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Dear McGill News, 


I was delighted with the June issue of the 
McGill News and I would like to compli- 
ment you and your staff for a job well done. 
The articles are diverse and interesting, 
written in an upbeat way which is most 
refreshing in these days of stress, doom and 
gloom. They cover a broad spectrum of 
what McGill is all about, and I can assure 
you that I have read this issue from cover to 
cover. 

The idea of covering the various faculties 
and showing us pictures of the deans is most 
commendable and I was most encouraged 
by the message that came through from 
Agriculture, Law and Science. 

Having played tennis with Bob Steven- 
son on many occasions during the past 
year, I had no real idea of what he was 
doing at McGill or anything much of his 
background; the article on the new Dean of 
Students was therefore particularly per- 
tinent. 

I am sure we are all encouraged by the 
good news on the McGill-Queen’s Univer- 
sity Press and it is gratifying to learn of the 
help of the University of Toronto Press in 
getting us over some difficult times. 

The McGill Palliative Care Service 
article was done with insight, compassion 
and intelligence covering a most difficult 


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subject. Dr. Mount gave the address at the 
Convocation of the Health Sciences on 
June 2nd, and I found him to be a most 
fascinating individual — your article adds 
“much depth to my perception of what he 
and his staff are all about. 

The articles on microtechnology and on 
Brian Macdonald were excellent, as the 
article states (with respect to the computer ) 
“Today few can escape its influence,” 
therefore the more we know about computers 
the better. 

Finally, I would like to offer a special 
vote of thanks for the article entitled 
“McGill’s Athletic Medics” which was 
very well done and gave us a short but 
incisive description of three quite different 
individuals who are able to combine excel- 
lence in academics with excellence in 
athletics. Intercollegiate athletics are of 
great importance for our university and it is 
fitting and proper that publications, such as 
the McGill News, provide insights into the 
players, the teams and the coaches. Having 
had some small connection with intercol- 
legiate football and hockey, I am impressed 
by the quality of the men who coach these 
sports and of their dedication to McGill and 
to the students who play on their teams. I 
am aware also of the literally hundreds of 
hours that these men put in beyond the 

limits of their strict coaching duties, attempt- 


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ing to contact and recruit the best quality of 


student athletes to come to our university. 
These men receive very little recognition or 
praise for the work they do. Their financial 
rewards are minimal, and in some Cases 
almost nonexistent and yet they are a most 
important part of the McGill indentity. I 
would like to suggest that at some point in 
the future it may be possible for you to do 
an article highlighting some of these excep- 
tional individuals. 

Once again my 
wishes. 


thanks and best 


Yours sincerely, 


R.O. Hill, M. D. 

Senior Radiologist 

Department of Diagnostic Radiology 
The Montreal General Hospital 
Associate Professor 

Faculty of Medicine, McGill University 


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Volume 64, Number 1 
September 1983 


ISSN 0709 9223 


Editorial Board 
Editor 
Charlotte Hussey 


Assistant Editor 
Peter O’Brien 


Members 
(Chairman) 
Robert Carswell 
David Bourke 
Gretta Chambers 
Betsy Hirst 
Katie Malloch 
Elizabeth McNab 
Gary Richards 
Robert Stevenson 
Tom Thompson 
Laird Watt 
Michael Werleman 
James G. Wright 


Art Direction 
Alison Hall/Design Kirk Kelly 


The official publication of the 
Graduates’ Society, the News 
is sent without charge to all 
recent graduates and to all 
other graduates and friends 
who make annual contribu- 
tions to McGill University. 


The copyright of all contents 
of this magazine is regis- 
tered. Please address all 
editorial communications and 
items for the “Where They 
Are and What They’re Doing” 
column to: 


McGill News 

3605 Mountain Street 
Montreal, Quebec 
H3G 2M1 

Tel: (514) 392-4813 


| | McGill’s faculties look to the future 


| The deans of Dentistry, Education, and Music discuss the 


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CONTENTS 


es 


by Charlotte Hussey 


|| plans that will strengthen their faculties in the years 
ahead. 


| I. F. Stone revisits the trial of Socrates 


_| denounced Socrates and his illustrious disciple Plato for 
|| being ‘‘anti-democratic.”’ 


Where North meets South: 
Bellairs Research Institute of McGill 
by Charlotte Hussey 


Bellairs Research Institute in St. James, Barbados, is 


pursue their research in a tropical environment. 
Scott, Smith, Edel and company: 1 5 
early McGill student publications 

by Peter O'Brien 


Over the decades McGill student magazines have played a 
seminal role in the development of “‘little’” magazine | 
publishing in Canada. They have also launched the literary @ 
careers of those who have gone on to win Governor- } 
General’s Awards and Pulitzer Prizes. 


| Planning a techno-logical future for Montreal 
by Professor Benjamin Higgins 


During his June 18, 1983 convocation address, Professor of 
Economics Benjamin Higgins told McGill Arts and Law 
graduates that they should stay in Quebec and make 
Montreal the ““Boston of Canada.”’ 


20 


Veteran journalist I. F. Stone was his audacious and witty 
self this year at the Beatty Public Lecture Series when he 


by John Sainsbury 


DEPARTMENTS | 


MCR, «> ote RS = 0 4a yo one 2. Perspecivessi6 is. ee 21 
Shot the Marilet heats ob oa occas We ees 3 

‘Foreign agent,’ Terri Nash, makes good ......... 3 Where they are and 

Homeless women in Montreal ................... 3 what they’re doing ..... 22 

McGillFEST to launch National 

Universes Week... . Geiss acs ws fle 26 4 eben as 4 Focus: Ronald Blumer... 27 

“What @ name?” . forge os. is As aeee ey pease 5 

Dr. Waldemar Sackston: the sunflower man ....... 7 Society Activities ....... 28 

An international look at mental illness ............ 8 

GRATULACIJE Polish Institute!................. 9 


diver waits for his partially 
submerged colleague to take 
the plunge. 


Cover: At work on a project to 
preserve a Shoreline on the 
island of Barbados, Bellairs 


Cover photo: Vivian Kellner 


| Research Institute boatman- 


SEPTEMBER 1983/McGILL NEWS 


providing Canadian scientists with the opportunity to | 


18 


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NEWSBREAK 


Custom and 
ceremony 


Approximately 4,200 students graduated 
this year from McGill’s twelve faculties 
and ten schools. At convocation ceremonies 
held in June, eight honorary degrees were 
also awarded — including a doctor of 
divinity degree to literary theorist Northrop 
Frye, who gave the address at the Religious 
Studies, Music, Science and Graduate 
Studies Convocation. A further highlight 
was the presentation of gold medals to the 
top four graduating students in engineering. 
All the recipients are Montreal women: 
Anne McQueen in chemical engineering, 
Margaret Furst and Caroline Firstbrook 
in electrical engineering, and Diane Julia 
Durnford in mechanical engineering. 


After more than thirty years of service to 
McGill, Robert Bell, PhD’48, DSc’79, 
and his wife Jeanne Bell, BA’47, BLS’53, 
LLD’78, have left the university to take up 
residence in British Columbia. Dr. Bell has 
been named the first director of Vancouver’s 
Arts, Sciences, and Technology Centre. 
He was McGill’s principal from 1970 to 
1979 and has been the Rutherford Professor 
of Physics since 1960. Mrs. Bell has served 
for many years on the university’s visual 
arts and museums committees. More recent- 
ly, she was coordinator of the Women’s 
Centennial Committee, established to 
organize activities marking the 1984 cen- 
tennial anniversary of the first admission of 
women to McGill. She has been replaced in 
this capacity by Arlene Gaunt, associate 
director of Industrial Research McGill. 


Dr. Robert and Jeanne Bell 


2 McGILL NEWS/SEPTEMBER 1983 


The hopes of physiology professor 
Douglas Watt to become the first Canadian 
in space have come a Step closer to 
fulfillment. Federal science and technology 
minister Donald Johnston recently an- 
nounced that Watt’s experiments on space 
sickness could be one of two Canadian 
research projects to be tested in orbit on 
NASA space shuttle flights in late 1985 or 
early 1986. 


Dr. Douglas Watt 


Dean of Science Svenn Orvig, MSc’51, 
PhD’54, recently received this year’s 
Patterson Medal, the country’s highest 
meteorological honour. In announcing the 
award, federal environment minister John 
Roberts cited Orvig’s “‘outstanding contri- 
bution to our knowledge and understanding 
of the climates of polar regions.”’ 


Many small businesspeople and would- 
be entrepreneurs took advantage this summer 
of a low cost consulting service offered by 
McGill’s MBA students. Services included 
advice on start-up procedures, market 
planning, and budgeting. The non-profit 
bureau was supported by an advisory board 
consisting of McGill Management Faculty 
members, and it enjoyed direct access to 
the university’s computer and library 
systems. 


Charles Scriver, BA’51, MD’S55, pro- 
fessor of biology and pediatrics and co- 
director of McGill’s Medical Research 
Council Group in Medical Genetics, recent- 
ly became the first Canadian to deliver the 
Rutherford Lecture to the Royal Society in 
London, England. Dr. Scriver’s presentation 
was entitled “An Evolutionary View of 
Disease in Man.” 


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Dr. Svenn Orvig 


Of the eighteen major research grants 
awarded by Imperial Oil Ltd. to Quebec 
researchers, four went to members of 
McGill’s Faculty of Engineering: Profes- 
sors David Cooper, PhD’73, John Dealy, 
Oliver Jensen, and Ronald Neufeld. 


Professor Henry Mintzberg, BEng’61, 
from the Faculty of Management, was 
recently awarded the honorary degree ““La 
Laurea ad honorem in Economica e Com- 
mercio” from the University of Venice, 
Italy. 0 


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“Foreign agent, 
Terri Nash, 
makes good 


Making the dean’s list, finishing a doctorate, 
and winning an Academy Award -— all in 
four months — would seem like no mean 
feat. But Terri Nash, PhD’83, takes such 
accolades in stride. Nash is the researcher, 
editor, and director of the controversial 
National Film Board (NFB) film Jf You 
Love This Planet. It won a special award 
presented by the World Peace Council at 
the 25th International Leipziger Docu- 
mentary and Short Film Festival in Leipzig, 
Germany last year and an Academy 
Award in April of this year. 

Nash began the film in 1979 after 
attending a talk by Dr. Helen Caldicott, 
national president of the American-based 
Physicians for Social Responsibility , whose 
members lecture on the medical conse- 
quences of nuclear war. Nash remembers 
that Caldicott enumerated the disasterous 
effects of a nuclear attack and then went on 
to say: “You have to figure out what you 
can do yourself. Think of your own life 
situation.”” Nash immediately thought of 
her first love, film. She says: “What I could 
do, and what Caldicott couldn’t, was to be 
in a lot of places at the same time. That’s 
the power of film, to multiply the mes- 
Sage.” 

Inspired by Caldicott, whose delivery 
Nash likens to that of a brilliant lawyer 
presenting a case, Nash followed her to 
Plattsburgh State College, in New York. 
There Nash videotaped more than two 
hours of another electrifying Caldicott 
lecture. Having taken along three cameras 
SO as not to lose anything while changing 
rolls of film, Nash eventually found herself 
somewhat disappointed. 

“‘T had the opening shots already fixed in 
my head,” she explains. “Then Caldicott 
changed her lecture. And I was horrified. 
But I had learned that in documentary 
filmmaking you go with what you’ve 
got.” 

After showing the video to several 
colleagues, Nash feared that it was destined 
for the shelf. But deciding to continue her 
research, she went to Washington, D.C., 
where by fortunate coincidence, she found 
in the National Archives rare and alarming 
material on American nuclear warfare and 
testing, including recently declassified mili- 
tary/medical footage taken seven months 
after the 1945 bombing of Hiroshima. 

During a five-day visit to America’s 
capital, Nash also lived through two fright- 
ening, but fortunately false, nuclear alerts. 
“They were announced on the news, 
followed by three minutes of commercials,”’ 


Le Lorrain, are all smiles. 


Back in Montreal with Oscars in hand, Terri Nash and her NFB producer, Eddie 


Nash says. ““Three minutes is not a long 
time, but when you have only another 
fourteen minutes until the end of the world, 
those three minutes become staggeringly 
long. Nothing could more convince me to 
make the movie than experiencing those 
two alerts.”’ 

Mixing archival footage with shots from 
Caldicott’s Plattsburgh lecture, Nash had 
her film. She then turned over to her NFB 
producer, Eddie Le Lorrain, a stark 26- 
minute documentary, intense and ludicrously 
funny by turns. “I meant it to be funny at 
certain points,” says Nash. “I felt that 
people would need to laugh, to take a break. 
If it were too intense, they would turn off. I 
also felt that by keeping it short, audiences 
could take it.”’ 

Nash knew that if the film was under 
half an hour in length it would receive 
twenty to thirty times the exposure than 
would a longer film. It would be appropriate 
to screen in schools and before feature films 
in movie theatres. But a final event nearly 
prevented any subsequent screenings of the 
film at all. 

The United States Department of Justice 
became outraged at the less than comple- 
mentary attitude of the film toward their 
government. They ordered that if the film 
was to be shown, it must bear a disclaimer 
that read, “foreign propaganda.’ Conse- 
quently the NFB moved to stop distribution 
of If You Love This Planet in the States. 
The film was also to be withdrawn from the 
Academy Awards competition, but fortun- 
ately the Academy Awards committee 
does not allow its nominees to withdraw. 

By then the media knew about the 
compulsory disclaimer, which also made 
mandatory the reporting to the U.S. govern- 
ment of all theatres and television stations 
that would screen the film. Many Canadian 
and American politicians were becoming 
incensed. And finally the American Civil 
Liberties Union stepped in and filed suit 


against the United States Government. 
Withdrawal from the Academy Awards, 
for several reasons now, was out of the 
question. 

And the rest is history. On the evening 
of the Academy Award festivities in Holly- 
wood, Nash and her producer Le Lorrain 
appeared on prime-time television with 
smiles and Oscars in hand. In her accep- 
tance speech, she thanked the United 
States Justice Department for helping to 
publicize If You Love This Planet, (which 
has sold more prints and has been seen by 
more people than any other 1982 NFB 
release). The United States, said Nash, 
sure knows how to show a “foreign agent” a 
good time. Louise RatelleLl 
RTI SORE he IE 


Homeless women 
in Montreal 


They are the invisible segment of society. 
Homeless women, suffering from severe 
isolation, rejected and abused by parents, 
husbands, and so-called lovers, caught in a 
tragic cycle of despair and defeat. Some 
have a history of violent acts or addiction 
problems; others are reduced to begging on 
the streets or prostitution (a bed’s a bed). 
They scratch out some sort of survival in a 
society that refuses to acknowledge their 
existence. 

“They aren’t news,” says Emeritus 
Professor of Sociology Aileen D. Ross, 
author of The Lost and the Lonely: 
Homeless Women in Montreal. ‘*We don’t 
hear about them unless they get run over by 
René Lévesque. Particularly the elderly, 
lonely, rejected women. They can’t get to 
shelters. They can’t walk far and they can’t 
afford transportation. What happens to 


SEPTEMBER 1983/McGILL NEWS 3 


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them? They die in street accidents, drunk or 
stoned...”’ 

Dr. Ross became fascinated with the 
problems of homeless women after her 
retirement in 1970. “‘A sociologist is very 
lucky — you can always go on doing 
research. I became very interested in the 
concept of loneliness. It’s an epidemic in 
our society. I began to look around, and 
everyone told me that there were lots of 
people in that situation, but no-one seemed 
to know much about them.’’ Then she made 
contact with Sheila Baxter, who had run an 
experimental all-night, sit-up shelter for 
women and was about to open the first 
women’s day shelter. (There are many 
more places for destitute men in Montreal’s 
shelters and missions — up to 600, as 
opposed to just 60 to 80 for homeless 
women, whose plight has only recently 
begun to attract attention.) 

The project took seven years. Many of 
the sociologist’s usual tools were of little 
help in this study: there could be no 
questionnaires, no personal questions unless 
the women volunteered information, no 
statistics, not even any full names. ““These 
women have been harassed,” explains 
Ross. ““They’ve been to all the social 
agencies. The last thing they need is more 
questions. It was more difficult for me this 
way, but it was better for the women.” 

The Lost and the Lonely is based on Dr. 
Ross’s observations of the women who 
came to two downtown shelters: Chez 
Doris, a day shelter that serves a free hot 
lunch and tea and coffee all day long, and 
Maison Marguerite, a night shelter run by 
Soeurs Grises de Montréal. Between the 
two shelters, hundreds of women have 
found a place to go and a sympathetic ear. 
But still, says Dr. Ross, “‘it’s a heartrending 
selection process every night. Every night 
they have to turn away women. Will they 
keep one woman for three nights — does she 
deserve it more than someone else? Imagine 
having to send someone out into the cold 
without a cent!” 

Funding is always a problem, and 
particularly today, with major social service 
cutbacks in Quebec. But one encouraging 
sign is the generosity of the community. 
“When Soeur Georgette Leduc was opening 
Maison Marguerite, she got the most 
incredible donations: a television, a clothes 
dryer, everything!” Similarly, Chez Doris 
simply could not function without its corps 
of dedicated volunteers, who give time, 
money, services, food, and clothing. 

Destitute women, says Dr. Ross, tend to 
“keep up appearances” better than do men 
in the same situation. ““People who visit the 
shelters are sometimes almost disappointed 
..they come expecting to see dirty old 
hulks!”? But the need is great, even if the 
women do not at first glance appear to be in 
dire straits. Dr. Ross hopes to help raise 
their visibility in the community. Kathe 
Lieber 


4 McGILL NEWS/SEPTEMBER 1983 


McGillFEST to 


launch National 
Universities Week 


McGill’s Principal and Vice-Chancellor 
David Johnston is currently serving as the 
co-chairman of National Universities 
Week, which will run this year from 
October 2 to 8. At this time, McGill and 
other universities across Canada will join 
together to celebrate the achievements of 
higher education. “‘National Universities 
Week is a tribute to the role that universities 
play in our local, regional, and national 
development,” explains Johnston. “‘Never 
before have Canadian universities joined in 
celebrating their achievements on a nation- 
wide scale.” 

Actually McGill will begin its festivities 
on September 30, October 1 and 2 with their 
eleventh Open House entitled McGillFEST/ 
McGill en féte. “McGillFEST weekend is 
our university’s major contribution to 
National Universities Week,” explains 
Principal Johnston. And McGillFEST 
coordinator Maisie Cheung says: ““McGill- 
FEST is not just the usual Open House. It 
has been designed to draw every sector of 
the Montreal community into McGill’s 
activities. In particular, it will stress research 
and community projects that convey the 
links between McGill and the day-to-day 
lives of the public.”’ For example, the 
McGill Committee for Studies on Aging 
will hold an open symposium on housing 
and transportation for Montreal’s senior 
citizens. And elderly participants in this 
program will be given special tours of the 
campus. 

In addition to the ever-popular campus 
tours, McGillFEST will focus on scheduled 
events. On Saturday, October 1, McGill- 
FEST’s main ceremony will take place. At 
11:30 a.m. the starting gun will be fired for 
a 10-kilometer road race. Local groups are 
invited to register individually or in teams 
by September 26. The proceeds from the 
$5 registration fee will be forwarded to the 
McGill Cancer Centre. 

Other weekend highlights will include 
four performances of a classical ballet 
produced by the department of education in 
arts, the staging of the Greek play, Heracles, 
by the classics department, and the screen- 
ing of McGill graduate Terri Nash’s 
Academy Award-winning film, If You 
Love This Planet. A mini-farm will be set 
up on the downtown campus by the Faculty 
of Agriculture. And there will also be open 
clinics run by McGill Legal Aid and the 
School of Occupational Health and Safety 
for adults and computer games, clowns, 
hot-air balloons, and free daycare on 
campus for children. 


‘“‘We wish to include everyone, from the 
very young, to the very old. This is to 
express the fact that McGill is a highly 
accessible institution whose involvement in 
the community goes much further than 
academic excellence,” says Cheung. 
“Basically there are no limits to what is 
being featured and for whom.”’ 

So mark September 30 and October | 
and 2 on your calender as McGillFEST 
and the following week from October 2 to 8 
as National Universities Week. During this 
period the numerous events taking place on 
the downtown and Macdonald campuses 
will be open to all. (For more information 
please call 392-4250.) And at these 
autumnal festivities, returning graduates, 
staff, students, and the public will have the 
chance to discover that at McGill — “We 
have the future in minds.” Nomi MorrisU 


Principal David Johnston and his 
daughter, Alexandra, helped raise money 
for the McGill Cancer Centre by running in 
the 10-kilometer race during last year’s 
Open House. 


SS Ne eee ee 


“What’s in a name?’’ 


“Would you trust a surgeon named ‘Bambi’? 
Have you ever met an Anglican priest 
named ‘Buck’?’? Onomatologist Leonard 
Ashley, BA’49, MA’S0O, asks these ques- 
tions with serious bemusement. Names, he 
says, profoundly affect our lives. 
Onomastics, a branch of linguistics, 
studies the phenomena of how names shape 
us and how we shape them. Ashley is 
president of the American Name Associa- 
tion, a member of half a dozen linguistic 
associations, and regularly attends interna- 
tional conferences on onomastics. His 
book, Names, has just been published by 
Washington Square Press, and he is working 
on a new volume about place names. 
Ashley is one of those Montrealers who 
are now completely at home in New York. 
He teaches English literature at Brooklyn 
College and lives a block away from the 
campus in an anachronistic New Amsterdam 
version of a French chateau. His living 
room, full of shadows and antique furniture, 
is barely lit by two tiny lamps, and behind 


a aoe ee ae oe eee Se ee ee i ee ae 
PSUEL GEL AE CEST ORS FUPECCRRE CRETE RCC 


— 


his head, seventeeth century portraits look 
down sternly from behind layers of varnish. 
All this provides a scholarly backdrop for 
Ashley’s humour and exuberant, parenthe- 
tical discourse. 

Names, he begins, are magical. If we 
know the name of something, we have 
power over it. Conversely, when we name 
something, we attribute qualities to it. 
When we name a child or a literary 
character, we affect the way other people 
perceive them. Names carry expectations. 

“Even kindergarten children will agree 
that someone named ‘Michael’ runs, while 
someone named ‘Hubert’ sits,’ explains 
Ashley. “‘It’s not the derivation of the name 
that really matters: sure, ‘George’ comes 
from a Greek word that means ‘farmer’, but 
‘George’ carries other associations now. 
We think of an ineffectual worker, or a 
weak husband. For reasons that psycho- 
logists haven’t been able to fathom, names 
don’t carry the old meanings anymore. 
Psychologists are telling us that “Tony’ 
conveys an image of somebody who is 
sociable, ‘Adrian’ somebody artistic, and 
‘Michael’ strong, but ‘Hubert’ and ‘Isidore’, 
people who are weak.” 

As an English teacher, Ashley is preoc- 
cupied with literary onomastics, the way an 
author sets up certain expectations with the 
name of a character. The author can help 
create a personality or alert us to the social 
standing or fate of these imagined indivi- 
duals. Witness, as blatant examples, the 
‘Sir Foping Flutters’ or the ‘Armaggedon 


y— 
Pon Se 
| SP 
o oF prokey TA Je ie 


T. Thunderbirds’ in farce. An author can | 


suggest that a ‘Shamwell’ or a ‘Cheatley’ 
will behave unreliably. We can expect 
stratagems from someone named ‘Archer’ 
or ‘Aimwell’. Or we can discern a char- 
acter’s social standing or fate as with Willy 
Loman (Low Man) in Arthur Miller’s 
Death of a Salesman. 

“As far as I know,” says Ashley, 
“nobody has yet written an article on how a 
writer can use personal names to suggest a 
character or person’s religion.’ But they 
can. He cites the examples of men named 
‘Moishe’ or ‘Kevin’ or ‘Wesley’ — each 
telling us respectively ‘Jewish’, ‘Irish 
‘Catholic’, or ‘Methodist’. But here we have 
to be careful. 

Ashley is off on one of his frequent, 
sparkling parentheses. He explains that the 
connotations of names are changing rapidly. 
At least in the New York area, names like 
‘Bruce’ and ‘Stuart’ are becoming indicative 
of Jewish families assimilating into WASP 
culture. And the names we think of as 
‘Jewish’, like ‘Sidney’ and ‘Norman’, 
actually hail from the British aristocracy. 

In yet another quick parenthesis, he 
explains that middle-class mothers in the 
nineteenth century gave their children the 
names of Anglo-Saxon and Norman war- 
lords —like ‘Seymore’, ‘Irving’, and ‘Hubert’. 
We might note how those associations have 
changed. The point is that we try to 
attribute specific virtues to our children or 
to fictional characters when we name 
them. 


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SEPTEMBER 1983/McGILL NEWS 5 


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7 
/ 


And what determines the names given to 
most of today’s children? Ashley says they 
are names developed from television, film, 
or literary characters or personalities. 
‘Clarissa’ and ‘Pamela’, for example, are 
names we ve taken for granted. In fact, both 
names were invented by Samuel Richardson 
for heroines of his novels. George Bernard 
Shaw, in one of his plays, coined the name 
‘Gloria’, for a headstrong, determined, 
young woman who could dominate any 
man. ‘Pamela’ and ‘Clarissa’ both embodied 
qualities of purity and humility. How many 
‘Glorias’ or ‘Clarissas’ do we know? And 
what kind of overtones do such names carry 
now? 

Another example is ‘Darren’, which the 
British adopted as an ‘American’ name, 
only after they had seen the television 
program Bewitched (when, in fact, ‘Darren’ 
is an African name ). We may have to wait a 
while for “Tootsie’ and ‘R2D 2’ to appear on 
a baptismal certificate, but we can wonder 
how many ‘Farrahs’ and ‘Jaclyns’ will be 
with us in twenty years. 

‘“‘Names are faddish and can indicate 
the age of a person,” says Ashley. “If I 
offered you a choice of a blind date between 
a ‘Martha’ and a ‘Sandra’, whom would 
you choose? Martha carries an image of 
someone with her hair in a bun and wrinkles 
around her mouth. Women’s names are 
especially subject to change. Most of the 
‘vegetable’ names like ‘Iris’, ‘Rose’, or 
‘Daisy’, are now out and the ‘stewardess’ 
names, like ‘Kimberly’, “Tracey’, and 
‘Stacey’ are in. Men’s names, on the other 
hand, are generally more resistant to 
change. We still have a lot of new ‘Michaels’ 
and ‘Johns’ and ‘Christophers’ and ‘Davids’, 
but not too many, if any, ‘Clints’ or 
‘Rocks’. 

As for his own name? Well, ‘Ashley’ 
derives from the tree —the ash —and a field — 
a lea. In ages past, it had Druidic connota- 
tions. Today it’s just another WASP name. 
‘Leonard’ comes from ‘Lion-hearted’, but 
certainly doesn’t connote that anymore. 
“Most people think of a Leonard as a 
chartered accountant with horned-rimmed 
glasses,” says Ashley. 

Names in the public eye and ear affect 
all of us. They affect the way we see 
namesakes. For example, James Earl 
Carter became ‘Jimmy’ Carter after James 
Earl Ray had gotten enough press. And the 
names that have become stereotypes through 
their use in literature or in the media can 
make or break their bearers. Pity the boy 
named ‘Zeke’ who will be taken for a 
hayseed, or the girl named ‘Lola’, who will 
be taken — for granted. Ashley is simply 
telling us: be aware when you name 
someone. John GeezalUl 


Dr. Waldemar 
Sackston: 
the sunflower man 


Dr. Waldemar Sackston, MSc’40, a plant 


pathologist at Macdonald College, is un- | 


moved by the beauty of sunflowers. And he 
never uses their oil for cooking. But thanks 
in large measure to the past forty years of 
his research efforts, the sunflower — a 
member of the botanical family that includes 
chrysanthemums, lettuce, and ragweed — is 
now a major commercial crop. Its seeds are 
in growing demand in the confectionary 
trade; and as a source of vegetable oil, the 


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sunflower ranks second only to the soy- 
bean. 

Sackston’s work with sunflowers began 
in the 1940s when he was a young plant 
scientist working at the Agriculture Canada 
research station in Winnipeg, Manitoba. 
“At that time,” he explains, “‘the federal 
government was encouraging Mennonite 
farmers in southern Manitoba to grow 
sunflowers to compensate for a wartime 
shortage of edible oils. And the director of 
the research station volunteered my services 
to help them.’’ The Manitoba sunflower 
project proved highly successful and con- 
tinued after the war. But by the early 1950s, 
the plant disease, rust, was ravaging crop 
yields. “‘In the space of a couple of years,” 
Sackston recalls, “the sunflower acreage in 
Manitoba declined from 60,000 acres to 
around 2,000 because of the tremendous 
losses.”’ Working with plant breeder Eric 
D. Putt, Sackston managed to avert a total 
catastrophe by searching for and finding 


Dr.Waldemar Sackston: “Without international cooperation, sunflowers would not exist 
as a crop.” 


UES LEE LACH CEES Sq Sieg get 
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SEPTEMBER 1983/McGILL NEWS 7 


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wild species of sunflower that were rust 
resistant. The introduction of these cultivars 
made the crop commercially attractive 
once again. 

Sackston cautions, though, that there is 
no such thing as a permanent solution to 
plant disease. The pathogens that attack 
plants mutate swiftly, so that new resistant 
strains have to be continually developed. 
“We are always trying to catch up to 
changes in the parasite population in order 
to keep the resistant varieties just ahead of 
the game,” he explains. Since coming to 
Macdonald College in 1960 as a professor 
of plant pathology, Sackston has continued 
to work on the problems of sunflower 
diseases, sometimes with graduate students, 
while also being involved in undergraduate 
teaching and administration. 

Much to his satisfaction, Sackston’s 
research has placed him in an international 
network of sunflower experts, whose shared 
concerns have transcended linguistic and 
political barriers, even at the height of the 
Cold War. He freely acknowledges that the 
successful development of the sunflower is 
the result of the cumulative scientific 
contributions of these experts. ““Without 
international cooperation, sunflowers would 
not exist as a crop,” he says. He points in 
particular to the research of the Russian 
plant breeder, V.S. Pustovoit, who in the 
1960s increased the viability of sunflowers 
by developing strains with an oil content of 
more than 50 percent. This work was in 
turn enhanced by certain French and 
American scientists who developed a 
method for the controlled breeding of 
hybrids that optimized, not only disease 
resistance and yields, but also the uniform 
attainment of plant maturity. 

Sackston — who is proficient in French, 
Spanish, and Russian — has traveled exten- 
sively throughout the world to inform 
himself of the latest sunflower research, as 
well as to dispense his own profound 
knowledge of the pathology of oilseed 
plants. His travels have included a visit to 
Russia (where he was able personally to 
validate Pustovoit’s research, which had 
been initially received with scepticism in 
the West) and a five-year stint in Spain, 
organizing that country’s National Research 
Centre for Oilseed Crops. In 1982, the 
International Sunflower Association recog- 
nized his contribution to the development 
and promotion of sunflowers by presenting 
him with its highest honour — the V.S. 
Pustovoit Award. 

Though he has just retired from full-time 
service at McGill, Sackston intends to 
continue active research. And his sun- 
flowers, no doubt, will continue to grace the 
plant nursery at Macdonald College for 
many years to come. John Sainsbury 


An international 
look a mental illness 


Mental illness is something that most | 


people would rather not think about. But 
globally it’s on the rise. The World Health 
Organization (WHO) estimates that 10 
percent of the earth’s population suffer 
from severe forms of mental illness, such as 
schizophrenia, while another 10 percent 
suffer from milder forms, such as low-grade 
depression. 

As more and more governments recog- 
nize the magnitude of the problem, they’re 
trying to resolve how best to treat mentally 
ill patients. In order to look at the latest 


methods of organizing and managing psy- | 


chiatric hospitals, the WHO asked one of 
McGill’s teaching hospitals, the Douglas, 


to host a three-week course on the subject. | 


The course was held in the spring and 


brought together top-level psychiatric per- | 
| centre for research, education, and training 


sonnel from twenty-one countries, including 
nine delegates from Africa and three from 
the Caribbean. Some of the faculty members 
came from the Douglas Hospital and other 
Montreal institutions; others came from 


medical centres in different parts of Canada | 


and the United States. 

The course examined several critical 
areas, such as the treatment of alcoholic 
and suicidal patients, epidemiological 
methods, and the relationship of the psy- 
chiatric hospital to the rest of the com- 
munity. Virtually all the faculty members 
brought with them international clinical or 
research experience, and in their presenta- 
tions took into account the different cultural 
considerations, acute shortages of trained 
staff, and lack of technological aids in the 
Third World. Dr. Heinz Lehmann, the 
former director general of the Douglas, for 
instance, gave a popularly received talk, 
entitled “Bootstrap Research,” on conduc- 
ting research with limited resources. 

Even when the approaches under dis- 
cussion were characteristically North 
American, however, the delegates found 
relevant applications to their own situa- 
tions. For example, Doja Adewolu, the 
executive secretary of the management 
board of psychiatric hospitals in Nigeria, 
hopes to return to Africa, and set-up a 
community centre and an on-site training 
and research centre modeled on those at the 
Douglas. And Dr. Albertine Mathurin- 
Jurgensen of Antigua is anxious to under- 
take an epidemiological study on mental 
health in the several eastern islands of the 
West Indies where she serves as the sole 
psychiatrist. “‘One of our big problems in 
the Caribbean,”’ she explains, “‘is that we 


| don’t have any proper epidemiological 


8 McGILL NEWS/SEPTEMBER 1983 


studies going on. As a result of this course, 
I’ve realized how important it is for 
psychiatrists — even one psychiatrist on a 
small island —to get involved in doing these 
studies. It helps planning and_ policy 
making.” 

Faculty members, too, feel that they 
have learned as much as the delegates from 
the exchanges of information. According to 
the director general of the Douglas, Dr. 
Gaston Harnois, North American psychi- 
atric institutions could improve their health 
care delivery systems by studying the ways 
in which other countries have integrated 
traditional healing methods with modern 
psychiatry, expanded the role of community 
nurses, and involved family members in the 


| treatment of the mentally ill. “I’ve been in 


Africa and I was very impressed by the 
psychiatric villages they've developed,” he 
points out. ‘The beauty of them is in their 
integration with the community. From the 
word ‘go’, they’re trying to create structures 
that won’t reject or stigmatize the mentally 
ill, as opposed to what we still see too much 
of in our own country.” 

It was the first time that such a course 
has been held at the international level, but 
its success has ensured that it won’t be the 
last. In fact, the Douglas Hospital — which 
was designated as a WHO collaborating 


in mental health last year — will soon be 
preparing a similar course for French- 
speaking delegates from around the world. 
Louise AbbottU 


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GRATULACJE 
Polish Institute! 


Nineteen eighty-three marks the fortieth 
anniversary of the Polish Institute of Arts 
and Science. The Institute has been closely 
associated with McGill since 1943, when 
its first charter was drafted. The charter 
States that the institute is an ‘“‘autonomous 
non-political institution devoted solely to 
cultural work, to interpreting Poland to 
Canada, and to preserving the menaced 
tradition of Polish thought and learning.” 

Several prominent McGill personalities 
were among the founding members, including 
Wilder Penfield, R.A. MacLennan, Cyrus 
MacMillan, and Noel Fieldhouse. The first 
Honorary Presidents were Dr. F. Cyril 
James, Principal of McGill, and Mon- 
seigneur Olivier Maurault, Recteur de 
l’Univerdité de Montréal. Mrs. Wanda 
Stachiewicz, who was named Secretary of 
the institute in 1943, remains still active in 
its daily functions. 

Over the years the institute has organized 
commemorative celebrations, art exhibi- 


—_—_____1— 


tions, musical recitals, and cultural and 
scientific meetings. For the last nineteen 
years the institute and its accompanying 
library have been located at 3479 Peel 
Street, a two-minute walk from the McGill 
campus. The library has steadily grown and 


| now includes over 30,000 books and 


several thousand volumes of periodicals. 
The institute’s influence, like its library, 
has expanded considerably since 1943. 
Among other important events, it helped 
organize the May 1975 meeting of the 
Polish Institute of Arts and Science in 
America held at McGill. In attendance 
were some 400 scholars, writers, artists, 
and scientists of Polish origin from Canada, 
the United States, Europe, and Latin 
America. 

This year, to mark the fortieth anni- 
versary, several activities have taken place 
or are being planned. On 3 May (the 
anniversary of Poland’s constitution, pro- 
claimed in 1791) the Polish poet Czeslaw 
Milosz read his work to an enthusiastic 
audience on the McGill campus. The 
reading was initially planned for Moyse 
Hall, but had to be relocated in the H. Noel 
Fieldhouse Auditorium at the last minute 
because of an overflow crowd. Mr. Milosz 
has been professor of Slavic literatures at 
the University of California, Berkeley, 
since 1960 and won the Nobel Prize for 
Literature in 1980. He read his poems in 
English, French, and his native Polish, one 
of which was addressed to Lech Walesa: 


Le EE DOE ES TAME Each eae Re ea BRE LEEENE CELA TNE SRE GSE ROLES REES ELS 
SRST ESE PEPESCETES ESA ECEEANE:Y Gos ECSu ted COREE CES Cs Ce ncornuareta nts presseeteestacs 


ars nae 4 ~ 


Czeslaw Milosz 


I dont know by what right, 
Lech Walesa, 

You are addressed by one who chose 
exile 

And refuses to think constantly of 
enslavement 

Though he understands that he 
Should, every day 


Mr. Milosz states that his poetry is ‘‘pes- 
simistic, but ecstatic.’ In one of his poems, 
‘Ars Poetica?”’ he speaks of the mystery of 
his craft: 


The purpose of poetry is to remind 
us 

how difficult it is to remain just one 
person, 

for our house is open, there are no 
keys in the doors, 

and invisible guests come in and out 
at will. 


The Polish Institute is also sponsoring a 
lecture by Oxford University political 
scientist Dr. Z. Pelezynski, who was a 
visiting professor at McGill in 1978-79 and 
is presently a visiting professor at Harvard. 
In additon, an exhibition of watercolours is 
planned for this fall. 

The first forty years of the Polish 
Institute of Arts and Science have been 
mutually beneficial for both McGill and the 
Canadian Polish community. The next 
forty can only be better. Peter O’BrienU 


SEPTEMBER 1983/McGILL NEWS 9 


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McGill's 


Photos by Vivian Kellner 


faculties look 
to the future 


by Charlotte Hussey 


In part three of this continuing series of interviews, the deans of Dentistry, 
Education, and Music discuss the plans that will strengthen their 
respective faculties for the years ahead. 


FACULTY OF MUSIC 


Enrollment figures are not the current problem in the Faculty of Music. As 
its dean Dr. Paul Pedersen explains: “Our basic problems are lack of space 
and lack of funds. Our applications were up 20 percent this year over last. 
This means we are able to be more selective in our admissions, but the 
faculty cannot grow in size, since we are extremely tight for space.” 

Expansion of the Marvin Duchow Music Library is a priority towards 
which the dean would appropriate some $600,000. The library is 
becoming extremely crowded as more and more stacks are added to-house 
the growing music collection. Pedersen, who says that the library will be 
vital to the initiation of two recently proposed PhD programs in theory and 
musicology, forsees two possible renovation plans: “We could extend a 
wing of the library into the adjacent lot, or the unused sub-basement of the 
library could be excavated and a new floor put in.” 

The dean would also portion out $100,000 to provide sealed, acoustic 
windows and an air conditioning system for the 100-seat Recital Hall used 
regularly throughout the year for performances. “The hall has two main 
problems,” he explains. “The noise from Sherbrooke Street is very loud and 
sometimes it will drown out quiet passages in music during a concert, 
especially if it’s hot weather and the windows are open. The other concern 
is that there’s no other ventilation in the hall except for these 
windows.” 


10 McGILL NEWS/SEPTEMBER 1983 


Collections are another area the dean wishes to enhance. He has 
earmarked some $100,000 to build up a baroque instrument collection to 
be used in the new BA program in early music. He would also allocate 
$95 000 towards the purchase of a substantial library collection of choral 
music. This new collection would include contemporary scholarly editions 
of masses, motets, cantatas, oratorios, sets of madrigals, and other forms 
of music composed roughly from 1450 to 1700 during the so-called 
“Golden Age of Choral Music.” This would allow the choral program, which 
includes 250 students in four large choirs, to take a major leap forward. 
“We have a very active choral program,” explains Pedersen. “And it’s 
simply very expensive to purchase a score for every student in a choir. If 
we had the money, there would be selections from all periods of choral 
music.” 

Another urgent need for the faculty is the endowment of several 
substantial fellowships to be awarded annually to students of exceptional 
merit. These fellowships would be used to attract outstanding graduate 
students in composition, theory, musicology, school music, performance, 
sound recording, and undergraduate orchestral instrumentalists. They 
could also help alleviate the financial concerns of foreign students wishing 
to study music at McGill. Pedersen, who would portion out $350,000 to 
this end, explains: “It’s the same in any field; to get the really top students, 
you have to offer them some financial assistance.” 

The dean would also put $500,000 toward the establishment of a 
visiting professorship, the Faculty of Music’s first endowed chair. Such an 
endowment would guarantee ongoing interaction between staff and 
students and leading academics, composers, and performers from the 
international music community. “Lack of budget and lack of space” adds 
Pedersen, “are the real problems for us. If the university is willing to make 
the space and the budget available, there is potential for us to grow in 
numbers as well as in quality.” 0 


FACULTY OF DENTISTRY 


3 


As Dean of Dentistry Kenneth C. Bentley, DDS’58, MD’62, looks to the 
future he forsees the need for his faculty to become more fully automated. 
He also says that Dentistry could be strengthened by the addition of 
academic staff, increased research activity, and the consolidation of 
physical resources. To achieve the first goal, he has earmarked some 
$450,000 from his budget over the next five years to set up a computer- 
based, clinical administration system. “We have to recognize the fact that 
our operating budget is shrinking,” he explains. “And we must look at more 
efficient ways of managing information.” 

Clinical teaching in the faculty is mainly carried out in the department 
of dentistry of the Montreal General Hospital (MGH), where such an 
automated record keeping system could aid in the evaluation of student 
performance. Also, it could be used to match patients’ dental needs with 
the students who can give them the appropriate treatment. 


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To achieve his goal of strengthening the faculty, the dean says he must 

concentrate his efforts on improving the dental library. The present library, 
for example, is administered from the medical library. Both the dean and 
Dr. Peter Noble, associate dean of graduate studies and research, would 
like to have a full-time librarian responsible only for the dental collection. 
“It's not a matter of ‘Wouldn't this be nice’,” says Noble. “We need it for 
teaching and research, both of which have to undergo accreditation 
surveys.” 

At the moment, McGill’s dental library is one of the best in Canada. In 
spite of having to operate on a considerably reduced budget since 1975, it 
was ranked second in current periodicals received and third in 
monographs held in the 1980 “Index to Dental Literature.” In order to 
maintain this valuable resource centre, used not only by McGill staff and 
Students but by researchers from other universities and companies, the 
dean is seeking $51,000 over the next five years to update existing 
collections. 

The dean also says that “ideally we need a new facility in which to 
house the faculty, because at present we are always running back and 
forth between three buildings.” Dentistry has its teaching Clinic in the 
MGH and its administrative offices in the Donner Building and the 
Strathcona Anatomy and Dentistry Building. The latter, which is shared 
with the Faculty of Medicine, also houses research facilities. Short of this, 
$1,500,000 would be required by Dentistry to renovate the Strathcona 
Building. 

In the past, McGill’s Faculty of Dentistry, like other such schools in 
North America, brought in professors from the Faculty of Medicine to 
provide expertise in the basic sciences. With the recent growth of dental 
research, it has become necessary for Dentistry to obtain more of its own 
specialists. Over the next ten years, the dean would like to allocate 
$200,000 for the hiring of a biochemist with knowledge of cellular and 
subcellular fractionation and another $200,000 for the hiring of an 
experimental pathologist — both appointments would be important 
additions to the research presently being undertaken. As the dean points 
out: “Improved patient care is directly related to research activity.” 0 


FACULTY OF EDUCATION 


= 


The trick,” says Dean of Education George Flower, BA’40, MA’49, ‘is to 
become leaner, but stronger.” And that is exactly what his faculty has been 
doing over the past eight years —a time that has seen its staff pared down 
from 149 to 123 full-time members and its 13 departments streamlined 
into today what are 8 well-functioning units. 


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Back in the early seventies, the majority of staff efforts 
the Bachelor of Education or the one-year Diploma of Education programs. 
But today much more emphasis is being placed on research at the 
graduate level and on community service. Work, for example, is being done 
in such areas as adult education, early childhood and family life, and in 
programs for CEGEP teachers, school and business administrators, and 
members of school boards. As Flower explains: “We have even been 
attempting to influence, through back rooms, the province’s educational 
policies in what is a new and informed role for the faculty.” 

One service the faculty is currently providing is access to the rapidly 
growing field of computer applications in education. ‘The computer 
courses we've been giving have been swamped,” says Flower. “We had 
over 1,000 people taking courses at our Micro-Computer Teaching Lab 
this year.” The dean would like to allocate over the next five years some 
$300,000 from his budget to provide the necessary computer technology. 
He would also spend $250,000 to hire skilled technicians and another 
$200,000 to employ a specialist in mini-computers. 

Another considerable priority is McGill's Education Library, referred to 
by Flower as “the best in the province.” To augment its holdings, he would 
spend $80,000 over the next five years. This would help keep up with the 
escalation of acquisition costs and the mushrooming number of significant 
printed materials, tapes, records, and computer software. 

Another means of enhancing his faculty would be for Flower to provide 
some $275,000 towards a visiting professorship in education. An 
additional $215,000 would be spent to hire a specialist to spearhead the 
establishment of a recently authorized program in adult education and 
$125,000 has been earmarked for a number of short-term, post-doctoral 
fellowships. Plans are also afoot to create two senior fellowships that 
would attract experienced practitioners who hold positions of special 
responsibility, mainly within the school system. “The presence of 2 or 3 
such people in addition to our staff core of 123 would be helpful indeed,” 
says the dean. 

Leaner, stronger, and certainly more innovative, the Faculty of 
Education is one thing that Dean Flower speaks of with pride. He is also 
pleased McGill alumni, during the past eight years, have been supportive 
of the efforts of his staff members to learn how to learn new things. ‘The 
concrete interest of McGill alumni,” he adds, “really makes the difference 
between what's satisfactory and what's on the growing edge.”O 


SEPTEMBER 1983/McGILL NEWS 11 


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Photos by Vivian Kellner 


SPAPTERATT 30298292 F ORIG 725 39 957 


Where North meets South: 
Bellairs Research Institute 


by Charlotte Hussey 


cGill’s year-round, multi-disciplinary research and teach- 

ing laboratory in St. James, Barbados has always kept a 

low profile. Dr. Wayne Hunte, its new director, remembers 
when he was growing up on this eastern Caribbean island that “‘the 
only thing that could be seen from the outside road was a small sign, 
saying ‘Bellairs Research Institute of McGill’ (BRI). Nobody 
knew what went on inside.”’ And many still don’t. 

According to Hunte, one of the most important aspects of BRI 
today is that, as Canada’s only tropical research centre, it is 
providing Canadian scientists with the opportunity to develop new 
perspectives on their research and on the working hypotheses on 
which this research has been based. As he explains, modern 
science has evolved, not in the Tropical Zone, but in the 
Temperates. And the observations on which its hypotheses are 
based are temperate observations. At BRI, scientists have the 
chance to test certain of these observations against tropical ones. 
“T think this will increase their comprehension of whatever system 
they are working on,” says Hunte. “And as well, McGill students 
coming to BRI will have the opportunity to do portions of their 
degree in a different social environment. This is a necessary part of 
a well-rounded education.” 

Situated on the west coast of Barbados, about eight miles from 
the capital city of Bridgetown and close to a safe and pleasant 
beach, BRI consists of a complex of three buildings. They house 
dry laboratories and laboratories supplied with running sea water, 
office space, a library, a dark room for photographic development, 
instrument rooms, two kitchens, a dining room, a student’s lounge, 
and guest rooms. (The guest rooms are available to visiting 
scientists and students at modest rates.) 

Because of BRI’s advantageous position offering access to a 
wide range of marine habitats, research efforts in the past have 
been primarily directed towards the marine sciences and tropical 
climatology. In some instances deep oceanic waters lie only one 
mile offshore, while further inshore there are coral reefs, rocky 
shores, sandy beaches, brackish water ponds, and shallow water 
flats of sand, mud, and grass. Given these conditions, BRI has been 


12 McGILL NEWS/SEPTEMBER 1983 


New director of the Bellairs Research Institute, Dr. Wayne Hunte 


sees to it that MCGill’s expertise is being put to good use in the 
Caribbean. 


an ideal base for those wishing to study, for example, the deposition 
and diagenesis of carbon sediment in the reef environment, or the 
effects of sea level changes during certain prehistoric periods. 
Also, the striking contrasts between Barbados’s leeward shore 
flanked by coral headlands (where BRI is located) and the 
windward east coast with its high limestone cliffs and long 
unprotected beaches has lent itself to comparative studies of the - 
preservation of shoreline environments. Moreover, the non- 
volcanic island of Barbados occupies a key position for the 
understanding of the tectonics of the Caribbean and the relationship 
of the West Atlantic crustal plate, moving westward, and the 
Caribbean plate, moving north-eastward. 


Pe 


Left: BRI students are studying the social 
behavior of vervets such as this one. 
Above: BRI houses dry laboratories and 
those supplied with running sea water. 


CES CEATR TRE SEER ea cK Meet eeeT Cs Cbs Ke bama nes 7ee! 


Hunte would like to maintain BRI’s position as a leading 
contributor to advances in the area of tropical marine sciences, but 
also wishes to continue broadening its research interests to include 
a wide spectrum of disciplines in both the natural and social 
sciences. His students are currently studying a population of 
vervets brought from Africa some 300 years ago (that today are 
found only on Barbados and one other Caribbean island) to 
determine the effects of social rank and social behaviour on the 
genetic fitness of the individuals. 

“Also,” says Hunte, “Barbados is interesting sociologically. It 
is trying to move stably from a historical system in which whites 
controlled resources to one in which colour plays no role in 
affecting job positions or income brackets. It is interesting, too, 
because of the spread throughout the Caribbean of a religious cult 
called Rastafarianism, which has considerable social implications, 
but which has not as yet been seriously studied by sociologists.” 

Dr. Hunte, who recently terminated a CIDA/NSERC research 
contract at Dalhousie University in Nova Scotia to return to his 
native island to head BRI, has also taken a leave of absence from 
the University of the West Indies at Cave Hill where he lectures in 
biology. He describes his first year at BRI as “challenging... 
Coming into the job straight from an academic position, which is 
what I’ve always had, I had to learn how to handle administration, 
finances, and employer-staff relations at a level I haven’t had to 
before.”’ But certainly his demanding first year has not been 
without a few surprises — one in the form of a $50,000 gift given to 
BRI by the George Cedric Metcalfe Foundation. ‘We plan to call 
our library the Metcalfe Library as a gesture towards his 
generosity,” says Hunte. “‘Half of this sum is going to stay as 
capital to bring in interest that will allow us to subscribe to certain 
key science journals again. Another one-fourth will go for 
: all | | : = | structural renovations to the library. And the rest is to improve the 
; The results of this BRI student’s research may help Barbadians to sea water pumping systems used in our laboratories.” 

. | better manage their dolphin and flying fish populations. BRI, in fact, stands on a tradition of such generosity. It was 

4 va egg founded and endowed in 1954 by the late Commander Carlyon W. 
Bellairs who, because of a growing disenchantment with England, 
retired to Barbados. Shortly before dying he wrote to McGill 
University offering them his property. “In fact,”’ explains Hunte, 
“Commander Bellairs had in mind that the place be used as 
somewhere that the senior personnel at McGill could take a 
vacation to revitalize themselves. It was McGill, itself, that saw 
more in it than that and decided to turn it into a research 
station.” 

Another highlight of his first year as director, says Hunte, “‘was 
the Association of Island Marine Laboratories Symposium 
recently held in Miami, Florida, for island research stations. We, 
that is the people associated with Bellairs, presented six papers 


The genetic fitness of orb-weaving spiders such as this one is 
being studied at BRI. 


SEPTEMBER 1983/McGILL NEWS 13 


there. That was the most delivered-y any individual lab.” ) 

One of Dr. Hunte’s projects that has generated a number of 
research papers is the study of the evolution of life histories in 
aquatic organisms, using a small crustacean — an amphipod — as its 
model. “The amphipod has many useful attributes for doing 
genetics work, because it’s easy to keep in the lab and has a short 
generation time,” says Hunte. “That means, if offspring are 
produced now, they will be mature in about thirty days, and you 
can run through many generations in a short period of time. Also 
this same amphipod has been used to investigate the effect of 
uncertainty on decision-making in animals.’ 

Another study is attempting to determine the effect of web 
location on prey availability and on fitness in tropical orb-weaving 
spiders, while another investigates feeding habits in corals. In 
addition to the already-mentioned research on rank relations 
within vervet troops, another study is focusing on these same 
monkeys. The second effort has already given rise tO a paper 
recently published in American Zoologist and entitled, “Spite: a 
constraint on optimal foraging in the Barbadian vervet.” The long- 
term objective of this research is to recommend planting strategies 
that may reduce the magnitude of crop damage done by vervets 
who. because of similar dietary preferences, have been in 
competition with man for many years. 

This primate study is but one of a number of applied research 
projects currently underway at BRI through which McGill’s 
expertise is being channeled into aiding the developing Caribbean 
countries. In another such project, researchers are attempting to 
understand the biological characteristics of tropical fisheries in 
order to make preliminary management recommendations for such 
stocks as the dolphin and the flying fish. These two pelagic species 

| — : _ 2 (migratory fish found in the top water column) constitute about 80 
b : . : - _ - percent of the total catch landed annually on the protein-poor 
i y 9 i maaan maar ' island of Barbados. Nominated by the Food and Agricultural 
Above: BRI researchers assess the effects of pollutants on Organization of the United Nations to coordinate research in the 
Barbadian coral reef communitites. Caribbean Basin on these fish, Hunte explains: “I’ve written a 
large research program for all the pelagic fish in this region that 
could run for six years. We’re seeking funds for it now, and the 
project is designed to train five or six research students. By the end 
of that time, we should have a much better understanding of what is 
happening with the pelagic fish in the Caribbean Basin.” 

Another applied research project at BRI is assessing the effects 
of pollutants on the fringe coral reefs in Barbados. The recent 
pollution of these coral reef communities is having negative effects 
on both the fishing and the tourist industries in the Caribbean. A 
second project is a pre-feasibility study being conducted under a 
one-year Barbadian government contract to locate a marine 
sewage outfall that will create as few environmental problems as 
possible. A third is investigating the feasibility of establishing a 
commercial sponge fishery. 

Barbados is an island of some 258,000 people, many of whom © 
live along the south and west coasts. These same shorelines have 
been particularly vulnerable, not only to pollution, but to beach 
erosion — another threat to the country’s tourist-based economy. 
Thus BRI is also involved in a government-sponsored study to 
make recommendations as to how this problem of erosion can be 
overcome. In fact, the institute is currently serving as a government 
watchdog. “The Barbadian government puts out a contract that 
goes to a foreign consulting company. But, under a separate 
contract with the Barbadian government, Bellairs agrees to choose 
which company should get the contract. Once we choose one,” 
says Hunte, “we negotiate the final budget with them on behalf of 
the government, and then we supervise their performance 
throughout the project. We advise and keep the government 
informed and then assess the company’s final report and tell the 
government whether we think they got their money’s worth.” 

So,low profile or not, BRI is making an impact — “‘I think the 
Barbadian government is very pleased to have our service,” 
explains Hunte. ‘““They do not have the expertise themselves to be 
‘ os able to really assess the quality of a proposal or the final 
‘co ~=Csst rs—sti(‘is = "te . = in performance. And the strength of Bellairs, in this context,” he 
Studying the effect 9f social rank on growth and maturation adds, “‘is that it is providing a focus through which the full range of 
requires that individual monkeys be weighed. expertise at McGill can be put to use in the Caribbean.” 


14 McGILL NEWS/SEPTEMBER 1983 


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Scott, Smith, Edel and company: 


early McGill student publications 


by Peter O’Brien 


This is the first of a two-part series on McGill 
student magazines by Peter O’Brien, the new 
assistant editor of the News and the founding 
editor of the literary journal, Rubicon. In this 
article, he discusses McGill “little” magazines up 
to and including The Forge, which ceased publica- 
tion in the late 1960s. In the December issue of the 
News, he will take a look at many of the new 
student publications. 


the McGill Fortnightly Review, of which he 

was managing editor, was “‘at times witty, a 
trifle pompous, and certainly at times insufferably 
priggish.”’ 

The McGill Fortnightly Review appeared 
regularly between November 1925 and April 1927 
and is perhaps the most distinguished student 
journal to have been published at McGill. It is 
considered now to have played a seminal role in the 
development of Canadian “‘little’”’ magazines, and 


L eon Edel, BA’27, MA’28, once remarked that 


several members of its editotial board went on to 
pursue successful literary caeers. The collective 
honours of three of them, A. J. M. Smith, 
BSc(Arts) ’25, MA’26, F. R Scott, BCL’27, and 
Leon Edel, include, among many others, three 
Governor-General’s Awards, a National Book 
Award, and a Pulitzer Prize. 

The McGill Fortnightly Review permitted both 
its editors and contributors te develop and some- 
times flaunt their literary musdes, but it was not the 
only attempt to forge the agirations of McGill 
students in print. Since 1875, vhen the first issue of 
the University Gazette appeared, there have been 
many active, student-run majazines and journals 
associated with McGill. And teir range of subjects 
has run the gamut, from pcetry, fiction, satire, 
politics, and humour to that utiquitous genre called 
“university thought.” 

Almost without exception hese magazines had 
brief, turbulent lives, some lasing for a year or two, 
several only for one issue. Ani many, such as The 
Alarm Clock, Alcool, The Floating Rib, The 
Scratch, The Rebel, The Blaci Sheep, and The Fig 
Leaf, had names as tentative is their life spans. In 
their inaugural editorials, the editors of these 
magazines ran through a set of common laments. 
They mentioned the demise o/ magazines immedi- 
ately preceeding theirs, or complained of their own 
lack of financial stability, or voiced their various 
criticisms of the McGill Dail). 


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SEPTEMBER 983/McGILL NEWS 15 


The Scritch, published during the early 1920s, began its first 
editorial wih: “The following may be a trifle incoherent; it will 
certainly lak definiteness. It is impossible to present a platform or 
state a policy,” and then added a dramatic flourish to its 
indefinable >bjective: 


Things have become altogether too stuffy; there is need of a 
draught. Apathy is more and more fillng (sic) the stage, and 
ossifiration follows in its wake. Spontaneity is unknown and 
enthusiasm is merely traditional, lacking all buoyancy. “The 
Scrath” feels it must wriggle in the icy grip of indifference if 
only o keep warm. 


Published in the early 1890s, the McGill Fortnightly (not to be 
confused wth the McGill Fortnightly Review) was a professional- 
looking magazine that, in spite of the several pages of advertising in 
each issue,suffered financially. After printing two issues without 
any mentim of monetary contributions, the third stated: “The 
annual subscription is $1.00, payable strictly in advance.” 

The Blatk Sheep, as its name implies, was somewhat less than 
delicate in ts handling of university affairs. In its February 1933 
inaugural editorial it called the editors of the McGill Daily “‘soft- 
hearted idicts”’ and said that its purpose would be to express 


the tmporary likes and dislikes of the editorial board, 
modiied by the desire to be as objective as possible under 
the crcumstances .. . we are lovers of the paradox, and this 
is the age of equivocal statements and events. May 
provilence protect us from indignation, varbosity (sic), split 
infintives, the higher education, all reverent gentlemen, the 
Canian Authors’ Association and infectious epidemics; 
and nay righteousness guide all the days of our existence. 
Selal. 


The McGill Daily has remained the one constant in McGill 
student publishing, despite, and sometimes because of, the 
controverses it continually finds itself in. Most magazines that 
have sprun: up over the years have been in response to the Daily 


16 McGILL NEWS/SEPTEMBER 1983 


and, to one degree or another, in competition with it. The Daily did 
in fact publish its own literary journal, the McGill Daily Review, 
which in its winter 1955 issue included the following bit of verse by 
F.R. Scott: 


“Why is the McGill Daily,” 

Said the pessimist sourly. 

“Thank God,” said the optimist, gaily, 
“Tt isn’t hourly.” 


The Daily Review was not so much a literary production as it 
was a collection of more or less serious editorials. One such 
editorial, “For Dignified Embrace,” had things to say about the 
state of McGill romance: 


Westmount Mountain is a massive hump of stately concrete 
with only the very top left comparatively bare and 
unravished. For years the younger populace of Montreal, 
and McGill students in particular, have retreated here with 
their dates in the hope of a little privacy, a moment of quiet 
contemplation. There is nothing immoral or distasteful 
about this. Since time immemorial man has retreated to nature 
for the peace and the solitude for which his soul cried out. 
We see no reason why this cannot be done equally 
successfully in couples. The collective soul of the couple 
should be twice as cleansed. 


The Daily Review survived for several issues until it too, like its 
predecessors, quietly died. 

The one magazine that did sustain itself, despite a constantly 
changing editorial board, was The Forge, which began in 1938 and 
continued into the late 1960s. Printed on good paper stock and well 
bound, The Forge published the youthful offerings of many people 
who are now established writers, including Norman Levine, 
BA’48, MA’49, Henry Moscovitch, BA’62, David Solway, 
BA’62, Seymour Mayne, BA’65, Peter Van Toorn, BA’67, and 
Leonard Cohen, BA’55 (known at the time as Leonard Norman 
Cohen). The Forge also printed visual art portfolios and used 


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coloured ink and a variety of paper stocks within the same 
issue. 

If The Forge was the one journal that managed to survive the 
years, there are a number of magazines vying for the distinction of 
shortest-lived. One of the briefest attempts by McGill students was 
Miss McGill, which appeared in March 1948. On its first page is 
an apology for being later than expected followed by the announce- 
ment that the present issue is to be the last of that year. It was never 
heard from again. Miss McGill printed short articles on such items 
as the Women’s Union Fashion Show and the Photogenic 
Competition: 


In order to choose the most photogenic girls at McGill to be 
models in the fashion show, the Rapid, Grip and Batten Co., 
held a Photogenic Competition. Entries poured in, and your 
Executive got an inferiority complex from which we are only 
just recovering. 


One magazine that suffered more than the usual difficulties is 
The McGilliken, which published news, poems, and short 
congratulatory notices in France during World War I. In his 
covering letter accompanying one of the issues sent to the McGill 
Daily, its editor complained about “‘red-tape,” “‘censoring,” and 
the fact that most of the print shop employees responsible for the 
magazine were mobilized for active duty. This made the meeting of 
regular deadlines “out of the question.”’ Like many of the smaller 
magazines published over the years, The McGilliken was never 
properly documented and copies of it are now hard to find. 

Humour magazines have always been popular and among the 
best remembered at McGill are The Floating Rib, The Fig Leaf, 
and The Gastric Growl. The last of these, produced by some 
medical students, upheld the motto: ‘“‘All the news that’s print to 
fit.” Appearing first in 1954, The Fig Leaf met its demise after a 
few issues, but was resurrected in 1961. In March 1965, The Leaf 
could be bought according to the following price scale: “‘Cretins: 
35¢, Patrons: $10.00, Assistant Profs.: $49.95.” 

At their best, these McGill “‘little” magazines, often the result 
of a small group of students, demonstrated a Sharp wit, an 


intellectual vigor, and at times a precocious egotism. Several of 
them produced literary criticism of some weight: the University 
Gazette published papers on William Shakespeare and Matthew 
Arnold; the McGill Fortnightly Review on T.S. Eliot and Eugene 
O’Neill; and The McGilliad on James Joyce, Marcel Proust, and 
Sinclair Lewis. 

Atall times, the magazines have attempted to wake up apathetic 
students, as the title of The Alarm Clock implies, and have 
encouraged them to question things taken for granted. These 
publications also have given students of varying persuasions the 
space to discuss their reservations about sundry matters and to 
explore their first literary and political awakenings. These 
awakenings of intelligence, and the ways they have changed over 
the years, can be followed through the differing course of the 
editorials appearing in these various magazines. Certainly the 
influence of a classical education can be seen not only in the syntax 
of these early publications, but also as the modern reader finds both 
Greek (in the McGill University Magazine) and Latin (in the 
McGill Fortnightly Review) quoted with seeming ease. 

Although the McGill student journals have consistently 
encouraged the brightest students to engage in printed dialogue, it 
must be remembered that not all students who wanted to contribute 
were graced with an acceptance note. Writing in the inaugural issue 
of The McGilliad , Stephen Leacock, always a strong supporter of 
student productions, remembered his early days as a student editor 
in an essay entitled “Perils and Pitfalls of College Journalism”’: 


There was, I recollect, a young freshman named William 
Lyon Mackenzie King who sent us in a poem. The boy’s 
name somehow has stuck in my mind all these years. He sent 
us ina poem called, Why I like the Winter or The Futility of 
Human Greatness. 1 remember that...it was one of the worst 
poems we had received that week. We sent it back to King 
with a smart rebuke as a warning. Perhaps we were wrong. 
Without our rebuke King might be an established poet 
today. As it was he abandoned literature. Nor didI ever hear 
that he ever had any career beyond a little temporary 
employment at Ottawa.L) 


SEPTEMBER 1983/McGILL NEWS 17 


~ AnyBluyoy DOW ‘Bulsieapy 


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-* 


for Montreal 


by Professor Benjamin Higgins 


On June 18, 1983 Professor Benjamin 
Higgins received an LLD at McGill 
University’s Arts and Law Convocation. 
Bronfman Professor of economics at 
McGill from 1942 to 1952, he has taught 
at Harvard University, the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology (MIT), L ‘Univer- 
sité de Montréal, and the University of 
Ottawa. Professor Higgins has also served 
as economic advisor to a number of 
Canadian provinces and to some twenty 
other countries. Author of fifteen books, 
including the standard text, Economic 
Development: Problems, Principles and 
Politics, he is currently chairman of the 
advisory committee for the United Nations 
Centre for Regional Development in 
Nagoya, Japan, and directs the Centre for 
Applied Studies in Development at the 
University of the South Pacific, Suva, Fiji. 
In the following excerpt from his convoca- 
tion address, Professor Higgins makes 
clear his plan for turning Montreal into the 
kind of city that his audience, McGill's 
new law and economics graduates, would 
never wish to leave: 

expect the next few years to be espec- 

ially troublesome ones for Canada. We 

have delayed for far too long the 
quantum leap from natural-resource-based 
to human-resource-based development that 
every country must sooner or later make if 
it is to provide productive employment for 
its entire labour force and progressively 
raise standards of living. At a recent 
conference in Canberra, Australia, we were 
discussing the “‘miracle’’ of Singapore’s 
transition from poverty to affluence. An 
Australian economist broke in, rather 
impatiently, and said: ‘““That’s no miracle! 
Singapore is not cursed with rich natural 
resources and a vast hinterland!’’ Countries 
that have those things tend to rely on them 
for their development, as Australia, New 
Zealand, Canada and even the United 
States have done. The real success stories 
of recent decades have been those of 
smaller countries with limited resources: 
Switzerland, Sweden, Holland, Singapore, 
Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Japan. In such 
countries there is no choice but to go the 
human-resource route, developing on the 
basis of scientifically-oriented industry, 
sophisticated services, and even higher 
technology. Nor can we stop the developing 
countries from increasing their share of 
industrial exports. The comparative advan- 
tage for most of them lies clearly in 
industry. 


18 McGILL NEWS/SEPTEMBER 1983 


de ee ee | 


Planning a techno-logical future 


as 


“Québecois par choix.” 


|. Brecher (left) congratulates Professor 
Benjamin Higgins at the spring 1983 Arts 
and Law Convocation at Place des Arts. 


Within Canada, the province of Quebec 
shows most clearly the reliance on natural 
resources and the accompanying techno- 
logical lag. Ever since Confederation, 
Quebec has been nearly as industrialized as 
Ontario; but Quebec’s industry has had less 
technology and less productivity, facts that 
well explain the lower incomes in Quebec. 
The further fact that the more advanced 
enterprises were under anglophone manage- 
ment, which preferred to hire graduates 
from anglophone institutions for the top 


In his early McGill years as Bronfman Professor of Economics, Benjamin Higgins was 


ee el 


nINoONT 


Re: Sen rivel hoe ae 


scientific and managerial jobs, helps to : 
explain the gap between French and j 
English incomes within Quebec. : 

The technological lag inQuebec centres 
on Montreal, where most of the hi-tech 
industries and sophisticated services are. 
These are precisely the enterprises that are 
leaving Montreal. This trend started well 
before the Parti Québécoiscame to power, 
and there are more fundanental forces at 
work than the fear of an independent 
Quebec. 

Cities grow and prospermainly through | 
interaction with other cities. Increasingly, 
Montreal has become stranded in an 
industrial desert. Eastern Ontario, which 
was the industrial heartland of Ontario up 
to 1850, has stagnated since then. There is 
nothing in northern New England and little 
in northern New Brunswick. Within Quebec 
itself there is no other major industrial and 
services centre with whichto interact. The 
latest blow is the decay of the Great Lakes 
industrial region and the shift of the hi-tech 
industry to the Sunbelt, a move that hurts 
Toronto, but hurts Mont-eal more. The 
only solution for Montreal now is to 
operate in a world market on the basis of 
hi-tech industries and services. 


| When I gracuated in 


paaty lors 
Tore ts ds 


A good model for Montreal is Boston. 
1933, the New 
England economy, with Boston as its 
centre, was flet on its back. On top of the 


| devastation of the Great Depression, the 


| textile and pulp and paper industries had 


migrated to the South, the boot and shoe 
industry to the Midwest. As you graduate 


| in 1983, Boson and New England are 


more dynami and prosperous than ever, 
with a highly-~killed financial sector and a 


| galaxy of hi-tzch industries. And behind 


this transformation are Boston’s great 


| universities: Harvard, MIT, Boston Uni- 
| versity, Brandeis, and Tufts. 


And so we come back to McGill. In the 
process of transforming Montreal into a 
Canadian Boson, and thus strengthening 


* John Geeza 


McGill — granddaughter, 
— daughter, — mother, 
etc.: Holly Higgins Jonas 


oe 


3 Se 


& 


In attendanc? at this year’s Law and 
Economics convocation was at least one 
McGill-daugher. And as Holly Higgins 


Jonas, BA’S8 MSW’71, (also a McGill- | 
| granddaughter, 


McGill-wife, 
mother, and cf course, graduate), goes on 
to explain, sae was extremely proud of 


Professor Higgins, her father, whose con- | 


vocation addiess put her into a nostalgic 
mood. In the following, she reminisces 
about her legendary father, her early years 
as a ‘faculty brat,’’ and about her own 
student days at McGill: 

itting in 1 prominent position on the 

Salle Wilfred Pelletier stage, sur- 

rounded by splendidly-gowned figures, 
flowers, and multi-coloured flags, my Dad, 
Ben Higgins, was evidently enjoying himself. 
The twinkle ir his eye was more apparent 
than ever. It had been five years since I’d 
last seen him, due to his ‘“‘non-retirement’”’ 
to Australia. He looked wonderfully fit, as 
he prepared toreceive his honorary doctor- 
ate from McGill University, and subse- 
quently, to delver the convocation address. 


| bon! 


Holly HigginsJonas at the Roddick Gates. | 


McGill- | 


eS 


(VAY PEL IE Py oeee Lhe ee ey ad 
FERRE AL Re Se a tia Sk SMe: 


the Quebec and Canadian economies, 


McGill, with its almost two-centuries-old | 
| tradition of freedom of inquiry, freedom of 
| speech, and freedom of publication, has a 


unique role to play. But McGill is not | 


alone. 
In the French-speaking world, the Uni- 


versity of Montreal is as well known as | 


McGill is in the English-speaking world. 


Two weeks ago at a brasserie in Nouméa, | 
| the capital of Nouvelle Caledonie, two 


French colonials drew me into conversa- 
tion. When they learned I had lectured at 
the University of Montreal, they said, “Ah 
L’Université de Montréal, c’est 
fameuse en tout le monde!”’ 

The “‘two solitudes” of McGill and the 
University of Montreal have broken down 


since I was at McGill, but I would like to 
see still more cooperation between them. 
Concordia University and the University of 
Quebec have their own characteristic 
contributions to make. Together the four 


universities can make Montreal, like Boston, | 
a city whose graduates don’t want to leave, | 
thus giving Montreal a comparative advan- | 


tage for hi-tech enterprises. 
So my message to the Class of ’83 is 


| this: stay in Quebec. Help to reconstruct | 


the Quebec and Montreal economies, thus 
making Canada more whole and more 
likely to hold together. My colleagues at the 


University of Montreal used to say of me: | 


“Tl est Québécois par choix.’’ And it was 
true. I was a Quebecer by choice, and I 
hope you will be too. 


Dad did, in fact, give a stunning speech, as 
he shared the concepts that he earnestly 
believed could encourage Montreal to pull 
itself up by its boot-straps. I later learned 
that Dad’s speech put tears into quite a few 
eyes —including some of the new graduates 
themselves. And he certainly put me into a 
nostalgic mood. 

I was five years old when Dad was 
brought to McGill’s economics department 
to occupy the Bronfman chair, thus making 
me a McGill-daughter. (I really should add 
that I am also a McGill-granddaughter, as 
my Dad’s parents met as students at 
McGill at the turn of the century.) My 
memory of McGill during those ten years is 
somewhat feeble, since the economics 
department was then housed in Morris Hall 
on Pine Avenue, and I had little reason to 
cross the main campus except to gawk 
longingly at the caléeches parked on Sher- 
brooke Street in front of the Roddick Gates. 
I got to know the Faculty Club well enough 
though, which in those days was a rather 
austere place, with many mysterious rooms, 
“off-limits” not only to children, but also to 
adult females — although I’m sure I was 
guilty of a few naughty peeks. 

When Dad departed from McGill in 
1952 to serve on many missions in Third 


World countries or to teach at other | 


universities, a host of legends remained 
behind. He is known as that young professor 
who sunbathed on the library roof and 
whose pre-lecture warm-up was to mount 


the Moyse Hall podium by walking on his | 


hands. He’s also remembered as an inspiring 
teacher and a most hospitable host to his 
students, many of whom, incidentally, were 
World War II veterans. 

My next encounter with McGill was as 
a student, from 1954 to 1958, when I 
graduated with a BA on the open lawn of 
the lower campus. It was still OK back then 
to live it up with the fraternities, the Winter 
Carnival, and the Red and White Revue. 
Sports were mandatory, weekly dances 
featured the jitter-bug, and the number of 
clubs and societies to join was endless. The 
student population, which was one-third of 
what it is now, also engendered a ‘‘family- 
feeling.”’ Scholarship had its place too. I 
had some outstanding teachers, some who 


even wore tattered gowns to lectures. And I 
still treasure letters written to me after 
graduation by some of my professors, 
including Dr. Cyril James. 

My second time around as a McGill 


student from 1968 to 1971 for an MSW | 
was nowhere near as much fun. It was a | 


period of student rebellion and ferocious 
attack on university administration. The 
prevailing atmosphere on campus was not 
altogether conducive to learning, and I 
feared for McGill at that time when it was 
“marched upon” and special riot police 
were stationed on the university rooftops. 
But McGill survived gracefully. 

My convocation reminiscing then 
brought me back to 1960, when I re-entered 
university life as a McGill-wife. I had 
married John Jonas, BEng’54, who had 
accepted a teaching position in McGill’s 
metallurgy department, where he remains 
still. These last twenty-three years have 
given me an altogether different perspective 
of my alma mater, as professors and 
administrators have become colleagues 
and friends, and as my husband has served 
as associate dean of Graduate Studies and 
as president of both the Faculty Club and of 
the McGill Association of University 
Teachers. And I should not overlook the 
year 1966-67 when I served McGill, albeit 
briefly, as a McGill staff member and 
teaching assistant in the classics depart- 
ment. I was impressed with the quality of 
my students, but I don’t think they were or 
are today having as much fun as we did. 

As the June 8, 1983 convocation came 
to a decorous end, my thoughts slowly 
came back to earth. They returned for a 
moment to June, 1982, when my daughter 
Jennifer crossed the same stage at Place 
des Arts on which my Dad now stood, to 
receive her BA. I guess that makes me a 
McGill-mother too! 

To end, I mused on my Dad’s words 
uttered as we crossed lower campus together 
earlier that day. He had rejoiced that 
McGill was still a first-rate university and 
one that enjoys an unbroken tradition as a 
liberal institution where academic freedoms 
are really valued. And what more can I add, 
but simply to say: ““Queen of the colleges, 
dear old McGill.” 


| 
— —— 


SEPTEMBER 1983/McGILL NEWS 19 


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Harold Rosenberg 


ne 


of Socrates 


by John Sainsbury 


F. Stone has long been acclaimed and 
often idolized as a wise and intrepid 

e defender of free thought and expression. 
In a career of journalism spanning over fifty 
years, he vigorously assailed the enemies of 
freedom, while defending the victims of 
intolerance. And his independent news- 
letter, the 7.F. Stone Weekly, persisted 
from the McCarthy era through the Vietnam 
War as an often lonely voice of reasoned 
dissent. 

One might assume, then, that Stone 
would identify a kindred spirit in Socrates — 
the Athenian philosopher, who through 
twenty-four centuries has been depicted as 
a victim of popular intolerance and as a 
martyr to the cause of free inquiry and 
speech. But such an assumption would be 
wrong. As this year’s guest speaker in the 
Beatty Public Lecture Series held in the 
Fieldhouse Auditorium in May, Stone 
revisited Socrates’ trial for impiety and 
corruption of youth, not to celebrate the 
originator of dialetical inquiry, but to 
denounce both him and his illustrious 
interpreter and disciple, Plato. The two, he 
argued, were far greater threats to demo- 
cracy and free speech than their Athenian 
detractors. 

Speaking without notes in three ninety- 
minute lectures, Stone — puckish in appear- 
ance and wit —treated the capacity audience 
to an idiosyncratic reappraisal of Socratic 
philosophy and Plato’s “Ideal City.” They 
were, he said, not simply anti-democratic; 
they also offered a blueprint for the develop- 
ment of harshly authoritarian societies. He 
stopped short of asserting that Socrates 
deserved his fate, though he did present a 
convincing account of the intolerable pres- 
sures on his persecutors — an historical 
backdrop to the trial often omitted in more 
traditional accounts. 

How and why did I.F. Stone, veteran 
journalist, become I.F. Stone, revisionist 
classical scholar? In his lectures (which are 
drawn from a book in progress) and in 
discussion with the McGill News, he 
emphasized that his academic studies are a 
logical extension of, not a comfortable 
retreat from, a lifetime of political reporting. 
He discounts any significant distinction 
between the methods of the journalist and 
the scholar. “‘Both look at all the facts 
meticulously and freshly,” he says. “‘I’m an 
old fire-horse put out to pasture, but I’ve set 
out to cover the trial of Socrates and still get 
a scoop.” 

His revisitation of ancient Athens came 


20 McGILL NEWS/SEPTEMBER 1983 


1.F. Stone revisits the trial 


about as part of a detailed historical study 
of freedom and its foes, which he began in 
1972. Eventually his odyssey took Stone to 
the Athens of the fifth and fourth centuries 
B.C. “This was the first extended period of 
free thought and free speech known to us,” 
he explains. ““There I fell in love with 
Athenians and Ionians, and I have been 
there ever since.” 

In pursuing his inquiries into Hellenic 
society and philosophy, Stone was not 
content to rely on translations of classical 
texts. So at age seventy he embarked on the 
study of ancient Greek. “Every point in 
classical scholarship, and especially in 
Platonic studies, is involved in tremendous 
controversy,’ he says. ““That’s one of the 
reasons why you have to learn Greek, to 
study the documents for yourself.’ Typi- 
cally, he regards his language studies as a 
marvelous adventure, rather than as a 
chore, and he approaches them with the 
Same enthusiasm with which he once pored 
over mountains of official publications to 
find evidence of government mendacity. 

Stone finds particular joy in reading the 
Greek poets and dramatists in the original. 
“Sappho just sizzles,” he says. “And 
reading Aeschylus is like talking to God.” 
Even the prose of Plato, whose theories 


Stone finds so repulsive, he describes as 
‘intoxicating.’ ““No-one ever told me how 
beautiful the Apology was in the original,” 
he says. “The artistry is on a level with 
Homer and Sappho and therefore just as 
untranslatable.”’ 

For Stone, however, Plato’s seductively 
brilliant prose fails to redeem his political 
philosophy or that of his mentor, Socrates. 
He identifies in their ideology the “glam- 
orous packaging”’ of an ancient myth — the 
notion that the common man is unable to 
govern himself. This notion is supported by 
an equally repugnant moral theory whereby 
Socrates equated virtue with knowledge. 
This narrow view, Stone points out, ignores 
or denigrates the wisdom and common 
sense of ordinary people as celebrated in 
Athenian democracy itself and in the 
Judeo-Christian tradition. 

The Socratic solution to the supposed 
irredeemable stupidity of the masses was 
rule by a philosopher king — a concept that 
has appealed both to scholars and despots 
throughout the ages because, says Stone, it 
is flattering to both. But Plato’s ideal state — 
as sketched in the Republic, Politicus, and 
Laws —is for Stone a totalitarian nightmare, 
containing most of the elements that have | 
come to characterize.closed and absolutist | 


pee lee eS a 


all dissent was to be stifled (including that 
of rival philosophers ) and strenuous efforts 
were to be made to inculcate what Plato 
called the Noble Lie — the notion that the 
lower classes were congenitally inferior 
and could not hope to rise above their 
humble station. Socrates was quite adamant, 
in fact, that rulers could lie, even to their 
own subjects, “‘for the benefit of the state.”’ 
For Stone, this argument paves the way for 
what today the CIA refers to as “‘disinfor- 
mation,” classified facts not available to 
the public. 

It would, of course, have been entirely 
out of character for Stone to assert that 
Socrates deserved execution for advocating 
a repressive society. But in his examination 
of the trial, he convincingly demonstrated 
that the ideas Socrates was fomenting were 
not harmless philosophical musings, but 
were genuinely threatening to the fabric of 
Athenian democracy. At the time of Socrates’ 
trial in 399 B.C., Athens was still reeling 
from a long and debilitating war with its 
arch-rival, Sparta. Its power waning, Athens 
had been subverted from within by recent 
Oligarchic coups against the democratic 
government. During these coups, young 
upper-class thugs — many of whom had sat 
at Socrates’ feet — tyrannized the city with 
whips and cudgels. In such circumstances, 
then, the charge against Socrates of corrup- 
ting the youth of the city was scarcely 
trivial. 

Even so, Stone claims, Socrates could 
have avoided conviction had he conducted 
himself in a more conciliatory fashion. 
Instead, he deliberately provoked the jury 
by his arrogance and boastfulness and 
chose not to appeal to the city’s longstanding 
belief in free speech. Weary of life at 
seventy years old, and disappointed with 
his most promising pupils, Socrates willingly 
accepted the cup of hemlock. His death 
should thus be regarded as a suicide, not a 
martyrdom, according to Stone. And its 
real tragedy lay in the ‘‘awful blemish it 
placed on Athens.”’ 

Stone has rejudged Socrates and Plato: 
how in turn will he be judged as a classical 
scholar? Certainly his approach is vintage 
Stone — audacious, witty, and meticulous; 
but it is doubtful that his interpretations will 
be accepted as seminal. Most serious 
perhaps is his starry-eyed view of Athenian 
polity, which he contrasts with that of 
“fascist” Sparta. After all, even Thucydides, 
the Athenian historian, attributed his city’s 
protracted war with Sparta to Athenian 
expansionism. 

Nor does Stone’s analysis of Platonic 
ideology add a great deal to an anti- 
Platonist tradition that stretches from 
Benedict de Spinoza to Karl Popper and 
Bertrand Russell. But by looking afresh at 
Socrates’ trial through the eyes of a veteran 
journalist steeped in contemporary politics, 
Stone has brought to an event of ancient 
history an immediacy that generations of 
more traditional scholars have been unable, 
or unwilling, to accomplish.0 


societies. Under Plato’s projected regime, 


PERSPECTIVE 


“Medico-arqueologico”’ 
in the Andes 


by Brian Ward, MD’80 


s soon as I finished my internship at 

the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in 

Montreal, I had the opportunity to join 
some friends at their archeological dig in 
the central highlands of southern Peru. 
Their proposal seemed ridiculous: I was to 
learn Spanish, read up on diseases I had 
barely heard of before, beg, borrow, or steal 
supplies, and pay for my own transporta- 
tion. Having never taken an economics 
course, I accepted. 

My appeal for medical supplies was 
generously supported by the local drug 
companies, and the McGill community 
provided valuable information on everything 
from Caesarean sections under local anes- 
thetic to rabid bats. Eleven days out of my 
hospital internship, I set off with several 
thousand dollars worth of medical supplies 
in my pack and a favourite bit of advice for 
those practising medicine in the non-indus- 


trialized world: “‘Penicillin, suture material, 


and a fast horse!” 

Almost as daunting as some of the 
stories told to me before I left were the 
travel arrangements awaiting me in Lima. 
Although they started well enough with a 
series of short bus and truck hops, the last 
leg was a 200 kilometer stretch of officially 
“abandoned track’? winding its way up 
4,500 meters to be negotiated with the aid 
of a military map and compass. It was 
becoming clearer why the expedition 
members already on site were so anxious to 
have a doctor along. 

The 8,000 or so kilometers to Lima had 
taken twelve hours, while the remaining 
500 to the dig took six days. Following 
routes seldom used by non-Indians, I 
quickly learned certain handy facts about 
traveling with sheep (i.e. which end is more 
fun to travel with) and got used to a dust- 
supplemented diet. Each kilometer forward 
seemed to be a step backward in time. 
There were such incongruities that, after a 
while, I stopped making most assumptions. 
The few I maintained were abandoned at 
midnight after the fourth day of travel when 
a huge Quetchua woman camped beside 
me on the floor of a bus with her potatoes 
and chickens, broke into a gutsy and nearly 


Brian Ward: “I never guessed that my first medical shingle would be hung here in a 
desolate river valley in the Peruvian Andes.” 


VRMPRIIOAPRAPILSSIGIPASIGS HG PSP PIS FALIS ARTS PML T A a7 8 23 


perfect Mick Jagger imitation inspired by 
the overhead speakers that blared out 
“Satisfaction” and ‘Jumpin’ Jack Flash.” 

By the time I arrived at the archeological 
base camp in the Soras River Valley, I was 
thoroughly acclimatized and, having spent 
the last fourteen hours astride the side-rail 
of a vintage Chevy pick-up, able to grin/ 
wince at the unfortunate coincidence of the 
region’s name. Looking down the desolate 
fifty kilometer valley for the first time I had 
to concede that I had never guessed, when 
entering medical school, that my first 
shingle would be bilingual (in Spanish and 
Quetchua) and would be hung in Peru. But 
for four months, ““Medico-Arqueologico”’ 
it was, as I divided my time between 
practising archeology and operating small 
medical clinics for the local Indians. 

The expedition was housed in Pampa- 
chiri, a small adobe village with a population 
of approximately 750. These Pampachir- 
ianos, as they are called, are able to scrape 
only the thinnest subsistence from the land 
and their herds. Their dirt-floored homes 
have no running water or sanitary facilities. 
They have no regular transportation, com- 
munication, or health care. It is no surprise 
that the region has one of the highest infant 
mortality rates in the world. Cut off from 
the mainstream of Perwyian life for centuries, 
the valley and its inhabitants have been 
forgotten. 

Yet the isolation of this valley of some 
2,000 inhabitants has also protected its rich 
archeological record from pot-hunters and 
developers. Once supporting as many as 
35,000 people and a vast network of 
canals, aqueducts, and terraces, the valley 
had been a natural corridor for trade, 
influence, and conquest. It is literally 
choked with evidence showing that it was 
once an important link between coastal and 
mountain civilizations. 

In the three years since its rediscovery, 
archeologists Monica Barnes and David 
Fleming have found more than forty-three 
individual sites along the length of the 
valley. They range from 10,000 year old 
stone tool sites to magnificent Inca cere- 
monial centres with more than 350 standing 
buildings. I joined the third expedition to 
the region and, for a neophyte, the situation 
was ideal. The days were filled with 
wandering, mapping and collecting surface 
finds, and trite as it may sound, “discovering 
things.”’ Only the happy monotony of “too 
many” artifacts to catalogue, the predatory 
cacti growing at strategic survey points, and 
the cook who insisted on serving hot chili 
peppers for breakfast, put dampers on an 
otherwise idyllic archeological adventure. 

As the season wore on, the daily contact 
with roofless buildings in still recognizable 
cities slowly created an eerie intimacy. 
More and more, the tangles of measuring 
tapes and angles of theodolites were for- 
gotten as doorways became passages for 
real, although long dead, people. By day I 
worked with stairways and altars carved 
from solid rock, aqueducts still functioning 
after some 500 years, and the majestic 


22 McGILL NEWS/SEPTEMBER 1983 


cascades of terraces dominating the valley 
walls — all of which had been created by 
peoples little different from the modern-day 
Pampachirianos. But by night, when the 
descendants of these same architects, 
engineers, and planners opened the doors of 
their crude homes to a gringo doctor the 
contrasts were obvious. 

Limited by time, language barriers, and 
lack of experience in the environment, I had 
no illusions that anything “significant” 


could be accomplished by working with the | 
| aside to explain a fact I had been sheltered 


Indians. The provision of emergency 
medical services was simply a courtesy and 
a public relations gesture made toward a 
populace that was not completely sympa- 
thetic to the presence of our expedition. 
Initially the Indians were hesitant to bring 
their medical problems to me. Once several 
brave souls had tested the waters and 
survived, I had a steady flow of evening 
customers. Over the next four months, 
consultations ranged from simple things 
like scrapes and bruises to malnourished 
children (no less than 25 percent worms- 
by-weight) to bizarre problems confidently 
diagnosed by the local witch as “hex 
induced”’ (psychosomatic?). As for this last 
group, I was amazed and amused to have a 
woman wink and tell me to give her my 
largest and most brightly coloured pills or, 
better still, an injection that stung a bit. 
Called to candle-lit corners for difficult 
deliveries or to the bedsides of dangerously 
ill patients, I always felt that on the one 
hand I might be able to do something. But 


. 


on the other, my presence would spread the 
responsibility, and possibly the blame, to 
others in our expedition. In return for these 


| “services” and the occasional request for 


specific medicines, the witch was happy to 


| teach me some of the local remedies: coca 
| tea for soroche or altitude sickness, coca 


itself for muscular spasms or toothache, 
and all manner of herbal concoctions for 
everything from headaches to the galloping 
trots. 

And it was this same witch who took me 


from my whole life. Faced one day with a 
sudden case of renal failure in a young and 
otherwise healthy man, I responded predic- 
tably. There was plenty of time to take him 
the 300 kilometers to the nearest hospital 
where, I was certain, they would be able to 
save his life. Encountering passive resis- 
tance in the village at every turn, I became 
almost frantic in my appeals for transpor- 
tation. When the witch took me aside, all 
she said was, “It will be cheaper to bury 
him in the mountains.” I had always 
known, in a bookish sort of way, that death 
for economic reasons was, in non-industri- 
alized countries, the rule to our exception. 
But that knowledge did nothing to temper 
my shock and anger at its application to the 
life of someone sitting in front of me. When 
the funeral bells had rung and the feasting 
was over, the dead man’s brother thanked 
me for what I had tried to do, saying, among 
other things, ‘“You’ll get used to it.” I hope I 
never do.L) 


WHERE THEY ARE AND 
WHAT THEYRE DOING 


"26 

BRIAN P. SUTHERLAND, MSc’26, 
PhD’28, of Victoria, B.C., was recently 
awarded a doctor of divinity degree by 
Regent College, a graduate theological 
college affiliated with the University of 
British Columbia, in Vancouver. 


"33 

ROBERT F. SHAW, BEng’33, is the 
honorary chairman of the Centennial Board 
of the EIC, which will celebrate its hun- 
dredth anniversary in 1987. 


34 

J.J. DINAN, MD’34, a surgeon for forty 
years at St. Mary’s Hospital, Montreal, is 
writing a history of the hospital. 


°36 


WILLIAM B. HUTCHINSON, MD’36, 


founding director of the Fred Hutchinson 


Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Wash., 


has been named Alumnus Summa Laude 


Dignatus for 1983 by the University of 
Washington Alumni Association. 
RACHMIEL LEVINE, BA’32, MD’36, 
deputy director for research emeritus at the 
City of Hope Medical Center and Research 
Institute, Duarte, Ca., has been elected to 
membership in the National Academy of 
Sciences. 

DAVID PALL, BSc’36, PhD’39, is foun- 
der and chairman of Pall Corp., a manu- 
facturer of industrial filters that ranks, 
among publicly-held American corpora- 
tions, second in total return to share- 
holders. 


"37 

F.MUNROE BOURNE, BA’31,MD’37, 
recently retired from practice as a physician 
in the D. V. A. Hospital at Ste. Anne de 
Bellevue, Que. 

HILDA GIFFORD, BA’37, BLS’38, 
recently retired from Carleton University 
in Ottawa, Ont., was awarded an honorary 
doctorate for her work in their library 
system. 


Se A A SS 


}—— = Se = 


"38 
DAVID R. FRASER, BA’38,MA’39_ has 
joined Columbia Pacific Resources Group 
Ltd. as a director and full-time consul- 
tant. 

JOHN D. STENSTROM, MD’38, a 
surgical specialist living in Victoria, B.C.., 
was recently awarded the badge and certi- 
ficate of senior membership in the Canadian 
Medical Association. 


"41 

CLERMONT DUSSAULT, BSc’4]1, re- 
tired in June from Canadair Ltd., after forty 
years of service. 

HARRY OXORN, BA’41, DipObstetrics 
"51, Obstetrician-Gynecologist-in-Chief, 
Ottawa Civic Hospital, Ont., has written a 
biography of the late Dr. Harold Benge 
Atlee, who was professor of obstetrics and 
gynecology of Dalhousie University, Hali- 
fax, N.S., for thirty-five years. 
CLARENCE SCHNEIDERMAN, BSc’39, 
MD’41, has been appointed assistant 
professor of urology in McGill’s Faculty of 
Medicine. 


"43 

A. JEAN DE GRANDPRE, BCL’43, 
LLD’81, has become chairman, president 
and chief executive officer of Bell Canada 
Enterprises Inc., in Montreal. 

HARRY STARR, BSc’41, MD’43, 
MSc’47, recently received the distinguished 
neurosurgeon of the year award from the 
Texas Association of Neurological Sur- 
geons. 


"44 

GEORGE BOUKYDIS, BCom’44, is the 
president of Diana Sweets Ltd., one of 
Toronto’s oldest restaurants. 


"46 

JAMES C. THACKRAY, BSc’46, has 
been elected chairman and chief executive 
officer of Bell Canada. 


"a7 

DAVID BAIRD, PhD’47, will head the 
new Tyrrell Museum of Paleontology, 
which will be located five kilometres north 
of Drumheller, Alta. 

DAVID CULVER, BSc’47, president and 
chief executive officer of Alcan Aluminium 
Ltd. of Montreal, has been named Canadian 
international business executive of the 
year. 

ROBERT M. MacINTOSH, BA’47, 
MA’49, PhD’52, president of the Canadian 
Bankers’ Association, has recently become 
chairman of corporations and foundations 
for the Bracebridge Library Restoration 
Building Fund, in Ontario. 

Dr. HELEN KATHLEEN MUSSAL- 
LEM, BN’47, former executive director of 
the Canadian Nurses Association, recently 
received a doctor of laws degree from 
Queen’s University, Kingston, Ont. 
KENNETH G.W. SMITH, BSc’47, has 
been elected president and chief executive 
officer of the Canadian Paint and Coatings 


‘ Pe Perce sda Re ASP OR EY ERE OAS ECE ORS EE LAR TRE SERRE EO Re SERE CLO be OW 
BDL VEE LESS SPORS (OPE EES AE ARETE CUe RRL L ENE EES BEERS UNS EE EOCRE CF LEAT CSRISRT SS ORE SS ERREEITE CES ES 
ShOG WS ae, 2) Ne ek Sod oe 2 De Re ANA OE ie Se A! ie te PS eg late a . - 


"48 
KENNETH H. JONES, BEng’48, has 
been named president of the Ontario 
Centre for Computer-Aided Design/Com- 
puter Aided Manufacturing in Cambridge, 
and the Ontario Centre for Robotics in 
Peterborough. 

EVA KUSHNER, BA’48,MA’50, PhD’56, 
recently received a Killam award from the 
Canada Council for literature. 

ARNOLD McALLISTER, MSc’48, 
PhD’50, a geology professor at the Univer- 
sity of New Brunswick, Fredericton, re- 
cently won the Canadian Institute of 
Mining and Metallurgy’s Distinguished 
Lecturer Award. 

JOHN S. McKENDY, BA’48, who is 
scheduled to retire from National Trust in 
mid-1984 after twenty-three years of service, 
will continue as vice-president on special 
assignment. 

A.RICHARD TREMAINE, BSc’48, has 
been appointed vice-president, finishing, of 
the Apparel and Industrial Fabrics Co., of 
Dominion Textile Inc. 


"49 

GORDON L. COOPER, BEng’49, is 
taking early retirement from the Ontario 
Paper Co., after thirty years of service. 
D. A. 1. GORING, PhD’49, a prominent 
scientist and educator, was recently ap- 
pointed vice-president academic of the 
Pulp and Paper Research Institute of 
Canada, in Pointe Claire, Que. 


*50 

GEORGE B. CREAMER, PhD’S50, re- 
cently retired from ITT Rayonier Inc., after 
thirty-three years of service, and has moved 
to his working farm in Putnam Station, 
New York. 

HERBERT SIBLIN, BCom’50, was re- 
cently elected president of the Sir Mortimer 
B. Davis Jewish General Hospital Centre 
Board, in Montreal. 


"51 

JOHN P. FISHER, BEng’51,a resident of 
New Brunswick, has been elected chairman 
of the executive board of the Canadian Pulp 
and Paper Association. 

J. MAURICE LeCLAIR, BSc’49, MD’51, 
is president and chief executive officer of 
Canadian National Railways, headquar- 
tered in Montreal. 

TED TILDEN, BCom’51, of Montreal, is 
president of the Tilden Rent-A-Car System, 
a franchise holding company. 


"52 

DONALD K.CAMERON, BSc’52, after 
eleven years with Aramco in Saudi Arabia, 
and London, England, has recently settled 
in Slidell, La., where he is palynology 
coordinator for Chevron U.S.A.’s eastern 
region exploration program. 

GEORGE DENTON CLARK, MEng’52, 
president and chairman of RCA Ltd., 
recently received a doctor of laws degree at 
the University of Prince Edward Island 


ee GSES 


53 


MORLEY CALVERT, LMus’53, 


BMus’56, was one of the adjudicators at | 
the recent Kiwanis Music Festival in St. | 


John’s, Nfld. 


RODERICK C. FOSTER, BCom’53, | 
was recently appointed executive vice- | 


president of Imasco Ltd., Montreal. 
MICHAEL A. KLUGMAN, MSc’53, 
PhD’56, has recently been appointed 


special employment coordinator of On- | 


tario’s Ministry of Natural Resources. 
MURRAY McEWEN, BScAgr’53, chair- 
man of the Macdonald Agricultural Cam- 


paign that successfully raised the $7.2 | 
million for the new building at Macdonald | 
College, has bought a farm near Guelph, | 


Ont. 


Dr. MARTIN C. ROBINSON, BSc’53, of 


San Jose, Ca., has been elected to fellowship 
in the American College of Cardiology. 


"54 

JAMES FINLAY, MEng’S4, has recently 
become executive coordinator, mineral 
resources, of Ontario’s Ministry of Natural 
Resources. 

JOHN A. MAHOMED, BEng’54, was 
recently installed as president of the Cana- 
dian Society for Mechanical Engineering. 
DEREK H. MATHER, BCom’54, was 
recently appointed president and chief 
executive officer of Vencap Equities Alberta 
Ltd. 

JOHN W. McGILL, BCom’54, has re- 
cently been made president of Canadian 
Liquid Air, Montreal. 


‘Do 

Dr. DONALD GEORGE, BEng’55, is 
dean of the new Faculty of Engineering at 
Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, B.C. 
ROBERT T. STEWART, BCom’55, is 
executive vice-president of Scott Paper, 
Vancouver, B.C. 


56 

CARMAN RANDOLPH COLWELL, 
BCom’56, of Moncton, N.B., recently 
received an FCA commemorative certi- 
ficate for his service to the accounting 
profession. 

JOHN KENNERLEY, BSc’56, has been 
appointed deputy director of the industrial 
division of E.C.E.atthe United Nations in 
Geneva, Switzerland. 

BRIAN D. QUINN, BSc’56, DipMgmt’70, 
MBA’76, has been appointed vice-presi- 
dent, manufacturing, of Smith and Nephew 
Inc., Lachine, Que. 

NICKOLAS J. THEMELIS, BEng’56, 
PhD’61, professor of mineral engineering 
at the Henry Krumb School of Mines, 
Columbia University, New York, N.Y., 
was recently elected a member of the 
National Academy of Engineering. 


"S57 
RAWDON JACKSON, BSc’57, has been 
appointed vice-chairman and chief execu- 
tive officer of Jones Heward and Co. 
Lid. 


SEPTEMBER 1983/McGILL NEWS 23 


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esetnsy 


af pee eo 
PRE 5 


rast” 


23] 


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ns iititaty’ 


OD LAB 
eu Lt i 


hol 


CP EE PPE eM RSA PEND ot Bh 
as nebata tite hie AAG ty ti Me 


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ee Pa 
Bae ee ee ce 


ee mF rye 7, * a ee es aes R 
ti ee sigeld 8s Byte Pig ti 
High in Airnahey tre i oe ff AN 


- 4 % . o x es a = - 
es 2-7 pts alae 


AIDAN F. RYAN, BEng’57, is the 
director of the Newfoundland Light and 
Power Co. Ltd., in St. John’s. 

C.R. YOUNGER, BCom’57, the vice- 
president of Dominion Securities Ames 
Ltd., has been elected chairman of the 
Toronto Stock Exchange. 


"58 

MELVIN CHARNEY, BArch’58, a pro- 
fessor of architecture at the University of 
Montreal, designed ““A Kingston Construc- 
tion,” the first major piece of architectural 
art to go up in Kingston, Ont. 

CLAUDE MAILLET, BEng’58, general 
| manager, network services, of Bell Canada, 
in Montreal, has accepted a second term as 
president of the Quebec branch of the 
Kidney Foundation of Canada. 
TAKETO MURATA, BSc’58, president 
of Hunt-Wesson Canada and Norton 
Simon Canada Inc., has been elected 
chairman and chief executive officer of the 
Canadian Food Processors Association for 
1983-84. 

SIDNEY PASOFF, BEng’58, has been 
appointed vice-president, management 
information services, of the Oshawa Group 
Ltd. 


"59 

OTTO FORGACS, PhD’59, of Vancouver, 
B.C.., is senior vice-president, research and 
development, of MacMillan Bloedel Ltd. 

STEPHEN T. O’FARRELL, BEng’59, 
has been appointed director, public and 
government relations department, Texaco 
Canada, Inc. 

GERALDINE SCHWARTZ, BA’S59, 
MA’69, PhD’76, of Vancouver, B.C., has 
been elected the first president of the 
International Foundation of Learning, 
recently formed to research learning dis- 
abilities in children. 


60 

ROBERT BECKER, MD’60, has been 
appointed professor and chairperson of the 
department of psychiatry at Southern 
Illinois University—Carbondale’s School 
of Medicine. 

ROMAN BOYKO, BCom’60, has joined 
the insurance firm of Coopers and Lybrand/ 
Laliberté Lanctét as a partner, in Mon- 
treal. 

Lt.-Col. JEAN B. LIBERTY, BSc’60, is 
posted to the Canadian Forces Base, 
Edmonton, Alta. 


"61 
ARTHUR J. BIRCHENOUGH, BEng’61, 
was recently appointed president of Canatom 
Inc., a private consulting firm offering 
services in the nuclear energy field. 
FRANCES (SILVER) KUSHNER, 
BA’61, has earned a master’s degree in 
social work from the University of Southern 
California. } 

MARCEL MASSE, BCL’61, was recently 
appointed under-secretary of state in the 
External Affairs Department, Ottawa, 
Ont. 


24 McGILL NEWS/SEPTEMBER 1983 


MOSHE SAFDIE, BArch’61, LLD’82, 
was recently given the job of designing the 
new National Gallery building in Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Dr. KETO SOOSAAR, BEng’61, head of 
structures and dynamics division, at the 
Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Cam- 
bridge, Mass., has been appointed to the 
NASA Space Systems and Technology 
Advisory Council. 

DANIEL J. SULLIVAN, BCL’61, is 
public affairs adviser with the Canadian 
Bankers’ Association in Ottawa, Ont. 


’62 

W. PETER ADAMS, MSc’62, PhD’66, 
associate dean of sciences at Trent Univer- 
sity, Peterborough, Ont., is co-chairman of 


Participaction and has run the Boston | 


Marathon three times. 

DIETHARD K. BOHME, BSc’62, 
PhD’66, professor of chemistry at York 
University, Toronto, Ont., has won the 
Noranda Award for 1983, given by the 
Chemical Institute of Canada for a distin- 
guished contribution in physical chemistry 
by a scientist under the age of forty. 


MAURICE BROSSARD, PhD’62, is the | 


new vice-president, biotechnology, of the 
Société Générale de Financement du 
Québec. 

A.E. COLLIN, PhD’62, is the associate 
deputy minister for Energy, Mines and 
Resources Canada. 

Rev. THOMAS EDMONDS, BScAgr’57, 


BD’62, MA’70, of Montreal, holds a | 
United Church of Canada McLeod Scho- | 


larship for 1983-84. 

JOHN A. HANSULD, PhD’62, has been 
elected president and chief executive officer 
of Canamax Resources Inc., a newly- 
formed Canadian mineral exploration and 
development company. 

STAN NESTER, BA’62, operates a 
landscape gardening business in Moshav 
Sde Hemed, Israel. 

RICHARD M. WISE, BCom’62, of Mon- 
treal, has been elected a partner of Thorne 
Riddell/Poissant Richard, Canada’s largest 
firm of chartered accountants. 


"63 

Dr. ARTHUR M. BLANK, BSc’63, is 
chief of the department of psychology at 
Queensway-Carleton Hospital, Nepean, 
Ont. 
ROELC.J.P.BRAMER, BA’63, has been 
appointed managing director, international 
division, of Murray and Co. Ltd., an 
international real estate and mortgage 
brokerage firm. 


64 

INA CUMMINGS AJEMIAN, MD’64, 
is a director of the Montreal Convalescent 
Hospital and an authority on palliative 
care. 

ALDO BENSADOUN, BCom’64, runs 
Aldo Shoe Stores, a chain stretching from 
Quebec to Alberta. 

JUDITH A. FINKELSTEIN, BSc’64, is 
professor of anatomy at Northeastern Ohio 


| Universities 
| town. 


College of Medicine in Roots- 


65 
LAWRENCE BLOOMBERG, MBA’65, 


| heads First Marathon Securities Ltd., in 


Toronto, Ont. 

MAURICE COLSON, MBA’65, is a 
partner in First Marathon Securities Ltd., 
in Toronto, Ont. 

ROBERT G. COOPER, BEng’65, 
MEng’66, is the new director of research of 
the Canadian Industrial Innovation Centre, 
Waterloo, Ont. 

AFTAB MUFTI, MEng’65, PhD’69, has 
been appointed a director of the newly- 
created Computer-Aided Design Centre at 
the Technical University of Nova Scotia. 


"66 
HAROLD RAVEN, BSc’66, MBA’69, 
has been appointed group controller, foods, 


| of Nabisco Brands Ltd. 


Dr. MICHAEL ROSENGARTEN, 
BEng’66, a cardiologist at the Montreal 
General Hospital, recently helped implant 
a computerized pacemaker into a man who 
had suffered palpitations for fifteen years 
and who had not responded to medica- 
tion. 


| H. BERNIE SHAFFER, BA’63, BCL’66, 


a senior counsel for the Government of 


| Canada in Ottawa, Ont., has recently been 
| appointed a Queen’s Counsel. 


67 

GARY R. CAMERON, BScAgr’67, lives 
in Athens, Greece, where he is manager of 
technical services in the eastern Mediter- 
ranean for Pepsi-Cola International Ltd. 
GWENDOLINE PILKINGTON, MA’67, 
has just published from the History of 
McGill Project a volume entitled Speaking 
with One Voice — Universities in Dialogue 
with Government. 

GLEN K.WOODIN,BEng’67,MBA’69, 
has been appointed general sales manager, 
major systems division, CNCP Telecom- 
munications. 


68 

HENRI DEGIOANNI, MBA’68, was 
recently named vice-president of Torrington 
International, Torrington, Conn., a division 
of Ingersoll-Rand. 

PAUL A. GELINAS, BCL’68, is the 
Paris, France, representative of the law 
firm Phillips and Vineberg. 

DIANNE JOHNSON, BA’68, was re- 
cently appointed principal of Montcrest 
School, an independent co-educational day 
school in Toronto, Ont. 
CHRISTOPHER JURCZYNSKI, BA’68, 
recently joined the corporate finance depart- 
ment of Pitfield Mackay Ross Ltd., in 
Toronto, Ont. 

SHEILA O’NEILL, DipNurs’66, BN’68, 
is assistant director of nursing at the Royal 
Victoria Hospital, Montreal. 

H. CHRISTIAN WENDLANDT, BA’65, 
BCL’68, has been appointed regional 
counsel, Canadian Pacific, in Montreal. 


69 
JACK MARIA KAPICA,BA’69, MA’72, 


| is an editor with the Globe and Mail, 
| Toronto, Ont. 


Dr. JOSEPH MITTELMAN, BSc’69. 
MSc’73, of Rockland, Ont., was recently 


| elected president of the Ontario Association 


of Optometrists. 
SYLVAIN SIMARD, PhD’69, is the vice- 


| president of the Parti Québécois. 


LORRAINE SMITH, BSc’69, recently 
completed an MLS degree at the University 


| of Western Ontario, in London. 


"70 

Dr. C.J. CHIU, PhD’70, a cardiovascular 
Surgeon at the Montreal General Hospital, 
recently helped implant a computerized 
pacemaker into a man who had suffered 
palpitations for fifteen years and who had 
not responded to medication. 
GEOFFREY W. GOSS, BEng’70, has 
been appointed vice-president of marketing 
for the telecommunications networks divi- 
sion of the Harris Corp. in Melbourne, 
Fla. 


‘71 

STEVEN G. ARLESS, BSc’71, has been 
appointed vice-president, marketing and 
sales, of Smith and Nephew Inc., Lachine, 
Que. 

MARK FIRTH, MEng’71, is manager of 
the Calgary, Alta., branch of Non Destruc- 
tive Inspection Ltd. 
VICTORJ.E.JONES,BSc’71,MBA’75, 
has been appointed president of Westly 
Mines Ltd. and Majorem Minerals, Ltd.., 
exploration companies based in Vancouver, 
BC. 

Dr. JOY PARR, BA’71, is a professor of 
history at Queen’s University, Kingston, 
Ont. 

ANDRE L. POTVIN ,BCom’71, is consul 
and first secretary in Bamako, Mali, West 


|| Africa, where he heads the office of the 


Canadian embassy. 


he £’- 


JOHN BANDIERA, BA’72, is assistant 
professor of art history at Emory University, 


w| Atlanta, Ga. 
i} PAUL OSTROV, BSc’72, MBA’74, has 
ii] recently been appointed manager, mergers 


and aquisitions services, Ernst and Whinney, 


| Chartered Accountants. 


i] MYASSAR M. TABBA, MEng’72, 


= 


PhD’79, is chief engineer with A. M. AL- 


‘| ISSA Consulting Engineers in Riyadh, 
| Saudi Arabia. 


73 


{| CAROLE P. CRAWFORD, BA’73, has 
{| been appointed manager of program ser- 
| vices and registrar for the Banff Centre 


School of Fine Arts, in Alberta. 


(| THERESE d’AMOUR, BSc’73, MSc’77, 
| Tecently had a one-person show of her 


| paintings at Dresden Galleries, Halifax, 
| N.S. 


Eh: Mig ne Te Le LEEURS Ge LAR TAT ER ORE EC heeeredereicorwtesenet tet.“ 
EMETEESES SORE LLOTA RR EEC DS LORS RRL Cee Cty Be EO LEN ES PENNS FER RES R ERC AC eRe ES eReE Cet es eee aaetet ese 
‘ ee SP ee Se ee eS Aes Sh eee ee Tg a Se pct 5 a ee ae Ys : 


"74 
L. GEORGE BENDIKAS, BSc’70, 
MD’74, is a clinical instructor of ophthal- 
mology at Northwestern University, Chi- 
cago, III. 

NICK DRAGER, BSc’70, MD’74, is 
currently medical officer with the World 
Health Organization in Geneva, Switzer- 


| land. 


PHIL MAGDER, MSW’74, has become 


| a partner with Murray Axmith Inc., an 


executive career planning firm in Mon- 


| treal. 


MIKE PRESCESKY, BMus’74, gives 
organ lessons in St. Stephen, N. B., and 
recently become the organist at the Stone 
Church in Saint John, N. B. 


75 


| JAMES BAER, MBA’75, was recently 


elected treasurer of the French Chamber of 
Commerce in Canada, headquartered in 
Montreal. 


| NED MEHLMAN, BSc’71, MD’75, of 
| Cincinnati, Ohio, has been elected to 


fellowship in the American College of 
Cardiology. 


"76 

MICHEL BOUCHER, BA’76, associate 
director of Theatre New Brunswick, was 
appointed adjudicator of the 1983 Pro- 
vincial Drama Festival in’ St. John’s, 
Nfld. 

EDWARD NIN-DA SHEN, BSc’72, 
MD’76, an instructor in medicine at 
Moffitt Hospital at the University of 
California, San Francisco, has been elected 
to fellowship in the American College of 
Cardiology. 

DAVID WOLF, BA’76, has become a 
partner in the Boston, Mass., law firm of 
Weiss, Zimmerman and Angoff, P.C. 


17 

ANNE-MARIE MacLELLAN, BSc’72, 
MD’77, is the new director of the medical 
emergency service at the Montreal Child- 
ren’s Hospital. 

CHRIS WOOD, BScAgr’77, is regional 
hygiene officer for CN Medical Services in 
the Great Lakes Region of Ontario. 


"78 

ROBERT SCOTT,MD’78, an Alexandria, 
Ont. physician, works with Dr. Henry 
Morgentaler’s abortion clinics in Winnipeg, 
Man., and Montreal. 

NOHA DAKKAK TABBA, BA’78, 
DipEd’79, is teaching English in Riyadh, 
Saudi Arabia. 


79 

STEVEN CHIN, BSc’79, a student at the 
New England College of Optometry in 
Boston, Mass., was recently selected to 
become a member of Beta Sigma Kappa, 
the international optometrical honour 
society. 

CATHERINE A. PAWLUCH, MA’79, 
was recently called to the Bar of Ontario 


| TERRI NASH, PhD’83, made the film Jf 


and is now working with the Toronto, Ont., 
law firm, Morris, Rose and Ledgett. 
DEVKUMAR SAINANI, BSc’79, recently 


won first prize in a competition among | 


graduating engineers at the University of 
Western Ontario in London, for his device 
to detect early deterioration in the eyes of 
diabetics. 

ANNE ELIZABETH SMITH, BMus’79, 
recently won the Mead Johnson Canada 
Award, a national dietetics award made 
possible by Mead-Canada, a unit of Bristol- 
Myers Pharmaceutical Group. 

BRENDA SMITH, BA’79, is the new 
children’s librarian at the Renfrew public 
library, in Ontario. 


80 
HELEN LOWTHER, BSc’80, was ap- 


pointed 1983 supervisor of the Canada | 


Employment Centre for 
Amherst, N. S. 

PHILIP PRICE, MLS’80, is a chemical 
information scientist for the Canadian 
Centre for Occupational Health and Safety 
in Hamilton, Ont. 

ROSEMARY SULLIVAN, MA’80, has 
opened an Irish house of hospitality, called 
Pigeon Hill Bruideen, in St. Armand, 


Que. 


"81 

LOUIS HAECK,LLM’81, a counsel with 
Claveau, Haeck & Le Francois, St. Laurent, 
Que., has been elected assistant corporate 
secretary of the International Air Transport 
Association, Montreal. 

JOHN MacQUARRIE, BScAgr’81, was 
recently appointed potato disease and 
disinfection administrator, plant industry 
services branch, of Prince Edward Island’s 
Department of Agriculture. 
KATHLEEN MARCINIAK, BScN’81, 
is a nurse at the Royal Victoria Hospital, 
Montreal. 

GERALDINE SMOLUK, BSc’81, is 
working on a biochemistry PhD at the 
University of California at La Jolla. 


Students, in 


"83 
You Love This Planet, a documentary that 


recently won an Academy Award. (See 
page 3.) 0 


DEATHS 


"TS 
Lt. Col. ORRIN B. REXFORD, BA’15, 


MA ’36, at Montreal, on April 7, 1983. 


"16 
GEORGE RITCHIE HODGSON, Eng’ 16, 
at Montreal, on May 1, 1983. 


"20 
DAVID M.BALTZAN,MD’20, at Saska- 
toon, Sask., on June 15, 1983. 

VERNON RUSSELL DAVIES, BSc’20, 
MSc’23, at Toronto, Ont., on April 2, 
1983. 


SEPTEMBER 1983/McGILL NEWS 25 


i) te eee) 


FATTER C RT SARA OU Te 
Les ee ML a oe 


ee 
bata teh ‘ 


REE SS 


i 2 Fs , oe * ane , 4 Nascar hs, tif 
. iy Jeighesip at Ba die Pints WO eda Pe MEBs his Piet 
mylar ata byte ie a aid Pee ee EC 


" 7 lr atigv et & eeiberaeh i 
. Ue DUA SOS Sas eh ee 


4 vi? 


"21 
GUY S._LORDLY,BSc’21, at Saint John, 
N.B., on May 10, 1983. 

Judge JAMES GORDON NICHOLSON, 
BCL’21, at Montreal, on May 1, 1983. 


22 

SHIRLEY EDYTHE (MacRAE ) 
CLARKE, BA’?22, at Pointe Claire, Que., 
on April 19, 1983. 

SIDNEY G. MURRAY, BA’22, MA’38, 
at Toronto, Ont., on March 30, 1983. 


23 

DR. EDGAR WENDELL HOLDEN, 
BSA’23, at East Stroudsburg, Pa., on 
March 19, 1983. 

GERALD W. WILLOUGHBY, BCom’23, 
at Birmingham, Mich., on March 29, 
1983. 


3 


WILLIAM EDWARD HUME, MD’24, 
at St. Catharines, Ont., on June 7, 1983. 
LILLIAN (BINGHAM) HUTCHISON, 
BCom’24, at Ottawa, Ont., on May 24, 
1983. 

JOHN P. MARSH, MD’24, at Grand 
Rapids, Mich., on June 4, 1983. 
ABRAHAM USHER, BCom’?24, at Mon- 
treal, on May 31, 1983. 


25 
WILLIAM A.J. PITT, BSc’25, at Miami, 
Fla., on March 26, 1983. 


26 

GEORGE ARTHUR GRIER, BA’26, at 
Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain, on May 
17, 1983. 

DAVID S.WATSON,DDS’26, at Bruns- 
wick, Ga., on April 13, 1983. 


"27 

MONICA (WRIGHT) COWLEY, 
DipPE’27, at Guelph, Ont., on April 7, 
1983. 


"28 

JEAN GORDON (CUMMING) 
TURNER, DipLS’28, at Victoria, B.C., 
on June 7, 1983. 


29 
CHARLES E. MOORE, BSc’29, at 
London, Ont., on April 13, 1983. 


30 

EMILY J. LeBARON, DipPE’30, at 
Montreal, on June 10, 1983. 

JH. PARKS MATHESON, BSc’30, at 
Pointe Claire, Que., on June 8, 1983. 


"31 
CLEMENT JOHN PIMENOFF,BSc’31, 
MEng’32, at Montreal, on March 31, 
1983. 

EDMUND W.WYLDE, MD’31, at New 
Westminster, B.C., on Jan. 18, 1983. 


26 McGILL NEWS/SEPTEMBER 1983 


32 

J. PIERRE CHARBONNEAU, BCom’32, 
at Ottawa, Ont., on Sept. 5, 1982. 
HARRY N. CHURCH, BCom’32, at 
Tillsonburg, Ont., on April 21, 1983. 


JH. EDWARD DuBOIS, BCom’32, at | 


Montreal, on May 24, 1983. 


"33 

CHARLES B.G. CHURCH, MD’33, at 
Perth, Ont., on April 26, 1983. 
EDWARD GORDON KIRBY, BEng’33, 
at Ottawa, Ont., on May 8, 1983. 


34 

WILLIAM LESLIE HUTCHISON, 
BEng’34, at Toronto, Ont., on March pi 
1983. 

WALTER WILLIAM NICOLSON, 
MD’34, at Alameda, Ca., on Jan. 13, 
1983. 

CONSTANCE (McKENTY) O'TOOLE, 
BLS’34, at Montreal, on May 25, 1983. 
KENNETH G. SMYTH, BCom’34, at 
Ottawa, Ont., in Nov. 1981. 


36 

B. GRACE (BERNSTEIN) ROSE, 
Arts’36, at Long Beach, Ca., on Jan. 21, 
1981. 


"37 

CHARLES U. LETOURNEAU, MD’37, 
BCL’48, at Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Que., 
on May 30, 1983. 

BRUCE R. RITCHIE, BCL’37, at Toronto, 
Ont., on May 23, 1983. 

HAROLD L.B. SEIFERT, BEng’37, at 
Mississauga, Ont., on April 14, 1983. 


"38 

REV. ELI CLEMENT KELLOWAY, 
BA’38, at Cobourg, Ont., on Aug. 8, 
1982. 

HARRY L. NUTIK, BCom’32, MD’38, 
at Montreal, on May 5, 1983. 


39 

D.MARGARET (SLACK)SCHOFIELD, 
BA’39, DipSW’41, at Montreal, on June 
13, 1983. 


"40 
DOUGLAS H. TOZER, BSc’40, at 
Liverpool, N.S., on July 17, 1982. 


"41 

BRENDAN JOSEPH KENALTY, 
MSc’41, at Port St. Lucie, Fla.,on April 5, 
1983. 

F. SIDNEY STOPPS, BEng’41, at Rich- 
mond, Va., on Jan. 20, 1983. 


"42 

DESMOND G. CARTY, BEng’42, at 
Winnipeg, Man., on Oct. 29, 1982. 

ROY A. KIRKBRIDE, MD’42, at Van- 
couver, B.C., on Feb. 12, 1983. 


43 
BERNARD L. ROSENBERG, BA’39, 


| MD’43, at Woodbury, Conn., on May 7, 


1983. 


"45 


| EVAN ALEXANDER MacCALLUM, 
| BA’42, MD’45, at Montreal, on June 6, 
| 1983. 


"a7 

JACQUES R. LANGEVIN, BCom’47, 
at Trois Riviéres, Que., on April 25, 
1983. 

W. WALLACE LUMMIS, BScAgr’47, 
at Princeton, N.J., on May 7, 1983. 
GERALD M. MAHONEY, MsSc’47, 
PhD’49, at Montreal, on June 15, 1983. 


"A8 
ALAN H.S. MacCARTHY, BA’48, at 
Aylmer, Que., on Dec. 14, 1982. 


"50 
STEFAN DRELUCH, BEng’50, at Mon- 
treal, on Jan. 13, 1983. 


51 

Major BENJAMIN RICHARDSON, 
BSc’51, at Lakeview, Que., on April 30, 
1983. 


"52 

DOMINIC J. NICKILO, BEng’52, at 
Oakville, Ont., on May 10, 1982. 

ROY ROOKLIN ROGERS, BEng’52, at 
Boston, Mass., on April 22, 1983. 


53 
JOHN JACQUES PRAIRIE, BEng’53, 
at Pointe Claire, Que., on Feb. 23, 1983. 


’*59 

RICHARD DESMOND THOMPSON, 
MEng’59, at Malton, Ont., on Nov. 11, 
1982. 


"66 

ZVI PALEY, PhD’66, in late March, 
1983. 

MYRNA B. SHERRARD, DipNurs’65, 
BN’66, at Moncton, N.B., on March 15, 
1983. 


67 

BONNIE NOREEN BRYANS, MSc’6/, 
PhD’69, at Halifax, N.S., on March 3], 
1983. 


"71 
JONATHAN A. GUSSMAN, BEng’71, 
at Cincinnati, Ohio, on June 2, 1983. 


81 
ROBERT EIDINGER, BSc’81, at Mon- 
treal, on April 8, 1983.0 


Mr 


FOCUS 


Ronald Blumer 


wenty stories above Manhattan traffic, 

in a white-on-white apartment, docu- 

mentary writer-producer Ronald 
Blumer, BSc’64, quietly folds his hands 
behind his head. Shy and at ease at the 
same time, he has the world spread out 
below him and his past and his future in 
perspective. 

Fourteen years ago at McGill, Blumer 
was a teaching assistant to John Grierson, 
the now legendary co-founder of the Na- 
tional Film Board (NFB). Blumer has 
come a long way since then, having just 
finished two series with American television 
journalist Bill Moyers: five episodes of the 
Creativity series and five of A Walk 
Through the Twentieth Century. 

“What I learned from Grierson,” says 
Blumer, “‘is an idea about filmmaking that 
doesn’t occur to many people: How do you 
get funding? Filmmaking costs money, and 
it’s getting more expensive all the time. The 
point is that you have a responsibility to the 
people who are paying you to do what they 
want. If you’re working for television, you 
have to make the product accessible to a 
television audience. If you’re working for 
an oil company, you have to find a way to 
make them happy.” 

For Blumer, Grierson wasn’t a film- 
maker — he was a “practitioner” of the 
documentary idea. “I didn’t learn how to 
make films from him, but I did learn a 
certain social responsibility. In Grierson’s 
case, the client was the government and the 
good of the client was — at least theoretically 
— the good of the whole country.” 

Grierson was largely responsible for the 
art of documentary filmmaking as we know 
it today. And it’s that art, Blumer feels, that 
our neighbors to the south haven’t quite 
mastered. “‘Most of the people working in 
documentaries in the States are in the field 
because they can’t get into feature films. 
(That is, by default.) But in the country of 
the blind, the one-eyed man is king.” 

And Blumer does bring a great deal of 
expertise to his work. “If what I do has to be 
specified, I would say I cast documentaries. 
Writing documentaries is different from 
anything else. In the Creativity episode on 
the black American poet Maya Angelou, 
for example, there’s no narration, but it’s 
written all the same. In documentary work, 
choosing a situation is writing. Another 
thing I learned, from NFB producers Bob 
Duncan and Donald Brittain was the 
importance of researching a subject before 
going out with a camera. You have to find 


often difficult. 


Ronald Blumer admits that writing for journalist Bill Moyers 


NUMRECS SET ORE SEPTATE OLS OWL AEWA pet! 
Soe tr Be oe ee ee A A a eee ee ea 


(On video screen) is 


something — a subject where something is 
happening — and express this in an inter- 
esting way.” 

One of Blumer’s gifts is finding the right 
perspective. In How to Create a Non- 
Person, for example, he wanted to portray 
the dehumanizing effects of old-age homes. 
Rather than treat the subject as a grim 
expose, he did a parody of a “how-to- 
dehumanize-someone”’ tape for institutions. 
He has, to date, rented or sold more than 
500 copies of it. And in the CBS-NFB co- 
production, Paperland, he translated the 
abstract theme of bureaucracy into a series 
of vignettes that gained him the Canadian 
Film Award for the best non-fiction script 
in 1980. 

What’s it like for an off-stage man like 
Blumer to work with a television personality 
like Bill Moyers? “Moyers takes a more 
active role than many network staff people 
would,” says Blumer. ‘In some situations, 
we'd give him 100 ideas and he’d pull out 
50 and then we’d pare those down. Writing 
for a writer like Moyers is generally 
difficult. He would often rephrase every- 
thing we wrote into his own vernacular to 
say on the air. He always questioned how 
an audience would react to something. 
“What would my parents think of this?’ he’d 
ask.” 

Now that he’s finished the series, A 


eae 


Walk Through the Twentieth Century (to 
be aired in 1984), Blumer is breathing a bit 
easier. He still works with Dave Grubin, 
the producer-director of A Walk Through 
the Twentieth Century and the Creativity 
series, and they are looking for new 
projects. As we talk the phone rings. It’s 
someone from the American Civil Liberties 
Union asking Blumer to participate on a 
panel to discuss why the United States 
government labeled two NFB films pro- 
paganda. 

“You didn’t ask me what I miss about 
Canada,” he adds, hanging up. ““Crumpets, 
222’s, and Laura Secord chocolate pud- 
ding,”’ all said with the air of a man who’s 
become a New Yorker. ““Well, I’m married 
to a Manhattanite — happily married by the 
way — who is a filmmaker herself. So I’m 
here. No I don’t feel a great loyalty to 
Canada, but I do for Montreal, and 
strangely enough, for McGill.” 

It’s time to go. He has a business lunch. 


Ina rumpled dress shirt, he saunters out of 


his building with a nod to the uniformed 
doorman. In Montreal, Blumer’s resemb- 
lance to Woody Allen might be noted. In 
New York, it doesn’t get a second glance. 
He’s just a casual, shy man in a rumpled 
dress shirt on his way to get someone else’s 
image on the screen so that several million 
people will get to see it. John GeezaQ 


SEPTEMBER 1983/McGILL NEWS 27 


ez9a5 uYyor 


SyPR RRNA RA See easy 04 9459999 E9E T24 


Photos by Harold Rosenberg 


SOCIETY ACTIVITIES 


Martlet House 
hellos and good-byes 


ome important staff changes have 
taken place in Martlet House this 
summer. 

Gary Richards recently resigned as 
executive director of the Graduates’ Society 
to assume a similar position with his alma 
mater, Concordia University. During his 
five years of service at McGill, the society 
has flourished in all its aspects — thanks in 
large part to Gary’s energy and enthusiasm. 
He will be affectionately remembered in 
Martlet House for his irrepressible sense of 
humour and his ability to move around the 
building at lightning speed. Those working 
on the third floor will miss the familiar 
exchange: “Where’s Gary?” “I don't 
know. He was here a second ago.”’ 

Gary takes with him to Concordia a 
wealth of experience from his McGill 
years: “I have learned about the mechanics 
of budgeting and alumni programming in an 
era dominated by financial restraint.” He 
will also retain a lasting impression of the 


—— 


loyalty of McGill’s graduates to their 


university. “I hope to initiate programs at 


Concordia that will encourage the same | 


kind of loyalty,” he says. 


Regret at Gary’s departure has been toa | 
large extent assuaged by the appointment | 
of Gavin Ross as his successor. Gavin is | 
well known to graduates through his work | 


——— 


as director of annual giving during the last | . 


seven years. Under Gavin’s direction, the 
alma mater fund has nearly doubled to its 


1982-83 level of $1.5 million. In addition, | 


Gavin has effectively administered the 
McGill Parents Fund and the McGill 
Associates (non-graduate members of the 
business and _ professional 
whose support for McGill has increased 


four-fold during his term as director of | : 


annual giving). 

Before coming to McGill in 1975, 
Gavin enjoyed a successful career as an 
insurance broker. So he brings to the 
position of executive director valuable 
business and administrative expertise. But 
he plans — initially at least — no major 
changes in the society’s operations. “My 
inclination,’ he says, “is not to make 
changes in something that seems to be 
working well.” 

As Gavin assumes his new duties, one 
of the society’s most loyal and dedicated 
staff members takes his leave. After serving 


Gavin Ross brings valuable business and administrative expertise to his new position 
as director of the Graduates’ Society. 


28 McGILL NEWS/SEPTEMBER 1983 


community, | 


Tom Thompson has recently become tull- 


time deputy director of the McGill Advan- 
cement Program. 


the society for twelve years — for the last 
eight as director of alumni relations - Tom 
Thompson is now deploying his talents as 
fulltime deputy director of the McGill 
Advancement Program. Tom’s accomplish- 
ments in the field of alumni relations have 
indeed been impressive. For example, 
since 1975, activities in the branch network 
have expanded five-fold, and the number of 
classes attending reunion weekend has 
more than doubled. Because of his sterling 
efforts in visiting alumni branches through- 
out North America, there are few Martlet 
House staffers who are better known and 
respected among graduates than Tom. The 
one consolation of his departure is that he 
will still be headquartered in Martlet House 
and thus available for advice and consulta= 
tion. 

The society also welcomes a new 
special events coordinator. Kathryn 
Whitehurst takes over from Mary Payson 
who recently left for Toronto. Kathryn is 4a 
native of England where she taught lan 
guages at two comprehensive schools im 
Derbyshire. She also has taken groups of 
children on tours of France and Germany 
and loves to travel. She and her husband 
came to Montreal in 1980, “because we 
wanted a chance to see this side of the 
world,” she explains. Here she has worked 
at McGill’s Instructional Communications 
Centre and enjoys reading and gardening in 
her spare time. Given her sprightly pet 
sonality and lively wit, Kathryn should 
soon endear herself to colleagues and 
graduates alike. 

We send our congratulations to McGill 
News assistant editor John Sainsbury on 
the arrival of his new son, Edward. John 
will begin a leave of absence from the News 
this fall to take up a sessional teaching 


appointment in the McGill history depart 
ment. 


Special events coordinator Kathryn Whitehurst and 


ee 


McGill News assistant editor Peter 


O'Brien relax before the beginning of another busy September. 


Filling in for John as assistant editor is 
Peter O’Brien, a published poet and critic 
and McGill MA candidate. Born in New 
York, Peter grew up in Vancouver, B.C., 
and has completed an honours BA in 
English at the University of Notre Dame in 
South Bend, Indiana. He has also spent a 
year at the School of Irish Studies in 


Millions of children desperately 
need basic food. shelter, 
schooling and health care. 
Your help is needed. 


Send your donation today. 


CARE Canada 


1312 Bank St., Ottawa K1S 5H7 


Dublin, Ireland, and has studied ceramics 


| at the Banff Centre School of Fine Arts in 


Alberta. As the founding editor of the 
McGill literary journal, Rubicon, and as an 
assistant editor of Essays on Canadian 
Writing, Peter brings a great deal of 
editorial expertise to the McGill News .O 


4 “- " . Pm ett Oro ew hat pee! 
RET ELEM CAT SERTICEC Re Reheat 


A message from 
the president 


As with any organization, the Graduates’ 
Society must experience changes in its 
personnel from time to time. But while we 
Shall miss the energy and talent of Gary 
Richards and Tom Thompson, we are very 
fortunate to welcome aboard as executive 
director someone of Gavin Ross’s exper- 
ience and dedication. ; 
Perhaps the most interesting aspect of 
the recent staff changes is the close link 
they demonstrate between the activities of 
the Graduates’ Society and the university’s 
fund raising efforts: Tom has moved from 
alumni relations to work for the capital 
campaign; Gavin meanwhile has moved 
from annual giving to direct the Graduates’ 
Society. But both in a sense have remained 
in the same field, because it is the loyalty of 
the alumni, expressed through the activities 
of the Graduates’ Society, that will form an 


| essential base for the success of the McGill 


Advancement Program. 

I wish all the appointees well in their 
new endeavors — including Gary “at that 
other place.” And McGill graduates can be 
assured that the society will continue to 
enjoy capable direction from Martlet 
House. 


M. Carlyle Johnston, 
President 


McGills Applicant Follow-up Program 
is looking for volunteers. The Applicant 
Follow-up Program lends a personal touch to 
communication between the university and pro- 
Spective out-of-town students. New volunteers 
are always welcome to join the many young 
alumni in Canada and the United States who 
have been contacting applicants each spring. 

If you have graduated within the last ten years 
or So, and want to find out how you can get 
involved, write to Alta Abramowitz, Director 
Information & Liaison, Room 110, Burnside Hall, 
805 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, 


Quebec H3A 2K6 


World renowned Eskimo artist, Pudlo, photo- 
graphed with his latest work at Cape Dorset, North- 
west Territories, is one of seven famous Canadian 
artists whose work is now available in a special edition 
for only $19.95. 

An exclusive arrangement between the West Bafhin 
Eskimo Cooperative and the Mintmark Press enables 
you for the first time to have the work of a famous 
Eskimo artist at a popular price. 


B 


Each specially commissioned print mecsures 
19%” x 26” and is reproduced on fine art aper to the 
highest standards of quality and craftsmarship. 
These works are not available in any otheiform. 
The Mintmark Edition is the only edition Each print 
comes to you with Mintmark Press’s guarantee: 
if not completely delighted with your acquisition, 
your money will be cheerfully refunded. 


Beautiful graphics from the following artists also available: 


A Kenojuak C Kananginak _D Pitseolak 


fr This mark, which appears on each print along with the 

stonecutter’s “chop” mark and the artist’s own symbol, 
is the official emblem of the West Baffin Eskimo 
Cooperative, Cape Dorset, Northwest Territories. 


E Pitseolak 


By has 


G Jamasie | Eegyvudluk 


Kgs >, This is the seal of Mintmark Press, < Canadian 
RIB Vg firm specializing in the high-qualityreproduction 
6) of fine art. Mintmark Press has exclisive rights 
to reproduce specially-commissiond prints by 
members of the West Baffin Eskimc Cooperative. 


Please send me the following Cape Dorset print reproductions at $19.95 each or $75.00 for any four, B.C. 
plus $4.85 for handling and shipping. Ontario residents add 7% sales tax. 


Indicate quantities: A B & D 


Cheque or money order to Alumni Media enclosed: 


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se ye 4, oie ee , - _ ; , ; 
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FVelalovaliateR ial-mi-lse[-s-1mer-1 0) 
Can 


The McG 


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Group Term Insurance Program 


Serving graduates and their families throughout North America 
with preferred rates and combined coverage of over $65 
million to date. Non-smokers discount rates available. 


; 
Yinaesinennnn 4 $ 
3 Ne Stens™ ; Tocca 


? 
_ ‘ “ahotee 
Mi a 


From Canada and U.S.A. phone (collect): 


INA Life Insurance 
Company of Canada 


Toronto: (416) 367-9163 

Montreal: (514) 284-9232 

Identify yourself as a McGill graduate 
and ask for the Association Group 
Department. 


Ke SSn.. Oo bb taf 3 
ty fe Pgh hohhAh i < a 


Write to: 


INA Life Insurance 
Company of Canada 


Att’n: Mrs. Thirza Janes 
141 Adelaide St. West. 
Suite 709 

Toronto, Ontario 
Canada M5H 3L5 


Volume 64, Number 2 
January 1984 


ISSN 0709 9223 


Editorial Board 
Editor 
Charlotte Hussey 


Assistant Editor 
Peter O’Brien 


Members 
(Chairman) 
Robert Carswell 
David Bourke 
Gretta Chambers 
Betsy Hirst 
Katie Malloch 
Elizabeth McNab 
Gavin Ross 
Robert Stevenson 
Tom Thompson 
Laird Watt 
Michael Werleman 
James G. Wright 


Art Direction 
Signa Design Communications 


The official publication of the 
Graduates’ Society, the News is 
sent without charge to all recent 
graduates and to all other 
graduates and friends who make 
annual contributions to McGill 
University. 


The copyright of all contents of 
this magazine is registered. 
Please address all editorial com- 
munications and items for the 
“Where They Are and What 
They’re Doing” column to: 


McGill News 

3605 Mountain Street 
Montreal, Quebec 
H3G 2M1 

Tel: (514) 392-4813 


Please contact Advertising 
Director Peter O’Brien at 392- 
4806 for information about adver- 
tising in the News. 


Cover: (left to right) National 
Campaign Chairman Frederick 
Burbidge, Chairman of the 
Board of Governors Hugh Hall- 
ward, Principal and Vice-Chan- 
cellor David Johnston, and Gov- 
ernor Emeritus Conrad Har- 
rington have launched the 
McGill Advancement Program. 
So far their efforts have created a 
warm financial trend for the uni- 
versity, in spite of a cold and 
snowy Montreal winter. 


Cover photo: Harold Rosenberg 


5 SEEKS SBSRSS 


FEATURES 


Frum concept to controversy: McGill student publishing today 
by Peter O'Brien 

There are sixteen student journals currently being planned or 
published at McGill. They range from the sublime to the ridic- 
ulous. 


SX 


Martin Luther: A man for all reasons 
by Peter O'Brien 


In 1983, McGill helped celebrate the great reformer’s 500th 
birthday with an October symposium that attracted scholars 
from across Canada and Europe. 


The McGill Advancement Program: To serve the coming age 


McGill recently embarked upon a capital campaign to raise $61 
million — the largest campaign goal in Canadian university 


history. 


ee . = a ¢ - 


McGill's faculties look to the future PS ae 
by Charlotte Hussey 


and Research, Management, and Religious Studies discuss how *% 
they would improve their respective faculties. 


Alpha, beta, and radium-C: Reopening the Rutherford Museum 
by John Geeza 


This past fall a campus museum that serves to document nine 
years of Nobel Prize-winning research was ceremoniously 


reopened by the Chancellor. 


DEPARTMENTS 
LENORYS FAR is ES eek GER Coe SRA ON ee Sas oe be 2, PCTSPERTIVE ss soa ae 19 
OM DRORIE Saraki h pe oa 5 ase ola kchec et 0 ee Bee eRe owe 3 Where they are and 

what they're doing ...... 20 
What the Martlet hears DOME ii. vse nin See 24 
Chancellor Conrad Harrington retires................. 4 Society Activities ....... 26 
McGill-Addis Ababa medical exchange............... 4 Focus: Patrick Blouin .... 28 
Fog-wild SOOut Clea WAEEE ho ite wet edie O46 5 
Sctabbic¢, that Sensual GDSeSSiOn in) loa eee ye. 6 
rhe Nutetion and Pood Science Centre soos sides a 6 


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JANUARY 1984/McGILL NEWS 1 


nas 
hme 


at! wy " Cady A ae vt *% if 


Dear Professor Higgins, 

I have read with interest your article 
‘‘Planning a techno-logical future for 
Montreal’’ in the September issue of the 
McGill News. 

As an ex-Bostonian (formerly a partner and 
upon incorporation a director, vice-president 
and shareholder of Kidder Peabody & Co., 
Inc.) I am in agreement with you on the 
dramatic transformation which has occurred 
in the economy of New England and in par- 
ticular of Massachusetts in the past half cen- 
tury. 

As the father of a daughter who graduated 
from Boston College, I am somewhat sur- 
prised that you failed to mention Boston Col- 
lege — and for that matter, Northeastern — in 
your list of Boston’s great universities. 

Originally a Montrealer, I received a B.A. 
and M.A. in Economics from McGill Univer- 
sity having the honour of being Stephen 
Leacock’s final graduate student. 


Sincerely, 
Arthur D. Styles, BA’34, MA’35 


Thank you from 
Open House 83 


Dear McGill News, 

Thank you so much for your cooperation in 
publicizing Open House 1983 to the McGill 
graduates. 

We were delighted with the write-up that 
appeared in the September issue of the McGill 
News. 


Coverage such as you gave us helped a 
great deal in attracting a large crowd this year. 
Thanks again. 
Sincerely yours, 
Cynthia Taylor, Staff Advisor 


Maisie Cheung, Coordinator 


Nomi Morris, Coordinator 
Everything you always 


wanted to know... 


Dear McGill News, 

First, the good news. I enjoy reading the 
McGill News. It has news, the writing is 
good, the material is interesting. 

And now, the other comment. On page 2 of 
the September issue, you were very kind in 
mentioning that I was “‘the first Canadian to 
deliver the Rutherford Lecture to the Royal 
Society in London, England.’’ The fact is a 
little different. I was actually ‘‘the first to 
deliver the Canadian Rutherford Lecture to 
the Royal Society.’’ 

The Canadian Rutherford Lecture was 
established to recognize a second century of 
activity in the Canadian Royal Society begin- 
ning in 1982. There is already a Rutherford 
Lectureship and it has been functioning for 
many years. Both lectureships operate on the 
exchange system: the Canadian lecturing in 
England one year; the UK coming to Canada 
in the alternate year: the Canadian Rutherford 
Lectureship began in 1983 with a Canadian 


| else besides the facts; namely, many Cana- 


to know but were afraid to ask in Case you got 
the whole darn explanation as given above, 
My sensitivity to the issue includes something 


dians, more distinguished than I, preceded 
me in delivering the Rutherford Lecture to the | 
Royal Society over the past many years. I felt | 
it necessary, on that account, to set the 
records straight. 

Yours sincerely, 

Charles R. Scriver, MD, FRSC 


Tying one on! 


Dear McGill News, 
This is probably a very unusual letter, but: 

I’d like to know where I could buy a McGill’ 

crest tie. It looks pretty good on Gavin Ross - | 

page 28 of the September issue of the McGill 

News!! Thought I might get one for my son) 

who graduated last year, and put it in his: 

Christmas box. 

Thank you, 

Mrs. Catherine Nadeau 


Editor’s note: McGill crest ties, and other 
McGill souvenirs, can be purchased from the 
McGill University Bookstore. See advertise 
ment below. | 


McGill graduates can still shop 
at the University Bookstore 


In cooperation with the Graduates’ Society, the 
McGill University Bookstore is now offering, 
through mail-order, a large selection of sou- 
venirs and gift items bearing the McGill crest. 
There are more than 150 items from which to 
choose. Each item has been carefully selected 
for quality material and finish and is suitable for 
both home and office. All items are guaranteed 


and may be returned for exchange or a full 
refund. 

If you would like to receive a free copy of the 
University Bookstore Catalogue, please return 
the order form below. 

The catalogue lists all items, 30 of which are 
illustrated. 


Please Mail to: McGill University Bookstore 
1001 Sherbrooke St. W. 
Montreal, P.Q. H3A 1G5 


PARIS CPLEAGE DETREI sip en en el 


Address 


City 
\ 


2 McGILL NEWS/JANUARY 1984 


Postal Code 


Jonn F. VicUariny 


A new chancellor, 
a writer-in-residence, 


and a galloping gourmet 


A total of 1489 degrees and diplomas were 
awarded by McGill at the fall Convocation on 
November 1. Three honorary degrees were 
also conferred: a Doctor of Laws to His 
Highness Prince Karim Aga Khan, the 
spiritual leader of Ismaili Muslims and friend 
of McGill’s Islamic Studies program, and to 
the Hon. Hartland de Montarville Molson, 
a senator since 1955, and at one time a gover- 
nor of McGill. An honorary Doctor of Sci- 
ence degree was conferred on Harold Segall, 
MD’20, former chief of cardiology at the 
Jewish General Hospital, physician at the 
Montreal General Hospital, and member of 
McGill’s medical faculty until 1960. Robert 
Bell, PhD’48, DSc’79, principal of McGill 
from 1970 to 1979 and now director of the 
Arts, Sciences and Technology Centre in 
Vancouver, B.C., was awarded an emeritus 
professorship. 


McGill was well represented at the 7th 
annual Gourmet Food Festival held at Kin- 
sale, County Cork, Ireland, on October 6, 
1983. Gavin Ross, executive director of the 
Graduates’ Society, has made the pilgrimage 
every year since the festival’s inception seven 
years ago. Also present were Gordon G. 
Fehr, BEng’55, president of Montreal’s 
Board of Trade, Mrs. Fehr, and Mr. Edgar 
Benson, Canada’s Ambassador to Ireland, 
who opened the event. Noted Ross: ‘‘As one 
gourmet meal succeeded another the endur- 
ance of the guests began to lag, but the high 
quality of the food served was kept up to the 
end.’’ 


Gavin Ross, Marilyn Fehr, Edgar Bensen, Gordon Fehr 


A. Jean de Grandpré, BCL’48, LLD’81, 
chairman of Bell Canada Enterprises Inc. and 
director of many major corporations, has 
recently been selected by the Board of 
Governors to replace Conrad Harrington, 
BA’33, BCL’36, as chancellor of McGill 
University effective in the spring of this year. 
De Grandpré served on the Board of Gover- 
nors from 1968 to 1976 and has helped with 
university fund raising efforts. 


On November 21, His Excellency the 
Right-Honourable Edward Schreyer dedi- 
cated the cornerstone of the Montreal 
Neurological Institute’s new Webster Pavil- 
ion. The cornerstone, of black Belgian mar- 
ble, once formed part of the memorial in 
Westminster Abbey to Thomas Willis, the 
17th century British physician who has been 
called the Father of Neurology. The five- 
story Webster Pavilion, now under construc- 
tion, will house a brain imaging centre com- 
prised of three laboratories dedicated to 
positron emission tomography, nuclear 
magnetic resonance tomography, and com- 
puterized telemetering of the brain’s electri- 
cal activity by electroencephalography. 


Engineering G.W. Farnell, PhD’57, and 
C.K. Jen, have been working with the 
National Research Council’s Industrial Mat- 
erlals Research Institute and the University of 
Sherbrooke to develop a new type of micro- 
scope that uses acoustic waves to study the 
microscopic features of matter. At present 
there are only two such instruments in Cana- 
da, one at McGill and one at the University of 
Sherbrooke. Still in the experimental stage, 
this new branch of microscopy may prove 
useful to such varied fields as biology, micro- 
electronics, medicine, and chemistry. 


Osami Nakao, a visiting student in the 
Arts Faculty at McGill, was one of the pas- 
sengers on Korean Air Lines flight 007, 
which was shot down by a Soviet missile in 
late August 1983. Nakao, 24, was enrolled at 
the International Christian University in 
Tokyo, Japan, and was returning home after a 
year of studies in Canada. 


Ken Norris, PhD’80, is McGill’s first 
writer-in-residence. He has published a dozen 
volumes of his own poetry and anthologies 
and has books forthcoming from several 
Canadian publishing houses. He is helping 
students with their creative writing and is 
working on a novel of his own. 


Dr. Ken Norris 


Sydney Pierce, BA’22, BCL’25, 
LLD’56, recently donated 211 books on 
mushrooms to the Macdonald College Li- 
brary, which now has the best Canadian col- 
lection on mycology (mushrooms and other 
fungi) outside the national capital. Pierce 
produced the first Red and White Review, 
was a member of the Canadian Olympic 
Team in Paris, 1924, and has been Canadian 
Ambassador to Mexico, Brazil, Belgium, and 
Luxembourg and the European Com- 
munities. In a “‘thank you’’ speech Pierce 
expressed his gratitude to the library for 
accepting *‘a couple of hundred mushroom 
books that were threatened with eviction and 
had nowhere to lay their weary spores.’’ He 
also mentioned his early days as a book col- 
lector: “‘I bought my first mushroom book 
forty years ago and brought it into the house. 
My wife accepted it without comment. When 
I brought my third mushroom book into the 
house, my wife said, ‘Do you really need 
three mushroom books?’ After that I sneaked 
them into the house in brown paper bags. If 
my wife saw me, she’d say to me ‘That’s not 
another mushroom book, is it?’ and I’d say 
‘No. It’s just a copy of Playboy.’ ’’? 0 


Over the past five years, Dean of 


JANUARY 1984/McGILL NEWS 3 


jEaNUOWY ‘O|ZSE 


UOSILIOW Gog 


McGill honours 
retiring Chancellor, 
Conrad Harrington 


Conrad F. Harrington, BA’33, BCL’36, 
recently retired as chancellor of McGill Uni- 
versity after eight years of distinguished ser- 
vice. His retirement was marked by an offi- 
cial reception at Redpath Hall on November 
24. In attendance were a number of his busi- 
ness and academic friends, including Presi- 
dent of the McGill Board of Governors, Hugh 
Hallward, BA’51, and Principal David 
Johnston. 

Harrington spoke of his long association 
with the university. He began with his 
remembrances as a child of a large *“‘M”’ 
McGill sweater and of the McGill football 
games his father took him to as soon as 
‘*Con’’ (as he is known to many) could walk. 
His father, Conrad Dawson Harrington, a 
championship football player, graduated 
from McGill in Engineering. His grandfather, 
Dr. Bernard Harrington, was a professor at 
the university, while his great-grandfather, 
Sir William Dawson, was principal of McGill 
for forty years, until 1891. 

Harrington, himself, has been active in the 
McGill community in various capacities: as 


Photos by Rick Kerrigan 


4 McGILL NEWS/JANUARY 1984 


Mrs. Joan Harrington (left) with the assistance of Associate Registrar Margery Paterson 
successfully unveils the Chancellor's portrait in Redpath Hall. 


Chancellor Conrad H 


Alma Mater Fund class agent, as president of 
the Graduates’ Society, as a McGill governor, 
and as chairman of the McGill Development 
Program. He has also served as chairman of 
the board of the Royal Trust Company and of 
Glaxo Canada Ltd., and as director of seven 
other companies. Most recently, he has been 
honoured by the Washington, D.C.-based 
Council for the Advancement and Support of 
Education with their Distinguished Friend of 
Education Award. 

After his farewell speech, he was presented 
with several McGill honours. Lorne Gales, 
BA’32, BCL’35, LLD’79 on behalf of the 
Athletics Board, presented Harrington with 
his very own ‘“‘big M’’ sweater. Mrs. Joan 
Harrington, after playing tug-of-war with 


aoe 


arrington (left) receives his very own “big M” sweater from Lorne Gales. 


certain ropes and pulleys, unveiled a portrait 
of her husband. Painted by Toronto artist, 
John Angel, it has been hung in Redpath Hall 
along with those of other McGill eminences. 

On behalf of The Friends of McGill Uni- 
versity Inc., University Treasurer Stuart 
Budden announced the establishment of the 
Conrad F. Harrington Student Loan Fund that 
will aid American students at McGill. And 
the Principal added that the Joan and Conrad 
Harrington Endowment Fund for Students 
had been created from funds donated by many 
in attendance at the reception. He also assured 
the audience that Harrington would continue 
on at McGill as a governor emeritus. Peter 
O’Brien O 


SEBEL EIR I RR OE 
McGill-Addis Ababa 
medical exchange 


As recently as a decade ago, there were only 
forty doctors in Ethiopia. Today, asa result of 
a government drive to step up medical train- 
ing, there are over five hundred. But that still 
constitutes an acute shortage: the African 
nation has a population of thirty-four million, 
and malnutrition and infectious disease are 
rampant. 

According to Dr. Belai Damtew, an Ethio- 
pian who is currently enrolled as a post 
graduate medical student at McGill, *“There 
are few adequate medical staff in Ethiopia to 
do undergraduate training, let alone post 
graduate training. There are only a few inter- 
nists in the teaching hospital in the capital, 
Addis Ababa, to take care of about 125 medi- 
cal students and 10 post-graduates.’’ 

To help alleviate the problem, Chairman of 
Medicine at the University of Addis Ababa 
Edemariam Tsega, MD’65, proposed an 
exchange program with his alma mater. 
McGill willingly accepted, and the Canadian 
International Development Agency added to 
the funds provided by the co-sponsors. While 
Damtew pursues his studies at McGill, two 
McGill physicians, Richard Lalonde, BA’69, 
MD’78, and Dr. Peter Somerville, are teach- 
ing at the University of Addis Ababa. 


McGill has been involved in medical educa- 
tion in Africa. Between 1968 and 1978, for 
example, McGill sent faculty members to the 
medical school at the University of Nairobi in 
Kenya. As the co-ordinator of the new 
exchange program, Dr. J. D. McLean 
explains: *‘McGill was looking for new ways 
to become involved because of its ongoing 
commitment to medicine in underdeveloped 
countries. Ethiopia has had relations with 
Canada in the past. After World War II there 
were many Catholic missionaries from 
Quebec in secondary school education there, 
and several Ethiopians had studied at McGill. 
So it became logical to start a program that 
would be a continuation of the Kenyan idea. 
Eventually, McGill will decrease its 
involvement, as the post-graduate medical 
students go back and take over the teaching 
that McGill is helping with at the moment.’’ 

Certainly Damtew is enthusiastic about the 
benefits of his residency at the Montreal Gen- 
eral Hospital: ‘‘The training is rigorous. You 
learn good, basic approaches to disease.’’ As 
for the McGill physicians in Ethiopia, there’s 
little doubt that they'll gain much from the 
experience as well. ‘‘They’ll learn more 
about tropical diseases,’’ McLean points out, 
‘‘and they'll have a broader view of 
medicine, both administratively and clini- 
cally.’’ Louise Abbott UO 


Hog-wild about 
clean water 


Pollution, pollution 
They ve got smog and sewage and mud, 
Turn on your tap and get hot and cold running 
crud, 
See the halibuts and sturgeons 
Being wiped out by detergones. 
Fish gotta swim and birds gotta fly, 
But they don’t last long if they try. 
Tom Lehrer (Pollution) 


Academics have perennially been concerned 
with the problem of pollution. In the 1960s, 
Harvard math professor Tom Lehrer satirized 
the situation in song. In the 1980s, Mac- 
donald College Professor of Agricultural 
Engineering Pierre Jutras, BSc(Agr)’51, has 
solved it with science. He and his colleagues 
have combined three known filtration 
methods into a new system that could help to 
eradicate Quebec’s primary river pollutant — 
pig manure. 

Jutras’s three-step mechanical process, 
which uses no chemicals, separates water 
from solid pig wastes. It thereby renders the 
water potable and reduces the volume of the 
refuse by up to 90 percent. ‘‘The key was the 
development of a new type of membrane from 


| the States, allowing us to remove everything 


It is not the first time, of course, that 


except traces of total nitrogen from the 
water,’ Jutras explains. ‘‘All the equipment 
was available and is being used in other pro- 
cesses. For example, its last step is a principle 
that’s also used in making maple syrup.”’ 
Currently seeking to patent the use of this 
filtration process, Jutras is reluctant to 
describe it more fully, because it is being 
commercially developed by a Laval, Quebec, 
water firm. He will say that his purification 
system would cost less than the estimated 
$150,000 for its prototype. And it will be 
financially appealing to the individual farmer. 
‘‘It would reduce the storage costs of waste 
for the farmer, since he’s not allowed to 
spread manure when the ground is frozen,’’ 
explains Jutras. ‘‘The solids left could be 
used as fertilizer, dried for compost, or mixed 
fifty-fifty with fresh feed, because the waste 
is 16 percent protein.’’ ss 


CS eo eee oe Caot whe sw hee ree! 
Aas eel =) 


table’’ where solids could be stored inoffen- 
sively. This storage device would have an 
advantage over the concrete structures cur- 
rently in use that are easily cracked by frost 
and the expansion and contraction of the 
earth. The specifications that Jutras is draw- 
ing up for the Minister of the Environment 
show that manure would seal up any seepage 
holes in this earthen device. 

Jutras’s water purification process and his 
manure storage unit are further steps in a 
career that has spanned both the business and 
academic worlds. After graduating in 
Agriculture from McGill in 1951, he worked 
for the Carnation Company and then returned 
to school to receive a master’s degree at the 
University of Maine in 1957. He then con- 
ducted research into the mechanization of 
Floridian citrus crops. Returning to Canada in 
1964, he studied at Laval University and 


Professor Pierre Jutras, who invented a process for purifying water polluted by pig manure, 


takes a swig of the end product. 


Jutras’s priority, however, is to eliminate 
pollution, or at least reverse the trend that, in 
the last ten years, has rendered the Achigan, 
Yamaska and Chaudiere Rivers undrinkable. 
The water produced by Jutras’s process is 
odorless, tasteless, and cleaner than ordinary 
tap water. And it can be used instead of the 
often unsuitable well-water many pigs are 
forced to drink. ‘‘Vets have made water qual- 
ity surveys,’’ says Jutras, ‘‘and the high min- 
eral content they have found in well-water can 
cause stress in pigs.”’ 

Quebec is Canada’s largest pork-producing 
province, with 6,500 farmers raising 3.4 
million pigs that make 34 million litres of 
waste daily. During the long northern winter, 
Quebec farmers have been forced to store 
manure for as long as up to half a year. And 
when the ground does begin to thaw, much of 
this waste seeps out of storage bins and into 
nearby rivers. 

Along with his water purification method, 
Jutras has also invented an earthen structure, 
‘‘a hole in the ground above the natural water 


Macdonald College. He left academia again 
in 1970 to go into a business that would 
develop the use of flexible plastic for soil 
drainage. 

Asked to come back to Macdonald in 1977 
to teach and do research, he accepted. *‘I 
wanted to get away from management for a 
while,’’ says Jutras, whose penchant for 
administration has just recently been put to 
good use again. In December 1983, he took a 
leave of absence to establish an agricultural 
engineering department at the Institute 
National du Developpement in Thies, Senegal. 
He is there to encourage the teaching of 
technologies appropriate to developing 
countries, such as the use of solar energy for 
heating water and cooking. Jutras’s goal is to 
set up the department, recruit Senegalese staff 
members, and then leave. And since his water 
purification program is being monitored by 
specialists during his absence, one hopes that 
by the time he does return, both fish and men 
will be able to swim safely in the pollutant- 
free rivers of Quebec. Donna Flint 0 


JANUARY 1984/McGILL NEWS 5 


seBng |eeyoIp 


John Geeza 


6 McGILL NEWS/JANUARY 1984 


Scrabble, that 
sensual obsession 


To most of those who play it, Scrabble is a 
pleasant and challenging word game, but to 
Joel Wapnick, a thirty-seven-year-old 
associate professor of music at McGill, it 
amounts to an obsession. 

For Wapnick, Scrabble’s appeal is sensual 
and aesthetic, as well as intellectual. “‘It’s a 
beautiful game,’’ he says with enthusiasm. 
‘‘The board is beautiful, the colours... the 
tiles feel nice; they are lovely. The patterns 
you make with the words on the board are 
pretty; aesthetically, it’s a pleasing game. In 
addition, there is the possibility of making 
plays that show lots of creativity, not just 
plays that score lots of points, but also those 
which are not so easy to see, but are clever.’’ 

On August 25, 1983, Wapnick proved he 
was clever enough to be the first Canadian to 
capture the North American Scrabble Players 
Championship. The tournament, which is 
sponsored by Selchow and Richter, who 
manufacture the game, is the largest of its 
kind in North America. It is held once every 
two years and the participants are the winners 
of numerous local and regional tourneys who 
meet in a Chicago hotel for a three-day 
playoff to decide the overall winner. This 
year’s playoff was unusually tense, according 
to Jim Houle, the tournament director. 
‘‘Down to the last minutes of play, it was 
uncertain who would emerge the champion. 


McGill Professor of Music and recently-crowned Scrabble Champion Joel Wapnick says he 
relies heavily on his memory for both music and Scrabble. 


During the last game of the grueling three-day 
series, the four top players were fighting it out 
in a tense round robin. Two were American, 
two were Canadian.’’ (Of the thirty-two 
finalists, five were Canadian; they placed 
first, fourth, sixth, tenth and eighteenth. ) 

Wapnick won thirteen of the seventeen 
games he played, thereby amassing a winning 
margin of 705 points, about two hundred 
more than his closest rival. His prize was 
$5,000 in cash, a bronze trophy and a 
‘‘Monty’’ computerized Scrabble console. 
He competes in four or five Scrabble tourna- 
ments a year, for which he prepares by 
memorizing words from the dictionary. For 
the Chicago tournament, he estimates that he 
spent nearly six months getting ready and 
about 180 hours memorizing words. He 
believes he has accumulated a mental voc- 
abulary of eleven thousand words. 

Interviewed in his office at McGill's 
Strathcona Music Building, Wapnick admit- 
ted to taking a rest from his preoccupation 
with Scrabble. He had not been studying it for 
a month and claimed to be tired of the game. 
But this hiatus would be of short duration, 
since there was another tournament coming 
up, and he expected to be “‘hitting the books 
again’’ afew weeks before it started. That one 
would be his twenty-ninth tournament. *‘] 
love to compete,’’ he says. ‘‘I love playing 
against good players.’ 

Wapnick holds a master’s degree from the 
State University of New York and an MFA 
from Sarah Lawrence College. He came to 
Montreal five years ago to teach music at 
McGill and is now a landed immigrant. 
Although playing Scrabble from an early age, 
he traces his current involvement with the 
game back to 1975, when he was living in 
Binghamton, N.Y. A fellow pianist made 
him aware of an organization called Scrabble 
Players. He wrote away for information and 


attended his first tournament several months 
later. ‘‘I got hooked, basically,”” he explains: 

The appeal of playing in a tournament is 
social as well as competitive. ““I know every- 
body that I’m going to be playing, and it’s 
nice to see old friends again.’” Indeed, he and 
Steven Fisher, the Montrealer who finished 
fourth in the tournament, play together all the 
time. 

Despite his evident expertise with words, 
Wapnick claims that he has never been good 
at learning languages. He has not learned 
French, and he thinks that his Scrabble play- 
ing is actually a hindrance as far as learning 
French is concerned. “‘French is very con- 
fusing for me. There are a lot of French words 
in the official Scrabble Players Dictionary, 
Then, there are a lot of French words that are 
not in the dictionary, and it can get very 
complicated. If you play a word that is good 
French, but not good English, then you are in 
trouble. ‘Rouleau’ is in the dictionary; ‘rous- 
seau’ is in the dictionary; ‘femme’ is in the 
dictionary, but ‘homme’ is not. You have to 
know that ‘homme’ is not permitted.”’ 

It is the necessity of knowing such things 
that accounts for the prodigious amount of 
memorizing Wapnick engages in as prepara- 
tion for a tournament. And it is in the area of 
memorization that he sees the only link be- 
tween Scrabble and music. ‘‘Both require 
heavy memory work,’’ he says. 

In two years time, he will have to defend 
his title, but in the meantime, he intends to 
relax with once-a-week recreational games. 
Goldie Morgentaler 
ALAS PAA LT AT TT 


Food for thought: 
The Nutrition Centre 


If the McGill Nutrition and Food Science 
Centre has one overall mandate, it is to prove 
that nutrition is a wider field than commonly 
acknowledged. Dr. Erroll Marliss, senior 
physician of endocrinology at the Royal Vic- 
toria Hospital and director of the new centre, 
defines many health professionals as nutri- 
tionists: ‘‘Conventionally, a nutritionist was 
considered someone who had training in food 
science or nutrition as it related to animal 
nutrition. To my way of thinking, a nutri- 
tionist is anyone who has a background in 
dietetics, medicine, or any of the sciences, 
including behavioral science. My definition 
is a broad one, and this is going to be the 
philosophy of the Nutrition Centre.’’ 
Marliss hopes to translate this breadth of 
vision into a nutrition centre that will be 
responsive to the needs of the medical profes- 
sion and the public. The centre will depend on 
collaborative research, using the resources of 


————— 


both McGill and Macdonald College. Initial 
studies will focus on obesity, diabetes, and 
hospital malnutrition, and Marliss hopes to 
attract people from a wide range of fields, 
such as agricultural engineering, dentistry, 
and education. 

It is an ambitious program, geared primar- 
ily to education and research. A whole wing 
of the Hersey Pavilion has been given to the 
recently-opened laboratories, where scien- 
tists will research the entire field of nutrition, 
ranging from molecular and cellular 
biochemistry and diseases such as obesity, to 
the role of nutrition in obstetrics and surgery. 

Marliss is particularly excited about col- 
laboration between the Faculty of Medicine 


and the Faculty of Agriculture. By way of 


example, he cites a direct corollary between 
loss of body protein in humans on a particular 
diet and in lambs eating a certain kind of grass 
— a link he says he would never have dis- 
covered had he not come to McGill. **There is 
a huge body of knowledge that is potentially 
applicable both ways.’’ he says. **‘We have 
the capacity to come in and do the research 
based on classic metabolic medicine, con- 
verging with animal nutrition.’ 

The second objective is nutritional educa- 
tion, a comprehensive field embracing all 
levels of training. At its most basic, nutrition 
has always been taught at medical school, but 
generally within the context of another sub- 
ject, such as biochemistry. In the revamped 
curriculum it will probably stand on its own. 


‘We're going to highlight clinical nutrition 
by having its basic principles taught to medi- 
cal students. A proper understanding of the 
subject presupposes that you know a certain 
amount about biochemistry, physiology and 
something about disease processes, so the 
best place to put it is at the end of the basic 
courses that medical students have to take.’’ 

It will also be emphasized at more 
advanced levels. Marliss hopes to introduce it 
into medical rounds, so that “‘interns and 
residents are thinking nutritionally.’’ He has 
already done so at the continuing education 
level for practising physicians. And masters 
and PhD programs will be available to dieti- 
cians who wish to do post-graduate clinical 
work. 

Physicians and dieticians can complement 
each other, Dr. Marliss explains: ‘‘It is cer- 
tainly not our intention to make the physicians 
graduating from McGill into dieticians, but to 
enable them to know what nutritional princi- 
ples are and at what point to call up another 
expert for help. We want to sensitize the pro- 
fession, before they get their medical 
degrees, to the thought that nutrition is critical 
in all the disciplines and that there are experts 
they can relate to.”’ 

In fact, the relationship is symbiotic, par- 
ticularly where complex cases are involved. 
‘*To put a diabetic in renal failure on a diet 
you really need a lot of help: someone 
interested in diabetes, an expert in kidney 
disease and a dietician, all working together 


The Guardian Trustco Group of Companies 
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to make sure the patient is eating properly. So 
you have three areas of expertise: the sen- 
sitized physician, the dietician and the doctor 
who is an expert in a specific area of nutri- 
tion.” 

To further fine-tune hospital nutrition, the 
centre will set up a special clinic for in- and 
out-patients; obesity will be its initial con- 
cern. Given its importance as a factor in dis- 
eases like hypertension, diabetes, coronary, 
gall bladder and gout, Marliss feels obesity is 
the western world’s most important nutrition- 
al problem. He dismisses people who criticize 
weight control as a purely cosmetic problem. 
But having said that, he indicates that those 
who wish to lose weight for cosmetic reasons 
will be served and, if possible, studied. 

Marliss hopes that the service will become 
a resource centre for the public, clearing up 
the misconceptions and distortions that often 
surround nutrition. He will be joined by Jerzy 
Radziuk, MD’78, recently recruited from 
Ontario as associate director (research), and 
by Dr. Sherman Touchburn, professor in 
animal nutrition, as associate director, Mac- 
donald Campus. It is hoped that the two cam- 
puses, traditionally separated by more than 
geographical distance, will be drawn closer 
through the auspices of the Nutrition Centre. 
Phoebe Munro 


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JANUARY 1984/McGILL NEWS 7 


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by Peter O’Brien 


Frum concept to controversy: 
McGill student publishing today 


This is the second part of a two-part series on 


McGill student magazines. In the September 


issue of the McGill News, Peter O'Brien dis- 
cussed ‘‘little’’ magazines up to and includ- 
ing the Forge, which ceased publication in the 
late 1960s. In this issue, he discusses con- 
temporary magazine activity, including the 
controversial McGill Magazine, edited by 
Linda Frum, daughter of TV journalist 
Barbara Frum. 


t a time when funding for universities 
seems to be in a dismal state, 
McGill students are more active than 
ever producing a variety of publications. At 
last count, there were sixteen magazines 
being published or planned on the campus — 
from the internationally-recognized McGill 
Law Journal, which has appeared regularly 
since 1952, to Hejira, a newly-launched 
women’s journal produced by a group of 
undergraduates. The size, price, and dis- 
tribution of these magazines also vary. The 
most recent issue of The Fifth Column, the 
architecture students’ nationally-distributed 
publication, offers its readership some one 
hundred, magazine-sized pages, all for 
$8.00. In contrast, the Social Science Forum 
is a twelve-page monthly bulletin distributed 
free and intended primarily for the McGill 
community. A number of different faculties 
and departments produce journals, including 
Management, Medicine, Law, Education, 
Linguistics, history, English, and political 
science. Even Engineering is represented by 
its venerable publication, the Plumber’ s Pot. 
Peter F. Hoffmann, vice president 
(finance), of the Arts and Science Under- 
graduate Society (ASUS), is optimistic about 
the recent flurry of activity: ‘‘It’s very excit- 
ing to see such enthusiasm by students want- 
ing to produce and publish journals. I’m not 
sure how to explain this, but it’s certainly 
indicative of an intelligent and motivated stu- 
dent body. It’s good for the students and for 
the university.’’ The ASUS is responsible for 
funding most of the student magazines pro- 
duced in the Faculties of Arts and Science, 
and contributes about $25,000 annually to 
this end. Other sources of funding are also 
actively being sought. The Fifth Column has 
an extensive list of benefactors, supporting 
institutions, sponsors and patrons, and 
Scrivener, a Magazine of poetry and fiction, 
recently received a Canada Council grant. 
Advertising space is sold to offset the costs of 
producing such publications as The Observer, 
the official publication of the ASUS, The 
Register, a product of the history department, 
He» Rate ROS 
8 McGILL NEWS/JANUARY 1984 


Rubicon, a journal of creative work, visual 
art, and interviews, and Education McGill 
Education. Although funding these publica- 
tions is a concern, it is never an insurmounta- 
ble problem. No McGill student editor gets 
paid, and if money is desperately needed, a 
number of impromptu sources can be called 
upon, including sums otherwise put aside for 
rent or telephone bills. Outstanding debts 
owed to various typesetters or printers 
throughout the city are not uncommon. 

Love of controversy is much more impor- 
tant that a solvent bank eccount and the clash 
of opposing editorial ideologies keeps many 
student publications bristling with fervour. 
The McGill Daily, left of centre in its most 
conservative years, seems more ready today 
than ever to make friends with any organiza- 
tion that challenges the siatus quo. Any group 
supportive of the IRA orrevolution in Central 
America or homosexuality or subjugation of 
the ruling class is sure to win the Daily's 
editorial support. But a more recent publica- 
tion, the McGill Magazine, has questioned 
the Daily's liberalism. The Magazine is 
edited by Linda Frum, daughter of the CBC 
journalist, Barbara Frum. 


iS aera cl FT he eae 


ee 


Her first issue, entitled the McGill Univer- 


sity Magazine (or MUM, as it was referred 


to), caused considerable controversy. The 
university objected to the use of the words 
‘‘McGill University,’ fearing that the 
magazine would be mistaken for an official 
publication. The university s secretary-gen- 
eral. David Bourke, BArch’54, had warned 
Frum not to go with this title, but she decided 
to ‘‘publish and be damned,’’ in the words of 
a Montreal Gazette cover story. 

In its opening editorial MUM made not-so- 
subtle references to what it believed the Daily 
stands for: 


Take a deep breath. You are holding in 
your hands a student magazine that does 


not believe in radical social change. Is also | 


does not believe in socialism, pacifism, 
vegetarianism, nudism, collectivism, anti- 
Americanism, or anti-intellectualism. Are 
you still there? 

McGill needs a student magazine that 
does not kow-tow to the orthodoxies of the 
day. The slogans of the El Salvador and 
South Africa Committees, of Gay McGill, 
of the Women’s Union, and of the Palesti- 
nian Students’ Organization do not, in fact, 
represent student opinion. It is past time for 
intellectual diversity on this campus. The 
McGill University Magazine is a whoop of 
non-conformity. We invite the non-con- 
formists of McGill to join us. 


) _ a 
AU BIC ons 


NUMBER ? 


WINTER 1983-84 


After this, the Daily received numerous 
letters both in support of and against MUM. 
And even now, after her publication was 
forced to delete the word **University’’ from 
its title, Frum still upholds her mandate that 
is, among other things, against state funding 
for universities and for a somewhat nostalgic 
return to the tradition-bound days of *‘good- 
old McGill.’” When Volume 1, Number 2 
recently appeared, its editorial contained the 
following understatement: “‘Not everybody 
loves the McGill Magazine.”’ 

One ‘‘publication’’ that exists more for the 
sake of controversy than anything else is the 
Plumber's Pot. tt has always enjoyed taking 
jabs at the ‘‘artsie’’ students and wallowing in 
the slough of sexually-explicit (sometimes 
funny) jokes. The swearing, beer drinking 
and arts bashing that appear in the Pot have 
long endeared it to that select group of 
inhabitants frequenting the Macdonald 
Engineering Building. Volume 81, Number 3 
(where the numbers came from is anybody’s 
guess) of the Pot shows on its cover a picture 
of the Leacock Building floating several 
hundred feet above the ground on top of a 
mushroom cloud. Below the photo are the 
words **Nuke the Leacock Building’’ and in 
an editorial on page three is an explanation of 
the Por’ s mission: 

Awright people, listen up! This is Nigel 

‘*Nuke ‘em till they Twinkle’’ Anthrax. As 

you are no doubt aware, the Leacock 
Building, bastion of the Artsie Internation- 
al Development Society (A.I.D.S.) and 


ESSAYS ON POLITICS 


dwelling place of many questionable, 
somewhat Cheesey entities, has recently 
been destroyed. Well, okay, maybe you 
haven’t noticed. Doesn’t matter anyway. 
The point is, the cbliteration of that build- 
ing and all pseuco-lifeforms in it is the 
direct responsibility of the P.P.O. Bange 
Gange. We have ‘orcibly taken over con- 
trol of the new particle accelerator equip- 
ment in the Rutherford Physics Building, 
and we are now holding the entire campus 
hostage. The Leacock explosion was 
merely a subtle demonstration of our pow- 
er. Give in to our demands or we will be 
forced to obliterzte something that will 
actually make a di'ference in the world. 


Although student bickering at times 
appears to dominate many of the magazines, 
they do have other objectives. They provide 
students with the opportunity to develop the 
first, sometimes faulty explorations of serious 
research. Students not ready for a wide criti- 
cal audience can still see their names in print 
and can propagate their views. Most of the 
magazines publish essays or working papers 
by undergraduates and graduate students. 
Concepts publishes dapers on politics, and in 
a recent issue had articles on the Middle-East, 


Soviet foreign policy, and the Parti 
Québécois. The McGill Journal of Political 
Economy and the McGill Journal of Labour 
Management Relations also publish much 
student work. 

Audience is, of course, always a concern, 
and in the first fledgling days of many 
magazines the editors depend upon family 
and/or an immediate circle of friends who can 
be coerced into reading the finished product 
and sometimes even to take out a subscrip- 
tion. Established journals like the Medical 
Journal have a stable readership, but new 
publications such as Working Papers in Lin- 
guistics are always on the lookout for unsus- 
pecting relatives or friends to support the con- 
siderable effort that goes into the production 
of a student magazine. 

There is a flurry of student publishing 
activity on the campus. Perhaps one of the 
reasons for this is that the economic situation 
is not encouraging, and students must fight 
harder to make themselves be heard and their 
efforts be seen. Over the years there have 
been many McGill student magazines that 
have flourished for a year or two. Then for 
any number of reasons, including editors who 
graduate, financial instability, or just flag- 
ging interest, the magazines have died. But 
central to their sometimes truncated lives is an 
intellectual enthusiasm — an enthusiasm that 
perpetuates itself, that encourages new 
perspectives on a wide range of topics, and 
that results in a considerable number of intel- 
ligent and well-produced magazines. 0 


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JOURNAL OF ARCHITECTURE 
ETUDIANTS EN ARCHITECTURE 


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Sotytataty 


Martin Luther: 


A man for all reasons 


by Peter O’Brien 


ebel, reformer, and biblical scholar, 
Martin Luther remains to this day a 
controversial Christian figure. Born 
on November 10, 1483, he continues to be at 
the centre of religious reform and innovation. 
There were celebrations around the world in 
1983 to mark his 500th birthday — throughout 
North America, in his home town of Eiselben 
(now in East Germany), and even in Rome, 
where Catholics as well as Protestants are 
reconsidering his multifarious influence. 

McGill helped celebrate Luther’s birthday 
by sponsoring a symposium entitled *“The 
Enduring Legacy of Martin Luther.’’ It was 
held in early October and incorporated the 
annual Birks lectures. The Faculty of Reli- 
gious Studies was the primary sponsor of the 
event, with help from the Faculty of Music, 
the Renaissance and Reformation Group, the 
Goethe Institute of Montreal, and the local 
Diocesan, Presbyterian, and United 
Theological Colleges. Prof. E.J. Furcha, 
BD’63, chairman of the planning committee, 
and his research assistant Sandra McNevin, 
BSW’75, BTh’83, were the two people most 
responsible for the success of the symposium. 

A selection of Canadian scholars presented 
a dozen papers on all aspects of Luther’s 
work: on his doctrine of justification by faith, 
his importance to the development of the 
German language, his literary roots, and his 
relationship to scholasticism, ethics, and 
soteriology. There were also three interna- 
tionally-recognized authorities on Luther: Dr. 
Heiko Oberman from Tubingen, West Ger- 
many, who delivered two papers entitled 
‘‘Luther: Hero or Heretic’’ and ‘*Luther Dis- 
covers Satan’’; Dr. Ingetraut Ludolphy from 
Erlangen, West Germany, whose definitive 
biography of Luther’s protector Frederick the 
Wise will be published in 1984; and Dr. Harry 
McSorley from Toronto, a Roman Catholic 
scholar who is well respected for his views on 
the relation between the Protestant and 
Roman Catholic churches. 

There were, of course, healthy disagree- 
ments throughout the week, for Luther’s 
ideas are large enough to incorporate many 
differing conclusions. What was tacitly 
agreed upon during the symposium was that 
his ideas are as important now as they have 
ever been. And this year, for the Roman 
Catholic church, Luther has taken on a special 
significance. 

There are many reasons why the Catholic 
church should find much difficulty with the 
subject of Luther. From the moment Luther 
posted his 95 theses on the church door in 
Wittenberg, the Catholic church was forced 


publically to confront his harsh criticisms. 
Luther’s writings added fuel to a smoldering 
fire, and he became the object of the first mass 
publicity campaign in history. Both the 
Catholic church and the Holy Roman Empire 
denounced Luther as a heretic, and in 1521 he 
was called before the Emperor Charles V and 
the Imperial Diet at Worms. His friends 
advised him not to go, but he asserted that he 
would even if there were as many devils in 
Worms as there were tiles on its rooftops. It 
was at Worms that Luther, when demanded 
that he retract his erring ways declared: ‘‘It is 
neither safe nor honest to act against consci- 
ence.’’ In some later accounts he is said to 
have added: ‘‘Here I stand. I cannot do 
otherwise. God help me. Amen.’’ 

Luther had already been excommunicated 
by Pope Leo X before his appearance at 
Worms, but he was now placed under the ban 
of the Holy Roman Empire. It was Frederick 
the Wise, the Elector of Saxony, who pro- 
tected Luther at this time and arranged for him 
to be able to carry on his writings and his 
translation of the Bible into German. In one of 
her lectures, Ludolphy pointed out that Fre- 
derick was as much responsible politically, as 
Luther was theologically, for the early 
development of the Reformation. 

Luther’s break with Rome has been much 
discussed. McSorley stated that ‘‘had Luther 
remained a Catholic, he may well have 
become the most important saint since St. 
Francis of Assisi.’’ Many historians have 


10 McGILL NEWS/JANUARY 1984 


pointed out that the Catholic church of the 
14th and 15th centuries was much in need of 
reform, and that its practice of selling 
indulgences, of accepting money in exchange 
for promising to reduce a believer's sentence 
in purgatory, was certainly not the best way to 
raise funds for the rebuilding of St. Peter's 
Basilica. Writing in the Notre Dame 
Magazine, KennethL. Woodward states that 
it is the consensus among historians that 
‘‘Pope Leo X and his representatives could 
have prevented the final rupture with Luther 
and his followers if they had taken his legiti- 
mate criticism seriously — if, in short, the 
papacy had not been as corrupt as Luther had 
charged.’’ And during the symposium, 
Oberman was to add another perspective to 
the controversy by stating that, were Luther 
alive today, he would not be against the Pope, 
but against the papacy, just as he was in the 
early 15th century. 

It does seem now that the rift between the 
Protestant and Catholic churches is slowly 
being mended. The Catholic church has pub- 
licly supported many of Luther’s criticisms. 
Jaroslav Pelikan, < noted Luther scholar, 
states that the Roman Catholic church, which 
excommunicated Luther in 1521, ‘‘has spent 
most of the time since then excoriating his 
memory , (and) has begun to treat Luther more 
as an alumnus than <n apostate.”’ 

For years Luther had been blamed for many 
of the problems that afflicted Catholicism. 
This perspective has been largely reconsi- 


ezeay UYOr AG SOIOUd 


Drawings: (left) This woodcut of Martin Luthe 
was made by Lucas Crarach the Elder in 
1522. (right) This frontispiec2 appeared on the 
German New Testament, the last issue per- 
sonally revised by Luther. Photos: (left to right) 
Doctors Heiko Oberman, Harry McSorley, and 
Ingetraut Ludolphy participated in McGill’s 
Luther Symposium: “There was healthy dis- 
agreement throughout the week.” 


dered recently, and it is ncw quite common 
for Catholics and Protestants to share similar 
views on the man who reformed religious 
thought in Europe and America more than 
anyone else. In his lecture, McSorley pointed 
out that much has been done to reconcile the 
Catholic and Protestant churches, and 
although there are still differences of opinion 
between them, these need not be ‘‘church- 
dividing’ differences. He went on to say that 
Rome has not always presented Luther’s 
work correctly and originally mistook what 
he was saying. The *‘Catholicity’’ of Luther’s 
central protest — that faith is the most impor- 
tant ingredient of a religious life — was mis- 
understood, and this naturally hardened 
Luther against Rome. 

Certainly many of Luther’s reforms have 
been incorporated by Catholicism, several 
important ones by the Second Vatican Coun- 
cil: that the mass be said in vernacular lan- 
guages, that an emphasis be placed on 
preaching and congregational singing, and 
that both bread and wine be used in the ser- 
vices. Luther also promoted the idea of 
Christian marriage, child-rearing, and secular 
work. Woodward points cut that all these 
reforms were embraced by Vatican II. 

Most recently, the Pope has come out in 
support of much of what Luther stands for. In 
a letter addressed to Johannes Cardinal Wil- 
lebrands of the Netherlands, the head of the 
Catholic Secretariat of Christian Unity, the 
Pope called Luther a man of ‘‘profound 


L¥ PESOS ELE ORE 
. ‘ = x. 


religiousness’’ and said it was time Catholics 
‘*distanced ourselves from historic events’’ in 
the pursuit of Christian unity. The Pope also 
delivered a sermon at the Lutheran Evangeli- 
cal Church in Rome on December 11, 1983, 
the first time a Pope has participated in a 
Protestant service in his own diocese. 

We do know that Luther did not want to 
start a church of his own -— that it was his 
intent to reform the existing church, not split 
it apart. He was not in favor of calling any 
church Lutheran, and his thoughts and 
teachings were modified by such people as 
Huldrych Zwingli and John Calvin in ways 
that Luther would not have condoned. The 
Catholic church did, in fact, undergo many 
reforms in the years following the divisive- 
ness spawned by Luther, changes that came 
too late, however, to reverse the widening 
gulf between Catholicism and what came to 
be known in 1529 as Protestantism. Luther’s 
reforms not only encouraged a new church, 
but greatly modified the existing one. The 
reverberations of his teachings are still felt 
today. 

Together with the academic papers pre- 
sented at the symposium, there was much else 
over the course of the week to stir up interest 
in Luther. Rare book librarian Mrs. Elizabeth 
Lewis, with help from Rosemarie Bergmann, 
BLS ’63, Professor Furcha, and the National 
Library of Canada, organized a display of rare 
manuscripts, pamphlets and maps relating to 
the life and times of Luther. Drawn largely 


— 


from McGill’s own collections, this display 
was on view in the McLennan Library foyer 
and afterwards at the National Library in 
Ottawa. The film, ‘‘Where Luther Walked,’’ 
which was shot on location in several of the 
towns where the reformer had lived, was also 
screened. And no celebration in honour of 
Luther would be complete without music. 
Luther himself composed many hymns, 
perhaps the best known being “‘A Mighty 
Fortress is Our God.’’ The West German 
organist, Dr. H. Vogel, presented an illus- 
trated lecture, taught a master class, and 
played at the final symposium event, a wor- 
ship service at the St. John’s Lutheran 
Church, a short walk from the McGill cam- 
pus. 

The enthusiasm with which Luther is being 
considered in the international press was 
much in evidence during the McGill Luther 
Symposium, where a selection of univer- 
sities, religions, and McGill faculties pay tri- 
bute to a man who remains at the centre of 
ongoing religious controversy and reform. 
And the essential optimism that surrounds 
Luther’s teachings as it was presented at 
McGill embraces a multitude of differing 
beliefs. In a lecture, Oberman referred to a 
statement that is often credited to Luther. 
Although it is not found in his voluminous 
writings, it nevertheless sums up his legacy: 
‘*Even if the world were to end tomorrow, | 


} 


would still go out and plant my tree today.’’ 0 


JANUARY 1984/McGILL NEWS 11 


SOLIAEAS SE OWL RRP Pat! 
CSUR ORS Oe SR ho eee 


Photos by Rick Kerrigan 


12 McGILL NEWS/JANUARY 1984 


To serve the coming age 


The McGill Advancement Program: 


hen Sir William Dawson became principal of 
McGill, he found partially-completed buildings, an 
overgrown campus, a small student enrolment, 
and empty coffers. The Nova Scotian educator, however, was 
determined to keep the struggling university alive. Shortly 
before the Christmas of 1855 he set out for Toronto to solicit 
government support. He crossed the icy waters of the St. 
Lawrence by canoe, then traveled overland for five days 
before reaching his destination. 

One hundred and twenty-nine years later, McGill has grown 
and diversified into an institution of international stature. In 
addition to its main campus and associated teaching hospitals 
in Montreal, it has Macdonald College in the suburb of Ste. 
Anne de Bellevue, which houses the Faculty of Agriculture 
and the School of Food Science. It also runs far-flung research 
facilities, such as the Subarctic Research Station in Scheffer- 
ville, Quebec, and the Bellairs Research Institute in Barbados 
— the only Canadian research and teaching laboratory in the 
tropics. 

Through its faculties, schools, and institutes, McGill 
provides teaching leadership in dozens of disciplines and 
continues to implement new programs of study to meet 
society's changing needs. The university also has kept abreast 
in research. It draws more than 8 percent of Canada’s graduate 
students and more than 7 percent of public research monies. In 
addition, it undertakes many research projects commissioned 
by industry. 


* ithe <% 


Hugh Hallward: “Our objective is to do better those things we 
already do well.” 


a: 


McGill in the 1850s: It was not unusual to see cows grazing on lower 
campus when Sir William Dawson served as principal of McGill. 


McGill has continued to attract first-rate faculty and stu- 
dents. In fact, despite a predicted decline in numbers of stu- 
dents, the university has seen a steady increase. The total 
daytime enrolment is over 19,000. Although the majority of 
students are from Quebec, 10 percent come from the rest of 
Canada, 5 percent from the United States, and 7 percent from 
120 other countries around the globe. 

While there are more programs and more students at McGill 
than ever before, there is less money available to support 
them. The university receives 80 percent of its general 
operating funds through the federal and provincial treasuries. 
In recent years, this funding has failed to keep pace with 
spiraling inflation. Both academic and non-academic staff on 
campus have become adept at accomplishing ‘‘more with 
less.”’ Government underfunding and increased costs aggra- 
vated by earlier inflation are a major concern to North Amefi- 
can universities. If McGill is to maintain the tradition of 
excellence on which it prides itself, it must rely on the private 
sector for generous support. 

That is the reason why the university has embarked on 4 
capital campaign known as the McGill Advancement Pro- 
gram. In September 1983, the Board of Governors of the 
University officially announced the decision to raise $6l 
million — the largest campaign goal in Canadian university 
history. Its Chairman, Hugh G. Hallward, BA’51, explains 
that “‘plans for the McGill Advancement Program have been 
underway for two years.”’ 

First, the Board of Governors established a special com- 
mittee under the leadership of Principal David Johnston. That 
committee, in turn, conducted a poll of attitudes both inside 
and outside the university towards higher education in general 
and McGill in particular, as well as a preliminary assessment 
of the potential for public and private support. Based on the 
encouraging survey results, the Board of Governors initiated 


Principal David Johnston: “This is not a wish list.” 


preparations for a campaign. A core campaign office was 
established under the direction of John Heney, BCom’49, to 
coordinate fund-raising and development activities. Meetings 
were held with potential donors, corporations, small and 
medium businesses, foundations, alumni, the campus com- 
munity, and other friends of McGill to pinpoint the key gifts 
that would later form the cornerstone of the McGill Advance- 
ment Program. 

To ensure the most efficacious expenditure of the money 
raised, all the deans of the university were asked to examine 
their faculty’s particular needs and to draw up a list of 
priorities. The proposed projects fell into seven broad areas: 
research and development; staff; fellowships; the library sys- 
tem; buildings; and equipment. As Johnston pointed out in the 
1981-82 Annual Report, ‘‘Building modernization and reno- 
vation, along with provision for additional teaching staff, led 
the deans’ priority list in most cases. Extended computer 
facilities, increased funds for library collections, and more 
funds for fellowships and scholarships — to attract more of the 
best students, especially at the graduate level — were similarly 
deemed high priority items.”’ 

The final step in the campaign kick-off was a Leadership 
Day held in September on the campus. Three hundred selected 
alumni and other friends of McGill came from across Canada, 
the United States, and as far afield as the West Indies to hear 
lectures from a cross-section of university faculty members; 
take tours of the McCord Museum, the Rare Book Room, and 
other facilities; to premiere a new McGill film, and to meet 
some of the key figures in the McGill Advancement Program. 

Chancellor Conrad Harrington, BA’33, BCL’36, great- 
grandson of Sir William Dawson, opened the plenary session 
of Leadership Day with reference to Dawson’s approach: ‘‘He 
knew the importance of community involvement and nurtured 
it. He knew the value of research equipment, facilities, li- 


braries, museums and excellent students and staff and he 
sought them with determination. ”’ 

However urgent its own needs, McGill is acutely aware of 
the many demands being made on everyone's pocketbooks in 
the 1980s. It believes that activities like Leadership Day 
should inspire the confidence needed for donors to support the 
McGill Advancement Program. So should the caliber of the 
business people and professionals who have become active 
participants in the campaign. Hallward chaired the Leadership 
Day program and emphasized ‘‘the determination of the Gov- 
ernors to confirm a plan for McGill’s future.’’ 

He also invited the key leaders, including the Principal, to 
explain how the campaign ‘‘will make a significant difference 
for McGill.’’ Johnston pointed out that the major needs of the 
campaign are not a ‘‘wish list,’’ but the result of an eighteen 
month study and review by a committee involving representa- 
tion from all major areas of the university community to 
establish these priorities. ‘‘I assure you,’’ he added, ‘‘that 
through the combination of skilful investment, judicious 
administration, and dedicated efforts by all the academic and 
non-academic staff, together with the remarkable record of our 
annual fund, we have managed well. But even the most careful 
management of resources cannot guarantee excellence in edu- 
cation in the face of rising costs.” 

Johnston’s optimism for the campaign is prompted by the 
highest caliber of volunteer leadership from the local and 
national community that will direct this major endeavor. 

The national chairman of the campaign, Frederick S. 
Burbidge, chairman and chief executive officer of Canadian 
Pacific Limited, admitted his initial hesitations over the enor- 
mity of the task. However, he expressed his enthusiasm based 
on ‘‘the favorable response of key volunteers who are now 
assisting in establishing an army of volunteers for the months 
ahead.’” He then introduced his top team. Heading the list for 
corporate contacts is Charles Bronfman. Individual key gifts 
will be coordinated by Rowland Frazee, and the solicitation of 
foundations is led by Charles Perrault, BEng’43, MEng’46. 
Solicitation of individuals at all other levels will be managed 
by Warren Chippindale, BCom’49, with the campus com- 
munity being attended by Vice-Principal Gordon Maclachlan. 
Guiding public relations is McGillGovernor Madeleine Saint- 
Jacques. Burbidge, also a Governor of McGill, indicated that 
his attraction to the campaign was its “‘support of people.”’ 


Frederick S. Burbidge was attracted to the campaign because it 


aims to support people. 


| 
| 


JANUARY 1984/McGILL NEWS 13 


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Leading the McGill Advancement Program are (left to right): Director of the McGill Advancement Program John Heney; Inidividual Key Gift 
Chairman Rowland Frazee; Corporations Chairman Charles Bronfman; National Campaign Chairman Frederick Burbidge; Foundations Chairma 
Charles Perrault: Public Relations Chairman Madeleine Saint-Jacques; Chairman of the Board of Governors Hugh Hallward; and Principal 4 

Vice-Chancellor David L. Johnston. } 


Because of its ambitious scope, the McGill Advancement 
Program has developed a wide network of enthusiastic, com- 
mitted volunteers. They will attempt to meet personally with 
as many potential donors as they possibly can, and these 
regional campaigns will continue for the next three years. 

It is important to point out, however, that the McGill 
Advancement Program will not interfere with McGill’s Annu- 
al Giving Programs, or the Alma Mater Fund, (AMF), which 
recently celebrated its 35th Anniversary. Graduates’ Society 
President Carlyle Johnston, BA’50, BCL’53, and AMF 
Chairman A. Keith Ham, BA’54, BCL’59, have reviewed and 
endorsed the plan that will permit the Annual Giving Programs 
to continue as a separate project throughout the campaign. As 
Ham explains, ‘‘The campaign will initially focus on special 
individuals and all graduates will be asked to support the 
campaign while maintaining their interest in the AMF. 
Increased participation is now our goal to maintain and 
strengthen Annual Giving.’’ Nor will the Program jeopardize 
government funding. As Johnston emphasized, *‘Dr. Camille 
Laurin, Minister of Education, has encouraged us... and 
assured us that this campaign will in no way affect the regular 
operating grants received from the government. ’’ 

The monies raised will ensure that McGill will be able to 
keep pace and, as the title of the new film about the university 


McGill today: Althoug 
university's cosmopolitan campus. 


14 McGILL NEWS/JANUARY 1984 


suggests, ‘“‘serve the coming age.’’ According to Burbidge 
‘The largest portion — $38 million — will be for excellence 
education to provide the best setting for the best teacher 
students, and research activities possible. Only $23 millid 
will be directed to major renovation and extension of existing 
facilities. Included in this amount is the unique pr 
ject of grafting a new athletics hall into the present athleti¢ 
complex. This accounts for $11 million, $4 million of thi 
pledged by McGill students through a special athletics assess 
ment, a project that the students initiated themselves throughé 
campus referendum. ’’ 

In launching a major campaign during tough economit 
times, McGill has taken a calculated gamble. But the gamble 
appears to be paying off. The McGill Advancement Progra 
has already collected nearly $27 million in gifts and pledges 
The campaign leaders are just as determined as Dawson once 
was. In Perrault’s words, they hope ‘‘to strengthen McGill ne 
for its own sake, but for what it can contribute to individual 
who teach and study here and to serve society. It has its rootsi 
Montreal, Quebec, but it has contributed to growth af 
development in many ways throughout Canada and beyond: 
As Hallward sums up, ‘‘Our objective is to do better thos 
things we already do well.’’ 0 


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1948 


The Alma Mater Fund has been a 
constant source of pride to McGill 
over the years. Dedicated alumni 
founded the Alma Mater Fund in 1948 
as the first Canadian university Annual 
Giving program. McGill has been a 
leader in fund raising ever since. The 
motto of the Fund from the outset was 
to be a “Living Endowment” for the 
University. It continues to provide 
significant funds for immediate use 
each year. The total amount generated 
for McGill since the Fund’s inception 
is more than $20 million. This is a 
remarkable example of splendid sup- 
port and leadership for the Univer- 
sity. 

The Annual Fund, from its start in 
1948 (the same year as the $8 million 
McGill Fund campaign), has built upon 
contacts among alumni and has ex- 
panded the volunteer network to tell 
its story. Its importance is reflected in 
the unique purpose it serves for faculty 
development, libraries, scholarship 
and student aid, athletics and other 
designated projects. These areas 
cover abroad spectrum andallowfora 
wide range of interest. Such resources 
can provide new opportunities beyond 
the regular programs for students and 
staff alike. Deans and Directors can 
give examples of how the faculties, 
schools, or departments annually 
benefit from these designated funds. 


Cover 


The importance of Annual Giving to 
the University is reflected in this cover 
concept of 35 years of continuous 
support of the Alma Mater Fund depic- 
ted against the backdrop of. capital 
campaigns: in 1948 the McGill Fund 
Campaign raised $8 million; the 1956 
McGill Campaign, $8.9 million; 1963- 
68, the McGill Fund Council Cam- 
paign, $10 million; 1973-79, McGill 
Development Program, Macdonald 
Agriculture Campaign and the Learn- 
ing Centre campaigns raised $34.5 
million and 1983 represents the be- 
ginning of the McGill Advancement 
Program with a goal of $61 million. 


The Board of Governors recently 
announced a $61 million capital cam- 
paign for McGill. There are special 
needs which are so clear and So large 
that they can be realized only through 
a capital campaign. This campaign, 
announced in September and sche: 
duled to be completed by 1986, wil 
not diminish the importance of the 
Alma Mater Fund and other annual 
giving programs, but will in fact make 
them even more significant. All donors 
to the University will be asked to 
contribute in a special way to the 
capital campaign while, at the same 
time, maintaining their interest in 
Annual Giving. 

This means that the normal growth 
of the Annual Fund can only be realized 
with expanded participation which Is 
fundamental to success. It is essential 
that graduates who have never con: 
tributed before, or have not contributed 
recently, reconsider the value of the 
Alma Mater Fund to the University. 
Your thoughtful support of Annual 
Giving will ensure another benchmark 
of success for this program. 


hr~ 


/ David L. Johnston 


Sincerelv 


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No. in No. of % Amount Average | 
Faculty Faculty Donors Part. $ Gift$ jj 
Agriculture & Food Science 3,850 829 23.5 47,930 57 i 
Architecture 984 250 25.9 23,884 93 : 
Arts & Science, Men 12,076 2,109 17.4 152,129 72 
Arts & Science, Women 13,379 2,896 21.6 175,306 60 
Dentistry 1,361 566 41.5 60,392 106 
Diplomas 1,075 154 14.3 5,137 = 
Education 3,633 490 13.4 17,857 36 
Engineering 8,367 2,260 27.0 218,753 96 
Graduate Studies 8,625 1,182 13.7 fi aoe 65 
Law 2,591 811 31.3 98,387 121 
Library Science 1,190 212 17.8 7,932 ms Fg 
Macdonald - Others 900 12 12.4 4,636 41 
Management 5,326 1,488 27.9 142,894 96 
Medicine S213 2,035 39.1 287,498 141 
Music 736 78 10.5 2,911 37 
Nursing 2,148 568 26.4 24,239 42 
Phys. & Occ. Ther. 1,470 309 21.0 9,486 30 
Religious Studies 304 43 14.1 2,070 48 
Social Work 1,393 305 21.8 18,841 61 
Company Matching Gifts 128 46,493 
Anonymous & Non-Alumni 243 77,974 


crrccccccccmccccmccnccccccccccccccccccccccccccnncncnncccccccnnnccn rss 


Faculty Totals 74,616 17,077 a aa 1,502,147 102 
In Dollars In Participation 

Medicine $ 287,495 Dentistry 41.0% 

Engineering 218,753 Medicine 39.1 

A &S (Women) 175,356 Law 3133 

A &S (Men) 152,129 Management 27.9 

Management 142,894 Engineering 27.0 

Law 98,387 Nursing 26.4 


Faculty Development 


Architecture 8,422 
Arts 28,770 
Continuing Education 3,927 
Dentistry 30,121 
Religious Studies 2,864 
Education 6,481 
Engineering 95,190 
Graduate Studies 

& Research 13,791 
Law 20,860 
Library Science 986 
Macdonald College 30,829 
Management 27,309 
Medicine 74,967 
Music 2,622 
Nursing 18,803 
P.&O.T. B20 
Social Work 11,405 
Science ny» (QURete 
TOTAL $ 408,359 


Libraries 


Alma Mater Library Fund $ 96,798 
Parents Library Fund f2;Lao 
Total designated $ 168,933 


Scholarships and Student Aid 


Alma Mater Fund 
Scholarships, 
Fellowships, Bursary 
and Loan Fund 


Total designated $ 119,439 


Quality of Student Life 


Total designated S$. ..12,30) 
Athletics 
Total designated $ 23,028 


The memory of the following McGill 
graduates, former students and friends 
was honoured by Memorial Gifts to 
the Alma Mater Fund. The University 
extends its thanks to the families and 
friends who chose the McGill Alma 
Mater Fund as the beneficiary of 
these Memorial Gifts. 


Dr. JU.W. Abraham, DDS’23 
Frederick P. Alward, BA’27, MA’28 
Moe Bauman, BCom’24 

Professor Dalbir Bindra 

Allan Turner Bone, BSc’16 

Gregory Bradfield 

Edward E. Brown, BEng’32 

A. Sydney Bruneau QC, BA’13, MCL’17 
Mrs. Bruneau (Ruth Dawson), BA’17 
David M. Camp 

Dr. Mary C. Childs, BA’15, MD’22 
Mrs. Gem Chippindale 


4 


Dr. Gibson E. Craig, BCom’32, MD’43 
Dr. Richard E. Dagg, DDS’27 

Miriam Donahue 

Abraham and Ida Echenberg 

D. Archibald Finlayson, BSA’32, MSc’34 
Dr. A.O. Freedman, MD’08 

P.D.P. Hamilton, BSc’22 

John S. Heslop 

Dr. EW. Holden, BSA’22 

Dr. Laurence Hooker, DDS’28 
Maury Kaye 

Burt Kidd 

Floyd C. Lantz, BSc’21 

Mrs. Annie Lathe, BA’08 

Robert C. Legge QC, BA’49, BCL’52 
Dr. Josephus C. Luke, BA’27, MD’31 
W. Wallis Lummis, BSc’47 

M. Yolande Plante Lynch 

Dr. Basil C. MacLean, MD’26, LLD’62 
Moses Marks, MD’23 

H.W.S. Marshall 


Dr. Hollis W. Merrick Il, MD’33 
Beverley Millar Muirhead, DipP&OT 54 
A. Gordon Murphy, BSc’22, LLD’60 
Mrs. Anne Noad 

H. George Ott, BEng’45 

Frank Rigler 

Dr. R.F. Robertson, PHD’55 

Dr. Jacob Schwartzman, BSc’23, MD’27 
Marjorie Sharp, BA’67 

Dr. John A. Sheppard, MD’39 

Dr. Richard Shuman, MD’41 
Dr.A.J.M.Smith, BSc’25, MA’26, DLit’58 
Paola Strising 

Professor Herbert H. Tate 

John A. Tolhurst, BA’37 

Margaret Allen Tough, BA’32, BLS’33 
Robert G. Townsend, BSc’39, MD’41 
Mrs. Agnes Turner 

Abe Usher, BCom’24 

James B. Woodyatt, BSc’07 

Ernest Viberg, BSc’29 


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TAF. BAA E35 


In 1948, the first Alma Mater Fund 
Chairman, E.P. Taylor, BSc’22, spoke 
of the promise of the Fund which 
could “with great effort reach a goal of 
$75,000”. Now, in its 35th Anniversary 

, year, it is necessary to be equally 

! energetic and optimistic in setting a 

i suitable goal for 1983 and beyond. 

| We feel that $2 million is the challenge 
for the near future. 

The volunteer leadership of the 

4Alma Mater Fund over the past 35 
years has been marked by great 

'strength and has attracted enthusias- 

| tic participation. An active Alma Mater 

| Fund Committee, with the involvement 


A 


MF Chairman, A. Keith Ham (left) is wel- 
omed by Chancellor Conrad F. Harrington 


oe iP x © ee es a hl 
bine of <> 


Past chairmen honoured at special dinner. Seated (I to r) Elizabeth McNab, 
)/BA'41, Director of Development; Principal David L. Johnston, D. Lorne 
‘Gales, BA’32, BCL’35, Consultant, Gavin Ross, Past Dir. Annual Giving. 
Standing, the chairmen honoured: (I to r) Carlyle Johnston, BA’50, BCL’53; 
Colin W. Webster, BA'24; Lorne Webster, BEng’50; Donald R. McRobie, 
BCom’34; Robert E.J. Layton, BEng’47; Harold Corrigan, BCom’50; 
Lawrence McDougall, BA’39, BCL’42 and A. Keith Ham, BA’54, BCL'S59. 


of a network of class agents and 
regional committees, has vigorously 
carried the McGill message to an 
ever-increasing constituency. 

Each succeeding year has produced 
encouraging results for the University. 
For the first 20 years, the Fund sought 
undesignated gifts. Then in order to 
provide graduates with an option in 
directing their gifts to the University, 
designated giving was introduced by 
the Aima Mater Fund Committee in 
1969. Donors have a greater sense of 
commitment through _ identification 
with a particular area of the Univer- 
sity. 

At a recent dinner honouring the 
past chairmen of the Alma Mater 
Fund, there was reference to the 
changes at McGill over the years. In 
contrast to the first year of the Fund 
when there were 15,000 alumni, the 
number of graduates now exceeds 
85,000. The international composition 
of the student body explains why one 
finds McGill graduates in more than 
140 countries around the world. Last 
year, a total of $1.5 million was given 
by 17,000 graduates from 68 coun- 
tries, a record achievement since that 
earliest goal of $75,000. 

This fall, leadership donors at the 
Chancellor’s Committee dinner and at 


1948 
1949-51 
1952-53 
1954-55 
1956 
oe 1957-59 
od o 1960-61 
, 1962 
1963-65 
1966-67 
1968-69 
1970-71 
1972-75 
1976-77 
1978-79 
1980-81 
1982-84 


Chairman 


Committee 


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the Principal’s Associates reception 
heard Principal Johnston state that 
these two clubs account for a major 
portion of the Alma Mater Fund total. 
Later in this report, there is amember- 
ship listing of these donors. Even with 
this splendid support, the base of 
participation must be broadened. Only 
23% of graduates gave to the Fund 
last year. While this is slightly above 
the North American average, we must 
do better. 

The University knows the value of 
this Annual Giving Program and the 
promise it has to be even more effec- 
tive. You can provide added momentum 
to these efforts. If you are willing to 
take the initiative in this endeavour, 
please let me know. In this, the 35th 
Anniversary year, your involvement 
can make a difference. 

| wish to thank donors and volun- 
teers everywhere for their commit- 
ment, and their awareness of the 
importance of the cause and the 
urgency of the need. 


A. Keith Ham, BA’54, BCL’59 


A. Keith Ham, BA’54, BCL’59 


E.P. Taylor BSc’22 
Colin W. Webster BA’24 
S. Boyd Millen BA’27, BCL’30 


Anson C. McKim 


Frank B.Common, Sr. 


BCom’24, BA’27 
BA’13,MA’14, BCL’17 


J. Geoffrey Notman BSc’22 
A. Deane Nesbitt BEng’33 
H. Rocke Robertson BSc’32, MD’36 
J. Geoffrey Notman BSc’22 
D.R. McRobie BCom’34 
Lawrence G. McDougall, QC BA’39, BCL’42 
Robert E.J. Layton BEng’47 
Lorne C. Webster BEng’50 
Harold Corrigan BCom’50 
M. Carlyle Johnston BA’50, BCL’53 
John M. Scholes BEng’52 
A. Keith Ham BA’54, BCL’59 


Past Chairman 


Trevor H. Bishop, BA’54, BCL’57 
George Brabant DDS’52 
Michael Conway, BCom’79 
George D. Goodfellow, BEng’36 
Mitchell Greenberg, BA’70 
Glenn Higginbotham, BCL’75, LLB’76 
M. Carlyle Johnston, BA’50, BCL’53 
John M. Little, MD’61 
Hugh G. Marshall, BEng’51 
Mrs. G.R.W. Owen, BA’33 
Peter B. Reid, BCom’57 
Peter Woolhouse, DDS’77 


John M. Scholes, BEng’52 


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The top 10 areas with Graduates’ Society Branches 


In Dollars In Participation 
Montreal $ 549,149 Washington, D.C. 35.4% 
Toronto 155.023 New Brunswick 0 @ 
New York 85,166 Toronto 30.0 
Ottawa 83,476 Philadelphia 29.8 
Vancouver 34,608 Calgary 28.9 
Calgary 29,454 Boston 28.1 
San Francisco 27,219 London 27.9 
New Brunswick 18,319 Florida ar.6 
Victoria 18,059 Upper St. Lawrence oi 4 
Boston 17,605 New York 27.6 


Regional Response of Graduates’ Society Branches 


Number of Percent of Number of Percent of 
Canada Graduates Participation Total United States Graduates Participation Total 
Newfoundland 298 16.1" 3 2,828 Boston 854 28.1 $$ 17,68 
Pet. 233 21.0 5,180 Vermont 195 20.7 5 205 
Halifax 532 20.8 8,270 Hartford 160 30.6 2,840 
Cape Breton 123 21.9 3,070 New York 1,759 27.6 85,166 
Kentville 175 24.5 ao2e2 Philadelphia 298 29.8 7,650 
Fredericton 234 oo 4,660 Georgia 108 24.0 2,316 
Moncton 173 34.1 2 oT Ue Florida 423 27.8 11,2352 
St. John 174 a 3.218 Cleveland 172 27.9 5,760 
Bedford District 428 24:5 20,159 Cincinnati 98 25.5 1,885 
Montreal (Men) 18,835 22.4 400,648 Chicago Zis 24.3 3,794 
Montreal (Women) 14,166 19.1 148,501 Texas 256 at BE 7,340 
Quebec City 522 1 £90" 6,822 San Francisco 599 26.2 27,279 
St. Maurice Valley 155 20.0 1,225 Los Angeles 567 26.2 13,098 
Grand River Valley 506 20.9 9,122 San Diego 119 22.6 2,520 
Hamilton 633 19.2 7,938 Washington State 217 Pe ty 4,475 
London 523 279 8,619 
Niagara Peninsula 305 27.2 5,275 
Ottawa Valley 4,392 29.0 89,306 Other Countries 
Toronto 6,464 29.4 156:023 
Upper St. Lawrence 807 21.4% 16,455 Bermuda 127 40.9 °$ 5323 
Windsor Wee 29.1 a2or Great Britain 810 on 1,594 
Winnipeg 493 18.6 7,700 Trinidad-Tobago 242 4.9 694 
Saskatoon 203 24.1 3,197 Australia 179 6.1 ge 
Calgary 1,214 28.9 29,454 France 157 133 1,390 
Edmonton 803 20.0 14,568 Greece 132 3.0 327 
Vancouver 1,960 26.7 34,608 Japan 60 13:3 640 
Victoria 642 23.6 18,059 Switzerland 79 31.6 2,305 
NB. These areas were selected to give an indication of response by alumni in 50 of the 71 Branch locations. 
The success of the phonathon follow- The Alma Mater Fund Committee Conway, BCom’79, in Montreal; Tom 
up to the Alma Mater Fundrequestsis | acknowledges with appreciation the Jellinek, BSc’57, in New Brunswick; 
determined by the enthusiasm and special efforts of phonathon coordina- Gordon Lindsay, BEng’48, in Vancou- 
organization of voiunteers in many tors in these regions: Dan Amadori, ver; Gibson Brown, BEng’56 in Ed- 
areas. The increased cooperation of BCom’72,in Toronto; George Winters, monton; Edward Engstrom, BSc’69, in 


the regional Branches of the Gradu- BSc’48, in Ottawa; Tony Peccia, BSc’75, Calgary; Richard Gordon, BCom’67,in 
ates’ Society has produced excellent MSc’77, MBA’79, Ann Vroom, BA’67, Boston;and Arthur Coleman, BA’77, in 
results. Claudia Rogers, BA’66, and Michael New York. 


6 


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Classes Provide Special Gifts 


An anniversary year can be an occasion 
for a class to undertake increased 
giving and maximum participation in 
the Alma Mater Fund. Most classes 
choosing to make an Anniversary Gift 
to the University focus their support 
on a special project or faculty. 

In the last fund year, the majority of 
graduates celebrating their 50th 
Reunion successfully promoted in- 
creased or unique class gifts. The 
class of Medicine’32 committee 
headed by Dr. Gilbert Turner, Dr. 
Joachim Brabander, and the late Dr. 
Fred Mott, achieved a substantial gift 
in support of the Medical Faculty. 
They exceeded their goal of $100,000 
with more than 50% of the gift in hand. 
Graduates of Commerce’32, spurred 
on by Harold Goodman, contributed 
more than $10,000. A special grant of 
$10,000 was given by the Max Bell 
Foundation tocommemorate the 50th 
Anniversary of Max Bell’s graduation 
from McGill University. This grant 
provided important encouragement 
to the efforts of the Commerce class 
of ‘32. 

Alumni in all other faculties were 
coordinated by Alma Harrison, RVC’32, 
and her committee, which completed 
the participation of all classes in 
tribute to McGill on the occasion of 


Class Plans in Progress 


Although the emphasis for Reunion 
gifts should coincide with an Anni- 
versary year, some classes have been 
gearing up for their special gifts well in 
advance. 

Medicine’36, with a committee 
headed by Dr. H. Rocke Robertson 
and Dr. Mabel Howie, is working 
towards $100,000 for its 50th Reunion 
gift to McGill and, to date, gifts total 
$35,000. The graduates of Medicine’45 
are planning for their 40th Reunion 
and efforts to provide their faculty with 
an unique class gift on that occasion 
are being developed by Dr. Elizabeth 
Steffen. Current gifts in hand total in 
excess of $30,000. 

Dentistry’58, guided by the com- 
mittee of John Fenwick and Robert 
Faith, has produced $4,000 of its 
$10,000 goal on the occasion of their 
25th Anniversary. The enthusiasm of 
Reunion’83 encouraged the Macdon- 
ald Class of Agriculture and Home 
Economics’58 to do the same. Class 
Chairman Allan Douglas, BSc(Agr)’58, 
and classmates are coordinating class 
participation now for a Macdonald 
gift. 


their 50th Reunion. 

Law’57, under the leadership of 
Trevor Bishop, doubled their giving 
and provided more than $5,000 for 
the Law Library. 

One class presented their gift to 
Macdonald College during their Re- 


OMe BSP RELI LO OWE AEWA 
SHEAT EET EREN CE CAS SS SSE 


union. Pat Reynolds, BSc(HE)’53, ana 
her classmates contributed more than 
$4,000 for their 30th Reunion Class 
Gift. 

In each instance, participation and 
total class giving increased consider- 
ably as a result of Anniversary Giving. 


Principal Johnston is shown with Alma (Johnston) Harrison, RVC’'32, 
Gilbert Turner, MD’32, Mrs. Harold Goodman and Mr. Goodman, BCom’32 
at the Principal's Reception for the 50th Anniversary Class at Reunion ‘82. 


Carlyle Johnston, BA’50, BCL’53, President of the Graduates’ Society, 
presented Dr. Mabel Howie, BSc’32, MD’36, with the Distinguished 
Service Award for long service and outstanding effort on behalf of 

her class at the Graduates’ Society Annual Meeting during Reunion ’83. 


pact 


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This was the 20th anniversary of the 
McGill Parents Association. It was 
established in 1963 with H. Clifford 
Hatch as the first chairman. This was 
the first parents program in Canada 
and it provided non-alumni parents 
with information about the University 
and an opportunity to support those 
needs of primary importance to stu- 
dents at McGill. 

Support has increased four-fold 
since the early years. Donations re- 
ceived from parents over the years 
total $675,126. This includes $79,000 
contributed by parents last year of 
which $72,000 was for library collec- 
tions, a project that will continue to 
assist students for years to come. 

On completing our term as co- 
chairmen of the McGill Parents As- 
sociation, we are extremely grateful 
for the support from parents who have 
made a special effort for the Univer- 
sity, 

In closing, we extend a warm wel- 
come to the incoming co-chairmen, 
Patricia and Ken Taylor. Mr. Taylor, 
Canadian Consul General in New 


Founded in 1939 with Ross Clarkson 
as the first chairman, this association 
is one of the oldest with a special 
tradition at McGill. The membership is 
now made up of non-alumni in the 
business community in Montreal. It 
provides a sounding board for an 
exchange of ideas between the busi- 
ness community and the University. 
Professor Stephen Leacock once 
referred to the Associates as a forum 
for the “Town and Gown”. 

The Associates’ tangible support 
derives from contributions which range 
from minimum membership fees to 
substantial donations. Donations re- 
ceived last year in the amount of 
$30,495 permitted the Associates to 
support needs in Nursing, Social Work, 
Agriculture, Architecture, Physical and 
Occupational Therapy, Library Science 
and Athletics. 

The support provided by the Assoc- 
iates to McGill since 1939 now totals 
$1,007,382. 

To current Associates, | extend our 
appreciation for your involvement and 
ask you to welcome new members to 
join us and increase our service to 
McGill University. 


Kyou 


Donald S. Wells 


York, is an Honorary Life Member of 
the McGill Graduates’ Society in New 
York. We are confident that they will 
find the response from parents very 
rewarding and that they will enjoy a 
close association with parents from 
around the world. 


Ley + beled 2 sole 
Co-Chairmen 


Mr. & Mrs. John M. Walker 
Montreal, Quebec 


Honorary Chairman 
Mr. H. Clifford Hatch 
Walkerville, Ontario 


Past Co-Chairmen 
Mr. & Mrs. Bruce Rankin 
Aurora, Ontario 


Committee 
M. & Mme Marcel Casavant 
Montreal, Quebec 


Mr. & Mrs. John Hampton Hickman III 
Geneseo, New York 


Chairman 

Donald S. Wells 

President 

Industrial Credit Insurance Co. 


Committee 

William Alexander 
Senior Vice-President 
Toronto Dominion Bank 
Quebec Division 


Aldo Baumgartner 
President 
Hoffman-LaRoche Limited 


Nicholas Frankel 
Senior Vice-President & Director 
Marsh & McLennan Limited 


Lynn H. Goth 
Vice-President & Director 
Dominion Securities Ames Limited 


Robert Harrison 
President 
Hotel Suisse Sun Valley Inc. 


Philip E. Johnston 
Senior Vice-President 
Royal Trust Company 


/ 


Mr. George Horowitz 
New York, New York 


Mr. & Mrs. Ernest E. Monrad 
Boston. Massachusetts 


Dr. & Mrs. Edward H. Simmons 
Don Mills, Ontario 


Mr. & Mrs. Mandel E. Slater 
Boston, Massachusetts 


Mr. & Mrs. Hedley A. Smith 
Halifax, Nova Scotia 


Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Taylor 
New York, New York 


Mr. & Mrs. Robert S. Traquair 
London, England 


Dr. & Mrs. Roderick Turner 
Los Angeles, California 


Dr. & Mrs. James A.S. Wilson 
Montreal, Quebec 


David Lank 
Partner 
Lank, Roberton, Macauley 


Ralph S. Leavitt 
President 
Canada New Zealand Casings Ltd. 


John Lynch-Staunton 
President 
John de Kuyper & Son (Canada) Ltd. 


Maurice Masse 
Chairman of the Board 
Maurice Massé Inc. 


John J. Peacock 
Vice-President 
Fednav Ltd. 


Jane M. Polud 
President 
Agradex International Inc. 


J. Stuart Spalding 
Vice-President, Finance 
Bell Canada Enterprises 


Matching Girts Double Dollars for McGill 


More companies than ever are adop- 
ting matching gift programs as one 
way of providing support for educa- 
tion. Through matching gift programs, 
employees’ contributions to education 
will be matched by the companies. 
Today, there are 463 companies 
which will match gifts to Canadian 
institutions. Some companies will 
match gifts made by parents, spouses, 


A 

Abbott Laboratories *D,R 

A.S. Abell Company Foundation Inc. D.R 

Abex Corporation R 

Aetna Insurance Company 

Aetna Life & Casualty D,R,M 

Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. D 

Airco, Inc. D,R 

Albany International Corp. D,R,M 

Alco Standard Corporation D 

The Alcoa Foundation *D,R.M 

Alexander & Alexander Inc 

Allegheny Ludlum Steel Corporation 

Allendale Mutual Insurance Co. R 

Allied Chemical Corporation D,M 

Allis-Chalmers Corporation D,M 

Amax Foundation, Inc. D,R 

American Airlines, Inc. D 

American Brands, Inc. 

American Can Company D,R,M 

American Express R,M 

American Hoechst Corporation 

American Home Products Corporation D,R 

American International Group Inc. 

American Mutual Insurance Companies 

American Re-Insurance Company 

American Standard, Inc. 

American States Insurance D 

American Stock Exchange 

AMF Canada Limited 

Amoco Foundation D,R,M 

Analog Devices 

A.R.A. Services, Inc. D 

Arco Limited D,R,M 

Arkwright-Boston Manufacturers Mutual 
Insurance Company R 

Armak Company * 

Arthur Andersen & Company R 

Associated Spring Corporation * 

Athos Steel & Aluminum, Inc 

Atlantic Richfield Company D,R,M 

Atlas Steels Limited 

Augat Inc 

Avco Corporation 

Avis Rent-A-Car System, Inc. D 

Avon Products Inc 

Ayerst McKenna & Harrison Limited D,R 


B 

The Badger Company, Inc 

The J.E. Baker Company D,R 

Bank of Montreal 

The Bank of New York R 

Bankers Life Company 

The Barton-Gillet Company * 

BASF Wyandotte Corporation 
Baxter Travenol Laboratories, Inc 
Beatrice Foods Company D,R,M 
Bechtel Foundation of Canada 
Becton, Dickinson and Company R 
Beech Aircraft Corporation D,R 
Bernd Brecher & Associates, Inc 
Bird Companies Charitable Foundation, Inc. D 
Black & Decker Company Limited 
Blount, Inc 

The Boeing Company D 

Boise Cascade 

The Borden Company Limited 
Bowater North American Corporation 
The Bowery Savings Bank 
Boyle-Midway Canada Limited 
Brown-Forman Distillers Corporation 
Budget Rent-A-Car Corporation D 
Buffalo Savings Bank 

Bunge Corporation 

Burlington Industries, Inc. D,R 


C 

Calgon Corporation D.R 

Campbell Soup Company D,R 

Canada Starch Company Limited 

Canada Steamship Lines 

Canada Shipbuilding 

Canada Systems Group 

Canadian Acceptance Corporation Limited 
Canadian Fuel Marketers Group Limited 
Canadian General Electric Company Limited D 
Canadian Occidental Petroleum Limited D 
Canadian Salt Co. Ltd 

The Carborundum Company R 

Carrier Canada Limited D.R,M 

Carrier Corporation D,R,M 

Castle & Cooke, Inc. D 

Cavalier Corporation 

CBS Inc. D 


KEY: *- Matched in U.S.A. only. D - Dirgctor . gligible. 


retirees, and directors in addition to 
gifts by graduates of the University. 
Others have introduced broadened 
terms of matching 2 for 1,oreven 3 for 
1, under certain circumstances. 
Often graduates, parents, associ- 
ates, and friends of McGill are unaware 
of this potential added benefit for the 
University. To determine if a donation 
is eligible to be matched, donors 


Central Life Assurance Company D 
Certain-Teed Products Corporation M 
The Charter Company 
Chemical Bank D 

Chessie System Railroads D 
Chevron Standard Limited D 
Chysler Canada Limited D,|R 
Chubb & Son Inc, D|R 
Ciba-Geigy Corporation * 
The Clorox Company 

Clow Corporation 

CNA Financial Corporation 
Coates & Clark Inc R 

The Coleman Company Inc. 
The Colonial Life Insurance Company of America 
Combustion Engineering D,R 

Commercial Union Assurance Companies 
Connecticut Bank & Trust Company R 
Connecticut General Insurance Corporation D.R.M 
Conoco Inc. D.R,M 

Consolidated Foods Corporation D.M 
Consolidation Coal Company 

The Continental Corporation *D 

Continental Oil Company D 

The Cook Foundation D,R,M 

Frederick W. Cook & Company, Inc 

Cooper Industries, Inc. D 

CPC International Inc. D 

Crum Forster of Canada Limited D 

CUNA Mutual Insurance Group 

Customized Computer Systems, Inc. M 


D 

Dart Industries Inc. *M 

Deere & Company D,R 

Dekalb AG Research, Inc. D 

Diamond Crystal Salt Company 
Diamond Shamrock Corporation M 

A.B. Dick Company *R 

Digital Equipment of Canada Limited D.R 
Dillingham Corporation D 

Dominion Engineering 

Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette, Inc. 

R.R. Donnelley & Sons Company D,R,M 
Dow Badische Company R 

The Dow Chemical Company *R 

Dow Corning Canada, Inc. 

Dow Jones & Company D 

Dresser Industries, Inc. *D,M 

Wilbur B. Driver Company 

Durion of Canada 


E 

Earth Resources Company D 
Eaton Corporation D.M 

The E-B Industries, Inc. D.R 

Ekco Canada Limited 

Eldorado Nuclear Limited 
Electrolux (Canada) Limited 
Emerson Electric Co. D 

Emnhart Corporation *D,R 
Ensign-Bickford Company D\R 
Envirotech Canada Limited 

Essex International of Canada Limited D,R.M 
Ethicon, Inc. M 

Ethyl Corporation of Canada 

Ex Cell-O Corporation * 

Excelsior Life Insurance Company 


B 

Factory Mutual Engineering Research Corporation R 
Fiberglas Canada Inc. 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Company R,M 
Firemen’s Mutual Insurance Company 

First Bancorp Inc 

First Boston Foundation Trust D,R 

First National Holding Corporation 

The First New Haven National Bank 

First Virginia Banks, Inc 

FMC Corporation 

Ford Motor Company D,R 

Ford Motor Company of Canada Limited D 
Foremost-McKesson, Inc. D 

The Foxboro Company D.R,M 

Frank E. Gannet Newspaper Foundation D,R 
Fraser Inc. 

Freeport Minerals Company D,R 

H.B. Fuller Company *R 

Funderburke & Associates, Inc 


G 

Gardner-Denver Company D,R 
Gary Energy Corporation R 
GATX Corporation 

Geico 


.M 
R 


M - More than 1-to-1 match. R - Retirees eligible. 


should contact the personnel office of 
their companies. The current list off 
companies with established matching 
gift programs is provided for your 
information. At McGill alone last year, & 
matching gifts from 129 companies|™ 
totalled $46,493, which added subs-j 
tantially to the effectiveness of thelf 


Annual Fund. 


General Atronics Corporation D 
General Electric Foundation 
General Foods Limited D,R 
General Reinsurance Corporation 
Getty Oil Company *D 

Gilman Paper Company D 

Ginn & Company D,M 

Glidden Coatings M 

Goldman, Sachs & Company 
W.R. Grace & Company 

Green Giant Company R 
Grinnel Corporation D 
Griswold-Eshleman Company 
Grumman Corporation D 

GTE Products Corporation *R 
Gulf & Western Foundation 
Guy F. Atkinson Company 


H 

Hackney & Sons Inc 

Hanes Corporation 

Harper & Row Publishers, Inc. 

Harris Corporation 

Harris Trust & Savings Bank 

The Hartford Insurance Group D,R 

The Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection 
and Insurance Company D,R 

HJ. Heinz Company D,R\M 

Herco Inc. R,M 

Hercules Canada Limited R 

Hercules Incorporated R 

Heublein Inc. D 

Hewitt Associates 

Hewlett-Packard Co. D 

Hill Acme Company 

Homestake Mining Company * 

Honeywell Limited DR 

Hooker Chemical Corporation R 

The Hoover Company *D 

Horton CBI Limited 

Houghton Chemical Corporation 

Houghton Mifflin Company *D.R 

J.M. Huber Corporation D 

Huck Manufacturing Company 

Hudson Bay Oil & Gas Company Limited 

Hughes Aircraft Company 


! 

IBM Canada Limited D,R,M 

IBM Corporation D.R.M 

Inco Limited D 

Industrial Risk Insurers R 
Ingersoll-Rand Canada, Inc. D|R 


International Business Machines Company Limited D.R,M 


International Flavors & Fragrances, Inc 


International Minerals & Chemical Corporation D,R,M 


International Multifoods Corporation D,M 
International Nickel Company, Inc. D 


international Paper Company Foundation *D,M 
International Telephone & Telegraph Corporation *D 


Interpace Corporation D\R 
Intsel Corporation D,R 
Itek Corporation 

ltel Corporation 


J 
Jamesbury Corporation 
Jefferson-Pilot Broadcasting Co. D 


John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Company D,R 


Johns-Manville Corporation D.R 
Johnson Controls Limited D 


Johnson & Higgings Willis Faber Limited M 


Johnson & Johnson D,M 
Jones & Laughlin Steel Corporation R 
Josten’s Inc 


K 

Kearney-National Incorporated 

Kerr Addison Mines 

Kidd Creek Mines Limited D 

Walter Kidde & Company 

Kidder, Peabody & Company, Inc 
Kimberley-Clark Corporation *D,R 
Kingsbury Machine Tool Corporation D 
Kingsway Transport 


Richard C. Knight Insurance Agency, Inc. R 


H. Kohnstamm & Company, Inc 
Koppers Company, Inc. D,.R,M 
Ralph Korte, Inc 


L 

Lanier Business Products 

Life Savers Inc. D,R,M 

Loyal Protective Life Insurance Company 


a ee ee 


RS 


PIPER PSSA VARA SMHS VS0 7 Pee TIT Ed 


o29H8 383 23-24 


The Lubrizol Corporation R,M 
Lutheran Mutual Life Insurance Company 


M 

M &T Chemicals R 

MacLean-Fogg Lock Nut Company 
MacLaren Power & Paper Company 

P.R. Mallory & Company, Inc. *D,R,M 
Manulife 

Marsh & McLennan Management 
Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company D 
McDonnell Douglas Foundation 
McDonald’s Corporation 

McGraw-Hill Inc. D\R 

McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited D,R 

McKim Advertising Limited 

Medusa Corporation 

Mellon National Corp. D 

Merck & Co., Inc. *D,R 

Metrocan Leasing Limited 

Metropolitan Life Insurance Company D,R 
MFB Mutual Life Insurance Company 
Michigan General Corporation 

Middlesex Mutual Assurance Company 
Midland-Ross Corporation D 

Milton Bradley Company M 

Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing Company D,R 
MITE Corporation D 

Mobil Foundation * D,R,M 

Mobil Oil Canada Ltd. D,R,M 

Mohasco Corporation D 

Montgomery Ward Foundation D,R,M 
Moore McCormack Resources, Inc. 
Morgan Guaranty Trust Company D,R 
Morrison-Knudson Company, Inc. D 
Motorola Canada Limited 

Motorola Inc. D\R 

M.T.S. Systems Corp. R 

Murphy Oil Corporation D,R,M 

The Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York 
Mutual of Omaha D,R 


N 

Nabisco, Inc. D,R 

National Gypsum Company 

National! Life Insurance Company D,R 

National Medical Enterprises 

Nepera Chemical Company, Inc. 

New England Electric Systems Co 

New England Gas & Electric Association R 

New: York Bank for Savings D 

Noranda Mines 

Northsport Limited 

The Northwestern Mutual! Life Insurance Company R 
Northwestern National Bank of Minneapolis 
Northwestern National Life Insurance Company 
W.W. Norton & Company, Inc. M 


O 

Oakite Products, Inc 

Occidental Life Insurance Company D 
Occidental Petroleum Corporation R 
Old Stone Bank 

The Ontario Paper Company 

Ortho Pharmaceutical Corporation M 
Otis Elevator Company Limited D,R,M 


p 

The Ralph M. Parsons Company D 
Paul Masson Inc. R 

Paul Revere Life Insurance Company 
Pechiney Ugine Kuhlmann Corp. 
Pennzoil Company R,M 

Pepsico, Inc. D,R,M 

Pfizer, Inc. D.R 

Phelps Dodge Corporation D,R 
Pioneer Group D 

Pioneer Hi-Bred Corn Company M 


Pittsburgh National Bank 

Pittway Corporation D,M 

Planters R 

Polaroid Corporation D,R 

Porter Paint Co. 

Pratt & Whitney Canada Ltd. D,R,M 

Preformed Line Products Company 
Prentice-Hall Inc. 

Procter & Gamble Fund * 

Proctor-Silex M 

Provident Life & Accident Insurance Company R 
The Prudential Insurance Company of America D,R 


Q 
Quaker Chemical Products Corporation M 


R 

Rainier National Bank R 

Ralston Purina Canada Inc. D,R 

Arthur D. Raybin Associates, Inc 
Raytheon Company *D 

J.S. Redpath Limited 

Republic National Bank of New York 
Research Cottrell 

The Research Institute of America 
Richardson-Merrell, Inc. D 
Richardson-Vicks, Inc. D 

Rio Algom Mines Limited 

Rio Tinto Canadian Exploration Limited 
Robin Hood Multifoods Limited 
Rockefeller Center Inc. D.R 

Rockwell International Corporation, Inc. D 
ROLM Corporation 

Royal Insurance Company D 

Arthur Rudick Brokerage 


S 

Safeco Insurance Companies M 

Saga Corporation 

The St. Paul Companies * 

St. Regis Paper Company D,M 

Sanders Associates, Inc. 

Schering Corporation *D 
Schering-Plough Foundation, Inc. *D 
Schlegel Corporation 

SCM Corporation M 

Scotia Bond Company Limited 

Scott Paper Company Foundation D 
Joseph E. Seagram & Sons Inc. R 
Selkirk-Metalbestos (Canada) 
Shenandoah Life Insurance Company 
The Sherwin-Williams Company D 

Silver Burdett Company R 

Simonds Canada Saw Company Limited 
Sinclair Oil Corporation D,R,M 

The Singer Company Foundation *D,R 
Smith, Kline & French Canada Limited (SKF) D,R 
The Southland Corporation D 
Southwest Forest Industries D 
Spectra-Physics 

Sperry & Hutchison Company D,M 
Squibb Corporation D,R 

Stanadyne, Inc. 

Standard Brands Inc. R 

Standard Insurance Company 

Standard Oil Company of California D,R,M 
Standard Oil Company (Indiana) D,R,M 
The Standard Oil Company (Ohio) D,R,M 
Stanley Home Products, Inc. D 

The Stanley Works D,M 

State Mutual Life Assurance Company of America D,R 
Stauffer Chemical Company D 

Steel Heddie Manufacturing Company 
Suburban Propane Gas Corporation R 
Sun Life Assurance Company of Canada * 
Sun Company Inc. D, R,M 

Suncor, Inc. R,M 

Syntex Corporation D 


+ 
Teledyne, Inc. D,M 
Teleflex Foudation 
C. Tennant, Sons & Co 
Tennant Company M 
Texaco Canada, !nc.™M 
Texaco, Inc. M 
Texasgulf, Iric 
Texas Instruments 
T.H.A. Technical Industries Limited 
The Thomas & Betts Corporation D 

iger Leasing Group 
Tos River Chemi aI Corporation (TRC) 
The Toro Company D,R,M 
Toronto Star Newspapers Limited 
Total Petroleum (North America) 

Towers. Perrin, Forster & Crosby (Canada) Limited 
Townsend and Bottum, Inc 
Transamerica Corporation D 
The Travelers Insurance Companies RM 
Treadway Companies, Inc 
Tremco Canada 
Tuco Products Co 
Turner Construction Company 


mpany of New York *D 


U 

UGI Corporation 

Union Carbide * 

Union Oil Company of California D,R 

Uniroya!, Inc. D,R 
Uni-Serv Corporation R,M | 
United Airlines, Inc. D 

United Artists D 
United Bank of Denver R | 
United Parcel Service 

United States Fidelity & Guaranty Co.D,R,M 

United States Gypsum Company D,R 

United Technologies of Canada D,R,M 

United Technologies Corporation D,R,M 

United Telecom D,R 

The Upjohn Company of Canada D,R 

Urban Investment & Development Company 

U.S. Air 

United States Leasing International, Inc. D,|M 

U.S. Steel Foundation D 

Utah International Inc. D 

Utica National Insurance Group 


V 

Valvoline Oil of Canada Limited D,R 
Varian Associates D,M 

Vicks D 

Vitaulic Company of America 
Voyageur Limited 


W 

Wallace-Murray Corporation 
Warner-Lambert Canada Limited R 
Washington National Insurance Company 
The Washington Post M 

Waste Management Inc. D 
Wausau Insurance Companies D,R 
Watkins-Johnson Company 
Weeden & Company D 

Welch Foods, Inc. 

Wells Fargo & Company R 
Westvaco Corporation D 

Whitehall Laboratories Limited D,R 
William E. Young & Company 
Wiremold Company D,R 

Wolverine World Wide, Inc. 


xX 
Xerox Canada Inc M 
Xerox Corporation D.M 


Leadership Gifts and participation by the greatest possible number of donors provide 


the strong foundation upon which the Alma Mater Fund rests. The following four 
categories of giving were created for those graduates, parents, associates and friends 
who find it financially possible to contribute at these levels: 
Gifts of $1000 or more 
Gifts between $500 and $999 
Gifts between $250 and $499 
Gifts between $100 and $249 


For the year ending May 31, 1983, the Leadership Gift Roll lists all individuals 
contributing in one of these four categories, except those requesting anonymity. 


NAHUM GELBER BA54 BCL57 
MENARD M GERTLER MOD43_ BSC46 
MRS JOHN D GILLIAM 8B SC59 

DANIEL L GOLD BCOMS59 

GEORGE D GOODFELLOW B ENG36 
MARGARET EB GOSSE BA24 MD28 
HENRY W GREENBERG 

MRS HUGH G HALLWARD _ B SC52 

A KEITH HAM BA54 BCLS59 

ALEX D HAMILTON B ENG40 

MRS PDP HAMILTON’ B A22 

RMP HAMILTON - B SC(ENG)25 
MJHARKINS MD32 

C F HARRINGTON B A33 B C L36 
RICHARD M HART PH OD70 

DAVID M HARVEY M D55 

GERALD G HATCH BENG44 

MRS GERALD G HATCH BB ARCH46 

H CLIFFORD HATCH 

RENE V HEBERT M D45 

ISABELLE F HIGGINSON +B COM24 
ROSS O HILL BSC46 MD48 

CHEE KONG HO DD S/77 

HUGH R HOWSON MCOM71 

MRS G MILLER HYDE 

JOHN G IRELAND B A48 

WM F JAMES’ M SC21 

ALICE E JOHANNSEN = B SC34 

M CARLYLE JOHNSTON BASO BCLS53 
GEORGE B JOST B ENG32 

FRANK A KAY DD S68 

JOHN KAZUTOW WM D36 

PATRICK J KEENAN BCOM54 C A57 
PAULB KELLY MOD61 

TAYLOR J KENNEDY BENG38 MENG39 
RANALD KROLMAN |B A81 

SAMUEL B LABOW BSC58 MD62 
LAURENCE L LACAILLADE 8B A65 
AURELE LACROIX 

HUBERT LACROIX BCL76 MB A81 
WENDELL H LAIDLEY B ENG62 

PETER LANDRY BENG48 M SC62 
MRS WG LEACH B A46 

HELENRE LEAVITT BA45 MA49 

J J MAURICE LECLAIR BSC49 MD51 
MRS ROBERT C LEGGE _ iB A511 

EARL LERNER DD S63 

AOLESLIE BA22 8B SC(ENG)24 
EALESLIE BSC(ENG)16 LL D61 
DANIEL LING MSC66 PH D68 
JOHN B LIVINGSTONE 

ROBERT LOVEDAY 

MARTYN LOVEDAY 

ROBERT E MACFARLANE M OD61 

A ROY MACLAREN _ B SC(ENG)23 
LOUIS B MAGIL B ARCH36 


The Chancellor’s 
Committee 

This Leadership Club 
recognizes donors of 
gifts of $1000 or more. 
Gifts from the 
Chancellor's Committee 
totalied $429,372, 
including gifts given 
anonymously. 


ARNOLD AARON 
WILLIAM RG ABBOTT B COM68 
SAUL ABRACEN 
CHARLES S ALEXANDER BAS2 BCLS59 
MRS CHARLES S ALEXANDER B AS58 
D MURRAY ANGEVINE M D29 
YU KEI ANN B ENG66 
ABRAM APPEL 8B COM35 
JOHN A ARMOUR 
RICHARD A ATKINSON M D58 
ROBERTE BELL PHD48 DSC79 
HAROLD F BIEWALD 0D S$55 
G DRUMMOND BIRKS 8B COM40 
H LLOYD BLACHFORD __B SC(ENG)18 
ANCEL U BLAUSTEIN BSC42. M D45 
HELMUT BLUME 
E ROGER BOOTHROYD MSC40 PHD43 
LIONEL BORKAN 
R DAVID BOURKE 8 ARCHS54 
HUGH M BROCK B SC(ENG)28 
C R BRONFMAN 
GERALD BRONFMAN 8B COM35 
ROBERT S BROUGHTON PHD72 
G STEWART BROWN 
MRS FREDERICK BUECHNER B A54 
ERWINL BURKE M D55 
JAMES ABUTLER ™M DS59 
JOAO P RCAMPOS 8B A70 
GEORGE SD CANTLIE M D60 
RONALD E CAPE PH D67 
E BOWER CARTY BCOM39 
WARREN CHIPPENDALE B COM49 
SHELDON MCLAMAN DD $57 
ROBERT N COCKFIELD B COM45 
DONALD L COLE 8B SC(AGR)55 
MRS DONALD L COLE B SC(H EC)57 
MRS ERNEST C COMMON _B A28 MRS ROBERT B MAYER 
MRS FREDERIC B COPPIN B A37 GEORGE RONALD MCCALL B SC(ARTS)21 
GORDON A COPPING M030 M D39 
HAROLD CORRIGAN 8B COMS50 CHARLES A MCCRAE B COMSO 
THOMAS | CRAWFORD M D45 EILEEN MCKYES DIP P E29 
JOSEPH F CRONIN DD S58 DROSS MCMASTER BA30 BCL33 
RF PATRICK CRONIN MD53. MSC60 ELIZABETH B MCNABB A414 
CLAYTON H CROSBY MD37_ DIP MED47 AHMENDEL 8B ENG44 
DAVID CULVER 8B SC47 DUDLEY N MENDELS 
GEORGE NMCURRIE 8B ENGS1 S LEON MENDELSOHN BCL24 
RICHARD G DAMIANO DD S60 ROBERT D MIDGLEY M D60 
MRS EDGAR DAVIDSON _B A33 MRS HAMILNE BA32 
HUGH P DAVIS M D27 DAVID H MOLSON B ARCH52 
| GEORGE DEGNAN MD39 RODNEY J MORRELL BENG63 DIP MGMT71 
j L PACIFIQUE DESJARDINS B ENGS54 DONALD D MOSSMAN _B SC(ARTS)23 
jj SHODOBELL COM22 DAVIDB PALL BSC36 PHD39 
be MARGARET RUTH DODDS BA32 MA34 CHARLES FRANCIS PATTON 
) DAVID G DORION 8B COMS54 CHARLES H PETERS BA28 LLOD74 
ty DEREK A DRUMMOND _B ARCH62 MRS HJLPETERSSON 8B A41 
ty CHIPMAN H DRURY 8 ENG39 GEORGE S PETTY BCOMS54 DIP MGMT59 
‘| MRS RUDOLPH DUDER 8BSC42 MSW70 LAZARUS PHILLIPS BCLI8 LL D65 
W, CHARLESAEAVES BSA32_ M SC(AGR)37 CHARLES HUGH PIGOT _B SC(ENG)26 
} GORDON L ECHENBERG BAG6i BCL64 WARD C PITFIELD BCOM48 

MRS GMMEDWARDS BAI6 JANE M POLUD 

WILLIAM E EVENS 8B COM35 RICHARD W POUND BCOM62 BCLE7 
, MOHAMMED A FARIS BENGSS M ENG62 ALFRED POWIS BCOMS1 
}. ANGELO J FAVRETTO B ARCH47 WILLIAM M PRUDHAM BA23__ B SC(ENG)25 
| DONALD G FINLAYSON BCLS52 ANTON P RANDAZZO MD32 


- 


JANET L FINLAYSON BSC(H EC)59 BL S65 JAMES B REDPATH -—B SC(ENG)31 
JOHN P FISHER 8B ENGS1 ROBERT M RENNIE 8B COM48 
PHILIPS FISHER BAI6 LL D64 MRS MICHAEL RIDDELL B COM61 
GEORGE E FLOWER BA40 MA49 W GORDON ROBERTS 8B COM32 
RJAFRICKER BENG40 H ROCKE ROBERTSON CC BSC32 MD36 
DLORNE GALES BCL35 LLOD79 MRS ANDRE ROSSINGER MS W51 
\) JOHN M GARDNER B ENG49 WILLIAM S ROW B SC(ENG)27 
\ JOHN MF GAREAU_ B SC52 LAURA ROWLES BA25 PHD28 
WROWLES MSC26 PHD28 
NATHAN W RUBIN M D27 


LEVON K GARRON' M D036 
DAVID ALAN GEAN MD53 


HERBERT C SALMON BASO BCLS53 
MRS ARTHUR J SANTRY JR B SC47 
LINDA S SCHENCK =B SC72 
JOHN M SCHOLES BB ENG52 
DAVID G SCOTT BCOM32 
CHARLES R SCRIVER BAS5i MDS55 
JAMES M SHEA M OD61 
GEORGE A SIMPSON WM D30 
CHARLES E SMITH DDS70 PHD75 
MRS HR STEACY' 8B SC47 
ELIZABETH ASTEFFEN M D45 
H ARNOLD STEINBERG 8B COM54 
ROBERT W STEVENSON BA4S_ BD61 
JAMES R STUART MD45 PH D57 
MRS DOROTHY E SWALES_ BS A21 
M SC(AGR)22 
F RICHARD TERROUX = B SC(ARTS)25 
M SC26 
ROBERT C THOM BSC53° MD55 
A LLOYD THOMPSON PH D43 
EDWARD L THOMPSON B COM48 
MRS JOHN A TOLHURST BA33 MA34 
LAURENCE C TOMBS BA24 MA26 
J GILBERT TURNER MD32 
PF VINEBERG MA36 BCL39 
ROGER N VIOLETTE M D382 
ROGER W WARREN COM55 
ELIZABETH F WATSON _ DIP NUR56 
COLIN W WEBSTER" B A24 
LORNE C WEBSTER - B ENG50 
RICHARD C WEBSTER 8B COM32 
WILLIAM P WILDER 8B COM46 
THEODORE WILDI 8B ENG44 
H BRUCE WILLIAMS M D55 
JAMES WILSON 
HAROLD R C WRIGHT 


The Principal’s 
Associates 

This Leadership Club 
recognizes donors of 


gifts between $500 and 


$999. Gifts from The 
Principal’s Associates 
totalled $168,131, 
including gifts given 
anonymously. 


MRS SAMUEL T ADAMS_s B A339 


BERNARD M ALEXANDOR BA28 BCL31 


CLIVE VALLEN BAS6 BCLS59 

GEORGE A ALLISON BA37 BCL40 

LLOYD B ALMOND BB SC(ENG)26 

JOHN D ANDREW B COM49 

LUKMAN ANWAR 

DAVID H APPEL BA62 BCL66 

FRANCIS M ARCHIBALD 8B SC(ENG)23 

EFFIEC ASTBURY BA38 BLS39 

LOUIS AAUBE MD43 

DOUGLAS AVRITH 8B A75 

DAVID M BALTZAN MD20 

ELINOR M BARTLETT BAS3 BLSS59 

JOHN BATES M8BA78 

NORMAN BECKOW _ B COM46 

PAUL BEDOUKIAN BENG36 PH D41 

THEODORE S BEECHER BSC39 MD41 

JOSEPH BENDER M D853 

ABRAHAM BENJAMIN DD S23 

NORMAN W BENSON _ B ENG40 

KENNETH C BENTLEY DODS58 MD62 

MRS MURIEL BIEWALD _B SC(P E)52 

BRENDA L BIRKIN BSC67 MOD71 

MRS LLOYD W BIRMINGHAM M SC46 
P H D49 

LOUIS BIRO M D852 

TREVOR H BISHOP BA54 BCLS57 

DAVID BLOOM = B ENG35 

JOHN BLUNDELL 

DOUGLAS T BOURKE B ENG49 

MRS DOUGLAS T BOURKE B A49 

J ROBERT BOWEN M D45 

HARRY M BOYCE 8B COM30 

ROMAN BOYKO 8B COM60 

SHIRLEY A BRADFORD 8B COM41 

MARTIN A BRADLEY LL M62 


* FREDERICK W BRADSHAW _ B SC(ENG)25 


ALFRED J BRAGOL! BSC51 MDS53 


*Deceased 


PAUL BRAIS BENG49 


DONALD D BRENNAN _ B ENG61 Pe MGMT 
WILLIAM G BRISSENDEN = B ENG3 E 
REAA BROWN MD62 MSC66 


NORMAN E BROWN BSC48 MSC52 

G COLIN BUCHAN MD58 

ARTHUR G CAMPBELL 8B A38 

LLOYD CARR-HARRIS__B A511 

MRS WILLIAM K E CARSWELL MS W69 
M B A80 

ALLAN V CASTLEDINE BCOM48 


ALISTAIR G CATTERSON BSC52 MD56 


KIRTT K CHARAN PHOD70 

ROGER CHENG’ 8B ENG38 

J C CHERNA 

JOSEPH B CHERRY BSC42 MD43 
DONALD L CHEW BSC66 MD/7( 
STANLEY G CHRISTIE BSC49 MD53 
ROSS T CLARKSON BCL48 LL OD67 
EDWARD G CLEATHER _B A511 

MRS AUDREY CLEGHORN 

DORIS NUNES COLLINS MD44 MSC49 
DAVID LCOLLINS MD54 

F T COLLINS C L24 

JEREMY C CROGGON' 8B COM60 

J MCRUIKSHANK MD25_ DIP MED36 
THOMAS RM DAVIS BCL72 LLB79 


A JEAN DE GRANDPRE BCL43 LL D81 


JADE LALANNE BAI9_ LL OD80 
FELICE DE STEFANO 

GUY R DECARIE 8B ENG48 

FRANK T DENIS BENG32 MSC33 


DAPHNE FS DENTON MOD53_ DIP MED63 


DONALD J DEWAR PH D40 

JADIXON 8B SC48 

JOHN W DODDS BSC43 PH D49 
CMDRURY BCL36 

ROBERT L DUBEAU 

TIMOTHY H DUNN B COM40 

ELIZABETH G EDWARDS _siB A‘47 
RUSSELL L EDWIN BSC50 MD54 

A DOUGLAS ELLIOTT BENGS1 

ROBERT W FAITH BASS OD S58 
JOHN B FELTNER' WM D837 

BERNARD J FINESTONE BCOM41 

MRS MILLIE FISCHEL 

MRS ALLAN J FLEMING 

ROBERT P FLEMING B ARCH37 

BARRY D FLETCHER’ M D61 

ROBERT FLOOD’ B SC(AGR)35 

R ARMOUR FORSE MD47 MSC50 

A NORTON FRANCIS SC39 

PHILIP 8B FRENCH B ENG34 

SAMUEL FROMSON- B ENG38 

MARVIN B GAMEROFF BAS53 BCL58 
H GRAHAM GAMMELL_—«B SC48 

JEAN GARCEAU  BCOM54 

AR GILLESPIE BCOM30 

WAT GILMOUR - B SC(ENG)26 

PHILIP GOLD MD61 PH D65 
NORMAN J GOLDBERG BSC55 MD59 
ALAN ZGOLDEN BCL62 

JOHN H GOMERY BAS53 BCLS56 
HAROLD M GORDON B ENGS50 

C ALLISON GRAHAM-~_- BB ENG34 
MICHAEL JOHN GREEN  B ENG62 
TASS G GRIVAKES BA54 BCLS5 
A LOUISE HALL 8B N61 

JOHN M HALLWARD_ B A50 

H GEORGE HAMPSON BA47 MA49 
ABRAM B HANDELMAN DD S39 
DEREK AHANSON BA54 BCLS57 
EDWARD T HARBERT 8B SC(ENG)23 


~ 


PATRICIA MHARNEY B SC(AGR)50 PH D63 


SEAN J HARRINGTON BCL68 

MRS DENT HARRISON iB A32 
WILBUR J HART BA34_ B ARCH40 
WILLIAM HAYS M D64 

ROBERT W HENWOOD_sB ENG33 
LEWIS W HERSEY 8B SC52 

ROBERT W HESLOP _B SC(AGR)53 
MARGARET C HIGGINSON —_B SC(ARTS)26 
WILLIAM P HILLGARTNER 

BETSY HIRST~ B A70 

DAVID STANLEY HOLLETT MOD77 
EDWARD P HOOVER B A25 

DORIS AHOWELL WM D49 

FS HOWES BSC(ENG)24 M SC26 
PETER W HUTCHINS 8 A66 
GMILLER HYDE BA26 BCL29 
MRS NEILB IVORY 8B A54 

WILLIAM JAMES PH D57 

RICHARD B JAMIESON M D42 
WILLIAM E JAQUES ™M D42 


. Ss 


KATHLEEN R JENKINS B A26 MRS DOROTHY SOROS B A23 RAYMOND CARON BA28 BCL31 JOAN C GILCHRIST ae Ae. P 
ANTHONY H JEW M D62 NUNZIO MARIO SPINO 8B ENG73 TIMOTHY W CASGRAIN B A69 JOAN M GILCHRIST Je : Pa, )64 
DAVID! JOHNSTON 8CL57 LLM61 TOR OSCAR STANGELAND BAS5O BCL53 MRS STELLA CHARLESON B SC63 LYALL MACM GILLE 4 DS? 
NEIL V JOHNSTON’ M D61 IVAN STANKOVIC DD S78 JEAN CHARTON 8B ENG47 PIERRE GLOOR PH D657 
ROBERT VICTOR JOHNSTON BSC71 MD76 JAMES P STANLEY  B ENG38 LOUISE CHEVALIER +B ENG74 CRGLUBE BAS2 5 $ we. 
; LESLIE K JONAS 8B SC56 PAMELA D STEWART M A61 SIMON W CHIASSON M D45 MARY GOLUBEVA 5S oe 
DAVID PHILLIP JONES B A70 MALCOLM A TASCHEREAU B ENG53 SIDNEY S CHIPMAN M D28 MRS JEAN Aa ie 5 CCA 
J KENDALL JONES M D56 RUSSELL F TAYLOR BSC47 MDS5O0 GEORGE CHRISTIE HAROLD H GOODM hae 
PIERRE J JUTRAS —_B SC(AGR)51 CYNTHIA KATHLEEN TAYLOR B A77 NICOLAS CHRISTOU MD75 PH D80 MRS MORTIMER paneer bee M A35 
HARRY N KANGLES BSC46_ B COM48 MIRIAMH TEES BA44 MLS75 WALLACE B CHUNG M DS53 NORMAN LUSBY wae oot 
HAROLD J KATZIN B ARCH65 WILLIAM A TETLEY 8B A48 JOHN B CLAXTON BCLS5O JAMES A GRANT B at 1 
E DUDLEY KEEVER M D853 ALAN G THOMPSON M D43 JOHN E CLEGHORN — B COM62 WILLIAM 1 GRANT 8B eg 
ALBERT A KENWOOD = _B ENG49 DANIEL H TINGLEY BCL63_ BA63 CALECLCLOKIE DD S58 ALEXS GRAYDON BAS be 
KATHERINE D KETCHUM BA24' MDS1 JMTRAINOR M055 ALAN JORDAN COHEN _B SC72 RONALD MICHAEL GREAVES — B SC74 
DANIEL KINGSTONE BA53 BCL56 HILDA TREMBLETT BA49 MD55 ARTHUR COHEN BA38 MD40 MILTON GREENBERG M D28 
MOHANDAS M KINI PH D60 CEDRIC EM TUOHY JR MD53 ELEANOR COLLE MGGREENBLATT BA24 BCL27 
JOHN G KIRKPATRICK BSC39 BCL42 IAN N URQUHART B A70 MICHAEL J COLMAN B ENG57 HERBERT JOHN GREENIAUS 8B COM66 
of ELEOKOLBER BA49 BCLS52 NORMAN VAN WYCK BA30 MD35 WILLIAM R COOK BCOM52 JOHN H GRISDALE B SC(AGR)49 
ANDREW J KOVACS BSC66 MD68 MRS MAGTILDIS VANDERSTAP GERALD E COOPER BSC48 PHDS53 PHILIP N GROSS _B SC(ENG)26 
MRS WENDELL H LAIDLEY 8B A64 INGRID MVICAS BSC70 MOD76 ROSS M COOPER BENG48 MENGSO NAOMI JACKSON GROVES BA33 MA35 
W E LAMBERT ROBERT VOGEL MA54 PH D59 F CAMPBELL COPE BA24 BCL27 ROBERT S GURD_ B SC48 
HOWARD J LANG 8B ENG35 M LAIRD WATT 8B COM34 MRSECCORISTINE B A41 JOHN W HACKNEY M039 DIP MED48 
JOHN A LANG B A937 PETER W WEBSTER _ DIP AGR63 GEORGE ACOSLETT 8B ENGS1 HMHAGUE BCL21 
MRS THOMAS A K LANGSTAFF 8B COM34 GEORGE W WESTON’ BCOM51 RJ BLANCHE COULTIS M A49 ALFRED HD HAIBLEN 8B ENG46 
ELIZABETH C LATHEM MD50 BARBARA J WHITLEY 8B A40 MARY ROCHE COURTRIGHT 8B SC40 THOMAS R HALE B SC47__M D49 
ROBERT EJ LAYTON B ENG47 ARTHUR WILKINSON 8B ENG33 PH D44 JOHN AHALL BSC42 BENG49 
MRS ROBERT E J LAYTON B A47 JOHN P WILMSHURST 8B COM70 PATRICIA COURTRIGHT 8 SC71 THOMAS M HAMBLIN BENG65 MENG74 
PAUL KUAI YU LEONG = B COM81 DONALD R WILSON MOD39_ DIP MED47 DANIEL F COWAN' M D60 EHP HAMILTON  B SC(ARTS)27 | 
JOHN M LITTLE M D61 FRANK D WOLEVER' B ENG43 DAVID COWAN’ BA23 J DAVID HAMMOCK _ B SC63 
A BRIAN LITTLE BA48 MDSO EDWARD WOLSTEIN B SC(ARTS)28 MD32 RICHARD S CRABBE PHD77 H ANTHONY HAMPSON _ B A50 
MRS JOHN B LIVINGSTONE — B A60 WILLIAM EDWARD YVORCHUK ROBERTELCRAIG M062 MRS EDMUND A HANKIN BA34_ DIP P E35 
MARVIN NLOUGHEED M D47 WILLIAM G CUMBERLAND B SC68 pitgigabioe’ fi M ED72 | 
G DONALD LOVE B ENGS50 ALAN S CUNNINGHAM B COM48 ! 
45 MCL46 . PETER ACURRIE DD S75 C GORDON HARRIS’ _B ENGS50 | 
DONALD Taiccanccien 6 ENCED Gifts between $250 MARIAN C CUSHING BA60 M D64 THORNLEY W HART COM37 | 
ALEXANDER S MACINNES PH D41 and $499 MICHAEL CYTRYNBAUM BA62 BCLE65 ROBERT K HARWOOD ENG48 
DAVID MACKENZIE 8B A48 C L51 : ; E LESLIE DARRAGH BB A44 JAMES S HASEGAWA BSC56 DD S58 
ALAN AMACNAUGHTON BA26 BCL29 Gifts at this level JOHN T DAVIDSON 8B Scé4 M D68 H CLIFFORD HATCH JR B A63 
RS J AIER A L $3 MRS MARY A DAVIDSON A4t 
PHP Mt WALOUF ; ENGSS. ; totalled $160,743, MARCELLE DE FREITAS B A43 LILY HECHTMAN B S063 M 067 
ROBERT H MARCHESSAULT PH D54 ; i j ARMAND LC DE MESTRAL BCLE66 ROY ML 
PATRICK JMARS BCOM62 MB A65 including gifts given MARC E DE WEVER BCL69 STEPHEN J HELLE BSC52 MD56 
HUGH G MARSHALL B ENGS1 anonymously. JOHN M DEALY JOHN J HENEY —B COM49 
AIAN MATHESON 8B COM32 G DOUGLAS DENTON MOD45_ DIP MEDS51 JAMES P HENNIGER BSC60 PH D65 
HARRY MAYEROVITCH BA30_ B ARCH33 GILBERT G DESNOYERS 8B ENGS55 MRS JAMES P HENNIGER BA62 M A65 
MRS J CRAIG MCCLELLAND MA38 MONROE ABBEY LAW26 JOHN J DINAN MD34 LUCIUS T HILL JR MD58 
NEIL W MCDERMID B ENGS5O OCABBOTT BCL21 LLDS51 DONALD G DOEHRING DAVID Y HODGSON = B COM48 
FRANK T MCDONNELL BB ENG61 FRANCES E ABOUD MA70 PHD73 EVERITT P DOLAN MD50 *GEORGE R HODGSON ENG16 
J IAN MCGIBBON -_B ENGS1 GEORGE K AJEMIAN DD S64 MAURICE DONGIER JEAN MHOLMES BF A52 
STANLEY E MCGURK 8B ENGS54 JAMES M ALEXANDER M D34 JAMES N DOYLE BA37 BCL41 MRS EDWARD P HOOVER B A34 
KENNETH G MCKAY BSC38 MSC39 WILLIAM ALEXANDER LANEY ADOYLE 8B N69 WS HUNT  B ENG36 
MARJORIE F MCLAGGAN MAS31 GWYNNETH A ALLEN BNS58 MSC(N)75 GORDON DRUKER'- _B SC57 C GRANT HUNTER BCOM60 8B A62 
DONALD R MCROBIE B COM34 ROBERT E AMARON- BASS DWAYNE DUDGEON ODDS75 REED WHYDE BSC41 MD44 
JF MEAKINS MD36 JOHN H AMBROSE __B SC(ENG)24 P ARTHUR H DUFAYS 8B ENG63 W FARRELL HYDE 8B COMS54 
MICHAEL A MEIGHEN B A60 EVANGELOS D ANDROUTSOS DD S62 C ALEX DUFF B SC37 A STUART HYNDMAN BA48 BCL52 
ROBERT M MELNIKOFF BSC54 MD58 HRANGELL BS A25 DONNA N DUNCAN BLS62 ML S68 RENALDO IADELUCA 
OHEMIGHT MD25 MARK G APPEL _B A65 RUSSELL A DUNN B ENG38 J WILLIAM IBBOTT M D54 
WILLIAM| MILLER BCLS53 LEONARD APPLEBY BA46 MD48 DOUGLAS L DYKEMAN MD53 KOJI YAMA M SC72 
MRS JWEMINGO BS W50 ROBERT F APTER B SC(ENG)30 DAVID G EASTMAN MD51 GEORGE W ILOTT 8 ENGSO 
GHMONTGOMERY BA33 BCL36 WILLIAM LARGO MD40 WILLIAM J ECCLES BA49 PHDS5 MORTON P ISRAEL BSC65 MD69 
MCEDRIC MOONEY BA32 MD36 DONALD E ARMSTRONG PH D54 ROSS EDDY BCL76 JOHN B JEWELL MD43 | 
R DUNCAN MORAN BSC67 DDS72 PHILIP P ASPINALL B COMSO PETER GEDGELL MD43_ DIP MEDS50 GEORGE E JOHNSON JR. MOD74 
DAVID AMURPHY M D60 HAROLD H AUDET M D45 BRYANAEKREN DD S63 LOUIS G JOHNSON BSC35 MD39 
F LLOYD MUSSELLS BA40 MD44 CORNELIUS M BAARS MSC(APP)58 M D64 MAURICE J ELDER 8SC42 MOD43 J STUART JOHNSTON _B ENG40 
HELEN R NEILSON BHS39 M SC(AGR)48 RONALD A BACKUS'  M D64 MARTIN AENTIN MSC42 MD45 MRS M CARLYLE JOHNSTON -~—B A50 | 
ROBERT NELSON K JEAN BAGGS BSC67 MD71 LORNE FRANKLIN ERDILE 8 SC78 M S W54 
WALTER W NICHOL BA48 MOD51 JAMES L BALLENY 8B SC(ENG)25 H MARTYN ESTALL BA30 MAS31 ROSE JOHNSTONE BSC5O0 PHDS53 
JOHN SCOTT NIXON B A32 EDWARD M BALLON. B A47 FRANK PRIDHAM ESTEY BSC72 MOD76 WILLIAM M JONES BSC52 MODS54 
WILLIAM E NORRISH BA38 BCL42 HUGH G BARCLAY _B ENGS57 GERALD W FARNELL PH D57 A HUGH JOSEPH —__B SC(ARTS)20 
ROBERT S O'BRIEN BA51 BCLS53 IANA BARCLAY BCL48 JEAN H FAUROT M A40 J JOSEPHSON B ENG44 
GOOBEMBE 8B ENG52 HARVEY BARKUN- _B SC48 MARY ANN FERGUSON BSW72 MSW73 JEAN BAPTISTE JULIEN M A81 . 
CHRISTOPHER O ORANYEL! M SC(AGR)64 MRS STANLEY BARON B A51 OJFIRESTONE MA42 ROBERT S KADOWAKI 8BSC57 DOD S63 
MRS ISOBEL OSWALD BA37 M A81 J DOUGLAS BARRINGTON 8B COM64 MORRIS J FISH BASS BCLE62 GERHARD E KAUNAT 8B ENGS54 
JAMES S PALMER B A48 A JOYCE BARWICK BSC46 MSC48 J GERALD FITZPATRICK BSC44 RONAN KEARNEY 


BERNARD PANET-RAYMOND _ B ENG47 THOMAS C BATES’ M D62 DAVID JFLAM BSC62 DD S66 RALPH G KEEFER 8B COM40 

BRUNO J PATERAS BCL57 MRS CLIVE LB BAXTER M A61 MRS PATRICK J KEENAN B A54 | 

TJFPAVLASEK BENG44 PH D58 DONALD W BAXTER MSC53 LINDA JANE KELLEY 8B A76 

J ALLAN PERHAM'-_B ENG38 M GLADYS BEAN BA40_ ODIPP E41 JOHN P G KEMP BENG48 } 

CHARLES H PERRAULT BENG43 M ENG46 MRS JAMES ROBERT BEATTIE 8B A30 E BRUCE KENNEDY BENG70 ODS74 

ISIDORE C POLLACK B A35 BL S31 JOHN J KERR 8B ENG46 | 
*MRS PHEBE G PRATT BLS39 SIDNEY J BECKER B ENG38 ESTHER W KERRY DIPS W30 MA39 . 

JAMES D PRENTICE BSC51 MSC53 RICHARD S BELL OD S69 LLOYD S KING 

WILLIAM H PUGSLEY BCOM34 PH D50 MIMI M BELMONTE BSC48 MD52 DOUGLAS G KINNEAR BSC48 MOD52 

COLIN RAMSEY M D48 JACK BERMAN DOD S54 ROYAL C KIRBY BA5O0 MD52 

DUNBAR O C RAPIER B A50 JOSEPH BERNOTAS BA54 BCLS57 ALAN KIRSCHBERG BA28 MA29 

EVANS B REID 8SC37 PHD40 MICHEL R BIENVENU ODDS75 STANLEY | KIVENKO BCOM63 

MICHAEL D RENNERT BSC61 ODD S63 ROBERT J BIERSNER MA64 PH D66 ERIC J KLINKHOFF 8B A72 

EDWARD RESNIK MD30 MRS KERSTI BIRO BCOM70 MBA/77 FRANS K KONG’ B ENG80 

MICHAEL L RICHARDS BA60 BCLE63 ELDON P BLACK BCL49 OLEG S KOPYTOV BSC69 DDS73 

MRS R J RICHARDSON -— B SC52 WESTON BLAKE JR MSC53 SOLOMON M KOZOL DOD S837 

RONALD T RILEY B ENGS56 JOHN BLAND B ARCH33 BARBARA PEAD KRAFT BA43. MOD47 

WILLIAM A RIVERS MD55 ETHEL BLOCK BAI6 R G KURANOFF 

JAMES AROBB BA51 BCL54 JOHN E BOGUE 8B COM62 MRS NICHOLAS P KWOK MED72 

C JAIME ROBERTON'’ B SC55 ROBERT S BOIRE BCOM48 WILLIAM T LAMBERT  _B ENGS50 

MRS FRANCES M ROBINSON — B A25 GEORGE BRABANT DD S52 HAROLD B LANDE MA30 BCL33 

ISADORE ROSENFELD BSC47 MDS51 WILLIAM E BRAISTED M D396 ADELE DE G LANGUEDOC —B A29 

GORDON M ROSS" B ENG55 LOUP BREFORT MB A77 C PHILIP LARSON JR MD58 

JOHN STC ROSS B ENGS55 AUBREY BRENDISH CHARLES P LARSON MOD71 

MRS WILLIAM K ROSS_ BB A48 J ALAN BRIDGES BSC64 DDS75 KIN WA HENRY LAU M ENG81 

G MEREDITH ROUNTREE BA31 MA33 JOHN EC BRIERLEY BCL59 ELIZABETH V LAUTSCH MSC51 PHDS3 

HERBERT B RUBIN BSC64 MD68 JAMES H BRODEUR _— B ENG56 RAYMOND D LE MOYNE BAS56 

JOHN TRULON M D55 ROBERT J BRODRICK M D47 — - inlets RALPH S LEAVITT 

ANTHONY F SALVATORE 8B ENG49 C KIRKLAND BROWN BENGS6 PH D63 MRS MA FLOWER 8B A39 CARLLEE BSC47 MD49 

DAVID MARCH SCHAFFELBURG MD72 CLIFFORD F BROWN’ B COM37 LYVES FORTIER BCL58 ROBERTSLLEUNG BSC66 MOD70 

JOHN H SCHLOEN' 8B ENG32 EDWIN J BROWN M D48 JEAN-GUY FORTIN MD72 RUSSELLALEVE BSC69 DDS71 

SEYMOUR SCHULICH BSC61 MB A65 GLENN RUSSELL BROWN _ B SC74 ERIC D FOSTER MD65 MSC71 EDWARD D LEVINSON BSC49 MD53 

DONNA G SEXSMITH MS W55 ROBERT S BROWN PHOD36 ROYE FOSTER OD S68 SOLOMON LEVITES 8B A36 

HERBERT M SHAYNE  B COM47 RICHARD D BRUNNING M D859 ROBERT W FRANCIS’ WM D68 MRS SOLOMON LEVITES 8B A36 

DOUGLAS J SHELTINGA MD48 JOHN H BURGESS BSC54 MD58 A SCOTT FRASER BCOMS1 JEAN B LIBERTY B SC(H EC)60 

JAMES G SHETLER BA58 BCL61 DUDLEY G BUTTERFIELD BCOM34 IAN H FRASER _B A47 MRS GORDON LIERSCH BLS33_ SW58 

KA CHUEN SHIN M D54 MRS DUDLEY G BUTTERFIELD BA35 JAMES W FRASER__ B ENG47 JC LIKELY MD43 

EDWARD J SHOIRY BCL74 A RODDICK BYERS BSC32 PH D36 NORMAND C GAGNON _ B ARCH56 DOUGLAS M LINDSAY BSCS51 

DOUGLAS A SHORT 8B COM39 ROBERT L CALDER’ 8B ENG57 RONALD E GALLAY BCOMS54 J STEPHEN LIPPER 8B AG63 

MRS RICHARD SHUMAN DAVID M CALDWELL JR M D52 MARGARET | GARLICK 8B SC35 EDWARD LLEWELLYN-THOMAS M D55 

MOREY L SIMON DD 823 DARRELL L CALKIN B SC(ENG)21 MICHAEL L GARMAISE BA60 BCLE63 LEWISE LLOYD BSC(AGR)48 PH D52 

C IRVING SLACK 8B SC(AGR)48 A RAE CAMPBELL 8B ENG64 JEAN C GARNEAU B ENGS53 VICTOR KS LUI BSC67 MD71 

HARRY SMITH CRAIG E CAMPBELL 8SC71 MOD/75 WHGAUVIN BENG41 PHD45 SAMUEL LUKS B ENG55 

ZOE B SMITH BAI15 BENJAMIN CAPLAN BA30 MAS31 FRED H GENESEE MA70 PHOD74 HAROLD LYNGE MM Da49 

WILLIAM C SMYTH _B ENG36 MRS BENJAMIN CAPLAN B A32 ROBERT E GIBBONS DD S63 PETER M MACCALLUM B ENG39 


12 


DEREK H MATHER 


if ANSON R MCKIM 


s¢ ROY WATT MILLER 


. JAMES W MITCHENER 


GORDON S MACDONALD 8 ARCH35 
THOMAS D MACDONALD DD S71 


DOUGLAS W MACEWAN MDS52_ DIP MEDS8 


JOHN MACHADO B SC77 


R DE WOLFE MACKAY MA29 BCL32 


DAVID A MACKENZIE BSC60 MD64 


JOHN C MACKIMMIE 
MARGARET MACKINNON-SCHUTZ 8B 
M D053 


BSC50 MDS: 


S( 54 


ELEANOR A MACLEAN BSC67 ML S69 


ALLISTER W MACLEOD B COM55 

JAMES A MACMILLAN M D48 

KEITH A MACMILLAN 8B SC(AGR)66 
M SC(AGR)68 

ANNE E MACNAUGHTON —B A32 

WILLIAM J MACPHERSON'- M D58 

J ARTHUR MADILL BCOM42 

JALAL MAHDAVIAN 

M BENNETT MARCUS M D49 

WALTER MARKHAM ~ B COM35 


JOHN DE MMARLER BA29 BCL32 


MRMARSHALL MD26 
PETER D MARSHALL 8B SC(AGR)65 
ROBERT EDWIN MARSHALL M D52 
JEANNE G MARSOLAIS BA70 MA 
JOHN R MARTIN BSC44 MD45 
B COM54 

B SC(ENG)13 


WALTER MATHESON 
ALEXANDER MATZKO 
_ BENJAMIN R MAXWELL M D38 
" WILLIAM MCCOUBREY 8B COM53 
GEORGE MCDOUGALL BS 
JOHN WILLIAM MCDOWALL 


ALEXANDER MCGREGOR B SC48 
RLMCINTOSH PHD39 O0SC72 
GEOFFREY G MCKENZIE BCOM52 


B ENG57 

JOSEPH C MCLELLAND 

JOHN L MCNIVEN BCOM41 

ALAN LINDSAY MCPHERSON M073 


GEORGE V J MEAGHER’ B ENG42 
DENIS MELANCON 
EDWARD MENASHE = B COM63 


 LISE MICHAUD 


Vf KEITHG MILLAR DD S68 
KENNETH S MILLER B A40 


Pt Pa 


- 


BSC67 MSC 
MRS W O CHRISTOPHER MILLER’ 8B A53 


FRED C MILLS MD56 MSC61 
PETER MMILNER MSC50 PH D54 
MRS ELEANOR MILTON’ B N71 
DAVID MITCHELL 
SHARON R MITCHELL 8B ED63 

' HARTLAND DE M MOLSON 
, STEPHEN T MOLSON 8B A63 
* ROBERT H MONTGOMERY 


BCL35 
. JOHN R MOORE MD41 


DIP MED51 


YY NORMAN D MORRISON JR M D34 
B SC33 


MRS NORMAN MORRISON JR 
THOMAS S MORSE B ENG36 
CHRISTINA M MORTON B A24 
CAMILLE MOUCHAWAR 
ARTHUR E MUKOMELA M D857 
* DAVID E MUNDELL B ENGS54 

_ GROSS MURPHY BSC53. MD57 


" AF NANCEKIVELL M D42 


JOHN S NEWMAN ~~ B ENG50 

LYNTON NGUI-KON-SUE DD S62 

G RICHARD | NICHOLSON'-_—B SC61 

GRANVILLE H NICKERSON MD45 
DIP MED50 

JOHN A NOLAN BA34 BCL37 

SALME NOMMIK MSC52 PHD57 

JOHN L NORRIS MD31 

EDWARD NORSWORTHY 8B ENG39 

HAROLD ANORTON'- 8B ENG43 

EDWARD G O'BRIEN MD52 

JACK | O'HASHI M D64 

RONALD OELBAUM BCOM53 

JR OGILVIE B SC(AGR)54 

JOHN A OGILVY 8B A52 

JANICE OLIVER BCOM63 

PETER ONNO BENG58 PH D65 

PHILIP F OSLER B SC(ENG)24 

THOMAS W OSTAPOVITCH 8 ENG75 

PRABIR KUMAR PAL 

HUGH D PALMER MD43 

ALLAN A PARK 8B ENG49 

¢ JOHN WM PATRICK BA42 MD43 

® RONALD E PEARL BCOM57 

DAVID W PEAT BENGS5O 

ROBERT Z PERKINS M D47 

ERNEST PERRY 8 SC42 


BC L55 


P H D051 


c 


a ce — 
B SC4; M D51 


3 


v 


B SC53. MD55 


D D S63 


CHARLES W PETERS B A61 
PERRY A PETERSON M D66 
ROBERT !1C PICARD BA31 MA32 
JOHN M PIERCE 8 


JOHN G PIESLEY SC48 

LEONARD PINSKY BSC56 M D60 

ANNE MARIE PINTO MA72 PHOD74 
l 


R JAMES PLANT BCL60 
STANLEY K PLOTNICK BCOM62 
ERVIN PODGORSAK 

RONALD S POTTS M D54 

JOHN B QUINLAN B ENG62 


DONALD O D RAMSDALE BB ENG33 
ROSE-MARIE RANCOURT CERT C ED75 
GORDON A READ BENGS53 


WILLIAM M REIM MB A68 

LIONEL M REIMAN BSC64 MD68 
DONALD RHODES = B SC(ENG)28 
GARY RICHARDS 


MRS ERIC J RICHTER BASS MLS76 
WAYNE K RIDDELL B MUS60 
MRS ROBERT M RIGGS _ B SC(N)64 


GORDON S RITCHIE BCOM41 


*KENNETH S RITCHIE BA32 MD36 


NOAH ROBBINS M D69 

J A BRUCE ROBINSON B SC(P E)49 
STEVEN R ROESSLER 8B ENGS59 
CLAYTON J ROLFE BCL31 
KEITH RONALD = _B SC(AGR)53 
BRAM ROSE MD33 PHOD39 
TF ROSE MD43_ DIP MEDS50 


DD $53 


P H D58 


‘BERNARD L ROSENBERG BA39 MD43 


CLARENCE ROSENHEK JM D40 

N PAUL ROSMAN BSC55 MD59 
GAVIN ROSS 

JOHN ROSTON’ BA76 

AUGUSTIN ROY 

DONALD W RUDDICK BA38 MOD42 

R BRUCE RUDDICK BSC38 MD44 
AARON H RUDOLPH' B SC44 

DONNA R RUNNALLS-~ B D64 

EILEEN RUSSEL 8B A24 

CARROLL A RUSSELL M D388 

MORRIS SAMOTIS BCOM54 

JOHN WESTWOOD SANDISON 

CARL S SAWYER M D839 

GEORGE P SAYRE MD38 

ALASTAIR G SCARTH BSC47 MD51 
FRANK R SCOTT BCL27 LL OD67 
JESSIE BOYD SCRIVER MD22 DSC79 
MRS J MARSHALL SEATH DIP P E17 
WILLIAM M SEATH' B ENGS52 
HAROLD N SEGALL M D20 
LAURENCE SESSENWEIN BA24 
CHARLES E SHAPIRO M D22 
GORDON R SHARWOOD = B A53 
ROBERT F SHAW CC I 
DOUGLAS T SHAW B 
RICHARD A SHAW B SC66 
DAVID Y MSHEK  B SC(ARCH)70 
WARNER F SHELDON’ M D37 
MRS WARNER F SHELDON B A33 
PETER W SHENON' MD58 
ROBERT WALLACE SHEPHERD MD76 
BRYAN M SHIEMAN MD54 
GEORGE ANTHONY SHUNOCK 
HERBERT E SIBLIN BCOMS50 
DANIEL SILVER BSC60 WM D64 
MELVIN O SIMPSON JR B ENGS1 
STEPHAN J SLESAR' M D59 

MRS MAEFORD SLOCOMBE 
CHARLES J SMITH’ M A51 
THEODORE L SOURKES 

W W SOUTHAN _ B SC(ENG)30 

COLIN A SPENCER BENG48 

VERA L SPENCER B N51 

HERBERT O SPINDLER BCOM52 
MARIO SPINO- BENG47 

D HUGH STARKEY BA27 MOD31 
HARRY STEIN BCOM34 

URSULA STEINER DIP NUR64 

HARRY D STEVENS BSC48 MD50 

H HEWARD STIKEMAN BA35 BCL38 
PATRICK MCG STOKER -_ B ARCXH51 
JOSEPH STRATFORD MD47 MSC51 
WILLIAM N STRONACH B COM46 
ROGER D STRONELL MOD71 

D’ALTON M SWIFT BENG64 

WILLIAM E TAFT BSC44 

A SANDY TAMBOSSO- DD $57 

GENE D TANG MD59 

PARRA TATE BSC46 MSC47 
DUDLEY R TAYLOR BENG37 

JOHN H TAYLOR’ BENG35 

LAUGHLIN B TAYLOR’ WM SC61 
HERBERTH TEES BA33 BCL36 
JOSEPH TELGARSKY 

JACQUES TETRAULT BCOM49 
JAMES C THACKRAY 8B SC46 
RAYMOND C THOMAS 8B A51 
SAMUEL F TILDEN JR BENG45 
TREVAM TILLEY DIP P E27 
JOHN TODD 

STUART R TOWNSEND BA29 MD33 
FRANK M TRASLER-  B ENG48 
MRS FRANK M TRASLER-__ B SC48 
HARRY E TRENHOLME 8B COM48 
FRANKLIN A TSAO - B ENG57 
LESLIE VADASZ BENG61 

LOUIS A VALENTE M D937 

JOHN H VAN DE LEUV MD57 
ROBERT B VAN WINCKLE DOD S71 
ZEEV VERED BENG54 
HERSCHEL VICTOR BCOM44 
EARLE J VINING BCOM49 
HUDSON H VIPOND ~~ _B SC65 
HAMILTON G WADMAN- WM D50 
ALLEN S WAINBERG 8SC57 DDS59 
LOUIS J WAINER BA29 MD33 


BC L27 


B ARCH71 


D D S65 


PH D54 
B SC39 MSC46 


BC L52 


P H D58 


* J W ABRAHAM 


PETER DWALSH BA52 BCL55 
MRS CYNTHIA G WARDWELL iB A36 
GORDON WATTERS 

MRS L STUART WEBSTER B A38 

R HOWARD WEBSTER iB A311 

|W WEINTRUB BSC48 MD52 
WILLIAM F WELLER) 1 M D45 


JOSEPH WENER MD41 MSC48 


GEORGE EA WHELAN BA49 BCL52 
WILLIAM H WHITE MD36 

MICHAEL A WHITEHEAD 

MRS HARRIS WHITTEMORE JR ARTS18 


JOHN M WIGGETT 8B ENG42 

MRS WILLIAM P WILDER BB AS51 
DONALD BOYD WILLIAMS M D67 
MRS HOWARD H WILLIAMS — B A55 
WILLIAM M WILLIAMS 

ROLLA E WILSON  M D53 
CHARLES V WILSON PHD33 
HENRY E WILSON M D37 


PETER WILLIAM WILSON 8B SC78 
RICHARD WILSON BCOM24~ LL D80 
RALPH D WINSHIP BENG54 MENGS57 


RAY MWOOD MD54 
FRANCES B WRIGHT B A52 
JAMES W WYSE _ B SC(ENG)24 


HARVEY YAROSKY BA55 BCL61 
EDWIN HSUN KAO YEN DOD S73 

T KUE-HING YOUNG BSC69 MOD73 

L ZARIF| BENGS52 

WOLF ZITZMANN 

PAUL J A ZSOMBOR-MURRAY 8B ENGS58 


PH D71 


RADOSLAV ZUK B ARCHS56 


Gifts between $100 
and $249 

Gifts at this level 
totalled $419,292, 
including gifts 
given anonymously. 


KENNETH E AARON’ MD71 
ARTHUR ABBEY _B SC(AGR)51 
ROBERT LEE ABBEY DD S57 
CHAIKER ABBIS BCL48 
CHARLES W ABBOTT-SMITH 
ARTHUR C ABBOTT 
JOHN AR ABBOTT B ENG57 
DAVID PETER ABER BCOM29 
SAMUEL ABER BA35 MD40 

D D $23 

DAVID K ABRAMOWITZ B COMS57 
MRS MORTIMER ABRAMSKY  B A55 


M SC71 


BSC59 MD63 
B SC(ENG)26 


C F DOUGLAS ACKMAN MD60_ DIP MED67 
MRS H ADAM BS W50 

K ADAMOPOULOS DD S/77 

LEYLAND M ADAMS_-_‘M D68 

SHIRLEY R ADAMS BSC62 MD68 

JAMES COWAN ADAMS _— B ENG75 

JAMES R ADAMS BSC36 PH D40 


DAVID ADDLEMAN BA66 MD70 


ANTONIO ADELFIO LL M55 
H ADELMAN 

EDWARD | ADELSON'_B SC58 
IRWIN ADELSON B COMS53 
MRS MONA S ADLY 8B SC75 
NATHAN AGENSKY  B ENG61 


MRS M AGES _ B SC67 

MRS MERIBAH AIKENS -_B .A79 
ALEXANDER R AIRD- B A58 

PETER J AIRD BCOM49 

MRS ALAN AITKEN B A34 

GRAHAM C AITKEN 

JR AITKEN M SC(AGR)47 

RICHARD H ALBERT BSC66 DD S68 
GEORGE ALEXANDER 8B COM41 

S PAMELA ALLAN’ B N64 

WM SINCLAIR ALLAN M D28 

GARY WILLIAM ALLARDYCE 8B ENG74 
A GIBSON ALLEN BA48 MD50 

F MOYRA ALLEN BN48 

JOHN C ALLEN BENG49 _ DIP ED72 
NORMAN TH ALLEN ODD S64 

MRS STANLEY V ALLEN BA34 

W WARREN ALLMAND- BCL57 

MRS FEDERICO ALLOD!_ BB A511 
HEINO ALTOSAAR 

KISHORE S AMBE M D64 

HAROLD D AMES’ M D47 

ALLEN C AMOS __B SC57 

PAUL M AMOS __ B SC65 

MRS CHRISTINA ANASTOPOULOS 
RICHARD G ANDERSEN’ _M D60 


DUNCAN P ANDERSON BSC63_ M D67 
CATHERINE ANDERSON LLB72 BCL73 
MRS G J ANDERSON _ B SC(H EC)48 


LAWRENCE K ANDERSON B ENG57 

MARGARET E ANDERSON’ M A65 

WILLIAM JOHN ANDERSON _ B SC67 
M SC(APP)70 

DAVID C ANGELL M D55 

JOHN VA ANGLIN M D53 

WALTER W ANGLIN DD S44 

HENRY F ANGUS BA11i LLOD49 

M G ANGUS 

W DAVID ANGUS BCLE62 

JOHN C ANTLIFF BSC51 

LEONARD P P APEDAILE 8B SC(AGR)60 

EDWARD M APEN JR_ M D61 

ERIC B APPLEBY BCOM52 

BERNARD ARCHAMBAULT 


VIOLET B ARCHER _L MUS34 
WILLIAM L ARCHER B A49 
V T ARCHIBALD M D43 
THOMAS D ARKWRIGHT PH D74 

D AARMSTRONG BSC52 PH DS55 
MRS ELSEE R ARMSTRONG DIP NURS5S5 
MILTON ARNOLD 8B COM47 

A ARONOFF BSC45 MD49 
MICHAEL D ARONSON B SC72 
KELLY J ARREY BENGS5O 
CORNELIA K ARRONET 8B A70 

M ELIZABETH ARTHUR WM A47 
MRS IRENE M ARTHURS'-_—-B SC39 
J A ARTO 

MRS OLIVER RENDELL ARTON BH S42 
MRS ASHLEY JEFFERSON ASHMELE BB A56 
ALFRED ASSALY 8B ENG46 

CHAS ASSELIN DD S43 

HS ASSELSTINE BSC42 MD43 


B MUS36 


MB A77 


P H D49 


MRS EDITH ASTON-MCCRIMMON _ DIP P T50 
M SC(APP)80 
MRS DEREK S ATKINSON BCOM47 


ELHAMY L ATTIA 
PETERAMAULD MD52 
JOHN S AUSTON -_B SC57 
MRS E AVRITH DIP POT52 
HAROLD E AYERS 8B COM28 
DEREK H AYLEN’ BAS53 
PETER GORDON AYOUB 
JOHN O BAATZ 8B ENG62 
HOWARD A BACAL BA54 MDS58 
CONSTANTINE BACH _B ENGS51 
CHARLES BAILLIE 

MRS DONALD C BAIN BH S39 

E BARBARA BAIN BSC53. PH D65 
GEO WM BAIN — B SC(ENG)21 
MRS HGS BAIN DIP P E27 

D C BAINBRIDGE 

MRS DAVID R BAIRD -—CODIP P T58 


M SC(APP)59 


BSC74 DD S80 


ROBERT L BAIRD B ENG49 
ALLAN R BAKER-_ B ENG59 
JOHN L BAKER B COM47 

SAM BAKER 

LESTER BALDWIN B SC54 
BENJAMIN W BALL 

JOHN C BALL BSC42 MD49 


ANASTASIA BALLOU BN71 = M SC(N)73 
ALEXANDER G BALOGH _ _B ENGS54 
LBALTAS BENG58 PH D67 

MARCEL A BALTZAN BSC49 MD53 
GEORGE PHILIP BANCROFT BSC75 MSC78 
ARNOLD D BANFILL BCL40 BLS47 
CHARLES R BANNON M D44 

ALBERT F BANVILLE BCOM78 

WILLIAM J BARAKETT BSC67 MOD71 
RAYMOND BARAKETT BA55 BCL58 
GILBERT ABARBER DOD S30 

G MELVIN BARCLAY _B SC(AGR)64 

JEAN MC BARDIN PHOD72 


CHARLES S BARKER BA28 MD32 
HENRY A BARON M D28 

MRS LEONARD BARRETT 8B SC42 
PAUL RICHARD BARRETT 8B SC7 


RICHARD E BARRETT 8B SC(ENG)26 
JOSEPH R BARRIE 
WALLACE A BARRIE  B ENG61 


L HOPE BARRINGTON’ B A29 
AUGUSTINE L BARRY 8B ENG40 
ALLEN E BARTLETT BCOMS52 
FRED W BARTON MD48 
KENNETH BARWICK B ENG52 


MICHAEL J BARZA BSC60 MD64 
EJBASSEN MD22 

ARTHUR F BATTISTA BSC43 MD44 
HARRY MORIS BAUM DD S77 

BERT E F BAUMAN _ B SC(ENG)27 

ALICE J BAUMGART NUR64 M SC(N)64 
ALDO BAUMGARTNER 


JAMES D BAXTER MD47 MSC52 
JOHN WM BAXTER MSC69 MD73 
ROBERT BAXTER BSC33 MD38 


MRS ROBERT BAXTER B A34 
WJBAXTER MOD29 

J RONALD D BAYNE BA45 MD47 
CHARLES M BEACH _B A68 

RUTH M BEACH BL S51 

CHARLES B BEAMISH DD S58 

RAHNO M BEAMISH NUR28 

HARVEY E BEARDMORE 8 SC46 MD48 
MRS HARVEY E BEARDMORE ‘8B A46 


LAURENCE R BEATH' 8B ENG35 
EDMOND G BEATTY B SC48 
LEON BEAUDIN BS A22 


PRS MRRP VOLIADIPRSAG PAPAS SP PSS OPIS PELSS POEL SA EPL Ss Vaan ees pas 


i 


RICHARD BEAUDRY _B ED(P E)79 
MARK PATRICK BEAUREGARD _B ENG75 
M B A82 
BRUCE H BECKER BCOM46 C A54 
LAVY M BECKER" B A26 
MICHAEL F A BECKERMANN _ B ENG61 
RAYMOND J BEDARD DODS79 
PETER E BEDFORD-JONES M SC60 
JAMES F BEESLEY MD853 
PAULB BEESON MD933 
JACQUES BELANGER = B COM33 
JEAN BELANGER BCL64 
JOHN N BELL M D53 
EDWARD S BELL 8B ENGS4 
MRS EDWARD S BELL _B AS54 
FLORENCE ML BELL B A32 
MRS ROBERTE BELL BA47 DLITT78 
CLAUDETTE BELLEMARE BA70 BCL/73 
FRANCE BELLISLE 8B A76 
PETER BENJAMIN BSC51 MD55 
GERALD BENJAMIN B COM46 
BRUCE G BENNET BCOM49_ DIP MGMT59 
G FRANK BENNETT B SC(ENG)31 
R DOUGLAS BENNETT BENG32 PHOD35 
BRUCE M BENTON'- BSC55 
ROBERT J BERCKMANS BSC70 MD/76 
D DANNY BERCOVITCH BA54 MD58 
MRS MORRIS BERENSON _ B SC(H EC)52 
BENNY BERGER BA57 BCLE60 
DAVID BERGER BCL75 
IRVIN J BERGER 8B ARCH32 
KEVIN BERGER _B A80 
RONALD LBERGER BA64 BCLE67 
MRS JOHN BERGERON _ B SC(H EC)53 
LAWRENCE R BERGERON B ENG54 
M B A77 


GEORGE D BERKETT BSC(ARTS)31 MD36 


NATHAN BERKSON M D49 
MELVYN BERLIND MD28 
ROBERT M BERNSTEIN PHD72 MD/77 
BRUCE M BERRIDGE B ENGS54 
CAMERON G BERRY B SC61 
EDGAR POWELL BERRY 
R STAVELEY BERRY BSC48 MD52 
WILLIAM POWELL BERRY MOD/75 
OSCAR BERUBE 
GREGORY O BEST 8B A/70 
AUSTIN C BEUTEL B COM53 
MRS AUSTIN C BEUTEL B AS8 
BARRY BIBERMAN BA58 BCLE62 
JOHN A BICKLE M D29 
BEN BIERBRIER BSC64 BCLE67 
JESSE E BIGELOW B A38 
SERGE BIKADOROFF BSC54 MD58 
RALPH BILEFSKY BSC57 M D61 
JOHN C BINNEY BSC59 M D64 
KENNETH M BIRCHWOOD _ B SC60 
JOSEPHINE N BIRD BSC49 MD53 
BARRIE D BIRKS 8B A70 
GERALD A BIRKS 
H JONATHAN BIRKS B A67 
MRS JOHN E BIRKS BA34 MA39 
RICHARD S BIRKS BSC40 MD42 
THOMAS M BIRKS — B A68 
MRS JOSEPH BISCH BL S53 
JOHN M BISHOP JR B ENG47 
JOHN GL BISHOP BA5O BCL53 
* GILBERT BISHOP 8 SC(ARTS)23 
JACQUES G BISSON __B ENGS1 
NEVILLE BITTAR M D61 
ARLAN E BJARNASON M D53 
MARTIN J BLACK BSC63 M D67 
DOUGLAS EA BLACK DD S63 
DUNCAN R BLACK —B ENGS50O 
PERCY BLACK M SC46 
GAIL E BLACKWOOD _B SC67 
BARBARA-ANN BLAIR_ BB A81 
DAVID C BLAIR M D652 
MRS WM SUTHERLAND BLAIR_ iB Ad2 
ROY MS BLAKE BSC54 MD59 
MRS ROBERT BLAKELY B A711 
PAUL M BLANCHET — B SC(ENG)30 
HOWARD A BLANCHETTE BSC65 MD/71 
LIONEL J BLANSHAY BA61 BCL64 
ANTON BLASKOVICH 
MICHAEL A BLAU BSC64 DD S69 
AARON BLAUER _ B ENG48 
ANCEL U BLAUSTEIN M D48 
GEORGE BLEIER B ENGS59 
JOHN W BLEMER’ M D30 
J BENJAMIN BLOCK 8B ENG37 
LAWRENCE S BLOOMBERG MB A65 
WARREN T BLUME M D62 
PETERR BLUNT BSC60 8BOD70 
JOSEPH E BLUSTEIN BSC57 MOD61 


14 


- 


LEOMBLUTEAU- B ENGS5O 

MRS J D BOADWAY iB A41 

PHILIP DAVID BOBROW —- B ARCH60 

THOMAS E BODY MB A68 

MAURICE J BOIVIN M D58 

EDWIN B BOLDREY M SC36 

RICHARD AE BOLTON BSC60 MSC63 

SARAH LOUISE BOLTON B SC65 

GEORGE F BONDAR MD57 

HUGH J BONNER MD97 

BENJAMIN H BONNLANDER BSC53. MD59 

ARTHUR BOORMAN 

MICHAEL BOOTH MOD72 

WILLIAM H BOOTH’  _B ENGS58 

GEORGE BORCHARD ODD S45 

HENRY BORDEN 8B A21 

ROBERT R BORIGHT 8SC41 MD44 

MRS ROBERT R BORIGHT _B SC(H EC)51 

MRS LIONEL BORKAN 

WALTER H BORLASE 8B ENG59 

HERB H BORSUK DD S72 

HAROLD NORMAN BORTS__ B SC66 

CARLO G BOS BA41 MD43 

MARK M BOSS-_B SC(AGR)44 + MD49 

MRS ALLEN PATERSON BOSWELL B A47 

WILLIAM C BOSWELL BAS5O MED75 

MRS GABOR BOTH ML S69 

JACQUES BOUCHARD 

JAMES ERNEST BOUCHARD MB A79 

GEORGE G BOUKYDIS BCOM44 

JOSEPH E BOULDING M D853 

GERALD BOURBONNIERE 8BSC47 MD49 

F MUNROE BOURNE BA31 MOD37 

ROBERT C BOURNE BSC67 MD/72 

ROBERT H BOURNE BSC47 MD49 

JOHN R BOUSFIELD 

GEORGE ROBERT BOVELL 8B SC76 

RICHARD J F BOWIE BA60 BCLE3 

DON BOYANER MD51 

MRS RL BOYCE BCOM42 

HARVEY CLARK BOYD MD38 

DAVID P BOYD MD939 

DOUGLAS M BOYD -~— B SC(AGR)67 

FRANKS BOYD BCL62 

EDWARD J BOYLE M D54 

W HOWARD BOYLES ODD S41 

JOACHIM BRABANDER MOD32 

GE BRADFORD B SC(AGR)51 

WESLEY H BRADLEY 8BCL37 

MRS JAMES W BRADLEY _B ED60 

FREDERICK ALBERT BRAMAN B A72 
BCL75 

THEODORE BRAMOS 

E ARNOLD BRANCH M D20 

KENNETH NR BRANDS _~ B ENG40 

REUBEN | BRASLOFF 8B ENG44 

MRS |B BRAVERMAN BA49 MS W52 

JOHN R BRAYNE - B ENGS50 

ELIZABETH BREAKEY WM SC76 

F MAURICE BREED M D40 

RICHARD W BREITHAUPT  _B SC62 

CR BRENCHLEY 8B COM23 

R LYLE BRENNAN BSC43- MDS50 

O W BRESKI 

ROLAND B BRETON'- 8B COM59 

WENDELL B BREWER-_— B COM23 

PETER R BRIANT' 8B A70 

PAUL D BRICK BCOM68 

JOHN F BRIDGEMAN M D857 

MRS JAMES G BRIERLEY BA26 MA28 

JEAN BRISSET BCL35 

PIERRE M BRITT BENG60 DIP MGMT74 

C IAN BROADBENT  B ENGS52 

HYMAN B BROCK BB ENG46 

JAMES WILLIAM BRODE MD73 

GEORGE N BRODERICK BA31 BCL34 

CG BRODIE-BROCKWELL DD S48 

MRS WILLIAM A BROIDY DIP S W21 

ROBERT D BROMLEY B COM55 

MICHAEL BROOKER 

RONALD BROOKS 

FRANK S BROPHY BCOM48 

LEO BROSSARD M SC40 

MAXWELL BROTMAN  B COMS59 

JOHN BROUGHTON B ENG81 

LYLA|BROWN BA26 MOD30 

EDWARD E BROWN B ENG32 

HARVEY C BROWN _—‘M SC67 

HUGH C BROWN B ENG36 

LINDA J BROWN B ED66 

MRS THOMAS G BROWN _ B SC(P T)70 

IRWIN BROWNS _ B A54 

MRS IRWIN BROWNS BA5S9 MED78 

SEYMOUR BROWNSTEIN BSC61 WM D65 

MICHAEL J BROWNSTEIN 8B COM70 

PHILIP BROWNSTEIN BSC52 0D S56 

ARTHUR A BRUNEAU BA47 BCL49 

MRS ARTHUR A BRUNEAU- B SC46 

IDA R BRUNEAU_ B A42 

JOHN P BRUNSWICK M D60 

EDWARD T BUCHANAN _ B SC(ENG)28 


ISIDORE BUCHBINDER 

S$ J BUCHSBAUM BSC52 MSC53 

JOHN H BUDDEN' B ENG37 

EWART M BUDGELL 8B COM63 

MARKUS BUKSBAUM 

J THOMAS E BULGER 1 MD/77 

HUGH BULLOCK 

G RAPLEY BUNTING B ENG56 

J PEARCE BUNTING B COMS52 

FREDERICK S BURBIDGE 

PETER W BURGESS M D54 

RALPH C BURGESS __B SC(AGR)49 
M SC(AGR)52 

MRS JOHN BURLAND — B SC(H EC)48 

LAWRENCE D BURPEE BB ENGS/7 

L FRANK BURROWS B SC42 

BARBARA M BURRY 8 ED77 

WILLIAM B BURWELL BSC49 MD53 

RAOUL C BUSER'- B ENGS59 

JOHN W BUTLER BENG6O MBA/7 

HC BUTTERFIELD B A48 

JOHN F BUTTERWORTH _ B ENGSO 

WILLIAM B BUZAN BB COM51 

WARREN WILTON CABRAL  B A82 


* JOHN D CAGEORGE BSC35 MD44 


ELIZABETH CAHILL MA66 PHD/71 
ROBERT P CAHN B ENG45 

WILLIAM P CAINE B ENGS57 

PHILIP R CALANCHINi M D56 

ALICE D CALDER BA31 MA33 
THOMAS L CALDER M D53 

MRS WSCALDWELL BA27_ DIPL S28 


eR) | 


JOHN M CALHOUN PH D38 
MRS JOHN M CALHOUN _ DIP S W37 
ROBERT B CALHOUN BA30 BCL33 
ALDO CAMARDA DODS76 MSC81 
EILEEN S NASON CAMBON'- _-M D51 
KENNETH GCAMBON BA49 MD51 
ARCHIBALD F CAMERON DD S43 
DOUGLAS GEORGE CAMERON M D40 
MARGARET M CAMERON B A16 
RICHARD H CAMPBELL JR M ENG48 
MRS ARTHUR G CAMPBELL _ B A38 
BRUCE L CAMPBELL B ENG54 
COLIN J CAMPBELL BA45 BCL49 
MRS COLIN J CAMPBELL BA46 MS WS51 
COLIN CAMPBELL M D853 
DOUGLAS J CAMPBELL B ENG48 
GEORGE D CAMPBELL 8B COM49 
IAN BRUCE CAMPBELL 0DS79 
J ELLIOTT CAMPBELL B ENG42 
JANET E CAMPBELL M D851 
WAYNE HARRY CAMPBELL BA70 MOD/74 
JOHN H CANDLISH 8B SC(AGR)53 
MURRAY GCANN MB A79 
DAVID G CAPE BSC48 MD50 
JOHN M CAPE 
HERBERT CAPLAN OD S50 
L DAVID CAPLAN 8B COM61 
SAMUEL L CAPLAN BCOM22 BCL28 
MRS KIMON CARAGIANIS B ARCHS51 

M ARCH58 
GODEFROY-MAURICE CARDINAL 
R GILLIAN V CARGILL BN70 
MRS ROBERT H CARLEY 8B SC45 
GRANT M CARLYLE BCOM34 
JOHN B WOODS CARMICHAEL B A49 
WILLIAM R CARMICHAEL 8B SC33 
ANNE EVELYN CARNEY  B N65 
MC CARON’ B ENG44 
A ALDEN CARPENTER M D54 
GEORGE S CARPENTER B COMS52 
R BRUCE CARRICK BL S36 
JOHN KINGMAN CARSLEY MD77 
MRS JANE CARSON 
ROBERT S CARSWELL BA60 BCL63 
MRS DONALD C CASE 8B COM39 
CHARLES ACASEY BSC60 DD S62 
PETER C CASEY BCL65 
ANDRE P CASGRAIN BCL49 
REZIN CASHER 
STANLEY CASSAN BSC58 M D62 
JOSEPH E CASSAR BCLS59 
MRS ANNE SAUNDERS CASTLE 8B A79 
MRS BARBARA LAMBERT CATAFAGO B A811 
W MANSON CATTERSON _ B SC45 
MRS W MANSON CATTERSON -~_B SC45 
J CHARLES CATY BCOM63 
WILLIAM S CAVE BSC49 MD851 
MRS E ELIZABETH CAWDRON'’ BH S36 
TULLIO CEDRASCHI MB A68 
OTTO MCEPELLA BENG47 
JOHN A CHADWICK M D65 
JOHN T CHAFFEY M D64 
MORTIMER CHAIKELSON BA64 BCLE67 
THOMAS W CHALLIS M D51 
GORDON J CHALMERS B ENG47 
ROSS E CHAMBERLAIN B ENGS1 

DIP MGMT63 
MRS EGAN CHAMBERS _ B A47 
DANIEL CHAMPAGNE BENG75 MENG78 


Ras 
ete: 


JACQUES CHAMPAGNE 

JAMES CHAN MM D64 

WING C CHAN _B SC64 

MIU CC CHAN’ 8B ENG71 

TS! UCHU CHAN B ENG61 

VINCENT WING SUEN CHAN BSC76 MDa 

WILLIAMK CHAN 8SC61 M D65 

BEVERLY CHANDLER 8B SC67 

CHRISTCPHER M CHANDLER _ B ENG79 

GEORGE BERNARD CHARLEBOIS ML $77 

ISIDORECHARNESS BCL24 

GERALDS CHARNESS_ _B SC47 

MORRISCHARNEY 8 ARCH62 

VEDA R DCHARROW _ B A67 

JOHN S CHARTERS BSC43 MD44 

MRS JOHN S CHARTERS B A42 

C STEPHEN CHEASLEY BASS BCLE62 

GORDON L CHEESBROUGH'_B SC48 

CHAO-JEN CHEN M SC45 

KE KUNG CHEN 

PETER CHEN 

C BRANDON CHENAULT M D56 

i PARKER CHESNEY BA38 MD40 

M CHRISTINE CHICOINE B COM65 

JAMES CHILDERS 

DANIEL CYRIL CHIN OD S65 

F H BRUCE CHISHOLM 8B ENGS50 

RAE CHITTICK NUROO 

SYLVES"ER S Y CHIU MD64 M SC65 

MRS YVONNE CHIU B SC66 

PETER CHODOS 8B COM/72 

JOHN CHOMAY  B SC(P E)51 

JAMES CW CHOW BSC66 MOD70 

BAK-CHIJ ESMOND CHOW B ENG78 

BRUCE CHOWN’ BAI14 

ANNA ACHRISTIE 8B N55 

R LOUISCHRISTIE B ENG35 

CHRISTOS CHRISTOFIDES 

VIVIAN HCHROM~ BB SC54 

MRS ALEX HSIONG CHU BSC72 MSC74 

DAVID HK CHU! M D63 

WILLIAM R K CHURCH WM D68 

FE CHURCHILL B ENGS5O 

DOMINIC CIANCIARELL! B ENG75 

DMYTRO CIPYWNYK  M SC(APP)57 

GEORGE P CITROME BSC67 DDS72 

MARVINCLAMEN BSC48 MD52 

ALAN GCLARK  B A41 

DAVID BCLARK BSC48 BCOM51 

MRS DAVID B CLARK 8B ARCH52 

EDWARD A CLARK BENG54_ DIP MGMT71 

GEORGE W CLARK M D44 

JEREMY CLARK BENG73 

STEPHEN D CLARK M D42 

T L CLARK 

BRUCE > CLARKE BENG34 

WILLIAN B CLARKE B ENG62 

MARGOI E CLARKSON”) BS W48 

ANDRE JACQUES CLAVEAU BSC70 MD74 

MRS BLUMA CLAYMAN _ B A63 

ALAN WCLAYTON' B COM66 

MRS ECWARD G CLEATHER DIP PO 754 
B SCPO T)58 

GRUTKCLELAND- B N69 

FRED C.EMAN-~ B A49 

OTTO CCLEYN BENG43 

JOANNE CLIFFORD 8B COM/77 

JOSEPt CLIFFORD MD43 

JOHN FCLOSE BCOM33 

ROY B CLOUGH _B SC(ENG)17 

W GROSVENOR CLOUGH’ B ENG36 

ROSS NCLOUSTON' BSC49 

STUART H COBBETT BA69 BCL72 

JOHN N COCHRANE BSC66 DD S68 

PETER NW COCHRANE B ENG41 

DONALD J COCKBURN 8B COM57 

G ALANCOCKFIELD BENG52 MBA/Z8 

MRS GALAN COCKFIELD 8B SC52 

K BRIAN COCKHILL M SC(APP)64 

ERIC MCOCKSHUTT BCOM22 

J EDWIN COFFEY M D52 


JOHN F COGAN 

BAYARD COGGESHALL MD43 

DAVID D COHEN MDS51 

MRS DAVID COHEN BAS4 MEDB80 
DOUGLAS MCOHEN BAS51 BCL54 
EDGARH COHEN B A34 

ERIC HCOHEN BSC69 MOD73 
HAROL) COHEN BA28 MD32 
HOWARD COHEN _B SC74 

JACK COHEN BSC55 MD59 
LAWRENCE NCOHEN BA54 ODD S56 
LEONARD N COHEN B A5S5 

MICHAEL COHEN BSC70 DDS74 
MONROE W COHEN BSC61 PH DE65 
MONTAGUE COHEN 

MORRIE M COHEN 8B COM60 

ROBERT HAROLD COHEN BA43 DD S44 
WILLIAM COHEN BA29 MOD33 
EMILEJCOLAS BCL49 MCLS50 
JOHN HE COLBY BA39 BCL47 

E WENDELL COLDWELL BA32 BCL35 


JOHN BCOLE 8B ENG63 
NORMAN W COLE B ENG®61 
WILLIAM R COLES BENGS51 
MRS NATALIE A COLLINS 8 SC49 
R VERNON COLPITTS MD44 
LYNNE COLSON 8B SC75 
CARMAN R COLWELL B COMS56 
GERALD E COMEAU- B ENGS9 
JP GERARD COMTOIS 8B ENG6O 
MRS CAROLYN FERSTMAN CONDE 8B A@ 
ML S74 
HARVEY ACONDY 8B ENG60 
ROBERT FRED CONN BA74 
JAMES E CONNOLLY DD S39 
" ALAINCONTANT BA72 BCL75 
.. CSTUART COOK B ENG60 
JAMES HAROLD COOPER -_B SC(AGR)38 
' ROBERT MCOOPER MD49 
A ARTHUR COOPERBERG MD42 MS(49 
HARVEY M COOPERSTONE BCLE60 
DANIEL COORSH' B A35 
DONALD F COPE BAS6 BCL59 
E BRUCE COPLAND BA22 MA32 
RONALD DAVID CORBER 8SC76 DD378 
CVBCORBET BCOM34 
PERCY ECORBETT BAi3 DCL61 
MRS GLORIA COREY 
_ ARMAND CORIAT 


® MRS CHARLES CORKIN M SC(APP)61 


PH D64 
W FREDERICK CORKRAN- B ENG46 
PIERRE CORMIER 8B ENGS5O 
ROBERT E CORRIGAN 8B COM49 


) DOMINIC J COSTANTINI 8 ENG60 


STEPHEN D COSTELLO BSC50 MD54 

WALTER COTTINGHAM —_B COM51 

VIOLETTE L COUGHLIN 8B SC{ARTS)28 
BL S38 

WILLIAM J COULDWELL M D850 

i} RUSSELL A COULL BCOM49 

NORMAN G COUREY BSC51 MD55 

JAMES H COURTRIGHT _B SC68 

LEO J COUSINEAU B ENG49 

C FRANCOIS COUTURE BCL69 

MARK M COUTURE MD74 


jg ROBERT A COUZIN' BCL72 


» JOHN R COWANS -— B ENG64 
MRS ALEXANDRA COWIE 8B SC50 


s GEORGE A COWLEY 8B ASI 


- BETTY LOU COWPER BB A35 


37 GEORGE V COX 8B ENG56 


GORDON COX 8B SC70 

RUSSELL COX 

JAMES J COYLE M A48 

HERBERT K CRABTREE 8B COM32 
DOUGLAS B CRAIG MD65 MSC70 
MRS DOUGLAS B CRAIG __B SC60 
SUSAN M CRAIG B ED63 


» MARRY | CRAIMER B COM33 


DEREK G CRAIN B ARCH69 

JOSEPH H CRAMER BSC71 MD75 

sss W DOUGLAS CRANIFORD  _B ENG56 
“THOMAS R CRANSTON BSC49 MDS53 
GERALD B CRANSTOUN DD S51 

ALLAN E CRAWFORD _ B SC(AGR)50 
DANIEL ELDON CRAWFORD 

GORDON L CRELINSTEN BSC68 MD 
DAVID CREVIER LLB73 BCL74 
PAUL HCREVIER BCL68 

MICHAEL J CRIPTON DD S57 


_ JEAN-PAUL R CRISTEL B SC(AGR)46 
# JOHN A CROCKER B COM65 


_,H MORREY CROSS _ B ENG43 
WEMRS GLORIA A CROTIN  B N59 
ALEXANDER C H CROWE —B SC(AGR)63 
M067 

TERENCE W CROWE _B ENGS5 

WWIMRS CLARENCE R CROWELL B SC56 
} PH D62 

FRANCIS A CROWLEY DD S51 
CHARLES N CROWSON M D49 
ROBERT N CROZIER PH 028 
MGORDON H CRUTCHFIELD DD $38 
ROBERT B CRUTCHFIELD 8SC71 DDS75 
CHARLES E CRUZE 
HOMAS R CSORBA MSC62 PH D66 
ANLCUBITT B SC(AGR)62 
UGO CUEVAS B ENGS53 
RS BEVERLY A CULLEN 
ROBERT C CULLEY 
MRS DAVID CULVER _B SC47 
KEITH CUMMING B ENG44 
THOMAS LE CUNARD _ B ENG64 
.F PETER CUNDILL 8 COM60 
RICHARD ACURRIE BSC46 MD48 
STANLEY CYTRYNBAUM BC L59 
ANTOINE JEAN D'AILLY 
IBERNARD D'AMOUR 8 ENG47 
WANTONY J D'OMBRAIN 8 COM62 
PJOHN A D'URSO BSC53 MD58 
LYUBICA DABICH M D60 

JACQUES DACCORD BENGS5S3 DIP MGMT61 
LYNN DAGENAIS _B SC(P T)82 


si GEORGE HDAGG DD S75 


"i JOSEPH H DAGHER = P- H_ 068 
~ NORMAN DAITCHMAN —_B COM68 
FENNER F DALLEY 8 COM38 
DEBORAH S DANOFF BSC69 MD73 
RICHARD DANYLEWICK B SC78 
FRANCES MARR DARLING B A72 
@MRS KENNETH H DARLING B SC48 
" SANDRA L DAVENPORT ™M D68 
y ROBERT JC DAVID 0D S62 
,fIAN H DAVIDSON 8B COM67 

O MARGARET A DAVIDSON _B COM52 
GRANT L DAVIES MB A71 
MRS JAMES | DAVIES B A46 
“MELVYN A DAVINE  B S67 
, F ANDREW DAVIS M 063 


ROBERT S DAVIS MLS73 
TERENCE DAVIS 

PETER S DAWSON 
JOHN H DAWSON 


THOMAS D DE BLOIS 
ERIC A DE BOOR 
RAFAEL DE BOYRIE 
ARTHUR DE BREYNE 
PIERRE DE GRANDPRE 
LOUIS P DE GRANDPRE 
P MICHEL DE GRANDPRE 
JEAN DE GUISE 
DENNIS PDE MELTO M A63 
HUBERT DE MESTIER DU BOURG 


JEAN M DE TEMPLE 
SIDNEY A V DEANS 


J DAVID DEJONG MD50 


A W Y DESBRISAY 
J M DESCHAMPS 
ROGER DESERRES 
DENNIS S DESKIN 
MRS C A DESOER 
MICHAEL FERNAND DESROCHERS 


JOAN DEVRIES 
BENJAMIN GW DEW M D61 
JAMES P DEWAR 
HARJIT DHILLON 
MRS ANGELA DIACOVO 
GENEROSA DIAMOLA 

EDGAR D DIAZ 


J CAMPBELL DICKISON 
DAVID L DICKMAN 
ROBERT W DICKSON 
JOSEPH DICKSTEIN 
DONALD P DIDELIUS M D62 


MRS ROBERT A DINGWALL 
WILFRID DINNICK JR 
MICHAEL E DIXON 
THOMAS JULIAN DIXON 
DAVIN C DOBBIN 
ANTHONY R C DOBELL 
JOSEPH F DOBRANSK! 
J ARTHUR DOBSON 
JOHN W DOBSON 
R NESBITT DOBSON 
VIRGINIA L DOBSON 
SUSAN DODDS-HEBRON 
CLEVELAND E DODGE III 
CLEVELAND E DODGE JR 
DANIEL DOHENY 
RONALD P DOIG 
DAPHNE A DOLAN 
JACOB DOLID M SC(AGR)21 
JOSEPH NORRIS DOMINGUE 
JAMES DE 8 DOMVILLE 
ROBERT G DONALDSON 
HAROLD G DONDENAZ  B A48 
ELAINE DONNELLAN M D49 
ERIC A T DONNELLY 
W GORDON DONNELLY 
LAWRENCE DONOGHUE 
LOUIS DONOLO JR 
ARTHUR L DONOVAN MD29 
CHAD DONOVAN’ B ENG73 
A BURKE DORAN 
JANET LOIS DOREY 
H RUDOLF DORKEN 
WALTER R DORKEN 
LOUIS M DORSEY 
STEPHEN DORSEY 
KENNETH ROOT DOUGLAS’ M D56 
MRS MONTEATH DOUGLAS 
W BLAIR DOUGLAS 
LILLIAN G DOUGLASS M SC(N)74 
MRS PEARL T H DOWNIE 
JAMES J DOYLE 
BERNARD J DRABBLE 
THOMAS S DRAKE 
FRANCES SELYE DREW M D42 
LEONARD L DRUCKMAN 
MRS LEONARD L DRUCKMAN _ DIP ED47 
DENIS S DRUMMOND _ 8B A57 
MRS DAVID DRUMMOND B A44 
MRS DENIS S DRUMMOND _B A56 
MRS DEREK A DRUMMOND si A611 
BARBARA M DRURY 
L ANNE DRURY 
* JH EDWARD DUBOIS BCOM32 
HARRY | DUBOW 


GERALDINE A DUBRULE BB SC(P E)57 
W MOSSMAN DUBRULE = B A27 
CAMERON F DUFF B ENG40 

EC DUFF 8B SC(ENG)22 

JAMES A DUFF 

JAMES C DUFFIELD 8 SC54 

LOYOLA! DUFFY DD S37 
JEAN-PAUL DUFOUR BCL58 

ALAN TDUGUID 8BSC75 

MARILYN DUMARESQ_~ B SC(N)68 
JOHN G DUNN B COM57 

LEO J DUNN 8B SC49 

PAUL J DUNN 

MRS TIMOTHY H DUNN ARTS45 
MRS WHS DUNN S W41 

GERALD J DUNNE’ 8B ENG44 

E AENID DUNTON BA47 MD49 
HENRY B DUROST MD50_ DIP MEDS55 


MRS MARIO DUSCHENES BAS5O0 MP S52 


JJ DUSSAULT B ENG47 
RF DUSTON BENGS5S2 
RICHARD S DUTTON + MD63 
FRANK S EADIE BSC45 PH D52 
R KENNETH EADIE BSC42 8B ENG47 
F C EAGLESHAM M D36 
ARTHUR P EARLE 8B ENG49 
MRS NORA J EARLE 8BN70 
STEPHEN MEARLE DD S76 
ERICA L EASON MOD79 
EDMOND G EBERTS __B SC60 
ARNOLD J ECHENBERG B COM57 
DONALD ISRAEL ECHENBERG_B S71 
M D076 
GEORGE ECONOMO BA72 MOD76 
DAVID S EDELBERG' B ENG63 
RALPH SEDMISON DD S43 
ROBERT H EDMISON OD S68 
R M EDMONDS 
HUGH HARRISON EDMUNDS 
DE IRDRE M EDWARD 
DOUGLAS F EDWARDS _—B SC(AGR)52 
FRANK J EDWARDS M D43 
MURRAY A EDWORTHY MD51 
NICHOLAS EHRENFELD DD S54 
MARTIN EIDINGER BSC51 ODD S53 
MRS MARTIN EIDINGER _B SC51 
M SC(APP)72 
HARRY B EISBERG M D40 
JOHN MELDER BSC49 MD51 
MRS JOHNMELDER BA46 BL S47 
ROBIN H ELEY BCOM80 
MILTON ELIASOPH 8B ARCH32 
ERIC HWELKINGTON MD18 
R BARRY ELLIOTT 8B ENG39 
MRS R FRASER ELLIOTT 8B A50 
BARTON S ELLIS BCOM47 
C DOUGLAS ELLIS BA44 PHDS54 
ARCHIBALD D ELLISON 
LESLIE TELLYETT BCOM36 
ARTHUR R ELVIDGE MD24 PH D27 
EDWARD C ELWOOD_ B A35 
ASHTON EMERSON’ M D40 
JOHN R EMERY DODS76 MSC79 
J VERNON EMORY 8B COM38 
LESLIE H CEMSDEN MD852 
MILTON ENGEL 
W KING ENGEL M D55 
STANLEY F ENGLISH B 
SEYMOUR EPSTEIN E 
RALPH F ERIAN' B SC76 
PAOLO ERMACORA E 
GWERSKINE SC33 


Mem 


RALPH H ESTEY BSC(AGR)51 PH DS56 


ROBERTO L ESTRADA BSC42 MD43 


ALLEN ETCOVITCH BSC60 M SC(APP)63 


ERIC BERTRAM EVANS__B A72 
MICHAEL W EVANS B ENG71 
RICHARD W W EVANS _ B SC(AGR)55 
MRS WILLIAM EVANS 

HARRY HEVERETT M D42 

CFRED EVERETT B SC(AGR)48 
MRS C FRED EVERETT 8B SC(H EC)48 
MRS HARRY H EVERETT ARTS42 
ROBERT MCD EVERSON B A47 
WILLIAM K FALLS 8B SC35 

HENRY F FANCY WM D45 

MICHAEL E FARLEY 


MICHAEL A FARRUGIA BENG65 MB A68 


J HUGH FAULKNER _- B A56 
ANNA J FAUST DIP S W35 
WILLIAM E FEARN B COM65 
MRS ABIGAIL P FEARON -B A57 
HAZELR FEE BED78 
RICHARD FEIDLER 

H ERIC FEIGELSON' 8B A29 


MARK JOEL FELDMAN BCOM67 BCL70 


ROBERT E FELLOWS JR MD59 
BARBARA R FELLOWS’ M D54 
EDWARD ARNOLD FELLOWS ODD S62 
WARREN ALAN FELSON'  B ENG73 
MRS DS FENSOM- BB MUS29 

JOHN D FENWICK BSC56 DD S58 


CHARLOTTE | FERENCZ BSC44 MD45 


CHARLES A FERGUSON M D057 

ELDON FERGUSON 

JAMES B FERGUSON _B ENG35 

ROBERT M FERGUSON _ B ENGS51 

ILAY CFERRIER BCOM48 

YOLANDE FERRON = B A81 
STENEFERSING DD S66 

MRS FRANK FIDLER DIPS W30 MA32 
ALLAN GEORGE FIELDING M D80 
KENNETH C FINCHAM B COMS50 
DONALD U FINDLAY © B ENGS1 

RONALD F FINDLAY 8B COM55 

MRS ALAN H FINESTONE — B SC47 
NRTFINK MD53 

HARRY FINKELSTEIN BSC42 BCOM44 
MICHAEL F FINKELSTEIN 8 SC61 


JOHN B FOTHERINGHAM 8 SC52 MD54 
BARBARA EVELYN FOWLE 
ALLAN FRANCIS 
STEPHEN F FRANCIS BSC65 MBA82 
LEOPOLD FRANCOEUR 8B COM49 

FRANK L FRAN D D $59 

ELEANOR FRANK-SILVER BA54 MS W56 
aERALD FRANK B SC45 

HERBERT B FRANKENBERG) BL S61 


SAMUEL B FRANKLIN B COM23 

7EORGE W FRANKS 

SUZANNE M FRAPPIER — B A76 

MRS SHEILA FRASER-GAGNON  BCOM72 
LARICE B FRASER B A24 

DAVID C FRASER BSC49 MD51 
AVIDR FRASER BA38 MA39 
RAMSEY FRASER 4 
ISWALD L K FRASER - 

WILLIAM M FRASER DD S62 

ARTHUR N FREEDMAN 


DANIEL FREEDMAN 


HERBERT DAVID FRIEDMAN BCOM44 
JERRY J FRIEDMAN 8B COMS53 
MARK | FRIEDMAN 8B COM64 
PHILIP FRIEDMAN BCOMS58 
SYDNEY FRIEDMAN MD40 PHD46 
MADELEINE AFRITZ 8B A19 
TAK FUJIMAGARI BSC52 MDS56 
MRS GLLOYD FULFORD DIPS W30 MA30 
JOHN A FULLER BCOM50 
PETER C FULLER BENG39 
DOUGLAS H FULLERTON BCOM39 

M COM40 
MRS FRASER F FULTON BH S27 
DANIEL FUNDERBURK WM D56 


EDWARD J FURCHA s-B- D63 
JAMES T FYLES 
THOMAS G FYSHE BA31 MOD36 


E PETER GABOR MD59 MSC64 
ANTHONY GABRIEL 
MRS HELENE GAGNE BCL/71 
MRS JOAN GAGNE 
EDWARD GAIOTT| BENG76 
JOHN S GALE M047 
MRS JUDITH GALLANT-RCDRIGUE 
B SC(AGR)72 DIP ED80 
HENRY MGALLAY BA60 MOD65 
A HARRY GALLEY BCOM24 
JOHN H GALLOWAY B A60 
MRS TMGALT 8B A42 


AMY GALVIN B A75 M BAT77 


SAPRERSES SAS VAS SMPRIT OS PREP AP ORAS IFAS IRS PSG 3 7 PFS F273 


FRED GAMBLE 8B ENG34 
PHILIP C GAMPEL BSC66 DDS/70 
JOHN W GAMWELL M D63 
JOSEPH M GANNON MD35 
MAURITS GANS 
NATHAN GANS B ENG45 
DONALD S GARDNER _ B SC(AGR)52 
JAMES E GARDNER COM33 
MARSHA L GARDNER _ B A68 
RICHARD GAREAU BB COM52 
U PAUL F GAREAU BSC49 MD53 
ABRAHAM L GARELLEK ODD S61 
AVRAM H GARMAISE 8B COM40 
MRS EDITH-ANN GARNEAU 
RAINIER] DOMENICO GAROFALO BENG/72 
PHILIPPE C GASCON B COM68 
IVAN GGASO!| BSC65 CD S69 
ROLF GASSER DIP AGR56 
MRS RH GAULT B SC(PO T)54 
MRS RICHARD H GAUNT_ B SC53 
WILLIAM H GAVSIE M D027 
JOSEPH BRUCE GECIUS 8B ENG79 
DURWARD BELMONT GEFFKEN 
PETERHS GEGGIE M D66 
MORRIE M GELFAND BSC45 MOD50 
KENNETH R GEMMELL 8B A35 
JAMES THOMAS GENDRON _ B SC(AGR)74 
LEO JH GENDRON'- BENG63 
GERARD GENEREUX 
DAVID E GENSER__B A62 
JOSEPH R GERACE M D47 
MAURICE A GERARD _B SC(AGR)53 
RICHARD MICHAEL GERGOVICH _B SC711 
M D77 
GUY GERIN-LAJOIE BARCHS56 
LYNN B GEROW MD67 
PIERRE GFELLER M D80 
FRED G GHANTOUS B COM54 
JULIAN F GIACOMELLI BSC63 DOD S65 
GUIDO GIANFRANCESCHI M D48 
NICK GIANNONE 
ROBERTSON M GIBB- B ENG40 
JEROME GIBLON 
JAGIBSON DOD S51 
MIRIAM L GIBSON CERT NUR27 
ROBERT H GIBSON BB A66 
GORDON L GILBERT M D937 
EDWIN G GILES JR B SC(AGR)66 
DOROTHY R GILL DIP NUR43 
ROBERT J GILL BENG48 DIP MGMT65 
R HAMPSON GILLEAN 8B SC(ARTS)28 
MRS R HAMPSON GILLEAN  B A36 
ALASTAIR GILLESPIE COM47 BCOM75 
KATE M GILLESPIE 8B A21 
THOMAS § GILLESPIE BASS BCLE63 
PETER GGILLETT MD63 
MRS PAULA GILLETT 
CSGILLIATT B SC(AGR)47 
DEIRDRE M GILLIES DIP MED55 
ELIZABETH GILLIES M A41 
LUCIUS GILMAN PH D36 
BARRY W GILMORE DD S67 
FRANK GIOELI 
BRUCE GARY GIRARD BA76~ 8BSC79 
G RALPH GIRVAN MD36 
SAMUEL A GITTERMAN — B ARCH35 
WILLIAM R GLADSTONE M D52 
PETER B GLASSFORD 8B COM54 
MRS WILLIAM B GLECKMAN 
MRS ALEXANDER F GLEN DIP P E26 
HARRY GLICK BSC58 MD62 
HYMAN GLICK MOD65 M SC66 
IRWIN GLICKMAN MSC45 MD49 
JAN GLUCH 
GABRIEL GLUCK BSC68 MD/72 
HENRIETTE GNAEDINGER DIP P E17 
PE GNAEDINGER ENG22 
RICHARD O GODE M D60 
MRS RICHARD O GODE iB A60 
ELLIOT GODEL BCOMS50 
MORRIS GODEL 8B SC54 
ROBERT P GODIN BCL62 
MORTON R GODINE BA38 MA39 
SAMUEL GODINSKY BA27 BCL30 
JOHN PHILIP GOFTON M D50 
ALAN B GOLD 
ALLEN GOLD MD42 MSC48 
MRS ALLEN GOLD B A43 
JACK A GOLD 
SIMON GOLD MD40 MSC45 
RICHARD B GOLDBLOOM 8B SC45 MOD49 
MRS HARVEY GOLDEN B A311 
H CARL GOLDENBERG BCL32 LLOD66 
EDWARD S GOLDENBERG MA71 BCL74 
MRS H CARL GOLDFNRFRG RA44— M AB6 
ROBERT W GOLDIE 8B ENGS51 
LEWIS H GOLDMAN B A62 
WILLIAM J GOLDSMITH BSC67 MO71 
MARVIN GOLDSMITH 8B COM55 
MRS CHARLES H GOLDSTEIN DIP S W30 
MAURICE S GOLDSTEIN BSC45 MD47 
NORMAN JOSEPH GOLDSTEIN 8B SC75 
ROSE GOLDSTEIN BSC75 MOD79 
YOINE J GOLDSTEIN BA55 BCL58 
MYER GOLFMAN BA31 MOD36 
GEORGINA GONSALVES 
MRS GEORGE D GOODFELLOW DIP MGMT35 
LAWRENCE GOODFRIEND 8BSC44 PH D6) 
ROBERT J GOODLAND BSC63 PH D69 
WOLFE GOODMAN 
MARTIN B GOODWIN M D48 
MURRAY GOODZ 8B ARCH64 
ALAN GORDON 
CAMPBELL GORDON 
MRS DONALD GORDON 8B A43 
ELIZABETH M GORDON B A68 
HAROLD P GORDON BCOM58 BCL64 
LOUIS GORDON’ B ENG58 
NEWTON C GORDON BSC66 DDS/70 


16 


RICHARD GORDON -__B COM67 

GERALD V GORESKY BSC68 MD/72 
WILLIAM GOSSAGE BA49 MD53 
GORDON J GOSSELIN B COM49 


KURT GOTTFRIED BENGS1 MSC53 
MRS KURT GOTTFRIED 8B AS55 
ROBERT GOTTSCHALK —_B SC(ENG)31 


JACQUES R GOUDREAU_ _B ENGS1 


DAVID H GOULD BA54 MD58 
KEITH P GOULD B ENG48 
DOUGLAS H GRAHAM BSC63 M D69 


J WALLACE GRAHAM M D60 


MARY F GRAHAM M D69 
FRANK A GRAINGER MD43_ DIP MED57 
WILLIAM A GRANT BA42 BCL48 


JANET LESLIE GRANT B A/74 


WILLIAM J GRANT 8B ENG40 
MRS WILLIAM J GRANT _B A44 
OAGRATIAS MBA/75 

JAMES B GRATIOT MD/72 

COLIN A GRAVENOR JR BA64 BCLE67 
RHGRAVES DD S43 

ED GRAY-DONALD — B SC(ENG)26 
DONALD A GRAY _B SC(ENG)25 
JOHN H GRAY BENG52 

C GREEN 

MORRIS GREENBAUM _ B ARCH60 


MRS HENRY W GREENBERG 8B A931 

MITCHELL S GREENBERG BA70 BCL81 

SAM GREENBERG - B ENGS56 

SELMA J GREENBERG B A711 

MRS DJGREENE BL S48 

SAUL GREENFIELD BCOM48 

TEDDY T GREENFIELD 8B COM54 

MRS PENELOPE GREENLER_ B ED(P E)72 

FRED A GREENWOOD BSC50 MD54 

JEDGREENWOOD- B COM48 

KEMBLE GREENWOOD 

DONALD F GREER B COM57 

NANV GREGG BL S36 

H DAVID J GREGORY BCLS57 

JACK GREGORY _B ENG34 

RONALD GRETI MSC(APP)78 B SC80 

JULIUS HGREY BCL71 MA73 

DAVIDDE GRIER’ BAS53 

WILLIAM J GRIER +B COM55 

MRS LOUISE GRIFFITH 

GAGRIMSON’- B COM25 

SIMPSON V GRISDALE 8B ENG36 

ARNOLD J GROLEAU = B SC(ENG)28 

MARTIN GROSS 

HARVEY GROSSMAN _B Adi 

RONALD A GROSSMAN BSC57 DD S59 

KNUT GROTTEROD' 8B ENG49 

ERNEST H GRUBB _—M D48 

PETER HGRUNER MD59 

NERI P GUADAGNI BA38 M D42 

ROBERT D GUALTIERI 8 A57 

G RICHARD GUERETTE B COMS54 

T IVAN GUILBOARD DD S36 

GEORGE C GUILLON B SC68 

YVES J GUISAN MSC71 

ARSHAVIR GUNDJIAN 

CHARLES S GURD_B SC38 

MRS DAVIDS GURD BA 

FRASER NGURD BA34 MOD939 

| TORRENCE GURMAN _ B SC(ENG)22 

ROMAN GUT MD/72 

A DEREK GUTHRIE BA B 

DAVID G GUTHRIE BSC43 MD44 

JOHN E GUTHRIE 8B SC5C C55 

FRANK M GUTTMAN B SCS 
( 


JEAN M GWYNNE B A27 
MRS ELKE E HAAS B SC(N)65 
JAMES H HABEGGER’ M D64 
JOHN F HALDIMAND  B COM47 
MRSAF HALE BA21 PH 
BURT BHALE BSC47 MD49 

JOHN H HALE 

JOHN E HALL MD52 

GEORGE W HALL BCL37 

C DENIS HALL 8B ENG60 

DAVID L HALL BSC69 MD/77 

H BRIAN HALL B ARCH59 

MRS GEORGE C HALLIDAY 8B A26 
KENNETH HALLSWORTH ~ B SC36 

HUGH G HALLWARD_ B AS51 

EARL S HALTRECHT BSC67 DD S69 
ELIE HAMBURG 

DOUGLAS ERWIN HAMILTON OD S81 
ERIC L HAMILTON BCOM34 
FREDERICK W HAMILTON 8B COM29 
HUGH A HAMILTON 6 SC49 PHOD53 


BENJAMIN J GREENBERG BA54 BCLS57 


* MRS HUGH A HAMILTON B SC48 
WILLIAM M HAMILTON B COM47 
JOHN MELVIN HAMMEL  B ENG57 
DAVID IAN HAMMOND MD/72 
DAVID HAMOVITCH 
ALLEN J HANLEY 8B ENGS1 
MRS HELEN BUDD HANNA MA/75 
NEIL| HANNA BSC(AGR)53 DD S64 
DAVID C HANNAFORD 
MATTHEW S HANNON’ BC.LS5O0 
A GEORGE HANSON M D935 
ANGUS A HANSON M SC(AGR)46 
MRS ANGUS A HANSON _ B SC(H EC)46 

M SC(AGR)48 
PAUL P HARASIMOWICZ OD D S61 
JAMES P HARDING 
MRS DONALD HARE B SC5 
MRS THOS HARKNESS BA14 MSC16 
GORDON G HARLEY B ENG41 
HOWARD M HARRIS” M D55 
DONALD G HARRIS MD55 
FRANK H HARRIS B ENG60 
JOHN G HARRIS’ B ENG71 
RICHARD C HARRIS BA22 MA24 
MRS SIMON HARRIS BA45 BS W48 
THOMAS E HARRIS B ENGS5O 
LAWRENCE ELLIOT HARRISON 
ROBERT WM HARRISON 
CHARLES M HART B SC65 
CHRISTOPHER C HART 8B ENG56 
RICHARD M HART B A65 
RONALD D HART BSC71 MD/75 
STEPHEN D HART BCL/70 
J WARREN HARTHORNE~ M D57 
E FRED HARTWICK 8B ENG38 
DONALD F HARVEY M D60 
DENIS HARVEY BS A34 
JEAN EHARVIE BA35 MA36 
TAHARVIE 8B ENG41 
JOOST HARWIG BSC(AGR)62 PH 068 
MICHAEL A HASLEY 8B A62 
MRS DONC HATT 8 A33 
PER THAUGESTAD M A59 
THOMAS J HAUGHTON BSC32 MOD35 
MRS HUGH E HAVEN JR_ iB A54 
LLOYD S HAWBOLDT ——- B SC(AGR)38 
M SC(AGR)46 
ROMA Z HAWIRKO MSC49 PHD51 
MRS GEORGE HAYTHORNE  B A33 
CHARLES G HAYWARD _B ENGS51 
JAMES F HEAL 
JOHN D HEAMAN’” B ENG33 
REHEARTZ B SC(ENG)17 
E SHELDON HEATH BSC53 MD57 
MRS LB HEATH’ BCOM51 
JEAN-GUY HEBERT 8B SC71 
SOLS HECHT BCOM32 
JAMES L HEFFERNAN MD51 
MELVYN HEFT BCOM53 DD S60 
IRVING H HELLER MD50 PH D62 
JOHN G HELLSTROM 8SC50 MD54 
CRAMPTON H HELMS MD58 
ANN E HENDERSON ~ 8B N70 
ARTHUR A M HENDERSON _ B SC(P E)48 
MRS ARTHUR T HENDERSON _ DIP P E27 
DOUGLAS G HENDERSON ~_ B SC(AGR)42 
MRS IAN WD HENDERSON 8B N61 
M SC(N)67 
JOHN M HENDERSON ~ B SC40 
KATHARINE HENDERSON _ B SC(P 1T)76 
ROWLAND E HENDERSON BA33 MOD38 
LEO HENDLISZ 
KENNETH R HENERY-LOGAN  _B SC42 
P H D46 
ELWOOD HENNEMAN WM D43 
JOHN F HENNESSEY M D53 
ROSS AC HENRY BCL49 
GEORGE L HENTHORN' B COM49 
JAMES H HENWOOD _ 8B A66 
J A LYONE HEPPNER 
MARTIN D HEPPNER_ B A711 
AGNES MHERD BN66- MSC(N)72 
LAWRENCE T HERMAN B SC68 
PETER HERMAN _B A81 
STEVEN HERMAN BSC68 MD/72 
ARNOLD JOHN HERON 
E MELVYN HERSHENFIELD BSC63 DD S65 
MRS CHARLES HERSHORN _B A30 
RWHERZER MSC35 
MRS HAROLD G HESLER' 8B COM27 
MATTHEW L HESS_-_ BB ENG64 
STEPHEN S HESSIAN 8B ENG57 
E PETER HEYBROEK BCOM46 
PAUL HEYMAN 
D RONALD HICKEY BENGS50O 8B SC63 
*ARHICKS MD43 
CAROLINE B HICKS BA37 BLS38 
MRS H BRODIE HICKS 8B A32 
RAYMOND F HIGGINS M D37 
HOWARD A HIGGINSON BCOM49 
CHAN SENG Hil BENG79 
ALLANC HILL MSC27 PHOD29 
OLIVE MARY HILL BA31 MA33 
SARA WHILL  B A25 
WHPHILIP HILL BA30 MD34 
THOMAS A HILLMAN ML S69 
MRS THOMAS A HILLMAN ML S69 
JAMES HBHILTON MD38 
EJHINCHEY MSC63 
ROBERT P HINDS MSC(AGR)71 MBA79 
GEORGE G HINTON BSC51 MD55 
LUCIEN HIRSCH MD35 
ALEXANDER S HLEDIN DD S67 
LOUISC HOB ENG61 
RONALD S HO MA74 
WALTER HODDER _s:B SC-48 
BERNARD G HODGE —B SC(AGR)50 
DAVID MHODGES BSC64 DD S69 
ALLAN A HODGSON B A58 


2 
1 


ERNEST WB HOEN PH D63 
JOAN EAKIN HOFFMANN BA70 PH D80 
MARY HELENE HOGAN 
GEORGE H HOLLAND 8B COM49 
HARVEY HOLLINGER MD52 MSC58 
H | B HOLLINGSWORTH — B COM32 
REGINALD HOLLIS 8B D56 
ROBERT W HOLMES B ENG41 
STANLEY W HOLMES BSC49_ M SC50 
DONALD E HOLNESS —__B SC(AGR)61 

M SC(AGR)63 
G ANTHONY HOLT  M D69 
ALAN BHOOD M D56 
JENNIFER C A HOOKER B SC69 
W WAYNE HOOPER M D75 
WILLIAM TEMPLE HOOPER BSC44 MDdé45 
MARGARET E HOOTON’ M SC(N)66 
GLHOPKINS BENGS52 
STANLEY M HOPMEYER  B COMS59 


* ISYDORE HORN 


DOUGLAS H HORNER _ B SC50 

MRS MARTIN L HORNSTEIN DIP PO T53 

GEORGE F HOROWITZ 

ISADORE HOROWITZ MD62 MSC71 

W GRANT HORSEY 8B COM38 

JAMES F HORWOOD MSC33 PHOD35 

MRS JAMES F HORWOOD BB A33 

NABIL HOSSARI 8B ENG79 

JOHN R HOUGHTON B ENG35 

T WALTER HOUGHTON -~_B ENG32 

JAMES HOUSLEY 

MRS SHELAGH HOUSTON 

KENNETH S HOWARD BA46 BCL49 

GORDON T HOWARD B COM36 

R PALMER HOWARD MOD87_ M SC47 

ROGERS VANDEGRIFT HOWARD _ B ENG80 

HERVEY LHOWE  _B ENGS5O 

JOHN HOWIE M D27 

REHOWIE BENG44 

PETER AHOWLAND- M D61 

PETER AHOWLETT BCLE66 

MRS JOHN HOWSON 

EDUARD HOYER 8B ENG67 

KENNETH S HOYLE 8B ENG47 

PAUL B HOYT B SC(AGR)53 

ANDREW HRNCHIAR BSC56 M D58 

ALEX S HRYCAY B ENG64 

JOHN R HUCKELL M D52 

STEVEN HUEBNER BA77_ LMUS/8 

ANDREW K HUGESSEN _ B ENG49 

MRS JAMES C K HUGESSEN BCLS58 
M S W82 

JAMES M HUGHES BB COM62 

D CERI HUGILL 8B A67 

WILLIAM J HULBIG BA35 BCL38 

WILLIAM D HULME =B ARCH68 

JOHN P HUMPHREY BCL29 PHD45 

ALFRED C HUMPHREYS 8BSC51 DDS&2 

AWSHUNTER BSAS32 PHOD937 

ROBERT G HUNTER B ENGS58 

HAROLD HURDLE 

ROBERT M HURLEY M SC68 

ALFRED M HURTER- B ENG46 

MRS JOHN A HUTCHINS 

WILLIAM B HUTCHINSON MD71 

GORDON BRUCE HUTCHINSON — M D81 


* MRS GEORGE HUTCHISON 8B COM24 


JOHN D HUTCHISON B ENG61 
WILLIAM G HUTCHISON 8B ENG62 
WILLIAM H HUTCHISON =_B ENG33 
LINDA C HUTTON BSC63 MD68 
MRS M VERONICA HUVELLE 8B SC66 
YATES HWA 

PILLJ HWANG DD S69 _ DIP DENT70 


BRAHM B HYAMS BSC52 MD56 
DAVID B HYNDMAN 8B COM57 
ELEANOR HYNES DIP MGMT79 MB A862 
JAMES AINKPEN — B SC(AGR)60 

J FLOYD INNES BA25 

MRS W DOUGLAS INNES _ B A40 = 
JOHN M IONSON _B SC(AGR)67_—_-M SO(AGRYES 
NORMAN E IRONSTONE 8 SC66 DDS 
HAROLD A IRVING B AS1 

LORNA JEAN IRVING BHS39 

BERNARD LISAACS BA44 BCL47 

MRS ROSS ISAACS BA5O BCL54 
MAHER A ISHAK 8B ENG69 

GEOFFREY B ISHERWOOD 

MRS SYLVIA IVANSKI 

JERRY AIVANY 8B SC(AGR)66 

JOHN W IVANY B A65 

JAMES E IVERSEN BA49 MASI 

MRS JAMES E IVERSEN B A49 

JAMES IVORY BCOM65 

MRS ROBERT C M JACK B A67 

HAROLD B JACKSON MD43 

MRS MARY E JACKSON BED63 M ED69 
EDWARD N JACOBS COM32 

SIMON JACOBSON BSC64 DD S66 
VALERIE A JAEGER PHD79 MOD82 


‘PRPS ERAS PAO Maa SOs Pea ERD HS 24 ERPS SA PIS SSIIS AIG? 


ALAN J MACLEAN MD/70 
MRS BASIL MACLEAN 
DONALD FRASER MACLEAN DOD S79 
MRS GUY R MACLEAN _ B SC60 
MRS IAN H MACLEAN" B Ad1 
WALLACE: H MACLEAN  M SC(APP)64 
P H D68 
ANNE-MARIE MACLELLAN BSC72 MD/77 
MRS R J MACLENNAN _ B SC(H EC)62 
J PETER MACLEOD MD64 
J WENDELL MACLEOD 8B SC(ARTS)26 M D30 
JOHN A MACLEOD BA36 MD41 
KC MACLURE BSC34 PHD52 
FRANCIS A MACMILLAN M D42 
CHARLES C MACMILLAN BSC52 MD54 
MRS FRASER MACMILLAN 
GORDON A MACMILLAN’ B SC76 
CERT C ED79 
MRS KENNETH G MACMILLAN — B A33 
MARY MACMILLAN _ B A51 
ERIC AMACNAUGHTON' M D026 
DAVID MACNAUGHTON _ B SC59 
CECIL F MACNEIL 8B ENG47 


D FRASER MACORQUODALE 8 A34 BCL37 
Ze - 

i 

so nest = 

— eS 

—_— 


MRS WF S MACRAE_ 8B A34 

EDWARD S MACTIER B COM48 
JAMES C MAGUIRE B ENG37 

YVES R MAHEU BB ENGS3 

JOMAHON M D43 

JOHN H MAHON’ B SC(AGR)48 PH DS3 
JAMES J MAHONEY MD/75 

PAUL K MAIER 

ROLF MAWJER ODD S71 

JEAN MAILLET 

RAYMOND J MAILLOUX M D68 

PATRICK MALARD 8B SC(ARCH)79 B ARCH80 
CHARLES MALDOFF 

ERIC MICHAEL MALDOFF BCL74 LLB75 
DAVID MALKA 

HOWARD MALLEK M D37 

JOSEPHINE MALLEK MD36 M SC37 
JACQUES MALLET BCOM41 

GUYLAINE MALLETTE BCOM78 
CLIFFORD S MALONE BCLS56 
AHMALOUF BA38 BCL41 

NORMAN LMALUS BA57 BCL60 
ANITRA MAMEN BSC65 MD67 

ROLF MAMEN _ B ENG66 

JEAN C MAMET MENG6S PHD/72 
MARK S MANDELCORN BSC65 MD67 
ROMAN MANGEL BSC59 MD63 
POORAN R MANMOHANSINGH 

B SC(AGR)64 + M D68 

ALAN M MANN MD49_ DIP MEDS4 
DONALD P MANZER 

KOSTAS C MARCAKIS BENG76 MENG79 
PAULINE MARCHAND B ENG80 

SORANA MARCOVITZ 8SC71 MOD73 
MRS LOTTE MARCUS MS W655 _ DIP S W64 
MARIO MARFOGLIA 

MAX H MARGLES _ B ENGS1 

RICHARD G MARGOLESE M D60 

MRS EVELYN MARGUS _ B SC70 

PAUL E MARGUS__ B SC70 

BREEN N MARIEN MD49 MSC52 
GEORGE G MARINI BCOM75 

H KEITH MARKELL B A38 

RONALD J MARKEY DD S69 

OSWALD S MARKHAN _ B A30 

MRS MARIA MARKOPOULOS 

MRS H M MARLER | DIP P E29 

ARTHUR E MARLIN BSC68 MOD72 
BEN MARMUR _ B ENG45 

JOHN D MAROTTA BSC64 DD S68 
GEORGE MAROULIS 8 COMS1 

HARRY H MARSH M D55 

WILLIAM E MARSH M D37 

PAUL M MARSHALL BC L49 

ANDREW B MARTIN — B SC(P E)51 
BRENDA E MARTIN 

FRANCE MARTIN 8B SC82 

MRS JOANNE F MARTIN BN70 M SC(N)72 
JOHN A T MARTIN BCOMS1 

MRS JOHN | MARTIN 8B COM49 

PETER SMARTIN BA69 BCL73 
RJDOMARTIN 8B SC(AGR)38 

RK MARTIN B A30 

WILLIAM S MARTIN MD50 MENGS5S2 
JOSEPH D MASCIS DD S58 

WILLIAM EH MASON BSC49 MD51 
HUGH J MASON _ B A64 

KATHRYN H MASON BASi BCLS4 


. 


18 


ROBERT W MASON’ BC L64 
MAURICE MASSE 

GIORGIO MASSOBRIO 
GEORGES M MASSON’) PH D42 
MICHAEL A MASTRIANNI 8B 
JANIE B MATHESON BSA 
MRS GAIL MATTHEWS 


HOWARD S MATTHEWS — B COM23 
RICHARD D MATTHEWS + BA49_-B COMS1 
MRS LINDA C MATTIS' 8B SC66 

ANTHONY S MAXWELL B ENG62 


H STIRLING MAXWELL B ARCH28 
J S MAXWELL 


MICHAEL P MAXWELL MA61_ PH D66 
W KEITH MAXWELL MM D60 
THEODORE MAYER B A42 


| A MAYSON 

EDWARD H MAZAK DD S61 
ERIC DEAN MAZOFF_ B SC72 
KEITH P MAZUREK B ENG49 
MRS ANNA MAZZA 

JOHN D MCARTHUR 

ROBERT G MCBOYLE 8B COM48 
CHARLES M MCBRIDE 8B SC52 
JOHN H MCBRIDE BSC59 MSC64 

J LESTER MCCALLUM BA37 MD43 
WILLIAM | MCCALLUM — B COMS0 

J BRIAN MCCANN -— B ENGS56 

D HUGH MCCARTEN 8B COM49 

GERALD J MCCARTHY BCL53 

JOHN ALEXANDER MCCLELLAND 

HENRY LOCKWOOD MCCLINTOCK M D76 
DAVID MCCLURE 

JOHN A MCCORMACK BENG68 MBA/71 
KENNETH R MCCORMACK M D54 
CATHARINE C MCCORMICK — B SC48 
PETER N MCCRACKEN M070 

WILLIAM G MCCRUDDEN -~_B ENGS53 

URBAN F MCCULLOCH _B ENG42 

JANE MCCUSKER-  M D67 

MICHAEL D MCCUSKER _—‘M 067 

KATHLEEN L MCCUTCHEON _ B N68 
WILLIAM B MCDIARMID 8B COMS52 

P ROBB MCDONALD _B SC(ARTS)30 + M D34 
RDMCDONALD PH D935 

ALLAN H MCDOUGALL B COM30 

MRS ALLAN H MCDOUGALL BA36 PH D69 
MRS LAWRENCE G MCDOUGALL = B COM39 
ADA E MCEWEN_ 8B N62 

BENNETT B MCEWEN M D382 

MURRAY D MCEWEN _ B SC(AGR)53 
ARTHUR H MCFARLANE BA39_ M A46 
MRS ARTHUR H MCFARLANE — B A40 

G PAUL MCGEE MD651 ‘ 
LEONARD D MCGEE 8B ENG33 

GERALD SR MCGEOUGH 

MRS MARION MCGILL 

J M MCGILLIS 

IAN MCGOWAN" B ENGS59 

FREDERIC AMCGRAND- M D23 

BRIAN | MCGREEVY BA30 BCL33 
FRANK R MCGREGOR MD30 
MARGUERITE MCINTOSH M D76 

BRUCE A MCIVER 8B ENG80 

HUGH R MCKAY _B ENG69 

WILLIAM BOYD MCKEE MOD21 

J LORNE MCKEOWN  B A48 

DONALD E MCKERRICHER M D50 
ALFRED J MCKINNA M D52 

PETER W MCKINNEY M D60 

DAVID P MCKITTRICK BENG63 

JOHN A MCLAREN MD43 

MRS MARION MCLAREN BA49 MLS/77 
ELIZABETH MCLAUGHLIN BSC48 BS W49 
VICTOR D MCLAUGHLIN M D52 

ROBERT A MCLELLAN BSC48 M D52 
DONALD MCLEOD M A63 

HECTOR| MCLEOD DOD S851 

MALCOLME MCLEOD BA61 BCL64 
PETER JAMES MCLEOD 

THERESA C MCLOUD M D68 


*W FINLAY MCMARTIN BA30 MD35 


MRS DARIA MCMORRAN- BOT71 
SYDNEY D MCMORRAN BCL34 
JOHN F MCMULLAN DD S57 
ARTHUR R MCMURRICH 8B COM39 
FRANCIS E MCNAIR M D43 

NATHAN MCNAIR = B SC(AGR)49 
HERBERT B MCNALLY BCLS55 

J PATRICK MCNALLY BENG75 
DUNCAN | MCNEILL BA62 BCLE65 
JAMES W S MCOUAT _ B ASO 

BRUCE R MCPHERSON SC44 

DAVID MCPHERSON BA68 MD/76 
DOUGLAS F MCPHERSON M D44 
WILLIAM J MCQUILLAN BCL34 
MRS DONALD R MCROBIE - B A34 
DOUGLAS G MCTAVISH B COM66 


VAUGHAN E MCVEY . 
WILLIAM A MCVEY BCOM5S1 

JAMES C MEAD M D58 

AIDAN JOSEPH MEADE 8B ENG78 

MRS J W R MEADOWCROFT _ B AS1 

J KENNETH MEAGHER B ENG49 

JOHN H MEANY M D37 

VOLKER MEHNERT BCL62 

RICHARD E MELANSON ~~ B SC(AGR)43 
STEWART W MELDRUM 

ENDEL MELL 8B ENGS59 

GEOFFREY MELVILL-JONES 

ROGER MENARD 

A|MENDELSOHN - B ENG39 

MAXWELL W MENDELSOHN _ B A62 
MELVIN MENDELSOHN BSC57 MD61 
MYER D MENDELSON BSC45 MD4/7 
JOSEPH MENDELSSOHN — B COMS1 

JEAN H MENETREZ M D50 

MORAVIO MENNI 

MRS HARRIET ANNE MENZEL 
RRMERIFIELD BA38 BCL4I1 
RUSSELL G MERIFIELD BCL70 

MRS HOLLIS W MERRICK II 

CLARKE F MERRITT DD S48 

OLIVER MERSEREAU 

ROGER EG MESMER- M D56 

MICHAEL J MESSEL_ B ENG38 

| MESSINGER BCOM29 

MOSES J MESSINGER M D22 

JOHN G METRAKOS — B ENGSS 

JULIUS D METRAKOS BSC47 PHDS1 
AARON H METTARLIN BA23 BCL26 
PHILIP MEYEROVITCH BC L21 

MRS DAVID MICHAELSON _ B A59 

ALAN GREGORY MICHAUD 8SC72 DODS/7 
PHILIPPE MICHEL DIP MED54 

PETER M MIESZKOWSKI BSC57 MASI 
FRANK MILES 


F THOMAS MILL 8B ARCHS58 
DAVID S MILLER JR M D67 
ALEXANDER MILLER BSC45 MD47 
ALICE E MILLER’ 8B A34 

CAMERON D MILLER BA61 BCL64 
JAMES R MILLER PH D59 

MARY L MILLER BSC49 MD53 
MORRIS MILLER BSC44 M D48 

SAUL MILLER MD39 M SC48 

MRS WILLIAM B MILLER’ B A46 

WILLIAM M MILLER COMS51 

BJMILLIGAN BN50 

ROGER MILLINGTON 

STUART MILLOWITZ BAS57 BCLE60 
ALANVLMILLS BCL42 

GH STANLEY MILLS M A47 

KCFMILLS ARTS31 

CATHERINE AMILNE BSC68 MOD70 
ARTHUR M MINNION BA32 BCL37 
OSHER MINOVITZ M D47 

W HAROLD MINSHALL MSC38 PH D41 
MRS MINA KUDISH MINTZ 8B SC70 
HENRY MINTZBERG 8B ENG61 

JEAN R MIQUELON BCL52 
REMITCHELL M D47 

BETSY AMITCHELL BA71 BCL75 
HERBERT E MITCHELL BCOM48 
NELSON S MITCHELL BA55 M D859 
WILLIAM MITCHELL 

WESLEY MIYAMOTO = _B COM81 

HENRY F MIZGALA M D857 

PETER MLYNARYK BSC54 M D56 
DRUMMOND S MODE 8B COM63 

HARRY HK MOE PH D68 

MRS ROBERT E MOEN _B SC(P E)55 
WILLIAM W MOFFAT BSC49 MD53 
LEO KAM-SUM MOK B ENG72 

HANS MOLLER 

MRS MAUREEN MOLOT BA62~ M A64 
CJGMOLSON ARTS22 

ERIC H MOLSON 

ALMAS W MONAHAN _ B ENG48 

ROBERT L MONAHAN PH D59 

PETER H MONK = B COMS58 

MRS PETER H MONK’ B A58 

RICHARD C MONKS MD68_ DIP MED74 
ERNEST E MONRAD 

THOMAS H MONTGOMERY BA36 BCL39 
BROCK L MONTGOMERY _B ENG34 
DOUGLAS W MONTGOMERY BCL57 
THOMAS R MONTGOMERY = _B COM32 
HELEN MONTIN 

A RUSSELL MOODIE MD10 

CRAIG W MOOK SANG BSC71 ODS/75 
DONALD R MOONEY- B ENG47 

MONICA EA MOONEY DOD S51 

ERNEST J MOORE 8B ENGS6 
JACQUELINE MOORE B A74 


PETER GERALD B MOORE MD/75 
FRED MOOTE 

CHARLES R MORELAND _ B SC(AGR)51 
JAMES E MORGAN _ B A37 

JOHN D MORGAN — B COMS2 

MRS JOHN D MORGAN — B COMSO 

MRS AE MORIN’ B N48 

HUGH L MORRIS M D56 

KENNETH W MORRIS AGR44 

SAUL MORRIS BA54 BCLS57 

M KATHLEEN MORRISON _ B A28 

MARY MORROW 8BSC49 MD51 
AVRUM MORROW ENG47 

J FRED MORROW _ B SC(AGR)50 

JAMES N MORTON ENG43 

W O J MOSER 

MARY JANE MOSSMAN | B A67 

JOHN W MOSSOP_ B ENGS5 

HAROLD E MOTT  _B SC(ENG)22 

MRS ERIC W MOUNTJOY BN66 M SC(N)76 
JOHN E MOXLEY 8B SC(AGR)47  M SC(AGR)52 
HENRY WILDING MOXON _ B SC(ENG)30 
JASON K MOYER M D45 

MRS SAM MOYER _ B SC(AGR)60 

MRS ARNOLD G MUIRHEAD — B SC(ARTS)26 
DAVID S MULDER WM SC65 

THOMAS C MULLIGAN — B A42 

WILLIAM O MULLIGAN BA48 DD S50 
WILLIAM P MULLIGAN M D56 

ROBERT L MUNRO BCOM48 BCLS51 
MRS ROBERT L MUNRO B SC52 
JAMES P MUNROE M D60 

WM MORGAN MUNROE BA43_ M A46 
WILLIAM T MURCHISON —B COM63 
JAMES D MURDOCK BSC49 PHD82 


*A GORDON MURPHY 8B SC(ENG)22 LL D60 


DAVID J MURPHY 8B SC66 

DAVID R MURPHY MD42 M SC48 
FREDERICK G MURPHY MD54 MSC58 
HAROLD JOSEPH MURPHY 

DONALD M MURRAY BCOM55 C A58 
HUBERT J MURRAY 

J RICHARD MURRAY BA38 BCL41 
MRS JAMES A MURRAY — B SC(H EC)53 
JAMES G MURRAY BSC48 MOD51 
MARION MURRAY B SC59 

H LINDSAY MUSSELLS DD S41 

S TERENCE MYLES DIP MED72 MSC73 
PAUL NADLER BA64 BCL6/7 

JAMES D NAFTALI 

MAURICE NAIHOUSE MD18 

ALLAN P NAIMARK BSC56 MD60 

J LEITH E NANCE B N63 

MICHAEL JAMES NANNE BSC72 DDS/6 
PHILLIP M NASSIEF B ENGS7 

MIREILLE NAUD B COM80 

RONALD P NAYLOR ML S68 

LEWIS C NEACE M D939 

MALCOLM E NEARY _ B SC(AGR)37 
JUAN CARLOS NEGRETE 

BEVERLEY C NEILL BENGS57 

BARBARA ANN NEILSON BB SC(AGR)60 
GREGORY MA NEIMAN BSC43_ M SCS53 
J GORDON NELLES BCOM28 MCOM33 
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PATRICIA SULLIVAN BA71 MA/78 
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JOHN H SUMMERSKILL BA46 LLODZ1 
RICHARD S SURWIT PHD72 

FRANK H SUTCLIFFE 8B ENGS53 

D WM SUTHERLAND _B COM39 

HUGH S$ SUTHERLAND MSC29 PHOD31 
NIGEL SVAMI_B A63 

ALAN SWABEY 8B COM30 

DAVID WSWALES BSC59 MD61 
MRS MORRIS SWALSKY — B N49 

JN SWARTZ BENG34 PHD97 

G PATRICK SWEENY M D54 

SIDNEY TSWEETING BSC61 DD S63 
J ROBERT SWIDLER B COM68 

JOHN SWIDLER BCOM65 BCLE69 
LIONEL D SWIFT 8B ENG34 

DONALD C SWOGER BA52 ML S66 
JAMES F SYMES_ MSC73 
PETERLSZEGO BSC61 MD65 
EDWARD TABAH 8BSC40 MD42 


ALEXANDER H TAIT B ENG37 

G EWING TAIT 8B SC(ENG)30 

G RODNEY TAIT BENG61 PHOD71 

JOHN CHARLES TAIT BCL72 

HYMAN TANNENBAUM BSC65 MD69 

GLORIA SHAFFER TANNENBAUM _ B SC59 
PH D76 

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MRS ISAAC TANNENBAUM 8B A44_ B SC46 

CLARE W TANTON M D641 

TMUNCEY TANTON MD41 

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JOHN TATAM 

WILLIAM G TATHAM BB ABO 

WILLIAM A TAYLOR BSC44 MD45 

A SCOTT TAYLOR 8 ENG60 

DONALD TAYLOR DD S66 

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FREDERICK TAYLOR 8B ARCH30 

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JOHN S TAYLOR 8B ENG49 

RICHARD W TAYLOR BSC69 MOD73 

WADE A TAYLOR COM24 

CECIL T TEAKLE 8 A24 

ROBERT C TEDFORD 8B COM63 

MRS ROBERT C TEDFORD DIP P T65 

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MRS RALPH C TEES BCOM34 

PHILIP M TEIGEN 

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ALBERT D TEITLEBAUM 8SC58 PHDE67 

ANDREW TEKELA 0D S57 

DEREK TEMPLETON 8B ENG79 

ALAN TENENHOUSE PHD59 MD62 

IVAN CN TENNANT BSC52 

JOHN D TENNANT BCOM63 

MICHAEL LESLIE TERRIN M074 

MRS F RICHARD TERROUX BA21 PHOD90 

CLAUDE M TETRAULT MA4O BCL49 

JEAN THIBAULT 

PAUL THIVIERGE 

B EDMOND THOMAS MD36 

HOWARD B THOMAS” _ MW D62 

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WALTER L THOMLINSON 8B ENG38 

GEORGE H THOMPSON _— MW :D47 

MRS ALAN G THOMPSON ARTS40 


ARTHUR BACON THOMPSON M D36 


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» BGORDON THOMPSON MD59 MSC65 AC WEAVER BENG43 ROSS WILSON BCOM24 
’ CHARLES A THOMPSON M D38 MRS DORRIEN WEAVER BA36_ DIPS W38 WILLIAM R WILSON B ENG34 
CLIFFORD S THOMPSON M D025 GARY D WEBB BSC65 MD67 ISRAEL WINKLER BA36 MD39 
JAMES E THOMPSON _ 6 ENG70 JEAN F WEBB M D42 ROLAND B WINSOR _ B SC(ENG)27 
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WILLIAM B THOMPSON _B A67 RICHARD V WEBBER BB ENG7 JACKS WISE BSC65 MD69 
WILLIAM J THOMPSON B ENG52 ORWEBSTER MSC30 PHD33 MRS MELVIN WISE 8B AS6 
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BENJAMIN J THORPE BA28 MA32 ALLEN WEIGENSBERG _ B SC(AGR)73 LEONARD H WISSE_B A52 
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DONALD S THURBER __M D25 MORTIMER WEINFIELD BA33 BCL36 POLLY BWITHROW M141 
MRS GUNHILD TIBBETTS DONALD E WELCH B ENG61 HERBERT WITTCHEN 
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GEORGE S TOMKINS ™M A52 URRAY VAUGHAN BASIL J P WHALLEY PHD5?2 GEORGE W WOODS BCOM47 CA49 
GH TOMLINSON PHD35 ROBERT P VAUGHAN = B ENG40 MRS ERIC E WHEATLEY B A32 CLARENCE P WOODWARD B ENGS5O 
MRS GH TOMLINSON PH D36 MAURICE A VERNON BA49 M DSI ROBERT JOHN WHEATLEY 8B COM72 JAMES C WOODWARD BS A30 
RALPH J TONELLI B ENG49 JEAN VEZINA BENJAMIN B WHITCOMB M D35 HUGH W WOOLNER 8 AG66 
SIARTHUR TOOLEY MRS ERNEST F VIBERG MRS AILEEN WHITE ROBERT G WORRALL B COMS0 
C FRANK TOPP BCOM38 WILLIAM VICTOR __B COMS1 KERR LACHLAN WHITE BA4O MD49 JERRY AWOWCHUK 0D S76 
JOSEPH TOTH DIP MED67 MRS WILLIAM VICTOR _ B A32 V MICHAEL WHITEHEAD M D59 SIMON F WREN BSC58 MD63 
STRATIS TOULOUMIS BSC70 DDS75 ROLAND J VIGER M033 RUTH M WHITLEY _B A29 ENWRIGHT MD29 
GORDON TOWNSEND MD29 JOHN VINCELLI DD S51 JAMES G WRIGHT _B A65 
SUSAN E TRECARTIN BSC68 MD72 ANDREW K VINE BSC68 MOD72 JOHN H WRIGHT B ENG49 
JAMES W TREMAIN  B ENG55 MICHAEL D VINEBERG BCL68 MA68 JOHN P WRIGHT COM31 
GILLES G TREMBLAY B ENGSO STEPHEN A VINEBERG B COM58 ANDREW R WROBEL B ENG70 | 
JEAN-CHARLES TREMBLAY MRS STEPHEN A VINEBERG BB A62 ISRAEL J WYGNANSKI BENG61 PH D64 
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MAMDOUH MOHAMED YONES'- M ENG80 

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DONALD A YOUNG MD35 

MRS ELLIOTT T YOUNG fi 
MRS JOHN G YOUNG 8B a 
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JEFFREY MARK YOUSTER DOS80 MSC80 : 
HOWARD S YUDIN BSC67 MSC69 

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MICHAEL P VOTICKY BCOM71 
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RICHARD HARVEY WAIT M D57 
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JOHN WALDES BB ENG66 

HARVIE D WALFORD - B ENG49 

J HARRIS WALKER MD43 

JAMES A WALKER _ B SC(AGR)51 
JEAN M WALKER_B A44 


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JOHN M WALKER MRS DOROTHY ZARSK BS W5I MS W51 
; LAURENCE R WALKER BSC35 PHD39 CHARLES K ZENWIRT B ENGS5O 
ls —_e- O JAMES WALKER PH D50 RNOLD ZIDULKA BSC62 MD66 
MRS ROBERT L_TRERICE MRS TF WALKER B A119 MRS ARNOLD ZIDULKA B SC68 
g CHARLES C TRETTER ', WILLIAM G WALKER M D48 JEAN PAUL ZIGBY BCOMS52 BCLS59 
_ J LOCH TRIMINGHAM  M D66 JAN WALL M SC75 BENJAMIN ZIMMERMAN M D66 
AE W IRITES M054 YVONNE C WALL al GEORGE ZIMMERMAN 
MARSHALL TROSSMAN BA43. MD50 K RONALD J ZINNER MD59 ' 
MARYE|TROTT BSC65 MD69 A BRADFORD WALSH B SCIAGR)36 RODERICK L WHITMAN = M D39 ALFRED 8 SION B ENG35 | 
LORNE | TROTTIER. B ENG70 M ENG73 ALLISON WALSH BA33 BCL36 PHILIP WHITTALL 8B ENGS9 s MOSES ZNAIMER _B A63 ‘it 3 
GEORGE NTRUSCOTT DD S52 GEORGE C WALSH MD42 MSCA49 N BLAIR WHITTEMORE M D60 JEROME F ZOBEL M033 ‘| 
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MRS MEI ELENG TSAO JOHN S$ WALTON B ENGS3 A PATRICK WICKHAM BC L49_ LUBOMYRA ZUK __L MUSS57 | 
\HMICHAEL L TUCKER B ENGS3 MRS JOHN S WALTON B AS52 FRED WIENER 8 SC42_ M043 EDGAR 8 ZURIF BENG61 M SC(APP)64 ‘gs 
SMALAN DM TURNBULL MD61 MSC65 SALLY SHUN YEE WAN _B A79 MICHAEL GEORGE WIENER —B COM66 ; & 
MARTHA LENNOX TURNBULL = B SC(N)81 ERIKBWANG BAS54 BCL57 ERNEST J WIGGINS PH D46 ~ 
| WALICE W TURNER BA27 MA28 FRANKLIN R WARD M D67 JOHN B WIGHT —B COM47 
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RICHARD C U'REN WM D64 BRIAN JAMES WARD WM D80 JOHN WILCOCK B ENG51 
ALFRED BUDOW BA39 MSC40 WALTER G WARD _B ENG4?2 RALPH D WILKINSON | 
ERNEST S USZKAY BENG58 JAMES E WARE BENGAO BERNARD WILLIAM WILLERS BCOM78 
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WILLIAM B VAN ALSTYNE MD59_ DIP MED64 HERBERT H WARREN BCOM30 CA31 JOHN W WILLIAMS B SC44 
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McGill University Montreal Campus 


Disks 


TAA VRS 


The McGill Development Office 


Martlet House, 3605 Mountain Street, 
Montreal, Quebec H3G 2M1 
(514-392-5924) 


byt 


y Elizabeth B. McNab, Director of Development 
Thomas B. Thompson, Coordinator AMF & MAP 

" Paul Heyman, Associate Director of Annual Giving 
i Allan Berezny, Class Agent Coordinator 


Donors livinc in the United States and Donors living in Canada and other countries 

requiring U.S. tax receipts should make will receive Canadian tax receipts by 
cheques payable to: making cheques payable to: 

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The McGill Development Office 


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McGill's faculties 
look to the future 


by Charlotte Hussey 


The following interviews with the deans of Graduate Studies and 
Research, Management, and Religious Studies conclude this four-part 
series on faculty planning. If you have missed any of the previously 
published interviews please feel free to write to the News fora free copy. 


FACULTY OF MANAGEMENT 
3 25 RO ead Bod BS PE 


One pritarion i for Leaeuiding into the Faculty of Management’s ever- 
popular MBA program is scoring comfortably above the national 
average on the Graduate Management Aptitude Test (GMAT). ‘‘Our 
average GMAT score,’’ says Dean of Management Dr. Laurent Picard, 
“is in the 85 percentile. But our GMATs could be close to the 90 
percentile, if we had a better-funded fellowship program.” 

Quebec students attending the faculty are relatively well-served by 
their provincial scholarship system. Picard’s concern is to set up a 
$250,000 endowment to help recruit out-of-province students of merit. 
“We used to have 25 percent of our students coming from outside 
Canada,’ he says. ‘‘Now we’re losing these top students because we re 
not strong on scholarships. We need a substantial number of MBA 
scholarships to compete with other universities. 

The dean wishes to boost other scholarly efforts as well. He would do 
$0 by building on one of his faculty's pedagogical innovations — the 
combination of the fields of policy and organizational theory in a cur- 
riculum for BA, MA, and PhD students. This trailblazing merger that has 
resulted in an area of scholarship attempting to define the nature of the 
manager’s role, the process of strategy formation, the design of organi- 
zational structure, and the development of basic managerial skills has 
become a model for other North American business schools. It has also 
laid the groundwork for the establishment of a McGill Institute for Policy 
Studies in Management. 

“We want to build on our strong, young research team led by Henry 
Mintzberg, with the help of Professors Kets de Vries, Miller and their 
colleagues, and develop an Institute,’’ explains Picard. A monthly col- 
loquium organized by Mintzberg’s group and featuring international 
experts has already attracted to McGill one of the largest number of 
policy doctoral students to be found at any North American university. To 
further his faculty's leadership in the field of management policy, the 
dean would earmark specific sums for an Institute: $350,000 to create a 
fellowship program: $150,000 to fund colloquia, symposia, and 
research; and another $525,000 to provide for a staff secretary, guest 
lecturers, and a visiting professorship. 

Picard also plans to assist financially in the establishment of a Centre 
for Management Science. This discipline offers the means to develop 
mathematical infrastructures appropriate to public and private sector 
management. All areas of business — accounting, finance, international 
business, marketing, management information systems, and resource 
Management - draw on its principles. 

“In the field of management science,’ explains the dean, ‘‘we have a 
core of such well-known researchers as Professors Whitmore, Yalov- 


sky, Loulou, Darmon, etc. to build on.’’ Picard wishes to consolidate the 
research efforts of these men by creating an interdisciplinary centre. To 
do so, he would put aside some $180,000 for the hiring of a secretary 
and for the sponsorship of an annual series of visiting researchers. He 
would also provide $355,000 for the support of conferences and sym- 
posia, for the guidance of faculty research projects, and for holding 
in-house research seminars with business and government. 

Another priority for Picard is to strengthen the Faculty of Manage- 
ment’s library with an additional operational budget of $160,000. Man- 
agement research is a relatively young, rapidly growing pursuit that 
necessitates the expansion of present library holdings. Important collec- 
tions must be updated and new subscriptions purchased. 

While talking about his faculty, which is as young and vital as the field 
of management itself, Picard keeps returning to one adjective — ‘‘excel- 
lent. I’m saying that with no false sense of pride, because |’m not 
responsible,’ he adds. ‘‘It was built before | came and has matured 
during my term. My role is simply to make it better known.” 


FACULTY OF RELIGIOUS 
STUDIES 


Dean of Religious Studies Dr. J.C. McLelland feels optimistic about 
the popularity of his faculty. Undergraduate enrolment is up, graduate 
enrolment has increased significantly, and some 300 students from 
other disciplines have chosen this year to take one or two religious 
Studies electives. ‘‘The morale is certainly good here,’’ says the dean, in 
spite of the fact that in a recent campus survey his staff members ranked 
second highest in faculty work loads. 

To lighten these work loads, McLelland would put $100,000 towards 
the improvement of his faculty’s teaching assistantship fund. The estab- 
lishment of additional teaching assistantships would relieve faculty 
members of the burden of certain time-consuming, pedagogic tasks. It 
would also provide doctoral candidates with financial help and teaching 
experience in such areas as Bible, theology, philosophy of religion, 
ethics, church history, and comparative religion. “These teaching 
assistantships,’’ adds McLelland, ‘‘will attract high quality graduate 
Students. And our students have an excellent record of winning awards, 
including an average of three Canada Council Fellowships each year.’ 

Increased faculty work loads, occurring largely because of budgetary 
restraints, have been difficult because of the size of the Faculty of 
Religious Studies. ‘‘In a small teaching unit such as ours, the loss of one 
staff member is proportionately greater than in a larger faculty, ’’ explains 
McLelland. ‘‘For example, if there are only two people in an area, the loss 
of one would be 50 percent of our staff.”’ 

The dean is especially concerned about coming faculty retirements in 
the areas of psychology of religion and ethics. Full-time replacements 
can not be hired because of financial cutbacks. The dean would like to 
authorize that the sum of $100,000 be spent over the next ten years for a 
visiting professorship in ethics. Such support would answer the growing 
need for the intensified teaching of new and popular specialties like 
business ethics, medical ethics, and bioethics. It would also abet the 
collaboration of faculty specialists with scholars from other faculties or 
institutions. 


JANUARY 1984/McGILL NEWS 15 


Photos by Vivian Kellner 


McLelland also wishes to spend another $62,000 to enhance the 
world religion program. Nost of this money would be used to purchase 
special texts and audio-vsual teaching aids. The remainder would be 
spent to strengthen the Fculty’s offerings in Hinduism and Buddhism. 
‘This year we have two visting lecturers from India and a Buddhist monk 
from Sri Lanka. And we vant to capitalize on their work for the future. 
Our faculty also includes tle Institute of Islamic Studies, which enjoys an 
international reputation fo teaching and research at the graduate level. It 
relies on private funding ind is presently seeking $700,000 to endow a 
chair in Urdu language ani culture.” 

Another $25,000 has teen earmarked for collaborative projects with 
the affiliated Anglican, Pesbyterian, and United Church colleges. “In 
co-operation with these colleges,’’ explains McLelland, ‘we are 
strengthening our ties wit the Caribbean and Africa. For example, there 
are graduates returning ti Africa who are so appreciative of what we ve 
done that they want to enourage a relationship.” Money, then, could be 
well-spent to help coverthe high costs of transportation to and from 
Africa. 

McLelland is optimistii about his faculty's future. ‘Given the enrol- 
ment increases and the excellent scholastic reputation of our staff 
members and our graduites, | see a healthy faculty and one that can 
cope well with further cuttacks. But clearly,” he adds, “it will be one that 
must rely on private fundng.” 


GRADUATE STUDIES & 
RESEARCH 


ee ay \ 


Dean of Graduate Stuties and Vice-Principal (Research) Gordon 
Maclachlan likes to respnd quickly to new ideas, and many come his 
way. Overseeing reseach funding applications submitted from all 
corners of the university, 1e enjoys having funds at the ready to assist his 
most promising scholars. In the past, he has drawn from a $150,000- 
per-annum University Risearch Development Fund to purchase start- 
up equipment and to provide seed money for new research adventures. 
“It is amazing,’ explain; Maclachlan, ‘“‘how a relatively modest input 
from this fund gives a larje application the extra credibility that results in 
a successful grant of tenor more times our contribution. 

Maclachlan’s top prioity is to increase the income of this Research 
Development Fund to $3million per year. Such a boost would stimulate 
efforts to enlarge upon university research budgets. These ‘‘soft’’ 
research funds are gradially becoming the mainstay of a university's 
financial well-being as amual government teaching grants dwindle away 
under the impact of inflition. ‘‘In the past several years, points out 
Maclachlan, “‘research finds in the form of grants and contracts to our 
professors and fellowshiys to our graduate students increased far more 
substantially than operaing grants for salaries and teaching. At these 
rates, research funds wil overtake operating grants at McGill by 1986.’ 

Maclachlan’s list of additional priorities is long. For example, the 
Biotechnological Reseach Group, established in 1980, wants to 
strengthen and expandits efforts by recruiting highly-qualified staff 
members and by providiig seed money to attract outside capital. Repre- 
senting the Faculties of Agriculture, Engineering, Medicine, and Sci- 


16 McGILL NEWS/JANUARY 1984 


ence, this research body has taken on one of the most demanding tasks 
facing Canadian universities today - developing a solid base in the 
interdisciplinary field that has rapidly developed out of recent break- 
throughs in the genetic manipulation of microorganisms, plants, and 
higher organisms. Studies are currently being conducted at McGill in 
such socially significant areas as agricultural and food engineering; 
microbial technologies for industry, medicine, and agriculture; fermen- 
tation technologies; genetic engineering; and enzyme production. Over 
the next five years, the dean would like to put some $1.3 million towards 
the consolidation of this multi-talented biotechnological endeavour. 

The Graduate School of Library Science has long been recognized asa 
leader in its field, being the first in Canada to offer a master s degree and 
to be accredited by the American Library Association. The School wishes 
to remain in the vanguard of librarianship education. To do so, it must 
keep up with recent demands from libraries, business corporations, and 
government institutions for information retrieval and data analysis 
experts. Maclachlan would allocate $17,000 for the School to set up a 
one-terminal-per-ten-students computer laboratory. He would put 
$25,000 towards the establishment of a teaching assistantship and 
$700,000 towards an additional professorship. He would also earmark 


$150,000 for a five-year, visiting professorship. | 
McGill, again, led the way in 1974 by launching Canada's first com- 


munications studies program. In fact, McGill is still the only Canadian 
university today to offer a PhD in communications. “Students are 
attracted to this program,’’ says Maclachlan, ‘‘because It's so interdis- 
ciplinary. And they are snapped up quickly because all kinds of industries 
want their expertise.’’ To further this vigorous and appealing program, it 
is proposed that an Institute of Communication Research be established. 
The dean would encourage this effort by setting aside some $200,000 


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towards the hiring of two support staff and another $200,000 fora | 


visiting professorship. 

The dean also hopes to give financial assistance to the Centre for 
Developing Area Studies. Third world students enrolled in this graguate 
program suffer the dual burden of high foreign student tuition fees and oI 
ineligibility for federal assistance. Maclachlan would use $240,000 to 
establish two fellowships for them. He would also spend $180,000 fora 
visiting fellowship program for scholars and senior government officials 
from developing countries. Attracting such specialists to the Centre 
would enrich teaching and research endeavours. It would also 
strengthen ties with foreign research institutes. Such collaborations até 
necessary if the Centre wishes to solicit external assistance. 

In 1974, the School of Social Work established a policy of admitting 
students from disadvantaged or minority backgrounds to ensure that its 
social work graduates would be as diverse as the communities they 
would go on to serve. These are often mature students, some of whom 
come from the Third World and many of whom have family respon- 
sibilities. The dean would assist them through a $50,000 bursary 
program. 

He would also assist two far-flung research projects. McGill's SUD- 
arctic Research Station in Schefferville, Quebec, needs $10,000 t0 


purchase a small, desk-top computer. ‘‘In such a remote place, it will be | 


the only computer within 1,000 miles,’’ says Maclachlan. Plugging into 
the university's central computer system in Montreal, it would enable 
researchers to stay in the north for longer periods and cut down on the 
large expense of flying them back and forth to compile their findings. He 
would put another $52,000 towards the maintenance and replacemenl 
of the Station’s trucks and snowmobiles, vehicles whose lives ale 
shortened by harsh climate, rocks and muskeg. 


Travel expenses are also a consideration for scholars wishing to 00 


field work at Canada’s only tropical research station — the Bellairs 
Research Institute of McGill in St. James, Barbados. ‘‘Granting agencies 
prefer to fund Canadian-based projects,’’ explains Maclachlan. “Fist, 
it’s hard to get money to spend time down there. Then if there is enougn 
grant money to do the work, it’s the getting down and living there that 
stops them.’’ To help those wishing to work for a few months at Bellaits, 
Maclachlan would establish a $125,000 endowed research fellowship. 

Summing up this list of research projects in a few concluding words, 
Maclachlan adds, ‘‘All the projects I’ve identified as high-priority are ina 
rapid stage of development. They are already strong at McGill, and we 
want to make sure that they get stronger.’ 


Museum 


by John Geeza 


Alpha, beta, and radium-C: 
Reopening the Rutherford 


n the Macdonald Physics Building, 


newly-renovated to house the physical 

sciences and engineering library, is a 
modest room on the third floor. It was cere- 
moniously reopened this fall as a museum that 
will serve to document nine years of Nobel 
Prize-winning research conducted at McGill 
by one of the university’s greatest scientists — 
Ernest Rutherford. In its five oak display 


cabinets are materials explaining the nature of 


such things as alpha rays and radioactive 
transformations. As well, there are letters and 
other documents, handwritten by Rutherford, 
and a few dozen pieces of laboratory 
apparatus. The tarnished brass and apparent 
Simplicity of these items belie the 
fact that they were not only conceived by 
genius, but helped revolutionize modern 
science. 

Dr. Montague Cohen, recently-appointed 
curator of the Rutherford Museum, points to 
his favorite exhibit. It is a brass cylinder about 
20 cm long. A nozzle at the side connects it to 
a Vacuum pump. At the bottom is an entrance 
slit that allows alpha particles from a wire 
coated with radium-C to pass up the cylinder. 
These particles rising up from the radium 
produce an image on a small photographic 
plate supported near the top of the tube. But 
when a high voltage is applied across a pair of 
parallel brass plates, sitting less than 1 mm 
apart just above the slit, the alpha particles are 
deflected and the photographic image is dis- 
placed. This small displacement — less than 2 
mm — allowed Rutherford to make an accu- 
rate calculation of the velocity and charge-to- 
mass ratio of the particles and hence to deduce 
that they were probably doubly-charged 
atoms of helium. It was an important step 
towards understanding the nature of radioac- 
tive transformations. 

‘Rutherford,’ says Cohen, ‘‘was a giant 
among giants, a contemporary of the Curies, 
Bohr, Einstein, and Planck.’’ He was also, 
Cohen adds, the greatest faculty member 
McGill has ever had. In 1898, at the age of 27, 
Rutherford, a New Zealander by birth, was 
enticed from Cambridge University to the 
relative backwaters of McGill by the promise 
of a full professorship and superb laboratory 
facilities. For the next nine years, he pursued 
his systematic exploration of radioactivity 
and radioactive transformations. 

At the Cavendish Laboratory in Cam- 
bridge, Rutherford had become aware that 
uranium, radium, and thorium gave off two 
Kinds of radiation. One kind, the ‘‘beta’’ 
rays, penetrated solid materials fairly easily, 
but only weakly ionized air; the other, called 
“alpha,’’ was readily stopped by a thin sheet 


ght tte eee OLAS CEEOL CE LER TRE RRS ES Se ee ORE EE TE 


Newly-appointed Curator of the Rutherford Museum Dr. Montague Cohen, has a warm 


working relationship with retired Curator Dr. Ferdinand Terroux (seated. 


of cardboard, but strongly ionized air and 
other gases. At McGill, Rutherford studied 
mainly the alpha rays (their particulate nature 
was not realized until 1902) and used several 
instruments for measuring ionization that are 
on display in the Museum today. 

The nature of the alpha rays was only one 
aspect of the radioactive puzzle. Of equal 
importance was the nature of the radioactive 
process itself. The key to this was the mys- 
terious “‘emanation’’ produced by both 
radium and thorium that could be carried off 
from its parent substance by a current of air. 
Frederick Soddy, the young McGill chemist 
who assisted Rutherford, showed that the 
emanation was itself radioactive and behaved 
like an inert gas similar to helium or argon. 
They found that a metal rod in contact with 
the emanation became radioactive - a 
phenomenon at first labelled ‘‘induced 
radioactivity’’ until it was realized that the 
gaseous emanation had deposited a solid 
radioactive material on the rod. 

What Rutherford and Soddy (who would 
also become a Nobel Laureate) had discov- 
ered in their emanation investigations was 
that a radioactive element such as thorium not 
only emits a massive particle (the alpha parti- 
cle), but in so doing produces a distinctive 
element, thorium-X, with its own chemical 
properties and itself radioactive. Thorium-X, 
in its turn, also emits an alpha particle and 
produces an inert radioactive gas, thorium 
emanation, which in turn.... 


Today we would describe these successive 
events aS a “‘radioactive series,’ but in 
Rutherford’s time the idea that a primordial 
element could transmute spontaneously into 
another element was revolutionary indeed — a 
return to medieval alchemy! Yet this was pre- 
cisely what Rutherford proposed. And later in 
his work in England with Neils Bohr at Man- 
chester, he elucidated the mechanism of these 
changes, which in tura gave rise to the atomic 
model we all know from our school texts — the 
heavy nucleus surrounded by whirling elec- 
trons, like a sun with its planets. 

In 1908, after returning to England, 
Rutherford was awarced a Nobel Prize for his 
work done at McGill. The equipment he had 
designed and used in Canada was left behind 
to be recycled or ‘‘cannibalized’’ for the con- 
struction of other apoaratus. Fortunately, a 
large proportion was rescued from this fate by 
Professor Howard Barnes, who had collabo- 
rated with Rutherford and later became the 
director of the Physics Building. 

After Rutherford’s death in 1937, A.S. 
Eve, a distinguished physicist who had 
assisted Rutherford a! McGill, was asked to 
write an official biography. He needed 
photographs of the extant equipment and took 
up the matter with Dr. Ferdinand Terroux, 
BSc’25, MSc’26, who had meanwhile ‘‘in- 
herited’’ a cupboardful of the neglected and 
abandoned equipment. Terroux realized the 
importance of this apparatus, since he had 
worked under Ruther ord in the early 1930s, 


JANUARY 1984/McGILL NEWS 17 


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| 


| 
| 
/ 


ce 


3 meee or 


SyPERTER RAPA SURAT IHG Fag E IT IGITRL ETRE eT TFT 


during the latter’s final years at the Cavendish 
Laboratory, and set about to slowly restore it. 
Cleaning tarnished brass, restoring electrical 
connections, and identifying and cataloguing 
the nature and purpose of each of the forty or 
so items was no small task. Terroux under- 
took these labours with meticulous and loving 
care; and without his heroic efforts of restora- 
tion the Rutherford Museum would have 
remained an idle dream. 

Yet cleaned and restored apparatus does 
not a museum make. Herein enters Lorne 
Gales, BA’32, BCL’35, LLD’79, McGill 
fund-raiser extraordinaire, who conjured 
sums out of the air fora museum. And Profes- 
sor Norman Shaw, chairman of the physics 
department until 1952, also served as a major 
protagonist in this scheme. The Rutherford 
Museum was opened in 1967 on the third 
floor of the Macdonald Physics Building with 
Terroux, who had just retired from a physics 
professorship, as its first curator. In 1977, 
when the physics department moved to the 
appropriately-named Rutherford Physics 
Building, it was decided to retain the Museum 
in the original structure where the master had 
worked. 

On September 23, 1983, Chancellor Con- 
rad Harrington, BA’33, BCL’36, reopened 
the Museum in the presence of such dig- 
nitaries as Principal David Johnston, Mr. 
Gales, Dr. ‘‘Ferdie’’ Terroux, and Dr. 
Cohen, to whom the curator’s mantle had just 
passed. Cohen was the obvious choice. He 
not only has a warm working relationship 
with Terroux, but holds appointments in both 


oa 


A 


Fig, i 


the Faculty of Science, as a physics professor, 
and in the Faculty of Medicine, as director of 
the Medical Physics Unit. His interest in the 
history of science and in radiation and 
radioactivity takes us back to the phenomena 
that launched Rutherford, and the world, into 
the modern atomic era. 

And Cohen is aware of his responsibilities 
beyond the laboratory. ‘“‘Those in the cor- 


- 
ie ; me ‘ 
g W oe 


This 1906 drawing by Ernest Rutherford 
pictures the apparatus he used for measur- 
ing the properties of aloha-particles. (See 
second paragraph of text.) 


Ents : 


ridors of power tend to be lawyers and 
accountants rather than scientists,” he says. 
‘It’s incumbent on scientists to explain to 
people the importance of their discoveries. 
Rutherford did this many times. Every scien- 
tist has a duty to devote a portion of his time to 
the public, discussing the implications of his 
science.’ 

He and this unique museum help that end. 6 


DOT JUST THINK ABOUT (T— BT! 


es 


18 McGILL NEWS/JANUARY 1984 


SSS 


oe ‘ 


R 


PERSPECTIVE | 


My Grand Tour of 
Quebec 


by Principal David Johnston 


‘What a fantastic province we live in!’’ This 
was my reaction as I journeyed across Quebec 
with the other rectors and principals from the 
province during National Universities Week, 
a very successful event organized by the 
Association of Universities and Colleges of 
Canada. The purpose of this early-October 
fournée was to celebrate the accomplishments 
of Canadian universities, and to underline 
how a healthy system of higher education is 
important to a healthy society. 

Each regional university association 
planned its own festivities and each campus 
Organized its own schedule of events. The 

~ Conference of Rectors and Principals of the 
‘Universities of Quebec decided on this 
unusual tournée of the ‘‘Flying Rectors’’ as 
jfits special event. This was particularly 
if appropriate for Quebec, where the number of 
\i francophone university graduates is still con- 
\w siderably below the Canadian average. Only 
in recent years has an effort been made to 
establish regional universities outside of 
ia Montreal and Quebec City. And there is still a 
— great need for groups, such as our own, to 
visit and speak with the citizens of some of 
| Quebec’s smaller municipalities in order to 
make clear the essential role universities have 
to play. 

Rimouski, Chicoutimi, Rouyn-Noranda, 
Quebec City, Trois Rivieres, and Sherbrooke 
were the stops on our itinerary that began on 
October 2 and ended in Montreal on October 
7, Without exception, we received a warm 
and enthusiastic welcome from the univer- 
sities and local townspeople in these areas 
that we visited. 

We also had the opportunity to meet with 
provincial and federal government officials. 
At a Quebec City breakfast meeting, I sat 
beside Premier René Lévésque and found that 
my earlier impressions of his well-developed 
wit and sharp intelligence were confirmed. 
We touched upon many topics, including the 
necessity of finding ways to have the mission 
and benefits of universities better understood 
by society and especially by public policy 
makers. 

In Ottawa, Secretary of State Serge Joyal, 
speaking at a dinner he sponsored in recogni- 
tion of National Universities Week, stressed 
how large a part the federal government plays 
in the funding of university education and 
research. The $5 billion per annum it spends 
accounts for two-thirds of all government 
funding of higher education in Canada. Joyal 
Said this effort was often complicated by the 
fact that many Canadian taxpayers were 
unaware of the existence or extent of such 

| support. 


\ 


i.¢ t< &arw i3 


Throughout the rournée, | was aware of 
how well McGill serves the province of 
Quebec. The University of Quebec at 
Rimouski, which has only been in existence 
for slightly more than a decade, has a par- 
ticular strength in its Institute of Oceanog- 
raphy. Through a series of strong collabora- 
tive research programs, it has drawn from and 
is now well-connected with McGill’s Institute 
of Oceanography. 

At the University of Quebec at Chicoutimi, 
[ was struck by the enthusiasm of 
Chicoutimines for their university and by the 
magnificent beauty of the Saguenay region, 
which I surveyed for the first time. Here too, I 
found McGill connections. Professor Gérard 
Bouchard, a social demographer and his- 
torian, described to me a genealogical register 
that he has developed. It records the genetic 
history of the population of the Lac St. Jean 
region, extending back to its first settlers. He 
and Charles Scriver, BA’51, MD’S55, of the 
McGill Center for Human Genetics, have 
already used this data bank to identify several 
genetically-transmitted illnesses, among 
them hereditary rickets. The lessons from this 
research may eventually be applied to more 
cosmopolitan areas. 

At Rouyn-Noranda, I was conscious of 
how crucial our university is to this northern, 
somewhat isolated community. For example, 
McGill scientists were involved in the origi- 
nal discoveries and the subsequent processing 
of various minerals, as well as with the train- 
ing of a number of mining and metallurgy 
engineering graduates who have worked or 
are working here. And our Faculty of 
Medicine has made special efforts, not only to 
place its younger graduates and medical 
administrators in the Rouyn-Noranda hospi- 
tals, but to deal with the isolation these pro- 
fessionals often experience in such remote 
communities. 

At the University of Quebec in Hull, it was 
my turn to serve as porte parole for the group. 
In so doing, I delivered a major address on 
university research and conducted a press 
conference and several lengthy television 
interviews, all in French. This was a personal 


) 


plateau in my four years of effort to become 
bilingual. It was especially satisfying that it 
occurred with this group of colleagues, 
because they have been particularly suppor- 
tive and at times unusually tolerant of my 
usage of the language of Moliere. 

While at the University of Quebec at Trois 
Rivieres, | met with the rector, Professor 
Louis Hamélin. Together we reviewed plans 
for the fourth Fur Trade Conference to be held 
at McGill in the summer of 1985. Hamelin, a 


| geographer, will chair this event that is being 
| organized jointly by our university and the 


Macdonald Stewart Foundation. 

And at the twenty-five-year-old, *“*new 
francophone’ University of Sherbrooke, our 
group discussed the theme of the university as 
employer. We also considered how a univer- 
sity can serve the development of a region. 
The University of Sherbrooke and its 
neighbour, Bishop’s University in Lennox- 
ville, stand as examples, having both deeply 
influenced the quality of life in the Eastern 
Townships. 

Our last day was spent in Montreal at a 
luncheon attended by representatives of the 
press, business, the professions, and other 
institutions. Here we concluded that the rour- 
née had successfully demonstrated what a 
university is and had served to emphasize the 
positive links existing between our univer- 
sities and society. It had reinforced the visi- 
bility of certain new Quebec university cam- 
puses. And our tour also managed to sensitize 
university staff and students across the pro- 
vince to the fact that they can act as ambas- 
sadors by explaining our mission to the pub- 
lic. 

On a personal note, it was exciting to see 
what an impact the newer university cam- 
puses were having on the various regions of 
Quebec and what a talented group of younger 
people, rectors, administrative staff, and pro- 
fessors was actively involved in these schools. 
The enthusiasm and support that was shared 
by so many for the advancement of learning 
and, therefore, the advancement of our 
society, will certainly be a positive force 
for Quebec and Canada in the future. 0 


JANUARY 1984/McGILL NEWS 19 


USSOY PIARG 


rae! 


Sa ee 


LGPL SSIADA SOSA SD SOAR EPIFS RIG IAL AGS HPPA ATS PATIL LHP Se EE? 


2 Ce oe 


WHERE THEY ARE AND 


WHAT THEYRE DOING 


18 

E. CLIFFORD BROWN, MD’18, one of 
Montreal’s oldest practising doctors, recently 
celebrated sixty years of practice at a party 
with nearly one hundred friends, relatives, 
and patients. 


28 

WILLIAM A. KETCHEN, BSc’ 28, has been 
awarded a Special Certificate of Appreciation 
by the coating and graphic arts division of the 
Technical Association of the Pulp and Paper 
Industry. 


29 

NORAH B. LONGWORTH, BCom’29, 
Prince Edward Island’s *‘Horseman of the 
Year’’ in 1981, has recently had a race named 
after her, The Lady Norah Open Two Year 
Old Place, at the Charlottetown Driving Park. 
J. P. (BUD) McINERNEY, MD’29, was 
recently honoured at a dinner of appreciation 
given by the St. Joseph’s Hospital Founda- 
tion, Saint John, N.B. 


"32 

DAVID E. SHERMAN, MD’32, was 
recently awarded honorary membership in the 
Canadian Association of Gerontology at their 
annual meeting in Moncton, N.B. 


"33 

NAOMI JACKSON GROVES, BA‘’33, 
MA’35, recently published two books on her 
uncle A. Y. Jackson, The Arctic, 1927 and 
Young A. Y. Jackson, and a recent issue of 
Northward Journal (Penumbra Press) was 
devoted entirely to her writing and paintings. 


37 

EVANS B. REID, BSc’37, PhD’40, retired 
chairman of the chemistry department, Colby 
College, Waterville, Me., recently had a one- 
person show of his paintings in the gallery of 
Thomas College, Waterville. 


’39 

MONTY BERGER, BA’39, has been elected 
chairman of Berger & Associates, a public 
relations and marketing communications 
consulting firm. 

B. SEYMOUR RABINOVITCH, BSc’39, 
PhD’42, professor of chemistry at the Uni- 
versity of Washington, Seattle, was named 
1984 Michael Polanyi medalist by the Royal 
Society of Chemistry, London, and will also 
receive the Peter Debye Award in physical 
chemistry from the American Chemical Soci- 
ety in April 1984. 


"40 

O. A. BATTISTA, BSc’40, is the chairman 
and president of RSC Corp., Fort Worth, 
Texas. 

W. E. SACKSTON, MSc’40, professor of 
plant pathology at Macdonald College, 
Montreal, was the first recipient of the Dr. 
and Mrs. D. L. Bailey Award, presented by 
the Canadian Phytopathological Society at its 
annual meeting in August 1983. 


"41 

MAXWELL J. DUNBAR, PhD’41, a profes- 
sor at the Marine Sciences Centre of McGill 
University, recently delivered the Irving/ 
Scholander Memorial Lecture, “*‘Northern 
Marine Ecosystems: Evolutionary Aspects, 
at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks. 
BERNARD J. FINESTONE, BCom’41, has 
been elected chairman, Quebec region, of the 
Canadian Jewish Congress, Montreal. 
MARY BIGGOR PECK, BA‘’41, is the 
author of the recently-published book, 7he 
Bitter with the Sweet: New Brunswick 1604- 
1984. 


"42 

ROBERT L. GRASSBY, BEng’42, has been 
elected president of St. Mary’s Hospital 
Foundation, Montreal. 

JOHN A. HALL, BSc’42, BEng’49, senior 
vice-president of Noranda, has been elected 
president of the Ontario Mining Association. 
DIMITRIOS (JIM) PANOS, BA’42, 
MA’44, recently had a collection of short 
stories entitled Even Smoke Rising published 
by Fellowship in Prayer, Inc., Princeton, 
N.J. 


"45 

GEORGE DOUGLAS DENTON, MD‘45, 
DipIntMed’51, recently received a Doctor of 
Civil Laws, honoris causa, from Acadia Uni- 
versity, Wolfville, N.S. 

WILLIAM FEINDEL, MD’45, director of 
the Montreal Neurological Institute and the 
Montreal Neurological Hospital, has recently 
been awarded an honorary degree from 
Mount Allison University, Sackville, N.B. 


"46 

JOHN C. DAVEY, BCom’46, has been 
appointed director of marketing for InSys- 
tems Inc., Toronto, Ont. 

DANIEL WERMENLINGER, BEng’46, 
head of the Quebec Liquor Corp., recently 
became the first general director of the 
Montreal Urban Community. 


20 McGILL NEWS/JANUARY 1984 


"47 


been elected president and chief executive 


H. GRAHAM GAMMELL, BSe’48, has 


| Ottawa, Ont. 


KENNETH G. W. SMITH, BSc 47, has 


officer of the Canadian Paint and Coatings 
Association, Montreal. 


48 

DONALD H. DRENNAN, BCom’48, has 
been appointed president and chief executive 
officer of the Simmons Group in Canada, 
Mississauga, Ont. 


been appointed director and chairman of the ‘ 
board of Aberford Resources, Calgary, Alta, }}. 
SYLVIA OSTRY, BA’48, MA’S0, PhD’54, }/ 
LLD’72, who recently ended her term as | 
chief economist for the Paris-based Organi- 
zation for Economic Co-operation andj) 
Development, has been named a special | 
economics advisor to the federal government, 


"49 
MARGARET BLACKLOCK, BN 497) 
recently retired as director of nursing of the}, 
Montreal Chest Hospital. 
PETER M. BROPHEY, BCom’49, vice] 
president, corporate affairs, of Xerox Canada}, 
Inc., has recently become a vice-president ot . 
the Canadian Business Equipment Manutat }) 
turers Association. 
ALLAN L. FORBES, BSc’49, was recently} 
elected president-elect of the American Sock j} 
ety for Clinical Nutrition and also received i 
the U.S. Public Health Service Superior Serj 
vice Award ‘‘for outstanding leadership and 
scientific contributions to public health}, 
nationally and internationally in the area of 
human nutrition.” | 
JAMES MURDOCK, BSc’49, PhD’S2, t | 
the president of Chemetics International Ltd, } 
Vancouver, B.C., acompany that builds high | 
technology chemical plants. 
R.C. PATERSON, BCom’49, has been} 
appointed executive vice-president, treasuly 
and money markets, of the Royal Bank of 
Canada, Toronto, Ont. 

R. KENNETH ROBERTSON, BEng 49, has 
been appointed president and chief executive 
officer of Versatile Vickers Inc., Montreal. 
JOHN P. ROGERS, BA’49, has bee 
appointed president and chief operating 
officer of the Molson Companies Ltd. 
DAVID B. SMITH, BEng’49, has been 
appointed president and chief executive 
officer of Western Co-operative Fertilizens 
Ltd. 

JOAN (HAMILTON) STEWART, BSc49; | 
has recently been appointed to her tenth yeal | 
as consumer representative on the Ontario 
Apple Marketing Commission, and regulatly 
attends the meetings of the Canadian Hor 
ticultural Council. 


"50 
PHILLIP P. ASPINALL, BCom’S0, o 
Montreal, has been appointed president of the 
Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants 
for 1983-84. 


WILLIAM E. (TED) BEMBRIDGE. | 
BSc’ 50, has been named vice-president, 
international operations, for MSD AGVET. 
the worldwide animal health and agricultural 
division of Merck & Co., Inc., Rahway, N.J. 
LILLIAN MATTHEWS, BSc’S0, has 
recently retired as chairperson of the depart- 
ment of home economics, Indiana Universi- 
ty, Bloomington. 

F. ALVIN STEWART, BSc’50. was recently 
the site chairman for the 1983 Internationa] 
Plow Match and Farm Machinery Show held 
near Richmond, Ont. | 
ZIPPORAH (BATSHAW) WISEMAN. 
BA’50, professor of law at Northeastern Uni- 
versity, Boston, Mass., will be the first 
incumbent of the Robert Brauchers Visiting 
Professorship, a new Harvard University Law 
School chair. 


51 

J. ARCHIE CARMICHAEL, MSW’S1, 
recently received a Good Citizenship Award 
from the Tourism Industry Association of 
Manitoba, Inc. 

PIERRE JUTRAS, BSc’51, has been 
appointed director of the Macdonald Exten- 
sion Service, Macdonald College, Montreal. 
(See page 5.) 

J. WILLIAM RITCHIE, BSc’51, president 
of Scotia Bond Co., has been made a director 
of East Coast Energy Ltd., Halifax, N.S. 


~ 


52 

JOHN H. DINSMORE, BEng’S2, president 
of Pétromont Inc., has been appointed 2nd 
vice-chairman of Concordia University’s 
Board of Governors, Montreal. 

ROBERT G. GRAHAM, BCom’S2, is the 
chairman of the board of the newly-formed 
Roam Communications Ltd., a company 
dealing with advanced communications 
technology. 

W. J. STENASON, BCom’52, MCom’54, 
has recently stepped down from his position 
a$ president of Canadian Pacific Enterprises 
Ltd. to establish a consulting practice. 


"53 
RODERICK C. FOSTER, BCom’S53, has | 
been appointed to the newly-created position 
of executive vice-president of Imasco, 
Montreal. 

SAMUEL O. FREEDMAN, BSc’49, 
MD°53, DipIntMed’58, vice-principal 
(academic) at McGill, has been appointed a 
Special advisor of the St. Mary’s Hospital 
Development Program, Montreal. 

ALLAN A. REID, BCom’53, has been 
appointed comptroller of the Canada Pension 
Plan, Health and Welfare Canada, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

GEORGE RIESZ, BA’S3, is the vice presi- 
dent, provider development and relations for | 
Nu-Med Medical, Inc., Encino, Ca. | 
ALFRED N. SEGALL, BA’S50, BCL’S3, 
Q.C., has been appointed municipal judge for 
the city of Cote St. Luc, Quebec. 


ROLLA E. WILSON, MD’S53, of Montreal, 
was recently named a fellow of the American 
College of Radiology in recognition of her 
outstanding performance in medicine. 


54 

JOSEPH FISHMAN, BSc’50, MD’54, 
MSc’60, has been appointed chief of 
ambulatory care at the V.A. Medical Center, 
Castle Point, N.Y. 

VERNON G. MacKAY, BSc’54, MSc’56, 
has been appointed director of marketing for 
East Chilliwack Co-operatives, a British Co- 
lumbia agriculture and manufacturing com- 
pany. 

DEREK MATHER, BCom’54, is president 
of Vencap Equities Alberta Ltd., an invest- 
ment company headquartered in Edmonton, 
Alta. 


55 

EVE MARSHALL, BA’SS, is the new 
headmistress of The Study, a private school 
for girls in Westmount, Quebec. 


56 

JEAN BABY, BEng’56, has been appointed 
vice-president, carrier relations and settle- 
ments, of Telecom Canada. 

J. HUGH FAULKNER, BA’S6, has been 
appointed managing director of the Indian 
Aluminum Company Ltd., Calcutta, a sub- 
sidiary of Alcan Aluminum Ltd. 

SAMUEL J. GOLDENBERG, BA’S56, has 
been appointed vice-president, personnel, of 
Polysar, Ltd., Sarnia, Ont. 

JOHN C. KEATING, BEng’56, has been 


appointed director of corporate affairs and | 


planning for ITT Canada Ltd., and ITT 
Industries of Canada Ltd. 


"57 

GORDON G. BALES, BA’57, recently 
received his C.L.U. designation from the 
Institute of Chartered Life Underwriters. 
IRVING LUDMER, BEng’57, has been 
appointed president and chief executive 
officer of Ivanhoe Inc., the real estate sub- 
sidiary of Steinberg, Inc. 


58 

MICHAEL J. B. ALEXANDOR, BA’58, 
has been appointed executive vice-president 
and chief operating officer of Ronalds West- 
ern, Vancouver, B.C. 

L. YVES FORTIER, BCL’58, a partner in 
the Montreal law firm of Ogilvy, Renault, has 
been appointed a special advisor of the St. 
Mary’s Hospital Development Program, 
Montreal. 

Dr. LORNE G. HART, BA’S58, has been 
appointed to the executive of the Canadian 
Society of Aviation Medicine, and will be 
their Quebec representative at Canadian 
Aeronautical and Space Institute meetings. 
ALLAN A. HODGSON, BA’58, recently 
became a member of the Canadian Operations 
Advisory Board of the Allendale Mutual 
Insurance Co., Toronto, Ont. 


| JOHN CLEGHORN, BCom’62, 


CoE LK ORS 
aie 


"59 
TONY ASPLER, BA’59, of Toronto, Ont.. 


recently published Vintage Canada, a book | 
about the Canadian wine industry, with Pren- | 


tice-Hall publishers. 


GODWIN O. PATRICK OBASI, BSc’59, of 


Nigeria, has been elected secretary-general of | 


the World Meteorological Organization, an 


agency of the United Nations, for the period | 


1984-87. 

D. MILES PRICE, BA’S9, has joined the 
investment management firm of Neuberger & 
Berman, New York, N.Y. 


60 

ROBERT E. BECKER, MD’60, has been 
appointed professor and chairman of the 
department of psychiatry at Southern Illinois 


| University School of Medicine, Springfield. 
| PETER W. DARLING, BEng’60, 


Dip- 
Man’67, is the director of personnel for Ethi- 


| con Sutures Ltd., Peterborough, Ont. 
| PETER GERGELY, BEng’60, 


has been 
appointed chairman of the department of 


| structural engineering at Cornell University, 


Ithaca, N.Y. 


61 
| DAN I. ABRAMS, BEng’61, has joined the 


firm of E. M. Warburg, Pincus & Co., New 
York, N.Y., as managing director. 

C. T. OGRYZLO, BEng’61, has been 
appointed vice-president of Wright Engineers 
Ltd. and general manager of eastern Canada 
operations, Toronto. 

DANIEL J. SULLIVAN, BCL’61, has been 
appointed assistant vice-president and man- 
ager, personal services, of the Montreal 
branch of Montreal Trust. 


62 

has been 
appointed executive vice president, interna- 
tional banking, of the Royal Bank and has 
recently moved to Toronto, Ont. 
MOHAMMAD ANWAR KHAN, PhD’62, is 
the director of the Central Asia Area Study 
Centre at the University of Peshawar, Pakis- 
tan. 

DIONYSIA ZERBISIAS, BCL’62, was 
recently appointed a judge of the superior 
court for the District of Montreal. 


63 

JOHN van ABBEMA, BSc’63, has been 
appointed regional manager for the Atlantic 
provinces of Farm Credit Corp. Canada. 
DOUGLAS F. HASLAM, BCom’63, has 
been appointed president of D. A. Stuart Inc., 
a Canadian company that produces cutting 
and grinding fluids, specialty lubricants and 
cleaners. 

MARGARET STEED HENDERSON, 
BN’63, retired professor and associate dean 
of the faculty of Nursing at the University of 
Alberta, Edmonton, was recently awarded an 
honorary membership in the Alberta Associ- 
ation of Registered Nurses. 


JANUARY 1984/McGILL NEWS 21 


BP SSELINA A OSS CWE ARR Ee Pat! 
See STROLL See OR A ee 


ARILD S. NIELSSEN, BEng’63, has been 
appointed president and chief operating 
officer of Tahsis Co. Ltd., a British Columbia 
forest products company. 

PETER WEBSTER, DipAgr’63, recently 
retired executive director of the B.C. Sports 
Hall of Fame, was named chairman of the 
Soccer Bowl ’83 committee. 


64 

A. RAE CAMPBELL, BEng’64, has been 
appointed a vice-president of Bechtel Canada 
Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

PETER S. COHEN, BSc’64, MBA’66, has 
been appointed vice-president and regional 
director for the province of Quebec for the 
Marcil Trust Co. 

PAUL S. ECHENBERG, BSc’64, has been 
appointed vice-president, plastics and bag 
division, of Consolidated Bathurst Inc. 
IVAN R. GABOR, MD’64, psychiatrist and 
psychoanalyst, has been appointed affiliated 
senior associate of the Adizes Institute, Inc., 
Santa Monica, Ca. 

GERRY KELLY, BEd’64, MA’68, 
MEd’70, is president of the Grant MacEwan 
Community College in Red Deer, Alberta, a 
school specializing in vocational training. 
WILLIAM R. ROBERTSON, BSc’64, has 
joined the Atlanta, Ga. office of Peat Mar- 
wick, an international professional account- 
ing firm. 


"65 

DANIEL C. CHIN, DDS’65, was elected 
president of the Chicago Society of Oral and 
Maxillofacial Surgeons for 1983-84. 

JOHN PRIOR, BSc’65, has been appointed 
vice-president, information systems, of 
Crown Life Insurance Co. 


66 

ALLAN D. FLEISCHER, BCom’66, has 
been appointed director and vice-president of 
Carsilco International Ltd., a Canadian tex- 
tile importing company. 

SUSAN M. KERSHMAN, BA’66, is an 
associate professor at the Pennsylvania Col- 
lege of Optometry, Philadelphia. 

BARRY Z. SCHACTER, BEng’66, 
MBA’70, has been appointed vice-president, 
marketing, of the IDEA Corp., a technologi- 
cal Ontario Crown corporation. 

FRANK SLOVER, BA’66, has been named 
director of corporate communications for 
Georgia-Pacific Corp., Atlanta, Ga. 


67 

JEAN AUBERT, BCL’67, has joined the 
Montreal firm of McLeod Young Weir, Ltd., 
as vice-president. 

MARY ELLEN JEANS, BN’67, MSc’69, 
PhD’76, has been appointed associate dean of 
Medicine and director of the school of Nurs- 
ing, McGill University. 

DAVID H. LAIDLEY, BCom’67, has 
recently become the chairman of the board of 
governors of the Royal Victoria Hospital, 
Montreal. 


22 McGILL NEWS/JANUARY 1984 


JACQUES LARIVIERE, MBA’67, is the STELLA E. HUMPHRIES, BSc’71, recently 
vice president, planning and development, of | received her PhD from the Australian Nation: 
Culinar. al University, Canberra. 

CHARLES F. MACFARLANE, BCom’67, | RICHARD KUZIOMKO, BSc’71, | 
MBA’69, has been appointed vice-president, MBA’82, has been appointed manager, mar | 
personal trust services of the Royal Trust | ket planning, for the newsprint and pulp |} } 
Corp. of Canada. businesses of CIP. li 
KEVIN O’CONNELL, BEng’67, MEng’70, | RICHARD LANDE, BA’71, won the British jf ' 
DipEd’73, a full-time physics instructor at Railways Medal for 1983, a medal given for |} | 
Vanier College, is presently on a teaching | the best publication on a rail subject. 
exchange at Kwantlen College in Vancouver, RON RODECK, BSc’71, has been appointed | 
B.C. marketing manager, film, of Hercules Cana: 
MEL A. SAUVE, BEng’67, MBA’71, has | da, Ltd. 

been appointed vice-president of marketing, 
Planters division, of Nabisco Brands Ltd. 72 | 
GRAHAM WILSON, BSc’67, has been | BETH BUDD, BSc’72, MSc’74, has been 
appointed vice-president of finance for Petro- | appointed assistant secretary and legal coum: 


= wane, -“ ung =m 


Canada, Calgary, Alta. sel for Hawker Siddeley Canada Inc., 
Toronto, Ont. 
68 PAVEL HAMET, PhD’72, internationally- 


JOSEPH BERGER, BA’65, BCL’68, has | acclaimed researcher into diabetes and 
recently been appointed the president and | hypertension, has been named a Great Mon- 
general manager of Sherwin- Williams Cana- | trealer of the future. 

da, Inc. JOHN D. HENDERSON, BA’72, recently 
CARMINE FALCONE, BEng’68, has been | received a bachelor of laws degree from the 
appointed general manager, corporate University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon. 
strategies, of Shell Canada Ltd., Toronto, MICHEL KOZLOVSKY, LMus72, 
Ont. BMus’74, MMA’76, is the director of the 
MORTY B. LOBER, BCom’68, was | Conservatoire de Musique du Québec in: 
recently admitted to partnership in the firm of Chicoutimi. | 
Levitsky, Feldman, Wexler & Associés. HELEN M. TROJANOWSKI, BN72, 
FE. COURTNEY PRATT, BA’68, has been | received a juris doctor degree from the New 
appointed national director of management | England School of Law, Boston, Mass., if 
consulting services of Touche Ross & | 1983. 

Partners in Toronto, Ont. 

VAL MARY (HARDING) STOLZ, BSc’68, | ’73 

has recently received a doctorate in Educa- | J. R. (RAY) McMANUS, BCom’73, has 
tional Psychology at the University of Regi- | been appointed senior vice-president of the 


na, where she now teaches part-time. Mercantile Bank of Canada’s eastern divirf 
sion. 
69 PETER VAMOS, MEd’73, is the gener}, 


ROBERT P. BOUTIN, BA’69, has been 
appointed executive vice-president of 
Charme et Beauté Lise Watier Inc., a cosme- 
tics company. 

MAURRY EPSTEIN, MA’69, recently 
received a Medal of Bravery from Governor 
General Ed Schreyer for rescuing six people 
overcome by carbon monoxide fumes from a 
car left running in the garage of a house. 
MICHAEL C. SHINER, BSc’69, DipEd’72, 
recently received a master’s in education 
from the University of Saskatchewan, Sas- 
katoon. 


director of The Portage Program, a therapét 
tic community for drug rehabilitation at Lat 
Echo, forty-five miles north of Montreal. 


74 

JONATHAN HAYNES, BA’74, has beet 
hired as an assistant professor of English al 
Albion College, Albion, Mich. 

PIPPA G.HALL-HENDERSON, BEd 74, 
recently received a medical degree from the 
University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon. 
JEAN-PIERRE ROSTAING, BCL’74, has 
been appointed a project manager to the land 
management branch of the Canadian Oil and 
Gas Land Administration Department 
Ministry of Energy, Mines, and Resources, 
Ottawa, Ont. 


70 

NORMAN E. THOGERSEN, BA’70, has 
been appointed marketing manager, 
Chloralkali Business Group, Industrial 
Chemicals Division of C-I-L Inc. 


"15 | 
JACK BERNSTEIN, BCL’75, LLB’76, is 
been appointed a principal of the fim 
Laventhol & Horwath, an accounting, audit: | 
ing, and management consulting firm. | 


‘71 
JOYCE BORENSTEIN, BA’71, recently 
won the Grand prize de Montréal at the 
World Film Festival for her film ‘*La 
Plante.”’ 

DAVID JACK HOLLOMBY, BSc’67, 
MD’71, a specialist in nephrology and on 
staff at the Royal Victoria Hospital, Montre- 
al, has been named a fellow of the American 
College of Physicians. 


ROGER N. BUCKLEY, PhD’75, a professor 
of history at the University of Hartford, West 
Hartford, Conn., has been awarded a basic 
research grant of $52,000 from the National 
Endowment for the Humanities to complete 
his work on a two-volume history of the 
French Revolution and Napoleonic Wars in 
the West Indies. 

DENIS L. GASPE, BEng’75, has been 
appointed manager, engineering and proj- 
ects, for Fording River Operations, one of 
Canada’s largest metallurgical coal mines. 
ROLAND HOAG, PhD’75, is the vice-presi- 
dent for exploration of BCI Geonetics, Inc., 
of Laconia, N. H., a water drilling company. 
GORDON A. IRONS, MSc’75, PhD’78, 
_ recently shared the John Chipman Award, 
_ given by the American Institute of Mining 
and Metallurgical Engineering, for the best 
, paper of the year relating to the production of 
_ iron and steel. 

feeAN PELLETIER, BSc’75, has been 
working for the past three years as a geologist 
for Phillips in Abidjan, Ivory Coast. 


| 76 

Dr. VINCENZO F. DiNICOLA, BA’76, a 
» resident in psychiatry at the Institute of 
» Community and Family Psychiatry, McGill 
University, recently presented a paper at the 
' annual conference of the Canadian Psychiat- 
; ric Association that was awarded the $500 
| C.P.A. prize for research in psychiatry. 
FRANCOISE GUENETTE, BCL’76, has 
been appointed vice-president and secretary 
of the National Bank of Canada. 

‘ KATHARINE HENDERSON, BSc’76, is 
. director of physical therapy at Carney Hospi- 
. tal, Boston, Mass. 

_ISABEL MILTON, BN’76, MSc(Appl)’79, 
. is the director of nursing at St. Peter’s Centre, 
. ageriatric, chronic care hospital in Hamilton, 
Ont. 

. J. CRAIG STIRLING, BA’76, has published 
his Concordia master’s thesis, The St-Hilaire 


Church Interior Decorations (1896-1900) of 


Ozias Leduc, that served as a catalyst for the 
, costly restorations of the church. 


ne A 

. ISABELLA C. BASSIGNANA, BSc’77, 
_ was recently a visiting scientist at the Centre 
. d’ Etudes Nucléaires de Saclay, France, and is 
_ presently at the University of Munich, Ger- 
_ Many. 

_ JOHN R. D. BONAR, BA’77, has been 
_ appointed vice-consul of the Canadian Con- 
' Sulate General, New York, N.Y. 

CARLOS FERNANDO CHAMORRO, 
BA’77, is the editor of Nicaragua’s largest 
. hewspaper, Barricada. 

’ NATHAN LAUFER, MD’77, has completed 
' a fellowship in Cardiology at the University 
’ of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and has joined the 
faculty there as a clinical instructor in the 
department of internal medicine. 

Dr. LEILA G. MITCHELL McKEE, BA’77, 
recently received her PhD from York Univer- 
sity and is a visiting assistant professor at the 
University of Toronto. 


DEANE M. PERKINS, PhD’77, associate 
professor of philosophy and religion at Nor- 
wich University, Northfield, Vt., is the 1983 
recipient of the $1,000 Dodge Award for 
excellence in teaching. 


78 

P. JEFFREY S. GRAHAM, BCom’75, 
BCL’78, LLB’79, has completed the admis- 
sion requirements to the Bars of Ontario, 
Quebec, and the District of Columbia, and 
has joined the Washington, D.C. law firm of 
Hogan & Hartson. 

ANN KITCHING, MA’78, is the new princi- 
pal of the Richmond campus of Kwantlen 
College, Vancouver, B.C. 

RICHARD B. MacDONELL, BEng’78, has 
been appointed regional manager for Quebec, 
Ontario and Eastern Canada for Reinforced 
Earth Co. Ltd. 

JUDITH MEGAN RORISON, BSc’78, 
received a DPhil from Oxford University in 
1982 and is now employed by the British 
Ministry of Defence at Malvern, England. 


‘79 

BRIAN COUSENS, BSc’79, is working as a 
research assistant in the department of 
Oceanography at the University of British 
Columbia, Vancouver, doing research on the 
chemistry and mineralogy of deep sea man- 
ganese nodules from the Pacific Ocean. 
MICHAEL GAVIN, BA’79, recently 
graduated from journalism school at the Uni- 
versity of Western Ontario and is working on 
a weekly newspaper in Bracebridge, Ont. 
PIERRE MATUSZEWSKI, MBA’79, has 
been nominated vice-president of McLeod 
Young Weir Ltd., an integrated investment 
banking firm. 

LYNN DIANE MONTREUIL, BSc’79, 
recently graduated from the coast guard col- 
lege in Nova Scotia and is now a junior relief 
engineer for the Canadian Coast Guard Fleet, 
Victoria, B.C. 

TIMOTHY G. SMITH, BEng’79, is smelter 
superintendent, Afton Operating Corp., 
Kamloops, B.C. 


"80 

MAUREEN CALES, BSc’80, MSc’82, has 
been appointed manager of the mortgage 
division for Rothenberg & Rothenberg 
Annuities Ltd. 

LINDA S. GREENE, BSc’80, is studying for 
a master’s degree in biochemistry at Ottawa 
University. 

KEN NORRIS, PhD’80, poet, editor and 
anthologizer, is the writer-in-residence at 
McGill for 1983-84. 

TREVOR PAYNE, BMus’80, is the director 
of the Jubilation Gospel Choir, Montreal. 
LYON J. SCHWARTZBEN, BSc’76, 
DDS’80, recently completed postdoctoral 
studies in endodontics at the University of 
Pennsylvania, School of Dental Medicine, 
and is now in private practice both in Montre- 
al and Ottawa, Ont. 


81 
DAVID AFTERGOOD, BA’81, recently 
received a degree in economics from the Uni- 
versity of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon. 
PHILLIP K. BURGESS, BA’81, a real estate 
broker for Ryan, Elliott and Co., Inc., Bos- 
ton, Mass., has recently completed his sec- 
ond year of law at the New England School of 
Law, Boston. 

CARLEEN CARROLL, BA’81, recently 
worked as a parliamentary intern for the 
Ontario government, in a program primarily 
sponsored by the Canadian Life and Health 
Insurance Association. 

JOHN DICKIE, LLB’81, recently opened his 
law practice in Ottawa, Ont., with a specialty 
in rent review hearings. 

ANNA-MARIE (MacKENZIE) KELLY, 
BEd’81, is teaching at Landmark East, a pri- 
vate school for learning-disabled students, in 
Wolfville, N.S. 

KATHLEEN MARIA MIZZI, BA’81, was 
recently named to the dean’s list at the New 
England School of Law, Boston, Mass. 
LEAH MIRIAM ROSENFIELD, BA’81, 
completed an internship at Brandeis Univer- 
sity, Waltham, Mass., and has joined their 
development staff. 

HAZEL MURIEL THOMPSON, BEd’81, is 
taking her master’s degree in educational 
technology at Concordia University, Montre- 
al. 

SETH J. VOGELMAN, BA’81, has finished 
a year’s work on behalf of Zionism and 
Oppressed Jewry and has recently moved to 
Kibbutz Ketura, Israel. 


82 

JOHN GOCEK, BA’82, is a junior foreign 
exchange trader with Marine Midland Bank 
in New York, N.Y. 

NANCY MOTT MACLEAN, MBA’82, has 
been appointed director, Healthcom division, 
of The Halls Group. 

ROBERT W. WINTEMUTE, LLB’82, 
BCL’82, is practicing law with the bankrupt- 
cy department of Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & 
McCloy, New York, N.Y. 


83 

DIANA DURNFORD, BEng’83, recently 
received the Arthur Surveyer Medal, spon- 
sored by the SNC Group, awarded annually 
for excellence in engineering studies at 
McGill. 

HILLEL M. FINESTONE, . BSc 79; 
MDCM’83, is in his first year in the family 
medicine residency program at the Ottawa 
General Hospital, Ont. 

TOM POTTER, BEd’83, is the director of 
physical education at the Westmount YMCA, 
Montreal. 

SERGE P. POULIN, MD’83, recently began 
residency training in family practice medicine 
at the Hahnemann Family Health Center, 
Worcester, Mass. 0 


JANUARY 1984/McGILL NEWS 23 


SAPRREERRATRASUMADDIOT DATE ERIPIPAPIGTEDZRS a Is PItay poeP Seyret dps ts 


DEATHS 


"10 
WILLIAM GORDON HANSON, BSc’ 10, at 
Montreal, on Oct. 5, 1983. 


"12 
R. V. COLVILLE SINCLAIR; BCL’ 12, at 
Hamilton, Bermuda, on June 23, 1983. 


"13 

PERCY E. CORBETT, BA’13, MA’15, 
DCL’61, McGill Dean of Law 1928-1936, at 
Newport, Vt., on Oct. 24, 1983. 


"14 
F. HILTON WILKES, BArch’ 14, at Toron- 
to, Ont., in June, 1983. 


"19 

PERCY L. BACKUS, MD’19, at London, 
England, on Aug. 3, 1983. 

LESLIE A. GOODRIDGE, MD’19, at 
Moncton, N.B., on Oct. 20, 1982. 


"21 

GEORGE M. HALE, DDS’21, at St. Lam- 
bert, Que., on Oct. 19, 1983. 

WALLACE ROSS HENRY, BCL’21, at 
Montreal, on June 20, 1983. 

ABRAHAM W. LEFCORT, BCom’21, at 
Montreal, on Nov. 9, 1983. 


CHARLES CHAPPELLE PHELAN, 
BCL’21, at Winnipeg, Man., on Nov. 16, 
1983. 

22 


JOHN R. BRADFIELD, BSc’22, LLD’68, 
on Oct. 29, 1983. 


"23 

GILBERT BISHOP, BSc’23, at Calgary, 
Alta., on Sept. 12, 1983. 

ARTHUR L. CREWSON, MD’23, on July 
25, 1983. 

GARFIELD DUNCAN, MD’23, at Chester 
County, Pa., on June 17, 1983. 

SOLOMON GOLD, MD’23, at Montreal, on 
August 5, 1983. 

WILLIAM A. McDONAGH, DDS’23, at 
Windsor, Ont., on Aug. 20, 1982. 
LENDRUM EDMUND McMEANS, 
Eng’23, at Ottawa, Ont., on Sept. 14, 1983. 
ROYDEN M. MORRIS, BCom’23, at Mis- 
sissauga, Ont., on Sept. 15, 1983. 

WALTER S. PHELPS, DDS’23, at Montre- 
al, on Sept. 14, 1983. 

ZERADA SLACK, BA’23, DipPE’24, Dip- 
PE’34, at Toronto, Ont., on Jan. 2, 1983. 
JAMES M. VAUGHAN, BSc’20, MD’23, at 
New York, N.Y., on Sept. 17, 1983. 


"24 
ANNE (TARSHIS) BATSHAW, BA’21, 
MD’ 24, at Montreal, on Nov. 11, 1983. 
Rev. DUNCAN HERBERT MacFARLANE, 
BA’24, MA’26, at Waterloo, Que., on Sept. 
18, 1983. 

ARTHUR DOUGLAS RICHARDSON, 
DDS’ 24, at Ontario, on July 15, 1983. 


24 McGILL NEWS/JANUARY 1984 


25 
FREDERICK WYKEHAM BRADSHAW, 
BSc’25, at Montreal, on July 6, 1983. 

T. B. MacCALLUM, DDS’25, at Sault Ste. 
Marie, Ont., on March 23, 1983. 

Brig. Gen. CLIFFORD S. THOMPSON, 
MD’25, at Ottawa, Ont., on Aug. 6, 1983. 
MILDRED (RICHARDS) WHITE, Dip- 
Soc Wk’25, on May 12, 1983. 


26 
Rev. LOUISE W. (HURD) MacLEAN, 
BA’26, in Vermont, September 1983. 


"27 
BERTHA (NEWMAN) ROUGH, DipPE’27, 
at Montreal, on Oct. 24, 1983. 


28 

OLIVE ADELYN HIBBARD, LMus’ 28, at 
Montreal, on Oct. 24, 1983. 

JEAN B. MALTAIS, MSc’28, on Sept. 10, 
1982. 

H. STIRLING MAXWELL, BArch’28, at 
Montreal, on Nov. 17, 1983. 

Ven. BENJAMIN JAMES THORPE, 
BA’28, MA’32, at London, Ont., on Sept. 
13, 1983. 


29 

Rev. SAMUEL L. POLLARD, BA’29, 
MA’30, at Toronto, Ont., on Sept. 9, 1983. 
THEODORE H. SHAPIRO, BA’29, at 
Montreal, on Sept. 3, 1983. 

MARGARET GORDON SYVERTSEN, 
BHS’29, on Aug. 17, 1983. 


30 
DAVID COSTOM, MD’30, at Montreal, on 
June 24, 1983. 


31 

JOHN W. GERRIE, MD’31, at Montreal, on 
August 6, 1983. 

MOLLY (MARY ELIZABETH BISSON- 
NET) PUDDINGTON, BA°’31, at Ottawa, 
Ont., on Oct. 13, 1983. 


"32 

MARJORY (LIPSEY) AUSTIN, BHS’32, at 
Pincher Creek, Alta., on May 3, 1983. 
JOHN VERNON RICHES, MD’32, at 
Ontario, on July 16, 1983. 


33 

JOHN A. DAVIDSON, BSc’28, MD’33, at 
Ottawa, Ont., on July 22, 1983. 

ANNA L. PHILBROOK, MD’33, at Con- 
cord, N.H., on Aug. 18, 1983. 


"34 
PATRICK M. T. BEATTS, BA’34, at Los 
Altos, Ca. on Nov. 8, 1983. 


35 

JACK BARZA, BEng’35, at Chicago, Ill. 
Rev. J. MORTON FREEMAN, BA’35, at 
Calgary, Alta., on June 16, 1982. 
WILLIAM FINLAY McMARTIN, BA’30, 
MD’35, at Hudson, Que., on June 29, 1983. 


Vt., on Aug. 10, 1983. 


ROBERT H. MONTGOMERY, BCL’ sa 
Windsor, N.S., on Sept. 6, 1983. 
ELSPETH (SELKIRK) SHARPE, BA’35, at 
Langley, B.C., on June 28, 1983. | 
JACK VINOKUR, BA’35, at Toronto, Ont) | 
on Sept. 22, 1983. 


| 


"36 
J. G. BISSON, BCom’ 36, on June 24, 1983, 


| KENNETH STEPHEN RITCHIE, BA‘32) 


MD’ 36. at Ottawa, Ont., on Oct. 15, 1983, 9! 
\ 


We 54 

| WILLIAM BUSH, BA’37, at Sidney, B.C, })' 
on Oct. 27, 1983. 
BERTHA ELIZABETH  (STEELE)}? 


HOOPER, DipNurs’37, at Sherbrooke, }” 
Que., on Nov. 6, 1983. | 


| 
38 ‘i! 
ESTHER (SALOMON) GELBER, BA’38)}' 
at Toronto, Ont., on Nov. 7, 1983. i 
Rev. EDWARD G. KETTLEBOROUGH, |! 
BA’38, at Cowansville, Que., on June 23, | 
| 
| 
| 
| 
| 


| 1983. 


H. KEITH MARKELL, BA’38, at Stowe, 


"39 

JOHN L. BURNIE, BEng’39, at Port Credit 
Ont., on June 16, 1983. | 
JOSEPHINE (SHEFFIELD) JOHNSTON, 
BLS’39, at Brockville, Ont. | 
EVELYN RAE (STAPELLS) MATHESON, 
BHS’39, at Toronto, Ont., on Oct. 26, 1983, 9) 
J. LLOYD MORROW, MD’339, on Sept. 21, } 
1983. 

PHEBE GROSS PRATT, BLS’39, on July3, #| 
1983. 


"40 

MARY FULLER, BA’40, at Montreal, on 
Nov. 16, 1983. 

Rev. ARCHIBALD EARL WILFONG, 
BA’40, at Beamsville, Ont., on Aug. 22, 
1983. 


"AT 

RODERICK REED JOHNSTON, BA‘41, at 
Montreal, on Nov. 17, 1983. 

FREDA N. WALES, DipPE’41, BSc’47, at 
Halifax, N.S., on March 11, 1982. 


"42 
JOHN WRIGHT HALPIN, BSc’42, at) 
Ottawa, Ont., on Oct. 19, 1983. 
MARY T. (EDDY) HAY, BA’42, at O10 
Station, Ont., on Aug. 19, 1983. 


"43 

ALBERT R. HICKS, MD’43, on May 20, 
1983. 

R. ROSS MacDONALD, BA’43, MA’46, at 
Falls Church, Va., on June 16, 1983. 


44 
JOHN D. CAGEORGE, BSc’35, MD’44, a 
Kingston, Ont., on Sept. 12, 1983. 


"45 
WINNIFRED (ROSS) SIMS, BSc’45, at 
Sherbrooke, Que., on Aug. 1, 1983. 


"46 
OLLI K. LAUREN, BEng’46, on August 9, 
1983. 


"47 

ROBERT C. GUNTON, PhD’47, at Newark. 
Ca., on Sept. 21, 1983. 

MARTIN M. HOFFMAN, PhD’43, MD’47. 
at Vancouver, B.C., on Nov. 17, 1983. 
NORMAN DOUGLAS JOHNSTON. 
BCom’47, at Montreal, on Sept. 5, 1983. 

A. LOUISE MAXWELL, DipNursAdm’47, 
on June 28, 1983. 


"48 

GUYNEMER TOLLANDAL GIGUERE. 
BEng’48, at Montreal, on August 10, 1983. 
HAZEL JEAN (CLARK) HAMILTON, 
BSc’48, at Zurich, Switzerland, on Oct. 10, 
1983. 

SAMUEL McPHERSON HENDERSON, 
BSc’48, at Montreal, on Nov. 6, 1983. 
PERCY W. LANE, BA’48, at Montreal, on 
Oct. 3, 1983. 

JOHN BEVERLEY ROSS, BEng’48, at 
| Jackson, Mich., on Oct. 24, 1983. 


749 
CLAUDE LAVERY, BCL’49, at Montreal, 
-on July 7, 1983. 


51 
Dr. M. ARNOLD DAVIS, BSc’51, at 
Montreal, on May 30, 1983. 


COME BACK TO REMEMBER 


THESE DAYS 
IN SEPTEMBER 


REUNION 84 © 


All welcome, especially graduates of years ending in 4 or 9. 
Macdonald Reunion will be held September 29. 


—— 


RICHARD KEITH MacKENZIE, BSc’51, at 
Toronto, Ont., on Nov. 18, 1983. 
MURRAY F. PITTUCK, BEng’S51, at 
Montreal, on July 9, 1983. 


"52 
GRACE (HOPKINS) KLUGMAN, BSc’52, 
at Sudbury, Ont., on Oct. 15, 1983. 


54 
SEYMOUR J. SOFER, BSc’54, on Oct. 29, 
1983. 


"55 
TIMOTHY G. COLLINGE, BSc’55, at 
Toronto, Ont., on Nov. 8, 1983. 


56 
BENOIT J. CLAVET, BEng’56, on July 3, 
1982. 


"57 

A. W. MICHAEL ROBERTSON, DDS’57, 
at Vancouver, B.C., on Aug. 2, 1983. 
ELIZABETH (CHURNEY) ZERVOS, Dip- 
Nurs’57, at Montreal, on Aug. 18, 1983. 


"58 
EDWARD J. DOHERTY, DDS’58, at North 
Providence, R.I., on June 24, 1983. 


59 
ALDONA O. (SOSTAKAITE) JAUGELIS, 
DDS’59, at Montreal, on Sept. 12, 1983. 


66 
JOHN J. MASKOLIUNAS, BSc’66, at 
Montreal, on Aug. 29, 1983. 


69 

JOHN H. CLARK, MSc(Agr)’69, PhD’73, 
at Ottawa, Ont., on Oct. 13, 1983. 
STEPHEN F. PATON, BEng’69, at White 
Rock, B.C., on July 28, 1983. 


70 
ROBERT L. BEAUCHAMP, DipMan’70, at 
Montreal, on July 1, 1983. 


"Ta 

FLORENCE (LUNDBLAD) DAILY, 
BN’72, at London, Ont., on May 25, 1983. 
ANNE MARY PALUSZEK, BSc’72, at St. 
Louis, Mo., on Aug. 14, 1983. 
MAUREEN (O’CONNELL) 
SCHNEEWEISS, BA’72, at Vancouver, 
B.C., on Aug. 2, 1983. 


74 
PAMELA GOLDMAN-WEXLER, BA’74, 
on August 2, 1983. 


"76 
[AN MARTIN SAMIS, LLB’76, BCL’77, at 
Toronto, Ont., on July 3, 1983. 


vr 

JAMES FRANK LOCKE, BA’77, on Oct. 
11, 1983. 

LILIANE STAMBOULIEH, BSc’77, at 
Hawkesbury, Ont., on July 17, 1983. 


78 
ANNETTE SELINGER, DipContEd’78, at 
Montreal, on July 20, 1983.0 


KEEP THESE SEPTEMBER DATES OPEN! 


20 


Opening Reception 
Annual Dinner Meeting 


21 


Faculty Seminars 
Leacock Luncheon 
Deans’ Receptions 
Dinner Dance 


22 


Graduates’ Pre-Game 
Luncheon 


( Class of 1964, 1969, 
1974, and 1979) 
President's Reception 
(Class of 1959) 
Chancellor’s Dinner 
(Class of 1929 and earlier ) 
Principal’s Dinner 
( Class of 1934) 


The Graduates’ Society of McGill University. 


R.V.C. Alumnae Reception 


23 


Sunday in Old Montreal 
Organ Recital 


Homecoming Football Game 


JANUARY 1984/McGILL NEWS 25 


ow 


” 


LePRRRER RASA STE MRT 3 09 Fn IFT ETE INT TSS 


26 McGILL NEWS/JANUARY 1984 


Across the continent 
and around the world 


by Gavin Ross 
Executive Director 
of the Graduates’ Society 


Reunion °83 This year more than 3,000 
graduates and their spouses took part in one of 
the most successful alumni weekends in 
recent memory. Running from September 22 
to 25, it consisted of twelve general events 
and eighty class reunion parties, in addition to 
the 45th reunion of McGill’s 1938 Cham- 
pionship Football Team. 

On Thursday, September 22 nearly 200 
graduates filled the dining room of the Saint 
James’s Club for the Annual General Meet- 
ing. The nominations printed in the June issue 
of the McGill News were unanimously 
approved and awards and honours were pre- 
sented to certain distinguished graduates and 
friends. The Society's Award of Merit was 
graciously accepted by Lawrence 
McDougall, Q.C., BA’39, BCL’42, in rec- 
ognition of his many years of valued service 
both to the university and to the Graduates’ 
Society. Honorary Life Membership Awards 
were presented to Dr. Gladys Bean, BA’40, 
DipPE’41, and the Honourable Chief Justice 
Alan B. Gold, former chairman of the Board 
of Governors. Accepting Distinguished Ser- 
vice Awards were Mabel Howie, BSc’32, 
MD’36, and Paul Salvatore, BA’72, 
BCL’78, LLB’79. In recognition of their 
special service to the university, David 
Sinyard, BA’79, MBA/LLB’83, Jeff Tel- 
garsky, BSc(Arch)’82, BArch’83, and Bruce 
Williams, BEng’83, were given Student 
Awards. 


SOCIETY ACTIVITIES 


ae 


Conrad Harrington (right) 
for Reunion '83. 


congratulates Dr. Wilbur Lowry, the “oldest” graduate returning 


During the weekend, the 25th Anniversary 
Class of 1958 was entertained at a wine and 
cheese reception at the McCord Museum 
hosted by the Graduates’ Society President 
Carlyle Johnston, BA’50, BCL’53, and his 
wife, Alice. The main event for the 50th 
Anniversary Class of 1933 was a special din- 
ner at the Ritz Carlton Hotel during which the 
returning members of the class and their 
spouses were greeted by Principal David 
Johnston and his wife, Sharon. Graduates 
returning for their 55th, 60th, 65th, and 70th 
reunions were entertained at a dinner hosted 
by Chancellor Conrad Harrington, BA’33, 
BCL’ 36, and his wife, Joan. 

The ‘‘oldest’’ graduate returning for the 
weekend was Dr. Wilbur Lowry, BA’13, 
MD’ 16, who celebrated his 70th reunion. To 
the best of our knowledge, the graduate 
coming the furthest distance was Jeff Goode, 
BEng’33, MEng’34, with his wife, Ninon, 
from South Africa. It was heartening to see so 


many graduates from virtually every part of 


Canada and the U.S., as well as from Europe 
and South America. 


Jett Goode of South Africa, the graduate who came 


sc, : Vas FF 


the farthest distance for his reunion, 


receives a memento from President of the Graduates’ Society, Carlyle Johnston. 


Among the Branches It is difficult to single 
out the accomplishments of one branch when 
we have so many McGill societies across the 
continent and indeed around the world, each 
of which is doing a great job of keeping 
graduates together, but I feel that special 
mention should be made of the McGill Soci} 
ety of Vancouver’s extraordinarily successfil 
meeting at the Vancouver Art Gallery on 
October 27. Superbly organized by local 
vice-president Bruce Ambrose, BSc’70, and 
assisted by president Michael Alexandor, 
BA’58, and other executive members, this 
event attracted 484 local graduates and 
spouses, some from as far away as Seattle, 
There was no sense of crowding as graduates 
and their guests explored the magnificent new 
art gallery designed by Arthur Erickson, 
BArch’50, LLD’75, and availed themselves 
of the four fine sushi bars to the accompaiir 
ment of British Columbia wine and Molson 
beer. 1 

There was a door prize for a graduate from 
each decade. Dr. Lowry, recently returme 
from celebrating his 70th reunion in Monte 
al, won the ‘‘teens’’ hands down — there was 
no competition! In all, eight decades ol 
graduates were represented. Four University 
of British Columbia students provided string 
quartet music all evening, and the special 
guests were Robert Bell, PhD’48, DSc 7) 
former principal and vice-chancellor, and his 
wife Jeanne, BA’47, BLS’53, LLD’78. ~~ 

Other branches were equally busy and 
active during the first semester, with Toront 
and Ottawa each hosting three successitl 
activities. The McGill Society of South Flor | 
da held a lunch on board a local cruise ship; 
while our Calgary branch sponsored its 5th 
annual McGill Nostalgia Night with Montreal 
smoked meat flown in especially for the oct 
sion. = | 

McGill faculty and staff have once | 
been most cooperative. Dean of Arts Micha! 
Maxwell, DipAgr’54, MA’61, PhD’60; 
addressed our New Brunswick graduates 
early October while Professor Derek Drum 
mond, BArch’62, director of the School of 
Architecture, visited branches in Toronto and 
the Niagara Peninsula. Dean of Medicine. 
Richard Cruess spoke in Washington, D.C., 
and Secretary-General David Bourke; 


Pee re oD 15 ; : 
a 


27 


BArch 54, visited graduates in Toronto, New cg 
York, and Philadelphia. Tom Thompson, | _.. 
BSc’58, MEd’78, deputy director of the | 
McGill Advancement Program, was guest of 
honour at the 30th Annual Molson Evening in 
Toronto and was honoured at a Christmas 
cocktail reception by the McGill Society of 
New York. Professor of history Robert Vog- 
el, MA’54, PhD’59, addressed the annual 
meeting of our Lakeshore Branch (Hamilton, 
Burlington, and Oakville, Ont.) and Vice- 
Principal (Finance and Administration) John 
Armour spoke to graduates in Boston and 
Barbados. 
On October 28, a special event organized 
by President of the McGill Society of Vic- 
toria, Harvey Mathews, BCom’78, took 
place in Victoria, B.C. The University of 
Victoria, which was established by McGill in 
1903 as Victoria College, honoured its foun- 
ders by choosing to name its new residence 
complex **The McGill Residences.’’ McGill, 
in turn, commissioned a bronze plaque in 
appreciation of this gesture, and Dr. Bell pre- 
sented it to President of the University of 
Victoria, Dr. Howard Petch. 
A meeting was held in New Haven, Conn., 
in mid-November at the home of Dr. Graeme 
L. Hammond, MD’62, and his wife Janet, 
BA’57. The result of this meeting was the 
reestablishment of the McGill Society of 
Connecticut. Serving the entire state, it will ¢} 3 : , 3 | | ; ees 
ee eave his New Haven-Hartford area. | Returning for their 45th Reunion were the following members of McGill's 1938 Championship 
. | 1 Se Football Team: (front row, left to right) Ronald Perowne, David Grimes, Russell Merifield, Douglas 
And finally, the McGill Society of North- | erton: (second row) Chuck Smith, Dr. Ed Keefer, Chipman Drury, Ralph ‘Bob’ Keefer, Hugh 
savage; (third row) Graham Gould, Herb Westman, Walter Markham, Fred Sauder, Colin 
McDougall; (fourth row) Murray Telford, Dr. Edward Tabah, Alex Hamilton, Daniel Doheny, Andy 


Dr. Kenneth C. Bentley, DDS’58, MD’62, as _| Anton. Only two team members missed the Reunion, Dr. Preston Robb and Howard Bartram. 
the special guest. 


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ern California held a reception in San Fran- 
cisco on January 12, with Dean of Dentistry 


Pt ai, " . SELON TOKO tery 


| These “not-so-recent McGill acquisitions,’ (left to right) Roderick Roy, Lorraine (Brender 


Wolfe, Donald Morrison, and Lorna (Houston) Kertland enjoy their 25th reunion. 3 


JANUARY 1984/McGILL NEWS 27 


44523942 


LYPESRE SSA VASO PMA HPT OT PMAPIT DRAG IGA IGS PS RAPES FATAL LMP Te 
Pe se er eo geet e PCC Ee Se STS Oe TOC Ee 


FOCUS: 


Patrick Bouin 


It is perhaps mt surprising that an architect 
who studied plilosophy as an undergraduate 
should now beapplying that earlier pursuit to 
| his own prifession. Patrick Blouin, 

BArch’64, therecently-elected president of 

the Royal Araitectural Institute of Canada 
/ (RAIC), wishs to perpetuate the develop- 
ment of a phibsophic overview of architec- 
ture. 

Few fields ae as complex and, at the same 
time, as relevint to man as is architecture. 
And this colaborative art, according to 
Blouin, has b:en widely misunderstood by 
the public, pditicians, and even the prac- 
titioners themelves. ‘‘Nobody really under- 
stands the issu:s, not even the architects,’’ he 
says. ‘‘It is bith a science and an art - you 
cannot take tiem apart and this confuses 
many peopk. Last year, when the 
Applebaum-H:bert Report on Cultural Policy 
| came out, arclitecture was, as usual, an area 
they didn’t krow how to handle. Tradition- 
ally, it has ben handled as a technology, 
ignoring its ceative dimension or its social 
implications.’ 

Blouin came to Canada from France as a 
child, when iis father was hired to teach 
architecture a the University of Montreal. 
Today as patners in the firm of Blouin, 
Blouin and Associates, father and son have 
participated ii the construction of the Con- 
cordia Univenity Library, the Montreal sub- 
way, and on various restoration projects. 
Blouin himsef has worked on Expo’s Place 
des Nations, the Mirabel Airport control 
tower, projecs in Senegal and Zaire, and the 
renovation of Windmill Point on Ile Perrot, 
Quebec, whih won the Heritage Canada 
award in 197. He also served as president of 
the Order of Architects of Quebec before 
joining RAIC 

Now as president of RAIC, Blouin intends 
to take a far nore active role in developing a 
nationwide achitectural strategy. ‘“We have 
to identify vhere the problems are and 
address the gevernment on some of the things 
we feel theyshould be doing. This doesn’t 
mean decidiig what we'll do so much as 
understandin: what happens and then having 
the decision-nakers make more right deci- 
sions for the irban environment.’ 

Part of the roblem, Blouin believes, is that 
attention is pid to the glamour projects at the 
expense of everyday architecture, so that “‘we 
have monum:nts in a sea of mediocrity.”’ 

‘‘I would say,’’ he continues, “‘there are 
three differert kinds of architects, the preser- 
vation-restorition architects, who are sensi- 
tive to the pist and have a specific compe- 
tence, the disign-architects who have very 
strong ‘phanasms’ of what architecture must 
be, and the builder-architects, the largest 
category, wip actually build our towns. And 
this is wherewe must put our attention. The 
federal govenment addresses the top class 


28 McGILL NEVS/JANUARY 1984 


wuasoH Pmmecd 


and ignores the others and then wonders why 
they don’t create good architecture. But | 
think it’s much more complex than that.”’ 

The complexity lies within the profession, 
its techno-creative duality, and with the 
architects themselves, individualists working 
in a collaborative medium. ‘“‘It isn’t an easy 
profession, but one with ongoing fights. And 
I think architects are busy enough fighting 
their own fights that they’re almost impossi- 
ble to get together. The profession does not 
support itself. Let’s have our discussion take 
a truly social dimension, going back to Moshe 
Safdie’s ‘architecture of compassion.’ ”’ 

It is with this idea in mind that Blouin and 
his confreres are seeking to reorganize the 
seventy-six-year-old Institute, attempting to 
make it more flexible. In order to broaden 
their perspective, they are considering asking 
a layperson to sit on their council. But the 
overriding mandate this year is to focus on 
architecture rather than on the architects 
themselves. 

Admitting that he didn’t invent the idea, 
Blouin points to a similar resolution passed 
several years ago by the American Institute of 
Architects: “‘If we quarrel about the fact that 
architects don’t have enough work, we’re 
starting in the wrong place. It may not be only 
because of the recession, but because 
architects don’t have an overview of 
architecture.’’ 

Blouin feels that politicians should be con- 
sulted about what kinds of impact modern 
architecture is likely to make on society. And 
he feels they should have the courage to make 
choices. ‘‘By political choices, | don’t mean 


the choice of architects, | mean what our 
cities look like. The cities that we admire in| 
Europe were also in good part the result of 
political choices in the sense that they ex- 
pressed some social view, an expression of 
the time and an understanding of what must 
be done. This is absent in most of our urban 
scenes. Our cities are happenings, but they 
are sad happenings. They answer the logic of 
economics, of real estate, of technology and 
small politics, but they don’t answer the 
needs of the populace.’ 

Like many other urban observers, Blouin 
feels that the city street has been sadly ne 
glected. ‘‘The street is a communal building 
that we have forgotten completely and we ale 
killing it,’’ he explains. ‘‘In North America, 
buildings are imposed on the street, and we 
are creating cities of walls, creating emptt 
ness and fear.’’ 

And while he mourns the destruction of 
much of the valuable architectural heritage of 
Canada, he also warns against an infatuation 
with all things old. As secretary of Heritage 
Montreal, he speaks from experience: 
‘‘ Architects helped a lot to destroy old builé- 
ings and didn’t have much feeling for hent 
age, which was terrible. But now | think we 
are doing completely the reverse. Suddenly, 
because something is older, we have nothing 
good to replace it with. To me this is kind of @ 
macramé approach to architecture. 

‘‘T don’t think we should defend every: 
thing. We should ask the public what they 
think. If it’s ugly, and in the way, then lets 
come back to common sense.’’ Phoebe 
Munro () 


{OS A See 


Fee ET Se Sb ee & >.42 


“eX Rhhe ewe hehe LELELE SS LEER REGRESS LECH ORRSET CEC RS Sehserass eae! 
. < = ‘ ie) SS Ee) aes fs tA a ee ee . 5 Pe Sie <-* 


John V. Galley, BSc ie | : 

A thoughtful gift q 

so that his name will be remembered | 
all through the years. : 


This is what Mrs. Gertrude Walker Galley had He participated actively in the affairs of the iz 
in mind when she created an endowment fund McGill Society of New York, serving as Preident a 
in the name of her late husband, John V. Galley, of that Society and later as the Graduates’ Society’s il 


BSc (Arts) 20. The income from this fund 
provides for annual scholarships in the Faculties 
of Arts, Science, Engineering and Management. 

Mrs. Galley’s father, Donald F. Walker, 
gtaduated in the Faculty of Medicine in 1895 
and her elder daughter, Joan, in Arts 1953. 
The family had a great interest in McGill over 
a long period of time. 

John Galley, after graduating with honours 
in Chemistry at McGill, developed his own 
plastics manufacturing company in New York, 
Luxene Inc. 


Regional Vice-President for the U.S.A. East. 
He was Vice-President of The Friends of UcGill 
University, Inc. and was also appointed to the 
University’s Board of Governors as a Graduates’ 
Society representative. The John V. Galley 
Scholarships are to help deserving young scolars 
further their educational ambitions in ther 
respective faculties. 

If you are interested in such programs, please 
call or write: 


McGill Bequest & Planned Giving Program 
3605 Mountain Street 
Montreal, Quebec H3G 2M1 


Tel.: (514) 392-5932 


LPPRRRERRA RATT MDTD IOS PLTPITHRIGPPAGISE PPZS2 eT petag Leer se eee 


Woodland Indian Artust 


Benjamin Chee Chee 


Alumni Media ts pleased to present 9 reproductions of works by the late Benjamin Chee Chee. 
These are the only reproductions authorized by the artist's estate. 


A mainly self-taught artist, Chee Chee was a prominent member of the secg 
generation of woodland Indian painters. : 

Unlike many of his contemporaries who employed direct and primitive | 
means, Chee Chee’s work was influenced by modern abstraction. His style 
reduced line and image in keeping with international modern art. | 

At the age of 32, at the height of his success, Chee Chee died tragically by sue 


These reproductions are printed on high quality, textured stock and measug 
48 cm x 61 cm (19”x24”). | 


Sa a ee eee a rns 1 biel 


A Friends B Swallows C Good Morning 


D Proud Male E Mother & Child F Sun Bird 


a 


G Spring Flight H Wait For Me I Autumn Flight 


Please send me the following Benjamin Chee Chee print reproductions at $23.95 each or $88.00 for any four, 
plus $4.85 for handling and shipping (overseas: $7.50). Ontario residents add 7% sales tax. 


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If you are not satisfied, please return your purchase to us and your money will be returned (/ess handling and postage): 


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ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING 


The Meeting is called for the purpose of receiving 
reports, presenting awards, electing and installing 
officers, appointing auditors, and other business. 


Notice is hereby given of the Annual General 
Meeting of the Graduates’ Society of McGill 


Margaret Davidson 


Edward Cleather 


David H. Laidley 


University. 

Thursday, September 20, 1984 
5:30 p.m. 

Saint James’s Club 

1145 Union Street, Montreal 


For Graduate Governor on McGill's Board of 

Governors 

Term - Five Years (starting January 1, 1985) 

Margaret Davidson, B.Com. ’52 

President, Montreal Investment Management Inc. 

Former Director, McGill Graduates’ Society 

Director, University Womens Club 

Director, Montreal Symphony Orchestra 

President, Centaur Theatre 

Former Member, Board of Regents, Financial 
Analysts Federation Seminar 


For President 

Term - Two Years 

Edward Cleather, B.A. ’51 

Executive Vice-President and Director, 

Guardian Trustco Inc. 

Former Vice-President, McGill Graduates’ Society 

Former Chairman of Board of Governors and 
Governor, Lower Canada College 

Former Honorary Treasurer of National UNICEF 
Committee 

Founding Member and Director of African Students 
Foundation 

Director, Youth Horizons Foundation 

Governor, Diocesan Theological College, McGill 


For Vice-President 

Term - Two Years 

David H. Laidley, C.A., B.Com. ‘67, 

Partner, Touche Ross & Co. 

Former Treasurer, McGill Graduates’ Society 

Vice-President Planning, McGill Society of Montreal 

Chairman of the Board, Royal Victoria Hospital 

Member of the Board, Centaur Theatre 

Former Treasurer, University Club of Montreal 

Former Treasurer, Montreal Badminton and Squash 
Club 

Member, Quebec Provincial Council, Boy Scouts of 
Canada 

Past President, Estate Planning Council of Montreal 


Article XIII of the Society's by-laws provides for 
nominations by the Nominating Committee to fill 
vacancies on the Board of Directors and the 
university's Board of Governors. Additional 
nominations for any office received before July 31, 
1984, and signed by at least twenty-five members in 
good standing, will be placed on a ballot anda 
postal election held. If, however, the Nominating 
Committee’s selections are acceptable to 
graduates, those named will take office at the 
Annual General Meeting. 


Ann Vroom, Honorary Secretary 


GRADUATES’ SOCIETY NOMINATIONS 


For Honorary Secretary 
Term — Two Years 
Joan McGuigan, B.Com.’55 


For Honorary Treasurer 
Term -— Two Years 
Robert Kerr, B.Sc.’66 


For Members of the Board of Directors 
Term - Two Years 

Jean Francois De Grandpré, B.C.L.’70 

Dr. Ross O. Hill, B.Sc.’46, M.D.'48 

Daniel Kingstone, Q.C., B.A.’53, B.C.L.'56 
Betsy A. Mitchell, B.A.’71, B.C.L.°75 

Gael (Eakin) Plant, B.A.’61 


For Regional Vice-Presidents 

Term - One Year 

Atlantic Provinces 

John William Ritchie, B.Sc.(Agr.)'51 


Quebec (excluding Montreal) 
David Ellis, B.Eng.'56 


Ottawa Valley and Northern Ontario 
Joan Winters, B.A.'46 


Central Ontario 
Don Greer, B.Com.’56 


Alberta 
Norman Brown, B.Sc.’48, M.Sc.'52 


Saskatchewan and Manitoba 
Douglas MacEwan, M.D.'52 


British Columbia 
Michael J.B. Alexandor, B.A.’58 


Great Britain 
Barry J. Moughton, M.C.L.'58 


New England States 
Lyn Trojanowski-Mononen, B.N.’72 


U.S.A. East 
Richard M. Hart, Ph.D.’70, M.B.A.’73 


U.S.A. Central 
Dr. Albert Rabinovitch, B.Sc.’66, M.Sc’69 


U.S.A. West 
Donna Sexsmith, M.S.W.’55 


Caribbean 
George L. Bovell, B.Sc.(Agr.)'45 


Bermuda 
John D. Stubbs, M.D.’56 


eCws 


Volume 64, Number 3 
Spring 1984 


ISSN 0709 9223 


Editorial Board 
Editor 
Charlotte Hussey 


Assistant Editor 
Peter O’Brien 


Members 
(Chairman) 
Robert Carswell 
David Bourke 
Gretta Chambers 
Betsy Hirst 
Katie Malloch 
Elizabeth McNab 
Gavin Ross 
Robert Stevenson 
Tom Thompson 
Laird Watt 
Michael Werleman 
James G. Wright 


Art Direction 
Signa Design Communications 


The official publication of 
the Graduates’ Society, the 
News is sent without charge 
to all recent graduates and 
to all other graduates and 
friends who make annual 
contributions to McGill 
University. 


The copyright of all 
contents of this magazine is 
registered. Please address 
all editorial communications 
and items for the ‘‘Where 
they are and what they’re 
doing’’ column to: 


McGill News 

3605 Mountain Street 
Montreal, Quebec 
H3G 2M1 

Tel: (514) 392-4813 


Please contact Advertising 
Director Peter O’Brien at 
392-4806 for information 
about advertising in the 
News. 


Cover: Child Skipping 1958 
by Alex Colville 

Oil and synthetic resin 

60.9 x 45.7 cm 

Private Collection, Toronto 


CONTENTS 
ee) 


Healin de sick in Shantytown 
by David Lake 


Dr. Kaimeng Lui practises medicine in the poorest slums 
of Jamaica — a country filled with mystery, beauty, and § 


danger. 9 


Private Tommy Atkins and company rF £ 
by Christy McCormick 


In two recent books by McGill historians, the typical 19th _ 
century British regular is portrayed as a civilizing, albeit g | ry, 
rowdy force. In the Caribbean, he furthered black eMancl- jpd <a a; i 
pation; in Montreal, he enlivened an otherwise sleepy 5 
outpost. 11 : one 
ETE TE = ETN Ra Rh A i RCN LER TERT AIRE NAN 0S ot A A 
Where mind meets machine: 
The symbionic brain 

by Phoebe Munro 


Professor of Education Glenn F. Cartwright has coined 
the word, “symbionic” to help explain his futuristic 
research into the ways modern technology may be used to 
amplify human intelligence. 14 


Roughing it in the (academic) bush: 
Mature student diaries 
by Drs.Donna Logsdon and Kathleen Sibbald 


: Yt Ak Vv 
Mature students face certain problems when they decide fi PYLE Mio 
to return to university. Their candid diaries are helping oe Ze Legh, BH. 


researchers alleviate some of these difficulties. 


Het ¢ aie Dil bugle 


16 4A ZW hin 


The paintings of Alex Colville: 
‘A relaxed, but explosive quiet” 
by Peter O’Brien 


Canadian artist Alex Colville recently visited McGill to } 
discuss his work and the tradition of “realism” in painting. 


DEPARTMENTS 

ReRGCPS LG Seis vera cntvvesoaph ius neycysakonkas eae easyoe ne ¢ od ag 4 San Tra eee paan es 2 Focus: Pearce Bunting....21 

2:2 | ae MMI DD =, aod Hepa A GRY ANOS PSA rc ONO AY. 3 Focus: Peter Van Toorn.. 22 
Society Activities ............. 20 

What the Martlet hears Where they are and 

POE) CSIR CR ACTER i oe i asectiek ua ebletialea da tedieceneds 4 what they’re doing........... 24 

YOU TO O09 88 O14OS YOURE cc 8 oan ennai 5 Diente. oo a 28 

Quod edis es (you are what you €at)......... ce ceeceseeseeeeee: 5 

Chaneellor A. Jean de Capa npr ers i023 cscs fotteceenecietbnnets 6 

Lerup assaults the single family house ............. eee 6 

_ Sound PIE Pei 5c Kp ar Sats ods enna eaNanyapieenicdsatuenayeea vas Net 


*, 


SPRING 1984/McGILL NEWS 1 


LYPREREPRIS PAGS MBN TH GT PRARIPERAPIFATAST PS PARIS TALIS HOES eter, ests 
Lind Bee Si SCL Bee ee C2 ee oe Ss) eth Ee ese ites ‘ 


Dear McGill News, 

You might note that there is no such 
word as “publically? and tat “may” 
should be “might” (January ssue, p. 10, 
column 2, line 1, and third las line). 

A university publication should be 


careful about such things. Y QO j & t’ 
Eugene Forsey, BA’25, MA”6, PhD’41, e Ou on ur IS cy 
LLD’66 


Dear McGill News, 


May I take this opportunty to state . $< 7 99: 
that notwithstanding » your. interesting Readers are reminded that “membership” in the Gradu- 


article on the McGill-Ethiovia medical | ates’ Society is automatic and free to all McGill graduates 
exchange (January issue, p. }), | do not 


currently find myself strollin; the boule- | @Nd to any former full-time students who spent at least 


vards of Addis Ababa. Nor do I antici- | One year at McGill. If you know of anyone in this latter 
pate this pleasure. 


I would be at something ofa loss to ac- category, please advise US. 
count for the identity of ths imposter, 
were it not known that neitier Premier 
Yuri Andropov (of Russia nor Field 
Marshall Idi Amin (the Conaeror of the 
British Empire) have bee: seen for 
months. Both these gentlenen bear a 
strong physical resemblance 0 me. 

I myself am engaged in more mun- 
dane employ at the Montreid Children’s 
Hospital. 


Sincerely 
Richard Lalonde, BA’69, MD’78 


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2 McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1984 


NEWSBREAK 


The right stuff: 
An astronaut 
and the all-stars 


Marianne Scott, BA’49, — BLS’52, 
McGill’s director of libraries since 1975, 
has recently been appointed by the fed- 
eral government as the National Librar- 
ian of Canada. As head of the National 
Library in Ottawa, she will oversee a $30 
million annual budget, a 541 member 
staff, and a collection exceeding five mil- 
lion books and documents. She will also 
serve as chairman of the Committee on 
Federal Libraries and will act as Ca- 
nada’s representative to various national 
and international library associations. 
Scott is the first woman and the first pro- 


fessional librarian to hold the office of 


National Librarian of Canada. 


Professor Roderick Macdonald has 
recently been appointed the Dean of the 
Faculty of Law for a five year term com- 
mencing | June. He succeeds Dr. John 
Brierly, BCL’59, who has been dean of 
the faculty since 1975. Before coming to 
McGill in 1979, Macdonald was a mem- 
ber of the Faculty of Law at the Univer- 
sity of Windsor. He is proficient in both 
Common and Civil Law, and is a mem- 
ber of the Law Society of Upper Canada 
and the Bureau du Québec. 


Robert Thirsk, MD’82, a doctor at 
Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Montreal, is 
one of six chosen from the thousands 
who applied to be the first Canadian as- 
tronauts. Of these, two will be chosen to 
fly on separate missions. Thirsk has an 
interest in motion sickness: “About 40 
percent of astronauts get. it for up to 
three days in space” he says, and this 
disability can represent a valuable loss of 
time on a space mission. Notes Thirsk: 
“When I received the phone call telling 
me that I was accepted I was in seventh 
heaven and I still haven’t come down.” 


The Royal Victoria Hospital has 
recently become the first hospital in 
North America to acquire the Selectron 
remote controlled after-loading device, 
an advanced piece of equipment used in 
the treatment of cancer. It was purchased 
with a $190,000 grant from the Cancer 
Fund of the Royal Victoria Hospital. The 
equipment will be used for patients with 
gynecological cancer, although it may in 
future be employed for patients with 
other malignancies as well. The treat- 
ment technique consists of the placement 
of sources of radioactive cobalt adjacent 


to the tumor. A high dose of radiation 
can then be delivered to the tumor with- 
out having to pass through and harm 
healthy tissue. 


The Ladies’ Lounge in the Faculty 
Club has not only been redecorated, but 
renamed the “Maude Abbott Room,” in 
recognition of the distinguished medical 
professor, Dr. Maude Abbott. A McGill 
Donalda — one of the university’s first 
women students — Abbott received her 
BA in 1890. She thee attended Bishop’s 
University, in Lennoxville, Que., to ac- 
quire her medical degree in 1894. Al- 
though McGill did not admit women 
medical students, it did hire Abbott as an 
assistant professor of medicine. Here she 
did important cardiological research and 
was later named curator of the Medical 
History Museum. In 1910, the university 
awarded her an MD, CM. In 1936 it re- 
cognized her again with an LLD for her 
contribution as a pioneer in the field of 
medical museums, as a valuable contri- 
butor to the history of medicine, and 
“above all as a stimulating teacher, an in- 
defatigable investigator, and a champion 
of higher education for women.” 


McGill started granting doctoral de- 
grees in 1909, and in 1910 Annie Louise 
MacLeod received the university’s first 


chemistry PhD for a forty-five page, 
hand-written thesis entitled: “A com- 


parison of certain acids containing a con- 
jugated system of double bonds?’ Since 
her time, 992 chemistry PhDs have been 
awarded by McGill, and this year a cur- 
rent graduate student will receive the de- 
partment’s 1000th PhD. Congratulations 


McGill rugger Brian Sims 


VECEATR TSS IES EECA ERESEEL ITEC RS EE BER e RSE he 


are in order. 


Two of McGill’s sports teams recently 
visited Europe: the men’s hockey team 
was in Switzerland over the Christmas 
holiday and the rugby team toured Eng- 
land in mid- February. McGill has alse 
had its share of all-stars in a variety of 
sports: Gilles Hudon, hockey defence- 
man, was named to the Quebec Univer- 
sity Athletic Association (QUAA) first 
team all-star team, Héléne Cowan was 
named to the QUAA women’s basketball 
all-star team, and Simon Onabowale and 
Carlo Del Bosco were named to the 
men’s basketball QUAA all-star team. 
And the fencing team, composed of men 
and women, was recently named QUAA 
champions. 0 


SPRING 1984/McGILL NEWS 3 


Photos by lan Barrett 


WHAT THE MARTLET HEARS 


Each one teach one 


Her students are getting older. And the 
former nursery schodl and kindergarten 
teacher, Susan Craig, BEd’63, DipMus’69, 
DipSpecEd’74, couldn’t be more de- 
lighted. Today, her teaching hours are 
spent with adults, helping them to ac- 
quire the basic reading and writing skills 
needed to function fully in the world. 

“It’s okay not to be able to ski or 
cook.” says Craig, “but our society has 
decided that those who can’t read are 
stupid’? Small wonder, then, that adult 
learners are bashful about admitting 
their lack of skills and fear of failing in 
school. That’s where Craig comes in. As 
consultant in adult basic education for 
the Protestant School Board of Greater 
Montreal, she runs a program called 
RECLAIM, the Reading Council for 
Literacy Advance in Montreal, out of of- 
fices in the old High School of Montreal 
on University Street. Working with co- 
ordinator Ricki Goldstein, she organizes 
literacy classes for 150 students per term. 
She also matches up another 100 people 
too intimidated to come to school with 
volunteer tutors who work with them on 
a one-to-one basis. 

Canadians who feel smug about our 
standards of education should read a 
recent report prepared for the Canadian 
Commission of UNESCO. According to 
the study, the problem of adult illiteracy 
is sometimes better handled in Third 
World countries than it is here in Ca- 
nada. Estimates of the numbers of func- 
tionally illiterate Canadian adults range 
from one to four million people. In Mon- 
treal, the problem is particularly acute. 
The 1976 census revealed that 32 percent 
of this city’s population had less than a 
grade nine education — the highest per- 
centage in any of the twenty-three major 
Canadian cities. By way of comparison, 
Calgary, for example, had only 13 per- 
cent — the lowest rate in the country. 

RECLAIM holds classes at the High 
School in the mornings, afternoons, and 
evenings. But for shift workers, single 
parents with small children, the handi- 
capped, and those simply scared stiff of 
institutionalized education, the best solu- 
tion is frequently one-to-one tutoring in 
the student’s or teachers home. RE- 
CLAIM tutors have even taught inmates 
at Bordeaux Prison and hospitalized car 
accident victims. 

Since the first training session in the 
fall of 1981, about 100 volunteer tutors 
have been instructed in the Laubach 


4 McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1984 


method, a technique developed in the 
Philippines in 1930. Dr. Frank C. Lau- 
bach, an American teacher, devised a sy- 
stem by which each letter in the Roman 
alphabet was assigned a different sound. 
By associating each letter with a specific 
sound, adult students could learn the 
whole alphabet in a few hours. This 
method was perfected in no less than 313 
languages in 105 countries of Asia, Latin 
America, and Africa. The Laubach team 
finally tackled English in 1944, modi- 
fying the method to accommodate our 
vagaries of spelling and pronunciation. 
Dr. Laubach soon discovered that the 
best way to teach adults was “each one 
teach one” — a slogan that has become 


the byword for the literacy movement in| 


North America. His technique stresses 
the need to be sensitive to the fact that 
the students are adults, not children. 
Paperback novels are available written at 
the grade one, two, or three level, but 
with adult themes. As Goldstein says, 
“There are no little bunnies in them.” 

Illiterate adults are by no means unin- 
telligent. In fact, the subterfuges they 
develop to cover up their lack of reading 
skills often require considerable cunning. 
Many illiterates have a fantastic memory 
and learn to pick up on visual clues in 
their surroundings that those who read 
would never notice. One way of sensi- 
tizing potential tutors to their student's 
situation is to show them how it feels to 
be surrounded by a “foreign” language. 
At the beginning of the training session, 
tutors are bombarded with posters of 
common English words written in the 
Cyrillic. alphabet. Their puzzlement soon 
turns to empathy. 

What does it take to be a tutor? “Our 
criteria are simple; says Craig. “You 
have to be able to read, be a caring per- 
son, and be willing to commit at least 
three hours a week for a minimum of ten 
weeks.” Volunteers undergo an intensive 
training period of four evenings or two 


full dav sessions. “hey are given a thor- 
ough grounding in the Laubach method. 
which encourages the use of everyday 
learning materiali: restaurant menus, 
newspapers, maps, phone books, and 
bank deposit slips, things most of us 
handle every day without a second 
thought. 

Besides overseeng RECLAIM, Craig 
is the chief Lautach supervisor-trainer 
for Quebec. Last June, she served on the 
host committee for the first National 
Biennial Conference of Laubach Literacy 
of Canada, held a' Bishop’s University in 
Lennoxville, Quetec. Craig feels that the 
tutor-student reletionship is one that 
needs careful nurturing. “Tutors can be 
afraid sometimes, too,” says Craig. “They 
have a whole bag of expectations. They 
need to learn not to judge students and 
help them to lean to risk so they can 
progress. Then, sometimes, they must 
cope with the students’ fear of success. It 
can be a pretty panicky feeling.” 

At present, there is a waiting list for 
the next tutor training session. It is one 
thing to voluntee: to help a non-reader, 
but quite anothei to admit you are one 
and ask for help “If potential students 
only knew what fine people there are 
waiting to tutor them, they wouldn't be 
so shy about «ming forward,’ says 
Craig. 

Not all student: succeed. Not everyone 
is prepared — or able — to commit large 
chunks of time t> reading, writing, and 
homework. As Craig points out, when 
reading is work, you don’t particularly 
want to do it. The success stories out 
number the disaspointments, but Craig 
stresses the need for concerted action on 
literacy. “It’s such a waste of human 
resources. For the literacy movement 10 
succeed, we must cross provincial and 
national boundzries and work on it 


together.” Her smile is gentle, but her look 
is sheer determination. Kathe Lieber U 


Susan Craig helps adults acquire basic reading and writing skills. 


Youre only asold as 
you feel 


It is estimated that th: number of Cana- 
dians over the age of sixty-five will more 
than triple within tht next forty years. 
And McGill University is looking at how 
this demographic shft will effect our 
health. Dr. Blaine Hchizaki and gradu- 
ate student Steve Mctaw of the depart- 
ment of physical education, in coopera- 
tion with researchers «t the University of 
Victoria, have been <t work since 1980 
designing a test “to promote fitness and 
educate the elderly is to what fitness 
involves.” 

When finished, ther “Post-50 3-S” as- 
sessment package (whch will include the 
test, norms for compaison, and informa- 
tion on fitness) will be available from 
Health and Welfare Canada, the agency 
sponsoring the study. “Post-50” identifies 
the target population and “3-S” refers to 
the three physical crittria to be evaluated 
— suppleness, strengtl, and stamina. The 
starting age of the ta’get population for 
the test was set at fifty, in order to ascer- 
tain what fitness leves are like prior to 
the decline in physicil performance oc- 
curring around sixty t) sixty-five years of 
age. The test involve a fairly rigorous 
series of exercises, such as modified 
push-ups and sit-ups,a 400 m. walk, a 
number of flexibility measurements and 
“walking” (actually nore like jogging) 
on the spot. Test resilts are then com- 
pared to those of otha Canadians of the 
Same sex and age goup to determine 
levels of fitness. 

There are four stages involved in the 
development of this 10me fitness pack- 
age, two of which hare been completed. 
Initially, some 300 people underwent the 
fitness test in order to determine perform- 
ance norms reflective >f the different age 
groups. At this stage there were some 
surprising findings. U> to 80 percent of 
the people in some age groups over fifty 
could not do a single st-up, and this exer- 
cise had to be modifitd for the package. 
It was also found thatcontrary to the as- 
sumption that flexibilty diminishes with 
age, flexibility in the shoulder muscles in- 
creases. Also, the gap between male and 
female physical strength decreases with 
the increase of age aid the decrease of 
muscular developmen among men. 

Approximately 1,000 to 1,200 senior 
citizens in Montreal and Victoria have 
had the test administeied to them by uni- 
versity students. “The resulting distribu- 
tion of fitness levels was enormous,” says 
Hoshizaki. “It became apparent that the 


ll. 


It's not a cake walk. It’s a 600 m. fast walk for 
this senior and his student monitor. 


elderly in Victoria were more fit than 
seniors in Montreal’’ The main reason 
for this, as McCaw points out, is that the 
elderly in Victoria are better organized 
and more active in community groups. 
The results from the “Post-50 3-S” test 
were sent out in February 1984 to all par- 


ticipants in the study. The final stage of 


the project will be to mail the test to a 
sample population. This will be done to 
ascertain whether people can accurately 
test themselves. 

Hoshizaki has found that the elderly 
really enjoy doing the “Post-50 3-S” and 
are anxious to know how they compare 
to other Canadians of the same age and 
sex. He is optimistic that the information 
in the package will provide the impetus 
for many sedate, elderly people to partici- 
pate in some form of physical activity. 

Hoshizaki was fortunate to have done 
some pretesting on members of McGill’s 
popular “Seniors on the Move” program. 
Dr. Gregory Reid, BEd’70, an associate 
professor in physical education and then- 
graduate student Karen O’Neill, MA’83, 
were in charge of this effort that ran 
from 1981 to 1983. Forty to fifty people 
enrolled, most of whom were over sixty 
years of age. This group participated in 
student-taught activities ranging from 
stretching and breathing exercises to 
dance, yoga, swimming, walking tours of 
Montreal, cross-country ski weekends, 
and rigorous calisthenics. 

According to Reid, a major finding of 
the O’Neill thesis was that “the barriers 
that prevented the elderly from partici- 
pating were psychological. They believed 
that they were in poor health, and didn’t 
need exercise, or that the need for phys- 
ical activity diminished with age, which 
is a fallacy.” 


Hoshizaki emphasizes the benefits of 
staying active and healthy and says that 
aging does not necessarily mean physical 
decline to the point of incapacity. An el- 
derly person who keeps fit has a better 
chance of surviving accidents and reco- 
vers more quickly from surgery. In addi- 
tion, fitness has an indirect effect on lon- 
gevity (in combination with other factors 
such as nutrition, stress, smoking, etc.). 
“If seniors perform better, they feel that 
they’re younger because they’re per- 
forming as well as forty-year-olds, or 
thirty-year-olds. Remember, you're only 
as old as you feel.” Debbie Mercier 0 


Quod edis es (you are 
what you eat) 


Audi alteram partem is the Latin bromide 
that greets visitors to the Faculty of Law 
and means, as any first year student will 
tell you, not something about a German 
luxury car, but rather that “all must be 
heard.’ However, any visitor who hap- 
pens to stray past this weighty inscription 
and descends to the student cafeteria in 
Chancellor Day Hall may get the idea 
that a newer Latin expression is gaining 
currency: Quod edis es or “You are what 
you eat.” 

The Law cafeteria is only one of the re- 
cent casualties in a health food epidemic 
that has swept McGill faculties over the 
past few years. More and more McGill 
students can be found munching on 
alfalfa sprouts and pita bread between 
lectures, as “healthy food” outlets have 
taken root in the Arts, Education, Engi- 
neering, and Law Faculties, as well as 
the Undergraduate Library and the Uni- 
versity Centre. Health food now accounts 
for more than half the food sold at 
McGill. 

The change-overs generally came 
about when students in each faculty be- 
came dissatisfied with the quality of food 
and service received from commercial 
contractors, and approached the McGill 
Students’ Society to set up better oper- 
ations. “The correct term for what we’re 
serving is not health food,’ explains Jon 
Shifman, the burly Students’ Society 
Comptroller, who is presently in charge 
of food and beverage operations. “What 
we have is healthy foods — simply nutri- 
tious meals with a variety of natural 
products — not part of some strict vegetar- 
lan regime, but certainly not junk food 
either.” 

As Shifman points out, and as a trip to 
one of the new cafeterias shows, a 
healthy diet does not require exotic 
foods. It simply involves reducing the 
number of highly-processed, protein- 


SPRING 1984/McGILL NEWS 5 


Sa es ae 
. 2&e> 7 < a ey eee 
PPRSPIVERRG IFAT IGS PB 25523 


poor foods such as white bread sand- 
wiches and sugary pastries — _ the 
common fare until now. In their place 
are featured nutritious whole foods, espe- 
cially protein powerhouses like beans, 
eggs and yogurt, and vitamin-rich fruits 
and green vegetables. 

Even if they are not exotic, some of 
these menu successes sound a bit strange 
to the meat-and-potato-trained ear. For 
example, a “smoothie” is actually 
a whipped-up combination of banana, 
orange juice, and yogurt (not someone 
who got into medical school with a 
B-average). Another popular item is 
“paté végétale.’ Made with a secret recipe 
known only to its Montreal distributor, it 
is a favorite with trademark law students, 
because it is questionable as to whether 
this knowledge represents “property” in 
a legal sense. 

Prices are not lower than those down- 
town, at $1.50 to $2.25 a sandwich. But a 
McGill healthy sandwich offers a sub- 
stantial portion of filling, whole-wheat 
pita bread, tomatoes, shredded carrots, 
and enough alfalfa sprouts to get you 
through an hour of Latin. 

Says Shifman, the chartered accoun- 
tant who helped make it possible: “I 
think a school cafeteria should challenge 
student tastebuds.” Rick Goldman 0 


OMA MAAT EARS EN LLL ARTA EAE 
Pomp, circumstance, and 
sound advice: Chancellor 
A. Jean de Grandpré 


Albert Jean de Grandpré, OC, QC, 
BCL’43, began his third career when he 
became chancellor of McGill this past 
November. His first two professions have 
led him through the worlds of law and 
business, to the forty-fourth floor of 
Montreal’s Stock Exchange Tower, to the 
office he now occupies as chairman, presi- 
dent, and chief executive officer of Bell 
Canada Enterprises, Inc. As well, de 
Grandpré serves as director of Bell Ca- 
nada, DuPont Canada, the Toronto- 
Dominion Bank, TransCanada Pipe- 
Lines, Northern Telecom Limited, the 
Seagram Company Limited, Stelco Inc., 
and the Chrysler Corporation. He is also 
a life member of the international advi- 
sory board of the Chemical Bank in New 
York City and of the Canadian Bar 
Association, an emeritus member of the 
Association of Canadian General Coun- 
sels, a member of the Bar of the Province 
of Quebec, and an officer of the Order of 
Canada. 

The visitor who makes it past the list 
of credentials on his résumé and into his 


6 McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1984 


Chancellor A. Jean de Grandpreé: ‘‘When you 
genuinely try to understand others, they will 
respond to this and open up.’ 

et. Tee. a 
presence may well be surprised — in fact, 
disarmed — to find that de Grandpre is 
modest, open, and cordial. Weighing his 
words, McGill’s first francophone chan- 
cellor speaks with candor and directness. 
“In the 1940s,’ he recalls, “when I first 
went to McGill, there was a feeling 
among many Montrealers that it was dif- 
ficult to become part of the fabric of a 
different culture. There were few English 
people going to the University of 
Montreal, and few French people going 
to McGill. And, although my brother 
had gone to McGill before me, I had 
never been exposed to a different 
environment.” 

And how was he received at McGill? 

“With open arms,” says de Grandpre, 
who became class president and gradu- 
ated in 1943 with a gold medal in civil 
law. “It confirms what my father had 
told me. There’s a lot of misunder- 
standing rising out of a lack of know- 
ledge of a people. My father said that you 
have to understand them, if you want to 
understand their world. I try to teach my 
children and my colleagues at work: it is 
an open world. When you genuinely try 
to understand other people, they will 
respond to this and open up.” 

De Grandpré’s affiliation with McGill 
has been long and continuous. He served 
on the Board of Governors from 1968 to 
1976 and on that of the Montreal Neuro- 
logical Hospital and Institute from 1970 
to 1977. He was vice-president of the 
McGill Development Program and a co- 
chairman of the Royal Victoria Hospital 
Fund Drive. 

What will he do as Chancellor? 

‘“‘Well,’ he says, “the role has an honor- 
ary side, a kind of pomp and circum- 
stance side, but I think [ll be there as a 
counsel to the principal and the chair- 
man of the Board of Governors. You see, 
the university has tried to create a kind 
of tripod with uneven legs, the principal, 
the chairman, and the chancellor. I’ll also 
participate when necessary at the Board 
meetings as a kind of sounding board.” 

Obviously a man who looks before he 
leaps or speaks, de Grandpré is easing 
himself into the new role. He has no axes 


‘to grind, he says, no pet faculties to pro- 


mote: “It’s too early for me to tell what 
the future of the university should be — 
other than to continue to be a centre of 
excellence. And to be perceived as such.” 

The position will demand time and 
energy from a man whose days are 
already loaded almost beyond human 
capacity. “I’ve told these other organiza- 
tions that I’m going to ease myself off. 
After all, I’m sixty-two and a half, and 
I’m not going to be behind this desk for- 
ever. This will be my third career.” 

His legal career took him to Bell in 
1956-57 when he served as their legal 
counsel to the Royal Commission on 
Broadcasting; ten years later he joined 
the company as general counsel. In 1970 
he became Bell Canada’s vice-president 
(eastern region), after having reorganized 
what he describes as its “monolithic” 
legal department. In 1982, as chairman 
and chief executive officer, he decided 
their corporate structure made no sense 
and divided the company. “How long,” 
he asks, “did it take me to make the 
decision to reorganize it? About thirty 
seconds.” 

Although he will not advise that 
McGill undertake any major reorganiza- 
tion of its structure, the chancellor will 
bring it the same carefully weighed, yet 
open approach he has brought to bear on 
his other two careers. John Geeza U 


(i RE SEA 
Lerup assaults the single 
family house 


pe ee ee eee ee Pe 


This year, an astonishingly loyal follow- 
ing packed McGill’s H. Noah Fieldhouse 
Auditorium to celebrate the tenth anni- 
versary of the Alcan Lecture Series on 
Architecture. Indeed, a show of hands 
atthe inaugural lecture delivered by 
Swedish-born architect Lars Lerup re 
vealed the many regulars in the audience 
who return annually to this Montreal 
event. Lerup, himself, was no newcomer, 
having been an Alcan lecturer in 1981. 
But the ideas of this forty-three-year old 
assistant professor from the University of 
California, Berkeley, continue to pf0o- 
voke controversy. 

Lerup is known primarily as a theorist. 
Like most original thinkers, he enjoys 
questioning the taken-for-granted. His in- 
fluential book, Planned Assaults (On the 
Single Family House), examines Our eX 
pectations of the family home. He argues 
that our many preconceptions about the 
house we live in make us oblivious 0 
how it effects our behavior. We accept 


John Geeza 


the standard house plan with its requisite 
kitchen, bedroom, garage, etc., as readily 
as if nature had bequeathed it to us. 
Yet historians like Michel Foucault and 
Phillippe Aries, says Lerup, show the 
single family house to be a relatively re- 
cent cultural acquisition. For example, it 
was not until the eighteenth century that 
residential architecture began to reflect a 
specialization, room for room. In our 
time, Lerup adds jokingly, it is signifi- 
cant that our houses grant as much space 
to the garage as they do to the living 
room. 

Lerup intends not to redesign the 
house plan, but to point out how it func- 
tions as a social constraint. He aims to 
free architecture from such restrictions in 
order to experience it in its own right. 
Otherwise, says Lerup, our perception of 
architecture is dominated by consumer 
functionalism. 

To counter this utilitarian perception, 
Lerup has proposed a number of imagi- 
native schemes. One consists of a long 
Structure shaped something like a shed. 
It avoids any reference to what might be 
called rooms. Instead, one is confronted 
by a series of doorways between the 
front entrance and a sleeping area at the 
opposite end. Each door is constructed of 
a material meant to suggest a strong ar- 
chitectural aroma. The first is intended to 
evoke softness, and accordingly Lerup 
cut it out of a wall of bushes. Then there 
is his “dry” door fashioned out of 
concrete blocks, or his “wet” doorway 
complete with dripping water. In all, one 
encounters a succession of soft, dry, hot, 
hard, wet, and soft before sleep. For 
Lerup, these aromas are the elemental 
components of an architectural expe- 
rience. His intention is to free them from 
their usual utilitarian roles so that we can 
see the real “physiognomy” of archi- 
tecture. 

He also wants to disrupt our habitual 


expectations with “The Nofamily 
House.” This design includes a number 
of traps meant to frustrate pre- 


conceptions. It has doorways to nowhere, 


cuts in the floor, useless stairways, and 
windows looking into other rooms. Le- 
rup acknowledges Marcel Duchamp as 
the inspiration for these fantasies. They 
also point to his own interest in the lan- 
guage and signs of architecture and in 
semiotics. 

This is apparent in Lerup’s “Lover’s 
House,’ which is based on Roland 
Barthes’s A Lover’s Discourse. Lerup says 
that considering the central position love 
occupies in our lives, it is accorded a 
paltry recognition by our architecture. 
Consumerism makes no room for love at 
all in our homes. “If there is any love in 
the single family house,’ he quips, “the 
closest it gets is probably in the bushes 
out front.” 

His “Lover’s House,” is more than just 
a building. It involves an entire drama in- 
cluding the neighbours and a surround- 
ing courtyard. A girl’s room is on the 
third floor near the apex of a triangular- 
shaped tower designed to cast a distinct 
shadow. This darkness is intended to give 
her lover somewhere to wait for a 
glimpse of his loved one. Lerup says she 
must be viewed through a high window 
to enhance her desirability. Next door is 
a widow who must naturally spy upon 
the lovers, while another room houses 
a madman. Both he and the chatter of 
a nearby immigrant family create an 
evocative backdrop for this amorous 
rendezvous. 

The sheer beauty of Lerup’s drawings, 
some of which were recently purchased 
by the Canadian Centre for Architecture, 
make him an important figure. But his 
designs, as he himself admits, are “too 
radical” to be built. They are best appre- 
ciated for their dramatic value. Unfortu- 
nately they are indicative of a widening 
gap in contemporary architecture be- 
tween the speculative realm of ideas and 
evocative images and the rather mun- 
dane reality of concrete and steel. As if 
to reinforce this, Lerup, when asked 
what he had built, said, “Nothing I want 
to talk about here.” Peter Legris 0 


Lars Lerup; 


ee ig iS ¢ i 
traps 2 ta CORTE Vii, BEBE AB gS 


Collection Centre Canadien d’Architecture Montréal 
Canadian Centre for Architecture 


FP HEL IAA CLS OWE AAR a Poe! 
» >) ¢ < * : ~ a - ~ 


In the control room of the Faculty of 
Music’s recording studio, the air is dead 
silent — so silent that the snap of a per- 
son’s fingers is immediately swallowed 
up by the dark, fabric-covered walls. But 
when Professor of Music Wieslaw 
Woszczyk begins to re-record some 
“pure” sound, the air fills with an unwa- 
vering 1000 cycle tone, going on and 
OR. 3 

Woszczyk turns from the thirty-four 
channel mixer and looks through the win- 
dow into the small recording room. 
There, Alan Lofft, editor of Sound 
Canada is speaking into a microphone: 
“The sound you hear should be coming 
from between the speakers. Adjust your 
balance control until it does so ... How 
does that sound, Floyd?” 

“Fine,” says Dr. Floyd Toole of the 
acoustics section of the National 
Research Council (NRC), as he flips 
through the script: “But maybe we can 
rephrase the next part?” 

This day’s work will result in a record, 
a cooperative venture between McGill 
Records, Sound Canada, and the NRC, 
to be used by the public to test the qual- 
ity of their home stereo systems. On one 
side will be certain test signals, and on 
the flip side, a variety of musical selec- 
tions recorded at the studio. There are fif- 
teen musical recordings on the McGill 
Label to date, ranging from pop to clas- 
sical, and the NRC has been using them 
to test new sound equipment. 

The real raison d’étre of the studio, 
though, is to turn out annually three or 
four highly competent sound engineers 
with a master’s degree in sound record- 
ing. And McGill is the only school in 
North America to offer this degree. “It’s 
much easier and quicker to develop a 
good music recording engineer,’ says 
Woszczyk, “and we provide the most 
reliable, most mature people. We only 
accept people into the master’s program 
who are absolutely sure of their career. 
They all have a bachelor’s in music when 
they come in and are acquainted with the 
personal and professional problems of 
making music. Mature students are more 
competent in dealing with people. It’s 
not only a question of assimilating techni- 
cal and aesthetic information, but of 
digesting and integrating it.” 

Another sound fills the room. This 
time it is a 20,000 cycle tone verging on 
the uncomfortable. Woszczyk adjusts the 


SPRING 1984/McGILL NEWS 7 


John Geeza 


8 McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1984 


head of the Studer recorder and goes on 
to explain that students entering must 
have already taken certain prerequisite 
courses, some of which involve other de- 
partments such as mathematics, the phy- 
sics and psychophysics of music, electro- 
acoustics, electronic music, and an 
introduction to sound-recording. There 
are a number of undergraduate sound- 
recording programs in the States, but as 
Woszczyk points out: “A master’s in mu- 
sic recording is an idea that’s a little for- 
eign on this continent. Education in the 
United States is geared to business, and 
it can’t ask for the stringent requirements 
that McGill does. For example, in most 
of these undergraduate programs there 
are no realistic ear training courses, little 
music theory, and only a little musical 
performance, say in a band.” 

In Europe, Tonmeister Programs 
aimed at this congruence of technical 
and aesthetic expertise are common 
Woszczyk, himself, is a graduate of the 
Tonmeister Faculty at the Academy of 
Music in Warsaw, Poland. It was in War- 
saw that he was introduced to McGill 
through a chance meeting with its dean 
of music, Dr. Paul Pedersen. 

“I was in Warsaw, in the Academy on 
a Friday afternoon,’ says Pedersen, 
“when I was trying to explain to a porter 
who spoke neither English nor French 
what I wanted. He called over some of 
the students who spoke English. One of 
them was Wieslaw, and we spent the day 
touring the place. He said he was inter- 
ested in coming to North America, so | 
invited him over to McGill as a visiting 
grad student. Then he got a job with Big 
Apple Records in New York City, and 
while he was there we started making 


records here at McGill. We had wanted 
to begin a recording program here for 
some years, and so Wieslaw drafted our 
program while in Manhattan.” 

Lots of practice and individual gui- 
dance are the keys to the McGill program. 
The number of students is deliberately 
restricted. And about 250 performances 
across McGill get recorded annually. 
Forty microphone lines channel the 
sound from adjacent Pollack Hall into 
the studio. Recordings are also made in a 
studio adjacent to the smaller Recital 
Hall and there are remotes from the new 
organ in Redpath Hall as well. The 
equipment, too, is all top-of-the-line and 
state-of-the-art: besides the mixer there 
is a twenty-four track tape recorder, 
several two-track recorders, a digital 
reverb unit, a digital delay reverse unit, 
parametric equalizers, a compressor lim- 
iter, and expander and noise gates — 
enough to make an electronics affician- 
ado move in for life. 

Each student, therefore, gets hours of 
experience dealing with professional 
equipment and musicians. Some per- 
formers come from the off-campus com- 
munity to record recitals and demo tapes. 
“Musicians often do a recording with us 
in order to hear themselves before their 
public performance,” says Woszczyk. “It’s 
a service to the city that way.” 

Diplomas don’t equal talent, but if 
employability is a criterion of success, 
the grads are finding jobs. All (except 
one who is writing a thesis) are currently 
employed. “Everyone knows our stu- 
dents are well qualified?’ says Woszczyk, 
“and once people have tried them, they 
don’t send them back.” 


The recordings, too, are top quality. 


“Our student recordings,’ says Woszezyk, 
“regularly win awards. They have won 
an annual Down Beat award three times 
now, since the program started in 1980” 
These recordings, which range from 
noels and French classical organ music 
through jazz, Jean Carignan, and the 
electronic avant-garde, also provide a 
showcase for McGill composers and mu- 
sicians. Fanfare, for one, raved about Uni 
Mayer’s record of contemporary pieces 
played by the McGill Symphony: “Here 
is a disk that should be purchased not 
only by all those interested in Canadian 
music.” it said “but also by those curious 
to learn how good a university symphony 
orchestra can be ... The recording qual- 
ity and that of the pressing itself are 
among the highest I have seen coming 
from Canada to date.” 

Many of the recordings done here com- 
bine synthesized sounds with live sound 
embellished by electronic elements. 
Woszczyk did his graduate work at 
McGill in computer applications of mu- 
sic and seems equally at home listening 
to avant-garde electronic music and to 
rock. He explains: “I started piano early. 
My father was a chemical engineet who 
played piano, guitar, double bass, and 
managed a thirty-piece band. I got inter- 
ested in jazz when rock became 
monotonous...” 

Another higher-pitched sound makes 
us wince. Would he like to go out and do 
a jam session every evening after work? 
“Sure I’d like to, but with this job and 
the thesis and an eight-month-old son at 
home I just don’t have the time.” He flips 
a switch, stopping the sound, and then 
breaks into a broad smile. John Geeza 0 


: , z= a . wae 2 3 o oy .* Fe 
Left to right: Alan Lofft, Wieslaw Woszczyk, and Floyd Toole man the control panel of the McGill Recording Studio’s thirty-four channel mixer. 


Healin de sick in 
Shantytown 


by David Lake 


n a two-story, non-descript building 

on Spanish Town Road, central to 

Trench Town, Lizard Town, and the 
Concrete Jungle, Kaimeng Lui, BSc 64, 
MD ’68, runs a general practice. The pov- 
erty found in these Kingston, Jamaica 
ghettoes is among the worst in the West- 
ern Hemisphere. Tenement yards dot the 
destitute landscape, each crowded with 
five or six corrugated tin shacks, housing 
ten people per room. With no toilet facili- 
ties, disease breeds easily alongside chick- 
ens, dogs, goats, and roaches. 

Day “after day, Lui drives to work 
through sections of Kingston where most 
would refuse to go. Once in his office, he 
chats amiably, explaining that in 1968 he 
was the first Malaysian to complete un- 
dergraduate and graduate work in medi- 
cine at McGill. 
internship at Montreal’s Queen Elizabeth 
Hospital, he worked for the Jamaican 
government for eight years before going 
into private practice. 

Oblivious to the sweltering temper- 
ature and the depressing surroundings, 
he claims that growing up in Malaysia 
and his sojourns in India and war-torn 


Vietnam have inured him to the worst of 


human miseries. “It is part of my job, the 
absolute poverty,’ he explains. “It is part 
of being a physician in the Third World.” 

The poor are Lui’s primary concern, 
but the rich living in the lush hills over- 
looking Kingston have sought his medi- 
cal help as well. He mentions that among 
his clients have been Governor General 
Glasspole, Attorney General Winston 
Spaulding, and the richest Chinese busi- 
hessman on the island. And he attended, 
as well, to the internationally-renowned 
reggae musician, the late Bob Marley 
and his musical family. 

In politically-sensitive-to-a-fault Ja- 
maica, the struggle between socialist 
Michael Manley’s People’s National 
Party (PNP) and the incumbent Edward 
Seaga’s Jamaica Labour Party (JLP) has 
created much violence. The last election 
in 1980 transformed Kingston into a bat- 
tleground. Few people dared walk its 
streets, day or night. Death squads ran 
amok killing all not of their own political 
persuasion with weapons fit for a well- 
equipped army. Eight hundred died in 
this power struggle and many more were 
wounded. 

Despite the chaos surrounding Lui’s 
Spanish Town Road office, it never 
Closed during this pre-election turmoil. 


Following a year of 


“When I drove to work in the morning, 
I continuously heard gunshots and explo- 
sions. Many of the houses surrounding 
my building were burnt to the ground. 
There was much Shooting and death. 
I had to remove bullets and treat crimi- 
nals. 

“Yet, through all this time I was left 
alone,” he continues. “No political post- 
ers or graffiti were placed on my build- 
ing. Election or no election, people get 
sick — I was able to treat them. An un- 
spoken truce was called because the gun- 
men knew I supported no political party 
and never asked patients about their po- 
litical beliefs. As an old saying goes, 
heats respect three people the law- 
yer, the doctor, and the obeah man (witch 
ent 

Although new blood may be shed 
come the next election, the streets are 
quiet now. The silence is weary. Posses- 
sion of a gun means life in prison or 
death by a police bullet, but the ghettoes 
still maintain arsenals. With the JLP cur- 


rently in office, the gunmen supportive of 


the PNP and protected by the law of the 
slums, watch and wait. 

“When I first came to Jamaica, the 
policies of the two parties were not so dif- 
ferent. It did not matter which won,’ says 
Lui, who has practised under both 
regimes. “Now the situation has changed 
because the PNP has gone to the left and 
the JLP to the centre. Yet, I must say, 
this country is very democratic. When 
politicians do not do what the people 
want they are kicked out of office 
quickly.” 

Under both the PNP and the JLP gov- 
ernments, health care has been largely 
neglected. When Seaga’s JLP took over 
from Manley, the country was virtually 
bankrupt and, as many believed, a step 
away from being controlled by Fidel 
Castro. Medical care was not Manley’s 
priority. At the moment, the JLP is 
trying to build clinics around the island, 
but money is still in short supply. 

Given Jamaica’s present political sta- 
bility, emphasis has gone into other cru- 
cial areas such as increasing agricultural 
productivity. The cost of medicine re- 
mains a serious concern. Tests and x-rays 
are rarely ordered unless urgently 


needed. Most equipment and supplies 
are imported at high cost to both the gov- 
ernment and the patients. 

Once a year Lui returns to Canada to 
practise medicine in suburban Toronto. 
“The difference between practising in 
Canada and in Jamaica is the type of 
cases one sees. Patients coming to a 
Jamaican doctor are really sick. They 
never come to waste his time. They can- 
not afford to,’ he explains. “There are 
free hospitals in Kingston, but they are 
hard to enter. In Canada, on the other 
hand, many patients who visit physicians 
do not really have to. The free medical 
system produces many psychosomatic 
complaints — a situation that is not evi- 
dent in Jamaica.” 

The fact that the majority of Jamai- 
cans must work hard to save money for 
just one visit to the doctor changes the 
style of treatment. In Canada, a hyperten- 
sive patient may visit his doctor once a 
week. A Jamaican with the same ailment 
may only be able to seek treatment twice 
a year. As well, acceptance of a physi- 
cian’s advice is surprisingly different in 
the two countries. In Jamaica, a doctor’s 
opinion is not questioned. Such is not the 
case in medical offices across Canada. 
Lui remembers a Canadian Inco miner 
who escorted a son into his office to be 
treated for eczema, a cure that involves 
time. The miner came back the next day 
cursing that the prescription was not 
working and that another doctor was 
being consulted. 

“I have never seen a similar expe- 
rience in Jamaica,” he says. ‘*Poor 
patients tip me fifty cents after paying 
their bills. Fishermen drop by with pre- 
sents of red snapper and locals bring in 
coconuts. There is a feeling of grateful- 
ness. That is part of being a doctor. If 
you feel good about the work you have 
done, it is part of the payment.” 

On average, Jamaican physicians 
receive half the pay of their Canadian 
counterparts. But what is lost in money is 
gained in quality of life. Lui and his fam- 
ily live comfortably, and his children go 
to good schools. ‘““When I arrived in 
1969, I fell in love with the country, the 
climate, the beaches. ... The people, es- 
pecially in the rural areas, are honest and 


SPRING 1984/McGILL NEWS 9 


David Lake 


10 McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1984 


sincere. Through we are paid less, it costs 
much less to live here. There are not as 
many things to spend your money on. 
The stores are not filled with the latest 
video equipment, for example. Jamaica 
is technologically behind Canada, but 
that is alright with me.” 

Not many foreign doctors would agree 
with Lui that a tropical lifestyle is a good 
enough reason to practise in the Carib- 
bean. The island needs physicians, but 
can do little to attract them. In fact 
Jamaican medical graduates tend to set 
up practice either in the United States or 
Canada. “It would be good for Canadian 
doctors to spend at least a year ina 
Third World country like Jamaica,’ says 
Lui. “It is a great learning experience, 
and it adds to one’s understanding of 
people. A doctor who has worked only in 
Canada would be shocked initially by 
the situation, but would adapt quickly. In 
the end, the person would not regret the 
move.’ 

Also, a Jamaican ghetto would offer 
any North American doctor a crash 
course in tropical medicine. Illnesses, es- 
pecially those related to diarrhea and gas- 
troenteritis, are prevalent. Many women 
suffer from inflammatory pelvic prob- 
lems due to a lack of hygiene. Sickle-cell 
anemia is evident in a population primar- 
ily of African descent. Alcohol abuse, 
chronic ulcers, diabetes, and hyperten- 
sion round out the list of most common 
ailments, with malnutrition being the 
most serious. 

Close to half the work Lui does in- 
volves acupuncture — an Oriental treat- 
ment he has practised for over ten years. 
It is universally accepted by the poor, but 
rich Kingstonians are resistant and skepti- 
cal. The choice of whether to use West- 
ern procedures or acupuncture depends 
on the diagnosis. If a patient complains 
of a migraine, Lui will suggest acupunc- 
ture. But if a person comes in with bron- 
chitis, Western medicine is a necessity. 

Lui works out of a narrow, inconspicu- 
ous office. An elderly lady sits in the wait- 
ing room keeping people quiet. The doc- 
tor does everything else himself from 
answering the phone to filling out pre- 
scriptions. Many of his patients are unso- 
phisticated and do not trust pharmacists. 
After purchasing a prescription, they of- 
ten quickly return to Lui to ask if they 
have been cheated. As the law allows 
doctors to fill prescriptions, Lui does so 
to simplify this process. “A Jamaican doc- 
tor can set up a Canadian-style practice, 
but the extravagance is unnecessary in 
this poor area,’ he explains. “If I were to 
employ a nurse, put in a stereo system 
and air conditioning, buy a computer, 
then people would be frightened away. 
They would think of me as being too 
expensive. Besides, in this country you 
do not need to recall a patient’s history 
in two seconds flat.” 

One of the biggest obstacles to better 


BS - > . : 


Jamaican health care is the lack of knowl- 
edge many people have about modern 
medicine. This makes them easy prey for 
quack doctors. In Lui’s office, for 
example, a well-to-do accountant tells 
how he spent $700 US to acquire a Ko- 
rean cobra gall bladder to treat his back 
pains. Why did he purchase such a rem- 
edy? Somebody told him it would work. 
These charlatans aside, Lui has others 
that compete with him for his clientele. 
An estimated 50 percent of those living 
in Kingston ghettoes prefer the services 
of an obeah man. “The locals are driven 
to witch doctors through tradition and 
superstition,’ explains Lui. “‘These 
so-called doctors use chanting and bush 
remedies to cure disease. They don’t 
charge much, so people can afford them. 


= 


Poverty in Jamaica is among the worst in the Western world. 


Louise Holubek 


The government, with too many other 
important issues to handle, leaves them 
alone. Besides, many of these doctors do 
good work. Patients who go to them with 
psychosomatic problems, anxiety reac 
tions, and neuroses are often successfully 
treated?” 

At two o’clock in the afternoon Lui’s 
workday ends. With desk in order, win- 
dows boarded up, and the double-lock 
snapped on the thick front door, he is a 
careful man. An early departure is de- 
signed to avoid unnecessary con- 
frontations. As he drives through the 
slums to his suburban home, he has a 
look of satisfaction on his face — the 
look of a man who tackles a hard job in 
a country filled with mystery, beauty, and 
danger. 0 


by Christy McCormick 


All prints courtesy of The Society of the Mon- 
treal Military and Maritime Museum. 


rivate Tommy Atkins certainly 
made his mark on Montreal. 
Molson’s Brewery and the Bank 
of Montreal would not be what they are 
today without him. Some even say the 
appetites of the British Tommy gave 
Montreal her reputation as the sensual 
sin city of the Dominion, where there 
were more bars and brothels than any- 
where else. 
Private Atkins was an ignorant brute. 
Wellington called him the “scum of the 
earth.” He came from the Irish bogs, the 


Welsh coal pits, from the broken clans of 


Scotland, and the industrial slums of Eng- 
land. In the throes of desperation, drunk- 
enness or both. Tommy Atkins took the 
Queen’s shilling in the nineteenth cen- 
tury and was marched off to barracks. He 
would receive a shilling a day, 
which would be deducted at source for 
his upkeep, leaving him two pence to 
spend, two pence to lend, and two pence 
to send home to his wife. 

There would be other deductions he 
would learn about later, deductions care- 
fully noted in the excellent book, British 
Regulars in Montreal (McGill-Queen’s 
University Press) by historian Elinor 
Kyte Senior, BA’52, PhD’76. Senior tells 
us that Montreal was one of the best sta- 
tions of the Empire for the British sol- 


dier, after having experienced some of 


the worst. 

The fact that Montreal was a fun town 
for the soldier is given greater clarity, 
however obliquely, by another excellent 
book Slaves in Red Coats (Yale Univer- 
Sity Press). It is written by professor of 
history at the Univ ersity of Hartford, 
Connecticut. Roger Norman Buckley, 
PhD’75. Senior’s work covers the 1832- 
54 period, while Buckley deals with 
earlier period between 1795 and 1815. 
One connection between the two works 
is that the British soldiers often went to 
the Caribbean station before coming to 
Montreal. And the life in Canada was so 
startlingly superior to that in the tropics 
that these soldiers were often inclined to 
desert their Montreal post and melt into 
the local population. 

The British soldier arrived in a stink- 
ing brig, often shaking off the remnants 
of a sub- tropical disease, not an easy 
thing to do packed in with 500 others in 
his battalion. His band would play as the 
regiment disembarked to be marched off 
to the old Water Street and Quebec Gate 
barracks, near the present day corner of 


half of 


Bringing a few friends to dine in the barracks (1870) 


by Henry Buxton Laurence 


Amherst and Notre Dame Streets. 

If Montreal wasn’t burning or rioting, 
which it frequently was in those days, Pri- 
vate Atkins would tidy up the barracks 
usually left in a mess by the none-too- 
house-proud departing regiment he had 


come to replace. Then to the big task of 


preening himself, shining boots and brass 
for the big parade on the Champs de 
Mars that would introduce his unit to the 
local population. 

Some soldiers had wives and children 
with the unit. Only 6 percent of the unit 
was permitted this privilege. But their 
choice of a wife had to be vetted by the 
company commander and then approved 
by the colonel. The standing orders of 
the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, later to be im- 
mortalized in Goodbye to All That by 
Robert Graves, were precise about the 
role of regimental women: “No woman 
is to be allowed in barracks who objects 
to making herself useful in the Regi- 
ment, in washing and mending, in clean- 
ing rooms, assisting the cooking, and 
attending the sick women when occasion 
requires.” 

In the Montreal station, the soldiers’ 
life began at 6 A.M. After breakfast they 
went through the training cycle, drill and 

maintenance of quarters. They were 
beef-eaters and received their ration of 
beef and bread at noon, after which most 
were allowed to hit the town’s bars and 
brothels until 8 P.M. curfew. Occasion- 
ally, there were evening passes for spe- 
cial events, such as theatricals, courses, 
society and club meetings, but these were 
infrequent. After curfew, they could 
drink in the barracks canteen, use the gar- 
rison library or take courses in the Three 
Rs, given by either a sergeant school mas- 
ter or one of the civilian teachers hired 
from the town 

Molson’s Brewery made no bones 
about its love for the army. In an average 
year, the brewery earned £253 from di- 
rect sales to the military establishment, 


which was only a fraction of the money 
made from sales to soldiers off base. The 
military also dealt with the Bank of Mon- 
treal, who became the leading banker of 
the nation and held that lead for more 
than a century. 

Efforts were made to limit drinking 
and wenching. Spreading beer money 
payments to once a day was a simple ex- 
pedient to prevent a monthly splurge of 
drunkenness that would incapacitate an 
entire regiment for two or three days. 
The Roman Catholic church pitched in 
to help reduce the influence of the 
brothel, setting up a house for “unfortu- 
nate females,’ with a view to providing a 

“retreat to preserve the innocent and des- 
titute from pollution.” 

In addition to raiding the “disorderly 
houses” in the 1840s, the authorities set 
up libraries in the hope of redirecting the 
energies of the soldiers, but there were of- 
ficers who disapproved of the idea alto- 
gether. Said one: Libraries would set 

“the direction of the minds of men to 
subjects utterly unsuited to their position 

. expanding his intellect, these tend to 
give the soldier, especially if he be a 
young man — an unduly exalted opinion 
of himself, and induce contempt for the 
position he occupies.” 

However, such objections were over- 
ruled. In the 1850s, schooling was consid- 
ered part of a soldier’s duty, illustrated 
by a standing order: “‘A soldier, after 
being dismissed from drill, shall attend 
school as a duty, until he has been re- 
ported upon as sufficiently advanced in 
reading, writing, and arithmetic.” 

Garrison strength was seldom less than 
1,500 and at times grew to nearly 3,000. 
It was mostly infantry, with the per- 
manent Provincial Cavalry and a large 
detachment of Royal Artillery. In a town 
of 50,000 in the 1840s, great numbers of 
troops made a highly visible impact on 
Montreal social life. When the governor 
changed, troops lined the streets. The fire 


SPRING 1984/McGILL NEWS 11 


Rt 


12 McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1984 


Officer’s winter 
dress 


brigade, raised as a militia unit, would 
also take part in these displays. The 
route of the departing and arriving gover- 
nors would be ablaze with scarlet and 
gleaming brass. Bands played, pipes 
skirled, gunners fired salutes, while the 
Provincial Cavalry and the local militia 
regiment of horse, the Queen’s Light 
Dragoons, rode escort. 

Most parades and reviews took place 
on the Champs de Mars, but bigger mili- 
tary displays, to celebrate the Queen’s 
birthday or the anniversary of Waterloo, 
took place at the large race course at 
Lachine taken over by the military for 
this purpose. These would draw people 
from miles around, who would go to con- 
siderable inconvenience to see the 
gargantuan military displays. 

The arrival of a new unit would be 
marked by a parade on the Champs de 
Mars. Great attention would be paid to 
its drill and the quality of the regimental 
band. The Gazette of the Sutherland 
Highlanders in 1844 stated: “it has a 
body that can be seen to perfection, and 
their particular dress shows to the highest 
advantage,” and added that the band “is 
one of the finest we have heard in a long 
time and will be a great acquisition to 
evening amusements in our good city.” 

That last statement touches on one of 


Officer, sergeant, 
and private of the 
71st Highland Light 
Infantry 


the tensions that arose between the garri- 
son and locals. Montreal musicians com- 
plained that military bands were 
reducing their ballroom work. This of 
course was a small problem when put 
against the Rebellion of 1837 as well as 
the many riots of Irish Lachine Canal 
builders and political battles at election 
time, which often placed the garrison at 
odds with elements of the population. 
There was also the constant irritant of 
having drunk soldiers wandering the 
streets, getting into the usual troubles. 

The military was conscious of this, for- 
ever trying to placate ruffled feathers. As 
Senior comments on the arrival of the 
Highland Light Infantry: “...as the first 
rebellion was over and before the second 
had erupted, its band coquettishly played 
‘Voulez-vous Danser, Mademoiselle’ as 
the troopship neared the wharf where an 
immense crowd on the beach ... cheered 
without end.” 

Local groups, churches, theatres, debat- 
ing clubs, museums, literary historical so- 
cieties actively solicited participation 
from the officers and men of the garri- 
son. The Garrison Amateurs staged innu- 
merable plays and theatricals of a light- 
hearted nature. Debates on whether 
flogging should be abolished in the army, 
or whether mail service should be 


Sergeant of the 15th 
(York, East Riding) 
Regiment of Foot 
(1837-38) 


stopped on the Sabbath, were enthusiasti- 
cally joined by the garrison. The garrison 
has also been credited with the introduc- 
tion of hockey and curling. “Whatever 
the legitimate claims for the military ori- 
gins of the game of hockey,” writes Sen- 
ior, “undoubtedly the military fostered 
curling. By 1840, the city had two curling 
clubs — the Montreal Curling Club ... 
and the Thistle Curling Club.” 

If the British garrison had a complaint 
against the Montreal station, it was the 
costly and “saucy” servants, and the pro- 
pensity of the government to tax amy- 
thing it could, even imposing a levy on 
the import of officers’ uniforms. 

The Caribbean was appreciated for 
cheap, servile servants, but as Buckley 
points out in Slaves in Red Coats, there 
was little else to the liking of the British 
soldier there. Buckley deals with a time 
when the life of the British soldier was 4 
good deal more difficult than it was later 
in the nineteenth century. The thrust of 
his work deals with the purchase, treat- 
ment, and role of the slaves of the West 
Indies Regiments, who had to augment 
the sickly British garrison whose mem- 
bers fell prey to infection and disease, 
particularly yellow fever. Because blacks 
contracted yellow fever as children, they 
had a high resistance to the disease later 


Berkshire Regiment 
of Foot (1838-47) 


in life. Another problem was the general 
ill health of the British soldier during the 
late eighteenth and early nineteenth cen- 
tury. He had been driven into military 
service because of hunger, and on arriv- 
ing to reinforce the West Indies garrison, 
he was further debilitated. As one com- 
mander put it: “(we) only serve to fill the 
hospitals and are sweeped (sic) away by 
the clitiiate.” 

The military business of the day was 
fighting the French in the post-revolu- 
tionary and Napoleonic periods. It was a 
time when revolution was in the air and 
the republican spirit was a fuse that 
might set the vast slave populations into 
revolt. So it was understandable that 
slave owners vociferously opposed ar- 
ming slaves as troops. But Buckley points 
out that the slave soldiers turned out to 
be excellent troops, who éffectively de- 
fended the establishment against its 
enemies, be they external or internal. 

The big problem confronting the colo- 
nial society of the Caribbean was the so- 
cial position of the slave soldier. Was he 
a soldier under military law, or a slave 
under civilian slave law? This was no 
light matter when a slave soldier on duty 
might be forced to strike a white in 
defending a post. If white, the soldier 
would simply be doing his duty; but if 


eS 


Officers and private 
of the Royal Artillery 


black, he might be committing a capital 
offence. Before it was resolved, in favor 
of military law for the most part, black 
soldiers were held without trial for up to 
a year, because no one could agree on 
which law would apply to the felony. 

Accordingly the slave soldier led an 
odd double life. The army said he was 
equal to the white soldier and treated 
him that way. But beyond the gates of 
the military post, he was a slave. Inside 
the gates, he earned the same pay, per- 
formed the same duties, and went to the 
same hospitals. It was a life that gave 
him every reason to believe that even if 
he wasn’t exactly free, he enjoyed a spe- 
cial status — a special status he jealously 
guarded. 

After Waterloo, the French ceased to 
be a threat and the cost of maintaining 
garrisons in the British Caribbean be- 
came intolerable to the local colonial gov- 
ernments. But the colonials were obdu- 
rate on one point. They did not want the 
black garrisons disbanded on the islands. 
In the end the slave units were scattered. 
Some 1,200 returned to Africa to popu- 
late the free state of Sierre Leone. Some 
went to British Honduras, others to Trini- 
dad, all drawing, unlike those blacks who 
had not been inducted, the same army 
pensions as their white counterparts. 


a 


ee eee 
ETE WE CE ES 


Highland Piper 


Defending the Empire and furthering 
its growth was a costly business. In the 
West Indies, it meant buying slave sol- 
diers at a price that rose from £56 to £75 
a head between 1795 until the last pur- 
chase in 1808. In Montreal, it meant 
keeping the British soldier in line with a 
much higher standard of living than en- 
joyed by those stationed in other colonial 
outposts. But what seldom was or is ap- 
preciated by the societies in which these 
soldiers served is how much they contrib- 
uted to the culture in which they lived. 
These works by Senior and Buckley 
make this clear. Whether it was the per- 
formance of the soldier slave that 
showed his worth was equal to, if not sur- 
passing, that of the white soldier, or 
whether it was the participation of Pri- 
vate Tommy Atkins in Montreal debat- 
ing, curling or hockey clubs, the British 
Army made an enormous contribution to 
culture and the advancement of civi- 
lization. It is something that is rarely 
acknowledged, but we can thank the 
excellent work of these two historians for 
proving it. 0 


SPRING 1984/McGILL NEWS 13 


by Phoebe Munro 


he study of the brain has come a 
long way from the Victorian “sci- 
ence” of phrenology, a theory that 
suggested that all our acts were dictated 
by the shape of our skull. It has come so 
far that some foresee tiny computers im- 
planted in the cortex of the brain to 
make us more intelligent. McGill Profes- 
sor of Education Glenn F. Cartwright, 
who heads up his faculty’s Computer- 
Based Instructional Research Lab, refers 
to this recent development as the “sym- 
bionic brain.” “Far from being science 
. fiction,’ he explains, “it is science projec- 
tion, based on medical developments 
now going on.” 

Cartwright has coined the term “sym- 
bionic brain” to describe this new com- 
puter. A synthesis of “symbiotic” and 
“bionic,” the word describes a unique in- 
terface between man and machine, be- 
tween brain and bio-chip. Cartwright’s 
definition of “symbionics” has just been 
included in the Encyclopaedia of Educa- 
tional Media Communications and Tech- 
nology. “The reason for the word’s popu- 
larity?’ says Cartwright, “is that it 
expresses the idea of an advanced elec- 
tronic cortical function that becomes so 
important to you that it almost seems to 
be living with you. Imagine an in- 
strument that is intimately connected to 
you, that cannot function without you, 
that depends on you for data, thoughts 
and input. I am not ascribing life to it, 
but it is useless without you, so it pro- 
duces a kind of symbiotic relationship. 
Enhanced by this device, you become to 
some degree “bionic.” 

Cartwright describes a Toronto confer- 
ence where he and several other scien- 
tists delivered papers on symbionic func- 
tioning; none had ever met before. “One 
member of the audience stood up and 
said we were perpetrating a hoax. Yet it’s 
all based on medical research going on 
today. It doesn’t take a genius to see 
where it’s heading.” 

Not a genius perhaps, but certainly 
someone as knowledgeable about com- 
puters and their use as is Cartwright. As 
an educational psychologist and com- 
puter scientist, he conducts studies into 
the use of computers in education and 
their effects on students and teachers. He 
also looks at social and personal varia- 
bles in computer instruction, including 
the influence of hemisphericity in word- 
processing techniques, the difference 
between gifted and non-gifted children 


14 McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1984 


Where mind meets machine: 
The symbionic brain 


using LOGO (a computer lanzuage de- 
signed specifically for children), and the 
use of computers in group teaching. 

Cartwright foresees the symbionic 
brain as one of the next inventons to ex- 
pand human capabilities evn further 
than have the microcomputer aid the cal- 
culator: “In the future it will te possible 
to build more sophisticated iitelligence 
amplifiers that will be internal >xtensions 
of our brains. These ‘ethnotronc’ devices 
will be significantly more powerful than 
present-day computers and may even be 
wired directly to the human brain for 
both input and output. They wll amplify 
and strengthen all the intelledual abili- 
ties we now take for grantec as com- 
prising intelligent human activiy.” 

The development of “emzors” has 
shown us one way of interfaang to the 
brain directly and may contritute to the 
development of the symbiouc mind. 
These electromyogram sensor are cur- 
rently being used to help amputees better 
operate artificial limbs. As Carwright ex- 
plains: “The trick is to find inthe stump 
of the severed limb the brain’sown natu- 
ral impulse called the myoelettric signal 
or electromyogram (EMG), mprove it 
through amplification or other means, 
and use it to control electronechanical 
devices in the prosthetic apfliance ... 
The extension of this researck could al- 
low quadriplegics to contrel devices 
other than myoelectric arms granting 
them greater control over ther lives by 
allowing them to do more of the simple 
things we all take for granted: close a 
window, turn on the TV, swich off the 
room lights, or type a letter. In the fu- 
ture, the same principles may be used to 
benefit everyone by allowing us to con- 
trol mentally a wide variety ofuseful ap- 
pliances.” 

Another device that is enhincing the 
human cortex is the cerebelar stimu- 
lator, or brain pacemaker. “For ex- 
ample,” explains Cartwright, ‘there is a 
small model that can be implaited under 
the scalp to stimulate certain yarts of the 
brain when directed to do se by radio 
command. The technique was described 
some years ago by Dr. José MLR. 
Delgado, now at the Centre Ramon y 
Cajal in Madrid, Spain, who in a dra- 


matic demonstration, achieved fame by 
pressing a button to stop a charging bull. 
The button activated a radio signal to a 
pacemaker implanted in the bull’s skull 
designated to alter its charging behavior. 
In humans, such mental pacemakers are 
now being used to prevent patients from 
falling into deep depressions, to avoid 
epileptic seizures, and to reduce in- 
tractable pain.” 

Also under study is biocybernetic com- 
munication. It attempts to link brain 
wave patterns to specific thoughts. This 
work is an off-shoot of research that was 
being undertaken by scientists at Stan- 
ford University in Palo Alto, California. 
They had developed a way of receiving 
brain waves so that subjects hooked to a 
computer were able to move a white dot 
on its screen simply by thinking about it. 
“This Stanford work; points out 
Cartwright, “seems to have vanished, but 
not before the United States Defense De- 
partment picked it up. It obviously has 
enormous military implications. It has 
been reported that the U.S. Air Force 
has trained subjects to control their alpha 
waves in order to send Morse code 
messages that could be picked up by a 
scalp-monitoring machine and fed into a 
computer.” 

Certain brain waves are believed, as 
well, to be associated with decision mak- 
ing. “The P 300 wave (positive potential, 
300 millisecond latency) is usually associ- 
ated with decision-making ability,’ says 
Cartwright. “Though the wave appears 
after each decision, it is often delayed 
when a wrong decision is made. Theo- 
retically then, it should be possible to 
construct a device to warn us when we 
have made a bad decision, to alert us to 
when we are not paying attention (a 
boon to air traffic controllers), or to mon- 
itor general states of awareness.” Cer- 
tainly, biocybernetic communication 
points to a time when a vast range of ap- 
pliances, from small calculators to army 
tanks, could be controlled directly by the 
human brain. They would simply be op- 
erated by our thoughts and without such 
intermediaries as keyboards or push- 
buttons. 

Artificial intelligence is another subject 
under investigation. Researchers are cul- 
rently working to endow computers with 
such human abilities as pattern recogni- 
tion and problem solving. The small 
chess-playing machines now available 
are a result of this research. And finally, 


Vivian Kellner 


ELE: DEA NE Rcd kt muh CLF aK : 
biotechnologists are experimenting With 
the principles of genetic engineering to 
construct tiny biological processors or 
“bio-chips.” As Cartwright explains: 
“The advantage is that by using the tech- 
niques of recombinant DNA, very small 
devices (VSDs) can be assembled with 
great precision.” 

He predicts that these bio-chips could 
be successfully implanted in the cortex 
and may even be designed to assemble 
themselves. “The actual device will con- 
sist of electrodes connected to an inter- 
face of cultured embryonic nerve cells 
which can grow three-dimensionally and 
attach themselves to mature nerve cells 
in the brain .. . Ultimately, the provision 
of the appropriate set of genes could en- 
able, a chip to repair itself, DNA codes 
could be used to program it, and en- 
zymes to control it... Though the imme- 
diate medical goal is to produce a more 
effective visual prosthesis, the technique, 
if successful, has wide-range ramifica- 
tions.” 

This research on emgors, cerebellar 
stimulators, biocybernetic commu- 
nication, artificial intelligence, and bio- 
technology is steadily converging into the 
first successful interface between brain 
and computer — the symbionic mind. All 
this will not make us equally intelligent, 
Cartwright argues, but rather relatively 
smarter. We -will have access to huge 
data banks, instant mathematical com- 
putation, and worldwide commu- 
nications. We may develop artificial 
senses, thought-control over mechanical 
devices such as light switches and, as star- 
tling as it may seem, the direct transmis- 
sion of TV and radio signals into the 
brain. 

“People laugh at the TV idea, but a 
TV is a converter. It converts a signal 
you can’t do anything with into some- 
thing the eyeball can use, but that the 
eyeball converts right back into a form 


a N ~,. 
Dr. Glenn F. Cartwright: ‘‘In the future it will be possible to build more sophisticated intelligence 
amplifiers that will be internal extensions of our brains.” 


suitable for the brain. So why not bypass 


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REL VELA TEN DEES POP OG ERS CLAUE DRT SLs Ret Hee ea 
Rn SE WE ae PRISE Ea) pe Se ea 


RPE K ee S4 
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the sensory inputs?” asks Cartwright. 
“Get rid of the TV and the eye, and have 
the program beamed directly into the 
brain: the sensation of seeing pictures 
will be created in your head. 

“I don’t believe telepathy exists, but 
we could stimulate it by hearing voices in 
our mind that have been transmitted 
over the telephone lines. If I took this 
telephone wire;’ he says, “cut off the 
phone at the end of it and could connect 
it directly to my brain, my thoughts could 
be picked up by the symbionic brain and 
transmitted over the wires to you.” 

All this begs questions that Cartwright 
says should be asked before the sym- 
bionic brain comes into existence. Will 
people, for example, be able to read 
other people’s minds? Will the computer 
actually enhance intelligence or simply 
widen the gap between those who are in- 
tellectually gifted and those who are not? 
Could the benefits of symbionic thought 
be limited to a powerful minority? 

The schooling of children will also be 
effected by these technological advances. 
When students have access to huge data 
banks of material and instant commu- 
nication, the role of the teacher will 
change substantially. They will become 
true “managers of instruction” and re- 
source people for the students who, in 
effect, will design their own learning pro- 
grams. As children become expert at find- 
ing information instantly, relating ideas 
and patterns of thought, they will de- 
velop a highly conceptual form of think- 
ing, creating a special quality of genius 
that has never appeared in history before. 

Cartwright says that there are basically 
two types of people who are critical of 
the notion of a symbionic mind. “Some 
say it will never happen. I say, ‘Okay, 
what’s your scenario?’ What scares me is 
not that they don’t know what will hap- 
pen, but that they’ve never thought about 


veepees 


= 


it. I don’t like to be called a futurist, but 
it is common sense that we are all going 
to live in the future, and we should pay 
attention to it, rather than criticize those 
who are trying to predict future trends. 
The second kind of skeptic says they 
don’t know of any kind of work being 
done in this area. Well, they’re just not 
up on it.” 

To give an example, he launches into a 
description of computers operated by 
light rather than by electrical impulses, 
using a sophisticated system of laser 
beams, fibre optics, and a new invention 
called a transphasor. All the elements ex- 
ist now. It is merely a matter of putting 
them in place. As with the light-powered 
computer, so it is with the bio-chip: pro- 
jection based on fact. “Nature;’ he 
explains, “can build anything out of pro- 
tein, from bacteria to whales, so why 
shouldn’t we use the same principles to 
build a small bio-computer. A computer 
that self-assembles, repairs itself, is pro- 
gramed with the use of enzymes, is 
smaller, more powerful, bio-compatible 
and uses less energy than the conven- 
tional silicon chip. We’re talking the size 
of a molecule or slightly larger.” 

This tiny bio-chip has implications 
beyond expanded intelligence. Cart- 
wright predicts it may lead to a whole 
new level of consciousness — what in 
1900 McGill doctor Maurice Bucke 
called “cosmic consciousness.’ “Global 
awareness was brought about by the elec- 
tronic media. Global consciousness, 
though not well-defined, could be 
brought about by levels of commu- 
nication beyond the conventional media, 
the symbionic mind inputting stuff di- 
rectly into your brain. Each brain then 
becomes a cell in a giant consciousness. 
Bucke felt that Christ, Mohammed, and 
Buddha had all achieved that level.” 

Cartwright would like to see a centre 
established for the study of electron- 
ically-enhanced consciousness, a multi- 
disciplinary effort embracing medicine, 
philosophy, and psychology. “Wilder 
Penfield electronically stimulated the 
brain and produced memories. Why 
can’t we do the reverse?” he asks. “Find 
out how memories are encoded electro- 
chemically and so on. There is room for 
imaginative approaches, not only in neu- 
rology, but in philosophy, social psychol- 
ogy, and the ethical and moral issues of 
enhancing people’s consciousness elec- 
tronically.” 

Amazingly little research has been 
done in this area, and there is no centre 
that Cartwright knows of which brings it 
all together. “There are scientific ways of 
studying the future,” he adds. “Whether 
one agrees on which are the best ways is 
a whole different issue. The point is that 
we have to get away from the notion that 
someone who studies history is a histo- 
rian, but that someone who studies the 
future is less than a serious scientist.” 0 


SPRING 1984/McGILL NEWS 15 


Perrry AF iets pear aegas fm 
ADehihatseutatctityiedy 


bap a bast os 
ity, 


Roughing it in the (academic) bush: 


Mature student diaries 


by Drs. Donna Logsdon and Kathleen Sibbald 


Mary: 
32, wife of a professor, with 2 children 
under 12, wanting to be a minister 


Alain: 

23, single, hoping to be “among the first 
people to colonize and industrialize 
space” 


John: 

39, single, computer systems 
programmer, interested in geography as 
a means “‘to broaden” his outlook 


Helene: 
32. divorced with 2 children under 5, and 
“tired of being poor” 


Robert: 
28, single, living at home, anxious to get 
away from “everyday jobs” 


Marguerite: 

47, caring for “husband, daughter, car, 
(fat) dog, (black) cat and (3) fish,” 
looking forward “to springing merrily 
into the next 50 years of her life” 


hat do these people have in 
common? All over twenty- 
three and without the usual ac- 
ademic background necessary for admis- 
sion, they are currently enrolled at 
McGill among the 150 or more who en- 
ter the university each year as mature stu- 
dents. In order to assess their needs and 
help in their initial adjustment to univer- 
sity life, the office of the Dean of Stu- 
dents sponsors a three day orientation 
and academic skills workshop for mature 
students. In September 1981, 1982 and 
1983 participants were invited to become 
involved in a novel experiment. As part 
of the Mature Student Journal Writing 
Project, they were asked for frank eval- 
uations of themselves in particular and 
of the institution in general in the form 
of daily journals recording their first four 
weeks at university. 

These journals were read by 
Dr. Donna L. Logsdon, workshop anima- 
tor and professor of education, and by 
Associate Dean of Students Kay Sibbald, 
PhD’76, both interested in learning more 
about the problems, experiences, and 
feelings of mature students during this 
crucial adjustment period. Based on their 
work with them over the last five years, 
Logsdon and Sibbald have provided stu- 
derits with the opportunity to make their 


16 McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1984 


needs and problems known. The two pro- 
fessors have offered solutions to immedi- 
ate difficulties, as well as encouragement 
to continue on at McGill. Overall, jour- 
nal comments were positive, both in 
terms of personal assessment and with re- 
gard to McGill’s academic programs and 
student services. However, careful reread- 
ing of the journals, revealed certain diffi- 
culties that mature students experience in 
their first weeks at university. These may 
be grouped into four categories: aca- 
demic, financial, travel, and emotional. 
The following conclusions and direct 
quotations are taken from the journals. 


Academic 

Generally, mature students feel the need 
for specific academic advising. The prob- 
lem is a complex one: sometimes individ- 
ual students have inadequate training for 
certain university level courses and must 
be oriented toward introductory level ma- 
terial; occasionally a student has a mis- 
taken — if popular — idea about a 
particular course of study (management, 
psychology, translation) and would be 
happier elsewhere; and, all too often, the 
present advising system tends to ignore 
the academic shortcomings of those stu- 
dents. “Today I am no less disgusted at 
the disorganization of the advisory pro- 
cess I’ve encountered” states one student. 
“I consider effective counselling and ad- 
vising of new students as one of the most 
important preparations for a successful 
academic career. It seems laughable that 
I should have had to advise myself.” 
Indeed, naive questions such as “What is 
a major and a minor?” illustrate how ill- 
prepared many students are for self- 
advising. 

Having been away from formal learn- 
ing for some time, most mature students 
are concerned, sometimes with good rea- 
son, about their inadequate academic 
skills. A common lament is that “Often 
the instructors want us to read the chap- 
ters ahead of time. I am struggling be- 
cause I can’t understand everything.’ 
“Cal. II is becoming a pain. I know | 
can’t handle it, so I’m going to drop it 
and take Cal. I?’ Some students, unfami- 
liar with procedures for efficient library 
use and reluctant to confess this diffi- 
culty to library personnel, fear getting 
lost or wasting precious time. Kay, 
age 46, whose last formal learning was 
nurses’ training twenty-five years ago, 
reports, “I was able to write a one page 


; 


synopsi —tf is not due for two weeks, but 
I needed to try my hand at something 
concrete to remove the fear of the un- 
known. that is, to see if I could write 
something. | Many feel their brains are 
“rusty” and they must “get in shape.” 

Usually the mature ‘student is goal- 
conscious, seeing courses and the degree 
as necessary steps to career advance- 
ment: however, the attaining of that goal 
is sometimes fraught with difficulties, 
“My major is political science, but I’m 
starting to wonder if I miscalculated, and 
maybe my emphasis should have been in 
religious studies.” “T went to the biology 
lecture today ... felt the same frustration 

. went to the Powell Building and 
wrote an aptitude test ... my feeling is 
that I’m definitely not going in the right 
direction”’ Further discontent results 
when previous life and/or work expe- 
rience related to their degree program is 
accorded little value and no academic 
credit by the university and its instruc- 
tors. On the positive side, however, most 
students consider education “a privilege” 
and, although demanding, course loads 
are nearly always stimulating. 


Financial 

Attending university involves certain fi- 
nancial pressures for all students. In the 
case of mature students these pressures 
may be exacerbated. For example, giving 
up a well-paid job to study full-time 
results in a loss of financial freedom that 
many find traumatic. “Why did I leave 
my nice high-paying job for the hard 
working life of a student when I might 
not even get a job in this field after 
graduation?” Conversely, others who opt 
to study part-time may find themselves 
ineligible for government loans and bur- 


siete 


aed 
/ 


saries. “I was seriously thinking of Os 
ting because I can’t make it alone with 
the loan and bursary from the Quebec 
government,” says a single male, age 29. 
Another single male states, “If I don’t re- 
ceive it (government loan), I will have to 
stop my studies. My whole future is de- 
pending on this. I’m so scared?’ What- 
ever the cause of the financial pressure, 
the problem is clearly an urgent one. 
“My main concern right now is money. 
Will I get enough to survive, buy books, 
eat, pay the rent?” wonders a divorced 


woman after leaving the protection of 


her “live-in arrangement.” And a 23 year 
old male, no longer eligible for 
unemployment insurance, gives a cry for 
help: “Money is a big issue right now. 
I need it now, not in two months. I guess 
I’m kind of desperate. What can I do?” 


Travel 
Although one of McGill’s attractions is 
its downtown location, access presents 
some problems. The older mature stu- 
dents tend to live in the suburbs, some- 
times ten to twenty-five miles away from 
McGill and often experience difficulties 
in commuting to a downtown campus 
where parking is not readily available. 
Comments like, “I think I spend all my 
study time on buses’”’ often point to a 
long day, physical exhaustion, and no 
real peace and quiet for reading. Certain 
mature students travel considerable dis- 
tances to attend only one or two courses 
and are at the university only two days a 
week; some share “sleep-over-pads” for 
several nights a week; and yet others re- 
sign themselves to spending only week- 
ends with their family and enormous 
phone bills. Increasingly, however, ma- 
ture students live closer to campus, occa- 


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| sionally in the Student Ghetto, but at 


most four miles away. Some are particu- 
larly energetic and energy conscious, buy- 
ing a new wheel for a ten-speed bicycle 
and setting impressive track records for 
mobility on and off campus! 


Emotional 

Finally, coping with emotional stress is 
an accepted part of university life for all 
students; however, mature students with 
complex family, work, and community 
responsibilities may experience diffi- 
culties juggling demands made on their 
time. “Grappling to handle all my obliga- 
tions,” a married man with two children 
and a 40 hour a week job reports 
“trouble squeezing it all in’’ Caring for a 
household of three, a mature woman 
questions “how everyone and everything 
will fit in?’ but later observed that her 
“strings of attachment to household du- 
ties” were loosening slightly. Some “rush 
home to household duties,” while others 
resign themselves, “I’ve decided to leave 
my daughter’s bedroom just as it is.” 
Those with families often experience 
guilt at their decreased contribution — 
“made supper... was home early 
enough to do it for a change?’ Most ma- 
ture students would agree “‘it’s not easy 
to put away things you are used to doing 
and that need to be done, so you can put 
your studies first. But it is vital?’ Some- 
times partners are less than sympathetic. 
Usually financial considerations add fur- 
ther stress to the relationship. For 
example, it is hard to justify time away 
from established patterns; “My boyfriend 
thinks school is not important and that I 
should keep on working to make money 
instead of being poor”; or “In general 
I feel quite on top of things, although my 


ft the See Ae ee 


husband keeps in mind the exact number 
of weeks I am owing for child support.” 

Other mature students may not have 
these familial worries but, conversely, 
they experience the loneliness con- 
sequent on being late to move away from 
a previous home base. They are anxious 
about “fitting in” with the younger stu- 
dents and are curiously relieved to find 
that “the students accept me more read- 
ily than people my age as I look so 
young” or that although the students 
“seem so young, they behave well any- 
way compared to older students.” Social 
life, however, seems a problem, and 
some younger male mature students have 
decided, initially at least, that only celi- 
bacy is compatible with a return to 
studies. 

Common to all mature students are 
self-doubt, a somewhat defeatist attitude, 
and a desperate desire not to fail. “In- 
secure,’ “struggling”’ “worried” are the 
usual adjectives chosen to describe them- 
selves during the first two weeks at uni- 
versity. Sometimes such fears have physi- 
cal manifestations. Several cases of 
rashes and severe headaches were 
reported. 

Although it is impossible to identify 
the “average” mature student at McGill, 
all share the often difficult period of 
adjustment to life on campus. Happily, 
however, there seems to be a turning 
point and by the third week comments 
become more positive; “I feel tout a fait 
ad l’aise dans ma nouvelle vie étudiante,’ 
“It was worth it to hang in;’ “Finally ’'m 
launched into my university year.’ The 
notions of study as excitement and as a 
privilege return and, generally, all agree 
that ““McGill is great ... beyond my 
expectations.” 0 


The paintings 


18 McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1984 


of Alex Colville 


“A relaxed, but explosive quiet” 
by Peter O’Brien 


lex Colville is one of a small num- 
ber of Canadian painters who en- 

joys an international reputation. 
His work is in the collections of art gal- 
leries and museums across Canada, as 
well as in the Museum of Modern Art in 
New York, the Musée nationale d’art 
moderne in Paris, and the National- 
galerie in East Berlin. In 1971, the Ger- 
man art critic Heinz Ohff wrote that Col- 
ville may be “the most prominent, in- 
deed the most important realist painter 
in the Western world.” 

A travelling retrospective of Colville’s 
work that includes working drawings and 
such well-known paintings as “Horse and 
Train” and “To Prince Edward Island” 
was at the Montreal Museum of Fine 
Arts from 2 February to | April. While 
in Montreal for the opening of his show, 
Colville delivered an illustrated public 
lecture at McGill and conducted a small 
student seminar in the department of art 
history. As a complement to the Colville 
visit, this department along with that of 
Canadian studies invited the Art Gallery 
of Ontario’s Curator of Contemporary 
Canadian Art Dr. David Burnett to 
speak on the subject of “Critical Issues in 
Canadian ‘Realist’ Painting?’ Burnett is 
the author of the recently-published 
book, Colville (Art Gallery of Ontario- 
McClelland and Stewart Ltd.), which pro- 
vides a much needed overview, tracing 
the painter’s career from his early years 
as an Official war artist in World War IJ 
Europe to his most recent work. Placing 
him within the context of art history, 
Burnett shows how numerous well- 
known painters, including Jan Vermeer 
and Thomas Eakins, have influenced 
Colville’s vision. 

Of the many aesthetic and critical is- 
sues raised during the visits of Colville 
and Burnett, perhaps the most important 
was the question, “What is ‘realism’ in 
the visual arts?” During his lecture, Col- 
ville stated that “the things we make 
have only an extrapolated connection to 
experience. ... What I do is not reality.” 
The scenes in his paintings are staged, 
contrived, or in his words, “‘manufac- 
tured ... artificial’’ He stated that in fact 
there is no such thing as “realism”: each 
person brings his or her own conscious 
and unconscious “realities” to a work of 
art. Speaking with the art history stu- 
dents, he stated that “every individual 
brings to the examination of any given 
work of art a different experience, so that 


experience.’ 


Alex Colville: ‘‘Every individual brings to the examination of any given work of art a different 


the work is different for everybody who | 


looks at it.” 

In many Colville paintings the charac- 
ters are turned away from the viewer; or 
they hide or partially cover their faces 
with a hand, hat, or binoculars. Colville 
noted that it would be uncomfortable for 
the audience if the people in his paint- 
ings were “turning around and looking at 
you.” Rather than being confronted by 
the scene, we are encouraged to partici- 
pate in it. We become an integral part of 
the viewing process by bringing our own 
life experiences to the work. Colville is 
more interested in an active than a pas- 
sive audience: “An important thing in a 
work of art, I think, is the ability of the 
viewer to identify, to find some way to 
get into the thing.” 

In a recent painting, “Target Pistol and 
Man.” a man looks at us. His hands hide 
the bottom portion of his face, and a tar- 
get pistol rests on a table with its barrel 


pointed towards us. The situation, as well 
as the man’s pose, evoke many different 
imaginative responses. We are compelled 
to ask a multitude of questions regarding 
the relationship between the man, the 
gun, and the audience. 

Burnett in Colville talks about the “im- 
mediate and striking” impact of “Target 
Pistol and Man” on the viewer: “Yet the 
picture, so clearly constructed, so tightly 
locked, is somehow not at rest. It calls for 
completion. Is there a key to it, a hidden 
clue that will set it still? Do we need to 
find a category for it? ... If, for instance, 
we could see it in photographic terms, as 
a painstaking transfer from a photo- 
graph, we could recognize it as a frozen 
moment from a continuous action. If we 
could look at it in terms of narrative, 
then we could find ways to reconstruct its 
past and project its future. If we accept 
the picture as a self-portrait, then it 
could be a painted soliloquy, an image of 


Vivian Kellner 


Reproductions courtesy of the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts 


Target Pistol and Man 1980 
Acrylic polymer emulsion 
60.0 x 60.0 cm 

Private Collection 


ete s af ve oe £54 € LORE CE Lee ExY BREE CAM EE POLS sot ghe heb es cd ast é rad! 
« ‘ venues MS : : Zi Me eet Rel hse ee A BUR ~ >. =A 


nS ee ee es ee ee ee S| Oe ES AEs AS ed a EP 


soul-searching for which the pistol stands 
both as a symbol for and an instrument 
of death. Or is it that the picture is sim- 
ply a way to tug at the spectator’s atten- 
tion, an imposition into his space backed 
up by the threat of aggression?” 

In the painting, “Child Skipping,’ 
reproduced on the cover of this News, it 
is also apparent that Colville wishes to 
elicit an intellectual as well as an aes- 
thetic and emotional response from his 
audience. This “frozen moment” of a 
child suspended in mid-air encourages 
our imagination to complete her move- 
ments for her. Burnett points out that she 
is suspended between the two buildings 
dominating her childhood — ‘home and 
School. “In picture after picture Colville 
brings disparate elements into balance,” 
he writes, “reflecting the complex of de- 
mands we face daily. We must reconcile 
Our inner selves with the circumstances 
of the outer world. The girl in ‘Child 


Skipping’ does not yet fully see this, 
absorbed as she is in her game. We, as 
spectators, can live her future through 
our pasts. We can reconcile these ele- 
ments for her, just as we can come to 
terms with events in our own lives by 
bringing their movements into a balance 
that we control.” 

At times, Colville’s paintings exist 
more as ideas than as things. One of his 
best known, “Horse and Train,’ shows a 
train and a horse converging on what 
seems to be a collision course. There is 
something deterministic yet at the same 
time free about this image: the train al- 
ludes to an imminent collision, but the 
horse is in mid-stride (as the child is in 
mid-air) and runs forward as though free- 
dom were not an illusion. Many of the 
things that Colville paints (trees, animals, 
water, people) are recognizable, yet there 
is always a disturbing intelligence that 
informs the work. 


This notion of recognizability brings 
up another question — that of region- 
alism, an important topic when dis- 
cussing Colville, because of the misunder- 
standings that accompany this term. 
Many of Colville’s paintings are set in 
and around Wolfville, Nova Scotia, 
where he has lived most of his life; yet 
the ideas behind the paintings in- 
corporate a much larger map. The same 
could be said of James Joyce’s Dublin or 
Johann Strauss’s Danube: although there 
is a geographic influence, their themes 
are universal. When asked about region- 
alism, Colville stated that he thought it 
was a foolish idea: “I don’t think of my- 
self as a regionalist in the silly, sentimen- 
tal way that people talk about it (yet) I’m 
a person who wouldn’t want to live any- 
where else.” 

Colville prefers familiar surroundings, 
not so much because he considers the 
Maritimes particularly beautiful, but be- 


SPRING 1984/McGILL NEWS 19 


ee 


‘3 


Me 


% 
"Wi, 


cause of his concern for tradition and a 
sense of rootedness. “I don’t think any 
place is more beautiful than any other,” 
he says. “But I like being where I know 
what’s going on. Every time you move, 
for example, you lose your friends, you 
lose your known environment, you un- 
dergo a real trauma. All your con- 
nections are broken and you have to 
rebuild your life.” 

Rather than being classified as a region- 
alist painter, Colville belongs more com- 


fortably to a loosely-knit school known’ 


as the ‘‘magic realists,’ a group that 
includes such American artists as Edward 
Hopper, Grant Wood, and Andrew 
Wyeth. In 1942, Alfred H. Barr defined 
magic realism as “a term sometimes ap- 
plied to the work of painters who by 
means of an exact realistic technique try 
to make plausible and convincing their 
improbable, dreamlike or fantastic vi- 
sions.’ The term is particularly useful 
when we look at or talk about a Colville 


painting such as “Pacific”? which shows a 


gun resting on a wooden table and be- 


20 McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1984 


’ 


hind it a man turned towards the ocean, 
with his back to the viewer and his head 
cut off by the top of the canvas. Al- 
though everything in the painting is clear 
and instantly familiar, there is a night- 
marish vision presented, a relaxed but 
explosive quiet. 

Colville has been a practising artist 
since the late 1930s, but it was not until 
1963 that he could quit his teaching job 
and devote himself completely to his 
painting. Over the years he has been in- 
volved in various art activities in Canada, 
the United States, and Europe. In 1967- 
68, he was a visiting artist at the Univer- 
sity of California at Santa Cruz, and in 
1970 with the Berliner Kunstlerpro- 
cramm. He has honorary degrees from a 
selection of Canadian universities, has 
been an Officer of the Order of Canada 
since 1967, and in 1982 was named a 
Companion of the Order of Canada. In 
1981, he was appointed the Chancellor of 
Acadia University, Wolfville, Nova 
Scotia. He has also received several im- 
portant commissions: he designed the 


To Prince Edward Island 1965 
Acrylic polymer emulsion 
60.9 x 91.4cm 

National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa 


A he cB DS i 


coins for Canada’s 1967 centennial and 
in 1975 the commemorative medal for 
Governor General and Mrs. Jules Leger. 

Colville’s work and teaching have also 
been of considerable importance to a 
younger generation of Canadian paint- 
ers, including Hugh MacKenzie, Christo- 
pher and Mary Pratt, Tom Forrestall, and 
D.P. Brown. His influence on these Mari- 
time artists has not been to encourage a 
regionalism, but to inspire them with the 
universality of his unique vision and with 
the confidence that has always sustained 
his work. 

During the McGill seminar, Colville 
joked about being the “locomotive of art 
history ... I know this sounds pre- 
tentious,’ he says, “but I don’t believe in 
false modesty. I’ve always taken myself 
seriously — even as a kid. I always 
thought, ‘I’m going to try and do really 
great things.” Really! I always felt that 
way, and I don’t see why everybody doesn't 
feel this way. I think we should go all 
out.” O 


FOCUS 


Pearce Bunting 


t's a typical Friday morning at the 

Toronto Stock Exchahge (TSE). 

Down on the noisy, paper-strewn 
floor, traders buy and sell pieces of Ca- 
nada’s largest corporations as prices flash 
overhead on dozens of electronic screens. 
Overlooking this bustle in a private gal- 
lery and accompanied by a friend stands 
Pearce Bunting, BCom’52. He is quiet 
and unassuming in his conservative 
greys. Suddenly an oak panel slides open 
and a young hostess appears. “You gen- 
tlemen will have to leave or move to the 
public gallery,’ she says authoritatively. 
“But I’m the president of the Exchange,’ 
says Bunting softly, almost apologeti- 
cally. The flustered hostess mumbles an 
apology and retires. 

This mistake was easy to make _ be- 
cause Bunting looks more like an ano- 
nymous businessman than administrative 
head of Canada’s most important stock 
exchange. And the truth is, he never 
planned to become a stock broker, let 
alone president of a busy exchange. He 
simply accepted the first job that came 
his way after his McGill graduation. “A 
friend told me that a firm called 
McLeod, Young and Weir was hiring 
people, so I went down, was hired and 
started in the brokerage business. That 
was the limit of my job investigation.” 

Bunting remained in McLeod, Young 
and Weir’s Montreal office until 1955 
when his father wooed him back to the 
family business in Toronto. The elder 
Bunting was also a broker and Pearce 
Stayed with Alfred Bunting & Co. Ltd. 
until 1977, when he gave up its presi- 
dency to take on that of the TSE. 

Although born in Toronto, Bunting 
moved to nearby Oakville at the age of 
two. But his father’s ill-timed entry into 
the brokerage business — a year before 
the crash — made his family’s arrival in 
one of Canada’s wealthiest communities 
somewhat precarious. “He thought at the 
time he was a _ millionaire,’ recalls 
Bunting. “But then the bottom fell out of 
the stock market.’ 

Luckily for the Buntings, this setback 
was only temporary. In fact, the move 
soon proved to shelter them from the 
hardships of the Great Depression. “I 
don’t remember that it was a difficult 
time for our family;’ he says. “I do 
remember it as a trying time for a lot of 
other people.” 

Then the Buntings left Oakville when 
World War II broke out, moving to a 


small farm. “I’m not sure why we 
moved,” says Bunting. “It turned out to 
be a great error, because gas rationing 
meant we were really stuck on the farm.” 

But it was not Bunting’s destiny to be- 
come a gentleman farmer. He was 
packed off to Appleby College, a private 
boy’s school near Oakville, and then to 
McGill. “It was the thing to do at that 
time,’ he explains. “There was quite a 
large group of people from Toronto at 
McGill then. And I think my parents 
also hoped I’d come back from Montreal 
bilingual and broadened. I think it was 
broadening; it certainly wasn’t bilingual.” 

Bunting’s poor grasp of the French lan- 
guage finally prompted him to abandon 
arts for business. “I actually ended up 
with more arts courses than I needed for 
an arts degree, but I never was any good 
at French. 

“McGill, at least in my first couple of 
years there, was as much a social event as 
an academic one. Having been let loose 
on a community as big as Montreal after 
boarding school, I felt a need to test all 
the things that were available. And it was 
a time when ideas were flying around. 
There was a lot of discussion on all sorts 
of subjects. Perhaps I shouldn’t admit it 
in this day and age, but I went to meet- 
ings of the Communist Club in my first 
year. I found it all quite fascinating. It’s 
an era in my life that was maybe the 
best.” 

One of Bunting’s classmates at McGill 
was Zbigniew Brzezinski, BA’49, MA’S0, 
later to gain fame as United States Presi- 
dent Jimmy Carter’s national security ad- 
visor. Bunting roomed with Brzezinski, 
and they discussed political philosophy 


VECE LIRA SRE SEE CORO CSET AGCL OLS OWE a Rwhae 24d! 
Ms ~ ee ee ee ee Se lat eae 
“er 


on their daily walks to McGill. “I ob- 
viously had no idea at the time that I was 
talking to somebody who would make a 
difference in all of these things a few 
years later,’ he says. But he should have 
known when Brzezinski played foreign 
minister to Bunting’s prime minister in 
the McGill Conservative Club’s mock 
parliament. 

Today, Bunting still presides over a 
conservative organization, but his job is 
closer to that of clerk of the privy council 
than to that of prime minister. The equiv- 
alent to the latter would be the chairman 
of the Exchange, a post Bunting held 
from 1973 to 1974. 

As chief administrator of the Ex- 
change, he is responsible for all aspects 
of its operation, from regulating listed 
companies to ensuring that the computer 
systems are functioning. He also oversaw 
the TSE’s recent move to its new quar- 
ters in the Exchange Tower at First Cana- 
dian Place “the best facility in the 
world today.” It should, according to Bun- 
ting, serve the TSE’s needs for another 
fifty to seventy years. He does admit he 
shocked some traditionalists by leaving 
the TSE’s old Bay Street address behind. 
For decades, it had been synonymous 
with Canadian finance. 

“I truly love the job here;’ he con- 
cludes. “And what I really enjoy is being 
a manager. There’s a much larger staff 
here than at Alfred Bunting. There’s 
much more to do in the way of motiva- 
tion, organization, and planning. Some 
of the things I learned in Commerce at 
McGill have finally paid off?’ Mark 
Gerson 0 


SPRING 1984/McGILL NEWS 21 


Peter Van Toorn 


hen his new book of poetry, 
Mountain Tea, is \|aunched this 
spring by McClelland and 
Stewart, Peter Van Toorn, BA’67, 
will probably turn up for the party. Not 
in the gold Cadillac he threatens to own 
someday, but behind the wheel of his 
new Mustang. One of the first Montreal 
poets since Leonard Cohen, BA’55, to 
make it in Toronto, Van Toorn doesn't 
mind a little attention — by every stretch 
of the imagination he has earned it. 

Still, he is characteristically modest 
about his achievement. “If I accomplish 
anything, it’s just through industry, 
through Montezuma-like labors!” he 
notes. “I mean labors that would kill 
most ordinary mortals! I’m capable of 
gigantic feats of asceticism and physical 
endurance that would leave most people 
dead, but they haven’t killed me for 
some reason. They do reveal a few things 
to me.” 

Van Toorn’s tongue is a match for the 
most jammed CB radio. His speech is an 
odd marriage of tough talk and eccentric- 
ity, accident and erudition, scholarliness 
and mystic sensibility. Sometimes he 
seems as far from the human world as a 
blast of freezing rain on a cracked wind- 
shield flying eighty miles an hour down a 
highway to the Aurora Borealis. His 
poems seem just to happen, like snow or 
a lucky saxophone riff, until he shows 
you the 150 drafts of a single poem, any 
poem, and you realise: this man works at 
being spontaneous. 

It has been fourteen years since In 
Guildenstern County, Van Toorn’s second 
book, was published to an enthusiastic re- 
sponse from, among others, Northrop 
Frye and Raymond Souster. Louis 
Dudek, BA’39, (who taught Van Toorn in 
the early 60s at McGill and published 
his first chapbook, Leeway Grass) has 
often said In Guildenstern County should 
have won the 1971 Governor-General’s 
Award for Poetry. 

The book came from nowhere Cana- 
dian poetry had ever been before; it 
seemed to have been written by a 
Whitmanesque upstart with a yen to 
“Rap up a storm/ get laid like track,/ go 
all out like dieselstack./ Start a beep, 
blaugh, gloovel, vroopazang or some- 
thing” Was this “sound poetry”? For 
lack of an adequate label, somebody 
called him a postmodernist, a term that 
sidesteps the universality, even the popu- 
larity, of Van Toorn’s work. If anything, 

it is ancient, more evocative of tenth cen- 


22 McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1984 


tury Japan than of North America in the 
late twentieth. 

There is more than a whiff of Zen in 
his writing, and a fearsome discipline 
that seems foreign to much that is con- 
temporary. Even Van Toorn will admit to 
the oriental influence. “For many years,” 
he confesses, “I’ve loved the brushwork 
of Katsushika Hokusai (medieval Japa- 
nese Sumi-e painter). And [’m crazy 
about the films of Kobayashi.’ An editor 
once commented that Van Toorn’s un- 
published book of essays on poetics, 
Chopsticks for the Atomic Age, 18 “ex- 
tremely economical and dense. You must 
have been made in Japan.” “It’s been ob- 
served by many people,” he says. “Each 
line in my poetry is packed, it’s a whole 
little world. My sonnets read like giant 
haiku.” 

Notwithstanding the spiritual con- 
nection to Japan, Van Toorn is thor- 
oughly a Westerner. He spent his child- 
hood in the rubble of post-war Holland, 
coming to Canada in 1953 at age nine 
with his parents and younger brother. At 
McGill he studied literature with Dudek 
and Hugh MacLennan, and painting 
with Patrick Landsley. He names as in- 
fluences “all of English poetry,” but Beau- 
delaire and Leopardi get thrown in along 
with Robert Frost and Leonard Cohen 
when he lists those most important to 
him. The jazz influences are there, too — 
Van Toorn is a poet of the ear, who was 
also a musician once, playing for years 
with a local blues band called Albert 


Faille. 

In the past, Van Toorn did all the de- 
sign and editing of his own books, supet- 
vising every detail of layout and printing. 
But now that McClelland and Stewart 


have stepped in, he can sit back and take | 


a breather. He’s now polishing his book 
of essays for eventual publication, work- 
ing on a new Book of Portraits, and finds 
time as well to help younger Montreal 
poets like Neil Henden and Stephen 
Brockwell, former students whose work 
shows promise. 

This year Van Toorn becomes editor- 
in-chief of Village Lights Press, which he 
has started at John Abbott College where 
he currently teaches. “It’s a natural proc- 
ess” he explains. “Older poets help 
younger poets. That way the tradition 
gets passed down.” 

In a sense, twenty years went into the 
making of Mountain Tea, a collection 
that includes some work from the earlier 
books, much new work, and numerous 
translations. When it comes to writing, 
Van Toorn shows a taste for the 
monumental and the minute. An early 
poem, “Dragonflies, Those Bluejays of 
the Water,’ reveals an encyclopedic fasci- 
nation with the magic of the natural 
world. Obsession with detail means that 
books don’t roll easily from his type 
writer. It takes a special gift to make 
mountains out of molehills, and when 
recognition finally comes, perhaps it 
tastes sweeter because it’s deserved. Anne 
McLean 0 


David Rosen 


Spring training 


by Gavin Ross, 
Executive Director 
of the Graduates’ Society 


News from Martlet House In March we 
were delighted to welcome to the Gradu- 
ates’ Society, Gerry Ludwig as our new 
alumni relations officer. No stranger to 
Martlet House, Gerry has spent the best 
part of the last two years working as com- 
munications officer for the Development 
Office. Her knowledge of McGill gradu- 
ates, combined with her gracious person- 
ality, make her a welcome addition to 
our staff. She will be working closely 
with Kathy Whitehurst and Susan Reid- 
Boyle. 


Among the Branches My travels during 
this second semester have taken me to 
San Francisco, Chicago, Boston, West 
Palm Beach, New York, and Washing- 
ton, D.C. In San Francisco, the Chinese 
banquet with Dean of Dentistry Kenneth 
Bentley, DDS’58, MD’62, drew more 
than seventy graduates, spouses, and 
friends from within a fifty mile radius of 
the city. Apart from the good company 
that one would expect at a McGill get- 
together, the twelve course Chinese feast 
was absolutely fantastic! The new presi- 
dent of the McGill Society of Northern 
California is John Baird, BCL’65, who 
succeeds Dr. Norman Morrison, Jr., 
MD’°34. New additions to the branch 
executive include Elaine Andrews, 
BA’83, Ingrid Corber, BSc(PTh)’78, John 
Hugill, PhD’46, and Jim MacMahon, 
MD’68. 

A graduates’ luncheon was held in Bos- 
ton in early February, the day after for- 
mer Chancellor Conrad _ Harrington, 
BA’33, BCL’36, was presented with the 
Distinguished Friend of Education 
Award from the Council for the Advance- 
ment and Support of Education. Special 
guests included Mr. and Mrs. Harrington 
and Principal and Mrs. David Johnston. 
The luncheon was chaired by Branch 
president Michael Blau, BSc’64, DDS’69. 

On 18 March, the McGill Society of 
Florida held a most enjoyable and well- 
attended event at Municipal Stadium in 
West Palm Beach. Prior to the Montreal 
Expos-Kansas City Royals game, gradu- 
ates gathered in the “McGill Tent” and 
met some of the Expos players. Also in 
attendance were team owners Charles 
Bronfman, who is corporations chairman 
for the McGill Advancement Program, 
and Hugh Hallward, BA’S1, who cur- 
rently chairs the McGill Board of Gover- 
nors, 


Corporations Chairman of 
the McGill Advancement 
Program and owner of the 
Montreal Expos Charles 
Bronfman (second from 
left) enjoys the Florida sun 
with (left to right) Bill Fong, 
BCom’72, Steve Stinson, 
LLM’82, Sherry Stinson, 
and Angela Fong. 


ete ober Se eae ee oe ee 


McGill has three staunch Expos supporters in (left to right) Trea- 
surer of the McGill Society of Florida Ross Manella, BA’72, 
BCL'75, LLB’77, Hugh Hallward, BA’51, Chairman of the McGill 
Board of Governors and partner of the Montreal Expos, and 
Allyn Lean, BA’75, President of the McGill Society of Florida. 


Later that week, the McGill Society of 


New York held a reception at the Cana- 
dian Consulate at which Professor of 
Maritime Law Bill Tetley, BA’48, 
introduced the National Film Board’s 
“Rhyme and Reason,” a film about the 
life and times of Professor Emeritus 
Frank Scott, BCL’27, LLD’67. A couple 
of days later, McGill was the host univer- 
sity at the All Canada University Associ- 
ation of Washington, D.C.’s Eighth An- 
nual Dinner. Dr. William Feindel, 
MD’45, director of the Montreal Neuro- 
logical Institute, was the guest speaker. 
The success of the evening was due in 
great part to the tremendous effort of 
local President Rhoda Knaff, BA’52 
MPS’S54, and her executive. Graduates in 
Chicago, working in conjunction with the 
Canadian Club of Chicago, are currently 
planning their own All Canadian Univer- 
sities Evening for Friday, 18 May. 

Our two largest branches, Toronto and 
Ottawa, each held three successful events 
during the past few months. Principal 
Johnston was on hand for the annual 
meeting of the McGill Society of the 
Niagara Peninsula, at which Kerry Mar- 
tin, BA’67, was re-elected president. For- 
mer Dean of Education George Flower, 
BA’40, MA’49, addressed a gathering of 
our Upper St. Lawrence Branch (King- 
ston, Ont.) and, as usual, it was well 
attended. 

Here in Quebec, the McGill Society of 


Montreal continued to provide lead- 
ership for its many activities such as the 
Travel/Study Program, the Insurance 
Program, Learn-To-Swim Classes, 
Squash Clinics, the Financial Planning 
Seminar, and the Student Career Confer- 
ence, to mention only a few. Congratula- 
tions to Ann Vroom, BA’67, and her 
executive. The Young Alumni led by 
Victoria Rorke, BA’70, DipMan’81, has 
held six interesting evening activities 
this semester. Also active locally have 
been the Alumnae Association headed 
by Linda Cobbett, BA’67, MLS’69; the 
Macdonald Branch under Peter Knox, 
BSc(Agr)74; and the MBA _ Society 
whose president is Hosen Marjaee, 
BEng’78, MBA’81. This enthusiastic and 
active volunteer leadership continues to 
be a great source of strength to our 
Society and our university. 


Alma Mater Fund With its goal of $1.75 
million well in sight, Chairman Keith 
Ham, BA’54, BCL’59, reports that as of 
31 March the fund was running about 15 
percent ahead of last year at this same 
time. Corporate matching gifts have al- 
ways been important to the Alma Mater 
Fund, and Keith tells us that during the 
past few months both the Bank of Mon- 
treal and Alcan have become matching 
gift companies. 

Thanks also to phonathons organized 
by branches of the Graduates’ Society in 


SPRING 1984/McGILL NEWS 23 


Photography 


24 McGILL NEWS/ SPRING 1984 


Toronto, New York, Boston, Fredericton, 
Vancouver, Ottawa, Calgary, and Mon- 
treal (at both the McGill and Macdonald 
campuses), the 1983-84 goal is in sight. 
One hopes it will be reached by the fiscal 
year-end on 31 May. As always, how- 
ever, participation is the name of the 
game, and it is important that every 
graduate, especially those from recent 
years, give something to indicate their in- 
terest in McGill (and to ensure that they 
continue to receive the McGill News!). 
Finally, apologies from the Develop- 
ment Office to Lew Goldman, BSc’62, 
who organized last year’s successful 
phonathon in Washington, D.C. His 
name was omitted from the list of 
regional phonathon organizers in the 
1982-83 Report on Annual Giving. 


Student Activities The Graduates’ 
Society has always worked closely with 
McGill students to assist where possible 
in some of their more worthwhile activi- 
ties. For example, during the second se- 
mester, the Graduates’ Society or the 
McGill Society of Montreal (our Mon- 
treal “branch’’) has provided assistance 
to the Student Debating Union, the Med- 
ical Students’ Blood Drive, Hejira (a new 
womens’ literary journal), the McGill 
Club, and many of 
McGill’s sports teams. When our cham- 
pionship soccer team played in a tourna- 
ment outside New York City last fall, the 


McGill Society of New York kindly pro- 
vided a grant that enabled them to spend 
one extra night and do sight-seeing in 
“The Big Apple.” 

A most recent, worthwhile student ac- 
tivity that has been assisted by the Gradu- 
ates’ Society is the McGill Engineering 
Students’ Summer Employment Pro- 
gram. Organized by Pierre MacKinnon, 
a second year engineering student, the 
project received the approval of the Engi- 
neering Undergraduate Society and of 
Dean G.W. Farnell, PhD’57. MacKinnon 
and other energetic students from his fac- 
ulty have contacted nearly 700 McGill 
engineering graduates asking those that 
are employers to interview McGill engi- 
neering undergraduates for summer jobs. 

The results of this effort are yet to be 
determined, but it has worked well at 
Queen’s University. It is hoped that our 
engineering graduates will be sympa- 
thetic to our students’ requests. The 
Graduates’ Society was most pleased to 
provide assistance to these deserving 
students. 


Travel Program Last summer it was felt 
that our Travel Program should be re- 
examined and, Rob Kerr, BSc’66, and his 
committee have been busy. The success- 
ful programs presently being run by Yale 
and Harvard were looked at and, as a re- 
sult, arrangements have been made with 
McGill’s Centre for Continuing Educa- 


tion to combine efforts and offer an excit- 
ing Travel/Study program to our gradu- 
ates and other supporters. Such a 
program, in most cases, would involve 
six to eight lectures given at the univer- 
sity prior to a trip. The professor giving 
the lectures would then accompany the 
group to its destination. The first such 
trip offered to Vienna, Salzburg, and Mu- 
nich, led by Professor of Music Robert 
Markow, sold out within two weeks of its 
announcement! It will leave in early 
May. The only other trip being planned 
for 1984 will be to China, Japan and Tai- 
wan. This trip will be led by Dr. Stanley 
Frost and will leave Montreal on 18 Oc- 
tober and San Francisco on 19 October. 
There are still several places on this trip 
and interested graduates should contact 
our travel agents, Mrs. Vivien Lieu or 
Mrs. Joyce Fok at (514) 735-1641. 

The Travel Committee hopes to have 
an advance information brochure for the 
1985 Travel/Study Program available in 
June or July of this year. To date, destina- 
tions include a trip to the Andes, Gala- 
pagos, and the Amazon; India and Sn 
Lanka; Central Africa and _ perhaps 
Poland. Rob Kerr and his committee 
would welcome advice from graduates re- 
garding Travel/Study Program destina- 
tions. Drop Rob a note at Martlet House, 
3605 Mountain Street, Montreal, Québec, 
H3G 2M1.0 


ie I ei a 1 ERR ARAN AON OTN IEE ELITE AT ETE IE RT 


WHERE THEY ARE AND WHAT THEY'RE DOING 


"22 

ARTHUR. W. CARLYLE,  BSc’22, 
MSc’23, has worked as a geologist and a 
consulting geologist in Africa, Japan, 
Europe and North America, and is pres- 
ently living in Johannesburg, South 
Africa. 


"29 

JOHN HUMPHREY, BCom’25, BA’27, 
BCL’29, PhD’45, professor emeritus in 
McGill’s Law Faculty, was the author of 
the original draft of the United Nations’ 
Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 
and recently addressed the United 
Nations’ General Assembly to com- 
memorate the passage of the declaration 
thirty-five years ago. 

ALAN A. MACNAUGHTON, BA’26, 
BCL’29, has been appointed to the Inter- 
national Advisory Board of the Banca 
Nazionale Del Lavoro, the largest bank 
in Italy and the twelfth largest in Europe. 


’30 

ROBERT M. HARDY, MSc’30, has been 
honored by the Alberta Research Coun- 
cil through its sponsorship of the “Robert 
M. Hardy 75th Anniversary Lectureship” 
at the University of Alberta’s Faculty of 
Engineering. 


MARTIN K. LEVINSON, BCom’30, has 
been elected a life member of the On- 
tario Institute of Chartered Accountants. 


31 

R. HOWARD WEBSTER, BA’31, honor- 
ary chairman of “The Globe and Mail,” 
Toronto, Ont., and former chairman of 
Quebecair and Windsor Hotel Ltd., has 
recently become an officer in the Order 
of Canada. 


32 

ROBERT B. GREENBLATT, BA’28, 
MD’32, professor emeritus of endocrino- 
logy at the Medical College of Georgia, 
recently received the International Alpha 
Omega Dental Fraternity’s 1983 Achieve- 
ment Award. 


"36 

B. EDMOND THOMAS, MD’36, has 
been elected president of the Palm Beach 
Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 
Florida, for 1984. 


"37 

ROBERT P. FLEMING, BArch’37, is a 
partner in the firm of Fleming and 
Kaltsas, Architects. 


"39 

FRANCIS S. ERICSSON, MD’39, of 
Warren, Penn., recently built a scull, 
painted it McGill’s colors, and is now 
rowing it on the Allegheny River in 
northwest Pennsylvania. 


"40 

Rev. CHARLES F. JOHNSTON, BA’40, 
MA’42, recently retired as professor of 
church history and ecumenics at St. 
Andrew’s (United Church) College in 
Saskatoon, Sask., and in Sept. 1983 was 
awarded a Doctor of Divinity (honoris 
causa) by the Anglican College of Emma- 
nuel and St. Chad in Saskatoon. 


"a1 

RUSSELL MERIFIELD, BA’38, 
BCL’41, has recently been elected chair- 
man of the executive board of the Inter- 
national Coffee Organization. 


"44 

M. ELIZABETH (WEATHERILL) 
SMITH, BA’44, has recently been elected 
to chair the governing council of the On- 
tario College of Art, Toronto. 


"46 

SAM MELAND, BEng’46, recently pub- 
lished Electrical Project Management 
with the New York publishing firm of 
McGraw-Hill. 


‘47 

RONALD BAYNE, BA’45, MD’47, pro- 
fessor of medicine at McMaster Univer- 
sity and chairman of the Gerontology 
Research Council of Ontario, has been 
elected vice-chairman of the clinical med- 
icine section, Gerontological Society of 
North America, and has been elected 
president of the Canadian Association on 
Gerontology. 

DONALD CRAIG, BScAgr’47, one of 
Canada’s foremost authorities on berry 
crops, recently retired after 36 years with 
the Agriculture Canada _ Research 
Branch. 

JOHN W. KORCZ, BEng’47, was re- 
cently elected president of Reynolds 
Aluminum Company of Canada Ltd. 
HERBERT M. SHAYNE, BCom’47, is 
the president and chief executive officer 
of Werthan Industries Inc., Nashville, 
Tenn. 

PETER A. TURCOT, BCom’47, has 
been appointed senior vice-president, On- 
tario region, of Guardian Trustco Inc., 
Toronto. 


"48 

SYLVIA OSTRY, BA’48, MA’SO, 
PhD’54, LLD’72, has recently been 
named Canadian Pacific Visiting Scholar 
at the Centre for Industrial Relations at 
the University of Toronto, Ont. 


‘49 

ARTHUR EARLE, BEng’49, senior vice- 
president of Dominion Textile, has re- 
cently been made president of the 
Chambre de Commerce de la Province 
de Québec. 

DOUGLAS J. HERON, BSc’49, director 
of economic development for the city of 
London, Ont., was recently elected presi- 
dent of the Ontario Industrial Develop- 
ment Council, Inc. 

PAUL MARSHALL, BCL’49, is the 
chief executive officer of Westmin 
Resources Ltd., a producer of oil and 
gas, coal, base, and precious metals. 
FREDA (LEIBOV) PALTIEL, BSW’49, 
recently represented Canada at an 
OELD Expert Meeting in Paris, France, 
on Social Security, Fiscal Policy, and 
Social Welfare, and also served as a 
consultant to the Pan American Health 
Organization in Washington, D.C., on 
Women, Health and Development. 
JOHN PITTS, BEng’49, is president of 
MacDonald, Dettwiler & Associates, 
Richmond, B.C. 


ERIC ROBINSON, BA’49, MA’60, for- 
merly director of Industrial Relations at 
Niagara College, Welland, Ont. has 
recently begun a two-year volunteer pro- 
gram with Horizons of Friendship in 
Honduras. 


50 

VIRGINIA (WELSFORD) McCLURE, 
BA’50, is a vice-president of the Visual 
Arts Centre, Westmount, Que. 

J. W. S. McOUAT, BA’S50, has recently 
been appointed vice-president, law, of 
TransCanada PipeLines Ltd. 


51 

JOSEPH A. MENDELSON, BCL’51, 
has been appointed judge of the provin- 
cial court of the province of Quebec. 

E. W. NETTEN, BCom’51, is managing 
the national practice of Price Water- 
house. 

Dr. MAX J. PALAYEW, BA’51, profes- 
sor and chairman of diagnostic radiology 
at McGill, was recently elected president 
of the Canadian Association of Radio- 
logists. 

J. MONTAGUE SQUIRE, BEng’51, is 
Industrial Technology Advisor for the 
National Research Council of Canada, 
Montreal. 

R. VANCE WARD, BSc’51, vice-presi- 
dent, chemicals division, C-I-L Inc., has 
been elected chairman of the board and 
re-elected a director of The Chlorine 
Institute Inc., New York, N.Y. 


52 

JOHN F. FRISCH, BEng’52, has been 
appointed vice-president, Windsor Pro- 
ject, of Domtar Pulp & Paper Products. 
FE. LEO KOLBER, BA’49, BCL’52, has 
been elected president of the Corpo- 
ration of the Sir Mortimer B. Davis 
Jewish General Hospital, Montreal. 
ROBERT A; LCEWIs, BCom’ 32, 
DipMBA’58, has been appointed vice- 
president, marketing and sales, of the 
Personal Insurance Company of Canada. 


"53 

HENRI COLAS, BCom’S3, is the execu- 
tive vice-president, finance and adminis- 
tration, of Teleglobe Canada, an interna- 
tional telecommunications company. 

H. REGINALD HARDY, Jr., BSc’53, 
professor and chairman of the geome- 
chanics section of the department of min- 
eral engineering, Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity, was recently named the 1983 
recipient of the C. A. Hogentogler 
Award, an award granted to the author 
of a paper of outstanding merit on the 
uses of soil and rock for engineering pur- 
poses. 

WILBUR H. HUELS, BCom’S3, has 
been appointed vice-president, finance, 
of Westclox Canada, Peterborough, Ont. 


RADCLIFFE R. LATIMER, BSc’53, 
president and chief executive officer of 
TransCanada PipeLines, Toronto, Ont., 
has been appointed chairman of the 
Canadian Advisory Board of Prudential 
Assurance. 

EDWARD O. PHILLIPS, BA’53, author 
of Sunday’s Child, recently published 
Where There’s a Will, with the Toronto, 
Ont. publishing firm of McClelland and 
Stewart. 

MALCOLM A. TASCHEREAU, 
BEng’53, is the new chairman of the 
board of Aiguebelle Resources Inc., a 
gold producer in the Rouyn-Noranda 
area of northwest Quebec. 

JOHN S. WALTON, BEng’S3, is the 
executive vice-president of Westmin 


Resources Ltd., a producer of oil and 
gas, coal, base, and precious metals. 


"54 

EDWARD ANDREW CLARK, 
BEng’54, DipMan’7]1, is director of plan- 
ning for Bell-Northern Research Ltd., 
Ottawa, Ont. 

STANLEY M. DIAMOND, BCom’54, is 
the director of international marketing 
for Intalite Inc., a decorative ceiling com- 
pany headquartered in Montreal. 

GUY P. FRENCH, BA’54, has been 
appointed president and chief executive 
officer of Carborundum Abrasives Inc. 
BRIAN MACDONALD, BA’S4, resident 
choreographer of Les Grands Ballets 
Canadiens, won a 1983 Molson Prize, 
worth $50,000 from the Canada Council. 
JEAN M. TAGUE, BLS’S54, has been ap- 
pointed dean of the School of Library 
and Information Science at the Univer- 
sity of Western Ontario in London. 


"55 

ZAVE CLIMAN, BCom’55, has been ap- 
pointed vice-president, finance, of Conti- 
nental Pharma Cryosan Inc., Montreal. 
PIERRE E. deBROUX, BEng’S55, has 
been appointed vice-president, engineer- 
ing, of Dominion Textile Inc. 

IRWIN J. KOPIN, BSc’51, MDCM’55, 
has been appointed’ director of 
Intramural Research at the Neurology 
Institute, Bethesda, Md., and received 
the 1983 Anna Monika Foundation 
Award for studies investigating the bio- 
logical bases of depression. 


"56 

DAVID S. NEWCOMBE, MD’56, has 
recently been appointed director of the 
division of experimental pathology and 
toxicology in the department of environ- 
mental health sciences at Johns Hopkins 
University, Baltimore, Md. 


57 

DAVID H. RACE, BEng’57, has been ap- 
pointed executive vice-president of CAE 
Industries Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 


SPRING 1984/McGILL NEWS 25 


SMPPRRPRSASPAAVSRPSIIOTPLAPIF SRIF PAG ISS PF I3 7279 S45 


HARVEY M. ROMOFF, BA’5S7, has 
been appointed chairman and chief exec- 
utive officer of The Canada Line, a cellu- 
lar container shipping company that 
operates on the North Atlantic between 
Europe and Canada. 


"58 

A: J. GILLIES, BEng’58, BA‘Ol, 
has been appointed regional manager, 
marketing, of CN Rail, Toronto, Ont. 
ROBERT G. HUNTER, BEng’58, has 
been appointed president and chief exec- 
utive officer of Otis Elevator Co. Ltd., a 
subsidiary of United Technologies Corp., 
Hartford, Conn. 

FRANK KARMAN, BEng’58, DipMan’6/7, 
has been appointed manager, peroxide, 
of the Chemicals Group, Du Pont 
Canada, Inc. 

DONN K. WILSON, MA’58, has been 
appointed senior vice-president, adminis- 
tration, of Molson Breweries of Canada 
Ltd., Montreal. 


"59 

E. J. BARAKETT, BCom’59, has been 
appointed president and general manager 
of Cashway Building Centres, a subsidi- 
ary of Canadian Corporate Management 
Co. Ltd. 

ROBERT J. STOCKS, BCL’59, has been 
elected director and chairman of the 
board of IHEC Ltd., a distributor and du- 
plicator of video software products. 


60 

CHARLES B. ARNOLD, MD’60, of 
Scarsdale, N.Y., has been appointed a 
medical director of Metropolitan Life 
Insurance Co., New York, N.Y. 

WAYNE RIDDELL, BMus’60, has been 


earning national recognition as one of 


the top choral directors in Canada. 


61 

DOUGLAS C. CAMPBELL, BEng’6l, 
has recently been appointed president of 
CN Communications, Toronto, Ont. 
THOMAS A. FARRELL, MD’6], has re- 
cently joined the medical staff of Wills 
Eye Hospital, Philadelphia, Penn., as 
director of the  hospital’s General 
Opthalmology Service Clinic. 

MARVIN KRASNOW, BEng’6l, runs 
Bootlegger Inc., a Canadian footwear 
company. 


"62 

DAVID G. FRASER, BEng’62, has been 
appointed executive vice-president, cor- 
porate development, of Computer Inno- 
vations, Toronto, Ont. 

IAN A. HENDERSON, BSc’62, has been 
appointed vice-president, financial insti- 
tutions banking, of the Continental Bank 
of Canada. 


26 McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1984 


J. E. McCRACKEN, BA’62, has been ap- 
pointed general manager, mortgages, and 
president, Scotia Mortgage Corp., of the 
Bank of Nova Scotia. 

ERIC C. RIORDON, BSc’62, has 
recently been appointed president of 
Foster Advertising Ltd., Montreal. 

JOHN. F. SEELY, BA’58, MD’62, 
PhD’73, has recently become chairman 
of the department of medicine at the Uni- 
versity of Ottawa Medical Faculty and 
physician-in-chief at the Ottawa General 
Hospital, in Ontario. 

STUART L. SMITH, BSc’58, MD’62, 
DipPsych’67, is the president of the Sci- 
ence Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ont. 


"63 

H. CLIFFORD HATCH Jr., BA’63, is 
president of Hiram Walker-Gooderham 
& Worts, the major distilling subsidiary 
of Hiram Walker Resources Ltd. 

ANITA LANDS, BA’63, recently joined 
the Boughner Group, a New York, N.Y.., 
real estate investment banking firm, as 
director of marketing. 


"64 

J. RICHARD BERTRAND, BSc’64, is 
vice-president and partner of Executive 
Consultants Ltd., Ottawa, Ont., and a 
member of the Executive Committee of 
the Board of Governors at the University 
of Ottawa. 

DAVID A. RATTEE, BCom’64, has been 
appointed chief general manager of the 
Continental Bank of Canada. 


65 

ROSANNE (BAATZ) CARSWELL, 
BA’65, MSW’69, MBA’80, is director of 
the downtown campus of Collége Marie- 
Victorin, Montreal, which offers courses 
in specialized education, social coun- 
selling, and French as a second language. 
REIN MUTSO, BEng’65, DipMan’68, 
MEng’70, is a professor of metallurgy at 
the University of Texas, El Paso. 


"66 

J. D. TAYLOR, BEng’66, is the president 
of Canadian Astronautics Ltd., Ottawa, 
Ont., an advanced technology systems 
company involved in the space business. 


"67 

TIMOTHY AITKEN, BA’67, is a direc- 
tor of Aitken, Hume Ltd., London, 
England. 

MICHAELI CANTERO-SANSREGRET, 
BA’67, has been appointed consultant in 
the Montreal office of Public and Indus- 
trial Relations Ltd. 

DANIEL Z. GOODWILL, BA’67, has 
been appointed vice-president, sales, of 
Overland Express, a divison of ITNT 
Canada, Mississauga, Ont. 


JAY. F. MacCAULAY, BEng’67, has 
been appointed vice-president and gen- 
eral manager, Rempel-Trail Transporta- 
tion Ltd.. and Johnston Heavy Haul, divi- 
sions of Johnston Terminals and Storage 
Ltd. 

ERIC RODIER, BCom’67, MBA’73, has 
recently become a partner of Richter & 
Associés, Montreal. 


68 

MERLIN W. DONALD, PhD’68, profes- 
sor of psychology at Queen’s University, 
Kingston, Ont., is now chairman, life sci- 
ences division, of their School of Gradu- 
ate Studies and Research. 


69 

GORDON ROY KELLY, BSc’69, re- 
cently received an MSc from the Univer- 
sity of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon. 

S. MURRAY MILLER, BSc’67, DDS’69, 
recently obtained a Certificate of Ad- 
vanced Graduate Study in Orthodontics 
from Boston University, Mass., and is 
now practising orthodontics in the 
greater Boston area. 

JEANNE (CHUBBUCK) NORRIS, 
BA’69, has been promoted to manager, 
marketing research, of the R. T. French 
Co., Rochester, N.Y. 

PIERRE POULIN, DipMan’69, has been 
appointed vice-president, manufacturing, 
of Pepsico Bottling International 
(Canada). 


70 

WILLIAM CLEMAN, BCom’70, has 
been appointed vice-president and divi- 
sional coordinator of Ivanhoe Inc., Stein- 
berg Inc.’s real estate management and 
development subsidiary. 

J. J. FRIDMAN, BCom’66, BCL’70, is 
the general counsel of Bell Canada Enter- 
prises Inc., Montreal. 

Dr. MARTINE ANNE JAWORSKI, 
BA’70, associate professor at the Univer- 
sity of Alberta, Edmonton, has been 
elected a Fellow of the American Acad- 
emy of Pediatrics and has been awarded 
a scholarship by the Alberta Heritage 
Foundation for medical research. 
JAMES A. NEATE, BEng’70, has been 
appointed general manager, films depart- 
ment, of Hoechst Canada Inc., a chem- 
ical and pharmaceutical company. 
ALFRED SZETO, BScArch’70, recently 
had a project designed by his office win 
an honorable mention in the 1983 
Scarborough Urban Design Awards. 
GEORGE WEBER, BEd’70, has recently 
become secretary general of the Cana- 
dian Red Cross Society, Toronto, Ont., 
the largest voluntary organization im 
Canada. 


‘71 
RICHARD Y. BOURHIS, BSc’71, who is 
teaching in the department of psychol- 
ogy, McMaster University, Hamilton, 
Ont., recently edited Conflict and Lan- 
guage Planning in Quebec, published by 
Multilingual Matters Ltd. 

JOHN R. BRITT, BEng’71, MEng’73, is 
the vice-president, marketing (interna- 
tional), of Luscar Ltd., a major producer 
of Western Canadian coals. 

JEAN-LOUIS HAMEL, BCL’71, has 
been appointed group vice-president, 
Real Estate and Mortgage Services, as 
well as president and chief executive offi- 
cer of General Trust Inc., a subsidiary of 
General Trust of Canada, Montreal. 
JAMES A. TILLEY, BSc’71, vice-presi- 
dent and product manager in the Fixed 
Income Analytical Research Group at 
Morgan Stanley & Co., New York, N.Y., 
has been elected to the Society of Actua- 
ries’ Board of Governors for a three-year 
term. 

ANTHONY DEAN WILSON, BSc’71, 
recently received an honors certificate in 
science from the University of 

Saskatchewan, Saskatoon. 


‘72 

VIJAY S. BABLAD, DDS’72, has re- 
cently started a dental practice in Saudi 
Arabia, after having practised for ten 
years in Pointe Claire, Que. 

PETER F. CHODOS, BCom’72, has 
joined the firm of Loewen Ondaatje, 
McCutcheon & Company Ltd., Toronto, 
Ont. 

G-PAUL DONNINI. BSc’72, PhD’77, is 
technical manager, pulp and paper, of 
C-I-L Industrial Chemicals, Montreal. 
LAWRENCE J. MONONEN, MA’72, 
PhD’76, a senior research analyst at 
Wang Laboratories Inc., Lowell, Mass., 
has recently been admitted to the Execu- 
tive MBA program at the Wharton 
School, University of Pennsylvania, in 
Philadelphia. 


‘73 

KATIE MALLOCH, BA’73, has a new 
jazz show on CBC-Stereo, Saturday 
evenings. 

MICHAEL A. PAVEY, MBA’73, has 
been appointed director of strategic plan- 
ning of the Maritime Electric Co. Ltd. 
ROBERT M. REID, BEng’73, is plant 
manager, Industrial Mineral Products 
Division, 3M Canada, Havelock, Ont. 


74 
ARTHUR HOWARD KRULEWITZ, 
BSc’74, MD’78, is completing a pulmo- 
nary fellowship at Tufts, New England 
Medical Center, Boston, Mass. 
RICHARD LAFONTAINE, 


LLB’75, is vice-president, public affairs, 
of Fenco Engineering Inc., Toronto, Ont. 


BCL’74, 


PHILIP MAGDER, MSW’74, recently 
opened his own social work practice 
specializing in career counselling, with 
services available to individuals and on 
corporate referral, in Montreal. 

JAMES R. YEATES, MSc’74, has been 
appointed president and chief operating 
officer of Computer Innovations, a Cana- 
dian owned microcomputer company. 


"45 

WILLIAM JAMES BOOTH, BA’75, 
MA’78, recently received a PhD in politi- 
cal science from Harvard University and 
is currently employed in the Department 
of External Affairs, Ottawa, Ont. 

LYON J. GREENBLATT,  BA’70, 
BCL’75, LLB’78, formerly a Broward 
County Assistant State Attorney, has re- 
cently become an associate in the law 
firm of Glenn R. Roderman, P.A., in 
Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 

MALCOLM P. HAMILTON, MSc’75, 
has been appointed a principal of 
William M. Mercer Ltd., a Canadian 
consulting firm. 

JEAN PELLETIER, BSc’75, recently 
transferred back to Calgary, Alta., from 
Abidjan, Ivory Coast, where he had 
worked for the oil company, Phillips, for 
the past three years. 


76 

VICTOR de BREYNE, BA’76, MBA’83, 
has recently been appointed head of 
acquisitions, York University Libraries, 
Toronto, Ont. 

ALAN BEREZNY, BA’76, MA’81, is di- 
rector of fund raising for the Alliance 
Research and Education Institute in 
Montreal. 

SHELDON F. CHAD, BA’76, won the 
1983 ACTRA Award for best writer, tele- 
vision drama, for his script “Seeing 
Double;’ used in the CBC series Seeing 
Things, and is currently working on a fea- 
ture screenplay for Universal Studios, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

NEIL M. POCH, BSW’76, has been 
appointed project director of Goldfarb 
Consultants, Toronto, Ont. 


‘77 
LISSA (COHEN) BAUM, BCom’77, has 
recently been appointed vice-president, 
finance, of the Chemical Bank, New 
York, N.Y. 

LOUIS GALARDO, BCom’77, has been 
appointed director, business develop- 
ment of Ivanhoe Inc., Steinberg Inc.’s 
real estate management and develop- 
ment subsidiary. 

DEBRA O. HANSEN, BSc’77, has been 
appointed assistant investment officer in 
Travelers Investment Management Co., a 
subsidiary of The Travelers Corp., of 
Hartford, Conn. 

SIMON HERMAN, BEng’70, DipMan’73, 
MBA’77, has been appointed officer of 
Norr/SH&G Ltd., Engineers Planners. 


S. F. REDA, BCom’77, has been ap- 
pointed manager, Montreal pension divi- 
sion, of Confederation Life. 


BARBARA J. ROBERTSON, MD’77, 
has joined the department of anaesthesia 
at the University of British Columbia 
Health Sciences Centre Hospital in Van- 
couver, B.C., as a consultant anaesthetist 
and clinical instructor. 

DAVID SNIDER, BSc’77, LLB’81, was 
recently called to the Bar of Ontario and 
is now working with Revenue Canada in 
Ottawa, Ont. 

MICHAEL STANTE, BCom’77, has 
been appointed manager, government 
grants, of Siblin, Zittrer & Associates, a 
management consulting firm. 

CYNTHIA KATHLEEN TAYLOR, 
BA’77, was recently named vice-presi- 
dent of Synergistics Consulting Ltd., a 
communications and social marketing 
firm, in Ottawa, Ont. 


"78 

PIERRE PAYETTE, MBA’78, has re- 
cently been appointed a principal in the 
firm of Rourke, Bourbonnais & Associ- 
ates, an executive recruiting and reloca- 
tion counselling company. 

Sister LEYLA RAPHAEL, PhD’78, is 
seeking funds to help the homeless and 
the battle-scarred in her own country, 
Lebanon, through the Montreal organiza- 
tion, Carefour des Cedres, which she 
founded several years ago. 

JUDY (IZENBERG) SNIDER, BA’78, is 
the coordinator of the National Breast 
Screening Study Centres at the Civic and 
General Hospitals in Ottawa, Ont. 
NORBERT SPORNS, LLB’78, BCL’79, 
has been appointed a partner in the firm 
of Pelletier, Poirier, Kimmel & Filion, 
Notaries, Montreal. 

RICHARD C. TOBEY, MD’78, is a med- 
ical missionary physician in Cameroon, 
Africa. 

BRENDA LEE WALSH, BSc’78, is work- 
ing as a physiotherapist with CUSO in 
Zimbabwe. 

IAN WETHERLY, DipPubAcct’78, has 
been appointed comptroller of the 
Mercantile Bank of Canada. 


"19 

CHRISTOS D. KALTSAS, MArch’79, is 
a member of the Ordre des Architectes 
du Québec and is a partner in the firm of 
Fleming & Kaltsas, Architects. 

JOHN McELHONE, BSc’79, is presently 
doing a master’s degree at Queen’s Uni- 
versity, Kingston, Ont. 

CHRISTINE SAZIE, BEd’79, is teaching 
grade one French immersion in Calgary, 
Alta. 

PAUL F. J. SENECAL, BCom’79, is 
product manager at the Campbell Soup 
Co. in charge of the Chunky Soup brand, 
and is a director of the Canadian Bad- 
minton Association. 


SPRING 1984/McGILL NEWS 27 


SMPERPS RSA PRAV SMAPS THAR EPSTSRAGRIPHREISS PERS eee srs aS 


MARLA SHAPIRO, MD’79, is a lecturer 
in the department of family and commu- 
nity medicine, University of Toronto, 
Ont., and has a clinical practice at the 
Toronto Western Hospital. 


80 

EDUARDO DIAS, BCL’80, has been ap- 
pointed a partner in the firm of Pelletier, 
Poirier, Kimmel & Filion, Notaries, 
Montreal. 

CLIFFORD LION, BSc’80, is in his sec- 
ond year of medicine at the University of 
Toronto, Ont. 

MAMDOUH MOHAMED  YONES, 
MEng’80, is working for General Metals 
Co., in Cairo, Egypt. 


81 

KATHI R. ANDERSON, BA’81, and her 
husband are stationed at the Guangxi 
Medical College in Nanning, Guangxi, 
People’s Republic of China, where they 
are teaching English to professors and 
doctors. 

ROBERT J. CRAIG, MLS’81, is work- 
ing at Food for Thought Books, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

JOANNE KUSSNER, BCom’81, has 
been appointed a director of Biltwell 
Packaging Ltd., Montreal. 


82 

GUY DAGENAIS, BSc’82, is teaching 
bar and hotel management and geogra- 
phy full time at Collége Lasalle, 
Montreal. 


"83 

JOSHUA GRUNBERG, BSW’83, has re- 
cently been appointed director of the 
Maimonides Hospital Geriatric Centre in 
Cote St. Luc, Que. 

WENDY MOORE, BA’83, is working at 
the IBM lab in Toronto, Ont. 

BRAHM RESNICK, BA’83, is currently 
enrolled in the graduate program at the 
Medill School of Journalism, North- 
western University, Evanston, Ill. 5 


28 McGILL NEWS/SPRING 1984 


PCIV HSE MES 


DEATHS 


"09 
WALTER O. BRIEGEL, BSc’09, at Mon- 
treal, on 2 Dec. 1983. 


an 
MARGARET (DIXON) 
BA’11, on 28 Jan. 1984. 


WILSON, 


"15 
ZOE BALDWIN SMITH, BA’15, at 
Toronto, Ont., on | Dec. 1983. 


"16 
PHILIP S. FISHER, BA’16, LLD’64, at 
Montreal, on 17 Dec. 1983. 


AT 
ALPHONSE TRUDEAU, BSc’17, at Ste. 
Anne de Bellevue, Que., on 2 Feb. 1984. 


18 

GREEBA (WILLIAMSON) FINDLAY, 
DipPE’18, at Montreal, on 9 Jan. 1984. 
H. BURROUGHS PELLETIER, BSc’18, 
at Quebec City, Que., on 20 Jan. 1984. 


20 
JAMES ARTHUR LATHAM, BA’20, on 
15 Dec. 1983. 


21 

JANE (SPIER) HALE, BA’21, MSc’22, 
PhD’35, at St. Lambert, Que., on 11 Dec. 
1983. 


te 

GEORGE DUNCAN McTAGGART, 
BSc’22, at Montreal, on 10 Dec. 1983. 
ALICE VICTORIA SMITH, BA’22, on 
20 Jan. 1984. 


23 

FRANCIS GLENN ADNEY, _ BSc 
(Arts)’23, at Ramsey, N.J., in Dec. 1983. 
Rev. NORMAN EGERTON, BA’23, at 
Westerly, R.I., on 20 Oct. 1983. 
WENDELL H. LAIDLEY,  BSc’23, 
BCL’28, at Montreal, on 30 Nov. 1983. 
FLORENCE M. (BANFILL) WILSON, 
BA’23, at St. Lambert, Que., on 11 Dec. 
1983. 


24 
DAVID LEON CAHANA, BCL’24, at 
Montreal, on 5 Dec. 1983. 


"25 

WILLIAM JAMES McNALLY, MSc’25, 
DSc’34, at Montreal, on 24 Nov. 1983 
MURIEL (McNAUGHTON) SMILEY, 
BA’25, at Sherbrooke, Que., on 15 Dec. 
1983. 


26 

Dr. W. BROOKS HAMILTON, 
BSA(Mac)’26, MSc’28, at Lexington, Ky. 
on 3 Oct. 1983. 

The Ven. I. M. LIDSTONE, BA’26, at 
Florida, on 24 Dec. 1983. 


ERIC BLAIR LUSBY, BSc’26, at Vic- 
toria. B.C., on 7 Dec. 1983. 


28 

JOHN A. SHOTTON, MD°’28, on | Dee. 
1983. 

DESMOND WALSH, § Arts28, at 
Hudson, Que., on 6 Jan. 1984. 


29 

VERA (WEINFIELD) BERGER, 
BMus’29. at New York, N.Y., on 7 Feb. 
1984. 

JOHN S. L. BROWNE, BA’25, BSc’29, 
MD’29. PhD’32, at Montreal, on 21 Jan. 
1984. 

MALCOLM MacGREGOR _ ROSS, 
BA’25. MD’29, at Vancouver, B.C., on 
1 Feb. 1984. 


"30 
ROBERT JAPP, MA’30, at Montreal, on 
7 Jan. 1984. 


"32 

WILLIAM STURGES PARKER, 
MD’32. at Rosemont, Penn., on 11 Jan. 
1984. 


EDWIN PINKERTON, BA’28, MD’32, 
at Vancouver, B.C., on 15 Jan. 1984. 


"33 
RUSSELL L. KUTZ, PhD’33, on 14 
Nov. 1983. 


"34 

JOHN ARTHUR TWEED BUTLER, 
BEng’34, at Brantford, Ont., on 12 Jan. 
1984. 

CHARLES ELLSWORTH, MD’34, on 
16 Nov. 1983. 

KENNETH R. GRAY, PhD’34, on 
25 July 1983. 

JAMES RICHARD JOHNSON, 
BEng’34, at Kingston, Ont., on 18 Oct. 
1983. 

WILLIAM JAMES  McQUILLAN, 
BCL’34, at Montreal, on 25 Jan. 1984. 
JAMES FORTIN MINNES, MD’34, on 
24 Dec. 1983. 


"36 

E. BURTIS AYCOCK, MD’36, on 
28 Aug. 1983. 

W. GROSVENOR CLOUGH, BEng’36, 
on 2 May 1983. 


"38 

DORA MACKENZIE (MITCHELL) 
CRAIG, BA’38, at Toronto, Ont., on 
7 Dec. 1983. 

MARJORIE E. (HICKS) DOYLE, 
BHS’38, at Olds, Alta., on 27 Nov. 1983. 
MILDRED ALICE RODDEN, BLS’38, 
at Kingston, Ont., on 24 Jan. 1984. 

Rev. IVOR D. WILLIAMS, BA‘38, 
MA’42, at Toronto, Ont., on 14 Dec. 
1983. 


"4 

A. KEITH BUCKLAND, BCom’40. a 
Dorval, Que., on 11 Feb. 1984. 
WILLIAM ALEXANDER REED. 
MD’40, at Scarborough, Ont., on | Jan. 
1984. 


— 


"AT 
VIRGINIA E. MURRAY, BLS’41, at 
Montreal, on 27 Dec. 1983. 


a7 
MARCEL TIPHANE, MSc’47. on 3 
May 1983. 


— 


"48 

WILLIAM A. CAMPBELL, BCL’48. in 
March 1983. 

ROY MITCHELL LIDDY, BSc’48. at 
Toronto, Ont., on 27 Nov. 1983. 
DONALD FRASER McOUAT, MA’48. 
in Nova Scotia, on | Jan. 1984. 


"49 

BERNICE DONALDSON, DipNurs’49. 
MSc’69, on 17 Jan. 1983. 

THEODORE HARDING PORTER, 
BCom’49, at Montreal, on 30 Jan. 1984. 


"50 

CONSTANCE ELOISE (GARNEAU) 
DRUMMOND, BA’S0, at Montreal, on 
13 Jan. 1984. 

WINONAH AGNES LINDSAY, BN’SO, 
on 13 Jan. 1984. 


Announcing the First Edition of 


51 


RUTH M. DUNCAN, BSc’51, at Mon- 
treal, on 14 Sept. 1983. 

VIKTORS LINIS, MSc’51, PhD’53, on 
2 July 1983. 


"69 
G. RUTH CLELAND, BN’69, on 5 Feb. 
1984. 

H. NOEL FIELDHOUSE, DLitt’69, at 
Kingston, Ont., on 25 Nov. 1983. 


53 


FRANCIS J. 
30 Oct. 1983. 


ROBINSON, MD’53, on 


Wt & | 
PETER JOHN SHEARMAN, BSc’77, at 
Toronto, Ont., on 8 Jan. 1984. 


59 


1984. 


Oct. 1983. 


CHRISTINE (WASILEWSKA) GEOF- 
FRION, BCL’59, at Montreal, on 19 Jan. 


DOROTHY RUSSELL, DSc’59, on 19 


‘78 

HAMIDOU S. BARAYA-MIL, MSc’78, 
PhD’80, in Gongola State, Nigeria, on 
25 June 1983. 


"80 


"60 


"62 


63 


"64 


DAVID HENRY BUSH, BEng’60, at 
Montreal, on 26 Jan. 1984. 


JOHN NORMAN ATKINSON, BSc’62, 
at Toronto, Ont., on 7 Jan. 1984. 


ROMAN J. OSTASHEWSKY, BLS’63, 
on 26 Feb. 1984. 

ANN DALE (WELDON) RICHARD- 
SON, BA’63, at Surrey, England, on 
20 Dec. 1983. 


BARRIE J. ROBINSON, BLS’64, in 


June 1983. 


RONALD DOUGLAS NAYMARK, 
BSc’80, on 4 Feb. 1984.0 


WHO’S WHO OF CANADIAN WOMEN 


Biographical information on WOMEN in Canadian Business, Finance, Law, 
Government, the Media, the Arts — position, company, address, personal information, 
education, career, affiliations and interests approved by the biographees, listed at no cost 


or obligation. 


CANADIAN 
WOMEN 


FIRST EDITION 
1984 


.» Trans-Canada Press 


142A DUPONT STREET, TORONTO, ONTARIO MS5R 1V2 


TELEPHONE (416) 968-2714 


TO ORDER: Please complete and forward with your cheque to: 
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copy(ies) WHO’S WHO OF CANADIAN WOMEN 
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WWonet smo) colem,werem elon ch-ilo) eleyuccremselewavestem\yleltc 
Fund this year, with special thanks to those of you 
who have increased your support or made a second 
aie 

With your continued support, we should Keyemeleny 
goal of $1.75 million before the 31 May year end. 


Sincerely, 


jae ae Ham, 
BA *54, BGL 759 
Chairman, McGill Alma Mater Fund 


McGill Alma Mater Fund, 3605 Mountain Street, Montreal, Quebec H3G 2M1 


In the USA, The Friends of McGill University Inc., P.O. Box 441, 
Mlizabethtown, N.Y. 12932 


IR eae gee BRN Nt AN GSE AIS: ie is BE oS NE eile RAR EN NE IR RIES II Gr EC et at 


~~ 


5 a ‘’ Fy \ 4 oo.’ 
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Sue a aot eee | By - t 


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The McGill 


Women’s Centennial 


PeetTrete 


1884-1984 
A Celebration! 


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SHQURSERRATRAPTRMASR SHS HE RTITER ETAL PIS PT Da eT EPstag Loess 


Women’s 
Centenni 


These articles are 
pictured below. 


in celebration of the Women’s Centennial at McGill, 
a variety of souvenir items |s available for sale. 


China mug 
gold leaf rim, made in England 


York coffee spoon 
chrome enamel, Centennial 
crest, Wm. A. Rogers Oneida 
hotel plate 

Lapel pin 

gilt enamel, crest, with 
clutch-back, 1/2” 


Bloc-Notes 
3.3/4"' x 3-3/4" x 1-7/8" 


Centennial button 


Decal 
3-5/8"'. self-adhesive 


ja ‘“‘Sportsman”’ T-shirt 

ha White with red Women's 

bi Centennial emblem. 
50% Fortrel/50% cotton. 
Machine wash/dry. 

; Sizes S,M,L,XL 


‘‘Sportsman’’ sweatshirt 
White with red Women’s 
Centennial emblem. 

50% polyester/50% cotton. 
Machine wash/dry. 

Sizes S,M,L,XL 


A Fair Shake 
| 


Autobiographical Essays by 
McGill Women. Margaret Gillett 
) and Kay Sibbald, editors. 
al Montreal, Eden Press. 


/ Women’s Centennial 
” Medal 
A Struck by the Royal Canadian 
Mint. One troy ounce, 
.999 silver, 36mm. diameter, 
3.5mm. edge thickness 


Souvenir items are available from the McGill University Bookstore, or the Women’s Centennial Committee (3450 McTavish Street, 
"| Room 10) and will be on sale at major Centennial events. To order by mail, please fill out the order form below. 


ORDER FORM o.oo oes ves ee apes oc ccee beats te © 6 ene sp lennieen 


McGill University Bookstore Please send the following items: 6 Decal @ $0.46 
1001 Sherbrooke Street West (quantity) (total) 7 ___ T-shirt @ $7.50 - SO MOLO XLO ee 
Montreal, PQ, 1. Mug @ $5.00 ; 8 _ Sweatshirt @ $14.00 - SO MOLD XLO- 
Canada H3A 1G5 2 _____- Coffee spoon @ $6.50 9 ____ A Fair Shake @ $16.95 ae 
3 ____ Lapel pin @ $3.00 he 10 ~~ Centennial Medal @ $45.00 
4 ___ Bloc-Notes @ $5.50 ($50.00after Jan. 1, 1985) ee 
5 Centennial button @ $0.69 Total order $ oe 


Quebec residents add 9% provincial sales tax on items 1-6 and Item 10. Allow three weeks for Total order $ a. 
delivery of Items 1-9; minimum eight weeks for Item 10. Sales tax ae 


Postage and handling charges: $3.00 for Centennial Medal orders; $2.00 for all other Handling charge a 


orders over $5.00. Grand total $ CS 


188491984 


Cheque or money order in Canadian funds, made payable to McGill University Bookstore 


eerie aa a : Por ae NG ina 
(please print) ae — 


Address: = 4 


84120 (postal or zip code) 


ia 


eCws 


Volume 64, Number 4 
Summer 1984 


ISSN 0709 9223 


Editorial Board 
Editor 
Charlotte Hussey 


Assistant Editor 
Peter O’Brien 


Members 
(Chairman) 
Robert Carswell 
David Bourke 
Gretta Chambers 
Joan Cleather 
Betsy Hirst 
David Lank 
Elizabeth McNab 
Gavin Ross 
Robert Stevenson 
Tom Thompson 
Laird Watt 
Michael Werleman 
James G. Wright 


Art Direction 
Signa Design Communications 


The official publication of 
the Graduates’ Society, the 
News is sent without charge 
to all recent graduates and 
to all other graduates and 
friends who make annual 
contributions to McGill 
University. 


The copyright of all 
contents of this magazine is 
registered. Please address 
all editorial communications 
and items for the ‘‘Where 
they are and what they're 
doing’ column to: 


McGill News 

3605 Mountain Street 
Montreal, Quebec 
H3G 2M1 

Tel: (514) 392-4813 


Please contact Advertising 
Director Peter O’Brien at 
392-4806 for information 
about advertising in the 
News. 


Cover: As part of the pre-Cen- 
tennial planning, Le Chateau 
Stores of Canada Ltd. lent the 
McCord Museum these two mod- 
els wearing their new fall line. 
This photo session will result in a 
poster announcing a costume 
exhibit at the McCord entitled A 
Centennial of Costume: 1884- 
1984. The models joke around 
with a mannequin whose dress is 
similar to those worn by McGill’s 
first Donaldas. | 
Cover Photo: Vivian Kellner 


CONTENTS 


FEATURES 


McGill alumnae through the decades 
by Goldie Morgentaler 


The first of a four-part series on distinguished women graduates 
discusses three pioneering women who studied at McGill in the 
late 19th century. 


Celebrating 100 years of women at McGill: Struggle, determina- 
tion, and success 
by Charlotte Hussey 


Members of the McGill Women’s Centennial Committee talk 
about the plans for this year’s celebrations. There’s something 


for everyone. 
12 


Women in the professional faculties: Then and now 
by Peter O’Brien 


Women in the professional faculties have sometimes had 
difficulties in what used to be considered the ‘‘male’’ ® 
professions. They are now proving that determination and talent +S 
are more important than gender. 1 errr 


Post-feminism and the campus 
by Charlotte Hussey, Debbie Mercier, Debra Martens, and 
Goldie Morgentaler 


Although the ranks of a feminist vanguard on campus have 
dwindled, specific gains have been made over the past 10 years 
toward a more liberated university community. 1 G 


A Fair Shake 
by Effie Astbury and Rose Mamelak Johnstone 


collection of autobiographical essays by McGill women, show | 
that many have had a “‘fair’’ if not a ‘‘brilliant’’ chance to © 


succeed with their chosen career. 19 re | b. , | 
DEPARTMENTS 


OCIS Sar ae este oho ae eek Oe RAS eee ETE SS Rs eee Rae 2 Focus: Chaviva Hosek ....21 

Ue aa 5 ge oo ee a nee: OEE 0 dW oe at 3 Society activities ........ 23 
Where they are and what 

What the Martlet Hears they're doing ........ 24 

Canada’s National Librarian Marianne Scott............. 4 Deaths. ou. oa 27 

Frost's remembrance Of (nings Past 66504 Hea 6 6 Salve a eer 5 

Photographs of Convocation 84.0 3 6. 8 bi sig caine ccc es 6 


SUMMER 1984/McGILL NEWS 1 


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‘pQURSERRATRARUP MEER SOs RTPID RAG PITTS Paps terepesae ke! 


Dear McGill News, 

I was disappointed to see Eugene Forsey 
take you to task publically in the Spring issue, 
page 2. Were he exposed to pditical life, he 
should know this is something that is done 
privatally. 


Everett Clausen, BSc’63 


Dear McGill News, 

I’m writing to comment m the Martlet 
‘*You’re only as old as you feel,’’ that ap- 
peared in the Spring issue, pige 5. | am a 
senior citizen and visited Victoia, Vancouver 
and Seattle for three weeks inFebruary. The 
‘‘main reason’’ why the elde‘ly in Victoria 
are more fit than the elderly in Montreal is the 
climate. Because of the mild climate, many 
senior citizens retire to Victoria, and many 
others spend January, February and March in 
apartment hotels there. Last February, when | 
began to walk frequently, unncumbered by 
heavy boots, coat, etc. , I quickly felt more fit. 
I suppose Dr. Blaine Hoshizaki and Steve 
McCaw are too young to realize that in Mon- 
treal, as in Ottawa, both walkng and driving 
| become burdensome and wontying for the el- 
derly: in winter because of snow, ice and 
sleet, and in summer becauseof heat, humi- 
dity and blazing sun. To makea fair compari- 
son with seniors in Victoria, ore should select 
Montrealers from among the nany who keep 


Stanley Brice Frost 


Volume II: 1885- 1971 


fit by spending the winter months in cottage 
country. 

For the young, Victoria has an unemploy- 
ment rate next to that of Newfoundland, but 
for the retired it has great attractions. I cer- 
tainly hope to return next winter for a longer 
stay, if I don’t go to the south of England, 
France or Portugal. I would go for the 
climate and friends, not for ‘‘Silver Thread’’ 
activities. 

The researchers may not have heard that 
the Silver Threads Centre was severely van- 
dalized late in the winter by a gang of 
youngsters. Can it be that resentful young 
people are going to make the elderly in Vic- 
toria suffer for their fitness, their organization 
and their activity? 


Hilda Gifford, BA’37, BLS’38 


Dear McGill News, 

I notice in the Spring issue of the McGill 
News on page 24 that I was given credit for 
being chairman of an International Coffee 
Committee. That is my son, Russ Jr., 
BCL’70, who is stationed in London, En- 
gland, with the Canadian government, De- 
partment of Trade, Commerce and Industry. 
If activities of an old timer are of interest, I 
can report that since my retirement as a vice 
president of Victoria and Grey Trust Com- 
pany in 1981, I have continued as a consul- 


tant, become registered as an investment 
council, and have been appointed secretary- 
treasurer of the Canadian Club of Toronto. | 
recently delivered a speech at the Internatio- 
nal Congress of the Institute of Chartered 
Secretaries and Administrators in Kruger 
Park, South Africa,:and became chairman of 
the executive committee of the Canadian Bi- 
ble Association. Last year I retired as national 
treasurer of the Presbyterian Church in Ca- 
nada after holding this office for eleven years. 

I believe that Principal David Johnston will 
be addressing the Canadian Club of Toronto 
this fall. I hope we can get a good turnout of 
McGill grads and friends to support the 
meeting. It will be a good opportunity to 
promote the current financial campaign. 

Best regards to Old McGill which gave me 
so many happy days. 


Russell R. Merifield, BA’38, BCL’41 


Dear McGill News, 

Just a note to let you know how much we 
both enjoy the McGill News. Perhaps the 
main reason for our first contribution to the 
Alma Mater Fund was so we would receive 
the News. 

Thanks for the high quality magazine with 
the many interesting articles. Keep it up! 
Jean Simpson Drury, BSc’63 
Fred C. Drury, BEng’62 


ss , sa 


McGILL UNIVERSITY 


For the Advancement of Learning 


McGILL 
PINIVERSITY ~ 


FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF LEARNING 


VOLUME I] 1895-1971 


Volume I: $30.00; Volume II: $39.95 
Volumes I and II, boxed set: $69.95 


, . Volume II only, with box: $45.00 


STANLEY BRICE FROST 


Obtain your copy by mail from 
McGill University Bookstore 
1001 Sherbrooke Street West 
Montreal, Quebec H3A 1G5 


Please make cheque payable to McGill University Bookstore. No tax, postage, OF 
handling charges. All orders must be prepaid. 


2 McGILL NEWS/SUMMER 1984 Z 


NEWSBREAK 


Honors, backbenchers, 
and a birthday 


Hugh MacLennan, who taught in McGill’s 
department of English from 1951 to 1979 and 
is now professor emeritus, recently received 
the $100,000 Royal Bank award. MacLennan 
is perhaps best known for his novel Two 
Solitudes, for which he received a Governor 
General’s Award in 1945. The Royal Bank 
award acknowledges those who have made a 
significant contribution to Canada, and previ- 
ous winners have included McGill honorary 
degree recipients Wilder Penfield and 
Northrop Frye. The committee chose Mac- 
Lennan because ‘‘it is through the arts a soci- 
ety discovers its collective spirit’’ and noted 
that the author’s importance lies in his 
‘*interpretation of Canadians to each other.”’ 


Of the ten Parliamentary Internships 
awarded this year, three went to McGill stu- 
dents, all of whom graduated with a BA in 
political science in June 1984. Going to 
Ottawa in September are Mario Iacobacci, 
Dennis Marinakis, and Ariel Delouya. The 
Parliamentary Internship program enables ten 
Canadian university graduates between the 
ages of twenty-one and thirty-five to work for 
ten months in the nation’s capital with mem- 
bers of the House of Commons. While the 
salary is small, the program does provide 
interns with an opportunity to participate in 
decision-making at the national level. Five 
months are spent with a member of the gov- 
ernment and the rest with an opposition 
backbencher. 


Six Canadians with close McGill connec- 
tions recently received the Order of Canada, 
the country’s highest distinction. Appointed 
officers of the order were Alfred Powis, 
BCom’51, who is chairman of the board and 
president of Noranda Mines Ltd., Graham 
W. Dennis, BA’49, chief executive officer 
and president of the Halifax Herald Ltd., Dr. 
Victor Goldbloom, BSc’44, MD’45, Dip- 
Pediatrics’50, a former Liberal provincial 
cabinet minister and a member of McGill’s 
pediatrics department, and Louis Dudek, 
BA’39, a well-known Canadian poet and cri- 
tic. Robert V. Nicholls, BSc’33, MSc’35, a 
McGill chemistry professor for thirty-seven 
years and one of Canada’s most prominent 
railroad historians, was named a member of 
the order. David Macdonald Stewart, who 
died 27 April 1984, was elevated within the 
order from member to officer. Stewart, the 
director of the Macdonald Tobacco Com- 
pany, was an important McGill benefactor 
and had a particular interest in Macdonald 
College. In the early seventies he fought hard 
to safeguard the Ste. Anne de Bellevue estate 


me 


Hugh MacLennan 


as the home of the Faculty of Agriculture and 
contributed significantly to the rebuilding of 
the Macdonald campus. In 1973 Stewart sold 
the tobacco company in order to establish the 
Macdonald Stewart Foundation. The founda- 
tion was subsequently responsible for many 
philanthropic projects in the Montreal area. 
As Dr. Stanley Brice Frost states: ‘*McGill 
University in all its faculties, and particularly 
in Macdonald College, recognizes with 
gratitude its immense debt to the Macdonald 
Stewart tradition.”’ 


- 


David Macdonald Stewart 


Dr. Stanley Brice Frost is heading up a 
committee that will report to Senate in 
October regarding the controversial DeVoe- 
Holbein case. McGill microbiologists, Dr. 
Irving DeVoe and Dr. Bruce Holbein had 
developed a series of compounds that, among 
other things, are designed to remove virtually 
all hazardous radioactive metals from water 
and other waste materials found in nuclear 
power plants. The two, nevertheless, found 
themselves in “‘hot water’? when there 
appeared to be a conflict of interest between 
their private business dealings and their 
relationship to the university. Principal 
David Johnston selected lawyer Alex Pater- 


son, BCL’56, to investigate the case, and the | 


Frost Committee is currently studying the 
Paterson Report to determine how technology 
can be transferred from the laboratory to the 
university. 


In 1932 the young Wilder Penfield 
approached the Rockefeller Foundation with 
a dream — he wanted to build a centre where 
clinician andresearcher would work side by 
side to unravel the mysteries of the brain and 
the nervous system. He managed to talk the 
Foundation ait of $1,232,652, and in 1934 
the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI) 
opened its doors for the first time. Today, with 
135 beds and 26 research units, the Institute is 
at the forefront of neurological research. The 
MNI had Carada’s first CAT and PET scan- 
ners, and performs more operations for 
epilepsy thanany other centre in the world. In 
September the MNI will celebrate its 50th 
birthday, and many of its graduates and 
friends will be returning for the celebration. 
The MNI will also soon have a new director. 
Dr. Donald Baxter, MSc’53, chairman of 
McGill’s department of neurology and 
neurosurgery and neurologist-in-chief of the 
MNI, succeeds Dr. William Feindel, 
MD’45, on | October. Baxter joined McGill 
as associate professor of neurology in 1963.0) 


Dr. Donald Baxter 


SUMMER 1984/McGILL NEWS 3 


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4 McGILL NEWS/SUMMER 1984 


WHAT THE MARTLET HEARS 


McGill’s loss, Canada’s 


gain: National Librarian 


Marianne Scott 


McGill’s former Director of Libraries 
Marianne Scott, BA’49, BLS’52, is modest 
when she says of her recent appointment as 
Canada’s National Librarian: ‘‘I suppose it is 
one of the major positions in the field.”’ 

After completing two McGill degrees, 
Scott began her climb to the top of the world 
of Canadian libraries in 1952 as a Bank of 
Montreal assistant librarian. In 1955 she 
returned to McGill as its Law librarian. 
‘‘From the time I went to work off-campus, I 
was eager to return and work at the university. 
There’s a whole support infrastructure — the 
familiar, comfortable things — that you're not 
conscious of until it’s been stripped away.’ 

Serving as McGill’s director of libraries for 
the past nine years, Scott does acknowledge 
that ‘‘perhaps there is a limit to what you can 
do in one institution. My Ottawa appointment 
is areal challenge; it has helped overcome my 
concern for leaving McGill.”’ 

Aside from being the first female National 
Librarian, Scott represents the first profes- 
sional librarian to be chosen for the post. 
Replacing Dr. Guy Sylvestre, Scott, who will 
be the third National Librarian, says: *“The 
Library community expressed their interest 
that a professional librarian be appointed. In 
broad terms, it’s not much different than it 
was at McGill because I’m responsible for the 
effective management of a major library 
resource. It’s the clientele that’s different - 
the primary clients are other libraries. The 
library’s role is to collect, preserve, and 
make known and available Canada’s literary 
heritage.”’ 

Continuing to differentiate between her 
posts in Montreal and Ottawa, Scott adds: 
‘One was always conscious of McGill’s role 
in the country and its relationship with other 
Canadian libraries, but its prime function has 
to be serving its local clientele. National and 
international relationships will be more 
important than local duties at the National 
Library. But it’s a large, complex organiza- 
tion, and until I become fully acquainted with 
it, I really won’t have any sense of what my 
first concerns will be.’’ 

Scott will manage a $30 million annual 
budget and a staff of some 500 people. She 
will travel abroad as Canada’s representative 
to the International Federation of Library 
Associations and other groups, and adminis- 
trate a collection of five million books and 
documents. ‘‘I’ve moved from one situation 
of limited budgets to a similar situation on a 
larger scale. The cost of library materials has 
soared due to inflation and the proliferation of 
written materials. Some computer technology 
seemed to be made for libraries — sorting 


\ 


Canada’s National Librarian Marianne Scott: “My Ottawa appointment is a real challenge; it has 


helped overcome my concern for leaving McGill.” 


technology is a natural for them — so library 
jobs have become more complicated,’’ Scott 
explains. 

She points out that in her field there is a 
higher proportion of women than in most 
others: ‘‘Whenever you have a field of activ- 
ity with a high number of women there should 
be a number of administrators among them. 
At the same time, I believe you should be 
trying to get the best person for the job. 

‘*Men were being appointed to senior pos- 
itions, not because they were necessarily 
better qualified, but because they were men. 
This trend is changing. There are more 
women leading research libraries now. It’s 
really fair game,’’ she says proudly. 

Scott, who describes herself as a bit of a 
‘‘workaholic,’’ puts in a fifty-hour work 
week, sacrificing much of her private life for 
her job: ‘‘Choices have to be made, and you 
do get a little one-sided. I don’t think I have as 
varied a life as some people have.’’ 

Still, Scott is fascinated by her profession 
because “‘today we're entering a new era.’’ 
Those such as herself or Dr. Hans Moller, the 
current acting director of McGill’s libraries, 
will have to deal with the fact that ‘‘the card 
catalogue is disappearing and that use of 


microfilm is increasing along with the prolif- 
eration of information data bases. It’s even 
difficult to keep up with changes required for 
the profession.’ 

If the librarian of the future will have more 
to deal with, the library user will also have to 
adapt perhaps to a time when the book itself 
will become obsolete. ‘‘I’m not a good 
enough clairvoyant to make such a predic- 
tion,’’ Scott confesses. ‘‘It will depend on 
how quickly the younger group coming Up 
will adapt to reading material on a screen as 
opposed to picking up a book.”’ 

Keen to become more familiar with com- 
puters, Scott agrees that they greatly facilitate 
the acquisition and organization of materials: 
‘‘You’re always going to need information. 
The only difference is how that informationis 
going to be obtained,’’ she adds. ‘And 
technology does free us to do more and differ- 
ent things.’”’ 

Scott is confident that with ‘‘increased let 
sure time and the present desire for informa- 
tion, the public library’s importance to the 
community will grow.’ And after twenty: 
eight years of serving in McGill’s library 
system, she should know. Steven YudinU 


Photo: John Geeza 


Frost's remembrance of 
things past 


McGill’s history in the twentieth century has 
been one of both continuity and fundamental 
change, according to Stanley Brice Frost’s 


McGill University: For the Advancement of 


Learning, Volume II, 1895-1971 (McGill- 
Queen’s University Press, 1984). Some trad- 
itions, such as recurrent financial problems, 
the university would prefer to do without. 
Others, such as its magnificent accomplish- 
ments in the physical sciences and its con- 
tributions to the social and cultural evolution 
of Canada, McGill justly clings to with pride. 

The traditions, desirable and undesirable, 
have survived in an institution that in other 
respects has altered profoundly since 1895. In 
that year McGill was a small college, depen- 
dent on lavish benefactions for survival and 
growth. Its undergraduates — mainly British 
in origin and Protestant by denomination — 
followed a curriculum still dominated by the 
classics. By 1971, McGill had evolved into a 
large, polyglot, publicly-funded university, 
teaching a range of disciplines appropriate to 
the demands of a modern society. A surviving 
vestige of its nineteenth-century classical 
heritage disappeared in 1967 when, to the 
relief of thousands of grumbling under- 
graduates, an elementary knowledge of Latin 
was dropped as a degree requirement. 

Frost — a longtime teacher and adminis- 
trator at McGill before he commenced writing 
its history in 1974 - chronicles McGill’s 
development without any cloying nostalgia 
for a past that cannot return. Institutional 
history is not to everyone’s taste, but Frost’s 
skill in relating the university’s story to 
national, even global, currents gives his 
account a general appeal. 

At the turn of the century, Frost explains, 
McGill was quintessentially an institution of 
the British Empire. Almost routinely its gov- 
ernors looked first to Britain when appointing 
the university principal. The British classicist 
Sir William Peterson, principal from 1895 to 
1919, revealingly described his sojourn at 
McGill as service ‘‘on the outskirts of 
Empire.’’ It was presumably to alleviate the 
tedium of his appointment that he habitually 
spent his summer vacations in Britain. 

Perhaps the most striking demonstration of 
McGill’s loyalty to Empire was the remarka- 
ble contribution, military and medical, by its 
students, faculty, and graduates to the allied 
campaign in World War I. A poignant 
epilogue to these heroic endeavors was the 
appointment of General Sir Arthur Currie, the 
commander of the Canadian corps, as 
McGill’s post-war principal. Vilified by 
detractors for allegedly squandering Cana- 
dian lives in pursuit of personal glory, Currie 


found some solace in McGill’s wholehearted 
approval of his wartime conduct. 

The university’s unquestioning devotion to 
the verities of Empire did not survive the 
interwar period, however, as Frost cogently 
describes. Though advocates of Empire (who 
included Stephen Leacock) argued that the 
imperial connection was one of equality, dis- 
sident voices were gaining ground. As stu- 
dents, Frank Scott, BCL’27, LLD’67, A. J. 
M. Smith, BSc(Arts)’25, MA’26, DLitt’58, 
and others sought ‘‘to cast off, consciously 
and publicly, the status of literary col- 
onialism.’’ Later, as a Law professor, Scott 
extended his critique of imperialism from lit- 
erature to politics. Together with Professor 
Edward Adair in the history department and 
Dean of Law Percy Corbett BA’13, MA’15, 
DCL’61, he advocated Canadian neutralism 
in the event of a renewed European conflict. 

Such heresies did not go unnoticed by the 
university administration. McGill’s chan- 
cellor in the interwar years was Edward 
Beatty, the redoubtable president of the CPR. 
It was said of him that ‘‘he never married a 
woman because he had early married a rail- 
road.’’ But much of his passion he later 
transferred into his determined effort to pro- 
tect McGill from anything that smacked of 
socialism. He found an ally in Lewis Doug- 
las, principal in 1938-39. While never 
directly attacking free speech on campus, the 
two initiated a program to remove faculty 
who embraced ‘‘collectivist philosophy’’ and 
replace them with so-called ‘‘more compe- 
tent’’ social scientists. One such appointee 
was F. Cyril James, who was brought to 
McGill to reorganize the School of Com- 
merce, but who shortly afterwards was 


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appointed principal on Douglas’s departure. 

The next twenty-two years of McGill’s 
history were dominated by James’s benign 
and autocratic leadership. Backed by an 
acquiescent board of governors, he skilfully 
guided McGill through World War II and the 
era of postwar expansion. Frost suggestively 
argues that his one-man rule was an academic 
analogue of the political circumstances of 
Duplessis’s Quebec. And just as in the 1960s 
the province would have its Quiet Revolu- 
tion, so too McGill was obliged to become 
less autocratic and more democratic in its 
administrative structure. James, of course, 
was scarcely the person to initiate such a 
change. This task was left to his successors, 
notably the *‘surgeon principal,’’ H. Rocke 
Robertson. 

Internal reform did nothing, however, to 
stem the tide of student rebellion that swept 
over McGill in the late 1960s. By no means 
trivializing this movement, Frost accords 
much space to it. Up to this point, students 
constitute a somewhat shadowy presence in 
the book. Though periodically riotous and 
often idealistic, their chief extramural occu- 
pation seems to have been college rags, 
pranks, and athletics. 

The book ends on a high note. The squall of 
student rebellion had passed in time for the 
university’s sesquicentennial in 1971. 
Academically, politically, even financially, 
the future seemed bright. Current economic 
difficulties have dimmed high hopes a little — 
but there is enough historical evidence in 
Frost’s splendid volume to suggest that such 
problems in their turn will be overcome. 
John SainsburyO 


ign 


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SUMMER 1984/McGILL NEWS 5 


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Jocelyne Goguen BSc(Nurs)’84, and over 
300 other graduates prepare for their Health 
Sciences Convocation at Place des Arts, 
Presiding over the festivities were Principal 
David Johnston and Chancellor Jean de 
Grandpré, inducted at the event. He alluded 
to his own graduation when he stated: “To 
become chancellor of this great university is 
an honor which I find is most gratifying and 
humbling. Such a possibility was far from my 
mind when I graduated from here forty-one 
years ago.” 


Sabrine El-Chibini BSc(PTH)’84 in her val- 
edictory address reminded her fellow 
graduates: ‘‘As we leave the fortress of 
McGill . . . we forsake the security that is 
inherent to being a student and we assume 
responsibility for society’s most precious 
possession, its very health.’’ She also 
encouraged her colleagues to help humanize 
the system so that ‘‘the health care machine 
will sound less like the roaring of an engine 
and more like the beating of a heart.”’ 


Chancellor Jean de Grandpré presented an 
honorary DSc degree to Professor Sir Gordon 
Robson, director of anesthetics at the Royal 
Postgraduate Medical School, London. Rob- 
son was Wellcome Professor in Anesthetics at 
McGill from 1956 to 1964 and has served on 
professional and public boards in the U.K. 


6 McGILL NEWS/SUMMER 1984 


The five most asked questions 
about the American Express“ Card. 


‘HOW GAN YOU 
REPLACE A 


‘4 can take weeks to replace Quite simply, we consider all 


other commonly held cards. 
How can American Express do it 
the same day, in Montreal or 
Milan? 

It’s quite simple, really. Most 
American Express Travel Service 
Offices around the world have 
the ability to make new 
Cards in an emergency. 
After that it’s primarily a 
matter of identification. 
For security, we’ll ask a 
few questions that only 
you can answer. With the 
correct answers, normally 
we Can issue you a new 
Card the same day or by 
the next business day. 

There are over 1000 
American Express Travel 
Service Offices, subsid- 
iaries or Representatives 
around the world, includ- 
ing 43 offices in Canada. 
Even if there’s no office 
where you are, you can 
telephone ahead and have 
the Card waiting for you at the nearest office. 


“HOW CAN YOU ASSURE’ A HOTEL 
RESERVATION? 
SURELY IFA HOTEL IS FULL, IT’S FULL.” 


You can hold a room for late arrival with other cards. 
But what happens if there’s a foul-up, a mix-up, a 
computer glitch? 

When you make an American Express Assured 
Reservation™, it’s guaranteed even if the hotel is 
completely full when you arrive. The hotel must find 
and pay for your night’s stay in a comparable hotel. Plus 
transportation there and one long distance phone call. 

To cancel, call the hotel before 6 pm destination time 
(4 pm at resorts) and ask for a cancellation number. 

If you fail to cancel, you will be charged for the room. 


“HOW DOES YOUR ‘NO PRESET SPENDING 
LIMIT’ WORK? THERE MUST BE A LIMIT.” 


It’s not unheard of for some Cardmembers to incur 
very substantial charges on the Card. How is this 
possible? 


LOST CARD, 
THE SAME DAY?" 


AMERICAN 


of our Cardmembers to be 
financially responsible and treat 
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Your purchases are approved 
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At a time when a rou- 
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Canada can cost thou- 
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believe that our approach 
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“I HARDLY EVER 
TRAVEL OUTSIDE 
OF CANADA. WHY 
SHOULD I CARRY THE 
AMERICAN EXPRESS 
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The American Express 
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even if you never leave 
your home town. 

It’s welcome at the 
very best hotels, restaurants and retail stores all across 
Canada. It’s also honoured by The Bay, Eatons and 
Simpsons. And for your automotive needs, you can use 
the Card at Sunoco stations, and Shell stations from 
coast to coast. 


“WHY SHOULD I PAY AN ANNUAL FEE FOR 
THE AMERICAN EXPRESS CARD?” 


If you’ve read this far, you already know several reasons 
why our Card is worth more than any other card you 
can carry. And there are many more reasons. 

There are, for example, other tangible benefits such 
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Shouldn’t you carry the American Express Card? 
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McGill alumnae through the 


decades 


by Goldie Morgentaler 


hat follows is a four-part series of 

profiles of McGill alumnae. It begins 

with Rosalie McDonald McLea, one 
of the original Donaldas. She serves as a 
bridge between those before her who found 
the doors to a university education closed to 
them, and women such as Octavia Grace 
Ritchie and Maude Elizabeth Seymour 
Abbott, who went on to their graduations, 
confident of their own academic abilities and 
successes. 


we 

Rosalie McDonald McLea-Prowse 

Rosalie McLea figured prominently in the 
effort to get women admitted to McGill. 

She was born on 20 September 1867, and 
received her secondary education at the 
Montreal High School for Girls, where she 
was made head girl. She was an excellent 
student and won many academic prizes. 
These gave her the confidence to compete on 
an equal footing with her male counterparts in 
the university entrance examinations. 

In order to get the same number of aggre- 
gate marks as the boys, McLea was forced to 
study three years of Greek in one, since the 
subject was not part of the girls’ curriculum. 
This was in addition to her other courses, in 
which she was also preparing for exams. 
When the results were announced, McLea 
had come first in Latin and Greek, and her 
overall score was the highest ever attained in 
the history of those exams. 

The other high school girls had also done 
well, but the doors of the university remained 
closed to them. They decided to petition 
McGill directly for admission, and McLea, 
then sixteen years old, was chosen as their 
spokeswoman. In answer to their petition, 
Principal Dawson declared himself to be 
impressed with the quality of the young 
women seeking admission, but pleaded lack 
of funds as the reason he could not accede to 
their request. He counseled patience. 

The young women did not have long to 
wait. In the late summer of 1884, Donald A. 
Smith, the future Lord Strathcona, offered 
Principal Dawson a bequest of $50,000 for 
the establishment of collegiate classes for 
women. In October of that year, twenty-eight 
women were admitted to the university, seven 
as full-time undergraduates. The latter were 
dubbed ‘‘Donaldas’’ in honor of their 
benefactor. 


8 McGILL NEWS/SUMMER 1984 


Rosalie McDonald McLea-Prowse 


McLea spent the first two years of her uni- 
versity life as a full-time Donalda. She also 
became the first president of the Delta Sigma 
Society, a Donalda literary and debating club. 
At the end of her third year, however, she 
withdrew from full-time study and resigned 
the presidency of the Society. She never again 
participated in the debates. 

For a year after that she continued as a 
partial student, then as an occasional, but was 
never awarded her BA degree. This was 
because after 1887, the year of her withdrawal 
from full-time study, she never again wrote 
any exams. When the first class of Donaldas 
graduated in 1888, McLea read her own 
prize-winning essay in their honor at a meet- 
ing of the Delta Sigma Society and, in this 
way, shared in their triumph. 

The reason for her sudden withdrawal is 
not known, although a family tradition has it 
that she withdrew in order that a younger 
brother might take her place at McGill. 

Although no longer a student, McLea con- 
tinued to be interested in women’s education 
and played an important role as a fund-raiser 
in the unsuccessful effort to get women 
admitted to the McGill Medical School. She 
is reported to have raised $12,000 for that 
cause. She also did volunteer work for the 
Montreal General and Royal Victoria Hospi- 
tals and tutored classics at the Montreal High 
School for Girls. 


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+ 48. ae i | 


In 1903, aged thirty-five, McLea married. 
Kenneth Prowse, a fish exporter, and moved | 
with him to St. John’s, Newfoundland. There | 
she gave birth to and raised three children. | 
She seems never again to have returned to 
Montreal. In 1935, aged sixty-seven, she 
committed suicide by hanging herself. 

Shortly after her death, her memory was 
honored by the presentation of her portrait to 
the Delta Sigma Society. Both of her 
daughters not only attended McGill but, 
unlike their mother, graduated as well. 
Research by Ted Balant 


LE SET 
’80s 


Octavia Grace Ritchie-England 

Octavia Ritchie was the first Donalda to 
become a doctor and the first woman to earna 
medical degree in the province of Quebec. 

She had been a member of the small group 
at the Montreal High School for Girls, that 
had successfully petitioned McGill for admis- 
sion to the Faculty of Arts. She graduated 
with the first class of Donaldas in 1888 and 
was chosen their valedictorian. 

Since 1888 marked the first year that 
‘‘bachelors’’ degrees were to be conferred on 
women, the university decided to have two 
valedictory addresses, one for each sex. The 
addresses were first submitted to Principal 
Dawson for approval. He censored part of the 
Ritchie speech and further decreed that she 
could not deliver it from the same rostrum that 
the men were to use. 

Ritchie disregarded both prohibitions. She 
walked straight up to the forbidden rostrum 
and from there addressed the assembly, which 
included the Governor-General and his wife. 
Furthermore, she delivered her speech as it} 
had originally been written, with the excised | 
sections intact. These sections contained a 
plea that women be admitted to the McGill 
Medical School. 

The doors to the Medical Faculty remained 
closed, however, and Ritchie was forced to 
pursue her medical studies at Queen's Uni- 
versity in Ontario. Her exile came to an end 
when Bishop’s University decided to admit 
women. Ritchie returned to Montreal to com- 
plete her final year of training at Bishop's and 
graduated in 1891. 

She left for post-graduate training 
Europe and, on her return, was appointed 
demonstrator of anatomy at Bishop's and 
assistant gynecologist at Western Hospital. In 
1897, she married Dr. Frank Richardson 
England, a surgeon, and continued to work 1 
private practice. Her daughter, Esther Eng: 
land-Cushing, graduated from McGill and 
became an instructor in English at the univer 
sity. 

After her marriage, Ritchie-England 
became active in various social causes. From 
1911 to 1917, she was president of the Montte- 
al Local Council of Women, during which | 
time the Council established the Women s 
Directory and the Montreal Suffrage Assocl- | 


ae 


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2 “4 


ation. In 1911, the Council invited the con- 
troversial British suffragist, Mrs. Emmeline 
Pankhurst, to Montreal. 

Under Ritchie-England’s leadership, the 
Council played an active role in the war 
effort, sending furs to Italian troops serving in 
the Alps and collecting funds for the Imperial 
Red Cross and other relief organizations. Asa 
token of appreciation for her service, Ritchie- 
England was presented in 1918 with life- 
membership in the National Council of 


Octavia Grace Ritchie-England 


Women and the Canadian Red Cross Society. 
She was also active in both the National and 
International Councils of Women and was 
often sent as a Canadian delegate to interna- 
tional conferences on women. 

Throughout her life, she championed 
women’s rights. In 1916, she was one of a 
three-woman delegation to journey to Quebec 
City on behalf of Annie Langstaff, BCL’14, 
the first female graduate of the McGill Law 
School, who had been denied admission to 
the Bar of Quebec on account of her sex. 
Despite Ritchie-England’s eloquent plea for 
equality, the bill that sought to eliminate sex 
as a criterion for admission to the Bar was 
defeated. 

Ritchie-England presented herself as a 
Liberal candidate for the Mount Royal Divi- 
sion in the federal election of 1930. Although 
knowing she had little chance of being 
elected, she felt it served the cause of women 
to have one of their own sex run for political 
office. 

Ritchie-England remained active and 
occupied with various social concerns until 
the age of eighty. A few weeks after her 
eightieth birthday, she caught a cold and died 
of pneumonia on | February 1948. 


PET RIAA AES I IN SS, 
90s 


Maude Elizabeth Seymour Abbott 

Maude Abbott was born on 18 March 1869. 
She entered McGill on a scholarship and 
graduated with the third class of Donaldas in 
1890, capping her undergraduate career by 
winning the Lord Stanley Gold Medal. 

This proof of academic excellence did 
nothing, however, to assist her in gaining 
admission to McGill’s Medical School. The 
doors of the Medical Faculty remained firmly 
closed to women, despite Abbott’s letters of 
entreaty and the fund-raising efforts of her 
supporters. Abbott was forced to enroll at 
Bishop’s University instead, which had 
opened its program to women in 1890. 

Octavia Ritchie, who had returned to 
Bishop's for her final year of training, advised 
Abbott to apply without delay for the required 
admission ticket for the wards of the Montreal 
General Hospital, where Bishop’s students 
did their clinical training. Abbott took her 
advice, obtaining a receipt for her $20, but no 
ticket. In the interim, the hospital had been 
receiving other requests from women wishing 
to attend its summer clinics. The prospect of 
having large numbers of female medical stu- 
dents walking the wards frightened the hos- 
pital’s board of governors, who refused to 
issue any more women tickets. That included 
Maude Abbott. 

The refusal sparked a storm of protest in the 
newspapers, and some of the hospital’s sub- 
scribers threatened to withhold their con- 
tributions. The board of governors relented 
and quietly mailed Abbott her ticket, but 
refused to admit the other women. 

Abbott graduated from Bishop’s with hon- 
ors in 1894, winning the senior anatomy prize 
and the Chancellor’s Prize for best examina- 
tion results. She then left for post-graduate 
training in Europe. On her return, she was 
invited to work at the Royal Victoria Hospi- 
tal. There she became interested in pathology 
and produced a statistical report on ‘‘Func- 
tional Heart Murmurs.’’ This paper was read 
for her by a male colleague at the Medio- 
Chirurgical Society, which did not admit 
women. On the strength of this paper, Abbott 
became the Society’s first female member. 
Numerous papers and articles followed, and 
she soon came to be recognized as an author- 
ity on congenital heart disease. 

She was appointed curator of McGill’s 
Medical Museum in 1901 and undertook the 
enormous task of bringing order to a collec- 
tion that had never before been properly 
catalogued. She also helped found the Inter- 
national Association of Medical Museums 
and served as its secretary from 1907 to 1938. 
In 1910, she was appointed lecturer in pathol- 
ogy. This made her the only female faculty 
member in a department that refused to admit 
women as students until 1918. 

Abbott was a woman of tremendous vital- 
ity. Her bibliography numbers some 140 
titles. Of these, she was especially proud of a 
chapter on congenital heart disease, which 


she contributed to Sir William Osler’s 
A System of Medicine. Not all of her publica- 
tions were scientific, however. She also wrote 
a biography of Florence Nightingale, as well 
as histories of McGill University, the McGill 
Faculty of Medicine, and of medicine in 
Quebec. 

She was made an assistant professor of 
medical research in 1925. Except for a brief 
period when she was on loan to the Women’s 
Medical College of Pennsylvania, she never 


Maude Elizabeth Seymour Abbott 


left McGill, which she dearly loved. 
Nevertheless, she is reported to have been 
bitter that she was not promoted to associate 
professor and not better paid. The latter was a 
serious concern, since she was the sole sup- 
port of an elder sister who was a chronic 
invalid. She was made the first female 
member of the Faculty Club, but the honor 
was not bestowed until a few months prior to 
her retirement. 

In 1910, McGill honored her with the 
degree of MDCM (honoris causa) and in 
1936, on her retirement, it conferred another 
honorary degree, an LLD. This made her the 
only person in the university’s history to be 
twice honored in this way. 

Maude Abbott died in 1940. She is the only 
Canadian to appear in a mural of cardiologists 
painted by Diego Rivera for the Institute of 
Cardiology in Mexico City.0 


SUMMER 1984/McGILL NEWS 9 


eee 


Eatcas 


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Li 
. 
§ 


WOH Seite 


tte 
PHA, 


Canada’s boom babies 
of the fifties have become. 
the young adults of the eighties. 


They’re c 
the way we live. 


Between 1952 and 1965, Canada experienced an 
incredible baby boom. Today, those boom babies 
have grown up. And now, there are nearly 7 million 
Canadians between the ages of 18 and 35. That’s 
almost 2 million more than normal birth rates might 
have produced. 

This population bubble is changing our society. 
It’s being reflected in our labour force, in accom- 
modation patterns and in contemporary social 
standards. But also in a growing demand for goods 
and services, information and entertainment. 

Our changing society is being reflected at the 
Commerce. We’re adjusting to better suit the 
needs of today’s young adults. For example, the 
average age of many Commerce loan officers is 
now between 25 and 30. 

We're active in helping young adults acquire 
homes. During the recent high interest rate period, 
we pioneered a variable rate mortgage. 

We're also bringing new technologies on 
stream, such as automated teller machines, to pro- 
vide the service flexibility young adults demand. 

For many years, the Commerce has been a bank 
young Canadian adults have turned to for financial 
help and guidance. For today’s young people that 
remains something they can count on. 


In a changing world, you 
can count on the Commerce. 


> 


CANADIAN IMPERIAL 
BANK OF COMMERCE 


LHPPRRSR SRA PAAT SRS THT Pee PISPHIGIPIL ISLE Tse ss 72t48 


Celebrating 100 years of women at McGill: 
Struggle, determination, and success @ 


by Charlotte Hussey 


uch has been accomplished since 

that Monday in early October 1884 

when McGill’s first women students 
were permitted to attend their classes clois- 
tered in the Redpath Museum, separate from 
the rest. A woman first received a PhD in 
1910 (Annie L. Macleod, Chemistry) and a 
professorship in 1912 (Carrie Derick, 
Botany). The Students’ Society admitted 
women members in 1932 and the Faculty 
Club followed suit in 1936. A woman 
(Elizabeth Rowlinson) was first named 
associate dean of students in 1970 and a minor 
in Women’s Studies was approved by the 
Faculty of Arts in 1979. 

For over a year now, the McGill Women’s 
Centennial Committee (MWC) has been 
working on plans to commemorate these and 
numerous other accomplishments of McGill 
women students, administrators, professors, 
and graduates. As Chairperson of the MWC 
Committee, Arlene Gaunt, BSc’53, who is 
director of the Office of Industrial Research, 
Research Contracts, says: ‘‘We have tried to 
plan something for everybody. It will be a 
celebration of past and present women’s 
achievements and of their aspirations for the 
twenty-first century.”’ 

And Gaunt is proud of the flexibility and 
commitment that characterizes the 100 vol- 
unteers who have collaborated with her, many 
of whom have rushed to 5:30 meetings after a 
full day’s work, foregoing a good night’s 
sleep and even an evening meal. Chairperson 
of the MWC Finance Committee, Ruth Brian, 
DipPE’39, who is the vice-president of an 
engineering firm as well as a grandmother and 
a fashion model, explains: ‘‘Busy people 
have the time that others don’t have.’’ And 
MWC Publicity Chairperson, Betsy Hirst, 
BA’70, who works as McGill, director of 
public relations, admits: ‘‘You never find 
your limit. You live through it somehow. ”’ 

What these women have been planning is a 
full slate of events to run from September 
1984 through May 1985. On the agenda are 
intellectual, cultural, and athletic activities 
ranging from concerts to seminars to the 
launching of A Fair Shake, a book of 
autobiographical essays written by McGill 
women and edited by Professors Margaret 


Gillett and Kay Sibbald, PhD’ 76. 
A special lecture series on ‘‘Women and 


World Design,’’ organized by the MWC 
Conference and Seminar Committee under 
the direction of Professor of Sociology Cerise 
Morris, MSW’71, will begin on 12 October 
1984 with an address on ‘“‘The Status of 
Women from an International Perspective’’ 
by Dr. Helvi Sipila. Lawyer and Finnish 


12 McGILL NEWS/SUMMER 1984 


delegate to the United Nations, Sipila has 
served as assistant secretary-general for 
social and humanitarian affairs and general 
secretary of their International Women’s Year 
in 1975. On the following day, panelists 
Laura Sabia, Marie-Josée Drouin, Simone 
Chartrand, and Margaret Fulton will discuss 
‘‘Women in Canada: Past, Present, and 
Future.’’ That evening, a dinner address on 
‘‘Linkages between the status of women in 
the West and the unmet needs of Third World 
women’’ will be given by Margaret Snyder. 
In March 1985, two panel discussions on 
‘World Design and Canadian Social Policy’’ 
and ‘‘Women and Success’’ will round out 
this series. And on 9 March, there will be 
speakers, tributes, and a reception ‘‘In 
Celebration of Women at McGill.’’ 

The MWC Cultural Committee has also 
been working long hours. Costume Curator of 
the McCord Museum and a traveling lecturer, 
Jackie Beaudoin-Ross, MA’75, says one of 
the reasons she has been able to head up this 
effort is because of the support she has 
received from an ‘‘understanding husband’ 
who is a ‘‘gourmet cook.’’ She and her Cul- 
tural Committee colleagues will launch a 
September exhibit at the McCord Museum 
entitled, ‘‘100 Years of Montreal Costume,’ 
and another at the Redpath Museum of archi- 
val photos and memorabilia of early women 
undergraduates. An exhibit of McGill women 
artists will be mounted at Royal Victoria 
College in the fall, accompanied by lectures 
and discussions. And the Notman Gallery of 
the McCord Museum will feature a photo 
exhibition — ’* Women at McGill, the Early 
Years.”’ 

A concert series of jazz and classical music 
will emphasize works composed and/or per- 
formed by women. A St. Valentine’s Day Big 
Band Dance with demonstrations of ‘‘old 
time’’ dance steps will take place in the Stu- 
dents’ Union Ballroom. Numerous athletic 
events have been planned as well. 

Dr. Gladys Bean, BA’40, DipPE’41, 
recently retired as assistant director of athle- 
tics, is chairing the MWC Athletics Commit- 
tee. When she isn’t camping or judging syn- 
chronized swim competitions, she meets with 
her group of avid volunteers who have 
organized a McGill women’s run for 22 Sep- 
tember as well as women’s invitational bas- 
ketball, volleyball, and hockey tournaments 
scheduled throughout the year. For the hale 
and hearty, an international woodswomen 
tournament will be held at Macdonald Col- 
lege on 25 January 1985. Also a Weston Pool 
exhibition of old team photos, demonstra- 
tions of old time games, rowing competi- 


MWC S isinadiaah Avicas Gauri “The cen- | 
tennial is not a revolution. It’s a celebration. 


+ 


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es fh a * ao44 wee TULF ee ORS shor 2 oS Ale 


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Lote ys he te arny 
Py PRA S ES 


x2 ee 
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To mark the achievements of women such as Maude Abbott (whose photograph appears in the background) these women are some of the many 
who are making the Women’s Centennial possible: (left to right) President of Alumnae Society Linda Cobbett; MWC Steering Committee Secretary 
Kyra Emo-Davis; MWC Publicity Chairperson Betsy Hirst; MWC Cultural Committee Chairperson Jackie Beaudoin-Ross; MWC Chairperson 
Arlene Gaunt; MWC Athletics Committee Chairperson Dr. Gladys Bean; MWC Souvenir Committee Chairperson Josie Katz; and MWC Finance 


Committee Chairperson Ruth Brian. 


tions, and a water show are in the works. 


Gaunt does admit that the number of 


meetings needed to arrange all of the above 
has been a bit overwhelming. ‘‘We planned 
and talked for so long, we were getting 
Stale,’’ she says. ‘“‘But now we’ve gained 
momentum and are starting to generate a 
response.”’ 

She sees the whole effort as a kind of ‘‘con- 
sciousness raising’’ that has brought many 
people together at McGill. “‘I’m not sure it 
will stay at the high level it has reached at 
present,’’ she adds. **But it will not go back 
to where it was.”’ 

The women on her MWC Steering Com- 
mittee agree completely. They admit they are 
more conscious of what it means to be a 
woman than before they began working 
together. They also have found out that 
women organize things a bit differently than 
do men. ‘‘Women are more careful about 
details and feelings. Men, on the other 
hand,’’ explains Hirst, ‘‘have established 


ground rules. They more willingly accept a 
hierarchy and expect a leader to be bossy.”’ 

‘*Men tend to delegate work more than 
women do. Men don’t do the nitty-gritty,”’ 
says Secretary of the MWC Steering Com- 
mittee Kyra Emo-Davis, BSc’53, who has a 
full-time job as the coordinator of information 
for the Faculty of Arts as well as three 
daughters, three grandchildren, and a nightly 
commute to her home in the Eastern 
Townships. And MWC Souvenir Chairper- 
son, Josie Katz, BCom’55, who works 
‘“days, weekends, and evenings’’ as the 
assistant town clerk of the Town of Mount 
Royal, as well as caring for ‘‘three hungry 
boys and a husband who helps a lot,’’ feels 
that ““getting the job done is more important 
for a woman than experiencing a sense of 
power. But we do tend,’’ she adds, ‘‘to 
downplay ourselves.’’ 

Gaunt agrees that women “‘don’t take the 
credit and in our absence others will.’’ She 
sees women as less competitive than men. 


During the past year, “‘there has been no 
intercommittee sparring over budgets,’ she 
explains. 

Brian adds that administering the overall 
budget for the MWC has been an enjoyable 
task. Could this be because she has worked 
primarily with women? What she does know 
for sure is that “‘the university itself has given 
us much support.’’ 

‘“We are committed,’’ continues Brian, 
speaking for all her MWC colleagues, “‘to 
make this year a successful year, a cultural 
year that will bring lots of publicity to 
McGill.’’ Gaunt would also add a bit of 
encouragement to those more reticent mem- 
bers of the opposite sex: ‘“The Centennial 
is not a revolution. It’s a celebration. We 
invite both men and women to join in this 
celebration.’’U 


SUMMER 1984/McGILL NEWS 13 


‘enteeteeensctcts 
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Photos: Vivian Kellner 


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PEP LA PRL BSA 1538 353 $o2 


Then and now 


by Peter O Brien 


n 1914 Annie Macdonald Langstaff 
received her BCL, the first professional 
degree awarded to a McGill woman. 

Although women had been attending McGill 
since 1884, it took another thirty years before 
they were allowed access, and then some- 
times only grudgingly, to the professional 
disciplines. In her book We Walked Very 
Warily: A History of Women at McGill, Mar- 
garet Gillett notes that women ‘‘encountered 
the greatest difficulties in the Faculties repre- 
senting traditional ‘male’ professions. Time 
and again, the myths associated with mascu- 
linity and femininity were invoked to show 
how inappropriate and impossible it would be 
for women to become physicians, surgeons, 
lawyers, dentists, or engineers. ”’ 

There are many reasons why the education 
of women at McGill proceeded slowly. Stan- 
ley Brice Frost, in Volume I of McGill Uni- 
versity: For the Advancement of Learning, 
states that the university remained ‘‘unre- 
sponsive’’ for two major reasons: the conser- 
vatism of French Roman Catholic Canada and 
the lack of funds for new ventures. Gillett 
adds to these the ‘‘general prejudice against 
women in prestigious or power positions.” 
McGill of course was not alone in its unwil- 
lingness to accept and then to grant women 
students free access to all its faculties. Frost 
states that the ‘‘movement for the higher edu- 
cation of women that developed in the West- 
ern world in the latter half of the nineteenth 
century was representative of a profound and 
far-reaching revolution.’ 

When women were finally admitted to the 
professional faculties, the move was indica- 
tive of many cultural currents. Individual 
women such as Grace Ritchie, a member of 
the first graduating class of 1888, and Maude 
Abbott, BA’90, MDCM(honoris causa)’ 10, 
LLD’36, had gradually made their arguments 
heard — first by the women who wished to 
pursue their own studies unhindered by pre- 
judice, then by the local newspapers of the 
day (which for the most part, supported the 
concerns of women students), and finally by 
university administrators. Together with the 
efforts of these women, there were a number 
of imperatives outside the university per se 
that necessitated the active participation of 
women. In a speech shortly after her gradua- 
tion, Langstaff, in words that seem as rep- 
resentative of 1984 as 1914, stated that ““The 
plain fact . . . is that women have to earn their 
living outside the home, if they are to have 
homes at all.’’ And World Wars I and II made 
it essential that women take a more active 
role. In her memoirs, Jessie Boyd Scriver, 
BA’15, MDCM’22, DSc’79, notes that in 


14 McGILL NEWS/SUMMER 1984 


Women in the professional faculties: 


Law Undergraduates 


A rose among the thorns? This law class from the Old McGill '18 placed its one woman student 


front and center for a graduation picture. 


Great Britain ‘“‘women graduates in medicine 
were filling the gaps in medical jobs both at 
home and abroad. . . . In Canada, the desire 
to contribute to the war effort was wide- 
spread; large numbers of trained nurses, 
V.A.D.’s and others went overseas and many 
were actively engaged in war work here in 
Canada.”’ 

According to Gillett, Medicine was one of 
the first professional faculties to which 
women aspired. She recounts the story of Dr. 
James Miranda Stuart Barry, who disguised 
herself as a man long enough to graduate from 
the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, in 
1812 and subsequently to be appointed in 
1857 the Inspector-General of Hospitals for 
Upper and Lower Canada. Abbott was not 
allowed to study Medicine at McGill, 
although she was granted an honorary 
MDCM. It was not until 1922 that McGill 
graduated its first female medical students, 
Scriver among them. 

Currently a medical student at McGill, 
Judy Nielsen does not see signs of prejudice 


a 


wo eae oerseneay 
LDL 


against women, partly because ‘‘of the 
women who came before us.’’ She states that 
the women she knows in Medicine “‘have no 
more problems than the men. . . . Some 
women look for discrimination wherever they 
turn, but I think that has more to do with 
individual personalities than anything else.” 
She also notes that for the contemporary 
female student, intelligence and ability ate 
much more important than gender, and that 
the women studying Medicine today have all 
of the opportunities and difficulties that men 
have. 

Compared to Medicine, Law has been one 
of the easier faculties for women to enter. In 
recent years women have made up about one 
third of the graduating classes, and Law stt- 
dent Lori Weitzman believes that prejudices 
a ‘‘non-issue’’ in the Faculty. Another recent 
Law graduate, Joanie Vance, BCL’84, is not 
so optimistic. She points out that there are few 
female Law professors, and therefore few 
role models for women students. Another 
graduate, Phyllis MacRae, LLB’84, is evel 


Va 


less enthusiastic. When describing the 
Faculty of Law, she uses words such as ‘‘pre- 
historic’’ and *‘monolithic.’’ She also thinks 
that high schools don’t prepare women well 
enough for disciplines like Law, and that men 
are taught to be more comfortable with com- 
petition than women. 

All three students agreed that the changes 
in the Faculty over the years have been harder 
on men than on women. As women gain more 
of a say, it seems that men feel more and more 


Should be more tolerant in their hiring of 
half-time employees and women with chil- 
dren. On this point she said that it is easier for 
women to take time off, while men are not 
expected to take time off to help bring up 
children. 

One of the professional faculties that has 
remained almost exclusively male is Dentis- 
try. Since 1926, when Florence Johnston, 
BA’24, DDS’26, graduated as the first 
woman to receive a DDS from McGill, there 


More women and more smiles: this scene is taken from the O/d McGill '80 and is representative of 


the present male-female ratio for law students. 


threatened. Some men resent women who do 
better on exams, or women who end up win- 
ning major academic prizes. There are also 
more subtle forms of prejudice, such as 
women not being invited out to faculty din- 
ners as often as men, or the fact that there has 
not yet been a female president of the Law 
Students’ Society. 

Although there are problems within the 
Faculty of Law, most of the problems in the 
profession are encountered once the students 
graduate. Many of the Faculty’s first 
graduates, including Langstaff and Florence 
Seymour Bell, BCL’20, were not eligible for 
the Quebec Bar simply because they were 
women. MacRae noted that Law is still ‘“‘nota 
flexible profession’’ and Vance stated that 
women ‘‘have a harder time getting ahead.’’ 
The big law firms are more resistant to 
change, and if there are to be any changes in 
the profession, they will have to come from 
the smaller, more progressive companies. 
Weitzman, who worked with a large law firm 
in Montreal this summer, stated that law firms 


have never been large numbers of women 
studying Dentistry. The reasons why this is so 
are still not clear. Gillett notes a 1978 survey 
by Norma Blomme, BEd’79, who attempted 
to explore why there was such a low female 
participation in Dentistry: ‘“Questionnaires 
were distributed to 200 students and faculty 
members; 61 replies were received. The 
results, which made no claim to be conclu- 
sive, showed that female respondents cited 
‘tradition’ as by far the most important deter- 
rent, with ‘sex discrimination’ as a secondary 
factor; the male respondents also ranked 
‘tradition’ as the most important influence 
followed, in descending order, by ‘lack of 
interest,’ ‘poor recruitment,’ ‘sex discrimi- 
nation,’ and ‘inferior abilities.’’’ One female 
dental student noted that there is a “‘latent 
degree of discrimination in most disciplines at 
McGill, and Dentistry has been a little slower 
than most to overcome that.’’ 

Once again, the problem does not exist 
only at McGill. There is in fact a greater 
percentage of female Dentistry students at 


they 
nF ’ 


| Cat bab Pee 


McGill than many other universities. In the 
United States, the number of female dentists 
rose from four to seven percent during the 
period 1970-80. This is a daunting figure for 
most female dental students and is further 
entrenched by the fact that approximately 
ninety-five percent of U.S. nurses are 
women. In the workplace, many traditional 
stereotypes still have a tenacious hold. 

Engineering is often thought of as a tradi- 
tional male profession, and women interested 
in becoming engineers or architects have had 
to put up with what must appear at times to be 
excessively conservative thinking. It was not 
until 1939 that the first women were admitted 
to architecture, and it was not until 1978 that 
the first two women graduated in mining 
engineering, Camille Ann Dow and Justyna 
Kuryllowicz. A recent graduate, Navine Nas- 
sif, BEng’79, MEng’81, BA’84, PhD’84, is 
representative of the strong-willed woman in 
a male-dominated faculty. She states that *‘a 
lot of guys would be better off in Arts and are 
afraid to admit it, and vice versa for women.”’ 

Although she thinks that things have gotten 
better for women in Engineering, there is still 
much more that needs to be done. The prob- 
lem starts, she says, in high school: **Female 
high school students don’t know what 
engineers do.’” She mentions that engineer- 
ing firms should be more flexible and that 
women with children should be given the 
opportunity of working half-time. Although 
she considers herself ‘‘old-fashioned,’’ she 
thinks that both men and women should help 
bring up children: ‘‘Why must it be only the 
woman who stays home?”’ 

Nassif is not a complainer. Although there 
has been some discouragement from some of 
the older members of her family, she has 
remained determined and resilient. She also 
mentioned that her father has two perspec- 
tives on women in the workplace: one for the 
rest of women, and one for his daughter. 
Although he may not be as liberal when it 
comes to other women, she notes that he has 
been encouraging and supportive throughout 
her education. 

She does not think that she would have 
fought to be the first woman in Engineering or 
Medicine. Like most of the women in the 
professional faculties at McGill today, she is 
happy that the initial difficulties in women’s 
education have been overcome and is 
confident that things can only get better. She 
now wants to pursue her interests with the 
knowledge that intelligence and determina- 
tion are much more important for jobs than 
sexual stereotyping. She is able to make a 
statement now that women one hundred or 
even fifty years ago would not have been able 
to: ‘‘I wanted to be an engineer and I went out 
and did it. . . . If | worried too much about the 
problems, I’d never get anywhere. I just do 
what I like doing. That’s the most important 
thing.’’L 


SUMMER 1984/McGILL NEWS 15 


SPEER SERB RAPA SOR MRRD ITS DLTPATE RAP IPRITE PSII eTEpesae peeT se ye 


Post-feminism and the campus 


s is evidenced by the first of the fol- 

lowing articles, students today balk at 

being labeled ‘‘feminists.’’ Most, 
nevertheless, would agree that the 
‘‘feminist’’ vanguard that caucused in the 
new left organizations in the late sixties 
ushered in a necessary period of change. 
Thanks to the efforts of these ‘‘libbers,”’ the 
university has become more sensitized to the 
need for sexual equality. The remaining arti- 
cles serve to show some of the specific gains 
that have been made over the last ten years at 
McGill. The incorporation of the McGill 
Community Family Centre in 1972 and the 
establishment of the Senate Committee on 
Women in 1977 and the Women’s Studies 
Program in 1979 have provided new options, 
as well as service organizations that are still 
striving to achieve a truly ‘‘liberated’’ uni- 
versity community. 


RCI AOS 


“I’m not a feminist, 
but....” 


Many women students today balk at being 
called a ‘‘feminist.’’ Others react with 
ambivalence, accepting the label apologeti- 
cally or with certain qualifications. Maisie 
Cheung, BA’83, who is currently enrolled in 
the MBA program, says: ‘‘I’d be reluctant to 
brand myself as a ‘feminist.’ I just believe in 
freedom of choice for women.’ 

The word ‘‘feminist’’ says Kathy Ricketts, 
BSc(PTH)’84, ‘‘raises the hairs on my 
neck.’’ Associating it with the bra-burning 
libbers of the sixties, she believes it did, 
nevertheless, issue in a period of necessary 
change. Baila Lazarus, BArch’84, also finds 
the term passé: ‘‘I associate it with the 
women’s liberation movement of some 
twenty years ago. It’s outdated.’’ 

Part of the reason that the word ‘‘feminist”’ 
is no longer in vogue is that students at McGill 
today, on average, are not highly politicized. 
‘‘The ‘feminist’ movement has different fac- 
tions today,’’ explains Cheung. ‘‘I’m not 
interested in them per se.’” And Amy Schatz, 
BA’84, the founding editor of Hejira, a cam- 
pus literary magazine for women, explains: 
‘‘T wouldn’t call myself a ‘feminist’ although 
I support ‘feminist’ ideology. A ‘feminist’ is 


16 McGILL NEWS/SUMMER 1984 


something political, and the movement on 
campus is all words and no grounding. From a 
distance, it seems like a lot of jargon.”’ 

A small cadre of politically sensitized 
women who congregate at the Women’s 
Union are involved in refining this jargon into 
a more precise definition of the word 
‘“‘feminism.’’ Undergraduate Laura Craw- 
ford, who helped the Union organize a lunch- 
box guest speaker series on women’s 
health, the Take Back the Night March, as 
well as screenings of the anti-pornographic 
film, Not a Love Story, makes a distinction 
between a ‘‘feminist’’ and an “‘ideal 
feminist.’’ ‘“‘I’m against people who say 
they’re an ‘ideal feminist.’ Certain people at 
the Union feel you must be women-identified 
to be areal ‘feminist.’ I don’t agree with this. 
For some it’s a woman-identified existence, 
while others want a man.”’ 

Also an active member in the Women’s 
Union, education student Yvonne Price dif- 
ferentiates between feminism prevalent in the 
late sixties and that seen today: “‘I’m a 
‘feminist,’ but not a ‘capital F feminist,’’’ she 
says, going on to explain that twenty years 
ago ‘‘feminists’’ had broad, political aims. 
Today it’s more complicated. ‘‘Before, 
women talked in terms of revolution. Now 
this seems almost hopeless. We went through 
an angry stage, a critical period of finding 
things wrong. Now we’re just living our poli- 
tics, finding new ways of expression through 
art, erotica, and clothing.’’ 

Others completely reject the term 
‘*feminist’’ because it has been tainted by this 
‘‘angry stage’’ — a phase that may be neces- 
sary to any real self-awakening. Bio-chemis- 
try student Anne Loewen says: ‘Many of my 
friends would hesitate to classify themselves 
as ‘feminists,’ especially if men are in the 
group. You tend to get branded as anti-male, 
not pro-woman.’’ She feels that what women 
need today is “‘not a fighting stance, but an 
inner determination to succeed.”’ 

Although Schatz says Hejira accepts only 
submissions from women writers and artists, 
she explains: ‘“‘It’s a women’s thing, not a 
‘feminist’ thing. It’s not a political, but an 
aesthetic endeavor.’’ Nor does she label her- 
self or her editorial board as anti-male. *‘] 
have trouble with excluding men,’’ she 
explains. “‘I don’t see Hejira as a turned 
shoulder, but more as a celebration of 
women. ’’ 

Phyllis MacRae, LLB’84, also had trouble 
getting the word out of her mouth. ‘‘I’m a 
‘feminist,’ although it’s hard to say this. Stull, 
every intelligent woman should be a 
‘feminist.’’’ A member of the National 


Association of Women and the Law, MacRae 
sees ‘‘feminist’’ groups today as comprised 
of primarily middle class professional 
women. She also says these groups generally 
‘think collectively, as opposed to the trend 
today towards individualism.” 

If this is so, then Hejira’s decision-making 
structure could be considered *‘feminist”’ in 
that, according to Schatz, her editorial board 
‘tends to do things by consensus.’’ She goes 
on to describe this as a laboriously rewarding 
process entailing hours of debate centering on 
whether art or politics should be emphasized 
in Hejira. Her successor, Deanne Young, 
says: ‘‘It is so exciting to get involved with a 
nine-woman editorial board that often debates 
quite contrasting positions.’’ For Young, “It 
is a productive disagreement, an emotional 
experience. A few sparks fly, as some want to 
make statements about women’s lot and 
others just want to present women’s art.” 

Carol Sheppard, BCL’83, LLB ’84, 
another member of the National Association 
of Women and the Law, seems somewhat 
perplexed when asked if she is a ‘*feminist.”’ 
‘‘I don’t know what being a ‘feminist 
means,”’ she says. ‘‘If it means that a woman 
can define what it is she wants to do and have 
every avenue open to her then, yes, I'ma 
‘feminist.’”’ 

Sheppard does agree with Ramona Mateni, 


“I'd be reluctant to 
brand myself as a 
‘feminist. I just believe 
in freedom of choice for 
women.” 


REEL EEE LONG 


BA’84, that ‘‘those ‘feminists’ back in the 
sixties were responsible for us being where 
we are now.’’ Sheppard adds that the 
‘feminist’ movement has ‘‘sensitized every- 
body to what women’s feelings and aspira- 
tions are. I think politicians actually think in 
terms of women’s issues now. ’’ 

Still the women’s liberation movement has 
had negative repercussions. ‘‘Homemak- 
ers,’’ Sheppard concludes, ‘‘have been made 
to feel that they are not socially responsible. 
We have to recognize that there is nothing 
more socially valuable than taking care of 
children. Motherhood is a high calling.” 
Charlotte Hussey } 


The McGill Community 
Family Centre 


The McGill Community Family Centre, 
which provides daycare services to seventy- 
five McGill families as well as child 
development research facilities for the uni- 
versity, is celebrating its eleventh birthday 
this summer. Director Marilyn Neuman, who 
has been working at the Centre since Sep- 
tember 1973, six months after the official 
opening, says that ‘‘from all reports, getting 
the daycare centre off the ground was a real 
struggle.”’ It was a time when debates were 
raging over the effects of such care for chil- 
dren. Also financial matters had to be re- 
solved after the incorporation of the Centre 
in 1972. 

Charles Pascal, formerly of the Centre for 
Learning and Development, and Wally 
Weng-Garrety, the first director and currently 
a humanities instructor at Dawson College, 
were instrumental in establishing this daycare 
service, which began with four teachers and 
forty children. Today there are sixteen full- 
time teachers, two part-time assistants, one 
full-time substitute/ office assistant, a secret- 
ary, a director, and eighty-two children. 
However, despite this growth, there is still a 
long waiting list, which climbed from 100 to 
200 names over the past year. 

Tina Wolfson, BSc’76, MSc’78&, a 
graduate student in the epidemiology and 
health PhD program whose husband, David, 
is an associate professor of mathematics at 
McGill, considers herself especially fortunate 
to have been able to register her eight-month- 
old son, Julian, at the Centre in September 
1982. The Wolfsons put their name on the 
waiting list when Tina was six weeks preg- 
nant. Normally there is only space for fifteen 
or sixteen new infants per year. 

Talking in superlatives about the Centre, 
Tina says that knowing Julian is being well 
taken care of puts her at ease, allowing her the 
freedom to carry on with her doctoral studies. 
Nor does she experience the guilt or separa- 
tion anxiety so often felt by mothers who put 
their children into daycare. Receiving regular 
written reports on Julian’s activities and 
progress, she is also encouraged to visit the 
Centre at any time. This makes Tina feel 
secure, as well as knowing that during their 
working hours at McGill, she and her hus- 
band could be at the Centre in five minutes if a 
problem arose. 

In fact, she believes that Julian would be 
bored if she had raised him at home. At the 
Centre, he is encouraged to draw, read, play 
with toys and participate in ‘‘circle time’’ 
discussion groups and physical activities. He 
also is invited to join group excursions to, 
for example, flower shows, parks, and fire 


aN 
‘\ 


stations. 

Her only reservations are that this daycare 
facility is not modern and suffers from a seri- 
ous lack of space. And its director, Neuman, 
underlines the need for a gym. Although there 
is a small, “‘gross motor’’ room, the children 
can only jump and climb, but not run around. 
To do so, they must go out into the backyard, 
up on the mountain, or down to lower campus 
if it is not too cold, which it is for the winter 
months. 


numbers of women grew from 16.5 percent 
for the years 1967-70 to 19.8 percent in 1981. 
This makes an increase of 3.3 percent in the 
number of women in total academic staff over 
a seventeen-year period. At the highest 
academic level, however, only 5.5 percent of 
all full professors were women in 1967-70; 
this increased to 7.7 percent in 1981, which 
makes an increase of 2.2 percent over the 
same period. The most telling figure is that for 
the assistant professor: of their numbers, 20 


Her only reservations are that this daycare facility is not 
modern and suffers from a serious lack of space. 


As a ‘‘hand-to-mouth,’’ non-profit organi- 
zation, the Centre keeps afloat by way of 
Quebec government subsidy and by tuition 
fees. And although McGill does offer some 
help with building renovations, concerned 
parents have formed a house committee to do 
minor repairs. Still Neuman says that the 
Centre benefits from its McGill affiliation. 
For example, it has a better staff/child ratio — 
ranging from 1:3.5 in the infant group to 1:7 in 
the four year old group — than most city day- 
care centres. 

In order to place a child in the McGill 
Community Family Centre, both parents 
must be studying or working full-time during 
the day and at least one of them must be a 
McGill student or staff member. According to 
Neuman, ‘‘this is to provide the service for 
those who really need it.’’ Neuman adds that 
she is relieved that the Quebec Social Affairs 
Ministry’s Office de Services de Garde is get- 
ting more involved in establishing standards 
for daycare services throughout the province. 
She hopes this will result in many more alter- 
natives that will be on a par with the excellent 
daycare services now available for a limited 
number of McGill families. Debbie Mercier 
BTA LARS LE LAREN IER SB 


The status of women 
at McGill 


Founded in 1977, the Senate Committee on 
Women agrees that it is too early to tally up 
what progress they have made as regards the 
status of women at the university. Director of 
the McGill Admission’s Office, Peggy Shep- 
pard, and some of her colleagues on the 
Committee, Professors Nicole Domingue, 
Barbara Heppner, MSW’69, PhD’84, and 
Sam Noumoff do, nevertheless, point to the 
fact that the number of women in teaching 
positions at McGill has increased slightly. 
Considering the total academic staff, the 


percent were women in 1967-70. This 
changed to 26.9 percent by 1981, indicating 
an increase of 6.9 percent over seventeen 
years. This slight increase in the numbers of 
women academics, then, is greater at the 
lower levels. 

The figures for non-academic staff show a 
similar pattern. In 1981, 64 percent of the 
total non-academic staff were women. Of the 
total clerical staff, 92.5 percent were women. 
Of the total executive staff, 16.7 percent were 
women. No females were employed in the 
Physical Plant in 1981. Given that the number 
of women is greater than the number of men 
in total non-academic staff posts, the discre- 
pancy at the executive level, for example, is 
questionable. 

Part of the Committee’s work involves 
raising the consciousness of both men and 
women. A member of the subcommittee on 
Senior Administrative Positions, Sheppard 
notes that one of their goals is to encourage 
women to apply for higher positions. At pre- 
sent few have done so. In addition, Domingue 
and Noumoff point out that the criteria used 
for self-promotion and for hiring, long 
accepted by men, should be re-examined. 

Explaining her non-confrontational posi- 
tion, Heppner says consciousness-raising is 
important, but not sufficient. She believes 
that the more important task for the Commit- 
tee is to find ways to modify the existing 
system. *‘[tisn’t only individual attitudes that 
prevent people from achieving whatever they 
want to achieve,”’ she says. “‘It’s also a ques- 
tion of due process, law, and commitment. ”’ 

There should be a regular review of 
salaries, because differences still exist, and at 
present the onus is on the individual to plead 
her case. In addition, a count should be kept 
of how many women hold administrative 
posts and how many apply, especially for 
positions such as the director of a department 
or institute or the dean of a faculty. It might be 
impossible to prove that past anomalies were 
caused by sexual discrimination, but some- 
thing should be done to equalize the situation: 
hire qualified women when given the chance. 

Women at McGill, then, have a large task 
ahead of them. The first major hurdle has not 
even been passed: getting the university to 


SUMMER 1984/McGILL NEWS 17 


SPPPSRSERSAISVRHC SMHS PI OF EVERITT EAGIIATIAS PP IS 73s 


There should be a regular review of salaries, because 
differences still exist, and at present the onus is on the 


individual to plead her case. 


ORAL AAA ERLINDA ILE ES LL LENE BEET 


make a written commitment that will ensure 
equal status for men and women staff mem- 
bers. Without this, women have no laws or 
precedences to fall back on, and so they must 
argue their own cases individually. Heppner 
emphasizes that she is, nevertheless, 
optimistic. If women don’t expect progress 
immediately, if they are willing to-adjust to 
the administration’s schedule, then the 
administration will be willing to improve the 
record. ‘‘We’re asking for a commitment 
from the administration, and we would be 
prepared to work with them towards involv- 
ing women in administration at all levels. 
I don’t see that there’s any reason why 
it shouldn’t go forward,’’ Heppner con- 
cludes, ‘‘because it’s long overdue.’’ 
Debra Martens 


The McGill Women’s 
Studies Program 


This year, McGill will graduate six students 
with a minor in Women’s Studies and one of 
them is a man. Professor of Education and 
Coordinator of the Program Margaret Gillett 
thinks that the role of women in society needs 
to be comprehended by men as well as by 
women. ‘*‘We have to think what’s in it for 
men as well as for women, and how their 
self-concepts have to be modified by the 
humanistic approach of Women’s Studies. If 
we just devote these things to women, it’s like 
one hand clapping.’ 

While the enrolment in the Women’s 
Studies program is small — there were 
approximately 10 students registered in 1983- 
84 — it has remained steady since the minor 
was first instituted in 1979. The place of 
Women’s Studies in the undergraduate cur- 
riculum seems, for the present, to be secure. 
It was not always so. 

The genesis of Women’s Studies at McGill 
was a shaky affair. In the fall of 1974, mem- 
bers of the Women’s Union circulated a peti- 
tion signed by 200 students and calling for the 
establishment of a Women’s Studies program 
at the university. This expression of interest 
prompted the Associate Dean of Stu- 
dents, Dr. Erin Malloy, to call for a series of 
meetings to gauge the level of commitment on 
campus and to bring together all those mem- 
bers of the academic community who have a 
strong interest in women’s issues. A steering 
committee was set up, which in turn gave 


18 McGILL NEWS/SUMMER 1984 


birth to the McGill Committee on Teaching 
and Research on Women. Their report, which 
appeared in December 1976, resulted in the 
establishment of the Senate Committee on 
Women. It was through the work of the men 
and women of this committee and especially 
the efforts of Professor of English Irwin Gop- 
nik that the proposal for an inter-faculty, 
interdisciplinary Women’s Studies minor was 
approved by the Faculty of Arts as part of the 
undergraduate curriculum in 1979. 

Gillett, who was one of the three co- 
authors of the 1976 Committee Report, has 
been associated with Women’s Studies since 
its inception. The quality of students in the 
program has been very good, she says. ‘It is 
not just an easy option. It has been selected by 
students who are good to outstanding.”’ 
Moreover, the number of people who are 
interested in the program has been maintained 
and new courses have been added every year. 

Currently sponsored by the Senate Com- 
mittee on Women, which also appoints an 
advisor and organizes a required interdisci- 
plinary research seminar, the minor consti- 
tutes an academic package of twenty-four 
credits. Half of these must be taken from a 
selection of fifteen core courses. These deal 
specifically and directly with the subject of 
women. The remaining twelve credits may be 
selected from a larger list of optional courses, 
which may contain material on women, but 
do not focus on them exclusively. 


—— ae 
ae 


— 
she points out. They draw on traditional fields 
like history and literature, but focus on one 17 
particular population. ‘*If the people who are 
concerned with Canadian Studies or Hispanic 
Studies or Women’s Studies didn’t concen- 
trate their interests, nobody would,”’ she 
says. 

Admittedly one danger of such a specific 
focus is the cultivation of a ghetto-mentality, 
but Gillett thinks that this “complicated, 
paradoxical situation’’ cannot really be 
avoided at present. * ‘If the claim of women for 
attention were sufficiently strong, then it 
would be considered part of the mainstream; 
but the activities that have historically been 
assigned to women have been ignored. 
Women’s Studies has this unique opportunity 
to insert into the general record all of these 
things that have been left out. It makes it a 
rich field.’’ 

Despite her satisfaction that the minor now 
seems a fixed part of the undergraduate cur- 
riculum, Gillett feels that the overall gains 
made by Women’s Studies have been small, 
consisting largely of the quality of the stu- 
dents and the consistent level of interest. She 
would like to see the establishment of many 
more courses, especially in the social sci- 
ences, sociology, and anthropology. 

Gillett, who next year will be succeeded as 
Women’s Studies coordinator by Professor of 
Sociology Prudence Rains, says she would 
like to see this position recognized as a true 
part of a professor’s academic workload. At 
present, the job is part-time and largely vol- 
untary, in that it must be taken on as an addi- 
tion to regular teaching duties. ‘‘Women’s 
Studies,’’ says Gillett, ‘‘needs an office; it 
needs a centre; it needs visibility. That would 
help the program to be known and to grow. It 
needs that kind of continuity — somebody to 


“Women’s Studies has become a respectable part of the 


academic world.” 


While the program offers no graduate 
courses, Gillett points out that it has always 
been possible for graduate students in the 
more traditional departments to write theses 
on women. ‘‘This is Women’s Studies with- 
out the label,’’ she says. As for turning the 
minor into a major, that seems unlikely to 
happen in the near future. As far as Gillett 
knows, there is no interest at McGill for such 
a change at present. ‘‘We had enough trouble 
just establishing the minor,”’ she says, adding 
that she does not have the stamina for the kind 
of political battle such a move would entail; 
nor, she thinks, does anyone else. 

Dismissing the charge that Women’s 
Studies is not an academic discipline, she 
points out that this accusation is generally 
leveled at anything new that is introduced into 
the curriculum. Hispanic Studies and Cana- 
dian Studies are similarly interdisciplinary, 


really care and to push it, as well as the 
backing of the university in general.’”’ 

‘‘Women’s Studies,’’ she continues, 
‘‘broadens and contributes to the enrichment 
of traditional areas of study. It may be 
antagonistic to parts of them, but that’s the 
stuff of intellectual life — to have intellectual 
discourse and argument. It’s a healthy, 
stimulating development. I think McGill 
should be glad that we have the minor. 
Women’s Studies has become a respectable 
part of the academic world.’’ Goldie 
Morgentaler U 


A Fair Shake 


by Effie Astbury and 
Rose Mamelak Johnstone 


Effie Astbury, BA’38, BLS’39 


he following have been excerpted from 
A Fair Shake, a collection of some 
thirty-one autobiographical essays 
written by McGill women and edited by Pro- 
fessors Margaret Gillett and Kay Sibbald, 
PhD’76. The launching of this Eden Press 
publication at the university on 6 September 
will signal the start of the 1984-85 commem- 
oration of 100 years of women at McGill. 
Gillett and Sibbald borrowed their title from 
playwright Lillian Hellman who said of her 
life: ‘‘I had a fair shake, not a brilliant one, 
but a fair one.’’ It seems many McGill women 
feel much the same way. 


Effie Astbury, 

emeritus professor and retired director of 
the McGill School of Library Science 

I was happy to fit into a position in the Library 
School. This appointment opened on wider 
vistas and brought fresh challenges with 
every passing year. As might be expected, 
being in a largely female profession, there 
were moments when my colleagues and I felt 
like second-class citizens in the university. 
For many years, we were subjected to dis- 
crimination at the Faculty Club, and we 
advanced slowly up the academic ladder, 
being stalled for an undue length of time at the 
rank of assistant professor. In my case the 
Stages of promotion were: teaching assistant, 
1949-50; lecturer, 1950-53; assistant profes- 
sor, 1953-65; associate professor, 1965-69; 
professor, 1969; emeritus professor, 1982. 
But we went quietly on our way, certainly 
never harassed, merely ignored. 


There came a day in 1964 or 1965, te 


ever, when retirement from the position of 
director was in prospect for Professor Vernon 
Ross, who had ably guided the School for the 
previous fifteen years. She was summoned to 
the dean’s office, and, when she returned, 
brought back word that the higher powers had 
decreed that the next director of the Graduate 
School of Library Science must be a man. The 
air was electric with shock. Nevertheless, it 
was not until 1981 that a selection committee 
managed to find a suitable man for the job. In 
the interval, four women had held the position 
of director. 

It is sometimes claimed that women do not 
like to work under the direction of a woman. 
This was definitely not true in my case. I was 
well satisfied with the leadership given by the 
four women under whom I served — Miss 
Edith Gordon and Professors Vernon Ross, 
Virginia Murray, and Violet Coughlin. Mar- 
garet Gillett’s characterization in her book, 
We Walked Very Warily, of the typical style of 
McGill’s women aptly applies to all four: 
Theirs was a ‘“‘polite, cautious, but deter- 
mined approach.’’ To this I would add their 
exceptional capacity for surmounting 
difficulties. 

In our time, we demonstrated that we were 
bold enough to take a big risk. This was the 
decision to do away with the traditional one- 
year bachelor of library science and to replace 
it with a two-year master’s program. The plan 
for this was initiated by Murray and 
negotiated by Ross, while Coughlin and I 
backed them and helped structure the new 


program. After a year or two of planning, it 
went into effect in the 1965-66 session. The 
directors of the four other Canadian schools 
of library science were dismayed, aghast, and 
outraged. In particular, one of the men pre- 
dicted immediate disaster for McGill - we 
would lose all our students and ‘‘fall flat on 
our faces.”’ Naturally, under this barrage we 
went ahead with some trepidation, but the 
men in McGill administrative positions, 
especially Principal Rocke Robertson, reas- 
sured and encouraged us to go forward with 
our plan. In the years that followed, our stu- 
dent body increased, not simply because we 
had two classes instead of one, but also as 
more and more of our graduates returned to 
take the second year of the program to qualify 
for the MLS. 

In fact, so successful did this new set-up 
prove that on an historic occasion in April 
1968, the director of the Toronto School 
invited all the other directors to a meeting in 
that city. To this I accompanied Professor 
Murray. We described all the benefits the new 
system had produced, and tried not to look too 
smug when the outcome of the meeting was 
that all the schools endorsed *‘the principle of 
a four-term graduate program leading to a 
master’s degree in library science as the basic 
preparation for the professional practice of 
librarianship in Canada.’’ Thus, the women 
at McGill led the way in the development of a 
program of education for librarianship that is 
uniquely Canadian. Without question, this 
was the most important achievement during 
my thirty years with the School. 


Rose Mamelak Johnstone, 

chairperson of the department of 
biochemistry 

Had I not become involved with the problems 
that women face in academia, I would not 
have had the nerve to accept the chairperson- 
ship when it was offered. I must disabuse any 
readers of the notion that a ‘‘Draft Johnstone 
for Chairman’’ movement became a rallying 
cry in biochemistry. Like so many events in 
life, being there is often a compelling reason 
for being chosen. 

The natural, internal candidate for chair- 
person in 1980 was tempted away to another 
part of Canada by the promise of a bigger 
research facility, with fewer teaching respon- 
sibilities, and more financial support. Sud- 
denly, there I was, overnight, an elder states- 
man! Then I had to ask myself, ‘‘Would | 
assume the responsibility if asked?’’ In this 
respect, my involvement with attempts to 
increase the profile of women on campus 
made me respond, **Why not?’’ 

Being afraid has never appeared to me to be 
an excuse for not doing. I recall the time when 
I first started to teach students in the proper 
way to handle laboratory animals. I was posi- 
tively catatonic. I had never really done it 
before, since most of my work until then had 
involved bacteria. But do it I must — so | 
learned and did, despite the fear that pervaded 
every nerve in my body. I laughed myself 
silly (silently, of course) when one of the 
students in admiration, and ignorance, 
blurted out, “‘Oh, Dr. Johnstone, I wish | 


SUMMER 1984/McGILL NEWS 19 


Vwhse seas LORE REL TAGS Piviviske hae 


7a 


RveTSTPT ITI Titi Too ereereuet li trove rere averiss? tee Bene ce se 


Rose Mamelak Johnstone, BSc’50, PhD'53 


TR 


could handle rats as easily as that!”’ 

Could being chairperson really be worse 
than handling the laboratory beasts? Since the 
university was undergoing one of its periodic 
bouts of financial retrenchment, and our 
department was fairly young, an internal can- 
didate was a likely choice. The dean and his 
selection committee recommended my 
appointment. If anyone expected an outburst 
of objection, none was forthcoming. My col- 
leagues have generally been supportive of the 


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changes that have occurred in the department, 
and I became chairperson. 

Overall, I can say that chairing a depart- 
ment is no worse than doing the demonstra- 
tions in student laboratories, but | am not 
convinced that it is more rewarding and 
exciting than dedication to research and 
teaching. Would I encourage other women to 
seek senior administrative positions? Proba- 
bly — because I think it’s important to 
minimize the sexual differentiation in our 


social environment. People should be} 
encouraged to do what they want to do. Itis | 
also satisfying to learn how to get peopletodo | — 
their best work. In times of financial restraint, 
when contraction, not expansion and 
development, is the order of the day, there is 
little opportunity to guide departmental 
growth. There are also few occasions to fol- 
low the evolution of young staff members as 
they develop their craft and scientific stature. 
There does remain, however, the satisfaction 
of following the progress and development of 
the graduate students. Inexperienced and 
unsure when they begin, they become, ina 
few short years, polished, knowledgeable, 
and determined to make their mark on the 
world. The successful completion of their 
work is an essential element in maintaining 
the scientific life of a teaching department. 

Only time will tell whether I have been an 
effective chairperson. It has given me a new 
insight into myself and the people with whom 
I work. I lack the empire-building instinct, 
which may be an important attribute for a 
leader. I find it totally inimical to my nature. I 
often wonder if this is characteristic of 
women (acquired through genes or jeans) of 
merely me. The statistical sample is too small 
to judge. 

Would I accept the chairpersonship again 
having acquired wisdom from hindsight? 
Probably, but only because I cannot resist | 
trying to do something I have not done before. | 
A challenge is a challenge.U | 


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Montreal, Quebec H3C 1E3 
International Dept. 


(Precious Metals & Foreign Exchange) 


(514) 842-8251 


VANCOUVER 


571 Howe Street 
Vancouver, B.C. 
V6C 2C2 
(604) 687-0011 


All other Departments: (514) 842-7161 


20 McGILL NEWS/SUMMER 1984 


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FOCUS: 


Chaviva Hosek 


resident of the influential lobby group, 

the National Action Committee on the 

Status of Women (NACSW), Chaviva 
Hosek, BA’67, has never doubted for a 
moment that she would be a working woman. 
Now an associate professor of English at 
Victoria College, University of Toronto, she 
attributes this expectation largely to her par- 
ents who came to Canada from Czecho- 
slovakia in 1952. Survivors of World War II, 
her family “‘had a clear sense that no one 
could protect anyone from anything. Every- 
body had to be able to take care of them- 
selves.’’ Her father encouraged her to 
become self-sufficient, as did her mother who 
had started working just after her daughter 
turned six. “‘She got a lot of respect for 
the work she did,’’ says Hosek, who from 
her early years had her mother’s example to 
follow. 

After graduating from McGill with first 
class honors, Hosek went on to complete an 
AM and a PhD at Harvard University. It was 
during this period in Cambridge, Mass., that 
she came to realize: “‘If you were female, you 
didn’t count. I was shocked to discover that 
suddenly being female was a big problem.’’ 

Joining a consciousness-raising group, she 
began reading feminist works. ‘‘I think I was 
always a feminist and didn’t know it. This 


because there were no words for what we 
believed.’’ 

Finding these words at Harvard, Hosek 
went on to become politically active at the 
University of Toronto where she began 
teaching in 1972. Here she chaired the 
Women’s Studies Program Committee from 
1975 to 1977. Work on the Ontario Commit- 
tee on the Status of Women, from 1975 to the 
present, she says, taught her to prepare briefs, 
press releases and how to lobby ministers. 
She then became secretary of the NACSW in 
1980, vice-president in 1982, and finally, 
president in 1984. Headed by a twenty-two 
person executive, the NACSW is an organi- 
zation of nearly 300 member groups includ- 
ing women in political parties, churches, pro- 
vincial and local service to women and status 
of women groups, and ‘‘old-line women’s 
organizations.” 

Hosek’s statement that ‘‘education and 
political work are much the same’’ is reflected 
by the method in which NACSW works. 
Resolutions, ‘‘the backbone of the organiza- 
tion,’’ are passed at an annual meeting. 
Information is gathered and presented to 
NACSW members, and then each group 
sends a delegate to the annual meeting to vote 
on the motion. Once one is passed (the 


was true for a lot of women of my generation, 


NACSW has ten years of resolutions on the 
books), the concerned member groups and 
the NACSW executive set about lobbying 
government officials and publicizing their 
platform. One of their primary tools is their 
magazine, The Status of Women. 

Although there are conflicts between 
member groups, Hosek says ‘‘there is almost 
total agreement on all our main objectives’’: 
on daycare and its funding, on mandatory 
affirmative action, on equal pay for work of 
equal value, on the need for training and 
retraining women for the job market, on pen- 
sion reform, on divorce and family law 
reform, on reproductive choice, and on issues 
having to do with peace and survival. 

Such a consensus is particularly important 
now that NACS W is preparing for the coming 
federal election. As Hosek puts it: ‘‘We’ve 
managed to convince all the parties that 
they'd better pay attention to us.’’ Following 
this, “we will do public education and hope 
that people make informed choices.”’ 

Recently the economic status of women 
has gotten worse, says Hosek, who adds: 
‘“Women are still the poorest people in soci- 
ety.”’ The NACSW, consequently, is lobby- 
ing for affirmative action at both the federal 
and provincial levels. ‘‘Affirmative action,’’ 
she says, “‘is an acknowledgement that there 
is a problem, naming the problem, and trying 
to find solutions for it.”’ 

Voluntary affirmative action has not cor- 
rected past discrimination; the method must 
be changed. Hosek dismisses charges of 
reverse discrimination against men with this 
comparison: ‘“There has been an affirmative 
action program in place in the federal gov- 
ernment for a long time, and it has succeeded. 
It is called bilingualism. I think the same 
thing needs to be done for women.’’ 

Hosek does see an improvement in the 
status of women in Canada. The sexual 
equality that is stipulated in the Charter of 
Rights is an important political, and eventu- 
ally economic, victory. Hosek also thinks 
women are a permanent presence in the labor 
force. ‘‘And,’’ she adds, ‘‘the consensus that 
it’s not acceptable to pay women less is 
growing.’ 

Further, attitudes to women seem to be 
changing. *‘All the polls suggest that people 
under 45, especially those who are better edu- 
cated, are more likely to agree with the main 
goals of the women’s movement. With this 
changing consciousness, political and 
economic change will follow in the future,”’ 
says Hosek. 

‘I see real progress. You have to see it in 
the reach of history. It’s going to take a long 
time. We’re not going to dismantle the pat- 
riarchy by the next federal election. That’s 
not what I’m saying. But I see a real move- 
ment. It’s a series of waves, and each time the 
wave subsides at a slightly higher level.”’ 

Riding the crest of the newest wave, Hosek 
concludes: “‘I wouldn’t have missed being 
president of NACSW in the year of an elec- 
tion for anything.’’ Debra Martens 0 


SUMMER 1984/McGILL NEWS 21 


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Reunion ’84 


‘Put on your red and white sweater, the dir- 
tier the better....’’ 


| | by Gavin Ross, 
Executive Director 
of the Graduates’ Society 


Reunion ’84 Weekend is shaping up to be one 
of the best ever, with more than eighty classes 
from years ending in 4 and 9 planning special 
get-togethers. It will start on Thursday, 20 
September, with the annual general meeting 
of the Graduates’ Society at 5:30 PM at the St. 
James’s Club. The next day’s Leacock Lun- 
cheon at the Grand Salon of the Queen 
Elizabeth Hotel promises to be a sellout with 
Canada’s foremost contralto and recently 
named Chairperson of the Canada Council, 
Maureen Forrester, as our guest speaker. Miss 
Forrester, who received an honorary docto- 
rate in Music from McGill in 1982, is noted 
for her wit and humor. It is especially fitting 
that she will be our ‘‘guest lecturer’ during 
the McGill Women’s Centennial celebration. 
Later that day the president of the Graduates’ 
Society will entertain members of the class of 
1959, who will return to celebrate their 25th 
Class reunion. Principal and Mrs. David 
Johnston will host a 50th anniversary dinner 
for the class of 1934, and Chancellor and Mrs. 
Jean de Grandpré will welcome graduates 
returning from the classes of 1929, 1924, 
1919 and prior. 


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The Scarlet Key is alive and well. This year 
forty-four outstanding students were honoured 
at a dinner given by Principal and Mrs. 
Johnston at their home. Pictured with Principal 
Johnston is President of the International Stu- 
dents’ Association Amalia Martinez, BA’85. 


Saturday’s activities will begin with an 
alumnae reception at Royal Victoria College, 
followed by a graduates’ brunch at Bishop 
Mountain Hall at 1]:00 AM. Many alumni will 
wish to attend the McGill-Queen’s home- 
coming football game at Molson Stadium 
Starting at 1:00 PM. 

Sunday’s activities include an organ recital 
at Redpath Hall given by Professor of Music 
John Grew, walking tours of Old Montreal, 
and the traditional closing luncheon at Gib- 
by’s. Private class parties will be taking place 
throughout Reunion Weekend. For more 
information, graduates are asked to call Susan 
Reid at (514) 392-4815. 


SOCIETY ACTIVITIES 


Macdonald Reunion ’84 Macdonald Re- 
union will be held one week later on 29 Sep- 
tember. It will feature a Leadership Day 
program with a variety of seminars and guest 
speakers of interest to agriculture and food 
science graduates. Eleven class reunions will 
provide opportunities for special get- 
togethers. 


Branch Activities May, June, and July were 
busy months among the branches with meet- 
ings held in Windsor; Chicago; Winnipeg; 
Atlanta; New Haven, Ct.; Burlington, Ont.; 
London, Ont.; Ottawa; Los Angeles; Boston; 
Toronto; London, England; and at the Kitch- 
ener-Waterloo-Guelph Branch as well. We 
thank Professors Storrs McCall, BA’52, 
Derek Drummond, BArch’62, and Norbert 
Schoenauer, MArch’59, Dean of Medicine 
Richard Cruess and Vice-Principal (Finance) 
John Armour for visiting our branches during 
these months. Our new Chancellor and Mrs. 
Jean de Grandpré hosted the McGill Society 
of Toronto Annual Dinner Dance on 21 June 
and, as usual, this was a sellout. For jobs well 
done, we thank outgoing Branch Presidents 
Kerry Martin, BA’67, (Niagara); Brian 
Doyle, BSc’72, MBA’74, (Oakville/Bur- 
lington/Hamilton); Sue Willis, BA’66, 
(London); Marc Denhez, BCL’73, (Ottawa): 
Elizabeth Gillies, MA’41, (Philadelphia); 
and Michael Blau, BSc’64, DDS’69, (Bos- 
ton). We welcome the incoming presidents to 
these branches. 


Montreal Area Activities The Young Alum- 
ni concluded one of their most active years by 
electing as their president, Brent Hussey, 
BCom’75, BCL’77, LLB’79, to succeed 
Victoria Rorke, BA’70, DipMgmt’81. The 
McGill Society of Montreal had their annual 
meeting on 13 June, and Mrs. Ann Vroom, 
BA’67, was re-elected president for a second 
one-year term. The Alumnae Association 
continues to busily prepare for its annual book 
fair to take place on 17-18 October. 


Alumni Relations Officer Gerry Ludwig, Special Events Co-ordinator Kat 
Reunion Co-ordinator Susan Reid put the finishing touches on plans for Reunion ’84. 


: 4 ee . 
Maureen Forrester will be this year’s Leacock 
Lecturer. 


Student Relations During the past decade it 
has become a tradition that the Graduates’ 
Society, in cooperation with the Office of the 
Dean of Students, assist the Scarlet Key 
Committee in its selection process by pro- 
viding meeting space and refreshments, and 
by coordinating the presentation dinner. The 
Scarlet Key Committee, working with Alum- 
ni Relations Officer, Gerry Ludwig, selected 
forty-four outstanding student leaders to 


Chairman of Reunion '84 Rob Kerr and Presi- 
dent of the Graduates’ Society Carlyle 
Johnston relax at the reception for class 
chairmen of Reunion ’84. 


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SUMMER 1984/McGILL NEWS 23 


‘PPRAEP RAAT LAE RATES 09 Fa TIDE IE IAT SS TEs a 7 Res 


cial 15th Reunion in Banff, Alberta, on 10-3 
May. Twenty-four original ““Mooney Men,” | ; 
including coaches, participated along with | 
their wives and children, in this long weekend 


the United States. A volunteer graduate coor- 
dinator in each city is advised by McGill’s 
Information and Liaison Office of students in 


receive awards at a most enjoyable dinner 
hosted by Principal and Mrs. David Johnston 
in their home 12 April. 


During the 1983-84 academic year, many 
student groups received financial and moral 
assistance from both the McGill Society of 
Montreal and the Graduates’ Society. Work- 
ing with and getting to know student leaders 
enables the staff and volunteers to inform 
students about alumni activities while they 
are still on campus. 


Miscellany McGill’s Applicant Follow-up 
Program continues to be popular and 
appreciated by applying students and their 
parents. This program now involves alumni 
working in nine cities in Canada and four in 


"25 

OTTO KLINEBERG, BA’19, MD’25, 
ScD’69, after twenty years at the University 
of Paris, France (the Sorbonne), has returned 
to New York, N. Y., where he has been named 
honorary life member of the New York 
Academy of Sciences and the World Federa- 
tion for Mental Health. 


29 

PETER S. WISE, BCom’29, CA’30, has 
recently been awarded the title of Fellow of 
the Order of Chartered Accountants of 
Quebec. 


"38 

SAM MISLAP, BA’38, has recently been 
appointed fund-raising coordinator for the 
Vancouver Centennial Commission’s plan- 
ned activities. 


"40 

BETTY ISSENMAN, BA’40, DipSW’42, is 
guest curator, Inuit clothing, at the McCord 
Museum, Montreal, Que. 


"Al 

WILLIAM C. GIBSON, MSc’36, MD’41, 
DipMed’48, has been elected to the council of 
the International University Consortium for 
Distance Education, based in Baltimore, Md. 
He is currently involved in a television-aided 
teaching project for students living at great 
distances from the campuses of British Col- 
umbia’s three universities. 


"42 

JOHN D. SPIVACK, BEng’42, PhD’47, is a 
distinguished research fellow, plastics and 
additives division, at CIBA-GEIGY Corp., 
Hawthorne, N.Y. 


"43 

MERVYN L. WEINER, BCom’43, of 
Washington, D.C., has recently retired from 
the World Bank, after thirty-three years of 
service. 


24 McGILL NEWS/SUMMER 1984 


that area who have applied to McGill. These 
names are distributed by the coordinator to a 
team of local and, for the most part, recent 
graduates, who call potential students and 
offer to tell them about McGill. They talk 
about life in the residences, in the ‘‘student 
ghetto,’’ and in greater Montreal, and about 
university sports, student politics, and the 
academic curriculum. In Toronto alone, thir- 
ty-eight volunteer alumni made personal 
contact with more than six hundred high 
school and university transfer applicants. 
The McGill Redman Football Team of 
1969 honored Coach Tom Mooney at a spe- 


WHERE THEY ARE AND WHAT THEYRE DOING 


"44 
ARTHUR S. PERLIN, BSc(Agr)’44, 
MSc(Agr)’46, PhD’49, E.B. Eddy. Profes- 
sor in the department of chemistry at McGill, 


delivered the Clifford B. Purves Lecture | 


Series in 1984. 


"a7 

ROBERT LEE, BEng’47, works in the 
research and development offices of Cana- 
dian Liquid Air Ltd., Montreal. 

J. ROSS LEMESURIER, BA’47, has been 
appointed a director of Great Lakes Forest 
Products Ltd. , Thunder Bay, Ont. 
WENDELL F. WHITE, BCom’47, has 
recently been appointed secretary-treasurer of 
Argus Corp. Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 


"48 

AARON BLAUER, BEng’48, is the presi- 
dent and chief executive officer of Sorel- 
O-Vision Inc., Montreal, a company that 
distributes cable television to five cities, 
including Sorel and Tracy, Que. 

EVE KUSHNER, BA’48, MA’50, PhD’56, 
of McGill’s Faculty of Arts, recently received 
a Killam Award from the Canada Council. 
JAMES NATHAN WOLFE, BA’48, 
MA’49, has recently retired as professor 
emeritus from the department of economics, 
University of Edinburgh, Scotland. 


50 

W. F. GILMORE, BEng’50, has become 
vice-president, mining, of Wright Engineers, 
Vancouver, B.C. 

CHARLES McCRAE, BCom’50, is the 
deputy chairman, Montreal, corporate leader- 
ship gifts, of the McGill Advancement 
Program. 

LORNE C. WEBSTER, BEng’S50, is the 
Chairman, corporate leadership gifts, of the 
McGill Advancement Program. 


"51 
ROY DOHN, DDS’51, of Baie d’Urfe, Que., 
recently began marketing a board game he 
invented, adapted from the game of baseball, 
called *‘*It’s a Whole New Ball Game.” 


that was superbly organized by Jay Hanrris, 


Goulet, BEd’71. From all accounts, it was a 


developed fifteen years ago at McGill were 
quickly solidified, and it was nice to see that 


BCom’70, with the assistance of Gerry 


‘‘physical’’? weekend with a program includ- 
ing racquet ball, squash, touch football, ski- 
ing and probably the odd toast or two! Current 
McGill Redmen Head Coach Charlie Baillie 
summed it up this way: “The friendships 


everybody involved was not only successful 
in their chosen career, but also in good physi- 
cal shape!’’U 


"52 
J. A. DAVID BRUNET, BA’50, MDCM’52, 
vice-president, medical services, of Consoli- 
dated Bathurst Inc., has been appointed a 
governor of the Council of the Canadian 
Centre for Occupational Health and Safety. 
JOHN D. MORGAN, BCom’52, is vice- 
chairman in the Montreal office of Walwyn 
Stodgell Cochran Murray Ltd., stockbrokers. 
J. KEVIN REYNOLDS, BCL’52, works as 
assistant vice-president, personnel services 
division, of Montreal Trust. 

HYMAN RODMAN, BA’S52, MA’S3, 
director of the Family Research Center and 
Excellence Fund professor at the University 
of North Carolina, Greensboro, has recently 
published The Sexual Rights of Adolescents: 
Competence, Vulnerability, and Parental 
Control, with Columbia University Press. 
HAROLD G. ROSSER, BEng’52, of Singa- 
pore, has recently been appointed managing 
director of Northern Telecom, Asia, Ltd. 


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"53 
LORNE W. COX, BCom’53, has been 
named vice-president, finance and adminis- 
tration, of Phillips Cables Ltd. 

MURRAY D. McEWEN, BSc(Agr)’53, 
vice-president of Redpath Industries, has 
recently been named a director of the com- 
pany. 


54 

NORMAN KALANT, PhD’54, has been 
appointed director of research at the Sir Mor- 
timer B. Davis Jewish General Hospital, 
Montreal. 

JOHN W. McGILL, BCom’S4, is president 
and chief executive officer of Canadian 
Liquid Air Ltd., Montreal. 

DONALD W. SEAL, BA’50, BCL’5S4, a 
senior partner in the firm Seal & Associates, 
has recently been named a judge for the 
municipal court of the city of Hampstead, 
Que. 

JOSEPH P. VILAGOS, BEng’54, has 
recently been appointed vice-president, 
Canalog Division, of CANAC Consultants 
Ltd., a subsidiary of Canadian National, 
located in Montreal. 

GEORGE ZAMES, BEng’54, of McGill’s 
Faculty of Engineering, recently received a 
Killam Award from the Canada Council. 


"55 
BERNARD L. SEGAL, BSc’50, MD’S55, a 
cardiologist and director of the Likoff Car- 
diovascular Institute of Hahnemann Univer- 
sity Philadelphia, PA. , has been named one of 
the ‘‘Best Medical Specialists in the United 
States’’ by Town and Country Magazine. 
DOUGLAS G. WILSON, BCom’55, works 
as general manager, converting operations, of 
‘| CIP Inc., a Montreal-based pulp, paper, and 
u| forest products company. 


56 
MIKE V. BREBER, BCom’56, is vice- 
chairman of Canadian Liquid Air Ltd. 

GILLES G. CLOUTIER, MSc’56, PhD’S59, 
is the vice-president of technology and inter- 
national affairs of Hydro-Quebec, Montreal. 
GEORGE H. KING, BEng’56, has been 
named vice-president, design, of E & B 
Cowan Ltd., of Montreal, an engineering 
management consulting firm. 


57 
BEVERLY ANNE (SMITH) HALL, BA’S57, 
after completing a Masters of Divinity degree 
from the University of Toronto, Ont., was 
ordained a deacon in May 1984 and was 
appointed assistant curate at St. Mary’s Ang- 
lican Church in Richmond Hill, Ont. 
WILLIAM JAMES, PhD’57, president of the 
nickel producer Falconbridge Ltd., and a 
McGill Advancement Program volunteer, has 
recently become president of the Mining 
Association of Canada. 

T. DOUGLAS KINSELLA, MD’57, has 
recently been appointed assistant dean, 
biochemical ethics, in the Faculty of 
Medicine, University of Calgary, Alta. 


"58 
ANDREW J. BOBKOWICZ, BEng’58, 
PhD’63, has recently been appointed presi- 
dent of the Canadian Plastics Institute, 
Toronto, Ont. 


"59 
DENNIS DWYER, BCom’59, BTh’80, is a 
United Church minister who lives with his 
family in Mansonville, Que. 

J. MICHAEL McCORMACK, BEng’59, has 
recently been appointed vice-president, 
human resources, of Reed Inc., Toronto, 
Ont. 

STEPHEN T. O’FARRELL, BEng’59, has 
been appointed vice-president, public affairs 
and administration, of Texaco Canada Inc. 
PHYLLIS NORMA SMYTH, BA’S59, 
BD’64, recently received a doctor of divinity 
degree from Victoria University, Toronto, 
Ont. 

DOUGLAS A. WOODWARD, BEng’59, is 
vice-president, sales, for Stelco Inc. He 
resides in Burlington, Ont. 


60 
PETER CUNDILL, BCom’60, manager of 
Cundill Value Fund Ltd., recently changed 
his home base from Vancouver, B.C. to Lon- 
don, England. 

ANTONIO R. GUALTIERI, BA’60, BD’61, 
STM’63, PhD’69, professor of Religion at 
Carleton University, Ottawa, Ont., recently 
published a book, The Vulture and the Bull: 
Religious Responses to Death, with Univer- 
sity Press of America Inc. 

C. DENIS HALL, BEng’60, has recently 
been appointed managing director of Ryerson 
Polytechnical Institute’s new Centre for 
Advanced Technology Education, Toronto, 
Ont. 

MOHANDAS M. KINI, PhD’60, associate 
professor of ophthalmology and director of 
vitreo-retinal services at the Boston Univer- 
sity School of Medicine, was recently elected 
president of the Massachusetts Society of Eye 
Physicians and Surgeons and chairman of the 
Massachusetts Medical Society, ophthal- 
mology section. 


61 
L. DAVID CAPLAN, BCom’61, has been 
elected president and chief operating officer 
of Pratt & Whitney Canada Inc. 

IRWIN MARGOLESE, BSc’56, DDS’61, is 
currently president of the Federation of Den- 
tal Societies of Greater Montreal and has 
just completed his term as president of the 
Mount Royal Dental Society, Alpha Omega 
Fraternity. 

HENRY MINTZBERG, BEng’61, McGill 
professor of Management, has collaborated 
on a book, Organizations: A Quantum View, 
recently published by Prentice-Hall Inc., N.J. 
MOSHE SAFDIE, BArch’61, has recently 
been appointed Ian Woodner Adjunct Profes- 
sor of Architecture and Urban Design at Har- 
vard University’s Graduate School of Design, 
Boston, Mass. 


62 
COLIN P. CAMPBELL, BSc’62, has been 
named president of Sparfil International Inc. 
FRED C. DRURY, BEng’62, is a founding 
partner and executive vice-president of 
Econex, Inc., Wheaton, Ill., which is a 
blasting agent manufacturer and the largest 
distributor of commercial explosives in the 
lS. 

PIERRE G. LEROUX, BEng’62, is execu- 
tive vice-president of Coronet Housewares 
Inc., Baie d’Urfe, Que. 

JURIS MAZUTIS, BEng’62, is director of 
the OASIS project at the House of Commons, 
Ottawa, Ont., on behalf of the Canadian 
Broadcasting Corp. 

MICHAEL A. MILLARD, BEng’62, has 
been appointed president of Traders 
Associates, a land development company in 
Mississauga, Ont. 


63 

H. CLIFFORD HATCH Jr., BA’63, has 
recently been appointed president and chief 
executive officer of Hiram Walker- 
Gooderham & Worts Ltd., Walkerville, Ont. 


64 

PATRICK BLOUIN, BArch’64, has been 
made an honorary fellow of the American 
Institute of Architects and recently has 
become a member of the Royal Canadian 
Academy of Arts. 

J. W. KWAMINA DUNCAN, MEng’64, has 
been elected Fellow of the Institution of Civil 
Engineers of England, and is now the project 
manager of WHO Intercountry Project on 
Community Water Supply and Sanitation, 
Lusaka, Zambia. 

KENNETH KIVENKO, BEng’64, Dip- 
Man’74, has been appointed chairman of the 
board, president, and chief executive officer 
of Aviation Electric Ltd. 

GOULDING LAMBERT, BCom’64, is an 
investment broker with Jarislowsky, Fraser 
Co. Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

HARVEY LEVENSON, BCom’64, 
MBA’68, is executive vice-president of 
Commonwealth Curtain Co. and Rosedale 
Draperies Inc. 

MICHAEL RABINOVITCH, BCom’ 64, has 
joined the Montreal office of Richter & 
Associates, a member firm of the Canadian 
Association of Management Consultants. 

C. MURRAY TRIGG, PhD’64, president of 
Trigg, Woollett, Olson Consulting Ltd., 
Edmonton, Alta., was awarded the 1984 A. 
O. Dufresne Award by the Canadian Institute 
of Mining and Metallurgy. 


65 

JOHN B. ARMSTRONG, BSc’63, MD’65, 
PhD’75, has recently founded the consulting 
firm, Scientia Biomedica Inc., in Vancouver, 
B.C: 

CHRIS BRYANT, BA’65, is the executive 
director of CUSO, Ottawa, Ont. 

MARIAN KAHN, BMus’65, is founder of 
the Montreal Bed & Breakfast Association, 
an agency that represents about thirty 
Montreal homes offering guest accommoda- 
tion. It is run from her own Montreal home. 


SUMMER 1984/McGILL NEWS 25 


PPV PR SRS IS PR AW SMR PT O2 FRED 


CALVIN SHEA KALMAN, BSc’65, has 
been promoted to full professor in the physics 
department at Concordia University, 
Montreal. 

VAIRA VIKIS-FREIBERGS, PhD’65, pro- 
fessor of psychology at the University of 
Montreal, has been appointed vice-chairman 
of the Science Council of Canada, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

THOMAS N. YOUNG, BSc’65, is vice- 
president, data processing, of the Vancouver 
Stock Exchange, in British Columbia. 


"66 
W. A. COCHRANE, BSc’66, has recently 
been named product manager, systems, with 
STC Canada, Toronto, Ont. 

JACQUES DROUIN, MBA’66, has recently 
been named a director and member of the 
executive committee of Geoffrion, Leclerc 
Inc., investment dealer, and of Gestion 


ee at = 


a Be 


“3 22 Le a 
= 


Geoffrion, Leclerc Inc. 

H. JOHN GREENIAUS, BCom’66, has 
recently been appointed chief executive, 
Nabisco Brands Ltd., in the United Kingdom. 
JAMES PANTELIDIS, BS c’66, 
DipMgmt’74, MBA’77, has recently been 
appointed vice-president, marketing coordi- 
nation and development of PetroCanada, 
Toronto, Ont. 


"67 
JOSEPH BALADI, BEng’67, has recently 
been appointed senior vice-president, energy 
resources and technology, of Gaz Metropoli- 
tain, Que. 

ROSEMARY CHRISTENSEN, BA’64, 
BCL’67, is the founder and president of 
Somerville House, a network of companies 
that specialize in tax incentive investments. 
E. V. DODGE, BEng’67, has recently been 
appointed general manager, marketing and 
sales, of CP Rail, Vancouver, B.C. 

PETER A. SANDIFORD, BCom’67, has 
been appointed president of Systemhouse 
Inc., a software systems company, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

ANTON SCHORI, BSc(Agr)’67, has 
recently joined Monenco Consultants Lid. : 
Calgary, Alta., as senior supervising soil sci- 
entist. 


68 
JAMES ALBRIGHT, BSc(Agr)’68, 
MSc(Agr)’71, MBA’82, is product manager 
of Canadian Liquid Air Ltd., Montreal. 
SOLY COHEN, BSc’68, has recently been 
appointed group vice-president and general 
manager of Steinberg’s Miracle Mart depart- 
ment stores, Montreal. 

BARRY W. GLICKMAN, BSc’68, MSc’69, 
has been appointed professor of biology at 
York University, Downsview, Ont., where he 
will continue his work on the mechanisms of 
mutagenesis and environmental toxicology. 


"69 
PAUL M. BLAIR, MSc’69, works as a mine 
manager at the Ojibway Mine, one of the 
mines operated by the Canadian Salt Co. 
Ltd., Windsor, Ont. 


26 McGILL NEWS/SUMMER 1984 


GILBERT E. PLAYFORD, BEng’69, is 
vice-president and treasurer of Union Carbide 
Canada, Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

STEVEN TARNOFSKY, BA’69, of Sac- 
ramento, Ca., has been appointed to the 
advisory council of the Kentucky Central 
Insurance Co. 


70 

DENNIS KUKULSKY, BEng’70, has 
recently been appointed president, chief 
executive officer and director of Human 
Computing Resources Corp., Toronto, Ont. 
RUSSELL MERIFIELD, Jr., BCL’70, has 
been elected chairman of the executive board 
of the International Coffee Organization. 


a 

RUSSELL J. BOYD, PhD’71, of Bedford, 
N.S., won the 1983 APICS/Fraser Gold 
Medal and Young Scientist Award. 
RONALD W. DALFEN, BEng’71, has 
joined the Montreal office of Richter & 
Associates, a member firm of the Canadian 
Association of Management Consultants. 
MARIO D. N. FERREIRA, MSc’71, is the 
chairman of the department of histology and 
embryology at the New University of Lisbon, 
Portugal. 

WILLIAM LAHT, BSc(Arch)’71, BArch’73, 
has recently been named director of 
engineering for the CBC’s broadcast centre 
development project in Toronto, Ont. 


‘72 
LOUISE ABBOTT, BA’72, the editor of the 
McGill News from 1973 to 1975, currently a 
freelance photographer, broadcaster, and 
writer, will soon publish her photodocumen- 
tary of the Eastern Townships’ Stanstead 
County with McGill-Queen’s University 
Press. 
GHISLAIN BROSSARD, BCL’72, has 
joined the firm of Hart, Saint-Pierre, & Des 
Marais. 
JACK I. COHEN, BCom’72, has joined the 
Toronto, Ont., office of Richter & 
Associates, a member firm of the Canadian 
Association of Management Consultants. 
JOS B. GAVIN, PhD’72, recently edited a 
book, Tradition and Innovation, Belief and 
Consent: Essays by Jesuits from a Canadian 
Perspective. He is president and associate 
professor at Campion College, University of 
Regina, Sask. 
LAWRENCE J. MONONEN, MA’72, 
PhD’76, a senior research analyst at the Wang 
Laboratories Inc., Lowell, Mass., has been 
admitted to the executive MBA program at 
The Wharton School, University of Pennsyl- 
vania, Philadelphia. 
DAVID B. ROBINSON, BSc(Arch)’72, 
BArch’74, recently won an award for a series 
of banners entered in a nation-wide competi- 
i sponsored by the County of San Diego, 
a. 


73 

YVAN G. PARADIS, BCom’73, is vice- 
president, operations, of Le Groupe Desjar- 
dins, Assurances Generales, Montreal, Que. 


‘ 
. @ 


74 ie 
DAVID ABRAHAM HEFTER, BA’ 14, ¢ 
Sunday Express Sports writer, has recut 
been appointed sport director at CJFM Ratio, 
Montreal. 

HARSH V. KHULLAR, BSc’74, recently 
received his PhD in pharmacology from the 
University of Montreal. 

CHRISTINE O’ CONNELL, BA’74, of Van. | 
couver, B.C., has recently been granted her| 
MA in English at McGill. 

MICHAEL TO, MSc’74, has joined the 
Montreal office of Richter & Associates, 4 
member firm of the Canadian Association of 
Management Consultants. 

DONNA TOLMATCH, BA’74,| 
BSc(Arch)’77, BArch’78, works as a free-| |! 
lance architect in Montreal. 


iI; 


; 


i) 


75 
STEWART J. COHEN, BSc’75, a visiting 
research fellow at the Atmospheric Environ- 
ment Service, Environment Canada, worksat 
the Canadian Climate Centre in Toronto, Ont. | 
MICHELINE (LABRANCHE) COTE, 
BA’75, has recently been appointed the| 
Quebec regional director for the Secretary of 
State. | 
DAVID DAVIS, LMus’75, 
organist and choirmaster at Christ’s Church 
Cathedral, Hamilton, Ont. 
BRIAN HELLER, BCL’75, LLB’78, of the 
Bars of Ontario, Quebec, and Alberta, has 
recently established an office for the practice 
of criminal law in Toronto, Ont. | 
RIMA ROZEN-PALEFSKY, BSce75, 
PhD’81, who recently joined McGill's 
department of biology as an FRSQ Fellow, 
will be affiliated with the human genetics 
group and the Centre for Human Genetics. 


is the new| 
40) 
i 


(ha 


76 
LUC BRISSETTE, BSc’76, is the assistant | id 
the executive vice-president, domestic oper | }\i 
ations, of the National Bank of Canada, xt 
Montreal. jt 
GILLES CHIASSON, BA’76, is a staf ite 
psychologist at Kingston Penitentiary, Ont. 
JAMES diDONATO, BA’76, of Fort 
Lauderdale, Fla., will participate in am|) % 
English Channel swim this year along with || | 
his twin brother, Jonathan. h 
ROBERT A. KLEINMAN, BSc’76, Dip 
PubAcc’78, is a partner of Zittrer, Siblin, 
Stein, Levine, Chartered Accountants. 
DANNY MILLER, PhD’76, has co-authored | 
a book, Organizations: A Quantum visi 
recently published by Prentice-Hall Inc., NJ: | 
ISABEL MILTON, BN’76, MSc’79, he vk 
recently been appointed assistant executive)! 
director, nursing services, Queen Elizabeth i 
Hospital, Toronto, Ont. i 
CHRIS ORVIG, BSc’76, has recently begtil| 
a University Research Fellowship at the Uni- | 
versity of British Columbia, Vancouver, ia) 
inorganic chemistry. \ 
RONALD G. PEROWNE, BTh’76, one time 
professional football player with the Mon | 
Alouettes, is now a manager at Domtex, | | 
Toronto, Ont. : 


a! 


q 


| 


\| 


| 


GERRY ZAMPINI, BCom’76, has been 
promoted to product manager, printing pa- 
pers, of Rolland Inc., a Quebec-based com- 
hi, | Pany specializing in the manufacturing of fine 
papers. 


a Ff 
JEFFREY ALAN BARR, BA’77, recently 
graduated from Benjamin Cardozo Law 
School and is now with Lihn, Menaker, and 
Simpson, New York, N.Y. 
EUGENE MEEHAN, LLM’77, LLD’84, a 
professor of Law at the University of Alberta, 
Edmonton, recently authored two books, The 
‘| Law of Criminal Attempt and Creditors’ 
Remedies, to be published by Carswell Legal 
Publications Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 
SUSAN STROMBERG-STEIN, MA’77, has 
recently written a book, Louis Dudek: A 
| Biographical Introduction to his Poetry, 
‘spitt:| published by Golden Dog Press, Ottawa, 
‘Cami! Ont., 1983. 
titi] STEPHANIE TRENHOLM, BSc’77, is a 
Nit} family medicine primary care nurse at the 
‘1 4] family medicine unit of the Queen Elizabeth 
rie} Hospital, Montreal. 


st “78 

(Ci) HOWARD I. VINEBERG, DipPubAcc’78, 
is a partner of Zittrer, Siblin, Stein, Levine, 

‘[)) Chartered Accountants. 


cefuris “79 
i, JOHN S. W. MacMURRAY, BMus’79, has 
sk) | Tecently been appointed associate principal 
iin! trumpet of the Halle Orchestra of Manches- 
i ter, England. 
ines DAVID TETREAULT, BCom’79, upon 
im? Staduation from the University of Toronto 
Law School, was awarded the Treasurer’s 
Medal, the Roland O. Daly Scholarship, the 
sit’ Edwin George Long K. C. Memorial 
a Scholarship for the student attaining the high- 
3, €St mark in the Bar Admission Course, and 
the Stuart Thom Prize for the student attainin g 
4) the highest marks in income tax, corporate 
ey €nd commercial law, and accounting. 


, 80 

., JEAN-PIERRE DeMONTIGNY, MBA’80, 

has recently been appointed vice-president, 

yi COtPorate finance, of Lévesque, Beaubien 

eo Inc., Montreal, Que. 

aq PHILIP HULME, DipPubAcc’80, has 

. fecently been appointed director of finance 

_ and administration for Allergan Inc., Toron- 
to, Ont, a subsidiary of SmithKline Beckman 

. Pharmaceutical. 

. H. BUI QUANG, MBA’80, has recently 

™,, Deen appointed vice-president, marketing, 

Wi" Gaz Metropolitain. 


sm gy 

". MICHEL P. LAZURE, BA’81, is studying 
' for a Masters degree in business administra- 
, tion at The Wharton School, University of 


pi’ Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. 


tty se 


"82 

JANE HSIEH, BSc’82, has been appointed 
assistant research microscopist with the Pulp 
and Paper Research Institute, Pointe Claire, 
Que. 

NEAL ROCKOWITZ, MD’82, represented 
the Southern California region at the grand 
finals of the Insilco National B/C/D Squash 
championships, in Los Angeles, Ca. 


GEORGE HERBERT CARTWRIGHT, 
BSc’22, on 3 May 1984. 


"23 
WILLIAM GORDON CUTTLE, BSc’23, at 
Hudson Heights, Que., on 2 April 1984. 


24 
HARRY BATSHAW, BCL’24, at Montreal, 
on 8 June 1984. 

GEORGE H. RUMPEL, BSc’24, on 15 Oct. 
1983. 

NORMAN M. VINES, BA’23, MD’24, at 
Montreal, on 9 May 1984. 

DORIS (THOMPSON) WIGGS, DipPE’24, 
at Port Perry, Que., on 24 April 1984. 


"83 
MICHEL BAKHOS, MBA’83, serves as 
Quebec regional manager for Flygt Canada, 
the world’s largest manufacturer of Electric 
Submersible pumps. 

JOSHUA GRUNBERG, BSW’83, has 
recently been appointed coordinator of group 
work services at the Maimonides Hospital 
Geriatric Centre in Cote St. Luc, Que. 

ZVI RESHEF, MArch’83, recently started 
his own firm, Reshef Architects, in Ramat- 
Gan, Israel.0 


DEATHS 


’07 
EDITH (MOWATT) CHRISTIE, BA’07, at 
Montreal, on 20 July 1983. 


26 
WALTER DAVID FARMER, MD’26, on 7 
Feb. 1984. 

MORRIS HERMAN, MD’26, at Davidson, 
Sask., on 19 April 1984. 

IRWIN GILBERT NORTON, BSc’26, at 
Memphis, Tenn. 


27 
PAULINE JACK MORRISON, BA’27, 
BLS’32, at Montreal, on 9 June 1984. 
MIRIAM ALICE NASH, DipPE’27, on 29 
March 1984. 

E. WALTER WORKMAN, MD’27. 
MSc’34, at Montreal, on 14 June 1984. 


08 
LEVERETT DeV. CHIPMAN, MD’08, at 
Berwick, N.S., on 22 March 1984. 

ANNIE (SMITH) LATHE, BA’08, at 
Kingston, Ont., on 1 March 1984. 


28 
RAHNO MARY BEAMISH, CertNurs’28, 
at Kitchener, Ont., on 13 May 1984. 

ELMORE GAGNON, BSc’28, at Montreal, 
on 20 March 1984. 


"10 
EMMA G. LAWLOR, BA’10, at Montreal, 
on 23 Feb. 1984. 


29 
W. J. BAXTER, MD’29, in August 1983. 

a; CLARENCE BERNSTEIN, 
BSc(Arts)’29, MD’29, at Greenlawn, N.-Y., 
on 29 Nov. 1983. 

JACK R. BOGANTE, BA’26, MA’27. 
BCL’29, at Montreal, on 1 March 1984. 
FREDERICK HAMILTON, BCom’29, at 
Brockville, Ont., on 14 April 1984. 


"16 
STARR WHITNEY FAIRWEATHER, 
BSc’ 16, at Guelph, Ont., on 21 May 1984. 


"18 
HELEN RUTH (REYNOLDS) MATHEWS, 
DipPE’ 18, at Montreal, on 10 March 1984. 


"19 
MARION K. PROUDFOOT, BA’19, at 
Montpelier, Vt. in 1984. 


30 

JACK BONESS, DDS’30, at Toronto. Ont. : 
on 23 May 1984. 

FRANK CALDER, BSc’30, in Florida, on 
10 April 1984. 

ROBERT G. M. GAMMELL. BA’27, 
BCL’30, on 7 March 1984. 


20 

ISADORE NISSAN PESNER, DDS’20, at 
Montreal, on 9 April 1984. 

WILLIAM JOHN REID, BSA’20, at 
Montreal, on 8 April 1984. 


"31 
"21 RAYMOND A. BOUCHER, BA’31, on 24 
KENNETH LEE CROWELL, BCL’21, at Aug. 1983. 
Middleton, N.S., on 6 April 1984. VINCENT PAUL CUMMINGS, MD’31, at 


BEATRICE JEAN KERR, BA’21, on4 June 
1984. 

JOHN W. SCOTT, MD’21, in April 1982. 
KENNETH A. WILSON, BCL’21, at 
Montreal, on 26 April 1984. 


"22 
LEON A. BEAUDIN, BSA’22, on 2 May 
1984. 

CECIL E. CARSON, BSc’22, at Toronto, 
Ont., on 30 March 1984. 


Largo, Fla., on 13 April 1984. 

JOHN deV. DOYLE, DDS’31, on 23 Sept. 
1983. 

ERNEST GOLDSTEIN, BSc(Arts)’27, 
MD’31, at Ottawa, Ont., on 6 March 1984. 
DONALD G. HENDERSON, BSc’27. 
MD’31, on 12 June 1984. 


\ SUMMER 1984/McGILL NEWS 27 


LYPERRER RAT OARG MASP TOG PRE PIE DATIPRTIIE PDS eTe passe os 


| 


32 

. ROBERT deWOLFE MacKAY, BA’28, 
MA’29, BCL’32, at Montreal, on 6 April 
1984. 

! HUGH HAMILTON SAUNDERSON, 
| PhD’32, DSc’62, at Winnipeg, Man., on 14 
May 1984. 

ARTHUR SHECTER, BA’32, at Montreal, 
on 25 March 1984. 


H 33 

. RUTH (McEWEN) FLEMING, BHS’33, at 
| Kingston, Ont., on 16 Feb. 1984. 
ABRAHAM LAPIN, BA’29, DDS’33, at 
Montreal, on 13 June 1984. 

ANDRE G. LEROUX, BCom’33, at 
Montreal, on 9 June 1984. 

SELWYN THOMAS WILLIS, BA’33, at 
Cowansville, Que., on 20 March 1984. 


34 

WILLIAM B. CLEMENTS, BSA°’34, in 
Florida, on 5 Jan. 1984. 

ALMA (HOWARD) EBERT, BSc’34, 
PhD’38, in England, on | April 1984. 
GERALD WINTER HALPENNY, BSc’30, 
MD’ 34, at Montreal, on 4 June 1984. 
WILLIAM T. W. SHUTE, BA’34, in 1981. 


"35 

HYMAN KLEINMAN, BCom’35, on 1 
March 1984. 

JACK SIMINOVITCH, BSc’31, MD’35, at 
Montreal, on 3 April 1984. 


37 

ALAN BELL, PhD’37, on 23 June 1982. 

J. STEWART CAMPBELL, BEng’37, at 
Winnipeg, Man., on 25 April 1984. 
HOMER L. FLETCHER, BSc(Agr)’37, on 
26 June 1983. 

MARC ANTOINE LARIN, BEng’37, at 
Montreal, on 14 Feb. 1984. 

C. WARD O’CONNOR, BCom’37, in Flori- 
da, on 17 Feb. 1984. 

CECIL D. SOLIN, BA’37, MA’38, at 
Montreal, on 23 Feb. 1984. 


38 

J. ROBERT BROOKE, MD’38, at Tacoma, 
Wash., on 2 March 1984. 

J. BERNARD COOK, BA’33, MD’38, at 
Sudbury, Ont., on 9 March 1984. 
KENNETH R. MacKENZIE, BA’33, 
MD’38, PhD’48, at Montreal, on 12 Nov. 
1983. 


"40 

EDYTHE (COLE) DUNDASS, DipNurs’40, 
at Hamilton, Ont., on 26 Feb. 1984. 

COLIN MALCOLM McDOUGALL, 
BA’40, MA’82, at Montreal, on 3 June 1984. 


"41 

CHARLES BISHINSKY, BSc’41, PhD’44, 
at Montreal, on 25 Feb. 1984. 

EDWARD LEWIS JONES, BEng’4l, at 
Calgary, Alta., on 23 August 1983. 

ELDEN EDMUND SPENCER, BCom’41, at 
Toronto, Ont., on 18 June 1984. 

T. MUNCEY TANTON, MD’41, in October 
1983. 


28 McGILL NEWS/SUMMER 1984 


ELIZABETH (COOKE) WATTS, BA’41, at 
Montreal, on 25 Feb. 1984. 


\ j 
i a 

| 

4 (| 


58 a 
LEV " a 


DOUGLAS CLIFTON 
DipPsych’58, at Montreal, on 8 March 1984 


"46 
CYRIL P. BROPHY, BEng’46, at Pointe 
Claire, Que., on 28 Feb. 1984. 
ANNABEL (LEVINE) 


59 
MAJOR JOHN L. McDOUGALL, BEng’59, | 
at Calgary, Alta., in Nov. 1983. | 


SOLOMON, 


BSc’46, at Montreal, on 21 March 1984. ay i 
"61 ‘ 
‘47 DANIEL N. METTARLIN, BA’58,|" ; 
ELEANOR (DOOHAN) HIBBARD, | BCL’61, at Montreal, on 7 March 1984. Lis 
BSW’47, at Clearwater, Fla., on 7 April | MARILYN JANE MODE, DipPT’61,| | 
1984. BPT’66, DipEd’70, at Toronto, Ont., on 19 
March 1984. 
"48 
RAYMOND DAOUST, BCL’48, on 20 July | ’64 
1983. DAVID D. RENDLEMAN, MD’64, on 6} 
EINAR LEIFSON, MD’48, at Wheaton, IIl., | June 1981. 
on 15 May 1984. 
66 = 
"49 GRAEME CROSSLEY WILMOT, MSc’66, 
GERALD WHEELDON MacFARLANE, | on 22 March 1983. Vi 
BCom’49, on 24 March 1984. = 
MARY (HILL) PURDY, BSc’49, at| ’67 


GEORGE DAVID MASON, MSc’67, at| |” 
Calgary, Alta., on 9 April 1984. 


Amherst, N.S. 


"50 
MARCO ENRICO CLIFTON GIGLIOLI, 
BSc’50, on 3 March 1984. 

PHILIP WISELBERG, BCom’50, 


69 Rr 
GILDA (BROWN) McKESEY, BN’6), a 
MSc’77, at Montreal, on 20 April 1984. } \p 


at 


Montreal, on 29 May 1984. hy 
'73 i 
51 MARIANNE NEUMANN, MA‘73, at Vall-| 4, 
WILLIAM CROSLEY BENNETT, | couver, B.C., on 6 June 1984. De 
BEng’51, at Scarborough, Ont., on 16 April bd 
1984. 74 \\ 
JACK EMERSON GUNN, BEng’51, on 24 | PHYLLIS (JUKIER) GOLDFINGER, | | j, 


April 1984. BSc’72, MD’74, at Toronto, Ont., on 12}}\, 


PETER ROWNEY JENNINGS, BA’S51, | March 1984. Me 
MA’53, at Gaucin, Spain, on 8 June 1984. 0c 
RALPH G. WILSON, BEng’51, on 5 Dec. | ’78 Mh 
1982. JACQUES MICHEL GRIMAUDO, | 


BEng’78, at Ste. Anne des Monts, Que., 0m? |" 4g 
June 1984. Att 


"52 
JOHN B. BALLOU, MD’52, on 25 April 
1984. 

JESSE RAYMOND WISEMAN, BEng’52, 
at Montreal, on 6 May 1984. 


‘79 Hu 
IAN KENNETH McCRAE STRATHY, \ 
BSc’79, at Philadelphia, Penn., on 15 Apml h 
1984. 


53 
CECIL S. WOODS, BSc’53, on 15 Aug. 
1983. 


81 

SHELDON ZEMELMAN, BSc’77, MD'6l, 
at Gros Morne National Park, Nfld., on 20 
May 1984. 


"54 
JOSEPH P. MILLER, BCL’54, on 14 
October 1982. 

LOUIS G. MURRAY, PhD’54, in the Andes 
Mountains, in April 1984. 


83 | 
ELEFTHERIOS CESAR TSEKREKOS;| 
MBA’83, at Toronto, Ont., on 4 March | 
1984.0 | 
AARNE ‘ 
ERRATA: ie 
Dr. John Brierley’s name was spelled 
incorrectly in the Spring 1984 issue of the | 
News. He was Dean of Law from 1974 to | 
1984 and his successor, Professor Roderick 
Macdonald, is a member of the BarreaudU | |, 
Québec. Bk. 
The lecture hall in the Leacock Building $ 
the H. Noel Fieldhouse Auditorium. ; 
The News regrets these mistakes. 


"55 
JOHN DAVID VIPOND, BCom’S5S, at Van- 
couver, B.C., on 29 May 1984. 


"56 
FRANCOIS A. GUILBAULT, BEng’56, on 
29 Aug. 1983. 

GUNARS SULTMANIS, DDS’56, in Sep- 
tember 1983. 


>REUNION ’84 


KEEP THESE DATES OPEN! 


CN 
i 


RL 
Mart 


‘Onto, (b 


ILM 


THURSDAY 


Opening Reception 


FRIDAY 
SEPTEMBER 20 SEPTEMBER 21 


Medical Seminar 

Annual Dinner Meeting Dental Seminar 

Leacock Luncheon 

60’s & 70’s Dinner Dance 


President’s Reception (759) 
Deans’ Reception 

(54, °49, °44, °39) 
Principal’s Dinner (’34) 
Chancellor’s Dinner 

(29 & earlier) 


CLASS PARTIES TO DATE: REUNION YEARS (YEARS ENDING IN 4’s and 9’s) 


FACULTY and YEAR 


. Agr. & Food Science 1979 
_ Architecture 1979 


Arts 1979 

Education 1979 
Library Science 1979 
Management 1979 


' Medicine 1979 


Physiotherapy 1979 


Agr. & Food Science 1974 
Dentistry 1974 

Education 1974 

M. Education 1974 


/ Elec. Engineering 1974 
! Met. Engineering 1974 


Medicine 1974 
Occupational Therapy 1974 
Physiotherapy 1974 


is) Agr. & Food Science 1969 


Arts & Science 1969 
Dentistry 1969 

Law 1969 

M.L.S. 1969 


_ Physiotherapy 1969 


Agr. & Home Ec. 1964 
Architecture 1964 


. Dentistry 1964 


Education 1964 
Medicine 1964 


Medicine 1964 


Agr. & Home Ec. 1959 
Engineering 1959 


- Law 1959 


Medicine 1959 
Nursing 1959 
Phys. & Occ. Therapy 1959 


Agr. & Home Ec. 1954 
je Agr. & Home Ec. 1954 
| Dentistry 1954 

,) Engineering 1954 

yy Law 1954 

“Medicine 1954 


Phys. & Occ. Therapy 1954 


CHAIRMAN 


Mr. Jack Sadler 

Mr. Gordon Odell 

Mr. Remi Mariano 

Mr. Jamie Henderson 

Mrs. Sylvia Piggott 

Ms. Louise Courey-Dziemian 
Dr. H. Mitchell Shulman 

Ms. Janet Hale 


Mr. Jim Gendron 

Dr. Gerald W. Trager 

Mr. Harry Zarins 

Mr. Keith Alnwick 

Mr. Gary Sakauye 

Mr. Randy Sakauye 

Dr. Michael Dworkind 
Mrs. Janet Davis 

Mrs. Marlene A. Turgoose 


Mr. Cameron Clarke 

Mr. Richard Bourne 

Dr. Arnold Closner 

Mr. Bernard Stern 

Mrs. Linda Cobbett 

Mrs. Chauncey M. Bramwell 


Mr. M. Pirhonen 

Mr. Patrick Blouin 

Dr. Gary Freedman 

Ms. Peggy Sheppard 

Dr. D. Allan MacKenzie 
Dr. M. Christine Lejtenyi 


Miss Janet Finlayson 
Mr. William S. Hodges 
Mr. John H. Dawson 
Dr. Jack Cohen 

Mrs. Gertrude Jacobs 
Mrs. Delphine Bush 


Mrs. Barbara Wilding 
Dr. Herbert F. MacRae 
Dr. Harold Scherzer 
Mr. Gordon C. Leslie 
Hon. Fred Kaufman 
Dr. Robert E. Paulette 
Mrs. Joan Cleather 


SATURDAY 
SEPTEMBER 22 SEPTEMBER 23 


Alumnae Reception 

Graduates’ Brunch 

Football Game 
McGill vs. Queen’s 


SUNDAY 


Old Montreal 
Walking Tour 
Organ Recital 


FACULTY and YEAR 


Agriculture 1949 
Engineering 1949 
Home Economics 1949 
Library Science 1949 
Medicine 1949 


Agr. & Home Ec. 1944 
Commerce 1944 
Dentistry 1944 
Engineering 1944 
Medicine 1944 
Medicine 1944 
Medicine 1944 

R.V.C. 1944 


Arts & Science 1939 
Commerce 1939 
Engineering 1939 
Medicine 1939 
R.V.C. 1939 


Arts & Science 1934 
Commerce 1934 
Engineering 1934 
Home Economics 1934 
Law 1934 

Medicine 1934 

R.V.C. 1934 


Agr. & Home Ec. 1929 
Law 1929 

Medicine 1929 
M.S.P.E. 1929 


Commerce 1924 


Non-Reunion Classes: 
McGill Hockey ’30-’40 
Engineering 1937 
Dentistry 1940 

Chem. Engineering 1981 


Closing Luncheon 


CHAIRMAN 


Mr. Frank Whitteker 
Mr. Ralph Johnson 
Mrs. Dorothy E. Sim 
Mr. T. Lionel O’ Neill 
Dr J.F. MacDonald 


Mrs. David Dunbar 
Mr. Herschel Victor 
Dr. Robert H. Cohen 
Mr. G.J. Dunne 

Dr. Benjamin Levitan 
Dr. Hyman Surchin 
Dr. Isaac Tannenbaum 
Mrs. Edith Drummond 


Mr. Claude M. Tetrault 
Mr. Edmond A. Lemieux 
Mr. Fred G. Barker 

Dr. R.G.M. Harbert 

Mrs. Margaret R. Cathcart 


Mr. Edgar H. Cohen 
Mr. Donald R. McRobie 
Mr. Marcus Stein 

Miss F. Elizabeth Kemp 
Mr. J. Gibb Stewart 

Dr. W.R. Slatkoff 

Miss Alice E. Johannsen 


Miss Barbara J. Dougherty 
The Hon. G. Miller Hyde 
Dr. A. Stewart Allen 

Mrs. H.M. Marler 


Mr. Harry Marpole 


Mr. Ken Farmer 
Mr. W.O. Horwood 
Dr. Thomas J. Jones 
Mr. Douglas Yip 


If this is a reunion year for your class, but your class is not listed above, why not contact 
Susan Reid (514-392-4815) 


at 3605 Mountain St., Montreal, Quebec H3G 2M1, and talk over plans for your year. 


LH PRRSE RAS DS SOPRA THF Pee PIPE RDEIPREITE PE 2522 ae setae goes se 


Woodland Indian Artist 


Benjamin Chee Chee 


Alumni Media is pleased to present 9 reproductions of works by the late Benjamin Chee Chee. 
These are the only reproductions authorized by the artist's estate. 


A mainly self-taught artist, Chee Chee was a prominent member of the second 
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Unlike many of his contemporaries who employed direct and “primitive” 
means, Chee Chee’s work was influenced by modern abstraction. His style 
reduced line and image in keeping with international modern art. 4 

At the age of 32, at the height of his success, Chee Chee died tragically by suicide, ~ 


These reproductions are printed on high quality, textured stock and measure 
48 cm x 61 cm (19”x24”). 


A Friends B Swallows C Good Morning 


5 


D Proud Male E Mother & Child F Sun Bird 


G Spring Flight H Wait For Me I Autumn Flight 


Please send me the following Benjamin Chee Chee print reproductions at $23.95 each or $88.00 for any four, 
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Volume 65, Number 1 
Fall 84 


ISSN 0709 9223 


Editorial Board 
Editor 
Charlotte Hussey 


Members 
(Chairman) 
Robert Carswell 
David Bourke 
Gretta Chambers 
Joan Cleather 
Betsy Hirst 
David Lank 
Elizabeth McNab 
Gavin Ross 
Robert Stevenson 
Tom Thompson 
Laird Watt 
Michael Werleman 
James G. Wright 


Art Direction 
Signa Design Communications 


The official publication of 
the Graduates’ Society, the 
News is sent without charge 
to all recent graduates and 
to all other graduates and 
friends who make annual 
contributions to McGill 
University. 

The copyright of all 
contents of this magazine is 
registered. Please address 
all editorial communications 
and items for the ‘‘Where 
they are and what they’re 
doing’ column to: 


McGill News 

3605 Mountain Street 
Montreal, Quebec 

H3G 2M1 

Tel: (514) 392-4813 

Please contact Advertising 
Director Mary McCutcheon at 
392-4806 for information 
about advertising in the 
News. 


Cover: A crowd of 
enthusiastic fans cheer on 
the McGill Redmen at the 
McGill-Queen’s Reunion 
"84 weekend game. The 
Redmen, regrettably, ended 
up on the wrong end of a 
59-30 score. 


Cover Photo: Harold 
Rosenberg 


CONTENTS 
a 


Three new deans: preserving traditions, adapting to change 
by Carol Sheppard 


The university has recently appointed new deans of Educa- 
tion, Engineering, and Law. Their role is a dual one: 
maintaining the fine academic reputation of each of their fe 
faculties, while adapting to the changing needs of today’s ! ~ 


students. 


eR 


The child in the attic: creativity and madness 
by Charlotte Hussey 


Psychoanalyst Dr. Julien Bigras writes successful novels in his 
spare time. His protagonists are ones that often walk a fine 
line between the creative and the insane. 


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Pictures of a humanist 
by Anne McLean 


McGill graduate Edward Hillel will mount an exhibition of 
his photographs at Montreal’s Saidye Bronfman Centre in 
late November. Selections from the show reprinted in this 
issue attest to the fact that his is a humane vision of the world. 


10 


a ee | 
McGill alumnae through the decades: part II 
by Goldie Morgentaler 


The second in this four part series presents portraits of 
women graduating in and around the turn of the century. 
Two of these saw their career hopes dashed by choice or by 
circumstance. A third went on to enjay a lifetime of 


accomplishments. ? () 


DEPARTMENTS 


CCM Ns Tea Fee Kae Oe se SE BR PR a Se ke 2 Society activities... .. 17 
Wee tie SRT UIEE NORE. ce So SS eek 3 Focus: Derek Mather . 23 
Writing course instills confidence ................... 3 Focus: Steve Holt .... 24 
Weeting out dangers (0: Crone. 6650s. cok ied eae wo ew 4 Where they are...... 25 
Black artist in Canada: Lorris Elliot................. 4 DOSS. S56 See 27 


FALL 1984/McGILL NEWS 1 


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NEWSBREAK 


Murder mysteries, swim 
flicks, travelogues, and 
a western 


Shirley Cull Thomson, PhD’82, director of 


the McCord Museum ' since 1982, will 
become secretary-general of the Canadian 
Commission for UNESCO (the United 
Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural 
Organization) in January 1985. The Commis- 
sion acts as a liaison between Pars-based 
UNESCO and Canadian groups coicerned 


with international cooperation in the ields of 


the natural and social sciences, communica- 
tion, heritage, culture and education, Thom- 
son, an art historian, teacher, broadcaster and 
editor, was assistant secretary-generil of the 
Commission in the 1960s. She also served as 
a director of the UNESCO pavilion at Man 
and His World in Montreal for 2 years. 


John Kurien, economics professor at 
McGill, was recently elected presideat of the 
National Association of Canadians ofOrigins 
in India (NACOI), at the organization’s 9th 
annual meeting in Montreal. NACOIwill ask 
Ottawa to send a fact-finding commssion to 
India’s Punjab province, scene of recent vio- 
lent clashes between Sikhs and Hindus. 
Delegates to the meeting agreed to ask the 
Canadian government to undertake aploma- 
tic initiatives to guarantee fair treatment for 
India’s minority Sikh community andto press 
India to release complete lists of deiths and 
arrests made during the recent outbreaks of 
violence that preceded and followed tpon the 
assassination of Indira Gandhi. 


Professor John Kurien 


2 McGILL NEWS/FALL 1984 


Peter Macklem, MD’56, physician-in- 
chief at the Royal Victoria Hospital, has 
become involved in the controversy sur- 
rounding the Grange Commission enquiry 
into the mysterious deaths of 36 infants at 
Toronto’s Hospital for Sick Children. In a 
speech September 10 to the Canadian Society 
for Clinical Investigation, Macklem 
criticized the manner in which the exhumed 
bodies of infants were tested for digoxin 
poisoning. He claimed that the tests, which 
suggest that at least one baby died from an 
overdose of the heart drug, were clinically 
inadequate and had been performed for politi- 
cal, not scientific reasons. Macklem disputed 
the claims of the Ontario Government, which 
commissioned the tests, that there is evidence 
that the eight exhumed babies had been mur- 
dered. He stated there is no valid means of 
measuring levels of digoxin in the 
bloodstream after burial. Accuracy would 
have been assured only by performing paral- 
lel tests on the bodies of babies who were 
known not to have been murdered. He raised 
the possibility that the drug digoxin could be 
created naturally in decomposed tissue, a 
hypothesis rejected by both Justice Samuel 
Grange and Commission counsel Paul 
Lamek. Despite the resulting furor, Macklem 
stands by his statements, while conceding 
that it would be highly unethical to exhume 
bodies of a control group of infants in order to 
assess the validity of the tests. 


The department of athletics has named 
Mike Sharadin as head coach of the men’s 
and women’s swim teams. The appointment 
is part of a joint Coaching Excellence Project 
being carried out by the Quebec Swimming 
Federation and McGill, Sherbrooke, Laval 
and Montreal Universities. Their aim is to 
provide Canadian universities with coaching 
of an international calibre in order to encour- 
age Canadian swimmers to train in their own 
country, rather than in the United States. In 
addition to recruiting top competitive swim- 
mers, Sharadin intends to significantly 
expand the Masters’ Swim Program, which 
will enable swimmers who do not fall into the 
elite category to train and compete. 

A Texas native, Sharadin has taught in 
Montreal and Ste. Foy, Quebec; in Toronto, 
Ontario; and as far afield as Lima, Peru, 
where he was coach of the Peruvian National 
and Olympic swim teams. Sharadin is plan- 
ning an alumni get-together following the 
McGill Invitational Swim Meet on November 
30 and December |. Further information can 
be obtained by calling Coach Sharadin at the 
McGill department of athletics. 


McGill is one of four Canadian universities 
that will share a million-dollar grant to con- 
duct biotechnological research into problems 
of Western Canadian agriculture. The West- 
ern Canadian Agriculture Research Program 
(WCARP) was announced on September 18 
by the sponsor, Canadian Pacific Ltd. (CP), 
as part of that company’s centennial celebra- 


Va 


ton. Frederick Burbidge, chairman of CP 


and also of the McGill Advancement Pro- 
gram, was present for the announcement. 
The CP funds will be used to encourage re- 
searchers in biotechnology to conduct co- 
operative studies on agriculture problems. To 
this end, the money will be spent in a number 
of different ways: identifying and publicizing 
priorities; directing funding of projects; and 
promoting university exchanges of graduate 
students, professors and researchers. McGill 
will receive $250,000 over five years. 

Dr. Desh Pal Verma, professor in 
McGill’s biology department, has been cho- 
sen as the program’s first touring lecturer. 
Beginning in 1985, he will be delivering pap- 
ers at McGill and the Universities of Alberta, 
Manitoba, and Saskatchewan, the four 
schools involved in WCARP. Also in con- 
nection with this program, Canada’s first 
chair in biotechnology, funded by CP witha 
special $750,000 grant, has been established 
at McGill. Chemistry Professor Kelvin Ogil- 
vie will be the first incumbent. In addition to 
his teaching duties in the department of 
chemistry, Dr. Ogilvie will be the first head 
of the university's proposed new Office of 
Biotechnology. He also plans to establish a 
course in this important scientific field. 


AB 
oe 


Principal David Johnston 

McGill Principal David L. Johnston has 
received a Japan Foundation Short-Term 
Visitors’ Grant. The grant provides recipients 
with the opportunity to deepen their under 
standing of Japan and to promote cultural 
contact between Japan and their countries. 
Johnston, accompanied by his wife Sharon, 
will travel to the Orient in early December. 
The purpose of his visit will be to make con- 
tact with academic, government and corpo 
rate agencies. He will be making preliminaly 
overtures toward initiating academic 
exchanges between McGill and Japanese uni- 
versities. He also hopes to contact McGill 
graduates in Japan, with a view to establish- 
ing a branch of the Graduates’ Society in that 
country. Susan Keys. 0 


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Writing course instills 
confidence 


Most of the students enrolled in Effective 

Written Communication appreciate the help 

they receive from this four-year-old writing 

course. Their gratitude is well documented in 

a line picked at random from one student 
journal: ‘‘I’m glad McGill makes us take this 
kind of course. I feel much more secure when 
I have to write something now...”’ 

The course has its origins in a request from 
the Centre for Learning and Development to 
the Faculty of Education asking for their help 
with a university-wide problem: the quality of 
student writing. This petition for aid was 
directed to Assistant Professor of Education 
Patrick Dias. ‘‘Five years ago concern was 
expressed about student writing,’’ says Dias. 
‘‘A request came through the then-Center for 
Learning and Development to see if the 
Faculty of Education could help. We had been 
teaching theories of teaching writing, and this 
was a chance to test those theories. A great 
deal of research was available about writing 
difficulties and the nature of the writing pro- 
cess; based on this we set up a writing center 
and advertised it as a service for students with 
writing difficulties.”’ 

The ad attracted a large number of stu- 
dents, ‘‘some of whom thought,”’ says Dias, 
‘“we were a laundry service that would clean 

up their papers. This we refused to do.”’ It 
soon became obvious that their writing prob- 
lems went beyond those of the misuse of 
Syntax and diction to the inability to think. 
“They had not conceived their topics or their 
goals clearly,’’ says Dias. 

The ad also caught the attention of the 
Faculty of Management, which asked Dias to 
set up a program for its MBA students. The 
result is a course that helps students from a 
variety of disciplines identify their writing 
problems and develop their own writing 
Strategies. ‘‘We’re teaching a process, not a 
product,’’ says Dias. 

Carolyn Pittenger, an Effective Written 
Communication instructor, quotes Archibald 
MacLeish on the teaching of writing: ‘‘The 
whole situation in a writing course is a rever- 
sal of the academic pattern. Not only is there 
no subject, there’s no content either. Or, more 
precisely, the content is the work produced by 
the students.” 

One of the basic methods of the course is to 
respond constructively and sympathetically 
to student efforts as they appear in journals 
and other assignments. The focus is not only 
on what students write, but how they go about 
writing. ‘“‘We ask them to keep a journal. 
They write with the confidence that comes 

from knowing what they’re talking about and 
with the delight that comes when their own 


eetgtria 


MARTLETT HEARS 


writing surprises them. As they start to 
confirm themselves as writers, they begin to 
experiment, to explore what they can do in 
and through writing,’’ explains Dias. 

The journals and the course as a whole go a 
long way towards helping students overcome 
their apprehensiveness about writing. 
Another major writing project is the final 
report in which the students, who now come 
to the Centre from the Faculties of Engineer- 
ing, Arts, Education and Management and 


from Continuing Education and the School of 


Social Work, choose their own topic and 
develop it as much as they feel is necessary. 
“The topics come from their work on their 
particular interests. In many cases, they do a 
great deal of research,’’ says Dias. ‘‘We are 
concerned less about technical details and 


SHES ase 


moe about their ability to say what they have 
to siy clearly. 

‘Many of the writing problems we see are 
realy thinking problems. We have found that 
stucents are more articulate if they think in 
terns of addressing a specific audience and/ 
or secific goals when they write,’’ explains 
Dias. *‘We also encourage them to take a 
topr and make it their own. Once they know 
wha they’re talking about and to whom 
they're talking, then language flows,’’ says 
Dias. 

Cias insists that the course is not a remedial 
writing course. ‘‘Effective Written Com- 
murication,’”’ he adds, ‘‘can benefit students 
at dl levels of university study.’’ Donna 
FlinQ 


FALL 1984/McGILL NEWS 3 


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Weeding out dangers to 
crops 


To Macdonald Professor of Plant Science Dr. 
A.K. Watson, it may all be elementary. But to 
many North American farmers, his current 
research may fall just short of a revolution. 

Watson, together with the University of 
Vermont’s Dr. Alan Gotlieb, is co-discoverer 
of a biological agent that may result in the 
non-chemical destruction of a noxious weed 
threatening the major North American crops 
of soybean and corn. ‘‘It’s a good association 
because we have the opportunity to work with 
two different ideas. We had known each other 
as graduate students. Gotlieb is expert in plant 
pathology, while I have more weed exper- 
tise,’ says Watson. **We have an agreement 
with the Universities of Vermont and McGill 
to collaborate on the development of a fungus 
for the control of the weed, velvetleaf. As the 
major weed in the corn and soybean growing 
area, it is difficult to control by cultural or 
chemical means.’’ 

Watson has worked extensively to further 
understanding of the ways biological agents 
can eliminate troublesome weeds. In 1980 he 
co-authored a paper on the results of his 
experiments using the white rust fungus, 
Albugo tragopogi, to prevent the spread of 
common ragweed, the major cause of 
hayfever in eastern North America. In this 
research, as well as in his most recent work, 
endemic plant pathogens were used as 
biocontrol agents of weeds. *‘In the approach 
of biological herbicides, you’re talking dis- 
ease organisms that occur here naturally in the 
field on the weed species. Under normal cir- 
cumstances the disease does not generally 
cause a destructive effect to its host popula- 
tion. There are some lesions on the weeds, 
and it may or may not kill one or two plants. 
But the weed is generally in a static natural 
balance with its host pathogen,’’ he says. 


example is taking this pathogen, Colletot- 
richum coccodes, and applying it in large 
quantities early in the season when the plants 
are more susceptible. We’re basically man- 
ipulating the environment around the weed, 
velvetleaf, to determine whether or not the 
pathogen can be used as a biological her- 
bicide. 

‘*This is dissimilar to the general approach 
to pesticides in that most pesticides form a 
broad spectrum looking for a group of pests, 
whereas with biological control it is a narrow 
spectrum. We’re looking at only one weed 
within a crop in a certain environment. It is 
the nature of biological control that the 
organisms we are working with have a limited 
host range.”’ 

Watson explains that the use of biological 
herbicides differs from the more commonly 


4 McGILL NEWS/FALL 1984 


‘‘What we are doing with the velvetleaf 


used method of weed control. The latter 


involves going back to the country where the 
weed originated, finding organisms there that 
attack it, and then importing them to Canada. 
‘‘One of the reasons these weeds are so 
aggressive in their new habitat,”’ explains 
Watson, ‘‘is that they’ve left their natural 
enemies back where they came from. This 
area is also quite advanced in the use of 
insects. There have been some successes in 
North America and elsewhere with this 
approach. ’’ 

Within the unique plant pathogen contain- 
ment facility at Macdonald College, exotic 
rust fungi are being evaluated by Watson and 
co-workers as possible biocontrol agents of 
certain weeds. Asked if pathogens could 
inadvertently wipe out other vegetation, Wat- 
son explains why this would not happen: *‘In 
our quarantine facility here on campus, we do 
not allow spores to scatter into the environ- 
ment. We’re pretty certain that we're not 


Black artist in Canada: 
Lorris Elliott 


The situation of young black writers in Cana- 
da today is a complex and often frustrating 
one. One of the major difficulties they face is 
getting their work published. Lorris Elliott, 
novelist, playwright, and associate professor 
of English at McGill, is determined to remedy 
this. And the development of his career alone 


going to be adversely affecting the environ- 
ment. Once we find a pathogen that’s a threat, 
then it’s not'introduced.’’ 

Watson, however, is exploring a relatively 
new area where only two other micro-agents 
for weed control have been developed and 
commercial products formed, and these are 
recent as well. ‘‘There is a specific protocol 
within McGill, a patent policy that was for- 
warded to and administered by the Faculty of 
Graduate Studies. We disclosed and assigned 
our invention to the Universities of McGill 
and Vermont. We have signed a license 
agreement with an appropriate industrial 
partner to develop the bioherbicide. It is 
important that the discovery is patented in 
order that it be developed by industry. It will 
not necessarily be useful to society unless itis 
patented, and the ultimate objective of this is 
to benefit the farmers,’’ says Watson. Donna 
FlintU 


could serve as a model for others. 

A native of the island of Tobago in the 
Republic of Trinidad and Tobago, Elliott says 
his first love was not literature, but music. He 
had his own orchestra on the island and ambi- 
tions for a career as a composer, arranger, and 
musician. But his father, one of the senior 


Professor Lorris Elliott: “Do you Know any blacks who write?’’ 


ts 


headmasters of the then-colony, wanted his 
eldest son to go to university. There were no 
music schools on the island, and music was. 
in any case, associated with ‘‘drinking and 
carousing.”’ 

So Elliott’s career shifted course. He 
attended Queen’s Royal College in Trinidad 
then in 1959 continued his studies at the Uni- 
versity of British Columbia, because Van- 
couver had the best climate in Canada. Here 
he discovered American literature and in par- 
ticular the black author James Baldwin. After 
this he moved to Montreal where he renewed 
contact with his West Indian heritage by 
reading V.S. Naipaul, whom he had known as 
a fellow student in Trinidad, and by complet- 
ing a doctoral dissertation on the Guyanese 
writer Wilson Harris. 

The influence of Harris can be seen in 
Elliott’s first novel, Coming for to Carry. 
Recently published by Williams-Wallace 
International of Toronto, it tells the story of a 
West Indian student trying to adjust to life in 
the **big land’’ of North America. ‘‘Harris, 
who now lives in England, is enjoying an 
increased popularity with European audi- 
ences,’’ says Elliott. “‘And his way of think- 
ing about the Caribbean has influenced my 
writing.’” Harris doesn’t approach Caribbean 
history out of a sense of futility. Instead he 
takes the facts, explains Elliott, and reinter- 
prets them in light of a literary imagination. 

Certain critics, as well, have pointed to the 
influence of James Joyce on Coming for to 
Carry. Elliott begs to differ with this assess- 
ment. “It resembles more the influence of 


William Faulkner on certain Latin American 
writers,’’ he says. 

After experiencing some difficulty finding 
a publisher for Coming for to Carry, Elliott 
became determined to help other aspiring 
black artists: ‘‘I had encountered my own 
problems with publishing, and I realized that 
there was so much talent around. Nobody was 
helping these people. There were people with 
writing just stuck in a drawer.”’ 

This hitherto-unrecognized talent will be 
showcased in an anthology of black writing 
in Canada, of which Elliott is the editor. 
The collection is soon to be published by 
Williams-Wallace. A grant from the Multi- 
cultural Program of the Secretary of State 
made it possible for Elliott to find many 
unknown, yet gifted writers. He searched in 
bookshops, attended community events, 
conducted writing workshops, and spoke to 
clerics, asking everyone he met, ‘‘Do you 
know any blacks who write?’’ 

Several obstacles exist to the success of 
black writers, according to Elliott. In the first 
place, he notes a strongly marked preference 
on the part of publishers for established writ- 
ers and traditional forms. This means that 
young writers, who often tend to favor 
experimental writing, have trouble finding a 
publisher. “You have to be impressive to get 
in, if you’re new,”’ Elliott says. 

For black writers, there is the additional 
problem of what is perceived among pub- 
lishers as a limited market for black writing in 
Canada. Young black writers are often told to 
send their material to the United States or the 


West Indies. Elliott, nevertheless, believes it 
is important for blacks to be published in 
Canada, where they can serve as role models 
for the next generation of writers. 

Elliott says his own experience contradicts 
the argument that there is limited interest in 
black theatre and fiction in Canada. The audi- 
ences for his plays — which have been per- 
formed at the Centaur and Loyola College 
Theatres in Montreal — were seventy-five per- 
cent white. His novel, Coming for to Carry, 
has also drawn sympathetic responses from 
people of various ethnic backgrounds. 

Continuing to look for ways to enlarge 
public awareness of black writing, Elliott 
organized a McGill conference on ‘‘The 
Black Artist in the Canadian Milieu’’ in 1980. 
He will also publish a bibliography of litera- 
ture by blacks in Canada, to be sent to lib- 
raries throughout North America. This vol- 
ume will serve as an aid to those interested in 
pursuing’ research on black writing and will 
help to alleviate the dearth of scholarly mat- 
erial available in this area. 

Elliott feels that his work, both the plays 
and the novel, owe a debt to the Anglo-Euro- 
pean education that he received in the Carib- 
bean and to the whole West Indian folk tradi- 
tion, with its rhythmic speech patterns, pic- 
turesque language, and music. He is currently 
drafting a second novel in which he also 

‘hopes to capture some of the multi-ethnic 
flavor of Montreal. ‘‘Instead of imitating 
American novels,’’ he concludes, ‘‘I think 
that Canadians have wonderful opportunities 
to create a new approach to the novel.’’ GMO) 


An invitation to submit 
nominations for the 1985 
Ernest C. Manning Awards. 


Principal Award $75,000 


2 PRA Ae eR 


Award of Merit $25,000 


he Ernest C. Manning Foundation is seeking 

nominations for its 1985 annual awards. 

The Foundation is a national, privately funded, non- 
profit organization formed to encourage, nurture and 
reward innovation by Canadians. 

If in the discretion of the selection committee 
there are suitable candidates, the Foundation will 
annually award $75,000 for the Principal Award and 
$25,000 for the Award of Merit. 

The Principal Award is presented to a Canadian 
who has shown outstanding talent in conceiving and 
developing new concepts, processes, or products of 
potential widespread benefit to Canada, with or with- 
out the benefit of institutional or corporate research 
facilities. 

The Award of Merit will be granted to a Cana- 


dian who has shown great talent and promise in con- 
ceiving and developing new concepts, processes, or 
products of potential widespread benefit to Canada, 
without the benefit of institutional or corporate 
research facilities. 

Of special interest are nominations from the 
fields of biological sciences (life), physical sciences 
and engineering, social sciences, economics, business, 
labour, law, government and public policy, the arts, 
and humanities. 

The deadline for nominations for the 1985 
awards is March 15, 1985. 

For further information, or to acquire a nomi- 
nation form, please write to: 


Mr. George E. Dunlap, Executive Director 
Ernest C. Manning Awards Foundation 
#2300, 639-5th Avenue S.W. 

Calgary, Alberta T2P OM9 


FALL 1984/McGILL NEWS 5 


OTT TAP EL ITIL LIL. SORTEELOTELLISL OE LEL EAE EEIATT TST IEEE Lee 


Photos by John Geeza 


Three new deans: preserving 
traditions, adapting to change 


by Carol Sheppard 


Dean of Engineering 
Pierre R. Belanger 

orn and raised in Montreal, Dean of 

Engineering Pierre R. Belanger, 

BEng’59, was educated at the College 
Mont St. Louis by the Christian Brothers, a 
teaching order that emphasizes technical and 
scientific studies over the liberal arts. 
According to the Dean, lawyers’ and doctors’ 
sons attended Jesuit schools, while *‘shop- 
keepers’ sons’’ predominated at the College 
Mont St. Louis. 

From these humble beginnings, Belanger 
went on to complete his bachelor’s degree in 
engineering physics at McGill. He then 
received his master’s and doctoral degrees 
from the prestigious Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology. Returning to McGill in 1967 
to teach in the electrical engineering depart- 
ment, he served as their chairman from 1978 
until his recent appointment as dean of the 
Faculty. 

M.I.T. certainly merits its excellent repu- 
tation, says Belanger. He held his first teach- 
ing position there in the mid-’60s, when 
student unrest was rampant. M.I.T., how- 
ever, remained notably insulated from strife. 
‘*A straw poll conducted before the 1964 
presidential election indicated that if the 
entire electorate had been composed of 
M.1I.T. students, Barry Goldwater would 
have become President,’’ he says. 

Dean Belanger’s field is control systems 
which, put in layman’s terms, involves the 
examination of variables in a system with a 
view to controlling them, and thus the system 


6 McGILL NEWS/FALL 1984 


itself. A simple example of this is the bath- 
room shower. ‘*The hot water tap is a decision 
variable you have control over. You try to 
manipulate that to achieve some desired end 
result. In the case of your shower, it’s the 
right water temperature.’’ 

Due to his own analytic training in control 
systems, Belanger is a firm believer in a cur- 
riculum that encourages engineering students 
to think through problems rather than one that 
emphasizes learning rules and procedures by 
rote. ‘‘What we’re trying to do is prepare 
students for a whole career of change,’ he 
says. The goal is not to furnish a series of 
‘*how-to’’ courses over the three-year pro- 
gram; it is to produce graduates with the criti- 
cal and creative ability to adapt to, and indeed 
help bring about rapid, even revolutionary 
change in science and technology. 

When asked what qualities he thinks he 
brings to his new job, Belanger was quick to 
point to the fact that he is a francophone, a 
factor he believes influences the approach he 
takes to engineering. Whereas his predeces- 
sor, Dean G.W. Farnell, PhD’57, is an 
‘‘excellent experimentalist,’’ an anglophone 
pragmatist, Dean Belanger’s approach is 
more theoretical and Cartesian. According to 
Belanger, it is noteworthy that the deans of 
the two faculties most intimately linked to the 
economy, himself in Engineering and Laurent 
Picard of Management, are francophones. 
These are two areas that traditionally have 
been the preserves of anglophones. 

In his new role as Dean, Belanger believes 
it is his job to provide his Faculty with a 
strong sense of direction. One priority is 
computerization. Thanks to the McGill 
Advancement Program, Engineering will be 
able to make some sorely needed purchases 
and thereby keep the various engineering 
departments and the School of Computer Sci- 
ence up to date. “‘I must nudge faculty in 
certain ways to take a leadership role,’’ he 
adds, ‘‘but always in a collegial setting.’’ 


Dean of Law Roderick 


Alexander Macdonald 

The new Dean of Law at McGill, Roderick 
Alexander Macdonald, appears at thirty-five 
to be rather young for the job. If you were to 
look at his curriculum vitae without ever 
having met the man, however, the long list of 
publications would lead you to assume that he 
is an octogenarian. At this early stage of his 
academic career, he has already produced 
more than sixty articles, case comments and 
reviews for learned journals. The new dean 


V2 


points out that his predecessor, Dean John 
E.C. Brierley, BCL’59, was only thirty-eight 
when he assumed the post ten years ago, and 
that deans of law faculties are often in their 
mid to late thirties. 

A native of Markham, Ontario, Dean Mac- 
donald began his academic career by studying 
political theory at York University. He consi- 
dered obtaining advanced degrees in that 
field, until one of his professors, feeling that 
his student was not then intellectually mature 
enough to benefit from such graduate studies, 
suggested law school as an interim program. 
Acting on that suggestion, the young Mac- 
donald enrolled in Osgoode Hall Law School 
at York University, receiving an LLB in 
1972. While there, he took a course entitled 
‘Introduction to Civil Law.’’ The subject 
captured his interest and prompted him to 
apply at the University of Ottawa Law 
School, from which he received his civil law 
degree in 1974. One year later he completed 
his master’s in law at the University of 
Toronto. 


Macdonald is thus well qualified to teach at 
McGill’s Faculty of Law which, since 1967, 
has prided itself on its National Program, 
training students in both Canadian legal tra- 
ditions. He is one of the few professors who 
teaches both civil and common law courses. 
While recognizing that civil and common law 
have different conceptual structures and use 
different methods of analysis, the Dean 1s 
sceptical that the dichotomy between them is 
as rigid as it is often claimed to be. 
Macdonald intends to capitalize on the 
achievements of outgoing Dean Brierley, but 
also wants to undertake a few initiatives of his 
own. Special areas of concern are the library, 
the promotion of legal research and the 
improvement of the student-faculty ratio. He 
also hopes to encourage student participation 
in extracurricular Faculty activities that could 
serve to sharpen legal skills. For example, he 
believes that sitting on Faculty committees 
enables students to develop abilities in the att 
of oral advocacy, in negotiation, in leg 
drafting and in problem diagnosis. 


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The role of the dean of Law, asserts Mac- 
donald, is to try to create an academic atmo- 
sphere in which everyone, staff members 
and students alike, may pursue high level 
legal scholarship. And Macdonald eagerly 
looks forward to his tenure as dean. He feels 
that McGill has a first-rate law faculty and 
hopes to be able to assure its continued suc- 
cess. 


Dean of Education David Smith 
“IT would very much encourage our interna- 
tional role as part of a balanced way of 
approaching education,’’ says Dean of Edu- 
cation David Smith, BEd’58, MA’61, whose 
five-year term began September 1, 1983. 
Smith regards this international dimension as 
threefold: first, Education should be aware of 
the national and international aspects of its 
curriculum. Second, in keeping with 
McGill’s international character it should 
attract some students from different parts of 
the world. As an example, the Dean points to 
some one hundred Kenyan students who 
recently graduated from the science education 
program. Such an infusion of new blood adds 
“a precious dimension’’ to the Faculty, he 
says. Third, Education professors should be 
encouraged to gain experience abroad, as 
consultants or through secondment. Cur- 
rently, among a number of international 
projects, there is one in Ecuador involving 
‘two members of staff. 


MARKING MAP’S ANNIVERSARY 


Closely allied to his international perspec- 
tive is Dean Smith’s commitment to **Peace 
Education,’’ which, he explains, ‘‘is not a 
subject in itself, but is a way of approaching 
all the subjects we teach.’’ On an individual 
level, it allows people to live more peaceful 
lives and, through the changing of values and 
behavior, may contribute to an improvement 
in relations between communities, nations, 
and other political entities. 

Adult education is another field that Dean 
Smith views as important. Faced with an 


AcGill 


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aging population in Quebec and Canada, the 
Faculty must be prepared to meet the 
increasing needs of adult learners and those 
who retrain for second careers. In Smith’s 
view, one of the essential tasks of Education 
is to understand the process of life long edu- 
cation that includes the similarities and differ- 
ences that characterize how the young and old 
learn. This is what compelled him to enter the 
field of education. ‘‘I’m fascinated by the 
learning process and by how we can facilitate 
and encourage it.”’ 

Since the mid-’70s, the emphasis in Edu- 
cation has shifted from initial teacher training 
to graduate and diploma programs that pro- 
vide qualified teachers with a specialization. 
This change has occurred in response to lower 
birth rates, the higher, average age of the 
population, and the changing needs of socie- 
ty. Smith intends to continue the development 
of new and specialized programs and to 
encourage events such as the Montreal con- 
ference on the use of computers in education 
recently sponsored by the Faculty. 

To his new job, Dean Smith hopes to bring 
the ability to encourage all his staff members 
to work to their potential. He feels it is abso- 
lutely essential to promote scholarship of high 
quality in the field of education and laments 
the fact that over the past seven years, his 
Faculty’s base budget has been cut by thirty- 
three percent. However, even in the face of 
severe budgetary limitations, he is confident 
that Education will continue to produce first- 
rate teachers. 


$61,000,000 


$50,000,000 


$40, 659.000 


Principal David L. Johnson joins McGill Gov- 
ernor and Chairman of Public Relations for the 
McGill Advancement Program Madeleine Saint 
Jacques (right) in a brief ceremony to note the 
progress of the Campaign. At the same event 
National Campaign Chairman Frederick S. Bur- 
bidge (left ) announced that the MAP had 
reached two thirds of its $61 million goal after 
one year of the three year campaign. He 
acknowledged the excellent efforts of such key 
volunteer leaders as Charles Bronfman, Row- 


land Frazee, Warren Chippindale, Charles Per- 
rault and Gordon Maclachlan and of Board of 
Governors Chairman Hugh Hallward. Bur- 
bidge explained that the Campaign total of 
$40,659,000 in gifts and pledges reflects a 
growing momentum of response generated by 
the expanding volunteer network in Montreal, 
Ottawa, Toronto and beyond. He added: ‘‘This 
is the largest capital campaign in the history of 
Canadian universities. | have no doubt at all we 
will make it!”’ 


FALL 1984/McGILL NEWS 7 


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The child in the attic: 
creativity and madness 


by Charlotte Hussey 


Dr. Julien Bigras is both a psychoanalyst and a novelist. A visiting professor of 


psychiatry at McGill University and a psychiatric consultant at the Royal Victoria 
Hospital, he has published such works of fiction as Premier Bal (in collaboration with 
Jeanne Cordelier), L’Enfant dans le grenier, and Kati, of course. His Le 
Psychanalyste nu broke ground in the development of a theoretical concept of a 
‘‘maternal monster,’’ and his Les Images de la Mére was recently translated from 
French into German. A film script is currently being written, based on his latest 
novel, Ma vie, ma folie, published in Paris and Montreal in 1983. 


onducting a private psychoanalytic 

practice as well as working with 

psychotic patients, Dr. Julien Bigras 
spends his weekdays with severely depressed 
people. To compensate for this grueling 
work, Bigras finds he must write fiction on 
weekends and at night. ‘‘It’s a question of 
survival. I’m so overwhelmed by the pro- 
found suffering of my patients. They are torn 
apart. I am overwhelmed by them, and in the 
evening I need to write, to let out the steam, to 
pull the pieces together.”’ 

Bigras never aspired to become a novelist. 
It happened almost by ‘‘accident,”’ if a Freu- 
dian would allow for this word. At eighteen 
years of age, upon the death of his father, 
Bigras read Sigmund Freud and decided 
‘‘once and for all’’ to become a 
psychoanalyst. He received a doctorat en 
médecine from the Université de Montreal in 
1958. Then, he completed his training in Paris 
in psychiatry at the Salpétriére Hospital, 
where Freud had studied before him, and in 
psychoanalysis at L’institut psychanalytique 
de Paris. Returning to Montreal in 1963, he 
started work on a “‘scientific’’ book, a chapter 
of which was devoted to the case history of 
one of his first patients, a severely disturbed 
woman named Marie. He explains: *‘She read 
it and was disgusted. She felt she was little 
more than a rat, a laboratory animal. She was 
really hurt.”’ 

Shortly after this Bigras was interviewed 
by Chatelaine: ‘‘It was late in the evening,”’ 
he says, ‘‘and I was tired. I lay down on the 
living room couch, and the journalist sat 
beside me, taking my hand. I free-associated 
a story about Marie. It was published and 
Marie read it, finding it most illuminating. I 
was completely surprised because it was 
fiction. But Marie felt respected. It was then I 
decided I would use the art of fiction to con- 
vey what was really going on between a mad 
patient and myself.”’ 

An expert on such subjects as adolescent 
suicide and ‘‘le monstre maternel,’’ Bigras 
has authored close to sixty essays. In the past 
he alternated between scientific and fictional 


8 McGILL NEWS/FALL 1984 


writing, using one genre to further his under- 
standing of the other. Today he prefers the 
novel. Fiction, he feels, provides the most 
frank portrayal of what goes on between 
psychiatrist and patient. Unlike a scholarly 
report, a novel conveys to the reader the 
‘‘nuances of distress’? — the surrounding 
atmosphere, tones of voice, and physical 
gestures. Also, it maintains the dignity of 
patients such as Marie, rather than reducing 
them to mere psychological stereotypes. “‘I 
can’t generalize about my patients,’ says 
Bigras. ‘“They are individuals and are treated 
as such in my writings.” 

Bigras has other, more personal, motiva- 
tions for writing fiction. The exercise of 
drafting novels, short stories, and character 
sketches is not only a catharsis, but an explo- 
ration. Through it he comes to examine his 
own enigmatic characteristics more deeply 
than his classical Freudian training has 
allowed. Spending seven years as an 
analysand, he did a first analysis in French 
and a second in English. ‘‘For most of the 
Quebec psychoanalysts trained in France like 
myself,’’ he explains, “‘a second analysis 
became a popular thing to do. It is supposed to 
be the real one.”’ 

In his first novel, L’ Enfant dans le grenier, 
Bigras explores a hidden “‘psychotic core’’ of 
repressed rage that, he says, exists in 
everyone. Joseph, the analysand-narrator, 
searches through his writing, dreams, and 
memories for an interpretation of the recur- 
ring symbol of a mad child abandoned in an 
attic. Ironically, the child rages, but is also 
dead. Through his painful recollections of the 
deaths of a Hungarian hired hand who worked 
on his father’s Quebec farm, of the loyal 
workhorse Prince, and of his dog Smokey, 
Joseph reawakens his feelings of sorrow, 
abandonment, and rage. He comes to realize 
that the mad child represents the inexpressible 
anger he felt at the birth of his younger 
brother, Léon. One of eleven children, 
Joseph, at the age of 21 months, saw his 
mother completely absorbed in nursing Léon. 
Suddenly he knew he no longer existed for 


A 


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her. Years later he tells his analyst: “I don’t| 
know what has stopped me from killing her, 1} 
just don’t know.’ ) 
Perhaps Bigras’s most poetic novel, 
L’Enfant dans le grenier, 1s written as a 
stream of consciousness where daydreams 
and nightmares intertwine with childhood 
memories and daily events taking place in 
France and Quebec. The novel recreates the 
experience of what it is like to be an analysand 
free-associating on the proverbial couch. Its 
associational coherence suggests that Bigras, 
as artist, still subscribes to the first com- 
mandment of psychoanalysis: Say anything 
that comes to mind. “‘I let myself go,” he} 
explains. ‘‘I write at random, just as it comes. 
It’s a mix of memories of mine and situations 
and characters I invent. If I’m really moved] 
lose consciousness after a while. My hand| 
writes and I don’t know what’s going on.” | 
He likens the act of writing fiction to the 
playing he and his psychotic patients do 
together. It’s like ‘‘living theatre,’ he} — 
explains: ‘‘I don’t focus on what a patient’s 
real story is. I prefer to play what’s going on 
in the present, to invent together the story of 
his childhood as a first step.”’ 
He says this therapeutic approach has been 


influenced by the work of Dr. D.W. Win- 
nicott, English child psychiatrist and author 
of Playing and Reality. To initiate these 
playful exchanges, Bigras often takes his cue 
from a patient’s body language. *‘For exam- 
ple,’’ he says, ‘‘one of my psychotic patients 
is listening to a little bird outside. Why not! 
And then I start, ‘Do you hear that little bird?’ 
And he answers, ‘Oh yes!’ Or his gaze 1s 
completely in the distance, completely lost. 
‘Come back, oh, oh, come back,’ I say. 50 
you see, we’re playing, and it often starts with | 


“a 


a signal coming from the body.”’ 

Writing at home at night, Bigras might 
begin by listening for messages from his own 
body — from pains and blissful feelings. This 
tactic has resulted in a lot of experimental 
writing. ‘For instance,’’ he says, ‘‘I’ ve made 
up a lot of stories about my nose, my mouth, 
my cheeks, even my navel.”’ 


Bigras finds the writing of fiction to be both 
gratifying and painful. He has experienced 
writer's block, but is usually able to reopen 
his creativity by elaborating upon and talking 
about the impasse with close friends, much as 
one would with an analyst. At other times as 
he writes, contradictory voices emerge that 
must be resolved. ‘‘It doesn’t work all the 
time,”’ he says. ‘‘I have a lot of writing I have 
destroyed. The effect is to put the fragmentary 
parts of oneself together, but it is not always 
successful. And it’s the same with my 
patients, sometimes all you can do is to wait 
and see. You don’t know. You’re in the 
dark.”’ 

This period of doubt, dark night of creativ- 
ity, or, in the words of the English Romantic 
poet John Keats, ‘‘negative capability’’ is 
dramatized in Bigras’s latest novel, Ma vie, 
ma folie. The anti-hero, a middle-aged 


ons 


psychoanalyst, falls under the magnetic 
influence of a suicidal woman who speaks a 
primitive wolf language and suffers from the 
delusion that she is more lupine than human. 
Based in part on the aforementioned Marie, 
this patient warns her psychiatrist that she will 
either kill him or drive him mad. Struggling 
against his desire to. conspire with her and go 
insane, he begins to speak her ‘‘animal’’ lan- 
guage and confides in her to such a degree that 
certain of his colleagues try to jeopardize his 
professional reputation. He further risks 


erage 46.425 
. . ’ 


alienating his own family when he is com- 
pelled to bite two teenagers, one of whom is 
his own son. 

As with the other novels, Ma vie, ma folie 
is a mix of autobiography and invention. ‘‘I 
actually did bite my own son,’’ Bigras 
explains. ‘*This had a most surprising effect. 
My son was so moved. He realized that 
something profound was happening between 
him and me. But I was scared to death.’’ 

This bizarre event, which is fictionalized in 
the novel, occurred during a sailboat cruise on 
the Great Lakes. It was a period of intense 
creativity for Bigras: “‘I was writing what | 
was living and that was frightening. I started 
writing like mad. The expression is to be 
taken literally; I was writing like mad. I was 
writing for six hours a day on that boat. It was 
so overwhelming that I started treating people 
around me like the characters in my novel.’’ 

Bigras, who was able to write himself out 
of this all-consuming state, says it is the only 
time his literary preoccupations have verged 
on madness. It was during this turbulent 
period, however, that he composed the most 
powerful sections of Ma vie, ma folie. He 
sees a clear connection between creativity and 
madness. ‘‘I call it madness when I am con- 


vinced that the cause of my rage is coming 
from outside. In contrast, I am positively 
creative when my rage is worked through 
from the inside. These two states, neverthe- 
less, come from the same source which I call 


$39 


‘infant sorrow. 

Bigras says this term, which is the cor- 
nerstone of his theoretical work, was bor- 
rowed from the title of a William Blake poem. 
Lines from the poem describe a newborn 
child as “*Helpless, naked, piping loud: /Like 
a fiend hid in a cloud.’’ Such helplessness, 


e 2s a 5 


rage and sorrow occurs because a baby under- 
stands little of what goes on around him, 
primarily in his relationship with his mother. 

In L’ Enfant dans le grenier, Joseph comes 
to terms with his *‘infant sorrow’’ through his 
writing and his analytic sessions. Marie, on 
the other hand, who is convinced that people 
are trying to poison her, commits suicide. 
‘Her paranoid delusions,’’ says Bigras, ‘‘are 
the prototype of what it’s like being con- 
vinced that suffering comes from outside. 
Vincent Van Gogh is a good example of 
someone who was both psychotic and crea- 
tive. In a painting such as Starry Night on the 
Rhone, Van Gogh stood on the borderline 
between creativity and madness. He was 
profoundly tempted, at that point in his 
career, to reject his ‘infant sorrow’ outside of 
himself and go completely mad.”’ 

Bigras, himself, is not afraid to walk that 
fine line between creativity and insanity. The 
‘enfant dans le grenier’’ is not ultimately to 
be feared: ‘‘Actually I was a healthy child,’’ 
he says, “‘very lively and with a good sense of 
humor. This is why I am not scared to let my 
madness express itself.”’ 

Nor is he afraid in his fictional writings to 
depict the human frailty of that modern and 


impassively virile authority figure, the 
psychoanalyst. ‘‘When I was a child I was 
very robust. The more I am getting old, the 
more I feel fragile. The contradiction is that 
out of this fragility I am discovering my real 
strength. [am much more in tune with myself 
than ever before, even though | am more 
vulnerable. I no longer believe,’ he con- 
cludes, ‘‘in those so called neutral 
psychoanalysts with their stainless steel 
egos.’’U 


FALL 1984/McGILL NEWS 9 


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Photos by Vivian Kellner 


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Pictures of a humanist 


by Anne McLean 


t’s a Montreal summer afternoon. The sun brightens a row of dusty hollyhocks on 
Esplanade Street, as children bicycle past the open door of photographer Edward 
Hillel’s studio. Inside, photographs dry on fiberglass screens, while others lie 
stacked in dozens of boxes. Atop one pile, a serene, 1 14-year-old Mexican man grins 
toothlessly from a glossy print. The subject’s detachment and serenity could be the 
photographer’s. Such calmness is surprising considering that Hillel, BA’75, must 
assemble two photo exhibitions and complete a book by the end of this year. . 


82 ATEN 


Edward Hillel by Vivian Kellner 


| Kacphu & Thieu, 
| Cambodian Refugees, 1983 


10 McGILL NEWS/FALL 1984 


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Butcher & Grocer, 
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‘*My motto,’’ says Hillel, who will open a 
show of his photographs at Montreal’s Saidye 
Bronfman Center on November 27, ‘‘is chaos 
on the outside, calm on the inside.’’ Becom- 
ing a ‘hot item’’ in the photography world 
hasn’t made his life any easier. In order to 
properly print and frame the exhibit, he still 
must raise some $4,000 to cover his costs. He 
faces this financial problem with the same 
wry acceptance expressed by the face of the 
1 14-year-old man. This capacity to meet life 
head-on, with compassion and objectivity, 
also accounts for the power of Hillel’s 
images. 

An Iraqi Jew who came to Montreal in 
1964, Hillel often documents those confron- 
tations where an immigrant’s inner world 
comes face to face with a strange, sometimes 
hostile, new environment. His photographs 
of Montreal capture the ingenuity, courage, 
and even the absurdity of people struggling to 


v8 3 MESES wh LESS Liters Ge tears ie aeet eae CAEL ees 


preserve their traditions in a seemingly tradi- 
tionless country. His portraits penetrate 
beneath the cultural disguises and imagined 
‘‘invisibility’’ of their subjects: a Greek tailor 
hides behind the Cyrillic lettering of his shop 
window; a Portuguese girl appears preoc- 
cupied with her elaborate costume; an Italian 
priest surrounds himself with the parapher- 
nalia of religious ritual. At his best, Hillel 
would strip away the surface trappings of 
religion and culture to lay bare the human 
beings buried inside. 

Displacement, insecurity, the search for 
shared human values: these themes underlie 
Hillel’s work. This is a perspective one might 
not expect to find in a man barely 31 years 
old. Hillel, nevertheless, remembers growing 
up amid the turmoil and fear that often 
gripped the Baghdad Jewish community 
during periods of political unrest and 
nationalistic fervor. These childhood 


FALL 1984/McGILL NEWS 11 


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Rak BF 8 SD tea 


Photos by Edward Hillel 


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Chaim Kramer, 
Montreal, 1982 


12 McGILL NEWS/FALL 1984 


memories continue to sensitize him to the 
plight of threatened minorities and to the 
spiritual realities that hold communities 
together. 

Nor is Hillel’s approach as bleak as it might 
seem. Many of his images serve to celebrate 
what fascinates him the most — the vibrant 
meeting of diverse peoples that he sees in 
Montreal. ‘“‘Montreal is a sort of laboratory 
for mixing cultures,’’ he explains. *‘People 
come from everywhere and recreate their own 
traditions. There’s a great vitality here. We 
have a world community that’s probably one 
of the most tolerant anywhere. ’’ 

‘‘Anybody dealing in the arts,’’ he con- 
tinues, “‘has to have a humane vision of the 
world. I like the work of people such as 
Dorothea Lange and Walker Evans who 
started in the Depression Era. I’ve also been 
influenced by the European tradition, for 
example by Cartier-Bresson and André Ker- 


tesz. In my own photographs I’m interested in 
what isn’t there; you might call that ‘the 
soul.’ For me, that’s what a photograph has to 
bring out.”’ 

He is elated to have been asked by Cana- 
dian Geographic to do a photo essay on the 
Jews of Montreal. ‘‘It’s the first time the 
magazine is using black and white photo- 
graphy,’’ he explains. ‘‘This to me is a small 
victory. The thing about black and white is 
that it shows you the world as illusion. It's 
completely abstract; you’re putting down this 
image on a two-dimensional piece of paper, 
and you still have to keep the spirit of what 
you’re seeing. And the amazing thing is thatit 
works. It’s as if you’d removed the soul from 
its material casing. Your three-dimensional 
street has turned into a piece of paper without 
any color, without any movement, without its 
day-to-day reality — and yet it works, the 
essence is there.”’ 


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Jean-Marcelin Longevin, 
Montreal, 1980 


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FALL 1984/McGILL NEWS 13 


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14 McGILL NEWS/FALL 1984 


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Newspaper vendor & friend, 
Montreal, 1984 


Last spring at Montreal’s Galerie Samuel 
Lallouz, Hillel mounted a stunning exhibition 
of photographs called ‘‘Passages.’’ Commis- 
sioned by Canadian Friends of Bar-Ilan Uni- 
versity in Jerusalem, the show explored vari- 
ous aspects of Montreal Jewish life. “‘I was 
not looking at Canadian Jewish life in 
Montreal, but at the timeless traditions that 
can be found in every society where Jews 
have settled. In the personal, I was looking 
for the universal.”’ 

Hillel’s next show, which opens at the 
Saidye Bronfman Center in late November, 
will focus on the multi-ethnic community 
living on and around St. Lawrence 
Boulevard. Well-known for its ethnic food 
shops, garment factories, and cut-rate cloth- 
ing outlets, *“The Main,”’ as it is often called, 
has been an important point of arrival and 
departure for Montreal immigrants. The 
exhibit will include photographs of Por- 


tuguese religious festivals, Italian street pro- 
cessions, Greek Easter celebrations, as well 
as rare shots of Montreal’s Hassidic com- 
munity. Certain of these photos will appear as 
well in a book that is nearing completion: 
‘Using personal accounts, interviews, and 
my own short stories, I plan to weave together 
a visual and literary poem,’’ explains Hillel, 
‘“in order to present a human portrait of life on 
the Main.”’ 

Hillel is also excited about a new series of 
photographs taken during recent trips to 
Jamaica and the Dominican Republic. Some 
of the most moving ones resulted from time 
spent in Spanish Town, a rural ghetto near 
Kingston, Jamaica. “‘It’s a powerful experi- 
ence to parachute into a human colony like 
that, which is so entrenched in its daily life, 
always dealing with tragedy and poverty — 
and to walk into it and be accepted in every 
way. It’s only happened to me two or three 


FALL 1984/McGILL NEWS 15 


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16 McGILL NEWS/FALL 1984 


Mr. & Mrs. Ross, 
Montreal, 1982 


Chinese woman, 
Montreal, 1980 


times in my life,’ Hillel says. “‘I consider 


myself lucky.’’ 
‘*You're not going there as a social worker 


or a tourist. You don’t even go ‘to take photo- 
graphs.’ You just go. In situations like that I 
often end up not taking photos. In fact I only 
took a few in the Caribbean, but the ones I did 
take were the result of deep feelings, of our 


finding something in common. You might be 


in a foreign place, yet recognize a part of 


yourself there. When that happens you feel 
that the camera is no longer a weapon.”’ 
Hillel’s intense, often highly personal 
approach sometimes places him outside what 
is considered mainstream. He is, neverthe- 
less, aware of current themes and ‘‘issues’’ 


affecting photography, including those that 


address the threat of a nuclear holocaust. A 


series of his photos depicting anti-nuclear 


demonstrations that took place in Seabrook, 


Z 


/ 


New Hampshire in 1979 is currently appear- 


ing in ‘‘The Anti-Nuke Show.’’ Organized by 
Montreal’s Powerhouse Gallery, this group 
exhibition will tour Canada in 1985. **Thisis 
the nuclear age,’’ says Hillel. “‘It’s the 


responsibility of art to make us realize how | 
serious this is. I’m not interested in destruc- | 


tion. There’s even destruction inside the 
peace movement. I don’t think art is im @ 
position to stop any of that.’’ 

Continuing to maintain the sane, humanis- 
tic approach that is the hallmark of his 
photography, Hillel concludes: “‘Artists are 
privileged in the sense that they can survive 
by making their emotions public. This 18 @ 


task no bigger or smaller than any other. | 


Artists are just a part of society. They re not 


saints or gods.’’O 


— 


ry, 


a 


by Gavin Ross, 
Executive Director of 
the Graduates’ Society 


Hail and Farewell 
At its annual general meeting, held at the St. 
James’s Club in Montreal on September 20, 
the Graduates’ Society elected the entire slate 
of officers presented by the nominating com- 
mittee and printed in the Spring ‘84 issue of 
the McGill News. One of these candidates, 
Edward Cleather, BA’51, was unanimously 
chosen as president of the Graduates’ Society. 
He succeeds Carlyle Johnston, BA’SO, 
BCL’S3, and will serve a two-year term. 


Fd pts ah awe 
os ' 


secretary-treasurer of Guardian Trustco Inc. 
He serves on the boards of two Montreal-area 
hospitals and the Montreal Symphony 
Orchestra. He is a past chairman of Lower 
Canada College and is involved in many other 
areas of the community. 

Cleather, in his tribute to outgoing Presi- 
dent Johnston, mentioned that he was the first 
Graduates’ Society president to have served a 
two-year term. He cited the many hours that 
Johnston and his executive spent on 
Graduates’ Society work, especially during 
the period of many staff changes at Martlet 
House. He also praised Johnston’s service as 
past chairman of the Alma Mater Fund and as 
class agent for Law’53. Cleather presented 
Johnston with an engraved crystal decanter as 
a token of the Society’s appreciation of his 
service. 


at: 


for the Class of ’34. 


Also elected at the annual meeting was 
David H. Laidley, CA, BCom’67, as vice- 
president. David is a partner in the accounting 
firm of Touche Ross and Co. He has served as 
treasurer of the Graduates’ Society, and vice- 
president of the McGill Society of Montreal, 
and is currently chairman of the board of the 
Royal Victoria Hospital. 

Margaret Davidson, BCom’52, was 
elected a graduate governor to serve for five 
years on McGill’s Board of Governors. Her 
term starts January 1, 1985. She succeeds 
Douglas T. Bourke, BEng’49. 

Elected honorary secretary and honorary 
treasurer were Joan McGuigan, BCom’55, 
and Rob Kerr, BSc’66, respectively. New 
directors include Jean Francois de Grandpré, 
BCL’70, Dr. Ross Hill, BSc’46, MD’48, 
Daniel Kingstone, Q.C., BA’53, BCL’56, 
Betsy A. Mitchell, BA’71, BCL’75, and Gail 


FALL 1984/McGILL NEWS 17 


BORO LO ROME EA RI RES Se a Ces eee) eiess 
2 -: >< aoa : = es oe NEES : 


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Photos by Andrew Mitchell 


SHPPRP ESSA PAQV SRST IT OT eRe PAD CRAG IFAE ARS PITS 2 IsSe 


(Eakin) Plant, BA’61. 

Each year at its annual general meeting, the 
Society honors its graduates. This year’s gold 
medal was presented to J. Taylor Kennedy, 
BEng’38, MEng’39. It was given in recogni- 
tion of the special contributions Kennedy has 
made to the Society and to the university in 
his capacity as a member of the Board of 
Governors and chairman of the athletics 


board. 
Honorary life membership in the Society 


Principal David Johnston directs alumni 
through ‘‘Hail Alma Mater.”’ 

was presented to Joan Harrington, wife of 
Immediate Past-Chancellor Conrad Har- 
rington, BA’33, BCL’36. In citing Mrs. Har- 
rington, Honours and Awards Committee 
Chairman John Hallward, BA’50, pointed 
out that ‘‘ While McGill was manifestly fortu- 
nate in having the outstanding qualities of 
Con Harrington in its Chancellor, it was dou- 
bly fortunate in the gracious, caring, unstint- 
ing manner in which his wife gave of herself 
so consistently on the university’s behalf.”’ 


Receiving distinguished service awards 
were Rhoda Knaff, BA’52, MPS’54, of 
Washington, D.C.; Edith Aston-McCrim- 
mon, DipPT’50, BSc’60, MSc’80, of 
Montreal; and Dan Amadori, CA, BCom’72, 
of Toronto. A special student service award 
was presented in absentia to Stephan von 
Cramon, BSc(AgrEc)’84, past president of 
the Macdonald College Students’ Society. 


Reunion ’84 


The annual general meeting was but one of 
many Reunion Weekend activities. Eighty 
classes from the years ending in 4 and 9 
returned to Montreal to celebrate reunions. 
Highlights included the annual Leacock Lun- 
cheon with famous Canadian contralto, 
Maureen Forrester, as guest lecturer. For the 
15th consecutive year, Don MacSween, 
BA’56, BCL’61, acted as moderator and, as 
usual, his was a tough act to follow. Much to 
the delight of more than 400 graduates and 
friends gathered in the Grand Salon of the 
Queen Elizabeth Hotel, Miss Forrester rose to 
the occasion and delivered an extremely witty 
‘‘lecture.”’ 

Newly-elected Society President Ted 
Cleather and his wife, Joan, DipPOT’54, 
BSc(POT)’58, hosted a special reception at 
the University Club for members of the class 
of ’59, returning for their 25th anniversary. 
Principal David Johnston and his wife, 
Sharon, were hosts at a 50th reunion dinner 
for nearly 200 members and spouses from the 
class of ’34, while at the same time, in 
another hotel, Chancellor Jean de Grandpré 
and his wife, Héléne, presided at a dinner for 
members of the classes of °29, ’24, °19, and 
"14. 

Members of the classes of ’39, °44, °49 and 
54 attended a special reception in Redpath 
Hall during which the deans of our Faculties 
and directors of our schools were on hand to 
meet graduates and bring them up to date on 
the‘ disciplines they followed as students. 
Members of the ’79, ’74, °69 and ’64 classes 


For good measure, Engineering '44 celebrates their 40th Reunion at the Faculty Club. 


18 McGILL NEWS/FALL 1984 


GA 


Flinging their thing, Queen’s Pipe and Brass 
Bands sally forth at a pre-football game 
luncheon. 

enjoyed a Faculty Club dinner dance. 

All the above events took place on Friday, 
and those who had strength enough to con- 
tinue on Saturday attended a special brunch at 
Bishop Mountain Hall prior to the McGill- 
Queen’s football game. Also in attendance 
were Montreal-area graduates of Queen’s, 
together with 120 members of the Queen’s 
Pipe and Brass Bands, highland dancers and 
cheerleaders from both universities. 
Although the pre-game party was a great suc- 
cess the McGill Redmen, regrettably, ended 
up on the wrong end of a 59-30 score. 

Saturday evening, there were many indi- 
vidual class parties as well as a special Re- 
union dinner for senior intercollegiate hockey 
players from the °30s, organized by Ken 


\ew | 

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eo a a Montr 
Hilarity reigns at the Leacock Luncheon under 1 | 
the auspices of Chancellon Jean Grandpré, i 
Maureen Forrester, and Donald MacSween. rm 
Farmer, BCom’34. And on Sunday morning mi 


there was a good turnout for what is becoming 
a traditional annual event — Professor John 
Grew’s organ recital at Redpath Hall. For) — \y 


those with remaining strength and stamina, ie 
there was a walking tour of Old Montreal] | jin) 
climaxed by a closing luncheon at Gibby’s in aly 
Youville Square. na 

The Graduates’ Society wishes to] | \y 
acknowledge and thank members of Kappa am 
Kappa Gamma Sorority and Sigma Chi hea 
Fraternity for the many hours of voluntary om 
student assistance they provided over Re- " 
union Weekend. Reunion Coordinator Susan bey 
Reid and the staff at Martlet House are noW ly 
busily preparing for Reunion °85, which ba 


Starts September 19th next year. 


‘‘Let us have wine and women, mirth and 
laughter (at the Leacock Luncheon), Sermons 
and soda water the day after.’’ Ar 


Art Dickson pipes Chancellor de Grandpré and his graduate guests to dinner. 


New Programs 


A few years ago, the McGill Society of 


Montreal invited graduates in the Montreal 
area to participate in what was called the 
MATCH Program (McGill Alumni Too Can 
Help). Essentially, the idea was to involve 
graduates in voluntary work for the universi- 
ty, specifically in areas where budget 
restraints and cutbacks had taken their toll. 
MATCH’s fundamental aim was to serve both 
the volunteer alumni and the university 


simultaneously. A significant number of 


graduates indicated an interest in this pro- 
gram, but for various reasons it was put ‘‘on 
hold.’’ The idea, however, did not die. A 
committee consisting of graduate volunteers, 
faculty and staff refined MATCH and 
approached Principal Johnston, who was 
Supportive and enthusiastic. The committee 
then examined a project undertaken by the 
University of Toronto Alumni Association 
that is specifically aimed at senior alumni in 


Alumni Ron Harris performs for the Class of '34. 


A graduate samples from a sumptuous 
smorgasboard at the Dean’s Reception in 
Redpath Hall. 


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that metropolitan area. It offers its seniors a 
chance to attend a lecture series geared to 
their interests and an opportunity to do vol- 
unteer work for the university. 

The McGill committee is currently dis- 
cussing this idea with several of its faculties 
and departments. Before approaching 
graduates to ask for their help, MATCH feels 
that it must first define the requirements of the 
university. It is hoped this will be done during 
the fall semester. 

The other new project being considered by 
the Society is a Student Alumni Association. 
This has proven successful in the United 
States and in other Canadian universities. The 
program will involve students on campus in 
alumni activities of benefit to them and the 
university as a whole. It is anticipated that 


Hail and Farewell: Outgoing Graduate Society 
President Carlyle Johnston (left) passes on the 
gavel to his successor, Ted Cleather. 


‘‘Here’s to our 50th!’”’ The Class of '34 
celebrates their Reunion. 

students who work for the Alumni Office will 
become sympathetic with this effort. It is 
hoped that this interest in the university will 
continue after graduation. Basically, there is 
nothing new or magic about the idea — in 
many ways the Society has been doing it for 
years — but many new and exciting pos- 
sibilities are being explored. 

Both these programs are being coordinated 
by Alumni Relations Officer Gerry Ludwig, 
who will report on further developments in 
coming issues of the McGill News. 


FALL 1984/McGILL NEWS 19 


‘YPERSESR APART ERAT OS bard EERIE DTA 


20 McGILL NEWS/FALL 1984 


part II 


by Goldie Morgentaler 


McGill alumnae through the decades: 


What follows is part two of a four part series of McGill alumnae profiles. In the portraits of two women graduating near the 
turn of the century, career hopes were dashed by choice or by circumstance. In the third, nevertheless, a distinguished 
member of Medicine ’22, the first class to graduate women in that discipline from McGill, looks back on a lifetime of 


accomplishments. 


°00 

Harriet Brooks-Pitcher 

Harriet Brooks was on her way to becoming a 
first-class physicist when in 1907, at age, 
thirty-one, she married Frank Pitcher and 
gave up science in favor of raising a family. 

She was born in Exeter, Ontario, in 1876 
and received her BA from McGill, graduating 
in 1898 with the Anne Molson Gold Medal in 
Mathematics and Natural Philosophy 
(Physics). For a year after her graduation, she 
was on the staff of the Royal Victoria College 
as a non-resident tutor in mathematics. She 
then resumed her studies as a master’s student 
in physics, working under the direction of the 
future Nobel laureate, Ernest Rutherford. 

Rutherford seems to have had no objection 
to placing women on an equal footing with 
men in the laboratory. He took a personal 
interest in Brooks’s career. He even acted as 
her mentor after she had graduated. 

The relationship began when Rutherford 
chose Brooks and three other students from 
the undergraduate honors physics course to 
help him set up the Macdonald Physics 
Laboratory. Here he hoped to continue the 
research into radioactivity that he had begun 
in England. As a graduate student, Brooks 
worked with Rutherford to estimate the 
atomic weight of radium emanations by 
measuring the diffusion that is a characteristic 
of this gas. 

Brooks received her MA in 1901 and left to 
pursue further study at Bryn Mawr College in 


Pennsylvania. Rutherford then informed her 
that she would be named co-author of a paper 


that was based on the results of research they 


had undertaken together. She protested that 


he was being too ‘‘generous’’ in giving such 


credit to someone who had only been his 
‘*humble assistant.’’ Rutherford ignored her 
objections and published these findings under 


their two names. 

It was on the strength of this paper that 
Brooks was awarded a scholarship to the 
Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge to work 
with Sir Joseph J. Thomson. Rutherford per- 
sonally made the arrangements for her admis- 
sion, reception, and accommodation. While 


in England, Brooks discovered the recoil of 
the radioactive atom. This brilliant research 


effort led to the detection of several new 
radioactive elements. 


Brooks returned to North America in 1904 
and accepted an appointment in the physics 
department at Barnard College in New York 
City. In the winter of 1906-07, she again 
traveled to Europe, this time to work at the 
University of Paris (Sorbonne) under 
Madame Curie. On her return to Montreal in 
1907, she decided to marry Frank Pitcher, an 
older man, who at the time was a 
demonstrator in the Macdonald Physics 
Building, a job he soon left for a position with 
the Montreal Water and Power Company. 
Rutherford expressed disapproval of the 
match. He had by this time left McGill for 
Manchester, England, and was annoyed when 
Brooks turned down his offer of a post there. 
Certainly from the scientific point of view, 
Rutherford’s disapproval was fully justified, 


Harriet Brooks-Pitcher 


since Brooks gave up her career when she 
became Mrs. Pitcher. (Rutherford’s biog- 
rapher thinks that the physicist’s misgivings 
were valid on the personal level as well, since 
Mrs. Pitcher came to lead *‘a not very happy 
NG.) 

After her marriage, Brooks-Pitcher was 
known for her sociability, her love of litera- 
ture and her talents as a gardener. Involved 
with the McGill Alumnae Society, she served 
as its vice-president in the early 1920s. She 
died after a long illness on April 17, 1932, at 
the age of fifty-six. Of her three children, only 
one lived to survive her. 

Harriet Brooks is truly a ‘‘lost’’ woman, 
For all her brilliance and accomplishments, 
her name is almost totally forgotten. Ironi- 
cally, hers is an oblivion that was seemingly 
self-willed. 


10s 
Annie Macdonald-Langstaff 


Annie Macdonald-Langstaff was the first 
woman to graduate with a law degree from 
McGill. Unlike the women who preceded her, 
whose battle for acceptance had been with the 
university administration, Macdonald- 
Langstaff encountered no difficulties from the 
Law Faculty. In her case, when the opposition 
came, it was made up of some of the most 
powerful legal, political and ecclesiastical 
elements in Quebec society. 

Macdonald was the child of Scottish par 


ents. She grew up in Ontario and at sixteen } 
passed her senior matriculation exams. She | 
moved to Montreal and, after a brief unhappy 
marriage, separated from her husband and 


went to work for the legal firm of Jacobs, Hall 
and Garneau in 1906. The work appealed to 


her, and she decided that she wanted to prac- 
tise law on her own. In 1911, with the support | 


of her employers, she applied for admission 
to the Faculty of Law. 

Everything went smoothly. She was pet 
mitted to attend classes and graduated in 1914 
with first class honors, a prize of $25.00, and 
an overall standing of fourth place. She was 
on the verge of becoming Quebec’s first 
woman lawyer. 

Macdonald-Langstaff had known when she 
applied to McGill that women were not péer- 


mitted to practise law in the Province of 


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Quebec. Similar restrictions in Europe and 
other Canadian provinces had been removed. 
She was confident that Quebec would follow 
suit and admit her to the Bar. 

Her confidence turned out to be sadly mis- 
placed. Her application to take the prelimi- 
nary bar exams was rejected on the grounds 
that she was a woman. She then petitioned the 
Superior Court for a writ of mandamus to 
show cause why the Quebec Bar should not be 
ordered to grant her request to take the exams. 
The petition was rejected. The Quebec Bar 
argued that it had an absolute right to decide 
whom to admit to the examinations and that 
Macdonald-Langstaff had neglected to obtain 
her husband’s consent to take the exams. 

In all her legal battles, the fact that Mac- 
donald-Langstaff was separated from her 
husband, did not know his whereabouts. and 
was the sole support of her daughter became 
the focal point of the Court’s decisions. In a 
province that did not grant divorce, nor allow 
women to enter into any contractual obliga- 
tions without their husbands’ written permis- 
sion, Macdonald-Langstaff’s marital status 
was added to the fact of her sex as a strike 
against her. 

She appealed again, this time to the Court 
of King’s Bench. Again she lost. In a three to 
one decision, the judges once more deter- 
mined that women should not be allowed to 
practise law in the Province of Quebec. Mac- 
donald-Langstaff’s separation from her hus- 
band was again cited as a reason for rejecting 
her appeal. The judges claimed to be *“pro- 
tecting’’ her from the contempt of her hus- 
band and of the male sex in general. 


Annie Macdonald-Longstaff 


Sam Jacobs, Macdonald-Langstaff’s 
lawyer, who argued all her appeals, then 
attempted to attack the problem by trying to 
amend the discriminatory legislation itself, 
With the help of a colleague, he drafted the 
Cannon Bill for submission to the Quebec 
Legislative Assembly. The bill was defeated 
by a committee vote of seven to two. 

Macdonald-Langstaff, her avenues of 
appeal exhausted, returned to work at her old 
firm and took up flying in her spare time. By 
the time the Bar Act was changed in 1941 to 
permit women to practise law in Quebec, the 
requirements for a law degree had also 
changed. Macdonald-Langstaff would have 
had to return to university for her BA degree 
and this she declined to do. 

In 1965, aged seventy-eight, Macdonald- 
Langstaff retired from the firm. She died ten 
years later without ever having had the chance 
to practise law on her own, despite her degree 
and a long legal battle with the establishment. 


°20s 

Jessie Boyd-Scriver 

Dr. Jessie Boyd-Scriver was a member of the 
first class to graduate women in Medicine 
from McGill. A member as well of the 
pediatrics staff of the university, she main- 
tained a private practice in Montreal. In the 
1950s she became the first woman to be 
appointed head of a hospital department, 
when the Royal Victoria Hospital named her 
pediatrician in charge. She has also been dis- 
tinguished for her research into sickle cell 
anemia and for her contributions to 
prophylactic child care. 

It was Boyd’s father who suggested she go 
into medicine. This was during the First 
World War, when medical personnel were in 
great demand. The McGill Faculty of 
Medicine did not admit females at the time, so 
Boyd and three other women initially regis- 
tered as part-time students in the BSc pro- 
gram. After the first year, McGill permitted 
them to stay on as full-fledged second-year 
medical students. 

‘“[ think we were an oddity,’’ Boyd-Scriver 
recalls. ‘‘We tried not to do anything that 
would arouse antagonism. We watched our 
P’s and Q’s. But everybody was good to us.”’ 

Boyd graduated in 1922, winning the 
Wood Gold Medal and election to Alpha 
Omega Alpha, a medical honor society. She 
was immediately offered an internship in 
pediatrics at the Royal Victoria Hospital. She 
does not believe she encountered any dis- 
crimination on account of her sex. ‘‘I may 
have been too stupid to recognize it,’’ she 
adds with a smile. 

Today, at ninety years of age, Boyd- 
Scriver still maintains an active interest in the 
women’s movement and is concerned with 
the problems facing young women who enter 
the medical profession. She believes that 
ways must be found, through the establish- 
ment of fellowships and day care facilities, to 
enable women to pursue medical training 
without shortchanging the needs of their 
families. This is based on Boyd-Scriver’s 
Own experience with the often conflicting 


demands of family and profession. The only 
answer, she claims, is to have expert house- 
hold help. Moreover, when she was at home; 
she was able to call on junior doctors to 
replace her in case of emergencies. 

With regard to medicine, Boyd-Scriver 
concludes that doctors must look at the whole 
picture of a patient’s life. ‘‘ You must know 
what is going on in the home in order to 
adequately look after a child. I think that 
doctors today are missing out by not making 
home visits, because you can’t size up the 
atmosphere of a child’s home from across the 
office desk.’’ She also feels that with the 
medical system in Quebec, ‘‘No person need 
be without medical help at the present time. 
Under socialized medicine, serious or pro- 
longed illness is no longer as financially 
devastating to people as it once was.’”” 

Since her retirement in 1967, Boyd-Scriver 
has turned her attention to writing. In 1979 
she published a history of the Montreal Chil- 
dren’s Hospital. She has also written essays 
on Maude Abbott and on the first women 
doctors at McGill and recently contributed an 
autobiographical piece to A Fair Shake, a 
book of essays by McGill women. 

Boyd-Scriver still makes hospital rounds 
and keeps up with medical literature. Of all 
her accomplishments, she takes most pride in 
the gratitude of parents whose children she 
has helped. It is her greatest hope that 
‘people think I did a decent job.’’0 


Jessie Boyd-Scriver 


FALL 1984/McGILL NEWS 21 


. ete : 
— é - 
r is 
M oll 
ke 
a : 


A SPECIAL OFFER TO McGILL GRADUATES, 
STUDENTS, AND FRIENDS 


Are you looking for an attractive and original Canadian crafted gift? These hangings are 
especially designed for our antique loom and are woven by Canadian craft weavers On a 
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The number of these hangings will be limited. They will be numbered and registered in the } 
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22 McGILL NEWS/FALL 1984 


ile 


FOCUS: 
Derek Mather 


hen Derek Mather, BCom’54, was 
turned down for a job wth the giant 
Canadian International Paper Com- 
pany (CIP) after graduation, it never occurred 
to him that he would eventually found one of 
the largest venture capital pool in North 
America. Today, Mather is presicent of Ven- 
cap Equities Alberta Limited, with assets of 
almost a quarter of a billion dollars. Ironical- 
ly, some years after CIP rejected his initial 
application for employment, Mather and a 
group of investors bought out s»me of the 
company’s assets and established Tembec, 
which is now a highly successfu firm in its 
own right. Working from this bese, Mather 
has become a builder of Canadian companies. 

Mather’s experience in industry sensitized 
him to the need for venture carital invest- 
ment. Joining the Sun Life Assurance 
investment department in 1954, he spent 
eight years with the company in Montreal and 
England before leaving in 1962 to found the 
Canadian Enterprise Development Corpora- 
tion (CED). In early 1978, seconded by CED 
to Westmills Carpets in his home town of 
Calgary, Alberta, Mather succeeced in turn- 
ing around this troubled CED-funded com- 
pany. This posting, which was to have lasted 
for nine months, extended to two and a half 
years. It also led to Mather’s invclvement in 
the world of venture financing: ‘‘ When I was 
trying to raise money for Westmils, I found 
one could raise money for oil or real estate, 
but not a dime for industrial companies. This 
gave me the idea to start a venture capital 
company. So I began Vencap by setting out to 
talk to certain banks and the steering com- 
mittee set up by Alberta Minister of 
Economic Development Hugh Planche. 
When a Price Waterhouse search suggested 
my name as a possible president ‘or them, I 
guess Vencap was not too surprised.”’ 

Vencap Equities Alberta Ltd. was born on 
October 12, 1983, when its shares opened for 
trading at a 100% premium over issue price. 
There were some 42,000 subscribers to the 
initial issue, and the company capitalized 
with $44 million of common shares and con- 
vertible debentures. 

Vencap also received a $200 million loan 
from the Alberta Heritage Savings Trust 
Fund. In exchange for this support, Vencap 
agreed not to participate in areas of business 
such as oil and gas exploration ani develop- 
ment, real estate development and conven- 
tional banking, which the provincial govern- 
ment believes are already well served. 

Mather sees Vencap’s role as attracting 
new businesses to Alberta. Vencap does not 
seek to control or manage the companies it 


funds. It prefers to invest on a minority basis 
and assist competent entrepreneur-managers 
in achieving worthwhile goals, often with the 
aid of outside investors. 

Mather forecasts an ambitious future for 
Vencap: “Our central task in the next few 
years is to build several major corporations 
that would not otherwise exist or have 
achieved outstanding promise without Ven- 
cap’s help. Our business is building sound 
companies. It takes time for a successful 
enterprise to emerge and failures often pre- 
cede successes. But if we do our job well, 
then the eventual gains will far outweigh the 
earlier losses, and the shareholder will have 
an excellent return on the risk portion of his 
holding.’’ 

As a venture capital company, Vencap is 
unique in that its builders have structured the 
company so that in the typically barren early 
years there will be a flow of revenue to pro- 
vide reserves for losses and to permit some 
build-up in shareholders’ net asset value. 

Vencap seeks the potential for substantial 
growth in the firms that it backs. This does not 
mean, however, that Vencap is interested 
only in making investments in excess of $1 
million, Mather says. ‘‘We are prepared to 
consider smaller initial investments providing 
we can be satisfied that there is potential for 
substantial growth. We especially are pre- 
pared to help start new Alberta companies 
having prospects for substantial growth; to 
Support existing ones needing additional 
equity capital in order to finance attractive 
growth plans; to assist competent manage- 
ment to acquire Alberta companies whose 
present owners wish to sell; and to invest 
outside Alberta in ventures which, if they 


succeed, will in some significant way 
enhance Alberta’s economic future.’’ 

Vencap’s first funded venture, P.T.I. 
Holdings Ltd., is a Peace River-based com- 
pany that received $3 million to develop its 
existing market potential for industrial cater- 
ing, camp leasing and manufacturing, and oil 
field and general heavy transport. For the 
most part, Vencap’s advanced technology 
investments are in firms whose activities 
relate to Alberta’s strengths — oil and gas 
exploration and development and agriculture. 
Mather sees Vencap’s role as facilitating 
the development and importation of 
“class technology that can compete inter- 
nationally.”’ 

Espousing a free-enterprise philosophy, 
Mather is an enthusiastic booster of the 
Alberta government, which he says ‘‘has the 
best blueprint I have ever seen for encourag- 
ing sound, long-term corporate growth. They 
do what governments the world over should 
do. They set the environment and then sit 
back and wait. Most governments meddle in 
various ways. Venture capital and entre- 
preneurs die in climates where governments 
meddle. They thrive where the politics of 
self-reliance exist, and the best thing Alberta 
has going for it is this tradition of self- 
reliance.”’ 

Mather believes his views might not sit too 
well with his favorite McGill professor, Jack 
Weldon. Despite their political differences, 
Mather insists that the training he received at 
McGill has been invaluable to him. Of Wel- 
don, he concedes, ‘‘Although I can’t stand 
his politics, I never had a better teacher.”’ 
Hawley BlackO 


FALL 1984/McGILL NEWS 23 


MEMESS SE ELKO CEPA OLS eh eee het eee! 
. Se, ee ee > 2 E'S 


David Rosen 


SPPREPR SRSA VIS ORAS OF Pee PSPSRAS IPR ARS PESTS SIS PLAVIS Aye sr Eres 


FOCUS: 


Steve Holt 


aaa, 


ownbeat, America’s premiere jazz 

magazine, says that Steve Holt, 

BMusic’81, could be Canada’s next 
big jazz piano export, following in the 
footsteps of internationally-acclaimed musi- 
cians like Oscar Peterson. Such rapid recog- 
nition speaks well for the training McGill’s 
first jazz performance graduate received from 
the Faculty of Music. 

‘‘T was the first student who managed to 
squeak through as a jazz major at McGill. 
And that was only because I was an experi- 
ment. The program has changed vastly since I 
graduated. It was an ad hoc course for me,”’ 
says Holt, who has been a jazz improvisation 
instructor at the Faculty of Music since 1981. 

Holt’s reaction to the Downbeat review of 
his first recording, The Lion's Eyes (Plug 
Records), is typical of the quiet-spoken 30- 
year-old musician. ** You can’t take all of that 
too seriously. What they mean is that I will 


24 McGILL NEWS/FALL 1984 


move away from Montreal, make lots of 
money, and not be heard from again,’’ he 
says. 

Jazz musicians are looked on as funny 
people who stay up late and party a lot, says 
Holt. Even classical musicians don’t think 
jazz musicians really know anything about 
music, a judgement belied by Holt’s musical 
experience and academic training. His first 
contact with the piano was at the age of four. 
He nevertheless remained a self-taught 
pianist until, at age twenty-two, he began 
formal studies at McGill. 

‘*T became interested in jazz in my late 
teens. Most jazz musicians start out in jazz, 
and then move over to jazz-rock or crossover 
music. I did it the other way ‘round. You 
might say I came in by the back door,’’ says 
Holt, who has been a professional musician 
since the age of seventeen. 

Jazz improvisation is not the magical pro- 


—— 


cess many people seem to think it is. Holt 
would compare it to writing poetry. “Before 
you begin to write poetry, you have to learn 
the language. Then you become acquainted 
with the various poets. Eventually, you are 
encouraged to write your own poems. It is the 
same with jazz improvisation. You can't 
teach someone to write original poetry, or to 
improvise. You can only take them so far, 
then throw them out of the airplane — witha 
parachute,’’ he adds with a smile. 

One of the bugbears of all jazz pianists is 
the unreliability of the instruments they use in 
performance. ‘‘Every other musician gets to 
bring his own instrument onto the bandstand. 
Not so the piano player. His piano stays in his 
living room. A bass player can go out and 
spend $15,000 on his instrument and bring it 
to the gig that night. Even if I get to play on 
good pianos, they aren’t the one I am used to, 
If this happened to a horn player, he would 
flip,’ claims Holt. 

Holt’s assessment of the Montreal jazz 
scene is generally positive: ‘*The atmosphere 
among the musicians is good. They are eager 
to hear new talent and to give people a chance 
to play. Of course, the club scene could be 
better; there aren’t enough clubs, and those 
that exist don’t come up to the standards they 
might,’’ he says. Still, ““Some of my great 
musical heroes live here — people like Jean 
Beaudet and Oliver Jones. This is really a 
good piano town. On the other hand, business 
can be slow for me because there are only so 
many gigs to go around,’’ he says. 

While studying at McGill with Armas 
Maiste, BMus’72, who was then the Montre- 
al Symphony Orchestra’s resident pianist, 
Holt travelled once a month to New York City 
to train with jazz pianist Kenny Barron. It is 
obvious from Holt’s enthusiasm that Barron 
is one of his great musical influences. **Just to 
be with Kenny was an education. We would 
spend the afternoons talking, listening to 
records, playing and drinking cognac. Thenl 
would go and listen to him perform with bas- 
sist Ron Carter. They’d demonstrate all the 
things we had talked about in the lesson, ” 
says Holt. 

Holt used to do considerable work in the 
advertising field. ‘‘Jingles — radio and televi- 
sion commercials — are a whole skill in them- 
selves. You have to go into the studio and get 
it right the first time. It’s a mechanical busi 
ness. There are a lot of musicians who can 
do the job, but the decision as to who gets 
the work often depends on extraneous 
circumstances.”’ 

What does Holt do when he is not playing 
and teaching jazz? ‘‘I’m a financial analyst. | 
manage a few stock portfolios. Often when I 
get home at 4 a.m. I log onto the Dow Jones 
service with my IBM computer. That is my 
other keyboard. I can make a fair bit of money 
doing this, not only with my own investments 
in the market, but with other people’s,’’ Holt 
continues. ‘‘Just to switch hats is such a trip. 
It’s a different kind of improvising.’ Simon 
Twiston DaviesO 


*“ gta? 


= 


2, OU a 00tét~—t | See 


"36 

VIOLET ARCHER, BMus’36, was chosen 
composer of the year by the Canadian Music 
Council in March and received the Order of 
Canada in April 1984. 


'37 

EVANS B. REID, BSc’37, PhD’40, retired 
chairman of the chemistry department at Col- 
by College, Waterville, Me., recently has had 
exhibitions of his art work at the Art Center of 
Ogunquit and the Harlow Gallery in Hal- 
lowell. 


"38 
W. GRANT HORSEY, BCom’38, has been 
elected honorary chairman of D.R.G. Inc. 


"39 
JAMES N. GRASSBY, BEng’39, MEng’40, 


is chairman of the United Appeal in Sudbury, 
Ont. 


"41 

STEWART E. JAMIESON, BEng’41, has 
joined the board of directors of Cruiser Min- 
erals Ltd., Vancouver, B.C. 


out the coupon below: 


"43 

A. J. DE GRANDPRE, BCL’43, 
Hon.LLD’81, has been appointed to the 
board of directors of Sun Life Assurance 
Company of Canada. 

R. G. E. MURRAY, MD’43, was awarded 


the Flavelle Medal of the Royal Society of 


Canada for contributions to biological science 
in May 1984 and in June was appointed pro- 
fessor emeritus at the University of Western 
Ontario. 


"46 

JAMES D. RAYMOND, BEng’46, has been 
appointed president of CEMP Investments 
Ltd., Montreal. 


"a7 

LUC PARENT, BCL’47, has been named a 
judge of the trial division of the Federal Court 
of Canada. 


"48 

MARCEL JOYAL, BCL’48, has been named 
a judge of the trial division of the Federal 
Court of Canada. 

J. S. MCKENDY, BA’48, who has been 
elected to the Vancouver Advisory Board of 
National Trust Company, Ltd., retired as a 
vice-president of National Trust in July. 


| at Eas Se 


Entrance Scholarships to McGill 


Five scholarships per year, $5,000 each. 


These are awarded to outstanding students showing promise 
of future success and responsible citizenship. Academic 
Standing, leadership qualities, participation in community 
affairs or athletics will all be taken into consideration in 
selection of applicants who are Canadian citizens or perma- 
nent residents. These scholarships are renewable for up to 
four years in any full-time undergraduate degree program, 
including Dentistry, Law and Medicine. Financial need will 
not be a factor in the choice of scholarship winners. 


For further information, including an application, please fill 


Scholarships Office, McGill University 
845 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, PQ, H3A 2T5 


Greville Smith Entrance Scholarship. 


eB Bethy BO” | ee OB, we Oy ee Te eee et) ele Se Oe ei. Siete 
oe et Ee 8: ee, OF ee Ta - 6h ee 8 ee: See Oe eee 


(postal code) 


WHERE THEY ARE AND WHAT THEYRE DOING 


"49 

GRAHAM DENNIS, BA’49, has been 
named a member of the Order of Canada. 

A. G. MCCAUGHEY, BCom’49, has been 
elected to the board of Toromont Industries. 
Ltd. 


50 

GEORGE G. FLATER, BEng’50, has been 
appointed president and chief operating 
officer of British Columbia Forest Products 
Ltd. 

JOHN H. WALSH, BEng’50, MEng’51, 
senior special advisor (Coal), Department of 
Energy, Mines and Resources, Canada, has 
been elected a fellow of the American Society 
for Metals. 


"51 

J. AIME F. DESAUTELS, BArch’51, 
recently retired as director of planning for the 
City of Montreal. 

ALFRED POWIS, BCom’51, was invested 
as an officer of the Order of Canada in 
October. 

WALTER C. STETHEM, BEng’S51, has 
received the distinguished service award of 
the American Society of Heating, 
Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning 
Engineers, Inc. 


FALL 1984/McGILL NEWS 25 


SH PPSV ERP ASP RAV SMAT II ERED P TRIG PRESSES PSTAP RES PAIAS ADH FHM PRA 


"52 
SENATOR E. LEO KOLBER, BA’49, 
BCL’52, has been appointed vice-chairman 
of CEMP Investments Ltd., Montreal, and 
has been elected to the board of directors of 
CJAD Inc., Montreal. 


"53 

GEORGE J. RIESZ, BA’53, is the executive 
director of Contra Costa County Hospital, 
Contra Costa County, Ca. 


"54 

AL SEAMAN, BEng’54, has been appointed 
external relations manager of Digital Equip- 
ment of Canada, Ltd., Kanata, Ont. 


"55 

MICHAEL KAYE, DipIntMed’55, BTh’82, 
head of the division of nephrology at the 
Montreal General Hospital, was appointed a 
member of their chaplaincy team in May 
1984, a year after his ordination into the 
ministry of the United Church of Canada. 


"56 

ALLEN A. DESJARDINS, BEng’56, was 
appointed vice-president, operations, of 
Timminco, Ltd., with responsibility for the 
company’s metal plants at Beauharnois, 
Que., and Haley, Ont. 

JOHN C. KEATING, BEng’56, was recently 
elected vice-president, corporate affairs and 
planning, for ITT Canada Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 
BRUCE LITTLE, BEng’56, was recently 
appointed executive vice-president of James 
Maclaren Industries Inc. 

CLIFFORD S. MALONE, BCL’56, has been 
appointed president and chief executive 
officer and a director of Wabasso Inc. 

W. JOHN MOFFATT, BEng’56, has been 
promoted to vice-president, specialty chemi- 
cals, at Hercules Canada Inc., Toronto, Ont. 


"57 

ROBERT CALDER, BEng’57, vice-presi- 
dent and general manager of Waterville Cel- 
lular Products Ltd., is the first Quebecer to 
serve as chairman of the 32-year old Auto 
Parts Manufacturers’ Association of Canada. 
JOHN D. THOMPSON, BEng’57, has been 
nominated to the board of directors of La 
Groupe SGF. 


59 

JACK COHEN, BSc’55, MDCM’S59, 
recently obtained a BA in honors history, 
with distinction, from Concordia University, 
Montreal. 

JOHN UDD, BEng’59, MEng’60, PhD’70, 
was recently appointed director, mining 
research laboratories, at the Canada Centre 
for Mineral and Energy Technology. 


26 McGILL NEWS/FALL 1984 


60 

MICHAEL D. SOPKO, BEng’60, MEng’61, 
is the new president of Inco Ltd.’s Ontario 
division, based in Sudbury. 

PETER G. WHITE, BA’60, is a member of 
the board of directors of Donohue, Inc. 


61 

PIERRE Y. DUCROS, BEng’6l, was 
recently elected to the board of directors of 
Unigesco, Inc. 

DR. TOBY GILSIG, BEng’61, vice-presi- 
dent of Hydro-Québec’s Research Institute, 
has been appointed chairman of the Associa- 
tion des directeurs de recherche industrielle 
du Québec. 

MORTIMER ZUCKERMAN, BA’57, 
BCL’61, owner of Atlantic magazine, 1s cur- 
rently negotiating to buy U.S. News and 
World Report. 


"62 

FRED C. DRURY, BEng’62, is a founding 
partner and executive vice-president of 
ECONEX, Inc., Wheaton, IIl., the largest 
distributor of commercial explosives in the 
United States. 

N. E. FLORAKAS, BEng’62, has been 
appointed vice-president, Masterfeeds Divi- 
sion, of Maple Leaf Mills Ltd., London, Ont. 


63 

ROGER E. GAWNE, BCom’63, was 
recently appointed vice-president and general 
manager of Plough Canada Inc., Missis- 
sauga, Ont. 

BARRY HULL, BEng’63, is president and 
chief operating officer of Comterm, Inc., 
Pointe Claire, Que. 

NICHOLAS KAUSER, BEng’63, was 
named vice-president, engineering, of Cantel 
Cellular Radio Group Inc., Montreal. 
PHANOR L. PEROT, Jr., DipNeurosur- 
gery 61, PhD’63, professor and chairman of 
the department of neurological surgery, 
Medical University of South Carolina, has 
been appointed to a four-year term on the 
National Advisory Neurological and Com- 
municative Disorders and Stroke Council, 
Bethesda, Md. 

F. DAVID RADLER, BCom’63, was 
recently appointed to the boards of directors 
of the Insurance Corporation of British Col- 
umbia and Commonwealth Construction 
Company Ltd. 


64 

JOHN G. LASCHINGER, BSc’64, has been 
appointed president and chief operating 
officer of Dale and Co. Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 
JAY SCHECTER, BSc’64, was recently 
appointed vice-president, finance, and trea- 
surer of Joseph E. Seagram and Sons, Ltd. 


65 

JOEL I. BELL, BA’62, BCL’65, has been 
appointed to the board of directors of Tele- 
globe Canada. 


group, of Bramalea Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 
VAIRA VIKAS-FREIBERGS, PhD’65, was 
recently appointed vice-chairman of the Sci- 
ence Council of Canada. 


66 

DANIEL LING, MSc’66, PhD’68, recently 
accepted an appointment as dean of the newly 
created Faculty of Health Sciences at the Uni- 
versity of Western Ontario. He is also the first 
Canadian to be elected president of the 
Alexander Graham Bell Institute in the 
United States. 

HENRY SREBRNIK, BA’66, MA’7Q, is 
assistant director of the Adult Jewish Educa- 
tion Commission of B’Nai B’Rith Interna- 
tional in Washington, D.C. 

VICTOR A. TANAKA, BSc’66, has been 
appointed general manager, minerals explo- 
ration and acquisition, Canada, of Asamera 
Inc., Calgary, Alta. 


"67 

H. JONATHAN BIRKS, BA’67, has been 
elected to the board of directors of CJAD 
Inc., Montreal, Que. 

E. V. DODGE, BEng’67,was appointed gen- 
eral manager, marketing and sales, Van- 
couver, B.C., for CP Rail Inc., with national 
responsibility for servicing the coal and 
lumber industries. 

D. G. MCDOUGALL, BA’67, has been 
appointed vice-president, planning and 
development, with Ogilvie Mills Ltd., 
Montreal. 


68 

BRIAN L. BARGE, MSc’68, PhD’72, has 
been appointed head of the newly-formed 
advanced technologies department, industrial 
and engineering research division of the 
Alberta Research Council, Calgary, Alta. 


69 

ALAN HERSCOVICI, BA’69, will have two 
books published this autumn: Second Nature: 
The Animal Rights Controversy, published by 
the C.B.C., and Tibetan Treasure, a novel 
that will be published by Simon and Pierre. 
DAN HILLEL, BCom’69, has joined 
Toronto Investment Management, Inc., as 4 
vice-president and portfolio manager. 
LORRAINE SMITH, BSc’69, has accepted 
the position of reference librarian at the 
Health Sciences Library of the University of 
Saskatchewan in Saskatoon. 

PRAKMARD SUWANASING, MSc’69, 
chief, environment section, Department of 
Mineral Resources, Bangkok, Thailand, has 
been visiting mining and metallurgical estab- 
lishments throughout North America during 
the spring and summer of 1984. 


70 

BARRIE D. BIRKS, BA’70, has moved to 
Minneapolis, Minn., where he is overseeing 
Birks Company interests in the United States. 


DAVID PTAK, BEng 6), was recently | 
appointed senior vice-president, residential | 


on 
a Me 


Ss 


aT | ne 


mt 
‘) |M. GRANT BROWN, BEng’71, was 
recently appointed vice-president of Cana- 
dian Corporate Funding, Ltd. 
ROBERT E. GALLANT, BEng’71, has been 
appointed vice-president and general man- 
ager of the Film Group of Hercules Canada 
Inc., Mississauga, Ont. 
JULIUS H. GREY, BA’70, BCL’71, 
MA’73, recently had a book, /mmigration 


Law in Canada, published by Butterworths of 


Toronto, Ont. 

MICHAEL C. NEWBURY, MSc’71, has 
been appointed vice-president of corporate 
banking with Barclays Bank of Canada, with 
particular responsibility for natural resources 
and project financing. 

MARGARET C. OUTERBRIDGE, BN’71, 
who recently obtained her master’s of divinity 
from the Atlantic School of Theology, was 


ordained a minister of the United Church of 


Canada in May 1984 and has been appointed 
to serve the Cobequid Pastoral Charge of the 
United Church near Truro, N.S. 

PAUL A. ROLLAND, BA’71, Dip- 
PubAcc’78, has been admitted as a partner in 
the firm of Mallette, Benoit, Boulanger, Ron- 
deau & Associés, Chartered Accountants. 


‘72 

PETER D. MACLEOD, BEng’72, was 
appointed director, design and construction, 
CN Hotels. 

CHERYL CAMPBELL STEER, BCom’72, 
has been made a partner, financial planning 
and control, with Woods Gordon, Manage- 
ment Consultants. 

JOYCE E. TAYLOR, BSc’72, has been 
named an associate of the Society of 
Actuaries. 


‘73 

ROGER’ CLARKE, PhD’73, will become 
assistant director of the Countryside Com- 
mission for England and Wales, a body 
responsible for conserving the landscape and 
promoting public access to the countryside. 


‘74 

DR. KENNETH C. CADIEN, BEng’74, 
MEng’77, assistant professor of materials 
engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Insti- 
tute, Troy, N.Y., recently received a faculty 
development award from IBM. 

MARK COUTURE, MD’74, recently began 
a fellowship in thoracic oncology at M.D. 
Anderson Hospital in Houston, Tx. 
NICHOLAS J. ROBERT, MD’74, has been 
appointed clinical director of medical oncol- 
ogy at the New England Medical Center with 
joint appointments in the departments of 
therapeutic radiology and pathology, where 
he will pursue his chief research interests — 
the treatment of breast cancer and the use of 
hyperthermia in the treatment of cancer. 


"75 

ALLISON DOUPE, BSc’75, received her 
medical degree and a PhD in neurobiology 
from Harvard University this past June and is 
currently interning at the Massachusetts Gen- 
eral Hospital in Boston, Mass. 


SUSAN E. HERSHMAN, BA’75, has 
recently been promoted to director, new 
product development, for Joseph E. Seagram 
and Sons, Ltd., in Montreal. 

GEORGE KACHANIWSKY, BEng’75, has 
left Mines Gaspé and has been appointed 
Metallurgical Superintendent at the Horne 
Smelter, Noranda, Que. 

DR. SHERRYL KLEINMAN, BA’75, 
recently published Equals Before God: 
Seminarians as Humanistic Professionals, 
with the University of Chicago Press, and is 
assistant professor of sociology at the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. 


‘76 

DR. VINCENZO F. DI NICOLA, BA’76, a 
resident in psychiatry at the Institute of 
Community and Family Psychiatry of the 
Jewish General Hospital, is an editor of the 
McGill journal, Transcultural Psychiatric 
Research Review. 

Dr. SHARON HORLICK, BSc’76, is work- 
ing at the Regional Children’s Centre of the 
Windsor Western Hospital, Windsor, Ont. 
DR. STEVEN PINKER, BA’76, has won the 
1984 American Psychological Association 
Distinguished Scientific Award for an early 
career contribution to psychology in the area 
of human learning and cognition. Pinker, 
associate professor of psychology at the Mas- 
sachusetts Institute of Technology, was cited 
for his studies on the mental perception of 
three-dimensional space and for his work on 
language acquisition. 

STANLEY ROWEN, BA’76, has recently 
completed a master’s degree in business 
administration at New York University and 
is currently managing institutional options 
portfolios at Balch, Hardy, and Scheinman, 
New York, N.Y. 

RICHARD R. VISCARELLO Jr., BSc’76, 
received a doctor of medicine degree from 
Hahnemann University of Philadelphia, Pa., 
as well as the Hahnemann Hospital Associa- 
tion Award for overall academic excellence 
and the Obstetrics and Gynecology Award for 
meritorious achievements in obstetrics. 


at 

LEYLA ALYANAK, BA’77, will be 
assuming a senior public relations position 
with the International Air Transport Associa- 
tion in Geneva, Switzerland. 

BRIAN R. MILLS, BSc’77, is employed at 
Canadian Occidental Petroleum Corp. as a 
region geologist in the exploration depart- 
ment. 


‘78 

KWONG L. MARK, MBA’78, has been 
appointed manager, planning and business 
development, at PanCanadian Petroleum 
Ltd., with responsibility for evaluation of 
new business opportunities and assisting in 
strategic planning. 


WILLIAM McPHEE, BSc’75, LLB’78, has 
joined the strategic management consulting 
firm of Bain and Co. in Boston, Mass., as a 
consultant. 


‘79 

T. GREG HAWKINS, MSc’79, vice-presi- 
dent of MPH Consulting Ltd, is responsible 
for exploration and evaluation consulting ser- 
vices in their Vancouver, B.C. office. 
MARY JANE IAIA-MCPHEE, BA’76, 
LLB’79, has joined the Arthur D. Little 
organization in Boston, Mass., as a consul- 
tant specializing in financial industries. 
DONALD CHARLES MANNING, BSc’79, 
was awarded the degree of doctor of 
philosophy from Johns Hopkins University, 
Baltimore, Md., at the May convocation. 


80 

KENNETH ABRAMOVITCH, BSc’76, 
DDS’80, received a postdoctoral certificate in 
dental diagnostic science at the May convo- 
cation of the University of Texas Health Sci- 
ence Center in San Antonio. 

SANDRA SCHRIDER EPSTEIN, BA’80, 
received a master of family therapy degree 
from the Graduate School of Hahnemann 
University, Philadelphia, Pa. 


"82 
TIMOTHY R. FORD, BA’82, is a planning 
technician with the City of Edmonton, Alta. 


"84 

RAFFI TOUMAYAN, BMus’84, will be 
studying in the master’s program at the 
Gomidas Conservatory in Yerevan, Soviet 
Armenia. (1 


DEATHS 


12 
RUBY R. WADLEIGH, BA’12, at West 
Vancouver, B.C., on February 24, 1984. 


"13 
BENJAMIN B. RICHARDSON, BSA’ 13, at 
Woodstock, Ont., on June 3, 1983. 


14 
ANNA (WILLIAMS) SHEARMAN, 
BA’14, at Montreal, on September 9, 1984. 


"21 

JOHN F. CHISHOLM, BCL’21, at Ste. Anne 
de Bellevue, Que., on June 28, 1984. 
CALVIN S. JELLY, BSc’21, at Toronto, 
Ont., on September 14, 1984. 

KATHLEEN (GODWIN) TERROUX, 
BA’21, MSc’22, PhD’30, at Montreal, on 
July 31, 1984. 


22 
STEPHANE BOILY, BSA’22, at Montreal, 
on August I, 1984. 


"24 
ELEANOR (McTAGGART) ALLEN, Dip- 
PE’24, at Goderich, Ont., on June 22, 1984. 


FALL 1984/McGILL NEWS 27 


"51 


PAUL R. CROSSON, DDS‘S51, at Weyburn, | 
"52 


"35 
VERA (HART) ELKIN, BA’35, at Montre- 
al, on June 22, 1984. 

DONALD R. JACOB, MD’35, at Lincoln, 
Me., on March 31, 1984. 


26 
AILEEN CRAWFORD, DipPE’26, at Punta 


Gorda, Fla., on June 8, 1984. Sask., on July 6, 1984. 


ess 
LOUIS M. BLOOMFIELD, BA’27, at 
Jerusalem, Israel, on July 19, 1984. 


WILLIAM MARTEL, BEng’52, at St. 
Bruno, Que., on August 18, 1984. 


36 
KEITH A. BOOTH, BEng’36, at Ottawa, 
Ont., on September 20, 1984. 

LEVON K. GARRON, MD’36, at Kanab, 
Ut., on May 5, 1984. 

KENNETH HALLSWORTH, BSc’36, at 
Toronto, Ont., on September 8, 1984. 


"53 

MICHAEL RICHARD PAZUR, BSc’S3, at p 
Ruthven, Ont., on May 16, 1984. 
JAMES G. RIPLEY, BEng’53, at Toronto, 
Ont., on August 14, 1984. 


"28 

R. HAMPSON GILLEAN, BScArts’28, at 
Toronto, Ont., on June 29, 1984. 

JOHN C. MACKENZIE, MD’28, Dip- 
PubHealth’47, at Hammond, La., on July 8, 


1984. W. RONALD TAYLOR, MD’36, at Van- ie 
GEORGE McLEOD TAIT, BSA’28, at St. | couver, B.C., on March 21, 1984. "54 v 


DR. PAUL PETER HELLER, LLM’54, at bes 
Auckland, N.Z., on August 9, 1980. oo 
DOROTHY S. SMYTH, BLS’54, MLS’81, Mt 


Lambert, Que., on September 14, 1984. 
FREDERICK B. TILTON, BCom’28, at 
Burlington, Ont., on August 4, 1984. 


"37 
JUDITH (SEIDEL) SPIER, BA’37, MA’39, 


at Montreal, on September 8, 1984. at Montreal, on April 28, 1984. ne 
CATHERINE (MACLEOD) DECHMAN, 38 55 16 
BHS’29, at Hamilton, Ont., on July 15, O.N. HUGGARD, BSc’38, at Fredericton, | EDWARD LLEWELLYN-THOMAS, ry 
1984. N.B., in March 1984. MD’55, at Toronto, Ont., on July 5, 1984. - 


LAWRENCE G. MARKS, BA’29, at 
Montreal, on August 8, 1984. 

EILEEN McK YES, DipPE’29, at Montreal, 
on July 21, 1984. 

HELEN E. WEBSTER, BA’29, at Montreal, 
on August 3, 1984. 

MYRON S. WHELEN, PhD’29, at Wil- 
mington, Del., on June 19, 1984. 


"56 


39 hy es 
JAMES BALLANTYNE DICK, BEng’s6,| 


CLEMENT L. DONOHUE, MD’39, at 
Caribou, Me., on July 2, 1984. 


MEng’63, at Sherbrooke, Que., on June 26,| —s 
1984. iim 


"40 
NORMAN W. BENSON, BEng’40, at 
Montreal, on July 2, 1984. 


"58 

PAUL E. GOULET, BEng’58, at Charles-] , 
bourg, Que., on July 31, 1984. pq) st 
LIESELOTTE WOLF, BN’S58, at Toronto, bese 


"30 "Al 


ANNE (MACFARLANE) BEATTIE, HAROLD GLEN LANGTON, BCL’41, at | Ont., on March 7, 1984. tf 
BA’30, BLS’31, at Tadoussac, Que., on | Edmonton, Alta., in August, 1984. ~ 
August 2, 1984. ‘59 | 
HARRY COVICY, DipPharm’30, at| "43 ANDREA (DALY) BELCOURT, BA’59, at |_| igs 
Montreal, on September 18, 1984. HARRY STARR, BSc’41, MD’43, MSc’47, | Montreal, on June 25, 1984. st 

at Beaumont, Tx., on August 18, 1984. ics 
31 64 << 
WILLIAM J. VEITCH, BCom’31, at | “49 MATTI J. PIRHONEN, BSc’64, at Stoney} * 
Montreal, on July 1, 1984. ANCEL U. BLAUSTEIN, BSc’42, MD’45, | Creek, Ont., on August 9, 1984. fyi ve 
RAY G. WEBBER, BSA’31, at Halifax, | at New York, N.Y., on June 27, 1984. hw 
N.S.,on June 17, 1984. EDWARD N. LAWAND, BA’4S, at Fort | ’67 BAT 


Lauderdale, Fla., on August 7, 1984. 
DAVID R. SHAPIRO, BSc’42, MD’45, at 
Newburgh, N.Y., on June 26, 1984. 
F.RUSSELL YEOMAN, BArch’45, at 
Montreal, on March 16, 1984. 


KEVIN J. O’CONNELL, BEng’6/7, 
MEng’70, in Peru, on July 8, 1984. 
CECILIA (UCHE) OMENUKOR, BN’67, at 
Enugu, Nigeria, in May, 1984. 


"32 

JAMES CORNEIL BINNIE, BA’29, 
BCL’32, at Lakefield, Ont., on August 16, 
1984. 

W. GORDON ROBERTS, BCom’32, at 
Montreal, on July 3, 1984. 

E. DAVID SHERMAN, MD’32, at Montre- 
al, on September 5, 1984. 


"75 

JOEL AMSEL, BSc’75, at Montreal, on 
August 25, 1984. 

MALCOLM J. HEATON, MSc’75, PhD’78, 
in Alberta, on August 2, 1984. 


"46 
CECIL E. MACDONALD, BEng’46, at Old 
Greenwich, Ct., on May 23, 1984. 


"33 "a7 


HAROLD C. BONNER, MD’33, at Tucson, | ROBERT V. DESAUTELS, BCom’47, at | ’77 
Az., on July 15, 1984. Newmarket, Ont., on August 3, 1984. REV. WILLIAM E. BLACK, STM’77, at Ker 
KATHARINE (SMITH) HUTCHISON, Cornwall, Ont., on September 18, 1984. 


BA’33, at Calgary, Alta., on August 27, 
1984. 


"48 
J.W.R. MEADOWCROFT, BSc’48, 
MA’52, at Grand Manan, N.B., on August 
22, 1984. 


ANTONIO DI CIOCCO, BCL’77, a) 
Montreal, on July 14, 1984. 


"34 

MICHAEL G. DOYLE, BEng’34, at 
Ottawa, Ont., on June 25, 1984. 

GORDON B. LOOMIS, MD’34, at Sher- 
brooke, Que., on August 26, 1984. 

HOLLIS A. RENTON, MD’34, at Alameda, 
Ca., on May 23, 1984. 


‘78 hi 
KEITH SCOTT SOKOLYK, BCom’78, at} 
Toronto, Ont., on September 6, 1984. . 


50 

MONA C. MERCIER, BSc’42, MD’50, at 
Montreal, on September 6, 1984. 

TEKLA ELSE TAMMIST, BLS’50, at 
Montreal, on July 8, 1984. 

ROBERT W. WILSON, BCom’S0, at 


79 UK 
JOHN WILFRED DARCH, BA’79, at : 
Montreal, on September 5, 1984. 


Montreal, on August 23, 1984. 83 i he 
MARGARET ANN FURST, BEng’83, a] 7 a 

Montreal, on August 3, 1984. 0 Wallis 

a 


28 McG'LL NEWS/FALL 1984 


a 
". =r 


Keep in touch! 


Directory of Graduates’ Society Branches 


THE GRADUATES’ SOCIETY 
OF McGILL UNIVERSITY, 
MONTREAL. 

President 1984-86 

Edward Cleather, BA’51 

469 Stanstead Crescent, 
Montreal, Que. H3R 1Y1 
Macdonald Branch 

President 

D. Grant Ross, BSc.Agr’56 
Agri-Marketing Corporation, 

592 Grande Allée, 

Mont St. Hilaire, Que 

J3G 4S6 

Alumnae Society 

President 

Mrs. Linda Cobbett, BA'67, MLS'69 
P.O. Box 187, 

Hudson Heights, Que. JOP 1JO 
McGill Society of Montreal 
President 

Mrs. Ann Vroom, BA’67 

510 Mitchell Avenue, 

Montreal, Que. H3R 1L4 

McGill MBA Society of Montreal 
President 

Hosen Marjaee, BEng'78, MBA’81 
Bimcor Inc., 

600 de la Gauche, Suite #2141, 
Montreal, Que. H3B 4L8 

Young Alumni 

President 

Brent Hussey, BCom'75, BCL'77, 
LLB'79 

1590 Pine Avenue West, 
Montreal, Que. H3G 1B4 


ALBERTA 

Northern Alberta 
President 

John Lindell, BCom’59, CA’61 
10852 - 33rd Avenue, 
Edmonton, Alta. T6J 3C5 
Southern Alberta 
President 

Michael Crombie, BCom'56 
62 Brae Glen Lane S.W., 
Calgary, Alta. T2W 1B6 


BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Trail and District 

Contact 

Dr. J. M. Ramaradhya, PhD’59 
P.O. Box 1708, 

Rossland, B.C. VOG 1Y0 
Vancouver 

President 

Bruce Ambrose, BSc'70 

6138 Wiltshire Street, 
Vancouver, B.C. V6M 3M2 
Victoria 

President 

V. Harvey Mathews, BCom'78 
977 Convent Place, Apt. 3, 
Victoria, B.C. V8V 2Y9 


MANITOBA 

Winnipeg 

President, 

Claude Joubert, BCom'76 
277 Wellington Street, Apt. 1405, 
Winnipeg, Man. R3M 3V7 
NEW BRUNSWICK 
President 

Mrs. Ruth-Anne Waday, 
BSc.Fd.Sc’73 

RR. 1., 

Salisbury, N.B. EQOA 3E0 


NEWFOUNDLAND 
President 

David B. Sparkes, BSc'52 
Box 1532, 

St. John's, Nfld. A1C 5N8 


NOVA SCOTIA 
Cape Breton 
President, 
Gordon S. Macdonald, BArch’35 
P.O. Box 160, 

Sydney, N.S. B1P 6H1 

Halifax 

President 

David B. Hyndman, BCom'57 
881 Brunswick 

Street, Suite J 

Halifax, N.S. B3H 3Y3 


ONTARIO 

Grand River Valley 

Contact 

Mrs. Lila Willis Beach 

57 Balmoral Drive. 

Kitchener, 

Ontario N2M 2J7 

The Lakeshore 

President 

Ms. Linda Powidajko, BEx'79 
2169 Devlin Drive, 

Hamilton, Ont. L7P 3C6 
Kirkland Lake 

Treasurer 

J.M.C. Gamble, BCom'29 
97 First Street, 

Kirkland Lake, Ont. P2N 1N6 
London 

President 

George W. Piper, BEng’51 

28 Foxchapel Road, 

London, Ont. N6G 1Z2 
Niagara Peninsula, 
President 

Ceri Hugill, BA'67 

P.O. Box 1013, 

12 Bigelow Crescent, 

Fonthill, Ont. LOS 1E0 
Ottawa Valley 

President 

John Forsey, BEng'73 

226 Daly Avenue, 

Ottawa, Ont. KiN 6G2 
Toronto 

President 

Mrs. Mary Robinson Brebner, BA'68 
24 Dunbar Road, 

Toronto, Ont. M4W 2x6 
Upper St. Lawrence 
President 

Dr. D. Paul Harris, BA’'52, MD’57 
Beechgrove Regional Children’s 
Centre, P.O. Box 7777, 
Kingston, Ont. K7L 5H1 
Windsor 

President 

Mrs. Jessie lwasiw, BA’65, MA’67 
R.R. 1, 

Belle River, Ont. NOR 1A0 


PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND 
President 

Mrs. John K. Ellis, BSc(PE)'50 
6 Victoria Road, 

Summerside, P.E.1. CIN 2G5 


QUEBEC 

Bedford District 

President 

Guy Robichaud, BSc'49 

33 Leclerc Blvd. East, 
Granby, Que. J2G 1S8 
Quebec City 

Contact 

David C. Ellis, BEng’56 

2795 Ville Marie Street, 
Quebec. Que. G1IW 1Y6 

St. Francis District 
Treasurer 

G. Hewson Hickie, BSc’61, MSc’65 
Chemistry Dept., 

Bishop's University, 
Lennoxville, Que. JOB 1Z0 
St. Maurice Valley 
President 

John Wickenden Jr., BEng'59 
710 des Peupliers Street, 
Trois Rivieres, Que. G8Y 2P2 


SASKATCHEWAN 
Northern Saskatchewan 
Secretary/Treasurer 

Jeffrey M. Whiting, BSc’67 
612 Quance Avenue, 
Saskatoon, Sask. S7H 3B4 
Southern Saskatchewan 
President 

Arthur-D. McKellar, BEng’44 
82 Dunning Crescent, 
Regina, Sask. S4S 3W1 


UNITED STATES 


CALIFORNIA 

Northern California 
President 

John N. Baird, BCL'’65 

33 Pacific Avenue, 
Piedmont, Calif. 94611 
Central California 
President 

Dr. Bennet Marcus, MD'49 
15215 Leffingwell Road, 
Suite B, 

Whittier, Calif. 90604 
Southern California 
Vice-President 

Dr. David L. Collins, MD'54 
7920 Frost Street, Suite 402, 
San Diego, Calif. 92123 


CONNECTICUT 

President 

Dr. Graeme L. Hammond, MD’62 
37 Old Orchard Road, 

New Haven, Conn. 06475 


FLORIDA 

President 

Allyn F. P. Lean, BA’75 
2850 S.W. 28 Terrace, 
Townhouse C, 

Coconut Grove, Fla. 33133 


GEORGIA 

President 

Peter Caldwell, BEng’56 
524 Carol Way N.W., 
Atlanta, Ga. 30327 


ILLINOIS 

Chicago 

President 

Christopher Doonan, BSc'80 
8901 Western Avenue, Apt. 116, 
Des Plaines, Ill. 60016 


MARYLAND 
Washington/Baltimore 
President 

Ms. Rhoda Knaff, BA’52, MPS'54 
9004 Seven Locks Road, 
Bethesda, Md. 20817 


MASSACHUSETTS 
Boston 

President 

David Ulin, BCL'69 
Hochberg & Schultz, 
1 Boston Place, 
Boston, Mass. 02108 


MINNESOTA 

Contact 

Barrie D. Birks, BA’70 
2315 Pen Avenue S 
Minneapolis, Minn. 55405 


NEW YORK 

New York City 
President 

Blair McRobie, BA'61 
154 The Boulevard, 
Pelham, N.Y. 10803 


OHIO 

Cleveland 

President 

Dr. Albert Rabinovitch, BSc’66, 
MSc’69 

3255 Altamount Avenue, 
Cleveland Heights, Ohio 44118 


PENNSYLVANIA 
Philadelphia 

President 

Dr. Samuel Tirer, BSc’72, MD'76 
431 Anthwyn Road, 

Narberth, 

Pennsylvania. 19072 

Pittsburg 

President 

Eric R. Jacobsen, BSc'29, Meng'32 
205 Farmington Road, 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 15215. 


TEXAS 
Secretary/Treasurer 

Mrs. Jean Sullivan, BA'63 
1305 South Bivad., 
Houston, Tex. 77030 


VERMONT 

Vice-President 

Dr. L. J. Wainer, BA’29, MD’33 
P.O. Box 302, 

Hinesburg, Vt. 05461 


WASHINGTON STATE 
Contact 

Dr. Vincent Jolivet, BEng'52 
16724 37th Avenue N.E.., 
Seattle, Wash. 98155 


WORLD CONTACTS 


AUSTRALIA 

Canberra 

President 

Dr. Christopher C. Kissling, PhD'66 
81 Springvale Drive, 
Weetangera, Canberra 

ACT 2614. Australia 

Melbourne 

President 

Dr. James Peterson, MSc’64 
Geography Dept., 

Monash University, 

Clayton, Victoria, 

3168. Australia 

Sydney 

President 

Dr. Susan Butler, BEd'59, MA'63 
108 Elizabeth Bay Road, Apt. 82, 
Elizabeth Bay, N.S.W., 

2011. Australia 


BAHAMAS 
T.B.A. 


BARBADOS 
Vice-President 

Frank McConney, BEng'57 
Rowans, 

St. George, Barbados 


BERMUDA 

President 

G. MacLean Holmes, 

1 Old Rectory Lane, 
Pembroke 5-61, Bermuda 


FRANCE 

Paris 

President 

Philippe Lette, BCL'68 
3 rue du Boccador, 
75008, Paris France 


GREAT BRITAIN 

Contact 

Russell G. Merifield, BCL'70 
Canadian High Commission, 
1 Grosvenor Square, 
London. W1X OAB. England 
Contact 

Rosalind Hudson, BSc’57 
25 Cissbury Gardens, 
Findon Valley, 

Worthing, West Sussex, 
BN14 ODY, England 


GREECE 

President 

Leon Argyropoulos, BEng’51 
Deinokratus 10, 

Athens 139, Greece 


HONG KONG 

President 

Peter Lui, BArch'’65 

Lee King Fun & Associates, 
Man Yee Bidg., Suite 302, 
62-68 Des Voeux Road, 
Hong Kong 


IRELAND 

President 

Mary O'Sullivan, BA’36 
Lissadell, 

20 Avondale Crescent, 
Killiney, 

Co. Dublin, Ireland 


JAMAICA 

President 

Lloyd P. Brown, BA’57 
5 Glendon Circle, 
Kingston 6, Jamaica 


JAPAN 

Director 

Yukio Sadamori, MBA'77 
Personnel Division, 
Mitsui & Co. Ltd., 

1-2-1 Otemachi, 
Chiyoda-Ku, Tokyo 


NEW ZEALAND 

Contact 

Marilyn G. Stoddart, Dip.PTh'64, 
B.PTh'67 

11 Christina Grove, 


Lower Hutt Normandale, NewZealand 


PAKISTAN 

Contact 

Maqbool H. Rahimatoola, BCcm’'68 
Bandenawaz Limited, 

P.O. Box 4792 

Karachi 2, Pakistan 


SINGAPORE 
Contact 


Dr. Gregory W. C. Tang, MSc.Agr’65, 


PhD’68 

6-A Swettenham Road, 
Singapore 1024, 
Republic of Singapore 


SOUTH AFRICA 

President 

Donald T. Breackell, BSc'54 
Geo. J. Meyer Ltd., 

P.O. Box 31356, 
Braamfontein 2017 
Transvaal, South Africa 


SOUTH AMERICA 
President 

G. A. Cousineau, BEng’53 
Caixa Postal 377, 

ZC-P 20000, 

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 


SOUTH KOREA 

Contact 

Dr. Chung Yup Kim, MSc’69, FnD’71 
Polymer Materials Lab, 

Korea Advanced Inst. of Science 

& Technologies, 

Dongdaemun, Seoul, South Kcrea 


SWITZERLAND 
President 

John A. Kennerley, 

42 Rue Plantamour, 

1201, Geneva, Switzerland 


TRINIDAD 

President 

George Bovell, BSc.Agr’45 
Cocos Bay Ltd., 

P.O. Box 1310, 

Port of Spain, Trinidad 


Woodland Indian Artist 


Benjamin Chee Chee 


Alumni Media is pleased to present 9 reproductions of works by the late Benjamin Chee Chee. 
These are the only reproductions authorized by the artist's estate. 


A mainly self-taught artist, Chee Chee was a prominent member of the second 
generation of woodland Indian painters. 7 
Unlike many of his contemporaries who employed direct and “primitive” 
means, Chee Chee’s work was influenced by modern abstraction. His style 
reduced line and image in keeping with international modern art. ; 
At the age of 32, at the height of his success, Chee Chee died tragically by suicide 


These reproductions are printed on high quality, textured stock and measure 
48 cm x 61 cm (19”x24”). 3 


a FIT TLE ee LTS Ve PR FN TERE, ee 


A Friends C Good Morning 


D Proud Male E Mother & Child F Sun Bird 


G Spring Flight H Wait For Me I Autumn Flight 


Please send me the following Benjamin Chee Chee print reproductions at $23.95 each or $88.00 for any four, plus $4.95 for handling and shipping f 
(overseas: $7.50). Ontario residents please add 7% sales tax to combined cost of print(s) plus shipping/ handling. MMMM | 


Indicate quantities: A B C D E ¥ G H I 

Cheque or money order to Alumni Media enclosed: 

Charge to my MasterCard, Visa or American Express Account No. 

Name Street 

City Prov. P. Code Signature 
Alumni Media, 124 Ava Rd., Toronto, Ontario M6C 1W1 


UNCONDITIONAL MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE. 
If you are not satisfied, please return your purchase to us and your money will be returned (/ess handling and postage). 


Va 


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SECC eRe eee gene 


Y -e- Mateos 


Winter-Spring 1985 


A McGill International 
Mission drew lessons 
in housing design from 
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To be worn with Pride and Happy Memories 


Your precious time at McGill will variations. There are two for women 
be brought back in a surge of wonderful and three for men, each with the McGill 
recollections every time you glance at Coat-of-Arms at the center of the dial. 
your slim and beautifully styled McGill 


quartz watch A fine quality Swiss quartz 


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These were designed with special and performance. A McGill watch on 
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Volume 65, Number 2 
Winter-Spring 1985 


ISSN 0709 9223 


Editorial Board 
Editor 
Charlotte Hussey 


Assistant Editor 
Mary McCutcheon 
Members 
(Chairman) 
Robert Carswell 
David Bourke 
Gretta Chambers 
Joan Cleather 
Betsy Hirst 
David Lank 
Elizabeth McNab 
Gavin Ross 
Robert Stevenson 
Tom Thompson 
Laird Watt 
Michael Werleman 
James G. Wright 


Art Direction 
Signa Design Communications 


The official publication of the 
Graduates’ Society, the News 
is sent without charge to all 
recent graduates and to all 
other graduates and friends 
who make annual contribu- 
tions to McGill University. 


The copyright of all contents 
of this magazine is registered. 
Please address all editorial 
communications and items 
for the ‘‘Where they are and 
what they’re doing”’ column 
to: 


McGill News 

3605 Mountain Street 
Montreal, Quebec 
H3G 2M1 

Tel: (514) 392-4813 


For information about advertising 
in McGill News contact the 
Advertising Coordinator, Mary 
McCutcheon, at (514) 392-4806. 


Cover: This street in Kulkarni 
Ka Bhatta, a section of the city 
of Indore in the Indian state of 
Madhya Pradesh, was settled 
about 40 years ago. The photo- 
graph is one of a series taken 
last summer during a McGill 
International project (see page 
16) by a field study team of the 
School of Architecture’s Cen- 
tre for Minimum Cost Hous- 
ing. This neighbourhood 
demonstrates how people with 
low incomes have been able to 
build and organize their own 
living environment, with suc- 
cess. 


CONTENTS 


McGill alumnae through the decades: part III 
by Anne Cimon 


The third installment in this four-part series describes 
the careers of women who graduated in the decades 
before, during, and after the Second World War. Their 
university training prepared them for active roles in 
three very different fields. 


A tribute to F. R. Scott (1899-1985) 


The late Professor Scott’s multi-faceted personality is 
recollected in poems by his contemporaries that have 
been selected with the help of Professor of English 
Louis Dudek. Among them is one written a few days 
after Scott’s death in January by a young Lebanese- 
born poet and a poem-epilogue by a Montreal poet- 
activist. 


10 


McGill International: sharing ‘‘development’’ with the 
third world 
by M. J. McCutcheon 


Since the summer of 1980, this office has coordinated 
the university’s service missions on three continents. 
Through helping non-Western countries progress, 
exchange academics are finding renewed relevance in 
their disciplines. 


SONIA s cP aacey Sai nog S hes ho. ave os 2 Focus: Trevor Payne 
NOWEDPCRR: Orkid, oie Oa. cae cx 3 Society Activities 
_ What the martlet hears............. 4 Perspective: Erika Ritter 
eye « DY ENCGOd sat. Pe 4 Where They are 
Atwood’s November reading ....... Se MIE a sash g gid. a saris’ciss Weg aet te cee 27 
MBA Case Contest winners......... 5 
MAP endows faculty posts ......... 6 
Women’s Centennial fellowships .... 7 
First MAP endowed chair.......... 7 


WINTER-SPRING 1985/McGILL NEWS 1 


ce ee | PERS RS PAAC SMR OF PEPE PS HAG IFAT AGS PS IS 234 SSE RAPED ESAS, 


LETTERS 


Who done in Houdini? 

I’m in the process of researching a maga- 
zine article and possible book on the last 
days of Harry Eoudini. Thus, I’m trying 
to trace two cf the students, Joselyn 
Gordon Whitehzad and Jacques Isadore 
Price, who were in Houdini’s dressing 
room at the Priacess Theatre in Montreal 
in 1926 when th: blow to the solar plexus 
was delivered that was said to have caused 
the magician’s death shortly after that in 
Detroit. Houdini had boasted that he 
could withstandany blow, but apparently 
was not quite ready when tested. 

I thought sone former classmates of 
Whitehead or Price might be able to 
provide some dues as to whether either 
would still be dive, and if so, how they 
could be traced (neither graduated from 
McGill). If theyare deceased, I would still 
like to find relatives or friends. 

My information is rather scanty. White- 
head was born in Gurrock, Scotland in 
1897 or 1899, and migrated to British 
Columbia. He was registered in Applied 
Sciences at McGill in 1920-22 and was in 
the Faculty of Arts in 1925-26 and part of 
the 1926-27 serester before dropping out 
shortly after the Houdini incident in Octo- 
ber, 1926. Price was born in Preston, 
England and was, I believe, in the Science 
Faculty in 1926.27 and 1927-28. He was a 
member of the Sigma Alpha Mu fraternity. 
I’d be deeply appreciative if anyone with 
information ofany kind on either White- 
head or Price diopped me a line: Don Bell, 
Post Office Box 806, Sutton, Quebec, 
JOE 2K0. 


Don Bell, BCon’57 
Editor’s note: 


Unfortunately the Graduates’ Society has 
no current addiess for either of these men. 


Setting it straight 
Your article profiling me in your Fall 1984 
issue was goodin most respects. It erred, 
however, in giving me credit for two events 
that belong to others. I was not in any way 
involved in theestablishment and building 
of Tembec which, as you point out, is a 
highly succesful firm. The man who 
founded Tembec was the same person who 
competed successfully for the Canadian 
International Paper Company job for 
which I competed unsuccessfully. His 
name is George Petty, BCom’54, and his 
career would ilso make an excellent sub- 
ject for a profile. 

In the secord place, I did not begin or 
found Vencary either. This was accom- 
plished by a snall group of Alberta busi- 
nessmen headed by Mr. F. Newton 
Hughes. It wis my good fortune to be 
selected to run the company, as its presi- 
dent. 


I would appreciate it if you would 
publish this etter to set straight these 


> McGill NEWS/WNTER-SPRING 1985 


important inaccuracies in what otherwise 
was a good article. 


Derek H. Mather, BCom’54 


Editor’s note: 

George Petty, BCom’54, is chairman of 
the board and chief executive officer, 
Repap Enterprises Inc., and serves volun- 
tarily as chairman, Friends of McGill 


Hockey. 


Torontonian strikes tents, treks north 
Verily let it be scribed in thine histories that 
I, one Loren Hicks, an avid peruser of 
thine publication these many long years, 
hath stricken mine tents, and having 
embarked on an arduous and perilous 
trek, and having suffered grievous misfor- 
tune and all manner of vile pestilences 
along my chosen paths, hath duly arrived 
at my predestined terminus, and await my 
doom without apprehension only in the 
secure assurance that mine issues of 
McGill News wilt follow me to mine 
present abode. Or: I have moved. Two 
doors north. Mail to follow, please? Label 
below. Thanks. 

Yours obfuscatorily, 


Loren Hicks, BCom’77 


and Constitutional Law. 


(F.R. Scott Fund)’’ to the 


F.R. Scott Chair 


in 


University Secretariat 
McGill University 
845 Sherbrooke Street West 
Montreal, PQ H3A 2T5 


Charitable receipts will be issued. 


Whether you're 
picking up a book 


from the library, 
or enrolling in a 
night course, edu- 
cation and learn- 
ing are a part of 
your life, all of 
your life... Leg 
learning turn your 
life on... 


CEA CANADIAN 
. $ MS ASSOCIATION FOR 
a 4am ADULT EDUCATION 


Corbett House, 

29 Prince Arthur Ave., 
Toronto, Ontario 
MSR 1B2 


Public and Constitutional Law 


In order to honour a great Canadian teacher and thinker, a fund 
has been established within McGill University to receive dona- 
tions with a view to endowing the F.R. Scott Chair in Public 


Persons wishing to contribute to the foundation of the chair are 
invited to forward cheques payable to ‘‘McGill University 


I ell 


NEWSBREAK 


The Board of Governors installed five new 
members on 21 January. The Graduates’ 
Society nominee this year is Margaret 
Davidson, BCom’52, a former society 
director, president of Montreal Investment 
Management Inc. and of the Centaur 
Theatre Company, and a director of the 
University Women’s Club of Montreal and 
the Montreal Symphony Orchestra. Pro- 
fessors Irwin Gopnik and Jagdish Handa 
were elected by the Senate for terms ending 
31 December 1987 and 1985, respectively. 
The Board named two members at large 
to five-year terms: Mrs. David M. Stewart 
and Edward P. Walsh. Mrs. Stewart is 
president of the Macdonald Stewart Foun- 
dation, Chateau Dufresne Museum, and 
the Lake St. Louis Historical Society. An 
honorary colonel of the Queen’s York 
Rangers, she is also a board member of 
Hopital de l’Enfant-Jesus and les Amis de 
Jacques Cartier, and an officer-sister of 
the Venerable Order of St. John of 
Jerusalem. Mr, Walsh, BEng’46, of Que- 
bec City, is president and chief executive 
officer of Donohue Inc. and holds posts in 
its many subsidiaries and in other pulp and 
paper companies and associations. He also 
belongs to the Professional Engineers of 
Quebec, the Engineering Institute of 
Canada and the Chamber of Commerce. 


‘The McGill-Montreal Children’s Hospi- 
tal Learning Centre announces the arrival 
of its new director, Dr. H. Gerry Taylor, a 
pediatric neuropsychologist. He was assis- 
tant professor of pediatrics and psychol- 
Ogy at the University of Pittsburgh and 
worked in their Children’s Hospital. His 
research has focused on learning disabili- 
ties and neurological and attention deficit 
disorders. 


NEWSBITS: 

« Twenty-five meters of papers chronicling 
McCord family history from 1770 to 1930 
will be inventoried at that museum’s 
archives thanks to $55,025 from the Social 
Sciences and Humanities Research Coun- 
cil of Canada. 

* The metal pollutant extraction system, 
known during its origins somewhat notori- 
Ously as the Devoe-Holbein process, has 
gone from McGill to Dorval where Devoe- 
Holbein Canada Inc., Research and Devel- 
Opment, is installed. The former 
microbiology professors have joint ven- 
tures On three continents. 

* “McGill has...the best overall research 
funding record in Canada,’’ reports the 
Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research 
and, although ranking seventhin numbers, 
McGill staff, during the past three years, 
have attracted the second largest amount 
of federal research grants. 

* Frank Miller, BEng’49, is premier of 
Ontario following the Progressive Conser- 
vative Party’s 26 January election. A ten- 
tative date has been set for Miller to 


31 May. For more information call Mary 
Cape Usher-Jones at (416) 489-0750. 


Senior grad student Sylvaine Zimmer- 
man made the papers this winter when she 
decided to raise money for African relief 
by trying to dispose of her nine-year-old 
car for more than it was worth. The future 
oceanographer learned something of busi- 
ness law while carrying out her charitable 
act: consulting la Régie des loteries et 
courses du Québec at the last minute on the 
advice of a friend, she was informed that 
raffling without a permit is a ‘‘crime 
contre la société.’’ Head of Investigations 
André Courtemanche supervised the 
draw, examined the cheques to see if they 
were made out to the charity, and declared 


Sylvaine Zimmerman 


the event according to Hoyle. Business 
administration student Roxanne Engel 
was the lucky winner while Development 
and Peace received $828.45. 


Born 13 May, 1889 in Paris, pianist Paul 
Loyonnet, whose name still appears on the 
Faculty of Music list of active staff, has 
not rested on his laurels. In 1982 he 
received the ‘“‘Chevalier de la Légion 
d’honneur’’ from France where he was 
based during his career as an international 
concert artist. That same year, his book 
Paradoxes sur le pianiste was published by 
Leméac. These ‘‘réflexions spirituelles’’ 
on a fascinating past were followed this 
January by an illustrated text on the 
correct physical and mental skills for piano 
playing, Les Gestes et la pensée du 
pianiste, Louise Courteau, Editrice (Ver- 
dun). Professor Loyonnet recently com- 
pleted the manuscript for a third book, 
Lecons d’histoire de la musique. In 1983, 
Alexander Stanké of Vilnius Records pro- 
duced a recording of his former teacher’s 
performance, at the age of eighty, of 


address the McGill Society of Toronto on | 


Paul Loyonnet 


Beethoven’s Sonatas, cpus 109, 110 and 
111. The nonagenarian, ¢ widower who has 
a daughter in France end a son in San 
Francisco, still attends concerts and 
teaches at home. 


The Ski Team’s fifteeath annual equip- 
ment sale at the student Union last Novem- 
ber was “‘so jam-packedwe were too busy 
keeping track of inveniory to count the 
people,’’ says team trezsurer Dean Foti. 
Undergraduate Jeff Stevenson, who 
directed the sale, was hdped by members 
of the downhill and cress country teams 
including Louis Beauchenin, team captain 
and ’83-’84 intercollegiate men’s individ- 
ual champ. The basis for the event is 
turning over members’ used equipment. 
New ski goods, too, are obtained from 
retail stores that quote ‘‘z0od prices’’ and 
‘‘who are starting to prepare for these 
sales.’’ In the past five years, more and 
more city skiers have been attending the 
sale. Radio stations lke CHOM and 


CKGM promo’d generously, and 5,000 
flyers were posted. ‘‘It took two weeks to 
set up,’’ says Dean, but the proceeds 
covered this season’s traisportation, race 
fees and hardware. 


Gavin Ross 


Gavin Ross, director of the McGill Gradu- 
ates’ Society, has been elected chairman of 
District I of the Council ‘or Advancement 
and Support of Education, known as 
CASE among the initiated who perform 
fund-raising, public relaions and alumni 
coordination work for coleges and univer- 
sities. He thinks it is :he first time a 
Canadian university menber has wielded 
the gavel. In January he znd several Mart- 
let House staff attended the District | 
annual assembly in Bostcn with more than 
900 other Quebec, New England and. 
Atlantic provinces delegates. | 
M. !. McCutcheonO 


WINTER-SPRING 985/McGILL NEWS 3 


Owen Egan/ McGill Daily 


Alain Cornu 


Thomas W. Bleezarde 


SPU PPSAIVABVSKSD AT OT Hae e RAS 


WHAT THE MARTLET HEARS | 


When I’m Elected: 


dark horse revue 
overcomes all odds 


The ficticious hero of this winter’s Red & 
White Revue, When I’m Elected, is Steve 
Baker. Played by Jeff Kadner, Steve is a 
McGill graduate who decides to run for a 
seat in Parliament and, against all odds, 
wins. Of course his uphill struggle to the 
top is eased by a little help from a former 
university kingmaker - the ghost of James 
McGill, and by Lady Luck herself. 

In real life though, the fates weren’t as 
kind to the trio of McGill students who 
teamed up to produce the November show. 
‘We didn’t have one thing going our way 
in two years,’’ says co-writer and producer 
Remy Kawkabani, BCom’81, as he chroni- 
cles a series of setbacks that would have 
had Rodgers and Hammerstein reexamin- 
ing their career strategy. 

Perhaps the most overwhelming obsta- 
cle Kawkabani, co-writer Yona Shtern and 
musical arranger, lyricist and co-producer 
Steve Wood, BEng’82, had to overcome in 
their two-year struggle to mount the show 
was the popular notion that the Red & 
White was in decline. According to some, 


had experienced was not what university 
should be. So I decided when I came back 
that I was going to have some fun, even if I 
had to work hard to do it.”’ 

It was while working as associate pro- 


ducer and director of the 1982 Red & White 


red 
£3 


Kawkabani had unintentionally missed a 
deadline, and the show was canceled. 
‘©We decided to try again in September 
83, but what let us down this time was the 
people. We had been given another chance 
to do the show on the condition a producer 


and director be appointed for us,” 


explains Kawkabani. ‘‘We had overcome 
the problem of the production by then, but 
the person who’d been appointed to help 
left the show four weeks before it was to go 
on, so it was canceled again.” 

In January 1984, Dean Stevenson reluc- 
tantly withdrew his support of the trio. 
They were left with what they believed 
could be a hit, but without any official 
status or backing. ‘‘By February we’d hit 
rock bottom,’’ says Kawkabani. “It 
looked as if a Red & White Revue was 
highly unlikely. At this point we seriously 
asked ourselves, ‘What is it going to take 
to put on a successful show?’ We realized 
that what we were missing most was good 
people behind the scenes to help us putit 
together.’’ 

Wood, Shtern, and Kawkabani then 
decided to involve more students in the 
project. They organized an information 
seminar featuring a slide show of McGill 
in the fifties with pictures of Wilham 
Shatner, BCom’52, Galt MacDermot and 
others frolicking through such legendary 
shows as My Fur Lady and Wry and 
Ginger. ‘‘We figured if we couldn’t attract 
the interest of the students, we would have 
to reconsider whether McGill really 
wanted an original Revue again,’’ Kawka- 
bani adds. 

Fortunately for all concerned, this pre- 
sentation was the turning point on the road 


United States took a job, and the whole 
thing was just too Hollywood to tum 
down. I figured the show needed me, so | 
auditioned for the part and, believe me, iM 
all my years of playing football I'd nevel 
been so scared.’’ Donna FlintU 


the Revue had deteriorated to little more to success. The thirty-five students in C 
than a variety show in recent years; while attendance became the nucleus tiat 
the dizzying success attained by the 1957 mounted the show eight months later. 
production, My Fur Lady, continued to ‘“‘That was the first piece of good fortune 
cast a shadow over efforts to bring back we'd had so far, and it really marked the 
the original musical comedy format. beginning of a group effort that finally 
= “Nobody seemed to believe McGill stu- paid off,’? says Kawkabani. ‘“ Although 
z\ dents could successfully write and produce putting on the Revue has always been a 
2| a Broadway musical any more,”’ explains struggle, | don’t think anyone had quit? as ba 
a! Kawkabani, lamenting the fact that there much of a struggle as we did.”’ Mo 
was no cadre of Red & White veterans to President Ray-gun a.k.a. Heroy.. Kawica bat Another show is in the works for next . 
Too Hollywood to turn down. ; ; IN 
turn to for guidance and encouragement. SoS 2 etree year. Kawkabani hopes to offer its writers ; 
‘It would have helped a lot, if we could that Kawkabani first met Wood, stage | the kind of advice that could have bene- 
have turned to someone to read the script | Manager of the production, and Shtern, | fited the authors of When I’m Elected. | — : 
who could have told us what to do with it,”’ MC and ‘‘star of the show.’? Wood, | One thing he has learned is that topics such " 
the former football MVP (Most Valuable Kawkabani and Shtern each submitted | as elections and patronage can backfire if ‘ 
Player) says. ‘‘To a lot of people I was just projects for the 1983 Revue. When | the timing goes wrong. ‘‘Having already : 
some dumb jock who wouldn’t be able to | Shtern’s proposal was accepted, a mutual | written the story when Pierre Truceau e 
pull something like this off,’” Kawkabani friend suggested that the three team up, | resigned, we reworked the script on the : 
adds admitting that to many, his trio | which they did. premise that John Turner would remain h 
appeared unlikely successors to the Mac- Their first attempt to stage When I’m | Prime Minister. Then,’’ says Kawkabani, - 
Dermot-Macdonald-MacSween crown. Elected was in the spring of 1983, ‘‘and | ‘‘when Turner called an election we had to 
But these were the ones who completely | what let us down then was the product,’’ | rework the script again.”’ : 
underestimated Kawkabani’s talent and | says Kawkabani, explaining that the origi- Asked if he has any regrets about the last : 
determination. Graduating in September | nal go-ahead had been based on four | two years, Kawkabani admits to only one- . 
1981, he returned as a special student with | scenes that had been submitted to Dean of | that he never did get to see the show. He n 
the dream of producing an original Red & | Students Robert Stevenson BA ’49, BD | ended up on stage playing President Ray- 5 
White Revue. “‘I finished McGill feeling | *61, for approval. While managing to | gun instead. ‘‘At the last minute the guy ; 
that I was missing something - that what I complete a script in six weeks, Shtern and | who had the part of the President o’ the : 


| 4 McGill NEWS/WINTER-SPRING 1985 


or 


Vivian Kellner 


November reading 
consolidates 
Atwood’s reputation 


Between autographs, Margaret Atwood greets 
Montreal fans at Paragraph Bookstore. 


In celebration of the 100th anniversary of 
women at McGill, this fall’s popular Liter- 
ary Imagination Series, organized by the 
English department with the support of 
Consolidated-Bathurst Inc., welcomed 
five female speakers to campus. Promi- 
nert among them was the Canadian writer 
anc critic Margaret Atwood, who read toa 
capacity crowd in the H. Noel Fieldhouse 
Auditorium on 12 November. 

Earlier that day Atwood was on hand to 
autograph her books at Paragraph Book- 
store, where she met with several McGill 
reporters. Here she described her own 
beginnings: ‘‘When I was in high school 
there weren’t many careers open to 
women. One I was most interested in was 
home economist because they made the 
most money....As a child I did a lot of 
painting. I decided to be a writer when | 
was sixteen, but I can’t really tell you 
why,’’ 

She also spoke about various influences 
on her work: science, the Bible (especially 
the Psalms), and the tradition of the poet 


as magician or conjurer. Calling herself a 
‘‘multi-form’’ writer, Atwood has pub- 
lished ten books of poetry, four novels, 
and three collections of short fiction. 
Admittedly, she doesn’t suffer writer’s 
block: ‘‘When I have trouble with one 
form I switch to another,’’ she explains. 
‘*People who have writer’s block should 
try to write letters or copy out recipes.”’ 

Aside from her creative writing, 
Atwood is well-known, even infamous, for 
Survival — her ‘‘thematic guide to Cana- 
dian literature.’’ She recently edited an 
Oxford University Press anthology, 
another major work that is helping to 
promote Canadian writing at home and 
abroad. She also contributes regularly to 
The New York Times Book Review. 

The stereotypically ‘‘unfriendly’’ 
Atwood was not in evidence at The Liter- 
ary Imagination lecture. The accommo- 
dating writer entertained her audience 
throughout the evening. Reading from a 
collection of ‘‘short fictions,’’ some of 


‘which have several endings, she involved 


them in the imaginative process by encour- 
aging them to ‘‘make your own’’ story 
from the available options. 

Atwood also read from her most recent 
collection of poems entitled /nterlunar. 
Among many things, this book attempts to 
explore the play between light and dark- 
ness: 


and I take your hand, which is the shape 
a hand 

would be if you existed truly. 

! wish to show you the darkness 

you are so afraid of. 


Trust me. This darkness 
is a place you can enter and be 
as safe in as you are anywhere. 


Humorous, stark, and at other times 
disturbingly realistic, Atwood as trickster 
captivated her audience. And although her 
protean public image could not be pinned 
down, her reputation as Canada’s most 
influential writer was further ‘‘consoli- 
dated’’ at this McGill reading. Peter 
O’BrienO 


Se 


oe a ‘gf : 
Carrying home the cup, McGill MBA Case Competition winners (left to right) Barry Lee D'Amour, 


Ge eR OSES LOS OR CELE RTE 


Victorious McGill 
team cracks MBA 
Contest cases 


Deadlines and decisions made under pres- 
sure are the realities of the business world. 
This was clear to MBA student team 
members. Barry Lee D’Amour, Yves 
Cloutier, Danielle Poudrette and Greg 
Watson on the occasion of their winning 
the fourth annual MBA (Master of Busi- 
ness Administration) Case Competition 
held at Concordia University this past 
January. A civil engineer continuing his 
studies in finance, Cloutier explains it was 
“very tough, very high pressure. You 
don’t have time to read the cases twice.”’ 

The four-day event involved teams from 
sixteen Canadian universities. It required 
participants to study four cases chosen by 
the MBA Association of Quebec. In the 
space of four hours, the students had to 
solve the problems in each given situation, 
as well as take part in an oral defense and a 
question period. Management Pro- 
fessor Louis Gialloreto, DipAirSpace’82, 
MBA’84, who served as an advisor to this 
year’s case team, admits that the competi- 
tion takes place in ‘‘a rather tight time 
frame.’’ 

The purpose of the contest is to acquaint 
participating universities with each others’ 
MBA programs and to present real busi- 
ness situations. Concordia students orga- 
nized it again this year. The cost was nearly 
$40,000, some of which came from compa- 
nies such as IBM, Bell Canada, Pratt and 
Whitney, Alcan, Coca-Cola, Schenley, 
and the Bank of Montreal. Seventeen 
judges were invited from the Montreal 
business community. 

Of the quartet of cases presented to each 
team, two were prepared by the University 
of Western Ontario and two by Harvard 


Pe cane 


Danielle Poudrette, Yves Cloutier, and Greg Watson celebrate their victory with coach Louis 


Gialloreto (centre). 


WINTER-SPRING 1985/McGILL NEWS 5 


lan Westbury 


; PEARLS ATLAPV OMA S03 baa IT HEIGHTS TVET PEEL ETS 


| 
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- RE Ok GAP ane, RP og wm Dey a CUE 


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Canadian Pacific Photo 


University. The first was ‘‘whether 
Imasco, the holding company that owns 
Imperial Tobacco, should invest ina U.S. 
fast food burger chain,’’ explains Watson, 
a second-year MBA student specializing in 
finance. According to Cloutier, McGill’s 
team decided that, ‘‘there was a big shake- 
out in that industry....The bigger a com- 
pany was, the more successful it was in 
taking advantage of the economy of scale. 
Thus purchasing the burger operation 
made sense, although not all the financial 
information was available.”’ 

The second case concerned a New Eng- 
land architectural firm called The Archi- 
tect’s Collaborative. According to 
Watson, ‘‘it dealt basically with what a 
business should be like. Should someone 
who just wants to be artistic and creative 
be able to run a company without worrying 
about making money?’’ McGill’s recom- 
mendation was that, ‘‘although the archi- 
tects should be more aggressive in 
marketing, they should remember they are 
artists as well and not go all-out to be sales 
oriented. That would destroy the principle 
behind their business, which is quality 
first,’ says Cloutier. 

The third case examined the orientation 
of The Itty Bitty Machine Company. Expe- 
riencing financial difficulty, this small 
personal-computer retailing firm was also 
involved in developing a computer lan- 
guage. ‘‘They wanted to start a retail store 
and do research and development as well,”’ 
Cloutier explains. ‘‘They should do one or 
the other, especially when the ventures are 
that opposed. We proposed that the firm 
get into the retail business and stop doing 
research and development.”’ 

In the final round, only McGill, the 
University of Toronto and the Universite 
de Sherbrooke remained. These contes- 
tants were challenged with the case of 
Petro-Canada, which had just purchased 
Petro-Fina and Pacific Petroleum and was 
about to acquire British Petroleum. ‘“The 
question here,’’ Watson says, “‘was how 
could Petro-Canada take three oil compa- 
nies and make one out of them? What sort 
of structure should the company have, and 
what do you do with all the old execu- 
tives?’’ Though all three teams recom- 
mended retaining regional structures, 
‘Sour solution was that they also change all 
the signs and uniforms, and so on, to 
Petro-Canada. I still don’t know what 
Petro-Canada actually did,’ Watson con- 
cludes. 

Coach Gialloreto feels that McGill espe- 
cially impressed their judges in the last 
question-and-answer period. The practical 
experiences of Poudrette, who has worked 
for eight years as an accountant, and of 
D’Amour, who is a Northern Telecom 
employee, also helped the team win. The 
victorious foursome will share a $2,000 
Bank of Montreal scholarship. This is the 
university’s second victory; McGill also 
won the first Case Competition. Paul 
SerralheiroU 


6 McGill NEWS/WINTER-SPRING 1985 


~ ." 
First appointee to the Canadi 


an Pacific Chair in Biotechnology, Dr. Kelvin Ogilvie is working ona 


McGill Campaign 
endows major faculty 


posts 


ie ‘ ii at 
Se Fic, "lls 


new class of chemical compounds that fight such common viruses as influenza and herpes. 


Four new endowed teaching appointments 
are now in place as a result of the McGill 
Advancement Program (MAP). Chairs 
were conferred this year in medicine, 
biotechnology, architectural history, and 
nutrition and food science. By 31 Decem- 
ber 1984, the MAP Campaign had 
obtained commitments for $43.6 million in 
private sector funds. This was just a year 
into the most ambitious capital campaign 
ever launched by a Canadian university. 

In all, the MAP is slated to generate $61 
million, of which $13 million will be 
directed to teaching and research support, 
including visiting professorships in many 
key areas. The named chairs of highest 
priority include posts in honor of “Bo RR. 
Scott, MA’32, in Law and D.O. Hebb, 
MA’32, in psychology; appointments in 
Management and Arts; and key posts in 
several interdisciplinary fields. 

In the Faculty of Medicine, endowed 
chairs will serve to confirm McGill’s long- 
standing reputation as a world leader in 
research and teaching. Eight chairs in 
major clinical departments - medicine, 
surgery, obstetrics/gynecology, psychia- 
try, pediatrics, and radiology - have top 
priority to benefit from the MAP Cam- 
paign. 

The university has appointed Professor 
Peter T. Macklem, MD’56, to the Mass- 
abki Chair in Medicine, a new post. The 
chair was created through the generosity of 
Mr. Antoine G. Massabki and includes the 
Mary Massabki Endowment for Medical 
Sciences in memory of Percy C. Cowans. 
Dr. Macklem heads the department of 
medicine within the Faculty of Medicine at 
McGill; he is also director of McGill’s 
University Medical Clinic, and physician 
in chief of the department of medicine at 
the Royal Victoria Hospital. 

Dr. Errol Marliss, director of the McGill 
Nutrition and Food Science Centre, was 
named to the new Garfield Weston Chair 
in Nutrition, a joint appointment of the 


a 


Faculties of Medicine and Agriculture. 
The Centre promotes basic and clinical 
research in human and animal nutrition 
and food science, and advanced training 
for nutritionists. Drawing on the Centre’s 
resources, the Faculty of Medicine addeda 
nutrition course to its undergraduate cur- 
riculum this year. 

Canada’s first chair in biotechnology 
has been established at McGill with funds 
donated by Canadian Pacific. The first in- 
cumbent is Dr. Kelvin Ogilvie, an organic 
chemist and internationally-recognized 
researcher. Ogilvie is widely known for his 
development of a DNA/RNA synthesizer 
or ‘‘gene machine’’; his more recent stud- 
ies have yielded a new class of chemical 
compounds whose members act strongly 
against a tange of viruses including 
influenza, herpes virus, and cytomegalo- 
virus. 

Biotechnology - molecular reconstruc- 
tion as applied to a whole range of organic 
and industrial processes - is one of the 
most rapidly growing areas of scientific 
study. As holder of the Canadian Pacific 
Chair in Biotechnology and director of 
McGill’s new biology office, Ogilvie will 
work with members of the Faculties of 
Science, Engineering, Medicine and Agti- 
culture and with colleagues across 
Canada, to encourage and share research. 

Also committed to the Campaign are 
funds endowing a joint appointment by 
the School of Architecture and by the art 
history department to the Saidye Rosneft 
Bronfman Chair in Architectural History, 
a gift of Mrs. Phyllis (Bronfman) Lambert 
as a tribute to her mother. This interdisci- 
plinary chair will permit the School of 
Architecture to continue its leading role i 
teaching and research in the field of archi- 
tectural history and criticism. 

The MAP Campaign continues through | 
December 1986. As of 31 December 1984, | 
commitments to the Campaign totalled 
71 percent of the goal. Vivian GeezaUl 


whe 


“4 = = 


Women’s Centennial 
Fellowship supports 
research te Heth 
defects 


Carolyn Kapron-Bras is the first recipient 
of a new award established to commemo- 
rate the 100th anniversary of women at 
McGill. The $8,000 Women’s Centennial 
Fellowship, funded through the McGill 
Advancement Program (MAP), was 
granted to assist her research into spina 
bifida and anencephaly. 

At 27, Kapron-Bras is a fourth-year 
PhD student in biology who began her 
doctoral research in the fall of 1982. Her 
tiny office in the north wing of the Stewart 
Biology Building looks out on Mount 
Royal and the herb garden planted by 
McGill’s Women Associates. A native of 
Kitchener, Ontario, she came to Montreal 
in 1980 from the University of Waterloo. 
‘IT chose McGill because of the work going 
on in this lab,’’ she says. ‘‘I guess I was 
lucky. I wrote several schools to find out 
what research was going on. McGill was 
the first place I visited. I met Daphne 
Trasler, BSc’48, MSc’54, PhD’58, and was 
really interested in her research. Four 


investigators at McGill are studying neural 
tube defects. 
biology.’’ 


It’s an interesting area of 


At a recent reception, the university 
acknowledged the establishment of an 
endowed chair in architectural history to 
be a joint appointment in the Faculty of 
Engineering’s School of Architecture, and 
the art history department of the Arts 
Faculty. 

Phyllis (Bronfman) Lambert is well 
known for her initiatives with Heritage 
Montreal and the establishment of the 
Canadian Centre for Architecture in Mon- 
treal. This endowed chair, a gift of Lam- 
bert, is a tribute to her mother, Saidye 
Rosner Bronfman, and to the value of the 
work of the School of Architecture and the 
art history department in their respective 
fields of study and for their future benefit 
to the community.0 


Biology PhD student, | Carolyn Kapron-Bras: 
The fellowship’s great. It leaves this term freer 
for my research.’ 


Spina bifida is a birth - or developmen- 
tal - defect whose incidence (currently 
about three per thousand births in Quebec) 
has a genetic component in combination 
with unknown environmental factors. One 
factor that has been identified is vitamin A. 


Kapron-Bras is studying the effects of 


different levels of vitamin A on fetal 
development in mice with a genetic suscep- 
tibility to this disorder. ‘‘My study is fairly 
Straightforward,’’ she explains. ‘‘It’s 
Organismal research whereby I vary the 
level of vitamin A and administer it at 
different times within the developmental 
cycle. There are so many questions about 
birth defects, and I’m glad to be working 
in an area where you can have the chance 
to apply new knowledge on a human 
scale.”’ 

Even as a high school student, Kapron- 
Bras wanted to go into biology. ‘‘I enjoy 
investigative work and also teaching,’’ she 
says. ‘‘I’ve had two teaching assistantships 


and assisted with an introductory genetics 
course. It’s good experience. The fellow- 
ship’s great, though. It leaves this term 
freer for my research.”’ 

‘“Working with animals,’’ she adds, 
‘“you have to schedule things. We do timed 
matings and come in every weekday at 
about the same time to check the mice, to 
follow them. We do embryo cultures, too, 
to observe specific times of development.”’ 
On her desk, pages of neat figures and 
boxes of file cards record the lives of 
generations of laboratory mice, the result 
of months of careful research. 

‘*It has not been a long time since people 
started looking at the interaction between 
genes and the environment in causing birth 
defects - and some of the early work in this 
field was done here at McGill. There’s still 
lots to do, to find out. It’s exciting. It’s a 
real help to have the support of this 
fellowship.’’ 

After completing her PhD, Kapron- 
Bras hopes to work as a researcher- 
teacher. ‘‘I find I have more questions now 
than before,’’ she says, ‘‘so I think mostly 
of going on with this work. Then again, if 
something interesting comes up in another 
area I might branch into that...’’ 

Two other new scholarships were estab- 
lished this academic year to mark 100 years 
of women at McGill. The $1,884 ‘‘McGill 
Alumnae 1884 Scholarship’? was awarded 
to Johane Robitaille, a pre-med student. 
Sarah McFarlane, a first-year science stu- 
dent, received the Women Associates of 
McGill Scholarship of $1,500. In all, some 
$4.3 million in fellowship and scholarship 
support funding has been committed since 
the MAP Campaign was launched in the 
fall of 1983. The year 1984-85 has seen 
eight fellowships awarded from capital 
campaign funds. Vivian GeezaQO 


First chair endowed by MAP Campaign 


Shown above the official presentation are (left to right) Director, School of Architecture. Derek 
Drummond, Saidye Rosner Bronfman, Phyllis (Bronfman) Lambert, and standing (left to right): 
Vice Principal Academic, Dr. S. O. Freedman, Principal David Johnston and Chairman. 
Department of Art History. Rigas Bertos. 


WINTER-SPRING 1985/McGILL NEWS 7 


John Geeza 


‘SERPS SPAS VAAVOwPD 9305 eee S HISD 


Neilson’s heart was set on studying 
history when her father died during the 
Depression, and the family was left short 
of funds. University was costly, and her 
mother was advised to save what little she 
had for her son’s education. Within a year, 
however, they were financially back on 
their feet when an aunt died and left a 
small inheritance. 

By this time, Neilson had changed her 
mind about studying history and, as she 
notes in her autobiographical article in the 
book, A Fair Shake, ‘‘I drifted off to 
Macdonald College’ following a friend 
who had enrolled in household science. 
Neilson, who eventually graduated from 
the degree program with an option in 
dietetics, says of the one-year course, “‘I 
became imbued with a thirst for 
knowledge, especially about science.’’ 

A required student internship at the 
Royal Victoria Hospital was followed by a 
position as an assistant dietitian at the 
Montreal Children’s Hospital. ‘‘I found 
that I enjoyed the planning and organizing 
aspects of administering the dietary 
service. And my salary,’’ Neilson adds, 


at the beginning of World War II. For four 
years she served as a command messing 
officer in the Eastern Air Command, 
traveling miles by service planes despite 
acute airsickness. She admits that another 
problem during her RCAF commission 
was ‘‘resentment against women in charge 
of men.”’ 

After her discharge, she completed a 
master’s degree in nutrition at Macdonald 
College. She then went to Toronto to work 
with Dr. Frederick Tisdall at the Institute 
of Aviation Medicine on the development 
of rations for use in arctic and sub-arctic 
regions. But Neilson was soon to be 
offered the position that would determine 
the course of her life: the directorship of 
the School of Food Science at Macdonald 
College. 

This appointment came at a time when 
the science of nutrition was changing. 
‘‘Specialization was being emphasized, so 
that therapeutic and clinical dietitians were 
being identified as distinct from 
administrative dietitians,’’ explains 
Neilson, who was challenged to offer 
programs that reflected these changes. 


During this period she directed the| — 


garments was sparked in 1978 when she 
and her husband, Arnold Issenman, 
BA’38, both licensed pilots, flew a private 
plane to Frobisher Bay. ‘‘*I was 
astounded,’’ says Issenman, ‘‘I didn't 
know that there were Canadians who wore 
this marvelous clothing every day.” She 
bought a costume for herself and returned 
home eager to do research. Finding no 
books on the subject, she compiled 
scattered articles into a bibliography 
that is now requested throughout North 
America. 

During her student years at McGill, 
Issenman was a political activist who took 
a stand against the Quebec Padlock Law, 
supported Norman Bethune, and 
“foreswore silk’? and ‘‘wore only lisle 
(cotton)”’ to protest the Japanese invasion 
of China. She remembers joining other 
social work students to distribute leaflets 
to wartime factory workers during 4 
CIO-AFL and CNTU organizing drive. 
Issenman also became the first woman 
elected to represent Royal Victoria College 
on the then all-male Student Council. 


‘‘RVCites were able to strike some) — 


Wik 
° women’s residences at Macdonald and fl 
McGill alumnae through served as the first woman faculty member ‘ 
elected to the McGill Senate. She says she i 
| the decades @ part Hil participated mainly as “an observer” who h 
. could not compete, especially against “‘a f 
. number of senators whose skill at oratory i 
; exceeded the value of their deeds.”’ R 
Fl On two occasions Neilson’s expertise N 
ty was sought in foreign countries: in the late 
by Anne Cimon fifties she assisted in developing a course in ef 
| . home economics at Kasetsart University in 
| his is the third article in a series on Bangkok, Thailand. In 1977 she also 
|| McGill alumnae. In the following traveled to Australia to teach at the 
interviews, representatives from the Riverina College of Advanced Education 
WBS "30s and ’40s speak about the in New South Wales. These assignments 
breakthroughs they, as women, made into were of a year’s duration, and Neilson 
the McGill Senate, the Student Council, suggests she might have stayed in Australia 
and even the Student Union Grill Room. ‘thad I been younger.”’ 
The spokesperson from the ’50s feels, Two years after this Pacific trip, Neilson 
| however, that there was equality between officially retired from Macdonald College. 
the sexes in her field. By this time, the Retaining a campus office, she can often 
university had also come to sanction the be found there, hard at work on a history 
traditional areas of feminine expertise of the Faculty of Agriculture. 
where these graduates would establish Comfortably settled in her house in 
their careers: music, social work, and Hudson, Neilson enjoys gardening in the 
household science, which became home summer, skiing in the winter and, as she 
economics in 1943 and, food science in says, ‘‘living like everybody else.” 
HayT. 
*40s 
’30s 
rs) 
= Betty Kobayashi Issenman 
| Helen Neilson Betty Issenman, BA’40, DipSW’42, is now 
E McGill Professor Emeritus Helen R. guest curator, Inuit clothing, at the 
Z! Neilson, BHS’39, MScAgr’48, recently McCord Museum. With this assignment, 
retired to Hudson, Quebec, after many she says she has ‘‘come full circle’’ since 
years of making her home on the campus Halen Neil graduating from McGill in sociology and 
of Macdonald College, Ste. Anne de BION MENSOM) 6 ro ip Ce ee | anthropology, Shegs currently 8 
Bellevue. For twenty-six of those years, she | “‘was $65 per month with food, lodging | coordinating an exhibition of Inuit \ 
directed the School of Food Science. This | and laundry provided. I spent my first pay | wearing apparel and tools to be mounted f 
was a long academic appointment for | cheque on anew pair of skis.’’ at the Museum in 1986 - a project that is ; 
someone who admits to almost not making Her plans changed when she was| her brainchild. 4 
it to university. recruited by the Royal Canadian Air Force Issenman’s keen interest in Inuit r 


~ "= _——t = ~_—— a —— 


8 McGill NEWS/WINTER-SPRING 1985 


Wh 


mighty blows for women’s liberation,”’ 
she explains. ‘‘In 1936 women were 
admitted to the Band....In 1939, women 
were allowed to be cheerleaders, but we 
had to get permission to shorten our skirts 
to the knee. And we finally won 
admittance to the Student Union Grill 
Room and Cafeteria in October 1939, but 
not to the sacrosanct billiard room.’’ 
Graduating with honors, Issenman 
entered the Montreal School of Social 


Betty Kobayashi Issenman 


Work. By her mid-twenties, with only a 
few years’ experience in different social 
agencies, she was chosen as head of the 
department of social work at the 
Department of Veterans Affairs Hospital 
in Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Quebec. 

During World War II, Issenman wanted 
to join the Army, which needed social 
workers. After waiting for months, she 
was told she would not be admitted 
because her father was Japanese. ‘‘This 
was a terrible blow,’’ she says sadly, 
pointing out that her father had fought 
courageously for Canada during World 
War I. 

Issenman soon married and started a 
family. ‘‘Many of my fellow students went 
on to careers,’’ she says. ‘‘A majority still 
have them today, and most have had 
families as well.’’ She herself stayed home 
to care for three daughters until they were 
adults. She then completed an MA in 
“organisation communautaire’’ at the 
Université de Montréal in 1969. 

In 1970 Issenman secured a position at 
the Allan Memorial Institute as a 
community organizer, but within a few 
years decided to change her life. Wanting 
to work with her hands and pursue a 
lifelong interest in the theatre, she studied 
costume design. She got design and 
construction assigaments from Montreal 


amateur theatre troupes, but the pace was 
“too hectic.”’ 

Content with her present post at the 
McCord Museum, Issenman is pleased 
when students consult her about Inuit 
clothing. ‘‘They are the ones,’’ she says, 
‘‘that will carry on this work.”’ 


50s 


Luba Zuk 

Born in the Western Ukraine, Luba Zuk, 
L.Mus’57, emigrated to Canada at an early 
age with her family. Her mother, a singer 
and musician, and her father, a doctor, 
both enthusiastically supported her inter- 
est in the piano, and Zuk soon enrolled at 
McGill’s Faculty of Music. She points out 
that the Faculty, although much smaller 
than it is today, included an equal number 
of male and female students. The tendency 
to prefer men over women, she feels, has 
always been at a minimum in the perform- 
ing arts. 

Although a lack of funds caused an 
interruption in her studies, Zuk soon 
obtained a scholarship to the Conserva- 
toire de Musique de la Province de Qué- 
bec. Eventually she returned to McGill and 
completed her degree, teaching beginning 
piano students in her spare time in order to 
earn experience and extra dollars. She is 
now an associate professor in the Faculty. 

She says she received much support 
from her teachers and still rides in the 
elevator with senior professors who 
remember her as she was when she first 
came to McGill - a shy young woman, 
eager to learn piano, and wearing a ‘‘knit- 
ted hat.’’ She adds, ‘‘In my profession, 
you never actually stop studying. You are 
continuously refreshing and enriching 
your repertoire.’’ 

Zuk finds teaching gratifying, and 
‘‘loves her students,’’ many of whom have 
gone on to distinguish themselves as musi- 
cians. But she herself must manage a 
second career as concert performer. Active 
since the early sixties as a solo pianist, Zuk 
has toured North America several times. 
In 1977 she formed a piano duo with her 
younger brother, Ireneus Zuk, BSc’63, 
BMus’68. 

She explains that she and her brother, 
“like doing things that are seldom done.”’ 
When Ireneus settled in Kingston to teach 
at Queen’s University in the mid-seventies, 
they began practising informally together 
on weekends. When their mutual interest 
in Canadian music had grown into a 
repertoire, they decided to promote the 
Zuk Duo outside their own cities. This led 
to several tours in Canada and the United 
States and in the summer of 1984 to Europe 
and countries behind the Iron Curtain. 

‘“There is a great pleasure in introducing 
something new,’’ Zuk says of their 
unusual Canadian and Ukrainian reper- 
toire, for which she has done hours of 


research. Fascinated with the two musical 


traditions, she explains they are ‘‘both 
connected with my formation.’’ These 
music programs have found enthusiastic 
response in the different countries where 
she has played, and the Zuk Duo can be 


heard on a Radio Canada International. 


recording and on the CBC. 

The teacher-performer has found the 
time to be a Federation of Canadian Music 
Festivals adjudicator and a visiting assis- 
tant professor at the Ukrainian Free Uni- 


Luba Zuk 


versity in Munich, West Germany. At 


McGill, she fulfills teaching and adminis- 
trative duties and this year organized and 
performed in a chamber trio for the 
Women’s Centennial. On 15 April she and 
two other Faculty piano teachers will close 
this Pollack Concert Hall recital series. 

Active and dedicated, Zuk claims there 
is never enough time to do all that she 
wants to do. She tries, nevertheless, to 
keep abreast, if not ahead. 0 


WINTER-SPRING 1985/McGILL NEWS 9 


lrene Photo Studio 


A Tribute to F. R. Scott, 
1899-1985 


he notable presence of Francis a ' - | 

Reginald Scott, BCL’27, has been : a L on a 

penned into lines by fellow poets . , 
since he and the late A. J. M. Smith . . 1 ; 
founded the McGill Fortnightly Review in coe “ tii | ‘ 
1925. McGill News thanks Louis Dudek, | mn : | 
who helped assemble this selection as a 
tribute, as well as the writers and publish- 
ers who granted their permission to use the 
poems that follow. 

Born in Quebec City in 1899 as the sixth 
of seven children, the astonishingly versa- 
tile Scott went on to win acclaim as a poet, 
professor, civil rights lawyer, and social 
democrat. A McGill graduate, he became a 
full-time professor at the Faculty of Law in 
1928 and served as its dean from 1961 to Cc 
1964. The Fabian socialism that Scott had wr . a cy a 
learned at Oxford University as a Rhodes ‘ a a = 2 : | 
scholar led him in the early thirties to help 
found and then chair the Cooperative 
Commonwealth Federation, predecessor 
to the New Democratic Party. 

In the late fifties he began to crusade 
against Quebec premier Maurice Dup- 
lessis’s persecution of religious dissenters 
and Communists. In so doing he over- 
turned the nineteen-year-old Padlock Law 
and won his case in defense of Frank 
Roncarelli, a restaurant owner, who had 
stood bail for Jehovah’s Witnesses. Going 
‘to bat for the Lady Chatte’’ as Scott 
wrote in a poem, he also struck a blow 
against censorship by winning the right for 
Lady Chatterley’s Lover to be published in es 2 * : | 
Quebec in 1959. oo Pt a " - . : 

A staunch federalist who stood behind “ Ok sy * we 
the 1970 War Measures Act, Scott was also 
one of the earliest defenders of bilingual- 
ism and played an influential role as a 
member of the Royal Commission on 
Bilingualism and Biculturalism. A Fellow 
of the Royal Society of Canada and a 
Companion of the Order of Canada, he 
translated the poetry of Saint-Denys Gar- 
neau, as well as work appearing in the 
anthology, Poems of French Canada. He 
won the Governor General’s Award for 
Essays on the Constitution in 1977 and for 
the Collected Poems of F. R. Scott in 1981. 

Irving Layton writes of his accomplished | : ~ 
colleague: ‘‘Poetry was the strategy he . 
employed for self-liberation.’”’ | . . 

Scott died on 31 January 1985 and is — h 
survived by his wife, painter Marian Scott, , 
and their son, Peter. 


Chris Payne 


10 McGill NEWS/WINTER-SPRING 1985 oe ie 


To Frank Scott, Esq.., 
on the occasion of his seventieth birthday 
by A. J. M. Smith, BScArts’25, MA’25 


Poet and Man of Law - O brave anomaly! - 

dove wise and serpent-tongued for Song or Plea - 
a parti-coloured animal, committed, parti-pris 
but not a party man, a Man, and free. 


Padlock unlocker and voice with a key, 
unbanner of books, and by a natural necessity 
against duplicity and privileged Duplessity. 


But what endears you most to me, 
old friend, ’s your love and practice of sweet poesy. 


I ask, then, what it means to be a poet: 

- to grasp the Muse’s saxophone and blow it? 
- to have a quivering soul, and show it? 

- fo prance in purple like an Emperor’s clown? 
or tickle the gallant salons of the town? 

or lift the Holy Grail, and toss it down? 


Not today, I think. Wrong answers drop, 
facile as angels’ tears, and plop 


so dully unctuous you cry, ‘‘For God’s sake, STOP!”’ 


To be a poet, Frank, you’ve shown 
'S a harder thing. It is to be a stone, 
an eye, a heart, a lung, a microphone, 


a voice, but not a voice alone, a hand, 
a hand to grasp a hand, a leg to stand 
on, nerves to feel, and in supreme command 


the shaping mind that shapes the poem 
as it shapes the man, foursquare, and needle-eyed, 
and Frank. 


nA 
7) 


Acknowledgements: 

Smith’s ‘*To Frank Scott, Esq., on the occasion of his 
seventieth birthday,’’ The Classic Shade: Selected 
Poems, McClelland and Stewart Ltd., Toronto, 1978. 
Jones’s ‘Sketches for a Portrait of F. R. S.,’’ The Sun 
is Axeman: Poems, University of Toronto Press, 
Toronto, 1961. Layton’s ‘“‘F. R. Scott,’’ Collected 
Poems, McClelland and Stewart Ltd., Toronto, 1965. 
Gustafson’s ‘‘F. R. Scott,’ Selected Poems, McClel- 
land and Stewart Ltd., Toronto, 1972. Souster’s 
“Wasp Nest,’’ Collected Poems, Vol. 3, Oberon Press, 
Ottawa, 1982. 

SEGRE SE er Ce) Se a 


From Continuation II 
by Louis Dudek, BA’39 


Who is the great one, by God? No one 


if you look close. 
But those who ask for nothing may find it 


Not a solitary vice 
It involves the whole damn world 

and that’s why failure 
hurts. 


Not for success who needs it but 
“‘not another failure’’ (Chaplin). 


Listening to music mostly 
like passing small stands 
of treesinatrain, asoft blur 


(Better play one adagio 
than do the whole sonatas in one afternoon). 


Wachet auf! 
Wrote it to sing in church - 
no ‘great man’ at all 
(Failed to get the job, despite Six Brandenburg Concerti). 


Or Frank Scott 
blind in one eye like Yeats 
who saw with rational clarity 


the monopolists, financiers, speculators 
puddle our national wealth 
into one private pile. 


The facts, 
the significance of the detail 

as I saw on a packing case 
HECHO EN MEXICO (Made in Mexico) 


The secret key to poetry 

B-natural 

C-sharp etc. (whether minor or major) 
And try not to hit a flat. 


After the poetry reading, 
sitting in the Union Station (Toronto) 
thinking that I had mentioned Chaplin 
in two of the poems I had been reading 
and was there a third 
when the Muzak in the station 
began playing ‘‘Limelight’’ 


Meaning what? 
That there are more things in heaven and earth 
than are dreamed of in our poetry.... 


A word from on high 


Maybe, maybe 
and maybe not 


Those unique events are always happening 
They are in the nature of nature 

Chance 
the surprise factor. 


God, precisely, plays dice with the universe 
That’s how it happens (at least 
it’s one of the elements)... 


CGAY 


WINTER-SPRING 1985/McGILL NEWS 11 


LEPRSRE PRIS PAAR ew RTH TF 


PRPIFPRAGIFAPASSE PERSP eRe rag poe? 


Sketches for a Portrait of F.R.S. 
by D. G. Jones, BA’52 


I 


He has the evil eye, 
Politically, and yet 
Is lionized. 
See him at bay, a 

Cocktail against twenty voices. He is 
Cyrano with a toothpick and his wit 
Is rhymed. 

Touché! And he has foiled 
Le Chef 
Dans sa belle province. 


II 


A basilisk - and hard 
To sentimentalize — his glare 
Shrivels the forked tongue. 


Yet honest serpent 
Struggles 
With the haggard bird 


And candour 
Looks him in the eye. 


II] 


He comes disguised - would be 
But given better times, Féng Huang, 
That bounteous bird. 


“Why, Kim!’’ He 
Plays out greetings from the 
Party’s height. 
He winds you in. 

And so, 

No Eve in Eden to reflect 
His Adam, or his snake, you shift 
The metaphor: 


In the midst of Babel to create 
A paradise from fools. 


IV 


Oh, suddenly some speech 


Reveals magician as a hometown boy, his roots 


In a Victorian Quebec! 


Voila! He cuts the deck. There’s 
Justice for an ace. 


He has them up his sleeve, the old 
Ideals of freedom. 

He gambles 
On the right to speak. 


12 McGill NEWS/WINTER-SPRING 1985 


V 


Snake-charmer par excellence, he 
Uncoils in 
Oh, how many baskets round the world - 


A tongue at midnight, there 
To conjugate 
French with English, Indian with Greek. 


Petite minorité anglaise 
Parmi les gens du vieux Quebec, 
He is unchanged - the catalyst. 


VI 


More than writer, 
More than book or force, 
Seeming fabulous, both bird and snake, 


He yet is mortal, not 
Enduring myth. 


He is aman - and hereby great 
Though we forget 


The hooded eyes, the face, 
The voice which was the agent 
Of our truest life. 


F. R. Scott 
by Irving Layton, BScAgr’39, MA’46 


Drops his arm 
on your shoulder 
like a heavy plastic; 
drives a witticism 
into your thick, dull skull; 
waits for the smiles 
to start 
in your eyes, rolldown 
your cheeks; 
esples 

another: undubbed, virginal, 
and leaves you gasping 

your delight. 


For all that, 
weary of his too clear sight, 
his icy brain, 
would rather be 

an ignorant Italian 
grinding his hurdy-gurdy 
for coppers 

under a lady’s balcony. 


Even if, friskily, 
he lifts high 
his long, tailored legs, 

and higher...sO...SO... 
making one wonder 
what tormenting ghost 
has got him by the ankle 

and won’t let go. 


F. R. Scott 
by Ralph Gustafson 


To say 

that this man is fantastic 
is to be 

Frankly wrong. 
Real 

is the right root 
for him. 

He bears history, 
the lakes 

he dives under, 
the cold hard sun 
he walks in, 
Canada, perhaps. 
He shoulders 
distance, 

levels 

facts. 

Nothing is too true 
for him. 

Praise 

he goes into, 
padlocks 

he gets well out of 
and piety. 

He chairs children 
and keeps up wit. 


Not to say 

if this man is 

God is. 

Mortality 

moves him, 

he goes for wrong-doing, 
never lets bad enough 
alone. 

Being with him 

is not psalm 

singing 

but pfun. 


Words 
he gets the wear out of, 
lives by a poem, 


buried with respectable honour dl 


goes 
Scott-free. 


WH 


Wasp Nest 
by Raymond Souster 
(For Frank and Marian) 


The wasps at the north end of your verandah 
have the best view of Lake Massawippi 
three terraces below. 


So easy to get rid of them, 

you say, a paper bag 

suddenly popped over the nest 

would do it. But there’s a fascination 

in watching the work expand 

inch by inch as the weeks slide by, 

seeing another form of life go about 

its living with a frenzied earnestness 

a dedication to shame us listless humans. 
What if one gets careless sometimes 

and draws a sting or two? 

Can you really blame these home-loving buzzers? 
Think of them, if you will, 

as les séparatistes of North Hatley, 

better tolerated than stirred up, 

better at the end of the verandah 

in plain view than hidden in the woods.... 


And who knows, in time 

we may even come to know each other 
well enough to live together 

under this same good roof. 


NZ 
AS 


For Frank Scott 
by John Asfour, MA’75 


“The future of man is my heaven.’’ 


Three times I was introduced to you - 

the defender of Lady Chatterley, 

of the poor, the elderly, the infirm and victimized, 
of Jehovah’s Witnesses. 

[do not know 

whether on each occasion your glassy eye 

did not recognize me 

or if my two bad ones were bleary. 

No matter. There was more between us than 

little eyesight 

and Lady Chatterley. 

We talked of justice for all 

and the dignity of man. I told you 

my country naps on an active volcano 

while yours is sitting on ice. How could we possibly 
make progress? But then I remembered 

you lived by that curious creed: the world was your country. 
You smiled and told me 

better to write than to worry. 


All citizens of the world confer 

at some point. 

lam hoping to be introduced to you again. 

lam hunting up and down the streets for you now. 
I see that unemployment still runs high, 

our cities are full of crime 

and intimations of nuclear missiles. 

What kind of heaven have we made for you? 


ZF?) 


Frank Scott at eighty-three 
by Mona Elaine Adilman, BA’45 


He spoke about horizons receding 

as we advance to touch them. 

His horizons were always infinite, 
and his glance silvered their surface, 
drawing fathoms of history from art. 


He delighted in the thrust of life, 
and from it, deduced a universe. 

His thoughts ranged over continents, 
and the slow-moving currents 

of human struggle and yearning. 


He championed the inarticulate. 

The torrent of his voice and pen combined, 

and ‘‘challenge water’’ burst the banks of prejudice 
to vitalize the parched throat of the law. 

He walked with science; ineluctable forces 
mesmerized his vision 

and greened the pastures of his creativity. 


When Roncarelli, holding a Hebrew-English 
translation of the Bible, said 

“Don’t worry, Professor Scott, 

we have Jehovah on our side, ”’ 

he answered, ‘‘That’s well and good. 

But I think I would rather have 

the Supreme Court of Canada on my side. ’”’ 


Now he sails on the receding horizon, 
conquistador of four-score years and more. 
His Heaven will not be a paradise 

where trade is flourishing and God is secure. 
Rather will it be an open forum of ideas, 

a widening frontier of wonder 

where knowledge grows larger and larger. 


There will be no phony literati or British peers. 
Socialites please register Down Below. 

D. H. Lawrence will shake his hand, 

and Lady Chatterley will prance 

ona Bill of Rights stallion, 

godiva-like and fair. 

Corporation presidents will own 

Class A preferred stock in Dante’s Inferno. 
Struggling poets and little mags 

will all receive Canada Council grants. 


He never lost in choosing 

what he did not choose, 

for