Skip to main content

Full text of "The McGill news v.59-61 1978-1980"

See other formats


ene 


Tah ar oi 


‘aaa "akg anf: Mitte} 


res 


moe Sgited nod 


pathy ati 


a 
h- pe peer 
tei taht eas 


iteh wise 


: Be ay aki fe eed pe cries 


Tine 


he ni “£4 


ta0 tr ye 
perivnyt abr pt 


mstihul ee 
4 Dene S EY Y 


huh a 


at fe 
mies 


Ma 


cw ite 


er Nee a LeAaiea 
ree eae | 

non a wohl 
ae ary SP 

oi ee sabi e id 

? 


lees Boag pct 
oy Bho etree inet 
; B43 of sein bitte 


spy be hde pp pape h: 
ater AAP Hy 


tc vin baat 3: 9° 36509" 
ga NEM ren he ete ee & 


et hn beat 
mPa jerre- 
reper yb atpt 
Pole Fy Carkeg 
phatatetel 
y Pome ; ons aah 


abst . 
ic atd bjt $ 


ad coud 


Varppacr gt pe 


ae diheess aie bat 


q ' «£ [5 7 & ft a 

, 2 if us i 4 {jmb’?- 

, : ~% 

oe a eg pe 

| j Na “es he th See 
7 $ 7 - a f ves 
ee Py j at } 

har art rq 
:: Are kere 
rt t : 6 
1 
: . 4 
pig : 
Z 84 P+i 
riot Bhp Beg : 
+> ¥ < ‘ 4 7 
, rs 4 
a 
4 
{ ; { 
? 


“> 


4% 


Wve 


ye oe ee ee ee a ee ee 2 


PESTS HF ei Kaegng xh % uk 8-3 43 uh: DUALS CAC RSS Se SPS TRS ae eT Eee tema oy 


Ne a Ee Om Be Pig 
ae Pe 


‘ LeORE bE ayAracee 


nn. 


——s 


phe thee it visas | 


wv 
Ae 


fl 4 (? tar 


ena 


2a at sates SI a a 
%, 
od 4 = 


te em Sih 
TRIG tA 


ad 


SMT 


TST 
in) 


war 


a 


*: 


Eid 


if- 
ms 
_ 


nw 


a a ee ee 


TP AeA ‘SS 


ME eRe hegeaeay, 


Agnes Senay PPA Re hs Sek Tess Is see 
ph or ng bie Ct ap Bi aE rie 


John M. Hallward 


Annual General Meeting 


Notice is hereby given of the Annual General Meeting 
of the Graduates’ Society of McGill University. 
Thursday, September 28, 1978 

5:30 p.m. 

Faculty Club — Ballroom 

McGill University 

The Meeting is called for the purpose of receiving 
reports, presenting awards, electing and installing 
officers, appointing auditors, and other business. 
Donna Templeton-Henophy — Honorary Secretary 


Graduates’ Society Nominations 


For Graduate Governor on McGill’s Board of Governors 

Term — Five Years 

Warren Chippindale, BCom’49, L.A., C.A. 

Chairman and Managing Partner, Coopers & Lybrand, 
Canada. 

Director, Currie, Coopers & Lybrand Ltd. 

Former President, McGill Graduates’ Society. 

Director, Quebec Blue Cross. 

Governor, Montreal General Hospital. 

Advisor, McGill Faculty of Management. 


For President 

Term — One Year 

R.F. Patrick Cronin, MD’53, GDipMed’60, MSc’60 
Professor, Former Dean, McGill Faculty of Medicine. 
Senior Physician, Montreal General Hospital. 
Director, McGill Graduates’ Society. 


For Vice-President 

Term — One Year 

Edward M. Ballon, BA’47, MBA (Harvard)’50 

Vice-President, Henry Birks and Sons Ltd. 

Member, Board of Governors of Selwyn House School 
and St. Andrew’s College. 

Chairman of the Board, Lucas Foundation. 

Former Director, McGill Graduates’ Society. 


For Vice-President 

Term — One Year 

John M. Hallward, BA’50 

Vice-President, J.J.C.T. Fine Arts Ltd. 
Director, Helex Investments Ltd. 

Chairman of the Board, The Study. 

Chairman of the Board, Centraide (Montreal). 


For Vice-President (Alumnae) 
Term — One Year 
Clare Brais, BSc(PE)’53 


For Secretary 
Term — Two Years 
Harriet Stairs, BA’67 


For Treasurer 
Term — Two Years 
Michael L. Richards, BCL’63 


For Members of the Board of Directors 
Term — Two Years 

Peter Turcot, BCom’47 

Donald F. Greer, BCom’57 

Peter Landry, BEng’48, MSc’62 
Suzanne Handman, BSc’65 

Bernard Moscovitz, BA’66 


For Regional Vice-Presidents 
Term — One Year 


alt 
‘ 


Atlantic Provinces yi 


— William Ritchie, BSc(Agr)’51 
Quebec (excluding Montreal) 

— William T. Ward, BEng’48 
Ottawa Valley and Northern Ontario 
— JoAnne S.T. Cohen, BA’68 
Central Ontario 

— R. James McCoubrey, BCom’66 
Prairie Provinces 

— Don Pollock, BSc’53, MSc’55, PhD’57 
British Columbia 

— Boak Alexander, BArch’62 

New England States 

— Robert Sylvester, BA’38 


U.S.A. East 

— Richard M. Hart, PhD’70, MBA’73 

U.S.A. West : 
— Neri P. Guadagni, BA’38, MD’42, GDipMed’51 : 


Caribbean and Bermuda 


— George L. Bovell, BSc(Agr)’45 a 


Article XI |! of the Society’s bylaws provides for 
nominations by the Nominating Committee to fill 


vacancies on the Board of Directors and the university's 


Board of Governors. Additional nominations for any 


least twenty-five members in good standing, willbe 


placed ona ballot and a postal election held. If, however, — 
the Nominating Committee’s selections are acceptable — 


to graduates, those named will take office at the Annual at 
General Meeting. a 


office received before July 31, 1978, and signed by at a 


Ses aes SS SS Ss Sos ae SE Sa YS 


J 


eCws 


Published by the Graduates’ 
Society of McGill University. 


Volume 59, Number 1 
Summer, 1978 


ISSN 0024-9068 


Editorial Board 

Chairman, James G. Wright 

Editor, Victoria Lees 

Assistant Editor, Carol Stairs 
Business Manager, David Strutz 
Members, Andrew Allen, Edith Aston. 
David Bourke, David Cobbett, 

Josh Freed, John Hallward, 

Peter Lebensold, Elizabeth McNab, 
Peter Reid, Tom Thompson, 

Laird Watt. 


Feature Articles 


7 Jacques-Yvan Morin: “McGill has 
a dual mission.” 


9 The Enrolment Dilemma 
by Christine Farr 


12 Feeling at Home in Hospital 
by Victoria Lees 


14 McGill’s Collections: The Floating 
World of Japanese Prints 


by Holly Dressel 


18 Doing It Their Way 
by Carol Stairs 


21 Psychic 
by David Lees 


28 Perspective 
by Marie Poirier 


Departments 
2 What the Martlet Hears 


22 Where They Are and 
What They’re Doing 
by Carol Stairs 


Credits: Covers, “Warriors,” by Japanese print- 


maker Kuniyoshi (see pp. 14-17), photographed by 
Brian Merrett and Jennifer Harper; 3, Courtesy of 
McLelland and Stewart, Ltd.; 4, Barry Blitt; 5, 
Elizabeth Charles: 7, Harold Rosenberg; 9, Courtesy 
of Statistics Canada; 10, Harold Rosenberg; 11, 

Carl Calantone: 12, Harold Rosenberg; 13, Elizabeth 
Charles: 15-17, Brian Merrett and Jennifer Harper; 18, 
William C. Brown; 19, 20, Courtesy of Canadian 
University Service Overseas, Ottawa; 21, David 
Paterson; 28, Harold Rosenberg. 


The copyright of all contents of this magazine |s° 
registered. Please address all editorial communica- 
tions to: The McGill News, 3605 Mountain Street, 
Montreal, H3G 2M1. Tel. (514) 392-4813. Change 
of address should be sent to Records Department, 
3605 Mountain Street, Montreal, H3G 2M1. 


Letters 


Refreshingly Worldly 
Congratulations on the Fall 1977 issue of the 
McGill News. The worldliness expressed in the 
feature articles is indeed refreshing when the 
publication could be preoccupied with the 
social and economic problems of a struggling 
Quebec society and, more particularly, with the 
problems of an elitist English bastion within 
a progressively more francophone milieu. 

Keep up the good work of extending your 
horizons to the more worldly concerns in 
which graduates are involved. 

W. Robert Tucker, BEng’60 

New York City 


... or Myopic and Xenophobic? 

| was most disappointed when I picked up the 
Fall 1977 issue of the McGill News, which 
purported to salute all 65,000 alumni, and 
found that you had chosen to limit alumni 
profiles to graduates living in Canada and the 
United States. Surely a story about a Barbadian 
doctor or a government minister in Ghana 
would have provided your readers with a more 
representative sample of alumni and would 
have greatly enhanced the special issue. 

May I suggest that your editorial board 
suffers from a case of acute myopia, compli- 
cated by latent xenophobia? 

Rev. Harold T. Lewis, BA’67 

Washington, D.C. 


Editor’s Note: One of our longstanding con- 
cerns is that the News reflect the activities of 


McGill graduates around the world. Shortcomings 


in this area should be attributed not to ‘acute 
myopia’’ nor “‘latent xenophobia,” but rather 
to a chronic shortage of funds. (That we have 
had to change our four-issue glossy format to 
two newsprint issues and two magazines is 
evidence of the budgetary constraints we face. ) 
It would be difficult to commission an article 
on a Ghanaian government minister. A journalist 
covering western Africa for another paper 
would not write for our meagre honorarium, 
and good local writers are not easy to find 
from such a distance. Articles that do appear 
about out-of-town graduates result from 
interviews held when alumni visit Montreal 
or staff members vacation outside the city. 


Mickey Mouse 
In an article titled ““Super Sleuths” (Fall 1977) 
I spoke of the Mickey Mouse courses given in 
the English department in the late sixties and 
early seventies. In a letter published in the 
Spring 1978 issue Dr. Archibald Malloch 
maintained that eccentricities practised in 
the department were part of ‘“‘a continental 
phenomenon.” Perhaps so. My dismay about 
the state of English studies at McGill derived, 
however, from conversations I had with friends 
and colleagues from other Canadian univer- 
sities at the 1974 meetings of the Learned 
Societies of Canada, held in Toronto. I learned 
that English graduates from McGill were no 
longer routinely accepted into the master’s 
programs of other universities, and were 
often required to make up a year of course 
work to bring them up to the required level of 
competence for graduate studies. When a 
McGill BA degree has been undermined to 
that extent, Mr. Mouse has indeed been busy. 

Rosemary Eakins, BSc’56, MA’60 

New York City. 


Women at McGill 

I am preparing a history of women at McGill 

— from the mid-nineteenth century, when the 
first claims for admission were made, to the 
present. I hope to record all aspects of women’s 
participation in and relationship to McGill — 
as students, instructors, researchers, support 
personnel, and benefactors. I would like to 
know about the problems they faced at McGill, 
the work they did, the clubs they joined, the 
causes they supported, the fun they had, who 
helped and encouraged them, as well as who, 
or what, made life difficult. 

I would appreciate it if alumnae and/or 
their descendents would send me any material 
that might provide information or insights 
into McGill past and present. All documents 
will be deposited in the McGill University 
Archives or, upon request, returned to the 
owners. 

I may be reached at the Faculty of Education, 
3700 McTavish Street, Montreal, Quebec 
H3A 1Y2. Telephone: (514) 392-8875. 

Margaret Gillett 

Professor, Faculty of Education 


. ale ee ee a ee oe BA BE ee: < eae Xx 
Se i eh oe eet ey PoP ee od ee eS Ree eee ey ei eee i ee Aes 
4  - Re rere tet or ee al eo or a 

Pe ort A See ae ee 


Troubled Waters 

The Indians called it Kanata, “land of many 
waters.”’ Unfortunately, some of those waters 
have become contaminated with mercury, and 
the Indians who fish the streams for food may 
be exposing themselves and their families to a 
debilitating neurological illness, known in 
Japan as Minimata disease. 

For the past two years federal medical 
services have been analyzing Indian hair and 
blood samples to determine just how much 
methylmercury has been absorbed. “‘There is 
no question that one-quarter to one-third of the 
Indians in northern Quebec have abnormal 
methylmercury concentrations,” says Dr. 

John Ruedy, chairman of McGill’s department 
of pharmacology and therapeutics. ““The 
concentration averages five times the upper 
limit of normal.’ But, Ruedy adds, that is still 
only one-third the concentration that exists in 
proven cases of methylmercury poisoning. 

Has this relatively low level of methylmercury 
accumulation affected the Indians’ physical or 
mental health? Ruedy and a team of researchers 
leave for northern Quebec on July 1 to look for 
the answer. The twenty-one neurologists, 
pediatricians, ophthalmologists, internists, 
epidemiologists, and pharmacologists (almost 
all of whom are on staff at McGill and its 
teaching hospitals) will spend six weeks 
examining Cree in the northern communities 
of Mistassine, Waswanipi, Fort George, and 
Great Whale. The subsequent compiling and 
sorting of data will require two years. Costs 
of the study — estimated at $400,000 — will be 
shared by Health and Welfare Canada, the 
Quebec Department of Social Affairs, and the 
Donner Canadian Foundation, a Toronto-based 
organization whose particular interest is 
native people and the Canadian north. 


“Since we already have a complete description 


of methylmercury concentrations in about 90 
per cent of the people in those villages,” says 
Ruedy, “‘our major thrust will be neurological 
and ophthalmological testing. We don’t really 
know what the early signs of the disease are, 
but we assume they are neurological — the 
flagrant disease is neurological, and methyl- 
mercury is known to accumulate in the cere- 
bellum and cerebral cortex.”’ Researchers will 


2 


What 
the 
Martiet 
hears 


be looking for such symptoms as unsteadiness, 
tremor, and poor motor control. 

How did mercury get into northern waters? 
No one really knows. Three possible explana- 
tions are: chlor-alkali dumping from pulp and 
paper mills, atmospheric fall-out (mercury in 
rain and snow), and the leaching of metallic 
mercury from rocks, a natural process that 
may have been accelerated by mining 
operations. Whatever the source, however, 
mercury has found its way up the links of the 
food chain to man. 

The researchers, divided into three teams, 
will focus on two main age groups in the Cree 
population — children between the ages of one 
and two and a half, and adults over the age 
of thirty. Because the fetus is known to be 
highly susceptible to methylmercury, one team 
will study 300 children and correlate their 
findings with the amount of methylmercury in 
the mother’s body during pregnancy. ‘“‘We have 
a precise means of measuring fetal exposure 
to methylmercury,” explains Ruedy. “The 
Cree wear their hair very long and we can go 
back along a strand of the mother’s hair, 
segment by segment, to determine the amount 
of methylmercury accumulated each month.” 

Middle-aged and elderly Cree were selected 
for study because they have been exposed 
to methylmercury longer than young adults. 

In addition, since the brain’s ability to cope 
with toxins diminishes with age, researchers 
believe evidence of neurological damage will 
show up more clearly in older people. 

The second research team will screen a 
broad sample of 600 adults and will videotape 
all interviews for later analysis and review. 

The third will examine a group of 180 adults 
registering high methylmercury accumulations, 
as well as a mercury-free control group. 

Ruedy will not even hazard a guess about 
what he will find in the north: “‘I share the 
government’s view that, in light of all the in- 
formation we have at present, we honestly 
don’t know if there is a problem or not.” One 
reason for Ruedy’s hesitation is the fact that 
symptoms often attributed to methylmercury 
poisoning are also common to a number of 
other diseases: to date, no Canadian cases of 
methylmercury poisoning have been confirmed. 


The Cree, who stand to gain — or lose — the 
most from the study, are cooperating with 
Ruedy and his team at many stages of the — 
project. A native member of the Cree Regional 
Board of Health and Social Services sits on the 
project planning committee; there will also be 
a Cree coordinator in each of the fourcom- 
munities studied. In addition, half of each field. 
site team will be Cree, trained to carry out 
the simpler tests as well as to interpret. 

“The impetus for the study came from the _ 
Cree themselves,” says Ruedy. ““Though they ~ 
didn’t recognize any ill health inthemselves 
or their neighbours, they were told by the 
government to stop eating fish. In order not 
to eat fish, they would have had to alter their 
lifestyle greatly. Consequently, their leaders are 
looking for definitive answers.” 

So are the McGill researchers. Notes Ruedy; 
“Frankly, we are hoping to come up with 
conclusive negative answers — that the Cree _ 
are healthy.” 0 


Burning the Midnight Oil 


‘A lot of people think the Centre for Continuing 


Education gives courses in basket weaving and - 
care of the dog,” says its director, associate 
professor of management Alistair Duff. “But 
the image of the continuing education student 
as a dilettante is not borne out by the facts.” 
Last year the centre processed over 26,000 
registrations for certificate and degree 
programs as well as for interest and diploma 
courses. You can still attend night school to 
learn elementary German; but you can also 
study textile technology, marketing manage- 
ment, and health care organization. : 
In March 1977 the centre welcomed anew — 
addition to its roster — the department of 
professional development. Explainslawyer 
André Major, its associate director, “The 
department offers courses to members of the 
professional orders to help them keep abreast 
of current developments and new technology — 
in their field and to upgrade their proficiency.” 


7 


In Canada professional development is mostly 


| 
! 
| 


: 


voluntary; in many parts of the United States, 


however, it is required by law. Quebec is the 
first Canadian province to take steps in this 


direction: since the adoption of the Profes- 


sional Code in 1973, professionals have been 
strongly encouraged by their professional 
orders to keep themselves up to date through 
continuing education. The code also contains 
provisions whereby individual professionals 
might be required by their orders to take 
refresher courses. 

A course in labour law, offered in French 
last fall, was the professional development 
department’s pilot program. Courses in taxation 
and in accounting for professionals were added 
in the spring. Response has been healthy: the 
accounting course, which concerned itself with 
the interpretation of financial statements, 
attracted about thirty professionals, including 
lawyers, notaries, engineers, and a pharmacist. 
In general, says Major, the students want highly 
pragmatic courses. “‘What they learn in the 
classroom today they wish to be able to apply 
at work tomorrow.” 

The format of the sessions, like the content, 
is tailored to the varied needs of professionals. 
Some prefer day-long seminars; others are 
happier with weekly evening classes. ““These 
professionals have full-time jobs as well as 
families,’ says Major. “‘The people in our 
programs are very plucky — it’s tough to go 
through night school. We have to be extremely 
flexible to meet their needs.”’ 

In response to the needs of Quebec’s anglo- 
phone professionals a new program called 
French for Professional Purposes is now being 
developed. Under Bill 101, enacted last August, 
every professional applying for a license to 
practise in Quebec must be able to conduct his 
affairs in French. Courses designed especially 
for accountants, doctors, engineers, and 
architects are planned for the fall term and 
language programs for other professionals 
will be gradually phased in according to 
the demand — and the budget. 

The provincial government provides no fund- 
ing to the university for professional develop- 
ment. To boost registration and decrease the 
per-unit cost, the department hopes each of its 
courses will be of interest to more than one 
professional group. This arrangement has an 
added advantage — “‘It provides participants 
with an opportunity to communicate with 
professionals in other areas,”’ says Major. 

“It helps break down some of the 
barriers.” 0 


Poet and Prophet 
Irving Layton — self-styled Jewish prophet, 
scourge of the Gentiles, and Canada’s most 
conspicuous poet — descended on McGill one 
frosty night in February. He read and discussed 
his work at a Hillel Society event, “‘Poetry of 
the Jewish Experience.”’ The poet was in the 
best of form: comical and angry, bitter and 
gentle by turns, and consistently, outrageously 
arrogant. 

Once a gutter-fighter determined to topple 
the nation’s social structures and a swaggering 


es) 


exhibitionist bent on dynamiting Canada’s sexual 

repressions with his poems, Layton is today a 

white-maned elder of sixty-six who has taken 

Christian persecution of the Jews as his theme. 

His talk attempted, as had his two most recent 

books, For My Brother Jesus and The Covenant, 

to reclaim a humanized and demystified Jesus 

as one of the greatest Jewish prophets. 
“Christianity is Judaism with a nose job,” 

he quipped. *‘The principles of peace, human 

dignity, and universal brotherhood are all 

Jewish ideas. Had St. Paul not made of Jesus 

the son of God, deity incarnate, no doubt he 

would have been beside Isaiah and Jeremiah 


Irving Layton: “We were the third solitude.” 


in the synagogues and schools.”’ Layton sees in 
the crucified Jesus ‘‘a great symbol of the Jew, 
powerless, without centurions, without legions, 
defying the Roman imperium; a tremendous 
example of spiritual power overcoming the 
imperium of tanks and guns.”’ He added, “‘I 
think the time has come for Jews to begin a full 
re-evaluation of Jesus’s role and teachings, 

and I am glad to say that Jewish scholars 

are now doing exactly that — or are doing it 
two or three years after I said so in my book.”’ 

Responsibility for the centuries-old persecu- 
tion of the Jews the poet lays squarely at the 
feet of ‘Xianity’ — ‘ta term I have coined and 
handed over to the Oxford Dictionary to 
distinguish true Christianity from false.”’ 
Describing the golden age of Spanish painting, 
he noted, ‘‘Here were assumptions and cru- 
cifixions being painted, but what about the Jews 
that were tortured, that were forcibly baptized, 
that were burned at the stake because they 
would not renounce their faith? Surely the 
painters must have seen this happen. They give 
you the crucified Jew of hundreds of years 
ago, but of the Jew who was being crucified 
right then and there, no painting.” 

Israel Lazarovitch, as he was known for his 
first twenty years, was born in Romania in 
1912, and ‘“‘at the age of one decided to come 
to Canada.”’ Layton rejotces in the memory 
of his archetypal Jewish mother, who was 


‘‘a wonderful curser. She would start cursing 
before | opened my eyes in the morning and 
wouldn’t stop until I Closed my eyes in sleep. 
It is to my mother’s cursing that I owe my 
impeccable ear for rhythm.” 

Layton attended Montreal’s Baron Byng High 
School, “‘where there wasn’t a single Jewish 
teacher, though 99.99 per cent of the pupils 
were Jewish.”’ He spent a considerable part 
ofhis youth fighting off Jew-baiting Gentiles, 
both English and French. “*We were the third 
solitude,” he recalls. 

In 1939 the poet earned a BSc from Mac- 
donald College and in 1946 an MA in economics 
and political science from McGill. For many 
years Layton taught English at Sir George 
Williams University, where he was also poet- 
in-residence, and in 1969 was named writer- 
in-residence at the University of Guelph. That 
same year he took up his present position as 
a full professor in the English department of 
Downsview’s York University. 

Jewish sensibility, though evident to some 
extent in all thirty-five volumes of his poetry, 
has now become the dominant theme. Layton 
is not always logical in its expression: lauding 
Judaism as the religion of love and brother- 
hood, he nevertheless advises his sons to 
become gunners in the Israeli Air Force. 
Critics have castigated him both for his con- 
tradictions and for the unevenness of his poetic 
output. But Layton has the last laugh. People 
buy his books and remember his poetry — his 
voice gave out long before he could read all 
the poems his McGill audience requested. 

A poem from For My Brother Jesus reveals 
the range of weapons this modern Maccabee 
has at his disposal — wit, pathos, anger, and, 
of course, “impeccable rhythm.” V.L. 


“Incident at the Cathedral” 

Your hands, Jeshua, were stretched out in 
welcome 

and weren’t it for a couple of rusty nails 

I think you would have embraced me 

so glad were you to see one of your kin 


But you observed — didn’t you? — 
how the guard chased me out 

because my bare knees were showing: 
he thought you'd be angry 

and your mother too, 

in fact the entire mishpoche 

if | walked in wearing khaki shorts 


Sometimes, brother Jeshua, I wonder 
whether you know 

what imbecilities have been said and done 
in your name, what madnesses 


At other times, though, 

seeing you hanging so helplessly 

on the Cross 

with that agonized took on your face 

I know as if you had spoken that you know. 0 


3 


‘ 


Going for Distance wanted to watch me come in. The race started thenow- ous Margaret Atwood, Leonard 

On April 13, Montreal oral surgeon Edward at noon and he said he would have to leave fora Cohen, and Jesse Winchester. The faithful still 

Slapcoff, BSc’54, DDS’56, began to devour golf game before 3:30. I said, ‘Harry, just be flock there, passing the good word along. One 

quantities of cake and ice cream, strawberries there at 3:15.’ I was close: I came in two fellow recently showed up on the recommendatioy 

and whipped cream, nuts and French fries — minutes late.” ofa stewardess on his transatlantic flight. 

in preparation not for a heavyweight compe- Patriots’ Day in New England arrived cool But the Yellow Door is more than a coffee 

tition but for the eighty-second running of and damp — good conditions to go for distance. house. It is the home of a particularly social 

the Boston Marathon. Slapcoff, wearing number V (for veteran) 689, brand of Christianity practised by members of — 
According to unofficial estimates, the 4,212 began somewhere near the rear of the thousands McGill’s Student Christian Movement (SCM). > 

competitors consumed over 50,000 pancakes of runners and did not actually cross the With six staff members and an active body 

in the four days preceding the April 17 race. starting line for more than two minutes. of volunteers, the SCM caters to the varied 

The number of spaghetti dinners served in the Nevertheless, he clicked on his stopwatch needs of several inner-city neighbourhoods. 

north-end Italian community also reached five the instant the gun sounded and came in, Particular emphasis is placed on work with the 

figures and Parmesan cheese was sprinkled according to his calculations, at 3:14:44. The young and the elderly. 

around as liberally as foot powder. This sort The Yellow Door’s services, like the needs 


that generate them, are physical and spiritual. — 
Visitors can share a lunch or a eucharist, find 

a bed for the night or attend a seminar. “During 
the past year,” explains former information 
and program director Pat Oldfield, “our 
program included discussions on alternate 
lifestyles, death and dying, and housing 
problems, with the occasional talk on religion 
and politics. Next year we plan to have a talk e 
on religion and the healing arts, one on the 
future directions of masculinity and femininity 
— and others, of course, as suggestions ; 
come up.” 

The coffee house itself is located in the 
basement of the rambling, three-storey town- 
house. At noon its aroma and atmosphere evoke 
memories of a country kitchen — cheerful, | 
honest, wholesome. The “‘El Cheapo” lunch, 

a hearty meal available every weekday for a 
dollar, is a perennial favourite. In the evenings 
folk music, coffee, and fellowship are drawing — 
cards for the area’s young people. The rest 
of the house is also a friendly, informal place. 

In its functionally furnished but comfortable 
rooms you feel you can put your feet up 

and relax. 4 

The Yellow Door is the nerve centre for a 
number of neighbourhood projects. SCM staffer 
Stanley Wilson works with “problem youth” 
in the community, notably with boys from 
Weredale House and other group homes. 
Wilson’s particular expertise lies in helping 
them find jobs. “Stanley has a special rapport 


of caloric extravaganza is known as carbo- 
hydrate loading. By consuming large amounts 
of foods that are efficient sources of heat 
energy, runners are better able to survive 

the 26-mile, 385-yard course. 

Slapcoff, an associate professor of dentistry 
at McGill, was accompanied on all trips to 
restaurants by his wife Dorothy, who ate 
nothing. (On the day of the race she was just 
past the halfway point in her liquid-protein 
diet: she consumed only a foul-tasting solution 
prepared from cows’ hooves and other 
unappetizing sources of amino acids.) “It’s 
funny, but we’re both doing a similar kind of 
thing,” explained Slapcoff between bites of his 
deluxe, don’t-hold-the-mayo steerburger. 
‘“‘We’re both engaged in feats of endurance — 
it may seem bizarre but it parallels.” 

Dorothy Slapcoff had not eaten solids for 
four months — with the exception of the 
unfortunate day when the good doctor, out 
training with the other loyal joggers of the 
YM-Y WHA Wolfpack, fell and injured his 
knee and right arm. “I was so upset I ate six 
brownies straight from the freezer,” she said. 

Slapcoff's worry was not that the sore arm 
might interfere with his practice but that the 
swollen knee might prevent him from running in 
Boston. True marathon runners are blasé about 
damage to appendages that do not touch the 
ground. ““The arm was something to worry 
about when I got back,” he said. “‘All I cared 
about was getting to Boston and seeing the people, 


the Prudential Center at the finish line, and with these young people,” says Oldfield. “He — 
the newspapers full of marathon stories.” Dr. Edward Slapcoft coming home. is frequently able to head off a crisis. In this 
Since he started distance running five years way the kids are helped to remain independent | 
ago, Slapcoff has competed in eight marathons. _ official computer clocked him at 3:14:48, putting of public agencies and resources, and are 4 
(Unlike root-canal work, it is not something him 2,802nd among male competitors. encouraged to stand on their own two feet.” 
he does every day.) He ran in Boston in 1974, “I feel like a super athlete,” said the dentist The SCM’s concern also embraces the aged. 
finishing in 3:21:3 (that’s short for three at a celebration dinner. The Elderly Visiting Program was established — 
hours, twenty-one minutes, three seconds), “I feel like a masochist!” said his wife. 0 in 1972 to improve the quality of life for | 
and again in 1975, finishing a few seconds By Alan Richman, sports writer for the housebound, ill, or lonely old people in the 
slower — when runners jammed up at the Boston Globe. area. Volunteers help the elderly with their 
finish line, he had to wait nearly two minutes banking and shopping; accompany them on trips 
to enter the chute. Behind the Yellow Door to the doctor or clinic; assist them in trans- A 
This year he was out to set a personal 3625 Aylmer Street, Montreal. The address is actions with pension, social welfare, or legal 
record. “‘I’ll be in at 3:15:00,” he vowed two known around the world as that of the Yellow agencies; or simply lend a sympathetic ear. 
Severe tie sane: Tis estimates urthe Door Coffee House. In its heyday — the folk- ‘Friendship is the key to all we do,” remarks - 
past had proved fairly accurate: “‘The last time music and flower-child sixties — the Yellow Rev. Roger Balk, SCM general secretes and 2 


I ran, inthe Ottawa Marathon, a friendofmine Door hosted many struggling artists, including McGill’s Anglican chaplain. ‘“‘And sometimes 
i ' 


4 


we bury and mourn for people who might 
otherwise have died forgotten.” 

Over a hundred elderly people have been 
befriended by forty carefully screened SCM 
volunteers, more than half of whom are from 
McGill — often nursing, social work, or 
medical students who participate in the program 
as part of their field training. The Law Faculty 
and its students also support the Yellow Door 
by providing legal information. 

Through their work with young and elderly 
residents of the area, students gain practical 
knowledge of situations they might otherwise 
encounter only in books. And learning experi- 
ences are shared at regular group discussions. 
“Our approach is centred around teamwork,”’ 
says Balk. ‘“‘When a crisis does arise, one 
ofthe most important things is to know that you 
have other people you can talk to while trying 
to deal with a seemingly hopeless situation.” 

Although its role in the community is con- 
tinually evolving, the SCM has a long tradition 
of action rooted in religious commitment. 
Founded in 1887, the McGill branch was 
incorporated as the university's YMCA in 1902. 
When the Canadian YMCA relinquished its on- 
campus work among students in the early 
1920s, however, the SCM remained as a vital 
force. Its ties with McGill are still strong — 
ten of the thirteen members of the board of 
directors must be from the university com- 
munity, be they students, staff, faculty, or 
alumni. 

According to Balk, the contact has been 
crucial to maintaining the SCM’s viability and 
existence. ‘“The paperwork part of our payroll, 
for example, has been handled through McGill 
for some time now, affording us a certain 
stability,” he notes. ““We have access to McGill 
facilities for our lectures and presentations. 
And, of course, the value of the professional 
support we receive from McGill faculty can 
never be overestimated.” 

The one fly in the ointment is money — or 
rather the lack of it. Despite grants from the 


Anglican Church, foundations, and government, 


as well as limited private endowments, there is 
simply not enough to go around. During Balk’s 
seventeen years as chaplain he has never seen 

it any other way. “‘Not only do we zero-base 
budget,’’ he muses, “‘we zero-base operate. 
And expenses such as salaries are already at 
the barest minimum, so I don’t think we could 
pare our operating costs by any appreciable 
amount.’ Considering the range of programs 
offered, the amount of money needed to operate 
the McGill SCM — $25,000 last year — 

seems low indeed. 

An important bond has been forged between 
SCM workers and members of the community, 
due in part to their common economic status. 
“Having highly paid civil servants dispensing 
advice to the poor doesn’t make much sense,” 
says Balk. Oldfield agrees: “All of us know 
first hand what it’s like for the people in this 


Ne 
sector to have to scratch for a living from 
meagre old-age benefits or subsistence-level 
salaries. But, in spite of the SCM’s low 
salaries, the work is extremely satisfying and 
staff turnover is very low.”’ 

Many of the rewards for working at the 
Yellow Door are intangible. For volunteer 
Joan Bolvin, a second-year sociology under- 
graduate and head of the SCM student cabinet, 
the experience has resulted in a new career 
direction. ‘At one time I thought that working 
with children would be my choice,”’ she says. 
‘*But since I started working with the aged 
I’ve found my niche. I’ve come to understand 


i 


the university context this translates into good 
grades and a degree, with an enjoyable job the 
reward at the end of the road. Reality, unfor- 
tunately, intrudes rather harshly. “‘In a 
declining economy this kind of supposition 
can’t be maintained forever,’ says Herschorn. 
‘There are only so many slots to fill.” 

The university is finding it harder today than 
it did twelve years ago to evaluate the applicants 
intent on one day filling those slots. With the 
introduction of the CEGEPs, from which McGill 
draws about 70 per cent of its undergraduate 
enrolment, the university lost one important 
indicator by which to judge student potential — 


Student Christian Movement member Joan Bolvin, left, lunches with two friends at the Yellow Door. 


their very real contribution to our society and 
to realize and appreciate the value of life 
itself.” O 

By Christine Farr, a Montreal freelance writer 
and a regular contributor to the News. 


A More Liveable Place 

‘“‘There’s no doubt that McGill was a very 
different place when I was a student here,” 
observes newly appointed dean of students 
Michael Herschorn, BA’53, MA’56, PhD’58. 
‘“‘Boundaries were respected, there was far 
less questioning of the status quo, and 
certainly professors were much more rigid 
than is the case today.” 

On the first of June Herschorn, an associate 
professor of mathematics, relinquished his 
post as associate dean of Science to succeed 
Dr. Saeed Mirza as McGill’s fourth dean of 
students — inheriting with the mantle all 
the non-academic problems and grievances 
of today’s student body. During his five-year 
term he will be responsible for coordinating 
the work of his own office as well as that of 
seven student-related services — athletics, 
counselling, health, financial aid, placement, 
chaplaincy, and off-campus housing and tutorial 
SeTVICes. 

Though much has changed since Herschorn’s 
student days, one source of anxiety has re- 
mained constant: the pressure to succeed. In 


the high school leaving examinations set and 
marked by the provincial school boards. Quebec 
matriculation examinations have been replaced 
by the variable assessments of individual 
CEGEP teachers, and students often arrive 

at university uncertain of their intellectual 


capabilities. 


Herschorn cites yet another aspect of the 


CEGEP system which he believes has resulted 


in apprehension among university students. 
‘Before the CEGEPs were introduced, a student 


who started a certain program of studies was 


more or less locked into that program. Now, 


when a CEGEP student encounters difficulties 
in one particular field, it’s quite an easy 


matter to change to another.” This lateral 
mobility, he feels, allows a student to follow 


the line of least academic resistance. 


“Those students who enter university without 


a clear idea of where they’re headed — and 
there are a good number of them — become 
increasingly disillusioned with their prospects,” 


Herschorn explains. ‘“*Pressures mount, and 


the whole point of what they are doing and why 
they are doing it becomes less clear. This 1s 
devastating, not only because of the wasted 
time and effort, but also because of the sense 
of personal failure.” 


Though he admits he doesn’t have all the 


answers, Herschorn hopes his plan of action 
will benefit McGill’s students, especially 


those seeking help. ‘‘I would prefer to tackle 
things in the small,”’ he explains, ““by showing 
flexibility in dealing with individual situations, 
by counselling students who are having difficulty 
coping, and by making the university a more 
liveable place.”” Christine Farr 


McGill’s Ambassador-at-Large 

Like many universities across the continent, 
McGill faces the problem of declining student 
numbers — enrolment dropped 2 per cent this 
year and is expected to continue dropping at this 
rate for a decade. Helping McGill find solu- 
tions is the task of Alta Abramowitz, BA’59, 
MEd’72, appointed director of the College and 
School Liaison Office in January. 

“It was the challenge that enticed me to take 
the appointment,” she says. A substantial 
part of that challenge will be to restructure 
the way in which parents, students, and aca- 
demics view the university’s role in the 
community. “I would like to see McGill 
become more accessible to the part-time and 
mature student than itis at present,’’she explains. 

A staunch believer in the intrinsic value of 
education, Abramowitz does not see her role as 
that of “‘selling’” McGill to prospective students. 
‘“We present McGill in the best possible 
light,” she notes, “but I like to think of our 
approach as informative rather than hard-sell.”’ 

Abramowitz is no stranger to academia. She 
has served as a student counsellor at Mac- 
donald High School in Ste. Anne de Bellevue, 
and comes to her present assignment from 
Dawson College, a Montreal CEGEP, where 
she established and directed the Vocational 
Planning Centre. 

With her staff of four full-time liaison 
officers, Abramowitz has mapped out a grass- 
roots strategy to counteract the negative 
influences on university enrolment. One of 
her innovations is to use McGill graduates as 
volunteer recruiting ambassadors outside 
Quebec. “‘The idea is for people from the 
Graduates’ Society to provide an ongoing 
personal contact with the students who apply 
to McGill,” says Abramowitz. ‘‘For example 
the graduates could contact the applicants by 
telephone to answer any questions they might 
have, to tell them a little about what 
it’s like at McGill and how the university 
functions, or just to say hello. In this way 
McGill would reinforce its image as a uni- 
versity that is interested in its students.” 
A.recent trip to western Canada has borne out 
Abramowitz’s expectations — interest among 
graduates is encouraging and the program has 
been launched. 

This fall high school students across the 
country will learn more about McGill by means 
of an informative, glossy booklet now being 
prepared. “I’m quite excited about the publica- 
tion,” says Abramowitz, “‘especially as there 
seems to be a growing trend for English 
parents in Quebec to send their children to 


7 


6 


college outside the province. By forgetting for 
a moment the nuts and bolts of entrance 
requirements and course loads, and concen- 
trating instead on the quality of the McGill 
experience, this publication will, we hope, 
convince some to stay and try McGill.”’ 

The public, well aware of the numbers of 
unemployed and underemployed university 
graduates, is carefully weighing the costs of 
a university education against its value and 
rewards. Abramowitz’s strategies just might 
tip the balance in favour of McGill. Chris- 
tine Farr 


McGill and Industry 

‘‘A promoter” is how the newly appointed 
director of McGill’s Office of Industrial 
Research (IR McGill) describes himself. 
What Adolph Monsaroff promotes is the use 
of McGill talent and technology by industry 
and government. 

Since it was established in 1971, IR McGill 
has carried out over five hundred projects; 
one hundred studies are currently underway in 
disciplines ranging from medicine to manage- 
ment. Some examples: the department of 
mechanical engineering is investigating child 
automotive restraints for Consumer and 
Corporate Affairs; Macdonald College’s School 
of Food Sciences is examining a mould preven- 
tative for a chemicals company; and the 
Engineering Faculty’s occupational health and 
safety unit is studying plant worker mortality 
for a mining firm. 

IR McGill serves as a middleman between 
industry and academe to the benefit of both 
parties. Companies get the answers they 
need without the enormous expense of in-house 
laboratories, and university faculty and 
graduate students gain experience while 
receiving financial assistance in the form 
of research contracts. These contracts now 
account for 12 per cent of the $22 million in 
research funds available to the university. In 
some Faculties — notably Engineering and 
Agriculture — contracts amount to as much as 
33 per cent of the total. It is not surprising that 
professors eager to carry out research receive 
Monsaroff’s brokerage, as he puts it, “‘with 
enthusiasm.” 

The Russian-born director brings to McGill 
more than forty years of experience in the 
Canadian chemical industry. A 1934 graduate 
in chemical engineering from the University of 
Toronto, he has served as executive vice- 
president of Monsanto Canada Ltd., as well 
as president of Domtar Chemicals Ltd. He has 
also been a director of the Manufacturing 
Chemists Association (USA), and president of 
both the Chemical Institute of Canada and the 
Society of Plastics Industry of Canada. Though 
he calls himself ‘tan industrial type,’’ Monsaroff 
has wide-ranging interests. For many years 
he was an active member of the St. James 
Literary Society, where discussion seldom 


* 
turns to business or industry. 

As for his decision to leave semi- -retirement_ 
Monsaroff says, “I’ve never regretted it for f 
a moment.” A lifetime’s contacts in the 
industrial world are helping to make the 
services of IR McGill more widely known, 
and to cement the university’s relations with 
business, industry, and government. UJ 


The Bookshelf 
Herewith capsule summaries of seven books 
written by McGill alumni. 

A. Margaret Evans and C.A.V. Barker — 
Century One: A History of the Ontario Vet- 
erinary Association. Toronto: Hunter Rose 
Co., 1976. A. Margaret Evans and Dr. 
C.A.V. Barker, MSc’45, a professor at the 
Ontario Veterinary College, have produced 
a detailed history of the first hundred years — 
ofthe Ontario Veterinary Association. : 

Victor Levant — Capital and Labour: r 
Partners? Toronto: Steel Rail Educational * 
Publishing, 1977. A doctoral student in a 
science at McGill, Victor Levant, BA’68, 
MA’75, has published this expanded version — 
of his master’s thesis. He examines the devel- — 
opment of company unions, a form of labour 
association initiated by employers. 

Norman Levine — J Walk by the Harbour. 
Fredericton: Fiddlehead Poetry Books, 1976. 
Now known as a prose writer, Norman Levine, - 
BA’48, MA’49, began his career asapoet. __ 
The twelve short poems in this collection, 
written in 1949 and 1959, record Levine’s sen- _ 
sitive perception of the sea and shore of 
Cornwall. 

Howard O’ Hagan — The School-Marm Tree. 
Vancouver: Talonbooks, 1977. After a brief ~ 
career in law, Howard O’ Hagan, BA’22, LLB25 
abandoned his profession to become, like many 
of the characters in his fiction, a guide and 
packer in the Rocky Mountains. This novel __ 
traces its heroine’s growing empathy with the 
mountain world in which she lives. 

Magnus Pyke — Butter Side Up! or, The 
Delights of Science. Don Mills: Longman 
Canada Ltd., 1977. In this amusing account, a 
Magnus Pyke, BSA’33, secretary of the British } 
Association for the Advancement of Science, _ 
reveals, among other things, how zippers zip, j 
why ketchup sticks, and what makes bread fall ; 
butter side down 60 per cent of the time. 

George Radwanski — Trudeau. Toronto: 
Macmillan of Canada, 1978. George Radwansk 
BA’68, BCL’71, Ottawa editor for the Financia 
Times, describes the childhood, education, 7 
travels, and political career of Prime Minister — 
Pierre Elliott Trudeau, analyzing both the man 
and his motivations. 

Grace Berne Rose — The I/lustrated Ency- 
clopedia of Crafts and How to Master Them. — 
Toronto: Doubleday Canada Ltd., 1978. Grace 
Berne Rose, Arts’36, offers detailed instruc- — 
tions on eighty crafts ranging from glass- 
blowing to metal-casting. 0 


“All 


_— = | et, lee 


we 


A: €- 
. 
/ 


‘Jacques-Yvan Morin: 
- McGill has a dual mission” 


Jacques-Yvan Morin,-Quebec Vice- 
Premier and Minister of Education, 

Nt discusses anglophone universities and 
their English-speaking graduates. 


Editor's Note: When Jacques- Yvan Morin, 
lt BCL’52, became Quebec's Minister of Educa- 
it tion in November 1976, he inherited Quebec's 
tt) version of the Gordian knot — the question of 

language of instruction in the province's 
» schools. The ruling on English language educa- 
m tion rights embodied in Bill 101, passed last 
i August, caused widespread controversy and 
{ left no aspect of life in Quebec undisturbed. 
si Although Bill 101 does not directly affect the 
is province’s universities, it has nevertheless 
py become a source of anxiety in English uni- 

versity circles. 
iy The education minister came to his post well 
i equipped to appreciate the concern of the 
|» universities. Morin earned his law degree 
» atthe Université de Montréal and pursued 
» postgraduate studies in political science and 
4¢ international law at McGill (where he also 
edited the McGill Law Journal), Harvard, and 
Cambridge. He has taught at the universities 
of Montréal and Paris. 

From 1964 to 1968 Morin was a member of 
)| the International Tribunal at the Hague. Long 
» an activist in the cause of Quebec independence, 
heserved from 1971 to 1973 as president of 
the Mouvement national des Québécois, a 
nationalist pressure group initiated by 
the Société St. Jean Baptiste. In 1973 he ran and 
. wonon the Parti Québécois (PQ) ticket in 
Montreal's Sauvé riding, and was chosen 
official opposition leader when René Lévesque 
failed to win a seat in the National Assembly. 
With the PQ’s landslide victory in 1976, Morin 
became Lévesque’s vice-premier. 

In late March the News talked with the 
education minister in his Montreal office about 
the role of English-language universities and 
their graduates in the province. Although 
considered a hard-liner on language, Morin 
spoke Quebec’s unofficial language throughout 
the interview. He concluded by remarking, 
“You will have to do a lot of editing on that — 
my English is not as good as it used to be.” 

His concern was unfounded. Morin’s English, 
like his welcome, was impeccable. 


L’honorable Jacques- Yvan Morin, Vice- 
™ Premier ministre du Québec et Ministre de 
* Education, Député de Sauvé. 


News: Like several other universities, Mc- 
Gill is faced with the prospect of declining 
enrolment. Many anglophones are leaving the 
province, and those entering often cannot enrol 
their children in the English primary and 
secondary schools from which McGill draws 
most of its students. Should McGill merely 
resign itself to growing smaller? 

Morin: Law 101, the Charter of the French 
Language, does not apply to colleges or uni- 
versities. It applies only at the primary and 
secondary school levels. After that the young 
people are free to go where they wish. In other 
words, if the English-speaking universities of 
Quebec — McGill, Concordia, and Bishop’s — 
manage to insert themselves harmoniously 
into Quebec society, as they are trying to do, 
and continue to offer centres of excellence, as 
they do indeed, then I would not be surprised if 
there were a flow of French-speaking young 
people towards English-language universities 
and vice versa. As a matter of fact, it might be 
a good thing. 

News: Francophone students are attending 
anglophone universities at a rapidly increasing 
rate: in last year’s freshman class McGill had 
47 per cent more French students than it did 
the year before, and at Concordia the figure 
was 79 per cent. Why are more and more 
francophones coming to English universities? 
Morin: For the same reason that I went to 
McGill — they wish to learn the English 
language properly. And, of course, some of 
your professional Faculties and scientific 
departments have a very good reputation, and 
this will attract students inevitably. If McGill 
continues to offer excellence in its programs, 

I am very confident that the drop in enrolment 
will not be as dramatic as some Cassandras 
expect it to be. 

News: In your eyes is McGill a Quebec uni- 
versity or a university of the world? 

Morin: It is both; it should be both. It has a 
dual mission. Every university — not only 
McGill, but also Montréal, Laval, Bishop’s, 
Concordia — has a dual preoccupation. The 
first is to belong to its milieu, to contribute 

to the development of the society in which it 
lives. And the second is to reach such a level 
of quality as to be able to compete with other 
universities in the world, and to contribute to 
the development of learning not only in the 
particular country which has seen its birth, 
but in the wide world. McGill has already 
reached this international level — it is known 
abroad as one of our great universities. It 
should have little trouble in maintaining that 
status while at the same time contributing to 
the development of Quebec. The two things 
are not irreconcilable; I would even go so far 
as to Say that they are complimentary — they 
are the two dimensions of any university. 
News: How would you suggest McGill inte- 
grate itself more fully into the Quebec com- 
munity? 


8 


Morin: McGill is planning to offer a course 
which I think shows the type of thing that can 
be done. It is called French for Professional 
Purposes. Now there is a contribution not only 
to Quebec society but also to the quality of 
professional services in Quebec and, of course, 
to the adaptation of McGill graduates to Quebec 
society. Perhaps this should have been done a 
long time ago; perhaps many of those graduates 
who have left might have stayed if they had had 
this type of help. There are many more exam- 
ples that could be given to show that McGill 

is trying to adapt, and indeed has been adapting 
for the past few years. McGill is also working 
hard in the Conférence des recteurs et des 
principaux du Québec. It is present at all the 
meetings I have with the Quebec universities, 
active and showing an interest in asserting 

itself more than it has done in the past. And 

this will bear fruit; it is already beginning to 
bear fruit. 

News: Why did the government impose dif- 
ferential fees for foreign students? 

Morin: We hesitated a lot before we made that 
decision. Had Alberta and Ontario not applied 
differential fees I don’t think we would have 
done so, but it creates an unfair situation if 

one province applies differential fees and the 
other does not. For example, differential fees 
brought about a relatively important diminution 
of the number of foreign students in Ontario 
during the past two years, and there is evidence 
to show that most of those students came to 
Quebec institutions. 

News: But they certainly did not come to Mc- 
Gill, which has experienced a drop in foreign 
student enrolment in the last year. 

Morin: Yes, but the drop might have been 
more dramatic. A lot of foreign students went 
to Concordia and into the English and French 
CEGEPs. The moment Alberta and Ontario 
took the decision on differential fees it meant 
that sooner or later all the provinces with 
substantial numbers of foreign students would 
have to act in the same way. We feel that by 
applying the same rules as Ontario we will get 
our fair share of foreign students — and our 

fair share of the responsibilities, because 

there is a cost involved. It is estimated that 
between $40 and $50 million of Quebec’s public 
taxes go every year to support college or uni- 
versity instruction to foreign students. 

News: Do the foreign students not bring 
money into the province? 

Morin: Yes, but they don’t bring money into 
government coffers, and they do not pay very 
many taxes. It is the people of Quebec and 
Ontario and Alberta who have to support them. 
News: There is a current argument that runs 
like this: “The $2 million that differential fees 
will bring into government coffers is not really 
the important issue. What the government is 
actually trying to do is reduce the total 
government grant to universities by diminishing 
the number of students and hence the size 


j 


of the universities themselves.” 
Morin: No. The basic reason for differentia 
fees is that we did not want to pick up the 
students who were more or less evacuated 
from Alberta and Ontario. We did not want to 

pay more than our fair share of what all a pC 

Canadian provinces pay for foreign students. 

News: You were a foreign student in Britain The 


and the United States. How do you view your ea 
government’s decision? , Bu 
| of 


Morin: | had to pay very high fees as a foreign 
student. but I never considered it to be unfair. ~ 

| admit that if teaching had been free I would — 
have had a little more money to look after 

my daily needs! 

One country in which there are no tuition fees | Mi 
for foreign students is France, and that creates 
a problem. When we are dealing with countries | sg 
which accept our students free of charge we pl 
will have to reexamine our policy. It is a bit | el 
unfair to reciprocate by imposing tuition fees. | ay 

Then, of course, there is another aspect to doe 
this. At the present time we are not doing — no- va 
Canadian province is doing — all that we aot 
should to help the developing countries. Some | I 
of the foreign students that come to Quebec and ta 
Ontario — the wealthy classes from the West _ ; ba 


Indies or Europe — need little help. Butwe lot 
must think in future of helping those that need — th 
help. | Tt 
News: McGill’s relations with the present pe 


government seem to be very positive. 

Morin: We are indeed on good terms. There | 
is no reason not to be. | 
News: But many anglophones tend to be | 
suspicious of such accord. 

Morin: I suppose this has to do with the 
climate of uncertainty as to the future of the 
English-speaking people of Quebec. But I wish 
that the young graduates would understand that 
there is a place for them in the Quebec of 
tomorrow if only they will make one step 
towards Quebec society, and if the university _ 
will — as indeed it has begun to do — try to 
orient its programs towards the needs of 
Quebec society. We need the English-speaking, 
well-qualified graduates for the development of | 
Quebec, and will be needing them foralong 
time to come. 

I believe that the authorities at McGill 
University, and many English-speaking stu- 
dents, understand that there is no attempt 
to treat McGill differently from the other 
universities. The present government is 
extremely sensitive to that, and has gone out : 
of its way to make sure that all institutions of — 
higher learning are treated on exactly the 
same footing. Quality then becomes the dif- 
ferentiating factor, and I believe McGill is well 
placed to offer quality. There is every reason — 
to believe that the future of McGill will be 
bright. 0 


This interview was conducted by Victoria Lee 
editor of the News. 


Ae) 


The enrolment dilemma 


by Christine Farr 


The 1960s saw rapid growth in the 
universities and the economy as a whole. 
But times have changed and McGill, like 
other universities, must adapt. 


Mix equal parts of low birth rate and high 
unemployment, add a good dash of economic 
stagnation, and simmer slowly in an uncertain 
political climate. It is a sure-fire recipe for 
declining enrolment at McGill. But the univer- 
sity can take some comfort in the fact that it 
does not face the problem alone — with regional 
variations, declining enrolment appears to be 
a continental phenomenon. 

The enrolment dilemma is easier to explain 
_ than it is to solve. The end of the postwar 
baby boom is a major factor. Canadian women 
today bear an average of 1.8 children, below 
the rate required to replace the population. 
The decline in the birth rate has been 
particularly marked in Quebec — in 1959, 


142,383 children were born in the province; 
by 1972 the number had dropped to 83,603. 
The province’s primary and secondary 
schools have been hit first by the effects of 
rapid population decline. Scarcely a day goes 
by without some mention in the media of drop- 
ping enrolment and resulting financial difficul- 
ties for local school boards. The largely 
francophone Montreal Catholic School Commis- 
sion, once the largest school board in Canada, 
registered 80,000 fewer students in 1977 than 
in 1970. It closed thirty-one schools last year 
alone. The Protestant School Board of Greater 
Montreal recently voted to close eight of its 
ninety-six schools in June, and foresees twenty 
more closures within two years. 


Though declining birth rate is common to 
most developed areas of the world, the enrol- 
ment problem in Quebec schools is further 
exacerbated by a regional issue — the threat 
of separation. Statistics Canada figures recently 
confirmed what most English-speaking 
Quebecers have known for a year and a half — 
people are leaving the province by the 
thousands. Following the Parti Québécois 
victory, the emigration trickle became a flood: 
in the year from June 1, 1976 to May 31, 1977 
Quebec suffered a net loss to other provinces 
of over 23,000 people, double the number for 
the previous year. Families moving out of 
Quebec take with them, quite simply, the raw 
material from which schools and universities 


Total Full-time Institutional Enrolment, Canada, 1975-76 to 1979-80 


Millions 


6.3 — 


6.2 = 


et lo 


6.0 — 


oh es 


58 = 3 


Te Se 


7 Ra 


§.5 — 


2.4-— 


so a 


5.2— 


i: ia 


1976-77 


University graduate enrolment 


University undergraduate 


Post-secondary non-university 


Elementary-secondary 


1977-78 


1978-79 


Millions 


— 6.3 


62 


— 6A 


— 6.0 


=639 


=— 5.8 


=F 


— Se 


=5.35 


— 5.4 


— §.3 


== 62 


<5 


1979-80 


aaa 


are built. Had they stayed, some of those 
children would certainly have found their way 
to McGill’s campus. 

McGill planners are well aware of the exodus 
and its affect on enrolment. Dr. Edward 
Stansbury, Vice-Principal (Planning), estimates 
that for the next decade McGill will lose about 
2 per cent of student numbers per year. Whereas 
McGill’s enrolment for 1976-77 (in full-time 
equivalent figures) was 18,315, for 1977-78 
it was 17,877. By 1986-87 it is expected to 
drop to 14,845 and could conceivably slip to 
12,000 by 1991. 

The university bases its estimates, in part, 
onelementary and secondary school enrolment 
figures. In its 1977 Brief on the Charter of 
the French Language, the university noted that 
between 1969 and 1975 school enrolment at all 
levels — kindergarten, elementary, and 
secondary — showed a total actual loss of 
189,503 children. But the projected loss for 
the period 1975 to 1981 was nearly double this 
figure. And these projections did not take into 
consideration the specific effects of Bill 101, 
which denies the English school system many 
of its traditional sources of students. The 
brief states: ‘‘If all those leaving Quebec are 
a loss to the English school system, and none 
of those coming in can enter it, then we will 
see the eventual decline of the English schools 
to negligible proportions.”” The impact on 
McGill could be immense: the university 
presently draws 60 per cent of its students 
from English-language schools in Quebec. 

University enrolment is further eroded by 
a third social development. Quite simply, a 
university education is no longer the guarantee 
of employment it once was. As Alta Abramo- 
witz, director of McGill’s College and School 
Liaison Office, remarks: ‘‘People have to re- 
think what university is all about. To go to 
university specifically to get a job is no longer 
realistic.” 

In deciding whether or not to attend 
university, today’s student is influenced by 
many factors, not the least of which is the 
bleak employment picture. ‘‘Perhaps he has 
friends who have tried university and failed, 
or who have graduated and can’t find work in 
their chosen professions,” says Dr. Michael 
Herschorn, McGill’s new dean of students and 
chairman of the university admissions commit- 
tee. ‘All this discourages enrolment.” 

In sharp contrast to the pessimistic outlook 
for university graduates is the very 
impressive placement rate for graduates of the 
CEGEPs’ three-year career stream. Joe 
Rabinovitch, registrar at Montreal’s Vanier 
College, maintains that about 95 per cent of 
those students who opt for career programs 
(formerly called vocational or technical 
training) find employment in their fields. “That 
kind of success rate,”’ says Rabinovitch, “‘is 
pretty impressive in attracting people.” 

On a province-wide basis, almost half of 


10 


{ye BAP OP ee ae he TR I 


those entering the CEGEP system now choose 
the career program. (In 1967, when the first 
CEGEP opened its doors, the figure stood at 
34 per cent.) Many students, it would appear, 
have come to the conclusion that a practical 
diploma is more marketable than a degree. 

To understand what happens to a university 
when its enrolment drops, it is necessary to 
examine the financial interrelationship of 
student, institution, and government. “The 
global yearly amount allocated by the provincial 
government to the university is predicated 
upon permissible expenses for one year,” 
explains Allan McColl, Vice-Principal (Finance). 


The Silver Lining 

Two bright spots in the enrolment picture 
at McGill are the Faculties of Management 
and Agriculture. Management has tripled its 
enrolment and teaching staff in the past 
decade and currently accepts only 320 of the 
more than 500 students applying annually for 
the bachelor of commerce degree program. 
And, over the past three years, the Faculty 
of Agriculture has been registering a 15- 
per-cent yearly increase in enrolment for 
the bachelor of science in agriculture 
degree. 

Many students gravitate towards the 
Management and Agriculture programs 
because they offer good employment potential. 


Dr. Lewis Lloyd, dean of Agriculture. 


As outgoing Dean of Management Dr. Stanley 
Shapiro remarks, ““When head offices began 
to move out of Quebec, the students got-a 

little concerned. But, however you slice it, ... 
Montreal is a regional business capital for 

a market of six million people and that’s 

still a substantial business operation.” 

Two additional factors help maintain the 
steady stream of applications to Manage- 
ment. The first is the conservatism of the 
current crop of CEGEP graduates. Less 
inclined to idealism than their counterparts 
of a decade ago, these students, says Shapiro, 


¥ 


“These expenses, of course, are directly “ 
related to the number of students registered = Fos 
at McGill in any one year. Ifenrolment goes § of: 
up, the university is given development funds, — M 
allowing expansion to accommodate the in- cu 
creased number of students. If enrolment is at 
static, we receive only increments sufficient ye 
to maintain the status quo.” 

But enrolment at McGill has not goneup, & yc 
nor has it remained static. Rather, ithas been § 
shrinking and will continue to do so at an Ri 


estimated rate of 300 students per year. “When® w 
you’re getting about $3,000 per year in grants fl 
and tuition fees per student,”’ says McColl, 


are prepared to accept the system as it is 
and no longer feel compelled to scrap insti- 
tutions in order to improve them. A second 
factor boosting applications is the growing 
number of women entering the work force — 
women now constitute 30 per cent of each 
freshman class. 

Students opting for Agriculture also have 
their eye on employment opportunities. 
Notes Dean of Agriculture Dr. Lewis Lloyd, 
‘‘Eor those students who are science- 
oriented, it makes sense in terms of getting 
a job after graduation to choose an applied 
science such as agriculture.” 

The Faculty is also actively engaged in 
educating prospective employers. “We have 
a program whereby we undertake to 
enlighten companies about the practical 
nature of our graduates’ knowledge,” 
explains Lloyd. ““Many employers are 
not aware of our environment-related 
programs and this is a field currently 
experiencing employment demand.” | 

The two Faculties attract both anglophone . 
and francophone students. Management, iz 
where 24 per cent of the students are 
French-speaking, offers a combination of | 
English- and French-language courses and | 
features joint programs with francophone | 
universities in Quebec and France. Conse- 
quently, the Faculty can boast truly bilingual — 
graduates. ‘| 

Thirty-five per cent of the students in 
Agriculture are francophone. “The French 
students come here to learn English,” says 
Lloyd. And while the Faculty does not offer 
any French-language or bilingual courses, | 
it has, he says, ‘‘a number of French and 
French-speaking professors who act as 
resource persons when necessary.” 

With steady budgets reflecting the healthy © 
state of enrolment in their Faculties, both 
deans are optimistic about the future. Says 
Lloyd, ‘‘We have a problem in terms of 
space and class loads but it is a problem 
on the happy side.”” And Shapiro is equally 
content: ‘I’ve got a business school that 
has never been stronger, healthier, or 
happier.” 0 § 


To be | or? Pt Pr, ct 


“you re talking about nearly one million dollars 
lost to the university.’’ Based on the number 
of students expected to register this fall, 
McGill’s $104-million overall budget will be 
cut 1.7 per cent, with the university anticipating 
a deficit in excess of $2 million. The following 
year the cut will likely increase to 4 per cent. 
Total Faculty budgets for the coming fiscal 
year have been calculated at $56.5 million — a 
decrease of nearly $1 million in one year. 
Hardest hit by the cuts are the larger Faculties 
with the most dramatic drop in student 
numbers — Science, Education, and Arts. 
Planners have little leeway when it comes 


Thousands 
_ 150 


140 


130 


120 


110 


to trimming the budget. Salaries, which account 
for about 80 per cent of the overall operating 
expenses of the university, are protected by 
tenure and collective agreements (for academics) 
and job security (for non-academic staff). 

McGill’s salary situation is unique among 
Quebec universities. ““Our policies are 
determined internally,” says McColl. “‘This 
allows us some flexibility provided we stay 
within government norms.” McGill professors 
enjoy salaries that are among the highest in 
Canadian universities. As yet, neither salary 
cuts nor dismissals are anticipated; it is 


_ hoped that normal staff attrition will preclude 


such drastic budget-cutting measures. 
There is very little hiring at McGill, however, 


, and Faculty deans must approve every new 
- appointment. “It will be impossible to bring 
; young blood onto our staff for quite a long 


time,” notes Dr. Walter Hitschfeld, dean of 
Graduate Studies and Vice-Principal (Research), 
in McGill’s 1976-77 Annual Report. As a 

result, the university is finding it difficult 

“to keep itself reasonably youthful and energetic 


" onthe staff side.” 


Without the invigorating input of fresh 


, imaginations, McGill runs the risk of 
_ intellectual atrophy. Eventually, it will be 
’. difficult to find young university teachers — 


; with fewer job openings in academe, young 
people are increasingly unwilling to sign up 


for doctoral studies. The problem is distressingly 
circular. 


Dr. Svenn Orvig, dean of Science, also touched 
on this matter in the 1976-77 Annual Report. 
‘“‘Future leadership in Canadian science must 
come from today’s students and it is essential 
that the very best ones be kept employed in 
their own specialties,”’ he wrote. ““Otherwise, 
when the need comes, we will have to recruit 
these talents from abroad when the competition 
is severe.” 

The effects of declining enrolment filter 
down through every level of university life. 
Services available to students are no exception. 
Dr. Saeed Mirza, associate professor of 
engineering and outgoing dean of students, cites 


Live Births — Quebec 
1954-1977 


the student health, housing, and counselling 
service as a case in point. ‘‘We offer a minimal 
service as it is,” he says. “If it has to be cut 
for budget reasons, there will be serious 
repercussions for the students who depend on 
this facility in times of difficulty.” 
Demographers have predicted an upsurge in 
university enrolment around 1992, when the 


echo of the postwar baby boom reaches university 


age. In the meantime, McGill’s academics and 
administrators hope to convince a dwindling 
number of young people to come to university. 
The Faculty of Education, for its part, is 
encouraging accredited teachers to return to 


university to augment their academic credentials. 


Dean Dr. George Flower believes that such 

retraining will not only buoy enrolment in his 
Faculty but will also upgrade teachers’ quali- 
fications in an increasingly competitive field. 

McGill alumni have given the university not 
only financial endorsement — donations this 
fiscal year have surpassed $900,000 — but also 
moral support. Out-of-town graduates recently 
joined forces with the Montreal-based College 
and School Liaison Office to help coordinate 
recruiting activities in their own localities. 

In addition, McGill administration is main- 
taining a high profile through a vigorous and 
continuing dialogue with the public and private 
sectors. Detailed briefs on government policy 
affecting the universities are presented whenever 
the opportunity arises. 

Also touted as remedial measures to bolster 


Sagging enrolment are more evening classes, 
freer access for mature students, assistance 
for women returning to school, increased 
francophone recruitment, and lower academic 
entrance requirements. But Herschorn 
advises caution: ““Simple answers are not the 
whole story. The logistics required to expand 
evening classes or admit more mature students 
are not necessarily justified when you consider 
the uncertain benefits to be reaped, especially 
when other universities are already well 
established in this field.” 

While Abramowitz supports the principle of 
greater accessibility to the community, she 
maintains that McGill must remain “‘a university 
which can attract the high-caliber student 
who is challenged in an intellectual atmosphere.” 
The quality of this atmosphere, she feels, 
involves the imposition of certain academic 
standards. “‘Standards have already dropped, s 
says Abramowitz, “cand many students who 
would not have been considered ten years ago 
are now admitted to McGill.” 

The question of increasing the number of 
courses given in French in order to attract 
more francophone students was discussed at a 
February meeting of the McGill Association of 
University Teachers. “At the moment, 4 per 
cent of all French-language university students 
in Quebec are at McGill,’ remarked Vice- 
Principal Stansbury. ‘““They constitute 17 per 
cent of our enrolment. If we increase the 
proportion of French courses to welcome more 
French students, the question is where do we 
stop? There is no good precedent for a bilingual 
university, and certainly Quebec does not need 
another French one. In my opinion, we can 
best serve the community by remaining a good 
English university.” 

Commenting later on McGill’s planning 
program, Stansbury said, ““The 1960s were a 
period of quite rapid growth for the universities 
and the economy as a whole. Now, however, 
the situation is quite different. Basically, it 
means learning to live with a no-growth, 
rather than a growth, policy. And this, of 
course, is much more difficult to do.”’ 

Principal Dr. Robert Bell, addressing a 
meeting of Montreal’s St. James Literary 
Society in March, expressed the university's 
confidence in its product: ‘University graduates 
can benefit initially from specific training,” 
he said, ‘“‘but ... the general features of higher 
education are what carry the lifelong advan- 
tages.... What counts most are good habits of 
thought, an acquaintance with the sources of 
basic knowledge, and the love of continued 
learning.... It is the cultural content of the 
university education that counts in the long run.” 

Behind all the argument, discussion, and 
debate about declining enrolment lies an 
unshakeable belief in the fundamental value of 
a university education. Despite gloom-and- 
doom statistics, McGill seems more than 
ready to meet the challenges of the future. 0 


11 


Feeling at 


by Victoria Lees 


A dedicated group of men and women at 
Montreal Children’s Hospital faces the 
formidable task of making hospitaliza- 
tion a positive childhood experience. 


“There was an eleven-year-old boy, chroni- 
cally ill and in hospital for a long time. The 
boy knew he wasn’t doing very well. The 
child life worker told him that the medical 
team would be meeting to see what decisions 
could be made. Together they worked out a 
list of questions for the doctors — what were 
they going to do about his colostomy, what 
were they going to do about this and that. But 
his first question was, ‘Am I going to die?’ 


Carolyn Larsen, a former nurse who now 
directs Child Life and School Services at the 
Montreal Children’s Hospital, is describing one 
of the many roles her twelve staff members 
play. ‘‘The child life worker often becomes an 
advocate for the child,” she says, “especially 
where the child may be expressing his needs 
in such a subtle way that they are not recognized 
by other people.” 

Montreal Children’s, a McGill teaching hos- 
pital, was one of the first in North America 
to provide child life services. At the turn of 
the century it hired its own school teachers to 
work in the hospital, and in the thirties child 
life was set up as a separate hospital service. 

Its aim: to promote emotional stability, 
sound development, and rehabilitation through 
play and supportive relationships. 

“Care of the whole child” could serve as the 
motto of the group. “‘We concern ourselves 
with the life and developmental issues of 
children,” explains Larsen. “In general we 
are concerned about the care of the child as a 
growing person, as opposed to what most hos- 
pital staff members are focussing on — his 
medical problems and needs.”’ This is a tall 
order to fill. It involves everything from tying 
eye-catching, coloured mobiles above a baby’s 
crib to finding some privacy in a busy hospital 
for a pensive teenager. 

Each child life worker handles a caseload of 
between twenty and thirty-five children. Charts 
maintained on the social development of some 
of these children are useful to the entire 
hospital team. ‘‘We often pick up problems 
first because the children are afraid of the 
doctor,” says child life worker Anne Hodgson, 

DipEd’75. The child life staff is also respon- 
sible for training and supervising a body of 


12 


home in hospital 


over one hundred indispensable volunteers, and 
for teaching student nurses how to facilitate 
play. 

Monitoring stress or, as Larsen puts it, 
watching out for stress overdose, is a major 
part of child life work. Away from home, 
surrounded by strangers, haunted by pain and 
the threat of pain, the child sometimes finds 
his fear is bigger than he is. Uncooperative 
behavior and aggression are not the only 
symptoms of stress overdose. ‘*Very often 
in the past, when we saw a young child finally 
settling in, we assumed he was adjusting and 
adapting. But we began to realize that this 
was a giving-up phase.” 

Hospitalization is especially difficult for the 


hot 
pat 
hin 
lite 
in! 
dis 
Ie 
many Eskimo and Indian children who are flowng 
to Children’s from northern Quebec for treat- § {rt 
ment. Severed from their families, they m 
suddenly find themselves in a totally alien Fite 
environment. Child life staffers’ sensitivity , 


to the cultural backgrounds of these homesick — wi 
patients brings delighted response. One worker § 1 
encouraged a withdrawn Eskimo child to build § - 
a kayak out of blocks; the little boy climbed in, § 1 
harpooned a stuffed animal, and began to speak § 


after two weeks of silence. 0! 
To help alleviate stress, the service has | 
set up numerous ward playrooms and stocked § ™ 
them with books, records, and toys. To the eh 
children, the playrooms represent havens th 
where no medical procedures are ever carried " 
out. ‘We don’t put much emphasis on fancy Es 
activities where the children produce tremen- 
dous things,” says Larsen. “*We put far more te 
emphasis on the general atmosphere, so that a 


the playroom is a place where children can feel § 2 
at home and involve themselves in an activity § " 
which is important to them.” 

One favourite playroom activity is, predict- 
ably, playing hospital. ‘In their play children 
will sometimes express real misconceptions — 
about the reason for an intravenous, for 
example, or what an intravenous fluid is,” 
notes Larsen. ‘‘It gives us a good chance to 
correct these misconceptions and decrease the — 
anxiety a little.” In an effort to prepare the 
child for what could otherwise be terrifying 
experiences, staffers use simple props to 
explain medical procedures — they will help 
a child with a broken leg wrap a doll in cast 
material, or bring a noisy saw into the 
playroom to show that removing the cast 
will not harm the limb. &§ 

Members of the child life staff are also 
active in hospital planning groups. Their goal 
is once again to reduce stress on the child by © 
contributing to sensitive hospital procedures ~ | 
and policy. One development that child life — 
workers endorse: parents are now welcome 0! 
the wards at any time. It is not unusual to seed 
mother bedding down on a cot for the night, 
ora father breakfasting with interns. “In- 


o> of p> Oo =| —< 


—_— — _ o> 


Left: The leg of this well-loved doll was set in@ 
cast by an injured boy and his child life wOrKe 


\e 
F & 
+% 


creased parental involvement does a 
tremendous amount to decrease stress, 
particularly in the young child who just can’t 
cope with the separation,’ Larsen notes. 

The day-to-day continuity the child life 
worker provides the hospitalized child is 
invaluable. Nurses change shift every eight 
hours, doctors step in only briefly, other 
patients arrive and depart, and the child may 
himself change wards. But the same child 
life worker often follows him wherever he goes 
in the hospital, and occasionally even after 
dismissal to other institutions. 

This enduring relationship is particularly 
reassuring to children who are hospitalized for 
very long periods — some stay at Children’s 
from birth to their preschool years. “‘It is 
mind-boggling what a child can miss if he is 
here for a long time,’ remarks Larsen. 

‘**Y ou really have to stop and think about 
what a baby’s life is like at home, and about 
all the different things he sees in a day 

— the father shaving, the other children going 
to school, the mother preparing meals.”’ The 
child life staff members try to fill in some 

of these gaps. ‘“‘We had one boy here for 
several years,” Larsen recalls. ““The staff 
‘member would sometimes make breakfast with 
him in the ward kitchen so that he could see 
things cooking. Then she would sit with him 
while he ate it so that he would not always be 
served in the institutional manner.”’ 

Not forgotten are the special problems of 
teenagers, who are often embarrassed to be 
admitted to a “‘children’s”’ hospital. ““They 
are going through a stage where they are very 
independent — they want a lot of privacy and 
you can’t always get it around here,” explains 
Hodgson. They also want to talk. To encourage 

conversation and friendships as much as to 

_alleviate boredom, the child life staffers set up 
activities like macramé, billiards, cooking, 
and electronic ping pong. 

And, of course, parents have their own 
anxieties and often call upon the services of 
the child life workers. Anne Dubrofsky,a McGill 
_nursing graduate who has worked in the child 
‘life service for two and a half years, remarks: 
_‘*My goals are to help kids deal with being in 
‘hospital, and to help parents deal with their 
‘hospitalized kids.”” Working with parents can 
_be as complex as working with children. ‘Many 
’ parents are frightened by the hospital and are 
_afraid to come in. And if they work all day, 
it is hard for them,” explains Hodgson. “If 
“they can’t afford to come, we try to get social 
” service involved to find them bus money or 
* taxi fare.” 

* Comfortable sitting rooms have been set 

“aside on most floors where parents can make 

"coffee, talk, or attend a weekly coffee hour 

“along with hospital staff. In this way, says 

’ Larsen, ‘parents get the message that we are 
also thinking about them.’’ Hodgson adds: “It’s 

especially good for the parents of terminally 

ji! 


Mater Sts ale ster ae i evant aseiy - 


Child lite worker Anne Dubrofsky plays with a small patient at Montreal Children’s Hospital. ‘The 
children know that somebody cares.” 


ill children to get together, talk out their 


feelings, and share their grief with one another.” 


At the moment there is no specific training 
available in Canada for child life workers. The 
men and women who comprise the child life 
service at Montreal Children’s are an eclectic 
group — they have degrees in counselling, 
education, human development, psychology, 
recreational therapy, and nursing. When hiring, 
Larsen looks for people “‘with a good back- 
ground in normal and abnormal child develop- 
ment. We require very special people who are 
sensitive to the needs of others. And since it is 
very draining work, it is important that the 
people doing it have the support they need to 
carry on and have their own escapes after 
work.” 

The stresses of the work vary with the in- 
dividual. ‘‘The most difficult thing for one 
person might be having to experience so much 
of the pain that the child experiences,” explains 
Larsen. ‘‘Often the child wants to have the 
worker nearby when he is having something 
painful done. The debridement of the skin of a 
burned child, for example, is very painful for 
the child and extremely painful for the person 


who is supporting the child. For another worker, 


the hardest thing might be to see the child 
leaving hospital and going back to a situation 
where he knows his needs cannot be well met.” 


But undeniably the job has its rewards. 
‘‘Sometimes I think this is like nursing,” 
explains former nurse Dubrofsky. “‘But only 
the good part of it. It is the interesting, meaty 
part. We are making the hospital a personal, 
human place — we are not such a big institution 
that we have no feelings. The children know 
that somebody cares.”’ And, as director Larsen 
points out, the caring, giving, and teaching flow 
in both directions. *‘The children,” she says, 
‘tare always our best teachers.”’ 


... ‘The boy was on a treatment known as 
hyperalimentation — intravenous feeding to 
put the stomach and bowels to rest, says 
Anne Hodgson, the child life worker assigned 
to the case. ‘‘He couldn't eat for months and 
months. He wasn't getting any better and 


finally he just rebelled and was having temper 


tantrums. I talked with him and with the other 
staff and we arranged a meeting. I took his 

list of questions and comments to the doctors. 
The result was that hyperalimentation was 
stopped, he was allowed to eat again, and 

he went home a lot sooner than he normally 
would have.’ 2 


13 


McGill's 


by Holly Dressel 


western art for more than a century, 
combined the artistic abilities of an 
entire culture to sublime effect. 


- a 


Japanese prints, which have influenced 


collections: th 


Laughing girls, nonchalant men, the genial 
beauty of nature. Such were the themes of 
ukiyo-e, the wood-block prints that portrayed 
the “floating” or “transient world”’ of eighteenth- 
and nineteenth-century Japan. Though their 
name derived from a word meaning “‘sad 
world,” ukiyo prints recorded the carefree 
pleasures of theatre, brothel, and countryside. 

At the turn of the century a benefactor known 
only as Mr. Hankey gave McGill his collection 
of Japanese woodcuts. After spending many 
years in a floating world of their own, the 
seventy valuable art works now have a perma- 
nent home — the Print Room of McLennan 
Library’s department of rare books and special 
collections. 

Japanese prints were very much in vogue 
when Hankey began to collect them. Scores of 
books on how to recognize authentic signatures 
and how to mount, restore, and evaluate the 
prints were being published in English, French, 
and German. The prints had first turned up in 
Europe in 1856 as packing material in a box 
of porcelain. Artist-engraver and man of 
fashion Félix Bracquemond got hold of them 
and introduced them to the art circles of Paris 
as exciting treasures. 

By 1862 ashop called La porte chinoise was 
selling Japanese prints along with other exotica 
and, by the end of the century, /e japonisme 
was in full swing. It was a mark of the avant- 
garde not only to have the prints hung on their 
walls but also recorded in their portraits — 
Japanese woodcuts are featured in Manet’s 
portrait of Zola and in Van Gogh’s portrait of 
Pére Tanguy. (Van Gogh, in fact, used to trade 
his canvases for prints by Hiroshige and 
Utamaro.) 

The popularity of Japanese wood blocks was 
based on a deep appreciation of their artistry, 
and the profound influence they exerted on 
western art is still being felt. Painters like 
Manet and Gauguin were overwhelmed by 
their oblique, asymmetrical composition and 
by the way figures disappeared off the edge 
of the paper, suggesting movement about to 
escape the viewer’s field of vision. And just 
as Japanese printmakers rejected classical 
subjects to portray the transient world of 
everyday life, nineteenth-century French 


artists like Degas and Toulouse- Lautrec 
avoided the religious and mythological topics 
of the academicians, seeking instead to cap- ~ 
ture tavern and cabaret scenes, peasants at 
their labour, and momentary visions of beauty, 
Painters like Whistler and Van Gogh respondé 
even more enthusiastically to Japanese aesthe- 
tics, borrowing their flat, brilliant colours, — 
two-dimensional treatment, and economical 
sweeping lines. 

For close to eight centuries before the 
emergence of ukiyo-e, Japanese painting had 
been patterned after Chinese art. Scenes from 
poetry and romance had adorned scrolls and © 
screens intended for the wealthy classes. But” 
by 1700 economic power was shifting to a grow 
ing merchant class, and Japan was a society — 
in transition: decadent, corrupt, and wracked 
with economic calamities. The woodcut, the 
representative art form of the emerging middle 
class, remained through it all curiously blithe, 
wry, and satiric. What the middle class com-~ 
missioned and bought were depictions of kabuk 
actors, warriors, and beautiful women — the | 
courtesans, female impersonators, and 
prostitutes who thronged the Japanese capi 
of Edo, now Tokyo. 

Black-and-white book illustrations sold in” 
the late seventeenth century were the first 
Japanese wood-block prints to appear on 
separate sheets. The technique of these wood 
cuts was simple. With the artist’s drawing 
fastened to a block of cherry or pear wood, 4 
craftsman carved the design into the wood 
along the grain. A printer then brushed th 
block with ink and transferred the design to } 
paper by rubbing it with a smooth, round tool 
called a baren. 

Around 1761 a woodcut designer named Sul 
Harunobu (1725-1770) took the process a Step 
further. Using the black-and-white print asa 
proof, he had craftsmen cut separate blocks: 
for each additional colour. The art develope 
to such dazzling complexity that up to as 
different colours — requiring fifteen differen 

blocks — were used in a single print. Harun 
woodcuts, called brocade pictures, marked 
beginning of the golden age of japaneaal if 

Polychromatic prints were enormously P 
lar and designers became correspondingly 


G.. = (Ge | 


I 


— ees :irrrnrxkT rer were rrr wr el Ot aa ee _ eee er eS” 


world of Japanese prints 


prosperous. From contemporary accounts, it 

would seem that the money was spent as fast 
as it was earned. The theatre and pleasure 
quarters were the centres of jet-set life in 
eighteenth-century Japan, and the artists who 
depicted the actors and courtesans were often 

on intimate terms with their models. Though 
a few printmakers were beacons of oriental 

honour, most were notorious for their wild, 

dissolute lives. 

Utagawa Toyokuni (1769-1825) was the son 
of an Edo wood-carver whose studio was a 


, gathering place for actors of the kabuki theatre. 


Not surprisingly, Toyokuni became a designer 
of actor wood blocks and with his prints 1l- 
_lustrated popular accounts of actors’ lives. 


le 
‘ ta J Me 
: ds ‘ 


ent Ree en ee me eter 


Piet 2 ve , ( 
| @e I} 
: fj Ay 
| om: Oe J ae 

A 
ig ' 


Toyokuni’s student, Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1798 
1861), began his career with actor woodcuts. 
But he soon surpassed his master and is re- 
vered today for his iridescent prints of warriors 
(see covers) and for his haunting landscapes. 
Kuniyoshi’s woodcut of the priest Nicheren 
climbing a mountain in the snow (see below) 
is recognized as one of the most beautiful in 
existence. Enormous economy of line renders 
almost palpable the snowy night, the muffled 
village, the plodding priest. 

Kitagawa Utamaro (1753-1806) was abhorrec 
by many early collectors as much for his 
mannerist period as for his immoral life. He 
elongated his beautiful women to the point of 
distortion and portrayed the lowest-grade 


ae ou “ ) } 
i seonray hh 
we lh: 


prostitutes with great sensuality. Disinherited 
by his uncle and master when in his late 
twenties, he worked out of his publisher’s 
house for his remaining years and died un- 
reformed. 

The prolific Utamaro produced erotica, 
nature prints, and “‘yellow-cover books,” the 


Page 14: Ukiyo-e, Japanese calligraphy by 
Dr. Pei- Yuan Han, Montreal General Hospital; 
Below: Snow Scene — Mountain Village by 
Kuniyoshi (131%” x 8%”); 

Page 16: Courtesans by Utamaro (10/” x 
14%”); 

Page 17: Three Actors under Umbrella by 
Toyokuni (912” diameter). 


15 


essa reretets, 


mg ve i eeeheneibemesenminas mainte 


wb senenote ome > 


ore 


A nt Re aR ty Sa rete ie ne green enn cites 


sophisticated and satiric Japanese equivalent 
of magazines. The fine detail and subtle colour 
in his prints required special care in the 
printing process. Utamaro rubbed powdered 
mother-of-pearl into the background to enrich 
the gloss on the paper. For colour, he required 
only two or three pale shades, which he dis- 
solved into one another and toned into soft 
pastels. Even when faded, as are most of the 
seven examples of his work in the Hankey col- 
lection, the prints still reveal a ravishing 

sheen and delicacy of tint. 


Although Utamaro is today considered one of 


the greatest Japanese print designers, it is 
Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849) who is proba- 
bly most familiar to westerners. His ““Thirty- 


Six Views of Mount Fuji” and his seascapes 
with their characteristic curly waves have been 
widely reproduced. But like Utamaro, Hokusai 
was known as a shameless hedonist, perhaps 
because of his many woodcuts of courtesans. 
Over a long, careless, and roving life he 
produced prints in a multitude of styles on a 
multitude of subjects. McGill has a single 
Hokusai, a stylized, highly animated depiction 
of court gardeners around a bonfire. 

When Hokusai died in poverty in 1849, the 
age of the great printmakers died with him. 
The art began to absorb more and more wes- 
tern techniques — perspective, defined back- 
grounds, cheaper papers — and entered the 
twentieth century as an ugly hodgepodge of 


eastern motifs, western machines, and garish 
aniline dyes. 

Ukiyo-e is admired for its transparent delica- 
cy and for its revolutionary composition. But 
it is also valued for its craftsmanship — the 
perfect carving, inking, and matching of many 
blocks. Because of its technical complexity, 
the polychrome print had always depended as 
much on the skill of the carvers and printers 
as on the originality of the designer — the 
artistic abilities of an entire culture had 
combined to sublime effect. When technical 
attitudes changed, however, the fragile, subtle 
art of ukiyo-e was lost. 0 


Holly Dressel is a Montreal freelance writer. 


17 


Doing it their way 


by Carol Stairs 


Development expert Christopher Bryant: 
“If situations change and programs 
remain the same, you can very quickly 
become irrelevant.” 


Lying barely a hundred miles north of Australia 
and occupying the eastern half of the world’s 
second-largest island is a new developing 

nation whose unique tribal rituals and self- 
reliant lifestyle have remained unaltered for 
centuries. But the winds of change have begun 
to ripple through the tropical valleys of Papua 
New Guinea. Independence and United Nations 
membership came in 1975, and the fledgling 
government has been striving to balance the 
aims of development with the preservation of 

a valued way of life. 

The challenge is keenly felt by thirty-four- 
year-old Christopher Bryant, BSc’65, veteran 
of numerous international assignments and now 
senior field staff officer in Papua New Guinea 
for the Canadian University Service Overseas 
(CUSO).“The basic philosophy in the country is, 
‘we can do it on our own,””’ he notes. ““The 
leaders of Papua New Guinea realize that 
having 70 or 80 per cent of their young people 
essentially self-reliant — feeding, clothing, 
and housing themselves from their own labours 
— is an advantage. They don’t want to change 
that. The idea is to preserve it and add to it a 
range of services that will make people’s 
lives better.” 

To assist Third World countries like Papua 
New Guinea with their manpower needs during 
such periods of transition is the primary role 
of CUSO. A non-profit, private organization 
founded in 1961, it is supported largely by 
grants from the Canadian International 
Development Agency (CIDA). At the request 
of host governments, CUSO recruits skilled 
Canadians and landed immigrants for a broad 
spectrum of programs in education, health, 
technology, business, and agriculture. 

Bryant’s career plans underwent a radical 
transformation when he stepped into CUSO- 
McGill’s recruiting office back in 1965. The 
honours mathematics graduate had decided to 
hecome an actuary. Then CUSO made him an 
irresistable offer: a two-year teaching assign- 
ment on the tiny Caribbean island of Granada. 
He recalls rushing home from his interview 
to look up the country in the encyclopedia — 

“I didn’t even know where the place was!” 
he says. 

In 1967 Bryant took time out to earna 


18 


Christopher Bryant. ‘We've got the people, 
they’ve got the needs.” 


master’s degree in mathematics education at 
Harvard University. But the following year 
found him back-in Granada, this time on a 
private contract as acting vice-principal of 
McDonald College in Sauteurs. The young 
teacher rejoined CUSO in 1969. He served for 
four years as field staff officer in Jamaica, 

for one year as regional field director in 
Barbados, and for three years as director of 
human resources at the organization’s Ottawa 
headquarters. In February 1977, with his 
Jamaican wife Sybil and two young sons, Bryant 
headed out to the “‘field’’ once more. After 


an 11,000-mile journey via the West Indies ant 

Fiji, they set up housekeeping in Papua New 

Guinea’s capital city, Port Moresby. | 
“We’ve got the people, they’ve got the needs 

says Bryant, whose job it is to match the two. 

Officially launched in 1970, the CUSO prograt 

in Papua New Guinea now has 156 volunteers 

serving overlapping, two-year contracts. 

According to Bryant, about half have assign- 

ments in education, a quarter in technology, — 

and the remainder in business, agriculture, and 

health care. ‘“‘And we recruit more than just 

fresh university graduates,” he adds. “The  §— | 

group that came last August had six couples ; 

over fifty years old.’ As well as possessing 


greater life and work experience, he notes, , 
older volunteers are highly respected in ye 
tribal societies. ft 


Bryant and the two field officers on his staf N- 
each cover a third of the country’s rough 
terrain. Since few roads exist, they travel 
almost exclusively by small airplane. These 
regular trips provide opportunities to visit 
volunteers and investigate new manpower 
requests. 

As well as evaluating volunteer positions ont! 
basis of continuing relevance to the communi 
Bryant examines their training element. “CUS 
is being judged in two ways — can we do the © 
job and are we training the Papua New Guinea 
to replace us,” he says. ‘‘There is no sense 
putting in and putting in if there is not going - 
to be any change.” 

Although he enjoys the broad perspective his 
work affords him, Bryant misses the in-depth 
community involvement that is so vital a part 
of the volunteer’s role. ‘‘I am here, I am there, 
he says. ‘“‘I am four days in Masse province, 
two days somewhere else. It is not dull but itis 
like an administrative job anywhere.” His 
position, however, offers its own challenges. — 
“You have to keep an eye on what is actually 
happening,” Bryant explains. “If situations f 
change and programs remain the same, you ~ | 
can very quickly become irrelevant.” a | 

One area which is under scrutiny isthe ; 
placement of CUSO teachers. “‘Like many om 
countries,”’ he notes, “Papua New Guinea is” 
looking closely at its education sector and 4 
asking if it is worth spending a lot of money — 


——, -——, —_—— Sie 


Faces of Papua New Guinea. The three- 
year-old government is striving to balance 
the aims of development with the pre- 
servation of a valued way of life. 


Ny 


on secondary schools. There is quite clearly 

not going to be paid employment for more than 
a small percentage of graduates. General 
education has got to be geared to making the 
rural people more efficient at what they have 
traditionally done — producing food. The 
question is whether putting people through 

a formal school circuit is the best way to do 
that.” 

Many innovative programs that emphasize 
self-reliance as well as learning are being 
introduced in rural schools, says Bryant. 

To help students earn a share of tuition fees, 
one school has provided garden plots and 

in turn purchases some of the students’ produce 
for its own kitchen. At another school, a CUSO 
agriculture teacher supervises a twenty-five- 
acre coffee plantation where students put into 
practice what they have learned in the 
classroom. 

Bryant feels that Papua New Guinea, as a 
relatively new developing nation, has a distinct 
advantage: it can look at the development 
efforts of others and learn from their mistakes. 
As he puts it, “Countries that came into the 
development cycle earlier often focussed on 
industrialization and a whole series of things 
that tended to change not only the economy but 
also the basic structure of society.’ But he 
believes that things will be different in Papua 
New Guinea, where the government is making 
decisions that should lead to a smoother, 
more integrated development program than 
that chosen by other traditional societies. 

CUSO engineers and technicians working on 
road-building projects are among the volunteers 
witnessing the ramifications of this cautious 
approach. Before any construction is under- 
taken, says Bryant, “the government is asking 
very serious questions, like ‘roads to where?’ 
and ‘for what purpose?’ If a new road network 
just allows people to flow into the city, then 
they are not so sure. Instead, they have tried 
to support the building of roads that open up 
rural areas for farming and for the marketing 
of produce. They have to ask questions, even 
about a simple thing like building a road from 
Ato B.” 

When it comes to health care, traditional 
ways have not been abandoned. In Papua New 
Guinea, CUSO’s physicians, nutritionists, 
laboratory technologists, and nurse tutors 
experience an approach to medicine very 
different from that commonly accepted in the 
West. The system radiates, not from the doctor, 
but from the relatively untrained aid post 
orderly. 

“There are thousands of aid post orderlies 
around the country,” says Bryant. ‘“‘What they 
can’t handle they send on to the health extension 
officer who runs the health centre. These people 
have three or four years of postsecondary 
training and can handle a broad range of health 
problems. Backing up the extension officers 
are the doctors and the base hospitals.” The 


Above: A young girl daubed in white clay. 
Below: A youth in ceremonial finery, with 


colourful makeup, feather headdress, and 


necklaces of cowrie shells and dog teeth. 


PSC ae byt RESP SE OE ove a CLES 


19 


CUSO on Campus 

To carry out its far-flung programs, CUSO 
relies heavily on a comprehensive network 
of recruiting offices located both in 
metropolitan centres and on university 
campuses across Canada. The faculty 
chairman of CUSO-McGill is associate 
professor of biology Dr. John Southin. 
Every week about twelve students come to 
see him, drawn by the CUSO information 
distributed regularly in each Faculty, or 
by the advertisements run in the McGill 
Daily. 

“Maybe one student every three weeks is 
sufficiently interested to go through the 
rather harrowing application process,” 
explains Southin. “‘In the course of a year 
we interview between six and ten, and of 
these five to eight are accepted. That’s been 
fairly consistent for McGill over the past 
few years.”” Recent campus recruits have 
included a librarian, a medical doctor, 
two engineers, and an English teacher. 

Macdonald College graduates, particularly 
agriculture specialists, are also in demand. 


‘These people get fantastic experience,”’ 
says director of extension Martin van 


Lierop, CUSO-Macdonald’s faculty chairman. 


‘‘They have just graduated and yet they are 
making decisions that affect a great number 
of people. I compare their experience to 
what a thirty-eight-year-old junior executive 
would get here in Canada.” 

CUSO presently has over 750 volunteers 
working in thirty countries. Although 
recruitment and placement are its major 
thrusts, the seventeen-year-old organization 
also strives to make Canadians more aware 
of the problems and aspirations of develop- 
ing countries. To this end, it mounts 
education programs in schools and com- 
munities, and supports, through public 
donations and matching CIDA grants, 
over 200 self-help projects around the 
world. 

This year the CUSO offices at both 
Macdonald College and McGill came up 
with unique — and successful — ways 
to raise not only contributions to the 
project fund but also the consciousness 


Towards greater self-reliance in food production: a CUSO agriculture specialist, right, 
consults with a Papuan pig farmer. When the people are ready to “‘do it on their own,”’ 
however, Bryant feels it will be time for CUSO to leave. 


see 
| a 


tyes 


20 


ofstudents. The Macdonald committee sold 
hundreds of raffle tickets during fall 
registration. The prize? Free tuition 

for one term. At McGill, residence 

students backed a drive to help the Bongo 
Agricultural Service in Ghana. “We asked 7 
everyone to give up one lunch,”’ says Southin, | 
‘All the money that would have gone into 7] 
preparing lunch was donated to the CUSO © 
project. Going without lunch for a food- 4} 
related project gave us an echo of what it 

must be like to go hungry all the time.” 

As long as applicants enjoy good health, 
CUSO imposes no age limit for volunteers. 
Notes Southin, ‘““Dr. Allan Elliott, now an 
emeritus professor in our biochemistry , 
department, went to Nigeria with CUSO when 


he retired. We have lots of jobs for people The 
with experience.” isth 

For people without university degrees, tele 
CUSO’s job list includes requests for such tion 
diverse talents as weaving, plumbing, pres 
ironworking, and beekeeping. “‘And if you not 
know a bush pilot,” says Southin, “for Eis 
goodness’ sake suggest CUSO!”’ (ra 


government has reinforced this decentralized § “™ 
system of medical care by cutting back on the § 
funding of urban health centres in an effort 
to improve facilities and increase staff in ~ 
rural areas. _ 
A shortage of doctors is common to all Pe 
developing nations. Says Bryant, ‘‘We can it 
organize a job for any doctor who wants to a 
work with CUSO!”’ With typical determinatior hl 
however, Papua New Guinea has begun to Hi 
tackle the problem at its roots. “‘Training be 


is now done in the country for almost all types | 
ofhealth worker,” he points out. ‘““The medical} 


college in Port Moresby is beginning to turn of 
out more graduates. I think eventually they ) 
will be self-sufficient in doctors.” _ 

Bryant believes that CUSO’s role in Papua q 
New Guinea is a valid one — for now. But i 
when the people are ready to ‘‘do it on their ? 


own,” it will be time for CUSO to leave. “A 
small country can achieve a healthy inter- 
dependence with the world,” he claims. * 
‘‘My own feeling is that Papua New Guinea 

as a traditional society will last much better 
than some people suspect, though there will be 
changes. A society built on minimal communict 
tion and almost pure self-reliance has to 
change when it comes in contact with a 
sophisticated, technological culture. But 

I do not favour the ‘hothouse theory’ which 
Says it is a weak flower that will wilt in the 
winds from the West.” 


Ce NE on Be ~~ em ~~ ~~ ae 


Carol Stairs, assistant editor of the News. 
and a former CUSO volunteer in Jamaica, 
interviewed Christopher Bryant in Ottawa 
during his recent recruitment tour of Canada. 


C2 *=3 


WAAwraass> Ty 
sts Siete 


x 
NS.) 


weewutere 


The peculiar thing about Dr. Howard Eisenberg 
is that he tells his tales of spirit contacts, 
telepathic messages, and extrasensory percep- 
tions without being in the least peculiar. His 
present-tense, present-life ghost stories send 
no delicious chill along the spine because in 
Eisenberg’s language “‘life after death” is 
trransmogrified into P.M.S. (for post mortem 
survival), “poltergeists’’ become manifesta- 
tions of recurrent spontaneous psychokinesis, 
and “‘mind over matter” is psychokinesis (or, 
simpler still, P.K.) 

A lecturer in parapsychology at the Uni- 
versity of Toronto’s Innis College, Eisenberg 
is also a physician and practising psychothera- 
pist. His monastic, orange-hued office in a 
Toronto professionals’ building is mute 
testimony to the stature and medical respecta- 
bility of his techniques. Science and the Ontario 
Health Insurance Plan have taken one step 
beyond. 

Eisenberg spends about fifteen hours a week 
giving psychotherapy sessions. Though most 
of his patients are not plagued by other-world- 
ly forces, the few that are receive assistance 


and reassurance that can be found in few clinics. 


Their experiences are not the stuff of which 
The Exorcist was made, but for the people 
involved it can be just as frightening. 
Eisenberg treated and ‘cured’ in a single 
session a woman diagnosed as a borderline 
schizophrenic. The woman had developed 
psychic abilities late in life and was unaccount- 
ably picking up intimate knowledge of friends 
and strangers when she handled their personal 
possessions. “She related this to her husband 
and he told her that she was wacko,” says 
Eisenberg. ‘He sent her to a psychiatrist who 
prescribed Largactil, a major tranquilizer.”’ 
The woman, Eisenberg explains, had ex- 
perienced a well-documented form of clair- 
voyance known as psychometry. Somehow, it 
seems, personal objects become the deposito- 
ries of encoded psychic information which, to 
the person with the right headphones, can be 
played back like a tape recorder. Treatment 
consisted largely of assuring the woman that 


Sf 


wy: 


Mi | m4 I 


Wb fi 


she was not insane, and offering advice on 
how to tune out the unwanted signals. 

Eisenberg earned his BSc at McGill in 1967, 
and then worked on his MSc and MD simul- 
taneously. Though parapsychology is now 
studied in more than 130 North American 
universities, Eisenberg’s MSc, granted in 1971, 
was the first ever given at McGill for research 
in this field. 

As befits his Canadian pioneer status, Eisen- 
berg has begun to spread the word. His book, 
Inner Spaces: Parapsychological Explorations 
of the Mind, expands upon his McGill research. 
And recently, Eisenberg acted as anchorman 
for a six-part CBC radio series, ““Odyssey,”’ 
which carried psychic testimonies from all 
over the continent. 

As evidenced by the ““Odyssey”’ commentary 
and the host’s own experiences, psychic pheno- 
mena are more prevalent than is generally 
believed. Eisenberg argues, for example, that 
telepathic rapport is commonplace between 
patients and their psychiatric therapists, at 
least the best of them. The phenomena may 
be unrecognized by the therapist who dismisses 


insights as lucky hunches or, at best, as intuition. 


Eisenberg takes the reader of Inner Spaces 
ona search for acommon denominator of 
psychic phenomena, and concludes that they 
represent an interaction between the human 
ego and the underlying universal mind. This 
universal mind, or collective unconscious, 
is a god figure and something else besides. 

For all its omnipotence, the collective un- 
conscious, as pictured by Eisenberg, suffers 
shortcomings as human as the vanities of the 
Greek pantheon and the vengefulness of the 
Old Testament Jehovah. 

“The Universal Mind is conceived of as being 
lonely by virtue of its essential oneness, and so 
dreams up the phenomenal world ... to keep 
itself company and to be entertained,” he 
writes. “‘However, in order to feel that it has 
genuine company, it has to forget who it really 
is by pretending to be other people and objects. 
Sometimes it becomes so engrossed in this 
fantasy ... that it temporarily forgets its 


; i Nh 


eeeeeeesn © 
* . . 
ee. . 
-* Par 
eeeoeene 
“*-. 
eo. ee Se ee we... 0e.8 £0 06 
ee eee Oe. | Se os ae er OS Oe 
642 6:0 8 9) le |. eee. S48. 8s 
“*eeeee 


. >, Yh, 
Da BR “a 


a a, 
hb 


real source and identity.” 

A more revealing image of the collective 
unconscious compares individual egos to the 
waves of an ocean, separate yet related to all 
other waves and only momentarily distinct 
from the ocean on which they ride. Still in 
terms of that image, telepathy and psychic 
phenomena are conveyed from ego to ego 
through the sea below. 

Eisenberg claims the picture is logical in 
terms of the new physics of relativity and 
quantum mechanics, which views the world as 
‘‘a probabilistic organic whole.”’ All atoms, 
he points out; including those that make up 
the human form, are in constant flux with the 
external environment and are subject to the 
influence of subtle magnetic fields and bio- 
meteorological fluctuations. 

If laboratory shoptalk steals the mystique 
from strange happenings, however, Eisenberg’s 
final explanation more than makes up for it. 
He concludes that science and mysticism are 
interrelated. The discoveries of modern phy- 
sics, which have resulted in an almost sur- 
realistic picture of the world, seem to bear 
this out. British physicist and astronomer 
Sir Arthur Eddington postulated decades ago 
that the ultimate substance of the universe 
might be simply “‘mind stuff.” 

“There has been a measure of convergence 
between modern physics and ancient mysticism,” 
says Eisenberg. *“‘Unfortunately, orthodox 
psychology is still modelled on the obsolete 
system of Newtonian mechanics and, hence, has 
more difficulty in coming to terms with psy- 
chic phenomena than does modern physics.” 

For a clinical, cynical age, the blending of 
hard science and soft mysticism is creating 
a thinking man’s voodoo, a scientific religion 
that can be mathematically defended but that 
hovers inalterably beyond final proof. The 
disciples of parapsychology, Eisenberg says, 
are already with us and working in university 
physics departments. 0 


David Lees is assistant editor of Harrowsmith 
magazine. 


21 


and 


"19 

MADELEINE A. FRITZ, BA’19, has received 
an award from the University of Toronto for 
her distinguished service to the geology 
department and to the Royal Ontario Museum. 


’28 

MARGARET E.B. (CAMERON) GOSSE, 
BA’24, MD’ 28, has been awarded a national 
honorary life membership in the Canadian 
Cancer Society. 


"31 

JAMES B. REDPATH, BSc’31, has retired as 
president of Dome Mines Ltd. after forty-seven 
years with the company. 


"33 

EVERETT CHALMERS, MD’33, has been 
sworn in as cabinet minister without portfolio 
in the New Brunswick legislature, Fredericton, 
and will be responsible for the provincial 
alcoholism and drug dependency commission. 
LEONARD MARSH, MA’33, PhD’40, has 
received an honorary doctor of laws degree 
from McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. 


34 

NATHAN KEYFITZ, BSc’34, has been 
appointed chairman of the sociology depart- 
ment at Harvard University, Cambridge, 
Mass., and was recently elected to the National 
Academy of Sciences. 


"35 

EDWIN B. O’REILLY, MD’35, has received 
the Ben Fish Award from the vocational re- 
habilitation section of Rhode Island’s Depart- 
ment of Social and Rehabilitative Services. 


36 

GEORGE D. GOODFELLOW, BEng’36, has 
received the Queen’s Jubilee Medal in 
recognition of his contribution to amateur 
sport in Canada. 


"37 

EVANS B. REID, BSc’37, PhD’40, has retired 
as chairman of the chemistry department at 
Colby College, Waterville, Me. 


22 


Where they are 


what they re doing 


°39 

CLIVE H. CARDINAL, BA’39, MA’41, who 
recently retired from the department of 
Germanic and Slavic studies at the,University 
of Calgary, Alberta, has been named professor 
emeritus. 


*42 

W. DONALD GRAHAM, MSc’4?2, has been 
appointed executive director, research and 
development, for Farmland Industries, Inc., 
Kansas City, Mo. 


"44 

RUTH (HUBBELL) ROSE, DipPE’44, has 
been elected a director of the Canadian 
Archaeological Institute at Athens, Greece. 


*45 
E. CLARK GILLESPIE, BSc’44, MD’45, 


has been named a Fellow of the Royal College 
of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. 


”49 


G. NORMAN IRVINE, PhD’49, is the recipiert 


ofthe M.P. Neumann Award, given by West 
Germany’s Association for Cereal Research. 
GILBERT ROSENBERG, BSc’42, MD’49, 
MSc’56, GDipMed’56, has become professor 
of medicine and of family practice at the 
University of Calgary, Alberta, and medical 
director of the Dr. Vernon Fanning Extended 
Care Centre. 


Bl 

AIME DESAUTELS, BArch’51, has been 
appointed director of the planning office of the 
City of Montreal. 

CHARLES E. MEREDITH, MD’S1, has 
become superintendent of Saint Elizabeths 
Hospital, Washington, D.C. 

DR. LEO STERN, BSc’51, chairman of 
pediatrics at Brown University, Providence, 
R.I., has received an honorary doctorate from 
the University of Nancy, France. 


52 
JOHN M. SCHOLES, BEng’52, has been 


appointed senior executive vice-president of the 
Royal Trust Co. 


"53 

MALCOLM A. TASCHEREAU, BEng’53, 
has been elected president of Dome Mines 
Ltd., Toronto. 


>BA 4 
SHIRLEY S. (BLOOMSTONE) ANGRIST, 
BA’54, MA’S55, has been named manager 

of public policy research for PPG Industries — 
Inc., Pittsburgh, Pa. 


a5) 
BERNARD L. SEGAL, BSc’50, MD’5S, 
has been appointed director of the William 


Likoff Cardiovascular Institute of Hahnemann 
Medical College and Hospital, Philadelphia, ~ 


Pa. : 


A. BRUCE WHITEHEAD, MSc’55, PhD’57, 


has become manager of programs at Honey- 
well’s Corporate Technology Center, 
Minneapolis, Minn. 


"56 
PERRY BLACK, BSc’51, MD’56, associate 


professor of neurosurgery at the Johns Hopki s 
University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md. 


has received the Distinguished Service Award 
of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. 


LESLIE R. TISSHAW, BCom’56, has become 
president of Quantus Advertising Associates — 


Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 
"57 


McGill aquatics coordinator, has received the 
Distinguished Service Award of the Canadian 


Amateur Synchronized Swimming Association. 


"58 

PHYLLIS (RUBIN) BLACK, BA’58, 
MSW’60, has received a doctorate in 
social work from the Catholic University 
of America, Washington, D.C., where sheis — 
a member of the teaching staff. 

M. DAVID COTTLE, BEng’58, has been 


x 


appointed production manager, animal indus y 


and plant food products, of the agricultural — 
division of Cyanamid, Princeton,N.J. 
JEAN E. DOUVILLE, BCom’S58, has become 
vice-president, public affairs, of Air Canada. 


GERALDINE A. DUBRULE, BSc(PE)’57, 


59 

JOHN P. ESSEPIAN, DDS’S59, who practises 
n Loudonville, N.Y., has become chairman of 
Houghton College’s Awareness Program, part 
»f a long-range development effort. 

BERNICE (LOEB) QUINN, BLS’59, MA’S59, 
1as established a consulting medical librarian 
practice in Pinole, Calif. 


60 

JOHN HEDLEY SPENCER, PhD’60, has 
become professor and head of the biochemistry 
department at Queen’s University, Kingston, 
Ont. 

SANDRA (FREEMAN) WITELSON, 
BSc’60, MSc(A)’62, PhD’66, a professor 

of psychiatry at McMaster University, 
Hamilton, Ont., has won the John Dewan 
Award of the Ontario Mental Health 
Foundation for her research. 


"62 

M. LAWRENCE LIGHT, BSc’62, has been 
elected executive vice-president of Batten, 
Barton, Durstine, and Osborn, Inc., New York. 
IMRE PUSKAS, PhD’62, a research associate 
for Amoco Chemicals Corp., Naperville, IIl., 
specializing in butylene polymerization, has 
been honoured by the corporation for receiving 
his twentieth patent. 


65 

WILLIAM ERIC FEARN, BCom’65, has 
been appointed deputy minister of finance 

and comptroller for the Province of 
Newfoundland and Labrador, St. John’s. 
DIANE (THOMPSON) KITCHING, BA’65, 
MA’68, has received her doctorate in war 
studies from the University of London, 
England, and is currently working in the 
research office of the official opposition in 

the House of Commons, Ottawa, Ont. 
MARILYN LIGHT, BSc(Agr)’65, MSc’67, is 
curator and education coordinator for the 
Backus Conservation Area and Agriculture 
Museum, Southern Ontario and Simcoe. 
PAUL A.R. LOWE, BEng’65, has been 
appointed chief engineer of Supercrete Ltd., 
Winnipeg, Man. 


66 

NEWTON C. GORDON, BSc’66, DDS’70, an 
assistant clinical professor at the University 

of California, San Francisco, has received an 
MS in oral surgery from the University of 
Illinois at the Medical Center, Chicago. 
SUSAN KERSHMAN, BA’66, on the faculty 
of the special education department at the 
University of Kentucky, Lexington, has 
received an Exceptional Achievement Award 
in recognition of her efforts in establishing a 
program for deaf-blind preschool children. 


BEVERLY SHAFFER, BA’66, was director of 


the National Film Board’s Academy Award- 
winning film, /’// Find a Way. 


VicLean 
Varler 
"ees 
Vatson 
Poitevin 
javet 

« Roberge 


Notaries 


suite 1200 

(20 Dorchester W. 
Aontreal — H3B 1P3 
‘elephone 866-9671 


icMaster 
Vieighen 


3arristers 
x Solicitors 


‘29 St. James Street 
fontreal — H2Y 1L8 
‘elephone 288-7575 
srea Code 514 


).R. McMaster, Q.C. 
*.A. Patch, Q.C. 

\.S. Hyndman, Q.C. 
1.C. Legge, Q.C. 

.C. Camp, Q.C. 

\.K. Paterson, Q.C. 

3.J. Riendeau, Q.C. 


Herbert B. McLean 
Hon. George C. Marler 
Herbert H. Tees 
John H. Watson 
Henri Poitevin 
Ernest A. Javet 
Philippe Roberge 
John C. Stephenson 
Harvey A. Corn 
David Whitney 
Pierre Lapointe 
Gérard Ducharme 
Pierre Senez 

E. Bruce Moidel 
Pierre Venne 

André Boileau 
Leslie Greenberg 
Yves Neault 
Erigene Godin 


W.E. Stavert 

R.J. Plant 

H. Senécal 

T.R. Carsley 
M.A. Meighen 
R.A. Pratt 

A.P. Bergeron 
T.W. Stewart 
S.J. Harrington 
G.P. Barry 

N.A. Saibil 

R.D. Farley 

J.A. Laurin 

B.M. Schneiderman 
J.H. Scott 

R.W. Shannon 
M.A. Pinsonnault 
E.A. Mitchell 

M. Charbonneau 


Martineau 
Walker 
Allison 
Beaulieu 
MacKell 

& Clermont 


Counsel 

T.R. Meighen, Q.C. 
A.M. Minnion, Q.C. 
R. Cordeau, Q.C. 
W.C. Leggat, Q.C. 


IMPORTANT NOTICE 


ABOUT 


OLD McGILL YEARBOOKS 


Due to the untimely resignation of the 
editors of Old McGill’ 76 and Old McGill 
'77, the delivery dates of these books 
have been unavoidably delayed. 
Projected delivery dates are: 

Old McGill’76 — September 1 

Old McGill ’'77 — October 15 

The current book, Old McGill 78, will be 
delivered on September 15. 


Are you missing a past edition? 


A limited number of the following yearbooks 


is still available: 


Old McGill ’66 through '73 and Old McGill 
'75. They may be purchased for $10.00 each 
at the University Centre Box Office or 
ordered by mail for $10.00 plus $2.50 


postage. 


Write to: 


Box Office Manager 


Students’ Society of McGill University 
3480 McTavish Street, Room 105 
Montreal, P.Q., H3A 1X9 

Telephone: (514) 392-8926 


La Compagnie Enveloppe Canada 


Canada Envelope Company 


8205 Boul. Montreal-Toronto Bivd. 
Montreal West, Que. H4X 1N1 
(514) 364-3252 


Advocates 


Telephone 395-3535 

Area Code 514 

Cable Address: Chabawa 
Suite 3400 

The Stock Exchange Tower 
Place Victoria 

Montreal — H4Z 1E9 
Canada 


Robert H.E. Walker, Q.C. 
George A. Allison, Q.C. 
Roger L. Beaulieu, Q.C. 
Peter R. D. MacKell, Q.C. 
André J. Clermont, Q.C. 
John H. Gomery, Q.C. 
Robert A. Hope, Q.C. 

J. Lambert Toupin, Q.C. 
Bertrand Lacombe 

F. Michel Gagnon 
Edmund E. Tobin 

C. Stephen Cheasley 
Richard J.F. Bowie 
Robert P. Godin 

Jack R. Miller 

Serge D. Tremblay 
Michael P. Carroll 

Jean Prieur 

Claude Lachance 
Maurice A. Forget 
Stephen S. Heller 
Pierrette Rayle 

Robert E. Reynolds 
Pierre E. Poirier 

David W. Salomon 
Jean-Maurice Saulnier 
Andre T. Mecs 

Marie Sullivan Raymond 
Serge Gueérette 

André Larivée 
Jean-Francois Buffoni 
Suzanne R. Charest 
Michel Messier 

Wilbrod Claude Décarie 
Robert B. |lssenman 
Marc Nadon 

Andrea Francoeur Mécs 
Donald M. Hendy 
Martin J. Greenberg 
Francois Rolland 
Graham Nevin 

Richard J. Clare 

Alain Contant 

Marie Giguere 

Eric M. Maldoff 

Xeno C. Martis 

Ronald J. McRobie 
David Powell 

Robert Pare 


Counsel 

Jean Martineau, C.C., Q.C. 

Hon. Alan A. Macnaughton, 
P.C., Q.C. 

Marcel Cing-Mars, Q.C. 


ohana eer ee ee ee ee ee, es ee ee eee Aen 
ae OS tole RO TU oe ee de oe Se oe ee a Oe 


I AARA? SNE SSSA 
Ft ee PE TT > ae 


a me 


THE McGILL SOCIETY OF MONTREAL TRAVEL PROGRAM __ Nomay: “our Way" 


June 1979, 3 weeks. 
Price: approx. $1,950.00 


Membership in the Travel Program is avail- Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iran Includes flight, transfers, and bet cl 
able to graduates, parents, and associates May-June 1979, 3 weeks. accommodation. Tour ei - = ice 
making contributions to McGill, or by paying Price: approx. $2,200.00 . Johannsen, director of McGi s Mont St. 
a $10.00 fee to the McGill Society of Montreal. Includes flight, transfers, and first-class Hilaire Nature Conservation Centre. 
accommodation. Tour leader will be Dr. 
Charles Adams, director of McGill’s Institute Galapagos Islands, Peru, and Ecuador 
Disney World and Beach Holiday of Islamic Studies. June 1979, 3 weeks. 
One-week vacations; Daily departures. Price: approx. $2,100.00 W 
Price includes air transportation, car rental, China Trip IV Includes flights, transfers, course, and first- q 
and accommodation (3 nights in Disney World May-June 1979, 3 weeks. class accommodation. An unusual opportunity to | 
and 4 nights in Clearwater Beach) via Skylark Price: approx. $2,500.00 see the animal life, land forms, and vegetation 
and SunTours. The McGill Society of Montreal has applied for that inspired Charles Darwin. 
permission to take another special group visit . 
The Middle East: to the People’s Republic of China in 1979. Details of these special tours are now being 
israel, Jordan, and Egypt finalized. This is your opportunity to plan 
May 1979, 3 weeks. Tour of the Greek Islands ahead and let us know your preferences. q 
Price: approx. $2,000.00 May-June 1979, 3 weeks. Complete details will be available in August, 
Includes flight, transfers, and first-class Price: approx. $1,875.00 
accommodation. Tour guide will be Dr Stanley Includes flight, transfers, course, and first- Jost Travel 
Frost, former dean of McGill's Faculty of class accommodation. Tour leader will be 100 Alexis-Nihon Blvd. 
Graduate Studies and Research and presently Professor George Snider, chairman of St. Laurent, Quebec H4M 2N7 
director of the History of McGill Project. McGill's classics department. Tel.: (514) 747-0613 


PLAN NOW FOR REUNION ’78! SEPTEMBER 28 to OCTOBER 1 


Note: Macdonald College Reunion: October 14; Dentistry Reunion: November 11 | 


CLASS PARTIES SCHEDULED TO DATE: 


FACULTY AND YEAR CHAIRMAN Flee a Roane eee 
Arts & Science ’53 Daniel Kingstone 
Commerce '23 Wendell B. Brewer Soy nese pemes 
Law '23 acques Senecal, Q.C Commerce ’53 George A. Latimer 
A R.V.C. '23 Marjorie (Leggatt) Bourke Snide ese beans ih sei 
| Law ’53 Irving L. Adessky, Q.C. 
Science (Eng.) ’28 Arnold J. Grolea : 
(Eng.) Sie besiege Medicine ’53 Dr. Geoffrey Lehman 
Commerce '33 Harry |. Craimer Phys. Ed. '53 Clare (Cran) Brais 
| Engineering '33 Gilbert W. Painter 
shail fake '33 9 hk adawwell Rouen Agriculture & Home Ec. '58 Alan Douglas 
Medicine '33 Dr Bawin Stuart Architecture '58 F. Thomas Mill 
RW.C.33 Marjorie (Lynch) Russel a aa ‘98 Pine = ae ne 
r. Robert W. Fai 
Wik Sclonce 38 Charies Guard Engineering "58 (All) Louis Donolo 
7 Dentistry '38 br Howard Oliver Chem. Engineering '58 Keith Marchildon 
Engineering '38 Donald C. MacCallum {eetandae Robert Benson 
Football Team ’38 Dr. Preston Robb egies 55 Dr. Douglas Morehouse 
Law '38 H. Heward Stikeman, Q.C. Aaricatt si En es Gaia 
Medicine '38 Dr. Rowland E. Henderson suture & Fiome Ec. obert Farr 
& Dr. Frank P. Flood Architecture ‘63 Gerald Soiferman 
R.V.C. ’38 Phyllis (McKenna) Duchastel Arts & Science ’63 Joan (Retallack) Marshall | 
Dentistry ’63 Dr. Ross E. Jenne a 
Arts & Science '43 William Munroe Engineering '63 Frank Kruzich & Jacques Samson | 
Engineering '43 Otto C. Cleyn Law ‘63 Doug Pryde 
Medicine '43A or. H. Leighton Smith Medicine ’63 Dr. Peter G. Gillett | 
& Dr. Ronald M. Fyfe & Dr. John K. MacFarlane ; 
Medicine '43B r. Roberto L. Estrada Physio. & Occ. Ther. '63 Suzanne (Howick) Batrie a 
R.V.C. ’43 Margaret (McGarry) Stronach : 
Agriculture & Home Ec. '68 Harold W. Cook 
Agriculture & Home Ec. '48 Gordon Thomson Dentistry '68 Dr. Avrum F. Sonin 
fs ‘48 3 Frank B. Common Jr., Q.C. ee 68 Allan Kohl 
edicine ’ Dr. Ross Hill .B.A. 68 Ron Pearson 
Phys. Ed. '48 . Lorna (Hamilton) Murphy Physio. & Occ. Ther. 68 Carolyn (Vincent) Jones 
Physiotherapy '48 Carol Morency 
Agriculture & Food Sc. ’73 Suzelle (Thauvette) Barrington 
Agriculture & Home Ec. '53 Maurice Gerard Nursing (BSc) '73 Susan ‘4 Agnes . : a 


If this is a reunion year for your class (all years ending in 3s and 8s) but your class is not listed above why not contact | 
Lynda MacLaren (514-392-4815) at Martlet House, 3605 Mountain Street, Montreal, Quebec H3G 2M1, and ‘start something!’ 7 


FRANK SLOVER, BA’66, has become public 
relations manager, international tobacco, in the 
corporate public relations department of R.J. 

Reynolds Industries Inc., Winston-Salem, N.C. 


», DAVIDA.C. WALKER, BA’66, has become 


educational officer at the National Gallery of 
Rhodesia, Salisbury. ““The hope is,”’ he writes, 
“to “Africanise’ the gallery in such a way that 
it can foster indigenous art, drama, dance, 
and music... and act as an international, 


' multi-racial art and conference centre.”’ 


 °67 


DR COLIN C.J. ANGLIKER, DipPsych’67, 


; has become director of the Whiting Forensic 


Institute, Middletown, Conn. 

EVA GAJDOS, BSc’67, MSc’69, has 
completed her doctorate at Rutgers University, 
New Brunswick, N.J., and is currently working 
as a Clinical psychologist at the Community 
Mental Health Center, Elizabeth, N.J. 

JACK AARON SIEMIATYCKI, BSc’67, 
MSc’71, PhD’76, is an epidemiologist at 

the World Health Organization’s International 
Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. 
DAVID N. SLONE, BSc’67, has received a 
doctor of jurisprudence degree from Stanford 
University and is practising patent, trademark, 
and copyright law with the law firm of 
Townsend and Townsend, San Francisco, Calif. 


68 

JEREMY RICKARDS, DipMan’68, has been 
appointed associate professor of industrial 
engineering, department of forest engineering, 
University of New Brunswick, Fredericton. 


"69 

HARRY AGENSKY, BArch’69, is president 
and creative director of Gingko Design Ltd., 
Toronto, Ont., a newly formed graphic and 
corporate design firm. 

KAREN QUINTON, BMus’69, DipMus’73, 
has won a Canada Council Community 
Musician Grant to organize workshops 

for music teachers and students in com- 
munities throughout Newfoundland. 


"70 


HARVEY BIENENSTOCK, BSc’70, MBA’75, 


has become controller of First Quebec Corp.., 
a real estate developer based in Montreal. 
ZOLTAN J. CSENDES, MEng’70, PhD’73, 
has joined the General Electric Research and 
Development Center, Schenectady, N.Y., as 
an electrical engineer. 

MICKEY ERDELL, BCom’70, is a doctoral 
student in the counseling psychology program 
at the University of Kentucky, Lexington. 
ALEX MARINELLI, BEng’70, has become 


. manager of the Toronto, Ont., branch of 


Atlas Copco Canada Ltd. 
PAUL J. WEINBERG, MA’70, has been 


} appointed vice-president, employee relations, 


( 
} 
ra 


_ of American Express Co., New York City. 


"71 

PATRICIA N. COURTRIGHT, BSc’71, is 
practising dentistry in Fort McMurray, Alta. 
ANDRE ENGEL, BSc’69, MD’71, on staff at 
the Civic, Grace, and Children’s Hospitals, 
Ottawa, Ont., has opened a pediatrics and 
adolescent medicine practice. 

DAVID JONES, BMus’71, has received a 
Community Musician Grant from the Canada 
Council to organize musical activities at the 
University of Prince Edward Island, Charlotte- 
town, and in other areas of the province. 
VICTOR J.E. JONES, BSc’71, MBA’75, has 
been appointed manager, marketing, sales, 
and development, of CP Rail Coastal Marine’ 
Operations, Vancouver, B.C. 


ha 

DR. DONALD G. BRUSHETT, BSc’72, has 
opened a family practice in Houlton, Me. 
ALBERT DAIGEN, BA’72, who recently 
received an MA in intercultural communication 
and a certificate in French translation from 
Monterey Institute of Foreign Studies, 
California, works as an English translator 

in the Translation Bureau of the Secretary 

of State Department, Toronto, Ont. 
EDUARDO F. DEL BUEY, BA’72, is cur- 
rently second secretary and vice-consul at 

the Canadian Embassy in Tehran, Iran. 

G. PAUL DONNINI, BSc’72, PhD’77, is a 
research chemist at the Chemical Research 
Laboratory of Canadian Industries Ltd., 
Industrial Chemicals, McMasterville, Que. 
RICHARD J. MEADOWS, BSc’72, has be- 
come new products manager, Pharmaceutical 
Products Group, of Norwich Pharmacal Co. 
Ltd., Paris, Ont. 

A. DAVID PELLETIER, BSc’72, has been 
appointed associate actuary of Manufacturers 
Life Insurance Co., Toronto, Ont. | 
CHRISTOPHER PENNEY, BSc’72, PhD’77, 
has won a two-year postdoctoral fellowship 

at Yale University, New Haven, Conn., where 
he will conduct research in bio-organic 
chemistry and co-author the first under- 
graduate text on the subject. 

DR. LINDA (SHRIRO) SCHENCK, BSc’72, 
is a Fellow in psychiatry at the University 

of Minnesota Medical Center, Minneapolis. 


"74 
ROGER AMELUNXEN, BEng’74, is a 


metallurgist at the El Mochito Mine, Honduras. 


GASTON JORRE, BA’70, LLB’74, BCL’75, 
who has become a member of the Quebec Bar 
and the Law Society of Upper Canada, has 
joined the constitutional, administrative, and 
international law section of the Department 
of Justice, Ottawa, Ont. 

YVONNE M. MARTIN, MA’74, PhD’77, 
has been appointed assistant professor, 
division of communication and social foun- 
dations, in the Faculty of Education, University 
of Victoria, British Columbia. 


..... gok something 


[TREON & 


ST le Tell us about it! 


The McGill News 
3605 Mountain St. 
Montreal, P.Q. 
H3G 2M1 


Nominations and Applications for 
the Position of 


EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 
of the 


GRADUATES’ SOCIETY OF 
McGILL UNIVERSITY 


The appointee will be expected to take office 
not later than September 1, 1978. Nomina- 
tionsand applications should be accompanied 
by a curriculum vitae and submitted to: 


P.S. Ross & Partners 
Suite 835 
1 Place Ville Marie 
Montreal, P.Q. H3B 2A3 


ao 


GREGORY TARDI, BA’70, BCL’74, recently 
called to the Bar of the Province of Quebec, 

has joined the legal branch, air transport 
committee, of the Canadian Transport 
Commission, Ottawa, Ont. 

HEINZ K. WEINDLER, DipMan’74, has 
been appointed vice-president and chief 
accountant of the Mercantile Bank of Canada, 
Montreal. 


"1D 

DARLENE CAMPBELL, BScN’75, has 
joined the staff of St. John’s Hospital, Santa 
Monica, Calif. 

STUART NADEAU, BSc’75, is a chemical 
engineer with Imperial Oil Ltd., Montreal. 


"76 

EUGENE MEEHAN, LLM’76, has become a 
professor in the Law Faculty at the University 
of Alberta, Edmonton. 


"77 

ROBERT L. WOOLARD, MBA’77, has been 
named associate director, graduate business 
programs, and director, executive fellows 
program, at Rockhurst College, Kansas City, 
Mo. 


Deaths 


"09 


GEORGE L. BABSON, BSc’09, on March 11, 


1978. 
RUBY A. (NORRIS) CUMMER, BA’09, on 
Jan. 15, 1978. 


"10 


KATHERINE TORRANCE TRENHOLME, 


BA’10, at Montreal, on April 6, 1978. 

"11 

CLIFFORD ST. J. WILSON, BSc’l1, at 
Wolfville, N.S., on March 27, 1978. 


"12 


ARMAND PAPINEAU-COUT URE, BA’ 12, 


at Montreal, on April 10, 1978. 


LEANDRE VADNAIS (“TRIX”) PARENT, 


BSc(Agr) 712, at Lennoxville, Que., on 
April 29, 1978. 


"13 

C. KEITH MORISON, BA’13, BLS’34, on 
April 25, 1977. 

IRVING R. TAIT, BSc’ 13, at Montreal, on 
March 8, 1978. 


"14 

HERBERT MASON DROST, BA’14, at 
Vancouver, B.C., in early 1978. 

GRACE LEE(RYAN) PARLOW, BA’1/4, at 
Victoria, B.C., on Feb. 13, 1978. 


26 


“ttt TPA De ee wd Se ee oo oe Ce od te ae ee bee Ba 
SURF TA OT eR a ee er at eta 


"15 

MAXWELL STUART NELSON, BSc’15, at 
Preston. Ont.. on Feb. 13, 1978. 

"18 

BEN BERNSTEIN, BA’15, BCL’18, on 

May I, 1978. 


MYER SOLOMON, DDS’18, at Montreal, on 
Feb. 17, 1978. 

SALLIE G. SOLOMON, BA’18, in September 
1977. 


719 
JEAN HENRI BIELER, BA’13, BCL’19, at 
Montreal, on Feb. 17, 1978. 


*20 

DR. P. GEOFFREY GILBERT, BSc’20, on 
Dec. 21, 1977. 

WILLIAM SHAPRAY, BCom ’20, on Feb. 24, 
1978. 


21 

OSWALD F. BEAMISH, MD’2], in April 
1977. 

COL. PAUL PHELPS HUTCHISON, 
BA’16, BCL’21, at Montreal, on Feb. 11, 
1978. 


"22 

REGINALD B. ABBOTT-SMITH, BSc’22, at 
Folly Beach, S.C., on Feb. 7, 1978. 

PAUL H. ADDY, BA’22, at Montreal, on 
March 22, 1978. 

SOL E. GOLDMAN, MD’22, at Montreal, on 
Feb. 14, 1978. 

DALE HENDRY MOORE, BA’22, MA’23, 
on May 14, 1977. 


23 

IAN H. BRODIE, MD’23, on Sept. 27, 1977. 
KENNETH EARDLEY DOWD, MD’23, in 
Barbados, on March 26, 1978. 

SIMON DWORKIN, DDS’23, MD’27, 
MSc’ 28, on March 25, 1978. 

EDITH (CAMPBELL) RHIND, BSc’23, at 
Hudson Heights, Que., on March 23, 1978. 
MALCOLM VAUGHAN ROSS, BSc’23, at 
Montreal, on Feb. 12, 1978. 


°24 

JOHN HALLIDAY CRANE, BSc’24, on 
March 5, 1978. 

RICHARD FREDERICK REDDICK 
EAGER, MD’24, on Jan. 21, 1978. 

DAVID R. MORRICE, BCom’24, on April 
13, 1978. 

MAXWELL HARRIS TOKER, DDS’24, at 
Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on Feb. 26, 1978. 


D5 . 

E. LINDEN BOUILLON, BArch’25, at 
Paspebiac, Que., on April 19, 1978. 
CLIFFORD H.F. COTTEE, BSc’25, at 
Ottawa, Ont., on Feb. 20, 1978. 


FLORA A. GEORGE, DipNurs 25, at 
Knowlton, Que., on Feb. 27, 1978. 
LINDSAY MANSUR HOVEY, BSc’25, at 
Winnipeg, Man., on Dec. IL ASE 
W.REGINALDG. R. AY, BSc’25, at Quebec 
City, on Feb. 24, 1978. 


°26 
RALPH E. McMILLAN, BSc’ 26, in early 
1978. 

MARCUS STAR, DDS’26, on Feb. 10, 1978) 


21 
ROBERT E. FINDLAY, BSc’27, at 
Kitchener, Ont., on March 16, 1978. 


28 

ELIZABETH M. ROBERTSON, DipNurs 28, 
at Montreal, on April 10, 1978. 

FLORENCE (SCOTT) SPEARMAN, 
DipEd’28, at Victoria, B.C., on Feb. 22, 19787 
HUGH ALLAN INGLIS VALENTINE, 
BArch’28, at Port Hope, Ont., on Feb. 16, 1978 


’29 

NEAL MARSHALL CARTER, PhD’29, in 
Anguilla, W.I., in March 1978. 
JOSEPH DAINOW, BA’26, BCL’29, at Bata 
Rouge, La., on March 17, 1978. 
MRS. EVERETT D. KIEFER, MA’29, on 
July 29, 1977. 


”30 
HARRY E. GRUNDY, BCL’30, at Sherbrooke 
Que., on Feb. 3, 1978. 

FRANK SPENCER HEWITT, BA’30, 
MA’31, at Galveston, Tex., on Feb. 16, 1978. 
JOHN SPENCER SAUNDERS, Sc 30, at — 
Saturna Island, B.C., on April 13, 1978. 


"31 id 
EDMOND H. EBERTS, BA’28, BCL’31, in” 
October 1977. . 
EDWARD ARTHUR GOODEVE, Com’3l, i 
Sarasota, Fla., on Feb. 23, 1978. 4 
HOWARD B. WITTER, MD’31, at Baton — 
Rouge, La., on Feb. 1, 1978. 


739 : 
VICTOR A.A. ARCHER, BSA’32, at Castries 
St. Lucia, on March 9, 1978. 
JAMES ALFRED BAILEY, BEng’32, at 
Toronto, Ont., on April 22, 1978. 
REV. LA. DONALD CURTIS, BA ‘32, at St 
John’s, Nfld., on Dec. 30, 1977. 
REV. HUBERT DOODY, BA’32, at Vietoria 
B.C., on March 15, 1978. 
HENRY SCOTT, MD’32, at Mission City, 4 
B.C., on Jan. 28, 1978. 
ISADORE M. TARLOV, MSc’32, at New 

York City, on June 9, 1977. : 


739 4 
GEORGE H. HAMILTON, MSc(Agr)'33, 
at Niagara Falls, Ont., on April 22, 1978. 


ORVILLE E. KIRBY, MD’33, on Aug. 18, 
» 1977. 


, 34 


“EDMUND ALFRED HANKIN, BEng’34, at 


Montreal, on April 14, 1978. 


735 


“LEWIS C. HASLAM, MD’35. at Clearwater. 


Fla., on Feb. 13, 1978. 
LUCIEN L’ALLIER, BEng’35, at Montreal, 
on March 17, 1978. 


”36 


BASIL RABNETT, BEng’36, at Picton, Ont., 


on Jan. 25, 1978. 


"37 


WATSON S. HALL, BEng’37, at Cranbrook, 


,B.C., on Feb. 11, 1978. 

,GERALD W. HOPE, BSc(Agr)’37, at 

,_ Kentville, N.S., in March 1978. 
“NORMAN F. JEFFERSON, BSc’37, at 
Longboat Key, Fla., on Feb. 1, 1978. 

»CAMERON A. McDOWELL, BCom’ 37, at 

‘Windsor, Ont., on March 20, 1978. 

| 599 

JAMES ARTHUR DUNLAP, BEng’39, at 

Portland, Ore., on Dec. 20, 1977. 


ALAN F. MORRISON, MD’39, on April 21, 


1978. 


Ni 40 
_R.ELLEENE (MUNROE) MARKELL, 
* BA’40, at Montreal, on March 6, 1978. 


N 4) 
|‘ HARRY N. EIN, BA’40, MD’41, at South 
Orange, N.J., on Feb. 10, 1978. 


\ 492 

WILLIAM BELL HEWSON, PhD’42, at St. 
Charles, Ill., on April 23, 1978. 

WILLIAM R. LIVINGSTON, PhD’42, at 
’ Deep River, Ont., on April 20, 1978. 


"43 


FRANK WINTON CLEARY, MD’43, at San 


(i Mateo, Calif., in early 1978. 
THOMAS E. LUNNEY, MD’43, 

): GDipMed’50, at Saint John, N.B., on 
April 1, 1978. 

! EDWARD WILFORD MONTGOMERY, 
BEng’43, on Feb. 9, 1978. 


\ RJ. JIM”) SIMPSON, Com’43, at Granby, 


Que., on March 17, 1978. 


"46 


BETH (NELSON) BEATTY, BSc(HEc) *46, in 


August 1977. 


"47 


EVELYN (TUFTS) McGREGOR, BLS’47, on 


March 4, 1978. 


"48 

BERTHA (SINGER) GARBER, BSc’48, 
MSc’49, PhD’52, at Birmingham, England, 
on April 16, 1978. 

VICTOR A. HADDAD, BEng’48, at 
Montreal, on Feb. 28, 1978. 

BARBARA (GOODWIN) KEATS, LMus’42, 
BMus’48, at Montreal, on March 9, 1978. 
ALVYN J. SHILLER, BSc(Agr) ’48, on Feb. 
12, 1978. 

FRANK G. STEEN, BSc’46, MD’48, at 
Ormond Beach, Fla., on Dec. 29, 1977. 


*A9 

DAVID J. JOHNSTON, BSc’49, at Kuala 
Lumpur, Malaysia, on Sept. 27, 1977. 

REV. W. CHARLES PELLETIER, BA’49, 
at Lévis, Que., on May 6, 1978. 


50 

JOHN EWASEW, BCL’SO, at Montreal, on 
March 26, 1978. 

GERALD OWEN HENNEBERRY, 
MSc(Agr)’50, at Pointe Claire, Que., on 
March 8, 1978. 

C. WALTER MURPHY, MD’SO, in Mexico, 
on Jan. 9, 1978. 


"51 
DOROTHY J. (PORTER) AINSWORTH, 
BSc(Agr)’51, on Jan. 5, 1978. 


"53 


RAYMOND CROMARTY, MD’S3, on 
Jan. 22, 1978. 


DR. CLAUDE J.P. GIROUD, MSc’53, PhD’S5S, 


in Mexico, on Jan. 9, 1978. 


"55 

SYLVIA (GOLDBERG) BURSHTYN, 
MSW’55, on March 20, 1978. 

BRUCE CHISHOLM TAYLOR, BSc’55, 
in the Bahamas, on March 29, 1978. 


56 

JOHN (VASIL BALKANSKY) BASIL, 
BArch’56, at Toronto, Ont., on May 5, 1978. 
AUSTIN WEST CAMERON, PhD’S6, at 
Sydney, N.S., on Jan. 28, 1978. 


DR. FREDERICK G.V. DOUGLAS, MSc’67, 
at Toronto, Ont., on April 30, 1978. 


"68 
EDWARD A. AROWOLO, PhD’68, on 
Feb. 21, 1977. 


69 
DR. BENJAMIN K. TRIMBLE, BSc’69, 
MSc’71, in early 1978. 


70 

ZIGMUNDS. PECKA, BSc’70, on Dec. 22, 
1977. 

ROBERT VAUGHAN WELLS, MD’70, at 
Montreal, on March 9, 1978. 


"2 
JOHN NORBERT ENOS, MA’73, at 
Montreal, on Jan. 27, 1978. 


"75 

JOAN KATHRYN CUNNINGHAM, 
BSc (FoodSc)’75, on March 26, 1978. 
JAMES PETER McTEIGUE, BA’75, on 
April 3, 1978. 


in Memoriam: A. Deane Nesbitt 
McGill University lost one of its outstanding 
alumni with the untimely death of A. Deane 
Nesbitt following a ski accident in February. 

A 1933 graduate in electrical engineering, 
Nesbitt was president of both his class and 
the Students’ Council. Joining the RCAF 
at the outbreak of World War II, he downed 
six enemy planes in the Battle of Britain 
and was shot down twice himself. He 
received the Distinguished Flying Cross, 
the Order of the British Empire, and the 
Croix de Guerre. 

A lifelong resident of Montreal, Nesbitt 
was president of the investment firm Nesbitt 
Thomson and Company, Ltd., and played a 
prominent role in the establishment of the 
trans-Canada pipeline. He gave unselfishly 
of his time and talent — he served on several 
hospital boards, and headed the Canadian 
Club and the Welfare Federation. 

Nesbitt’s interest in McGill continued 
throughout his life: he served successively 
as chairman of the university’s 125th 
Anniversary Reunion, chairman of the 
Alma Mater Fund, university governor, 
and valued investment counselor to the 
Board of Governors. 

His wife Sherrill (McMaster), son Deane, 
and many friends will remember him for his 


DIANE ELIZABETH (HOLMES) DUNTON, | humour and enthusiasm, unimpeachable 


EFF BA’52, BCL’56, at Montreal, on March 22, 1978. 


honesty, and generous encouragement of 
ATHOMAS W. GORMAN, MD’44, MSc’49, on others. To have been his friend has been, 
Nov. 16, 1977. 67 and will remain, a privilege and an honour. 
DAVID CLAUDE BURKE, BA’67, at Ottawa, 
45 Ont., on Feb. 14, 1978. This tribute was written by McGill governor 


BRYAN FRANKLIN DELWO, BSc’67, at 
Quesnel, B.C., on Feb. 23, 1978. 


y CHARLES U. WASSERMANN, BA’‘45, at Donald R. McRobie, BCom’34. 


 Altaussee, Austria, on April 30, 1978. 


27 


ae 
ea — all 


‘‘My friends thought | would be the last 
person on earth to study at McGill, the 
bastion of English and conservatism,” 


recalls francophone student Marie Poirier. 


Editor's Note: Last year one in every six under- 
graduates enrolled at McGill listed French as his 
mother tongue. What is it like to be a francophone 
at McGill? We asked Marie Poirier, editor of the 
French McGill Daily, for her impressions. 


At Collége Bois-de-Boulogne my announcement 
that I would be going to McGill was greeted with 
stunned surprise. I was rather an indépendantiste 
then, and hung around from time to time with a 
left-wing discussion group. My friends thought I 
would be the last person on earth to study at McGill, 
the bastion of English and conservatism. 

Nobody was really opposed to my decision — on 
the contrary, everyone was quite enthusiastic. But 
it took even me some time to adapt to the idea. I 
always felt I had to defend my choice, even if my 
interlocutors did not raise objections. I remember 
telling one of my CEGEP teachers that I would be 
going to McGill the following year and adding imme- 
diately, ““But I won’t be assimilated.” Though I 
didn’t believe that McGill was an assimilating place, 
I thought others did; I felt I had to warn them that 
it wouldn’t happen to me. I had always wanted to 
study in another province or in the United States. 

But we in Montreal are very lucky — we have a nice 
foreign university right downtown. 

Walking on campus I could be anywhere in North 
America — except Quebec. I feel that McGill, under 
the pretext of internationalism, ignores the society 
in which it exists. Universities will always be 
centres for the exchange of ideas and the intermingling 
of people from all parts of the world, but their first 
commitment is towards their immediate environs. 

In French Canada McGill is often taken, for good 
or evil, as the symbol of the English-speaking 
community in Quebec. It is strong and, whereas 
francophone universities were near bankruptcy until 
the sixties, McGill has always presented an image of 
financial and academic stability. In the past, Québécois 
looked at McGill with a mixture of love and hate. On 

the one hand, many francophones praised McGill and 
some studied there. On the other hand, they wondered 
why French universities were lagging behind, and what 
McGill brought to Quebec in exchange for the fees it 
collected. 

Today there are many francophones studying at 
McGill and we are very well received. During my 
two years here I have never encountered any 
unpleasantness because I was a francophone. I have 
never been insulted on campus, or received lower 
grades because I wrote my exams and papers in 
French, or even heard of any francophone student 
being treated unfairly. 

Administrators and professors do not promote 


28 


Perspective 


“bet Pe Oe bee Bee See og ee A 


prejudiced views of francophones. Nevertheless, 
I believe that McGill, by its very position of splendid 
isolation, has built a barrier between itself and the 
majority in the province, and this lack of exchange 
breeds prejudice in the least-informed of the students. 

Some of the anglophone students, though not 
prejudiced against the French on an individual basis, 
dislike the French collectivity. Still carrying the 
insecurities and hang-ups they picked up at home and 
in English society, they have a stereotyped view of 
francophones and see everything French as a threat. 

The francophone community at McGill, though 
fairly large, is not an organized group. Other groups, 
like the Chinese students, are better organized and 
more closely knit, probably because they have few 
off-campus events available in their own language. 
French students, once off campus, are in their own 
community. They tend to study at McGill and relax 
elsewhere. Few of us, I think, really feel at home on 
campus, no matter how polite people may be. 

I made two important personal discoveries at 
McGill: the Jewish studies program, and the 
McGill Daily. Last year I chose Jewish history as 
an elective course — it was new to me and it fitted 
my timetable. I became increasingly interested as 
the weeks passed. Because of its small size, the 
Jewish studies program is very stimulating — students 
and professors get to know each other and engage in 
fascinating discussions. 

That first course gave me a perspective on 
Jewish history which has helped me to understand 
Zionism and the whole Middle East situation more 
fully. 1 am now majoring in both Jewish and North 
American history, and this year I took three courses 
in the Jewish studies program. I suspect I am the 
only non-Jewish Québécoise so seriously involved. 


The other students, though they are all very kind, © 
certainly question why I aminterestedinthe 
subject. But I am glad to say that my opinions in © 
class are taken as those of a student of Jewish history 
and not as the voice of the “non-Jewish minority, 
My other important discovery at McGill was the 
Daily. Last summer the editorial board decided to 
publish one issue per week which, except for ads — 
and announcements, would be entirely in French. In 
March 1977, I had been elected by the staffers as 
news editor of the English Daily; when it was decides 
to put out a French edition I was appointed editor. 
This new venture for the Daily, which was founde 
in 1911, received a great deal of coverageinthe 
English media. Anglophones on and off campus im- 
mediately began to wonder if a French Daily were 
the first step towards the francization of McGill. — 
They also wondered if the French publication were 
a Parti Québécois plot. As for the first fear, 
francization of McGill would begin with the 
administration, not the Daily; as for the second, it” 
was soon laid to rest by numerous articles in both ~ 
the French and English Daily critical of Parti 
Québécois policy. 
Unfortunately, there were always fewer ads for 
the French edition than for the English. Eventually, 
even the English advertising revenues went down, — 
the Daily began to lose money, and the French editiot 
was dropped. A grant from the Students’ Society ha 
since made the Daily’s financial situation more 
secure, but the future of the French edition remains 
uncertain. . 
The paper had its faults. Like its English counter 
part, the French Daily emphasized Arts and Science 
simply because most of its writers came from those 
Faculties. Though most French students on campus 
study management, we had no management staffers 
and I regret that we failed to reach those students 
as much as I would have liked. I hope that we can” 
assess our strengths and weaknesses over the 
summer, and that the French Daily will continue” 
next year. It satisfies a real need, for without it ~ 
there is no voice for McGill’s francophones. 
McGill has been an interesting experience. 
Because I had a solid background in French I coul¢ 
afford to study at university in another language 
without losing my own. I ended up writing much m0 
French at McGill, via the Daily, than I had ever 
anticipated, but I have been able to enrich miyself 
in another language and a different way of life. 
Though I am in Jewish studies and not in aa 
management, I feel I am a fairly typical francopho! 
student at McGill — one who has found it an educat 
in itself to be part of the minority within, and the — 


majority without, the Roddick Gates.0 i 


? 
Pa . 
= 


I GIVE AND DEVISE 
all that tract or 
parcel of land com- 
monly called Burnside 
near the city of 
Montreal aforesaid 

i| forthe purpose of 

“| learning in this 


| province. 


=e F oe = —— = 


-Extract from the will Ss ee Sm ee 
a of James McGill James McGill’s farm “‘Burnside”’ in 1842 (from a sketch by W.B. Lambe) 


: From an idea expressed in twenty-eight words, supported by 
' £10,000 and his Burnside estate, James McGill created the 
University that so proudly bears his name. Since 1821 
thousands of gifts and bequests, both large and small, 


have helped to build the McGill we know today. 


| 
\ 


If you are interested in 
helping to assure McGill’s 
future by means of a 
bequest, please contact: 


4 
: 
) 


Mr. D. Lorne Gales 
McGill Bequest and 
Planned Giving Program 
3605 Mountain Street 
Montreal, Quebec 

H3G 2M1 


Tel. (514) 392-5932 


x : % 
5s ae me se 
i SH ip 


Canada 
Post 


Postaye pans Port paye 


oh. 


” 


* 
. 
. . 


Montreal ‘ 


1X eee 


etd eee me 


eens ed gt 


= 
tv 
= 


2 ng 


aoe nee er er ree 


fy oe 


Aho « Sod 


F 
i 
f 
5 


geen 


ea ee ee eee te 


ti Ae ee we ed oe a Oe 


“tae 


‘aa |. 


oh it en TA 


Z 
: 


a , Z Sie = oe 


Fall 1978 


What’s up? 


Why not 
let us know — 


The McGill News 
3605 Mountain Street 
Montreal, P.Q. H3G 2M1 


Martineau Advocates 
Walker 
Allison 
Beaulieu 
MackKell 


& Clermont 


Telephone 395-3535 

Area Code 514 

Cable Address: Chabawa. 
Suite 3400 

The Stock Exchange Tower 
Place Victoria 

Montreal — H4Z 1E9 
Canada 


Robert H.E. Walker, Q.C. 
George A. Allison, Q.C. 
Roger L. Beaulieu, Q.C. 
Peter R. D. MacKell, Q.C. 
André J. Clermont, Q.C. 
John H. Gomery, Q.C. 
Robert A. Hope, Q.C. 

J. Lambert Toupin, Q.C. 
Bertrand Lacombe 

F. Michel Gagnon 
Edmund E. Tobin 

C. Stephen Cheasley 
Richard J.F. Bowie 
Robert P. Godin 

Jack R. Miller 

Serge D. Tremblay 
Michael P. Carroll 
Claude Lachance 
Maurice A. Forget 
Stephen S. Heller 
Pierrette Rayle 

Robert E. Reynolds 
Pierre E. Poirier 

David W. Salomon 
Jean-Maurice Saulnier 
Andre T. Meécs 

Marie Sullivan Raymond 
Serge Guerette 

Andre Larivee 
Jean-Francois Buffoni 
Suzanne R. Charest 
Michel Messier 

Wilbrod Claude Deécarie 
Robert B. |lssenman 
Marc Nadon 

Andrea Francoeur Meécs 
Yves Lebrun 

Donald M. Hendy 

Paul B. Belanger 
Martin J. Greenberg 
Francois Rolland 
Graham Nevin 

Richard J. Clare 

Alain Contant 

Marie Giguere 

Eric M. Maldoff 

Xeno C. Martis 

Ronald J. McRobie 
David Powell 

Reinhold Grudev 
Robert Paré 


Counsel 
Jean Martineau, C.C., Q.C. 


Hon. Alan A. Macnaughton, 


P.C., Q.C. 
Marcel Cing-Mars, Q.C. 


A.R. DEANE NESBITT 


Advocate 


2075 University Street 
Suite 1008 
Montreal, Canada H3A 2L1 


Telephone : 


Member : 


(514) 286-1244 


Barreau du Quebec, 


The Law Society of Alberta 


Registered Trade Mark Agent 


La Compagnie Enveloppe Canada 


8205 Boul. Montreal-Toronto 
Montreal Ouest, Que. H4X 1N1 


(514) 364-3252 


McLean 
Marler 
Tees 
Watson 
Poitevin 
Javet 

& Roberge 


Notaries 


Suite 1200 

620 Dorchester W. 
Montreal — H3B 1P3 
Telephone 866-9671 


McMaster 
Meighen 


Barristers 
& Solicitors 


129 St. James Street 
Montreal — H2Y 1L8 
Telephone 288-7575 
Area Code 514 


D.R. McMaster, Q.C. 


R.A. Patch, Q.C. 
A.S. Hyndman, Q.C. 
R.C. Legge, Q.C. 
T.C. Camp, Q.C. 
A.K. Paterson, Q.C. 
R.J. Riendeau, Q.C. 
W.E. Stavert 

R.J. Plant 


Herbert B. McLean 
Hon. George C. Marler 
Herbert H. Tees 
John H. Watson 
Henri Poitevin 
Ernest A. Javet 
Philippe Roberge 
John C. Stephenson 
Harvey A. Corn 
David Whitney 
Pierre Lapointe 
Gérard Ducharme 
Pierre Senez 

E. Bruce Moidel 
Pierre Venne 

Andre Boileau 
Leslie Greenberg 
Yves Neault 
Erigene Godin 


H. Senécal 

T.R. Carsley 
M.A. Meighen 
R.A. Pratt 

A.P. Bergeron 
T.W. Stewart 
S.J. Harrington 
G.P. Barry 

N.A. Saibil 

R.D. Farley 

J.A. Laurin 

B.M. Schneiderman 
M.E. Leduc 

J.H. Scott 

R.W. Shannon 
M.A. Pinsonnault 
E.A. Mitchell 

M. Charbonneau 


Counsel : 

T.R. Meighen, Q.C. 
A.M. Minnion, Q.C. 
R. Cordeau, Q.C. 
W.C. Leggat, Q.C. 


University 
Emtramce | 
Scholarships) 


For candidates demonstrating 
superior academic achievement 
and leadership qualities 


Greville Smuth 
icholarships 
$5,000 each 


Four awards each year, renewable 
for up to three additional years 


James McGill Scholarships 
J.W. McConnell Scholarships 
$2,500 each 
Twelve awards each year 
Both renewable for up to 
three additional years 


Other entrance scholarships 
based on high academic 
achievement and/or financial 
need: $500 to $2,500 per year. 


Applications for admission and scholarship 
applications with supporting documents 
must be received no later than March 1. 


Scholarships Office,McGill University 
845 Sherbrooke St. West, Montreal, PQ H3A 215 | 


Please send me information on the 
Greville Smith Scholarships and other 
entrance scholarships to McGill University. 


ublished by the Graduates’ 
ociety of McGill University. 


olume 59, Number 2 
all, 1978 


SSN 0024-9068 


ditorial Board 

hairman, James G. Wright 

ditor, Victoria Lees 

ssistant Editor, Carol Stairs 

usiness Manager, David Strutz 

embers, Andrew Allen, Edith Aston, 

avid Bourke, David Cobbett, 

osh Freed, John Hallward, 

»eter Lebensold, Elizabeth McNab, 
Jeter Reid, Tom Thompson, 

aird Watt. 


‘eature Articles 


6 Dr. Bruce Shore: Advocate for 
" Gifted Children 


Citizens? 
by Victoria Lees 


i 2 All Rhodes Lead to Oxford 
by Brian Ward 


J 4 McGill’s Collections: All Creatures 
Great and Small 
by Holly Dressel 


a 
x18 Mechanics of Movement 
by Donna Nebenzahl 


20 Partners Against Crime 
‘ by Carol Stairs 


2>8 Perspective 
i by Lois Mackenzie 


| Jepartments 
2 What the Martlet Hears 


»2?22 Where They Are and 
” What They’re Doing 
i by Carol Stairs 


23. ~Society Activities 


ai 
fe? 
4 


Credits: Cover, Go/den or Queen of Bavaria's Parrot 
(Psittacus luteus), a watercolour from the sketchbook 

of Edward Lear, painted at Knowsley, England, in 1831 
(see pp. 14-17), photographed by Brian Merrett and 
Jennifer Harper; 3, Harold Rosenberg; 5, courtesy of 

“Public Relations Office; 7, Olive Palmer; 9, 11, John de 
Visser; 12-13, courtesy of the Print Room, rare books 


and special collections department, McLennan Library, 


photographed by Sean Huxley; 14-17, Brian Merrett 
_ and Jennifer Harper; 18-20, 23-24, Harold Rosenberg; 
28, Kim Ondaatje. 


“The copyright of all contents of this magazine is 
Aegistered. Please address all editorial communica- 
tions to: The McGill News, 3605 Mountain Street, 
Montreal, H3G 2M1. Tel. (514) 392-4813. Change 

of address should be sent to Records Department, 
43605 Mountain Street, Montreal, H3G 2M1. 


“ 


Letters 


Tell It Like It Is 
As a graduate who moved from Montreal to 
Toronto some twenty years ago, I found your 
Summer 1978 issue interesting, particularly in 
providing insights into the current and future 
challenges facing McGill, not the least of 
which will be declining enrolment. 

Keep telling it like it is on that little island in 
a sea of French Canadian culture. 

F. Hugh Wadey, BSc(Agr)’45 

Toronto, Ont. 


Another Point of View 

The McGill News interview with the Quebec 
Minister of Education (Summer 1978) 
revealed Jacques- Yvan Morin as a man just as 
far removed from reality as his colleagues. 
Morin states that McGill has a dual function, 
namely, to compete with other universities on 
an international level and “‘to contribute to the 
development of the society in which it lives.” 
This is a rather simplistic assertion when 
Morin’s government seems dedicated to 
destroying that society by attacking the basic 
freedoms which should be the foundation of 
any university and of every society.... 

Morin is seriously undermining his own 
credibility if he expects McGill to contribute to 
the type of society which his government is 
trying to create. On the contrary, McGill 
should re-dedicate itself to teaching its students 
the values inherent in the basic freedoms upon 
which a democratic society is based, and how 
these freedoms are being denied by a govern- 
ment that doesn’t understand or doesn’t care. 

Tim R. Carsley, BA’58, BCL’61 

Montreal, Que. 


Learning from the Third World 
Congratulations on a splendid Summer 1978 
issue. Especially good was Carol Stairs’s 
article “‘Doing It Their Way.” It is important 
to know that there are a few societies learning 
from our mistakes and trying to do things 
differently. Maybe we can reverse the trend and 
learn from them before we have exhausted our 
natural resources. 

Pat Alcock 

Canadian Peace Research Institute 

Oakville, Ont. 


Female Chauvinism ? 

I read with interest the letter from Margaret 
Gillett in the Summer 1978 issue. She inform- 
ed the community that she is writing a history 
of women at McGill and solicited information 
and material. 

If I had written stating that I was preparing 
a history of men at McGill I am certain that I 
would have been inundated with indignant 
letters from women claiming I was engaged in 
a sexist venture. Surely, the reaction must be 
the same to that which Professor Gillett is 
endeavouring to do. - 

Professor Stanley B. Frost, formerly Dean 
of Religious Studies, Dean of Graduate 
Studies and Research, Vice-Principal 
(Administration), and at present McGill 
historian, is writing a history of McGill. 
Would it not make more sense to realize that 
McGill is a community of people, and that all 
information could more profitably be sent to 
him? Sexism is sexism regardless of whether it 
is male-oriented or female-oriented! 

Leo Yaffe, PhD’43 

Vice-Principal (Administration) 


John Grierson Remembered 
I appreciate this opportunity to draw to your 
readers’ attention the work that has com- 
menced on the Grierson Project at McGill. We 
are collecting papers, manuscripts, corres- 
pondence, audiotapes, videotapes, films, 
and reference material by and about the late 
John Grierson, founder of the National Film 
Board in 1939 and often referred to as the 
father of the documentary film movement. 

John Grierson lectured in film and 
communications at McGill from 1969 until 
1972; his magnetism in the lecture hall will 
long be remembered. It is hoped that graduates 
possessing memorabilia would be willing to 
donate, lend, or reference them to the project. 

Those who wish to know more about the 
Grierson Project are asked to contact the 
Graduate Program in Communications, 
Macdonald-Harrington Building, 815 
Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal H3A 2K6, 
telephone (514) 392-4878. 

Brenda M. Parsons, BA’75 

Research Coordinator, Grierson Project 


os 55 ae wy ae tt ee 
Me hPa ete PP eek Pat ey ee ees 
Re Se ee ne ee ares 
ete Sauer Se he Sane 


The Individual Approach 

Over 9,000 students applied to McGill through 
the Admissions Office for the fall term, and 
the mounds of paperwork involved in process- 
ing their applications have kept the twenty- 
one staff members on their toes. 

The office handles applications to all 
McGill Faculties except those that have 
special entrance requirements or operate on 
a quota system — Law, Medicine, Music, 
Dentistry, and Religious Studies. For reasons 
of convenience, Macdonald College in Ste. 
Anne-de-Bellevue also handles its own 
admissions. 

Applications are coded, programmed, 
and fed into the IBM 370-158 computer 
operated by McGill’s management systems 
department. But the human touch is not lost 
in the shuffle. Form letters are kept to a 
minimum. “‘We emphasize the individual ap- 
proach,” says Director of Admissions Peggy 
Sheppard. “‘Each file is examined at least three 
times, and we send the student three request 
letters to allow him ample time to assemble 
any outstanding documents.” 

Applying to McGill is now about as 
straightforward as it can possibly be. The 
application form has been pared to a single 
page and asks only for a student’s age, sex, 
educational background, field of academic in- 
terest, and basic statistics such as address, 
telephone number, and social insurance num- 
ber. No longer are students required to di- 
vulge details about their domestic and financial 
circumstances. 

The student, in fact, receives more in- 
formation about McGill than he is required to 
give about himself. The application kit 

(bilingual for Quebec applicants) contains not 
only forms for university admission and for 
residence, but also detailed information on 
academic requirements, deadlines, and finan- 
cial aid. Three address labels, a return 
envelope, and a yellow “‘reminder sheet”’ 
complete the package. “‘The better things are 
organized,” notes Sheppard, ‘‘the more 
quickly they can be processed.”’ 

Like most universities in North America, 
McGill anticipates a decline in enrolment 
over the next decade. Through a question- 


2 


the 
Martlet 
hears 


naire, the Admissions Office hopes to be able 
to analyse why some students who have 
expressed an interest in attending McGill do 
not complete the application process. 
‘Foreign students often decide to attend a 
university closer to home,”’ explains 
Sheppard. ‘“‘Canadian students give a variety 
of reasons, from financial to personal. Quite 
a number indicate that they might reapply at 
a future date. 

“We're always trying to clarify and sim- 
plify things for the students and for our- 
selves,” she adds. Nonetheless, she dreams 
wistfully of the day when applications will 
arrive in a steady stream instead of in the 
sudden flood that inundates the office on the 
first day of March every year. “‘It’s better 
now than it’s ever been,”’ she admits, ‘“‘but it’s 
never perfect.” Christine Farr 


Safety First 

Don’t dismiss MACIP as just another 
acronym. This one could save your life. The 
padded dashboard in your car, the collapsible 
steering wheel, the mandatory seat belts — 

the McGill Automotive Collision Investigation 
Project (MACIP) has actively endorsed them 
all. 

Funded by a $70,000 annual grant from 
Transport Canada, MACIP is one of ten such 
groups sponsored at Canadian universities. 
Its mandate : to perform in-depth investiga- 
tions of Montreal-area accidents in which late- 
model automobiles were so badly damaged 
that they had to be towed from the scene. 
Since receiving their first federal contract in 
1970, investigators have untangled the cause- 
and-effect relationships of more than 300 
serious accidents. The project is presently 
staffed by two full-time and two part-time 
investigators, including a medical doctor. 

Alerted by the police when a serious 
accident occurs, team members rush to the 
scene, often in police cruisers. They photo- 
graph the vehicles from various angles, 
measure skid marks, note “‘crush factors,” 
and record the condition of any faulty 
mechanical devices. From their observations 
they try to estimate the force of the collision, 
the speed of the vehicles at the moment of 


impact, and even the condition of braking 
systems. In order to uncover any relevant 
psychological factors, investigators also in- — 
terview the drivers. MACIP guarantees their - 
anonymity. ““Without such a provision,” 
explains project coordinator Diana Steiner, 
‘‘most people would be reluctant to divulge — 
all the details we need. We’re interested in 
what’s at fault, not who’s at fault.” 

The team’s close relationship with 
various provincial and municipal police 
departments facilitates its work. *“*A con- 
siderable amount of detail and just plain leg- 
work goes into our reports,” explains project 
director Dr. Lloyd Thompson, associate pro- 
fessor of mechanical engineering. ‘For 4 
example, we include medical evaluations and — 
safety implications when preparing our com- 
ments for Transport Canada. The police have 
always played an important role in assisting © 
us with information.”” MACIP reciprocates 
by supplying accident statistics and photo- 
graphs for police lectures and seminars and ~ 
acting as a resource centre for accident 
information. 

MACIP also studies the effectiveness of 
motor vehicle standards, evaluates the need — 
for possible changes in the code, and watches 
for safety defects. ““*The car manufacturers 
see our reports, and they definitely read 
them,” says Steiner, who believes that 
MAC IP’s unbiased approach promotes good” 
will. ““The safety engineers and others we 
deal with are most pleased to cooperate when 
we need their assistance or advice.” 

Over the years MACIP has been com- 
missioned by government agencies to conduct 
investigations into a number of automotive — 
safety devices, including child safety seats, 
air brakes, and seat belts. Just completed is — 
a study of accidents involving car occupants © 
wearing both lap and shoulder belts. “Figures 
show that fatalities have declined 50 per cent _ 
since enactment and enforcement of com- _ 
pulsory seat-belt legislation,” says Steiner. 
Restraints do more than simply minimize 
injuries, ‘‘Seat belts keep you conscious 
during accidents by preventing your head 
from going through the windshield, or your 
body from being crushed by the steering 


. 


7 


~ 
a 
sy ’ 
ta. 


™~ 


wheel or dashboard,”’ Steiner explains. Many 
fatalities occur when fire breaks out and the 
unrestrained victim, knocked unconscious by 
the impact of the collision, is unable to leave 
the vehicle. 

Human error, however, remains the 
constant factor in accidents studied by the 
MACIP team. Drivers affected by fatigue, 
alcohol, adverse weather, or by any combina- 
tion of geographical, emotional, and physical 
factors cause far more accidents than do 
mechanical defects. With the help of MACIP 
investigators and other safety experts, cars 
are being improved to protect drivers from 
themselves. Christine Farr 


Notes from Summer School 
Ww “It’s fun!” 


“Can we come again next year?” 
Summer school means pleasure, not 


ig punishment, to the sixty-three young people 
w enrolled in McGill’s summer Music Work- 
(i shop. The fourteen-week project, the first 


such program ever run in Montreal, is the 
brainchild of Oleg Telizyn, director of the 


» McGill Conservatory of Music. Concerned 
» about the high cost of private lessons for 

» children, Telizyn wanted to make music 

» training available at reasonable prices. 


The workshop caters to two groups of 


, young people : children aged 8 to 12, mainly 
», from inner city schools, are given instruction 
, in the instrument of their choice — flute, 

, clarinet, saxophone, trumpet, trombone, or 
f percussion; and high-school students with 
_some music background study jazz band 

.. techniques. Fees are nominal : 50 cents a 

_ week, or $7 for the whole summer. 


“Tf there is money for city sports 
programs, there should be funds for music,” 


_ Telizyn maintains. “We have great facilities 


_ here. All we need are grants to cover the 


costs of hiring teachers and renting 


_ instruments.” 


In accordance with the terms of a 


- $14,400 Canada Manpower grant, the work- 


shop hired as instructors six university students 


-— chosen on the basis of their ability as 
* performers and experience in teaching. “It’s 


* a lot of work, but we all have a good time,” 


says student manager Jaime McMillan, en- 


* rolled in McGill’s master of arts program in 


' own 


’ school music. “I think our attitude communi- 
' cates itself to the students. They’re 

* tremendously enthusiastic. When one boy 

’ misbehaved during class, the others jumped 

* onhim. And whenever kids have to be absent, 
' they call and let us know. That isn’t our rule 


— it is something they’ve decided on their 


”9 


The thirty-six young beginners receive 


’ an hour’s instruction every weekday morning. 


Initially they worked in groups of five or six, 
but as they progressed the hour was divided 
between private lessons and independent 


practice. “‘We are trying to expose children 
to music, not create musicians,” says Telizyn. 
‘“But some children are born super-talented.”’ 
He is on the lookout for special music 
scholarships for four of the more promising 
beginners. 

The children are also enthusiastic in 
their praise of the program. One ten-year- 
old came in by herself to register for flute 
lessons, seven one-dollar bills rolled up in 
an elastic band. ‘‘My teacher told me about 
the workshop,” she says, “‘so I took my own 
money and joined. My mother didn’t know at 
first, but she knows now and she lets me do it 


At McGill’s summer Music Workshop, an 


eleven-year-old learns to blow his own horn. 


because I like it so much.” Telizyn will take 
his program into the city schools in the fall. 
After-class instruction — at the cost of 
$210 per school year — will be available in 
Montreal West, Notre-Dame-de-Grace and 
Westmount schools. 

Summer afternoons at the Strathcona 
Building are devoted to the twenty-seven 
teenage musicians who meet for three hours 
of jazz band instruction under conductor 
Patricia Craighead, a student in school 
music. Each session begins with sectional 
practices and ends with a full rehearsal. 


“Most high-school band literature is for 
stage band, so many students have had no jazz 
band experience,” Telizyn explains. “‘Any 
high-school musicians who thought they might 
be interested in our jazz sessions were invit- 
ed to a special class last May to learn first- 
hand what the summer workshop would be 
like. Then those who wished registered for 
the course.” 

McMillan is proud of the band’s progress. 
‘““They’re really talented,” he remarks. ‘*‘When 
we were invited to play at the premiére of 
the movie Sergeant Pepper we couldn't find a 
suitable arrangement of the theme song. So 
our lead trumpet player wrote one.”’ 

Over the summer the group also played 
in Pointe Claire’s Stewart Hall, the Crippled 
Children’s Centre, Place Ville-Marie, and the 
Alexis-Nihon shopping mall. 

What moment stands out in McMillan’s 
memory? ‘‘When we played at the crippled 
children’s centre,” he recalls softly, “‘the 
kids started to dance.” Heather Kirkwood 


“Traduisez, s.v.p.” 

Four million words in need of translation. So 
reckoned McGill’s Bilingual Implementation 
Committee, which spent most of 1974 examin- 
ing university contracts, forms, and booklets 
to determine what McGill would have to do to 
comply with Quebec’s Official Languages Act 
(Bill 22). 

The establishment of a translation office at 
McGill that fall was “‘symptomatic of the 
political and social realities of Quebec,” says 
head translator Georges Néray. ““The more 
bilingual documents McGill puts out, the 
better it is for the university’s image.”’ Despite 
the fact that the year-old Charter of the 
French Language (Bill 101) makes less- 
stringent demands on universities than did its 
predecessor, the translation office continues to 
do a thriving business. 

Néray, four full-time translators, and the 
occasional freelancer handle everything from 
thank-you notes to scientific documents. Each 
staff-member is expected to produce about 
1,800 words a day, depending on the 
complexity of the material; together, they 
translate a million words a year. *‘Until now 
we have been working like mad to keep up with 
the daily routine,” Néray explains. “‘But we'd 
like to be a full-fledged department making a 
positive contribution to the university. My 
dream would be to make this office a resource 
centre. We’re already doing this in a sense — 
we receive calls daily from the public asking 
us to translate certain terms, or to help find 
interpreters. And not only in French!”’ 

Néray, who teaches translation in McGill’s 
Centre for Continuing Education, would also 
like to study French nomenclature as it relates 
to education, eventually compiling a lexicon of 
educational terminology. ‘“‘We need to find 
equivalents for English terms,” he says. A 


number of expressions from France are 
inadequate or inappropriate for the North 
American educational system. Explains Neray, 
“We have, at times, spent days looking for an 
appropriate term in French, only to find that 
none exists.” 

But these plans have had to be temporarily 
shelved. In addition to meeting its daily quota, 
the translation office is still whittling away at 
the university’s four-year backlog. Basia 
Hellwig 


Underground Medicine 

Montreal’s subway system, the Métro, has 
been touted as the world’s cleanest, brightest, 
and quietest. It could also claim to be the 
healthiest. 

In November 1977 a new-style medical clinic 
opened its doors on the shopping-mall level of 
the Guy Street métro station. It offers one- 
stop, all-inclusive health care programs that 
can mend anything from a broken leg to a 
broken heart. 

The métro clinic, formally known as a 
Centre Local des Services Communautaires 
(CLSC), is part of a widespread network of 
community health centres set up by Quebec’s 
Ministry of Social Affairs with the help of the 
family medicine departments of the province's 
teaching hospitals. The clinic has operated for 
nearly a year under the watchful eye of the 
Montreal General, a McGill teaching hospital, 
and recently became fully independent. 

Hanging plants decorate the cheerful offices 
of CLSC Métro; freshly brewed coffee eases 
the wait in the reception area. By utilizing to 
capacity the three waiting rooms, treatment 
room, and small laboratory, clinic doctors are 
able to see forty patients in a twelve-hour day. 
Dr. Gary Goldthorpe, professional director of 
CLSC Métro, would like to see this figure 
increase. “*Roughly 70,000 people pass this 
location each day,” he notes, “‘and what we 
should be able to provide is convenience and a 
shorter waiting time for those who come to see 
us. Space is a more limiting factor than the 
availability of doctor time.’ Language 
differences present no barrier: in deference to 
the ethnic mosaic of the downtown community, 
services are available in French, English, 
Greek, Portuguese, German, Spanish, and 
Italian. 

Natural ailments of the clinic’s inner-city 
patients are often exacerbated by the stress of 
an impersonal and accelerated lifestyle. 
‘People’s problems rarely stem from one 
source alone,” maintains Dr. Walter Spitzer, 
professor of family medicine and epidemiology 
at McGill and the man responsible for setting 
up the clinic. ‘There is a definite interaction 
between emotion and physical illness. An 
integrated, interdisciplinary approach is 
important when considering global health 
requirements, Response to people’s needs must 
remain flexible.” Goldthorpe concurs. ““We 


4 


have a special responsibility to see that people 
don’t fall into the cracks between private and 
public health and social care. This is 
particularly important in cities, where primary 
services are so fragmented and specialized.” 

To catch those who might get lost in the 
shuffle, CLSC Métro has access to a host of 
professionals, from social workers and home 
helps to nurses and community volunteers. 
‘“‘We have no rigid barriers between professions 
and organizations,’ says Goldthorpe, “so our 
resources can be allocated rationally and 
efficiently.’’ Closely allied with the clinic are 
community institutions like the Montreal 
Y outh Clinic, the Marriage Counselling and 
Family Life Education Centre, and the 
Dorchester Residence for the Elderly. 

As well as serving the needs of the 
community, CLSC Métro provides training 
for McGill’s medical students, residents, and 
nurses. ‘We will continue to be associated with 
McGill,” explains Goldthorpe. “‘Some of our 
trainees come here for recycling, so to speak, in 
family medicine. Others are fresh from 
McGill’s medical school and are doing a two- 
year family medicine certification program. In 
fact, the law governing CLSCs stipulates that 
there be a teaching committee, with an 
appointee from the university to decide the 
training program’s content and priorities.” 

One of Goldthorpe’s teaching priorities is 


preventive medicine. “‘Every health profes- 
sional should become a health educator,” he 
contends, ‘“‘and it can’t be a direct authority 
role. It has to be persuasive — helping people 
to understand what the risks are and to make 
health decisions on their own initiative. 
Whether we do it door-to-door, in the schools. 
or through the media, we must go beyond hard- 
core health care and educate our community to 
a more healthful way of life.” He has high 
hopes for the métro clinic. ‘A few years down 
the road I'll want our CLSC to be judged in 
terms of people’s actual health. I'll be looking 
for hard evidence of improved levels of health 
and decreased incidence of various diseases 
and social problems.” Christine Farr 


The Bookshelf | 
Herewith capsule sum maries of eight bookell | 
written by McGill faculty members and 


alumni. 
Marc Angenot — Les champions des 


femmes: Examen du discours sur la supério ie 


des femmes 1400-1800. Montréal: Les presses 
de l’université du Québec, 1977. Dr. Mare © 
Angenot, associate professor in the French — 
department, traces the theme of female 
superiority through eighty French literary — 
works spanning four centuries. 4 

Athanasios Asimakopulos — An /ntro- J 
duction to Economic Theory: M icro economics 
Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1978. [nth 
text for students in intermediate-level micro= 
economics courses, Dr. Athanasios (“Tom ), 
Asimakopulos, BA’51, MA’S3, former chair 
man of McGill’s economics department, ex= 
plains the basic principles of neoclassical j 
economic theory and offers alternative 
approaches to explaining the behaviour of fim 
and markets. j 

Paul Cappon — Jn Our Own House: Socitl 
Perspectives on Canadian Literature. Toronto 
McClelland and Stewart Ltd., 1978. Dr. Paul 
Cappon, BA’69, has edited this collection of 
five Marxist essays on the sociology of 
Canadian literature. The book analyzes the 
relationship between English-Canadian writit 
and the country’s social structure. 

Brian Cuthbertson — Canadian Military” 
Independence in the Age of the Superpowers, 
Toronto: Fitzhenry and Whiteside, 1977. 
Presently an archivist at the Public Archivesdl 
Nova Scotia, Dr. Brian Cuthbertson, BA’S7, 
has expanded his University of London 
doctoral thesis to produce an in-depth analysis 
of Canada’s defence policies, past, present, and 
future. 

Daniel K. Donnelly — CanAmerican Unio) 
Now! Toronto: Griffin House, 1978. Daniel 
Donnelly, BCom’48, contends that Canada a 
a nation is no longer workable and argues fot i 
union with the United States. | 

Henry Milner — Politics in the New Quebet 
Toronto: McClelland and Stewart Ltd., 197%: 
Dr. Henry Milner, BA’67, a professorof 
political science at Montreal’s Vanier College 
examines Quebec’s political system and the 
forces that have shaped it — social classes, 
economics, municipal politics, nationalism, 
and the relationship between Quebec and — 
Canada. 2 

Frank R. Scott — Essays on the 
Constitution: Aspects of Canadian Law and 
Politics. Toronto: University of Toronto 
Press, 1977. In this collection of twenty-nine 
essays, former Dean of Law Dr. Frank Scott, 
BCL’27, discusses constitutional, political, am 
legal development in recent Canadian histoly 
The volume has received the Governor- 
General’s Award for non-fiction. q 

George Szanto — Theater and Propagan nd 
Austin: University of Texas Press, Bs Dr. 


es 


* 
* / 
* 


George Szanto, associate professor and 
director of McGill’s comparative literature 


program, examines both medieval and modern 


theatre to reveal the distortion of information 


' that occurs in dramatic literature. 0 


| A Head for Business 


‘ Last June a francophone assumed control of 
« operations at Quebec’s largest anglophone 

‘ business school. Replacing Dr. Stanley 

* Shapiro as dean of McGill’s Faculty of 


Management is fifty-year-old Dr. Laurent 


» Picard, whose career has spanned top jobs in 


" both the public and private sectors. 


A graduate of Laval University and the 


’ Harvard School of Business, Picard has 


—3 


|) served as labor arbitrator for the federal 
*« government, president of the Canadian 


Broadcasting Corporation and Marine 


« Industries, and associate dean at the 
* University of Montreal’s Ecole des Hautes 
» Etudes Commerciales. For the past year, he 


also taught part time in McGill’s Management 
Faculty. 
Picard admits that his love of teaching 


, made him hesitate about accepting the dean- 
4 ship. But eventually, he recounts, “*I became 
- convinced that, although I was losing some- 


. thing by not being involved in the classroom 


4 anymore, I was being provided with a 


fascinating challenge.”’ For the next five 


_years, Picard will devote his considerable 


managerial skills to the thriving ten-year-old 


» Faculty. 


“When you look at Management,” he ex- 


4 plains, “you define what you want to do by 
. looking at what it is you can do better than 


any body else. When you know what kind of 


__ assets you have, then you try to build on 


them.” In Picard’s opinion, McGill has two 


- enormous assets : its international reputation 


. and its unique position as an English-language 


_ university in a predominantly French-speak- 


ing city. “I would like to think of ways to use 


* this asset more than we have used it in the 


past,” he adds. 

Of the 320 freshmen accepted annually 
into Management, 25 per cent list French as 
their mother tongue; they obviously see value 
in an English business education. McGill 


offers advantages to anglophone students as 


well. Picard believes that the knowledge of 


* Quebec culture that each student acquires will 


be invaluable in his later business career. 
“If you are moving up in a corporation where 
Quebec is either part of your operation or 
part of your market, the fact that you have an 
understanding of the culture is a definite 
asset.’ The new dean hopes to foster a desire 
among students for more French-language 
courses than currently offered by the Faculty. 
He also supports social gatherings with 
French business schools and summer work 
programs in francophone offices. 

Picard holds a balanced view of McGill’s 


position in Quebec. “‘There are two ways of 
looking at the university’s relation to Quebec 
and Canada,” he says. “‘One is that the posi- 
tion of McGill is similar to that of any other 
university : generally, some kind of enrolment 
decline, plus a tightening of government 
budgets because of the high cost of education. 
(In such a period it is a bit more threatening 
for a university like McGill, which is English 
ina French-speaking province.) But the 
second point is that the government has 
shown no indication of discrimination, from 
what I can understand. It has a very good and 
equitable system of allocating budgets.” 


select and purchase artworks, particularly 
Canadian prints, silkscreens, and engravings. 
Funds for purchase and preservation, how- 
ever, are severely limited — no more than 
twenty works are bought each year. 
Fortunately, many alumni and friends of 
McGill have chosen to continue a tradition 
almost as old as the university itself : giving 
or bequeathing works to the collection. *“The 
largest donation in the recent past,’ explains 
Anderson, “‘is a collection given by the late 


A. Sidney Dawes, BSc’ 10. It includes sixty- 
four paintings by Canadian artists, including 
Cornelius Krieghoff, Alfred Holdstock, 


New Management Dean Dr. Laurent Picard takes stock of McGill's biggest assets — 
her international reputation and unique position in French Canada. 


The dean sees his priority as promot- 
ing continuity, not change. ‘‘The Faculty has 
grown substantially in the last five years,”’ 
he notes, “‘so now we might be at a time of 
consolidation and development rather than fast 
growth. Also, I’m very impressed with the 
way the Faculty is organized and managed. If 
you're impressed you don’t start to change 
for the sake of change ; you try to reinforce.” 
His prognosis for Management? ““No 
revolution.” 0 


The Art of Giving 
For more than eighty years an imperious 
lady has raised a defiant sceptre to the 
snarled traffic on Sherbrooke Street. The 
larger-than-life-size bronze of Queen 
Victoria, the work of her daughter Princess 
Louise, was presented to McGill’s Royal 
Victoria College by railroad magnate Donald 
Smith, Lord Strathcona. But the statue, long a 
campus landmark, is only one of many works 
of art which, through the generosity of private 
donors, have enriched the university both 
indoors and out. 

Custodian of the extensive and varied 
university collection is the ten-member 
Visual Arts Committee, chaired by associate 
professor of architecture Bruce Anderson, 
BArch’64. The committee meets monthly to 


and the Group of Seven.” 

Among the most recent gifts are: Le 
Buffet Rouge (oil on canvas by French painter 
Bernard Lorjou), presented by Lionel Rubin, 
BCL’35; Kneeling Hunter (a large Eskimo 
soapstone carving by Pinney), donated by Dr. 
Frank Scott, BCL’27; and two caricatures of 
lawyers by French painter Adrien Barreére, 
given by sessional law lecturer Dr. Jean 
Castel. The first is displayed in the Faculty 
Club ballroom, the others in the law library. 

Prior to accepting works of art, the 
committee ensures their “suitability for dis- 
play in the university,’ says Anderson. Works 
are then professionally appraised and receipts 
for income-tax purposes are issued to donors 
upon request. “‘In that sense, the donor cer- 
tainly benefits,” he adds. “‘I think it is a very 
good reason for people to consider giving.” 

McGill’s art collection is not stored 
away in dusty garrets or kept under lock and 
key. Explains Anderson : “We have always 
preferred to display works of art where 
people work and study and where the public 
can view them, rather than in the specially 
contained places so many universities have.” 
And plans are in the works for a walking- 
tour guide to make the treasures of the 
university art collection even more accessible 
and better known. 0 


Dr. Bruce Shore: 
dvocate for gifted children 


Associate Professor of Education 

Dr. Bruce Shore, an expert on gifted- 
ness, discusses the dos and don'ts for 
parents and teachers. 


Editor's Note: ‘Bright children are like kids 
who are incessantly hungry — they get in the 
way, God bless them,” says Dr. Bruce Shore, 
associate professor of education and a recog- 
nized Canadian expert on giftedness. Bright 
children have a difficult time fitting into the 
regular school system where teaching is geared 
to the average learner, he maintains. Their 
cleverness is often misinterpreted as insubordi- 
nation, their intellectual superiority regarded 
as a threat. Gifted youngsters learn quickly, 
complete assignments easily, and all too often 
sit daydreaming while classmates finish their 
lessons. They turn into sullen underachievers 
as boredom leads to poor work habits. In fact, 
so acute are the problems of bright children 
that educators are beginning to look upon them 
as a disadvantaged minority group. 

Shore is an articulate advocate for the gifted. 
Born and raised in Montreal, he earned his 
undergraduate science degree from McGill in 
1965, his teaching diploma a year later, and his 
master’s degree in educational psychology in 
1967. After two years spent teaching mathe- 
matics to Laval high-school students, he 
returned to school himself, receiving a doc- 
torate in educational psychology from the 
University of Calgary in 1971. 

His current research relates to the learning 
styles of gifted children and the kinds of 
learning situations which serve them best. As 
acting director of McGill's Centre for Learning 
and Development, Shore is also studying the 
relation of teaching to research activity. He is 
interested in the most able students at the 
university level as well. 

News freelancer and former teacher Heather 
Kirkwood recently spoke with Shore about 
gifted children. Excerpts from that interview: 


News: How would you define giftedness? 
Shore: There is no precise definition. Since 
giftedness comes up in different ways, you can’t 
put down a number and say that’s what it is. 
The term usually refers to some academic or 
intellectual exceptionality at the positive end. If 


you're talking in academic or intellectual terms, 


then it means children who are brighter, learn 
faster, are more adult in their thinking than 
their peers. 


6 


There are two kinds of giftedness — that 
which is observable and that which you know Is 


there but whose potential hasn’t been tapped. If 


you're talking about school performance, an 
underachiever may really be a gifted child. He 
may have read every book in the house and 
devoured the public library but, because the 
school doesn’t allow him to use the library, he 
does not show his skill. Or he may be a child 
who learned to read at home at the age of three 
and then was forced to start again with Dick 
and Jane. 

Bright children often become behaviour 
problems. If they don’t find a release for their 
energy, they can get into trouble. Gifted 
children are overly represented among school 
dropouts, adolescent suicides, and juvenile 
delinquents. There are a lot of bright young- 
sters out there stealing hubcaps. It’s too bad 
they can’t get their thrills from learning. 
News: What tests are used to determine 
giftedness? 

Shore: Unfortunately, mainly the standard 
IQ tests. The problem is that IQ tests display a 
bias for a particular type of thinking or 
thinking style, and they leave out children who 
display forms of giftedness other than excep- 
tional intellect. 

It is important to be looking for giftedness 
where you wouldn’t expect it. There are false 
stereotypes about inner-city schools, schools in 
poor neighbourhoods, and schools with immi- 
grant pupils. There are as many gifted there as 
anywhere else; they’re just harder to find. You 
might have to speak Greek to find them or 
know something about a culture and its 
interests. But the bright children are there. 
News: Does motivation contribute to 
giftedness? 

Shore: It certainly contributes to observable 
giftedness. It’s easier to ascertain that a child 
has some particular intellectual gift if he is 
motivated to do things which display it. The 
child who has great athletic potential but isn’t 
interested in sports is never going to show it. It 
is the same thing with paper and pencil and 
ideas. 

Motivation is very important. I have no idea 
what the source of that motivation is, because 
it varies from child to child, and sometimes 


=a 


from minute to minute. There are children who 
at a certain age meet a teacher who greatly 
inspires them. Sometimes it’s an uncle or a ~ 
grandparent. Occasionally, it’s a parent, but. 
nobody ever does something because their 
parents want it. (That’s the myth, anyway.) Bill 
children who are better motivated are certai iy 
more likely to take advantage of their gifts and 
enjoy them to the full. 

News: Is it paisa to differentiate bet wel n 
a gifted child and an “‘overachiever?” d 
Shore: | really don’t know what overachieve 
ment means because it’s hard to believe thata 
child who achieves something is overachieving 
He may be performing well beyond someone 
else’s expectations but he certainly isn't per- 
forming well beyond what he is capable of § 
doing. 

I think the idea of overachievement is a silly 
notion — and a dangerous one. It’s dangerous 
to the child’s motivation. It also implies that’ 
have the right to expect low levels of achieve- 
ment. Our responsibility, I think, is to expect 
high levels of performance from children. — 
News: What should a parent do when he — 
realizes his child is exceptionally bright?) ~ 
Shore: Many people regard gifted children As 
a threat. They think, ‘“‘My child is reading 
things I don’t understand; therefore, [can’t 
help him with his homework.” Or, “I dont 
understand him,” or “‘He’s trying to show me 
up.’ That’s sad, because they’re still children 
who need the same encouragement and tender 
loving care all children do. And, in fact, 
because their interests are sometimes differet 
from those of their classmates, they need ev cr 
more support and emotional encouragement 

If you discover that your two-and-a- -half- 
year-old can read, don’t get upset. There $7 
nothing wrong with a child who learns to re ( 
before he goes to school. That’s the schools 
problem. If the children feel that you supp 
them and enjoy their gift, then they will have 
ball and so will you. 

To teachers I would suggest getting them 1 
of your hair a little bit. Let them go to the 
library without having to ask permission. © g 
Associate Professor of Education Dr. BM 
Shore: “Humanity needs gifted people. 


% 


them organize outings with a parent chaperone 
so that you don’t feel obligated to do everything 
with them. Most of all, enjoy them. They can be 
a lot of fun. 
News: At what level should gifted children 
begin to receive special education? 
Shore: Pre-kindergarten. The worst pessi- 
mists say that by the time they get to school it’s 
too late. I don’t subscribe to that, though 
there’s a germ of truth in what they say. Most 
pre-kindergartens and kindergartens are pretty 
exciting places to be, educationally, but it gets 
progressively worse from then on. 

One problem is that a lot of very bright 


RES, 


children in the primary grades have specific 
interests. Not enough of our primary teachers 
have specialized educations. Large numbers are 
not expert at anything. It’s a great pedagogical 
tool to say, “I don’t know; let’s look it up,” but 
only to a certain point. You have to be able to 
show enthusiasm for something. And if you 
haven’t set high academic and intellectual 
standards for yourself, should you be trusted to 
do it with other people’s children? 

News: Need the teachers of gifted children be 
gifted themselves? 

Shore: Not necessarily. But I think they must 
be excited about learning and inquiring and 


enjoy pushing a subject to its limits. Even if the 
teacher’s interest isn’t the first interest of the 
students, children soak up the enthusiasm. 
News: Is teaching a class of gifted children 
any more difficult than teaching children of 
average intellect? 

Shore: I don’t think so. All teachers doing 
their job Know it’s hard work. You go home 
and the first thing you need is a nap. The second 
thing you want is an aspirin. Then, if you have 
any energy left, you settle for supper. Some 
teachers prefer working with the gifted; others 
feel threatened by them. If a teacher revels in 
the challenge of children who push him intellec- 
tually, then he should be assigned to work with 
those children as much as possible. 

News: What is the optimal class size for 
gifted children? 

Shore: In terms of learning, I don’t think the 
class size question is necessarily important. It 
may be in the long run, but we still don’t know. 
Class size probably matters only in terms of the 
children’s learning preferences, and the 
learning styles of children are not so closely 
related to their ability that you could make a 
prescription for very bright students. 

Gifted children seem, in general, to prefer to 
work alone. Does that mean the class has to be 
limited to one or six students? I don’t know. 

I don’t think class size is particularly critical 
unless the teacher is stereotyped in his class 
organization. You can have a class of fifty and 
still have the students working on their own. 

There is one thing class size definitely affects, 
and the literature makes it quite clear: with 
very few exceptions class size affects the 
teacher’s workload. Teaching 38 students in an 
English class to write — which means they 
write every day and you read every word — is 
something just this side of hell. And it is the 
same for almost every subject. There is no 
doubt that it is easier and more pleasurable to 
teach a class of 12 than a class of 38. 

News: What facilities for gifted children are 
available in Quebec? 

Shore: We have an unfortunate situation 
here — there’s no mention whatsoever of gifted- 
ness in the education statutes. In fact, there are 
some things that get in the way of gifted chil- 
dren. There is, for example, a minimum age for 
entry into school. If a child below that age 
happens to be socially mature, big and healthy, 
and able to read — as is common among the 
very bright — he still can’t get into school. The 
school, however, can immediately put the child 
into grade one when he reaches school age and 
accelerate him where acceleration is desirable. 

But the Quebec government’s 1977 Green 
Paper on education proposes to restrict the 
amount of acceleration, so there are dangers 
that one possible way of dealing with some 
gifted children — speeding them through the 
system — may be closed to us. 

There are signs of hope. Many school 
commissions and individual teachers have 


attempted to do things for gifted children and 
the Protestant School Board of Greater 
Montreal is well along in launching a board- 
wide program. They are beginning modestly 
and cautiously, but with good intentions. | am 
optimistic. 

News: Referring to your point about accelera- 
tion, should children not stay with their age- 
mates? Isn’t “peer grouping”’ an argument 
against acceleration? 

Shore: Yes, but it’s not an argument; it’s a 
presumption. There’s little evidence to support 
it other than a few case studies for which no 
comparisons were made. There are some classic 
cases of the supposed “‘burn-outs” — children 
who were pushed so hard they burned out. But 
these are the exceptions, magnified by the press. 
When, in fact, you do radically accelerate 
young teenagers by putting them into univer- 
sity — youngsters who are academically ready, 
who are emotionally willing, whose parents are 
supportive — you find that they thrive. 

News: Given the present school system, what 
is the best course for the gifted child’s parents 
to follow? 

Shore: You have four choices. The hardest is 
to get your local school to do something. There 
are great advantages in the neighbourhood 
school — it is around the corner and the child 
can walk. If you know that your school has 
three grade-four teachers and one of them has a 
super reputation, go to the principal and beg to 
have your child put in his class. Ask the teacher 
to ask for the child. Do everything you possibly 
can in as courteous a way as you can — that’s 
important. You also have the right to send your 
child to any public school you wish, in any 
school board, as long as you are prepared to get 
him there. So, parents can shop around. 

Then you have a fairly large network of 
alternative schools. There are the private 
schools, but they don’t make any greater claim 
to serve the needs of gifted children than do 
the others. Children don’t go to private 
schools primarily because they’re brilliant. 
They go because their parents have the money 
and want them to go to private school, or 
because they think the school has a good 
academic reputation. The fact that a school has 
a solid curriculum doesn’t guarantee that its 
students will be more academically able than 
those you’ll find elsewhere. And the disadvan- 
tage of private schools is that most of them 
have waiting lists; if you start making special 
demands for your child, they perhaps have less 
need to listen to you than do the public schools. 

Halfway between public and private schools 
are parochial schools. They satisfy the needs of 
some bright students because they condense the 
regular curriculum — they do all the public 
school does in two-thirds the time — and they 
offer French as well. In other words, not only 
do they cover the full curriculum and add a 
partial or nearly complete French-immersion 

program, but they also provide training in the 


8 


Pet hene a ee he PPA Rte 2s 


language and culture of the school’s predomi- 
nant group. It could be a Greek Orthodox 
school or a Jewish parochial school, for 
example. 

Another alternative is French immersion, but 
there are great problems holding the interest of 
very bright children. A lot of them drop out. 
The program is highly structured and the level 
of language being learned, especially in later 
immersion classes, is quite elementary. So 
you’ve got gifted children, whose verbal skills 
may be well developed in their native language, 
having to struggle along in elementary French 
with great restriction on the quality of thought 
they can express. Intellectually, school becomes 
dull. It’s like an adult having to speak grade- 
two language all day. 

News: Should a different approach be used in 
teaching gifted girls as opposed to gifted boys? 
Shore: There is a special problem with gifted 
girls — particularly teenagers. We’re still 
saddled with sex stereotyping in career choices 
for women. They are not, on this continent any- 
way, appearing in numbers anywhere repre- 
sentative of the female population in the 
sciences, engineering, the high-prestige 
management professions. 

One of the reasons is that they’re dropping 
math and science in high school. They are no 
worse at it than the boys but, by the time they 
are old enough to be aware of the women’s 
liberation movement and start thinking of 
themselves as women in a man’s world, it’s too 
late to catch up. You cannot be a chemist 
without math, and you cannot suddenly decide 
in grade eleven to make it up. It’s a cumulative 
subject. (The only positive outcome of this 
unfortunate situation is that we have more 
highly able women teachers, nurses, and 
librarians than we probably deserve. Had they 
been able to be something else they might well 
have been so.) 

One of the responsibilities that we have for 
all girls in school, especially for those with 
ability, is not to let them drop math. If we don’t 
convince them to keep up their quantitative 
studies through high school, they will be con- 
demned to a non-competitive position in 
university and post-graduate studies. 

News: Why is there opposition to special 
classes for the gifted? 
Shore: The main objection is the élitism 
argument — that you’re giving special privi- 
leges to bright youngsters by setting up special 
classes. It’s just not true. If, in fact, the classes 
are being set up to meet the real educational 
needs of children who are capable of dealing 
with the more challenging subject matter, then 
you’re not cheating anybody of anything. When 
setting up these programs for the gifted it is 
important not to take away from others. But 
neither should these children be denied the 
chance to use their brains to the fullest extent. 
That’s one answer to the élitism argument. 
It’s really a question of how you define 


| 


: ‘ 
hy 

| 

“ 


educational equality. If you accept the élitism — 
argument, equality of educational opportunity 
means ‘“‘the same thing offered to everybody,” 1. 
But another definition of educational equality is" 
“each child to the limits of his potential.” We : 
know that’s impossible and, economically, at 
least, equally silly. In between there has tobe 
some accommodation. 

I think you can defend a separate class if the. 
subject matter and the number of children : 
warrant it. The separate class may be three 
students together in a corner or it may be thirty 
in a separate room. a 
News: Should we have separate schoolsto 
train mathematicians and scientists, just as we | 
have schools to train ballet dancers? ‘ 
Shore: It’s harder to defend special school - 
than special classes because there is a totality of 
social segregation that occurs in a separate 
school. But some segregation is necessary; the | 
gifted need each other. They have to be ableto i 
discover that there are others as smart as they — 
are. They have to be able to talk the same lan _ 
guage. I think the answer is acompromise: 
they should be together some of the time with — 
their intellectual peers and some of the time . 
with their social peers. | 

There are segregated schools in the per- 
forming arts and they seem to be respected for 
what they accomplish. The Bronx High School | 
of Science is another example. The viability of 
a segregated school must also depend on the 
size of the population from which the students 
are attracted. ¥ 

We have to avoid cornering ourselves by 
making absolute and all-encompassing state- 
ments. Total segregation is not the answer. — ] 
Total integration is not the answer. Total any- 
thing is not the answer. Andthe morewe 
destroy these totalities the closer we come to | 
dealing with each child individually. We will” 
never really be able to do that, but that isa | 
goal. If we had individualized instruction we ~ 
wouldn’t need to talk about education for the 
gifted. But they are an identifiable group that is 
not well served by the way things arenow. 

We’ve fallen into stereotypes about gifted- 
ness — we seem to feel that there is something 
abnormal about it. It is not abnormal at all. _ 
High intelligence, though not typical, is quite 
normal. Some people are endowed with beauly 
or strength, others with mental abilities. [tis 
important to regard these gifts as normal and 
good and healthy. 0 


—e 


4 


Women at McG 
Second-class c 


by Victoria Lees 


The starting salary of PhD holders within 
two years of graduation was $11,800 for males 
compared with $9,400 for females.... The more 


i years of experience the more marked becomes 


the difference in income between the sexes. 
Females who had held PhDs for 19 or more 
years earned 53.9 per cent of their male 
counterparts’ average salary. In dollar terms, a 
male earned $22,800 whereas the average 


female's income was $12,300. 


— Max von Zur-Muelhen, “Profile of PhDs 
in Canada,’ Canadian Statistical Review, 


« July 1976. 


yh 


Inthe century that has elapsed since the first 
Canadian woman was granted a bachelor’s 
degree, women have fought and won a number 
of battles within the ivy-covered walls. 
Coeducation has been accepted, women have 
gained admittance to the professional Faculties, 
and female professors are no longer rarities. 

Feminists claim, however, that Canadian 
campuses are still not free of sex discrimina- 
tion. Sensitized by the liberation movement, 
some women academics have begun raising 
their voices against the inequities in hiring and 
promotion practices, and the sexism that has 
fossilized into university structures. History 
courses, they say, ignore half the world’s 
population. Male academics are addressed as 
Doctor or Professor, while females are often 
called Mrs. or Miss. Counsellors continue to 
direct women students into low-paying service 
jobs. 

How does McGill stand in regard to sex 
discrimination? Is it a good place for women to 
study and work? Yes and no. McGill still has 
no women in top university management, 
though they hold some senior positions. 
Women still do not play prominent roles in 
student politics. Female professors, on average, 
earn less than their male counterparts. But a 
Senate Standing Committee on Women was 
set up a year ago, a successor to the relatively 
ineffectual 1970 Committee on Discrimination 
as to Sex in the University. An interdisciplinary 
minor in women’s studies will be offered to 
students this fall; and later in the year a woman 
will be chosen associate dean of students. 

The driving force behind these advances has 


itizens? 


been the McGill Committee on Teaching and 
Research on Women (MCTRW). A loosely 
structured organization, the MCTRW 
developed out of a series of open meetings on 
women’s studies held at McGill between 1973 
and 1975. 

Student organizer Libby Israel summed up 
the feelings of meeting participants: “When 
51 per cent of the total population considers 
itself a minority something is very wrong. And 
when the total population considers 51 per cent 
of itself less important than the rest, something 
very wasteful and equally wrong is going on. 
Women’s studies is the most exciting and 
explosive issue in my life right now because, 
like every other woman who is exploring 
women’s studies, I am beginning to understand 
the world as it exists for me, not as it exists for 
some white, Anglo-Saxon male academic, but 
as it exists for me, woman.” 

The open meetings resulted in no dramatic 
campus demonstrations, no burning bras, no 
fiery demands for reform. But interest in 
women’s studies and in the creation of a 
women’s centre was smoldering. A small but 
determined group of staff, students, and 
alumnae banded together under the leadership 
of education professor Dr. Margaret Gillett to 
see what it could do to fan the flames. 

In order to publicize its cause and to 
demonstrate to the McGill community that 
valid academic work in the field of women’s 
studies was in progress, the MCTRW 
sponsored a seminar series in 1976-77, to which 
it invited ten distinguished women speakers 
from a variety of disciplines. The group also 
submitted to Principal Dr. Robert Bell a well- 
documented study entitled “*A Survey of 
Teaching and Research on Women at 
McGill.” 

The fifty-page report laid bare some dis- 
quieting facts. Researchers discovered that 
although women hold almost half the 
administrative positions at the university, they 
cluster at the lower levels of the management 
strata. Their numbers decrease as responsibility, 
pay, and prestige accrue. 

For women academics the pattern is 
identical. Noted the report: “‘Female full 
professors constitute only 5.3 per cent of that 
rank, while female assistant professors, 
lecturers, and visiting professors are 24 per 
cent, 26.1 per cent, and 21 per cent respectively. 
It is apparent from these statistics that 
academic women are not favoured at McGill 
and that neither the university nor the women 
academics have cause for complacency.”’ 

The study did not lay the blame entirely at 
the feet of the university. Women, it noted, are 


underrepresented in research: ‘‘Out of a total of 


842 faculty, 46 women (5.4 per cent) were 
receiving research funds (other than for travel) 
in 1975-76. Out of a total of $19,241,656 
awarded, those women received $897,121 or 
4.6 per cent.... It would appear that greater 


10 


diligence on the part of women is needed in 
seeking grants.” 

If the researchers found the status of women 
at McGill-somewhat alarming, they were 
encouraged by the considerable interest in 
women’s studies expressed by McGill 
academics, both male and female — over forty 
scholars in twenty departments were carrying 
out related research. Topics ranged from 
women in higher education in Kuwait to the 
effects of women’s liberation on gynecology. 

The MCTRW study closed with a list of 
recommendations. ‘‘We asked for the moon 
hoping to get its reflection in a puddle,” says 
study researcher Dr. Janet Donald, associate 
professor of education. First on the list was a 
centre for women’s studies that would under- 
take research on women at McGill and in 
universities generally, provide a forum for 
communication, and stimulate interest in 
research activities related to women. 

To date, nothing has come of this request. 
Andrea Vabalis, who worked on the study while 
a graduate student in Religious Studies, is not 
holding her breath. “McGill has a history of 
apathy,” she maintains. ‘“‘Even if you had a 
brand new centre located right on campus and 
open regularly 9 to 5, with offices and plants, 
an enormous resource centre, and interesting 
guest speakers, no one would come.” But 
Gillett is just as certain that the centre will be 
established — so certain that she plans to 
devote the next ten years to the project. 

The MCTRW also asked that a vice- 
principal (women) be appointed. Though this 
request was denied, the MCTRW claims a 
victory of sorts. Because of its pressure, Senate 
has reestablished the post of associate dean of 
students and stipulated that a woman be 
appointed to fill the position. 

A third recommendation — the establishment 
of an interdisciplinary minor in women’s 
studies — became reality this fall with the 
introduction of fifteen women-related courses 
in four Faculties. The minor, however, is seen 
only as a first step. The committee would like to 
see a major offered as well, though not every- 
one on campus Is convinced of the validity of 
such a project. Even the MCTRW member who 
drew up the preliminary outline of the minor 
had initial doubts. “‘I first became interested in 
women’s studies by being ferociously opposed 
to it, and then seeing the light,” says Dr. Paola 
Tomaszuk, associate professor of classics. ‘I 
had the feeling for many years that this kind of 
study was not really scholarly. I told Andrea 
Vabalis when she came to ask me about the 
content of my courses that I would never dream 
of giving a course on women. But two years 
later I was teaching one — ‘Women in Classical 
Drama.’ In the meantime I had been to Europe 
and seen things and talked. I spoke to a 
learned friend who said, ‘This is not the time to 
talk about being scholarly. It is the time to fight 
and then be scholarly.’ ”’ 


The MCTRW’s final request was that Se te 
establish a Standing Committee on Women, — 
This was done in April 1977. Chaired by the 
indefatigable Gillett and composed of ten ner i 

and women from the McGill community, is 
mandate is broad — the possible establishnent 
of a women’s centre, support for positive ation” 


in the employment and promotion of women, = 
2 4A 


“4 
' 
{ 
a) 


the encouragement of women returningto 
graduate school... in short, advocacy for all a 
women on campus. 4 
After only ten meetings the standing 4 
committee has barely sunk its teeth into th | 
assignment. One small but symbolic step: th is 
challenged McGill’s bastion of male chauvin- — 
ism, the Faculty of Engineering, whose 19°7- 8 
student handbook was replete with sexist jokes, 
pornographic pictures, and bawdy songs. ‘The 
trouble with the handbook,” says committee ‘ 
member Dr. Irwin Gopnik, associate profissor 
of English, “‘is, number one, that it is * 
extremely offensive — to anyone, not justo 
women. Number two, although it was pubes 
by the students, it has in it messages of wecol ne 
and photographs of the dean and departmnt 
chairmen. It looks like an official documeit.” 
The committee made its feelings known te 
Dean of Engineering Dr. Gerald Farnell. He ~ 
refused, however, to withdraw his sanction — 
or his photograph — from the publication. : 
matter may yet go before Senate. ’ 
Unlike the MCTRW, the Senate committee 
carries considerable political clout. But it aks | 
the fiery commitment characteristic of the 
informal body. Vabalis explains: “The Senate” 
committee was forced into existence. People 
were appointed, so it was not the closest thing 
to their hearts. It was to ours.” 
Gillett believes the MCTR W still has avital ” 
role to play in changing the attitudes of th: ¥ 
university community. ‘It would be goodif the” 
contact aspect of the MCTRW could be 
strengthened and stimulated. You don’t git tial 
at all in a Senate committee. In addition t the 
tangible things the MCTR W has accompls 
it has brought people together and that is 1 Vet) 
worthwhile function. People have found iat 
those in Arts or Medicine or Education don't 
have two heads. Even that is a start.’ . 
But the MCTRW needs new blood. Sone — 
original members have graduated; othershave 
taken their considerable energies and teading | 
skills to other universities. Gillett is on : 
sabbatical this year; Vabalis, who still feds ~ 
committed and responsible to the womenol ~ 
McGill, is busy with a new career in publishing. 
‘Whenever anyone says, ‘The feminist 
movement on campus is going, it’s gone, 1 g& 
all tensed up,” she remarks. “I want to Sa, — 
‘Pll organize it for you; just give meten 
interested people.’ ”’ <q 
Finding ten dedicated feminists on campus 
would be as difficult now as it has been inthe r 
past. ‘On the whole,” remarks Gillett, — 
“women at McGill are simply not politically 


By 


re 


" activist.” Biochemistry professor Dr. Rose 


Johnstone, who recently completed a study on 
wonen’s wages at McGill, explains: “Ifa 
woman has a valid complaint and makes a lot 
of roise about it and causes a lot of fur to fly, 
shewill never be able to work there again, even 


‘ if the situation is improved. She will have 


offended so many people. She asks herself, “So 


* whut if | am not promoted? So what if in my 


ow mind I am not being treated as well as Joe 


Bicw next door? So what if I earn less? Some- 
thing is better than nothing. I like this job. It 
givzs me something.’ I think it would be an 
unusual individual who would risk irritating her 


 coleagues, and still be able to work in the 


sittation. So women accept their lot and say, 
*Farget it." ”’ 

“he women academics who do speak out 
clam that the university discriminates against 
then when hiring. Women hold only 18 per 
cert of McGill’s teaching positions, although 
they represent 33 per cent of the graduate 


} stulent body. In a situation which feminists call 
' “tke pimping system,” the university 


apparently is willing to train women academics 
bu! not employ them. The university adminis- 
traion responds by pointing out that it hires 
wanen in proportion to the number who apply 
fora job opening. “I think that in terms of 
ap)ointments made in recent years, the 
unversity has been fair,’ says Vice-Principal 


» (A:ademic) Dr. Eigil Pedersen. “I don’t think 


it tas been pro-woman or pro-man.” 

On wage disparities Pedersen remarks: “‘The 
am)malies in terms of salary and rank between 
Faculties are greater than the anomalies 
be:ween male and female at McGill. For 
eximple, a law professor of a given age, 
exyerience, and background at the early stages 
ofhis career earns virtually double what a 
music professor of the same age, background, 
and experience earns. And it has nothing to do 
wih whether the person is male or female. 

“Women tend to be clustered in those 
Feculties where the doctorate hasn't been 
required. Those tend to be the low-status 
occupations which have generally been reserved 
fo: women in society — teaching, nursing, 
physical and occupational therapy. That is what 
th:ows out the statistics. Social custom and 
tridition are things that the university doesn’t 
control. If, however, you find in the university 
women of a similar background doing the same 
jo), publishing as well and not being treated 
eqially with men in the same Faculty, then I 
think there is a real case against the university.”’ 

In the spring of 1977 the McGill Association 
ofUniversity Teachers undertook a study to 
determine whether inequalities existed in 
sdaries paid to men and women professors. 
The answer: a qualified yes. (Researcher 
Jchnstone cautions that there were not enough 
women in the sample to make the study truly 
revealing.) 

Women claim that, in addition to being 


underpaid, they are not advanced at the same 
rate as their male colleagues. At McGill, of 40 
directors of services, 10 are women. Of 47 
chairmen of departments, 3 are women. There 
has never been a female dean, vice-principal, or 
principal. 

And so the argument rages back and forth. 
Defenders of the status quo say that women 
academics are not advanced as far or as fast as 
men because they are less competent. Backed 
by published research, feminists retort that 
women consistently outscore their male peers 
on IQ tests. “Yes, but women don’t publish as 
much as men,’ detractors respond. ‘Men 


academics go home at night to supper on the 
table,’ feminists counter, ‘while women 
academics go home to wash the break fast 
dishes, prepare the evening meal, and catch up 
on the laundry.’ One American study showed 
that women PhDs average 28 hours per week on 
household tasks; another revealed that their 
greatest problem is lack of domestic help. To 
feminists, at least, the message comes across 
loud and clear: women are entitled to seek 
academic rewards only after they have paid the 
price of their biology. Female potential is being 
wasted while women academics, administrators, 
and graduate students try to juggle home and 
career. 

The issue of hiring and promoting women 


academics is more than a matter of dollars and 
cents, say feminists. They want enough women 
employed by the university to demonstrate to 
female students that there are, in fact, many 
options open to them. Johnstone says she 
entered the fray ‘“‘primarily to awaken female 
students so they would size up their life’s work 
before they had responsibilities to other 

people, and make a conscious decision on how 
they are going to conduct their lives. If they are 
going to be primarily wives and mothers, if that 
is what they consider their career, the decision 
should be conscious rather than something that 
just happens. I think that if you are going to 
change the face of women in society they have 
got to be self-sufficient. All this consciousness- 
raising and talking are fine, but they won't 
change anything until every woman feels she 
has an obligation to herself to be able to be 
financially independent.” 

The MCTRW argues that by their very 
presence in senior positions women would 
proclaim to female students that “‘women can.” 
But as long as the university is loath to advance 
anyone who has not compiled a lengthy list of 
publications, women professors will find it 
difficult to climb the academic ladder. ‘“‘Maybe 
women should be promoted with less research 
than men,” says Pedersen. *“*Maybe that would 
be fair. But I think a lot of people would be 
after my head if I promulgated that.” 

Pedersen sees biology as the major reason for 
the scarcity of women in high-level positions. 
Women bear the children and are largely 
responsible for their care. They simply don’t 
have time to take on high-pressure jobs. 
Vabalis, however, lays the blame on female 
apathy. ‘‘Women at McGill are sufficiently 
comfortable,” she remarks. “‘It is like being 
partially opiated, and it is a chronic situation. 
Women have just enough. They have reached 
associate professor, and a dozen or so are full 
professors. Just enough. There is a women’s 
union. Just enough. (The fact that it stays open 
only three hours a week during the prime-time 
school year, and that it’s got a wonderful 
library but everybody steals the books, doesn’t 
bother people.) Just enough, so we don’t create 
problems.” 

The solution, in Vabalis’s opinion? “All you 
have to do is get angry — creative anger propels 
you out of your situation of tolerance and 
understanding,”’ she asserts. “ “Yes, I know 
how hard it is for male professors to work at the 
same salary as women.’ Garbage! If you get 
really angry you say, “This is plain and sheer 
discrimination.’ I think you should call a spade 
a spade. Nothing ever gets done if people refuse 
to look at reality.” 

Both the standing committee, backed by all 
the official weight of the Senate, and the 
McGill Committee on Teaching and Research 
on Women, carried along on creative anger, are 
examining the female reality very closely, and 
are calling the spades as they see them. 0 


11 


———— 


All Rhodes lead to Oxford 


A clerk ther was of Oxenford also, 
That unto logyk hadde longe ygo. 


Sownynge in moral vertu was his speche, 


And gladly wolde he lerne and gladly teche. 
— Chaucer, Prologue to The Canterbury Tales. 


Editor's Note: Last September third-year 
medical student Brian Ward set sail for 
England — with a prestigious Rhodes 
Scholarship tucked in his pocket. Currently 
studying for his master’s in neuroendocrinology 
at Oxford University, Ward will return to 
McGill in 1979 to complete his medical degree. 
Last year, for the first time in their 75-year 
history, Rhodes Scholarships were awarded to 
women. To the News’s request for his 
impressions of life at Oxford, Ward replied 
with typical wit: ‘‘The Rhodes folks of the 
male variety have been feeling alittle left out 
of the excitement this year. Too bad I wasn't 
born a woman; then you'd have areal story!” 


Still wary of sharp corners and straight edges 
after the five-day boat trip I stood, bags in 
hand, at the door of the sixteenth-century 
space that was to be mine for the year. 
Theologians, scientists, classicists, and a good 
number of the idle rich had stood at that same 
Corpus Christi door. It may have been a 
momentous occasion for me but, with time out 
for wars, purges, and the odd plague, the room 
had seen four hundred and sixty-one years of 
service. Accordingly, it had not made any 
special fuss. 

I couldn’t believe my eyes. Floor, black ; 
walls, grey ; ceiling, with the benefit of the 
doubt, white. The furnishings : a sway-backed 
bed, desk, and three overstuffed, moth-eaten 
chairs huddled in the middle of 1,000 cubic feet 
of air that was a good ten degrees colder than 
outside. The room’s concessions to luxurious 
living consisted of a water heater and a twelve- 
inch electric affair on the wall, the sole source 
of heat. Both were metered; neither worked. 
One twenty-watt light bulb, two hangers, and 
three-quarters of a bookshelf completed the 
scene. A bay window looked out on the 
quadrangle, but it had become the unfortunate 
casualty of a dividing wall a century before. 
The loo, an exhibitionist’s delight, command- 
ed an excellent view. 

And bienvenue... it had started to rain! 
Twenty minutes of English housing and already 
I was suffering from incipient sore throat. The 
popularity of the English pubs suddenly 
became obvious, their attraction irresistible. | 


12 


soon found myself sampling rather more of tle 
warm English bitters than I had intended — | 
had to drink enough to make the new, and 
appropriately named, “‘digs”’ look tolerable, 
let alone inviting. 

Out in the city again, I met a dozen of my 
ship mates wandering the streets in a state na 
unlike my own — awe-struck and shell-shocked 
at once. After a quick ‘‘depression round” of 
living quarters, we discovered (to our delight 
strangely enough) that no one in particular hid 
been singled out for the authentic experience 
eighteenth-century style. We all had. So we 
poured ourselves into the nearest pub before 
10:30 closing time to drink some more — firs, 
to our incredible good luck to be where we 
were; second, to the winter of sweating plastir 
and soggy sheets to come. 

“Time, gentlemen, please,’ came all too 
quickly but we left the warmth of the pub int 
considerably better frame, if not state, of mnd. 
Oxford lesson number one was awaiting us: 
steeple and spire navigation through the cityis 
impossible. (While it may work in every othir 
city I’ve ever staggered home in, it still won’ 
work in Oxford.) That night, probably for tke 
first time but not the last, the walls of Corpu 
Christi College looked down on an unusual 
sight — a Canadian tossing on the floor ina 
down-filled Arctic sleeping bag. 

Unfortunately, when I awoke nine hours 
later the room was still there. But outside wis a 
different Oxford. The sun was just getting tle 
edge on the slime moulds, the sky was a 
cloudless blue, the air was fresh. There was 
also a racket outside my door. Suddenly, th: 
sun, the air, and the racket burst into my 
room... “to get it ready for the Canadian 
arriving any day now.”’ Smith was every ina 
the traditional Oxford scout. In a brisk bedto- 
broom conversation we established that I 
would need a cap and gown and polished shies 
to matriculate, that Yorkshire was the fines 
corner of the British Isles, and that I was gang 
to make myself scarce in less than ten minues. 


The golden spires of Oxford rise to greet 
scholars today as they have for centuries 
Aquatint of Radcliffe Library and All Soul; 
College by P. Burdett, n.d. (181" x 12”) 


As I stepped outside, the sensation of ; 
walking into a storybook was overpowering. ~ 
The rainsoaked beauty of the previous day had 
been transformed into sunlit magnificence. 
That eye-rubbing, arm-pinching excitement | 
must come to every new resident as a matter of 
course; tinges of it return with new lighting, 
angles, or seasons for as long as you stay. For 
me, that morning’s walk left a glow that not 
even baked beans for breakfast could cool. 

Tuition paid, bags unpacked, it was 
distraction time at the Freshers’ Fair. The old 
campus standards, of course, were well 
represented. What university doesn’t have 
meditators, ‘‘Moonies,”” and Marxists? But 
there the similarity ended and Oxford took ~ 


a 

) 
+ 
| 


“ane 


over. Two hundred booths offered thousands of 
milling students a variety of extra-curricular 
activities. Perhaps some caving, calligraphy, 
or coursing as either the hunter or the hunted? 
‘**Hunted?”’ I asked. “‘It’s easy,” replied a 
British student. “* We tie a bag of chemicals to 
your leg, let you loose in the woods, and set the 
dogs on you after an hour’s head start.” Hats 
offto the RSPCA and on to the next booth — 
quickly. (I have since learned from friends 
foolish enough to give it a go that adrenalin- 
assisted running is quite a thrill. Lots of “good 
vibes” from fox holes, too. I suppose it is only 
a matter of time before a whole new profession 
emerges and we’re treated to live BBC 
coverage, interviews with the fox, and all the 
rest of it.) 

Posters, films, and slide shows promoted a 
kaleidoscope of people and purposes: 
Aristotle, black magic, Robbie Burns, the 
cheese society, Paul Henderson, mushrooms ... 
‘*Wait a minute!” I thought. “*Paul 
Henderson? Those guys must be Canadians.” 
But they had spotted me first. *“* North 
American, aren’t you?” came a voice from 
behind the desk. Although annoyed at the ease 
with which I had been picked out of the swarm 
— having already given up lumberjack shirts, 
down vests, and fluorescent training shoes 
— I began to enjoy the interview. The glint 
in my interlocutor’s eye developed into an 


ei Peemriner yr nrenme be veneers So 


excited twitch as he heard “‘Canadian”’ and 
then, hallelujah, ‘“‘Montreal.” I was, 
apparently, a hot prospect for the Oxford ice 
hockey club. Little did he know he was talking 
to a man who had peaked at peewee and been 
judged incompetent to play for McGill’s 
McConnell Hall residence team five years 
running. Little did I know that twenty-three 
years of armchair exposure to the NHL was 
sufficient recommendation for a tryout. 
“You'll know the rules better than half the 
referees,’ he exclaimed in delight. And before 
| knew it, I was on the Oxford Blues. 

There is nothing quite like English ice 
hockey. Two-inch gill nets protect the fans, 
and the lines and face-off circles are hand- 
painted before each game. Smashing penalties 
are second only to infractions for unnecessary 
language. Three thousand screaming fans (who 
had paid admission!), programs, press 
coverage — peewee was never like this. 

The ice hockey team is not the only group on 
the lookout for Canadians at Oxford. Quebec 
House, the Commonwealth Club, the 
Canadian Students Overseas, the British 
Canadian University Students Organization, 
the Canadian Club, and the lacrosse and ski 
teams are all in need of recruits. 

Some unfortunate North Americans never 
meet any of the locals at all; not surprisingly, 
they find they can’t adapt to England and 


Oxford and remain doomed to comb the 
cobbled streets in search of a smoked meat 
sandwich or a hamburger just like McDonald’s 
makes. Still others, whose vocal cords undergo 
a strange transatlantic metamorphosis, land 
bow-tied and bowler-hatted and spend their 
stay trying to fool foreigners and making fools 
of themselves. 

But to embrace the real Oxford is to enjoy a 
tremendous variety of experience. How to 
describe it? Corpus Christi College with its 
weather-pocked yellow stone, heavy oak doors, 
and pelican sundial; the grace of the slow- 
motion stretch and sink between drifting punt 
and mud-paralyzed pole; frosty February 
mornings cut by coxswains’ razor-sharp 
tongues ; evening walks through tranquil 
cloisters and magical gardens; anticipatory 
gastrointestinal distress when faced with 
English delicacies like faggots, spotted dick, 
and toad-in-the-hole. 

And I’ve not even mentioned academic 
Oxford. At the end of three years’ work, 
undergraduates write between ten and fourteen 
papers in an all-or-nothing degree blitz. For 
North Americans with intellectual milk teeth 
cut on multiple-choice exams and weaned on 
academic anonymity, Oxford is a shock — and 
a delight. The system is based on accessibility : 
lawyers, researchers, novelists, and Nobel 
laureates expect to teach and are available to 
anyone interested enough to seek them out. 

This academic archipelago boasts a fauna of 
bewildering variety rivalled by few, if any, 
institutions. Numerous attempts to describe 
Oxford’s zoology have been made over the 
years ; everyone, for example, has his own 
mental picture of the quintessential Oxford 
teacher. Outlandish as the images may seem, 
they are probably quite accurate, or even 
understated. The professor emeritus who 
surreptitiously fires mashed potato balls during 
special dinners; the distinguished don who 
receives equally distinguished guests with his 

feet in a plastic tub of Epsom salts; the 
collected academic giants who frolic in the 
nude at Parson’s Pleasure, a public and well- 
punted part of the river — they are all for 
real. 

And so are the infuriating yet hilarious 
regulations of the last century which govern the 
students of this one. Supper is denied in some 
colleges for lack of an academic gown and 
students wearing anything but regulation dark 
socks are barred from examination rooms. 
(When refused entrance, one inappropriately 
socked but enterprising individual bought a 
can of spray paint. He was admitted moments 
later with dark, if sticky, socks.) 

Oxford generates anecdotes by the thousands 
— the bad times make great stories, the good 
times marvellous memories. Every student 
lucky enough to have shared the Oxford 
experience leaves with an ample supply of 

both. 0 


McGill's collections: all creature: 


by Holly Dressel 


The Blacker-Wood Library of Zoology 
and Ornithology is a living legacy for 
McGill scholars — a treasure-trove of 
books and art. 


McGill’s 75,000-volume Blacker-Wood 
Library of Zoology and Ornithology is con- 
sidered by experts to be among the best or- 
nithological collections in the world. Its 
reputation rests in part on its magnificent 
collection of rare books and manuscripts: 
fifteenth-century herbals bound in vellum and 
Persian natural histories bordered with gold 
and lapis; original quarto volumes by John 
Audubon and pieces of Charles Darwin’s 
correspondence. 

These works, and thousands more, were 
collected by ophthalmologist Casey Wood, 
MD’03, whose passion for ornithology was 
partially financed by McGill. Funds for the 
zoological collection were donated by Wood’s 
friend, California businessman Robert 
Blacker. Upon retiring in 1920 Wood set out 
on an eight-year tour of the world in search 
of birds and bird lore, avidly collecting art- 
works, books, and curiosities along the way. 
Crate after crate of treasures destined for 
McGill continued to arrive on the docks at 
Montreal harbour until Wood’s death in 1942. 

While he enjoyed a distinguished medical 
career and produced two classic zoological 
texts as well as a number of scholarly 
articles, Wood was something of an eccentric. 
He and his wife Emma were accompanied on 
their travels by a legendary parrot named 
John the Third. “He was a lovable, gentle, 
playful, intelligent and highly educated mem- 
ber of his species, Amazona oratrix,’ wrote 
Wood in The Passing of John III, a touching 
tribute marking his fifty-year-old parrot’s 
death in 1930. “He had been carefully trained 
in his early youth by a lady who made a 
specialty of educating intelligent parrots and 
he grew up to be a personage of many accom- 
plishments.”’ A tinted drawing of John the 
Third graces each bookplate in the original 
volumes of the collection, and his portrait, 
which Wood commissioned from Danish 
artist Henrik Gronvold, looks down on all who 
use Blacker-Wood’s rare book room in the 
Redpath Library. 

Natural acquisitions for Wood’s collec- 
tion were Edward Lear’s “‘Parrot Book” and 
his personal sketchbook, which contains a 
series of watercolours of birds (see cover). A 


14 


Above: Dr. Casey Wood's beloved parrot 
and travelling companion John the Third 
“grew uf to be a personage of many accom- 


plishmerts.” Here he enlivens an original 
bookplate from the Emma Shearer Wood 
Library of Ornithology. 

At right: Hedgehog (Ericulus setosus), 
original watercolour by J.G. Keulemans in 
Histoire Naturelle de Madagascar, edited by 
Altred Giandidier, 1875-1899 (912"’ x 7"’). 


celebrated painter in his youth, Lear turned 
to writing nonsense verse and doggerel in 
1834 when his eyesight began to fail. The 
“Feather Book”’ is also one of a kind. Its 156 
‘“paintings”’ were constructed in the early 
seventeenth century by the Duke of Milan’s 
gardener, and depict village life, hunting 
scenes, and commedia dell’ arte motifs. They 
represent more than curiosities — they have 
preserved the skins and plumage of species 


" . 
» 
es 


> is 
= £2 


- é ik f . 


q 
now extinct or unknown in northern Italy, 
The lifesize watercolours of Asian birds, 
fish, and flowers attributed to Lady a 
Elizabeth Gwillim, wife of a British official 
in India, are another highlight of the Blacker: 
Wood collection. Between 1800 and 1806 she” q 
either painted or commissioned a series of 
208 numbered works — the 121 owned by 
McGill are the only ones known to have sur- 
vived. Unlike Audubon and many other bird 
painters, Gwillim painted from life. As a ~ 
result her works are authentic observations 
of avian shape and stance, not conscientious ~ 
studies of taxidermists’ mistakes. As well, © 
she was able to note correctly the colours of © 
beak, feet, eyes, wattle, and comb which fade 
shortly after death. a 

The first ten Gwillim paintings to go on | 
public view were borrowed by Toronto’s } 
Royal Ontario Museum for its international 
exhibition of wildlife art held three years agoy 
In the Summer 1975 issue of Rotunda, museum 
art director Terry Shortt described his ) 
excitement upon viewing the works: “We 
were quite unprepared for what we saw when 
Miss Eleanor MacLean, the head librarian, 
opened a big folder and revealed to us the 
artwork. Painted two decades before Audubon 
published his illustrious Birds of America, ~ 
the Gwillim bird portraits can rightfully be. 
said to be among the finest ever done of 
Asian birds.” 

Not all the works in Blacker-Wood's cole 
lection are known for their scientific 4 
accuracy. Quite the opposite. Pictured in the 
Theatrum Universale Omnium Animalium® 
John Jonston, printed in 1755, arethree 
species of unicorn, as well as a “‘manticore” 
and an “‘alicorn’’ — a cow-like beast with 
fish eyes, an ear-to-ear mouth lined with 
sharp teeth, and hair growing forward from ~ 
the rump. A map in Thomas Pennant’s | 
Arctic Zoology of 1792 truncates Alaska am d 
oe halfway up with a dotted line marke 4 
“ice,” shows Vancouver Island as part of the 
ene and extends the Oregon River into 
lowa. 

So large and varied is the rare book col- 
lection that even the librarians are not cert in 


exactly what treasures it conceals. A recent = 


.” 


- oo _ 


Reptilia. 


Trt oeyr ates, cr 7st 


Above: Ashy swallow-shrike (Artamus fuscus), waterco/our attributed to Lady Elizabeth Gwillim, c. 1801 (6"'x 7’). The wife ofa 

British official in India, Lady Gwillim either painted or commissioned a series of over 200 lifesize watercolours of Asian birds, fish, 
and flowers that are regarded as ‘among the finest ever done.” 
At left: Turtle (Chelonia (mydas) virgata Schweiger) , hand-tinted lithograph drawn by Pretre in Historia Fisica Politica Y Natural de la 


Isla de Cuba, volume /V of Atlas de Zoologia, edited by Ramon de la Sagra, 1855 (6" x 7/2 


inquiry about the French painter Edouard 
Traviés brought to light a number of the 
artist’s original drawings bound into a copy 
of one of his books. Estimated value: 
$40,000. 

Until the collection was transferred in 
1970 to a separate locked room, many of the 
rare volumes had to be kept on open shelves 
as part of the lending library. Theft was a 
constant worry. Five years ago a Dutch rare- 
book firm contacted the university to ask if it 
had sold its edition of Monograph of the 
Petrels, which featured hand-coloured plates 
by Dutch artist J.G. Keulemans. The com- 
pany had been offered the valuable two- 
volume work by a New York bookstore. On 
checking the shelves, library assistant Anne 
Habbick confirmed that the books were 
indeed missing. Since the thief had gone to 
the trouble and expense of having the copies 
entirely rebound and every trace of McGill’s 
possession eradicated, the Dutch company 
demanded proof of ownership. Fortunately, 


from the beginning, Blacker-Wood librarians 
had taken precautions against theft. Habbick 
telegraphed a secret coded mark and both 
volumes were mailed home — beautifully 
rebound. 

Few Blacker-Wood books are that lucky. 
Many volumes are in need of repair: leather 
covers are literally crumbling away ; books 
bound in vellum are curling and cracking; 
papers and drawings lie stacked in broken 
portfolios. ‘Nothing gets restored,” sighs 
MacLean, whose budget is so tight that no 
funds can be allocated for this purpose. 
(Endowments from the Blacker family are 
earmarked for the purchase of rare and 
historical zoological material; the Wood fund 
is used solely for the acquisition of rare books 
and ornithological texts.) “Very little is even 
conserved,” the head librarian adds. “Items 
are stored but unless we have a little money 
left over we can’t even interleaf drawings 
with acid-free paper.” 

The rare book room, located off the 


library’s reading room, is itself far from 

ideal — it houses no display facilities, little 
work space, and lots of dust. The room, 
though temperature-controlled, is “‘little 
more than a glorified storage area,’ Habbick 
notes ruefully. There is no subject index and 
no accurate listing of the 3,000 original 
manuscripts in the collection. A recipient 
index of the letters collected by Wood has 
only just been started. 

In the meantime, the librarians are eager 
to have the rare books and artifacts seen and 
studied. They do their utmost to make the 
room accessible to illustrators, researchers, 
graduate students, zoologists, and bird 
watchers. “‘If they’re keen,” says Habbick, 
‘““we go out of our way to show off all we've 
got’? — everything from Charles Collins’s 
eighteenth-century portrait of the last living 
dodo to a complete set of twentieth-century 
German falconry equipment — hoods, lures, 
jesses, and all.0 


Mechanics of movement 


by Donna Nebenzahl 


Researchers in McGill's Biomechanics 
of Sports Medicine Laboratory apply the 
principles of mechanical engineering to 
bodily movement. 


@ Organized sports in their present form can 
be harmful to the physical development of 
children. 

@ Thecrouch is not necessarily the fastest 
or the safest — way to begin a race. 

@ Contrary to what coaches believe, the power 
for the hockey slapshot comes from the 
upper, or lead arm. 


These and other startling findings from 
McGill’s year-old Biomechanics of Sports 
Medicine Laboratory may one day alter the 
way both professional athletes and little 
leaguers are trained. To unlock the secrets of 
muscle and bone, researchers are applying to 
bodily action principles borrowed from 
mechanical engineering. The name of the new 
game is biomechanics. 

“My interest in the subject started several 
years ago, essentially with high-speed motion 
picture photography,” explains laboratory 
director Dr. Michael Greenisen, formerly 
assistant professor in the department of 
physical education and now both an assistant 
professor at the University of Wisconsin and 
associate member of McGill’s Faculty of 
Engineering. “‘We were filming different kinds 
of human movement patterns related to sports 
at 500 frames a second, and we started seeing 
things we hadn’t noticed before” — like 
pronation, the unconscious backward and 
outward flip of a pitcher’s hand after the 
baseball is released. It had gone unnoticed even 
by the athletes themselves. 

After high-speed cinematography revealed 
the external mechanics of sports movements, 
Greenisen grew curious about what was going 
on inside the muscles. Electromyography — 
the computerized recording of electrical 
activity in the muscles — gave him some 
answers. Equipment in McGill’s DATAC 
Computer Laboratory provided detailed 
information on the timing sequences of 
muscular action and on the amplitude and 
frequency of muscular contraction. 

Co-director Louis Vroomen, computer 


Electrodes and wires attached to this 
athlete's body transmit information on 
electrical activity in his muscles. 


18 


expert and special lecturer in the department of 


mechanical engineering, explains how a 
computer can measure a slapshot or a pitch. 
‘“‘Surface electrodes are put on the athlete’s 


skin over a particular muscle and are connected 


to the computer that records the electrical 
signals and stores them in digital form. Later 
on, the data can be calculated, analyzed, 
graphed — whatever we want. We get good 
myographs and repeatable results, and we can 
do ten tests on a subject in one hour.” 

Using a combination of high-speed 
photography and electromyography, the 
biomechanics laboratory is solving problems 


= SAREE 


that have baffled athletes and coaches for 
years. Researchers are presently engaged in a 


project for the Shooting Federation of Canada. 


‘*They have a number of shooters who develop 
bursitis of the shoulder and they asked us to 
try to find out why this happens,”’ explains the 
third member of the research team, Dr. Bernie 
Costello, orthopedic surgeon at the Royal 
Victoria Hospital. “‘We will select a 
representative group, examine them, and then, 
with a mechanical analysis of their shooting 
position and the effects of various weights of 
rifles, we will see why these factors combine to 
give them this particular problem.” 


For the researchers, prevention of injury is 
the priority application of their work. “If you 
have better-conditioned, better-trained 
athletes and better equipment, you're less 
likely to have injuries,’ says Costello. *““The 
first thing we should do is try to analyze the 
demands on the body for a particular sport and 
the most effective way for the body to meet 
those demands. Then we will see if there are 
areas where this can be improved.” 

Particularly worrisome to the researchers 
are the injuries coaches may unwittingly be 
causing to young children. While pitching 
fastballs may not harm an adult, the pronation 
effect can interfere with normal skeletal 
development in a child. An eight-year-old’s 
arm contains nine developing bones, six of 
which are pliable cartilage. Pronation twists 
the cartilage in a direction it was never 
intended to go and could, eventually, bend it 
out of shape. To prevent damage, Greenisen 
argues, organized sport should be redesigned so 
that children do not specialize in one 
particular skill but play a different position in 
every game. 

The group looks forward to doing work ‘on 
location’ — the football field, the hockey rink, 
the baseball diamond. “‘In aroom upstairs a 
pitcher can throw a ball, but he can’t pitch,” 
says Vroomen. ““We are now making a 
proposal to get facilities to go into the field. 
Portable equipment will collect the data; then 
we ll let the big computer do the analysis.” 

Professional baseball teams, including the 
Montreal Expos and the Los Angeles Dodgers, 
have expressed interest in the research, and 
pitchers Mike Marshall and Steve Garvey 
have donated their time and well-toned 
musculature for experiments. “It’s been our 
experience,’ says Greenisen, “that four or five 
national-level performers give us much more 
reliable data than thirty subjects selected 
randomly from a university physical education 
class.”” 

Despite widespread interest in the lab’s 
findings, convincing coaches to change their 
training techniques will be no easy task. 
‘‘Professional athletes are wary of scientific 
approaches and coaches are generally very 
traditional,’ remarks Greenisen. The real 
value of his work, he believes, lies elsewhere. 

‘What the sports scientist can do is collect 
data and use it with more beneficial results in 
the training of young children,” he explains. 
‘“‘We can’t make a difference to the Canadian 
Olympic team in time for Moscow, but we can 
eventually help young athletes develop more 
efficient and beneficial training programs, and 
prevent injuries caused by repetitive, strained 
practice.”” Vroomen agrees: “There is no 
reason why Canada cannot develop the same 
topnotch amateur talent as the Eastern-bloc 
countries. But this country must begin to 
develop its training of young children. That's 
where the emphasis must be.” 5 


— 


by Carol Stairs 


Swindlers and arsonists, extortioners 
and thieves — detectives Robert 
Beullac and Joel Hartt have exposed 
them all. _ 


He has been immortalized as Sherlock 
Holmes and Hercule Poirot, glamourized as 
Kojak and Columbo. But the real-life detective 
knows from experience that crimes are not 
always solved and that wearing a trench coat 
— no matter how rumpled — does not guaran- 
tee success. 

“Fiction shows the positive side,” ex- 
plains thirty-one-year-old detective Robert 
Beullac, BCL’73, founder and director of the 
Montreal-based Metropol Bureau of Investiga- 
tion. ‘‘But there is also the negative image 
— the shady operator who will do anything 
for a dollar, to whom illegality and legality 
are just technicalities.” 
Beullac and deputy director Dr. Joel 


Partners against crime 


Hartt, MA’66, give the lie to both images. 
Integrity, they maintain, is Metropol’s 
watchword. ‘“‘Sure we want to serve the in- 
terests of the client,’ notes Beullac, ““but our 
main commitment is to do a thorough inves- 
tigation and to tell the truth. Under no condi- 
tion are we prepared to doctor evidence.” 
How did a lawyer and a philosopher end 
up running a private detective agency? For 
Beullac and Hartt it was a logical move. 
During Expo ’67 Beullac served on the well- 
drilled auxiliary police force that provided 
security for visiting dignitaries. He continued 
to work in the field of investigation and 
security while taking his degree at McGill. 
‘‘A bout a year and a half ago I decided to 


Won 


start my own business,” he recalls. “IT con- 
tacted John Abbott College’s police techno- 
logy department to try to find new recruits as 
agents for my firm. The chairman of the 
department happened to be — and still is — 
Joel. He was personally interested in getting 
involved in the organization, so we began 
operating as ateam.”’ 

Hartt, 38, who heads the only English- 
language police technology program in 
Quebec’s CEGEP system, earned his doc- 
torate in political and social philosophy from 
New York University in 1974. “There isa 


Lawyer Robert Beullac, right, with his 
partner, philosopher Joel Hartt. 


- % 4 i. ‘ 7 : ‘ i AA 

3 “ ne \ j i} \ 4 ‘A f 
> < \\ ( ' ; ‘ ; % % * ‘ 
: ’ 4 ae AA 
%* ey : + 2% 3 ‘ 
.? Att aae 4 HiA\Y 
= 3 Fy ; 4 oe: : 2h + > : \ 
: RAL 
: é ; : 
} ALLY \ 
x 


a AU 
. yyw! 


>) 
wee 
j f pene? 


close connection between philosophy and 
detective work,” he explains. ‘*A lot of 
philosophers read detective stories to help 
them with their analytical philosophy. Here is 
one philosopher who has actually gone into the 
business!”’ 

Describing detective work as “‘essential- 
ly brain work,” Hartt seeks as agents those 
who are able to interpret data as well as 
gather facts. As a result, ten of Metropol’s 
fifteen investigators have a university or college 
education — the highest average of any 
Canadian investigation agency, according to 
Beullac. In addition, the company underwrites 
the cost of courses in police inquiry techni- 
ques and training in firearms. ‘‘We believe 
in investing in the people who work for us,” 


_ says Beullac. “‘We would rather have a good 


agent for two years than a lousy one for five.” 
Unlike most other detective agencies, 
Metropol hires few former policemen. Notes 
the director, ‘“‘Policemen have been taught to 
obey orders and follow procedures, which is 
fine in a paramilitary organization like a 
police force. But, in our field, agents are 
pretty well let loose on a case. We give them 
as much support as they need but they have to 
be resourceful and confident, and be able to 
organize their work and follow through on 


. leads. This is something most policemen 


have not been taught to do.” 

Metropol is unusual in another way — 
about half its agents are women. While some 
cases May require a man and others a 
woman, no special privileges are extended to 
the female detectives. “‘We try to identify the 
hazard factor as much as possible,” says 
Hartt. ‘““Then it is up to our agents to decide 
whether or not they want to be involved. 
We've never been turned down, though, even 
for the more hazardous operations.” 

While they make use of available facili- 
ties to hone their agents’ skills, the partners 
are anxious to broaden the educational 
horizons of the profession. At the urging of 
Hartt and a friend from the Montreal police 
force, Concordia University and the University 
of Quebec are considering the possibility of 
establishing bachelor’s and master’s 
programs in the administration of criminal 
justice. Hartt and Beullac are also in the 
process of designing new CEGEP-level 
courses for security and investigation per- 
sonnel. There is no question that such 
programs are in demand. “At John Abbott, 
we have about six or seven times the number 
of applications we can accept,” says Hartt. 

There seems to be no shortage of cases, 
either, as Metropol’s bulging filing cabinets 
attest. Surveillance, debugging, robbery, 
divorce, arson, rape, fraud, smuggling — 
Metropol handles them all. “Ours is a 24- 
hour-a-day, 7-day-a-week business,’ notes 
Beullac. ‘‘The day never starts and never ends.” 

Deputy director Hartt is mainly respon- 


sible for interpreting data, visiting clients, 


and providing liaison with government and law 


enforcement agencies. Beullac, on the other 
hand, is personally involved in detective 

work, teaming up with his agents and coor- 
dinating the activities of a very mobile staff. 

“We have several undercover agents 
operating on a long-term basis,” he explains. 
“Their only contact with reality is me, so 
they call every day to remind themselves who 
they really are and to let me know what’s 
happening. It’s a bit of a schizoid existence.” 
The agents are generally hired by business 
enterprises wishing to have an insider’s view 
of their organization. Though their purposes 
are legitimate, the agents have to be careful 
not to blow their cover — otherwise, the 
employer could lose the trust of his staff. 

Most clients get more than they bargained 
for, admits Beullac. Agents brought in to 
investigate suspected underground union 
activities in a large company recently stumbled 
across a lucrative theft ring and an extensive 
drug-trafficking operation. It is important, 
however, that management not react 
immediately to the scandals that are unearthed. 
Notes Beullac, “‘We do not want anyone to 
associate the presence of our new employee 
with the fact that suddenly the boss knows 
everything. Also, if he reacts now, he may not 
be able to get further information which might 
be even more useful.”’ 

Law firms engage Metropol to help gather 
evidence pertaining to civil court cases. ““This 
is where my legal background helps,”’ says 
Beullac, who also has several staff members 
with legal and para-legal training. ““Some 
lawyers will come to us with the barest of facts 
and want us to build up a whole case for them. 
We put a little package together; all they have 
to do is get up in court and plead it. This is a 
dimension that none of our competitors offers. 
We are very much behind-the-scenes people, 
but as far as I’m concerned, litigation is only 
the tip of the iceberg. We are where the action 
is. That’s why I opted for detective work rather 
than the traditional practice of law.”’ 

Many of Metropol’s clients are individuals 
experiencing stressful family situations. 
Parents, anxious that their teenager might be 
heading for trouble with the law or in need of 
professional counselling, hire youthful 
Metropol agents to find out who the child’s 
friends are, what his lifestyle is, and whether or 
not he is involved in drugs or crime. Says Hartt, 
‘*Most of them would rather know the worst 
than just not know.” 

Reports of runaways and missing persons 
are also investigated by the agency. Though 
police departments routinely handle such 
cases, many families — particularly the well- 
to-do — prefer to keep their names out of the 
police blotter by arranging a private search. 

In addition, Beullac points out, independent 
detectives are able to devote more time to 


the case than can an overworked police de- 
partment. ““The reasons are probably similar 
to why someone would go to a private prac- 
titioner rather than a clinic,” he explains. 

A common stressful family situation is 
created by divorce proceedings. However, 
thanks to a change in Canadian law in the 
early seventies that made infidelity only one of 
several grounds for divorce, life is now much 
easier — and perhaps more ethical — for private 
detectives. 

“We were not in business at the time, 
but I’ve heard some pretty hair-raising 
stories,’ says Beullac. “‘Detectives had to 
barge down doors, look through keyholes, 
peer through windows, get pictures. Today, 
even with infidelity, circumstantial evidence 
is sufficient. We pride ourselves on complet- 
ing the case without the individual ever 
knowing the investigation took place, and yet 
giving our client sufficient evidence in the 
event that the case is contested — which it 
isn’t 97 per cent of the time.” 

Though all of Metropol’s cases have 
their origin in Quebec, investigations are not 
confined to the province. The agency has, for 
example, traced hidden assets in the 
Bahamas and the Cayman Islands, and 
smashed a household-appliance smuggling 
ring in New England. The agency also engages 
the services of other detective firms in the 
United States, Canada, and Europe to help 
reduce the overhead for certain investigations. 

Metropol’s rates range from $18 to $25 
an hour, or $200 a day, depending on the com- 
plexity of the assignment. Expenses are 
additional. The agency owns considerable 
equipment — fingerprint kits, cameras, 
firearms, walkie-talkies. A selection of 
automobiles is also kept on hand. “We like to 
have the right car to fit the environment,” 
says Beullac. ‘‘We have what I call our 
St. Henri car and our Westmount car — in 
fact, anything from a beat-up jalopy to a 
limousine.”’ In addition, specialists in poly- 
graphy, electronic counter-surveillance, 
fibre analysis, and alarm systems are often 
hired to assist with investigations. 

Beullac and Hartt smile as they reminisce 
about many of their cases. But, undoubtedly, 
there are others they would rather not 
remember, some unsavoury characters they 
would rather not have met. 

In the course of investigations Beullac 
has also crossed paths with criminals wanted 
on charges unrelated to his case. *“That has 
involved some pretty heavy situations,” he 
states. Fortunately, he has only ever had to 
fire his gun as a deterrent. “‘Contrary to the 
fictional TV image,” he says, “‘we don’t look 
for confrontation.” After sizing up the 
lawyer’s 6-foot 5-inch frame, bullet-studded 
gun belt, and holstered revolver, one con- 
cludes he could hold his own — not only in 
court, but also in the street. 0 


21 


ne ine 


and 


of 

ABRAHAM EDEL, BA’27, MA’28, a 1978-79 
Associate of the National Humanities Center, 
North Carolina, is conducting research in 
moral philosophy. 


gs 2 

JOHN F. CLOSE, BCom’33, has been 
appointed chairman of the Canada Deposit 
Insurance Corp., Ottawa, Ont. 


735 

RABBI HAYIM PERELMUTER, BA’35, 
has been elected president of the Chicago Board 
of Rabbis, Illinois, and next year will be a 
visiting professor at the Pacific Lutheran 
School of Theology, Berkeley, Calif. 


"37 

CLAYTON H. CROSBY, MD’37, 
GDipMed’47, has been appointed medical 
director of the Allan Blair Memorial Clinic in 
Regina, Sask. 

DESMOND D. DOLAN, BSc(Agr)’37, 

MSc’ 39, has been honoured by the United 
States Department of Agriculture for his work 
on plant introduction. 


738 

REV. JESSE E. BIGELOW, BA’38, has been 
elected moderator of the Presbyterian Church 
in Canada. 

ALLAN DUFFUS, BArch’38, has been 
awarded an honorary doctor of engineering 
degree by the Nova Scotia Technical College, 
Halifax. 


40 

WALDEMAR E. SACKSTON, MSc’40, 
professor of plant pathology at Macdonald 
College, has been elected president of the 
International Sunflower Association. 

JAMES R. WRIGHT, BSc(Agr)’40, has been 
named a Fellow of the Agricultural Institute of 
Canada. 


"41 

REV. EUGENE R. FAIRWEATHER, 
BA’41, has been elected a Fellow of the Royal 
Society of Canada. 


22 


Where they are 


what they’re doing 


>44 

ARTHUR BOURNS, PhD’44, has been 
named a member of the Natural Sciences and 
Engineering Research Council of Canada. 


"45 

CLAUDE LUSSIER, BCL’45, MCL’46, has 
joined the Canada Council as secretary-general 
of the Canadian Commission for UNESCO. 


46 


MICHAEL SHAW, BSc’46, MSc’47, PhD’49, 


has become a member of the Natural Sciences 
and Engineering Research Council of Canada. 
DANIEL WERMENLINGER, BEng’46, has 
become president of the Quebec Liquor Corp. 


"47 

JOHN P.S. MACKENZIE, BCom’47, has 
been elected president of the Shaw Festival, 
Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ont. 


"48 

DONALD H. DRENNAN, BCom’48, has 
become president of Simmons Ltd., Canada, 
in Mississauga, Ont. 

LAURIE E. HARDMAN, BEng’48, has been 
appointed superintendent of engineering and 
services at Abitibi Provincial Paper, Thunder 
Bay, Ont. 

MICHAEL OLIVER, BA’48, MA’50, 
PhD’56, has been appointed director of the 
International Development Office of the 
Association of Universities and Colleges of 
Canada. 

DONALD E. TILLEY, BSc’48, PhD’S51, has 
been selected principal of Royal Military 
College, Kingston, Ont. 


49 

JACQUES BRAZEAU, BA’49, MA’51, has 
been elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of 
Canada. 

ALLAN URHO PAIVIO, BScPE’49, 
MSc’57, PhD’59, has become a Fellow of the 
Royal Society of Canada. 

JOHN TURNER-BONE, BEng’49, has 
become manager, project services, of Montreal 
Engineering Co. Ltd., Ontario region, in 

St. Catharines. 


50 
WALTER F. HITSCHFELD, PhD’S0, nasil 5 


been elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of 
Canada. a 
FRANK T.L. HUGHES, BA’SO, has been 
admitted to the Ontario Bar and is practising — 
law in Toronto, Ont. y 
GEORGE STORY, BA’S0, a lexicographenlaa \ 
Newfoundland English, has won the Canada : 
Council’s Molson Prize. 

JOHN H. WALSH, BEng’50, MEng’S1, hag 
received the Joseph Becker Award of the 
American Institute of Mining and 
Metallurgical Engineers for his work on coal — 
carbonization. a, 


"51 
A.SCOTT FRASER, BCom’S1, has joinedii he 
partnership of Lank Roberton Macaulay, 
investment counsellors, Montreal. . 
NIELS H. NIELSEN, BA’51, MA’54, has — 
become director of personnel services for ARA 
Services Inc., Philadelphia, Pa. 
DR. MAX JACOB PALAYEW, BA’S1, hale 
been named chairman of McGill's icpaee 
of diagnostic radiology. 


| 
— 


"52 * 
CYRIL MAX KAY, BSc’52, has been named 
a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. 
MARCEL SICARD, BEng’52, has been 
elected president of the Association of fi 
Consulting Engineers of Quebec. 


»53 5 
IAN CHRISTIE CLARK, BA’53, MA58, 

has been appointed secretary-general of the — 
National Museums of Canada, Ottawa, Ont. 
ROBERT D. GOLD, BA’53, MA’60, has eA 
received the University of Winnipeg's 1973 
Clifford J. Robson award for excellence in — ‘| 


teaching. 5 
rs 


"54 
GORDON CHESS, MEng’54, has become 
dean of the Faculty of Engineering Science at ; 
the University of Western Ontario, London. — 
JAMES E. FINLAY, MEng’54, has been — 
named president of the Ontario Mining 
Association. 


society activities 


Dr. Robert Bell has anew award to add to his 
lengthy list of honours. At its recent Annual 
General Meeting, the Graduates’ Society 
presented the principal with the Award of Merit 
for his outstanding contribution to the work of 
the society. Among other things, Bell and his 
wife Jeanne have visited more graduates and 
society branches throughout the world than.any 
of their predecessors. As he suggests in the 
following account, it has not always been 
smooth sailing. 


The principal’s job is glamourous. Think of all 
the interesting trips he takes, all the luxurious 
hotels he stays in, all the delicious meals he 
eals.... 

Jeanne and | arrived at the hotel desk about 
5:00 p.m. (It is the major hotel of a large 
Canadian city, but the tortures of Torquemada 
could not drag its name from me.) “Bell? Bell? 
How do you spell it?”’ said the young desk 
clerk. “*Oh, yes, Mr. Bell, we can give you a 
room.’ (We had a confirmed reservation.) | 
registered and he handed me the key to 217. 
‘It’s on the second floor,” he added helpfully. 

The room was incredibly tiny, with a small 
window giving directly onto an air-conditioning 
machine on the adjacent flat roof. The hotel 
was “older;”’ the original air was still in the 
room. ‘*Well, it’s only an overnight stay,’ we 
said. “It won’t hurt us.”’ 

We had a good half hour to spare before 
dinner. Going out for a walk would have been 
natural enough; given our quarters, it was 
compulsory. Very much revived after the outing 
we returned to 217. 

There was a strange suitcase in the room. I 
put it outside the door and called the desk (a 
complicated operation in itself). They said they 
would send someone up. 

Two friendly, middle-aged porters arrived; | 
explained, they consulted their list. ““Are you 
with the bus tour?” one of them asked. We 
weren’t. ““This room is assigned to the bus tour, 
but that’s all right. Here’s your suitcase. Sorry 
about the mix-up.” 

I saw my chance. “If you need this room for 
the bus tour,” I said, “‘we’d be glad to move to 
another one.” The two porters agreed with my 
suggestion and said they would be back ina 


moment to see to it. They didn’t come. 

I called the desk to explain the proposal. 
‘‘Fine,”’ the clerk said cheerfully. “*We'll call 
you right away.” They didn’t, so I went down to 
the desk. “‘Oh, yes, sir,” the clerk smiled. “‘We 


just got your new room, number 415.” 


Room 415 was already occupied — it must 
have been the bus tour again. Now we had no 
room at all! I carried our gear back to the desk, 
turned in both keys to the clerks, and threw 
myself on their mercy. Would they find us a 
room and put our stuff in it while we went off to 
dinner and our Graduates’ Society meeting? 
They were very obliging — of course they would. 

The main dining room was ornate in the 
1930-Victorian way. We were seven for dinner, 
seated at a table for eight. (The extra place and 
chair were never removed — we sat with an 
absent friend throughout the meal.) Our 
waitress, who was friendly, cheerful, and 
obliging, behaved as though she knew what 
went on in hotel dining rooms but had never 
actually seen it happen. 

Both Jeanne and I chose soup and a main 
course. The portions of the entrée were so small 
that I would not have believed we could be 
poisoned by them... but we were. Another 
visitor had taken the same main course without 
soup, with the same result. And, as Holmes 
said to Watson, when all other possibilities have 
been eliminated the remaining one, however 
improbable, must be correct. During the 
evening we remained perfectly healthy; by 


next morning we were both feeling what 
Jeanne calls ““worm-eaten.” 

The Graduates’ Society meeting that 
followed dinner was well attended and the 
people were welcoming and warm-hearted. We 
enjoyed every minute. Eventually, we found 
ourselves back at the hotel desk. Our belongings 
were still there but, miraculously, anew room 
was available — and unoccupied. 

The next morning we were slow to get going. 
I formed the idea that I would feel less “‘worm- 
eaten”’ after a substantial breakfast. | managed 
to get a slice of ham and stale toast — which, 
fortunately, I happen to like. After collecting 
our luggage we went to check out, only to find 
that the hotel bill included a whole set of 
charges we could not possibly have incurred. 
‘“‘It must have been the bus tour,” the clerks 
agreed. I mentioned mildly that we were due at 
the airport and that they might simply cancel 
the old bill and make out another. They looked 
shocked — apparently, to do so involved 
unspeakable sin. 

I then asked about getting to the airport. The 
clerks thought a taxi would be best and 
telephoned for one. It might take a few minutes, 
they said, but we’d make our flight. I thanked 
them, said goodbye, and picked up our 
luggage. 

We stepped through the door just in time to 
see the hotel’s airport limousine disappearing 
into the traffic. Next time, I think we'll take the 
bus tour. 0 


23 


Focus 


Anyone strolling near Montreal’s massive St 
Joseph’s Oratory on a Sunday afternoon is 
welcomed by the sound of bells — not tolling 
the hour or announcing a mass, but ringing 

out with anything from Bach to the Beatles. 

At the keyboard of the Oratory’s fifty-six-bell 
carillon sits Andrea McCrady, 25, third-year 
McGill medical student and part-time carillon- 
neur. 

McCrady’s love affair with bells began seven 
years ago at Trinity College in Hartford, 
Connecticut. The history undergraduate, who 
had studied piano since the age of five, accepted 
a friend’s invitation to watch her play Trinity’s 
thirty-bell carillon. “In the middle of the night 
I climbed the spiral Gothic staircase of the 
chapel tower,” she recalls. ‘When she started 
to play, the bells just captivated me!” 

Her informal training began at Trinity — 
‘Students taught other students how to play,” 
she says, ‘‘and we passed bad habits on to 
each other.” In her senior year she applied 
for a $7,000 Thomas J. Watson Travelling 
Fellowship to travel and study for a year 
independent of any university. ‘““They give out 
seventy a year for projects in anything from 
geology to literature,” she notes. “But you 
have to be just kooky enough to attract their 
attention. I took the interviewer from the 
foundation up into the tower — and got the 
fellowship.” 

Determined to play as many bells as she 
could during her year away, McCrady began 
with six months in Holland, where the instru- 
ment first evolved in the sixteenth century. 

Her teacher at the National Carillon School 
was world-renowned carillonneur Leen ’tHart. 


have calluses. Most carillonneurs develop 
high blood pressure from climbing all those 
stairs before they ever have any other physical 
problems.” ; 

By definition, a carillon has at least twenty- 
three tuned bells. (Anything less is known as 
a chime.) Forty-eight bells are standard but, 
as McCrady points out, “there are very few 
standard carillons. And each has a different 
touch and sound since the bells are cast by 
different foundries and weigh different amounts. 
After going around Europe I can pick out from 
a distance who has made the bell and about 
when. They all have a voice of their own.” 


Says McCrady,**We concentrated on overcoming 


my bad habits and broadening my repertoire.” 
Realizing that she also needed to learn how to 
adapt to different instruments, however, she 
left Holland to play the bells of Belgium, 
France, Switzerland, Germany, Denmark, 
Sweden, England, and Scotland. As she puts it, 
‘“‘I saw Europe from the rooftops.” 

The carillon was originally a folk instrument, 
McCrady explains. “‘Most commercial towns of 
the Dutch lowlands had a big clock tower in 
their market square. All the merchants kept 
time by its bells. To let you know that the time 
of the bell strike was coming up, they had 
what was called a four-strike, with tuned bells 
playing a melody for the clock.” To facilitate 
the ringing of the bells, an instrument was 
introduced which featured pedals and a modified 
keyboard — wooden levers that were struck 
with clenched fists. ‘Like a drummer, it’s all 
in the wrists,” says McCrady. “I don’t even 


24 


Andrea McCrady at the carillon. 


McCrady’s musical background was a definite 
asset in learning the carillon. “If you play 
the piano, you know how to vary your touch 
to add expression to the instrument,” she says. 
‘And if you play the organ, you know how to 
coordinate your feet and hands.”” Knowledge 
of theory and composition is also essential 
for the carillonneur, who often must adapt the 
music to suit the instrument. Arrangements 
are available from various guilds, however, 
and carillonneurs also exchange music among 
themselves. 

During her month in Oxford, McCrady studied 
a British bell-playing technique known as 


¥ 


change ringing. Whereas carillon bells have 


wires attached to their clappers but remain a 


stationary themselves, change-ringing bells 
swing full circle when pulled by ropes. “One | 
person is assigned to each bell, which weighs — 
from 400 to a few thousand pounds,” she eX- 
plains. ““ You have anywhere from four to 
twelve people, each pulling a bell rope. You 
must control the swing of the bell and the timi 
of the strike — it’s a very complicated art.” q 

By the time McCrady was ready to return to 
North America in 1976, she had learned of the 
carillon at St. Joseph’s. Emilien Allard, who 
had once played it, had been named Domini on 
Carillonneur at the Peace Tower in Ottawaé anc 
she wrote telling him of her interest inthe 
Oratory carillon. He responded with a letter” 
of introduction to the Congregation of Holy 
Cross. 

“They were a bit taken aback,” 
‘“Here’s this girl on their doorstep saying, — 

‘I’m acarillonneur.’ They took me to see 4 

the carillon but it was like something out of 
4 horror film. It hadn’t been touched in three 
years — it was full of cobwebs, broken wires, 


rust, and warped wood from the damaged 
ceiling. When I pulled out my tools and started 
fixing everything, they said, “I guess you know 


what you’re about. Go ahead.’ That was two 
years ago, and I’ve been playing every Sunday 
ever since.” * 
Whereas most bells are located high in 
towers, those at St. Joseph’s — which were 
originally cast for the Eiffel Tower — are 
housed on the roof of a building almost at - 
street level. The view may be less exciting, — 
says McCrady, but the contact with the publ ic 
is valuable. ‘A lot of people who go pasta — 
bell tower think it’s all electric,” she says. 


‘They would think that at St. Joseph’s, too, 


except that they can look in the window and — 
see me playing.” 4 
The nature of their art makes bell ringers 


she grins. 


j 
{ 
: 
| 


an unusual breed. *‘These hermit-like eccentrics | 


are wary about visitors to theirtower—- 
especially if the visitor is a beginner who 


starts making awful sounds,” McCrady s smiles 


‘*Because there’s no such thing as a private 
concert, they get possessive about their bells.’ 
McCrady, however, welcomes beginners. 
She hopes her two students will keep St. i 
Joseph’s carillon ringing should she leave — 
Montreal. She also has plans for the change 
ringing bells of St. Patrick’s Church: “They ~ 
haven’t been rung for at least twenty years, 
she exclaims, ‘‘but we’ve been working ont 
getting the tower and the bells restored.” 
After graduation, McCrady hopes to set UP 
a family practice somewhere. One thing is 
certain: any community wishing to attract — 
Dr. Andrea McCrady would do well to have " 
a bell tower in the vicinity. 0 Re 
By Donna Nebenzahl, BA’75, a Montreal 
freelance writer and editor. i ; 


9 , an 


BD 

DALE (ENGLISH) YOUNG, BA’SS, has 
been elected a governor of the Real Estate 
Institute of British Columbia, Victoria. 


"56 

WALTER BUSHUK, PhD’S6, has been 
named head of the plant science department, 
Agriculture Faculty, at the University of 
Manitoba, Winnipeg. 

ARLENE (MAXIMCHUK) CROWE, 
~MSc’56, PhD’62, a clinical chemist at Hotel 
Dieu Hospital, Kingston, Ont., has won the 
Ames Award of the Canadian Society of 
Clinical Chemists. 

WILLIAM H. FULLER, BCom’56, has 
become an investment counsellor with Lank 
Roberton Macaulay, Montreal. 
BERNARD SHAPIRO, BA’S56, has been 
appointed vice-president (academic) and 
provost of the University of Western Ontario, 
London. 


757 

‘BARRY A. CULHAM, BEng’S7, is vice- 

' president, foreign investments, of Export 

| Development Corp., Ottawa, Ont. 

/ CHRISTINE PERKS, BArch’S57, has become 
' a Fellow of the Royal Architectural Institute of 
) Canada. 


1759 

* MOHAMMED A. FARIS, BEng’59, 

* MEng’62, has become a research associate, 
\ cereal breeding, in Macdonald College’s 

» department of plant science. 

» JULIE LORANGER, BCL’S9, has been 

¢ appointed Canada’s consul general in 

, Strasbourg, France. 

RAYMOND A. REID, BCom’S9, has become 
» general manager of Fiducie du Quebec, 
Montreal. 


"60 
MERVYN FRANKLIN, PhD’60, has been 
, appointed president of the University of 
_ Windsor, Ontario. 
_ ROSS GARRISON, PhD’60, has become 
, director of product development at Parke, 
_ Davis and Co., Greenwood, S.C. 


a 
61 

_ JOHN D. HSU, BSc’57, MD’61, is assistant 
, professor of orthopedics at the University of 
Southern California, Los Angeles. 


969 

DR. MICHEL CHRETIEN, MSc’62, has 
received the Archambault medal of 
l’Association canadienne-francaise pour 
l’Avancement des Sciences. 

JAMES FERGUSSON, BSc’62, has become 
vice-president, operational research and 
systems, of TEE Consulting Services Inc., 

- Ottawa, Ont. 


NORMAN PRESSMAN, BArch’62, has won 
a 1979 Central Mortgage and Housing 
Scholarship to study urban housing in Belgium 
and a Lady Davis Visiting Fellowship that will 
enable him to spend most of his sabbatical at 
the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology. 
HELEN D. TAYLOR, BN’62, MSc(A)’75, 
has been elected president of the Canadian 
Nurses’ Association. 


"63 

CLAUDE AUBE, MSc’63, PhD’65, has been 
appointed program analyst, eastern Canada, 
for Agriculture Canada, Ste. Foy, Que. 


65 

MICHAEL C. CORBALLIS, PhD’65, has 
become professor of psychology at the 
University of New Zealand, Auckland. 
DOROTHY (ARTHURS) THOMSON, 
DipNurs’57, BN’65, of Halifax, N.S., has won 
the Johnson and Johnson Bursary for achieve- 
ment in the University of Saskatchewan’s 
correspondence course in hospital and health 
care administration. 


66 
DAVID GIBSON, BCL’66, is Ottawa manager 
of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce. 


DIPLOME UNIVERSITAIRE C'EST LE MOMENT - 
DE VOUS FAIRE VALOIR 


IBM Canada Ltée lance un défi 


aux hommes et femmes aimant 
un milieu de travail dynamique 
qui leur demande de posséeder 
un esprit createur, un sens prati- 


que et efficace de la communica- 


tion et beaucoup dentregent. 
Les candidats choisis, diplomes 
universitaires, seront appeles 

a assumer d'importantes 
responsabilités et a relever les 
défis complexes que pose 
l‘informatique. 

En tant que représentant de 
l‘'equipe des ventes de la 
division Informatique, vous 
travaillerez de pres avec nos 
clients actuels et futurs. Votre 
role consistera a élaborer des 
solutions informatiques qui 
repondent a leurs besoins. 

Une expérience anterieure 
dans les domaines de la vente 


ou de l'informatique constitue un 


atout, mais elle n'est pas essen- 
tielle. Votre carriere debutera 
par un programme de formation 
intensif d'une durée de 18 mois, 
comprenant des cours theori- 
ques, pratiques et des stages. 

Cet emploi ne s adresse 
qu’aux candidats qui recher- 
chent le défi d'une profession 
tres exigeante. Votre reussite 
chez IBM peut vous ouvrir les 
portes sur une carriere interes- 
sante dans le domaine profes- 
sionnel ou la gestion. 

Nous offrons un excellent 
salaire et une vaste gamme 
d'avantages sociaux entiere- 


ment defrayes par la compagnie. 


Les postulants qui seront 


Wy 


ly) 
t 
| 


/ 
/ 


| 


] 
} / 


appeles a travaillerau Quebec =~ 


doivent posséder une bonne ae 
connaissance du francais = 
parle et ecrit. = 


Veuillez mentionner 
le numéro de a 
reference: 1,003 —~ 
Adressez votre 
candidature a: 
Monsieur J. K. Johnston 
Vice-president 
Région de |'Est = 


IBM Canada Limitee A en Ss 
5, Place Ville Marie bad | Q 
Montreal (Québec) en S 
H3B 2G3 = | WS 
as eee oe pe , en aN 
— ee ee <= ea \ 
p= Ree gio at to oh ~~ SSN 

2 =o WY 


25 


ee - 


ETHEL (KECES) GOLDMAN, BA’66, who 
received her LLB from the University of 
Toronto, has opened a law practice in Guelph, 
Ont. 

SIDNEY M. KAUSHANSKY, BCom’66, 
has become a partner in the Montreal 
chartered accountancy firm of Richter, Usher 
and Vineberg. 

MAUREEN T. McELLIGOTT, BScN’66, 
has been appointed assistant professor of 
cardiovascular nursing at Catholic University, 
Washington, D.C. 

CHERYL LYNN (STOKES) RACKOWSKI, 
BA’66, has completed her PhD in Canadian 
literature at the University of Connecticut, 
Storrs. 

HELEN ROSS, BA’66, who recently received 
4 PhD from the University of Toronto’s 
Institute of Medical Science, is a researcher in 
the epidemiology unit of the Clarke Institute of 
Psychiatry, Toronto, Ont. 


67 

LEN A. HOLUBOWICH, BSc’67, has 
become director of marketing for Champlain 
Industries Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

DANIEL KLASS, MD’67, assistant professor 
in the University of Manitoba’s department of 
medicine, has won a Canadian Life Insurance 
Assoc. medical scholarship to continue his 
research in lung physiology. 

DARCEY M. POOLE, BA’67, has been 
appointed director of the career center at Hood 
College, Frederick, Md. 


68 

RONALD I. COHEN, BCL’68, is a partner in 
Buena Vista Productions, a new Canadian 
motion picture company. 

L. CLAIRE CREIGHTON, BA’68, has 
become communications consultant for A.S. 
Hansen, Inc., in Los Angeles, Calif. 

DR. LAWRENCE T. HERMAN, BSc’68, is a 
clinical instructor of oral and maxillofacial 
surgery at Tufts University, Medford, Mass., 
and has a private practice in Norwood. 
RAYMOND J. MAILLOUX, MD’68, is 
practising family medicine in Sherman, Tex. 


"69 

S. JAMES BONNY, BEng’69, has been 
appointed assistant general manager, refinery 
operations, at Eldorado Nuclear Ltd., Port 
Hope, Ont. 

ANNABEL COHEN, BA’69, has become a 
research associate in the psychology depart- 
ment, University of Toronto, Ontario. 


ROBERT COOPER, BA’65, MA’68, BCL’69, 


is a partner in the Canadian motion picture 
company Buena Vista Productions. 

JOHN H. DOI, BSc’69, who recently received 
his MEd in educational administration from 
the University of Alberta, Edmonton, is on 
staff at the County of Strathcona Board of 
Education, Sherwood Park, Alta. 


26 


"70 

ILLIMAR ALTOSAAR, BSc’70, has been 
named assistant professor of food chemistry, 
nutrition and dietetics program, in the 
University of Ottawa’s biochemistry depart- 
ment. 

KENNETH FRUMKIN, MA’70, PhD’72, 
has received his MD from Hahnemann Medical 
College and Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa., and is 
4 resident at Letterman Army Medical Center, 
San Francisco, Calif. 

PETRA SCHREINER, BEd’79, is a French 
teacher in Windsor, Ont. 

RICHARDS. VINEBERG, BCom’70, has 
become a partner in the firm of Richter, Usher 
and Vineberg, chartered accountants, Montreal. 


i 

BRENT NOSWORTHY, BA’71, is a game 
designer and researcher with Simulations 
Productions Inc., New York City. 


"Ae 

CHARLES C. GURD, BA’72, has joined the 
architectural firm of Parkin Partnership, 
Toronto, Ont., as a designer for the new 
National Gallery of Art of Canada. 

ROBERT B. MADY, BEng’72, is a consulting 
engineer with Consultores Occidentales 5.2; 
Maracaibo, Venezuela, an affiliate of CI 
Power Services, Montreal. 

THOMAS SCHNURMACHER, BA’72, is an 
entertainment columnist for the Montreal 
Gazette. 

ANDREW ROBERT TURNER, BSc’70, 
MD’72. is on staff at the W.W. Cross Cancer 
Institute, Edmonton, and is an assistant 
professor at the University of Alberta. 


"13 

SIMON COTE, MD’ 73, is studying advanced 
endoscopic techniques in Koblenz, West 
Germany, on an R.S. McLaughlin Foundation 
Fellowship and will join the department of 
gastroenterology at Montreal’s Hotel-Dieu 
Hospital in 1979. 


"74 

GLORIA JANE FITZGERALD, BSc’74, is 
teaching biology and chemistry at Freetown 
Secondary School for Girls in Sierre Leone. 
ANDREW M. LASKY, BSc’74, has complet- 
ed his dentistry degree at Georgetown 
University, Washington, D.C. 

JOSEPHINE PAJACZKOWSKI, MSc’74, is 
studying towards her master’s in religious 
education at Fordham University, New York. 


"15 

PIER GIORGIO FONTANA, PhD’75, has 
joined the medical department of Boehringer 
Ingelheim (Canada) Ltd., Burlington, Ont. 
ROBERT HOULE, BEd’75, has been 
appointed curator of contemporary native art 
at the National Museum in Ottawa, Ont. 


ALLAN ROBERT JONES, BSc’71, MD’75, 


has joined the staff of F ‘oothills Hospital, a 
Calgary, Alta. a 
76 7 


ANTHONY D. BARANYI, PhD'76, is an 
associate research scientist, glass and coral 
group, of the Ontario Research Foundation’ S 
department of materials chemistry, 
Mississauga. 

IRENE P. DUNCAN, BN’76, has been q 
appointed coordinator for staff development at _ 
the Douglas Hospital, Montreal. ‘i 
JOHN HEATH, BSc’71, MD°76, a membergh 
the University of Manitoba’s respiratory 
diseases department, has won a fellowship from 
the Manitoba Lung Association. = 


| 


ir 
CATHERINE HARDING, BA’77, has won — 
an IODE War Memorial Scholarship to st J 
art history at the University of London, England, 
REV. HARVEY WHITE, PhD’77, has a 
become assistant professor of philosophy at — 
Bishop’s University, Lennoxville, Que. 


Deaths 


“13 

CORINNE (HARDMAN) BRENNAN, ~ 
DipPE’ 13, at Sebastopol, Calif., on Aug. re 
1978. Ff 
J. KENNETH KING, BSc(Agr)’13, at 
Fredericton, N.B., on Aug. 22, 1978. 


"14 
ALAN KEITH HAY, BSc’ 14, at Ottawa, 
Ont., on Aug. 27, 1978. @ 


716 \ 
CHESTER C. LYSTER, BSc(Agr) 16, on © 
Oct2 4 1ST: 


718 

JOHN GERARD AHERN, BCL’I8, at Sea 

Sauveur, Que., on July 13, 1978. ‘7 
7 

19 


HY MAN GARBER, MD’19, on June 2, 9 


21 

WILLIAM SCHUYLER LIGHTHALL, 
BCL’21, at Phoenix, Ariz., on June 30, 1978. 
ROBERT MURRAY PENDRIGH, MDI. 
at Saint John, N.B., on Jan. 18, 1978. ‘= 
IVAN SABOURIN, BCL’21, at Iberville, 
Que., on July 31, 1978. i 


Lies ” 
WILLIAM J.S. EVANS, BSe’22, on Julia 
1978. 
DAVID WHITNEY MacKEEN, BSe 2: 
Halifax, N.S., on May 12, 1978. 


BARNEY DAVID USHER, BA’19, MD’22, 
on July 14, 1978. 


°23 

JOSEPH HAROLD GOLDSMITH, 

BCom 23, at Montreal, on May 31, 1978. 
WILLIAM JAMES JOHNSON, BSc’?23, at 
Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on May 27, 1978. 


"24 
EDYTHE H. LINDSAY, CertSW’24, at 
Montreal, on Aug. 16, 1978. 


725 

NICHOLAS PARSELL HILL, MD’25, at St. 
Catharines, Ont., on June 7, 1978. 
ARCHIBALD DUNCAN MacGREGOR, 
DDS’25, at Truro, N.S., on June 8, 1978. 


26 
ALFRED E. MANVILLE, BSc’26, on June 8, 
1978. 


hee j 
RIVA (RUDY) REICH, BA’27, on Aug. 5, 
1978. 


’28 

HOWARD T. DAWE, BSc’ 28, in December 
1977. 

JOSEPH CARL SUTTON, MD’28, at 
Montreal, on July 10, 1978. 


29 
LOUIS I. FROHLICH, BSc’25, MD’29, on 
June 23, 1978. 


’30 

CECIL H. DICKEY, MD’30, on March 15, 
1978. 

STANLEY KOUGH LUNN, BA’30, at 
Montreal, on Aug. 3, 1978. 


"31 

SANFORD R. GRANGER, BCom 31, on 
Jan. 2, 1978. 

WALTER T. STOBART, BSc’31, MEng’32, 
on June 21, 1978. 


"Se 

T. GARNET COLLINS, BEng’32, at 
Montreal, on June 10, 1978. 
GERRARD JACKMAN, BCom’32, on 
October 6, 1977. 


ren 

ALAN R. ANTHONY, BA’29, MD’33, in 
Hawaii, on July 30, 1975. 

JOHN M. ARMSTRONG, PhD’33, at 
Ottawa, Ont., on May 19, 1978. 

EVA R. YOUNGE, MA’33, in June 1978. 


34 
PETER WOODBURN BLAYLOCK, BSc’34, 
at Pointe Claire, Que., on Aug. 4, 1978. 


DAVID OSWALD WOOTTEN, BCom’ 34, 
on May 28, 1978. 


35 
HAROLD E. HABER, BA’31, DDS’35, on 
July 4, 1978. 


736 

DONALD JOHN OSWALD BARRY, 
BEng’ 36, on June 26, 1978. 

HENRI F. BEIQUE, BEng’36, at Homer, 
Alaska, on July 31, 1978. 


"37 
CATHERINE OLDING HEBB, PhD’37, at 
Cambridge, England, in 1978. 


38 

HAROLD E. PITTIS, MD’38, on June 9, 
1978. 

MICHAEL JOSEPH SABIA, MD’38, at 
St. Catharines, Ont., on May 24, 1978. 


"oo 

MOSES ASHKENAZY, BSc’36, MD’39, in 
May 1978. 

LOUIS J. RUSCHIN, MD’39, on Jan. 9, 
1978. 

JACK WAUD, LMus’30, BMus’39, at 
Montreal, on May 25, 1978. 


"40 

BERNARD D. CULLITY, BEng’40, at South 
Bend, Ind., on March 26, 1978. 

ISABELLE GALARNEAU, BA’40, at 
Scituate, Mass., on May 21, 1978. 

KARL E. GUSTAFSON, BEng’40, on 

May 23, 1978. 


"41 
DONALD LORNE LINDSAY, BEng’41, at 
Montreal, on Aug. 14, 1978. 


"42 

WILLIAM BELL HEWSON, PhD’42, at St. 
Charles, Ill., on April 23, 1978. 

GERALD M.F. JOHNSON, BEng’42, at 
Pointe Claire, Que., on Aug. 30, 1978. 
MARGARET (MAIN) MUSSELLS, BA’42, 
at Montreal, on June 26, 1978. 


"43 

SAMUEL TOWNSEND ADAMS, BA’42, 
MD’43, GDipMed’S54, at Montreal, on July 9, 
1978. 

GEORGE BRUCE MacKIMMIE, BEng’43, 
on June 28, 1978. 


"44 
G.G. GARRIOCH, BSc’43, MD’44, on 
Jan. 30, 1977. 


"46 
CLARA ALICE PARTINGTON, 
DipNurs’46, at Montreal, on July 15, 1978. 


’48 

R. CATHERINE AIKIN, BA’48, BN’49, at 
London, Ont., on Aug. 15, 1978. 
ALINE(GALLAGHER) BAK, BSW’48, at 
Kingston, Ont., on July 2, 1978. 

STEPHEN ERIC BRYAN, BEng’48, at 
Montreal, on Sept. 30, 1977. 

RALPH ALAN FORBES, BA’48, at 
Montreal, on May 24, 1978. 

REX A. LUCAS, BA’48, MA’S0, in England, 
on July 18, 1978. 


"49 

FRANK J. MANHERZ, BEng’49, at Niagara 
Falls, Ont., on Aug. 21, 1978. 

OTTY E. McCUTCHEON, DDS’49, on 
Oct..8, 1977. 


LEO MERGLER, BSc’42, MD’49, on July 23, fe 


1978. 
CHARLES FREDERICK NORRIS, 
BEng’49, at Toronto, Ont., on July 23, 1978. 


"53 

EDWARD J. NETH, MD’S3, in April 1976. 
HARRY JAMES PEPPIATT, PhD’S3, at 
Lynchburg, Va., in August 1978. 


"54 
ROSLYN JOY (LESTER) PYTEL, BA’54, 
at Montreal, on June 6, 1978. 


"55 
DAVID GORDON FROSST, Com’S55, on 
June 17, 1978. 


58 
SUSAN (GRIGGS) WEBSTER, BA’58, on 
April 23, 1978. 


60 

JEAN PIERRE VALOIS, BEng’60, at 
Montreal, on Aug. 14, 1978. 

JAMES IAN WATSON, MD’60, at Calgary, 
Alta., on March 23, 1978. 


61 
JOAN E. BEPASS, BA’61, at Ottawa, Ont., 
on Aug. 29, 1978. 


62 
SHIRLEY FOSTER SMITH, BLS’62, at 
St. Catharines, Ont., on May 23, 1978. 


"71 
DAVID V.A. WHITE, BMus’71, on Jan. 5, 
1978. 


"74 
LILY (““LYL’”’) JEAN ETLER, BSW’74, at 
Montreal, on Aug. 28, 1978. 


"76 

GUY DESAUTELS, MA’76, in May 1977. 
SYLVIE DORAY, BA’76, on November 13, 
1976. 


27s 


ne 


Perspect 


by Lois Mackenzie 


Recording the architectural heritage of Upper 
Canada with camera and pen was a labour of 
frustration — and love — for two McGill 
graduates. Old Ontario Houses, released in 
1977 by Gage Publishing, is the work of photo- 
grapher, painter, and film maker Kim (Jones) 
Ondaatje, BA’52, and journalist Lois 
(Parkhill) Mackenzie, BA’49. In the following 
account Mackenzie describes the agony and 
the ecstasy that preceded the book's 
publication. 


I am not too clear on just how the whole effort 
managed to hang together and end up a book. 
What I do know is that it was an eighteen- 
month marathon against the clock that seemed 
even to start behind schedule. 

Photographer Kim Ondaatje and I shook 
hands with the publisher in January 1976 after 
a morning’s discussion on the how and the 
what. Three hundred slides of old Ontario 
houses, culled from the 5,000 in Kim’s col- 
lection, were to be submitted within three 
months. Of these, 198 would appear in the 
book. By January 1977 I was to deliver 
between forty and seventy thousand words of 
“clean copy,” approximately 250 words per 
picture, covering the architectural detail and, 
as far as possible, the social history of the 
area illustrated. Although a trifle heady, it 
seemed manageable. 

As we parted, the publisher said: “‘I 
presume the slides cover all of southern 
Ontario?” They didn’t. “I don’t have Guelph,” 
said Kim, ‘“‘and I don’t have Brockville or 
Maitland.” In a haze of two-day tours, we 
ended up shooting a third of the book between 
January and April. While Kim photographed 
each structure, I sat in the car taking down 
telephone numbers — many of the houses 
were for sale — addresses, and other per- 
tinent details. In the back seat with me were 
the 5,000 slides ; between note-taking, I began 
the great elimination contest. 

Word got around and people tried to be 
helpful. ‘‘Have you got the So-and-So House 
in Harrowsmith, or is it Hammersmith?” (I 


28 


doubted it.) ‘‘I hope you are doing the houses 
between Muskoka and Lake Simcoe because 
they have been neglected in the other books.” 
(What other books?) ““What are you going to 
say that Verschoyle Blake has not already 
said?” (Just what every author wants to hear. 
Besides, who is Verschoyle Blake?) 

I gradually became acquainted with the 
definitive works on old Ontario houses. Some 
of them, I noted with alarm, had taken ten 
years to complete. But two of the books were 
out of print, the others in black and white. 
‘“‘Wait until the world sees our coloured 
plates,”’ I muttered to myself. ““Don’t stop 
now. Don’t send back your advance.” (I 
couldn’t — I had already bought a piano.) 

As time passed, I accumulated an im- 
mense amount of trivia. I discovered that one 
of the last fatal duels in Canada had involved 
two law students in Perth in 1832. (The gov- 
ernment seat of Lanark County, Perth was, it 
seems, awash with law, justice, and pas- 
sionate law students.) I also learned that 
German officers fighting for King George III 
in the American War of Independence had 
been given Ontario land grants, and that 
Alsatians had come to Canada in 1837 to 
escape Napoleon’s conscription. 

I developed a primitive but reliable 
technique for sizing up a town. Mill towns: 
usually at the mouth of a river flowing into 
Lake Ontario, or upstream and now deserted. 
Staging towns: no mill and often no water, but 
a fine collection of taverns. County seats: 
built around a large court house, usually 
Greek revival. Railway towns: flat, brick, 
and Victorian. 

Meanwhile, the enlarged slide collection 
was taking shape under rigid scrutiny — in 
the beginning, on our diningroom wall. The 
slides, however, were heavily insured; once 
submitted to the publisher, they were to 
remain there. This meant committing them to 
memory, an entirely unsatisfactory arrange- 
ment, so I began to make the forty-mile 
round trip to the publishers almost daily. 

In addition to frantic telephone calls to 


glean information about the houses, I wrote 
letters — sometimes to people, sometimes 
simply to an address. A lady in London who 
represented the sixth generationtoownan 
impressive coachhouse on the banks of the 
Thames, actually rang metwo days after[ 
posted the letter to her. ‘““You must come and 
see the house,” she said brightly. “But don’t | 
leave it too long. I’m eighty-one, you know!” 
Others answered my inquiries more 
slowly. During a blinding rainstorm, I had 
managed to scribble down the address of a 
notable house in Oakville. I wrote, but months — 
went by with no answer. Finally, with the 
deadline closing in, I rang the doorbell. A 
nice-looking teenager ushered me into the 
hallway. From the far end an attractive ; 
woman came forward and said, “I received 
your letter but haven’t had time to answer.” 
As we talked, I looked at the crowd of = 
children that drifted from room to room and 
simply had to ask. Are they ... all yours? a 
‘Yes, they are.” How many? “Thirteen.” 
Inevitably, the day arrived when allthe 
material had been collected, all the photos 
chosen. It was time to write. But Icouldn't. — 
I went through stalling periods during which 
I felt it imperative to count and rearrange the 
flatware, attend the rowing events at the 
Montreal Olympics, and clip a rose hedge that 
hadn’t seen shears for twenty years. And] 
began brushing my teeth ten times a day. 
By working around the January clock, 
however, I finally delivered the goods the 
first week in February. Ten days later all 
300 articles — covered with arrows and pen- — } 
cilled notations — were back on my desk.1 
felt as if I had just been handed four year’s 
worth of university essays to rewrite. : 
I have only a dim recollection of what we c 
ate during this time. Mostly frozenlamb, 
I think. My husband became a short-order — 
chef and then calmly sat down and wrote his 
own book. Despite my writer’s block, though, 
something must have clicked. As oneofmy 
friends says, ‘‘Now I know what my log cabin 
is all about.” Pe 


a. 7 


SpecialGroup Offer on 
THE “ew ENCYCLOPAEDIA BRITANNICA 


a revolutionary new Home Learning Center 


3g eTpadepoug 
‘A 
e2EE VG eipadoptowy 


fees 


Ay 


BHUURILIG BipadopCtry 


Hig Pipador 
SMUURTIG VipRdopoug | 


ay 
7 
e 
= 
= 
3 — 
P~ 4 
Bas 
ws 
a. 


f sl ratte A 
Ie ir iw iy i eouRig vipadopiouy ; 


An important announcement for 
Members of the Alumni Association 


ENCYCLOPAEDIA BRITANNICA offer to mem- 
bers an opportunity to obtain the new 
ENCYCLOPAEDIA BRITANNICA at a reduced 
price, a substantial saving on the price available 
to any individual. You can choose either the 
Heirloom or Regency Binding and select your 
choice of valuable options — included at no extra 
cost. 

The new ENCYCLOPAEDIA BRITANNICA 
— now expanded to 30 volumes — Is not just a new 
edition . . . but a completely new encyclopedia 
which outmodes all other encyclopedias. Never be- 
fore has so much knowledge, so readily accessible, 
so easily understood — been made available as a 
complete home library. 

The new edition of Britannica is reorganized to 
better serve the three basic needs for an encyclo- 
pedia. First, the need to “LOOK IT UP’”’ is 
handled by the Ready Reference and the Index. 
These ten volumes are a complete index to every- 
thing in the set. At the same time, they serve as a 
12-million word short entry encyclopedia that ts 
helpful to look up accurate information quickly. 


Second, the need for “KNOWLEDGE IN 
DEPTH” ts fulfilled by the main text, a 28-million 
word, 19 volume collection of articles arranged 
logically which provide full and authoritative 
information for the student, for research in busi- 
ness, or for new insights into new fields of 
knowledge. 

Third, the need for “SELF EDUCATION” 
is met by the Outline of Knowledge and Guide to 
Britannica, a unique volume which acts as a giant 
study guide, more comprehensive and more de- 
tailed than a college course outline. 

The new ENCYCLOPAEDIA BRITANNICA is 
more useful in more ways to more people. 


Members who would like to receive further 
details on this exciting Group Offer are invited to 
fill out and mail the postage paid reply card. 

This offer is available for a limited time only, 
and may be withdrawn without further notice. 

If the card is detached, please write to 
Britannica Special Group Offer, 2 Bloor Street 
West, Suite 1100 Toronto, Ontario M4W 3]1 


Etna) - more useful in more ways to more people. 


6 Si oS das CAS Aha Seek eRe betes B24 HESS a8 2 
PAP EEE PALER EL yi bt ee et eee 5 
EST ee ER SORE LS St BLES Be ee eee 

SE An ae he Bee eh 


= 


1393.3" 
ASSQCIATE LIERABEPN ADMIN 
MC LENNAN™ ER AR Y 
MCGILL -¥NIVERSITRE Ss 
MONTREAL QUE H3C 361 


EM6O0925 


as 


McGill Society of Montreal 
Travel Program for 1979 


Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iran 


May-June 1979 (3 weeks) 
Price : approx. $2,200.00 


Membership in the Travel Program is 
available to graduates, parents, and as- 
sociates making contributions to McGill, 
or by paying a $10.00 fee to the McGill Includes flight, transfers, and first- clans 
; Society of Montreal. accommodation. Tour leader will be Dr. * 
ee! | Charles Adams, director of McGill's 4 
Disney World and Beach Holiday Institute of Islamic Studies. q 
One-week vacations: a 


K< 


S$ 
ay 


SL: | ae, we 
=a 


Ae it oe 


SAA URE 


SE eet tes 
Ser 1iikFe i 


ne ET Un COTA Sai CSURN DLR = 


Weekly departures. 

Price includes air transportation, car 
rental, and accommodation (3 nights in 
Disney World and 4 nights in Clearwater 
Beach) via Skylark and Sun Tours. 


The Middle East: 
Israel, Jordan, and Egypt 


March 1979 (3 weeks) 

Price : approx. $2,000 

Includes flight, transfers, and first-class 
accommodation. Tour guide will be Dr. 
Stanley Frost, former dean of McGill’s 
Faculty of Religious Studies and present- 
ly director of the History of McGill 
Project. 


Galapagos Islands, Peru, and Ecuador 


May-June 1979 (3 weeks) 

Price : approx. $2,100.00 

Includes flights, transfers, course, and 
first-class accommodation. An unusual 
opportunity to see the animal life, land 
forms, and vegetation that inspired 
Charles Darwin. David Lank, naturalist, 
author, and expert tour leader, will guide 
this special group tour. 


Left: The sarcophagus of an elderly Egyptian 
woman named That a Nufer Amun, cult servant 
to the divine votaress of Amun; c. 945-750 B.C. 
From the Redpath Museum collection, McGill 
University. 


China Trip IV “4 
May-June 1979 (3 weeks) | 
Price : approx. $2,500.00 ae 
The McGill Society of Montreal has 
applied for permission to make another 
special group visit to the People's 
Republic of China in 1979. 


Tour of the Greek Islands 


May-June 1979 (3 weeks) 

Price : approx. $1,875.00 a 
Includes flight, transfers, course, ang” 

first-class accommodation. Tour leadé 
will be Professor George Snider, chair 
man of McGill’s classics department.” 


Norway 


June 1979 (3 weeks) 

Price : approx. $1,950.00 
Includes flight, transfers, and first-clas 
accommodation. Tour leader will be D 
Alice Johannsen, director of McGill's” 
Mont St. Hilaire Nature Conservalialg 
Centre. 
Details of these special tours are 7 
being finalized. This is your opportunit 
to plan ahead and let us know yourm a 
preferences. 


Jost Travel 
100 Alexis-Nihon Blvd. 


St. Laurent, Quebec H4M 2N7 
Tel. : (514) 747-0613 


me DE Mtattmolisbitiatyel 


by 


al-ele 


incip 


(¥V Peewee Tso 
sl 


| i 


Can 
Mw 
* 
tere 
ol 
& 
” 


el 


c 
. 


Tere | 


a4 
we 


~ 


a é 
On -.ie he 


~*~ J . — 
A 
ee Et 2, 
x . a 4 NN 
. —2 4 ow. SI 
+ =< P 2 
S - b+4-4 


SP WARS BY, | eee 
Af | SS Lan | LAN ip 


i 
dite 


/ 


vf 
?, 


ects 7 
f 
4 
> alt ~ 
rf 
i Set — 
\ 


Z) A “ . <~ i — 
= fi f+. Hie =i, ~ 
= es eg i. i. — i / 
Ed 
' ner ' 5 F ati i 
~ Ps -_-= " tJ a ~ 
= : iy, 2 Ars ~f < ~ - 


By 


| 


in 
Wn 


— 


ee | 


Behind these gates lies a world of opportunity for thousands of students. 


You can help assure McGill’s future by making a 
bequest to the university. Your gift could help 
equip a laboratory, add to library resources, or 
establish scholarships, bursaries, and loan funds. 


For further information please contact: 


Mr. D. Lorne Gales 

McGill Bequest and Planned Giving Program 
3605 Mountain Street 

Montreal, Quebec 

H3G 2M 1 


Tel. (514) 392-5932 


Notebook 


ews 


-ublished by the Graduates 
Society of McGill University. 


Volume 60, Number 1 
Spring, 1979 


ISSN 0024-9068 


Editorial Board 

Chairman, John Hallward 

Editor, Victoria Lees 

Assistant Editor, Carol Stairs 
Business Manager, David Strutz 
Members, Andrew Allen, Edith Aston, 
Javid Bourke, David Cobbett, Josh 


Freed, Peter Lebensold, Katie Malloch, 


Elizabeth McNab, Peter Reid, Tom 


Introducing principal-elect David Johnston to 
the Senate in January, ChancellorConrad 
Harrington noted that the Johnstons have five 
daughters — “‘which proves that the nominating 
committee was not chauvinistic.”” When 
Montreal freelancer Olive Palmertravelled to 
London, Ontario, to photograph Western’s Dean 


Some articles are a joy to write, a delight to 
edit. Such an article, ““Silverberg,”’ appears 
in this issue. Impressed with an exhibition 
of David Silverberg’s coloured engravings, 
assistant editor Carol Stairs wrote the artist 
at Mount Allison University requesting an 
interview during his next visit to Montreal. 


{hompson, Laird Watt, James G. Wright. 


Feature Articles 


*7 A Judicious Choice 
| by Carol Stairs and Victoria Lees 


& Planning for the Future 


3 Silverberg 
by Carol Stairs 


6 Alcan’s David Culver: In Defence 
of Big Business 
by Don Worrall 


9 Teaching, Research, and Practice: 
The McGill Cancer Centre 
by Heather Kirkwood 


’0 Aid for Injured Athletes 
by Christine Farr 


’8 Perspective 
by Andrew Cohen 


Jepartments 
2 What the Martlet Hears 
6 Letters 


21 Where They Are and 
What They’re Doing 
by Carol Stairs 


23 Society Activities 


edits: Cover, 1, Olive Palmer; 3, José Bérubé and 
larie Valois; 4, 5, 7, Harold Rosenberg; 9, Paul 
hefurka; 10, courtesy of the McGill Daily; 11, 

ourtesy of McGill’s Minimum Cost Housing Group; 

2, Harold Rosenberg; 13, John A.P. Stairs; 14, 15, 
iabor Szilasi, courtesy of Elca London Studio, Town 

f Mount Royal; 17, 18, courtesy of Alcan; 20, Harold 
iosenberg; 23, John de Visser; 26, Harold Rosenberg; 
'8, Francois Huot. 


he copyright of all contents of this magazine is 
egistered. Please address all editorial communica- 
ons and items for the “Where They Are and What 
hey’re Doing” columns to: The McGill News, 

605 Mountain Street, Montreal, H3G 2M1. Tel.: (514) 
92-4813. 


/ 


of Law for our cover, it seemed imperative 
that we get a shot of those five testimonials 
to McGill’s open-mindedness. 

Easier said than done! When Palmer arrived 
at the Johnston home, pre-birthday-party 
chaos reigned. “‘I’d look through the viewfinder 
and everything would seem fine until I realized 
there were only four children there,” Palmer 
recounts. “‘We’d find the lost one, only to 


discover that another had disappeared. On top 
of that, children kept arriving for tie party 
and, from time to time, I would have a 
neighbour’s child in the picture, too!” 

Everyone in the photo above, however, is a 
bona-fide Johnston. Shown with their parents 
are, left to right, Catherine, 3, Jeni‘er, 5, 
Alexandra, 8, Sharon, 6, and Deborah, 11. 
Johnston is quite accustomed to good-natured 
ribbing about his five daughters and takes it 
all in stride. “‘Every now and then the hockey 
coach at Harvard writes me and says, ‘I’m 
very disappointed you haven’t managed to raise 
a son for the Harvard hockey team.’”’ The 
principal-elect’s reply? ““*You’ve gct ten years 
to make that team coeducational!’” 


After an exchange of letters, artist, assistant 
editor, and editor arranged to meet for lunch 
at McGill’s Faculty Club. “You can recognize 
me as I'll be wearing a beard and some fifty 
pounds of excess,”’ Silverberg wrote. 

Recognizing him proved to be no problem. 
Among the dark-suited academics seated in 
the lounge, Silverberg shone like a bird of 
paradise. Short and rotund, he wore a flowing 
white smock, a Peruvian poncho, and a wide- 
brimmed black felt hat from which cascaded a 
yard of embroidered ribbon. 

An excellent conversationalist, Silverberg 
recounted anecdotes from his travels, spoke 
about his work, and shared his eclectic 
philosophy of life and art. “In Japan,” he 
explained, “‘they have a special word for an 
artist who lives by his work. It means he’s 
allowed to look poor and be poor, but he earns 
an honest respect.”’ 

To gather more material for the profile, 
Stairs visited Silverberg in his Sackville studio 
during her summer vacation. The author then 
finished her article as she had started it — by 
mail. Final details were checked by writing 
to Silverberg in Rome, where he is presently 
on sabbatical — studying, sketching, thinking, 
and earning an honest respect. 


Readers may have noticed a new by-line in the 
last few issues of the News. Heather Kirkwood, 
BMus’69, DipEd’70, who prepared the article 
on the renaissance of McGill’s track and field 
program for this issue, is an avid jogger. It 

was only after her copy came in, however, 

that we learned just how appropriate she was 
for the assignment — Kirkwood holds the 
Canadian Master’s record in the 50, 100, 200, 
and 400 metre sprint and will be running 

with the Canadian team at the World Masters’ 
Track and Field Championship in Hannover, 
West Germany, thissummer. Victoria 

Lees 


Do Not Bend, Fold, or Mutilate 

The McConnell Engineering Building is home 
to a zealous breed of student known as the 
“computer bum.” “‘They’re like ‘ski bums’ 
except that they live for the computer,” 
explains Dr. Martin Levine, professor of 
electrical engineering and chairman of the 
undergraduate program. “The computer 
laboratories operate virtually twenty-four 
hours a day.” 

To relieve the pressure on its two-dozen 
computers, the department of electrical 
engineering recently opened two new 
facilities — an Undergraduate Computer 
Laboratory and a Computer Vision and 
Graphics Laboratory for graduate students — 
boasting four new computers. Funding for the 
project, more than a third of a million 
dollars, came from the university budget and 
a grant from the Natural Sciences and 
Engineering Council of Canada, aided by a 
donation from Digital Equipment of Canada 
Limited. 

The new machines are all members of the 
PDP 11 family. While the PDP 11/04, 11/10, 
and 11/40 are general-purpose computers, 
the new VAX 11/780 is being programmed to 
process images — read fingerprints, 
photographs, or X-rays — as well as peform 
more general functions. Only the second of 
its kind in the country, McGill’s VAX 11 has 
already been put to work tracking the 
movement of blood cells in vitro. ““The 
practice of medicine involves the evaluation 
of pictorial data to such a great extent that it 
appears to be an excellent application,” 
Levine states. “‘But there are greater 
implications than just in the biomedical area. 
For example, we are looking at coloured 
slides of the outdoors — a building, a suburban 
house, a tree — and we are trying to get the 
computer to delineate what it sees and 
actually say what it sees. If one were going 
to design a machine or robot that would move 
around in the environment, it would have to 
do this kind of interpretation. This is a more 
futuristic application.” 

Early last year, urged on by the Quebec 
CEGEPs and the electronics industry, the 
Faculty of Engineering instituted Canada’s 


2 


Martlet 
hears 


first undergraduate computer engineering 
program. (The Faculty is already recognized 
for its strong graduate program in the field.) 
“People in management tend to stress the 
data bases and information systems — how to 
store and manipulate data in the computer 
with the objective of using it in a management 
role,” Levine explains. ‘‘In engineering we 
are concerned that people know both how 
computers are built and how to use them. 
Our students get a balanced program of 
design and usage — in other words, hardware 
and software.” 

Hardware in the two new labs is now 
providing engineering students with invaluable 
‘“thands on’’ experience — a prospect as 
exciting to the computer bum as a fresh 
snowfall would be to his skiing counterpart. 
Victoria Lees 


Ready, Set... Go 

“You think you know what’s going to happen 
because you’ve read several books on the 
subject and you’ve had friends with one. But 
once you live with your own, it’s really quite 
different — it requires a huge adjustment.” 
Jeff Derevensky, MA’73, PhD’76, is speaking 
about babies — normal babies born to loving 
parents — and the problems that often 
accompany the arrival of the stork. To help 
new parents cope, the thirty-one-year-old 
associate professor of education has estab- 
lished ‘“‘Ready, Set... Go,’ a year-long course 
that teaches the rudiments of behaviour 
management and infant development. 

Every Monday morning ten parents and their 
infants (aged two months to two years) as- 
semble at the Education Building for one and 
a half hours of child observation. This is 
followed by a discussion period with Dere- 
vensky and other experts — a psychiatrist, a 
speech therapist, an occupational therapist, 
and a child-care worker. “‘Many of the 
parents have gone through prenatal training,” 
Derevensky explains. ‘““They’ve learned how 
to have the baby and picked up a few basic 
survival skills for afterwards, like diapering 
and feeding. But that’s where it ends. Yet, 
actually having the baby is the easiest thing 
about parenting!”’ ‘‘Ready, Set... Go” picks 


up where the prenatal classes left off. “There 
is no other program in the city,” says 
Derevensky, ‘“‘that can provide parents with 
the information they need on developmental 
skills.”’ 

That information has proved most welcome 
to new parents, especially career women who 
find themselves at home for the first time, 
alone with a child. *‘We get out of the ‘stuck- 
at-home’ syndrome while receiving a lot of 
support from each other,” reports one mother 
enrolled in the program. Others praise 
“Ready, Set... Go”’ as the only intellectual 
stimulation they receive in the first year of 
parenthood. ‘‘We’re concerned with the 
mother’s problems as well as the child’s,” 
says Derevensky. Women today are not likely 
to have a mother or mother-in-law nearby to” 
turn to for advice on child rearing, he 
explains; in addition, particularly during the 
first year of motherhood, women find them- 
selves cut off from the world and physically 
and psychologically drained. 

Derevensky would like to see the program 
expand: ‘‘Our program to date really deals 
with normal children and normal parents, but 
we'd like to start a group for high-risk 
parents — single teenaged mothers and retarded 
or psychologically distressed parents; and for 
high-risk infants — those who for physical of 
psychological reasons might one day have 
learning problems. The greatest problems 
with high-risk parents appear to revolve 
around poor mother-child interaction. We 
want to try to strengthen that interaction s0 
that parents can understand what’s going 00 
in development and get lots of positive feed 
back for their behaviour.”’ Derevensky would 
also like to make the program accessible 
to low-income families. 

Although “Ready, Set... Go” is extremely 
popular — Derevensky cannot accept all the” 
parents who apply — the program is running 
into financial difficulties. The $100 tuition 
fee, he notes wryly, just about covers the cos! 
of coffee. Yet, raising it would eliminate 
from the program the parents he is most 
anxious to reach. Meanwhile, donations of 
equipment and money trickle in, and only ont 
staff member receives pay. 


Derevensky’s reward is thepersonal 
satisfaction he derives from vorking with 
the children and their parents, and the boost 
the experience gives him when it comes to 
preparing lectures — “‘It give; me funny 
stories to tell,” he says. Morethan that, 
“Ready, Set... Go” is a learnng experience, 
for him as well as for the parents: ‘“‘No 
matter how much I think I krow about infants 
and children in general,” he «plains, 
“*there’s always a lot more tolearn.” 0 


The Best is Yet To Be 

Life begins at sixty, they say. But for many 

elderly men and women the statement rings 
false. They must adjust not orly to physical 
frustrations — failing eyesigh! and tempera- 


mental knees — but also to considerable mental 


stress. All too often the “‘goldzn years” are 
marked by a dreary sense of loss — loss of 
position as the family head, Icss of a job and 
che self-esteem that comes with working, loss 
of family and friends. 


The McGill Graduate Faculty Committee on 


Studies on Aging would like to see old age 
studied just as carefully as youth. Until 
-ecently, the problems and needs of the elderly 
were not even recognized, much less subjected 
.o the scrutiny of researchers.*‘At the turn 
ofthe century life expectancy was about 
/orty-five years, so growing od gracefully 
wasn’t.exactly a problem,” says Blossom 
Wigdor, BA’45, PhD’52, asscciate professor 
of psychology and head of the multi-discipli- 
Aary group. “And until fairlyrecently there 
wasn’t any specialization in the problems of 
aging. But now there is a generally recognized 
1eed for geriatrics and geronblogy. With 
-he changing life expectancy <nd the changing 
jemographic composition of Canada, we’ve 
»decome much more consciou: that we’re going 
o have an older population. When I started 
nthe early fifties,” she recalls, “‘there was 
ilmost no research being don: — but the liter- 
iture has just mushroomed.” 

For the past two and a halfyears Wigdor 
ind several colleagues have been investigating 
he special needs of the elderly. “‘We began 
nformally, just through interest,”’ she 

~xplains, “but then we all feltthat if we wanted 
‘o accomplish anything we'd have to become 
in official McGill committee We applied and 
ast February were recognizec by the Graduate 
“aculty Council.”’ The Comnittee on Studies 
yn Aging, composed of ten farulty members 
tom psychology, medicine, nursing, social 
‘work, law, and architecture, vas given a 
mandate to foster awareness of aging and the 
reeds of the aged, to make recommendations 
‘o the Graduate Faculty for possible programs 
‘yn aging that might stimulateresearch in the 
jeld, and to coordinate and dsseminate know- 
edge already acquired. 

This winter, to sensitize theuniversity 

community to their work, thecommittee 


sponsored a public lecture series titled 
‘‘Perspectives on Human Aging.” Two- 
hundred and fifty people turned out to hear 
Dr. John Brocklehurst, a leading British 
geriatrician, speak on mental states in the 
aged. In February Dr. Leroy Stone, professor 
of sociology at the University of Western 
Ontario, gave a lecture on ‘“‘Population 
Changes and Social Planning in Canada:”’ and 
in March Dr. Ethel Shanas, a socio-gerontol- 
ogist from the University of Illinois, discussed 
family life and the aged. 

The lecture series is just the beginning, 
Wigdor hopes. *‘McGill is interested in 


scope in Canada, although indications are that 
there will be. The demand for trained people 
is growing faster than the supply. Canada just 
doesn’t have enough expertise in this area.”’ 

If Wigdor and her colleagues have their way, 
McGill-trained gerontologists may one day 

be able to restore some of the sparkle to the 
golden years. Heather Kirkwood 


New Peak on Campus 

Manning a garden hose on a February day 
might seem an unusual campus activity. For 
twenty-two architecture students, however, it 
was serious business: they were creating a 


* BOL SS ee re thee 
: Pe. D8 hy om? 


i) Mare TR 

WR SATE 

ot 
=>; 


Fea ee TH 

ar 3 : a” ra 
-. a 
: 4 


Architecture students created a new look for this year’s winter carnival ice palace. 


instituting some sort of program of studies in 
the field of aging,” she says. “‘We hope that 

by the end of this academic year our committee 
will be able to make recommendations as to 
how the university should proceed.” 

Wigdor regrets that she cannot devote more 
time to the work of the committee. “‘If we 
really want to get something going we’ll need 
a full-time person and facilities — in other 
words, a centre run by a director or coordina- 
tor, with a mandate to develop a program of 
studies,” she explains. ‘‘We feel there is a 
real need for such a program — there are no 
established gerontology programs of any 


aN 


‘new look”’ for the university’s traditional 
winter carnival ice palace. 

The ice palace started out as a classroom 
project. ‘‘Usually students make small clay 
models for design courses,”’ explains Pieter 
Sipkes, assistant professor of architecture. 
‘This year I asked the Students’ Society if we 
could put up the ice structure.” 

Given the go-ahead, everyone in Sijpkes’ 
second-year design and construction class 
built an original model. Edward Hercun’s 
design was unanimously selected and the 
whole class ““worked like mad”’ to translate 
his concept into reality. They managed to 


finish the thirty-foot-high palace both ahead 
of schedule and vithin their $500 budget. 

The construct narks a breakthrough in ice 
building. Insteadof piling ice blocks on top of 
one another, the students stretched nylon 
mesh over a steel-pipe frame. The material 
was then sprayed with water. “‘Our biggest 
problem was tha’ the ice was sublimating 
[evaporating intc the air],”’ says Sijpkes. 
‘“‘We had to hoseit once in a while. But ice is 
an ideal teachingmaterial — mistakes melt 
away in spring and there’s no disposal 
problem!” 

No mistake atout the McGill ice palace, 
however; in fact,the design may be offered 
to Quebec City for next year’s winter 
carnival. ‘‘We’reon a tangent that could lead 
to something more serious than building ice 
palaces,” Sijpke: continues. ““Two places in 
Europe are expelimenting with the use of ice 
as an alternativeto concrete. They’ve asked 
us to share our kiowledge with them. And up 
north the army i: doing quite a bit of work 
with ice as a builling material.” 

Sijpkes believes his students have learned 
more from their project than simply how to 
construct an ice palace. ““Before we began 
several people, including engineers, told us 
the design wouldn’t work,” he recalls. “We 
went ahead anyvay. It’s good for students to 
learn to trust thar own judgement. And 
working outdoois on campus from morning 
until night madeus all realize what a 
fantastic place McGill is. With the mountain 
and the old buildings, it’s magnificent. We’re 
lucky to be here.” Heather Kirkwood 


Off and Running 

“I’m satisfied oily with perfection — so keep 
at it,’ track and field coach Russ Kidger 
chides a tired distance runner. It’s 8 o’clock 

on a wintry morning but it looks and feels 

like dawn. Outsile the snow is building into a 
blizzard; even urder artificial lights the 

McGill gyms ar¢ cold and dark. Despite 
uninspiring concitions, however, thirty men 
and women trair today and every day. 

After an abseace of six years — during which 
students competed only in cross-country races 
— the track and field program at McGill sprang 
back to life in November 1977 through the 
efforts of Kidge: and ardent runner Dr. Vince 
Saull, professorof geological science. At 
Saull’s suggesticn, the foundering McGill 
program merged with Uni, a private Montreal 
track club of which Saull was an executive 
member. The aliance McGill-Uni offered 
mutual advantages. ‘““With this arrangement,”’ 
explains Saull, ‘McGill athletes can have 
access to Uni’s coaches and sports clinics, 
while Uni members can use McGill’s facilities 
and research resources. The main shortcoming 
of any university club is that it has a transient 
membership. Bit continuity can be achieved by 
grafting a community club on to the university.” 


4 


Twenty-five students turned out to McGill’s 
first track and field practice held under the 
new aegis; fifteen committed competitors 
survived the rigorous early morning sessions 
in the Sir Arthur Currie gyms. Their hard 
work paid off. Although athletes exposed to 
track for the first time at the university level 
work under a tremendous handicap — most 
senior club members have many years of 
training behind them — McGill proved modestly 
successful during local meets held that first 
summer. Two team members selected to 
compete in the Senior Provincial Championships 
brought laurels home to their alma mater — one 


Breakthrough in Pain Control 
Achieving the delicate balance between pain 
control and drug addiction has perplexed the 
medical profession for centuries. But a 
research team at Bristol Laboratories of 
Canada, working in close collaboration with 
Dr. Bernard Belleau, professor of chemistry 
at McGill, has developed a new drug that could 
provide the answer. 

Marketed by Bristol-Myers Laboratories 
under the brand name Stadol, butorphanol 
tartrate has been available in injection form 
in the United States since November 1978 and 
should be available in Canada shortly. “Stadol 


Members of McGill's track and field team set a brisk pace on a morning practice run 
After an absence of six years, track has returned to McGill. 


placed first in the 100-metre hurdles, the other 
came fourth in the 5,000 metres. 

But it takes time to build a strong team. 
Kidger estimates it will be spring before 
the club is operating to his complete satisfaction. 
As well as organizing the group and setting 
up individual training programs, a coach must 
transmit his ideas and discipline to the 
athletes. “I'd like to build McGill into a 
showpiece of university track and field,” he 
says. Nevertheless, the twenty-nine-year-old 
coach believes his primary responsibility is 
pedagogical. “I don’t just tell athletes how 
to train,” he says. “‘I explain why. By doing 
that I fulfill a service; I become an educator 
as well as a coach. This makes the program 
continue, because I train people who will in 
turn become coaches.”’ 

Kidger’s work is bearing fruit. This year 
the track and field team doubled in size and 
McGill dominated the fall cross-country season. 
At the Canadian University Championships 
held in Toronto, McGill placed sixth in a field 
of fourteen. In a demanding twelve-kilometre 
race on Mount Royal, the entire thirty-member 
team placed in the top third of a field of 370 
competitors. McGill won not only the university 
championship but the overall meet. Kidger 
and his athletes have high hopes for the spring. 
Heather Kirkwood 


will relieve any pain that can be alleviated by 
narcotic analgesics [drugs such as morphine 
and demerol],” says Belleau. The new 
compound is totally synthetic and is five to 
eight times more effective than morphine as an 
analgesic. Both animal and clinical tests 
indicate, however, that Stadol, even in large 
doses, does not lead to “‘drug-seeking 
behaviour.” Belleau hopes that the new drug 
will free the medical profession from its 
reliance on fields of opium poppies in other 
parts of the world. Since Stadol is synthesized 
from coal-tar chemicals, its availability is 
ensured. 

More than eight years ago, Belleau and 
Dr. Irwin Pachter of Bristol Labs theorized 
that it should be possible to produce a drug 
that was both an analgesic and a “‘clean” 
antagonist to narcotics (that is, a drug which 
blocks and reverses the effects of narcotics). 
Supported in part by grants from the National | 
Research Council, Belleau and Dr. Yvo 
Markovic began chemical research with the 
specific aim of developing a safe and effective 
painkiller. Butorphanol, one of the initial 
target compounds, was extensively tested im 
animals by teams of pharmacologists. Once 
it was proved to be non-toxic and non- 
addictive, Stadol was tested as a painkiller. 
Clinical trials were carried out on 2,500 


seo ple in Canada and the United States. “‘It 
s impossible for any one man to be given or 
o take complete credit for a drug like this,” 
jays the fifty-three-year-old chemist. ‘“‘Going 
trom a theory to a practical medical application 
nvolves a great many steps and a lot of people.”’ 
For Belleau, the Stadol breakthrough marks a 
ligh point in a lifetime of research interest 
n the chemistry of opiates. After receiving his 
joctorate from McGill in 1950, he went to the 
Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research 
n New York City and then to the Case Institute 
»f Technology in Cleveland. Returning to 
-anada in 1955, he worked first at Laval 
niversity and later at the University of 
tawa. In 1962 Bristol-Myers tried to coax 
im into their laboratories but, he recalls, 
I didn’t want to leave the university.”’ Belleau 
lieves strongly in “bridging the gap 
etween industry and academic life.’ He 
ccepted only a consulting position with the 
jaboratories, first in Ottawa and later in 
Montreal. 
Belleau joined McGill’s department of 
Pennie in 1971 and five years later became 
the first Canadian to win the American Chem- 
ical Society Award in Medicinal Chemistry 
or original work in the pharmaceutical field. 
ast year he received the I.W. Killam Memorial 
Scholarship for studies in the chemistry of 
Jrug receptors and enzymes; he was also 
warded the Marie-Victorin Prize for science 
»y Quebec’s Ministry of Cultural Affairs. 
3elleau is presently carrying out research ina 
ariety of fields, including enkephalins 
morphine-like substances produced by the 
»ody), antitumor agents, and adrenaline 
mhibitors. 
, To date, butorphanol has been used to 
yontrol the pain caused by terminal cancer as 
well as pre- and post-operative pain. It has 
ilso been found effective in allaying dental 
and back pain. Belleau speculates that Stadol 
night eventually play a variety of roles. It 
sould replace codeine as an ingredient in cough 
juppressants; other closely related drugs 
ander study might be used to block or inhibit 
sertain hormonal activities or to affect 
electively the central nervous system. 
Concludes Belleau, “‘It will be up to the drug 
sompany to provide the financial and human 
vesources to develop this field.” By Zoe 
3ieler, a medical reporter for the Montreal 
star. 


3ookshelf 
Dapsule summaries of books by McGill 
‘aculty members and alumni: 

Leonard Cohen — Death of a Lady's Man. 
“oronto: McClelland and Stewart, 1978. In 
his, his first book in six years, Leonard Cohen, 
3A’55, uses both poetry and prose to describe 
‘trained relations between the sexes. 

Lawrence Freiman — Don’t Fall Off the 
Rocking Horse. Toronto: McClelland and 


Stewart, 1978. In his autobiography, Ottawa 
businessman, philanthropist, and humanitarian 
Lawrence Freiman, BA’30, describes his 
formative years and his involvement in 
education, the arts, Zionism, and the family 
retailing business. 

Douglas H. Fullerton — The Dangerous 
Delusion: Quebec’s Independence Obsession. 
Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, 1978. 
Douglas Fullerton, BCom’30, MCom’40, former 
advisor to René Lévesque and four other Quebec 
premiers, examines the province’s recent 
history and attacks the separatist aims and 
activities of the Parti Québécois. 


Chemistry Professor Dr. Bernard Belleau, 
developer of the non-addictive analgesic 
Stadol: “It is impossible for any one man 
to be given or to take complete credit for 
a drug like this.” 


Irving Layton — The Tightrope Dancer. 
Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, 1978. ‘“‘For 
me, poetry has meant packing maximum 
meaning and intensity into every line; if 
possible, into every word,” writes Irving 
Layton, BSc(Agr)’39, MA’46, in the foreword 
of his new poetry collection. “‘A poem should 
resonate in the mind and heart long after it 
has been heard by the ear.” 

Patrick MacFadden, Rae Murphy, and 


Robert Chodos — Your Placeor Mine? Ottawa: 
Deneau and Greenberg, 1978.Carleton 
University journalism profesor and broadcaster 
Patrick MacFadden, BA’66, ind writer Robert 
Chodos, BSc’67, collaboratec with journalist 
Rae Murphy to produce this lumorous political 
satire set in the Canada of 1935. 

Hugh MacLennan — The Colour of Canada. 
Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, 1978. In 
this revised edition, English Professor Dr. 

Hugh MacLennan’s descriptire text is 
complemented by dramatic celour photographs 
depicting the changing moods and seasons of 
Canada. 

Seymour Mayne, ed. — Irving Layton: The 
Poet and His Critics. Torontc: McGraw-Hill 
Ryerson, 1978. Since Irving Layton published 
his first volume of poetry in 1)46, he has 
garnered both critical acclain and abuse. Dr. 
Seymour Mayne, BA’65, an English professor 
at the University of Ottawa, tas compiled 
reviews and articles about thecontroversial 
poet that date from 1945 to 1975. 

Don Murray and Vera Mutay — De Bourassa 
a Lévesque. Montreal: Les Editions Quinze, 
1978. Husband-and-wife tean Don and Vera 
Murray, MA’75, describe therise and fall of 
Quebec’s most recent premieis. 

Neal Olshan and Julie Waig — Phobia Free 
and Flying High. New York:Condor Publishing 
Co., Inc., 1978. Julie (Dreyer) Wang, BA’67, 
has coauthored a guide to phcbias that 
describes not only how to ideatify fears but 
also how to overcome them by a combination 
of body control techniques. 

Gordon Pape and Tony Aspler — Chain 
Reaction. New York: VikingPress, 1978. In 
this thriller set in the Canadaof the early 
1980s, publisher Gordon Pap: and radio 
producer Tony Aspler, BA’S‘, postulate that 
the Parti Québécois is still in »ower and that 
the separation referendum ha been won. When 
the premier of Quebec is assaisinated, 
however, an international pover struggle for 
the province ensues. 


Brenda Rabkin — Growing Up Dead. 
Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, 1978. In the 
last twenty years the suicide rite for North 
Americans aged 15 to 24 has ilmost tripled 
— 10,000 Canadian adolescerts attempt suicide 
each year. Freelance journalit Brenda 
(Yablon) Rabkin, BA’66, presents interviews 
with young people who have attempted suicide 
and probes for the reasons beiind their 
despair. 

Homer Scoggan — The Flora of Canada. 
Ottawa: National Museum o! Natural Sciences, 
vol. 1-3, 1978; vol. 4, 1979. Hymer Scoggan, 
BSc’34, MSc’35, PhD’42, fomerly a botanist 
at the National Herbarium o/Canada, has 
produced a detailed study of Canadian ferns, 
conifers, and flowering plants, accompanied 
by comprehensive keys for th: identification 
of over 4,000 indigenous and 1onindigenous 
botanical species. 0 


Letters 


A History of Women at McGill 

... Defended 

I read with interest the letter trom Dr. 
Margaret Gillett in the Summer 1978 issue. 
Her idea of documenting the history cf women 
at McGill seemed a good one; consequently, 

I was more than a little surprised at Dr. Leo 

Y affe’s reply in the Fall issue. 

It would appear that Professor Yaffe fails 
to see the purpose of a history, does not 
understand the women’s movement, or both. 
A history of women at McGill is logically 
just as valid as a history of Quebec in Canada 
— each permits a minority to offer its unique 
perspective. Furthermore, the women’s 
movement itself is a major force in the 
university of the 1970s, as affirmative action 
programs clearly demonstrate. Thus I see 
no support for Yaffe’s claim of “‘reverse 
sexism”’ on the part of Gillett. 

I do agree with Yaffe that material relating 
to the history of women at McGill should also 
be sent to Dr. Stanley Frost (director of the 
History of McGill Project j for his book. 
However, the idea that this information could 
“more profitably be sent to him”’ is, in my 
opinion, sexist. I suggest that we let the two 
historians decide for themselves the relevance 
of the received material by sending all of it 
to both of them. I look forward to the 
publication of both books. 

Colin M. MacLeod, BA’71 

Toronto, Ont. 


... Welcomed 

The letter of my colleague and friend Dr. Leo 
Y affe in the Fall 1978 issue asks an interesting 
question: ““Why is Margaret Gillett writing a 
history of women at McGill if Stanley Frost 
is writing a general history of McGill?” One 
way to respond is to ask why, if there are 
general histories of Canada, should there be 
an economic history of Canada? 

Moses was once asked to rebuke two 
unauthorized individuals who had presumed to 
prophesy, and he replied, ‘““Would to God all 
the people were prophets!” I very much wish 
that all McGill people were historians. I could 
then take the special-interest histories and 


wisely combine them so as to balance out any 


biasses and produce the perfect history of 


McGill. Unfortunately, not all McGill interests 


have historians and I suspect I might lack the 
omniscience and possibly even at times the 
impartiality required. As it is, I have been 
greatly helped by a number of special-interest 
studies, and have already profitted from some 
of Margaret Gillett’s research. Readers will 
be able to compare her specialized study 

with my general account when the History of 


Women at McGill appears next spring — about 


the same time, we hope, as the first volume 
of my History of McGill. 

Stanley B. Frost, Director 

History of McGill Project 


And for Dessert, a Magazine? 
Although the Winter 1978 issue, in the 
newspaper format, was every bit as 
interesting, informative, and well written as 
the magazine, I missed the sparkle of the 
colourful magazine covers, which had become 
so imaginative, and the gloss of the photos. 

If we are now restricted, because of budget 
cuts, to a meat-and-potatoes diet, I hope we 
may still look forward to the occasional 
dessert. 

Bea Kemp, Secretary 

Graduate Studies in English 


“A Forsey to be Reckoned With” 
Congratulations on a first-rate interview with 
Senator Eugene Forsey (Winter 1978). 

David J. Gibson, BCL’66 

Ottawa, Ont. 


Bouquets 
The Winter 1978 issue of the McGill News 
was excellent. I read and enjoyed all the 
articles. Thanks for making it such an 
interesting paper. 
Kathryn B. Tierney, BSc’39, BLS’47 
North Hollywood, Calif. 


...and Brickbats 

Ignorance of the historical seems endemic 
these days... and now we have Lois 
Mackenzie’s “‘Perspective”’ on old Ontario 
houses (Fall 1978) bringing Alsatians to 
Canada in 1837 to escape Napoleon’s 


conscription. Even if Mackenzie has managed 


to avoid European history this long, don’t 
your staff have some obligations? 

Gerald McCaughey, BA’S1 

University of Alberta 

Edmonton 


Editor's Note: The Alsatians escaped 
Napoleon's conscription long before 1837 — 
the ‘Little Corporal” died in 1821. It was 
the house that was built in 1837. We regret 
that this error crept into the article during 
the editing process. 


Faculty Donatons 

We have received a copy of McGill Today 
in which Chancelor Conrad Harrington, 
referring to the sanding of the McGill 
Development Program, states that he is 
“not only gratified by the result, but full of 
admiration for the support received.” 

My wife and [are not. It is disturbing 
to note that facuty and staff, the direct and 
indirect benefactors of this massive 
campaign, contrbuted slightly more than 
| per cent. Over ‘he five-year span, the 
average return fiom Salaries is an 
interesting example of marginal values. 

We will have to reassess our donation. It 
is difficult to have faith in the future of 
McGill when the present faculty and staff 
obviously do not. 

Charles N. M:Pherson, BEng’47, and 

Elizabeth (Atkinson) McPherson, BA’47, 

BSW’48, MSW’S53 

Kamloops, B.C. | 


The McGill Development Program replies: | 
Professors are not only “benefactors” of __ 
the university; trey are also employees. 
These days some employees do not readily 
see themselves a; having this kind of 
responsibility. 

Personally, I do not agree, at least as 
regards universities — and, in fact, many 
staff members do not. That’s why 1,200 
members of our faculty and non-academic 
staff gave as much as they did: more than 
those at the University of Toronto (with all 
the difference insize in that university’s 
favour), althougi less than those at | 
Queen’s. Smaller and more homogeneous 
places, where people know each other a little 
better, can do beter in such situations. 

There are other factors. Some important 
gifts made to the MDP by professors who 
are also graduates were attributed not to 
“staff” but rather to “‘graduates.”’ Had 
they been counted as staff, the staff total 
would have doubled. 

Faith in the future of McGill is amply 
demonstrated b: many exciting , 
developments. Research, for which our 
professors raise ;ome $22 million every 
year, is demonstrably more diversified 
than ever before... New teaching programs 
and improvements are being implemented. 
These, coupled vith the terrific response 
to the campaignat all levels of the 
community, areample evidence of faithin 
Old McGill. I honestly think that ifthe 
McPhersons continue their support, they 
will have in McGill a good and worthy | 
cause. 

Walter F. Hitschfeld, PhD’50 

Vice-Principal (Research) and Dean of 

Graduate Studies 

MDP Faculty Liaison Chairman 


Oe Saket et ale mae ~ 
‘ era TRF Sle Ra eye RSP as iG ev F SSE * 
eh eS Ba ee Ee ey 


Ce Sees > mes 


A judicious choice 


by Carol Stairs 


On the first of September David Lloyd 
Johnston, dean of Law at the University 
of Western Ontario, willbecome 
principal of McGill. 


After ten months of searchirg and deliberating, 
McGill announced in early January the ap- 
pointment of its fourteenth principal and tenth 
vice-chancellor. David Lloyi Johnston, 
thirty-seven-year-old dean of Law at the 
University of Western Onta‘io, was the 
unanimous choice of both the Senate-appointed 
Statutory Committee to Ncminate a Principal 
and the Board of Governors “‘The enormously 
stimulating challenge of being a part of McGill 
attracted me to the position,” the principal- 
elect stated at a press conference. ‘“‘When it 
‘was Offered to me by the Boird of Governors, 
I accepted without a momert’s hesitation.” 
McGill’s gain, however, i: Western’s loss. 
‘Johnston’s colleagues in Loidon are already 
lamenting his departure. Says Dean of 
‘Dentistry Dr. Wesley Dunn, “‘The day his 
appointment was announcec, I must admit | 
had very ambivalent views. On the one hand, 
I couldn’t imagine anybody more suited to 
the principalship of a univenity than David 
Johnston. But I was almost lisconsolate to 
irealize that he would be leaving Western.” 
‘Dr. Louise Forsyth, a Frenc professor who 
has worked with Johnston 01 several 
committees, says simply, “He cares 
‘terribly about people. We stall miss him.” 
President of Western Dr. George Connell 
ifeels that Johnston has the qualities that will 
‘make him a first-rate princival. “He is a 
very sound academic personand that is 
important in any position ofacademic leader- 
ship — you have to be good tt the basic job, 
which is teaching and doingresearch. Then, 
,too, he is a good administraor. He has been 
,an excellent dean for the Fa:ulty of Law.” 
When he begins his five-y:ar term on the 
first of September, Johnsto will be the 
youngest university head in Canada. (Sur- 
prisingly, perhaps, he is the ifth-youngest 
principal in the 158-year hisory of McGill.) 
‘Born in Sudbury, Ontario, <nd raised in 
‘Sault Ste. Marie, Johnston von a scholar- 
ship to Harvard University n 1959. Named 
every year to the Dean’s Hoour List, he 
graduated in 1963 with a barhelor of arts, 


A pride of principals: Dr. Robert Bell, 
right, and his successor Cavid Johnston. 


Looking for leadership 


by Victoria Lees 


The ideal McGill principal was once 
described as a combination of Jesus Christ 
and Genghis Khan. An exaggeration perhaps 
— but only a slight one. Not only does the 
principal and vice-chancellor guide a 
university of almost 27,000 souls — 
19,600 students, 4,000 academics, and 
3,300 staff members — but, in addition, he 
is often called upon to act as a spokesman 
for Quebec’s English-speaking population. 
When Dr. Robert Bell, principal through- 
out the seventies, announced his resignation 
over a year ago, he set into motion the 
Senate-designed machinery for choosing 
his successor. The Statutory Committee 
to Nominate a Principal was convened last 
March, with Chancellor Conrad Harrington 
as chairman and two representatives each 
from the Board of Governors, the Senate, 
the Students’ Society, the Graduates’ 
Society, the McGill Association of 
University Teachers, and the McGill 


University Non-Academic Staff Association. 


The committee held twenty-eight meetings 
and innumerable informal get-togethers. 
In addition, individual members held 
confidential talks with people mentioned 
during proceedings as either possible 
candidates or referees. Points of order 
were hammered out, letters of reference 
examined, long-distance calls made across 
the continent. The paperwork was vast 
and the meetings both exhaustive and 
exhausting. 

Nevertheless, the Thursday afternoons 
given over to choosing a new principal are 
remembered fondly by those who 
participated. ‘‘To me, it was one of the 
greatest experiences I have had a McGill,” 
recalls Donald McRobie, a representative 
from the Board of Governors. “‘I have 
been around here practically since Noah’s 
Ark and I’ve done a lot of things. But 
nothing was nearly as interesting as this. 
The twelve on the committee represented 
different segments of the university 
community, but it became apparent after 
a few meetings that everybody was dedicat- 
ed to getting the best person for McGill. 


We all saw eye to eye on that. It was an 
amazing exercise. There were no differ- 
ences of opinion, there wasn’t a word 
spoken in anger or criticism throughout 
the whole ten months.”’ 

Harrington drew up a list of criteria. 
“The key function of the principal,”’ he 
wrote, ‘‘is to be able to present a good, 
alive, interesting profile to the university 
and to all milieu in which the university 
is properly concerned.” To this end, the 
principal should be physically and mentally 
strong, bold, innovative, patient, persuasive, 
and warm. Finally, wrote the chancellor, 
he should “‘be capable of great fairness 
and decision — and sometimes of righteous 
indignation.” | 

The criteria were intended as informal 
guidelines only. ‘““We didn’t have an 
accepted model,”’ explains McRobie, “*but 
each of us had his own conception of what 
the attributes of the best person would be. 
They started off with the obvious one of 
leadership. I think the person to lead a 
university or any big enterprise must have 
a presence.”’ The committee, he adds, was 
also looking for an academic. “‘There are 
no rules laid down on the matter, but I 
personally don’t believe that anybody but 
an academic could lead a university.” 

One-hundred and nine applications and 
nominations poured in — there was, 
Harrington notes, /’embarras du choix. 
Eventually, the committee narrowed the field 
to nine, and each finalist was interviewed — 
intensively. At 11 o’clock the candidate would 
meet with four committee members for coffee, 
at 12:30 with four others for lunch, and at 
4 with the entire committee. They faced 

a barrage of questions. ‘“‘McGill’s place 

in Quebec and in Canada was a frequent 
question,” recalls third-year Law student 
Neil Wiener, a Students’ Society repre- 
sentative. ““There were many questions on 
the budget and McGill’s financial future. 
The non-academic staff asked about union- 
ization; representatives of the Graduates’ 
Society asked about the relationship of the 
graduates to McGill. Specific things that I 


was interested in were a willingness to 
speak up on issues, given the present 
situation in Quebec, and also some 
realization that curriculum and academic 
standards at McGill are not all they 
should be at the undergraduate level.” 

David Johnston, Western’s young dean 
of Law, passed his orals with flying 
colours and emerged the favourite of the 
committee. Before coming to a final 
decision, however, the nominating com- 
mittee wanted an even closer look at its 
prime candidate and six members flew to 
London for a day. They returned to 
Montreal impressed; the committee 
decided on December 14 to present 
Johnston to the Board of Governors as its 
sole candidate. 

“We were all taken with his maturity 
and his presence,” notes Harrington. “He 
had more dignity, more poise and balance 
from the beginning than many of us achieve 
in our whole lives.’’ Wiener concurs: “It 
wasn’t any particular position he adopted, 
or any particular skill that he possessed. 

It was the general impression he created 
that I found so admirable.”’ McRobie says 
simply that Johnston stood head and 
shoulders above the other candidates. “He 
has the intrinsic, basic integrity that you 
look for in a leader.” 

On January 9 the Board of Governors, 
like the nominating committee, voted 
unanimously to name David Johnston 
McGill’s fourteenth principal and tenth 
vice-chancellor. The following day he was 
introduced to the public at large through a 
press conference and gracefully fielded 
questions from media representatives in 
both English and French. “It’s very good 
discipline for a lawyer to be cross- 
examined,” he allowed. Asked if he planned 
to continue teaching Law while serving in 
his new post Johnston quipped, “I'll have 
to ask the dean! Deans of Law have very 
particular concerns about who teaches in 
their Faculty!” 

In any capacity in which he serves at 
McGill, the principal-elect’s interest in 
students will stand him in good stead. 
Wiener has already experienced it. After 
the new principal had been presented to 
the Board of Governors and the celebratory 7 
sherry had been poured, he stepped over 
to speak with the Law student who had 
devoted so many hours to the selection 
committee. “‘He asked me about my 
courses, about my exams, about what I 
planned to do after Law School,” Wiener 
recalls. “‘At what must have been the high 
point in his acadernic career, he paused 
to talk to me like that. And he really i 
cared.” 

The ultimate accolade. O 


magna cum laude. Johnston then entered law 
studies at Cambridge University on a Trinity 
Hall Scholarship, emerging two years later 
with an honours bachelor of laws degree. In 
1966, he added a second LLB to his creden- 
tials when he completed his studies at 

Queen’s University. After teaching there for 
two years, Johnston joined the Faculty of Law 
at the University of Toronto and became a full 
professor in 1972. Two years later, at the age 
of thirty-three, he assumed the deanship of 
Western’s Law School. 

Not everyone has been overawed by his 
brilliant career, however! With typical self- 
deprecatory humour, Johnston recounts a 
family anecdote: “I have a great-uncle who 
‘is now in his eighties and he’s lived on the 
same farm for most of his life. He’s a man 
who believes in roots. A few years ago he 
said to me, ‘Let me see, you’re in London 
now, aren't you?’ Yes, that’s right, Uncle 

)Frank. ‘Well now, just a couple of years ago 
you were in Toronto, weren’t you?’ Yes, Uncle 
»Frank. ‘And before that you were in Kingston?’ 
/Yes, that’s right. ‘And didn’t you spend some 
‘time over in England and down in the States?’ 
» Yes, that’s right, Uncle Frank. Then he 
stopped for a long, dramatic pause and he 
‘said, ‘Sounds to me, young fella, like you 
can’t hold a job!” While Johnston admits that 
he, too, is “‘very conscious of roots,” he 
snonetheless seizes each new challenge that is 
presented to him. 

A specialist in securities regulation and in 
.corporation and labour law, Johnston has 
published dozens of articles, coauthored 
‘several casebooks, and written a text 
entitled Canadian Securities Regulation 
(1977). Since 1972 he has been an active 
member of the Ontario Securities Commission 
‘which, he explains, “‘is responsible for 
regulating and supervising the trading of 
‘stocks and bonds in the province of Ontario, 
and which, specifically, has jurisdiction 
over the activities of the Toronto Stock 
‘Exchange.” His work as a commissioner is 
“‘one of the outside activities... that reinforces 

my interest in economic regulation and 
, corporate law.” It is a post, nevertheless, 
‘that he must leave behind upon moving to 
“Quebec. 
- Johnston has also been active in other 
‘aspects of provincial legal affairs. He has not 
‘only drafted provincial securities legislation 
‘and chaired arbitration hearings for several 
‘teachers’ strikes, but also headed committees 
‘as diverse as the Ontario Hospital Inquiry 
‘Commission and the Canadian Law Deans 
‘Committee. 
' It goes without saying that Johnston has 
‘been a sought-after committee member within 
‘the ivy-covered walls of Western. ‘‘I’ve 
\watched him take difficult stands,’’ notes 
Forsyth, who was a faculty representative on 
the President’s Commission on Salaries and 


Benefits which Johnston chaired. “‘But he has 
never compromised the stand he takes [for 
fear that] it might do him personal harm. He 
is willing to get involved and take his knocks.” 

The openness and enthusiasm of *‘Dean 
Dave”’ have also won him the respect of 
students. Says Students’ Council president 
and recent Law graduate Alan Patton: “‘He 
has always had a sincere concern for students, 
whether it is academic or social. And he’s 
gung ho about everything he does — it’s 
terrible to be dragging into the Law School at 
8:30 on a Monday morning and see him bound- 
ing down the hall to a class or a meeting!” 


fourteen years, and their five daughters, 
Deborah, Alexandra, Sharon, Jenifer, and 
Catherine. Distance running, downhill skiing, 
horseback riding, ice skating — the Johnstons 
enjoy them all. A defenceman on the All- 
American Hockey Team (and a roommate of 
author Erich Segal) while at Harvard, Johnston 
has always been a believer in physical fitness. 
Last fall he completed the rigorous twenty- 
six-mile Toronto Marathon, though he admits 
that ‘“‘most of it seemed uphill to me!”’ The 
principal-elect enjoys running “‘because it’s 
relaxation and it’s a time to think. If I have 
any good ideas, I think they tend to come when 


Principal-elect David Johnston, left, has retired his Western track suit. Jogging partners 
Dean of Dentistry Dr. Wesley Dunn, centre, and Dean of Physical Education Dr. Bill 
L’Heureux admire his new uniform, a gift from McGill's department of athletics. 


A statement Johnston once made to 
Patton’s first-year Law class left a lasting 
impression. ‘“‘He quoted Thomas Aquinas, 
saying that the lawyer should be the complete 
man,” Patton recalls. “‘Dean Johnston said 
he had always agreed that there should be 
more to your life than just the law. I think 
that is something he really lives up to — in 
his work with the community, his students, 
and his family.” 

Busy as he is, Johnston makes time to be 
with his family — Sharon, his wife of 


I let my mind roam free. To go and have a 
run is my way of handling tension and pres- 
sure.”’ The sport has become a family affair. 
“Our eight-year-old daughter ran in the 
Springbank race here—four and a half miles 
—and my wife is now a jogger too,” says 
Johnston. 

In addition to running regularly and raising 
five children, Mrs. Johnston is a student — 
she is in the final term of her BSc in 
physiotherapy at Western. She hopes to be 
able to complete her summer internship at 


SIR, 1S 1T CIKELY THAT 


SO, MEMBERS OF THE PRESS, WITHOUT 
FURTHER DELAY LET ME INTRODUCE OUR 
NEW PRINCIPAL. LADIES AND 6ENTLE- 
MEN... HEEEERRRRES DAVEY / 


REAL CUTE, 
6 
° 


OO 
i REE 


Wwe, THE LAST TIME 
I SAW ERICH T 
CRACKED A HOCKEY 
STICK OVER H/S 
HEAD SO, NOSIR, 
ITS NOT VERY UKE 


RICH SEGAL WI VISIT 


IM OF L&éAC AGE 
MADAME , THAT'S 
wHAT'S }MPORTANT, 


SIR, HOW Does IT 
FEEL To BE THE 
YOUNGEST CHIEF 
ADMINISTRATOR OF 
ANY CANADIAN 
UNIVERSITY ? 


SIR, DO You THINK ITS 
TO Me Gills ADUANTAGE 
TO HAVE A PRINCIPAL 
WHO Looks CIKE 
JOHNNY CARSON? 


WOULD YOU PREFER 
PETER G2ZO0WSKI 7 


a francophone hospital in Montreal, with a 
view to improving her professional French. 
The Johnstons are happy about their move to 
Montreal and McGill. “‘I perceive the situation 
as being a very positive one for all of us,” 
states Mrs. Johnston. “‘There are so many 
opportunities for us to enrich ourselves that 

I think we’re lucky to be able to go.”’ The girls 
will attend a French private school in 
Montreal. 

So enthusiastic was eight-year-old 
Alexandra after a recent two-day visit to her 
new school and new city that she decided to 
make Montreal the subject of a class 
presentation upon her return to London. 
‘Montreal has many universities,” she 
wrote. “‘Several are of world stature. My 
favorite one is McGill University. And that’s 
because my dad will be principal of it.” 

Alexandra and her sisters are happily 
unaware of the problems that their father has 
inherited with the principal’s mantle. McGill, 
like all North American universities, faces 
a nexus of demographic issues — a potentially 
dwindling student population and an aging 
faculty. And McGill, like all Quebec univer- 
sities, must do more with less as government 
grants shrink inexorably. As he guides the 
university into a new decade, David Johnston 
will doubtless be called upon to use the 
originality and energy for which he is known 
and respected. 

The News recently spoke with the principal- 
elect in his office at Western and invited 
him to comment on issues of concern: 

@ Declining Enrolment: *‘We in the Canadian 
university community have to begin to live 
with the notion of smaller, but more beautiful. 
Through the sixties, we expanded very quickly; 
it is always difficult to scale those kinds of 
efforts back. But there have been many other 
periods in the history of higher education in 
this country and in other countries when we 
have had to learn to live with diminished 
resources and we have done so successfully.” 

@ Staff Shrinkage: “It is important to try to 


cause the shrinkage to occur by natural attrition. 


It is also important to have the shrinkage occur 
at a gradual pace so that you are bringing 

in fresh ideas on a regular basis. These must 
perforce come from people whose experiences 
are those of other institutions and sometimes 
those of other countries, and who have the 
freshness and the new perspective that younger 
people can bring to a university. I don’t think 
there are any marvellous solutions.” 

@ Undergraduate Curriculum: ‘My own 
interests in terms of undergraduate education 
are to ensure that a broadly based liberal 
arts education remains one of the very 
important centres of the university and a 


The principal's first press conference, as 
seen through the eyes of McGill Daily 
cartoonist Stuart Logie. 


} 


foundation for the work of a more specialized 
kind that is done in so many disciplines. My 
own education at Harvard involved a four- 7 
year, broadly based liberal arts degree with 
an avoidance of any narrow concentration. 
Only after I had completed that did I go onto 
pursue professional studies in the Law. 

“TI think I am a better professional because 
of that foundation. It is awfully important in ~ 
professional education that young men and 
women are educated for a lifetime in their 
practice. During that lifetime the content of 
the discipline is going to change quite 
dramatically and the best people will be those 
who have the capacity to adjust to the change _ 
in content and the change in skills.” 

@ Admission Standards: *“My contributionty 
discussions at Western has been that we 
should not lower admission standards but that 
we should be prepared to have a gradual 
decline in the number of students entering our 
undergraduate programs. It is important that — 
this decline be gradual so that one can adjust 
to the consequences.’ 

@ The Role of Alumni: “1 can’t tell you how 
impressed I am with what the Graduates’ 
Society at McGill has done. I look forward 
to my association with the society and to 4 
direct contact with the graduates. Wetalked 
about declining enrolment and the task of 
attracting high-quality students to McGill. 1 — 
think graduates have an important role to play. 
in these respects. My alumni work with the — 
Harvard Club in Toronto has been partly in 
that connection. It started out as a desire to 
put a little bit of water back into the well from 
which I have drawn so much. But I find that! 
continue to take more water out of the well 
than I put back.” 

@ The Move to Quebec: “I’m a Canadian and 
McGill is an exceedingly important Canadian 
university. That is what attracted me to the 
position. We look forward to living in Quebec 
very much; it is the most culturally stimulat- 
ing of Canada’s regions. Quebec is now 
involved in a series of changes that present 
challenges which I think are quite exciting. 

“As to my background in French, I havea 
basic knowledge and feel that I am making 
good progress. I feel reasonably confident that 
by the first of September I’ll certainly have 
competence in speaking French and will be 
able to carry on discussions with people in 
the Quebec government and elsewhere. Ina 
reasonably short time my northern-Ontari0 
accent should diminish a little bit!” 

® Personal Priorities for September 1:"1 
think my priorities are to be sure that I get 
out from my office and around the university, 
so that I come to understand it in a direct 
way. There’s a tendency sometimes to becolés 
a victim of the paper that crosses your desk. 

I want to see the university as it really is and — 
come to know the people who make it a first 
quality operation.” 9 


= a s » 
—_— ee, aE ——ee 


_* 


Planning for the future 


Two imaginative master’s programs 
at McGill train students to build a 
better environment for both the haves 
and the have-nots. 


Cheaper Homes 

While many architects devote their talents 

to designing elegant homes for the wealthy, 

the Minimum Cost Housing Group (MCHG) in 
McGill’s School of Architecture is endeavouring 
to develop cheap and efficient housing for the 
world’s homeless. 

Part of a graduate program in housing 
design, the eight-year-old MCHG has begun 
looking at a virtually cost-free — and ubiquitous 
— construction material, consumer garbage. 
‘Waste products can be recycled in a number 
of ways, the group has discovered — baby-food 
jars can be glued together into panels, tin 
cans wired into blocks. The architects are also 
experimenting with modifications to commercial 
packaging design. Cardboard boxes, soft drink 
bottles, bleach containers — with a few simple 
adaptations all could be reusable as building 
materials. It is estimated that a small super- 
market generates enough packaging to build 
twenty houses a week, and that the world’s 
ten largest soft-drink and brewery corporations 
produce enough bottles to build one-hundred 
million homes a year. 

Those homes are already desperately needed 
in the Third World, and the situation can only 
deteriorate — by the year 2000 the world’s 
population is expected to reach six billion. 
Witold Rybezynski, associate professor of 
architecture and head of MCHG, says bluntly, 
**Mexico City grows by a thousand people a 
day. There are no miracle solutions.” His 
group, nevertheless, continues to search for 
alternatives. 

_ Thecornerstone of MCHG technology is the 
sulphur building block. Cheap, abundant, and 
often produced as an industrial waste, sulphur 
can be melted down and poured into moulds. 

‘A strong, waterproof building block can be hand- 
produced in twenty minutes. Because the blocks 
interlock like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle, no 
mortar is required during construction. To 

date the MCHG has erected three sulphur-block 
buildings in Canada — a small dwelling on the 
‘Macdonald College campus, a pavilion for the 
Cree Indians at Saddle Lake, Alberta, and an 
orphanage near Sorel, Quebec. 

Alternative sanitation systems are also high 
on the researchers’ list of priorities. Water- 


based sewage systems are not only expensive 
to install but also use an inordinate amount 
of water. (The average North American family 
uses 334,000 litres of water a year, 40 per 
cent of which is used for toilet flushing. Such 
liquid luxury, impossible in the arid regions 
of the world, is wasteful even in temperate 
zones.) Consequently, the MCHG has been 
engaged in developing low-cost dry toilets. 

A few years ago the group also invented 
a device to reduce the amount of water required 
for bathing. The six-minute atomized shower, 
featuring a mist sprayer, vinyl tubing, and a 
bicycle pump, uses only two litres of water as 
opposed to the 42 litres used in a normal 
shower and the 125 in a bath. Since run-off 


The glass brick: Imaginative packaging 
results in useful garbage. 


from the atomized shower is minimal, no 
elaborate drainage system is necessary; 
rather, the two litres are easily collected for 
disposal or recycling. 

The original atomized shower had one 
drawback — it was chilly. “‘It’s nice to take 
a warm shower,” confesses auxiliary professor 
Vikram Bhatt, ‘‘so one of our students worked 
this year on developing a cheap water heater.” 
His low-cost solution to the problem? A black 
plastic garbage bag filled with water and left 
to warm in the sun. “‘But how do you seal it? 
We tried the most expensive glue on the market 


and worked backwards,” Bhatt explains. 
‘Finally, the student found a method — he 
folded the edges of the bag over and used a 
cigarette to heat-seal the plastic. It gives a 
tremendous bond.”’ 

The MCHG disseminates its innovative ideas 
not only through publications but also through 
representatives who travel to developing 
countries to teach its technology. As well, 
foreign students returning home carry the 
MCHG message with them. Master’s student 
V.S. (““Chotu’’) Nataraj, who plans to return to 
India this spring, is critical of his country’s 
slum-clearance programs. “‘They build four- 
storey concrete buildings for slum dwellers, 
but people just rent them out to others who 
earn a little more; with four months’ rent, 
they can build another slum house,” he 
explains. ““You can’t take people away from 
where they live — they don’t like it. Especially 
fisher folk — there is no point taking them 
away from their shores. It is better to go 
there and help them build a better community 
with very cheap material.’’ One inexpensive 
material Nataraj envisions using is stabilized 
earth. ““They have very good clay in many 
parts of India,”’ he notes. 

Although the varied work of the MCHG is not 
likely to have much impact on urban areas, it 
has enormous potential for rural regions and 
for the Third World. “In the western world,”’ 
Bhatt explains, “housing is not supplied in 
adequate numbers because the market doesn’t 
want it supplied that way. While a house is a 
necessity, it is also regarded as an investment 
and the supply must be limited to keep prices 
high. If you own a house today, one day you 
will be rich. In ten years’ time the value will 
double. You will sell it, buy another of greater 
value, and finally you will make a hundred- 
thousand dollars profit and buy a condominium 
in Florida.” 

Unfortunately, that formula doesn’t work for 
everyone — the free-market concept of housing 
as an investment is totally foreign to slum 
dwellers. What they need is basic shelter. For 
many citizens of the world, a home built of 
beer cans or a shower in two litres of water 
— cold or warm — would be considered a luxury. 
Victoria Lees 


11 


Better Cities 

Most McGill students do fairly routine things 
while earning their graduate degree — chemists 
experiment in their labs, historians live in 

the library. Some, however, use the city as 


both lab and library. They spend two and a half 


years researching it—not only measuring noise 
levels, tracing property ownerships, and 


estimating traffic flow, but also investigating the 


accidents on its streets, the suitability of its 
industries, and the happiness of its inhabitants. 
They are master’s students in the School of 
Urban Planning, one of twelve such facilities in 
Canada. 

What, in fact, do urban planners do? “In a 
city like Montreal, planners are likely to be 
specialists,’ explains Harvard-trained 
Professor David Farley, BArch’59, director of 
the school. ‘“‘They might specialize in housing 
or urban economics. They might specialize in 
municipal finance and work on the economic 
problems of the city —how to increase the tax 
base, how to run the city in an effective way. 
Then there are urban designers —they study the 
form of cities, projecting them into the future. 


came out. In fact, it is really rather funny 
because at the end of term the francophones 
were moaning, ‘Speak English —I’m here to 
learn English.’ But the English-speaking 
students are very anxious to learn French — 
they have to, in order to get into their 
professional corporation. So you hear them 
having fierce discussions —the English students 
speak French and the French students speak 
English. They’re all determined to practise!” 
The program covers a core of compulsory 
basics (the theory of planning, general 
principles and practices) and a choice of 
electives (including site usage, urban 


TITUTIONNE L 
MO ESIDENTIEL 


lon 


studio work. ‘The students divided thea 
into groups and each studied a specific 
question,” Wolfe explains. “One of them did th 
proposed bridge between Nuns’ Island and Ver¢ 
—a cost benefit study on whether it should be 
built or not —and came out against it. One of 
them did a study of merchandising on Wellingig 
Street —a series of planning proposals on how 
to cheer up the main street — which was 
fantastically well received. The merchants are 
paying to have this student exercise published 
and distributed. Another group studied the use 
of the back lanes and what could be done to 
improve them. A local citizens’ committee 
got hold of their report and is reprinting it.” 
“The second-year studio is again terrific,” 
Wolfe adds. “‘The students have just done a 
huge project, in conjunction with the two school 
boards, on school closures in the inner city and 
what they are going to do about them. They _ 
operated at three levels. One was a macrolevel, 
a demographic study saying, “This is the 
composition of the population and this is the wa 
things are changing. Globally, these are the j 
numbers of schools you are going to have to 


close.” A second group went into meso-scale; 
they took one district of the city and madea 
specific plan of which schools should be closed 
and which kept open. A third group took three 
specific buildings and invented uses for them — 
within the community context.” | 
A planner may plan, but the government 
decides. How do planners deal with politica 


They will be involved in design questions, such 
as where roads should go and what kind of land- 
use regulations should exist. Other planners 
work at the level of citizen involvement, making 
up conceptual schemes, for example, for 
redevelopment of the waterfront. 

“Small communities need planners who can 
do everything,” Farley continues, **—apply for 


1LVIE PARE 

PRANK KAGAN 
PIERRE AFOND = = 
FEYRIER 1979 t 


gf 
LSPACES VERTS 


a eh federal and provincial aid to fix things up, | problems? ‘‘Any way they can,” says Farl 
| MH work with the city manager on transportation ‘‘My feeling is that most planners, for g00 
) r problems, advise the mayor on all sorts of =? o ill, have taken the position that they haveé 
issues. The planner reports to the city council obligation to do a first-rate technical job,t 

; and works with the city manager on things like 2 Sas make clear what the options are. Then the 


accept that the decision will not be theirs. 
can strongly recommend, they can resign 
lose. In a public administration you eithél 
to quit at a certain point or accept the polit 
decision.” 

Job opportunities for students holding: 
master’s degree in urban planning (MUP) 
says Farley, “a function of the economy. | 
have been affected the way the developme 
industry and architects have been affected 
the slowdown in economic activity over th 
two years we don’t have as many consult 
phoning us to say they’ve got to have plam 
Wolfe estimates that for the student “who 
have a clue about getting a job,” it takes¢ 
two months to find work. 4 

Certainly the long-term prospects for 
planners are bright. Three-quarters of Cal 
population is already concentrated on less 
one per cent of the land. By 2001, i gr 
predict that 90 to 95 per cent of all Ca 
will live in cities. Urbanization will inevit 
force citizens to think carefully about i 
environment. City size, modes of transpor 
housing, land use, congestion, ecological § 
— these complex issues must be faced. 
planner will be consulted on them all. 0 


building approvals. He probably also works with 
the chamber of commerce. In this kind of 
practice you have to know a bit about everything. 
ar On the whole, you can’t solve any urban planning 
problem without getting into a number of 
different areas. Planning does not lend itself 

to a single perspective. It predetermines an 
approach that places one in the difficult position 
of not being an expert!” 

Those who choose this profession come from 
a variety of educational backgrounds. Urban 
designers usually have architectural training, 
while transportation specialists are generally 
engineers. Also accepted into McGill’s urban 
planning program are graduates in geography, 
social work, law, economics, political science, 

; and sociology. The three full-time staff members 
are also multidisciplinary: Farley is trained 

| as an architect and planner whereas asso- 

| ciate professor Jeanne Wolfe, MA’61, and 

assistant professor David Brown are both 

geographers as well as planners. 

Of the ninety students who apply annually to 
the School of Urban Planning, only fifteen are 
accepted. This year, nine of those students are 
francophone. ‘‘We don’t aim at a particular 
mix,” explains Wolfe. ‘‘That is just the way it 


ae 


: i: ; 


An urban planning student presents his 
plan for the development of Nuns’ Island. 


transportation, housing policy, planning in 
Quebec). Two studios (or planning projects) and 
a supervised research paper complete the 
academic requirements. ‘“‘We expect the students 
to learn the basics of planning and to 
specialize,” explains Farley. ““Someone 
concerned with social issues might well do more 
work in political science; another interested in 
transportation would probably concentrate on 
math, civil engineering, and perhaps economics.” 
Work carried out by the students often proves 
useful to the city under study. This year, various 
problems in the City of Verdun were assigned as 


12 


by Carol Stairs 


~“Tfmy nails are dirty I know I’m okay,”’ 
muses artist-engraver David Silverberg, 
BA’57. “It’s just the ink — and a little bit of 
joy!” 
In all his coloured engravings, Silverberg 
celebrates life. Lovers and animals, women 
and birds, dancers and butterflies — these 
recurring images are natural extensions of 
his optimistic spirit. ““The world is not just 
made up of what you see,” says the forty- 
three-year-old artist. ““You reorganize it in 
your mind and in your heart and in the light 
of experiences you have had. One of the most 
exciting things about being an artist is that 
you can hold on to images and ideas; they 
become part of your existence.” 


As achild Silverberg studied under Dr. 
Arthur Lismer at the Montreal Museum of 
Fine Arts and went on to specialize in fine 
art at McGill. In 1963, the young high-school 
art teacher moved to Sackville, New Bruns- 
wick, to join the Mount Allison University 
staff as a lecturer in graphic arts; he has 
been an associate professor since 1971. 
Silverberg has travelled extensively, 
studying etching and engraving in France, 
lithography in England, wood-block carving and 
batik in Japan, and ceramics and terra cotta 
in Peru. By combining elements of these 
centuries-old arts, he has evolved a method 
of engraving that is as unique as his fingerprints. 
“T use an instrument from the 1400s called 


& tPA PRP Ste Kaveh orer as wi ayer atel 5) 
mes ths Sites op eee Se 


Seer eae 


a graver, or burin, and carve lines in a steel 

or zinc plate by pushing the tool forward and 
moving the plate with the other hand,” he 
explains. “It is a very slow, delicate process 
and has serious disadvantages for the modern 
spirit.’’ Before the burin ever comes in 

contact with the metal plate, however, 
Silverberg makes numerous detailed drawings 
in a sketchbook. “‘I use pen and ink almost 
exclusively,” he notes. ““They closely resemble 
the dangerous element in printmaking — you 
can’t make a mistake.”’ 


Printmaker David Silverberg at his intaglio 
press: ‘‘There’s a lot of physical work 
and a lot of sweat, but /| like the contact.” 


13 


Once the design is complete, Silverberg 
draws directly on the plate with ink and then 
begins to engrave. “‘It’s much like working 
with the melody before adding the orchestration,” 
he says. “‘It’s being put down, but with the 
knowledge that it will go much further.” 

To create three-dimensional images, 
Silverberg employs a method reminiscent of 
the art of batik. After waxing over certain 
features of the engraving, he dips the plate 
into a vat of diluted acid and uses large 
feathers to spread the solution evenly. He 
then removes the etched plate, washes it 
carefully, and resumes work with the burin. 
As a result, the finished plate is rough to the 
touch — to achieve the realistic depth of 
pine boughs in Mourning Dove (see page 15), 
he submerged the plate in acid sixteen times. 

During the printing process, Silverberg 
explains, “‘What is low in the plate becomes 
high in the print and vice versa. There is a 
great deal of embossing in my work. In some 
ways it’s a pity that the prints are framed. 
They should be handled and touched.” 

It takes a month, and sometimes longer, for 
the artist to complete a large engraving — and 
as much as an hour to produce a single 
finished print. ‘‘I don’t think I have great 
patience in other things,”’ he remarks, “‘but 
here I must have. It is an illness, a tem- 
perament. I want the plate to have enough 
integrity to be able to take sixty or a hundred 
prints. Integrity is a word not used too easily 
nowadays, but it is the name of the game.”’ 
Using his fingers, Silverberg deftly rubs a 
rainbow of oil-based inks into the grooves of 
the engraving. Those sections that have been 
polished with a burnisher totally reject the 
ink; the grooved and etched portions retain 
it in varying degrees. This inking process 
must be repeated for every print pulled from 
the plate. 

While most of the tools of his trade are 
portable, the massive intaglio printing press 
that Silverberg designed and had built in Japan 
twelve years ago is a permanent fixture in 
his campus studio. Its rollers exert a pressure 
of 20,000 pounds per square inch. ‘‘There’s 
a lot of physical work and a lot of sweat, but 
I like the contact,” says the diminutive but 
muscular artist as he manhandles the spoked 
wheel of the press. ‘““The students have much 
better equipment than I do,”’ he adds with a 
laugh. “*We have presses that the girls can 
use without turning into Charles Atlases!” 

Silverberg usually prints about ten 
“‘artist’s proofs”’ to experiment with the 
blending of colours and subtlety of detail. 

‘I think they are more valuable than the 


Woman of Chichicastenango (12” x 19/2”’) is 
an engraving based on sketches Silverberg 
made while visiting Guatemala. Says the 
artist, “My exposure to far-flung places 

and cultures influences my imagery.” 


14 


umbered prints,” he notes — no two proofs 
are quite the same. “I try to make all the 
prints in the edition as closely alike as I can.”’ 
The artist admits, however, that he is not 
ommercially oriented. ‘‘I have no idea what 

appens in the art market,” he confides. 
‘Some of my prints are so popular they 
are sold out within a week; others, which 

thought were as good or perhaps better, sit 
and gather dust.”’ 

Although he does sell his work privately, 
Silverberg jealously guards his hours in 
he studio and prefers to distribute his work 
hrough art galleries. Since graduating from 

cGill, he has given over ninety one-man 
exhibitions — not only in Canada and the United 
States, but also in France, England, West 

ermany, Austria, Japan, Peru, New Zealand, 
and most recently, Sweden. His engravings are 
epresented in numerous private collections and 
art museums around the world. ‘‘A printmaker 
wants his work to be available at a reasonable 
price to many people,”’ says Silverberg. 
‘Printmaking involves an enormous amount 
of work. It may not be worth it in monetary 
erms, but that is the way I do it.”’ 

Silverberg restricts the number of prints 
aken from each engraving. “It is a business 
onsideration, not an artistic one,” he points 
ut. But he regards the finished metal plates 
s works of art in themselves. Given the 
ours of patient work they represent, he is 
nderstandably loath to part with them. All 
ompleted engravings are carefully stored in 
is studio — all, that is, except the series of 
fteen he created for The Song of Songs, a 
00-copy, limited-edition book published when 
e was twenty-five years old. He is still bitter 
bout having to destroy the plates. “It was 
articularly brutal and I'll never do it again,” 

e asserts. ** You are cutting them up so each 
ustomer has a little corner and knows they 
an never be reproduced. It has nothing to do 
ith art.”’ 

The associate professor willingly shares 
ith his students the techniques and skills it has 
aken him decades to learn — he teaches all 
rintmaking methods, not just his own. ‘‘I 
ant to make sure that young people have what 
didn’t have I-had-to-teave the country-to 
parn this,” he notes. ‘‘The students have got 

enty years of what I know and if they want 
, ’m available.” He has little patience with 
ose who attend university merely ‘“‘to have 
good time learning about being arty.”’ He 
so deplores the waste of materials that he 
pes. ““I can keep myself equipped from what 
e students throw out,” he despairs. 

These are but symptoms of a greater 
roblem, maintains Silverberg. ‘“‘The whole 

estion of whether creative art should be 
aught at university has to be rethought. 
therwise, we are spending a lot of money 

d we are not helping the climate of art or 
le creation of new materials. All we are doing 


Mourning Dove (9!2” diameter). ‘‘The pomp and splendour of the male bird intrigues 
me,” explains Silverberg. ‘It is beautiful, it is free to move, it is flighty. A bird that 

can fly away can also fly back — this liberty appeals to me. It is part of the way /| think 
of the world. | have total control of the print, but | have no control of the world.” 


is creating a lot of jobs for art teachers. The 
better the student, the more I feel constrained 

to say, ‘Take two years, learn your basics, 

and then get out — get away from the professors, 
get out of the comfort of the school.” 

In universities generally, he says, ““The 
word is primary, the book is secondary, and 
the image is tertiary. But we have to realize 
that some people see better in images. The 
tragedy is that most people in Canada grow up 
thinking that it is not one of the important 
things in life to be conversant in music or 
art. It’s ‘Now we’ve got a dishwasher; next 
year we'll get a painting.’ It could be different.” 

As he selects another classical record from 
his vast collection — he always works to 
music — Silverberg muses about the 
frustrations he faces as a professional artist. 
‘There are times right at the beginning of a 
plate that I know it is not going to be as good 
as I want it to be,” he says. **But I will persist 
because it is a challenge and because it is me. 

“The second I take the print, I havea 
moment of elation — and then the whole world 
falls apart. What am I going to do next? If it 
is a terrific print, I say, ‘Ill never make 


iN 


one like that again.’ If it is a lousy print, it’s 
“You mean I’ve been working all these years 
and I can’t do anything better?’ Anybody who 
asks for that kind of tension must be a little 
cuckoo! 

“] think anguish and uncertainty are very 
much the lifeblood of the artist. You are never 
as good as you want to be. You want to do 
beautiful things, but they’re never quite as 
beautiful as they should be. You want to make 
really powerful statements, but they’re never 
as powerful as they might be. You want to choose 
the right colour, but it is never as good as you 
had hoped. You want everybody to love it ... 
but there aren’t enough everybodys. 

“Perhaps the thing that bothers people most 
about my work is that it’s optimistic,” he 
continues. “*A critic at my last show in Toronto 
was terribly upset that I was doing happy 
things, that I was a happy person. He just 
muttered, “God, how awful!’ and marched out. 
[t’s not that I don’t see the black side of life. 
But when I look at the world, I almost invariably 
choose to find the part that elates me. I look 
at my work to find out where I’ve been and 
what I am.” 0 


15 


ae 


Alcan’s David Culver: In defence 


by Don Worrall 


‘We must stop equating incentive with 
rip-off, investment with gains to the 
few,” says the president of a powerful 
multinational corporation. 


It was startling to find the head of the world’s 
second-largest aluminum company tending 
three-billion-dollar assets from behind a 
wooden kitchen table. But no, I thought, as 
Alcan’s David Culver ushered me to the very 
ordinary couch and chair in the opposite 
corner of his austere office in Montreal’s 
Place Ville Marie. Such a spartan “‘desk”’ 
befits this tall, athletic fifty-five-year-old 
who is so passionately committed to the 
competitive spirit. 

What Canada needs “‘is more people who 
revel at the sight of their competitors’ blood 
running down the street,’ Culver told an 
Ontario economic seminar shortly after his 
promotion to the presidency of Alcan 
Aluminium Limited in September 1977. The 
metaphor gives an accurate picture of the 
depth of Culver’s conviction. Canada enjoys 
one of the world’s highest standards of living 
and that standard can be extended, he be- 
lieves, to more of its citizens. To do so, 
however, Canada must compete. “At times it 
seems we are more interested in neutralizing 
the inequalities which result from success 
than we are in unleashing our potential,” he 
told a Vancouver audience a year ago. “If we 
are to succeed in achieving the economic 
growth which will support the standard of 
living most Canadians seem to desire, we 
must stop equating incentive with rip-off, 
investment with gains to the few. The world 
beyond our borders owes us nothing but that 
which we earn.”’ 

Winnipeg-born Culver entered McGill in 
1941 at the age of sixteen. “I learned a lot 
about booze, bridge, and staying up late that 
first year,” he recalls. ‘‘We were all waiting 
around to be old enough to join the forces — 
it was considered fun in those days.” Half way 
through second year, Culver joined the army; 
he served as lieutenant and then returned 
to McGill, graduating with a bachelor of 
science degree in 1947. Two years later he 
received an MBA from Harvard. 

Culver immediately joined Alcan and that 
same year married Mary Powell, daughter of 
the president of the company’s Canadian sub- 
sidiary. Culver served on the staff of the 
Alcan-founded Centre d’ Etudes Industrielles 


16 


eye S23 stews 


ee a ee eee ee ee ee ee 


in Geneva for two years and then joined 
Alcan’s New York City sales office, rising 
steadily through the company ranks to become 
president of Alcan Aluminium Limited and 
chairman of its Canadian subsidiary, 


Aluminum Company of Canada. (The Financial 


Post recently reported that the stage has been 
set for Culver to assume the chairmanship of 
Alcan Aluminium two years from now.) 

Culver’s blood-in-the-streets remark was 
quoted from the autobiography of Charles 
Revson, creator of the Revlon cosmetic 
empire. ‘‘I was interpreted by many as look- 
ing to grind my heel on the poor man in the 
street, to make him bleed to death or some- 
thing,” he says, admitting that he is in the 
habit of speaking off-the-cuff. “*‘What I had 
been talking about was a state of mind. 
Government can set a framework which helps 
the country’s cost [structure] and investment 
possibilities, but when you come right down 
to it, some people have the competitive spirit 
and some don’t. You can’t legislate it, and my 
wish for Canada is that we use our God-given 
assets with a competitive frame of mind. 
There’s no reason why we can’t compete 
around the world with anyone.”’ 

But how free should free enterprise be? A 
major rubber company recently admitted that 
it had lied to the public for three years about 
the safety of its tires. An automobile company 
continued to manufacture dangerously short 
tailpipes after calculating that to lengthen 
them would cost more than court settlements 
with accident victims. What about that kind of 
corporate freedom? 

“T think our system of checks and balances 
is such that if a company does produce a lousy 
product they suffer for it,’ Culver replies. 
“Watch their profits drop. In the end, changes 
are made. I honestly don’t think we can find a 
better system than the one we’ve got.” 

But what if there are several deaths in the 
meantime? “‘The safer people are, the more 
they find ways of committing suicide slowly,” 
says Culver. “It’s a basic tenet of the human 
being. Look at the deaths from drugs. Or the 
guy who’s got economic security, is healthy, 
and hasn’t a care in the world — he’ll probably 
take up motor-car racing or something.” 


Perhaps, but he has a choice whereas 
unwitting victims of product defects don’t, | 
counter. ‘‘Look, there are thousands of cor- 
porate decisions taken every day and, okay, 
some of them go wrong. The companies - 
suffer and some of the customers suffer. But 
I don’t think government regulation is the 
answer. You can’t remove all risk from life.” 

Might we not have people trained in cor- 
porate affairs appointed to the boards of large 
companies to safeguard public interests? 
Culver does not find this a good idea. “The 
Norwegians have that system,” henotes. 
There is, in fact, a Norwegian representative 
on Alcan Aluminium’s board, “but I can’t say 
they are any better or worse offthan any 
other board.”’ 

Alcan employs more than 61,000 people © 
worldwide, and Culver respects his worke Y 
‘*l believe labour should understand a lot m 
about business. We must realize that in this” 
day and age the guy in the plant can underst 
anything we can and, in the odd case where 
can’t, he’s probably got a brother with a Phi 
who can. I feel industry should do a much” 
better job of describing all the factors leadi 
to company direction of investments. Guys 
should be encouraged to participate in decr 
sions affecting their own work.” : 

The place for this to happen, however, is 
not on the company board, Culver maintaif 

‘‘Lower levels of management should be — 
instructed to discuss things more. I believe 
we have to work from the plant floor up.” — 

In recent years, several European counttl 
have come to recognize a worker’s “propett 
right to his job. By law, companies must jus 
tify layoffs, not only in terms of company 
efficiency but also in terms of their effect 0 
the community and the national economy. If 
Canada, however, companies can close plants 
and lay off workers simply by giving minimal 
notice and severance pay. | 

Should Alcan be allowed to close down ne 
plant solely because it is not quite as prolit 
able as another? “Basically, yes,” Culver ~ 
replies. “‘We don’t make every decision on 
basis of a fraction of a per-cent return, pa 
because you can’t always believe the figutt 
But when you get right down to it, people! 


to be prepared to move where there is work. 

If they don’t want to move, that is their choice. 
But they shouldn’t feel the world owes them a 
living in the place where they live.”’ 

Culver is not insensitive to the hardship 
plant closures cause, particularly in one- 
company towns. When Alcan shut down its 
fluorspar mine in St. Lawrence, Newfoundland, 
Culver cast about for ways to help the un- 
employed miners. A decade of costly health 
and safety problems followed by a strike in 
1976 had rendered the mining operation un- 
economical. When striking workers cut off 
Alcan’s fluorspar supply, the company was 
flooded with offers from around the world 
to supply the essential material more cheaply 
than Alcan could mine it. ““Obviously, there 
was a great attraction to closing the mine,” 
says Culver. 

Concerned about the social effects of the 
decision, Culver approached the federal and 
provincial governments with a scheme com- 
mon in Britain. He would pay the workers, 
tax free, for loss of permanent employment 
in their home community so that they would 
‘‘at least be able to buy a fishing boat or set 
up a discothéque in St. John’s or something.” 
But the officials balked. ‘“‘They said our laws 
wouldn’t permit it,”’ he recalls, “and one 
politician told me the workers would just 
fritter the money away and be back in three or 
four months looking for handouts. I said to 
him, ‘Your view of human nature is worse 
than mine. Maybe IS per cent would do that, 
but 85 per cent wouldn’t.’ ’’ Government offi- 
cials suggested that Alcan operate the mine 
for another three months. “‘That’s money 
that should go to the guys and not be wasted,’ 
I said, but they just answered, ‘No way.’”’ In 
the end, Alcan provided land to help the com- 
munity set up a fish-processing plant. 


Alcan President David Culver: “It’s 
illogical to talk one minute about what we 
are going to do about the /ess fortunate 
countries and the next minute complain 
about exporting jobs.... They’re God’s 
children too and I’m fed up with those who 
say that any capital raised here must be 
spent here.”’ 


17 


| 


a. 
— 


Problems like this are inevitable in a far- 
flung industrial empire like Alcan’s. Subsi- 
diaries and related companies mine bauxite in 
eight countries, smelt primary aluminum in 
nine, make aluminum products in thirty-four, 
and have sales offices in over a hundred. In 
its 1978 statement of company policy, Alcan 
declared its intention to respect both human 
rights and the laws of the countries in which 
it operates. In places like South Africa, such 
a policy seems doomed to failure. 

“There are a lot of things I don’t like about 
South Africa,” says Culver. ‘But then, there 
are a lot of things I don’t like about every 
country in the world. If we had a firm policy 
not to invest in any country that did not give 
equal rights to women, where would we go? 
There’s discrimination everywhere. It is to be 
regretted and has to be worked against.” 

In relation to the size of its holdings in 
other countries, Alcan’s interests in South 
Africa are minor and, to that extent, its 
influence is minor too, says Culver. None- 
theless, it has made some headway against 
apartheid — more than some other Canadian 
companies operating there, according to the 
Task Force on Churches and Corporate 
Responsibility which recently saluted Alcan 
for its $4,000 donation to race-relations groups 
outlawed by the South African government. 
The contributions were not large, a church 
spokesman pointed out, but their symbolic 
effect was important. 

But could Alcan not do more? Could it not, 
for example, have refused to participate in 
the construction of the Cabora Bassa Dam on 
the Zambesi River in Mozambique? A hydro- 
electric and irrigation project which, upon 
completion in 1981, will be even more vast 
than Egypt’s Aswan Dam, the Cabora Bassa 
will be a major source of electrical power for 
South Africa. Because the dam was seen as 
further entrenchment of minority white rule in 
Mozambique, many African leaders urged 
western countries not to support the dam. 
Sweden held back its investment firms from 
involvement in the project; the Italian govern- 
ment withdrew financial guarantees to a 
prospective Italian participant. Alcan, how- 
ever, became involved and was loudly 
criticized. 

“We were employing people in Arvida to 
make rods and selling the rods to a guy in 
Spain who was making cable for the dam,” 
Culver points out. ‘‘What’s wrong with that? 
Those people (in MozambiqueJare far better 
off to have electricity and, consequently, 
modern industry, than not to have it.”’ 

But so is the South African government, 
which is buying the power. “‘Why not go after 
the Newfoundland fisherman who sold fish to 
the people in Spain who made the cable for 
the dam,”’ Culver retorts. “* You can carry 
these things to extremes. I don’t support 

apartheid but the answer is not for us to pull 


18 


up stakes and take away black-African jobs. 
The answer is gradualism.” Culver cites the 
recent Rhodesian black-rule vote as proof of 
the effectiveness of this policy. 


Could progress not be accelerated if 


multinationals were to team up to pressure 
the South African government? “‘That’s the 


attitude of Andrew Young | American ambas- 


sador to the United Nations], remarks 


Culver. ‘He says equal opportunity for blacks 
didn’t come to Alabama until thirty or forty 
companies got together and instituted it. And 
he feels the same thing could happen in South 
Africa. I don’t know if he’s right. I think all 


we can do is be satisfied that we’re doing all 
we can.” 

But isn’t Young’s suggestion worth a try? 
Alcan, Culver replies, won’t take the lead in 
such a move because the company’s South 
African holdings are too small. “‘That’s not a 
cop-out, that’s a fact,”’ he asserts. ‘‘When 
we picked that company (the Alcan subsidiary 
in South Africa], we think we picked liberal 
people. And there are plenty of tribal chiefs 
down there who would agree.” 

Multinational corporations are frequently 
criticized for using Third World resources 
to produce luxury items like automobiles and 
appliances when what less developed countries 
(LDCs) need are food and clothing. Culver 


agrees that the multinationals who improve 
agriculture in Third World countries are doing 
the most good. " 

Culver is particularly proud of his own 
company’s record in Jamaica. Alcan has not i 
only replaced the earth ripped open in the 
search for bauxite, but has entered into an 
agricultural project in cooperation with the 
Jamaican government. “We've got around 
5,000 tenant farmers, producing two million — 
quarts of milk a year. The farms are extremely 
well run; they’re models for farming in that 
part of the world.” 

It is through such self-help projects that 
Third World countries can improve their lot, 
Culver insists. ‘‘The one thing LDCs should ~ 
avoid like the plague is feeling the world owes — 
them a living,” he says. 

What these countries need from us are 
“extra favourable” trade terms—andno 
tariffs. ‘Every time an LDC producesan 
item that somebody in the world can use, its 
very much in the interest of the rest of the 
world to buy that item and not to protect its 
own workers. If the Third World produces 
saleable goods we should buy them without 
impediments.” 

Culver admits, however, that if he were 
running a Canadian textile firm facing stiff 
competition from Asian countries, he would” 
feel obliged to denounce just that sort of free 
trade. But as president of Alcan he takes a 
broader view: “It’s illogical to talk one minute 
about what we are going to do about the less” 
fortunate countries and the next minute 
complain about exporting jobs. Why the hell 
don’t they have a right to investment funds if 
they’re in a position to produce something 
more cheaply than we can? They’re God's 
children too and I’m fed up with those who say 
that any capital raised here must be spent 
here.” 

To help Third World countries without 
eliminating jobs at home, Canada should 
specialize in capital-intensive rather than 
labour-intensive industries, Culver believes. 
‘‘That’s what Japan is doing and we'll havet 
do that too. Our only salvation is to employ 
our people in sophisticated, technical, and 
highly capitalized industries and let the work 
shops of the world, with their teeming 
millions, have some work.” The result will 
not be an overnight redistribution of the 
world’s riches, Culver notes, but at least the 
gap between the haves and the have-nots 
will begin to close. 

As the president leads me back across the 
carpet towards his office door, I ask him wha 
his favourite school subject was. “Math,” he 
replies firmly. ‘You either got the right 
answer or you didn’t.” Balancing Alcan’s 
profitability curve with corporate citizenship 
may well prove the most difficult problem — 
Culver has ever faced. Again, he is looking” 
for the right answer. O 


- 
BN, 


ee eet 2a aoe 


Teaching, research, and practice: 


The McGill Cancer Centre 


by Heather Kirkwood 


-ancer is the second-greatest killer in North 
America today — the disease strikes one in 
very four people. Since the end of World 
Nar II, however, the cure rate has doubled — 
oday, almost half of all cancer patients will 
ve restored to health. Concerned physicians 
gue that the-cure rate could be increased to 
t least 60 per cent if all present knowledge 
vere applied to patient care. Research 
indings, they say, are not being disseminated 
ast enough. 

In an attempt to translate research results 
ato clinical practice, the university opened 
1¢ McGill Cancer Centre in the spring of 
978. The multi-disciplinary facility is 
-affed by thirty physician-investigators, 
ost-doctoral fellows, students, and techni- 
,ans; a further one-hundred people are 
inically affiliated with the group. Although 
1e centre is headquartered in the McIntyre 
fedical Building, most of the cancer treat- 
,ent and some research, as well as medical 
sudent and resident training, is carried out 

McGill’s teaching hospitals. 

_ The new centre coordinates the work of 
aiversity and hospital investigators with the 
xdside care given by clinicians. Both groups 
efit — doctors learn of the latest labora- 
ry advances more quickly than was possible 
_the past, while researchers have ready 
scess to case histories and tissue samples. 
The centre evolved because of a feeling 
jthin the medical community that there was 
aeed for some centralization of cancer 
Nctions,”’ explains director Phil Gold, 
3’57, MSc’61, MD’61, PhD’65. An inter- 
\tionally respected immunologist, Gold is a 
fessor of medicine and physiology, senior 
ysician and director of clinical immunology 
d allergy at the Montreal General Hospital, 
d senior investigator at that hospital’s 
esearch Institute. 
“What distinguishes the centre from its 
edecessor, the McGill Cancer Unit, is that 
's not only a research centre, although 
search is a very important aspect of 
T work,” notes the director. ‘‘Here, the 
tient is our major concern.” Gold hopes 
it the new facility will shorten the waiting 
riod cancer patients now face before they 


receive diagnosis or treatment. ‘A patient 
with a lump in her breast should have it out 
yesterday,” he emphasizes. ‘‘In most cases it 
is benign, but the psychological trauma to that 
person is incredible. The few weeks of wait- 
ing — first for a surgeon’s appointment and 
then for a bed — are disastrous.” 

The centre also offers patients the latest 
advances in medicine. ‘‘Every cancer patient 
deserves to be treated in a cancer centre,” 
Gold insists. “‘We don’t want to take the 
patient away from his own physician — you’re 
more comfortable with somebody you know. 
But our ultimate objective is to make sure 
that the physician has access to all the 
expertise available, at his own hospital 


and at every hospital affiliated with the centre.” 


To ensure the best possible cancer care, a 
director of oncology services has been 
appointed at each of the four affiliated hos- 
pitals — the Montreal General, the Royal 
Victoria, the Jewish General, and the 
Montreal Children’s. ‘These directors will 
coordinate the interaction of the medical, 
surgical, and radiation oncologists,” Gold 
explains. “They will make sure the chemo- 
therapist or the radiotherapist is aware of 
the patient’s case before the surgeon 
operates.” 

The arrival of new researchers at the 
centre — immunologists, molecular biologists, 
a physical carcinogenisist, a chemical 
carcinogenisist, and their support teams — 
has given new impetus to cancer research at 
McGill. ‘“‘Our own proven research area is 
cancer immunology Cthe use of antibody 
molecules in the study of cancer],”’ says 
Gold. (Working with Samuel Freedman, 
BSc’49, MD’53, GDipMed’58, now dean of 
Medicine, Gold discovered in 1965 a carcino- 
embryonic antigen (CEA). CEA, produced 
when cancer cells grow in the digestive sys- 
tem, seeps into the blood and can thus signal 
the presence of a cancer.) 

Epidemiology — the study of cancer as an 
epidemic disease — is a focus of atten- 
tion at the centre. “‘We’re losing tremendous 
amounts of information concerning cancer — 
its natural history, its course, its possible 
causes — because we don’t have a system- 


atized method of gathering data on the disease 
and the patients,” explains Gold. 

Clinical trials are also being carried out at 
the centre. “Patients are not guinea pigs,”’ 
Gold stresses. “‘In a clinical trial, every 
patient is given the best treatment we have 
with the addition of a drug whose ultimate 
therapeutic effectiveness is uncertain. We do 
know it is not going to harm patients; what we 
don’t know is if it will do them any good. We 
can only find out by trying. Over the years 
this is how the major advances have been 
made in the management of the leukemias, 
breast cancer, Hodgkin’s disease, and 
tumours which can now be considered curable 
under appropriate circumstances.” 

The establishment of the centre has had a 
beneficial side effect on the medical 
curriculum at McGill. ““The teaching of 
cancer medicine was previously neglected 
here,”’ explains Freedman. “Individual 
professors within the different departments 
gave lectures, but these were not coordinated. 
Now, for the first time, an integrated block of 
teaching has been set aside for cancer 
medicine.” 

Funded mainly through endowments (the 
first and largest being a $1.2 million bequest 
from the estate of Sir Mortimer Davis, 
founder of the Imperial Tobacco Company), 
the centre budgets its resources carefully. 

It pays no medical salaries. ‘Centre members 
who are on the staff of McGill or one of the 
hospitals continue to receive their regular 
salaries,’’ Gold explains. ‘Researchers who 
work only here are funded by grants or 
scholarships. No centre money is used to 
support research. If someone is not good 
enough to obtain research funding by peer 
review, then he’s not good enough to be here.” 

Gold is modest about past accomplishments 
and optimistic about the centre’s future. 
“We've been lucky,” he remarks. “I'd like to 
say that everything we’ve accomplished here 
has been due to our phenomenal insight and 
brilliance, but I know that’s not quite the way 
it has all happened. McGill is a first-rate 
institution; we have a lot to offer the world 
and with a little luck and a lot of hard work 
we're going to do it.” O 


19 


id for Injured 


by Christine Farr 


At her sports physiotherapy Clinic, 
Karin Austin treats both ‘“‘little old 
ladies” and “‘big, tough Montreal 
Alouettes.” 


The weights, exercise equipment, and reha- 
bilitation machinery make it look, at first 
glance, like a gymnasium. But surgical scars 
on muscular limbs reveal that this is no 
normal gym; it is, rather, a sports physio- 
therapy clinic. Skiers with dislocated elbows, 
hockey players with smashed kneecaps, 
tennis buffs with strained muscles — all find 
their way to Physiothérapie Internationale. 
The Montreal clinic, which specializes in 
the treatment and rehabilitation of sports 
injuries, is the creation of Karin Austin, 
BPTh’67, BSc(PTh)’77. ‘“‘Patients who use 
hospital physiotherapy facilities often just get 
back to functioning level,” Austin explains. 
‘This is all that’s really possible considering 
the long waiting lists at hospital clinics. Here 
we are freer to do a thorough job and we 
understand the athlete’s problems.” 
The thirty-three-year-old physiotherapist 
is a sportswoman herself. Granddaughter of 
the renowned cross-country skier ‘“‘Jack- 
rabbit”’ Johannsen and daughter of 1937 
Canadian ski champion Peggy Austin, she has 
been on skis since the age of two. It was as a 
physiotherapist, however, that she became a 
member of the Canadian Olympic delegations 
to Sapporo, Munich, Innsbruck, and Montreal, 
and travelled around the world with the 
Canadian ski team from 1971 to 1974. ““My 
experiences, particularly in Switzerland, 
were very influential,” she explains. **I was 
extremely impressed with the benefits that 
resulted when an injury received the right 
kind of treatment right away. If the injury 
isn’t treated properly and at once, it can take 
up to three times as long to heal.” 
Austin learned on the job — at that time no 
formal training in sports physiotherapy was 
‘available in Canada. “‘There I was with the 
team,” she recalls, “having to apply all the 
tricks I had been taught by trainers and at 
courses and sports symposia, and relying on 
my own experience as a skier and ski 
instructor to devise treatment techniques. 
The challenge was to adapt my physiotherapy 
training to the skiing world.”’ 
When she returned to Montreal in 1974 
intent on putting her hard-earned knowledge 
to work, Austin knew that no facilities were 


20 


Se eee 


Karin Austin, left, assists a patient. 


available for the treatment of sports injuries. 
Armed with the moral support of her friends 
and the financial support of her bank she 
established her own clinic a year later. After 
a slow start, word of the new facility began to 
spread: two-hundred patients a week now 
receive treatment at the hands of Austin and 
three other physiotherapists. Although 70 per 
cent of the cases are athletes suffering from 
sports-related injuries, the clinic handles 
regular physiotherapy patients as well. “*We 
have little old ladies as well as big, tough 
Montreal Alouettes,’ Austin smiles. 

After medical assessment of the extent and 


Athletes 


‘ 


‘ 
nature of a new patient’s injury a program of 5 
treatment is developed. “‘We work very 
closely with the doctors in designing a treat- « 
ment program for the patient as well as for 
the injury,” Austin explains. Taken into 
consideration are the patient’s level of a 
activity and physical condition prior tothe — 
injury, his general health at the time of jj 


if 


treatment, and his lifestyle. ““Swimmingis 
often an adjunct to treatment but,” says 
Austin, ‘‘we wouldn’t prescribe ten lapsof 
the pool for someone who hates to swim.” ; 
Patients are encouraged to supplement clinic 
workouts with home exercise. “‘I tell my : 
patients that if they do the exercise, they 

get better, if / do the exercise, then / get 
better,’’ Austin laughs. 

Rehabilitation is often impeded by 
ignorance on the part of the patient or coach, 
the physiotherapist believes. ‘“‘Most people 
either do too much and push through pain 
when they shouldn’t, or they do too little, 
become impatient with the healing process, ~ 
and return to their previous level of activity — 
before the injury has had achancetoheal 
properly.” * 

Many of the injuries treated at Physio- 
thérapie Internationale might have been 
avoided by proper training. Research shows 
that the typical bounce-and-stretch 
calisthenics, the muscle-strengthening 
exercises, the deep knee bends advocated for 
athletic development can sometimes be 
harmful. ‘What results are muscles that are 
strong but not flexible,” says Austin. When 
flexibility or speed is required these muscles 
often succumb to injuries that a different 
type of training would have prevented. “A 
slow, steady stretch or a contract-relax type 
of exercise is best for developing flexibility.” 

Austin has already carved a place for 
herself in the field of sports physiotherapy. 
As well as giving in-service training to her 
staff, she set up a half course in sports 
physiotherapy at McGill in preparation for 
the 1976 Montreal Olympic Games. It has 
become a popular elective. Austin is 
convinced that having more specially trained 
physiotherapists on the sidelines will result — 
in fewer athletes on crutches. 0 7 


j 
At 
5 


and 


Where they are 


what they're doing 


9y Carol Stairs 


{23 

WENDELL B. BREWER, BCom’23, recently 
yecame the oldest graduate of Laurentian 
University, Sudbury, Ont., when he received a 
achelor of arts degree in social sciences. The 
seventy-nine-year-old now plans to study for 
lis master’s degree. 


(33 

ROBERT SHAW, BEng’33, a former McGill 
‘ice-principal, has been appointed chairman of 
he Board of Governors of the University of 
New Brunswick, Fredericton. 


34 
HENRY FINKEL, Arch’34, is president of the 
\ssociation of Canadian Industrial Designers. 


3D 
VILLIAM MAYCOCK, MD’35, has been 
warded a knighthood by Queen Elizabeth II. 
NORMAN H. WADGE, BEng’35, MEng’ 36, 
jas been made an honorary doctor of laws 

y Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ont., in 
cognition of his contribution to the founding 
{the university and to the establishment of a 
egree program in mining and mineral process 
Agineering. 

39 

DMOND-A. LEMIEUX, BCom’339, has be- 
ome vice-president, finance, of Hydro- 
ruébec. 

HILIP F. VINEBERG, BA’35, MA’36, 
CL’39, is the first Canadian to be elected 

) the Board of Trustees of the Benjamin N. 
ardozo School of Law at Yeshiva University, 
ew York City. 


10 

IRLANDO A. BATTISTA, BSc’40, director 
f the Center for Microcrystal Polymer 
cience at the University of Texas, Arlington, 
as applied for a patent for soft contact 

‘nses that may be worn continuously for 
-veral months and then discarded. 
OUGLAS G. CAMERON, MD’40, McGill 
‘ofessor and president of the Royal College 
Physicians and Surgeons, has been named 
member of the Order of Canada. 


JAMES R. WRIGHT, BSc(Agr)’40, has 
retired as director of the Kentville Agricul- 
tural Research Station, Nova Scotia. 


"41 

ELIE ABEL, BA’41, has been appointed the 
Harry and Norman Chandler Professor of 
Communication at Stanford University, 
California. 

JUSTICE ALBERT MALOUF, BA’38, 
BCL’41, is heading a commission to examine 
overspending during the contruction of the 1976 
Montreal Olympic site. 

CLARENCE SCHNEIDERMAN, BSc’39, 
MD’41, a past president of the Canadian 
Urological Association, is senior urologist at 
Montreal’s Jewish General Hospital. 


"42 

E. LEE CAMERON, BEng’42, MEng’54, has 
retired as vice-president, development, of 
Georgian College in Barrie, Ont. 


"45 

HERBERT BERCOVITZ, BA’45, who 
teaches hospital organization and manage- 
ment at McGill, is director of hospital 
services at the Montreal General Hospital. 
NORMAN EPSTEIN, BEng’45, MEng’46, a 
professor of chemical engineering at the 
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, 
has become vice-president of the Canadian 
Society for Chemical Engineering. 


"47 

CATHERINE EKERS, BA’47, has become 
head of the public relations department and a 
vice-president of Ogilvy’s, Montreal. 
THOMAS INGRAHAM, PhD’47, has been 
appointed director, programs, of the Natural 
Sciences and Engineering Research Council, 
Ottawa, Ont. 


*48 

EDWARD FRANKLIN, BEng’48, has been 
named assistant to the director of purchases at 
Corning Glass Works, Corning, N.Y. 
GERALD HENDERSON, BSc’48, MSc’50, 
has been appointed senior vice-president and 
director of Chevron Standard Ltd. 


MARGARET (COPPING) PATTERSON. 
BSc’48, has been re-elected a city councillor 

for Pointe Claire, Que. 

GEORGE SAHOVALER, BA’48, is general 
manager of Georges Valere and Co., a Toronto- 
based distributor of European tableware. 


”49 

LEONARD R.N. ASHLEY, BA’49, MA’S0, a 
professor of English at Brooklyn College of the 
City University of New York, has been elected 
president of the American Name Society, an 
organization of onomasticians. 

ANGUS M. MacFARLANE, BA’49, is 
parliamentary secretary to the Minister of 
State for Federal-Provincial Relations, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

GUY K. MANTHA, BEng’49, has been elected 
vice-president of |’ Union régionale de Montréal 
des Caisses populaires Desjardins. 

JOHN R. SADLER, BEng’49, has been made 
senior vice-president, Canadian metals division, 
of Hudson Bay Mining and Smelting Co. Ltd., 
Toronto. 


BO 

T.G. HANSON, BA’S50, has been named 
general manager of Eaton’s Contract Sales. 
ROBERT E. LANDRY, BEng’S0, has been 
appointed vice-president and manager of the 
external affairs department of Imperial Oil 
Ltd. 

ANDRE MICHAUD, BEng’S0, has been 
named manager of loss prevention for the 
Iron Ore Co. of Canada. 

BRODIE J. SNYDER, BA’S0, has become a 
senior consultant with Public and Industrial 
Relations Ltd., Montreal. 


"51 

ATHANASIOS ASIMAKOPULOS, BA’S1. 
MA’53, a McGill economics professor, has 
won a Canada Council Leave Fellowship and 
will spend the next academic year in France 
and England writing a text on macroeconom- 
ics. 

R. VANCE WARD, BSc’51, manager of the 
industrial chemicals division of Canadian 
Industries Ltd., has become a director of the 
Chlorine Institute, New York City. 


21 


Doi PAP et eto 
Sao ee alee 


McGill Society of Montreal 
Travel Program 


for 1979-80 


Membership in the Travel Program 
is available to graduates, parents, 
and associates making contributions 
to McGill, or by paying a $10.00 fee 
to the McGill Society of Montreal. 


Tour of the Greek Islands 

13 May - 2 June 1979 

Price: $2,200.00 

Includes flight, transfers, course, 
and first-class accommodation. Tour 


leader will be Professor George Snider, 


chairman of McGill’s classics depart- 
ment. 


Galapagos Islands, Peru, 

and Ecuador 

24 May - 8 June 1979 

Price: $2,000.00 

Includes flights, transfers, Course, 
and first-class accommodation. An 
unusual opportunity to see the animal 
life, land forms, and vegetation that 
inspired Charles Darwin. David 
Lank, naturalist, author, and expert 
tour leader, will guide this special 
group tour. 


Norway 

17 June - 8 July 1979 

Price: $2,150.00 

Includes flight, transfers, and first- 
class accommodation. Tour leader 
will be Dr. Alice Johannsen, director 
of McGill’s Mont St. Hilaire Nature 
Conservation Centre. 


Tour of the People’s Republic of 
China 

1 August - 21 August 1979 

Price: $3,460.00 (from Montreal) 
Includes flight, transfers, tours, 
accommodation, and all in-China 
expenses. This tour will be part of 
the CP Air China Tours for 1979. 
Cities to be visited: Changchun, 
Peking, Shenyang, Kwangchow, 
Shumchun. 


Plans for 1980 include: 


Central America: Guatemala, 
Mexico, Yucatan (February) 


U.S. Skiing: Ski Utah (February- 
March) 


South America: The Amazing 
Amazon River Route (March) 


South America: Galapagos Islands 
and Peru (May) 


Britain, lreland, Norway: Cruise 
in Comfort (May) 


Greece: Tour Greece and the 
Greek Islands (May-June) 


China: Tentative Dates Only 
(October) 


Details of the 1979 special tours 
have been finalized. For an itinerary 
and application form please contact: 


Jost Travel 

100 Alexis-Nihon Blvd. 

St. Laurent, Quebec H4M 2N7 
Tel.: (514) 747-0613 


52 : 
MARGARET A. DAVIDSON, BCom’S2, is 
president of Montreal Investment consi 
Inc. | 
MOSES LAUFER, BSW’S2, a psychoanalyst, 
is director of the Brent Consultation Centre — 
in London, England, a walk-in centre for 
psychologically distressed young people. 
DONALD S. ROTHWELL, BEng’52, MBA 
PhD’73, has been appointed president and 
general manager of Great Lakes Waterways 
Development Association, Ottawa, Ont. 


753 
GRAHAM TUCKER, BD’S3, is the ministero 
the King-Bay Chaplaincy located in the 

Toronto-Dominion Centre, Toronto, Ont. His 
work involves helping downtown workers face 
emotional, family, and business problems. | 
>BA ' 
BRIAN MacDONALD, BA’S54, former artist 
director of Les Grands Ballets Canadiens, 
is a Montreal freelance choreographer. 1 
ZENON B. WOWK, BEng’54, has been electe 
chairman of the board of the Shoe Manu- ? 
facturers’ Association of Canada. 


Tt 
PETER BENJAMIN, BSc’51, MD’S55, has bee 
appointed chief of adolescent services at @ 
Texas Children’s Hospital and clinical assistai 
professor at Baylor College of Medicine, 
Houston. 
BRUCE M. BENTON, BSc’SS, is a warden ~ 
at the Church of St. Mary Magdalenein 
Toronto, Ont. 
PATRICK R. JUDGE, BD’SS, has been matt 
director of marketing for Sunshine Village Ski 
Resort in Banff National Park, Alberta. He 
also conducts outdoor worship services for 
skiers. 
DAVID J. McLEOD, BEng’S5, has tll 
pointed vice-president, research and cent 
ment, of Haworth, Inc., a manufacturer 0 
open office interior systems in Holland, Mich ch. 
IAN McPHERSON, LLM’55, general couns 
for Air Canada, has been named a Queen's — 
Counsel. 
SEYMOUR A. SIEGAL, MD’SS, has 
named associate director of the departmt 
of obstetrics and gynecology at South Nass# 
Communities Hospital, Oceanside, N.Y. ; 
: 


"56 
JOHN G. FERRABEE, BCom’56, has been 
appointed vice-president, real estate, of the 
New Providence Development Co. Ltd. 
MARGARET (HOLMAN) ROSSO, BN 
has become a nursing consultant with the 4 
Saskatchewan Registered Nurses Associatio! 
HUGH J. SUTHERLAND, BEng’56, has b 
appointed executive vice-president, construe 
of the Beaver Group of Companies. ¥ 


* 


The principal and the Graduates’ 
Society work on two fronts to enhance 


the image of the university and forestall 


a predicted decline in enrolment. 


_ Like every university on the continent, 

_ McGill is facing the prospect of a dwindling 

_ student population. Fewer students will mean 
cutbacks in government grants. Less money 
will result in poorer facilities and an older 
faculty — young professors will not be hired 

_ to replace those who leave or retire. 

To study and, it is hoped, forestall declining 
_ enrolment at McGill, the Graduates’ Society 
has set up a Committee on Admissions and 
_ Recruitment chaired by society vice-president 
Edward Ballon. Its mandate: to support the 
work of university recruitment officers and 

_ coordinate graduate input in this area. The 
committee’s recommendations will be for- 
warded both to the society’s Board of Direc- 

_ tors and to the university administration. 

Dr. Robert Bell, meanwhile, has been 
fighting the battle on a broader front. Ina 

_ speech to the Canadian Club of Toronto in 

' February, the principal defended universities 
in general against the slings and arrows of 

their detractors — social critics, public 

' servants, media commentators, and graduates 

' themselves. Conceding that his title — ‘‘The 

' War Against the Universities’’ — was meant 
as ‘‘a grabber,” Bell nonetheless pointed out 

- that “actions today originating from many 

' different sources constitute in effect attacks 

/ upon the universities.” 
Social critics, Bell said, assume that 

‘ universities should somehow instigate changes 

) to cure the ills of society. To this he replied 
that the university is not, and cannot be, a 

_ social or political agency. Rather, it is hoped 

' that graduates will be ‘‘agents of change with 
» a wisdom that comes in some part from their 
) university experience.”’ To ask for more is, 
in Bell’s opinion, “‘unrealistic.”’ 
The principal also had an answer for 
| politicians and public servants who demand 
, full value for the money spent on the univer- 
sities. It is extraordinarily difficult, he 
| noted, to measure the output of institutions 
/ of higher learning. ‘“‘Simply counting the 
» number of diplomas awarded will hardly do; 
(after all, in that competition the schools 
, advertised in the back pages of Popular 
Mechanics magazine would win hands down. 


Society activities 


ee Pa tg tod, 


pie, : Hat 


Words of wisdom set in glass — a frosty window in Redpath Hall. 


In the revolting expression ‘more scholar 
per dollar’... it is relatively easy to count 
the dollars but very difficult to evaluate the 
worth of the scholars.”’ 

All agree, Bell said, that universities 
should make the best possible use of their 
resources. **What university people dislike, 
though, is being evaluated in terms of crude 
indices like number of diplomas per dollar, 
or number of net square feet per student 
graduated, or whatever. It is as if one were 
to evaluate the worth of a legislative as- 
sembly in terms of the number of bills 
passed per B. t.u.”’ 

Media commentators, the principal conti- 
nued, often attack the universities on the 
grounds that post-secondary studies are too 
vague, and that university research is overly 
theoretical and of no economic benefit. 
‘Somehow our commentators have become 
sold on the idea that the secret of economic 
progress is education and research — provided 
the commentator in each case specifies what 
the research is to consist of.” To this cri- 
ticism Bell retorted: ‘‘Most such arguments 
depend on the assumption that you can specify 
in advance what it is that the proposed re- 
search is going to reveal. If this were known, 
of course, the activity in which you are 
engaging might be a worthwhile one, 


but it would not be research.” 

But the most widespread attack, the prin- 
cipal maintains, emanates from graduates 
frustrated by the depressed employment 
scene. Bell conceded that the universities 
themselves are, to some extent, responsible 
— in the past some academics “‘allowed the 
assumption to grow that university graduation 
was practically a guarantee of a superior 
job right after graduation.”’ This is even less 
true today. “In a society with widespread 
unemployment...,”’ Bell countered, “‘no pro- 
gram of education can possibly guarantee an 
immediate superior job to every graduate. It 
remains true that the unemployment rate is 
lowest among university graduates, and is 
highest among those whose education termi- 
nated the farthest from university.” 

Bell argued that critics focus too closely 
on the first few months after graduation. 
‘During this period, the advantages of the 
professional or vocational university degrees 
are at their maximum, and the students of 
arts and science are at a disadvantage.... 
We ought to be speculating on the value of a 
university education over the forty-odd years 
of working life and the years of retirement 
that follow.”’ Over the broader span, the 
principal concluded, the advantages of a uni- 
versity education are absolutely manifest. 0 


23 


"57 

JAMES deBEAUJEU DOMVILLE, BA‘S54, 
BCL’57, has been named film commissioner 
and chairman of the National Film Board of 
Canada, Ottawa, Ont. 

ALBERT W. EASTON, BEng’57, has been 
appointed manager of metal sales for Cominco 
Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

ARNOLD A. LAWLESS, BEng’S7, has be- 
come general sales manager of Flygt Canada, 
Pointe Claire, Que. 

JOHN H. VAN de LEUV, MD’S7, is now 
medical director of the emergency depart- 
ment of Good Samaritan Hospital and Health 
Center, Dayton, Ohio. 


"58 

JULIAN GWYN, MA’S58, has been promoted 
to professor of history at the University of 
Ottawa, Ontario. 


59 

PETER R. DUFFIELD, BEng’59, has been 
appointed vice-president, fibres group, of 

Du Pont of Canada Ltd. 

E. MICHAEL JOHNSON, BSc (Agr)’59, now 
living in Somalia where he is general manager 
of the Juba Sugar Project, was recently 
awarded the OBE for his services to agriculture 
in Kenya. 

ARNOLD SHY KOFSKY, BArch’59, has been 
appointed resident manager of the London, 
Ont., office of Richardson Securities of 
Canada. 


60 

JOHN J. CORSO, BCom’60, has been named 
partner in charge, Ontario, for Rourke, 
Bourbonnais and Associates, Toronto, Ont. 
SANDRA (FREEDMAN) WITELSON, 
BSc’60, MSc’62, PhD’66, professor of 
psychiatry at McMaster University, Hamil- 
ton, Ont., has been awarded the 1978 Clarke 
Institute of Psychiatry Research Fund Prize. 


61 

LEON R. KENTRIDGE, MArch’61, has been 
named vice-president, planning, of Marshall 
Macklin Monaghan Ltd. 

SYLVIA OSTERBIND, BLS’61, has received 
an MA in the history of art from the University 
of Toronto, Ontario. 

JACK UTSAL, BEng’61, has been appointed 
market development manager, extrusion, for 
the plastics division of Du Pont Canada Ltd. 


62 

ROBERT E. AMY, BEng’62, has been ap- 
pointed plant manager of the Beauharnois, 
Que., chlorine and caustic soda plant of 
STANCHEM, a division of PPG Industries 
Canada Ltd. 

JOHN O. BAATZ, BEng’62, has been named 
president of Smithsons Holdings Ltd., a 
subsidiary of Canadian Pacific Transport Co. 


24 


RICHARD BEACH, BEd’62, is director of the 
Canadian Studies program at the State Uni- 
versity of New York, Plattsburgh. 
CYNTHIA (MARVIN) FISCHER, 
MSc(A)’62, has been named vice-president of 
Vermont Federal Savings and Loan Associa- 
tion, Burlington. 

M. DAVID GUTTMAN, BSc(Agr)’62, has 
been appointed vice-president, marketing, of 
Pedlar Storage Products. 

DAVID NORMAN, BA’62, has been named 
managing director of the London, England, 
office of Russell Reynolds Associates, Inc., 
an international executive recruiting firm. 


In January 1978, Car and 
Driver Magazine called the 
Volkswagen Rabbit “the brightest 
kid in the class. 

More than just flattery, this 
was d statement based on many 
facts. So, let's talk about the facts 
of why you should buy a Rabbit 
and do so by listening to some- 
one whos sold on it. Enter 
Mr. Leslie Cho-Chu, accountant, 
family man, and Rabbit owner 
since March, 1978. 

VW: Just why did you buy a 
Volkswagen Rabbit, Mr. Cho-Chu? 
Cho-Chu: | bought the Rabbit 

after | found out everything | could 
about all other cars. 

Shopping and comparing is 
always a wise thing to do. 


VW: Mr. Cho-Chu, what about 
the economics of the VW Rabbit? 


Cho-Chu: A car can't be good 
unless the economics are equally 
as good. The Rabbit is most 
economical to drive and uses 
regular gas. 


When the rear seat folds down, 
cargo space goes Up. 
Facts support the wisdom of 
Mr. Cho-Chu's statement. 
Transport Canada's compara- 


PAUL C. RAMBAUT, BSc’62, MSc’64, is © 
chief of the medical research branch of the 

NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, Tex 
JOHN WEARING, BEng’62, has been named 
manager, styrenic product line, for Monsanto 
Canada Inc., Mississauga, Ont. 


it 


°63 . 
ANITA LANDS, BA’63, has become director 
of the east-coast office of the National Asso- 
ciation of Bank Women, Inc., New York City, 
LARRY LUTCHMANSINGH, BA’63, has _ 
been named chairman of the art department — 
at Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Me. : 


Mr. Leslie T. Cho-Chu and family of Agincourt, On 


tive fuel consumption rating 
the Rabbit is 8.0 litres/100 ki 
meters*:; for the Rabbit Diese 
541/100 km*. Being an 
accountant, these figures 08 
up to Mr, Cho-Chu. 
VW: Does the pertormants 
of the Rabbit stand up 10) 
economics, Mr. Cho-Cat 
Cho-Chu: In a word, yes 
A short, but very accula 
comment. Because the 
wy Rabbit's one performing 
alien: automobile. There's tom 
wheel drive, a fuel ined 
15 litre engine, rack ana 
steering for sure hanclingy 
a four wheel indepenaen 
suspension system for smoe 
ness of ride. 


VW logo, Volkswagen and Rabbit are registered trademarks owned by: Volkswagenwerk A.G., West Germany. Registered user: Volkswagen Canada Inc., Toronto. 


bad « . ) * ne ™ < i 
Estimates based on laboratory tests using approved Transport Canada test methods and vehicles equipped with 4-speed manual transmission Your fuel 


consumption will vary depending on how and where you drive 


optional equipment and condition of your car 


‘HENRY C. WITELSON, BSc’59, MD’63, has 
been appointed chief of the ophthalmology de- 
partment at Hamilton Civic Hospital, Ontario. 


64 

DIXI K. LAMBERT, BA’64, is director of 
correspondence communication with the 
federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans. 
‘Ottawa, Ont. 


°65 

A. DAVID McFARLANE, BSc’65, has become 
vice-president and actuary of the Sovereign 
Insurance Companies in Toronto, Ont. 


67 

MAX S. CYNADER, BSc’67, associate 
professor of psychology at Dalhousie 
University in Halifax, N.S., has been 
awarded an E.W.R. Steacie Memorial 
Fellowship by the Natural Sciences and 
Engineering Research Council of Canada. 
He is researching the organization of the 
human visual system and the role of genetic 
and environmental factors in its development. 
A. VAN FORBELL, BA’67, has been appointed 
vice-president, finance and administration, 

of Cowley and Keith Ltd., a realty company 
in Calgary, Alta. 


t Cho-Chu. 


/: |s the Rabbit ride a comfort- 
e ride, Mr. Cho-Chu? 

>Chu: It's most comfortable. 

t year we drove all the way to 


Mr. Cho-Chu? 


Florida for The Rabbit's safety features 
Be ovrholidays. include a safety cell passenger 
©, |twasa compartment, negative steering 
long trip and rol} radius that helps bring the 
a good test Rabbit to a straightline stop in 
when you skidding conditions, a gas tank 
consider We that's safely ag 
had two little positioned in 
loeedtang | rO-Chu's front of the 
ign of the times. In tow. rear axle, 


rear window 
defogger, and 


Rabbit's seats are a good 
mple of what Mr. Cho-Chu is 


png. They're anatomically steel belted 
igned to comfort the back radial ply tires. 
cially on long journeys. All standard. 


ample headroom and 
oom for four large adults and 
pace-stealing hump under Si 
. The Rabbit's cargo spaceis 4 
ther big asset. It's 370 litres 4 
cubic feet). And, with the # 
seat folded down, 4 iii 
S$ more cargo 
“ce than in most 
-dard-size 


VW: What about the safety factor. 


Cho-Chu: | find the Rabbit as 


concerned with safety as | am. 


Childproof locks 


on rear doors. 


VW: Mr. Cho-Chu, isn't it true you 
also own an Oldsmobile? 
Cho-Chu: ‘és, it is our second car. 
We couldn't get what we wanted 
for the Oldsmobile on a resale, 
so it remains with the family. 


VW: Does Mrs. Cho-Chu drive 
the Olds? 

Cho-Chu: | sincerely wish she 
would. But, | cannot seem to get 
her out of the Rabbit. 

VW: Mr. Cho-Chu, could you 
summarize in one statement how 
you feel about the Rabbit? 
Cho-Chu: It is the kind of car | 
would advise a very close friend 
to buy. 


VW: Thank you, Mr. Cho-Chu. 


Dont settle for less. 


COLIN A. GRAVENOR, BA’64, BCL’67, a 
partner in the law firm of Lette Marcotte 
Biron Sutto and Gravenor, has become a 
lecturer in international business law in 
McGill’s Faculty of Management. 

DR. JACK RUBIN, BSc’67, has been 
named assistant professor of medicine at 

the University of Mississippi Medical Center 
in Jackson. 


68 

A. L. (“LEE”) BARKER, MSc(A)’68, has 
been appointed chief geologist, Canada, of 
Lacana Mining Corp. 

HARVEY SCHACHTER, BCom’68, has 
become city editor of the Kingston Whig 
Standard, Ontario. 

EDWARD A. WILSON, BEng’68, is Regina 
manager and a principal of Clifton Associates 
Ltd., a firm of consulting geotechnical 
engineers based in Regina, Sask. 


69 

MICHAEL M. AVEDESIAN, BEng’69, has 
been elected secretary of the Canadian 
Society for Chemical Engineering. 

JAMES W. BECKERLEG, BSc’69, has been 
appointed vice-president, corporate credit, 

of Commerce Capital Corp. Ltd. 

KHAIRY EL-HUSSAINY MOSTAFA, 
LLM’69, has become Egypt’s representative 
on the council of the International Civil 
Aviation Organization. 


70 

JANICE (TRYLINSKI) BURNETT, BSc’70, 
has established a memorial fund, named for 
her late husband Dr. William Burnett, for the 
diagnosis, prevention, and cure of Ewing’s 
Sarcoma. The fund is being administered 
through the Dr. W.W. Cross Cancer Institute, 
Edmonton, Alta. 

ROBERT MAYEROVITCH, BMus’70, is as- 
sistant professor of piano at Baldwin-Wallace 
College, Berea, Ohio, and a member of the 
Elysian Trio (piano, violin, and cello) which 
recently performed at Carnegie Recital Hall, 
New York City. 

GEOFFREY B. NANTON, BCom’70, is 
general manager and director of Harrisons 
Electrical Co. Ltd. in Barbados. 


"71 

GARY D. DAVIES, MSW’71, who recently re- 
ceived his master of arts degree in social 

welfare policy from McMaster University, 
Hamilton, has been appointed agency rela- 
tions associate of the United Way of Greater 
London, Ontario. 

HELENE GAGNE, BCL’71, has been appoint- 
ed counsel of the Insurance Bureau of Canada, 
Toronto, Ont. 

COLIN M. MACLEOD, BA’71, is assistant 
professor of psychology at Scarborough 

College of the University of Toronto, Ontario. 


29 


sda <2 = a = Je 


26 


For many late-night radio aficionados, the 
soothing voice of a CBC announcer inton- 
ing, ““Good evening, this is “Nightcap,””’ 
signals the perfect end to a busy day. 
Curled up in bed, listeners are treated to 
interviews with the likes of playwright 
Arthur Miller, sculptor Henry Moore, and 
composer John Cage. A reading — from 
Cry, the Beloved Country or Emma — 
might follow, the whole bound together 
with carefully chosen music. 

“Nightcap”’ is produced in Montreal by 
twenty-eight-year-old Deborah Weinstein, 
BA’70. The prize-winning program gives 
expression to a life-long interest in the 
arts. Weinstein began piano lessons at the 
age of five and, as a teenager, she painted 
and wrote. “‘I gave up all those things 
because I was never going to become one 
of the best, or even one of the mediocre,” 
she explains. 

Accordingly, when it came time to enter 
university, Weinstein abandoned the arts 
in favour of political science. She hoped to 
enter the foreign service upon graduation. 
But the rosy dream of life in foreign 
climes was cut short by the high level of 
mathematics required to pass civil 
service examinations — she had dropped 


_ the subject while still in high school. 


Weinstein gave up political science upon 
graduation and settled in Israel for a year 
to teach high school. 

Inspired by an experimental film course 
she had taken at McGill, Weinstein re- 


_ turned to Montreal to enter the English 


department’s communications master’s 


_ program. It proved unsatisfactory: “‘I 


wanted to learn about communication, but 
the program was so theoretical there 
wasn’t any room for that. Everything 
solidified in my mind one day when a 
professor said in a colloquium, “The 
university is not the place for creative 
people. If you want to create, you have to 
get out.’ So I left.” 

Weinstein began with freelance jobs at 
the CBC and went on to produce a number 
of programs, many of them for the CBC 
series ‘‘Ideas.”’ ““One day I’d be talking to 
an exterminator about cockroaches and 
rats, the next I’d be interviewing an 
Egyptologist about mummies.” In the 
spring of 1974 she found work with Radio- 
Canada International in Montreal and was 
soon producing ““The North America.” 
‘It included music and a daily magazine 
which I wrote, produced, directed, mixed, 
and sometimes even hosted — everything — 
and this went on for three years,” she 
recalls. “‘I’d start working at 3:00 in the 
afternoon and it was broadcast live from 
9:00 to 10:00 every night. It was awful. 

I had no social life — all I did was work.” 

When a Weinstein documentary on the 
handicapped won an Ohio State Award, the 
exhausted producer felt it was time to 
strike: “‘The first thing I did was try to 
find myself another job.’”’ Weinstein was 
appointed producer in the Radio Arts 
division of the CBC when “‘Nightcap”’ was 
still in the planning stages. 

Weinstein decided to flesh out the 
program with interviews. She developed a 
network of people in Europe and North 
America who could be called upon to 
interview the artists she wished to spot- 
light. Eventually, she assembled a crew of 
talented and reliable “‘nightcappers.”’ 

The young producer also set stringent 
technical standards for the show: “‘Since 
‘Nightcap’ is about art and contains reflec- 
tions on art, I decided that it should have 
its own artistic merit.’ Hence, there are 
no telephone interviews on “‘Nightcap,”’ 
and mixes — the final balancing of various 
sound elements on tapes — are done and 
re-done until they approach perfection. 
Music is selected with great care. “I have 
high respect for the people who contribute 
to the show, both the freelancers and those 
extraordinarily talented people who are the 
subject of the interviews, because they are 
the very best in the world. There is no 
way I would present them except ina 
highly complimentary fashion.” 

Because of belt-tightening at the CBC, 
““Nightcap”’ will sign off for good on 
April | and Weinstein will move into the 
world of television with a current affairs 
show. That political science degree should 
come in handy. Holly Dressel 


72 
JOSEPH B. GAVIN, S.J., PhD’72, has been: 
appointed president of Campion College, 
University of Regina, Saskatchewan. 
J. DOUGLAS HOUSE, PhD’72, has become 
head of the sociology department at Memoria 
University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, ‘ 
DONALD EDWARD SULLIVAN, BSe'7, 
has been appointed assistant professor in the 
physics department of the University of . 
Guelph, Ontario. 

JOHN R. WOOD, PhD’72, is a research , 
scientist at Domtar Pulp and Paper Research 
Centre, Senneville, Que., and a member of 
the Lakeshore School Board. 


> ee ee 


"73 | 
THERESE D’AMOUR, BSc’73, MSc’77,4 
resident of St. Andrews, N.B., recently 
exhibited her watercolours and ink sketches _ 


in Fredericton. . 
JULIAN J. DODSON, PhD’73, is a professoi 
of biology at Laval University, Quebec City, 
EDWIN H.K. YEN, DDS’73, who recently _ 
received a diploma in orthodontics anda 
doctorate in oral biology from the University 
of Toronto, is an associate professor of 
orthodontics in the University of Manitoba's” 
Faculty of Dentistry, Winnipeg. . 
/ 
"74 
GUY M. TOMBS, BA’74, has been appointei 
corporate secretary and director of Guy 
Tombs Ltd., a Montreal travel firm. 


"75 
FREDERICK A. BRAMAN, BA’72, BCL7: 
has become a partner in the law firm of Se- 
linger and Lengvari, Montreal. 
CATHERINE (MERCURIO) McINNIS, 
MLS’75, has been appointed head of technical 
services at Guelph Library, Ontario. , 


f 


: 


i j 
CHARLOTTE REINHOLD, BEd’77, teacit 
arts and crafts courses to children in Guelph, 
Ont. 


oo 


78 

JAMES DERDERIAN, BA’78, has been 
awarded a Rhodes Scholarship to continue hi 
history and political science studies at Oxford 
University. 


Deaths . 
ie 


JAMES’ BLAIN WOODYATT, BSc! 
Pierrefonds, Que., on Feb. 11, 1979. 


12 
ALAN B. McEWEN, BSc’12, at sal 
on Dec. 12, 1978. , 


COL. JOHN G. ROBERTSON, BSA’12. 
‘at New Glasgow, N.S., on Sept. 30, 1978. 
‘ALLEN NYE SCOTT, BSc’ 12, at Ste. Anne 
‘de Bellevue, Que., on Dec. 29. 1978. 


"13 

‘E.B. HUGH-JONES, BSc’ 13, on Nov. 8. 
1978. 

"©. KIRKLAND McLEOD, BSc’13. at Vic- 
‘oria, B.C., on March 6, 1979. 

HENRY WILLIAM MORGAN, BA’]3. at 
“Montreal, on Feb. 26, 1979. 


14 


LOUIS CARREAU, BSc’ 14, on June 12, 1978. 


RALPH CYRIL FLITTON, BSc’ 14, at 
Cowansville, Que., on Feb. 2, 1979. 


15 
(OR. ANN (PURDY) HOLMAN, BA’15, on 
Dec. 10, 1978. 


“16 
STANLEY A. NEILSON, BSC’ 16, at 
‘Aontreal, on Feb. 26, 1979. 


1.E. (“DICK”) SPROULE, BSc’ 16, on Feb. 11, 


979. 


17 
\. SYDNEY BRUNEAU, BA’13, BCL’17. on 
“eb. 4, 1979. 


(18 
=ANNY (SALOMON) SCHERZER, BA’18. 
in Jan. 11, 1979, 


‘20 

-YRIL H. CROWE, BSc’20, at Peterborough, 
Int., on Jan. 16, 1979. 

‘\. GASTON DENEAU, BSc’20, on Jan. 7, 
979. 

AIERBERT JAMES EMERY, BSc’20. at 
“hunder Bay, Ont., on Feb. 15, 1979. 
IAROLD CARLETON LEE, BSc’20, at 
sronxville, N.Y., on Feb. 6, 1979. 


21 
{ORMA CAMPBELL (COOPER) ADAMS, 
‘ertS W’21, at Ottawa, Ont., on Jan. 21, 1979. 


22 

TENRY HARPER HART, BA’16, MD’22. in 
anuary 1979. 

XYONALD GORDON KYLE, BSc’?22, at 
Mttawa, Ont., on Feb. 16, 1979. 

[OPE (MacINTOSH) MURRAY, BA’22, on 
eb. 14, 1979. 


»4 
|. GORDON REID, MD’24, on Oct. 30, 
178. 


5 
SRAEL BEINHAKER, DDS’25, on Feb. 5, 
979. 


BEVERLEY KNIGHT BOULTON, BSc’25, at 


Richmond, Va., on Feb. 23, 1979. 
THOMAS HENRY JOHNS, DDS’25, at 
Victoria, B.C., on Dec. 18, 1978. 


*26 
ALICE WESTLAKE, DipPE’26, on Dec. 16, 
1978. 


"27 

WILLIAM ADDLEMAN, BA’?4, MD’27, on 
Feb. 9, 1979. 

GAVIN CHISHOLM, MD’27, at Victoria, 
B.C., on Dec. 25, 1978. 

HECTOR McKEEN MILNE, BCom’27, on 
Jan. 12, 1979. 


»29 
NORA ALICE (HOME) BRIDE, BCom’29, 
on Feb. 23, 1979. 


WILLIAM HANBURY BUDDEN, BCom’29, 


at Cowansville, Que., on Feb. 23, 1979. 
ALDETH ELSIE (ADAMS) CLARK, BA’29, 
at Victoria, B.C., on July 13, 1978. 

SAMUEL G. ELBERT, MD’29, in Delaware, 
on Dec. 16, 1978. 

MARY A. (McNAUGHT) FOURNIER, 
BA’29, on Jan. 5, 1979. 

REV. FRED WILLIAM TAYLOR, BA’?29, on 
Jan. 23, 1979. 


*30 


REV. HARRY G. TUTTLE, BA’30, MA’31, at 


Toronto, Ont., on Feb. 8, 1979. 


an 
CARL A. DAHLGREN, MD’3], at Concord, 
N.H., on Dec. 3, 1978. 


HAROLD J. DORAN, BArch’31, at Scottsdale, 


Ariz., on Feb. 4, 1979. 


"32 

FLORA (AIKIN) MARSHALL, BA’32, at 
Schomberg, Ont., on Jan. 6, 1979. 

EILEEN PARTON, BA’32, on Jan. 1, 1979. 


"33 
HARRY M. ADELSTEIN, BCom’33, on 
Dec. 30, 1978. 


JOHN H. COUSSIRAT, BCom’33, on Dec. 24, 


1978. 

CARL POMERLIAN, BCom’33, on Dec. 18. 
1978. 

ROBERT H. WHITE-STEVENS, BSA’33, 
MSc’ 36, at Trenton, N.J., on Sept. 4, 1978. 


"34 


HELENE (KOHOS) FIELD, BA’34, on Jan. 23, 


1979. 


"35 

WALLACE JOHN LAFAVE, BSc’34, MD’35, 
at Montreal, on Jan. 14, 1979. 

ISABEL (CURRIE) LYMAN, BCom’35, in 
June 1978. 


36 
GEORGE SCOTT MURRAY, BCom’36, at 
Ottawa, Ont., on Dec. 24, 1978. 


39 
HAROLD FASSETT STANIFORTH., 
BEng’39, at Montreal, on Jan. 24, 1979. 


”40 

MURIEL ANN (SCOBIE) BIRKS, BA’40, at 
Montreal, on Feb. 19, 1979. 

DONALD D. WILSON, Com’40, at Ottawa, 
Ont., on Jan. 10, 1979. 


"Al 
ELSIE (LAUDER) HAMILTON, BCom’41, 
at Montreal, on Dec. 31, 1978. 


"42 
ELIZABETH BRODIE, BA’42, MSW’61, at 
Montreal, on Jan. 4, 1978. 


45 
SAUL WILNER, BA’42, MD’45, 
GDipMed’S50, on Feb. 28, 1979. 


"47 

WILLIAM BARLOW JEFFREY, BEng’47, 
at Montreal, on Dec. 30, 1978. 

EDWARDS. MURRAY, GDipMed’47, at 
Boston, Mass., in October 1978. 

JOHN H. OULTON, BCom’47, on Nov. 5, 
1977. 


49 
JAMES McELROY, MD’49, at Hartford, 
Conn., on Jan. 17, 1979. 


51 
STANLEY R. COLPITTS, BSc(Agr)’51, at 
Fredericton, N.B., on Feb. 19, 1979. 


"54 

DRAGUTIN (“DRAGO’”) F. PAPICH, 
BSc’50, MD’54, at Montreal, on Feb. 16, 
1979. 


"67 
WILLIAM T. COWAN, MBA’67, in August 
1977; 


"76 
WILLIAM DAVID CHAIKIN, BA’76, at 
Chappaqua, N.Y., in December 1978. 


ERRATUM: 


FRANCES (CURRIE) O’BRIEN, BA’51 
was incorrectly listed in the ‘“‘Deaths”’ 
column of the Winter 1978 issue of the 


» 


News. She is, in fact, alive and well and 
living in Ottawa. We sincerely regret the 
error, which was a case of mistaken 
identity. 


27 


by Andrew Cohen 


The wind surges through Red Square like a 
knife-wielding lunatic, slashing at everything 


in its path. It cuts through layers of wool and 


sheepskin as cleanly as a surgeon’s scalpel. 
Water, blood, and marrow congeal; skin 
blanches, mustaches bristle with hoar. The 
temperature is minus 45 degrees. If the 

lone red star atop the Kremlin looks stunning 
at first sight, the power it represents soon 
becomes irrelevant in an orgy of foot-stamp- 
ing, arm-slapping, and other attempts to 
soothe a body in revolt. 

No matter. December has brought the 
cruellest temperatures in a century but, all 
things considered, there is achievement in 
enduring. One takes cold comfort in tasting 
winter, the quintessential Russian experience. 
Eventually, there is that gratifying reward 
of travel — the sense of texture. 

Building stamina hadn’t been my intention 
in coming to the Soviet Union; cold-weather 
training was not included on the itinerary. 
But, when Dr. Alexander Fodor, chairman of 
McGill’s department of Russian and Slavic 
studies, invited me along on the department’s 
annual excursion, it was an opportunity not to 
be missed. To the relentless traveller, the 
Soviet Union is one of those countries that 
must be seen — and felt. 

Certainly the department sees it that way. 
Like other language departments, it encour- 
ages students to visit their area of study. 
Winter is the best time to go to Russia — 
travel is inexpensive then. For $750, students 
get return air fare, two weeks’ room and 
board at first-class hotels in Moscow and 
Leningrad, twice-daily tours, and tickets to 
cultural events. A similar package would 
cost double in the summer. 

“The main purpose of the trip is to offer a 
living contact with the language,” says Fodor, 
who attended the University of Leningrad in 
the fifties. “We notice that, without practice, 
students can become uninterested in the whole 
thing. If you take them to the country they 
realize how essential the language is. It 
inspires them. The second thing is to see the 
country and discover attitudes. Some stu- 
dents may be spurred to greater study; 


28 


0 OB a 
eres 


“Perspective: 


others may not like it at all and find out it 
isn’t for them.” 

Fodor has a point — the Soviet Union is an 
enigma to the student. While the Third World 
presents a reality and seeks a redeeming 
image, the Soviet Union throws up an image 
and invites you to look for the reality. In 
defining this country, the question mark Is as 
necessary as the exclamation point. The 
students grant it both. They gape at the 
Hermitage, extol the Summer and Winter 
Palaces, empathize at the war memorials, 
and wax poetic over the ballet, champagne, 
and caviar. They marvel at the achievements 
of the state — displayed in inordinate num- 
ber — and delight in practising their Russian 
in stores, restaurants, and subways. 

But some are wary; it is they who ask the 
questions. They challenge an economist and 
an historian to explain discrepancies in the 
productivity of private and collective farms 
and inquire about the official status of 
Trotsky and Stalin. They dispute Lenin’s 
methods with such vigour that an authority 
leading them through a museum flees in 
disgust. They politely and persistently direct 
questions at the well-trained guides of In- 
tourist, the official tourist agency. 

Predictably, there is a confrontation: late 
one afternoon, in the bowels of a museum in 
Leningrad, the guide abandons the history 
of Soviet art and rounds on the foreigners. 
‘“‘Too many of you come here and ask ques- 
tions you already know the answers to,”’ she 
fumes. ‘“*Why ask them? Your minds... have 
been poisoned. No, not poisoned, that’s not 
the word.” “You do mean poisoned, though, 
don’t you?” one of the students asks. The 
guide turns away, perhaps a little embar- 
rassed about arguing with visitors. 

Although I refrain from throwing snow- 
balls at Lenin’s tomb (unlike the Pierre 
Elliott Trudeau of some years ago), I come 
in for a barrage of criticism as well. ‘““You 
have a sarcastic and critical mind,” a 
dishevelled guide tells me with characteristic 
Soviet bluntness. “‘But,’’ she adds, with 
characteristic Soviet evasiveness, ‘‘this is 
neither a compliment nor a criticism.” 


Despite the constraints of travel in Russia, 
most of the forty students appear satisfied 
with the trip. Resolved to refine their Rus- 
sian, they make an unusual degree of contact 
with people, and in so doing are able to 
scratch beneath the automaton’s surface 
of courage, will, and strength to find the more 
human, less monolithic figure beneath. Under 
the facade lies the Ivan Ivanovich who goes 
along to get along but all the while barters, 
bribes, and wrangles on the black market, 
woos foreigners, and speaks his mind whenit 
is safe to do so. 

The visitor also becomes aware of Rus- 
sia’s larger contradictions. Windy editorials 
of self-congratulation aside, this is a country 
of chronic shortages, erratic harvests, 
shoddy goods, widespread corruption, re- 
pression, and privilege. It is also a country 
of immaculate streets and graffiti-free walls, 
free education and medical care, subsidized 
housing and guaranteed employment. This 
nation of long suffering has wrenched itself, 
in sixty years, from backwardness to indus- 
trial might and nuclear parity. 

There are idealists who are dismayed and 
skeptics who are delighted, and vice versa. 
One says the revolution is in retreat, another 
pronounces it triumphant. A political scien- 
tist sees the state as physically strong and 
ideologically weak, and mourns the reversal 
of yesterday’s reality. Everyone has his own 
perspective. 

The night before our departure, several 
of us trudge to Red Square to reflect for the 
last time. The lights swathe the onion-shaped 
domes of St. Basil’s Cathedral in gold, 
green, and brown. The observer, bemused, 
sees shadows of the past — hungry peasants 
clamouring at the fortress walls, jack boots 
racing across the cobblestones during the 
ten days that shook the world. Silently, im 
perceptibly, the snow and wind and cold ale 
reduced to insignificance. 


Andrew Cohen, BA’77, a reporter for the 
Ottawa Citizen, is working on a masters 
degree in international affairs at C. arleton 
University. 


. Martineau 
. Walker 

| Allison 

, Beaulieu 

| MacKell 

) & Clermont 


A.R. DEANE NESBITT 


Advocate 


2075 University Street 
Suite 1008 
Montreal, Canada H3A 2L1 
Telephone : (514) 286-1244 


Member : Barreau du Québec, 
The Law Society of Alberta 


Registered Trade Mark Agent 


Advocates 


Telephone 395-3535 

Area Code 514 

Cable Address: Chabawa. 
Suite 3400 

The Stock Exchange Tower 
Place Victoria 

Montreal — H4Z 1E9 
Canada 


Robert H.E. Walker, Q.C. 
George A. Allison, Q.C. 
Roger L. Beaulieu, Q.C. 
Peter R. D. MacKell, Q.C. 
André J. Clermont, Q.C. 
John H. Gomery, Q.C. 
Robert A. Hope, Q.C. 

J. Lambert Toupin, Q.C. 
Bertrand Lacombe 

F. Michel Gagnon 
Edmund E. Tobin 

C. Stephen Cheasley 
Richard J.F. Bowie 
Robert P. Godin 

Jack R. Miller 

Serge D. Tremblay 
Michael P. Carroll 
Claude Lachance 
Maurice A. Forget 
Stephen S. Heller 
Pierrette Rayle 

Robert E. Reynolds 
Pierre E. Poirier 

David W. Salomon 
Jean-Maurice Saulnier 
André T. Mécs 

Marie Sullivan Raymond 
Serge Guérette 

André Larivée 
Jean-Francois Buffoni 
Suzanne R. Charest 
Michel Messier 

Wilbrod Claude Décarie 
Robert B. Ilssenman 
Marc Nadon 

Andrea Francoeur Mécs 


Donald M. Hendy 
Paul B. Bélanger 
Martin J. Greenberg 
Francois Rolland 
Graham Nevin 

Yves Lebrun 
Richard J. Clare 
Alain Contant 

Marie Giguére 

Eric M. Maldoff 
Xeno C. Martis 
Ronald J. McRobie 
David Powell 
Reinhold Grudev 
Robert Paré 
Marie-France Bich 
David W. Boyd 
Pierre J. Deslauriers 
Brigitte Gouin 
Daniel Picotte 


Counsel 
Jean Martineau, C.C., Q.C. 


Hon. Alan A. Macnaughton, 


P.C., Q.C. 
Marcel Cing-Mars, Q.C. 


La Compagnie Enveloppe Canada 


8205 Boul. Montréal-Toronto 
Montréal Ouest, Qué. H4X 1N1 


(514) 364-3252 


McLean 
Marler 
Tees 
Watson 
Poitevin 
Javet 

& Roberge 


Notaries 


Suite 1200 

620 Dorchester W. 
Montreal — H3B 1P3 
Telephone 866-9671 


McMaster 
Meighen 


Barristers 
& Solicitors 


Herbert B. McLean 
Hon. George C. Marler 
Herbert H. Tees 
John H. Watson 
Henri Poitevin 
Ernest A. Javet 
Philippe Roberge 
John C. Stephenson 
Harvey A. Corn 
David Whitney 
Pierre Lapointe 
Gérard Ducharme 
Pierre Senez 

E. Bruce Moidel 
Pierre Venne 

André Boileau 
Paul-André Lazure 
Bertrand Ducharme 
Erigéne Godin 


129 St. James Street 
Montreal — H2Y 1L8 
Telephone 288-7575 
Area Code 514 


D.R. McMaster, Q.C. 
R.A. Patch, Q.C. 
A.S. Hyndman, Q.C. 
R.C. Legge, Q.C. 
T.C. Camp, Q.C. 
A.K. Paterson, Q.C. 
R.J. Riendeau, Q.C. 
W.E. Stavert 

R.J. Plant 

H. Senécal 

T.R. Carsley 

M.A. Meighen 
D.F.H. Marler 

A.P. Bergeron 

T.W. Stewart 

S.J. Harrington 
G.P. Barry 

N.A. Saibil 

J.A. Laurin 

B.M. Schneiderman 
M.E. Leduc 

J.H. Scott 

R.W. Shannon 

M.A. Pinsonnault 
E.A. Mitchell 

M. Charbonneau 
W.J. Demers 


Counsel: 
A.M. Minnion, Q.C. 
R. Cordeau, Q.C. 

W.C. Leggat, Q.C. 


phates)» 


Wis, 
“P | vr 1 
iy TT dat il 


—= 


Why not tell us about 
your latest achievement! 


Write: 

‘“Where They Are and 
What They’re Doing’’ 
The McGill News 

3605 Mountain Street 
Montreal, Que. H3G 2M1 


Tel.: (514) 392-4813 


‘SARaASt SASS FEES avenue $23 ave RAR eveet Lt Ta EQS abs sgigessean Fe 
raLrserese See a2 > : 
wae ae pe SiS To 


+ ae . 


Montréal 


THE McGILL GRADUATES’ SOCIETY PRESENTS 
THE COMMEMORATIVE CONVOCATION MEDALLION | 


The Convocation Medallion, a prestigious gift and unique keepsake for McGill 
University graduates, features both the Arts Building and the university’s coat of 
arms. 


These beautiful bronze, silver, gold-plated, and gold medallions are encased in lucite 


and personalized with an inscribed plaque (up to 36 letters). Prices range from $29. 94 
to $339.00. 


For more information please call: 
Orgold Corporation (514) 844-6294 
or write: 
Orgold Corporation 
P.O. Box 294 
Place d’Armes 
Montreal, Quebec H2Y 3G7 


All major credit cards accepted 


ree 


ie -_” 
tials 


A te ey — 


_- 


= 
. 
a 
o 
A 


PsP USS AeSe he ses pSse tA resis swe Swe S24 FS Fa sts ess Rei 
a Rite log Sag tm esi gene pe OF a area Seam 


vac Saas : 


eauUueyiig eipadojsAsug | 


yaig eipedopAsuy 


enuUepig vipadopAsuy 


euueyiig vipazdojAsug 


eruueyig eipedopAoug 
enuueyig vipzdopsoug 


BIUUev 


An important announcement for — 
Members of the Alumni Association — 


Encyclopaedia Britannica offer to members an oppor- 
tunity to obtain the NEW BRITANNICA 3 at a 
reduced price, a substantial saving on the price avail- 
aole to any individual purchaser. 


The NEW BRITANNICA 3 — now expanded to 30 
volumes — is not just a new edition .. . but a com- 
petely new encyclopedia which outmodes all other 
ercyclopedias. Never before has so much knowledge, 
s) readily accessible, so easily understood — been 
made available as a complete home library. 


The current edition of Britannica is reorganized to 
better serve the three basic needs for an encyclo- 
pedia. First, the need to “LOOK IT UP” is handled by 
tie Ready Reference and the Index. These ten vol- 
umes are a complete index to everything in the set. 
At the same time, they serve as a 12-million word 
short entry encyclopedia that is helpful to look up 
accurate information quickly. 


Special Group Discount Offer on 
THE NEW BRITANNICA 3... 


a Complete Home Learning Centre: 


BduUE IG eipadop<oug 


euUEyig vpwdosiruy 


a 
s 


| 


. 


eauueyig tipsdopAug 
BHUUs Ig eIpwsdop sug 


@ enue spwdojrsouyg 
eHUUwY SIpawdeysouy 


| enue eypaedsy Aru ‘ 


You and your 
family are invited to 
sample the most readable, 


most understandable ? 

> encyclopaedia ever : 
oe created. ot a 
i % ‘ 

os aw ANN AJ f wt ; 


Second, the need for “KNOWLEDGE IN DEPT 
is fulfilled by the main text, a 28-million word, 1% 
volume collection of articles arranged logically which 
provide full and authoritative information for the 
student, for research in business, or for new insights” 
into new fields of knowledge. 

Third, the need for “SELF EDUCATION’ is met 
by the Outline of Knowledge and Guide to Britan 
nica, a unique volume which acts as a giant study 
guide, more comprehensive and more detailed than 
a college course outline. 

The 30-volume NEW BRITANNICA 3 covets 
more subjects more completely. It is more responsive 
to the current needs of your family. 

Members who would like to receive further details 
on this exciting Group Offer are invited to fill out 
and mail the postage paid reply card. : 

This offer is available for a limited time only, an@ 
may be withdrawn without further notice. 


If the reply card is detached, please write to Britannica Special Group Offer 
2 Bloor Street West, Suite 1100, Toronto, Ontario M4W 3J1 


- more useful in more ways to more people. 


= 


~— 


>. A 


__—_— 


~ HAROLD RUSENBEHG 


Introducing. ‘i 


n this issue we introduce Carol (Brown) 

Stairs as the new editor, and Charlotte Hus- 
sey as assistant editor, of the McGill News. 
Former editor Victoria Lees has remained part 
of the McGill family—she is now in charge of 
publications for the Montreal Neurological 
Institute. 

A former editorial assistant and assistant 
editor of the News, Carol is a native of Ot- 
tawa, Ontario, and a Carleton University 


ews 


New editor Carol Stairs, left, and assistant editor Charlotte Hussey. 


English graduate. She followed an instinct for 
travel and another kind of education when she 
joined Canadian University Service Overseas 


(CUSO) in 1968; for almost two years, she ran 


a school for continuing education and directed 
youth programs in Montego Bay, Jamaica. In 
connection with her work, Carol regularly 
chauffeured her young charges in a Bedford 


bus along the treacherous mountain roads of 


the Caribbean island. This experience was 


Feature Articles 


followed by a brief sojourn in the les hair- 
raising confines of Ottawa and the photo- 
graphic exhibitions section of the }ational 
Film Board. 

Carol moved to Montreal with her lusband 
John in 1970 and, following the advic of her 
father, applied for work at his alma mater, 
McGill. For two years she was secretay to the 
directors of drama and communicatiots in the 
department of English. Upon moving o Saint 
John, New Brunswick, Carol becam coor- 
dinator of the city’s family planningclinic. 
She began work at the News in Augut 1975 
following her return to Montreal. 

New assistant editor Charlotte Huss:y hails 
from Kennebunkport, Maine, and hs been 
living in Montreal since 1974. She recived a 
BA in English from Wheaton College n Nor- 
ton, Massachusetts, in 1968, and ha com- 
pleted the written requirements for hr mas- 
ter’s degree at Concordia University. 

While a student at Wheaton, Clarlotte 
spent a summer in Glendale, Californa, as a 
volunteer in an interracial project After 
graduation, her interest in other culturs took 
her to Asia and Russia; she even spenta sum- 
mer on scholarship studying the larguage, 
Bengali. (**All | can remember now + ‘Ami 
Bangla pori’—‘I read Bengali,’’’ ae ad- 
mits. ) 

Moving to New York City in 1971 Char- 
lotte began work as a freelance edibr and 
researcher for a creative writing firm; he fol- 
lowing year she became an administratve and 
research assistant to two psychiatriss who 
specialize in bioenergetics. Prior to oining 
the News, she was assistant editor of Gnema 
Canada and CineMag, two Montrea-based 
film publications. Though in Canada br five 
years, Charlotte has retained her sof, New 
England accent—to the delight of unversity 
colleagues who can finally distinguin staff 
members’ voices on the telephone! 


By Gary Richards, executive directorof the 
Graduates’ Society. 


James McCoubrey: Telling it like it is 7 
Interview by David Lees 


; ; : Signs of the times 10 
Published by the Graduates’ Society of McGill University. 
ee agin . oer : by Carol Stairs 
N 
egy app “This won't hurt a bit” 14 
by Christine Farr 
4- 
‘p's hasige acai “May | have the envelope, please?” 17 
Editorial Board by Donna Nebenzahl 
Editor Carol Stairs a 
Assistant Editor Charlotte Hussey Perspective: Jake Turnbull 28 
Members John Hallward (Chairman), Andrew Allen, Edith Aston, David — . 
Bourke, David Cobbett, Katie Malloch, Elizabeth McNab, Peter Reid, ~°P@rtments 
Gary Richards (ex officio), Tom Thompson, Laird Watt, James G. Wright What the Martlet hears 2 Society Activities 25 
Business Manager David Sirutz Where they are and 50 by Gary Richards 
Design Kirk Kelly what they're doing Focus: Dr. Robert Dorion 26 


by Charlotte Hussey 


The copyright of all contents of this magazine is registered. Please 


by Althea Kaye 


Cover: At McGill's summer dental clinic for children, fourth-yearstudent 
Kenneth Abramovitch and young patient Paul Mullen discuss the low and 
the why of tooth brushing and the importance of dental health. Se p. 14. 


address all editorial communications and items for the “Where They Are 
and What They’re Doing” column to: The McGill News, 3605 Mountain 
Street, Montreal, H3G 2M1. Tel. (514) 392-4813. Change of address 
| | should be sent to Records Department, 3605 Mountain Street, Montreal, 


' | H3G 2M1. Tel. (514) 392-4820. Cover photograph by Harold Rosenberg. 


McGILL NEWS/FALLI979 1 


eye seesaw ee 


KAREN COSHOF 


| protectively on the packing crates that con- 


| Francis, MD’09, who opened McGill’s Osler 


ew4223 


Osler Library: A birthday tour 


Legend has it that when the first custodian of 


Sir William Osler’s medical library sailed into 
Montreal harbour in 1928, he was perched 


tained the valuable, 8,000-book collection. 
Such was the dedication of Dr. W.W. 


Library of the History of Medicine in 1929 
and lovingly looked after it for the next thirty 
years. Marking the library’s fiftieth anniver- 
sary and honouring the contribution of its first 
librarian is a recently published sixty-four- 
page volume entitled The Osler Library. 
‘*Francis could take people around the li- 
brary, pull any book from the shelf, and tell its 
story,’’ explains current librarian Dr. Philip 
Teigen. “Principal Cyril James and the Dean 
of Medicine Dr. Charles Martin finally in- 
sisted that Francis buy a dictating machine 
and record his memories of the library. Much 
of the information for the book has been taken 
from his dictated notes.’’ 

Through forty-four photographs and ac- | 


£1 ere 
‘ vel %- = 


— 


r ‘ 
wer? het ‘SS » 


McGILL NEWS/FALL 1979 


companying text, The Osler Library takes the 
reader on a colourful guided tour of Osler’s 
medical and scientific treasures: 


title pages; illuminated incunabula; medieval 
herbals; hand-coloured woodcuts; anatomical 
drawings; surgical instruments; even original 
invoices sent to Osler by international book 
dealers. It is as if Francis himself is leading 
the reader across the library’s oriental carpets, 
stopping here to point out Osler’s Oxford desk 
and there to admire the gold watch that his 
students presented to him. 

Although Osler had lived and worked on 
two continents, he always had a special fond- 
ness for McGill, where he completed his med- 
ical degree in 1872. ‘‘The formative years 
were there, with the strong ties of head and 
heart,’ he wrote in the introduction to his 
library’s detailed bibliography, Bibliotheca 
Osleriana. “‘The members of the medical 
faculty adopted me, bore with vagaries and 
aggressiveness and often gave practical ex- 


ad 


— 


, 


leather- | 
bound volumes with inscribed flyleaves and | 


| had by nurture than by nature.’’ When Osler 
| collection to McGill. 


| cona Medical Building was the original home 
| of the Osler Library; today, it is housed in the 


| ‘*There are three well-stocked rooms whichit | 


pressions of sympathy with schemes that were | 
costly and of doubtful utility. That they be- 
lieved in me helped to a belief in myself, an 
important asset for a young man, but better 


died at Oxford in 1919, he bequeathed his 


An elegant, panelled room in the Strath- 


McIntyre Medical Building—but still within 
the same beautiful woodwork. The well- | 
known Osler Niche holds his favourite books; | 
‘*T like to think of my few books in an alcove 
of a fire-proof library in some institution that] 
love,’’ he once wrote. *‘At the end of the 
alcove [would be] an open fireplace and a few 
easy chairs, and on the mantlepiece an um 
with my ashes and my bust or portrait, 
through which my astral self could peek at the | 
books I have loved, and enjoy the delight with 
which kindred souls still in the flesh would 
handle them.’’ 

Books were Osler’s lifelong passion. 


should be the ambition of every doctor to have | 
in his house: the library, the laboratory, and 
the nursery—books, balances, and bairns,” 
he maintained. * But as he may not achieve all 
three, | would urge him to start at any rate 


| with the books and balances.”’ 


According to Francis, the first book Osler 
purchased was the Globe Shakespeare. “He 
often invoked ‘the curses of Bishop Emul- 


| phus on the son of Belial’ who stole it,” said 


Francis. “‘His second purchase was an 1862 
Boston edition of Sir Thomas Browne’s ‘Re- 
ligio Medici.’ This was in 1867, when he was 
18, and book and author became his lifelong 
favourites. That particular copy, the father of 
the collection which McGill has inherited, 
went with him everywhere, and on his 
deathbed he scribbled in it in pencil this proud 
boast, ‘I doubt if any man can more truly say 
of this book, Comes vioe vitoeque’ [a friend 
and companion of one’s life].’’ This book 


_ rested on the purple pall that covered Osler s 


coffin. 
As Francis would be the first to point out, 


| though, the most popular book in the library 


has always been Osler’s magnum opus, Zhe 
Principles and Practice of Medicine —0r, a& 
Francis called it, the ‘‘Bible of medical 
men.’’ First published in 1892, it continued as 
the standard medical text until 1947. The li- 
brary’s copy is dedicated to Grace Revert | 
Gross, who had told young Osler to finish the 


| book and then come and discuss their maf- 


riage. As the first copies rolled off the press; 
he arrived at her Philadelphia home, threw the 
book in her lap, and said, ‘‘Here’s the dart 
book! Now what are you going to do with the 
man?’’ They were married a few months 
later. 

The Osler collection has tripled in size ovel 
the past fifty years and, although the emphasis 
eee 


< Osler’s favourite book, the Boston, 1862, 
edition of Religio Medici, with Osler's man: 
script in which he describes it as “the father of 
my Browne collection.” 


continues to be on education and research, the 
library also preserves medical Canadiana— 
like the vibrant papercuts and posters that 
depict Dr. Norman Bethune’s life in China. In 
The Osler Library, the imagination of de- 
signer Robert Reid, the artistry of photogra- 
pher Karen Coshof, and the precision of 
storyteller Francis have combined to produce 
a living history—not only of the science of 
medicine, but of Osler himself. As the great 
physician once wrote, ‘*A library represents 
the mind of its collector, his fancies and 
foibles, his strength and weakness, his pre- 


judices and preferences.”’ 
Charlotte Hussey 


& e 

McGill’s musical 
8 

detective 
Assistant Professor Dr. Mary Cyr could be 
described as a musicological Agatha Christie. 
A year ago, her persistent sleuthing was re- 
warded when she discovered a baroque can- 
tata hidden away in an ‘‘anonymous’”’ file at 
the Bibliotheque Nationale de Paris. Further 
detective work established it as a long-lost 
composition by Jean-Philippe Rameau 
(1683-1764). 

A teacher, conductor, and performer during 
the university year, Cyr devotes many sum- 
mer hours to yet another passion, musicology. 
“French opera is really my specialty, and 
particularly Rameau,’ she notes. A desire to 
study *‘how Rameau’s music ought to be per- 
formed’’ took Cyr to Paris in the summer of 
1977; a McGill research grant made the trip 
possible. 


Oye 
yd, , 


As she pored over the writings of Rameau 
and his contemporaries, something caught her 
eye. It was a letter written in 1777 by 
Rameau’s son, little-known composer 
Claude-Francois. The missive lists four of the 
elder Rameau’s compositions that were in 
his possession. Three of the works were 
known to Cyr; the fourth, however, called the 
‘*Cantate pour le jour de la saint Louis,’’ was 
a mystery. 

The mere mention of an unknown cantata 
was all the enticement Cyr needed, and she 
immediately began a systematic search 
through the library’s card catalogue. The 
young scholar came up empty handed. It was 
not until she was able to return to Paris the 
following summer that she discovered a work 
closely resembling, in both title and musical 
notation, the missing Rameau manuscript de- 
scribed by Claude-Francois. 

Cyr followed up on all the clues the seven- 
teen-page composition would yield. 
‘‘Rameau’s other cantatas were very early 
pieces that he wrote while in his teens or early 
twenties,’ explains the musicologist. The 
cantata for St. Louis’s Day, however, ‘‘is col- 
oured by the rich harmonic style and poignant 
melodies’’ of the mature Rameau. Cyr has, 
accordingly, dated it in the decade 1735-1745. 
The clincher was the discovery of a one-line 
quotation used by Rameau in his 1748 ballet 
Pygmalion. ‘‘It’s not like him to quote a 
melody outright unless it has been running 
through his head recently,’ Cyr maintains. ‘‘] 
don’t think he’d have written the cantata very 


v The Prélude from Jean-Philippe Rameau’s 
“Cantate pour le jour de la saint Louis.” 


7 ee 


oe 
( 72 late 


ie” 


p OUN Les OUT Ve la Saint nots. 


ST 
£ if d 


early and then used the same melody in an 
opera forty years later.’’ 

Nothing is known about the original per- 
formance of the cantata, other than that it 
likely took place on August 25, the feast day 
of St. Louis. ‘Those celebrations were never 
written up in any of the journals,’ Cyr notes. 
“It was probably just performed once and 
then filed away’’—for 250 years, as it turned 
out! 

Music is Cyr’s life. Taking up the cello at 
the age of eight, she later studied baroque 
cello in Amsterdam and viola da gamba in 
Brussels. She also went on to complete three 
degrees at the University of California, 
Berkeley, receiving her PhD in musicology in 
1975. 

Since joining the Faculty of Music in 1976, 
Cyr has teamed up with Associate Professor 
and harpsichordist John Grew. The duo, 
whose North American concert engagements 
include Carnegie Hall next January, recently 
taped the complete Bach sonatas for viola da 
gamba and harpsichord for McGill University 
Records. 

Hired to expand the Faculty’s early music 
program, Cyr is founding director of the 
baroque orchestra and is responsible for more 
than fifteen smaller early music ensembles. 
Her teaching ranges from music history and 
musicology to baroque performance practice. 
“I have four majors in viola da gamba now, 
which is quite a large number,’’ she explains. 
“There aren’t very many places in North 
America where you can get a degree in the 
instrument.” 

Playing and singing baroque music in the 
original style are very important, Cyr main- 


Alea se ed 


McGILL NEWS/FALL 1979 


HAD AYVW 40 ASSLYNOO 


HAROLD ROSENBERG 


tains. ‘‘If you want to revive the music, you 
have to come back to the sound as we think it 
was. The music was written for those instru- 
ments and for that sound. If you can get the 
two back together, it’s usually a happy 
union.’’ Such training has an added benefit for 
students, says Cyr. *‘Even if they don't go on 
performing baroque music or performing in 
that particular way, it helps their modern play- 
ing and makes them more versatile.’ 

Students and staff members give numerous 
free concerts in Pollack Concert Hall 
throughout the year, but Friday, November 
23, will be a particularly special day for Cyr. 
At 8:30 p.m. the *‘lost’’ Rameau cantata will 
be performed by soprano, harpsichord, vio- 
lin, and viola da gamba or cello. Bach’s triple 
concerto for violin, harpsichord, and baroque 
flute and a suite of music from a Rameau 
opera will complete the program. 

The words of the St. Louis’s Day cantata 
are simple and somewhat circular, says Cyr, 
‘‘| haven’t prepared a translation of the text, 
but it just says, ‘We're celebrating this happy 
day; isn’t it fortunate we have this happy day 
to celebrate?’’’ Cyr could not agree 
more. 


Charlotte Hussey = 


En Garde! 


The age of chivalry is not dead at McGill. 
Fortunately, however, honourable *‘duels to 
the death’’ have given way to the graceful 
sport of fencing, and today not only dukes but 
damsels cross swords at McGill’s Sir Arthur 
Currie Gymnasium. 

Fencing has often been compared to chess 
for it demands strategy and mental concentra- 
tion. It also requires agility and physical con- 
ditioning. Unlike university hockey and foot- 


4 McGILL NEWS/FALL 1979 


ball, though, fencing is a sport that is open to 


the uninitiated. Says coach Jean-Claude 
Lanthier, ‘‘We accept sixty beginners each 
year and we always have a full class plus a 
waiting list. At the end of the eight weeks, 
students who have participated in more than 
two-thirds of the classes are invited to join the 
fencing club. About 10 per cent quit because 
they find the training too difficult.” 

The McGill fencing club, which dates back 
to 1907, currently has about forty members 
who train two evenings a week. “*This year 
we are running extra Saturday morning ses- 
sions too,’ adds Lanthier. *‘At practices we 
work on conditioning and footwork drills and 
a fencing master comes in to give group les- 
sons. Students are then paired off to fence for 
the remainder of the time.” 

Modern fencing tournaments feature three 
weapons: the foil, the saber, and the epee, or 
rapier. The foil evolved from the lightweight 
practice sword used by duellists. The saber, 
its flexible triangular blade designed for cut- 
ting and slashing, was originally a cavalry 
weapon. And the épée, a heavier version of 
the foil, was the traditional duelling sword. 
While men compete in all three events, 
women participate only in foil. 

Competitive teams are composed of a 
maximum of five women (four fencers and an 
alternate) and twelve men (three participants 
and an alternate in each of the three events). 
Fencers garner both individual and team 
points. Rather than selecting specific club 
members for McGill’s fencing team, how- 
Students Lynn Smith, left, and Thérese Cop- 
lin, members of the McGill fencing club, cross 
swords at the Sir Arthur Currie Gymnasium. 

Vv 


ever, Lanthier has devised a ladder system to | 
determine who will represent the university at | 
each tournament. T he names of all club mem-| 
bers are entered-on a board and, at practices; a 
fencer may challenge the person listed di- 
rectly above him. If he wins, his name is 
moved ahead of his opponent's. Those at the 
top of the ladder the week prior to a tourna- | 
ment are automatically members of McGill's 
team and become eligible for individual les- 
sons from the fencing master. 

The McGill fencing club, which operates 
on an annual $5,000 budget from the athleties 
department, supplies students with all equip- 
ment, lessons, and tournament-related travel 
expenses. Funding is adequate except in one 
area, says Lanthier: *‘We could use more 
money for equipment. Right now, we have to 
keep repairing old equipment instead of te- 
placing it.” 

The coach’s major problem is lack of time. 
‘‘It may take five years to develop a fencer of 
national-team calibre, but we see students for 
only two or three years. They just start to 
become good and then they graduate.” Lan- 
thier also laments the loss of top fencers to 
local private clubs. He hopes to remedy the 
situation by opening membership to those 
who are not full-time students. ~“Now all} 
McGill alumni, employees, and part-time] 
students are welcome to join.” | 

What does the future hold? *‘In both the 
men’s and the women’s divisions, we have 
members who could rank in the top 
twenty—not just at university meets but at 
provincial open tournaments,’ states the 
coach. *‘Quebec is strong in this sport—its 
fencers did not lose once in team competition 
at the 1978 Commonwealth Games in Edmon- 
ton. The McGill team should do well this 
year. Heather Kirkwoelaa 


An American 
in Montreal 


‘*Study and live in the world’s largest Ot ilin 
gual, bicultural city,’ reads the flye er. 
‘McGill, one of North America’s oldest and 
most respected universities, is located m 
heart of downtown Montreal on a beautt 
historic, 76-building campus....The MeGit 
University library system is among the most 
comprehensive in North America, containing 
more than 2.4 million volumes.... | 

Readers will be forgiven for assuming thal 
the brochure is promotional literature put 
lished by McGill. It is not, for it directs a 
inquiries to the State University of New ? 
(SUNY). Since 1971 SUNY’s Plattsburg 
campus has been home to the Center fort 
Study of Canada, which sends selectet 
American students for a semester or a yea 
McGill. | 

SUNY’s northern option is not limited 
students enrolled in its BA program in - 
dian studies. Students from any discipline 
within the faculties of Arts, Science, Educ 
tion, and Management can study at McGil 
under the Center’s auspices. Those enrolledin 
the program take one or two courses on 
Canada from the program personnel, and thet” 


—— 


choose two or three others from McGill’s 
calendar. (SUNY Plattsburgh also operates 
programs in conjunction with Concordia 
Carleton, Laval, and Ottawa, but most stu 
dents elect to study at McGill.) 

Course work poses few problems—all 
sophomores, juniors, and seniors who come 
to Montreal have been carefully screened by 
SUNY. “‘Our students do quite well aca 
demically,’’ notes Paul Andrews, resident di 
rector of the SUNY program and a master’s 
student at McGill. *‘When they first come 
they feel, ‘Gosh, Ican’t compete.’ There is an 
inferiority complex. But after a while they 
decide, “I am as good as any other student 
here, and they set to the task of proving 
themselves. A few of the students really 
do—to use the jargon—‘bomb out,” but that 
is because they have decided academics are 
less important than social life. They start 
| going down to Old Montreal or get involved 
in all sorts of extracurricular activities.” 

Why do Americans want to study in 
Canada? **Of the forty-two students now at 
McGill, | would say that five came specific- 
ally to study Canada,’* says Andrews. **They 
are interested, for example, in American 
diplomatic history, and they want to study in 
Canada because there has always been a 
diplomatic question between the two coun- 
tries. And a lot of our students—psychology 
majors, for example—-come specifically to 
study with a particular professor. But I think 
most of them come because they are stifled at 
their home universities. Their own campuses 


are pretty limited in scope as far as the type of 


students goes—students all come from the 
same background, the same economic class, 
and there is very little international flavour. 


af 


eH 


a 


i” =" 


‘Also 

tive factor, because a lot of the students do not 
come from big cities. We hear nasty stories 
about New York City but we hear nice things 
about Montreal.”’ 

Montreal's cosmopolitan atmosphere, as 
well as its size, proves a definite attraction 
and, although few of the American students 
speak French, they seldom encounter social 
problems. “‘Some of the students will com- 
plain that the French Canadian hates the 
American, or that he is treated rudely by a 
saleslady,’’ Andrews notes. *‘As a director I 


can t say nasty things to the student, but I do | 


say, “Basically, it’s your personality. If you 
come across as being a coarse person you are 
going to be treated shabbily—by anyone, in 
any language.’ Some of my students have the 
tourist mentality—‘I am an American; I can 
do whatever I want.’ I try to reform them in 
my own subtle way.” 

Over the past eight years, 200 American 
students have returned to their campuses 
enriched by the Canadian experience. An- 
drews recalls vividly the effect of his under- 
graduate year at McGill. “*I found it to be the 
where | 
‘he 
says. He hopes for nothing less for his stu 


Victoria Lees 2 


TE PR a Se A 


place where I became civilized, 
learned there is a proper way to do things, 


cq 


dents. 


Bookshelf 


Capsule summaries of books by McGill fac- 
ulty members and alumni: 

Elliott Allison and Kathleen Allison- 
Monadnock Sightings: Birds of Dublin, New 
Hampshire, 1909-1979. Dublin, N.H.: Dub- 
lin Conservation Commission, 1979. Kath- 


AThe Faculty of Agriculture’s new Macdonald Stewart Building opened its doors to students on 


June 2. The building is named to honour the College's founder Sir William Macdonald and current 


benefactor Walter Stewart. 


, the City of Montreal is a very posi- 


| 


| 


& “Wild Man of the Woods,’ a nineteenth- 
century Kwakiut! Bookwus mask from British 
Columbia, reproduced in Landmarks of Cana- 
dian Art by graduate Peter Mellen. 


leen (Perrin) Allison, BA’25, LMus’26, has 
collaborated with her husband to document 
218 bird species sighted at Dublin and nearby 
Mount Monadnock. Their account of con- 
temporary bird life is compared with a similar 
record of 181 species made by naturalist 
Gerald Thayer seventy years ago. 

Don Bell—Pocketman. Toronto: Dorset 
Publishing Inc., 1979. Winner of the 1972 
Leacock Award for Humour for his Saturday 
Night at the Bagel Factory, Don Bell, 
BCom’57, has published the second of what 
he hopes will be a trilogy about the personal- 
ities who frequent his favourite haunt, the 
Montreal bistro. Pocketman is a collection of 
madcap episodes based on the real-life wan- 
derings and adventures of Roy McDonald, 
Bell’s long-time, Sufi-like friend 

Gustave Gingras and E. David Sherman, 
eds.—Human Rights for the Physically 
Handicapped and Aged. Montreal: Rehabili- 
tation Institute of Montreal, 1977. E. David 
Sherman, MD’32, director of research at the 
Rehabilitation Institute of Montreal, has 
| coedited this volume of eight essays that focus 
attention on Canadian society’s discrimina- 
tion against physically handicapped and el- 
derly populations in such areas as human 
rights, employment, education, and transpor- 
tation. 

Peter C.W. Gutkind, Robin Cohen, and 
Jean Copans, eds.—African Labor History. 
Beverly Hills, Calif.: Sage Publications, 
1978. McGill anthropology professor Dr. 
Peter Gutkind has coedited this series of es- 
says on African labour and the working 
classes. This volume is the second in the Sage 
Series on African Modernization and Devel- 
opment, for which Gutkind is series editor. 

Julian Gwyn and Christopher Moore—La 
chute de Louisbourg. Ottawa: Les Editions de 


McGILL NEWS/FALL 1979 5 


LYVM3LS ONY GNVTISTIOOW 4O ASSLYNOO 


Université d’Ottawa, 1978. Julian Gwyn, 
MA’58, professor of history at the University 
of Ottawa, is coeditor of the diary of Gilles 
Lacroix-Girard, an inhabitant of the French 
fort at Louisbourg, Cape Breton Island, when 
it was captured by the English in 1745. 

Sidney Lee—Quebec’s Health System: A 
Decade of Change, 1967-77. Ottawa: The 
Institute of Public Administration of Canada, 
1979. Dr. Sidney Lee, associate dean (com- 
munity medicine) and professor of social 
medicine at McGill, examines the develop- 
ment of Quebec’s health care system over the 
decade that began with the formation of the 
| Castonguay-Nepveu Commission of Inquiry 

on Health and Social Welfare. Lee reviews 
the work of the commission, the legislation it 
prompted, and the province’s health care sys- 
tem today. 
Brian W. Mackenzie and Michel L. Bilo- 
deau—Effects of Taxation on Base Metal 
Mining in Canada. Kingston, Ont.: Queen's 
University Centre for Resource Studies, 
1979. Dr. Brian Mackenzie, BEng’61, a pro- 
fessor of geological sciences at Queen’s, and 
Michel Bilodeau, MSc’72, PhD’78, an as- 
sistant professor of mining and metallurgical 
engineering at McGill, have collaborated to 
prepare this detailed study. The two re- 
searchers have examined 124 Canadian min- 
ing operations to determine the effects that 
changeable government tax policies between 
1951 and 1974 have had on these companies. 
Peter Mellen—Landmarks of Canadian 
— Art. Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, 1978. 
ae THOR Art historian and filmmaker Dr. Peter Mellen, 
iS Be BA’61, traces 2,000 years of Canadian art 
NM history—from painting and sculpture to 
printmaking, drawing, and film. 

i Frank R. Scott—Poems of French 
Canada. White Rock, B.C.: Blackfish 
Books, 1977. In his preface, McGill emeritus 
Leni ad law professor Dr. Frank R. Scott, BCL’27, 

eb writes: ‘“There is...no better window open- 
ing upon a country than that which its poets 
provide.’’ This slim volume of translations of 
twentieth-century, French-Canadian poetry 
was awarded the Canada Council Translation 
Prize. 
Martin Shapiro—Getting Doctored: Criti- 
cal Reflections on Becoming a Physician. 
Kitchener, Ont.: Between the Lines, 1978. In 
this candid, often humourous, account, Mar- 
tin Shapiro, BSc’69, MD’73, claims that the 
medical profession is suffering from an over- 
dose of technology and from too little human- 
ity. Currently a teacher and physician at the 
University of California at Los Angeles as 
well as a history student examining the rela- 
4, tionship of medical care to social change, 

, Shapiro believes that medical schools should 
| accept a broader mix of students and place 
| more emphasis on the human side of 
medicine. 

Stefan Starenkyj—Bellechasse en Blanc et 
Noir. Armagh, Que.: Les Publications Orion, 
1977. An architect who lives and works in 
Bellechasse County, Quebec, Stefan Staren- 
kyj, BArch’69, has published a collection of 
fifty-one detailed ink drawings of historic 
buildings indicative of the region in winter- 
time. In the introduction he writes, **Ce livre 


6 McGILLNEWS/FALL 1979 


est un hommage au courage de ceux qui ont 
construit Bellechasse et a ceux qui savent 
l’apprecier.’’ 

Darko Suvin—Metamorphoses of Science 
Fiction: On the Poetics and History of a 
Literary Genre. New Haven, Conn..: Yale 
University Press, 1979. English professor Dr. 
Darko Suvin defines science fiction as *‘the 
fiction of cognitive estrangement.’” In this 
work he discusses the literary history and crit- 
ical theory of a genre whose roots he has 
traced to classical writers. 

John Herd Thompson—The Harvests of 
War: The Prairie West, 1914-1918. Toronto: 
McClelland and Stewart, 1978. In a work 
based on his doctoral dissertation, associate 
professor of history Dr. John Herd Thompson 
examines the social and economic effects of 
the Great War on the prairie provinces. 

Lionel Tiger—Optimism: The Biology of 
Hope. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1979. 
In this, his fourth book, Dr. Lionel Tiger, 
BA’57. MA’60, discusses the value of op- 
timism and the physiology of hope. Tiger, a 
professor of anthropology at Rutgers Uni- 
versity, theorizes that optimism is a biologi- 
cal. rather than cultural, phenomenon that has 
been central to the evolution of man. 

Arthur W. Wallace—An Album of Draw- 
ings of Early Buildings in Nova Scotia. Hali- 
fax: Heritage Trust of Nova Scotia, 1976. The 
classic beauty of early Nova Scotia buildings 
has been captured in this series of pencil and 
ink drawings by Arthur Wallace, BArch °26, 
a restoration architect now residing in On- 
tario. The sketches, made during his years as 
a McGill architecture student, preserve a de- 
tailed record of provincial heritage buildings, 
some of which have been demolished. 4 


A new Centre for 
Human Genetics 


‘‘We’re here to spread the genetic gospel to 
the greater McGill community,’ says 
Leonard Pinsky, MD’60, director of McGill’s 
new Centre for Human Genetics. Established 
last January to coordinate the varied work of 
genetic researchers, clinicians, and teachers 
throughout the university, the centre is the 
first of its kind in Canada. 

‘*We felt the need to develop a ‘corporate 
identity’ for the medical geneticists at 
McGill,” Pinsky explains. ‘‘In the past ten 
years, genetics lectures occasionally have 
been integrated into other courses. Genetics 
has also been subjugated to other subjects. 
The net effect was that medical students did 
not receive the impact a complete course 
could give them.’ The centre has changed all 
that. Last March a twenty-hour introduction 
to medical genetics was offered to first-year 
medical students; this fall teaching activities 
are being expanded to include courses for 
science undergraduates and postgraduate 
medical students. 

Although located in the Stewart Biological 
Sciences Building, the centre is the financial 
responsibility of the Faculty of Medicine, 
with Pinsky reporting to a committee com- 
posed of the deans of Science, Medicine, and 


i 
Graduate Studies and Research. All of the | 
centre’s twenty-three staff members hold joint 
appointments with other departments. Pinsky 
himself is an associate professor of pediatrics 
and director of the Cell Genetics Laboratory 
at the Jewish General Hospital. Eva Ander- | 
mann, MD’63, PhD’72, also affiliated with | 
the new centre, is a neurogeneticist at the 
Montreal Neurological Institute who is com- 
piling a Canadian Registry for Degenerative 
Diseases of Childhood and Adolescence, as | 
well as screening the Quebec population for | 
carriers of the fatal Tay-Sachs disease. 

McGill is a pioneer in the field of medical | 
genetics. In 1951 the university established | 
Canada’s first department of medical genetics 
at its teaching hospital, the Montreal Chil- 
dren’s. Medical geneticist F. Clarke Fraser, 
PhD’45, MD’50, is the department’s found- 
ing director. Since 1972, Fraser and forty-four 
colleagues in the McGill University-Montreal | 
Children’s Hospital Medical Genetics Re- 
search Group have been studying birth de- 
fects, genetic diseases, and related problems. | 
‘‘Our work at the hospital now covers four 
main areas of genetics—research, diagnosis, | 
genetic counselling, and teaching,’’ explains 
Fraser, a professor of pediatrics and Molson 
Professor of Genetics at McGill. **Of course, 
all four areas constantly overlap. One of the 
most difficult aspects is diagnosis; some 
genetic diseases are extremely rare, so ittakes | 
special tests and knowledge to make a cortect | 
diagnosis. Especially satisfying 1s ee 
counselling, because it is of practical use.” | 

In addition to carrying out research, coun- | 
selling, and teaching, the cross-appointed 
staff of McGill’s new Centre for Human | 
Genetics are actively involved in recruiting 
new faculty members and developing 4 
provincial registry of birth defects to help 
correlate the defects with environmental fac- 
tors. “‘In the future, genetics will become 
more and more important in studying the 
common diseases of western man—cancel, 
heart disease, diabetes,’’ claims Pinsky. “We 
know genetic background isn’t the only 
cause—genetic and environmental factors 
collaborate to create these diseases. Perhaps 
the most effective method of prevention 1s t0 
change the environment, but we don’t know 
exactly what must be changed. If we could 
learn to recognize which people might be 
genetically susceptible, we could perhaps 
concentrate our efforts on them instead of 
looking blindly through the population. 

‘European studies of alcoholism, for ins 
stance, have shown that identical twins reared 
apart still have a much higher rate of concord- 
ance for alcohol than others. The more We 
understand what constitutionally predisposes 
a person to alcoholism, the easier it will be to 
prevent it. The same applies to the common, | 
serious mental diseases—they are strongly | 
under the influence of heredity. : 

‘‘In the western world we have conquer] 
many ‘killer’ diseases, like typhoid, ’ Pinsky 
continues. ‘‘Now we have to work on Pit 
venting, not just treating, those diseases hat 
still occur. This is where genetics will play@ 
increasingly important role.” 

Heather Kirkwood © 


a 


- Jy 


James McCoubrey: 


Telling it like it is 


An outspoken adman fights for honesty, accuracy, 
and fairness in advertising. 


Editor's Note: His was a voice of conserv- 
atism amidst the student radicalism of the 
mid-sixties. As McGill Students’ Society pres- 
ident in his final year, Jim McCoubrey, 
BCom’'66, loudly opposed the use of student 
fees for left-wing, off-campus causes; he even 
attempted to oust the editor of the student 
newspaper, the McGill Daily, for promoting 
radical views. 

Though he has now traded the blustery 
world of student politics for the pressure- 
cooker world of advertising, McC oubrey is no 
less outspoken. Named president of Toronto- 
based Young and Rubicam Ltd. two years 
ago, he has often been on the hot seat in 
defence of the advertising industry—and he 
savours the debate and discussion generated 
by his many public appearances. ‘‘I joined 
the advertising business because I have a 
fondness for dealing with people and doing 
things that require their approval in order to 
be effective,’’ says the young executive. 
‘When I graduated, I went to work for the 
Proctor and Gamble Company in a marketing 


position, and I loved it. But I missed some of 


AS AY N 


the people contact I had enjoyed at university 
through my political and other activities.’ 
News freelancer David Lees recently visit- 
ed McCoubrey in his penthouse office and 
solicited his response to some probing ques- 
tions relating to the world of advertising: 
News: You once described your work as *‘10 
per cent inspiration and 90 per cent perspira- 
tion.’’ What kind of person becomes an 
advertising executive? 
McCoubrey: The new people in this busi- 
ness are rather different from the people who 
were successful previously, and I think the 
change is good. For example, I don’t play 
golf, which is a stereotype many people at- 
tribute to our business. I don’t owna yacht. In 
fact, I don’t engage in very many of the social 
activities that people associate with 


advertising—you'll seldom find me at a 
cocktail party or a bar, I don’t entertain 
lavishly or often, and I’m often in the office 
very early in the morning and very late in the 
evening. And people are not surprised to find 
me there. 

[ enjoy my work so much that I foolishly 


began forsaking many of the recreations and 
outside pursuits that healthy people have. It 
took having a son two years ago to make me 
recognize that there are other things in life. 
You can imagine how long-suffering my wife 
has been! 

News: As a member of the Advertising 
Standards Council of the Canadian Advertis- 
ing Advisory Board, you are closely involved 
in developing and enforcing standards for the 
industry. How does the council work? 
McCoubrey: The Advertising Standards 
Council is the self-regulatory arm of the 
Canadian advertising industry. The council 
has regional offices across the country and 
includes both public and business representa- 
tives who meet to revise, update, and make 
more effective the general code by which all 
advertisers must abide. 

The code is designed to help set and main- 
tain high standards of honesty, truth, accu- 
racy, and fairness for advertising; it is, of 
course, supplementary to the various federal. 
provincial, and municipal regulations that 
govern advertising. A special code exists for 
all who wish to advertise their products to 
children. 

Canada is really in the vanguard of adver- 
tising self-regulation. It is something the in- 
dustry is very proud of because not only does 
it work but it works at a great saving to the 
taxpayer, who otherwise would be charged 
with funding government regulation. 
News: How are complaints handled by the 
council? 

McCoubrey: We meet regularly to hear 
complaints from the media, from consumers, 


McGILL NEWS/FALL 1979 7 


wi Leer ae ed een ated 


SYAMOIA NOY 


re. 
Sohne. 


from competing companies, and from other 
jurisdictions, which say, ‘We think this ad- 
vertising should not be allowed on the air; this 
advertising is misleading and misinforming 
people; it’s in poor taste, it uses devices that 
unfairly portray the product's benefits.’ 

Four or five hundred complaints are regis- 
tered in an average year, of which between 
forty and fifty are sustained by the council. 
We judge the pieces of advertising to see if 
they conform to the code. In the event of a 
violation, the council staff gets in touch with 
the advertiser and corrective action usually is 
taken. Where the advertiser disagrees with the 
staff, the matter is taken to a full council. If 
the council sustains the complaint, then the 
advertiser is asked to withdraw or amend the 
advertising and this is where the matter usu- 
ally ends. If an advertiser refuses to do this, 
however, the council informs the media in- 
volved and the advertising ceases to run. 
News: In your experience, does broadcast 
advertising tend to generate more complaints 
than printed advertising? 

McCoubrey: You will find that the most 
deceptive advertising in Canada runs in 
magazines and newspapers, whereas the most 
factual, honest advertising runs in the broad- 
cast areas. The reason is that broadcasting 
outlets require government approval to con- 
tinue operation. In the council, we're working 
to improve communications with the print 
sector so that offending advertisements are 
barred immediately and offending advertisers 
have their future work more carefully 
screened. 

News: Have your views on children’s adver- 
tising changed now that you have a two- 
year-old son? 

McCoubrey: I’m in a difficult position be- 
cause my personal views are often in conflict 
with my industry views on this subject. Let 
me say that while the outburst of complaints 
against advertising directed towards children 
is very top-of-mind with many people in the 
media and in government, it remains to be 
proved that the issue has broad appeal with 
parents. Studies conducted by the Marketing 
Sciences Institute in Cambridge, Massachu- 
setts, where I believe the largest body of hard 
information resides on this subject, show that 
activists and government leaders are at one 
end of the pole, advertisers at the other, and 
most parents somewhere in between on the 
issue. 

A very small percentage of parents—the 
higher socio-economic groupings whose 
children watch the least television—believe 
that such advertising should be banned out- 
right. They support the ban, not because of 
any reason found in their own homes but 
because they believe most parents, unlike 
themselves, are unable to withstand the de- 
mand for products advertised on the television 
programs their children watch. 

News: Why do you call this small group of 
parents “activist”? 

McCoubrey: The issue is an activist one 
because most parents seem quite capable of 
dealing with the demand, if there is any, that 
television advertising creates. The old argu- 
ment that advertising creates an interest in and 


8 McGILL NEWS/FALL 1979 


demand for goods and services that should 
not——and otherwise would not—exist, sim- 
ply doesn’t hold with most parents. Perhaps 
they recognize that their children are exposed 
to more profound influences in the home and 
on the street. If their child wants a toy he saw 
advertised on television, maybe that toy 1s 
better or safer than the one the child next door 
is playing with and many parents tend to be 
helped by this alternative. 

Maybe that is too simplistic, but children 
have been acquisitive as long as I can re- 
member. I didn’t get my acquisitiveness 
through television; | was born with it—my 
family didn’t have a television until I was 
almost out of high school. So I grew up with 
all the wants that television gets blamed for 
and missed out on the education that most 
parents will concede television helps provide. 
News: How do you respond to complaints 
that television advertising has an adverse ef- 
fect on children? 

McCoubrey: | think television, by and 
large, can be an instrument of tremendous 
social good. I see many things that television 
has done that are very powerful but, like 
everything else that is an instrument of 
change, I see by-products that aren't so good. 

Children’s advertising is more of an issue in 
the United States than it is in Canada. Here it 
is checked by our self-regulation coding. The 
issue really can be boiled down to one of 
nutrition. It is of some concern whether or not 
bad nutritional habits are created through the 
advertising of products that have both a high 
sugar content and a tremendous appeal to 
children. In those areas, I think there needs to 
be a little more parental education—that is 
probably a more appropriate route to take than 
to cause the whole category, the advertising of 
edibles to children, to disappear. 

High-sugar-content items include apples 
and other things that I think most parents 
don’t want to discourage their children from 
eating. You can’t say all chocolate bars are 
bad because some chocolate bars, in fact, 
provide a good source of food energy and 
don’t have products that contribute to tooth 
decay. There is a demand for products with a 
lot of sugar and, while I don’t purchase them 
or use them in my own house, that is a deci- 
sion we have made freely. If my child were to 
ask for them, we would offer him an alterna- 
tive. If you put a ban on that sort of thing it 
also means you ban messages that promote 
drinking milk or eating good foods. The 
question is, how do you draw the line? | think 
parental education and the self-regulation of 
advertising are the best ways to approach the 
problem. 

News: The Quebec government recently un- 
veiled a Consumers’ Protection Act that, 
when it takes effect next March, will prevent 
provincial radio and television stations from 
airing advertisements directed towards chil- 
dren under thirteen years of age. How has the 
advertising industry reacted to the legislation? 
McCoubrey: The people who own the 
broadcast stations and the people in our in- 
dustry did unite to present a number of very 
persuasive cases to the Quebec government 
suggesting that further information be gained 


before the ban is put into place. The govern- 
ment’s response? ‘Bring us all the studies you 
wish: the decision has been made!’ (This was 
off the record, obviously, but it was well un- 
derstood by the industry. ) 

The ban on children’s advertising is the” 
result of the government's decision that ad- 
vertising creates pressure on parents to buy 
‘tems for children. In the government's mind, 
the products being promoted originate from 
another culture and are therefore a bad in- 
fluence on Quebec children. They wish to 
take away the child’s interest in and drive to 
acquire things from the English, North- 
American culture. 

They believe universally, | think, that ad- 
vertising creates wants and needs that require 
consumers to spend money unnecessarily. Itis 
interesting to note, though, that the Quebec 
government is probably the largest advertiser 
in the province. They recognize its influence 
but they certainly don’t believe it 1s bad for 
them— just for everyone else. Eastern Burope 
has a very similar attitude towards advertising 
government messages. 

If you look in the areas where there has 
been a tremendous amount of attention paid to 
the issue of children’s advertising, you will 
find there are better ways to approach the 
question. In English Canada a very good code 
has been developed by the people who make 
the products that are advertised to children. 
And it works. Quite frankly, at this moment 
there are few complaints from the very people 
who are touched by children’s advertising= | 
parents and children. | 

Now, I guess, if somebody creates some 
thing that is unique and Quebecois, he will 
have a very difficult time bringing it to the 
attention of Quebec kids. 

News: In his energy speech last summer, 
President Jimmy Carter suggested that 
Americans were becoming soft through sell 
indulgence and urged that citizens help cope 
with the energy crisis by ending their infatua 
tion with consumer goods. This could apply 
equally well to Canada. Is advertising i 
danger of becoming an anachronism? 
McCoubrey: In the advertising business, We 
are accused of creating consumer demands 
and of asking people to do more, spend more. 
If everything were priced properly, thee 
would be no problem with that. On the other} 
hand, every time there has been a real need to 
communicate things to people, advertising 
has proved its utility. | 

The horrid amounts of money probably 
spent by government to solve the energy prob- 
lem have not borne fruit. I contend that if you 
were to give people in the advertising industry 
$10 million this year and probably a tenth o! 
that on a sustaining basis thereafter, we would 
make a lot of progress in a very short time if 
terms of teaching people how to conserve 
energy. 

As a consequence, advertising will always), 
have an important role. I’m not at all worried 
by people who believe that growth must come 
to an end. In fact, if that day ever does), 
come—and it won't be in my lifetime—ay 
there will be a very vital advertising indust) 
around to help solve the problem throug! 


communication skills. 
News: Does advertising raise the price of 
consumer goods? 
McCoubrey: Absolutely not. In fact, the 
opposite is true. Obviously, the cost of adver- 
tising has to be included in the product’s final 
price, as do production and distribution costs. 
But the savings far outweigh these costs— 
advertising fosters competition between pro- 
ducers and helps achieve the stable quantity 
production that keeps the cost of goods down. 
The advertised brand also creates a market for 
the generic, or private-label, brand which is 
sold without any advertising expense at the 
lowest possible price; this gives consumers an 
alternative they would not otherwise have. 
A limited number of prestige products in 
the fashion and cosmetic areas do have a high 
unit cost for advertising. In these cases, the 
advertising adds an exclusive aura to the 
product and consumers have demonstrated 
that they are quite happy to pay for this. You 
and I are not forced to use a $12 aftershave 
instead of a slap on the face with rubbing 
alcohol, but if that’s how we want to end our 
morning shave, that is our choice. 
News: What about critics who claim that 
advertising creates unnecessary or artificial 
needs? 
McCoubrey: It’s true that these are real con- 
cerns for society, but to lay the responsibility 
for them on advertising just cannot be sup- 
ported. Advertising plays a very small part in 
creating demand; rather, it accelerates a de- 
mand that either exists or is latent. There is 


ample evidence for this in the large number of 


new products introduced unsuccessfully 
every year. 

News: Advertising also is blamed for crea- 
ting discontent and frustration among people 
unable to afford the goods they see adver- 
tised. 

McCoubrey: | find it preposterous to lay this 
charge on advertising’s doorstep. People see 
more to make their mouths water during an 
hour-long television program than they do in 
the ten minutes of advertising carried each 
hour. The same applies to magazines. Any 
advertising that uses a mass medium naturally 
will show a product or circumstance that isn’t 
within everyone’s reach. But the same mass 
medium forces the advertised goods or serv- 
ices to be within the reach of most people. To 
follow this still further, if we really believe 
this could create a societal neurosis, then 
window shopping, or browsing in stores, or 
looking at people or cars in the street should 
be prohibited. 

News: Is the emphasis in advertising on 
emotional appeal or on information? 
McCoubrey: Advertising, by its nature, is 
selling. People understand this and expect the 
advertiser to show his product in the best 
light. This includes showing someone using 
the product and being pleased with the result 
he gets. It also includes the creation of a mood 
that is favourable to telling the story. But 
remember, if advertising doesn’t motivate you 
through information to buy that product, then 
it’s wasted. The representation of human aspi- 
rations and emotions in advertising most often 
reflects the character of society as it is. If it 


were otherwise, then advertising would not be 
effective in communicating. 

As an advertising professional, I don’t seek 
to educate the public taste or attitudes but 
rather to capitalize on them to help sell my 
client’s product or service. It is true that ef- 
fective communication very often depends on 
impressions and emotional stimulation rather 
than on purely rational information—pictures 
are often better communicators than words. 
News: Is advertising truthful? 
McCoubrey: Believe me, it is. You can't 
fool consumers. Besides, advertising depends 
on repeat purchases. If you lie to someone. 
you may get him to try your product once but 
you'll never get him to repurchase it. You 
can't afford to advertise a loser, so not only is 
most advertising truthful but most advertising 
supports a product that is better value than an 
unadvertised brand. 

As an advertising practitioner whose life- 
blood depends on your believing the adver- 
tisements, I am anxious to raise the level of 
truth and therefore the value of advertising. 
To do this I have to take truthfulness in adver- 
tising very personally. How? By answering 
these few questions for all the advertising that 
Our COMpany Creates: 

* Would I take it home and show my wife, my 
children, my friends, and my neighbours? 

* Would I like to see my children imitating the 
people in this advertising? 

* Would I take this advertising to the com- 
pany’s sales force, factory workers, and 


president? 


0 


“You can’t 


ss 


* Would I take it to my competition? 

* Would I put my own name on this ad? 

If the answer to each of these questions is yes, 
then I think the advertising is both true and 
useful. 

News: But how can you legislate against bad 
taste in advertising? 

McCoubrey: Well, bad taste is a very sub- 


jective thing. Let me ask you this. If you were 


offended by a particular commercial, would 


you buy the product? Probably not. If a lot of 


people feel that way, then a person has wasted 
his money creating and placing that adver- 
tisement. 

Nobody sets out to use an expensive vehi- 
cle like advertising to have an ineffective re- 
sult. It is almost predetermined that advertis- 
ing will be to the taste of the day and speak to 
people in a tone of voice that doesn’t offend 
them. It should provide them with informa- 
tion that they find useful and by which they 
can gauge similar products and services. 
Otherwise it doesn’t communicate and it cer- 
tainly doesn’t sell. 

We work very hard to make advertising a 
pleasing form of communicating news abouta 
product. But it has to get people’s attention 
and communicate persuasively. In order for 
all that to happen, it has to be a friend, some- 
one they want to hear from and develop a trust 
in and whom they'll remember. It can’t offend 
them; it can’t gnaw at them; it can’t create 
situations that they find unbelievable. Adver- 
tising is not a sinister force at all. * 


McGILL NEWS/FALL 1979 


9 


SY3AMOIA NOW 


The roaring twenties, the dirty thirties, 


wartime, and beyond— 


advertisements in the News tell the 


story of good times and bad. 
By Carol Stairs. 


hat do the Faculty of Dentistry, Molson 

Stadium, and the McGill News have in 
common? All are celebrating their sixtieth 
birthdays this year. 

For six decades the News has kept a finger 
on McGill’s pulse. It has recorded the uni- 
versity’s steady growth—from three 
thousand students in 1919 to the twenty 
thousand who registered this fall. It has also 
kept pace with a war effort that saw over SIX 
thousand McGill men and women serve in the 
armed forces; has reported the birth of new 
Faculties, Schools, and departments; has wit- 
nessed the construction of new buildings and 
the demise of some old ones; and has 
chronicled the many and varied achievements 
of student, staff member, and graduate alike. 

The McGill News owes much to the hun- 
dreds of unheralded individuals and com- 
panies whose advertising has helped support 
the publication through the years. As the fol- 
lowing pages reveal, however, these adver- 
tisements represent more than financial con- 
tributions towards the cost of publication. 
They are truly signs of the times. 

Volume 1, Number |, published in De- 
cember 1919, carried an ad for the Molsons 
Bank, which was taken over by the Bank of 
Montreal just five years later. In the Septem- 
ber 1929 issue, the Royal Bank of Canada 
urged graduates to save for the future—or 
face ‘‘financial shipwreck on the relentless 
reefs of debt’?! Pages of business cards in 
each magazine were interspersed with plugs 
for fashionable gaiters, medicinal remedies, 
classy automobiles, and miraculous house- 
hold appliances. 

And 1934 was quite a year. A room at the 
lavish Ritz Carlton Hotel could be had for a 
mere $3 a night; the Graduates’ Society's 
membership was still wieldy enough to permit 
the operation of an alumni employment 
bureau; and, although women were barred 
from McGill’s engineering and architecture 
programs, men were not allowed into 
graduate nursing and household science. 

Still other advertisements reveal ironic 
twists of history. In mid-1939, the German 
State Railways were promoting Germany's 
summer festivals—while the country geared 
itself for war. In the same issue of the News, 
‘‘McGill Cigarettes’’ were being sold to aid a 
building fund—for the university's new ath- 
letics facility! a 


December 1919 


10 McGILL NEWS/FALL 1979 


Raye? 


a NAVY CUT 


September 1927 


The 
Molsons Bank 


INCORPORATED 1855 


Capital Paid-up $4,000,000 
Reserve Fund $5,000,000 


\Wu. Motson MACPHERSON 
President 


EpWARD C. PRATT 


General Manager 


125 Branches throughout Canada 


HEAD OFFICE: 200 St. James St.. Montreal 


\\ hen ord ring yout 


OVERGAITERS OR LEGGINGS 


Always 


Always 


Insist on having the wigs yen A REAL 
ats nn ee High Class 
IMPERIAL BRAND FRENCH 


Performance 


TITLES 


j Cat ©) ‘reaiters are 1 CNC E lee {) } ~ . . 
Puce overgal re wnexcetied tor. fit Devoted to Exclusive Presentations 


Of Features de Luxe. Syncopated 
With Atmospheric Musical Inter- 
pretations— Amid Luxurious and 
Magnificent Surroundings 


Theatre 8 a” p | a & () MONTREAL 
SLOGAN Folks 
December 1922 


September 1920 RITZ CARLTON 


MONTREAL 
SHERBROOKE STREET WEST 


and wear and are for sale }. all first 


class shoe Stores throughout (‘anada 


VIANT FAC TI RicklD RY 


L.H.PACKARD & CO. Limited 


MONTREAL 


Delightful location, quiet, comfortable and 
easily accessible. 


Whether for Business or Pleasure 


—a McLAUGHLIN Motor Car 


RATES $3.00 Gaacquail Plan) 


~ ~ The man who is looking for a car of comfort and 
dependability —a car made to stand up under 
“ the daily grind of business use, to spin smoothly 
on the frequent pleasure trips — comes to the 
McLaughlin as a matter of course. For the 
unchanging superiority of the McLaughlin has 
won, many times over, its title of “Canada’s 
Standard Car.”’ 


Attractive Plat du Jour 
served in the Ritz Cafe, 
60c. 


MAIN 
DINING ROOM 


Luncheon, $1.25 
Dinner, $1.75 


Also a la Carte 


EMILE C. 
DesBAILLETS 


Manager 


McLAUGHLIN MOTOR 
CAR CO. LIMITED 


Oshawa Ontario 


BRANCHES IN LEADING CITIES June 1934 
DEALERS EVERYWHERE 
June 1921 
June 1934 


WRITE oR ’PHONE Us 


WHEN YOU HEAR OF 
AN OPEN POSITION 
WHICH CAN BE FILLED BY A 


I HE man or woman who plunges 
into thoughtless spending, making 
no provision for the future, faces 


financial shipwreck on the relentless McGILL GRADUATE 
reefs of debt. MAN OR WOMAN 

Men in debt no longer control 
their time or their careers. Others 
control them. Freedom from debt 


‘A free Service to all concerned” 
Ask for our folder *‘A New Horizon.’ It will 


show you an ¢asy way of Saving $1,000 


lies in a definite savings plan. 


GRADUATES! Register with us 


The Royal Bank if you are not employed 


of Canada THE GRADUATES’ SOCIETY 
EMPLOYMENT BUREAU 
September 1929 McGILL UNIVERSITY MA 9181 


ocal 15 


McGILL NEWS/FALL 1979 11 


a) ~ 


MALTO MORRHUVIN 


MALTED WINE OF COD LIVER OIL 
AND HYPOPHOSPHITES 

An elegant and palatable preparation containing the active= 
principles of Cop LIVER Om AND WILD CHERRY WITH MALT 
EXTRACT AND HyPOPHOSPHITES OF LIME, Sopa, POTASSIUM, 
[RON, QUININE AND STRYCHNINE, the whole scientifically 
blended with finest Port WINE and agreeably flavoured so as 
to render it acceptable to the most sensitive stomach. 

DOSE:—Adult one tablespoonful three times a day and 


at bedtime. 


CHAPMAN-DART, Limited 
MONTREAL, Can. 
Proprietary or Patent Medicine Act No. 5947 


December 1921 


dl . 


SUMMER FESTIVALS | 


21039 


HEIDELBERG 


REICH MUSIC WEEK Bi ” ta REICH FESTIVAL 


JULY12:ALIG20" 


VIENNA fq BAYREUTH 


REICH THEATRE WEEK WAGNER FESTIVAL 


JUNE4-11 “| JULY2SALIG 


| FRANKFORT 
1 _ INTERNATIONAL 
MUSIC FESTIVAL 


JUNE15°24 


=a MUNICH 
OPERA FESTIVAL 


Ht JULY29°SEPTIO" 


MUNICH 
PAGEANT OF GERMAN ART 


JUlY14-16" 


December 1934 


60% REDUCTIONS IN RAILROAD FARES 
‘“TRAVEL MARKS”’ SAVE ABOUT AN : 


McGill University 


Montreal 


confers the following degrees: 


BACHELOR OF ARTS BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN Master OF SCIENCE CANADIANS NEED NO VISA 
i BACHELOR OF SCIENCE AGRICULTURE Master OF COMMERCE 
BACHELOR OF COMMERCE BACHELOR OF HOUSEHOLD Master OF ENGINEERING 
Sctence (Women only) Master oF Crvit Law * 


BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING 


(Men only) BACHELOR OF Music Doctor OF PHILOSOPHY 
) BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE * 2 Doctor oF Civir Law : 2 
| Ciden ents) Docror oF DENTAL SURGERY recta Olt ee For further information, ask 
Bacuetor oF Civit Law a mm Doctor or LireraTuRE your Travel Agent, or Dept. M 
BACHELOR OF Liprary ScieNcE MAsrTeErR OF ARTS Doctor oF Music : 


and offers diplomas m:— 


Music HousgEHOLD ScIENCE - 
Grapuate Nursinc Ga MD). (Women only) Information Bureau 
(Women only) PuysicaL EpucaTion DOMINION SQUARE BUILDING - MONTREAL! J 


Books of information giving particulars of the various courses may be obtained from the Registrar's Office. 


McGILL NEWS/FALL 1979 


12 


—~ ee 
Cale, 


59 
\\ | DON'T BE A GRUMBLER | 


\ “rationing is helping 
| to win the war. ie 


Autumn 1945 


Winter 1943 


_ JHE GREATER DESTINY INA . 
of tomorrow isin “W 
our hands 

& 


NoW- more than ever- 
must we strive un- 
ceasingly to finish 
the job 

j e 

NoWw- more than ever- 
must we SAVE and 
LEND for | 


> 
‘ atts lar > ence ; 
afiic the ystem .? “808 and IN town 
traffic Contro] Protect Community Electric 3 the disposa/ of al] Small, their S€rvices ‘ 
co S Ped oes t ae aut : are 
: "8eStion anaes P €Strians, alleviates 1€ application ng horities interested 
8Clilitates the events ac €tte In 


“_ 
"4 


> _ a . 
WE NOW HAVE REACHED A POINT IN THEZTOURNE } WHERE 


THERE CAN BE NO PAUSE. WE MEST GO ON/ JT MUST BE 
HORLD ANARCHY OR WORLD ORDER. 


WINSTON CHURCHI a! Harvard Univervity) 


McGILL NEWS/FALL 1979 13 


ee ne ee ee 
~ 


W: get a whole range of children here— 
everything from the very sweet, 
cooperative child to the one who'd gladly kick 
a dentist in the shins,’ laughs Assistant Pro- 
fessor Howard Katz, PhD’73, DDS’77, 
coordinator of McGill’s twelfth summer den- 
tal clinic for children. He should know—he 
too worked in the clinic while a student in the 
Dentistry Faculty. 

In a large, bright room on the third floor of 
the Montreal General Hospital, the buzz of 
dentists’ drills replaces the usual ‘quiet, 
please’’ atmosphere. Fourth-year dentistry 
students are hard at work repairing young 
teeth damaged by too much junk food and not 


-enough brushing. **The only difference be- 


tween ourselves and a private dentist is that 
the pace here is a little slower,’’ explains 
Katz. “‘Although our students are almost 
qualified to work on their own, they are still 
learning. Every step they take is checked and 
commented on by one of the seven staff 
demonstrators.’ 

This year’s six-week clinic treated over 
1,100 children ranging in age from five to 
eighteen. **We try to do as much as possible 
for as many as possible, rather than extensive 
work for a few,’” notes Katz. During the first 
two weeks alone, students performed nearly 
twenty thousand dollars worth of dental work, 
including preliminary examinations, restora- 
tive work, and preventive care treatments. 
‘We try to instill in the children a concept of 
oral hygiene,’ he adds. “*Preventive serv- 
ices, such as fluoride treatments and the 
demonstration of proper brushing and floss- 
ing techniques, are our prime objective.” 

Working in the clinic gives students expe- 
rience in handling a spectrum of dental situa- 
tions as well as an opportunity to develop a 
‘*chairside’” manner. Last summer, twenty- 
five of thirty-eight final-year students, as- 
sisted by twelve third-year colleagues, were 
able to take advantage of the invaluable train- 
ing afforded by the clinic. 

Each student works at his own station with 
up-to-date equipment, charts, and miscel- 
laneous tools of the trade at his fingertips. The 
young dentist-in-training keeps regular office 
hours—9:00 a.m to 4:30 p.m., five days a 
week—and sees an average of eight patients a 
day. Payday brings a weekly salary cheque of 
$150. 

The dentists’ services are free of charge, 
making it a bargain for those children over 
fifteen years of age who are no longer covered 
by the Quebec denticare program. The clinic 
itself is funded by the provincial govern- 
ment’s Ministry of Social Affairs—last sum- 

mer’s grant totalled $66,000. 


14. McGILL NEWS/FALL 1979 


“This won't hurt a bit” 


Fourth-year dentistry students practise for practice at McGill's 
summer dental clinic for children. By Christine Farr. 


A tight budget, however, requires careful 
utilization of all dental supplies, some of 
which have increased in cost by as much as 30 
per cent over last year. “‘Quite a bit of our 
material comes from the States,’ says Katz, 
‘and the declining value of the Canadian dol- 
lar has increased costs across the board. We 
have to be very frugal with our supplies and 
keep waste to an absolute minimum. ” 

For people living on the Island of Montreal, 
access to the clinic could not be easier. Trans- 
portation to and from the hospital is free. 
While patients living off the island must 
provide their own transportation, attendance 
does not seem to have suffered. **We draw 
our patients from as far away as Mascouche 
and Clarenceville,’’ smiles Katz. 
**Everybody—from anywhere in Quebec— 
is welcome.’ 

Though children attending the clinic need 
not be accompanied by an adult, parental con- 
sent forms must be signed before any exam- 
ination or restorative work can be undertaken. 
Older children often come to the clinic on 
their own initiative, while most younger ones 
are brought by school nurses. **Over the past 
ten years, we've developed an excellent rap- 
port with these nurses,’ Katz explains. 
‘*They send the children to us towards the end 
of the school year and then once again during 
the summer.” 

Ruth McFarlane, a retired public-health 
nurse, ferries children to the clinic from the 
town of Clarenceville, a small community 
near the American border. **I knew about the 
clinic when I worked as a school nurse in 
Montreal,’’ she recalls. ““Two years ago, 
after my husband retired and we moved out 
here, I contacted the clinic to see if they'd be 
interested in having children from this area. 
They were enthusiastic, and I’ve been bring- 
ing the children ever since.” 

This year, McFarlane arranged a total of 
197 visits for 73 children from 38 families. 
‘*We have only two dentists serving a large 
area,’ she notes. ** While the dentists are very 
good, parents often find it difficult to travel 
the distance required. They tend to take them 
only in emergencies.’’ 

Bussing the children to the city for treat- 
ment seems to have solved the problem, and 
the two dollars parents contribute towards ex- 
penses is regarded as a worthwhile invest- 
ment. ““One woman didn’t like the wait at the 
clinic,’’ McFarlane remembers, *‘but gener- 
ally, I’ve received terrific support from the 
parents and from the community. Awareness 
of the importance of dental hygiene has also 
improved considerably among the children 
since they started going to the clinic—one 


ete 
Seay 
wirtta 
Pree | 
Wale 
=) ‘ 
» bs 
ahs 
ween? 
teag 
we BS 
* 
aad 
iste 
a? 
= : 
% need 


HAROLD ROSENBERG 


15 


McGILL NEWS/FALL 1979 


little girl even influenced her father to seek 
ie dental treatment!”’ 
| This year, the provincial government asked 
that the clinic treat mentally and physically 
handicapped children as well. Did this neces- 
sitate special treatment methods? “‘It really 
depends on the nature of the handicap,’’ ex- 
plains Katz. *“The deaf children were accom- 
panied by people trained in sign language who 
did the explaining for us; with blind children, 
ee | you have to be very talkative and relate in 
=f detail exactly what you're doing. Mentally 
a handicapped children are a different story— 
depending on the severity of the impairment, 
all their work might have to be done under 
general anesthesia.” 

The government initially requested that 
handicapped children make up half of those 
treated at this year’s clinic. The figure, how- 


A mental block 
to dental care— 
why? 


hat do actress Farrah Fawcett and Pres- 


your response is “‘beautiful teeth,”’ then 
you're one of an increasing number of North 
Americans who consider dental care more 
than a necessary evil. 

‘There has been a tremendous turnaround 
in the public’s attitude towards dental 
health,’’ says Dr. John Stamm, associate pro- 
fessor and chairman of the community den- 
tistry program at McGill. *‘In the fifties and 
earlier, little importance was placed on tooth 


: " retention and healthy teeth in general, to the 
ne point where children today actually badger 
i 4 their parents for braces because they know 


what it will mean to them down the road.”’ 

What accounts for the switch in attitude? 
Stamm believes the answer is twofold. First, 
there are the cultural influences in a world 
where the media’s glamourous personalities 
present an unfailing image of perfect teeth, 
and where the spectre of jungle breath and 
tooth decay can be quickly dispelled by 
powerful mouthwashes and clinically tested 
toothpastes. *"We learn from seeing Farrah’s 
teeth—and from advertising that sells every- 
thing from cars to Coke with a dazzling 
smile—that healthy teeth are good and so- 
cially desirable things,’’ says Stamm. 

Also contributing to the fight against tooth 
decay is the vastly increased use of water 
fluoridation. Close to 110 million North 
Americans drink fluoridated water—with no 
ill effects and some very visible benefits. *‘In 
communities where the water is fluoridated,’’ 
explains Stamm, ‘‘dental decay has been re- 
duced by about half.”’ 

These two relatively recent developments 
combine to paint a rosy picture for dental 
hygiene in Canada. ** We know that tooth-loss 
rates are going down,”’ notes Stamm. *‘In the 
United States, forexample, from 1961 to 1971 
there was an almost 10 per cent reduction— 
for all ages groups—in the number of people 


16 McGILL NEWS/FALL 1979 


ident Jimmy Carter have in common? If 


ever, proved somewhat unrealistic. ““We 
actually saw about a hundred,’” says Katz. 
The lack of advance notice received by the 
institutions was a contributing factor. Says 
Marcelle Polgari of the Centre Marroniers in 
Montreal, *‘We first became aware of the 
program at the beginning of the summer 
through a government newsletter. Because of 
vacations, we had difficulty finding escorts to 
accompany the children to the clinic.” 

Of the eighty-three mentally handicapped 
children at the centre, only two seventeen- 
year-olds and one twenty-year-old received 
treatment. It was their first-ever visit to a 
dentist. ‘You couldn’t send me enough den- 
tists to look after the children we have,’’ Pol- 
gari notes. ‘‘Certainly next year we plan to 
take much better advantage of these excellent 
facilities.” 


with dentures. I suspect that by inference 
there has been a similar improvement in 
Canada.’’ This 10 per cent figure, Stamm 
points out, is almost error-free: ** You don't 
make mistakes about whether or not a person 
has any teeth!” 

Canada’s current trend towards denticare 
programs has added further impetus to the 
fight against tooth decay, although the pres- 
ence of such a program does not, in itself, 
promote better dental health. (““The Ameri- 
cans have better dental health than the popu- 
lations of many countries,” notes Stamm, 
‘‘and they don’t have denticare.’’) Where 
denticare does play an important role, how- 
ever, is in making dental treatment accessible 
to people who would otherwise seek out a 
dentist only in anemergency. “There's a very 
strong relationship between a person’s eco- 
nomic status and the proportion of teeth that 
are properly treated,’’ Stamm explains. **The 
higher the socio-economic status, the greater 
the incidence of treatment, and vice-versa. 
And this holds true independent of urban, 
rural, or cultural factors.’ 

Denticare in Quebec now extends to chil- 
dren up to age fourteen. It covers fillings, 
extractions, cleaning, preventive treatment, 
and root-canal work. Despite such a com- 
prehensive program, however, Quebec chil- 
dren statistically have poorer dental-health 
records than children from other parts of 
Canada. 

A recent survey, funded by the Conseil de 
la recherche en santé du Québec and con- 
ducted by Stamm together with Dr. Charles 
Dixter (from McGill's pedodontic depart- 
ment) and Dr. Robert Langlais (formerly with 
McGill's oral diagnosis department and pres- 
ently at the University of Texas), studied 
roughly 2,500 Quebec children from six to 
seven and from thirteen to fourteen years of 
age. The random sampling reflected ur- 
ban/rural splits, linguistic and geographic 
distribution, and socio-economic status. Re- 
ports Stamm: “*We found that the average 
thirteen- to fourteen-year-old in this province 
has 1.6 missing teeth, which is vastly higher 
than in any other part of North America. Total 
caries experience—that is, the accumulated 
decayed, missing, or filled teeth in a 
mouth—was 9.0."’ A comparable study of 


Government statistics reveal that more than | 
half of Quebec’s children reach the age of nine | 
without ever visiting a dentist. When one 
considers who is ultimately responsible for a | 
child’s health habits, the conclusion that par | 
ents are transmitting their own lax attitudes on 
dental hygiene to their children is difficult to 
escape. ‘There's just no excuse for such ne- 
glect,”’ claims Katz. *‘Denticare now covers 
all fillings, extractions, examinations, 
fluoride treatments, and even root-canal work 
for children.”’ 

Today’s children, however, are tomorrow § 
parents. By teaching young people the impor- 
tance of dental care, McGill's summer clinic 
is helping to ensure that future generations 
will also have healthier teeth. t 


Ontario children put the caries experience 
figure at 4.3. 

In the group of Quebec children aged six to 
seven, the survey found that the average 
number of baby teeth with caries experience 
was 6.1, with 1.3 of those teeth lost. That 
same child, living in Alberta, would have 
averaged only 4.0 teeth with caries experi- 
ence and .2 teeth missing. 

According to Stamm, Quebec's poor show- 
ing can be attributed to several factors. “We | 
have to remember who these children’s pat} } 
ents are and what their attitudes are towards 
dental hygiene. Ultimately, it is the parent) 
who decides whether or not there are tooth-) } 
brushes and toothpaste in the house, and 
whether or when a child uses them. The type 
of dental treatment a child receives is also} 
directly determined by the parent.’ 

In addition, francophones have not tended 
to emphasize dental health, maintains 
Stamm. The retention of natural teeth has not 
held as much importance in Quebec as it has 
elsewhere in Canada. And Quebec is one of 
few provinces that still does not fluoridate its 
drinking water. The legislation is there—Bill 
88 was enacted in 1976—but a moratorium 
and ongoing studies have effectively blocked 
its implementation. 

Stamm is a believer in preventive dentistry. 
‘A tooth is not like a broken bone that will 
heal almost as good as new. It takes geneta 
tions for a positive attitude towards dental 
hygiene to show up as improved caries expe 
rience. The problems of ten or more years ag0 
remain in the mouth—you can’t cure a Cav) 
ity.” | 

Nevertheless, Stamm prefers to downplay 
the negative and accentuate the positive. We} 
do have a denticare program and we have at 
least the enabling legislation for water fluott ) 
dation,”’ he smiles. **Also, parents are def- 
nitely taking a more active interest in thei) 
own dental health and that of their children 
To the degree to which prevention is effec 
tive, I think that the dental profession is fr | 
nally beginning to see the first signs of con- 
trolling tooth decay.” : 

As another McGill professor says, tongue |= 
in cheek, ‘‘Dentists must be the only profes ; 
sionals actively working to put themselves Out) 
of business!”’ t 


please?” 


“May I have the envelope, 


” 


Making good in Hollywood. By Donna Nebenzahl. 


Editor's Note: McGill faculty and alumni 
have figured prominently in the forty-year 
history of the National Film Board of 
Canada. Last year and this were no excep- 
tions as documentary filmmaker Beverly Shaf- 
fer, BA '66, and animator John Weldon. 
BSc '66, added a pair of gleaming Oscars to 
the board's burgeoning case of awards and 
honours. On the following pages, News free- 
lancer Donna Nebenzahl profiles the young 
Academy-Award-winning graduates: 


Portraits on celluloid 


I like to make films that are uplifting,’ 
says National Film Board freelance director 
Beverly Shaffer. ‘‘A good human-interest 
story that touches you is what film is all about. 
If you can put something on the screen that 
elicits an emotional response from the audi- 
ence, then that’s a good movie.”’ 

The members of Hollywood’s motion pic- 
ture academy must agree with her philosophy. 
lll Find a Way, Shaffer’s sensitive twenty- 
three-minute film about a young crippled girl, 
came away from the 1978 Academy Awards 
ceremony with the Oscar for best live-action 
short. 

Shaffer's moment of glory was preceded by 
much hard work and, admittedly, some good 
luck. In 1970 the young high-school teacher 
decided to return to university for further 
studies in education but was unsure which 
path to take. When the guidance book she was 
consulting fell open at ‘‘Film, Masters,’’ her 
fate was sealed. She made only one 
application—to Boston University—and 
completed its rigorous two-year program. 

Landing a job with Boston’s public televi- 
sion station WGBH-TV, Shaffer began work- 
ing on **ZOOM,”’ a program for and about 
American children. With the idea of a similar 
Canadian series brewing in her mind, she 
submitted a proposal to the National Film 
Board in Montreal. **I came up and made two 
pilot films in 1974,” she recalls. ‘*The execu- 
tive producer of the women’s unit, Kathleen 
Shannon, looked at my proposal, considered 
my experience, and thought I was a good 
risk.”’ 

The young director went on to produce 
eight documentaries in her ‘‘Children of 
Canada’’ series. The films, she explains, are 
‘portraits of kids who live in all parts of the 
country—miaybe a farm child or an inner-city 
child or a physically handicapped child. They 
give children a chance to meet other kids who 
live in a different way but with whom they can 
relate very well because they’re kids.’’ 


The lives that the camera records are filled 
with both happy and bittersweet moments— 
the visions, the explorations, the emotions of 
childhood. Kevin lives on a reserve, sur- 
rounded by his Indian heritage. Veronica 
thrives in her inner-city neighbourhood. Tony 
is just a regular kid who loves to play, even 
though his eyes can barely distinguish light 
from shadow. Benoit plays his violin with 
passion and participates in family games with 
exuberance. And Nadia displays courage, 
dignity, and humour as she lives with the 
handicapping disease spinabifida; when 
asked how she'll cope at her first public 
school, she simply shrugs, smiles, and says, 
“Tl find a way.”’ 

Shaffer does some careful detective work 
to find the subjects for her films. **First,’’ she 
explains, **I decide in my mind the lifestyle I 
am looking for. Then I look for children 
whom I personally admire. I'll go out and 
meet them, and seeing them in certain situa- 
tions will make an impression on me. When I 


“| thought I'd like to meet a 
handicapped child who was coping 
well with the situation,” says 
award-winning film director 
Beverly Shaffer. “I found Nadia De 
Franco in the first school for 
handicapped children that | 
visited.” 


come back with the crew, I'll re-create that.”’ 

For /’/l Find a Way, continues Shaffer, **I 
thought I'd like to meet a handicapped child 
who was coping well with the situation. I 
found Nadia De Franco in the first school for 
handicapped children that I visited.’’ To find 
the subject for Beautiful Lennard Island. 
Shaffer ventured into the wilds of British 
Columbia. *‘I thought of different lifestyles 
and, because B.C. has such a big coast, | 
thought there must be some children who 
lived in lighthouses. I had another idea, too: 
the frontier. Maybe I could find a kid who 
went to a one-room schoolhouse or took 
correspondence courses.’’ In her travels she 
discovered Steven Thomas Holland of Len- 


McGILL NEWS/FALL 1979 17 


nard Island—population, four. 
Seeing a blind child cook or a handicapped 
child play basketball seems to have an espe- 
cially strong effect on young viewers. They 
enjoy Shaffer’s films because they ‘‘are not 
condescending’’ but ‘‘deal with the kid as a 
person,’’ she explains. Children have sent her 
reviews of their favourite films, have com- 
posed letters describing their feelings upon 
seeing them, and have often requested that all 
children, and even adults, be able to view the 
films so that they too can see how other chil- 
dren live. 
The visual impact of Shaffer's docu- 
mentaries is reinforced by the child’s own 
on- and off-camera narration. In /’/l Find a 
‘ay, for example, young Nadia makes a 
simple yet moving plea for mutual under- 
standing: **My family and friends are impor- 
tant to me—they never feel sorry for me and 
that’s the way I like it,” she says matter-of- 
factly. ‘‘Sometimes. .. all the kids in the park 
stare at me. But they shouldn’t stare—it’s not 
nice. It makes me feel bad; I really feel bad 
when I get home.’ 
Funding for additional ‘“‘Children of 
Canada’”’ films is not guaranteed but Shaffer 
hopes to expand the series to include children 
from all regions of Canada. *‘I’d like to do a 
film about a kid who is fat, or one who has a 
dying sibling or parent,’ she notes. Currently 
underway is the story of a child with divorced 
parents. “One of my ideas is to have other 
directors make some of the films in the series 
and perhaps use this as an opportunity to train 
new directors,” she adds positively. 
Shaffer is a filmmaker with a practical eye 
and few illusions. **I still have trouble coming 
Th to terms with the notion of the director as 
artist,” she says. *‘Filmmaking is a craft. I 
know what the camera does, what the sound 
recorder and editor do, and I know how to put 
all these together to tell an interesting story. It 


Pei trees ge RO eite tans 


+ 


drama. ‘‘In a documentary,’’ she notes, *‘the 
situation is there; but ina drama, you create it. 
You create the mood and say what the scene 
will be. To me that is a challenge.” 
Whatever she does, Shaffer continues to be 
preoccupied with children. In 1978 she 
attended a children’s film seminar in Rome 
and later addressed a New York conference 
sponsored by the Media Center for Children. 
The filmmaker has also judged a children’s 
literature contest and recently worked on a 


A postman’s demise 


ohn Weldon, animator of the 


for inspiration. 


1979 

Academy-Award-winning short Special 
Delivery, is not your ordinary I’ve-been- 
drawing-since-childhood artist. Rather, this 
young man with the twinkling eyes and un- 
even beard admits that he, like countless 
others of his generation, spent years searching 


‘‘T wasn’t motivated when I was a stu- 
dent,’’ he says with a wry smile. **To tell the 
truth, I probably studied psychology because 
[ hadn’t done well in anything else during my 
first year.’ The thought of a career in 
filmmaking never crossed his mind during 
those years at McGill—the heady years of the 
early sixties that saw fraternity parties and 
football fever replaced by radical student 
politics and campus demonstrations. A group 
of budding writers, actors, and musicians nur- 
tured their talents with the university’s Red 
and White Revue, but Weldon remained dis- 


short film to salute the International Year of 
the Child. 

Will her new projects put her in line for 
another Academy Award, and does it matter? 
‘‘When you get the taste of one you want to 
win another,’ she smiles. **But you're only as 
good as the /ast film you make!’ Shaffer 
unabashedly describes filmmaking as ‘the 
most enjoyable way of making a living,” 
Winning an Academy Award for doing what 
she loves is just an added bonus. i 


tant. ‘‘I knew I was vaguely interested in 
cartoons or writing,’ he remembers, ‘but ] 
was not a highly involved person.’ 

In 1967 Weldon began a teaching degree at 
Macdonald College and his vibrant humour 
found expression in the sketches he wrote for 
the Green and Gold Revue. But indecisive- 
ness again won out, and he left after a year to 
become an actuarial trainee with an insurance 
company. He looks back on this time as ““put- 
ting off having to decide on a career.” 

Weldon gave up the business world aftera 
year and turned his vague interest in cartoons 
into *‘The Pipkin Papers,’ his first—and 
only—satirical comic book. **I had it printed 
myself and sold it around Montreal,” he ex- 
plains. Though it was not an overwhelming 
success at the time, the comic book recently 
attracted a Los Angeles collector’s interest. 
‘*He had come across it and wanted to knowil 
I had any left,’’ says Weldon. **He was disap- 
pointed when I told him I had lots left! He said 
that if I'd had only a few, they would be worth 
a fortune, but he bought some anyway!” 
After ‘The Pipkin Papers,’ Weldon landed 
freelance job as an inker for the National Film 
Board in Montreal. The rest, as they say, 8 
history. 

Weldon acquired his technical skills on the 


is a very competitive field, and I think a lot 
about how I ‘made it.’ I might have more 
initiative than I give myself credit for, but it’s 
not that I’m especially gifted.” 

Her films reflect a uniquely female sensi- 
bility. ‘‘Generally speaking,’ says Shaffer, 
‘*women are more interested in the emotional 
side of life, though I think times are changing 
and men are becoming more interested in 
things of the heart.’’ And, while it may be that 
she was accepted at the film board because of 
the new women’s unit and in deference to 
International Women’s Year, Shaffer now 
feels she has the experience to work anywhere 
in the board. ‘All institutions or organ- 
izations need or should have some set-up that 
enables women to get their first opportunity, ’ 
argues Shaffer. “In filmmaking you can only 
improve by doing.’ 

For documentary work, Shaffer considers 
the film board *‘the best place in the world. 
You have the freedom you want, as long as 
you want, with very little interference. And a 
lot of your colleagues are right in the building: 
you can invite them to screenings to give their 
impressions, their opinions, their criticisms.’ 

Although she enjoys—and plans to contin- 
ue—making documentary films, Shaffer 
would like to branch out into the world of 


job, beginning his film work with a short 
animation about income tax. He diversified 
with a film about teacher’s college, titled No 
Apple for Johnny, and received his first off 
cial recognition in 1977 when the Canadian 
film industry awarded him an Etrog for Spur 
nolio, an animated satire on Pinocchio. 

A particularly auspicious partnership 


National Film Board animator John Weldon. 


18 McGILL NEWS/FALL 1979 


began when Weldon teamed up with anima- 
tion supervisor Eunice Macaulay to work on 
the seven-minute, black-humour comedy, 
Special Delivery. Weldon describes Macaulay 


as a “‘jack-of-all-trades’’ at the film board. 
“She tends to work on larger productions,’ 
he adds, noting that twenty or thirty people 
often team up to make longer cartoons suita- 
ble for the half-hour television format. ‘*The 
board is one of the few places where you can 
still work in small teams,’’ says Weldon. *‘It’s 
a tremendous advantage because you can get a 
more individual style.”’ 

Special Delivery is based on an encounter 
Weldon once had with the post office. “*At 
seventeen, I got a letter from the post office 
complaining that the stairs to our front door 
were not cleared of snow,’ Weldon recalls. **I 
told Eunice the story and we started going off 
on tangents. We turned it into an animated 
script.’” Adds Weldon, the film has **a Cana- 
dian touch, a Canadian sense of humour.’ 

The film tells a deliciously complicated 
tale; the opening narration sets the scene: 
When Alice Phelps left home that day to go to 
her judo class, she told her husband Ralph to 
clean off the front walk before he left for work. 
But Ralph never did what his wife told him to 
do. When Ralph returned home, there was a 
body lying on his front stairs. It was the mail- 
man. He had obviously slipped on the ice that 
Ralph hadn't cleaned away and broken his 
neck. Ralph, fearing the wrath of the letter 
carriers’ union, carried the body into the 
house .... “‘Our hero”’ proceeds to dream up 
an interminable series of macabre proposals 
on how best to dispose of the body, little 
knowing that the mailman was also his wife’s 
lover! 

Weldon’s animation techniques are as ori- 
ginal as the plot. Instead of working with inks 
on celluloid, the artist has used _pastel- 
coloured pencils on ordinary bond paper. 
‘*It’s normal to have a paper background but 
celluloid characters,’ explains Weldon, 
meaning that the background remains static 
while the characters move. In Special Deli- 


“It was the mai/man!”: A cell from 
John Weldon’s Academy-Award- 
winning animation, Special 
Delivery. 


very, however, there is no difference between 
background and characters. Sometimes the 
background even moves with the characters, 
notes Weldon. *‘This meant hours of labori- 
ous work because the backgrounds often had 
to be drawn over and over again along with 
the characters. On the other hand, it had the 
advantage of being freer in ‘style.”’ 

To reduce the amount of repetition, Weldon 
used a very small field—the camera filmed 
only the five-inch sheets on which he worked. 
The film’s 5,000 individual drawings took 
over eight months to complete. Notes Wel- 
don, **This is probably a bit faster than aver- 
age for an animated film.”’ 

Praise began pouring in as soon as the film 
was released; the possibility of an Academy 
Award arose but, smiles Weldon, *‘I didn’t 
expect it.’ Nonetheless, he and Macaulay 
were bundled off to Hollywood where * ‘there 
was so much happening there wasn’t time to 
be nervous!”’ 

The duo had many enjoyable moments. **‘A 
nominee from the U.S. brought their crew 
down, and we met the night before the 
Awards,’ recalls Weldon. Then there was the 
pre-Awards party at the Canadian Consulate. 
The consulate limousine took them to the 


ceremony—and good thing, too. **Another 


guy tried to go in his Volkswagen.” smiles 
Weldon, ‘but they wouldn’t let him in.”’ 

The most amusing scenario—to others, at 
least—occurred the morning after the night 
before. The CBC radio program **Morning- 
side’’ had asked if they could interview the 
new Academy-Award-winner and agreed to 
call him at 5:00 a.m., Los Angeles time. 
(Unfortunately, Weldon partied after the 
ceremony and finally fell into bed at 3:00 
a.m.) **I remember saying hello—and wak- 
ing up three hours later with the telephone 
beside me,’’ laughs the young filmmaker. It 
seems that the show’s host, after an uncom- 
fortable pause, excused him to the nation’s 
listeners with, **I think Mr. Weldon has fallen 
asleep.”’ 

Perhaps even more thrilling than the Aca- 


demy Award was the first prize Weldon won 
for Special Delivery at the Zagreb Interna- 
tional Animation Festival held in Yugoslavia 
last summer. “‘It was a cultural event for the 
whole country—national television coverage 
for two or three hours every night, interviews 
with animators, and so on,’ says Weldon. 
“Europeans seem to put a lot more into the 
various arts and, when they do something 
well, they’re really proud of it.”’ 

Choosing his words carefully, Weldon 
continues: **There’s a lot of frustration at the 
National Film Board these days, mainly due 
to the recent budget cuts. But I'll tell you 
what’s really frustrating. Many Canadians 
don't realize how well respected the film 
board is in the world. In foreign countries, 
they're very excited about the board and wish 
their institutions were more like it. 

“But back in Canada, it’s just another 
government institution. All the annoyances 
Canadians have against the government they 
also have against the film board. It’s part of 
the general cultural malaise of this coun- 
try—we don’t love our own products. Canada 
has a semi-annual, animated film festival in 
Ottawa, but no one even hears about it. [know 
there are Canadians coming out with better, 
more original ideas because I know them, I’ve 
seen them. But they'll never get them ac- 
cepted here; they have to go to the U.S.”’ 

Happily, Weldon has built an international 
reputation without having to leave his native 
Montreal. He recently completed a three- 
minute film for the board’s Canadian Vi- 
gnettes program. Entitled The Log Driver's 
Waltz, the animation complements a sound 
track by folk singers Kate and Anna McGar- 
rigle. Weldon has also worked on animated 
Sequences for various government depart- 
ments and has yet another project up his 
Sleeve: a ten-minute film combining live- 
action and animation. ‘‘Now that I’ve been at 
the film board nine years,’’ says Weldon, *‘] 
might as well accept the fact that I’m staying. 
Besides, it’s a great environment for a 
filmmaker!’’ » 


McGILL NEWS/FALL 1979 — 19 


QYVO8 Wis IWNOILWN SHL AO ASSLYNOO 


me 23 

WALTER CHESTNUT, MD’23, who re- 
cently celebrated his seventy-ninth birthday, 
continues to practise medicine in Hartland, 
N.B. 


me 31 

WILLIAM P. FOGARTY, BSc’31, has been 
awarded an honorary doctor of engineering 
degree by the Nova Scotia Technical College, 
Halifax. 


me 34 ; 

NATHAN KEYFITZ, BSc’34, a sociology 
professor at Harvard University, has been 
named to the Robert Lazarus Chair in Sociol- 
ogy at Ohio State University, Columbus. 


me 38 

MICHAEL J. MESSEL, BEng’38, has re- 
ceived the Distinguished Service Award from 
the Canadian Institute of Mining and Metal- 
lurgy for his contribution to the Quebec 
mining industry. 


me 40) 

A. KEITH BUCKLAND, BCom’40, has 
been appointed vice-president and general 
manager of Montreal Standard Inc. 
JOSEPH (**JIM’’) W. TOMECKO, PhD’40, 
has won the Protective Coatings Award of the 
Chemical Institute of Canada. 


mm 42 

ROBERT F. STAPELLS, BEng’42, has been 
appointed vice-president and general man- 
ager, international operations, of Champlain 
Power Products Ltd. 

HERB STEINHOUSE, BA’42, has become 
director of coverage planning at the Canadian 
Broadcasting Corp., Montreal. 


mm i4 

ARTHUR S&S. PERLIN, BSc(Agr)’44, 
MSc’46, PhD’49, a McGill chemistry profes- 
sor, has been awarded the 1979 Hudson Prize 
by the American Chemical Society's Division 
of Carbohydrate Chemistry. 


Me 46 

PATIENCE (WHEATLY) WANKLYN, 
BA’46, has had a short story, “*Mr. Macken- 
zie King,’ anthologised in Fiddlehead 
Greens (Oberon Press, 1979). 


me 47 

JOHN E. MOXLEY, BSc(Agr)’47, MSc’52, 
a professor of animal science at Macdonald 
College, has been awarded the Agricultural 
Institute of Canada’s Grindley Medal. 


20 McGILL NEWS/FALL 1979 


mm 48 

R. HARRY JAY, BA’41, BCL’48, has been 
appointed Canadian Ambassador and Per- 
manent Representative to the United Nations 
in Geneva, Switzerland. 

JOHN TILLARD MEADOWS TAYLOR, 
BEng’48, has been elected president of the 
Institution of Mining and Metallurgy, Lon- 
don, England. 

CLAUDIA TENNANT, BN’48, is a nursing 
volunteer with the United Nations in Yemen. 
KEITH S. TISSHAW, BA’48, has been ap- 
pointed public relations manager of Canadian 
Industries Ltd., Willowdale, Ont. 


me 49 

JACQUES BRAZEAU, BA’49, MA’S1, has 
been namec dean of the Faculty of Graduate 
Studies at tie Université de Montreal. 
DOUGLAS J. MacDONALD, BEng’49, has 
recently been appointed executive vice- 
president of the Canadian Certified General 
Accountants’ Association. 

JAMES NAIMEN, BA’45, MD’49, 
DipPsych’55, an associate professor of psy- 
chiatry at McGill, has been elected vice- 
president of the International Psycho- 
analytical Association. 

ALLAN A PARK, BEng’49, has become 
manager of engineering at Mathews Con- 
veyer Co., Port Hope, Ont. 


me 50 

A. PETER Mac VANNEL, BSc(Agr)’50, has 
been appointed manager of market research 
and development for Schenectady Chemicals 
Canada Ltd. 

WALTER J. McCARTHY, BCom’S0, has 
become a senior vice-president of the Sun 
Life Assurance Co. of Canada. 

BRIAN C. McGRATH, BEng’50, has been 
made president of the Churchill Falls (Lab- 
rador) Corp. Ltd. 

WILLIAM PERCY McKINLEY, 
BSc(Agr)’50, MSc’51, PhD’54, director- 
general of the Federal government’s Food 
Directorate, Ottawa, has received the Harvey 
W. Wiley award from the Association of 
Official Analytical Chemists. 

A. ROBERT McLEAN, BCom’S0, has been 
appointed manager of the aviation division of 
the Quebec North Shore and Labrador Rail- 
way, a Subsidiary of the Iron Ore Co. of 
Canada. 


me 51 

ROBERT K. BUHR, BEng’51, has been 
named a Fellow of the American Society for 
Metals in rcognition of his contributions to 
the Canadian foundry industry. 


JOHN ELDER, BSc’49, MD’S1, an associate | 
professor of pediatrics at McGill, has been 
named president of the Canadian Pediatric 
Society. 

ROSS A. HENNIGAR, BSc(Agr)’51, has 
become president and chief executive officer 
of Suncor Inc., Toronto, Ont. 


Mm 52 

JOHN DINSMORE, BEng’52, has been ap- 
pointed president of Petromont, a petrochem- 
ical consortium based in Montreal. 

W. HEWARD GRAFFTEY, BCL’S2, has 
become Minister of State for Social Programs 
in the Federal cabinet, Ottawa, Ont. 
HAROLD R. KLINCK, MSc’52, PhD’55, a 
Macdonald College professor of plant sci- | 
ences, has been made a Fellow of the Agricul- 
tural Institute of Canada. 

E. LEO KOLBER, BA’49, BCL’S52, has been 
appointed vice-president of Cadillac Fairview 
Corp. Ltd. 

PAUL D. MATTHEWS, BCom’S2, has been 
made assistant treasurer of the Steel Co. of) 
Canada Ltd. | 
GEOFFREY McKENZIE, BCom’52, has 
been elected president of the Institute of 
Management Consultants of Ontario. 
ELINOR (K YTE) SENIOR, BA’S52, PhD’76, 
has been commissioned by the Cornwall, 
Ont., city council to write a history of the 
community. 


mm 53 

PAUL J. BOURASSA, BEng’S3, has te 
ceived a Proficiency Medal and the DonaldJ. | 
McParland Memorial Medal from the Cana- 
dian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. 
ROBERT D. CHAMBERS, BA’S3, has been 
appointed vice-president of Trent University, 
Peterborough, Ont. 

JOHN S. KIRKALDY, PhD’S53, has been 
named chairman of the engineering physits 
department at McMaster University, Hamil 
ton, Ont. 


mm 54 
RONALD DOYLE, BEng’54, has been made 
president of Sault College, Sault Ste. Marie, 
Ont. 

JAMES FINDLAY, MEng’54, has been fe 
elected president of the Ontario Mining 
Association. 
K.D.A. MORRISON, BA’54, has been ap 
pointed vice-president, general counsel and 
secretary, of the B.C. Telephone Co. i 
Vancouver. , | 


me 56 7 
JOHN M. BAXTER, BSc’56, has been mage 


named professor and chairman of the newie 
surgery department at the Hahnemann Meet 
cal College and Hospital, Philadelphia, F# 
EDWARD L. BOBINSKI, BA’S6, has beet 
appointed Canadian Ambassador to Me 
Philippines. ' 
J.H. STEWART DYSON, BEng’56, his 
been made president of M&T Chemicals 
Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 

HAROLD SHAPIRO, BCom’56, has beet 


named president of the University of Michi- 
gan, Ann Arbor. 

ROBERT C. SMITH, MSc’56, PhD’60, an 
associate professor of physics at the Univer- 
sity of Ottawa, has been named University 
Staff Teacher. 


me S7 

CLAUDE TALBOT CHARLAND, BCL’57, 
has been appointed Canadian Ambassador to 
Mexico and Guatemala. 

DAVID RUBINSTEIN, BSc’47, MSc’S1, 
PhD’S53, MD’57, has been named head of 
biochemistry at Dalhousie University, 
Halifax, N.S. 

STUART E. SMITH, BEng’57, is an en- 
vironmental engineer at the South Carolina 
Department of Health and Environmental 
Control, Columbia. 

LIONEL TIGER, BA’S7, MA’60, an an- 
thropology professor at Rutgers University, 
New Brunswick, N.J., recently hosted ‘*Be- 
ing Human,’ a CTV documentary series that 
was awarded the gold medal at the Interna- 
tional Film and Television Festival, New York 
City. 


Me 58 

JOAN GILCHRIST, BN’58, MSc(A)’64, di- 
rector of McGill’s School of Nursing, has 
been named Flora Madeline Shaw Professor 
of Nursing. 

ANN (FISHER) GOLDEN, LMus’S58, 
BMus’68, has become a voice teacher at the 
Mount Royal Conservatory of Music, Cal- 
gary, Alta. 


GILLES H. LEDUC, BEng’58, has been 
elected vice-president, needl: division, of 
Torrington Inc., Bedford, Que. 


Me 59 
RAOUL C. BUSER, BEng59, has been 
appointed vice-president of ccrporate devel- 
opment at Reed Paper Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 


me 60) 
B. ELDON HORSMAN, BE1g’60, has be- 
come vice-president, operations, of VIA Rail 
Canada Inc. 

ALAN R. LANGILLE, BScAgr)’60, has 
been made a full professor in the department 
of soil sciences at the University of Maine. 
PAUL C. McDONALD, BSc’60, has been 
appointed marketing manage Kraft Paper 
and Boxboard, for Consolidated-Bathurst 
Paper Sales Ltd. 


me 6! 
JULES CARBOTTE, MSc’6l, PhD’64, a 
physics professor at McMast:r University, 
Hamilton, Ont., has been awarded the 1979 
Medal of the Canadian Association of 
Physics. 


Me 62 
H. GARTH COFFIN, BSc(Agr)’62, is now 
associate professor and chairmin of the agri- 
cultural economics departmentat Macdonald 
College. 

RUDOLPH V. JAVOSKY, BArch’62, has 
been made a partner of Bregman and 
Hamann, Architects and Engireers. 


The way we were... 


GORDON SMITH, BA’62, has been named a 
Deputy Undersecretary of State for External 
Affairs, Ottawa, Ont. 


eS 63 

ROBERT COHEN, BSc’63, has been made 
director of communications for the Ontario 
Ministry of Culture and Recreation, Toronto. 
JOHN C. THODE, BSc’63, has been ap- 
pointed market development manager, mold- 
ing, for the plastics division of Du Pont 
Canada. 


me 64 

JEAN M. BELANGER, MSc’64, is president 
and chief administrator of the Canadian 
Chemical Producers Association, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

MERLYN J. ROYEA, BEng’64, MEng’67, 
has been made manager of the Sullivan Mine 
in British Columbia. 


Me 65 

DAVID H. LEES, BSc(Agr)’65, MSc’67, has 
been named vice-president, technical, of 
Griffith Laboratories. 

PETER F. McNALLY, BLS’65, MLS’66, 
MA’77, an assistant professor at McGill’s 
Graduate School of Library Science, is spend- 
ing his sabbatical year as a research fellow at 
the Centre for Research in Librarianship at the 
University of Toronto, Ontario. 

MARGOT J. (DONNELLY) WALKER, 
BA’65, MLS’69, has been elected president 
of the Canadian Society of Training and 
Development. 


», 


In February 1897, McGill Classics Professor Dr. A.J. Eaton and his| composed for the chorus. As the Star reported just prior to opening night, 
Students mounted two performances of the Plautus comedy, Rudens—in | “The lyri:s of the monologues will be given in recitative to a rich accom- 
Latin. Women’s roles were played by men and music was specially | panimert, and the effect we believe will be found not unpleasing.” 


a 


McGILL NEWS/FALL 1979 


21 


S3AIHOUY THOOW 3SHL 4O ASSLUNOD 


Er te a 
~ 


(Advertisement) 


Could improve 
our net worth 


by $161,450.00 


The Goal: Total Control of Your Personal Financial Destiny 


By EUGENE M. SCHWARTZ, Staff Writer for FINANCIAL EDUCATION SERVICES 


TORONTO — “‘I’ve made good money 
for more than ten years now,’’ the thirty- 
five year old executive mourned. “‘But | 
don’t have one red cent in réal net worth to 
show for it. If I keep on this way, I’m going 
to have to spend my entire life working day 
and night, and still end up broke.” 

He is not alone. All across Canada, mil- 
lions of executives, both men and women, 
face the same dismal future. Their plight is 
simple: They have learned how to make 
money, but they have not learned how to 
keep it. 

‘‘Why don’t colleges teach money- 
management?’’ another young executive 
asks. ‘‘What good is it to fight for a bonus or 
raise, and then see it turn into ashes when 
you follow a ‘‘hot tip’’ in the stock market, 
or take a wild plunge in real estate.”’ 

‘‘Inflation is eating me up alive,’’ says a 
third. ‘‘When I make more money, I pay 
more taxes, and I pay more for everything I 
buy. By the time I turn around, I’m actually 
living no better, and my nest egg for the 
future seems to be shrinking, and not grow- 
ing. There’s simply no way out. No way 
people like us can win.” 


All Tragic Misconceptions 

But there is a way — now, for perhaps the 
first time — that you can win. Can learn how 
to make intelligent high-return, low-risk 
investments using somebody else’s money, 
but where you reap the profits. Can, in 
essence, learn for yourself how to build your 
personal fortune the safe, sure way — and do 
it in your own time, at your own pace, in the 
comfort of your own home. 

This way is based upon two simple but 
startling facts about money. 

First, during your working career, you'll 
earn between $500,000 and $1,000,000 in 
cash. This is an immense sum, and if 
prudently invested, can not only build your 
own personal nest egg, but protect it from 
the ravages of taxation and inflation. 

How safe, how secure is this protection? 
Just look at this second fact: If you were to 
invest just $88 a month at a return of 15 per 
cent, starting at age thirty, you would have 
over a million dollars in assets by the time 
you retire. This may sound incredible, but it 
is perfectly true. 

And, if you’re over thirty, you can still 
accumulate more money than you ever 


22 McGILL NEWS/FALL 1979 


thought possible by either: 1) increasing 
your investment; or 2) getting a higher rate 
of return. And you can accomplish both of 
these goals once you are given the know- 
how. Let us prove this to you right now: 


The Cumulative Effect of Getting 


$1,000 More to Invest Each Year 
and Increasing Your Returnby 2% 


5 Years 10 Years 20 Years 25 Years 
After 25 


years you are 


A Investing $2500 per year at 8% ahead by 
$161.450 


B GBBB investing $3500 per year at 10% 


After 

20 years 
you are 
ahead 

by $86 058 


After 
10 years 
you are 
After ahead - 
5 years by $19.565 
you are 
ahead 
by $6,701 


Sos 


An Extra $161,450 


Let’s assume you are now investing 
$2,500 per year and averaging an 8 per cent 
after’tax return. This way, in twenty-five 
years, your assets will total $182,764. 

Now, however, when the Successful In- 
vesting & Money course (described to you 
below) teaches you how to find just an 
additional $1,000 per year to invest, and 
then goes on to show you how to increase 
your return to 10 per cent per year, you will 
then have accumulated assets of $344,214 
over the same period. 

In other words your net worth will be 
$161,450 higher because you enrolled in the 
course, and on top of that, the income 
generated from your investments will be 
$34,400. That’s an additional $19,800 each 
and every year. That’s a remarkable return 
on your modest investment in time and 
tuition fees. As the chart illustrates you 
could be thousands of dollars ahead in a few 
short years. 


A Safe Nest Egg; A Sure Nest Egg 
What is the Successful Investing & 
Money Management course? A 29 lesson 


learn-at-home curriculun, that will give 
you an unparalleled eduation in not only — 
how to survive — but acually prosper and — 
build assets — even in thee times of spiral- 
ing inflation. 


Learn from Those Who Did it 

It took 12 outstandingy successful men 
five full years to developthis course. . .4 
course that is not offeredanywhere else — _ 
not at McGill, Universiy of Toronto, or 
University of British Colimbia — not even 
at Harvard or Yale. They nclude: Dr. Mor 
ton Shulman, millionaire investor and au- 
thor of the best seller ‘‘ Anyone Can MakeA 
Million’’. Charles E. Neapole, former 
Vice-President of the Royal Bank of Can- 
ada, and past President othe Montreal and — 
Canadian Stock Exchaiges. Donald C. 
Webster, President of felix Investments 
and Chairman of the Boad of Huxley Insti- 
tute of New York. Richar A. N. Bonnycas- 
tle, Chairman and Presient of Cavendish 
Investing. 


A Small Sample of tie Surprises 
You Learn 

Lesson 1, page 14 getsright down to the 
business of making yu money, de 
monstrating how, using Pverage, you Call 
get a 30% return on a giaranteed invest — 
ment. 

How to get the most oit of an RRSP. If 
you are 40 years old, in 245% tax bracket, 
you can have $400,000 by the time you 
retire, for less than $225per month. 

A system of zeroing in m the right kindof” 
investments for you (Leson 1, page 20), 80 
that you can identify theones that fit your 
wallet with the kinds of isks you are pie 
pared to take. | 

The various, little-kiown sources 10 
which you can turn for investment funds 
(many, many more than jist your friends oF 
your local bank). 

In Lesson 5, David Louis, a lawyer, 4 
Chartered Accountant ani one of Canada $ 
foremost tax experts willteach you how 10 
compare investments on in after-tax basis. 
This can be critical to your investment — 


-— 


= 


success in terms of rea dollars in your 
pocket. For instance, on pge 15, he’ll show — 
you how, for most Candians, dividends 1 
can yield more after-tax dllars than terest 
on capital gains. 


.- 


ae | 
q 


You are going to earn half a million to 
a million dollars in your lifetime. .. 
How much of it are you going to Keep? 
How much of it are you going to 


needlessly let slip through your fingers? {  ~ 


You'll learn tke fine art of minimizing 
your market risks. Eye-opening page after 
page. 

An Hour anda Half 
a Week is All It Takes 


Where to find ‘he safest stocks that also 
tend to have the highest yields. 

How to anticipate market trends by buy- 
ing and selling atthe right time and in the 
right way. 

Professional investment techniques. In- 
cluding risk-rewerd potential. The quick 
way to check wheher you’ re buying a stock 
that’s “‘expensive’’ or ‘‘cheap’’. 

A quick way ‘o gauge how a fund is 
performing in today’s market environment. 

Debt securities. Bonds, etc. — but the 
kind that can sometimes provide an annual 
yield comparable to the return on stock 
investments in mature companies. 

Your most important buying opportunity 
for bonds. How to read about it before the 
unsophisticated investor knows about it. 

How to buy bonds for as little as 10 per 
cent of your own money, and 90 per cent of 
the broker’s. (Talk about leverage!) 

When stock warrants are actually better 
buys for the prudent investor, than the 
Stocks themselves. (Another surprise- 
Opportunity. ) 

In Lesson 15, Dr. Morton Shulman, will 
Show you the only two guaranteed ways to 
make money from options. 


Limit Risks in Commodities 

How you can use commodities to reduce 
your income tax — without taking any risks. 

Dr. Shulman will also teach you the one 
key to success in commodity trading (Les- 
son 16, page 7). Tie risks are high, but it’s 
the only place lefi where $5,000 invested 
has actually grown to $6,000,000 (see case 
history on same page). 

Inflation-fightinz through coin and cur- 
rency investments, where huge profits can 
be made. 

Why, if you find the right real estate 
opportunity, you must not be afraid to 
borrow heavily (upto 90 per cent or more of 
the purchase price), and thus use other 
people’s money to make 90 per cent or more 
of your own profits. 

How to get ycur original investment 
back, when you’ ve hit it big in real estate, 
without losing either your yearly income, or 
chance for further zain. 


How to Increase Return Without 
Increasing Risk 

Turn to Lesson 2?, page 18. There you’ll 
find an investment area that conventional 
sources at this moment avoid. And where 
you can step in andpull out yields in the 12 
per Cent range, or more, at less risk than 
you'd have to incurin high-quality bonds. 


The Last Opportunity to Make 
Tax-Free Investments? 
Your pension plan as an all-important 


investment. All the real options you have 


open here, and how to select the best one for 
you. 

How to judge how your present pension 
fund is being managed, at this very moment. 


How to Protect Yourself From 
the Ravages of Inflation 

In Lesson 26, Vincent Egan, the well- 
known and highly respected Business and 
Consumer Affairs Analyst, will teach you 
all kinds of techniques you can use to help 
you actually capitalize on inflation, instead 
of being one of its victims. 

Starting on page 21, he will show you 
how to construct an investment portfolio 
that will preserve your capital, provide a 
Steady income and provide good growth 
potential. 


The Only Program of its Kind 

This is the only course of its kind that is 
especially designed to teach you everything 
you need to know to build a substantial 
personal nest egg safely and surely — and 
how to protect your income and assets from 
rampaging inflation and an ever-increasing 
tax load. It’s the kind of skill and know-how 
you really can’t do without if you are to 
survive and prosper financially in the world 
of the °80’s. 

When you enroll, you'll receive the first 
two lessons immediately, and then two new 
lessons will be sent to you approximately 
every three weeks until-the course is com- 
pleted. Since each lesson takes three to four 
hours to complete, you have plenty of time 
to schedule your study before your next 
lesson arrives. 

Each lesson includes assignments of the 
type you will actually encounter as you start 
to accumulate money, and solutions to the 
problems are included so you can evaluate 
your progress. 


Personal Help When You Need It 


When you enroll, you will be assigned a 
personal counselor who will give you spe- 
cial help with the course whenever it is 
requested. You are encouraged to seek help 
with any aspect of your studies the entire 
time you are on the course. If you encounter 
any problems understanding or applying the 
material you are studying, simply write, and 
your counselor will get right back to you 
with personal help. 


Your Tuition is Tax Deductible 
Successful Investing and Money Man- 
agement is certified under the Federal In- 
come Tax Act as an authorized course. 
Tuition fees can be deducted from your 


income. 


bie 


(Advertisement) 


Valuable Bonus for Prompt 
Enrollment 

Enroll within thirty days and get a free 
4-month subscription to The MoneyLetter 
(regular $95. per year). This remarkable 
publication will bring you special insider 
information that could be worth thousands 
of dollars to you. We'll continue your 
4-month subscription even if you decide not 
to continue with the course. 


You Risk Nothing 


We are so convinced you will be pleased 
with the Successful Investing & Money 
Management course that if, within 15 days 
after receiving your first two lessons you do 
not agree that the program will pay for itself 
countless times over, just send back your 
first two lessons and we will return your 
registration fee immediately and without 
question. Right through the program you 
have the right to drop out and pay for 
materials only after you have had the oppor- 
tunity to assess their worth for a full 15 days. 


The Choice is Yours 

You can do nothing and keep missing out 
on money-making opportunities . . . sim- 
ply because you haven’t allowed yourself to 
gain the know-how you need to exploit 
every financial situation to your advantage. 

Or — you can enroll today, and learn how 
to build your personal nest egg the safe, sure 
way. 


Here’s How to Get Started 


Write the words ‘‘Financial Indepen- 
dence’’ and your name and address on a 
piece of paper, and send it together with 
your $5 registration fee to: 

FINANCIAL EDUCATION SERVICES 
716 Gordon Baker Road, Dept. 787, 
Willowdale, Ontario, M2H 3M8. 

You will then be sent your first two 
lessons by return mail. Examine them for 
fifteen days. If you are dissatisfied, simply 
return them for a full refund of your $5. 

Otherwise, you will be sent the balance of 
your 29 lessons, at the rate of two approxi- 
mately every three weeks. You will be 
billed monthly for only $8 for each lesson 
received. You may cancel your enrollment 
at any time you choose, with absolutely no 
penalty. 

Incidentally, if you prefer to use your 
Master Charge or VISA bank card, simply 
write in the name of the card, and your 
account number and expiration date. Same 
money back guarantee, of course. 


McGILL NEWS/FALL 1979 


23 


University 
Entrance 
Scholarships 


For students entering any 
undergraduate degree program, 
including Dentistry, Law and Medicine 


For candidates demonstrating 
superior academic achievement 
and leadership qualities 


Greville Smith 
Scholarships 
$5,000 each 


Five awards per year, renewable 
for up to three additional years 


James McGill Scholarships 
J.W. McConnell Scholarships 
R.E. Powell Scholarships 
J.F. Jewell Scholarships 
$2,500 each 
Approximately 20 awards each 
year, renewable for up to three 
additional years 


Other entrance scholarships 
based on high academic 
achievement and/or financial 
need: $500 to $2,500 per year. 


Scholarship applications with supporting 
documents must be received no later 


Scholarships Office, McGill University 
845 Sherbrooke St. West, Montreal, P.Q. H3A 2T5 


Please send me information on the 


Greville Smith Scholarships and other 
entrance scholarships to McGill University. 


OEE oo, 


McGILL NEWS/FALL 1979 


Me 66 
ROBERT RENE de COTRET, MBA’66, has 
become Federal Trade and Commerce Minis- 
ter, Ottawa, Ont. 

W. ROBERT HUSSEY, STM’66, has been 
inducted as minister of St. Andrew’s United 
Church, Westmount, Que. 

DONALD TAYLOR, DDS’66, has opened a 
practice in orthodontics in Montreal. 


Me 67 

LEONARD M. BORER, BCom’67, has been 
admitted to the partnership of Arthur Ander- 
sen and Co. 

KEITH DAWSON, PhD’67, is the new head 
of medicine at the Shaughnessy Hospital in 
Vancouver, B.C. 

ELIZABETH (VALSAM) HUNTER, BA’67, 
has become an assistant treasurer in the 
international division, commercial banking 
group, of the State Street Bank and Trust Co., 
Boston, Mass. 

IAN SMILLIE, BA’67, has been appointed 
executive director of Canadian University 
Service Overseas (CUSO), Ottawa, Ont. 


EE 68 

JOHN D. MAROTTA, BSc’64, DDS’68, 
who practises family dentistry in Welland, 
Ont., has been awarded a Fellowship in the 
Academy of General Dentistry. 

PAUL POTTER, BSc’66, MD’68, has been 


appointed acting chairman of the history of 


medicine and science department in the Uni- 
versity of Western Ontario’s Faculty of 
Medicine, London. 


Mm 6° 

ROBERT ERIC BURRIDGE, PhD’69, has 
become dean of Engineering at the University 
of New Brunswick, Fredericton. 
ANTHONY KALHOK, DipMan’68, 
MBA’69, has been named executive vice- 
president of Imasco Associated Products 
Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

GORDON ROY KELLY, BSc’69, has com- 
pleted his doctoral degree in veterinary 
medicine at the University of Saskatchewan, 
Saskatoon. 


me 7() 

GUY SPRUNG, BA’70, is director of Paper 
Wheat, a musical about pioneer prairie life 
that is presently touring Canada. 


ms 71 
IRWIN A. MICHAEL, BCom’71, who re- 
cently received his CFA degree from the Insti- 
tute of Chartered Financial Analysts, Uni- 
versity of Virginia, Charlottesville, has been 
appointed vice-president of Beutel Goodman 
and Co. Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

REV. WILLIAM P. MORRISON, MA’71, 
teaches English and religious studies at East 
Kootenay Community College, Cranbrook, 
Bc. 

RICHARD B. SIOK, BSc’69, MBA’71, has 
been appointed manager, industry affairs, for 
CP Telecommunications. 

WILLA MARY (BEDDOE) VORONEY. 
BSc’71, has completed her bachelor of laws 
degree at the University of Saskatchewan. 


mm 72 
JACK I. COHEN, BCom’72, has been 
named a principal in the management consult 
ing firm of Richter and Associates, Toronto, 
WAYNE FULKS, BA’72, has been appointed | ” 
cultural program officer in the New 
Brunswick Department of Youth, Recreation 
and Cultural Resources, Fredericton. 
DONALD F. GERSON, PhD’‘72, has become 
a member of the Basel Institute for Immunol- 
ogy, Switzerland. 


$ 


| WENDY (McKNIGHT) NICKLIN, BN’72, 


MSc(A)’78. is a clinical specialist in the 
emergency department of Ottawa Civic Hos- | 
pital, Ontario. 


me 74 
DEBORAH BARBER, BA’74, DipEd75,) 
DipReading’79, is teaching for a year at the |” 
Reigate Priory, Surrey, England, as part of ai 

exchange program. 

LENIUS GEORGE BENDIKAS, BSc 70,) 
MD’74, who recently received his Canadian | 
and American Specialty Boards in ophthal- | 
mology, is practising in Chicago, Il. 


a 
| DONNA LYNN TOLMATCH, BA74, 
| BSc(Arch)’77. BArch’78, has received the | 


edal 


Royal Architecture Institute of Canada 
for her study of air rights over Montrealis) 
Ville Marie Expressway. 


{ 
\ 


. 
me 75 4 { 
SUSAN JOAN CAMPBELL, MA‘73) iis) 
received her bachelor of laws degree fromthe | 


University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon) 
STEPHAN J. LOGAN, BSc’75, MS¢ 7am) 
has joined the scientific division of Alla) 
Crawford Associates, Toronto, Ont., a | 
sales representative. 


me 76 

JERRY F. O'BRIEN, BA’76, who recently) 
received his LLB from the University 0 
Western Ontario, London, is articling Wily 
the Toronto law firm of Cassels, Mite ell, 
Somers, Dutton, and Winkler. ; "| 
JUDITH C. THVEL, BN’76, teaches in tie 
staff development department at the Toronto 
General Hospital, Ontario. | 


am 77 

MICHELE TUREK, BSc’72, MD’77, who 
recently worked at the Pan-American Games 
in San Juan, Puerto Rico, has been named a 
member of the Canadian Academy of Sports 
Medicine. : 
mm 78 

ROSEMARY J. KITCHING, BEng 78, isan 
engineer in the reduction development 
partment of Alcan Smelters and 7 
Ltd., Kitimat, B.C. : 
HOPE ANNE LEE, BMus’78, has been | 
awarded first prize in the young COMpOSks)) 
competition of the Performing Rights Ur rgé 
ization of Canada. 
CATHERINE MacLEAN, BA’78, who | 
cently received the first Jonathan G. Mael 
non Scholarship for Gaelic Studies # 
College of Cape Breton, Nova Scot 
studying for her master’s in Celtic Stud 

the University of Edinburgh, Scotland. 


- 


Reunion °79 by Gary Richards 


They came from as far as Australia, the | fever pitch at the Martlet House 
Netherlands, Portugal, and the United King- | 
dom, and as near as Sherbrooke Street West. 
But all had one thing in common—McGill. | 
From September 27 to 30, over three | 
thousand graduates converged on the campus 
to enjoy the camaraderie of class parties and 
receptions, seminars and campus tours, spe- 
cial luncheons and anniversary dinners, a 
football game, and the planting of a gingko 
tree. 

Reunion Weekend ambiance reached a 


———----— —_ SE 


Rendez-Vous 
following Saturday’s game Returning grad- 
uates packed the headquarters of the Grad- 
uates’ Society to rekindle old friendships, 
watch McGill films, look up classmates’ ad- 
dresses, and munch on assorted goodies. 
Especially popular were the disco-dancing 
lessons. Joining the ‘‘movers’’ on the dance 
floor were Principal David Johnston and his 
five young daughters, all under the watchful 
eye of Allan Turner-Bone of the Class of 
1916. The weekend drew to a happy, though 


ALD 


weary, Close on Sunday as seventy-five revel- 
lers toured Old Montreal and shared a parting 
lunch that lasted three hours. 

Stephen Leacock, in his message to the 
Class of 1944, takes a lighthearted yet 
appropriate look at what it means to be a 
graduate: *“You carry away a parchment— 
keep it. In the time being its utility is small 
although even now you can use a McGill 


| degree as constructive evidence of mental 


Sanity.... 

“But as the years go by your McGill 
parchment will take on a deeper meaning and 
will seem to breathe forth from the wall on 
which it hangs a magic wealth of memories. 
of wistful regrets and abiding and justifiable 
pride. It will serve to remind you that you 
have not really left college: no true graduate 
ever does....In going out from McGill your 
fellowship in all that it means remains un- 
broken.”’ & 


Above: “| just love parties,” exclaimed nine- 
year-old Alexandra Johnston as she mingled 
with members of the Class of 1954 at the Prin- 
cipal’s Reception. 


Left: Rev. Bruce Copland, BA’22, MA’32. of | 


Montreal, and Alice (Roy) Amaron, BA’23, 
DipPE’'24, of Renfrew, Ont., had more than fifty 


years of catching up to do at the Chancellor's | 


Dinner. 
Below: Bill Baker, MD’24, right, journeyed all 
the way from Victoria, B.C., to see lifelong 


friends—like Cecil Teakle, BA’24. of Montreal. 


YAW Wd SAINO 


HAROLD ROSENBERG 


FOCUS 


ee ee 


Robert Dorion 


| look upon each case as a challenge, as a 
puzzle to be solved,’ says Montrealer 
Robert Dorion, DDS ’72, one of only thirty- 
six forensic dentists on the continent. For 
many people, forensic dentistry —or odontol- 
ogy—is synonymous with cadavers and 
skull remains. Dorion, however, defines it 
more generally as ‘*a science that utilizes den- 
tal or paradental knowledge for the solution of 
certain legal problems.’’ 

Teeth are more reliable than fingerprints 
when it comes to identification, says the 
thirty-four-year-old dentist; in cases of ad- 
vanced decomposition, they often represent 
the only clue. ‘‘Each tooth has five 
surfaces—cheek, tongue, top, front, and 
back,’’ says Dorion. ‘*‘Multiply all of these 
factors by thirty-two teeth and then add the 
possibility of different filling materials on any 
one or a combination of these surfaces and 
you have one possibility in two billion of 
finding two identical individuals.”’ 

Dorion came by his interest in dentistry 
honestly—his father Eugene, DDS °41, is 
also a McGill-trained dentist. His decision to 
specialize, though, came about ‘‘by a fluke.’’ 
A lecture he attended as a second-year student 
triggered his imagination, and after gradua- 
tion he spent some time studying and working 
at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology in 
Washington, D.C. (Post-doctoral degrees in 
forensic dentistry are not yet offered in North 
America. Experience is the best teacher, 
maintains Dorion. ** You learn from your mis- 
takes; then you teach others how to avoid 
them.’’) In 1976, he became the first Canadian 
to be certified by the American Board of 
Forensic Odontology. 

Dorion’s first case in Montreal involved an 
eight-month-old child who had been severely 
bitten. From teeth marks on the baby’s body, 
Dorion was able to identify one of the parents 
as the assailant. Most of his forensic cases 
involve assisting the police with the identifi- 
cation of corpses and consulting in cases of 
assault or rape where teeth prints are discern- 
ible. 

‘‘To me, the most stressful situation is 
when it comes time to go to court,’” says the 
dentist. ‘‘You are dealing with people not 
knowledgeable in this particular area—the 
judge, the members of the jury, the lawyers. 
As an expert witness, you have to anticipate 
questions from the opposition and educate 
your own lawyer on what questions to ask the 
other expert witness. Yet, you must remain at 
a level that the judge and jury can understand. 
It requires lots of concentration.”’ 

Forensic dentistry is gradually gaining of- 
ficial recognition. Quebec’s Ministry of Jus- 


26 McGILLNEWS/FALL 1979 


tice, which appointed Dorion as a consultant 
in 1973, was the first in North America to 
institute an official computer program to aid 
in the identification of disaster victims. And 
in 1975, for the first time in Canadian juris- 
prudence, the science of rugoscopy was ac- 
cepted in a court of law—Dorion’s prints of 
the roof of a suspect’s mouth led to a convic- 
tion. 

In addition to offering assistance to the 
police and the courts, Dorion lectures on 
forensic dentistry at all three dental Faculties 
in the province—at McGill, the Université de 
Montréal, and Laval. He is also a consultant 
at the Laboratoire de Medecine-Légale in 
Montreal, where the emphasis is on forensic 
pathology. In addition, Dorion teaches reg- 
ularly at the Canadian Police College in Ot- 
tawa, serves as president of the Canadian 
Society of Forensic Science, and fits in his 
own dental surgery practice three days a 
week. 

‘‘One reason I can handle the pace,’’ ex- 
plains Dorion, ‘‘is that I have tremendous 
variety in my work—teaching, writing, prac- 
tising, and applying my knowledge in foren- 
sic odontology. I average fifty special cases a 
year and every one, no matter how mundane, 
is achallenge. They can be difficult, but never 
boring.” 

One particular investigation sparked Dor- 
ion’s interest in the preventive aspect of 
forensic dentistry. A seemingly healthy man 
in his mid-twenties had been found dead a few 
hours after dental surgery. Dorion discovered 
that he had died of asphyxiation after a cotton 
roll, used to stop bleeding at the extraction 
site, lodged in his lungs. In this case a routine 
procedure, when used along with freezing and 
sedation, had proved fatal. As a result of 
Dorion’s findings, dentists have been warned 
about the potentially dangerous combination. 

Dorion, however, derives his greatest pro- 
fessional satisfaction from teaching, where he 
stresses structure and order, discipline and 
thought. “‘I want students to be able to stand 
on their own two feet and know and under- 
stand why they are doing certain things,’’ he 
asserts. *‘When a student comes to me after 
graduation and tells me he now understands 
the need for discipline, that is where I get 
positive feedback.”’ Althea Kaye @ 


LEYLA RAPHAEL, PhD’78, is a professor! 
in the Faculté des lettres et des Sciences | 
humaines at the University of Beirut, Leba-| 
non. iE 
RICHARD WALLS, PhD’78, has become a 
senior exploration geologist for Canadian 
Hunter Exploration Ltd. , 


é 


q f 


ms 79 
RAYMOND BEDARD, DDS’79, has opened | 
a dentistry practice in Dolbeau, Que. | 
JOHN COLLIS, BCom’79, has received a| 
Rhodes Scholarship to continue his studies at | 
Oxford University, England. 

DAVID WILLIAM GARANT, DDS’79, is} | 
practising dentistry in Whitby, Ont. ia 
ELIZABETH MELLISH, BSc(Agr)’79, ison | 
staff at Agriculture Canada’s Research <7 
tion at Charlottetown, P.E.I. 

BRUCE OLIVER, BSc’75, DDS’79, nas 
moved to Dolbeau, a small community in} 
northern Quebec, to practise dentistry in| 
partnership with classmate Dr. — 
Bedard. 

K. SCOTT ROBERTSON, BEng’79, is em- 
ployed by Canadian Steel Wheel, Montreal. mi 
BRIAN ROONEY, BSc’79, has joined Du- 
Pont Canada Inc. as a chemist. 

ALLAN RYAN, BA’79, has been awarded | 
master’s fellowship and a teaching assis 
tantship by the University of Toronto, On| 
tario, where he will continue his studies in 
philosophy. } 


= 


DEATHS 


ma 07 
GERTRUDE (MACAULAY) SUTTON 
BA’07, at Montreal, Que., on Sept. 18, 1979. | 
me 09 | 
ARTHUR FRANK M. BRIGGS, BSc’09, at 
Welland, Ont., on June 10, 1979. 
HUMPHREY S. GROVE, BSc’09, in Sept | 
ember 1978. 


| 
| 
| 


| 


41 
=e 10 i 
BEATRICE RUTH (MOUNT) POWLES, 
BA’ 10, at Brantford, Ont., on July 28, 1979. 


JOHN NEWTON TIMBERLAKE, BSc’l, 
at Lindsay, Ont., on July 28, 1979. | 


=e il 
JAMES WINFRED BRIDGES, BA’ll, #) 
Montreal, Que., on Sept. 3, 1979. | 


i] 


ms 12 

HAROLD A. CALKINS, BSc’l2, on Sep | 
12, 1979. | 
MALCOLM BRANCROFT DAVIS. 
BSA’12, on June 8, 1979. 

LILLIAN MAY (CAMPBELL) O'NEILL, 
BA’12, on Aug. 30, 1979. 


Me 13 
ALICE MORGAN KEENLEYSIDE, Bat, 
at Vancouver, B.C., on Aug. 8, 1979. 


me 15 
FREDA M. WATT, DipPE’15, at Montreal. 
Que., on June 28, 1979. ( 


me 17 

EVELYN (HOLLAND) BAKER, DipPE’17, 
at Brampton, Ont., on June 17, 1979. 

MAX BERNFIELD, BA’14, BCL’17. at 
Montreal, Que., on June 7, 1979. 


i 18 

ROBERT R. STRUTHERS, MD’18, at To- 
ronto, Ont., on May 31, 1979. 

GEORGE G. ULMER, BSc’ 18, on March 10. 
1978. 


me 19 
DAVID GIBB PROUDFOOT, BA’19. 
BSc’20, at Montpelier, Vt., on June 1, 1979. 


me 20 

JESSIE FRANCES (PARKINS) DON- 
NELLY, CertSW’°20, at Montreal. Que., on 
July 26, 1979. 


me 21 
FELIX BERNSTEIN, BA’19, MD’21. on 
Aug. 18, 1979. 


REV. LEMUEL OSCAR BUNT, BA’21. at 
Beamsville, Ont., on Dec. 14, 1978. 
HOWARD L. DAWSON, BA’18, MD’21. at 
Montreal, Que., on Aug. 28, 1979. 

ALICE R. HOROBIN, DipPE’21, on July 13, 
1979. 

BARUCH SILVERMAN, MD’21, on Sept. 
6, 1979. 


me 23 

J. WILFRED FAGAN, BSc’23, at Montreal. 
Que., on June 10, 1979. 

FRANCES H. (PERRY) WEBB, BA’23. on 
July 16, 1979. 


me 24 

RUTH MAY FERGUSSON, BA’24, on Sept. 
13, 1979. 

T. HAROLD GAETZ, MD’24, on Nov. 26, 
1977. 

JAMES C. SIMPSON, BSc’24, at Ste. Anne 
de Bellevue, Que., on Sept. 7, 1979. 


Me 26 
MARION PATTERSON BOA, DipNurs’26, 
at Montreal, Que., on July 21, 1979. 


me 28 

C. EMERSON BROOKS, MD’28., at 
Montreal, Que., on June 6, 1979. 
ALEXANDER WRAY JONES, Arts’28. at 
Vancouver, B.C., on July 27, 1979, 
MARGARET E. ORR, DipNurs’28, at Oak- 
ville, Ont., on June 29, 1979. 


me 29 

RUTH M. BECHTEL, BA’29, MA’30, on 
March 23, 1978. 

3RIC C. JACQUES, BCom’29, on July 14, 
979. 

-EO E. MARION, PhD’29, at Ottawa, Ont.. 
m July 14, 1979. 
SUGENIE (CLEMENT) 
3A°29, on Sept. 19, 1979. 


RONDEAU, 


mm 30) 
MOLET BEATRICE ARMSTRONG. 
3A’ 30, at Montreal, Que., on June 22, 1979. 


RAE (ROUTTENBERG) MACKIE. BA’30, 


on July 17, 1979. 


me 3] 


ABRAM BLAU, BSc’27, MSc’29. MD’31, 


at New York City, N.Y., on May 14, 1979, 
D’ARCY MANNING DOHERTY, 
BCom’31, at Toronto, Ont.. on Sept. 14, 
1979. 

HARRY RAYMOND IRONSTONE, 
DDS°31, at Ottawa, Ont., on July 21, 1979. 


mm 32 

HAROLD SHAFFER, BCom’32. at Ottawa, 
Ont., on June 5, 1979. 

ALFRED R. TUCKER, BCom’32. at Win- 
nipeg, Man., on May 2, 1979, 


Me 33 

PERCIVAL A. HUDSON, BSc’33, on June 
13, 1979. 

MARJORIE (GOWANS) SCOTT, BA’33. at 
Sherbrooke, Que., on May 25, 1979. 


Em 35 
JAMES C. LEAHEY, BEng’35, at Bea- 
consfield, Que., on June 27, 1979. 


BE 36 
SEYMOUR S. FELS, BA’36, at Philadel- 
phia, Pa., on Aug. 14, 1979. 


Me 37 
CHARLES F. H. ALLEN, DSc’37, at Cleve- 
land, Ohio, on Aug. 31, 1979. 


Mw 38 
HARRIET (GRANGER) 
BSc(HEc)’38, on June 7. 1979. 


LEGER, 


me i) 
WILLIAM W. DODDS, BA’41, on June 26. 
1979, 


me 43 

S. BERNARD RAPHAEL, BSc’43. 
BSW’47, at Richmond, Va., on June 30, 
1979. 


me 44 

GWENDOLYN C. HAZLETT, BA’44. 
BLS’45, MLS’65, at Montreal. Que., on 
Aug. 23, 1979. 


Me 46 
WILLIAM J. BAXTER, BA’46. BD’S0, on 
June 29, 1978. 


me 47 

MARY BEATRICE (WINSBY) NEWELL, 
DipNurs’47, at Bowmanville, Ont., on June 
28, 1979, 

HELMUT A. RICHTER, BA’45, MD’47, on 
Aug. 17, 1979. 


mm 49 

ISHBEL J. GRAY, BN’49, in British 
Columbia, on May 10, 1979. 

GEORGE H. PARRETT, BA’49, at Ottawa. 
Ont., on Oct. 12, 1977. 

GERALD D. SEABOYER, BCom’49, at 
Dartmouth, N.S., on June 17, 1979. 


D 


CLAUDE WAGNER, BCL’49, at Montreal. 
Que., in July 1979. 


mm 5! 

ANDRE N. DELAND, BSc’51, MSc’S52. at 
St. Jean, Que., on July 7, 1979. 

WENDY (DAWSON) GRACE. DipPT’S1, 
at Brockville, Ont., on Aug. 28, 1979. 


mm 52 
IAN LOUIS COUGHLAN, BSc’52. at 
Montreal, Que., on May 26, 1979. 


Me 53 
HUGH M.E. DURNFORD, BA’S3. at 
Montreal, Que., on July 6, 1979. 


Mm 54 

JUDITH MARGARET (VEITH) BOURKE, 
BA’54, at Montreal, Que., on Aug. 29, 1979. 
EDITH (GILLIS) BOWE. DipNurs’54, at 
Nassau, Bahamas, on June 22. 1979. 


Me 56 
CONSTANTINE LAFKAS, BEng’56, at 
Montreal, Que., on July 19, 1979. 


Me 57 
FRANK BARNA, BEng’57, on Aug. 1, 
1979. 


Me 58 

NORMAN R. BRETON, BEng’58, on June 
12, 1979. 

FRANK P. LALONDE, BEng’58, at 
Montreal, Que., on July 8, 1979. 


Me 63 
ELSPETH A. (KEMP) DAIGLE, BA’63., at 
Ottawa, Ont., on July 23, 1979, 


Ge 65 
HELENA KRYK, BN’65. on Jan. 19, 1979. 


Ml 66 
JANET ELIZABETH QUINLAN, BN’ 66, at | 
Vancouver, B.C., on July 12, 1979. 


Ge 67 
ANDREA MARY STEWART, BA’67. at 
Montreal, Que., on July 22, 1979. 


me 73 

DAVID ALLEN BRUCE HARRIGAN. 
BSc’73, MSc’75, at Saskatoon. Sask., on 
July 5, 1979. 


me 74 

FREDA (KRELENBAUM) KRELL. 
BOccTher’74, on July 14, 1979. | 
me 75 

JULIETTA McGILLIVRAY, BA’75, at 
Westmount, Que., on June 12, 1979. 
DAVID SCHOUELA, BEng’75, at Lake 
Louise, Alta., on Aug. 1, 1979. 


me 78 

MARC ANDRE LEGERE, BEng’78, at 
James Bay, Que., on June 8, 1979. 
GEORGE KER THOMPSON, BMus’78. on 
Aug. 25, 1979. 


—_ et 
McGILL NEWS/FALL 1979 27 


Jake Turnbull - 


Editor's Note: John Turnbull 
twenty when he graduated as a mining engi 

neer and set out by railway to seek his fortune 
in the boom towns of British Columbia. That 
was in 1897. Today, at 102 years young, 
McGill's most-senior citizen is still keenly in- 
terested in mining. Last spring, his tales of the 
early days captured the imagination of young 
mining students at the University of British 
Columbia, where he taught for thirty years 
and is now an emeritus professor. 

News editor Carol Stairs recently visited 
Turnbull at the Vancouver senior citizens’ 
home where he has lived since giving up his 
apartment a year ago. She, too, found him a 
spellbinding storyteller: 


was barely 


hen I graduated from McGill in 1897, 
there was an applied science class of 
about thirty. I think there were four of us in the 
mining section. I came straight out west from 
there—it was a good time to get into mining. 
I came out on the strength of a job as a 
timekeeper in an old mine called the Lanark, 
about 2,000 feet up a mountainside. It was a 
silver and lead mine located about thirty miles 
east of Revelstoke. 


ran through the mountains, and there was a 
road or trail running from each station to the 
mines. Lanark had an aerial tramway with 
about a mile of rope strung up the side of the 
mountain like a clothesline. Buckets were 


the fastest—and most dangerous—way for a 
man to get up to the mine. I once got hung up 
in a bucket and spent about four hours sus- 
pended 300 feet above the ground! 

It was a ten-hour shift when I first started 
but it became eight hours before long. As 
timekeeper I had to go around the mine and 
check the workers. At the end of the month, 
I'd make out a statement of the amount owing 
each man and deliver the cheques for the 
bookkeeper. When the Lanark mine ran out of 
ore, it shut down and I was on the unemploy- 
ment list. 

I travelled by stagecoach, train, and ferry 
and wound up working as an assayer for the 
famous Dan Mann, who owned the North Star 
Mine. It was just a patch of ore lying right on 
the face of a mountain, way up high—a nice 
patch of solid lead with tunnels into it. 

There were about twenty men working at 
the mine, and we had a big log boarding- 
house. When the gong rang at 6:30 a.m., we'd 
all pile into the cookhouse and gobble up 
breakfast. We ate a lot! But the mine cooks 
were very uncertain people. They could drop 
their hat and go anytime. 


JOHN A.P. STAIRS 


28 McGILLNEWS/FALL 1979 


The Canadian Pacific Railway’s main line | 


used to bring down the ore. They were also | 


q 


[ put in my first six months in the winter- 
time. and there was lots of snow. I took re- 
cords of the measure of the mine itself and had 
to make monthly reports. I’d take a sample 
every five feet in each tunnel, cutting across 
the ore with a hammer and chisel. Every day 
there would be eight or ten samples. At the 
end of the month, I’d average the number of 
samples and from that calculate the amount of 
ore there was. By the time I was through I'd be 
able to say, ‘This tunnel has 400 feet of ore 
and the average width is four and a half feet.’ 
I'd look along and say, ‘There is 22 per cent 
lead, 16 per cent silver,’ and so on. It was the 
same for every tunnel. Of course, my job 
would be to figure out the tonnage of ore in 
between. 

Moving ore at the North Star Mine wasn't 
as sophisticated as it was at Lanark. Men and 
horses were used to take the ore down to the 
Kootenay River, where it was loaded onto 
barges and shipped to the smelter at Spokane. 

When Dan Mann and [ had a parting of the 
ways, I went to Rossland and worked at the 
War Eagle Mine. We used to play hockey, and 
the losing team bought drinks for the winners. 
Scotch was two drinks for two bits—the bar- 
tender just handed you the bottle and you 
poured your own. In those days you could 
order ‘drinks for the house’ and not pay more 
than a dollar! We worked hard and we played 
hard. It seemed it would last forever. 


eas eels 
oxr*al4 
4765% 


sssststifiitt 


Ni | 
~3 < 
& “Ss >» 
hi : - 
Fe : é 
2 oe "i : 
tee io & 
Ts, ate A 
“ ; ~ a 
e ; “S #4 . 
sa 
* . . 
a . 
. : 
at 
£ , : «, 
. : | 
* 
4 * 
te 
eee - 
4 
t ¢ 
eee t : 
3 x 
‘et? 
: ae - tL, ‘ 
J hha - a q — 
F © a " J NM 
Pee 
o 
ig ig in ® t 
. he ‘ 
neat . the field! 
. 
Se eee 


Then the Rossland miners’ union called a 
strike in July 1901. Muckers’ wages were | 
$2.50 for a ten-hour day; they wanted $3, 00. 
The strike continued, and the miners and their} 
families left to find work in other mines.] 
found myself managing a small gold mine in 
Yreka, California. 

In 1902 I became a mining engineer forthe 
CPR at Trail. They took over a number of 
mines and in 1906 formed a new company. It 
ended up with a very clumsy name—the Con-} 
solidated Mining and Smelting Company of 
Canada Limited—and we were all very much} 
disgusted with it! My job was to go all over | 
the province checking the different mines and | | 
putting values on them. That was what my} 
knowledge was, of course; I knew my miner- | . 
als. You had to be able to recognize the min- | 
erals and judge the percentages by taking 
samples. 

I’d go into a tunnel and the sheets of ore 
would be more or less arranged in streaksor 
slabs. I'd take a sample and check out ihe 
percentage of lead, for example, over 
feet. From that I’d estimate what was thete 
and in the level above. When the men dmillet | 
holes in the face of the tunnel, you could look 
in and see the ore. As long as there was one | 
the face, you kept the tunnel going. When 
got no more, then the tunnel quit. My. j 
though, was mostly looking for new vines 
When we found a property that was We 
working, we brought in a gang of mensM 
end of the job would then be over. 

The big-name mines had the most upt 
date operations around. They used omy) 
number-one equipment. We had steam 
engines, deep shafts, heavy machinery, # I 
that kind of thing. We were always fidgeting 
around making little improvements in the 
equipment we had—but I never invented ® | 

‘Turnbull Method’ or anything like that! 

When we heard of a new explosive, W 
immediately get samples and test them. 
ordinary mining operation was to drill a 
and put a stick of powder in it, light the 
and blast it. You'd arrange the holes so mat) 
each two-hole blasting would break Mie 
ground in-between. q 

I worked for the CPR for many years, fe 
lowing it all over Canada, wherever there W 
a mining operation and you could get Ol 
Then, when the provincial gove 
started the University of British Columbié m 
1915, I was asked to set up the new m ini 
department. The whole staff of the univers) | 
numbered only twenty-five or thirty. 

With no teaching experience, no assistal 
poor texts, and little equipment, I had ogie 
courses in mining, mineral dressing, $ ef 
ing, mine surveying, and assaying. The is 
full class of graduates was capped in 1923 

After I retired from the university in 1945, 
opened a private consulting office in Vat 
couver. If a mine had a problem, I'd come 
and check it over. I’d say, “Drive the tu in 
here and you'll get the ore over there, | ‘ 
‘Arrange the blasting holes this way # 
you'll get ten tons of ore instead of on ) 
eight.” As | always told my students, the 
highest master’s degree in mining 1s € 


ing 


cc | 
=, Coneréfe and Synthesizer Musi | 


xo By Bengt Mambroas 


” 


‘Romantic Flute Music 


4 Bees = Pay 


w? 


ae fa f Os fF; 
te aud Har wichonl ass 


erage 


| | Sans! See, Ss 
MATHER-LEPAGE ten HK hs" 
Piano Duo ee i 
bi a ge j j ae 
e SCWuL ddl Gainipa 


McGill Jazz Band 

Director: Gerry Danovitch 

# 78006 

Richard Evans: First Thing | Do 

Willie Maiden: A Little Minor Booze 

Alan Broadbent: Bless Johnny 

Sammy Nestico: Ta// Cotton 

Bart Howard: F/y Me to the Moon 

Ray Brown: Neverbird 

Kelsey Jones: Jazzum Opus Unum 

William Bolcom: Gracefu/ Ghost Rag 
and Last Rag 


Concréte and Synthesizer Music 
By Bengt Hambraeus 

+ 76001 

Intrada: “’Calls’’ 

Tornado 

Tides 


The Mount Royal Brass Quintet 
# 77004 
Samuel Scheidt: Canzon “Bergamasca”’ 
J.S. Bach: Contrapunctus | 
(The Art of Fugue) 
Victor Ewald: Quintet, Opus 5 
Malcolm Arnold: Quintet 
Kelsey Jones: Passacaglia and Fugue foi 
Brass Quintet 


Mather — LePage Piano Duo 
# 77002 

Quarter-Tone Piano Music by 
Ivan Wyschnegradsky 


Concert Etudes Opus 19 No. 1 & 2 
Fugues Opus 33, No. 1 & 2 
Integrations Opus 49, No, 1 & 2 
Bruce Mather: Sonata for Two Pianos 
Bengt Hambraeus: Cari//on 


McGil On TUersity 
ons 


The McGill 

Percussion Ensemble 
Director: Pierre Béluse 

# 77003 

Francois Morel: Rythmo/ogue 
Alcides Lanza: Sensors / 


Serge Garant: Circuit / 
Andrew Culver: Signature 


Winner of first prize for 
the Best Chamber 
Music Recording in the 
1979 Grands Prix du 
Disque—Canada. 


Romantic Flute Music 
Jeanne Baxtresser, Flute 
Paul Helmer, Piano 


# 77005 


Franz Schubert: 

Variations for Flute and Piano on 
‘Trockene Blumen’ 

op. posth. 160 (D 802) 

César Franck: 

Sonata for Flute (arr.) 

and Piano in A major 


Sonatas for Viola da Gamba 
and Harpsichord 

Mary Cyr, Viola da Gamba 
John Grew, Harpsichord 

# 78007 

J.S. Bach: 

Sonata in G major 


Sonata in D major 
Sonata in g minor 


McGill 


University 
Records 


555 Sherbrooke Street West 


University Montreal, PO, Canada H3A 1E3 
Records 
SN er Se te ee 
EONS ae LE ORS SO OND AN Vas Sal 


Quantity 


Payment Enclosed $ 


Record Number 


Price: $6.95 each (plus 8% tax for 
Quebec residents). Postage and han- 
dling: $1.00 per order. 


ey eS ce et a ee 


A.R. DEANE NESBITT 


Advocate 


2075 University Street 
Suite 1008 
Montreal, Canada H3A 2L1 
Telephone: (514) 286-1244 


Member: Barreau du Québec, 
The Law Society of Alberta 


Registered Trade Mark Agent 


Martineau 


Walker 
George A. Allison, Q.C. 
Roger L. Beaulieu, Q.C. 


Advocates André J. Clermont, Q.C. 
John H. Gomery, Q.C. 
Robert A. Hope, Q.C. 
J. Lambert Toupin, Q.C. 
Telephone 395-3535 Bertrand Lacombe 
Area Code 514 F. Michel Gagnon 
Cable Address: Edmund E. Tobin 
Chabawa. C. Stephen Cheasley 
Richard J.F. Bowie 
Suite 3400 Jack R. Miller 
Stock Exchange Tower Serge D. Tremblay 
Place Victoria Michael P. Carroll 
Montreal—H4Z 1E9 Claude Lachance 
Canada Maurice A. Forget 
Stephen S. Heller 
Pierrette Rayle 
Robert E. Reynolds 
David W. Salomon 
Jean-Maurice Saulnier 
André T. Mécs 
James G. Wright 
Serge Gueérette 
André Larivée 
Jean-Francois Buffoni 
Michel Messier 
Wilbrod Claude Décarie 
Robert B. Issenman 
Marc Nadon 
Andrea Francoeur Mécs 
Donald M. Hendy 
Paul B. Bélanger 
Francois Rolland 
Graham Nevin 
Yves Lebrun 
Richard J. Clare 
Alain Contant 
Marie Giguere 
Eric M. Maldoff 
Xeno C. Martis 
Ronald J. McRobie 
David Powell 
Reinhold Grudev 
Robert Paré 
Marie-France Bich 
David W. Boyd 
Pierre J. Deslauriers 
Brigitte Gouin 
Daniel Picotte 


Counsel 


P.C.,Q.C. 
Marcel Cinq-Mars, Q.C. 


Robert H.E. Walker, Q.C. 


Peter R.D. MacKell, Q.C. 


Jean Martineau, C.C., Q.C. 
Hon. Alan A. Macnaughton, 


La Compagnie 
Enveloppe Canada 


8205 Boul. Montréal- Toronto 
Montréal Ouest, Qué. H4X 1N1 
(514) 364-3252 


PHILIP AMSEL 


Life Underwriter 
Personal & Business Insurance 
R.R.S.P.s & Annuities 


Sun Life du Canada 
5858 Cote des Neiges, Suite 312 


Montreal, Que. 
Off: (514) 738- 


H3S 121 
1138 


Res: (514) 748-9413 


McMaster 
Meighen 


Barristers 
& Solicitors 


630 Dorchester Blvd. West 
Montreal—H3B 4H7 
Telephone 879-1212 

Area Code 514 


D.R. McMaster, Q.C. 
R.A. Patch, Q.C. 
A.S. Hyndman, Q.C. 
R.C. Legge, Q.C. 
T.C. Camp,Q.C. 
A.K. Paterson Q.C. 
R.J. Riendeau, Q.C. 
W.E. Stavert 

R.J. Plant 

H. Senécal 

T.R. Carsley 

M.A. Meighen 
D.F.H. Marler 

A.P. yooh 


T 
S 
G 
N. 
J. 


Hi 
2 
.M. 
E. 
fy 


Schneiderman 
Leduc 
Scott 
. Shannon 
. Pinsonnault 
. Mitchell 
harbonneau 
. Demers 


SEMEae ee! 


Counsel: 

A.M. Minnion, Q.C. 
R. Cordeau, Q.C. 
W.C. Leggat, Q.C. 
J. Brien 


Posies Canada 
Canada __— Post 
Port paye Postage paid 7 


Montréal 


Marler Hon. George C. 
Herbert H. Tees 


Tees John H. Watson 
Henri Poitevin _ 


Watson Emest A. aves 
Ps vin hilippe berge — 
Poite John C. Stephensor 
Javet Hone Corn — 
avid Whitne 
& Roberge rei Lapointe 
érard Ducharme. 
PierreSenez 
Notaries E. Bruce Moidel 
Pierre Venne } 
André Boileau 
Paul-André Lazure 
Bertrand Ducharm 
Suite 1200 Alain Castonguay 
620 Dorchester W. _—_ Yves Prevost 


Montreal—H3B 1P3 Lucie Houde = 
Telephone 866-9671 ""ge"@ Goma 
Area Code 514 


Your 
company may 
match your gift 
fo McGill 


If the company you work for has 
matching gift program, your empi 
will match your gift to McGill. 
Dollar for dollar. 


All you have to do is contact you 
personnel office to see if your 
company has such a program. 


If so, just comply with the proced ; 
of your employer. 
And that's it. You ve just doubled 
value of your gift to McGill. 
lf you find that your employer dot 
have a matching gift program bu 
does have an interest in it, pur yf 
company in touch with this Offices 
Its worthwhile. Last year $17,00 
was given to universities and Col 
in Canada and the United States 
companies with matching gift 
programs. 


THE McGILL _ 
ALMA MATER 
FUND 


Martlet House, 3605 Mountain St., Montred 
H3G 2M1_ Tel. (6514) 392-5924 


‘ Aa t / 
F » fh : i * v, . 
" - J et rte ; : . 4 | 
‘ - f 4 ' 
; £ $ - ” MA f , ,/ 4 ’ 
ay , ? 2 . 7, . 
~~ x .* 
oy 4 "5 ; 
- s 4 - f : 
y ; ‘ : ‘ ! 1 : " 
ga : | : | | 
a - 
| ’ 
ithe eee Pelee they Tee eV Apis : i ‘ 
The * et aPotienfhiee ; ” ey? a | ‘ . “4 ke : 2 
«ike . ele recs te 2 : J 3 ; 
« Pan ot Aree eels he See eye ih | ee 48 Pot |e or $F, ‘ edhe ; ; q *) te . ‘ ; 
os ices , rp SY hae - . * . . 4 ’ ohy ce F “ye : i. 
eee Peed ena | witht dd ape ' ‘ aeeus . ri ‘ 4 , he “ Le 
-? ee | ' ‘ rf ae. a8 ‘ r 4 oF a ae er q ‘ 
Fut ‘ ane) . shoes . p! etsy a2 ‘ Laer $5 “da . ‘i ‘ ’ 
; os OE ' ite spt ee ‘ ws ! : et ri Dae 4 ‘ 
Teer! ‘ és vf is ae z year’s! : 4 KAR hy 
, fe 2 ih ‘ CME: Laer 
a ah, - e a wm = - i = ~ + Ms 
ee dat “ Ed soe min * ~ * - >> 


rats 


= 
Ft 


PASE ESE 
t 
\ 

}; \ 


ah 


ion of 


| David Johnston. 


/ 


‘ 


Spring 1980 ” 


moment for - 
ti 


A proud 
McGill: The installa 
Tater] oy: 


J.G. Fitzpatrick 


John M. Hallward 


te Bk OS Ae od 


ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING 


Notice is hereby given of the Annual General 
Meeting of the Graduates’ Society of McGill 
University. 

Thursday, September 25, 1980 

5:30 p.m. 

Oval Room 

Ritz-Carlton Hotel 


GRADUATES’ SOCIETY NOMINATIONS 


For Graduate Governor on McGill's Board of 

Governors 

Term—Five Years 

J.G. (Gerry) Fitzpatrick, BSc’43 

President, J.G. Fitzpatrick Construction Ltd. 

Former President, McGill Graduates’ Society. 

Former Director, McGill Graduates’ Society. 

Former Director, New Brunswick Branch of the 
McGill Graduates’ Society. 


For President 

Term—One Year 

John M. Hallward, BA’50, MA’53 (Oxford) 
Vice-President, J.J.C.T. Fine Arts Ltd. 

Director, Helix Investments Ltd. 

Member, Board of Governors of The Study. 
Chairman of the Board, Centraide (Montreal). 
First Vice-President, McGill Graduates’ Society. 
Chairman, McGill News Editorial Board. 


For First Vice-President 

Term—One Year 

Richard W. Pound, BCom’62, BCL’67 

Former Director, McGill Society of Montreal. 

Graduates’ Society Representative, McGill Athletics 
Board. 

Trustee, Martlet Foundation. 

Second Vice-President, McGill Graduates’ Society. 

Former Reunion Chairman, McGill Graduates’ 
Society. 

President, Canadian Olympic Association. 

Member, International Olympic Committee. 

Lawyer, Stikeman, Elliott, Tamaki, Mercier and 
Robb, Advocates. 


For Second Vice-President 

Term—One Year 

Carlyle Johnston, BA’50, BCL’53 

Chairman, McGill Alma Mater Fund. 

Lawyer, Lavery, O’Brien, et al, 
Advocates. 

Director, McGill Graduates’ Society. 

Member, McGill Fund Council. 

Class Agent, Law’53. 


¥ > 
om y 
ide =—— 


The Meeting is called for the purpose of receiving” 
reports, presenting awards, electing and installing 

officers, appointing auditors, and other business. 
Harriet Stairs—Honorary Secretary 


a 


For Vice-President Alumnae 
Term—One Year 
Joan McGuigan, BCom’55 


For Secretary i? 
Term—Two Years 
Martha McKenna, BSc’49 


For Treasurer 
Term—Two Years 
Edward Cleather, BA’51 


For Members of the Board of Directors 
Term—Two Years 

David Cobbett, BA’66 

Mitzi Dobrin, BA’68, BCL’71 

Gordon S. Currie, BEng’56 

Bernard Moscovitz, BA’66 

Peter Walsh, BA’52, BCL’55 


For Regional Vice-Presidents 
Term—One Year 

Atlantic Provinces 

— John William Ritchie, BSc(Agr)'51 
Quebec (excluding Montreal) 

— William T. Ward, BEng’48 
Ottawa Valley & Northern Ontario 
— JoAnne S.T. Cohen Sulzenko, BA’68 
Central Ontario 

— R. James McCoubrey, BCom’66 
Prairie Provinces 

— Janet Pollock, BSc’53 

British Columbia 

— Andrew Boak Alexander, BArch’62 
Great Britain 

— Barry J. Moughton, MCL’58 

New England States 

— Robert Sylvester, BA’38 

U.S.A. East 

— Richard M. Hart PhD’70, MBA’73 
U.S.A. Central 

— Sidney A. Schachter, BCom’47 
U.S.A. West 

— Norman D. Morrison, MD’34 
Caribbean 

— George L. Bovell, BSc(Agr)’45 
Bermuda 

— John D. Stubbs, MD’56 


Article XIII of the Society's bylaws provides for — 
nominations by the Nominating Committee to fill ” 
vacancies on the Board of Directors and the univer 
sity’s Board of Governors. Additional nominations 
for any office received before July 31, 1980, and 
signed by at least twenty-five members in good ~ 
standing, will be placed on a ballot and a postal 
election held. If, however, the Nominating Commit 
tee’s selections are acceptable to graduates, those 
named will take office at the Annual General 4 
Meeting. i 


An im rtant m Bonne with the October 1980 issue, the 
po Cssage McGill News will reappear quarterly as a 

e magazine. (The summer issue, June 1980, 

for all McGill News readers will be the last to appear as a newspaper.) A 


recent readership survey confirmed that most 
graduates prefer the magazine format. We are 
happy to make this change; it will, however, 
significantly increase publishing and mailing 
costs. 

Since 1976 the News has been sent without 
charge to 65,000 graduates, staff, and con- 
tributors to the university—55,000 in 
Canada, 9,000 in the United States, and 1,000 
in other countries around the globe. We would 
very much like to continue to send it io all of 
you on the same basis, but it is no longer 
financially possible to do so. 

Commencing with the October 1980 issue, 
we Shall continue to send the McGill News 
without charge to all graduates in the first 
three years following their graduation, and to 
all other graduates and friends of the univer- 
sity who make annual contributions to 
McGill. 

We very much hope that all alumni will 
want to stay in touch with McGill and receive 
news of their fellow graduates and their uni- 
versity during these important times. If you 
have not already done so, we invite you to 
make a contribution to McGill—and thereby 
continue to receive the McGill News. 

Please make cheques payable to the Martlet 
Foundation (or, if you are a resident of the 
United States, to the Friends of McGill Uni- 
versity Inc.) and forward to: 

Department “*N’’, 

3605 Mountain Street. 

Montreal, Quebec H3G 2M1. 

Gifts are tax deductible in Canada and the 
United States. 


John Hallward, 

Chairman, 

McGill News Editorial Board 
McGill News staff members receive letters from the four corners of the globe (a source of 


leasure for editor and office philatelist alike). Increased printing and mailing costs for the Gary Richards, 
Jublication, however, will soon result in decreased circulation. Beginning with the Fall 1980 issue. Executive Director, 
he magazine will be sent without charge only to Alma Mater Fund donors and recent graduates. Graduates’ Society 


Feature Articles 
The installation of the principal 2 


ews Microsurgery: A modern miracle 8 


by Zoe Bieler 


-ublished by the Graduates’ Society of McGill University. 


Research at McGill: 10 
folume 61. Number 1 A responsibility—and a joy | 
pate by Charlotte Hussey, Heather Kirkwood. 
spring, 1980 ; 
and Carol Stairs 
SSN 0024-9068 Gentlemen and scholars: 15 
ee Matthew, Marc, and John 
-ditorial Board by Charlotte Hussey 
ditor Caro! Stairs ; 
Assistant Editor Charlotte Hussey Perspective: Dr. Stephen Leacock 28 
fembers John Hallward (Chairman). Andrew Allen. Edith Aston, by David Savage 
avid Bourke, Gretta Chambers, David Cobbett, Katie Malloch, 
lizabeth McNab, Peter Reid, Gary Richards, David Strutz, Departments 
om Thompson, Laird Watt, James G. Wright What the Martlet hears 4 
Society activities 14 


he copyright of all contents of this magazine is registered. Please by Gary Richards 

ddress all editorial communications and items for the ‘Where they are | 

nd what they're doing” column to: the McGill News, 3605 Mountain Where they are and what they're doing 21 
treet, Montreal, Quebec H3G 2M1. Tel. (514) 392-4813. Change of | , 

ddress should be sent to Records Department, 3605 Mountain Street, | Cover photograph by Pierre-Louis Mongeau. 

lontreal, Quebec H3G 2M1. Tel. (514) 392-4820. Design Merv Walker, Kirk Kelly Design 


McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1980 1 


The installation of the principal: 
A 150-year-old tradition 


I, Edward Schreyer, Governor-General of 


Canada and by Letters Patent given by our 
Gracious Queen Victoria in the sixteenth year 
of Her Reign [/852 |, Visitor of this Univer- 
sity, do receive David Lioyd Johnston to the 


Office of Principal and Vice-Chancellor of 


the University and, in testimony thereof, | 
entrust the Charter and Seal of the University 


decade: ‘‘Our fundamental mission is the ad- 
vancement of learning....One may char- 
acterize this advancement in three geograph- 
ical orientations, Quebec, Canada, and the 
international community, and a fourth that 
transcends geography—was it Frank Scott, 
McGill’s towering poet-lawyer, who de- 
scribed it as the ‘‘Country of the Mind’’?... 


of Canada, to North America, and to the in 


ternational community. This role of MeGillin 
Quebec is not new, though it now takes ong 
new importance.... 

‘‘ That leads us naturally to McGill's role ag 


| a university in Canada. In its 1965 Brief tothe 


Royal Commission on Bilingualism and 

Biculturalism, McGill said this: “It cannot be 

doubted that the location of English-speaking 

universities in Quebec can be of inestimable 

benefit to the whole of English-speaking 

Canada, as a means of fostering the duality of 

Canadian culture and encouraging the grow. 

ing understanding between English-speaking | 
universities in other Provinces and French | 
Canada .... 

‘*Finally, McGill is an international une 
versity simply as a consequence of its com 
mitment to the advancement of learning 
measured by international standards of qual 


ity. Thus its scholars in various disciplines 
contribute to and learn from the work of other 
scholars in every part of the world. Over 120 
different countries are represented if 


Its mission in Quebec is defined by its re- 
markable opportunity to serve two cultures 
and, in serving, to bridge them and to provide 
an illuminating window for Quebec to the rest 


to his keeping. 


ee, by numerous government dig- 
nitaries, representatives of over fifty 
Canadian and American universities, and a 
thousand McGill staff members, students, 
and well-wishers, David Lloyd Johnston was 
formally installed as the university’s four- 
teenth principal at a colourful ceremony held 
February 8 at Place des Arts. Thirty-eight- 
year-old Johnston, the youngest chief ad- 
ministrator of any Canadian university, took 
over the reigns of power last September upon 
the retirement of Dr. Robert Bell; the nod 
from the University Visitor, Governor- 
General Schreyer, symbolized the traditional 
approval accorded each new head of the 
‘Royal Institution for the Advancement of 
Learning.” 

The hour-long ritual featured an impressive 
‘‘Inductio’’ composed for the occasion by 
Professor Bengt Hambraeus and performed 
— from the celestial regions of the third 
balcony—by the Music Faculty’s concert 
choir and soloists. There followed formal 
messages of welcome from representatives of 
the university’s academic and non-academic 
staff, students, and graduates. Speaking on 
behalf of all McGill alumni, Graduates’ 
Society President Edward Ballon said: **Mr. 
Principal, it is my happy honour to report the 
widespread enthusiasm with which your ap- 
pointment has been received by the graduates 
of our great university. This enthusiasm stems 
partly from your dedication to the highest 
standards of scholarship, partly from your 
keen concern for the all-round development 
of the individual, and partly from your sen- 
sitivity to McGill’s important responsibilities 
to our City, to our Province, and to our Coun- 
try. We have welcomed, too, your concern for 
people, as you embark on a job involving the 
leadership of such a vast university commu- 
nity. On this occasion of your installation as 
Principal, may I, as the official representative 
of the Graduates’ Society, express our warm 
welcome, our loyal support, and our de- 
light.”’ 

Johnston then removed his gold-tasselled 
mortarboard and stood proudly before the or- 
nate, carved podium to deliver his formal 
address on the theme, McGill’s mission in this 


McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1980 


McGill’s student body. One student in nine 
comes from beyond Canada’s border and adds 
his unique experiences to a learning atmos- 
phere which welcomes diversity and recog- 
nizes that each of us grows by contact and 
friendship with others of different traditions. 

“In reflecting on these three geographical 
orientations we recognize that in the most 
fundamental sense we transcend borders. We 
speak of the country of the mind. We believe 
hat the advancement of learning is liberating 
for the individual and for the society, for all of 
society, that the cause in which each of us is 
sngaged is to provide continuously for a cul- 
‘ure, for a number of cultures, in which free- 
Jom and rationality prevail. 

‘What are the peculiar characteristics of 
McGill which shape and suit it for this mis- 
sion? There are at least five. First the vigorous 
nteraction of teaching and research; secondly 
a substantial number of professional schools; 
hirdly a broadly based, multifaceted univer- 
sity; fourthly a strong commitment to quality; 
ind fifthly a collegial system of government 
and collegial goals. I wish to focus on the last 
wo of these, quality and collegiality, because 
think they present the most demanding chal- 
enges for us in this decade.... 

“The challenge of quality requires that we 
indertake individually and institutionally a 
enewing creativity that begins with the re- 
ection of complacency and self-satisfaction, 
hat welcomes critical appraisal, and that 
rays for the faith and the courage to insist on 
he best that lies within each of us in our 
nission to the country of the mind. 

‘And now to collegiality because I believe 


4 


As brightly garbed academics took 
their places on the stage, four- 
year-old Catherine (“Sammy”) 
Johnston caught sight of McGill’s 
fourteenth principal, resplendent in 
black and gold. For the thousand 
guests, it was a silent moment of 
pomp and circumstance; but for 
Sammy, it was a family affair as she 
exclaimed, “There’s my daddy!” 


collegiality and quality will be closely inter- 
linked in this decade, that we shall succeed in 
both or succeed in neither. A definition of 
collegiality would not confine it to any 
specific political forum. Perhaps it is closest 
conceptually to a democratic system. As for 
any such participatory system, it is probably 
above all an attitude....It will only work 
when most members of the group perceive 
that in fact the collective activities of the 
group conform most of the time to their idea 
of the common aims. And thus for us, ad- 
ministrative structures must allow for the free 
flow of information throughout the commu- 
nity and must encourage wide interest in the 
decision-making function.... 

‘We have struggled hard and successfully 
to make collegiality work at McGill. But let 
us remind ourselves that it does not require 
individual participation in all decision- 
making. Chief Justice Bora Laskin of the Su- 
preme Court of Canada, an early President of 


zhancellor Conrad Harrington, University Visitor Edward Schreyer, and Board of Governors 
third from left) as McGill's fourteenth principal. 


shairman Alan Gold welcome David Johnston ( 


fo hh. Rage Sea 


z xa ee gs ; 
Sil aon Sg ee : 
pe" a ea ok Se! ad ee 


the Canadian Association of University 
Teachers, was an articulate advocate for a 
greater voice for faculty in the affairs of the 
university, but he has asked recently if profes- 
sors were not spending too much time away 
from their classrooms and their research in 
endless committee meetings.... He wonders 
whether administration by the many may re- 
sult in administration by none. 

‘There is a final ingredient in the goal of 
quality and the concept of collegiality which 
is necessary to complete a working trinity and 
that is commitment—the commitment by 
each of us.... In underlining commitment 
may I pay tribute to our last Principal, Dr. 
Bell, who represented this quality so remark- 
ably. Dr. Bell devoted a most significant 
amount of effort to the selection of academic 
leaders and selected people who shared his 
commitment to the University. ... McGill has 
as fine a group of dedicated and deeply con- 
cerned University administrators as one could 
find anywhere.’’ 

A journey ‘down McGill’s river of time’’ 
can be very instructive, Johnston stated. 
“While the waters have been turbulent and 
the current fast, the voyage, like James 
McGill’s furtrading ventures into the North- 
west, has been invigorating. It leads re- 
lentlessly to a larger purpose. We come to 
know that from adversity comes strength, that 
from battling creatively comes self-reliance, 
and that from an unswerving commitment to 
enlightenment comes a legacy of enlightened 
service to the community. McGill’s progress, 
like that of our country, confirms the prophe- 
tic vision of McGill’s creators who seized for 
its motto the proposition, ‘‘By hard work all 


McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1980 3 


HAROLD ROSENBERG 


SON Tet EOP AE ty Gey 
BADE ee 


484d ak 


SEP se 2H 


4 


“Matchmaker, 
matchmaker...” 


‘‘Employers are desperate for MBA 
graduates and they’re paying excellent start- 
ing salaries to get them.’’ In light of the 
‘gloom and doom’ that usually clouds the 
employment horizon for graduating univer- 
sity students, this may seem a startling state- 
ment, but Dr. Robert Cooper, associate dean 
of the Management Faculty and MBA (Mas- 
ter’s of Business Administration) program di- 
rector, has the facts to back it up. In a recent 
survey conducted by the Financial Post, most 
Canadian business faculties predicted that all 
their students would be hired within six 
months of graduation; the majority would be 
offered jobs before they even received their 
sheepskins. 

For McGill’s MBA graduates, this bright 
outlook assumed an added lustre last summer 
with the establishment of the MBA Placement 
Office in the Faculty’s Bronfman Building. 
‘But if MBA graduates are so marketable,’ 
you may well ask, ‘isn’t a placement office 
somehow redundant?’ 

Not so, says director Brenda Martin. 
Rather, the Placement Office provides an im- 


portant, and hitherto-untapped, communica- |. 


tions link between potential employer and 
prospective employee—the 250 students now 
enrolled in McGill’s day and evening MBA 
program represent a considerable resource. 
‘*The office came into existence in response 
to the demand from corporations interested in 
recruiting our graduates,’’ Martin explains. 
‘*Until now, these companies recruited either 
by going through the university’s regular 
placement office and Canada Manpower, or 
by contacting individual professors in the 
Management Faculty.”’ 

About twenty-five multinational com- 
panies now actively recruit personnel through 
the Placement Office, says Martin. ‘*Also, a 
good many smaller firms contact us to see if 
we have someone suitable for them, and we 
receive the occasional call from a university 
offering a non-PhD teaching position.”’ 

In a typical transaction, a company’s per- 
sonnel officer calls Martin and describes the 
kind of graduate his company wishes to hire. 
(General Foods, for example, is interested 
primarily in students with special training in 
marketing and finance.) The job description is 
then posted on the Faculty bulletin board. 
‘*Students interested in the position come to 
see me about making a formal application to 
the company,’’ says Martin. ‘‘We screen by 
personal interviews and through a series of 


McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1980 


application forms, such as the one put out by 
the University College Placement Associa- 
tion.’’ The office makes every effort to match 
student to position. “‘A shy student, for 
example, is more likely to thrive in a research 
laboratory than in a marketing or public rela- 
tions function,’’ Martin observes. The stu- 
dent is also able to make an informed decision 
about the company to which he is applying — 
the Placement Office has an up-to-date library 
of corporate literature. 

Of great assistance to prospective employ- 
ers is the 48-page booklet entitled McGill 
MBA 1980, to be updated and published an- 
nually by the Placement Office. The booklet 
profiles graduating MBA students, listing 
their names, addresses, and spoken lan- 
guages, as well as their personal, academic, 
and employment histories. A photograph of 
each student is also included. ‘‘It’s an excel- 
lent reference book,’’ says Mario Donati, di- 
rector of personnel recruitment for Montreal 
Engineering Company Limited, a large na- 
tional firm with international contracts. “*By 
presenting a bird’s-eye view of the graduates’ 
qualifications and interests, it’s much easier 
for us to decide which students best meet our 
requirements. It also helps us remember them 
once the interviews are over.”’ 

Since the Placement Office did not become 
fully operational until mid-August, it was 
January before the publication was available 
for distribution to recruiters. *“*‘We certainly 
would like to have seen the book last fall,”’ 
says Donati. ‘As it was, we posted our job 
description on the university bulletin board 
and waited for response from students.”’ 

Aside from this small delay, Donati is high 
in his praise of the Placement Office. ‘*Con- 
sidering the very brief time it has been in 
operation, it’s already a good program,’’ he 
says. ““The staff are super-helpful and ac- 
commodating.’’ The MBA students who use 
and benefit from the service share Donati’s 
enthusiasm. George Goodwin cites the 
office’s convenient location in the Manage- 
ment building as an important plus. ‘‘In pre- 
vious years, MBA students were recruited 
through the university’s regular placement 
service up the hill,’’ he explains. ‘‘ Now, with 
the office, interview rooms, and classes 
together under one roof, life is that much 
simpler and we can schedule our time more 
effectively.’’ “‘They offer a very personal, 
very helpful program,’ adds Joan di Pietro, 
BEng’74, DipM’77, another final-year stu- 
dent. “‘The staff is never too busy to listen to 
your problems or to answer your questions. 
They keep careful track of everything and will 
even mail applications for you if they know 


—— 
Me Xe 


=a 


you’re too busy to meet the deadline.’ 

Martin and her staff (one part-time and 0 
full-time secretary) offer advice and helpf , 
hints on every aspect of job hunting, a 1 
preparing a professional curriculum vitae to 
dressing for an interview. Students take | heir 
recommendations very seriously. Mar tin 
chuckles as she remembers the time that all 
her candidates ‘“‘were spruced up and clea 
wearing shirts and ties and looking yen 
sharp’’ in readiness for a visit from a compan) 
recruiter. ‘“You can imagine my surprise) 
when the recruiter turned up dressed ing 
casual, short-sleeved sport shirt!”’ . 

Where does the fledgling Placement Offic 
go from here: ? **What I want to do now,” say; 
Martin, ‘‘is encourage McGill alumails 
terested in changing jobs to use our office as 
way of getting in touch with the variou b 
opportunities available in fields other than th 
one they’re in now. I see it as a sort of clea ring 
house, or alumni bank, of potential job 
changers to which I would refer whenever 4 
suitable opportunity presents itself.” 

MBA program director Cooper recenth 
wrote an article for CASE Currents, a mé 
zine published by the Washington Si Sec 
Council for the Advancement and Suppor of 
Education, in which he stressed: **A univer 
sity is a business. Like any other business, if 
delivers a service or product to the marke 
place....The key to business planning. .. ist 
recognize market needs and then develop: 
product or service in response to thos 
needs.”’ ; 

McGill’s new MBA Placement Office of- 
fers the business community the pick of It 
graduates and, in so doing, serves its stude nts 
in a truly positive way. Given the Faculty’ 
business acumen, one can rest assured ha 
both product and service are being deliveret 
first-class all the way. Christine Farr % % 


Building second-language 
skills | 


* 


‘*The enrolment of French-Canadian students 
at McGill is increasing all the time, 50 
offer special courses in English to help them 
develop the skills they need in order tob 
successful in their university studies, ” 
plains Assistant Professor Barbara Sheppal 
director of McGill’s Centre for Second Lal 
guages (known until recently as the encl 
Language Centre). % 

At first glance, it may seem sane 
English has been included in the “sé 
language’ category at McGill, an Engl 
language institution down to its very 
The fact remains, however, that 20 per cel - 
today’s student body list French as @ 
mother tongue; an additional 20 per cent lis 
neither French nor English as their meh 
guage. Students from abroad are requil 
take tests for English proficiency before. e 
mission to McGill, so the university is able 
help satisfy their language needs whee ne 
arrive on campus. There is, however, 2 t 
for French Canadians, many of whom $ - 
English well enough to get by, but w( oul 
benefit from additional training in compo 


iy. 


é) 
‘igs 
4 i) 


ig 


tion, grammar, and comprehension. 
In 1978 the Board of Governors approved a 


Senate proposal that urged the provision of 


increased language training for non-anglo- 
phone students. “‘McGill’s language pol- 
icy, reads the document, “‘‘reflects the 
university's determination to retain its essen- 
tial character while meeting the changing 
needs of its students and assuming its role as a 
meeting point of the country’s two main lan- 
guages and cultures....We wish to make 
francophone students feel welcome at 
McGill.” 

For many years students have been permit- 
ted to write papers and examinations in either 
French or English, but for francophones wish- 
ing to improve their English-language skills 
there have been, until recently, only limited 
opportunities. (These include continuing 
education and summer school courses in 
English as a second language, a three-credit 
course in the Faculty of Agriculture, and an 
introductory literature and composition 
course in the English department.) **A fran- 
cophone student can find his way through 
McGill in courses taught in French, but this is 
a bad solution,”’ explains Associate Dean of 
Arts Dr. Leslie Duer, an associate professor 
of English. ‘Their ability to take part in the 
general education here is restricted by their 
limited use of English.”’ 

A survey conducted over a year ago by 
McGill's Planning Commission revealed that 
the withdrawal and failure rate among first- 
and second-year francophone students was 
higher than that among their anglophone 
classmates. The survey also found, however, 
that “*the opportunity to study in English was 
one of the important reasons [francophone 
students had | for choosing McGill.’’ Another 
reason was the excellence of programs and 
professors in their chosen field of study. 

Last spring the Board of Governors author- 
ized funding for voluntary English-language 
testing for more than a hundred students as 
well as for daytime credit courses in English 
as a Second Language. Developed by the 
Centre for Second Languages, the inter- 
mediate- and advanced-level courses have 
been enthusiastically received. More than 150 
francophone and foreign students are now 
learning the complex rules—and excep- 
tions—of the English language under the 
tutelage of eight experienced, part-time in- 
structors. 

With financial help from the centre for 
University Teaching and Learning, Sheppard 
and her staff are currently developing a series 
of modules that will enable students to work at 
their own pace as they overcome particular 
areas of weakness. **With language teach- 
ing,’ explains the director, ‘‘it becomes a 
very expensive proposition to teach in a tradi- 
tional manner and give students sufficient in- 
dividual attention. If you put some of the 
course into a modular form, you can release 
your staff to give more time to students in 
smaller groups.’” The Centre for Second 
Languages also benefits from the federal 
government's bursary program for language 
monitors. Says Sheppard, *‘They work in var- 
lous institutions helping students learn the 


other national language. McGill has about six 
French and six English monitors who help out 
in small groups. They work all over the cam- 
pus, but we give them a fairly high proportion 
of their work.’ 

The administration believes these pro- 
grams are totally compatible with, and indeed 
enhance, the university’s traditional role. 

“McGill is an English language university, 
and it is clear that it can best function and 
should continue to function in that lan- 
guage,’ asserts the 1978 Senate report. **An 
English McGill with a flexible policy on the 
use of French can best serve the interests of 
Quebec, Canada, and the international com- 
munity, and has a unique role to play in de- 
veloping understanding and cooperation in 
a pluralistic society.’’ Valerie 
Simpkins 4 


McGill’s honorable __ 
graffiti 


Lavoie- 


Editor's Note: Their curiosity piqued by the 
numerous quotations engraved on McGill's 
buildings or set into stained-glass windows, 
the News staff recently invited University His- 
torian Dr. Stanley Frost to decipher the say- 
ings and, if possible, identify the authors. He 
files this report: 

The Graduates’ Society tour had reached 
Egypt's Temple of Abu Simbel. As I gazed at 
the colossi carved out of the face of a moun- 
tain three thousand years ago, my eyes were 
drawn to the figure of the owl-god of Ancient 
Egypt. There, roughly carved into the stone, 
was the name of a fourth-century-B.C. Greek 
mercenary. Kheilla, like Kilroy, had been 
there! The scratching of graffiti is, it seems, a 
timeless occupation. 

Most of the old desks in McGill’s Arts 
Building, hoary with age and crumbling from 
the onslaught of initials, have given way to 
hygienic, arborite-topped panels designed to 
defeat even a ball-point pen. But if you retreat 
into the Redpath Museum and venture behind 
the pillars that overlook the amphitheatre, you 


Z|] TA 


ch 


REET NONNRN ReR SROONRNENCANERRN Sm n 
Aa ONRE ARS OIE OMIM 1 


a = 


@ maces @ wees Ty eames Go 


2 GT = A 


can still find a goodly crop of initials, names, 
and dates. The oldest is “Reed, M.D. 1891.” 
No initials are given and the graduation date 
seems to have been a misplaced hope—no 
Reed appears in the medical class lists 
between 1871 and 1910. As for those **other’’ 
graffiti, only too frequently found in places 
unmentionable and sadly lacking in intelli- 
gence, wit, or any other grace, let us leave 
them unnoticed as they deserve, and move on 
to what might be called McGill’s honorable 
graffiti—those professionally inscribed ‘to 
adorn our buildings and to admonish succeed- 
ing generations.’ 

When you begin to look for them, you find 
a surprisingly large number, far too many to 
be dealt with in one brief article. But let us 
begin by simply looking out the window of 
my McLennan Library office. The **new’’ 
Redpath Library was completed in 1953, but 
the inscription running along its south wall 
(now largely obscured by the bridges to the 
even newer McLennan Library) sounds 
strangely Victorian in its sentiment. Univer- 
sity librarian (1947-65) Richard Pennington, 
who undoubtedly chose the phrase, was 
spiritually a Victorian, if not an eighteenth- 
century /iteratus. Yet the source is even ear- 
lier: “Beholding the bright countenance of 
truth in the quiet and still air of delightful 
studies,’ a quotation from John Milton’s essay 
‘The Reason of Church Government Urged 
Against Prelaty,’’ cannot be called anything 
other than a noble observation. But is that 
what those feverish students scrambling to 
finish their term papers are really doing? As 
they anxiously await their turn at the Xerox 
machine, one does not get that impression! 

Redpath Hall’s *old’’ reading room (it was 
the “‘new”’ library in 1893) yields a splendid 
crop of honorable graffiti hidden away in the 
stained-glass windows of the stairwell leading 
to the musicians’ gallery. Some are the stan- 
dard Greek and Latin tags—even “Ars longa, 
vita brevis’ is there. But the interesting ones 
are those from English authors: ‘Nature never 


did betray the heart that loved her,’ William 
Wordsworth assures us, adding in another 
panel (rather more obscurely), ‘Voyaging 


through strange seas of thought alone.’ 
Presumably, that is something readers in the 
Redpath are being encouraged to emulate. 
Chaucer, however, wants us to keep our 
minds strictly on our work—*And out of old 
bokes in good feith, cometh al this newe sci- 
ence that men lere.’ Reading is, on the whole. 
supported as a Good Thing. Francis Bacon is 
in favour of it: “Reading maketh a full man, 
conference a ready man, and writing an exact 
man.’ Bacon writes in quotations, as other 
men write in prose or verse. That claim cannot 
be made for the unknown who produced the 
pedestrian platitude on the complementary 
panel: ‘Reading furnishes the mind only with 
materials of knowledge. It is thinking makes 
what we read ours.’ 

The Arts Building’s graffiti present a defi- 
nite challenge to one’s literary skills. High up 
on the western gable is a marble slab that 
commemorates in Latin William Molson’s 
gift of Molson Hall in 1862, McGill’s first 
continued next page 


McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1980 


major benefaction. It was the library cum 
Convocation Hall cum lecture auditorium 
until 1926, when the Arts Building was gutted 
and rebuilt and Molson Hall was converted 
into classrooms. Moyse Hall was erected to 
replace it, and on its wall we find two lofty 
exhortations. The biblical one, from Ben 
Sirach’s ‘‘Let us now praise famous men,’’ is 
appropriate because the hall is named for 
Charles Ebenezer Moyse, Molson Professor 
of English (1879-1920) and Dean of Arts 
(1904-1920). The second inscription is writ- 
ten in Canada’s other official language and its 
gallic logic is as unassailable as its origin is 
obscure: ‘La pensée sans action est un vain 
mirage. L’action sans pensée un vain effort.’ 
Though perhaps not the most profound of 
sayings, it is undoubtedly a useful aphorism 
for thoughtless and impetuous youth. Who 
said it? Montaigne? Pascal? My enquiries to 
date have been fruitless. (There is no prize, 
other than honorable mention, for the first 
correct answer!) 

Outside Moyse Hall is a piece of advice 
ominous enough to dampen the spirit of any 
student earnest and literate enough to translate 
it: ‘Kalliston ephodion toi gerai he 
paideia’— ‘Education is the best provision for 
old age.’ Is that what education is all about? 
Acquiring intellectual capital to provide a 
cerebral retirement annuity? The inscription 
hardly offers the most uplifting of encour- 
agements for learning, even if Diogenes 
Laertius was quoting Aristotle. 

The Greek language is put to more utilita- 
rian employment in Birks Hall, home of the 
Faculty of Religious Studies. ‘Ariston men 
hudor,’ engraved in marble above the water 
fountain, says sternly: ‘Water is better.’ (The 
McGill students of 1879 seem to have known 
more than Pindar, though, for in one of their 
drinking songs they included a verse in doggy 
Greek and Latin which, in translation, ran: 
Water then is better, boys 
But should be spiked you see 
And I'll bet in days of yore, boys 
Water meant eau de vie. 

In the forthcoming university history, McGill 
University: For the Advancement of Learn- 
ing, you can read the original version!) 

Greek may get short shrift at the water 
fountain, but Latin is accorded some respect 
in the senior common room. Carved in stone 
above the fireplace, Psalm 133:1 proclaims: 
‘Ecce quam bonum et quam jucundum habi- 
tare fratres in unum’ —‘ Behold how good and 
how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell in 
unity.’ Seeing that Birks Hall was originally 
Divinity Hall, and that theological professors 
have always been (until these present ecumen- 
ical times) a cantankerous lot, one can see 
why William Birks chose that particular verse 
for the divines to have before them as they 
gossiped over afternoon tea. 

The competition for the noblest use of La- 
tin, however, must surely lie between lawyer 
Frank Scott and architect Percy Nobbs. Scott 
obtained permission to pay for three words to 
be carved over the doorway into the new Law 
Building: ‘Audi alteram partem,’ ‘Hear the 
other side.’ For future lawyers, the reminder 
is surely an excellent one. But Percy Nobbs,, 


McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1980 


McGill’s remarkable architect in the first 
three decades of the twentieth century, 
possibly outdoes even McGill’s poet-lawyer 
when it comes to graceful Latin allusions. 
In 1922 Nobbs was commissioned to de- 
sign the new pathology building, which might 
not have been considered a very “‘lively”’ 
commission. But he rose to the challenge with 
great architectural imagination and made 
equally imaginative use of a number of Latin 
inscriptions. Two are particularly worthy of 
mention. Over the gateway through which 
many a corpse has passed, Nobbs carved the 
words: ‘Locus ubi mors resurgens rediviva 
est’ —‘This is the place where death arises to 
new life.’ The same thought finds expression 
in the main entrance hall: “Hic est locus ubi 
mors gaudet succerrere vitae’—‘Here is the 
place where death rejoices to be of service to 
life.” To have understood the Pathology Insti- 
tute’s role in that way was truly perceptive. 
McGill possesses a wealth of ‘honorable 
graffiti.’’ Should you recall a favourite one, | 
would be very pleased to hear about it! Stan- 


ley Frost 4 


Man and nature 


‘*Nature has a way of working, and the whole 
world has adapted to that,’’ observes Dean of 
Science Dr. Svenn Orvig, a member of 
McGill’s meteorology department. **Rivers, 
for example, have natural high and low cycles 
that dams change to something uniform, alter- 
ing water temperatures, fish life, and so on. 
You can’t just barge ahead with man-made 
changes without assessing the circumstances 
beforehand.”’ 

For nearly twenty years Orvig and Dr. 
Eberhart Vowinckel, 
meteorology, have studied the climatological 
changes that major engineering projects can 
cause. ““Tall buildings, parking lots, huge 
power dams, all bring about changes in cli- 
mate that must be assessed,’’ claims Orvig. 
**Even one simple beaver dam can reduce the 
annual run-off of water by 20 per cent!”’ 

To study the effects that both man-made 
and natural changes have on climate, the two 
meteorologists have developed a computer 
program called an ‘‘energy budget’’ model 
that takes into account the myriad of factors 
that influence climate—including winds, 
ocean currents, pollution, population density , 
and surface texture and colour. Whereas 
thirty years ago climatologists relied prima- 
rily on distribution maps for calculating tem- 
perature, wind, and precipitation, they can 
now make highly sophisticated predictions 
thanks to the modern computer. 

In the fifties, prior to joining the meteorol- 
ogy department, Vowinckel had studied the 
energy balance of forests in South Africa: 
meanwhile, Orvig was examining arctic gla- 
ciers and ice caps. Since joining forces in 
1960, the two professors have expanded their 
vistas and are now able to design energy 
budget models that apply to any climate zone 
on earth—and they needn’t set foot outside 
their McGill climatology laboratory. Most, if 


a fellow professor of 


soar +r 


not all, necessary climatological vo on 
can be obtained through a world- wide n net : 
work of scientific stations and agencies, 2 
can be tabulated on university compile 
With the energy budget model, explains | 
Orvig, ‘‘you effectively put a cylinder ‘ova 
on a region and study all the ways that t | 
energy—heat and water—are transporte dd 
into and out of that box. Visualize the box | | 
extending down into the ground and up ini to | 
the atmosphere. The sun pouring in heats the} 
air in the box, and a good part of it goes down | 
and heats the ground. Then things begin to} 
happen’ a 
‘‘The ground radiates long-wave heat that t, | 
in turn, heats the atmosphere,”’ he continues. 
‘The atmosphere radiates too, up and outial 
space. Water evaporates and, because warm 
air rises, clouds form. Heat therefore en ers 
the ground in daytime and rises at night. W 
split up these processes.’ The energy budgl 
model is then able to measure them using 
wind and temperature data collected 0} ef 
many years by observation stations. *‘All of | 
these processes must be in balance—it i 
much like a bookkeeping procedure,” adds 
Orvig. “‘Imagine a box over Florida and an- | 
other over Montreal. The warm spells we had 
from Florida last fall resulted from an energy 
deficit in the north—tropical air flowed in to 
regain a balance.’ | 
To calculate the climatic ramifications of 
man-made changes proposed for the James 
Bay Power Project—where a massive dam 
now backs up the La Grande River flooding 
extensive areas of Quebec’s hinterland—the 
team ‘‘placed a box over the area” in “ 
With the computer, they estimated the mag 
nitude of the component processes for ever) 
day and night of the year, simulated the fut re 
size of the lake, and then recalculated he 
component dynamics. One prediction the} 
made was that the advent of both summer and 
winter would be delayed by several weeks al 
the site of the lake: deep water takes longerto 
warm and to cool than a forested area. “Ttis’ 
too early to know what the actual results 
are,’’ says Orvig, though he is eagerly look 
ing forward to them so that comparisons may 
be made. 


Altering nature wil! alter the climate, cea 
McGill metecdrologists. 


a , 
’ 


Even more scientifically challenging than 
the James Bay energy budget model, says 
Vowinckel, is the team’s partially completed 
study of the Nile River in the Sudan. (Their 
link with the project is strictly academic.) 
With the surrounding desert expanding as 
vegetation recedes, engineers are planning a 
diversion of the river around the Sudd 
swamps of the White Nile—this would re- 
duce the heavy water loss caused by evapora- 
tion as well as increase the available water 


Supply in the river downstream. Since moving 


water evaporates more slowly than stagnant 
water, a diversionary canal, to be built around 
the swamp near Jonglei, has been proposed. 

Using the weather, humidity, and tempera- 
ture data collected by weather stations in and 
around Entebbe, along with mean rainfall 
maps and information on vegetation types and 
land forms, the McGill scientists constructed 
an energy budget model to encompass the 
Nile’s lakes, swamps, and surrounding land. 
Once they had established the irrigation 
potential given current meteorological condi- 
tions, they made changes in certain surface 
parameters in order to study other permuta- 
tions and combinations. Draining the 
swamps, they concluded, would indeed elim- 
inate water loss from evaporation; run-off 
would increase substantially and a significant 
water budget would result. 

Among McGill’s other energy budget 
models are a study on the climatological in- 


fluences of forest fires in British Columbia 


and one on the changes in vegetation cover in 
Eastern Canada as an increasing number of 
abandoned farms revert to forest. 

Given the large price tag for most modern 
scientific investigations, the cost of develop- 
ing energy budget models is relatively low: 
Our main expense is $2,000 a year for com- 
puter time,”” explains Orvig. **Research costs 
are low because we need no other machines. 
both professors working on the program are 
already on staff, and meteorological data are 
freely available.’’ The unique research oppor- 
tunities the program provides cannot be given 
a dollar value. **About twenty graduate stu- 


dents have already written their theses on the 


Subject,’’ notes Orvig, ‘and the studies we 
are asked to do help make our department 
better known.”’ Cay Draper 4 


Bookshelf. 


Capsule summaries of recent books by and 
about McGill faculty members and alumni: 

Sheila McLeod Arnopoulos and 
Dominique Clift—The English Fact in 
Quebec. Montreal: MeGill-Queen’s Univer- 
sity Press, 1980. Award-winning journalists 
Sheila (Stone) Arnopoulos, BA’61, and 
Dominique Clift, BA’53. analyse the histori- 
cal English-French interface in Quebec, pin- 
point recent social changes that have led to a 
resurgence of French nationalism. and 
present perspectives for the future. 

Yurko Bondarchuk—UFO Sightings, 
Landings and Abductions: The Documented 


Evidence. Toronto, Ont.: Methuen Publica- 
tions, 1979. This chronicle by urban planning 
graduate Yurko Bondarchuk, BA’72. records 
documented cases of UFO activity on or 
above Canadian soil since 1947. The 200- 
page volume, available in both English and 
French, is amply illustrated with govern- 
ment-issued photographs, eye-witness snap- 
shots, and conceptual drawings. Writes Bon- 
darchuk in his introduction, *“The question is 
no longer, Do UFOs exist? But rather. Why 
are they here?’’ 

lan S. Butler and Arthur E. Grosser 
Relevant Problems for Chemical Principles. 
Menlo Park, Calif.: The Benjamin/Cum- 
mings Publishing Co., 1979. In this third edi- 
tion, Chemistry Professor Dr. Ian Butler and 
Associate Professor Dr. Arthur E. Grosser 
have devised up-to-date, introductory prob- 
lems and solutions for chemistry students and 
have included all data in both conventional 
and SI (Systeme International) units to help 
‘students who are taught in one system to 
attain competency in both.”’ 

Francisco Javier Campos-Cornejo— 
Enrique Gonzalez Martinez: Ensayo 
psicologico. Mexico City: Editorial JUS. 
1978. Mexican psychiatrist Dr. Francisco 
Campos-Cornejo, DipPsych’70, examines 
from a psychological perspective the creativ- 
ity of modern Mexican poet Gonzalez Mar- 
tinez. The study relates his writings to his 
family, his medical profession, and his liter. 
ary activities and concludes with the recogni- 
tion of Martinez’s major work, El hombre del 
buho, as a lyric, human message. (Note: The 
text of this book is Spanish.) 

Michael Feuerstein and Eric Skjei— 
Mastering Pain. New York City: Bantam 
Books, 1979. Particularly useful for chronic 
pain victims seeking alternatives to drug 
addiction and despair, this study coauthored 
by Assistant Professor of Psychology Dr. 
Michael Feuerstein offers relaxation tech- 
niques for the self-regulation of stress and 
pain associated with such problems as ar- 
thritis, migraine, and ulcers. There is a psy- 
chological dimension to pain, claim the 
authors, ““that is as subject to the influence of 
our thoughts and emotions as to that of the pill 
and scalpel.”’ 

Stanley Brice Frost—McGill University: 
For the Advancement of Learning, Volume I: 


The McGill Observatory 
(1863-1963) : A detail from the 
montage, “The University of McGill 
College, 1882,” first printed in the 
Canadian Illustrated News of 
August 26, 1882, and now 
reproduced in Volume | of Dr. 
Stanley Frost's history of McGill. 
Under founder Dr. Charles 
Smallwood and subsequent 
directors, the observatory became 
the outstanding time-keeping 
observatory in Canada. The stone 
building was demolished in 1963 
to make way for the Leacock 
Building—faculty members and 
students now gaze at the heavens 
from a new observatory atop the 
Rutherford Physics Building. 


/801-1895. Montreal: McGill-Queen’s Uni- 
versity Press, 1980. In this well-illustrated 
study, History of McGill Director Dr. Stanley 
Frost traces the events leading up to the found- 
ing of McGill and chronicles its moderniza- 
tion under Principal John William Dawson. 
With the establishment of the first Medical 
School on campus in 1872, the admission of 
women students in 1884, and the construction 
of such notable buildings as the Redpath 
Museum and the Macdonald Physics Build- 
ing, McGill had already achieved a position 
of prominence as the fledgling Dominion of 
Canada prepared to enter the twentieth cen- 
tury. 

Norman Levine—Thin Ice. Ottawa, Ont.: 
Deneau and Greenberg, 1979. In this collec- 
tion of twelve biographical short stories, 
Norman Levine, BA’48, MA’49, portrays 
with nostalgia and humour the cyclical nature 
of life. 

John’ D. McCallum—Crime Doctor. 
Mercer Island, Washington: The Writing 
Works Inc., 1978. Journalist John McCallum 
has penned this biography of internationally 
known forensic pathologist Charles P. Lar- 
son, MD'36. Reports from his crime file in- 
clude such unusual cases as ‘The Body in 
Striped Pajamas,’’ **The Lady of the Lake’’ 
who turned to soap, and the infamous mur- 
derer Jake Bird. 

Bryan D. Palmer—A Culture in Conflict: 
Skilled Workers and Industrial Capitalism in 
Hamilton, Ontario, 1860-1914. Montreal: 
McGill-Queen’s University Press, 1979. 
Assistant Professor of History Bryan Palmer 
discusses the historical context, culture, and 
conflicts that surrounded the skilled work- 
ingmen who transformed Hamilton from a 
handicraft production centre to a modern, 
industrialized city. 

Gustave and Alice Simons—Money and 
Women. New York City: Popular Library, 
1979. Founder of Connecticut’s Weston 


Workshop for Women and leader of its five- 
year study on the role of women in contempo- 
rary society, Alice (Winslow-Spragge) Si- 
mons, BA’36, has coauthored with her hus- 
band, a tax attorney and financial expert, this 
how-to book on financial management for 
women. Charlotte Hussey 2 


McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1980 


COURTESY OF McGILL-QUEEN’S UNIVERSITY PRESS 


Microsurgery: 
A modern miracle 


by Zoe Bieler 


lood vessels less than a millimeter in di- 

ameter are reconnected with stitches in- 
visible to the naked eye. Severed nerves are 
skillfully rejoined so that they are again 
capable of conveying sensation to and from 
the brain. A big toe is moved from foot to 
hand to replace a thumb lost in an accident. 

These revolutionary operations have been 
made possible through the marvels of micro- 
surgery. Using high-powered microscopes 
(some capable of magnifying forty times 
larger than life), microinstruments (some so 
small they are invisible unless magnified), 
and microsutures (half the diameter of a 
human hair), today’s surgeons almost 
routinely operate on parts of the body that 
only a few years ago wefe considered too 
small or too delicate to be repaired. 

In the forefront of microsurgery devel- 
opments on the continent are McGill's largest 
teaching hospitals, the Montreal General 
(MGH) and the Royal Victoria (RVH). 
‘*Without microscopes, many of our newer 
surgical techniques would be impossible,’’ 
says Associate Professor Dario Lorenzetti, 
BSc’58, MD’60, ophthalmologist-in-chief at 
the MGH. Using microsurgery, eye surgeons 
are able to strip the vein of the retina and 
remove blood clots from the vitreous body of 
the eye. ‘Before microsurgery, we could do 
nothing with these blood clots; we had to 
leave them to nature,’’ explains MGH 
ophthalmologist and McGill lecturer Robert 
Lewandowski, MD’69. About 300 such op- 
erations are now performed annually at the 
hospital. 

Neurosurgeons in McGill’s teaching hospi- 
tals employ microsurgery techniques to repair 
or rebuild blood vessels, thereby minimizing 
the permanent damage caused by strokes. 
And today, nearly all patients who have cra- 
nial tumors removed come through surgery 
with no facial-nerve damage—about half 
would have suffered such damage without the 
new operating techniques. Gynecologists and 
urologists consider microsurgery an invalu- 
able tool as well—it enables them to remove 
obstructions from the delicate Fallopian 
tubes, reverse tubal ligations and vasec- 
tomies, and correct certain kidney defects. In 
addition, university otorhinolaryngologists 
regularly perform microsurgery on the deli- 
cate tissues of the ear, nose, and throat. 

For the layman, however, perhaps the most 
dramatic manifestation of modern mic- 
rosurgery is the replanting of accidentally 
amputated digits or limbs. Dr. Bruce 
Williams, director of plastic surgery at the 
General and at the Montreal Children’s Hos- 
pital and chairman of the plastic surgery di- 


8 McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1980 


vision in McGill’s Medical Faculty, reported 
the results of sixty-five digit replants to a 
recent medical symposium. The success rate, 
he explained, had been about 89 per cent 
when the amputation “‘was incomplete’’ and 
60 per cent when it was complete. 

The Royal Victoria’s record is almost 
identical, says Associate Professor Dr. Rollin 
Daniel, MSc’74, who co-directs with Assis- 
tant Professor Dr. Julia Terzis the hospital's 
two year-old microsurgery research labora- 
tory. Daniel makes an important distinction 


a bs ” } 


Ne ernattanmenees: 


between the survival of a replant and its func- 
tional capacity. *“It must be emphasized to the 
patient that the replanted part will never be 
normal but that immediate reconstruction 
with the amputated part is superior to most 
upper-extremity prostheses and to a pro- 
longed, multistaged reconstruction employ- 
ing diverse, distant tissues,’’ he wrote in the 
May 1979 New England Journal of Medicine. 
A ‘“‘successful’’ limb replant may result in an 
arm that can carry a purse or an overcoat, but 
cannot control the finer hand movements 
necessary for writing or eating. 

The success of digit and limb replants 
hinges on the first-aid given at the accident 
site, Williams stresses. The severed part must 
be kept cool and clean. (It should not be 
frozen, but should be packed in a clean plastic 
bag and placed, if possible, in a container of 
ice.) When the digit or limb is kept cool, 
replanting can be done up to twenty-four 
hours after the accident; otherwise, surgery 
must be performed within twelve hours. 

In assessing the desirability of attempting a 


replant, the surgeons take many factors it 
account: the age of the patient, wheitice ; 
dominant hand is involved, the occupatia n of 
the patient, the level of amputation, the ti ‘ime 
of the accident, the first-aid treatment 6 
patient and limb have received, and the’ type | 
of injury—‘‘whether the nerves, tenc ons, | 
blood vessels, or bones need repair,” "notes es 
Williams. Replanting is usually indicated” 
the thumb is involved, if multiple digits | 
been amputated, or if the patient is a chi 
The amputation, however, must be clean— 
the accident has resulted in crushed tissue a an ‘ i| 
bone, a replant is generally impossible. ~ Be | 

Microsurgeons may spend up to two hours | 
treating the amputated part before wheeling ng 
the patient into the operating room fx 
surgery. Replanting a thumb may take fourt 
six hours and reattaching four fine 
require as much as twenty-four hours of fe 
effort; a full limb replant calls for an eve 
more complex and lengthy operation. — fic. 
rosurgery makes more physical demands 0 na 
surgeon than do traditional operations ane 
techniques, concedes Daniel. ** You must be | 
able to operate for long periods of time.” AS] 
long as one remains in good physical ¢ 
tion and can tolerate the gruelling pace, 
ever, Daniel sees no reason that a micr 
geon should not continue to — 
many years as other surgeons. 

A typical operation requires a staff of at 
fifteen people—four or five surgeons, sve 3 
anesthetists, and as many as eight nurses, 
essential requirement in such surgery 
visibility—microscopes must poi 
only the needed magnification but also 
appropriate illumination. Since the fift 
when the first good operating microscop Wi S| 
designed, technology has made rapid at 
vances; today’s models are highly sop 
cated. They are focused by foot control 
have twin observation tubes so that a secon 
surgeon can follow the progress of the opera 
tion and assist when necessary. Closed-cite 
colour television monitors make it pos ble 
for other members of the team, including 
attending residents and fellows, to obs 
the microsurgeon’s every move. Video 
cameras, meanwhile, document the case | for 
teaching and evaluation purposes. ~ 

Most of the instruments used in m ic 
rosurgery have been developed in the past 
decade. A basic set, explains Daniel, includes 
jeweller’s forceps, a bipolar coagulator i 
spring-handled scissors, and needle holders: 
(The surgeon’s arc-shaped operating ne el 
and ultra-fine sutures are visible only unde T 
the microscope.) Manipulating the tiny in IM- 
struments with skilled precision, the micto= 
surgeon works on a magnified operating field 
that is a mere two centimeters square—He 
cannot even see his own fingertips! 

The RVH team performs about a hundred | 
microsurgery operations every year; Som 
make the headlines. Last June Elizabel : 
McFadden, an eleven-year-old Long Isla 
girl whose right leg had been amputate 
above the knee in a train accident and 
planted by New York surgeons, journey ed | 
Montreal for microsurgery that, it was hoped ) 
would restore sensation to the replanted lit 


“a 


ti 


and foot, as well as use of the right knee. 
During the fifteen-hour operation, Terzis and 
her medical team repaired defects in the sci- 
atic nerve and performed eight grafts of the 
sural nerve. Because nerves grow only about 
a millimeter a day, however, there was to be a 
long wait before the operation could be 
termed a success. (Hospital spokesmen said it 
would be *‘nine to twelve months’’ before it 
was known whether the operation would re- 
sult in a fully functional knee, and ‘‘another 
twelve months’’ before doctors could deter- 
mine whether sensation had returned to the 
Sole of the child’s right foot.) 

In October a brave and smiling Elizabeth 
returned to the Royal Victoria for her medical 
examination. The news was good. The nerves 
had grown three inches more than had been 
predicted, perhaps due to the girl’s age. Sen- 
sation as well as movement seemed to be 
coming back. **We’re along way from saying 
it 1S restored,’ Terzis said, ‘*but if things go 
as they are going now, I think she’ll get sen- 
sation in her foot.’’ 


tas oee ee eee et eee ee | 
Tet 62 oe eo Ue Bee Ds 2 Fw) 


=e Neco 8 


Elizabeth is only one of many non- 
Quebecers who travel to Montreal for mic- 
rosurgery. One young boy came from Win- 
nipeg for a toe-to-thumb replant and another 
from Trinidad for a vascularized bone graft. A 
Pennsylvania girl, her heel amputated in a car 
crash, also sought help; Daniel rebuilt her 
heel using a flap of skin and tissue from the 
front of her other ankle. 

Such ‘‘free-tissue transplants,’’ says 
Daniel, are as dramatic to medical profes- 
sionals as digit or limb replants are to the 
public. In the past, multiple operations over 
extended time periods have been required to 
transfer tissue from one part of the body to 
another. With microsurgery, tissue can be 
moved in a single operation. In his May Jour- 
nal article, Daniel, wrote : **A large skin flap 
was transferred from a patient’s abdomen to 
his ankle and revascularization was 
achieved through microvascular anas- 
tomoses, thus accomplishing in ten hours 
what would have required three to six months 
with conventional techniques.’’ Skin, mus- 


GaN 


cles bones, intestines, nerves, and even toes 
have been successfully moved from one site 
in the body to another—in one operation. 

Surgeons often spend many days planning 
operations of this magnitude, studying 
X-rays, and experimenting in the laboratory 
with different operating techniques. They 
also prepare the patient—not only physically, 
for the operation itself, but psychologically, 
for the long and painful period of recovery in 
intensive care. 

Microsurgery has made it possible for 
cancer patients requiring head and neck op- 
erations to return home ‘‘with minimal de- 
formity,’’ notes Daniel. There is a team ap- 
proach between the surgeon who removes the 
tumor and the plastic surgeon who repairs the 
deformity—‘* We try to do the reconstruction 
the same day the tumor is removed.”’ Sixteen 
such tissue-graft cases have been handled by 
the RVH team; other operations have in- 
volved replacing bones in children with bone 
tumors, or correcting congenital bone de- 
fects. The MGH microsurgery research lab- 


The microsurgeon operates in a 
magnified field only two 
centimeters square and uses 
needles and suture material so 
small they are dwarfed by the 
human eye. 


oratory, says Williams, has made the revas- 
cularization of free bone and muscle grafts a 
focus of its work. 

Without ongoing governmental and private 
research funding, ‘‘the future growth of mi- 
crosurgery is precarious,’ claims Daniel. 
The RVH’s new microsurgery research lab- 
oratory and adjoining clinic—unigue in 
Canada and ‘‘probably the largest in the 
world’’—were built at a cost of half a million 
dollars. They require a further $200,000 each 
year to maintain. Through continued re- 
search, Daniel hopes that microsurgeons will 
one day gain the ‘‘ability to transplant tissues 
from one body to another,”’ as is presently 
done with kidneys from accident victims. 
With this skill, surgeons could repair crushed 
hands and feet and perform major reconstruc- 
tion following tumor operations. ‘‘Though it 
is an ultimate goal,’’ cautions Daniel, ‘‘we 
are decades away from realizing it. We are not 
yet even trying transplants on animals.”’ 

In the seventies alone, however, giant 
strides have been made in microsurgery. 
Daniel is optimistic about the future: ‘‘Mic- 
rosurgery has revolutionized nearly all surgi- 
cal specialities,’’ he maintains. ‘‘It involves 
the perfection of previous techniques as well 
as the development of new operations.”’ A 
microsurgeon, he says, needs no special dex- 
terity. “‘If you can tie your shoe you can learn 
to do miscrosurgery. It is an acquired skill. 
Once you learn how to do it, it stays with 
you—like learning to ride a bicycle.’’ To a 
patient, however, whose hand has been re- 
stored to usefulness through a toe-to-thumb 
replant or his body to wholeness following 
removal of a cancerous tumor, the microsur- 
geon is nothing short of a miracle worker. 0 


McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1980 


ee ee SSS ee ee 


Seg hySehe seasesriatprasewe ses Pe IS 4548557543 
A Fi eR EOE Pe FOS 


es ae SEP oF VPS A IPE SS 


Research at McGill: 
A responsibility —and a joy 


by Charlotte Hussey, Heather Kirkwood 


and Carol Stairs 


he seventies was a decade of anxiety for 

university researchers across Canada. Er- 
ratic and fluctuating government funding 
turned many a silent researcher into a vocal 
lobbyist as universities sought a larger slice of 
the fiscal pie. 

Their efforts did not go unrewarded. On 
January 31, 1980, just weeks before the Con- 
servative government fell, the Minister of 
State for Science and Technology Heward 
Grafftey unveiled unprecedented boosts in 
funding for 16,000 university scientists, 
scholars, and graduate students. The Natural 
Sciences and Engineering Research Council 
(NSERC) received an increase of $41.8 mil- 
lion to a total of $162.6 million, while the 
budget of the Social Sciences and Humanities 
Research Council (SSHRC) was raised $5.8 
million to a high of $41.7 million. In addition, 
the Medical Research Council (MRC) now 
has $82.2 million at its disposal, an increase 
of $12.2 million over last year. 

‘‘These substantial increases for the 
Councils will reverse the downward trend in 
federal support of university research over the 
last decade,’’ Grafftey announced. ~‘Re- 
search and development [R & D] is the cor- 
nerstone of Canada’s economic development 
and the increased funding, in addition to 
promoting excellence in university research 
and encouraging more of our outstanding stu- 
dents into research, will stimulate the creation 
of a larger number of interesting and better 
paying jobs. The increased funding will also 
add significantly to the scientific manpower 
over the 1980s needed to achieve the govern- 
ment’s target of R & D expenditures of 2.5 per 
cent of the GNP [Gross National Product] .”’ 

Dean of Graduate Studies and Research Dr. 
Walter Hitschfeld welcomes the govern- 
ment’s intention to link research funding to 
the GNP. *‘It doesn’t sound like much, but it 
is an enormous change. It involves billions of 
dollars—though most of this money will be 


spent in the industrial and applied areas, notin, 


the universities. ’ 

Research grants and industrial contracts 
brought into McGill coffers a total of 
$24,238,000 in 1978-79 (the most recent year 
for which figures are available). Faculty 
representatives interviewed by the News 
agreed, without exception, that though re- 
search is a very expensive undertaking, it is 
vital to a balanced and healthy university life. 
‘‘Teaching and research are absolutely equal 
requirements and challenges for the univer- 
sity,’’ maintains Hitschfeld. *‘No other in- 
stitutions have this joint mission—the dis- 
semination of knowledge and the creation of 
knowledge.”’ 


10 McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1980 


While most research funds come to the 
university as direct grants—from govern- 
ments, foundations, associations, and 
societies, as well as private endowments— 
about 10 per cent of the $24.2 million total 
takes the form of industrial contracts, which 
last anywhere from three months to three 
years. For the first eight months of 1979-80, 
the university undertook sixty-three such pro- 


jects, up from forty-one for the same period 


last year. ‘‘Expertise is the whole purpose of 
this exercise,’’ states the director of McGill’s 


. a. 
aaa 2 é 
fier: ~ 
eZ wy : Pawns 
oe 


aah ~ is 

ville: oa wt oh 
“a i eee ae 
mia 


nine-year-old Industrial Research office, | 


3 


Adolph Monsaroff. ** We're only interested n |} : 


ics 


research projects that have some intellectual | 1 
and scientific value, that will be of 1 interest to | ' 
one of our principal investigators or to a PhD | | 
student for his thesis. The skills available at 
McGill, particularly when you get into mul- | 
tidisciplinary areas, are greater than the aver- | 
age company would have.’ ii 
In dollar terms, about 50 per cent of all | 
McGill’s industrial contracts are with the | 
Faculty of Engineering, while 25 per cent are i 
with Science, 15 per cent with Agriculture.) 
and the remaining 10 per cent with non- | 
scientific areas like sociology, psychology, | 
management, and law, explains Monsaroff, | 
‘The real credit for the success of this office” | 
goes to the investigator who is willing to write | | 
the proposal, meet the people, and have his | | 
students work on the project. 
Hitschfeld points out that, while grants and | 
contracts make large-scale research finan- | | 
cially viable, ‘for some, the only tools ba 
need are pencils and paper and a quiet room.” 


P ly 
Y Sm 
Mea 


fj 
f/ 


e 


Ye. IN N \ § fs 
ne 
sa 8 3 ; 
es | ae 
le ° 


) it, we 
‘, WwW 


Whether a project costs $100 or $100,000. 
however, the frustrations—and the joys—are 
somehow similar. “* You set yourself a goal, 
but nothing ever works out the way you ex- 
pect itto. Your student gets sick or is dis- 
tracted by other courses; the books you need 
are out of the library; the manufacturer deliv- 
ers slowly or the instrument doesn’t work 
when it does come. For everything you want 
to do you have to find alternatives. 

“Research isn’t only Einstein writing 
hieroglyphics on the blackboard,”’ says the 
dean, ‘though that is how the media have 
always shown research. It’s nice to be a 
genius, but there’s usually only one Einstein 
in the world at a time. Research is mostly 
made up of people taking little steps. Putting 
these little steps together to make one big step 
is the greatest of all achievements.”’ 

Note: On the following pages, the News 
presents an overview of the research activities 
of McGill's twelve Faculties. The research 
figures quoted for each section are 1978-79 
Statistics as recently reported by the Faculty 
of Graduate Studies and Research. C.S. 


Agriculture 
$1,385,000 


~ 


While the number of Canadians actively in- 
volved in primary agriculture has dropped 
dramatically since the Second World War, the 
demand for food—both nationally and 
internationally —has grown relentlessly. Ag- 
ricultural research, it seems, holds the key to 
improved farm technology and increased food 
productivity. 

“The projections to the year 2000 are that 
the world’s population will be somewhere be- 
tween 6.5 and 7 billion,’’ says Howard Step- 
pler, MSc’48, PhD’55, chairman of the plant 
Science department and associate dean of re- 
Search at McGill’s Macdonald Campus. 
Projections are that the rate of food produc- 
tion will have to grow at least 3 per cent per 
annum—some even suggest 4.4 per cent—in 
order to meet the requirements of an ever- 
increasing population. But no developed 
country has ever reached a level of 4.4 per 
cent! The challenge is tremendous; there’s 
only one group that can meet it, and that’s 
within agriculture.’ 

In attempting to answer this challenge, 
Macdonald sees training research scientists as 
one of its primary objectives. **We’re a con- 
sumer of research people in our teaching 
roles, and other Canadian institutions are also 
consumers of researchers,’’ notes Steppler. 
But there is only one producer, and that’s 

the university. We have to have a research 
Capacity to provide an environment in which 
researchers can be trained.’’ Both Steppler 
and Dean of Agriculture Lewis Lloyd, 
BSc(Agr)’48, MSc’50, PhD’52, agree that 
the ‘training’ aspect of the Faculty’s research 
programs is of paramount importance. 

Ninety-nine per cent of the Faculty’s 80 
full-time teaching staff—and 100 per cent of 
their 190 graduate students—are involved in 
research activities, notes Steppler. **We have 
nO university-budgeted staff who are here 


solely for research, though we do have some 
auxiliary professors who do not teach but 
work on specific contract research.’ One 
such professor, funded by the federal gov- 
ernment, is studying means of controlling the 
destructive blackbird populations that 
threaten corn and other valuable crops. 

‘Agricultural research is different from 
other research in that it has a very practical 
role,’’ continues Steppler. ‘*Instead of ‘pure’ 
and ‘applied,’ I prefer to use the words 
‘discipline’ and ‘problem.’ Discipline in- 
volves pushing back the frontiers of knowl- 
edge as opposed to trying to solve a problem. 
Most of our contract research is very defi- 
nitely problem-oriented, as is the funding we 
receive from the Quebec Agricultural Re- 
search Council. This is quite appropriate, 
since their priorities are the current problems 
that exist in Quebec agriculture.’ 

Like all university researchers, Macdonald 
Scientists have been hard hit by inflation—not 
only have research grants not kept pace with 
the cost of equipment, supplies, and labour, 
but any cutback in requested funding can re- 
sult in considerable upheaval for the profes- 
sors involved. *‘If the project is approved but 
the money is reduced,’’ says Steppler, **then 
they've got to redesign their whole research 
program. A very good example of this is 
large-animal research—in no way can they 
afford to use the original number of animals.”’ 

It is a fact of life that staff members gener- 
ally receive less than the amount requested 
from funding agencies. In 1978-79 federal 
awards—from Agriculture Canada, the Nat- 
ural Sciences and Engineering Research 
Council, Environment Canada, and other 
departments—totalled almost $725,000; the 
Quebec government accounted for $480,000 
in grants and contracts to faculty members. 
Notes Lloyd, **‘There’s no question that 
Quebec is very supportive of agriculture.’ 

Financial setbacks notwithstanding, re- 
search projects are almost as numerous as 
acres at Macdonald. Tile-drainage studies, 
improved dairy cattle production and effi- 
ciency, classification of the world’s cassava 
germplasm collection, and new vegetable and 
grain varieties are but a sampling of on- 
campus research activities. Many projects are 
necessarily interdepartmental in scope, adds 
Steppler. *“The major researcher may be from 
agricultural engineering, while the people 
cooperating with him may be from microbiol- 
ogy and plant science. ’”’ 

Macdonald researchers have also initiated 
projects in cooperation with developing na- 
tions, where agricultural production and 
technology lags far behind that of the indus- 
trialized world. An animal science project in 
Trinidad is currently studying the feasibility 
of diverting sugar cane to animal feed stock, 
thereby encouraging the production of meat 
and milk in a country presently possessing no 
native feed for cattle. In addition, the plant 
science department is assisting Kenyan ag- 
riculturalists in their search for a cure for 
mosaic disease, a serious threat to the valu- 
able tropical crop, cassava. *‘We have not 
been able to crack it yet, °° notes Steppler, 
‘‘but neither has anyone else.’ 


Agriculture shares with other Faculties the 
combined problems of an aging staff and an 
acute shortage of young scientists entering the 
research field. Given the high salaries offered 
to today’s BSc graduates, not to mention the 
ongoing debate on the relative value of a 
postgraduate education, few students are pur- 
suing master’s and doctoral degrees. **Large 
stipends for graduate students don’t seem to 
be the answer,’’ Lloyd emphasizes. **The 
University of Guelph offers a number of very 
high-value fellowships and they cannot fill 
them.’’ Undergraduate enrolment at Mac- 
donald, however, is still growing—an 8.6 per 
cent increase was registered this year— 
though administrators estimate that this will 
stabilize by 1985. **If job opportunities main- 
tain themselves, people who have never 
thought of agriculture before will turn to 
us,’ says Lloyd. 

The pattern of North American agriculture 
has undergone tremendous change since the 
early nineteenth century, when ‘about 90 per 
cent of the labour force was engaged in pri- 
mary agriculture,’’ Steppler points out. *‘It is 
now about 4 per cent, though if you take into 
account the whole infrastructure—process- 
ing, marketing, transportation, the produc- 
tion of agricultural machinery—then you’re 
up to nearly 40 per cent. 

‘The only way you can get increased pro- 
ductivity from natural resources is through 
improved technology—and you can only get 
improved technology through research. 
Canadian agricultural research is going to in- 
crease in importance; it must if we are going to 
meet our responsibilities.’ C.S. O 


Arts — 


$448 ,000 


The very word ‘research’ has become a 
cliche, maintains Robert Vogel, MA’54, 
PhD’'59, dean of the Faculty of Arts. *‘It has 
become such a hackneyed term that it has lost 
much of its passion. Real research has to do 
with staff members who are obsessed with 
finding out something, or with trying to create 
a theoretical framework, or with making a 
major contribution. This sometimes results in 
new knowledge; in the humanities, however, 
it often results in a new point of view, a new 
integration of facts that are already fairly 
well-established.”’ 

This passionate curiosity, so essential to 
university research and teaching, is deeper 
than an intellectual quality and cannot be 
regulated, says Vogel. ‘*The idea that you can 
separate research and teaching is very attrac- 
tive to authoritarian types of government. It 
presupposes that you can set up a big opera- 
tion or fund a laboratory and get something 
out at the other end, as though it were an 
assembly-line operation. This concept is quite 
inapplicable to the kind of research one does 
in the Faculty of Arts. 

‘*The major research funding necessary for 
laboratories and highly sophisticated equip- 
ment is not our problem. We do need com- 
puter facilities for the more quantitative de- 
partments like economics and sociology, for 


McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1980 


11 


example, but our basic research tool is the 
McGill library system. As long as it has the 
books and is able to obtain collections of 
manuscripts, then it can retain its place as one 
of the leading libraries in North America.”’ 

Most research in the Arts Faculty is highly 
individualistic in nature, Vogel explains. 
Projects range from studies of Eskimo lan- 
guages to modern German history, from Is- 
raeli foreign policy to a lexicon of French- 
English judicial terminology, from Yiddish 
literature to modern Greek. 

The Faculty also houses several major re- 
search projects each involving a number of 
staff members. These include a political sci- 
ence project on international crisis behaviour; 
the Centre for Developing Area Studies pro- 
gram; and the Burney Project that is editing 
and publishing the letters of eighteenth- 
century writer Fanny Burney and her father, 
musicologist Dr. Charles Burney. 

‘‘We have not enjoyed a great deal of 
funded research,’’ says Vogel. ““By and 
large, staff members haven’t looked for it 
because they tend to do their research as indi- 
vidual projects rather than’as institutional 
operations. I think that’s probably a good 
thing. It means they have not become intellec- 
tual slaves of a particular thrust on the part of a 
foundation or a government.’’ 

Arts administrators are very concerned that 
only 10 to 15 per cent of the total graduating 
class goes on to do postgraduate work each 
year. *‘Within ten years we will be short of 
trained staff,’’ claims Vogel, “‘but govern- 
ments will not give any support to tide us 
over. If we could be assured of hiring two or 
three people more than we absolutely needed 
in any given department, then we could have a 
stability that would adjust to the increases and 
decreases in student population expected over 
the next decade.’’ 

The Faculty is nonetheless striving to 
create an atmosphere in which individual 
enterprise and a passion for research are sup- 
ported. The only way a university can foster 
this passion in its students is by example, says 
Vogel. *“‘We don’t know how to inoculate 
people or give them the right pill. All we can 
do is provide good ideas and hope that our 
students will take it from there.”’ C.H. O 


Dentistry 


$42,000 


When the layman thinks of dental research, he 
thinks of teeth. ‘This is one of the biggest 
things for people to overcome,’’ says Den- 
tistry Dean Kenneth Bentley, DDS’58, 
MD’62. **Dental research involves the teeth, 
the gums, and the oral cavity. Inessence, you 
could think of it as ‘from the eyes down.’”’ 

Research is a very important activity in the 
Faculty, reports the dean, “but we don't 
spend as much time on it as we would like to, 
primarily because we are so short-staffed. 
Our prime commitment is really to under- 
graduate teaching.’’ Dr. Peter Noble, associ- 
ate dean of dental research at McGill as well 
as chairman of research for the Association of 
Canadian Faculties of Dentistry, is in full 


12 McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1980 


<= * 


agreement. “‘I don’t think that anyone can be 
an effective teacher unless he is doing some 
research,’’ asserts Noble. “‘If you don’t do 
research, your lectures just pass on what the 
book says, without any personal feeling about 
the strength of this result or the weakness of 
that technique.’ 

The trend in modern dental research is 
towards teamwork, continues Noble. ‘*‘Re- 
search has become so specialized in terms of 
techniques and capabilities that no one indi- 
vidual can conduct a research project; it’s 


could “offset the predicted shortage of dents al 
specialists. © 
to go into practice for three, four, or five | 
years, and then take specialty training.” Adds | 
Bentley, ‘““There is certainly a movement} 
afoot to give preference to candidates who | 
have already had experience in the practices of 
general dentistry.’’ 

Predicted bites in the budgets of Canadian | 


i 


‘It is not uncommon for a den tist 


a; 
is 


dental faculties, however, could precipitate | 
an even more serious situation—an exodus of ; 
practising Canadian po and spe e | 


eal research has to do with staff members who are obsessed with 
finding out something, or with trying to create a theoretical 
framework, or with making a major contribution.” 


Dr. Robert Vogel, Faculty of Arts 


more a group effort that pools the talents of 
many disciplines. All the granting agencies 
favour this approach.’’ 

Despite the demands of teaching, practice, 
and administration, staff members have sev- 
eral ongoing research interests. One group is 
investigating leucocytes and their potential to 
kill oral malignancies; another is examining 
the interaction of microorganisms in the 
pathogenesis of periodontal disease. In addi- 
tion, the Faculties of Dentistry and Medicine 
are collaborating on a study of rat incisors as a 
model system of tooth development, while 
teams at McGill and the University of West- 
ern Ontario are jointly investigating the 
epidemiology of root surface caries (decay) in 
fluoridated and non-fluoridated communities. 

Though undergraduate enrolment in Den- 
tistry has remained constant, Bentley and his 
colleagues express concern over the diminish- 
ing numbers of students entering graduate 
programs. Financial considerations do not 
seem to be the problem: American dental 
graduate students must pay astronomical tui- 
tion fees, but their Canadian peers receive 
generous financial support in the form of 
Quebec bursaries, stipends for hospital re- 
sidencies, and grants from the Canadian Fund 
for Dentistry. 

Noble points to an emerging trend that 


‘If the decreases come through,” | 


cialists. 
says Bentley, “‘some people may become 
little apprehensive about what the future hold | 
for them and seek positions elsewhere.” In- | 
flation, too, is taking its toll. **The incre 
level of funding for research has not kept pace | 
with inflation,’’ notes the dean. **In my owf ' 
case,’’ adds Noble, ‘‘the cost of a technicia n 
must have gone up at least 100 per cent over | 
the last five years. The cost of equipment is 
also phenomenal—several years ago I bougat 
a $300 camera for a time-lapse experiment; 
the same camera now costs $1,600!” | 

Unlike Medicine, Dentistry has limi 
funding sources; presently supporting Facull ) 
research projects are the Medical Research 1| 
Council, the National Cancer Institute, Me) 
National Institute of Health, and the Ameti| 
can National Institute for Dental Research.) 
An even more serious problem, however, & ff 
the fluctuating nature of grants. *“There is 00} 
consistent policy towards funding,’’ Noble 
points out. ‘‘It seems to start, stop, start, ste P 
it’s like a political game. You just cannot do 
research under such conditions. ”’ ea ¢ 

Bentley remains philosophical about th 
future. ‘*Funding for dental research is bette 
now than it was, but it is not being suppe ed 
to the degree that it should be,”’ “he main' 


dontal disease is higher than any other diseasy 
process—but it is not critical or life 
threatening. ’ There may be a kidney founda 
tion, a heart foundation, and even a toot} 
fairy—but, laments Bentley, *‘There’s mn 
tooth foundation.’’ C.H. O 


Education 


$243,000 


It has been traditional to have some full- 
time staff members supported entirely on 
outside funds. One such contract with the 
Quebec Ministry of Education involved the 
preparation of technical and vocational 
teachers. At its peak, contract money 
amounted to $500,000 a year 


Salaries. This year, $100,000 from the Minis- 
try is earmarked to finance ten research proj- 
ects in vocational teacher training —the uni- 
versity now underwrites all staff salaries for 
the program. 


“In the past there has been reason to think o{ 
the Faculty of Education as not being 
research-oriented, but it becomes less reason- 
able with each passing year,’’ says Dean Dr. 
George Flower, BA’40, MA’49. ‘‘Origi- 
nally, the Faculty’s prime job was the initial 
preparation of teachers for the anglophone 
schools of Quebec, but its role has been 
changing in recent years. One reason for the 
merger with St. Joseph’s Teachers’ College 
and the move of the Faculty from Macdonald 
College to the main campus in 1970 was to 
place greater emphasis on graduate studies 
and on continuing education for practising 
professionals in the field.’’ 

Enrolment in the full-time bachelor’s and 
diploma programs has declined by 43 per cent 
since 1975, Flower points out. **This has left 
greater opportunity for staff members to be- 
come involved in other activities.’ A number 
of staff members originally involved in these 
programs were experienced, master teachers. 
With the passage of time, they have learned 
skills and approaches that have enabled them 
to take on research projects as well. 

With the proliferation of research activities 
in the Faculty, funding has increased from 
$77,000 in 1975-76 to $243,000 in 1978-79. | 
Says Dr. David Smith, BEd’58, MA’6l. di- 
rector of graduate studies in Education, **The 
overwhelming proportion of research money 
comes from the Quebec Ministry of Educa- 
tion, while $14,000 comes from the federal 
government and $37,000 from small internal 
grants. Four departments out of the thirteen in 


“ ZLYor some, the only research 
tools they need are pencils 

and paper and a quiet room.” 

Dr. Walter Hitschfeld, 

Faculty of Graduate Studies 

and Research 


Trends to look for in the near future are the 


for staff 


| 


the Faculty of Education account for the bulk 
of these research grants. They are educational 
psychology, our largest department with 
twenty-five members; social foundations. 
which includes the history and philosophy of 
education as well as comparative education; 
educational administration: and elementary 
education, which is well funded due to the 
efforts of one individual.’ Most of these de- 
partments are primarily involved in the study 
of education rather than in school field work 
or student-teacher supervision. 

Additional funding from local school 
boards and provincial contracts does not ap- 
pear in university research figures, explains 
Flower. **A lot of activity in our Faculty does 
not result in direct grants administered by the 
university. These projects tend to be devel- 
opmental or mission-oriented. rather than 
‘pure’ research. One example is the project to 
develop a geography curriculum for the 
Kativik Board of Education in northern 
Quebec.’’ Studies of enrolment decline. stu- 
dent retention, and the teaching of French as a 
second language receive research funding 
from local school boards. 


OM 3 


advances 


return of practising teachers to courses of ad- 


vanced study, and the further development of 


graduate programs in education that will help 
offset falling undergraduate enrolment. **We 
may eventually find ourselves in a flap, as we 
did in the sixties when there were not enough 
teachers,’’ cautions Flower. **But that’s not 
our immediate concern. Instead, we have to 


find ways to make use of the very good staff 


members we have in the Faculty. People are 
not educational spare parts that can simply be 
shunted about. We have a long way to go to 
catch up with Faculties that have long his- 
tories of teaching and research, but I don’t 
think we need to be apologetic about it.’’ 
C) 


Engineering 


$2,930,000 


In the Faculty of Engineering, research is a 
must. By revising facts, developing theories, 
and studying applications, staff members re- 
main in the vanguard of a field where daily 


are the norm. “Technology is 


changing so fast that you have to have people 
actively involved in research,’’ maintains 
Engineering Dean Gerald Farnell, PhD’57. 
‘In our reply to the Quebec government’s 
Green Paper, the university as a whole, and 
the Engineering Faculty in particular, found it 
impossible to separate teaching professors 
from research professors. It just wouldn’t 
work.” 

There is a wide spectrum of both basic and 
applied research in the Faculty, he reports. 
“Several of our people I would consider 


| applied mathematicians; then there are people 


working at various levels, right up to what are 
almost production problems.’’ A number of 
researchers are engaged in large industrial 
contracts involving Alberta’s oil sands devel- 
opment or the dispersion of explosive mix- 
tures; others are working in association with 
Hydro-Québec on an energy study of large, 
“‘egg-beater’* windmills. **I think it is impor- 
tant that we have a number of these research 
contracts so staff members become involved 


| with current technology in industry,”’ Says 


Farnell. “It is a good way of forming the 


bridge.”’ 


While most research is conducted indi- 
vidually or interdepartmentally, there are a 
number of inter-Faculty collaborations as 
well. The mechanical engineering department 
and the Medical Faculty’s department of 
physiology, for example, are involved not 
only in studying the human skeleton as a me- 
chanical structure, but also in examining the 
dynamics and obstructions of liquids, such as 
blood, flowing through tubes. The computer 
science department is collaborating with the 
pathology department on a pattern recogni- 
tion project, where computers are used to 
evaluate the lungs for emphysema. Interna- 
tional cooperation is also part of Engineering 
research—several joint projects are under- 
way with the Universities of Montpellier and 
Grenoble under the auspices of a France- 
Québec exchange agreement. 

While the Faculty’s thirty-one industrial re- 
search contracts added over $1.3 million to 
the 1978-79 total, the prime source of funding 
remains the Natural Sciences and Engineering 
Research Council (NSERC). Grants to indi- 
vidual researchers tend to be small, but they 
are very flexible, Farnell points out. *‘The 
individual may do more or less what he wants 
with the money. He has a certain amount of 
choice in deciding what problems he will 
tackle, the direction his work will take, and 
how he will split the money between research 
assistants and supplies. ”’ 

Despite recent increases in NSERC grants, 
Farnell feels that the present level of research 
funding in the Engineering Faculty is in- 
adequate. ** NSERC is our largest source, but 
it has not really been keeping pace with infla- 
tion. There is also a sophistication factor built 
into research—you cannot afford to use yes- 
terday’s measuring equipment to make to- 
day’s measurements, because the customer 
wants results that are not attainable with yes- 
terday’s instruments. Even if the prices of 
instruments weren’t inflated, you would need 
more-sophisticated instruments just to keep 
pace with technology.”’ 


McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1980 


continued page 16 


13 


PIERRE-LOUIS MONGEAU 


SOCIETY ACTIVITIES 


ht ee See meee Geet OI Oa te ee eT ee es 


McGill alumni move an average of seven times in the first ten years 
following graduation! Keeping track of current addresses is the major 
preoccupation of the Graduates’ Society Records Office. 


by Gary Richards 


a 


y aaeinn records are the heart of any alumni 
society operation. If they are well kept, 
the organization and its purposes flourish; if 
not, a great deal of time and energy is ex- 
pended with very little to show for the effort. 


The challenge of keeping track of graduates: 


starts the moment they leave the Roddick 
Gates. As they move, marry, change jobs, 
and otherwise become inaccessible, the 
Society’s records director Joyce Newton, 
BA’58, valiantly struggles to keep the files 
up-to-date. As well as helping graduates 
maintain contact with their classmates and 
with their alma mater, these records play a 
vital role in the recruitment of voluntary 
graduate leadership for the university com- 
munity, for McGill branches throughout the 
world, and for other purposes, such as semi- 
nars, conferences, and special events. 
Graduates may neglect to inform us of ad- 
dress or name changes, but our Sherlock 
Holmes and her staff, Maria Jurkus and 
Nance (McMartin) Common, BA’28, have 
ways and means of tracking them down. 
(They need them, too, considering that the 
average graduate changes addresses as often 
as seven times in the first ten years following 
graduation!) One of the most important is a 
regular check of newspapers and magazines. 
Both the business and obituary sections of the 
Montreal Gazette and the Toronto Globe and 
Mail are checked daily, and this is supple- 
mented by an examination of the national 


press clippings forwarded by the university’s 
Public Relations Office. 

This process is not without its surprises. 
Graduates, never thinking there might be 
more than one person having a certain name 
with a certain spelling, will from time to time 
inadvertently give the Records Office staff a 
false lead regarding a job promotion, obituary 
notice, or other change of status. But experi- 
ence has taught Newton to make every possi- 
ble verification before telling the computer. 
‘*Six-hundred address changes a week is 
experience enough,”’ she smiles. 

Twice yearly, the addresses of all new 
graduates are verified and entered into the 
Society's computer system. Not only is the 
accuracy of names and degrees checked and 
rechecked, but a comparison is also made 
with other departmental lists. In recent years, 
over 5,000 students have been capped at the 
annual spring and fall convocations. The staff 
must process these names within a few weeks, 
for the entire alumni operation depends on it. 
Accuracy and speed are basic to the suc- 
cessful distribution of the McGill News and 
Fund Office mailings, not to mention the 
three-hundred class newsletters and other 
alumni material sent out each year. 

The process of updating information ab- 
sorbs the bulk of the Records Office’s time. In 
the weeks following a general, first-class 
mailing, for example, an avalanche of mail 
marked ‘‘undeliverable’’ descends on the 


Fad 


ie 


staff. The ensuing search for “*lost™ 


sraduates might include letters to their par 
ents’ addresses, verification with a university 


department or with professional associates, | 


the consultation of telephone directories, of 
correspondence with branch officers and 
former classmates. The mailing of each issue 
of the McGill News also results in a barrage of 
change-of-address cards, both from the post 
office and from graduates themselves. This 
contact is greatly appreciated and all new in- 
formation is entered weekly into the Society's 
computer terminal. 

Additional sources for updating graduate 
lists include the network of seventy alumni 
branches around the world as well as mailings 
in the form of class letters, questionnaires, 
and notices of meetings. The Alma Mater 
Fund, through its pledge cards and through 
activities such as alumni phonathons in major 
cities, regularly supplies information to the 
record data bank. Records Office reference 
sources are almost limitless—almanacs, 
Lovell’s Directory, Canadian and American 
professional directories, not to mention a It 
brary of three hundred telephone books for 
cities in Canada and the United States. 

As readers will note on the detachable page 
opposite, the Graduates’ Society will soon 
publish an alumni directory to celebrate its 
hundredth anniversary of incorporation. The 


directory will be the seventh in the Societys) 


history, and the first since 1965. You are 


urged to examine the mailing label on this) 


issue of the News: should any corrections be 


necessary, please forward them to the Rec- 


ords Office using the attached ‘‘self-mailer- 


form. The other information you supply will 


also be of great assistance to us. With your 
help, we will be able to make this direc 
tory —and our ongoing graduate records—%s 
up-to-date as possible. Let’s keep in touch. U 


Records Office staffers Maria Jurkus, left 
and Joyce Newton. 


LVVUAVANA 
NVVAAAN 
THAN 
VAAN 


”  <cccaay 
ene cia 

‘ 

‘ 
— 


— 
(aaah deity 


2 


je 


f 


TAL 


PU 


TLL 


traAakarnsi TY Gerla ce ce Alo Ee ocr 


VMUYAISIVNGOVS UU WWOaVE 


Gentlemen and scholars: 


Matthew, Marc, and John 


by Charlotte Hussey 


anly virtue, moral fibre, leadership, aca- 

demic and athletic prowess—these were 
qualities that diamond magnate Cecil Rhodes 
(1853-1902) hoped to nurture in the gentle- 
men and scholars who would win the Rhodes 
Scholarships awarded annually after his 
death. Today, not only has the image of the 
Rhodes Scholar as a Victorian paragon of 
brains and brawn been transformed, but in 
1977 for the first time, the prestigious, male- 
only scholarships were extended to women. 
“Many of the early Rhodes Scholars hap- 
pened to be involved in sports, but now ex- 
tracurricular activities other than sports have 
developed in universities,’’ explains McGill 
Students’ Society President and 1980 Rhodes 
Scholar John MacBain. *‘They are looking 
for a well-rounded person.’’ 

An honours economics student from 
Niagara Falls, Ontario, MacBain is but one of 
three Rhodes Scholars who will leave McGill 
next fall to study at Oxford University. The 
second, Marc Tessier-Lavigne, from Trenton, 
Ontario, received his secondary education in 
Belgium, but came to McGill to study hon- 
ours physics ““because I wanted to resume my 
studies in English and, at the same time, live 
in a French-speaking city.’ 

The third is actor-director-linguist 
Matthew Jocelyn from Toronto, a master’s 
Student in McGill’s French department. Joce- 
lyn, who obtained his BA in 1979 from Mount 
Allison University in Sackville, New 
Brunswick, won one of the two Rhodes 
Scholarships awarded in the Maritimes. 
(Only two of Canada’s yearly allotment of 
eleven Rhodes Scholarships may be won by 
Quebec students.) Jocelyn explains with a 
chuckle that both McGill and Mount Allison 
have claimed him as their Rhodes Scholar! 

The trio shares many qualities— 
intelligence, self-discipline, wit, energy, and 
unquenchable enthusiasm. But there the 
similarities end—MacBain plans to take law 
while Tessier-Lavigne will further his studies 
in physics and Jocelyn in theatre. 

A swimmer and former wrestler, MacBain 
hopes to enter the business world after obtain- 
ing his BA in jurisprudence at Oxford. ‘‘I 
have a more positive view of business than 
Some people do today,’’ he says. ‘‘I’m very 
interested in the innovations that have taken 
place and in the opportunities that are there, 
not only to make society more productive and 
efficient, but also to make people and things 
work together.’” MacBain has already gained 
some valuable, real-life experience in this 
area. In 1977 he founded the Swim School for 
Niagara-region children under five years of 
age. The ongoing summer program utilizes 


A trio of Rhodes Scholars: left to right, 
Matthew Jocelyn, Marc Tessier-Lavigne, and 


John MacBain. 


private backyard pools and employs about 
fifteen instructors. ‘‘By linking all the pools 
to one central telephone, by hiring really good 
instructors, and by having small classes and 
warm water which small children like, I have 
used the community’s resources without hav- 
ing to build a big pool,’’ explains MacBain. 
“Also, about $20,000 a year is given out in 
student wages.”’ 

Former chairman of both Welcome Week 
and Winter Carnival, the aggressive young 
Students’ Society president has also made his 
mark as a university Senator and 
Governor—he was recently honoured by the 
Board as the first McGill Governor in office to 
receive a Rhodes Scholarship. And, as if 
running a swim school for a thousand children 
and preparing for Oxford University were not 
enough excitement for one summer, the 
energetic student plans to fly to South 
America. “‘I’m hoping to get a single-engine 
plane and put extra fuel tanks on board and am 
looking around for companies that might want 
to sponsor and send somebody with me.’’ 
Even if he can’t find a partner, MacBain, who 
earned his commercial pilot’s licence two 
years ago, has no qualms about ‘‘flying 
solo.”’ 

Tessier-Lavigne, tall and slender with 
classic features and dark eyes, is a Renais- 
sance man who enjoys playing duets on his 
flute. In Belgium he worked with children in 
the Fédération des scouts catholiques and was 


~ 


a research assistant at the University of Brus- 
sels; at McGill he has played soccer for the 
Douglas Hall team and instructed rock- 
climbers in the Outing Club. Science, how- 
ever, is his main preoccupation. *‘I hope to 
graduate with a doctorate in physics and then 
go into theoretical research,’’ says the young 
scholar. “I'd like to teach as well, because I 
have a different way of looking at science that 
| would like to communicate. I would like to 
get involved in the interface between science 
and society.”’ 

As current science editor of the McGill 
Daily, Tessier-Lavigne has begun to formu- 
late and express his views on this important 
subject. “‘I’ve always felt that people like to 
lock scientists in ivory towers, or that scien- 
tists like to lock themselves in ivory towers 
and not feel concerned with anything that is 
going on around them,”’ he notes. ‘‘In fact, 
some of the greatest problems now facing 
mankind—like nuclear energy, pollution, 
genetic engineering—show very clearly that 
science cannot be disassociated from soci- 
oy.” 

Willowy, bearded Jocelyn, every inch the 
medieval thespian, enjoys ‘‘being exposed to 
a myriad of things.’’ At Mount Allison he 
acted in both English and French plays, per- 
formed with a jazz ensemble, and promoted a 
glass recycling program. During 1977-78, 
while a student at France’s Université 
d’Aix-Marseille, he lead hikes and rock- 
climbs, enjoyed long-distance cycling trips, 
and took fencing lessons. Jocelyn looks for- 
ward to being ‘‘at the centre of things’’ at 
Oxford, where he will study for his doctorate 
in comparative theatre, act, write, and direct. 
He hopes eventually to form a communal, 
politically oriented theatre group in Canada 
through which he can ‘‘express something 
new.”’ 

Jocelyn readily admits to being a devil’s 
advocate. *‘During my last couple of years at 
Mount Allison, I wrote a number of articles in 
university papers about sexist practices on the 
campus and about the general anachronistic 
attitude of men towards women.”’ Arching 
his eyebrows and using his trained voice to 
full advantage, he confides: *‘I have also been 
involved in guerrilla theatre activities. It was 
my year in France that turned me 100 per cent 
towards thinking of the theatre as a social 
force, as a medium not only of communica- 
tion but of change.’ Involvement in the 
theatre has not been a ‘“‘normal’’ direction for 
past Rhodes Scholars, Jocelyn notes. 
‘Theatre was my extracurricular activity; it 
took the place of sports. In some ways, I guess 
I was a bit of an unorthodox applicant!”’ 

Orthodox or not, Jocelyn, MacBain, and 
Tessier-Lavigne firmly believe that their 
scholarships to Oxford will broaden their 
already-diverse academic and extracurricular 
interests. None sees the award as the key to an 
elite *‘old boys’’ club. *‘There is altogether 
too much prestige attached to the Rhodes,”’ 
concludes Jocelyn. ‘It is not a ticket to an 
open door for the rest of our lives. What itis is 
an opportunity to study with some of the most 
exciting professors in one of the world’s 
greatest institutions.’’ [ 


McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1980 15 


Research continued from page 13 
A second threat to research, Farnell claims, 
is the ““huge dip’’ in the number of staff 
members that will occur fifteen years down 
the road. **This is because most of our stu- 
dents do not go on to do graduate work,’’ he 
notes. ‘There is quite a demand for master’s 
degrees in industry, but their starting pay is 
not enough to compensate for the loss in sal- 
ary they take to get their master’s degree 

Incentives for students to do postgraduate 
degrees are helping to remedy this situation. 
NSERC research associateships and summer 
bursary programs have been created and, this 
summer, the Faculty itself will finance a 
number of undergraduates to work as research 
assistants to NSERC grantees. 

‘*| am reasonably optimistic that the re- 
search component of this Faculty will con- 
tinue to be as important as it is now,’’ adds the 
dean. *‘We will probably have higher teach- 
ing loads that will cut into non-allocated re- 
search time, but we can make a very con- 
scious effort not to overload our good re- 
search people.”’ 

The most important factor in fostering re- 
search, however, is creating a climate of ex- 
citement and enthusiasm, Farnell maintains. 
“If you were to lose that excitement, the 
research effort would collapse very quickly,”’ 
he says. **People tend to do research because 
they want to do it; if they find it exciting, they 
will spend a lot of time on it. And research is 
indispensable if we are going to keep the 
quality that we have—and the people that we 
want to have.’’ C.H. O 


Graduate Studies and 
Research 


$573,000 


The resident expert on university research is 
Walter Hitschfeld, PhD’50, outgoing dean of 
the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Re- 
search. **We coordinate a large number of 
graduate programs— 140 or so—as well as 
the courses and research activities of 3,000 
students,’ he explains. ‘‘We watch the flow 
of new programs and try to ensure that stan- 
dards are acceptable. 

The Faculty also oversees funding applica- 
tions for over a thousand research projects 
annually and administers *‘a not insignificant 
flow of funds that goes for the stimulation of 
research in the university,’’ says the dean. 
““‘We have a committee that disperses a 
half-million dollars or more each year. We 
cannot handsomely support ongoing pro- 
grams, but we can put money in where stimu- 
lation is required—a change in a professor's 
research direction that the councils are not yet 
ready to recognize, help in emergency situa- 
tions, help with travel expenses, and so on.”’ 

The majority of the faculty’s twenty-four 
staff members work in the “graduate studies”’ 
area, processing student records and assisting 
students in various and sundry ways. Seven 
staffers tend the bulging files of research ap- 
plications and meet the deadlines set by fund- 
ing agencies. 


/ 
| 
| 16 McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1980 


BRON BABE TIES 


Hitschfeld’s $573,000 research budget is 


Library Science, the Industrial Relations 
Centre, the School of Social Work, the School 
of Urban Planning, the Centre for Northern 
Studies and Research, the Centre for the 
Study of Regulated Industries, and the Bel- 
lairs Research Institute in Barbados. (Actual 
administrative costs for the Faculty absorb 
only $32,000 of the total.) 

Given the diversity of the Faculty’s 
Schools, Centres, and Institutes, it is well- 
nigh impossible to single out individual re- 
search projects. In his Fall 1979 newsletter to 
graduates, however, Hitschfeld highlighted 
the activities of one such team: ‘‘The Centre 
for Northern Studies and Research has since 
1974 been a rallying point for some forty 
professors and their ninety graduate students 
from ten departments who share interest in the 
north. These concerns include geology, 
exploration, transport, ice physics, inuktitut 
language, teaching in isolated communities. 
arctic parasites, and the health problems of 
northern people; and major analyses of human 
and political problems in the north have led to 
some quite tangible improvements in land 
claim settlements and in legislation. The 
Centre... also has direct responsibility for our 
subarctic field station at Schefferville. 
Quebec, and watches over three long- 
established stations on Axel bewhere: 
Coburg, and Carey Islands,”’ , 


he observations of the people treating patients are very useful to 
the laboratory researcher. At the same time, we want to bring the 
latest laboratory discoveries to the bedside as quickly as possible.” 
Dr. Samuel Freedman, Faculty of Medicine 


shared by members of the Graduate School of 


il 
. 


A major concern for most North America 
university administrators is the ‘employaiil : 
stagnation’’ that exists in academe and its) 
effect on graduate enrolment, notes 
Hitschfeld. ‘‘Students and professors alike’ 
know that there really are only very few aca- 
demic vacancies, and there will only be few | 
till the nineties. We have no place for young” 
people to join us to leaven, even to upset, the ‘ 
departments and this is a very great loss i ing 
deed.’ ; 

During the 1968-78 decade, the number ot 
research (PhD, MA, and MSc) degrees 
granted each year by McGill remained at) 
about 420; meanwhile, the annual number Ol} 
professional degrees and graduate diplomas) 
lept from 748 to 1236, thus reflecting te) 
increasing number of students taking IBA | 
and other professional programs. Sail | 
Hitschfeld, ‘These relative shifts in the popu= 
larity of programs are quite a natural respons ‘ 
of our young people to the job oppor 
they perceived them.”’ ey 

Hitschfeld is justly proud of McGill's te) 
search record and paints an optimistic pic re 4 
for the future. ‘‘Considering our manyfolé) 
difficulties, which are natural in any large al nd 
multipurpose, public and private, Conserve: 
tive and progressive undertaking, we ale : 
going concern,’’ he told the Faculty’ 
graduates in his newsletter. ‘‘Write, OF | 
us sometime; and most of all, send us your 
children!’? C.S. O 


Law 


$203,000 


“Until recently, Law was considered one of 
the practical Faculties and was essentially 
concerned with the practice of law and with 
the preparation of students for the Bar of 
Quebec,”’ says Professor Paul-A. Crépeau, 
director of McGill’s Institute and Centre of 
Comparative Law. 

It is really only in the past twenty years that 
Law Faculties have developed a research 
component, and postgraduate research in Law 
is even more recent: McGill’s Comparative 
Law Institute is only a decade old, while the 
Faculty’s postgraduate Law program is cele- 
brating its fourth birthday this year. A turning 
point came in 1965 when the Quebec govern- 
ment invited the Faculty of Law ‘‘to contri- 
bute to the reform of the civil code,’’ notes 
Crepeau, who chaired the university’s civil 
code revision office until the project was 
completed in 1977. 

The research-oriented spin-offs of this un- 
dertaking have been many and varied. One is 
a legislative history of Quebec’s civil 
code—and its 2,715 articles—from its 


enactment in 1866 to the present. Chuckles 
Crepeau, ‘It’s a mammoth task that only Be- 
nedictine monks would be crazy enough to 
undertake! But it is about finished and will be 
released in the early fall.’’ An English-French 
vocabulary and dictionary of civil law ter- 
minology is also being developed. ‘‘It’s an- 
other monkish operation,”’ quips Crépeau. 
We're in the middle of the letter ‘C’ at the 
moment; when we’re finished, we’ll have 
about 6,500 words in the jurists’ vocabulary 
and 4,500 words in the dictionary.’” An 
example of interdisciplinary team research is 
the exhaustive study being made of Quebec 
medical law in cooperation with the Faculty 
of Medicine. Once their report is released in 
1982, the dauntless researchers will ‘‘do the 
other provinces.’’ Members of all Quebec 
Law Schools, meanwhile, are collaborating 
in the preparation of a multi-volume treatise 
for *‘students, lawyers, and justices in the 
application and interpretation of the new civil 
code,’ explains Crépeau. 

Funding for such ‘‘mammoth’’ works 
comes primarily from outside sources. The 
legislative history of the civil code. for 
example, has been financed by La Chambre 
des Notaires du Québec, while the lexicon 


Towards a scientific research policy for Quebec: 
McGill and the government’s Green Paper 


Last March, after more than two years at the 
drawing board, the Quebec government re- 
leased its important Green Paper on research. 
Entitled **Towards a Scientific Research Pol- 
icy for Québec,’ the 383-page document de- 
tailed projected policy as it relates to univer- 
sity, industrial, and government research, and 
discussed the changes in the present structure 
it wished to effect. 

Quebec organizations and institutes in- 
volved in research— including universities, 
learned societies, CEGEPs, teachers’ federa- 
tions, and community groups—were invited 

fo examine and respond to the Green Paper 
but were given only a matter of weeks in 
which to prepare their briefs. McGill’s 17- 
page submission, presented in both French 
and English, was one of almost 150 such 
documents received by the government be- 
fore the June deadline. 
__ AS an institution deeply committed to all 
aspects of research, McGill rallied its forces 
to study the tome. Principal David Johnston 
requested that the Faculty of Graduate Studies 
and Research, which directs university re- 
search policy, assume the task of coordinating 
the Green Paper response. Faculty Dean Dr. 
Walter Hitschfeld, also Vice-Principal (Re- 
Search), immediately Organized an eight- 
Member executive committee. In addition to 
Hitschfeld, who served as chairman, commit- 
tee members were: Dean of Engineering Dr. 
Gerald Farnell, Professor of Mining and 
Metallurgical Engineering Dr. John Jonas, 
Professor of Biology Dr. Gordon Mac- 
Lachlan, Dean of Science Dr. Svenn Orvig, 
Professor of Biology 


Dr. Frank Rigler, . 


Associate Professor of Philosophy Dr. 
William Shea, and Professor of Pediatrics and 
Biology Dr. Charles Scriver. 

The committee circulated copies of the 
Green Paper to thirty-four active and experi- 
enced McGill scientists representing thirty 
disciplines. Their purpose was, as the brief’s 
preface states, ‘‘to inject the hard-won expe- 
rience of the person active at the bench and his 
views, which are often not identical to those 
of administrator or planner.’’ 

What was McGill’s reaction to the Green 
Paper? ‘‘Our community in general was Op- 
posed to it,’’ says Hitschfeld. ‘‘The Green 
Paper seemed to suggest it would be conven- 
ient, for administrative or financial purposes, 
to separate research from teaching. We find 
this unconstructive—and it would be an ex- 
pensive operation. Nor would it lead to more 
research or better teaching. The evaluation of 
a professor’s performance as a teacher and 
researcher is not something easily done by 
means of gross criteria. It must be done in the 
departmental family through existing struc- 
tures—by the chairman in particular. 

‘‘One of the good things about any such 
inquiry is that it brings the community to- 
gether,’’ stresses the dean. *‘The Green Paper 
made the university think about research— 
people in all levels of McGill are now a little 
more conscious of the question than they used 
to be.’’ Not unexpectedly, there was also a 
high level of unanimity among the province’s 
universities, all of whom submitted briefs to 
the Quebec government. “There was no col- 
lusion,’’ smiles Hitschfeld, “though there 


. were several public workshops and symposia 


~ 


and dictionary are being Supported by 
Quebec’s Office de la langue francaise. The 
examination of Quebec medical law is being 
funded by the Department of Social Affairs. a 
number of professional colleges, and insur- 
ers. Despite these expressions of Support, 
however, it is often difficult to balance the 
research budget. *‘These various sources do 
not come up for renewal at the same time.’’ 
Crepeau points out, ‘‘so you’re always on a 
hinge. You don’t know what will happen to- 
morrow.”’ 

For Crepeau’s colleague Dr. Nicolas Matte. 
director of the Institute and Centre of Air and 
Space Law, research funding has resulted in 
an embarras de richesses. *‘We don’t have 
money problems,’’ says Matte unabashedly. 
“The only problem we have is finding the 
needed researchers to continue our work and 
to maintain the family spirit which prevails 
here.”’ 

The air and space law facility is unique in 
the world, says Matte, in that it not only 
conducts research into air transportation and 
space-related problems, but also has a teach- 
ing capacity. This year, twenty-six graduate 
students from around the world are actively 
doing research as part of their master’s or 


held at the time we were writing the re- 
sponses; obviously, there were informal ex- 
changes of ideas. But universities like Mon- 
tréal, Laval, and McGill have similar tradi- 
tions and philosophies. We have different 
internal procedures and structures, but I think 
those are much less important than the general 
congruence in philosophy.’’ 

What happens now? No one in the univer- 
sity community is quite certain. The govern- 
ment’s original intention was to produce a 
White Paper leading to new legislation, but 
the latest rumblings out of Quebec are that 
‘there might not be legislation,”’ explains 
Hitschfeld. *‘Rather, there may be a declara- 
tion by the government of certain choices they 
will make. This was promised for January but 
it’s not here yet. With elections and the refer- 
endum, it is doubtful that the Green Paper is a 
high priority at the moment. Our brief, and 
others, tended to say that the government al- 
ready has considerable powers; it doesn’t 
need more. 

‘There's no doubt that nearly every other 

province has worried about science policy and 
has made statements about it. But Quebec’s 
Green Paper is a first because it is so coherent. 
One can easily challenge the Paper on a 
number of statements, and we have done so; 
but I have no quarrel with its basic 
philosophy—that scientific research is a 
priority for the province, for our society, and 
for mankind.’’H.K. 
Editor's Note: Graduates wishing to obtain 
copies of the government's Green Paper 
("Towards a Scientific Research Policy for 
Québec’) or McGill’ s response (‘‘A Brief by 
McGill University on the Green Paper’’) are 
invited to contact the Faculty of Graduate 
Studies and Research, Dawson Hall, 853 
Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, Quebec 
.H3A 276, telephone (514) 392-5092. 0 


McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1980 


ina 


17 


449148 G1Ves9 


18 


doctoral thesis requirement; in addition, says 
Matte, ‘‘the Russians sent a lady here for six 
months last year, and the Japanese have sent 
several professors and paid us $2,000 each to 
train them to do research.’ 

While the academic centre is almost thirty 
years old, the research institute is a youthful 
three. The importance of its research efforts 
has already been recognized through ongoing 
governmental support. A $120,000, three- 
year contract from the federal Department of 
Transport and the Canadian Transport Com- 


This international element is, in fact, re- 
flected across the board in postgraduate law 
studies. Explains Crepeau, ““We have stu- 
dents from Europe, Asia, Africa, Latin 
America, and just a few Canadians and 
Americans.’’ Why is this so? The existence of 
cultural exchange scholarships, the colonial 
tradition of studying in the West, and the 
European emphasis on postgraduate studies 
are some of the reasons. Of special import, 
however, is McGill’s position as *‘a meeting 
point between the civil law and the common 


mn e fave to have a research capacity to provide an environment in 


which researchers can be trained. The objective of a plant breeding 
program is not really to produce new cultivars—but when you make a 


discovery, it’s an added bonus!” 


Dr. Howard Steppler, Faculty of Agriculture 


mission has concentrated on all aspects of air 
transportation— ‘regulation, bilateral and in- 
ternational treaties, consumer problems, air- 
ports, taxation, and so on,”’ explains Matte. 
The comprehensive project involved eight 
students and four faculty members and will 
soon result ina 1,000-page treatise for the use 
of government officials. The Quebec gov- 
ernment, too, has lent generous support—a 
recent $50,000 grant will enable the centre to 
study legal, economic, and technical prob- 
lems at Mirabel Airport; assess the role of 
regional and provincial airlines in the devel- 
opment of Canadian aviation; and examine 
the implications of remote sensing and broad- 
casting by space objects. Such research ef- 
forts generally result in the publication of 
monographs; the institute also produces a 
yearbook, The Annals of Air and Space Law. 

With the headquarters of the International 
Civil Aviation Organization and the Interna- 
tional Air Transport Association nearby, 
McGill’s air and space law facility is ideally 
situated. ** Montreal is indirectly the mecca of 
air activities,’” observes Matte. *“This is why 
an institute is needed here. We have all the 
facilities—and we have the best specialized 
library in the world. This is one of the 
privileges students find when they come 
here.”’ 


McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1980 


law, between the French and the English legal 
systems,’’ Crepeau notes. “It is indeed a 
unique place, a living laboratory for com- 
parative studies between the two main legal 
systems in the world.’’ C.S. 0 


Management 


$168,000 


‘*The Faculty of Management is growing 
tremendously and we feel research is vital to 
our teaching,’’ says Rabindra Kanungo, 
PhD’62, a professor of Management and 
chairman of research in the Faculty. **We 
must be involved in research to keep up-to- 
date. Our staff recruitment program empha- 
sizes research-oriented individuals—we look 
for people who are innovative.”’ 

This emphasis on research has led to the 
formation of a Faculty research committee 
that coordinates the distribution of informa- 
tion to other Canadian business schools, sup- 
ports staff research projects, and organizes 
not only weekly research seminars but also a 
major annual conference to which top North 
American lecturers are invited. ** We don’t yet 
have a separate research budget, but we’re 
planning to develop one,”’ notes Kanungo. 
‘At present, our operation is not funded by 


any external source—if the dean has the 
money, we get it. Otherwise, we do with- 
out.”’ 2 : 
In 1978-79, however, individual facult ty 
members secured $168,000 in grants — and 
contracts to pursue their research activities, 
Explains Kanungo, “Most of our esearch is 
interdisciplinary because our proolems are | 
interdisciplinary. One study, on the effects of 
television advertising and programming on 
consumers, requires a knowledge of market 
ing, economics, and psychology; another, on } 
corporate morality, involves behavioural Sci- 
ence, accounting, and finance.’ ~ 
About 80 per cent of the Facultys research” 
is industrially-related, while the renainder is | 
basic, theoretical work, the research chair 
man points out. In most cases, however, itis 
virtually impossible to isolate the “pure” from } 
the ‘applied ’—one professor's basic research | 
into understanding different personalities, or 
instance, has resulted in stress research thatis 
highly applicable to industry. A 
Inflation has not yet directly affected indi- 
vidual research funding in the Management 
Faculty but “if the government doesn't in | 
crease funding to keep pace, we will suffer,” 
warns Kanungo. ‘Right now we have a very 
good research climate at McGill. Each indi- 
vidual on staff contributes. In terms of output, 
we're the top research Faculty among Cana- 
dian business schools.’” H.K. UO a 


Pi 


2 


$12,510,000 


Ay 
cae: 
< 


“Research is a ‘major preoccupation of the 
Faculty of Medicine,’’ says Dean Samuel 
Freedman, BSc’49, MD’53, GDipMed 58 8, 
himself a distinguished cancer researc 

‘* About half [51.6 per cent] of thetotal je 
value of research grants in the university ae 
held by members of the Faculty. ‘n additic Mh 
there are substantial research grarts and con- | 
tracts directed to the teaching hospitals.” 

The majority of the Faculty’s sev en 
hundred full-time staff members are closely y 
involved in both research ane teaching 
Freedman stresses. *‘The most efficient W 
to provide up-to-date teaching at the niet 
graduate level is to have teachers who ar 
involved with research. And when one 
about postgraduate teaching, the majo yi 
done in research-oriented programs.” 
addition to its 640 medical studeits and» 
residents, interns, and clinical aid reseah 
fellows, the Faculty has resporsibiiy 
teaching 300 master’s and doctoral studen is 
from McGill’s basic science deputies 

While the university underwrites | th 
salaries of most full-time staff members 
about fifty physicians, called career it 
vestigators, are funded by the federal NV Medica 
Research Council (MRC), the Conseil de re 
cherche en santé du Québec (CR5Q), of Pl 
vate research organizations like tae Nation 
Cancer Institute. **These career investi igator 
spend 75 per cent of their time in research d ane 
the spin-off is of great benefit to st 
research fellows, and other faculty | 7 
bers,’> notes Freedman. . 


904 


The Canadian medical research community 
recently received a much-welcomed shot in 
the arm when Health and Welfare Canada 
annoumed a 17.4 per cent increase in the 
MRC’s 1980-81 budget—a_ 12.2-million- 
dollar boost to a total of $82.2 million. **This 
is something the medical community has been 
pushing for for a long time,’ Freedman 
points out. ““The cost of research equipment 
has beer particularly hard hit by double-digit 
inflatior and the devaluation of the Canadian 
and American dollar. ”’ 

One zea of ongoing concern to Faculty 
administrators, however, is a perceived de- 
cline ir the number of medical under- 
graduates choosing research careers. **One 
reason for this,’’ Freedman explains, **is that 
in the lay press there has been an increased 
downgrading of science, of technology, of 
intellectiality, of professionalism. Second, 
when w make public campaigns to increase 
the level of medical research funding, it’s a 
double-edged sword—we may be effective in 
convineng legislators to increase their re- 
search bidget, but at the same time our med- 
ical stucents are reading this material and 
saying, ‘Why should I trade a safe career in 
the practce of medicine for the uncertainties 
of a carer in medical research?’ And, of 
course, ve can always use more research fel- 
lowships to support our students.”’ 

The Medical Faculty has already taken 
positive steps to stimulate an interest in re- 
search anongst its undergraduates. In addi- 
tion to aregular research forum and summer 
research dursaries, every effort is being made 
to “‘get tudents in contact with some of the 
outstandng people in the Faculty who are role 
models nn the research field,’’ says Freed- 
man. And since last June, master’s and doc- 
toral stucents from the biological and medical 
sciences have been permitted to apply for 
deferred admission, thus allowing them time 
to comphte their postgraduate degrees before 
entering Medicine. 

Unlike many of its sister Faculties, 
Medicine has very little applied research. 
(Generally, it is centred in the School of 
Human Communication Disorders, the 
School of Nursing, and the department of 

-epidemioogy and health.) *‘The balance— 
about 90 ser cent, if you can make that rather 
artificial distinction—is basic laboratory re- 
search atthe bench,’’ Freedman notes. 

The Shriners Hospital for Crippled Chil- 
dren, forexample, has laboratories for the 
investigation of childhood arthritis.’ ex- 
plains the dean. *‘The Kellogg Centre at the 
Montreal General Hospital is conducting 
applied research on the training of faculty and 
staff for te health care delivery system; the 
McGill Cincer Centre, which resulted from a 
two-million-dollar bequest from Sir Mortimer 
Davis, coordinates the cancer-related work of 
McGill’s ‘esearchers, physicians, epidemio- 
logists, ard teachers: the recently established 
Centre forHuman Genetics brings laboratory 
knowledg: in genetics to the teaching hospi- 
tals; and te Montreal General Hospital Re- 
search Insitute has an immunology project to 
study why some people are genetically resis- 
tant to dissase.*’ 


In addition, the Faculties of Medicine and 
Agriculture are presently developing a nutri- 
tion centre. ** You can’t talk about nutrition 
without talking about food,’’ smiles Freed- 
man. **Therefore the only realistic way this 
can work is to have a collaborative effort. It 
will be the coordinating body for both basic 
and applied research in areas of joint 
interest.”’ 

Cooperative Faculty projects are not lim- 
ited to Montreal but include ongoing contacts 
with such countries as Ethiopia, Kenya, 
Pakistan, China, Costa Rica, and Venezuela. 
“Our international involvement is mainly 
educational, though there is some research 
element,’’ explains Freedman. ‘*Many of 
these projects are not the result of coordinated 
efforts on our part but rather the result of 
individual faculty contacts.”’ 

Combined careers in teaching, practice, 
and research are the rule, not the exception, in 
the Faculty of Medicine. Freedman, too, in- 
Sists On maintaining personal contact with 
patients despite his administrative, teaching, 
and research commitments. He can be found 
on the hospital wards at least half a day each 
week, come rain or shine. *‘The observations 
of the people treating patients are very useful 
to the laboratory researchers,’ he stresses. 
‘‘At the same time, whether in cancer or ge- 
netics or nutrition, we want to bring the latest 
laboratory discoveries to the bedside as 
quickly as possible.” C.S. O 


Music 


$11,000 


Research is essential to the study of school 
music, theory, and musicology, explains 
Dean of Music Dr. Paul Pedersen. ** Within 
these areas we have been hiring people delib- 
erately for research, with the expectation that 
they will consider it a normal part of their 
work. Consequently, our staff’s research pro- 
ductivity has been growing rapidly in the last 
few years.”’ 

Research in music, as in most of the 
humanities, tends to be highly individual and, 
as a result, grants are generally small. Notes 
the dean, *‘Our demands for research grants 
have always been relatively modest, and they 
have always been met.”’ 

Approximately half of the Faculty’s 
musicologists and theorists receive research 
grants each year, most of them from the fed- 
eral Social Sciences and Humanities Research 
Council. Projects range from a research lab- 
oratory for school music to a computer 
analysis of music, and from the identification 
of unsigned baroque compositions to modern 
recording techniques. 

Finding qualified Canadians to fill staff 
vacancies, however, is an ongoing problem in 
the Faculty of Music—two Americans and a 
Swede were recently hired when no Cana- 
dians applied for the positions. **This short- 
age may be caused by the fact that doctoral- 
level music studies are relatively new in 
Canada,’’ says Pedersen. **When I received 
my PhD from the University of Toronto in 
1970, | was their second graduate. And there 


are still no doctoral theory programs in the 
country, though we are submitting a request 
to Start one. 

Another area of great concern is the poor 
climate that exists in Canada for music re- 
searchers. The absence of scholarly journals 
is a major drawback, Pedersen admits. **The 
most important publications are American 
and European—there is only one Canadian 


journal. Thus Canadian research is scattered. 


with our best work being published in foreign 


journals.” 


Pedersen is nevertheless optimistic that 
McGill’s music research will continue to in- 
crease. “*We are actively promoting it by our 
hiring policy,’ he notes, “‘and by the re- 
search interest and activity of our current staff 
members.”’ H.K. 


Religious Studies 


$216,000 


‘*Research in the humanities differs from sci- 
entific research in that it is almost completely 
individual,’’ says Dean of Religious Studies 
Dr. Joseph McLelland. **A researcher inves- 
tigates a question and then tests his theory by 
consulting with scholars in the field and with 
research libraries. His work results in an arti- 
cle or book, generally completed in the sum- 
mer or during a sabbatical leave. Because 
research is so individual, funding tends to be 
low.”’ 

Actual “‘religious studies’’ grants account 
for only $2,000 of the 1978-79 total of 
$216,000. The hefty balance belongs to the 
Institute of Islamic Studies, a research insti- 
tute that comes under the wing of the Faculty 
of Religious Studies. Says McLelland, **This 
makes our research budget look good, but it is 
not indicative of how things really are!”’ 

Despite the modest budget for religious 
studies research, McLelland feels that fund- 
ing is “‘adequate.’” Money for short study 
leaves and teaching assistantships could be 
increased, however: ‘Our biggest worry is 
graduate students—if we can’t afford to keep 
a good group of doctoral students, then re- 
search suffers,’’ he emphasizes. **This is a 
priority.”” Two or three doctoral students do 
receive substantial Leeds Fellowships from 
the Social Sciences and Humanities Research 
Council, and further government funding 
(about $4,000 annually) is provided to assist 
faculty members with book publication. 

The Faculty continues to attract good re- 
searchers. Given the scarcity of available 
teaching positions, only top applicants are 
considered, and their interest in research is an 
important qualification. *‘A teacher must re- 
search to keep up in his field,’’ notes McLel- 
land, ‘“*but we don’t necessarily look for the 
kind of research that results in publishing. | 
hope we don’t force young teachers to *pub- 
lish or perish.’ *’ 

Research in religious studies covers the 
spectrum, from Canadian theology to the 
ethics of privacy, from modern atheism to Old 
and New Testament studies, from compara- 
tive religion to reformed religion. A number 
of books, articles, and research papers record 


McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1980 19 


the results of such investigations. **“There is a 
good climate for religious studies research in 
Canada,’’ McLelland states. ‘‘The centre for 
our field recently shifted from Europe to 
North America—some top European scholars 
have settled here and researchers who studied 
in Europe have returned. It’s a new field, so 
we get a lot of enthusiasm. We are enjoying 
this positive stage.” 

Research is the primary preoccupation of 
the Faculty’s Institute of Islamic Studies, 
housed in the Leacock Building. ** We try to 
coordinate research and teaching,’’ says Insti- 
tute Director Dr. Charles Adams. ‘‘Staff 
members teach seminars in areas related to 
their research interests.’’ 

The Institute presently has 9 faculty mem- 
bers and 60 students, of whom 36 are from 
foreign climes. Most return to their home- 
lands after graduation and readily find work 
as university teachers or administrators. A 
considerable number of the western students 
are clergymen, particularly Roman Catholic 
priests; some graduates go on to serve in 
government posts, but the majority pursue 
academic careers. 

In addition to the $214,000 raised through 
individual research grants in 1978-79, the Is- 
lamic Institute attracted over $420,000 from 
such private sources as the University of 
Kuwait, Hartford Seminary, and Saudi grants 
for graduate fellowships. Next year, how- 
ever, the withdrawal of some funding will 
necessitate the reduction of the staff to seven 
professors, and will eliminate foreign student 
fellowships and money for library purchases. 

Staff members are nonetheless continuing 
to pursue research in such areas as mysticism, 
modern Arabic literature, and the history of 
Kuwait, and their scholarly articles have ap- 
peared in a number of North American, Euro- 
pean, and Oriental journals. The director, 
however, is concerned about the future of the 
Institute. ‘“‘McGill is very research-oriented, 
but lately funding has become harder and har- 
der to procure and that is discouraging. With 
upcoming budget cuts, I estimate that in five 
years we will have less than half the funding 
we'll get next year, not counting inflation. We 
could not suffer that. Unless outside funds are 
found, we are in danger of not having enough 
substance to continue.’’ H.K. 


$5 ,463 ,000 


‘‘The purpose of the university is the ad- 
vancement of knowledge, the preservation of 
knowledge, and the teaching of our knowl- 
edge,’’ states Dean of Science and Professor 
of Meteorology Svenn Orvig, MSc’51, 
PhD’54. ‘Teaching and research go hand in 
hand.”’ 

Research is a vital element in all ten Faculty 
departments—geography, psychology, bi- 
ology, meteorology, physics, chemistry, 
geological science, mathematics, marine sci- 
ences, and parasitology. The departments of 
physics, biology, and chemistry each re- 
ceived over a million research dollars in 
1978-79, explains Orvig, while the tiny, 


20 McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1980 


ig a 4 


Physicist Ernest tutherford (1871-1937) won a Nobel Prize in 1908 for research he began 


while a professor a McGill. The above photograph, taken in his Macdonald Physics Building 
laboratory in 1905, is rare indeed—according to Dr. F.R. Terroux, curator of the Rutherford 
Museum, the brilliait young researcher was almost always too busy to be bothered posing for 


photographers. 


“This was a vitallyimportant experiment,” notes Terroux. “It was one in which he confirmed his 
ideas about the nature of alpha particles, an integral part of the radioactivity story. Rutherlord 
loved alpha particls—they became kind of mascots of his. 

“Government reszarch grants were not available in Rutherford’s day, continues the curator, 
“The only help he would have had was from Sir William Macdonald who built and endowed the 
laboratory. Rutherford had to devise all his own equipment and his mechanic would make 
it—there were no catalogues to order from as scientists have today!” 


five-member Insttute of Parasitology at 
Macdonald College obtained $341,000 in 
grants and contracts. *“That leads the whole 
Faculty in terms ¢f individual funding—it 
isn’t always size that makes for quality!”’ 

The lion’s share «f Science’s research fund- 
ing comes from he federal government’s 
Natural Sciences md Engineering Research 
Council (NSERC),whose 1980-81 budget re- 
cently received a 35 per cent increase to 
$162.6 million. *‘"he amount is very hand- 
some,’ notes Orvig, “but one should re- 
member that it cones after a number of rather 
dry years.”’ 

The training of iniversity researchers and 
the need for youngacademics are a dual con- 
cern for Orvig ard his administrative col- 
leagues. This year’s enrolment figures show a 
slight drop in the 1umber of students taking 
graduate programsin Science. **In almost all 
departments we have people, facilities, 
space, and work for more graduate students 
than we have,’’ the dean points out. *‘But 
today’s students ae in a ‘buyer’s market’ — 
they don’t automatically say, ‘I'll go to 
McGill.’ They stat comparing the financial 
assistance availabl: at various universities, so 
there is also that kind of competition.’’ 

A second hurdk is that new research and 
teaching talent is “not coming in or moving 
up’’ the academic ladder. Orvig quotes re- 
vealing statistics or his Faculty: There are 
103 full professors with an average age of 52 
years, 85 associateprofessors with an average 
age of 43 years, md 28 assistant professors 


with an average age of 34 years. “It's top 
heavy and every year it gets worse,” he 
claims. ‘‘It will be several years before sig- 
nificant numbers reach retirement age; until 
that happens, we can’t get them in at the 
bottom rung.’’ 

Another chronic problem, particularly for 
Faculties like Science which often requife ex- 
pensive equipment and laboratory facilities 
for research projects, is that nine-letter word, 
inflation. ‘‘Both NSERC and the Quebec 
government give us capital funds, but prices 
are up and grants are becoming more difficult 
to get,’’ notes Orvig. ‘‘There is such ai 
evolution in Science that there are always neW 
instruments you have to buy.’’ 

With over $5 million in grants and com 
tracts, however, staff researchers have 
numerous projects underway—everything 
from meteorology’s weather radar observa: 
tory at Macdonald College to biology’s study 
of lake pollution in northern Quebec. The 
marine sciences department’s study of the St. 
Lawrence River, like physics’ nuclear high 
energy facility, is being run in collaboratiol 
with members of other universities. 

The very nature of university reseatel 
places staff members in a ‘‘privileged post 
tion,’’ according to Orvig. ** You receive SUP 
port, even if it is not as much as you feel you 
should have. And you are given the opportu 
nity to do research in the hope of advaneiig 
our knowledge—and for the sheer joy of it!” 
CS2a 


"32 
SEN.H. CARL GOLDENBERG, BA’28. 


MA’29, BCL’32, a long-time member of 


McGill’s Board of Governors, has been ap- 
pointed Governor Emeritus. 


33 

ROBERT F. SHAW, BEng’ 33, a special ad- 
viser to the Newfoundland government, has 
been awarded the 1979 gold medal of the 
Canadian Council of Professional Engineers. 


735 

PETER M.LAING, BA’35, who served on 
McGill’s Board of Governors for many years, 
has been made Governor Emeritus. 


37 

EILEEN (CRUTCHLOW) BLOOMING- 
DALE, BA’37, in private practice in 
Scarsdale, N. Y., has been appointed an assis- 
tant professor of clinical psychiatry at New 
York Medical College. 


39 

J. PRESTON ROBB, BSc’36, MD’39. 
MSc’46, a McGill professor of neurology 
who recently won the William Lennox Award 
of the American Epilepsy Society, is engaged 
in developing a World Health Organization 
program for epilepsy control in Kenya. 


"40 

G. DRUMMOND BIRKS, BCom’40. pres- 
ident of Henry Birks Ltd. , has been appointed 
to McGill’s Board of Governors for a five- 
year term. 

GEORGE K. GRANDE, BA’40, former 
Canadian Ambassador to South Africa, has 
been made vice-president, international op- 
erations, of Later Chemicals Ltd., Richmond. 
B.C. 

EDWIN L. LOVELL, PhD’40, has retired 
after twenty years as director of the Olympic 
Research Division of ITT Rayonier Inc., 
Shelton, Wash. 


"42 
H.J. MICHAEL WATSON. BSc’42, 
BCom’47, has been elected vice-president, 


finance, of the Stee] Co. of Canada, Ltd.. 
Toronto, Ont. 


’43 

ERNEST A. GRANT. BSc(Agr)’43, a re- 
Search scientist with Agriculture Canada in 
Fredericton, N.B., has been made a Fellow of 
the Agricultural Institute of Canada in recog- 


nition of his outstanding work with forage 
crops. 


"45 

NORMAN EPSTEI), BEng’45, MEng’46, 
professor of chemicalengineeri ng at the Uni- 
versity of British Cohmbia, Vancouver. has 
been elected presiden of the Canadian Soci- 
ety for Chemical Engneering. 


"46 
J. MORRISON PRYDE, BEng’46, has been 
made president and clief executive officer of 
Chancellor Energy Riwources Inc.. Calgary, 
Alta. 


"48 

ANDRES AGULAR-MAWDSLEY, 
MCL’48, chief counsil for Venezuela’s state 
oil company, is co-clairman of the United 
Nations commission investigating alleged 
crimes of the deposed Iranian Shah. 
JAMES H. DARRAGH, BSc’46, MD’48. 
GDipMed’56, MSc’5), a senior lecturer in 
the department of medcine at the University 
of Ottawa and honorar: attending physician at 
the Ottawa General Hopital, has been named 
executive director of the Royal College of 
Physicians and Surgems of Canada. 


749 

DOUGLAS T. BOURKE. BEng’49, pres- 
ident of Drummond McCall Ltd.. has been 
named to McGill’s Bard of Governors for a 
five-year term. 


SAMUEL F. GHOURALAL, MD’49, has 
received the Trinidad and Tobago Medical 
Association’s scroll of honour for twenty-four 
years of outstanding service to the commu- 
nity. 

CARL A.R.LEE, BSc’47, MD’49, has been 
awarded a scroll of honour by the Trinidad and 
Tobago Medical Association. 


*50 

HAROLD CORRIGAN, BCom’S0, has been 
appointed vice-president, corporate relations, 
of Alcan Aluminium Ltd., Montreal. 
ROBERT A. JOSS, BEng’50, a group di- 
rector, production services, of the Canadian 
Pulp and Paper Assoc., Montreal, has been 
made a Fellow of the Technical Association of 
the Pulp and Paper Industry. 

W. PERCY McKINLEY, BSc(Agr)’50, 
MSc’51, PhD’S54, first director-general of the 
Food Directorate of Canada’s Health Protec- 
tion Branch, has received the 1979 Wiley 
Award of the Association of Official Ana- 
lytical Chemists. 


"51 

RITA (BROWNSTEIN) KOPIN, BSc’51. 
has received a master’s degree in museum 
education from George Washington Univer- 
sity, Washington, D.C. 


’52 

HERBERT E. GRAY, BCom’52. has been 
named Minister of Industry, Trade and Com- 
merce in the new federal cabinet, Ottawa. 


"54 

PAUL PETER HELLER, LLM’54, is an 
honorary lecturer in aviation law at Auckland 
University, New Zealand. 

H. ARNOLD STEINBERG, BCom’54. 
executive vice-president of Steinberg Inc., 
has been made a McGill Governor. 


a SR, 


Canada was a mere $x years old when these intent young men graduated as McGill's 


first engineers in 1873. 


~ 


McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1980 21 


COURTESY OF THE McGILL ARCHIVES 


ta Kav gig 2 er ac tt Svar e 


EAE AL TATE EERE ATT toa 
gs MSTA ARMS! t eA hake 
Ove Poca | " weer 


te nw 


Special Group Discount Offer on 
THE NEW BRITANNICA 3... 


a Complete Home Learning Centre 


ee 


BIUULIg eIpadojAsuy 


eauUeyig eipadoj(ouq 


eanuUuepig eipadopAsuq 


eouueyig vipadop Aug 
BUULIG eipwedopAIUq 


| 
| 
| 
| 


& eotuuvyiuig eipadopoug 


ae 


AUT 
a 


Squaw esp 


VHUUs Ig vIpwdopAsuq 
VHUUEIg sipsdojssAcsuy 


BHMUULUG EeIpadopy 
Vxuueywig epwdopAcsu 


ol BHUUEPIGg BIpwdoprirucy 
5 Ee 


You and your 
family are invited to 
sample the most readable, 
most understandable 
encyclopaedia ever 
created. 


ZL Ly 
cece : 


An important announcement for 
Members of the Alumni Association 


Encyclopaedia Britannica offer to members an oppor- 
tunity to obtain the NEW BRITANNICA 3 at a 
reduced price, a substantial saving on the price avail- 
able to any individual purchaser. 


The NEW BRITANNICA 3 — now expanded to 30 
volumes — is not just a new edition ... but a com- 
pletely new encyclopedia which outmodes all other 
encyclopedias. Never before has so much knowledge, 
so readily accessible, so easily understood — been 
made available as a complete home library. 


The current edition of Britannica is reorganized to 
better serve the three basic needs for an encyclo- 
pedia. First, the need to “LOOK IT UP” is handled by 
the Ready Reference and the Index. These ten vol- 
umes are a complete index to everything in the set. 
At the same time, they serve as a 12-million word 
short entry encyclopedia that is helpful to look up 
accurate information quickly. 


If the reply card is detached, please write to Britannica Special G 
2 Bloor Street West, Suite 1100, Toronto, Ontario M4W 3]1 


- more useful in more ways to more people. 


22 McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1980 


Second, the need for “KNOWLEDGE IN DEPTH 
is fulfilled by the main text, a 28-million word, 19 
volume collection of articles arranged logically which 
provide full and authoritative information for the 
student, for research in business, or for new insights 
into new fields of knowledge. 


Third, the need for “SELF EDUCATION?” is met 


by the Outline of Knowledge and Guide to Britan= 


nica, a unique volume which acts as a giant study 
guide, more comprehensive and more detailed than 
a college course outline. | 


The 30-volume NEW- BRITANNICA 3 covers: 


more subjects more completely. It is more responsive 
to the current needs of your family. * 

Members who would like to receive further details 
on this exciting Group Offer are invited to fill out 
and mail the postage paid reply card. | 


This offer is available for a limited time only, and 


may be withdrawn without further notice. 


roup Offer, 


a ar 
pee 


mat 


*55 

PATRICK R. JUDGE, BD’55, has been 
named development manager of the Banff 
Centre for Continuing Education, Alberta. 


56 
DOREEN (HOGG) KIMURA, BA’S6. 
lll mars7, PhD’61, a psychology professor at 
the University of Western Ontario, London. 
appeared in the Canadian Broadcasting 
Corp.'s television series The Nature of 
Things, on the program *‘Left Brain-Right 
Brain.’ 
PETER MACKLEM, MD’S56, has become 
physician-in-chief of the Royal Victoria 
Hospital, Montreal. 
)BERNARD J. WOLOSHEN, BA’S3, 
/ BCL’S56, has been made a Governor of Con- 
' cordia University, Montreal. 


"57 

BARRY A. CULHAM, BEng’57, has been 

appointed senior vice-president and corporate 
_ controller of the Export Development Corp., 
. Ottawa, Ont. 


58 

DONALD JOHNSTON, BCL’58, BA’60. 
has become president of the federal Treasury 

Board, Ottawa, Ont. 

ROBERT C. NEAPOLE, BEng’58, has been 
made vice-president of BG Checo Interna- 
tional Ltd., Montreal. , 
BRUCE H. SELLS, PhD’S58, a professor of 
molecular biology, has been appointed asso- 
ciate dean of basic sciences in the Faculty of 
Medicine at Memorial University of New- 
foundland, St. John’s. 


59 

MARINUS FRANK BOODE, BSc’59, has 
been appointed marketing manager, organic 
intermediates product group, in the Dow 
Chemical U.S.A. Organic Chemicals De- 
partment, Midland, Mich. 

ALLAN CURRIE, PhD’S59, a professor at 
Ryerson Polytechnical Institute, Toronto, 
Ont., is spending a sabbatical year in the 
department of environmental biology at the 
University of Guelph. 
JOHN HOWSE, BSc’59, has joined Southam 
News as their first full-time energy specialist. 


Attention Commerce graduates! 


Yesterday: Graduates of McGill’s origi- 
nal School of Commerce are invited to 
contribute to the preparation of a history of 
the School by sending reminiscences and 
memorabilia to: Prof. Earl Beach, Eco- 
nomics Department, Leacock Building, 
855 Sherbrooke St. W.. Montreal, Que. 
H3A 2T7. 

Today: Editors of the Faculty of Manage- 
ment yearbook announce that copies of the 
1977, 1978, and 1979 Widget may be 
picked up at the Management Under- 
graduate Society office, Bronfman Build- 
ing, 1001 Sherbrooke St. W., Montreal, 
Que. H3A 1GS5, or ordered (at a cost of $3 
tO cover postage). 


MICHAEL E. DIXON, BSc’58, MD’60. 
MSc’63, has been appointed registrar of the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons of On- 
tario. 

ROGER PHILLIPS, BSc’60, has become 
vice-president, research and engineering, of 
Alcan Aluminium Ltd., Montreal. 

MARGO (FREIMAN) ROSTON, BA’60. 
writes a daily social column in the Ottawa 
Journal. 


"61 

DONALD J.A. MacSWEEN, BA’56. 
BCL’61, director-general of the National Arts 
Centre in Ottawa, Ont., has been named a 
McGill Governor. 


"62 

ALFRED G. WIRTH, BA’62. DipM’70, has 
become chief securities investment officer. 
Canada, for the Sun Life Assurance Co. of 
Canada. 


"63 

MARGARET HAGERMAN, BN’63, has 
been named executive director of West Park 
Hospital, Toronto, Ont. 

GEORGE T. NEEDLER, PhD’63, has been 
named director of the Atlantic Oceanographic 
Laboratory of the Bedford Institute of 
Oceanography, Dartmouth, N.S. 

COSTAS S. NICOLAIDIS, BArch’63, is a 
partner in the new Montreal firm of Stahl & 
Nicolaidis, Architects. 


"64 

PETER KATADOTIS, MSW’64, has been 
appointed director of English productions at 
the National Film Board of Canada, 
Montreal. 


65 

NORMAN PEARL, BCom’65, has been ap- 
pointed president and chief executive officer 
of the Sherwin-Williams Co. of Canada Ltd. , 
Montreal. 

GEORGE B. PENDLEBURY, BSc’65, is a 
senior geologist at Quasar Petroleum Ltd., 
Calgary, Alta. 


’°66 

CLAUDE P. DUPUIS, MBA’66, has be- 
come director, agreements and licensing, of 
Rhone-Poulenc Santé, Paris, France. 

DR. ALBERT RABINOVITCH, BSc’66, 
MSc’69, an assistant professor of pathology 
at Case Western Reserve University School of 
Medicine, has been appointed director of clin- 
ical pathology at University Hospitals of 
Cleveland, Ohio. 


"67 

W.R. (*DICK’’) COWAN, MSc’67, has be- 
come a senior terrain scientist with Northern 
Pipeline Agency, Calgary, Alta. 

IAN G. MACINTYRE, PhD’67, is chairman 
of the committee overseeing the construction 
of Paleontology Hall, a new home for the 
Smithsonian Institute’s dinosaur collection, 
Washington, D.C. 

continued page 25 


a 


Burlington Carpet Mills 
Of Canada Ltd. 


Division Engineer 


We are a leading carpet manufacturer in 
Canada, located in Bramalea, Ontario, 
just northwest of Toronto. 


We require a division engineer to head 
up our engineering group. This will be a 
key position involving mechanical ac- 
quisitions, projects, modifications and 
rebuilding of major manufacturing 
equipment, and managing all the divi- 
sional plant engineering functions. We 
require a university graduate in 
mechanical engineering with a 
minimum of five (5) years’ working 
experience in a manufacturing en- 
vironment. 


Our benefits are excellent. Salary com- 
pensation is competitive and commen- 
surate with qualifications and experi- 

ence. 


Please send your résumé outlining 
work history, position(s) held, accom- 
plishments, and career objectives in 

strictest confidence to: 


Director, Human Resources 
and Relations 

Burlington Carpet Mills of Canada Ltd. 
45 Glidden Road 
Bramalea, Ontario L6T 2H9 


Quote File DE-80-3 


630 Dorchester Bivd. 
West 


McMaster 


Meighen Montreal—H3B 4H7 
Telephone (514) 879-1212 
Barristers A.S. Hyndman, Q.C. 
al R.C. Legge, Q.C. 
& Solicitors TC Cam Ot 


A.K. Paterson, Q.C. 
R.J. Riendeau, Q.C. 
W.E. Stavert 
R.J. Plant 

H. Senécal 

T.R. Carsley 
M.A. Meighen 
A.P. Bergeron 
T.W. Stewart 
S.J. Harrington 


A 

.M. Schneiderman 
.E. Leduc 

Ayotte 


.W. Shannon 
M.A. Pinsonnault 
E.A. Mitchell 

M. Charbonneau 
W.J. Demers 

J.P. Thomson 
E.H. Straus 

D.W. Rothschild 


Counsel: 

D.R. McMaster, Q.C. 
A.M. Minnion, Q.C. 
R.A. Patch, Q.C. 

J. Brien 


McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1980 23 


— See 


er wt a ee 
—— > — 


Come back to remember 
these days 


in September. 
25 27 


: 
4. % 
ee oe 


Faculty Receptions 2s 


Special Event 
(Class of 1965, 1970 and 1975) Sunday in Old Montreal 
President’s Reception 


(Class of 1955) 


Opening Reception R.V.C. Alumnae Reception 
Annual Dinner Meeting Graduates’ Pre-Game 
Luncheon 
26 Football Game 3 
McGill vs Queen’s a 
Faculty Seminars Graduates’ Rendez-Vous e. 
Leacock Luncheon 


Kot 


REUNION 80 : 


Chancellor’s Dinner All welcome, especially graduates of years ending in 0 or 5. 
(Class of 1925 and earlier) Macdonald Reunion will be held October 3, 4 and 5. . 
Principal’s Dinner 
(Class of 1930) The Graduates’ Society of McGill University. 


Keep these dates open! 


Merve ke ily 7 MRS ie Maca See rae «ime hanes Meas 


For the Advancement of Learning Volume I: 1801-1895 


By Stanley Brice Frost | 
When Stanley Frost told Frank Scott that he had been asked to write a history of McGill, Scott replied: ‘‘You’ll 
be writing the history of Canada!’’ So it has proved. The heroics of the fur trade, the rivalries of French- 
speaking Canadiens and English-speaking Scots, the personalities of George Jehoshaphat Mountain, John 
Bethune, James Ferrier, William Dawson—it is all here and so much more. Abundantly illustrated, hand- 
somely produced, this is a book to make McGill graduates proud of their heritage. 


McGill-Queen’s University Press, April 1980, 334 pages, 72 illustrations 
ISBN 0-7735-0353-6, $25.00 


Order direct from: 

McGill University Bookstore 
1001 Sherbrooke Street West 
Montreal, Quebec H3A 1G5 


Please send _______s copies of McGif/ University: Volume | 
NAME: 


ADDRESS: 


Prepayment is required from all individuals. Prepaid orders are ; pi a 
sent postage paid. | 


24 McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1980 Ara 


68 

HOWARD ALPER, PhD’68, has won a 1980 
Steacie Fellowship from the Natural Sciences 
and Engineering Research Council of Canada 
to continue his research on methods for re- 
moving sulphur from crude oil. 

KENNETH WIGHTMAN, BCom’68, has 
been appointed comptroller of Zellers Ltd., 
Montreal. 


"69 

RALPH ENGEL, BCom’69, has been ap- 
pointed vice-president, finance, of Majestic 
Industries (Canada) Ltd., Montreal. 

JOHN HIGGINBOTHAM, MA’69, is a Fel- 
low at the Center for International Affairs at 
Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., and 
a member of the policy planning staff in the 
Department of External Affairs, Ottawa, Ont. 
GRAHAM McFARLANE, BEng’69, has 
been named a partner of Western Manage- 
ment Consultants, Calgary, Alta. 


’70 

GEOFFREY W. GOSS, BEng’70, has be- 
come director of marketing support for 
Northern Telecom’s Network Systems Di- 
vision in Richardson, Tex. 


71 
MOHAMAD A. FARIS, PhD’71, has be- 


| come a forage legume breeder, alfalfa, at the 


Ottawa Research Station of Agriculture 
Canada. 

CAROLE (SPENCER) MASK, BA’71, who 
recently graduated from the University of 
Georgia’s College of Veterinary Medicine, is 
practising at Fort Hill Animal Hospital in 
Huntington, N.Y. 

ANDRE L. POTVIN, BCom’71, is second 
secretary, Canadian International Develop- 
ment Agency, at the Canadian Embassy in 
Lima, Peru. 

MEREDITH SIMON, BA’71, completed her 
MD degree at the University of Calgary last 
summer and is now doing her residency in 
Calgary, Alta. 

JAMES A. TILLEY, BSc’71, has won the 
American Society of Actuaries’ Triennial 
Prize for his paper entitled ‘‘The Pricing of 
Nonparticipating Single Premium Immediate 
Annuities.’ 


"72 

MIRON U. SAVICH, MEng’72, is in charge 
of noise control studies in the Elliot Lake 
Laboratory, Mining Research Centre, of En- 
ergy, Mines and Resources Canada. 

DALIA SINIUS, MEd’72, is a consultant in 
curriculum development at the American In- 
ternational School in Katmandu. Nepal. 


73 

LU ELLEN ABRAHAM. LLB’73, has be- 
come administrative law judge for the Texas 
Health Facilities Commission in Austin. 
PETER JONES, PhD’73, has been appointed 
director of the Alumni Association at the Uni- 
versity of British Columbia, Vancouver. 
GABRIEL ZAINO, BEng’73, has become 
chief plant metallurgist at Canadian Steel 
Foundries Ltd.. Montreal. 


"74 
LARRY J. BEHAR, BA’74. has opened a 
private law practice in Fort Lauderdale. Fla. 


"75 

EZZAT ABDEL ALIM DESSOUKI, 
BSc(Agr)’75, has received his Master of Sci- 
ence degree from the University of Sas- 
katchewan, Saskatoon. 

PIER GIORGIO FONTANA, PhD’75. has 
been appointed to the Alberta Department of 
Economic Development, Edmonton. 
GORDON A. IRONS, MSc’75, PhD’78. has 
been named an assistant professor of mining 
and metallurgical engineering at McMaster 
University, Hamilton, Ont. 

VICTOR J.E. JONES, BSc’71, MBA’75. 
has been appointed president of International 
Mobile Data, Inc., Vancouver, B.C. 
PAMELA MAHER, BSc’75, who recently 
received her PhD in biochemistry from the 
University of British Columbia, Vancouver. 
has won a two-year Anna Fuller Fund fellow- 
ship to pursue postdoctoral work at the Uni- 
versity of California, San Diego. 

ROSS H. MANELLA, BA’72, BCL’75. 
LLB’77, has opened a law practice in Hol- 
lywood, Fla. 


"76 

JUDY POLUMBAUM, BA’76. is currently 
assistant to the director of the English Lan- 
guage program of the Institute of Journalism. 
Beijing, China. 

WALTER SOK YRKO., BEng’76, is on staff 
at Bell Northern Research in Ottawa. Ont. 
ALAIN K. SUTTON, BEng’73, MBA’76, 
has become director of the international di- 
vision of the Toro Co., Toronto, Ont. 


"77 

BEVERLY (HALLETT) BRESEE, BEd’77, 
is a teacher at John Adam Memorial School in 
Delson, Que. 

LINDA CEKAL, BCom’77, has become a 
product manager at General Foods Ltd., To- 
ronto, Ont. 

JANET DOREY, BSc’75, DDS’77, has 
joined the staff of the oral medicine depart- 
ment at the University of British Columbia. 
Vancouver. 

THOMAS A. McKEE, BA’77, who recently 
received his LLB from Osgoode Hall Law 
School, is articling with the Toronto law firm 
of Blake, Cassels and Graydon. 

LEILA GAY MITCHELL, BA’77, is pres- 
ently completing her doctorate in Canadian 
history at York University, Downsview, Ont. 


’78 

PETER S. BIRKBECK, BSc’78, is a chemist 
with C-I-L Inc., Mississauga, Ont. 

LINO DiLULLO, BSc’74, DDS’78, is spe- 
cializing in oral and maxillo-facial surgery at 
the State University of New York at Buffalo. 


°79 

KENNETH ARMBRUSTER, BEng’79, has 
been appointed a drilling engineer by Guthrie 
McLaren Drilling Ltd., Edmonton, Alta. 


a) 


PHILIP AMSEL 


Life Underwriter 


Personal & Business Insurance 
R.R.S.P.s & Annuities 


Sun Life du Canada 

9858 Céte des Neiges, Suite 312 
Montreal, Que. H3S 1Z1 

Off: (514) 738-1138 

Res: (514) 748-9413 


A.R. DEANE NESBITT 


Advocate 


2075 University Street 
Suite 1008 
Montreal, Canada H3A 2L1 
Telephone: (514) 286-1244 


Member: Barreau du Québec. 
The Law Society of Alberta 


Registered Trade Mark Agent 


La Compagnie 
Enveloppe Canada 


rae 


8205 Boul. Montréal-Toronto 
Montréal Ouest, Qué. H4X 1N1 
(514) 364-3252 


Hon. George C. Marler 
Herbert H. Tees 
John H. Watson 
Henri Poitevin 
Ernest A. Javet 
Philippe Roberge 
John C. Stephenson 
Harvey A. Corn 
David Whitney 
Pierre Lapointe 
Gérard Ducharme 
Pierre Senez 

E. Bruce Moidel 
Pierre Venne 

André Boileau 
Paul-André Lazure 
Bertrand Ducharme 
Alain Castonguay 
Yves Prévost 

Lucie Houde 
Hélene Drapeau 


Marler 
Tees 
Watson 
Poitevin 
Javet 

& Roberge 


Notaries 


Suite 1200 
620 Dorchester W. / 
Montreal—H3B 1P3 
Telephone 866-9671 
Area Code 514 


McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1980 25 


“SAS KR28 SLR PS ES ee ee ob pen wea ‘eae " “8 a i 
Aes <2 FP ee 2egts ys 2s B4 ee ER ey Ses PELE ae ee ee eo eee — ~~" re 
rpperlmt eis ees og Lott oleh St re bf et oie SES OSE Se RU ROee tLe Ct LEB ESERey BS Se CREE Me PERE ee PS Oe RPE Pee e Tt Ee Ree eres aoe ere aoe See 


Sag 


DEATHS 


705 
SOPHIA MAY IDLER, BA’ 05. 
on Feb. 6, 1980. 


at Montreal, 


"07 
WILLIAM D. LITTLE, BSc’07, on Dec. 20, 
1979. 


710 
MARGARET (TAYLOR) MOORE, BA’ 10, 
on Nov. 25, 1979. 


7411 
ALLAN GRANT LOCHHEAD, BA’Il, 
PhD’19. at Ottawa, Ont., on Jan. 5, 1980. 


"12 

KATE (LAWRENCE) CASSELS, BA’ 12, in 
late 1979. 

DANIEL MARSHALL GORDON, BA’ 12, 
at Victoria, B.C., on Nov. 19, 1979. 
EDWARD CARRINGTON MacDERMOT, 
BSc’ 12, at Croydon, England, on Feb. 15, 
1980. 


"15 


DOROTHY (CAULDWELL) CORRIGAN, 


DipPE’15, on Dec. 27, 
1979. 
LAURA MAE (WHITE) COX, BA’IS, at 


Mesa, Ariz., on Jan. 6, 1980. 


at Toronto, Ont., 


"18 
FLORENCE (WALKER) LAUBER, BA’ 18, 
on Jan. 1, 1980. 


°20 
JOHN D. KEARNEY, BCL’20, at Ottawa, 
Ont., on Feb. 22, 1980. 


"21 
JAMES E. GILL, BSc’21, 
Ont., on Jan. 26, 1980. 


at Kitchener, 


to excellence. 


Give them a chance. James McGill 
would be proud you hired his graduates. 


McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1980 


For Information, phone 514-283-4411 
sponsored by the Students’ Society of McGill University 


PE 21, at 
1980. 


DOV JOSEPH, BA/‘’19, 
Beersheba, Israel, on Jan. 5, 


"22 

ADRIAN LESLIE GNAEDINGER, Eng’22, 
at Belleville, Ont., on Feb. 10, 1980. 
DOUGLAS GORDON MARTIN, Arts’22, 
at Nanaimo, B.C., on Feb. I1, 1980. 


23 

T. ARMSTRONG, BSA’23, MSc’25, in 
August 1978. 

CHARLES SCOTT HANNEN, BSc’23, at 
Geneva, N.Y., on Dec. 31, 1979. 
CHESTER PETER MacLEAN, MD’23, at 
St. Catharines, Ont., on Oct. 23, 1979. 
CHARLES HILL SPIRO, MD’ 23, at Ottawa, 
Ont., on Jan. 16, 1980. 


"24 
MAUD (DOBBIE) GREIG, BA’24, at 
Lachute, Que., on Jan. 24, 1980. 


25 

JAMES G. DAVIDSON, MSA’25, at Van- 
couver, B.C., on July 8, 1979. 
LAWRENCE W. FITZMAURICE, MD’25, 
GDipMed’40, on Aug. 8, 1978. 


°26 
HARVEY C. MacNABB, DDS’26, at Ot- 
tawa, Ont., on Feb. 18, 1980. 


LEILA (ARGUE) RAY, BSc(Arts)’26, at 
Vancouver, B.C., on Feb. 3, 1980. 


"27 
LEYLAND JOHN ADAMS, MD’27, at 
Magog, Que., on Jan. 1, 1980. 


28 
HARRY A. SINCLAIR, MD’28, on Dec. 30, 
1979. 


29 
JEAN MURIEL AULD, MA’29, on Aug. 23, 
1979. 


ALLAN A. GROSSMAN, BA’29, on Jan. 


1 21, 1980. 


REMEMBER YOUR FIRST JOB 
AFTER GRADUATION? 


Someone probably took a risk on you 
and allowed you to prove your ability. 

This year’s McGill graduates are looking 
for their first full-time job. They are the 
products of McGill's continuing commitment 


7 
i 
ae 


VIC ee 4 PHELPS, DDS’29, at Montreal, 

on Jan. 12, 1980. 

aie ‘MILES WILLIAMS, BSc’29, at 
Sidney, B.C., on Jan. 12, 1980. } 
AYL ESWORTH R. WRIGHT, BCom ’29, at 
Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on Dec. 18, 1979. 7 


"30 

JAMES L. DOWD, DipPharm’30, on Oct. 

aE 1979. 7 

ANTOINE LANGLOIS, BCom’30, aff 

Quebec City, on Jan. 11, 1980. , 
4 
4 


31 
GEORGE E. ERLICK, BA’31, on Jan. 14, 
1980. 
STEWART JAMES HUNGERFORD, 
BSc’ 31, at Victoria, B.C., on Dec. 22, 1979, 


32 : 
FLORENCE MARY BRENNAN, BA’32, <q 
Jan. 1, 1980. 


cae JOSEPH FOURNIER, BA’28, 
MD’32, at Exeter, England, on Jan. 3, 1980. 
SAUL HAYES, BA’27, MA’28, BCL’32, at | 
Ste-Adéle, Que., on Jan. 12, 1980. 

GEORGE N. KELLY, DDS’32, at Pawling, 
N.Y., on Feb. 7, 1980. ri 


33 . 
HERBERT A. DUNNING, BA’29, MD'33,, 
on Nov. 21, 1979. yr 


34 
PETER C. STOBBE, MSc’34, PhD’50, on 
July 27, 1979. 


36 ql 
PHILIP S. BAZAR, BA’33, MD’36, in June 
1979. 
37 a 
SAMUEL RODGER STOVEL, BSc’37, at 
Montreal, on Dec. 12, 1979. 


738 | 
LORNE C. CALLBECK, BSc(Agr)’ ic | 
Summerside, P.E.I., on Dec. 28, 1979. 


UNCLE JAMES WANTS YOU 
YO NUBE A WEOIL GRADUATE 


"39 

JOHN ROSS FERGUSON, BCom’39, at 
Montreal, on Jan. 12, 1980. 

EDWARD A. HART, MSc’39, sat 
Willowdale, Ont., on Nov. 18, 1979. 
CAROLYN (CLARKE) ROGERS, BA’39, 
at Toronto, Ont., on Jan. 26, 1980. 


"40 

ELIZABETH (CARR) JONES, BHS’40, at 
Chelsworth, England, on Feb. 5, 1980. 
CLIVE J. PHILLIPS-WOLLEY, MD’40, at 
Vancouver, B.C., on Jan. 6, 1980. 


"Al 

HOWARD M. BROWNRIGG, BEng’41, a 
Joliette, Que. on Feb. 28, 1980. 

JOHN CHARLES LYONS, BEng’4l, at 
Montreal, on Feb. 11, 1980. 

R. WALLACE WRIGHT, BEng’41, at Hud- 
son, Que., on Dec. 19, 1979. 


- 


"42 
ALFRED E. CARTER, MA’42, in May 
1979. 


’ 

4a 
FRANCOIS LACHANCE, BSc(Agr)’44, 
MSc’46, at Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ont., on 
| Oct. 24, 1979. 


"A7 
ANDREW G. ESFAKIS, BSc’45, MD’47, in 
1978. 


CAREER PLANNING 


"48 

WILLIAM P. DAGGER, BLS’48, at Ot- 
tawa, Ont., on Sept. 12, 1979. 

WILLIAM ARTHUR MAGILL, BA’48. on 
Feb. 25, 1980. 

PHILIP UREN, BA’48, MA’49, at Ottawa. 
Ont., in early 1980. 


"49 

ERIC WILLIAM LARKING, MD’49. 
GDipMed’SS, at Kitchener, Ont., on Feb. 19. 
1980. 

WALTER C. NANCARROW, BEng’49, at 
Sydney, Australia, on Jan. 13, 1980. 


"50 

ENID (BETCHERMAN) ABRAHAMS. 
BA’S50, in 1978. 

LEWIS J. MIEDEMA, BEng’50, at Ottawa, 
Ont., on Feb. 9, 1980. 

MURRAY M. OUTHET,. BSc(Agr)’50, at 
Ottawa, Ont., on Dec. 26, 1979. 


51 

JAMES J. KASMAR, MD’S51, on July 26, 
1978. 

DANIEL KEENAN, BSc(Agr)’51, MSc’55, 
in November 1979. 


"54 

LOIS (BURKE) DEAN, DipHEc’54, at 
Pointe Claire, Que., on Feb. 7, 1980. 
ALLAN LOUIS GROSSBERG, PhD’54, on 
Nov. 2, 1979. 


°56 
JULIA KAREN FINDLAY, BA’56. at 
Lanark, Ont., on Jan. 3, 1980. 


"57 
DAVID RUBINSTEIN, PhD’53, MD’57, on 
Feb. 5, 1980. 


*'58 
KENNETH W. TRICKEY, BD’58, MA’63. 
at Montreal, on Dec. 27. 1979. 


"59 
F. DAINTRY DAVISON, MSW’S59. at To- 
ronto, Ont., on Dec. I1, 1979. 


"66 
JANET (McDIARMID) PROULX. MA’66. 
on March 29, 1979. 


°67 

MARK DEGNAN, MD’67, at Delmar. 
N.Y., on July 24, 1979. 

WENDY (RAWES) McKEE, BSc’67. at To- 
ronto, Ont., on Dec. 14, 1979. 


‘D. DOUGLAS MUNROE, BSc(Agr)’67, in 


New Zealand, on June 12. 1979. 

’°68 

JEFFREY MARVIN, BSc’68, in Ecuador. in 
early 1980. 


"72 

JEANIE ELIZABETH (MACDONALD) 
FULLER, BSc’72, at Fredericton, N.B.. on 
Sept. 22, i979. 


Montreal Job Exchange/La Bourse d’emplois de Montréal 
can reduce the uncertainty, the delay and the cost of the 
job selection process by putting qualified applicants in 
touch with companies easily and quickly. 


Montreal Job Exchange is a new and unique service 
covering all of Quebec. Very soon we plan to extend 
our services across Canada. 


Our individual members come from middle manage- 
ment in the administrative, technical and professional 
sectors. Our company members are large and medium 
sized firms that represent all sectors of industry. 


Our system allows candidates to: 
® introduce their ownc.v. toan 
employer, exactly as written by 
them 

@ keep their identity confidential 
until they personally agree to 
further pursue a specific job 
opportunity 

® be presented to future employ- 
ers without subjective evaluation 
on our part 

® receive statistics and informa- 
tion on career planning contained 
in our monthly newsletter at the 
cost of $25.00 per year. 


Our system allows companies to: 
® spend less time in recruitment 
since our services are fast and 
precise 

® spend significantly less of their 
budget in advertising 

® use a flexible system that can 
respond to the varied needs of a 
wide range of users 

@ have access to our bank of c.v. 
representing a large sampling of 
professional candidates 

® belong to a highly professional 
service that stresses confiden- 
tiality and objectivity in the 
selection process. 


We are neither a recruitment agency nor an employment 
bureau. We offer our services to companies and individ- 
uals alike, through a computerized matching system. 
We do not take part in any of the other stages of the 


selection process. 


For further information please contact: 


Montreal Job Exchange/ 


La Bourse d’emplois de Montréal 


1110 Sherbrooke St. West 
Suite 2206 


Montreal, Que. 


H3A 1G8 
Tel: (514) 849-4125 


McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1980 


SNOILOST1IOO WIDdsdS 8 SHOOSE A¥VY/SSIYVEEIT THDOW 


PERSPECTIVE 
Dr. Stephen Leacock 


by David Savage, BA’37 


t is hard for me to believe that 1934 is now 
forty-six years ago. Yet, ineveryone’s life, 
certain years gleam down the long corridor of 
time and, for me, 1934 was one of those 
shining beacons. It was hardly so for most, as 
we were then stuck in the midst of the De- 
pression. But it marked a great departure for a 
very green, very shy, seventeen-year-old 
country boy from Duncan, Vancouver Island. 
This was the yearI was sent to McGill. 

By signing on for Chinese guard duty, I was 
able to travel free to Montreal in the Canadian 
Pacific Railway’s colonist car; I got a free 
first-class ticket home, too. (The CPR used to 


hire students and others to guard groups of 


Chinese as they travelled across Canada in 
bond—my group of five was heading for a 
ship on the east coast.) Four days after leaving 
Vancouver, I arrived in huge, awesome, 
frightening Montreal, feeling totally lost and 
knowing no one. Little did I know that after 
three years this same Montreal would be- 
come, and would always remain for me, not a 
city but an emotion. That emotion was love. 

But right then I was ignorant of both 
Montreal and McGill. All I knew was that 
McGill had a figure of world renown, the 
celebrated Canadian humorist Stephen 
Leacock. To my good fortune, I enrolled in 
Leacock’s introductory course in political sci- 
ence and, the next year, in his British Empire 
course. 

I found it hard to picture Leacock, the 
humorist, as Dr. Leacock, the professor and 
head of the department of economics and 


David Savage, a former writer for CBC 
radio, is a lecturer in English at Simon 
Fraser University, Burnaby, B.C. 


28 McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1980 


political science. I did not know what to ex- 
pect as I sat in his lecture room in the Arts 
Building that first Monday at 2:00 p.m. I 
imagined that some tall, elegant, richly attired 
wit would enter; when a small, loosely dress- 
ed, friendly looking old man came in, I was 
surprised. His ruddy, outdoorsy face was 
crowned by a thick crop of iron-grey hair that 
reminded me of a newly opened package of 
steel wool. 

Leacock was always completely prepared 
for his lectures and he worked us very hard. 
For the first two or three weeks I kept wonder- 
ing, ‘‘When is he going to start being witty? 
Where’s all the funny stuff?’ It finally 
dawned on me that Leacock, the professor, 
and Leacock, the writer, were two different 
entities and that, in the event of conflict, the 
humorist was ruthlessly sacrificed to the 
economist. Not once during my two years 
with him—and, for all I know, not once in his 
thirty-three years at McGill—was Leacock 
absent, or a minute late, or the slightest bit 
unprepared. With the enormous pressure of 
writing at least a book a year—he wrote about 
sixty in all—not to mention his speaking tours 
and guest lectures, he had every excuse. But 
no, his job and his students came first. I 
learned from Leacock the meaning of that 
old-fashioned word, dedication. 

Nonetheless, every week or two, Leacock 
would, like one of those unpredictable 
Hawaiian volcanoes, erupt: there was the 
warning twinkle in his eye, the chuckle, and 
then the helpless laughter. One afternoon, he 
was discussing honesty in government—a 
problem then, as now—and this led to hon- 
esty in the everyday citizen. *‘ Would he cheat 


his wife? No! Would he cheat his butcher? 


Never! Would he cheat the paper boy? Un 
thinkable! Would he cheat the government oi 
his income tax? Ah, that’s quite aera } 
By the time he had finished, Leacock” 
bubbling and shaking with laughter, and § 
was the entire class. i: 

Montreal was a great town in those days. At 
Murray’s Restaurant, you could drink cof 
all day for the price of the first cup—te er 
cents. At a student hangout, the Peel Tavern 
opposite the Mount Royal Hotel, you could 
get a huge stein of strong beer, plus all the 
chips and pretzels you could eat, for ten cents, 
And at that little French restaurant on Moun 
tain Street, you could order an excellent, 
full-course dinner for thirty cents. Night life, 
too, was cheap, and the nightclubs had 4 
verve and sparkle that even the Depression 
could not still. 

My first two years with Leacock oassea 
too quickly. I was happily anticipating a thi ird 
when I heard the incredible news: McGill’ 
new principal, Dr. A.E. Morgan from Hull, 
England, had informed Leacock that he had 
reached retirement age and was to leave. Hi 
final lecture to us could have been a sad occa 
sion, filled with memories and goodbyes. In- 
stead, he crisply summarized the course 1 
preparation for the final exam and quickly left 
the room to our heartfelt applause. When we 
gathered the following week for the exam, 
Leacock was nowhere to be seen, but hi 
secretary came in carrying a box filled with 
copies of his latest book, Hellements of Hic- 
kenomics. They were for us, his students; in 
typical Leacock style, he had individually in 
scribed each copy on the flyleaf. 

Several days later, McGill’s Economies 
Club gave a farewell dinner for Leacock at the 
Dorchester Hotel. What we all thought would 
be a sorrowful occasion was turned, by 
Leacock alone, into a happy one. After the 
gloom occasioned by all the emotional trib: 
utes, Leacock got up and soon had us ¢ ll 
laughing at the humorous poem he had writte 
as his reply. (It was a poem about retirin ng 
people because of age—he prefaced it by 
saying that it was all in fun and that he ft 

‘‘with the greatest good will.’’) Just before 
left, I noticed a newspaper reporter approach 
Leacock. He said he had missed a line ort : 
of the poem because of all the eee nd 
could Dr. Leacock please tell him what th : 
were. *‘Here,’” said the professor, giving hi 
the hand-written verse, ‘‘but don’t lose it be 
fore you print it— it’s the only copy I havel”” 

I recall this incident every time I read tha 
some university has paid dearly for some sec 
ond- or third-rate poet’s manuscripts. — 
Leacock wore his honours lightly and that w was 
another thing I learned from him: success 
makes people better, not worse. As Somerset 
Maugham put it, ““The common i that 
success spoils people by making them vé 
egotistic, and self-complacent is erroneol 
on the contrary it makes them, for the most 
part, humble, tolerant, and kind. Failure 
makes people bitter and cruel.” Wel 
Leacock died eight years later, on March 28 
1944, his students everywhere knew they ha 
lost a great teacher and a humble, tolerar ant, 
and kind man. 0 : 


| 
| 


| 


| 


| The daughter of an 
| English-speaking father 
| who died early in her life 
and a mother of Huguenot 
| extraction, Mabel King 
was raised in a quiet, 
scholarly family on Ste- 
Famille Street. Among 
their friends at nearby 
McGill University were 
a number of professors 
from France, and Mabel’s 
penchant for languages 
led to a Bachelor's degree 
in 1907 and a Master’s in 
1910. As well as lecturing 
at the university and 
tutoring privately in her 
home, the young scholar 
became a lively member 
of the Mount Royal 
Tennis Club. She also 
served as president of 
the Women’s Canadian 
Club of Montreal and, 
during World War II, 
was a translator for the 
International Labour 
Organization. 

A former pupil and 
close friend left Mabel 
King a handsome bequest 
which enabled her to live 
in simple luxury and 
travel extensively. When 
it came time to make her 
own will, Mabel King 
remembered McGill and 
provided a most generous 
scholarship fund for the 


This graduate remer 


Alumnae Society — a 
living legacy for future 
generations of McGill 

women students. 


* * * 


McGill continues to 
receive generous support 
from the private sector 
through bequests and 
trusts. In 1978-9 
graduates and friends of 
the university dedicated 
over $1,300,000 to 
research, scholarships, 
bursaries, libraries, and 
other needs. The nine 
bequests already received 
this year have added more 
than $500,000 to these 
worthy areas of support. 
A booklet entitled 
Opportunities will soon 
be available for those 
considering making such 
bequests and gifts to 
McGill. 

If you are interested 
in helping to assure 
McGill’s future by means 
of a bequest, please 
contact: 

D. Lorne Gales, Director 
McGill Bequest and 
Planned Giving Program 
3605 Mountain Street 
Montreal, Quebec 

H3G 2M1 


NOTMAN PHOTOGRAPHIC ARCHIVES 


Tel. (514) 392-5932 


Ee Er EON TFT Pore tT 
per MiiGatae RA vd ts 
oe be PEED eT 


Today, more and more university 
graduates are finding the route to career 
advancement lies in management. 
Regardless of when you obtained your 
undergraduate degree, the field you 
graduated in, or your work experience, 
graduate study in management merits 
serious consideration. An MBA is a two 
year intensive program designed to pro- 
vide the specialized knowledge and skills 
so essential to modern management in 
both the private and public sectors. 

The McGill MBA is a distinctive inter- 
national program offering a balance be- 


eM 


tween learning-by-doing (case method) 
and the theoretical approach to the 
study of management. You benefit from 
the best of both worlds — integrating 
problem-solving techniques and con- 
cepts in practical situations. 

The first year of the program 
covers the ‘need to know” areas 
of management. In the second year 
of the program you specialize in one 
of our fifteen areas of business 
(marketing, finance, etc). And you 
become an expert in your field — 
not just a general manager. 


Postes 
Canada 
Port paye 


Se 


yon 


ae simisinimiiinin.s 
Sn ) 


eo 
er as ce i Mtn en Mi ee 


r£ 


If you are interested in learning 
about the McGill MBA Program, yt 
invited to contact Alison Barker, f 
Admissions Director, by telephone 
(514-392-4336), by mail or in perso 
1001 Sherbrooke Street West, Mc 
Quebec. 

McGill offers a part-time as We 
full-time MBA Program. 


. 


McGill University 
\w” Montreal 


{SAbSh eee etitgs FS 


~ . * 
Sais; eS 
sae 
De _~ 


potters site te 69. 


mane 


ts 
al | al 
f % 7 
, bie 3% ~ 
5 wit mA sg 
5 hs 
\ is — Sa P : 
’ ~~ - oo ie > apg 
" fom ; are f ek r 
* . ies 4 soa? 
. “4 
a P \ . a ee. + 
a _. ak ; 
’ | A - ad ~4 : 
adh ; ¥ 
i “er a : ” > 
ae a - oa 
; < 
wag ; | 
4 7 s 
* ; ey 
be P ’ uf 
‘ \ * 3 4 ( : 
4 - SF ty, 
- Pe 
- i 
a 4 va 
a , a F 
} 
. ull yi f 
- bp grea, ® 
\ * 
e ee Fs 
‘ 
+ a “ ? . 4 
ott hoe, 
4 
: f 
2 7 ’ 
‘ 4 - 
° wa i 
2 _— oe. ; re wep 
- * —_ i Za u v pv = 
: Pad] | 
a > v* 3m » Z 
Z q as 
= M&M - - ie 
_ a /- - . —_ 
Se eo ra ~ astra ie ie oA i 
- «7 ~ a ~4F r 4 ‘ = 
" te - ‘J 
- ° P, z o , ¥ a ’ . ro... ha ; 
7 ' 7 i ™ . an : : ; a 
. = : “A - 
: des ‘ iv 4 : J 3 eee 
ee en wD he ave! fea hod Z ui &, . 4 t zx = a a” > ee Sy a. et LY nN 


ee 


GEORGE HAS A DEGREE IN MARIN 
BIOLOGY AND A JOB DRIVING 


science and technology graduates A C ment is ready to help by contributing 
like George are too valuable to waste. ® up to $1,250 a month (for a maximum 


These are the people, young and enthusiastic, of 12 months) towards the salaries of university, - 
who should be helping us to shape tomorrow. community college and technical school 
These are minds, fresh and innovative, that graduates with the qualifications to tackle 
could be involved in research and development those projects; graduates who havent, © 

and inits application to urgent energy and until now, been able to find employment in 


environmental problems and to the task of their disciplines. 
making Canadian industry more efficient Talk to Employment & Immigration Canada 
and competitive. about our New Technology Employment 


We cant afford to wait. Private sector Program. 
companies, individuals, associations, research You know what's on our minds. Tell us 
institutes and community organizations can whats on yours. 
help ef eos es that will contribute 


Nerney 


“tenes hasan iis. 


A’S EMPLOYMENT PLANS WON’T WORK 
WITHO 


gen why Employmentand —— Emploiet 
anh a a Taslesliele-\ ilo] aM @r-lat-Yol- Wm antaatiete-ltel ah @r- Uae 
Lloyd Axworthy, Minister. Lloyd Axworthy, Ministre 


1981 


Ski Utah 
Dates: 


1981 (7 days) 
Saturday, March 7, 
1981 

(7 days) 

US $750.00 

per person 


Price: 


Galapagos, Inca Civilisation, 
Amazonia 


Date: March 3, 1981 
(18 days) 
Price: Approx. $2,800.00 


. Cdn per person 
Tour Guide: David Lank 


Greece, The Greek Islands & 
Ephesus 
Date: 


Friday, May 22, 1981 
(14 days) 

Price: $2,750.00 per person 
Tour Guide: Dr. George Snider 


Rome, Florence & Sardinia 
Dates: Saturday, May 30, 
1981 (14 days) 
Saturday, June 13, 
1981 (14 days) 
$1,950.00 per person 


Price: 


McGill Society of 
Montreal 
Travel Programme 


Saturday, February 28, 


If you want to make everything 
you do better, start by making 
yourself better. 


Alaska Cruise 
Date: June 1981 (8 days) 
Price: TBA 
Tour Guide: Dr. Alice Johannsen 


Sri Lanka, India, Nepal 


Date: October 1981 
(15 days) 
Price: TBA 


Tour Guide: Dr. Stanley Frost 


Membership tn the Travel Pro- 
gramme ts available to graduates, 
parents, and associates making 
contributions to McGill, or by pay- 
Ing a$10.00 fee to the McGill 
Society of Montreal. 


Details of the 1981 special tours 
have been finalised. For an itiner- 
ary and application form please 
contact: 


Jost Travel 

100 Alexis-Nihon Blvd. 

st. Laurent, Quebec H4M 2N7 
Tel.: (514) 747-0613 


PARTICIPACTION 


go’ 


The Canadian movement for personal fitness. 


CONTENTS 


Feature Articles 
Dean Gordon Maclachlan enjoys it all 7 
by Janet Kask 


W.J. Eccles: detective, lawyer, and judge 8 
Interview by Robert Armstrong 


Mid-career crisis iid 5a 
by Manfred F.R. Kets de Vries 


Remembering Dawson College: Boulais 
busses and Betty the carnival queen 12 
by Gary Richards 


Research and scholarly progress . the 
by Dr. Walter Hitschfeld 


ME CICA Oe ul ES arts eg aie 
by Christine Farr 


A manifesto of cooperation: McGill and 
Peking University 
by Alison Nesmith 


Departments 
What the Martlet hears Ree ae 2 
Newsbreak ... SL eR 


by Alison Nesmith 
Where they are and what they're doing 19 


society activities Rees oie a eS 
by Gary Richards 


Perspective: Madame Liang Si-Zhuang .. 28 


Cover photograph: Pierre-Louis Mongeau 
Design: Merv Walker, Kirk Kelly Design 
Cover: Autumn shadows fall across lower 
Campus as students gather for a late after- 


noon game 


ews 


The official publication of the Graduates’ 
Society, the News is sent without charge to all 
recent graduates and to all other graduates 
and friends who make annual contributions to 
McGill University 


Volume 61, Number 2 
Fall, 1980 
ISSN 0709 9223 


Editorial Board 

Editor Charlotte Hussey 

Assistant Editor Alison Nesmith 
Members John Hallward (Chairman), 
Andrew Allen, Edith Aston, David 
Bourke, Gretta Chambers, David 
Cobbett, Katie Malloch, Elizabeth McNab, 
Peter Reid, Gary Richards, David Strutz, 
Tom Thompson, Laird Watt, James 

G. Wright 


The copyright of all contents of this 
newspaper is registered. Please address 
all editorial communications and items 
for the “Where They Are and What They’re 
Doing’ columns to: The McGill News, 
3605 Mountain Street, Montreal, Quebec, 
H3G 2M1._ Tel.: (514) 392-4813. 


McGILL NEWS/FALL 1980 1 


‘ 


= oe 


"RS ra 243 


McGill International 
furthers foreign 
relations 


The Faculty of Medicine is sending five 
people to Ethiopia. A Nigerian vice- 
chancellor is shopping with his petro-dollars 
for educational expertise. And, the Chinese 
are back intown. Events like these, involving 
McGill's participation in the world commu- 
nity, were given a new focus last June with the 
opening of McGill International. 

Conceived at university planning discus- 
sions in 1977, McGill International aims to 
advance McGill's foreign relations, particu- 
larly in the Third World. While McGill has 
well-established academic ties in the indus- 
trialised nations, it has fewer links with de- 
veloping countries. After a one-year feasibil- 
ity study launched in 1978, McGill decided to 
respond to the Third World's need for educa- 
tional and technical expertise by increasing its 
cooperation with institutions and govern- 
ments in developing nations. 

McGill International director Neil Croll is 
passionately committed to international de- 
velopment. A full-time professor in the Insti- 
tute of Parasitology who has travelled exten- 
sively to study tropical diseases, Croll has 
seen some of the world’s worst health condi- 
tions. He believes their remedies lie, not so 
much in laboratory research as in social, polit- 
ical, and economic change. As he points out, 
**Many of the solutions we need for these 
diseases are already known. We could control 
malaria tomorrow if we just had the com- 
munication, the finances, and the policies to 
do it.” 

Croll worked on McGill's planning com- 
mission for five years and was convinced that 
McGill should play a more active role on the 
world stage. He recalls, ‘*It was my percep- 
tion that we had become myopic about 
Quebec. We had concentrated too hard and 
too long and too short-sightedly on our rela- 
tions in the province. However important they 
are, they are not the only thing that concerns 
the university. And with a small crusading 
body, I tried to capitalise on the excellent 
international reputation of McGill.”’ 

The McGill International office, consisting 
of Croll, his assistant Ginette Lamontagne, 
and development officer Astrid Richardson, 
will operate for a three-year experimental 
period on a grant from the Macdonald- 
Stewart Foundation. According to Croll, they 
hope “to coordinate, stimulate, and be a 


2 McGILL NEWS/FALL 1980 


Vikram Bhatt demonstrates the do-it-yourself 
solar water heater. 


broker for the innovative in McGill’s interna- 
tional activities.”’ They would like to involve 
McGill individuals in foreign educational 
projects and develop the university’s foreign 
relations policies. 

McGill International directs a two-way 
traffic. Supplying McGill professors, who 
want work overseas, with contacts, project 
information, and possible sources of funding, 
they also guide foreign governments and in- 
stitutions to the appropriate department or 
individual on campus. Croll estimates that 
McGill International handles five such exter- 
nal requests per week. Some countries, like 
the oil-rich Persian Gulf states, can afford to 
buy McGill's expertise while poorer nations 
obtain funds from international development 
organisations. 

At one time a professor could organise an 
overseas project single-handedly. Now, how- 
ever, these arrangements generally involve 
institutions, governments, and the signing of 


Judee GantenW 


contracts. And, McGill International as mie 
dleman is making sure it all happens. Confj 
dent that this service will prove indispensg 
ble, Croll says: “‘I don’t see how McGil | 
could possibly function effectively without g} 
McGill International.’’ Alison Nesmith] ~ 


Solar energy’s 
in the bag 


When McGill’s School of Architecture take 
out the garbage, look closely—it might be. 
low cost solar water heater. What hey ye 
done is fill a slightly modified, green garbage} 
bag with water and place it in the sun. By lat 
afternoon this simple device will have heateg 
100 litres of water to 40 degrees celsius. Coste) 
ing about $1.80, it’s ideal for campers) 
sailors, or anyone wanting to rough it in style, 
Valkalathur Nataraj, MArch’79, began, as 
part of his master’s thesis, to develop an inex: 
pensive solar water heater. Wanting a simple; 
effective unit, he chose a bag or pillow-type 
similar to one marketed ten years ago by the 
Japanese. Although the basic design is not 
new, Nataraj’s innovation lies in the use of 
cheap household materials and the “do-it 
yourself’? assembly method. a 
First, a PVC pipe is attached by gaskets a nd 
washers on one side of the bag to accommo- 
date the water flow. Next, the open end of the 
bag is folded and sealed by touching a lighted 
cigarette along its edge. As the plastic begins} 
to melt, the edge is pressed between the thumb 
and forefinger. *‘With a little practice, it is 
possible to make a leak-proof joint. Whether} 
or not the operator smokes the cigarette is, of 
course, optional,’” says assistant architecture 
professor Vikram Bhatt, MArch’75, the ac 
visor who worked closely with Nataraj on he 
project. Finally, the bag is filled with one 
hundred litres of water and placed in the 
on.a flat piece of styrofoam which preve 
heat loss. One such bag will provide enough 
water for two campers to bathe in comforta- 
bly. . 
During a three-month experimental period, 
the solar bag water heater never sprang a leak. 
The design was also tested with aici 
apparatus. ‘‘We tried adding glazing and fe} 
flectors,’’ says Bhatt, **but the slightly higher 
temperature difference did not warrant forfeit 
ing the simplicity of the device.’’ There are 
however, certain drawbacks. Dishes ¢ 2 
washing must be postponed until late @ 
noon, and the heated water cannot be store 
overnight. 4 
Nataraj and Bhatt have just published 
pamphlet, one in a series of self-help pan i 
tions put out by the School of Architecturt 
Minimum Cost Housing Group, that outlir In 
the simple step-by-step method of assemopi 
the garbage bag solar heater. **The te an 
ogy we try to develop at the Minimum ¢ Cos 
Housing Group,’” says Bhatt, “‘is desig ie 
with the idea that interested people, using 
materials that are commercially availé 
should be able to reproduce the design th Ml 
selves.’ Your own solar-heated water in $a 


iT 
sul 
io 
iS 
e 


AicGillmobile: 
victory at 67 m.p.g. 


rive to Toronto on just seven dollars worth 
f gas? It’s possible if you’re at the wheel of 


1¢ McGillmobile—an ordinary-looking Dat- 
un fastback that averages sixty-seven miles 
er gallon. 

Put together at McGill by mechanical 
ngineering students, the car is five years 
head of its time according to one General 
fotors design engineer. But engineering pro- 
‘ssor and project coordinator David Pfeiffer 
escribes it as “*a return to simplicity, simple 
ke the Model T. Our invention is not new. It 
ses technology that was available twenty 
ears ago. What we did do was a complete job 
n all the components to make the engine 
ork properly.”’ 

With the exception of its new independent 
ur-wheel Fiat suspension, the McGill- 
bile has been reconstructed from a six- 
2ar-old, rear-engine transverse-located 
ustin Mini 1000 powerplant and other re- 
aimed parts. Students made slight altera- 
yns to the carburetor and ignition and added 
new intake manifold with polished, over- 
zed ports. But their most significant modifi- 
ition was to install dome-shaped pistons, 
ereby raising the compression ratio to 11:1. 
his increased both the power and efficiency 
the car. 

The average four-cylinder motor can be 
ade as fuel-efficient as the McGillmobile 
tr about $2,000, says Pfeiffer. But, depend- 
g on the model and age of the car, these 
odifications may or may not pay off. ‘* Were 
anadian gas prices as high as those in 
irope, it would be a viable investment to- 
ly,’ says McGill student Michel Hutchison, 
ho worked on the vehicle. : 

This summer, the McGillmobile competed 

Western Washington University’s Econo- 
llye II, a competition to test fuel-efficient 
hicles on a controlled run covering fifteen 
ites and some 3,296 miles. Going the dis- 
ice on $91 worth of gas, it placed first based 
its 2,160 pounds of weight, averaging 67 
les per gallon on the best legs of the trip. 
That figure (67 miles per gallon) was ob- 
ned at a highway speed of 60 miles per 
ur. If the speed had been reduced to 50 


Le ee 2a ee es wy 


Admiring the McGillmobile’s new paint 


PSeh tae asti 


job are mect 


+ 


Professor Michael Paidoussis and project coordinator Professor David Pfeiffer 


miles per hour, we could be getting 72 to 75 
miles per gallon,’’ Pfeiffer adds. 

Most Econorallye entries ran a support ve- 
hicle to carry baggage and extra weight, but 
the McGillmobile was loaded down with 
camping supplies and luggage. It required 
comparatively little maintenance during the 
four-week, 8,500-mile round trip between 
Montreal and Washington State. It also per- 
formed surprisingly well without energy con- 
suming anti-pollution devices in emissions 
tests. A by-product of its finely-tuned engine, 
it seems, is low pollutant discharge. 

Government and industry have been slow 
in showing interest in the McGillmobile de- 
spite its impressive track record. ‘‘It’s 
funny,’’ comments Pfeiffer, ‘‘the knowledge 
of what we have would be enough to start an 
attractive car industry in Canada.’’ Hutchi- 
son, who worked last summer at General 
Motor’s Oshawa plant, agrees: *‘Its more than 
overdue for us to have our own auto manufac- 
turer.”’ 

‘‘Besides,’’ adds Pfeiffer, ‘‘if everyone 
drove one of these McGillmobiles, there 
would be 440,000 barrels of fossil fuel saved 
per day.’’ That’s about two-thirds of the fuel 
Canadians use everyday on the highway. 
Judee Ganten{_| 


i 2 EG a a Sy 
ident Robert Sing demonstrates a breathalyser test in a McGill chemistry exhibition at Man and 


World last summer. 


Chemistry for 
Man and His World 


Chemistry should be a household word. That 
was the message conveyed in an exhibition 
presented by McGill’s chemistry department 
at Man and His World last summer. An in- 
Structive and entertaining spectacle of 
demonstrations, lectures, audio-visuals, and 
magic, this bilingual show attracted more 
than forty thousand visitors including Prime 
Minister Pierre Trudeau and his family. 

Last spring the City of Montreal asked 
McGill to contribute to Unesco’s *‘Man and 
the Biosphere’’ pavilion. Coordinated by 
chemistry professor David Harpp, depart- 
ment chairman Mario Onyszchuk, BSc’51, 
PhD’54, and.. his administrative assistant 
Normand Trempe, plans began to take shape. 
Harpp saw the project as an opportunity to 
show people how chemistry affects their 
daily lives. *“‘Everyday we make important 
decisions concerning the foods we eat, the 
drugs we take, the soaps we use, the cosme- 
tics we prefer, and the fabrics we wear. Very 
often the basis for a good decision is rooted 
in simple scientific principles,”’ says Harpp. 
‘“However, most individuals have had only 
minimal training in science and are often left 
at the mercy of advertisers in making their 
choices.’’ An effective way of informing 
people about chemistry, Harpp feels, is to 
combine entertaining demonstrations with 
straightforward, scientific explanations. 

Two Dawson College professors, Joseph 
Schwarcez, BSc’69, PhD’74, and Ariel Fens- 
ter, PhD’73, collaborated with Harpp in or- 
ganising the exhibition. They are the 
originators of a show called the ‘*‘Magic of 
Chemistry,’’ which has met great success in 
performances in a number of cities over the 
past three years. They had also teamed up 
with Harpp last winter on a lecture series for 
consumers. Consequently when the city 
wanted McGill to join the pavilion, Harpp 
recalls, “‘it was a chance to polish some 
things and try out new ideas.’’ Continued 


vanical engineering department chairman, 


McGILL NEWS/FALL 1980 3 


Harold Rosenberg 


Their efforts generated a three-facetted 
programme. The main event was a series of 
mini-labs conducted by seven chemistry stu- 
dents. These labs examined three themes- 
colour, household chemistry, and 
synthetics—and incorporated slides, brief 
scientific explanations, and some impressive 
chemical sleight of hand. A spray of water 
revealed the magenta streak of a laser beam. 
A natural pink cabbage dye changed in- 
stantly to green when the acidity was altered. 
A needle pierced a rubber balloon that, 
miraculously, didn’t burst. Although admit- 
ting that some of their performance was just 
for show, student Robert Sing thinks the 
spectators learned that chemistry was not 
‘*just monstrous glass test tubes. At least, the 
demonstrations give people some insight into 
what chemistry is.”’ 

student Pierre Haddad ‘‘found it a little 
nerve-racking at first’’ when he gave a com- 
mand performance for the prime minister. 
Haddad, however, soon got over his stage 
fright and recalls that the Trudeau children 
‘“were amazed—they really had a good 
time.” 

In addition to the mini-labs, the chemistry 
department’s exhibition included a shortened 
version of ‘The Magic of Chemistry’’ and a 
series of brief lectures devoted to science and 
the consumer. While the Schwarcz and Fens- 
ter production was a fast-paced combination 
of demonstrations, slides, music and magic, 
the lectures tackled more serious subjects 
like synthetics, food additives, and acid rain. 
A public lecture series based on similar 
material is being presented at McGill this fall 
by Harpp and his colleagues. It may eventu- 
ally evolve into a university course for arts 
and science undergraduates. 

The cost of last summer’s show was 
covered mostly by the Unesco pavilion 
which paid for salaries, construction, and 
equipment. The lecture series and the 
‘“Magic of Chemistry’? show required 
additional funds raised by the chemistry de- 
partment. Harpp feels the undertaking, 
which attracted not only VIP’s, but televi- 
sion cameras and the press, was well worth 
it: “*In terms of local public relations, I can’t 
think of anything that would have been bet- 
ter. [It was like an open house all summer.”’ 
Alison Nesmith 0) 


Margaret Laurence: 
the terrifying legacy 
of the present 


“It will not be light-hearted.’’ warned 
novelist Margaret Laurence in a conversation 
before her September 29th McGill lecture— 
the first in Consolidated-Bathurst’s ** Literary 
Imagination’ series. 

While an eager crowd overflowed into the 
aisles of the H. Noel Fieldhouse Auditorium, 
Laurence read, moving without comment 
through selections from The Diviners, The 
Stone Angel, A Jest of God, A Bird in the 


House, and The Fire-Dwellers to underline 


4 McGILL NEWS/FALL 1980 


Pa F SEO E TS SE 


one theme: the impact of World Wars I and I] 


on her characters. She later admitted that her 


own school years were eclipsed by the death 
of friends and family in World War II and 
remembers Hiroshima, August 6, 1945, as the 
beginning of “lost innocence when man came 
to know that he can destroy all life on earth. *” 
The reading ended with an excerpt from a 
convocation address recently delivered by 
Laurence to ‘‘the inheritors’’—the younger 


generation left with a terrifying legacy of 


world war, atom bombs, and the Holocaust. 
In her straightforward manner, she cautioned 
the audience against the helplessness of this 
post-war age: ** The enemy is always, to some 
extent, within in the form of. self-right- 
cousness, spiritual pride, and despair. ‘We 
must take responsibility for ourselves while 
continuing to protest non-violently.”’ 
Although alluding to warring nations in her 
novels, Laurence more readily depicts strife- 
torn families. As revealed in the highly au- 
tobiographical book, A Bird in the House. 
Laurence grew up in a home comprised of 
children, parents, and grandparents. As a 
consequence, she is especially **interested in 
the relationship among three generations.”’ It 
is sad, she feels, that today’s children fre- 


Novelist Margaret Laurence spoke at McGill this fal! 


quently don’t know their grandparents. She 
hopes to write more about **the embattled, bul 
supportive family.”’ 

Children have always been very importanl 
to Laurence who has written several chil 
dren’s stories, with her latest, The Christmas 
Birthday Story, soon to appear. *‘I find 1 
great fun to write for children, but not easy] 
Certainly the books will be shorter ; there Will 
probably be a single theme instead of a ml 
tiplicity of themes. But you cannot talk dowi) 
to children,”’ she says. | 

As for her view of Canadian literatult:} 
Laurence commented that, while eailitt) 
authors had received little recognition in this | 
country, those like herself who began publish | 
ing after 1950 benefited from a surge of it 
terest. She added that today’s writers are hin- 
dered by Canada’s economically restricted 
publishing industry. | 

Laurence refused to talk about her lates 
work-in-progress because, she admits, “Tike 
many writers I am really superstitious. ” Bul 
she gladly spoke about the message of hops 
intrinsic to her novels: **Life is given to each 
One of us to protect, honour, and celebrate: 
Heather BallonQ 


Western honours 
Principal Johnston 


‘I was deeply flattered and touched,’’ admits 
Principal David Johnston when asked to 
comment on the University of Western On- 
tario’s new scholarship established in his 
name. The David L. Johnston Entrance 
Scholarship was made available in March, 
1979, by Western’s Student Legal Aid Soci- 
ety in recognition of Johnston’s stewardship 
as dean of their Faculty of Law from 1974 to 
1979. 

The income from a capital sum of $2,500 
will be awarded annually to a member of the 
entering class who demonstrates not only 
academic excellence, but outstanding service 
lo the community or distinguished perform- 
ance in extra-curricular activities. The recip- 
ent, therefore, must show promise of serving 
society through his study of law. 

Principal Johnston is particularly pleased 
hat the terms of selection emphasise the 
jualities of character that he has always 
valued. Expanding on a favourite theme, he 
sxplains: ““Canadian legal educators do a 
nost effective job in teaching the technical 
eatures, but I have often worried that we are 
lot as effective in developing the ethical sen- 
sibilities that are the key to service in the 
-ommunity.”” 

Indeed, Johnston is quick to tell his own 
aw students that they should donate a signifi- 
‘ant portion of their time to such charitable 
ervices as legal aid, law reform, community 
Wganisations, and governing bodies. 
leather BallonO 


Bookshelf 


The following are capsule summaries of 
900ks by McGill faculty members and 
ilumni: 


Lloyd R. Amey—Budget Planning and 


Jontrol Systems, London: Pitman Publishing 


Ad., 1979. In this original approach to busi- 
less budgets, Dr. Lloyd R. Amey, a professor 
n McGill’s Faculty of Management, applies 
ystems theory to budgeting and budgetary 
‘ontrol. Defining the boundary between 
lanning and control systems, he also asserts 
hat planning and control budgets should be 
ormally separated. 

Michael Brecher with Benjamin Geist— 
ecisions in Crisis: Israel, 1967 and 1973, 
erkeley: The University of California Press, 
980. Basing this case study on two crucial 
eriods in Israel’s recent history, McGill 
olitical science professor Michael Brecher, 
}A’46, examines how leaders make deci- 
ions in times of crisis. 

Louis Dudek—Technology & Culture: Six 
ectures, Ottawa: Golden Dog Press, 1979. 
AcGill English professor and well-known 
oet, Louis Dudek, BA’39, has collected six 
-ctures presented at various universities and 
-arned societies from 1969 to 1975. Ventur- 
1g beyond literature, to grapple with ‘‘the 
yhole of reality,” Dudek records his reac- 


tions to many of the challenges that arose 
during the sixties. 

Allan (K.A.C.) Elliott—Common Sense 
Revolution and Other Essays about Life and 
the World, Toronto: Dreadnaught, 1980. Re- 
tired McGill biochemistry professor, Allan 
Elliott has written sixteen short essays on such 
topics as ‘‘Violence and Creativity’’ and 
‘History and the Future’’ that reflect his 
views on a variety of human dilemmas. His 
ideas are expressed simply, directly, and 
compassionately in a form of ‘‘ wisdom litera- 
ture’’ rarely seen today. 

Richard French—How Ottawa Decides: 
Planning and Industrial Policy-Making 
1968-1980, Toronto: James Lorimer & Co., 
1980. Here, Richard French, an associate pro- 
fessor in McGill’s Faculty of Management, 
takes a look at the federal bureaucracy and the 
failure of government planning during the 
seventies. He identifies three planning 
systems—those of the Department of Fi- 
nance, the Treasury Board, and the Cabinet 
—that have worked at cross-purposes, with 
no regard for public support or ministerial 
cooperation. 

Francois Gendron—La Jeunesse Dorée: 
Episodes de la Révolution francaise, Sillery, 
Queé., Les Presses de l'Université du Québec, 
1979. In this meticulous study of French ar- 
chival material, including some 36,000 police 
files, Frangois Gendron, MA’70, depicts ‘‘La 
Jeunesse Doree,’’ the Muscadins of the 
French Revolution. Identified with the reac- 
tionary Thermidorian movement, these bands 
of young, elegantly-dressed, bourgeois 
hooligans eventually provoked an uprising of 
the masses. 

Hugh MacLennan—Voices in Time, To- 
ronto: Macmillan of Canada, 1980. McGill 
English professor and acclaimed novelist, 
Hugh MacLennan sets his latest novel in 2030 
A.D., in the ruins of Montreal, which was 
obliterated during the ‘‘Destructions’’ of the 
1980’s. While the new world tries to rebuild, 
an old man, John Wellfleet, remembers the 
past and comes to understand the underlying 
causes of the holocaust. 

Roger Magnuson—A Brief History of 
Quebec Education from New France to 
Parti-Québécois, Montreal: Harvest House 


Says suggests 


Ltd., 1980. In this historical account of edu- 
cation in Quebec, McGill education professor 
Roger Magnuson covers all traditions, from 
the French and British colonial regimes to the 
present. Among other factors, he considers 
the bicultural character of Quebec society, the 
active educational role of the Roman Catholic 
Church, and the French-Canadian preoccu- 
pation with cultural survival. 

Richard Augustus Parsons—Curtain Call, 
St. John’s, Nfld., Harry A. Cuff, 1980. This 
collection of some fifty poems by R.A. Par- 
sons, BCL’21, is illustrated with paintings 
and prints by his own family. Dealing with the 
historical, geographical, and folkloric fea- 
tures of Newfoundland and some universal, 
philosophical questions, the poems celebrate 
the indomitable human spirit. 

Witold Rybczynski—Paper Heroes: A 
Review of Appropriate Technology, New 
York: Doubleday Anchor Original Paper- 
back, 1980. McGill architecture professor 
Witold Rybezynski, BArch’66, MArch’72, 
assesses the ideology and achievements of 
Appropriate Technology (AT), a movement 
that promoted such developments as 
windmills, solar heaters, composting toilets, 
and bio-gas. Regretting AT’s association with 
international development agencies, 
Rybczynski maintains that improved tech- 
nology is no substitute for social reform. 

Philip Carl Salzman, ed.—When Nomads 
Settle, New York: Praeger Publishers, 1980. 
Edited by McGill associate professor of an- 
thropology Philip Salzman, this series of es- 
that sedentarisation—when 
viewed as an inevitable step toward civilisa- 
tion—can be detrimental, both for nomadic 
peoples and their societies. 

Norbert Schoenauer—6,000 Years of 
Housing, New York: Garland STPM Press, 
1980. McGill architecture professor, Norbert 
Schoenauer, MArch’S59, in this three-volume 
review of housing from ancient times through 
the nineteenth century, looks at the pre-urban 
house and the oriental and occidental urban 
house. Illustrated with more than 350 line 
drawings, the series explores man’s never- 
ending quest for warmth, comfort, privacy, 
and protection. 1 


Saul /artaonk 


Paul Parsons has drawn this Newfoundland scene to illustrate his father Richard’s poem 
“Early Ploughing” from the collection Curtain Call. 


~ 


McGILL NEWS/FALL 1980 5 


Courtesy of Harry A. Cuff 


ee Beer Gk Or Ye et ae er a 


the Genetics Society of Canada last June. = 
Dr. Solbert Permutt of Johns Hopkin 
University has received the Louis and / 


Newsbreak 


Conrad Harrington, BA’33, BCL’36, has 
been reappointed Chancellor of the univer- 
sity. 

While Dr. Gordon Maclachlan replaces 
Walter Hitschfeld, PhD’50, as vice- 
principal (research) and dean of Graduate 
Studies and Research, Svenn Orvig, 
MSc’51, PhD’54 starts another term as dean 
of the Faculty of Science. 

Forthcoming vacancies in three vice- 
principalships will prompt a redistribution of 
senior responsibilities in the university. The 
major changes, which will occur as of June, 
1981, will reduce the number of vice- 
principals from six to five by combining fi- 
nancial and administrative services and plac- 
ing all teaching faculties under one vice- 
principal. 

Dr. Svenn Orvig 


are working together to establish the McGill 
Nutrition and Food Centre, expected to be 
operating sometime within the current aca- 
demic year. The centre will coordinate teach- 
ing efforts and stimulate nutrition research. 
Meanwhile, the pharmacology and therapeu- 
tics department is offering Canada’s first PhD 
training programme in toxicology. The new 


programme will concentrate on the effects of 


many agricultural, industrial, and household 
chemicals on human tissue. 

F. Clarke Fraser, MSc’41, PhD’45, 
MD‘°50, professor of human genetics, was 
named outstanding geneticist of the year by 


Fall enrolment summary 


Lucian Award for his research into the phys 
ology of pulmonary circulation. Permutt wif 
be serving as a consultant to the cardiovascy. 
lar division of McGill's Faculty of Medicin 2 | 
until December 15, 

The McGill Redmen football team ended | 
in second place in the Ontario-Quebec Inter 
collegiate Football Conference. In a semi | 
final game against Queen’s Golden Gaels, | 
they lost 23 to 21——a close game and an exci 
ing season’s finish. Alison Nesmith D | 


Dr. F. Clarke Fraser 


1980. 


Faculties & Schools 1979 
Agriculture 923 
ae Arts 4522 
HE. Riaies 
The McGill- Queen’ s University Press, or y i 
Education 2336 
reported in the last issue of the News to have Phiotpecctn 1846 
= suspended operations for economic reasons, ae . 517 
: ‘ has been revived by an arrangement with the M : 
= Tepito Ns AM ae eae anagement 1423 
\ h| University of Toronto Press finalised in Octo- or 
) * Sas Be Medicine 635 
_ ber. McGill-Queen’s will retain its own board Nae 436 
— i of directors and editorial advisory committee, a : 
7 atic We OS ear Oe falas Nursing 13] 
i while the University of Toronto Press will P&OT 57 
‘ provide copy editing, manufacturing, market- Reli wath) Ss Le ae 
WW LSS ey RR Seno eligious Studies 58 
g, and distribution services. Science 9227 
Phil Gold, BSc’57, MD’61, PhD’65, has Continind Baia vi 4 
left his position as director of the McGill e ‘ : 
"hy Cancer Centre to take over as physician-in- | Total Undergraduate IS515 
} Dr. Roger Hand Graduate Studies 3918 
Interns & Residents 707 
Total Graduate 4625 
Grand Total 20140 
Full-time Undergraduate 12344 
Full-time Graduate 2960 
Total Full-time students 15304 
4 chief of medicine at the Montreal General | part-time Undergraduate 317] 2967 204 4 
Hospital. Dr. Roger Hand, who has been | part-time Graduate 958 “939 ~119 . 
associated with McGill since 1973 in the mi- | Total Part-time students 4129 3806 —373_—| 
crobiology and immunology departments, is i ie 
the new head of the Centre. Interns & Residents 707 704 a 
McGill’s Centre for Northern Studies and 4 
20140 19704 —436 


Research also has a new director—Dr. John 
M. Cram, a professor in the education psy- 
chology and counselling department who has 
worked in Arctic Quebec since 1967. The new 
assistant director is Paul F. Wilkinson. 
The Faculties of Medicine and Agriculture 


6 McGILL NEWS/FALL 1980 


Continuing Education students who are also registered in regular McGill day courses. The 
number of Continuing Education students not in 


is LOI fewer than last year. 


cluded in the grand total for 1980 is 7,647. This | 


| 


Su 


Dean Gordon Maclachlan 


enjoys it all 


by Janet Kask 


Fes x, 


Dean Gordon Maclachi 


mat wo 


e: xs “3 he 
ES gee! 


an enjoys this “severe yet cheerful canvas by Bauhaus painter Max Bill.” 


Magee Maclachlan is a man whose moods 
are reflected in the contemporary paint- 
ings decorating his new Dawson Hall office. 
“When I feel very precise and need to bring 
order out of chaos,’” he explains, ‘‘I look at 
he severe yet cheerful canvas by Bauhaus 
yainter Max Bill. When I feel more generous, 
look at the softer abstract composition by 
Maritimer Jack Humphrey.’’ A British 
-olumbia seascape by Gordon Smith is an- 
ther favourite he points to enthusiastically. 
n fact, he is as eager to talk about art as he is 
bout his teaching, research, and administra- 
ive duties. 

On September |, the versatile, Saskatoon- 
orn Maclachlan took over his new adminis- 
fative post as vice-principal (research) and 
lean of Graduate Studies and Research from 
etiring Dean Walter Hitschfeld, PhD’50. A 
otany professor, he had come to McGill in 
962 from the University of Alberta and by 
970 had assumed the chairmanship of the 
ewly formed biology department. This in- 
olved uniting some 45 fac ulty members from 
otany, genetics, and zoology with about 50 
upport staff, 100 graduate students, and 
everal thousand undergraduates to form one 
arge department—an administrative feat that 
vell-qualified him for the deanship. 

AS a department chairman or Senate 


member, a professor sympathetic with late 
sixties student radicals, or the president of the 
McGill Association of University Teachers, 
Maclachlan has moved without conflict from 
one role to another. ‘‘I’ve always had ad- 
ministrative commitments that I’ve enjoyed, 
but I think of myself as a professor. I’m still 
engaged in teaching, and professors do move 
in and out of the administration.”’ 

Teaching is still a high priority for the new 
dean. *‘I love having contact with the stu- 
dents, especially all those highly competitive 
pre-med types,’’ he says. Throughout the 
sixties, he saw student attitudes changing 
from optimism, enthusiasm, and ambition to 
a restlessness and rebellion characteristic of 
the later part of the decade. During his first 
term in the Senate from 1967-69, angry stu- 
dents broke down Principal H. Rocke 
Robertson’s door. Maclachlan, who was be- 
hind said door, admits that the incident was 
frightening, but atypical of university life. 

That troubled era also had a positive side: 
‘‘It was during that time that students were 
admitted to many university bodies such as 
the Senate and Board of Governors,’’ says 
Maclachlan. ‘‘In many ways, they were well 
ahead of their professors in getting this repre- 
sentation. One result was that the university 
could hardly give voting rights to students 


a, 


without recognising that the faculty had cer- 
tain interests in the outcome of things. It gen- 
erally democratised the whole institution,’’ 
he added, *‘and it was then that McGill really 
solidified its collegial atmosphere. ”’ 

After that, students confronted with a 
dwindling job market began their pursuit of 
the professions rather than the pure sciences 
and arts. He also notes the increase in bilin- 
gualism on campus that concurred with 
McGill’s entry into the mainstream of Quebec 
life. “There are many more connections with 
French-language universities,’’ says Mac- 
lachlan. *‘These are the days of big science 
and big projects, so it’s useful at the official 
level to get together to see just what the 
possibilities are. And there are already several 
joint research projects between universities. ”” 

Dean Maclachlan is married to botanist and 
former McGill lecturer Dr. Sally Maclachlan 
who now teaches at Dawson College. They 
have two daughters. While they don’t work in 
the same laboratories, their research projects 
are close enough to allow them to read and 
criticise one another’s papers before publica- 
tion. “If my wife doesn’t understand what 
I've written, then I know something’s 
wrong,’ Maclachlan notes with a smile. 

A longtime interest in art made his chair- 
manship of McGill’s Visual Arts Committee 
one of his favourite assignments. Music is 
another of his passions; he says that listening 
to the Montreal Symphony Orchestra on CBC 
radio while growing up in Saskatoon made 
him want to experience the city that’s become 
his home. And there’s yet another attraction: 
‘‘For someone from a_ unicultural back- 
ground, a bicultural city is an intriguing and 
exciting experience.”” 

Reviewing all his varied talents and in- 
terests, Maclachlan admits that ‘‘research has 
been my raison d’étre for the last thirty years. 
You don’t just give it up overnight.’’ Receiv- 
ing his master’s in plant physiology at the 
University of Saskatchewan and his PhD in 
plant biochemistry from the University of 
Manitoba, he went on to become a National 
Research Council post-doctoral fellow at the 
Imperial College of Science and Technology 
in London, England. 

In the early fifties, he and a fellow botanist 
did the first studies in Canada on plant 
biochemistry using radioactivity. At the mo- 
ment he’s engaged in trying to find a plant 
enzyme capable of forming cellulose, the 
most abundant organic compound on earth. 
‘*But, even though cellulose is the basis of 
Canada’s most extensive industry—pulp and 
paper—to this day biochemists don’t know 
how it’s made,’’ he explains. ‘‘It’s rather 
embarrassing, since we've made everything 
imaginable from DNA to RNA. What we do 
know is that it would involve speeding up the 
growth of plants and that the potentials of 
such a discovery are tremendous.” 

But the greatest rewards for Maclachlan 
have come from seeing his own students suc- 
ceed: “*I don’t know of any greater gratifica- 
tion than watching them go on to win impor- 
tant post-doctoral awards and scholarships. 
I’m very proud of them.”’ (1 


McGILL NEWS/FALL 1980 7 


. 
4 
ce 
a 


W. J. Eccles: 


Interview by Robert Armstrong 


Editor’s note: William J. Eccles, BA’49, 
MA’S51, PhD’SS, is a senior historian and 
authority on New France. Born in Yorkshire, 
England, he came to Montreal at age eleven. 
Except for a year in Paris at the Sorbonne, all 
of his university studies took place at McGill. 
He left Montreal in 1953 to spend four years 
teaching at Brandon College in Manitoba fol- 
lowed by six years at the University of Al- 
berta. 

Since 1963 Eccles has taught in the history 
department at the University of Toronto where 
he is currently a Senior Connaught Fellow. 
He recalls that, upon his arrival in Toronto, 
Canadian history was still ‘‘what one politi- 
clan said to another.’’ ‘‘Historians never 
asked the question, ‘How much bread is being 
put in the mouths of the poor?’ It’s only in the 
last ten years or so that Canadian historians 
have begun to consider social history.”’ 

Eccles has been the recipient of numerous 
fellowships, medals, and prizes including the 
Tyrrell Medal of the Royal Society of Canada 
and the Gilbert Chinard Award of L institut 
frangais de Washington, D.C., for his book 
France in America. He is now preparing a 
study of the interplay between the fur trade 
and imperial politics in which he will examine 
Canada's role in the French empire prior to 
the British Conquest. 

News freelancer Robert Armstrong re- 
cently spoke with Eccles about his approach 
to Canadian history. Excerpts from that in- 
terview: 

News: How did you develop an interest in the 
history of New France as opposed to some 
other period? 

Eccles: Professors Charles Bayley and Ed- 
ward Adair were, in my view, the two best 
men in the history department at McGill. It 
was a small department. I wasn’t too eager to 
work in the mediaeval period—Bayley’s 
period. And, although the state of Canadian 
history after the Conquest was pretty dreary as 
it was taught in the 1940’s, the pre-Conquest 
period that Adair dealt with was really fas- 
cinating. Adair was a very tough man, ex- 
tremely rigorous and frightening to everyone. 
But there was no doubt that one received a 
marvellous training from him. He had made 
his reputation as a European and British his- 
torian. So when he moved to McGill, he had 
this tremendous background knowledge of 
sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth cen- 
tury Europe, and he began looking at Canada 
during this same period—the French period. 
He was the only English-Canadian historian 
to do so at that time. 

News. Were there other scholars who influ- 
enced you? 


8 McGILL NEWS/FALL 1980 


Het hee ae Spe ee 4 Fh oO ee 


¥ 


detective, lawyer, and judge 


When one looks at old maps and historical atlases of North 
America, it appears as if New France consisted of an area 
running down the St. Lawrence, the Great Lakes, andthe. 
Mississippi Valley. I think that’s nonsense. All that the French | 
held were little posts dotted here and there. Their sovereignty 
extended to the range of a musket outside the walls of their 
forts. The Indians were sovereign and they allowed the French 
to have these posts purely on sufferance—as long as they 
served the Indians’ purposes.... 


Eccles: Paul Vaucher, an historian of the old 
school, greatly influenced my work. Vaucher 
had a seminar at the Sorbonne on the diplo- 
matic history of the eighteenth century that 
was very impressive. He had a tremendous 
fund of knowledge and an ability to analyse 
the evidence and come up with really convinc- 
ing answers. 
News: You spent a year at the Sorbonne dur- 
ing 1951 and 1952. How did this affect your 
perspective on history? 
Eccles: At that point in time French historians 
were about a light year ahead of everybody 
else. Getting plunged into the Annales School 
of social history was quite shattering. The 
Annales School was looking at the whole of 
society, largely the lower classes, and putting 
them in a context. 

At that time, Canadian history was just 


‘politics and battles.’ Society was not looked 
at as a whole. French Canadian historian 
were the first to move. They were much mog 
strongly influenced by French social hist 
rians and the Annales School. 7 
News: Were you influenced by this school ag 
well? Y 
Eccles: The Annales School did not have a 
immediate impact on my work. During the 
early fifties, I was still doing an old fashioned 
British-style biography—‘the life and times 
of....’ The French have never regarded that 
as history. They admire the British for doing 
it, but they won’t touch it themselves, It was 
not until later that my work changed, and]) 
looked more at society. In all my later works} 
I ask questions that I would never have asked 
before. q 
News: What are you working on at present? | 
Eccles: | am now working on a paper called 
‘‘Sovereignty-association, circa 1750,” on 
relations between the French and the Indians 
When one looks at old maps and historical 
atlases of North America, it appears as if New 
France consisted of an area running down the 
St. Lawrence, the Great Lakes, and the 
Mississippi Valley. I think that’s nonsense. 
All that the French held were little posts dot- 
ted here and there. Their sovereignty ex- 
tended to the range of a musket outside the 
walls of their forts. The Indians were sover 
eign and they allowed the French to have 
these posts purely on sufferance—as long as 
they served the Indians’ purposes, as long as 
they provided goods and services at competi 
tive prices. 


The Indians could drive a pretty hard bar 
gain. They didn’t like to haggle. It was be 
neath their dignity. But if they didn’t receive 
what they considered to be fair prices from me 
French, they could always go to the Englist. 
They made this very plain, and they played 
the French off against the English. . 

What the English wanted from the India) 
was his land. The Indian was occupyillb) 
something that the English coveted and, from! |} 
this point of view, had to be removed. Je 
French saw the English population expandily |} 
rapidly and feared that they would flood it ) 
develop the continent’s resources, and oe; | 
come extremely powerful. For this reasol 
the Indians had to be kept in tight alliance | 
the French. _ 
News: To what extent did Indian culture aff oat 


| 
| 
French-Canadian culture? i. 


— 


= Oe EE SOTO 


This William Bollan 
imprint of amap of 
North America 
shows Pre- 
Conquest Canada 
as conceived by 
French cartog- 
rapher Sieur Bellin 
1746. 


a a — 


% yg 


Hout - lung: tule frum Furr 


wo 99| 


cles: | can see very little evidence of French 
Iture being influenced by the Indians. 
iperficially, yes, clothing, means of trans- 
rt, a few Indian legends crept into Canadian 
Iklore. But Indian sexual mores were com- 
-tely different. When the French went out to 
> west, they accepted the Indians’ sexual 
res. But you do not find these mores brush- 
2 off on the people who lived in the central 
lony, where society was strictly monoga- 
DUS. 
ws: Was French Canadian society deprived 
economic leadership or ‘decapitated’ by 
British Conquest in 1760, as is claimed by 
€ current of Quebec historians? 
eles: | wish that I could give you a clear 
swer. I don’t really know. I think it was, but 
tin the way suggested by some. It was the 
bility, not the merchant class, that was de- 
itated. New France was dominated by the 
bility. It’s that class that was eliminated by 
Conquest. There were very few merchants 
New France. Most business in the colony 
S$ controlled from France by metropolitan 
rehants who had agents in Quebec City. 
€ or two of these agents stayed on after the 


Nquest and went down the drain eco- 
Mi Te 


NEW FRAN © E ghana 


> ies. 
4 
. ree yt . 
“y ae Sd Py w : ek 
| Jorha J Pe niil ss , has _— 
vania fa» jai: ee 4 


aS” oat anid 


Var gas 


(' we 


ne pa eee 


‘~ 
Chefap** 


4% ad 
fia i) 4 yarn 
| Ju my 


eel 


nomically. 
News: Do you feel that the Conquest was the 


most important event in the history of 


Quebec? 

Eccles: It was the most important event in the 
history of Canada. English Canadian histo- 
rians have always regarded the Conquest as 
being in the natural course of events, as 
though it was ordained! It was just sheer luck 
that the British won at Quebec. And if they 
hadn’t, we would all be speaking French. 
Toronto would be a French-speaking city. 
News: How do you relate to the Toronto 
school of economic history, the so called 
‘staple’ approach, which suggests that Cana- 
dian history was determined by the country’s 
dependence on resource exports’? 


| Eccles: To me, the staple theory is equivalent 


to saying, yes, water normally runs downhill. 
It’s a painful elaboration of the obvious. It is 
really an economic theory; it is not an histori- 
cal theory. It is an explanation of Canada’s 
economic role in the world. Harold Innis and 
his followers maintained that Canadian de- 
velopment was normal because of Canada’s 
colonial role. This is nonsense. The United 
States began in a similar way—exporting raw 


materials—but very quickly switched to be- 
come a great manufacturing and industrial 
power. Canada never made it. It’s got nothing 
to do with geography, or the economy, or the 
environment. Canadian entrepreneurs were 
happy just to be engaged in mercantile activi- 
ties. 

News: Why didn’t Canadian entrepreneurs 
develop as their American counterparts did? 
Eccles: Inertia. Lack of initiative. You know 
the essence of the Canadian genius has always 
been to stumble onto a good thing and then 
screw it up. When Canadians do show initia- 
tive in business or manufacturing, they usu- 
ally find they have to go to the United States to 
get financing. The government won’t give 
them support. 

News:. What do you think of the work of 
Harold Innis, who originally developed the 
staple approach? 

Eccles: When I first came to Toronto, I had 
the view that Innis’s work was garbage. When 
I used to express this view, people stood back 
because they didn’t want to get hit when the 
lightning struck. Last December, I published 
an article in the Canadian Historical Review 
criticising Innis’s view of the fur trade and its 
impact on Canada before the Conquest. | 
presented this paper to historians and 
economists in Toronto before publication— 
running it up the flagpole to see if anybody 
would salute. To my surprise, the economists 
Said, yes, we quite agree with your criticism. 
News: What is the nature of the historian’s 
craft? Does he have established criteria for 
accepting or rejecting facts and hypotheses? 
Eccles: Oh yes. The normal rules of evidence. 
Many historians of the old school began with 
an answer—historians such as Donald 
Creighton, A.R.M. Lower, W.L. Morton. 
They started with their conclusions and found 
evidence to support them. But the nature of 
the work is such that one begins with a ques- 
tion. At least one should. In a sense it’s rather 
like the writer of fiction, but the historian is 
more circumscribed. He has to stick to evi- 
dence, and he’s trying to present to a reader 
what has passed through his mind—his 
theories and the questions and answers that 
he’s put forward. Basically an historian is an 
artist in search of an audience. He’s also a 
detective, lawyer, and judge. 0 


Selected Bibliography 

os following books have been written by 
W.J. Eccles: 

ey Under Louis XIV. Toronto: McClel- 
land & Stewart, 1964. 

The Canadian Frontier 1534-1760. New 
York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1969. 
France in America. New York: Harper & 
Row, 1972. 

Frontenac. Toronto: McClelland & Stewart, 
1959. 

Frontenac. Translated by Francoise de Tilly. 
Montreal: Hurtubise HMH, 1962. 

The Ordeal of New France (thirteen radio 
scripts). Montreal: Canadian Broadcasting 


Corporation, International Services, 1966. 
Philip's Historical Atlas. of Canada. With 
J.W. Chalmers & H. Fullard. London: G. 
Philip, 1966. 


McGILL NEWS/FALL 1980 9 


a et 


10 McGILL NEWS/FALL 1980 


by Manfred F. R. Kets de Vries 


iddle life is the moment of greatest un- 
folding, when a man still gives himself 
to his work with his whole strength and his 
whole will. But in this very moment evening 
is born, and the second half of life begins 
..one begins to take stock, to see how one’s 

life has developed up to this point. The real 
motivations are sought and the real dis- 
coveries are made. The critical survey of him- 
self and his fate enables a man to recognise his 
peculiarities. But these insights do not come 
to him easily; they are gained only through the 
severest shocks.”’ 

Carl Jung 

Psychological Reflections 


The transition described by Jung starts 
around the mid-thirties and continues for a 
number of years, varying with the individual. 
Mid-career crisis relates closely to this transi- 
tion. It is the time when managers evaluate 
original career aspirations and the degree to 
which they have been fulfilled. 

A contemporary example of mid-life and 
mid-career crisis is portrayed in Joseph Hel- 
ler’s book Something Happened. This novel 
deals with the life of Bob Slocum, a middle 
manager in a large corporation. In a dispas- 
sionate way the principal character of the 
story describes his sense of failure, fatigue, 
and boredom with his job, his inability to 
rebel, and his state of anxiety about his career: 
His marriage has reached rock bottom. 
Plagued by insomnia, headaches, nervous- 
ness, and depression, he fears, on some oc- 
casions, that he is losing his mind. 

The novel confronts us with the frightening 
portrait of a manager, desperately unhappy 
about missed opportunities. Slocum copes 
poorly with mid-career transition, a time 
when responsibilities are the heaviest, and his 
story reveals how stressful the onset of the 
‘‘prime of life’’ can be. For men, the term 
‘male climacteric’’ is occasionally used; for 


This article is adapted with permission from 
Organisational Paradoxes: Critical Ap- 
proaches to Management, a new study by 
Manfred F.R. Kets de Vries published by 
Tavistock Publications, Ltd., copyright 
© 1980. Dr. Kets de Vries is a-professor in 
organisational behavior and management 
policy at McGill's Faculty of Management. 
He is also training to become a psychoanalyst 
at the Canadian Psychoanalytic Society. In- 
terested in the interface of psychiatry and 
management, he does clinical work with 
patients as well as consulting work in corpo- 
rate strategy, organisational design, and 
human resource planning. 


Pethwnt. 88 SORE eer St Fa aks 


women, this period often culminates in 
menopause. Psycho-neurotic and psycho- 
somatic tendencies become more noticeable. 
Divorce, health problems, and incidence of 
death show a sudden peak. It is a time when 
careers are viewed in a different light. Goals 
and aspirations may turn into resignation or 
belated attempts at achievement. And given 
limited room at the top, many managers have 
to be disappointed. Mid-career thus becomes 
the time when many a dream will be shat- 
tered. 


Sir William Osler once stated 
that one of the best ways to 
assure longevity was to have a 
mild heart attack at life’s 
mid-point. We hope, however, 
that continuous personal 
assessment and frank self- 
evaluation will make such a 
drastic solution unnecessary. 
Every individual has the res- 
ponsibility to appraise the 
satisfaction and pleasures 
derived from career and 
personal life. 


The coming of middle age 


When an individual reaches the mid-point of 
his life, a number of changes occur. Although 
the outer environment seems full of oppor- 
tunities, his inner life preoccupies him. He 
begins an existential questioning of self and 
values. He is suddenly aware that he is aging 
and more than half of his life has already been 
lived. This leads to depression in some, while 
motivating others to make life more meaning- 
ful. 

Uncomfortable physical changes may take 
place. ‘Body monitoring”’ also begins to oc- 
cur, reflecting an urge to keep the middle- 
aged body at given levels of performance. For 
women, menopause becomes an approaching 
reality; men experience a reduction in their 
sexual drive. 

The future is no longer unlimited. The in- 
dividual views life in terms of time-left-to- 
live instead of time-since-birth as the body 


declines and friends of the same age gro 
may die. Little time seems left to ‘i | 
behaviour of one’s children, and it becom 
urgent to impart one’s values to them. There 
a general perception of losing control 4 
child-rearing mistakes assume a more definig 
and irreversible form. 

In a larger social context, the individ 
realises that he is a “‘bridge”’ between the 
older and younger generation. The youll 
come distant and the old close. The manage 
at mid-life suddenly notices that the younger 
management generation sees him as a ill. 
fledged adult, an authority. He is deferred) 
at work and in social interactions. For some 
this will provoke anxiety and create fantasies 
of being unprotected and alone. 7: 

Critical to the onset of middle age is the 
need to come to terms with accomplishmeniy 
while accepting the responsibilities that a¢ 
company achievements. Many people wil 
demonstrate a greater willingness to take re. 
sponsibility for actions and decisions. Bi 
others fear aging and feel constrained He $0) 
cial norms. This will cause a profound an¢ 
disturbing crisis for a number of people. 4 
Jung once said, *‘the wine of youth doesn not 
always clear with advancing years, some 
times it grows turbid.”’ 


Transformations ‘ 
In the future, increasing life expectancies will 
lengthen the potential working life of men and 
women. This trend, in conjunction ith 
zero-population growth, will place an ever 
larger proportion of managers in the middle 
and older age groups. In order to enhance the 
quality of working life, we will need to view 
career paths and length of productivity will 
less rigidity. Commitment to one organisation 
and one career may become less common. We 
might see a trend in the future toward more 
flexible and varied careers. We can look at 
this changing perception of career as a way t0 
improve the often wasted wealth of talent and 
skills that the middle-aged have to offer in the 
work place, home, or community. The mid 
career transition could become an opportunil 
for reassessment, reevaluation, and positive 
action. Several steps can be taken to facilit ale 
this process. 


Generativity and the mid-stage of life” 


One of the best-known researchers of ii 
human life cycle is Erik Erikson. In his mote 
of the eight stages of life, the stage< 
generativity—‘‘the concern in establishiti 
and guiding the next generation’’—is closél} 
associated with mid-life and mid-career. It 
crucial for organisations to cultivate a senset 
generativity. Energy should be devoted tom 
development of the younger manager, in ond 
to ensure organisational continuity. 
generativity fails, psychological and org 
sational stagnation follow. Managers in ut 
suit of personal glory have no time to care for 
others and fail-in their interpersonal relatia i 
ships. 

The need for counselling Ke | 
In light of the many problems manage x | 
encounter at mid-life and mid-career, her 


4 «ae 
fay 


ems to be a need for counselling to break 
insatisfactory behaviour patterns. This coun- 


elling would teach them the significance of 


zenerativity and provide them with access to 
dult-education in organisational settings. 
Career monitoring could become more of a 
ompany policy. Most managers are aware 
hat entry, mid-career, and pre-retirement are 
Titical points of the career cycle. At present, 
he bulk of resources are directed toward 
areer entry and, very recently, the idea of 
re-retirement counselling has begun to take 
old. But, mid-career counselling remains 
eglected. f 
Mid-career clinics and career redirection 
vorkshops are worth considering. Here, the 
hanager could reexamine the goals of work- 
ng life and explore the possibilities for a 
lultiple career. Douglas T. Hall has 
uggested the notion of a ‘‘protean career’’ 
~more shaped by the needs of the individual 
lan the organisation and subject to regular 
-direction. Thus. flexibility and _ self- 
"een make the mid-career transition 
ler. 
(> | SS 


Prevention of obsolescence 

Managerial obsolescence is fostered by a 
rapid increase in information accompanied by 
changes in technology, managerial practices 
and occupations. From mid-career onward, 
the danger of obsolescence begins to increase 
progressively. Certain people can prevent ob- 
solescence through retraining. Some organ- 
isations make extensive use of job rotation, 
and others ease the mid-career passage by 
providing reorientation periods in the form of 
grants and sabbaticals. Although it may be 
better for both parties to reeducate redundant 
managers for positions more in line with their 
talents and interests, few companies have 
viewed managerial obsolescence in this way. 
Often, the initiative has come from govern- 
ment legislation. 

Naturally, the manager himself has a strong 
responsibility to deal constructively with 
mid-career transition and prevent his own ob- 
solescence. This requires an ongoing and 
realistic assessment of goals and opportuni- 
ties. The manager at mid-career should, 


therefore, be alert to changes in the company. 
Only through such involvement is he, or she, 
able to appraise the potential inherent in the 
present situation and take appropriate action. 
For example, the manager should watch care- 
fully for the incidence of reduced profits, top 
management changes, mergers, excess hir- 
ing, technological transformations, and 
changes in market needs. From another per- 
spective, personal symptoms may 
suggest that a change in the work environment 
iS appropriate. 

Sir William Osler once stated that one of 
the best ways to assure longevity was to have 
a mild heart attack at life’s midpoint. We 
hope, however, that continuous personal 
assessment and frank self-evaluation will 
make such a drastic solution unnecessary. 
Every individual has the responsibility to ap- 
praise the satisfaction and pleasures derived 
from career and personal life. A good hard 
look at these matters will enable the manager 
to traverse the quicksand of mid-career, mak- 
ing it a station en route to personal growth 
instead of decline.U 


stress 


McGILL NEWS/FALL 1980 11 


Edward Hille! 


ee 


carnival queen 


by Gary Richards 

n September 6, 1945, McGill’s colours 
Q appeared for the first time atop a St.Jean, 
Quebec flagpole, signalling the opening of 
Dawson College and the beginning of its 
five-year occupation of a Royal Canadian Air 
Force base. World War IT had just ended with 
many of the returning men wanting to con- 
tinue their education aided by government 
bursaries. Accommodating these thousands 
of war veterans posed a major problem for 
most North American universities. Through 
the foresight of Principal F. Cyril James and 
the help of the Canadian government, McGill 
was able to convert the St. Jean base into a seat 
of higher learning. Thus, Dawson College, 
named for past-principal Sir John William 
Dawson, began its brief yet memorable exist- 
ence. 

Some fifty-six hundred students attended 
the college. The campus population was 
composed of veterans living in austere bar- 
racks, young couples whose only privacy was 
a small bedroom, and an over-worked and 
largely volunteer staff. This post-war mar- 
riage of necessity and goodwill produced a 
tremendous spirit of togetherness with people 
from all ranks of service and a variety of 
backgrounds contributing to the collective 
well-being. 

Enrolled for the first term were 320 science 
and 320 engineering students. By January, 
1946, Dawson’s population had risen to 900 
Students plus their wives and children. To 
cope with this increase, a repair depot was 
obtained from the War Assets Corporation 
and nicknamed **Lower Slobbovia’’ by those 
frequenting it that first winter. Winter and 
Summer sessions were continued until 1947, 
with a peak enrolment of 1,687 in January of 
that year. 

McGill professors such as Dr. Cecil Solin, 
BA’37, MA’38, Elton Pounder, BSc’34, 
PhD’37, and others, remember the red, 
white, and blue Boulais busses and Betty, the 
grounds keeper’s St.Bernard who reigned as 
Dawson Carnival Queen one winter. The 
steamies and frites wagon arrived at 10:30 
p.m., and for those students wanting a real 
break, there was always the local tavern. 

Most important, there were Emmanuel 
**Em’’ Orlick, MA’41, DipPE’42, and his 
wife Aggie, otherwise known as Mr. and Mrs. 
Dawson. They arrived as volunteers one week 
after the college opened. Over the next five 
years they rarely left campus although Em 
travelled to McGill to teach gymnastics and 
coach the gymnastics team. 

The establishment of Dawson’s own ath- 
letic programme presented a challenge that 
Em met vigorously. At the outset there were 


12 McGILL-NEWS/FALL 1980 


Remembering Dawson College: 
Boulais busses and Betty the 


en ee 


ey 


Top: Dawsonites transform 


no sports facilities or equipment. Faced with 
student demands for football, he called a hur- 
ried meeting and pronounced, *‘Gentlemen. 
we have no coach, no equipment, no playing 
field, and no uniforms. Other teams in the 
league have been organised for years and have 
been training hard for over a month. The 
difficulties that stand in our Way are insur- 
mountable, but if you want football. by God, 
we Il have it!”’ 


ed the gym into an impromptu barber shop. Centre: Buried in sncw, | 
Dawson College looked more like a Siberian work camp than a university campus. Below | 
Emmanuel Orlick volunteered and then became “Mr. Dawson.” a 


ie a 


| 
f 


At that moment, a burly ex-officer, stillin) 
uniform, stood up and said, ‘The hell wih} 
the difficulties, let’s have football!”’ Studeats) 
cheered enthusiastically and Em rushed offt0} 
hire a bulldozer to level a suitable site. Then, | 
with pick and shovel, he and a large groupot| 
volunteers finished the job and went onto) 
clear a baseball field. In that first year Orlitk | 
organised facilities and provided equipment} 
for twenty-one intramural activities ald] 
eighteen intercollegiate sports. Cons} 
quently, 93 per cent of all Dawson students} 
participated in the athletics programme. ~ 

Four days after their first football practit® 
the Dawson Dynamos, dressed in cast 
gear, won their first match. Although they) 
played teams better trained, conditioned, and | 
equipped, the Dynamos won every game tit 
year. Most of them had just returned from te} 
battlefields of Europe and had not toucheda) 
football in five years; so their success WS] ] 
credited to the quiet motivating force of EM) 
Orlick. Sa 

The Orlicks’ influence was profound. Ar} 
cording to Vince Jolivet, BEng’52, now liv- 
ing in Seattle, they were just old enough tol 
parental figures to most Dawson students. EM) 
and Aggie, their children, and their spaniel 
Skipper were Dawson’s ‘first family.” Thetr | 
home, one of the old barracks, was the plac: 
people congregated, day and night, for come) 


anc sandwiches. 

Ih a recent discussion about Dawson, Or- 
lick said: **I averaged sixteen hours just about 
every day, fifty-two weeks of the year for five 
yeas. I don't regret a bit of it. The students 
weie wonderful.” 

Day-to-day living at Dawson was often 
compared to life in a small mining town where 
everyone worked for the company, shared in 
community life, and consciously or uncon- 
scicusly helped to shape it. Most people ate 
ther three meals in the dining room; bath- 
AREER Sh) 
This post-war marriage of necessity 
and goodwill produced a tremen- 
dois spirit of togetherness with 
people from all ranks of service and 
a variety of backgrounds contribu- 


ting to the collective well-being. 


room and laundry facilities were available on 
each floor of the barracks; common rooms 
anda library were open to all; and there were 
recreational facilities such as tennis courts, 
billard and ping-pong tables. 

By February 1950, enrolment had declined 
to 654 students and on February 13, McGill 
announced that the college would be shut 
down. It closed in May to the strains of Tony 
Pasbr’s big band, imported from New York 
for the most extravagant social event of Daw- 
sons history. Guests included Principal 
James who, in an open letter to all students, 
said the closing of Dawson symbolised the 
-ompletion of Canada’s first phase of post- 
war reconstruction, since the veteran stu- 
Jens, whose arrival led to the creation of 
Dawson College, were about to graduate and 
>nter new careers. 

His speech captured the sentiment sur- 
‘ounding the occasion, as he addressed the 
ast Dawson students: *‘For five years Daw- 
ion College has been a real academic com- 
nunity. You have shared in its life and made 
/oul individual contribution to it. Your own 
eelings, I imagine, are similar to those of 
oul predecessors, but the nostalgia may be a 
ittle stronger because, after you, there will be 
10 more Dawsonites, no more Dawson Col- 
egeStudents Council, no more Dawson Col- 
ege This is the ending of a chapter in the 
istcry of McGill as well as the ending of a 
hapter in your individual lives.”’ 

Chief Justice and University Chancellor 
Jrville Tyndale and the three vice-principals 
hat ihe college had known—Professors A.H. 
jillson, Carleton Craig, and W.H. Hatcher 
—Were present at the ceremonies. Dr. 
latcher described the closing as *‘the end of 
AcCill’s most daring and successful educa- 
Ondl experiment,’’ to which the principal 
dded, *‘Long live the memory of Dawson.’ 
diter’s note: On November 28, 1980, to 
omnemorate the thirtieth anniversary of 
lawion College’ s closing, a special reunion 
ren Sponsored by the Graduates’ Society 
ill ake place at the Faculty Club. Leading 
if the list of returning Dawsonites will be Em 
nd Aggie Orlick. O 


Research and scholarly progress 


by Dr. Walter Hitschfeld 


niversities are unique institutions in that 
U they are places where both teaching and 
research occur. Different universities give 
different weight to research and teaching, and 
some are more skillful than others in com- 
bining the two functions to best advantage. In 
the United States, the universities that stress 
research are called research universities, and 
they are proud of it. In Canada we tend to 
avoid such distinctions because we consider 
them invidious or elitist, but they exist never- 
theless. Let me give you some statistics about 
McGill. It has 5 per cent of all the university 
students in Canada and 5 per cent of the 
budget of all Canadian universities. But it has 
7 per cent of all graduate students and ad- 
ministers 7.5 per cent of all the available re- 
search funds. This alone makes it a research 
university in the American sense. And this is a 
cause for rejoicing, achieved only by great 
effort and with occasional hardships and, 
most of all, by perpetual vigilance in our 
hiring and promotions policy. 
Let me ask, nevertheless, whether it is a 
good thing that teaching and research are 


aN 


combined? This question is often posed by the 
public, the government, and financial 
analysts concerned with rising university 
costs. It may also be asked by students, espe- 
cially those who are not research students. 

Teaching and research do compete for the 
professor's time and energy. But more is ac- 
complished by two professors, each doing 
teaching and research, than by two equally 
good people, one teaching, the other doing 
research. Teaching also forces the professor to 
communicate the essence of his discipline and 
helps clarify the matrix of ideas from which 
the research proceeds. Thus, research bene- 
fits from teaching. 

Research, in turn, enhances teaching. It 
keeps teaching close to the cutting edge of the 
discipline and instills in teacher and student 
an ever vigilant attitude towards facts and 
theories. And nothing profits a man more than 
experiencing the elusiveness of facts, the er- 
roneousness of texts, and the misfit of theory. 
These are humbling as well as challenging 
experiences. Through them we attain both an 
Continued next page 


McGILL NEWS/FALL 1980 13 


ee en 


essential scepticism and a dedication to those 
facts and theories that stand up under 
scrutiny. Conveying this scepticism and dedi- 
cation is at the heart of teaching. 

In pursuing research, student and teacher 
alike come to admire those who find the facts 
and create the theories. In a marvellous auto- 
biography, Freeman Dyson describes what he 
believes characterises a great scholar: the 
ability to hold a problem in mind for hours and 


( 


writing their books. It may require years of 
disciplined work, interrupted by discussions 
in small and large groups and by arguments 
that are occasionally abrasive because the 
emotions are inevitably involved in even the 
most reasoned of discourses. Others perform 
research in the field by observing the foibles 
of their subjects or their diseases, by studying 
the plants and the animals, the viruses and the 
microbes, or the clouds and the storms that 


Practical research occurs when the answers obtained look 


applicable. It should enlighten people, create opportunities and 


profits, simplify procedures, fill stomachs, make things easier, 
and improve the...security of our lives. Professors usually do 
not...take part in the development that actually leads to the 
final product. But they should talk to and work with people in 
industry, business or government, who are responsible for the 


application of their research. 


days at a time, turn it around, and view it from 
all angles until its intrinsic structure is seen. 
This gives him the lever with which to solve 
it. 

Just as teaching in the university is done in 
different ways by different people, research 
can range from pure to applied. Pure research 
will answer a question for its own sake. It may 
look as if such questions are attempted just 
because “‘they are there,’’ but in the mind of 
the researcher, the motivation is much clearer. 
He sees a context and expects that the solution 
to the problem will lead to another problem. 
Pure research, for which governments and 
some of the public have not always enough 
understanding, is the motor of scholarly prog- 
ress. 

Practical research occurs when the answers 
obtained look applicable. It should enlighten 
people, create opportunities and profits, 
simplify procedures, fill stomachs, make 
things easier, and improve the decency and 
security of our lives. Professors usually do not 
and probably should not, take part in the de- 
velopment that actually leads to the final 
product. But they should talk to and work 
with people in industry, business or govern- 
ment, who are responsible for the application 
of their research. This cooperation is very 
useful. It helps reduce the delay between the 
inception of a good idea and its application 
and, furthermore, relates the university to the 
wider community. Currently, more than 50 
per cent of all research at McGill is applied. 

Research styles vary a great deal. Some 
professors publish a few, or many, articles 
every year, often in collaboration with their 
students or colleagues. They may pack their 
plans and equipment in suitcases, travel to 
great scientific installations hundreds of miles 
away, and in a day’s time perform an experi- 
ment, much of which has been prepared by 
local technicians. Analysing their results may 
take ten or a hundred times longer and may 
add a grain or a bushel to the storehouse of 
knowledge. Others do research by slowly 


14 McGILL NEWS/FALL 1980 


nature visits upon us, and with which we have 
to come to terms if our lives are to be reason- 
ably content and civilised. 

The Faculty of Graduate Studies and Re- 
search recently prepared the McGill Univer- 


sity Thesis Directory, an index of all masters 


and doctoral theses written by our students 
from the turn of the century to the present. 
Reading some early thesis titles such as **The 
Apology of Slavery,’’ ‘“‘Schools in Man- 
itoba,’’ or ‘‘Inhibition and the Uncon- 
scious,’” one gains a simple if episodic grasp 
of what professors thought or tried to find out. 
I think scholars were right in working on such 
questions, whether or not one agrees today 
with what they said. For by saying it, they 
raised issues that they felt were important. 
Another illustration from this early period is 
Ernest Rutherford’s innovative study of the 
natural disintegration of radioactive materials 
from which supremely important practical 
applications were to follow some forty years 
later. In short, what the Directory reveals is 
that eighty years ago McGill was ‘‘with it ’ 

—our professors and students were ahead of 
their time. 

As the importance of university research 
has become recognised, concerned govern- 
ments are funding and tending to guide it. The 
federal government has done so quite sys- 
tematically and increasingly since the days of 
the First World War. Awarded through open 
competition by three research councils, some 
$286 million are being spent this year in all 
fields of university research. 

In more recent years, the provinces have 
started to enter the field. In the late sixties. 
Quebec was one of the first provinces to show 
interest and, in 1971, established the Forma- 
tion de chercheurs et action concertée, a pro- 
gramme that distributes $13 million annually. 
In 1979 the Quebec government issued a 
Green Paper that discussed research in the 
province, engaging in a dialogue with the 
universities and others doing research in 
Quebec. 


= 


In the heat of the recent referendum cam, 
paign, the government brought down a White 
Paper. It included a number of expected anj 
welcome steps such as strengthening existing 
programmes, more and better bursaries for 
students, and a most praiseworthy programme 
for training and supporting scientific map. 
power. Also foreseen is the creation of anew 
portfolio—that of Minister of State for S 
entific Development. In the last chapter of the 
White Paper appears a statement of P 
Québécois policy, namely that Quebec shoal 
recover—repatriate is the expression 
used—the funds now spent federally for j 
own support programmes. I do not know what 
the post-referendum ideas of the government 
are in this respect. But I say categorically tha 
this 1s an issue that needs careful and 
public discussion and an involvement of th 
agencies most concerned, including, in par 7 
ticular, the universities. There has been no 
discussion so far, and there is no sign of such 
involvement! 

No one says that because the federal re- 
search councils have played their roles for 
sixty years, they should have a monopoly. No 
one says that these federal agencies do it so 
well that the provinces have no chance of 
competing effectively. But the federal coun- 
cils have done it well, often in the face of great] 
difficulties, and have created a research sys- 
tem throughout Canada that is the envy of 
many countries, not because it has the most} 
Stars or the most money, but because of its! 
freedom and its essential humaness and jus-| 
tice. A federal element in scientific research 
makes sense and should continue. Other re-) 
search has a more local flavour: the effects of | 
asbestos on health, high-voltage power 
transmission, life in a cold and snowy cli- 
mate, land and urban planning, local history, 
and language teaching. These are clearly of 
overriding interest in Quebec and should most 
reasonably be sponsored here. But I would 
not impose hard boundaries because they do 
not exist. Dialogue between federal and 
provincial sponsors is, therefore, desperately 
needed. This has been quite difficult in the) 
past, in part because responsible spokesmen 
have not existed provincially or even fede | 
ally. | 

There are also scientific considerations: the | 
peer system of allocating grants requires 
knowledgeable but uninvolved committees. | 
You cannot staff such committees if the com 
munity to draw on is too small. Also, sciet 
tists desire a genuine multiplicity of channels) 
and resources. They frequently have ideas) 
that fall outside the guidelines of any ont) 
funding source. 

This is not intended to be a political state- | 
ment. It is merely a plea, but a very insistent 
plea, that in any constitutional conversation | 
on this subject, the people at the laboratory | 


bench and in the libraries be consulted 4] 


cause they know best what research is ane 
how it can be most efficiently nurtured 
Whatever the validity of my remarks, | 
for an open and frank discussion of these 
issues, lest they be decided as apparently un | 


important parts of larger deals, without 
appreciation of the realities involved.U p 


— 
+ 


U 


os 
= 


= at — 
= 
: 


— 
gi : 
oy 4 
-* od } 
eT 
ms « ' 
> nay 
ee 
_ = 4 
"rao Ss 
aie 
ee Dy. 
a = it. 
Pe ee 
- ! ya 
atad> 
a 
a : 
er t 
eal fe 
yee! Cs 
BFS Fae 
east & | 
(£2 \ 
pene OR 
4 ;A 
“% - . 
. , q 
ar 
- 
es * - 
yeh 
oan? 
y? “ 
. oi 
. 
7 
cy 
Dace Sem XS 
: ee | 
RP se. 
‘ee a 
7 
Te vj 
= 


af * 
a Be 
~~ - 
—— 


. 
4 
— 
* . 4 
Svea 
We . 
> t Yo» 
<e Apes 
= % » 
oe 


Watercolour by Mike Green, 1971, of the Macdonald Chemistry Building renamed the Macdonald- 
Harrington Building in 1978 when the Department of Chemistry moved to the Otto Maass Building. 


N 


——_ a oe 


', 


M. Carlyle Johnston 


Past-Chairman 

M. Carlyle Johnston BA’50, 
BCL’53 

Chairman 

John M. Scholes BEng’52 

Vice-Chairman 

A. Keith Ham BA’54, BCL’59 


Itis.a great pleasure to report on what was another record year for the Alma Mater_ 
Fund. Annual giving by graduates totalled $1,320,232. Of this total, $1,246,018 was 
received from the regular solicitations of graduates and an additional $74,214 was 
received from the balance of pledges to the McGill Development Program and faculty 
and staff who are graduates of the University. The grand total of graduate annual 
giving since the start of the Alma Mater Fund in 1948 is $16,788,542. 

The new emphasis on faculty and library designation resulted in a heightened 
awareness among graduates of the activities of McGill’s 16 faculties and schools 
and the needs of the University’s 23 libraries. More than $440,000 was specifically 
designated to these two areas. An additional $81,840 was designated to general 
university development and $482,000 for unrestricted use. The balance of the 
$1,320,232 was designated to specific projects throughout the University. 

The Alma Mater Fund Committee was encouraged by the slight increase in 
participation from the previous year. From what figures we have seen, 24% 
participation is the best of any Canadian university and it compares favourably with an 
average of 22% for private, four-year U.S. institutions. 

We were particularly encouraged by the significant increase both in participation 
and in dollars from our recent, large Arts & Science classes and this was due to the 
extra effort made by our class agents to meet with the deans of their faculties and 
explain to their classmates the specific needs of these faculties. 

Membership in our Leadership Gift Clubs increased. A black-tie dinner for 
members of the Chancellor’s Committee and a cocktail reception for members of the 
Principal’s Associates were held in September. Both functions were well attended and 
will become annual events. 

Phonathons during 1979-80 were the most successful in recent years. Enthusiastic 
graduates helped in eleven regions and students assisted in three special phonathons 
in Montreal. 

My two-year term of office ended May 31st. I would like to take this opportunity 
of thanking the members of the Alma Mater Fund Committee for their assistance 
and cooperation. I would like to particularly thank the nearly 1,000 class agents and 
regional volunteers around the world without whose help this would not have been 
possible. Finally, I would like to thank all graduates who have supported McGill so 
generously and I hope they will continue to do so. 

To conclude, I welcome John Scholes, BEng52 and Keith Ham, BA54, BCL59 as the 
new Chairman and Vice-Chairman respectively of the Alma Mater Fund. I wish them 
good luck in their work and I know they will find it as rewarding as I have. 


Uf, Bi ee: 


Committee 7 John M. Little MD’61 
Trevor H. Bishop BA’54, BCL’57 Hugh G. Marshall BEng’51 


George Brabant DDS’52 Mrs. G. R. W. Owen BA’33 
Michael T. Conway BCom’79 Peter B. Reid BCom’57 
George D. Goodfellow BEng’36 Miss Heather Sanderson BA’78 
Mitchell Greenberg BA’70 Frederick M. Wiegand BA’56, 


Glenn Higginbotham BCL’75 : MD’60 
LLB’76 Peter Woolh DDS’77 
Claude Joubert BCom’76 a 


tok we ot yp 


e 24% of all graduates gave. In Canada, 24.6% contributed; 28.1% in the United 
States; 6.5% from other countries. 

e There were 1,191 new donors and 2,796 who had given before but not in the 
previous year. 

e 9,445 graduates or 33% of donors, increased the size of their gifts. 

e Membership in the top Leadership Gift Clubs, the Chancellor’s Committee and the 
Principal’s Associates, increased 11%. 


Four years ago a graduate made a challenge. If met, that challenge would contribute 
$1,000,000 to the Alma Mater Fund over the following five years. 

This was the challenge. The graduate, who wishes to remain anonymous, was 
willing to make a gift of $100,000 a year for five successive years to match new and 
increased gifts up to a maximum of $100,000. 

The 1979-80 Fund Year marks the fourth year of meeting this challenge. 

The generous graduate’s challenge and the response of many other graduates have 
combined to contribute more than $800,000 to McGill in the last four years. 


This report includes all graduate giving for the year through the Alma Mater Fund as 
well as giving through the special solicitation committees of the McGill Development 
Program and the Macdonald Agriculture Campaign. 


No.in No.of % Amount Average 
Faculty faculty donors part. $ gift $ 
Agriculture & Food Science 3,387 foo: “22:4 SPP on I 42 
Architecture 891 224 25.1 14,197 63 
Arts & Science, men 11,260 2414. 18.7 142,895 67 
Arts & Science, women 11,915 Zo 902°- 246 119,240 40 
Dentistry 1,300 576 © «44.3 38,334 66 
Diplomas 897 1 age Pe 3,688 33 
Education 2,976 425 14.2 12,886 30 
Engineering 7,775 2 347- 30e1 184,892 78 
Graduate Studies 7,600 1,076 * “T4#A 46,038 42 
Law 2,267 693 = 3035 70,433 101 
Library Science 1,053 182 7.2 4 768 26 
Macdonald - Others 776 12-7 3,183 32 
Management 4 483 1,341 29.9 154,843 115 
Medicine 5,023 1,968 39.1 214,558 109 
Music 614 G3*° 10.2 1,660 26 
Nursing 2,114 560 26.4 15,990 28 
Phys. & Occ. Ther. 1,287 ao ees 6,320 as 
Religious Studies 268 49 18.2 1,907 38 
Social Work 45235 245 = 20.1 8,658 35 
Company Matching Gifts 18,252 
Anonymous, Widows and friends 225,201* 
Faculty Totals 67,393 16,191 24.0 1,320,232 81 


*Includes $100,000 Challenge Gift 


Area 
Montreal 
Toronto 
Ottawa 
NYC 
Vancouver 


In Dollars In Participation 

Medicine $214,558 Dentistry 44.3% 
Engineering $184,892 Medicine 39.1% 
Management $154,843 Law 30.5% 
Arts & Science (Men) $142,895 Engineering 30.1% 
Arts & Science (Women) $119,240 Management 29.9% 
Dollars San Francisco 19,854 (29.8%) Victoria 9,119 (28.9%) 
$449,796 (21.6%)* Calgary 17,712 (31.6%) Philadelphia 8,091 (35.3%) 
109,459 (35.3%) New Brunswick 11,476 (32.4%) Edmonton 6,781 (29.7%) 
56,995 (33.0%) Boston 10,325 (34.4%) Texas 4,985 (28.0%) 

35,608 (30.0%) Florida 10,166 (26.7%) wai | 
23,527 (25.2%) Los Angeles 9 654 (25.4%) Bae of participation of graduates in that 


A special gift to mark a special occasion 

Once every five years, members of McGill’s reunion classes are asked to make a 
substantially larger gift to honour their class and help to maintain their university's 
excellence. 

On the occasion of a major anniversary year, the 10th, 25th, 40th and 50th — 
especially on the 25th and 50th — graduates are encouraged to form committees to 
organize face-to-face solicitation of their classmates in order to make the best possible 
class gift to mark the occasion. 

At universities such as Harvard, Yale, Princeton and Dartmouth, the anniversary 
class gift accounts for more than half of the alumni fund totals. 

At McGill, the Anniversary Gift Program is a growing area of support for the 
University. In the 1979-80 Fund Year, 2,733 members of the year’s 10 anniversary 
classes contributed $284,190. 

The year’s leading class was Commerce 1954 with a 25th anniversary gift of 
$80,105. George Petty headed the strong Commerce committee of Ron Gallay, Pat 
Keenan, Arnold Steinberg and Frank White. 


Medicine 1930 Golden Anniversary Gift tops $100,000 
The class that started it all with a special anniversary gift for its 25th reunion in 1955 
achieved another ‘‘first’’ when it set a goal of $100,000 for its anniversary gift for its 
50th reunion. 

Medicine ’30 deserves special mention because they have already reached the goal 
they set themselves at their 45th in 1975, and will go well over $100,000. 

Their Golden Anniversary Endowment Fund is for the Medical Library and 
Medicine ‘30 hopes and expects that other classes will follow this lead. The Class 
Committee is composed of Morris J. Groper of San Francisco, Chairman; G.A. 


Simpson of P.E.I., Class Agent; Stanford Pulrang of New York, the originator of the 
25-year gift; Gordon A. Copping, Montreal. 


It was one of the best phonathon years in recent memory for the Alma Mater Fund. 
What made it a success was the nearly 300 graduates and student volunteers who 
placed approximately 10,000 calls on behalf of McGill. 

The telephone campaigns contacted graduates in Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, 
Calgary, Edmonton, New York, Boston, Washington, Philadelphia and the entire 
Province of New Brunswick. , 

In addition to the above, senior students spent four evenings calling recent Arts & 
Science graduates. 

On yet another occasion, graduates spent two evenings on a coast to coast “special 
names” phonathon. 

These phonathons contact a large number of graduates in a brief time and at a 
reasonable cost. They permit volunteer graduates to explain McGill’s need for private 
support and they give graduates an opportunity to ask questions about their 
university. 


The memory of the following McGill graduates, former students and friends was 
honoured by memorial gifts to thé Alma Mater Fund: 

The University extends its thanks to the families and friends who chose the McGill 
Alma Mater Fund as the beneficiary of these In Memorial Gifts. 


E. Percy Aikman BSc32, MSc33, David Harrigan BSc73, MSc75 
PhD35 Irvine Henders 

Mrs. Margaret Moffatt Batty Dr. David A. Keys (Hon) DSc47 

Harry J. Baum Bertram Kidd Science 68 

Clive Baxter Basil C. MacLean MD26, LLD62 

Dr. Ruth M. Bechtel BA29, MA30 Dorothy McIntosh 

Edward T. Bourke DDS23 Wilson Mellen LLB26 


Mrs. R. David Bourke 
(Judith Veith) BA54 

Prof. J.W. Boyes 

J.W. Bridges Ball 

Kenneth R. Burgess BEng50 

Harold A. Calkins BSc12 

Herman Cohen BSc44, MSc45, 

MD49 

Mrs. Percy E. Corbett 
(Margaret Morison) BA13 

Dudley B. Dawson BA35 

Michael Peter Diamond BA77 

Don Engel 

Thomas Ferguson 

Gordon B. Glassco BSc05 

Frank Gertler 

Adeline Hackie BLS51 

Mrs. J. Peter Harling 
(Heather Roy) BSc55 


A. Deane Nesbitt BEng33 

Valdis Ortmanis 

Elena Paull 

Marie-Thérése Reverchon 
Octavia Grace Ritchie 

Margaret Robertson 

Tal Salman BEng43, MEng44 
Peter Sebestyen Eng69 

Marjorie Sharp BA67 

Richard Shuman MD41 

Rev. R. Douglas Smith BA29 
Kathleen Tate 

Robert L. Trerice BSc49 

K.P. Tsolainos BA18 

Harry E. Voss MD30 

Arthur Weldon OC BA34, BCL37 
G. Stafford Whitby PhD20, DSc39 
Cecil Whitmore BA23 

Eva R. Younge, MA33 


| 
' 
| 


eo es See 


Lynn and John Walker 
Co-Chairmen 


i 


The 1979-80 Year was a record one for the McGill Parents Association. Gifts totalling 
$50,039 were received, slightly more than 10% over the previous year. These gifts came 
from 1,552 non-alumni parents compared to 1,509 in 1978-7). 

Of this total, $46,580 will be transferred to the McGill lib:aries. The remainder was 
designated to Women’s Intercollegiate Athletics and a specia. prize in memory ofa late 
student. 

Last fall, the Parents Association in cooperation with the McGill Graduates’ 
Society sponsored several coffee receptions for freshmen parents during Orientation 
Week. These proved to be very successful and parents of students attending McGill for 
the first time had many questions answered at these receptions. 

In November of 1979, members of the Parents Associatim Committee living in the 
Montreal area had the opportunity of meeting with PrincipalDavid Johnston and Miss 
Marianne Scott, McGill’s Director of Libraries. This meetingincluded a most 
interesting and impressive tour of the Undergraduate Library and Miss Scott expressed 
her appreciation for the marvellous financial support received from the Parents Fund. 

Finally we are pleased to report that the Parents Association co-ordinated the 
mailing of a newsletter accompanied by a letter from Principél Johnston to all parents of 


_ students attending McGill for the first time. This went out in late October of 1980 and 


the purpose of this mailing was to welcome these new paren’s to the “McGill family”. 


Ly + Seu. bstlve 


Past Co-Chairmen: Ambassador & Mrs. Bruce Rankin, Tokyo, Japan e Co-Chairmen: Mr. & Mrs. John M. Walker, Montreal, Que. e Honorary 
Chairman: Mr. H. Clifford Hatch, Walkerville, Ont. e Committee: Mr. & Mrs. E. Michael Cadmus, Nassau, Bahimas e M. & Mme Marcel 
Casavant, Montreal, Que. e Mr. George Horowitz, New York City, N.Y. e Mr. & Mrs. Ernest E. Monrad, Bostor, Mass. e Dr. & Mrs. Edward H. 
Simmons, Don Mills, Ont. e Mr. & Mrs. Mandel E. Slater, Boston, Mass. e Mr. & Mrs. Hedley A. Smith, Halifax, N.S. e Dr. & Mrs. Roderick 
Turner, Los Angeles, CA e Dr. & Mrs. James A. S. Wilson, Montreal, Que. 


4 
V4 


].M.G. Scott 
Chairman 


The McGill Associates is Canada’s oldest university annual giving program. Formed in 
the late thirties by members of Montreal’s professional and >usiness community (both 
graduates and non-graduates) it has since served as an important link between the 
University and the community. 

With the founding of the McGill Alma Mater Fund in 1948, membership in the 
Associates was by and large made up of non-McGill graduates. 

Fund-raising is of prime importance to the Associates but equally important is the 
friends and contacts developed by the Associates within the business and professional 
community of Montreal. 

In our 1979-80 Fund Year, gifts to the Associates totalled$14,440. These gifts came 
from 228 members, 62 of whom are new members. 

A well attended reception was held in the fall to introduce members to McGill's 
new Principal, David Johnston. An excellent dinner was hell in April attended by 128 
members and their spouses. Dr. Paul Lin, Director of McGil’s Centre for East Asian 
Studies, addressed the group on the subject of China. The Associates have organized a 
trip to China to take place in May of 1981 coinciding with the first anniversary of the 
signing of the accord between the University of Peking and McGill. 

The Committee of the Associates will] shortly be allocatiig the receipts from our 
1979-80 Fund Year to several areas of the University and weshall report these 
allocations to our members in due course. In the meantime, we look forward to a very 


successful 1980-81. 


Chairman: J.M.G. Scott e Vice-Chairman: Donald S. Wells e Committee: Charles EF. Barrelet e Frederick S. Burbdge e Melvyn Dobrin e Russ 
Greenwood e Philip E. Johnston e F.R. Kearns e Ralph S. Leavitt e Maurice Massé e Edwin Moler e Roger Neror e Steven F. Owen e John 


Peacock e David Torrey 


4 


The Chancellor's 


Committee 


This Leadership Club 
recognizes donors of gifts 
of $1,000 or more. Gifts 
from the Chancellor’s 
Committee totaled 
$613,512, including gifts 
given anonymously. 


WILLIAM ABDALL 


GEORGE F ALLEN 
A BRAM APPEL 


ROBERT E BELL 


MRS GORDON BERSON 


B BEUTEL 
DALBIR BINDRA 


H LLOYD BLACHFC 


HELMUT BLUME 
HUGH S BOSTOCK 


A MAXWELL BOUL 


M D37 


B COM35 
RICHARD A ATKIN 


SON M 
PH D48 


IRD 


B SC(ENG)24 
A30 


TON B 


MRS EDWARD T BOURKE 


G W BOURKE 
HYMAN B BROCK 


GERALD BRONFM: 


G STEWART BROW 
GORDON BROWN 


B Al? 


B AS? 


A BCOMS4 
CHARLES § ALEXANDER 
MRS CHARLES S ALEXANDER 


D58 
D SC79 


ARCH69 


BC L59 
B AS8 


B SC(ENG)I8 


M SC25 
BC L33 


B SC(ARTS)23 


B ENG46 


AN BCC 
N 


)M 35 


MRS FREDERICK BUECHNER-_B AS4 
KIRTIK CHARAN PH D70 

JOSEPH BCHERRY BSC42 M D43 
WARREN CHIPPINDALE BCOM49 
ROBERT N COCKFIELD BCOM4S5 

MRS ERNEST C COMMON sB. A28 
HAROLD CORRIGAN B COMSO0 

R F PATRICK CRONIN MDS53_ M SC60 
GEORGE NMCURRIE BENGS! 

H WEIR DAVIS BA28 BCL31 

MRS RUDOLPH DUDER BSC42 MS W70 
MRS GM MEDWARDS BAI6 

ANDREW A EISEN 

JOHN P FISHER B ENGS| 

PHILIPS FISHER BAI6 LL D64 

H GRAHAM GAMMELL __B SC48 

DAVID ALAN GEAN _MDS3 

DANIELL GOLD BCOMS9 

GEORGE D GOODFELLOW BB ENG36 


*G BLAIR GORDON 


MRS DAVID R GRANT 


MORRIS J GROPER 


DOUGLAS § GROSS 
JOHN W HACKNEY 


P D P HAMILTON 


MRS P D P HAMILTON 
CEDRIC H BERESFORD HANDS 
B SC(ENG)10 


W G HANSON 
DAVID M HARVEY 
H CLIFFORD HATC 


B SC(ENG)22 
MARGARETEBGOSSE B 


M D30 
M D39 


A24 


B COMS| 


DIP M 


B SC(ENG)22 


M DS5 
H 


DONALD G HENDERSON 


M D3 


ISABELLE F HIGGINSON' 


G MILLER HYDE 
WM F JAMES 


B A26 


M SC21 


M CARLYLE JOHNSTON 


MRS PATRICIA KEI 
PAULBKELLY \ 


TAYLOR J KENNEDY 


AURELE LACROIX 
YU-MING LAM 
MRS W G LEACH 
EARL LERNER 
E A LESLIE 
MORRIS MACLAN 


A ROY MACLAREN 


LORN MACLAREN 
LOUIS B MAGIL 


B SC68 


R 
1 D61 


B A46 


D D $63 
B SC(ENG)16 


BSC(E 


K A2?? 


BC 


COM24 


BC L29 


ASO 


BENG38 M 


D D $72 


L L D6 
NG)23 


B SC(ENG)28 
ALAN A MACNAU GHTON . 


B ARCH36 


B A26 


M D28 
B SC(H EC)46 


ED48 


L29 


B SC(ARTS)27 


BC LS3 


ENG39 


BC L29 


Vital to the success of any fund raising program is a substantial number of leadership 


gifts. 


The following four categories of giving were created for those 


graduates, parents, 


associates, and friends who find it financially possible to contribute at these levels. 
Gifts of $1,000 or more, Gifts between $500 and $999, Gifts between $250 and $499, 


Gifts between $100 and $249. 
For the year ending May 31, 1980, 


the Leadership Gift Roll lists all individuals 


contributing i in one of the four categories, except those e requesting anonymity. 


GEORGE RONALD MCCALI HUGH M BROCK _ B SC(ENG)28 
B SC(ARTS)21__M D39 G COLIN BUCHAN M DS8 
LAWRENC E G MCDOUGALI B A39 *ALBUCKLAND  BSC(ENG)I7 
te! 3 ERWIN LBURKE M DSS 
KENNETH G MCKAY BSC38 MSC39 * LESLIE N BUZZELL BCOM?23 
D ROSS MCMASTER BA30 BCL33 ARTHUR G CAMPBELL B A38 
ELIZABETH B MCNABB Ad! DONALD W CARMICHAEL COM45 
DONALD D MOSSMAN _B SC(ARTS)23 E BOWER CARTY BCOM39 
WALTER C MUELLER B COM26 ALISTAIR G CATTERSON BSC5S2 M DS6 
DONALD D PATTERSON BSC48 MSC50 GUY B CHAMPAGNE _— B- ENG33 
CHARLES H PETERS BA28 LLD74 DIP MGMT60 
GEORGE S PETTY BCOMS54 DIPMGMTS9 SHAMLCHELLARAM  BCOM6R8 
LAZARUS PHILLIPS BCLI8 LL D65 ROGER CHENG B ENG38 
VINCENT A PICCONE JR) MDS? M SC64 L DEV CHIPMAN’ M DOs 
ALFRED POWIS' BCOMS|] SHELDON MCLAMAN- DD S57 
R STANLEY QUACKENBUSH M D30 BROCK FCLARKE BCL4? 
RALPH PRANDLETT BSC47 M D49 ROSS TCLARKSON BCL48 LL D67 
JAMES B REDPATH _ B SC(ENG)3! DAVID L COLLINS M DS54 
H ROCHE ROBERTSON B_  SC32 M D36 MRS FREDERIC BCOPPIN B A37 
MRS ANDRE ROSSINGER M § W §] WAVELL F COWAN'-  B ENGS4 
NATHAN W RUBIN. MD27 H ROY CRABTREE _B SC38 
ALAN C SALTER DAVID CULVER -_B SC47 
MRS ARTHUR J SANTRY JR _B SC47 MRS EDGAR DAVIDSON _B A33 
JOHN M SCHOLES B ENGS2 HUGH P DAVIS M D27 
JM G SCOTT A JEAN DE GRANDPRE BCL43 
JAMES M SHEA _ M D6! DAPHNE FS DENTON MDS53_ DIP MED63 
HUNTINGTON SHELDON _ B ASI L PACIFIQUE DESJARDINS BENGS4 
GEORGE A SIMPSON M D30 JA DIXON BSC48 
JOHN DSPRING M D30 SH DOBELI COM?2?2 
ELIZABETH A STEFFEN ™M D45 MARGARET RUTH DODDS’ BA32 M A34 
H ARNOLD STEINBERG BCOMS4 DONALD G DOEHRING 
MRS H ARNOLD STEINBERG B A55 CM DRURY BCL36 
PH D6l ROBERT L DUBEAL 
PATRICK KY SUN BCOM76 GORDON L ECHENBERG BA61l BCL64 
EPTAYLOR BSC(ENG)22 LLD77 JOHN B FELTNER M D37 
ROBERT C THOM BSCS3. M DSS KENNETH C FINCHAM'-  BCOMSO0O 
LAURENCE C TOMBS BA24 M A26 ROBERT P FLEMING B ARCH37 
HILDA TREMBLETT BA49 M D§55 GEORGE E FLOWER BA4Q M A49 
RAFAEL TUDELA R ARMOUR FORSE MD47 MSCS0 
COLIN W WEBSTER B A24 A NORTON FRANCIS = $C39 
LORNE C WEBSTER BENGSO DONALD H FREEMAN’) M DS9 
R HOWARD WEBSTER _B A3! PHILIP BFRENCH' B ENG34 
MRS LORETTA WELDON RJA FRICKER BENG40 
WILLIAM P WILDER B COM46 SAMUEL FROMSON _ B ENG38 
THEODORE WILDI BENG44 DLORNE GALES BCL35 LLD79 
G M WOLOCH JOHN M GARDNER_ B ENG49 
EDWARD C WOOD FRED GGHANTOUS' BCOMS4 
AR GILLESPIE BCOM30 
MRS JOHN DGILLIAM_-~ BSC59 
. ° P . W AT GILMOUR _ BSC(ENG)25 
The Principal’s Associates © 3 scjencx 
. SAM GOLDWATER _B AS8 
This Leadership Club COLETTE L GOSSELIN B EDS9 
. . . ‘ Lh . Ss CC77 
recognizes donors of gifts “S - — RTSOYANNI! M SC72 
C ALLISON GRAHAM- _B ENG34 
oan pe ee oe JAMES H HABEGGER _M D64 
~ 7 MRS HUGH G HALLWARD _ B SC52 
Gi ts som t ae nichae sien ERIC LHAMILTON - B COM34 
Associates totaled RICHARD M HART PH D70 
‘ . ‘ GERALD G HATCH’ BENG44 
$111,536, including gifts MALCOLM HEATH M D4l 
x WILLIAM P HINGSTON _ B A67 
given anonymously. EDWARD P HOOVER B A25 
W DAVID HOPPER _ B SC(AGR)SO 
CARL H JACKSON _ B SC(ENG)2] 
WILLIAM R G ABBOTT BB COM68 MRS GUY H JAMES JR_ B A60 
PREMA AGRAWAL DIP MED70 WILLIAM E JAQUES M D42 
BERNARD M ALEXANDOR BA28 BCL31 KATHLEEN R JENKINS’ BA26 
LLOYD B ALMOND ~ B SC(ENG)26 ALICE E JOHANNSEN” B SC34 
YL KEL ANN BENG66 RALPH M ran RA a 
ILAS AV 7§ NEIL V JOHNSTO 61 
ays pty ees HARRY N KANGLES B SC46 B COM48 
DAVID M BALTZAN M D20 JOHN KAZUTOW MD36 == 
PAUL BEDOUKIAN BENG36 PH D4! PATRICK JKEENAN BCOMS4 CAS 
LOUIS J BEIQUE BSC49 E DL DI EY KEEVER M D53 : 
JOSEPH BENDER M DS3 J DAVIDSON KETCHUM = B A24 M D31 
JOHN B BEWICK M D5! JOHN G KIRKPATRICK B SC 39 «=B C 142 
GEORGE A BEY BSCSI BCLS56 ANDREW J KOVACS B SC66 M D68 
HAROLD F BIEWALD D DSSS SAMUEL BLABOW = =BSC38. M D62 
MRS HAROLD F BIEWALD _ B SC(P E)S2 LAURENCE L LACAILLADE B A6S 
RICHARD | BIRKS BA49 PH DS? BERNARDJLANDE BA3O 
LOUIS BIRO M DS2 MRS DERN ARS 2 e-TRie Ero 
JOHN BLUNDEL;} HOWARD J LANG B ENG33_ : mene 
E ROGER BOOTHROY D M SC 40 Pp H D43 MRS THOM AS A K LANOST AFF _ B COM34 
DOUGLAS T BOURKE 8B ENG49 ROBERT E J LAY on B ENG4 : 
MARTIN A BRADLEY LIL M62 MRS ROBERT EJLAYTON’ BA4 


JEAN BRISSET BC L3S JOHN MLITTLE M D61 


A L LOCKWOOD 
JACOB M LOWY 


M DI 


ALEXANDER S MACINNES PH D4] 
DOUGLAS W MACMILLAN MD?? 
HUGH G MARSHALL _B ENGS|! 
A DAVID MCCALL BENGS6 
CHARLES A MCCRAI B COMS50 
J1AN MCGIBBON- B ENGS] 
STANLEY EMCGURK BENGS4 
|} LORNE MCKEOWN iB A48 
ANSON C MCKIM BCOM24 BA27 
DONALD R MCROBIE BCOM34 
4H MENDEL BENG44 
S LEON MENDELSSOHN BCL24 
ROBERT D MIDGLEY M D60 
OHEMIGHT MD25 
MRS HAMILNE_ BA3? 
DAVID H MOLSON _ B ARCHS? 
ELIZABETH C MONK BCL23 LLD?75 
GH MONTGOMERY BA33 BCL36 
MRS NORMAN MORRISON JR BSC33 
WALTER W NICHOL BA48 MDS] 
ROBERTS O'BRIEN BAS!I BCLS} 
PAUL PARE BCL49 
ROBERT C PATERSON 8B COM49 
EIGIL PEDERSEN M A6! 
PAUL PEDERSON 
J ALLAN PERHAM _ B ENG38 
HENRI W PERRON- AGRS5?2 
WARD C PITFIELD BCOM48 
WILLIAM FW PRATT BA2!l BCL24 
WILLIAM M PRUDHAM__B A23 

B SC(ENG)25 
JAMES O RAMSAY 
N L RAPPAPORT 
ROBERT M RENNIE BCOM48 
MRS MICHAEL RIDDELL  B COM6! 
W GORDON ROBERTS’ BCOM32 
BERNARD B ROBINSON’) M D45 
GAVIN ROSS 
JAMES L ROSS BASO M DS54 
MRS WILLIAM K ROSS" B A48 
WILLIAM S ROW _ B SC(ENG)27 
DR LAURA ROWLES BA2?5 PH D28 
WROWLES MSC26 PH D28 
ARTHUR RUDNIKOFF 
HERBERT CSALMON BASO BCLS3 
JOHN H SCHLOEN- B ENG32 
DAVID GSCOTT BCOM32 
MRS HS SEXSMITH MS WSS 
WARNER FSHELDON' M D37 
MRS WARNER F SHELDON B A333 
DOUGLAS |! SHELTINGA M D48 
KA CHUEN SHIN M D54 
MRS RICHARD SHUMAN 
JCYRIL SINNOTT MDS53 M SCS58 
C IRVING SLACK — B SC(AGR)48 
ZOE BSMITH BAIS 
WILLIAM C SMYTH BB ENG36 
GORDON D STANFIELD  _B ENG39 
JAMES P STANLEY B ENG38 
JOHN C STARR’ B ENG38 
MARCUS STEIN BENG34 
JOSEPH STRATFORD MD47 MSCS] 


F RICHARD TERROUX — B SC(ARTS)25 


M SC26 


WILLIAM A TETLEY B A48 
4 LLOYD THOMPSON’ PH D43 
ALAN G THOMPSON” M D43 


MRS JOHN A TOLHURST BA33 = M A34 
JM TRAINOR M D55 

ROLAND J VIGER M D33 

ELIZABETH F WATSON _ DIP NURS6 

M LAIRD WATT  BCOM34 

G ROGER WEBBER 

MRS MARY M J FEHER WHITE 
ROLLA E WILSON) MDS3 
JAMES WILSON 

DJ WOO BENG64 MBA74 
WILLIAM EDWARD YVORCHLUK 


B AS3 


li a eek eee ee I ene ee 


"Deceased 


LF 


' 
: 
; 
' 
‘ 
1 


Gifts between $250 and 
$499 

Gifts at this level totaled 
$96,252, including gifts 
given anonymously. 


DC ABBOTT BCL21l LLDSI 
JW ABRAHAM DD 823 
EH ACHONG' BSC58 M D60 
JAMES M ALEXANDER’ M D34 
CLIVE V ALLEN BAS6 BCLS9 
GWYNNETH A ALLEN B N58 
M SC(APP)75 
GEORGE A ALLISON BA37 BCL40 
JOHN H AMBROSE _ B SC(ENG)24 
JOHN W ANDERSON 
JOHN D ANDREW BCOM49 
D MURRAY ANGEVINE M D29 
ROBERT F APTER _B SC(ENG)30 
FRANCIS M ARCHIBALD _ B SC(ENG)23 
JOHN A ARMOUR 
MRS STANLEY BARON BAS] 
FRED W BARTON’ M D48 
DONALD G BATES 
DONALD W BAXTER MSCS3 
M GLADYS BEAN” BA40_ DIP P E41 
THEODORE S BEECHER BSC39 M D4! 
MIMI M BELMONTE BSC48 M D§82 
GERALD BENJAMIN BCOM46 
B ROBERT BENSON’ BCLS58 
NORMAN W BENSON _ B ENG40 
BRENDA L BIRKIN BSC67 MD?7I 
HERBERT BLADES PH DS50 
DAVID M BLAIKLOCK  B A48 
ROBERT S BOIRE BCOM48 
R DAVID BOURKE BB ARCHS54 
SHIRLEY A BRADFORD -_B COM4! 
FREDERICK W BRADSHAW _ B SC(ENG)25 
PAUL BRAIS BENG49 
JOHN F BRINCKMAN ~ B AS55 
ARTHUR I BRONSTEIN BASO BCLS3 
JOHN H BURGESS BSCS4 MD58 
MICHAEL H CAIN BASO BCLS3 
RAYMOND CARON BA28 BCL31 
MRS STELLA CHARLESON _ B SC63 
JEAN CHARTON _ B ENG47 
STANLEY G CHRISTIE BSC49 M DS53 
WALLACE BCHUNG MDS53 
LLOYD ACLARK PH DS59 
JOHN BCLAXTON' BCLSO 
DORIS NUNES COLLINS MD44 MSC49 
R VERNON COLPITTS M D44 
WILLIAM R COOK = B COMS52 
SAM COOPER 
F CAMPBELL COPE BA24 BCL27 
MRS E CCORISTINE  B Ad] 
WILLIAM G CUMBERLAND _B SC68 
MRS FREDERICK H CUMMER JR_B SC38 
JADELALANNE BAI9 
DONALD J DEWAR PH D40 
RONALD P DOIG BSC60 PH Dé64 
JACOB DOLID MSC(AGR)21_ PH D23 
MAURICE DONGIER 
DAVID G DORION B COMS54 
LOUIS M DORSEY _B A29 
KEITH NEWTON DRUMMOND BAS53 
M DS5 
CHIPMAN H DRURY B ENG39 
RUSSELL A DUNN B ENG38 
HENRY B DUROST MDS0 _ DIP MEDSS 
ELIZABETH G EDWARDS _B A47 
MAURICE J ELDER BSC42.) M D43 
EUGENE R FAIRWEATHER B Ad! 
ROBERT W FAITH BAS3 DDSS8 
WILLIAM H FEINDEL M D45 
BERNARD J FINESTONE BCOM4! 
SM FINLAYSON- BSC(ENG)24 LL D76 
OJ FIRESTONE M A42 
J GERALD FITZPATRICK B SC44 
ROBERT FLOOD BS A35 
MRS M A FLOWER B A39 
L YVES FORTIER BCLS58 
JAMES W FRASER - B ENG47 
SAMUEL O FREEDMAN’ BSC49. MDS3 
AARON FUCHS” M D77 
JEAN C GARNEAU B ENGS3 
NAHUM GELBER BAS4 BCLS57 
MENARD MGERTLER MD43_ BSC46 
IAN GILLEAN _B ENG40 
LYALL MACM GILLESPIE BCOM47 
PIERRE GLOOR PH D§57 
PHILIPGOLD MD61 PH D65 
LEO GOLDFARB 
HAROLD M GORDON _ B ENGSO 
REAL GOSSELIN B ENG46 
KURT GOTTFRIED BENGSI MSCS53 
MRS KURT GOTTFRIED  B A55 
BERNARD GRAD BSC44 PH D49 
WILLIAM T GRANT BCOM34 
E PHILIP GREENBERG _ B COMS8 
TASS G GRIVAKES BAS4 BCLS7 
HMHAGUE BCL21 
A LOUISE HALL B N6! 
JOHN AHALL BSC42 BENG49 
JOHN M HALLWARD  B ASO 
EH P HAMILTON _ B SC(ARTS)27 
H GEORGE HAMPSON BA47 M A49 
ABRAM B HANDELMAN-) DD 9839 
GEORGE J HARASYMOWYCZ DD S870 
DIP DENT71 
EDWARD T HARBERT _ B SC(ENG)23 
JEAN EHARVIE BA35 M A36 
JAMES S HASEGAWA BSC56 DDS58& 
RSHAYDEN MD3! 


ANTHONY BECKER M D40 


EDWARD S HENEY B AS4 
JAMES P HENNIGER BSC60 PH D65 
MRS JAMES PHENNIGER BA62_ M A65 
LEWIS W HERSEY BSCS52 
MARGARET C HIGGINSON __ B SC(ARTS)26 
ROSS O HILL BSC46 M D48 
WILLIAM P HILLGARTNER 
DAVID Y HODGSON B COM48 
ALFRED T HOLLAND BCOM4I CASO 
MRS EDWARD P HOOVER’ B A34 
DORIS AHOWELL M D49 
FS HOWES BSC(ENG)24 M SC26 
JEAN EHOWIE BSC44 DIP MGMT76 
REED WHYDE BSC4!1 M D44 
W FARRELL HYDE BCOMS54 
J WILLIAM IBBOTT M D54 
HAROLD A IRVING BAS! 
DORTHA M JACKSON _ DIP S W26 
H ANTHONY JEW M D62 
JOHN BJEWELL M D43 
A LJOHNSON MD40 M SC47 
DONALD J JOHNSTON BCLS8-~ BA60 
MRS M CARLYLE JOHNSTON _ B ASO 

M S W54 
DAVID PHILLIP JONES 8B A70 
J KENDALL JONES M D56 
GUY EJORON M D4! 
M A KAUD 
GERHARD E KAUNAT_ B ENGS4 
STUART E KAY B SC(ENG)21 
Y GREGORY KELEBAY 
JOHN J KELLY M DS53 
DUNCAN J KENNEDY DD S850 
JOHN J KERR B ENG46 
ESTHER W KERRY DIPS W30 M A39 
AYTON G KEYES BCOM40 
STEPHEN KONDAKS 
MORTON KORN M D6] 
BARBARA PEAD KRAFT BA43_ M D47 
JERZY RICHARD KRAJEWSKI _ B SC72 
STUART EKROHN M D30 
PETER MLAING_ B A35 
W E LAMBERT 
WILLIAM J LAMBERT _ B ED(P E)60 

D D S64 
ADELE DE G LANGUEDOC B A29 
MURRAY LAPIN MA4I BCL44 
C PHILIP LARSON JR- _M DS58 
HELEN RELEAVITT BA45 M A49 
C P LEBLOND 
SOLOMON LEVITES B A36 
MRS SOLOMON LEVITES BB A36 
MRS GORDON LIERSCH BLS33_ S WS58 
DOUGLAS M LINDSAY _ BSC5] 
A BRIAN LITTLE BA48 M DS50 
ISADORE LUBIN. DD $43 
CLAUDE LUSSIER BCL45 MCL46 
DONALD J MACCANDLISH _B ENGSO 
THOMAS D MACDONALD DDS$71 
DOUGLAS W MACEWAN’) MDS? 

DIP MEDS8 
DAVID MACKENZIE BA48 BCLSI 
MRS A B MACLAREN _B SC(ARTS)19 
JAMES A MACMILLAN’ M D48 
MAYSIE S MACSPORRAN BA27. M A30 
EDWARD S MACTIER B COM48 
ROBERT H MARCHESSAULT PH D54 
JOHN DEM MARLER BA29 BCL32 
JEAN A MARTIAL BCLS! LLMS53 
A IAN MATHESON _ B COM3?2 
ALEXANDER MAYERS B ARCHS3 
ABE BMAYMAN- BSC45_ M D4? 
WALTER J MCCARTHY B COMS0 
JOHN F MCDOUGALL M SC31 
JOHN WILLIAM MCDOWALL 
MURRAY D MCEWEN eB SC(AGR)53 
ANDREW MCINROY  B ENGS4 
RL MCINTOSH PHD39_ DSC72 
JOHN R MCLERNON BB A62 
SYDNEY DMCMORRAN-) BC L34 
HERBERT B MCNALLY BCLSS 
JOHN RILEY MCNULTY MDS3 
JONATHAN L MEAKINS _ B SC62 
MICHAEL A MEIGHEN _B A60 
DENIS MELANCON 
MARTIN G MENDELSSOHN _ B SC65 

M D69 
STANLEY MEROVITZ BCOM68 
WILLIAMI MILLER BCLS3 
KENNETH S MILLER’ B A40 
SHARON R MITCHELL BB ED63 
JAMES W MITCHENER BSCS3. M DSS 
R DUNCAN MORAN" BSC67_ DDS7?2 
NORMAN D MORRISON JR M D34 
DAVID A MURPHY M D60 
F LLOYD MUSSELLS BA40 M D44 
DOUGLAS A NESS 
JOHN S NEWMAN B ENGSO 
ALEXANDER NIES_ M D58 
JOHN A NOLAN BA34 BCL37 
JOHN L NORRIS M D3}1 
EDWARD NORSWORTHY — B ENG39 
JACK | OHASHI =M D64 
RICHARD | OGILVIE 
MRS SETZKO OGINO 
MARIO ONYSZCHUK BSCSI1 PH D54 
JOHN G PAGE M D56 
MAX J PALAYEW_ BAS! 
HUGH D PALMER’ M D43 
TJFPAVLASEK BENG44 PH DS58 
RICHARD O PEACH M D54 
ROBERT Z PERKINS M D47 
CHARLES W PETERS BB A6! 
PERRY A PETERSON’ M D66 
MRS HJL PETERSSON B A4! 
ISIDORE C POLLACK - B A35 
RICHARD W POUND BCOM62- BCL67 
JAMES D PRENTICE BSCSI MSCS3 
HAROLD PRICE 


WILLIAM H PUGSLEY BCOM34_ PH DS0 
JOHN B QUINLAN - B ENG6? 

T JAMES QUINTIN M D30 

L ERIC REFORD BA2!I 

MRS R J RICHARDSON _ B SC5?2 

IRMA RILEY CERT NURSI 

GORDON S RITCHIE BCOM4! 

JAMES AROBB_ BAS! BCLS54 

HUGH G ROBSON’ BSC5S6 M D60 
STEVEN R ROESSLER- B ENGS59 

BRAM ROSE MD33 PH D39 

H HYMAN ROSENFELD BCLS52 
ISADORE ROSENFELD BSC47 MDSI 
CLARENCE ROSENHEK M D40 
GORDON M ROSS__ B ENGSS 

MRS ANDRE ROSSINGER MS W5I! 
JOSEPH E RUBINSTEIN BA26 M D30 
MRS DANIEL RUDBERG BB A56 

DONNA R RUNNALLS _ B D64 

EILEEN RUSSEL B A24 

LEO ERYAN- BENG32 

ANTHONY F SALVATORE ~ B ENG49 
DAVID MARCH SCHAFFELBURG- M D7? 
LINDA S SCHENCK — BSC72 

CHARLES R SCRIVER BASSI MD55 
JESSIE BOYD SCRIVER MD22- DSC79 
H HERSCHEL SEGAL _B A55 

HAROLD N SEGALL M D20 

HERBERT M SHAYNE - B COM47 

JAMES G SHETLER BAS8& BCL6] 
BRYAN MSHIEMAN' M D54 

EDWARD H SIMMONS 

CHARLES JSMITH MAS] PHDS4 
SWSMITH M D40 

SAUL SOLOMON BA26 M D30 
THEODORE L SOURKES BSC39 M SC46 
W W SOUTHAM _ B SC(ENG)30 

DEREK J SPEIRS BCOM54 DIP MGMT59 
HERBERT O SPINDLER BCOMS52 
MARIO SPINO  B ENG47 

ROBERT SSPROULE- B ENG37 
BRSTACK M ENGS3 

TOR OSCAR STANGELAND BASO BCLS3 
W JSTENASON BCOMS52 M COMS54 

L J STEPHENS 

ROBERT T STEWART B COMS5 

PAGE W T STODDER 

PATRICK MCG STOKER B ARCHSI1 
BERNARD STOTLAND — B COMS57 
D'ALTON M SWIFT B ENG64 

PETER LSZEGO BSC61 M D65 

A SANDY TAMBOSSO _ —D D S57 
GENEDTANG MDS9 

W REES TAPRELL BCOM23 

MALCOLM A TASCHEREAU- B ENGS3 
PARRA TATE BSC46 M SC47 
DUDLEY R TAYLOR -B ENG37 
LAUGHLIN B TAYLOR’ M SC61 

MRS FLORENCE TELFORD SMITH 

W MURRAY TELFORD BSC39 PH D49 
JACQUES TETRAULT BCOM49 BCLS? 
ALLAN W THOMSON’ M D5? 

SAMUEL F TILDEN JR- B ENG45 
KATHLEEN M TOOMEY ML S67 
CEDRIC EM TUOHY JR) M DS53 

JOHN H VAN DELEUV- MDS57 
NORMAN VAN WYCK BA30 MD35 
ZEEV VERED- BENGS4 

E VON SPEYER 

HAMILTON G WADMAN- M DSO 
LOUIS WAINER BA29_ MD33 
ROLAND G WARE M DS58 

ALLAN G WATSON’ ENG42 

MRS L STUART WEBSTER BB A38 
CLAIRE A WEIDEMIER’ M D64 

|W WEINTRUB BSC48 MDS? 
WILLIAM G WEISS’ M D40 

WILLIAM H WHITE M D36 

FREDERICK M WIEGAND MD60_ M SC64 
JOHN M WIGGETT B ENG42 

MRS WILLIAM P WILDER BAS! 
WILLIAM E WILSON MDS53 MSC57 
RICHARD B WILSON =BCOM24 

RALPH D WINSHIP BENGS4 M ENGS7 
FRANK D WOLEVER - B ENG43 

RAYM WOOD M D54 

LAWRENCE A WRIGHT BCOM48 
HARVEY YAROSKY BASS BCL6I 
WOLF ZITZMANN 


Gifts between $100 and 
$249 

Gifts at this level totaled 
$328,996, including gifts 
given anonymously. 


MONROE ABBEY LAW26 
CHAIKER ABBIS BCL48 
CHARLES W ABBOTT-SMITH — B SC59 
M D63 
ARTHUR C ABBOTT _ B SC(ENG)26 
ELIE ABEL BA4] LL D7] 
SAMUEL ABER BA35_ M D40 
FRANCES EABOUD MA70 PH D73 
MRS MORTIMER ABRAMSKY BASS 
ARTHUR S ABRAMSON BSC34. -M D37 
JACK ABUGOV _B ENG49 
C F DOUGLAS ACKMAN_ M D60 
DIP MED67 
SHIRLEY RADAMS BSC62 ™M D68 
JAMES R ADAMS” BSC36 PH D40 
MRS SAMUEL T ADAMS B A39 


H ADELMAN 
IRVING L ADESSKY BCLS3 
ROBERT AGAJEENIAN BB A29 
NORMAN J AHERN _B COM49 
MRS E PERCY AIKMAN 
MRS.ALAN AITKEN B A34 
GEORGE K AJEMIAN DD S64 
INA E AJEMIAN M D64 
DANIEL ALBERT B A40 
MRS ANTHONY L ALBU BAS9 M A65 
GEORGE ALEXANDER _B COM4| 
NORMAN M ALEXANDER _B COMS5 
WILLIAM ALEXANDER 
J CLAUDE ALLARD BCOM&49 
A GIBSON ALLEN BA48 MDSO 
E ANDREW ALLEN 
NORMAN THALLEN DD S64 
J WARREN ALLIN BCOMS2 
HAROLD ALPER 
BO ALPHONCE 
KISHORE S AMBE_ M D64 
BRUCE A AMBROSE BB SC70 
HAROLD D AMES' M D47 
PAUL M AMOS _ B SC65 
RICHARD G ANDERSEN M D60 
EUGENE C ANDERSON M D60 
LAWRENCE K ANDERSON B ENGS7 
EVANGELOS D ANDROUTSOS _D D $62 
JOHN BANGEL B ENG35 
DAVID C ANGELL M D855 
JOHN VA ANGLIN MDS3 
M G ANGUS 
STEPHEN F ANGUS B ENGSS 
W DAVID ANGUS’ BC L62 
JOHN F ANNESLEY BB ENG60 
JOHN C ANTLIFF  B SCSI 
LEONARD PP APEDAILE  B SC(AGR)60 
DAVID H APPEL BA62 BC L66 
JOSE AQUINO 
ARTURO L ARANAS _ DIP MED64 
MRS A ARCHAMBAULT-ROBACZEWSKA 
RICHARD E ARCHIBALD _ B SC(AGR)52 
WILLIAML ARGO M D40 
T ARGYROPOULOS B ENGSI 
DONALD E ARMSTRONG PH D54 
MILTON ARNOLD _B COM47 
KELLY JARREY B ENGSO 
M ELIZABETH ARTHUR MA47_ PH D49 
PHILIP P ASPINALL B COMSO 
EFFIE C ASTBURY BA38 BLS$39 
MRS EDITH ASTON-MCCRIMMON 
DIP P TSO B SC(PO T)60 
MRS ROSE O ATHERLEY 
MRS DEREK S ATKINSON B COM47 
ELHAMY L ATTIA 
LOUIS A AUBE M D43 
PETERAMAULD MD52 
MRS E AVRITH DIP PO TS2 
CORNELIUS M BAARS__ M SC(APP)58 
M D64 
ROMAN BABYN 
ROBERT A BACK PHDS3 
MRS ROBERT A BACK MSCS4 PH D60 
RONALD A BACKUS'  M D64 
K JEAN BAGGS BSC67 MD7I 
E BARBARA BAIN’ BSCS3_ PH D65 
FRANCES BAIRSTOW 
JOHN L BAKER B COM47 
SAM BAKER 
LESTER BALDWIN B SC54 
RICHARD J BALFOUR BB ENG46 
DR PENNY J BALLEM__B SC71 
JAMES L BALLENY _ B SC(ENG)25 
EDWARD M BALLON B Ad? 
ALEXANDER G BALOGH BB ENGS4 
MARCEL A BALTZAN BSC49_ MDS3 
ALFRED BANDI 
ARNOLD D BANFILL BCL40 BLS47 
CHARLES R BANNON'  M D4 
HUGH G BARCLAY B ENGS7 
IAN ABARCLAY BCL48 
CHARLES §S BARKER BA28 MD32 
HARVEY BARKUN _ B SC48 
HENRY ABARON MD28 
MRS LEONARD BARRETT _BSC42 
J DOUGLAS BARRINGTON _B COM64 
L HOPE BARRINGTON _B A29 
AUGUSTINE L BARRY B ENG4O 
MACDONALD L BARRY M DS? 
ALLEN E BARTLETT BCOMS2 
KENNETH BARWICK _B ENGS2 
MICHAEL J BARZA BSC60 M D64 
GEORGE CONSTANTINE BASTIAN 
THOMAS C BATES M D6? 
CLARENCE L BATES. M D34 
MRS CLARENCE L BATES B A30 
ARTHUR F BATTISTA BSC43. M D44 
HARRY MORIS BAUM DD S77 
MRS U BAUTA__B AS6 
JAMES D BAXTER MD47_ MSC32 
MRS CLIVE L BBAXTER M A6l 
WJBAXTER M29 
J RONALD D BAYNE’ BA4S_ M D&7 
CHARLES M BEACH __B A68 
CHARLES B BEAMISH DD S58 
RAHNO M BEAMISH NUR28 
LAURENCE R BEATH B ENG35 
J WALLACE BEATON C A48 
MRS JAMES ROBERT BEATTIE B A30 
BL S31 
ROBERT T BEATTIE M DS7 
LEON BEAUDIN. BS A22 
PIERRE H BEAUDRY 
JULES BEAUREGARD BCL45 
WILLIAM L BEAUREGARD M DS8 
DENIS YVES BEAUSOLEIL  B A78 
DR RUTH M BECHTEL BA29 MA30 
ROBERT G BECK _B SC(ENG)27 


—— 


” = 


BRUCE H BECKER BCOM46 C AS54 HARVEY CLARK BOYD M D38 MRS KIMON CARAGIANIS B ARCHS| GEORGE A COSLETT B ENGS| 
LAVY M BECKER B A26 JOHN R BOYD M DSO M ARCHS8 * STEPHEN D COSTELLO BSCS0” M DSA 
NORMAN BECKOW  B COM46 EDWARD J BOYLE MD54 GRANT M CARLYLE BCOM3s JAMES P MCD COSTIGAN  B SC(ENG)2 
. , 7 yee es ‘ ; : j C(ENG)26 
RAYMOND JBEDARD DD S79 GEORGE BRABANT DDSS JOHN B WOODS CARMICHAEL BB A49 HACOTNAM BCOM25 CA26 
ANDREW BEELIK PH DS54 ALFRED J BRAGOLI BSCS5I1 MDS3 A ALDEN CARPENTER M DS4 R J BLANCHE COULTIS M A49 
JAMES F BEESLEY M DS3 WILLIAM E BRAISTED M D36 LLOYD CARR-HARRIS BAS! NORMAN GCOUREY BSCSI_ MDSS 
PAUL BBEESON MD33 ROEL CJPBRAMER  B A63 CECARSON BSC(ENG)22__ DR MARY ROCHE COURTRIGHT _ B SC40 
JEAN BELANGER = BC L64 E ARNOLD BRANCH M D20 ROBERT S CARSWELL BA60 BCL63 PHD > | 
JOHN N BELL MDS53 2 KENNETH N R BRANDS _ B ENG4O MRS DONALD C CASE _B COM39 DANIEL FCOWAN M D60 
LORRAINE ELLEN BELL BSC72 MD76 REUBEN | BRASLOFF 8B ENG44 JANET C CASEY B A66 DAVID COWAN BA23 
EDWARD S BELL BENGS54 MRS !|BBRAVERMAN BA49 MS WS? PETER CCASEY BC L65 BETTY LOU COWPER BB A35 
FLORENCE ML BELL B A32_ JOHN R BRAYNE _B ENGSO FRANK E CASHMAN BSC65_ M D69 GEORGE V COX B ENG56 
MRS ROBERT E BELL B A47 B L S53 LOUP BREFOR1 M B A7? T CATT ERILI B SC5? M D54 RICH ARDS ¢ RABBE PH D77 
PETER BENJAMIN BSCS! M D55 ALBERT S BREGMAN MARY FLORENCE CAVANAUGH ROBERTEL CRAIG M D6? 
DIP MGMTS9 ae HENRY BRENMAN MRS E ELIZABETH CAWDRON BH $36 ALLAN E CRAWFORD _ B SC(AGR)S0 
G FRANK BENNETT B SC (ENG)31 DONAIL DD BRENNAN _ B ENG6] TULLIO CEDRASCHI MB A68 D DOUGLAS CREIGHTON BCOMS| 
HAZEL W BENNETT BH S42 __DIP MGMT70 OTTO M CEPELLA B ENG47 GORDON L CRELINSTEN BSC68 M D70 
R DOUGLAS BENNETT B ENG32 PH D35 EDWARD H BRENNAN B ENGSO JOHN A CHADWICK M D65 MICHAEL J CRIPTON DDSS7 
VICTOR R BENNETT B COM5S1 O W BRESKI JOHN T CHAFFEY M D64 DOUGLAS H CROSS 8B ENG34 
WILLIAM H BENTHAM $M D55 PETER R BRIANT  B A70 PAULA GOOD CHAFFEY BSC60 M Dé64 H MORREY CROSS B ENG43 
DIPMEDS9 : J ALAN BRIDGES BSC64 DDS75 MORTIMER CHAIKELSON BA64 BC L67 TERENCE W CROWE_ BB ENGSS 
D DANNY BERCOVITCH BAS4 M DS8 MRS HELEN BRIDLE B A38 THOMAS W CHALLIS. MDS! FRANCIS ACROWLEY DDSI 
HECTOR V BEREZOWSKI = M D54 JOHN EC BRIERLEY BCLS59 GORDON J CHALMERS _B ENG47 ROBERT W CRUICKSHANK B D70 
DAVID BERGER BCL75 C IAN BROADBENT _B ENGS?2 ROBERT H CHALMERS’ M D4! J MCRUIKSHANK MD25__ DIP MED36 
GEORGE D BERKETT __B SC(ARTS)31 GEORGE N BRODERICK BA3l BCL34 ROSS E CHAMBERLAIN — B ENGS! GORDON H CRUTCHFIELD DD $38 
M D36 JAMES H BRODEUR B ENG56 DIP MGMT63 ROBERT B CRUTCHFIELD BSC71 DDS$v75 
SAUL M BERKOWITZ BB ARCH39 ROBERT J BRODRICK M D47 R TULLY CHAMBERS M SC69 CHARLES E CRUZE 
MELVYN BERLIND M D28 ROBERT D BROMLEY BCOMSS MRS EGAN CHAMBERS B Ad? THOMAS R CSORBA  MSC62 PH D66 
JACK BERMAN DD S54 CR BRONFMAN JACQUES CHAMPAGNE HUGO CUEVAS BENGS3 
CHARLES S BERN B ENG49 PAMELA BROOK JAMES CHAN’ M D64 ROBERT C CULLEY 
MRS MARGARET BERNARD BB A46 ALFRED J BROOKS M DSS DR CHRISTINA CHAN BPT69 PHD79 MRS DAVID CULVER __B S47 
BL $47 VIVIAN EH BROOKS BSCS0 MDS54 MIUCCCHAN BENG? F PETER CUNDILL BCOM60 
LAURA C BERNTSON BSC69 MD74 FRANK S BROPHY BCOM48 HSIN-KANG CHANG ALAN S CUNNINGHAM — B COM48 
BRUCE M BERRIDGE BENGS4 LEO BROSSARD_ M SC40 ISIDORE CHARNESS B.C L24 PETER ACURRIE DDSv75 
EDGAR POWELL BERRY ROSS BROUGHAM- —_ B COM49 GERALD S CHARNESS _B SC47 JAMES WR CURRIER __B SC(AGR)52 
LORINE BESEL B N60 LYLAIBROWN BA26 MD30 JOHN S CHARTERS BSC43 MD44 MARIAN C CUSHING BA60 M D64 
AUSTIN C BEUTEL B COMS3 REA A BROWN MD62_ M SC66 WHCHASE BSC4 MDS2 EACYR 
MRS AUSTIN C BEUTEL BB AS8 KENNETH H BROWN B A29 LESLIE R CHASMAR_ _M DS! MICHAEL CYTRYNBAUM BA62. BCL65 
ALEXANDER BIEGA BC L49 C KIRKLAND BROWN BENGS6 PH D63 ERNEST C CHAUVIN B ENG42 MRS LAURA D ANGELO 
ROBERT] BIERSNER MA64 PH D66 CLIFFORD F BROWN _B COM37 GORDON L CHEESBROUGH _B SC48 ANTONY J D'OMBRAIN  B COM62 
SERGE BIKADOROFF BSC5S4 MDS8 MRS DOROTHY BROWN PHILIP N CHEIFETZ BSCS6 M D60 GEORGE HDAGG DDSv75 
RALPH BILEFSKY BSCS7 M D6! EDWIN J BROWN M D4g MRS ISABEL CHEN MRS HENRY DAINOW BB COM35 
JOHN C BINNEY BSC5S9 M D64 G CAMERON BROWN _ B ENG4O C BRANDON CHENAULT M DS6 FENNER F DALLEY BCOM38 
JOSEPHINE N BIRD BSC49 MDS3 HUGH C BROWN’ B ENG36 L PARKER CHESNEY BA38 M D40 WILLIAM R DALRYMPLE- _B ENGS4 
GERALD A BIRKS LINDA J BROWN BB ED66 LOUISE CHEVALIER BENG74 DEBORAH S DANOFF BSC69 M D73 
MRS JOHN E BIRKS BA34 M A39 LOGAN R BROWN SIMON W CHIASSON M D45 GERALD DANOVITCH 
MRS LLOYD W BIRMINGHAM M SC46 NORMAN E BROWN’ BSC48_ -M SC52 M CHRISTINE CHICOINE B COM65 RAYMOND DAOUST BCL48 
PH D49 ROBERT S BROWN PH D36 DANIEL CYRIL CHIN DD S65 MRS KENNETH H DARLING B SC48 
JOHN M BISHOP JR B ENG47 WILLIAM G BROWN SIDNEY S CHIPMAN MD28 JAMES H DARRAGH MD48 MSC59 
JOHN GL BISHOP BASO BCLS3 IRWIN BROWNS _B A5S4 F H BRUCE CHISHOLM —_B ENGSO E LESLIE DARRAGH B A44 
DON L BISHOP M D63 MRS IRWIN BROWNS BAS9 MED78 RAE CHITTICK NUROO ROBERTJC DAVID DD Sé62 
GILBERT BISHOP —_B SC(ARTS)23 SEYMOUR BROWNSTEIN BSC6l M D65 SYLVESTER SY CHIU MD64_ MSC65 JOHN T DAVIDSON BSC64 M D68 
TREVOR H BISHOP BAS4 BCLS? MORTY BROWNSTEIN JOHN CHOMAY _B SC(P E)51 J ROSS DAVIDSON M D29 
ARLAN EBJARNASON MDS53 PHILIP BROWNSTEIN BSCS2 DD S56 HOK SHAN CHONG _B SC7! JOHN A DAVIDSON _B SC(ARTS)28. -M D33 
MARTIN J BLACK BSC63 M D67 DARRYL BRUCE BCOMS9 NURUL CHOUDHURY MELVYN A DAVINE _B SC67 
DUNCAN R BLACK B ENGSO DOUGLAS M BRUCE M ENG66 R LOUIS CHRISTIE B ENG35 F ANDREW DAVIS M D63 
ELDON PBLACK BCL49 FRANCOIS BRULEY B ENG78 J PETER CHURCH MDS! JOHN F DAVIS MENG49 M DSO 
ERNEST D BLACK —_B SC(AGR)52 DELMAR BRUNDAGE ENG35 F ECHURCHILL BENGSO MRS JAMES L DAVIS —_B SC(AGR)49 
M SC(AGR)58 ARTHUR A BRUNEAU BA47 BCL49 FORREST JC CIOPPA M D62 THOMAS RMDAVIS BCL72 LL B79 
A JAMES BLAIR JR PH D6! ROGER E BRUNEAU- B ENGS4 JOHN DCIPERA PH D54 MRS THOMAS RM DAVIS BA70 BCL73 
DAVID C BLAIR MDS? RICHARD D BRUNNING  M DS9 GEORGE PCITROME BSC67 DDS?2 DONALD H DAVISON. MD57 
WESTON BLAKE JR MSCS3 JOHN P BRUNSWICK M D60 MARVIN CLAMEN BSC48 MDS52 * DUDLEY B DAWSON B A35 
BARBARA BLAKE JOHN A BRYANT BSC49 M DSI G DENTON CLARK M ENGS? MRS HOWARD L DAWSON ARTS32 
ROY MSBLAKE BSC54 MD59 IRENE M BUCHAN’ B N63 GEORGE WCLARK M D44 JOHN H DAWSON BAS6 BCLS9 
HOWARD A BLANCHETTE BSC65 MD71 JOHN BUCKLEY BRUCE P CLARKE B ENG34 JAMES H DAY MD59 
MRS JOHN BLAND BB Ad! JOHN H BUDDEN BB ENG37 WILLIAM B CLARKE _B ENG62 RAFAEL DE BOYRIE M D29 
JOHN BLAND B ARCH33 GB BONAR BUFFAM MD35 ALAN W CLAYTON BB COM66 ARTHUR DE BREYNE B ENG49 
LIONEL J BLANSHAY BA61 BC L64 J DOUGLAS BULGIN — B SC(ARTS)25 EDWARD G CLEATHER BAS! PIERRE.DE CHARMANT  BCLSS 
MICHAEL ABLAU BSC64 DD $69 G RAPLEY BUNTING BENGS6 MRS EDWARD G CLEATHER MARCELLE DE FREITAS B A43 
HECTOR PBLEJER BSC56 MDS58 FREDERICK S BURBIDGE DIP PO TS54 BSC(PO T)58 LOUIS PDE GRANDPRE BCL38 LLD?2 
H ALLISTER BLENKHORN _B SC(AGR)38 MRS DORIS ANITA BURGESS JOHN ECLEGHORN - B COM62 NAPOLEON DE LA FUENTE 
ETHEL BLOCK BAI6 MRS WBC BURGOYNE BA43 G RUTH CLELAND _B N69 NANNIE K MDELEEUW MSCSO0 
J BENJAMIN BLOCK —B ENG37 MIRIAM S BURLAND _B A26 FRED CLEMAN' BA49 DENNIS PDE MELTO MA63 PHD70 
DAVID BLOOM =B ENG35 EDWARD BURNETT M SC(APP)68 DED79 YVES W CLERMONT PHDS3 ARMAND LC DE MESTRAL BC L66 
MRS DAVID BLOOM = B. COM36 MRS SARAH BURNS OTTO CCLEYN BENG43 MARC E DE WEVER’  BC.L69 
LOUIS S$ BLOOM L GRANT BURTON B ENG63 WMDCLINTON BSC46 BDS6 JOHN M DEAL) 
LAWRENCE § BLOOMBERG MB A65 WILLIAM BBURWELL BSC49 MDS53 W GROSVENOR CLOUGH BB ENG36 SIDNEY AV DEANS BSC39 PH D42 
MRS LEWIS M BLOOMINGDALE BB A37 RAOUL C BUSER B ENGS9 ROSS N CLOUSTON BB SC49 THOMAS DES B DEBLOIS_ B A4?2 
MAIER L BLOSTEIN BENGS4 M ENGS9 MRS JEBUTLER BA34 JOHN M COCHRANE BSC66 DD S68 CHARLES RMJ DEHEM BA79 
PERRY BLUMBERG MSC29. M D3? DUDLEY'G BUTTERFIELD BCOM34 G ALAN COCKFIELD BENGS2 MBAZ78 J DAVID DEJONG M DSO 
LEOMBLUTEAU B ENGSO MRS DUDLEY G BUTTERFIELD _B A335 K BRIAN COCKHILL M SC(APP)64 NV DELBEL M D43 
JOHN ABOA BENGSO DIP MGMT57 E M CADMUS ERIC M COCKSHUTT BB COM22 LEONARD GJ DELICAET BENGS4 
MRS JD BOADWAY BB Ad] JOHN D CAGEORGE BSC35 M D44 ANNE MARIE COEMAN W ED DESBARATS B ENGS6 
THOMAS E BODY MB A68 MRS MAVIS CAIN B A49 J EDWIN COFFEY M DS52 A WY DESBRISAY _B SC(ENG)27 
GINO BOGGIA  BCL77 WILLIAM P CAINE B ENGS7 JOHN F COGAN ROGER DESERRES BCOM37 
JOHN EBOGUE BCOM62 NARASIMHAN CALAMUR PH D66 ALAN JORDAN COHEN _ B SC72 DENNIS S DESKIN B ARCHS9 
MAURICE J BOIVIN M DS8 PHILIP R CALANCHINI M D56 ARTHUR COHEN BA38 M D40 GILBERT G DESNOYERS'- B ENGSS 
FRANCOIS J BOLLINGER BENGS4 THOMAS L CALDER MD53 MRS DAVID COHEN’ B AS4 MRSC ADESOER_B SC52 
J GERMAIN BOMBARDIER DAVID M CALDWELL JR MDS2 EDGAR H COHEN’ BA34 ROLAND DESOURDY _ 
GEORGE F BONDAR. _M DS7 JOHN MCALHOUN' PH D38 RICHARD | COHEN JOAN DEVRIES M D45 
MICHAEL M BONE B COMS2 ROBERT BCALHOUN BA30 BCL33 ROBERT HAROLD COHEN BA43 DD S44 BENJAMING WDEW MD61_ __ 
HAROLD C BONNER M D33 DARRELL L CALKIN  B SC(ENG)21 JOHN HECOLBY BA39 BCL47 KENNETH MCI DEWAR __B SC(ENG)27 
BENJAMIN H BONNLANDER-B SCS3 ARCHIBALD F CAMERON DD S43 E WENDELL COLDWELL BA32 BCL35 EH DEWIS B SC(ENG)23 
M DS9 MRS JOAN P CAMERON’ BA44 DONALD L COLE  B SC(AGR)S5S5 LEONARD B DIRE _BSCS3_ 
HENRY BORDEN BA?! JOHN H CAMERON JN COLE STANLEY M DIAMOND = B COMS54 
FRANCIS C BORGNINO M D4s MARGARET M CAMERON B Alf WILLIAM R COLES _B ENGS! NASSER DIBAL 5 
ROBERT R BORIGHT BSC41 M Dad SHEILA M CAMERON |B ED(P E)62 ELEANOR COLLE E GORDON DICKIE M Ds8__ 
MRS ROBERT R BORIGHT __B SC(H EC)51 STEWART H CAMERON BA49 MDS! MRS SUSANN COLLIN J CAMPBELL DICKISON BA38 M D40 
IGOR BORISSOV MRS ARTHUR G CAMPBELL B A338 FTCOLLINS BCL24 ROBERT W DICKSON. 
WALTER H BORLASE B ENGS9 BRUCE L CAMPBELL B ENGS4 SALVATORE J COMPAGNONE M D60 DONALD P DIDELIUS M D62 x 
CARLOGBOS BAdI M D43 CHRISTOPHER F CAMPBELL _ B SC(ENG)25 J P GERARD COMTOIS B ENG60 DOROTHY L DIXON BA37_ BL S38 
MARK M BOSS BSC(AGR)44.__M D49 COLIN CAMPBELL M DS3 ROBERT FRED CONN’ _BA74 JOHN FC DIXON BSC42 PHD47 ~ 
MRS GABOR BOTH ML S69 CRAIG ECAMPBELL BSC71 MD75 JAMES E CONNOLLY DD $39 MS BARBARA J DOBBIE-MCMILLAN _ B N65 
LINDSAY R BOTTOMER —-M SC(APP)75 DOUGLAS J CAMPBELL B ENG48 PETER CONTOMPASIS ANTHONY RC DOBELL BSC49_ M DSI 
JOSEPH E BOUCHARD BCOMS? J ELLIOTT CAMPBELL = B ENG42 KENNETH H COOKE _ B SC69 J ARTHUR DOBSON M D49 
MICHELE BOUCHER B ENG7S JOAO PRCAMPOS BA70 GERALD E COOPER BSC48 PH DS3 JOHN W DOBSON B COM49_ 
GEORGE G BOUKYDIS BCOM44 GEORGES DCANTLIE M D60 HARRIET COOPER _B A75 R NESBITT DOBSON _ B ENG35 
JOSEPH EBOULDING M DS3 DAVID G CAPE BSC48 M DSO JOHN | COOPER. PH D38 JOHN W DODDS _BSC43__P-H D49 
GERALD BOURBONNIERE BSC47 MD49 JOHN M CAPE ROBERT M COOPER M D49 =i CLEVELAND EARL DODGE JR 
BR BOURKE _B ENGS| . BENJAMIN CAPLAN BA30 MA3I ROSS M COOPER BENG48 M ENGSO LESLIE A DOGGRELL _B SC46 
F MUNROE BOURNE BA3l MD37 RS BENJAMIN CAPLAN B A32 DANIEL COORSH_ B A35 DM DONALDSON BENG4 __ 
raed he, SED: MRS BENJAMI ‘ORDON A COPPING ROBERT G DONALDSON _D DSS8 
} ROBERT BOWEN M Das HARVEY CAPLAN BA43_ M D44 GORDON A COPPING MD30 RT G DONALDSO! S5t 
ALEXANDER BOWMAN DD S68 HERBERT CAPLAN DD SSO CV BCORBET BCOM34 : HAROLD G DONDENAZ B A48 
DON BOYANER M D5) : JACOB H CAPLAN B ENGS4 PERCY ECORBETT BAI3 DCL6! ELAINE DONNELLAN  M D49 : 
HARRY ae ‘ pte gh eo oe sina ;ERALD CORKRAN M D45 W GORDON DONNELLY BA39 BCL4 
YM BOYCE BCOM30 SAMUEL LCAPLAN BCOM22 BCL28 R GER ey See iEie 
MRSRLBOYCE BCOM4? Se PIERRE CORMIER B ENGSO H RUDOLF DORKEN _ B SC(ENG)!8 


LS 


*Deceased 


————— oo 


= 


WALTER R DORKEN’- B ENG33 
DONALD B DOUGHERTY BCOM48 
KENNETH ROOT DOUGLAS M D56 


MRS MONTEATH DOUGLAS _ B A36 
M S W67 

ROBERT J DOUGLAS _B ENG50 

WJDOWNS M D34 

JAMES N DOYLE BA37 BCL4l 

LANEY A DOYLE B N69 

BERNARD J DRABBLE B A45 

KINGSLEY G DRAKE BENGS54 

THOMAS S DRAKE ~~ B ENG3?7 

M C DRESSLER 

FRANCES SELYE DREW M D4? 


MRS LEONARD L DRUCKMAN 
GORDON DRUKER_ B SC57 
DEREK A DRUMMOND B ARCH62 
LANNE DRURY BA42 
EARL H DRYMER- BAS6 
HARRY | DUBOW BSC54 
GERALDINE A DUBRULE 
W MOSSMAN DUBRULE 
CLAUDE A DUCKETT  B ENGSS 
RUDOLPH DUDER_B A3?2 

P ARTHUR H DUFAYS'- _B ENG63 
JAMES A DUFF 

JAMES C DUFFIELD B SC54 
HUGH AG DUNCAN B A37 
JOHN G DUNN’ _BCOM5S57 
LEO J DUNN BSC49 
TIMOTHY H DUNN 
MRS WH S DUNN 
GERALD J DUNNE 

E AENID DUNTON 
JACQUES DUQUETTE 
JJ DUSSAULT B ENG47 
RFDUSTON' BENGS2 
RICHARD § DUTTON M D63 
DOUGLAS LDYKEMAN MDS53 
ROBERTS EADIE  B SC(ENG)20 
MRS ROBERTS EADIE BAI? 
FCEAGLESHAM M D36 
ARTHUR P EARLE BENG49 
JOHN M EASSON’ BCOM23 
DAVID G EASTMAN’ MDS5iI 
MRS MICHAEL EBERT BSC34 PH D38 
ARNOLD J ECHENBERG- BB COMS7 
MYRON J ECHENBERG BA62. M A64 
MRS PHILLIPPA ECKERT BCOM49 
ROSS EDDY BCL76 

PETER GEDGELL MD43 
RALPH S EDMISON DD S843 
DOUGLAS F EDWARDS _ B SC(AGR)52 
FRANK J EDWARDS M D43 

RUSSELL L EDWIN BSC50 MDS4 
NICHOLAS EHRENFELD DD S54 


DIP ED47 


BC L59 
M DS58 
B SC(P E)57 
B A27 


M D42 


B COM40 
S W41 
B ENG44 


BA47 M D49 


M SC22 


DIP MEDSO 


MARTIN EIDINGER BSCSI DDS$53 

SAMUEL EIDINGER BA29  M D35 

VICTOR EINAGEL 

DAVID DYMOND ELCOMBE BB SC63 
M D67 

JOHN M ELDER BSC49 MDSI 


GARDNER SMITH ELDRIDGE 
MILTON ELIASOPH _" B ARCH32 
ERICH W ELKINGTON MDI8 
HOWARD L ELLIOT BA22 MD29 
BARTON S ELLIS BCOM47 
WHELLIS' BENGS8 
ARCHIBALD D ELLISON 
LESLIE TELLYETT BCOM36 
ASHTON EMERSON’ M D40 
MRS KYRA EMO _ BSCS3 

J VERNON EMORY BCOM38 
LESLIEH CEMSDEN' M D5? 
MARTIN AENTIN M SC42 
JEROME EPSTEIN 
WILLIAM ERRINGTON 
GWERSKINE S$C33 
JOHN M ESDAILE 

H MARTYN ESTALL 
RONALD H ESTEY BSC66 MD70 
RALPH H ESTEY BSC(AGR)SI PH D56 
ROBERTO L ESTRADA BSC42. M D43 
ALLEN ETCOVITCH BSC60 M SC(APP)63 
CHARLES HOWARD EVANS JR M D37 
WILLIAM E EVENS B COM35 
MRS DOUGLAS MCL EWART 
LEO M EWASEW M D56 
E JANE FAIR” BA70 
CHARLES O FAIRBANK 

T BRUCE FALLOWS 
WILLIAM K FALLS B SC35 

HENRY F FANCY M D45 

GERALD W FARNELL PH DS57 

JEAN H FAUROT M A40 

ANGELO J FAVRETTO — B ARCH47 

HAZEL R FEE BED78 

H ERIC FEIGELSON'-~ B A29 

ROBERT E FELLOWS JR- M DS59 
BARBARA R FELLOWS’ M D54 

JOHN D FENWICK BSC5S6 DD S58 
CHARLOTTE | FERENCZ BSC44 M D45 
CHARLES A FERGUSON’ M D57 
ELDON FERGUSON 

R STIRLING FERGUSON — B ARCH39 
ROBERT M FERGUSON " B ENGS|] 
STEN E FERSING DD S66 

MRS FRANK FIDLER DIP S W30 
MRS ROBERT A FINDLAY  B A36 
RONALD F FINDLAY B COMS55 
HARRY FINKELSTEIN BSC42 BCOM44 
WILLIAM E FINKELSTEIN BSC39 M D4] 
MRS MARY FINLAY ML‘S72 

DONALD G FINLAYSON’ BCLS52 

PHYLLIS FISCHER M DS5 

MICHAEL JS FISH B ARCHS6 

MORRIS J FISH BAS9 BCL6? 

MRS MORRIS J FISH B A65 
MAXWELL FITCH BB SC38 


B SC(ENG)1! 


M D45 


B COMS50 


BA30 M A3l 


BH S40 


ENG27 
B COM37 


M A32 


M D43 


JOHN J FLAHIVE M D48 

MICHAEL E FLANDERS BSC66' M D70 
GEORGE G FLATER-_B ENGSO 

IAN N FLEMING B COM47 

MRS IAN N FLEMING -— B COM47 

JOHN D FLINTOFT  BENGSI 

MORTON FLOM _ B ENG49 

EDWARD FLOMEN 

NICHOLAS J FODOR 

JANOS FOLDVARI 

PHILIP F FORAN BC L30 

OTTO L FORCHHEIMER _ B SC47 
ALASTAIR D FORDYCE ~ B SC71 
MAURICE AL FORGET BC L69 

ROY FORSEY 

J M FORSYTH 

EUGENE J FORTIN BCOM70 

GUY FORTIN BSC72 BCL76 

J ROBERT FORTIN’ B ENG63 

ROBERT A FORTUINE M D60 
BARBARA EVELYN FOWLER ~ B ED72 
ZELDA FOX 

LEOPOLD FRANCOEUR BCOM49 
FRANK LFRANI DD $59 

KEITH B J FRANKLIN 

SAMUEL B FRANKLIN’ BCOM23 
DORIS S FRASER BF A352 

IAN H FRASER _ B A47 

J RAMSEY FRASER B COM34 
OSWALD LK FRASER — B SC(AGR)48 
WILLIAM M FRASER DD S62 
ARTHUR N FREEDMAN MDS55_ M SCS58 
GARY L FREEDMAN __ DD S64 

JAMES H FREEMAN’ M D59 

DONALD H FRENCH _ B SCS4 

GEORGE P FRENCH DD S52 
RICHARD D FRENCH 

A O FRENKEL 

SAUL FRENKIEL BSC67 M D7] 
CONSTANCE FRIEDMAN’ BSC4! PH D48 
HERBERT DAVID FRIEDMAN  B COM44 
JERRY J FRIEDMAN BCOMS3 
SYDNEY FRIEDMAN MD40 PH D46 
MENNO JOHN FRIESEN 

MADELEINE A FRITZ  BAI9 

TAK FUJIMAGARI BSC52 M D56 


MRS G LLOYD FULFORD _ DIP S W30 
M A30 
JOHN A FULLER 


PETER C FULLER 


B COMS0 
B ENG39 


DOUGLAS H FULLERTON B COM39 
M COM40 

MRS FRASER F FULTON’ BH 827 

DANIEL FUNDERBURK M D56 

THOMAS G FYSHE BA3!l MD36 

E PETER GABOR MD59 M SC64 

G GALAVARIS 

JOHN SGALE M D47 


ROBERT L GALES — B SC(AGR)68 

J CHRISTOPHER GALLANT DD S47 
RONALD E GALLAY B COMS54 
HENRY GALLER 

A HARRY GALLEY BCOM24 

MRS TMGALT BA42 

FRED GAMBLE '_ B ENG34 

MRS BERNICE LGANG_ B N75 
JOSEPH M GANNON’ M D335 
NATHAN GANS B ENG45 

JEAN GARCEAU BCOMS4 

YVES EGARDERE BCOMS3 
DONALD S$ GARDNER _ B SC(AGR)52 
JAMES E GARDNER COM33 

JOHN M F GAREAU _ B SC52 

U PAUL FGAREAU BSC49 MDS3 
MRS U PAUL F GAREAU _ B SCS50 
ABRAHAM L GARELLEK DD S61 
MARGARET I! GARLICK — B SC34 
MRS EDITH-ANN GARNEAL 
LEVON K GARRON’ M D36 
JAMES P GASTON’ M DS58 

MRS RH GAULT B SC(PO T)54 
JEAN G GAUTHIER BENGSO M ENG79 
WHGAULVIN BENG4] PH D45 
YOUSSEF GEADAH _ B ENG71 

DURWARD BELMONT GEFFKEN 

DAVID CGEGGIE BA48 M DSO 
BRAHM M GELFAND BAS7 BCL60 
MORRIE M GELFAND BSC45_ M DS0 
GUY GERIN-LAJOIE B ARCHS56 

LYNN BGEROW M D67 

GUIDO GIANFRANCESCHI M D48 
ROBERTSON M GIBB B ENG40 

ROBERT E GIBBONS DD S63 

DAVID H GIBSON — DIP AGR58 

FRANK M GIBSON — B COM40 

MRS FRANK M GIBSON _ B A39 

MIRIAM L GIBSON CERT NUR27 
GORDON L GILBERT M D37 

JOAN M GILCHRIST BNS5S8 M SC(APP)64 
EDWIN GGILES JR B SC(AGR)66 
* DRUMMOND GILES _ B SC(ENG)27 

EVAN WTGILL_ BSC(ENG)25 

R HAMPSON GILLEAN _ B SC(ARTS)28 

KATE M GILLESPIE B A21 

PETER GGILLETT M D63 

JAMES A GILLIANS BCOM48 

MICHAEL F GILLIS B SC(AGR)5! 


B SC35 


SAMUEL A GITTERMAN _ B ARCH35 

LS GIULIANELLI BSC(ARTS)28 M D32 

ARTHUR E GLADMAN-” BSC38 M D40 
* GORDON B GLASSCO _ B SC(ENG)05 

ALEX GLASSMAN _ B ENG46 

MRS ALEXANDER F GLEN DIP P E26 

HARRY GLICK BSCS8 M D62 


MME JUSTICE CONSTANCE R GLUBE 
P EGNAEDINGER  ENG2?2 

H JAMES GODBER B COMS4 
ELLIOT GODEL BCOMSO 

MORRIS GODEL _ B SC54 


B AS2 


+ 


JOHN E GODFREY _ B SC(ENG)30 


ROBERT P GODIN’ BC L6?2 
MORTON R GODINE BA38 M A39 
SAMUEL GODINSKY BA27 BC L30 


ALAN B GOLD 
ALLEN GOLD 
JACK A GOLD 
MRS JOHN M GOLD  B N68 
SAMUEL GOLD BA29 MA3l 
SIMON GOLD MD40 M SC45 
NORMAN J GOLDBERG BSC55 
RICHARD B GOLDBLOOM _ BSC45 
VICTOR C GOLDBLOOM _B SC 44 
ALAN ZGOLDEN' BC L6?2 
H CARL GOLDENBERG BC 132 
MORRIS GOLDFINGER _ B SC71 
PHYLLIS JUKIER GOLDFINGER 
M D74 
ROBERT W GOLDIE 
LEWIS H GOLDMAN _B Aé? 
MARY GOLUBEVA BS WSO MS WS3 
R GRAYDON W GOODALL MD53 M SC56 
R C JEFFREY GOODE BENG33 M ENG34 
MRS JEAN E GOODERHAM_B A33 
MRS GEORGE D GOODFELLOW 
DIP MGMT35 
MRS MORTIMER GOODMAN 
M A35 
WILLIAM E GOODMAN 
WOLFE GOODMAN 
MARTIN B GOODWIN 
ALAN GORDON 
MRS DONALD GORDON 
HAROLD P GORDON B COMS8 
NEWTON C GORDON _B SC66 
PHILIP GORDON B ENG39 
WILLIAM GOSSAGE BA49 MDS3 
JACQUES R GOUDREAL B ENGS| 
FRANKLIN MGOULD' M D5? 
KEITH PGOULD- BENG48 
J WALLACE GRAHAM M D60 
FRANK A GRAINGER’ M D43 
WILLIAM J GRANT _B ENG40 
MRS WILLIAM J GRANT B A44 
JAMES N GRASSBY _ B ENG39 
COLIN A GRAVENOR JR_ B A64 
RH GRAVES DD S43 
E D GRAY-DONALD _ B SC(ENG)26 
JOHN H GRAY B ENGS?2 
ALEX S$ GRAYDON" B A37 
E MORTIMER GREAVES 
GORDON K GREAVES _B A4? 
HAROLD L GREAVES DD $29 
VLADIMIR GREBENSCHIKOV 
DANTE PRGRECO M D65 
C GREEN 
MICHAEL JOHN GREEN 
ROLAND GREENBANK 
DIP ED56 
MILTON GREENBERG M D28 
RBGREENBLATT BA28 MD32 
FRED AGREENWOOD- BSCS5O0 M D54 
RUSS GREENWOOD 
DONALD F GREER’ B COMS57 
JACK GREGORY BENG34 
FRANCES A GRIFFITHS — B SC65 
ANTHONY J M GRIFFITHS 
DOUGLAS R GRIMES B ENGS54 
GA GRIMSON- BCOM25 
SIMPSON V GRISDALE BB ENG36 
HARRY GROBSTEIN 
PHILIP N GROSS _B SC(ENG)26 
HARVEY GROSSMAN BAS] 
DAVID GROVER 
NAOMI JACKSON GROVES 
ERNEST H GRUBB) M D48 
NERI P GUADAGNI BB A38 
ROBERT D GUALTIERI__B A57 
PIERRE JACQUES GUAY BCL49 
G RICHARD GUERETTE BCOMS54 
GEORGE C GUILLON _B SC68 
YVES JGUISAN M SC7] 
ALFRED AGUNKEL PH D73 
DACIE GUNN) M D45 
CHARLES S GURD _ B SC38 
MRS DAVIDS GURD_ B A33 
FRASER NGURD BA34 MD39 
ROBERTS GURD BSC 48 
| TORRENCE GURMAN 


M D42 M SC48 


M D59 
M D49 

M D45 

LL D66 

M D75 

B SC72 


B ENGS|] 


B A32 
BA42 M D43 
M D48 

B A43 


BC L64 
D D $70 


DIP MEDS7 


M ENG40 
B C L67 


BC L49 
B A20 


B ENG62 
B SC(AGR)47 


M D69 


BA33) M A35 


M D42 


B SC(ENG)22 


DAVID G GUTHRIE BSC43 M D44 
HARVEY GUYDA 
D ANTONIO GUZMAN BAS& M D60 
JEAN MGWYNNE_ BA27 
PETER PC HAANAPPEL LLM74 DCL76 
MRS ELKE E HAAS _B SC(N)65 
LEONIDAS HADIJIS 
ALFRED H DHAIBLEN B ENG46 
SAUL HAICHIN 
JOHN F HALDIMAND _B COM9? 
BURTBHALE BSC47 ™M Da9 
THOMAS RHALE BSC47_ M Dag 
JOHN EHALL MDS? 
GEORGE WHALL BCL37 
MRS GEORGE C HALLIDAY B A2% 
ROGER WHALLIN MDS? 
KENNETH HALLSWORTH __ B SC36 
EARLS HALTRECHT BSC67 DD S69 
A KEITHHAM BAS4 BCLS9 
THOMAS M HAMBLIN BENG65_ M ENG?74 
ALEX D HAMILTON B ENG40 bar 
MRS ALEX D HAMILTON B SC4] 
WILLIAM M HAMILTON BCOM4?7 
J DAVID HAMMOCK _ B SC63 
DAVID IAN HAMMOND w D7? 
H ANTHONY HAMPSON _B ASO) 
S EDMUND A HANKIN 3 
DIP P E35 re 
ALLEN JHANLEY B ENGS| 
MRS HELEN BUDD HANNA M ATS 


MRS JOAN HANNA BA35 = M ED72 
BARBARA HANNACH M D78 
MATTHEW S HANNON BC L 
4 GEORGE HANSON M D35 
PAUL P HARASIMOWICZ DD S61 
JOHN E HARBERT ~ B ENG60 
RGMHARBERT BSC34 M D39 
MICHAEL B HARDING B ENGS54 
JGHARDMAN MD43 
MRS DONALD HARE B SC52 
MJHARKINS M D32 
MRS THOS HARKNESS 
PATRICIA M HARNEY 
PH D63 


BAI4 M SCI6 
B SC(AGR)50 


SEAN J HARRINGTON BCL68 
HOWARD M HARRIS” M D55 

C GORDON HARRIS — B ENGS5O 

DONALD G HARRIS” M D55 

JOHN G HARRIS — B ENG71 

MRS MELANIE HARRIS BA72 MLS76 
ROBERT P HARRISON’ _B COM35 
CHARLES M HART B SC65 

RICHARD M HART B A65 

J WARREN HARTHORNE- M DS57 

G RONALD HARTMAN _ B A38 

E FRED HARTWICK  B ENG38 

DONALD F HARVEY  M D60 

ROBERT K HARWOOD-  ENG48 
MICHAEL A HASLEY  B A62 

H CLIFFORD HATCH JR- B A63 

MRS GERALD G HATCH _ B ARCH46 
THOMAS J HAUGHTON BSC32. M D35 ' 


LLOYD $ HAWBOLDT 
M SC(AGR)46 
ROMA ZHAWIRKO MSC49 PH DSI 
DOUGLAS L HAY _ B SC(AGR)57 
WILLIAM DREW HAY BS A20 
WILLIAM HAYS M D64 
MRS GEORGE HAYTHORNE B A33 
RHHEADLEY BSCS0 DD S56 
REHEARTZ BSC(ENG)I7 
E SHELDON HEATH _ B SCS3 
LILY HECHTMAN _ B SC63 
PETER BHECHTMAN BSC63_ PH D70 
ROY MLHEENAN BAS7 BC L60 
JAMES L HEFFERNAN M DS 
MELVYN HEFT BCOMS3 DD S60 
AEHELD BA26 MD30 
STEPHEN JHELLE BSCS2 
BRIAN HELLER BCL75 
JOHN G HELLSTROM _ B SCS0 
MYER HENDELMAN BB A38 
DOUGLAS G HENDERSON 
IAN GORDON HENDERSON 
ROWLAND E HENDERSON 
JOHN F HENNESSEY M DS53 
ROSS A HENNIGAR — B SC(AGR)SI 
ROSS AC HENRY BCL49 
GEORGE L HENTHORN _B COM49 
ROBERT W HENWOOD BB ENG33 
ANDREW A HERCUN BB ENG79 
MOSES HERMAN 
ALEXANDER W HERRON 
E MELVYN HERSHENFIELD 
D D S65 
HYMAN P HERSHMAN 
MRS CHARLES HERSHORN BB A30 
MRS HAROLD G HESLER _B COM27 
ROBERT W HESLOP _ B SC(AGR)53 
MATTHEW L HESS B ENG64 
STEPHEN S HESSIAN B ENGS7 
C F G HEWARD 
E PETER HEYBROEK 
PAUL HEYMAN 
MRS PAUL HEYMAN 
ARHICKS M D43 
ARTHUR J HICKS 
BEN CHURCH HICKS 
CAROLINE B HICKS 
RAYMOND F HIGGINS 
HOWARD A HIGGINSON 
LUCIUS T HILL JR M DS8 
ALLAN CHILL M S$C27 
SARA WHILL  B A25 
WH PHILIP HILL BA30 MD34 
JAMES HBHILTON M D38 
GEORGE G HINTON B SCSI 
LUCIEN HIRSCH M D35 
BETSY HIRST B A70 
J FRED HOCKEY BS A2I 
WALTER HODDER _ B SC48 
GEORGE R HODGSON ENGI6 
MARTIN M HOFFMAN PH D43 
MRS MORTON HOFFMAN 
JOHN RHOGLE M D33 
KALERVO HOKKINEN 
GEORGE H HOLLAND 
HARVEY HOLLINGER 
REGINALD HOLLIS 
ROBERT W HOLMES 
DAVID HONIG 
ALAN BHOOD M DS6 
PHYLLIS EHOOD BH $37 
LYNDON G HOOKER _ B SC(AGR)59 
WILLIAM TEMPLE HOOPER _ B SC44 
M D45 
GLHOPKINS 8B ENGS2 
E PETER HOPPER B COMS3 
GEORGE F HOROWITZ 
W GRANT HORSEY B COM38 
JAMES F HORWOOD__M SC33 
ROBERT THORWOOD _ B SC63 
JOHN R HOUGHTON — B ENG35 
KENNETH S HOWARD BB A46 
GORDON T HOWARD BB COM36 
R PALMER HOWARD M D37 
JOHN HOWIE M D27 
REHOWIE BENG44 
PETER AHOWLAND M D6 


B SC(AGR)38 


M D57 
M D67 


M DS5S6 
L L B78 

M D54 ; 
M D40 7 
B SC(AGR)42 

B SC(ENG)26 
BA33 M D38 


B A6! 
B SC63 


B ENG45 


eS ee 


B COM46 | 


BSC49. MPSS5I 
BS A27_ M SC(AGR)31 
B SC(ENG)27 
BA37 BLS38 
M D37 

B COM49 


PH D29 


M DS55 


M D47 


B SC(P E)48 
B COM49 
M DS2 

B DS6 

B ENG41 


M SCS58 


PH D35 


BC L49 
M SC47 


——<—$ 3 <$<$S—$ S$. i ETERAHOWLAND MDOL 


*Deceased 


8 


BC L66 


JAMES F KELLY 


~ 


PETER AHOWLETT BCI B SC(ENG)23 SIDNE S ‘WE : 7 
EDUARD HOYER B ENG67 , SHARRON M KELLY _ B SC66 GE RGE : C LEFEBVRE BA4I M D44 sani ig Aaa sae a 32 
KENNETH S$ HOYLE B ENG4 DR FRANCES OLDHAM KELSEY _B S34 ROBIN C LEFEBVRE BCL72 KENNETH J MACKINNON _ BY 
ALEX SHRYCAY _B ENG64 Us M SC35 LOUISE A LEFORT B SC70 PETER TMACKLEM _M DS6 
ROBERT DOUGLAS HUDSON BB ENG79 FREDERICK KEMP |} HANCE LEGERE BENGSO DIP MGMTSS GORDON A MACLACHLAN 
JAMES M HUGHES —_B COM62 F DEAN KEMPER-  M D4? STEVE LEGLER LORN MACLAREN | : 
BARRY GHULL B ENG63 JOSEPH G KENNA B COM4? CHARLESLLEGROW MD34 STEWART M MACLAURIN BENGS! 
MRS KIM HUM HAROLD W KENNEDY) D D §$§? GEOFFREY W LEHMAN B A49 M DS53 MRS BASIL MACLEAN 
WG MACKENZIE HUME M D49 S MICHAEL KENNEDY DD S68 H E LEHMANN | ELEANOR A MACLEAN BSC67_ ML S69 
PETER HUMPHREYS BSC64 = M D66 JAMES C KENRICK DD S58 HEINZ EDGAR LEHMANN WALLACE H MACLEAN M SC(APP)64 
WS HUNT Bac hes LBONARD : KENT IR BSCS3 DDSSS WILFRED LEITH MSC48 DIP\ EDS} PH D68 . 
A WS HUNTE § A32 37 -RT AKENWOOD | B ENG49 M CHRISTINE LEJTENY! MD64_ M SC7 :. ‘ACLE SC72 
C GRANT HUNTER BCOM60  B A62 LEO C H KERKLAAN PIERRE MLEMAY MD56 am ayn, pony eaten oral eed 
DOUGLAS D Hl NTER B ENG42 MRS PETER F KERRIG AN BA4S6 MS W64 IAN LEM