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THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA 


STUDENT OPINIONS AND ATTITUDES IN SECOND 


LANGUAGE LEARNING 


BY 


(Cc) ALLEN GORDON MCIVER 


Rei io lS 
SUBMITTED TO THE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES 
IN PARTIAL FULFILMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE 


DEGREE OF MASTER OF EDUCATION 
DEPARTMENT OF SECONDARY EDUCATION 


EDMONTON, ALBERTA 


FALL, 1970 












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THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA 
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES 


Themunders toned=centiry that they shave read, and 
recommend to the Faculty of Graduate Studies for accept- 
ance, a thesis entitled, "Student Opinions and Attitudes 
in Second Language Learning" submitted by Allen Gordon 
MeLvermine pagel leu oil menteote (he Trequixvements efor tne 


degree of Master of Education. 


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ABSTRACT 


The purpose of this study was to obtain the reactions 
of junior high school students. toward a particular French 
course, and to assess their attitudes in regard to the French 
language and French-speaking people. It was assumed that 
such information from the students themselves. would provide a 
better understanding of some of. the problem areas which 
second language learners and their teachers face. 

A questionnaire, developed for the purposes of this 
study, was administered to the Public School students of 
Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan who were following the French course, 
"Voix et Images de France". Students, who had studied French 
prior to Grade VII or who had not begun the French course in. 
question in the first year of junior high schooljaweremeli- 
minated from the study. The findings of this report were 
based on the responses of the remaining 917 students. 

Since classes had been. divided into top, middle, and 
bottom thirds on the basis of French marks, comparisons of 
students' responses were possible by achievement level as 
well as grade level. These comparisons were in additwon to 
the overall reaction of the respondents for each item in 
the questionnaire. 

The analysis of the data indicated that students 
generally held favorable attitudes toward the French language 
and French-speaking people, and that the French course was 


considered to be a good one for people wishing to learn to 


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speak French. First. year students of the course were 
more positive in nearly all of the areas .under examination 
than were students. in the second and third years. Like the 
Grade VII's, high achievers tended to be more sympathetic 
toward the language, and in certain areas somewhat more 
positive toward the course than were students who did not, 
perform as well. 

Comprehendine the meaning of the Prench. sentences 
and a proper grasp of the grammar appeared to be two 
important areas of concern to many students. Considerable 
criticism was also leveled at the scarcity of time for 
Dracr icing srrencheconversation, in-class, the boredompresult- 
ing from the. repetition of the.sentences, the poor quality 
Gamithomtanes. and tne lack Ot provision OL a textbook 
CONntaininoewsthie 1 reneh-senvences and exercises. ~In-=almost, 
every case the strongest disapproval came from the Grade 
Lvs CUGENLCS . 

Simple solutions to the problems encountered in this 
study will not be easily found. One great step forward 
would be the creation of more positive attitudes, and 
certain changes in the methodology of the course could 
possibly provide other improvements. However, it seems 
that: the most important: role’ in’ the process of acquiring a 
second language is played by the teacher. Skilled, efficient, 
and imaginative instructors. are able to bring about most 
effectively the positive opinions and attitudes which are so 


necessary. in. this. field of study. 




























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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 


The-writer wishes to express his gratitude and 
appreciation to all whose contributions made the completion 
of, this thesis possible. Above. all, ,honor and. thanks are 
given to God for health, strength, and guidance at all times 
during the study. 

Gratitude is expressed to the advisor of this study, ° 
Dr. D. V. Parker,-for his: encouragement and invaluable 
suggestions throughout the compiling and writing of this 
thesis, ,and the helpful contributions: of.the committee 
members,:Dr. M. J. Monod, and.Professor W. D. Wilde. 

Appreciation is also expressed to Dr. H. Kass and 
Mr. D. Precht for much needed, advice and assistance during 
the data analysis. 

Thanks is extended to the Board and the Superintendent 
of the Moose Jaw Public School, Board of Education, Mr. R. 
Stephenson, for permission to conduct. the study, and,toe. ene 
teachers and students. of this school, system fox ther 
cooperation. 

For the financial assistance of the Department of 
Secondary Education, the writer is indebted since it enabled 
him to undertake a master's program at. the University of 
Alberta. 

Finally, to my wife and family go special thanks for 


their patience, understanding, and support. 

























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TABLE~OF CONTENTS 


CHAPTER 
fs THE PROBLEM 
Introduction. 
Statement.of the Problem. 
Significance of; the Study. 
Overview of the Study 
Ie. THEY REVIEW OR THE bi TERATURE 
Learning Theories and Methodology 
Related Studies 
Crasticisms byaAuthorities . : 5 
Definitions of Teaching Methods 
Repetition and Habit Formation. . 
Inductive versus Deductive Learning 
The Use of English to Convey Meaning 


Prior Presentation of Materials. in 
Spoken. Form, . : : : i ; 


Motivation, -Interest, and.Attitudes 
Related. Studies 
Boredom in. the Classroom 
Concluding Statement. 
Weieiey THE. DESIGN OF: THE STUDY 
hire Instrument... .. : " : 5 ; 
Setting and Population 
Teachers and Their Classes 


Gathering of the Data 


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Treatment of the -Data F 4 ‘ ‘ : 32 

LV". THE RESULTS AND DISCUSSION, : . ; : 34 
Analysis of. the Questions : ; > ‘ ae 

Analysis of.the Clustered Items . ‘ : oh 


Analysis of Responses of Students Taught, 
by VIF-Trained Teachers Compared to 
Responses of Students eran by non-VIF- 
Trained Teachers . | 106 


V: SUMMARY, CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS, 


RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FURTHER RESEARCH. XE Able 
Summary of the Findings . ‘ : didi, 
Attitude Toward French and French- 

Speaking People . ee : ‘ ele 
Opinion of the VIF Course . : : 5 ks 
Comprehension of Meaning . 5 : , 120 
Grammar : ‘ er , ‘ : ee deed. 
Repetition. : ‘ oe : 5 wees 
Reading and Writing ; : ‘ ° ee 

Danes Provaedced tor Free CORDIC sicke U ake in 
Prench —. ; : 3 : : , eae 
Aspirations to Speak French ; : = 128 
Teachers Sl raining. ° : . ‘ wo pice 
Conclusions: and Implications, : : Dn Ae ie 
Recommendations for Further Research. .. 126 
_ BIBLIOGRAPHY ‘ ; : 5 : <i gis 5 , ale 
APPENDIX A:. Pilot Study Questionnaire : : ey Sale 


APPENDIX B: . VIF Questionnaire. ‘ : : aa oboe 


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82 nottesu) ot yToOg a = 
orod bra yorneupeTd oe aK e- 
norvesu oF (Tog ae 

— a 


Jnsotst baie yo roypsta amine 


Oh notsesuD of yrog ? 


et & 
ee 


: ® 
tn9519% bes yousypsrt ~ inal 7 
[h sortesnD oF yYIeg _ 
bs / - . ie 
tneo1eo bos Yomsupsxd ER 


22 


Sh maori Pca oy Og 7 

7 *) 
SnsoteT bas eer 2 
Et lorse2oup oF 08 


a 


a 
. . 


Troorey Bis ‘@rsupert “wrx 
bh noitesn) oF sad . 





JsI95T SF ae - 
“fh AOE eu | ay 


on rath & Mite 


anooxed ba ne upst r 
“ary : ct — 
<~ 
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Sh no Lae: oa Gaus 
AAS 
to tIneoteT' 


. ile 28 2119 
ri 








TABLE 


ne 
vie 
inte, 
LIV. 

1 
LVI. 
LVII. 
EVE ds. 
LVIX. 
LX. 
LXI. 
LXII, 
LXIII. 
LXIV. 


LXV. 


Prequency 


gory to. 


Frequency 
gory to 


Prequewey. 
gory to 


Prequency 
gory ete 


Frequency 
gory to 


Frequency 
gory to 


Fréquency . 


gory. to 


Frequency 
gory to 


Frequency 


gory to. 


Frequency 
gORYNEO 


Frequency 
gory to 


Frequency 
gory: to 


Frequency 
gory to 


Frequency 
gory to 


Frequency 
gory to 


Frequency 
gory to 


and Percent 
Question 50 


and.Percent 
and Percent 
Ques Grenten2 


and Percent 
Ques tron «53 


and Percent 
Question 54 


and Percent 


QUesibiien §5:5% 


and Percent 
Question 56 


and Percent 


Ques tion =57-, 


and Percent 
Gihus tercis 


and Percent 
Chusters2 3 


and Percent 
Cluster Sx 


and Percent 
Ginster 43 


and Percent 
Cluster-5. 


and Percent 
Ghus tercox 


and Percent 
Chustere/* 


and Percent 
Cluster 8. 


tof 
OMtocher mony lle 22 


Of 


of 
of 
of 
of 
oF 


of 


of 


of 
of 


of 


EO. 


of 


of 


Response 
Response 
Response 
Response 
Response 
Response 
Response 
Response 
Response 
Response 


Response 


Response 


° 


Response 


Response 


Response 


Response 


by 
by 
by 
by 
by 
by 


by 


by. 


by 
by 
by 
by 


by 


by, 


by 


by 


satel 


PAGE 
Cate- 
F Dade 
Cate- 
A BAAN 
Cate- 
Die 
Cate-= 
; aS ee 
Cate- 
4 » 26 
Cate- 
DRANG 
Cate- 
e e 218 
Cate- 
Cate- 
: 220) 
Cate- 
; Zoe 
Cate- 
; Z22 
Cate- 
‘ LER 
Cate- 
} 224 
Cate- 
s ORS 
Cate- 
§ 226 
Cate- 
° Deh 


-93e) 
«98D 


-e350 


. 


-9356)9 


-9its) 


-sts0 


-9t60 


-938) 


-9t50 


= xd piaiie. gig 


“9359 xd Serioqaom to 4 


. rs er) 


yd 
yd 
yd 


yd 


yd 


vd 


ud 


vd 


yd. 


xd 


senoqeod 


‘oenoqeed ek 


eenoqzsd to 






















senogesA. to 5. 


senoqee te 


’ J . 
= \ 


senoqeon to 


senoqesH to 


SenogesH to 


senogesd to 3 


Ssenoqesh to 


ae 








TABLE 


LXVI. 


LXVII. 


WXVITE. 


LXIX. 


LXX. 


LXX1. 


LXXII. 


EXXEL I 


LXXIV; 


LXXV. 


Frequency and Percent of Response for 
Students Taught by VIF-Trained Teachers 
Compared to Students Taught, by Non-VIF- 
Trained Teachers to. Question 2 


Frequency and Percent of Response for 
Students Taught. by VIF-Trained Teachers 
Compared to Students Taught by Non- 
VIF-Trained Teachers to Question 6 


Frequency and Percent of Response: for 
Students Taught by VIF-Trained Teachers 
Compared to Students Taught by Non-VIF- 
Trained Teachers to Question 8 


Frequency and Percent of Response for 
Students Taught by VIF-Trained Teachers 
Compared to Students Taught by Non-VIF- 
Erained Teachers: to Question 12 


Frequency and Percent of Response for 
Students Taught by VIF-Trained Teachers 
Compared to Students Taught by Non-VIF- 
Trained Teachers: to; Question, 16 


Frequency and Percent of Response for 
Students Taught by VIF-Trained Teachers 
Compared to Students Taught.by Non-VIF- 
Trained Teachers to Question 24 


Frequency~ and| Pencent.of Response for 
Students Taught by VIF-Trained Teachers 
Compared to Students Taught. by Non-VIF- 
Timoaned!) Teachers; to; Question 32 


Prequencvyeaud fercenim Of Response tor 
students’ Taught. by -VIF-Trained Teachers 
Compared to Students Taught by Non-VIF- 
TrainedaledcnerSetOe Question, 55 


Drequeney sailaerenrecelusOit Response tor 
Students Taught by VIF-Trained. Teachers 
Compared to Students Taught. by Non-VIF- 
Trained Teachers to Question 355: . ° 


PrecucicCvealG@mrercenu Ot Responses tor 
Students, Taught: by .VIF-Trained: Teachers 
Compared to Students Taught by Non-VIF-~- 
Trained: Teachers to Question: 42 


pg ics 


PAGE 


(as) 


230 


foie 


233 


234 


235 


236 


-" 
bes 
sé 
eS 
| bes 


2es 


-TIV- 10% 


~TIV-noN yd FF iguet etme +2 


SEP 





























a) 3 013 2aup ‘od erga 
rot e2anogesh to ohead i. 
eredossT bentextei0y bs te nebys 
~4tV-10K bh i ta 2s | ei 1. barat 
‘ rp2sen0 of ard fe ae 


tot s2og 10 Fit 35S Team 
atenoesT bs Tay jdgusT 
-41V-no yd 3s 23 
, SE gor 


10% semonesd te jnsoyst — 
ensizseT bomierT-I1V . aifgus?» 2: 


of noiteoup oF svodaa3t & patie 


toi S2moq2e to tneoted Bre 3 
arerfoseT ‘bontatT-dIV “dd tilgusT | 
-FIV-a0K yd sHgusBT atnebute ot Bs 

; . d5 nokteeu0 oF 


tot sahogest to 2 29 bas yoneu, 
eredossl bsaisiT-FIVv - gust ete 


“HIV-no% yd td f 
. Sé mor ca afore Goren 


_ 20% S2meqesh to tns0x6 
etefiossT bonistT-WV ro) regis 
sl mon yd tilgusT es obore a Od 


ce aren oe a 


tot ep a4 ial: 
eredogel. bs 
-A1V- ci ¥ 


TABLE 


LXXVI. 


EXAVIT. 


DAAVIL 


LXXIX. 


LXXX. 


LXXXI. 


DAXAE Es 


Prequency and, Percent of Response for 
Students. Taught by VIF-Trained Teachers 
Compared to Students Taught by Non-VIF- 
Trained Téachers to Question 4¢4 


Frequency did Percent OL enesponse Lor 
Students Taught, by VIF-Trained Teachers 
Compared to Students Taught by Non-VIF- 
Trained Teachers to Question 49 


PLeaguewcy ald PETCEN t Or hes polse tor 
Students Taught by VIF-Trained, Teachers 
Compared to Students Taught .by Non-VIF- 
Trained Teachers sto Uuest.on 51 


ETeQuency- alas ercelntlaou Response for 
Students laugic Dy ViF=lrained Teachers 
Compared to Students Taught by Non-VIF- 
trained | oaciols = (Om UUes tur On, s5 


Preducncy and Percent.or Response for 
Students Taught by VIF-Trained, Teachers 
GUompared. to otiudencs “laught py Non Vi r= 
Trained Teachers to Question 56 


Frequency and, Percent.of Response’ for 
Students Taught by VIF-Trained. Teachers 
GoOmpared to ocbudcenes Laught. by Nou-VIFE 
DreticantedctersimcO=@ULus ce tues 


Prequcncy alcererceuc Of “RUSUOHSe =10T 
Students Taught. by VIF-Trained Teachers 
Compared to Students Taught by Non-VIF- 
Trained: Teachers, to. Cluster 7/ 


sida beg 


PAGE 


250 


240 


241 


242 


243 


244 
































an 









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fet 7 ; 


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BES ; d } Y tsyeul> oF atedzeer | ome. 


GHAPTER 941 
THE PROBLEM 
TaOINTRODUCTION 


Although many feel that second language learning is 
of growing importance in.a shrinking world, teachers in 
this subject area have not always been successful in 
communicating to their students: the value of. such study. 
Those who have had experience in this field frequently 
observe classes in which enthusiasm for the subject is 
lacking. They see students who are relatively successful 
in most subject areas of the curriculum often having 
difficulty in learning a foreign language. The large number 
we dropouts and the high failure rate of these students 
have long disturbed educators because of the waste of human 
talent and potential. The seriousness.of the situation 
certainly warrants investigation. One may ask: Are the 
students bored by the method of presentation? Are the 
theories of.learning faulty? Do negative attitudes defeat 
Chembestecit Orcs Op tUlemteaciersi. Haveatie students: no 
real interest in learning a,second language? Is: French 
really that important today to students, compared with 
Russian, Chinese, Spanish, or some other world language? 
Obviously, these questions have been asked and debated 


previously by teachers, professors, and administrators on 


vi 


















YOLTOUGOATMI os ) ries : 


ei gnintsel agsugasl baopee ses fost vie in = 
mit eredosss ,blxow gnidniaite & o£ gomsstoqmi gaiworg 20 | . 
ai Inteeodoue nosd eyswis sor vad awn Joatdue eidd : 

Ybute Howe to oulsv ody atnebute risds ot ants 6oiaummos 
yismoupert blort erat or coup ieagie hail eel oe soit | 

eit soefdue sit ¢o% mepteudsag dotdw mt zoeeslo evie2do 

Ivtdeexque yisvitsler ots’ odw etnebuse 902 yodT .gnidosl 
goived netio muisuoiries ont to. ansts spe due Jeom ni 
tedmun ogisi ofT . sgeuyael ngiero? 6 gaigisel ai ysfivoi2tkb 7 os 
etmebuse seedt to ster o1uiist dgid off bis 2tuoqorb to ° 7 “7 
temud to bee to eseusoed erotsoubs iwc ovad 


ng 
- get otA ples xsi tion eee erty at ae: 
‘odd otA Bani cok a) bets 


on étasbute edd oval Sersioses ‘ods to ee é 
doneti 21 agesugnst baosse 5 paeates, i ss 


dtiw bersqmo: catmsbuse at ae ce beso 
2 x oo i — 


qd 


Togeugnsl blrow redtd “amoe, Geek pis Meiaa 
bers deb baé betes need 
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numerous occasions, but too often these people forget. that 
if education is to be effective, it should be geared to 
those being educated, not the educators. Since this is 
the case, would it not be worthwhile to ask the opinions 
of the students themselves about these problems? 

It is only lately that educators have been paying 
closer attention to student opinions about the content of 
the curriculum, the methods of.presentation, and other 
decisions which affect them directly. This has been most 
evident at the university and college level, but even in. 
the high schools there is a growing insistence on the part 
of the learners that their opinions be heard. Bamberger 
(1955, p. 241) feels that it might be wise to investigate 
the opinions of all students with regard to preferred aims 
and procedures, since even the most radical and erroneous 
views of students cannot be overlooked, because they serve 
to determine their attitudes toward a subject. The French 
programe according ito Kaulfersi( 1955, p..~30) , musit® give 
satisfactions to both students and teachers to obtain the 
best results. Up to the present very few educators have 
given students: much voice in determining the course of 
studies. Student activists are: demanding a. greater voice 
in determining their future, and even though the older 
generation may not be too sympathetic, thoughtful consider- 
ation should be given.to all suggestions, The associate 


secretary of the National Association of, Secondary School 




























S 


seit leer aiqooq Sséenit netto- oot tod , prename 
os beresg od bivode ti Pe mst ‘ & aoe ii 
ai zidd soni2 2rd oube edt jon 4 seodt | 
enoinigo ert Ize of olidwitzow sd tom 4 bluow ce . 
Semeidoxq seont suods zevioemerts. edt to 
gaiyaq mood eved ‘etospoube tedd - fete 40 et 11 7 
to tmstmo> eft tyuods enoinigo snebute oF noitnests rez0ls aa 
_edto bas ,noittsinasestq to bedaam ois dultpereus oat ; | 
¢eom mood esr etdlT .NLdoe1tbh mods tobhis doidw enotetoeb 
fi neve sud level sgoifoo bas \o ietow fae edt te snebive | 
gueq adt.no soteteient gniwory 6 at stent ators? gid ofa : 
seg redine 4 -btsed od enointgo trsas ters . ‘etonreek 
efegizveovai os seiw od tigim 3£ sans zfest aaa +g .22et) 
amis ereresers ot breget fit iw atnabuse seal to enoinigo ‘ot ee 
eoenotrs bas fs2tbst tzom edt seve conte . 291ubs90%q baa | 
evtee yedt sevsood .bstoolrevo ed souns ennebude ‘to | 
donot edT ,toetdue s brewos zobusitis tieds snieroseb 2 2 ) 
evig seum ,(0% .q ,22ef) as shIuew of gnibroz26 J 
edt mistdo ot eredoset bas etnebuse dtod ot anoks 


ne 
- 





eaved etoysoubs wet \19v taseotd os ot qu. Pets 
to eztwoo ods gainimretebh at sotov doum & 2 
edtov tetserg s gnibnsmeb ors eheivitos sine 
reblo eds dytrosis nove baa ort ur tied: 
-tebienoo Luts diguoiis Saka 3 203 9 os 208% 
etekoozes SiT enoitesygue Ife fbr 


foots? yraba032 20 noiseisoaeh 98 ‘ 


Principals, J. Lloyd Trump (1970, p. 65), was quoted in 
Newsweek as saying, "Each year the kids are in schoe]; they 
have less enthusiasm for it."'. The article: goes on to Say 
that many students display a passive acquiescence or a 
resignation to boredom, and that the schools have failed to 
keep pace with the changes in modern society. If changes 
have occurred, they have been superficial in many cases, 
but students are still expected to remain passive 
receptacles for knowledge.. 

During the past decade a. growing number of foreign 
language teachers, in an attempt to revitalize the old 
courses and methods, have adopted the audio-lingual approach 
in which the fundamental skills are emphasized. The new 
methodology at first seemed. like the complete answer to the 
problems that had long plagued this subject area. There 
were many favorable reports from both teachers and students. 
The audio-lingual method was viewed as a panacea, hopes were. 
high, and optimistic predictions were made. However, in 
more, recent. years a,certain amount of disillusionment has 
set in. Many of the evaluative reports speak of qualified 
success and reservations. Classroom results have not 
matched expectations. Belasco (1965, p. 482) observes that 
students are able to manipulate drills and memorize dialogues 
very expertly, but most of them are unable to. understand and 
speak the language outside the classroom.situation. It 


appears that many students receive the new approach with 


=) 

























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evieesg dismet os hofeqxe Lfise ots einabute od 
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wen edt .bosiesnqme ere ellite ee 
SA3 oF towers otelygmoo sit sAil bomese sarit ts ygosobodson 
erediT- .sets. Jootdue eidt beygslq gaol’ bsd sed? emokdonq . 
-atnebuse bus eronfgses dtod mort atroqet oldstove? (hem enew eg : 
stew esqor ,s90s8neq s 28 baweiv esw bodtem Lsugnit-oibus: 9fT =| 
‘mb yrevewoll .ebsm otaw enoitabberg oiszimitqo be. Agia ; 
aad Tmounoleuilieth to Savoms misst92 8 2188 J8997 oxOM 
beitileip to dseqe atxoqor svitsulsve sit to a 
tom sved esiuest moorees LO .enoitsy 

ted? eevisedo (58h .q ,20@L) oneshed 21083932 

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bas bastetebav ot ciate ae Saou - ve - if 
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2 > » 





















Bui a 


a 


enthusiasm, but, as with the traditional. grammar- 
translation method, interest falls off after extended 
exposure. Efforts, both preventative and remedial, have 
to be undertaken to conserve these human resources. A 
close examination of these problems from the students' 


point of view could be most revealing. 
II. STATEMENT: OF THE PROBLEM 


In this study the investigator is concerned with an 
examination of students' opinions of an audio-lingual 
French course, ''Voix,et Images. de France" (hereafter 
neferred toeas VIE) et as well as their attitudes ‘toward 
the French language and French-speaking people. A compari- 
son of these attitudes and opinions in three grades and 
at three levels of achievement is also made to see the 
effect of these divisions upon. student response. 

Studies by Lambert: (1963), -Pimsleur. (1964), Politzer 
(1953-54), and Reinert. (1970) have already demonstrated 
that success in second language learning canybehinfliuenced 
by the attitudes and values held by students toward the 
foreign language and the people whose language is being 

t For CHE DUDS SmOeLidS es CUCYe theme VOax et simapes 
dé France” ca@urse will be designated. as-an audio-lingual 
course. However, jithmustebéfpountedtout that, although VIF 
HdsmMany soLethie teatures: of~an) audio-lingual course, “it 
does rely heavily upon visuals, in the form, of filmstrips, 
to assisSteinnthedpresentationeocfrmeaningthelhereforestone 
could say that VIF stands apart from other audio- lingual 


courses in that it is really an audio-visual approach to 
the learning of a second language. 




















‘  pemmayg incest EO a ar ! 
bebastxs tefis Tio 2list seerseni . | 
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A (egntvoesr nsmud s2edt avteetos of notes rebated "ot 
Veoasbue eit mort emofdorg saedt Ao soitentmgns’ Beols ; 








sgukinetes Sea ae bitio> “Welw a 7 
aoe a 
MHIGOAT SHT JO THEMSTATZ «TT cane af 


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. brsewot asbutistss visit és [fow ee , Lay. 2B od boristet . 

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bas 2s5sTy serdi mi esoParqo Sas. esbusirtte 92603 to aoe = 
eit s52 of sham ozls ef tnomeveidos t0 efevel | cords te 

,eefog2et tnebuse noqu enoretvib e2ens to t99t%e 

tostilol ,(poel) rmwelemi4 -(eder) srsdmsJ ey ae — ; 
‘besers extomoe ybserls oved (OTOL) ‘sromten bas ,(aeEzery 
beoneuLint ed as gninrsel egsugast brosee at eassoue fede 


sdf brswot zsasbute yd bled zoulsy bns oaneaue 


gnted et sgsugnsl seodw sfqosq oss ons 
. ae "2 
os Bere | 7 


amie oe 





nil xLioV" oat ante ae t oa goqTug 
ig os set atl Tie 





Studied, This study does not attempt to inquire further 
into this question. Rather, the investigator wishes to 
ascertain the attitudes and opinions of a particular group 
of students in hopes of discovering information which will 
improve the learning process in the field of second 


language learning. 
Dir > LGN I EI CANCGES OF STHESSTUDY 


There have been but few studies concerned with 
student opinion. It is hoped that the present study sheds 
some light on. the audio-lingual method from the student's 
point |of view. If teachers and. administrators: can: be 
provided with information as to the methods and procedures 
which are received favorably by their clients, it should 
asco teilepldiiingecOreasbetter program Or, Instruction or 
in making adjustments which will facilitate learning. 

Since attitudes: and interests play such an important 
Tole in determining motivation, it ought,to be, of value to 
know the attitudes of the students with which this study 
Pseconceined., Inisemay prove, to be, worthwhile information 
to teachers in dealing more, successfully with,their 


students. 
IV. OVERVIEW OF THE: STUDY 


The introduction to the problem, the purpose of this 


Study, and: its significance have been presented in-this 

















& i 


redstui stiupni of sqmoste : 
of esdeiw rotsyiteevat odo ,redtea i 
qorg xslwottxeq & to clase alae 7 
[Liw dotdw roitemrodat gnitevooetb to Hiei etree “ . 
rn 


Hnovee to bisit edt ai 22e201q 


YOUT2 BHT JO HOMADTADMOIe  . IIT 


, dtiw hemes 109 zeibute wet sud need a ape i ‘ 
eberle ybute snoestq odd Teds wogod 2t-si non 









2*tnebuse oft mort. bod tom Isugaii-olbus edt 0 
ed m89 erotsttziaimbs Sas etodoss1 tI. ere 
 schalaaiatel bas ebodtem edt ot 28 Hoitsmrotat ee . 
biuode 3f ,2tnetlo treds yd vidstovst. bevieost oe dott 
“to aoktouste0i Yo mst Zorg Tested s rot giinasiq ni tetas 
gointssl stssilfost Show doidw rn 

Jae rsoqmi mg dowe yolq stampasn’ “hike eobusedss eamke 
ot oulsv to ed oF tdguo Si .noitavisom gninimnes 9b mi olor 


Ybuse aida doddw dsiw ednebuse eds 20 — word 





chapter. The remainder of the thesis has been organized 

in four chapters as follows, Chapter II is devoted to 

the relevant literature in the second language field. The 
design of the study and the development of the instrument 
are then described in Chapter III. Chapter IV is concerned 
With the review and discussion of the findings which are 
Summarized in the last part of this report, Chapter V. In 
this final chapter the conclusions and implications are 
also presented along with some suggestions for further 


research. 


o 
dilaialcas aad 
oF batoveb et IT aa 
oat .bieit essognal baove2 ef 
smemust2 ci odd 26 cAemyol ovob i 
bente>no> et VI tetqsdd .T11 x 
ets Adiriw doc bbe. edt an a 
at W totqsdo oruie: 2crnt ac eas as 








CHAPTERTSLI 
THE REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE 
I. LEARNING THEORIES AND METHODOLOGY 


Criticism of the educational system is a pastime 
in which young and old engage, and far too often those who 
would tear down everything in this system have nothing 
Constructive withswiich to replace it. It is perhaps for 
this reason that students" opinions of courses of study 
have never been very highly valued, nor have they received 
much attention, especially below the college level. How- 
ever, there are certain educators who do see some worth in 
asking the opinions of all who are affected by educational 
decision-making. One of these educators, Bamberger (1955, 
p. 241), advocates that every foreign language student be 
reques ted toy till) out, a questionnaire to determine reactions 
to.the study. and teaching process. He says that no 
iNobiucuOGucaneDemcnitarely Suresot himsedt anduhope: for 
success unless he knows what is in the student's mind, 
even though a student may or may not understand his own 
needs and desires or be able to judge educational principles 


COmmec tly. 


Related Studies 
Rice (1967) reported a successful study in San Diego 


which was designed to obtain the opinions of gifted students 


7 






















YeOsOMOHTAM CAA aatsoanr SauManas b S | 


*) td J ) 
omisesq & ei mateee ridiod esau sit to. one : 
ow eeods getio oot 18% bas «PaeRne ‘Bio ms oe eae 


gnidton svsd moteye aide ft grciisiexexe awob kad ms 
103 aqedteq 2i tI .ti soslyet oF sotiin din ovisourte 


 ybsute %o 2d21u09 20 20 E@Dgo o eaaohuse tad> nasser Pe 
bevisoet yedt sved ron ,bowley titer yrev ased reven oved 
-woH .Isvel spellor eds wdlad Viletseqes cioigeiape> ea 


‘ mi dtrow emoe ose ob odw e1totssubs nisires’ ets Seton enews : 


= 
ot 


' ; 





fsaottsoubs yd botoetts ers ofw [is Yo emormiqo ot gate: Sit 
~2eer) rogredmed .2tote2ubs eeasit to 9A0 ‘att sreseleiga o) it 7 
od anecaialis egsugnel tgierot yreve tsdt testa a om : 


enoltose1 ebcocana’s ot ae s tuo [lit Hie 








tot eqod bos tisemid to stue yLlertinas sd ry 


ebaim e'¥nebute eft ai et tedw 2wo ml e) 


ogeid ase at iss 2, ves 
baesciad ‘adie to ta 


we Miho 


14 re in a aoe 





a 


regarding changes in the current. academic: program. Inter- 
views and written submissions showed that gifted students 
provide meaningful ideas about the nature of their academic 
programs, and thus represent.a largely unused source of 
imaginative suggestions for program innovations and change. 

Huebener (1963) inian-article, titled, "The New-Key 
is Now Off-Key", reports on a questionnaire submitted to 
the foreign language teachers in New York. After some 
experience with the new approach to second language learn- 
ing, these teachers expressed a number of criticisms. 

They felt that it was too time consuming for crowded time- 
tables, that the pre-reading period was too long, ‘that 
English could not. be eliminated entirely, and that grammar. 
could not; be neglected all together, particularly for the 
brighter students. These were some of the more important 
Criticisms which resulted in:certain modifications: to 
their methodology. 

Similar dissatisfactions. were reported by Fisk 
(1969,-p. 66)-who: quotes the complaints: of a-number of 
FLES (foreign language in. the elementary school) graduates: 

1. "We didn't know what we were saying," 


2. "We had to repeat too much after the teacher; 
we didn't do enough on our own."'- 


3. "What we learn should be more usable in 
communication. '"’ 


4; "We knew: the meaning. of: the whole: sentence, 
but» not the. parts)" 







nai. -istgorq oimebsos sabiabe egas i: - (oae 

| admebute boskig sndd bowortz 2 | 
oimebsos riert to stwtan ed 3 ebivorg . ¥ +” 
to go7uoe beevnus ylegral B. msi iillaairieet maaan lien: e 
/sgnedo bas enoitevenni mer QOTY ‘tot 2m0k exisankgent sy | 
yeUu-We ai?” ,~boftist elait1s oe ni cal renedeul | di 
ot bettimdye stisanoistzoup & mo es roger Cod - 220 wolt 28 ‘eae 
emo2 s93tA .AroY wo ot etooses egeugisl mgioxo? | 





- 

















— 
oT ae 


-tsef sgsuynel baoze2 o dosorqgs wen edd Adiw 7 
eameioitixs io. 1adaun 6 beezotgne erodosst ad r - 
-omis bebwors tot ge enre ae? emit oot esw tr Pee = 
ted3 .gaol oo3 25W botraq gnibsor =a edt a i 


= 


TsMmMs TE read bone ,yisritas betsmimifs ed ton bisoa dektgna 
wea 

eds tot Yitslusisteg ,r9dtegot Els besoeigen od tom biuso 

‘tmettoami stom oft to smo2 stsw szeHiT _atdebyte b ¢: a ic 


> 
— 
- 





= 

7 

‘ , 2 

- ages 
2a A 
> We > 


o3 anolssoit bom itissteo mr betinesr dy Edy 2 


. maby A 

deit yd betroqer otew enoltostetssceth Ts 

t0 redmun 8 to etnisiqmo> sft eotoup odw 

reeteubsetg (Loodo2 yisinemsle ods mt asios 

; es oe A 
itedoses oft rosts doym oot tseqet ot bed : on 
", mio THO Mo -Aguose ‘Ob t'nbib ow 

mi oldpeu oxom( Sed rpc del 


i BaLYBe oTew SW saw wont 3'p 


,sonetnee eLodw elt to anim ie 


ss TSH: ) 
i ae ae 4) { b 5 7 on “ vi oe. 


Be Riis. = 
ae = er 


5, ‘We learned to say, 'Paco is tired.'» Why 
couldn't we have learned, 'I am tired, we 
ane Ibuned, ayioueare ati red wh? 

Not all of these complaints relate to a method, but 
to the way the method is used by the teacher who is often 
times lacking in experience or the knowledge of how to 
make effective use of dialogues. However, in many classes 
there is mindless repetition and memorization with only a 
hazy idea of the meaning of what is being said. Fisk goes 
on to say that students often learn to respond with a 
"jumble of syllables" when the proper stimulus is given, 
but. that they are not really grasping concepts which they 
can use in» other situations; and therefore, learning is 
easily florngetten. «This «results,jin+frustration and : 


discouragement. 


Grrtrcisms by Authorities 


Some of the-more,prominent educators, linguists, and 
psychologists have also expressed skepticism about certain 
aspects \ofothe-audio-lingual theory... Chastain. (1968, 

p. 268) says that there are assumptions concerning this 
theory about which many experts have been asking questions. 
N@ks on sB rooks u@1966% sp o9359 yhhas; stated, Up to the 
present, what-is.called the new approach. is: largely. an act 
@f- faith; fesearch ito sprove jthenvalidity, of its basic 
Principles is scanty." Carroll (£965, p. 281) observes 


that the audio-lingual theory was consistent, during its 


7 i> 
- Dra 

















tone ate ges 


t? ,betis @ 
eid caentaahae ot etsior asntalgmos. - 2 : : 7 
aasto,2i ow taroset ods yd boew 2k peinnsencerta:, 
02 word ‘to egbed word! odd To SoTL 4S Ge ak Saregama: | a. : 
2ezesin yas oi <revewoll , saugole th: to. oeu evidootie otea. Pics _ 
& \lno dtiw sotsesitomsm bos noisiteqet ceblbata eioeved - | 
zeég del .bise gniod ei tadw to goinsem od? 29 sebk yom 
¥ 8 diiw bnoqest oc nrsol nesto ernsbute reds yee et m0 a 
<Mevig eb evfumite reqorg eit nod "zoldsiiye to efdmsg" P 
yous doidw etqoon0> gniqestg yilser Jon sis vodt tedd sud a 
et gaiavesl etobereds bas ,2moivsysie soto mt eau saiao 7 : 
, Dae nolttsittevtt ot etiveor 2eidT _n9339 940% Ybkeme 


néStIED Muods meinitqade bsegeetqxs oefs aves etaigo 
.800L) mistasdd .yroeds Letronif-otbus sad hi | 

ekdt goimreamon enoistqmyees ots eters tedt “s 
,enoitzeup gnides seed svsd 2s1aqxe yeti oe 
eis. 0 qU" .besste ead (282 .g .d00; 1) 0 

tos os ylogisi et fizsotqgs won ot be ited > 
piead ett Yo _sibifey osls. overg. ot dor 
tatennde (rO8 44 fei tLows#) o aevek @ 


10 


development, with the psychological ideas at the time, 
but it. is no longer. abreast of recent developments. 

In 1966 when teachers. felt that research had at 
last given them some answers to the problems of methodology, 
and they were beginning to feel comfortable with the audio-. 
lingual method,. Chomsky (1966, p. 43) upset the status. quo 
by seriously questioning much of the work: done in 
linguistics in recent years. He said that what was well 
established doctrine a few years prior to that time was. now 
the subject of extensive debate, and that in. psychology 
many question the view that the basic principles of learning 
are. well understood. Chomsky (1966, p. 44), a linguist 
himself, also stated that linguists are equally at. fault 
for contributing to the idea that language learning is 
"habitual and that a fixed stock of patterns is acquired 


through practice and is used as the basis for analogy." 


Definitions of Teaching Methods 


Before examining in more detail what these experts 
have. to say, a brief description of the basic teaching 
métheds issincerdersraSpoisky (19665); ptrl20)vhasasummarized 
the basic assumptions upon which the audio-lingual method 
is based: 


1. Foreign language’ learning i1s'a mechanical 
process of.habit formation. 


4.iHabatsgareystrengthenediby. reinforcement: 






















or 
bata ome seach? 
, etireacqo ts vsb tn s 
ts bed dorss2o is ea r ii: 
KgoLlobodsen. to ame dotq sds oa 21 
-obbus ond Hew eldésrotmoo {3st ot gm | 
oup autet2 od3 tsequ. (Eb .q ,doeL) lemon (baton Tange 
tat onob aArow eds to doum let tiraeaar 


Won 26w omit Sedz oF roltq 2169y wet £ Ss 
ygokodsy2q sit tsd3 bits .stedeb Pe a8 








giimieel ho eolqionitg otesd ent taft wely ony a 


Sehuganil s ,(M .q (88@L). wlemodd Jpoosexsbau ten ons | 
siust te \Lieupe 81s ateivgail teddy betsse cele isemid iL 


et guiaxsol agsugnsl ted3 sobs odd oF ) aaiaudizsmeai ao : 


ebodtoM_ gn. 

etxoqxs seed; tedw [itstob Seantiee git 
gitttlogs’ 2t2esd ond to noidgixazeb teit J 
besicawsive eet (Ost fq, dae ty wletoga 
bhoristem fnugnil-otbus sdz daidw toque 2 


He a 
Aen Ds Me “ fe 
oe ‘a 
: ¢ y : 







ila) 


3. Language is behavior made up of habit 
sequences at the phonemic, morphological, 
lexicale and isyntactresievels } 

4. Repetition, practice, and reinforcement of 
units and their concatenation are effective 
ways of developing language performance. 

These principles are derived from the. behavior theory 
Skinner developed which were based.on his work with rats 
and pigeons. Chomsky (1966) says that human verbal behavior, 
in reference to the habit-skill theory of language learning, 
Can net. be explained; by principles of association and. rein- 
EOrcement = ln regard sto repetition and practice Jakebovits 
(1309 pe 8438) has shown, that there’ is “little value in 
implanting responses, and that imitation of novel. gram- 
Matacal forms occurs infrequently." 

At the other end of, the spectrum there is what 
Carroll refers to as the "cognitive code-learning theory" 
and which Chastain (1968, p. 269) has summarized as 
follows: 

1. The use of exercises designed to teach gran- 

matical understanding of concepts being 


introduced, 


Z. The deductive explanation of all grammar 
prior to. practice™with* theustructure, .and 


SveThe*practicevoftall*the- languageyskills»from 
the beginning of, the course. 


ERG LeeismalLso what. Grittner (1969a, ep .9118) ieters 
to as the "eclectic. method" whose, proponents believe that 
language learning involves cognition and conditioning. In 


a sense this-is.an attempt. to combine the. best of the old 


to tHomeotoinaL a) ft” x 
evitoeiie ors mpanech mpl ir 
,eonnmrottsq eysugnsl gnfgqe 


ytoeds totweded ot mort bovirsh o1s zalqtoniiqg seedt ~ Lé 
ete1 dviw Stow ‘eit no.bezad svSw atdw Beqofeveb reameta 
<toivedied Ladrev msmui ted3 evse (000L) wlemohd . cnoegig bre 
‘QAiMAel sgeugnsi to ~rosds {lite-sided ond oF eonenstom ae 
sniet bas noisgincess to zelqionitq yd betisiqxe od tom ties 
efivodoist episostq bne soitiseqe: af brbget vl . SeenteoTe® 
gi solev sitsil’ et ered? tsit owode 2sd (8€) »q Geen) 
~msxg Levon to sitar tedd bas .2senoqestT gaitasiqut 

" yltnsupertai 2z1uoD0 emnod feobtem 

tenw et ered? murtoeqe edz to bas refjo sft TA» 7! 





Nwrosds goimrsel-eboo ovistingon" sdt es of ereter Lierred 
ee bosivemme est (COS .q ,800L) minted doh 















-styg dose? of pa ght egetoisxe to eat 
gated etqeonos to dinetiaiilaeit 2 
: - > od 
semuetg ILs to aoitsaslqxs avi souk q Pt} 
bas, ,ormmsdoutte eft dtiw sattostq helt) a) 


. as fs Rink tft. 8C 


ereter (Sif .gq seer) ronttir0 ra oak 
tedt svsiled sonsnonory sgory 
ar perratoee tae s 2 
head ale to g2od ors eutatao; ee bet 

ps ~ 


— = 19 














LZ 


and the new, and may prove to be the best solution to the 
extremes that have been. in evidence in the schools. It 

has been. difficult to compare the audio-lingual method 

with the cognitive code-learning approach, although some of 
the more recent critics have tended to favor the latter of 
these two theories of learning. The many variables 
encountered in the classroom situation often cause research 


findings to be quite unreliable. 


Repetition and Habit Formation 


Some teachers would have the course committed to 
memory and disregard the essential thought processes needed 
for the acquisition of the foreign language skills. 
Grittner, (1969b, p. 476) feels-that rote’ verbalization, 
whether in the form of dialogue or grammar rules, is "the 
lowest and least humanizing link in the chain of language 
learning", even. though a certain amount of memorization is 
necessary in acquiring a second language. 

Ausubel (1964, p. 421) says that because children 
are often unaware of the rules: and uses of formal grammar, 
it is assumed that their language capacity consists of 
rote verbal habits. But the fact that they can understand 
andiegenerate new sentences “implies that-even in. children 
there is an understanding of the structure that is more 
than! memorization. In adults this meaningfulness is 


developed to a higher degree indicating that the habit-skill 


Si 







ans b: noisutoe seed ott) od oo euanaly 


$1 .afoots2 ody ni eomsb ive at tend v 
bors om Saugat<-9.cbus ont. 318 | 2 of 388 
to omoe nguoils is pdosotqgs gniinrs sel 2 108 
too teste! oft rovst oF bebnetd svsd cosh ansoen exam 9 1 
esidsitsv asm dT .ygftatsol io esitoost ows meds . 2 
doisees: Seus2 astio nofisuiie moox2eaio ant nt bevedavesse 
»oldsiloto stiup sd os: egnkiedt 











moitsestisdrsy \stor dod efeet (Oh dv net 
ods" ef ,2ofut TSmMsrg TO ougols ib to mrot sid ai 
Spaugnet to arsed sdt nit Hakl snisteonan —— bas 28M sf 
2i notyesitomem to tmsome MLR FIOS 6 tcuettd sto ’ 
egsugnst Biase & air anae 

nothlinds sevsosd tedd exye2 casei. “4 008) % . * 

~Tammstg [snrroi to egeu bas, Bb ons a: enc eae 
to etetdnod ytiasqs> eysugasl riodt ves bam sip 

i. a Sale sree 


ae Liedsr 4. 4 
stom ef taeds Src a era er Lead i ods 


2k Samba aint os tiene “ 


scales 
, 
: 


tble-skded oft tedt gai oe nt ae : . 


Haisservsboay as> your sedy 32st oft” ae 
_ tetbItil> ni asve “ted sehr 29 







13 


approach does not provide for a complete description of 
the language learning process. 

Fisk (1969, p. 66) considers that the audio-lingual 
habit theory appears to be well suited to the nature of 
the eight year old child who mimics well and does not 
reason about the language, but as the child grows older, 
he develops an analytical mind and is less and less satis- 
fied with thoughtless mechanical repetition. He wants to 
know what he is saying and the reason for doing so. Once 
he knows the reasons he can usually make the application of 
the generalization .»«Fisk«pointss,out, thatethe; habit, 
formation approach fails to make use of these facts with 
the result being frustration and negative attitudes on the 


part of the learners 


Inductive versus Deductive Learning 


Certain. authorities state. that the learner needs to 
Dewgivenathesgeneralization first, while others maintain 
that: the: learner. is: to discover.this intuitively. The 
inductive learning of-grammar. rules-by. pattern practice 
aeLenpts, toarduplicate the process whereby chiidren learn 
their, native language.- An intuitive grasp. of-syntax.is 
sought following a great deal of experience manipulating 
theses tructures. Ausubel, (19604, p.-422) reels that this 
type of learning is suitable for very young children, but 


is wasteful and unnecessary in dealing with older learners 


1 






to ‘noitqixoeeb aeoiquods aR biverg tom evob. dowexqga 

[augnif-otbus oft ted2; asebiengd | (ea. ¢OeL) de 6 ol . “ : 
to. stusss edt oF bstive [Lew 8d oF erssaqs yrosds atded - 

m 2965 bns Eiew epimim ofw blido blo Tesy tHgée ods 

petbbe wary bite sds <0 stud .9g6ugnsl si} Is0ds sReeT = 

~ebtee edel bms ezel ef bas bain levis yiage 6 aqoleveb ed 


ot etnmew 9H .noitiseqet isoinsdosm ceoliquors doaw bed 
@9n0 .0¢ guiob 1ot moeset od7 Dae gakyee. 2i say jada 











t0 moisesitgqgs odd sAsm yilsuen feo ok enoeset vont 


tided odd tent i860 etalog eka pei: 


fdtiw eon? seeds to Sail eAsm ot alist bidet 


~ 
ay 


ui 









oat ito eobusitis ovitegen brs noitsi test? ates 


soktosiq arozssq yd. 25lgt tamms1g to 
nts9l petechie ydersdv 2299014 od? ot 
ab xetnye to qzsty Svitiutm: nA vsgsuy 
— abi) *: to pice Pye 


14 


who are perfectly capable of understanding the more 
abstract syntactic ideas. He goes on to say that the 
deductive use of grammatical generalizations is decidely 
more efficient in learning the foreign language since the 
generalization and the application of it are transferable 
from, Thesbeginnineg of spractice: 

in@arsftudy;-at Purdue, in ithe, fall of 1965 Chastain 
and Woerdehoff (1968) compared the audio-lingual and the 
cognitive code-learning methods with two groups of Spanish 
students. One group did not do significantly better- than 
the other, but.the results-did favor the cognitive group. 
It was felt that the deductive presentation of structure 
freed more class time for contextual practice. “It seemed 
that utewase this typesofapractice in manipulating structure 
to express their own ideas which enabled students taught 
by the cognitive method to transfer what had been studied 
to unfamiliar contexts. The authors of this study inferred 
frem-the results that the deductive presentation of: 
Material-was- superior to inductive presentation, that 
analysis was superior to analogy, that drills stressing 
understanding were superior to pattern practice, and that 
Usmiirer auiestive mensespfittethe istiidy to fpymatervalgfrom.the 
beginning was superior to the natural order of presentation. 

Avustudy by Politzer (1967) at Stanford reached 
conclusions similar to those in the study by Chastain and 


Woerdehoff. Politzer's study found that the inductive 






Webioob ei atottssilsrsieg totaal bail ed oa 
edt eonte eghignel mgiorot odz gainrsal ni tdersi¥e efom > ) 
efdatetznsrs ers ti to sotzdsilqgs edt bap cottesiiatensg _ 

, 994i 7 28Tg Yo grimniged oft monk i . a 


mintesdd 28@f Yo. [fst aft nt eubtud te ybot2 BAT 7 





. 5 ; a 
ons bas Laugnil-otbuys ods boisqmos (80@L) Vodebaeow bam = 
D- 

fainsg2 to equorg ows dtiv ebodtom guistreat-9bos wee Te 
a 
‘fiat tested visnsottingie ob tom bib quorg” nO: eee ae 
(quotg evisiagos edt revst bib zitfives1 sdt sud <rarito ofl a 
siugou1t2 Yo noitiyngeerg, evitoubsh sdt, tad thet wee 2 

- 

—_ 


bemese ti . soitossq fsosxe%n0> rot Smis 2enlo ovom bsett 
StUsoutTI2 saitidiiierens ti opttrnerq hovegy aida 2ew 02 ec 















gdgust 2tasbute beldsas doitw esobi wo erody 
boibuse aeod had stadw Tetensts ot bediom svirm 
berretat ybuse eid3 to evodgus, edt ee ae 
to noiststneestg avi 2dub 9b edz todd = aon 
tsd3 ,noitesnezetq svedaubri Os» ie*5 qu 
gitizzexse ellixb tedt 4% vad teda os roby ne 
tadt bos ,eritzerg mregteq) o3) sonnei 
edt most Isivsipm to ybuse ents ne 
-MoktaIasestg to 1obr0. ianusen, ba eee 
“4 

bedos et brotassé ae (sa ie: 


Baa agent 6 bez ont 


‘eee ae gadg 





15 


presentation of grammatical explanations was not superior 


to the deductive presentation of grammatical explanations. 


The Use of English to Convey Meaning 


The use of English in the classroom has been another 
area of controversy among teachers of foreign languages. 
Ausubel- (1964, p. 422) feels that for. the older student it 
1s unrealistic, and inefficient to bypass the mediating role 
of his native tongue, an argument which is also supported 
by Bazan (1964, p. 344). She states that for the learner 
LO ignore, his mother tongue Is not.only. ''to waste his 
Syntactic, awareness but also to obscure the many refinings 
SiecOlcepitsne Nas alpeady made. = 9"Gritiner, (1969a,"p. 163) 
takes a sensible approach in advocating discriminate use of 
English in the foreign language classroom. In this way 
English can be used. to speed up the learning process as 
iGienaseit ledds™toumore, Creative and concentrated practice 
in the. second language, The teacher must. be on guard 
since students will not--take the: target language seriously 
as a means of direct communication when they know that 


they can, fall. into English at the slightest Cit at Gud ty, < 


Prior Presentation of Materials. in) Spoken) Form 


The supporters of the audio-lingual method advocate 
the prior presentation of material in the spoken form 
because, it.is argued, this is the way children learn. their 


native language. Ausubel (1964, p. 423) questions the 







roitsque som esw eno Frere lgx 
.zmoiteusiquxe Lsvitsmmary bo 






Fi tnsbute teblo ods rot Teds shpat (580 ri “aer) 
elon gnisaibem sft eanqyd oF fnotsrasat baw Df at 
aa iy rwcaonaw a 


« 


bestoquue o2is ei do tlw TSM gts 16 2ugries vabag 1 to _ 
chances oft tot tedt eetate sif2 ‘he’ a eae) 











zid otesw 02" ylao ‘ton et pu O35 t eid stongi 7 
x ts seu} ire svonyi 03 aa 
agninttsx vitsm oft orudedo* os dnt jud ezensTs me ieietah ore Salo 2 
(Gol .q ,sC00l) xzsadtim “ ~sbem ybaetis Sat on somes -_ 
¥ i od s a 


#6 92u oisnimitoeib gnitsoovbs at dosorqgs stdtenee s 
yaw 2int of ,mooreeats ogsuynet agtexed ont mk ae 

28 eesv0rg gaintsel edt qu besge ot baew od ee 
soisoatg beset Ie2N03, bis svitss7> stom oF ‘ebsol . 
breug ao ed teum redoset oAT sata Ui 


ylevoitse spsugnsi togiss od3 ods3 jon tliw. 


sans wond yords nodw no ite> tmumnos eee 
nt: 
qiluoit3 ih seetdy tia od’ +8 fleitgna pe 1 set a 
i 
mrod of tts et 


eigoovbs bodsem Laugnt {nob = 
intyo2 nodloge edt has ‘ 


TERS cee Beth RAsia: wae ate | 
os: enobiealp (est 4 ‘lila nus 


) . aie a 


16 


theory that, once a child can read, it follows that he 
must observe the same sequence in second language learning, 
because once reading is learned, it can be used as a tool 
to learn new knowledge. It is unnatural to expect that 
after an individual becomes literate he will learn the 

Same way as when he was illiterate. 

Brown (1965, p. 890), who did a research project in 
a Spanish FLEX program introduced reading immediately 
because of "the inescapable fact that the student already 
has the basic features of one language system completely 
internalizedi"’ “Stern? (1964)nagrees) Stating: thatvonce 
reading and writing have been learned by the child, it is 
unreal to treat him as a non-reader. 

In ansexperiment®carried*out by Lipton. (1969) ,sthe 
auditory comprehension of two groups of gifted children in 
a Grade IV FLES situation was compared to determine the 
value Sof*the extended *préreading period, /eTheestudy 
hypothesized that there would. be no difference in auditory 
comprehension between an experimental group using listening, 
speaking, and reading activities, and the control group 
using only listening and speaking activities in the first 
year of French instruction. The major findings showed that 
the experimental group significantly outperformed the 
control group when tested on auditory comprehension. 
Liptonsconcluded'ithat®this- experiment#supported. the. theory 


held by several psychologists that better achievement 


ar ‘ 










foot 5 26 baeu od aso ti ,banresl ei 


yeds toeqxe eh tivemtvetinay’ bt ST 


edt nieel Lliw gi sterestil aeanasd peer as retts 


ce eyag_ |= 





.stetetifiz eam, sa aedw en ‘YSwW emse 
ni toehovq dotsee]er « bib odw , (028 vq ,200D) aword 


¢ Ranage, 
vleisibomni yribest beoubor tnt msigosy aaa fenneg? 


Wbsorle trebyte sit tedtd tost eldsqe.2em oft" 20. 





ylotelgmoo mbteve sysuygmel ono to so1uteet oiend at 
gone teds gnitszss2 Tee a (h0€l) narerd 


" ~bos ‘aa 
ef st ,b£ido ads yd Hénrsel mood over! gatsixw ‘bas sore 


.TabB9t- “nO B 2B mid aes os é 
sad (eae!) notqii yd 80 belrxso dnomivsgxs AaB nl 4 
at metbiido bettig to equorg owt to no iemeitotgmog < 


74 « We 
~boiied gntbestorq bebasaxe bial 
>. - 
(rosibus ni sometstiib on sd biuow s1sdz° sia 



















ef? sotmrstsbh ot boisqmo> esw notssuste audit VP | 
“ybuse2 oT 


wQattneteil gies guoty TS PAGCASGKS oP. oO 
quot Lortnoo edt bas _2sitivitos 2 be 


SeTit ofs of 25idivitog go tdesqe- bai 
Jsds bewosde eynibhait totem ‘OAT © 


taka 


noi s000n3 ibe 
6d3 bemrotieqsuo ¢hina> ctgie q 


cl sine’ = Po a ; 
se a re 
afotensdetgqmos i posact 2S ae 
aahatias bosiogqwe. ae atsta’s Bs re 


LZ 


results are obtained when more senses are brought into 
play during the learning process. However, it should be 
pointed out, as was done by the nesearnchersséthat this 
experiment may indicate that gifted children may perform 
better under these conditions than children of more 
average ability. 
Mueller and Leutenegger (1964) in an interview 
study of foreign language dropouts learned that students 
objected to an oral approach in which reading was de- 
emphasized. In this study students again and again stated 
that they wanted to read even though they could hear the 
sounds well. Students of the present generation appear to 
have a’ greater dependence on visuals than ever before which 
may cause overdependence on reading. Carroll (1969, p. 229) 
has observed that students in the Pennsylvania Research 
Project who were in the classes where the functional: skills 
were stressed had a greater tendency to desire more emphasis 
on formal grammar, reading, and writing. Grittner (1969a, 
Po 2458):.asserts that-it.is unrealistic to'expect students 
to adjust readily to a course that expects them to rely 
solely upon listening and speaking especially when a 
prolonged prereading period has no research to back it up. 
Bazan (1964) quotes several psychological studies 
to back up her statement. that a verbal-visual cue may 
IttGnacts tO produce. betten ie arnan go pcandiesaysirthat, ith comld 


be hypothesized that the written word could act as a 


wt 







od at Aig) ore asering’ Som aM 1do Lueot 
sd biwoda- 3 ,revowol eesgotg gaimrast €d3 gai sig. ae 
agds tes ,vedose 920% Chay ae eine Yoneda i. 
mrotieq ysm notbLitts botitg, Sot : 
erom to nerbL ins: nets dntds ttinbe oneds sobaw sert0d ate 


woiveotni as mi (bOGL) roggensdved Bas TeRfewM = = = 8 ~ a 
atnebete tedt bentrsel etuoqorb ogelgnst et eee > me 

-8b eaw gaibset dordw ni AgsoT age fe1o saad ot besaetdo ae 72 
batete nisge bus niegs etnsbute ybuse 2idad nl -bestesdquo z « 
eft rsed biluo> yer Agdoys nove bsot of botnew yeds dads =) 

_ OF Taegge Holstaronsy sa 8e¢e eft to etasbus2 .ffew ebnyee | i" 
doinw eroisd rove neds efeuety oo conehmeqeb tegestg s syed . - 
(eSsS..¢g G02) [fotrs) .gntibset tp. sonsbneqobrsve s2us2 yen ae 


dorse2sh sinsvivyenned edd at etnsbuste ted bevreede. ead : a 
elite L[enoisamiit sds stodw eseeslo ont os sxsw ow t29¢ort onan 
abesdqme stom otizsb-ot yonebaet totso1y 6 bed Beeestze exew 
yabaet) Tentsizd .ghidiaw Boe .paibeor vtemaaxy Lameot ae 
esmebuse tosqxe of a hale 2i, tt teds saree: (Bag | 


yiexr o3 meds, esaeqxe tard s2etu0D s& OF _* 








& todw yileipeqes gmidseqe bas gut 






seis 
7 a 







_squ 32 dosd ot dovrsseoet on esr boiteq x 
_ eeibuse {erigolodoyaq Intevee ess0up, 
yam euo Laveiv-ledrey. 8 tens : 
bkwoo ti Sedy eyse bas ae 
‘& 28 dos bluos br 


stnbsates 
* WE ato ; se 
om ‘altel 


18 


reinforcer of a spoken utterance. 

Belasco (1965, p. 483) indicates that under the 
audio-lingual method students can often send but cannot 
receive utterances properly from native speakers in a 
natural situation. He says that the student is not 
always equipped with a solid structural stockpile of 
internalized patterns, and that the. acquisition of true 
audio-comprehension may be the key to achieving a high 
degree of development in other skills. Immigrants may 
never learn to read or write:but learn. to speak a. new 


language after hearing and understanding properly. 
II. MOTIVATION, INTEREST, AND ATTITUDES 


The way motivation affects the learning process must 
iotebemoverlookedfeven™ though 10 1sediltticuit tosassess 
properly. Do students work hard because ,they enjoy school- 
work, or do they enjoy. schoolwork because they are 
Peasonavlvesvuccesstuleatyit?’. Thussas the. ditficulty one 
encounters when discussing motivation. The classroom 
teacher has the responsibility for making the student 
successful in the second language by giving him experience, 
iimoupplyingecOrrecteanswers. “Repeated farlure=leads ito 
resentment, disinterest, and negative attitudes which often 
Cannot. be changed by the best efforts. of future foreign 
language teachers. It would seem that learning which leads 


to successful performances before fellow class members 


tonmao tud baee nesto aoe eaten 
8 mi erelnege oviten mort Yhrogorq asomsvetau evieseT 
jon et sasbite oft tedt eyae SH notteusia (erutea 

‘to sliqdoote isrwtourte Biloe 6 déiw) beqqiups eyswis 
eurt to fottteiypos eft tedt Bas , 2nresteq besifsatstat 


tigid s gniveidos. of yer ons of vem 








Yam esastygiomt 


sylveqotq guibnsterebsau bas gnitsed retts ogsugnel 


i @caee 
@3QUTITTA QUA ,T@HAXTUI ,MOITAVITOM .1IF aa 
Pei e2920TG gaintsel efd etoetis noitsvitom yew edt <a 


etee28 oF sivoittib ei 2% dauods revs botoolteve sé -Joa | 


-Loodze yYo~ns yes saussed bred Arow z2tnsbute od . Lreqorq 


“ora yod? Sengoed Arowfoodse yotas yedt ob 16 ,t10w | 


em0 YIivoittib efy ei einT {si ts luteesooue yl damozset 
mooreesis efT .notssvitom gnizewsetb nedw evesmoone 


tgebute sit gaidsw trot seared: - lara 


-effide toddo si suongoteveb Yo: serge ? 


wen 2 Asege of meel tud otitw to besr ot atsel teven 






ey 





79 


would build up the confidence necessary for face-to-face 
communication in the second language, and cause the 


student to exert maximum effort. 


Related Studies 

Pew xvesearchers agree with Carroll (1963, p., 1089) 
who reported that a person's likes or dislikes for study 
of a foreign language were unrelated to aptitude or achieve- 
ment. He says, "As long as learners remain cooperative and 
actively engaged in learning, whether they want to or not, 
motivational differences will not make much difference in 
achievement." 

Politzer (1955-54) Pimsleur (1964), and=lambert 
(1963) have all shown the importance of interest and 
positive attitudes to bring about proper motivation. 
Indeed, Lambert.states that the student’s attitude toward 
the culture of the language he is learning is the crucial 
factor intduencing his: achievement. His research indicated 
that people who have the most favorable attitude toward a 
group whose language they are studying will have the least 
difficulty in learning the language. This was shown in a 
study by. Lambert and.his associates (1963; p. 177) -who 
compared groups of students .in Maine, Connecticut, \and 
Louisiana. to investigate the. importance of,social attitudes 
toward ''the other" language group, the majority and minority, 


and motivation to learn the language. At the same time 

















(Q80r .q ,&0eL) Elorts2 “ht aergs etdia 


ae 

7 3 IaMeVve : 7 

Prodmed bus <(00l) xwetemed .(h2-E20L) ae8gi tod a 
bas tz019tni to sonstroqmi sit nwode Ife — en) 1. 


foitsvitom reqotg tuods gaitd ot eobusittn ¢ x 
ea. — re 

biswot sbut isa e'tnobuste oft stadt sdtene: tt 
P| es 


feisurs ods 2: gaiarsel 2k of: sgaugstsl io ao 
betesibat dorssest 2i -Imomevetios eid x tie Dink x 
& bxyswot sbhutitis eidstoyst 30m sit wat Peake 
Fesel sd sved [Liw gmtiybuse ree en 1s 3 
@ mi mwose egw 2inT ogeugnsl att 3 
ofdw (TVL .q ,£0@L) 293s izoees eid 
‘bas: suai soenn09 .omtsM ak an ie me 0 aquotg. 
eebysitts [eisoz to sonattognt of Rigi: cigig 
vtireaia bas \térotsm ods .quos ensuys ne "ods oils 


a BP Ar 
omét Smg2 sz 3A 98H gaat 9. (t mrpol of 
opie , OF) wis (> ] 


7 
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: ; 
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. ; : ae a a ae 
> a‘ : - : a : a 
rt 7 P a oe we | 


20 


they were investigating the importance of intellect and 
language learning aptitude. Lambert reported that "two 
independent factors underlie the development of skill in 
learning a second language: an intellectual Capacity and 
an appropriate attitudinal orientation toward the other 
language group coupled with a determined motivation to 
learn the language."' 

Lambert (1963, p..155), who bases his "social- 
psychological theory" of language learning on.experiments 
carried out at McGill University, feels confident that those 
who are learning a second language most SUuCce sseiuil ly stende-to 
identify with members of the other language group, and 
gradually accept their patterns of behavior for themselves. 
Thus, the attitudes this person has toward those whose 
language he is learning become extremely important, and 
asisaisit ori hinder, his metivation.to learn. The attitudinal 
orientation may be either "instrumental" or "integrative". 
Instrumental motivation may be described as the desire to 
learn a language for its practical value as a tool to the 
student, whereas integrative motivation may be defined as 
the desire to be more like the other language group 
linguistically and culturally. Lambert found that more 
successful learners possessed this latter type of 
motivation. He also noted that some learners were motivated 
to learn a second language because they felt dissatisfied 


with their own cultural group. Of course, this researcher's 






ows" tefy betroqs: tredmad ste aximsal enna 
ni {Lide to tismaqolseveb oe 
bas ytioagss [gusosilesni ms :egsugnel hose é 

tedto sis brews. noitsinetro a a ote 


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a 


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os bast y¥iiuteeoooue t2om ogsugief! bnovee & aaomet om 
bas ,quorg sgsugnsl reso oft t0 ersdmom. ifaw ytitnebt 


2 

7 
= 
Ps) 2 


-tevisemsds tot roiveded to entetseq tiedy dqanns <i tenmaee Vy 7 
seodv seodt brswot esd noereq eids eobuaizys edt aut — 




















bas ,iuss1oymi yLomettxe Smossd yatieges 2h off 
fentbusists el .axvssl of noistsvisom aets rebaid 10. 
; "evitsrgetai” x0 “fs tromuexteae tedsis od ene 
03 gtieeb ef9 2s bedixs26b od bain noi 


ap heatteb od yeu Hottavi ton Rivas cus 
quotg eyeug net’ totlso 9 <a 
exon tedt bavot.trodmed aor | 
to says roviat city & 

botsvisom sT9W Pomc: 
ae tist © ee 


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ZA 


studies in Canada have been limited to the Montreal area 
which, as far as second. language learning is concerned, is 
quite different from other regions in this: country, 
Studies which could replicate his work in other parts of 
Canada, would possibly provide very different results from 
those found in Montreal. 

Ford's study (1957) of junior high school students 
illustrated that their performance was clesely* related: to 
age and sex roles. Boys at this age are concerned with 
establishing themselves as males. Parental interest in and 
aspirations for their children were found to have a power- 
ful influence on work in school. This is certainly borne 
out, by Gardner (1960) who found that parents with positive 
attitudes toward the French language and sympathy toward 
the French-speaking community passed these traits on to 
their.children, 

Reinert. (1970), reporting.on a 1968 study. concerning 
the reasons given by students for taking a foreign language 
and the values: they felt foreign language study had for 
them, found. that most,students. do not enroll in fereign 
language courses because they desire to. learn the. language 
and culture of.another group. Over one half.of the 
students surveyed indicated. that they were.taking it..for 
celiege credit, and-once. this’ was dene they would.:not be 
doing any further study in this field. késs than one, third 


of these learners originally enrolled because of any kind of 






wil slots sie a 


2k ybeardoap 2t gutatsol ogougnet b00302 28 ve) em yiatdie 
‘MEdnEDakds ni eneigo't sree Hoot aan mey = 
to etrag wertto ci Xrow zed oanditger btvos: datd sekbose 


mort etiveer eset yrev sbivorg uisieeoq bkwew yobs 





@tnebute Lood>e dgid rotnut to (920) ybyte 2 "bem ee | 
63 betsisx ylezolo-2sw sonsmietiog Tish), tadd Botettewlte 4 a 
ddiw beaxeonoa ets egs eidt tx even .2elor x98 Baeiepe a 7 
bas mi tesitetar [stners?t on as 2ovieamadd gaidenideses 


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ae 


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swrtod yiniestitoo 2f etdT .footse at stow no sonsultat tut 75 

evisyizog dtiw etnetsq tsdt bayot odw (008L) zentread Wie <j 
brawot ydsequye bas sysigasl tonerd odd brewos eebutioee ' afi 
Oo? mo etiatt seeds baeesq Ytinummoo gaits oqe-doneed- sais : i 


guinresme2 ybure 800! s no gnitrogex , (Over) Jreaker | wade 


syeug nsf mgionot § gaiis3 101 etmebute yd asvég enoeser eas 
t02 bed ybuse ogsugas! agiexot. ist vod? eeulsev edt bag 
mgiero? ai Llomas ton ob etasbuta teom text bavet - 

ogeugnel ofa arpel ot stizeb ysds ene eetuOD S98 

edt to Lisd eno revo i ‘ syed 
tot ti gnices erew yodt tad bes 
ed ton bivow yards snob bets asks <a ae 

brida 200 msdy eeod bei ids ne a 

bat a te ssn bottrn 












; 
re 
4 


22 


interest in languages. Travel to other parts of the 

world is often listed as one of the important: practical 
reasons for such study, but only about ten percent of 

these people considered this reason as worthwhile. The 
figures show that the majority were not pursuing the study 
of a second language because they wanted to but because 
they had to. Strangely enough, these students did not feel 
such study was unimportant. Nearly forty percent believed 
it should be required of everyone. However, this survey 
indicated that they felt two years. study of a. foreign 


language was sufficient. 


Boredom in the Classroom 

Boredom is the great enemy. of the foreign language 
program. The drill and repetition required with the audio- 
lingual method become quite ineffective unless the student 
sees some practical way of putting the language to use, 
according to Wardhaugh (1967). 

Mirsky, (1967, p, 1) states. that-FLES classes are 
especially subject to boredom, because of the,fact..that -they 
are limited by, the scope. of their immediate.goals. He 
advises that the teacher must be constantly on guard 
against this problem since, ence it.has set in, the- teacher 
WhiimocC Naradaput~to regain. the interest. of the. class. Thas 
cails for variety of teaching techniques: and a rapid pace 


of presentation. Mirsky. also maintains that much of the 


- 

















Cc 4 apraq todto-oF Lewaier ‘eriekanae 
Iesigoetg dansroqmi sf? 20,900 be BQdeaD BOdRD ef bheow 
to Inesrsq met suods y¥Ino sud use doua ORyeaoeer 7 
edt .olidwildtow 29. noepor bt, bsvobiewo2 ofgoag seeds 
ybute sd guivetyg’ Jon oxsw Yiiiocem eds. jany woe eonmgh? 
Seusoed tud “ besnsw vod seusosd ogeugasl baosee «30 
{eS ton Bib etasbut2 seed? ,dguone Usgangte 02 bed yon? 
boveiled tnooteg yitot yirser ass Toqmidy eew Nbute doe 
yowtus 2idt ,1tevewoH — .smoyreve to betinper od bluode 3k 
mgisrot s lo ybute eragy ows t1ot yeds Jsd3 Beteoiins . 
.drototlive 2ew egeugast 
2 





| mooTte sk) 

egeuynsl dgieto? sit to mone ta5tg oft 24 mobetot 
“Oibus oft dtiw bexvispes nottiteqe: bas Llirb oAT mbtgete ' 

tnebute oft 22olau svitoetisni otiup smosed bontem ‘Knerganbe 
+ oan a egeugnsl eft gnittugq to yaw Igaisoetg ‘noe ‘ea: — 
| = -(180L) dgusdbxeW 03 anibrooo8 i | 
Sis es¢2eia 8aJ9 tens eesete’ CL va; TORE) ete os Se 

(edt tsds tost eft to s2uszed mobetod of ioetéue xiis. | 








sH .elsog otsibsmmi rtsAdsx r0 eqosz ods vd ba 1 
brsey mo yvisnsdenon od t2umn reiiane?- ods a 
rodoee9 ed? .mi t92 “esd ti sano <somte im otdona id yen en 
ges 2 
; tt ee Eo ae 
efi .easi> od3 Yo sesiebnt adh star o ; Fic od | 
song Shapes 6 bas eoupimioe? does te 


A 


trouble lies with authors and publishers of materials who, 
in spite of impressive advertisements, have used the same 
old approaches in their new texts. Few of the dialogues 

appeal to the separate interests of boys and girls. All 

of this means that the teachers have to be very sensitive 
to the moods of their classes and must glide quickly from 
one activity to another when it is perceived that interest 


is waning. 
IIIT. CONCLUDING STATEMENT 


Few of the problems discussed have simple solutions. 
Grittner.(1969b) observes that there.is little. in- the: new 
approach to foreign language teaching which can be proven 
to be superior to that which went before. He asserts that 
tieLnem@l smanma llLormatesapproach which consists of 
concentrating on objectives and being permissive as to how 
they are reached and upon which theory of language learning 
they are based. Sometimes an inductive presentation is 
effective and at ether times a deductive learning experi- 
SHGemusmbesSt.e Garroll, (1963, p. 1090) ,has stated the 
problem most,.teachers. face..and for which they must try to 
Pies OLUti Ol MHCwSdyS 0.0. v thesanew methods of.teach- 
ing languages almost invariably stimulate students during 
GicmcaGlyestageseOralNStruGce1on; Effective means, of Lfore- 
Stauuing thestediumeanduetatigue that eften set in at later 


stages have not been discovered.'"' It seems obvious that a 




































aR , 7 7 ae) et . 7 
m7 "i * Li 
- i ur - . - 
ex me : AL 7 
me - ><a __ ; ae. 


odw Gisivetee to etaticitdaq bie | 
. - ea ih vite js m vost —_— 
sedi en. has 9mo2i7 “a 

eoygolsib ot to wot a a o> 

[LA eltig bus eyod to etestetai ¢ ae pm 


evistiense ytev ed ot evsd eredaees edt eenprouerme 
most ylaoiup ebilg taum bas 29ee8fo toi 30. cbeom-ade on = 4 


fecteini-ssdt bsvisoreq 2i si nodw tedtons os ‘\(ivises eno | 


7 . 
j 7: 
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—  Bitiasw at ne 


‘ 
/ = 


’ var A ghh¢e + ie : 
THAMATATE DUIGUIINOD | 2 
it eee uA fy Ds 


.efortuloe slqmize saved bossuontd anion doe uaa Wace ‘psel 
won ons ai oftttl ei otads t8dt zevis2do (deel) tenssin0 


nevorq od BD, do idw grpdopes aay ngtovot os donoegas ; 
isds aeieand 8H ,stotsd tnsyw daidw tsdz on roltaque. Sel ) ia i 
to 2teteno> dotdw dosotqgqs aes ne ei 31 


ris 


titers; 





4 


wo ot es svizeimioq gnied bas esvitoatdo ag; 
gaiarsel egsiigasl to yrosds d>itw noqu bag 6 ne ot OTE ror: . 
> Bi fobtstnseetq svrtoubat 118, cia dee ae . 
-£teqxe gnintsol svissubeb s e omit ae 
ens botste eed (O80L .¢ eden) ite ae 

ot YI teum varit iio Ei 102 bas 2287 ate Tike} Bee 
~losst to ebotem won ody , , ." pia “sift is 
gritub 23nebuse otelumite 7 son 


cae’ to ensem arias in 






es 


24 


great deal of the success of the foreign language program 
depends on the teacher. Good teachers can achieve good 
results regardless of the method, and yet good methods 


certainly will facilitate.the-task, 


baie: 
5 
. at 
a 
pteencheenn 
i nah 
wecees! 





CHAPTERS OTT I 
THE’ DESIGN OF-THE STUDY 


In this chapter the design of the study is presented 
in detail. Included are descriptions of the instrument, 
the setting and population, the training of the French 
teachers in the methodology of the course and the ty pesro. 
French classes, the gathering of the data, and the treat- 


ment of the data. 
I. THE: INSTRUMENT 


As was explained earlier, the purpose of this study 
was to obtain the opinions of students regarding a 
particular French course, and their attitudes toward the 
French language and those who speak this language. Since 
no satisfactory instrument was available for this purpose, 
a questionnaire was devised. 

Accordingly, a pool of items was drawn up which 
would examine areas of interest to the study. These 
included items pertaining to the VIF course generally, 
attitudes toward the French language and French-speaking 
people, opinions of the delayed introduction of reading 
and writing, possible grammar problems, the effect of 
repetition and its usefulness, and the time devoted to 
liberated dialogue in the second language... 


As a check on the validity of these items, they were 













ina — uced ve : 
YauT2 SRT #0 vorean Tek saath ED _) 
betnseetq ei ybute edt to myteeb oft ee ee 
,itemyt sent odd to enoitqitoesb ors bebulont. -Listeb at 
donor siz to gtiaier? ont ROL IELUHOT! SNe GaN Iee: ods 

to 2oqys oft bas s2tvo> odt to ygolobodtem edt nk etetomed 
-t8stt edt bas ,pdeb dz to gniredtss odd. .29e28f> fonett | I 
-538b oft to tn0m 





TUAMUATOUI FHT .F 


ybuse 2eids to seoqtuq eft ,19tirs® bemisiqxe esw eA ¥ % : 
& gnibrsget etmebute to enotniqo edt nistdo of eau | 
edt brewot eebusitts tied? bos ,o2two> donetd telusisteq i. 
“sonte ogsugas [ eids Asege oflw ozoft bine sgsugnet donor? 
~e20gtuq zid3 tot eidslisvs esw sasmutsent (rososteitse on : ; 
| | -beeiveb esw erisntotsedtip = 7 | 
foidw qu nwstbh 2sw amett to foog s ,ylgnibroosA . VES 
seoiT .ybute oft oS teeretmi to esets smimexe bivew 
«Vilstensg saruos HIV edd o% gninistisq emeti bebutomt 
gttdseqe-donett bas ogsugns! donot ods Sano eobusisza 
gnibses to noitqwhorsmi beysleb eit 20 emokniqo ,efqoeq 
“Ro foette ot a stdiaeon otew hy 











26 


submitted to several professors, supervisors, teachers, and 
graduate students, all involved in and familiar with second 
language instruction as it relates to the VIF course. These 
individuals were asked to check the items and give their 
criticisms and suggestions for improvement. For the pilot 
study fifty-four items were selected. These appear in 
Appendix A. 

This questionnaire was administered to two VIF 
classes at Concordia College in Edmonton. This involved 
forty-five students in Grades X and XI. Copies of the instru- 
ment were also distributed to ten students of junior high 
school age who were taking the same course in the Public 
Schools of. Edmonton. Both groups were encouraged to write 
impressions or observations on any of the questions or to 
make comments or suggestions at the end of the question- 
naire. * The responses of these students.,.were then 
processed in order to locate items which caused difficulty 
or. confusion. Certain questions were reworded, others 
were deleted, and some new questions were added where it 
was felt that areas had been inadequately covered. The 
final questionnaire containing fifty-seven items appears 
in Appendix B, 

Questions rather than statements were selected for 
the instrument. in the hope that questions would elicit more 
response from students of the junior high school level.. 


Various response scales were considered but a simple -- 


os 





ns _steiteies _2tozivreque ,croezetord Ierewee 0? bettimdue ‘ 

bacoee ddiw xeitims? bos ot bovbevnt [is .2tmebuse oseubsty . 7 

sesiT .setuo> AIV ent ot eotBfor ti 26 norsouttedt opsugast ) 

tiedt evig bas emeti of tosts ot belies stew elaubivibal ~ 

toLiq odd 10% .tnemevotqmi tod enoidesggue bas amefoitima 8 = 

ak +seqqs eseut -,betoele2 stow amsti tuot-ysti? ybuve =| 

A xibmaggé RY 

4IV owt ot Sorsteinimbs esw sripnhdiseoup efdT «9.1. | 
beviovai eid? .cotnombd mi egeliod sibropn03 ts eezesta 
“urseni oft to 20iqoD .1X bas X ethane nk etmebute svit-ysret 
dgid toinut to etnebute net of betudittetb oefs stew mem 
vifdud edi ni e2xyos site sd3 goidst s1tow ofw oye Loose 
esitw ot hegstwoone 4|18w equoty dtof .notnombd to efoosdoz 
of 10 enoiteeup sft to Yas mo enoitevisedo to enoteeerqmi 

| -mott2eup sft to bas Sods ts enoitesaguue 10 ectjaisadirte:cmalaaht 
neds oxew etnoebute seodt to 2ezhoqeer efT .orisa 
ysiwortiib bseuss doidw emeti stsool ot tebto at beeesso1q: 

| ered3o ,.besbrowst stew enoiteoup pee .oiavtnes to : a 

ti oxerlw bebbs s1ow diiod ye8ip wen omoze brs ,beteleb etew 

edT .bevrevo>s yistsupsbsni nood bed essts tsdt £6? ew . oa 

2tssqqs emati meve2-yYttit gniaistnos ae : 

p | 1 git: 

to¥ betosiee stew etnomeys te asds enitaniiaa ) 


tom tinife bivow enoiteeup ted bs edt cael 
-Level Loodoe dgid toinut edt to etnebute mot? j20% 







20 


YES, UNDECIDED, NO -- format was decided upon because it 
seemed more appropriate for the grade level of the students 
in the study. In addition, this response scale adapted 
well to the use of IBM 1230 machine scored answer sheets 
which were used with the final fifty-seven item question- 


naire. 
IIl.°- SETTING AND:.POPULATION 


The study was concerned with the Grade VII, VIII, and 
IX Public School Board of Education students of Moose Jaw, 
Saskatchewan, who were enrolled in the VIF course in the 
spring of 1970. The study was restricted to the Public 
School students because students of Grade IX enrolled with 
the Separate Schools were not taking the VIF course. It 
was not possible to include senior high school students of 
the city in the study since: they were not involved in an 
audio-lingual approach to the learning of French,.and would 
obviously have quite different views about their French 
program. 

The city of Moose Jaw was selected because this is 
the system with which the investigator is most, familiar 
and in which he is most interested. However, the results 
of the study should have fairly wide application for the 
Prairies because the nature of this city and the background 
of the students are similar to what might be found in other 


parts of Western Canada. 


















betqabs oe pemoqeot eka eno bibs at base oda 
etooda.rewans berooe ontdasm O8SL Mal to eey edt ot thew — 
“Roijesup moti nevoa-ystit fanit odt dziw beew eTew igh | 





WOITAMUIOT GUA AMITTI2 TI pew hy 


bas , ILIV ,IIV sberd off? Ad iw benveorios 2sw ‘ybute ORR <a 7 is 
awel e200M to 2tnsbuse apiseouba to brse& Loofoe okt dy KE age 
oa? ai. setuas TIV ads ni belforns sxsw odw  ewedotedese 
aifdud sit o3 bozok saaer zew ybute od! .OVOL to gairge 
itiw beflotns XI, sbetd: to esnabute censjod etnshuse Loose 
a1 aenued 41V edt gnidst ton otew aloole2, stBaaqse eds = 
to etnebuse Loodse dyif totmee ebufani et sidtereq tom ew . 
ft at Sevlovnt Jon anew yodtooonie ybute aly ah <tio. oft 
biwow bas ,domett to gniarsel ons. o> dosorggs Laugeil -ofbup 
donett viele Juoda ewetv trotsilib etivp eved ylesoivde | 
ei gidt e2uansd bedoelse esw wel se00oM ta yrio SAT) ee a 
tailimst s20m 2i somsgiteevnb® oft dotdw iw meseye edt 
etiveet eft ,rovewoH .botestetni teom ef ot ou es bm, 
edd so? nos recilqqs shaw YIried ever biuoils yhune ed Ro 
bauorgdosd: ods bas ysis aids to enuten: 19 
vedio mi basot ed Tigim Ist ot ca Limi 


_% . 2 = 





28 


Moose Jaw has: several small industries, is a 
divisional point on the mainline of the CPR, and, like many 
Prairie towns, serves the surrounding farm area which is 
chiefly devoted to wheat-growing. There are four, high 
schools and fifteen elementary schools in the Public and 
Separate systems which have almost nine thousand students. 
A good cross section of students from business, professional, 
and working class homes can be found in the schools. There 
are no zones in the community which could be classed as 
very poor, nor are there any exclusive areas. There are no 
large concentrations of people from any one ethnic back- 
ground, and so it may be expected that the attitudes held by 
the students ought to be fairly representative of others in 
many parts of the three prairie provinces. 

Since French is a compulsory subject in the Province 
of Saskatchewan for students: of Grades: VII, ‘VIII, and IX, 
all of the students from these grades were administered the 
questionnaire in the ten schools where the VIF course is 
effereds-*This*involved 1,207 studénts*in® forty-five 
CYasseS= = Titty -Ninewsstudents an tworclasses=were= in*a 


semestered program. 
III. TEACHERS AND THEIR CLASSES 


During the administration of the questionnaires 
interviews were conducted with the eight. teachers who were 


employed at that time by the Moose Jaw Public School, Board 






BS 





/ 8 2t ,eetvteubai [feme Parmer ne onlay Ve 
 ynem offD ,bme (999 oft 20 ogee 
ei doidw sors mrst gnibnvorrye sft 2ovrse ,enwod sitiatd 
gid suo ere) otedT “.yaitworg- tsedw 03 bovoveb yftebdo | 

bas 2i1du% ef3 at eloorse yretmemols 995382 bas efoodse = 

. 2tnebute brsevods emia teomls sved Aoidw ameseye stansqe2 - 





; 

pfenoieestotq ,ezenieud mor etnobute to nottese eeorTs boog A co 
etedT .efLoodoe eds ni bayot od 182 2esmod 2aslo gaidrow bas - 
ee beeesio od biwoo doidw ytinummo> sit mt eenos on ots 7 

of 916 sT9HT, . 25078. eviewloxe yns etsdt ets tom ,~to0q \Ytev 
-Aoed otadse emo yng mort elqoeq to 2nottextmesdo> egret 4 _ 

yd bled esbusisze oft sods betoeqxe od ysm tf o2 bap ebmvotg | 
fi etedio to evitsinsesrqer yitist ed ot tdguo etasbute edt 7 
.2eomivorg sintstq setdt oft to attsg yam = 

somivord of si sosidue yroeluqmos s 2i donevd somise- = 
«Al Bas ,Iliv ell zebar.) to etnebuste 10? nswedotetes2 to a 
ods betetetaiabs ersw eebstg seeds mott etasbute edt Boubhe -” 
ab setwoo TIV eds oredw eloodze m3 oft ni ovtsnnoiteoup ) . 


evil-ysrot mi etnsbute (0S,f beviovm: eidT .berstto 
& mi stew 2eeesl> ows oi etacbute onta-yttit .20ze8l> 
MSTZOTE Hoaateqmee 
2828 2AI0 AIGHT avn ene III pte 
: ae Cae 

eexianaolszoup oft 44 © meisexzetatabe oft iad 
orsw ow enedoses sigis odd dyiw § Taub 









a9 


of Education to teach the VIF course to the junior high 
school students. . Four of these teachers were very familiar 
with the VIF course Ses because they had learned French 
by this method or had taken courses in preparation for 
teaching it. The other four teachers. had received general 
French courses at the University level but no formal 
training in the method, nor was any form of in-service 
training available in.this- particular area, 

With one or two exceptions the teachers were follow- 
ing the VIF method as it is recommended by the publisher. 
Deviations from the method were chiefly by those who had 
not had.any.formal training .in.it., These.deviations 
consisted of leaving out. some phases of the lesson such as 
the introduction of reading and writing before they were 
called. for.in the lesson schedule, the use of. group 
repetition in place of individual repetition, the use of 
English to convey.meaning, and the failure to use the tape 
recorder consistently as a model for pronunciation, 

All of the teachers had some classes which were too 
large for an audio-lingual program to. operate effectively. 
Indeed, very few classes had fewer than twenty students. 
The typical class had between twenty-five and thirty-five 
students, A few. of.the teachers had as,many.as thirty-six 
to forty-two students in one,class, All of these.teachers 
were..of the opinion that under. such cenditions it was. very 


diffiacult.to achieve-satisfactory results,... The. shortage 


es 


gid coin edt 03 sexo cvciaan 
| Ttaklinst yrev e1ew etedsset ezedd 20 108 .eimebute Keodge 
donext bemrsel bad yods o2uazed atthe sneha dicts 







vol nokIstsgetg ai esxe1v09 fexed bad to boddem akdt yd 4 
Leteneg Devieser bed etedoase2 wot redio efT .di gatdosest | ae 7 
fsmreit on Jud Level yskerevEnll ed? Js e9etwos doaeta =: - 
ssivis2e-ai to mrot yng 2sw ton ,bodsom eft mi gaiaisty | "] 

. e918 TSlyotitsq 2idy of oldslisve gaimisys = ; 
-wollot sxew etedosey edt enottqesxe ows to so APLW.. »-. | 7 7 
«tedeiiduq ods xd bebsemmo2st ef 3i es bodsom I1V oft gat F. _ =, 
bed ow seods yd yftetdo stew bodtem sds mort. eno tseived =e 
anoissiveh ezedT .3i ni gninist> Lemret yns bad dom 8 

as doue moees! ottt 0 zeesig emo2 ivo gnivsel te beteienoo 7 - 
stew yeds ei1oted gaisizw bas gaibse1 to noit2ubortak edt ; r 
qvotg to eau sdt ,slubedoe nozeel dz ai tot belfso | Fa 

to. sau ods pines ees {subivibni to soslq mi aoktiteger ie : 
eget eds s2u oF otvlist sdt bas. ,.gninsom ysvmoo) oF deilgnd a 
| »foitsionumotg rot Lebom is 2B (itneteienos vebreser . ) 7 


oot stow doidw e92eslo omoe bed etodoset adt to ITA 
-YWovistsetis essreqo oF mstgotq Isugnil-oibys os 10d sgael 
-etnebute yiaews osdd 19wei bed eeeeslo wot ev besbal 
evit-ysiridt bas evit- iggy ay Sed aan, ie aa 
xbe-ys1idt 25 em 28 aes pon ae eda to 
etedoges seedj to LLA oeehla gaol ptnebiite 
\etev eam 34 ea0isibuos Hive xobay tend abimig 
SPARE. hie melED 













30 


of time for French and the manner in which it was 
distributed was another handicap for some of the teachers, 
Timetables varied from 105 minutes per week divided into 
three thirty-five minute periods to 160 minutes per week 
divided into four forty minute periods. A number of the 
teachers felt that they had insufficient time to cover the 
course, not to mention additional activities which might 
have been included for the sake of variety and interest. 

As could be expected the manner in which the 
individual teachers conducted and controlled their classes 
varied considerably. Some of the teacher maintained very 
Strict discipline, some tended to have a relaxed atmosphere 
where favorable learning conditions existed, while others 
had so little control that the noise level would have. 
prevented students from hearing the lesson properly. It. 
appeared that some students held their teachers in high 
esteem, and had developed a favorable attitude toward the 
French course because of this. Conversely, other students 
appeared to exhibit a negative attitude toward the course 


because of their lack of rapport, with the teacher. 
IV. GATHERING OF THE DATA 


The questionnaires were administered in each of the 
forty-five classes by the investigator with some assistance 
from the French teachers involved. After a brief 


explanation of the purposes of.the queStionnaire, the 





o9ni bebivib teow req eotunim 20 n A 
leew r9q detunim 0d! os eboireq osumtm “ase tas hl a 
oft to tedmun A’ .eboiteq otuaim y310% wot otmi BebivEb | | 
ol tevon 0% Swit Snetsitiuent belt yedt Jedt s£9t ereioses bs 7 
tdgim doidw esitivisos Lenotsibbs moitmem of tom ,setueD 
»2eTetai bas YIsrtsv to sase odd rot bebulon: ased oved 
edt dotdw mi tonasm oft bstseqxe od bluo> 2A Am 
eseesiz risds biditiok dled boas betoubno> etesdoset Lsubivibmt / i = 
<tov benistnism tedokes oft to smo2 .yidsrebieno> betsy ot. 


_ stedqeomts bexelor s ovsd. ot bebast smoe ,enilqinekb Fortze : 
evedto aitdw .beteixe enoitibnoo gaintsel eldsvovel sieiw =. - 
eved bluow [evel seatom sd} teddy Lortnos sisvit ee Han - 

I .vlatsqong noeeesl st gnitsod aed etnebute besneveng : 
fgin at er9rlosst tiedd Bled atnebus2 smoe tedd betesqqs : 


ons Brgwos abutitss ofdetovet 6 beqolsveb bed bits «s9420 7 

eimebyte rodto ,ylsetevnod .2idt to seusozed eseruoo domert 

Seryo2 oft brawod sbititts evitsgea s sididx® of beresqas 
tenosst eft atiw troqqet to Asst tied? to geusded 

ATAG SHT 70 DUTASHTAD tS apie’ — 


en, — yy. hus - ral 
ni } ‘ 7 = — 
5 —_ 7 | = 
Me 5 : 
tO 
u U 





ok 


Students were each handed the questionnaire and answer 
sheets., These materials had corresponding numbers stamped 
on them previously, and while these were being handed to 
the students a note was made of the number beside the 
student's name. This enabled the investigator to enter the 
student's placement as to achievement in the course for 
each class at a later date. The students were then asked 
to indicate on the answer sheet whether they had studied 
French previously or had started the VIF course subsequent 
to Grade VII. These students were later eliminated from 
the study in an attempt.to keep the sample as homogeneous 
as possible, After the students had indicated their grade, 
school, and language spoken at home, they were asked to 
indicate their responses to the items of the questionnaire. 
They were encouraged. to write observations and impressions 
under any of the questions and additional comments or 
Suggestions at the-end of the-questionnaire. 

While the students were replying to the questions, 
the. teacher was asked to give an estimate of the student's 
achievement in the course. In most cases this consisted 
ef*the results ef the Easter tests. given. several.weeks 
previously. These marks: were’ later ranked for each.class, 
divided into thirds, .and entered on, the answer. sheets by 


the. investigator. 






Seqmese etedmun gaibnog2 stro. ee a 
0 beband gated ovew caert sfidw bas -ytevoiveny mode iio 

edt ébteed toda adt to abam ew eson s astebuse ott 2 

ett teins of Totegitesvas edit beldsns eidT oman 2! tmebuse aa ‘a 

tot satyoo ei3. mi tnemeveidos oF 28 tasmessiq e'dasbuve ~ 





) ) i 

bet2s neit stow ednebyte odT .otsb total s 35 2eefo Mowe ea 
beibute bed yet tentedw toede towats oft no etentbat of, 1 ie be 
dasupsedue setuo> FIV efd beirste bed to yLevotverq danerd rh as : 
mort betenimile retsl svew etnebuse seodT .TIV SsBped) oF ‘ a 
avoonaygomon es siqmsa ody qoou o+¢ tqmsett5 as AE youre ont ne 


*Sbetg vied? betsoibni bad ernebute oct rettA + oldteeog es 
ot betes erew yet ,omod ts noloqge ogsugast bmg -Loorze 


 9T28RA0i3 soup sdt 2© emai. ott ot eszenoqest tisdd ossvibed - 
emoizezotqmi bns elioissvisedo stitw ot bagsTVoons: orew out > 
xo esnemmo2 [enotarbbs bas encisesup sit to oa “reba - 


-etiadnottesyp add to bre edt te enoiteeggue 
james ods ot gmiylqer orew atnsbute altootidWw °° 7 
e'Snebute edt to otemnites ne 8vig ot beies esw 19do8en ont 
betefrenos 2zidt 2easo-t2om ml .sertoo elt ni iromeveiHoe 
stsew Istevee mevig eteo3 tesesd od? to -etfuesr es 
<e2sfo doee 10t bedns1 tetsl orew ett eener “feu — a 
Yd eteede towens oft no beresae bas ,%  bebiv ay 


' 
S 



























i : oe © rah 
7 


: SE. : ee = Ail 
ie ees Tae wi 


2 


V. TREATMENT.OF THE DATA 


When all of the necessary information had been 
transferred to the answer sheets, they were processed by 
the optical scorer. The comments and suggestions on the 
questionnaires were recorded and grouped according to topic. 
These may be found in Appendix C. 

In order to get.a better overall. picture of the 
response pattern certain items which cover. the same. area 
were clustered. The first-:of these clusters is cencerned 
with student attitudes toward the French language and those 
who speak French. Others refer to the time available for 
free expression in the language, the problems of grammar 
comprehension, student. preference for reading and writing 
Pititereimetne schedule ot lessons, meaning ditticultaes, 
boredom, caused by repetition, and the usefulness of 
repetition.. The shades of meaning in.each of the questions 
made’ it.difficult te cluster too many items together,.but 
iteseemed that this procedure,was valuable fer certain 
tepics. 

Since the design of the study was conducive to a 
nonparametric.statistical treatment, the NON@9 computer 
program was used in the analysis of the data. This program 
VLedds sclid=square Ga and two measures of association 


ter typographical reasons, the proper Greek symbols 
have not been used in Chapter IV or.the tables. 






















need ‘bet net semrt0% nk ae 
«d bezeasorg etew yort hess: Towe 
si2 fo 2ayt? coygue Bits 229mm Be ‘etole 1s 
2iqot of th renee boquorg as ionssoded ae ms i ae yi. teeup / 
0 xbbmaggA ne api he xa ney ; 
_ ast To eratoiq Ifsrsve teited & 9g on abro | “ 
| ete ome oft 1evo> dotdw emer i aiest8o" ¢ i384 aaa " 
Belren n> 2k etetents seedt to terit edt me é ey a 
s20dt bus sgeuynel fonert sit Hrewot gabirdbode: rsbute Atiw 
rot sldslisvs omits sft oF rater vila ta ont aa fesg ; 
Tethistg to emoldotq odt ,sgsugasl oe ni a a ate 
gtistizw bas ygnibess tot 92 neTst stg tnobuse oie per +4 
-@ertiuaittib yninsom ,enoeesf to ‘a dobenes ste 18 
to e2oniuteen en3 bis (HO lsbt oqor vd boaus 
anoitesoup sits to dos9 ni gainsen to asbarte oT 
sud .tedtegos emeti “ans oos Teteuto of rib tae 


nistrso tot afdsulsy eam rie ai zee oe sie 
& ot evigubaos Zan \buge aiid) to conn = ie" a 1 
tesuqmo. &QMon ais tibet Lepnees) | : 

mecZorg 2FXdT stab “eid rm ae 


ai sexs0ees to va wee B 


a c 


Sh) 


Suitable for this study, gamma (V) and Pearson's 
contingency coefficient.(C).° The XG Ces tand thenG 
measure of association are described fully by Siegel 
(1956). Vis a statistical measure of association which 
theoretically may. vary between 1 and -1. It indicates 
how much more probable it is to get like (concordance) 
than unlike orders (discordance) in two classifications 
when two individuals are chosen from the population. A 
more complete description is given by Goodman and Kruskal 
(2964)8 

Sorting the data cards which were produced by the 
optical scorer was the final step before the analysis. This 
eliminated students who had not begun the VIF course at the 
beginning of Grade VII, those who had studied French before, 
and students who came from homes where French is spoken. 
There were 290 in these three categories leaving 917 for the 
computer analysis. 

The: analysis*may® be’ divided! into three parts: (1) 
the analysis item by item as they appeared in the question- 
naire, (2) the analysis of the clustered items, and. (3) the 
analysis of responses by students of VIF-trained teachers 
compared to those.of' the non-VIF-trained, teachers. In 
both (1) and (2) a comparison was made of the responses by 
grade as well as a comparison of the top, middle, and 


bottom thirds of classes-on the basis of achievement. 






fegeste yd yliut bedirozeb sts” ett 
fo idw nodIwizoete Ro siwesem LesbFEt * Pr 
2etsoibat 31. it- bos [ deowsod adie eh 
famitiinostesy oni I jeg oF 2i tr old 


=. | oe 


enoitestiieesio. ows ai (sonsbroseib) oe ost las a a: 


A .nokteingog eft mort xozod> ors 2isubivibas ows as co. 
pw; »* 


LeAzurk bas asmbood yd mevig zi nobsqits2eb a 









° r - 7 re 
eis yd bheowborq st4w doidw zbts> sisb oct ee ae 


erat .eteyisns oft etdtad es Cepse edt 280 r91098 +] 
AAs ) 
eff 38 s2ivos 11V efs mmod ton bad ornw ei heb Ark: n? gras 


(St0i9d domes berbute Ssd odw aod ..IV ebsx0 3 









a 


,astoge 24 domett orsite eoion mort smED. ora .2F 
sit tot Tle gnivasl eetrogorso sards seeds mp 008 oxew pee 


he) a0 


(4) fetteq send? otni bebivib ed Nein 2k af 
-foitesup elt ni botasqge yous 26 mest (sor oceans of - 
sat (2) bos ,2emett betsteulo s3 to ibe Y at ae 

eredones benisrs-TIV 9 2tasbeae Sate eu ig : 
mt ,aredoses koaiany-AlV- “fon Sl ban 
yd esenoqest sft to om mq 28W mm 


ae ms: 










hae) 


bas ,slbbim atte) 3 20 1 


ew ts sta dm 


CHAPTER IV 
THE RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 


The results of the study are presented and discussed 
in detail in this chapter in three sections: (1) the 
analysis of the questions item by item, (2) the analysis of 
the clustered items,<and (3) the analysis of the responses 
of students taught by VIF-trained teachers compared to 
those of the non-VIF-trained teachers. In each case the 
material iS cempiled in tabular form. The tables may be 
found in Appendix D. 

For the interpretation of the tables the following 
guidelines are given: 

1. -The chi-square (x?) test 1S considered signifi- 
Cantratathe-.01 level, 

2. As a rough estimate for this study only a value 
of .25 or- greater for the contingency coefficient (€) will 
be considered indicative of.a strong relationship, iand'a 
value of less than .15 will be considered weak. Any value 
between these two figures will be referred to as a moderate 
level of relationship. However,:whether the relationship 
is statistically significant or not depends upon the value 
of ge Where x? is Suignig weanty  C as stenistiicant) 

S-ormimilarly, a»value for gamma (V). of .30:0or greater 
will be considered as high association, and a value of less 


than .15 will be considered as low association. Any value 





- 


Pe 






: Lenk 
oe oe Ai, e 
ie Anh ¥ _ 
yeateane |S . 1a 
1) Qa + : 
bezauseib bas besasesrq 918 ybute ont-to. Pee eee 

oft (2) remottose gerd? mi rotqsdo aids a Lksdeb mt ; 
to zievisns eft ($) MB3i yd mt6d% eaoiszeup oft Ae abevians z va 
esenogest eft to efeyisns odd (&) bate .emesi bores euls ent ; 

/ Ot bevsqmo> eredoses. bonists-A1V xd ‘ddguss etnebuse te Se 

\ sd3 ses2 dose al. .eredoset bontsr3- -11V-n0n sid to ezodt Le Ep 
ed yam zofdst saT .mrot aetude? ni beligmon ei isitetsm ise an 

| act xibasqgA mi bauot 

aniwolfot edt 2eldet aad to noitetoxqredint sit 108%.) tes 
19vig 91s soni tabby 

-ihingie betebienoo 2i teer ( S\) etsupe-id> odT if wot 

| level 10. edt 36 ammo 
euisv s vino ybuste eidt tot otamit2se dgyor s 2A .S | = | “4s 
fliw (3) tneisitise> Yoneygnts mos edt tot T9389%g 10 By 20 
& bas, .qidenoitslet gnorse s to evitssibmi berebiemoo ed 
eviay yA .Assw berebieno> od [fiw 21. msdz aes) te Suter 
etarebom s 28 03 betreter ad Iliw zouug it ows nigh 
qidenoitsie1 edt redtsdw veoh »qisdeno BL a 
sutsv edd moqu i ton to San2thingie fae acne 
stHtbitingie 2k EO ced aie —* 4 
tetestg to OF, Io (V) eae ar ee 2, a : ye 
zaol ee vrs | 
sulev yA .noissiooees Mor a nap i " tt, 


eT as \s i 



























noleeudera aya | 
‘ 












am ear eT vs 


a f 


+ : . > | 4 4 ae 


28 


between these two figures will be referred to as a 
moderateslevelofsassociationy *Asvalue of «-.30%or greater 
will be considered as high counterassociation, and a value 
of less than -.15 will be considered as low counter- 
association. Any value between these two figures will be 


regarded as a moderate level of counterassociation. 


I. ANALYSIS OF THE QUESTIONS 


Ques tCLonelse should valiecanadians know how to 
spea rench*% 


The use of this question was an attempt to obtain an 
indication of the general attitude of students toward the 
use ©&ithegrren¢hslanguagesinrCanadayelTablesiseindicates 
that 48.5 per cent of the students answered negatively, 
whereas only 36.5 percent were in favor of all Canadians 
knowing how to speak French. Students' written comments to 
this question indicated that there is considerable 
Opposition to having French a compulsory subject as is the 
case for all junior high school students in the Province 
of Saskatchewan. Nevertheless, many students indicated in 
their written observations that if a person wishes to study 


the French language,. the opportunity should: be‘ available. 


Grade, A tc Vea buCw@UeOU slomoua Ul sitiGa labyerssle tidied 
Gaitepeyond the ,Ul Tevel. A GC value of (18 shows that a 
moderate. level of relationship exists. A V value of .26 


shows a moderate level of association between grade and 

























4 
canter. ts atanted ; 
jane 7a 


teissty 10 G8.- Fo suisvy A fois 


sulsv s bns Moitetsoz eset mos: of a | 
~e3muo> wot 26 betsbk33. ee wineaiae? . 
7 otsntgones a 

od ILtw eextigt? ows szeds scouted ouley 


inne a. to. Lever eset a pepe he 


+ @ eas) a 


Oust ee 
at 





suoi'teaup aHT 10 re vga I 
rh neats 7) 





as mistdo oF tqmes3s5 ag z8w noiteasup iat 


ois bxswot etnebuse to: sbutittes Leroneg art - 
¢ an hy lol ae 


eetsoibai I sabe -Bbensd mf Se pap Ee 





ievisegou heremads etnebute ods to ta92 nog 2.6 

. aneibpnsd [fs }0_tovs? mi etsw snaoteq 2.0 eno 

oF elmemmos metsinw 'e2tasbuse ,dorext asege a: mh 

siderebien09 2: sredd tals bessoibat x 

sat ef as toafdue Yio elu gatos & domed anivad¢ 2 

editivetd silt ni etashure Loordse dg ial robe 1 

fii Bets2ibat zteobut2 yoam 2entedazeyeH 1s of 
ybuse of 2adeiw no2tsq 8 ti jada anoise de 


ofdeLieve ed biuosta “a iaudreqgo odd 38 ee a 


| sige ylisoitetiss2 E0208 0 avtey 4 a 
@ tedt ewede BL, 20. wt “a eee 
saslihcirloe at's Rees ins | 


ie 
a oat 


ee 


a 7 







| : iv, MY 
= : ie. 
“* 


36 


response which means that the Grade VII students were more 
likely to answer affirmatively than the Grade IX's. It 
would appear from these figures that a greater number of the 
Grade VII's compared to the Grade IX's: felt more. idealistic 
and enthusiastic about the study of French, whereas the 
students of Grade VIII and IX were beginning to lose some 

of the fascination that second language study may have held 


for them formerly. 


Achievement level. A ‘G value of 442. 4e1s@statisti- 
cCallytsignificantebeyondithe s0lelevelievAlCovaluetofal21 
indicates that a moderate level of relationship exists. 

A V value of .28 shows a moderate level of association 
between achievement level and response which means that the 
top third of the students were much less opposed to the 
question than were the low achievers. The fact that more 
of the successful students favored the idea that all 
Canadians should speak French would imply that success in 

a language fosters a favorable attitude toward it. This 
elite group of students may feel that they, in particular, 


need to know how to speak French, 


QUES trons 2-5 Do you like to speak French whenever 
you get a chance? 


Responses to this question were probably influenced 
by attitude toward the language and ability or success with 


itv lables ii showsethat-50.9>percent of the total sample 












Bt 


Fa . 


stom ora etmebuse ia more" 


hoc: — as 


$1 .a'KT sbexd oft ces yldvks 
i . bead po 
ant to Tednan saa & dent 7 . wore See 
siteilsebt ‘etm Let: 2"Xl. obsrd ie fa 
shad 2soTsnw donor to; ybuta odt Than 
amoz szof o3 ei stew XT Ane TEV" 





,adeine qideanotisiet® to Level one epremes 
moideioozes to Lfovel sterebom s ewode BS. (oar. 
edd ‘telle eneem. Hoisdw senoqeet bits evel snensvesibe alleen - | 

ad of DERAES ezef dovm STW MRC ) 


Sromaedt 255 siT  2tevetdos wol 5A7 $18 

» pepansg 
. 

eidT .3i brswos sbvsis3e) stdarovrst 5 2193 20% 

ews 


: saa 














{is teds sobt ott berovst etnebute ft 
ME e2sdoue Jsdt xigat bivow domes] ne 


wtelusittsq ai exeds tsdd [99% em atnb 


.donerd songs 03 

. He 7 7 oe 

syenedw dons a deoge 2+ ALL WOK 
_ 


a a> | 


besneutint hina a. 
“dtiw eeezoue 10. Ne 


stomge tas0s 2As 


by) 


did not like to speak French whenever there was an 
opportunity compared to 33.5 percent who did. Written 
comments on this question revealed that some students used 
French as a novelty with their friends or family, -buty asi a 
rule, the largest percentage of them did not use the 


language outside the classroom to any worthwhile degree. 


GradezeaA x? Value ot 23,9) tse statistically Signi fi- 
cant beyond the .01 level. A C value of .16 shows a 
moderatesicvel of relationship. exists... A V-valuel of .21 
reveals that there is only a moderate level of association 
between grade and response which implies that the Grade IX 
Students were more likely to answer negatively than were 
the Grade VII's. One might have expected a larger number 
ofthe Grade IX students to have answered in the affirma- 
tive than was the case, since they should have been more 
capable of handling the language than the first year 
students. However, speaking French for someone who is more 
familiar with the language may mean a very different thing 
than it does to the novice.. The new student in the language 
may regard greetings or other simple forms as "speaking 
the language'', whereas those who have reached a more 
advanced level. may realize that some degree of fluency is 


expected before qualifying as a speaker of the language. 


7 


AGG Vemeliamleven mai Vole Ot. 64 0/ 91S Statist. - 


Cally significant beyond the .01:-level.. A C-value of .19 


vee oli aw oredt revensdw | 
fetsiwW - «bib ofw taeot 9g Perey 
bees eseiebuse. emoz ted3 atnesay lols a 
s en sud .vlimet to ebneixt ti\eds dtiw ysieven # es donert 
eis seu. tom bib moi? to ogedneoteq teogtel eft, shar 

4 Betgab oLidwdtzow.yne 03 mooteesi> of3 ebiatuo egsugasl 
tom). ape ee 
































‘+bhingie vlleviseitesa el @,£8 to ies XA 
gs ewonde OL, to eulavy DA Level Id. vr baoyed Sua 
AS. 20. eulav VA. .exeixe qidenoisels? to: Lovet sterobom 
Mpisjginoees to level siatebom # xiao 2i enerit tedt eleaven ' 
XI ebard ods se13 aeilqmi doidw eenogesr bas sbatg neowied 
stew asd3 ylovisegen t9ewens of ylodil orom siew etmobyse 
tedaua tegisl s betoeqxe eved siypim onO ,e'TIV oberd oft = 
entities eds ni bexewens sved 03 etnebute X1 ebard oltpgo © 
stom need eved biuode yous sonie ,o2s2 es eaw eds: owkt 
tsey Jetit ed? madd ogeugnsl of3 anitbaed to stdagaa: 
stom 2i odw snoomoe rot dometd guideesqe ,r9vowoH, -essbue aa 
gnids tnotsitib yrev s msom Wee agacynsl dt L 
egaugnsl edt ai tnebute won odT seabven a9. 08 aeab; 
gaidleoqe" 26 emrot olqmiz redto to esti 
atom s bedoset sved osiw szods enotait 
et sian ¥0 nbecah fads osifesr “3 
Ei siees i a te wie 7 
bales cic mers? to 











Cy 





38 


indicates that a moderate level of relationship is present. 
A V value of .27 shows that there is a moderate level of 
association between the two classifications in the table 
which means that the lowest achievers were more likely. to 
answer negatively than were more successful performers. 

The results for achievement level are what might have been 
expected. The more able students would be more apt to make 
use of their opportunities to speak French simply because 
they possess greater confidence than those who achieve less 


well. 


Questiond3s redo you like French more than other 
Subj eets: 


The figures for this question, recorded in Table III, 
show that 76.1 percent of the students indicated that they 
didsnoteprefer French, tovother subjects compared to 14. 3 
percent who replied that they did. Presumably, the group of 
respondents who answered affirmatively have a very positive 
attitude toward the language, but this does not necessarily 
mean that all those who answered this question negatively 
hold a negative attitude toward French. Many students in 
this second group may rate-French.high on their list of 


DLetercoapsupy eects e DULelO GtiTs ti, 


Gradesc A ag Valucwot 19 s/eis S\tatastically dsignifis 
Can fobeyond hte m0 1 dlevetmalAyCevaluedotn. ISeindicates ethat 


onlyha moderatesievelyoflrelationshipvexists. isAsVevalue of 


i i eee ee Pe! oe 
o ie - ©! =a a i ~ oan 
: 


“ ay es 7 
em | Sie | ) rou care 


7 Y i’ 
‘ Lia 9 : a 
.theeetg ei qidenortsfer to ieee, 4 ereeey ants on 62 
2 Gs 













: ; _ . 
z to fovel eterstom s et sted? isd} ewotle VS, to owis sa 
: — ia mA 
elds edt mi enoitssitiezesto ows sat ia =— ozes 


‘02 yietil stom stew erovetdos teewol sit Cian  aneem dobiw 


r ise 
: seremroiteq Inteezssoue stom I919w resis ciseasene pine: 
maod eve tigis dsrw-ors Level tnomsyverdos 104 23 Iuevs a 
a eism of tas stom ad. bluow einsbute ds stom odT pina fh 
geueoad yiqmie domsti Aseqe of ie witoqqo tied? to. eeu, 
‘ 


zeel sveidos onw seondt nshd sonebrinoo 1sde6e7y 


tendto sedi etom «a TO Hy otrl NOX of x 


—_ —— a — 


eill sidsT mi bebtoss1 ,motseoup etdd rot esuugit SAT 
yous tenis betsoibn: etnebuse oz to. iagateg fof te? wode” 


a ayy 


‘bh 


















&.bf ot bessdmoo zjiostdue refte of daasyd retstq ton-& 


_ 
to quotg ofy ,.yldsmueotd .5i6, yodt tedd botiqer onw taeprs oq 


fu 


evisreou yrsv 6 ovad vylovitemaitas bsrswens’ onw ssehaen and 

yitrsecsson Jon 29o0b eidi tud ,sgeupnmel srs btignfey’ sbu. tie 
: ~ 

ylevitsygea noiszeup 2zidt betswens onw seond Lie ts >. — 


+ is sf 


mi atnebute ynsM .donsetl brewot ob AS3R 9 sa ca! S 3 


40 Jeri risis mo Agi donasr4 SIBT vom quo’ rg a bnooee @ abd 


ares 
E exit ton tud epee ote shore 
ce ©. _ 


a 


tay 


—s aoe 2 a & 
~itingie ylisstteissse 22 0.0L %o siiisy an 
3ed3 25tpoibai ef, to sulgyv 0 A Mowot 4 10. 
to sulsy v A ,23Bixs qidamaiseter 26 

‘ +t « ay 


mee ee > mot n 


a 


5g 


.09 reveals a low level of association between grade and 
response which means that Grade IX students were somewhat 
more likely to answer negatively than were Grade VII 
students. Since French is a new subject for the Grade VII 
Students, there may be a tendency for a larger percentage 


Of them to prefer this subject. 


Achievement level. A x4 value ofr2758uisastatisti- 
callytsioni ficant.beyondethe@e0lelevel. hA Cavalueho£t £17 
shows that a moderate level of relationship exists. AV 
value of .30 represents high association between achievement 
level and response which means that the low achievers were 
more likely to answer negatively than were the better 
students of French... Such results are what» might have been 
expected because low achieving students would not:-be as 
likely to prefer a subject in which they were performing 


poorly. 


Question 4: Would you prefer to start learning read- 
ingvat sthesbeginning of your French course: 


There was not a large discrepancy: in opinion on this 
Ques GLOn we tie eresults in=labile lV andicatewthat 39.7 per- 
Centtoir the studéentserepliedrthat they wouldiprefer-to 
Stapereagding atathe beginning of their French course 
compared to 46.2 percent who stated that they would not wish 
to do so. Reading is normally started in the second year 


of the VIF course about Lesson 10, and there is some 


Rt 






aes wow F 





ssdwomo2 9Tew eats febute XI ‘bard t 2 7 | 
TV abet) ata nent ae 0 
IV abst2 oft sot oStdue yor 8 2k dodett eonie : 
sy Kh T1997 9q tegiel a ‘ot yonobnst Bs od 0 Seaside. ° 
oeidee end retenq oF medt TO 


7 ’ 
imeres : ae 


< 





_ pe 
wy 
_ 
ik 


oe 





ber 
- 


-is}etisse 2: B.XS to sutav Sy A. 


TL. to sulsy J A + i50et 0, old bnoyed dans humgie ties iy ine 
eae 
- 


4 y oS 


VA .atetxe qidemottgier to Laver staisbom Teds eworle 
a i ey , ieee 
taemeveidos nsewted noitstooges. figid 2insestqsx Of. to suey 


STOW areveisos wol edz stsdz Bagom iloisiw cemogens Sime: heen =5 
rstted sf¥ stow asdt, «Levissgon tswelts of visdif stom 


meed Svs taeint saith ot etiveor fou2 .donett to meno ; y 
zs sd ton bluow_etnebuse Sassiitss wol, seusoed 







giimroitsg stew yedt doidw mi to0tdye s retest oF 


45% | w 
mah ty bla 
ye drete ot 1926 a: 
SMS) 33 ot poy oi te 
eit no noimico mt vauhgor ee 


“teq ¥.Ct 35d? ots ibn VI> peed 














bast 


03 1t9tetq blvow yodt sadt & 
“se1w0> ‘donetd tiedy to -yatic 

detw tom binow ysds ssi? baaeze of 
TROY biose2 oly ni ‘vied q aes ft 


eniog ay eran, bas’ 0 ry oud | Si 
; - a i 







rit : 


ae 


40 
controversy over the length of the prereading period. 


Grade. A xe value of 28.1 is statistically Signifi- 
cant beyond the .01- level. A C-value of .17 Signifies that 
a moderate level of relationship is present. A V value-of 
-.16 reveals a moderate level of counterassociation between 
grade and response which means that Grade VII students were 
more likely to answer negatively than were students of the 
two higher grades. The percentages in the table show that 
Opinion in Grade IX is about evenly divided, whereas in 
Grade VII a much larger percentage of the students are 
opposed to the idea of beginning reading at the beginning 
eficthemr coursiey© tl ti inayrbe possible that beginning 
students fear a new complication in their regular Troutine, 
whereas the more advanced students are seeking more variety 


because they grow weary of the sameness of the course. 


Achievement level. A x? valuertof It, 6. WsimniGit 
Statistically significant at the .01 level. <A V value of 
.04 signifies only negligible association between. achieve- 


ment level and response. 


Question 5: Do you. believe French. is a.useful 
language in today's world? 

The figures in Table V disclose that a large pro- 
portion of the junior high school students sampled felt 


that French held a place of importance among the languages 


of the world. There were 66.4 percent of the respondents of 


Ob 
f 


sania Speessits oils 20 dynes 's 






~fiingte “ilaodseisaz: ek £.8% Sad ocipniy at 


i 


Len, | Me 
ted} 2eektingte Vi. to aulev DA Level fo. a 


to oulsy VA 1188974 et. 5 beet a ame +9 Lover ate om “s ys 

neowted nobteio0226tesnyo2 to fevel ose tieea steaver d.- =e - 

eisw 2tmebute IIV ebesd ssdd ensem dotdw oemaqeot ike 2 ohany | a 

efft-to esmobute s1sw nsdz <lovisenen xeweme ot gloat “ant = 

tat woe oldest 9d3 ni eogstnsszeq edT .2oberg todgid ows | ie 

at esstodw ,bsbivib yLneve mode et XI gbei® mb nokatgo 7 a ; | 

Sis 2tnsbuse ont. to ogntneateq 1ogrel doum s lV obe7 “a £ 
debicieéa ef ts gaibed: gatamtyged to sebi st ot bezoqgo - 

gaiantged tedt eldiezoq sd yem 31 .szt09 tient Xe | 

eSoni tot ts lig st tieds «a notteokIqmoo wen 8 t8si 2trebute 7 a 


yisitsy s1om gnitese ots etaobute boonsvbs sion eather 4s “i 
.BeTUOD ont to zzenomse oft to yrsew woTg “ods seusoed - 4 

an 

= 


s 


gon 2t 0.1L to sulsv “K A 





41 


this opinion compared to 17.1 percent of the Opposing 
view. However, these results do not necessarily give any 
Suggestion of how useful these students felt the language 


might be to them. 


Grade.» A x? value of. 14-4risnstatisticaliy sapgnifi- 
cant beyond the .01 level. A C value of .12 reveals that 
only a weak relationship exists. A V value of .17 denotes 
a moderate level of association between grade and response 
which means that Grade VII students were more likely to 
answer affirmatively than were students in the two higher 
grades. The fact that the Grade VII's were slightly more 
inclined to answer affirmatively may have been due to the 
novelty and importance which a new subject holds for 


beginning students. 


Achgevementideve lthy A Me val uch fy cbse Gea Sesitatisiti- 
malllyvisa gnicha Ganite beyondr thel« 0de levedus A.C values ofiads 
indicates that a weak relationship exists. A V. value of 
-16 suggests a moderate level of association between the 
two classifications of the table which means that the better 
students were more likely to answer affirmative to this 
(ues cCLOnechalieaweresthaseswho performed Lessiwell. The 
poorer students may rationalize their lack of success by 


indieéating that French lacks importance in the world. 
















egaugans of? thot eonebure sear | 


} r 


-iRingi2 yileaiteitere 2i .01 0 9utav §K\A \.gbaxDe | 
teds alagver Si. 20 ulev DA steve’ 10. 9d? baoyed tn89 oo 
geroneb (i, 30 swlav VA .eteixe gidemoiteler deow s yao 
eefoqest bas ebsty nsswied noitsiz0ees to Level etersboms 

| ot yletil orom etow etmebute IW ebstd sais engom doidw - 

inde ows off ni etasbute stow asis ylevitemitie teweqe by." S 
etom “itdgite ei1ew e'lIV sbsrd oft sedd tos? oft .2ebatg 
ed3 oF sub aoed svsd yam Rtas TSwenR oF bontlont 
ot 2blod tostdue won s Asidw tet us bos yi leven —- 

4 | * a rer a ‘a 










-ideisste 2i 2.21 to ovlsv “XA Level Japmeue 
zk, fo eulay 2A + Level £0) odd mabe ssid 
te eviav V A .2teixe qidenottsler 


edi meswied noitsizozes to Level «se 


wetted ofd seit ensom doidw oldss oft tO enolt 














~*~ _ - 
eid? of evitsmritts towens 03 eacats | pee Le se 


1. 


edt .Llew ezel, bemroiteq ofw 42 | 
(sence to sont wip dln a : oq 
— | seg: ay 
cI cero i | 
nd vie 


ai /fe@me «= ae & ,@ 
ait -( Fam Hess 7 ars Duel ey r 


a). ae aa ul 








7 
at 


42 


uestion 6: Can you usually understand the teacher's 


exp anations in Frenc O vocabDu ary al iculties* 


This question was intended to inquire into the 
problems that students have understanding meaning in the 
second language. In Table VI the responses of the students 
answering "Yes" comprised 50.4 percent compared, to) 46.4 
percent answering "'No". Obviously, the responses of the 
students would have been influenced greatly by the skill 


which the teacher had used in conveying meaning clearly. 


Grade. A X2 


Vere  ote2; 0) is statistically sipnifi - 
cant beyond the .01 level. A C value of .17 reveals that a 
moderate level of relationship is present. A V value of 
-12 indicates low association between grade and response 
which means that Grade VII students were somewhat more 
likely to answer affirmatively than were the students in 
the two higher grades. Why more of the younger students 
believed they were better able to understand the teacher's 
explanations in French of vocabulary difficulties may be 
due to the simpler vocabulary in the beginning lessons of 


the course or because not as much material is covered in 


CieerirSt year. 


Achievement level. A ie VialLUGmO Lie Mis es tat Sti 
Galdynsignifiicantebeyond@the. -01 level, A Givalue of .27 
indicates a strong relationship exists. A V value of .39 


denotes high association between the two classifications 


; , 
f| : 
bl 7 . : 
; re y on ss 
=) = a 
i P 
, - - 
. . - 
7 “ - 7 Ps ih } fy 
2'rados 3. bas eles | 
< =s. I a a bute De - ‘ . 
aa a — b> Oe . tee 0 ." 
JL ee SNE ee 


ont ori eriupai o3 be agi 






is xT oy 
x jie , Hathaigs i ime 


nis 
oil i grins om gatihas terol nur” viet atti wor on vo 
atnebuste edt to zo2noq2et ot iV. oldaT al _ 
$.0¢ 03 betsqmo2 TST 9H hb. Oe beatx@sios "2el" gaivewent 
sat io .esanoqest sid «yfeyoivdo om gtirswenes taesteq 
fbide ont ys yssorg Loombultat nised sve Siuow-esmebmpe | 






















: on 
sqlxselo gmingem yaiyovhoo at boa bad tedsnet ods dokdw | _ 
. a i] ‘3 
5 0 a — nl 
-Etiagi« vileshsetveds er 0.68 3h sulev "XA aaa 
s 353 2Iseyex TL. to sulay 9A ,Lowsl 10, eg baoyed ict ae 


to eufavy V A .tnezetgq er qitznoiteist Yo Lovet ssataban 
semoqest bas sbetg noswisd noitgizc0ees wol sesuatent 
atom jsdwonmoe stow 2tnsbuete IL) sbatd todd ca fold | Fs F 
ni 2tnebut2 siz s19w asdt yLevitemriiise vewena of qodiL 
etasbute segmoy sdt te stom ydW .zsbarg raged ows. eds ae 
e'xeitsss: eds bassetsbau od olds totted araw vod? bevetted 
ad yam eeitivoitiib yraludsooyv to dares’ ak enottenshqxe y 
to eno2z2of gninniged edt mc yredudszov reiqnie dt of eub 
mi betevos 2: bsitetsm doum 28 tor seussed 10 setwoo ede 


- a 


 - 
es 


















i] 
, 
7 - ‘ 


~igeitese et 0.15 do suisy %, A a : i nemeve. me 
TS. 20 sullav 9 A Lover £0, ods : 82 
ee, to evisy wa seseixe: aidenbiss 


gai e ae ows on? sepwsed a0 


te | 
F fe or ¢ Cae 





a 


i YP ad 

oe. > ian i a] 

si thoes : eae : 
a Na 7 


w, PANY 
- ad ), fea 


43 


of the table which means that the high achieving students 
were much more likely to answer affirmatively than were 
the lower achievers. It is not Surprising that the above 
Statistical measures for achievement level are as Signifi- 
cant as they are. It is only reasonable to expect that 
the best students would have less difficulty understanding 
the explanations of problem areas than would the poorer 


students. 


uestion 7: Do you think French should be studied 
By everybody Pisa CFRae UIT ee Benge er eee 
This is another question designed to examine the 
basic attitudes of students toward the French language. In 
Table VII one may note that there is little difference of 


opinion between the affirmative and negative responses, 


41.9 and 44.9 percent respectively. 


Grade 5 aA x? Value®or 2757 Ase statistatally signifi - 
cant beyond) the! . 018 Wevel.. A C-value’ of °17° indicates 
that a moderate level of relationship is present. AV 
value of. .19 shows a moderate level of association between 
grade and response which means that fewer Grade IX students 
were likely to answer affirmatively than were students in 
Grade: VII. The reason for more’ of the Grade VIII and IX 
students feeling that French should not be studied by 
everybody from Grade VII to XII may be due to the 


realization that after two or three years of study, success 


a 





-fikaghe es 918 bavi eae rser +8 fem: ts 

























Jedd Joeqx9 oF. dsnozset no 2i sl ote tne res 
8 qx of “L ¥ 5 feuame _ , cs 
gtibnes erebaw ytiuoLttib zeel sved biuow sake! 78 edd : 
renooq sit bluew Bice es9ts meldotq to » enol zens igxe on? wi 
aad b 
+ era ae : i- 
: - 
betbuse od ie donott Ante iS nots zont Lo 
vd Ti sbesd of TIT sb Sx woTt ye GYISve Ya ou 
edt onimsxs of bongiesb ‘moiseoup reitons: ak eiaT ) 7 
ml .opsugasi donetd oft brswot etaobude to-eebusizts sieed ~ : 
. . 
bo sometsitib slitil ei eredd teds oton yem smo’ IIV sidsT - ; 
<28enoqest ov aaa barn evitsmtritts edt tooused notaigo ss 
.“WLavitseqest nite J e.ad bas O00 : 
7" : ; ay 


-itingie ylisoisetisy2 ef VSS to ovlev “x A 
~ aa fed 

zotsoibni VL. to sylev °) A .fevel £0. ods buoyed pom 

VA .ta9e8tq ei qidenoitsiex to Level otexobom § s vad 


neSwied nofitsizozzs to Lavel etstebon & sine aa 3e 0 sutay 


etaesbuse XI aha +6wet tsdt 2ns9m tions mpage 
: : ; 





mi adasbute orow ment bovidemr ite tewens oF 
XI bas ITIV sbexd edd Yo \erom rot noess1. | 


yd beibuse od. som biuoite 2 domeed wre 


edt ot sub od yom 1X a8. LIV 9b: 
2zonque ,ybute to veel cannons ae reste. 


44 


in a second language is not as Simple as it appeared in 
the first year of the course, The apparently more 
idealistic viewpoint of the first year students in the 


course is another factor to consider. 


Achievement level. A ne Valuesotf: 18) 4°asis tatas ti 
cally significant beyond the .01 level. A C value of .14 
denotes that a weak relationship exists. A V value of .17 
represents a moderate level of association between achieve- 
ment level and response which means that the students in 
the top third of their French classes were more laitk elev: yt 0 
answer this question affirmatively than were those in the 
bottom third. These results would Suggest that good 
performance in the language leads to a positive attitude 


toward =1¢ ; 


uestion 8: Do you usually understand the meaning of 


wnat you_ are Saying PCE ome Wier) spea ing mBenene 


Table VIII reveals that 56.9 percent of the students 
were of the opinion that they did understand what they were 
Saying in class when speaking French compared to 31.2 per- 
cent who indicated that they did not. Those who answered 
"Undecided", 11.9 percent, may have been having compre- 
hension problems as well. The fact that approximately one 
third of the students sampled felt that they were not sure 
of what they were saying when speaking should be cause for 


some concern for the teachers of the VIF course. 





edz ni etnebure 1sey tatit edt to ichehiay ikea 
»tebienos ot tos38t. maaan 






~3ee3 ‘ a 
-iteitste eat §.8L to ovfev Sy A 


bi. to evlev 3 A seat £0. ode pref aes nr pel 


VL. to eutsv V A -eteixe gidenotsslot dsow 5 ‘Said. Wededeb 








fe i 
-sveidos neawted nottsioozes to Level etarebom 5 ernseetqar 7’. 
oe ee Fl 
mi etaobute of3 teds ensom dAoitw oznoge bs Lovel dnem . a 


ot b aaadilens stom s19w eozesl> donstd Wats b 
ext mi seors stow nent ylovitsmritis mottesup ids — : 
booy aH, Jesygque bivow est{uest 520AT bu bd? mot 


obusitss ‘evidiaog s 6% ebsol sysugasl odd ni astaineiceg : 
asks Se om 





s1sw yeds tedw bastershbau bib yors sail 


“seq S.L2 03 boereqnto> donot aaitsege it 
betowens odw seodT : stom bib yoda. sed3 bes 


45 


This question resulted in a large number of 
additional written comments from the students. One 
Student stated, "I think French is very boring because I 
don't really understand what I'm Saying.'' Reference to 


Appendix C reveals many other comments of similar nature. 


Grade. A x? Male mOTMI2 eisenot statistically 
Significant at the .01 level. A V value of .10 indicates 
a rather low level of association between grade and 
response which means that it was only slightly more 
probable for Grade VII students to answer affirmatively 


than it was for students in the two higher grades. 


Achievement level. A x? Value of 89.7 is statasti- 
Callywsignificant* beyond..the .01:level.. AC value of 4730 
denotes that a strong relationship exists. A V value of 
-44. shows high association between the two classifications 
in the table which means that the high achievers tended to 
answer this question in the affirmative whereas the weak 
students were more apt to answer in the negative. Such 
results may have been expected. It seems reasonable to 
assume that good students would understand the meaning of 
what they were saying in French more readily than students 
who were weak in the subject. 

lt=is of interest) to note that the number of 
students who answered "Undecided" increased as achievement 


decreased. As was mentioned earlier, this may suggest that 






ah 


ee a. ee 
',etasbute odd mord 22 | aD: . : 

I eeusoed gmitod yrev ef Honor Sais 1 <beteee saabure : | 
ot const oi of a +QMiyse n't tedw bassersbay yltser' 3" nob | 








ai: 

.otussn tslimie2 3 atnemmo. ‘reito yasm “7 3 abana ea 
yilsoiteitease som ef §,Sf to sulsyv Sop gbs10 ye : 7 
soyszibai Of. 10 aulev VA .tevel £0. sie ge tan2ttingke . 
bas ebstg meswted foitetooade to Level wol tedster 6 4 4 

eTom Vitdenteand ies aBW ti ters ensom doidw seaoqest 7 x "i 


vievissmritts rewans of etmebuse LIV ebexD 20% efdsdotq Ng 
.zebsty todgid owt odd mi 2tnebute tot sw st nede | 


7 4 ee @ . ; 














-i32itste ei ¥.@8 to suisyv ay A .t: £ ; ——— 
- ° *@ > ; o 
0&. to sulsv DA ,Level I0, ont baoved' Inavihinyie yiiee 7 
; - 
to oufsv V-A .2teixe gitlemoisslox prety & teas banaue ‘_¢ 
2itottssittzesl> ows ond noewsed bates ix =a 
4 stab ey 
03 bebass srevaliios fgid ons sadd mo dst in 
teow edt esoredw ovitsmritiea ods re bokege vp. teweas = 


doue .evitsgen edt at Towels ot 3q5 bi row atr 

ot sldsnoassr emse2 +1 -bosdoqK9 Rha 
to yatasom oft basserebou blyow <Foebus 
etasbute asdt yLibssr stom nl 
[ ne 
‘to xedmut odt tant. ston ot 2 
tnemsvetHhse 2s bogsotont bab bioeb 
teHt » ‘Teoggue Xem eids steittss 6 s +3 a 


¥ 


46 


a number of students in this category could have been 


having comprehension problems too. 


uestion 9: Should all Canadians know how to 


spea ng ARSON 


According to Table IX most students, 072% Sipercents 
agreed that all Canadians should know how to speak Enpildsh, 
but Question 1 revealed that only slightly more than one 
third of the respondents were of the Opinion that all 


Canadians should speak French. 


Grade, AX: Value of 16.2 is statistically sdpni¢i- 
cant beyond the .01 level. AC value of .13 Sionities that 
a low degree of relationship is present. A V value of .19 
shows a moderate level of association between grade and 
response which means that the Grade VII's were more 
inclined to answer affirmatively than were the Grade IX's. 
It is not too clear why more of the Grade VII students felt 
that all Canadians should know how to speak English compared 
to second and third year students in the course. The 
results in Question 1 disclosed that Grade IX students were 
even more opposed to the idea of all Canadians knowing how 
to speak French than were students of Grade VII. It may be 
possible that the idea of compulsion to learn any second 
language is less appealing to older students. French is 
compulsory for junior high school, students in the Province 


of Saskatchewan. 


ab 












~Fnssreq B.S etiebuse seom XI. oidsT 03, BaRBTOIDAS’ mm Gs iy, 
leilgat sea os wort word biuofe Bias a {2 wp 7 iy 





-£tingiz vilsofseisste 2t $,0f to éulsv ue ‘Walle va cae 
teds eottingte tf. to stisev DA .fevsl 10. ods broved ams — 
€1, to ovlsv VA .3ng26rq et qidenoitsler ane o¢ 
bas sbstg aeowiad noitsiooe 2s to fevel s 
stom stew 2! TIV sbaqd sls ted4 7 " 

2'*Xl shstd edz erew asdt (evitens 338 ~ 


4 


al 
$ist eJnsbute [IV obs1d ont to aan yitw 


bersquos fdeifgad ada it ot worl word pier 


edT ,s2etu0> iy as ieee They | Ve 


. ra 
stew ‘2tnebute XI sbs10 sans boeotoeis 1 10 a 


fs - 
Wo gniwondt ens ianad {ls 20 wobi § te otk 
od. yer $2 .1IV sbs1d to “adneburé S76 > ie si 
bnossé yas mts! od fio iefuqmos 20) & 
« 
2i earn -ernebuse he oe oti a ' 


ee 


La 


47 


Achievement level. A af Va live go-fetlitn-14i cite) Ist atiins tii 
cally significant at the .01 Jevel. A C value of .12 
denotes that a weak level of relkatwonsthaip is \presient of A iV 
value of .15 shows a moderate level of association between 
achievement level and response which means that low achievers 
were less likely to answer affirmatively than were higher 
achievers. The reason for these results may be that under- 
achievers in French are just as opposed to having English 
compulsory for people learning it as a second language as 


they are to having French compulsory for themselves. 


uestion 10: Do you feel that the French sentences you are 


learning will be useful in conversations in rea 1 ( 


Table X shows that 48.6 percent of the respondents 
did feel that the French sentences they were learning would 
be useful to them compared to 31.8 percent who were not of 
this opinion. A rather large group, 19.5 percent, were 
not able to express an opinion for or against. the question. 
If students feel that the material they are learning is not 
practical, efforts to bring about meaningful learning will 
WOtGEDemuleG sUCCCSoSiULss Ihereirore, at 1S important that 
teachers have sentences in the second language that are 
appealing to.their students and. that such material be 
used effectively. It is without doubt that improper 
handling of the transposition phase of the VIF lesson 
would lead students to believe that the French sentences 


were of little use to them. 


vp 


-ijaitese et b.2L to pulev “XA . Bowel SmemeveidoA : 
Sf. to-oulsv DA .fsvel [0, oat 38 taeobPingie yilad ee 
VA THOROTS ar qidenoitster to Level Assw & gedt eotomeb : 


nsswted noijsizozes to Level ot aT abt B sities, Soap 


ereveidos wot 3sedt ans om Adidw sasoqeer bos Leved aaemeveidos =: 














rorgid sow mst chovitsmtitts tewens ot yYDedil eesl stew 3 
aber sadf sd ysm 2tivesr oesdt tot ‘MO.28 9% oT .ereveidos a) ae 
dektignd gnived of bezogqo es taut ere domed ai atovetdos : 
es egsugnsi bnoose sp eB JE gainarsot elqoeq ot croetiques . 
,2ovieemsds tot yroeluqmos doastt gatved o+ sts yorlt ; 
| = 
etmebnoqeo1 sit to tneateq 0. 8h edd halen t+ : | 

Biucw gtinissl stew yeds esonstase donert onl tert test bib a 
to toa stow ofiw tns21eq 8.f@ ot bersqmo> modt of tutees od _ 
519W .3 M997 9g c.@f .quorg sgtsl raider A 0 8a 90 tds : 
«motteoup oft tenisgs 10 tot Moimigo ms ze arqxe: ov elds. son _ 
Som ei gotnrsel sts yods [sivetsem sft tsdt leg einobuoe 21 at. a 
[liw gaiaxrsel [utgninsem tuods gnitd of wee 7 tea : - 

> \Feidee 

‘tedd tnstroqmi ei ti ,srotsredT Lae Tae ae Se 


eae | 


ets tsd3 sgsugasl baovee offs ni me 


sd I[siretsm dase rare sh pss. £9: hel 


48 


Grade. A reg value of 27.4 is statistically signifi- 


canti beyond: the. \.0Js level. - A C value® of .17 Suggests that 
a moderate: level of relationship exists. A V value of..21 
denotes a moderate degree of association which means that 
the Grade VII's were more inclined to answer affirmatively 
to this question than were the respondents in the two 
higher grades. These figures appear to illustrate the 
greater optimism and positiveness of the Grade VII's toward 


the course. 


Achievement level. A ang Valluemofwks .Camissistatistay 
ca llysisigni facantibeyond :thers..01: levelsamAs:C value of. 14 
reveals that low relationship exists. A V value of .18 
represents a moderate level of association between the two 
Classifications of the table. The figures seem to show 
that students who are not as successful in the language as 
they might be, are apparently less likely to see the 


practical application of the material they are learning. 


ucsiie ide) Ane sce ntains Rrench? Canaddanststryanigsetio 
OTrcemo the rwGanadwvans ito wlearm™ hréencn, 

This question was included in the- questionnaire to 
determine the attitude of the students. toward people whose 
Tan guagesmiseiFrench .eywni TabiletX lyoner may note) sthatt 39.0 
percent. mep lied sYes'icompared’ to; 26%. 7*-percentwhoitreplied 
"No'', The percentage who expressed no opinion on the 


question, Was large, 34.3 percent. 


ap 










-:Pingia ylibobteisere ef 4.98 Fo 9 
$edt etesggwe TL. to oulav DA. 
IS. to oulay VA vepetxe gidgdo fier 
sadt anion doithi riokaeisoses 30 estgsb 91 | 
yfovitasmiTiite sewetis.od benifosmi syom erew 2’ IV ebsra. oils / 
owt odd ai etasbioqeer silt oxow neds soit zoup etdsio a 

sd otsstevili oy, Twoqqe: estugit esent — paaborg) vedgud ipo 
brawot 2"1IV abard ott tovezenovitizay bend ebb atts qo-suening. ti - 
a nee 

ks re | = Bh eaea. 
-dje2ttste ei 0.81 to oulav “xX A Lael Smemevekdok Ss 
AL, 20 jie WA Level fo. eds Baoy +e 3 
Gf. to sufsy ¥ A veteixe (ideno:teLee well rots inavet | 
ows edt meowted nottsizozes Yo Paver: sisrebom. 8 eeneestger Z a 


: 
wode ot mas2e-2sttgit ‘oNT etdss eat to enot 


28° sgergasl ois ni Ivte2zsdoue 28 Jom 918 odw = 
edd ase oF ylodif orem gases 81s oe 


























gtiyit zn thens) donot ni 


es 
Hor rs 
[Saar 1 er ot ae 


4 


ot etisanoitesup ods me bobuloat ‘ek noise 

s2odw elqosq brewos eimobute edt bid sbucis 
ba ditt e200 ee aber ofc 
betlgen ciiw gno210q 7. os, Rides qo 
oat 20 9 moifizqo’ on bsee ok ° ae: 


ap 
Ms Sa Eon 


49 


Grade .WoA ‘e valve sof !436ers inoteustatistically 
Significant. A V value of -.09 signifies low counter- 


association between grade and response. 


Achievement level. A x4 Vialuetok, O92evVsEnot 
statistically significant. A V value of .04 indicates 
that there is practically no association between achievement 


level and response. 


Question 12: Do you want the teacher to explain the 
French grammar rules to you’ 

The audio-lingual approach to second language learning 
is based on an inductive approach to grammar. Question 12 
Was. an attempt to obtain the. feeling of students regarding 
this subject.—-The figures recorded in Table XII suggest 
that learners do want the teacher to explain the French 
grammar rules to them. There were 59.8 percent of the 
respondents who were for such explanations compared to 


ZSy7OVpercent opposedy 


Grade. A fe Valuer Otec. Zoe NO lms tatlStLcadily 


Significant. A V value of..14 represents low.association 


between the two classifications of the table. 


Achievement level. A xé vaduesoreos4- is not 
Seauisorcallyesionitvcants, A ViValue OL) .09 andicates a 
low level of association between achievement level and 


response. 






















(lissévantare-ton 2i abd 4 
-tetmos wol zoitingie O0.- to- 


tom 2h §.8 30 aula oe ay 
eetszibai 60; =p eutsv V A 


gnintsel sgeugasl baooe2 oF fios0tqas ae ; , 
Sf mottees) .+emmerg 62 dosotqge ovitoubak as 00 beesd ai ait 
gnibtsge: arnebute to gailsot sdt aistdo oF tqmet3s a8 esw - | 

Jeogygue [1X ofdsT at bebros 9% eeqga? odT Joetdue ends * a 
domexd sit cislqxe ot tedoest sits tnsw ob etemrsel sedt 
edt to tnerteq 8.02 stew stedT mods oF naive -temmety. 


of bersqmo> enotitsasiqxs Move 10t stew odw ‘erasbmoqeet 
Riiiaesepiiic 


yilsottetiste tom ek S.8 ie an SOR 98 
moitsizo22s5 wol atns2erqor ve to ouley hie 








a 
-sldst oft to anoiseaitizel 42 
_% 


yon ai 1.0 20 stew KA ca 
6 29382ibat 00. to bean 5 me 
' ays 7 i? ; 





50 


uestion 13: Would you take French if you didn't 
ave to‘% 


The written comments of the Tesponden ts mcOmt as 
question reveal that a number of students like French 
because it is an easy credit with little homework. It is 
difficult. to say how many of the 41.0 percent of the 
Students who answered affirmatively to this question would 
be interested in the language for its own sake. Reference 
to Table XIII indicates that 43.0 percent of the students 


would not take French if they had the choice. 


Grade me cA x? Valuemorsl ls7 tisno ttstatisiticaliy 
Significant. A V value of -.01 denotes very low counter- 


association between grade and response. 


Achievement level. A x? Value Of 52.99 Ais.asiba tis ti 
cally significant beyond the .01 level. AC value of .23 
Suggests that a moderate level of relationship is present. 
A V value of .32 shows strong association between achieve- 
ment level and response which means that high achievers 
were much more likely to answer affirmatively than were 
the low achievers. These results suggest that success in 
second language learning fosters interest and motivation 


which, in turn, leads to even better success. 


Question 14° Would you prefer BOms ware writing earlier 
in this course? 


This item was included in the questionnaire because 


02 

















efit of rs eee odd to iit mines a 

donetd oatrl 2tmabuse to cede 8 eds “inovst moiseeup 
2i tI .aAtowemod eltsil diitw ribet yase me ai 2H eauaoed q 

 @hF to In9steq 0. rh eit to ynsm wod yse ov Shuoitheb Pe 
biwow aeisesup 2ids ot ylevitsmritits betswens odw etnoebuse 
goaersteA .oAs2e nwo esi tot egsuynsl edd ab booeeresnt 9d 
etmebuse oft to smeateq 0.2) tsd3 eotaoibmi ITIX oidat ot 


todo ort bed yods tf ioe ges 





_ 


ylisbistettstse tor ei '.,if to ou Isy Sx A 4 etd 
-tetnuo>s wol yvisv estonsb [0.- to eufsy VA .doastking ba 


| ! : - Ske 
.seftogest bas, shatg seswsed moiteisozes 
. er 


‘-bJeitste 2ei &.S2 to suTsv > ae Level snomevebion DRE ¢ 
Ek. to sulsv DA .Level 10. sdt baoysd shockvingie xbhep 
»-Ime2etq 2i qittenortsisr to Loével etstebom 5s tans eteeggue 
-oveidos neewted noitsiooees gnotte ewode S8, to sulsv VA : 
ereveidos dgid teds ensom doidw eemoqeet bos Lovell tnem 
stsw nisidt visvissmittts TSwens of “lotit oom dum 


mi 2zeooue tedd teogyue etiueet oeonT Lerovebiion Wok 
foitsvitom bas tzetetni ereteot ‘gacmrest alee 
2eeDoue id nave os bgasiasn 
bia pea sa 
wilrts® 5 itixtw ey cs ot. te) a. vox 5 over Qy 7 


: a 
| St eee ee io 


Set oe. ee 7 
be cata One ee 
72 P 







e19W 
een 










” 
sauszed aateitiias Sits ond: ai bobuloni 2s igh | 
friye _ a ' al 7 _ ts 
ae awe sa ~ 
0 er (agli 
. ‘ 1 rh oe . 


yl 


in the VIF course writing is delayed until the second 

year in most cases. In an effort to remember the sentences, 
certain students make up their own version of the written 
language, and afterwards are faced with the problem of 
learning the proper script. A large percentage were 
expected to answer affirmatively to this question, =but 

Table XIV shows that the responses are almost evenly divided 
between the "Yes" and "No" category, 43.1 and 41.3 percent 
respectively. The fact that one or two teachers did 
introduce writing from the beginning of the course will 

have influenced the responses of these students to some 


degree. 


Grade. —A x? Valuer Otello. ISisestatisti cai yis dion itd — 
cant beyond’ the .01 level. A C value of .13 intimates that 
a weak relationship exists. A V value of -.14 denotes low 
counterassociation between grade and response which means 
that slightly more of the Grade IX's were likely to answer 
in the affirmative than were the students in Grade VII. 

The heavy oral emphasis of the VIF course may appeal more 
to beginning students than it does to those in their 
secendtformthirdtyeartselhus; Gaydesiresforeadditional 
variety by the more senior students may. explain the results 


obtained. 


Achievement level. A x? Value ot 6.8915 not 


Stalistacallyesdonificant. AAAV value of. .09-indicates.a 


~ z \ 























bivteu edt Lisaw boysieb @: 
,290n82n92 oft tedmemer ot st0tte ns ” vs 
aetsintw ont to to f 21 9¥ mwo xh0d3 wo odsm 2 
to mardorg edt doiw beost po ao 


stew egsanezteq ogre! A ,%qivse veqorg ¢ 





par 


f psa 
turd ~fo it 29up eidt ot vlevitsmriits Tewene os 


bobivib 4insva tzomis 918 i ods ted ewode “if 


sip eared + - 
pnaatsq E.f£6 bas L.t) ,yrogetss on" baw “aey" edt id is | 
= ehh ae as 
bth aredoeet ows to sao tsd3 +282 oft _oeenkzoeaeer e - 
ee “7 1 : a J 
Iliw servos eft to grinniged ods vitae grittion eoubotsni* ar 
emoz 03 etnobute seedt to esenogest oda beonsultai eved — ne 
- ybetgab 7 
cy : =” 
? $ 7 DACs ewe a 
-itimgia yilsoiseitet2 et @.ef to ouievy “XA Shae UP 


tadd estamitni tf.-t0 sufsy DA . fever 10. od3 bmoyed aso 
wolf estoneb #[.- to sufsv V A .eteixe qidenckesned. deans oe 
2nsem doinw serogeet bas sbhstg aeewted aoitstageestedayod: 7 
yswens ot yletil etaw e'X! ebex0 edt to stom Utdgtle sana. 
-1IV sbs10 ni etasbuse oft etow cadt ovisemnitte, edt oak 
srom Lssqgs van 22TU02 TLV siz 20 Nios?" 


tiers mi seodt oF 2e0b tt gd esnobus 





Esnobtibbs rots otizeb § aust t 
etiuder edt nislqxs vem pte Rophex ts 


iia oe 


52 


low level of association between achievement level and 
response. 

uestion 15: Do your parents encourage you to 

earn French? 

This question was asked in hopes of determining 
parental attitude toward French in the opinion of their 
Children. Table XV indicates that 48.4 percent of the 
respondents answered ''No" compared to 37.7 percent who 
were of the opposite opinion.. Unfortunately, from these 
figures one is unable to distinguish between parents who 
are neutral and those who are hostile toward the study of. 
the language. Many parents do not encourage their children 
in any subject area. However, this does not necessarily 


mean that they are opposed to education in general. 


Grade. A x? Values of. 3. | nsenot@sitabistical dy 
Sug ticant sacthew, 0lelevel eA Vovalue sof . 145s oni ties 
low association between grade and response which means 
that the Grade VII's were more likely to answer 
affirmatively than were students in the two higher grades. 
According to the younger students, their parents had a 
greater interest in thein study of the-second. language 
than did the parents of the second and third year. students. 
The fact that French was a new subject to the Grade VII's 


may explain why their parents showed higher interest. 


Achievement level. A x? value of 25.3 is 







$2 


Stall tov -aeqod ni bodes esw aiisheentin- abil wehbe, ; 
risds to toinigo -eit ni doneri- biswos sbusisse Lesaereg =! 
eft to tneot9q, ).85 stadt sersoibai VX ofdsT tterbLids > 
ow tneoreq V.%€ of betsqmos "ol" boteweas ernebnoqest ee 1 
seons mort ,yletsnutroiau “Mo kinigo. etLeoqqo ‘edt %0.-e10w _ * 
odw 2tnetsq moewted deiugniteib ot sidsnw 2i ono eotugit i a 
to ybuse oft brawot eliteod sts odw s2o0dt bas [sttuenm exs ‘ 
_fetblids rieds egstuoone ton ob 2e3natsq yasM .Sgeugael ods , ; 
\litseeesen ton zeob eidt ,revewoH 5918 — ye i ; 


.isteneg mi ROTRE SHAE ot bseoqqo STs eas sad mB om cone 
gf? @@y 3 Ms 


“lisoisetisze som ei L.tL to oulsyv dees cS a : 
asitingie $1, io lew VA <fevel 10. odd de anepddangie 
easem doidw senoqeet bas shsty asowied notteipoees wot ' 
tewens oF yLoALl orom ersw 2'1IV ‘ebeiD eft sass 7 

.2obstg tolgid ows sit ni etnobute stow nedd dovissmritte | 7 
s bed etnotsq tisds _esaebuse segavoy edt 0% gnitbao22A 
egsugnsl baoose sds to ybuse tisdt ai: Shania Cena 


.2tnebuse xsey brit brs baoaee sit to 2: 
2'IIV sbsxo ont of tos{idue wen & 28W fon | a mt . 
te9193.0i redgrd beworle atm 8T5 é } ie. rae 
pw 


a 
bes aes 


















ei bi2S Yo sulev wid 


eo. a 


. , if . 5 
as < 5 woot TY 


pune 


& 


mys) 


statistically significant beyond the .01 level. AC 
value of .16 shows that a moderate degree of relationship 
exists. A V value of .19 denotes a moderate level of 
association between the two classifications of the table 
which means that the students in the top third of their 
classes were more apt to answer in the affirmative than 
students in the bottom third. These results would seem 
to suggest that more successful students receive greater 
encouragement from their parents than do less successful 


students. 


Question 16: Are the filmstrip pictures helpful for 
explaining the meaning of the sentences’ 
Sincesthesfilmstrip pictures play an important and 
essential role in the VIF lessons, certain questions were 
included in the questionnaire to ascertain the feeling of 
the students toward this aid.:. Table XVI reveals that 80.7 
percent of the sample felt that the filmstrips were useful 
for explaining meaning compared to only 11.5 percent who 
disagreed with this view. One student wrote that the film- 
strip pictures were helpful, but that the time devoted to 
the explanation of meaning was too short. It may be that 


teachers do not always exploit this tool sufficiently. 


Grade, A x? Value) Of~19 1.5: 1s istatistically signifi- 
cant beyond the .01 level, A C value of .14 reveals that a 


weak relationship exists. A V value of .24 denotes a 


i 





















OA) VLewet 50s saben oomutiitighes absiehianale | 


qidanoitsls1 to sstgeb otsrebom s tedt ewode OL, to sulsv . 
to Level ater sbom 8 zetoneb ef, to 7 eae VA | 

oidst+ sit to enoissottieesio ows eds i 
tied to bridd qo? oft si etnsbute edt tadt ensom doidw - wily 
eusit ovitsmritte’ sit ni Tewens oF Jqs stom S1ew eoeesto + 20 
mss2 bivow etfueo1 ocedT , brid? mostod of3 ni etmebute : 
19d89T3 svisoer 2tagsbute Iutesenbea srom. ted? sesggue oF, 
{[stezonoue 2eol ob nsdt etnersq tisdt mort ImsmegeTsOONe 






163 fut 









Lod em 


bas tnstroqmi as yela sebtenbs qritemlit oft Sonbe © 
S1Ssw enorseevp nafetiso qsmpeess 1iV ods nt slot Ieisneese 
to gailsst sds nisita5es of stisnnoitesup oft mi Sebutoat 


v.08 tsd3 2issvet IVK eldsT° /bk8 eiadc biswos at ute edt ; 
Vengia ; 7 
{uiseu stow eqitjem£ tt ads tedg sist e!qnse eds 40 ImeoTeg a 
ee yer 7 
ow taesteq 2.I£) vino ot beraqmoo gninsom Baki «mh 
+¢ : 


-miit sdt tsd3 ‘tor tasbuye enO .weiy eidt diw beer; me 
or 4ets ! 








ot betoveb omit ont teds jud fuygled adi 2s 


weds ed ysm 31 .ttod2 ooF enw. aninsen 20.6 rs 


v@amsiatiiwe foot aids abte! oe ie bas 


~itingle yilsoisteisste ei ee QL to. oulav ‘Sow 
8 tadz elsever tI, to euley: hy ae ene ot ve 
B e9tomeb bS. to euley Vv A .22 


54 


moderate degree of association between grade and response 
which means that the Grade VII's were more likely to answer 
affirmatively than were the two higher grades. An 
explanation for the above results may be that beginning 
students are probably much more dependent upon the filmstrip 
pictures than students who are more advanced in the 


language. 


Achievement level. A x? Valiue-"o fel6'; 61's est ats bi 
Cally significant beyond the .01 level. A C value of .13 
intimates that a low degree of relationship exists. AV 
value of .24 shows a moderate level of association between 
achievement level and response which means that the top 
achievers were more likely to answer affirmatively than were 
the low achievers, If students see little value in. the 
filmstrips for conveying meaning, they will probably be 
less likely to achieve well since the pictures were 


intended primarily for this purpose. 


eee 17: Would ae like to visit Quebec on a 
OPYdays i SCUmCOULCs 


The*intent-of this "item wasi*to “learn. ofstudent 
attitude toward the French language and the people who 
speak ite" Table XVIT shows “that 67,9 percent ‘of the'fsample 
was in favor of visiting Quebec on a holiday compared to 
20.1 percent opposed. Some students wrote that they would 


like to visit Quebec as long as someone paid their way. 


eT tz 



















\ 


wu . 
saneqaet (bi steionnanioaie 


rawecs ot Yfexif stom srow 2° TIV seatO ode Veds -ensem Hofiw ean 
aw .2sbetg sedgid ows oda etew. tedy ' 
gninniged tadt od yan ativeor evode ont Tot | 
qixtemiitt si noqt  Frisbrsqob. etom doum yidedotq ets esmebase . ce. 
sai? «af eri stom sts onfw etnebute ned zotu sig | 








(hoektete2 ef 0,0l to suey A Lowel | 

; UP eee 8 
éf. to sulsv DA .isvel 10. ods baoyed janoitimgea ‘isa ; 
VA .atetxe qidenottstox to setgeb wol s sens petal eee _ i 


nsewsed noissizoeen to Lovell starebom & soda BS. ier 
qot eft tsdt ensom dona sanogesr bas Level ‘Taemevs 

eT4w nsdt efsyi stenthenes Tewens o2 lodt tL eToOm oT SW ereveidos 
eit at eulsv sittif soe dsiabirde tt ereveidos i Fyy 


ed yvidsdorq ILiw yons eRIiMmsem guitysvnoo tot <enaeert? 


\etew eordsorq ont samie Ifew sverdos on yhewkL eeek S 
wit ey : 


s2ogiuq 2ids rot Gane 


& Mo Dedsu0. tEeFyv 2 emit won Siue 


Stas 


_ammss 


sasbuse i0 arsel og 2BW most aids 30 ae 3 

onw elqosgq ody bits: og sig ite L fonsrt aii 18 se 
siqmse oft to 1nes19q BS a Tadd pene a 
ot bersqmos “abit tod: a m0 “dedauo 9 
bitow vedi tedz storw. edreBuss: = 


Pal tisds bisq ra 28 3 soit 


30 


Whether this can be interpreted as a favorable attitude 
is uncertain. Other students indicated that they would 
not be able to visit this province because they did not 
think they were fluent enough in French. Such comments 


would not likely be the result of unfavorable attitudes. 


Grade > 820A x? valuesor Ol +7 Vis¥niot*statistically 
Significant. A V value of .02 reveals practically no 


association between the two classifications of the table. 


Achievement level. A x2 Ofel) + Seusenot Ss tants tae 


Cally signiticant.at-the .01 level. A V value of .14 
represents a low degree of association between achievement 
level and response which means that high achievers were 
somewhat more likely to answer affirmatively than were 
lower achievers. High achievers would probably be more 
anxious to practice their newly acquired skills with 
native speakers of French than would the poorer performers. 
Question 18: Do you. get aa Classmcime Lor pracei1ce 

your French on topics whic 1rrer from those in your 

essons? 

Item 18 was designed to inquire into the use made 
of the transposition phase of the lesson or the 
possibilgties for the development of liberated. dialogue 
in the second language. The figures of Table XVIII disclose 
Dvdteonly. 20, s8percent Of=the respondents felt that they 


did have enough class. time to practice their French 
















abut i338 eidstovel 8 26 betorqredaé od fea eid? redzedW | 
bluow Yedt tedt botesibat agnsbute red30 .nistreomy ef 
gon bib qed? eeusced sontvotq efdt tiekv ot elds ed ton — 
etnommoy dove ,foneti ni dguvonse taoult erew yeds Anids 
,2ebutitts elds1oveiay 20 tiuess odt od ylekel som bivow 





‘ : ‘, & Oe Aeerar si 
Uilabisertese tad et V1 26-sahay Re 


on yifsoisostq elssvex $0. to sulsy VA tina Pet hgh a 
.sidst edt to enoitsvitieeslo ows odt meswied moitstzoees 


ONe= « iin) © 


| ~ttettsse ton 2i-t.If ¥o Sy pd Lol See ae ) 
ae F =) 


‘BE. %o sulav VA .lovel I0, edt ts Tapoitingte «ifso 
> 2. S9784 


tremeveisos neewted foitsinoees to estgeb wol s a 


etew etevsindos dgid tedd ensem dotdw setoqest bas ‘ton 
= @i devi ezaa 
Is dwomoe 


etew med? ylevissmritts tewens ot ylowil eT om a 


se4 @es 


siom od vidsdorq bluow erevetdos dgrh .eveveidos tewol 


! [at 
at iw el[lide betivpos yiwen risaz eoitostq oF ‘auoixns 
ee ee 
.atemrotreq tetoog edd bivow asdt sash to ame evisen | 


prt.a@ ie 





sbem seu ihc otni otiupri of bongiesb 25w BL mort 


eft 10 noze ok edt to sestq maiaogmtrsn te 
ougolsib beteredil to raomqofeveb ‘oft xod aoigenidiezeg | 
: 7 


-_ 2 ° 


seofoetbh TITVX sidseT to corgi edt - ogeuga { ba ak a 


yout tedi set panies aren a 
donert rieds sotioerg o2 


, 







a 


ais pies : 


sears 






ial 


) ‘wl Bae 


56 


conversation compared to 58.3 percent who held the opposite 
view. It should be pointed out here that most of the 
teachers indicated that they were not allowed sufficient 


time in the schedule to cover the course properly. 


Grade, A 4 walueyot. 21, 0ras.statistically signifi- 
cant beyond the .01 level. A C value of .15 suggests that 
a moderate level of relationship is present. A V value of 
.20 denotes a moderate degree of association between grade 
and response which means that Grade IX students were more 
likely to answer negatively than were the Grade VII's. 
These results probably imply that, once the basic essentials 
have been mastered, considerably more time is needed for 


the more advanced students to practice the language. 


2 Value: Ol04 sO senor 


Achievement level. A X 
Statzactlcally ssignitacanec., AV value of -.07 Sieniities 
that there is a negligible degree of counterassociation 


between the two classifications of the table. 


Question 195;Do your wpanents. feel tihad studying French 
1s a waste of time‘ 


According to Jable= xXIX, ‘only, 10.2 percent of the 
parents thought. that the study of French was a waste of 
time, inpsne opindony,of thee students ,..compared,. to, more 


than sixty-seven percent. who did not feel this way. 


Grade. A e value of 9.8 is not statistically 


ae 





















; . | i i 
ustthubea sit bled ofw taca19eq 82 of botsqnos notseaxsvaos 
af3 ko Seom sat coved tuo botaiog sd bivode 71  swoly 
tneioittve bewolla ton exew ysdt 2647 Setestbad epedoges | 
setcadahe getuoo sdt dope ot alubedoe oft ai omizs 


¢ | vibe '; 


-itingte yflsoitersete zi 0.18 10 sufsy “KA sper ae 
ted3 et2egyue cf. to sulev 9 A .isvel £0, sad Geeyed tmeo 
to sulsv VA .jnageorq 2i qidanoitsier to Level: exsrebhom)s 
sbetg fisowred soitainozes to sergeb ststebom s eetoneb.0Ss 
ai stew 2inobute X1 shs1D Jsnds ensem dotdw eenegess baa 
.2'T1¥ eberd sdt stew med3 ylevitagen rewene GY yiewis 7 7 
Cindi va dée Sreke edit sono ,jsdi ylami yidsdorq atiuess o2edT 


; e 
tot bebssn 2i smit stom yidstsbiznoo ,~bstsdesm Ased sven 


.9gsugasl sds soitosrq ot 2etrebuse beonevbe stom sag 


. 
jom 2ei U.h 20 sulsw “XA loyal SRSmsveEABA, 9 ai 
eoitiogfe '0,- to sulsv. V A .tnpoaiitingia yEleotsessace 
noitsinozesreinuos to sstyob eldigtigen a 2f sastt sade 


.Sldsi sdt to enoltssitteesis ows sae deswied ; 






donssI gnivbuse tsdd est 





27 Le 





eft to tn9g759q $05, Nino. XK sidsT ot ninettnh 
20 etesw sn zew donard Yo yOste edt tedt pods: aa 
Stom ot borsqmoz _ atadbuse eit 20 noiniqo sfz ai “Ey 
‘yew 2tdt Lest son bib oiiw sa9r8q wevee- yaxie ge 
Mie 


Ae 






yifssisetiste ton ei Bye ees suds SR 4 


Suh 


Sisniticantiat thes 0lelevele A.V. valuecofi =206 indicates 
a very low degree of counterassociation between grade and 


response. 


Achievement level. A fe Valuetotel5,5 “tsestatis ti 
Cally significant beyond the .01 level. A C value of..13 
denotes that a weak relationship exists. A V value of -.14 
represents a low degree of counterassociation between 
achievement level and response which means that low 
achievers were somewhat more likely to answer negatively 
than were high achievers. The large proportion ‘of: 
"Undecided" responses for the lowest achievers, 30.0 per- 


cent, makes it difficult to interpret these results. 


Question 20: Do you find that time Passes squickly jin 
youre hnenchicJlass « 


Twenty-nine percent of the respondents agreed that 
tinespassed quicklysinatheireFrenchaclass .aseindicated in 
Table XX, Fifty-nine percent disagreed with this 
observation. Of course, these results do not: necessarily 
mean that fault lies with the VIF course. The manner of 
presentation by the teachers would likely influence, to 


delareesdegree, the typesoraresponseea given, 


Gia cens a x? V4lLUC TO. 4008s. Statistically signi f£1- 


Galtmatlecie:U0le leveln, -AyCovalue of .is.reveals that a 
Wedwetelationsnip exists. A V value of .18 is indicative 


of a,moderate level of association between grade: and 


~ eae 




















2 





slants 30,- to sufsv VA ea £0, 8 


bas sbstg asswiod notssizozesrssnyoD: coach wat ore 
 -bemogeeT 


| . 2 pe | 7 
~igeitste ef ¢.cf to sulav “% A gee vh 
ti, to evisv DA *sfevel 10. eft broyed rapoidimgte qiiae We [ 
ff.- to sulsv VA veteixs qidenoftstsy isow 8 ted? eetonsb it 
nsewted nolteindeasisinuos to sergebh wok 8 etaeestgsr a 

| wol tel? ensem doidw senogeort brs fever ynameveidos | 
yisvitegon tswens o+ yletil strom Jetwomoa stew eveveidos aro 
to nolstogortg egtst oft .2toveisos aged stew neds ss 
-req 0.08. ,etevetdon Jeowol oft tok zoenoq2e2 "bebi 'bebisebal” a 
.esiues1 e2edd terqretmi ot +isota ee ti esdem .3n99 ) 


rs oe 








mt betsothat es ,2eslo donot a tedd 06 + lana aaa | an 

eid? ditw besrgsetb tnso1eq nin ah 1 oti 7 ‘ 
(litse2e09a ton ob extluest seeds «22 THO 10 uoasavrende 
to rennem edt esetu0? TV ont Aviw toil 1 P 


ot ,eonsu lint bedi bluow leer. ony wd 
Bit.) 
meviig enoqeet iat oat! Basal 9" 


-tLingte Wlssiteiser2 ef 0.61 20 Suter bey 
8 tsdt 2elsevet €1. to euLsy 2A ey: tt + ie 
ov dasene HBF, to sufey mi an ixs ‘¢. 
ee er es no 20228 to Level 
[fim > 
aay : 
=a 


7 rw 


58 


response which means that the more advanced students were 
more likely to answer negatively than were first year 
students inathencounsesakOnelreasonhfor ithisesituation Vis 
the likelihood that the novelty of a new subject had not 
workroff for.the Grade. VII students. It is also possible 
that as the course became more demanding and rigorous, the 
less serious minded students would have gradually lost 


interest. 


Achiévement -level.s iA x? value of. LZg8ecisinet 
statestreallycsrgnificantpatstheh. 01 level. ehAiVevalue,of 
.17 denotes a moderate level of association between achieve- 
ment. level and response which means that the better students 
were less likely to answer negatively than those who were 
less successful. Undoubtedly, the latter group was more 
easily bored by a course in which they did not excel, and 


accordingly, they found that time passed.very slowly. 


Question 21: Are you studying French because it may 
some day be useful in getting a good job? 

The figures recorded in Table XXI show that nearly 
half of the students replied that they were studying French 
because of the practical value it held for them. Since 
French is a compulsory subject in the Province of 
Saskatchewan, the results for this question may not have 
the same significance that they might have if the subject 


were voluntary. 


wwe 


ae 


















ode: weelibes beorisvbs 10m sit tent ensom Ustdw eeaoqeet 
Tasy terit erow nsd? “Lovitegen tewene of yLedil stom - 

ei moitsutie 2ids 102 noeser ef) .Satv09 oft ni etmebute = 
ton bad to0(due wen s to Yi Lovon edz sens boodilextit ods 
eldtezog ozis 2i 51 -2inebuse IIV sbetd edt rot tto Atow 
edt 2uoTogit bas anibaemeb stom amped semos edt 26 ted 
_teol ylisubarg sven bluow etnsbute bebnim euoitee geal y 


AR 
ton 2f &.81 to eulay Sy A ,fevel trom 7 3 jas 


to sulsv VA .leyvel 10, edi ts tasoitingre viinsteuts@ae = 
-esveidos nasewied moitsinoz2s to [evel stsitebom s aetomeb I, 


f 


ebaebute sedted eit Sede annex dotdw eenoqest bas Level sn9m 
erew ofw szodt nedt ylovitsgen rewens ot ylodil eel ot 
- etom esw quorg retssl oft , vbstduobau Sued eda: azel ‘ 
bas ,leoxe ton bib yords doidw ait serves s yd bstod yliese 
«“fwole yrev heeesq emit tads bavot yore  Ugnibrosos © 


5) EE 4 










Yea ti 22un 26d 


\itsen teds worde [XX efdsT ni bebroser esrugi? edt 
domert gaiybuse orow yedt tedt beilqes etaebute edt 20 Bed 
s2ni2 .modt 102 bled Jf evlsv ispitosirg alt %0 sauaded” 


to somivord 7, ‘tb tostdue LPCSE Ga ‘ ase i. 
eved son ysm noitesup aids tot etlueot al . 


ts st pats i oved 33 im yads Sods. 


“is 


Grade.” A ee Vid ee Ot Ove els so Calls ta cal. y 
wow Gano beyona tne .Ui= level. A Cc value of t13 
suggests that only a weak relationship is present. A V 
value of ~-.03 signifies very low counterassociation between 


Piesiwor Classis icaraons. am the. table. 


Achievement level. A ee Value. OF Ml (ee is 
SuetletuCdiiy SIgiiticant beyond tne .Ul level, A C value 
Otewi¢ Indicates thacwasweak relationship exists, AV 
Value Of .15 denoves a moderate level of association between 
achievement level and response which means that the more 
SUCCCos TUS GUCENtSILeNGeUstOsdnswer ditlimauvivedy. | such 
students may answer in this manner because they are able 
cOmocCeomeNneCe DOSS IDa LLtY Or USinee Frenchy ins some stuture 
DUSeurOlee = Lesce SUCcCeSonUTe scUdentSs=prODapmyesee litle 
Bicol uioodwOle bills eventuality. 

Question 22... ls it amporntant, to develop; a, good French 
pronunciation? 

Veeco Ril ClO dUCmAX I | eOGculcdle se Vel ly ape Lcelt 
of the sample agreed that the development of a good French 
DGrOnuUnclavLon 1S important. That such a large majority 
Oretie students were Of this Opinion 1s encouraging since 
the success of an audio-lingual program would doubtlessly 
be undermined if most students disagreed with this 


ttl GDL eG. 


Grade. A x? Ve lucw Lee TUM ISH ILO UNG UALds bdoad Ly 



















ral’ 
we Wire nn 0 a 
i a r( : 
EL 9H buvfav DA are ald fhe | 
VA .Snoeerg 2i yidenoiseler Aeaw® 
nvewted aoiteloozestermos 7 Yio ena 


.oldst iia ie 


~2i t, YL 20. eutev eat fo) 

outev D A .feyel 10. bits Snoved ach thay 'Y 
VA .etelxe qifznoftslor Asow s teds eo8botbat ae 
meawuted fortaivcees to fevel e3 stobant & 2esonab 21. 20 cuter 
stom sd? 3ed3 eho Paar Senogest bas fever . 
Howe -“loviismsitie vuvens ot bebues Sanishee teedal i. 
anda: STs ysda q2usoed 1Sanain Bids mt towane you 2tusbuse 
etusut smoe ai danstd girben to. Ntiledreaog ange OF 
sissif ss2 yidsdorq etnebute (uteesapue sea) .notteacq — 
isi leutsoveretag eal ecemiaieiee 


v - * 
fonesti booyg .s qoloveb od ins sroqms = 

















feed Steer . 


ionett boog s to srsmqol sveb out a. i i 
. 


YTitO(Bm spiel s fidue teaT » SHE - 
: Pree: _ 
sonte Ruigeiuoons 2f Hoi NEQo , ca J 
ROR secdle > 


beaks duob bi vow ms Bog. as US 2 
= - 7 
, ett sid Ew noungs tb ie or } 


4 ety 4 | 


sasoT9q (imevee. fads vom Tbe oldat of 







Tana | a a Aon ata 

» Nifsoiteizste ton zi 0.e 20s 
; ; 7 ,% it 7 “ : : 

; ana. _ cat 


a Fy uy 
ae 7 a | 


60 


Significanteatethe 01 level...A V value of+.13.shows 
only a low level of association between the two classifi- 


Gations.of athe -table. 


Achievement level. A X? Vaiue of 47.7 15 
Statistically significant beyond the .01 level. AC value 
of .22 signifies that a moderate degree of relationship is 
present. A V value of .36 shows high association between 
achievement level and response. This means that the better 
students were much more likely to answer in the affirmative 
than were their less successful classmates. Such results 
are only logical since pronunciation is normally one of 


the factors tested when measuring achievement. 


ues Bion 123%eWould...ou-like more sopportunities.to 
speak French with other students in the class? 


Affirmative responses to this question may be 
indicative of a positive attitude toward the language, at 
licactmcOnesomesextent, An examination of) lable sxx iit 
reveals that the affirmative and negative responses were 
Practically the same, siightly Less’ than forty percent. 
There is no doubt that among those who answered this 
question negatively are students who hold a negative 
attitude toward the language, but the written comments to 
Chis) and, Other questions reveal.other factors, which may 
have caused students to answer in the negative.: Students 


who say they would like to converse in French but feel 























09 


ieee eooebae 1A mbpiael 
-itizeslo ows eft neewted notteivoees ges ot #ol 


at 0.08 20 surav “A vcedaabiar ste 

owisy DA Level £0. six buoyed inscitingie Yisoitetiexe 
et qtdenotteler to spayed sterebom a tedt ia $S.- 20 
meswied coitsisoees dgin ewode of, to sulev V A _ +S aezerg 
retsed sd} stadt ensem 2eidT ,eemoqeet bas Level snomeveiton , a 
evisemritts oft si xrewens 03 ylexil erom dows orew etnobuse aa 
asiueet dove .zessmeeslo Iudeesooue geal 1 _ stew | apds oe 
to sno ylismron ef moksteionunorg sonie Isoigol feo ems 7 
/Tnoemeve tds pairueson nedw betees etotos of3 









oj e2enjinusioggo « oArl wl GET a ¢ moitesuD 
2 ST oils mei ighuse yertse A sia ee . 
od Yam “noidaensp aids os eeetoqgesi ovitaumed 123A 





ts ,9gsugns! offs brswor sbusitis evistieoq & bo liens 7 | 
11IXK 9fdeT Yo moktenimaxe aA .Inesxe 9m0 | f 
orev esznoqest svitsgem bas ovisamritis ot 3a oo i 
Ineoteq (S102 asds 220! ‘isigile + se afta <iteotjosta 
aids betswens ony seods gfoms sads Maha A ‘nr 
evitsgen s blod oriw patsbute oT - : 
03 2tnemmoo nettinw edt tod spennaet see ‘BY 
bi! dosdw arosost teito tnover © sey P . Beil Pn 
agmsbewe evitsgon odd ae towers ot. | = wry 
int ee | yond x 
. ee F 


. 4 a ot iti 7 = 









61 


their knowledge of the language is inadequate, would not 
have answered this question in the affirmative. The same 
might be said of students who are further advanced in the 
language than are the average class members because they 
would be frustrated by the inability of the weak students 


torrcconverse properly. 


Grade. A x? Matkne corel) <5 tus miotestapiusticadiy, 
Significant at the .01 level. A V value of .04 denotes 


very low association between grade and response. 


Achievement level. A x? Values ot LOS Us sa statist = 


Cally Significant beyond. the .01 level. A C value of .14 
Signifies that a-weak relationship exists. A V value of 

-18 discloses a moderate level of association which means 
that the better performers were more likely to answer 
affirmatively than were the lower achievers. Once again 
this appears to point out the greater interest and 
enthusiasm that high achievers have for the second language. 
taglines Uecess sDUuLl dS Upeconridences tom actual practice 


With the new skill. 


Question 24: Does the word order in French sentences 
appear sensible or reasonable to you? 


Like Question 12, this item is concerned with the 
student's grasp of grammar. as it is presented in an audio- 
Pingualicourse.a dineriiugunesmrecorded: anmielable XXIV: show 


tha t39i9npe rcent, of théssubjects, S tated that: :they did not 


10. 


f 


son Biuow er bupsbsni 2i sgaugnet eit to 
ouse ofT caviteiiite eds ni sings nee | 


eit st boonsvbs tedsxut ets odw ‘ie 


yeds seussed exediem geal egereve oda 
etnebus2 Assw edt Fo ysilident sdt ed bases 3 9d biuow 


ee 


-yilsorteriste ton .2t &.0L to sulsy oy & cs 


7 
sue 





eetonsh $0, lo sulay VA 


.Sanoqést bos sbsvg néswiod noltsigoeas wot rev if 
seal 


-ffetsiste ai 0,@L 10 sulsy SKA wl 3 a 
.favel £0. edt ato a Samat ingie “alas 
.eteixe qidenottsior teaw a deat sittin 
2nsom doidw noijsivoees to fevel 938 Tohemem gartytar s 


ke 
towers of ylexil fom et ow eramio}19q tetied odd 
-atsveidos tswol od? oxew Hed poms 


bas teersini teiseTg eit ae snfoq 03 


bi. to sulev 2A 


tc suflsy V A- 





fle gs son0 


»9geugnsl broose siz tot oved exaveiitas appt: at, 
7 : 
im? 


editostq. [ausos tot sonsbltnos qu cbliad ataooue 1 


— 


be 5 a eis ral aM ome 


~ Tee oF 6. ae 

edt d3 iw bemresn0o: 2h co oar 8 i 9 of 

rotbus “np ak Bernese 2b. Hes <3 on 
vote WOK opedat ab fhe | 

ton bEb aati’ voc ni 


Nate so 


295Nst192 


ee 


; “Pr 


7. oe 


: are 


Level 20, efty te yess tbe agie ; 
























62 


see the rationale for the word order in French sentences 
compared to 29.6 percent of the opposite view. A rather 
large proportion of. the sample, 30.5 Percents ewere slitan le 
to make an affirmative or negative decision about this 
question which may indicate that they did not grasp its 


intent properly. 


Grade. A x? value of 54.0 is statistically signifi - 
cant beyond the .01 level. A C level of .24 suggests that 
a moderate level of relationship is present. A V value of 
.20 represents a moderate level of association which means 
that the Grade IX's were more likely to answer this item 
negatively than were the Grade VII's. While the figures 
presented are statistically significant, the large number 
of 'Undecided' responses by the Grade VII's makes it 
difficult to draw any firm conclusions. However, the 
majority of the Grade IX students have indicated dissatis- 
LoccLeOlmwitimilecmianialing (Of this: part ofthe course. 


Whether their complaint was justified or not cannot be said. 


Achievement level. A x? Va IGP PO de eos Lees: 110 t 
Statistically sipgmiiicant? A Vevalue of '°07 “indirdcates* low 


association between the classifications of the table. 


eee Zoe Would you like to continue improving your 
renchh at ter’ oultle'avet 's'c ool ‘ 


THES? Vs* "a question that’ was designed to inquire ‘into 


UieravuLeuderoi theess tudents\*toward ‘the Language.’ Tt is 




















$0. 


esonetase fonert “ni 19h10 bsow oat 12 ateamasenadeiy . 


tadtst A .wéiv stieeqqo oft to ansoTeq @. 0S oF beraqmaa 
cidsay etew ,3me51sq 2.0€ ,ofqmse edt 20 mokttoqerq egret 
2iat ti0ts mokataeb eviteyon xo ovitetitie ne edgmos 
ati qestR ton ‘btb yodt part etsotbat ysm sotdw motteeup 
xeqorq saetai rei 


-itingie yilsstteiisse 27 0.82 40 evtev “KA pbexd 

Fass eteegque &$, to fevel 0 A .Lloaveld ry ant bnoysd 389 

to sulsv VA .tne2erg et gidenottsier 2a Level etstebom's 

eneom doidw norte ksoees ‘Yo Loved Ate ohana & ernseorgoy os, | ‘sy 
most erat tswens of vEodil sTom stew 2 "KI obs ods — | 


garugit oft oltdW ,2'TIV sbaxd ods stew madd <lovisagen 
J a ost b | 
todmun egisl sdz tassitingie Setar iad set S18 betaeavta 


Si 2otgm 2'11V shard ods xd soenoqest “bobissbav” to 


‘s. Faas 
oft ,revewoH ,enokemfomoo mrii vas wexb oF rivatttib 


-ettseetbh betsotbai evs etmebute XI sbatd ede 20 wstrotan 
-gatuo> edd to gasq eidt to eile edt djaw. eet 


te Apart 
.bise 9d toanso-ton to beititevt esw intekemes tigds 
som ef £[.€ to sutey Sy A ,fsw 


wol estsorbar ‘0. to sulsv VA abs ies figt: 


bs 


-eldst oft to~ erotseoil kepat io. M99Ws 


~ - 


THOV gL iver gm! Sun i509 


i ee i yop ge 
cael eines eel ahd ; 


otni erivpni oF bengreeb 28W me 
2i 31 sogeugast ods brawoa 2: 








c ’ 7 
or ian ie as 


a2 Wad eee 







2 


63 


theoretical and for this reason may not have been too 
successful in determining the desired information. Table 
XXV shows that 28.8 percent of the students would like to 
continue improving their French after they leave school 
compared to 44.5 percent who indicated that they would not. 
It is likely that many of the respondents associate the 
improvement of their skill in the language with continued 
attendance “in some type of class situation. Such an idea 
would no doubt be largely rejected by students of this age 


group. 


Grade. A x? value of 13.3 is statistically signifi- 
Cant ato thee .0ladevel.+ A C-valuejof..12*shows that)a:weak 
relationship is present. A V value of .11 represents low 
association between grade and response which means that the 
Grade VII's were somewhat less likely to answer negatively 


than were the Grade IX's. 


Achievement level, A x? Values of 26g den5] statisti - 
Canliyesend fujcant) beyond! thea .0lydevel.y ALC valueyof-.d/ 
Suggests that a moderate level of relationship is present. 

A V value of .23 signifies a moderate level of association 
between the two classifications of the table. This means 
that a greater number of the high achievers were in favor 

of. continuing the improvement of their, French after leaving 
school than were lower achievers. The success of these high 


achievers appears to have encouraged a more favorable 


ae | V \" | 

























aie need evsd ton yam nozset sind vot bap, Laotseroeds 
sldsT .soitsmrotat bettesb ods gubatmzeteb mb Ieeenoue | 
ot sdil bilyow etnsbyte odt to tasoteq 8,89 Tedd ewode VEX | 
lood>e evasl vyors t9tis hin ael ties gatvorgms sumksneg 
ton biuow yed2 ted botecibai ondw tasoreq 2.04 of Betaquoa V2 
eit otsizo2es etmabnoqes1 sdt to ynsm seqdy yledil 24:31 7 
bewattaos dtiv egeugnsl oft at ILide tisds to Tramevotqms 3 
sebt as dov@ .mottsusie zesfo to Ssqyd Smoe at oonebnests 
Sys 2ids to etnebute xd betosfet yiegrsl sd sduob on biuow 
yr OE :¥ 
-£tingi2 “idan teweseee ei €.é1 to eufsy Sy A -9baia ras 
Agew s tends ewore SL. to sulsv DA Level BO. ene 18 3089 
wol etnseerge: If. to ouisv V A .tne2erq ef gidemokialen 
‘edt tent ensem dotdw genoqgest bas sbstg asewied moistsiooe2s 
ylevitsgon tswens o+ yleAil eeel tsdwemoe stew 2*hI¥ ebard 


2'XI sbstd eft stew asd? 


-iSeitste er €,8S to sulsv Sy A Lovel imemevgtdok 


Vf. to oisv J A- .fevel £0. sdt baoyed Snasth babbn “liso 
-3usestq ei qidenoitsfer to Level statsbom 9 Saad eteeggue 

Motisioozes to Level otstebom s eettingre oS. 2a: oman Mh 
enpom aid? ,eldat sdt to engizsoitie sata. ows 
Tovei mi stow eroveisos dgid oo ae — vesnong «suds . : 


gtivsel*tests donorT tient to; 18m 


, & 7 


igid seeda,to 22eD2ue oT esovoiioe: Ae of 
eldstoys? stom & begeruenns s s 


64 


attitude toward the use of the French language. 


uestion 26: Do you feel that a French rogram of 
titiscnature crs che ping you develop a good Frenc 
pronunciation: 


Table XXVI reveals that the majority of the students, 
55.9 percent, believed that they were developing a good 
pronunciation in the VIF course. One quarter of the 
respondents were not of this opinion. There may be various 
explanations for a negative response to this item. Ounwe 
a large number of students' written comments disclosed 
difficulty hearing the teacher or the tape recorder 
properly. Some indicated that the time for drill with the 
tape recorder was insufficient. Others felt that their 
Classes were too large for them to have enough opportunity 
for practice. In addition, some students stated that they 
lacked confidence in their teachers' ability to speak the 


language. 


Grade. A a value, of ZOOS’ statistically signifi - 


Cantibeyond thes.0l devel.® ‘AC value’ of 15° reveals’ that 

a moderate level of relationship is present. A V value of 
.20 shows a moderate level of association between grade and 
response which means that a larger proportion of the Grade 
VII students tended to reply affirmatively than did the 
students in the two higher grades. The generally more 
positive attitude toward’ the’ VIF course by the first year 


students seems to be the only explanation for these results. 


TA 




















tO MBYTROTG NoOnsti & ISAT 199 
wl a = wae, . % = ho é r) « i - = « 
ass oe Ro fs VSD NOY 





2taebute sit to ytirotem ols tsdt alsevet 1% eideT 


; a ae 
boog & gfiqolsveb stew yent ted3 bevaited <sohereg ters at 
-_ od oa 
eis to res1sup enO .setuod TIV end me noi tabomnorg 
‘ : sey IRS / a 
auotrev sd yem orsdT .motmiqo eit to ton srew esnebnogeot 
> wo sera, 


etiu .meti aid? ot senoqzesr ovitsygen’s tot eneisame Lent 
bezols2ib etnommoo nettixrw ‘etnsbute to tedmun egtal 8° Pea 
rebrojeT sqsd eft to terloses ont gnitsed voto E¢%tb = 
efit dtiw [Litb tot omits od3 ted} bsteotbnit aes) vylregorgq ) 
tiedt tedt £5 eteds0 tnekoitiweni 2sw rebross1 sqst 
ySinwtroqgo dguons svsd o3 modt 102° Sgrsl oot Siew aseesio 
‘yedt tsdt betste 2zinesbute smoz moitibbs al ,soivoetq 102° 
efit aseq2 o3 ytilids ‘ersnioses 1ttsdi at sonebrines bedosl 
~itingte vilssiseitst2e 2i 0.08 to emisv- Sy Ay gbexd 
tedt elsever 2L. to sulsv DA Jisvel 10, sme ‘bnoved :2ne0 
to sulsv VA .snoesrq 2f gqidenoissist to fevsel siausbom ss 
bas sbstg meewsod sottsinoeds to Level ostehom # ewode 0S. 
ebstd oft to nottregora tegTel 6 tents ennom doidw samoqaer 
eit Bib nady \Lovitemrtits ger ot words 
etom yilsisney siT , 2obetg, tadgid o 
189¥ Jetit ody yd eatyos FIV ape ee ve 
.2etfueet seeds vot noitsnsiqze 
MiA 


' ,)” eee » Ahly . wr lie 
; a 


ie oe. ra 











65 


Achievement level. A x? Valuésoieboanvais 
statistically significant beyond the .01 level. A C value 
of Ggiosindicatesaitthat jasstrong.relationship.exists.* A V 
value of .34 denotes a high degree of association between 
the two classifications of the table. This means that the 
high achieving students were much more likely to answer 
affirmatively than were their less successful counterparts. 
These results are very similar to those examined for Question 
22 which was concerned with the importance of developing a 


good French pronunciation. 


Question 27: Does the out-of-date style of idresis, 1n 
the ilmstrips other you? 


[INemWOrciigrOt tis stem implies sthiat tiveusty leno. 
dress in the filmstrips is out-of-date. The question was 
stated in these terms because during the development of the 
questionnaire some consultants felt that the films were 
considered out-of-date by many of the students with which 
they had come in contact. Nonetheless, consultation of 
Table XXVLil shows) that the majority of the respondents in 
Thice study so >. percent, were not, disturbed aby) thesstyle 
of dress in. the pictures. Students, who stated that they 
were comprised 36.8 percent. Doubtlessly, some moderni- 
zation of these materials would increase their appeal, but 
this is a costly process which might not be regarded 
favorably by the publisher nor by school, boards faced with 


the replacement of present materials. 


20 





2: 1,€2 to oufev “XA Aewet ememiuaidtoie +: 


sulsv 9A ',fevel [0. oft booyed tnesttingte ylleotvetsase 





T4248 






VA .atekee qidenoitslsr gnotte 8 38d . 
nsswied Pere to setysb digtd 8 estomeb bE. 
efit tsait ensem 2taT .sidst odd to ano igeaitieeslo ows aed 
t5wens oF yLexil srom doum etsw etmebuse gakvaidos gia 


.atisqretayos Ivtazssoue eeef tied? stow aed? <levisemy, iis 
s+ 

tortesu0 Tot benimsxs seods of +slimie (tev ars etiueer ozodtt 
oe , US 

& gmigolseveb to sonst togms sdt Ati bem1sos105 esw dotdw ss 
ts 


. foitsionsnotg donor bee 


ni 220tb to slyte stsb-to-tu0 es 2 





to elyte odd tedt estiqmi messi erdt to gribtow ent 


esw noitzeyp siT .oetsb-to-tso0 ef ai sa edz ni zeorb 


~ — » 


ant to ttemqolsveb oft gairwb seusoed emret seeds ai botese 
stow emirt od3 tsi? 19% etnstiuenod smoe ovieauei? exp 

do Eclw dtiw etnsbute edt to ynsm yd etsb-to-tve betebienos 
to motisiluenoco ,eesledtemow .tostaos ak emo2 bed yodt 

ni etnsbnoge er Sit to ytirojsm ‘ons 3sdt ewode DIWKK <oldsT 
elyte ods yd veGamaes Jom, ot9w ,tmeateq 2.22 ,ybute ends 
YSd? tect betste onw .etiasbyte .29tustzig sdt gi eeenbh to 
~Enrsbom omoe  (Lezelt dual _ tneoreq: 8.08 beetxqmoa erew 
sud ,fesqqs tisdt sesoTom. bivow ois rosea eaedd\ 20, aottas 


bebisg 9% ed ton tdgim. doiiie sescong (ia R0> # abv eae 
dtiw beost ebrsod Loose yd tom Paid ie 5s 


els iretem”. tae 
' ane ie ew) 





_ 





66 


Grade > PoA x? value of 6.9 is not statistically 
Significant. A V value of -.10 represents a low degree 


of counterassociation between grade and response. 


Achievement level. A x? Value ,Ofe5s, 281s) NOL 


Statistically significant. A V value of -.09 denotes a 
low degree of counterassociation between the two classifi- 
cations of the table. 
uestion 28: Do you become bored with an arts of the 
esson? 

Responses to this question would naturally be 
influenced greatly by the manner in which the teacher con- 
ducts the lessons. It is also possible that many students 
misinterpreted this question to mean: Do you become bored 
with any lesson? According to Table XXVIII, more than three 
quarters of the respondents, 77.7 percent, stated “that “they 
did become bored with some parts of the lesson. Only 
fFerreem percent sand *that*they “did noty “Some Pstudents 
fevearlcdmiiretiiterr wrreten Observations that just waiting for 
the other members of the class to learn the sentences caused 
boredom, and suggested that the brighter learners be grouped 


together in order to allow them to proceed at,a faster pace. 


Grade vy" "A < Valuemwoiwe4S 5915 Statistically Signiti- 
Cobeuey OlUmtnem, UlgloVvelww gnuG Value-Of .2l.Signities that 
a moderate level of relationship 15 present. <A V value of 


-.38 reveals a high degree of counterassociation between 


ee 


' 
‘ ni t 
1 
0d mv" sy 


‘Vino eeee ‘ton ef 0.3 ho sutey KoA gba ae . 


sergsb wol s etieesrasr OL. ~ dvarminenite. 4 
-2@n0q2st bins obs yy i 






“tom @2 8.2 po sulsy A th 


al PWD, wee; 2 
8 estoneb 20. - to euisy V A -Insottingie Pe ae : 


~ftizesl> ows sds ‘sewied io its izozesTssmMMos to song ale 
[aes Wee coe | 
sided edt to enottss 


Ltiay at eds. 


_ 





a | 


od yilswwoed bluow moiteeup efds oF esenoqesHa 4 
-ao> tefosed ot dotdwont yonasm siz xd essen none, 
etrebuste yasm tedt sldiezeoq gets 2i si emoeeal ony ms 
berod amozsd soy od ‘nsem of noiseoup eirla boserqretnizia 


iveth 

s6rdt asd stom .TEIVKX sfdsT 03 giibroo9A Ymoreet yaa driw 
a i2¢ Fe 

yoit ted? botsse .tmeareq F.T) , 2 ngbaogess ods = etetisup 
at fie SP 

yinO ,mogeel dt to et+sq smoz oto Secot oped bib 


ro) Ct 2 Rawe 


2insbuse smo? .sonm bib’ yedt ter Eee ee he ce 
ge 
16% gattisw set ted eso Lisvreed6 asttixw ried — al aslek 
beevso zoonstnse sft misel of 2eB15 odd io exedmem ; ie, 
- aredmem socveid 
bequoty sd ersntsel tSoMgiad ont sedt 


a rosent £ ts bosaorg ot mart?’ ee oo a 





~ftingie ylisoisteitate pt EVER Yo. insite | ae 
ted e6tiingie [£. to su lev, . AC vena ‘ Preeti 
to sulspv VA Juseong ob ai 

geswisd hoiteioozes os mut 


ate wei 


ee 


_ at i. Pty 


" ; 
ae 


aiei ars iw 


























67 


grade and response which means that fewer Grade VII's 

were likely to answer affirmatively than Grade IX's. The 
increasing disenchantment of the more advanced students, 

or the fact that such learners tend to become more critical 


of presentation methods may account for this situation. 


Achievement level. A xX? Values Or se Seno t 
Statistically significant. A V value of -.08 shows a low 
degree of counterassociation between achievement level and 


response. 


Question 29: Is understanding and speaking French more 
important to you than reading and writing it 
Bas#ettkonthegaudiorslingualyapproach isithe bediert 
that the natural order be maintained in the learning of a 
second language. The figures in Table XXIX indicate that 
64.6 percent of the students: in this study believed that 
understanding and speaking French is more important than 
reading and writing it compared to only 18.4 percent who 


didenot feel, this way. 


Grade. <A x? Valueso fiel0 7/ 9s notes tatiustical ly 
Spoiled twa tecne 01 elevel. (Theav value sot. 05 ashows 
a very low degree of counterassociation between the two 


classitieations of the ‘table. 


Achievement level. A x2 vadiuesorsls;S6i1spstatis ti- 


Cablyasuonmricantebeyondgthe. 40ivlevel. A €C value of: .13 


0, a eae 

adi | : ; Ps | ; 7 i 
; me i 7 > as 
2tTIy shot) rewst Jedd coum do omen a ib or 


eff .e'Xl sbe1d asd3 vLovitsmmetie, G ae 
E 
a 

















= 
~ 









: zinsbuse beonsvbs stom eft ae ens. ahipensshogethamsgy 


{fsofttizra stom omo29d ot bras sremeet dove tad? tos ‘93 20 
moltssutie eins TOL Jnvosss ent mands aoisadaszerg 40 : 


aad He 19 69 == 

som at @.€ %0 outav *X A ios, siatimatiok Seen | 

wort s ewode 80,- to oyleyv VA  .dasoitiagia. \ilaoiseisaze , 
bite fovel tnomsveidos neswied sa lalla 5 to ore” | _ <i 






stom donexrd 


r See Sones ee “ai Scsiiogar = 
teifsd ef3 ef dosovqas Isugnil-otbus sit oF ofesd 95 
s to gaintesl off oi bonietaism sd tehv0 letwten edt sedt 
. $ed¢ otsoibni XIXX sidsT wi eoxuy it oT -ogsugasl bnozee: , 
tefdt beveiied ybute eins ni ecnebuse, sat Ro tasot0q 2,42 i 
ned? tostroqmer 210m zi ronet gaitseqe bas gntbasd.ex ebay. ig 
‘odw Snsateq b.8f vino ot bstsqmoo Ir gaitinw bas gaibs sx A 
(BW aide Lest som.bib ¥. 
phigsieaebaes ton ei V.0f to eulsy Sy a, sft ad 
ewodz 20,- to oyfev V odT , level £0, ont ta 9 
ows sdz nsewsed_ moi tsi002 6193 imos to. 


<add ae a | 
| aon i 
“teitsae 2i 8,eL to. sutiie! ef A 4 ret 3: A 


aan 
ei: to eulsy 2 A a me 
# 


10% = ‘oe 


68 


denotes that a weak level of relationship exists. A V 

value of .15 represents a moderate level of association 
between achievement level and response which means that a 
larger percentage of the more successful students tended 

to answer this question affirmatively compared to the 
weaker students. It is understandable that more of the 
brighter students would have answered in this manner because 
they were attaining more readily the initial goals of the 


audio-lingual approach. 


uestion 30: Does the time seem to drag when the members 
or the class are repeating the sentences after the 
tape recorder’ 

A certain amount of controversy has arisen over the 
habit formation methods employed with the audio-lingual 
approach in the learning of a second language. The use of 
Question 30 was an attempt to determine student reaction to 
these methods. Table XXX shows that 53.5 percent of the 
respondents thought time passed slowly when class members 
were repeating the sentences after the tape recorder 
COMmparedmtOesiyespercentawnho didnot think#so. »Wraitten 
comments on this item by the students were mostly concerned 
With the problem of individual. differences. Several 
students stated that they became bored waiting for other 
members of the class to learn the material, and suggested 
some form of individual grouping be devised. to speed up 


learning for those’of higher ability. 


82 




















Fs Fa lias 
VA ,e@tetxe qitenoitaler bo isvel | bal a 
Notts foezes to. fevel terchsiaie capitan aaa v 


s ted? eagsm dotde SamoqgesT bas Level tmemevetios asewsed 7 


a 
bebasit esiasbink ys iyteessoue srom edt to egatneotegq ‘regret 


ot “4 


odt oF boraqwoo ylovitenritis soiteoup eis sowens of es 
oils to stom tedo sfdebartersbm 2k 41 -etmobuse rolsew fae 
; Vis Pah. : 
seusosd tomnam efds, gi botowens sved bluow ; re xoadgind i el 
sit Sara a irw 
oft to elsog Isitint eds ylibser stom yaimtassa og edt, ah 
ic fey 





eds t9vo mezits esd yerevyortmos to dnwome oietreo A | 
isugnil-oibue edt dviw beyolqms ebodtem noksemt0? sided 
to sey sil ,oysugnsl bnosse s- to gaiersel edd ni dosorqgs 
oF Goitoset tnebude soimrs3eb of tqmetis ns asw 08 moiseeuD : 7 
ot to smeoteq 2.82 stadt ewode XXX aldeT” .ebodtom saedt- » &an 
a19dnom eeslo nodw ylwole boaeey. sks srigueds: ee 
tsbio2e1 sqst sit testis coonetne2 ont gakzaeqer xew | 1 
nettitW .o2 Anids ton bib odw —s Sy bie ot bersqmo> 7 t 
hesroonoa yizeom stow atnebute. ast per maaan 22 7 se 
fersvee 290meT 913 tb cevbiv iba 38 ¢ 
reito 102 gnitiow deiod smgo8e sl 
botgeggue bas ,lsbtegsm ods tee es 
qu besa? ot boziveh od 9: 


ie ph eiiskrk : 
pees ek ad 5 


, fh he 


7 _ a - i - - 
4 ’ : 2» 7 m» Bir 
7 aoe S 4 : 
> ie os a4 
y ' : 
ti ry 


i. Conia A \ ' 
‘ a 7 a 1 Ayre : H 














69 


Grade #* A x? value of 13.0 is not statistically 
Significant at the .01 level. A V value of -.16 denotes 
a moderate level of counterassociation between grade and 
response which means that Grade IX students were more 
likely to answer affirmatively than were those in the two 
MoM rec Tadeo wel cmtactethat third year students in the vir 
course found this phase of the lesson more boring may have 
been expected. It is surprising that a higher percentage of 
the sample did not feel this way because this phase of the 


lessons not likely =the most interesting for learners. 


Achievement level. A ‘e Va luc™ Of"*2io 1S" tr0 t 
SUES alilyess oni facant.. > A Vevalue of = 90] "suggests that 
there is practically no counterassociation between achieve- 


ment level and response. 


Question (iw lSmeerenchetoOn ditt Loud peor yOU ston leawn | 


InGereCuLesmOotelablem\\\ieadilsclose: thateomly aly. 
percent of the students believed that French was too 
Cia CuUltaLOr tiem compared sLOv05.9 percent whowdid not 
think it’ was. One student.wrote that French was easy if.it 
Nasmuduphtecugitee lilt SesiecmstOebe thes core ct athe problem, 
and reveals just how important the role of the teacher is. 
Some other students indicated that the subject matter was 


not challenging enough for then. 


Grade, <A x? Value Oil e2senot statistically 




















ry 


vitesiveituse fon et O.EL to sulsv SA pbx 
zojonsh @L.- to sulsv VA , Level £0.) oft ts Snsoktingte | 
bas shat aeowded soijsi2oeestetmiod to Level etereboms — 
stom ST8W einahae XI ebs10 teda eqpem dotdw eenoqeot 
owt of3 af seods stow asdt \Llovitsmritts rewans om yledkl 
qIV offt ni esnebure “*H9X bridd tsdd tost ofT ,eebatg tewol 2 
avai yam gcitod srom mozeel eft to seat ebad bnwot séxbos om 
to ays titer 4q Tesfgid s tsd3 eile tacawe ai 31. -bet29qx9 990d i 
sit to sesdq 2idt oeusoed ysw eidd Lost dom bib elqmae eas 


,.2tsnrssl rot aisesreias szom odt ‘emits ton et nozzal 


‘a ‘es, =. 


4 : aoe Paes _ 
ton ei &.8 to edffav SKA “teviet Spat Aeat: ~ane 


taeda atzoggue {0.- to sulsv V A .tnsortingberylisottersate 





-svsifos neewred noitsisoeestetauos on YileotiouTqg: ef ereds 
.Senoqest bas Level trom - 


oars 
Taresl of uo. 





Tot siuzittib aos 





&,Vi vino ted? seoloetb IXXX ofdbT to a oe odT ; 





miceriey | 
oot 2esw doastd tend beveiled i bee oars ous to tneoTeg 
san 4gae 
tom bib ofw tasateg @.20 of paineees maity 403 tiustttib 
as es SG67 4 


tt tf yeno eaw donexd tends etorw Smebyse sn © cpa as pen 


~moldorq ont to stos ods ed ot emeee eisT .diigir sigusa ens ie 
2h tedosst oft to-slor sit tas stoqnti woul seut 


esw tetsism too due ot tsds bestéatbak stk: 
a3 3" 104 dynein: 


yvfissiteistst2 son ef T. ff to ob 






pear 







ne 
hes 





70 


Significante@at the” .0iilevel.SeASVivaluetoft->¢06lreveals 
a very low degree of counterassociation between grade and 


response. 


Achievement level. A xe Value SO <6 415.5 t ats toe 
CollversLenuercant beyond thes, JJelevel; “AsG valuesof 128 
Suen iesmtnat aestrong, relationship is present, “AV 
value of -.45 indicates high counterassociation between the 
CwOmcvassiiLicationsmomitnen table which means that’ the) hich 
ability students were much more inclined to answer 
negatively than were the low ability students. The above 
results for achievement level are what-might have been 
expected since few students would be likely to state that 


they found a subject difficult in.which they performed well. 


(HOSS one SS PE SE ee 
andtactivitiessinntheclessons ofyyour French course’ 
AccordingstoathecfiguresbinwlablenxXxx?Pd: theslargest 
percentage of the students, 44.7 percent, were of the 
Opin thatevariety, andaactivi ties were slacking inotheiy 
VIF course compared to 36.5 percent who took the opposing 
view. Two factors which would possibly influence the 
responses made to this question are the imagination of the 
teachers involved and the time available for additional 
activities. The heavy teaching loads of some teachers as 
well as their lack of experience, in certain cases, would 


also work against a more ideal situation. 









7 . : at a 
7 - 


or “ : b i i ' “4 : | 
a i ie 





bos sbsty meowted noissivo2es: 


atgdwas 00.- to oulay VA sve 8 


~tsettste ek 8, 08 to sulsy a 4 A ok 


omnes ay 
8S, to sulsv OA stevel £0. ods pe 1108 








, @? 


| ‘2h. - 
VA_ ,Sms2etq ef qrdenortslor gnorte 6 tent eelting z= as 














a 
; ' » be ait A _ 

of? meowted nottsizoeesresauo2 gid zotsotbmi 2}, - 20 ouley 
a 

*. 


igid edt ted3 annem dotdw ofdses edd to saoitsattizesio own 


rowans of bonifoni etom doum etew etnebuse ithe: oe 


 pabedge “ee 
esvods siT .2tnebute ysilids wol odd srew nasdt “(lovisegen : 


7 vy" 7 
i 


Tih 


_= 


ased eved tdgim tsdw sis [svel snomeveidos ‘Tot atiueer 
tedt oiste oj \leAil ed bluow etnebuse wet somite besioeqxe ' - 
-{few bemrotreq yedt doidw ai tiusititb toetdee =» bavet yer? | 


¢ 
90 7a 2% (- 
. 





ec) 
teegusl ont LIXXX eldsT nt cet edt ot untoroo0A tee ~ 
eft to stew .sneoteq VBA errs ont Yo egssneareq 


a ie Pee = 
tiedt mi gnitosl orew eeitivitos bits ytaitey at >i nkgo / 
gateoqqo sft Aoos odw taeot9q €.0& oF beregnos sexue> . 109 41V 


a | 
edt sonsulini yidiezog bivow sto i dw sxoxogt mr aria | - 


eft to sottsnigsmt od? sts noitesup eids ot obsm a 
{snoizibbs tot efdslisvs emit oft bas beviowad 21 a3 

ul 

25 SeauzB es ond2 10 2bsol gitidoses ‘eect on A | ise vi328 


bluow ¢29259 mistres mi: ee shar Us 
a ot row O8 
s: comers a NN og ae 


1 ; : ott Ani 














ie 


Gradens A x? value of So .Widslstati sticaldy 
SleiuelLcantsbeyOndstne wodstevel, A C value of .20 
Suggests that a moderate level of relationship exists. 

A V value of .27 shows a moderate level of association 
between grade and response which means that the Grade IX's 
were more inclined to answer negatively than were the Grade 
Vilts. “It appears. that teachers of the students in the 
Digieneerades seilveanlwertoy tmto COver.the material or the 
Course, may tend to forget that’ variety is vital for 
Mates ges tUcCeitwIncerest. selhemsecond andathird:y car, 
Studentswo cs thescoursesare, alsoulikely to, be more critical 
alaerealistic about, their learning situation than the first 


year students. 


Achievement level... A x? valuehoied 485 lstunet 
Statistically significant.. A V value of .07 represents: a 
very low degree of association between the two classifi- 


cations of the table. 


Question 33: Do you find the learning of the taped 
sentences which accompany the filmstrips an temesit ing % 
Like Question 30, this item is concerned with the 
repetition phase of the VIF course and its effect on 
student interest. It is surprising that the affirmative 
and negative responses shown in Table XXXIII are almost 
evenly divided, 39.3 and 40.9 percent respectively. A 


larger percentage of the students would have been expected 


a | . | 7 


<ihesiseneber et €.02 Yo eulav “A sgbexd 9 

OS. to evlsv DA ,fevel £0, edd bnoyed) taz>ttingte 

-2teixe qidenoitsier to Level eterebom s teat eteeggue 
noitaiooees to Level etstobom 8 eworde vas to sulev VA 

2'XI sbstd sri isds ensom datdw ocnoqest bas oberg asowsed 
shetd silt stow ret levisegen Toeweis oF beniloat STom avait 
eit oi etmobute sft to etedoses teri? eTBe9gqs 51 verry 
edt to [sitetam sd¢ 1svoa ot trotte as ak veebarg reilgid, 
tot [stiv et ytoitsv teat toyrTot of baes (sam «se1409 

tsev brids bos bnoase sdT .st2919etnt aebus 2 enicieséien 
[s2isir13a-stom 3d oF visate o2ls 918 9atuos eit to eae 
_ter£t oft nedd noitsytte gninwssl tisds suods >iteilser bap 


j 2am 
; atnsbus 2 189X 


XA ,Lovet snemeveinon — 


>. we 4 

& zimseotgqst 10. to syfsy V A .Inslitiagte th vitoit tere 

~ftreesl> ows sft nsewted moitsioozes to estgeb wol ytev 
oldest ods to enottss | 


) 


Jon 2L 8.4 t0 suisy s 


ws. 01 EO 






Sonkiestosnt cairtemt "Yee Gin fSidw 3 





ey dtiw benreanod ef mati -eidd oe oar 

mo tostie 235i bas setuo5 Tv. edt t0° sesig noisigeqet 
sVitsmritts oft tadt ghiefirqrue ef di -tasretni tmebuse 
<ggmye e18 I1IXXX ofdsT nk aworle esastoqaet evisegen bus 


A .qevisosqest tneoteq @.0h bas. a8 seomemaoes 
bestseqxe need evsd bluow etasbute edt to 9, ; 





ee Ae ) ange 


12 


to find the repetition phase of the lesson uninteresting. 


Grade se value of. 41,.4.1s.statistically signifi- 


GCantwbeyvondethes<0lLslevel. qiAyCuvalue sof .2lyindicates that 
agmoderateslevel of srelationship.existS«eacA-V value of%3.:28 
denotes a moderate degree of association between grade and 
response which means that the Grade VII's were more likely 
to answer affirmatively than were the Grade IX's. An 
examination of the percentages by grade shows that the 
figures for Grade VII and those for Grade IX are almost 
reversed. Boredom with this part of the VIF lesson increased 
rapidly between these two grades. This- growing disinterest 
is not surprising, .especially if. the more advanced students 
have been taught this phase of the lesson no differently 
€hanpthey, were awhen; first ,.being introduced.toathessounds sof 
thesnewelanguage wasstudents willpbegsabis fiedstomrepeatathe 
Sentences jas slong aas..they find git,useful -or -interes ting: 
The Grade VII's are learning new sounds, and thus, they are 
apt stOmtindsthis spart.ot. the. lesson jinteresting. olheseGrade 
IX Usaknow «the, Sounds ,carestamilian with thestopie in ythe 
lesson, and seek to learn the meaning of what is being said. 
For them to have to repeat words they already know how to 
Say appears to be a waste of time. Obviously, certain 
modifications need to be made in the repetition phase for 
the more advanced students. More manipulation of the 


structures for these learners is likely to be more valuable 


Vee Ay ae ee 
be! Wee en ee 
: : : 


sy 


am ne ¢ 
sed? 2zodsotbat 1S, to eulsv DA; towel £0, edz baoyed sn 


= 
88. to sufey VA «etarxe qidenoitefer to feved pievtsen & 
Syetys 
bas sbsrg nasewted nottsis0zes to 9St99b ‘otptebom a 


yletil stom stow 2’ TV shst) oft tad? eanem do tw saneeent 

nk .2'XIl sbst0 sas ovew osdd Lovisemr ite ‘ene a 

siz tsd3 ewonle ebsty yd eegetasorag ont 20 nokshgienne 

teom{s srs’ XI sbsitd 10% sods Bas LIV shad 10% eeiwnsa 

beehetoni noeeel TiV edt to treq etds dtiw moberod -boesaver 
| ‘sia 


Seetsinieth gniwotg 2idT .2ebsetg ows s2edt neowsed ‘biges 
2tnebuse beonsvbs e1om sft Yi YLlatveqes gnieirqrse jon rr 
; (ovy¥ 
yltaststiib on moeesl eft to s2esdq efdt tigust mesd sved 


to ebayoe edt ot heawbotsat yntod teri nedw etew yod? asdt~ 


sat tseqet of battertee sd Liiw eFnebuse . ogaugast weaned? 


/Qfisestsiar to lutsey Ji bait yedt 28 gaol ae asdnstase 
ers yords ,2udt bas ,ebauoe wom gatoissl sip 2' LIV shard edT 


eberd sit .ynitestotni noezel sd3 to t1eq ee ‘bait oF tqs 
edd mi Siqos oft dtiw teilinst exe <2bauee oly wok 2X1 
-bise gated 2 tedw to gaiaesom odd ateel ov Mese Bas ,noeesl 
07 wod wort ybsetls yedi ebrow Jssqex 0d sved of med tol 
Mistiss ,ylevoivdo .omit Jo Stesw 6 od ot exseqga -yae 


rot enna noititego:s 403 ab. sbem od 02 eon snananalitbos | 
ods to noicteluqingm stoM fst 


oidsufsy oxom od ov ylodil eb execs 


rea 
¥ 


‘ 7 - = ry cs Par 


i 
wns Sore Shee fhozzel edt 26 <cebinlicelaiaislaaal 
-ftingte dbbeuina tres: ef &, DR Bef outow Sea a : 

® 


“— 





stick 
vat 


















7 


oy ‘ 


a 


73 


than a lot of time spent on repetitive drill. 


Achievement level. A x2 VeanUeuO1l5.60-15 Statist 


cably=sStenitrcantaat =the: .01 levels 9A.G value of 712 
Signifies that a weak relationship is present. A V value 

of .13 represents low association between achievement level 
and response which means that low achievers were more likely 
to answer negatively than were high achievers. Disinterest 
in a subject and low achievement appear to be related 


LaAceOlsiwaccOlLaligmeOmtiescures | (Ss), 


Question 34: Do you hope to ‘be Fable to speak French 
some day % 


Mesetfortesecondslanpuage learmers devotes tomtnei: 
task ought to -be-influenced considerably by: the aspirations 
which they hold for themselves. Item 34 was an attempt to 
learneabout the =aSpirations of the students in_ this study. 
Table *XxxI1V-discloseés that +6228 “percent of “thesé:ts tudents 
hope, to be. able to speak French at some future date. Only 
18.2*percent of the respondents: feel pessimistic about this 
possibility. It is somewhat’strange to note that only 33.5 
percent of these same students stated in Question 2 that 
they liked to speak French whenever they could. The 
realization that constant. practice is necessary has not 


become apparent to many of these learners. 


Grade. e A e Va luiew oil 4q0rtses tatis tical lye Sign ti - 


cant at the .01 level. A C value of. .12 suggests that a 


— : , 
et? es i 7 3 7 a ay 


a? 



























ae ea rare ie aa | 
| . [Lith svititeqer wc me a _ 
~trefiate at 0,tL to sulsy Sx 4K z oy a: 

SI, 3 outsv DA Lavet £0. od? 30 snasitkagee yitaa ; 

euisv V A ,3neeorq 2t qifenottslor deew & tadt anttingie 
level tnemsvetios neswied noiteiooses: wot etneeerqer EI. 20 ea > 
yloextil er stow eroveitios wol tedd ensom Aokiw senoqest bas 4 
Sesrstnieid .erevetdos dsid srow mets yiewi sagen 19wens of - is 
betsier ed oJ tseqqs Saemevetdos wol bas soe{due wat 7 ; 
.etivebr szedt of gmibronda| . 2t0t>82 * ; 


fonetl aAgpsqe od side ed of 






tkeds of Ssoveb erenreel egsuynsl bnosese t1etie saT ~~ © © 
anottstiges ads yd yldsrebienoo beonewlint $d°oo sage Head 
os tqmetis ms zesw-hi motl .2syloameds Tot blow yedt doit 
Nbuse etfs ai etasbute ods to enotverigas say Suede mest 
etmebus2 s2eed3 to stasoreq 8.80 Sent aseokoeib VIZEE Sider La 
yinO .sotsb orutut emoe ts donerd Agegqe oF olde aa | 
2tut twods sideimizzsq Last esneimoqeer eas 26. Inosteq’S 
e.@€ yino saat oton o} ogustte tsndusmoe 2f 2E peed 
tsd3 S$ noitesu0 ni betste etmebure smee saade 2H 38978q 
otf  .bLvox yous agera ie iinastd assqge oF boul odd 
ton ead Yise2e09n” ai hee bbkl dagtenoo ten, 
. events ie Dasa yo yvnoem 





~£tistgte, lao iseesere et ’. St 20 aga \ 
B. Sads edeayaue Sf. t0 oulsy DA 0, odt te 


| of eery 
\ =a, Payee) J ae 


= 





Re = tha 





74 


weak relationship is present. A V value of .09 denotes 
low association between the two classifications of the 
table which means that Grade VII students were more 
likely to answer affirmatively than were the Grade IX's. 
The more idealistic outlook of the first year students 
appears towbe*one reason for this situation. 

Achievement level. A X¢ value of 46.4 is 
sivatisticalilyis lens fican teibey ondethes«0lydievelie A C value 
of .22 shows that a moderate level of relationship exists. 
A V value of .33 denotes high association between achieve- 
ment level and response which means that high ability 
Students were more likely to answer affirmatively than 
students of lower ability. As would be expected, success 
in the course genders optimism for future use of the 


language. 


WUCS ELON So. 1 Saitea noes idea CO lwaltountil your second 
Car opsitu etore beginning to read in French? 

This question,e.concerning, the prereading period,,is 
Simply a restatement of Question 4, and similar results 
were obtained. » Table» XXXV' discloses that a.larger 
proportion,of the students, 44.3 percent, were of.the 
opinion that reading should be delayed until the second year 
of study compared to 35.4 percent who were of the opposite 


Opinion. 


Gradean A x? VadUemOtmd,lelSenot Statistically 


oe 












sosonsh 0, Yo. sifev VA .Jnoeerg 2 qidesoizeier dsew 
edt to énoitsoitieesio ows edt ae soisetzoxes wot 
oTom etew etnebute ITV sbord sets 
/2'X!l ebetod ods stew nents “eoviteaeeten “qewer ieee yi 
Sees 169y. devi eft to Joolsuo civetiaess sale ween © 


as a .% ae: 
noiteusie zidd to? nozserx emo od of eueayge —- 


eo Mae ‘ ra 








ei 8,80 Yo ovlev “KA . | 
ovisv JA .fevel £0. oft broyed rneotd hagie 2. - 
.eteixe qidenoiselot to Level sisyebom & ands awoda $8. do a “ul 
-sveirnos neewied noftstooeés dgid essoneb ee. ‘to oulsy vA rae 
vsiftde dyed sed3 ansom doidw senogest bas het A 2 ? 

iwsdt. ylevitsmtitie tewens of yiedil stom etew 


. =. $ 
2ee0ou2e ,bestoaqxs od bluow 2A oitids rewol to “etnebuse a 


ed? al 
edi 10 sey otytut rot meimitgo anny 92tu02 


yee tt a 










ef ,botrsg ygarbsststa odd & fee reanate eins | - - 
etineor relimie Biel\.4 noid saat io Snomedeteor. 8 | | 
19gtal s stadt soeotdetb-viak stds c 

sit io sxew tneameg ar) ernsbure sit tn 19 £2" rraqgor 

THSY bhons2 oft Lismn boys feb od ques | ibes tai? noiniq 


2 ) nasi : 
ertzoqqo sit to stew orl Saooreg or sles be vn i i a 


f ay / : i eo “i i, 
ftatbiasbds ton ab sone «ha . 


oth 
mm 


Ws 


Significant at the .01 level. A V value of .12 shows a 


low degree of association between grade and response, 


Achievement level. A xe Wehbe Kole AROS! GL aye 
Stadtastically significant at’ the .01 level. <A V value 
of .00 indicates absolutely no association between the 


TWORCTAaSSITt1cations= of the. table. 


uestion 36: Do you feel that learning French is 


actual Veda was Ono peetimen 


This question is probably as revealing as any in 
the questionnaire as to the basic attitudes of the students 
toward the French language. It is encouraging to note that 
in Table XXXVI nearly two thirds of the respondents did 
not feel that learning French was a waste of time. Only 
139.7 percent indicated that study of the language was 


WLEDOUL value to them, 


Grade. A X* value of 22.6 is statistically signifi- 
Gait, beyondrther, Oltibevel,. ret iG wvalueriof 716 denotes: that 
amodenate) mevelkrotiirelatvonshipwis present. me Vievalue of 
216 sSignaiivesira moderate level «of counterassociati on 
between grade and response which means that Grade VII's 
were more likely to answer negatively than were the Grade 
IX's. This again appears to demonstrate the more idealistic 
SUC OOkKMOteLicmGrademVval' Sscompared to the students in, the 


two higher grades. 


ar f | | | 7 
" | 
s avbilé SI. do suiev VA leven 20, umn 


2enoq2st bas sbsvg noswred nokseiooees Yoeergeb wol — 























: ¢., io]. @c@ , ‘ ola . 
ton st 0.0L to sulsy “XA. . ig | 
% ake “| sf - 
eulsy VA .fevel £0, sft Ie tassitiagie lasisain 
- oe | 


eit neowied foitsizoees on \Lesuloeds sereoibat eg to a 
.ofds2 ett to shtemetaenba ows 
bose 4 LT 
zi donetd gnimrsel tadt [992 boy of p02 mobstesuO, 
Bey 3 Le CMMACEETEE 
ir Ys 26 aniisever 28 ytdsdorg et not Fee aidT 


av § u Oe = 
etnobute ods to eobusists otesd ot o7 25 SESE TS Eeny _ 4 






tsdt ston of gaigsisoons- 2i 1 . ogsugusl fo gort a2 saunee 


e ¢°2in0ce 


bib 2inebaoqest eft to absrds owt ae DVXXX eldest bo 
vind ,omit to dstesw s 2ew donott aie ae tandd fest Pe 


esw sgsugnsit-odt to ybute indt paseatbat tnsoTSq_ V.e@r° 
mont ot sutsv parr 

-itingie yilssiseitsste ei 0.58 yo ottny SKNA er ee 
tsit estoneb ol,-to sulsv DA,” 4 Lever 10, ‘eds baoyed ne | oe: 
to sulsev V A. .theeorq 2k qidenoi tater to fovel ojatsbom-s - 
noitsivozzsetsinyoa to Level sistebom & eoitingte OL. 
2'LIV sbs19 teds enssm noidw Semogest Pony eg, nese 
sbs1d sdt o1tsw nsat yloviete ged seven vom 


ditetissbi orom oft otaraaaomeb oF eriees 


~- 
oe 


F 
A i 


py > 
: . 
i 4 ae 7 ; 


76 


Achievement level. A na VALUE O Loose lL erSseStaArES Tt 1 = 
Cally signifieant®beyond the .01 level. A C value of .24 
shows that a moderate level of Te latLlonshsprexis ts seen e yi 
value of -.36 indicates strong counterassociation aieen 
the two classifications of the table. This means that the 
high ability students were much more likely to answer 
negatively than were their class members of lower abe lity. 
These results continue to reinforce the observation that 
success in the language has a positive effect on the general 
attitude toward it. 

uestion 37: Do you often fail to understand the meanin 
or the French sentences? 

The tigures recorded in Table XXXVile disclose. a 
mathenePargeproportion of affirmative responses to this 
GUes ron, 20) wipercentn Sitiroerathepedisturpinoeroeth ik 
that so many students indicated that they are having these 
difficulties with meaning. Reference to Question 6 shows 
that most of the students replied that they did understand 
the. teachers' explanations in French. This may mean that 
theyexplanations, given by the‘teachers are failing to clear 
up comprehension difficulties properly for the weaker 


students. 


Grade wash x? ValUeO tee 0+ Oersees TaLNS C1 Caley @sargn it 
Gaespey ond *thes. 01 levels vA Girvalue lof ©b? implies**that ‘a 


moderate level-*om relacorship “exists YA V value “of---}.01 


ary 







eee 2i [.22°%o sulev % A 7 
AS, to sulav DA .fevel 40, oft ponies 


VA ,etetxs qideeabtat-at to fevel osetabom s ee = 
uf 26 ) 


noswisd nots ivoeestetmios gnotte cesoibmi de. - ae outa / ‘ 
#1) 4.95282 7 
eit tedt ensom eid? -9idst edt to capisaothieanls ows = a 
7 ig ] cl , 
towens oF ylsdil exom doym Tew etnebuse ytilids 1 -_ . 
‘ ‘eas 


-\Jilids ‘yowol to eredmam gests ipa oTew neds wevtiaeak 3s 


























“s \ q 

tedt sotisvrsedo edd satotnter oF sumigmeg eslu2er A oar 
{sremeg sdt mo tostte evitizoq s esd syacgost oils at “geeooue - nT z 
AS brawos bist 195 <7. 


sarire GRY 






aninsen oft basterebas ot {tsi nas. 


Ta) @4 ) 
s s2oloetb ILVXXX sidsT at bebrooet pe oT ~ za 7 


_ 2idd ot esenogest svitsmritYs to noistoqorg sgrsl rodtex a. £: 
Anidt oF itteouss he tedist ei tI .inesteq VY. £0 cami veaup i 
e2ont gitived ers yodt tsdst bessorbat etnsbuste yaaa oe rads, i 
awode d noiteon0 of sonersteh .yninsem ddiw eobt1uz it? ib | A 


bostexsbau brb yort tsdt bettqex ztnebuse oft to t20m teds 
ted? asem vsm eidT .donevd mt enotisnsiqxs ‘ exerlaged odd 


reel ot gnilist ers exsdoses odt yd aevig enpraaniq et: 
tsisow sd? rot viregorg anata mie 





od 


7. ss 7 > 
~ £itmgie yilsorseitste 2i “0: 8S to. enfsv “XA ; oe am 
; 7 9 ; > 
s tedd 26ifgqmi ‘i. to ouley D. A ee a. Piyes 2 
10.- 30 euEsv.V A .2teéxs qise viteLer o Ie st é 
: ry ; my - 
; e (S| =A ~*. Ate 


- 
ma) 


ie @ 


79 


denotes a very low degree of counterassociation between 


grade and response. 


Achievement level. A x2 


Value (of 64,0 45° statusti- 
Cally sipnificant beyond the. .01 level. <A C value of .29 
Suggests that a strong. relationship exists. A V value of 
-.43 denotes high counterassociation between achievement 
level and response which means that the high ability 
students weremuch less likely to answer affirmatively than 
were the students who achieved less well. The above 
Fesuits appear to point out the.difficulties that slower 
students have with the comprehension of meaning, but they 


also -indicateythat quitegaslargesnumberyof the higher 


achievers are affected as well. 


Questions should thesstorres ot your Frenchy course: be 
about French-speaking people in Canada rather than about 
French-speaking people in France? 

(TheswGiecenecommentsOt one ws cudent. ld iwkem Go 
see the books and filmstrips made in Canada about 
Canadians ,"'".was supported by 46.0 percent of the students 


Gelipared) to,20./ percent who did not, These tipures are 


reported in Table XXXVIII. 


Grade, A x? Value-Ote20n ais «Statistically si19niti- 
Gant speyondstne, J0lelevel, "A G yvalue;of..15 indicates that 
a moderate level, of relationship is-present., A V- value of 


-,18 represents a-moderate level of counterassociation 


ct 


neewssd toitsr20zentet naa to _rn ota 






















~£tetiese af 0,48 to ‘eu lew Sy A: 


QS. to sulsv DA _ fevel 10, es sss aaeltaele vitae 4 
to otisv VA ateixe apenas gnott2 B ted eseoggue 
tndmeveitos moswied nottsirceeereraues - eetonsh th. 

viilids dgid oft tsdt 2ensom doidw 9z2noqeor bas Level 


asd yiesvitsmittis rewens of yledtil eeek dloums1 ow ‘sheseuee 
« ORS ioe : 
svods sAHT ,iilsw eee bevainos ornw ztnobute edt stew © 


neice (OS 
towole2 ted3 2obtiuzitt fb edt tuo tniog ot xs9qq8 esiueor 


- 
iA 


yoda sud <guinsem to mbiensdetqmos odt d3iw oved Pik 
— oft to todmun sgtel s ettup teat aonoibak O2ts 


.ifew 28 betostis: ors ‘Sie dee 
5 soit) * 


ad Ss2tTuo02 dane14 tuox to go8 SEBS 2E% JL 3 Be ; 
Nods sas 19181 sbeis. mm Saoge-dousrt_uode 
"Sones 9G gisssge- fon 
OS stil b'1l" .Snobuse sito 4 toommos nettirw edT, Ss 
tuods sbene) at sham eqittemliz bas efood edd+sae 
etushuse sit to sneotsq 0,08 yd bettoqque eew ",2neibensd 


9Ts 2o1ugit seedT .Jom bib ofw tneateq 1.08 0% bexsqmoa 
- LTIVEXX ofde? mf betteger 


-ktiagte (ilsoitettete at £.08 to eylsy “419 ia 
tert 2otsotbal al, 20. ouikgy 2A feavel 10. dt bac 
“ aitay VA ,Ineesng jer, enti tot | 

noitsidoees1etnves to Level « 











7 
i - 1 


i 6% | | die ele ula Ca 


78 


between grade and response which means that fewer Grade 
VII's were likely to answer affirmatively than Grade IX's. 
This suggests that first year students are more prepared 

to accept the VIF course in-its present. format: than are the 


second and third year students. 


Achievement level, = A x? VALUGHO Seo 4st Senet 
statisticallyesignificant...\A V value of -;05'signifies a 
very low degree of counterassociation between achievement 


teveleandsresponse. 


Quesitioneol.  lssaiteditficult, to understand why French 
sentences are constructed the way they are? 
TapdegxxxXiXydascloses tthatessi7 percent of-.the 
respondénpsorepatedythac theydfoundtat. disfiscultwtoeunder- 
stand why French sentences are constructed the way they 
arenunihese whoiansweredynegatively*constituted 30¢2sper= 
cent of the sample. Responses to this question reveal that 
the logic of the French language, which may be most. obvious 
to the: teacher, is not easily perceived by the students. 
A deductive presentation of the grammar. may be helpful for 


some students. 


Grade. A ce Value Orelor iwi Sustatasticaliy signig i 
Gatebeyena the ,0l level, «A C valuesor, .135 implies that 4a 
weak relationship is present. A V value of -.12-suggests 
low counterassociation between grade and response. This 


means that the Grade IX"S.were. slightly .more, inclined: to 








ober) rowet sed3- Rempeveurmar eave th 


.2'XI oberD neds yLlovisemritie rowans of YLestt sxow @"T1y 
bersqstq stom ots adnobusta reoy tenth li 
edt ots pads tsurro2- a tehii ati ai sees atv 


i hata 


a 
ae + 
| he tasbu ¢ 1a0y brid bas m baooee 
ton ei b.2 20 outev SX A .fevet shomevettion™ © 


s esitingie 20.- 20 sulev V A PPrercsnivicns 2 
snomsvsidos asewted noltpisoeesretayod “or ween’ 











< 

¥ pd aie ‘= 

donner | . 
sit to Jnsoteq V.ee rene eseoloeth KIXXX sldsT - ice ? . 


-tebou ot tivofltib ti bavet yedt teds betiqer 23 mebaogeet : F 
yedt vew oft besouttenos sxe usonsdaes donsti ydw baste 
~tsq $.02 botusisenos yevitegen berepneant od oeodt 
tedt [gover aoitesup 2ids 03 eeenogeod ise oad * +0 shed 


= 2 AL) 





euotvdo t2om od vem dotdw: ogsugast domed edt to rigo! od 
ny ie | 
setnobuse oft yd bovissteq iden 78 at \redonot 9 nod of oF 









sot Iviglod 9d ys Tsmmsty edt 0 no itaanoeeng evisoubeb > 


_ cbashene mcs 


“ad bngs © Yilsoitzisege 2k Lt, el to ey By A ,ebexd 
s ted3 eeiiqmi tf. 30 eulay DA, cay 0... 0dt Snoxed & a icc 
t ah : a & fa aad - ho a a - 
-abesggue S1.- 20 outey VA waa att ete / 
a (“¥ n', e Re ont oi 
erat roemog2or bas obstg a iintdetnnid Pee. 


- 
e 
ot baniloni ovom wisdgite ® | 


Aaa 


79 


answer affirmatively than were students in the two lower 
gtadesveathe fact’ that.~the material.covered by sthe.more 
advanced students becomes more difficult may explain this 
Situation. Another factor to be considered is the 
generally more negative outlook of the senior students 


toward the course. 


Achievement level. A x? Valuesotr, 44.401 Senet 
statistically -significant,. A V value of -.08-shows low 
counterassociation between the two classifications of the 


table. 


Question 40: Would you like to live in a community where 
Eoenchpusespaken by most or the people? 

Approximately two thirds of the students were 
opposed to the idea of living in.a French-speaking 
community. Table XL shows that 67.4 percent of the students 
héeldathis vaiewecomparedsto,16.2-percent who.said. that; they 
favOredasuchpa pesSibility, -To,conclude, thatathesstudents 
of this study held generally negative feelings toward 
French-speaking people on the basis of the above figures 
may. be quite inaccurate. Responses to other questions on 
the questionnaire seem to bear this out. Written comments 
revealed that inability to speak the language properly was 
the reason for not wishing to practice French even though 
there might be opportunities to do so. Such feelings would 
likely influence the answers obtained for this question as 


well. 


ie a oe rine . + 


V 
Mes <s las 
39% ws 963) mi ate nobus exswi ett OV i58 

















-_ « 24 
i a [a a tid 
fitis To8we 


sit 
* _ 


: J . 
. 4 “J 
stom sat Yd betovoo Laixetpm) 2 is sth a >Bt sdT: , esbsrg 


= teint , 
7 


4 7 f ms 
or 0 Vi: bs 

he seen 
== Nt a1 


2Insbute toinsa es to Aooksue evitegen: miei 
: ‘ae ie 


eins mire alaKa: ysm rhea kt +b stom 29me3 ad a9 
4 . Cs 


odd si bheveb£enon ed of 10toe? veago 


a ‘ gr: 
é +927y02 * iy 6 we $ 


. | | 2 
i.0.b to euley “XA .dewel somes flake 


ty 
2 | 
2 
Vv 
t 
©) 
5 


ey a OF o/ i ge foes ‘ A + ttn ee > . f on ae ‘ 
y of 2wone ¢ ) .* ae) guts y J fot . MBIT INGLE woes 
. ; , — a a 5 
sit to enoitsozitbiz2slo ows ely neewised NOL ItSEoC 
- f 4 
stedw yiioummoo & Bt svi Os earl uo bivow :0> apt 28 uO 
Tslgosq Sat to Feom yd siege ef donert 


= 


stow etasabuste odd to ebxrrd? ows \lozsaixorgga” é 


ae 


. 
a 
7 
















on 
Agsye-donerd s mi gaivil to sobs ony ot 1 betoq 

etnebuse. oft to tnesoteq +, \O tants gwone de oldaT eerie » 
yes tedt bise odw snsotsq. S.dE o2 a ac woiv aida b ht 
etnisbuse edt tect sbulsaop' oT .vitl redteeog: s four tates 


ite 
brswot aynifsst evijegsn yilstsnep Bb Lod te 2 at 4 2e 7 
~ - 4s » a a a 
P . am 7 is 7 robe 
291ugit syods sdt to gfesd sdz io ofqosg, gf ASS ~ >, asks 
- —_ ‘. ; : nw in 
; sitesup t9A20 , ost ) odswam 
HO effoltesup 19nso0 oF e9enogesn aay r Ps sa a ai i 
> : : - * 
etiommos oetiixW ,3tuo efdz reed of moe otis esup odd 


esw yltsgorq snsuanel sds Aseqe of ie) TD 


diguott neve dons soi soang oF gaideiw tom 


- ‘ a 
biuow 23 aiises dove .Qa2- ob. o3 soi simudvonge qq 


25 neistzsup #2: t02 DontRaee 21ewes wake 


és 


e ; : an ' 
¥ - : oa : i" 
Pie i ae. -_ | > ae 


80 


Grade. A x? value*of 4°78 is not. statistically 


Significant. A V value of .07 suggests a low degree of 


association between grade and response. 


Achievement level. A x? valué+of-94%5-1s5 not 
Statastically’sipniricant atSthes yolstevel.’ A V value of 
.12 denotes a low level of association between the two 
Classifications of the table which means that the low 
achievers were somewhat more likely to answer negatively 
than were the better students. That low achieving students 
would be against living in a community where they would be 
forced®*to*usea skillS®in° which they are*not*proficient. is 


HOteSurprising. 


Question 41: Can you hear the sentences on the tapes 
clearly iegh. Cente hate 


Consuleatirone Ot. lable XT» discloses thatvaftfirmarive 
and negative responses to this question were almost. the 
same,, 44,/4and 40,0 percent respectively, That so many 
Seugciemecxetleneccdencaring Gitrilculties 1S7 unitenrtunacte: 
such a situation could. only. result in. decreased motivation 
to learn the language. In ali schools Sony tape: recorders 
were used, but there were only two teachers who made use 
of external speakers with their machines. The figures 
above Suggest that’ in©°large classes, at least, better 
listening facilities-are required than was: the case’ in most 


of the classrooms visited during this study. The avoidance 












eee ton 2i 8.8 to aie tod 
40 sergeb wol © cicoygue VO. 20 suey WR! GSmeotREngee . 


senoqeer bas ere ee 
ate ‘wnt Seu ate 





ton et 2,8 to cuba > ee . 

to svisv VA .{sval [0, edt ts eer wis étuotsetsare 
ows odt noowied noitstoozes to level wok § eetomeb SI. 

- wol edt ted ensem doidw elday” ent tov enoiseoitreesfo | 
ylevitsgen rswene of yfodtil sTom ts wemoe ots ereverdon | . 
etasbuse gaiveisos wol sedT adnebure tested os tent at oa 
sd bivow yoda stedw <3 Enummo5 ‘8 oi gatvil teaisgs od bluow f : 
ei tnstoitorq tom sits yedt dotdw at flile s Case he! bye 






2ogst ot no esonsinoe sft 1s9m yo: 


ovitsmTitts tedt es2olz2eibh TIX eldsT to sottetivesed ~ halen 
sit tzomis stow mottesup aidt of soenoq2et evitegen brs 
“nam o2 tsdT .yLovitsegeey tneo1sq 0,88 bas T.bh pomee 
,etsautioiny et esis iusitith gatrsed beomeiveqxe etmebute 
noitevitom boas 01386 mi tluesr yfno blyod nokteutte se dove 
arebross: eqst yio2 eloodae fis al - ogsugnsl f 
Sey sbem odw 215d9893 owt xine. e19w <waeras 
2otwgit odT -ontdoem aReds doin ax * wars 


Tossed (tase 3s ite he ie 7 ie row 
7 - Se 
seom ai 9285 oft esw ma: Dt osett 


Win wt 














* : 7 Ma ic : 


Paw - 
7 Dae 


81 


of late generation tapes and the cleaning of recording 


heads could also be recommended. 


Grade. A ie Valice Ot l0t 2 tsenot. statistically 
Significant at the .01 level. A V value of .00 shows no 


association between grade and response. 


Achivevemnenteleve fs PsA x? Voie "Of oe. eiseTO C 
Statroerealby*sronrirircane. "9A Vevalue*ot 03s "denotes=a 
very low degree of association between the two classifi- 


Cations “of “the *table. 


Question 42: Do you..think that the repetition of.the 
taped sentences which accompany the filmstrips is useful? 
Even though many students may be of the opinion that 
the repetition phase of the VIF course. is monotonous, the 
majority of them believe that it is useful.. The responses 
CosQuestions42, presented in) lable XLil, show that: 72:5 
Devcent otetine= students werevin- apreement: With this) view 
cComparedmtonl4 epercenthwho were Not. —lt.1sS fortunate 
that such, a large percentage of the learners see.the value 
Cimcitcmey pe.O1saculvity Since it 1s essentials to an 


audio-lingual course lakes VIF, 


(Gaal CE AA x? Vales Ol owl erowsta Uist Cau lyees Tori 1 - 
Gave vey oiaetie =U) bevely YeA"C value ot. 71's "sleniprires 
tat ta moderate “léevell’"of “relationship ‘exists. *"A V fvalue 


of .24 indicates a moderate level of association between 







saibrooss to eee ent € 


Yisotteisiste son 2i §,0L eo! ial wi 


ot ewode 0D. to onlay ¥ A ,fevel 428 












tor 2t S,t *o° suey a A . fae 

a . / } ro (Ty a > 4 La’, ove 
B. estonsb £0, to sufsev V A Fras mann a 
ce pas eS | } 

-ftreesI> ows sit neoswted toitsiooees to erg i 


‘okies ie ‘aah re ie | 


1 4ogs a. 


sft Jo 0 nolsitsges “od 
Sietsen ex 






“Sa L" 






edd ,2voosonom 21 setuaD a1V eds to ee 


2senoqes:t st tuteey 2i ti tedz veiled wedd 


2, $1 3643 wode ,I1TdX sidsT at betaseorq a py: 
wsiv 2idt dtiw 2 namseres) iW ba er yObH ew 20 Samoreg 
sakiitso%! ai) Ga’. ee ee swenteas 0, 
eulsy edt 992 eremrssl sit. Fo. epatnesreg | , 
me ot [sigaseze/2i Fh esate “aivites 


TV “pa ror seis Fe ? 


ig she 






-itingie Si heaiectsaan et £185.20. nies? if 
. Ss o 
zethingie 21. Yo pacilah Alig tee xt 
she A ‘iain 7 - Ai J oh nae a 
i i ean See 


ae 4 







82 


grade and response which means that the first year 
students were more likely to reply affirmatively than were 
the more advanced students, The increasing number of 
negative responses between Grade VII and.Grade IX may be 
due to a generally more cynical attitude on the part of the 
eidereleamnexy arisingotromrthemfact-that hetfails tossee 
the usefulness of this activity once he has learned to say 
the sounds correctly. As was mentioned in: the discussion 
of Question 33, when learners no longer, feel. that this 
exercise, issinterestingeor useful, they will not wish. to 
Pag ti Cipatesinys tatudherefores«thegnature ofpthisephase of 
the VIF lesson will have to be changed if effective 


dgeagningndas teroccur. 


Achaevement level. .«A x? valuesotelSe0easistatastiz 
caliybstenaficanti beyond) thes .Qlyleveles AJC valueso£é 714 
implies that a.weak, relationship exists. A V value of. .20 
represents a moderate level of association between the two 
classifications,of the table; This means. that, the high 
achievers were more inclined to answer affirmatively than 
were the lower achievers. One of the reasons for the lack 
of success by the lower achievers is probably their failure 
to see the logic. for some of the. methodology in the. VIF 
course. Failure to understand the. usefulness of: the 
repetition phase would no doubt lead to decreased proficien- 


cy in the language. 


se 















wrssy teri2 os stedz canon dais . . 
erew nadt ylevitamrizts yiqet oF coil ston, eran atmabyae ay 
to copia gitieseroat eft -etnobude Sets en a - 

od Yam xT aber). bas, 11V ebsto iowies kegen | | 


Cw he -% 
edt to t18q ont no sburists Ipsiny stom viata 63 aub i iar s 


sez of elie ad fant Taek edt mort gnieris ‘redresl teblo 2 : 


a 





yse of benisel esd sd sano yJivitss aida to azsnlutoey eds ae 
nobaeuzeib oft ni benottasm aw 2h. wltoer103 ehnyoe odd ; 
zit tsdt Leet rognofl on atsareel mew ,f£ moitaeu—. io |, on 

6+ d2tw ton tkiw ved ,Lluteev 10 gniseerstai et e2totexe | as 
to sesinq-eid? to orien edt .e10tetsdT «Fk at stsqizisisq 
evitoetie tf beets ed of syed Lliw qozeet 41V edz 

| /m990 OF ef guimrael 


iN 


| ei, ei - 
-~Etettste zt 0.8L to esutsvy “KX A ‘i “~~ 





Isvol_: 
bi, 20 sufev 2A .fovetif0, og, baoysd aimoeeiagle Mikes | =e 
OS, to eiiav VA .etekxe qidenoitslox dsew 6 sede coliqai 
owt a3 nsewied noltsrooees to Level etstebom 8 etn 9eotqet 

dgid ods tadt ensom 2td’ ,eldas oat 20, ani teoltieesto 


msds visvitemriits t9wens of Ao ed peat a 










A>aI edt 102 enoessx1 9d3 to on0 etsveifiog 


stulist tredt yidsdorq ef ersveinos sv baeeeerer 


TLV oft gi vgolobodsem -ofs. te emo x¢ 
edz to 2ezenivieey' oid basterebau ass 
~neioitora beasstosb o3 beet tduob on b 






= 


' i‘ e jaty fh Je oe oe 


83 
Question 43: Would you like to have more tests so that 
ee wou ave _a better idea of your progress in 
rench ‘ 

This question was included-in the questionnaire 
Simply to.obtain a general opinion from the.students 
regarding the use of tests with the VIF course. Most 
teachers make provision for some type of informal test, ~ 
often in every lesson. However, such tests do not always 
keep the students informed of their progress. The figures 
recorded in Table XLIII show that the largest. proportion of 
the respondents, 65.1 percent, did not desire any more 
tests. Numerous, students wrote that they were already 
overburdened with tests, but whether this is the actual 


CASeG, 1S NOt, certain. 


Gradé.ceA x? VYaluehet 2629 Isrstatastically sifeni fi- 
Gamtybeyond thee.01 jlhevehow AyGhvalue ofechicsuggesits that 
a moderate relationship is present. A V value of .24 
Mepresents) a moderate level or association between, grade 
and response which means that the Grade IX's were more 
Wikely to. answer negatively: than were. the Grade VII's. 

The reason for such: a distribution of responses may 
possibly be the-greater apprehension which senior students 
have.of testing, or they may indeed have a greater number 
of formal tests compared to their counterparts in the- two 


lower: grades. 


Achievement level.» A x? Malu e 60 figs 71 S inet 




















stisaaoiszeup eds. ni bebuboai sn aidan 
zjnsbute edt mort nolnigo tery & aistdo oF yiqmie | 
S20M . 927109 Fiv oft dtiw esess to seu edd gaibrsget oe 
~t293 Lemtotart to sqys smoe 10} noketvong Siem eterdoees 2. “J 
eyewls tom ob 2te93 dove ,r9vowoH -fozeel yreve ni nest0 a 
eertat? edT ,22ergoTg 1r9d? 15 bentotak etasbuse edd qeed, Ti 
to \noksroqorq teogtsl eft tads wore {I1dX @fdeT ‘ni bebtoser = 
stom yas etieob. ton bib ,tasatsq [1 e0 .20nobnogest edt 
ybsetls s19w yedt tend etorw agtaouae enorsmu ,etesy om 
fsusos eft ef etda redtodw tod ,erest dtiw bonebrudrevo 
iteeen tiem 2h eeBd 7 


-ftingie yilsvisteitsse 2b @.d8 to oulev ‘ec +pbe7d | 
tesds ed2syggue ‘Ll. to suisv DA .tavel £0, eft baoyed: ta82 an 
&S, to sulsy V A ,tmezerg ef didepedeaiiee sbabebbets 
ebety nsowred nolisiooeeas to Level stsrsbom & ednozetqet . 

stom stow 2e'XI sbs10 edt sed} cosem doidw eemoqeer- bap | . 7 
.2'TIv obara eft sisw neds \ievisagon vameme 02 yLodtt 

ysm 2o2enoqeet to noistudiaterb sous Tob noaser’ edt 
egasbuse rinse doidw noi eeprtomqae, 19389x8) 
tedmun tespet, 5 over bosbai am (odd 40. peanaenee 
ows ods ai aszeqvedattes. yee T a 


» 4 e : 













4 es 


yor et £.2 to outev “KA |, 


84 


Stats ticalivesinificant. A V value of ,08 intimates a 
low degree of association between achievement level and 
response. 
Question 44: Do you think the teacher should write the 
French sentences on the board when you have learned to 
Say them? 

Table-XLIV: reveals that 59.6 percent of-the students 
believed that the teacher should write the French 
sentences on the board after they had learned them compared 
torso... percentiwho did not, believe.so. Two of-the eight 
teachers whose students answered the questionnaire said 
that they “did. write the sentences onthe board after 
PEeEscicingeenem towthe: Class.) This woulddvhaveslaikely 
ie luenced) respenses to this question. ~Students" written 
GOMmentseindicated that they were largely: in.tavor.of 
having ‘this? done Jusitthow much: this’ practice! causes 


interference with proper pronunciation is debatable. 


Grade. A x? value of 20.3 1s statistically 
Significant beyond the-,0 1) level. A Civalue-of 215 suggests 
that a moderate level of relationship is present. A V 
value of. -.20 reveals a moderate level of counterassociation 
between grade and response which means that the Grade IX's 
were more probable to answer affirmatively than were the 
Grade VII's, It may be that the.greater number of sentences 
and the increasing complexity of the material would 


influence the more advanced student to answer this question 


















$8) 


é noenidigiaty to ute bites + 
bas Isvel Sfsibvoisos . ‘ad 


etnobute oft to Jneotsg 4. ed tena sisover 3K otdet iF } rane 
‘L, sees 7 
donstd sta ssixw Siuorke raitoses ot ee cae a 


Bexsqmo> mad7 bsarssl bed yods TOTT6, brsod. ofa +o eae 


atigis eft to ow? .02 sveitfed ton bib ost saaoreg t.05 93 _ . 
761 oe 78 
bise siisnuoitzoup ollt borewann atnopute ones abe “3 
", 


1stis brsod sit no “posmetnee ott oti bib yeas 
seemed wi ae 


Lotil svar biuow efdT .eento sds ox itnee . Tr 
X | 5 | | Pt oe Spesese te 
netiixw 'etnesbuse .aottesup eidt.ot 2senogeer beonsuliat 20 


to xovs? ni ylogrsl orew Yods ted? besastbmr étasmmes  ” 
2eeusp 92isostq 2idt doum wod teul \Sheb wRie>garvel 2 
-aldeisdeb 2i noitsionuagrg 1Sqonq Adew SoneTetretat © 


Par eat 
\lissisettstse ai &.0 %0 RULES * a. . 
eteeugve ci. ta sulsv 3 A dtayel £0.. oat estou ft te a 
VA ,tneestq 2x videaoi sagen 40 — 
noitsinozestetnyos to fovel 908608 s elao 0s. 20 ou. 
a” X41 Shazo eis sedz> ensen Bead ie. <a 
ait orew nat loviws 1ii te ded hie te 
asonetasé 20 ¢odmun sine * | a 1 re 
bivow inirerem hess 30 TExXe | 
Mottzeup cits xewens od Sneby : 





= 


26 ad | noewrer fj =F 


ae 





85 


in the affirmative. 


Achievement level: A eG Via UCM Oc oo SanlGt 
Statistically significant. A V value of .03 represents 
a very low degree of association between achievement level 


and response. 


Question 45: Is one of the reasons for your study of 
French to allow you to meet and talk with French-speaking 
people: 

Responses to this item show that the largest percent- 
age of the students in this study held favorable attitudes 
toward French-speaking people. The results, presented in 
Table XLV, disclose that 48.7 percent of the respondents 


Nei ceciicepost@ielveraututude, comparedeto Sl. 0epercent who 


did not. 


Grade. A x? walué Pofez4c2 asastatusticadllyesignifi- 
GanttbeyondktheecOlL LeyelvedAnG Vallegofrels denotes. that a 
moderateslevel of relationship is: present.’ A V value of 
.19 represents a moderate level of association between 
grade and response. This means that the Grade VII's were 
more likely to answer affirmatively than were the Grade 
IxX’s. ~These results may suggest, that prejudice tends: to 
increase with age, or they may simply indicate that 
beginning.students. are more likely to have an idealistic 


point of view. 


Achievement level. A x2 vathetofmize Suis not 


ay oF Heh ls 






















; Tone 
roe. ifn eg as a4 ay 
ton ef €.8 to sutsyv os A ke ar see 2 16. 7 
aa ry oY ed ; 
atnszerqet £0, to oufev VA ‘.tmeor Liogie pid 2d sy 
fevel nemevor sop Pe hai ad bi 


-~$n9579q gzopitsl ont tert woe matt aidt ot ingiodsae + eee = 
zebugisis eidsrovat bl aif ybute 2idt at inate ie, ay | 
nit bsetits2eetq crn odT. . ef[qo9g gnideeye- -douox brewed — ; 

atnesbaoges: sds to tasp19q 1.3% teat szoloeth Wax eldest | 


onw tneateq 0.Lf of betsqmo> bus £78% ovittzeq (aide Blae —- - 7 
: »etee_p tia | ‘ver 
-Jon bib iv 


ica, 

-Fiingie yv{isoitetsete 2i S.bS to stlev “AA, 5 
fiingie xi 5 A. gba, 08 ; 
& tedt estonesb OL, to sulev : A .ievel LQ. sit beoyed sass a 
to sufey VA ,tneestq et qidenoitslox te veined he 
feewied moistgtooees to foyol otérebicn. ) 


etéw 2'Tiv ebstd oiit sed3 ens asi t obaT aera 


a: 
sbs10 sd3 sxsw nsdt <ioviremvEvie oad els 


. OF ebast soLbw Lota ted Peaae. x mo etiwess 201 os, 2'xI 
tedt etazibnt amie yen te. (838 pine re mana _ 
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Pat. rie 
oma 2.51 a0 ee 


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86 


Statistically significant at the .01 level. A V value of 
.16 implies a moderate level of association between the two 
classifications of the table which means that the high 
achievers were more likely to answer affirmatively than 
were lower achievers. Students with higher skill 
communicating in French would be more apt to welcome 
Opportunities for face to face contact with native speakers 


of the language. 


uestion 46: Would you say that this kind of. course, with 
filmstrips and tapes, is a good one for students who wis 
to learn. {to speak «French? 

En {spi te foiethemnumber, of. cra ticisms and icomplaints 
described in the students' written comments, most of the 
respondents. expressed a positive reaction toward-it. The 
figures in Table XLVI show that 66.1 percent of the 
students felt that the VIF course was a good one for learn- 
ing to speak French compared to 19.5 percent who did not 


believe so. 


Grade. A x? Vadiue: ose 40 27 Gus asta tusiticalily jsigni fi - 
Garni ibeyromd thet 0 lpalieve lf ASC evalue*jot 42 laint imat es: sthat 
a.moderatetlevel of relationship exists. A V value of .29 
Indicates. a, moderate.level of association between-grade and 
response which means. that the Grade VII's were more apt.to 
answer. affirmatively than were the students. in the two 
Ihchereorades, sslne fact. that Che VIF course,was new- to. the 


Gradé, VI1's probably accounts for-their more positive 












to diye VA .fovel 10, sft t6 
ows ods neous od not tsisce2s 26 Level e3s bom 
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fLide sues Ag fw. 23. obwae ~2t 


> Ch wre ty _ 














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- . af ane 


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iy Gores 0 
eat .ti ae Koitosst evitreog s beeesnqxe @ ! - on 
16k J e 
ed? to tnsvtsq 1,00 stedy wore IVIX eldest ak een Ae 


-nisef rot, 29m0 boon 5 ebw getvos FLV ont Tedd $fet gs nebere 
ton bib ow tneoteq 2.0L of beteqmes donest seeqe of gai 
oe svetled. 


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~liingie ere soeaeieabe 2i 1.0% to suley “xR 


teis eoismigni 1S, to sufev DA .fovel 0. or bane oa 


in 
@$. to sulsv V A -2d2tKe ‘an AiiE ae ee ie aD | 


7 


sei 
bas: pete neewsed notvatooezs ta fe. Se te 
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evigtzoq” 


87 


response to this question, and as has already been 
mentioned, the first year learners tend to be more 


1dealis tic sasitwe Li: 


AchievemenOrlovel » A ‘e Valueeon o70 81S =O t 
Statistically significant. A V value of .13 suggests a 
low degree of association between achievement level and 


response. 








uestion 47: Would you like more individual practice 
repeating French sentences-after the tape recorder? 


If students were strongly. opposed to the repetition 
phase of the VIF lesson, they would have probably answered 
this question in the negative. However, reference to Table 
XLVII reveals that 44.3 percent of the students wanted 
additional repetition practice compared to 39.0 percent who 
did not. Large classes combined with a shortage of time 
are two factors which would likely have caused the students 


to answer this question in the affirmative. 


Grade A x? VallcmoL 2.2 15 Mot Statistically 
Spit cali AaVeValuc FOr "0 5mSignities a very low degree 


of association between grade and response. 


Achievement level. A x? Valuewort eon UielSs) not 
Sedtis@uCcallves LpiltticCalbt. 9A \ Value Gt ,09 represents Very 
low association between the two classifications of the 


table. 

















, 


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arom ed os bast ersntsel * Seale rit off oiteaie 
i va oudesnaabh 


A 






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tom wi 0,8 to onlay “KA , 


. betowens "dadory sved ‘pivew eet aba ‘IV sits 40 seatg 
sidaTt of arm .Tsvewon vsvidsagea sAg ai ‘ao3 e0up- anda 
betnsw ‘isis ait to tnsvteq €.56 gene einover 1IVIX 

ofw tiesrsq 0,08 oF bersqmos exidemie molt byeqet renots thbs " 
enij to egatiode s dtiw benidmos eseasis egiad! stom bib 
esasbud2 ont boeuss. svad yfodil bluow dobdw erotos? owt ote 


evisemritts edd ak colt 2oup caine 
yilsoitetsete tom ai $48) to’ ‘gutsy ar ae 


g9rg9b wolf vrov s eof ingte 20. 29) ule V dei 


-aadogeer baa: obese 92! 


; > et. 
jon 2i°0.2 6 outa Sx a boys ¥ . 


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88 

Question 48: Do you sometimes have class time to talk 
inerrenchhaboutsthe t Ine Sew CHeAresOr Interest te 
you personally? 

thas -questiven is=very Similar to Question 18, but 
with this item an even stronger reaction was obtained from 
the respondents. The figures recorded in Table XLVIII 
show that 71.8 percent of the students considered that they 
did not have opportunities to discuss in French things that 
were of interest to them personally. Only 19.9 percent of 
the sample replied in the affirmative. The feeling of the 
majority of the students was probably well expressed by one 
individual who wrote, "Personally, I feel the present 
French course is good for getting a feel of the language 
in an oral way, but we should have more conversations in 
class to improve Qqur pronunciation and become more confident 
in speaking."' Neglect of the transposition phase of the 


Fesson yrsirlikely the sreasonefor*such comments.< 


Grade... A xe Value of 848 15 not Statistically 
Signiticant.«. A V-vaiue of .14 denotes a, low degree of 


association between grade and response. 


AchieVvemciumiLe Veuww xe VaAluceOtes, leis 
Suacisthcad ly si0ntagcani, eAVV value-of--.90 indicates 4 
low degree of counterassociation between achievement level 


and response. 









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a eideT iv bebtoget 2e1ugit eaT hie 
F8 SDaThe ~ = 
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‘ton bib ate Poo 

tsdz quart flometd at eewnetb o3 esisinutroqqe wena i 
to guenred ®.@f yinO .vilsaoeteq mois oF teers? ai wae ‘ . 
silt 20 gailest sat -oudeemsétis edt mt ners) i — 





end yd bezzergxe tbe ids dong eaw esnobude 


tnezetq oft fest I _eUiisnoe199" ebeee ee ‘Guus a 
a5 ‘? @¢s ’ 7 


sysugasl odt to leet s ‘gnitseg 10% boog ei setu0> 


o>), Seow 7 
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Per VEr i 
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os fate , 
sit to sesrig noitteoqensrs os 20 s29igev " -gattsoge ai aan 
‘gy OED 1a 
.etremmos doye 102 foesst odt views ei moezel . a 
stat “CMe we W3 





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.dmsaE Linge, 


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. .92togest bas sbszg 








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Level tnemeveidcs neswied not: t00 gests ) tes: eb wol 





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89 


Question 49: Do you like the filmstrip pictures used in 
the French course’ 


Consultation of Table XLIX discloses that opinion 
was fairly evenly divided on this question, 39.5 percent 
of the students stating that they liked the filmstrip 
pictures compared to 36.3 percent responding negatively. 
Unfortunately, almost one quarter of the sample was without 


an opinion either for or against the question. 


Grade. A X* value of 40.1 is statistically signifi- 
Sant sveyvold thea televel 7. A) GC Value of 22.0) reveals that 
a moderate level of relationship is present. A V value of 
.28 represents a moderate level of association between grade 
and response which means that the Grade VII's were more 
likely to answer affirmatively than were the Grade IX's. 
The greater acceptance of the filmstrip pictures by the 
first year students may have been expected since this aid 
would be a novelty for them. The second and third year 
learners would probably require greater variety in their 


lessons in order to maintain interest. 


Achievement level. A x2 Vader: Ota Us Senet 
Statistically significant. A V value of .11 suggests low 
association between the two classifications of. the table. 


uestion 50: Do you think a knowledge of French will hel 
ou have a more Sympathetic understanding or appreciation 
of French-speaking people? 


The figures presented in Table L show that 45.0 





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i 7 b. reece —- 

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= hid 1 it 

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Sedt elsover [8, to oulav 9 A .fovel 10, ed? baoysd Ymeo 

to sulsy VA .tnme2si1q 2: gidenoiss ler to Lever otstohom & - rs 

Sbetg meewssd nottsizezes to Lovsf starebom s ei mseotger 88) 7 | 

stom stow 2'LIV sbsxd odd tude eabew ppidw venoqeoe bas 

2'XI obsx0 edt stow asdt ylavitemrilts teweme’ od yiadit 


sHt yd zorutoig qiztemlt2 aids Xo 3263 49998 rotnsry edt 
bis 2idd sonie betosqxs asad sved ysm 2tnebute vay deni 
tHSY bridt bos baoose sdtT .msfht tod hanaebiaie hs ad hides 


tied3 mi yvisitsv retsetg entities \idedorg biuew exomrnat 
need ta 

.testetnt nhsrikee O23 ebro at pee. 

5 Ibe yee 


Jon 2i 0.2 to syisy Sy A. ov P ” \ a 
terse 














ia 


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ides sz Yo enotreaitiaes ts: on sat on mi ume 


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Ta —— 





-_ 


( 1 £ TW is Vea ‘ . on WT: ‘ af : ol 
. A ie d Sawai, » eS > it WO i: : v 
OLIRCoOST 15 10 pir $ Inset > ; r : 
. Cee | 7 # 
P ' ae: ny Rie : 
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90 


percent of the students considered that study of French 
would give them a more sympathetic understanding of French- 
speaking people compared to 28.7 percent who believed that 


thaswwould, not be the. case. 


Grade, A ie ValvemaheotgoiiSestatistically: signifi - 
cant beyond the .01 level. A C value of .19 suggests that 
aq moderate level of relationship exists, A V value of .2% 
denotes a moderate level of association between grade and 
response which means that the Grade VII's were more likely 
to answer affirmatively than were the Grade IX's. Once 
again the more idealistic viewpoint of the Grade VII 


students.appears.to,. account. for~this. situation. 


Achievement level; A ne Value sot L0G 451s ner 
Statistically esipngtveants at ther.0l level, A Vovalue of 
.09 signifies low association between achievement level 
and response. 

Uestion sles Doryoustandsthatethe frimstrip storiesrare 
interesting most of the: time? 

Table LI reveals that affirmative and negative 
responses.to this. question were practically the.same, 43.3 


and 43.4 percent respectively. 


Grade. A x? Value or 40.6 15.Statastically signifi- 
Colbebevyohdstiee.Uleleveles oA Covalue of .21 andicates that 


a moderate level of relationship is present. A V value of 






oe 


long 10: u yas : con 
-donsti) to gaibnsterebs vf rycen 


tent artes odw JhaMeg esas o 


Play 


ie 










- * 





























~ttingie yilsoitertate 2i 2.bé td owiay “XA ‘easiest ep ¥ 


7. —_ 











Jens 2tzoeggue ef. to sulsy 2A Vaver 20. Ha 95 
ES. fo sulsv VA lateixe qidenortel $1 30 \favel 
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s2n0 .2e'XI obs10 Files 919 rsd3 Vievisemrite 1 ‘3 a A 
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Mofteusti2 eid tot davooss oF stesqqE 


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Aa . 

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. feyel sasmeveinos asewted aortsis0ze9 wok estiingia 20. 
; ‘ Sian 








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: | Mavis oegeer 3 

| aad od 

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pan : Sire rom 







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-28 shows a moderate level of association between grade 

and response.which means that the Grade VII's were more 
likely to answer affirmatively than were the Grade IX's. 
The VIF course is a new one for the Grade VII students. 
This is likely one reason for their more, positive attitude 
toward it. A few written comments referred to the childish 
nature of the filmstrip stories. Such a reaction would be 


more apt. to come:from the Grade IX's. 


Achievement level. A x? Value~of 9.4-is not 
Statistically significant at the .01 level, A V value of 
-13 represents a low degree of association between the two 
classifications of the table. This means that the high 
ability students were more likely to answer affirmatively 
than were lower ability students. These results demonstrate 
the positive relationship between interest in the course 


and achievement: 


uestion 52: When a new story is begun, do you find that 
you ave torgotten the sentences you learne rom the 
essonsepetores 
Some authorities in the field of second language 

learning believe that, when meaning is not clear for a 
learner, retention of memorized phrases is brief. This may 
describe the situation for the students of this study since 
the majority of them answered this question in the 
affirmative. Table LII shows that 58.9 percent of the 


sample said that they had retention difficulties compared 






re 






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detbfrris oft, of berrsisr. atnammo2 mettitw wot A os 
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-eurh sba1) sat stort. 202 ot 348. a 


. fom ei 4.2 to sulsey Syria Level smemauen dane 
to SHES Y VA ,isvef I0. oft te tnssitingte meet 


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dgid oft tent ensem 2tdT ,.elfdss oft Yo enor seat¥been ts 
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Ststtenomsb 2ztivee1 gesdT. ,2atnobute yiritds Cound orow neds <2 
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ranrem - a 






















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& Tot teel5 jon ei ygniaesm nodw THnD ay 


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_ pene ae “veledaaae 


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a 


to 25.8 percent who did not think that they did. The 
results in Question 37 revealed that a large proportion of 
the students often failed to understand the meaning of the 
sentences. This being the case, it is not surprising that 
many learners were unable to remember the sentences from 


one lesson to the next: 


Grade. A ne Value@orss 1 15 not-statistically 
Significant. A V value of -.02 reveals negligible counter- 


association between grade and response. 


Achievement level; A re VAUUCROtE So .0 Sismestatisti— 
cally significant: beyond’ the .01 level. A C value of .20 
intimates that a moderate level of relationship is Dreste iin 
A V value of -.29 signifies high counterassociation between 
achievement level and response which means that high 
achievers were less likely to answer affirmatively than 
were. lower achievers. These.results could. probably have 


been predicted. 


Question 53: Do you think mau will be able -to speak French 
when you have finishe 1g Sic ool? 


This! 1s) a hypothetical, question and because*of this 
the number of "Undecided" responses is rather high. Table 
LIII shows that most respondents, 44.7 percent, thought 
that they would be able to speak French at the termination 
of their high school studies compared to 27.4 percent who 


were pessimistic about this idea. 






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batiarS 


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2idt to seussed brs mois 2eup iotssoontt a comet al 
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93 


Grades x? Value Ome”, 2's statis tieally 
Significant beyond the .01 level. A C value of. .23 
Signifies that a moderate level of relationship exists. 

A V value of .29 indicates a moderate level of association 
between grade and response which means that the Grade VII's 
were more likely to answer affirmatively than were the 

Grade IX's. The enthusiasm and optimism of the first year 
students is clearly evident in these results, however, a 
more pessimistic view seems to develop rapidly in the second 


and third year of the course. 


Achievement level. A x? ValIuUe@OL OO@l sisesStatisti - 
Cally sige cant beyond the 4.01 Mevel®: SAC Sraltie ‘of .2:7 
Suggests that-a moderate level of relationship is present. 
A V value of .36 denotes high association between the two 
Classifications of the table. » This means that the high 
achievers were much more likely to answer affirmatively 
than were the lower achievers, These results suggest that 
poor performance in second language study leads to lower 
optimism for future ability as a speaker of that language. 
Acie 54: Would you like to have a a textbook 

Or rrenchwcontainings the;sentences or the lessons an 

SUI eExerersesy 

A fairly large proportion of the students indicated 
a preference for a textbook containing the sentences and 
Some exercises, Table LIV shows that 70.8 percent.of:the 


respondents were in favyor,of this idea compared to.20.8 


ee 




















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taey tetit sdt+ to mzimitqo bas masievatee oAT a obp12 

& ,Tovewon ,2tlueer seers nt 1aebive ixpeba es ttnobase, ; 
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-£s2tiste 2f [,Cd to sirflsv Sy A Level e} 





iw os, 


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(lovitsnxitis tewens oF ylodif stom Aaum sT9W ereyel ion: 
tedt tesggue etivest szsdT -aTOVeL ion tSwol aN bi el 


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94 


percent who were opposed. There are likley numerous 
reasons for students wanting a regular textbook. Tradition 
is probably one of the strongest. Nonetheless, for any 
students the number of days between classes would be a 
legitimate reason for such a desire. Students who have 
French for the first three days of the week followed bysa 
four day period where no class time is devoted to the 
subject need some help for learning on their own. Library 
records are available, but the quantity is limited. In 
addition, problems created by absenteeism could possibly be 


alleviated by the provision of a textbook. 


Grades 7A x? value of 1.5 is not, statistically 
Significant, A V value of -.03-indicates a.negligible 


degree of counterassociation between grade and response. 


2 yalue of 12%74isnnot 


Achievement isyel, AX 
Statistically significant atathey.s0l.leveleo AuVevaluesof 
-15 represents a moderate level of association between 
achievement level and response which means that low 
achieving students were less likely to answer affirmatively 
than were higher achievers. The better achievers are 
usually more concerned about marks, and are probably more 
independent than their less successful counterparts. They 


therefore feel that they could benefit from a textbook to 


angreaterhextent. 













he 


eyOr Ommutt 5 yaitil sis svedT 
noisibs1T .Aoodsxes 1slugsy 8 yaks 

Yas T9% yeeelodseolt Seaghorte odt 30. ono hdadang, ak ~ 

s od Biuow beeesio! feewsed 2yub to: eduun edt etmsbyte 

syed odw etaobute .sitiesh s dowe tot nNoeast ssemttheas 

s yd bewollot tosw oft 20 eysb sort Jerid oft rot domext 

sit ot betoysh ef emis 2esla.om stedw boinsq ysb.xuod i 

yreTdil .awo tisds mo b onkaeeat toh aiod omoe boon soatdue 

ci .betimil et ytitasup 6d3 tud aidelisve st8 2brozex 

ed Yidiezog bluoo meiestnseds «d betss1a amsidong: ttoktibbe 


,Aoodtxet s to moteivorg sds yd besatvelis 





an 





= 


yilsotteitiste ton ef ¢.f to sulsy Oak + Sbax ine 
eldigiiysn s eetsotbnai t0.- to sulsv VA Tasobhingiea 
-Semoqest bas sbhatrg asswied noitsisozestes aves to segeb. 


tom er “SI to sulsv Sy A -fovel sismeyetiias ~~ a 

Fas oufsv V A .feovel {0. oda ss saoitingic yiepeeleaes | 
nSewsEd noitgtooges to fevel ststebom. s somoonger af. 
wol shad ansom dotdw senogest bas rou onomoveidos — 


yievitsmritis tewens o3 YloArl 22eL erow nails 


918 219VSidos tetied edt -ereveidy 

erom yldsdorgq 915 bas 2htem suods~ "8D 
(OAT .ettsqretquos iadgesooue, eeel, ey: 

of Agodaxe2 » nor? sso bah outa , 

rt wa 

. =e 

; a 


if 












ie 


— 


pico Se : a 


J 
al 
¢ 


a L 
: aa 4 sy. Th geal ip eee ee 


15 


uestion 55: Would it be helpful in learning the French 
sentences that accompan the al, US eae ab LCTUTreEsS 2 ou 
would write them in your exercise Bost 


The figures in.Table LV reveal that most students, 
62.7 percent, considered that writing the French sentences 
in their exercise books would be helpful. About one 
quarter of the sample, 24.1 percent, did not accept this 
concept. Contrary to the accepted methodology for the 
VIF course, some of the teachers stated that they had their 
students write the sentences in their exercise books 
Shortly after the new material was. introduced. This has 


probably influenced answers to this question to some degree. 


Grade oat x4 Valve  O8@s Fo: 6isiinet statistically 
Significant. A V value of -.08 denotes low counter- 


association between grade and response. 


Achievement.level. A 44 value foie. 3cnus snot 
Statistically significant. A V value of. .09 suggests a 
low degree of association between the two classifications 


of the table. 


Question 56:.Do you want the teacher to explain.in English 
Ee soo annie mien cetidorstanl ieee a you don't understand? 

The use of English for conveying meaning is. not 
recommended in, the VIF course, but the students: of this 
study were heayily in fayor.of English being used to. clear 
up comprehension problems, Table LVI reveals. that 86;1 


percent tofithe situdentsefavored théewusesof «English for 

















<etnebut2 220M tant feovet Vl o tds” ag atmenet rr 
2sone tage ifedest sds guts itw. tans bersbianey .Ineoteq 7.928 ai 
ono IgodA i Iptqisd-sd bivew exocd seLotexe theds: ii 7 ) 
zidt, $qeoo8 Soin bie vinesteg Ivkk ,oftmse oie Yo yesteup a 
efit 102 ypolobodtem beg gSo36, bat oF «rete e6D jeqebnoo | 4 
Tiedt bed yedt tad¢ betete etedossx sit to sme .oeTu0D TTY z 
etood s2intsxs. riod mh essitedtats ory opine etnebute | 
26a 2in Masuhortat. eaw Leitetsm wan ond 1ethe “Estos an : 
.99fgeb omoz o3 soitesup eid? oF erewene Daonsultnk Qidedorg 


qiisoiteisey2 tom ef 0.2 to swisy "XA Sema 
-1ethuoo wol 2stonsb 80.- t6.ocdfew ¥ A THsoktiagre | 
.s2noqz2st bne ghsty noaswied nolietaoeza. 


tow ei 8.¢ to culav “* A Uigyel Snempuaaia 

‘ =a 

8 eteoguue 20, to outlay VA ,sneotibagie naam ei 
enoitsotifeeslo ows eft nosywted nottsisores YO! bi wor” 








tom 24 gainsem, ghiyevnoy 10% tea tgall hehe 
eids io 23 nebute edt. tad .82TU05 itveddeds 
teelo9.03 beev guiod fektgad to-r0ve9 ai. st 6 
{.08 stadt ifenvas IVI afdsT aes 
tox neste ci to eau of? aa. 






ie hyp mevar <' 


etek 


6 - Oey 7 
| ota ‘ A) an 
ad ee i et 


Me 


this purpose compared to 9.4 percent who were not in 
favor. These results represent the strongest reaction 

of the respondents to any question on the questionnaire. 
While their solution to this problem may not be the right 
one at all times, the figures suggest that a large 
percentage of the students were having at least some 
difficulties understanding the meaning of the French 
sentences, and that better methods are needed to clarify 


meaning. 


Grade. A x? ViNuCeOte ,0P1S NOt] Statistically 
Significant. A V value of -.14 signifies low counter- 


association between grade and response. 


Achievement level. A a Value wOte seo MLSE NOt 
statistically significant. A V value:of -.10-indicates 
a low degree of counterassociation between achievement 


level and response. 


uestion 57: When you have learned the sentences of the 
esson, can you usually see some grammar rule for the 
Way the sentence is constructed? 


Tiestiguresmomelabie LVII reveal’ that only 28.2 
perecent.of the students believed that they could see some 
grammar rule for the way the sentence is constructed. 
More than half the sample, 52.4 percent, did not think 


they could, perceive any rule. 


Gradent A x? value of 43.4 is statistically 



















ti (tom stow ow tasoteg 4.8 ~ bs 
moitjsser F2egnors2e sdAr tszetqeT 2 

ievisamoiseoup sd. no nofteeup ys OF sortehusnsinatt Perr 

tdgit six od ton ysm maldorq id? ot aoftuloe Thedd of kaw | 

epiel s teds tesgaue 2oTegtt ols .eomis ils ts eno : : tae 

emtoz tesel Is gnived sitsw etnebute odd 20 oys3n9o19q 

donett oft to gninsom adt+ gnibnstersbaw eeisieaeaeeb 8D 





(titelo ot babes e1s zbordiom tsttod tsi? bas) peeometmee 
-3oinsom . eT 
| - 
uchel be S ie 
yilssitettste ton et 0.3 to sulsv “K A 26813 = 
Pe 7 Pst. 7 


-tstnuoy wol esriittgre S1.- to suisv v A ,Sapotitnagie 
.Senmogest bas sbsty neswied notisizeees 
5 ; =gA@ 


ton ef €.\ to sulsv “X A  .fswel 7F 2 ia 

‘ = © (an egey 
2etslibni OL.- to sulsv V A .tnsoitingre vilestdebsase 
tnemevetdos méswisd soljstoo0zeststnvoD to eergeb wol s 


Per er | 


S.8S yino sett picid LIV sidstT: ze 
smo2 592 blio ial teas beveited eiebuye 
sbetoutzeno2 zi sonednse eds ew ont 


tai tld Fon bth .ima18q h, S@ <siquea its iis 


. alin Ws SV 


Nilssizeisare 2H 8 Ep ia’ i 





{ ® ae ee) 


Oy, 


Significant beyond the .01 level. AC value of. .21 
indicates that a moderate level of relationship exists. 

A V value of .21 denotes a moderate level of association 
between grade and response which means that the Grade IX's 
were more likely to answer negatively than were the Grade 
VII's. The reason for these results is not too clear. 

The more candid opinion of the Grade IX's may account. for 
this in part, or it may possibly be due to the increased 
complexity of the French sentences at the higher grade 


levels. 


Achievement.level. A x? Values Otezle Us lsestarisSti- 
cally significant. beyond’ the .01 level; A C value-of. .15 
Signifies that a moderate level of relationship is present. 
A V value of-.17 shows a moderate level.of association 
between achievement level-and response. This means that 
high achievers were more likely to answer affirmatively 
than were lower achievers. These results suggest that 
Slow learners in the second language class cannot always 


be depended upon to intuitively grasp the rules of grammar. 
It:* ANALYSIS*OF* THE CLUSTERED ITEMS 


Cluster 1: Student attitude toward the French language 
and French-speaking people 


This-gYroup of Ltems comprises Questions, 5,713, 21, 
50, 45, and 50 of the questionnaire. Other questions .in 


the instrument do relate to the same topic, but have not 



















sou 20 sulle DA i hovet £0. 
,ateixe qidenoits ler to fsvel-e 
noitsisoees to fevel esstebom s 2etoneb £8. to-eukay Vid > 
2'XI abaed edt tedt 2nsem doidw senoqeor bas obsng: neswasd 
Sbstd odd stew EAS ylevissgeon TSwens o3 ylodit erom exew 8 8 8 
ets oor ton ei etiueer seodlt 10% noeesn sAT sen > a 
tot tnvoo05 yam 2'X1 @bsxd sdt 26 a0 taiqo bibass etom eT : " 
bé2setoat ont of aub od yldirzzoq ysm JL 26 tisq mb ebdle in 
ebatg tedgid sdi ts esonstnse dometd edd 20 ys eeeiquen 
elevel oe 

sieaisete 2i 0.IS to spisv Sy A -lovel tnemsverdoA a >a 
ef. to ovlsv DA ,foved 10. edo-baoysd tascktingee gitea 7 
Ine2etq ef qidenoiteloxr to Level stsrsbom 6 teat eeitingta a 
fotjstoo2zes to: Lovet stsrsbom e° awofla TP, io ‘obEav VA 3 


tae’ | 
tsit ensem eidT ,S2nog29% bre Iovel tnomsyettos mgsewsed = = | 


ots #0. & 


ylavitsm:itts Towems oF yYisxtil orom srsw exeveiitos dgid my 3. 
+ opeeel . 
tedt tesguue etivest seedT .eteveidos rewol oTow mane 


2yewls TORS 2esl5 ogaugnst, boozse. oid a | 






 THMMETS to abit edt qesty visvestytint at 


@MaTI GASATZUID ay AO, pile 








ogeu guts [ donee _otts Lis wos) sbisg. 
ae Ala 


_ 


efS ,ff ye eno iteenp yee Saese yen “a eed 


fir emoitzoup rodto pare Ht * » 0 _— 
Som oved, aut et ae at elor ob Siamuntemi 


cm oe 7 
7h ays Vv 
















Tou 
ey 7 i ee 


98 


been included because of the shades of meaning which they 
may carry or possible two fold interpretations that may 
have been given them. The items chosen for this cluster 
were included because they appear.to have what Lamber 
(LOSo )ereters tosasvaneinstrumental and an integrative 
Orientation. This authority, who has done. considerable 
research in the area of attitudes toward languages and 
their speakers, states that learners who have an instru- 
mental orientation toward a language are motivated by the 
practical value that the language holds for them. Learners 
who are integratively oriented are characterized by their 
desire to. learn more about~the other cultural group with 
the aim of identifying with them. 

The figures in Table LVIII show that the-majority of 
the students in this study. appeared to possess a favorable 
attitude toward the French language and those who speak it. 
Affirmative responses made up 52.6 percent of-the sample 


compared to 29.4 percent who answered negatively. 


Grade. en x? 


Value of 64.5 1S statistically signifi - 
cant.beyond the .01 level. <A C value of .11 indicates that 
a weak relationship exists. A V value of..11 denotes low 
association between grade and response which means that 

the Grade VII students were somewhat more inclined to 


answer affirmatively than were the Grade IX students. The 


analysis of the individual questions revealed that the 


ge 


ods doidw paiqnom to eebsde odd Ya 
yam sandy enoitstetqrssat blot a 
teteuts 2fdy 16% ugeod> emeti oft melt: 


xedmad tedw sve o2 tseqqs yads seusced bebuloas oTow : 
ovitsrgednt os Bas fstnemwitent ns 26 ot ateter €e2eL) } 





oldstsbizno> snob esd ofw ,(tinodtus 2iaT +, Ro Dsasneito 
bas 2epsuynel brawot esbutitie 10 segs od2 Gf douesest 
-uttemi as eved ow eremrsel tadt 2atave .2redeege, tied? 


vedi yd botevisom ets ogaugas! a biswos conte astro) Legnem | 


ersqrsel .msit t0i eblod speugasl off tads sutey Isdbtostq 
tiodt vd besirssostsda 978 besiaaito forts pines e165. odw 
ASiw quorg Istwtive reat eft tuods stom nies o ortesb 

, mont atiw gaiytitmebs 16 ate out 


; gla 

to ys ftotsm sit stadt wore ITEIVI slide at 2otug bt $adT 
ee FR 
eldstoys? = .228220q ot betesqqs ybuse 2idt ne epasbuse ond 
ws oe 


tt Aseqe odw seadt bes ogsugnel ionord sit brswo2 ae 


7 * 


-alqmee sit to Jmsoteq 6,2 qu sbam goenoqesd | 


rine betewens ow tne219q bLeS oF nes <7 
— on 


sitinpie ylidsiseitete zi 2.60 20 sutey XA ee ae. 
teit 28362%bni [f, 10 oulav 2 A, fever £0, ods <a 
Wol eetoneb Il. to ouleyv VA .23¥i%xe Seaman: 
‘Sad3ensen doidh sanogeey bre sbeg! a Ricnsi he rehoones 

OF Benifoni: sxom + 2 etow 2 ve TV obi 

AT -a2aebuse x1 mee Raa —_ 


eds aedz Bolsover enoesei a ’ | 

























J) 


Grade VII's were generally more positive and idealistic 
in their attitudes toward both the French language and 
the VIF course. This appears to be the case with this 


cilaisitie rx 


Achievement level. A X? Values Ofiel 20) 45 
Statistically significant beyond the .01 level. A C value 
of .15 intimates that a moderate level of relationship is 
present. A V value of .20 represents a moderate level of 
association between the two classifications of the table. 
This means that high achieving students were more likely to 
answer affirmatively than were low achievers. These 
figures suggest that success in the second language is 
quite closely related to a positive attitude toward the 
language and those who speak it. This simply corroborates 
what has been found by researchers in the field of second 


language study. 


Cluster -Zt Comprehension of meaning 


Questions grouped under this heading were numbers 
6598 p57); 152s andsS6.atTabilet LIXrrevealsethat! 54% 9" percent 
of the students considered that they encountered 
difficulties comprehending meaning compared to 34.1 percent 
who indicated that this was not a problem for them. This 
part of any language course is probably one of the more 
(ZEricubiatosdéeal with successfully, and yet. is most vital 


tielLedrming 1s te proceed smoothly. 


= 















viteiieeb? bas evisieeg erom < p 2701 ! 
brs ogsugnsl domed egb ttntet TEWO: 
efdy ae al $289 oss od-od ayeeqqs era een oe 
rote 


1 





ar als é ed ee OO 279 eek La 

2i \.0Si° 20 sulpy “A A .teve emev oi. ca 

| Te. : 

sulsvy DA ,Level 10, odd baoyed soot bngte yiiesi eitsse a 
+ Ip Eheage 


2 qidanoitstet to level otstebom 5 sed sosanizni 3 
0 {evel otsisbom s etneestqet 08. to ewlev v A tema | 
oldest od3 to enorssoitiees£s: ows oat reewted noiseizeces 

oF “fedil etom o1ew etnsbute gniveidos dyin seas encom 


‘s trae 


sauat- ceveestnns wol stow nade i ovisamcttts xowe 
ei egsugasl baoose oft ni eeedoue Jans teoggue eae 
aw 
edt brswot sbutitsts evitieoq s ot ‘boteler yiseols esiup— 
-eatetodorros yiqmi2 aint 56 Aseqe otiw azote ga 


baoae2 0 biott edt np ersiorsszet ¢d bro® pee sod sad 7s ae 
, wz ah a 













a S19 gribsod eindt robsau péistete 

Inestsq @.4¢c tsHhot elseve1 XII ofdst 08 bine 

betetnuoons yodt tens el ess 

theateq L, he ot benatihe> 3 fists om oni t 

einT ,modt tot mote & forma 
= ra il 

2b-s 109 7 


i 
Sls a [4 2 7 


a 
‘ ole on 





srom sit a9 So vide 











{stiv tzom ei soy bas, 


100 


Gradexe 1A x? valve@ets5S.4 ias)statastiéally 
Signifacants beyond’ the 1.02 develvacdA G: value» of:,11 
Signifies that a weak relationship is present. AV 
valuer of! -, 06) suggests. verys low! counterassociation 


between grade and response. 


Achievement.level. A x? VaUUlCM © t4 e277 Git mals 
Statastically significant,beyond’ the: .01 level.- A C 
value of .22 shows that a moderate level of relationship 
exists. AV value of -.31 represents high counter- 
association between achievement level and response which 
means that high achievers were less likely to answer 
affirmatively than were the lower achievers. These figures 
Suggest that problems related to meaning comprehension 
ar Lectthe’ slower istudentsoitel afar greater extent,.than 


Giesoright leamers: 


Clus tenses Drtticulties with grammar 


Items included in this cluster-were; Questions 12, 
245 39, and S57. Reference to Table’ LX suggests that there 
are problems associated with grammar for a fairly large 
percentage of the students. More than one half of the 
respondents felt this way compared to 27.9 percent who 


answered negatively. 


Grade, <A Re VeLUeNOL 6.011 5 eS tatastionlly 


Sigmitrcane beyond the. .01 level, A C value of .13 implies 


oor 







ak sil - 
sflaaiseriage: ict te 8 S. + es 
{£, 20 oulev0 K as “ san teak 
VA .thoverg 2 qidenoizeler Aiew = dem adm a | 
foitsisozenred nucs: wot ¢13¥ ztzeggue w0,- 


4  -senoqes bre. 






















- * ag 
2f ¥.888 to sulay “ef if ver 
= Wiese 


3A Level 10, efit bsovod jnsoingie Yltestetsste < 
| Gitenotse£ox to levee sasirebom 8 tent. awoite | a3. 20 outa 
-teimyoo Agid: otheeengat: ft.+ do sutewV A é 
doinw senogest bas level tismevoitor ee ees 
Twente oy «leAtl eesf srew lee oe vo 
@situgit o¢edT .ersveidos rewol. sad stsw apne ae ba 
fnotensdetqmos yatinssa oF betsiet emeideng oe 
msdy jas3x9 teisetg THI B oF 2tnsbuse Ce 








+ 
7 & 


7 





aia reds ed 2oagur Ne a3, ean hack ‘ 
egtal yirist s 10} rsmmsty Amiw, Wei 
> +> “Fy 


sit 20 ted eno asdt etoM .apndbutienesls) Bob 
arlw Snoor9q @.8S os ae 


{—~ %, od 


= 


" Mtaziseisene 2i 8.82 to 
Rk ais ip sae A fewest 


101 


that a weak relationship exists. A V value of -.10 denotes 
low counterassociation between grade and response which 
means that the Grade VII's were somewhat less inclined to 
answer affirmatively than were the two higher grades. The 
usually more positive reaction of the Grade VII students 
throughout the questionnaire may partially explain the 
figures mentioned. However, the simplicity of the material 
in the first year of the course is probably another factor 


which needs to be considered. 


Achievement level. A x? value SofiD4, Cars: statisti 
cally significant at the. .01 level. A C value of .06 
indjcates that a very weak relationship exists.- A V value 
of -.06 denotes a low degree of counterassociation between 


achievement level and response. 


Cluster 4: The preference for reading 


Quesitromsis4 33, 44, and. 54'‘made:up this cluster. 
Witlemthesresultsmioneouestions 42and 35 taken Separavcely) 
show that students generally favored a prereading period, 
Questions 44 and 54 appear to suggest that there was an 
Overall desire Covtead the French sentences. ‘This 
preference for reading is. revealed by. the figures in. Table 
LXI where affirmative responses made up 51.3 percent 
compared to 34.4 percent which were negative. It may be 
possible that the desire for. a text with the-French 


sentences, or the wish to have the sentences written on. the 






















estonsh a? to eulay VA. cet 

doidw 9anoqes7 bas ebsig A 

ot hantiaay 2291 tadwemoe. orew & of | 
edT .eebstg torlgid owt oft stow neds cit 

2inebute LIV sbatd sdt to moijoser sviiieog sicm 


of tislaxe vilwetene sm ovisnmotsesup oat _suedgoonds 


Leixvetsm 9f3 to yJizifqmie silt .1v3Ht0H F 





2s eel 


tain : ie 
tO308% tantons yidsdotq zi eexueo silt 10 in qerit edt ae is 
bares ranges a ot soon fon a . 


hs ea! 


~igeisste ef 0.P1 to eulsy “x A nea ie - 


30, to aviev DA -,fevel 10, ona de Josvth engi ehtes a 
euisy VA .2teixe gifenotigls:. Jeew yaev ie tess eesbokbat 
teowred aofteinozeaves ques ¥6 ostgsb Wot 5 29d00eb aOwn Be 


.s2noqest- hng Dever sanmeountdan : 





‘ebteuto #i40 qu shen SO .on8, Meh ee. ee 
Yletsiaqse nedst ct bas } nots vou) 102: ativeem eid 


sboiteg guibsorerg s bevoval yilsreagy 2 Oh ee we 7 
ns @aw otedt Jedd sesgpve oF tedqqe K2 Bae 
eid? .e@9onetng2 doner] eis bess of 
SKG0T-0k. 2onngen Rds yd beteeees af) 7 
tusoteq €.12 qu ash Reina 

od Yom 31 -evisagen, oxaw baat i 


ae oc a | = 


ry he wi a! an] 


102 


board, arises to some degree from curiosity or simply 


lack of drive to learn the sentences without some crutch. 


Grade. AX value of 39.1 is statistically signifi- 
Gant beyond thes. 01 tevels. AC value of .10 indicates that 
asweak relationship exists. AV value of -.12 signifies 
low counterassociation between grade and response which 
means that the Grade VII's were somewhat less likely to 
answer in the affirmative than were the two higher grades. 
These: figures seem  to’imply that the first year students 
are more content with the prereading period than the second 


and third year students. 


Achievement: level: <A x? Via Lucn Otr10 /Ons 
Statisticallyesignaficant: beyond) the: 401 leveliue A Covalue 
of .07 shows that a weak relationship is present. AV 
value of .05 represents low association between achievement 


level and response. 


Glustere 52a [he preference for writing 


IitSVciusteimisemade, up oL-Questions 14 and 55; The 
figures of Table LXII indicate that there was a preference 
for writings thearrenchisentences dats antearlierastage. 
Clustered responses of this opinion: comprised 52.8-percent 


compared to 32.7 percent: of the opposing view. 


Grade. A x? VaLUeCwOLe lO. oelSe Statistically Signi ta - 


Causbevyoud tne ©0lelecvel, A C value of .10 suggests’ that 


so 


+! a 
ae. om " _ 
_ 


- 

















\iqnte to ytieoirss mor 
_.fosuT> smoe aah sseapinnen ol 


D 


-~itingie viksosgeissré at f. er 40, sia me A= 
etl. "es 


sry 
sad oe reraee Of. 0 sulsy } Tevet 18 af’ wipe: 
29itingie SE: ‘e 40 eutsy vy h ee aie BOW 
re 


dotdw szmoqest Bae Shatg moans od a98e) 


. 


of yLeitl eeol reilwamoz eTaW 2" av oy 


- 
»20betg tedeid ows Bhd stow ment svizagittia “ ni 
| etasbute tsey tetit sdt Jsay Pera os nai 


baope2 ied nedt bottsq gaibsorety ast (issue 


a asaebud2 they bake bas 
>. dapthia a e 


: 
ae 


] 


9 
is ‘oe 
AF 
a 








et ,,0L to sulev “ A »tevah 
eulsy 9 A .isvel I0. edt broved ingot kage z “xiao tdaisere 


VA .aneestq 2i qgideagtssist issw. & sant ewot 80, Fo ve 


PY 

tnemeveitios nsewtsd nottsizoees wol sinvesrgox 20, Yo leukae 
i‘ a 

abies 


gat sitw tod. ; roto ‘ong HT 32 auld _ 


i 











sat .¢e bas BI enoitesud to qs sbem 2f xia fo. 


a 


Soaststetg & 2esw stods ‘fed? otnvtbni 11%) aide? 40 7 ugtt 
sopate reiltss fs ts een nei nee Wai a sti ec oe 
iasoreg 8.52 bo2itqmos Ao ENigo ate to 262 
.waky as ans tos 


re iacabegeen'c eet ws 
ted and eaeagun 01. 30 pate 
“9 | 


7 2 


7 _ Fy VL” Me, Fer 5 :. 


103 


a weak relationship is present. A V value of -.11 denotes 
a low counterassociation between grade and response which 
means that the Grade VII's were somewhat less probable to 
answer affirmatively than were the two higher grades. 
These hresults imply jthat etheopreference for writing»the 
French sentences was not as strong among the Grade VII 


students as it was for the more advanced students. 


Achievement level. A x? Valuer oie Oilers not 
statistical lyesienitieant at the yal belevel.% A<Vevalue of 
.09 reveals low association between achievement level and 


response. 


Cluster oo: Time, avatlablestor free conversation in French 

Two items were included in this group, Questions 18 
and 48 .oulhe }f2gures grecorded in; Table -LXIil+reveal: that 
theslargest»group of «clustered.responses, {65,1-percent, 
were negative:.compared,to 23.1 percent that were affir- 
mative; iThis»means;that the-majority of»the, respondents 
were of the opinion that-the time available’ for free 


E€ORVeErsSationsin French was. insufficient. 


Grade. A x4 Value of 25.35 is, statistically: signifi- 
€antibeyond thee)0l bevelweiA Calevelijo£ ol2 implies «that 
annoderabebleve hyofgrélatianshipseexists.y AgVeyalue of. .17 
denotes a moderate level of association between grade and 


response which means that the Grade IX's were more likely 









| 

‘ oe - mes * 
€or ie a a, 
ae ; 2 ut a : 7 
f 


3 
eatonabft.- to. sulav VA .Saseetq: 


doitiw senoqeor brs sbs1y <ons see m 
o3 sidsdorq 22s! tedwemoe orew 2! TV herd ode ede shale) 
.29b8Tg. tongid ows ait orsw msds ylov 

eat gaitiaw 10% soneteioty oft tends gmt utenene! 


> = ieee et 

T1y 9bst0 sri gnoms gnotse zs ton 26M 2eonetaee doaett 
i ee Bee 

.etnobute bsonsvbs stom dt aot 26W at 28 einer 5 


Jon ei £,0L to su Lav Sy A LeveL Sampson, aa - 



























1 ae 
to oulsv VA ,lovel 20. oft te tosottiagte yilestseésas2 i an 
bas lovel tnomeveidos fisewted aoitsiooees wok 2lesven @Q, aah 

| .senoqees 
donmetd nai MO LTR2TSV NOD sft 1 
8f a2nott2eu) ,quorg 2idt mi bsbiilant sxsw emest owh 154 ae 


ssd3 [sovet 1IIX!I ofdsT ni bebronst eotuged off 8h bos 
<HeDteq 1,20 ,zezHoqzor betetau!o to quotg) Tesgaaki edt 
-titts stow gaia tnenisq 1.t8 of Seragnios ovitagom ersw 


‘etmebaogest eit to yiivoism edt ted 2apom 2£dT 


29tt tot a omrs oft tedz ja 


.fusioitiuedt eaw dons ab ' 











ee 
od) ae 


we a 

“Hingie yilsvitetsese et 2.25 0 soley “h oe Be 
teds eoifqmi SI, fo Level DA ‘aed £0, - 

Vi. to oulsy VA .eteixs qisle notte fen, to ew } — ie 
bas sbsxg neswied moite1ooees biota om ei Bi 
ay om otew 2t XT obend ody 2 oe ie jana 


a ee 


7) 
ai > Vea 


Pere. S ie vr 










a . 


104 


to answer negatively than were the Grade VII's. These 
results would suggest that the teachers either did not 
give enough time for free conversations in the higher 
grades of the course, or they were unable to because not 
enough time was available. Of course, the second and 
third year students could have had the same amount of time 
as=the first year Students, .but were simply net: satis- 


fred witheit. 


ACHE VEMeNUeTe ver, =A eg Va PUCsOteO so et Senot 
Statistically significant.’ A V value of -.07 represents 
a low degree of counterassociation between the two 


elasstfications ot the -table: 


Cluster 7/2. Thesusefulness: of repetition 


Questions 42 and 47 made up this cluster. 
Consultation of Table LXIV: shows that 58.3 percent of the 
CHUsvTerederesponsesevete aLttimattve =-compared tou, 20% 0 
Pererne= il tne=neparuve,==the= general *toceiing of. the 
students was* that the repetition phase-of the’ VIF: lesson 


was beneficial. 


Grade. A X* value of 13.8 is statistically 
Sigiiiveaitydate thee Od@level, A G vaiue of 709 -indicates 
that avwedkerelatironshtp iS*préeséent?, -A®V>value*oerf 712 
denotes a low association between grade and response which 


means that Grade VII students were somewhat more likely to 






. 
2 


3 md | i. mere 4 

sor | ine 

seedT sav: sbi ens prepare 
ton bib‘ tedtis erodoast edz << 

xodgid od3 ii goitsetevnes: eee ee 

som seuszed ot efdsit ox5w yed? to coeenos: 649 20 

bas brozse oft ,setvos 20 .efdsiiave zew ome 

emit 0 tnvoms omse sit bed ever biwon etnebute itis 

-aitse ton a arow stud ,etheiut2 teoy seni? ena 88 a” 

, aed ml 74 ; 


AN : if A 

ton 2t @.0 to elsv “KX A .lewsl sae 2 hr’ ya 
eeeeelras? Y0.+ to sulsy VA ,tneoitingte elestestséte - i 
owt 913 meswisd nolisfoo2zesistauooa to ssTgeb wol 6 = 


.osidst eds to 2 } : a 




































.tstewvIo etdg qu obsm TS Bia S$ anoiteeuQ a. ein ’ 74 

sit to Insotegq €,8¢ tsdt ewore VIXI sbdsT to nottetfvenod 7 
2.88 of hetsqmod svitsmrrits Stow esenoqest boresewEy i 

! siz io gnéfest Leronog sadT -ovigegon ofa mt tmeoteq | ae 
noeest T1V. oils to sesdq noititeqer eds 200 steabs 


iisoiseissse2 2i 8.2L to sulsv be, A -9be7) | _ 7 (ek 
eetsoibnt 80. to eulsy 3 A .ifsver ai nig te om F mae 
SE. Fo sutsv VA a Pa i 
oid sangeet baa. eewtod 
ot yledEL orom ieee 








. ra onan ere ay, 


105 


answer affirmatively than were the more senior students. 
This more positive stance for the first year. students 
comparedsto the »feeling of-students in.the two higher 


grades has been mentioned previously. 


ACHMeVEeRenitmlLevela 4 Xa Valuer Ot elo. 0 eS 15 Cau1 sta - 
Cally significant.beyond the .01 level. A C value of .09 
Signifies that a, weak relationship exists. A.V value of 
.12 implies a low degree of association between. achievement 
level and response which means that high achievers were 
more likely to answer affirmatively than were lower 
achieverss: Theefactdthat,theabetter. students ,were.able to 
SCemencmUSeLUlnccsmOamtiesLepetit lon phase inwthe Vir 


lesson probably accounts for these results. 


Cluster 8: The boredom caused by repetition 


[GEMS WHteh  Comprisedstnhis cluster were Questions 350 
andes. Reterences to, lable UXVereveals that the largest 
proportion of clustered responses, 47.2 percent,:were 
affirmative compared to 38.3 percent. which were negative. 
Although students believed that repetition was useful, 
most of. them were_of the opinion that interest..lagged 


Uc SRLS pdt be OMeciom lesson, 


Grade. A ee weiue of 46, de1SeStatiastically. sagnifi- 
Caiuebevond thes. Ul elevelieeA.C value of .160 reveals.that 


ganlogerace leveleoterclacionship exists. AAV value of.-.22 

















Sige 
‘ages Toiase etom ois, onoW we 
atnebuste 1sey teTi? eit wo? 9 


sa? ows uate. Bs: eamebuse :eeeeae ae 
.Tewo i yang oa - 


-itertste at 0.2L t6 eu lsy« Sy A’  tevel 2 19 5 ee) a 
@0,. t0 svlav 2A -Lavel 10, edz broved ‘gnes liso z 
te siulsv V A ee qidenot3siex As ow 5 sods soi¥ingie 

tnemeveidas moeswitsd aoftRtooees to satgab wol 6 eoiiqné 81. 
' etow ereveitos dgid sed} ensem dotriv sanogest bas fevet — 

towol stow medi ylevitsmritis towess 0% yledil epom | 

03 ofds etow eunsbute tested eft ted tos? sdf .eneveidos a 

TTV edt ai: sestq nottitegqes sit to ezomluteay eit ose rf : 

-edivest szedt tod etnvooos yidsdorg moeeel = z 





9 
~ 


7 





st § bien i> 


notsissast 





QF. enoitesy0 sisw xrsteul> erat bezixgqmos doidw emesd. 4.5 
teogial oft tadt. eleevet. VX oldeT oF soneTsted th bas a 
. erow ,sSneoteq $.1 ,2eenogeet betstevls io soisttoqotg 
Lovitegen exsw dotdw tnea1eq E82 03 Soreqgoo.cneeamhiang 5. 


~futsev esw nottiteqes teds beverled esaobure dguodstA 
begysl! tesretni sexs motniqo oft to enew mods 20 som 
.nozaek edt to - 3: 





= 


-itiagie ylissitensat2 ab-c.ap ba sulsy Sy 
a 2isevex a1. to. sulsy 0 Tevet 4 
- Fo ulev/V A .2teixa gideaolsgre: 


106 


shows a moderate level of counterassociation between 
grade and response which means that the Grade IX's were 
more likely to answer affirmatively than were the Grade 
Niles hestactatiat) themsGraderl[x students had Spent 
nearly three years in the course -involved:in this 
activity probably explains their reaction to this 


Question. 


Achievement level. A x? va lue-jotiel0 vaivs not 
Statistically significant at the .01 level. A V value of 
-.07 represents a low degree of counterassociation between 


achievement level and response. 


Til. “ANALYSIS “OF RESPONSES OF STUDENTS TAUGHT: BY .VIF- 
TRAINED TEACHERS COMPARED TO RESPONSES OF STUDENTS 


TAUGHT BY NON-VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS 


In sorderetocsee tif there was\any esignificant 
difference between the responses of students taught by 
the VIF-trained teachers compared to responses of students 
taught. by the non-VIF-trained teachers, comparisons were 
made on all the items of the questionnaire and the eight 
ehus teyedy1 tems) e)Questions.,and cclusiters, where ¢statistti - 
cally significant differences exist are discussed below. 


The figures are presented in table form in Appendix D. 

















se 





segusens Sane 
stow 2'XI ebs10 art feds” 
obstd ails stow rgd viehicaliaiaandaaial 

taeq2 bedi 2tnebute XI obbt0 ond lade apie uy 


aids ge beylovat 92tu0> edit at 





eis ot ‘noitoset tiedt ents iqne | 





| a pe - 

ton ei 2.0L %0 sulsy *x A: Level sngmoveidoh ae - 
to sulsv VA Level £0. sdt 4s jmoitingle yilsobtebtese ¥ a 
meewted noitsizoeeststnuos to ostgeb wol s esmeeeaget TO,> 


c .senoqest bas level ¢remeveidos a 


~~ ae 4 
-T1V Ya THOUAT eTuaaUTe FO exenoreda 10 212 YdAMA | 


7k; Se anes 
eTMHGUT2 40 e4e01eaa OT GAMAGMOD 2AaNOAST GSMIART — vie 
eM HOAST ae a Ys PHOUAT 2) co peeys : 4 
> ee a7 


saga tvtngie yas 2aw etedd tf 992 of ‘tien al 


yd tiguss atmebute to 2senogeor edt apewred soamnsthib 
-adnsbute to esenoqest o3 bstsqmoo erodonat Benters- As BA 
‘oe % ey = 7 AA 
ods . ts ae 
se28 odo the no shag 
sigte ods bas etisanottesup eds a > 
20 big ts gauge ; 


-iteitsse oredw ereteuls bas enoiseoup: . oaa a 
‘woled bezenczib ets teixe zeomaTstneb: 34 f ~~ 
u 7 vs r 


mal xibasqqA nt mrét ‘efdst ‘nt Bet : 23 i. 







Stow eforixaqmo> ,2xerdoses bontst3- a1v-im 













107 


uestion 2: Do you like to speak French whenever you 


get ancianeex 


The figures in Table LXVI reveal a x? value tor 
13.2 which is statistically significant beyond the .01 
levels “A C value of, .i2Z-shows, that.a weak relationship 
exists. A V value of .21 represents a moderate level.of 
association between teachers' training and response which 
means that students of. VIF-trained teachers (1 in the 
table) were more likely to answer affirmatively than were 
Students of non-VIF-trained teachers. These results may 
Suggest that students of the VIF-trained teachers were 
more confident of their ability to converse in French 
because of the fact that their teachers had followed the 


prescribed methods for. the VIF course. 


Question 6: Can you usually understand the teacher's 
expilanationseainsrrench ort) voca Ulary eo MeneuL ties! 

Re berencemtomlable LAV leindicates: 2 fe value of 
28.3 which is statistically Significant beyond the .01 
tevel; AC value of,.1/7 implies that a moderate level-of 
RelaAGLOnsSiipsis present... A V-value of .25 denotes a 
moderate level of association between teachers' training 
and response which means that students of VIF-trained 
teachers were more likely to answer affirmatively than 
were students of non-VIF-trained teachers. It is possible 
that due to training the VIF-trained teachers were more 


Success lLUleile Glatliying, the vocabulary. difficulties of 


TOL 





to oulsv ~ 5 Issver IVXI eldaT at eerugit Rail , 3 
Id. odd bnoyed tnsvitingte ~lisoiseigete at ee “Ss a 
qidenofssiet dsow & tedt ewode SI. to oulsy 9 tevel a : 
? é ay }t eae | 54.8 


to Level ostebom & atmseotqer IS, to aulev V ad Rak ty 
foidw senoqest bas gaints13 'ersdoses moswied sotvasaenes 
. oft at 1) etedosest benisrs-AIV to etnebuse sed? eneom 
stew msdt ylovitsmritis tswens ot yledrl erom etew (eldas 
ysm etf{vest sesdT .2tsdoset benisrs-diV-non to atnebuse ¢ 
stow eredosss bentstt-AIV. oft to etnobuse sent seeggue 


fdomeri mi setevios o3 ytilids thedt 20 Inebitaoa stom 


eft bewollot bsd etsdaset riedt tsd3 toast odd To tt ) 
| sete FIV ent 202 ebomrem bedi rasets 





< 

to oulav “Xs 2etndtbai I1VE olde? of someneted , _ 
iO, oft bnoyed soscitiogi2 yilsoitzitete et dofdw ti8s ‘ 

to Isvel otsiobom 6 tsdt 2difqmt-‘il. tc suiey DA -fovel ~ oe) 
& eotoneb 2S. to sulsv VA .tns291q ef qidenotaatot _ 


gninisrs ‘areigses nreewsed noiisto0ees to fevel oxexsbom _— 
benist+-11V to 2etnsbuse’ tad3 2nsem doitw senogeet “bat 
nsdt yLovitsmritis tewens: od Lexie stom stew etedsset 
sldtezoq 2i tI , | 










108 


their students since the difference between the two 


groups is rather large. 


uestion 8: Do you usually understand the meaning of 
what you are saying in class when speaking Frenchy 


The figures in Table LXVIII disclose a x? value 
of 16.6 which-is statistically significant.beyond the .01 
level. A C value of .13 reveals that a weak relationship 
is present. A V value of .23 indicates a moderate level 
of association between teachers' training and response 
which means that students of the VIF-trained teachers were 
more apt to answer affirmatively than were students of the 
non-ViF-trained teachers. These results may indicate that, 
due to a better understanding of the VIF methods, the VIF- 
trained teachers were more capable of imparting to their 
students the ability to communicate in the second language 
with understanding. 
Question 12: Do you want the teacher to explain the French 

rammar rules to you? 

The x? vidluer ot, [ioe n APab Pech Y is- srtaltiis tifcally 
Signa facant ibeyomrd ithe calillyleveh’ £14 6G tvalueirot hl 
Suggests that a weak relationship exists. A V value of 
-.16 denotes a moderate level of counterassociation between 
the two classifications of the table which means that 
students of non-VIF-trained teachers were more likely to 
answer affirmatively than were students of VIF-trained 


teachers. This may signify that students of non-VIF-trained 


| -=.% 





BOL 


sulsy Sy 8 eeolzetb ITIVKd eldsT ai eotug it oaT | ae 
{0, oft baoysed tnsditingi2 yilsoitettete et doitdw 2.0L t0 
qidenoitsier tsew s tad? elssver EL. to emis 9 % eves 7 
Ievel otstsbom 6 2eiszibai €S. to eulsay V A .sapeera ef | 


senoqeot bas gninisrt ‘eredoses soewisd poiseioeees to 


‘ “Uns & . 7 
stow ersioset benis13-F1V edt to esnobute tedt enspom Adtdw = 
‘age 


edt to atnobuse ovow asdd yisvistemriits tewens of i ht hg ‘ 


ri 
etedd sts2ibni yam etiveer seedT .2reddse3 bontsit-1E¥-non 

| as. ey _ 
“HIV oft ,2bodsom IV edt to gnibasterebay rested 8 ot eub _ 
vty 


tiedt ot gnitrsqmt to eldsqss stom stew erefonsd bunkaxs = 
egetignst bnoaee ods. ni 9tsafaummos os \Jilids ont 7 | 
_guibdeteratan dite 

| a 

fonett oda atsiqxe o3 rtedos a3_oni, Insw voy of :Sf mors2eu - 















vilssisteitese et XIXI efdsT ai d.1k Yo eutay *X oH 
, “6 teh ei 


{f. to oulev DA Level 10. eft baoyed ie 


to sulsv VA ,2ateixes qtdenottsilox Apew s tadt 

meewsed foitsiooeesrsinuos to Level estrabem ie ; 

$sdt ensom doidw eidss eit to en hee 

ot yletrl Tom stew exsiio8e3 beaiens-AIV-m rm 
bonisx-a1V' 30 2anabuse orew fist? yLovi 


benistt-T1V-non to etnebude tert imgee X 


109 


teachers were not as quick to grasp the rules of. the 
language intuitively because their instructors had not 
been trained in the appropriate methodology for this 


course, 






uestion 16: Are the filmstrips helpful for explainin 


meaning of the sentences: 
In Table LXX the x? value oftleeZ isastatisticaliy 


Signiticantebeyond thene0ihieveludeAt€ valuenof) 514 
indicates that a weak relationship is present. A V value 
of .30 intimates high association between teachers' train- 
ing and response which means that students of VIF-trained 
teachers were more apt to respond affirmatively than were 
students of@theanon’ Viletrained*teachers, Training in the 
method, once again, may explain the apparent greater 
success of. the VIF-trained teachers at exploiting the 


filmstrip pictures to the advantage of. their students. 


Question 24: Does the word order in French sentences 
appear sensible or reasonable to you‘ 

Consultation of Table LXXI shows a ie value of 
21.5 which is statistically significant beyond the .01 
level. A C value of .15 indicates that: a moderate level 
of relationship exists. A V value of .09 represents low 
association between teachers! training and response which 
means that students of non-VIF-trained teachers were 
somewhat more likely to answer negatively than were students 


of VIF-trained teachers. These results are similar to those 





e0L 


: af mi 7 
off Yo \pelur ods qnatg 0s Sbdtp (ee) SRroTew ENetaEss | Fy 
ton bs evotoutsani tisdt seussed ylovisiveni sgecgasi =~ S 


aidt ug? ygolobodtem eteitqoraqs = ” benists mod ~ 


vat 





Sy eds XX sfdsT al f eet Wy 
bl. to oulsv D A + Level f0. sd baoyed tneottingie . 


eS 2t S,@f to sulsv 


eulav VA .tas2erq 2f qidenotsslo1 dssw s dedt eetestbae 
~misi1t ‘etedoses nsewied aoissioozes dgid 2zetamrtar OF. Zo | ; 
bentsts+AlV to atnebute tedi ensem doidw senogest bas gat a 
otsw nedt efavbsantitie bnogqest ot qs ofom sTéw etedosges 
edt ai gnintstT .2tedoset benisrt=AT1V - soneont to atavbuse 
| tesserg jnorsqqs od? aislqxe vem {ntess soao ,bodsem | a 
eld gmrisieiqxes 38 z19edoset boniars=qIvV sd to ezsD0Kg2 | : 
-2eJusbus2 tieds to egstnsvbs edt ot 2o1utaiq qittemlit a 7, 





Se B ewore Xx efdsT to ceitheentaiecaly ; 


{Q. oft bnoyed tasoittingbe yfisziseitesevet soide 208 _ 

fevel sisrtebom s tedt 2estsaibni ef. to oulsvy 3 A dowel 

wol etnezerqet 00. to oufsv VA’ -2t2hx9 qidemotaeier 20 
floivlw senogeor bas gcinists ‘exsdoses neewied \nobs 
Stow aredoass benters-A1V-aon zo ssc odes 
etnsbuse stow nicits b leabia rewans 02 whee , 


to sulsy 







110 
examined in Question 12 and may suggest similar conclusions. 


uestion 32: Do you feel that there is sufficient variet 


an aGtivities* inthe €ssons o your French. course’ 


Table LXXII discdoses a ne value of 18°9° which is 
Statistically significant beyond the. .01 level, A C value 
of .14 reveals that a weak relationship exists. A V value 
of .11 indicates low association between teachers' training 
and response which means that students of non-VIF-trained 
teachers were slightly more apt to respond negatively than 
were students of VIF-trained teachers. Such results may 
indicate that VIF-trained teachers were more successful at 
introducing variety and activities into their lessons due 


to their training in the VIF methodology. 


uestion 33: Do you find the learhing of the taped sentences 
which accompany the f1 mstrip interesting? 


Reference to Table LXXIII reveals a x? Value* Ot elo. 7 
which is statistically significant beyond the .01 level.. 
A C value of .12 shows that a low relationship exists. AV 
value of .17 denotes a moderate level of association between 
teachers' training and response which means that students 
of the non-VIF-trained teachers were more apt to respond 
negatively than were students of.the VIF-trained teachers. 
The reason for the students of. the non-VIF-trained teachers 
finding the learning of the taped sentences more uninterest- 
ing can only be explained by the manner in which their 


teachers dealt with this phase of the lesson. 








oft 


-enoteulomos talimte tesggue yen bas Sf peter pe 
Les 

ssitny daokatte ai ’ iy 19 is). a 

eae ast t Oy h eo iy. ol Ont it 

2i dots @.8L Yo autev “Xs eabenoel TINK signe es ; 

eulev 2A «Level £0, oft baoysd tnsoittagee widmatseivase ov 
sulay VA .atetxe qidenoitsfor teow & vei etnover 1. 30 

gtinis13 'eredoset adewted noijsizoees wol essaathat If, 20 | ‘ 

bonistt-AIV-non to etasbute t8c3 ensom dobaw sadoqest bas 

nedt ylovitsgon brogesr os tq8 orom (lidgite erow enedoned 

vem 2etIuest dove. «eredose3. benésr3-TiV to etmebuse etew = 

ts Ivtezsoaue stom oTow eroioset bentst3-31V teat sisotbat E 

sub enoezel tied boat 2sttivisos bas (ioitsv grkouboxsalk : 

.ygolobodiem TV sft ni gatatees wkedtos | 77 






‘ aotwt i: 

2sDses 92 Eguas sfi3_Yo edie Ec: . > { 
..€L Yo sulsv i 8 2lssvet rr Eexg sidat of s7aeTsish@ «2. / a 
; | 

Level 10. eit bnoyed sascitingte ylisaiseisese ef doidw = 


VA .etetxe qidemoitslex wol s get ewode Sf. Yo oulay DA a 
7 

meewied notisioozes to Lfevel ststobom s zotoneb TL, 2e oulsv 

etnobuse ted} ensem doidw senoqes: bas gapniets ‘exedosey 4 


bnogzet of tq6 stom stow eredosed ROK 
.2tedoset bentatg-TIV sdd to etnsbute « 


2tenisses beatets AlV-nom ods to ctaabire oft 
-JeotesMiny stom espaetmee beqss a 3 


risdt sate ni “tenant oe 
Mozeek aft 20 « 












veges, ? on 


PT 
yen a a : 


ao ae Sark TL 


; ns Pc: 7 
; : an fe 


lll 


Soe Sn eS ote food idea to wait until your 
second year of study before beginning to read in French? 

In Table LXXIV the Xx? Value. ot 15,7 is statistically 
Significant beyond the .01 level. A C value of .13 reveals 
that a weak relationship is present. A V value of .19 
denotes a moderate level of association between teachers' 
training and response which means that students of VIF- 
trained teachers were more likely to answer affirmatively 
than were students of non-VIF-trained teachers. The figures 
in the table show that a majority of the students of VIF- 
trained teachers favored waiting until their second year of 
study before beginning to read in French, whereas the 
largest percentage of the students of non-VIF-trained 
teachers were opposed to this idea. That the latter group 
of students was less satisfied with the Hea che re? handling 
of the methodology and wished to begin reading at an 


earlier date may be possible. 


Question 42: Do you think that the repetition of the 
taped sentences which accompany the filmstrips is useful? 
Table LXXV discloses a x? Veo Wel wf aor, 7a wh pont ts 
Statistically significant beyond the .01 level. AC value 
of .13 signifies that a weak relationship exists. AV 
value of .26 represents a moderate level of association 
between teachers' training and response which means that 
students of VIF-trained teachers were more likely to 


answer affirmatively than were students of non-VIF-trained 


a 


oe ee ah | ; ut 
« 7 a Ra. af ' ) bi. = ' 7 ie 

























wo Li tii Pisw_oF SD 4 E ' ith 7 
jie 7 ft “SB BST oF 3 EAR iigsd Sfoted ' | a t te 
vitaate nifaae eh ef to eile 1. ts VIRKE a mT va ae 

*, os a : Bi 7 zs 
sfesver Ef,.%0 sulay DA Level. 10. ody buoyed 2 Sei 


el, to sulsv V A tmezeTq af qideaataeliag new B 3 a ; 
'etodoset foowted. noitsitnoezs to Isvel oterebom s as 4% i 
-H1V 20 as obute tsdt ensem doidw eanogest bas gninis1 , : 


yfovitsmritis tewens ot yloAtil stom stow etedoset pea * : 
=7 a . ee 
i ail .2redoset benistt-TIV-aon to etmebuse stow pe 


-H1V Yo 2tnebute odt to ytixogsm s teds wode endss ods ‘nt : 
to ts9y bnovs2 tiedt lithe gnistiaw borovst eredoses bonters ' ios 
ait essionw ,doasti mi bsoxr of an siieee stoted bute ; 24% 

gal : 


benists-IlV-non to etnebuse oft to systmeoteg seogrsl 


quorg retsal edt tedT .sebi etdt of beeoqqo stsw eredoses 


guiibasd 'ersdoset edt dttw beitettse eeel enw aes: & a 
. oo 
ms 28 yntbser niged ot bederw bas ygolobodsea = f= 


.sidieeoq sd yam — reilise. 2 
re 5 










ods to darsitedey ods ads oe 


, . or pe 
2i doidw°\ . of to sulsv. Sy B Peawbasae nt ofdet oe 


eulsv DA .fevel f0. eft Broyed tnsoittagie yliestae 


VA .etetxe qidenotstefer. Asew 5 teds whine te 
noitsioozes to level staerebom s ainpeo1get as. to a 
tedd ensom doidw senbqeer bas gainisss "ereoned ® 
“ot \fotil eTom or 9M eredoses Wegrtet f abut 
bomists-TIV- -non to aaevT otew ai 2 towes 


| 


pa 


teachers. The fact that more of the students of VIF- 
trained teachers thought that the repetition of the taped 
sentences was useful may possibly be due to the more skill- 
ful adaptation of the learned material to new situations 


by these teachers who were more familiar with themethod. 


uestion 44: Do you think the teacher should write the 
French sentences on the board when you have learned to 
Say them: 

Table LXXVI indicates a x? Valuemotmel/ecewn1 chs 1s 
statistically signatacant. beyond the .01 level.~ A C value 
of .14 shows that a weak relationship exists. A V value 
of -.26 suggests a moderate level of counterassociation 
between the two classifications of. the table. This means 
that students of non-VIF-trained teachers were more likely 
to answer affirmatively than were students of VIF-trained 
teachers. As was indicated when discussing Question 35, the 
students of the non VIF-trained teachers may possibly wish 
to have the sentences written on the board because of the 
manner in which their teachers treated the lesson. That 
at least two of the non-VIF-trained teachers did write the 
French sentences on the board-in the course of the: lesson 
may partially explain the discrepancy in the responses 


for. the ‘two groups. 


Question 49: Do you like the Lilmns t nina pictures used in 
the French course‘ 


Reference to Table LXXVII shows a x4 value of.18.9 


Sif 






“ABM to etnebuse ond 208 
pnt = di Pom .- ries 4 pH 
baqst ont to doit iteqex atts as. meena 


i ~ ar. i ws 
-ILide stom edd 03 sub od yfdiezog ysm Iutoaw 2am 2021 a 
anoitsutie won ot Ipitedam bemtsel ods to meses 


bods smeds dsiw tei Lime? stom s1sw ei exedose ae 
e6>en 






















+ 









nee toner’ 
ELSERTE. 


2t doidw S.VL to avkay Sx 5 eotsoibat IVKXI ofdst ead 
oulsy JA .tlevel £0. sft Bnoyed tna ritingie lwotsedstesa im “aa 
eulsv VA .etetxe qidenoitsl[or Aesw s tedt ewode B21, 40 a 
moitstsozesrsimuo> to Level ssatsbom s etespgue @.+ to 2 
ensom 2idT ,o{dst odd to anoitsoitizesio ows edt neowsed 
Yletil etom srsw 2tedoset benists-dIV-non to asnebute tedd i, 
benists-AIV to 2inebute stew msdt “(lovitsmr ite Tewens ot 
sds ,c& notteou0 gaieeusetbh nsdw betsorbat 2sw eA erodonet <= Aan 
feiw y{[dieeog vem eredoses bonists-AIV con ont to. esasbute. 
sit to seusosed breed ei3 0 nettiztw esanesaee ont inca oF 
seqT .nozesl odd botsers aredosst 1isds delle ak % wt 
oft stitw bib 2xedosst bentsrs-F1V-non odd 40 ows tesol —e 
mozesl et to setuoa edt mt brsod sd? no tenant Seer ( 


2eenogeet sdt nit Yonsqetoerb oda en 
~— = ra : 
. Oo" ‘ows ¢ - . ; 
ea Reece 0 
¥ i — ae a oe 





[Pe 


iS 


ni bsev 26 mutot q_gittenk fit oft ott 






6 
ote ee ae. e' 


f ae J. 4) se: = y x 
A deal + £7 vee 
Q.Sils cian te ol le <.. 
ht pm — any 7 
. fe n rn j ‘ 7 0 7 ¥ sf 
hs! cae ie 


Te <4 ah) ee ee 


113 


which is statistically significant beyond the .01 level. 
A C value of .14 reveals that a weak relationship is 
present. A V value of .15 represents a moderate level of 
association between teachers' training and response which 
means that students of non-VIF-trained teachers were more 
likely to answer negatively than were students of VIF- 
trained teachers. An examination of the percentages of 
Table LXXVII shows that the majority of the students of 
VIF-trained teachers liked the filmstrip pictures whereas 
the largest percentage of the students of the non-VIF- 
trained teachers did not. As was noted for Question 16, 
students of the VIF-trained teachers appreciated the 
filmstrip pictures to a greater extent, possibly, because 
these teachers were more successful using this aid in the 


lessons. 


Question 51: Do you find that the filmstrip stories are 
interesting most of the time? 

In Table LXXVIII the X* value of 18.4 is statisti- 
cally significant beyond the .01 level. A C value of. .14 
Suggests that a weak relationship exists. A V value of 
.21 shows a moderate level of association between teachers' 
training and response which means that students of non- 
VIF-trained teachers were more likely to answer negatively 
than were students of VIF-trained teachers. It is 
possible that more of the students of VIF-trained teachers 


found the filmstrip stories interesting most of the time 





at om < a 
2 


ett 


































Level, 10. eit bnoyed sagotiuagie 

2£ qidenoitsler dsow 8 tent 2fmever 

to Loved e381 9bom & 2Taseetger ele he sulav VA: 
i> tw eenoqeet bas chtiriices 'atedones noowted moitaiseees — 

9Tom s1T2W etedases bentst3-T1V-sen to. esnebuse dsd2-eanoR EP Ui 

-41V to ete etow nedd ylovitsgsn tewens of wiedit 












to zeystnez1eq 943 to noitenimexs tA .etetoses 
to etnebute odt to ytizotsm off2 ahi aworle LVIKL of 


ate a 


esstoiw es1utziq gittemlii eds beAbl ersiloges bontars-11¥ a i aon 


tcerege = ie 

-¥1V-non sit to etnobute edz to Sg8insDTSq teogral ay ~ - 3 
Pe vi 5 be" _— —- 

~of soiszeu0 stot boson esw 2A .3on bib etotones bemiax3 mB 


ot betsioetgqqs wiektonels benis1tt-I1V odd te etmebute 


, ae of - 7 
sevsood ,yidizeoq ,tmetx9 tetserg 6 of eoTu sty gitsemliz a, 
de 
eft-ai bis eins gniau Iwizesooue strom si1sw everiones ee2edt Pay ~ 
0%, CF oi oe 
-emozeol >t 
PS 2 on - ay ; 






ae 





: Weer 
-itetosze 2ih.8f to eulsv °X ons. LIvEKa pat al | 


© ¢Ane 
bl. to eufsv 3 A -fevel £0, edt broysd sia heat “rs a 
tn 


a] 


to sulev V A .eseine gidenot tater Asew 8» ‘teds a 
'arenosss asewted moitsisozes to Level ik Sian 8 ete a 
-fon to esnebute, tedt aTBSal doidw oenogesx bas 
ylevitsgen towens of eheaet stom Stow pen b 
fouaki 33 .evodoBed benisrs-41V toe 
eredaset beaists-i1V %o esniebuse ita ve 


omit eds to tzom atiseorbant <9 ot 


rae 


| is 


a Since ae an an 


114 


because they could more readily relate the sentences 
from the lesson to their own situation. This may have 
been the result of having been taught by teachers familiar 


with the VIF method. 


uestion 53: Do you think you will be able to speak 
French when you. have finishe Vey ste ool? 


Consultation of Table LXXIX reveals a ne value of 
13.2 which is statistically significant beyond. the .01 level. 
A C value of .12 implies that a weak relationship exists. 
A V value of .20 denotes a moderate level of association 
between the two classifications of the table. This means 
that students of VIF-trained teachers were more likely. to 
answer affirmatively than were students of non-VIF-trained 
teachers, | The fact™that°a majority of the students of 
VIF-trained teachers felt that they would be able to speak 
French when they had finished high school may possibly be 
explained by the generally greater success with the VIF 


course enjoyed by those teachers trained in the method. 


uestion 56: Do you want the teacher to explain in 
Englis the ditticultewords you don"t understand?‘ 


Reference to Table LXXX reveals a 4 HcLibntey Cope Mie 
which is statistically significant. beyond the .01 level. 
A C value of .14-suggests that a weak relationship is 
Present. 9 A7V Valle of =. 59-denotes’ high counterasSsociation 
between teachers' training and response. This means that 


students of non-VIF-trained teachers were much more likely 






et 


eapnesmee oft telex yLibBoY sm_/,€-,e 
eved yam 2tdT .notseutiacdwo tied of aoeeel edt mot? 





teifimst 219doses yd tdgust need grived to tives: oft need 5 : 
be . * , 

-bodsom VIV ot dtiw - 

~ - & §4 a) Baa | ee : 










Assqe os atds sd [liw wo Ee: 3 AK 





ver Woy fnotw donor 


to auLev Sx s elssvet XTXKs eldsT to noisted¢inenod baltaed = 
fevel 10, eds bnoved tnssttiagie yilsorvertate 2k toidw SEL ef Sig ) 
\,eteixs qidenotislet Agsew s tedd eotiqmi Sl. Fo ewisv 2A . 3 
nottsivoees to Level stsrsbom s estonsb 0S, Yo -ssisev VIA a ‘< 
ensom 2idT ,sidst od3 to enottssitreasls ows sft nsows od i 


os yletil erom stew ete bantsts-T1V to 2e7aebuse sends - 
benists-Ily-non to einsbute sTrew medi ylevitemritis oheie 
to etnobuse edt to ysitotsm s tsds toni oT sundaes | + te 
deaaz ot sids 9d biuow ysis ted st19t erenosst benters-4IV 
od yidieeoq ysm Loodae dotd bedetait bed yoHs sodw domerd 


WIV edt ddiw eeeooue T9Is9tg yifareneg ons ae ee are 


-bodsem old af benisrs ereissst seodt yd beyotm se 1u09 4 
oe } | 





ni oftieli 






x8 o3 tedosst an3 







S.8f to aulsv Sy s 2elssver wera abiter’ 03 somone © e 12 
-lovel 10, oft bnoyed tae0ktingte aa reamed 


ei qidenotssisr aROM & tet eseoggue’ M. 


fo tistaozesresnyos data’ i get~ As , 
ted? emsem 2idT seenoqzer ba gnéntens”* 


yvletil stom aouge he di el 


AUS 


to answer affirmatively than were students of VIF-trained 
teachers. The reason for a greater percentage of the 
Students of non-VIF-trained teachers desiring explanations 
in English of the difficult words may. be. because the 
teachers of these students were not as. successful at 
exploiting the materials which are provided in the course. 

A French course of this nature is not as straight. forward as 
many others, and therefore, lack of training in the 


methodology could seriously handicap a teacher. 


Gluster. 2: Comprehension of meaning 


The x? value of 44.8 in Table LXXXI is statistically 
Significant beyond the .01 level. A C value of. .10 signifies . 
that a weak relationship is present. A V value of -.18 
represents a moderate level of counterassociation between 
teachers' training and response which means that students 
of non-VIF trained teachers were more likely to reply 
affirmatively than were students of VIF-trained. teachers. 
These results imply that the comprehension of meaning 
presented a greater obstacle to more of the students of 
the non-VIF-trained teachers. As was stated earlier, the 
teachers' lack of training in the VIF methodology may 
explain why their students had problems understanding 


meaning in the: French class. 


Cluster 7: The usefulness of repetition 
The figures of Table: LXXXII-indicate.a x? value of 





et 


benis1z-11V to eigebuse exsw ned? 
ois to ogstneoteq TetseTy 8 tot aoeson edt 

2noitsnsl qx gaitiesb exodoset boniexs-41¥-a0m Xo esmebuze 

ods saunzed ed yam 2btow JiuviItib oft 20 dekfgnd ab 

18 [ybeesvoue 28 ton stow etnebute neg to exedioaes 

S210 sd ni baphwete ets doidw. 2iet SEM 

es brswrot tdgistte 28 Jon 2i siuten 2ids do seine foment A 

; ot ni gaintstt to Adsl ,stotersdt bas ,etedto osm 

-tedose3 s qszibasd \leuolree blygoo ygolobodjem — 


Pine a = 











vilsotseisst2 2: IXXXJ sidsT of 8.48 to sufev “X sat 


= he CBr 

ésitingi2 OL. to oylsv DA .foevel I0, ods baoyed sasokbingke 
Law 

8[.~ io sulsv V A .tneeetq 2b qidenottelor Agew 8 sand 


ese eS ) 

asowsed folitsioozestetnuos to fevel stsrabom Bs eImezetqer 
= ae 
eJnsbute tedt 2nsem doidw senoqesr bas gaintens ‘eredoset 
° »s geay4 


tie oF Yfodif-etom srew exerpses bemiext aio isd 
:etenose? -bonis13-T1V to esasbuse syew nea qlowttems tite 
1 t i) ee : ‘ ae) 
‘gainsem to notenedetgmos, sd3 38d oa ana +5 
to esasbuse ods io stom oF Slagtedo tonaens. 8 
edt ,rtetixss besarte 2esw 2A etetioges benkers-2 
Ysm ygoLobors om LLV eis. ft ‘drtaigd fies baal: 
) Saar es one eats: ar her cwe 









i be 
J 
ad i ie | 


=% face as = 
to sulsv sy iy sta a de’ ay 

| Os Pt is 
aha if 





116 


15.6 which is statistically significant beyond the .01 
level. A C value of..09 intimates.that a weak relation- 
ship exists. A V value of .16 signifies a moderate level 
of association between the two classifications of the table 
which means that students of the VIF-trained teachers were 
more likely to reply affirmatively than were students of 
the non-VIF-trained teachers. In other words, a larger 
proportion of the students of the VIF-trained teachers 

were able to see the usefulness of repetition of the 

French sentences. This may possibly be due to the training 


of their teachers. 


10, -ais baoyod 3 43h | 
-sodtatos pew hsb 2 a> stent 
Level eterabom » are eg piprreesiass ae 


a 7. 


eldss edd to enoitsaitieesla ows hyertsetierea > 


erew eredosst benisss-AIV ont to etnsbute sent 
to edmebute otow med? (lovisemritte ger of 
togtsi 5 ,2b1ow redto al -2rodosed bemisxs-91V-nomedd 
| b -aIV) atmebute eft to / 
erssdoset enintt- eft to a 
edt to mortiteqs: to zzoniuteay abit , 


gnintstt odt ot sub sd uidizeog yam 2faT 















- 





CHAPTER V 


SUMMARY, CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS, 
RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FURTHER RESEARCH 


The objective of this study was to examine the 
general attitude of students toward the French language and 
French-speaking people, and the opinions of these learners 
of an audio-lingual French course. The subjects of this 
Study were 917 Grade VII, VIII, and IX students enrolled 
with the Moose Jaw Public School Board of Education, who 
had met the criteria of beginning the VIF French course in 
Grade VII, and of having had no instruction in French prior 
to this grade. An instrument, designed to inquire into the 
areas in question, was developed, administrered, and then 


analyzed to obtain the findings which are summarized below. 


I. SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS 


Besides an examination of the overall reaction of 
the students, responses were broken down into two cate- 
gories, grade and achievement level, to see what effect 
these divisions would have upon answers to the questions. 
With practically no exceptions, Grade VII students proved 
to be more positive toward the course, the language, and 
the speakers of the language than were students in the two 
higher grades. The second category, achievement level, 


revealed that high achievers generally held more positive 











edt snimexe ot zew \bute eids to) anid 

bas egsugue! donot edt bYswot, etmebuste Yo sbusitas Lereneg 
arentssl g2ed3 to enoiniqo odd bas .siqoeq gnideoqe-donert 
aint to 2joojdue eit .s2aruo3 dometd Isugail-otbus as to, 
belloims 2inobuse XI bas ,1IIV , LIV sbsrd VEG evew ybuse © ae 
odw ,fo0ftsoubd to brsed Loose xildud weleesooM edt: dztw a 

ni setuos donseti qIV odd gninniged to sitoatao ey som bad - : 
, tottq donetd ni nottourtenk on bsd gtived to aa" li¥ ebs1d : 
edt otai stivpni oF bemgieob ,sJnemutiemi aA . sbstg aids 93 y 
neds bas ,berexteinimbs ,beqoleveh esw ROLS SOND: ai = i. 7 ; 
.woted besitammue ots doidw 2gntbait sift atstdo of bos isas ; 


eoUuladult SHT 40 YAAMMUe .T 


to nmoisasor Ilsteve edt 20 noitsnimsxs ns egbteed — 9 a 


-si85 ows. oni mwob nsAoxrd stow 2eenoqest seonebuse: ‘oft ae 
- 
tietta dsdw eee ot ,fovel sremevetites bas: oberg ,20ft0g a; 


-enokt 2eup edt of atewens noqu oved bluow panes bas i 


bevorg esnebuse ILV sbs10 Slat ons 
bas egsugmsl edt (22109 ait brewor ever reo ) eae 


ows oft ni etnebuse stew jams makes . sepa oe wi 7 


-ylovel sstemevet deat 


asi - 


H 
7 


118 


attitudes toward French and French-speaking people, and 
were somewhat more positive in their opinions about certain 


questions related to the course. 


Attitude Toward French: and French-Speaking People 


The results of the questionnaire would suggest that 
most students held favorable attitudes toward the French 
language and French-speaking people even though many 
respondents were very negative and may others were undecided. 
Although the largest proportion of the students did not want 
to continue improving their French upon completion of high 
school, nor live in a French-speaking community, they felt 
that the study of French was worthwhile, that it was not 
too difficult, and that it could be a useful language for 
them in future years. As was mentioned previously, a 
greater percentage of the first year students and the high 
achievers had this positive outlook. However, even among 
the third year students, more than sixty percent of them 


considered that the study of. French. was of value. 


Opinion ofetheny 1 Facourse 


For the most part, students' written comments, which 
appear in Appendix C, are highly critical of the learning 
process. Certain observations reflect dissatisfaction with 
the course, whereas other criticisms are directed toward 
the teachers. There is then the problem of- distinguishing 


between these two, and deciding whether these remarks are 

















ast 
bas ,elqosq gatagege- Stickeh beams butis = 
it 
mtait9> toda enoinigo tieds mi evisizeq atom ee = 


.eeyo el? oF & 







tect teongue Sinai exisnnoiszoup ad+ to saison oat 3 
ees er ae b- 
donatd sdt biswos acbust338 oldatovs? ited essabus 2 t2om _ 


: aaa | 
yasm dguods neve slqosq gableoge- Honor bas ogsugael oe 
bebisebau stow erodto ys bas ovitagen rev orem ‘avemeeae 1. 
[e e ree 7% 1 2 
tew ton bib esnshute odt to Rakes XPS teogre! edt dguodsIA 
Y #449 ache a 


dgid to fo id eLgmoo. noqu donner tieds yaivorgnk ee 


sist yeds ysinummos gritssqe-doneti. 8 me ‘evil toa ‘tease 
toa esw ti teas oli dwdszow esw domart Yo ybute ae . 
tot sgsugrsl futese s ed bluod ti tedt bas didalttib obs ae : 
£ anes SEs bemoitnem esw eA i 2TR8Y oxbawt af mei $e9 f 7 

ork ary ; 


figid ons bas eimobute rsey terit sdt to ogesmeareq ¥9deeTg = | 
gtoms move ,r9vowol -Tooltuo svitieog 2idt bed erswetdop: 
meds to taso1eq yIxte asd2 stom .adnobute 188% cata odd 


,eulav to 2sw doferd %0 ybute odt teds berabiemos 
ore Pay! 


= i ' 





doisw ,2tnommod nattixw ,esnebute2 siete 320m ode x0 
gnimrsst eit to Igoisixa yLdgid sts. xF 







Bin 





dsiw. moisostetiseeib soeLior enoitevteado tt, I 


brswos besverih xs ease fettoeets 


gcineiggniteth to mol dorq ibe 
ore ettemst seers todtedws 






settee 
a eee 5) 
| 
7 is 
i 
7 





. ie ; a ry 7 





DT : : 
7 7 , — 
- S's a 


a © : it ae er 


ah ile) 


a result of attitude toward the course or the teacher. 
Question 46, however, was perhaps more revealing of the 
overall feeling toward the course. This item showed that 
almost two thirds of the sample thought that the VIF 
course was a good one for people wishing to learn French. 
That the majority of the students held this view is indeed 
quite remarkable since most of them believed that time 
passed slowly in their French classes, that they became 
bored with some parts of the lesson, and that variety and 
additional classroom activities were lacking in the 
course. This approach to learning French was more widely 
accepted by the Grade VII students than by those in the two 
higher grades. The greater acceptance of the course by the 
first year students may well have been influenced by factors 
such as their. age, the fact that the subject was a new one, 
and that it required little or no homework. High ability 
learners were more positive in their opinion about some 
aspects of the course. It must be remembered that this 
positive opinion of the VIF course must be interpreted in 
thesliuchteor the factsthat the junior high school students 
of this sample had had no previous experience with any 
Other French course, 

A large proportion of the students considered the 
filmstrip pictures to be-useful for explaining meaning 
even. though they were not as a group too happy with the 


DIGLuUresmOYe tne Stories ae fhe lack. of clarity o£ the tapes 























es simile dienes oxen eqsdzeq 2 
sais bewode medi eidT .se%uo> ody biewo? grist: Lisseve 


TIV add defy tdgwors ofdmsa eds 20 abri ds sa 
donetl areal 09 gaideiw ofgodg rot ano bo0g seqos ae 
besbai 2i waiv Shia. bisd Shier’ 3: ont to iroten ody sedT Sa 


A 
emit tsdt beveilsd mort to. 1e08 ‘sonke of daivemor  enkip | 
ee GPE 
omppsd yeds tedt yeoaesto dgaroxt xbaild ak iwote “boeeeq aa 
eee #3 


bas yJetrsv gsd3 bas ,moezol otis to eitaq omoe dtiw berod if 


sit mi gnidost Ssisw sas tw tae nooreesta taembsebek cory a f a 

yiebtw stom 28w donstt gaintsel of dosozage ekdT eae 

_ ows offs me o2o0dt yd nah einebuste 11V sbsxrd: ads d er : 
eds yd Sz2THOD edj to songtqesos tetsstg sAT eabexg. sane mo 









21osast yd booneultni nasd svad ILew xem 2tnobute ney 2atk? o 
-'. 4 ass 4 

. 300 Wem 8 2sw-toerdue sft tsds tost sit . 938 tisdt 2s dove | “f 
ne 7669 

yiilids dytH .dArowemond om ro siatil a 3i teds bas 
~~ 

smio2 tuods motatqo tieds mi sesreeee eTom oro eromtaol 

2idd tsit boredmeme: od teum $1 ,eemuoo ods $a: ‘onan 


(Give i 
Ni beterqretni sd teu e272 HiV edz to no kmige evisti | 


etnebute Loose rar tokaut aig tedd Jost old to gdgth ont 
yas dtiw sonetteqxs evoiverg on bed bed baat) 
| + S2tH03. ff 
eit bersbienos 2aneby x2 srit Yo sapieraien 
gninsom ariimic Laxe ro} teiteel ed ot ent a 3 . 
sity dix veges 007 quotg 9 ae som arate ri 
saa iain ak uh 2 ond? TO 2omus 


la » aay : aa 


120 


appeared to present problems to many, and received strong 


Criticism: 


Comprehension of Meaning 


While slightly more than one half of the students 
believed that they usually understood their teachers'! 
explanations in French of vocabulary Ciettecultiess and 
thought that they usually understood the meaning of what 
they said in French, many respondents obviously were having 
other problems with the comprehension of meaning. The fact 
that approximately sixty percent of the students believed 
that they often failed to understand the meaning of the 
French sentences, and that about the same proportion had 
difficulty remembering the material of the previous lesson 
is an indication of. certain imperfections in the learning 
process. The use of English to clear up difficulties in 
meaning was overwhelmingly advocated by the students as a 
remedy for this situation. While this is not likely the 
complete solution, there may be room for greater compromise 
in this respect by some teachers, 

As would be expected, slow learners found the compre- 
hension of meaning to be a much greater problem than did 
their brighter class members. Grade IX students were also 
of the opinion that this area presented an obstacle to 


their progress. 


















ost 


etmebut2 edt to tied smo neds stom “yeodgete of id | 
sGr segs Ce 
'eyedoses tied Booterebau' yilswes ysdt Jad? pe te 
24; ‘és a ; 
bas (e6bs lootdetb yrsiudszov to donstd ar enotssasiqxs 


e460 
tadw to gainsem odt booterebau “ifeven yous ted saguens 


gnives stew yfLevoivdo etnsbnogest ynsm ,fometd mi bise ‘yea: . 
a ,oted : 
tos onT -gninsem to notenedetqmoo sat daiw sseisoTy Raye | 


bevetied esaobute sdt to taenisgq YIxte ulstamixorqqa a ee 
ont to gtinsom oft bastetebats of balist netto yedt ‘gedd 


ee 


bsd nottirogorq sme2e sft tuods Ttshdt bas ,2o2m9t M08 done] 


‘ 24 
nozesl 2uoivetq ads to fekretim odd goitedmemat qoteokttih 
pe? Qeae _ 


-gttinrsel eft nt enottzotrSqmt nigixo> te noitsorbat ms ei . 


mt aot iuoit? ib qu xrs9l> os detiend to seu sdT ,229207q 


8 28 @tnebute os “d betscovbs ylgaimiodwiysvo esw gatanen - 
ureees. 
odd yleAil ton ef eidt off dW .mortausie ands 10% 


seimotqmos 1restse1g tot moor ed xem Ssxodt ‘,nottaloe svotqnoa 
.ersdosst smoe yd regen eins 3 


-etqmos ods Bavot zrearssl wole .betoaqxe sd bow 2A 


bo a 
bib asd mofdotq tstsstg doom s ad ot gaingem 20 eiaeae _ 


‘~ € 
oels saw etnobuse xD sbst) .2etodmom 2esio- a | 
ot de aaa ng bosabestq ots. etdt sede pens 





Grammar 

The majority of the students in this sample 
apparently had not attained intuitively a clear under- 
Standing of the basic structures which were being presented 
to them, although it may have been too early in their study 
of the language for such understanding to have crystalized 


properly. 


Repetition 
Thess tudentsweatgm the most part, felt ‘that time 


dragged during the repetition phase of the lesson, but they 
considered that this activity was. useful. Most of them did 
not think that repeating the sentences after the tape was 
interesting, but they did want additional practice which is 
indicative of a positive outlook toward repetition. 
Nevertheless, other means of achieving the same end should 
be investigated, because after the. sounds of the language 
have been mastered to a greater or lesser degree, the 
students rapidly become less. interested in repeating 
phrases, and as a result, fail to see the usefulness of 
this part of the lesson. Apparently, as long as students 
are. able to see the usefulness of.repetition, further 
learning can be expected.. However, increasing familiarity 
with the lesson material and topic reduces the need. for as 


mouths repetitive, drillg ihe the higher gradess« 


£8 




















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shauna eid? ni etnebuse oft to okvatam edt 

-rebou tselo s ylovitinint bemtstss Jon bed yi 
betns281g gnied 9T9OW doinw zorptourse stead 9 










bute tiedt at {tas oot nead ‘oved Yea si dguontie igus 
or ; % ane “ 
bss iisse ee) ovat ot ibiidserib oc doua opnuynel ons 
X a | 5 Sa i” _ 
7 » x 





: ee 
emit tsdt sist ,31sq jeom edt rot ,2taebuse ent “7 : 


yedt sud RARE eit to c2adg noititsqer siz gniwub beggath 

bib meds 20 t20M -luteey 2sw ytivitos eidd tend bersbienoo ap | 

2sw syst edt 1etts esrnetmee ott gti tseqex tedt datioadhs 
ai:dotdw soit2stq Isnoitsibbs tnsw bib yeds dud .gattestesni . 

»ftoitizsqer brswot foolsuo evitizog s io evitesibni ‘y 

bivode bas ems2e sit gnivetdos to enssm ted3o0 .2eelsdsrever : i 

egsugasl eis to ebayoe odd tetis seussed chossghtequeaiand 

sit ,9ergeb rez2eel 10 tetsetg 8 Ot borssenm mved eved a S 

gnisssqer ai bereerot at azot emoosd ‘eheilein eanobure af 

to 2zenfuteau edt 992 0} £282 .tigest s 28 bas ,zeesrdg - 

etnebuite as i 25 ne ameea ls one Ro eg vias. #2 


Yirsiliast gniesestani ,vevewoH — | 
25 “7a Hs0n sdt esauher er ; 19 | 
|. 2oberg bir isin ang mi 18 


Bay 


Reading and Writing 

A minority of the respondents, about forty percent, 
wished to have reading and writing introduced at an 
earlier stage in. the VIF course despite the fact that some 
of the teachers had given them the written material of the 
fessoneshortlysatterppresenting itsforsatheyfirsta~time. 
Nevertheless;,sixty percent of the respondents thought. that 
the teacher should write the French sentences on the board 
after they had learned to say them, and an even larger 
percentage wanted a textbook with the sentences of the 


lessons and some exercises. 


Time Provided for Free Conversation in French 

Most of the students were of the opinion that they 
were not given sufficient opportunities to speak French in 
class or to talk about the things which were of. personal 
anjbereste to dthemsys IhegGradesVI1's were.more. content with 
their. lot on this point than were the Grade IX's. or. the 
high achievers. It is obvious that the most important part 
of the VIF lesson, the transposition phase, was being 
neglected, by, somes of, the teachers.,, The, application, of the 
Material, learned. anytheselessonsanatheyreal tife situation 
of- the students should be the culmination of every unit 
Covered erdite isenotgsurprisang that the~students. felt 
dissatisfied when little or no time was devoted to real 


communication... 





















,imsotsq news tuods ,2tnebnogeor ed3 wo armen 7 
tis 18 beauborsai gnitiww bre gaibser =a) 
smoz tsd3 sont ods otiqesb. eequos AV edt RE 
ent ito (sitessm met3ExW edt mod OV LR bed eredonas ei 26 : hd 
omit 22713 ois tod ti ghisneastg 19ti8 Ystode sozeol rata 

ted3 siguods etnobnogzsr sdz to snesisq yIxte 22elodtteven 

brsod edz no 290netne2e donor odd siiiw bivode ae ody 7. i 

tegrsi move os bas ,msdt \se ot benrssl bef yods ene ) % 
eis to eepnesie2 ent dtiw oodsxes 5 bedasw egsineots vies ae 


‘an ‘ aes 


.292£919x9 smoe bas enoeeel ar, 
éou ** 20985 ad 


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yods tefdt noimiqo sit to stew 2insbute odt Yo seem arid 
fi donati Assqe ot 29LFinwItoOgdo tnatotitue novig Jon erew io 
[snoetsg to stow dortw egnidt sdt tuods Wises ot to eaets 2 a 
Atiw jasiao> stom Tow 2'1IV sbs1) edT moda of seategnt - 
Jee ta6 AY Sbexd oid erew asd tatoq end ao tol tisds 
sisq tasttoqmi steom edt tedt euotvdo et 71 , eusven damaged 
gaisd 25W ,2estq foitieoqens1t eds moze a1 wile 908 

edt to noistsaifqqe efT .eredoger sit to amoe “Gd besvelged 
noitsutie stil Lser sit mt noeeet srit ieetiaialamitgn: 


tin cxswa io noijsaimiua oft od biuarde 2 


sist 21nsbute ot 33a ynietrqrue Sea i 
isex ot betoveb zsw emit on to 9itsil ne t 








DRS 


Aap cae. Ose CO Speak French 


More than sixty percent of the respondents hoped 
to be able to speak French at some future date, but only 
forty-five percent of them thought that they would be 
able to do so by the time they had finished high school. 
The greatest optimism was. among the Grade VII's and the 


high achievers. 


Teachers' Training 


From the analysis of responses of students taught 
by VIF-trained teachers compared.to: those of students 
taught by non-VIF-trained teachers, it appeared that the 
former. group of learners held more favorable attitudes 
toward the French language and its speakers, and more 
positive opinions of the course than did, the other group. 
However, 1t should be-pointed out: that certain factors 
make this a dubious comparison. 

The Grade VII's: comprised forty percent of the 
students of VIF-trained teachers, whereas the Grade IX's 
made up only twenty percent. The students: taught. by 
non-VIF-trained teachers were thirty-five percent Grade 
Vil's and thirty-five percent Grade’ IX's. These per- 
centages show that since the Grade VII's comprised the 
tan eges tug roupsObeStudenuse taught: bythe VIR=trained 
teachers, and since Grade: VII students tended to’ be more 


positive and idealistic in their. opinions and. attitudes 


Bet 





beqod 2titsbmoges1 odd 20 tnSorsg YsKee Made OTOM 7 
xine sud ,efeb srutet emoe te dorert insqe oF elds ed 0s ~ a4 . 
ad wigan yorit tedy tdguvods jet to saooreg ove ysTOR | . 

7 


,foodoe dgid bedeiniit bed yods mix oils yd oR ‘ob ot efds 
eft bas 2'11V ebsxd ot gnoms esw meimitqo t2eseeTg SAT 
























” « 


- 
. = oe 
- 


ay. Y nity. “ 
- = 4 -; 
triguss etnsbust2 to 2ze2noqz2sr to sh at ons mort | i 
as |. ed ee 7 “Ag 
ernebut2 to e2orns oF betsqmo exeioss? bonten IV ey 


edt tsd3 bexseqqs Ji ‘,etsdosot beniszt-TIV-non vd aes 
esbusists sidsrovst stom, bios evortsal Xo qporg meme : 
stom b ress ~2tetssqe eti bre sgsignsl doaeye se Brewot i = 
‘quotg redso efs_bib*asdt senecs ait to encrnéqo levitieoq: 
eTos25t nivtres Isit gu0 betniog sd blues Pa +TSvawoH =" . 
. mozitagmo> .2uoPdub’ s etd ofan 
eit to Inssteq ytrot bezitquos 2°hIV Sharp oa 9 5e 
2'XI ebstd edt esstedw ,eredoset boaters An to eamebuse 
ye ddguss etmebute sd? .ines1sy \anewt xiao qu eben 
ebs1d tneoi1sq evit-yirEds sTSw erased boninxs-81VeqoR: 
-req SeedT .2'XT obs) taso19q ovat xartild a aeeY 
‘ed? beeinqmon e'TIVv ebsrd dt sonke! sett te eegesne -_ 

bonists-I1V sz Lagat ys | 1g 7% s a 

stom 9d of bobney etnebute ITV abexd 2 (etedoses 
nabaseaohe bas” eno btigo rhode “te iter, 











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‘Wiehe wa, | le & 


vz ' 
“ } | 


124 


than the Grade IX students, the differences between the 
two groups based on the training of their teachers may not 


be as great as first suspected, 
II, CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS 


On the basis of the findings of this study, the 
following conclusions and implications may be stated. 

1. Many factors prevent students from attaining their 
potential in a second language, and one of the most 
influential is negative attitudes toward the language under 
study and the native speakers of that language. This means 
that every effort to create these positive attitudes must 
be made. 

2. A foreign language course, which is well received 
by the students, is much more likely to promote interest 
and enthusiasm for the language. However, such courses are 
effective only in the hands of skilled, imaginative 
teachers.,' Therefore, it is imperative that teachers be 
highly trained in the methodology of these courses. The 
influence of the French teacher has proved to be one of 
the most important factors, and perhaps the most important 
factor, affecting the learning of the second language. 

3. The results of this study have shown that the 
younger learners have a more positive and idealistic view- 
point of both the VIF course and the language than older 


students have. Accordingly, it may. be advisable to begin 
























nh 


ee Oe | 

; 4 r | s) " wine vs 7 _ 
edt aoswied zeonerstith oft ,¢€ 
ton Yeu ereddset tisds Yo Set a iy aot i »: 
bese tenia as agerevaesee ©, 
7 

QKO1TADDIGMI MA avoreufomea 11 iden is tee 
=" » 66 ase ie ; Sa ; 
odd ,ybute 2idt 20 egmibatd oft Fo ebesd eds m0, — = 
.betste od yem enottszilqmi bas anotesfonos gaiwoliLot 7 se 
réedls goitistts mort etnebuste tnevéetq etotost wat PT 3 <a soaker} 


SE 








tzom odd to smo bas ‘Pgeupasl baos9e s at Yeteneboy - : i, 
19h au egsuaant sit brswod esbutitts ovitsgen at Istsaoultat ae 
ensom 2fdT .segsugnel Fey to 21eABeqe sviten ods bas ‘ - oe 

seum 2abutiiis eviobeon raat S93seTS oF sr02ts ereve sat 
~ .ebsm od 
bevisaet iLow 2i ine ,92TU0o ognuga! mgistot A oF eta a 
fesnesat stomorg ot ylettl stom dowm at etnebute "eid ea _ : 
OTH 2e92¢tuU0D dove ,1T9vewoH .syBugnsl sit 16% nnatendses bas, 
| svitsnigsmt eHOR tee to abnsd edz o£ yiao ovissette 
od epedosst tedt ovitsraqmi ei Fi oe ae 
saT 2earub2 sesdt to YeoLoborsem edt mk “helices | 
‘to sto sd ot bavorq esd resdosea donovl edt 20 | 
sasttoqmi Feom ody eqsitaq bas’ .et0100) 348 
-ogsugnsl boozse eft. bis aniorses ody ga 


‘edt tsdy aworle ovad_xbuse ‘Bese i hs,” 


OTe, Min 
-woiv. oiveileept ein mr r ¢ 
a re _ ects ier ie 


reblo as q | 
a 


E 






aigod ot sae 


tio is 


125 


the study of French at an even lower grade level, and not 
to have this subject compulsory beyond Grade VII in the 
Province of Saskatchewan. 

4, The inability to hear. the tapes properly has 
undoubtedly created problems associated with pronunciation, 
comprehension of meaning, and motivation. The proper use 
and maintenance of good equipment and materials would go 
a long way toward alleviating these difficulties. 

9. Meaning is not being conveyed clearly to many 
students, particularly to those of lower. ability. A re- 
evaluation of methods used by teachers for this purpose is 
necessary, and corrective measures need to be undertaken. 

6. Not all learners intuitively grasp the grammar 
of the material being presented in the lessons. The use 
of the deductive method, therefore, may be advisable for 
some students: inevcertain?situations ; 

7. Grade IX students, and to a lesser extent the 
Grade VIII's, had a greater preference for reading and 
writing the French sentences than did the Grade VII's. 

It might be worthwhile, after the first year of the 
course, to reduce the time lag between the presentation 
of new material and the reading and writing of it. 

8. The manner in which the VIF course is presented 
to the students of this sample showed that variety, 
supplementary activities, and time for conversation is 


lacking,.particularly for the more senior students. More 


ie aed 




























son. site: sheinen ebstg rewol seve ms Je 
oft ni HIV obs) baoyad: crostuqnes soe due: e84t,omedies ie 
newodotetane to sonivord 
eal <reqorg = edt seod os yilidsat edt * rs | 
Horistonugorq diiw betstoozek emaldorg betsets ylbetduobau paul 7 
ez Teqorq eT ho Beavigen ns ,.gninsom to Kotensdezquos = | 
og bivow elsitetsm bas tnasnqiups boog to ooneast aiam bas ve 
(20itivoittib seeds gnitsiveliz jrsWod ysw gnol Be. : ten ; 
ynsm ot vitsels bsyevnos yated som et gut neal 0 hbee 
61 A >. ystilids xswol to seadd ot (lrsfustiveq ,etaebuse: in Ji 
2i szoqxsq eids sot eredaset ¥d bsey ebodtem Yo notssufeve a , 
nsAstrobry od ot ae astuenon evitoorsxos bas -ttseesosn 
Ismmstg oft qesty yLovidivani erenrsel fis sou ,a Ace oe ae 
sey ofT ,2moeael edt at betneestq gaied Latistam saz to - <i 
tot sldszivbs od vem Jototstats -Suabhailt ovisauheb oft 20! 
.2cotisutiz2 mtattos mi 23 febote -onoe 
edt dnetxe reeeel s o3 Bre <2tagbute X1 shard & ieee 
bas gribest 10% sonetetstq <retsetg, B) ban ye! ILIV ebaxd 
an tTiv ohex9 odt bib neds eeo ne yn82, d2a91a odd gmatiaw! 
sit to ~esy text? aay reste al tang Tei or ae 
noltsinsze1q sit. neewted gal amit oft soubor e2 eet0y 


Jf Yo gnitiow bas acibaed a . 


betnezetq et 927K02 ay ody oo 
+ «\7etrteayv ae ‘be noe - vr 

ai AgiseerewnoD xox “oe 7 

stom eer ee 








126 


attention needs to be devoted to this area of the course, 
class enrollment will have to be limited, and sufficient 


time in the schedule must be allotted to the French course. 
III. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FURTHER RESEARCH 


Some recommendations arising from this study are 
Suggested below. 

1. This inquiry was conducted in an area where 
French is a,compulsory subject for. all junior high school 
students.. A similar study in a school system having both 
students who were required to take French, and other 
students who elected the subject on a voluntary basis 
would allow for a comparison of opinions between these two 
groups which should yield valuable additional. information. 

2. The conclusions of this research were based on 
data obtained from a questionnaire administered to junior 
high school students. An investigation, which included 
students in the senior high school grades, would provide 
a, more. complete. survey, especially if greater attention 
were given, to the differences at the various, grade levels. 

3. A questionnaire of the sort used in this study 
does not usually procure completely satisfactory responses 
on any topic. If interviews were combined with a question- 
naire, more light would be shed on many questions which 
otherwise remain only partially answered. 


4. A comparative study of student opinion involving 





















ae rl 
.aetdoa, ot) to sets efit ot betoveb od of ebosm ae 


sastoitiwe bas. ,berimifL ed ot aE Ee | a 
.s2tuoz foneTt edt o2 bossoris od teum slubadoe odd nt omit 


e 


HOAAMEAS AAHTAUT AOA auto eh ut” 7 ye 
eee : i 


ets ybute eit mort gntetrs aroisshremmopes emo® 60 2 ae 
ereiw s9ts me ai betoubno2 2sw yriupat ebdb yk fe | 
footise dgid tokaut [fs 10t tasidue yroaluqmop eo ef donor’ : 
ditod gnived moteye Léodge sar ybise telimie A. .eteebuse 

 tefdso bas ,donett sass of botiupst srew odw etnobuse 

2iaed yistaulov s fo soatdoe git betselo odw etnebyte 

owt ded nsowiad enorniqo to ao2itsqmes s t0t wolis biuow 
ademboeties L[snoitibbs sidsuley 5lery bivode doidw equotg Oe 
| fo beeed stew dote9ce1 z2idt to etoievfsnod Sa? oS sis Se . i‘. 
tormy( oF betstezinimbs srisnmoisesup s mort bentasde egab =) 
bsbuionit dotdiw ,noitsgiteevni EY .etaebusé foodoe dgid = 
‘ebivorq bIuow ,esbsty Lloodoe gid toinee oda at atnebute — 
hoitnetts, rersety ti yilstoeges ,yevige o7elqmos stom s 
.2fevel oebsty euoirey edt ts esonsrstith edt.ot sevig etew 
vbuze eid? ni boey tr02 edt to sriganotsasop Ase © ah) 
esenoqesi YrYosostettne Ther eigmes Merges : 
“Motseeup 6 dain Sontdmds, eo sialon ann ane 
doisiw emo Baug. em Ho beat th o' 
borowens' ‘it 
gatylovai notatqo sided yvbus 








12% 


two or. more. distinct. second language courses could 
provide additional information to those whose task it is 


te, select specific courses of study, 


4: i omy 
wy ie ~ i - 


rt: re 
—— Le hAG = ™ | 
| peers ae Sie picoceion 




















pot <2 eet 7 
(oo eet ty 
a $2506 
of i aa 

| }sea tem, 
a 0) pe® (taaae 

Oe CIP aE 

A ir igo 4 

pee) as alee aa 

eo FRG aa AN 

adh Pe is | 

it ie bh heonhanadl 

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129 
BIBLIOGRAPHY 


Ausubel,.David P. "Adults vs Children in Second. Language 
Learning: Psychological Considerations," The Modern 


Language Journal, 48(1964) :420-424, 


Bamberger, Fred H. ''What About the Student's Point of 
View?'' The Modern Language Journal, SOLO oe ae Le 


Bartley, Diana E. "The Importance of the Attitude Factor 
in Language Dropout: A Preliminary Investigation of 


Group and Sex Differences," Foreign Language Annals, 
970) 2383-393, 


Bazan, Beverly Moen. ''The Danger of Assumption Without 


Proof," The Modern Language Journal, 48(1964):337-346. 


Belasco, Simon. ''Nucleation and the Audio-Lingual 


Approach," The Modern Language Journal, 49(1965):482- 
491. 


Boucher, John G. "Discourse on Methods," Foreign Language 
News and Views in New Hampshire, 12t1988) 1-15 
Brooks, Nelson. "Language Learning: The New Approach," 


Phi Delta Kappan, 47(1966):359. 


Brosseau, John Francis. "Factors Influencing Second 
Language Learning." Unpublished Master's thesis, 
University of Alberta, Edmonton, 1965S. 


Brown, Margaret J. ''A FLES Research and Experimental 
Project,'' Hispania, 48(1965):890. 


Carroll, John B. "What Does the Pennsylvania Foreign 
Language Research Project Tell Us," Foreign Language 
Annals, 3(1969):214-236. 


+ the Contributions of Psychological Theory, and 
Educational Research to the Teaching of Foreign 


Languages,"' The Modern Language Journal, 49(1965): 
DIS Vi. 


- "Research on Teaching Foreign Languages," in 
Handbook ae Research on Training, edited by N..L. Gage. 
1Cago: cNally an ompany, 1963. 


Chastain, Kenneth D. and Frank J. Woerdehoff. A Methodo- 
logical Study Comparing the Audio-Lingual Habit Theory 
and the. Cognitive Code-Learning Theory,'' The Modern 


Language Journal, 52(1968) :268-279. 


esi 


iia cir 





egsupanl ieions ni nestBE bdo ev etfubA” 
orsboM ai " enottstobianod [so nyek tee f 
ay ae .BSA-OSD: (ROQEIBD Ley 










AY cf bived <feduewk 


to tntod 2e'tnsbuse edt tuodA tedW" . bord ,1tegtedmad } if 
»SHS-OBS: (ceRLjee [sntwol sgsugnsd robo sil *owatV oe te 
to3281 sbusitsA edt to sasnstroqmi ofT" .3 snail ,yolsisa ~- : 
to Moltisgisteoval yrsaimifexd A :suo Raia i ni 
tana’ ogsugns! agis1o4 aes D a 
ats ( ere 



















tuodtiW! goitgmue2zA to tegasd eT" .neoM ylteved ,assed’ 


\ORE-TEEs (SSCL) BS ,Lenryot anes s robo . " Yoord 


fsugisil - -oLbuA sit bas moisssious" .momi2 ,ovesied 
-S8h: RCOna De? isnot SasuE sss mrsboM sdT " aaa * 


egsugns! agierod " shod tM no prkrah/edel 9 sot Soe aya 
ST tT TSSCL St Dt file BH Ww us EPas 


" dosorqqA wo sAT :gnintsel sysugasl" .daoelen ,zdoord 
"O28: (08CL)T) <asqgel ested fag 





bno0292. gnionoultal 2ros281" .2fisasvi adol ,weee2ord 
2ieedt 2'tesesM bedzilduqnal ".gntarssd sgsugasl ce 
.co@l .notnombd ,s3rsdiA to ysberevinU 


iutenleees bas dorsseeh eaJi mune . = 
088: (280L)ah , oo tte . Vs 


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ogsugast grater ",2U Lfof soetord Hotss tt vets 
| -OCS-PLS: : (0008 g ere 


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agietol to gnidoseT eft ot ewe Lenoisssuba 
:(coeljes  fsatuot 


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nt " 2ogsugnsd mgierod gnidosel doteeeos Sa ad 






-9gs0 .I .U yd betibs oni 
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aii, .drodsbye ow no ITS’ a : es: 4 
<tosdT sidsH [sugnid-otbu Mit gnitsqmoD ybu 
"4 Sr fa Fp an grit 
«(ro —s { ate : (8 a eT) ae } Om e 


130 


Chomsky, Noam, "Linguistic Theory," Northeast Conference 
on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. Menasha, 
Wisconsin: George Banta cent Pera: pp. 43-49. 

Donoghue, Mildred. Foreign Languages and the Schools: A 
Book of Readings. Dubuque, neers C. Brown, 1567. 

3 - Foreign Language and the Elementary School Child. 
Dubuque, lowa: Wm. C.- rown, | ‘ 


Feenstra, Henry John. "Aptitude, Attitudes, and 
Motivation in Second Language Acquisition." Unpublished 
Doctoral thesis, University of Western Ontario, London, 


L960% 

Fisk, Sherrill, "What Goals for FLES?'"' Hispania, 752(1969)): 
64-69. 

Ford, Thomas R.- "Social Factors Affecting Academic 


Performance,'' The School Review, 65(1957):415-422. 


Gardner, R. C. "Motivational Variables in Second Language 
Acquisition."' Unpublished Doctoral thesis, McGill 
University, Montreal, 1960. 


Goodman, Leo A. and W. H. Kruskal. "Measures of Association 


for Cross Classifications,'' Journal of the American 
Statistical Association, 49/( : -/64, 


Grittner, Frank M. Teaching Foreign Languages. New York: 
Harper and Row, . ; 


"A Critical Re-Examination of-Methods and 


Materials," The Modern Language Journal, 53(1969): 


467-477, 

Howe, Michael J. A., Roberta Gordon, and Lyndell S. 
Willman. ''Motivational Factors in Learning a Foreign 
Language," The Peabody Journal of Education, 47(1969): 
26-31. 


Huebener, Theodore. ''The New Key is. Now Off-Key!" The 
Modern Language Journal, 47(1963):375-377. 


Jakobovits, Leon A. "Research Findings and Foreign 
Language Requirements in Colleges and Universities," 


Foreign Language Annals, 2(1969):436-456., 


Kaulfers, Walter V. "Earmarks of a Good Foreign Language 
Program, High Points, :37(1955):11-31, 





















bins , eopuit ta Fh Aine iats .udel ytaeH ,stfenesd | 
bederlduqn ". notsieidpaA, agsugned 5rtese2 gh motstavisoM- 
oe -ortein0 nvsteeW fo viterevintl sebaeds eet 


:(@0CL)S2 ,siaagetH "T24IT rot elsod FeriW’'. ALivred2 “get 


DimsbssA gatsssttaA eyo tatsoe” A raisins b1r04 
SSPLSIS: (Weel).20 eweivesd [dod5e oft " gompmrotts 


egeupne baooe2 ni zoldeitsV¥ IsnoitevisoM" .3 .f .toabr80 
fLtdoM ,ef2eds Is1otz0d bedetidugqn ".nokaiet 
.O90L  ,IseisaoM ,yilerevi 


noitsinozeA to 2e6tuessM" fst eux -H .Wobas .A ood 
mgvitomA sdz to [sarsou " saoissot® feesid eeotd rot 


Jeb ,sottetzog sh SMAUEEI SIE a 
:AroY wo .2spauensJ a istod ieee = Aner cross ixd . 
-C0CT .wo bes teqreH 


bas dieitsen to notisnaimsxi-oh acres ye d 


:(@oeLjee ,fentwol sysugasl oxsboM gat " 
wrrectas 
=, 


-@ Ifebayl bas ,aobrod sstedod. .0A Eh Loniiaih ewok 
mgistol 8 gaintssld ni 2tos284 sc Sade aa *, 
:(@0@F)TS ,mottssybd to Isnrsol vbodssd pier 


ent "!yedt-3220 wok 2i we wo edt" 
VTE«OSEs (E88 yh tsi 


— 


mgierol bias aga 
lela bas @ 
OGh+ 0EHs CBO 


sgsugned ngioror bood 58 


sander 


L335) 


Lambert, Wallace E. "Psychological Approaches to the 


Study of Language,'’ The Modern Language Journal, 
47(d963) :1hd4-12)0, 


Lipton, Gilady sy C. o,!!To Read ‘or Not to Read: An Experiment 


on the FLES Level," Foreign Language Annals, 3(1969): 
241-246, 


Mirsky, Jerome G. "Lagging Interest,'' FLES Panel -- AATSP., 
UUG Cy ro 67 jer vee ler ls 


Mueller, Theodore H. and Ralph R. Leutenegger. ‘''Some 
Inferences About an Intensified Oral Approach to the 
Teaching of French Based on a Study of Course Dropouts," 


The Modern Language Journal, 48(1964):91-94., 


Pimsleur, Paul, D. M. Sundland, and Ruth D. McIntyre. 
"Underachievement in Foreign Language Learning," 


wirerational Review of Applied Linguastics, 2(1964): 
a Ls Ui 


Politzer, Robert L. 'An Investigation of the Order of 
Presentation of Foreign Language Grammar Drills in 
Relation to Their Explanation." Stanford: A Research 
Report, Project No. 5 = 1096, U.S, Office of 
Education, September, 1967. 


Reinert, Harry. "Student Attitudes Toward Foreign 


Language -.No Sale!" The Modern Language Journal, 
Selo / 0) VLU = LLan 


Renard, Colette, and Charles Henry Heinle. Implementin 
Voix et Images de France in American et eots and 
Colleges: Part. I. Philadelphia: Chilton Books, 1969. 

Rice, Joseph.P. and George Banks. "Opinions of.Gifted 
Students Regarding Secondary School Programs," 


Exceptional Children, .34(.1967) :269-273. 
Rivers, Wilga M. Teaching Foreign-Language Skills. 
Chicago; «The University of PNGREENTE Press, 1969. 
Siegel, Sidney. Nonparametric Statistics for the 
Behavioral Sciences, New York: McGraw-Hi ook 
‘Company, 1956. 


Spolsky, Bernard... "A Psycholinguistic Critique of 
Programmed Foreign Language Instruction," International 


Review of Applied Linguistics, .4(1966):119- ‘ 


fe 


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to 99ktt0 .2.U ,8C0L - & of saa ail sroqeA 
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° 


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| , SEL-TOLs (OF ye o> a) Se 


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Stern, H. H. "A Foreign Language in the Primary School?" 
Paper read at the International Conference on Modern 
Foreign Language Teaching, West Berlin, 1964. 


Trump, Lloyd J. Quoted in "What's Wrong with the High 
Schools?" Newsweek, 75(February 16, 1970):65-69. 


Wardhaugh, Ronald. ''Some Current Problems in Second- 
Language Teaching," Language Learning 9 1/ (1967) 221-26, 


a 


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At Pe PeEaNe Dade X A 


PILOT STUDY. QUESTIONNAIRE 





134 
PILOT STUDY QUESTIONNAIRE 


We are asking you to answer some questions about the French 
course you are taking and how you. feel about French in general. Since 
this is simply to find out your opinions, there are no right or wrong 
answers. Please try to answer as honestly as possible. What you say 
will not affect your mark or credit in your course. Do not give your 
name. 


Please check the most suitable answer. There are some questions 
where you are asked to explain your answer. You may do this right 
under the question. However, feel free to make comments on any of the 
questions since a "Yes - No" response may seem inadequate. Thank you 
for, your cooperation. 


rai ere a Renee a el a Re Sa a lee 
1. Should all Canadians know how to speak French? Yes 


Undecided __ 

No 
2. Do you like to speak French whenever you get a 16S 
chance? : Undecided __ 

No 
3. Will you try to use French as much as possible eos 
when you have finished school? Undecided __ 

No 
4. Would you prefer to start learning reading at LCS aa 
the beginning of your French course? Undecided__ 

No 
5S. Do you believe French is a useful language in b 2h eemetaeenerenes 
today's world? Undecided ___ 

No 
6. Can you usually understand the teacher's ex- LeSoa—aeer 
planations in French of vocabulary difficulties? Undecided 

No 
7. Do you think French should be studied by every- Les eat 
body from Grade VII to Grade XII? (Please explain Undecided__ 

your answer briefly) No 

8. Do you usually understand the meaning of what you os 
are saying in class when speaking French? Undecided__ 


No 











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tigit etdt ob vem uoY Pe ge nee ot bodes sts 
seta f ,tovewoH ,norteeup 


eft to yne no 2tnemmoo Ssilam 


voy AneriT 





ee.) | 
.. bebisebav 
= a 


enter zaY 
___. bab Foabnau 
ov 


sae OY 
__. Babissbav 
— Wi 


es 


2oY 
—. bsbrosbni! 





maak eo 
__.. babrasint! 
nit OV 





z0Y 
__._ bab irosba 
ee 


—— 





aan 251 
_. bsbioasball 
ov 








ee rt) | 
___bshioshiav 
OV 





steupsbent mese yam senogeer “oA - 20Y¥" = sonte anot? 


MOLIBTEqOOD TOY 704 


‘ilome1t Asege oF wor worl ensbhansd ile binode 


8 Jeg Loy severed torts Asege oF eiil voy of 
. *sonsd> 


sidizeoq 28. dou 2a. 


ts gnibser gnimrsel txete. ot 


Tseru0>, rbasTi qwoy 26 


ni sgeugnsl [tees = 2h [ere akee 






. =%8 2' reseed oft bgesedshi 
Yesitinotttib \raludssov to Aor 


-yIove \d beibute od bivode re 
nisiqxe sesold) TIX shard of T 


toned seuod yrs voy Li. 
*foadae bedeinit sved voy medw 


odlt 


rebras 


ie 


& 


9, 


1d. 


dei ye 


12". 


ES 


14, 


ok 


16. 


lar 


18. 


ise 


20. 


Do you think Canada should forget its French 


background and become an English-speaking country 


from coast to coast? 


Do you feel that the French sentences you are 
learning will be useful in conversations in 
real life? 


Are French Canadians trying to force other 
Canadians to learn French? 


Do you want the teacher to explain the French 
grammar rules to you? 


Would you take French if you didn't have to? 


Would you prefer to start writing earlier in 
this course? 


Do your parents encourage you to learn French? 


Are the. filmstrip pictures helpful for ex- 
plaining the meaning of the sentences? 


Are your parents enthusiastic about your study 
of French? 


Do you get enough class time to practise your 
French on topics which differ from those in 
your lessons? 


Do your parents feel that studying French is a 
waste of time? (Please explain your answer 
briefly) . 


Do you find that time passes quickly in your 
French class? 


135 


Yoo ers 
Undecided __ 


NO eee 


Yese l2 se 
Undecided ___ 
No ee 


Yes —. 
Undecided____ 
No 


Yes sy 
Undecided____ 
No eed 
YeSs_: = 
Undecided____ 
No 





Yess ets 
Undecided ____ 
No 


Yess. 
Undecided ____ 
No 


Yes Rw ae 
Undecided ____ 
No 


Yes an 
Undecided ___ 
No mae 
Yess" ss = 
Undecided ___ 
No 


Yes 
Undecided____ 
No 


Yess. es 
Undecided __. 
No___. 





eel 





_.. bebinsbav 
ov 


ee ‘ 





2eY | 


__ babisebal 
Ea trae 
gay 
_.__ bsbiosbnv 


= s89Y 


___ babizsbat! 





29Y 
_.__ bsbissbal 








ee 


a 


$251 


of 


—~ 





















Aaah ch : fily | a a 
 qailto sor0% of if ensibsns) doasti tA .iL 7 ae 

: ‘ror maak 03 enmibens) 
1 These otf sone Seniie 


ciiiadimaiatha sey Oy a 
- Suoy oF ; “og 


ee ~~ ‘= ; 


e 9 yy 


‘os oved t'abib soy 24 donor eles woy bLuAH BL 
ni reiltss, enesisw. Sisie OF Ts76Tq MOY . 
wean ee 


TrdonsTd oxeel og HOY sgsivoone etneteg ywoy od .2l 
. ‘ in oy 


-x8 tot Inigfert pte OL 
qesoqatien out wulaal a apnatilg ” eka Shut 
vbute muoy juods, oétesbemitae aa ee 





- cor 
re ‘ 





21. 


os 


23. 


24, 


Zo 


26. 


27. 


28. 


oo. 


50. 


ile 


ee 


Pe 


Are you studying French because it may someday be 
useful in getting a good job? 


Is it important to develop a good French 
pronunciation? 


Would you like more opportunities to speak French 
in class? 


Do you see any logic or sense for the word order 
in French sentences? 


Would you like to continue improving your French 
after you leave school? 


Do you feel that you are developing a good 
French pronunciation in this course? 


Does the out-of-date style of dress in the filn- 
strips bother you? 


Do you. become bored with any parts of the lesson? 
(Please explain your answer briefly) 


Do you enjoy repeating the French sentences 
after the tapes? 


Does the time seem to drag when the members of the 
Class are repeating the sentences on the tapes 
that accompany the filmstrips? 


Is French too difficult for you to learn? 


Do you feel that there is sufficient variety and 
activities in the lessons of your French course? 


Do you find the learning of the taped sentences 
which accompany the filmstrips is interesting? 


136 





Yes. 
Undecided __ 
No 

Yes Ss elf 
Undecided __ 
No 

NOS oo. 
Undecided ___ 
No 

} (eee 
Undecided___ 
No 
Vesa 
Undecided __ 
No 
Yess” <2 al. 
Undecided ___. 
No 

VieSme eet 
Undecided ___ 
No 

Yes Poe 
Undecided ____ 
No 

Yess 
Undecided___ 
No ae 
Yes aa 
Undecided ___ 
No 

Yes = 
Undecided ___ 
No 

Yes 
Undecided___ 
No 

Yes ND Eo 
Undecided ____ 


No 





inte oedy 
... bebinsbrll 
‘its of 


_ eBay 
___ bebiozsbav 
ov“ 








2eY 


_.. bebioshnil © 


25 
__._ bebissbau 
on 





1 e8¥ 


_ babiosbau 
oh 





__2syY 
__bsbisebaus 
ov 





ers ae | 


___ bebizebnv 





a 


a CSY 
___ bebrosbal) 
rey 





donert ais oF eobtinus1oqgo a mie a. 


tebio brow oft rot sanse 1x0 Seem as 


donerT woy’ gaive meee Se gS ae ee 
: a TLoordse sveel voy tefis % 














vn nce et soca 


“mit oft ni eesth to olyte otish-to-tuo, ols WS 
Suoy redtod en 


fnoeesl sit to ettsq yas Atiw bored « 
(tei ‘rowess * a ae senate) % | 
esonstnse donsTa oft a ae 


ott to exedmem ont new gatb of 


2oqut edt M0 a eed 
Yayvsel ot voy tot DEUS cn donee a 2 a 


Si ‘ant 
So aaa . 









34, 


OS 


36. 


Sie 


38. 


Oo 


40. 


4l. 


42. 


43. 


44, 


45. 


y 


Is it a good idea to wait until your second year 
of study before beginning to read in French? 


Do you feel that learning French is actually a 
waste of time? (Please explain your answer 
briefly) 


Do you feel frustrated because you fail to 
understand the meaning of the French 


sentences? (Please explain your answer 
briefly) 


Do you find it difficult to understand why 
French sentences are constructed the way. they 
are? 


Would you like to live in a community where 
French is spoken by most of the people? 


Can you hear the sentences on the tapes clearly 
in class? 


Do you think that the repetition of the taped 
sentences which accompany the filmstrips are 
useful? 


Do you think the teacher should write the French 
sentences on the board when you have learned 
to say them? 


Is one. of the reasons for your study of French 
to allow you to meet and talk with French- 
speaking people? 


Would you say that this kind of course, with 
filmstrips and tapes, is a good one for students 
who wish to learn to speak French? 


Would you like more individual practice repeating 
the taped sentences which accompany the filnm- 
strips? 


Do you occasionally have class time to talk in 
French about the things which are of interest to 
you personally? 


137 


Yes 


Undecided 
No 


Yes 


Undecided 
No 


Yes 
Undecided 
No 


Yes 
Undecided 
No 


Yes 


‘Undecided 


No 


Yes 


Undecided 
No 


Yes 


Undecided 
No 


Yes 


Undecided 
No 


Yes 


Undecided 
No 


Yes 


Undecided 
No 


Yes 


Undecided 
No 


Yes 


Undecided 
No 


VEL 


| 





| 
get 


| 


| 
See 





a 


aw 

Ct iy 

oe & St ap a 
ae = o<. ec 


| 


ov 


25Y 


Bsbioasbau 

7 ou 
2oY 

bebrosbri 

ov 

25yY 


——Thabrssbau 


re) 


asyY 


babrasbas 









eof boaaenaba a ur ors ss « (Salt n, | 
iene sol 
wales zeqat, edt no escmednee ot a5 et 
ree 7 
mata ene a 


nee 










Ss 





boqst edt to roisisouos ont 
Sis eqitzjemlii ens 





* 
a= 
. 








donstt 20 ybuse tgoy rot ato289% 
_ -donexd dtiw Ales bas toon Aa 





_ dtiw semios! to babt 2idi i ; 
a 8qEF | 





7 
aw — . 


art Alert ot omis 
os testsini to 


i. wa oe 


46. 


47. 


48, 


49. 


50. 


oe 


D2. 


Sey 


54. 


Does the ability to speak French show that a person 
is well educated? 


Do you like the filmstrip pictures used in this 
French course? (Please explain your answer 
briefly) 


Do you think a knowledge of French will help you 
have a more sympathetic understanding or apprec- 
lation of French-speaking people? 


Do you find that the filmstrip stories are in- 
teresting? 


When a new story is. begun, do you find that you. 
have forgotten the sentences you learned from the 
lesson before? 


Would you.like to have a regular textbook for 
French containing the sentences of the lessons 
and some exercises? 


Would it be helpful in learning the French sen- 
tences that accompany the filmstrip pictures if 
you could write them in your exercise book? 


Do you want the teacher to explain in English the 
words you don't. understand? 


When you have learned the sentences of the lesson 
can you usually see the pattern for the way the 
sentence is constructed? 


Additional comments: 


138 


Yes 


Undecided — 
No 


Yes 


Undecided 
No 


Yes 


Undecided 
No 


Yes 


Undecided 
No 


Yes 


Undecided 
No 


Yes 


Undecided 
No 


Yes 


Undecided __ 
No | 


Yes: 


Undecided. 
No 


Yes 


Undecided 
No 


stf 


2% momiay 2a wade doment lenge oo itis et sea 


oY 





2sX 


ee dee 


or 


I 


zaY 


~~ bSbrosbau 
oA 


2oY 


bsbiosbav ° 


oi 
2sY 
ov 
‘eoY 


__DSbE 2ebnl! 
ou 





eind oi beew eewmsoia qitsemiit edt edil woy of 
tawens Tuoy nisiqne sazelT) feexoo donert 


fed [iow donss to sybelwoml » Anisdt 
“ovine 20 gribderairy or a 
Yefqoeq gridssge- 


“i 9%8 eeixote qittentlit ont tarit bait voy of 


Tgatsesres 


voy tedt batt voy ob .ouged ek re 
odd. mott benmipel voy eeonesnee atl emoareds ovad 
Setoted moze! 


101 Aoodtxes 1sluyot s eved ot elil voy blu 
etozesl sit to esoneinse sd? gninisinoo Aonett 
Taseizrexe emoe bas 


“fee donerd sit yotnxsof ai~intqied sd rand Perera 
ti eowtoig qixvemls2 ont Rae, og Manel 
Taood seloTexe. Woy at os itw ethene oe 


sit detignA mi mieigxe ot teroses oft taaw LOY on 
Tbneterebay t'neb voy ebrow 


nozeel ed} to esonsinse edt Benitsel oval uoy nodW 
ods yew ent tol mrettsq o> ose" yliewen oy maD 
Yhesoursenoy ef sonsinee 





(thebad 








Amal? PieN SD tleexX 


VIF QUESTIONNAIRE 


B 





140 
VIF QUESTIONNAIRE 


We are asking you to answer some questions about the French 
course you are taking and how you feel about French in general. Since 
this is simply to find out your opinions, there are no Yight or wrong 
answers. Please try to answer as honestly as possible. What you say 
will not affect your mark or credit in this course. Do not give your 
name. 


There are three possible answers for each questions: YES - 
UNDECIDED - NO. After reading the question, place your answer on the 
Separate answer sheet. Since the above response may seem inadequate, 
you.may wish to write a more complete answer. You may do this on the 
questionnaire paper right under the question. There is additional 
Space for comments at the end of the questionnaire. 


Fe edn ent ee SY a ones ee 
1, Should all Canadians know how to speak French? 


2. Do you. like to speak French whenever you get a chance? 
3. Do you.like French more than other subjects? 


4. Would you prefer to start learning reading at the beginning of 
your French course? 


5. Do you believe French is a useful language in today's world? 


6. Can you usually understand the teacher's explanations in French 
of vocabulary difficulties? 


7. Do you think French should be studied by everybody from Grade VII 
to Grade XII? 


8. Do you usually understand the meaning of what you are saying in 
Class when speaking French? 


9. Should all Canadians know how to speak English? 


10. Do you feel that the French sentences you are learning will be 
useful in conversations in real life? 


11. Are certain French Canadians trying to force other Canadians to 
learn French? 


12. Do you want the teacher to explain the French grammar rules to 
you? 


13. Would you take French if you didn't have to? 


<r ee 
Pe; ’ s] oa 
mo: 
ONL | 
fonetI aft tuods enorseoup emoe rewens ot voy grbles ere oW 
anni ,Letemsg mt donesl tuods Leet voy wod bas grioled ete uoy ezmod 


wt to Py ca en week .etotakgo wwoy suo bait oF 2 ei eid? 
wee Doe .oldizacq 3a yisesnod 22 reweme of (rt hn = ‘ 
moy svig ton of .eeruo> etuby at tibex to Auam woy Joetis Jon a 


- 2aY reno bteaup tioss tot erewens sidieczoq seadd ots otedT 
edt fo iswens suoy 2elq ,foitseup eit gaibeot 1es3A .% - 
~stsupsbsni mese yem Sanoqzet svodg sft soni .teade yewens 
eft mo aidt ob vem uoY .1ewens etofomoo stom @ otiiw ot deiw yam uoy 

lenottibbs 2i ovedT .moftzeup os tebau tfyiy teqeq etiannottesup 
.orisnnoitesup aft to bre edt ta e%meamo> rot soaqe 








Sonar Aeaqe ot wor worl enstbens) Ife bived2 .f 
Tsonedo 8 teg voy tevenedw domeat Agesqe of oALI.woy of «Sf 
catoeidue rerto neds stom donetd elif woy od =.t 


to gninniged oft ts patbsex patmtsel trete of uoy bina .b 
T92TUOD “TUOY | 


‘birow 2'ysbot mi sgswgnst [yteey s 21 domsrd evetisd woy of 


flometi at enotiansiqxe e'tedoset oft bastersbau yifevew woy ms 
Yeorsluaiitib yreludssov to 


TV sbe1) mort ybodyreve WW beibute ed bluote domes Amkds yoy of 
T1IX ebs1d oF 


fi giiyse sts voy tsdw to gninsem odd Soaterebay yileweu uoy of 
‘donett poiiesge nedw eeels 


qHektont Agsqe ot wor worl ensibeasd [fe bivod2 


od Iftw gainrssl ots voy eesnesnse donstd edt Jad feet voy of 
vontt fest ti enoissevewneo ai Ivteey 


ot enpibssasd redto sotot ot gniyrt emeibsag) donexd atestes etl 
‘domed smrseL 


ot 29lur TANMSTg sinner oi nisiqxs ot terbses ont aie a 


Tos ove s'abth voy ti domes edlet soy bi mie : an 


14, 
Doe 
LO. 


17. 
IE 


12: 
20. 
fal 


22% 
Zo. 


24, 


254 


26. 


2/3 


28. 
29. 


30. 


3, 


32), 


wie 


141 


Would you prefer to start writing earlier in this course? 
Do your parents encourage you to learn French? 


Are the filmstrip pictures helpful for explaining the meaning 
of the sentences? 


Would you like to visit Quebec on a holiday if you could? 


Do you get enough class time to practise your French on topics 
which differ from those in your lessons? 


Do your parents feel that studying French is a waste of time? 
Do you find that time passes quickly in your French class? 


Are you studying French because it may someday be useful in 
getting a good job? 


Is it important to develop a good French pronunciation? 


Would you like more opportunities to speak French with other 
students in class? 


Does the word order in French sentences appear sensible or 
reasonable to you? 


Would you like to continue improving your French after you 
leave school? 


Do you. feel that a French program of this nature is helping you 
develop a. good French pronunciation? . 


Does the out-of-date style of dress in the filmstrip bother you? 
Do you become bored with any parts of the lesson? 


Is understanding and speaking French more important to you than 
reading and writing it? 


Does the time seem to drag when the members of the class are 
repeating the sentences after the tape recorder? 


Is French too difficult for you to learn? 


Do you feel that there is sufficient variety and activities in 
the lessons of your French course. 


Do you find the learning of the taped sentences which accompany 
the filmstrips interesting? 


ee 


[bE ! ‘Geen 

















Yeemos aids af she ben ans Shy tere MOG 
OE RE ee ee at 


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Temit to stesw s ei Aonerd gaiybute sade lost etnetaq suoy of tt 


cial UP! 


tzesio donerl qoy mi yDloinp eseesq emis tails batt unos aa ; 
3 steaat< 
ni futeey od ysbemoe ysm fi seugzed rag 


oh ght 


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toto dtiw dones4 Anoge oO} 2eitimutroqgo stom sAli voy bivow AN 
feesls at ejasbute. § 


10 oldiense tseqgs eeonetmee dono’ ric tebyo brow eds 200d’ . A 
Suoy ot sidsnoesst — 


voy 193s donetd mwoy gnivorgmi eunitnos os edif voy binoW’ 2S. 
- Yioedoe sveol 


lia > - 
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Taors flomeTt boog .s qoleveb 


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Yaoeesl ont to etaeq yus dtiw bstod smooed) aan os BS 
fists voy oF tnstiogni stow domeyd gnitdesqe bre onde el 98 
ie bre gatbacr? BS: 
Trebtossy Sqed oAt +x coe 
~ Satsel oF uby 108 tiuoittth oot domerd el ff a 


eT . -* oe PAs 
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. 7 \. « rt ms P : a 


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34, 
oon 


36. 
OUR 


38. 


aoe 


40. 


41. 
42. 


43. 


44, 


45. 


46. 


47. 


48. 


49. 


50. 


ele 


142 


Do you. hope. to be able to speak French someday? 


Is it a good idea to wait until your second year of study 
before beginning to read in French? 


Do you feel that learning French is actually a waste of time? 


Do you.often fail to understand the meaning of the French 
sentences? 


Should the stories of your French course be about. French- 
speaking people in Canada rather than about French-speaking 
people in France? 


Is it difficult to understand why French sentences are con- 
structed the way they are? 


Would you.like to live in a community where French is spoken 
by most of the people? 


Can you. hear the sentences on the tapes clearly in class? 


Do you think that the repetition of the taped sentences which 
accompany the filmstrips is useful? 


Would you like to have more tests so that you would have a better 


idea of your progress in French? 


Do you think the teacher should write the French sentences on 
the board when you have learned to say them? 


Is one of the reasons for your study of French to allow you, to 
meet and talk with French-speaking people? 


Would you say that this kind of course, with filmstrips and tapes, 


is a good one for students who wish to learn to speak French? 


Would you. like more individual practice repeating French sentences 


after the tape recorder? 


Do you sometimes have class time to talk in French about the 
things which are of interest to you personally? 


Do you like the filmstrips pictures used in the French course? 
Do you. think a knowledge of French will help you have a more 
sympathetic understanding or appreciation of French-speaking 
people? 


Do you find that the filmstrip stories are interesting most of 
the time? 


















sot 





Ce onsen nena ied banestaaia nme | 
nn enim ga oemaegnas 
Conit 20 ogzew 8 <(Lfwtoe ei danevi gnivesel gedt Leet voy of ae ep) 
ser Syston ras oeahe ap Sails: Coane : 





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giilesqe-ronori auods aisd3 werltet abema) mi alqoeq 


Sooner mi elgoeq — 
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Tors yards yew edt area ie 


netoge ef donsyI sredw \inumos s nt svif oF elit yoy Bl i Sees 4a 
Seigoeq sft to . ae 


Teesio ai yiraslo rr ody no zeone3ase edt teed. woy m0 i _ 


sort 2sometnee bagst oft +0 fnoititeger sds Jat Antds wey, of .& 
Sifiseu ef eqivtemLit eds a cel 


retted s over blyow voy tert o2 eteet exom evan on eotl NOK biuoW a ae 
Tdonetd ak eestgetq imoy to sebi if 
flo esonesnee onsid oft etitw bivorle rersses edt Amidst woy.of . 
imeds yee ot benmresl sved voy nedw braod: ons 


OF LOY wolls ot comet to ybusa qvoy tot enoaset off to-ene,el .2bh at 
. Telgoeq gitbiseqe-ronerd dtiw Ale? bas teem = 


,2aget bus eqittemlit dtiw ,serwes to bart eicit set Yee uoy biuoW .dh- 
Yrlonexd agseq2 ot mresi ot detw odw etmebute rot one boog- a ek 6) 


esodesise donsii gristseqet svitostq Leubiviiat exom sAif yengena i Th 
T1ebroset sqpet eit 


sd juods donevd ai Alet of omit ezsio syed eembzempe. 
‘“ylfenoetéq voy oF seoresrtt to ote. dois 


Teemu donerd ads ni beau 2oTUTiG eqingambit _ elil soy of o 


£Tan 8 sved uoy gied Lftw T. to 9 
giitdssqe-fodotd to pans 70. reir 





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52. 


Sa6 


54. 


Don 


56. 


Hh 


143 


When a new story is begun, do you find that you have forgotten 
the sentences you. learned from the lessons before? 


Do you, think you. will be able to speak French when you. have 
finished high school? 


Would you like to have a regular textbook for French containing 
the sentences of the lessons and some exercises? 


Would it be helpful in learning the French sentences that 
accompany the filmstrip pictures if you would write them in 
your exercise book? 


Do you.want the teacher to explain in English the difficult 
words you don't understand? 


When you have learned the sentences of the lesson, can you 
usually see some grammar rule for the way the sentence is 
constructed? 





Additional comments: 


Please feel free to make any additional comments about, your 


French course. You may wish to indicate some of its strong or weak 
points, or you may wish to state how you would improve this course 
if you had the opportunity. 







or, -e Var tA on vi ies , 


4 *t, - 
4 


OY MBI ,foez9I oft Yo eeomod, 
at aonsinee, oft yew oft tok 


“i0y JuedR at nemnia Isnoisibbe 
Agow lo ylorie att Fraps: 
s2tu03 efdd svorqmi bluow 


AM Pet eerioN eer Le. X C 


STUDENTS' WRITTEN COMMENTS 





. &wTEES 2 SA 






2ThIMMOD MATTIAW 'eTMaGUTE 


145 


STUDENTS': WRITTEN COMMENTS 


I, ATTITUDE TOWARD FRENCH AND FRENCH-SPEAKING PEOPLE 


Question 1: Should all Canadians know how to speak French? 


i 
mae 
Se 


10. 
Tes 


125 
18% 


14, 


French should not be compulsory. 

Not elderly people. 

It is not a Canadian language. 

Canada belongs to England not France. 

No, but I think political leaders should. 


A country would have more pride if it could speak two 
languages . 


French is a national language as well as English and every 
Canadian should know both. 


French should be compulsory from Grade I to Grace VIII and 
then be optional. 


One language should be sufficient for one nation. 
Yes, it keeps us different from the Yanks. 


No, because the French were conquered by the English and 
this is a British Commonwealth country. 


We should learn the language we want. 


We shouldn't have to take French unless we are moving to 
Quebec or becoming a French teacher. 


They should start French in Grade I and only for those who 
want to learn it. 


Question 3: Do you like French more than other subjects? 


l. 
re 
Sie 


I would if I could speak it better. 
Yes, because there is no work to do. 


I would more but I've had three years of this French and 
it is boring now. 








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ie 


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he 


SE a SOI SI a SAETA 1) 
blue ome 
eroekugacs od tom btuode donor af a a 

ae 








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-egaigast asibens) 5 Jon ek 31 EB 
-Sonsyt ton brebgad ot egnoled abemsD «Bo = 


OF 7 














; i 

7 ie? [ae 

Lituode. Sees SARS HERS TSE See = 5 aes 

ows dseqe bitsos i it sbing o1om svar biuow yxsqoo’ A a) cA 


cm a a oo an anon 9 en ay i 
wort bivore neibsngD 
bas I1IV oops) ot 1 ebez:mov® ieroelugmoo od biverte-donex 4 2s 

fering sqo ed-metit 
Moiten eo. 16t tastoi¥iwe ed bivorle eyavgasl en0 .@ _ 7 a 
.2das’ edt mort tnowsttib eu eqeod 3i yes¥ .0L 


§, 
= 

bag retignd ods ¥ See ae sant ad3 seussed wit 
Gsdeiaiaieee detoien 6 at akan ( i 


ne ae 


oF yaivom ous om aealimg donor odes ot ovat 2'abluode oil. 
-terlgse3 donexd 8 grimosed to cedex) — 


or saods x0 Yino bas T shard ak domert $132 biuade ava 
Pee 





sate Sg bin 14 te E 
-ob of Axow om et oxsdt seumsed ,20Y 
Ka 1 a sn a a 





pe wth’ wet gt Es 









: 7 ag 
7 : 
va Tan i 


w~ 


Ay - 
aie 


a 
yy ey ht ani 


146 


4, There are too many students in the class so it cannot be 
enjoyed. 
9. I think French is horrible. 
6. Not too many people like it. 
7, It is far too boring watching films over and over. 
8. I like the teacher more than any other teacher. 
9. It is one of my favorite subjects. 
10. It's an easy credit and fun to learn. 
Question 5: Do you believe French is a useful language in today's 
world? —<_£_o- 
1. Practically every business uses it. 
2. One language'is all you need. 
3. Everything in the schools should be in English in Canada. 
4. Why should we learn. French when English is the most commonly 
spoken language in the world? French is a waste of time. 
Question 7: Do yeu think French should be studied by everybody from 
Grade ‘to Grade : 
1. It should be the individual's choice. 
2. They should start French earlier. 
3. All students-should try to but drop it if they fail. 
4. Some might find another language more useful. 
9. If the teachers are good. 
6. It's not. that important. 
7. Why force-it on innocent kids? 


We need to start French in Grade I. 







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tno sets of 2h detain . npn de 


eC t 


List yods ti tr ses aiid = Ske nt 2 Pi 
i ee Mt 


7 





a plein ene 

a ‘ se) ine e sis ve ae 

t= ; 2 behiptge 
aye tae sgh ary 

ae ceamal ; el 


on re 
an 









ome 






147 


Question 11; Are certain French Canadians trying to force other 
anadians to learn French‘ 
1. Well, you have to take French, 
2. Our French teacher is doing this. 
Question 13: Would you take French if you didn't have to? 
1. If the teacher was good. 
2. French is boring because of the repetition. 


3. No, because it drags on and on for such a long time in 
each lesson. 


4. There are much more useful subjects. 
5. The French language is a beautiful one. 
6. I'd like a better teacher. 


7, I'd like to if the system were changed, but as it is I'm 
not profiting much. 


8. Just for university. 


Question 17: Would you like to visit Quebec on a holiday if you 
could? 


1. I would like to if I knew French well enough. 
2. No, because I can't stand French people. 


3. What-a way to go! No way! You'd never come back alive. 


Question 19: Do your parents feel that studying French is a waste 
of time? 


1. I learned more in Grades VII and VIIi. My little sisters 
are ahead of me now. 


2. Yes, I agree with them. My father hates French people. He 
should know. He was over in France quite a lot. 


a ca “hy le 






Lnoitiaeiqes as 20 eeusded gained ab. sbonstt + ! 
ni sais got 9 Hue xo mo knw mo xyes 2h asumoed. OB 7 


noeevl dose a 
cetpetdve futeas cot mt ang 
. 910 Litizuesd & 23 egeuganl. dongs edt . a < 


aie tei ak a 


ml 2i si en tud ,begneds s19W masaye ‘em eto fo" 





.elgosg sloaexl bance 3'ns> 1 oeupaed en ,8 
| -evils toad omoo raven b'uo¥ yew Of og oF yawue-tad 


oH 


148 


Question 21: Are you studying French because it may someday be. 
useful in getting a good job: 


1. I'm studying French so that some day I will be able to 
communicate freely with them. 


2. Because it is compulsory. 
3. I'm studying it because I like it. 


Question 25: Would you like to continue i Vi our French after 
you leave school’? 


1. Yes, if I knew I would someday be able to speak it fluently, 
but I know I will not be able to. 





Z. Yes, but not the way we are doing it now. 


Question 31: Is French too difficult for you to learn? 


1. No, but it leaves time to fool around and some people are 
taking advantage of it. 


2: It can't be. hard. if you listen. 
3. Yes, because you.don't really know what you're saying. 


4, The teacher should write the sentences all on the board so 
it 1s easier to learn them. 


5. No, not if I had more individual attention. 

6. It-isn't hard enough. 

7. I don't want to learn French, but you have to. 
8. Not:if-1it 1s taught.right. 


9. At first we went slow and it was easy, but then we went 
faster and there isn't enough time to learn. 


Question 36: Do you-feel that learning French is actually a waste 
of time? 


1. No way! French is a thing you will be thankful for all 
your life. 


2. This is.the way it.is. 


3. If she told me what I was saying, I might like to learn 
French. 












ft a 


seteun: +t assqe of elds ad coli i 


oF, 8fds od tor a * o 

-wom ti gaieb sane tet ade pate is : ye 
Trrsel ot yoy tox itp 8b conionetetat (elt nslseap ae o 

ers slqoeq satoe bris a foot ot pret “et m4 | _ 
Mmsall voy FE baer ores af mas: 

.gitiyee o1'uoy tsriw woul yilser 3’ nob soy seusosd ~eeY & . zo 
02 bisod sit no Ils ze0metnese i s3ini rast ee ee ; ; 
Morinetts isubryibat sro bed 1 te gone 2. 7. 7 ; 


iquons bis t'mee sh WB” 
oF over woy Jud ,domeTl axsel oF Sage 2 ob T Rx —_ 
Tigi liiatide ds i oh aa 


tnew ongead tud .(285 25” ti bue wol2 + 2 
ae reds tne eRe us 


| 
- payee ie 7 
- rm - J Py = 7 
Si2aWw ; Shh do = Se ores] AAD ated ‘ mT So A - ' > - 4 

— am {a Ao < ot ‘ 7 _ - . 

7 = R ”" ‘ 

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. : id 

. 7 
7 


RR Sinn 









| et ae 
smiwael oF ALL tigim 1 caniyse exw I 3 





10. 


ata 


Zs, 


149 


Yes, the way it.is taught now. 


I think French is the sickest thing in school today. Because 
of French lots of students will fail Grade IX. 


French is a waste of time and quite boring. I'm happy with 
the English language. 


I don't like to take French. Where am I going where they 
speak French? 


We need a more interesting French course. 
I find French boring. Maybe it's the teacher. 


It is sometimes hard to understand, and time flies so 
Slow in French. 


French should be fun to learn and the teacher should make 
it fun. 


When I go for classes, I watch my watch counting the seconds 
until the period is over. 


Question 40: Would you like to live in a community where French is 
Spoken by most of the people’ 


ah 


Diy 


French people don't always speak French. Most of them speak 
English in Quebec, and these riots are mostly done by the 
French-speaking people. 

I have for two years and it's like a bum's- hangout in France. 
Not until I have a chance to learn French better. 


It would drive me crazy. 


If I knew how to speak it. 


Question 45: Is one of the reasons for your study of French to allow 


ls, 
pe 


ou.to meet and talk with French-speaking people? 
My reason for learning French is so I can go to University. 


I study French because it is compulsory, that is all. 





ae =e 2a 


dtiw yqqed mI ae sa crsiees 2 


anit gTorw aniog TP me sxe eee 5 ~~ a 













-seroa donsrT g 299: i Som @ bees oW ee 
tedoset ods 2'si sdyeM -gnirod done ah @ 
oe 29ilt omit bas ,basterebay ot bred Suaseas aah a +1 “OL 


+ 





edem bluode rsilosed ot brs. rest o3 at od eee ‘oRfoned) | 
d 


ebitoze2 Arlt anitmyo> same dotsw 1 ,esdesia tot oy edt Al 
-T9VO 2k botreg Lise 






2 bast ois 


_Asege mods to te0M .domar aeage’ +" nob ok Conia, 
ent yd snob yitecm. ors  eert Re a ip | 


. elgosy 
-Sonstt oi shipnalt. e'mud s atil 2'31 bas etsy ows Ot ovad 1 s 
.retisd loner missl o¢ eonedo s svsd I Lisay 30M f ; 
.\Ssto sm svith biuew + 7. ~ 
Pe A e ot ae I 1 







s@tseiee oF Og fs L oe eb ae vn 
[is at ted? Sevens ak ti setsoed ri: 





150 


Question 50: Do you think a knowledge of French will help you have a 
more sympathetic understanding or appreciation of French- 


as 
Zs 
On 


speaking people? 


Make them speak English. 
Being a French person has never affected me in the least. 


I don't think they need sympathy. 


II. GENERAL OPINIONS ON THE VIF COURSE 


Question 10: Do you feel that-the French sentences you are learning 


will be useful in conversations in real life? 


The French in class is. very formal, and in reality it isn't 
outside the classroom. 


If you know what the words mean, they may be useful, but not 
the sentences we get. 


I speak for the entire class. The French course is absolutely 
ridiculous. You can't use half the sentences. It's not a 
French lesson. It is a memory quiz. You are tested on how 
well you. know the filmstrips, not on your French speaking 
ability. We get sick of seeing three frames ten billion times. 
in a row. And you pelt us for falling asleep. We can't help 
it. In summary, French is the most useless, meaningless, and 
boring subject the way it is taught in this school. 


Question 16: Are the filmstrip pictures helpful for explaining the 


meaning of the sentences? 
Very few. They don't help that much. 


Yes, but the time given to learn the meaning is too short. 
I'd be lost without them. 
Yes, but terribly boring and monotonous. 


We should be taught how to write French and not memorize 
what is on the films. 






-tesel oft ni on botoetis tever2ed neeteq donewt a gated « 7 
xedsaquie been yards Xntd 3!mb 1 Bo 






dequoo TiV FHT ¥O eMOlvido JAMEYD aT 













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mootzests eft ebketuo ay 


ton sud cise 9d am ye anon abrow ont stv wort oy 2 S . S 
‘tag ow esomegaee oft os,.c: 0 ee 


‘\yfetufoads 2f semoo doneti sfl  .eeslo Srithe sft tot 
8 fom2't] .eepnstme sit thal S2u 3's uof . 2 
wor mo betzet exe uoY .Siup’ Nrcaran e zi 3] .fogest 
gibisege nonetd amoy no jon ,eqixrem( ii odd word. 
eomit mort ltd nod eameti sardt gatos: to dole Jey ol 
gfe 3'nso-eN ,qseles yaitlet rot 2) theg aps aA 
bre a ela eeolszis S20m nt 2t t 










dou 2a? eeteth ante aalia wet re a 

-27od2@ 003 ef gnimsem oft ovgol ot novig ootks od sud .esY Hf ars 
mods tunriin seb ed BT Bisieth 

. evonoténom bits giivod (dbs dud ,ae¥ parry 


ositomem ton bas dons v4 vol iin a Be a 


C oo is ’ 





Lod 


Question 20: Do you find that time passes quickly in your French 
class? 


1. Yes, when we have. the pictures. 
2. The teacher is boring. 
3. If you. get involved, yes. 


4. You can't learn French in only one half-hour three times a 
week, 


5. I find it terribly boring with these films. It ruins my 
attitude. 


6. It does when we take something new. 


7. Two consecutive periods of French is too long. I would like 
a French period in the morning and one in the afternoon. 


8. French the last period of the day is no good. 
Question 22: Is it important to develop a good French pronunciation? 


1. If you don't get your words correct, you could say something 
you don't want to say. 


2. The French on the tapes we learn is different from the 
French in Canada. 


Question 26: Do you feel that a French program of this nature is 
helping you develop a good French pronunciation? 


1. The tape sounds different from the way the teacher speaks. 


2. There isn't enough practicing of conversation as there used 
to be. 


3. No, because we do not always know what we are saying. 


4, My French relatives do not know the French words we learn 
and don't know the accent. 










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S zomtit soit wod tied eno yino nt sonerd axel 3'ngo woY 


’ 


i emtur tl .amlit seedt dtiw gattod yidivres $f Bait 1 2 
vebusitss 


Wor gridtomoe ovat sald tack it > ine 
efit bivow I .gnof oot 2i danev’ to zbobreq avivugeemtn ow? 
.moorrests aff ai sno bs ghictom sit of beiveq donevics 
.boog on 2i yeb a: to boiieg sie aad eens 8 


Trotisionunorq donst4 boo s 


gritemes yee biuos NOY ,t2erTo> ebtow Woy 7 C a Af: 
«Ya2 OF , ‘ 


odd mort sneteitib ei fsal oy 2eqet. silt 


. 








152 


Question 28: Do you_ become bored with any parts of the lesson? 


1. The mechanism is boring. 


2. I become bored just waiting for the others to learn the 
lesson. 


3. Where the teacher asks the questions. 
4. The repetition, but it helps. 
5. When others do not try, it gets boring. 


6. It's boring when you have to listen to every person in 
class repeating. 


7. I become bored when I don't understand something. 
8. When we are reviewing, it gets pretty bad. 
9. When the filmstrips go on. continuously. 


10. Why should we have to sit for thirty-seven minutes 
listening to a supid tape recorder. 


Question 29: Is understanding and speaking French more important to 
_ you than reading and writing it? 


1. It was good at the beginning, but in Grade IX you want to 
read and write more. 


Question 32: Do you feel that there is sufficient variety and 
activities in the lessons of your French course? 


1. There should be games and skits. 


2. From giving talks and plays it is.easy to learn French 
and know what it means. 


3. There is absolutely no variety. 


4. We want to learn French songs, draw pictures and describe 
them. 


5. Plays and talking to classmates would make it more inter- 
esting. Now, it's quite boring. 


6. We should have French games to improve our vocabulary and 
spelling. 


















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|  hozeel 


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veqled 42 sud .moitiveger odT .d ‘ie 
i> 


-gizod eteg ti wat ton ob etedio neal .é 


ni noeTeq “Isve Ot feterh ot overt: a at ktod e'sI .8 As 


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«bsd viiexg ete ti gaiwetvet’ ore en-euacil 8 7 ato 
(Leuourisno> 0 og aqittenhlt ede nei = .@ 


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.tebrovet eqs? biqua sot’ | 


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Ary) 


7. All Canadians should know how to speak French, but this 
course isn't the way to teach it. We need more variety to 
make it interesting. 


8. I'd like French if it was a more interesting course and we 
did more interesting things. This way you.can practically 
fall asleep. 

9. All you do in this course is repeat what they say without 
knowing what it is all about. When you-have to write a 


test you memorize it. It doesn't help you speak French 
very much. 


Question 34: Do you hope to be able to speak French someday? 
1. I will never be able to speak real true French correctly. 


2. Because of the way the French course is now, I will never 
be able to speak it fluently. 


Question 38: Should the stories of your French course be about 
French-speaking people in Canada rather than about 
French-speaking people in France? 


1. I'd like to see the books and filmstrips made in Canada 
about Canadians. 


Question 41: Can you hear the sentences on the tapes clearly in 
class? 


1. I usually have to guess at what the people said. 
2. The French say words like we do. They are run together. 
3. The voice is muffled and the tapes are too fast. 


4. No, but it is probably because of the noise the class is 
making. 


5. All I do is listen to a bunch of mumbo-jumbo because the 
teacher does not. explain what is going on in the film. 


6. The tapes sound different from the teacher. 


7. It is hard to hear the correct pronunciation on the tape. 
We need better equipment. 


8. If the students cooperated, it would help. 










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154 


Question 46: Would you say that this kind of course, with filmstrips 
and tapes, is a good one for students who wish to 
learn to speak French? 


1. No, because I don't know what I'm saying. 


2. I've taken French for two years and this year is the first 
I've really learned anything. 


3. In British Columbia we read, wrote, and spoke French, which 
was much more interesting and educational. In this course 
we learn what the filmstrips say and nothing else. 


4, Ifyoute not as smart as the others you're left behind. 
5S. This French course is easy to understand and learn. 


6. I think everybody should learn how to read and speak French 
at one time or another. I don't mind taking French that 
much but I don't love it. 


7. This is a useful course because we can understand certain 
things on T.V. 


8. I like French but find it hard to learn. 


9, For two years I took "Le frangais international", and I 
learned more from it than is possible from this one. VIF 
hasn't taught me anything. I get extremely bored with the 
films and tape and quickly lose interest. Half the phrases 
I'l] probably never use, and without the picture I can 
hardly associate them in real life. I've done most of the 
work this year on my own and in many areas seem advanced 
compared to those who have been taking this course for 
years. I've never found French difficult, but now my 
enthusiasm is gone and I couldn't. care less whether I do 
anything in French or not. 


10. I don't think the course could be improved in, any way 
except to have more exercises to make us think more about 
what we are saying. 

11. Our French course is wonderful for learning French. 


12. ENG, Ti this .tooteasy : 

















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Question 49: Do you like the filmstrip pictures used in the French 


course? 
1. Some of the people should be our age. 
2. We should have real people on the films. 


3. I don't like the filmstrips. I used to, but day after day 
after day I have lost just about all my interest in French, 
and I think that goes for everyone. 


4. I really wish the filmstrips were modernized. 


5. The filmstrips are alright, but how often are we going to 
use those same words and sentences in an ordinary con- 
versation. I think there should be more grammar and 
putting sentences together which would appear in a regular 
conversation. 


6. The filmstrips seem to be very dreary. 
7. The children in the filmstrips are too babyish. 


8. The filmstrips are a bad idea, Often I memorize a group of 
words to go with a picture, but I don't know what they mean. 
I'd like more variety, such as music, reading, writing, dis- 
cussions, speeches, plays, tapes, films, spelling contests, 
a bit of French history, real French people visiting classes. 
Why stick with one boring routine? I'm learning groups of 
words, but I don't know how to say what I want to using my 
own sentences. 


III. COMPREHENSION OF MEANING 


Question 6: Can you usually understand the teacher's explanations. in 
French of vocabulary difficulties? 


1. We have a good teacher. 
2. I'm having trouble. I can't understand any of the French. 


3. Our teacher stands there telling us in French the words we 
don't know. How are we to understand her? 


4. I hate French because I don't even know what I'm saying or 
what the teacher is talking about. I'd rather drop French. 









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noistne tev 


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158 


Question 8: Do you usually understand the meaning of what you. are 


LO. 


saying in class when speaking French? 


No, I'd like to find out, but I just memorize those I don't 
understand. 


I know how to say the phrases, but not what all of them 
mean. 


I memorize the sentences from the filmstrips, but I don't 
really learn it. I don't have much understanding of what 
I'm saying, and I can't make up sentences. 


French is fine for them that find it easy, but I just don't 
get ity 


In this course we are just learning a bunch of sounds to go 
with a picture. I'm not learning the meaning of the words 

and sentences that well. If the teacher says something to 

me, all I can answer are the very simple questions. 


Memorizing sentences is useless for students. They should 
construct their own sentences. 


We don't. know how to relate the French sentences to everyday 
life if talking to a French person. 


You should learn what you want to say, and not just repeat 
sentences and forget them. 


I do not know the meaning of the sentences and do not get any 
help in learning. I think there should be an English tran- 
slation. 


I feel the teacher does not explain what the words mean, but 
expects us to write a test in French. 


Question 56: Do you want the teacher to explain in English the 


difficult words you don't understand? 


Our teacher does. 
The teacher should try to.get it. across in French first. 


Yes, because when it is explained in French it usually muddles 
you up. 


Yes, but I doubt if she knows either. 


Definitely. -Uethink this is the worst thing in this course. 
Often I find myself saying things I don't understand. 













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6. I don't like the rule of having French spoken in French 
Class as soon as coming in the door because I've tried 
many times to ask questions about the lesson in French, 
but did not succeed because of the rule. We should be 
able to ask questions in English. 


7, Explain the lesson in English and then start with French. 


IV. GRAMVAR 
Question 12: Do you want the teacher to explain the French grammar 
rules to you? 
ee eS; ent theyveareecx plained lin French, 
2. This part is the most important. 


3. I-think there should be more grammar and putting sentences 
together which would appear in a regular conversation. 


4. We should take more verb forms, nouns, adjectives, so we 
could make our own sentences. 


5. It is difficult without grammar lessons. 
Ve REPERLTION 


Question 30: Does the time seem to drag when the members of the class 
are repeating the sentences after the tape recorder? 


1. When you know the phrase and the others don't. 


2. We don't repeat the sentences anymore. Our teacher doesn't 
like this method. 


3. We need individual grouping so that learning could be speeded 
up for those of higher ability. 


4, The class would be better if the teacher did more individual 
work. 


5. The course is good but we need smaller classes. 





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158 
Question 33: Do you find the learning of the taped sentences which 
accompany the filmstrips interesting? 
1. We don't use the tape recorder very often. 
2. If you can hear them. 
3. The filmstrip helps, but you can't understand the tape. 


4. No, I don't know what it means in English. 


Question 42: Do you think that the repetition of the taped sentences 
which accompany the filmstrips is useful? 


l. The tapes are muffled wherever I sit in the room. 
2. No, the teacher broke two tape recorders that way. 


3. No, it is just memorization, and you do not actually learn 
the sentences. 


Question 47: Would you like more individual practice repeating 
French sentences after the tape recorder? 


1. Ina class this size you have to say the sentences to 
yourself. 


2. If I know what the sentences meant, I wouldn't mind re- 
peating them. 


3. The teacher says it one way, the tape differently. 
4. We need more time and drill to help us remember. 


5. We-are going too fast to learn our sentences. 


VI. READING AND WRITING 
Question 14: Would you.prefer to start writing earlier in this 
course? 
1. Yes, but you. have to know how to speak before you write. 


Zz. It would be easier to learn the sentences if you.could write 
them down. 















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OMITIAW MA OMAR ty OR 


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LSS 


Question 35: Is it a good idea to wait until your second year of 
study before beginning to read in French? 


Le 


I'd get the pronunciation down pat before reading because 
the reading could mix you up. 


No, because you develop in your own mind what you think the 
words mean and a year later you find out that you are wrong 
and have to change. 


Question 44: Do you think the teacher should write the French sen- 


tences on the board when you have learned to say them? 


I think we would learn. quicker this way. 
No, because we cannot read French. 
The teacher already does. 


If the teacher doesn't. you really don't know what she's 
Saying. 


I think we have a better course than my parents had. It 
would help if the teacher wrote the sentences on the board 
because most kids in our class write out the sentences now, 
but with thewrong spelling, of course. I'm glad I'm taking 
French because it is great. to be able to speak a second 
language. 


Question 54: Would you like to have a regular textbook for French 


containing the sentences of the lessons and some 


exercises? 


People. would read ahead, say words wrong, and sometimes mis- 
takes are hard to get rid of. 


Yes, then we could study at.home, 


I would like the French phrases in a book with the accompany- 
ing picture. 


Question 55: Would it be helpful in learning the French sentences 


l. 


that accompany the filmstrip pictures if you could 
write them in your exercise book? 


I think the French program would be better if students were 
to write French, learn grammar rules, and get.a better under- 
standing of French sentences. 


I'd be more interested in French if we could be taught to 
read and write the sentences. 






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160 


VII. TIME FOR FREE CONVERSATION IN FRENCH 


Question 18: Do you get enough class time to practise your French on 


Is 


topics which differ from those in your lessons? 


I wish we did, then I think the students would be more in- 
terested in French. 


Personally, I feel the present French course.is good for 
getting a feel of the language in an oral way, but we should 
have more French conversations in class to improve our pro- 
nunciation and become more confident in speaking. The rooms 
are far too crowded. We need more aids, charts, and a 
reading text. 


We should have more conversation lessons. Each student 
should have to try to express himself to another student, 
and discuss in French the problems we are having. 


VIII. OTHER GENERAL OBSERVATIONS 


The course is good but we need smaller classes. When the 
class has too many students, the teacher finds it hard to 
help those who need it. 


I would like to see more teachers like ours who really cares 
whether you pass or fail. 


I would have a discussion period once a week in which students 
would tell me what parts of the lesson were causing difficulty. 
Then I would go over hard parts and offer extra help to those 
finding the lesson harder than the rest. 


The teacher should make French fun like ours does. 


The course is good, but you can't learn if the teacher can't. 
speak French or answer our questions. 


Divide the class into two parts. One for those who enjoy and 
want to learn French, and the other for those who don't.wish 
to and try to encourage them. 


I think the way our French is taught is a very good way. 























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161 


Some teachers are quite boring. We should have a different 
teacher every year because you can get sick of the same one 
every year. Our teacher can be lots of fun though. 


Whether you. like French or not depends mainly on.how well you 
like your teacher. Ours is a very good French teacher. 





Hd AAD SG Nie ps a 


THE TABLES 


D 


cAlHAT AHT 





TABLE I 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 1: 











Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
/ 160 8445.5 ey 35 econ Sy aa 
8 IMBR Sey) 45 14.2 16] 650.8 317°. 34.6 
9 64 25.8 ey eat 149 =60.1 248-- 27.0 
Total 50g SO eS 157" 1429 445 48.5 917. 100.0 





Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
i 138 45.2 46 15.1 1 SIF SUS iets es 
Z eed Le 485 15.5 134 43.4 B09 33557 
3 / Ome cok AS 14.2 190 62.7 303° 33.0 
Total 555 9) 5655 TS7 = 51429 445 48.5 917 100.0 


Ve eee ep 000 Ce) 8 


_ 
, 
7 

ss 

7 





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; ile) ny y 


1 
i 









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rans mc 8 He | 


















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164 


TABLE II 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 2 








Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
y) 180 42.6 Sa IS.6 147. 41.8 552 8658.4 
8 Oly 2842 48 15.1 178 56.2 317° 34.6 
9 66 26.6 40 16.1 Lae SHS 248 27.0 
Total 30% 331.5 143. 15.6 467 50.9 917 100.0 





Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level . N % N % N % N % 
1 133 45.6 49 16.1 123 40.3 SOSt 58%%S 
Z 1045 3387 Sie «165 154 49.8 309! 33457 
g 70 23.1 43. 14.2 190 62.7 303 33.0 
Total SOVE 35.5 143 15.6 467 50.9 917 100.0 





Xe. 303 dee p- 000} C- 10 We 27 








TABLE III 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 3 














Grade ' Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
7 58 16,5 46 1Sid 248 70.5 552. 58.4 
8 30 9.5 2A 6.6 206 835.9 S17 84.0 
Q . 45: ies Zi 8.5 184. 74:52 LAS Z21s0 
Total 131 1465 88 9:6 698 76.1 917: 100,09 
Xs iha d= 4 p- .000 C+ 45 V«< 209 








Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
NE TS ee eae Se See ee ae 
i 64 21.0 Sou Lue 208" 68.2 S057 S5e0 
2 45 14.6 52° 10.4 252 75.1 309° 33.7 
3 22 1409 ZS 7.6 253 * soe 303 33,0 
Total 131 2445 88 9.6 698 76.1 917: 100.0 
Ko = Bree dar~-84 - pp--.8000 Cc--.017 Vv--.030 


a 





aol 


ITI Sagat 
© WOLTEHUD OT YROOMTAD Ya S@MOGeTA 4O TWEDAHT GMA YOVEIUDANT 


























——— See Se eee 
fetoT ou bebinghntl 20Y 
: V $- ¥ é “ é M 
h.@& Se 2,08 sks [ver ah 2.01 82 
abe vie €.g8 sas 3.8 £§ 2.0 0& 
OTS sks Cpt ber 2.2 ts 2.31 tb 
§.001 vre F.ov 88 -82 88 Esc fet 
eo. - Vat 0.°'-q b-35 Yoer- & 
[stoT Oy bob roabrit] 20Y JrenrevercdoA 
“4 é ¥ 5 Vi # uv 
— RON OS CA EE tienes 
E.8& © 208 89 80S $.0f tf O.1S be 
V.g& ege rey «gas N.OL St SAr oh 
0.82 206 Lies Bes a, es oN gs 
0.60f ‘Le I.at 8a 9.0 88 Sef ser 





eStats eiaRrNt 


05. -V Sie 0 000--¢q bh -3e gone. 








166 


TABLE IV 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 4 








Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
qi lig. 35.6 $6 10.2 200 8656.8 S52 38,4 
8 Hey Sey ad “"54-- 17,0 128. 7 332 27 254). 6 
9 103 41.5 oor 15a 106 42.7 248 27:0 
Total 364 39.7 129° 14.1 424 6.46.2 917 100.0 
x? - 28.1 df - 4 p - .000 Can emer V - -.16 
Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
a! 128 42:0 39° 12:8 138" 745.2 305 33.5 
Z 122 39.5 46° 1525 144 46.6 509- 33.7 
3 114 37,6 49+ 15.5 142 46.9 303 8©=—«.: 333... 0 
Tetal 664. 39.7 1 ee A24. 46.2 917 100.0 
x? - 1.6 df - 4 pr--.802 C - .04 V - .04 











167 


TABLE V 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 5 


Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
7 498° 43.3 46 13.1 48 13.6 352 38.4 
8 187. Gace) 64 20.2 56 2.7 517: +3456 
9 154 §=62.1 41 16.5 53 21.4 248 27.0 
Total 609 66.4 ist i625 ISG da.t 917 100.0 


ie dean poe | 86b& Ae UWS 








Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
Level N % N % N % N % 
I, BZ 69.5 Bs 17.9 ay 13.04 305 Od 
Z 220 Au.2 40 12.9 49 1S.9 309 ee / 
5 Lai 58.4 59 19.5 67 Lidia Lt 303 33.0 
Total 609 66.4 151 16.5 LSi7 b.2 917. 100.0 
Wai des p- 004 C= ue W- U8 











168 


TABLE VI 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 6 





Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
7 193 54.8 62 17.6 G/- 2426 S57) | S0e4 
8 142 44.8 59° 12:5 186 42.9 Sl7* 34.6 
9 127. 0S «55134 20 Seal: 100 40,5 247 2750 


Total 462 50.4 Zk |= 1552 333 36.4 916 100.0 





= 2610. “dee p= .000 C=.ly V= (2 








Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
| 203 66.6 36 6«d11..8 66 21.6 S05 33.3 
2 156 50.5 44 14.2 109 55,3 309: 33.7 
3 103. 34.1 41 13.6 158: $255 302° 35.0 
Total 462 50.4 iz  doad $35 36.4 916 100.0 


N22 71,5 di=4 p= 000 €~.27- V- bd 


| 
—_s==«**“*“wannnn{j{[{Ic={x{x{l=H[ynm»]»"w=__ayyweweaeaeaS—S—S—-—-—-—-—— [earn 





h a 
rd 


wre i _ hae 
7 « : 
; er | yl 
oy : ad 
- 7 | 
a al | 
va | 


169 


TABLE VII 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 7 








Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
7 184 5225 4] LEG 127 36.1 S52 38 
8 105 Sar 49 iS 163 51.4 5 ley, 34 
9 94 38.2 ie 126 12% 49,2 246 26 
Total 383 41.9 Tr 13.2 All 44,9 915 100. 
Ronee dees Inve 000)“. Ges 21h os) “V2 19 


Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
1 T47-. 43.4 a 125 40:5 304- 33 
2 139 =45.0 40: 12.9 130 42.1 299- 33 
a Oe? - 32a 47 15.6 158. 52:3 302 33 
Total 383. -41.9 tye 1332 Ali ..44.9 915 100. 
weetes deo. 4 p> On G-.4  Fe 





170 


TABLE VIII 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 8 





Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N 3 N 4 N 4 N $ 
7 2 6a CCL 90 25.6 Cah eee 
g 163 $112 44 13.9 ab 25.0 A) ae 
9 141 56.9 22 8.9 85 34.3 AS agri 
Total 521 56.9 109 112.9 8G 3.2 916 100.0 
Youw2 dees pa hleg G2 cee We .1e 








Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
if 227 0 4 25 8.2 52. Agel 304 33.2 
2 182 58.9 32 10.4 95 30.7 309° 33.7 
cS) 122. $7.0 Sy a ba 4 139 45.9 $03 33.4 
Total 621 56.9 199 14.9 286 Sii.Z 916 100.0 





Melee. dF .4 p- 000 G:.30 V2 -44 











Be fee 
Ose Ve 0.28 
DNS Bhs ELNE 
0.001 oLe 







Oi. -v EL. 


om) 


TABLE IX 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 9 


Oe 





Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
4 Zia 86=—o 78 1) 30 Sia5 47 13.4 351 38.4 
8 220° hy, 5 28 8.9 62 19.6 316 834.6 
9 165 66.8 7 6.9 65 26.3 247 =27.0 
Total. 665 72.8 a5 8.2 174 19.0 914 100.0 











Achievement. Yes Undecided No Total 
ever N % N % N % N % 
1 22ie TAG 26. 18,6 50) le.5 503 = 353%2 
2 Zo0 Tits 23 7.4 aie Uste2 309° 33.8 
3 199 65.9 26 8.6 1 ee 302 = =33.0 
Total 665. 72.8 75 8.2 174 19.0 914 100.0 





ess d= 2 ws. C= a We ais 








$.8E 

ane 
OLTS VHS 
0.00f Are 





172 


TABLE X 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 10 











Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
i 202 =53'.4 oS 2097 PR 2¥3G S52 85834 
8 WSi 4552 61 19.2 119 «= 3725 317° 34:6 
9 107. 43.1 45 18.1 96 38.7 248 27.0 
Total 446 48.6 RS = 19S 292 3958 917 100.0 





NA eed Fp etodo |= OT Wt 2227 


Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
1 172 56.4 49 16.1 84 27.5 SOS SOs 
2 15S 49.25 66 21.4 90 29 «1 50S" 3357 
3 iz 39°59 64 21.1 118 38.9 | 303 33.0 
Total 446 48.6 7S =619'35 292 31.8 917 100.0 


NO Stes. Gee pte c~2h We -oe 


——————————————————————————————— COO ——— Ee 





TAS 


TABLE XI 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 11 


Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
7 128 36.4 119° (33:8 105 29.8 B52 58.5 
8 122 88/6 1g4 = «36,4 80 625.3 316 = 34.5 
9 107: 43,3 81 32.8 59-- 28:9 247 = 27.0 
Total 357° 39.8 314 = 34.3 244 26.7 915 100.0 


Xo Wee deeerAe pee BEG? 6G =. 0g | = = 709 


Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
1 125 62.8 10S 39.1 70 25:0 304- 33.2 
2 127- 41.2 96 31.2 85 27.6 506: 33.7 
3 115 38:0 99° 32.7 89 29.4 S05 >) 4531 
Total 357. 39.0 314 934.3 244: 26.7 915 100.0 


N42 6.2) d6-.4 p- 483 CC - .08 V-= .04 








‘ 


Yay, 


7 a in 
4/392 aan 
ak 






LS gf ee ene ) 
‘ nee ae] 


174 


TABLE XII 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 12 





Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
if 226 64.2 So Deo ml: 20,2 352 38.4 
8 191 60.3 52 16.4 yh, 286 S17 34.6 
9 151 6.0 45 18.2 71, 28.7 247° 27.0 
Total 548 59.8 152 16.6 216 23.6 916 100.0 


Ko = Bhe dete pe 085) 06+ 09) «2 Wd 


Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
i 201 ‘66.41 By) alate 6o | Ly SOA SS.2 
2 Lio 56.06 So ave. al KB 25.42 309 33.7 
3 U2 456.88 59 19.5 ii 25.98 505 65,4. 
Total 548 59.8 sz <aLosG 216 23.6 916 100.0 


Mei dke=-8 m-.053 G- 10 W- 99 





dee TIE 
OWS TRS vas 
0.00% o£ 





UB) 


TABLE XIII 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 13 
—ooOooeeeeeeeeeeee 








Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
ere ee ee a 
v 147 41.9 62 17 «# 142 40.5 551 56 no 
8 * LEE 35.0 55 14,4 TS 47.6 517 34.6 
9 118 47.6 29 ibes 101 40.7 248 Zl és 
Total 376 41.0 146 15.9 394 43.0 916 100.0 
sh ae Le eR eo 2 gs ae 
1g woe w= oe o-oo =i 
Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
I 167 54.8 42 US5.8 96 5S 305 55% 
iz 125 40.5 58 18.8 126 40.8 309 SORT 
3 84 27.8 46 DZ a ye 57.0 302 38<0 
Total 376 41.0 146 15.9 394 43.0 916 100.0 
He 2) GE pk oD és. Wee 




















EL WOLTeSU) OT. YAOOSTAD Y8 42M0923i 10 TWEQRSS MA YOU | 
¢ 4 : .¥ ¢ 4 * w 
Ege [2 2,00 - SPE Vt $8 em We 
ase UE ah ial ete ae om 66 - 
“Ws ahs Vi0b tor EE awe Be @ 
ore IstoT 


0.001 are Och BCE ‘C.2L OAL O.1e 
P 4 + ; = : - ‘i a ; —_— — 
(6-2 It: +9 ~@0hrh™ 


176 


TABLE XIV 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 14 


Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
i) LZs 55a) 6l° 17.4 167, 4736 Ser | 5845 
8 155 48.9 48 15.1 itd 36,0 317° 34.6 
9 LE 4x2 Sa, 1S OF ~39all AS Zhe 
Total Soar FS el l45 i546 S78 Hlbs 5 916 100.0 





4 1S deed Oop 00S 6 eS. OU = = 5 








Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
1 147 948.4 B/S 119-3642 504 = 55e2 
2 126 §©6©40..8 44 14.2 139 45.0 S09, S5te/ 
3 LZ AUS aa OP 129 42.6 303 8633.1 
Total 395 43.1 143 ©6115 ,6 378 =4lWS 916 100.0 





N= Gest dik -4a pie -.147® ce -.09% Ve-.99 








E.BE [2 
Oke SEE 
BAYS Bhs 


9.001 ae 


‘i- - 


Ste B08 
tog . 802 
[Re 80E 
0.00f oLfe 


V 


0, Th 
0, 0% 
[RE 
et, 1 


él 


W 
F 
J 
, 
. * * 
. 
5 t 
Pol 
‘ 
: 
_ - ~ 
: . : i 
 - , 





1 Tod 


TABLE XV 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 15 


Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
7 u52 © AS.2 47. 13.4 158. 43.5 552 38.4 
8 110 §=34.8 Bae WA 162 ~4b22 316 = 34,5 
9 83 = 83..5 27° = «10...9 188 55.6 248: 27,1 
Total 545  %37..4/ 128 14.0 443 48.4 916 100.0 


e168 @-4A p+ AM C- A2 W- wad 








Achievement Yes Undediced No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
1 138 845.4 Gi. Ie 129 42.4 204° = 33.2 
2 tS 36.76 58 18.8 138 44.7 309: 33.7 
3 94 310 oo 6110.9 76, 158.40 505 S671 
Total 345° B27 128 14.0 443, 48.4 916 100.0 





Wess gde-4 p-.e00 C-.16 W--.29 


eS 
———————————— 





178 


TABLE XVI 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 16 
Sa 





Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
7 304 86.4 ay; Bet al 6.0 352F 38.4 
8 248 = 78.2 27 3.5 SZ 2 317s 334.6 
9 a: ey So Aa 18 Aus 42a 0 2Afe 277.0 
Total i590 80.7 72 7.9 LOS, ~ y.5 916 100.0 





a 1085 de pul CS = 








Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
H ApoE 8a5 2 19 G...3 26 8.6 304, 3352 
Z 258) 85.5 19 6.1 32 10.4 SRO) 3557, 
&) 2226 - Wn 34 «11.2 ayy 1b35 303§ 33k) 
Total wooy §=68On TF, 72 749 10sy lies 916 100.0 





Ne leeey die 4g py. 002% = Gh. I, We 2 


0,8 





$.28 BOE 8S 
tbe Q0e OL S 
Lite S02. 7" 
0.001 aLe auf “20L 










L.0 
S. Lf 
@.t 


S..- Vo 8.-0 “08s 


- ~ 








et 
he 











sei oee 


TABLE XVII 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 17 











Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
L 240 =68.2 ay: 1354 65 16%5 352 «3834 
8 216° 68st 54 1037 Of are $17 = 33.456 
9 167 67:5 29. Ads? oz 02150 248 827.0 
Total 625 6739 £10, 1.230 184 20.1 947 «6100.0 





oe iy dee 4 pp 67859 «6c .045 86-02 


Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
1 215 705 360 «1148 4 77 305 S525 
Z 22a «7248 56 «List oi Woes 309 33.7 
5 186 61.4 $8. 1215 49 «2600 305 $530 
Total 623 67.9 120 = 1230 184 209d 917° 100.0 


Noe Mes Sderot, pp-- 4024 «6 Sc---Ci1 = Y=" 4 





z.8E | aE 
vee gor 
0.22 E0E 
0.00f£ Tre 
bf, oa Vv 


—_" 


TABLE XVIII 


180 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 18 


Grade Yes 
N 
q 105 
8 83 
fe) 53 
Total 241 
Xa 2 


Achievement Yes 


level N 

1 (a! 

2 ls 

3 89 

Total 241 
ya 4 





29,29 
26.2 
21.4 


26,3 


150 


2546 
24,4 
29.4 


ORS 


Undecided 
N % 
69 19.7 
An 6 a. 8 
25° 10.1 
4] 15.4 
df - 4 pe 
Undecided 
N % 
46°" P57 
aq) | 43 
St 16.8 
yp 8 5.4 
df - 4 je) = 


000 


-408 


No 


177 
187 
170 
534 


C - 


No 


182 
189 
163 


534 


C- 


DOwe 


225 


Seley 
61.4 
5o8 
58.3 


OF 


Total 
N % 
351 S370 
Sig, 34.6 
248 ZV S1. 
916 100.0 
Va--.20 
Total 
N % 
305 ORS 
308 3556 
303 SiS) eu 
916 100.0 
V¥--- 307 





181 


TABLE XIX 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 19 


——$$$$$$$LPD@@@§§_ aE Ses 





Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
7 x) 9.4 Mt 2002 247 70.4 554. 038.4 
8 28 8.9 88 27.9 199 635.2 e156 B45 
9 Bo ze 48 19.4 168. 07.7 248 8927.1 
Total 95 O42 207° 2256 614 67.2 914 100.0 





Moe ONSh da--46 pr .044s @—.10) W---.06 





Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
a a a i ee 
1 29 9.5 61 420.21 214 70.4 BOA. 335335 
2 32 10.4 p>  ALAL9 220° Sha 307 ~- S46 
5 32 10.6 91 30.0 180 59.4 S03 35542 
Total 93 «10¥2 207 12256 614 (67.2 914 100.0 


mo*-00585 4 ddf=-44. pp--.f004 (C--.413 W--.a74 


a 


Isso Pie 
¢ 6K é 













b.86 fe por ths S05 EF 
ake are S28 eer eS 8B 
INNS’ ans Ta 88 a a 
G.00E pe 8.3 $10 | OSS vos 





a0.--V Of. -9 Bh, -¢ 


Ezz NOR b.0T - BES 
d.c6 WE Yifv Oss 
S.gf 208 b:Re O81 


182 


TABLE XX 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 20 


Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
te re ee re ee ee Ee 
7 W26, S529 44 «12.5 gv =6oD.6 Spl 3843 
8 79: 24.9 SSF 1243 199 62.8 S17: 3436 
9 61 24.6 Zia §6=105..9 160 64.5 248 8627.1 
Total 266 29.0 JLOF 28.0 540 59.0 916 100.0 


aI da wos C-. W= as 








Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
at 109 35.7 567 1 8 1603 5225 305? 3535 
Z S75 285.2 397 «1247, 1827 «65942 308 33.6 
3 (0s - 26K. Son. «LAG 198? G5ad 3052 351 


Total 266. .29.0 LLO9 =1250 540 59.0 916 100.0 





Nee 127S8 EE 44 yp 002k «+ ek |W 


—_————ESEEESEEEEEeeEeeEeEeEeEeEeaEaEaEaEE||e|[——|=—E=E==_—— 





183 


TABLE XXI 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 21 





Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
7 172 + =48.9 60 17,0 120. =S4i1 552 38 
8 138 43.5 49-1545 130 «= 410 S17 34 
9 140 56.5 20 8.1 88 35,5 248 27; 
Total 450 49.1 129 14.1 338 36.9 917. 100. 


Keo= Holi ddts-44 Epe=.0003 Cc--.}93 W--.103 


Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 

level N % N % N % N % 
i LOZ ~ Sou 40 13.1 105 «33388 50S 33 
2 165 52:8 30 «=: 16.2 96 Silvl SUS 383 
3 125° 42535 59° 12,9 139 45,9 $05 - 85 

Total 450 49.1 129 14.1 $358 60.9 917 100; 


Wee Wee de 2h p= 002 Ge af V-= 6 











184 


TABLE XXII 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 22 





Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
7 242 47:3 544.5 29 8.2 352° 38.4 
8 219° 69:4 61. 19.2 2° ig 17° 34.6 
9 174 70.2 eo" 457 55° 14.4 248 3827.0 
Total 665 72:5 150 1650 10i) a. 0) 917 100.0 


Ke .. 990g dée- 4g py--.0626 Co-..10) VW )-..18 








Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
1 253 83.0 29 9.5 25 1.5 205 33.9 
2 236) 45.4 5 86=s 16,5 25 Bod 309 35.7 
3 ig - 59.4 fi. 25.8 56 d7:5 303° 33:0 
Total 665 72.5 152 16.5 101; i .0 917 100.0 





Ne aga <df-4 ~p- 000 G-= ,22- Vir 6 













0.8% VLE 
Q:NS BAS 
0.00r Te 











Grade Yes Undecided 
N % N % 
7 148 42.0 79 Za04 
8 110 SUye ae 224 
9 108 4355 38 LS 3 
Total 366 39.9 188 2085 
a1 d= 2 p= .055 
Achievement Yes Undecided 
level N % N % 
I 143 46.9 56 18.4 
Z 129 AVe7 68 Za°0 
3 94° ~ 3130 64 Zed 
Total 366 39.9 188 20.5 
x“ = To): fdre-44. Pp--.fo01 





TABLE XXITI 


185 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 23 


No 
N % 
125 he) 
136 42.9 
102 41.1 
363 39.6 
Ge ol 
No 
N % 
106 34.8 
BZ 356.62 
145 47.9 
363 39.6 
Ge- 4 


Total 
N % 
a2 358% 
Si7* 3&3 
248 aT 
917 100. 
V- .04 
Total 
N % 
305 53) 
309 35% 
203 33% 
917 6100. 
V -~.8LG 





186 


TABLE XXIV 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 24 





Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
i iva «= SB. 146 §=41.5 94 26.7 352 38.4 
8 85 «= 26.8 88 «= 27.8 144 45.4 317 34.6 
9 74 29.8 465 18.5 D28* —-Si..6 248 27.0 
Total 2708 291.6 280 30.5 366 39.9 917 100.0 


X= 540s - d= 4 ps 000) G- .2h We .20 





Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
1 1OOZ- 3248 St 291.2 116? 38.0 30D? §635RS 
2 915° «293.4 Gor Sd W2ze 39h S0RF = 35h0/ 
& 80 26.4 955 34d44 L28i 84282 305% 3520 
Total 27aa 2946 280 830.5 366° 39.9 917. 100.0 











b.8t See 


ast SLE 

TS 

G,00% y£e 
oS. - V 










T.a8 BO 
bch BAI 
d.f2 SSI 
Q.0& ave 


eS. - 9 


187 


TABLE XXV 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 25 











Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
7 i24 $5.2 89 «25.5 169 3995 352 384 
8 f2 22.8 89 = 28.2 155° 49x blo 34.5 
9 68 27.4 66 26.6 114 46.0 248° 27.8 
Total. 264 8 28.8 244 26.6 408 44.5 916 100.0 





Xo = 1693 dh-4 = 010 C- 412. V-+.11 





Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
oe ree ne Se Ne ee te eee I ee ee EE 
1 112~ 36.7 84) 27465 109. 35.7 S05 3525 
Z 90 29.1 87) 0-282 1§2 42.7 o09° 33.7 
3 62 20.5 75 24,2 167. 55.3 302 35.0 
Total 264 28.8 244 26.6 408 44.5 916 100.0 


Noe 20 Eads = 000 Cael? | RVs 


—————————————— — ——————————————————————————__—____ TEE 





188 


TABLE XXVI 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 26 








Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N 4 N 4 we N 3 
7 De ACG eh 173 64 18.2 aay 38.4 
8 ten 530 62 19.6 90 28.4 S17 34:6 
9 121 48.8 50 20.2 BG 248 27.0 
Total ks 55.9 173 18:9 Daly 252 917 100.0 
Mew deed gi< 300) (C.- als 4 W--120 








Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
1 210. 68.9 4% 613.8 BS: ba.4 S05 33.5 
2 182 58.9 64 20.7 63 20.4 S00; “S67. 
3 Wah - 39.9 Gi ZU 115 38.0 305 33:0 
Total She 35.9 Liye 18.8 25) 25.2 917 100.0 





#.8€ = See" 
O,8E TLE, 


OTS BAS 
@.00L Tie 





va canon 10 TE aM 


: in ; i 
Yous ' i as) 
: a? pe) 








189 


TABLE XXVII 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 27 











Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N & N 4 N & N 4 
7 123 34.9 35. Thea 204 58.0 352 38.4 
g 107 33.8 26 «8.2 184 58.0 317 34.6 
9 107. 4844 ie Te | 121 48.8 248 27.0 
Total 337 36.8 ey 509 55.5 917 100.0 
a a 
ye = 6898 «dete 4k pp ae?) ce-- 09k «= W=-2 10 


Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
——— ee ee ee 
is TU eons 19 6.2 185 6057 S05 S505 
oe 119 «= S845 26 8.4 164 953.1 309 33.7 
3 117. 38.6 26 8.6 160 52.8 303 335.0 
Total Sov" 5676 74. Tw 509° «5.5 917 100.0 


ee TE ae 






TS MOLTEUD OT YHODETAD YE deMoMOMA 40 TONES OMA WOU 





& o%* Jee 
i 


sleet) 


TABLE XXVITI 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 28 





Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
fi 254° “OO%D 56 0.2 82> 2o.6 S92 B.'5 
8 265 83.6 17 54 55 44.0 S17 0s 34.16 
9 2 ets Oe 14 Bu 20 8.1 246 26.9 
Total i Wty, 67 ibe) 57 = -4+,0 915 100.0 


245.5 Gee 4 bm: -00 ©~.21 V~ +158 








Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
iT ZI - "1Or4 23 Ve 49 16.1 505 «35005 
2 fain As dey 28 81 46 14.9 309 = 33.8 
3 245, - “SU 9), 16 oe 42 14.0 301 32.9 
Total ELLE mee, 67 fees 7 | SS 90 915 100.0 





x22 3708 dit--4% pp--.4098 c&~.073 vv---,68 











E,8E L.aL 


8.8E C.bl of fe  %& 
@.8e roe Oidr SB a) oe 


0,00r ete Qel SEE tin | 


gg 


80.- -V 0, -9 Eb. 1g » - 2 


— ee 7 = > 


4 


; ae 
~ 


abel 


TABLE XXIX 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 29 











Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
y! “ne, 05. 1 4a 2027, Si | 16,2 352° 38.4 
8 198 62.5 54 17.0 6& 20,5 Sir 3Sh.6 
9 172 69.6 aoe 6 Le. 3 47 19.0 24c; 27,0 
Total 592 64.6 LSS. 16.9 169 18.4 916 100.0 


Vee ON eee ni Oty (Ges la. eu. 05 


eee 








Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
1 204 66.9 52 Le; 0 49 16; | 305 35% .5 
2 218 70.6 , 44 1422 47 155 2 309 JOR 
3 170° 56.3 59 19.5 Jae 2442 SO2e 33,0 
Total 592 64.6 155, 16.9 169 18.4 916 100.0 
Cae LEG eer omen ongu! Gi. ase. mets 













b.8e 
Ode VIE euQ8,, 2d 
Q.XS TAS Oger (ha 
0.00f oafe 4.8L @éf 


go 


TABLE XXX 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 30 











Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
7 171 48.6 oe 8.8 ISG 642.6 352 38.4 
8 166 52.4 5S TV.G 116 8636.6 SLT 34.6 
9 154 8662.1 19 eg to B02 248 27.0 
Total 491 53.5 85 915 54 362 917 100.0 





Met d&-4 p.m C- .12- V- -.16 








Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
z 16> 53.1 55. - 10.8 1100 «36.1 S05 S325 
4 161 52.1 29 9.4 TiS 56.5 309°. 33.7 
S 168 55.4 23 7.6 Li2 34:0 SOS 38.0 
Total 491 53.5 84 9.3 341 3937.2 917- 100.0 





x4 = 2038 déf--48 pp--.680% CC--.058 Vi-~-.01 





bie 


93 


TABLE XXXI 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 31 





Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N $ N $ N 8 N $ 
7 48 13.7 59 16.8 244 69.5 set 58,3 
8 65 20.5 62 19.6 190 59.9 317. 34.6 
9 47 19.0 SY 12,5 170 68.5 248 27.1 
Total 160 17.5 152 16.6 604 65.9 916 100.0 
ee, dees, pe Ne Ce DCO = 5806 








Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
1 as eo Bz 10.5 250 82.0 S05 —SGa/5 
2 47 «5.3 SS. 12:9 206 66.9 308 33.6 
3 90.- 29,7 65. 2i5 148 48.8 303. 33.1 
Total 160 14.5 152: 16.6 604 65.9 916 100.0 





x2 - 8088 ddf--44 gp--.5000 C-0728 y V -07.45 


—ooooeeeoEoooEEoeEeElllEEEEEEEeEEEEEEeEEEESE—EEEEEEEEEEEeEeeeeSSS=SQEQQSESQSSESQEEE™EUO™O_™OOOELLLE SSS SSS" 












ye 
7 


pee iT 7 
‘ M a a 
® 
> f ra . : an 







7 ~suneee : ot a iS 
oe : a 1s - im ia Mi ral A ‘e 

a c a Fo te) 7 ) nil 

- a a ae ’ ‘ : 

eer : ° : a i : pies a 


1 oa 
: ' Pea 





“Ss : LOK BOGART | A ; : Ds 
1 VOTTESUD OT YSIGOHTAD YE MMENRGR 10 ERT Gia YOREUEMT 








S.8E 208 
2.88 BOE 0.98 
ee 20e a8) 
0.00 aie —-_b, 28 


dh, - “i Vv 8S, ~ 6 


194 


TABLE XXXII 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 32 


——————E—————_———_————————————————————===—___=—=—=—_—=—_—_—S 





Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
if 159 = 45.2 7 245 8. 93*5 552 $8.4 
8 108 34.1 63 19.9 146 46.1 517° 34.6 
- 68 27.4 34. 13.7 146 58.9 248 27.0 
Total O55 "SOnS 172 +=18.8 410 44.7 917 100.0 


x= So, = 4 p=-000 €=.20- VY = 427 


Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
evede N % N % N % N % 
1 1S ~ S807 62 20.3 125 41.0 505 Sots 
2 1G > S755 49 15.9 144 46.6 HD SONY 
3 TOL ~ 335%3 61 20.1 141 46.5 5 55,0 
Total 355 SOv5 172 18.3 410 44.7 917° 100.0 














1.9/3 


TABLE XXXITI 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 33 











Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
7 179 «= 51.0 69 19.7 103 29.5 35 8638.3 
8 106 §=33.4 68 21.5 145 45.1 317: 34:6 
9 75 30.2 44 44.7 129 52.6 248 927.1 
Total 360 39.3 181 19.8 375 40.9 916 100.0 


Xe AL ape 000 «|G 2B = 28 


Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level . N % N % N % N % 
1 L209, ~ 4203 6h 20.0 Ly 3G? a5; SS 
2 1300 42.1 68 22.0 Tey 45.9 509; 35.7 
3 101i - 33.4 o4 bys. 2 149 49.3 a2 6 35.0 
Total 360 4639.3 181 619.8 375 40.9 916 100.0 





Woe do 4 ps.009 G-.12 W- .18 


———oICIIIIIISSSSSSSSSSESESESESESE—————————eeeeeEEEEEEEEEESESESEEoooESESESESESSESESESESSSSSSSESESESESESES=S= 


an > i. 7 7. oe Oe ; 
; ’ ee - ; 


aa 





TABLE XXXIV 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 34 





Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N $ N 4 N 4 N 4 
7 242 68.8 52 14.8 OF 1642 352 38.4 
8 178 56.2 tae 2958 65 2028 317 34.6 
9 156 62.9 47 19.0 45 18.1 248 27.0 
Total 576 62.8 173 18.9 167 18.2 917 100.0 
Mate Gee m-flo “o- d W--loo 





Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level — N % N % N % N % 
1 226° «741 SO 16.4 29 vss SUs Sono 
2 199 64.4 som lene Noe lyes sugr Soe 
5 151 49.8 68 22.4 Bo. 2794 SUS) 5970 
Total 576 62.8 173, 18.9 167 18.2 917: 100.0 





rae tee Pe Oe 2k (Ve 3 








E,8E 208 
Tiel 08 
0.88 E02 
0.00f v4e 





c. - V 


77 ‘ 
yw’ wy wD 





ei 7 7 ae 


TABLE XXXV 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 35 





Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N 3 m8 N 4 N 4 
7 174 49.4 7 20.5 106 30.1 352 381.5 
8 134 42.4 57 18.0 125 39.6 316 34.6 
9 97 39.4 56 22.8 93 37.8 246 26.9 
Total 405 44.3 185 20.2 324 35.4 914 100.0 
we Ot0R daa4M pe -.0400 CG&-.106 V¥-.12 








Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
i 136 = 44.7 48 15.8 120 -39..5 304; 3353.3 
2 146 847.6 6G «19.5 LO 3.9 S07? 35.6 
3 123 40.6 77 =—-25.4 103 34.0 SOS © «351.2 
Total 405 44.3 185 20.2 324 835.4 914 100.0 





Ro 1069 Ge-@ ps oz C- 1 W- 00 


—————o—“—— EEE —<—<—<—————————— 





2.8 NDE 
at Soe 
S.2E 208 
9.00f Afe 










00, - Vv 


198 


TABLE XXXVI 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 36 





Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
(| 52° 4:8 42° 11.9 268 76.3 352 38.4 
8 20 22.4 64 20.2 a Se bey 517° 34.6 
9 GO: 23.8 Se 60125 158 63.7 248 27:0 
Total 281 W9.7 137. 14:9 599 65.3 917 100.0 





meerogt6 vdiatd)) no 1000 Gs 116 Y= =.46 








Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
1 68> 12.5 4° 10.8 234: 76.7 305 33.3 
2 49 15.9 46 14.9 214 69.3 309: 33.7 
3 94-- 31.0 58° 10.4. 151 49.8 303 33.0 
Total 181 19.7 137. 14.9 599 §8665.3 917 100.0 





Me 550) dh 94 =p = (000  G-=- 124 ¥ = <:36 








oie | 

ae Ale 
er? 
YE SQHOM2AS AO THORS MA YORE 








.. : 










; =.) 
oo 

— a 

P 7) 





a a 2 re a) 
Ose TEE Taye | BE S.0S 8 Ce 
OTS BAS v.89 82! asf 48 8.28 02. 
Q.0or te = 2) ek EEE ter 


a--V af -3 000r-q, &- mw wee - 





7 : f 
rin ay Pe 


198 


TABLE XXXVII 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 37 





Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
7 200 56.8 49 13.9 105 2935 352° +38.4 
8 z25.) 1075 ay 8.5 of: «© dart 317. 34.6 
9 EAS) SY 47 16 635 89 3§= 3539 248 27:0 
Total 566 §=66 157 92 10.0 Z59 282 917: 100,0 





X23 26:0 df= 4 p= 000 G= 1% # V= =.01 








Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
1 136 44.6 30 9.8 139 945.6 S05 35%3 
2 198 64.1 30 9.7 81 26.2 309 33.7 
3 252 ©=76.6 2 06 59 a259 303 33:0 
Total 566 §=G Lz? 92 10.0 259 «28.2 917 100.0 


X42 8490 G@de=-44 Bp--.7000 “C’- 929. *V ---243 














a bv O) 
AD 

r } 7 aT h 
Te WOLTEAUD OT YRONSTAD Ye SaWOMAAR 20 WEAR UMA YOM 


Ls 


sy 2 
if tile 


a 1 ae : ae oh we | ; bas 4 








MSE St 6 ees kore 
Od. HE vie {5S %0 2.8 
WTS ghs = eiee ee 2.8 
o.00r tte S88 G85 Quer 





Be as 


200 


TABLE XXXVIII 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 38 

















Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
i) 135 68.4 96 24.35 Za 63454 352 38.4 
8 IGZ) eSiat 84 26.5 oD 22.4 Sy 26426 
9 125 50.4 70° 28.2 es ie! 248 27.0 
Total 422 46.0 250. 27.3 245. “2604 917 100.0 
X22 205. “di='4 p=-000 “C=-.15 V-.-.{18 
Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
1 133 43.6 89 29.2 83 2h. 305 aoe0 
Z 146 ©6472 Ue? 258 91 29.4 lo 5 a7 
3 143 A7ViZ 89 29.4 71 26.4 303 33.0 
Total 422 46.0 250 2H 245 26.7 917 100.0 


Re 


Kolegdede 4) P= gs) oC =-.08 Vie =.05 


EE 





201 


TABLE XXXIX 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 39 





Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
7 174 49.4 64 18.42 114 32.4 352 38.4 
8 1835 oF 7 44 13.9 90 28.4 317. 34.6 
9 135 68.9 2) 4805 75° 2946 24% | 27:0 
Total 3100 55.7 129 «14.1 ape 6 80 42 916 100.0 





X22 ash edee-84. Pp--.%05 Cc--.073 W--.9712 








Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
i L56 ~ Slsl 46 15.1 LOS 3328 30S 865548 
2 181 58.6: 59° 1246 89: 28.8 S09 33¢/ 
3 Las - Sins 44 14.6 85 28.1 302° 33.0 
Total S10 5547 129 14.1 277 30.2: 916 100.0 





X7- Mh dfi-4 p- 358 C- 07. V-~ -i08 


BBE See 80bsE OATES BEG 
OnE TIE A.8S 00 @.8r MA 
GiNS Nes = aes 2.8 IS 
0.001 are S08 oS LAE OSE 


S.--V 8&.-9 200.°-¢ 





202 


TABLE XL 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT TO RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 40 











Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
7 66 18.8 60 17.0 226 8664.2 352 38.4 
8 47: 14.8 45 14.2 225° «3.0 317: 34.6 
9 S36 «14.5 45 18.1 167. 67.3 248 27.0 
Total 149 «16.2 150 16.4 618 67.4 917. 100.0 


X° - 4082 dgf--44 pp--.3057 CC--.07] vv¥--.07 


Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
ee a ee npr rrr eee 
1 52 27.0 62° 20.5 191 62.6 s05 35,5 
2 SY” 16.5 52 16.8 206 66.7 209° 35.1 
3 46 15.2 36> 1039 221 . 72.9 303 33.0 
Total 149 16.2 150 16.4 618 67.4 917 100.0 


v4 > Go) deem 4a ~. 050) Co. Aho. VV .0812 


Ee eee eee 





B22 -8E 9,89 Jer 
V.8E © QUE Tdd a0 
0.22 08 Qt £88 
O.00r tre -  p.na 84a 






; cre 
> a el ; , 


a0 Pele re, ie . 









203 


TABLE XLI 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 41 








Grade. Yes Undecided No Total 
Noe og N 4 N 4 N 4 
7 166 47.4 51 (4859 155 45.7 350 38.3 
8 120 37.9 36 11.4 161 50.8 19° 34.7 
9 122 49.6 18 32.3 106 43.1 246 26.9 
Total 408 44.7 85 49.6 420 46.0 913 100.0 
an al tl Se aN te i nee 
Ma 42 udficeA pe O87: 6: ld = 00 


Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
anil de esc ol. nt Snel Annet ee ae eel Rane see ene 
1 140 845.9 Bl 6 «.10,2 134 43,9 305 33.4 
2 137 4A.5 22 7y1 149 48.4 308: 33.7 
3 161 - 45.7 B2- 40.7 Loy. 5.7 300 32.9 
Total 408 44,7 85 9.3 420 46.0 913 100.0 
salesmen Se i letra ee 2 ela ea oe Ses Cc ee 
yu? S525 dée-49 po- C ~.06 03 


ea. «CCE on), 









LIK B48AT | | 
7 7 = 
. & 
{b VOLTeWD) OT YAODTRAD va 70 WUT 
, 7 . 4 7 - oe : 
'y oe - 
—_ ee : 7 sa - = , ae > ee 





204 


TABLE XLII 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 42 











Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
7 278 79.2 44: 32.5 29 8.3 Sok) See 
8 226 11.6 45 14,72 46 14.5 5ly =93.4.6 
9 159 64.4 35 14.2 53 21.5 247 27.0 
Total 663 12:35 124 13,6 128 14.0 915 100.0 
X2l-p2381) gdfo-44. wpi--g000 ¢Cl- 716 yV.- 224 
Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
1 255 77,0 35 aS 35 415 305 35.5 
2 205 76.1 41 13513 955 d0.7 309 33.8 
3 193 64.1 48 15.9 60 19.9 301 32.9 
Total 663 72.5 124 13.6 128 14.0 915 100.0 
M2 = 38i0- gdti-<g4 up - 4001 .C - 14 V- .20 
















Ree fee CBS 28: 8 Slee 








Se 
OSE VLE asf. ab ar 
OTS TOS rks, fe Stl 2 O68 Gr @ 
0,001 are OM 8&r  d.e “ neE 2.80 880 
eS. - Vo of. - 9 OO gk am es 


200 


TABLE XLIII 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 43 








Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
7 86 =. 24.5 tae 2065 193 55.0 oie, Sone 
8 44 13.9 48 15.1 Zoa0 Flee cay S450 
9 Sve F520 32 13.0 LSE PAO 2d 2730 
Total 167 18.3 152 16.6 596° 65/1 915 100.0 





‘Ne eles ded pe odo cl i7s ye «24 








Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
jt 592 ~=«19..5 5/2 1867 189. 62:0 SUS") Seno 
2 58 18:8 SIF 1625 200 = 64.7 509". 3373 
3 50 16.6 44 14.6 207 ~=68.8 oi" 325.9 
Total 1675 18:5 L522 1636 596" 65.2 Oi5* 16070 





Xesase die 48 pees 510s «ee '06. SP = OB 





206 


TABLE XLIV 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 44 








Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
a 128 = 507.9 56 =: 16.0 1i6, 33. 350° «=38.3 
8 206 65.0 i) ae he) 74. 233 Slje 34.7 
9 L618) .655.2 36 =: 14.6 50; “20 2 ZA7 =. 27.50 
Total 845 59.6 129 26.3 240 26.3 914 100.0 





x4 -20.3° d&-4 p- 000 G- .15 V- =»20 








Achievement. Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
di 186 §=61.2 56 bes Sz, 2 0 304, 33:..3 
2 185 59.9 47 15:2 77 ~—-24.9 309 33.8 
S 174° =5758 46. 15.5 Sl 26.9 S01 3269 
Total 545 59.6 P2956 ay 240 3=26.3 914 100.0 





YS aes diode ae 68S) «| GS.05e «Ve 03 








ee Ee 


> rs ep i 
20s 


ae 
os 







i : . et. . gi Til 7 
ee he SEPA. ae UU 


TABLE XLV 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 45 


SS rrr rr ewe nn re ee OC UR nn EES 
a a aA ae] 








Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N § N $ N 4 N 4 
7 194 55,3 iS 2755 ee a5 5884 
g 144 45,4 ea 27.1 106 33.4 Bly 3497 
9 107. 43.5 40 16.3 99 40.2 246 26.9 
Total 445 48.7 186 20.4 283 31.0 914 100.0 
Roe ae SUROO0 (Gs 6 «= S18 





Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 


level N % N % N % N % 
} 165 54.1 62 2033 78 2500 305 33.4 
2 155 50.3 61 19.8 92 29.9 308 SIS yi | 
3 25 41.5 | 65 20.9 113 Boil AS) 301 32.9 
Total 445 48.7 186 20.4 283 S10) 914 100.0 


oe) ae ee son) re A OV ab 


re ere a ine RE ee EE, 


fallen ue Ot 


4 . | i 


zb WOLTESUD UT YHONITAD Ya BEM 7 TRIAS A YOM 




















» : 
ay 





tasoT of bebioobat ae | 
iu ju’ #* &£ p49 a 





bgt ree CSS aT acs ef 
vise tle b.te 80 £.is Yo 
@.as ans $.08 -@@ t.at . ob 


0.00L pre O.fe -28S - AOS a6f | : 
4 7 = / : 7 ; : 7 —_ 5 Ss — 
O.-V of.-9 600.-q s-% gee- 





208 


TABLE XLVI 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 46 








Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
7 275 8697865 oo lied oY) 6.0.5 351 38.4 
8 185 58.4 54 17.0 78 24.6 317 = 34.6 
9 145 58407 69 45.8 05 Zoo 247 862740 
Total 605 66.1 132 «14.4 a78 lo. 915 100.0 


R“ = 007 @de--44 pp--.7000 c--.021 Vv--.029 


Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 





level N % N % N % N % 
1 219 7S 38 | bis 48 Se 305 DOad 
iZ 197 63.8 51 16.5 61 19.7 309 Sp 
3 189 62.8 43 14:3 69 22.9 301 32.9 
Total 605 66.1 oe slid. 4 7s 619.5 915 100.0 





a oo Tie | id ia ut 


4096 








a ™ 
oes 





oer ee eee Lat @ 
ake TE 9 a.bs at OTE bz 
OLTS HS 2,88 & G.2f @& 
0.001 2f@ ° 2.ef str . BM sex 


QS. -V I. -) W0.-q &&- 


nee ee) 
:  fareT fai bebirosba . r 
# Yi é 4 ri A 
&.8e eve Y.cL 8h c.st 8 . 
B.eE 20E Yel £8 dof te 
QS 00 ess SAE ob 


0.90£ ete 2,ef 8s bat ser 


209 


TABLE XLVII 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 47 





—_-—— 


Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N 5 N % N % N % 
a ae ee een ee 
7 162 46.2 59) 81628 130 37.0 351 38.4 
8 1B) A852 S7 18,0 123 38.8 317 34.6 
9 106 42.9 37. «1540 104 42.1 gay 2750 
Total 405 44,3 158° | 16.7 357 39.0 915 100.0 





KR aie pe aggd Gi 0S v= J0s 








Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
1 143 46.9 56 618.4 106 §=634.8 505° 33,5 
Ze 138 44.7 S10 s«16..5 120 38.8 309- 33.8 
K) 2a) Al 46 15.53 ASL =A 301 32.9 
Total 405 44.3 153° 16.7 boy «© BD 915 100.0 





Xe 0m ede) ph 2288 C87) Woe 409 










h.8E fae O.vE O82 8.0L @2 S.a 4 
QKE SIE - 8.88 ESE 0.8L 2 S.eh 
OTS TAS rsh por Cer e.96 


@.00f 212 0,28 .t2e . NOE ter tae 





20.-V 20.0 “BMY +q 8-36 (Sie Re ire 


a) 


TABLE XLVIII 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 48 





Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N § N § N 3 N 4% 
i pene re er ey 
7 85 24.3 30? ke 235° 67tl 350 38.3 
8 bee Gey 30° 955 234 Tans aye SAT 
9 44 17.8 16 «6.5 rey) 7687 Aye 2780 
Total 182 19.9. 76 8.3 656 71.8 914 100.0 
yer --300.2 ael®a 4d pBsocee® cl ciptl v¥ c14 








Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
ih 58 19.0 20 6.6 227 74.4 SUS" So.4 
2 61 19.8 Zs aks 224" 7277 SOS" S37 
3 63- 20:9 5o= 110 205° 68.1 301” 3259 
Total 182% 1979: 76 SS) 656 71.8 914 100.0 





Ker tS deeesM pe 2758 Ce 9.07) Vv = 2.09 





ay 


TABLE XLIX 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 49 


Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
7 178 50.7 80 22.8 93" 25.5 351° 38.4 
8 Fi oO. a Si 8625.6 421 0 38.2 Shy Sa. 7 
9 68 27.6 60 24.4 118 48.0 246 8=26..9 
Total 561 59.5 gab 6242 352 30.9 914 100.0 





Mo. AO, “deed? pp 000) Gra 2h Ves .28 








Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
fi 137. 44.9 74 =24.3 94 30.8 505° 35,4 
2 1iS. 86.6 Sl 26,2 LS) She S09, aa.8 
3 di S780 66 22.0 igs 41.0 300: 32.8 
Total 561 49.5 Zab 24.2 gog 56.3 914 100.0 








2eleZ 


TABLE L 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 50 











Grade. Yes Undecided No Total 
N 6 N % N % N % 
yi TSS 5 S255 103. 29.4 64 18.3 Sa0°  S8hS 
8 USS 45'.5 78 24.6 Lop S129 Sp S407, 
9 SG, 36).6 59 24.0 97: 39.4 246 §626.9 
Total 412 45.0 240° 26.3 202 28has/) 913 100.0 


Cs dea ps oo @G-u9 V= .28 


Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
1 147 48.5 74 =24.4 SA Ais 505) ~~ Soh 2 
2 139 45.0 94 30.4 76 8624.6 309 33.8 
3 E25. AWS tae = 23.9 104 934.6 So S50 
Total 411 45.0 240 26.3 262 28.7 913 100.0 





X20 EM Oop 055 CC CW = 09 





S88 208 
@.fe eb 
Q.8E 02 
0.00 ere 


oes 







. os 
e 


245 


TABLE LI 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 51 


Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
i 191 54.4 49 14.0 ERS eles Sole 255.4 
8 TES > 375 aIe sl ono 149 347.0 Sl7- 3456 
9 86 §634.8 24 9.4 137) =5ae5 247 = 27.0 
Total 396 =. 43.3 122 Se O97 6 45a4 915 100.0 


Ge MG ale 2 iy Sip ek AR ae te 


Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
1 148 48.5 43. 14.1 114 37.4 SUS. Bosca 
2} 134 43.4 St lS 140 845.3 309° 33.8 
3 114 37,9 44 14.6 T4Ss Ala5 S01 32.9 
Total 396 43.3 LZ 2 ls @o 397 43.4 915 100.0 





eRe dte- Aw pu 40520, G= 210) V- 13 








a 


L 





214 


TABLE LII 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 52 





—aoaoaooaoaoa==EoOESEIaoaoOoOoEOoEeeEeeeEeeeeeoeoeeeoeeEeEeEeEeEeEeeeEoeEoeeeeoeeoEoEooeEeEeEoEoeEeEeEEEeeeEEEeEeE—EeeTeEeeeeeeeeeeeee 








Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N 3 N 8 N 3 N § 
7 194 55.4 64 18.3 G2: 2643 350 38.3 
8 204 64.4 40 12.6 7) Tae SI 3ALT 
9 140 56.9 oH 14h2 71 28.9 246 26.9 
Total 538 58.9 139 15.2 236 25.8 913 100.0 
1 eae GHEE pe -.0so) Ce 09s VE ~.c 








Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
1 148 48.5 455° 1.8 Lie .36),7 305) 33.4 
2 180 § 58.4 50 16.2 TS 2520 308° 33.7 
3 210 70.0 44: 14:7 AS 15.3 300 32.9 
Total 538 58.9 . IBS) I1Sk2Z 250% ~257.8 913 100.0 
4. 300) de 800) «Gh - 28) V - ~.29 





Ay 
We 


se marnap or ssc at © ee * a 


245 


TABLE LIII 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 53 


aE 





Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
7 190 54.1 104 29.6 a) EGR Sou “SGn5 
8 £55 4221 94 29.7 89° §=628;2 316 =. 34..6 
9 85 = 3447 a6 22.9 104 = 42.4 245 26.9 
Total 408 44.7 254 27.9 250 27.4 912 100.0 





Xe 252% Mem Fp eov0 C-2s ~ V- 929 


Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
1 Kel 5S for *25.9 ply ee? 305 3334 
2 143 46.4 88 28.6 1 PRD 308° 35.8 
S 84 28.1 oF ote 122 40.8 299 32.8 
Total 408 44.7 254 27.9 250 2734 912 100.0 


Me Geen dese 000! «= = OV 56 












age 12 Svat fe aes = BOL 1.62 ef 

ase ale = SBS tee, | ye 
elas abs Sh por @.s$ a2 | aoe \ 
0.00r sre MYS 08 . @LRS hes my oT 


@.-vV &.-9 0. -¢ 


216 


TABLE LIV 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATETORY TO QUESTION 54 





Grade. Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
7 paz 69.1 33 9.4 75 2A,4 350 38.4 
8 gol 2.9 23 ES) (ee) Ege) 517° 34.8 
9 173 «70.6 20 8.2 Be ei 245 26,9 
Total 646 70.8 76 8.3 190 20.8 912 100.0 





Nea ig eee ip roe oC 404) = Vo- 308 











Achievement. Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
M Jfetl 74.4 24 79 54 ay ae S05 33.4 
Z 229 74.1 18 ated 62 201 309 33.9 
3 190 63.8 34 11.4 74 24.8 298 32.7 
Total 646 §70.8 76 8.3 190 20.8 912 100.0 
ie oan) eds de pp = 8013. C - 412 @V--agl5 





——OeeeeeEEEeEe————eeeEEoeEEEEeEEaEaaEEEEeEeEeEaEaEaEaESQ™SQQQOOOOll a eee eeeeem,smnaRere—eEeeeeeee 






- | in : 
be WOTTESUD OT YHOTATAD Ya SeWOW2HA 10 TMEORSd GWA YOMAUpEEE 


iy 


TABLE LV 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 55 














Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
7 203 58.2 55 15.8 91 26.1 349 38.4 
8 209. . 66.3 36 11.4 70 22.2 315 34.6 
9 159 64.6 29 11.8 58) 2366 246: 26.0 
Total 571 62.7 120 135.2 219 24.21 910 100.0 
2 


Xo 5,0) dieye= pr 200 Ce 106  V - =.08 





Achievement. Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
1 198 65.1 Ay, 1845 aky ee 304 35.4 
2 199 64.8 350 L 4 71> 2538 307° 33.% 
3 174 85832 44 14.7 Sl 627 a 299 32.9 
Total Sah 43° 62.7 120. 13.2 2u9 = 24.1 910 100.0 
Rote Gee 4 op sde) = ae V' 509 





VIS 


| Vil GUAT 
22 WOITeHUD OT YAOOSTAD YH SeWOdeH FO TWADAAT GMA YOMEUDAAT 











[stoT on babiosbnvU 2eY ebs1d 
; Vv eee ; Y * « 
A.8f Ope ec a | 8.2L 22 S.8 0S v 
Spe ale Gs oF hI at £89 0S 8 
O.TS abs d.e8 82 8.2L d.88 82 @ 
0.001 <ofe a Crs, . SR | ORE ..38 2 IasoT 








60.--V¥ 80. ->d, (O08) -q@ @-@e iees 

















[sto1 ov bsbisebrvy 2e9Y tnemevotrioA 

- Vi 2 UV ¢ “ $ yi Ievel 
a aa £0 2.f$ “do é.if is {.20 sel I 
Tce | Voe ron ci aif et es) eer § 
Ce ees PAY {8 TAL hh <. 82 atl z 


0.00f oie I.8S e@§S Sf OS: v.86 £82 IstoT 














TABLE LVI 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 56 











Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
7 290 82.9 29 6.6 ov 64056 550 36.3 
8 280 88.3 10 5.2 Di, 8.5 Sif: | 3407. 
9 216 = 87.8 8 ore 22 98,9 246 =26.9 
Total 786 «=. 86.1 41 4.5 86 9.4 913 100.0 


» ONES AG) df - 4 Die LO Gao. 09 Veo La 


Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
1 Zt ele 13 loses Sie Saas 305 33.4 
2 PAD Wat WARS 10 Bad 28 OL 509° 25558 
3 260 87.0 18 6.0 21 1PS8) 299% 3257 
Total 786 =6.86..1 41 4.5 86 9.4 913 100.0 


eee ee te meee Ch po y= e710 












bey 


£8 O28 i 0.0L VE 
Tbe TUE aig’! at 
Bas AAS 2.8) 98 
0.001 efe b.e@ a8 


el,-"- ¥ oO. - 2 


Payal) 


TABLE LVII 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO QUESTION 57 











Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
7 P2n. 5583 85 24.6 139 40.2 346 38.1 
8 64 20.3 60 19.0 192 60.8 316 34.8 
9 70 28.5 OP WA 145 58.9 246-2787 
Total 256 28.2 175 19.3 476 52.4 908 100.0 


Kip a5) seed eed e008 6G 021) = Vo ee2] 





Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
1 HARON celeyny 51 16,8 143 47.0 504s 735.0 
2 87 = 28.2 60° 19.5 160) 5159 308 33.9 
3 59 19.9 64. 21.6 173. $8.4 296 32.6 
Total 25 Omen 2 8-2 yee! Gore) 476 52.4 908 100.0 





cere Cate Say sa 01 Cun Sem Vs ai 17 


2.88 nog 0,%8 
@.28 ~ BOE Q.12 
ASE 80s Age 
0.00% oe §.82 


Ey’ as 8 100. = @ 







ERE 8.0L fa 
OaL 2.ef 09 
evi dS $a 
are f.ef aye 






Za 


TABLE LVIII 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO CLUSTER 1 





Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N 4 N 4 N 8 N 4 
7 Oe as 302 18.6 Phd goo) gdos | e868 
8 911 47.9 377 19.8 614 32:3 1902 34.6 
9 768 51.5 224 15.0 498) 33.4. aasp gal 
Total 2891 52.6 993 18.1 1616 29.4 5500 100.0 
ees GG Meee ep e000) WaGae all) gic a. 








Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
1 1087 59.5 303 16.6 438 24.0 1828 33.2 
2 1016 §=654.8 349 18.8 488 26.3 18535 95 7 
iS 788 43.3 341 18.7 690 37.9 1819 $3.1 
Total 2891 52.6 993 18.1 1616 29.4 5500 100.0 





WC aROW  edfae wt ap 2000 4C> ald 4V=..20 


OOOO OOOO ————EEaoaoaoEoEooooooooaoEoEeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee_eee 





Sit - BSB 
Vee Er bas 
fee Olar ate 
O.00r Qod2. es 


Os. - Vv or, ny 2 


os 





aidae 


TABLE LIX 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO CLUSTER 2 


Eo eee 





Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
7 871 49.6 240 13.7 643 36.6 B75 38,3 
8. 954 60.2 160 10.1 i 29.7 1585 34.6 
9 689 55.6 101 4868.1 450 36.3 1240 27.1 
Total 2514 = 54.9 S02) 170 1564 34.1 4580 100.0 





Woes deo.4 p= 000 ¢€-.10. W--=,06 


Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
1 OS 43.1 149 9.8 eS Aho IS24 33'43 
2 85a S542 166 10.8 $25 34.0 1544 33.7 
a 1004 66.4 187 «12.4 Sar ZZ ISDA * Sa.0 
Total 2514 54.9 502. 11.0 1564 34.1 4580 100.0 


Xf - 22887 edee-44 pp --fO0a. (C~.22 W=-=f31 


———————————————— 


eevee ye? re ee ie Oo ae 















oss 

$ SATEUID OT YAOOSTAD Ye BBMONEBA FO TVAIMAT GHA YOM 
IstoT oo bebioebal ‘eer | 
et 4 er “¥ & ¢ © ae 





ee ae a ne a ee se) eo - 
a a a ea aS i ee) 
HSS OMI 2.8 eh £.8 £0f 3.22 Co 68 | 
6,00L O82 6 LBE het Ott S0ktiti AS 





a.--V f1.-9 @00:-q B-3 ‘puee~ & 


Zoe 


TABLE LX 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO CLUSTER 3 


aesS=S=p»EasSa=S=aoqqQOomomomomomoooooeee eee 








Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N 8 N 8 N 4 ne 
7 633 45,1 350 250 419 29.9 1402 38.3 
8 710° 56.0 244 19.3 S16 2A CGY 54H 
9 558 56.3 145 14.6 288 29.1 991. 27.1 
Total 1901 51.9 739 20:2 1020 27.9 3660 100.0 
ye 35e8 gf. 4 bs one G+ 4s. ¥ =: =,10 


Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
1 616 50.6 225 18:3 eyo) 311 1218 33.5 
2 638 51.7 251 «20.8 345 28,0 1254 33.7 
3 647° 53.6 205 21,9 296 624.5 1208°- 33:6 
Total 1901 51.9 139: 20:2 1020: 27.9 3660 100.0 


MOS ua6 die 4 p=.006 G=.66 Y= -906 





+? hy © Sa ae ee 
' a eb ' AD * 
sss 
7 M1 BuGAT 
& SATAULO OT YSOURTAD YE SaMOGeAA FO TVEOARS GMA YOVEUDAITT 


fstoT ont bebrosbau 20¥ ebaid 
$ “i ‘- 4 $ i é u 





E.8f Sori @.0S Lp O.28 Oz [.2h &d t 
abe OSL TAS OLE €.0L pas 0.a2 Off 8 
DTS fee £8 BBs ah aM €.82 822 e 


§.00f 202 @.vS O80 S.0S e8i @.f2 per {sioT 


Of--V 2-9 @0.-q 8-% @ea- & 


S.88 §BEsr {48 -@NE E.8l es 8.02 of f 
V.ge DESL 0.88 ane E08 Les T.f@ 8% s 
0.8 g0Ss @.bS aes C18 2s ace ve a 


0,00f de @NS oOSOL S.0S eer @.52  s0e@L {stoT 
O0.-- Vo 80-2 800.-q d- ab opr By | 





a4 


TABLE LXI 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO CLUSTER 4 


—_——————————— 


Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
rn a a a i ta ih SC a is 
7 642 45.7 197. 14.0 565 40.2 1404 38.4 
8 10 S528 Lila oS 389 = 30.7 1267 34,6 
9 SDC mos eel Sty © 305 30.8 990 27.0 
Total 1879 51.3 52am olaeo 1259 34.4. 3661 100.0 





Nes SGN dee me ede MiGeS Sle. v= 2e 12> 








Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
al 661" 5455 TET Thee ALOT moos, 1218 35570 
2 637 51.6 168> 713.6 429 34.8 NAY he che! 
3 Soin See LOGIE eee LAH eS ely, 1289 33.0 


Total AW hep lye’ 525. 14.3 1259 934.4 3661 100.0 


a Geman 4am yt e002) . C’- 307 -V = D5 











a pace ; | - - enh | all enrenentememnsenaseniie 1 
a Se a a a a. Ph 
aS a a a a ee 
O.tS. ode 8.08  20E ‘ef @f 8423 G2 ‘S72 

evel : 





O.00f fase dM .CBSI  ELRD Exe Cie 





.:-¥ ©, -3 @.-e 2.5 






arr orn 
TEE SESE BNE ORS 
O.ce @OSE ThE Osh 
0,006 £80 $e eas 


= 


& te 


4 \ o Prod 
i 
a 
i t as 
—_— mere a _ 7 Cc ae ee 


224 


TABLE LXII 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO CLUSTER 5 











Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N 4 N % N 4 N % 
7 326 46.6 116 16.6 258 36.9 700 38.3 
8 364 57.6 84 13.3 184 29.1 632 34.6 
9 276 55.6 65 Tel 155 Sr. 496 vi eek 
Total 966 52.8 265 14.5 597 52:7 1828 100.0 
Mie Tae Ge Wdeeendie yg 2006) 9 Gee 10 YS cad 








Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
1 345 56.7 88-. 14.5 M5 28.8 608 33,3 
2 325° 52,8 79 12.8 212. 34,4 616 33.8 
3 296 49.0 98 16.2 210 34.8 604 33.0 
Total 966 52.8 265 14.5 597 82.7 1828 100.0 


Ce Se A ee ee ee 
yeee MONI) \Mdte-Ad. pps-.8029° €C--.607. VV---.09 


2 
—ESESEEEEEEEeE=e=E=SaEEaeaEeEeaeaeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee ee Ow NL ee 





2.26 -80a 8.88 2uf 2.05 88 | 1} 
v.28 ofa BAe SES 8.S$1 
0.2 Od She Ors Saf 


O.00f @88r THe vee 2.Hf 


eo. - Vv ‘WO. -.9 Q80, - q 


ae se 


TABLE LXIII 


229 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO CLUSTER 6 


——————<—[T[T7[(*“GS]>}=*{_]{=*=*_]]{*{_="==$=$=$_[_[_§§_$*=c@—————*—{@[Z[qTE_&{[q][q—K—>—>K<=—=q£q{ii—IIIy>>—_=—[=[—SyOE—>x>—>><&<=>_—S>>—>—$—[C<E@<]]${>_]]]]]]]{{_K&<&{&~i—wq&—={EqE«>K;[]$ ]TSESES—={ === 





Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
7 190 Dhel 99 14.1 412 58.8 701 38.3 
8 136 2125 TP ian 421 66.4 634 34.6 
g 97 19.5 41 SZ 359 T28Z 497 Zi ek 
Total 423 25°! ZL/ Tes 1192 GS ei 1832 100.0 
weiss d= 4 ps 000 G+ .12 V=- AF 
Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
I 135 Zeek: 66 10.8 409 67.0 610 S305 
2 136 22k 67 10.9 413 67.0 616 556 
iS E52 nm b 84 13.9 370 61.1 606 50 ek 
Total 423 25°el 217 TP s8 1192 655 1832 1000 
= eo8 asia pr-.1dPS c@-.06% vi- - 07 















aie re f 
. TDDL BURAT 
7. : E ; 7 - : 
7 
9 aTeutD OF a ow year 
5 is . oe ni © 
= a Zt ; = , = a 7 a 
: ; 4h e _ : = 





ca 2 


v - ™ 







B88 LON 
O.8E ED h, 00 
IWS Yes S.8f 
Q:00L Stal 


226 


TABLE LXIV 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO CLUSTER 7 





Grade Yes Undecided No Total 








N 8 N $ Nel N 8 
7 440 62.7 aA ee ne WATE 702 38.3 
8 563. 57:5 ee aay 169 26.7 634 34.6 
9 a TA 74 14.9 Nes 496 27.1 
Total 1068 58.3 279 15.2 485 26.5 1832 100.0 
cea HE: tai eS nee Mae Jar 








Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
1 $78 62:0 91 14.9 141 025.1 610 33:3 
2 373 60.4 92. 14.9 153 24.8 618 33.4 
5 Sly- 82:5 96 415.9 191 31.6 604 33.0 
Total 1068 58.3 mi AEP 485 26.5 1852 100.0 


a 


yo Get Pete hUS> Geis, 08 of c)12 


aa 


TABLE LXV 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE BY CATEGORY TO CLUSTER 8 


— ee E, 


Grade Yes Undecided No Total 
N % N % N % N % 
if 21S wees 59.5 0) 100 )=—:14.2 329 46.8 Die 5825 
8 509” 248757 dINO reer wal oping? APA eS) 634 34.6 
9 284 57.0 ay ed are 15 eee 0.9 498 27.1 
Total 867 47.2 2665 14.5 [02m ooo 1835. 100.0 


X4- 46,5. dfi74. p- 000 ~C-%16 . V-=-.22 





Achievement Yes Undecided No Total 
level N % N % N % N % 
1 277. 45.4 94 15.4 SIE os Skew G10RNS S22 
2 272 ~©=©44.0 OL oe 249 40.3 G18 soo. 
3 318° $2.4 ] ame 4 214 5905 GUie OS 0d. 
Total 867° 47.2 266 9) 14.5 102) 958.0 Te35 ye L00R0 





Deen 1OhS eecti deen pn -.055 C= .075 \Vio= =.07 





——— RT 


saireuss OF YAGORTAD  vAaSh: 90 THAN Oi ompR 







tatoT om . 
f “ *- W 24 . 9 
f ie i 7 aE _ ee ; 
&.8& OT 8.08 ee ‘ 
Ose hz 0.2 ss 
£:vS Beh €.0& far. 
O.00L 2&8 E.86 SOT | : 
S8.--V af. -0D 000. 
re neem /linps aa NSD ERE o ; iy 
fgtol re) 4) seb | 
8 uv f i 
S.2& Ofe Sef -BES 
Vige 81a E.On Ons 
Lge vod €,28 ALS 
0.00L e&8i E.Bf SOs 
; a Vi 





228 


TABLE LXVI 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE FOR STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS COMPARED TO STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
NON-VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS TO QUESTION 2 











Teachers ' Yes Undecided No Total 
training N % N % N % N % 
nT 204 36.9 94 17.0 25 Soe Aon S54. 60.2 
2 1032—Ze: 2 ASP ia. Zise) bees 364- 39-8 
Total CARP oS chetyiyh Zee © 468 51.0 917 100.0 





ae ceive ee C0) (Gk 12 Vea 21 










¢ ou 
S00 E@ fh 2 ON de Qa Ms if Ek. 
Bick NOE $2 CIS EE NSS RM en 
0.00: ‘tre  oyi2 Bod at Ser see wero tn 
| | 5G 





i =Vo St,-9 100.-@ <$~ ab 9a Ia alae 





rags) 


TABLE LXVII 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE FOR STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS COMPARED TO STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
NON-VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS TO QUESTION 6. 











Teachers ' Yes Undecided No Total 

training N % N % N % N % 
us 502° 5457 86 6:15 6 164 29.7 552° 60:2 
7 160 43.8 35 9.6 170 46.6 365 39.8 

Total 462 50.4 1Ziee rise 2 So48 36,4 917 100.0 


an 


Nee Oe 5a eee Pe Capes 000% Cis sly) Vie 225 





——— Nn — — — OEOEEE————_—_E—EEeEeEeEeeeeeeeee—eeeeee—eeeeeeeeeeeeeeS 





230 


TABLE LXVIII 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE FOR STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS COMPARED TO STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
NON-VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS TO QUESTION 8 











Teachers' Yes Undecided No Total 
training N % N % N % N % 
i SOOM Olas ee i A 14 Se oS 552 ~23=«60...2 
2 182 49.9 Aliwae lene 142 38.9 365 39.8 
Total 521 56.8 LOSS e129 EP ee Oi 917 100.0 


Naeeloege deer eens 0p0T tC 15 Ve 25 


_ 





$00 “S22 
B,OF 208. 
O.00L THe =e 


oon 


TABLE LXIX 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE FOR STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS COMPARED TO STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
NON-VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS TO QUESTION 12 


Teachers ' Yes Undecided No Total 
training N % N % N % N % 
i} 308 55.8 107. 19.4 137° 2448 552 60:2 
2 241 66.0 45 12-8 79. 21:6 365 39.8 
Total 549 8659.9 152 1646 216 «= - 56 O17 10020 


Roe died G22 p=i00s ©2.ai Vs <Ho 








252 


TABLE LXX 
FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE FOR STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS COMPARED TO STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
NON-VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS TO QUESTION 16 


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Teachers ' Yes Undecided No Total 
training N % N % N % N % 
} 468 84.6 42 7:6 43 7.8 553° 60:3 
2 vag 4 TA. 30 Se2 62 17.0 364 39.7 
Total 740 80.7 72 £i9 105 DS 917 100.0 





ee TO ee thee 2 eines s000.. Ce 1d) Vee 586 


nn 


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7 





£.09 22 







AY +E hat 
0.001 Tie 


TABLE LXXI 


25 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE FOR STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS COMPARED TO STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 


NON-VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS TO QUESTION 24 





Teachers ' Yes Undecided 
training N 6 N % 
1 Is7 2 28.4 ZUG) *S0ez 
2 TAD ee 80 «2272 
Total 271 29.5 280 30.6 


Re. eS aE =e 


p> 


196 
170 
366 


364 39.8 
917: 100°0 


Veo 


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234 


TABLE LXXII 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE FOR STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS COMPARED TO STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
NON-VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS TO QUESTION 32 











Teachers' Yes Undecided No Total 
training N % N % N % N % 
1 LOce = SOeS 1267 2560 (EN ANOS 552,)) 60.2 
2 133 36.4 A See lic Lee Sie 565 39.8 
Total SY ial ge A aoe 411 44.8 91% 100.0 





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28 


TABLE LXXITI 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE FOR STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS COMPARED TO STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
NON-VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS TO QUESTION 33 











Teachers ' Yes Undecided No Total 
training N % N % N % N % 
1 250 4157 122 E22 700 BU eZ 5527 | 6022 
2 VALU) RS Le 6) 59 16.2 176" 48.2 505° @639:8 
Total 360 39.3 Figs SAWS gy 570, 41.0 917 100-0 


Jo edt O0n. Ce Ste Ve ST 








256 


TABLE LXXIV 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE FOR STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS COMPARED TO STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
NON-VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS TO QUESTION 35 











Teachers ' Yes Undecided No Total 
training N % N % N % N % 
1 a7, = «49..5 eo} a We 1a) 32h8 So 8©660),.3 
2 1523 —36..4 88 24.2 143. 39.4 368} 39)..7 
Total 405 44.3 186 20.3 324 35.4 915. 100.0 
M2. 17 dgs2 p-.000 G+ 0% W- .19 





257 


TABLE LXXV 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE FOR STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS COMPARED TO STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
NON-VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS TO QUESTION 42 








Teachers! Yes Undecided No Total 
training N % N % N % N % 
1 424 76.8 70 12.4 68 40.5 552: 60:3 
2 259-—65 7 Soe. aed 70: 19:2 364 39.7 
Total. 665 72.4 125 13.6 128. 44.0 916 100.0 


Sec lG? df 2 p= 008 Gi .38 2226 











238 


TABLE LXXVI 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE FOR STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS COMPARED TO STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
NON-VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS TO QUESTION 44 








Teachers '! Yes Undecided No Total 
training N % N % N % N % 
Ni 299° 5402 86 15.6 167 We 0G 552°) 008.9 
Z 246 —67.8 NS WS Aisi 565 59 ay. 
Total 545 59.6 130 T4eZ 240 ZOne 915 100.0 


Ree ae tee een e000) mC tA = - VY ca 6 
















203 $2 E.0e tar 
vce €& £.0S et oa 
G.00r 2fe $88 OS 


289 


TABLE LXXVII 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE FOR STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS COMPARED TO STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
NON-VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS TO QUESTION 49 





Teachers! Yes Undecided No Tetal 
training N % N % N % N % 
1 224 40:7 155 Bhi LZ oS haw we 60.2 
Le 1K) DSH 675) 1824 160%) -4420 364 39.8 
Total 361 aS 222 Z4e5 S52 565 915 100.0 


Seen te O00 Ct |e S 








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Lid Soe 


“Soe tee SE STE LOS at LOB BRS 
G.0& bof - OD COE BL fe use TEL «8 
Qi @f@ = E.8E SEE ELAS SARE BE 


2  000.+ 35 3b @eb- Be 





TABLE LXXVIII 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE FOR STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS COMPARED TO STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
NON-VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS TO QUESTION 51 











Teachers ' Yes Undecided No Total 
training N % N % N % N % 
1 256 46.7 Gone Lone (AUR cy Gis) 552° *6055 
Z PSGer 5o7 79 See LUee 189 51.9 364 39.7 
Total 396 §=643.2 iZie Uses 398 43.4 916 100.0 
re Gayl: iki | oy aii ee ae en eer 








24] 


TABLE LXXIX 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE FOR STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS COMPARED TO STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
NON-VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS TO QUESTION 53 





Teachers' Yes Undecided No Total 
training N % N % N % N % 
I 270 849.0 Ish 274 130° ©2586 S51 604 
2 T3838... 104 28.7 120) 33al 362 39.6 
Total 408 44.7 255. 279 250) 2764 913. 100.0 


W212 d€=2 pedi €2. We 20 





242 


TABLE LXXX 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE FOR STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS COMPARED TO STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
NON-VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS TO QUESTION 56 











Teachers' Yes Undecided No Total 
training N % N % N % N % 
1 A55 82.6 26 aa. VA0). Aue Sl ORS 
2 Cty Se es 4.1 16 4.4 363 39.7 
Total 2) faa 5 cee | 41 4.5 86 9.4 914 100.0 


Reeedgeg- sdf apl-..000 C= 4 (Vy = <139 





a 





243 


TABLE LXXXI 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE FOR STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS COMPARED TO STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
NON-VIF~TRAINED TEACHERS TO CLUSTER 2 


Teachers! 1S Undecided No Total 
training N % N % N % N % 
1 1405 50.9 Sak abi bale) 1035 57.4 Zing) 00.2 
7 1109" «60.9 181 She) eR PALI ISZL S976 
Total 2514. =54.9 SUZ allen 156495 547 4580 100.0 
Kgeedteg dr 7. 000 OC OV a8 







“$08 eats | 
8.e8 rer 








244 


TABLE: LXXXII 


FREQUENCY AND PERCENT OF RESPONSE FOR STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS COMPARED TO STUDENTS TAUGHT BY 
NON-VIF-TRAINED TEACHERS TO CLUSTER 7 





Teachers ' Yes Undecided No Total 
training N % N % N % N % 
1 679. 61.5 168 15.2 eee ——aGNEY Coe 
2 389 53.4 il TS Wd he 728 39.7 
Total 1068 58.3 2 SmmIG a? 485 26.5 1832 100.0 
NGM ISeomdr 82 <p.= 000) C200 Veowle 


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