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ANNUAL REPORT & PROGRAM 

f, 

‘RoyaC /HexavuOuz 

WINNIPEG, MANITOBA 






“After fifty-two years of history this institution remains what its 
founders intended it to be. It is a farmers’ company owned and 
controlled by farmers, operated in the interest of those who make 
use of it and in the general interest of agriculture in the prairie 
provinces.” 

Annual Report 1958 United Grain Growers Ltd. 


UNITED 


GRAIN 



GROWERS LTD. 


CALGARY 


REGINA 


WINNIPEG 


SASKATOON 


EDMONTON 






MANITOBA FARMERS UNION 



7cat It /{actual 

CONVENTION 


Royal Alexandra Hotel 

MAIN AND HIGGINS, WINNIPEG, MANITOBA 

November 29, 30, December 1 

1 960 


“PloyKZM 


HEAD OFFICE: 

524 McIntyre Block, 416 Main Street 
WINNIPEG 2, MANITOBA 


U.G.G. OWNED AND 

OPERATED BY OVER 


50,000 FARMER 





SHAREHOLDERS 


“After fifty-two years of history this institution remains what its 
founders intended it to be. It is a farmers’ company owned and 
controlled by farmers, operated in the interest of those who make 
use of it and in the general interest of agriculture in the prairie 
provinces.” 

Annual Report 1958 United Grain Growers Ltd. 


UNITED GRAIN 



GROWERS LTD. 


CALGARY 


REGINA 


WINNIPEG 


SASKATOON 


COMONTON 




MANITOBA FARMERS UNION 



7e*tm rfwtuaC 

CONVENTION 


Royal Alexandra Hotel 

MAIN AND HIGGINS, WINNIPEG, MANITOBA 

November 29, 30, December 1 

I960 




HEAD OFFICE: 

524 McIntyre Block, 416 Main Street 
WINNIPEG 2, MANITOBA 



INDEX 


Page 

Board of Directors_ 3 

MFU Presidents, Past and Present _ 4-5 

Agenda _ 7 

Honorary Presidents' Reports _ 12 

President's Report _ 15 

Vice-President's Report _ 25 

Second Vice-President's Report _ 29 

Report of Women's President _ 33 

Report of Women's Vice-President - 37 

Report of Women's Second Vice-President _ 41 

Junior President's Report _ 42 

Honor Roll of 10-Year Members _ 45 

Board of Directors' Report _ 58 

Financial Statement _ 76 

MFU Income Tax Department _ 80 

Secretary-Treasurer's Report _ 82 

Resolutions _ 88 

Standing and Convention Committees - - _106 

List of MFU District Officials _ 110 

Advertisers' Index . _ 116 

The Voice of the Farmer _1 17 
























Welcome ^belegate* 

TO THE 



Tenth 

ANNUAL 

CONVENTION 


OF THE 

MANITOBA 

FARMERS UNION 


BOARD OF DIRECTORS—1960 


James Patterson _ 

Mrs. Koe Dyck ___ 

Rudolph Usick ___ 

Mrs. Mary McIntosh ___ 

H. J. Andresen __ 

Mrs. Olive Aitken __ 

Edwyn Dalgliesh _ 

Mrs. Margaret Oliver _ 

John Palmer _ 

Eggert Sigurdson, Mrs. Edna Bullock ___ 

John Zaplitny, Mrs. G. C. Smart_ 

Stanley Jackson, Mrs. J. Hrytsak_ 

Wm. Beam, Mrs. Geo. Crewson _ 

Fred Wevursky, Mrs. N. Giasson _ 

Ralph Rowan, Mrs. Margaret Oliver 

S. J. Tripp, Mrs. D. Conibear - 

John Daily, Mrs. H. W. Acheson 
Leo Kuntz, Mrs. M. H. Smith 
Rudy Nikodem, Mrs. Leslie Colbert 

R. M. Mann, Mrs. Irene Franklin _ 

Peter Penner, Mrs. E. Grienke 


- Honorary President 

. Honorary Women's President 

----— President 

_Women's President 

_ -- 1st Vice-President 

_ Women's Vice-President 

_2nd Vice-President 

. Women's 2nd Vice-President 
_Junior President 


Directors, 

District 

1 

Directors, 

District 

2 

Directors, 

District 

3 

Directors, 

District 

4 

Directors, 

District 

5 

Directors, 

District 

6 

Directors, 

District 

7 

Directors, 

District 

8 

Directors, 

District 

9 

Directors, 

District 

10 

Directors, 

District 

1 1 

Directors, 

District 

12 


CENTRAL OFFICE STAFF 


J. N. Galonsky ____ 

Mrs. Beatrice Cruden _ 

Miss Olive Edgerton _ 

Art Wheeler, Manager, and C. J. Smith 
Mrs. Ella Whiting, Mrs. Catherine Smigelsky, 
Miss Betty Leopold, John Ambrosichuk 


- Secretary-Treasurer 

-Assistant Director of Organization 

Managing Editor, Voice of the Farmer 
- Income Tax Department 

- Stenographers and Clerks 


3 





































MANITOBA FARMERS UNION LEADERS 

'P'te4ide*tt& 

On its Tenth Anniversary the Manitoba Farmers Union honors the men who have been 
its leaders over the past decade, each contributing in full measure his time and talents and 
energies towards advancement of the occupational farm organization and betterment of 
agricultural conditions in general. Dynamic Jake Schulz got the Farm Union away to a 
vigorous start in its formative years — diplomatic Jim Patterson widened the scope and 
enhanced the prestige of the Farm Union — determined Rudy Usick is carrying on the 
good work so well begun by his predecessors, expending his own vigorous efforts on 
behalf of Manitoba's farmers. 



J. SCHULZ 
1951-1954 




J. PATTERSON 
1955-1958 


R. R. USICK 
1959 - 


4 



0 


. . duct "PneteAtt 

*20amen 'Pre&icte*it& 

In the Manitoba Farmers Union, a family organization, women have played an equal 
part in building the Farm Union. Equal recognition was given to their efforts by the 
election in 1951 of the first Women's President, Mrs. N. Kutcher, whose untimely passing 
some years ago was much mourned. In 1953 Mrs. Mary McIntosh was elected Women's 
President. Having completed a four-year term, she stepped down in 1957 when Mrs. 
Kae Dyck served for a year as Women's President. Mrs. McIntosh resumed the office a 
second time and has added three more years to her long record of valuable service 
in the Farm Union. 



MRS. N. KUTCHER 
1951-1952 




MRS. KAE DYCK 
1957 


MRS. MARY MclNTOSH 
1953 - 56 , 1958-60 


5 


@toup%atcdati& vd ta 


MANITOBA FARMERS UNION 


on their 


fOt& fttttiCvm&cvuf, 


May you continue to grow in strength and influence. 

ONTARIO FARMERS UNION 

5 Douglas St., Guelph, Ontario 


The Hudson Bay Route Association 

Extends Greetings to the Officers and Members of 

THE MANITOBA FARMERS UNION 

Working in the interests of Manitoba Farmers. 

We wish your deliberations all success. May 
your organization, and ours, continue in their 
efforts to make Manitoba's own seaport, 
Churchill, the service centre for imports and 
exports between the Prairies and Europe. 


HEAD OFFICE — BOX 1034, SASKATOON 


6 




MANITOBA FARMERS UNION 


Pxofro&ed /iyeada 

TENTH ANNUAL CONVENTION 

Royal Alexandra Hotel Winnipeg, Manitoba 

November 29, 30, December 1, 1960 

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29th 

8.30 a.m. Registration 

9.45 a.m. O Canada: Official Opening — Provincial President, R. R. Usick 
10.00 a.m. Address of Welcome -—- City of Winnipeg, His Worship Mayor Stephen Juba 

10.10 a.m. (a) Election of Chairman and two co-Chairmen 

(b) Ratification of: 1. Credentials Committee 

2. Resolutions Committee 

3. Nominating Committee 

(c) Adoption of Agenda 

(d) Status of Visiting Members 

10.30 a.m. Greetings from Honorary President — Jas. Patterson 
10.40 a.m. P resident's Annual Report — R. R. Usick 

11.30 a.m. Women President's Annual Report — Mrs. Mary McIntosh 
12.00 a.m. Junior President's Annual Report — John A. Palmer 

12.20 p.m. Introduction of Board of Directors' Report — Edwyn Dalgliesh 

12.30 p.m. Noon adjournment. 


7 



TtaCaa /H&enfa 


membership extend tineir very best wishes to 
the delegates assembled at the 10th Annual 
Convention of the Manitoba Farmers Union. 
May you continue to grow in strength and 
influence ! 


THE FARMERS UNION OF ALBERTA 


Our Motto: "Service and Security" 


9934- 106th Street 

EDMONTON — ALBERTA 


Ok t£e trf*tKtve/i44ruf <*£ t&e 


MANITOBA FARMERS UNION 


Congratulations on a decade of Progress, and 
best wishes for successful deliberations at your 
Annual Convention. We hope that the MFU 
will continue in the years ahead to grow and 
expand in service and worth to the farmers 
and the farming community. 


SASKATCHEWAN FARMERS UNION 

SASKATOON, SASKATCHEWAN 


8 




AFTERNOON SESSION — NOVEMBER 29th 


2.00 p.m. 

2.10 p.m. 
2.40 p.m. 

3.10 p.m. 
5.00 p.m. 

5.30 p.m. 


Greetings from Honorary Women's President — Mrs. Kae Dyck 
Annual Report; 1st Vice-President — H. J. Andresen 
Annual Report, Women's 1st Vice-President — Mrs. Olive Aitken 
Resolutions 

Nominations for President, Women's President and Junior President (Report 
of Provincial Nominations Committee shall precede all Nominations) 

Adjournment 


EVENING SESSION — NOVEMBER 29th 


7.30 p.m. Greetings from the Province of Manitoba —— Hon. George Hutton, Manitoba 
Minister of Agriculture 

8.00 p.m. Address: Neil Reimer, Vice-President, Canadian Labour Congress, 

Edmonton, Alberta. 


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30th 


8.45 a.m. 
9.00 a.m. 

10.15 a.m. 

10.30 a.m. 
11.00 a.m. 

11.30 a.m. 

12.15 p.m. 

12.30 p.m. 


Notice of Constitutional Amendments 
Resolutions 

Income Tax Department Report — Manager Art Wheeler 

Interprovincial Farm Union Council Report — A. P. Gleave, Chairman, IFUC 

Financial Report: J. N. Galonsky, Provincial Secretary-Treasurer 
Discussion; Adoption; Appointment of Auditors 

Board of Directors' Report — Questions and Discussion, Adoption 

CBC Farm Broadcast 

Noon Adjournment 


AFTERNOON SESSION — NOVEMBER 30th 

2.00 p.m. Resolutions 

2.30 p.m. Election of President; Women's President; Junior President 


9 



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Convention delegates and friends are cordially invited to visit our three 
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Higgins Avenue), (1411 Main Street, North), St. Vital (507-509 St. Mary's 
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Virden, Killarney and authorized dealer stores in Steinbach, Dominion City, 
Beausejour, Teulon, Fisher Branch, Lac du Bonnet, Glenboro, Somerset, 
Altona, Pilot Mound, Winkler, Souris, Boissevain, Deloraine, Melita, Ste. Rose 
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10 





3.30 p.m. 
3.50 p.m. 

4.30 p.m. 
5.00 p.m. 

5.30 p.m. 

6.30 p.m. 


9.00 a.m. 
9.20 a.m. 
9.45 a.m. 
10.00 a.m. 

10.30 a.m. 
10.45 a.m. 
11.10 a.m. 

11.30 a.m. 

12.30 p.m. 


2.00 p.m. 

2.30 p.m. 

3.30 p.m. 
4.20 p.m. 

5.30 p.m. 
6.00 p.m. 


Nominations for 1st Vice-Presidents 

Address: Prof. L. H. Shebeski, University of Manitoba 
"Agriculture and Research in Europe and the U.S.S.R." 

Resolutions 

Woman Speaker — Mrs. Thelma Forbes, MLA — "Role of Wowen in 
Public Affairs" 

Adjournment 


EVENING SESSION — NOVEMBER 30th 

TENTH ANNIVERSARY BANQUET — ROYAL ALEXANDRA HOTEL 
Special Program — J. L. Phelps, J. Schulz, A. P. Gleave 

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1st 

Buyers' Strike Committee Report 

MFU Auto Insurance Pool Report — General Fire Insurance Pool 

Election of 1st Vice-Presidents 

Resolutions 

Nominations for 2nd Vice-Presidents 

Address — Hon. Alvin Hamilton, Federal Minister of Agriculture 

Constitutional Amendments 

Resolutions 

Noon Adjournment 


AFTERNOON SESSION — DECEMBER 1st 

Election of 2nd Vice-Presidents 
Resolutions 

Election of Honorary Presidents 
Resolutions 
Unfinished Business 
"God Save The Queen" 


11 



o-£ 'ityoK&uvufr 'P'ie&icU*tt 


J. PATTERSON 


It seems hardly possible that ten years have rolled around since the organization of 
the present Manitoba Farmers Union; yet, to many farmers it represents a period of 
struggle, disappointment, and finally their exodus from the farm to join the many thousands 
who hove deserted the land in hopes of a better living in the ranks of industrial labor. 

Ten years is a relatively short period in organization, and on the credit side of the 
ledger the MFU has a record that would be hard to duplicate in present-day society. 
This has been possible only through the untiring efforts of those faithful members who 
have given of their time and talents so generously. The employees of the MFU have 
also contributed in no small way to the progress of the organization, and the member¬ 
ship have reason to be proud of the fact that people of experience and ability have been 
attracted to their movement. 

Many of those who joined the organization in 1951 and 1952 — and are still 
farming — are not members today. Some never paid their second membership. It is 
doubtful if these people, who form a large part of your delinquent membership, really 
believed that an active farm organization was an asset to agriculture, but looked only 
to the possibility of quick financial returns. 

The record shows that on numerous occasions the efforts of farm organizations 
have brought immediate and substantial returns; and the Manitoba Farmers Union 
has proven its worth in many, many instances. 

But surely we can appreciate that the real value of our organization is in our capacity 
to build and consistently maintain that kind of an organization of which we can well 
be proud, and which we can be sure will be recognized for what it is. 

In ten years you have gained this recognition. You have won the respect of a great 
body of people in all walks of life. You have demonstrated your ability to define the 
problems of the farmer and have devised objective policies to meet these situations. You 
are an organization of influence on the Canadian scene. Your views are respected and 
you must accept responsibility in relation to your weight of influence. You must therefore 
at all times maintain the utmost vigilance in the discharge of your obligations. 

Conditions may change, and you must be prepared to accept necessary changes os 
the need arises. At the same time you must at oil times uphold the principles and 
objectives of the Manitoba Farmers Union, because these principles and objectives have 
provided the framework on which you have built the movement of which you have reason 
to be proud today. 



THE HEW 
GENERATION 
OF 

POWER 


12 





TRefcort ^04t<naty 7(/<Mt€K 4 'President 

MRS. KAE DYCK 

It is with great pleasure that once again I offer my good wishes for a successful 
Convention on this, the Tenth Anniversary of the Manitoba Farmers Union. 

This tenth year may be the most crucial one since our inception, both in organization 
and legislation. 

There are mony problems confronting us in every phase of our industry and each and 
every member of our Farm Union should feel it his responsibility to work towards 
achieving our aims. 

In our deliberations at this our Annual Convention, let us concentrate on our major 
problems such as parity prices, trade and world markets, and marketing boards. 

With the experience we in our organization have gained in many fields and in 
legislation already implemented, let us go on to rectify the major problems we have in 
agriculture. 

As a woman, I feel I must mention a new organization called "Voice of Women" that 
is working for world peace, to bon nuclear bombs. I feel we should give more study to 
these problems and lend our voice where needed, especially in the matter of refusing 
to allow any country to contaminate our agricultural products with nuclear fallout. 

Over the years there have been literally thousands of farmers and their wives and 
families who have worked to build the MFU. I would like to express appreciation of their 
sacrifices for their organization, and hope they will continue to give their active support 
in the years ahead. 

Once again, let me wish for the MFU the biggest, best and most successful convention 
we have ever had ! 


Greetings to the Delegates 
and Best Wishes for a 
Successful Convention 

During our thirty-two years of business operations we have 
enjoyed good relations with thousands of milk and cream 
shippers both in the Winnipeg and Minnedosa markets. We 
wish the MFU greater success in their endeavors. 

PEOPLE'S CO-OPERATIVE LIMITED 

610 Dufferin Ave., Winnipeg and Minnedosa, Manitoba 


13 




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14 





R. USICK 




The year just completed marks the Tenth Anniversary Year of the Manitoba 
Farmers Union. This assembly of delegates from our 350 Locals will have the 
opportunity of looking back on past achievements and forward to ever-greater goals. 
Policy that delegates lay down in the next three days will clearly show the extent 
of our maturity and experience in the farm policy field. Will the radical aggressive¬ 
ness and the basic philosophy of "parity prices" in the early years of the Farm 
Union be continued, or will it be replaced by a "laissez-faire" attitude and succumb 
to policies of "creeping conservatism" in the ranks of the older members so evident 
in many sterile and ineffective organizations. 

As we pay tribute at this Convention to our first President, fake Schulz — and 
to our first Interprovincial Farm Union Council Chairman, Joe Phelps, at our 
Anniversary banquet tomorrow evening — perhaps we may glean from their 
speeches some of the irrepressible spirit and drive, their basic convictions, their 
frank and honest approach, which made the establishment of the Farm Union 
possible. Using the first years as a base, we can measure the stature and growth 
of the Farm Union today. Are we stronger in membership, finances, policy, achieve¬ 
ments, recognition, public relations, administration? Where are our shortcomings 
and wherein do we excel? 

It the day should ever dawn when Farm Union membership universally felt 
that our organization had reached perfection and had accomplished its objectives, 
then at that time the need for our organization would cease. But perhaps, as we 
watch the quiet demise of what was once considered a rival farm organization to 
the Manitoba Farmers Union, we can learn from history that farm organizations 
live, thrive, and function only as long as forward policies and objectives, in keeping 
with the actual needs and desires of the membership, are formulated and carried 
out through the policy-making channels created by the actual membership them¬ 
selves. 

The eyes and ears of Manitoba are looking and listening in to this Convention. 
Many people outside the Province will be observing attendance, debates, resolutions 


15 




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16 





and decisions here. The farm organization Conventions are regarded as "listening 
posts" in the political arena. What will be farm reaction to Agricultural Minister 
Hamilton's newest proposal on the "Farm Rehabilitation Program" (with farm lands 
turned to pulpwood production), on an extension of Manitoba's test areas in "Crop 
Insurance," on the "hog and egg problem" and the Agricultural Stabilization Act 
in general, on surplus wheat disposal and marketing quotas, etc., etc.? 

It is unfortunate I am unable to report to you, after 10 years, that we are more 
than "government listening posts"; that I must say we are not in a position to make 
our policy into government policy. In effect, in Ottawa today, however, is one of 
the biggest majorities in the House of Commons that any political party has ever 
assembled — Western Canada has more members on the government side of the 
House than ever before. As I said, several weeks after the election almost three 
years ago: "If farm policies are not enacted favorable to Western Canada with that 
type of representation, then allegiance and support to a winning party is simply a 
hoax, fostered and nurtured over Western farmers for over half a century!" 

Today, farmers are prepared to accept this past theory of majority representation 
as a fallacy. The crowning height of hypocrisy in this regard was reached in Ottawa 
on September 13th, 1960, when the Western Liaison Committee met Prime Minister 
Diefenbaker and members of the Cabinet Wheat Committee, regarding favorable 
consideration of the objective of the mass delegation to Ottawa — deficiency pay¬ 
ments on wheat, oats and barley. For six months. Western farmers were unable 
to see the Prime Minister because of his refusal to arrange a date for a hearing; 
and not until a decision was made, regarding another acreage payment, was a date 
finally agreed upon. At this hearing, farm leaders were liberally treated to a lengthy 
lecture and told that proper recognition and support for government policies (both 
those enacted and those being developed) were not forthcoming in sufficient volume 
for the government's liking. After being admonished for their criticism, farm leaders 
were warned about future government policies. The inference was apparent: if 
there is no appreciation for government action, there will be no favorable govern¬ 
ment action. But to make it bluntly clear to the assembled farm leaders, the Prime 
Minister said, "If there is no pay-off, there are no more payments." 

It was also drawn to the attention of Western farm leaders that many special 
groups in the East also required assistance, and were more appreciative than 
Western farmers have been towards Federal assistance such as the acreage pay¬ 
ments. The inference here again appeared to be clear: Eastern votes can be bought 
much more cheaply than Western votes. 

This example alone should be food for thought to delegates regarding the light 
in which the Federal government views farm problems today. Are we in farm 
organizations to be political apologists for the government of the day? Are farm 
leaders supposed to be "yes men" and thus become political arms of the govern¬ 
ment? Or, are we to take a definite stand, provide constructive criticism where 
required, hold steadfast to our principles, regardless of what political party makes 
up the Government of Canada? There are some who will say that this is a calculated 
risk — but why, then, did 303,000 petition signers send a mass delegation of 1,100 
men and women to Ottawa just short of two years ago? 

Our problem in the country today is to avoid the dreaded paralysis of stagnation 
and decay associated with the advancement of age. This is no time to sit back on 
our laurels and expect farmers generally to flock in as members of the Farm Union. 
The same apathy, lethargy, inactivity and disinterest, which has haunted farm 
organizations for decades, is still far too evident in rural Manitoba today. How many 
times have farmers signed on as members, only to say, "Please don't elect me to 
any office." Or made the comment, "I agree with MFU policy, but please don't ask 
me to attend meetings!" Or the common, "I'll sign up each year; just have someone 
call on me when you are canvassing this district." Where in a democracy, where 
men and women have fought and died to be free, do we find that inner strength. 


17 




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18 






that positive approach, that worthwhile common effort which is so necessary in our 
citizens to guarantee freedom, and the continuation of Canadian life as we know 
it today? 

Although the task has been formidable, many farmers have had their eyes 
opened to the magnitude of the farm problem. Some have faltered and quietly faded 
away. Others have accepted Farm Union philosophy that farmers, like other groups, 
are entitled to their fair share of the national income, that parity prices are proper 
fair prices to aim at as our objective. Whereas our original approach was like a 
cry in the wilderness, today we have many supporters about us. 

Today it is recognized generally that a farm problem (or problems) exists in 
Canada. Our new Federal Minister of Agriculture, Hon. Alvin Hamilton, (unlike 
his predecessor) has made forthright public statements that a combined effort will 
be made to attack this so-called farm problem. His success will be closely watched 
by all of us. Much of the public press, particularly the "farm press" including radio 
and television, is on our side. Political parties are vying eagerly for the much- 
sought "farm vote." 

This is a time when a bold, vigorous, effective farm policy must be handed to 
these people by the farm organizations. Those who feel that a "laissez-faire" attitude 
is sufficient will perish and lie forgotten in the annals of farm history. At stake is 
the very family farm itself and all that it stands for in rural life. We must have an 
overwhelming desire to succeed. Confidence leads to support, and proper ideals 
and objectives are basic requirements for leadership. We cannot fail; we dare not 
slacken; we must be ever-stronger. As I said last year, "Only by combining all 
our resources and closing ranks in a united front, can we achieve our objectives. 
This is not the time to weep, but to act. The greater the problem, the greater must 
be our effort. We can not afford to lose; therefore we must work harder to ensure 
success, and success is within our grasp today." 

The farm problem is so acute that many people have been discouraged to the 
point where they have given up the struggle. Many of the most intelligent, pro¬ 
gressive and efficient younger farm operators have seen a brighter future for 
themselves in industries other than agriculture. The shortage of young men specific¬ 
ally trained for farming tomorrow is apparent everywhere. Whereas Engineering 
has the largest number enrolled in classes at the University of Manitoba, Agricul¬ 
ture has about the smallest. A real crisis is developing in agriculture regarding the 
personnel that will actually be doing the farming 15-20 years from today. 

The Farm Union in recent years has entered the second phase of growth of an 
organization —• that is, concentration of more time and men towards reaching our 
objectives through action on all fronts — legislative, commissions, publicity, MFU 
services, presentation of briefs and the follow-up, public hearings, debates, more 
Head Office staff, more time devoted to policy, and less time to country organization. 

This has been a period of shifting responsibility from Head Office to the District, 
Sub-District and Local levels for membership support. Some Locals have fallen by 
the wayside in this process — others have amalgamated with neighboring Locals 
to form larger Locals; yet others have emerged with renewed vigorous strength 
openly claiming that, as far as membership standing in their Local or District is 
concerned, they are fully capable of handling this dutiful chore themselves. To 
them, we offer our congratulations. With every occasion that more time is given 
your Provincial Officials to follow-up on farm policies on the provincial level, the 
sooner we can expect results from our efforts. Local meetings have not been ignored, 
but responsibilities of office make it impossible for me to fulfil many requests for 
meetings which 1 receive from our 350 active Locals. 

The true-test of our progress in this regard is our membership standing — 18,089 
members as at October 31st, 1960 (or 809 members below a year ago). Lapsed 
memberships for last year AND previous years are still coming in. 


19 


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20 




Snowfall of 30 to 40 inches hit the Western half of Manitoba as early as Oc¬ 
tober 7th, 1959 — one full month before National Farm Union Week. Compare our 
slight decrease in membership under these conditions to the disastrous snowfall 
and our lowest membership position in the winter of 1955-56, when the MFU 
dropped 8,105 members in the 1956 membership year. We have increased our 
membership since that time, but we have never really recovered in full from the 
impact of that unfortunate year. 

Our newspaper, the Voice of the Farmer, is finally paying its way from ad¬ 
vertising revenue. The only newspaper expense not covered in the last six months 
has been the wages of one secretary in the office for the days spent in assembling, 
editing and proof-reading the paper. 

The Farm Union Income Tax Department is becoming well-known in the province 
and now is considering the advisability of hiring a fourth consultant in the income 
tax filing period (January 1st to April 30th) to provide increased satisfactory service 
for our members. 

The MFU Auto Insurance Pool with the Co-op Fire & Casualty Company is now 
beginning to roll smoothly, but, with some added Local support, could be over the 
top with the required 5,000 vehicles before next spring. 

Some permanent addition to MFU Head Office staff is required to ease the 
overburdening load now carried by our Secretary-Treasurer. In fact, if we examined 
the overall position of the MFU and the requirements of a future, practical overall 
type of farm organization, none of us would be satisfied with the persistent 
precarious position regarding finances in the MFU in the past 10 years. A one- 
percent deduction on the sale of all farm produce in Manitoba would set aside a 
fund of two-and-a-quarter million dollars for farm organizations. This simply shows 
how effective and financially sound a farm organization would be if it received 
the overwhelming support and endorsation of a larger proportion of Manitoba 
farmers. 

While many of us have worked for greater unity and strength amongst farmers, 
there is a determined effort in some circles to further divide the farmers into more 
farm organizations along a sectional or a commodity group basis. The age-old 
proverb —- "divide and conquer" — is used as effectively by our opposition today 
as in past years. 

Although space will not permit me to cover all MFU activities during the year, 
the Directors' Report outlines the main efforts of the past twelve months. A recent 
MFU pamphlet, "10 Years of Progress with the MFU," covers 61 listed achievements 
the MFU has been instrumental in accomplishing since its inception. 

Some high points in the past year have been (1) Assistance received on crop 
disaster to cereal grain crops of over $10 million; (2) Another acreage payment of 
over $40 million; (3) Storage assistance under the Temporary Wheat Reserves Act 
which might be as high as $50 million this year; (4) Feed and fodder assistance 
amounting to $380,419; (5) No increase in tariffs on grain; (6) Successful opposition 
of yellow coloring of margarine. 

A decision by our Board of Directors last March to attempt to re-open negotiations 
with the Manitoba Federation of Agriculture regarding amalgamation is still 
awaiting a conclusion while their Board is giving the matter serious consideration. 
It was indicated that the conference-type meetings at the University of Manitoba 
would be judged as to their effectiveness before the MFA would be prepared to 
discuss the matter more fully. The three conferences at the University were con¬ 
cluded on November 5th. Future action on policy is now in the hands of the farm 
organizations themselves. Amalgamation of MFA and MFU will not be discussed 
at subsequent meetings. This we have cleared up so no one can be mistaken about 
the purpose of these conferences. The result — the MFU is waiting for a decision 
from the Manitoba Federation of Agriculture regarding the re-opening of negotia¬ 
tions as proposed by our Board of Directors last March. 


21 



CONVENTION GREETINGS 


We are happy to extend our best wishes to those 
who will be attending the Tenth Annual Conven¬ 
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efforts it is making to improve conditions in prairie 
agriculture. 


A 

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WINNIPEG 

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22 




23 














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24 




H. ANDRESEN 


RejxosU aj 'Vice-P'ie&ide+tt 

Ten years ago we told the farmers that, for a farm organization to be progressive 
and effective, it must be maintained at the grassroots level. So we have endeavored 
to maintain the Manitoba Farmers Union at the grassroots level in order that the 
policy of the organization would be formulated at that level, so that we could get a 
realistic picture of actual farm problems and, in turn, present them through res¬ 
olutions to our District and Provincial conventions for consideration by the delegates 
to lay down a policy for farmers as a whole. Our goal has been to receive our 
rightful share of the national income, so as to maintain our family-type farms. 

We joined the MFU because we felt, I am sure, that there was a need for such 
an organization. 

In analyzing our progress over the past ten years, it seems that in the first four 
or five years the farmers were more alert and aware of the need for an organized 
effort, more so than they have been these latter years. For the past five years out 
membership has been quite stable, with the exception of 1957 when our member¬ 
ship was down, mostly due to severe weather and impassable road conditions. 
This stability by no means indicates that we have reached our potential. There is 
no doubt in my mind that our membership standing would be much higher, in fact 
the MFU would show substantial increases in every respect, if some of the officials 
who have been a little lax would put a little more effort into the organization. In 
too many instances, the responsibilities accepted at various levels of the organization 
have not been adhered to; had they been, the membership standing in our organ¬ 
ization would be much higher and so would the returns on our membership invest¬ 
ment because your organization can only progress as fast as finances and moral 
support will allow it to. 

On the other hand, the untiring efforts of many officials and members in the 
Manitoba Farmers Union have been mainly responsible for our increased recognition 
and varied achievements throughout the past ten years, Unfortunately, some people 
seemed to be dissatisfied with the achievements made in the last few years and 
have refused to take the same interest or put the same efforts into MFU that they 

» 


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26 









originally did. To me, this would indicate defeat, which I am sure is not the intent 
of these people. 

Naturally, in a democratic organization we are going to have our ups and downs, 
disagreements, differences of opinion. But to realize our full membership potential 
and our rightful place in the highly-organized society we live in today, it is essential 
that, as members and officials of the MFU, we work together as a united, organized 
force. We must put every possible effort into our farm organization so that, when 
we come to celebrate our twentieth anniversary, our standing in the economy will 
be second to none. 

Constructive criticism has its place in any organization. These past few years, 
since the government instituted the Stabilization Act, Deficiency Payments Program, 
Crop Insurance (just to name a few), we have been criticized for not carrying out 
directives and for not putting more pressure on the government so that farmers can 
realize greater returns for their production. Constructive criticism is appreciated. 
It certainly is the responsibility of the MFU Provincial officials to carry out the 
policies laid down at annual conventions but certainly, too, the membershp as a 
whole has a responsibility in this organization. Too many farmers feel, when they 
have taken out membership, they have fulfilled their obligations. They can "let 
George do it." This is wrong; their responsibilities are much greater than that. They 
should attend their Local meetings more regularly than they have in the past. 
The last few years we have noticed quite a drop in attendance and this, in turn, 
seems to reflect on the resolutions received for presentation to the annual convention. 

To my knowledge this year, previous to our October Board meeting there were 
no resolutions indicating what kind of amendments the members wish in farm 
legislation so that it will benefit farmers to the extent it should . . . which means 
the MFU provincial officials must press for changes with very little indication from 
the membership as to what their wishes are. 

I cannot recall legislation of this nature affecting agriculture as it does which 
has been put into practice and not had some constructive criticism. Why is this? 
Have the members really looked into these Acts? Are they satisfied with the way 
they are working out? 

Stabilization Act passed in 1957, Deficiency Payment policy enacted 1959, Crop 
Insurance 1960 — we, the Provincial Board, know they are not entirely satisfactory. 
But if our Union is to remain a real grassroots organization we feel resolutions from 
the members should be pouring in through the regular channels to amend these Acts. 

This leads one to question: will the thinking of provincial officials and the 
grassroots members drift apart, or, do we want a grassroots organization? 

Our membership standing this year shows a drop, for which I see three reasons: 

(1) Requisition program instituted last year for the first time. If all the signed 
requisitions for membership had been honored, our emollment could have topped 
last year's figure. 

(2) Many lapsed members indicate they see no need to pay membership dues 
because the MFU hasn't made any major achievements, and because the position 
of agriculture is getting worse instead of better, membership investment in the 
MFU is not warranted. 

(3) Lack of support for Local and District officials in the canvassing campaigns 
and for those people who have carried the load to date. 

I hope the people who have held membership in the MFU for the past ten years 
have, or will, read and study the two pamphlets now being circulated — one on 
policy and one on achievements, and decide for themselves whether or not their 
membership investment has paid dividends. I am sure the answer will be in the 
affirmative, that if we hadn't made these achievements the position of agriculture 
would be just that much worse today. Through our organized effort, not just 12 
or 13% of the farmers have gained, but the 45% of the people who depend on 
agriculture have gained to the same extent. 

If everyone in this organization would do their full share to line up the potential 
membership along with the present enrollment, we could report to your next annual 
convention a majority membership among Manitoba, farmers. 


27 



Many people this past year have indicated they would like to see the two farm 
organizations in the province amalgamated and, until such time, they do not wish 
to join. This attitude indicates weakness, and will not solve the problem. It we are 
very anxious to see amalgamation in effect, if is the responsibility of everyone 
concerned to get their shoulders to the wheel and help to set up an organization 
that would serve the farmers so that agriculture can realize a fair share of the 
national income. It is my sincere wish that by the time our next convention rolls 
around, we will have attained this goal. 

Since this organization was formed ten years ago, we have been recognized in 
the intervening years as "the voice of the farmer" by more and more people in all 
walks of life. This we are prou d of, although to attain and maintain this recognition 
requires more of your provincial officials' time as the years go by. 

As your Vice-President, it is my duty to report to you on my work and activities 
for the past year. 

From December 6th, 1959, to November 26th, 1960, I have attended 64 Local 
meetings. Spent approximately 16 days canvassing. Attended various Sub-District 
meetings. Attended 12 committee meetings; namely, Buyers Strike, Interprovincial 
Hog Marketing, Dairy, Poultry and Poultry Products, Marketing Board, Leadership 
School and Finance. And 6 Interprovincial Farm Union Council meetings. 

Took part in a panel discussion at Miami. 

Attended two meetings with the Agricultural Stabilization Board in Ottawa. 

Attended 6 District Conventions and 5 Leadership Schools. 

Attended Brandon Leadership School for 5 days. 

Helped present briefs to the Provincial and Federal governments, to Manitoba 
Milk Control Board, to the Board of Grain Commissioners. 

Was present at all Executive and Provincial Board meetings. 

Spent approximately 28 days in the Central Office. 

Attended the CCIL annual meeting for one day; the Federated Cooperatives 
Limited annual meeting for two days; the CFA Western Conference and CCF Con¬ 
vention, three days. 

Four meetings of the Farm Organization Conference at the University. 

Two days Interprovincial Directors Conference. 

All told, I have spent about 170 days of the past year, acting on your behalf. 

In addition, I attended 18 meetings as a Director of the Co-op Vegetable Oils 
Limited, attending Board and Executive meetings. 

My congratulations are extended to the MFU Locals who have reached the 
"200" and "300" Club memberships this year, to all Locals that have increased 
their membership, and to all the people who worked so hard to attain or surpass 
last year's record. If all the other Locals were to take a leaf out of the book of the 
successful Locals, we could include many more Locals in our "200" and "300" Clubs 
this coming year. 

I have appreciated the privilege of serving in this office to which you elected 
me a year ago. It has been a real pleasure working with all of you. Special thanks 
to our President, officials and staff of the MFU for the co-operation they have shown 
throughout the year. 

In your deliberations at this 10th Annual Convention, 1 wish you every success. 
The decisions you reach will have far-reaching effects both on our organization 
and agriculture generally. May your deliberations be constructive, and your 
decisions lay down a policy whereby we can forge ahead to our rightful place in 
the Canadian economy. 


28 



EDWYN DALGLIESH 


2nd *Vice - 'Pxe&icteett 

It is with a great deal of pleasure that I take this opportunity to report to the 
membership of the Manitoba Farmers Union at this, our Tenth Annual Convention. 

1 wish to congratulate you on the organization you have built in the last 
ten years. This has been achieved by hard work and determination on the part of 
most of our members and officials. Many have given much in time and money to 
the formation of this organization. This, I am sure, will be proven by the number 
of 10-year members we have in this organization today. 

The MFU has gone, or come, a long way to being a very vital farm organization 
but, as we all know, there is STILL much room for further progress and strengthen¬ 
ing of the organization in the coming years. 

This is my tenth year in the organization—most of that time spent as an official 
in one capacity or another: Three years on the Local Board: three years as Sub- 
District Director, and four years as Director of District 7, and tor the past year I 
have held the office of 2nd Vice-President on the Provincial Board. 

These years have been very interesting and educational. Sometimes inspiring, 
sometimes very disappointing. Those who have gained the most respect, as far as 
I am concerned, are the Local officials who, through the past ten years, have given 
much time and effort all at their own expense. These workers, mostly unheard of, 
are those who have kept the foundation sound in our organization. And I cannot 
emphasize too strongly the need of keeping any farm organization firmly in the 
hands of the membership. 

During the past year I have tried as best 1 could to relieve our hard-pressed 
President and Vice-President, of some of their work, as well as canvass and take 
Local meetings. 1 canvassed and spoke at 46 meetings in Districts 1, 3, 4, 5, 8, 10 
and 12. I attended 7 committee meetings in Winnipeg; also 1 was at every Provin¬ 
cial Board meeting. Besides that, the President instructed me to take in the follow¬ 
ing special meetings: 1 was at the I.F.U.C. Conference in Edmonton; accompanied 


29 






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the President to a meeting with the Hog Marketing Board in Portage la Prairie. I 
was on a Farm Forum Panel at Lowe Farm, and took part on a Panel on the 
National Farm Forum over the CBC on November 7th. Also at the request of the 
President, I sat in on a meeting on Crop Insurance with the Manitoba Minister of 
Agriculture. I participated in the program "Rural Route" over CKX-TV. Besides this, 
at the special request of the President, I flew to Port Elgin, Ontario, last spring to 
appear on a panel on "Price Spreads" at the Farmer-Labor Conference there. And 
last, but not least, when our President and Vice-President were attending an IFUC 
meeting at Saskatoon, I took greetings to the Manitoba Federation of Labor's 
Sixth Annual Convention held here in Winnipeg last October. 

I have always found the work in our organization very interesting, and at this 
time 1 do wish you a very successful Tenth Annual Convention; I am looking 
forward to personally meeting as many of you as possible. 

Yours for a stronger farm organization, 


EDWYN DALGLIESH. 


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31 












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32 







MRS. MARY McINTOSH 


(lep.OJit &f 'Women'4. PneAident 

With the end of the Farm Union year, and our Annual Convention, come the 
inevitable reports from those whom you entrusted with offices in your organization. 
As I make my final report it is with some regret that the accomplishments do not 
seem to keep pace with the activity expended. Since last year's Convention, the 
following activities have consumed about seventy days with much of the travelling 
time omitted: 

1. Full time attendance at the Advanced Leadership School at the Agricultural 
Extension Centre at Brandon. 

2. The luncheon extended to all Manitoba Members of Parliament previous to 
the opening of the session at Ottawa. 

3. Presentation of the Annual Brief to the Manitoba Government, and to each 
political party, as well. 

4. Attendance at all IFUC meetings, except the last policy-making, two-day 
meeting in October. 

5. Spent four days in Ottawa in February, where the IFUC brief was presented 
to the Cabinet and all political groups, and discussed with the Labor Union executive. 

6. It was impossible for me to be present at the Provincial Board meeting on 
October 25th, as I was in Ontario, but this was the only one I missed in seven years 
on the Board. 

7. Attended all Executive meetings, and feel that one thing lacking in our 
organization is adequate time to deal with the long agendas accumulated between 
meetings. 

8. As a member of the Leadership School program committee, I helped prepare 
the material and attended five Schools. 

9. With the Vice-President, I took part in six District Conventions. 

10. Farm Women's Week consumed a full week ■— two days spent in committee 
planning and four days at the University. The attendance this year scarcely 
justified the efforts expended by Conveners, Women Directors of office staff, and 
I feel that the organization lost ground as a result. When one considers, however, 
that not one of the Director's wives was present for the sessions , it is difficult to be 
critical of the lack of interest shown by the members at large. 


33 






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34 








11. In July, along with a good representation from the Provincial Board, I 
attended the Joint Board meeting of the five Provincial Unions, at Edmonton. 

12. As the only woman member of the executive of the Committee on Rural 
Leadership Planning, I attended tour meetings. Here I am expected to represent 
all the rural women of the Province. 

13. Met Winnipeg City Council, and a Committee from its Department of Health 
and Welfare, regarding Daylight Saving Time. 

14. Attended a meeting between our Executive and the Horned Cattle Fund 
directors. 

15. In March, with several other Union representatives, I spent a day at the 
Conference on Education at the University of Manitoba. 

16. Assisted in preparation and presentation of a brief in opposition to the 
increase in Hospitalization Fees, in July to the Manitoba Minister of Health and 
Welfare. 

17. Again as the only woman member, I have attended three meetings of the 
Conference on Farm Organizations at the University. 

18. Up to the date of this report, my work in the Locals has been negligible. One 
week's series in District 5 which was stormed out in March, and about half-a-dozen 
Local meetings, would cover it. I make no apologies for this, because no refusals 
to attend have ever been made, unless the dates coincided with previous commit¬ 
ments. If the Locals want the women officials to come out, why not stipulate that 
they are requested, and then get the Local women to attend the meetings. We are 
failing to train new speakers and will run short of officers, I fear. 

19. My last official duty outside the Province was to visit the Ontario Farmers 
Union Convention, where an opportunity to address the delegates was extended. 
Anyone who has ever mingled with the members of the OFU will agree with me. 
I'm sure, that the constant publicity given to "strife" between the Eastern and 
Western farmers is mostly wishful thinking on the part of the politicians. I find none! 

As my term of office has extended beyond the ability to cope with organization 
and home duties, my name will not be among the nominees this year. To those who 
have helped to make the past seven years of service possible, I extend my sincere 
gratitude. First on the list must come my husband and family — without their 
generous help and support the situation would have been impossible. From mem¬ 
bers of the Board, past and present, co-operation and consideration have been 
generously received. May the incoming President be as fortunate! 

To all the members of the office staff, for their courteous and capable assistance, 
my thanks are extended. It is difficult to work with an absentee official, I realize, 
and the errors and omissions have been few. 

For seven years, in planning and executing the program for Farm Women's 
Week, we have enjoyed the co-operation and kindly advice of members of the 
Faculty, as well as the excellent facilities at the University of Manitoba- To Dr. 
Hugh Saunderson as President, and Dean J. Ft. Weir of the Faculty of Agriculture 
and Home Economics, and to all who contributed so generously to our programs, 
our thanks and best wishes for the future. 

Last, but certainly not least, I should mention the Sub-Directors, Local officers 
and members: For the work they have done, the miles they have travelled, the 
hours of sleep they have lost in making possible whatever work I've done in the 
country. If only the results were as generous as the efforts! But they have provided 
a memory of hospitality and friendship that will never be erased, whatever the 
future may hold for each of us. 

To those in the Farm Union, who have been afraid of my radical, outspoken 
attitude on behalf of farmers, I would say this — that unless, and until, more farm 
people are prepared to take whatever courage they can muster in both hands and 
offer stronger resistance to the forces that beset agriculture, conditions will remain 
as bad or worse than they now appear. Out of the confusion of the myriad voices 


35 




36 






MRS. OLIVE AITKEN 


*20amen'd 'l/Cce-'President 

The Manitoba Farmers Union has reached an important milestone — at this 
time we celebrate our Tenth Anniversary. 

We have reason to be proud of our progress in many respects. One of our 
greatest contributions has been in the leadership field. However, we still need 
people who are prepared to come forward and accept a larger share of the 
responsibility of the organization. 

There are still farmers who feel unable, or are not prepared, to try and help 
themselves. To awaken these people, to help them realize the value of farm 
organization, still remains a challenge to us all. I hope you are prepared to accept 
that challenge and help improve your own conditions. The saying "The Lord 
helps those who help themselves" is very true in regard to farmers. This can be 
accomplished, I believe, through supporting your Farm Union. 

During the past year, suggestions have been made that the MFU Provincial 
Board should be reduced in size. The women members feel that, if this should 
come about, they would stand to lose their representation. This was one reason 
why at Farm Women's Week the women decided that perhaps they should 
investigate the possibility of a separate women's group. Let me say, I hope this 
investigation will not be necessary. After all, farm problems know no sex. Dame 
Caroline Haslett says, "Half the human race are women. Human beings have to 
be fed, clothed, housed and educated. These are fundamental requirements and 
women are concerned with them as humans and not primarily as women. No 
culture can afford to deprive itself of the fullest contribution of half its members." 

Let me reiterate -—• women have a contribution to make in the organization. 
They should be prepared to act as helpmates in every way, just as they must in 
their homes. To divide forces would weaken rather than strengthen. This we 
cannot afford. Farm people, men and women, must work together and continue 
to build a farm organization of which we may all be proud — an organization 
which will be a credit to the farm people of Manitoba. 

My activities during the past year followed much the same pattern as in other 
years. I attended 4 Provincial Board meetings; 5 Executive Meetings; the IFUC 
Conference in Edmonton, and one IFUC meeting in Saskatoon. 


37 



38 








I was present at the annual presentation of the MFU brief to all the political 
parties in the Provincial Legislature; also the meeting with Hon. Dr. George 
Johnson, when we presented a brief protesting the increase in hospital rates. 
These were good hearings, even though the results were not all we had hoped. 

During April, 1 attended 6 Leadership Schools. In spite of bad roads, most of 
these were well attended. 

In June, I had the privilege of spending 4 days at the University where Farm 
Women's Week was held. We were disappointed that more women were not 
present but hope the attendance will improve next year. This is a valuable part 
of our program and one in which more women would be well advised to participate. 

Later in June 1 attended 6 District Conventions. 

1 spent 5 days in February at Brandon where I took part in a course on 
Farm Policies. 

I spent 2 days in Committee meetings, and to date (October 17th) have attended 
5 Local meetings. More have been arranged for the next month. 

1 hope the delegates at this Convention, through the resolutions they approve, 
will produce a policy that will improve the condition of the agricultural industry. 
I hope too that you will go home prepared to work to carry out that policy and also 
to obtain more farmers as members of your organization. 

In closing, I wish to express my appreciation to all officers and members for 
their kindness and help in the past year. My thanks also to members of the office 
staff for their co-operation. 

To all, I would like to extend the Season's Greetings. May each and every 
one have a Merry Christmas, and may the New Year be kind to you all. 


The Better You Support The Manitoba Farmers Union 
The Better It Can Work For You 

AND 

The More You Buy From C.C.I.L. The Greater 
The Savings C.C.I.L. Can Make For You. 

Last year, C.C.I.L. allowed its customers, on the overage, 
the equivalent of 16 per cent of the retail list price, in 
cash discounts, and in prices for trades in excess of what they 
were sold for. 

AND ALSO 

Allotted a 12 per cent dividend (in C.C.I.L. shares) on the 
retail list price on all purchases of new machines. This 12 
per cent is equal to more than 14 per cent of the actual prices 
paid by member-customers. 

Total savings for member-customers were therefore approxi¬ 
mately 30 per cent of the retail list prices. 

Back C.C.I.L. In The Attack On High Machine Prices 


39 






J. J. Hambley Hatcheries Ltd. 


Four leading Hybrids; Keylme No. 110 White egg 
layers; No. 126 Medium Cross Cream eggs. 
Hambley Sussex Hybrids; Hambley Barred Rock 
Hybrid. California Royal Bronze Turkeys. Duck 
lings. Goslings..... 


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Regina, Saskatoon, 
Edmonton, Dauphin 
Portage la Prairie, 
Swan Lake 


FOR DENTURE WEARERS 


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Makes your dentures look like new again 
with that clean feeling and bright ap- 
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One whole year's supply with full di¬ 
rections on the bottle. 

Call, write in, or phone to 

LEE LABORATORY 

401 - 416 Main St., Winnipeg 1. 
Phone WH 3-4048. 


ON THE 10TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE MFU 

0 -£ 

Crescent Creamery Co. Ltd. 


Compliments of 


INTERNATIONAL 

HARVESTER 


International Harvester Company of Canada Ltd 


40 







MRS. MARGARET OLIVER 


R,ep.osit ajj r Wa+ne*t'l 3Vice-Pteiident 

This is the hist year I have had the privilege of reporting to the Provincial 
Convention as your Women's 2nd Vice-President. 

As history records it, farmers in general have always been eager to join a new 
grassroots farm movement and have worked hard to build it tor a few years, and 
then they have reacted like little children with a new toy — if has become some¬ 
thing old to them and they have discarded the organization, and transferred their 
interests to something else. 

Will this be the fate of the Manitoba Farmers Union, which is celebrating its 
Tenth Anniversary Year? After ten years of effort on the part of many men and 
women, who have been inspired with the urge to do their own thinking, and who 
were trying hard to make up for lost time, will we let yet another farm organization 
slide through our fingers? 

Again, history furnishes us with numerous examples of people who have lost 
their liberty because they were too lazy to think through the problems that all free 
peoples must solve, if they are to continue free. Those of us who live in a country 
which is committed to democratic methods and practices must be prepared to devote 
time, energy and thought to learning how to better work the process of democracy, 
and that democracy requires from its people not merely obedience but judgment 
and a spirit of co-operation, for it is based on a willingness to accept differences of 
opinion and a respect for the right of the majority to govern. 

Let us hope that the policies set at this, our tenth Convention, will be worthy of 
the efforts of those who have given generously of their time in the past. 

My activities for the past year are as follows: 

I spent 5 days attending the Rural Leadership School at Brandon last December. 

Attended 4 Provincial Board meetings, 6 days in all. 

I was present when the Annual Brief was submitted to the Provincial Cabinet 
and also to the other political parties. 

1 also attended the Manitoba Conference on Education at the University of 
Manitoba, in February, preparing a report for The Voice of the Farmer following 
the Conference. 




I attended 1 District Convention and 1 Leadership School. 

I spent 4 days at Farm Women's Week which was held at the University of 
Manitoba in June. As Education Convener I conducted a. "Round Table" discussion 
on Education, in which Manitoba's Minister, Hon. Stewart McLean, took part. 

During July I attended the IFUC joint board meeting held in Edmonton. 

In October I attended the Sub-District Leadership School in Brandon. 

In closing, may I say that I sincerely hope we will see brighter things in the 
year ahead for the farming community. 


deposit &j fJunioA PfieAide*it 

J. A. PALMER 

One year ago you elected me as your first "Junior President". I assure you this honor 
was quite unexepected. Now I am to give the first report on "Provincial Youth Activities" 
at your Tenth Annual Convention. In spite of the fact we are called a young organization 
we have successfully completed our first decade of service to the farmers. I feel we have 
laid a good foundation for decades to come. 

When I took office as Junior President I had reasonably high hopes, in spite of the 
fact I knew my duties and obligations would not be easy. As you are aware I automatically 
became a member of the Provincial Board — and at the next Board meeting I was given 
the green light to go ahead, with the assurance the Provincial Board would give me their 
full support. Other than that I was on my own. 

Since 1957 you have had a Youth Committee in charge of youth activities; their duty 
was to explore the possibilities of setting up a youth organization and to present a 

program for them to follow. The Committee drew up a proposed program — upon 

circulation of this program they were advised that the program was far too rigid for the 
young people to accept, that they must have a program more or less of their own making 
with a great deal of flexibility. 

With this in mind, and being in possession of a copy of the Alberta Farmers Union 
Constitution which contains an elaborate constitution for their "Junior Branch," plus 
adding some views of my own, I made up a News Letter laying down a definite program 
that I felt included all the requests that had been received in the correspondence I had 
at hand. Thus completed, the News Letter was submitted to President Usick for construc¬ 
tive criticism and approval. In due course the letters were mailed to the MFU officials 

under a four-point letterhead that I felt would contact vital channels for proper organiza¬ 
tion. 

Recipients of the News Letter would find the answers in it to the many questions 
that had been asked in previous correspondence. The entire program contained the desired 
flexibility and in general substance it gave the young people the privilege of channelling 
any activities they might become absorbed in, through the Board they would be called 
upon to form. Thus organized, there would be no further burden placed upon them; 
they would be the ones to benefit by this arrangement — with, of course, the under¬ 
standing they would be a part of the MFU, under the supervision of a Youth Director, 
although the Youth Director would not take active part in the proceedings of their 
meetings. 

Since you had elected Youth Directors at your conventions last year and Local 
Youth Directors at the annual meetings, our prospects seemed to be good. Then at the 
request of President Usick a meeting was called in the MFU office for February 23, 
1960, requesting the attendance of the Youth Committee, Junior President and all Youth 
Directors. At this meeting we had two members of the Youth Committee and two District 
Youth Directors — one of which was myself. This meeting was called to turn over all 
jurisdiction from the Youth Committee to the Provincial Youth Board we hoped to form 
at this meeting. The proposed Provincial Youth Board would have consisted of the Junior 
President and twelve District Directors, one from each of the twelve Districts. As you 


42 



Compliments of 

KANE EQUIPMENT LTD. 

701 Henry Ave. f Winnipeg 
695 Erin St., Winnipeg 

BRANDON • MINNEDOSA • DAUPHIN 

can see the purpose of this meeting was defeated and no Board formed. This situation 
clearly indicated a lack of interest and initiative -—- so we decided to send out a 
questionnaire to all Locals to find out if the people really wanted a Youth Organiza¬ 
tion, all replies to be returned to Head Office before March 31, 1960. From all question¬ 
naires sent out we received twenty-seven replies, nineteen of these indicating possibilities of 
some degree, and eight definitely in the negative. 

Now in reviewing the report of the Youth Committee, April 27, 1959: They recom¬ 
mend that the MFU Constitution be amended to permit a Youth Director to be elected 
at the Provincial Convention and to be a member of the Provincial Board; Provincial 
Youth Director in co-operation with the District Youth Directors to be responsible for 
assisting Local Youth Directors to encourage Local Youth to elect their officers and 
give them training — unquote. 

At this point, with the Youth Committee still in existence, I realized that my report 
must be brought before you at this Convention with duplication of leadership, not con¬ 
forming with former Recommendations. Upon consulting President Usick I was advised 
to bring the matter before the Provincial Board at their meeting of October 25, 1960. 
The Board's decision was that the Youth Committee be dissolved, that the Junior 
President and in due course the Board of Youth Directors take full responsibility. 

It is with these circumstances in mind that I respectfully submit my report to you 
here today — that you may give these matters your careful deliberation, decide whether 
or not you feel a Youth Organization is possible within our ranks. 

As you elect your Junior President for the coming year I sincerely ask you to give 
him sufficient support with the election of, and above all, activity from Officers on all 
levels. When you are elected to office, fulfil your obligations by attending the meetings. 
Without these considerations your Junior President is helpless; you are wasting his time 
and the funds of the MFU. 

I regret I am not able to bring you a better report; I feel it is my duty to bring 
you the facts, such as they are. There are so many possibilities we can look to — and so 
few that we can rely on. So may I wish all at this Convention the very best for the 
coming year — and may your deliberations bring you reasonable rewards. 


Serving Farmers from Border to Border in Manitoba . . . 


Modern Dairies 



"YOU CAN WHIP OUR CREAM, 
BUT YOU CAN'T BEAT OUR MILK" 


43 







44 







MANITOBA FARMERS UNION 


*Pio*teei £ai 'Paiity—^anai TQM 

These are the founders of the Farm Union — those who had the vision, the vigor, 
the tenacity to build a sound occupational farm organization. They began at the 
beginning, ten or more years ago, and they still are enrolled as the Manitoba 
Farmers Union marks its Tenth Anniversary Year. 

Words cannot adequately express the gratitude that is deserved by our true 
pioneers in occupational farm organization who, a decade ago, had the foresight, 
the integrity and the ability to join forces to help put agriculture on an even plane 
with the other sections of our economy. 

The MFU Board of Directors are confident that all MFU members, across the 
length and breadth of this province, will join in extending to all of these farmers 
sincere congratulations, appreciation and thanks for their untiring support of the 
Manitoba Farmers Union for the past ten consecutive years. 

Although this Honor Roll records the farmers' names only, we wish to give full 
appreciation and recognition to the part that the farm wives and families have 
played throughout the years in building our farm movement. 

Those names which appear in this list preceded by an asterisk are members 
who have now paid membership for more than ten years in the MFU. 

Presentation of 10-year membership pins to all those whose names are listed 
on this Honor Roll recognizes the value of their support and their efforts in the 
Farm Union over the past decade, and pays tribute to their acumen and achieve¬ 
ment in the ever-continuing struggle to improve the position of agriculture in the 
nation's economy. 

We hope the recipients of these special pins will wear them proudly, as tangible 
evidence of their contribution to the farm movement, and because the pins will 
merit instant recognition of what they stand for, by farmers everywhere. 


DISTRICT 1 


‘Over 10 Years 

Local 225, ALPINE 

Backvall, Albin _Benito 

Fogh, Nels _ Durban 

Oberg, Eric _Durban 

Local 60, BIRCH RIVER 

Chamberlin, Lyie _ Birch River 

Kostiuk, John J. _ Birch River, Box 38 

Ross, W. A. _ Birch River RR1 

Scorgie, Alex _ Birch River 

Scorgie, James _ Birch River 

Wiwcharuk, Wm. _ Birch River 

Shewchuk, Pete _ Birch River 

Wozny, Pete _ Birch River 

Local 55, BOWSMAN 

Alexander, Gordon A. _ Bowsman 

Caverly, R. Hilton _Bowsman 

Colbert, Dave - Bowsman 

Cornforth, John R. _ Bowsman 

Ferriss, H. L. _— Bowsman RR1 


Ferriss, 0. H. 

_ Bowsman 

Fraser, A. K. 

_ Bowsman 

Glashan, J. A. _ 

- Bowsman 

Graham, Ted . ____ 

__ Bowsman 

Hofford, Max G. 

- - Bowsman 

Keith, Harvey _ 

Bowsman 

Pierrepont, Ernie - 

Bowsman 

Pierrepont, Fred __ 

_Bowsman 

Pierrepont, Harry_ 


Putnam, G. P. —. 

- _ _ Bowsman 

Sercombe, R. H. . 

— _Bowsman RR1 

Sims, Chas. E. _ 

_ Bowsman RR1 

Local 265, 

DUCK RIVER 

Tycholaz, Bill _ 

-Duck River 

Local 54 

, DURBAN 

Olmstead, Roy B. _ 


Yacyshyn, Harry 

_Durban 

Local 61, 

KENVILLE 

Cheyne, 0. _ 


Cotton, J. E. _ 

_Kenville 


45 
































Dixon, W. L. _ 

.. _ _Kenville 

Dobbyn, E. E. _ 

_ _ Kenville 

Farmer, Z. _ 

_Kenville 

Finlay, R. _ 


Fullerton, Cecil _ 

—. _Kenville 

Fullerton, Ken _ 

... _ ... Kenville 

Gogol, Tom _ 

- ... Kenville 

Gordon, J. R. _ 

_ . Kenville 

Harris, Morley 

. - Kenville 



McCulloch, Geo. __ . 

_ __ Kenville 

Redlich, A. J. . 

-Kenville 

Steen, Lloyd _ 

. ...._ Kenville 

Suggitt, J. D. _ 

_Kenville 

Terhorst, H. . ... 

. Kenville 

Thom, D. A. _ 

_ .. . ..Kenville 

Thomas, J. E. _ 

Kenville 

Westaway, C. H. . 

_ _Kenville 

Local 274, 

LENSWOOD 

Antichow, Mike 

_Lenswood 

Bradley, H. E. ... . 

_ Bowsman RRI 

Bradley, William ... 

_ Bowsman RRI 


Davy, Wm. _Lenswood 

Hogg, Jack -Lenswood 

Honoway, Peter _ ....Bowsman RR1 

Kobelka, Fred _ _ Lenswood 

Kobelka, Metro ... .... _Lenswood 

Larock, Isadore _Bowsman 

Local 62, MINITONAS 

Einarson, Steve _Minitonas RR1 

Yakelashek, Stanley _Minitonas RRI 

Local 63, PINE RIVER 

Caruk, Joe P. _Pine River, Box 43 

Krawchuk, Tony _ ... ... Pine River 

Mayuk, Tony _ _. Pine River 


‘Nakonechnay, N. J. 

Pine River 

Parcey, Stanley _ 

Pine River 

*Prysiazniuk, John . _ ... 

Pine River 

‘Semeniuk, Steve _ 

Pine River 

Wozny, Paul .. _ 

Pine River 

Local 53, RENWER 


Allen, Ed. C. ___ 

_Renwer 

Bell, Bert _ 

_Renwer 


Renwer 

Cocks, Reg. W. _ 

Minitonas 

Wozniczka, John _ .... 

Renwer 

Local 79, SCLATER 


Bartko, Mike _ _ 

_Sclater 


. -Sclater 

Bilyk, Wm 




Boyachek, Steve _ 

_Sclater 


...Sclater 

Reskitnyk, Paul __ 

...Sclater 


Local 59, SWAN RIVER 

Behrman, Henry _Big Woody 

Brandson, A. J. _Swan River RRI 

Brandson, Chas. _Swan River RRI 

Brandson, Stanley _Swan River RRI 

Bullock, John __Box 40, Swan River 

Dubray, Fred _Box 553, Swan River 

Hrappstead, Chas__Big Woody 

Hrappstead, Mrs. Mary _Big Woody 

Hrappstead, Walter _Swan River RRI 

Moore, Wm. _Big Woody 

Sigurdson, Eggert _Swan River RRI 

Sigurdson, I. H. _Big Woody 

Hunt, C. C. _Swan River, Box 209 

Madsen, Peter _Swan River, Box 475 

Brandson, Ollie S. _ _Swan River RRI 


DISTRICT 2 


Local 8, 

ASHVILLE 

Oscada, Walter_ 

— ........Dauphin RR2 

Green, Brian _ .... 


Poast, James _ 

...Dauphin RR2 

Local 17, 

DAUPHIN 

Ryz, Frank_ 

Symchych, Mack J 

_Dauphin RR2 

_Dauphin RR5 

Aberson, F. H. (Robt) _Dauphin RR3 

Symchych, Mike ... 

_ ... Dauphin RR5 

Archer, Harold F. _. 

Box 1276 
. _ ..Dauphin RR2 

Wasylyshen, Wm. 
Werbicki, Albert ... 

.. . Dauphin 

_Dauphin Gen. Del. 

Bonk, Joe _ 

_Dauphin RRI 

Werbicki, W. F. 

... _ Dauphin RR6 

Boris, Luke . .. . 

_Dauphin RR2 

Wilkie, Joe _ 

Dauphin Gen. Del. 

Bos, Derk _ 

Boughen, Robt. L. __ 

_Dauphin RR5 

_Dauphin RR2 

Local 21, 

ETHELBERT 

DeWarle, John _ 


*Bilinski, Nick M. 
*Dohan, Mike _ 

_Ethelbert RRI 

Kaczkowski, Andrew 
Komfolio, Joe _ 


_ .Ethelbert 


*Dohan, Stanley _ 

_Ethelbert 



*Machnitsky, Nick 

_ .... . .. .Ethelbert 

Lawrence, Stephen 


_Ethelbert 


Strilkiwski, Dmetro 
Slupski, John _ 

_ _Ethelbert 

Miner, W. 

_Dauphin RR5 

_ ... Ethelbert 


46 















































































Local 110, FISHING RIVER 


Yakilashek, Joe F. _Fishing River 

Local 52, FORK RIVER 

Budzey, Mike _ Fork River 

Local 10, GARLAND 

Brigo, Harry _ . Garland 

Cwihun, Paul .. _ Garland 

Filipchuk, William _ Garland 

Frankoff, Peter _Garland 

Fyk, Steven _Garland 

Hykaway, Mike _ -.Garland 

Hykaway, Wm. _ Garland 

Kozar, John _ Garland 

Marmach, George -.- Garland 

Rewko, D. _Garland 

Welyki, Paul __ . Garland 

Zubresky, Nick _ Garland 

Local 1, GILBERT PLAINS 

Bassett, Elmer F. ... G. Plains 

‘Currie, Arnet _ G. Plains 

‘Currie, Ray _G. Plains 

‘Dohan, Pete _ G. Plains 

Duncalfe, L. H. _G. Plains 

Genik, Harold _G. Plains 

Genik, Stafford _G. Plains 

McKay, John _ G. Plains 

Myk, Mike - G. Plains 

Plummer, S. H. _ G. Plains 

‘Plummer, S. W. _G. Plains 

Plummer, Wm. J. ... G. Plains 

Rehirchuk, Alex _ G. Plains 

Rehirchuk, Wm. _G. Plains 

Shaw, Hughie ... — .... ...G. Plains 

Shaw, Wentzel _ ... G. Plains 

‘Stoughton, A. L. ... G. Plains 

Stoughton, Donald B. ... G. Plains 

‘Yuill, Harvey _G. Plains 

Local 43, GRANDVIEW 

‘Alexander, A. M. Grandview 

Borys, Joe S. _ Grandview 

Bradley, Oliver _ Grandview 

Chornoby, Dan _Grandview 

Cruikshanks, Gordon P. _Grandview 

Fron, Walter _Grandview 

Grasby, John . .... _Grandview 

Hay, John A. ------ Grandview 

'Hyrc, Joe _ ... .... .„.Grandview 

Korzenowski, Paul . -Grandview 

Kotyk, Mike _ Grandview 

Paisley, W. D. Grandview 

Ross, Donald _ Grandview 

Sanchuk, John _ Grandview 

Schulz, Herbert _ Grandview 

Schulz, Jake, 173 Cheriton Ave., N. Kild. 
Squance, Ivan _ Grandview 


Local 28, KELD 


Bomak, Steve_ _ 

_Ashville RR1 

‘Bosiak, Mike _ 

Ashville RR1 

Bosiak, Tony _ 

_Ashville RR1 

Burkowski, Tony 

____ ..... Dauphin RR3 

Burtniak, John _ 

_Dauphin RR5 

Burtniak, Steve W. .. 

Dauphin RR5 

Drebinsky, Leo. . . 

— G. Plains RR3 

Duda, Wm. _ 

.... Ashville RRl 

Furkalo, Matt _ 

_Ashville RRl 

Goshulak, Frank _ 

_Ashville RRl 

‘Goshulak, Harry .... 

_G. Plains RR3 

Koshowski, Steve __ . 

.. _Dauphin RR3 

Lozinsky, Peter _ 

_Ashville RRl 

Magaias, Walter _ 

_ .. .Dauphin RR3 

Michaleski, Anthony 

.Ashville RRl 

Michaleski, Ernest ... 

__ Ashville RRl 

Michaleski, Mike _ 

Dauphin Box 1504 

‘Podworny, Mike ... 

_ Ashville RRl 

Sametz, Peter _ 

_ Ashville RRl 

Smelski, Alex 

. _ Dauphin RR3 

Smylski, Fred _ 

_Dauphin RR3 

‘Smylski, Mike _ 

_Ashville RRl 

Tokar, Frank J. .. ... 

Ashville RRl 

‘Tokar, Joe _... 

_Dauphin RR3 

Tokar, Tony J. _ 

_Ashville RRl 


Local 73, LAURIER 

Bernadin, Gordon _Laurier 

Bouchard, A. J. _Laurier 

Bouchard, Lucien _Laurier 

Bouchard, Rene _Laurier 

Bouchard, Wilfred _Laurier 

Callerec, J. A. _Laurier 

Duruisseau, Elie _Laurier 

Gagnon, Aime _ Laurier 

Gingras, Eugene _Laurier 

Maguet, Frank . Kergwenan 

Peloquin, Jacques _Laurier 

Saguet, Andre _Laurier 

Van Humbeck, Fred _ . ... Laurier 

Pennarun, Alain _ .. Kergwenan 

Local 6, MAGNET 

Ackerman, R. S. _Magnet 

Ackerman, W. H. _ _. ..Magnet 

‘Hopfner, Alfred M. _Methley 

Rehaluk, Phil _Box 33, Rorketon 

Stammen, Isadore _Rorketon 

Tocker, George _Magnet 

Local 82, MAKAROFF 

Beattie, Geo. H__ Makaroff 

Boyce, Evert W. _ _Makaroff 

Davis, Jack D._Makaroff 

Hilderman, Fred _ Box 7, Makaroff 

Kerswell, Jas. W. _Box 1, Makaroff 

Pound, John _Makaroff 


47 



































































Local 14, McCreary 


Harasmowich, Andrew . ..McCreary 

Hoefer, Leon W. _McCreary 

Jackson, Alex _McCreary 

Jackson, J. E. Jr. _McCreary 

Ledoux, E. D. _ McCreary 

McNarland, M. N. _McCreary 

Manko, John _McCreary 

Marciski, Emile _McCreary 

Plessis, Noel _ McCreary 

Roncin, Albert _McCreary 

Tereck, Emil _ McCreary 

Tereck, Fred G. _Box 102, McCreary 

Sidey, Percy S. _ McCreary 

Local 209, MAKINAK 

Murray, W. L. _Makinak 

Local 340, MINK CREEK 

Kozar, Nick _ ___ Ethelbert 

Local 48, OCHRE RIVER 

Boles, A. E__Ochre River 

Carter, J. -Ochre River 

McIntosh, H. _Ochre River 

McLaren, D. N. _Ochre River 

Podworny, Matt _Ochre River 

Robertson, Ted. W. _Ochre River 

Schapf, Francis _Ochre River 

Thacker, R. W. _Ochre River 

Wolfe, H. _Ochre River 

Schopf, George _Ochre River 


Local 377, PETLURA 

Komaransky, Mike J. _Shortdale RR1 

Local 45, ROBLIN 


Edel, Harold _Roblin 

Hanson, Philip N. __Roblin 

Leitz, Lawrence _ Roblin 

Nott, Jack, Jr. _Roblin 

Watson, Tom _Roblin, Box 258 

Wildeman, Robt__Roblin 

Local 24, STE. ROSE DU LAC 

Beasse, Mrs. Grace _Ste. Rose 

Brunei, Mrs. C. D. _Ste. Rose 

Brunei, J. L._Ste. Rose 

Gagnon, Rosaire _Ste. Amelie 

Guillas, Andre _Ste. Rose 

Knockaert, Gaston _Ste. Rose 

Lepine, Emile _Ste. Rose 

Maguet, Mrs. M. L. _Ste. Rose 

Mignon, Rene _Kergwenan 

Molgat, Gabriel _Ste. Rose 

Pelletier, Israel _Ste. Amelie 

Pelletier, Victor_Ste. Rose 


Local 44, SHORTDALE 


Cooper, F. S.___Shortdale 

Dobranski, Albert ___Shortdale 

*Ellis, Ivan G. _Shortdale 

Yakymishyn, Nick _Shortdale 


Local 343, VENLAW 


Chornoby, Wm__Venlaw 

Genik, James _Venlaw 

Lukey, Walter _G. Plains 

Maksymetz, Luke J. _Venlaw 

Negrych, Wm. B. _Venlaw 

Slyziuk, Horry _Venlaw 

*Slyziuk, J. W._Venlaw 

Slyziuk, Sam -G. Plains RR1 

Tokarchuk, Jim D. _G. Plains 

Tymchuk, John S. _G. Plains 

Tymchuk, Nick _G. Plains 

Local 40, WINNIPEGOSIS 

Basaraba, Mike _Volga 

Local 42, ZELENA 

Darry, John _Roblin Box 267 

Hawryschuk, Mike _Roblin Box 234 

Hawryschuk, Paul _Roblin Box 272 

Hawryschuk, Walter_Roblin Box 272 

Korman, Mike _Zelena 

Kosinski, Norman _ _ Zelena 

Mysko, Nick ___Deepdale 

Nykolaishyn, John _Zelena 

Nykolaishyn, Mike _Zelena 

Nykyforak, Mike _Roblin Box 453 

‘Phillipew, Steve _Zelena 

Sadowich, Russell _Zelena 

*Sadowick, Harry _Zelena 

Urbanski, Ben _Roblin Box 146 

Yakimishyn, Mervin _Roblin Box 207 

*Yakimishyn, Wm. P. _____ Roblin Box 39 


DISTRICT 3 

Local 56, ANGUSVILLE 


Boryskevich, John _Angusville 

Boryskevich, Matt _ ___Silverton 

Boryskevich, Tony _Silverton 

Chipelski, Steve _Angusville 

Chuchmuch, Alex _Angusville B41 

Chuchmuch, John _Angusville 

Chuchmuch, Nick A. _Angusville 

Chuckrey, Peter _Angusville 

Dufrat, Bert _Angusville 

Gensorek, Anton _Angusville 

Juce, Mike —__ Angusville 

Kalyniak, Alex. E. _Angusville 

Kalynuk, Alexander _Angusville 

Kalynuk, John _Angusville 

Katchin, John _Angusville 

Katchin, Wm. _Angusville 

Kostiuk, Mike Sr. _Angusville 

Kukurudz, Alex. __ Angusville 

Mazur Alex, ____ —— . Angusville B 23 

Mazur, Raymond _ Angusville B 23 

Melnyk, Charlie _ Angusville 


48 


































































































DISTRICT 3 


Mushumanski F. N. _Angusville 

Mushey, Stanley_Angusville 

Mushumanski, Mike K. _Angusville 

Pushka, Paul _Angusville 

Sawaryn, Joe _Angusville 

Sidoryk, Paul _Angusville 

Stefanyshen, John H.-.. Angusville 

Local 23, BINSCARTH 

Gooda, Frank P. _Binscarth 


Local 321, KELLOE 

Wowryk, Mike J. .—2405 Underwood Ave., 
Saskatoon, Sask. 

Local 74, MINNEDOSA 

Beddome, Herb _Minnedosa B 243 

Comrie, David Sr. _Minnedosa 

Comrie, Peter _Minnedosa 

Ross, George L. _Minnedosa B 727 

Terlecki, J. _Minnedosa RR2 


Local 76, BIRTLE 


Harrison, Tom A. 

_ Birtle Box 99 

Mychasin, M. F. 

_Birtle 


_Birtle 

Robertson, J. F. . 

. .Birtle Box 21 7 

Yeskiw, Mike _ 

_Birtle 

Local 92, 

CLANW1LLIAM 

Burgess, Howard .. 

_Minnedosa B 520 

Klym, Wm. _ 

. ...Clanwilliam 

MacPherson, Don . 

... _Clanwilliam 

^ladill, D. B._ 

. ... _ ..Clanwilliam 

Pollon, Arthur 

. .. _Clanwilliam 

Local 67, 

ELPHINSTONE 

Dmyterko, Mike 

.... . _ Elphinstone 

Drul, Nestor _ 

_ _Elphinstone 

Pasturshank, Frank _Elphinstone 

Shindruk, Willie 

_Elphinstone 

Local 66, ERICKSON 

Anderson, Albin 

.. . _Erickson 


_ _ __ Erickson 


_ Erickson 

Hunter, John A. 

_ Erickson 

Larson, C. A. _ 

_Erickson 


Larson, Wallace _Erickson 

Lundin, Arvid _Erickson 


Sanderson, Robt. H. . 




_ Erickson 

Usick, Mike _ 


_Erickson 

Wawaruk, Peter 

_ 

_Erickson 


Local 87, FOXWARREN 


Bamford, Cam. R. _Foxwarren 

Burdett, C. A. _Foxwarren 

Cooper, J. J__Foxwarren 

Gabriel, Joe _Foxwarren 

Hay, Alex F. _Foxwarren 

Hillcox, Clarence _Foxwarren 

Hillcox, Murray _Foxwarren 

Mispelon, Eugene _Foxwarren 

Mitchell, J. C. _Foxwarren 

Parton, Lloyd _Foxwarren 

Tymkiw, William _ Foxwarren 

Williams, Ed _Foxwarren 


Local 58, OAKBURN 

Antonation, Joe M. _Oakburn 

Boychuk, Harry _Oakburn 

Bucklashchuk, Mike _Oakburn 

Chwaluk, Tony S. _Menzie 

Drul, Dick -Oakburn 

Drul, John N. _Menzie 

Drul, Peter _Menzie 

Dutka, Mike _Oakburn 

Lazaruk, Bill _Oakburn 

Leganchuk, John N. _Oakburn 

Luhowy, Mike P. _Oakburn 

Malanchuk, Jack Jr. _ Oakburn 

Manulak, Mike _Oakburn 

Manulak, Wm. J. _Oakburn 

Matiation, Peter M. _Menzie 

Melnyk, Steve _Oakburn 

Megas, Peter M. _Oakburn 

Muzylowski, John _Oakburn 

Nowosad, John M. _Oakburn 

Nychuk, Peter _Oakburn 

Peleshok, Mike . Strathclair 

Polos, Mike -Menzie 

Sheeshka, Sam _Oakburn 

Shwaluk, Joe_Shoal Lake 

Shwaluk, Wm. _Vista 

Shwaluk, Wm. J. _Oakburn 

Skotlas, John _Menzie 

Tutkaluk, Phillip _ Oakburn 

Tutkaluk, Tony _Oakburn 

Yarish, Steve, 618 Matheson Ave., Wpg. 
Zubrack, Frank _Oakburn 


Local 278, OZERNA 

Bachewich, Harry N. _Erickson B 174 

Bachewich, John N. _Erickson B 129 

Kaloginsky,Steve_Erickson B 200 

Kologinski, Mike _ Erickson 

Sawisky, M. S. _Ozerna 

Shewchuk, Sam P. _ Erickson B 272 


Local 88, RAPID CITY 

Chapman, J. H. ... .. Rapid City RR2 

Wright, Hugh -Rapid City 


49 


























































































Local 51, ROSSBURN 


Cameron, David _Rossburn 

Kaban, Matt _Glen Elmo 

Kosteski, Adolph E. _Birdtail 

Plant, John A. _Glen Elmo 

Sawchuk, Tony T. _Birdtail 

Sotas, Mike J. _ Glen Elmo 

York, Eddy H. _Birdtail 

Zegalski, Frank _Rossburn B276 

Local 49, RUSSELL 

Boychuk, Paul _Russell 

Boychuk, Willie _Russell 

Derkach, Nick _Russell Box 202 

Hyra, Charlie _Russell 

Kalyniak, Wm. _ Russell 

Keller, Joe B. _Russell 

Mushumanski, Felix J. _Russell, Box 2 

Snitynsky, Mike _Silverton 

Local 65, SANDY LAKE 

Bachewich, Peter J__Sandy Lake 


Borys, Joe _ _ 

-Sandy Lake 

Desiatnyk, Wm. _ 

-Sandy Lake 

Koroscil, Donald - - _ 

-Sandy Lake 

Kristalovich, Mike . 

—- Sandy Lake 

Lewandoski, Mike _ . 

-Sandy Lake 

Lukianchuk, Bill 

-Sandy Lake 

Marcinyk, Andrew 

. .Sandy Lake 

Marcinyk, Wm _ 

-Sandy Lake 

Melcosky, Gus. „ _ 

Newdale Box 5 

Melcosky, Peter . _ 

-Sandy Lake 

Shindala, Steve _ 

. -Sandy Lake 

Shindruk, John . 

_Sandy Lake 

Wasylenko, Nick 

-. -Sandy Lake 

Local 75, SHOAL 

LAKE 

Antonation, Mike S. _ _ 

_Shoal Lake 

Cornwall, John _ 


Findlay, M. F. _ 


Kowalinski, Peter H. . 


Zenchyshyn, Mike _ 

_Shoal Lake 


DISTRICT 4 


Local 68, BIRNIE 

Babcock, A. W. -Birnie 

Bays, Nels _Birnie 

Eng, Karsten _Birnie 

Gibbons, J. A. _Birnie 

Higgins, George _ Birnie 

Zahodnik, Harry _ Neepawa 

Local 103, CARBERRY 

Baron, J. C. _Carberry Box 156 


Local 363, EAST PROSPECT 

Werbiski, A. _ P. la Prairie Box 953 

Local 77, EDEN 

Bland, Earl _ — Eden 

Boyko, Bill _Eden 

Ford, John _Eden 

Graham, Orville D. ___ Eden 

Steppa, John Jr. _Neepawa RR1 

Local 266, EDWIN 

Crewson, G. H. -Edwin 


Oshanyk, John _Elk Ranch 

Safroniuk, Wm. M. _Mountain Road 

Local 69, NEEPAWA 

Batters, Mel. J. _Neepawa 

Bray, C. L. -Neepawa 

Buchanan, S. G. -Neepawa RR1 

Buchanan, Weldon _NeepawaRRl 

Campbell, Allan R. _Neepawa Box 85 

Coulter, Fred S. _Neepawa RR1 

Farough, Alfred E. . -Neepawa Box 338 

Ferguson, W. J. _Neepawa 

Lindsay-Carman, J. C. _Neepawa 

McLaughlin, Robert _Neepawa RR2 

Patterson, James, 688 Renfrew St., Wpg. 
Yakiwchuk, J. A. _Neepawa RR1 


Local 71, NORGATE 


Ohirko, Steve _Norgate 

Tereck, Steve _Norgate 

Tereck, Wm. _Norgate 

Whyte, J. D. _ _ _Norgate 


Local 94, GLADSTONE 

McCaskill, Neil D. _Gladstone 

Local 230, GLENELLA 

Marciski, Mike _ — Glenella Box 71 

Local 81, MOUNTAIN ROAD 

Baranuik, Nick M--Mountain Road 

Moskaliuk, Mike _Mountain Road 


Local 186, PLUMAS 


Buschau, Carl _Plumas 

Buschau, Fred W. _Plumas 

Gabor, Steve _ Plumas 

Jolliffe, Arthur _ Plumas 

Klatt, Art _Plumas 

Knodel, Wm. _Plumas 

Madill, Bob _Plumas 


50 















































































McCurry, John _ 


_ -Plumas 

McCurry, Hugh _ 


..Plumas 

McCurry, Sam _ 


Plumas 

Oswald, Wm. F. 

_ 

Plumas 

Pratt, Frank _ 


— Plumas 

Rossnagel, Art. .... 

_ 

—.Plumas 

Single, John J. _ 


Plumas 

Tonn, Irwin 


- Plumas 




Wright, J. B. _____ 


Plumas 


Local 107, PORTAGE LA PRAIRIE 

Kupybida, Mike — _P. la Prairie, Box 1232 
Leslie, Frank, P. la Prairie, RR3, Box 22A 

Makarchuk, Emil _P. la Prairie, Box 879 

O'Neil, George P. la Prairie RR3 Box 20B 
Pannas, Wm. _P. la Prairie, Box 977 


Pauch, J. -P. la Prairie, Box 884 

Romaniuk, Wm. Jr. 

P. la Prairie RR3, Box 95 

Local 70, RIDING MOUNTAIN 

Bywater, Harry -Riding Mountain 

Czeck, K. _Rid ing Mountain 

Kalinowski, Stanley _Riding Mountain 

Lavich, Frank S. _Riding Mountain 

Prawdik, Alt__Riding Mountain 

Local 202, WELLWOOD 

Downey, Irwin _Wellwood 

Inverarity, George M. _Wellwood 

Kennedy, Morley _Wellwood 

Kirk, Jack -Wellwood 

Sinclair, S. _ Wellwood 


DISTRICT 5 


Local 29, ASHERN Local 179, CHATFIELD 


Arnold, Fred _ 

_ Ashern 

‘Kempa, Dmytro _ 

- Chatfield 

Ebbers, John _ 

_Ashern, Box 1 3 



Freeman, K. _ 

Ashern, Box 1 4 



Geisler, E. E. _ _ 

- .- - Ashern 

Local 173, FAULKNER 

Markwart, Mrs. Anna 

_ _ _Ashern 

Kaus, Arthur _ __ 

- Faulkner 

Stoneham, C._ 

- —Ashern, Box 58 

Kohanik, Albert 

- -Faulkner 

‘Wartak, Frank J. _ 

_Ashern, Box 9 

Olson, Kitchener _ 

- -Faulkner 

Winsberg, Oscar_ 

_ _ Camper 

Olson, Len 

- -Faulkner 



Springer, Adolf _ 

- Faulkner 

Local 19, BROAD VALLEY 



* Andrus, Pete _ 

_ Broad Valley 



*Klimchuk, Mike — 

— . Broad Valley 

Local 16, FISHER 

BRANCH 

‘Klimchuk, Walter — 

_ Broad Valley 

Bocek, Adolf _ 


*Kostyniuk, Theodore 

_ Broad Valley 

‘Boychuk, Dmytro 

Fisher Branch 

*Kubas, Louis _ 

Broad Valley 

‘Dmyterko, John - 

Fisher Branch 

*Osnach, Dmet _ 

_ Broad Valley 

*Genyk, Peter _ 


‘Podaima, John Jr. _ 

_ Broad Valley 

' t ^Hnatiuk, Harry _ 

- Fisher Branch 

‘Podaima, L _ 

Broad Valley 

‘Hnatiuk, Morris - 

_ Fisher Branch 

‘Podaima, R. _ 

_ — Broad Valley 

‘Kowalchuk, Harry 


*Polny, Joe __ 

_ Broad Valley 

‘Kowalchuk, Peter 


*Rutchka, Adolf _ 

_Broad Valley 

Malofie, Andrew N. 


*Rutchka, Mike _ 

_ Broad Valley 

Meilleur, Wilbrod 


*Talaga, John _ 

_Broad Valley 



‘Tretiak, Myrs _ 

_Broad Valley 

Nowosad, John _ 


*Woloshyn, Mike _ 

_ Broad Valley 

Packulak, Fred _ 

Fisher Branch 



x Packulak, Tony „ 


Local 166, 

CAMPER 

*Plishka, Walter 

— Fisher Branch 

Beroud, H. __ 

_ Camper 

Ravenstein, John 


Jundt, Gerhart _ 

_ Camper 

*Rudnicki, Stanley 

_ -Fisher Branch 

Kerbrat, J. L. _ 

_ Camper 

Small, Paul — 

— Fisher Branch 

Schwitek, Carl - - 1 649 Notre Dame Ave., 

Stephen, J. D. —Fisher 

Branch, Box 205 


Winnipeg 

‘Wagner, Peter 

Fisher Branch 

Schwitek, Wm. _ 

_ Ashern 

‘Wevursky, Fred 

— Fisher Branch 


51 







































































Local 90, GIMLI 

Benediktson, Art - 

- Gimli 

Bohonas, Kost 

. . . ..Gimli 

‘Cherniak, Joe _ 

. . . _Gimli 

Cherniak, Mrs. Rose 

...Gimli, Box 26 

Einarson, E. A. _ 

_Gimli, Box 152 

Einarson, P. F. — 

_ Gimli, Box 151 

Einarson, Stanley - 

_Gimli, Box 173 

Fjeldsted, B. E. _ 

_Gimli, Box 124 

Heidinger, John B. 

. - — - _Gimli 

Lycor, George 

_Camp Morton 

Mozalowski, Tony __ 

... _ _ Gimli 

Schnerch, Rudolph . 

. . Gimli, Box 1 1 

Sigurdson, Barney ... 

_ Gimli, Box 1 41 

Stefanson, Stefan J. 

. .Gimli, Box 185 

Local 170, GRAHAMDALE 

Cook, Otto _ _ 

.Grahamdale 

Grahn, Harold _ 

... .Grahamdale 

Harlos, Henry _ . . 

.. . _ Grahamdale 

Klapprat, Wm. .... 

_ .Grahamdale 

Klatt, Wm. Sr. _ 

_ Moosehorn 

Lemitz, Armand .... 

_ ....Grahamdale 

Middlestead, Fred 

_ Grahamdale 

Nickell, Roy . _ 

__ ... ..Grahamdale 

Sherbert, Louis _ 

__ _Grahamdale 

Wipper, Albert — 

_ _Grahamdale 

Local 11, 

KOMARNO 

Nazimek, Joe _ 

. . _Komarno 

Local 164, 

MALONTON 

Bass, Peter - 

_Malonton 

Local 18, 

MELNICE 

‘Galonsky, J. N. —. 

_83 Smithfield Ave. 

Winnipeg 

‘Hawrysh, Mike - 

..— RR1 Petersfield 

Nedotiafko, Steve .. 

_ RR1 Petersfield 

‘Piniak, John - 

_ RR1 Petersfield 

‘Skwarok, Frank .. 

.. . RR1 Petersfield 

‘Skwarok, John _ 

_ RR1 Petersfieltf 

‘Skwarok, Kasper _. 

_ RR1 Petersfield 

‘Skwarok, Philip — 

_ Winnipeg Beach 

‘Skwarok, Walter .. 

... RR1 Petersfield 

‘Spekuliak, Nick — 

_ ..Winnipeg Beach 

‘Wawryk, John _ 

_ RR1 Petersfield 

Local 25, MOOSEHORN 


Buchholtz, Adolf _Moosehorn 

Dewald, Phil _Moosehorn 

Dewald, Wm. _Moosehorn 

Drewlo, Albert _Moosehorn, Box 7 

Drewlo, Arnold _Moosehorn 

Helm, Jack _Moosehorn 

Gall, Robert _Moosehorn 

Krentz, Richard_Moosehorn 

Lange, Rudolf _Moosehorn 


Lentz, August -Moosehorn 

Meisner, Emil - Moosehorn 

‘Metner, Albert _Moosehorn 

‘Metner, Herbert _ Moosehorn 

Metner, Rudolf _ Moosehorn 

* Newman, Edward _Moosehorn 

Nickel, Henry _Moosehorn 

Reder, Paul -Moosehorn 

*Teimer, Alfred _Moosehorn 


Local 165, POPLARFIELD 

* Bai I ley, Andrew _Poplarfield 

*Husiak, Harry _ Poplarfield 

Grywinski, Andrew _Poplarfield 

‘Kartushyn, Walter _Poplarfield 

Mazur, Joe _Poplarfield 

‘Pododwarny, Harry _Poplarfield 

Roschuk, Wm._____Poplarfield 

Sokulski, Peter _Poplarfield 

Werstiuk, Mike _Poplarfield 


Local 169, ST. MARTIN 

Rawluk, Joe ___St. Martin 

Rawluk, Paul _St. Martin 

Turman, Alex _St. Martin 

Local 34, SHORNCLIFFE 

Bibb, John ___Shorncliffe 

Hrycyshun, Anitole _Shorncliffe 

Kruchkowski, Philip _Shorncliffe 

Lupyrypa, Harry _Riverton, Box 1 72 

‘Lupyrypa, Joe _Shorncliffe 

Owchar, Mike _Shorncliffe 

Tyliuk, Bill -Shorncliffe 

Tymoschuk, Sam _Riverton 

‘Widish, James___Shorncliffe 

Widish, John _Shorncliffe 

Yaremkiewich, Mike _Shorncliffe 

Local 12, WINNIPEG BEACH 

‘Huminicki, Nick H. '_Winnipeg Beach, 

Box 202 

Pemkowski, Andrew _Winnipeg Beach, 

Box 42 

Wolchuk, C. J. _Winnipeg Beach, 

Box 306 

‘Wolchuk, Wm. _Winnipeg Beach, 

Box 236 


Local 13, ZBARAZ 

‘Danelak, John _Fisher Branch 

‘Ostryzniuk, Steve —.Poplarfield, Box 12 

‘Podaima, Joe _Broad Valley 

‘Schurko, John _Broad Valley 

‘Soltys, John _Arborg, Box 180 

‘Stocki, Chas. _Broad Valley 

‘Stocki, Joe _Fisher Branch 

Stocki, Kasmir _501 Toronto St., 

Winnipeg 

‘Studney, Joe —Fisher Branch, Box 283 

‘Wladyka, Mike _Broad Valley 

‘Tkachuk, Chas. _Fisher Branch 

‘Yakymiw, Wm.___Fisher Branch 


52 
































































































DISTRICT 6 


Locol 96, ELKHORN 


Canart, John L. _Elkhorn, Box 1 91 

Clarke, Bruce M. _Elkhorn 

Goethe, Wm. _Elkhorn 

Francis, Geo. _Elkhorn 

Hamilton, L. H. __ Elkhorn 

Heritage, A. R. _Elkhorn 

Mulligan, Cliff _Elkhorn 

Mulligan, Eric _Elkhorn 

Rowan, Merlin _Elkhorn 

Rowan, Ralph _Elkhorn 


Local 133, GLENBORO 

Davidson, Herman _Glenboro, Box 206 

Hamilton, Ross _Glenboro, Box 1 01 

Hamilton, Stewart D. .Glenboro, Box 143 
Jones, E. J. Sr. _ Glenboro 


Sigurdson, B. R. __ 

_Glenboro 



Vertz, Martin Sr. . . .. 

_Glenboro 


Wood, Earl _Glenboro 


Local 271 

, HARTE 

McIntosh, G. H. _ 

_Harte 

Local 97, KIRKELLA 

Fraser, Roy E. _ 

-__Kirkella 

Oliver, Frank _ . 

_Kirkella 

Rowan, Gordon _ 

__.—Kirkella 

Torbet, John G. _ 

_Kirkella 

Local 99, 

VIRDEN 

Dracek, Mrs. Steve __ 

_Virden, Box 42 

Goodridge, Cliff 

_Virden, Box 508 

McDougall, L. H. _ 

_Virden, Box 457 


DISTRICT 7 


Local 138, DAND 

Teetaert, Francois _Dand 

Vanrobaeys, Gaston _ Dand 

Local 151, DUNREA 

Coulthard, Tom _Dunrea, Box 53 

Local 158, GREENWAY 

Desrochers, Urban _Greenway 

Preston, F. S__Greenway 

Stone, J. E. _Greenway 

Webber, C. M. _Greenway 

Local 246, KILLARNEY 

Teeple, J. C. _Killarney 

Tripp, S. J. _Killarney, Box 441 

Locol 152, MARGARET 

Dalgliesh, Edwyn _ Margaret 

Dalgliesh, Lind . Margaret 

Jackson, Howard N. _Margaret 

Local 178, MATHER 

Harris, John W. _Mather 

McLennan, R. A. _ Mather 

Vincent, Geo. _Mather 

Local 146, MEDORA 

Robinson, Hugh _Medora, Box 83 

Sambrook, Howard F. Medora, Box 74 


Tweed, O. B _ 

Tweed, T. A. _ 

Tweed, T. R. _ 

Tweed, W. Willie ... 
Van Daele, Maurice 
Williams, Reg. R. 


_Medora 

-Medora 

Medora, Box 5 

_Medora 

_Medora 

_Medora 


Local 143, MELITA 


Banks, Robert _ 

Dobbyn, C. S. Sr._ 

Dobbyn, R. C. _ 

Fraser, W. Ken _ 

Funk, Abe _ 

McKinnon, D. J. ... 

McLure, W. V. _ 

Simpson, Donald _ 

Tilbury, R. J. _ 

Wickstrom, Herman 


_Melita 

_Melita 

.. ... Melita 
.Melita, Box 55 
Melita, Box 175 

_Melita 

_Melita 

_Melita 

-Melita 

_Melita 


Local 150, NINETTE 


Gullett, Garner _Ninette 

Urquhart, James_Ninette 

May, Fred G. -Ninette 

Woolsey, Orval _Ninette 

Worden, Milton _Ninette 

Worden, Wm__Ninette 


53 




































































DISTRICT 8 


Local 129, ALTAMONT Local 306, MORDEN 


Bourrier, Marc _ _Altamont Friesen, Mrs. Margaret -Morden, Box 457 

Brunei, Leon _ Altamont R.R. 1 

Crampton, Allan S. _Altamont 

Turner, Harold L. _Altamont 


Local 176, CYPRESS RIVER 

Johnson, B. K. __Cypress River 

Johnson, J. J. _ Cypress River 


Local 175, DARLINGFORD 

Baloun, Jerry _Darlingford 

Lowry, Lloyd _Darlingford 


Local 159, ELM CREEK 

Moynham, Jim _Culross 


Local 108, HAYWOOD 


Allec, Joseph _ 

Bernard, Geo. _ 

Demers, Geo. _ 

De Rocquigny, Francois 

Ducharme, Ed _ 

Picton, Amedee _ 

Picton, Jean _ 

Souque, Gaston _ 

Via 11 et, Rene _ 


.Haywood 

Haywood 

Haywood 

-Haywood 

Haywood 

-Haywood 

Haywood 

..Haywood 

-Haywood 


Local 174, MANITOU 

Edgar, Geo. _Manitou 

Henderson, Archie J. _Manitou 

Henderson, Geo. L. _ . Manitou 

Metcalfe, J. A. _Manitou 

Owens, R. T. _Manitou 

Zilkey, Fred _Ste. 3, 152 Maryland, 

Winnipeg 


Local 157, MARIAPOLIS 

Desrochers, I. _Mariapolis 

Local 135, MIAMI 

Brown, A. Ivan _Miami, Box 224 

Daily, John __ _Miami, Box 206 

Hawken, Victor _Miami 

Hill, C. W. _Miami 

Hink, Rudy _Morden, R.R. 1 

Pearson, James J. .._ —. Miami 


Local 192, MYRTLE 


Andresen, H. J. _Myrtle 

Halstead, Elmer W. _ Myrtle 

Halstead, Elmer M. _Myrtle 

Halstead, Harold E. _Myrtle 

McLaren, J. L. _Myrtle 

Phillips, L. S. _Myrtle 

Stonehouse, Oliver _Myrtle 


Local 102, ST. CLAUDE 


Bellec, Albert _St. Claude 

Bellec, Francois _St. Claude 

Bellec, Marcel _St. Claude 

Bernard, Albert _St. Claude 

Binnes, Georges _St. Claude 

Bonnefoy, A. E. _St. Claude 

Bruneau, Albert _St. Claude 

Bruneau, Felix -St. Claude 

Bruneau, Louis _St. Claude 

Chappellaz, Art — _ -St. Claude 

Chappellaz, Joe - ..St. Claude 

Chappellaz, Leon _ St. Claude 

Chevrier, Charles _St. Claude 

Dequier, Damase _St. Claude 

Donda, Yves _ St. Claude 

Durupt, John _St. Claude 

Gobin, Pierre _St. Claude 

Goulet, Leo _St. Claude 

Heiget, Louis _ - St. Claude 

Lacroix, Jos. _ —- St. Claude 

Lambert, Jos. _ St. Claude 

Laurent, Regis _St. Claude 

Oliviero, Andre _St. Claude 

Phi 11 ippe, Robert_St. Claude 

Rey, Joseph A. _St. Claude 

Ricard, Raymond _St. Claude 

Rusywich, Phil _St. Claude 


Local 317, ST. DANIEL 

Burke, Ed --366 Madison Ave., Winnipeg 

Local 136, SOMERSET 


Clark, Art _Somerset 

Poiron, Roger H. Somerset 


54 


































































DISTRICT 9 


Local 162, DOMINION CITY 


Local 160, STE. ELIZABETH 


Opocensky, Joe M. _Dominion City 


Local 275, DUFROST 

Warbanski, Mike _Dufrost 


Berard, Albert _Ste. Elizabeth 

Berard, Edward _Morris, Box 343 

Dupuis, Rosaire _Ste. Elizabeth 

Dupuis, Wilfred _Ste. Elizabeth 

Enns, Arthur _Ste. Elizabeth 

Jorgenson, Ed. A. _Ste. Elizabeth 

Lussier, Edmond ... _Ste. Elizabeth 


DISTRICT 10 


Local 206, ALLEGRA 


Gmitrek, Mike _Allegro 

Kruk, Harry _Allegra 

Kruk, John _Allegra 

Lysack, Harry _Allegra 

Nikodem, Ed _Allegra 

Rogocki, Mike E. _Allegra 

Stupak, Anton _Allegra 

Woloshyn, Nick _ Allegra 

Yakemow, Andrew _Allegra 


Local 183, ANOLA 

Belsham, C. _Box 73, RR1, Dugald 

Brade, Eric _Dugald, RR1 

Fetterly, L. _Box 27, RRI, Dugald 

Koski, Melvin D. _Dugald, RR1 

Kloss, Stanley _Anola 

Kruchak, Dan _Dugald, RR1 

Kruchak, Wm__Dugald, RR1 

Marko, John _Anola 

Smith, N. Mike _Box 51, RR1, Dugald 

Local 121, BROKENHEAD 


Bauschke, Eric C. -Dencross 

Biedler, Emmanuel _Dencross 

Borkowsky, Edward _Dencross 

Chorney, Mike _Dencross 

Duma, J. J. _Glenfields 

Dyck, Peter _Dencross 

Elmas, Rudolph _Dencross 

Galay, Victor _Brokenhead 

Kendifora, Paul _Brokenhead 

Kolton, Sam _Dencross 

Kowalchuk, Steve _Dencross 

Krawchuk, John _Dencross 

Krawchuk, Mike _Dencross 

Krawchuk, Steve _Dencross 

Mazur, Peter F. _Brokenhead 

Molinski, Adolph _Glenfields 

Molinski, Jos _Brokenhead 


Mosquin, Wm. _Brokenhead 

Paseshnik, Steve _Dencross 

Shumila, Fred _Dencross 

Shumila, Paul _Brokenhead 

Stupak, John _Dencross 

Tymchuk, Mike __ Dencross 

Wychreschuk, John _Dencross 


Local 207, CLOVERLEAF 


Cyncora, Mike _Cloverleaf 

Mazur, Mike _Cloverleaf 

Warywoda, Mike _Cloverleaf 

Winzinowich, Joe L. _Cloverleaf 


Local 117, ELMA 

Tuzyk, Pete _lanow P.O. 

Local 212, GLENMOOR 

Pachal, Carl _Glenmoor 

Pascaliuko, Steve -Glenmoor 

Zirk, Herman B. _Glenmoor 

Local 322, GREEN BAY 

Goshulak, Nick _Beausejour 

Recksiedler, H. A. _Beausejour, Box 1 88 

Schindel, Wm. _Beausejour, Box 271 

Local 120, HAZELRIDGE 

Haier, John _Hazelridge 

Nimchuk, Dennis _Hazelridge 

Ruchkal, Joe _ .Hazelridge 

Local 31, LAC DU BONNET 

Kulikowski, August _Lac du Bonnet 

Maslow, W. M. _Lac du Bonnet, Box 464 

Sarapu, Arnold _Lac du Bonnet 

Sikora, Paul _Lac du Bonnet 


55 








































































Local 210, LADYWOOD 


Chryplywy, Steve_Ladywood 

Chryplywy, Waldemer _ -Ladywood 

Engel, John A. _Green Oak 

Ferens, Nick _Green Oak 

Kawecki, Alt _Ladywood 

Matychuk, John _ Green Oak 

Mikoliew, Gordon _ Green Oak 

Okolita, John _ Ladywood 

Paluk, Mike _ Ladywood 

Petrus, William _ Ladywood 

Pfeifer, John P. _ Ladywood 

Polkowski, Joe _ .—Green Oak 

Polkowski, John P. _Green Oak 

Rattai, Adolph _ Green Oak 

Struss, Joe J. _Green Oak 

Schreyer, Jack P. _Ladywood 

Shumilak, Casmir _Ladywood 

Syrowitz, Wm. _Green Oak 

Local 122, LIBAU 

Bolin, Alfred_Libau 

Malowany, John _Libau 

Smorang, John _ Libau 

Smorang, Peter _Libau 

Sopko, Stan _Libau 

Weremy, John___Libau 

Zapatotsky, John_Libau 

Zapatotsky, Mike _Libau 

Local 211, LOWLAND 

Betker, Art_Lowland 

Fandych, John _Lowland 

Fandych, Wm. _Allegro 

Murash, Steve_Lowland 

Worona, Conrad _ Lowland 

Local 118, RIVER HILLS 

Alstadt, Elmer F. _River Hills 


Henschell, Alex _River Hills 

Klaprat, Julius _Whitemouth 

Klaprat, Wm____.River Hills 

Knopf, Lome _River Hills 

Kroker, Milton _River Hills 

Kuhn, K. S. _River HilJj. 

Kuhn, Wm__Seven Sister Falls 

Merke, Art _River Hills 

Noel, Oscar _Seven Sister Falls 

Rohrig, Albert _River Hills 

Schultz, Albert G. _Seven Sister Falls 

Sieg, Ed _Whitemouth 

Tiede, Julius _River Hills 

Zoldy, John _River Hills 

Local 208, THALBERG 

Ostopowich, John _Stead 

Otto, A. W. ___Thalberg 

Repula, Mike _Stead 

Local 119, TYNDALL 

Banish, B. J. _Walkleyburg 

Boyko, Harry_._Garson 

Chorney, K_ Tyndall 

Hewko, Mark_Tyndall 

Hnatiuk, Maurice _Tyndall 

Kolbuck, Joe _Tyndall 

Komadowski, Mike _East Selkirk 

Kazina, John _Tyndall 

Kuffner, Emil _Garson 

Nazarewich, Steve _Tyndall 

Nawakowski, Wm. _Tyndall 

Shumilak, Bert —■_Garson 

Swirski, Mike _Tyndall 

Local 116, WHITEMOUTH 

Malkoske, Albert_Whitemouth, Box 103 

Neyedli, Jack _Whitemouth, Box 141 


DISTRICT 11 


Local 9, PETERSFIELD 

Hacking, George _Petersfield 

Popish, Harry _Petersfield 

*Pawluk, Mike _Petersfield 

Local 148, ST. EUSTACHE 

Gervais, Albert_ Elie 

Girard, O. M. _St. Eustache 

Lachance, Clement_St. Eustache 

Lachance, J. B. _St. Eustache 

Local 106, ST. FRANCOIS 

Allard, Jules R. _Headingley, R.R. 1 


Allard, Laurent _Headingley, R.R. 1 

Allard, Peter _ T _St. Francois 

Braun, H. John _1_Headingley, R.R. 1, 

Box 202 

Dyck, H. H. Jr.___Headingley, R.R. 1 

Franklin, C. G. _ 1 _Headingley, R.R. 1 

Futros, Joe _:_Headingley, R.R. 1 

Futros, John Sr..Headingley, R.R. 1 

Futros, Victor__Headingley, R.R. 1 

Lavallee, Albert ___Headingley 

Lavallee, Alex _Headingley 

Leclerc, J. R._Headingley, R.R. 1 

Leclerc, Roland_Headingley, R.R. 1 

Loewen, Pete _Headingley, R.R. 1 

Peterson, N. R. _Headingley, R.R. 1 


56 






















































































Regnier, Bruno _Heodingley, R.R. 1 

Stanley, Paul - _ St. Francois 

Local 83, SELKIRK 

Dalebozuk, Mike R.R. 3, Group 31 4, 

Selkirk 

Mazur, Harry - — Kirkness 

Gowryluk, Wm. T. -Kirkness 

Porfaniuk, Steve - — Lockport, R.R. 1 

Petaski, Casmir _Selkirk, R.R. 3 

Preachuk, Joe _ R.R. 1, Box 1, 

Winnipeg (Group 14) 

Romanic, Louis __Lockport, R.R. 1 

Tataryn, Joe _Selkirk, Box 745 

Verheul, Harry R.R. 3, Group 3 1 3, Selkirk 
Wonch, Albert _West Selkirk, Box 276 


Local 137, STARBUCK 



... _Starbuck 


_Starbuck 


__Starbuck 


Starbuck 


. ...Starbuck 


_ _Starbuck 


....Starbuck 


_Starbuck 


_Starbuck 


_ Docotah 

Schade, Otto .... - — 

..Starbuck 


Local 36, TEULON 

Lindgren, Carl H. _ Teulon, Box 333 


DISTRICT 12 


Local 155, AUBIGNY 

Berthelette, J. P. -Aubigny 

Robert, P. A. .Aubigny 

Roy, Noel _Aubigny 

St.-Onge, Henry Silver Plains 

Local 131, DOMAIN 

Dobrowolski, Carl — Domain 

Pitura, Carl _Domain 

Local 123, DUGALD 

Costin, Mathew _Transcona, Box 384 

Edie, C. S. - Dugald, R.R. 1 

Edmonds, Wm. R. ... Oakbank 

James, Bill Transcona, Box 1 59 

Kulbabo, Paul _ _ _Dugald, R.R. 1 

Lishko, John Sr. Box 43, R.R. 1,Dugald 

Ptak, A. Dugald, R.R. 1 

Smith, L. S. Transcona, Box 23 1 

Local 147, ILE DE CHENES 

Arnould, A. J. _ . lledesChenes 

Demarcke, Joseph lledesChenes 

Dumaine, Raoul lledesChenes 

Trudeau, Paul D. _lledesChenes 

Local 140, LA SALLE 

Lavallee, Elphige _:— La Salle 

Local 181, LORETTE 

Gauthier, Alfred . Lorette, Box 27 

Gauthier, Roger Lorette, Box 1 3 

Manaigre, Almonzor _ Lorette, Box 37 


Local 101, OAK BLUFF 

Acheson, Don _ Oak Bluff 

Bossuyt, C. A. _Oak Bluff 

Cuthbertson, Wm. - Oak Bluff 

Fisher, Geo. H. _Fort Whyte 

Fisher, Lloyd S. _Fort Whyte 

Herkert, Otto -Oak Bluff 

Hewett, Wm. Fort Whyte 

Horn, Geo. _Oak Bluff 

Jensen, Alfred ..Oak Bluff 

Pawlyszyn, Fred _Oak Bluff 

Local 182, PRAIRIE GROVE 

Gohl, Karl _Prairie Grove 

Peterson, James A. _ Prairie Grove 

Schellenberg, A. _ Prairie Grove 

Local 185, ROSEWOOD 

Ammeter, G. _ Dufresne 

Bednar, Joe _ Dufresne 

Bednar, Vlademir _Dufresne 

Emery, Mike _ Rosewood 

Kisclica, Joe _Dufresne 

Norman, Leslie __— Dufresne 

Norman, Walker Dufresne 

Winther, Kai _Dufresne 

Yestrau, Wm. _ Rosewood 

Roskos, John Dufresne, R.R. 1 

Local 130, SANFORD 

Simonsen, Neil _ ...Sanford 

Local 214, ST. GERMAINE 

Chopp, Stanley __- St. Germaine 

Paul, Leonard _St. Germaine 

Pushkar, Mike _ St. Germaine 

Local 372, WINNIPEG 

Gabel, Charles .. 692 Ross Ave., Winnipeg 


57 
































































MANITOBA FARMERS 


UNION 


“Sotf/id oj i Dviecto-'i& 1R.efr<yit 

Year ending October 31, 1960 


AGRICULTURAL CONDITIONS 

During the past year the challenging changes in our agricultural industry have con¬ 
tinued, and in some instances have created greater problems than those experienced in 
the past. 

One favorable aspect within our industry has been some evidence that the threat of 
vertical integration was somewhat curtailed because of legislative changes in our price 
support program. Your Board of Directors, however, are most concerned over the fact 
that legislative measures taken by our provincial and Federal governments during the 
past year, although providing some assistance to the individual farmer, have had a limited 
effect towards alleviating our overall agricultural problem of inadequate prices, excessive 
costs and instability. 

The ineffective application and administration of the Agricultural Stabilization Act 
has played havoc with our poultry and hog producers, many of whom (although established 
producers) suffered severe financial losses to the point where they were forced out of 
production. 

Our cereal crop producers continue to bear the brunt of the cost-price squeeze, and 
recent Federal legislative measures taken to assist these producers have placed more 
emphasis on political acceptability than on economic solutions to agriculture's problems. 
Furthermore, this has tended to pit farmer against farmer because of diversity of pro¬ 
duction. We are thankful, however, that the weather elements have been much more 
favorable than was experienced a year ago, with the exception of a few areas which have 
again experienced crop losses due to weather conditions. 

The cost-price index affecting the farmer has continued to worsen from a year ago; 
the following Tables will clearly illustrate the trend: 


PRICE INDEX OF COMMODITIES & SERVICES USED BY FARMERS 




— 

Western Canada - 

— 



1956 

248.9 

209.8 

211.1 

189.8 

518.4 

206.6 

1957 

257.5 

223.5 

213.2 

196.5 

559.9 

216.0 

1958 

263.6 

236.0 

216.9 

200.5 

581.0 

219.2 

1959 

269.1 

247.3 

223.0 

200.5 

592.6 

220.7 

1960 

276.3 

253.8 

227.9 

207.5 

61 1.0 

221.9 

Increase: 







1956-60 

27.4 

44.0 

16.8 

17.7 

92.6 

15.3 

1959-60 

7.2 

6.5 

4.9 

7.0 

18.4 

1.2 


FARM PRICE INDEX OF AGRICULTURAL 

PRODUCTS — 

MANITOBA 


April 1956 1957 

1958 

1959 

1960 

229.5 208.3 

233.1 

241.1 

218.1 


Decrease: 

1956-60-—11.4 points 
1959-60—23.0 points 


58 



PINE MOTORS 

LTD. 

FORD—FALCON—MONARCH 

BEAUSEJOUR 

MANITOBA 


FRED and VIC'S 

Nips, Chips, Hot Dogs 
Avon Representative 
Vicky Mackew 

Phone 89 — BEAUSEJOUR, Man. 


CONGRATULATIONS 


Congratulations for 

FOR 1OTH ANNIVERSARY 


1 Oth Anniversary 

BEAUSEJOUR DRUGS LTD. 


URBANSKI'S 

PRESCRIPTIONS 

VETERINARY SUPPLIES 


Quality Meats, Groceries, 

Pharmacists: E. 0. Walterson—R. A. Sanders 


Fresh Vegetables 

BEAUSEJOUR Phone 59 MANITOBA 


Phone 280 — BEAUSEJOUR 


CONGRATULATIONS 


Congratulations on 

FOR 1 OTH ANNIVERSARY 


1 Oth Anniversary 

LEIMANS SALES & SERVICE 


FARMERS STORE 

Authorized John Deere Dealer 


Pioneer Power Saws 

Phone 227 


Feed Rite Feeds 

BEAUSEJOUR MANITOBA 


Phone 181 BEAUSEJOUR, Man. 


Your Leading Shopping Centre 
For Finer Foods 

KAATZ FOOD MARKET 

PHONE 18 BEAUSEJOUR 


Congratulations to MFU 
on their 10th Anniversary 

LUCKO SALES & SERVICE 

• Imperial Esso Products • International 
Trucks • Volkswagen cars & Trucks 
• Cockshutt Farm Equipment 

BEAUSEJOUR — Phone 96 


OLDE HOME BAKERY 

Pies - Cakes - Pastries 

Phone 255 BEAUSEJOUR, MAN. 


Congratulation to MFU 
on their 10th Anniversary 

BUILDERS SUPPLY CENTRE 

Lumber & Hardware Appliances 

Phone 22 — BEAUSEJOUR, Man. 


Congratulations to MFU 
on 10th Anniversary 


Congratulations to MFU 

MARSHALL WELLS STORE 

Hardware, Furniture, Appliances 


on their 10th Anniversary 

BEAUSEJOUR LOCKER PLANT 

BEAUSEJOUR — Phone 268 


BEAUSEJOUR, Man. — Phone 66 




Congratulations to MFU 

CLARISS TEA ROOM 


on their 10th Anniversary 

Beausejour's Leading Restaurant 


GRETSINGER GARAGE LTD. 

Full Course Meals - Cigarettes 

Phone 27 BEAUSEJOUR 


GMC Products — Day & Nite Tow Service 



BEAUSEJOUR — Phone 52 - Res. 283 


WOJCIK'S Plumbing & Heating 


H. SHUSTER & SONS 

Excavating & Trenching 


General Merchants 

Phone 161 BEAUSEJOUR, Man. 


Phone 284—BEAUSEJOUR, Man. 


59 



















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60 




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61 










These statistics very adequately outline the dangerous situation we have reached. 
Further evidence of the injustice that has engulfed the farm people is revealed by the 
recent report of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics on Farm Cash Income from the Sale 
of Farm Products. 

During the first six months of 1960, and in comparison to the same period for the 
past years, DBS reports that in 1958 Manitoba's farm cash income was $100.4 million. 
In 1959 it dropped slightly to $100.2 million, while in 1960 it was $95.5 million, a loss 
of $5 million. This condition has developed in spite of the continuous heavy increases 
in production in practically every product grown on Manitoba farms. 

The January-June income from field crops was $44.5 million in 1958; $43.4 in 1959 
and $42.0 million in 1960, showing a $2.5 million loss in two years. Cash Income from 
Sale of Livestock and Livestock Products, with the heaviest production increases during 
the past three years, was $55.7; $56.6 and $53.0 million respectively. This indicates 
a $3.6 million loss attributed mainly to the drastic price reduction in hogs, poultry and 
eggs in the past year. 

The poultry situation has been aggravated through heavy importation of poultry and 
turkeys from the U.S.; during the period January to October 7th, 1960, imports totalled 
10,504,977 pounds as against 4,816,079 during this same period in 1959. 

The farmers' actual purchasing power today is relatively in line with that experienced 
during the thirties. In fact, in some cases the situation is even worse. Based on the 
present cost-price index of 276.3, this means that the actual purchasing power of the 
$1.40 initial payment on wheat at the Lokehead, equals only 50.6 cents or the equivalent 
of 42.2 cents per bushel at the average delivery point in Manitoba. The decline in 
purchasing power equals a loss of 6 cents per bushel since 1959. 

The cost of marketing our wheat has continued to rise throughout the years of grain 
congestion. The cost per bushel in marketing and storing wheat for the 1943-44 grain 
pool was 4.8 cents. In 1955-56 it had increased to 13.5 cents, and to 18.5 cents per 
bushel in the 1958-59 pool, total cost being $68,259,281 — the majority of which 
was absorbed by storage costs. 

These, and many other conditions that could be mentioned, prompt your Board of 
Directors to suggest that the overall economy of our nation is going to suffer unless early 
remedial measures are taken to stop the constant decline in the purchasing power of our 
basic industry, and effective long-range agrciultural policies are implemented. 

ORGANIZATION 

Your Board of Directors take pride in this honored opportunity of being your elected 
officers on this occasion, when we are commemorating our Tenth Anniversary as an 
occupational farm movement in the Province of Manitoba. Elsewhere in this publication 
we honor, this year, those members who have given consecutive support to our organiza¬ 
tion for the past ten years. To all of these farmers we owe gratitude for their integrity 
and understanding of the value of organization. Although in general the farmer, as 
such, is being acknowledged by name, we cannot forget the recognition that should also 
be extended to the wives and families of these farmers, for we fully appreciate the part 
they have played in building our Farm Union during the past ten years. 

Your Board of Directors have approved recognition of our ten-year members through 
presentation of a specially designed, ten-year membership pin. Those joining the organiza¬ 
tion later than the members mentioned in the Honor Roll will be recognized in future 
years. 

Furthermore, we recognize and appreciate that thousands of other members have 
played an important role in our movement, even though they may not have been conse¬ 
cutive ten-year members, but have joined the Union in later years. 

To all who have given moral and financial support throughout the years, we extend 
hearty congratulations and sincere appreciation and thanks. Without them the history 
that has been written on the agricultural scene could not have been possible. 


62 



During the post year there hove, as usual, been some changes on our Provincial 
Board of Directors. In District 2 we have two newly-elected Directors: Mr. John Zaplitny 
and Mrs. Corona Smart. In District 3: Mr. Stan Jackson and Mrs. John Hrytsak; Mr. 
Rudy Nikodem in District 10 and Mr. Roy Mann in District 11. Mrs. Edna Bullock in 
District 1 and Mrs. Margaret Oliver in District 6 were acting Directors for part-term 
last year and were elected to the Board at the last District Conventions. 

To the retiring Directors, some of whom had served their full constitutional term 
of office of four years, we owe our thanks for their untiring efforts. At the Provincial 
level, changes effected at our last Annual Convention were: Mr. Edwyn Dalgliesh elected 
as your Provincial second Vice-President; Mrs. Margaret Oliver as your Women's second 
Vice-President; Mr. John Palmer, as your Junior President. A complete list of your 
Provincial Board of Directors is published elsewhere in this program. 

Your Provincial Board met on five occasions during the fiscal year, deliberating 
seven days in all. Your Provincial Executive met on five occasions, all one-day meetings. 
The Interprovincial Farm Union Joint Board Conference was held this year in Edmonton, 
Alberta, with the majority of your Provincial Board in attendance. 

As an occupational farm organization, we have continued to play an important 
and vital role towards attempted improvements in our agricultural economy, and we 
have made additional progress during the past year. 

MEMBERSHIP 

Plans for our 1959-60 membership campaign were curtailed because extreme weather 
conditions early in the fall made it practically impossible for many of our Locals to 
carry out an effective membership campaign. However, at the year-end, our membership 
remained relatively stable compared with that of a year ago. The trend away from the 
farm appears to continue with many of our members leaving the land, although new 
members continue to join the organization. Statistics on the national scene indicate 
that about 38,000 farm workers are leaving the farm each year. From information 
obtained from our membership records, Manitoba appears to be sharing quite heavily 
in this loss of farm people. 

Membership standing for the fiscal year 1959-60 totals 18,089. District membership 


standing is as follows: 

District 1 _ 

1,121 

District 7 .. 


907 

District 2 _ 

...... 2,436 

District 8 _ 


_ 2,415 


. 1,567 

District 9 _ 


.. . 948 


2,081 

District 10 - 


1,404 


1,950 

District 1 1 


1,128 

District 6 

606 

District 12 ... 


_ 1,526 


The slight reduction in total membership for the last fiscal year is attributed to three 
main factors: first of the total requisitions signed for last year's membership, 294 were 
not honored; secondly, the heavy snowfall early in the fall prevented canvassing; while 
the loss of MFU members from agriculture was the third factor. 

MEMBERSHIP REQUISITIONS 

Voluntary membership requisition for collection of MFU dues through the elevators 
is now in its second year of operation. A year ago this program was started with the 
Manitoba Pool Elevators and the United Grain Growers being the first grain-handling 
organizations to approve the requisitions. 

The signing of these requisitions began late in the membership year and as a result, 
organizers encouraged farmer-members to pay their 1959-60 membership fee in cash 
and apply their requisition to the following year. We ended the fiscal year with 624 
requisitions applicable, of which 294 were not paid at the end of the membership year. 
For the present membership year, we began our campaign with 1,031 requisitions through¬ 
out the province being qualified for membership deductions, and from all indications 
there will be a considerable number signed this year. Also, we began this year's cam- 


63 
















paign with all major grain-handling companies having approved the deduction of dues 
from grain deliveries at the elevator. 

Your Board of Directors find that there appears to be some confusion, with many 
elevator agents not having full information on these requisitions, and we have attempted 
to clarify this situation. The main problem remaining is to have all grain companies 
agree on a system of recognition for easy identification of members' delivery permits 
in areas where more than one elevator or company operates, because a farmer signing 
a requisition with a specific company may find himself in a position whereby he has 
to deliver to another. 

Although it had been expected that these requisitions for membership dues might 
be extended to products other than grain, It was felt that we should wait until satisfac¬ 
tory experience is available on the application and acceptability of this system with 
grain producers. We extend to all of the grain companies our appreciation and thanks 
for their co-operation in processing membership requisitions through their elevator agents. 


ACTIVITIES 


As in the past, the organizational activities of our Farm Union during the past year 
have continued to place emphasis on grassroots participation and control of agricultural 
policy. However, at this time when we are celebrating our Tenth Anniversary, it may 
be timely to suggest that in some areas there has been evidence that the individual 
members have shirked their responsibility to the organization and to their elected leaders 
by failing to attend their regular Local meetings. It is only through full participation 
of the members that your Provincial Boord will be in a position to constantly express 
the thinking of the farmers on the land. We therefore encourage all members to play 
a more active role in planning effective farm policy for the future. 


Local meeting activities can only be reported on the basis of information at Central 
Office, as in the past, but we do know that many of our Local organizations continue 
to function effectively and hold their regular monthly meetings. During the past year 


meeting arrangements made and speakers 


as follows: 

District 1 _ 24 

District 2 _ 37 

District 3 _ 39 

District 4 _ 39 

District 5 _ 39 

District 6 _ 14 


provided through your Central Office were 


District 7 _ 9 

District 8 _ 51 

District 9 _ 27 

District 10 _ 34 

District 1 1 _ 8 

District 12 _ 30 


A total of 351 meetings were held, with 17 stormed out. 

Recognition of our larger and active Local organizations was continued this year 
through provision of special out-of-province speakers and presentation of the "200 
CLUB" and "300 CLUB" plaques. Mr. Gordon Hill, President of the Ontario Farmers 
Union and IFUC Chairman Alf Gleave from Saskatchewan honored the following Locals 
who qualified for the membership awards: The "300 Club" plaques went to Selkirk 
Local 83 and Dominion City Local 162; the "200 Club" plaques went to Swan River 
Local 59, Dauphin Local 17, Gilbert Plains Local 1, Oakburn Local 58, Killarney Local 
246, Plumas Local 186, Neepawa Local 69, and St. Claude Local 102. 


Smaller Local organizations, which cannot reach the 200-member objective, are 
eligible for these same awards provided that they have 90 percent of the farmers 
in the district signed up as members. To date we have received no applications for 
the awards, but it is understood that such applications are pending for the present 
membership year. 

Provincial and national activities of the Farm Union movement covered a wide field 
of endeavor in the past year. It is not possible to go into detail on all issues in this 
report, but we will attempt to highlight the year's work. 

The MFU was represented at the annual Dominion-Provincial Agricultural Conference 
at Ottawa in November, 1959. 


64 














^bei&witUf 'Ifotttta Matt AiAtlled fey 


AGRICULTURAL BURSARIES 


In 1959-60 academic year, 114 young Manitobans received $44,- 
674.00 in bursaries enabling them to further their studies in professional 
or practical Agriculture at the University of Manitoba; 72 in degree and 
42 in diploma courses. 

Since the inception of the bursary awards in 1957, 279 students have 
benefited through this policy. Total money awarded to date, $136,000.00. 

Bursaries are available to deserving young Manitoba men who wish to 
pursue either professional or practical studies in Agriculture at the Uni¬ 
versity of Manitoba. 

Call your Agricultural Representative for details about the Bursary 
Plan. 


MANITOBA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE & CONSERVATION 


HON. GEO. HUTTON 
Minister 


J. R. BELL 
Deputy Minister 


65 




66 

















The Dairy Essay Contest, started a year ago throughout the Manitoba schools, was 
completed early in the year. However, it was evident that the participation in the project 
was limited to only a few schools. 

In December, the MFU supported the Fluid Milk Producers for an increase in the 
price of fluid milk shipped to the Winnipeg Milkshed. 

The major annual Submission to the Provincial Government was presented in January 
as usual. Submission was based on policy established at our last Annual Convention 
and Conventions of prior years. 

The MFU held several meetings with the provincial government and grain-handling 
co-operatives early in the year to co-ordinate policy on transportation problems in pre¬ 
paration for the Royal Commission on Transportation hearings held in Winnipeg in 

February. Your organization was highly complimented by the Chairman of the Com¬ 

mission and technical staff on the brief presented and the able presentation made by 
your President. This presentation was well supported by a heavy delegation of Farm 
Union members, which had an important bearing on the Commission. 

At the request of several Locals, the MFU presented a submission in opposition to 

the proposed disbandonment of the Hallboro-Beulah CPR Railway Line, at a special 

hearing of the Board of Transport Commissioners in Brandon, Manitoba. 

Following the passage of the Buyers Strike resolution at last year's Convention, your 
Board of Directors selected a Promotional Committee under the chairmanship of our 
Vice-President, H. J. Andresen — Herb McIntosh, S. J. Tripp, Edwyn Dalgliesh and Mrs. 
Beth Crewson comprising other members of the committee — to study and promote the 
strike issue. The report on their findings will be submitted to you at this Convention. 

The women members of our organization were authorized early in the year to assist 
in obtaining signatures and to participate in support of the Non-Nuclear Clubs, working 
towards the objective of banning nuclear weapons. 

Prior to the opening of the last session of Parliament, your Executive arranged 
for a luncheon reception and meeting in Winnipeg with all of the Manitoba Members 
of Parliament, in order to review and reach an understanding of agricultural policies 
odvocated by the Farmers Union. 

Prior to the establishment of deficiency payments on hogs the Farm Unions met 
with members of the Stabilization Board and the government to review the intent of 
the program, but failed to convince the government to apply the deficiency payment 
program on a regional or provincial basis. 

After numerous meetings with the Manitoba Minister of Agriculture and the Premier, 
your organization was able to effect several important changes in the administration 
and application of last year's crop disaster payments. However, we could not convince 
the Manitoba government to approve dual payments under PFAA and the Disaster 
Program, as was in effect in Alberta and Saskatchewan. 

Your organization took an active part in discussions and amendments of the Crop 
Insurance Test Areas program. We were instrumental in obtaining several important 
changes of the Act before it was finalized, but failed to gain some of the very important 
amendments deemed necessary for an effective and comprehensive crop insurance plan. 
Being requested by the government to assist in the promotion of the Test Areas program, 
your Board ruled that we would co-operate only to the extent of carrying out an 
educational program based on MFU established policy on Crop Insurance and outlining 
to our members the advantages and disadvantages of the present Act. 

Your Provincial and District Officers participated in the two Leadership Courses 
held at the Brandon Agricultural School in December and February, with our full quota 
of ten representatives at each Course. Our organization was highly complimented on 
the results of our educational program in support of the various other courses held 
throughout the winter at the Brandon School, which resulted in a satisfactory increase 
of participation by farm people in these courses. 


67 




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68 



Your Provincial Marketing Board Committee has been actively working throughout 
the year, developing an educational program on Marketing Boards in support of orderly 
marketing of agricultural products. 

A Provincial Timber Permit Committee, comprising representatives from Districts 1, 
2, 9, 10 and 12, was established. They met the Manitoba Minister of Mines and 
Natural Resources with plans to clarify some of the discrepancies in the Forestry and 
Timber Permit regulations. 

Three of our Provincial Officers accompanied the IFUC to Ottawa for the annual 
presentation to the Federal government early last year. 

In January, your President and Vice-President accompanied the Western Liaison 
Committee to their meeting with the Prime Minister and Cabinet in Ottawa, in support 
of deficiency payments to western grain producers. Following the acreage payment 
announcement, your President accompanied the Western Liaison Committee to a special 
meeting with the Prime Minister and Cabinet in September. Your Provincial officers 
attended all meetings of the Western Liaison Committee meetings during the year. 

The MFU was instrumental in organizing an effective opposition against colored 
margarine in Manitoba. Through the formation of the Joint Agricultural Producers Com¬ 
mittee, supported by seven organizations, and of which committee your President was 
elected chairman, a Joint Producers brief was presented to the Inquiry Commission and 
a separate brief to the Government of Manitoba protesting the report of the Commission 
which favored coloring of margarine. 

In February, your Executive presented a brief to the Horned Cattle Fund Board in 
support of clarification on the administration of the Fund, and were successful in 
obtaining approval from the Board for a grant towards a research program in livestock 
production costs. 

Your organization met with the Winnipeg City Council in opposition to Daylight 
Saving Time, and were successful in reducing the period of Daylight Saving Time by 
one month. 

In support of our Leadership Training program, we held the usual District Leadership 
Schools in all Districts in April. 

Your Board of Directors stand opposed to the formation of any more farm organiza¬ 
tions in Manitoba on a Commodity Group basis, because we feel it will create further 
disunity among farmers; we are satisfied that special groups of producers can be 
adequately represented through committee operations within a general farm organization. 

Early in March, several municipalities approached the MFU to press the provincial 
government for an extension of the freight assistance on feed and fodder after March 
15th, the terminating date set by the government. Your organization was able to 
negotiate with the Agricultural Minister for a successful extension of this legislation. 

Somewhat concerned over the prolonged Brandon Packers Strike, your Board of 
Directors instructed the President to use every means possible to bring about a settlement 
of the strike in the interests of producers, consumers and labor. Meetings were held with 
the government and labor representatives on several occasions, and a brief was prepared 
for presentation to the Brandon Inquiry Commission. However, after settlement of the 
strike was reached, and because our brief was concerned mainly with settlement, the 
MFU brief was not presented; it was felt that the issues which would come before the 
Inquiry Commission would be of an entirely internal nature, and labor and management 
would be able to deal with these questions adequately. 

Your second Vice-President represented the MFU at a special Farmer-Labor Seminar 
held in Ontario in June. 

Five officials of the MFU were invited to participate in the Farm Organization 
Conferences sponsored by the University of Manitoba. Three meetings have been held. 


69 



and at the last meeting on November 5th the University felt that progress at a policy 
level had been approached and therefore withdrew from future meetings. Mr. R. Brown, 
Vice-President of the United Grain Growers, is chairman of the continuing committee 
which is to work towards one practical-type farm organization for Manitoba. Amalgama¬ 
tion of the MFU and the MFA is not a subject of discussion, nor is it the intent of 
the conference to attempt any discussion whatsoever on amalgamation. This leaves the 
MFU request for a re-opening of negotiations with the Manitoba Federation of Agricul¬ 
ture still under consideration of the MFA since last April. 

The MFU was officially represented at the 25th Anniversary celebrations of the 
Co-op Oil Refinery in Regina. 

Arrangements were made to hold a Producers Egg Marketing School in Winnipeg 
on June 20th; however, lack of interest made it necessary to cancel the School. 

The Provincial chairman of the MFU Marketing Board Committee and members 
of this Committee attended a special Dairy and Poultry Marketing Board Conference 
called by the Manitoba Dairy and Poultry Co-operative. The Chairman of the MFU 
Committee has been named as permanent representative on the Committee established by 
this Conference. 

From time to time, your Provincial Officers are requested to attend political conven¬ 
tions. Following an invitation received from the CCF national organization to attend 
their National Convention in Regina as guest observers, your Board of Directors approved 
a policy whereby, in the future, MFU provincial officers will accept similar invitations 
from all political parties and will be permitted to clarify Farm Union policy if required 
at any political convention. 

Your Provincial organization has maintained the various provincial committees and 
appointments to the various Boards and Advisory Committees at government levels, 
a list of which is found elsewhere in this publication. 

Your President, together with three representatives from the Provincial Board, 
officially represented the MFU at the Hudson Bay Route Association Convention at 
Canora, Saskatchewan, this fall. 

A number of your Provincial and District officials attended the first National Farm 
Forum held in Winnipeg, promoted by the Chamber of Commerce, at which your 
President was one of the participants in a panel debate. 

Our Provincial Dairy Committee, in order to co-ordinate thinking and policy on 
behalf of the fluid milk shippers in the province, have approved the appointment of 
the Vice-President of the Winnipeg and District Milk Producers Association to the MFU 
Dairy Committee. 

Prior to the present membership campaign, three special Leadership Courses were 
held in the province for all District and Sub-District officers in order to co-ordinate the 
thinking of elected officers on MFU policy and their responsibilities as elected leaders. 

A special Farmers Union Manual has been prepared and distributed to all District, 
Sub-District and Local officers, to assist them in their understanding of the concept of 
leadership and responsibility of each respective office. 

A special Agricultural Survey has been approved by your Board, for the purpose 
of assisting your organization in more effective representation of the members and to 
obtain necessary statistical information as to the types of agricultural producers that 
we represent. 

Following the announcement by the Provincial Government of the 50 percent 
increase in hospital premiums, the MFU made a strong protest to the government, 
through presentation of a special brief to Health Minister Johnson in July, opposing 
such a high increase. 

The Farm Unions again opposed any increases in grain handling and storage tariffs 
at the Board of Grain Commissioners hearing in July. 


70 



Your MFU has played a leading role in negotiations with the Federal government 
for assistance to grain farmers during the past year. 

Special submissions were presented to the Tariff Board in Ottawa, opposing tariff 
increases on chemicals; and another submission was made on nails. 

A special submission was presented to the Automotive Industry Inquiry in Ottawa. 
Upon request of the Inquiry Chairman a special supplementary submission was made on 
November 7th. 

Preparations have been completed for presentation of a submission to the Farm 
Machinery Inquiry, set up by the Federal government. 

Further to the foregoing highlights of activities, the MFU as an organization has 
maintained a constant vigilance on all developments of agricultural or economic nature 
which affect the farm people and has been at all times prepared to continue its fight 
in the interests of the farmer. 


ADMINISTRATION 

As in the past, administration of Farm Union affairs has continued to be a heavy 
responsibility of your Provincial Officers and Central Office staff. Farm Union members 
in general are demanding more and more services at all levels of organization. 

Although it had been anticipated that the facilities of our Central Office might 
have been moved during the year, financial circumstances prevented such a move and 
your Board of Directors have not been able to comply with their decision of a year ago, 
for purchase of property and possible ownership of our own headquarters. 

Preparations for National Farm Union Week campaign once again involved a very 
strenuous period of preparation for Central Office staff, and your Board of Directors 
wishes to extend to them our sincere appreciation for their untiring efforts throughout 
the year. 


SERVICES 

Voice of the Farmer 

Our official publication, the Voice of the Farmer, is now in its fifth year of service 
to the public and appears to have been accepted by our readers as an effective agri¬ 
cultural publication, through which medium we have brought to the public a clearer 
understanding of agricultural problems and conditions within the economy of the nation. 

We believe that the individual members could play an important role in the 
expansion of our circulation by contact and publicizing the publication to friends and 
relatives in the towns and cities in the province. Circulation of the paper has been main¬ 
tained above 10,000 throughout the year, and during the past six months, advertising 
revenue covers the entire cost of printing and mailing of our publication. 

Income Tax Department 

The MFU Income Tax Department has now proven its benefit to the members 
and, from all indications, it appears that expansion of this Department with additional 
staff will be necessary. A full report of its operation is given by the Manager of the 
Income Tax Department elsewhere in this publication. 

Discount Buying 

Your Board of Directors have been able to make arrangements once again this 
year for the purchase of binder and baler twine from two firms in Winnipeg and, through 
this action, we are confident that retail prices of twines throughout the province have 
been held down generally, not to mention the additional savings obtained by those 
members dealing with the firms with whom agreement has been reached. 


71 



MFU Auto Insurance Pool 

We now have a full year's experience in our auto insurance pool and can evaluate 
the progress made. One of the major difficulties in the growth of this project has been 
the fact that the Co-operative Fire and Casualty Company, underwriters of the Pool, 
did not have adequate agencies in the province to do the necessary work required. 
Although there are still a few areas where agencies need to be established, most of the 
province is now covered, which has resulted in favorable increases in policies during 
the past few months. Approximately 1,000 policies are in force in the Pool and your 
Board of Directors hope that in the present fiscal year we will have enough vehicles 
to reach the 5,000 vehicles required to launch the operations of the Pool. 

The Board of Directors are somewhat concerned over the fact that Farm Union 
members themselves have not used this program to full advantage, because the expe¬ 
rience shown in Alberta has been most encouraging and shows very favorable possibilities 
for the future. 

General Fire Insurance Pool 

Because of the success of the Auto Insurance Pool in Alberta, the Farmers Union 
in that province are prepared to extend this service to the members under a general 
fire insurance pool, to cover farm buildings and equipment. 

The Co-operative Fire and Casualty Company are prepared to underwrite this program, 
but favor an interprovincial scheme. 

The delegates will be asked to consider this proposal through a proper resolution 
scheduled to appear at this Convention. 

Group Pension Plan 

In previous years, the Convention approved the study and implementation of a 
security and protection program for MFU members through a group insurance scheme. 
Once again, we wish to report that although such programs are readily available through 
several companies at very substantial savings, no concrete action has been taken, because 
interest among members has been too limited to warrant implementation of such a pro¬ 
gram. Your Provincial Insurance Committee feel that unless considerably more interest 
is shown, it will not be worthwhile to commence such a service. 

Grievances 

As in the past, your Central Office has continued to service members on many 
individual complaints and grievances on a wide field of problems, without cost to the 
individual member. The scope of these activities is limited, however, because of the 
burden of work upon Head Office staff. These services will have to be curtailed unless 
our staff is expanded. 


FINANCES 

Membership income remains our main source of revenue in the organization, and 
during the fiscal year our total membership revenue has declined slightly from that of 
a year ago. The revenue received during the year from our Educational and Organizational 
Fund, started a year ago, assisted materially in keeping our financial position in the black. 

Our secondary source of revenue comes from financial grants from other organiza¬ 
tions. During the past year, grants were received from the Manitoba Pool Elevators for 
$10,000, and the United Grain Growers for $4,000. The UGG grant for the present 
fiscal year was actually only $2,000; the other $2,000 was received last November, 
and should apply to our 1958-59 fiscal year. 

Your Board of Directors, on behalf of the membership, wish to extend to these 
organizations, our sincere appreciation and thanks for the recognition and financial support. 


72 



'1 


Additional grants received during the past year included $750 from the North-West 
Line Elevator Association, in support of our National Farm Union Week campaign. This 
grant was directed to the Interprovincial Farm Union Council and is to be shared equally 
among Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. 

We are advised that the grant from the Manitoba Pool Elevators was reduced at this 
year's Convention to $5,000. In view of this, an earnest effort will be required to increase 
membership revenue in order to maintain the operation of the Manitoba Farmers Union 
for the present fiscal year; moreover, because of the reduction in grants, some source 
of supplementary income will be required. 

The Voice of the Farmer and the Income Tax Department have had a successful 
year and have shown a profit, but this source should not be classed as general revenue, 
because it is mainly for provision of services to the membership. 

Our MFU Building Fund Account, after being dormant for a while, was revived during 
the past year. However, we feel that the results of the campaign did not come up to 
our expectations. A number of our Local organizations have put forth a good effort, 
and we extend our appreciation to them. But, in this regard, it is felt that many other 
Locals could have done a better job during the past year. 

The Ottawa Action Fund, in support of a national office in Ottawa, has shown a 
favorable increase this year; total contributions hove amounted to $1,618.66. Details 
of these contributions have been carried each month in the Voice of the Farmer, and 
we are sure that the contributions made will assist materially the objective of maintain¬ 
ing a national office in Ottawa in the future. Your Board of Directors believe that a 
permanent policy of some kind must be established with each of the provincial Farm 
Unions, so as to ensure a constant annual income in order that this objective may be 
retained on a permanent basis. 

The major change in financing of our District organizations, implemented last year 
under an organizational cost budget, now gives us one year of experience. While some 
Districts have not spent their total allocations, others have required additional funds to 
finish their work. Under this budget program the following amounts have been expended: 


Budget Total expended 

District 1 _—$ 630.00 $ 459.06 

District 2 _ 1,100.00 737.42 

District 3 _ 800.00 800.39 

District 4 _ 950.00 1,211.52 

District 5 ... _ 800.00 861.82 

District 6 _ 500.00 494.72 

District 7 _ 650.00 389.25 

District 8 _ 950.00 1,130.44 

District 9 _ 500.00 762.88 

District 10_ 650.00 757.83 

District 1 1 _ 650.00 453.43 

District 12 _ _ .. 300.00 414.35 


Out of the total budget of $9,000, the Districts' expenditures amounted to $8,473.09. 

For further detailed information on income and expense for the fiscal year, you are 
referred to the Auditors Report on Revenue and Expenditure appearing in this publication. 

CONCLUSION 

We have placed before you a resume of the activities and progress of your occupa¬ 
tional farm movement in Manitoba and, concluding, we wish to extend to all of our 
members and friends the compliments of the season, and best wishes for the coming 
year. We also wish to extend to you, as the delegote body, sincere wishes for every 
success in your deliberations at this, our Tenth Annual Convention. 


73 
















Congratulation 4 to the jU 3 ll p 


Best Wishes to 

the Manitoba Farmers' Union from 

ST. CLAUDE CREAMERY 

Highest Market Prices For Your Ice Cream 
Accurate Weight, Grade and Test 

Phone 20-2 ST. CLAUDE, Man. 


ST. CLAUDE HOTEL 

G. Burgoyne, Mgr. and Prop. 

Rooms, Excellent Meals 
Courtesy and Service 

Phone 27 ST. CLAUDE 


ST. CLAUDE GARAGE 

Ford, Monarch and Edsel Cars 
and Trucks — Farm Implements 
Sales — Service — Parts — Repairs 
R. Pineau & Sons - Ph. 25—ST. CLAUDE 


Best Wishes to St. Claude Local 102 

M. JOBIN 

GENERAL MERCHANT 
Over 50 Years Service 

Phone 1 ST. CLAUDE 


ARBEZ LUMBER & HARDWARE 

Your Marshall Wells Store 
Builders' Supplies 
Electrical Appliances—Giftware 
Phone 5 ST. CLAUDE 


CHARLES DUPASQUIER 


ST. CLAUDE TRADING 

Experienced Insurance Agent 


Selling: Fire, Hail, Polio, Burglary 


Groceries, Tobacco, Dry Goods 

Casualty, Windstorm and Automobile 
Garage Auto Service 


Flour and Feed 

Phone 40 — ST. CLAUDE 


Ph. 32 - E. Boile, Prop. — ST. CLAUDE 


ROCAN ELECTRIC 


ST. CLAUDE BAKERY 



Phone 77 ST. CLAUDE, Man. 

Philco, Frigidaire—Electric 

Appliances—B.A. Gas & Oil 


For Bread - Buns - Pies - Donuts and Pastries 


Ask us about catering your weddings 

Phone 4 ST. CLAUDE 


and banquets 


GASTON ARBEZ & SONS 


Support 

ST. CLAUDE LOCKER PLANTS 


Our 

Fresh & Frozen Meats, Poultry, Fish 


Silverwood Ice Cream 


Advertisers 

Phone 31 ST. CLAUDE 



74 















M on their TJenth c4nniverAary, 


COMMERCIAL HOTEL 


Compliments of 

RUNNING WATER 


DR. PIERRE FLIPOT 

Rooms — Meals — Confectionery 
Courtesy & Service 


Veterinary Surgeon 

L. A. Bernard Phone 3 — ST. CLAUDE 


ST. CLAUDE Manitoba 


ST. CLAUDE TRANSFER 


TOUGAS TRANSFER 

Livestock Return Freight to Farmers 


GENERAL FREIGHT SERVICE 

Daily Milk Service 


Manitoba Truck Depot 

ST. CLAUDE Ph. 37—WPG. Ph. SP 2-3018 


ST. CLAUDE Ph. 52 Wpg. Ph. WH 2-3223 


RAYMOND CHATEL 

Your Local Insurance Agent 

Fire—Theft—Automobile 

Phone 5 ST. CLAUDE 


ROLAND'S SERVICE STATION 

SNACK BAR 

Power Chain Saws — Penner Tires 

B.A. Dealer 

Phone 19 ST. CLAUDE 



CAREL'S RED & WHITE 

Groceries - Dry Goods - Shoes 
Smallwares - Flour - Feeds 


C. A. BERNARD 

John Deere Sales & Service 

DeLaval Agency 

Imperial Oil Bulk Sales 

Phone 9 ST. CLAUDE 


COMMERCIAL GARAGE 

JEAN LEDUC, Prop. 

Massey-Harris Sales & Service 
General Repairs 
Elephant Brand Fertilizers 
Phone 29 ST. CLAUDE 


BINNE MOTORS 

Sales - Service, All makes of Cars 
Gchl & Beattie Equipment 
Minneapolis-Moline — Feed Cutters 
Phone 26 ST. CLAUDE 


EUGENE REPAIR SHOP 


ST. CLAUDE AUTO BODY SHOP 

Welding & General Repairs 

ST. CLAUDE, Man. 


Henri Dacquay, Prop. 

Body Repairs & Painting 

ST. CLAUDE, Man. 


75 














MANITOBA FARMERS UNION 

STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
for the Year ended October 31st, 1960 


RECEIPTS 

Membership Dues _ 

District Fees _ 

Miscellaneous Income - --------- 

Organization Grants — 

Manitoba Pool Elevators _ 

United Grain Growers -—- 1959 
— I960 


Others - 


$10,000.00 

2,000.00 

2,000.00 

4.00 


Interprovincial Farm Union Council 

Action Fund _ 

"Voice of the Farmer" 

Subscriptions _ _ 

Advertising __ 


Convention Program Advertising _ 

Educational and Organizational Fund _ 

Registration Fees _ 

Income Tax Service Fees __ _ _ 

Manitoba Hospital Service Plan — 

Advance Premium ___ 

Manitoba Medical Service — 

Advance Premium _ 

Farm Women's Week - 

Building Fund — Bank Interest_ 

Building Fund — Certificates _ 

Sale of Ledgers and Stationery _ 246.57 

Union Buttons _ 17.00 

Ties _ 45.00 


Associated Country Women of the World 
Bank Interest on Savings Account _ _ 


8,583.05 

4,229.85 


$42,429.47 

2,209.85 

654.41 


14,004.00 

1,618.66 


12,812.90 
2,143.23 
14,644.78 
505.00 
1 1,527.50 

214.45 

2,259.48 

77.40 

90.05 

885.99 


308.57 
1 1.25 
102.52 


DISBURSEMENTS 

Automobile 1,490.00 

Furniture and Fixtures _ _ — - - 463.40 

Manitoba Medical Service . 2,095.30 

Manitoba Hospital Service _ —. 213.15 

District Fees _ 2,255.60 

Educational and Organizational Fund — 

Prize Awards _ 4,366.57 

Rebates to Districts _ ... _ 2,121.50 6,488.07 

Associated Country Women of the World . 33.49 

Advances to Districts — 

Brandon Barbecue _ — 376.85 

Legal Fees Re: 

Acquisition of Meeting Halls - 385.54 

- 762.39 


Forward _ $13,801.40 


$106,499.51 


$106,499.51 


76 





































STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS—CONT'D 


Forward 


Disbursements — Continued 
Provincial Officials — 

Salaries and Allowances _$15,163.29 

Mileage and Other ___ 1,908.36 


Directors Organization Expense _ 

Woman's Directors' Organization Expense 

Other Organizing Expense _ 

Central Office Salaries _ 

Casual Help_ 


Income Tax Services—Salaries _ 8,191.80 

Income Tax Services—Administration_ 920.00 

Income Tax Services—Other Expense _ 1,545.84 


Hall Rentals _ 

Convention Expense _ 

Delegation Expense ___ 

Office Rent_ 

Printing and Stationery _ 

Office Repairs and Supplies _ 

Farm Women's Week ___ 

Legal and Audit _ 

Postage _ _ 

Telephone _ 

Advertising _ 

Unemployment Insurance _ 

Inter Provincial Farm Union _ 

Board of Directors' Meeting Expense _ 

Public Relations _ 

Bank Charges _ 

Car Expense _ 

"Voice of the Farmer" 

Administration _ 3,000.00 

Printing and Postage _ 5,144.68 

Miscellaneous _ 965.27 


Affiliate Membership and Public Relations 

National Farm Union Week _ 

Leadership Course _ 


$13,801.40 


17,071.65 
4,299.98 
1,488.35 
3,941.70 
1 1,209.07 
299.50 


10,657.64 

178.65 

3,016.13 

1,431.75 

2,572.00 

4,259.38 

1.244.68 

476.87 
275.00 

2,016.04 

1,421.62 

3.584.69 

370.88 
2,249.10 
2,357.21 

464.77 

93.85 

1,577.79 


9,109.95 

60.00 

1,270.62 

483.00 


Excess of Receipts over Disbursements ___ 

Cash on Hand and in Bank, October 31st, 1959 _ 

Cash on Hand and in Bank, October 31st, 1960 _ _ 

Cash on Hand - _ _ $ 1,146.40 

Petty Cash Fund _ 150.00 

Cash in Bank of Nova Scotia—Current _ 3,176.01 

—Savings Account _ . 5,859.09 

—Building Fund Account 5,581.52 


$106,499.51 


101,283.27 

5,216.24 

10,696.78 

$ 15,913.02 


$ 15,913.02 


77 







































November 16th, 1960. 

To The Members, 

Manitoba Farmers' Union. 

Dear Sirs: 

We have examined the accounts of the Manitoba Farmers' Union for 
the year ended October 31st, 1960. Included in the Cash Disbursements are 
the following advances on behalf of the districts which will be recovered during 
the 1960-61 year: 

Re Brandon Barbecue $ 376.85 

Legal Fees covering Acquisition of Meeting Halls 385.54 

Total $ 762.39 


We report that we have obtained all the information and explanations 
we have reguired and in our opinion, the appended Statement properly sets forth 
the Cash Receipts and Disbursements for the year, according to the best of our 
information, the explanations given to us and as shown by the books of the Union. 

Yours truly, 

Robison, Green & Company 

Chartered Accountants. 


When in Swan Valley 
For All Your Requirements Shop at 

SWAN VALLEY CONSUMERS 
CO-OPERATIVE LIMITED 

"Northern Manitoba's Finest Shopping Centre" 

Groceries, Dry Goods, Hardware, Service Station, Petroleum 

and Lumber 

See your Co-Op First 

Phone 700 Drawer 969 Swan River, Man. 


PORTAGE CREDIT UNION 
SOCIETY LTD. 

Savings — Current Accts — Loans 
Free Life Insurance on Savings 
Three-way Loan Protection 
Members' Owned 

Box 218 Phone 7-6851 

Office: Co-op Shopping-Centre 

PORTAGE LA PRAIRIE MANITOBA 


78 






GORDON'S SERVICE 

Chev — Olds — Pontiac — Buick 
Corvair — Tempest 
"Your Best Deal All-Ways" 

Allis Chalmers Equipment — Phone 3421 

Your Car, Truck, Tractor Headquarters at 
Erickson 


Compliments of 

ST. JEAN CO-OP 


Agents for Gasoline, Fuel Oil, Grease 
Phone 3453 
ST. JEAN, Manitoba 
BEST WISHES 


ERICKSON TRANSFER 


Support your 

Manitoba Pool Elevator Assn. 

Long Distancce Hauling 



To and From Winnipeg and Brandon 


Capacity: 100,000 Bus. 

Phone WH 3-7659 Winnipeg 


Dave Friesen, Agent 

3441 Erickson 


Phone 3401 ST. JEAN, Man. 


Congratulations to the M.F.U. on Their 


Best Wishes from 

10th Anniversary from 


VERMETTE MOTORS 

Ford, Falcon and Monarch Dealers 

ERICKSON LOCAL 66 - M.F.U. 


J. 1. Case Sales and Service 

Phone 3381 ST. JEAN 


Compliments of 


Compliments of 

JOE'S BARBER SHOP 


Alfred Roy Trading Co. Ltd. 

GROCERIES AND SPORTING GOODS 


QUALITY SEED AND PEAS 

JOE LENKEWICH 


Phone 3597 - Res. Phone 3405 

ERICKSON MANITOBA 


St. JEAN MANITOBA 


Compliments of 


Best Wishes 

COMMERCIAL HOTEL 


ST. JEAN HOTEL 

ERICKSON, MANITOBA 


COURTESY AND SERVICE 

Rooms — Meals 


L. Roch, Prop. 

L. Penonzek Phone 3601 


Phone 3591 ST. JEAN, Man. 


Compliments of 



Manitoba Dairy & Poultry 


TESSIER BROS. 

Co-Operative Ltd. 


HARDWARE, AUTOMOBILES 

E. COLLINS, MANAGER 


GARAGE, INSURANCE 

Cream, Eggs, Poultry and Baby Chicks 
ERICKSON, MANITOBA 


Phone 311-3 ST. JEAN, MAN. 


Support your 


Compliments 

Manitoba Pool 


ST. JEAN TRANSFER 

Elevator Association 


LIVESTOCK AND GENERAL FREIGHT 

575 Logan Ave., Winnipeg 

SERVICE AT COST 


Phone SP 4-3931 

ERICKSON — POOL No. 7 


St. Jean: Phone 3479 


Erickson Consumer Co-Operative 
Ltd. 

Operated for your Benefit . . . not for Profit 
GROCERIES, DRYGOODS, HARDWARE, 

GAS AND OIL 

Phone 3311 - 3461 ERICKSON 


D. DUPAS SHOE HOUSE 

Full range of Shoes and Dry Goods 
Clothing, Wedding Gifts 
Shoe Repairs, Canvas Repairs 
Chairs and Car Cushions Repaired 
St. JEAN MANITOBA 


79 


















MANITOBA FARMERS UNION 

9nc<une *7ax, ^epasit+nent 

This Department commenced operations during the winter of 1955-1956, which turned 
out to be a most unfavourable season for a venture of this nature. 

The success of the undertaking depended to a great extent on available transportation, 
and Mother Nature certainly squashed that early in the season by sending a super¬ 
abundance of snow, which put bus and train schedules out of kilter, in all areas and for 
extended periods. Some roads were "plugged' until the spring thaws set in. 

It was understood among Farm Union officials that this new Department had to stand 
on its own feet, or be dropped. 

The result of our first year's operation showed that some three hundred members 
entrusted their income tax affairs to this new Department, and the Department slid, 
neatly, in the hole to the extent of around twelve hundred dollars. 

However, it was decided to carry on. Fortunately, this time, conditions were more 
favorable and the results more gratifying. Had we experienced a repetition of the previous 
year's conditions, it might have been the death knell of the new Manitoba Farmers Union 
Income Tax Department, and wound up with the obituary "Died in Infancy". 

Better things were in store for this "infant". It continued to grow and increased its 
sphere of endeavour, until practically the whole of the farming area of Manitoba, 
barring The Pas district, was being served by the Manitoba Farmers Union Income Tax 
Department. 

Today we believe it to be the largest organization of its kind in the history of Mani¬ 
toba, with a membership very close to a thousand, and a gross income of between eleven 
and twelve thousand dollars. 

Had fees been charged comparable to others in the business, we estimate that a surplus 
of between fifteen and twenty thousand dollars would have been set up in 1959. 

The objective of the Manitoba Farmers Union was not to build up a huge surplus of 
this nature but to give a service to the members at, or near, cost. 

Certainly a service has been given as originally planned. The members using this 
Department have saved, or actually received government cheques, in the form of refunds 
for taxes paid in prior years, amounting to over one hundred and fifty thousand dollars. 

We have been successful in establishing Basic Herds for a great number of members. 
Our guess is that we have doubled the number of established Basic Herds in Manitoba, 
since the Manitoba Farmers Union opened its Income Tax Department. 

One man obtained a Basic Herd of one hundred and ninety-eight head. This means in 
reality that the proceeds from the sale of these animals will not be taxable income! 

We are proud of our record in dealing with Net Worth Assessments made by the 
government on members of the Manitoba Farmers Union Income Tax Department, who 
have relied on us to look after their income tax affairs. In each and every case dealt 
with the assessment has been reduced and, in more than one case, the Assessment has 
been wiped out entirely. 

An organization of this kind fills a great gap for the many who need help and 
guidance, a place to turn to when assistance is really needed, a "go-between" between 
the farmer and the Federal Revenue Department. 

We know that the Manitoba Farmers Union Income Tax Department is held in high 
regard by the Federal Income Tax Office in Winnipeg. 


80 



This does not mean that we tag along with all decisions made by them; far from it. 
On more than one occasion we have objected to their rulings and started appeal pro¬ 
ceedings with proper officials in Ottawa. Any time we have done this, we have always 
succeeded in having our position upheld, and of course, to our clients' benefit. 

The Manitoba Farmers Union Income Tax Department opened with a staff of one. 
Last year, three were fully employed compiling income tax returns during the filing 
season and were ably assisted in their work by Head Office Staff, which was appreciated. 

The Manitoba Farmers Income Tax Department has added greatly to the membership 
of the Farm Union. Last year it collected over seven hundred dollars in membership fees, 
without additional expense to the Union. 

Many members appreciate the fact that should they have income tax trouble they 
can rely on being helped by their own Income Tax Department, who have had experience 
on both sides of the fence. 


Officials of your Income Tax Department anticipate being present during the Conven¬ 
tion and will be only too pleased to discuss your own particular problems, if asked to do so. 


Support 

Our 

Advertisers 


LUNDAR DRUGS 

Your Headquarters 
for Veterinary Supplies 

LUNDAR Phone 5431 



Compliments of 

Maple Leaf Creamery Co. Ltd. 

Phone 5241 

LUNDAR, MAN. 


Compliments of 

G AND E CASH STORE 

General Merchants 

LUNDAR Phone 5331 


Best Wishes to MFU 


Congratulations & Good Wishes 

on Your 10th Anniversary 


LOCAL 20, MFU, LUNDAR 

Arnolds Radio & T.V. Service 


Together We Live 

Divided We Give 

LUNDAR Man. 


All Our Products Away 


Greetings from 

FORD LUNDAR GARAGE 

LUNDAR Man. 


Good Wishes on 


Your 10th Anniversary 


JOHNSON'S STORE 


Phone 5361 


LUNDAR 

Man. 


Congratulations to MFU on 

Your 

Tenth Anniversary 


LUNDAR BAKERY 


A. V. OLSON 

LUNDAR 

Proprietor 

Man. 

Phone 5341 



May 

Your Tenth Anniversary be 


a 100% Success 


LUNDAR HOTEL 


C. Kelm 

LUNDAR 

Man. 


Success at your annual gathering 


Compliments to the MFU Delegates 
on the Annual Convention 

BRECKMAN BROS. 


FISHER THEATRE 

GENERAL MERCHANTS 


D. MELNYK, Mgr. 

Phone 5281 


INSURANCE AGENT 

LUNDAR Manitoba 


Phone 6361 


81 














*7e*t tyeaxt Ti/Ct/i t&e 

by J. N. GALONSKY, Secretary Treasurer 

Fifteen years ago I became interested in the theory (and the hope) that if farmers 
could only get together through an effective occupational organization, they should be 
able to control their destiny and uphold their strategic importance within the economy 
of the notion. 

My public service with farm people began in my early years. After serving as 
Director of the Farmers Union for nearly two years, in 1948 I took over as Provincial 
Secretary from the original Secretary, Alf Gray of Gilbert Plains. 

The Manitoba Farmers Union era of 1946-50, under President J. L. Gunia, began 
at the time of the historic Farmers Union non-delivery strike in Alberta in 1946. During 
the latter part of 1946 and 1947, the MFU sprouted mainly in the north-western and 
interlake areas with some 20 Local organizations being formed, with approximately 1,200 
members. Because of favorable economic conditions and inadequate leadership, member¬ 
ship declined until mid-1950, when, under the determined efforts annd dynamic leader¬ 
ship of Jake Schulz, ably assisted by Howard Britton of Grandview, the organization 
flourished and mushroomed all across the province. At the re-organization convention 
in Portage la Prairie in January, 1951, a solid foundation for a true provincial organiza¬ 
tion was laid, and from the nearly defunct Farmers Union in 1949, the "Schulz era" 
(as I prefer to call it) during 1950-54, showed constant growth of the movement until 
it reached its peak membership in 1953 with over 30,000 members. 

Having now served under the leadership of four Presidents — Gunia, Schulz, Patter¬ 
son and Usick, and three Women Presidents, Mesdames Kutcher, Dyck and McIntosh — 
the first five years I will chalk up to experience and wishful thinking. However, it is most 
interesting to recollect and recount the developments and the progress that has been made 
in the lost decade. 

On this occasion when we are commemorating our Tenth Anniversary, I would prefer 
to talk about the farmer as an individual and as I have seen him throughout the years. 

First of all — Who is this "farmer critter"? What is he in the economic system of 
our country? What does he contribute to the natural wealth of our nation? And what 
is his behavior? 


82 


Kind Greetings to the MFU Delegates 
and Local 16 at the Annual Convention 
WALTER KOSIE — PHONE 6392 

NORTHERN GARAGE 

FISHER BRANCH 

Repairing Cars, Trucks and Tractors 
William Penn and Quaker State Motor Oil 


MASSEY-FERGUSON AGENCY 
White Rose Gas & Oil 
Pool Room 

HUSACK IMPLEMENTS 

Phone 6327 

FISHER BRANCH — MANITOBA 


Compliments of Local 16, 

Fisher Branch, Manitoba 

FARMERS! JOIN THE M.F.U. 


AND BE ORGANIZED LIKE OTHER GROUPS 


Best Wishes to the Delegates of 
the Farmers Union and Local 16 

J. A. RIVARD & SON LTD. 

SOLO — ALLIED STORE 

Phone 6231 FISHER BRANCH 


Kind Wishes to the MFU Convention 

ZUKE MOTORS & IMPLEMENTS 

J. M. ZUKE 

Cockshutt Sales and Service 
Chrysler - Plymouth - Fargo Dealers 

Phone 6293 FISHER BRANCH 


Compliments to the Delegates 
at the Annual Convention 

INTERLAKE HOTEL 

J. PELLETIER, Manager 
FISHER BRANCH, Phone 6351 


FISHER CLOTHING STORE 

Best Wishes to the Manitoba Farmers 
Union Annual Convention 

M. N. PAWLOWICH 

For Clothing See Us . . . Men's, Ladies', 
Children's Clothing and Footwear 

Phone 6313 FISHER BRANCH 


Best Wishes 

UKRAINIAN NATIONAL HOME 

FRED WEVURSKY, President 

FISHER BRANCH Manitoba 


Best Wishes to All Delegates 
at the MFU Convention 

Fisher Branch Pool Elevator Assoc. 

PETE LABETT, Agent 

Phone 6284 


For Good Service Call 

HARRY'S FREIGHTERS 


GENERAL FREIGHT TO AND FROM 
WINNIPEG TO FISHER BRANCH 
308 FOUNTAIN AVE. 

MANITOBA TRUCK DEPOT 

Fisher Branch Ph. 6252 - Winnipeg WH 3-7659 


Best Wishes to the MFU Convention 

WM. ZUBATIUK 


NORTH-WEST FEED MILL 

Dealer: 

FLOUR and FEED 

FISHER BRANCH Ph. 6333 Manitoba 


Compliments of 

FISHER BRANCH CO-OP. 

WALTER WOWCHUK, Manager 
Phone 6202 


OIL, FUEL, ANTI-FREEZE 
HARDWARE, DRY GOODS AND 
GROCERIES 


83 














Many farm people, as well as the public in general, appear to be so very misinformed 
os to the importance of agriculture in our economy. Although there may be less than 
15 percent of the population engaged in the production of food, 43 percent of our 
total population is entirely dependent upon agriculture for their livelihood. Our Canadian 
farmer is a vast potential force in the economic position of Canada. It is estimated that 
in the U.S.A., 65 percent of new wealth created in that economy each year is created 
by agriculture. In Canada, agriculture accounts for a much larger proportion of the 
national income — thus a larger share of our new wealth. 

As further examples — from the various reports available there are mare than 
1,000,000 cars, tractors, and trucks on Canadian farms; their annual expenses, including 
depreciation and financing, amount to $453,000,000. About 11,000 tons of pig iron 
annually goes into the production of agricultural implements. This industry employs more 
than 10,000 workers with a payroll of better than $42,000,000 annually. 

In 1957 there were more than 9,000 establishments with over 250,000 employees 
manufacturing and processing products of Canadian farm origin, producing more than 
$4.5 billion worth of products and an employee payroll of $763,000,000. 

Canadian farmers purchase annually $350 million of commercial feed and seed; spend 
$200 million for hired labor; pay $143 million in taxes; spend $105 million on repairs 
to buildings; $70 million on fertilizers; $63 million on rents; $38 million on fruit and 
vegetable supplies; pay out $47 million in interest on debts; spend $20 million on pest 
control; buy $20 million worth of electric power each year, and spend an additional 
$129 million on various miscellaneous items. 

To project our contribution even further -— one-eighth of the total revenue from 
motor transport of commodities and one-fifth of the revenue from oil carload freight is 
paid by the farmers of Canada. 

Now, on the average, what has the farmer done as an individual to try and improve 
his position to compare with people in other walks of life? What has he done to attempt 
to reduce his costs — other than grumble about the situation, and pay more each suc¬ 
cessive year? 

I believe it can be quite properly estimated that some 20 percent of our farmers 
in Manitoba appreciate and understand that, in order to keep pace with our highly 
organized society, they too require to be organized through an effective occupational 
organization. Next, I see 20 percent of our farmers who are the regular in-and-outers — 
these support the organization for one or two years, then drop out, expecting that miracles 
should have resulted the first year; then in a year or two they come back into thei organi¬ 
zation again. Most of this group are the type that prefer to "let George do it" for them. 

Next we have a grouping of farmers, possibly 10 percent, who are the self-centred 
individuals whose only ambition is material gain. They contribute nothing whatsoever to 
planning or proposals of farm policy or community affairs, but are the first to grab any 
advantages that are gained through organized effort. 

Following this group is another 20 percent of farmers who are confident and hopeful 
that politicians, or religion, will serve the purpose and guide their destiny for them. The 
next 20 percent surround themselves in small cliques with little Empire-Builders guiding 
them; or, believe that Co-operatives alone will solve all of their problems for them. 

The last 10 percent of our farmers are those who just "don't give a damn" about 
today or tomorrow, and who flounder around from day to day, riding on the other 
fellow's back. 

In spite of the foregoing classification, from time to time most farmers will agree 
that occupational organization has its place, because in the past ten years — on the 
basis of our membership records -— I believe it is proper to say that 75 percent of all 
farmers in Manitoba have been members of the Farmers Union at one time or another. 


84 



MOOSEHORN CREAMERY 

Best Wishes for a Successful Convention 
A. O. CUTHBERT, Prop. 

MOOSEHORN MANITOBA 


Best Wishes from 

J. JOHNSON'S 

STORE 

GROCERIES, DRY 

GOODS 

HARDWARE, ICE 

CREAM 

Phone 320-23 

MOOSEHORN 


NORTHERN MOTORS 

YOUR FORD AND MONARCH DEALER 
Cars - Trucks - Ford Tractors 
Sales and Service 
Parts and Repairs 
D. FERGUSON — Phone 301 R2-1 
MOOSEHORN 


Best Wishes 

MOOSEHORN HOTEL 

For Courtesy and Service 
Rooms and Meals 
See Frank and Olga 

Phone 302, R22 MOOSEHORN, MAN. 


Best Wishes 

To the MFU Convention 

INTERLAKE EXCAVATING & 
GRAVEL SERVICE 

R. TOBER _ _ MOOSEHORN 


NORTH WEST TRANSFER 

Moosehorn 

GENERAL FREIGHT AND LIVESTOCK 

Phone 319-32 — Moosehorn 
WH 2-2355 — Winnipeg 


For Good Service Call . . . 

MOOSEHORN FREIGHTERS 

P. KOZAK, PROP. 


MOOSEHORN LOCAL NO. 25 

Compliments and Best Wishes for a 

General Freight To and From Winnipeg 


P. KOZAK, PROP. 


Successful Convention from the 

Phono 304, R2 MOOSEHORN or 



WH 3-0219, WINNIPEG 


MANITOBA FARMERS UNION 


Best Wishes 

To the MFU Convention 

Moosehorn Consumer Co-Op. 

CO-OP BLOCK 

MOOSEHORN Manitoba 


BUY RITE STORE 


Groceries and Hardware 


E. L. Keisman 


Phone 302R2 


MOOSEHORN 

MAN. 


TRUCKING 

None to Large None to Small 

Phone 567 

REMPEL TRANSFER 

MORDEN TO WINNIPEG 

Winnipeg Phones WH 3-7659 - WH 3-7877 
BOX 21 MORDEN, MAN. 


MORDEN TIRE SHOP 

ED. RIECHERT, Prop. 

BOX, 521, MORDEN 
Vulcanizing & Tire Service — Gas & Oil 
General Trucking 
Phone 160 — Res. 155 
FIRESTONE TIRES & DOMINION ROYAL TIRES 


A. W. LIVINGSTON & SON 


WALTER'S FARM EQUIPMENT 

MARSHALL WELLS STORES — FURNITURE 


P.O. Box 747 — Phone 39 

Phone 37 — Phone4 


MORDEN Manitoba 

Phone 37 Phone 4 


MASSEY-FEGUSON 

MORDEN, MANITOBA 


SALES & SERVICE 


Compliments of 


SMITH MOTORS LIMITED 

WOLCH'S 


Sales and Service 

DEPARTMENT STORE LTD. 


FORD—EDSEL—MONARCH 


P.O. Box 1068 — Phone 7-3438—7-3439 

881-3 Main Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba 


Portage La Prairie, Man. 


85 



















On the average, the farmer as an individual is a serious and constructive thinker, but 
far too many do not apply their thoughts to matters other than management of their 
farming operations. Far too many are prone to accept propaganda that really works 
against them. Conformity runs rampant among our form people, and yet the majority are 
so very suspicious of others. 

I have found it evident right across the province that farmers, generally, are very 
vulnerable to innuendoes and confusion being directed at them at all times by people 
whose interest is nothing more than to keep the farm people divided. 

I find that farmers today in one sense are extremely over-organized in the multitude 
of organizations that provide little if any economic gain to them. But when it comes to 
reasons and excuses why they should not support an occupational organization — this is 
a most interesting point. 

Politics and petty differences with their neighbors rate "number one" in my book as 
to the reason why farmers are really one half-organized today in an effective occupational 
organization. Political education is seriously needed among farm people. Time and time 
again farm people will promote farm policy, and then at election time, they turn around 
and elect people who have little or no interest in agriculture. I am confident that as long 
as farm people continue to elect doctors, lawyers, businessmen or professional people, 
and further, as long as politicians continue to debate and implement farm policy on the 
merits of political strategy rather than on common sense and economics, we can expect 
meagre improvement or benefits. 

Another example is dislike for an individual. It hos been quite common for a farmer 
to condemn the entire organization just because he took a personal dislike to one of the 
leaders or elected officers at the various levels of our organizational structure. 

There are numerous other points that could be raised on this question. However 
I am quite convinced that until farmers, generally, stop and realize they are operating a 
tremendous business enterprise, and that each and everyone is o partner in this business; 
and further, until they learn to forget at least once a month, their political, religious, 
material and petty differences and get together to look after the business end of their 
industry like other people do, only limited progress can be expected towards a truly effec¬ 
tive, long-term agricultural policy in Canada. Unless this is done we will continue to get 
bits and pieces of agricultural solutions, such as we have received in the past. 

Frankly, I am convinced there is no substitute to an effective, overall, general farm 
organization. Farmers must unite and begin to solve their problems by themselves, instead 
of hoping that someone else is going to do it for them. 

As a farmer-member myself, I take much pride in having done my share to help 
build our Farm Union movement to what it is today, and am proud of the progress that 
has been made. Naturally, I fully realize that much more could have been done, but 
because of situations such as I have outlined earlier, agricultural problems are not 
readily resolved. 

My main Anniversary Message to all Farm Union members across the province is 
that it is we, the members, who will now have to judge from the record whether our 
organization has done enough; whether it has taken the proper approach on the multitude 
of issues that have affected our livelihood. Also, it will be our responsibility to scrutinize 
closely those policies which we have proposed, and those which have emanated as a 
result of legislative and administrative changes in the past ten years. We, as members, 
will have to account for the reasons why we have been prepared to accept half a loaf 
or less, on some of the major legislative measures that have resulted in this past decade. 

After we have sifted these matters over carefully, I sincerely hope that, as we enter 
a new decade of Farm Policy Planning for the future, we will have gained from the 
experiences of the past. 

To the delegates gathered here at this our Tenth Anniversary Convention, I wish 
every success in your deliberations; and to all of our members and friends across 
the province, my wife and family join with me in extending Compliments of the Season 
ond the Best of Health and Happiness in the New Year. 


86 



Phone 7-4881 

1st. & Sask. Ave. W. 

BRADLEY 

AND SON 

SERVICE 

STATION 

General Automotive Repairs 

Atlas Tires, Batteries and Accessories 

Portage la Prairie 

Man. 


W. B. Crealock 

CASE POWER MACHINERY 
& FARM IMPLEMENTS 
Westinghouse Electrical Appliances 

211 Saskatchewan Ave. E.—Telephone 7-5981 
Portage la Prairie, Manitoba 


25 First St. S.W. — Telephone 7-5191 

McLEAN'S TV & RADIO SERVICE 

Guaranteed Repairs 
All Makes and Models 
Bicycle Repairs 

Portage la Prairie Manitoba 


103—2nd SF. N.W. 

Phone 7-3115 

D. W. 

GRAY 

PORTABLE & 

SHOP WELDING 

Portage 

la Prairie 


Butter Plant, Tapper St. North, Phone 7-6334 
Milk Plant, Main St. South, Phone 7-4341 

PORTAGE CREAMERY 

Milk, Cream, Butter, Cheese and Ice Cream 
Portage la Prairie, Manitoba 


Compliments of 

LETWIN'S JEWELERY 

Diamonds - Watches - Repairs - Gifts 
age la Prairie Manitoba 


Compliments of 


Compliments of 

JAMES F. ANDERSON 


ASHERN SUPPLY 

B.A., LL.B. 


GENERAL MERCHANTS 

Barrister and Solicitor, Notary Public 


Complete Line of Lumber 

Ashern, Man. Phone 7 


ASHERN, MAN. PHONE 4 


Compliments of 


Compliments to the MFU 

A. KONZELMAN 


HARRY OTTO 

John Deere Sales and Service 


GENERAL MERCHANT 

Ashern, Man. 


Ashern, Man. Phone 45 


Best Wishes From 


Best Wishes From 

E. MAURISCHAT 


ASHERN SNACK BAR & POOL ROOM 

Agents For British American Oil Co. 


Meals, Lunches, Confectionery 

Ashern, Man. — Phone 25 


Ashern, Man. Phone 61 


THORGIES CASH STORE 


Best Wishes From the 

Ashern Farmers' Creamery Ltd. 

Groceries, Dry Goods, Hardware 

Ladies' and Children's Style Shop 


Serving over 500 Dairy Farmers in the 
Interlake Area 

Lakeview Brand Creamery Butter 

Ashern, Man. Phone 49 


Phone 130 

P.O. Box 130—ASHERN, MANITOBA 


Best Wishes From 


Support 

Frank's Clover Farm Market 


Our 

Ashern, Man. Phone 88 


Advertisers 


87 


















MANITOBA FARMERS UNION 

I960 (?<Mventtou “)R.c4oiutio-n<i 


CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS 

A. PROVINCIAL BOARD—District 2 

BE IT RESOLVED that the Provincial Board of Directors of the Manitoba Farmers 
Union be reduced to 1 6 members; and 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that this be achieved by electing one Director, either 
man or woman, in each District; and a President, Women's President, Vice-Presi¬ 
dent, and Women's Vice-President, to be elected by the Annual Convention. 

Amendment No. 1 

Section 59: Add—"One Director, man or woman, elected in each District by the 
District Board shall represent the District and be a member of the Provincial Board." 

Section 70: To read—"The Vice-President shall be the President of the Union in the 
event of the office of President becoming vacant from any cause." 

Section 74: To read—"The President, the Women's President of Women's Activities, 
the Vice-President, the Women's Vice-President of Women's Activities, and the 
District Directors shall constitute the Board of Directors of the Union." 

Section 103, sub-section (b) to read: "A Woman President of Women's Activities" 
sub-section (c) to read: "A Vice-President" 

sub-section (d) to read: "A Woman Vice-President of Women's Activities" 
sub-section (e): delete in its entirety 

B. MEMBERSHIP FEE—District 4 

WHEREAS we are demanding more and more effort from our Provincial Officials; and 

WHEREAS our funds are not sufficient to provide for adequate technical staff and 
efficient operation of our organization; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that our single membership fee be $11.00 and $2.00 
of each membership be taken off for Ottawa office. 

Amendment No. 2 

Section 20, sub-section (a): Delete the figures "$6.00" and substitute "$11.00" 
sub-section (b): Delete in its entirety 

Section 22: Add—following the word "Districts" in the fourth line — "$2.00 from 
each membership to be allocated for the Ottawa office." 

C. MEMBERSHIP FEE—District 6 

WHEREAS the Union is always short of funds necessary to carry on its business in 
the best interests of its members; and 

WHEREAS the women have equal status with men; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that our membership be raised to $10.00 for family 
membership, and $6.00 for a single person. 

Amendment No. 3 

Section 20, sub-section (b): Delete—the figures "$7.00" 

Substitute — "$10.00" 


88 



D. DISTRICT RE-ALLOCATION 


WHEREAS the present size of the Provincial Board is receiving criticism on its bulk 
and cost; 

BE IT RESOLVED that the division of District boundaries be re-allocated to reduce the 
number of Districts from 12 to 10. 

Amendment No. 4:—Section 53: 

Delete the figures "12" and substitute by "10". 

E. CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS 

WHEREAS under our Constitution there is no time limit control for presentation of 
Amendments to the Constitution and By-Laws previous to the Provincial Convention; 

BE IT RESOLVED that any Amendments to our Constitution must be submitted to 
the Locals thirty (30) days prior to the Provincial Convention. 

Amendment No. 5:—Section 108 (a) to read: 

(a) Notice of any amendment to the By-Laws must be submitted to the Locals 30 days 
prior to the Provincial Convention, and notice of any motion to amend any By-Laws 
shall be given in the Convention on the day preceding that on which the motion is to 
be voted upon, unless the Convention by a two-thirds vote dispenses with such notice. 


Where Your Dollar Does Its Duty 

R0BUN TRADING CO. 

Quality Groceries 

Phone 19 General Merchants 
Roblin, Man. 


Manitoba Bearing 
Works Ltd. 

270 St. Mary's Ave. — Winnipeg 
We Can Rebuild Your Engine 
Crankshaft Grinding A Specialty 

CONTINENTAL ENGINES 
PARTS AND SERVICE 


Compliments of 

Silmacs Ltd. 

RENTAL AGENTS 

100 McIntyre Block -— Winnipeg 


BRETT-YOUNG 

SEEDS LTD. 



BE WISE/ 

TO* ' 

B-Yfe 

SEEDS 


CORYDON & OSBORNE 
WINNIPEG 

Drop in 
and see us 
during the 
CONVENTION 


Compliments of 

McDougall's - Neepawa 

CHEVROLET — OLDSMOBILE 
CORVAIR — ENVOY 
Your General Motors Dealer 

Phone 297 NEEPAWA 


Compliments of 

Murray's Garage 

NEEPAWA, LTD. 


Pontiac, Buick, Vauxhall, GMC Trucks 

NEEPAWA MANITOBA 


89 









RESOLUTIONS 


PARITY PRICES 

1. AGRICULTURAL ASSISTANCE — Districts 1, 6 

BE IT RESOLVED that we go on record as supporting the Western Liaison Committee 
on their stand in their request to the Federal government for $100,000,000 for 
agriculture this year, 

2. FAIR SHARE OF THE NATIONAL INCOME — District 2, FWW 

WHEREAS the ten farm organizations asked for deficiency payments on wheat, oats 
and barley, and the government has turned down this request, along with all other 
recommendations; and 

WHEREAS the government promised the farmers a fair share of the national income; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that we again strongly recommend to the government, to 
institute a plan for a fair share of the national income for farmers by a deficiency 
payment plan. 

3. PARITY PRICES (MFU POLICY) — District 1 

WHEREAS the primary objective of the MFU is parity prices and to establish and 
maintain economic stability for farmers; and 

WHEREAS little progress has been made by way of petition and delegation to govern¬ 
ment and elsewhere toward this end; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the MFU begin a program of study and education 
for farmers and members in regard to a non-delivery strike; and 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the MFU proceed to plan such a move in preparation 
to back up any reasonable and just requests, when and if such a move is necessary. 

4. PARITY PRICES—Districts 1, 3 

WHEREAS the agriculturist is selling his produce at world market prices and buying 
his necessary goods and services from protected industrialists and manufacturers, 
thereby inducing the farmers' net income to gradually and continuously become 
lower, and cost of production to continually rise; and 


Compliments from 


EAT AT THE MOST MODERN CAFE 

Neepawa Co-operative Ltd. 


Bamboo Gardens 

THE HOME OF YOUR FARM SUPPLIES 



Phone 103 NEEPAWA 


NEEPAWA Manitoba 


Compliments of 

Strock Hardware & Appliances 

NEEPAWA'S ONLY HOME-OWNED 
HARDWARE 


Our Best Wishes 
For A Successful Convention 

Shoemaker McGilvray Agencies 

NELSON SHOEMAKER, M.L.A. 

JACK McGILVRAY 
Insurance and Real Estate 

NEEPAWA Manitoba 


Wm. Whitmore Ltd. 

J. I. CASE — NEW HOLLAND 
FARM EQUIPMENT 

NEEPAWA, MAN. Phone 4 or 510 


THE HEART OF EVERY MEAL 

HURRELL'S Home Made Bread 

Phone 278 

NEEPAWA Manitoba 


90 











Portage Ph. 7-4112 — 80 Sask. Ave. W. 

The Sherwin-Williams 
Paint and Wallpaper Store 

H. E. Henderson, Proprietor 
Kem-Glo Super Kem-Tone 

"The House of Color" Portage la Prairie Man. 


Compliments and Best Wishes 
For a Successful Convention 
on This Our Tenth Anniversary 

DISTRICT 4, - M.F.U. 




OTTO W. GRUNDMANN 

W. FRED HYDE 


Wawanesa Mutual Insurance Company 


OLIVER & LANZ DEALER 

Confederation Life Association 



Ripley Building — Phone 7-3041 

Portage la Prairie, Manitoba 


Portage la Prairie, Man. 


Compliments of 


Portage la Prairie 

Compliments of 

R. B. EARL CO. LTD. 


Anglo-Canadian Oils Ltd. 

165 Sask. Ave. E. 


Bulk Sales & Service Station 

Top Quality Products "Best by Test" 

Portage la Prairie 


F. Gunnlaugson, Manager 


Snider Hardware Limited 


Co-Op 

Portage la Prairie, Man. 

Phone 7-3466 


Prairie Drive Inn 

"Your Dollar Buys More At 

Your Marshall-Wells Store" 


East & West End of the City of 

"Try Snider's First" 


Portage la Prairie 


Me CalUdtefi 

Pea and Seed Cleaners Ltd. 

CONTRACT GROWERS 
OF PEAS AND GRAIN 
CUSTOM CLEANERS 

Agents for National 2, 4-D 
and Spray Rigs 

Phone 7-3111 
Portage la Prairie, Man. 


CHRISTIANSON LTD. 

First Street N.W. — Phone 7-3451 
PORTAGE LA PRAIRIE, MANITOBA 
John Deere Quality Farm Equipment 


15 Main St. South — Telephone 7-3196 

gagged PLUMBING & HEATING 

• Radiator Repairs * Roofing 
• Sheet Metal Work 

PORTAGE LA PRAIRIE, MANITOBA 


LEE'S 

BLACKSMITH AND WELDING 

34 First Street N.W. — Phone 7-6202 
PORTAGE LA PRAIRIE, MANITOBA 


91 














WHEREAS we feel that the Government of Canada is remiss in saying "No" to our 
proposals for deficiency payments on western grain as outlined by our mass delega¬ 
tion to Ottawa; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Government of Canada proceed to institute 
parity prices for agriculture by whatever means they feel that it can be accomplished 
most speedily and efficiently. 

STRIKE ACTION 

5. PRODUCERS' STRIKE — District 7 

WHEREAS many resolutions have been presented on various types of Producers' Strikes; 
and 

WHEREAS the MFU Strike Committee has been turned down by every other farm group 
in Manitoba for support in a strike; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the MFU drop any approach to a strike until more 
support is evident from other groups. 

6. BUYERS' STRIKE—District 2 

WHEREAS there has been no satisfactory progress made by the MFU Buyers' Strike 
Committee, as they met for the most part with organizations such as the Retail 
Merchants Association, Implement Dealers Association, and others who would 
naturally oppose it; 

BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the MFU Buyers' Strike Committee promote a 
Buyers' Strike with the Farmers of Manitoba. 


7. FARM STRIKE — District 5 

WHEREAS farmers are caught in what is known as the cost-price squeeze; and 

WHEREAS, while fighting for parity prices through deficiency payments in order to 
stabilize the farm income, the cost of production has been allowed to rise unchecked 
to a point where a parity level would further price farmers out of the world 
market; and 

WHEREAS our governments' protecting both industry and big business have allowed 
their profiteering and cut-throat practices to cripple the economy of the family farms 
and expand to the point where there is little or no competition; and 

WHEREAS the farmer, faced with a threat of integration, gets the promise of a long- 
range farm program with a loan of up to $25,000, which will further subsidize 
industry and big business; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the MFU seek the support of the Interprovincial 
Farm Union Council and other farm organizations and labor organizations, and 
organize a general Farm Strike. 

8. STRIKE — District 1 

BE IT RESOLVED that we as a group favor a strike on the purchase of farm machinery 
as far as private companies are concerned, and if it comes to a strike, that we buy 
only from our own company, Canadian Co-op Implements. 

FARM UNITY — AMALGAMATION 

9. AMALGAMATION — District 7 

WHEREAS the Killarney Local of the MFU and the Lena Local of the M. P. E. ore 
desirous of amalgamation of the MFU and the MFA; 


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THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the MFU and MFA Provincial Boards elect a nego¬ 
tiating committee to study the question of amalgamation of the two farm organiza¬ 
tions and make proposals to the membership at a membership meeting; 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the negotiating committee be composed of people 
who have not served on the previous negotiating committee. 

10. AMALGAMATION — Districts 3, 9 

WHEREAS a great deal of work has been done trying to amalgamate farm organizations 
in Manitoba; and 

WHEREAS farmers are rapidly becoming a smaller group in the growing population 
of Canada; and 

WHEREAS we feel that farmers must be united into one strong organization in order 
to effectively deal with our problems; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that we urge the Provincial Board to continue to press 
for amalgamation, with the hope that eventually we can get a Dominion-wide 
organization to represent the farmers. 

MARKETING BOARDS 

11. LIVESTOCK MARKETING BOARD—District 4 

WHEREAS cattle and sheep have been in short supply for some years, this being borne 
out by the fact that large quantities of mutton and wool have been and are being 
imported and a number of cattle have been imported from the U.S.A. to supply 
our Eastern market; and 

WHEREAS day-to-day prices in our Union Stockyards at Winnipeg appear to fluctuate 
on the basis of deliveries rather than on visible supply; and 

WHEREAS a sharp decline in prices from time to time, owing to heavy deliveries, have 
meant heavy losses to stockmen; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the members of the Manitoba Farmers Union firmly 
believe: 

1. That a Livestock Marketing Board should be established; 

2. That such Board be provided with a Revolving Fund for the purchase and removal 
of excess livestock at times of heavy deliveries; 

3. That such Board be provided with a Feed Lot and other necessary accommodation 
where livestock can be taken care of until arrangements can be made for the sale 
of such livestock. 


PRODUCTION CONTROL 

12. PRODUCTION LIMIT PER FARM UNIT —WHEAT — District 4 

WHEREAS surplus agricultural production in the United States has become a great 
problem in that country; and 

WHEREAS it appears that the lack of a limit per farm unit has encouraged a great 
expansion in agricultural production, owing to their better price program; and 

WHEREAS a great expansion by large farm units could create a great surplus problem; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that, in the event that a fair price for Canadian wheat 
be established, the members of the Manitoba Farmers Union believe that a limit 
should be set as to the amount of wheat each farmer be allowed to sell at that 
price; and that the limit should be based on the average production per farm unit 
in any one year, so as to discourage any large-scale expansion by large farm units. 


93 


DAIRY AND POULTRY 


13. COLORED MARGARINE — Dittrich 5, 7 . 12 

WHEREAS the Bill on colored margarine was defeated by only one vote; ond 

WHEREAS the livelihood of many small farmers is largely dependent upon a weekly 
source of income from cream cheques; and 

WHEREAS we of the Manitoba Farmers Union are still against the use of yellow 
coloring in margarine because we feel they are trying to sell margarine, using the 
attributes of butter as a sales means; 

BE IT RESOLVED that our Provincial office make strong representation to the govern¬ 
ment to have the ban remain on yellow coloring of margarine. 


14. EGG GRADING — District 9 

WHEREAS eggs for re-sale do not bear any marks to indicate government approval, 
grade or weight, such as is required by law in the case of various meats and canned 
foods; and 

WHEREAS in order to protect both consumer and producer from unfair practices which 
might occur in the grading and re-sale of same; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that we urge both the provincial and Federal govern¬ 
ments to advocate all licenced graders to mark all eggs with an indelible stamp, 
clearly indicating different grades and date. 


15. BUTTER SUPPORTS — District 3 

WHEREAS a steady source of income for some farmers is from butterfat; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that we urge the western M.P.'s and our Minister 
of Agriculture to bring the support price of butterfat back to 64 cents as it was 
previous to May 2nd; and 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that butterfat be set at not less than 64 cents for butter¬ 
fat scoring 39-92 or more. 


GRAIN 

16. FAIR PRICE FOR WHEAT—District 4 

WHEREAS the growing of wheat is still our most important basic industry; and 

WHEREAS the price of Canadian wheat is based mainly on the export price; and 

WHEREAS the export price for wheat appears to be far too low and out of line with 
our Canadian industrial price level; and 

WHEREAS an increase in the export price appears unlikely in the near future; and 

WHEREAS the Canadian wheat farmer cannot be protected by tariffs as is the case 
of many other industries, owing to the fact that two-thirds of his production must 
be sold in the export market; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the members of the Manitoba Farmers Union firmly 
believe that a fair price on Canadian wheat should be established, supported by 
a deficiency payment on exported wheat; such fair price to be based upon the 
cost of production — such calculation of cost to include cost of cultivating, sowing, 
depreciation on equipment, wages and board, and a fair return on investment in 
land ond buildings. 


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17. SEED GRAIN — District 1 


WHEREAS the Federal government's present plan for distribution of seed grain has 
proven to be most unfair and discriminatory, especially the recent distribution of 
Pembina Wheat; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that we recommend to the Federal government, the 
following points: 

1. When a new grain has been proven of commercial value, it shall be grown 
under contract until a sufficient quantity has been obtained. 

2. That each crop district in which said grain is deemed suitable, shall be allocated 
a number of bushels for distribution according to the size of the district. 

COMMODITY GROUPS 

18. SEPARATE COMMODITY GROUP ORGANIZATIONS — District 5 

WHEREAS the paramount need of the farm people is the unity into one farm organiza¬ 
tion to speak with one voice for the farm community; and 

WHEREAS some of the farm leaders have worked their hearts out to achieve that 
high aim; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that we deplore the activities of some people attempting 
to organize additional farm organizations based on commodities, which will only 
result in further division of the farm community and weaken its voice. 

19. MFU COMMODITY GROUP INTEREST — Dists. 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, FWW 

WHEREAS within the structure of the Farmers Union, os on occupational organization, 
membership is open to all farmers in the province; and 

WHEREAS specialized groups such as beef producers, dairy, hog or poultry producers 
have had problems peculiar to their specific commodities studied and reviewed 
under the committee structure set up from the Provincial Board; and 

WHEREAS it may be desirable, with a view to creating more interest for actual 
producers of specific commodities, to take the responsibility of electing a majority 
of the members to the commodity committee within the Farm Union; 

BE IT RESOLVED that we instruct our Provincial Board of Directors of the MFU 
to investigate this situation and take whatever action is necessary to get more 
membership interest and participation in improving present commodity committees 
within the organization, thereby ensuring a more effective Form Union. 

FARM MACHINERY 

20. COST OF MACHINERY —District 6 

WHEREAS the high cost of farm machinery has contributed largely to the cost-price 
squeeze in which the farmer finds himself; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that we commend the government in their start of on 
investigation into the high cost of farm machinery; and suggest that as soon os 
the investigation is completed, action be taken to reduce the cost of farm machinery 
to a level comparable to the farmer's income. 

21. MACHINERY SERVICE — District 5 

WHEREAS farmers are encountering difficulty in having their newly acquired machinery 
serviced by dealers who are not familiar with new machinery; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that we ask our Federal government to strictly enforce 
laws requiring these dealers to hire fully qualified mechanics all year round. 

(NOTE: The above Resolution was "Carried as Amended", but Amendment not available 
from the District.) 


95 



RESOLUTIONS 

22. INFORMATION — District 8 

WHEREAS we, as members, are often unaware of the full consequences and implications 
of our resolutions made in "good faith"; and 

WHEREAS our Provincial Officials can often point out these pitfalls; 

BE IT RESOLVED that our Provincial Officials be given the opportunity if necessary, 
at the Convention, to clarify the issues; and 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Resolutions Committee obtain authentic additional 
information where required. 

23. DUPLICATION — District 8 

BE IT RESOLVED that the Resolutions be more closely studied by the Resolutions 
Committee so there will be less overlapping; and 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that a limit of five resolutions be allowed from each 
District. 


ANNUAL CONVENTION 

24. DIRECTORS' REPORTS — Districts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, 12, FWW 

WHEREAS the reading at the Annual Convention of the Board of Directors' reports 
as published in the Convention handbook is time-consuming; and 

WHEREAS these reports could be read by the delegates in their spare time; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that this time be allocated to other business, preferably 
resolutions. 

25. PROVINCIAL CONVENTION — District 3 

WHEREAS our Provincial Convention is always held during the first week of December; 
and 

WHEREAS at that time of year it seems that most farmers are tied down with livestock 
chores, which prevent a large number of members from attending the Convention; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that consideration be given to holding the Provincial 
Convention one or two weeks earlier. 

26. LABOR SPEAKERS —District 5 

WHEREAS big business propaganda through the press, radio and television to keep 
labor and farmer apart and confused on many important issues, is having considerable 
success; and 

WHEREAS labor and farm unity is so vitally needed; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that we make it a practice to invite labor speakers 
to all of our District and Provincial Conventions. 

“200" AND "300" CLUBS 

27. "200" and "300" CLUBS — District 1 

WHEREAS we feel that the present qualifications for the "200" and "300" Clubs 
are not fair to all Locals; 

BE IT RESOLVED that any Local reaching 75 percent of the potential membership 
shall be eligible for the shield, the same as the "200" and "300" Clubs. 


96 



GOVERNMENT INQUIRIES 

28. ROYAL COMMISSION — District 12 

WHEREAS the Price Spreads Commission Report has absolved the farmer from any 
blame on consumer cost increases on food products; and 

WHEREAS the Commission has failed to reveal the real problem of agriculture because 
its term of reference established by the Federal government denied the Commission 
the right to investigate the costs of production and prices charged for goods 
and services that the farmer must buy; and 

WHEREAS the Commission Report has reveaTed little more than the fact that food 
processors are making exorbitant profits, and has failed to show the overall picture 
of profiteering in industries, which has caused the present cost-price squeeze upon 
the farmers; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that we urge the Federal government to take immediate 
action to establish a Royal Commission or Parliamentary Committee to study the 
cost-price structure of all commodities and services that the agricultural producers 
must purchase. 

29. SURPLUS DISPOSAL —District 5 

BE IT RESOLVED that we urge the government to reduce expenditure on armaments, 
and that such funds be used to buy up surplus agricultural products, to be distri¬ 
buted amongst the underprivileged. 

HOSPITAL RATES AND SERVICES 

30. INCREASED HOSPITAL RATES — Districts 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, FWW 

WHEREAS it is becoming increasingly more difficult for farmers to meet their financial 
commitments; and 

WHEREAS we feel that a Government Plan which is supported Federally should be able 
to operate on considerably less than a Voluntary Plan such as Blue Cross, but the 
new premiums are much higher; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Manitoba Farmers Union hereby protest the 
advanced rates on the Manitoba Hospital Services Plan; and 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the government be requested to reconsider the new 
rates before they become compulsory for payment; and 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that we vigorously protest this increase and suggest 
other means be found to finance new hospital building. 

31. HOSPITALS—District 5 

WHEREAS there are a great number of people who need to go to the hospital, but 
are turned away by being told that there is no room for them; and 

WHEREAS our country has been spending hundreds of millions of dollars on useless 
armaments that are obsolete before they become operative; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that we urge the Dominion Government to spend more 
of that money on hospitals. 

TAXATION 

32. TAXATION — District 9 

WHEREAS we believe land tax far exceeds the ability of farmers to pay at prevailing 
conditions; and 


97 


WHEREAS we believe the present land tax is one of the worst deterrents to a young 
man who wishes to farm; and 

WHEREAS we believe it is also very discouraging to the middle-aged farmer who 
has already lost his help to the city; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that we ask the provincial government to find other 
means of raising money, such as a sales tax to relieve the burden on land tax. 

T-V PROGRAM 

33. IFUC—TV PROGRAM—District 3 

WHEREAS the MFU has not been successful in getting a parity price system for farm 
produce; and 

WHEREAS the Buyers' Strike does not seem to be an effective method at this time; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the MFU approach the Interprovincial Farm Union 
Council to start a television program to educate the people of Canada as to the 
cost of production of farm products compared with the prices received by farmers 
for these products. 


UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE 

34. UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE — Districts 3, 7, 12 

WHEREAS it is becoming increasingly difficult to acquire farm help, one difficulty 
being the fact that farm workers are not eligible for benefits under the Unemploy¬ 
ment Insurance Act; 


V/ 


BE IT RESOLVED that the MFU go on record as requesting immediate legislation for 
the inclusion of farm labor under the Unemployment Insurance Act. 


EDUCATION 

35. STUDENTS' PASS MARKS — Districts 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, FWW 

WHEREAS we understand it is an established practice to limit to a certain percentage 
of those writing, the number of students allowed to pass; and 

WHEREAS we consider it unfair that students' marks be arbitrarily raised or lowered 
in order to comply with this percentage; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that we request the High School Examination Board 
to cease this discriminatory practice. 

EXPERIMENTAL FARM 

36. INTERLAKE DISTRICT — District 5 

WHEREAS, with the extension of the highway in the Interlake area, new lands will 
be opened up; and 

WHEREAS there is little knowledge about the soils of the Interlake district; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that we urge the Federal government to establish an 
Experimental Farm in the district. 


FARM IMPROVEMENT LOANS 

37. EXTENDED REPAYMENT — District 9 

WHEREAS the Federal government has increased the farm improvement loans from 
$5,000 to $7,500, mainly to cover cost of increase in machinery; and 


98 



WHEREAS the farmers' ability to repay such loans has been continuously decreasing; 


THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Manitoba Farmers Union urge the Federal 
government to extend the term of repayment from four years to six years. 


PUBLIC RELATIONS 

38. FARMER-LABOR RELATIONS — District 4 

WHEREAS farm and labor relations are not harmonious; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that in the future, we try to promote better relations 
with labor, by an educational program. 


NUCLEAR WEAPONS 

39. WORLD DISARMAMENT—District 5 

WHEREAS weapons of universal destruction and human extermination have greatly 
endangered human survival; and 

WHEREAS spending such huge amounts of money, labor and resources is draining our 
economy almost to bankruptcy; and 

WHEREAS the only alternative to the armaments race is total world disarmament under 
strict inspection and full control; and 

WHEREAS Canada is a member of a ten-nation special committee on disarmament; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that we urge our Federal government to instruct our 
representatives on our disarmament commission to exert every effort to help conclude 
an agreement on total world disarmament. 


40. CANADIAN LEADERSHIP — District 12 

,BE IT RESOLVED that Canada should provide leadership in a plan to control the 
spread of nuclear weapons by promoting an agreement of all nations — that 
they will not test, manufacture or possess any nuclear devices for warfare; and 

^ BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that Canada should encourage the establishment and 
inspection under the United Nations and enforce this agreement. 


MISCELLANEOUS 

41. HORNED CATTLE FUND — District 1 

WHEREAS the Horned Cattle Fund reaches a staggering amount each year; and 
WHEREAS there is considerable controversy over the allotting of the surplus; and 
WHEREAS the money rightfully belongs to the producers; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the deduction be reduced from two dollars per 
head, to one dollar per head. 


42. VETERINARY COLLEGE IN WESTERN CANADA—District 5 

WHEREAS the losses of livestock sustained by farmers are enough to pay for veterinar¬ 
ians' salaries; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the provincial government be urged to station 
veterinarians in farm districts all over the province and pay them the difference 
between what they collect in fees, and an agreed sum deemed as an annual income; 
and 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that we urge both the Dominion and provincial govern¬ 
ments to set up a veterinary college in Western Canada. 


99 


43. STABILIZATION BOARD ADVISORY COMMITTEE — District 1 


WHEREAS the Advisory Committee to the Stabilization Board has not been used accord¬ 
ing to specifications of provisions of the Stabilization Act; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that in protest to this action, we request that the 
Farm Union representative on the Advisory Committee be withdrawn. 


44. GRASSROOTS DIRECTIVE — District 2 

WHEREAS the Farmers Union is a grassroots organization and its officials are elected 
by the members; and 

WHEREAS some government ministers have said that our leaders do not represent 
the members' opinions; 

BE IT RESOLVED that we inform the public and/or the government, that our officials 
DO represent the membership that elect them. 

45. CAR AND TRUCK LICENSES — District 2 

WHEREAS older farm trucks and cars are used locally only, with limited total mileage 
each year; 

BE IT RESOLVED that farm trucks and cars, ten years or older, regardless of tonnage, 
have a flat license rate of $10.00. 

46. PREDATOR CONTROL—District 3 

WHEREAS the Minister of Mines and Natural Resources recently announced that 
bears would be on a protected list of game animals; and 

WHEREAS only the Swan River, Fairford and Piney areas were declared Predator 
Control Areas, which included bears; and 

WHEREAS around the boundary of Riding Mountain National Park, farmers often 
have bear damage to crops and livestock; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that we ask that the Riding Mountain National Park 
boundary area be declared open to farmers to hunt bears when damage occurs. 

47. TIRE STAMPING — District 4 

BE IT RESOLVED that all tires for trucks, cars, tractors, etc., be stamped as to grade. 

48. ROADWAY SPRAYING — District 3 

WHEREAS the provincial government and rural municipalities are engaged in on 
expansive road building program; and 

WHEREAS the ditches of these new roads left unsprayed are a hazard to adjoining 
farms with regard to the spreading of weeds; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the MFU petition the provincial government 
and the rural municipalities to spray all newly-built road ditches for at least 
two years, until grass is established. 

49. INSECTICIDES—Districts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, FWW 

WHEREAS there is a grave possibility that use of herbicides and insecticides on 
food during the growth period is detrimental to the health of humans and animals; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that we ask the provincial government to investigate 
health hazards from this source. 


100 



50. WOMEN'S GROUP —Districts 2, 4, 5, 9, 10, 11, 12, FWW 


BE IT RESOLVED that the MFU appoint a committee of three women to investigate 
the possibility of setting up a separate women's group in Manitoba, and that Farm 
Women's Week suggest three names for such a committee. 

51. POLITICAL EDUCATION — Districts 1, 2, 5, 6, 9, 12, FWW 

WHEREAS misinterpretation of the MFU Constitution regarding political activity has 
practically disenfranchised some members of the organization; and 

WHEREAS lack of knowledge of political parties and their record of performance 
has worked to the detriment of farm people; 

BE IT RESOLVED that the MFU Board elect a political education committee of three 
persons to promote greater understanding of all existing political parties, as well 
as the new party being formed. 

The following Resolutions have received approval from the Provincial Board of Directors 
for presentation at the Annual Convention. 

52. CROP INSURANCE 

WHEREAS our Crop Insurance program, as experienced during the past year, indicates 
the need for policy changes to make it more acceptable for farmers; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the MFU propose the following changes: 

(a) that compensation for hail damage be adjusted according to percentage of 

loss; if a partial hail loss occurs and other subsequent hazards cause further 
losses, and if the crop was worth less than the original guarantee, the farmer 
would collect again, but not to exceed the original guaranteed price on both 
claims; 

(b) that a revision in the formula used in determining 60 percent of the long¬ 

term average yield be made in some areas, as the figures used seem to be 
much too low and not realistic for normal yields; 

(c) that contribution towards premiums by the Federal and provincial governments 
should be not less than 50 percent; 

(d) that fire hazards from spontaneous combustion on peat land be covered. 

53. DEFICIENCY PAYMENTS 

WHEREAS our Federal government has turned down the request for deficiency pay¬ 
ments on wheat, oats and barley; and 

WHEREAS to date they have brought out no legislation to guarantee the farmer 
a fair share of the national income; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that if the government does not bring out any satisfactory 
plan to alleviate this deficiency in the near future, that the IFUC press for complete 
free trade. 

54. CASH ADVANCES 

WHEREAS the cash advance legislation on farm-stored grain is not sufficient to cover 
the cost of farming operations; 

BE IT RESOLVED that we request the Federal government to provide the following 
changes in said legislation: 

(a) that advances be made on the full initial payment up to a 6-bushel quota, 
with a maximum of $3,000 to any one farmer; 


101 


(b) that a renter of land be able to obtain cash advances on his own land without 
the signature of the land owner of the rented land. 

55. PARITY PRICES 

WHEREAS the Federal government has refused to consider a deficiency payment pro¬ 
gram on grain because it allegedly would not benefit all producers equally; and 

WHEREAS acreage payments are not based on production and do not provide any 
lasting policy for future realization of full production costs; and 

WHEREAS it is not feasible to combine a relief measure with an effective price 
policy; and 

WHEREAS, under the Stabilization Act, provision is made for producers of other 
commodities to obtain cost of production prices; 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Federal government reconsider its stand on 
deficiency payments to western grain farmers and increase the support price on 
all commodities under the Stabilization Act, thereby ensuring benefits based on 
parity, to all formers. 

56. FIRE INSURANCE POOL 

WHEREAS the success of the Auto Insurance Pool in Alberta has prompted the 
Farmers Union of Alberta to commence a General Fire Insurance Pool; and 

WHEREAS the Co-operative Fire and Casualty Co. are prepared to underwrite the 
Pool on an interprovincial basis with Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba partici¬ 
pating, with the view that it would be easier to reach the objective of 5,000 
policies necessary to launch the actual operations of the Pool and would reduce 
the costs of administration; 

BE IT RESOLVED that the MFU take the necessary steps to negotiate with the Co¬ 
operative Fire and Casualty Co. and other Farm Unions for an agreement towards 
a General Fire Insurance Pool for Farm Union members on an interprovincial bosis. 

57. MASTITIS DETECTION — MFU Dairy Committee 

WHEREAS the percentage of quality milk has been constantly increasing, while the 
problem of Mastitis infection has shown little improvement in comparison; and 

WHEREAS the installation of bulk tanks in Manitoba will tend to make it even more 
difficult for Mastitis control and will make it necessary for the dairy man to main¬ 
tain a closer .personal check on his herd; and 

WHEREAS professional theory suggests that the California test is a satisfactory basic 
system of Mastitis detection; 

BE IT RESOLVED that we urge the Department of Agriculture to prepare an educational 
program, with information and supplies of necessary apparatus for an inexpensive 
and basic system of Mastitis control, to be available to any dairy farmer. 

58. BULK MILK FREIGHT — MFU Dairy Committee 

BE IT RESOLVED that the MFU take necessary steps with the Provincial Government 
to establish the lowest possible maximum rates on bulk milk hauling, with the view 
that bulk milk rates shall necessarily be lower than milk shipped by cans. 

59. BULK MILK CALIBRATION — MFU Dairy Committee 

BE IT RESOLVED that we request the Department of Agriculture to devise an effective 
system of Bulk Tank calibration to provide for adequate supervision on bulk milk 
weight. 


102 


60. REGIONAL PRICES 


WHEREAS the present deficiency payment program on hogs and eggs is not based on 
cost of production; and 

WHEREAS the calculated prescribed prices on the national average are not equitable; 

BE IT RESOLVED that prescribed prices under the deficiency payment program of 
the Federal Government be based on full cost of production on a regional or 
provincial average; and 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the average price received by the producers for 
their commodities be calculated quarterly on o regional or provincial basis. 

61. WESTERN GRAIN POLICY 

Needs of Western Grain Farmers: 

The basis for this policy is prompted by the continually deteriorating position 
of the grain farmer caused by a prolonged period of congestion and inequities 
in marketing delivery opportunities. It sets out three basic principles which we 
regard as essential to the welfare of western grain farmers: 

(1) The success of a grain farm operation depends basically on volume and 

price. We believe that every grain farmer should be assured the oppor¬ 
tunity of delivering a fixed volume of groin in any one crop year. 

(2) The commodity so delivered should return a remunerative price to the 
producer. 

(3) The product marketed must have ready access in both the domestic and 
export markets. 

Objective of Policy: 

If these three basic objectives are to be fulfilled, it becomes essential that the 
prolonged congestion that has beset the elevator system in Canada for the past 
several years must be relieved in order that it may more properly fulfil its function 
of moving grain from the producer to the ultimate purchaser. Under the current 
conditions of congestion we are aware that there are occasions when delays have 
occurred or sales been lost to other countries because various kinds and grades 
of grain could not be brought forward to morket position quickly enough to meet 
market demands. 

Methods: 

As a means towards accomplishing these ends, we recommend the implement¬ 
ation of the following policy methods: 

(1) We go on record as being wholeheartedly in favor of retaining the 
Canadian Wheat Board as the sole marketing agency for western grains 
and urge that its powers be extended to the marketing of flax and 
rye and rapeseed. 

(2) Thot the pricing policy of the Canadian Wheat Board be continued as 
at present. 

(3) That the Canadian Wheat Board announce in advance of each crop 
year the level of quotas which it will receive from producers for that 
crop year and that a basic minimum objective of eight bushels per speci¬ 
fied acre be set. 

(4) That the Canadian Wheat Board accept through the elevator systems 
only those kinds and grades of grain needed to meet domestic and 


103 


export demands. This would avoid consistent plugging of elevator facili¬ 
ties with grades and types of grain not in demand, particularly at times 
when space and facilities are badly needed to meet domestic and export 
orders. 

(5) If by the end of the crop year the Canadian Wheat Board has been unable 
to accept the basic minimum quota of grain delivery which the farmer 
has available for delivery, payment be then made by the Wheat Board 
to the farmer on the balance of this undelivered minimum quota which 
will thereupon become the property of the Canadian Wheat Board and 
sealed in a bin to be moved to market at the discretion of the Canadian 
Wheat Board. Sealing and inspection of bins could be undertaken by 
an agent of the Canadian Wheat Board, or an alternate method could 
be employed which would permit entry in the producer's permit book 
of the volume of grain which he holds in storage, to assure that delivery 
is fulfilled at the time the Canadian Wheat Board calls it forward. 

(6) We recommend payment of storage by the Canadian Wheat Board to the 
farmer having undelivered grain seale'd in bins on his farm, at the 
same rate of storage as is paid for grain stored at country elevators. 
Storage payments would continue until such time as the Wheat Board 
calls forward the farmer's grain for delivery. 

(7) That the Federal government would institute a system of supplementary 
payments to farmers on grain sold to the Canadian Wheat Board at such 
a level as to assure the farmer of o parity price for grains consumed in 
Canada, but with a maximum amount of such payments to be received 
by any one farmer. 

(8) That the Canadian government institute trading policies which will enable 
the Canadian Wheat Board to take vigorous oction in promoting and 
expanding sales in foreign markets. 

62. NATIONAL FARMERS UNION 

BE IT RESOLVED that this Convention approve the proposal of the Interprovincial 
Farm Union Board Conference to change the name of the "Interprovincial Farm 
Union Council" to the "National Farmers Union"; and 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that an interprovincial committee be struck to prepare 
a proposed national constitution which will be submitted for approval at next 
Conventions of the provincial Farm Unions. 

63. IFUC FINANCING 

WHEREAS the IFUC has proposed provincial assessments through Local donations 
to be increased to $2,000 each year from the three prairie Farm Unions, and addi¬ 
tional sums from other provinces, for the purpose of financing the National Office; 

BE IT RESOLVED that the Provincial Board of the MFU requests this Convention for 
approval of said assessment. 

64. NATIONAL PUBLICATION 

BE IT RESOLVED that this Convention consider the feasibility of a National Form 
Union newspaper. 

65. WHEAT RESEARCH 

RESOLVED that we approve for one year only, the deduction of one-eighth cent per 
bushel of all grains handled by the Canadian Wheat Board; this money to be 
placed in a fund for research by the prairie Universities on these grains and their 
related problems of production, marketing and utilization. This Prairie Research 
Fund to be administered by a Board composed of one representative from each of 
the western farm organizations directly interested in the production and marketing 
of these grains and reporting only to them. 


104 



WELCOME MFU MEMBERS 

*Dui ty<KC *7 

MANITOBA POULTRY AND DAIRY 
CO-OPERATIVE LIMITED 

Operates 

5 Poultry Dressing Plants 
1 Poultry Eviscerating Plant 
15 Creameries 
30 Egg Stations 

cutd 

A Hatchery at Portage la Prairie, Manitoba 

ALL CONVENIENTLY LOCATED TO PROVIDE 
QUICK, EFFICIENT SERVICE TO THE DAIRY 
OR POULTRY PRODUCER 

*?uAe 'Points fo IRem&H&er; 

• We handle a full line of Co-op. Feeds. 

• We sell "MANCO" Quality Baby Chicks and Turkey 

Poults 

• We pay top prices for your shipments of Cream, Eggs, or 

Poultry. 

• We furnish poultry dressing service in modern, 

well equipped plants. 

• Watch for the Trade Mark. 

IT SIGNIFIES A CO-OPERATIVELY 
OWNED PLANT OPERATED BY 
AND FOR ITS MEMBERS 

“Suy and Scute . , . S&ifr and S6cvie 

FOR SERVICE OR FURTHER INFORMATION 
CALL YOUR LOCAL MANAGER 

(Head Office — 570 Roseberry Sf., St. James, Manitoba) 



105 




MANITOBA FARMERS UNION 


EXECUTIVE 


C RUDOLPH USICK, President _ Erickson 

H. J. ANDRESEN, Vice-President _Myrtle 

MRS. MARY MclNTOSH, Women's President_Harte 

MRS. OLIVE AITKEN _Glenella 

E. SIGURDSON_Swan River 

MRS. IRENE FRANKLIN _Headingley 

' MRS. BETH CREWSON _ Edwin 


INTERPROVINCIAL FARM UNION COUNCIL 

RUDOLPH USICK ____Erickson 

MRS. MARY MclNTOSH ___Harte 

H. J. ANDRESEN_-_Myrtle 


FINANCE COMMITTEE 


WM. BEAM , Chairman _Portage la Prairie 

MRS W CDNIBFAR _Baldur 

MRS. IRENE FRANKLIN ___Headingley 


RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE 

EDWYN DALGLIESH _Chairman _ 

JOHN CANARI _ _ 

JOHN ZAPLITNY ___ 


_Margaret 

_Elkhorn 

_Oak Brae 


FARMER-LABOR COMMITTEE 


H. MclNTOSH, Chairman _____Harte 

E. SIGURDSON___ Swon River 

MRS. O. AITKEN _____Glenella 


AMALGAMATION COMMITTEE 


J. CANART, Chairman_Elkhorn 

R. USICK _Erickson 

S. J. TRIPP _Killarney 


NOMINATING COMMITTEE 


J. J 3ALONSKY, Chairm an---Winnipeg 

MRS. D, SIMPSON _ _Melita 

J. CANART Elkhorn 


RESEARCH COMMITTEE 


J. GALONSKY, Chairman -Winnipeg 

L. KUNTZ_ _ Morris 

MRS. IRENE FRANKLIN _Headingley 


106 














































Our Business 
is Growing 
Too! 


The price of sickness is high, and the price of 
much sickness can be ruinous. No one knows this 
better than your doctor. That's why the doctors of 
this province started Manitoba Medical Service in 
1944. 

In that year, some 8,000 persons were enrolled. 
By 1950, enrollment was approaching the 100,000 
mark. Today, well over a third of the population of 
Manitoba enjoys the benefits of M.M.S. and enroll¬ 
ment figures are still rising rapidly. 

Inquire how you too can prepay those unexpect¬ 
ed costly medical bills the non-profit way through 
the only plan in Manitoba sponsored and recom¬ 
mended by YOUR doctor. 


'W'tite; 

MANITOBA MEDICAL SERVICE 


599 Empress St. 


Winnipeg 10 


Manitoba 


107 



LEADERSHIP SCHOOL COMMITTEE 


MRS. 0. AITKEN, Chairman _Glenella 

MRS. W. CONIBEAR __- Baldur 

MRS. B. CREWSON _ Edwin 

H. ANDRESEN _Myrtle 


LIVESTOCK COMMITTEE 


E. DALGLIESH, Chairman ___Margaret 

R. ROWAN _ _Elkhorn 

S. JACKSON ..._-___Inglis 


LIVESTOCK MARKETING BOARD COMMITTEE 

W. SHWALUK, Chairman _._Oakburn 

H. ANDRESEN _Myrtle 

MRS. I OLA DRAKE _Oakner 

r -—--—» 


POULTRY AND POULTRY PRODUCTS COMMITTEE 


H. ANDRESEN, Chairman _ Myrtle 

_FCM^NN _ Starbuck 

MRSTj HRYTSAk _ Oakburn 

DAIRY COMMITTEE 

P. PENNER, Chairman _ New Bothwell 

MRS. KATHY GRIENKE _Steinbach 

MRS. G. C. SMART _Ochre River 


GRAIN COMMITTEE 


L. KUNTZ, Chairman _Morris 

J. DAILY _ Miami 

R. MANN _ —Starbuck 


INSURANCE COMMITTEE 

J. PERKINS, Chairman __Winnipeg 

J. GALONSKY ... _ Winnipeg 

R. NIKODEM _ Glenfields 

REHABILITATION COMMITTEE 

MRS. KAE DYCK _Headingley 

FEDERAL FARM CREDIT ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

J. PATTERSON _Winnipeg 

MANITOBA HOSPITAL SERVICES PLAN ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

S. J. TRIPP _ Killarney 

MANITOBA AGRICULTURAL CREDIT CORPORATION BOARD 

R. USICK -Erickson 

MANITOBA CROP INSURANCE BOARD 

J. PATTERSON -Winnipeg 


108 


















































With Compliments of 


Massey 
Ferguson Ltd. 

WINNIPEG 




109 









7fc. 0 p. *Di4&Uct 


Director: 

Alternate: 

Women's Director: 
Women's Alternate: 
District Sec.-Treas.: 
Youth Director: 
Sub-District Directors: 

DISTRICT No. 1 





- -Swan River 




_Swan River 


. —Bowsman 




-Lenswood 





Mrs H 1 Ferries, R R 1 












Mrs. Tina Semeniuk, Box 13 

_._Pine River 


Director: 

Alternate: 

Women's Director: 
Women's Alternate: 
District Sec.-Treas.: 
^fouthDirector: 
Sub-District directors: 


Director: 

Alternate: 

Women's Director: 
Women's Alternate: 

district Sec.-Treas.: 
Sub-District Directors: 


Wo 

'•D|sl 


Director: 

Alternate: 

Women's Director: 
Women's Alternate: 
District Sec.-Treas.: 
vYouth Director: 
Sub-District' Directors: 


DISTRICT No. 2 

John Zaplitny _ 

Walter Werbicki, R.R. 6 _ 

Mrs. G. C. Smart _ 

Mrs. N. McLaren _ 

Walter F. Werbicki, R.R. 6 ... 

E. Wilkie, R.R. 2 _ 

Mike Bilous _ 

Mrs. Frank Curie _ 

James Poast, R.R. 2 _ 

Mrs. J. E. Robinson, R.R. 2 _ 

Steve Puhach ... 

Mrs. Neil McLaren _ 

Peter Budolowski _ 

Mrs. Nick Belza, Box 68 _ 


__ ____Oak Brae 

_Dauphin 

_Ochre River 

_Ochre River 

_—--Dauphin 

__Dauphin 

_Roblin 

_Roblin 

_Dauphin 

_Dauphin 

_ Glencairn 

-Ochre River 

-Ethelbert 

_Fork River 


DISTRICT No. 3 

Stanley Jackson, Box 57 _ 

Wm. J. Shwaluk _ 

Mrs. J. Hrytsak _ 

Mrs. Merrill Chapman, R.R. 2 _ 

Mrs. Merrill Chapman, R.R. 2_ 

John A. Plant ..... 

Mrs. A. Kalyniak _ 

Sam P. Shewchuk, Box 272 _ 

Mrs. Marian Usick _ 

Bruce Medd _ 

Mrs. J. Gabriel ___ 

Clarence Sedgewick _ 

Mrs. Merrill Chapman, R.R. 2 _ 

DISTRICT No. 4 

Wm. Beam, R.R. 1, Box 3 _ 

Geo. Carr _ 

Mrs. Beth Crewson _ 

Mrs. Alma Batters _ 

Mrs. A. R. Campbell ___ 

Scott Fisher ___ 

G. A. Thordarson _ 

Mrs. Margaret McDonald 
Irwin Fleger _ 


-Inglis 

_Oakburn 

_Oakburn 

-Rapid City 

_Rapid City 

_Glen Elmo 

.. Angusville 

_Erickson 

__Erickson 

..Beulah 

.Foxwarren 

_Minnedosa 

_Rapid City 


Portage la Prairie 

_Kelwood 

.. Edwin 

_Neepawa 

_Neepawa 

_Plumas 

_Amaranth 

_Glenella 

_ Birnie 


110 






















































N. M. PATERSON & SONS LIMITED 

FORT WILLIAM WINNIPEG MONTREAL 


PATERSON 


GRAIN 

CMld. ' 

COAL 


he Diamond <[P]> on your local 


elevator is a symbol of courteous service 


backed by over FIFTY YEARS’ experience. 


1 1 1 







DISTRICT No. 4—(Contd.) 

Mrs. Della Yuel, Box 384 _ Neepawa 

R. E. Storie, Box 143_Austin 

Mrs. W. Loney, Box 129_Austin 

Clarence Pennell, Box 263 _MacGregor 

Mrs. Anne Werbiski, Box 953 _Portage la Prairie 

DISTRICT No. 5 

Director: Fred Wevursky _____Fisher Branch 

Alternate: John Palamarchuk _Silver 

Women's Director: Mrs. N. Giasson _Fisher Branch 

Women's Alternate: Mrs. Paul Reder _Moosehorn 

District See.-Treas.: Mrs. N. Giasson _Fisher Branch 

Youth Director: Ted Hoffman ___ Camper 

Sub-District Directors: Albert Kohanik _Faulkner 

Mrs. A. Markwart _Ashern 

Henry Husiak _ Poplarfield 

Mrs. A. Kibsey___Chatfield 

Jim Widish-Shorncliffe 

Mrs. Stella Deneka, Box 271 _Arborg 

Paul Yakubowski, R.R. 1 _Petersfield 

Miss Kay Bass _Malonton 

DISTRICT No. 6 

Director: Ralph Rowan- _Elkhorn 

Alternate: H. McIntosh _Harte 

Women's Director: Mrs. Margaret Oliver_Oberon 

Women's Alternate: Mrs. Jerry Jones _Glenboro 

District Sec.-Treas.: Mrs. Alex Penny_Virden 

Sub-District Directors: Elmer Armstrong_Elkhorn 

Mrs. Peter Zazulak _Elkhorn 

J. M. Williamson _Sinclair 

Mrs. Ken Hayward _Sinclair 

Herb McIntosh _Harte 

Herman Davidson _Glenboro 

Mrs. Jerry Jones _Glenboro 


Director: 

Alternate: 

Women's Director: 
Women's Alternate: 
District See.-Treas.: 
Youth Director: 
Sub-District Directors: 


DISTRICT No. 7 

S. J. Tripp, Box 441 ___. 

Russell Fox_ 

Mrs. Winnie Conibear, Box 136 _ 

Mrs. Norman Simpson_ 

Ken Nichol, Box 593 __ 

Russell J. Fox _ 

Gaston Vanroboeys _ 

Mike Pelechaty, Box 463 _ 

Mrs. Mary Woolsey _ 

Ernest Stephenson_ 

Mrs. Norman Simpson _ 

Russell Fox _ 

Mrs. S. J. Tripp, Box 441 _ 


Director: 

Alternate: 

Women's Director: 
Women's Alternate: 
District Sec.-Treas.: 
Sub-District Directors: 


DISTRICT No. 8 

John Daily, Box 206 _ 

John Parsons _ 

Mrs. H. W. Acheson _ 

Mrs. A. B. Foster_ 

Mrs. May Foster _ 

John Parsons _ 

Mrs. B. K. Johnson ___ 


_Killarney 

_Wa kopa 

..Baldur 

-Melita 

_Killarney 

-Wa kopa 

_Dand 

_Killarney 

_Ninette 

_Melita 

__Melita 

_Wakopo 

_Killarney 


_Miami 

-Rathwell 

_Somerset 

_Somerset 

_Somerset 

_Rathwell 

Cypress River 


112 



















































Phone 329 



CLUB CAFE 


J. J. CROSS 

Agent—B.A. Oil 

WE SPECIALIZE IN 



AMERICAN & CHINESE DISHES 


RUSSELL, MANITOBA 

RUSSELL, Man. 


PHONE 36 


WHEATLEY & DOW 


Meet Your Friends at the 

DRY GOODS — CLOTHING 


CENTRAL COFFEE BAR 

"Shoes For All The Family" 


For Quick and Courteous Service 

Russell, Man. 


JOE PLUMB, Prop. 


"Good Equipment 


Compliments of 

Makes A Good Farmer Better" 


Phone 26 — Box 400 


RUSSELL CREAMERY 

RUSSELL FARM EQUIPMENT 


International Harvester Farm Equipment 


Manitoba Dairy and Poultry 

& Trucks 


Co-Operative Ltd. 

Russell, Man. 


Russell, Manitoba 


Gas - Oils - & Greases 


Compliments of 

CENTRAL MOTORS 


TEXACO GAS BAR 

Ford Tractors and Farm Implements 

Complete Motor and Tractor Repair Service 


and 

RUSSELL AUTO SUPPLY 

Auto, Truck and Tractor Tires 


Phone 90 — Russell, Man. 


Phone 828-2-3—Russell, Man. 


Compliments of 

GILLEN'S GROCERY 

Fruits & Vegetables—Frozen Foods—Meats 
Phone 120 
Russell, Man. 


Compliments of 

South Side Service and Coffee Bar 

W. A. Irwin, Prop. — Phone 303 
Russell, Man. 


R. S. COCHRANE 

Imperial Esso Agent 

Highest Quality Petroleum Products 

Phone Bus. 124; Res. 168 
Russell, Man. 


Clements Farm Equipment Ltd. 

Case, Massey-Ferguson, Minneapolis Moline, 
New Holland Haying Machinery 
Russell—Phone 53 


Best Wishes on Your 10th Anniversary 


Compliments of 

R. G. SMELLIE, M.L.A. 


AVALON THEATRE 

Barrister & Solicitor 


to the MFU on their 

10th Annual Convention 

Russell, Manitoba — Phone 28 


Russell, Man. 


W. G. GARNETT 


Compliments of 

Optometrist 


BOB McMURRAY 

Russell Clinic 


Complete insurance Service 

Russell, Manitoba 


Russell, Man. 


113 

















Director: 

Alternate: 

Women'* Director: 
Women's Alternate: 
District Sec.-Treas.: 
Sub-District Directors: 


Director: 

Alternate: 

Women's Director: 
Women's Alternate: 
District Sec.-Treas.: 
Youth Director: 
Sub-District Directors: 


Director: 

Alternate: 

Women's Director: 
Women's Alternate: 
District Sec.-Treas.: 
Sub-District Directors: 


Director: 

Alternate: 

Women's Director: 
Women's Alternate: 
District Sec.-Treas.: 
Youth Director: 
Sub-District Directors: 


DISTRICT No. 8 —(Contd.) 

Mrs. H. Andresen _Myrtle 

Cornelius Funk _Snowflake 

Mrs. A. B. Foster _Somerset 

Geo. G. Elias, Box 36 _Haskett 

Mrs. Joe Weber _ Morden 

DISTRICT No. 9 

Leo Kuntz, Box 171 _Morris 

Roland Lussier _Ste. Elisabeth 

Mrs. M. H. Smith ___Greenridge 

Mrs. Albert Gruenke ___Dominion City 

Roland Lussier _Ste. Elisabeth 

Mrs. Margaret Joman _Dufrost 

Victor Crook ___Dominion City 

Mrs. Tom Smith _Woodmore 

Nick Paley _Rosa 

Carl Van Kooten ___South Junction 


DISTRICT No. 10 

Rudy Nikodem_Glenfields 

Howard Wright, Box 46, RR1 _ Dugald 

Mrs. Leslie Colbert, Box 101, RR1 _Dugald 

Mrs. Mary Kowalchuk _Dencross 

Mrs. Mary Kowalchuk _Dencross 

Danny Mosquin_ Brokenhead 

John Woligroski_._Lowland 

Mrs. Helen Rattai _Green Oak 

K. Chorney _Tyndall 

Peter Savinkoff _ Medika 

Mrs. V. Karpick _Medika 

Ernest Klaprat _Whitemouth 

Mrs. Nellie Kozier _ Buchan 


DISTRICT No. 11 


Roy M. Mann _ 



R. Zozman, 188 Oakdean 
Mrs. Irene Franklin, RR1 

Blvd. _ 

_ St. James 

Mrs. Victor Futros, RR1 „ 
Mrs. Kae Dvck, RR1 

Percy Hudson, Box 1 1 _ 

Walter Vier _ 


_Headingley 

_ Headingley 

_Dickens P.O. 




DISTRICT No. 12 

Pete Penner _ 


_New Bothwell 

Stanley James, 17 Crescent 
Mrs. Kathy Grienke, Box 1C 
Mrs. Glen Colbert, Box 93 
Mrs. Gabriel Roy __ 

Dr. 


155 _ . 

_Steinbach 


_Dugald 


_Aubigny 






_Glenlea 



... . Oak Bluff 

Eugene Labelle . .. 


_St. Pierre 




Mrs. Mary Colbert, Box 93 
Albert Laramee _ 




_La Broquerie 


114 



























































I 

Congratulations and Best Wishes 
on your Tenth Anniversary from the 
merchants and business men of Roblin, Manitoba 


Parkside Motors & Body Shop 

MERCURY — METEOR — COMET 
Genuine Ford Parts Sales & Service 

Phone 103 — Body Shop 
Box 339 — Phone 209 


ROBERTSON'S GROCETERIA 

Phone 18 - Roblin We Deliver 

"Home Of Fine Foods' 7 


Phone 3 — 

P.O. Box 680 

ROBLIN 

HARDWARE 

Your Marshall-Wells Store 

HARDWARE 

APPLIANCES 

FURNITURE 

Roblin, Man. 



Compliments of 




ROUTE 83 MOTEL 


On the 

Shore of Beautiful 

Goose 

Lake 

Roblin, 

Man 

Phone 

228 


Goodyear Tires — Veedol Oil 


ROBLIN ELECTRIC 

ROBLIN IMPLEMENTS 


Complete Radio, T-V, Refrigeration 

Soles ond Service 


and Electrical Service 

Tractors, Oils & Greases 


"We Sell The Best and Fix The Rest" 

D. M. Staple, Prop. Phone 94 


Phone 68 Roblin 


CABANA GRILL 

Meals Lunches Confectionery 
Phone 181 — Roblin 
Ray Spencer — Prop. 


MITCHELL'S DRUG STORE 

Roblin, Man. 

Professional Prescription Service 
Veterinary Supplies 

After-Hour Service Phone 77-3 or 110 


R. Perchaluk 

ROBLIN BAKERY 

Phone 151 

We Appreciate Your Patronage 


With Best Wishes to MFU 

SPIGELMAN AND LICHTER 

Roblin 

Livestock Buyers and Commission Agents 
Dealers in Raw Furs, 

Hides, Wool and Seneca Root 


Roblin Consumers Co-operative 


Firestone 

Limited 


ROSS'S H & A SUPPLY 

Telephone Store 127 — Pharmacy 252 


Phone 102 Roblin, Man. 

Service Station 246 — Lumber 255 


Tires, Appliances, Hardware 

Owned and Controlled By The People It Serves 


Heating — Variety Merchandise 


Best Wishes From 


Phone 87 - Roblin - P.O. Box 275 

MacLeod's Authorized Dealer 


Mickelson's Farm Equipment Ltd. 

J. A. Hilland 


I.H.C. Sales & Service 

Fully Equipped Repair Shop 

Phone 119 — Roblin, Man. 


Trucks & Tractors — Oils 81 Greases 


115 
















ADVERTISERS' INDEX 


Pages 


Armstrong Commission Co. _ 20 

Armstrong Printing _ 38 

Ashern Advertisers _ 87 

Allis Chalmers Rumely Ltd. _ 36 

Alberta Farmers Union _ 8 

Bank of Montreal _ 34 

Bank of Nova Scotia _ 36 

Brett-Young Seeds Ltd. _ 89 

Beausejour Advertisers_ 59, 66 

British American Oil _ 61 

Canadian Livestock Co-op _ 14 

Cockshutt Farm Equipment _ 38 

J. I. Case Co. _ 23 

Canadian Co-op Implements _ 39 

Curtis Jewelry _ 44 

Co-op Fire and Casualty _ 68 

Co-op Life Insurance _ 34 

Crescent Creamery _ 40 

Clay Law Ltd. _ 38 

Denturists Assn, of Manitoba _ 34 

Erickson Advertisers _ 79 

Federal Grain _ 32 

Federated Co-operatives Ltd. _ 1 6 

Fisher Branch Advertisers _ 83 

Great West Life _ 18 

Graham Furniture . .... _ 109 

Hydraulic Engineering Co_ 10 

Hambley Hatcheries . _ 40 

Hudson Bay Route Assn. .. 6 

Hack & Patterson TV Service . ____ 23 

Imperial Oil _ 24 

International Harvester _ 40 

Interprovincial Farm Union 

Council - - Inside Back Cover 

John Deere Plow Co. Ltd. _ 12 

Kane Equipment _ 43 

Lee Dental Lab. _ 40 

Lundar Advertisers_81 

Manitoba Dept, of Agriculture _ 65 

Manitoba Bearing Works _ 89 


Pages 


Manitoba Telephone System _ 20 

Manitoba Pool Elevators_Back Cover 

Modern Dairies Ltd. _ 43 

McCabe Grain _ 30 

Manitoba Dairy & Poultry Co-op _105 

Macleod's Ltd. _ 10 

MasseyFerguson Ltd. _109 

Manitoba Power Commission _ 32 

Minneapolis Moline _ 34 

Morden Advertisers _ 85 

Moosehorn Advertisers _ 85 

Manitoba Medical Service _107 

Neepawa Advertisers _ 31,90 

North Star Oil _ 26 

National Grain Co. _ 24 

Ontario Farmers Union _ _ 6 

Oakland Hatcheries _ 38 

Palm Dairies _ 44 

Portage la Prairie Advertisers _ 91 

Paterson, N. M. & Sons, Ltd. _111 

Powell Equipment _ 44 

People's Co-operative_ 1 3 

Portage la Prairie Mut. Insurance .... 10 

Portage Credit Union Society Ltd. 78 

Robin Hood Flour Mills Ltd. _ 60 

Red River Co-op _ . 18 

Roblin Advertisers _ .... 115 

Russell Advertisers ____23, 1 13 

Reliable Wholesale Jewellers _ 109 

R.O.P. Breeders _ 109 

Roblin Trading Co. _ 89 

Silverwood Dairies _ 36 

St. Claude Advertisers ___ 74-75 

Searle Grain Co. Ltd. _ 22 

Sherwin-Williams Paints __ _ . 30 

Silmac's Limited _ 89 

Saskatchewan Farmers Union _ 8 

Swan Valley Co-op _ 78 

St. Jean Advertisers . _ 79 

United Grain Growers 

Ltd. _Inside Front Cover 

Western Savings & Loan Assn. _ 26 

Winnipeg Paint & Glass _ 44 

Wm. J. Renshaw Funeral Home_ 66 


116 














































































How loudly does YOUR voice speak ? 


That is, the Voice of your farm organization . . . 

THE VOICE OF THE FARMER 


How many of YOUR friends and neighbors are reading the farm paper that speaks 
for the grassroots, membership-controlled Manitoba Farmers Union? 

The Hon. Alvin Hamilton, newly appointed Federal Minister of Agriculture, has 
declared that "farming is everybody's business." Then why not tell everybody the former's 
side of the case! Publicize YOUR paper by personal contact — next time you are talking 
to the business men in your locality, suggest they subscribe to The Voice of the Farmer. 
Give a gift subscription to friends or neighbors not now receiving the farm organization 
paper. You can do this individually — or through your Local or District. 

SELL your paper, so it can 

TELL your story. THE VOICE OF THE FARMER 

O. Edgerton, Managing Editor. 


SUBSCRIBE TO THE VOICE OF THE FARMER AND MAKE YOUR VOICE HEARD! 

SUBSCRIPTION FORM Rate $1.00 Per Year 

THE VOICE OF THE FARMER 

524 McIntyre Bldg., Winnipeg 2, Man. 

Kindly find enclosed the sum of $ - for which send me 

your publication for ..._ years. 


NAME _ 

ADDRESS --- 

(If MFU Member, please mark Local No. -) 



117 










M F U AUTO INSURANCE POOL 


- <yfe&uztiae 'pire & &z4xuiCty 


Altono—Rhineland Consumers Co-op 
Box 367 

Austin—Loney, W. R. Box 1 29 

Beausejour—Dudych, J. J. 

Beresford—Clark, E. A. 

Binscarth—Ivey, Vernon R. Box 315 
Birtle—Brown, Wm, J. Box 238 
Boissevain—Hole, E. L. Box 96 
Brandon—Clark, A. C., 315 - 9th St. 
Broadvalley—Klimchuk, Walter 
Caliento—Zushman, Mike 
Carman—-Somers, H. J. 

Crystal City—Anderson, S. 

Dunrea—Greves, L. S. 

Dauphin—Jackman, G. I., 303 Kirby Ave. 
Deloraine—-Maxwell, Keith 
Dominion City—Bouchard, Lucien 
Dufrost—Turenne, P. E. 

Erickson—Shellborn, Glen 
Ethelbert—Budolowsky, Wm., Box 156 
Fisher Branch—Hnatiuk, Daniel, Box 235 
Foxwarren—Falloon, S. J. 

Gladstone—Sorenson, Svend 
Gilbert Plains—Plummer, Stan 
Gimli—Heidinger, J. B. 

Glenella—Wilson, Geo. J. 

Grande Pointe—Keweriga, John 
Grandview—-Miller, M. A. 

Hadashville—Lozinski, Joe 
Hamiota—Brown, Ernest M. 

Harte—McIntosh, Herb 
Hartney—Muir, A. A. 

Headingley—Jones, John 

Hodgson—Schreyer, J. W. 

lie des Chenes—Trudeau, Rene G. 

Kaleida—Angers, Blaine 
Killarney—Chapman, D. S., Box 98 
Killarney—Cowan, G. C. 

La Broquerie—Allard, A. G. 

La Riviere—Mooney, Thomas 
Lena—Ferguson, Ross 
Letellier—Klassen, M. 

Lowe Farm—Green, J. C. 

Lundar—Simpkin, W. H., Box 212 
Mather—Sorenson, A. 

Manson—Rose, Percy S. 

Marquette—Wood, C. E. 

Makaroff—Stoughton, S. A. 

MacDonald—Knight, J. A., RR1, Box 19 
MacGregor—Pennell, C. F. 

McTavish—Klassen, E. D. 

Miniota—Hainstock, G. F. 


Minnedosa—McNabb, P. E. 

Morden—Fraser, J. H. 

Moore Park—Hunter, F. A. 

Moosehorn—Reder, Paul E. 

Notre Dame de Lourdes—Deroche, J., 

Box 84 

New Bothwell—Friesen, C. C. S., Box 101 
Neepawo—Smee, Ed. 

Oak Bluff—Manchur, Nick 
Oakbank—Milne, G. E. 

Oakburn—Waytowich, S. M., Box 52 
Oakville—Tyler, N. D., Box 217 
Pierson—-Wiebe, A. D. 

Pilot Mound—Riglin, Kenneth A. 

Plumas—Fischer, Owen S. 

Plum Coulee—Penner, J., Box 83 
Pine River—-Adamowski, Mike 
Reston—Caldwell, Chas. A. 

Riverton—Pipegrass, M. 

Roblin—Dietrich, L. A., Box 150 
Rossburn—Gawryluk, Michael J., Box 124 
Rosa—Paley, Nick S. 

Sandy Lake—Bachewich, Dan 
Shoal Lake—Antonation, Mike 
Sifton—Ferance, J. 

Souris—Gerow, A. 0. 

Douglas, Roy W., Box 459 
Somerset—Lemoing, L. J. 

Starbuck—Mann, Roy 
Strathclair—Winstone, F. J. 

Swan River—Fulford, A. D. 

St. Adolphe—Martin, T. J. 

Ste. Agathe—Cote, Maurice J. 

St. Claude—-Lacroix, J. 

Ste. Elizabeth—Lussier, E. 

St. George—Boisjoi, Ralph 
St. Jean Baptiste—Marion, Simeon 
St. Joseph—Marion, Leon 
St. Leon—Labossiere, R. 

St. Malo—Gosselin, Germain 
St. Martin—Turman, Alex 
St. Norbert—Boisjoli, Geo. 

St. Pierre—Gagne, Gerard 
Ste. Rose du Lac—Beasse, Henri 

Treherne—Darling, W. A. 

Virden—Weldon, E. B. 

Box 481 

Winkler—Stanley Consumers 
Co-op Ltd., Box 1090 
Winnipegosis—Mudry, Nick 
Winnipeg—Winnipeg Branch 
144 Lombard Ave. 


118 



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When you help make policy for your Farm Union 
at your annual provincial convention, you can do so 
with confidence. 

You can afford this confidence because you 
know there will be no hurdles of special interest 
groups to cross before your policy is taken directly to 
"the powers that be" for action. 

There will be no "watering down" to contend 
with from people who have a special "axe to grind." 

This is so because as a Farm Union member you 
are the highest level of power. You have the final 
word in the formation of policy. There are no vetos 
from boards or officials. But with authority goes re¬ 
sponsibility. That's why it's up to you to be an active 
member — always! 

Best wishes for a successful convention. 


INTERPROVINCIAL FARM UNION COUNCIL 


202 Avenue B North 


Saskatoon, Sask. 




TEAMWORK 

Build your co-operatives bigger — bigger in membership — 
bigger in resources — bigger in research — bigger in services 
you render. 

Be satisfield with nothing less than top-notch leadership — 
top-notch directors — top-notch management. 

Bring about more co-operation between co-operatives. 

Build a better press — a better public relations — for the entire 
co-operative movement. 

'Light 

Is The Load 
Where Many 
Share 
The Toil" 


2SE[ 


Ezra Taft- Benson 

United States Secretary of Agriculture 


'•v 



MANITOBA 


ELEVATORS