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—  Jéoypola College 


! 


Montreal, | June, 1918 


Srhonl Class Dins, Presentation 
Cups, ©rophies, etr. 


Suitably engraved for all occasions. : Designs and estimates fur- 
nished upon request 


Diamond Чё, Goldamiths 
Merchants | Silversmiths 


MONTREAL 


Century Coal and 


Coke Company, 
——  — Limited———— 


ALMY'S 


Men's Departments 


make a specialty of 
SNAPPY STYLES 


Neckwear 


310 DOMINION EXPRESS BUILDING 


and Shirts vdd = 


For Boys and Young Men TELEPHONE: MAIN 7300 


PLEASE PATRONIZE ADVERTISERS AND MENTION "LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW" 


Хоуоа College Review Advertisers 


No Business Firms or indio other than those whom the Editor knows to bear the highest reputation, have been asked 
to advertise in the ** Review ". Readers are earnestly asked to refer to this list before purchasing articles, consult the advertise- 
ment therefor, on the page [indicated below, and thus patronize our advertisers. This practice will ensure to purchasers 
a guarantee of reliability, to advertisers some return for their support, to the Review continued kind favors from these firms. 


Business Firm Name Address Page 
Art Metal Workers. ...... The №. J. Feeley Со............................. 10 East 50th St., New York City, №.Ү.......... 3 
Auctioneers....... ЗЛЕ ПОНЕ Ба 244 Notre Dame Slo W и 110 
Bakers E Сапегу гоб ЛУ ЕЕ ИЕК JJ 103 
Banks ..The Montreal City & District Savings Bank...... J..... ИТЕ 111 
J J 109 
Barristers: Brown, Montgomery & McMichael.............. J45ISC:3James S6... 108 
Cürrani& Cürran ОЗЕК 180jStoJamesSCo E ee ш какан» нета 108 
ZHSDillon 9915 Јава 108 
oster, Martin, Mann, MacKinnon, Hackett & 
мМабепа ^ Б ЗИСТИ 2iPlaced'Armes Өй; скы ows x» Selecta ris nene 108 
Meagher сосна Еа оня Commercial Union Building.................- 108 
Fleet, Falconer, Phelan & Воуеу................. 157 St. James Б 113 
Kavanagh, Lajoie & Lacoste...................-. ZiPlaceid'Armes Sq: сз» Е Аре СЕ 6 113 
Booksin ейун ets ejr Rev. E. J. Devine, The Canadian Messenger...... 1075 ed a CGR ЖЖ. лел иш usse 106 
ВепочпРриррзати CO жер ser ie ROTE SI 25 McGill College +. еве 4 
Miss Poole's Book 45 McGill College Ауе........ cee n 109 
Cigarettes (Players)...... Imperial Tobacco'Co. ......—.- 5. doner ne viele e tee 900/StvAntoiBelSti-- ое 104 
Church Windows......... НорБЕМГЕ. СО 1. йик eret stercus ei Tel revs ets 44 St Tames 103 
Clothes and Men's Fur- я 
nishings.......... (Саг T Cn PERIIT e жыр йы tas RET TEE 507 St. Catherine St. №....................... 10 
Fashion Стао 229 St. James and ote Se. Catherine St. W..... 118 
Dunnett & Stewart..... 149 Notre Dame St. №. ..................-.... 115 
Вгеппат’ѕ.............. 251 St. Catherine St. УУ....................... 4 
Campbell’s Clothing 21 McGill College Ауе......................... 4 
aISBroldy- ин 166i C rales SET WE ааа единен heir 4 
а ЕЗБЕ 727 St. Catherine St. М... ...:................. 110 
Села (Ladies Wear). airweatbers: х. Ве поето лыс e mm a rises St: Catherine St:,at Peel........5.... eere 10 
стозавазинавванънаваа “Century Coal & Coke Co........................145 St. James С... Соуес 
The P2McCGrory.Goal Co-.. ы Жегиле с-з eere 140/SCBeteriSE К сылды пъ вто шети се 107 
Colleges: н EovolaiCollege ааа T PP Sherbrooke St. W., Мопёгеа1.................. 7 
Royal Naval College A T O R, Kingston, Ont... aae ai ea ea s на: 114 
Confectionery. ........... Christies Brown o соу ae i NAME De 127 Лагке CO si АА O erts Cover 
Соптей ва sous Лук» St. Joseph's College & Асайету................. St. Alban St., Toronto. Cover 
Outremont Convent... oc eee ei lees e Gutremont) Que... а 113 
WAVERING Fg падане ка aiaa are eta rgo РИД N.D.G., Nionteedla Nose ieu ni дыл oe 15.7 109. 
Denttifices: oe Мите Ө КООШ Paste O tiere НЕ Palmers Ltd., 100 Latour ЅЕ................. Cover 
Drüggists. саша BLL CASEY о anion re 5628 Sherbrooke St. W 109 
Wingate «Eimitedw a mer e E 344 St. Paul St. W....... 
innate Chemical! Co ane oane nen по ра 545 Notre Dame St. W 
TEE ДЕ a a A E T Кыт КО 8IZiSCCatherine:iSt. We ал. 113 
Engravets т SmeatoniBrosi а А тосасе БЕРИ Ее 
Encyclopedias............ The Catholic Encyclopedia........... ЖАК nis IRIS T. J. Ford, 303 Church St., Toronto........... 2 
Fish Dealers.............. J 18 BoünsecoursiSt:3. 111 
Foodstuffs............... бос CEIS АУ НН cites. tenho RECORDS ӨЛ Б ear ВЕ cle ы. Дл EUER 49e 112 
ТАЕ АТА Уе Со 0 defer usto t OA A 610 St. Paul 112 
ичеге Cummings & Cummings........ eese 109/St Рай БЕ 8 
Walter КО o0 ore dre cites 96 Notre Dame St. М№.......................... 4 
General Merchandise..... Almy'sLimited ine cig er К е тену ее St. Catherine St., at ВІеигу................. Cover 
as AS Оуу аер eee St. Catherine St., at Mountain.............--- 114 
Grocers е эзиз >ы udon Hebert anco лї 18 de Вгеѕоіеѕ: 56.............................. 115 
Lo Chaput Fila GiCie аа 2 Нкевоте3 ЗЕ: г. 112 
Laporte; Martin, Limited. .......... о. J 112 
i ЗА Ма Папсоаге динка она ORI osi inb aote ЕТ, 618:St..Paul St. cece ee nce cece ces 112 
Hardware: os 4Philbin Hardware Со... 4169 St. Catherine St. М№...................... 4 
Hats & Caps. ............ d Аррана о ЕЛЛЫК А vci e М 473 St. Catherine St. W.......... ee ese cece 106 
а лл НОЕ Е ТЕЕ Dominion Sq., Мотбгеа1...................... 103 
Ваай ооо лд Wickham в WickHan- С есеист Es 116 SC "Tames 108 
ЕтеПега ЕЕ, ити Henry, Birks tGlSonsy cele cite е ЕЕ л: 16 PhillipsiSq оло Соуег 
ather Goods. .......... Lamontagne Limited дора ы А 338 Notre Dame St. УУ... cs o ыткан ДЕ 110 
Marble Workers. ......... The Smith Marble & Construction Co........... 145 Van Horne Ауе. ........................... 118 
Meats eio s eme О 661 Dorchester St. Е................:.......... 107 
BETIS АБакон Со ар Bonsecours Магкеё..........................: 107 
Gunn; Langlios & Cony Jenn eese rre ese 105!StSPauliSt ES ИИА Camano 111 
" ДЪХ Ае ро и 39 Bonsecours Маскеё......................... 113 
Military Equipment...... Wmescully рапа ей“: паста omo tian ere ears 320 University eee n6 111 
Milkmen: 14. oos оки сиса 218 Mountain St......... ооо оосо io 
NOtBrieS рита Үз апр ecary, Barlow & Јогопм......................... 232 St James'St....... seem dete et 
РасіїѕуСойоу voee teretes Ele i eh ern e a RISO REIS 136 St. James St........... 
Walsh MUulcait e нр е 145 St. James St........... 
Nurserymen.............. КЕВИН АЕ GUN S era O E 83 Craig St. №.........:. 
Organs sees Casavant Ereres. iis oves cos «б». sco ne nee St. Hyacinthe, Que 3 
Opticians... oos RUNSTaylor 8 Со 77... а бнз e ery 522:St. Catherine St: Wira s icol ani, 
Carriere Su senecals го setae eye cere e ade 207 St. Catherine St. Е........................ 111 
Pennants...............- IEG PTs Ten can m Mete ot Oen erro На 1896 PeelSt erste 110 
РИсЕйгез коло ала ле ArtEmpongm Ее 23 McGill College Ауе......................:-: 113 
Photographers........... WmoNotman!i& Son. КЕЕ Ошо Мен e de 1.8471 Union Avenue ома Susie аре tres Io ee 109 
б есеи ЕСАД am P NN TO OS 375 St. Catherine St. М........... нее" 109 
Printerat. SpüuthanmiPress ^ exc. dedo vere ча ose О 63 SE Alexander SE- лаа 117 
Ranges ООо сл en Сео: Е: Рготве Range Co!..2.........: оа 575 University. St... аба мее а варна пра le tiam 110 
Refrigerators... ohn' Hillcock!84C€o:. кошу. ode ците ше mne See TofontoJ OPES Е 110 
Rups iere іске Oriental Ни е Ул. лае ГЫ лн» 1... .St. Catherine St., at Mountain..-.........---- 113 
Sanitary Appliances...... The James Robertson Со.................. I suisses таба ЕЕ ДЕЕ 116 
School a supe Че RN McKay School Еаџіртепє...................... 615 Yonge St., Тототёо........................ 103 
Soft/Drinks. e Charles бакан CO. ло Sees ы е 76 Вейгу ва оли Ден» «Лез ЕЗШ ИУ m age 113 
Sporting Goods.......... Ме есе в Orchard... css esse pus 774 St. Catherine St. А АЛЕ. eee ne 4 
AWESBregentkd9 oso heroes bep ЫЫ 208 St. Catherine St. E..... 110 
Starch кс "не Санада Starch Со... шыл» ңиш АЙ uses Montreal......... ие 
Steamship Travel........Canada Steamship [іпеѕ........................ 9 Victoria Square. . 
Teas & Coffees........... KeürneyjBEtOS лке су тора рано Ашны EROS 
“ДА. Simard & Cie BIS Paúl SE 
5 Saladaelea Со а ИР Cope e isse es da 102:St. Paul St. ММ... e te em enn 
Tonsorial (Barbers)....... МЛ Росита 163 T TT сыйры E E ДР де 
Valet Service............. est End Cleaners Westminster Ave., Montreal West........-- 106 
Woolen Goods............ Jaeger Sanitary Woolen System Co. (Miltons).. e SeuGatherine SC Won Ee RA TUE 
СХ гапсђешопєаЕпе stalls Иши ален 2591€ 110 
Woven Names. ........... Сал CcashyEimited: 30156: James Sto Кош to eee eee: SE 106 


No Library Should Be Without It 


THE CATHOLIC 
ENCYCLOPEDIA 


An International Work of Reference 
on the Constitution, Doctrine, Discipline 
and History of the Catholic Church 


FIFTEEN VOLUMES AND INDEX, 800 PAGES EACH—SIZE, 7 х 10 x 114, PRINTED ON LIGHT- 
WEIGHT PAPER—BINDINGS IN HOLLISTON CLOTH AND 12 LEATHER 


_ This Encyclopedia contains extensive information in the most important branches of knowl- 

edge: History, Biography, Literature, Art, Science, Education, Philosophy, Psychology, 
Law, Religion. It is in reality an Encyclopedia of Civilization. 
The. Index. This vast information is distributed in articles arranged in alphabetical order, 
and thoroughly indexed in the last volume, so that not only the titles of the articles themselves, 
but every one of the 350,000 topics occurring within the articles may be found without difficulty 
or delay. 


"Intended to inform the general public . . . . excellently adapted to its 
end." (NATION, New York.) 
" Notable contribution to science and a remarkable example of enterprise." 

-(TimEs, London.) 
“Thorough and learned enterprise . . . . . abounds in historical and artistic 
interest." (ATHENAEUM, London.) 
" Honest contribution to pure thought and human progress. Articles concise 
and well written." (CoNTEMPORARY REVIEW.) 
“It is a university in print, and the guidance of a thousand teachers is within 
its covers." (AMERICA.) 


No general collection of books of any size can afford to be without it. I may add that a number 
of people who use our library frequently have expressed to me somewhat this same opinion. 
EDWARD HARMON VIRGIN, Librarian, 
General Theological Seminary, New у, 


New York PUBLIC LIBRARY AND BRANCHES HAVE 42 SETS IN CONSTANT USE. 
Boston LIBRARY USES 28 SETS 


To All Librarians: 

If the Catholic Encyclopedia is not in your library, write us at once for special prices 
and terms. If your funds will not permit you to purchase this year, please advise us as we 
may be in position to aid you in securing a set. 


WRITE AT ONCE FOR FULL PARTICULARS 


T. J. FORD & COMPANY 


303 CHURCH STREET TORONTO, ONT. 


We have a few sets of Belloc, Lingards’ History of England and Thomas Addis Emmet. 
Quotations furnished on all De Luxe Editions of Standard Authors. 


2 PLEASE {PATRONIZE ADVERTISERS AND MENTION “LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW” 


p ————————————————Mà 


ESM es 


Eeclesiastical Metal Work 
of Exceptional Richness 


Г VERY article made by us is a true work of art, by 
reason of its beauty of design and the skilled 
craftsmanship employed in its execution. 


Sacred Vessels in Gold and Silver, Sanctuary and Altar Equipment, 
Altar Railings and Grills, Memorial and Roll of Honor Tablets 


‘Also: Specialists in Medals, Class Rings 
and Pins and Scapular Rings and Lockets 


CHALICE No. 7271 |: 


A superbly beau- 
tiful Chalice of 
Sterling Silver 
heavily gold plated. | 
Height 9% inches. 


Write for Catalogs 
Special Designs on Request 


The W. J. Feeley Company 


10 East 50th Street, New York City, U.S.A. 


5 
Н 
5 
E] 
Е 
H 
8 
9 
" 
8 
Е 


Tle ei meee ae Me Me tir WAS. 


Pn CE Lu Mu Ge eect 


ET 


Casavant Organs 


Are Superior in every respect 


Of the 700 Organs built by this firm, those of the 
following churches are some of the largest:— 


*Emmanuel Church, Boston, Mass T .. 188 stops 

15. Paul's Anglican Church, Toronto .. at 107 -* 
Maissonneuve Parish Church, Montreal ОТ 
Eaton Memorial Church, Toronto a „= RO S 
St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, Toronto .. 88 “© 
Notre Dame Church, Montreal ... 5 av Рака ие 
First Baptist Church, Syracuse, N.Y. .. NUT E: 
University Convocation Hall, Toronto .. xo wm. “е 
Sinai Temple, Chicago  .. з 63 “ 


* The largest church organ іп America. ї The largest organ in Canada. 


CASAVANT FRERES 


Church Organ Builders 
St. Hyacinthe, Qu e. Branch at South Haven, Mich. 


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IF You Need Clothes 
Consult Us 


FROM A COLLEGE SUIT 
To A DRESS SUIT 


батро Clothing 
WORKMANSHIP EXCELS 


WM. McLAUGHLIN (Registered) 
21 McGill College Avenue 


SUMMER FURS of 
FASHION and 
QUALITY 


Walter F. Cummings 


96 Notre Dame West 


Near St. Francois Xavier 


Buy your furs downtown and save 14 


PHONE WESTMOUNT 745 


PHILBIN & CO. 


Hardware, Stationery, Fancy Goods 
Picture Framing 


We repair locks, make keys and do odd jobbing 


: 4169 St. Catherine St., Westmount 
WHOLESALE DEALERS 


School, сее Lond University 
Text and Library Boobs 


WE SHALL BE GLAD TO SUPPLY YOUR NEEDS 


[i [zl 


Renouj Publishing Co., 


25 McGILL COLLEGE AVE. 
MONTREAL 


Students— 


Zi 


wogocon QZ-dzxomuwuo 


N 


Boys! 


251 St. Catherine Street West ( 


You have no doubt found it difficult to get a hair 
cut "as you want it.' 

Any barber can cut hair, but only an artist at 
his "business," who makes a study of each 


individual, the shape of his head, the texture of 
the hair, the way it grows, and who observes the 
styles, can guarantee you satisfaction. 


So don't 
fail to come to a barber shop of quality and enjoy 
a real hair cut, shave, massage or shampoo by 
barbers who know. 


Potvin's Barber Shop 


UNDER TOOKE'S 


COR. PEEL & ST. CATHERINE W. 


THOR MOTORCYCLES 


McNiece & Orchard 


774 St. Catherine St. West 


(Near Guy Street) 


LOYOLA COLLEGE TEAMS 
USE OUR HOCKEY STICKS 


BICYCLES 


Smart Clothes 
for Young Men 


$15 to $40. Less 10% to Loyola men 


CLOTHING 


DIDY 


MABERDASHERv 
Cor. St. Peter and Craig Streets 


| You Will Always Find 


BRENNAN'S 


Men's Furnishers 
and Hatters 


One Store Only 


Phone Up 3627 


4 PLEASE PATRONIZE ADVERTISERS AND MENTION "LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW" 


— 8 


The Nobby Things AT 


near 
Bleury 


Lounla College Keviem 


1918 MONTREAL, CANADA No. 4 


Address all communications to LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW, Sherbrooke Street W. 
Terms: One Dollar the Copy, Paper Bound; Two Dollars the Copy, Cloth Bound. 


A Subscription for Five Years: Five Dollars, the Paperbound Edition 
A Subscription for Five Years: Ten Dollars, the. Clothbound Edition 
All subscriptions will be gratefully received 


FIVE YEAR SUBSCRIPTIONS 


The Review's Editors will be especially gratified to receive Five Year Subscriptions. The name of 

each and every Five Year Subscriber will be listed in the Review itself and the publication sent to 

him or her for FIVE years. Itis the Review's ambition to have as soon as possible on its Circulation 

Lists every Old Loyola student and everyone who is interested in college affairs. A note or postcard 
to us will receive immediate attention 


Contents 


— ~ Раве 
Foreword Я 8 Е : M: : Е А : 11 
Our Five Year — ‘ : = Я 12 
The Year at Loyola : Р : ; Р s В я : 13 
Roll of Honour : Р : : : З : : 17 
То Loyola's Warrior Sons (бехаё) 3 > ; : 7 ‘ 7 23 
Lieutenant Edward P. Plunkett : : cue ; Е 3 24 
Captain Melvin Johnson Е : А s : : : : 28 
Corporal Stanton Hudson : 5 Я s Е я : 4 30 
Lieutenant John Wilkins Е э я 7 Е я 2 я 32 
Private Donald А. MacArthur. 3 à 3 7 Я . г 36 
Private Leo Shortall е 2 , j "T" : А : 38 
Lieutenant James B. Domville : : : 3 : А А 38 
Flight-Lieut. Arthur Dissette, R.N.A.S. . : . Я 2 й 40 
Captain Edward Dwyer . Е Е ; я г s х ; 40 
Lieutenant Henri de Varennes д 3 ; : ; Е : 42 
Lieutenant Guy Palardy : : Е . 2 : В я 42 
Letters from Ше Front . > 3 ; : : Я я 44 
The College and Ше Battlefield я Е 7 . 51 
Deceased Members of the Staff and Students of куле College : 54 
The Rev. Arthur E. Jones, S.J. s ; : а Р : 4 56 
Sodality B.V.M. . s А о : я ; : : ; 58 
Was Newman Successful? , Я г я : Е Е К 60 
Ireland, 1918 (Verse) . _. 7 : А * А я : 64 
Music . : : . : е : : 4 à 65 
Father O'Flynn (Vere) . 3 А к F - А А А 66 


Buying That Automobile с : : Е ; , : : 68 


6 LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


CONTENTS—continued 


| Page 

To My Mother (Verse) . < А А А : а А ; 70 
Graduating Class, 1918 . я ; я я i у : : 71 
Our Aryan Brotherhood . : А я : : * : : 72 
When I Thought I was a Poet E Я 5 : : ; ` 76 
Tears (Verse) А с Е E Е А : м : 77 
The House that Jack Built А З Е э : я : : 79 
School-Boy's Essay i ; я я : : : : : 80 
The Weekly Thunderstorm  . 4 3 ; 3 Е : à 82 
College Staff 1917-1918 . : А : А я Ра : 84 
A Generous Donation in Memoriam Р Д г 3 : : 84 
The Loyola Literary and Debating Society : j | ; : 85 
High School Literary and M apis Society ; ; Е ; : 85 
Class Chronicles. И я Е g Е : А Е 86 
College Athletics. А > А : 5 : А А А 92 
Field Day : 5 4 : Е А E M Е Ы 92 
Tennis . : ; : Е ? Е А : 3 : 92 
Football : : я 3 З й : е : A 94 
Hockey . : : 3 3 2 Е s s ? : 98 
Basket Ball . : Е е : е ; : : ? 100 
Base-ball : : Е я : OP х : 102 
Loyola Snowshoe Club я я Е х : са : Е 102 
Results of Field Day Events А r я 2 Е я я 105 


AEGE 


ine Pare Wool, 
IS NATURE’S COVERING 


Any doctor will tell you that the natural clothing which should be 
worn next the body is wool, because, in all seasons, it keeps the temperature 
of the body uniform—warm in winter and cool in summer. 

Men’s and Boys’ Jaeger Coat Sweaters may be had in various colours, 
made either with V neck or shawl collar. There are also Sweaters with roll 
collars, Cardigan Jackets, Spencers with sleeves, and Knitted Waistcoats 
with or without sleeves. 


There are also Jaeger Stockings with plain or fancy tops, Dressing 
Gowns, Lounge Jackets, Flannel Blazers, Ulsters, Collars, Belts, Shirts, 
Underwear, etc. 


JAEGER GOODS ARE DIFFERENT AND BETTER 


Retail Selling Agents for 
(Hiltons JAEGER PURE WOOL 
iced 326 ST. CATHERINE STREET W. 


(Opposite Goodwin's) 


PLEASE PATRONIZE ADVERTISERS AND MENTION *LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW" 


ORT FE "Hun туз S AS 


Toyo: 


Montre Co Canada 


4 


An English College under the direction of the Jesuit Fathers 


o The new Grounds and College Buildings are situated on Sher- 

Loc ation brooke St. West, in one of the choicest suburban sections of Mont- 
real—the location thus combining the healthfulness of the open 

country with the advantages of proximity to a great city. The 


electric cars passing the door every few minutes make the College easy of access from all parts of the city. 
'The Montreal West station of the Canadian Pacific Railway is a convenience to outside students. 


e e The new Buildings are very beautiful architecturally, being 

Buildin S types of English Collegiate Gothic. All Dormitories, Refectories, 

1 Class-Rooms, Recreation Halls, Smoking and Billiard Rooms are 

large and airy, hygienically arranged, and equipped with the most 
approved ventilating systems. 


The immense College Campus—nearly а half mile in circum- 

G ГО un ds ference—affords facilities for Baseball, Football and Field Games, 

as do Tennis Courts, a. Basket-Ball Field, and, in winter, an open 

‘air Rink, for other sports. Such games and outdoor exercise are 
encouraged and even insisted on. 


l.—The College Course, — to B.A., B.L. and 


C B.Sc. degrees. 
Ourses 2.—The High School Course. This Course, while 


embracing the 
subjects essential to a general education, prepares the student to enter the College Course proper, 
and, in general, for Matriculation into the Arts, Law, Medical, Engineering, or such courses of other 
Colleges or Universities. 


3.—The Preparatory Course, for young boys. 


Ask for Catalogue 


As the College is within Montreal—not Montreal West—address letters to 
Rev. Father Rector, Loyola College, Montreal 


PLEASE PATRONIZE ADVERTISERS AND MENTION *LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW" 


SUMMER FURS, 


COATEES, CAPES 
STOLES, SCARFS 


In all the Fashionable Furs 

and Combinations 
AT MODERATE PRICES 
C. & C. Models are exceed- 
ingly charming, attractive 
in design and exquisite in 
quality, specially designed 
to create individual distinc- 
tiveness. 


CUMMINGS 


& 


CUMMINGS 
St. Paul & St. Sulpice Sts. 


Rear of Notre Dame Church 


— J— 
Lorne 


LET YOUR NEXT SUIT BE A C. & C. 


C. & C. Custom-tailored Suits reflect the smartness and dash of style obtainable only in comfortable 


well made clothing. 
NOBBY COLLEGE SUITS 


The College Man has a reputation as a dashly dresser to uphold. He needs the careful service of 
expert tailors. It is because our tailors are perhaps the most skilled of their art—they tailor the 
intricate shell of our fur-lined coats—that C. & C. Made-to-Measure Suits owe their popularity 
among College Men. The latest styles, the newest patterns, await you here at moderate prices. 


CUMMINGS & CUMMINGS 


ST. PAUL & ST. SULPICE STREETS. Rear of Notre Dame Church. 


8 PLEASE PATRONIZE ADVERTISERS AND MENTION “LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW” 


LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


List of Mlustrations 


Lieutenant Edward P. Plunkett 

Captain Melvin Johnson 

Corporal Stanton Hudson 

Lieutenant John Wilkins 

Private Leo M. Shortall . 

Private Donald A. MacArthur . 
Lieutenant James de Beaujeu Domville 
Flight-Lieutenant Arthur Dissette 

Captain Edward Dwyer . 

Lieut.-Col. George J. Boyce, D.S. o. 
Lieutenant Guy Palardy 

Major-Adjutant George P. Vanier, M.C. 
Very Reverend William Power, S.J. 
Captain the Honourable Charles Gavan ouo: МС ME, 
The Reverend Arthur E. Jones, S.J. 

Old Loyola Boys awarded Military Cross . 
Views of the College я 

Refectory Building and Juniors' Building . 
Graduating Class, 1918 
Chapel—Students' Parlor—Boys' Billiard Room 
Boys' Dormitories and Refectory 
Refectory and Juniors' Building 

Editors of “ The Weekly Thunderstorm ” 
Orchestra and Mandolin Club 

Groups of Middle Division Boys and of Быланы — 
In the Chemistry Laboratory 

Corner of the Juniors' Building 

On the Tennis Courts 

Loyola at Ottawa 

Loyola College Campus 

Intermediate Football Team 

Senior Hockey Team, 1917-18 

Basket Ball Teams. 

Mr. “ Jack " McMartin . 


Facing 
Page 

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—— HU — — — 
тшшш шш CASE =z PTS EL ТТФ ТА 


507 ST. CATHERINE STREET WEST 


It is a pleasure to sell you 


Case Clothes 


e a urnishings 


rm 


because we know what great 
satisfaction they will bring. 
you. Quality and fair prices 
always dominating. 


— Brand Clothes 


9 4.D.50. 


шнш 


REGISTERED 


Fine Furs 


Manufacturing for three large stores enables us to give newer 
styles, better workmanship and better service, without added cost. 


Other Things Women Wear 


Our ready-to-wear garments are the best made. 
Individuality and character distinguish our 
ready-to-wear attire from all others. 


We invite you to come and see the things we sell, without obligation to purchase. 


Fairweathers, Limited 


St. Catherine Street at Peel 
Toronto MONTREAL Winnipeg 


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Й ацша College Meriem 


1918 г MONTREAL, CANADA No. 4 


Address all communications to LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW, Sherbrooke Street W. 
Terms: One Dollar the Copy, Paper Bound; Two Dollars the Copy, Cloth Bound. 


A Subscription for Five Years: Five Dollars, the Paperbound Edition 
A Subscription for Five Years: Ten Dollars, the Clothbound Edition 
All subscriptions will be gratefully received 


PIVE YEAR Ss 0 BS CREP ГО М5 
The Review's Editors will be especially gratified to receive Five Year Subscriptions. The name of 
each and every Five Year Subscriber will be listed in the Review itself and the publication sent to 
him or her for FIVE years. It is the Review's ambition to have as soon as possible on its Circulation 
Lists every Old Loyola student and everyone who is interested in college affairs. A note or postcard 
to us will receive immediate attention 


jf oreword 


Loyola College Review with this issue appears before the public for 
the fourth time. | 

The Review, therefore, is young. Like youth it is idealistic. It sees 
visions, and it dreams dreams,—it works from however afar off towards an 
ideal. It would be literary, it would be artistic, it would be interesting. 
But in these parlous times it dares not promise when this consummation 
will be fully realized. 

Experience, especially of this year, shows the Review the wisdom of 
not promising overmuch. The demands and alarms of war have played 
havoc with its ordinary staff and contributors. They have dropped the pen 
and seized the sword. A younger class of reserves had to be summoned— 
less weighty, more youthful articles are sometimes the result. 

The Editors trust their efforts will not make the judicious grieve. 
Conscious themselves of the Review's shortcomings, they would ask of all 
but especially of the critical and the hypercritical to allow for present 


conditions in passing judgments, recalling Pope’s lines: 


“ Whoever thinks a faultless piece to see, 
Thinks what ne'er was, nor is, nor e'er shall be." 


12 | LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


if 


OUR FIVE-YEAR SUBSCRIBERS 


The Review this year introduced a Five Year Subscription Plan, by which, as a result of 
the kind response of practically all who were asked to become Five Year Subscribers, its 
circulation has been greatly increased. By this Five Year Plan, the Review hopes in a few 
years to have on its circulation lists everyone who is even remotely interested in College 
affairs. 

To our Five Year Subscribers, whom it was possible to communicate with in the short 
period between the reception of Five Year Subscription forms and the date of going to press, 
the Review wishes to extend its most cordial thanks for their kind generosity, their encourage- 


ment, and their apparently indirect but very real support of Education. 


Following is the list, to date, of our Five Year Subscribers :— 


Mrs. E. C. Amos 
A. W. Anglin 


Toronto, Ont. 
Mrs. Guy Boyer 
Mrs. Cornelius Coughlin 
D. M. Coughlin 


James W. Domville 
Rosemere, Que. 


G. F. Griffith, M.D. 


Mrs. John J. Griffith 
Sherbrooke, Que. 


Hon. J. J. Guerin, M.D., C.M. 


John G. Hearn 
Quebec, Que. 


Lady Hingston 
Mrs. Walter Kavanagh | 
Miles Lonergan 

Quebec, Que. 
J. С. McCarthy, M.D. 
Mrs. John McMartin 
W. P. McVey 
Mrs. Catherine Meagher 
E. A. D. Morgan 
D. R. Murphy 
Ald Thos. O'Connell 


R. O'Leary 
Richibucto, N.B. 


H. E. Quinlan 
Leo O. Reynolds 


W. І. Scott 
Ottawa, Ont. 


Гога Shaughnessy 
Mrs. Charles F. Smith 
Mrs. N. A. Timmins 


Mrs. J. H. Walsh. 
Sherbrooke, Que. 


Capt. J. T. Walsh 

Mrs. S. Beaudin 

T. Charles Bermingham 
F. H. Carlin 


Rev. Robert J. Carse 
St. Charles, Ill. 


Mrs. E. F. Casey 
Miss Margaret Casey 
Mrs. M. Chevalier 

B. A. Conroy, M.D. 
G. W. Cook 

Mrs. J. T. Cuddy 
The Misses Cuddy 
E. R. Decary 

Mrs. E. Desbarats 

R. B. Dillon 


W. Roy Dillon, B.A. 
Ottawa, Ont. 


Richard Dissette 


Toronto, Ont. 
Michael Doheny 
John Donohue 
M. A. Downes 
Mrs. H. Duverger 


Mrs. M. H. Dwyer 
Halifax, N.S. 


G. W. Farrell 
Mrs. F. Feron 


John F. Geraghty 
New York 


H. R. Gray, M.D. 
Hon. Edmund Guerin 
Mrs. E. R. Gunning 
F. J. Hackett, M.D. 
Z. Hebert 


Mrs. A. J. Hudon 
Richmond, Que. 


W. J. Hushion 
Miss Patricia Irwin 
Mrs. J. E. Johnston 
I. L. Lafleur 

E. J. Laverty 

T. Laverty 


J. E. Lesage, M.D., M.P. 


R. W. Lovell 
Donald A. Macdonald 


Alexandria, Ont. 


A. G. McAuley, M.D. 
P. Е. McCaffrey 
Alex. D. McGillis 
Mrs. H. McLaughlin 


Rev. Corbett McRae 
Dickinson's Landing, Ont. 
Mrs. G. F. Maguire 
Quebec, Que. 
Peter N. Marien 


S. C. Marson 


Mrs. C, Martin 


Renfrew, Ont. 
J. L. D. Mason, M.D. 


H. J. Mayrand 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 


Mrs. Leila Morrison 


Mrs. P. Nadeau 
Port Daniel East, Que. 


M.. J. O'Brien, Jr. 
Renfrew, Ont. 


Maj. W. P. O'Brien 

Mrs. James O'Connor 

Mrs. C. W. Pearson 
‘Buckingham, Que. 

Mrs. C. A. Phelan 

F. H. Phelan 

J. T. Rogers, M.D. 

Mrs. F. J. Ryan 

Mrs. P. Ryan 

Miss Alice M. Sharp 


W. P. Shortall 
St. John's, N.F. 


Н. J. Tellier 


Pointe Claire, Que. 
Mrs. C. M. Thomson 
P. Vanier . 
Maurice Versailles 
J. C. Walsh, K.C. 
Mrs. A. S. Whitney 
Mrs. P. Wright 


LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 13 


The Bear at Lopola 


CHANGES IN THE FACULTY 


Rare, indeed, is the new school year that 
brings no change either in the administrative 
or the teaching staff of a Jesuit College. 
This year, chief among the appointments 
was that of a new Rector. Father Alexander 
Gagnieur, S.J., for the past years engaged 
in parish work at Guelph, Ontario, returned 
to the post he left four years ago, while 
Father Thomas MacMahon, S.J., whom 
Father Gagnieur relieved, has entered the 
Mission-field. We regret that ill-health 
obliged Father Gagnieur to abandon active 
work in the middle of December to seek rest 
at The Sanitarium of Gabriels, New York. 
During his absence, Father J. Milway 
Filion, S.J., who returned last August from 
England to teach Philosophy at Loyola, has 
been acting Rector as well. 

Father M. C. Malone, S.J., former Pre- 
fect of Studies, also by reason of impaired 
health has been ordered to a milder 
climate, and is now convalescing at Los 
Angeles, California (6634 Holywood Blvd.). 

Father A. J. Primeau, S.J., last year’s 
Bursar, is completing his study of the 
Institute of the Society at Poughkeepsie, 
N.Y. Father Thomas Gorman, S.J., left 
Loyola last November to do parish duty at 
Steelton, Ontario; Mr. J. I. Bergin, S.J., 
went to the English Scholasticate at Guelph 
as Professor of Rhetoric; Mr. W. S. Mc- 
Manus, S.J., began his theological studies 
at the College of the Immaculate Conception, 
Montreal. The vacancies thus made in the 
faculty were filled by Messrs. D. P. Cough- 
lin, S.J., and T. J. Lally, S.J., of St. Boniface 
College, Man., both former teachers at 
Loyola, Mr. P. J. McLellan, S.J., of the 
Immaculate Conception and Mr. F. C. 
Smith, S.J., of Guelph. Mr. Francis R. 
Burke is now teaching at Fordham Univer- 
sity, New York. 

As we are going to press, we are happy to 
welcome back from the battlefront Captain 
the Rev. William |Hingston, S.J., who 
accompanied the Irish Canadian Rangers 
overseas and has done service both in 


England and in France during the past 
eighteen months. Father Hingston will be: 
attached to the College. 


THE COLLEGE 


Despite the slight decrease in the roll of 
students, not unexpected under the stress of 
actual conditions, the scholastic year began 
auspiciously at Loyola, and progress charac- 
terizes it all along the line of College activi- 
ties. The interest aroused in dramatics by 
Father Filion, S.J., and the impetus given 
to the art of public speaking through the 
encouraged efforts of both the College and 
the High School Debating Societies, the 
organizing of the College orchestra by Mr. 
E. G. Bartlett, S.J., of the Choir and Glee 
Club under Prof. P. J. Shea, and of the Signal 
Dril Corps, have all supplied fresh and 
healthy interest leaving very little to be 
desired for the profitable use of time left 
free from the regular periods of class and 
study. It was no easy matter to assemble 
the required instruments for the orchestra 
and to train the players, but steady effort 
and faithful practice have accomplished the 
important task of making a good beginning 
in a difficult enterprise. 


FATHER FILION'S LAST VOWS 


The last covenant that binds a Jesuit 
irrevocably to his Order are the Final Vows 
pronounced after every stage of study and 
every term of probation has been satis- 
factorily completed. This solemn oblation 
Father Filion made publicly in the College 
Chapel on the day of our Lady's Purification, 
February 2nd, 1918. We take this oppor- 
tunity heartily to felicitate Father Filion on 
the significant event. 


FATHER BRADLEY'S FIRST MASS 


On Friday morning, May 17th, 1918, the 
College Chapel was privileged to witness the 
celebration of the first mass of Father George 
Bradley, S.J., former Loyola Professor who, 


14 LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


the day previous had been ordained priest 
by the Rt. Rev. Bishop Forbes. A large 
number of relatives, friends and old pupils of 
Father Bradley were present at the Mass 
and received individually the rich blessing 
which newly anointed hands alone have the 
power to give. The high esteem in which 
Father Bradley's old scholars held their 
Professor was attested by the number that 
were present to do him honor both at the 
ordination and the first Mass. To Father 
Bradley we extend our warmest congratula- 
tions and sincerest wishes that from his 
future labors in the ministry he may reap 
harvests a hundredfold. 


Of other quondam Professors and Pre- 
fects at Loyola, the Rev. J. I. d'Orsonnens, 
S.J., is Master of Novices at Sault-au- 
Recollet; Fr. Nicholas Quirk, S.J., is doing 
parish ministry at Guelph; and Fr. Jos. 
Leahy, S.J., is assistant to the Rector of the 
English Novitiate at Guelph. 


Fathers Louis Cotter, S.J., and Joseph 
McCarthy, S.J., are Chaplains at the General 
and the Royal Victoria Hospitals of 
Montreal respectively. 

Welcome news comes from Mr. Walter 
S. Gaynor, who is affectionately remembered 
by all for his devotedness as a teacher at 
Loyola, that he is finishing the second year 
of Theology at Valladolid in Spain, and has 
been raised to the Diaconate. 

Mr. Martin Murphy, another former 
master is now Principal of the Public School 
‘of Boissevain, Manitoba. 

Dr. William H. Atherton, Ph.D., one-time 
member of the Loyola Faculty, has recently 
been honored by two Catholic Universities. 
In recognition of valuable contributions to 
American and Canadian history, especially 


for his three scholarly volumes on the 
“ History of Montreal," the University of 
Laval has conferred upon Dr. Atherton the 
degree of Doctor of Literature, and Fordham 
University that of Doctor of Laws. 


EARLY DEPARTURE OF THE 
PHILOSOPHERS 


The recent Order-in-Council summoning 
those between the ages of nineteen and 
twenty-three to the colors, was promptly 
obeyed by Loyola students to whom it 
applied. It fell heaviest on the department 
of Philosophy. The course was hastened to a 
close, examinations were advanced and by 
Saturday, April 27th, all reported for service, 
although several were not yet nineteen. 
Before leaving the College a farewell ban- 
quet was tendered them by the Faculty. 
There were no tears shed; yet the close and 
cordial companionship of eight or more years 
could not be severed without some secret 
pangs of regret, the keener as the hope for 
the safe return of all from the battlefront is 
clouded with some degree of uncertainty. 
They go forth with the blessing of their 
Alma Mater and the fervent prayer of all 
that the God of battles will shield them and 
bring them back victorious. 

This year’s candidates for the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts are Rudolph Bernard, 
Gaston DeLisle, John A. Dixon, Joseph 
J. Ryan, Terence G. Walsh, Frederick 
V. Hudon, and W. Roy Dillon. 

E aa 

The Review gratefully acknowledges the 
generour kindness of Messrs. O’Brien and 
Doheny; A. W. Anglin, Esq., K.C., Toronto; 
R. E. Elliot, Esq; E. Desbarats, Esq; 
Messrs. Brodeur, Limited and Messrs. 
Roland Freres. 


Alumni Motes 


Owing to the general unrest and distrac- 
tion of the times and the departure of so 
many Loyola men for the battlefield, news 
from a large number of the old boys has not 
been easy to obtain. At the same time, that 
is the first thing all Alumni will look for on 
opening the “ Review," and sorely miss if 


none be given. We, therefore, beg and hope 
that every alumnus who reads this column 
will make it a point to send us, at an early 
opportunity, all the details he can about 
himself and any other old college associate 
he may be in touch with. He will thus do 
his part to satisfy the natural and laudable 


LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW | 15 


desire which all Loyola men, professors 
included, have to know where old com- 
rades and pupils are scattered in this wide 
world and what they are doing. 


1906 


1907 


After completing the usual period of 
teaching previous to the priesthood, 
Raymond Cloran, S.J., has begun his 
theological studies at the Immaculate 
Conception. 

It was with no little gratification 
that we saw John T. Hackett (B.L. 
106, B.C.L.), elected to the presidency 
of the distinguished St. Patrick's 
Society for the present year. In this 
capacity Hackett was one of the 
principal orators at the Victoria 
Monument on Empire Day. 


The congratulations of all Loyola men 
go out to the Hon. Charles Gavan 
Power, M.P., whom the last general 
elections returned to the Federal 
Parliament as Liberal Member for 
South Quebec. Inasmuch as Power 
is the first graduate from Loyola to 
attain the proud distinction, we have 
special cause for congratulations. 
That splendid success will attend 
“ Chubby's ” political career we have 
every reason to believe. ‘‘ Chubby " 
has it in him— 


“ The applause of listening senates to com- 
mand, А 
The threats of pain and ruin to despise.” 


The ‘ Toronto Globe" has this to 
say of him: 


“ The youngest member from Quebec, and 
incidentally the youngest on the Opposition 
side, is Charles Gavan Power of Quebec 
South. He is well known in sporting circles 
as “ Chubby" Power, a great Quebec 
hockey player. But he is more than that. 
He quit hockey when the war started and 
has gone '' over the top ” in France so many 
times that he has 22 wounds and the Military 
Cross. “ He is а true soldier ” said a fellow- 
citizen who knows him well. For his bravery 
on the battlefield he was decorated by the 
King at Buckingham Palace. He is the only 
returned soldier in the House who enlisted 
as a private, and he tells with great gusto 
how he used to black, or rather tan; the boots 
of Surgeon-General Guy Carleton Jones. 
“ Chubby " Power succeeds his father, Wm. 
Power, as member of Parliament. He is a 
lawyer and served for a while in the same 


1909 


1911 


1912 


1914 


1915 


1917 


office as Lucien Cannon of Dorchester by- 
election fame. Power has two brothers in the 
army and two brothers-in-law.” 


Captain Power, because of his 
brave record and long experience at 
the front, was recently invited by the 
American Knights of Columbus to 
tour the United States in order to 
speak at meetings in support of the 
great K.C. campaign to obtain funds 
for Army Huts at the front. Power 
immediately accepted the invitation. 


We are more than pleased to learn 
that John C. Wickham, M.D., who 
has been at the front from the be- 
ginning of the war, has within recent 
months been honored with the rank 
of Major. He expects to return to 
Canada on a three months leave be- 
fore the year is out. 


On November 20th, 1917, wedding 
bells rang for Leon Mercier 
Gouin, the son of Sir Lomer, when he 
led to the altar Miss Yvette Ollivier 
of Quebec. The marriage was 
blessed in the Church of St. Jean 
Baptiste by Rev. Father Gouin, the 
bridegroom's uncle. May Mercier's 
wedded life be long and happy. 
Bernard McCullough, S.J., who is 
member of the New York Province of 
the Society of Jesus, is studying 
philosophy at Woodstock College in 
‘Maryland. | 


After having left McGill, Bernard 
McTeigue has been connected with 
the Whalen Pulp & Paper Co., at 
Vancouver, B.C. If latest rumors are 
true, ‘‘ Barney " has joined the colors. 


On Whit Saturday Joseph O’Hagan, . 
who is completing his studies pre- 
paratory for the priesthood at the 
Grand Seminary, was | ordained 
deacon by Archbishop Bruchesi. 


The legal profession beckoned smil- 
ingly to most of last year’s graduates, 
of whom Frank McGillis, Richard 


16 


LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


Dooner, John Gallery and Maurice 
Versailles have finished their first 
year at McGill University. Frank 
Bussiere is also studying Law. 


John Cuddy is in Engineering at 
McGill. Paul Sentenne is holding a 
promising position in the Angus 
Work Shops of the Canadian Pacific, 
and Eugene Audet has taken special 
interest in farming. Gordon Carlin 
and Edward Duckett are at the front. 


Versailles, we are happy to chron- 
icle, attained first rank honors at 
McGill, winning, besides the seventy- 
five dollar scholarship, first prize for 
Roman Law. Cuddy passed with 


high distinction in the department of. 


Applied Sciences, having attained first 
honors in six out of eight subjects, 
and second honors in the remaining 
two. We heartily congratulate both 
Versailles and Cuddy. 


O.L. 1896 Capt. Armand Chevalier, pay- 


master of the 22nd Battalion, has 
lately returned on leave from 
headquarters in Westminster, 
London. 


Francis J. McGue has lately re- 
ceived appointment as Registrar 
in the Department of Finance, 
and is also representative for the 
“ Gazette," in Quebec City. 


O.L. 1898 The 


O.L. 


O.L. 


O.L. 


O.L. 


1900 


1903 


1907 


1909 


Rev. Thomas Kearney, 
C.S.C., is Professor of Literature 
at St. Laurent College. We were 
pleased to receive a visit from 
him on the occasion of the High 
School Debate. ` 


Lieut. Harold Hingston having 
returned from the front is mili- 
tary instructor at one of the camps 
in Connecticut, U.S.A. 


Major George Boyce has been 


recently promoted to the rank of 


Lieutenant-Colonel and has re-. 
ceived the D.S.O. He is to be 
married in Dublin this summer. 
Congratulations and best wishes! 


Father James Flood is laboring 
zealously and successfully as 
assistant to Fr. Donnelly in 
St. Anthony’s Parish, Montreal. 


Rev. Thomas J. Brady is doing 
successful work as curate of St. 
Thomas Aquinas in Astorville, 
diocese of Pembroke, Ont. 


Preparing for the priesthood at 
the Grand Seminary are Thos. 
Bracken and Wilfrid O’Kane. 


John Fitzgerald, who until re- 
cently held the post of Secretary 
for the Sherbrooke Board of 
Trade, has resigned that position 
to become Manager of the Cana- 
dian Merchant Protective As- 
sociation, in Montreal. 


Mie n mmm im m i m i m m m Ж 


| ot Rall- uf- onor æ | 


a a D TN 


Killed 


CAPTAIN EDWARD DWYER 

CAPTAIN MELVIN JOHNSON 
CAPTAIN FRANCIS MAGUIRE, D.S.O. 
CAPTAIN ARTHUR McGOVERN 
CAPTAIN JOHN P. WALSH 
LIEUTENANT HENRI DE VARENNES 
LIEUTENANT ARTHUR DISSETTE, Croix de Guerre 
LIEUTENANT JAMES DOMVILLE 
LIEUTENANT JAMES GRANT 
LIEUTENANT JOHN HOWE 
LIEUTENANT FRASER MACDONALD 
LIEUTENANT FRANCIS McGEE 
LIEUTENANT GUY PALARDY 
LIEUTENANT EDWARD PLUNKETT 
LIEUTENANT WILFRID SULLIVAN 
LIEUTENANT JOHN WILKINS 
LIEUTENANT MAURICE VIDAL 
SERGEANT-MAJOR GREGORY NAGLE 
CORPORAL STANTON HUDSON, M.M. 
CORPORAL ADRIAN McKENNA 

PTE. HERBERT BUTLER 

PTE. LEO LE BOUTILLIER, D.C.M. 
PTE. DONALD MacARTHUR 

PTE. LEO SHORTALL 


Wounded 


LIEUTENANT-COLONEL GEORGE J. BOYCE, D. 5. О. 
CAPTAIN UBERTO CASGRAIN 
CAPTAIN PHILIPPE CHEVALIER 
CAPTAIN WILLIAM MORGAN, M.C. 
CAPTAIN RENE REDMOND 
CAPTAIN RAYMOND RYAN$ 
CAPTAIN GEORGE VANIER, M.C., Cross of the Legion of Honor 
‘CAPTAIN CHARLES POWER, M.C. 
LIEUTENANT deGASPE AUDETTE 
LIEUTENANT ERNEST DONNELLY 
LIEUTENANT GERALD FINCH 
LIEUTENANT HAROLD HINGSTON 
LIEUTENANT AUSTIN LATCHFORD 
LIEUTENANT ALAIN MacDONALD 
LIEUTENANT CHARLES O'LEARY 
LIEUTENANT GUSTAVE RAINVILLE 
LIEUTENANT STUART ROLLAND 
LIEUTENANT VICTOR WALSH 
SERGEANT THADDEUS ARMSTRONG 
SERGEANT GEOFFREY MERRILL 

§ Returned to Canada 


18 


The following list of former Loyola students now serving with the colours is unavoidably. 
incomplete, and, no doubt, inaccurate in many details. Information concerning any Old Boys 


LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


PATRICK COUGHLIN (Rank unknown) 
HAROLD COYLE (Rank unknown) 
HARRY KELLY (Rank unknown) 
JOHN LUNNEY (Rank unknown) 
ROGER LELIEVRE (Rank unknown) 
ARTHUR SAUVE (Rank unknown) 
PETER THORNTON (Rank unknown) 
DRIVER FREDERICK DE ZOUCHE 


Missing 
AUGUSTUS LAW 


Distinguished Service Order 


LIEUTENANT-COLONEL GEORGE J. BOYCE 
CAPTAIN JOHN JENKINS 
CAPTAIN FRANCIS MAGUIRE 


Military Cross 


CAPTAIN CHARLES POWER 
CAPTAIN GEORGE VANIER 
CAPTAIN FREDERICK O'LEARY 
CAPTAIN HARRY O’LEARY 
CAPTAIN WILLIAM MORGAN 
CAPTAIN RODERICK WATT 


Military Medal 
CORPORAL STANTON HUDSON 


Distinguished Conduct Medal 
PTE. LEO LE BOUTILLIER 


Cross of the Legion of Honor 
CAPTAIN GEORGE VANIER 


Croix de Guerre 


FLIGHT-LIEUTENANT ARTHUR DISSETTE 


O.L. ON ACTIVE SERVICE 


in the army will be gratefully received by the Editors of the Review. 


Amos, Edward 
Armstrong 


1905 Motor Boat Squadron. 
1906 Lieut., 4th Batt. (Wounded). 


Audette, de Gaspe, M.C. 1911  Lieut., 21st Batt. 


Babin, Harold 
Bauset, Jules 
Bauset, Paul 
Beck, Austin 
Beck, Cyril 
Beique, Victor 


1907 5th University Corps. 


1906 Sergt., 16th Squadron, R.A.S. att. cl. 


1910 Lieut., 10th Reserve Batt. 
1907 
1907 
1898 Capt., 22nd Batt. Can. Frs, 


LOYOLA 


Belleau, Joseph 1911 
Belleau, Paul 1901 
Blanchette, Maurice 1907 
Bonnard, Daniel 1901 
Bordeau, Harold 1905 
Bouchette, Robert 1910 
Bouthiller, Charles 1906 
Boyce, George J. 1900 
1 Boyer, Guy 

Brais, Joseph 1907 
T Brannen, John 

Brodeur, Paul 1909 
Browne, Bashford 1909 
Brown, James Р. 1903 
Burke, M. T. (B.A. 1908) 1896 
Butler, Herbert 1911 
і Calder, Robert 

Carlin Gordon 1907 
Carpenter, Cecil 1909 
Casgrain, Uberto 1896 
Castle, Raymond 1910 
Chevalier, Armand 1896 
Chevalier, Philippe 1896 
Chevalier, Pierre 1896 
Clarke, James 1899 
Cogels, Hubert 1913 
Conroy, Emmet 1906 
Cook, Benedict 1909 
Cooke, Vincent 1909 
Coughlin, Cornelius 1909 


Coughlin, John M. (B.A. 1916) 


Coughlin, Patrick 

Coughlin, Robert (B.Sc. 1916) 1908 
Coyle, Harold 1897 
Dandurand, Hervé 1914 
Davis, William 1902 
Davis, Harold Е. (B.A. 1912) 1903 
Davis, Harry 1902 
Delisle, Gaston 1910 
Desbarats, Edward 1905 
Dissette, Arthur C. 1901 
Doheney Clarence 1905 
Domville, James 1907 
Donnelly Ernest 1898 
Doody, Edmund 1910 
Doran, John 1903 
Duckett, J. Edward (B.A. 1917) 
Drury, John 1911 
Dwyer, Edward 1898 
Farley, Howard 1911 
Farrell, Robert B. 1898 
Fawcett, Rev. Charles 1896 


COLLEGE REVIEW 19- 
Capt., Interpreter, H.Q., London. 


Lieutenant. 

R.A.F. 

Mich.—Wisc. Regt., U.S. Army. 

R.A.F. 

Capt., 5th Can. Mounted Rifles. 

Lieut.-Col., D.S.O., No. 1 Field Ambulance, C.A.M.C. 
Major, 22nd Batt. $ 

C.A.M.C. 

Capt., R.A.M.C. 


R.C.H.A.S. 

Gunner, No. 7 Can. Siege Battery. 
Lieut., C.G.A. 

2nd University Corps, P.P.C.L.I. (Killed in action). 
Major. 

R.A.F. 

13th Siege Battery, C.F.A. (att'd) 
Capt., C.A.M.C. (Wounded). 
Lieut, 50th Battery, C.F.A. 

Capt., 22nd Batt. $ 

Capt., 163rd (Wounded). 

Lieut., 22nd (Wounded). 

Capt., 13th Field Ambulance, C.A.M.C. 
Belgian Army. ; 
R.A.F. 

66th Battery, C.F.A. 

C.F.A. 

R.A.F. 

R.A.F. 10th Can. Siege. 
(Wounded). 

10th Can. Siege (Wounded) 
(Wounded). 

American Army, Interpreter. 
Lieut. 


Capt., Amm. Col. 

R.A.F. 

Lieut. R.A.S. (Prisoner of War). 
Lieut. R.N.A.S. (Killed). 
Lieut., Artillery. 

Lieut., R.A.F. 

Lieut, 42nd. (Wounded). 

648th Co. M.T., A.S.C, 

82nd. 

Lieut., 288th. 

R.A.F. 

Capt., 85th N.S. Highlanders (Killed). 
Cyclist Corps. s 
Lieut. 

Capt., Chaplain. 


{English Course, St. Mary's. $ Returned to Canada. 


20 LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


Finch, Gerald 
Fletcher, Adrian 

T Furlong, Gerald 
Galligan, John 
Galvin, Roy 
Grant, James 
Griffith, Gerald (B.A. 1910) 
Grimes, Ernest 
Grimes, John 
Hanna, Roy 
Harwood, Roderick 
Hately, Edgar 
Hayes, Murray 
Hennessy, Richard 
Hingston, Basil 

f Hingston, Donald 
Hingston, Harold 
Holland, John 
Hofner, L. 

Hudon, Frederick 
Hudson, Stanton, M.M. 
Hughes, Stanley 
Jenkins, John, D.S.O. 
Johnson, John 
Johnson, Melville 
Kavanagh, Walter 
Kearney, John D. 
Kelly, Burrows 
Kelly, Harry 
Kennedy, Ambrose 
Kiely, A. 
Lachapelle, Pascal 
Lafontaine, Jean 
Lahey, Charles 
Latchford, Austin 
Latchford, James 
Law, Adrian 

Law, Augustus 


Le Boutillier, Leo, D.C.M. 


Leitch, St. Claire 
Lelievre, Roger 
Lemieux, Rodolphe 
Lessard, A. 

Lunney, John 

Lynch, Leo (B. Sc., 1908) 
Lynch, Thomas 
Macarow, Philip 
MacArthur, Donald 
MacAsham, John 
MacDonald, Alain de L. 
Macdonald, Fraser 
Macdonald, Hubert 


1 English Course, St. Mary's. 


1905 
1901 


1906 
1916 
1908 
1903 
1909 
1909 
1910 
1909 
1904 
1912 
1904 
1896 
1896 
1898 
1908 
1912 
1908 
1907 
1909 
1904 
1896 
1903 
1905 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1915 
1905 
1915 
1911 
1913 
1908 
1908 
1897 
1897 
1907 
1909 
1907 
1896 


1897 
1901 
1902 
1908 
1903 
1908 
1897 
1906 
1909 


Lieut., 13th (Wounded). 
Lieut., 207th. 

Capt., 24th. 

Capt., C.A.M.C. 


Lieut., 102nd (Killed). 

Capt: R. A. M.C.S. 

Gunner, 4th Canadian Divisional. 
Gunner, 4th Canadian Divisional. 
148th Medical. 

Lieut., 50th Batt. 

R.A.F. 

74th Battery. 

3rd Overseas Siege Battery. 
Lieut., 24th Batt. 

Capt., C.A.M.C.§ 

Lieut,. 60th (Wounded). 

R.A.F. 

R.A.F. 

R.A.F. 

87th (Killed). 

3rd Overseas Siege Artillery. 
Lieut.-Col., C.A.M.C. 


Capt., 5th Mounted Rifles (Killed). 
Lieut. 

Lieut., 25th Battery, C.F.A. 
R.A.F. 

38th (Wounded). 

29th Battery, C.F.A. 

R.A.F. 

R.A.F. 

Lieut., 163rd. 

54th Battery, C.F.A. 

Capt., Artillery (Wounded). 
Lieut. 

Capt., Imperial Army. 

C.M.R. (Missing). 

24th (Killed in action). 
10th Can. Siege Artillery. 
22nd (Wounded). 

Lieut., 258th. 

1st Div. Supply Col., C.A.S.C. 
(Wounded). 

No. 5 Co., Div. Supply Col., C.A.S.C. 


Intelligence Dept., Naval Service. 
(Killed). 

U.S. Navy. 

Lieut. 163rd (Wounded). 

Lieut. 77th (Killed). 

6th Can. Reserve Batt. 


$ Returned to Canada. 


LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


Masson, Adrian 

Magann, Allan 

Magann, George (Mentioned . 
in desp.) 

Maguire, Francis (B.A. 1907) 

Maher, Henry 

Mahon, Arthur J. 

Marks, William 

Martin, Alfred 

McAnulty, Clifford 

McCaffrey, Maurice 

McCallum, Harold 

McCarthy, Edward 

McCool, Justin 

McCool, Joseph 

McCullough, George 

McDonald, Dawson 

McDonald, Somerled 


1915 
1905 
1905 


1899 
1912 
1912 
1910 
1911 
1913 
1903 
1913 
1905 
1898 
1898 
1903 
1903 
1906 


McEachen, Ronald (B. Sc. 1914) 1907 


1 McGee, Francis 
McGillis, Francis (B.A. 1917) 


McGovern, Arthur (B.A. 1909) 1903 


McGovern, Thomas 
McKenna, Adrian 
McKenna, Ernest 
McKenna, Philip 
McKeown, Leo 
McKenzie, Francis 
McKenzie, Vincent 
McLaughlin, Henry 
McLaughlin, John 
McMartin, John 
Merrill, Geoffrey 
Merrill, Walter 
Millard, Ellis 
Millard, Francis 


Milloy, John 
Milloy, Martin S. 
Mitchell, Alfred 
Monsarrat, Louis 
Moore, Arthur 
Moore, Francis 
Morgan, William, M.C. 
. Mulligan, Louis 
Murphy, E. Grimes 
Murphy, Neil 
Murphy, Pierce 
Nagle, Gregory 
Noonan, George 
Noonan, Gerard M. 
Noonan, Thomas F. 

1 English Course, St. Mary's. 


1903 
1905 
1898 
1906 
1912 
1906 
1906 
1908 
1908 
1907 
1904 
1900 
1906 
1902 


1896 
1896 
1912 
1905 
1912 
1912 
1910 
1899 
1910 
1904 
1907 
1903 
1910 
1910 
1910 


R.A.F. 
Capt., Gen. Staff. 


Capt., 2nd Batt. (Killed). 
4th Amm. Col. 

' C " Battery, R.C.H.A. 
R.A.F. 

79th Battery. 

R.A.F. 

R.A.F. 


74th Battery, Ottawa. 
C.A.S.C. 

4th Can. Ry. Troops. 
R.A.F. 

R.A.F. 

R.A.F. 


Lieut. (Killed in action). 
R.A.F. 

Capt., 28th (Killed in action). 
Lieut. “ С” Batt, R.C.H.A. 


Corporal, 24th (Killed in action). 


Lieut., 60th. 
R.A.F. 
R.A.F. 


66th Siege Artillery. 
79th Battery, C.F.A. 
R.A.F. 

Sgt., Artillery (Gassed). 
Lieut., R.A.F. 

R.C.H.A. 


> 


2l 


Lieut., No. 8 Can. Gen. Hosp., B.E.F., (Mentioned in 


despatches). 
Lieut., 4th Batt., C.G.R. 
79th Battery. 
Capt., 198th. 
R.C.H.A. 
5th Siege Artillery. 
5th Siege Artillery. 
Capt., 22nd Batt. 
R.A.F. 
Lieut., C.F.A. 
Lieut., R.A.F. 
74th Battery, Ottawa. 
Sgt.-Major, 3rd Batt. (Killed). 
R.A.F., U.S. Army. 
Lieut., U.S.A. Aviator. 
Lieut, U.S.A. Aviator. 


22 LOYOLA “COLLEGE REVIEW 


Noonan, Wilfred 
O'Boyle, Desmond 
O’Connell, Desmond 
O'Connell, Maurice 
O’Connor, C. 
O’Connor, James 
O'Gallagher, Dermott 
Ogier d'Ivry, Gaetan 
O’Gorman, Gerald 
O’Leary, Charles 
O'Leary, Frederick, M.C. 
O'Leary, Harry, M.C. 


Owens, Sargent T. (B.A. 1908) 


Palardy, Guy 
Panet, Henri de L. 
Perodeau, Horace 
Phelan, Arthur 
Phelan, Charles 
Phillips, John 
Plunkett, Edward 


Poirier, Charles E. (B.A. 1916) 


Poupore, Loyola 


Power, Charles G. (B.A. 1907) 


Power, Joseph 
Pridham, Alexander 
Quinn, Kevin 
Rainboth, Ernest 
Rainville, Gustavus 
Redmond, Rene 
T Rogers, James : 
Rolland, Francis 
Rolland, Stuart 
Roy, Rouer 
Ryan, Joseph J. 
Ryan Raymond 
Ryan, Roderick 
Sauve, Arthur 
Scott, Walter 
Shortall, Leo 
Spelman, James 
Steben, Murray 
Sullivan, Arthur 
. T Sullivan, Wilfrid 
Sutcliffe, Stanley 
Tellier, Antoine 
Terroux, Arthur 
Thompson, Leslie C. 
Thornton, Peter 
Timmins, M. J. 
Turenne (de) Aimar Auzias 
Varennes (de) Henri 
Vidal, Maurice 


1 English Course, St. Mary's. 


1909 
1906 
1913 
1913 


1898 
1906 
1906 
1903 


1897 
1909 
1896 
1916 
1905 
1907 
1908 
1912 
1912 
1910 
1914 
1908 
1897 
1897 
1908 
1908 
1906 
1903 
1898 


1911 
1899 
1910 
1907 
1898 
1906 
1910 
1908 
1913 
1911 
1897 
1896 


1900 
1913 
1909 
1897 
1906 
1908 
1901 
1905 
1908 


R.A.F. 


R.A.F. 

Lieut., 14th R.M.R. 

Lieut., 33rd. 

2nd Lieut., 168 Brig., R.F.A. 

Lieut., 24th Batt. 

Lieut., 10th Can. Railway Troops (Wounded). 
Capt., 11th Tr. Mortar Batt. 

Capt., 48th Highlanders. 

Lieut., 207th. | 

Lieut., R.A.F. (Killed). 

Lieut., 100th Field Co'y., Royal Engineers. 
Lieut., R.A.F. 

9th Brigade, Amm. Col. 

“С” Battery, R.C.H.A. 

R.A.F. ; 

Lieut., 50th Batt., С.Е.А. (Killed). 

Wag. Sup. Co., 12 F.A.—A.E.F. 

R.A.F. 

Capt. 3rd Batt. (Wounded). 

Lieut., 2nd Batt. 


R.A.F. 

77th. 

Lieut., C.A.S.C. 

Capt., 60th (Wounded), 

Capt., C.A.M.C. 

Sub. Lieut., Imp. Army. 

24th Batt., C.E.F. (Wounded). 
Royal Naval College. 

R.A.F. | 
Capt., 13th Battery (Wounded). $ 
Capt., Can. Engineers. 
(Wounded). 

42nd. 

1st Newfoundland (Killed). 
American Navy. 

5th Pioneers. 


Major, 43rd Cameron Highlanders of Can. (Killed). 
Lieut., 43rd Cameron Highlanders of Can. (Killed). 


R.A.F. 

68th Siege Battery. 
Sgt., 68th. 

Major, 257th. 
(Wounded). 

R.A.F. 

C.F.A. (Wounded). 
Lieut., 22nd (Killed). 
Lieut., C.F.A. (Killed). 


$ Returned to Canada. 


LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


Vanier, George P. (B.A., 1906) 1897 Capt., 22nd. 


M.C., Legion of Honor 
Walsh, Terence G. 
Walsh, J. P. (B.A., 1904) 
Walsh, Victor 
Watt, Roderick, M.C. 


1910 R.A.F. 

1896 Capt., C.A.M.C. (Killed). 
1904 . Adj., R.A.F. (Wounded). 
1907 Capt., Div. Amm. Col. 


Wickham, John C. (B.A., 1909) 1901 Major, C.A.M.C. 


Wilkins, John 

Wilkins, Lionel 

Wilson, Laurence 

Wolfe, John P. 

Wolff, Conrad (B.L., 1911) 
Zouche (de) Frederick C. 


1906 Lieut, 23rd (Killed). 
1904 Lieut. 

1905 105th Brigade, R.F.A. 
1914 “С” Battery, R.C.H.A. 
1901 Lieut., C.A.M.C. 

1907 C.A.S.C. (Wounded). 


KG DA 


TO LOYOLA'S WARRIOR SONS 


Champions of Right, of Freedom blest, 
Hero-Alumni, Loyola's best, 

Who strike to give Ambition pause, 
Who bleed for Sacred Human Laws, 


. On God of Hosts be your reliance 


For defence and not defiance. 


When you heard the clarion call, 

You faltered not but gave your all, 
Recking not what might befall. 

Wounds, grim Death ye held light price, 
So you helped to save from thrall 
World-Freedom by your sacrifice. 


Over Flanders’ shell-torn leas, 

Unawed by shock and roar of guns; 
Midst perils of the many seas, 

Where a lurking enemy shuns 

Manly fray; on fitful breeze , 

Where eagle-wings you spread with ease, 
ALMA MATER, still your guide, 

Is by you, thrilled with parent's pride. 


Her Honour’s writ upon your front, 
Let it gleam in battle’s brunt. 
Emulate your fallen brothers, 

And aim beyond the mark of others. 


And you! who nobly fought your last, 
And died for Justice’s Vindication, 
Sleep till called by Gabriel's blast 

To VICTORY'S Eternal Jubilation. 


23 


24 LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


LIEUTENANT EDWARD P. PLUNKETT 


Great sorrow was felt by his many friends, 
when the news ‘ Killed Somewhere in 
France,’’ was received concerning Edward 
Patrick Plunkett, eldest son of Mr. S. J. 
Plunkett, Manager of the Bank of Mont- 
Born at Moncton, 
N.B., he received his. early education at 


real, at Almonte, Ont. 


Van Buren College, Edmundston, N.B., and, 


came to Loyola in 1910. “ Ned " remained 
with us for years during which time he made 
a very successful High School course; pro- 
fessors still remember the genial, unselfish 
boy, conspicuous for leadership in the class- 
room and good sportsmanship in all games. 
Subsequent to his leaving Loyola, he matri- 
culated from the High School at Almonte, 
Ont. 

Heeding his Country's Call to Arms, he 
enlisted in the Royal School of Artillery at 
Kingston, being attached to Ше“ Queen's ”’ 
Battery ; then, having passed his Lieutenancy 
examination, he left for Petewawa Camp. 
The fact that he was on the firing line in 


less than three weeks after his arrival, is · 


proof of his ability as an Officer. 

Fellow officers and others, who spent 
long months with him at the Front, are 
unanimous in ascribing to him continual 
cheerfulness under trial, the greatest un- 
selfishness and an undying devotion to his 
men. Even-tempered, willing, £enerous, he 
was always optimistic, had a cheering word 
for everybody and, though young in years— 
he was scarcely twenty—he possessed а 
sureness of judgment and a coolness of 
determination which would have done credit 
to a more advanced age than his. His 
companions testify that constant associa- 
tion with him only served to heighten their 
esteem for the dauntless youth still in his 
teens. 

Before making the Supreme Sacrifice, he 
Һай several narrow escapes, being once 
wounded. He had already gone through 
the offensive at the Somme and had parti- 
cipated in the preparations for Vimy Ridge 
Offensive as well as the strenuous days 


A few 
months before his death, he was recom- 


following that glorious victory. 


mended for the Military Cross for his fine 
work on an advance, when he went up with 
the infantry to the last objective and there 
established and kept up communications. 

The 16th of June, 1917, was destined to be 
his last day. Those who knew Ned were not 
surprised to hear that he met his death while 
venturing on a perilous act of charity. The 
official report of his death, received from 
Military Headquarters at Ottawa, reads as 
follows: 


“ During the forenoon of July 16th, 1917, two 
mess-waiters were wounded by shell-fire and were · 
brought under cover. Lieut. Plunkett went out 
himself to get some water for them, when another 
shell fell, killing him instantly." 


It is worthy of note that it was Lieut. 
Plunkett himself who carried in the two 
wounded:men and who insisted on going 
out to procure them water, an act of devotion 
which cost him his life. This heedlessness 
of risk was characteristic of a young man, 
who, always a devout Catholic, had shown an 
unfailing loyalty to his Church and his 
relidious practices, and who was conse- 
quently so well prepared to meet his Creator. 

His burial is thus described by a fellow 
lieutenant in a letter to Mr. Plunkett. 


* His funeral was very impressive. Enclosed in a 
coffin wrapped with the Union Jack, a wreath of wild 
flowers above, his body was drawn on a gun-carriage, 
pulled by six beautiful black horses to the Military 
Cemetery, some distance away. Over fifty officers 
and men of the Brigade and Battery followed the 
body to the grave, including the acting Divisional 
Artillery Commander. Father Fortier read an 
impressive service and the body was tenderly 
lowered to its last resting place, while many sad 
hearts looked on. "There's an empty place in the 
Battery and an empty chair in our Mess, but our 
hearts are full, and he will always be in our memory, 
for we always appreciated him as a friend. It may 
please you to know that, as one man loves another, 
your son was loved by us. I feel quite justified in 
saying that no fellow ever gave his energy and life 
more nobly in a cause for the success of which the 
whole civilized world is praying." 


Lieut. Plunkett is survived by his parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Plunkett, a sister and 
two brothers. To his sorrowing parents 
Loyola College extends its sincere sympathy 
in the loss of so worthy a son. 


RIY, 


ail 
— 


LIEUTENANT EDWARD E. PLUNKETT, 
19th Battery. 


Killed in action, June 16th, 1917. 
Old Loyola, 1910. - 


26 LOYOLA COLEEGE REVIEW 


FROM LIEUTENANT PLUNKETT 
(HIS VOYAGE ACROSS) 


July 30th, 1916. 

We are still at sea but are steaming rapidly past 
the coast of Ireland. We have not had all the 
pleasures one might enjoy on such an ocean voyage 
in the piping times of peace, as there is a certain 
excitement and nervous tension which would be 
lacking at other times. Dodging the submarines is 
quite a game; we on board are completely in the 
dark, but the Admiralty and ship officers seem to 
know the game thoroughly. 

We kept out of sight of everything until yesterday 
when we passed a neutral ship, and to-day we are 
surrounded by British destroyers. At times in our 
course, at least in the danger zone, we zig-zag to 
fool some wandering torpedo and when turning, we 
list far over to one side. It has been foggy ever since 
we left Canada, and while that hid us from view of 
the German submarines, yet-we were not able to 
make such good time; we should have arrived this 
morning. In spite of the fog, we followed a fairly 
good pace; our best day’s run was, I think, 530 miles. 


France, September 29th, 1916. 


I wish you could see some of the sights I've 
witnessed, for instance, that of seeing a squadron of 
aeroplanes start out on a raid. There are always a 
dozen or so overhead and as to balloons—well, the 
French have as many as thirty up all the time. They 
are used for observation of course and are anchored 
to a truck, upon which is a windlass and they can 
thus be moved about quite easily. Р 

Rather an amusing incident occurred this morning. 
Doc. Freeman, the Battery cook, saw three men 
coming along the road, one of them being old, hatless 
and wearing a “ slicker.” Doc. called out '' Hello, 
old Timer, how would a cup of tea go?" The old 
fellow replied: “ By Jove, I would like a cup of tea! " 
So Doc. gave him some tea in an old tin used for 
condensed milk. He nearly fell dead from fright 
when the old fellow took off his coat and disclosed 
himself as a Staff Colonel. No wonder the Imperials 
think we are a bit free and easy! 


France, September 29th, 1916. 


I am living in a fine dug-out, but it is not shell-proof 
like the one I had previously. That one was forty or 
more feet deep and cut in solid chalk, with a little 
narrow stair, just large enough to crawl through; 
it was of German make, quite safe but rather stuffy. 
Necessity is the mother of invention; as proof of this, 
to-day our men made a stove out of a heavy, sheet- 
iron oil tin and stove-pipes out of eight cartridge 
cases (brass ones), all fitted together. 

One of our officers is away up forward with one 
gun. Last night his rations were put in a bag and 
left outside for the man who was to take them up. 
When the man came, he saw two bags, carelessly 
picked up one only, and went off to deliver his goods. 
When Mr. Morse opened his ration bag, he found 
18 tins of ‘‘ Bully Beef ” and nothing else. He was a 
bit peeved. 

France, October 3rd, 1916 


London is not the only place I’ve been lost in. 
Only the other day I went across about two hundred 
yards and on returning, I got completely lost; I 
started falling into shell-holes and trenches. Finally 
I found my way, but it gave me a scare; I was afraid 
I was heading towards Germany. 

Yesterday Ed. Cassitt and I, seeing a dozen rails 
lying idle, decided they would do no harm—and 
perhaps some good—on the roof of our dug-out. So 
we carried them over and placed them along, that is 
to say, we began to do so. We were just dropping 
our fifth rail on the roof when whiz! I heard a shell 
and thought she seemed coming straight towards 
the back of my neck. I dropped the rail and jumped 


sideways off the roof; my end, being suddenly 
dropped, nearly knocked him over. We picked our- 
selves up and whiz-bang!! just where the pile of 
rails had been. I dodged and was quite well sheltered 
from splinters by the mound of earth under which 
we sleep. As I dodged I saw Ed. grab off his tin hat— 
I don’t know why—and then the concussion caught 
him and tumbled him over backwards. We stayed 
under cover for a while and then congratulated our- 
selves that we got only a few “ strays.” 

Speaking about ' Tanks," I may say they are 
certainly wonderful. One stopped for breakfast this 
A.M. on the road near us. A Hun and a Tommy 
going back in an ambulance got talking, as the 
Boche spoke English. Tommy mentioned the fact 
that they had taken the trench that they were after, 
that very morning. Fritz admitted the fact but stated 
that his friend, the enemy, was obliged to come over 
in a taxi in order to do it. Well, itis surely some ‘bus. 


France, October 26th, 1916. 


Being wet for hours sometimes seems to be part 
of the work; c’est la guerre! There are only the 
captain, one subaltern and myself left at the guns, 
so we are a bit short on time and long on work. I 
have a tough little pony; his looks are not the best 
thing about him but he and I have some fine rides in 
spite of rain and mud. The roads are terrible; horses 
get stuck in the mud and it is impossible to get them 
out. They are then shot and help to fill up the hole. 

I enclose a handbill picked up beside a couple of 
dead Huns. Hundreds of these handbills were drop- 
ped by our men over the Hun lines to let them know 
what the effect would be if Roumania entered on our 
side. You may translate it—that is, if it is not 
removed before the letter reaches its destination. 
A couple of miles behind the Front line is not much, 
and we are hardly that now. We are safe enough from 
rifle and machine gun bullets of course, but right 
there for anything bigger, such as '' Whiz-bangs " 
and “* Dooley Bears,” to say nothing of ‘‘ Silent Sue,” 
a naval gun which has a muzzle velocity of 2,280 feet a 
second and lands long before it is heard coming. 
Don't worry about me; thank you all for being so 
good and thinking so much of me. 


France, December 23rd, 1916. 


I shall not be able to go to Midnight Mass this 
year as it happens to be my turn for Liaison duty then. 
We are billeted in what was once a house—‘‘A la 
Bairnsfather." We are getting it fixed up well and 
have had a bricklayer and a paperhanger at it for 
three days; thus our Christmas dinner will be set 
amid quite decent surroundings. 

I made a trip with a bombing officer the other night; 
not over the parapet—I am not tired of life yet!— 
just out into the gaps so that I could get some idea of 
how our line stands. Last night I had dinner about 
9 p.m. and when I was coming back, I stopped to 
watch a ghostly figure slipping quietly by. It was a 
man carrying a large, new, white cross. The sunken - 
road was so dark, and, at this particular time, so 
deserted that the not-unusual, but ever-pathetic 
sight of a man carrying a cross to the spot where 
his “ pal ” fell, was most touching. 


France, April 17th, 1917. 


I told you, did I not, that I went over with the 
infantry when we drove the Hun off his strongest 
fortress on the Western Front, the Vimy Ridge? 
We simply swept him off his feet and a couple of hours 
after the show had started, we had captured a number 
of his guns and gun-crews. 

One Battalion, the 25th, from Nova Scotia, went 
over with a piper playing on either flank. The French- 
Canadians went absolutely wild with excitement and 
a desire to £o over the bags and at the Huns. It was 
certainly a wonderful day. 


3.3.31. 


CAPTAIN MELVIN JOHNSON, 
Canadian Mounted Rifles. 


Killed in action at Passchendaele, October 30th, 1917. 
Old Loyola, 1903. 


28 LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


France, April 28th, 1917. 


On the night of the 24th and 25th, I went forward 
with ammunition. After some little excitement, I got 
the ammunition all in, and everybody out except a 
N.C.O., who had not got out; as I was to ride his 
horse back (he was staying) I had to wait. Well, the 
old Hun started in with Whiz-bangs. I couldn't get 
through the barrage so I hugged the ground in a 
ditch and waited. After some time, things became 


fairly quiet and I started out round the outskirts of . 


the place shelled. 

Iran into my Corporal and he handed me over his 
horse and went on. I had just mounted and started 
away when a Whiz-bang burst just at my shoulder it 
seemed, and I felt something burn my leg. I think 
the horse must have been hit also for he started away 
cross country as hard as he could go, jumping trenches 
` and shell-holes, and paying no heed to the way I 
pulled on his mouth. 

I got home without any further accidents except 
that a big gun went off, blinding me for a moment and 
I then collided with a pack-mule going the opposite 
way. It gave my back a bit of a strain, but the rest 
here had fixed me up well. I found the wound very 
slight and decided that I would not go out, but the 
others made me go to the dressing-station next day 
just to be sure it was O.K. I was inoculated for 
tetanus and sent down here to give my back a rest. 
The hospital is in a very pretty spot. Anything 
without shell-holes and mud looks pretty to me. 


FROM MAJOR A. C. CULVER, 19th 
BATTERY 


It is with more sincere regret than I can say that I 
am writing to tell you that your son was killed to-day. 
As I should have expected, knowing him as I did, it 
was in an effort to help two of our gunners who had 
just been hit. 

You will have the great satisfaction of knowing 
that your son died a splendid officer. He had been 
with me for nearly a year, and I shall always ap- 
preciate a great deal more than I can express, the 
honour of commanding an officer, who, though only a 
boy in years, was in every sense a man and a soldier. 

He was recommended last April for the Military 
Cross on account of this thorough work on the day 
of the advance, when he went over with the infantry 
to the last objective, not failing to keep up com- 
munications. 

His going will leave a great blank amongst the 
officers and his Section, for owing to his kindly and 
unselfish nature, his willingness and good spirits, 
there was not an officer or man with whom he came in 
contact, who did not appreciate him. 


FROM FATHER FORTIER, CHAPLAIN, 
MAJOR 


I made it my duty to preside at your son's funeral, 
for not only did I lose a Catholic officer, but a personal 
friend and this morning I made it my duty to say Mass 
for the repose of his soul. 

I understand Sir, how great must be your grief and 
that of his mother. Words are not sufficient to ex- 
press my sympathy and condolence in such a moment 
of bereavement. May you find your consolation in 
that truest religious saying: “ God's Holy Will be 
done." He has taken unto Himself the son whom He 
had confided to your care. 

His death was that of a hero, inasmuch as he 
devoted himself to save his wounded men. Тһе 
Canadian Army has lost one of the most able and 
devoted officers. May his death and the wilful offer- 
ing of his life help to attain the victory so long ex- 


‘pected. 


FROM LIEUT.-COL. J. S. STEWARD, 
19th BATTERY 


I did not get acquainted with your son until about 
April 9th, when he did heroic work for the Brigade 
while he was doing Liaison work with the infantry. 
He went all through that eventful day and his services 
were highly appreciated Бу the infantry with whom 
he was. Since that day I have often met your boy. 

He enjoyed not only our confidence but also our 


, admiration; always cheerful under the most trying 


circumstances and always having a cheering word 
and influence. He was always optimistic and never 
once downhearted. He will be sorely missed by his 
fellow-officers in the Brigade and by the boys in the 
Brigade, who admired and loved him. I pray that the 
£ood God will be near you and comfort you and his 
loved ones in this dark day. 


FROM THE DECEASED'S COUSIN, 
GUNNER S. PLUNKETT 


I have met several men who served under Ned in 
France, and being wounded, were sent here. It 
would indeed please you to hear them talk about 
him. They tell me he was the most popular and the 
bravest officer in the Battery. 

Bdr. Chisholm and he had their first experience of 
shell-fire together. He tells me that Ned was simply 
fine and it gave him courage to see the calm and 
fearless way in which Ned acted. He was indeed a 
son to be proud of and when I am at the Front, I 
shall always remember my brave cousin. 


CAPTAIN MELVIN JOHNSON 


Captain Johnson, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
John J. Johnson, was born in Boston in 
1895, and came to Loyola in 1903. Later on, 
after leaving Loyola, he was employed in his 
father’s business. 

Melvin had a long experience at the Front. 
After enlisting he became identified with 
the ‘‘ Canadian Mounted Rifles” in 1915, 
In 1916 he was wounded, but his undaunted 
spirit was not yet satisfied. After a long 
period in the hospital he returned once again 
to the conflict. 


His bravery is amply proven by the fact 
that he was made ‘ Chevalier de l'ordre de 
Prince Danilol,’’ by King Nicholas of 
Montenegro, on October 30th, 1916. He 
was also named Captain on the field of 
action. 

Just-one year after military honours had 
been conferred on him, Captain Johnson was 
killed while leading his men to victory at 
Passchendaele, on October 30th, 1917. 

Loyola extends her sincere sympathies to 
Mr. and Mrs. Johnson. 


CORPORAL STANTON HUDSON, 
12th Canadian Machine Company. 


Killed in action, at Passchendaele, November 14th, 1917. 
Military Medal. 
Old Loyola, 1907. 


30 LOYOLA.COLLEGE REVIEW 


CORPORAL STANTON HUDSON 


When Stanton Hudson's name appeared 
in the list of Canadian casualties, Loyola 
mourned the loss of a true Catholic gentle- 
man and a loyal alumnus. He was born in 
Perth, Ont., on September 16th, 1893, began 
his education in Perth Separate School and 
later attended Perth Collegiate for two years, 
whence he came to Loyola in 1907. 

When at Loyola, Stanton already mani- 
fested the qualities which were to mark him 


as a soldier on the battlefield. A generous: 


self-sacrificing boy, ever ready to do his share 
in upholding the honour of his College in 
whatever sphere his activities were required, 
he won for himself life-long friends with the 
pupils and professors. 

On leaving Loyola in 1912, his aim was to 
take up Civil Engineering, and, as he wished 
to have some practical work before finishing 
his course, he accepted a position in the 
Transcontinental for one year. At the end 
of that time, he became engaged with the 
engineers of the C.P.R., until he finally 
took a position with the Northern Develop- 
ment Branch of the Ontario Government. 

He enlisted with the Canadian Grenadier 


FROM MAJOR L. I. PEARCE 


Your son was with me a few: minutes beforé he 
was hit by a shell. He had just been to my head- 
quarters to make a report on his guns and was 
returning to his guns when a shell came and he was 
mortally wounded. He did not recover consciousness 
before his death a few minutes later. I was present 
at the burial and a small cross marks the place of his 
last resting place. 

During Ше attack the week previous, he was one 
of the outstanding N.C.O.'s of his section, and for his 
initiative and courage was then awarded the Military 
Medal. Itis our regret that he has not survived and 
the officers and men of my Company miss your son 
very much. . 

He was a most regular attendant at the Catholic 
Church Services and took every opportunity of attend- 
ing. His body is buried at Tynn Cott Cemetery. 


FROM LIEUT. J. D. RIDDELE 


The fighting at Passchendaele was indeed very 
severe and it was more by good luck that any of us 
came out alive; the shelling was continuous day and 
night with practically no shelter, the condition of the 
ground being such that dug-outs were impossible. 

Your son will be a great loss to the Company and 
a greater one to his Section. I looked on him as a 
coming man, and had he lived, he would certainly 
have made a name for himself. 

On the day he was killed, we had quite a few 
casualties; the section was naturally worn out and 
weary of the continuous shelling. Under these trying 


Guards at Montreal, and having finished his 
training at St. Johns, Que., left for overseas 
on April 15th, 1915. While at Bramshott 
Training Camp, he was transferred to the 
12th Canadian Machine Company, in which 
he continued until his death. From the 
time that he left England for France, August 
15th, he was continually on Active Service, 
taking part in the battles of the Somme, Vimy 
Ridge, Lens and Passchendaele. He was 
promoted to Corporal and was also awarded 
the Military Medal one week previous to 
his death for worthy deeds performed in the 
Passchendaele engagement. 

Before making the supreme sacrifice, he 
was once wounded. His chaplain informed 
Mr. Hudson, that shortly before being killed 
on November 14th, Stanton had received 
Holy Communion. In one of his own 
letters, Stanton, after mentioning that he 
frequently met old Loyola Boys, remarked 
that he often served Mass back of the firing 
line. 

On behalf of his old College, we offer his 
relatives our deep sympathy in their grief 
at his loss. 


conditions, Stanton organized stretcher bearers, 
supervised the burial of his comrades and many 
other worthy deeds, in carrying out his duty. 

His loss has affected me greatly and he can never 
be replaced in the Company. I might add with pride 
that his recommendation for the Military Medal 
was granted. He was buried with full military 
honours. 


FROM STANTON HUDSON . 
(HIS VOYAGE ACROSS) 


We set sail on Wednesday, April 26th, 1917. 
There were three of us in the convoy—The Empress 
of Britain, The Lapland and the Metagama. We 
were accompanied by the cruiser Kenervin. The sea 
was very rough and many were seasick; the decks 
were lined with men, leaning over the railing. 

We had fine weather the whole way across although 
at times the sea was very rough. It seemed very 
strange to look out and see nothing but water on 
every side. We did not follow the regular course; 
the Captain had been on the Hesperian when she 
was torpedoed in the Mediterranean and he was 
naturally very careful. Friday they mounted a guard 
with rifles aft and stern on the look-out for sub- 
marines. We had to take turns, three men to each 
gun for twenty-four hours, 

Thursday afternoon we were joined by the cruiser 
Drake and the Kenervin went back to Halifax. On 
Saturday afternoon she chased a boat that showed 
upon the Northern Horizon and didn’t answer her 
signals. However it proved to be some tramp 
schooner. I saw quite a few whales from a distance 
but nothing that looked like a submarine. Great 


LOYOLA. COLEEGE REVIEW E 


саге 15 taken; no smoking on deck after 7 p.m., and all 
lights out by 9 o'clock. The first night out, we almost 
ran down a large coal boat. In fact she crossed right 
in front of us and we only missed her stern by about 
5 feet. я 


We reached the danger zone оп Wednesday, 
May 3rd. Four escorts appeared on the horizon and 
soon reached us, travelling at great speed. The 
destroyers are small, are very low in the water and 
look about the size of a pleasure yacht, but they 
travel very fast. Their object is to ram a submarine 
before she can launch a torpedo. If one is launched, 
they are fast enough to follow it and get a shot at it 
with their small guns, thereby diverting its course. 
When the destroyers arrived, we all separated taking 
different courses. 


Awakening next morning, we found ourselves off 
the north coast of Ireland. The land was very green 
and all the farms divided off in squares of little: more 
than an acre; here and there a small village and 
church. We could see the coast of Scotland on our 
north and a few pretty islands. We were just losing 
sight of Ireland when we sighted the Isle of Man, one 
of the prettiest but most peculiar islands I have ever 
seen, being one continuation of hills and villages, and 
dotted here and there with castles. 


We got a lasting impression of Britain's Fleet. Off 
Ireland we saw the trawlers searching for mines, 
while on all sides one could see destroyers and 
cruisers patrolling the waters; we also saw aeroplanes 
and seaplanes. When we were nearing the Mersey, 
it became quite foggy and began to rain. We arrived 
at Liverpool about 6 p.m. Crowds of boats passed 
us, and every one cheered and saluted the Canadians. 


Arrived here at Bramshott Camp on Saturday: The 
country from Liverpool here is very fine; one con- 
tinual row of trees and parks. It looks like one big 
garden, and the small towns seem so strange, all old 
and the streets lined with beautiful lanes and quaint 
houses. . 


France, December 5th, 1916. 


If the people over there could spend a few weeks 
where we were, it would certainly open their eyes. 
You can't imagine what it is like and what the boys 
have to endure. Mud! you can't seem to get out of 
it and water ankle deep. Last time (luckily for 
forty-eight hours only) we had the worst spell of it 
yet; however after a day or so you forget all about it. 
For miles around you see nothing but a wasted 
country. Where villages have been, you see but a 
pile of debris and trees lying low. On all sides the 
country is one mass of shell-holes. One day a village 
behind Fritz's lines will bein good condition ; then after 
a day's bombardment, it is nothing but ruins. I 
have in mind one village; we had good observation 
on it from our position: we came out for a couple of 
days and on our return practically the whole village 
was demolished. As for shells, it is one continuous 
sound of them all day, but as long as they keep going 
over or do not get too close, one gets accustomed. 
However when the time comes for an advance and 
one knows he is going ahead, there is some com- 
pensation for it all. 


France, March 3rd, 1917. 


Our divisions made quite a raid the other day, using 
gas. They keep old Fritz busy all along the line; just 
one series of raids. Simultaneously the artillery and 
the machine guns open fire on Fritz with one contin- 
uous stream of explosives, shrapnel bursting in the 
air overhead in one big flame, and the high explosives 
on the ground; just one continuous sound of thunder 
and then after five minutes or so, every gun is raised 


on its supports, and with reserves, etc., over the top 

of the trench go the boys! If itis just for a raid, they 

£o for about half an hour and destroy his dug-outs, 

etc., and hurry back any prisoners they may find. 

One would think it impossible to live through such a 

barrage but the amount of men that are killed: 
is relatively small. However, it puts his trench in. 
bad shape and that, with the destruction accomplished 

by the raiding party, certainly tells on him. 


Кепе April 15th, 1917. 


Since my last letter, we have been through some- 
thing and it is certainly to your prayers at home that 
we owe our safety. By now you will have heard of the 
advance and of the part the Canadians played in it. 
This was the first time our guns were sent over the 
top. Formerly we were used behind and then moved 
up. However this was on such a big plan, on account 
of the value Fritz set on the Ridge, that they decided 
to send us over. We went over the top Easter Mon- 
day at daybreak and it was a sight I shall never 
forget. Our guns put up the heaviest possible barrage 
and poor Fritz had little chance. Everything was nice 
and quiet until about ten minutes before the time set, 
and then we scorched his line before his artillery got 
£oing at all. No opposition was encountered in his 
first two lines and it was only in his third and fourth 
that he made any kind of a fight. 


We took up a position quite a distance behind his 
original front and I managed to get my crew over 
O.K. though one of the boys was killed after we got 
there. We dug ourselves in, got our guns up and, 
though we waited, he didn't come back. We managed 
to hold everything we had taken but those three days 
of holding were the hardest; weather bad and food 
poor, but we were finally relieved. 


France, April 27th, 1917. 


Our section so far, is having the best time, as we 
did the heaviest part of the work in the advance. 
We are in one of those large tunnels in which the 
ridge abounds and it is a wonderful piece of work, 
being a regular underground village over six hundred 
yards long; it has electric lights, running water and 
numerous rooms and will be quite a place for sight- 
seers after the war. I do not like them, however, so 
well as the above ones we used to make for ourselves ; 
the air is too heavy and you never know whether it is 
night or day. 


Well, Fritz is back a few miles further than he was 
before Easter. We are in reserve now just where our 
old front line was and one hardly ever sees a shell 
reach this far now. I have been over the ground we 
took and you would wonder how we were ever able 
to get it from his hands. It is about a mile in width 
and then slopes into a wide plateau, which runs as 
far as the eye can see. He was practically free for 
observation except for aeroplanes and could bring up 
almost anything he wanted without being seen. The 
far side of the Ridge was practically a net-work of 
Fritz's dug-outs, almost impregnable against shell- 
fire. He was safe as long as he stayed in them and I 
think he did so, for they looked as if they had been 
continually inhabited. To see the ground of his old 
first and second line, is to realise the thoroughness 
of our artillery. It is nothing but a mass of shell- 
holes overlapping one another and how he ever kept 
any at all is beyond me. That his morale is broken 
does not surprise one. 


Reports are coming in of continual advances but no 
sight of him is visible. I have been up for a couple 
of nights and could see a series of fires in his rear; 
he is apparently setting fire to numerous villages 
before evacuating them. Enough about the war; 
best love to all. 


32 LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


LIEUTENANT JOHN F. WILKINS 


Lieut. Wilkins, youngest son of Mr. 
Robert C. Wilkins of Farnham, Quebec, was 
born in Montreal, 1897, and came to Loyola 
in 1906. Those who knew him while at 
Loyola remember him as a boy of strong 
character, with sterling qualities of mind and 
heart. That his future career did not belie 
such a promising beginning, is amply proven 
by the testimony of Chaplains and Officers, 
who had dealings with him at the Front. 

Lieut.. Wilkins went overseas with the 
11th E.T. Battalion; when this was broken 
up, he served for a term with the 23rd in 
England and was then transferred to the 
24th Victoria Rifles. He fell in action on 
August 15th, 1917, while leading his men in 
an attack. He had just succeeded in pene- 
trating the enemy barrage to a distance of 
800 yards and in attaining the objective 
sought for, when either a fragment of a 
shell or a sniper’s bullet laid him low, caus- 
ing instant death. 

Not the least striking trait of his character 
was his devotion to his religion. Chaplains, 
Catholic and non-Catholic alike, have testi- 


LETTERS FROM LIEUT. WILKINS 


Bramshott, October 8th, 1916. 


I am pleased to say that we are having a Mission 
in the Camp this week; it was opened this morning 
by the Bishop of Southampton. We shall have a 
sermon every night and finish next Sunday by con- 
fession and communion. I do not know if I shall be 
able to finish but at any rate I shall commence. I 
hope to get a chance to write to Mr. Brown, but it 

_will be rather hard to get in four more letters before 
tea, as I have my mission to attend this evening. 


Bramshott, Eng., October 11th, 1916. 


I thank you very much for your kind wishes for 
my birthday, and trust that before another one comes 
round, this wicked war will be over and I shall be 
back home with you all. But I have set out to do my 
duty towards my country, my parents and my all; 
until this is achieved, we shall have to bear our little 
troubles, but by God’s will, we shall soon be together 
again, my dear mother. 


France, April 12th, 1917. 


Our officer here is Col. Ritchie, a splendid chap; 
my brother-officers are all fine fellows and have 
treated me with all possible consideration and 
kindness. The Battalion forms part of the Canadian 
Division and has a good record in France. 

Last week I spent four days in the trenches and last 
Thursday night I received my baptism of fire. I 
happened to be in a trench which Fritz decided to 


fied to his admirable spirit of piety. One 
non-Catholic writes of him thus: “І know 
from talking to him again and again what 
love he had for his Church, and what strong 
moral and religious principles were the back- 
bone of his life. I feel sure he was ready 
for whatever might happen." As a boy he 
had been regular in his religious practices; 
and this fidelity still characterised him later 
on at a time, when not all are willing to 
make the sacrifices which such loyalty de- 
mands. 


To his bereaved parents, Loyola College 
extends its sincere sympathy and condolence 
in their loss. We close with an extract from 
the Farnham newspaper: 


“ А memorial service for the late Lieut. John Fox 
Wilkins, who was killed in action ‘‘ Somewhere in 
France,’’ on August 15th, 1917, was held in St. 
Romuald’s Church on Tuesday, at 9 o’clock. The 
church was appropriately draped and lighted, and 
over the catafalque rested the British flag. The 
Knights of Columbus attended in a body, as well as 
many friends from Montreal and the surrounding 
towns. The flags on public and private. buildings 
floated at half-mast to honour the memory of one of 
Farnham's heroic sons." 


try to hit; of course itis a most unplesaant experience 
to have shells and bullets flying and dropping about 
one, but in time one gets quite used to it. It is only 
fair to say that I was dreadfully nervous but I by no 
means gave way to my fears at any time. З 

The trenches are fearfully muddy and wet and it is 
no exaggeration to say that, at times, the water is 
knee-deep; it is quite an ordinary thing to be walking 
along a road or a trench with water up to one's ankles. 
One night I set out with a party of men to do some 
work on a certain trench in the Front line. We set 
out without a guide; I only knew the map location 
and was totally dependent upon sign-boards. It was 
pouring rain, and was very cold, considering the time 
of the year. 

We went on and on, but could not find our position ; 
we tried trench after trench until at last I realised that 
I was absolutely lost. No one around me knew 
where we were. The men by this time also realised 
that we were lost and some of them began to show 
signs of nervousness. Suddenly I got a message 
from the rear: ''Party of men coming across No- 
Man's-Land towards you." Ilooked over the parapet 
and saw quite a good-sized party of men; it was 
difficult to say if it was a friendly or à hostile party. 
Naturally if it was the former, I did not want to open 
fire; if the latter, I could not afford to let them get 
away. 

With visions of capturing a Hun raiding party 
single-handed, I leaped over the parapet and started 
crawling along on my stomach, through the mud, 
until I came to a shell-hole into which I crawled, 
drew my revolver and waited for signs of the party. 
Suddenly I saw them appear, but, Alas! all hopes were 
shattered; it was a small party of our men going out 


LIEUTENANT JOHN WILKINS, 
24th Victoria Rifles. . 


Killed in action, August 15th, 1917. 
Old Loyola, 1906. 


RIY. 


34 LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


on a special job, and as there was too much mud in 
the trenches, they were going overland. I turned 
and walked back to my own men and continued the 
search for the trench that I wanted. 

On a certain afternoon, two other officers and my- 
self started out to make a short reconnaissance of 
some work that we had to do that night. It was a 
beautiful afternoon and, strange to say, quite warm. 
We completed our work, and on our return, being 
somewhat heated up, decided to rest. We each 
coolly lighted a cigarette and were discussing the 
situation in a low voice, when I began to get a feeling 
of uneasiness. 

I said nothing for a while, but at last, made the 
remark that I thought we had better move on. 
“ Oh" came the reply, “ We have plenty of time." 
Suddenly through the air came the hissing sound of a 
shell and we realised it was going to strike close. We 
threw ourselves close to the parapet; the shell soon 
arrived and a piece of shrapnel, about the size of a 
fifty-cent piece, landed in the trench in the exact spot 
that I had just vacated; even as it was, it was only 
about three yards from where I was at the time. 
Rest assured, we did not stand there any longer, but 
started down the trench at no very slow pace. 

It is a queer sensation when the big shells explode 
close by, and the earth and shrapnel go up together 
around one. One never knows whether it is the 
earth or the shrapnel that is going to strike them. I 
have had a couple of experiences with the earth, but 
as yet have felt no shrapnel. 


FROM FATHER HINGSTON, SJ., 
CHAPLAIN 


France, January 15th, 1918. 


I saw a good deal of Jack at Valcartier Camp and 
found him a great help to me in my work. He used 
to go frequently to the Sacraments and was always 
ready to do all in his power to make it easy for the 
men of his Battalion to do likewise. On the eve of 
the departure of his Unit, he made arrangements fora 
general Communion. 

I saw him for the last time оп the morning when his 
Battalion moved out of Valcartier Camp. He, to his 
surprise and delight, though the youngest Officer, 
was not left behind, although some had to be left, 
as the Battalion had more than its full complement of 
officers. 

Several of the Catholic Chaplains in France knew 
your son, and they all found him just as I had found 
him, proud of his Faith, regular and devout in ap- 
proaching the Sacraments and always eager to be of 
assistance to the priest. 

You will greatly miss him, but you will have the 
consolation of having given back to God, faithful and 
unspoiled, a soul that He had entrusted to you, one 
who departed this life in the pursuance of duty. You 
have sent him on before you, to welcome you to 
Heaven when your own time comes. 


FROM REV. C. STUART, CAPTAIN 


(NON-CATHOLIC) 


It is a great blow to us all after he had made so 
many friends; indeed his enthusiasm was absolutely 
inspiring. He seemed always so keen on his work 
and the way he led his men at Vimy Ridge was 


very fine; he was so energetic in his practices that 
everything went like clock-work. It is regrettable 
that he did not have the satisfaction of seeing his 
work completed and the objective gained. 

He was a splendid chap in every way and the 


‘Roman Catholic Chaplains in this Brigade often spoke 


to me of him. I know from talking to him again and 
again what strong moral and religious principles 
were the backbone of his life and I am sure he was 
ready for whatever might happen. Father Letang of 
the 28th Battalion had been with us for the three 
previous Sundays and your son never missed an 
opportunity of going to Mass. He was one of the 
finest fellows I have ever known and he leaves 
behind him the fragrant memory of a young but 
splendid life crowned by a yet more glorious death in 
defence of Justice and Right, the cause of Jesus 
Christ. 


FROM LIEUT.-COL. RITCHIE, 
24th BN. CAN. V.R.C. 


France, August 22nd, 1917. 


Your son was a gallant officer and did splendid work 
the whole time that he was with us. He was very 
popular with both officers and men, being ever willing 
for any work that had to be done. I have lost in his 
death a very fine officer while you have lost a brave 
and splendid son. 

It is very difficult for me to express my sympathy 
as I too have suffered in the loss of my young brother; 
he was also killed in the same attack. 


(FROM THE SAME) 
France, October 23rd, 1917. 


I am very sorry to say that we never found your 
son's body although the ground over which we 
advanced, was thoroughly searched. It was during 
this search that my brother's body was found. 

My brother was hit very early in the attack; in 
fact he never got through the enemy barrage, whereas 
your son got through that and advanced about eight 
hundred yards with his platoon. The last that was 
seen of him was when he was occupying a shell-hole 
with his Company Sgt.-Major, waiting for our bar- 
rage to lift. A shell was seen to burst among them 
and your son and the Sgt.-Major were never seen 
again. His body we never found, yet he himself has 
found his reward and rest with Him who directs and 
rules all things. 

Lieut. Wilkins was in my Headquarters a few 
minutes before the zero hour to report that all was 
ready. I shall never forget him; he looked so keen 
and the picture of health. Your son knew no fear 
and was an excellent officer both in and out of the 
trenches. He came to us first a few days before we 
made our attack on the 9th of April. As at that time 
everything had been settled, I could not take him 
in, although he begged me to do so; I then detailed 
him to a most important piece of work, digging the 
jumping-off trench. He took charge of this and did 
an excellent piece of work under the most trying 
conditions. It was his first time under fire and he was 
very cool and collected. 

We lost a very fine officer when he was taken from 
us. He, along with those who have gone before us, 
has left us a very fine example which we are doing 
our best to follow. 


9.3.3. 


PRIVATE LEO. M. SHORTALL, 
1st Newfoundland Batt. 


Died May 30th, 1918, of wounds received at Vimy Ridge. 
Old Loyola, 1913. 


36 LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


PRIVATE DONALD A. MacARTHUR 


Donald MacArthur, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
D. A. MacArthur, was born in Alexandria, 
Ont., in 1898. He received his early educa- 
tion in the local Separate School, the 
Alexander School, and afterwards entered 
Loyola College where he remained two 
years. While at Loyola, Donald made many 
friends for himself by his true sportsman- 
ship, and, on several occasions, helped his 


fellow-athletes to win the laurels for the 
L.C.A.A.A. 


FROM FATHER E. J. MACDONALD, 
CHAPLAIN 


Donald was one of my best boys. He never missed 
an opportunity of approaching the Sacraments and 
told me he remembered his prayers in the trenches. 
On November 2nd, I remarked he was one of the boys 
to receive Holy Communion; he was killed by a shell 
the next night, not far from the dressing station 
where I was. He is buried along with Lieutenant 
Pendergrast, A. E. Tobin and many others whose 
graves I blessed. 

As a rule I keep as cool as possible, but on the 
morning of November 4th, to tell the truth, I nearly 
lost my nerve. I had lost many good friends and I 
knew how they would feel at home. I was comforted, 
however, by the knowledge that the day previous I 
had seen those friends receive Our Blessed Lord at 
my Mass. In Donald's case particularly, I felt at 
ease because I knew him like a book and knew he was 
always prepared to die. 

I remember watching him at the Divisional Games 
some time ago. He did very well and I thought of 
his father and mother, and even thought of his future 
success in life. You yourselves have likewise 
dreamed those fond dreams of loving parents. You 
may now dream of a still more pleasing future, 
though not of this world, where all things are so 
uncertain, and sorrow so often blights. You can still 
remember Donald as you saw him; you can still 
remember that out here, he was even better, a brave 
lad, a successful scout, a good soldier, a weekly 
communicant. He often spoke of you all and of the 
reception he would get. My prayer will ever be that 
God will prepare a grander reception for you all 
when “ten thousand times ten thousand " gather 
round the throne. 


FROM LIEUT.-COL. D. J. MACDONALD, 
STRATHCONA HORSE 
I was awfully sorry to hear of your loss and wish to 


express my deepest sympathy to yourself and Mr. 
MacArthur. 


On leaving Loyola, he went to St. Mich- 
ael's College, Toronto, whence he answered 
the Country's Call for soldiers, though not of 
military age at the time. Though a Sergeant 
with the 154th Canadian Highlanders, he 
sacrificed his stripes and reverted to the 
ranks, that he might have an earlier oppor- 
tunity of doing his share at the Front. 

Donald was a true Catholic as well as a 
soldier and, as such, made the supreme 
sacrifice on the 3rd of November, 1917. 

To the bereaved family, we extend our 
heartfelt sympathy in the loss of their son. 


Last summer when I paid a visit to the Canadian 
Division, I looked up Donald and he was well and 
happy. Iam sure that the hardship which he had to 
endure in the trenches, was no child's play, and that 
to the end he was happy in the knowledge that he 
was doing his duty. 

When I heard that he had made the supreme sacri- 
fice, I met an officer who was with Donald when he 
was hit by a piece of shell, and this officer told me 
that Donald's death was instantaneous. He spoke 
very highly of him and of his coolness and devotion 
to duty. j 


FROM PRIVATE DONALD MacARTHUR 


I now belong to the Scouts since we went over Hill 
70. We go out in No-Man's-Land more than we used 
to; itis not such a bad place and most of the Scouts 
say they prefer it to the front line trenches. Very 
seldom any of the big shells strike there but some- 
times you have to get very close to the ground to 
avoid machine gun fire. It is strange how quickly - 
you can drop, and do not mind how muddy the ground 
is either. I have passed through quite a number of 
the cities destroyed by the Huns but he is paying the 
price every day. 


FROM PRIVATE DONALD MacARTHUR 
(LAST LETTER HOME) 


France, October 31st, 1917. 


For the last few days we have been in tents, the 
first in nearly seven months and, believe me, I would 
not mind staying here for the rest of the war. Itisa 
real home, as the boys call any place that is quiet, 
with none of Fritz's iron- mines flying around. 

No doubt you read of the good work the Canadians 
are doing. I hope we shall have no more fighting 
after the next big show, but I would rather be doing 
my little bit here than running around dodging the 
Army. After this war, I will be just like father, not 
caring for anything like a Circus, for I see more than 
any Circus can show. 


BIB. 


PRIVATE DONALD A. MacARTHUR, 
Killed in action, November 3rd, 1917. 
Old Loyola, 1913. 


38 LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


PTE. LEO. SHORTALL 


On the 29th of April last, at the King 
George Hospital, London, Leo. M. Shortall 
died of wounds inflicted during the Vimy 
Ridge engagement. 

Leo came to Loyola in 1913; soon after 
the outbreak of war, he enlisted and went 
overseas as Private in the 1st Newfound- 
land Battalion. He took part in many of the 
big battles and gave a good account of him- 
self, as did every man in the Battalion. 

At College he was a congenial companion 
and made many friends for himself during 


FROM LEO SHORTALL 


King George Hospital, 
Stanford St., London, 
May 2nd, 1917. 


Well here I am in London with six wounds and a 
broken leg. Fritz got me pretty hard when he did 
get me. I have one in my right hip, one in my right 
Éroin, one in the right side of my stomach, one in 
my left thigh and one in my left arm. My right leg 
is broken close to the body. 

We made a charge the 15th of April, and just as we 
got as far as we were to go—the German second line— 
I heard the rattle of a machine gun at close quarters, 
and then something struck me like the kick of a 
horse. It turned me right over on my back. I was 
lyin£ out two days and two nights before the Red 


his short stay, friends who will not soon for- 
£et his kind and generous nature. 

Leo was a fervent Catholic and his many 
letters home from the hospital breathe a 
spirit of deep Christian submission in his 
severe. and prolonged suffering. We quote 
below from his letter in last year's “ Re- 
view,” 
when picked up on the battlefield. 

The Faculty and students extend to 
Leo's family and relatives their most sincere 
sympathy in this £reat loss. 


as it gives details of his pitiful state 


Cross got me. You can guess what I suffered. You 
don't know what thirst is yet, and I hope to God you 
never wil. Remember me to all the boys and 
Fathers. 


King George Hospital, London, 
November 5th, 1917. 


Well I am doing O.K. now and with God's help the 
turn has come; of course sometimes I feel pretty 
poorly but that is to be expected. 

I am sending you a picture of one of the Red Cross 
men, a Mr. Close, who carried me off the train to the 
ambulance, when I landed here at Waterloo Station. 
These men are too old for Military Service but they 
give so many nights a week to the Red Cross. They 
have to buy their own uniforms and they get no pay. 
The great majority are all well-to-do business men. 


LIEUTENANT JAMES B. DOMVILLE 


Lieut. James de Beaujeu Domville, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Domville of Rosemere, 
Que., began his early education at Loyola. 
He afterwards went to Stonyhurst, England, 
and thence to Bishop's College, Lennoxville, 
Que.; he was in attendance at the latter 
when war was declared. 

He enlisted in the Royal Air Force and 
had almost completed his training as pilot 
when he met his death. 
officers spoke of him in high terms as a 


His superior 


promising pilot, and of his constant applica- 
tion to duty. 

Though death came suddenly there is no 
doubt Lieut. Domville was prepared to 
make the sacrifice. In a letter to his mother 
he says: ''If your heart is pure, mother, 
and you are ready to face God, what does it 
matter, now or later? ” 

To his bereaved family, Loyola extends 
its most sincere sympathies. 


FACTS ABOUT LIEUT. DOMVILLE'S DEATH 


Station Headquarters, R.F.C., Deseronto. 


He had done approximately two hours Solo and 
was up in a machine by himself, when at a height of 
about 500 feet, he collided with another machine. 
The ensuing crash resulted in the death of your son 
and Cadet Kramer, an occupant of the other machine, 


and the injury of 2nd Lieut. Bridgman, who was 
instructin£ Cadet Kramer. ‘ 

Your son was a promising pilot and his death is a 
distinct loss to the service. He can have suffered 
no pain as he was unconscious when his machine 
struck the ground, and he died a few minutes after 
being removed from the machine. 


LIEUT. JAMES DE BEAUJEU DOMVILLE, 
R.A.F. 


Killed in training at Camp Mohawk. 
Old Loyola, 1907. 


1.3.37. 


` 


40 LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


FLIGHT-LIEUT. ARTHUR DISSETTE, R.N.A.S. 


Arthur attended Loyola from 1901 to 
1903 and afterwards continued his studies 


at the Technical School, Toronto, and the. 
After finishing his 


University of Toronto. 
education, he went to Vancouver where he 
was engaged in the automobile business. 
He enlisted shortly after the outbreak of the 
war, and after a course of training in Eng- 
land, was sent to France. 

During his stay in France, he was sent 
with other aviators on night raids over 
munition plants and was also engaged in 
aerial fighting in the Somme section. He 
took part in some of the most thrilling 
aerial conflicts recorded during the war for 
which he received Ше ' Croix de Guerre ” 
from the President of France, as well as 
Military honours from the King of England. 

With him passed away a gallant soldier 


FROM FATHER JOS. BRUTSAERT 


Watou, Belgium. 


I wish to offer you my deep sympathy in the loss of 
your son, Lieut. Dissette. Your dear son was billeted 
for a certain time in my neighborhood and used to 
come regularly to see me. I always remarked that 
he was a thorough Catholic, living according to his 
Faith and fulfilling his duties towards God and his 
Church. I gave him absolution two days before his 
death on June 2nd. x 

It will be a great consolation for you to know that 
your son died in the friendship of the Lord, fighting 
in defence of his country's honour. From Heaven 
he will watch over all his dear relations, and he will 
pray for those who were so dear to his heart. 

'To give you an example of his good dispositions, 
he told me, in one of his last visits, that for a time 
he had been unable to assist at Holy Mass on Sun- 
days, consequently he wished me to accept an offering 
for any poor church in Belgium. “І is my duty," 
he said, ‘‘ to give part of my wages to God, who has 
been so £ood to me." Such sentiments do honour to 
the son, but they also do honour to the parents, who 
£ave him such a £ood education. 

Your son died as a martyr for a noble cause in 
defence of his country and also for justice. Many a 


and a loyal son of the Catholic Church. No 
nobler tribute could be paid him than that 
given by a Belgian priest, Father Joseph 
Brutsaert, who gave him his last absolution 
on May 31st, two days before Arthur was 
killed. Father Brutsaert's letter is given 
below. 

Arthur's brother, Frank, also a former 
student of Loyola, passed away suddenly 
at his home in Toronto, on the 29th of April, 
1918. Frank was widely known for his skill 
as a hockey player. He was engaged in 
business in Toronto for many years before 
his untimely death. Frank was a thorough 
Catholic gentleman and esteemed by all 
who knew him. 

To Arthur's and Frank's parents and 
relatives, Loyola extends here most heartfelt 
sympathy. 
time he told me that it was his greatest happiness to 
be of service to his country and to fight for Belgium 
on account of the injustice done it. | 

I have already twice visited the grave of my dear 
friend and promise you to look after it well. But— 
and this wil be more helpful—I shall remember 
him in my prayers and especially in Holy Mass. 
May our Lord grant to your. dear son Eternal Rest 
and give you, his sorrowing relatives, consolation 


and strength to bear this great cross with resignation 
to God's Holy Will. 


OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENT OF 
"CROIX DE GUERRE" 


'The Admiralty, Whitehall, 
Sir: London, S.W., July 10th, 1917. 
I am commanded by My Lords Commissioners of 
the Admiralty to forward herewith the “ Croix de 
Guerre " awarded to your son, the late Flight Sub- 
Lieutenant Arthur C. Dissette, Royal Naval Air 
Service, by the President of the French Republic. 
I am, Sir, Your obedient Servant, 
(Signed) CHARLES WALKER, 
R. Dissette, Esquire, (For Secretary). 
339 Yonge St., 
Toronto, Canada. 


CAPTAIN EDWARD DWYER 


Edward Dwyer was a student here from 
1898 їо 1900. He entered the Militia early 
in life and served there for many years, 
being advanced from 2nd Lieutenant to 
Captain. On arriving in England, he gave 


up his Captaincy in order to get over sooner 
to France; he later won back his Captain’s 
Commission on the field of battle. 

His family received but few details con- 
cerning his death. He had been detailed to 
Italy to register the soldiers’ votes, when 
his ship was torpedoed off the coast of Spain. 


The boats were lowered and every effort 
was made to save Captain Dwyer, especially 
as he had important papers in his possession. 
The salvage crew managed to put him in the 
life-boat, but unfortunately it was capsized 
апа he was drowned. . 

Captain Dwyer was a man of excellent 
qualities of mind and heart, and was greatly 
esteemed by his associates. On behalf of 
Loyola we offer his relatives our deep 
sympathy in their grief. 


R.I.P. 


FLIGHT-LIEUT. ARTHUR DISSETTE, 
R.N.A.S. 


Killed in action, June 2nd, 1917. 
Old Loyola, 1901. 


42 LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


LIEUTENANT HENRI DE VARENNES 


The Editors of the “ Review ” regret that 
they were unable to procure direct informa- 
tion concerning Lieut. De Varennes. They 


France, September 2nd, 1917. 

You have heard the sad news of the Henri de 
Varennes' death. I learned of it only to-day from 
Father Fortier, O.M.I. It was à shock to me, as it 
is not two months since I saw him in England, and 
he had been only a few weeks in France when he 
was killed. 

I had taken an unusual interest in Henri ever 
since he began his career at Loyola as a very small 
boy. In course of time I became his teacher for two 
years. He was an exceptionally clever boy, most 
successful in his studies, as the yearly Prize Lists 
show, and though not a hard worker, he was steady 
and reliable. He had, moreover, a taste for reading, 
especially for History. 

When, after spending six or eight years at Loyola, 
he went to St. Mary's for his Philosophy, I was 
pleased, as I thought contact with French-Canadian 


must therefore restrict themselves to the 
following extract from a letter written by 
Father W. Hingston, S.J. 


fellow-students useful to him in view of his future. 
I always fancied that some day he would become a 
prominent figure in political life. 

He was the only son, a descendant of the famous 
Varennes de la Verendrye who, with his sons, was 
the discoverer of much of Western Canada beyond 
the Great Lakes. A great great-grand aunt was the 
saintly Mme. d'Youville, Foundress of the Grey 
Nuns. 

I last saw him at Shoreham Camp, Sussex. He 
was tall and broad and bronzed by the sun. He had 
thrown himself with all his energy into the study of 
tactics and was reputed a very good officer. Father 
Fortier tells me that, in the few weeks he was in 
France, he had already earned the reputation of a 
keen and efficient officer, and likewise of a most 
devout Catholic. Henri was always a frequent 
communicant and he was most exemplary in his 
whole life. R.I.P. 


LIEUTENANT GUY PALARDY 


Lieutenant Guy Palardy of the 62nd 
Squadron R.A.F. was the son of Dr. Hector 
Palardy, District Health Inspector for the 
Superior Board of Health. He received the 
greater part of his education at St. Mary's 
College, coming to Loyola the year previous 
to his enlistment for Active Service. 

The details of the accident which caused 
his death are given in a letter from the O.C. 
to his father: ‘‘ Almost immediately after 
leaving the ground, his engine cut out, 
the machine stalled, and before he could 


FROM LIEUT. PALARDY 


R.F.C. Rendcomb, 
Cirencester, 
Feb. 25, 1918. 


I had a bad crash the other day; luckily I fell into 
atree. І smashed the machine to pieces. The engine 
flew out of its bearings but I didn't get hurt. There 
was something really funny about it; I was perched 
in the top of a tree and they had to get a ladder to 
get me down. It happened that another machine 
was just going to hit me, so I tried a dangerous turn 
and side-slipped into the trees. 

When it happened, the mechanics rushed around to 
get my bones. They kept staring at me thinking I 


“ 
ра 
d 


( 
М 


regain control, it crashed to the ground. I 
need hardly say how deeply grieved we all 
were at Lieut. Palardy's death. He already 
showed great keenness, and both his Flight- 
Commander and myself considered he was 
the right kind of fellow to make a good war 
pilot." - 

Lieut. Palardy died on May 7th, 1918, in 
No. 59 Clearing Station, France. To his 
bereaved family and relatives, Loyola ex- 
tends heartfelt sympathy. 


was dead while I was yelling from the top of a tree 
to get a ladder and let me down. They kept looking 
at me without moving until they finally got a ladder 
for me. It was later discovered that the controls 
caught in my flying coat thus preventing my straight- 
ening out the machine. 


Cirencester, 
March 12th, 1918. 


Our machines have up to 400 horse-power. They 
are about the most powerful machine at the Front 
and are just as fast as scouts, the only difference is 
that you have an observer with you who sees that no 
Germans get behind. 


— 


BIB. 


CAPTAIN EDWARD DWYER, 
85th Highlanders. 


Drowned on Torpedoed British Transport. 
Old Loyola, 1898. 


Letters from the Tf vont 


LIEUT-COL. GEORGE J. BOYCE, 0.5.0. 


Lieut-Col. Boyce, one of Loyola's most loyal sons 
(1907), received the Distinguished Service 
Order in the recent Birthday Honours 


FROM CAPTAIN THE REV. 


France, January 16th, 1918 


Last Sunday I said Mass at X ; I had to pass 
through a place which Fritz had been shelling that 
morning. There were two roads I could take, the 
main road or the path through the fields. I chose the 
path, and on the way, saw the effects of the morning's 
shelling, a dozen new shell-holes in the field to 
right and left of the foot-path. 

At the village I heard about twenty confessions; 
I finished earlier than usual and started for home. 
Meanwhile Fritz had begun shelling again. On 
returning I took the road instead of the path, which 
would be decidedly unhealthy if Fritzie continued 
firing short. 

As I got into the village, I heard the distant boom 
of a departing shell. After about seven seconds, 
I caught the beginning of the whine, and knew that 
that shell was not for me in any case. Hundreds of 
people heard the boom and the whine, and stood 
white-faced at their doorsteps, looking up the street 
in terror and waiting for the crash. 

Some soldiers going up the road took to the fields 
to give the road a wide berth. I would have done 
likewise but it would not have been easy. Bob (my 
horse) could have climbed the bank, but there was a 


FROM. LIEUT.-COL. GEORGE BOYCE, D.S.O. 


France, 
April 9th, 1918 


News of dear old Loyola is always so welcome. 
Occasionally we become reminiscent and go back in 
fancy to the days now long gone, and all the memories 
are happy ones. The gay companions of long ago, 
the Masters whom we sometimes considered strict, 
but where would many of us be now, were it not for 
the splendid training received at the old College? 
All one can say is: “ Here's to them, every one 
of them." 

Loyola has a long list of sons serving in the present 
struggle; and whatever may come to us, we are proud 
to grant all true credit to our Alma Mater. The 
Old Boys out here greet those of the rising genera- 
tion now at the college. We wish them £ood luck 
and success in all things which we fully expect 
will be theirs. 

Particular reasons may call me home soon, in 
which case you will see me in Montreal. I shall 
be four years away from home in September and 
a little while with the family would be much appre- 
ciated. 

One expression of ours out here is “ Up Canada, 
every old time!" To this, one might add, “ Пр 
Loyola, every old time !” 


W. H. HINGSTON, S.J. 


barb-wire fence beyond. Besides, Bob is mortally 
afraid of shells, and at the rate at which he was 
travelling, I would soon be out of the danger zone. 

Just then I caught another boom, followed by 
the whine and the crash. The shell cleaved the road 
and I saw it demolish a house on the opposite side. 
Bob was now travelling at an unheard-of rate and 
I arrived at the spot only a few seconds after the 
shell. А little cloud of dust was blowing from the 
ruins across our path. : 

‘Somewhat further back in the road, a house had 
been struck for the second time and beams and other 
debris lay in the road. A few seconds more and I 
was beyond the danger zone; and I soon arrived 
at the presbytery door, with Bob trembling with 
fright. 

In all, thirty-seven shells were dropped with only 
one casualty. A man fleeing from the shelling was 
struck while going down the very road I had come up. 
A splinter of a shell had burst two hundred yards 
away and a piece about two inches long had gone 
through his right shoulder from behind, took a 
strange course and came out in front without damag- 
ing his lung. 

In the evening I had beads and Benediction for 
the soldiers. 


BIB. 


LIEUT. GUY PALARDY, 
62nd Squadron R.A.F. 


Died of wounds, May 6th, 1918. 
Old Loyola, 1917. 


46 LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


FROM CAPTAIN JOHN. WICKHAM 


Can. Gen. Hospital, England, 
December 10th, 1917. 


A new moonlight period has been on for some days, 
and as a consequence .of the light, we have been 
treated to very delightful air-raids, first by Zepps. 
and then by planes. You have read of what hap- 
pened to the Zepps.; our guns chased them miles 
up in the sky, their engines became frozen, they 
drifted over to France by morning, and then the 
French had a great time smashing the brutes. 

In one air-raid lately, the guns started at 10.45 
p-m. and continued until 3 a.m. It was a wonderful 


FROM CAPTAIN 
France, April 8th, 1916 


Since the Royal Fusiliers and the Northumberlands 
attacked near ——— some days ago, this has been 
the hottest part of the Western front, except Verdun. 

Between the shellings, I managed to get down 
through the communication trench, and after wander- 
ing about trying to locate my men, I finally found my 
Corporal alive and unwounded. Не was unable to 
tell me whether or not the gun was smashed, so, 
though I didn’t think we would get back alive, I 
took the Corporal and we started to get the gun. We 
got it out just before the Hun started putting 5.9” 
H.E. into the boys in the place where the gun had 
been. 

The parapets were all blown in and the trenches 
were blocked with sandbags and dead men; in 
some places the parapet was levelled to the ground. 
Needless to say, I doubled past these spots, crouched 
as low as I could; however, I couldn't go very fast, 
as I had given the Corporal the gun and had taken the 
forecarriage myself, the latter being more difficult 
to handle. I was sniped at, but missed, on my way 
back. I didn't mind that so much as the fact that 
on the return trip, I was just about thirty yards ahead 
of the 5,9"'s, which the Hun was putting in with 


game of chance but of course, somewhat nerving. I 
counted thirty periods of eight shots each from the 
Battery, making 240 shells fired by it alone. We 
could hear the Hun planes more distinctly than ever 
before. They sounded just over our heads; fortu- 
nately no bombs were dropped that we could hear. 
Except for the expectant danger of falling bombs, it 
was most exciting. 

Living is very expensive. Ordinary foods are 
scarce and double or triple the former prices. Rolled 
oats scarce and dear; fresh eggs are nine cents each; 
bacon fifty cents a pound; butter fifty cents a pound 
or more. Potatoes are cheap and plentiful. Coal is 
ten dollars a ton. 


AUSTIN LATCHFORD 


beautiful regularity. I kept that lead all the way 
down to the infantry dugouts; once there Г“ froze " 
to the rear side of a dugout until the 5.9”’s had passed 
up the line. 

I set out as soon as he stopped shelling it. We had 
just got out of it when he started in on it again; 
however, our luck held, and he didn't strafe the road 
above it. The trenches were in a terrible state, 
and to get the gun out, we had to walk over the poor 
dead chaps in the ruined parts of the trench, Lord 
have mercy on them! They were all good Canadians, 
brave Westerners. | 

I went to Confession yesterday, so don't worry 
about my spiritual state. "Trench mortars are cer- 
tainly exciting enough, but it's a pretty tough proposi- 
tion—either a Military Cross or a wooden one. 

Such sights as I saw in these trenches, I never 
wish to see again, although I probably shall before I 
am much older. They were unable to get the woun- 
ded out, not to speak of the dead, whose bodies 
blocked the trenches. Only the slightly and less 
seriously wounded had a chance; it has continued 
thus since, a terrific bombardment occurring yester- 
day afternoon. This is where the '' Princess Pats " 
were cut up last year. 


FROM LIEUT. JAMES LATCHFORD 
(Brother of above) 


Near Passchendaele, Oct. 14th, 1914. 


You know by this time where we are; it is the 
worst place yet, and the Somme was a home to it. 
Mud, water everywhere, broken guns, shattered 
waggons, overturned ambulances, dead horses by 
the score; men and pieces of men everywhere. 
Had it not been for my dissecting-room experience, 
I would find it ghastly, but it does not bother me at 
all. In fact—horribile dictu!—I find a dead soldier 
a good thing to step on when crossing the bottomless 
bogs. 


The Hun can change a landscape, but hedge lines, 
roads, hills and embankments cannot be entirely 
obliterated; however, they don’t look the same as 
they used to. In an exam. at Kingston, I was asked 
to point out a church in a certain village. It was then 
well behind the Hun lines and I did not dream that 
I should ever see it; well, I did see it recently. 
Some of the walls remain, but it is distinguishable 
as a church only by its map location. 


FROM LIEUTENANT NEIL MURPHY 


France, December 16th, 1917. 


We made a fake air-raid to-day on an aerodrome 
of a night-bombing squadron. They had a dog which 
one of the officers had found in a Hun dug-out; 
when we left them after a few days, we stole the dog 
and brought him with us; that was about a month 
and a half ago. We had him until about a week ago, 
when three or four of the officers of that squadron 
came over here on a visit. There was quite a breeze 
before they started home, and during the excite- 
ment, they sneaked the dog into their car and got 
away. 

To-day we took six machines and flew over in 
formation; when we got over their aerodrome, we all 
dived and scattered the bunch who had come out to 
look. Then we landed and started talking to them; 
while we kept their attention, one of the chaps stole 


the dog, rushed out to his machine and put him in. 
By the time they realised what had happened, he was 
in the air. We had a hard time to get away but 
managed it and now we are expecting a raid at any 
time, by air or land. Wouldn't you think we were a 
bunch of school-boys? Well we must do something 
for amusement or we would go crazy. 


France, 1917. 


Everything takes on a different aspect from the 
air. As one goes up high, hills and hollows are 
practically blotted out and the earth looks nearly 
flat. The higher up one goes, the more does the 
earth look like the map. It takes a great deal of 
practice before one can recognize things for what 
they really are. 


LOYOLA COELTEGE | REV LEW 47 


FROM. MAJOR GEO. P. VANIER 
France, July 12th, 1917. 


A few days ago, I had the privilege of re- 
ceiving the ‘‘ Cross of the Legion of Honour " 
from the hands of the French Minister M. 
Painleve. It was the proudest moment of 
my life. To a French-Canadian, a decora- 
tion awarded by France has a two-fold signi- 
ficance. I shall forward the Cross to you as 
soon as I find a suitable occasion. 


London, Eng., Sept. 25th, 1918. 


I am in London on twelve days' leave. I 
had hoped I would be free from gun-fire for 
some time; my hopes were unfounded. 
During the performance of “ Cheep " at the 
Vaudeville, it was announced that aeroplanes 
were about. Shortly after, heavy anti-craft 
gun-fire was heard and there was no respite 
for over an hour. Bombs were dropped but 
casualties were slight; six killed and twenty 
wounded. It is very probable that nightly 
raids on London will take place during the 
coming week at least, as there is an early 
moon and the weather is ideal for raiders. 


London, October 2nd, 1917. 


There have been raids on London each night 
since my leave. It's a bit of a nuisance; there 
are a great number of people who take very 
badly to the raids and who, in theatres and 
other public places, make scenes that are far 
"from soothing. . 

СепегаПу speaking the conduct of the 
civilians is splendid; when the official air- 
raid warning is given, they take cover quietly 
and remain in places of relative safety until 
the “АШ Clear" signal is given. I saw 
McDougall yesterday; also ran into Horace 
Perodeau. 


FROM LIEUTENANT EDWARD DUCKETT 


Somewhere in France, 
March 3rd, 1918. 


It is quite a novel experience to be in the 
midst of your men, when suddenly whizz 
bang! you fall flat to escape the shrapnel; 
you rise only to drop for another and they keep 
coming all the time. The feeling of being 
responsible for 200 yards of Front at night 
with Fritz's machine guns going ''pat-pat- 
pat” over your head, is a strange experience. 

Still it is remarkable how casually one takes 
things. When I went out into No- Man's Land 
to inspect my wire and frontage, I suddenly 
heard Whizz, whizz, whizz! I dodged into a 
shell-hole as if it were the most natural thing 
in the world. Fritz sends across many kinds of 
shells; there is the '' Fish-tail," ‘‘ Coal-Box,” 
“ Sancisse," ‘‘ Whizz-Bang " and the “ Flying- 
Pig." After a time, one gets to know which are 
our shells and which are those of Fritz. 

At times, I have seen the air above us simply 
filled with shells, all falling far behind or overhead. 
One morning about six o'clock, a Fritz plane flew 
about 90 feet over our line and I used the machine 
gun on him three times, while he did likewise. 
Another man was sniping at him with a rifle while 
he flew away dropping flares; inside of one minute 
we were dodging shells of all kinds. As you see, 
these flares were a signalfor the artillery to open fire. 


France, March 11th, 1918 


I am out in a field near our hut, enjoying the air 
and considering at the same time how much food 


MAJ.-ADJT. GEORGE P. VANIER, M.C. 


Old Loyola (1897-1906), B.A. '06. 
Major Vanier, who last year received the Military Cross, 
was this year decorated with the Cross of the Legion of 
Honor. 


for thought presents itself at the present moment 
before my eyes. 

I am in a valley, entirely surrounded by ridges 
which are lined according to the old French system. 
In the distance, not far off, I hear the continuous 
roar of cannon; before me I see ruins and nothing 
but ruins, while, standing up defiantly among these 
relics of war, is a church. Itis a cathedral, and through 
broken panes, the sun streams in varied colours, 
while afar off, a mile or so, farmers are tilling the 
ground, and in one place, a few women are re- 
erecting their home. . 

I see a country ravaged by the monster of War, 


l ' 


48 LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


and Civilization trying to come into her own by 
removing and destroying the memories of the terror. 
I would I were a poet, for I would simply rave, 
but being only a soldier, I see in it all the wonderful 
soul of that glorious France, who even though crushed, 
remains unconquered. 

I was out with a hundred men last night laying 
wire entanglements; It is unpleasant but not hard 
work—unpleasant because Fritz shells us. 

I suppose you heard of our beloved Chaplain's 
death. He was instantly killed by a shell which 


fell through the roof of the dressing-hut and struck 
him while attending a wounded man. His service 
was held to-day in the little village in the midst of 
those he loved so well and whom he called his 
children. I saw him just before and immediately 
after his death, as I was around the spot at the time. 
The work of the boys in general has been magnifi- 
cent; no sacrifice seems too great. 

I made my Easter duty about two weeKs ago. 
Good-bye for now. 


FROM E. C. AMOS, R.C.N.V.C. 


H.M.C.S. “ Stadacona," 
Halifax, Feb. 4th, 1918. 


пор о-оо We have been patrolling all winter—at 
least, that is what it is officially called; amongst 
ourselves we call it all sorts of things, complimentary 
or otherwise, according to the mood of the moment. 
We are five days in and five out. Of our five days in 
port, we spend the best part of two, coaling, watering 
and provisioning ship.. The remaining time, save for 
the ship's regular routine, is spent mostly on shore 
trying to shake пра“ time," which generally mater- 
ialises. 

Our patrol work is occasionally varied by convoy 
work, which is often quite a relief. 

The whole business may sound rather mono- 
tonous, but we certainly don't find it so, as there are a 
hundred things to make it interesting, and at times 


quite lively. We have had our share of dirty weather, 
and it is excitin enough in a small way when things 
begin to slide about and you have to hang on to 
whatever is handiest, to avoid being pitched along 
the deck. 


Now that I am watchkeeping, I find it very different 
from what it was last summer, when I was in training 
and had no responsibilities. It is watch on and watch 
off, and the beauty of it is that a thousand and one 
things, which must be attended to, invariably turn 
up when you feel like turning in during your watch 
off. Such is life! 


I met Duncan Desbarats ashore the other day. It 
was the first time I had seen him for a year. We had 
dinner together, followed by a long chat. He has 
joined the Wireless Branch, and is, I believe, an 
operator on one of our trawlers, the ‘‘ Festubert.” . . 


FROM FLIGHT-LIEUT. GORDON M. CARLIN 


Witley Camp, Surrey, Eng., 
Sept 12th, 1917 


I had a wonderful time when on leave. I went 
to see Brother O'Connor, of the Presentation Brothers 
in Dublin; he entertained us for a day and wired 
their. house at Killarney. The Brother Superior 
met me at the station, and after luncheon, sent 
several of the Brothers with me to visit the beauty 
spots. I spent two days with them; Killarney with 
‘‘its lakes and fells " is truly an earthly paradise, 
and, in my opinion, the most beautiful spot in the 
world. 


Mychett Camp, Aldershot, Eng., 
Sept. 22nd, 1917 


Yesterday afternoon at 2 o'clock, we left Witley 
on a fourteen-mile march. We arrived here at 
5.45 P.M., which was pretty good, considering that 
we carried our rifles and kit. One meat sandwich 
and one jam sandwich were given us to last from 
dinner to to- morrow's breakfast. 

This morning Reveille sounded at 5.15; then 
en route " for the firin ranges. When dismissed, 
Bob Coughlin and I went to Aldershot, finding 
much to interest us. We made enquiries and were 


directed to the Catholic Church, where a Father 
O'Flaherty heard our confessions. 

Monday evening next, all the Loyola boys, that is, 
Lieuts. Burke, Kearney, Pickett, with Gunners 
McLaughlin, Tellier, Coughlin, Browne, Leach, 
Moore and myself are to have a photograph taken; 
this is to be followed by a Loyola banquet. The 
Irish Rangers have been here before us, as their 
crest is painted on the wall. 


Royal Naval Air Station, Roehampton, 
April 4th, 1918 


Some answers to your queries: (1) In ascending 
we let out ballast, that is, shake out sand. If we 
threw out a bag at a time, the chance pedestrian’s 
feelings might be hurt. (2) We are forbidden to 
stay above clouds more than 15 minutes when wind 
is blowing towards sea. (3) Parachutes are O.K. 
You jump overboard, drop a hundred feet, get a 
nice jar when it opens and float safely (?) to the 
ground. 

Advice in making parachute descents. (Gems 
taken from one of our manuals). (1) If you land on 
telegraph wires, grab two, as one may break. (2) If 
crashing against a building, get something more 
secure than the rain-pipe as it may give way. (3) 
When landing in a tree, grasp a strong limb. 


FROM CORPORAL J. STANLEY HUGHES 


France Dec. 22nd, 1917 


Since writing last, things have been pretty hot 
along the line, but fortunately, except for a few bad 
scares, I am O.K. to date; we have been working 
day and night. Nothing gives me £reater pleasure 
than to shoot a few of our iron tonic pills over to 
Fritz to divide among himself and his friends— 
if he has any. : 

Our boys have done splendid work, not without 
paying the Great Price, but please do not worry, 
for with the help of God, I shall pull through as I 
did here before; so just continue praying for me 


that some day soon I shall be back to Home Sweet 
Home with everyone I love so much. : 

I heard this A.M. that an old pal of mine, when at 
Loyola, was killed yesterday at Ypres, namely 
Stanton Hudson. I saw him just the other day; 
he was in the best of spirits and we had an interesting 
talk about Loyola and the good old days there. 
I promised to go over again to-day, and when I 
£ot around to his Company, I was informed he had 
been killed. They say he was the last man left at 
his post and that he died a hero's death. He has 
since been recommended for the D.C.M. 


LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 49 


FROM GUNNER JOHN COUGHLIN 


England, Feb. 10th, 1918. 


It is very beautiful here now, especially in this 
spot, among pretty hills and a quaint town not far 
away. It is easy to jump around from one country 
to another over here—in peace times. During my 
journey from Petewawa to Digby, I might have 
crossed several countries, or at least have touched 
them, had I covered an equal amount of ground on 
this side and chosen the route well. 

To-night is our last Saturday in England, so all the 
R.C’s. are going to confession and communion. 
All the priests.we see now are soldiers. It took me 
quite a while to get used to seeing khaki showing 
beneath the robes, instead of black. But they are 
all splendid men and a good many of them have been 
gassed and wounded, themselves. So they know 
just how to handle the boys and what they are up 
against. 

France, March 29th, 1918. 


Bob and I are living in a splinter-proof dug-out. 
I am glad to hear that father is still so interested in 
the Collegé team. I would like to have seen some of 
those games, especially the one in which “ Irish ” 
Lonergan kept Loyola in the running by tying the 
score with McGill in the last half-minute. 

Just at present we are situated in a very interesting 
place in the line and, if it were possible, I could 
send home all kinds of souvenirs; the curio dealers 
at home would pay large prices for them, while here 
they are regarded as so much old ‘ junk." 

There are several nests of larks near us, and all 
day, from morning to the last thing at night, they are 
singing their beautiful songs. They start the mo- 
ment they leave the ground and soar up almost out 
of sight, singing all the time; but as soon as they 
start to drop to earth, their songs cease. It is too 
bad we haven't some of those birds in Canada. 
'There was one near my tent in Petewawa which often 
woke me up in the morning with its song. 

I have also seen butterflies floating around on 
bright days; can you imagine butterflies in Canada 
in March? We have passed through some beautiful 
country and also through some that is badly battered 
up. In some parts, only a few miles from the battle- 
line, one would not know there was a war going on. 
All the fields are вгееп ог ploughed; trees are bud- 
ding and birds sing all day. 


France, March 3ist, 1918. 


We are living in dug-outs now, nice little holes dug 
into the ground; it is surprising how comfortable 
one can make himself in a dug-out. Of course one 
has to work hard to accomplish this. 


FROM LIEUT. JOHN 


Belgium Nov. 12, 1917 


France is a peculiar looking country: the roads . 


wind through: the water like the rivers at home run 
through the land. Geologists might find fault with 
the statement that I am about to make, but I could 
find lots of eye-witnesses to support me when I say 
that the lowest level at which water can be found 
in this country is about a foot and a half above the 
ground...... 
Nov. 18, 1917 
ho Gu S I was at Communion on Sunday. It 
may be the last chance I shall have before going 
forward, so I made the best use of it. The strange 
part of it was that I received after breakfast for the 
first time іп my life. . . . . . 


Nov. 23, 1917 


Wr ub pet I am not staying long in any one place. 
The last spot we were in was a hot one. Fritz shelled 


Yesterday I had my first experience of shell-fire. 
It was my turn to go up, and on the way we had to go. 
through a position which was being shelled by Fritz. 
As soon as we would hear one coming, we would 
start for the nearest ditch or shell-hole, and try to 
make ourselves as small as possible. Two of them 
landed near us and threw up lots of dirt, but that 
was all! 


France, April 5th, 1918. 


I hear that the College lost out in the City League. 
That was hard luck for they gave the others a good 
run. Is the College getting out an ‘‘ Annual" this 
year? If so, don't forget to send. me one over. 


France, March 14th, 1918. 


Bob and I have been in France for quite a while, 
and are more or less used to hear them whistling 
over our heads. Seven shrapnel shells burst over 
my head the other morning at 3.30 while I was on 
£uard and sprinkled the field behind me with their 
little love messages. No harm was done but it 
kept me rather interested for a while. 

We are in a pretty quiet part of the line; the shells 
bother us only occasiónally. The mud and rain have 
caused us more discomfort. When we first came here 
it rained for a whole week, however we are in fine 
shape now. We have to work hard, but when we 
get into the dug-out and start our oil-can stove with 
the cartridge-case pipe, all our worries disappear. 
You would never know there was a war on, if you 
would drop in suddenly and see us cooking porridge 
and warbling away about the '' Sunshine of your 
Smile." 

I have seen many of the boys; ‘‘ Happy’ Mc- 
Laughlin was over to see me to-day, Bob also was 
over; he is signalling-observer. I have not seen 
John Kearney yet. I had a bit of luck in London. 
Bob and I met Carlin there; he is in the Air Service. 
I was sorry to hear the College was defeated in the 
City League, but there are plenty of more seasons 
coming. How is the old “ Annual"' this year; all 
the boys are impatient to receive a copy and you can 
be sure that it will be received nowhere with greater 
enthusiasm. We never knew what a good old place 
the College is until we got away from it. I am 
looking forward to that class-reunion which is to take 
place in a couple of years. The boys will have some 
interesting experiences to relate at that gathering. 


KEARNEY, C.F.A. 


us every night but the best he got out of it was five 


.mules. It is a peculiar sensation to be under fire 


in the dark; you see when a big gun is pointed directly 
at us, we can hear it easily above all the other noise. 
We then wait for the scream of the shell and the 
explosion, which follow. Why, we can hear the 
report of the gun before it gets to us because it has 
a high trajectory and takes a long time in its flight. 
It is much the same as sitting in the dark and having 
some one unwinding the wire from an old-style 
gingerale bottle. One can hear the fizz and know what 
is coming but it is inconvenient not knowing whether 
you or someone else is going to get it in the face. 
I have said good-bye to my kit. It has been a nuisance 
to be without it, when one sleeps on the ground. 
The rats have an affectionate way of rubbing their 
fur against your cheek. This is a soothing sensation 
and not so very disagreeable but some of the blighters 
spoil the party by putting their feet in your mouth. . . 


VERY REVEREND WILLIAM. POWER, S.J. 
Representative of Father General of the Society of Jesus. 
Father Power has written for us the 


article entitled “The College and the 
Battlefield "—on the opposite page. 


LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 5l 


The College and the Battlefield 


(By Father Power, S.J.) 


It has fallen to the lot of the present 
generation to see the whole world convulsed 
as it never has been before. A gigantic 
struggle is taking place under our very eyes, 
taxing to the utmost the national resources 
of the different belligerents, and creating 
many a difficult problem which unborn 
generations will be called on to solve. The 
piping times of peace have long since been 
relegated to the realms of romance, and 
tocsin, trumpet and drum mingle their 
discordant notes to fire the warrior's soul 
and send with doubled speed the blood 
coursing through his veins. At such a crisis 
it is but natural that the claims of patriotism 
should resound in every ear and that Nel- 
son’s spirit should be evoked, to trumpet 
forth once more his famous appeal for every 
man to do his duty. Private citizens are 
challenged as to the share they are taking 
in the general storm and stress, and still 
more, public institutions, and most of all, 
such public institutions as Loyola, which 
boldly disclaim all private selfish aims as 
totally at variance with their spirit and 
character, and profess to live and to work 
simply for the general weal. | 

Many а man prone to superficial observa- 
tion and hasty conclusions would be tempted 
to say: In times of peace such institutions 
certainly have their advantages, for they 
teach the arts of peace, but of what service 
can they be when the din of battle stuns our 
ears, and monstrous engines of destruction 
are belching forth havoc and death on every 
side? My answer to such a query will be 
brief and pointed. It is a grievous error to 
think that the efficiency of such a College as 
Loyola is limited to times of public tran- 
quility. It continues to render incalculable 
services to the country even after the war- 
trumpet has sounded, and dismal scenes of 
strife and carnage loom up before our view. 
Nor are those services to be regarded. as a 
casual by-product, but as the natural result 
of College training. For the College training 
is so constituted as eminently to qualify a 
young man for the military career, and I will 
£o so far as to say that there is not a single 


department of its activity that does not con- 
tribute most effectively to this object. Some 
might be tempted to look on this last state- 
ment as being somewhat in the nature of a 
rhetorical flourish, not intended to be taken 
at its full face value. Such, however, is far 
from being the mind of the writer. It is his 
contention, strange as it may seem to some, 
that in the most ample and definite sense 
which the terms can bear, every department 
of College training and activity contributes 
most effectively for the formation of a good 
soldier, should the graduate, having finished 
his course, be called on to enter on a military 
career. 

To begin with that particular department 
of College life which is certainly the lowest 
in dignity, and to all appearances the least 
related to a military formation, the athletic 
sports; it certainly has some very decided 
advantages. If it be true on the one hand, 
as no sound educator will deny, tbat to 
give undue prominence to such games and 
general physical training would simply be to 
divert the College from its proper purpose, 
and make of it a mere athletic club; yet on 
the other, to refuse the students a fair and 
reasonable allowance of both would simply 
be to ignore their very nature, to dull their 
energies, and to compromise in a manner 
the whole work of the College. Now this 
fair and reasonable amount of physical 
exercise found in such sports and games 
helps in no small measure to qualify the 
student for a future military career. In 
proof of this it should be sufficient to adduce 
the testimony of an eminent military author- 
ity, a man cast in too severe and stern a 
mould to value such sports simply for their 
own sake. I refer to the Iron Duke, as he 
was called, who did not hesitate to ascribe 
in great part his victory at Waterloo to the 
work done on the cricket fields at Eton. 
Who indeed can doubt that the strenuous 
contests of the College campus, and the 
physical resources they develop, the quick 
eye, the nimble limbs, the well-set frame, 
the sturdy back, the tense sinews and 
muscles are a very valuable asset to the man 


52 LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


called on to face the grim horrors of a modern 
battlefield, and to go through the countless 
manoeuvres and evolutions that its tactics 
demand. Place alongside of him a youth 
who has received a home training under the 
eye of a private tutor, and see the vast 
disparity between the two. 

This service, however, considerable as it 
is, is the least of those advantages which 
the aspirant to military honors will reap from 
his College training. Another of a much 
higher order is the discipline or outward 
moral formation to which he has been 
attuned. Itis needless to insist on the para- 
mount necessity of discipline and organiza- 
tion foran army. Without this it degenerates 
simply into an armed mob and marches to 
slaughter rather than to victory. It is not 
to be wondered at that the old saying: 
“The regulars always beat the militia ” 
has won for itself proverbial authority. Their 
superior discipline is of itself alone sufficient 
to account for the fact. Now in every Col- 
lege worthy of the name, for several reasons 
discipline is held in the highest honor, is 
regarded in fact by those charged with its 
administration as for tlie College a matter of 
life or death, since without it, it is impossible 
for the institution to conduct its work pro- 
perly, or to reach its object. Serious study 
imperatively demands such discipline, nei- 
ther teacher nor student can possibly dis- 
pense with it. Let listlessness, levity or 
irregularity profane tliis home of the Muses, 
application of mind and concentration ‘be- 
come an impossibility, and ignorance not 
knowledge will reign within its walls. But 
it is not simply in the interest of study that 
discipline is so rigorously insisted upon, but 
also for a much higher object, at least in the 
eyes of all Catholic educators: the formation 
of character. Hence order and constancy in 
the distribution of time, nothing being left 
to the whim of the moment. Hence silence 
to form habits of thought and reflection. 
Hence submission and due subordination to 
proper authority. Hence also diligence and 
fidelity in the accomplishment of such tasks 
as may be imposed. Who does not see in all 
this the numberless opportunities afforded 
the student for engaging in that grandest of 
moral exercises, Self-conquest, the far-famed 
" Vince teipsum," It is with good reason 


that the poet has written ‘‘ Self-knowledge, 
self-reverence, self-control— These three 
alone lead life to sovereign power." And 
were he to enter the walls of any well- 
conducted Catholic College he would have 
ample opportunities to see the practical 
verification of his doctrine. Here then is a 
second great feature of College life and 
activity which eminently qualifies the student 
for a military career should his country's 
needs call him to that field of action. 

A third great department of effort and 
endeavor for a College is of course the train- 
ing of mind, intellectual development, and 
here again its effectiveness as a preparation 
for military achievements later on, must 
become apparent to all. For after all, do 
not men as intelligent beings, battle much 
more with their brains than with their 
hands? Look at animals in conflict rending 
and tearing each other, giving simply an 
exhibition of sheer brute force. Barbarians 
will rise just a degree higher, using a certain 
measure of craft and cunning, but still their 
hostility, as a rule, takes the form of wild 
undisciplined valor. But pass now to highly 
civilized men and see the immense part 
which intelligence has to play. Even in 
ancient times, especially among the Greeks 
and the Romans we see the large part which 
intelligence had to play in their military 
achievements. It is remarkable that the 
inspired book of the Macabees, speaking of 
the latter, ascribe their conquests to their 


-intelligence and patience rather than to 
mere bravery. 


The writer can remember 
well seeing some years ago an inscription in 
large characters on the walls of an Italian 
barracks, reminding the soldier that his 
best and most effective weapon was “Il 
coraggio calmo ed intelligente," Now if 
such intelligence be claimed from the man 


in the ranks what about the superior officers, 


the captains and the colonels? What about 
the commander-in-chief himself? Is it not 
above all things else a feat of intelligence, a 
work of brains? And is it not plain and 
patent to all that where this intelligence is 
wanting no amount of personal bravery can 
make up for its absence? A skilful enemy 
will know full well how to exploit this very 
bravery for his own purposes. Hence, to 
resume the thread of the argument, Colleges, 


LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 53 


as professedly aiming at intellectual develop- 
ment, should receive high recognition in the 
military world. 

Doubtless more than one votary of Mars 
will be ready with an objection obvious 
enough of its very nature. Were Colleges 
to frame their curriculum so as to deal 
mainly with scientific questions bearing on 
military matters, their services would cer- 
tainly be incalculable, but they devote their 
attention to totally different branches of 
study, such as literature, philosophy, history, 
that have nothing to do with our special 
craft. The answer to this objection involves 
an appeal to a great fundamental principle 
of instruction only too frequently ignored 
in these days of unsound pedagogical 
methods. It is that the first great requisite 
for sound and successful specialization in 
any particular field whatever, is a thorough 
all-round intellectual formation, which may 
serve as а раѕіѕ for the work of specialization, 
and a remote preparation for the object 
ultimately desired. To act otherwise is to 
narrow and cramp the mind, to limit exceed- 
ingly the range of its vision, to give a false 
bias to the judgment by rendering it in- 
capable of viewing things except under a 
single aspect. Rather strive first to develop 
in a general manner the intellectual re- 


sources of the student, and to enrich his 


mind with a good supply of noble, beautiful 
thoughts, initiate him into the great art of 


application and concentration, exercise him 


in different fields of thought, teach him how 
to explore and to explain how to analyze 
and to combine. This done, let him special- 
ize to his heart's content, be itas a physician, 
as an engineer, as a lawyer, as a banker, as 
a soldier and rest assured that this primary 
all-round formation will prove of incalculable 
service to him in the studies to follow and 
that ere long he will far outstrip his com- 
petitor of the short-cut who from the benches 
of the high school takes a sudden jump to 
some advanced University course. 

An experienced engineer boldly declared 
that were there question of building a rail- 
road, other things being equal, he would 
prefer a man well versed in Greek. Had he 
been questioned as to what possible 
relation there might be between the two, he 
doubtless would have replied in the sense of 


this article that whatsoever tends to develop 
intellectual power, to enrich a man’s fund 
of mentality, will make itself felt in whatever 
field of activity he may choose to enter. 
Such a reply will serve to explain the claim 
made on this score for our Colleges in con- 
nection with the war. 


The supreme field of endeavor in a 
Catholic College such as Loyola, is the field 
of religion, for it consecrates in a manner 
the whole order of its activity and far from 
interfering in any way with the three other 
departments already mentioned, rather se- 
conds and supports them and adds im- 
mensely to their efficiency. The College 
student, because of this religious training, 
will be all the better qualified to make an 
excellent soldier. From the days of Joshua 
to those of the Maccabees and from those 
of the Maccabees to those of the Crusaders 
and thence to the Knights of St. John and 
down to our own time we have numberless 
instances of what religion can do to make a 
truly accomplished warrior,a man of the 
type of Bayard, '' Le chevalier sans peur et 
sans reproche." For the truly religious man 
every duty becomes a sacred duty, and 
viewing matters in this light he feels the 
sense of honor and loyalty grow daily 
stronger within his breast. Religion is a 
source of inspiration for noble sentiments 
and for high and generous endeavor. Re- 
ligion is the fostering mother of virtues most 
essential to the soldier, such as patience in 
privation, reverence for authority, vigilance 
and diligence, heroic self-sacrifice, fortitude 
in braving the terrors of death. Religion is 
also the soldier's best protection against 
more subtle and insidious foes than hostile 
steel, for many a heart that escaped the 
missiles of the enemy was pierced by other 
shafts touched with unholy fire, which still 
left him perchance his life, but a life bereft 
of all that could make it worth the living, 
bereft of all beauty, honor and worth. 


In these then and in many other ways will 
religion prove a most valuable resource for 
the soldier, and the Colleges which along 
with the other branches strive to promote 
it, are a most valuable acquisition for the 
state, no less in time of war than in time of 
peace. 


54 . LOYOLA COLLEGE КЕК LEW 


If, in addition to the arguments adduced 
in proof of this our contention, further con- 
firmation were sought in the shape of un- 
answerable deeds and facts, Loyola is ready 
to come forward with her bright roll of 
honor inscribed with the glowing eulogies 
pronounced upon her sons by superior 
officers who stood as witnesses of their 


deeds. The grandest eulogy, however, that 
crowns their merits is not recorded in 
human speech but in the crimson streams 
with which they have dyed many a field 
while charging in the foremost ranks of their 
country’s defenders. 


WILLIAM POWER, S.J. 


R. 3. M. 


Solemn Requiem Mass 


for the following Deceased Members of the Staff and Students of Loyola College was sung in 
the College Chapel on November 27th, 1917, at 8.30 o'clock:— 


Rev. Peter Cassidy, S.J. Jan. 19, 1902 Rev. Benj. Hazelton, S.J. Sept. 1, 1908 
Rev. John Coffee, S.J. Sept. 26, 1916 Rev. Victor Hudon, S.J. Oct. 4, 1913 
Rev. John Connolly, S.J. Nov. 16, 1911 Rev. George Kenny, S.J. Sept. 26, 1912 
Rev. Bernard Devlin, S.J. June 4,1915 Rev. Rod. Lachapelle, S.J. Feb. 19,1901 
Rev. William Doherty, S.J. Mar. 3,1907 Rev. Gregory O'Bryan, S.J. June 6,1907 
Rev. John Forhan, SJ. Aug. 11, 1916 Rev. Eugene Schmidt, S.J. May 21,1904 
Rev. Martin Fox, S.J. July 27,1915 Rev. Lactance Sigouin, S.J. Mar. 29, 1898 
Rev. Augustus Girard, S.J. Jan. 20,1916 Rev. Adrian Turgeon, S.J. Sept. 8, 1912 
Rev. Joseph Grenier, S.J. May 4, 1913 Mr. Francis Coll, S.J. Jan. 12, 1900 
Rev. Peter Hamel, S.J. June 6, 1905 Bro. George Brown, S.J. Dec. 7, 1901 


Mr. Cuthbert Udall, July 5, 1911 


Acton, William 
Armstrong, Lawrence 
Baxter, Quigg 
Blanchard, George 
Butler, Herbert 
Brady, Terence 
Brown, Henry 
Burke, John 
Cagney, Clarence 
Carriere, Charles 
Caveny, Martin 
Chevalier, Jacques 
Cloran, Edward 
Condon, Leo 

Daly, George 
Doran, Francis 


Farrell, Edward 
Hooper, James 
Howe, John 
Kavanagh, Joseph 
Keyes, Michael 
Lafontaine, C. Paul 
Maguire, Francis 
Macdonald, Fraser 
Marson, Robert 
Marson, Walter 
Morgan, Henry 
McGee, Francis 
McGee, James 
McKenna, Adrian 
McGoldrick, John 


McGovern, Arthur 
Monk, Henry 
Nagle, Gregory 
O’Brien, Richard 
Page, Severin 
Perodeau, Charles 
Poupore, Leo 
Rolland, Wilfrid 
Rousseau, Henry 
Ryan, Francis 
Shallow, Arthur 
Smith, Arthur 
Smith, Charles 
Tate, Louis 
Walsh, John 


Che Requiem Mass next November 


will be sung for Father Jones and the following О. L. Boys who have since died :— 


Lawrence Barbeau, Arthur Dissette, Francis Dissette, J. de Beaujeu Domville, James 
Grant, Stanton Hudson, Melvin Johnson, Leo Le Boutillier, Donald McArthur, Francis 
McNamee, Francis McKenna, Guy Palardy, Chisholm Pearson, Edward Plunkett, John 
Shallow,.Leo Shortall, Henri de Varennes, Maurice Vidal, John Wilkins. 


CAPT. THE HON. CHARLES GAVAN POWER, M.C.; M.P. 
Old Loyola (1898-1907), B.A. '07. 
Capt. Power—or “Chubby”? Power as we knew him during his ten 


years at Loyola—after distinguished service at the front was elected 
last December M.P.for Quebec South—Loyola’ s first Parliamentarian. 


j6 LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


Che Reb. Arthur €. Hones, S.F. 


Readers of ‘‘ Loyola College Review " will 
regret to learn of the passing away of a 
former Rector of Loyola College, the Rev. 
Arthur Edward Jones, S.J., whose death 
occurred at Montreal, January 19th, at the 
ripe age of seventy-nine years, sixty of 
which he had spent in the Society of Jesus. 
Father Jones, whose family was of United 
Empire Loyalist stock, was born at Brock- 
‘ville, Ontario, November 17th, 1838. Не 
made his classical studies at St. Mary’s 
College, Montreal, and entered the Jesuit 
Order in France in 1857. After his course of 
philosophy he taught humanities and rhetoric 
with brilliant success for several years in 
New York and Fordham. Не made his 
theological studies at Woodstock, Maryland, 
where he had as professor the celebrated 
Father (later Cardinal) Mazella. He was 
raised to the priesthood in 1873, and, during 
the following ten years he exercised an 
active public ministry in New York, Guelph, 
and Montreal. For eight years he was 
Editor of the Canadian Messenger and for 
three years Rector of Loyola College. He 
was also the first chaplain of the Catholic 
Sailors’ Club, founded in 1893, an institution 
which has done so much good among the 
thousands of Catholic sailors who make 
their yearly visits to the port of Montreal. 

As early as 1885 Father Jones began to 
develop a taste for the study of the early 
mission history of Canada, the study which 
was to occupy the rest of his life. Soon he 
became a recognised authority, perhaps the 
greatest in America, on the Canadian mis- 
sions between 1611 and 1800. Out of his 
documentary treasures he furnished material 
for a number of volumes of the splendid 
edition ot the ‘‘ Jesuit Relations and Allied 
Documents," contributing thereto, according 
to their Editor, R. С. Thwaites, ‘‘ invaluable 
suggestions and data almost without num- 
ber.” 


Father Jones made an exhaustive personal 
search in Simcoe County, Ont., in 1902, to 
discover the scene of the martyrdom of 
Fathers Brebeuf and Lalemant. The learned 
treatise of 500 pp., “ Old Huronia," which 
he wrote on the ancient Huron Country, 
was the occasion of his receiving the hono- 
rary degree of LL.D. from the University of 
Toronto. At the Louisiana Purchase Exposi- 
tion, held in St. Louis, Mo., in 1904, he won 
the Grand Prize for his Historical and 
Archeological Exhibit, with a gold medal 
for himself as archivist. He was a Fellow 
of the Royal Society of Canada. He was a 
Member of the International Congress of 
Americanists and addressed that learned 
body on Huron topography, in Quebec, in 
1906. He was a Corresponding Member 
of the various Historical Societies of North 
America. 

This learned old Jesuit was remarkable 
for his humility, his simplicity of manner and 
his kindness of heart, as many old Loyola 
boys will recall. He has left behind him to 
mourn his loss many friends of long standing 
among all classes. Although he had a long 
active life he worked on assiduously till its 
close. No one appeared to feel more 
vividly than he how quickly the years were 
passing, and when he saw that the end was 
near he laid down his pen to prepare himself 
for his proximate passage into eternity. 
Pathetic detail! the date which marked the 
sixtieth anniversary of his entry into his 
Order was the last on which he was able to 


. say Mass. After lingering a few days longer, 


Father Jones gave up his soul to God. He 
went to meet those heroic old missionaries 
of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries 
whom he loved so well and whose lives 
have, through his efforts, become familiar to 
thousands of Canadian readers.—R. I. P. 


E J. D, 


R.I.P. 


THE LATE REV. ARTHUR E. JONES, S.J., F.R.S.C., LL.D. 
Former Rector of Loyola College 


58 LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


Sodality 38.9.48. 


The first meeting of the Sodality of the 
Blessed Virgin Mary for the year 1917-18 
was held in the Sodality Chapel on the morn- 
ing of October 6th, 1917. Rev. Father J. 
Milway Filion, S.J., the new Moderator, 
made several important changes in the 
functions and programme for this year. 
The first of these changes was, that the 
weekly meeting should be held on Satur- 
day morning at 8.30 o'clock, instead of 
Sunday evening as last year, to facilitate 
the regular attendance of Day-Scholars. 
The second change was to abolish the social 
entertainments generally held after the 
spiritual exercises. Father Moderator, in 
explanation of this action, said that, in his 
opinion, true Sodalists needed no entice- 
ments to bring them regularly to the meet- 
ings. 

An election of officers for the year then 
followed. Candidates were nominated, and 
a ballot was taken, the result being as 
follows: 

Prefect, Wilfred Noonan; ist Assistant, 
Frederick Hudon; 2nd Assistant, Roy Dillon; 
1st Councillor, Robert E. Anglin; 2nd Coun- 
cillor, Henry Smeaton; Sacristan, Antoine 
Wendling; Secretary, Paul Wickham. 

A few weeks later a Junior Branch was 
formed, under the same Moderator, and on 
exactly the same lines as the Senior Branch, 
holding its meetings, however, on Wednes- 
days at the same hour. 


The officers are as follows :— 


Prefect, Edmund Brannen; 1st Assistant, 
Alexander McGovern; 2nd Assistant, Ed- 
mund McCaffrey; 1st Councillor, Cuthbert 
Scott; 2nd Councillor, Daniel Taugher; 
Sacristan, John McDougal; Secretary, Brian 
Hammond. 

Throughout the year Fr. Moderator has 
given the Sodalists a most instructive series 
of lectures outlining the characteristics of 
the true Sodalist. Of the meetings held 
during the year, the following may be con- 
sidered the most important: November 
15th, the Feast of St. Stanislaus Kotska; 
December 8th, the Feast of the Immaculate 
Conception, on which occasion the reception 
of Senior Candidates took place, and Rev. 
Father Power, S.J., spoke in glowing terms 
on the ''Necessity of True Devotion '"; 
February 2nd, the Feast of the Purification, 
when the Junior Candidates were received 
into the Sodality and Rev. Father Reid, of 
St. Patrick’s Orphanage, spoke eloquently 
on the “ Devotion that all should practise 
towards our Heavenly Mother"; April 
8th, the Solemnity of the Feast of the 
Annunciation, when all those candidates 
were received who had been absent at 
previous receptions. 


PAUL WICKHAM. 


Old Loyola Boys awarded Military Cross during past year. 


CAPTAIN HARRY O’LEARY, CAPTAIN WILLIAM MORGAN, 
Old Loyola, 1909. Old Loyola, 1910. 
CAPTAIN FREDERICK O'LEARY, LIEUT. J. DE GASPE AUDETTE, 


Old Loyola, 1897. Old Loyola, 1911. 


60 LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


Gas Newman Successful? 


“11 is the rule of Providence that we should succeed by failure” (Newman—Letter to Lord Braye, 1882) 


It is a strange fact that nearly every work 
to which Newman put his hand ended in 
failure. Whether, as one of his biographers 
suggests, this was due to qualities in his 
own temperament, of which he was un- 
conscious, or whether, as is more likely, 
the prejudice and suspicion of his со- 
religionists and external circumstances were 
to blame, certain it is that all his under- 
takings,—the '' Apologia " alone excepted— 
were unsuccessful. 

As a young tutor at Oriel he had attempted 
to support the High Church party against the 
Liberal School, but his zeal created mis- 
understandings between the Provost and 
himself and led to his being deprived of his 
tutorship. Later, as the recognized leader 
of the Tractarian Movement, he strove to 
protect the Anglican Church from the on- 
slaughts of atheism, but his ‘‘ Romanizing "' 
views roused the suspicions of the Oxford 
authorities. The publication of tract 90, in 
1841, forced him to leave, at the time the 
University, and later the very Church he 
had wished so faithfully to serve. 

As a priest Newman came to the defence 
of his fellow-Catholics in 1850 when the 
“ No-Popery " feeling, caused by the re- 
establishment of the Catholic hierarchy, 
was at its height throughout England. Ina 
series of discourses known as the Corn 
Exchange Lectures, he dwelt on the position 
of Catholics in England, incidentally at- 
tacking a certain Dr. Achilli, who had her- 
alded himself before the public as a prisoner 
escaped from the Roman Inquisition. The 
result was a suit for libel, and though the 
evidence was all on Newman's side, the 
prejudice of judge, jury and people turned 
the verdict in favour of Achilli. Newman's 
first appearance as champion of the Catholic 
cause brought down failure and enormous 
costs of litigation upon his shoulders. 

During the trial he had been asked by Dr. 


Cullen, Archbishop of Armagh, to found and’ 


govern as its first Rector, a Catholic Univer- 
sity in Ireland. Newman undertook the 
task, but was balked and thwarted at every 


step by the very man who had solicited his 
help. Two long years were wasted in en- 
deavouring to overcome the distrust of the 
Irish clergy and laity. Then in 1853 came 
the report that Newman was to be made 
Bishop. Congratulations began to pour in 
from all sides. His bishopric would put him 
on an equal footing with the members of the 
Irish synod, and do away with any inter- 
ference on their part in his management of 
the University. But though the Pope, 
Cardinal Wiseman, and all the clergy of 
England and Ireland seemed to approve of 
this step, nothing ever materialized. “ That 
elevation" to use Newman’s own words, 
“which was so publicly announced, was 
suddenly and silently reversed." Nor did 
Newman ever discover the real reason of 
such a quick change of front. Hemmed in 
as he was by the restrictions of Dr. Cullen 
and treated no longer as a possible candidate 
for the mitre, Newman realized that his 
office of Rector was merely nominal, and in 
1857 resigned. His hopes for another 
Oxford, the intellectual centre for English 
and Irish Catholics had not been fulfilled. 

No sooner was his connection with the 
Irish University broken, than he was called 
upon by Wiseman to undertake an English 
version of the Scriptures. The honour of 
being chosen for such a task was a signal 
one, but after a waste of much time and 
money, the matter was allowed by the 
hierarchy to fall to the ground. Newman 
felt that if he continued with the work '' It 
would be made as great a hash of as the 
Irish University had been hashed." The 
seeming indifference of the Cardinal and the 
Episcopate had cut him to the quick. 

But the greatest perhaps of all his dis- 
appointments came a few years later. In 
March 1859, he had accepted the editorship 
of the ‘‘ Rambler," a Catholic journal hither- 
to conducted by laymen of rather liberal 
views. On account of its intellectualism, 
the paper had been considered by the 
English bishops as inclining towards heresy. 
There is no doubt that the editors—Sir John 


62 LOYOLA СО БЕ ЕСЕ МСЕ ИЕ 


Acton and Richard Simpson—were at times 
rash in their statements, especially when 
they attempted to dabble in theology, but 
they were perhaps forced to their extreme 
attitude by the stringent policy of the Vatican 
and the fanatical outbursts of such men as 
Veuillot in France and Ward in England. 
Newman who foresaw the amount of possible 
good the ‘‘ Rambler ” could accomplish if 
properly handled, undertook its editorship. 
He hoped to moderate its tone without 
lessening its influence as an intellectual 
review for Catholics. But he soon found his 
position untenable. The excesses of Acton 
and Simpson were laid at Newman’s door, 
and though personally he did not sympathize 
with them in all their views, he was regarded 
by others as their leader and adviser. He 
was forced after only one issue to resign 
office. 

His connection with the “ Rambler,” 
short as it was, had given him a doubtful 
name with the clergy, and to his over- 
sensitive nature the suspicion of his fellow- 
Catholics, and in particular of the hierarchy, 
was a most bitter trial. His correspondence 
about this time shows the sadness that 
depressed him. In a letter written in 1862 
to his friend, Father Ambrose St. John, we 
find the following passage referring to a 
statement Newman himself had made at 
the Achilli trial ten years previous:— 

“І then said that as I was 20 I was cut 
off from the rising talent of the University 
by my failure in the schools, as when 30, I 
was cut off from distinction in the governing 
body by being deprived of my tutorship, as, 
when 40, I was virtually cast out of the 
Church of England by the affair of No. 90; 
as, when 50, I was cast out of what may be 
called society by the disgrace of the Achilli 
sentence, so when I should arrive at 60 
years, I should be cast out of the good books 
of Catholics and especially ecclesiastical 
authorities. This appals me in this way :— 
viz., whatis to happen if I live to be seventy?’’ 

What happened to Newman before he 
eventually reached that age, may be told in 
а few words. Seeing that after his failure in 
Ireland, the founding of a Catholic Univer- 
sity was out of the question, he thought to 
establish at Oxford a mission that would 
protect the faith of the Catholic students at 


the University from the spirit of scepticism 
and infidelity prevailing there. The usual 
trouble and opposition had to be encoun- 
tered, but at last in 1867 everything was 
ready for the scheme: land had been 
bought, money subscribed, permission for 
Newman to go to Oxford had come—so 
Newman was told—from Rome. “ Earlier 
failures do not matter now,’’ was his com- 
ment, '' I see that I have been reserved by 
God for this." But chilling in its unexpected 
suddenness came the word from Newman's 
bishop forbidding him to leave for Oxford. 
'The dream of months was rudely shattered. 
Newman bowed his head under the weight 
of his sorrow and said nothing. But his 
friends were indignant. They insisted on an 
appeal to Rome. This was made, but in 
vain. There was no objection, said the 
Roman authorities, to a mission at Oxford, 
so long as Newman himself did not reside 
there. Yetit had been on this very condition 
that Newman's friends had subscribed to 
the Oxford scheme, and he was placed in 
the awkward position of having gained 
money under false pretences. He therefore 
wrote to his bishop asking permission to 
withdraw from his engagement of under- 
taking the Mission. It was a painful but 
imperative way out of the difficulty. 

'Thus far in his life, Newman had failed. 
The “* Apologia ” gained him for a time praise 
and the plaudits of the whole Catholic 
world, but subsequent events, such as the 
Oxford question, turned public opinion once 
more against him. His books were not read, 
his sermons were scarce listened to, the 
halo of romance that had surrounded him 
when first he came into the Church, had long 
since faded, and he was left alone and for- 
gotten by the world. 

Then at length came the long looked for 
success. In 1879, when 78 years old, he 
received the Cardinal’s hat from Leo XIII. 
The rest of his life passed like a happy 
dream. The cloud of suspicion which had 
hung over him for so long was now lifted; 
his theological views, always considered as 
slightly unorthodox, were vindicated; his 
loyalty to the Holy See rewarded. He 
himself was to be treated no longer as an 
eccentric convert, but as a prince of the 
Church. The world, intellectual and social, 


VIEWS OF THE COLLEGE. 


64 LOYOLA COLLEGE. REVIEW 


woke up to the fact that he was a man 
worth honouring, and gave him the recogni- 
tion that had long been his due. 

And yet we prefer to read about the days 
of his trials and reverses. There is.some- 
thing grandly pathetic, not so much in the 
collapse of all his undertakings, as in the 
spirit with which he endured defeat. Snub- 
bed and misunderstood by those for whom 
he was toiling, heavy at heart and weary of 
soul he drudged faithfully on with his work. 
Though his sensitive nature exaggerated 
the humiliation of failure into a disgrace, he 


never struck aside from the path of duty, 
even when he knew that success was not to 
be his. 

After his elevation to the Cardinalate, he 
became the recognized leader and teacher of 
his people, the great writer, the profound 
thinker, the learned theologian, the saintly 
prelate, but in those dark days of obscurity 
and neglect we find him only the poor priest 
to be pitied for the failure of his under- 
takings, and loved for the undertaking of 
new failures. 


152567517: 


Зи апр, 1918 


Misjudge her not, good friend, nor scoff, nor chide; 


"Tis not a stranger’s part, but past his wit, 


To read what in a nation’s heart is writ, 
Or feel the hidden griefs her soul divide: 
Thou hast not lived her life nor known her pride. 


Dost thou not worship too, at Freedom’s shrine, 
And kneel to her as to a thing divine ? 
So Erin oft for freedom’s light has sighed. 


Angels may not the deeps of conscience sound 


To scan therein the will that moves the hand; 


In every land the sparks must needs abound 


When Freedom's fire unto a flame is fanned; 


She loves not more the Teuton creed than we, 


Her sin is Celtic love of liberty. 


LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 65 


Music 


“ Music 15 а kind of inarticulate unfathomable speech, which leads из to the edge 
of the infinite and lets us for a moment gaze into that.“ — Carlyle. 


What passion cannot music raise and quell! 

When Jubal struck the chorded shell, 

His listening brethren stood around, 

And wondering, on their faces fell 

To worship that celestial sound. 

Less than a god, they thought there could not dwell 

Within the hollow of that shell, 1 

That spoke so sweetly and so well. 

What passion cannot music raise and quell? 
—Dryden. 


Music, the Ideal, has long disappeared 
and with it has vanished the simple, pleasing 
expression of the passions of Love, Joy and 
Sorrow. In its place, Music, the Practical, 
stands triumphant. Technical achievements 
and mathematical relation of the notes are 
now, among students of music, of first con- 
sideration. 

Ruskin, who has understood music both 
Ideal and Practical has defined his concep- 
tion of it in these words: '' The movement 
of sound so as to reach the soul for the 
education of it in virtue,’’ and the great 
purpose of music ‘‘ is to say a thing that you 
mean deeply, in the strongest and clearest 
possible мау.” - 

On hearing a masterpiece by some famous 
composer, even the less enlightened know, 
as if by instinct, that music has a great 
command over their natures. What heart 
of stone, what coldly calculating mind re- 
mains unmoved by a grand chord of music 
struck from the organ by a master-hand? 
What mark of affectation can hide the soul's 
emotion, when through the shadowy cor- 
ners of a great cathedral the solemn notes 
are hurled, like thunder, up to the very 
dome? We feel that music touches the 
very roots of our hearts, it inflames our 
passions and rouses them to the highest 
pitch of frenzy or lowers them to the deepest 
vale of melancholy; again, it crushes our 
spirits and makes us feel sorrowful and sad; 
it fires our imagination, and visions of 
soldiers and battles, the wounded, dead and 
dying pass before our mind’s eye; or, per- 
haps it is gladness, rejoicing, excitement, 
anger, rage and turmoil that is aroused 
within our breast, as the passionate notes 
echo in our ears. 


How well has Dryden expressed these 
varied emotions in his Ode on Alexander’s 
Feast: 

“ Soothed with the sound, the king grew vain; 

Fought all his battles o'er again; 

And thrice he routed all his foes, 

And thrice he slew the slain. 

The master saw the madness rise, 

His glowing cheeks, his ardent eyes; 
And while he heaven and earth defied, 
Changed his hand, and checked his pride. 
He chose a mournful muse, 

Soft pity to infuse, 

He sung Darius, great and good, 

By too severe a fate 

Fallen, fallen, fallen, fallen, 

Fallen from his high estate, 

And weltering in his blood, 

Deserted at his utmost need 

By those his former bounty fed; 

On the bare earth exposed he lies, 
With not a friend to close his eyes. 
With downcast look the joyless victor sate, 
Revolving in his altered soul, 

The various turn of chance below; 
And now and then a sigh he stole, 

And tears began to flow." 


' Music, then, is the language of the heart, 
of the passions, of the soul. Its power 
extends not only over humans, but is felt 
even by the wild beasts. 


“ Orpheus could lead the savage race; 
And trees uprooted left their place, 
Sequacious to the lyre.” 


Handed down the centuries, through 
tradition, are tales and deeds of wonder 
accomplished by the mild sweet tunes of the 
three stringed harp. In Holy Writ it is 
recorded that David was wont to soothe the 
ungovernable fury of King Saul by the 
measured beat of his psalms sung to the 
sweet accompaniment of the harp. The 
bards of the middle ages sang their war- 
hymns and fired their listeners with the 
strength and feeling of their own passions ; 
the Marseillaise hurried on the harpies of 
the Revolution to their bloody excesses, and 
all Paris echoed the songs of the Opera, even 
in the midst of the Reign of Terror. 

To-day as then, music wraps us in joy-or 
sorrow, in rage or in melancholy, its harmony 
carries us body and soul to the very bliss of 
the seventh heaven. We feel new passions 


66 LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


kindled in our breasts, new thoughts rushing 
into our minds, new ideals taking possession 
of our hearts. And yet these passions, 
thoughts and ideals, so new to us, have been 
experienced by thousands of others through- 
out the ages; for, though music, as far as 
mere technicalities or individual melodies 
are concerned, may change as the centuries 
£o by, yet in substance and effect it is always 
the same. Greece had her heroic epics, 
Rome her martial songs; the Troubadours 
of Europe sang of love and chivalry; in 
more recent times the Sacred melodies of 


Mozart and Beethoven have charmed the 
world. Each nation and each century has 
left its own characteristic stamp on the 
Muse's handiwork, but the power of music 
over the passions of men is as unchange- 
able as ever. So will it continue to the end, 
then— 


“ When the last and dreadful hour 
This crumbling pageant shall devour, 
The trumpet shall be heard on high, 
The dead shall live, the living die, 
And music shall untune the sky.” 


HORATIO TABB, 721. . 


 jfatüer © Flynn 


At the request of one of our readers, a fine old Irish priest, we reproduce herewith 
" Father O'Flynn," by A. P. Graves; also a Latin version which we think he will 


appreciate, written by Rev. M. Kenny, S.J. 


FATHER O’FLYNN 


Of priests we can offer a charmin’ variety, 
Far renowned for larnin’ and piety; 

Still, I'd advance ye widout impropriety, 
Father O'Flynn as the flower of them all. 


Chorus 


Here's a health to you, Father O'Flynn 

Slainté, and slainté and slainté agin; 
Powerfullest preacher, and 
Tinderest teacher, and 

Kindliest creature in ould Donegal. 


Don't talk of your Provost and 
Fellows of Trinity 
Famous forever at Greek and Latinity 
Faix! and the devils and all at Divinity 
Father O'Flynn'd make hares of them all; 
Come, I venture to give you my word, 
Niver the likes of his logic was heard, 
‘Down from mythology 
Into thayology 
Troth! and conchology if he'd the call. 


Och! Father O'Flynn, you've the wonderful way wid 
‘you, ; 

АП the ould sinners are wishful to pray wid you, 

All the young childer are wild for to play wid you, 

You've such a way wid you, Father avick! 

Still, for all you've so gentle a soul 

Gad, you've your flock in the grandest control 
Checking the crazy ones 
Coaxin’ onaisy ones 

Liftin’ the lazy ones on wid a stick. 


And though quite avoidin' all foolish frivolity 
Still at all seasons of innocent jollity, 
Where was the play-boy could claim an equality 
At comicality, Father, wid you? i 
Once the Bishop looked grave at your jest, 
Till this remark set him off wid the rest; 
* Is it lave: gaiety à 
. All to the laity? 
Cannot the clargy be Irishmen too? ” 


PATER O'FLYNN 


Adest sacerdotum miranda varietas 
Quorum refulgent doctrina et pietas, 
Tamen hoc dicam-absit improprietas! 
Pater O'Flynn Clericorum est rex! 


Chorus 


Hinc multos ad annos, mi Pater O'Flynn 

Sis semper salute amplissimus in, 

Hortator fortissime, doctor dulcissime 
Rerum carissime in Donegal. 


Doctores mirificos jactitat Trinitas 

Quos semper celebrant, Graeca, Latinitas, 
О! ec diaboli ipsa divinitas !— 

Omnes tu superas, pater, cum vis. 

Nam logica Flynnica firmiter stat. 

Et semper, mehercle! victoriam dat: 

Tum theologicam, tum mythologicam, 
Conchologicam quidem, si provocet quis. 


Pater O'Flynn, pastor incomparabilis ! 
Parvulis omnibus es delectabilis, 
Feminis vetulis vere mirabilis, 

Quis tam amabilis hominum, dic? 

Et quamvis tam mite cor tuum et lex 
Gregem tu regis potenter ut rex, 
Placens errantibus, favens vagantibus 
Suadens cunctantibus baculo (sic)! 


Dum omnis stultitia abs te abhorreat 
Tamen quocumque jocositas floreat 
Ubi est vir qui aequalis appareat, 
Solutus si animus Flynnicus sit? 
Cum joco episcopum laeseris, mox 
Et illum collaetificavit haec vox: 
“Киш datur hilaritas, laica raritas? | 
An clericus minus Hibernicus fit? ” 


M. KENNY, SJ. 


REFECTORY BUILDING 
JUNIORS' BUILDING 


68 LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


Buving That Automobile 


I was always a man of moderate means 
but unlike the average man in similar cir- 
cumstances I was prudent and had put away 
about six hundred dollars for a rainy day. 
Then came the deluge in the form of gasoline, 
and my hard-earned savings, without a 
struggle, gave up the ghost. But let. me 
start at the beginning. It began thus: 
Our next-door neighbours the Jones' one 
day went crazy and bought a car. Evidently 
the disease was contagious, and my wife, 
whose constitution could not withstand the 
£erm, began to acquire a passion for motor- 
cars and Fords. At first I did not take her 
seriously, and pointed out to her that a car 
was as useful tó us as a cake of soap in a 
Coal-heaver's Union. In fact, I thought this 
latest craze would pass over like the former 
episodes of incubators, china, antiques, etc., 
which for varied periods of time were all she 
lived for. But I was mistaken, her sickness 
became decidedly worse, and every night 
our living room grew hotter than the Imperial 
Parliament discussing the Irish Question. 

Then one evening came the crisis. My 
for-better-or-for-worse half amidst a copious 
flow of tears uttered something about ‘‘ Not 
£oing to be outdone by the Jones. '' Brute," 
“ "Trunk," '* Mother " were words an eaves- 
dropper might have overheard in the develop- 
ment of arguments common to women. 

So now, do not blame me, dear reader, 
when I confess that I promised to buy the 
car,—after all I was only a mere man, and 
better men than I have been beaten by 
women's clear reasoning. Thus, as you 
may have surmised, I promised to investi- 
gate and buy a car on the morrow. Then, 
like the sunshine after the storm, all was 
bright again; but every storm leaves a 
rawness in the air and a feeling of dampness, 
and I could not help muttering that Webster 
should have pronounced it either Whim-en 
or Woe-man. “ What, dear?" asked my 
wife. “ Nothing—nothing,’’ I quickly re- 
plied—it had been a famous victory and 
there was going to be no counter-attack: 

The next morning going down to work I 
met Jones in the street car and the fact that 


Capital Punishment is still in vogue in our 
province kept me from making a scene. So 
returning his bland ‘‘ Good-morning," I sat 
down and glared at him till I reached my 
destination. That afternoon I paid a visit 
to the Underwood Motor Car and Truck Co., 
Ltd. As the door closed behind me four 
salesmen rushed forth and gathered around 
me as if I was a long lost brother, or the 
Tower of Babel, while they raved in a tongue 
foreign to me about wheel-bases, transmis- 
sions, differentials, boxes, carburetors, etc. 
At last my superiority in lung power asserted 
itself, and I was shown to the manager, 
whilst the salesmen lined up in their former 
places, ready to spring forth on their next 
victim. 

Entering the office, like a sheep being led 
to slaughter, I was surprised to find the 
manager a very affable gentleman, but still I 
was prejudiced, and when he told me to 
hang up my coat and hat on the rack I 
declined with thanks; possession is nine- 
tenths of the law. Nevertheless I accepted 
the bandless cigar he offered me, and we 
sat down to talk business. The long and 
short of it was, I bought an ‘‘ Underwood 
Six ” (sometimes called Seven, if the seventh 
passenger was very thin, and the other six 
not too stout). After I had paid him four 
hundred dollars in advance, and had given 
him my name and address, he asked me if I 
was to be found in Bradstreet— This only 
confirmed my idea that all auto people were 
mentally unbalanced; so without deigning to 
reply I went out to have a look at the land 
U-boat, that sinks your bank account 
without warning or mercy. That evening I 
returned home, but not—not with my six 
hundred. | 

The following afternoon was Saturday—— 
The day when I was to be initiated into the 
secrets of the horseless cart. After having 
set my papers and books in order, and 
making sure that the last premium on my 
Life Insurance Policy was paid, I took a 
fond farewell of my wife (we haven't been 
married very long) ànd with jaws set I 
proceeded towards the Auto Company. 


LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 69 


Here I met one of the salesmen. He was 
most agreeable and even invited me to 
jump into my own car, which was standing 
in the street, shining like a new quarter. 
The only thing I didn't like about the chariot 
was the suggestive. coffin-shaped radiator. 
The two of us got in, the salesman driving, 
till we came to a road suitable for me to take 
the wheel. As I watched him manipulating 
the gears, the salesman prattled on like a 
babbling brook, an art so well mastered by 
his tribe. '' Good little engine you've got, 
sir, you'd hardly believe she'd touch sixty.” 
“ O yes I would," I replied, “ and I'm no St. 
Thomas—T'l take your word for it." Then— 
“ Why, would you believe, sir, that this 
1161 buss ‘ill start on high without a jump.” 
But what worried me is where we'd end, even 
the best of Christians don't always land on 
high; and Iremembered that I far from loved 
my neighbour as myself. 

As he was thus charming me with his 
delightful conversation, we had already 
arrived at the outskirts of the town, and a 
large stretch of country road lay before us. 

“ Here!” said our driver, “ you take the 
wheel now." ‘Oh, I'm in no hurry," I 
laughed nervously. '' You drive a bit more, 
you drive so smooth." But the salesman 
insisted, so I had to take his place. In my 
first two attempts I stalled the engine each 
time, but a man can fail twice and succeed 
the third time and this I determined to do. 
Giving her all the gas I could I let up the 
clutch with a jerk. Shades of Caesar! 
The car stood quivering a second, then 
leapt its cable’s length. I could hear the 

salesman’s teeth rattling, as the car left the 
| £round, and his knees crack Ше cowl board, 
as we hit Mother Earth again with a bounce. 
With an apologetic laugh I turned towards 
my neighbour, but somehow he didn’t 
seem a bit friendly, so I turned my atten- 
tion back to the problem of shifting gears. 
The change from second to third was more 
refined, except for a noise rasping enough to 
wake the dead. 

Being now safe in third I heaved a sigh of 
relief and turned once more to my com- 
panion to tempt him to talk. '' I understood 
you to say, did I not, that one could start 
in high gear, without going through the 
formalities of the others?" ‘‘ Perhaps," I 


added smiling, ‘‘ it would be safer for me to 
start always on high." 

“ You'd be safer starting in neutral," 
he growled back. 

I was about to rebuke him for this, but a 
child was crossing the road about three 
hundred yards ahead, so I had to concen- 
trate all my attention on the car. 

Having avoided this imminent casualty, we 
came to the top of a hill, and like a skilled 
chauffeur I threw out my clutch, and for the 
first time, under my £uidance, the car ran 
smoothly down the hill. But as we descended 
our momentum increased alarmingly and I 
was at aloss to know what to do. Our speed 
began to grow dizzy, and so did I. Then 
suddenly, sweet as the voices of little angels, 
I heard the salesman, who had lost his stern 
decorum, howling in my ear “ Shove down 
your other foot—Nut " ! ! 

Now you and I with our present knowledge 
of autology, know that he meant the foot 
brake. Butalas! I was only a novice at the 
time, and in that wild exhilarating moment 
my foot ground the accelerator and the 
engine promptly howled and roared as if I 
had twisted its tail. I was frankly startled 
and grieved at its actions for I had meant it 
no harm. 

Then once again I heard the salesman's 
voice, this time far different from that of 
little angels. I can still picture him gesticu- 
lating wildly, and twisting on his seat and 
almost foaming at the mouth while he whis- 
pered very gently in my ear “ Leave up your 
foot, dear." You will- remember, dear 
reader, that the salesman did not specify 
which foot to leave up. In my ignorance I 
let up the clutch. 

I remember seeing dancing landscape, 
I remember flashing trees, I remember 
leaving go of everything— Then I remember 
no more. 

It is said by some that in moments of great 
distress, prayer, or sorrow, our feelings can 
attain almost supernatural heights. I be- 
lieve it. For in that short space of time I 
realized just how Phaeton felt when the 
horses bolted and his chariot ran amuck 
through the skies. When I awoke I was 
lyin on my back looking up at the calm 
azure void, where I could see countless 
stars. Somewhere near, birds were chirp- 


70 LOYOLA COLLEGE. REVIEW 


ing, and the air seemed filled with fragrance 
from the unseen censer of wild flowers. 
Yes, surely I was in the Elysian Fields of 
which the ancients sang. Somewhere below 
me I could hear strange and weird sounds— 
That, I thought, must be the manes of 
Achilles waging war with the wild beasts. 

I'll admit it was a rude shock to my faith, 
which had expected a different afterworld 
to this, but after all, thought I, the best of us 
can make mistakes. While thus musing on 
the droll uncertainty of the next world, my 
pleasant dreams were suddenly shattered 
by hearing the voice I knew so well of my 
friend the salesman telling me “ to come 
down and fight like a man ” and giving vent 
to doubtful compliments relating to my 
brain, individuality, personality, and in 
fact the whole of me physically and morally. 

It was here that I gained complete control 
of my wits and found that there was a much 
more practical reason for the stars I saw and 
the weird noises I heard. 

I was lying on the top of a hay stack and 
by craning my neck with pain and difficulty, 
I peered over the side. There was my old 
friend, fuming and bloodthirsty, looking as 
"though he had come out of a week's fighting 
та“ Tank." |. 

Although I was the object of his rather 
strong abuse, I could not but admire his 
extensive vocabulary. I honestly believe he 
did not use the same noun twice,—his 
adjectives were not so varied; and there 
also, to be sure, was the Underwood no less 
indignant than the salesman. How it got 
its nose buried deep in the hay stack I 


know not; at any rate, it was very moved 
now, for it shook and quivered spasmodically, 
till with one convulsive heave it passed out 
of its pain and lay still. In the twinkling of 
an eye I took in this sad scene of outraged 
justice and cruel death. I smiled wearily 
at the salesman and shook my head. I was 
in no mood for fighting. And for the second 
time that day, time was not, as far as I was 
concerned. 


Two weeks later I was in a state of happy 
convalescence. From my chair next the 
window, I gazed out at the beautiful picture 
of the close of a wonderful spring day. The 
sun was gradually sinking,—a fiery crimson 
ball. The air was balmy and laden with the 
glad message of young flowers. The thick 
foliage of the trees reflected the golden 
sunset. Somewhere in the sky a lark was 
singing, I could hear the musical laughter of 
happy children. With a sigh, my thoughts 
went back to the day when I was carried 
home to my wife, a weary and crippled 
wreck, and my heart leapt to remember how 
bitterly she wept on hearing the tidings. 
My heart filled and my eyes grew dim as I 


-turned towards her tenderly and with a 


husky voice said: ''Agnes (her name is 
Agnes) Agnes! You—you were put out 
that day of the accident, weren't you?” 
I waited trembling with emotion. “ Yes, 
John (my name is John), yes, John, and to 
think that it was a brand new car.”’ 


ANTHONY VANIER, 
Second Grammar. 


TO MY MOTHER 


Who is it that I think of, when the tempest rushes 
round, 

When Mighty Thor his thunder rolls with deep 
intensive sound, 

When the lightning flashes o’er me and the storm 
wind howls his song 

O'er my little hunter's cabin through some sleepless 
night and long? 


Who is it that I fight for when the bloody god of war 

Looses baying, straining hell-hounds, flanks and 
chest deep splashed with gore, 

When the bullets sing around me, and the shells 
in chorus burst, 

And Ше groans of wounded comrades fill my soul 
with murd’rous thirst? 


Who is it that I long for, when in calm and peace I lie, 

Gazing ‘tween the leafy branches at the azure 
autumn sky; 

While the drowsy hum of nature lulls to rest my 
weary brain, 

Frees my mind from dire forebodings and from 
memory’s bitter pain? 


Who is it that in time of war, in peaceful days or 
stress 

I remember with her gentle eyes, her smile and soft 
caress? 

"Tis the Mother of my childhood, she who crooned 
my cradle song, i 

Heaven grant that I may thank her; she has suffered 
for me long. 

WILFRID SCOTT, Third Grammar. 


YAS. J. RYAN 


я. BERNARD. 


GRADWATING CLASS 


LOY SEA WCSLLECE. 
1918. 


w.R.DILLON 


С .ьє LISLE. 


“оц CLEMENT - 


LOYOLA GRADUATES, 1918. 


BERNARD, RODOLPHE.—Winner of the Lieuten- 

А ant-Governor's Medal. 
A quiet and capable student, and an active athlete in 
many branches of sport. Has joined the wireless, 
where his cool head and steady nerves will stand him 
in good stead. We hope that in his new career he 
will meet with the success he deserves. 


CLEMENT, LOUIS.—A popular, earnest and opti- 

mistic young man. Good 
natured to a fault. These happy qualities will carry 
Louis successfully through life. In the small college 
world his record is such that all will miss him. 


DELISLE, GASTON.—Future “ Ace " of the R.F.C. 

Prominent in College activi- 
ties. President of L.C.A.A.A. and of Debating Society. 
Chief hobby is politics. We expect to see him take 
a seat in the House of Commons—or the Senate— 
“after the war." All liked Gaston, and all expect 
much of him in the future. 


DILLON, WENTWORTH ROY.—Winner of the 

Davis Medal for 
highest marks in Mathematics during College course. 
Valedictorian of his class. Quite an orator and a 
logically incisive debater. A brilliant student, 
light hearted and generous. Is following R.M.C. 
course preparing to take a commission. His many 
friends at Loyola will follow his career with interest. 


DIXON, JOHN ALOYSIUS.—Medallist of his 

class, in which since 
his arrival in 1912, he has always been one of the 
leaders. Famed for his ready smile. Has joined the 
American O.T.C., where we wish him every success. 


HUDON, FREDERICK VALMORE.—Earnest and 

г frank, Fred 
has always shown himself a loyal supporter of the 
College interests. A strong debater, and capable 
manager in the sporting or entertaining line. The 
College loses a £ood friend in Fred, but the Country 
£ains an able soldier. 


RYAN, JOSEPH JAMES.—' Joe " is well known 

to all Loyola boys who 
have been here for the last nine or ten years, and is 
popular with them all. Solid in character, kind 
hearted and courteous always. Like most of the 
Philosophers has joined the R.F.C. Our best wishes 
for his success £o with him. 


WALSH, TERENCE GERARD.—Ted’s quiet and 
cheerful temper- 
ament has earned him many a friend at College. 
As President of Loyola Scientific Society, he has 
shown his natural ability for scientific research. 
The first of his class to join the colours, he is now a 
cadet in the R.F.C. The memory of his manly 
character will not be easily forgotten at Loyola. 


72 LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


Фиг Aryan Brotherhood 


The unwritten history of the world has 
few secrets, however deeply hidden they lie 
in the nebulosity of the past, which the 
searching eye of time will not sooner or 
later reveal for the instruction of man. 
Owl-like time sits upon the branches of the 
present and looks out into the darkness of 
the past picking out here and there amid the 
gloom now a missing link sought by his- 
torians, now a corroborating inscription, 
now an archeological treasure, now an 
ethnological clue, or again some hitherto 
ignored affinity between the diversified races 
of men. This last shall be the theme of my 
essay; nor shall I delay to declare the mo- 


tive of my choice, to wit, the desire to see- 


men recognize their likenesses rather than 
their differences, the cast and trend of their 
thoughts rather than the color of their 
race, the soul of their language rather, than 
its accent. 

That Irishman and Indian, Icelander and 
Afghan, German and Russian, Italian and 
Persian are brother people sprung from the 
bosom of a parent race in Central Asia, and 
nourished by the milk of a common civiliza- 
tion, is a recent discovery of which most 
men are strangely ignorant. The story that 
tells how men made the happy find has the 
interest of a romance and the dignity of an 
epic. 

When, in the sixteenth century, the 
missionaries set out to spread the light of 
the gospel among the nations of the East, 
they little dreamed that by their labors 
they would some day give to the world of 
scholarship one of its noblest subjects of 
study. For the fact is that the moment they 
attempted to turn the minds of the haughty 
Brahmins to the true God, they found that, 
in order to meet with any measure of suc- 
cess, they must first be able to delve into 
the age-old Vedas or Sacred Books wherein 
are contained the religious beliefs and tra- 
ditions of the Hindoos. As these were 
written in Sanskrit, a thorough knowledge 
of that ancient tongue was indispensable. 
The task was indeed an arduous one, but 
what obstacles will not zeal for souls and 


“untiring labor surmount? 


Sanskrit was 
mastered and a new world discovered. 
The Italian Filippo Sassetti visited Goa 
between 1581 and 1588. After acquiring 
only a slight knowledge of Sanskrit he wrote 
to his friends that the new language he was 
learning had many words in common with 
Italian, especially in the names for the 
numerals, for God, and for the ordinary 
animals. But the Jesuit missionaries went 
far beyond this, and to them belongs the 
glory of having led the way towards practical 
results. Those of them who had acquired a 
comprehensive knowledge of the literature 
of India, frequently write back to their 
superiors giving details and material for 
some of the most brilliant discoveries of 
Sir Wm. Jones and Professor Bopp. The 
French Jesuit Father Coeurdoux writes 
pointedly to the French Academy, in 1767, 
asking that learned body how they explained 
the fact that the Sanskrit vocabulary was, 
in so many instances similar to the Latin 
and the Greek. After submitting a long list 
of words he observes the still more curious 
fact that there is a striking likeness in 
declension, conjugation and other gram- 
matical forms. All these announcements 
were at first received with a certain amount 
of incredulity, by some even with derision, 
and many witty things were said about the 
new “ Aryan heresy.’’ But it was not very 
long before scholars became serious about 
Sanskrit, and many of them inaugurated 
researches fraught with momentous results. 
Before we pass on to a more detailed 
account of these results, let us give the 
Jesuit missionaries their due for the part 
they took. Max Muller, the renowned 
Oxford Professor and foremost among lin- 
guists and Sanskrit scholars, attests that 
“ The first European Sanskrit scholar was 
the Jesuit Robert de Nobili." The first 
Sanskrit grammar written by a European 
is that of the German Jesuit, Heinrich Roth. 
With regard to Father Coeurdoux, S.J., Max 
Muller, says that the humble missionary 
anticipated the most important achievements 
of comparative philology by at least half а 


LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 73 


century. As works of other Jesuit scholars 
on this important subject are more than we 
have space to even mention, let us now pro- 
ceed to understand what the discovery of 
Sanskrit has meant for the world. 

It was not till the year 1808 that Sanskrit 
was acknowledged on all sides to be the 
£round-work on which are built the various 
languages of Europe; this is equivalent to 
saying that at a remote age in the dim past 
the inhabitants of Europe and India spoke 
the same tongue. It is impossible to over- 
rate the importance of this discovery or the 
interest it. ought to have in the minds of 
those who are nobly curious about the past, 
present, and future of the human race. 


The first department of human knowledge 
to receive new life from Sanskrit was gram- 
mar or the science of language. What the 
telescope has done for astronomy, what the 
microscope has done for biology, what the 
X-Ray has done for medical science, that has 
Sanskrit done for the grammar of language, 
—it has taught us the anatomy of words: 
the all-important difference between the 
“ material and formal element," i.e., bet- 
ween the root, the stem, and those little 
syllables that terminate them. It has shown 
that what we have been accustomed to 
regard as one word, is in thousands of cases 
the crystallized sum and substance of many 
words; that “ ibo,” I shall go, for example, 
is a compound of “і,” “ boulomai’’ and 
ч ego”; that “ cecidero ” placed under the 
microscope of philology will show six dis- 
tinct parts: ‘‘ fall-fall-going-to-be (as re- 
£ards)-me," “ I shall have fallen." Which 
of us using, as we so often do, the word 
' recommence " would be likely to suspect 
that he is really using six words: ''re-cum- 
in-it-i-a-re," i.e., to be going into again 
with? Or who would ever imagine that the 
“d” of the tiny word “ had " is the rem- 
nant of a Sanskrit auxiliary verb which once 
carried no less than eight inflections. 
Under the quickening light of Sanskrit, 
therefore, language, Latin and Greek in 
particular, ceased to be dry bones and pon- 
derous masses. If studied in the light of 
philology, they are a living thing permeated 


with the life blood of the people, and re- 
flecting the genius of their race. Where 
once we saw but a confused, unattractive, 
corpse-like exterior, we now see a trans- 
parent organism with bone, fibre, tissue, 
flowing veins, and a throbbing heart. When 
wil the student of the classics learn to 
appreciate the discovery that has done so 
much to make his task a pleasure? 


The second inestimable boon the dis- 
covery of Sanskrit has conferred on European 
life, is that it brought the intellect of Europe 
under the radiance of the intellect of 
Hindoostan. Imagine another sun suddenly 
appearing in our part of the heavens and 
throwing a redoubled effulgence on all 
sublunary objects; with what new life 
would not all living things bound and exult? 
It was even so when the sun of Aryan civili- 
zation unexpectedly rose upon Europe from 
the East reddening the pale light of Greek 
and Roman culture and revealing a new 
chapter in the history of the world’s youth. 
The intellectual life of Europe received 
fresh inspiration when the rich poetry of 
India raised men’s mind to grander heights. 
Moreover, the keen eye of Sir Wm. Jones 
did not fail to point out also '' the striking 
similitude between the chief. objects of 
worship ” in Greece, Italy and Hindoostan. 
And when Jacob Grimm, the friend of our 
childhood days, informed the world that 
the folk-lore of Germany and Scandinavia, 
the fairy-tales of Italy and the fables of 
Greece have a common source in the dramas 
and poems of the Hindoos, the stories that 
delighted our early youth at once became 
charged with new significance and fresh 
interest. ) 

The thrill of joy which stirred the most 
profound and cultivated thinkers of the West 
finds frequent expression. Goethe in Ger- 
many sings: 

“ Dost thou crave Spring's early blos- 
soms and Autumn's mellow fruit; dost thou 
long for charm and delight, for satiety and 
nurture; wilt thou Heaven and Earth in 
one name comprise? then call it Sakuntala 
(the celebrated Hindoo drama) and thou 
hast all said." 


74 | LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


Michelet, in France, after reading the great 
epic of India, the ‘‘ Ramayana," enthusias- 
tically writes: ''L'Année 1863 me restera 
chére et bénie. C'est la premiére oü j'ai pu 
lire le grand poème sacré de l'Inde, le divin 
Ramayana.” 


But if one thing more than another is to 
be inferred from a common language, a 
common religion, and a common stock of 
household tales, it is, most undoubtedly, a 
common ancestry. This appeals to me as 
the greatest and most providential blessing 
the discovery of Sanskrit has given to man, 
for the very good.reason that the recognition 
of a brotherhood of race must in the long 
run bring about kinder feeling, more sym- 
pathy, and be the strongest human guarantee 
of future peace on earth and good-will among 
men. 


The evidence drawn from the comparative 
study of the Indo-European languages, 
mythologies, and folk-lore, proves, beyond 
all doubt, that, moving first westward and 
northward and later eastward and south- 
ward, successive bands of Aryans, migrated 
from the ancestral home north of the 
Himalayas. The Celt led the way, excavated 
the silver ores of pre-historic Spain and 
worked the tin mines of Cornwall; behind 
him followed the Teuton hunting the boar 
in the Black Forest and building his hut on 
the banks of the Rhine, the Oder and the 
Elbe; on the Teuton’s heels came the Slav, 
who, turning to the north-east halted on the 
steppes of Russia; the Italic branch enter- 
ing Europe by a south-westerly route, built 
Athens, Sparta, and eventually Rome; while 
the Hindoo brother, crossing the mountains 
to the south-east, descended with his Veddas 
and Sanskrit tongue to establish himself on 
the banks of the Ganges and the Indus. 
As time ran its course rivers and mountains 
separated one offshoot from the other and 
diverse climates variously tinted their fea- 
tures and wrought many a change upon their 
language, until gradually the wanderers 
lost remembrance of the rock from which 


they were hewn. They often met in their 
peregrinations but they no longer recog- 
nized one another as brothers. An un- 
familiar accent disguised their speech and 
the mask of color their skins. They even 
mistook each other for enemies and fought, 
often bitterly,—fought like brothers in a 
drama, sadly ignorant of their close kinship, 
—Mede fought Persian, Persian fought 
Greek, Greek fought Roman, Roman fought 
Teuton and Teuton fought Celt,—and still 
they fight more savagely than ever before. 
Is it not, then, a consummation devoutly 
to be wished that, as in the final act of the 
drama, brother recognizes brother by a 
happy chance, and a tragedy is averted, so 
in the gruesome drama now being enacted a 
like revelation may save kindred nations 
from fratricide? 

The discovery has happily been made, yet, 
unhappily, too, it remains a secret locked up 
in learned heads, away from the vulgar gaze 
of the fighting masses whom it most con- 
cerns. Were all Englishmen, Germans, 
Frenchmen, Italians, Americans and Cana- 
dians conscious that the same Aryan blood 
flows through their veins, that the same 
Aryan thoughts arise within their minds, 
and the same Aryan feelings agitate their 
breasts, their swords would long ere this 
have been turned into ploughshares. Al- 
ready the Angel of Peace has gone abroad 
calling upon men to join hands in one Society 
of Nations; mutual protection, suffering 
humanity, Christian charity, call for such a 
union, and why not also the consciousness 
of a common race? The ways of Providence 
are inscrutable; we can only descry them 
dimly through the perspective of time, and I, 
for one, love to think that the discovery of the 
Ancient World of the East and the brother- 
hood of European nations through the study 
of Sanskrit may yet prove to be a means by 
which the same Divinity that' shapes our 
ends designs to hasten the. Reign of Peace 
for which men sigh. 


WALTER CORBETT, 
First Grammar. 


iard Room. 


Bill 


Lower Panel—Boys 


Parlor. 


Middle Panel—Students' 


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76 LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


ФО реп 3 thought 3 was а Poet 


The lunatic, the lover, and. the рогі, 
Are of imagination all compact. 
A MIDSUMMER NiGHT'S DREAM—Act V. 


I must not begin this little narrative by 
declaring myself a full-fledged poet, because 
by the end of it you may be convinced of the 
contrary. Without any dallying, therefore, 
I shall get right down to facts, and leave to 
the acute reader the decision as to which of 
Shakespeare's three classes of imaginative 
persons I belong. ; 

As a poet I always had quite an admirable 
opinion of myself, which although it has 
greatly suffered in the event I am about to 
relate, has never been quite uprooted. 


I had just completed.a poem on “ Spring." 


To me it was impeccable—the uplifting 
thought—the perfect metre—the grace and 


simplicity with which it was written—all. 


contributed to making it a masterpiece. 
Just imagine how enraptured I was when, 
after a long and liberal expenditure of mid- 
night oil, I had completed the last word of the 
last line. There came back to my mind a 
passage I had read from the historian Gib- 
bon embodying his reflections on the com- 
pletion of ‘‘ The Rise and Fall of the Roman 
Empire." He, like me, had just completed 
a great work. I looked up the passage and 
it ran as follows: “ It was on the day, ог 
rather night, of June 27, 1787, between the 
hours of eleven and twelve, that I wrote the 
last lines of the last page in a summer-house 
of my garden. After laying down my pen, I 
took several turns in a covered walk of 
acacias, which commands a prospect of the 
country, the lake, and the mountains. The 


air was temperate, the sky was serene. The 


silver orb of the moon was reflected from 
the waters, and all nature was silent. I will 
not describe the first emotion of joy on the 
recovery of my freedom, and perhaps the 
establishment of my fame. But my pride 
was soon humbled, and a sober melancholy 
was spread over my mind by the idea that I 
had taken an everlasting leave of an old and 
agreeable companion, and that, whatever 
might be the future fate of my history, the 


life of the historian must be short and 
precarious." Well, if my life also was 
precarious, thought I, at least I was in a 
good state to die—I had not an enemy in 
the world. I was pleased with myself. I 
began to see light; what Uncle Jed said 
was coming true; I would furnish a surprise 
for the folks one time. Already I saw my 
bust beside Longfellow’s in the dim recesses 
of the Poet’s corner in Westminster Abbey, 
already I saw my name in the head-lines 
of the great dailies and my fame augmented 
by the wagging of every tongue. Hundreds 
of press agents were seeking the services of 
my gifted pen. I was beginning to see my 
possibilities—my talents were altogether too 
precious to be wasted on the arid souls of 
the unenlightened rustics of my town. Why 
should I stay in a little insignificant village 
with no prospects of expansion? No! I 
would go the very next night—I would go to 
the big publishers in New York. There, ina 
larger field, would I reap the fruits of my 
unmitigated labor; I would deliver my first 
works and in a month New York would be at 
my feet. 

The shades of night were falling as next 
evening the N.Y. & H. Express pulled into 
the little depot and I stepped on board. The 
following morning I found myself in the big 
city. I had never seen such a station or for 
that matter so many people as were hustling 
and bustling about. To this crowd I was at 
present just another insignificant human 
atom, but soon, thought I—I checked my 
imaginings and immediately sought one of 
the largest publishers. 

Arrived at H Bros., Publishers, I 
walked boldly up to a clerk, that I might 
find out the whereabouts of the manager. 

“ He's not in " he replied, to my query, 
looking me up and down in a most imperti- 
nent manner. 

“ If he only knew what he was losing by 
this delay " I muttered to myself half-aloud. 


LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 77 


“ТП look again," said the clerk. 

In a moment he reappeared, “ Step this 
way, sir, if you please." 

The austere look on the manager’s coun- 
tenance somewhat discomfited me, none the 
less I ventured: ' I believe you are the 
manager of this firm? " 

“ Precisely,” he replied. 

This reassured me a little and I felt 
further: ''Possibly you have heard of me; 
I am Goliath Daniels of ——, N.J., I write 
elegies, sonnets—-" s 

“ What is your business," he cut in. 

“ This ” I replied. ‘‘ I have here a means 
of wealth to you and me, a golden opportun- 
ity that must not be overlooked—”’ 

" Poems, . eh!" he interjected, “ well, 
let's have a sample, a £ood one, now. 

Without further bidding I drew out the 
manuscript on '' Spring " and assuming my 
best posture, I sent forth these immortal 
lines: 


When mother nature wakens 

From her slumber icy cold 

And the sun sends forth his legions 
Arrayed in martial gold. 


When the birds sing in the orchard 
And the rivulets ring clear 

And the cows go back to pasture 
Then we know that Spring is here. 


When the dandelions are showing 
Their gold above the green 

And youthful thoughts are soaring 
With the beauty of the scene 

Then we know that summer’s coming 
Then we know that Spring is here. 


When I had finished, to my surprise, 
indignation and horror the manager burst 
out into a loud empty laugh such as one 
would expect to hear from a donkey had it a 
human head. 


“ Well ” said I. 

At this he literally guffawed. 

Without more ado I picked up my belong- 
ings, tore out the door, and made good till 
I came to the station. 


I am no longer in the dark; Uncle Jed. 


was right I did hand my folks a surprise 


when the next day I walked in, right in the 


middle of dinner. 

After dinner I picked up a copy of a college 
publication, the ‘‘ Loyola College Review," 
and I read therein the following short poem: 


A RASH INSPIRATION 


I am raging within till my skin burns 
With the blaze of poetical fire; |. 
My verse in a cadence of Swinburne's 
Leaps to birth, as I tinkle my lyre. 


My brow with a fever is glowing, 
My heart well-nigh stops in its beat; 
My teeming brain, full to o'erflowing 
Seems to seethe with Apollo's own heat. 


There's an itch in my hankering fingers, 
There are fires in my breast, on my tongue, 
Heliconian thirst ever lingers 

Unslaked, till my numbers be sung. 


"Tis the god! On my mind's magic easels 
The Muses are painting apace.... 

You're kidding yourself, it's the measles,. 
See the little red spots on your face! 


Hereupon the thought crossed my mind 
as to whether I had any symptoms, when 
just then I heard Uncle Jed call out: 
“ Goliath, ye better come help pitch off this 
load of hay." I went forth to give ‘‘a 


local habitation ’’ not to ‘‘ airy nothing ” but. 


to a substantial load of hay, and the hay 
season keeping me busy for some time, I 
recovered in the late summer. 


С. Е. ANGLIN, "23. 


TEARS 


When I consider Life and its few years— 

A wisp of fog betwixt us and the sun; 

A call to battle, and the battle done 

Ere the last echo dies within our ears; 

A rose choked in the grass; an hour of fears; 
The gusts that past a darkening shore do beat; 
The burst of music down an unlistening street— 
I wonder at the idleness of tears. 

Ye old, old dead, and ye of yesternight, 


-Chieftains and bards and keepers of the sheep, 


By every cup of sorrow that you had, 

Loose me from tears and make me see aright, 
How each hath back what once he stayed to weep— 
Homer his sight, David his little lad! 


LIZETTE WOODWORTH REESE. 


E 
| 
i 
| Е 
m | B 
E JI 
| T E 
Da See nae o n o —— e E 


LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 79 


The House That Jack Built 


Behold the mansion reared by daedal Jack, 


See the malt stored'n many a plethoric sack, 
In the proud cirque of Ivan's bivouac. 


Mark how the rat's felonious fangs invade 
The golden stores in Jack's pavilion laid. 


Anon with velvet foot and Tarquin strides 
Subtle grimalkin to his quarry glides— 
Grimalkin grim that slew the fierce rodent 
Whose tooth insidious Johann’s sackcloth rent. 


Lo! now the deep-mouthed canine foe's assault, 
That vexed the avenger of the stolen malt, 
Stored in the hollowed precincts of that hall 
That rose complete at Jack's creative call. 


Here stalks the impetuous cow with crumpled horn 
Whereon the exacerbating hound was torn. 

Who bayed the feline slaughter-beast that slew 
The rat predacious, whose keen fangs ran through 
The textile fibres that involved the grain 

Which lay in Han's inviolate domain. 


Here walks forlorn the damsel crowned with rue, 
Lactiferous spoils from vaccine dugs who drew 

Of that corniculate beast whose tortuous horn 
Tossed to the clouds in fierce vindictive scorn 

The harrowing hound whose braggart bark and stir 
Arched the lithe spine and reared the indignant fur 
Of puss, that with verminicidal claw 

Struck the wierd rat in whose insatiate maw 

Lay reeking malt that erst in Juan’s courts we saw. 


Robed in senescent garb that seems in sooth 
Too long a prey to Chronos's iron tooth, 
Behold the man whose amorous lips incline, 
Full with Eros’s osculative sign, 

. To the lorn maiden whose lactalbic hands - 
Drew albulactic bovine wealth from lacteal glands 
Of that immortal bovine, by whose horn 
Distort to realm ethereal was borne 

The beast catulean, vexed of the sly 

Ulysses quadrupedal, who made die 

The old mordacious rat that dared devour’ 
Antecedaneous ale in John’s domestic bower. 


80 LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


Lo, here, with hirsute honors doffed, succinct 

Of saponaceous locks, the priest who linked 

In Hymen’s golden bands the torn unthrift, 

Whose means exiguous stared through many a rift, 
Even as he kissed the virgin all forlorn, 

Who milked the cow with implicated horn, 

Who in fine wrath the canine torturer skied, 

That dared to vex the insidious muricide, 

Who let auroral effluence through the pelt 

Of the sly rat that robbed the palace Jack had built, 


The loud cantankerous Shanghai comes at last, 

Whose shouts aroused the shorn ecclesiast, 

Who sealed the vows of Hymen’s sacrament, 

To him, who, robed in garment indigent, 

Exosculates the damsel lachrymose, 

The emulgator of that horned brute morose, 

That tossed the dog, that worried the cat, that kilt 

The rat that ate the malt that lay in the house that Jack built. 


D. E. H. 
V LN 


WZ 


SCHOOL-BOY'S ESSAY 


state of that man was worse than the first. 
He died on Ше“ Field of the Cloth of Gold,” 


Henry VIII was the greatest widower 
that ever lived. He was born at Anno 


Domini in the year 1066. He had 510 wives, 
‘besides women and children. The 1st was 
beheaded, then executed afterwards. The 
second was revoked—she never smiled 
again. The greatest man in this reign was 
Lord Wolsely. He was called the “ Boy 
Bachelor," being at the age of 15 unmarried. 
Had he served his wife as diligently as he 
served the King, she would not have de- 
prived him of his grey hairs. Henry VIII 
quarrelled with Lord Wolsely because he 
courted Anne Boleyn. Не also quarrelled 


with the Pope because he called him “ Fide: 


. the Offensive " and ‘‘ Dandy Lion” and 
other unpleasant appetites. He also quar- 
relled with the monasteries. Не pulled 
down barns and built greater and the last 


his horse trod on a cinder and there was 
weeping and gnashing of teeth. In this 
reign the Bible was translated into Latin by 
Titus Oates, who was ordered by the King to 
be chained up in church. It was in this 
reidn also that the Duke of Wellington 
discovered America and invented the curfew 
‘bells to prevent fires in theatres. There was 
also a great fire in London called the Black 
Death and after the fire came the earth- 
quake, and after the earthquake a still small 
voice. Henry VIII was succeeded by his 
great-grandmother, the beautiful and ac- 
complished Mary Queen of Scots, sometimes 
known as the “ Lady of the Lake " or the 
“Тау of the Last Minstrel.”’ 


Juniors' Building. 


Refectory Building. 


The Review reproduces below a page from an esteemed local—very local—contemporary, namely:— 


| THE WEEKLY THUNDERSTORM 


Saturday, May 18th, 1918 No. 6 
EDITORIAL THE WEATHER 

Nearly all the students now have the “ Star Gazer ” Galipeau reports that the 
habit of looking for the ‘‘ Weekly Thunder- week will be unusually fair; every day in 
storm " every Saturday. We hope to make the week being fine with the exception of 
this weekly paper so good that all—without Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 
the nearly—will look for it eagerly each Thursday and Saturday we will have a 
week. “ Thunderstorm.” 


Our ' General College News” will get 
better as we go on. This department will 


tell what the boarders don't know about NATURAL HISTORY NOTES 


the day scholars and what the day scholars E. Brannan— This quiet handsome little 
don't know about the boarders. dove is of a very kind nature; it is seldom 


Added to this heard from, but 
there will be side- х PR when it speaks it is 
splitting jokes liable to mutter 
(every one of them anythin£g at all. 
original) There P.S.—It has just 
will also be Select put on long pants. 
Poems, Short 
Stories and a Grand 
Serial Story, “ The 
Spy." Some of 
these begin to-day. 


P. Dawson—No 
other bird of this 
species has yet 
been discovered. It 
has legs out of 
proportion with its 
body, these it covers 
with an absurd 
looking cloth, giving 


THE 
PHILOSOPHERS 


` We wept tears of 


sorrow when we Morris Davis Gerald Anglin Cuthbert Scott itself a very queer 
learned some time ; “ Ye Editors” appearance. Call: 
ago that the dear “The Weekly ENE ех “I paid three bones 
little philosophers, ; for these socks." 

in their mahogany suite above the hash-room, T. Walsh—A high crested and lordly 


were really going to leave us. Since then, 
four joined the aviation, one tookthe R.M.C., 
and another the wireless course. We have 
heard nothing about the others. 


bird, which takes long strides about the 
room, it is generaly known pyi its call, 
“ Ladies and Gentlemen." 


THE BOARDER'S DREAM 


Beside his unlearned books he sat, And then at furious pace he strode 
Minus his studious frown, Into the pantry wide, 
His eyes were closed, he calmly dozed, - His inner man with cakes and cheer, 
He dreamed of his home town. He readily supplied. 
Wide through the vision of his dreams, At each bite he could feel that a good square meal 


Were the streets of that little town, He was putting away БЕНДӘ. 
And in the shade beneath the trees, 


He walked them up and down. The scholar felt the teacher's hand,' 


Once more he saw his fair '' cousine,” It waked him from his dream, 
Upon her door-step stand, He rubbed his eyes in mild surprise, 
She smiled at him as he passed by, e Things are not as they seem.” 
The smile was sweet and bland— 
A tear dropped from the sleeper's lids, GERALD ANGLIN 


And fell upon his hand. 


LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 83 


“Тһе Weekly Thunderstorm "—continued. 
ODE ON “JUG” 


There are certain parts of college, . Visions flit before your eyes 
Which come first above my knowledge, Of all imaginable pies, 
No doubt, the same with you who read this rhyme; And the very thought of ‘‘ Walton's " makes you gay. 
And I'm sure when you have tried it, 
You will firmly have decided, With a bright and cheerful mind, 
That it isn't just like Heaven all the time.  . Thinking not of what you'll find, 
You are happy as a lark, but pretty soon, 
. It is lovely ГП admit, You will get a little note, 
On the campus green to sit, ' With this cheerful anecdote : + 
Ог to shoot the pill across the good old рап; “ Таке an hour of jug, my boy, this afternoon." 
But there are other things to bear, Е 2 И б 
Which would make a good man swear, Оп! it's lovely, this old life. 
That were customs since the college first began. Like a man without a wife, 


And we all feel sure we won't be back next year, 
But when another year comes ‘round, 

Here we are all safe and sound, 

And the same old bell and orders do we hear. 


C. SCOTT 


When the sun is shining down 
On this little one-horse town 
On the morning of a cheerful holiday, 


ORCHESTRA AND MANDOLIN CLUB 


Wendling, McVey, Beaudin, Anglin, Gaynor, Dowling, O’Brien, Lonergan, Hearne, Day, Chabot 
W. Scott, J. Whalen, Hammond, Brannen, Nadeau, McGee, С. Scott, Decary, М. Davis 
Wickham, C. Zimmerman, McGarry, Belisle, Rev. E. G. Bartlett, S.J., Pye, Binda, Nunez, Kelly, E. Whalen 
E. Zimmerman, Donoghue, Aubut 


84 LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


COLLEGE STAFF 


М TWENTY-SECOND ACADEMICAL YEAR 
1917-1918 


iu 


REV. ALEX. A. GAGNIEUR, S.J., Rector 

REV. J. MILWAY.FILION, S.J., Vice-Rector, Mental and Moral Philosophy 
REV. JOHN Е. COX, S.J., Rhetoric and Humanities, Apologetics 

MR. ERLE G. BARTLETT, S.J., Prefect of Studies and of Discipline | 
MR. JOSEPH A. CORCORAN, S.J., Higher Mathematics, Sciences 
MR. DEMETRIUS B. ZEMA, S.J., First Grammar 

MR. D. PATRICK COUGHLIN, S.J., Second Grammar 

MR. THOMAS J. LALLY, S.J., Third Grammar, Librarian 

MR. JOHN HUGH KEENAN, S.J., Latin Rudiments 

MR. M. FRANCIS BRESLIN, S.J., Preparatory I 

MR. RAPHAEL E. KENNEDY, S.J., Preparatory II 

MR. FRANCIS J. McDONALD, S.J., Prefect, Mathematics 

MR. PIUS J. McLELLAN, S.J., Prefect, Mathematics 

MR. FRANCIS C. SMITH, S.J., Prefect 

PROF. P. J. SHEA, Music 

J. G. McCARTHY, Esq., M.D., College Physician 

J. L. D. MASON, Esq., M.D., College Physician 


гуши 


A Generous Donation Зи Memoriam 
ar 


HE Fathers wish the Editors to put on record in the Review the 

generous gift of Mrs. Walter Kavanagh, a kind friend and 

benefactress of the College, who in the current year donated five 

thousand dollars to Loyola in memory of her son, the late Joseph 
Kavanagh, an old Loyola boy. | 

Joseph Kavanagh was at College from 1904 to 1906, and died on 

Aupust the thirty-first, nineteen hundred and sixteen. Of him all who 

knew him will reverently say with us: 

“ Being made perfect in a short space, he fulfilled a long time; for his 


soul pleased God: therefore He hastened to bring him out of the midst 
of imiquities.’’—Wisd. IV, 13-14. 


LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 85 


Debating S»ocíetíes 


THE LOYOLA LITERARY AND DEBATING SOCIETY 


The first meeting was for the election of officers, 
the following being chosen: 

President, Mr. Gaston de Lisle; Vice-President, 
Mr. Fred. Hudon; Secretary, Mr. C. Phelan; 
Councillors, R. Anglin, John Wolfe. 

Father J. Milway Filion replaced Mr. Bergin in 
the important duties of Moderator. 

The meetings were held weekly—de jure and de 
facto—and well attended always, because the de- 
baters from first to last made each meeting interest- 
ing and instructive. А 

The subjects selected for debate were varied, 
generally bearing on questions of actual interest. 
The Light-Saving Bill was luminously dealt with and 
passed before Commons or Senate voted; the 
Japanese were ordered out of Manchuria long before 
the Powers spoke; the urgent necessity for Military 
Service was so eloquently expatiated upon that both 
the local opponents of the Bill have enlisted since; 
in point of fact, the under-age volunteers were so 
numerous before many months that the two Philo- 
sophy Classes and the Debating Society itself were 
put out of commission long before the scheduled 
end of the term. 


A departure from the ordinary routine was the 
public debate in which Loyola representatives 
crossed lances with a K. of C. team in the latter’s 
Hall on Mountain Street; this battle of words and 
ideas resulted in a draw. Flattering comments 
were made on our youthful debaters’ (Mr. Roy 
Dillon and Gaston de Lisle) creditable showing. 


The Annual Banquet proved satisfactory to the 
members without giving offence to the Food Control- 
ler. The post-prandial drafts also were inoffensive — 
being chiefly drawn from the sources of anodyne 
eloquence. 


To sum up: This year (like each о the previous 
years) has been the most successful of all; chiefly 
because great interest was taken in the important 
training which public debating gives the earnest 
student; and secondly because the speeches were 
well prepared. 


Most of these Ciceros have discarded the toga to 
don the Khaki. After helping to drive Wilhelm’s 
legions back to Berlin, they will be ready to beat him 
at his own favorite game—speech-making. 


HIGH SCHOOL LITERARY AND DEBATING SOCIETY 


The outstanding features of the very successful 
and admirable work done by the H. S. Debating 
Society during the past year seem to be as follows: 


October 1st, 1917—The first regular meeting of 
the term was held to elect officers. The successful 
candidates were, C. McCarthy, President; J. Pen- 
fold, Vice-President; T. Walsh, Secretary; G. 
Carroll, Treasurer; Е. McGarr, Sgt.-at-Arms; 
J. Hearn, T. Day, W. Scott, Censors. 


December 10th—Lecture оп “ The Art of Shakes- 
peare " by Rev. J. Milway Filion, S.J. The lecturer 
took " Macbeth " for his text, and, by readings, 
illustrated to what extent the secret of Shakespeare's 
art of character delineation lies in the poet's power of 
suggestion. 


December 17th—Cicero’s action against Catiline 
for conspiracy. At this meeting the hall was trans- 
formed into a Roman court of Justice for the trial 
of Catiline. J. O'Halloran took the part of Cicero 
as “ accusator ", and A. Wendling that of Catiline 
as "reus", while the ''patronus causae" was 
W. Corbett and the '' advocati " defending Catiline 
were, Messrs. McCarthy, Bray, and Belisle. J. 
Penfold presided as “ Judex Quaestionis." АП the 
formalities of Roman judicial procedure were ob- 
served and both defence and prosecution adhered to 
historical data. “ Fulvia’s " swooning in the witness 
box and ‘‘ Caesar's " invective will be long remem- 
bered, as will O'Halloran's eloquence and wit in the 
part of Cicero. 

February 4th, 1918—First meeting of the Second 
Term at which the following officials were elected: 
President, W. Corbett; Vice-President, M.J. O’Brien; 
Secretary, T. Walsh; Treasurer and Sgt.-at-Arms, 
J. Meegan; Censors, J. Penfold, G. Anglin, G. 
Altimas. 

March 16th—Concert in honor of St. Patrick. 
“ Daniel O'Connell and Biddy Moriarty ” by L. 


Kelly and Н. Gaynor, “ The Grave Diggers," from 
Hamlet, by T. Walsh and T. Day, Irish melodies and 
violin pieces—all were on the programme. 


April 29th—The following Essays were read: 


“ Education of Ше Athenian Youth," С. Anglin; 
* Development of Gunpowder and Firearms," L. 
Macdonell; “ The Catholic Church—Muse of Christ- 
tian Art," W. Scott; “ The Popes, Sponsors of the 
Sciences," A. McGovern; “ The Combat " from the 
“ Lady of the Lake,” recitation by J. Galvin. 


May 6th—Public Debate. Question: “ Resolved, 
that the creation of an independent Jewish state in 
the Holy Land, is both desirable and practicable." 
Messrs. A. Wendling and T. Walsh defended the 
affirmative; Messrs. R. Belisle and H. Gaynor, the 
negative, and W. Scott was Chairman. The Judges 
were Rev. G. J. McShane, P.S.S. (Chairman), 
Rev. M. P. Reid, and Dr. Wm. H. Atherton, Ph.D. 


The Judges’ decision was given in favor of the 
Affirmative, and Thomas Walsh was officially declared 
the best individual debater. i 


The vocal and violin-selections were appreciated. 


The Very Reverend Father Power, S.J., who pre- 
sided, closed the exercises with an address rich in 
wit and wisdom. The auditors had perhaps never 
realized before that if the pen is mightier than the 
sword, the tongue is mightier than the pen and sword 
put together. ; 


The admirable training in public speaking received 
in the H. S. Debating Society is primarily due to 
Mr. D. B. Zema, S.J., our Moderator, and the 
secretary wishes to express hereby the Society's 
gratitude for the energetic interest which has helped 
so much to make the Society the success it is. 


T. WALSH, Secretary 


86 LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


Class Chronicles 


RHETORIC 


Mercury was despatched by Zeus to inform me 
that I was appointed Assistant. Manager of the 
Assignment Bureau in Hades. My duties were to 
receive the spirits, question them as to their abilities, 
and assign them to duties. I began work as a shallop- 
load of sullen-looking shades arrived. 

In the first batch was a personal friend of mine, 
M. P. Malone. I learned that he had capacities 
for everything. А fine fellow, I thought, and I chose 
him as my private secretary. Other shades flitted 
in. Amongst them was a tall thin man, who looked 
like a hungry poet. I at once recognized Horatio 
Tabb, my former classmate. Despite his violent 
appearance, I knew him to be harmless. From 
his own lips, I learned he was well versed in music 
and oratory, and I allowed him the freedom of the 
Elysian fields. Не departed, and Bob Bouchette 
stepped in. I appointed him guide to the Stygian 
summer resorts. Another shade appeared, and I 
found myself looking into Chabot's face. He had 
been my friend on earth, but І did not say “Hello! 
old 'top; glad to see you here!" because I never 
rejoice at the misfortune of my friends. Considering 
the good taste he had shown in photography, I 
appointed him official photographer in our depart- 
ment. я 

When he had left for Ше studio of his new avo- 
cation, I went in search of a cool drink; only liquid 
air could be had in Hades. 

On my return, I found a number of my former 
acquaintances waiting for employment. The first 
inline was Renaud. Неге I was puzzled. In answer 
to my queries as to his abilities, the only reply was, 
“І can do nothing." Finally, in despair, I told him 
to get out and do..... as he was wont to do in 
Rhetoric in days gone by. Next in line was Sarse 
Malone. At once recalling his wide abilities as 
a critic and organizer, I appointed him personal 
adviser to Pluto. Then came McGarry, “ Jim”, 
as I have heard Charon familiarly call him. His 
frame was so muscular and his skin so swarthy 
that without any further hesitation, I put him in 
charge of the foundry department to oversee the 


HUMANITIES—A 


The good ship Humanities having, with valiant 
prow, furrowed another journey upon the sea of 
knowledge is entering the welcome harbour of 
Vacations. 

During the months. that have passed, we have, 
above all else, learned to look upon the acquisition 
of knowledge only as a means to the greater goal of 
wisdom. Accordingly, we. have. not seen a vast 
quantity of authors. We have confined. ourselves 
to a few: Homer, Horace, Virgil, Cicero, Boileau, 
and the master English authors. But to come from 
our deeds to ourselves. 

Nearest to the patriarchal desk sits one who came 
into our midst this very year from the land of the 
Stars and Stripes, bearing the name of Walter 
Bryan. An effervescent youth, mighty on the Rugby 
field; who did valiantly chop the Rhetoricians’ 
ankles in that memorable game of hockey which we 
fought and won in an overtime period. No less mar- 
vellous is he on the diamond, and many a class has 
envied us his possession. We next record the deeds 
of another great man, J. Kenneth Chisholm. Always 
trustworthy, Kenny would give his heart and hand 
to anything for his class’s good, and now that he has 
gone from our midst, all join in wishing him Godspeed 
wherever he goes. John Hough sits next to Chisholm. 
Of John, the ''Gazette" and the “ Star” have 
spoken every Tuesday, when they informed North 
America how well he defended Loyola's fair name іп 
the City Hockey League. 


manufacture of keys for Pluto and wheels for Ixion. 
Next to him stood Nunez, who at College always 
showed his wisdom by his silence. What could I 
do with him? A sudden inspiration came and I 
instructed him how and when to throw rocks into 
the pool of Tantalus, that the water might rise to 
moisten that hapless one’s lips; this was by way of 
practising a little charity. . 

The last in line: was Anglin.. He informed me 
Toronto was hís home, and architecture his profes- 
sion. He was most welcome, for the limits of Tartarus 
needed extending; I graciously put him in charge 
of this work, suggesting that he might take his home 
town as a model. 

I dismissed them all, thinking to get a few 
moments' rest, when the door swung violently open, 
and in rushed an irate youth. He poured forth ex- 


.pressive words with such volubility, that I found it 


impossible to follow him. When he cooled down, 
Ilearned that he was complaining of the loss of part 
of his trousers, seriously mutilated by the dog 
Cerberus; he showed me all that remained of the 
shoe-string that held his glasses. Then, and not 
before, did I recognize Mousseau. As he was shed- 
ding copious tears I consoled him, saying that all 
such trinkets prized of mortals are not missed in 
the Plutonian regions. 

Then a youth whom I recognized as Lachapelle 
entered. He asserted that he was an artist. I knew 
him to be a sensible man, judging from his favourite 
maxim, '' If a coward won't show his face, hit him 
in the part he shows." I employed him in painting 
frescoes of Elysian scenes for the relief of the more 
desolate souls. 

His High Erebian Majesty, Pluto, was next at my 
side giving me flattering compliments on the tactful 
manner in which I had handled the shades; he 
said something about deposing Rhadamanthus and 
appointing me Judge in his place, but here I seemed 
to feel a little hand on my shoulder, and a treble 
voice seemed to whisper, ‘‘ Arthur, go to bed, dear!" 


" JACK-O'LANTERN" 


RETROSPECT 


John Hough’s broad shoulders almost shut 
out of sight another Humanitarian, small in body 
but great in mind, laconic “ВШ” McGee, the one 
and only man of his kind. Behind him, a tower of 
Strength arises, no less a man than Paul Wickham, 
our most diligent patron of the College store. Much 
will Canadian trade suffer if Paul carries out his 
threat to become a sailor. If you peeped long enough 
over his shoulders you might possibly see Henry 
Smeaton, who, with the aid of Anthon, finds pleasure 
in Homer. To his right, sits Norman, surnamed 
Masse, the young man who delights in politics, 
in sensational novels, and feats of strength. 


And now I pass to one who deals in technicalities, 
a veritable encyclopaedia, whose knowledge is so 
exact, that his name Fernand Terroux, has become , 
for us synonymous with inerrancy. Last, I mention 
John Edward Dolan, our porter. Though many a 
time and oft he was made leave his seat on false 
alarms, nevertheless, he has filled the useful office 
of traffic constable on Homer, and bravely raised 
his hand in expostulation when the Greek prelections 
seemed to exceed the speed limit. 

If one day success crowns our efforts, I am sure 
that one and all will unite in saying that the greatest 
part of that is due to our worthy professor, Father 
Cox. 


" EYE-WITNESS " 


87 


LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


GROUP OF MIDDLE DIVISION BOYS, 1918 


PREPARATORY BOYS 


88 LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


FIRST GRAMMAR 


First Grammar is a bee-hive all abuzz, a roaring 
forge of Cyclops, whose arms 


“ heaved in vast strength, in order rise, 

And blow to blow in measured chime replies, 
While with firm tongs they turn the sparkling ore, 
And Aetna's caves with ponderous anvils roar.” 


“ Ко half measures!” “do things well or not at 
all," “ age quod agis," “your brothers are bleeding 
on the battle-field, —justify your existence," under 
sich stimuli do they bend to a serious man's task 
and shun the trifler. 

Yet, have no misconceptions, good friend, it is 
not all a tragedy. Cheer is a law of this studious 
realm. ‘ L’Allgero’’ joins hands with “Il Pen- 
seroso" and “ Laughter holding both his sides ” 
is a frequent visitor in this ‘ studious cloister's 
pale." Did space allow, many episodes might go 
on record to show in what strange ways grave pur- 
suits in First Grammar will give cause for mirth. 
Did not Classic Architecture, for example, involve 
our esteemed fellow, Wendling, in a German plot 
to destroy the Bank of Montreal, when, enchanted 
with the ancient beauty of that edifice, he paused 
on Place D'Armes Square, book in hand to note the 
detail of execution in the Corinthian column and 
entablature? Greek is, on the testimony of all, 
the subject fraught with most serious consequences; 
and yet, what more mirthful than a recitation in 
taat ancient tongue. Every First Grammarian knows 
that he would almost forgo a home holiday to hear 
Corbett expound Greek. With what admirable self- 
reliance he will launch upon a troubled sea! and laugh 
you to scorn if you cry “ Rocks ahead!" But a 
sudden crash! then floating spars and a struggling 
form emerge: ] 


“Тт bubbled, I'm bubbled, 
Oh, how I am troubled, 
Bamboozled a bit." 


So united and yet so varied is the body of First 
Grammarians, that my fancy's eye sees them in the 
guise of a stream. At first I see it tumble with 
precipitous roar in Macdonell and Sutton. It breaks 
with Binda into clouds of sparkling spray, then kissed 


SECOND 


To undertake the composition of a chronicle for 
such a strenuous, hard-working class as that of 
Second Grammar would be the work of some peer- 
less scribe of the first water. But, hold! were I 
to continue, my pen would at last shelter itself 
securely beneath a pile of apologies as high as 
Olympus, so let us return to the original trend. 


In the above lines, the terms ‘ strenuous, hard- 
working Second Grammar," were used. Picture 
the gentle reader pondering deeply over these words, 
and, if he be familiar with our class, the aversion 
with which he would consider their misuse. But, 
we were strenuous; we were hard-working, although, 
perhaps, not exactly along the same lines. Who will 
deny that Casgrain, Nunez, Gleeson, and Leamy were 
energetic in as much as class-work was concerned? 
Again, who will deny that there were more vivacious 
chatterboxes than Coughlin and Wall? And, once 
more, who, may I ask, are more active in sports 
than Kelly and Vanier? 


To those who are unacquainted with the bustling 
class-life of Second-Grammar, let me say, that, 
in Latin, Greek, and Mathematics, we have gone 
far beyond the limits set by former classes. Besides, 


by the sun, arches into smiling rainbows with Gibson 
and Pye. With McCarthy at the foot of the plunge, 
it seethes in eddies and whirls; thence it moves ona 
deep river with not a ripple on its surface; so do I 
see Penfold, O'Halloran, Feeney and Hearn; it 
recedes. into placid bays with Lonergan, McGarr, 
McVey and Beaudin; chatters over stony ways with 
Bray, and murmurs and babbles “іп sharps and 
trebles." But look how it dashes onward again in 
Wendling and Belisle, submerging all the rocks that 
threaten its advance. And as it nears the plain, 
behold it spread in wide and expansive reaches in 
Hebert, Delisle and O'Brien until it mingles with 
the ocean. 


You recall the poet singing that ‘‘ Orderis Heaven's 
first law” :—It is First Grammar's also. Everything 
bespeaks it; as we cross the threshold into this 
hall of wisdom, we instinctively march with reverent 
steps, so unmistakbly do we feel its influence. 


Come forward and view the Art Gallery, the First 
Статтагіап'ѕ pride. There you may feast eye and 
mind upon scenes from History, Mythology, and 
upon gems of the Masters. Неге is Raphael's 
Sistine Madonna; there hang the ruins of the Roman 
Forum; the time-defying Pantheon, and the Temple 
of Poseidon. Turn to the wall at the rear and see 
where Ulysses, in his wild mood, ploughs the sandy 
shore; or where Apollo, lyre in hand, stands on 
Mount Parnassus instructing the Muses. 


The Black-boards, clinics where inert bodies of 
Arts and Languages are minutely dissected, the great 
book carrying fac-similes of Roman Amphitheatres, 
Temples and Triumphal Arches, the bookshelf 
groaning beneath the weight of lexicons and mytho- 
logical volumes, (a haven to which we often repair 
as thirsting travellers to a fountain) and the miniature 
Temple of Vesta dominating the whole, these artistic 
surroundings bear witness to the artistic tempera- 
ment of the First Grammarians; while the silver 
crests, hanging from every wall, attest the nerve and 
sinew that carries off the laurels from the field of 
sport. This, the Hall of Chivalry, the Table Round, 
whence knights have already gone abroad to '* uphold 
the Christ " and “ redress human wrongs.” 


M. J. PYE. 


GRAMMAR 


numerous debates, the weekly elocution, and a mock- 
trial, combined with an original way of rendering 
the Latin and Greek authors, made the year pass 
swiftly and agreeably. 


The debates, under the discreet and experienced 
guidance of Tom Walsh, proved to be time well 
spent. Messrs. Collins, Carlin, Kelly, and Vanier 
showed an unusual amount of talent, and bid fair, 
in the near future, to be orators of no mean ability. 


Moreover, Athletics are not by any means, un- 
known. The senior Football Team claims at least 
five of our members. In Hockey, Baseball, and 
Basketball, we fought to the bitter end for the coveted 
shields, representing the victor's spoils. 


Interesting undertakings such as the foregoing 
made everything exceedingly pleasant in Second 
Grammar. Labour may have been plentiful, indeed, 
but we performed it faithfully and with good will; 
and, now that the term is almost at an end, we can 
hardly realize that ten months have come and gone 
within the seemingly short space we spent together 
as Second Grammarians. 


TOM DAY. 


LOYOLA COLLEGE REVTEW 89 


THIRD GRAMMAR 


Often with prophetic eye I've scanned the future 
years, 

And lightly traced with eager hand the possible 
careers 

Of College friends; and Fancy seemed to lend me 
pleasant dreams, 

And lighted up the future years with far-extending 


beams. 

I saw the lawyer Tobin there, to fame known far 
and wide; 

Upon the bench sat H. Levesque, the while his fellow 
eyed; 


“ Geoff " Plunkett and Paul Casey too, were famous 
“ far from home.” 

Decarie George had left the town the northern wilds 
to roam. 


The scene was changed; lo! Europe's conflict then 
came into view, 

Where Anglin and John Rolland fought for the old 
Red White and Blae. 

Then to the Indies sped my thoughts, where in the 
jungle wild, ; 

“ бай" Hartney and Paul Brennan toil, to save the 
heathen child. 


A Baseball diamond met my gaze, as Davis stepped 
to bat, 

While from his private motor-car, Judge Connor 
waved his hat. 

There too was Murray Semple, as a dapper school 
trustee, 

While close behind John Sinnet sat, and yelled with 
frantic glee. 


The future College was now brought before my 
soothsayer’s eyes, 

Where Rev. Peter Duffey sat as Rector,—and, 
surmise 

My feelings, when, with awe, I gazed into the Pre- 
fect's room, 

And there saw Rev. D. Malone, amid the lowering 
gloom. 


Bright fancy next conveyed my mind to books by 
many sought, 

And, looking up the author's name, I saw ‘twas 
Wilfred Scott. 


Religious volumes now essayed my eager brain to lure, 
And on the gilded sides I read the name of Eugene 
Gourre. 


The vision faded quite away, and as it seemed to 
pass, 

I clearly saw Paul Cuddihy declaiming to his class 

From Hammond's Latin Grammar—and І well 
remembered now, 

That Brian always asked for themes, e’en though he 
caused a row. 


A scientific working den came next beneath my gaze, 

Where Snetsinger's experiments I saw with great 
amaze; 

Forsooth, I almost quite collapsed, when through the 
open door, 

I saw Will Brennan vivisect a dog upon the floor. 


Then I beheld Mulvena Marcus, a Rhetorician he; 

While Brannen, as a wealthy merchant, built schools 
and churches free. 

And happy in their southern homes, regardless of all 
care, 

Dwelt Gallegos and Villada, in peace and plenty 
there. ‘ 


John Gaynor and Ted Whalen in Parliament were 
found, 

Imbuing politicians there with doctrines new, but 
sound. 

Then I beheld G. Carroll, in purple robes attired, 

And like him Gerald Altimas, to equal heights aspired. 


I entered next a surgeon’s Hall, gloomy, cold, and 
dull, 

And there was Dr. Aubut, hard at work upon a skull; 

I rushed away in horror, and dashing down the stair, 

Ran into Dr. Quinlan, laden with collections rare. 


The fleeting vision passed away, but long I felt its 
thrill, - 

And here I have retraced it with faint and faithful 
quill. 

That future was unfolded, lads, where we shall win 
or lose; 

And may we one and all have light, the better path 
to choose. 


A. McGOVERN, '24 


IN THE CHEMISTRY LABORATORY 


90 LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


RUDIMENTS 


To enter into a detailed account of every boy in 
Rudiments would be, in view of the high cost of 
paper, to run foul of the Commission controlling the 
Dominion's Expenditures; to mention merely their 
names would be to run foul of the fair youths them- 
selves, probably a greater danger. By way of 
compromise, then, let us take a hurried glance at 
these jugglers of Latin declensions and conjugations. 


To begin by means of Reduction Ascending :— 


Parker, who, from his bench, can swing his feet 
clear without disturbing the dust on the floor; 
John Smeaton, who can utter more words in a single 
breath than Hiawatha ever thought of; О"Саш, 
always a shining light, and still an example of cool- 
ness; Nightingale, not even asked to join the choir; 
‘ Bobby " Burns, whose poetic instincts, like him- 
self, refuse to work; Boyer, Drolet, MacKenzie, 
and O'Grady form a cosmopolitan group very diffi- 
cult to part; Paul Dawson, a future “ Home-Run ” 
Baker without the “ Home-Run ";  Hesser, who 
aspires to become a Big League umpire; Harwood 
and McCaffrey, whose constant cry is “ Buy your 
tickets now"; Lane, who inserted an “ad” in a 


local paper to this effect: ''Lost—30 lbs. Finder 
generously rewarded." T. Laverty, who acted the 
part of the Prodigal Son, and returned home to 
Rudiments; A. Laverty, whose specialty is the high 
jump; Ethier and McAsey, the mathematical fiends; 
Kennedy and Chavanel, who seem to have a lease 
on the side-walk leading in from Sherbrooke St.; 
Dowling, an ardent devotee of the “ tuneful nine Liss 
Galvin, who thinks and lives Baseball, and does 
a little Latin on the side; Troughton, “ as silent as 
a painted ship upon a painted ocean’’; Gloutney, 
‘From the East came he, and sang '' America I love 
thee." Walsh, Gerald, '''twere sweet to talk," said 
he, “ and spoke he well "; Scott, ^ and he looks the 
whole world in the face—on St. Catherine St.’’; 
Thomas, having broken almost everything about 
the place, went back to the farm to break the soil; 
Davis, “ It was his wont to sing ‘I hear Me calling Ме" 
Smith, who holds the noiseless tenor of life's ways; 
Walsh, Desmond, "I don't know what you said 
about my loyalty, but I deny it"; and Taugher, 
who hasn't missed attending a political meeting for 
many moons. 
THE CLASS. 


FIRST PREPARATORY 


“ An hour will come with pleasure to relate 
Your sorrows past, as benefits of Fate. 

Endure the hardships of your present state, 
Live, and reserve yourselves for better fate.” 


Besides decisively defeating more experienced 
Baseball Teams, First Prep. boys are capable of 
many other startlin achievements. A half-hour 
visit to their class-room on a day when they are at 
their best would conclusively prove the truth of the 
foregoing statement. However, not to indulge in 
too lengthy an introduction, let us make a rapid 
review of these ‘‘ worthies " who are willing to under- 
take anything, be it reducing square feet to ounces; 
informing you that Brock won the Battle of Waterloo; 
ог giving any other priceless information. 


It takes all kinds to make up a class. Some are 
big, some are small. Percy Shea is among the small. 
But he isn't so small that he is not known. His 
English Compositions were always eagerly listened 
to, and his declamations were justly praised. “ Jack” 
McDougal made his debut in the “toga virilis ” 
at Easter, and spread winning smiles on his less 
favoured classmates. (His favourite studies are 
English Analysis and French. See prize list.) 
Tellier's extreme hatred of Ambition increased ex- 
ceedingly during the past year. In this he found an 
able seconder in the person of ‘‘ Jim " Riley, whose 
notion of work is still very limited. In company 
with Gallegos, Pangman seriously intends to revise 
the Revised Speller. Gerald Decary surprised all, 
himself included, by his return to form, and the tight 
grip he held on first place in Arithmetic. 


"Tis said that under the softening influence of 
time, disagreeable things become pleasant to remem- 
ber. "I wonder," says ‘‘ Jim Whalen, “ how many 
moons will pass before “ Jug ” will look pleasant to 
the residents of First Prep." “Jim” takes to his- 
‘tory as a ‘‘ duck takes to water," but we can happily 
add that it hasn't the same effect as the water on 
Ше duck's back. Handfield is noted for his rapt 
attention in other people's work, and his inordinate 


love for the word “ hey?" All express their admira- 
tion for Lanouette's serious study of English, and 
the amount of lead pencils his energy consumes. 


Is he the author of the saying, “ No matter how hard 


you drive a pen, a pencil must be lead ''? 


D'Arcy O'Connell, of “ you, understood " fame, 
intends to do much cycling this summer. Why 
does '' Freddy " Manley become so intensely inter- 
ested when Bigot's name is mentioned? No doubt, 
“ауіп 'inged "is" swaying mind to some passing 
monsoon or trade wind, Trickey often explored the 
regions of the Great Future during class hours 
through the medium of a deep snooze. In the opinion 
of the class ‘‘ Jimmy ” Bennett is good in Arithmetic, 
but according to his Competitions,—well, that's 
another story. Amos regales us with frequent out- 
bursts of oratory, which some day may merit for 
him a place in Parliament. Belair seemed to reserve 
all his fire and action for the weekly declamations. 
Could Edward Burke tell us who is the author of 
that harmful volume, ‘‘ Work, and how to avoid it '’? 
“ Frank " Duggan's class attendance may be summed 
up: “ Off ag'in, on ag'in, gone ag'in. Duggan.” 


Quinn's “ May I read?" and Charlebois’ “ May 
I do the next sum?” are the recurring decimals of 
First Prep. Who's responsible for the mysterious 
disappearance of the freight car, loaded with gum? 
Ask Janin—he knows. Roger Christin looked at 
the serious side of things this year, and did sur- 
prisingly well, even though his ''an-swears"' were 
not always correct. '' Harry " P. Donohue, whose 
middle name is Popularity, shows evidence of the 
severe strain the second term's work had upon him. 


In closing this chronicle, we wish to express our 
honest regret at being forced to lay aside our books 
during the vacations to come. 

i THE CLASS. 


LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


SECOND PREPARATORY 


Within the walls where Sapphic strains 
Long since have ceased to play, 

Where Rhetoricians in sweet refrains 
Poured forth their roundelay, 


Is seen to-day a class of boys, 
Of different size and age; 

Unknown to airs of stately poise, 
Yet all are bright and sage. 


There's Hutchison and Basserman, 
With aptitudes concealed, 

Until with vim, O'Connell Dan 
Shouts, “ Baseball," then they yield. 


And Byrom follows on the hop, 
With Conway at his heels; 

While Baker calls out, “ Kick a drop," 
"Tis foot-ball time, he feels. 


Then Charbonneau, with graceful stride, 
Comes strolling on behind ; 

His tow'ring height is all his pride, 
All else he does not mind. 


Next Coulson D., tho' never first, 
Asserts his rights when there; 

He argues loudly with the worst, 
Demanding Harrie's share. 


Stuart and Rolph and Zimmerman 
Speak loudest of them all; 

Set rules, and order when they can, 
But seldom catch a ball. 


Decary, Pierce, Menard and Smith, 
The meekest of the class; 

Hard workers all (this is a myth), 
Still wonder if they'll pass. 


Villada, Huber, Walsh, and Gray 
Are striving to succeed; 

By working hard both night and day, 
The honor roll, may lead. 


“ See now," says Tynan, “* 'Spite of all, 
The work is not too hard ''; 

And Gobeil e'er in wisdom tall, 
Won't show his monthly card. 


Our Nunez has been handicapped 
By sickness at the door; 

But Hough in lofty thoughts enwrapped 
Will lead the class no more. 


And now, farewell bright twenty-three, 
Though gone, you're not forgot; 

Enjoy your '' Уас.", from sin keep free, 
And heaven will be your lot. 


“t PARVULUS.” 


CORNER OF JUNIORS’ BUILDING. 


9] 


92 LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


College Athletics 


L.C.A.A.A. GAMES COMM COMMITTEE, 1917-1918 


Moderator, Mr. F. J. Macdonald S. J.; Presidenl, Gaston Delisle; 


Vice-President, T. G. Walsh; 


Secretary, Joseph J. Ryan; Treasurer, J. М. O'Halloran. 
Officers: Лив; Wolfe, C. С. Phelan, E. McGarr, Е. V. Hudon, M. Enright, G. Lonergan, W. Noonan, 
| Thomas J. Walsh. 


FIELD-DAY 


The 1917 Field-Day was a great success 
from every point of view. The Campus was 
beautiful in its natural and artificial decora- 
tions, the weather was ideal and the crowd 
large and enthusiastic. Records were bro- 
ken in every department. New high jump, 
broad jump, shot put and track records were 
established. The strength, speed and skill 
of the boys of 1917 exhibited much better 
form than that of previous years. Such 
facts speak well for the New College and 
the opportunities it affords for good healthy 
outdoor exercise. 


The following new records were set: 


High Jump.............R. Kennedy, 

High School..5 ft. 6.5 in. 
Broad Jump (under 16). А. Wendling....18 ft. 6 in. 
Shot Put (16 165.).......М№. A. Timmins . .34 ft. 9 in. 
Throwing Baseball......M. Enright..... 314 ft. 10 in. 


100 yards (under 16). :..А. Wendling....11 sec. 


The committee wish to thank the follow- 
ing contributors to the L.C.A.A.A.: 

Rev. Father Rector, Mr. L. Bradley, Mr. 
F. R. Burke, Mr. W. S. Gaynor, Mr. W. P. 
McVey, Mr. A. McGarr, Mr. and Mrs. 
N. A. Timmins, Mr. Wm. Scully, Mr. H. J. 
Trihey, Col. C. F. Smith, Mr. Jos. M. 
Lapointe, Mr. P. J. McCrory, Mr. A. J. 
Hudon, Mrs. F. H. Carlin, Mr. F. H. Carlin, 
Mrs. J. H. Walsh, Miss Edna McCaffrey, 
Mr. E. W. Tobin, Mr. R. Hammond, Mrs. 
Е. Manley, Rev. J. Flood, Mrs. Robinson, Mr. 
W. Е. Hayes, Ald. T. O'Connell, Mrs. E. C. 
Amos, Mr. J. R. Keenan, Mr. R. Wickham, 
Mr. E. R. Decary, Mr. Jos. Ethier, Dr. J. G. 
McCarthy, Mr. G. Dillon, Hon. C. J. Doherty, 
Mr. W. P. O'Brien, Mr. D. M. Coughlin, 
Mr. A. D. McGillis, Mr. J. Cuddy, Mr. W. L. 
Scott, Mr. T. P. Tansey, Mr. M. Lonergan, 
Mrs. Chas. F. Smith, Mr. T. Duckett, Mr. 
John Tobin, Mrs. Chabot, The Ladies of the 
Sanctuary Society. 


TENNIS 


A few years ago tennis was practically 
unknown to the majority of the College boys, 
but the introduction of the tournament in 
1914 brought the sport prominently before 
their eyes. Since then the interest taken in 
the game has increased steadily. This year 
the tournament was played for the first 
time on our own College courts, thus enabling 
everyone to take part in the sets and to be- 
come more familiar with the game. 

With favorable weather and the courts in 
splendid condition, the tournament was 
lively and interesting and marked through- 
out with fast playing. About 25 teams were 
entered in the league. 

The results follow: 


JUNIORS 
FIRST ROUND 
C. Scott and Dawson beat Chevanel and Galvin. 


6—2 6—0 

Lane and Smith beat Laverty and D. Walsh. 
3—6 6—3 6—3 

E. Anglin and Brennan beat J. Whalen and 

McDougal. : 

5:56 — 6—1 

Hammond and T. Whalen beat Gallagos and Villada 
6—1 6—3 

Semple and Davis beat Quirk and S. McGarr. 
6—4 6—5 


SECOND ROUND 
Whalen and Hammond beat Anglin and Brennan. 


6—1 6—2 
Lane and Smith beat Scott and Dawson. 
6—2 - 6—1 


SEMI FINALS 
Semple and Davis beat Lane and Smith. 
3—6 6—3 6—4 
FINALS 


Whalen and Hammond beat Davis and Semple. 
6—0 6—4 


PERUANO да 


mi: 


И 
|) 
А. 
|! 


ON THE TENNIS COURTS 


94 LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


TENNIS—continued 


SENIORS SECOND ROUND 
FIRST ROUND Wickham and Bryan beat Rolland and Hartney. 
3 + 6—3 651 
Wickham and Bryan beat W. Scott and Tobin. Gallegos and Quinlan beat Massé and R. Nunez. 
6—1 6—4 6—3 6—4 
Villada and Gaynor beat R. E. Anglin and McGarr. Gaynor and Villada beat Delisle and Lonergan. 
6—5 6—4 6—3 3—6 6—5 
Vanier апа Н. Decary beat Coughlin and McGarr. , SEMI FINALS 
—— со : b Gallegos and Quinlan beat Vanier and Decary. 
Gallegos and Quinlan beat Hearne and Wendling. Wickham and Bryan beat Gaynor and Villada. 
6—1 5—6 6—5 6—4 3—6 6—1 
Rolland and Нагіпеу beat Bray and E. McGarr. FINALS 
es a Wickham and Bryan beat Gallegos and Quinlan. 
Massé and R. Nunez beat Meagan and McMahon. 6—4 6—4 Е 
6—3 4—6 6—5 PAUL WICKHAM 
; FOOTBALL 


LOYOLA AT OTTAWA-—October 8th, 1917 


McGarry 
Vanier Wolfe McGarr Meegan O'Halloran 
Wickham Pye O'Brien Nunez Altimas Hough Villada Enright 
Coughlin Walsh Delisle 


Lonergan 


SENIOR TEAM 


With five of last year’s senior team and very 
promising new material available, conditions looked 
favorable for a strong senior team. Hence great 
enthusiasm was awakened, and this increased with 
each practice. Former members of the L.C.A.A.A.— 
stars of the gridiron as well as of the track and 
diamond—put the players through many a trying 
workout. Among those who gave time to the team 
were Noah and Leo Timmins, F. McGillis, John 
Gallery, and S. McDonald. М. J. Enright was 
elected captain. : 


Westmount vs. Loyola. 


Our first game was on the College Campus. 
Westmount High School, though fast and extremely 
dangerous when opportunity lent itself, was decisively 
defeated. 


October 7th—Loyola 0 Ottawa Collegiate 8. 


Our annual clash with the Collegiate in Ottawa 
was scheduled for Oct. 7th. Special car arrange- 
ments were made for the team and some sixty 
students. A number of interested graduates and 
old boys accompanied them. They enjoyed the 
holiday to the full in spite of defeat. 


LOYOLA COLLEGE CAMPUS—THE LARGEST IN CANADA 
In the distance—about one mile to the East—is seen the Montreal Mountain and to the right the College Buildings 


96 ШО DEA CU ERE. REV DEN 


FOOTBALL—continued 


The heavy field conditions at Lansdowne Park 
proved fatal to our comparatively light team, and 
the end runs of Lonergan and Enright, which were 


to be the salvation and hope of Loyola, were stalled. 


in their very inception. 

The return match was arranged for two weeks 
later on Loyola Campus. Owing to train arrange- 
ments Loyola was forced to decline the kind invi- 
tation of the O.C.I. to a dance and entertainment 
in their honor. 


Loyola 11 Ottawa Collegiate 5. 


In the first five minutes of play, Ryan scored a try, 
which was converted. Little, of the O.C.I., also 
succeeded in crossing the line, but failing to convert, 
the score at half time stood six to five in our favor. 
The visitors began to tire before the end. Our boys 


took advantage of this turn in their favor and slipped 


the ball to Enright. He was off like a shot. After 
a run of some sixty yards he laid the ball to rest 
behind their goals. .The game was won. Later 
the visitors were entertained at luncheon. 


INTERMEDIATE FOOTBALL 


The Intermediates had but few opportunities to 
compare their strength with outside teams. The 


first clash was with Westmount on Loyola Campus, 
but was far too easy and one-sided to be exciting. 
The final score stood 15 to 5 in our favor. The 
Westmounters were not discouraged. They knew 
they had good material. A return game was arranged 
for two weeks later. This contest on Westmount 
Park proved far more exciting and strenuous than 
the previous encounter. It was anyone’s game up 
till the last minute. Our boys fought pluckily to 
the bitter end, winning the game by the narrow 
margin of 13-11. 


INTER-CLASS FOOTBALL 


The exhibition games played by Seniors and Inter- 
mediates by no means represent the season’s entire 
football schedule. The Inter-class idea.had worked 
so marvellously in the other lines of sport that it was 
considered advisable to try it in Rugby. It was in 
this department that it really manifested its merits. 


` Space precludes details of these Inter-class contests. 


Their effect on sport was such that we sincerely 
hope this scheme will work in years to come the won- 
ders it has done this past year. More boys take part 
in the games, greater enthusiasm and love for good 
healthy exercise prevails, and healthier and happier 
college life is the result. 


INTERMEDIATE FOOTBALL TEAM 


Standing—McGarr Villada Decary 
Gallegos 
Sitting—Wickham Carrol 


Tobin 


Wendling Plunkett Day Altimas 
Nunez 
Kelly Anglin McMahon 


LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 97 


SENIOR HOCKEY TEAM—1917-18 


The College Team were runners-up in the Montreal City League this year, playing off for the Championship 
with McGill University Seniors 


Standing—C. Trihey S. McDonald . Mr. F. J. McDonald, S.J. Slater Mowatt 
Seated—J. Hough McGee G. Lonergan A. Clement H. Decary 
L. Clement 


98 LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


HOCKEY 


Serious doubts existed at the beginning of the 
season as to the possibility of our continuing in the 
City League. Gallery, Dooner and McGillis had 
finished and gone to McGill, Courchesne to Laval, 
and the Timmins Brothers were unable to play with 
us. Thus four of our last year regulars and two of 
our first spares were missing. 

As the sequel showed, however, we were found 
amply justified in casting our lot with the other 
Big Teams of the City League. Though by far 
the youngest and lightest team, we claim the honor 
of scorinf the highest number of goals during the 
scheduled season. We almost doubled our record 
of last year and incidentally of the next nearest high 
scoring team of this year, viz., McGill. 


LEAGUE GAMES 


December 18th—Loyola 7—Shamrocks 3. 


In the first league game, we won easily from 
Shamrocks. In the first period, Shamrocks tallied 
two goals while Loyola netted but one. In the 
second half, Lonergan ran in three goals in bewilder- 
ing succession. Slater added two more and “ Irish " 
slammed in his fourth. 


January 7th—Loyola 3—McGill 4. 


Loyola was beaten by the odd goal in seven on 
Jan. 7th. The “Star” reports Ше game as being аз 
good an exhibition of amateur hockey as has been 
seen in Montreal for many years. The superior 
weight of McGill coupled with its long line of sub- 
stitutes both of which they used to good effect won 
the game for the University. i 


January 14th—Loyola 1—Canadian Vickers 1. 


This game was fast and spectacular, but dissa- 
pointing to Loyola, as they thought they ought to 
have done better than tie the score. 


January 21st—Loyola 3—Laval 1. 


Our losses and disappointments had now reached 
the climax. Henceforth we were to treat our sup- 
porters with a long list of brilliant victories, which 
soon marked our team as the one to be contended 
with for the championship. 


The victory over Laval was a brilliant one. The 
University colors were lowered for the first time in 
the series, and Loyola rose again into second place, 
tieing with McGill and the Irishmen. The scoring 
honors fell to Mowatt and Clement. 


January 28th—Loyola 6—National 2. 


This victory was an easy one for our boys. From 
now onward there was never any doubt as to the 


intentions of the wearers of the maroon and white. 
They had two beautiful cups packed away from last 
year, and they meant to hold on to them. 


February 4th—Loyola 3—Shamrocks 2. 


Loyola again triumphed. Our young goal-tender, 
Hough, was now holding his own with the best 
of them. During the course of the evening 
the Vickers downed Laval, and Loyola and McGill 
were at the head of the League, positions they held 
until the end of the schedule. 


March 6th—Loyola 2—McGill 2. 

In this game the championship of the City League 
was practically at stake. Before the largest crowd 
that has witnessed a City League game this season, 
McGill and Loyola staged the best game of amateur 
hockey that has ever been seen in the League 
(Montreal Star). To Loyola must be given the credit 
of playing their six regulars throughout this strenu- 
ous contest without using a substitute or drawing 
a single penalty. At the end of timethe score was 
tied. The championship would have to be played 
off between Loyola and McGill, but the schedule 
was over for the year. Е 

Loyola was defeated in the game to decide the 
Championship, but showed the true sporting spirit in 
the way they accepted unexpected defeat. The 
L.C.A.A. wishes to congratulate McGill University on 
their decisive victory. 


FINAL LEAGUE STANDING 
Won Drn. Lost Agt. Pts. 


T'oyolas- а" 7 2 1 241 16 
МЕСТЕ леи 7 2 1 12 16 
Shamrocks....... 5 1 4 24 11 
aval ес У. 4. 0 6 31 8 
Nationale. jaan. 3 0 7 38 6 
Can. Vickers..... al 1 8 32 3 


INTER-CLASS GAMES 


The Inter-class games were a decided success. 
Besides bridging over the quiet periods, they gave 
to all an opportunity to get into the game and fight 
for their class. After a long and fascinating struggle, 
the championship honors of both sections, fell to 
First Grammar. The beautiful shield now hangs 
side by side with the elaborate Timmins’ snowshoe 
Trophy on the walls of the First Grammar classroom. 
Second Grammar proved a very formidable rival, 
and had it not been for the exceptionally poor con- 
dition of the Coliseum ice, the results might have 
been altogether different. 


T. W. M. 


Top Panel—JUNIOR BASKET-BALL TEAMS Slanting Panel—A SCORE? 
Lower Oval Panel - SECOND GRAMMAR JUNIORS Lower Panel—SECOND vs. THIRD GRAMMAR 


100 LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


BASKET BALL 


Basket ball at Loyola has flourished ex- 
ceeding during the past year. Pursued in- 
gloriously at the Old College, it was dropped 
completely for two years, but taken up 
again with renewed interest this spring. 
Our first attempt at the game was the entry 
of a team in the Shamrock A. A. A. Tourna- 
ment. It was defeated of course by the 
Shamrock squad, but at least gained prac- 
tical experience, if nothing else, for the com- 
inf season. 

As in the baseball the League was divided 
into two sections, Senior and Junior. First 
Grammar won the Shield in the former, 
Second Grammar Juniors in the latter. 
The games were scheduled for 3.30 on class 
days, the time being divided up so that a 
senior and a junior game could be run off 
in the interval between class and study. 
The large crowd that was always to be found 
around the court showed that the interest 
іп the game was more than a passing one. 

If some of the players at first knew little 
or nothing about the rules, their very inex- 


perience added zest and amusing incidents 
to the game. It took some time before our 
enthusiastic rugby players could be per- 
suaded that a flying tackle was not ' the 
correct thing to do " but once convinced of 
it, they played up in proper style, like all the 
rest. Every spare moment of the day was 
utilized by boarders and day-scholars alike 
in practising for the games, and more than 
one has shown that he had the qualities of a 
£ood basket ball player latent within him. 
The standing of the League is as follows: 


SENIOR LEAGUE STANDING 


Teams ID: W. L. For Agt. 
Fourth year...... - 4 3 1 69 44 
Third year....... 3 1 2 35.132 
Second year...... 3 1 2 23 51 
Rhetoric......... (No team.) 


JUNIOR LEAGUE STANDING 


Teams. 195 Ww L. For  Agt. 
Third year Juniors 4 4 0 71 14 

Rudiments..... 4 2 2 26 34 
SecondyearJuniors 5 2 3 34 59 

Preparatory.... 3 0 3 13 37 


“JACK” McMARTIN 
Old Loyola ('08-'16) 


Mr. McMartin has recently graduated from 
the Curtis Flying School, and is now with 
the R.A.F. 


LOY OA. COLLEGE, REV DEW. 


_ On this page 
Toyola College Review 


wishes gratefully to 
acknowledge its indebtedness 
to the kindness of 


Messrs. O’Brien and Doheny. 


101 


102 LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


BASE-BALL 


Last year the idea of Inter-class games was con- 
ceived and carried into effect. Shields were donated 
and schedules drawn up. This year the same idea 
is working wonders for Base-Ball and it is.due in 
Éreat measure to the Inter-class organization that 
the sport has secured such a firm foothold in Loyola, 
and promises to become one of the College's greatest 
sports. 


Following is the line-up of the Inter-class teams: 


Rhet. Human. 1st Gram. 2nd Gram. All Stars 
1st B. . Malone. . . Wendling. . Vanier... .Hartney 


(Capt.) 

2nd B..Hough....Gibson....Kelly..... Gaynor 
(Capt.) 
3rd B..McGarry..Hearn.....Leamy....Quinlan 
S.S....Smeaton...Beaudin...Coughlin. . Gourre 
(Capt. ) 
R.F....Masse....Binda..... Nunez....Gallegos 
L.F....An£lin....Delisle. . . . Altimas J.. Altimas С. 
C.F.... McGee....Bray. .....Gleeson. . . Rolland 
Cat....Bryan.....McGarr. ..Anglin. . .. Carrol 
(Capt.) 


Pit....Wickham. . Lonergan. . McMahon. Villada 


LOYOLA SNOWSHOE CLUB 


As is generally the case with any manly sport in 
Loyola, Snow-Shoe racing was very popular during 
the winter of 1918. The regular cross-country 
tramps were seven in number, of which one was by 
moon-light. The other six filled in very well Sundays 
and holidays on which races could not be held. 
These outings were productive of much sport for 
the participants, and the crisp, cold atmosphere, 
together with the brisk walking and running, was 
very conducive to health. 

The prizes were distributed at the annual St. 
Patrick's Day Concert. Everett McGarr was awarded 
the Silver Cup trophy; Desmond Walsh, as second, 
was also awarded a cup. The prize for the greatest 
number of “first places" was won by McGarr, 
with Paul Dawson as second, First prizes were 
also won by Paul Wickham, A. Wendling, Martin 
Pye, Ashton Tobin and Wilfrid Scott. 

A prize was awarded to Thomas Walsh, Captain 
of the Club, for his untiring efforts to make the Club 
a success. The Timmins Shield was presented 
First Grammar, with a special mention of the good 
showing made by Latin Rudiments. 

The Officers were: | 

Captain, Thomas Walsh; Executive, Paul Wick- 
ham, Everett McGarr, Antoine Wendling; Sec.- 
Treas, Wilfrid Scott; Faculty Moderator, Rev. 
D. B. Zema, SJ. 

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LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW 


105 


FINAL RESULTS OF FIELD-DAY EVENTS 


Event First Second 1 Third Sime Ie Ud Record 
OPEN TO SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 
100 yds. dash............ В. Kennedy (H.S.)|F. Bussiere. ...... M. Enright....... 10.3-5". ..........[10.1-5^(E- Musphy, 1312 
100 yds. dash (under 16 ) A. Wendling...... F. Ballon (H.S.) G. Gleeson,....... А ЕСЕ 11”, B. Brown, 1915 
yrs. М 
High Jump.............. В. Kennedy (H.S.)|G. Villada........ (Е. Bussiere рвезе Kennedy, 
OPEN TO COLLEGE 
100 yds. dash............ M. Enright....... F. Kearns........ G. Palardy........ ТО ЗУБ” Лэ + inser: 10.1-5", J. Gallery, 1914 
220 yds. dash............ G. Palardy........ Е. Bussiere....... M. Enright....... 265 МЕ eU 23", J. Gallery, 1915 
120 yd. Hurdles.......... M. Enright....... G. Palardy........ E. McGarr.... ee ee er 16 2-5" f% D n le 
Тае. secon W. Quinn......... E. McGarr..... a.. |R. MeMahon..... ОА 5' 5", Е. Shallow, 1900 
Broad jump............. A. Wendling...... M. Enright....... С. Villada........ 19:feet.- x eye 20ft. Llin, J. Gallery, 1915 
Pole Vault.............. T. Bracken........ J. McGarry....... R. Dooner........ ВТ Да а ес 8 fe TE T. Bracken, 
Putting Shot; o N. Timmins...... P. Sentenne...:..|R. Dooner........ 34 ft. Dins. 9.03.54 .|34 ft. 9 ins. N. Timmins, 
j Z 
Throwing Baseball......|M. Enright....... G. Villada........ W. Lapointe...... 314 ft. 10 ins...... 314 ft. 10 ins., M. Enright 
1917 


UNDER 16 YEARS 


100 yds. dash............ A. Wendling...... G. Gleeson....... В. МеМаһоһ.....|11”............... 11”, А. Wendling, 1917 ^ 
220 yds. dash............ A. Wendling...... G. Gleeson....... 26 1-5” MEDIA 
440 yds. dash............ Е. Kearns........|/J. Kannon........ 58”, G. Noonan, 1914 
880 yds. dash............ G. Gleeson....... A. Wendling 2’ 26", С. Noonan, 1914 
Long Jump............. A. Wendling...... G. Gleeson....... 18 ft. 614 ins., A. Wend- 
ling, 1917 

14 YEARS AND UNDER 
100 yds. dash............ С. Altimas.......|P. Маѕѕе......... |Н. Del Sole....... J 12", G. Altimas, 1917 
880 yds. dash............ G. Altimas....... C. Leprohon...... P. Маѕѕе......... QUOD d дас SAEI 2' 35", С. Altimas, 1917 
Obstacle Race........... T. Laverty........ C. Davis.......... J. Whalen........ 

12 YEARS AND UNDER 
100 yds. dash............ T. MacDonald....|J. Whalen........ Н. Pangman......|13 3-5”........... 13 is T. MacDonald, 

2 1 Ы 
Potato Васе. ............ С. Decary. ....... D. O'Connell. . . . F. Manley 

10 YEARS AND UNDER 
100 yds. dash............ T. MacDonald. ...|R. Basserman. . . . F. Manley........ 14.3254. omes 


.|14 3-5", T. MacDonald, 
1917 


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TRADE MARK 
WHEN BUYING 


LEATHER GOODS, HARNESS, 
TRUNKS and BAGS, 
Ask for “ALLIGATOR BRAND” 
e © 


LAMONTAGNE LIMITED 


BALMORAL BLOCK 


338 NOTRE DAME STREET W., MONTREAL 


Medals, Pennants, Flags, 
= Dias 


MADE BY 


T. P. TANSEY 
186-188 PEEL STREET 


Phones Uptown 3886 and 4283 


WHEN YOU THINK OF 


BICYCLES 


тнт нЕ от 


BREGENT 


The most complete range. of Sporting Goods 
in the City. ; 


m 


ST. CATHERINE STREET EAST 
PHONE Едзт 96 


BERKEFELD WATER FILTERS 
BARNET REFRIGERATORS 


STEEL RANGES 
COOKING APPARATUS 


Geo. R. Prowse Range Co. 
Limited 
575-579 University Street 
MONTREAL 


TELEPHONES, Uptown 6054-6055 


ARCTIC 


Refrigerators and 
Cold Storage Doors 


For Institutions, Stores and 
Domestic use 


John Hillcock & Co. 


Limited 
154 George St., Toronto 


110 PLEASE PATRONIZE ADVERTISERS AND MENTION “LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW” 


-4 


Gunn Langlois & Co. 


LIMITED 


105 St. Paul Street East 
MONTREAL, Que. 


vvv 


EGGS, BUTTER, CHEESE, BACON 
HAMS, POULTRY, OLEOMARGARINE 
MAPLE SUGAR, MAPLE SYRUP 
PEAS, BEANS, HONEY, ETC. 


NO SCALES OR EXERCISES 


Used in our Modern Simplified System for 


Piano, Hawaiian Ukulele, Guitar, «с. | 


ҮҮ REE opt 
VIOLING м 


FIPCATC] 


HOOL OF MUSIC 
m S CATHERINE ST-WEST 


SAME ADDRESS FOR 14 YEARS. SEND FOR BOOKLET 


Mr. Peate is QU of McGill College, M.A.A.A., Y. M.C.A., Sham- 
rock A.A.A. and Y.M.H.A. Mandolin Orchestras. 


THE UPSTAIRS MUSICAL INSTRUMENT STORE 


Where Conditions and Prices are Right 


PIANOS Also the Laréest Stock of STRING INSTRUMENTS 
and ACCESSORIES in Canada 


William Scully 


Manufacturer of Military Equipment 


320 UNIVERSITY STREET 
MONTREAL 


Contractor to the Government 
of the Dominion of Canada 


To the YOUNG MEN or LovoLA COLLEGE: 


“Tf you want to know whether you are going to be a 
success or a failure i in life,” says James J. Hill, the great 
American financier, “ you can easily find out. "The test is 
simple and infallible. Are you able to save money? If 
not, drop out. You will lose. The seed of success is not 


in you.” 
BE WISE \ 7 ASSURE YOUR 
SA E FUTURE 
Begin now. We cordially invite you to open an account 
with 


THE MONTREAL CITY & DISTRICT SAVINGS BANK 


Head Office and Fourteen Branches in the 
City of Montreal 


Every courtesy and attention will be shown to you whether your 
deposit be large or sma 


"A. Р. LESPERANCE, General Manager 


J. A. Simard & Co. 


Direct Importers of 


TEAS AND COFFEES 


The Best Canadian Tea and Coffee Firm 


Goods Guaranteed to give Satisfaction 


5 and 7 St. Paul St., Montreal 


CONSULTATIONS HOURS of 


ROD. CARRIERE 


At the Hotel Dieu - - 9-30 to 11-0 a.m. 
At the Optical Parlors - - 1-0 to 5-0 p.m. 


A full staff of Licensed Optometrists at your service 
from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. 


CARRIERE & SENECAL 


Phone East 2257 


ESTABLISHED 1874 


D. Hatton Company 


Montreal 


Largest trade in 
exponents of the F I S H Canada 
Experts in the handling of Bulk and Shell Oysters 


REPLATING IN GOLD AND SILVER 
GOLD VARNISHING AND REPAIRS 


CHURCH VESSELS Repaired 
CHURCH ORNAMENTS and 


Replated 
SILVERWARE AND CUTLERY as Now 
oO Oo 


Plating on Medals, Beads, Chains, etc. 


SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. PRICES REASONABLE. 


Royal Silver Plate Co., 


207 ST. JAMES ST., MONTREAL 


PLEASE PATRONIZE ADVERTISERS AND MENTION “LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW” 


111 


Established in 1842 


L. Chaput, Fils & Cie 
Limitée 
WHOLESALE GROCERS 
AND IMPORTERS 


2, 4, 6 AND 8 DE BRESOLES STREET, 
17 Sr. DiziER STREET, AND 
123 ro 135 LEROYER STREET 


MONTREAL 


J. A. Vaillancourt 


Limitée 


Groceries and 
Prowvisions 


618-626 St. Paul West Montreal 


Christie's Biscuits 


The Purest of all Pure Foods 
The Biscuits that are SIRE 
: good 


AT, ЕЕ GROCERS 


PRACTICE TENE. FOOD ECONOMY 


PARIS. PATE Т} 


Mephisto вай Баай Tongue 


Among the canned meats now on the market which are of 

. established excellence, and yet are helping by their use to 

save Beef and Pork for Overseas, none rank higher than 
“РеуШеа Tongue" and “Paris Pâté” 


OBTAINABLE AT ALL FIRST CLASS GROCERIES 


The John D. Duncan Co. Ltd. 


218 MOUNTAIN STREET 
ПП 


PURE PASTEURIZED 


Milk, Cream and Buttermilk 


OUR RECORD IS ‘SECOND TO NONE" 
FOR QUALITY, PURITY & CLEANLINESS ` 


Telephone Uptown 1318 or call our Drivers 


Laporte, Martin, Limitée 
WHOLESALE GROCERS 


584 ST. PAUL STREET WEST 
MONTREAL 
Ф + 


WE HAVE SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVES CALLING ON 
RELIGIOUS INSTITUTIONS AT YOUR REQUEST 


ASK FOR 


FSALADA 


CEYLON ТЕА 


AT YOUR GROCER’S 


The A. A. Ayer Company 


LIMITED 


Exporters of 


Butter, Cheese and Eggs 


610 St. Paul Street West - Montreal 


112 PLEASE PATRONIZE ADVERTISERS AND MENTION “LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW” 


WE GROW EVERYTHING in 
FRUIT & ORNAMENTAL 


PERENNIAL 
PLANTS 
VINES 

ETC. 


SHRUBS 
ROSES 
SMALL 
FRUITS 


TREES 


FLEET, FALCONER, PHELAN & BOVEY 


BARRISTERS, SOLICITORS, &c. 


C. J. FrEET, К.С. A. FALCONER, K.C. 

M. A. PHELAN, K.C. WILFRID BOVEY 

C. С. Осрем, К.С. ROBERTSON FLEET 
J. N. PAuLIOT 


Cable Address—"'' Еее 
Codes— Western Union, Liebers, A.B. e "sth Ed., Unicode 


157 ST. JAMES STREET 


Paul S. Conroy 


Yorkshire Insurance Building 
136 St. James Street 
Montreal 


'Telephone Up. Po 
2959 Residence and Night Calls 


T. J. QUIRK 


DISPENSING AND FAMILY 
CHEMIST 


817 St. Catherine Street West - 


“ “ 


Montreal 


ORIENTAL RUGS 


Our Collection of Eastern Rugs is unsurpassed in Montreal to-day. 
Why not let our representative call and study your requirements? 
The effect when in your home will help you decide. Our Rugs 
were purchased before the war and prices are right. 
Remember, they are made by hand and take years to weave 


Hicks Oriental Rugs 


(Registered) 
“Nothing but Rugs. 


” 


620 St. Catherine St. West, Cor. Mountain St. 
UPTOWN 2546 L. D. HICES, Prop. 


Are You Thirsty ? 


DRINK 


GURD'S 


DRINKS 
“They Satisfy” 


Gurp’s Dry GINGER ALE is a Prime Favorite 
among people of exacting taste. 


We will ship direct to consumers anywhere, and guaran- 

tee arrival in first-class condition, whether in large or 

small quantities. 

Get our Blue Book or use our Landscape or Service . 
Departments to tell you When—What— Where—and 

How-to Plant. 


LUKE BROTHERS, LIMITED 


MONTREAL, QUE. 


H. J. Kavanagh, K.C. Alexandre Lacoste, Jr. 
Н. Gerin Lajoie, K.C. T. J. Shallow 
Paul Lacoste, K.C. Henri Gerin-Lajoie 
Alexandre Gerin-Lajoie 
Sir Alexandre Lacoste, K.C. 


KAVANAGH, LAJOIE & LACOSTE 
ADVOCATES, SOLICITORS, Etc. 
Provincial Bank Building 
7 Place d'Armes - - - Montreal, Canada 
Cable Address “ Laloi ” Tel. Main 8675, 8676, 8677 


Walsh & Mulcair 


NOTARIES 


J. C. B. WALSH 
JOHN MULCAIR 


Dominion Express Building 
145 St. James Street 


BUY YOUR 


POULTRY, GAME, EGGS AND FEATHERS 


FROM 


P. Poulin & Company 


Poultry of the Best Grades. Game of AII Kinds. 
Eggs Certainly Fresh Received Daily. 


39 BONSECOURS MARKET, MONTREAL 


Convent of the 3901р Name of Mary 
OUTREMONT, P.Q. 


(Montreal Suburb) 


Boarding School for young ladies and children conducted 
by Religious of the Holy Name of Jesus and Mary. 
Mother House at Hochelaga. 


inj іс 
GRAMMAR, HIGH SCHOOL AND FIRST YEAR COLLEGE 
ScHooLs or MusiC-AND PAINTING 
oo 
Affiliation with Universities and Colleges 


Address Mother Superior. - Opening September 3rd 


PICTURES AND PICTURE FRAMING 
ARTIST AND DRAWING MATERIALS 


A 


Che Art Emporium, Limtien 


23 McGILL COLLEGE AVENUE 
MONTREAL 


ANDREW PARKHILL, Manager 


PLEASE PATRONIZE ADVERTISERS AND MENTION “LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW” 113 


114 


DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVAL SERVICE 


ROYAL NAVAL COLLEGE OF CANADA 


The Royal Naval College is established for the purpose of imparting 
a complete education in Naval Science. 

Graduates are qualified to enter the Imperial or Canadian Services 
as midshipmen. A Naval career is not compulsory however. For those 
who do not wish to enter the Navy, the course provides a thorough ground- 
ing in Applied Science and is accepted as qualifying for entry as second 
year students in Canadian Universities. 

The scheme of education aims at developing discipline with ability 
to obey and take charge, a high sense of honour, both physical and mental, 
a good grounding in Science, Engineering, Mathematics, Navigation, 
History and Modern Languages, as a basis for general development or 
further specialization. 

Candidates must be between their fourteenth and sixteenth, birthdays 
on July 1st following the examination. 

Particulars of entry may be obtained on application to the Department 
of the Naval Service, Ottawa. 


G. J. DESBARATS, 
Deputy Minister of the Naval Service. 
Ottawa, January 8, 1918. 


Unauthorized publication of this advertisement will not be paid for. 


The Pleasure of Shopping 


—and buying is a pleasure, isn't it?—is intensified when you can shop in such a 
beautiful store as OGILVY'S, in its floor of natural daylight, wide aisles and tasteful 
decorations. 


And our patrons will find our merchandise as delightfully inviting as the store 
itself. All our goods are thoroughly up to date. 


We cater specially to Young Men, and they will find our Furnishing 
Department on the ground floor replete with everything a young, man wants. 


On the first floor, a complete stock of Boys’ and Young Men's Ready- 
made Garments. 


Jas. A. Ogilvy’s Limited 


Corner St. Catherine Street West and Mountain Street 


PLEASE PATRONIZE ADVERTISERS AND MENTION “LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW” 


Hudon, Hebert & Co. 


LIMITED 


Wholesale Grocers 
and Wine Merchants 


18 DeBresoles Street - Montreal, Canada 


DUNNETT & STEWART 


LIMITED 


WHOLESALE TAILORS 
149 NOTRE DAME STREET WEST 


а jl 


As we cater extensively to the younger men's trade, our 
clothing has become popular with the students of the various 
colleges in the city. 


Loyola students will have the p succ of a strictly whole- 
sale price. 


PLEASE PATRONIZE ADVERTISERS AND MENTION "LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW" 115 


The James Robertson Company Limited 


Established 1857 


DESIGNERS, MANUFACTURERS AND 
WHOLESALERS OF HIGH GRADE 


SANITARY APPLIANCES 


HEAD OFFICE: 
142 William Street, Montreal, Quebec 


. OFFICES and WORKS at 
Montreal, Quebec Toronto, Ontario Winnipeg, Manitoba St. John, New Brunswick 


SANITARY EXHIBITION ROOMS uu 
320 Beaver Hall Hill, Montreal 207-219 Spadina Avenue, Toronto 
175-179. Pacife Avenue: Winnipeg 


The Grocers’ Favorites for more than Half a Century 


Benson’s Corn Starch 
Silver Gloss Laundry Starch 


and 


Crown Brand Corn Syrup 


Manufactured by 


THE CANADR STARCH COMPANY LTD. 


MONTREAL - CARDINAL - FORT WILLIAM 


116 p PLEASE PATRONIZE ADVERTISERS AND MENTION “LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW” 


| 
| 


Southam Press Limited 
Montreal 


The Complete Service 


Printers 


From the Idea to the 
Finished Product 


63 St. Alexander St. 


Phone Uptown 3900 


R.N.Taylor & Co. 


Opticians 


SPECIAL PRICES TO STUDENTS 


o 


522 St. Catherine St. West 


Between Stanley and Peel Streets 


Phone Main 8140 


DELIGHTFUL CRUISES 


TO THE 


BERMUDAS 


AND 


WEST INDIES 


THE IDEAL TRIPS FOR SUMMER OR 
WINTER HOLIDAYS 


Canada Steamship Lines 
LIMITED 


9 VICTORIA SQUARE 


PLEASE PATRONIZE ADVERTISERS AND MENTION “LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW” 


117 


—70 a М 
Т (Bo | —W 


Со КТ 
Fashion Craft Clothes 


are always abreast of the advanced age in which we live. : 
Worn by men young and old whokeep up-to-date. Fit, | 
D п. valueand service the keystone of success. п o | 
Price range $20 to $60. Sold at 200 shops in Canada 


Max Beauvais Ltd. A. A. Roy 


229 St. James St. 469 St. Catherine East | 
West end 463 St. Catherine West 


The Smith Marble, & 


Construction Co. 
Limited 


Ф 9 


MARBLES, SLATES, TERAZZO 
TILES, MOSAICS, ONYX, CERAMICS 
DECORATIVE MARBLE WORK 
MARBLE MEMORIAL TABLETS 
ALTARS, ETC. 


FONTS AND MANTELS A SPECIALTY 


*.. 9 


145 Van Horne Avenue 
Montreal 


. St. Louis 977 
Phones: { St. Louis 3796 


118 PLEASE PATRONIZE ADVERTISERS AND MENTION “LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW” 


SOUTHAM PRESS LIMI 
MONTREAL. 


COLLEGE AND ACADEMY 
ST. JOSEPH 


ST. ALBAN STREET - TORONTO 
RESIDENTIAL 


AND 


DAY SCHOOL 


FOR YOUNG LADIES 
AND LITTLE GIRLS 


COLLEGE COURSE OF FOUR YEARS, LEADING TO DEGREES 
ACADEMIC, COLLEGIATE, COMMERCIAL and PREPARATORY COURSES 


St. Joseph’s College is affiliated to the University of Toronto . 
through the Federated College of St. Michael 


For Prospectus, apply to the MOTHER SUPERIOR 


Teeth and 


Personality 


The applications for a vacancy in a large national 
organization were thinned down to two young men, 
both equally capable. Тһе characteristics of each were 
closely examined, and the position finally awarded to 
theone whose more particular personality was reflected 
in clean, strong, well-kept teeth. 


Mintys Pe 


Is Necessary to Good Teeth 


It cleans and whitens without scouring or bleaching; 
destroys all the germs that attack the enamel; steri- 
lizes the teeth, mouth and brush; purifes and leaves 
in the mouth a delightfully refreshing after-effect that 
lingers long after using. 


Get a tube to-day at any good druggist's 


Necessary to 


Palmers Limited Montreal Good Teeth 


PLEASE PATRONIZE ADVERTISERS AND MENTION "LOYOLA COLLEGE REVIEW" 


"de.