- 
longs the fruiting season beyond any other variety we 
know. The quality of its fruit is quite equaled by the 
quantity of its yield, and it is an excellent shipper. 
The foliage is a handsome glossy dark green, of 
spreading nature ; its crowns usually are large and 
numerous; so late is its bloom as to make it almost 
perfectly immune from frost. This is the seventh year 
we have grown Midnight in our breeding beds. 



suits may be achieved by the employment of 
a little gumption and the resources right at 
one's own hand. 



Reason and Common Sense 

TN ORDER that a machine of any kind 
may do perfect work every part of it 
must be in working order. A small defect 
in a machine will cause a defect in the article 
the machine turns out. If a horse is to do 
his best, whether on the track or in the field, 
he must be in perfect condition; must be 
properly fed, groomed, properly harnessed, 
hitched and driven. 

The same is true in the case of straw- 
berry plants. They must be perfectly devel- 
oped and strong in all their parts before they 
can produce big crops of big red berries, and 
it is because the Kellogg strain of Thorough- 
breds are thus perfectly developed that they 
have beaten the world's fruiting records. 



Never set a plant that comes from a bed that has fruited. Such a plant will not give you desired results. Its fruiting 

powers already have been discounted. 



56 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 




Brandywine, B. (Male) 



LATE. Bisexual. Brandywine possesses just those 
qualities which make a universal favorite in the 
strawberry world. The berries are immense fellows, 
deep blood red to the center, and they possess a flavor 
peculiar to the variety itself. Bright-yellow seeds that 
are very prominent make a beautiful contrast with 
the rich red of the fruit. It is one of the best canning 
berries grown. Not only is this variety one of the 
largest and most beautiful, it also is one of the most 
productive. The calyx is very large and the fruit 
stems grow erect, holding the big berries up from the 
ground. The foliage is ample and of upright nature, 
with a dark-green leathery leaf, affording protection 
for the bloom. Many of its flowers open under the 
leaves, and thus are protected from late frosts. This 
is the sixteenth year Brandywine has been selected in 
our breeding beds, and each year notes a steady 
increase in popular demand. See page 23. 



Barnyard Manure for Strawberries 

jy/JANY strawberry growers fail to compre- 
hend the value of barnyard manure to 
the strawberry, but if they will remember 
that barnyard manure has both a chemical and 
a physical effect upon the soil, while the best 
of commercial fertilizers produces only a 
chemical effect, they will begin to understand 
why it is we so persistently advocate the use 
of barnyard manure in the strawberry field. 

The first agricultural experimental farm 
ever created was that at Rothamsted, Eng- 
land, more than a half century ago, and there 
the most valuable experiments have been car- 
ried on since that time. On that farm it 
was found that the average yield of wheat 
for fifty years on land with no manure or 
plant food applied was 13.1 bushels, with 
heavy applications of farm manure each year 




Aroma, B. (Male) 



LATE. Bisexual. Aroma is another variety having 
a universal demand. And he who once has grown 
this fruit will always grow it. The berries are very 
large and are bright red to the center. The flesh is 
solid and smooth, and the flavor is richly aromatic. 
The berry is firm and it is one of the leading varieties 
as a long distance shipper. Its appearance in the box 
is most attractive, the yellow seeds imbedded in the 
bright-red flesh making it particularly attractive. 
These excellent qualities have combined to make the 
Aroma one of the most popular berries with the com- 
mercial grower, and in many localities it is the lead- 
ing late berry. Strong in pollen, Aroma is an excel- 
lent mate for late pistillates, the bloom starting to 
open medium early and continuing until quite late. 
The foliage is a smooth deep green, of spreading 
habit, which gives the sun a clear course to the 
crowns; its leaves are long, broad and clean. This is 
the seventeenth year we have selected and bred this 
great variety, and we can recommend it to our cus- 
tomers everywhere. See page 22. 



35.7 bushels, with commercial fertilizer with- 
out manure, 37.1. 

The effect of manure upon the physical 
condition of the soil is more apparent in the 
United States than in England on account of 
our drier seasons, which require that the soil 
be put in such condition that it has greater 
capacity to hold moisture than is necessary 
where the rainfall is more evenly distrib- 
uted. Occasionally they have a dry season in 
England, as for example in 1893, when the 
wheat plots of Rothamsted that were treated 
with commercial fertilizers produced only 
21.7, while those where farm manure was ap- 
plied yielded 34.2 bushels. 

From this experiment it may be concluded 
that in humid districts, where there is ample 



We appreciate the letters our patrons write us reporting success with our plants. We also appreciate good photographs 
of the fields and patches in which success was won. Send them along. 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 




Sample, P. (Female) 

LATE. Pistillate. One of the most attractive of all 
the late varieties, producing not only very late berries, 
but immense quantities of them as well. This extremely 
large berry is bright red, the inner part being a deep 
scarlet. The Sample is top-shaped. Its flavor is 
delicious, and the fruit very rich and juicy. The seeds 
turn red as the berries ripen, and so closely do they 
resemble the color of the berry as to be almost invis- 
ible. The stem and calyx are small and remain a 
bright green days after the fruit has been picked. As 
a shipper few varieties excel the Sample. It is a gen- 
eral favorite for canning purposes, while as a table 
berry it has few superiors. One important character- 
istic of the Sample is its perfect system of coloring a 
certain percentage of its fruit each day, until the 
season is over. Such excellencies as we have named 
have made the Sample a universal favorite. This is 
the thirteenth year of this variety in our breeding 
beds. See pages 22 and 33. 



rainfall to insure good crops, the greatest 
value of the barnyard manure is in the plant 
food it contains, although even here we must 
not fail to recognize its great physical value. 
But in the more or less arid regions, or where 
there are periods of drought at critical times 
for the crops, the physical conditions cre- 
ated by the decaying vegetable matter con- 
tained in barnyard manure are of the utmost 
importance. 

Organic matter in the soil does another 
thing of prime importance — it sets free some 
of the locked-up plant food that resides in 
the soils. All our soils contain vast quanti- 
ties of fertility, but these rich stores are 
mostly in forms which are useless to plants. 
To make them available as plant food is one 




New Home, B. (Male) 



VERY LATE. Bisexual. Grows extra large bright- 
red berries, which retain their color for several days 
after being picked. The firmness and keeping qualities 
of New Home make it one of the most profitable on 
the list. The flesh is a deep pink and the flavor of 
the fruit very rich. The seeds are brown and yellow 
and glossy, giving to the fruit a polished appearance. 
This is the fourth year in which we have bred this 
variety, and its performance on our farms fully con- 
firms the excellent reports which have come to us from 
innumerable sources. The foliage is light-green, and 
the plants are beautiful and thrifty. We get very fine 
reports as to yields of this variety, and are not sur- 
prised, for it fully bears out these reports. 



of the most important functions of the de- 
caying vegetable matter found in barnyard 
manure. 

And to these advantages are to be added 
the fact that the decay of vegetable matter 
generates materials which decompose the soil 
particles, and also promotes various soil ac- 
tivities. All these working together are con- 
tinually making food elements available. And 
the family of plants which includes the clo- 
vers, beans, peas and alfalfa actually add fer- 
tility to the soil. So we say, use barnyard 
manure; use it intelligently. It will bring 
large returns and render successful many an 
enterprise that without its use might prove 
a failure. 

Just the Thing for Strawberry Growers 

CTEPHEN T. CRUM, writing from Anoka, Neb., 
^ says: "I am in receipt of your book for 1908, and 
I am very much pleased with it. I would not take a 
good sum for it and do without it. It is just the thing 
for the strawberry grower." 



This book is copyrighted and all illustrations and letter-press matter are protected fully under the law. 

take notice and will avoid trouble by securing our permission before making any 
use of its pictorial or literary features. 



All persons will 



58 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 





Gandy, B. (Male) 

LATE. Bisexual. Gandy is one of our most popular, 
as well as one of our very latest and largest berries. 
The above illustration indicates its perfect strawberry 
form. The deliciousness of its fruit and the beauty 
of its color, together with its fine shipping qualities, 
unite to make it one of the most popular favorites. It 
is grown universally and is as universally admired. 
The berry is bright red with a smooth shining surface 
and glossy dark-red seeds, and its fine appearance is 
maintained after having been shipped several hun- 
dred miles. Commercial growers prefer it because 
its lateness always insures the top price. The foliage 
of Gandy is very tall, and has a dark-green leathery 
leaf; its fruit stems are long and strong, holding the 
berries up above the foliage, thus permitting the sun 
to put on the fine finishing touches. The fruit remains 
on the vines for several days after ripe, without 
deterioration. This is the twenty-fourth year we have 
had Gandy under our method of selection. As the 
first bloom of Gandy is deficient in pollen, it should 
be set with some other late variety like Pride of 
Michigan, Aroma, Dornan or Stevens' Late Champion. 

Kellogg's Thoroughbreds on a City Lot 

V/fRS. W. J. DORR, of Byron, Oklahoma, writing 
under date of January 11, 1908, says: "I re- 
ceived one hundred of your Thoroughbred strawberry 
plants in 1906 and set them out in the back yard of 
my city property, and I never saw anything grow 
nicer than they did. But in 1907 we sold our property 
and moved on a farm, and I want to get some more 
plants this spring." 

Thoroughbreds Succeed in Spite of Difficulties 

P M. CAPRON of Belfast, New York, writing 
• L " under date of May 16, 1908, says: "The 1100 
plants that I bought of you last season (1907) were 
subjected to a sixteen-day wait before I could prepare 
the ground, finally putting them out on a very windy 
day, when I was not so careful to protect the plants 
from the wind as I would be now. The ground was 
baked very hard, so hard, in fact, that I took my spad- 
ing fork and raised the plants and earth bodily and 
pulverized the lumps by hand before I could see much 
growth. Then later the plants were struck with rust, 
and I did not know what to do until I had sent you 




Marshall, B. (Male) 

LATE. Bisexual. In every respect the Marshall is a 
noble variety and its general popularity stamps it as 
one of the greatest berries ever grown. Anyone who 
has grown this splendid fruit will admit that our 
Boston friends have shown excellent good taste in 
awarding to this variety more first premiums than 
ever have been given to any other. Of extraordinary 
size, rich blood red in color, and having a delicious 
aromatic flavor peculiar to itself, the Marshall is one 
of the most universally grown varieties ever origi- 
nated. It is one of the richest berries on our list; the 
juice is like a syrup, and is almost as sweet. Few 
varieties excel them for canning purposes, and those 
who preserve their fruit in the sun pronounce them 
particularly delicious in that form. The foliage is 
extra large ; is an upright grower with round leaves, 
about one-half of which are light green and the other 
dark. The great big red berries distributed through- 
out the foliage make a gorgeous display. This is the 
fifteenth year we have bred the Marshall. 



sample of leaves, which was about ten days from the 
first appearance of the blight, before anything was 
done effectively to check it. But you ought to see them 
now! They are just coming into bloom and I am 
looking for very good returns as the growth of plant 
and bud system seem very good indeed." 

Beat the Other Kind Three to One 

A/T W. WOODCOCK, of Flint, Michigan, writing 
1V1, under date of April 20, 1908, says: "Although 
I was somewhat disappointed with my first 1,000 
plants I got of you on account of the dry summer 
(they were set out in 1906), I noticed that I had over 
$50 worth of berries ( 1907 ) to sell, while others around 
here did not have half that amount with three times 
the number of plants. My disappointment was turned 
to satisfaction." 

Plants Have a Splendid Root System 

A J. SIMPSON, writing from Carroll, Iowa, under 
^* date of June 2, 1908, says: "I purchased from 
you this spring plants representing six varieties. All 
these plants are living and all are now sending out 
numerous runners. They were exceedingly good- 
looking plants, with a grand root system." 



Our shipping season ends June 1. We have no plants to send to anybody anywhere after that date. Set your plants as 
early in the spring as possible, if you would win a victory worth while. 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 



59 




Bubach, P. (Female) 

LATE. Pistillate. Bubach has a wonderful reputa- 
tion as a money-maker and commands the market as 
do few varieties. Famous for its large yields, mam- 
moth in size and beautiful in color, the quality of the 
fruit is quite as remarkable as its fine appearance. 
The berries are very large and meaty, with bright- 
red surface. In form the fruit ranges from the 
conical to thick and broad. The bright-red color of 
the exterior extends throughout the berry. Bubach has 
a large calyx with medium-sized stems. Foliage is a 
glossy dark green with spreading habit and very short 
fruit and leaf stems. We have grown Bubach on 
black soil, on clay and on sandy loam, and in every 
instance this variety has given entirely satisfactory 
results. This is the twenty-second year we have had 
Bubach in our breeding beds, and every year notes a 
marked increase in its popularity. See page 25. 




Oregon Iron Clad, B. (Male) 

VERY LATE. Bisexual. This is a very large berry, 
broad in shape and of a glossy dark-red color that 
extends through to its very center. Very productive, 
it is strong as a shipper, and has a delicious flavor; 
qualities which make it very popular among extensive 
growers. The seeds are bright yellow, remaining that 
color no matter how ripe the berry becomes, and the 
fruit retains its brilliancy for days after being picked. 
The calyx which joins the berry in such a way as to 
form rather a long neck, remains fresh and green. 
The foliage is extra large, light green and tall, and 
the fruit stems are of more than ordinary length, hold- 
ing the clusters of berries up to full view. The Oregon 
Iron Clad is notable for the erectness with which it 
stands, this quality making it particularly easy to 
gather its fruit. This is the seventh year we have 
propagated this variety. 



More Than $500 an Acre 
T W. NATION, of Fremont, Nebraska, writing un- 
J * der date of March 30, 1908, says: "I see some 
very nice testimonials in the 1908 book. We had a 
scant one-quarter acre measured with a tape line, and 
sold $112 worth of berries last season, besides what we 
used and put up. The plants came from you. How 
was that for a crop? We figured it at over $500 per 
acre." 

The Best Berries in Kansas 

W M. WHITWORTH, of Lacygne, Kansas, writ- 
• ing under date of May 18, 1908, says: "I pur- 
chased one thousand strawberry plants from you in 
1907 and I will say that your plants have given me 
perfect satisfaction. I never lost one of them, and 
now I have as fine berries as this section of the coun- 
try can produce." 

Nothing Else So Good As Our Thoroughbreds 

A T Monroe, Mich., is the Lavender Fruit Farm, 
the owner of which is Harry Lavender. Under 
date of August 5, 1907, he writes us as follows: "You 
may like to know how I came out with the 600 pedi- 
gree plants I set out in the spring of 1906. I need not 



tell you of the peculiar season we have had ; all vege- 
tation is off, as you know; but my 600 pedigree plants 
did first rate, and 'don't forget it' that this English- 
man and his family had their fill of strawberries, first 
of one kind then of another until it was difficult to 
decide which was best. Not only this, but we sold a 
lot of strawberries from the patch at 25 cents per 
quart. It pays to grade them. We grade all the fruit 
and put the small over-ripe fruit into cans, and we 
have a ready sale for them, making more than we do 
off the finest graded fruit. I shall need a large num- 
ber of plants for 1908, and I want your plants or none 
at all, as I am convinced that there is much in what 
you say as to the pedigree plants." 

Thoroughbreds the Best He Ever Grew 

A SMITH, of Savannah, Mo., writes: "I have been 
getting some plants from the Kellogg Company 
and think they are the best I have ever tried. I had 
just a little over half an acre in 1907 and had the best 
lot of berries in the country. I sold almost 100 crates 
at $2 per crate, and did not have to deliver any of 
them. Shall want 6,000 more plants next spring." 



Don't work a minute in your patch when the ground is wet. 



60 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 




Parker Earle, B. (Male) 

LATE. Bisexual. One of the most universally popu- 
lar varieties, particularly famous because it is so pro- 
ductive on rich low land, under this particular cir- 
cumstance leading all other varieties; and a heavy 
producer everywhere. The berries are of medium 
size ; bright-red color, so bright as to give the fruit a 
polished effect; and this color extends through the 
berry. The flavor of Parker Earle is the delight of 
the epicure. It has large foliage and late bloom 
which insure it from danger of frost. The work of 
the grower is simplified in the case of this variety, 
because of the limited number of runners it makes, 
and it is an ideal variety for growing by the hill 
system. This is the twentieth year we have had 
Parker Earle under careful selection and restriction. 




Our New Device for Cutting Runners 

XT OR many years we have had calls for a runner 
cutter attached to a handle, so that the cutter might 
be used separately and apart from the cultivator. We 




Rough Rider, B. (Male) 



LATE. Bisexual. This variety becomes more uni- 
versally popular with the passing years. The berries 
are a glossy crimson in color, medium large as to size, 
and the illustration above gives exactly the form, 
from which there is but little variation. The crimson 
color extends to the center, and the fruit is rich and 
juicy. Rough Rider is quite productive, and one of 
its distinctive features is that it yields a better crop 
the second year of fruiting than it does the first year. 
The foliage is a dark green, with spreading habit, 
and easily is controlled in the fruiting bed because 
this variety forms so few runners. Rough Rider has 
been under our system of selection and restriction for 
ten years, and it is one of the varieties for which 
there is a regular and steadily increasing demand. 



have at last succeeded in getting up a device that 
exactly fills the bill. The cut shows the simplicity of 
operation. The operator can guide the cutter so that 
it will cut off all runners as desired, as it may be run 
as close to the row of plants as you wish. The cost 
of the runner cutter and handle complete is only $2.50, 
and we are sure it will save the price many times 
each season, to say nothing of the backaches that come 
from doing the work by hand. 

Runner Cutter without handle, $1.85. 




Planet Jr. Twelve-Tooth Cultivator 



A PERFECT tool for cultivating strawberries and 
all garden truck. We use these cultivators ex- 
clusively on our great Strawberry Farm. See illustra- 
tion on page 6. 

Complete, as shown in cut, $9.00. 

Weight when packed, 74 pounds. 



Plants travel at the purchaser's risk, and the purchaser pays all transportation charges. 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 



61 




GREAT WESTERN MANURE SPREADERS AT WORK ON KELLOGG FARMS 

OUR experience has convinced us that nothing else in the way of fertilizer equals in value barnyard manure, when properly applied to the 
soil. To do the spreading on our farms we have secured the Great Western Spreaders. These machines tear the manure into shreds 
and distribute it with perfect evenness over the entire surface. The machine is adjustable, so that as heavy or light a dressing can be 
given as is desired. In our judgment, it will pay any tiller of the soil to distribute all manure with a spreader. 






Tie BERRY PICKER'S PUNCH 

Price, postpaid, 50 cents 

THIS Punch is used for punching out the number 
of quarts of berries gathered by each picker. It 
saves much time, avoids many mistakes and pre- 
vents possible misunderstandings with your pickers. 



First Grow the Right Kind of Fruit — 
then Get the Best Packages for Market- 
ing Your Fruit. 




A 16-Quart Crate Filled with Boxes 

WELLS-HIGMAN CO., of St. Joseph, Michigan, have taken the 
lead in the manufacture of Fruit Packages for the past forty 
years. From their factories in the South and their Michigan 
plants at St. Joseph and Traverse City, they obtain the variety of woods 
best suited for the manufacture of 

Strawberry Boxes and Crates 

Fruit baskets, boxes and crates of all kinds, bushel baskets espe- 
cially for shipping fruit and vegetables, melon and grape baskets, peach 
carriers, etc. Their factories are equipped with improved machinery, 
are managed by men of long experience, and their aim is to supply 
first-class packages at moderate prices. We have used the Wells- 
Higman packages for years and take pleasure in recommending them 
to our customers. Write to them at St. Joseph, Mich., and make 
known your requirements. 





The KELLOGG ALL-METAL 
ONE-PIECE DIBBLE 

THIS year we introduce a greatly improved Dibble. You will note 
that this Dibble is one piece; no rivets to come loose or handle 
to break off. It is made from the very best grade of steel, with 
polished blade and japanned handle, which is simply a curve in the 
same piece from which the blade is made. It does not tire the hand 
and is in every way superior to any other Dibble ever put on the 
market. Notwithstanding its manifest superiority, we sell this Dibble 
at the same price as we did the old— 35 cents for one Dibble or $1.00 
for three Dibbles. For setting strawberry plants and all kinds of 
vegetables it has no equal, and no one should garden without them. 



62 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 



Price List of Strawberry Plants 

Read carefully the Inside Cover Pages of the Catalogue Before Making Out Your Order 

WHEN 500 or more plants of one variety are ordered we give thousand rates on that variety; 
but we do not permit customers to combine several varieties to make the number of plants 
500 in order to secure thousand rates. There are no discounts on the prices given. We leave 
nothing undone in order to grow the best plants possible, and the prices quoted are the lowest at 
which they can be furnished. When plants are to be sent by mail, add at the rate of 25 cents per 
hundred plants to the list prices given. No orders accepted for less than one dollar, and no fewer 
than 25 plants of any variety will be sold. No order will be booked until at least one-third of the 
amount of cash required is in our hands. Please do not ask for any deviation from these rules. 
Be very careful to get the prices right. 



EXTRA EARLY VARIETIES 



VARIETIES 


25 
Plants 


50 
Plants 


100 
Plants 


200 
Plants 


300 
Plants 


400 
Plants 


500 
Plants 


1000 
Plants 


Excelsior (B) 


$0.25 


$0.35 


$0.55 


$0.85 


$1.10 


$1.30 


$1.50 


$3.00 


August Luther (B) 


.25 


.40 


.65 


1.00 


1.35 


1.60 


1.75 


3.50 




.35 


.50 


.85 


1.35 


1.85 


2.25 


2.50 


5.00 


Michel's Early (B) 


.25 


.35 


.55 


.85 


1.10 


1.30 


1.50 


3.00 




.35 


.50 


.85 


1.35 


1.85 


2.25 


2.50 


5.00 




.75 


1.25 


2.00 


3.00 


4.25 


5.25 


6.00 


12.00 



EARLY VARIETIES 





$0.25 


$0.40 


$0.65 


$1.00 


$1.35 


$1.60 


$1.75 


$3.50 


Clyde '(B) 


.30 


.45 


.70 


1.10 


1.50 


1.80 


2.00 


4.00 


Lovett ( B ) 


.25 


.40 


.65 


1.00 


1.35 


1.60 


1.75 


3.50 




.25 


.35 


.55 


.85 


1.10 


1.30 


1.50 


3.00 


Wolverton (B) 


.25 


.40 


.65 


1.00 


1.35 


1.60 


1.75 


3.50 




.25 


.35 


.55 


.85 


1.10 


1.30 


1.50 


3.00 


Warfleld (P) 


.25 


.40 


.65 


1.00 


1.35 


1.60 


1.75 


3.50 




MEDIUM VARIETIES 










Lady Thompson (B) 


$0.30 


$0.45 


$0.70 


$1.10 


$1.50 


$1.80 


$2.00 


$4.00 


Ridgeway (B) 


.30 


.45 


.70 


1.10 


1.50 


1.80 


2.00 


4.00 


Glen Mary (B) 


.30 


.45 


.70 


1.10 


1.50 


1.80 


2.00 


4.00 


Wm. Belt (B) 


.30 


.45 


.70 


1.10 


1.50 


1.80 


2.00 


4.00 


Splendid (B) 


.25 


.40 


.65 


1.00 


1.35 


1.60 


1.75 


3.50 


Parson's Beauty (B) 


.30 


.45 


.70 


1.10 


1.50 


1.80 


2.00 


4.00 


Klondike (B) 


.30 


.45 


.70 


1.10 


1.50 


1.80 


2.00 


4.00 


Miller (B) 


.35 


.50 


.85 


1.35 


1.85 


2.25 


2.50 


5.00 


Nick Ohmer (B) 


.35 


.50 


.85 


1.35 


1.85 


2.25 


2.50 


5.00 


New York (B) 


.35 


.50 


.85 


1.35 


1.85 


2.25 


2.50 


5.00 


Thompson's No. 2 (B) 


.60 


1.00 


1.50 


2.50 


3.50 


4.25 


5.00 


10.00 


Beidler (P) 


.60 


1.00 


1.50 


2.50 


3.50 


4.25 


5.00 


10.00 


Senator Dunlap (B) 


.30 


.45 


.70 


1.10 


1.50 


1.80 


2.00 


4.00 


Haverland (P) 


30 


,45 


.70 


1,10 


1.50 


1.80 


2.00 


4.00 



GREAT CROPS OF STRAWBERRIES AND HOW TO GROW THEM 

R. M. Kellogg Co., Three Rivers, Mich. 



63 



Price List of Strawberry Plants— Continued 



MEDIUM VARIETIES 



VARIETIES 


25 
Plants 


50 
Plants 


100 
Plants 


200 
Plants 


300 
Plants 


400 
Plants 


500 
Plants 


1000 
Plants 




$0.30 


$0.45 


$0.70 


$1.10 


£1 SO 


.p 1 .OU 


<£? no 


<£4 00 




.40 


.60 


1.15 


1.80 


? ^S 


? 7S 


^ 00 

J.UU 


A 00 

O.UU 




.50 


.85 


1.25 


2.10 


? RS 


J.JU 


4. 00 


R 00 

O.UU 




.50 


.85 


1.25 


2.10 


? RS 


J.JU 


4. 00 

T.UU 


R 00 

O.UU 


r^Uollo«rvQ ^Ti\ 


.40 


.60 


1.15 


1.80 


? "3S 


? 7S 


^ 00 

J.UU 


6 on 

U.UU 




.50 


.85 


1.25 


2.10 


? RS 


1 SO 

J.JU 


4. 00 

T.UU 


R 00 

O.UU 




.80 


1.35 


2.40 


3.65 


s ?s 

J .At J 


6 SS 

U.J J 


7 SO 

/ . JU 


1 S 00 

1 J.UU 




LATE VARIETIES 










Aroma ( B ) 


$0.30 


$0.45 


$0.70 


$1.10 


$1.50 


$1.80 


$2.00 


$4.00 


Pride of Michigan (B) 


.50 


.85 


1.25 


2.10 


2.85 


3.50 


4.00 


8.00 


Brandywine (B) 


.30 


.45 


.70 


1.10 


1.50 


1.80 


2.00 


4.00 


Gandy (B) 


.30 


.45 


.70 


1.10 


1.50 


1.80 


2.00 


4.00 


Dornan (B) 


.35 


.50 


.85 


1.35 


1.85 


2.25 


2.50 


5.00 


Marshall (B) 


.35 


.50 


.85 


1.35 


1.85 


2.25 


2.50 


5.00 


Parker Earle (B).. 


.35 


.50 


.85 


1.35 


1.85 


2.25 


2.50 


5.00 


Rough Rider (B) 


.30 


.45 


.70 


1.10 


1.50 


1.80 


2.00 


4.00 


Bubach (P) 


.35 


.50 


.85 


1.35 


1.85 


2.25 


2.50 


5.00 


Sample (P) 


.35 


.50 


.85 


1.35 


1.85 


2.25 


2.50 


5.00 


New Home ( B ) 


.40 


.60 


1.15 


1.80 


2.35 


2.75 


3.00 


6.00 


Oregon Iron Clad (B) 


.40 


.60 


1.15 


1.80 


2.35 


2.75 


3.00 


6.00 


Midnight (B) 


.35 


.50 


.85 


1.35 


1.85 


2.25 


2.50 


5.00 


Mark Hanna (P) 


.40 


.60 


1.15 


1.80 


2.35 


2.75 


3.00 


6.00 


Stevens' Late Champion (B) . . 


.50 


.85 


1.25 


2.10 


2.85 


3.50 


4.00 


8.00 


Cardinal (P) 


.50 


.85 


1.25 


2.10 


2.85 


3.50 


4.00- 


8.00 



PRICE LIST OF BERRY GROWER'S TOOLS 

Twelve-Tooth Cultivator, complete $9.00 

Rolling Runner Cutter and Leaf Guard 1.85 

Rolling Runner Cutter and Leaf Guard with handle (See illustration on Page 60) 2.50 

Dibbles, 35c each ; three for 1.00 

PRICE LIST OF ODD NUMBERS OF PLANTS 
Many of our customers order plants in odd numbers, and for their convenience we have added 
the following price list, which gives at a glance the price for odd numbers. Please note, for 
instance, that 75 plants of a variety costing $4.00 a thousand will be 60 cents; of 275 of the same 
variety, $1.40, and so on. 



Number of Plants — 


75 


125 


150 


175 


225 


250 


275 


325 


350 


375 


425 


450 


475 


For $3.00 Varieties 


$0.45 


$0.65 


$0.70 


$0.80 


$0.90 


$1.00 


$1.05 


$1.15 


$1.20 


$1.25 


$1.35 


$1.40 


$1.45 


For $3.50 Varieties 


.55 


.75 


.85 


.90 


1.10 


1.20 


1.25 


1.40 


1.50 


1.55 


1.60 


1.65 


1.70 


For $4.00 Varieties 


.60 


.80 


.90 


1.00 


1.20 


1.30 


1.40 


1.60 


1.65 


1.75 


1.85 


1.90 


1.95 


For $5.00 Varieties 


.70 


1.00 


1.10 


1.25 


1.50 


1.60 


1.75 


1.95 


2.05 


2.15 


2.30 


2.40 


2.45 


For $6.00 Varieties 


.90 


1.30 


1.50 


1.65 


1.95 


2.10 


2.20 


2.45 


2.55 


2.65 


2.80 


2.90 


2.95 


For $8.00 Varieties 


1.05 


1.45 


1.70 


1.90 


2.30 


2.50 


2.65 


3.00 


3.20 


3.35 


3.65 


3.75 


3.90 


For $10.00 Varieties.. . 


. 1.25 


1.75 


2.00 


2.25 


2.75 


3.00 


3.25 


3.70 


3.90 


4.05 


4.45 


4.65 


4.80 


For $12.00 Varieties. . . 


. 1.65 


2.25 


2.50 


2.75 


3.30 


3.60 


3.95 


4.50 


4.75 


5.00 


5.45 


5.65 


5.80 


For $15.00 Varieties.. . 


. 1.85 


2.70 


3.05 


3.35 


4.05 


4.45 


4.85 


5.55 


5.90 


6.20 


6.80 


7.05 


7.30 



Preserve Copy of Your Order on this Sheet 



Do not tear out this leaf, but retain it for future reference. 
We enclose a separate order sheet, which should be used in 
sending in your order. And be sure to send it early. 



Name- 



Post Office- 



{Very Plain in Ink) 



"Rural Route No.- 



County- 



State- 



Name of town for 
Freight or Express- 



Ship Via- 



{Say whether to be sent by freight, express or mail) 



VARIETY 



EXTRA EARLY 

Excelsior (B) 

August Luther (B) 

Climax (B) 

Michel's Early (B) 

Texas (B) 

Virginia (P) 

EARLY 

Bederwood (B) 

Clyde (B) .. 

Lovett (B) 

Tennessee Prolific (B) 

Wolverton (B) 

Crescent (P) 

Warfield (P) 

MEDIUM 

Lady Thompson (B) 

Ridgeway (B) 

Glen Mary (B) 

Wm. Belt (B) 

Splendid (B) 

Parsons' Beauty (B) 

Klondike (B) 

Miller (B) 

Nick Ohmer (B) 

New York (B) 

Thompson's No. 2 (B) 

Beidler (P) 

Senator Dunlap (B) 

Haverland (P) 

Enormous (P) 

Downing's Bride (P) 

Total First Column 



Cts. 



No. of 
Plants 



VARIETY 



MEDIUM 

President (P) 

Clark's Seedling (B) 

Challenge (B) 

Arizona Ever-Bearing (B) . . 

Longfellow (B) 

LATE 

Aroma (B) 

Pride of Michigan (B) 

Brandywine (B) 

Gandy (B) 

Dornan (B) 

Marshall (B) 

Parker Earle (B) 

Rough Rider (B) 

Bubach (P) 

Sample (P) 

New Home (B) 

Oregon Iron Clad (B) 

Midnight (B) 

Mark Hanna (P) 

Stevens' Late Champion (B). 

Cardinal (P) 

Twelve-Tooth Cultivator . . . 

Rolling Runner Cutter 

Dibbles 



Amount in First Column 
Total Amount of Order 
Remittance With Order 
Balance Due 



Cts. 



IS SUBSTITUTION ALLOWED? Indicate your 
In case you do not indicate your wish on dotted 



answer by writing Yes or No on dotted line 

line, we shall assume that you intend us to make second choice when necessary. 



READ CAREFULLY every word upon the inside cover pages of this book before making up your 
order, so that you may know our rules and terms, and thus avoid possible misunderstandings. 

Our Terms' . ' 

CASH must accompany each order or it will not be booked. If not convenient to remit the entire 
amount at the time order is sent in, remit not less than one-third of the entire sum. required to 
cover order, and your order will be filed and plants will be reserved for yoit^die' bjdarjce) due"tp be 
paid, however, before plants are shipped. We send no plants to anybody, no matter *wfW his 
financial standing, until the cash is in hand. We send no plants C. 0. D. to anybody under any 
circumstances. Do not ask it. 

How to Remit 

ALL remittances should be made by postoffice or express money order, or by bank draft or regis- 
tered letter. We shall not be responsible for any currency or coin sent in a letter. When 
private checks are sent, add 15 cents to cover cost of collection. This for the reason that the 
clearing-house associations all the country over have adopted a rate of 15 cents for exchange on all 
personal checks, and the great volume of business done by us makes it necessary to insist upon 
this point. 

We Employ No Agents 

SCORES of complaints come to us every year to this effect: "The plants I bought of your agents 
are worthless." Tree peddlers secure copies of this book and represent themselves as our agents, 
and then deliver common stock, to the loss and disgust of purchasers. You can get the genuine 
Thoroughbred plants only by sending direct to us. Should anyone represent himself as our agent, 
offering to sell our plants, compel him to show his credentials. This will reveal his true character 
at once, for he will be unable to show any authority to sell our plants. 

How to Make Up a Club Order 

YOU can join with your neighbors in getting up a club and get the benefit of thousand rates on 
all varieties of which 500 or more of each variety are ordered. The club order must be shipped 
to one address. Each bundle of 25 plants being labeled, the division is easily made. Catalogs will 
be sent to any of your neighbors, on request, to aid in making up the club. 

Order Early 

A LL orders are booked in the rotation in which they are received. The earlier they come in the 
more certain will be the patron of securing the plants of his choice. Orders for earlv shipment 
are best, too, for the reason that the plants when dormant are in better form to transport and trans- 
plant. No order will be filled for less than $1.00, as the cost of handling is too great when the 
amount is less. 

Orders sent in after March 15 must be accompanied by full payment to insure proper position 
in the files. Plants will be shipped at the proper time, as nearly as we can judge, for setting out 
in your locality, unless you give us special date for shipment. Orders received after April 15 will 
be shipped according to date of their receipt, providing they have been remitted for in full, regard- 
less of special shipping dates. 

Transportation of Plants 

X^XPERIENXE has taught us that the best and safest way to ship plants is either by express or 
*-* mail, and it is cheaper by far when you come to figure up actual results. We recommend 
express even when the order calls for a large number of plants. And with small orders the cost bv 
express is cheaper than by freight because express companies charge only for the exact number of 
pounds in the shipment, and carry plants 20 per cent, cheaper than is done in the case of merchan- 
dise. If your plants go by freight you will be charged for 100 pounds, no matter how small the 
package. Do not send money to pay express or freight charges. You will pay these charges when 
you get the plants. The rate will be just the same. Although we have shipped and do ship plants 
by freight, we do not advise that method of transportation. Out of 17,000 orders shipped last season 
about ten only were transported by freight. What we desire to do is to get the plants to you at the 
earliest moment possible and in the best condition. If your order calls for less than 200 plants we 
would advise you to have them go by mail, as it would be cheaper than by express. Remember, when 
plants go by mail you should add 25 cents above the cost of plants for each 100 plants ordered. 

Estimated Weight of Plants 

TT IS impossible to give the exact weight of plants, because plants of some varieties are much 
larger than others, and plants steadily increase in weight as the season advances. But our experi- 
ence has been that it is safe to calculate on from 25 to 30 pounds to each thousand plants wnen 
packed ready for shipment. 



MANZ ENGRAVING COMPANY, THE HOLUSTER PRESS, CHICAGO 



IQflQ R - M - KELLOGG COMPANY'S IQnQ 

l%j\J%J PRICE LIST OF STRAWBERRY PLANTS lZJVJZ) 




STRAWBERRIES GROWING IN YOUNG ORCHARD 

THIS shows the results secured from well-developed plants, thorough soil preparation, careful 
setting and intelligent cultural methods. Anyone who will use the Kellogg strain of Thor- 
oughbred plants and observ e these methods can have a patch that will in all ways equal this one. 



IN MAKING REMITTANCES do not send personal check, but send either Postoffice or Express 
money order, bank draft or registered letter. If a personal check is sent, 15 cents must be added to 
pay exchange, as all banks now require exchange. 

Be sure to examine the remittance before enclosing to make sure it is correct. Every day in our 
busiest season we are compelled to return for correction remittances of all kinds. Even postmasters will 
once in a while make a mistake. A little care at this point will save both you and ourselves much un- 
necessary trouble. 

Send no money for prepayment of freight or express charges. You pay transportation charges when 
you receive the plants. The rate will be the same. If you wish your plants to come by mail, add 25 
cents to list price for each 100 plants ordered. 

If we are sold out of any varieties included in your order, we shall substitute other varieties un- 
less you say "No." (See Page D of this order sheet and front inside cover page of our 1909 catalogue.) 

Many of our customers, when ordering plants, write us from their office address, and ask to have 
their plants shipped to their home address, or for other reasons use more than one address in corres- 
ponding with us. Should you order in this way be sure to tell us where to notify you at shipping time 
in order to avoid any delay. 

Read all instructions on this sheet and the inside cover pages of the catalogue before making out 
your order. It may save much confusion and needless correspondence. 



R. M. KELLOGG COMPANY, THREE RIVERS, MICHIGAN 



PRICE LIST OF STRAWBERRY PLANTS 

Read Carefully the Inside Cover Pages of the Catalogue Before Making Out Your Order 

HEN 500 or more plants of one variety are ordered we give thousand rates on that variety; but 
we do not permit customers to combine several varieties to make the number of plants 500 in 
order to secure thousand rates. There are no discounts on the prices given. We leave nothing undone 
in order to grow the best plants possible, and the prices quoted are the lowest at which they can be fur- 
nished. When plants are to be sent by mail, add at the rate of 25 cents per hundred plants to the list 
prices given. No orders accepted for less than one dollar, and no fewer than 25 plants of any variety 
will be sold. No order will be booked until at least one-third of the amount of cash required is in our 
hands. Please do not ask for any deviation from these rules. Be very careful to get the prices right. 



EXTRA EARLY VARIETIES 



VARIETIES 


25 
Plants 


50 
Plants 


100 
Plants 


200 
Plants 


300 
Plants 


400 
Plants 


500 
Plants 


1000 
Plants 


Excelsior (B) . . . 


. $0.25 


$0.35 


$0.55 


$0.85 


$1.10 


$1.30 


$1.50 


$3.00 


August Luther (B) . . 


. .25 


.40 


.65 


1.00 


1.35 


1.60 


1.75 


3.50 




. .35 


.50 


.85 


1.35 


1.85 


2.25 


2.50 


5.00 


Michel's Early (B) . . 


. .25 


.35 


.55 


.85 


1.10 


1.30 


1.50 


3.00 




35 


.50 


85 


1.35 


1.85 


2.25 


2.50 


5.00 


Virginia (P) .... 


75 


1.25 


2.00 


3.00 


4.25 


5.25 


6.00 


12.00 




EARLY 


VARIETIES 










Bederwood (B) ... 


. $0.25 


$0.40 


$0.65 


$1.00 


$1.35 


$1.60 


$1.75 


$3.50 


Clyde (B) . . , . . 


. .30 


.45 


.70 


1.10 


1.50 


1.80 


2.00 


4.00 


Lovett (B) 


25 


.40 


.65 


1.00 


1.35 


1.60 


1.75 


3.50 


Tennessee Prolific (B) . 


. .25 


.35 


.55 


.85 


1.10 


1.30 


1.50 


3.00 


Wolverton (B) ... 


, ,25 


.40 


.65 


LOO 


1.35 


1.60 


1.75 


3.50 


Crescent (P) 


25 


.35 


.55 


.85 


1.10 


1.30 


1.50 


3 00 


Warfield (P) . . . . 


25 


" .40 


.65 


1.00 


1.35 


1.60 


1.75 


3.50 




MEDIUM 


VARIETIES 










Lady Thompson (B) 


. $0.30 


$0.45 


$0.70 


$1.10 


$1.50 


$1.80 


$2.00 


$4.00 




. .30 


.45 


.70 


1.10 


1.50 


1.80 


2.00 


4.00 


Glen Mary (B) . . . 


. .30 


.45 


.70 


1.10 


1.50 


1.80 


2.00 


4.00 


Wm. Belt (B) ... 


. ,30 


.45 


.70 


1.10 


1.50 


1.80 


2.00 


4.00 


Splendid (B) . . 


. .25 


.40 


.65 


1.00 


1.35 


1.60 


1.75 


3.50 


Parson's Beauty (B) . . 


. .30 


.45 


.70 


1.10 


1.50 


1.80 


2.00 


4.00 


Klondike (B) . , . . 


. .30 


.45 


.70 


1.10 


1.50 


1.80 


2.00 


4.00 


Miller (B) . . . . . 


35 


.50 


.85 


1.35 


1.85 


2.25 


2.50 


5.00 


Nick Ohmer (B) . . . 


, .35 


.50 


.85 


1.35 


1.85 


2.25 


2.50 


5.00 


New York (B) ... 


. .35 


.50 


.85 


1.35 


1.85 


2.25 


2.50 


5.00 


Thompson's No. 2 (B) . 


. .60 


1.00 


1.50 


2.50 


3.50 


4.25 


5.00 


10.00 


Beidler (P) 


60 


1.00 


1.50 


2.50 


3.50 


4.25 


5.00 


10.00 


Senator Dunlap (B) . . 


. .30 


.45 


.70 


1.10 


1.50 


1.80- 


2.00 


4.00 


Haverland (P) . . . . 


30 


.45 


.70 


1.10 


1.50 


1.80 


2.00 


4.00 


Enormous (P) .... 


30 


.45 


.70 


1.10 


1.50 


1.80 


2.00 


4.00 


Downing's Bride (P) . 


. .40 


.60 


1.15 


1.80 


2.35 


2.75 


3.00 


6.00 


President (P) . . . . 


50 


.85 


1.25 


2.10 


2.85 


3.50 


4.00 


8.00 



If you have a second choice, mark varieties with an X on this page. 
Page B 



PRICE LIST OF STRAWBERRY PLANTS— Continued. 





MEDIUM VARIETIES 












25 


50 - 


100 


200 


300 


400 


500 


1000 


VARIETIES 


Plants 


Plants 


Plants 


Plants 


Plants 


Plants 


Plants 


Plants 


Clark's Seedling (P) . . 


. $0.50 


$0.85 


$1.25 


$2.10 


$2.85 


$3.50 


$4.00 


$8.00 


Challenge (B) . . . . 


40 


.60 


1.15 


1.80 


2.35 


2.75 


3.00 


6.00 


Arizona Ever-Bearing (B) 


. .50 


.85 


1.25 


2.10 


2.85 


3.50 


4.00 


8.00 


Longfellow (B) . . . 


. .80 


1.35 


2.40 


3.65 


5.25 


6.55 


7.50 


15 00 



LATE VARIETIES 



Aroma (B) $0.30 

Pride of Michigan (B) . . .50 

Brandywine (B) 30 

Gandy (B) .30 

Dornan (B) 35 

Marshall (B) 35 

Parker Earle (B) . . . . .35 

Rough Rider (B) 30 

Bubach (P) ..... . .35 

Sample (P) ..... .35 

New Home (B) . . . ... .40 

Oregon Iron Clad (B) . . .40 

Midnight (B) 35 

Mark Hanna (P) . . . . .40 
Stevens' Late Champion (B) .50 
Cardinal (P) 50 



$0.45 


$0.70 


$1.10 


$1.50 


$1.80 


$2.00 


$4.00 


.85 


1.25 


2.10 


2.85 


3.50 


4.00 


8.00 


.45 


.70 


1.10 


1.50 


1.80 


2.00 


4.00 


.45 


.70 


1.10 


1.50 


1.80 


2.00 


4.00 


.50 


.85 


1.35 


1.85 


2.25 


2.50 


5.00 


.50 


.85 


1.35 


1.85 


2.25 


2.50 


5.00 


.50 


.85 


1.35 


1.85 


2.25 


2.50 


5.00 


.45 


.70 


1.10 


1.50 


1.80 


2.00 


4.00 


.50 


.85 


1.35 


1.85 


2.25 


2.50 


5.00 


.50 


.85 


1.35 


1.85 


2.25 


2.50 


5.00 


.60 


1.15 


1.80 


2.35 


2.75 


3.00 


6.00 


.60 


1.15 


1.80 


2.35 


2.75 


3.00 


6.00 


.50 


.85 


1.35 


1.85 


2.25 


2.50 


5.00 


.60 


1.15 


1.80 


2.35 


2.75 


3.00 


6.00 


.85 


1.25 


2.10 


2.85 


3.50 


4.00 


8.00 


.85 


1.25 


2.10 


2.85 


3.50 


4.00 


8.00 



PRICE LIST OF BERRY GROWER'S TOOLS 

Twelve-Tooth Cultivator, complete $9.00 

-pw i . . ^ . T . ^ j j with handle (see illustration in catalogue, p. 60) 2.50 

Rolling Runner Cutter and Leaf Guard < . , , • - 

{ without handle . . . 1.85 

Dibbles, 35c each; three for . 1.00 



PRICE LIST FOR ODD NUMBERS OF PLANTS 



MANY of our customers order plants in odd numbers, and for their convenience we have added the fol- 
lowing price-list, which gives at a glance the price for odd numbers. Please note, for instance, that 75 
plants of a variety costing $4.00 a thousand will be 60 cents; of 275 of the same variety, $1 .40, and so on. 



NUMBER OF PLANTS 


75 


125 


150 


175 


225 


250 


275 


325 


350 


375 


425 


450 


475 


For 


S 3.00 Varieties 


$0.45 


$0.65 


$0.70 


$0.80 


$0.90 


$1.00 


$1.05 


$1.15 


$1.20 


$1.25 


$1.35 


$1.40 


$1.45 


For 


3.50 Varieties 


.55 


.75 


.85 


.90 


1.10 


1.20 


1.25 


1.40 


1.50 


1.55 


1.60 


1.65 


1.70 


For 


4.00 Varieties 


.60 


.80 


.90 


1.00 


1.20 


1.30 


1.40 


1.60 


1.65 


1.75 


1.85 


1.90 


1.95 


For 


5.00 Varieties 


.70 


1.00 


1.10 


1.25 


1.50 


1.60 


1.75 


1.95 


2.05 


2.15 


2.30 


2.40 


2.45 


For 


6.00 Varieties 


.90 


1.30 


1.50 


1.65 


1.95 


2.10 


2.20 


2.45 


2.55 


2.65 


2.80 


2.90 


2 95 


For 


8.00 Varieties 


1.05 


1.45 


1.70 


1.90 


2.30 


2.50 


2.65 


3.00 


3.20 


3.35 


3.65 


3.75 


3 90 


For 


10.00 Varieties 


1.25 


1.75 


2.00 


2.25 


2.75 


3.00 


3.25 


3.70 


3.90 


4.05 


4.45 


4.65 


4.80 


For 


12.00 Varieties 


1.65 


2.25 


2.50 


2.75 


3.30 


3.60 


3.95 


4.50 


4.75 


5.00 


5.45 


5.65 


5 80 


For 


15.00 Varieties 


1.85 


2.70" 


3.05 


3.35 


4.05 


4.45 


4.85 


5.55 


5.90 


6.20 


6.80 


7.05 


7.30 



If you have a second choice, mark varieties with an X on this page. 
Page C 



No. 



R. M. KELLOGG CO., Three Rivers, Mich. 



Name 



( Very Plain in Ink.) 



Post Office 



Rural Route No. . 



County 



State 



Ship via_ 



Name of town for 

Freight or Express 

( Say whether to be sent by freight, express or mail) 
Make full order for plants and tools on this page, and be sure to tell us where to notify you at shipping time. 



No. of 
Plants 



VARIETY 



EXTRA EARLY 

Excelsior (B) 

August Luther (B).__ 

Climax (B) 

Michel's Early (B)___ 

Texas (B) 

Virginia (P) 



EARLY 

Bederwood (B) 

Clyde (B) 

Lovett (B) 

Tennessee Prolific (B). 

Wolverton (B) 

Crescent (P) 

Warfield (P) 



MEDIUM 

Lady Thompson (B) 

Ridgeway (B) 

Glen Mary (B) 

Wm. Belt (B) 

Splendid (B) 

Parsons' Beauty (B) 

Klondike (B) 

Miller (B) 

Nick Ohmer (B) 

New York (B) "... 

Thompson's No. 2 (B). 

Beidler (P) ... 

Senator Dunlap (B) 

Haverland (P) 

Enormous (P) 

Downing's Bride (P) 



Cts. 



Total First Column 



No. of 
Plants 



VARIETY 



Cts. 



MEDIUM 

President (P) 

Clark's Seedling (B) 

Challenge (B) 

Arizona Ever-Bearing (B) 

Longfellow (B)._ 

LATE 

Aroma (B) 

Pride of Michigan (B) 

Brandywine (B) 

Gandy (B) ....... 

Dornan (B) 

Marshall (B) 

Parker Earle (B) 

Rough Rider (B) 

Bubach (P) . 

Sample (P) 

New Home (B) 

Oregon Iron Clad (B)__._._ 

Midnight (B) 

Mark Hanna (P) 

Stevens' Late Champion(B) 

Cardinal (P)_.__ 

Twelve-Tooth Cultivator 
Rolling Runner Cutter.... 
Dibbles 



Amount in First Column 



Total Amount of Order 



Remittance With Order 



Balance Due 



IS SUBSTITUTION ALLOWED? Indicate your answer by writing Yes or No on dotted line.— 

In case you do not indicate your wish on dotted line, we shall assume that you intend us to make second choice when necessary. 



Page D