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SfUDY OF THE ONTARIO 



ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION 



INDUSTRY 



NOVEMBER 1988 







Environment &s B ter dley 
Ontario 



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STUDY OF THE ONTARIO 
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION 

INDUSTRY 



Prepared by: 

Woods Gordon Management Consultants 



For: 

Policy and Planning Branch 

Ontario Ministry of the Environment 



ISBN 0-7729-4884-4 

November 1988 



ABSTRACT 



r C a r i o orovices an cverviev/ oi cr_e curr—".'~.c ecor, i 1- _ 
activity generated in Ontario as a result :: 
environmental regulations, the prospects for tne growth 
of this industry, the impact of free trace zr. "iese 
prospects, and industry views en the potential role zz 
the provincial government in maximizing the economic 
spinoffs associated with environmental protection 
activity. It also describes an accompanying forecasting 
model for use on personal computers which will ce usee 
by the Ministry to estimate the macroecor.cmic impact on 
the provincial economy of future envircnmer.ta, 
protection spending. 



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TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 
Letter of Transmittal 

Executive Summary 1 

Chapter 1: Introduction 3 

Chapter 2: Methodology 7 

Chapter 3: Estimated Size of the Ontario EP Industry 13 

Chapter 4: Growth Trends and Prospects 32 

Chapter 5: Ontario Competitiveness and the Impact of Free Trade 43 

Chapter 6: EP Industry Issues and the Role for Government 67 

Chapter 7: Environmental Protection Impact Model 76 

Appendix I: Survey of Pollution Control Expenditures 

Appendix II: Sample Output from the EP Impact Model 

Appendix HI: Listing of Firms in the Ontario EP Industry 

Appendix rV: Mail Survey Questionnaire 

Annotated Bibliography 



Woods Gordon 



STUDY OF THE ONTARIO 
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION INDUSTRY 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 

This study of the Environmental Protection (EP) Industry was intended 
to provide an overview of the current economic activity generated in 
Ontario as a result of environmental regulations, the prospects for the 
growth of this industry, the impact of free trade on these prospects, and 
industry views on the potential role of the provincial government in 
maximizing the economic spinoffs associated with EP activity. In 
addition, the report contains a model which will be used by the Ministry 
to estimate the economic spinoffs of future EP spending. 

For the purposes of this study, the EP industry definition included 
private sector Ontario manufacturers or service suppliers of specialized 
EP goods and services, and the suppliers of the construction involved in 
equipment installation. General industrial products used in the course of 
EP activities are included in our economic impact model, but not in the 
discussions of the scale and trends in the EP industry. Since the 
boundaries of what constitutes an EP product are necessarily somewhat 
arbitrary, estimates of the scale of activity in this sector are at best 
approximations of any given definition of the industry. 

Data were gathered for this study from discussions with over 100 
buyers and sellers of EP goods and services in Ontario, from a large 
sample mail survey of EP goods and service suppliers, and from a 
review of existing literature on the EP industry in Ontario, Canada and 
the United States. With the exception of construction, official statistical 
sources were not very useful for estimating EP activity, since the 
aggregations used do not allow for the identification of EP products. 

Based on our survey results and the available literature, we conclude that 
the EP industry is a significant source of sales revenue and 
employment in Ontario. Roughly 28,000 Ontarians are employed in 
the generation of about $2 billion in annual sales of Ontario-produced 
products and services, including equipment, instruments, and supplies 
and waste disposal, treatment, recycling, consulting and analytical 
services. In terms of employment, the EP industry is similar in size to 
the clothing, wood and communications equipment manufacturing 
industries. Exports by our mail survey respondents totalled $67.8 
million, or 13.5% of their total sales. 

Growth by firms in this sector has been quite strong during the current 
economic recovery. The firms responding to our mail survey reported 
growth rates of 17% to 32% per year since 1983, with the fastest growth 
reported in the water and wastewater field. (All growth rates are 
unadjusted for inflation.) 

Growth prospects are expected to be quite favourable over the next 
five years, as both purchasers and suppliers anticipate further advances in 



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EP demand in response to tightening government regulations. Survey 
respondents expect annual growth ranging from \5 a o in the air pollution 
field to over 18% in water and wastewater treatment. 

• Free Trade is expected to be modestly beneficial to the Ontario EP 
industry, and will give a boost to export-oriented equipment 
manufacturers and consultants. The industry is quite competitive m 
serving the Canadian demand in specific market niches. In the goods 
sector, Ontario firms are in the strongest competitive position in either 
low-volume, high technology products, where scale economies are not 
significant, or in high-volume low technology items that would bear 
significant freight costs if imported or which require major customized 
assembly on-site. High technology items and general industrial goods 
that are produced with significant scale economies are already largely 
imported. Ontario consulting engineering firms have strong competitive 
capabilities in the EP field. Other services, such as waste hauling, must 
be performed by local branches of companies, whether Canadian or 
foreign based. 

• The most important area of government policy affecting the EP 
industry is in the setting of environmental protection regulations. 
Purchasers believe that they will be able to meet the new air and water 
quality regulations provided they do not go further than existing U.S, 
standards, but they are uncertain as to whether or not this will be the 
case. 

• Suppliers generally feel that Ontario's new regulations will merely match 
U.S. standards. According to suppliers, one of the problems facing 
the Ontario EP industry is that following the American lead in 
setting standards has been harmful for the development of the EP 
industry in Canada. By leading in regulations (if not necessarily in 
enforcement) a country stimulates the development of EP products that 
can later be exported. Other problems cited include purchasing decisions 
by U.S. multinationals that call for the replication of equipment used in 
parent company plants, a conservative approach by governments to 
permitting the use of experimental control technologies, and U.S. 
government sector purchasing preferences for American-made products. 

• Suppliers favour greater support by the government for new product 
development, through financial support for R&D and marketing, and 
greater flexibility in the approvals process to permit pilot projects with 
innovative approaches to environmental protection. 

• Accompanying this report is an Environmental Protection Impact 

Model, designed to estimate the direct, indirect and induced economic 
spinoffs of EP spending on Ontario incomes (GDP) and employment, 
using and input-output approach. The final chapter of the report is a 
guide to the use of this microcomputer-based model. 



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STUDY OF THE ONTARIO 
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION INDUSTRY 

CHAPTER 1 
INTRODUCTION 

1.1 Background 

The Ontario Ministry of the Environment has undertaken a number of recent 
initiatives to improve the monitoring and abatement of industrial and municipal effluents in 
the province. Some of these measures, and possible additional regulatory changes now 
under consideration, require significant expenditures by private companies, utilities and 
municipalities in order to meet the new tougher standards for environmental control. 

Opposition to such measures frequently centres on the financial burdens 
they impose on the affected companies and municipalities, and more broadly, on the 
economic costs that tighter regulations could entail including losses in employment, 
incomes and tax revenues in the province. 

While these considerations are important, and properly ought to be 
evaluated in developing appropriate standards, so too it is essential that any such cost 
analysis fairly presents net cost and benefits to the overall economy. Even where direct 
economic costs result from environmental regulations, there may be significant offsetting 
economic benefits. For example, direct savings in health care, agriculture and other areas 
could result from improvements in environmental control. 

Environmental regulations are tied to a sizeable amount of economic activity 
in the province, in the provision of pollution control equipment, materials and services. 
Some or all of this activity represents a transfer of economic activity from other sectors of 
the economy, since the need to devote investment funds to meeting environmental 
regulations may lower rates of return and thereby reduce industrial investment spending. 

The production of pollution control equipment and services generates 
spinoff activity in supplying the machinery and materials used by the EP industry, and in 
the consumer spending generated as the result of wage payments to employees in the 
pollution control sector. Even where the equipment involved is produced outside the 



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province, a major share of ihe required environmental control spending may be directed at 
engineering, design and consulting services provided by Ontario firms. 

Public policy -makers would find it useful to be able to generate quantitative 
estimates of these resulting economic spinoffs of regulatory changes. Such analyses have 
already been conducted with respect to environmental protection (EP) spending in other 
jurisdictions. (See for example, OECD (1985) and references contained therein.) 

The correct balancing of economic costs and benefits resulting from 
environmental protection is one of the most difficult areas of public policy formulation. 
The measurement problems that must be addressed are highly complex. Furthermore, there 
are very little data available on environmental protection spending and production in 
Canada, and there is clearly a need for a much more directed effort at assembling such data 
by official statistical agencies. Finally, there is a need for an acceptable approach to 
estimating costs and benefits. 



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This report does not attempt to address the costs and benefits of 
environmental protection. Rather, it focuses on the production of EP goods and services in 
Canada, and the extent to which the spending associated with environmental protection 
activities are transferred to firms in Ontario, as opposed to import suppliers, and on the 
nature of the industry that has been created in Ontario in response to the demand for 
environmental protection products. 

Environmental protection activities are those designed to reduce or avoid 
emissions of materials that are detrimental to the environment. The EP industry includes 
suppliers of equipment and services for air pollution control, water and wastewater 
treatment, solid waste disposal and recycling, and monitoring and analyzing environmental 
data. For the purposes of this study, the EP industry definition included private sector 
Ontario manufacturers or service suppliers of specialized EP goods and services, and the 
construction involved in equipment installation, as well as engineers and other consultants 
who provide advisory services on EP matters. General industrial products used in the 
course of EP activities are included in our economic impact model, but not in the 
discussions of the scale and trends in the EP industry. Resource conservation, nuclear 
waste management and noise abatement activities are excluded from this definition, and we 
do not attempt to measure the direct employment and value added generated by EP 
personnel at government environment departments or public utilities. 



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1.2 Objectives of the Present Study 

In view of the varied needs discussed above, the Ministry of the 
Environment asked Woods Gordon to prepare a broad study ot a number of aspects of the 
pollution control industry in Ontario. 

This report meets a number of distinct objectives. First, to address the 
paucity of data on the production of environmental protection products in the province, the 
study provides an initial overall assessment of the scale and economic importance of the 
production of EP goods and services in Ontario, as a first step towards improved census or 
survey efforts by official statistical agencies. In addition to developing an understanding of 
the current scale of activity, the report presents the views of both purchasers and suppliers 
of EP products and services on the future growth prospects for this area of economic 
activity. 

Second, the report develops an input-ourput methodology for estimating the 
impact of future EP spending generated by regulatory change on the Ontario economy. 
This economic impact framework will prove to be a useful tool for in-house analysis by the 
Ministry of the Environment's economics and policy staff. 

Third, the long-term prospects for the EP industry in Ontario will be 
affected by broad structural changes in the provincial economy and the global trading 
environment. The recently concluded Canada-U.S. Free-Trade Agreement, if approved by 
the legislative branches of both countries, will be a key driving force in the medium and 
longer term prospects of many industries in the province. This report addresses the 
implications that free trade will have for EP producers and their major sources of demand. 

Finally, the report provides an improved understanding of the potential role 
for government initiatives to support Ontario companies in this field. In the course of 
extensive discussions with both purchasers and suppliers of environmental protection 
products, we obtained the viewpoints of market participants on the means by which the 
effective implementation of new regulations and the development of a strong Ontario EP 
industry could be promoted by the government. These views should serve as a useful 
supplement to the extensive, ongoing industry consultations being undertaken by the 
Ministry. 



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1.3 Organization of this Report 

Including this Introductory Chapter, this report comprises seven chapters. 
Chapter 2 reviews the methodology undertaken to gather quantitative and qualitative data on 
the environmental protection industry. Chapter 3 summarizes our findings on the overall 
size of the environmental protection sector in terms of revenue and employment in Ontario. 
Chapter 4 discusses the recent trends and medium term outlook for growth in the EP sector 
and its various components. The impact of the Free Trade Agreement on these prospects is 
reviewed in Chapter 5. Chapter 6 discusses our findings on the potential role for 
government policies in promoting the growth of the EP industry in the province. The Final 
Chapter presents our Environmental Protection Impact Model, which is intended to be used 
in future research on the economic impact of environmental expenditures. 



Woods "Gordon 



CHAPTER 2 
METHODOLOGY 



2.1 Introduction 



No comprehensive data source exists for the environmental protection 
industrv in Ontario. Most of the activitv in this sector is undertaken bv firms involved in a 
range of non-environmental manufacturing and service activities, and is therefore 
incorporated into broader industry categories by statistical agencies. Data on expenditures 
on environmental protection fas opposed to Ontario production of EP products and 
services) is also available only in an incomplete form, with public sector spending tracked 
more comprehensively than private spending. 

It was therefore necessary for the purposes of this study to undertake for the 
first time a significant effort at obtaining new quantitative and qualitative perspectives on 
this sector in Ontario. This data was gathered using four different approaches: 

( 1 ) a review of existing related literature and statistical sources; 

(2) interviews with 75 purchasers of EP products/services; 

(3) a mail survey sent to over 1,800 Ontario firms identified as possible 
manufacturers of goods or suppliers of services for environmental 
protection; and 

(4) follow-up interviews with 30 suppliers of EP products. 

Our interview samples were drawn from a wide range of purchasing 
industries and municipalities, and from suppliers of various products and services for air, 
water and solid waste pollution control. 

A wide range of products and services are used in the course of 
environmental protection activities. In order to have a well-defined industry for public 
policy purposes, we have defined the EP industry as including all products and services for 
which environmental protection is the dominant application 1 . Thus, while sewage 



5 Environmental protection is in turn defined as, following the report of the Institute of Research on Public 
Policy, "any activity which has as its major effect the reduction or avoidance of emissions of materials that 
... may become detrimental to the environment". As noted by the IRPP report, it would be impractical to 

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treatment equipment is included in our definition, the pipes and valves that connect such 
equipment to the sewage collection system are excluded. This is similar to the approach 
adopted by official statistical agencies, who would include a mufflers company in the auto- 
parts industry, but not a manufacturer of fabrics that are sometimes used for car seats. In 
our economic impact model, however, where the purpose is to fully capture all of the 
economic spinoffs from environmental projects, we include expenditures on these general 
industrial commodities. 

The remainder of this chapter reviews the specifics of each of our 
quantitative and qualitative data gathering procedures. The methodology used in the 
creation of the Environmental Protection Impact Model is presented along with the manual 
for using the model in Chapter 7. 

2.2 Literature Review 

Our literature review covered both published and unpublished reports on the 
environmental protection industry in Ontario, Canada and other countries. A very large 
body of literature is available on very specific aspects of environmental protection 
engineering and technology. Our focus, however, was on the somewhat smaller group of 
reports on the economic aspects of the environmental protection industry and the scale of 
activity in various jurisdictions. The literature used in the preparation of this report is listed 
in the Annotated Bibliography. 

Data are also available from Statistics Canada figures on capital expenditures 
for which firms claimed accelerated capital consumption allowances, under tax law 
provisions allowing special treatment for water and air pollution control assets. We were 
advised by officials in the relevant department of Statistics Canada that data obtained by this 
method would provide a misleading picture of actual pollution control expenditures. 
Similarly, officials at the Approvals Branch of the Ontario Ministry of the Environment 
advised against using their data to estimate expenditures, since many firms do not report 
project costs. 



conduct a survey of suppliers of all goods and services used, however remotely in EP activities, since 
"cooperating with a survey (would be) a low priority" for such suppliers." 

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2.3 Survey of Purchasers 

The survey of purchasers was intended to provide an indication of the types 
of products and services demanded, the role that Ontario firms piay in meeting the needs of 
these purchasers, the views of purchasers as to the future growth in their environmental 
protection spending, and the impact of bilateral free trade on the Ontario environmental 
protection industry. 

The 75 individuals contacted in our survey were generally those with the 
prime responsibility for environmental protection at their establishment, as identified by 
senior officials at their companies. Their organizations span a range of industries that tend 
to purchase significant volumes of environmental protection products. In the case of a few 
large organizations, more than one individual at the organization was included in the 
survey. The industry breakdown of the respondents is as follows: 

INDUSTRY # OF RESPONDENTS 



Food and Beverage 
Wood Products 


2 
3 


Non-Metallic Minerals 


4 


Petroleum Refineries 


5 


Pulp and Paper 

Mining 

Metal Refining and Smelting 

Chemicals 


5 

6 

8 

11 


Consulting Engineers 

Public Sector (Government Departments and Agencies) 


15 
16 



TOTAL 75 

Based on the early interview results, we skewed the sample toward 
consulting engineers, who are much more frequently involved with large scale installations 
of new equipment than are engineers at any individual industrial establishment. Consulting 
engineers usually play the key role in specifying the equipment to be purchased for such 
installations. Thus, their impressions of Ontario, Canadian and imported equipment are 
particularly valuable in estimating market shares. One should note that, although the total 
sample should provide a reasonable representation of the views of purchasers, responses 
related to industry-specific items may not be representative of the industry involved, in 
those cases where we have sampled only a few firms (e.g., food and beverage and wood 
products). 



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The public sector sample included municipal water and solid waste 
management officials, as well as provincial officials who are the leading purchasers of 
monitoring instrumentation. We also discussed industry trends and developments with 
officials at the federal Department of Regional Industrial Expansion (DRIE), who have 
been engaged in ongoing work on this sector. 

2.4 Mail Survey of Suppliers 

In order to obtain a broad-brush view of the activity of environmental 
protection firms in Ontario, we conducted a large-sample mail survey of Ontario EP goods 
and services suppliers in the spring of 1988. The purpose of the survey was to obtain an 
indication of the scale of the industry in the province, its employment, recent growth trends 
and future growth possibilities, and product-range. 

The focus of this aspect our study was to obtain an understanding of the 
scale and prospects for the EP industry in Ontario. Thus, in contrast to the limited body of 
existing work that has been directed at estimating the value of EP goods and services 
purchased, our emphasis was on the even more difficult task of obtaining data on the nature 
of EP industry production (with significant Ontario content). 

Since any survey (perhaps with the exclusion of a census undertaken by 
statistical agencies which must be completed by law) will achieve only a partial response 
rate, and no fully-comprehensive list exists for all firms that are in pan involved in the 
environmental protection area, our results were not expected to provide complete coverage 
for any of the indicators sought. Further, private companies responding to some questions 
often tend to be reluctant to disclose sales data on individual product lines. However, our 
findings provide a lower-bound for the scale of the industry in Ontario, and suggest the 
potential merit in having a census conducted by Statistics Canada in this area. 

The survey was intended to cover a broad range of firms in the 
environmental protection sector. For goods-producing firms, our focus was on firms that 
are engaged in manufacturing within the province. We did not include the activity of 
wholesalers and distributors, since this would risk double-counting Ontario manufactured 
products at later stages of distribution, and would include virtually all imported goods in 
the EP industry, which are almost always distributed through a local office. 



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We also did not include the large number of firms for whom environmental 
protection constitutes a small part of their overall operations, This would apply, for 
example, to construction contractors, pipe and valve makers, chemical companies and a 
wide range of other manufacturers of industrial products. In the case of industrial 
construction firms, much of their activity in this area would be in the construction of water 
and sewage treatment facilities. Since this work must take place locally, and therefore 
inevitably involves Ontario workers, the activity and job creation in this area was more 
easily and comprehensively captured by existing data on public expenditures on such 
facilities. 

The list of respondents was compiled from two sources. The primary 
source was a directory of environmental protection firms in Canada assembled by William 
Glenn (1987), based on trade magazine listings, association memberships, government 
laboratory listings and other sources. This list, included in Appendix ITI, identified over 
1,700 firms in Ontario in the broadly-defined environmental protection sector, including 
firms in twelve categories: 

(1) consulting/engineering 

(2) air pollution control equipment 

(3) water pollution control equipment 

(4) other pollution control equipment 

(5) treatment chemicals 

(6) solid waste handling 

(7) liquid waste handling 

(8) waste treatment and disposal 

(9) laboratories 

(10) recycling 

(11) training 

(12) biotechnology 

A check against a number of other listings obtained by Woods Gordon from 
various trade journals and associations confirmed that the Glenn list was reasonably 
comprehensive in most of these categories. The only exception appeared to be in the area 
of air pollution control products, where the number of identified firms appeared to be too 
low. 

We therefore supplemented the Glenn list with firms identified by Made in 
Ontario (1987) as manufacturers of air pollution control equipment. This added a further 
107 firms. In total over 1,800 firms were sent the survey, although, as we discuss in the 



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next chapter, a portion of these firms turned out to be distributors rather than manufacturers 
of EP products, or were selling products and services that were only tangentially or 
infrequently related to environmental protection applications. 

The responses received were carefully reviewed prior to the tabulation of the 
results. In some cases, the description of the firm's products indicated that the product 
code listed by the firm was incorrect; these codes were corrected to match the actual product 
of the firm in question. In other cases, a miscellaneous category was used; we then used 
the description of the product to categorize the firm's output. 

2.5 Supplier Interviews 

In order to follow-up on the results of our mail survey, estimate the scale of 
activity undertaken by firms that would not respond to the mail questionnaire, and respond 
to the need for more qualitative data, we conducted discussions with 30 equipment and 
service suppliers for air, water and solid waste pollution control. Most of the firms 
contacted are leaders in their respective fields; a few were small, high-growth companies 
producing specialized lines of equipment. 

The discussions with suppliers were focussed on the competitive conditions 
facing Ontario firms in this sector, the potential impact of free trade on environmental 
protection goods and service production in the province, the growth prospects for the 
industry, and on the potential role for the provincial government in fostering this growth. 



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CHAPTER 3 

ESTIMATED SIZE OF THE ONTARIO 

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION SECTOR 

3.1 Introduction 

As we have noted, the environmental protection industry is not a well- 
defined sector of the Ontario economy in terms of statistical data from official sources. The 
industry spans a range of goods and service-producing activities, the activity of which is 
incorporated into broader industrial aggregates. Many of the firms involved in this sector, 
including equipment manufacturers, chemical suppliers, consultants, and other service 
providers, are also extensively engaged in non-EP activities; in many cases, environmental 
protection sales are only a small component of the firm's revenue-generating activities. 

Our mail survey of EP firms in Ontario, supplemented with information 
gathered in the course of our interviews with industry participants and a search of existing 
literature, provides an indication of the scope of EP activities in the province. Our findings 
suggest that the EP sector is a significant contributor to the provincial economy, with a 
quite conservative estimate for industry sales on the order of $2 billion per year, and 
directly employing roughly 28,000 Ontarians. 

3.2 Industry Definition and Segmentation 

A wide range of products and services are devoted to disposing or recycling 
waste products, water treatment, environmental clean-up and other EP purposes. There is 
no perfect method of dividing the firms providing these products and services into 
identifiable and wholly distinct segments, since, as noted in the report, Defining the 
Environmental Protection Industry (Institute for Research on Public Policy (1987)), waste 
products often may pose problems for more than one part of the ecosystem. Many wastes, 
for example, may be emitted into the water, disposed of in landfill, or burned and thereby 
enter the air. Thus, environmental problems that could be viewed as an aspect of water 
pollution control become issues for solid waste or air pollution control as well. It is thus 
not clear, for example, whether a firm disposing sludges left behind from water treatment 
should be considered part of the solid waste industry or the water treatment industry, or 
whether a firm building an incinerator to burn solid waste is part of the solid waste sector, 
or part of the air pollution control sector. 



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For the purpose of this report, we have usually divided environmental 
protection activities into three segments: air pollution control; potable water and wastewater 
treatment; and solid and hazardous waste. Occasionally, we separate instrument 
manufacturing and environmental consulting from these broader categories. 

The non-specialized nature of some of the equipment used in pollution 
control is well known. Valves, pipes and fans used in pollution control facilities may he 
much more widely applied in general industrial applications. Similarly, although there are 
specialized environmental service providers, the assembly and construction of 
environmental protection facilities (for water-related projects in particular) is handled by 
general industrial contractors. 

As we noted in the previous chapter, we have adopted a middle course in 
terms of our definition of the environmental protection industry. For the purposes of 
industrial policy formulation, one would wish to have a definition of the industry that 
focuses on true environmental protection products and services, rather than on the much 
greater number of products that are applied along with pollution abatement equipment as a 
part of large water and waste systems. For these policy purposes, it would be meaningless 
to include a pipe or valve maker, for example, as part of the EP industry, and make such a 
firm eligible for any special industrial development initiatives. For most of this report, 
therefore, we restrict ourselves to dedicated EP equipment and services (including the 
construction involved in equipment installation) in defining the industry. 

This was also the most pragmatic approach for our industry surveys. Since 
environmental protection accounts for only a modest percentage of the total demand for 
most non-specialized equipment, it was impractical to include these products in most 
aspects of this study of the environmental protection goods and services. We therefore 
focussed our data gathering and analysis on the more specialized products with a 
substantial degree of application to environmental protection. 1 



1 The decision on which products to include must be somewhat ad hoc. Our selection of firms corresponded 
to that developed by W. Glenn, op. cit., after consultation with the Policy and Planning Branch of the 
Ministry of the Environment. 



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Woods Cordon 

In terms of measuring the economic impact of environmental protection 
spending, however, one would want to include all of the spending on non-specialized 
industrial goods and services that is generated in conjunction with the installation of new 
EP products or the use of EP services. Therefore, our Environmental Protection Impact 
Model (described in Chapter 7) allows for the input of data on these broader expenditures 
when estimating the economic spinoffs from pollution control and monitoring activities. 

3.2.1 Air Pollution Control 

The air pollution control sector consists of firms which manufacture 
equipment for desulphurization and denitrification, dust collection, filtering, fume 
collection and other abatement processes, suppliers of monitoring and analysis equipment 
and instruments, and service firms providing consulting engineering and analysis. 

A wide range of equipment is used in the course of the control and 
monitoring of air quality. This includes specialized equipment, such as electrostatic 
precipitators, scrubbers, and cyclones, as well as a large variety of more basic pumps, 
filters, valves and other industrial equipment and structures that are used in conjunction 
with more specialized air pollution control products. 

Among the types of equipment now in use are the following: 

Electrostatic Precipitators - devices designed to collect particulate matter out of gases 
through the use of electrically-charged rods. They contain some electronic 
components, but are not a very high-technology product. 

Baghouses - another method to trap particulates, in which the incinerator emissions are 
forced through a chamber containing cloth bags. Among its other components are 
valves, iron walls, temperature sensors, and flow measurement devices. 

Scrubbers /Washers - a method of cleaning emissions, made up of (for wet scrubbers) 
spray nozzles, jets of water, lime, a steel box, valves, a water pump, flaps and 
temperature controls and pressure sensor instrumentation. This is also not a very 
high technology product. 

Cyclones - a method of swirling gases (using fans or a spinner) to cause heavier particles 
to settle. This appears to be a less popular method in terms of recent purchasing 



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and installation in Ontario, and doss not effectively control smaller particles. There 
are other similar devices that come under the general category of inertia! separators. 

Incinerators -devises used to burn off waste gases. (Incinerators used to bum solid or 
liquid wastes are users of air pollution control equipment.) 

Among the firms identified as suppliers of air pollution control equipment 
by Ontario purchasers we contacted were (in no particular order) Wheelabrator (now part of 
Henly), Peabody Engineering, Flakt Canada, AVC Specialists, Cadre, Dukon-Mikropul, 
Emtrol-Cassier, Ceilcote (part of General Signal), Research-Cottrell, Joy, Fair, 
Carborundum (a subsidiary of Flakt), N.R. Murphy, and American Air Filter. 

Instruments, consulting engineering services and industrial contracting 
services, are also purchased for air pollution control. Instruments include gas samplers, 
filter samplers, gas analysis equipment, and meters. Consultants assist in the design, 
selection and installation of equipment, and in monitoring, atmospheric modelling and 
testing services. Industrial construction contractors are used when major facilities (stacks 
etc.) are built. Most large industrial firms that purchase air pollution control equipment and 
services also directly employ environmental engineers as a part of their efforts to control air 
and water emissions. 

3.2.2 Potable Water and Wastewater Treatment 

The potable water and wastewater treatment sector consists of those firms 
which manufacture water purifiers, demineralizers, decanters, digesters, dewatering 
presses, clarifiers, filters and other water treatment equipment, producers of instruments, 
chemicals and other supplies, and firms providing consulting, testing and other services. 

Much of the equipment purchased for potable and waste water treatment is 
composed of non-specialized industrial goods such as pipes, valves, pumps, motors, 
chemicals and metal tanks. As such, it was more difficult than in the air pollution field to 
identify suppliers for whom the water pollution control equipment field accounts for a 
significant part of their business. 

Major purchasers of such equipment include governments, pulp and paper 
companies, chemical plants, refineries, and metal refining and smelting. Municipal 



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Woods Gordon 

governments are in total the largest single market segment, purchasing equipment and 
services to treat drinking water and sewage effluents. Industrial users treat water to make it 
suitable for their manufacturing processes (for example, in the paper industry), and then 
treat the wastewater before it is discharged. Some air pollution control processes also use 
water which must be treated before it is discharged. 

Among the types of equipment now in use in the province are: 

Aerators - devices that add air in order to speed up bacteria growth and metabolism to 
break down pollutants more rapidly. 

Gravity Sedimentation Devices - Clarifiers (which remove haze or small panicles from 
liquids), Flocculators (methods of causing particles to clump together so that they 
can be separated from liquids by settling, skimming or other means) and other 
equipment used to separate solids from liquids using gravity. These devices are in 
turn composed of tanks, rakes and other fabricated metal parts, motors, weirs and 
basic pipes, valves and other water system components. 

Filters/Screens/Strainers - various devices, made of a wide variety of materials, designed 
to separate solid particulates from liquids by blocking particles above a certain size. 

Centrifuges - devices that use centrifugal force to remove particles of solids in a liquid 

Chlorination Equipment - used to control the addition of chlorine to water for purification. 
Other chemical-feeding and mixing equipment is used in conjunction with chemicals 
used in sewage and water treatment. 

Sludge Processing - collectors, conveyors, digesters, aging ponds, incinerators, shred- 
ders, thickeners and disposal units (heat treatment, wet-air oxidation, or pressure 
filter) for sludges. 

Tanks, Liners, Pipes, Fittings, Pumps, Valves, Motors, Compressors, Hoses - basic 
components of fluid control systems, while not produced by the EP industry, form 
a large part of water and wastewater installations. 

Instrumentation - used to measure, record or control water levels, rates of flow, water 
quality, dust levels, temperatures, weights and so on. 



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Chemicals - a wide variety of chemicals are used for water treatment (disinfection, neutral- 
ization, softening, algae control, pH control, fluoridation, deodorizing, etc.) and 
sewage treatment (bulking control, coagulation, corrosion control, dechlorination, 
dewatenns. disinfection. pH control, siudee conditionina, deodorizing, etc.). 

Among the large list of suppliers used by the purchasers we surveyed are 
Moyno, Dorr-Oliver, Robins & Meyers, Degussa, Tad Co. Engineering, Aer-O-Flo, 
Control & Metering, DuPont, Marlow, Pacific Flush, Hankins, BIF, Flygt, Worthington, 
General Electric, Crane, Canron, Brier Hydraulics, Westinghouse, Jenkins Valves, Allied 
Collieds, Alcan, Emco Supply, Munroe, Leitch, Dezurik, Knifegate, Rockwell, Bauer, C- 
I-L, Stanchem, Gould, Wemco, Westburne, Bristol-Meyers, Dominion Steel, London 
Steel, Spencer Turbines, Hoffman, Fram, and Ingersol Rand. Many of these firms are 
manufacturers of a wide range of industrial products rather than specialists in water 
treatment. 

Services supplied in conjunction with these and other types of equipment 
include industrial contracting, consulting engineering, sampling and testing, cleaning and 
maintenance services. Some of the consulting firms are local offices of international firms. 

3.2.3 Solid and Hazardous Waste 

This sector consists of manufacturers of compactors, incinerators, 
composting systems, and other waste disposal equipment, specialized incinerators, plasma 
arc furnaces and other equipment for the handling and destruction of hazardous wastes, and 
service firms involved in the collection and disposal of solid and hazardous wastes, and 
consultants providing assistance in testing and monitoring, materials handling and process 
design. 

Solid waste equipment is used to collect, haul, and process a wide range of 
waste materials. Such equipment includes trucks, bulldozers, compactors, balers, loaders, 
containers, weighing systems, conveyors, cranes, incinerators, packaged sewage treatment 
systems and separation machines. Some facilities used the heat generated by incineration to 
create steam for heating buildings or for industrial processes. As in other environmental 
protection areas, many items with broader industrial purposes play a role in the handling 
and processing of solid wastes. 



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Among die equipment suppliers identified in this sector by purchasers are 
Duke, Mobil, Vacusweep, Cambridge-Frink Canada, Amertech, Mack, Shu-pak, and 
Sanivan. 

Many of the services in solid waste treatment and disposal are provided by 
the government sector. Private suppliers provide dumpster hauling, waste oil hauling, 
hazardous waste handling, groundwater testing, environmental impact studies, and 
recycling services. These service suppliers are also major equipment purchasers. Among 
the leading waste management service firms are Tricil, BFT, Waste Management Inc., 
Wasteco and Laidlaw. 

3.3 Number of Firms and Industry Size 

3.3.1 Mail Survey Results 

There are over 1,800 firms involved in the supply of environmental goods 
and service production in Ontario. Appendix HI to this report is a listing of Ontario firms 
developed by Glenn (1987). A more recent listing, developed on behalf of Environment 
Canada (1988) identified 1,661 firms in Ontario that were involved in environmental 
protection. 

Some of these firms, however, are not engaged in manufacturing products 
in Ontario or supplying services for EP uses. Our survey results indicated that several 
hundred of these firms are essentially distributors of the products manufactured by other 
Ontario or Canadian firms or imported from the U.S., Europe or the Far East. Other 
names on these lists were gathered from trade publications that are now out of date, and the 
firms listed are no longer in business or engaged in EP activities. We estimate that the 
universe of domestic manufacturers of reasonably specialized EP goods or service firms is 
on the order of 1 ,200 firms. 



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Table 1: Mail Survey Results 
REPORTED SALES OF ONTARIO EP GOODS AND 


SERVICES 1987 


Product/Service Num 

In 


oer of 
Cate^t 


Firms 

}rv* 


1987 Sales 


Air Pollution Control 








Equipment 


18 




518,079,200 


Instruments 


9 




$18,600,000 


Services 


30 




$10,723,479 


Total 


57 




$47,402,679 


Water and Wastewater Treatment 








Equipment 


27 




$92,132,264 


Instruments 


8 




$4,435,000 


Supplies 


3 




$2,010,000 


Services 


34 




$30,254,887 


Total 


72 




$128,832,151 


Solid and Hazardous Waste Disposa 


and Treatment 




Equipment/Instruments/S upplies 


21 




$30,376,980 


Solid/Hazardous Waste Disposal 
and Destruction Services 


16 




$129,506,791 


Recycling Services 


12 




$145,799,246 


Consulting, Other Services 


34 




$20,271,820 


Total 


83 




$325,954,837 


TOTAL ALL PRODUCTS/SERVICES 








143 




$502,189,667 


* Sales are classified by the commodity category which accounts for the largest share of the firm's Ontario 
EP goods and services production within the sector (air, water, waste). Since some firms are active in more 
than one of these three sectors, adding the three subtotals for the number of firms in each sector would 
double count such firms. 



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In total, of the 261 firms who responded to our survey, 164 indicated that 
they were involved in EP activities and provided sales and/or employment data, and 143 
provided sales data. Of the remaining replies, 64 indicated that they were not in fact 
involved in EP manufacturing or services in Ontario. The others supplied some data on 
products and growth projections, but did not report sales or employment. The list of firms 
with complete responses includes many of the largest firms in this area and a large number 
of small service sector firms. 

The respondents to our survey sold over $0.5 billion in Ontario- produced 
environmental protection products and services in 1987. The breakdown of these sales by 
the firm's primary EP commodity (including services) within each class of pollution control 
is shown in the table on the preceding page. 

In addition, some firms reported employment levels in environmental 
protection activities but did not complete the sales figures. Based on the average ratio of 
employment to sales in the EP industry of firms reporting both figures, we estimate that the 
239 employees in these firms account for an additional $23.8 million in EP sales. 

These sales figures are generated by firms producing products and services 
with a high degree of Ontario content. Only 10 firms, primarily instrument manufacturers, 
reported less than 50% Ontario content in their Ontario-made products. This is not 
surprising, since services account for a significant share of the total EP production in the 
province, and since our survey excluded distributors of imported products. 

The overall sales of EP goods and services in the province is of course 
much higher than the figures generated in our sample of respondents. As outlined in the 
next sections of this report, we considered a number of other statistical sources 1 in an effort 
to obtain an understanding of the overall level of activity in environmental protection in the 
province. Based on these data sources, our survey responses, a review of the list of 
respondents and non-respondents in light of our knowledge of the leading industry 
participants, and our discussions with over 100 industry participants, we have developed 



including Smith (1978), MacLaren (1979), Statistics Canada (1987), DRIE (1987a), DRIE (1987b), Ropes 
and Lorenz (1986), Canadian Association of Recyclers (1987), Management Information Systems (1986), 
F.A.C.E. (1984), and Glenn (1987). 

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Wc©£3 Gordon 

necessarily rough estimates of the annual sales volume of the Ontario EP industry by major 
category. These estimates should be viewed as conservative (i.e. low) ranges for the 
scale of the various types of EP activity in Ontario. They provide a useful indicator of the 
importance of the overall environmental protection sector to the provincial economy. 

In the following sections, we review our findings on the scale of individual 
segments of the EP industry, before turning to our estimate of the scale of the EP industry 
as a whole. 

3.3.2 Equipment, Instruments and Supplies 

Our survey identified Ontario production of over $165 million in equipment, 
instruments and supplies for environmental protection. We believe that many of the largest 
manufacturers are included in our respondents to the survey, but based on our interview 
program, we feel that we have only accounted for 1/2 or less of the total. 

A study by James F. MacLaren Ltd. (1979) on the pollution control 
equipment industry in 1978 estimated (based on a series of interviews) that the total market 
size (as opposed to production) in Ontario was $177 million per year (or 48% of the $369 
million size of the Canadian market). Of this total, $100 million was in water and waste 
water, $35 million in solid waste, $33 million in air pollution and $9 million in noise 
abatement equipment. Smith (1978) estimated that the total Canadian sales of water and air 
pollution control equipment in 1977 were $189.3 million. Although the EP equipment 
industry may have declined during the 1981-82 recession as a result of the collapse of 
capital expenditures in Ontario, our survey respondents reported considerable growth in 
nominal sales since 1983. 

Statistics Canada (1987b) recently reported data on 1985 capital 
expenditures, which included a breakout of spending that firms and government agencies 
categorized as being related to pollution abatement and control. The $91 million in 
pollution control machinery and equipment purchases reported across Canada appears to 
grossly understate the true volume of purchasing in this area, apparently because firms 
responding to the survey used an extremely narrow definition of pollution control spending 
or neglected to provide the required breakout. 



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Woods uofcion 

In contrast to the Statistics Canada figure, the department of Regional 
Industrial Expansion's (1987a) Capital Investment Intentions Survey reported that large 
companies (private and crown corporations, but excluding government departments) 
expected to spend S352.5 million in 1987 on pollution abatement investment in 1987. 
Expenditures in Ontario, based on the 1/3 share of all capital spending intentions 
attributable to Ontario, would be on the order of $120 million. However, Ontario firms 
may produce more than this figure, given the fact that Ontario accounts for about two-thirds 
of overall Canadian machinery manufacturing, according to the Ontario Ministry of 
Treasury and Economics (1986). 

A study by the Department of Regional Industrial Expansion (1987) used 
unpublished data from Statistics Canada's Census of Manufacturers to identify 71 firms 
across Canada who reported the production of air purification and dust collection 
equipment or water, waste and sewage treatment equipment. These firms accounted for 
shipments of $140 million in 1984. This figure may well be consistent with MacLaren's 
estimate of $369 million in EP equipment purchases in 1979, since the MacLaren study 
included equipment that would lie outside the categories measured by DRIE and since the 
DRIE study measures domestic production (which could be lower than domestic sales 
given the high import share of the Canadian machinery and equipment market). 

In its assessment of the competitiveness of the EP equipment sector, DRIE 
estimated the total size of the EP equipment industry (including instruments) across Canada 
in 1985 at $300 million, with 70% of the shipments, or $210 million, originating in 
Ontario. With annual growth of even 10% per year, this would put the Ontario industry at 
close to $250 million in 1987. 

In addition to these equipment sales there are sales of materials, including 
filters, chemicals and other supplies. Chemicals used for water and wastewater treatment 
probably account for the largest share of these materials. Ropes and Lorenz (1986) 
reported that the supply of chemicals to U.S. water and wastewater treatment operations 
totalled some $2 billion (U.S.) in 1984. If, as one might expect, Ontario consumption is 
similar on a per capita basis, there would be on the order of $50 million in purchases of 
chemicals for water and wastewater treatment in Ontario. Production could be greater or 
less than this figure if Ontario has a trade surplus or deficit in chemicals. 



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Woods QNmien 

On the basis of these data sources, and our own survey and interviews, we 
conservatively estimate sales of EP equipment, instruments and supplies manufactured in 
Ontario totalled roughly S200 - $400 million in 1987. 

If we included all of the pipes, valves, screws, and other industrial 
equipment used in conjunction with specialized EP products, the total purchases of 
machinery and equipment used in environmental projects would be much greater and could 
run into the billions of dollars. However, the suppliers of these products are not in what 
we have defined as the EP industry. 1 

3.3.3 Recycling Services 

Our fairly small sample of mail survey respondents sold close to $146 
million in recycled products in 1987. The actual scope of recycling in Ontario is thought to 
be considerably greater than this figure. The Canadian Association of Recyclers estimates 
that the recycling and reclamation industry has annual sales of $1.5 - $2.0 billion (as cited 
in Canadian Recyclers Directory (1987)). Based on our survey results, discussions with 
industry participants, and the share of national economic activity that is likely to take place 
in Ontario, we estimate that the Ontario recycling industry accounts for annual sales of $0.5 
to $1.0 billion. 

3.3.4 Solid and Hazardous Waste Disposal and Destruction 

Our mail survey respondents, which included several of the large waste 
haulers active in Ontario, identified revenues of close to $130 million in 1987. Interview 
respondents felt that this significantly underestimated the total volume of activity by the 
private sector, since there are a very large number of small firms involved in solid waste 
disposal. The Ontario Waste Management Association members employ some 3,000 to 
5,000 workers, although the membership includes some firms that would be included in 
our recycling category. We have very roughly estimated the activity in this sector at $300- 
$400 million, based on our survey response and these other data. 



l *ila F.A.C.E. (1984) report estimated that the broad industrial output devoted to water and wastewater 
projects totalled S2.4 bdlion in 1984. 



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Woods Gordon 

3.3.5 Construction Services 

We did not include construction contractors in our survey, in part because it 
was difficult to identify which industrial contractors would be involved in EP projects, and 
in part because, as we note below official statistical data already provide a picture of the 
scale of much of this activity. Since the construction work purchased in Ontario is 
performed in Ontario, most of the value of such construction flows to Ontario based firms 
(or to local branches of national or international companies.) In 1987, Statistics Canada 
reported that a total of $404 million was spent on the construction of sewage systems, 
disposal plants and connections and water pumping and filtration plants in Ontario. This 
figure, however, includes the value of equipment installed, which would either be 
specialized equipment accounted for in our EP equipment estimate above, or general 
industrial products excluded from our industry definition. Based on the usual ratio of 
materials costs to the value of construction purchased 1 , we estimate that the construction 
services provided, excluding equipment, totalled $250 - $300 million. 

Additional construction work would be involved in major air pollution 
control and solid waste disposal projects. For example, according to an Ontario Hydro 
official, the installation of scrubbers at one generating station would involve labour costs 
(excluding engineering) totalling 86% of the specialized EP equipment to be installed. We 
estimate that an additional $100 - $200 million was associated with construction on these 
other EP projects. 

In total, we estimate that $350 - $500 million in construction services was 
associated with the installation of EP equipment in 1987. 

3.3.6 Consulting Engineering and Analytical Services 

Our survey respondents reported 1987 revenues from consulting, 
engineering, analytical and other miscellaneous EP service of over $61 million, but there 
are a large number of consultants that were not included in this sample. 



1 According to Statistics Canada (Construction in Canada 1985-87), the materials content of construction 
undertaken by utilities in 1987 was 30.1%. For all construction work, this ratio was 38%. 



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Woods Oordors 

There are thought to be roughly 100 engineering consulting firms operating 
in EP areas in Ontario. According to the Association of Consulting Engineers of Canada 
(ACEC), there are 24 Ontario firms involved in the setting of environmental standards. 35 
firms in air pollution control, 69 in water pollution control. 60 in solid waste disposal and 
treatment, 27 in toxic waste disposal, and 62 firms conducting environmental studies and 
impact assessments. Note that there is a considerable degree of overlap among the firms in 
various categories. Assuming our sample respondents were typical in size, the number of 
firms on the ACEC lists suggests total annual sales in excess of $100 million. 

The Department of Regional Industrial Expansion (1987) estimated that 
consulting engineering fees in on environmental projects in 1987 would be on the order of 
$200-$400 million nationally. One would expect that Ontario firms would receive up to 
half of this total. Furthermore, analytical services are thought by industry participants to 
amount to a further $10 million in Ontario. 

On this basis, we have estimated that consulting, engineering and analytical 
service firms (commercial laboratories) in the Ontario EP industry account for about $100 - 
$200 million in annual sales revenue. 

3.3.7 Overall EP Industry Size 

Summing up our estimates for EP goods and services, we conclude that the 
total size of the environmental protection industry in the province is on the order of $1.5 - 
$2.5 billion in terms of annual sales revenue, and excluding non-specialized goods and 
services used in conjunction with environmental protection products. Within these totals, 
water and wastewater treatment accounts for the largest share of the goods production 
sector, while the solid and hazardous waste disposal and recycling are the largest service 
sector contributors. In addition to these commercially provided goods and services, all 
three levels of government provide a range of environmental protection services. 



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Table 2 

ESTIMATED 1987 REVENUES OF THE 

ONTARIO ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION SECTOR 1 


Commodity 


Estimated 1987 
Revenues 


Machinery, Equipment, Instruments, Supplies 


$250 - $400 million 


Recycling Services 


$500 -$1,000 million 


Waste Disposal and Destruction Services 


$300 - $400 million 


Construction Services 


$350 - 500 million 


Consulting Engineering and Analytical Services 


$100 -$200 million 


TOTAL 


$1.5 to $2.5 billion 


1. Excludes services provided by directly governments 





A number of other studies were examined to assess the validity of this 
overall size estimate. Ropes and Lorenz (1986) also estimates that the total market for 
water and wastewater treatment equipment, design and engineering, instruments and 
construction for industries, utilities and municipalities totalled close to $7 billion (U.S.) in 
1987. Adjusting for the scale of the Ontario economy (GDP) relative to that of the United 
States, the provincial demand for water and wastewater goods and services would be on 
the order of $300 million, but this estimate appears low given the data available on 
construction that we have obtained. 

As we outline below, U.S. data also provide useful indicators on 
environmental protection sector in Canada and Ontario. The American EP industry is 
somewhat more mature than that of Canada, and likely holds a greater share of its home 
market. However, if Ontario companies are able to capture a solid share of future 
environmental protection activity in the province the scale of the industry in the U.S. 
(relative to GDP) provides an indicator of the potential for the Ontario EP sector. 



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Woods Gordon 

According to a study by Management Information Services Inc. (1986), 
approximately $70 billion (U.S.) was spent in the U.S. by private industry and all levels of 
government in 1985 on environmental control programs. A higher estimate (with a slighdy 
different definition of expenditures) was produced by the Council on Environmental 
Quality, which projected annual expenditures in the U.S. on environmental protection at 
just under $93 billion (U.S.) (As cited in the MIS Inc. study noted above). If Ontario 
achieved the same level of expenditures as a share of GDP as these U.S. figures, there 
would be some $3-$4 billion spent annually on pollution control in the province. This 
estimate would include general industrial goods and services as well as specialized 
products. Our limited sample of survey responses, and our industry and purchaser 
interviews suggest that Ontario firms probably account for the majority of EP sales in the 
province. 

Another estimate for the overall scale of Canadian EP purchases, as 
opposed to domestic production, was generated by Water and Pollution Control (1979). 
Using Statistics Canada and other government data on public sector spending, and data 
from private sector claims for accelerated capital cost allowances for EP equipment, they 
estimated that total annual capital spending in Canada on EP products was $1.5 billion per 
year over 1974-79. Their estimate used a very broad definition for EP spending, and 
included all expenditures on water and sewage treatment and distribution by municipalities. 
On the other hand, they believed that their methodology significandy underestimated private 
sector environmental spending. 

Further estimates of the market demand or expenditures were obtained from 
our contacts in the course of our telephone interviews. Respondents estimated the Ontario 
demand for environmental protection, excluding construction, garbage hauling and 
municipal water and sewage treatment, at over $400 million per year. This also appears to 
fit reasonably well with our estimate of the broader industry size, which includes exports 
and sales to other provinces and the large municipal water, sewage and waste segment as 
well as construction. 

3.3.8 Employment in the Ontario Environmental Protection Industry 

The 159 firms that responded with employment data in our mail survey 
were responsible for the direct employment of 5,455 Ontarians (full-time equivalents) in 



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Woods Gordon 

their EP operations. The table below provides a breakdown of our survey results 

classified according to the firm's major EP product or service. 



Table 3: Mail Survey Results 
EMPLOYMENT IN EP ACTIVITIES 




Primary Product/Service 




# of Firms 
Responding 


#of EP 
Employees 


Air Quality Equip/Services 
Water/Waste Water Treatment 
Solid/Hazardous Waste 




37 
58 
64 


1,119 
1,598 
2,738 


Total 




159 


5,455 



Total employment in the EP industry would of course be considerably 
higher than that indicated by our survey response. Based on the ratio of employment to 
shipments indicated in our survey, the typical level of construction expenditures to 
construction industry employment, the ratio of employment to shipments of members of the 
Canadian Association of Recycling Industries, and our estimate for the total industry sales 
revenue, we estimate that the EP industry generates direct employment for 20,000 to 
36,000 Ontarians. 

As indicated by the table below, this area of activity ranks environmental 
protection similarly to the communications equipment, clothing and wood products 
industries, and ahead of such industries as metal mining in terms of total Ontario 
employment. Even the 5,455 employees identified in our mail survey would put the EP 
sector close to or ahead of such industries as Shoe Factories (7,500 employees in June 
1987), Knitting Mills (6,500) Iron Foundries (5,200), and Major Appliances (5,100). 



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Table 4: EP INDUSTRY EMPLOYMENT IN ONTARIO 
RELATIVE TO SELECTED OTHER INDUSTRIES 1987 


Industry 


Ontario Employment 


Rubber and Plastic Products 


48,100 


Paper and Allied Industries 


43,400 


Furniture and Fixtures 


34,800 


Communications Equipment 


30,000 


Environmental Protection 


28,000 (approx.) 


Clothing Industry 


27,400 


Wood Industries 


27,100 ; 


Metal Mines 


19,700 


Pharmaceuticals and Medicines 


10,300 


Source: Statistics Canada (72-002) data for June 1987, and Woods Gordon estimate 



A much larger number of Ontarians are employed in all EP related activities, 
including for example, the employment of federal, provincial and municipal officials, 
environmental engineers at large industrial plants, and at firms manufacturing pipes, wires 
and other basic products used in conjunction with EP industry products. Glenn (1987) 
estimated that across Canada, the government sector employed over 50,000 individuals in 
environmentally-related positions, and in total (including non-specialized equipment 
producers), he estimated that Canadian EP employment was as much as 150,000. 

3.4 Exports 

Of the respondents to our mail survey reporting sales data, 66 firms 
indicated that some or all of their 1987 revenues were attributable to export sales. These 
firms registered total export sales of $67.8 million last year, or 13.5% of the total reported 
EP production in the province. It is not possible, however, to confirm whether or not this 



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Woods Gordon 

export share is typical for the industry, as most EP commodities are included in broader 

export figures in Statistics Canada data. 

The large export figure in the solid waste services category is partly 
attributable to exports of recycled materials (scrap metal, etc.). Instrument manufacturers 
and consultants were the most active in terms of the share of their revenues attributable to 
such sales. The table below provides a breakdown of export sales classified by the primary 
sector of activity of the exporting firm. 



Table 5: EXPORT SALES BY PRIMARY COMMODITY PRODUCED 


Commodity Number of Firms 

Reporting Exports 


1987 Export 
Revenues 


Air Pollution Control 




Equipment and 

Instruments 15 


$10,908,000 


Services 5 


$1,005,000 


Water and Wastewater Treatment 




Equipment, Instruments 

and Supplies 19 


$12,861,000 


Services 7 


$2,763,000 


Solid, Hazardous Waste Disposal 




Equipment 8 


$2,845,000 


Services 12 


$37,426,818 


TOTAL 66 


$67,808,818 



Several interview respondents also reported success in the export market. 
We highlight these findings in Chapter 5, where we discuss the competitiveness of the 
Ontario industry and the potential impact of free trade. 



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Woods Gordon 



CHAPTER 4 
GROWTH TRENDS AND PROSPECTS 



4.1 Recent Trends 

The table on the next page highlights the results of our mail survey findings 
on the growth rates experienced by firms in the EP sector over the 1983-87 period. The 
first two columns show the growth rates achieved by firms who reported sales in both 
1983 and 1987. The second two columns report the growth rate in the total sales of all 
firms with sales reported for 1987. This rate includes the growth in total sales attributable 
to the entry of firms during the 1983 to 1987 period, although it may overstate the actual 
industry growth rate since it does not include firms that left the industry, and some firms 
may have failed to fully report sales in early years. 

The results of our mail survey indicate that sales of industry participants 
have been growing quite strongly since 1983, particularly for firms in the air and water 
pollution control sectors. Those firms reporting EP sales in 1983 showed a compound 
annual growth rate ranging from 17% in solid and hazardous wastes to 32% in water and 
wastewater over 1983-87. 

The compound annual growth rate of the sales of all firms in the sample has 
ranged from 19% in solid and hazardous wastes to 37% in water and wastewater over the 
period 1 , although this may overstate the actual growth experienced by these firms since 
some firms may not have reported sales for 1983 despite actually generating revenues from 
EP products in that year. We believe that the data for firms with non-zero sales reported in 
1983 is perhaps more closely representative of industry growth. 

It should also be remembered, however, that 1983 saw the Ontario 
economy emerging from a recession, in which capital expenditures for all items had fallen 
off dramatically. Thus, the reported growth rates may exceed sustainable, longer term 
prospects. Solid waste hauling, which is less cyclical, probably showed less of a decline 
in the recession and which may explain the more modest 1983-87 growth rates reported. 



lr This total growth rate is higher than that quoted in the preceding paragraph due to the inclusion of the 
1987 sales of firms that did not report sales in 1983. 



•32- 



Woods Gordon 

In addition, we suspect that the data may themselves overstate actual total 
industry growth over the 1983-87 period. Evidence from the growth of public 
expenditures on EP activities shows a somewhat more modest growth rate for their 
important share of EP spending. 



T 



Table 6: Mail Survey Results 
GROWTH OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION SALES 

(Compound Annual Growth Rate 1983-87) 



Firms Reporting Non-zero 
Sales Revenue in 1983 and 1987 



All Firms Reporting 
Sales Data for 1987 



# of Firms 



Annual Growth Rate 



# of Firms Annual Growth Rate 



Air Pollution 

Water and 
Wastewater 

Solid/Haz. 
Waste 



29 

43 
40 



21% 
32% 
17% 



57 
72 
83 



34% 
37% 
19% 



4.2 Future Growth Prospects 

4.2.1 Overall Growth 

Both purchasers and suppliers of EP products and services anticipate rapid 
growth in sales over the next five years. The weighted average annual growth rate 
expected by the suppliers who responded to our mail survey for the next five years (with 
the weights based on each firm's share of total 1987 sales) was 17% per year, more than 
twice the growth rate generally anticipated for nominal GDP in Ontario. While this may 
reflect an overly-optimistic assessment by individual respondents on the share of the market 
their firm will achieve, it appears that there is a general consensus that environmental 
protection will be a very rapidly growing field as we move into the 1990's. 

Most of the sales increase anticipated by EP suppliers is based upon their 
belief that environmental protection legislation will be significantly tightened in Ontario and 



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elsewhere in Canada over the next few years. Purchasers generally appear to share this 

viewpoint. Indeed, virtually all market participants agreed that government policies will 
dictate the growth rate for EP activity, and that the Ministry of the Environment might 
therefore be in a better position than industry participants to assess future growth 
prospects. 

Both suppliers and purchasers view the recent moves in Ontario to tougher 
legislation as being in part a response to similar legislation, if not always enforcement, in 
the United States. Ontario, in turn, is thought to be the path-breaking province for the rest 
of Canada. Ontario was viewed as being anywhere from 1-2 years to as much as five years 
behind the U.S. in some legislative areas. 

There has also been a growing recognition that environmental protection that 
is engineered into the process through environmentally-sound basic design, rather than 
added as an end-of-pipe system., may improve efficiency and reduce production costs. 
This perspective still appears to be stronger among engineering and technical staff than 
among industrial managers, according to engineering staff contacted in the course of this 
study. 

Export opportunities are also expected by industry participants to provide 
further room for growth in Ontario EP goods and services production. A report prepared 
for Environment Canada (1987) on International Opportunities for Canada's 

Environmental Industries concluded "that: 

1 . The environmental protection and conservation industry is extremely 
capable...; 

2 . International markets provide an extremely good opportunity to mobilize 
and focus this industry for domestic opportunities as well as export 
sales; 

3. Market opportunities, although not strong, are obvious and relate mainly 
to the provision or rehabilitation of public health engineering facilities 
(water and sewage works, solid waste management), but there are 
indications that opportunities for conservation, reclamation, hazardous 
waste management and environmental assessment are now developing." 



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4.2.2 Air Pollution Control 

Most purchasers of EP goods and services that we contacted believe that 
spending by their firm and industry on environmental protection, and air quality in 
particular, will continue to grow in the years ahead. This view is based on their belief that 
regulations will continue to be tightened in Ontario under the CAP program, with a trend 
towards requiring the use of the best available control technology. Some purchasers also 
suggested that compliance rates are higher in the air quality field than in other aspects of 
environmental protection, which in turn helps to generate demand for air pollution control 
and monitoring products. 

In addition, a majority of large environmental spending projects are tied to a 
major capital spending project, such as the opening of a new production facility or utility 
project. Such capital spending has been lagging behind the general economic recovery in 
Ontario, but purchasers of EP equipment in some sectors (paper, metals) felt that capital 
spending could gain momentum if the economic recovery continues in 1988-89. In the 
absence of plant expansions or major regulatory changes, growth in annual expenditures on 
air pollution control tends to be more modest. Indeed, plant shutdowns free up used 
equipment; two of the firms contacted have purchased used equipment for air pollution 
control. 

Some purchasers felt that a cyclical, economic slow-down could affect air 
quality spending, since they felt that the government would be more likely to delay 
requiring such expenditures in a weak market environment. 

Equipment and service suppliers concurred with the view of purchasers that 
the air pollution control market would exhibit rapid growth over the next five years, 
primarily based on their expectation of a continued tightening of the regulatory 
environment. Many of the larger firms we interviewed expected annual revenue growth of 
15% to 20% over this period, or 10% to 15% after inflation. Those respondents to our 
mail survey whose primary EP activities were in the air pollution field expected a 
(weighted) average growth in sales (weights are based on 1987 sales revenue) of 15.0% 
per year, or about 10.5% after inflation. Such growth would far exceed the roughly 3% 
real annual growth rate generally anticipated for the overall provincial economy over this 
period. 



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Equipment manufacturers identified a number of growth prospects. For 
example, there are currently three provinces and a number of U.S states which have 
implemented legislation making mandatory the use of continuous warning devices on 
underground storage tanks. One domestic manufacturer produces a system with 80 percent- 
plus Ontario content which continually monitors diesel, gas, and chemical emissions from 
tanks and which provides an advance warning so that measures may be taken to prevent 
leakage into the water table. Such legislation, which we understand Ontario is currently 
considering, would benefit this company. 

The area of portable gas detection and monitoring equipment is also felt to 
be a growth area, and one in which the province has good manufacturing capability. 
Energy efficient air quality monitors, wherein an infrared sensor activates a fan when the 
measured CO2 reaches certain levels, is another growth area with Ontario capability. 
Similar applications extend to the triggering of alarms and the isolating of problem areas in 
instances when air quality problems are detected. 

Some respondents felt that growth areas are to a great extent determined by 
media exposure and public attention. In this sense, projecting demand for environmental 
products is less predictable than that for other industries. One firm's sales are largely 
dependent on media exposure and legislation dealing with chemical waste. The company's 
perception is that the Pacific Rim represents an area of strong growth for its product line. 
Taiwan, Korea, Hong Kong and Japan are all expected by this firm to spend considerable 
amounts on environmental and toxic clean-up during coming years. 

Manufacturers of dust collectors and fans have seen strong growth in recent 
years in line with the active Ontario housing market. The resulting workload for industries 
associated with wood, furniture and lumber has meant increased activity for certain Ontario 
air pollution manufacturers. One respondent estimated the Ontario market for air control 
equipment in the woodworking industry to total $5 million annually. 

One respondent estimated the total North American market for cartridge 
collectors to be $100 million, primarily as a more compact and cheaper replacement for 
baghouses. Such a shift appears to be underway within the fabric filtration areas of the air 
pollution industry. A rough ballpark estimate places Ontario's proportion of this to be 2 
percent, or $2 million. Another industry participant suggested that even for basic products 
such as baghouses there may be considerable activity in developing new and improved 

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fabrics. Similarly, certain Ontario companies are working toward improving the ducting 
aspects wherein compartmentalization in the ducting would allow maintenance and 
servicing to proceed without having to shut down the entire ventilation system. 

Many of the air pollution companies with whom we spoke expect that 
increased public awareness regarding air quality issues will contribute to increased sales for 
several years. For example, one respondent felt that higher energy costs will continue to 
lead to increased sealing of buildings and indirecdy to increased requirement for air quality 
improvements. Similarly, the anti-smoking lobby will have a similar effect 

The scrubber industry is expected to enjoy strong growth for many years, 
stemming from acid rain and the established 1994 emission targets. Recent Ontario Hydro 
projections of $3 billion worth of flue gas desulphurization (FGD) related expenditures, 
while noteworthy for their size, are nonetheless uncommitted and dependent upon the 
amount of coal capacity which the utility is forced to use as a result of energy demand 
trends, and the type of coal selected for use. Ontario Hydro's projections included 
retrofitting two 500 MW units in each of 1994, 1995, and 1996. Based on data reported 
by Ontario Hydro to Woods Gordon for the retrofitting of one Ontario Hydro generating 
station with FGD equipment, the FGD system itself would account for roughly one-quarter 
of the total scrubber installation cost. 

There is a further trend in the air pollution industries away from in-house 
fabrication toward the contracting out of these basic, metal-fabricating aspects of the 
manufacturing process. One major manufacturer, for example, subcontracts work to five 
different contractors and therefore has lower overhead while receiving equivalent or better 
quality fabrication. This trend will encourage the growth of firms engaged in such 
subcontracting activities. 

Most of the companies with whom we spoke indicated that, in a general 
sense, there will be an increasing trend toward process improvements rather than end-of- 
pipe applications. Some companies are already acting upon this trend by moving more 
toward the consulting and process evaluation functions rather than the strict manufacturing 
and marketing functions. An official at one such firm argued that 'the dirty work' - that is 
the hands on process improvement area - will provide strong growth for several years. 



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According to some suppliers, some of the past efforts at end-of-pipe 
designs have involved incorrect precipitator and other equipment application, such as the 
use of equipment that cannot adequately handle particle grain size and variance. In the area 
of scrubbers, there are often problems of inefficiency, winter-freeze and sludge disposal. 
In some cases these problems have been caused by an excessive orientation toward making 
a sale, that can lead to poor matches between what is required and what is actually installed. 
According to these equipment suppliers, increased attention to the process aspects would 
lead to the reuse of up to 25 percent of the sludge waste. 

As in virtually any capital investment, many applications of air pollution 
control equipment are prone to undersizing. In these instances, the initial savings in capital 
costs inevitably catches up to the purchaser as higher maintenance costs. Such a tendency 
may be reflected in, for example, air to cloth dry filtration ratios which are too high for the 
application and therefore inefficient in the long-term but which at the same time are cheaper 
in the short-term. 

4.2.3 Potable Water and Wastewater Treatment 

Purchasers felt that tighter provincial regulations would promote the growth 
of the water pollution control market in Ontario. In the past, most of the spending has been 
tied to urbanization and population growth, as new water and wastewater facilities were 
installed to meet the needs of new residential developments. With the fall in population 
growth experienced over the last three decades and the expectation of continued moderate 
levels of population growth, there may now be a shift in the market towards repairing, 
replacing or upgrading existing systems, rather than new installations. This trend will be 
reinforced by the tightening of regulations expected to emerge from the current round of 
consultations under the Municipal Industrial Strategy for Abatement (MIS A) program. 
Municipalities will be required to install the best available technology in their wastewater 
facilities. Until this requirement has been defined, municipal purchasers of wastewater 
treatment equipment feel that they are not in a position to assess the impact of MIS A on 
their demand for environmental protection goods and services. 

Respondents to our mail survey whose primary activities were in the water 
and wastewater field supported the overall view of purchasers that continued growth in this 
sector was likely over the next five years, with a weighted average projected growth rate of 



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18.1% per year (excluding one very high outlying estimate), or about 13.5% after inflation, 
well above the prevailing industrial growth rate in Ontario. 

According to Ropes and Lorenz (1986), the U.S. experience suggests that 
the impact of legislation on expenditures is not necessarily an immediate one, as some 
polluters seek to delay expensive investments until forced to undertake them by 
enforcement measures. Industrial wastewater treatment demand is expected to lead to a 
10% annual growth in the U.S. market for package wastewater treatment plants for 
industrial applications. Municipal expenditures are expected to be less buoyant, and 
dependent on improved funding from more senior levels of government and trends in the 
privatization of municipal facilities. 

The industrial water treatment segment of the market makes more uses of 
chemical treatment or advanced treatments (ion exchange, electrodialysis, reverse osmosis) 
as a supplement to the sedimentation and biological processes used by municipalities. 
Some purchasers also noted that the demand for these more complex technologies will be 
stronger in Ontario than in parts of the United States, since some biological processes work 
less well in colder climates. 

In addition to the demand for complex treatment technologies, according to 
the Federation of Canadian Municipalities, there is also a need for more investment in basic 
water and wastewater infrastructures. Many of the province's older municipalities are 
overdue for repairs and replacements of sewer pipes, water lines, and other basic elements 
of water systems. The growth in the supply of such products, and the related construction 
services, will depend on the success that municipalities have in seeking funding from more 
senior levels of government. 

There are a number of wastewater and sewage projects currendy underway 
across Ontario. For example, Ottawa is spending over $300 million during the next eight 
years for a sewage treatment facility; another new installation will be constructed in 
Oakville. In eastern Ontario, the peak in demand may have passed, as recent expansions 
have been completed during the past five years in each of Napanee, Brockville, Cornwall, 
Belleville, and Kingston. 

While there are new installations in expanding subdivisions and northern 
communities, in the many populous regions the existing capacity is thought by 



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municipalities to be sufficient to accommodate population growth for many years. Primary 
activity in the Ontario wastewater and sewage treatment will rest in the replacement and 
rehabilitation of existing equipment, although a major effort to clean-up the problems 
associated with sewage overflows into Lake Ontario could require significant expenditures 
on new equipment in the greater Toronto area. 

The province of Quebec is currently in the midst of a major expenditure 
program directed toward the clean-up of wastewater and sewage. As of 1986, only 19.5 
percent of the province's population was served by sewage treatment plants. In 1979, the 
provincial budget outlined a twelve-year program (1979-1991) committing $4 billion 
toward municipal wastewater and sewage treatment. The province has already spent the 
bulk of this amount, but industry participants feel the program may be extended with 
additional financing through 1994. Ontario firms report some difficulties in tapping into 
these government funded projects in Quebec without establishing manufacturing facilities in 
that province. 

Groundwater cleanup was also cited by industry participants as a potential 
area for growth. One interview respondent hypothesized that Ontario's extensive surface 
water resources has led to a focus on keeping lakes and rivers clean, while ignoring the 
issue of groundwater pollution by industrial toxins and organic contaminants. A 
significant amount of work in this field was thought to have been done in the U.S. in this 
area, and Ontario was viewed as having to catch up to the level of activity south of the 
border. Ontario is seen to be supporting this effort through the establishment of a Centre of 
Excellence on groundwater research. 

The water treatment chemicals market tends to be much more stable than 
other sectors, as annual expenses by water treatment plants on chemical supplies do not 
fluctuate with the overall economy. 

The instrument market is thought to be a growth area, as the demands for 
monitoring and analysis increase with concerns over low levels of contaminants. Lorenz 
and Ropes (1986) cited this as an area where there was room for new entrants to the 
American market, particularly for on-line analyzers. 

Canada has historically been quite active in infrastructure developments in 
lesser-developed countries, and Canadian water and wastewater treatment equipment 



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manufacturers have on occasion benefitted as a result. Typically, foreign work involving 
the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) would place added importance on 
the issue of Canadian content when selecting suppliers. 

4.2.4 Solid and Hazardous Waste 

Solid waste disposal is a growing field in Ontario, as municipal and indus- 
trial waste volumes continue to expand. Among those surveyed, there was a strong 
consensus that some of the newly emerging areas of solid waste management will be 
among the fastest growing segments of the environmental protection industry, as 
restrictions on landfill sites force waste generators to turn to alternative methods of disposal 
for at least some of their waste materials. For the sector as a whole, which includes the 
more stable waste hauling industry, respondents to our mail survey anticipated a weighted 
average annual growth rate 1 of 16.3%, or about 12% after inflation. 

Among these newer fields, biomedical and other hazardous waste handling 
are expected to grow quite rapidly. Hazardous waste incineration could be a future area of 
growth in serving the needs of the chemicals and metals industries. 

In these and other industrial areas, tightening regulations and new concerns 
over even low concentrations of toxic substances are expected to lead to a significant 
growth for a number of hazardous waste treatment firms. A small Ontario firm has now 
started production of newly designed photochemical oxidation equipment to destroy 
persistent organic contaminants found in low concentrations in air, water and soil, as an 
alternative to incineration. This firm has found it beneficial to develop technology in 
anticipation of more stringent regulations, such as tighter controls over dioxins and other 
dilute contaminates in pulp effluent from bleaching plants. Another Ontario firm is also 
looking at biochemical means of toxic waste destruction. 

Secure landfill sites, with proper geological properties to prevent 
groundwater contamination, are becoming increasingly scarce with more intensive use than 
expected. These sites are used for such wastes as contaminated soils, ash and heavy 
metals. According to a waste disposal industry official, one site initially expected to last 



Growth rates were weighted by the share of reported industry sales accounted for by each respondent 

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five years is now projected to be filled after only two years after accepting about 300 tons 

per day. 

The shortage of landfill sites and a reluctance of communities to accept new 
ones is projected by respondents to lead to a resurgence in interest in recycling, which will 
also generate new demand for specialized equipment designed to process waste materials. 
Several municipalities are now in the process of developing recycling programs for 
household wastes. Others, including the Peel region, are adopting or considering 
programs for industrial/commercial waste recycling. The development of biodegradable 
packaging is also seen to be an area for research. 

Among oil refineries, heavy metal removal from the soil, and the monitoring 
of lead levels around petroleum product retail sites are areas that are thought by refinery 
engineers to be growing. 

4.3 Conclusion 

Our mail survey, and our interviews with selected industry participants, 
suggest that strong growth opportunities exist in all three major segments of the 
environmental protection industry (air, water, solid waste). Near term opportunities will 
include the supply of goods and services related to meeting the needs of such purchasers as 
Ontario Hydro and other responding to tightened provincial regulations. There are 
important requirements for monitoring equipment and analytical services, designed to meet 
the new emphasis on monitoring and controlling emissions of toxic substances in low 
concentrations. In the longer term, solutions to the growing problems associated with solid 
waste disposal could provide opportunities for recycling services and various process 
innovations designed to reduce waste production at the source. 



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CHAPTER 5 
ONTARIO COMPETITIVENESS AND THE IMPACT OF FREE TRADE 

5.1 Introduction 

The future of the environmental protection industry in the province will 
depend on the ability of firms in Ontario to compete with import suppliers from the United 
States, Europe and the Far East. In the goods sector, Ontario firms already compete with 
imports, particularly in the fields of instrumentation and basic equipment (pumps, motors 
and other machinery) used in environmental protection. In the service sector, much of the 
activity in the province is handled by local employees, whether of Ontario or Canadian 
based firms or local branches of multinationals. In this chapter, we examine the relative 
competitiveness of Ontario goods and services producers in the environmental protection 
sector, and the potential impact of free trade on this sector. 

Our results are necessarily somewhat general. The very wide range of 
activities undertaken as a part of environmental protection will mean that overall 
generalizations about the ability of firms in this sector to compete need not be applicable to 
all areas of specialized activity. However, our discussions with both purchasers and 
suppliers in this market have provided a useful overview on the ability of Ontario firms to 
thrive in a more liberalized trading environment. 

For the purposes of this chapter, we have segmented firms into a slightly 
different group of categories than that used in other chapters. Equipment manufacturers for 
air, water and wastewater treatment, and solid and hazardous waste disposal are treated 
separately from both control, sampling and monitoring (CSM) equipment makers, and 
from environmental engineering and other service providers. These latter two categories 
encompass firms providing equipment and services in all areas of environmental protection. 

On balance, our findings suggest that free trade will be modestly beneficial 
to the Ontario environmental protection industry, despite the fact that existing trade barriers 
are higher on U.S. exports to Canada than on Canadian exports to the United States. 
Freight costs and custom design will continue to limit the extent to which the final assembly 
of EP products could be centralized outside the province. Ontario service sector firms are 
quite competitive, and could expand the export of consulting engineering and design 



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services. In the higher-technology areas, Ontario firms are competitive in certain product 

niches, while other goods are already largely imported. 

There was a broad concern that exchange rates were at least as important as 
tariffs in determining Ontario's trade balance in the EP sector. Many respondents 
suggested that their competitive position would be eroded if the Canadian dollar went much 
above $0.80 U.S. in the absence of other competitive-enhancing developments, such as 
more moderate wage rate inflation in Canada than in the United States, or improvements in 
our relative labour productivity. 

Some of the other factors affecting the Canadian EP trade balance will not 
be addressed by the Free-Trade Agreement. The lack of awareness among Canadian 
engineering consultants about Canadian supply capabilities, and the resulting frequency 
with which they direct business to foreign suppliers in their specifications, was mentioned 
by Canadian manufacturers of water treatment equipment (and other EP products) as being 
a trade irritant. 

Another possible self-imposed barrier to exports results from the dominant 
role played by foreign-owned branch plants in Canada, who have not been given mandates 
from their parent companies for export operations. DPJE (1987b) estimated that 38 of the 
50 largest EP manufacturers in Canada are foreign-owned, but believes that domestically- 
owned firms account for the lion's share of the Canadian EP exports. One multinational 
we contacted admitted that their Canadian branch does not actively seek export 
opportunities. This tendency is due to the fact that the branch plants were originally 
established to get around Canadian tariff barriers, with exports to other countries handled 
by the parent company's larger and generally more efficient production facilities. 

5.2 Indirect Impacts of Free Trade 

The environmental protection industry could be indirectly affected by free 
trade if the agreement affects the prospects for their industrial customers in the province. 
Some of the purchasers surveyed by Woods Gordon in late 1987 had not yet conducted 
detailed examinations of the implications of free trade for their sector. Chemical producers 
felt that Canadian production of chemicals could be increased by a the Free Trade 
Agreement, which in turn could generate some additional demand for environmental 
protection products. Similar views were expressed by some respondents in the pulp and 



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paper industry, although the prevailing view appeared to be that free trade would serve to 

protect their existing access to the U.S. market rather than significandy expand it. Wood 
products firms did not foresee any major impact in either direction. Municipalities, utilities 
and the government are not likely to be strongly affected by the Agreement 

The existing literature on the impact of free trade on these and other Ontario 
industries using air pollution control equipment and other EP products and services also 
offers mixed conclusions. Lazar (1987) argues that, on balance, manufacturing activity in 
the province could be reduced by the Free Trade Agreement. Most of the literature, 
however, supports a conclusion that manufacturing output in Canada (and likely, in 
Ontario) will be enhanced by the improved access to the large U.S. market and the resulting 
scale economies that will be possible in Canadian plants. 

The nature of the adjustments foreseen by these authors (see Cox and Harris 
(1984) for example), may suggest that the number of plants in Ontario could be reduced 
despite the overall increase in output, as industries rationalize production to achieve the 
necessary scale economies. This consolidation of production into fewer plants is a key 
element in the process of the increased competitiveness needed to expand manufacturing 
output in Canada. Such a process could act to reduce the demand for environmental 
protection goods and services, since two small plants will generally require more EP goods 
and services than one large plant with the same total output. 

5.3 Air Pollution Control Equipment 

5.3.1 Current Trade Pattern 

Official statistical data on Canadian exports do not permit the identification 
of Canadian air pollution control equipment exports. Firms in our mail survey who were 
primarily in the air pollution control equipment and instrument industry reported exports 
(for all EP goods and services they produce) of $10.9 million for 1987. 

Some of the imports in this area are classified under "Ventilating and Dust 
Collecting Equipment" by Statistics Canada. Table 7 summarizes the recent trends in this 
area. While the dollar values of imports are not large, they are significant relative to the 
size of production in Ontario, although part of this category represents equipment that is not 
used in air pollution control. 



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Table 7 
IMPORTS OF VENTILATING AND DUST COLLECTING EQUIPMENT 

(Millions of Dollars) 



Imports into Canada 
1984 1985 1986 



Imports into Ontario (est.) 
1984 1985 1986 



Imports from U.S. 
Total Imports 



$12 



$15 
$18 



$13 
$19 



$9 
$10 



$11 
$13 



$10 
$14 



Source: Department of Regional Industrial Expansion (1987b). (DRIE made the estimates 
of imports into Ontario, based on their understanding of Ontario's share of total 
purchasing.) 



5.3.2 Current Trade Barriers 

Most U.S. air pollution control equipment imports into Canada face a 9.2% 
tariff, while Canadian exports to the U.S. of such equipment face a tariff in the 3-6% 
range, mostly at 3.9%. $2 million of the $13 million in 1986 ventilation and dust collection 
equipment imports into Canada were exempted from duties under the Machinery Program, 
which permits the duty free import of machinery and equipment not available from 
Canadian manufacturers. 1 Aside from tariffs, the other major trade barriers facing Ontario 
firms in this industry are preferential purchasing programs of public utilities under "Buy 
America" programs. 



Sterns qualifying for duty-free entry into Canada under the Machinery Program are listed in Memorandum 
D8-5-1 of March 11, 1987 published by the Department of National Revenue, Customs and Excise. 



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Table 8 
TARIFFS ON SELECTED AIR POLLUTION CONTROL PRODUCTS 


Commodity 1988 Tariff 


Years to Duty-Free 
Status Under FTA 


Canadian Exports to the U.S. 






Filtering or purifying machinery 
and apparatus for gases and 
associated parts (exci. intake 
filters for internal combustion engines) 


3.9% 





Centrifuges and parts 


3.9% 


3 


Large fans, vacuum pumps and parts 


4.7% 


3 


U.S. Exports to Canada 






Filtering or purifying machinery 

and apparatus for gases and 

associated parts (excl. intake 

filters for internal combustion engines and 

equip used in metal/mineral refining/smelting) 


9.2% 





Centrifuges and parts 


9.2% 


3 


Large fans, vacuum pumps and parts 


9.2% 


3 


Source: Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement, appendixes. 



The major non-tariff barrier in air pollution control equipment is the 
extensive metal fabrication component of much of the final products sold in this category. 
This metal fabrication is often conducted on site. Thus, even for imported products, there 
is a need for a considerable portion of local value-added. Freight costs also favour local 
purchasing of low-value metal parts. 

5.3.3 Competitiveness of the Ontario Air Pollution Control Industry 

The air pollution control industry is highly globalized. Multinational 
companies, based in the U.S., Europe, and Japan, appear to be the source of much of the 
specialized equipment presently in use for air quality control. Purchasers do not tend to be 



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highly informed on the location of production for equipment purchased from Ontario 

suppliers. 

For those respondents who could identify product sources, domestically- 
owned, Ontario firms appear to play a larger role in the supply of services for air quality 
control rather than in the production of equipment. In the equipment field, Canadian- 
assembled products, with some import content, appear to make up the majority of items 
purchased. Ontario content in major capital spending projects is enhanced by the need for 
on-site metal work and assembly. 

In the higher volume items, the movement away from more basic systems 
to higher technology devices may hurt Ontario suppliers, who are characterized (by 
purchasers) as suppliers either of more basic equipment, or very specialized, low volume 
items. In filters, for example, High Efficiency Particle Air (HEP A) filters are expected to 
be a growing market, but they tend to be imported. 

Some respondents felt that presently available technologies leave a number 
of unmet needs, and thought that this situation indicates that there is room in the market for 
an innovative Ontario firm to develop new products and processes, and thereby capture 
more of the equipment market. In particular, one consulting engineer felt that the existing 
systems for dealing with the problems of acid precipitation and hazardous substances were 
not fully meeting the demands from industrial emittors. The largest emittors are still in the 
process of determining how they will meet the government's targets for acid rain control by 
1994. Solid waste incinerators built in the future will be required to install baghouses, 
scrubbers and other control devices, rather than merely relying on a high stack to disperse 
emissions. 

Based on our limited sample, it appears that there may be a tendency for 
foreign-based multinationals to make fewer of their air quality purchases from 
Canadian/Ontario suppliers, relative to the purchasing patterns of domestically-based 
companies, or to prefer locally assembled versions of imported technologies. One 
respondent from a consulting firm suggested that these branch plants may be duplicating 
process and equipment decisions made by their parent companies. Most firms, however, 
claim that they will use an Ontario supplier if one is available and price-competitive, and 
where construction is involved, the work is usually-undertaken by Ontario-based firms. 



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Better service is usually cited as a reason for dealing locally, although foreign squipment 

can be accompanied by the same level of service through a local dealership. 

The air pollution control equipment industry is an industry which involves 
extensive fabrication of metal. As such, the Ontario content is traditionally very high - in 
excess of 85 percent - for most types of air pollution control equipment. The industry is 
quite competitive, wage rates are comparable to those of the northern states, and the small 
size and flexibility of many of the companies allows them to successfully pursue certain 
targeted segments of the market 

In the dust collection, fans, and precipitator industries, Ontario companies 
generally compete against other Ontario companies rather than imports. For example, a 
major manufacturer of dust collectors, fans, precipitators and other air pollution control 
equipment generally sells equipment with 100 percent Ontario content. A few components 
such as solenoid valves may be imported due to lack of local availability. Another firm 
produces electronic air cleaners, which are substitutes for precipitators, again with close to 
100 percent Ontario content 

Given the labour content, basic technology and fabrication orientation of 
most air pollution industries, price is generally the top competitive issue, with the lowest 
bid inevitably winning the job. 

In the cartridge collector industry, Ontario has a strong presence and 95-98 
percent Ontario content is generally attained. This is a method of filtration involving long 
cylindrical bags and felt to be a compact and less costly alternative to conventional 
baghouses. 

According to engineering officials with Ontario Hydro, the Ontario content 
of the proposed expenditures on scrubbers is quite high. Although certain components of 
the flue gas desuphurization (FGD) system may be imported from the U.S., the overall 
Ontario content of one sample FGD project would be over 90 percent. 

5.3.4 Anticipated Impact of Free Trade 

Most of those companies with whom we spoke felt that free trade would 
have a marginally positive effect on the profitability of their Ontario operations. In many of 



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the environmental industries, the removal of 4-6 percent tariffs into the U.S, combined 

with the psychological aspects of freer trade, is felt to be a positive development 

This majority view is shared by the federal Department of Regional 
Industrial Expansion, which forecasted a positive net impact of free trade on this sector in 
its impact assessment for the Trade Negotiations Office. DRIE's view is that the 
standardized nature of most of the technology involved in air pollution control, and 
competitive manufacturing costs in Canada, will ensure that the Canadian industry will 
thrive in a liberalized trading environment 

Contradicting this, however, is the opinion of certain of our contacts that 
U.S procurement will always favour domestic suppliers, that Americans generally tend to 
'wave the flag' more in this respect, and that this will remain unaltered by any trade 
agreement. Others felt that the agreement would not have much effect in either direction, 
since the current tariff levels into the U.S. are not a major impediment. 

In a situation where the Ontario company has a U.S affiliate and an 
agreement between the respective divisions, the trade agreement may tend to cause change 
in such arrangements. In the arrangement which one major equipment manufacturer 
maintains, for example, the Canadian operation may gain access to serving the northeastern 
states - an area which is currently poorly served by the west-coast plant of its U.S affiliate. 
Another wholly-owned subsidiary of a large American -based multinational has gained a 
mandate to serve certain North American segments of the cartridge collector market and 
thus will be more competitive under the trade agreement than would otherwise have been 
the case. 

The reduction in the arbitrary use of trade laws that is expected to result 
from the trade agreement was mentioned as beneficial by many of our respondents. One 
particular example cited was that of a 25 percent tariff on one of its products which was 
applied 'on a whim' a few years ago. Others felt that in general, a more certain trading 
environment would increase the incentives for Ontario manufacturers to develop markets in 
the United States for their products. 



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5.4 Water and Wastewater Treatment Equipment 

5.4.1 Current Trade Pattern 

Like the air pollution control sector, the water and wastewater treatment 
equipment sector is labour intensive and involves significant local fabrication. Ontario 
content for most water and wastewater treatment installations is close to 90 percent, as a 
result of the extensive construction requirements. 

On balance, although the data are not complete, the Department of Regional 
Industrial Expansion believes that Ontario runs a small annual surplus on trade with the 
United States in the potable and wastewater equipment market. Exports from Canada and 
Ontario of water and wastewater treatment equipment are incorporated into broader 
categories by Statistics Canada, although they are generally included in the commodity 
category "safety and sanitation equipment". Canadian exports under this classification 
were SI 17 million in 1986, of which $98 million were destined for the American market. 
Mail survey respondents whose primary EP area was in the water and waste water goods 
(including instruments and supplies) sector reported exports of $12.8 million in 1987. 

Most of the imports into Canada are included in the commodity category 
"water and sewage treatment equipment". Figures for imports in this category are provided 
in Table 9 below. Imports are also in part incorporated into the category "industrial 
filtration machinery and filters", which totalled $38 million in 1986. This category also 
captures elements of the air pollution control equipment market. 



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Table 9 
IMPORTS OF WATER AND SEWAGE TREATMENT EQUIPMENT 

(Millions of Dollars) 



Imports into Canada 
1984 1985 1986 



Imports into Ontario (est.) 
1984 1985 1986 



Imports from U.S. 
Total Imports 



$36 
$41 



$44 
$47 



$44 
$52 



$23 
$27 



$29 
$31 



$29 
$34 



Source: Department of Regional Industrial Expansion 



5.4.2 Current Trade Barriers 

The tariff on potable and wastewater equipment imported into Canada is 
9.2%. An exemption applies on equipment imported under the Machinery Program, which 
allows for the duty-free importation of machinery and equipment not available from 
Canadian production. Of the $44 million in water and sewage treatment equipment 
imported into Canada in 1986 from the U.S., $11 million was eligible for duty-free status 
under this program. Similarly, $3 million of the $30 million in industrial filtration 
equipment and filters imports from the U.S. were exempted from duties. 

Canadian water and wastewater treatment products face a 3% to 6% tariff 
when exported to the United States. The major trade impediments, however, are non-tariff 
barriers that result from the high-percentage of public sector purchases in the water and 
wastewater treatment field. For example, the Small Business Set- Asides program in the 
United States requires that, on those American projects receiving public financing, 20% of 
the contract value must be directed towards small American businesses. The Free Trade 
Agreement (in Annex 1304.3) specifically excludes Canadian access to contracts set aside 
on behalf of small or minority-owned American businesses. 

In addition, Buy America legislation also requires that projects receiving 
federal financing must provide a price preference for domestic suppliers over foreign 
bidders. This legislation has been particularly relevant for the water and wastewater 
treatment sector, since virtually all of the municipal and many of the industrial water 
treatment projects are granted such public financing. 



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Table 10 

TARIFFS ON SELECTED WATER AND WASTEWATER 
TREATMENT EQUIPMENT 



Commodity 1988 Tariff Years to Duty-Free 

Status Under FTA 



Canadian Exports to the U.S. 

Filtering or purifying machinery 

and apparatus for water and 

associated parts 3.9% 3 

Pumps (with some exceptions) 3.0% 3 

Large iron/steel tanks 2.6% 10 

U.S. Exports to Canada 

Filtering or purifying machinery 

and apparatus for water and 

associated parts 9.2% 3 

Pumps (with some exceptions) 9.3% 3 

Large iron/steel tanks 7.8% 10 



Source: Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement, appendixes. 



The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency administers these Buy America 
programs for water and wastewater projects. They typically have the effect of awarding 
contracts to U.S. bidders (with American content in excess of 50%) over imported 
products where the American price is up to 6% above that of the import supplier. One 
leading Ontario manufacturer expressed the view that these provisions have the effect of 
shutting out Canadian exporters from a significant slice of the U.S. market, and that many 
Canadian firms have not bothered to bid on projects where they know that domestic or local 
purchasing preferences are likely to apply. 

The Free Trade Agreement only directly addresses the purchases made by 
the U.S. federal government and its agencies. The government procurement chapter of the 
agreement will extend the equal access provided by GATT on purchases over $171,000 



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(U.S.) to all purchases over $25,000 (U.S.). This would not appear to challenge the 

domestic and local purchasing preferences of state and local governments, or federally- 
funded private- sector organizations. 

5.4.3 Competitiveness of the Ontario WaterAVastewater Treatment Industry 

Many of the domestically-owned companies operating in Ontario are small, 
niche-oriented companies where flexibility and quick response times are critical 
requirements. These firms are often technologically driven (i.e., they have emerged or 
grown as a result of successful R&D efforts), entrepreneurial firms that anticipate or react 
quickly to legislative change. 

Some of the larger companies that provide basic equipment and chemicals 
are Canadian branches of international firms. Most standard sewage and water treatment 
equipment has been available for decades, and thus the technologies are well-known. The 
major multinationals appear to conduct little R&D in Ontario as a result, and the research 
that is necessary is generally conducted in their home countries. Production in their Ontario 
plants is usually focussed on manufacturing and sub-assembly for the Canadian market, 
with instruments and other components being imported from the U.S. or overseas. 

Firms operating in this sector in Ontario feel that they are quite competitive 
on costs with suppliers outside the province at current exchange rates. 

Clarifiers, sludge collectors, filter presses, bar screens, and other types of 
equipment are widely available from Ontario suppliers. Chemicals for use in water 
treatment facilities are available from Ontario production. The Kingston water treatment 
plant, for example, sources chlorine from CIL in Cornwall, and ferric chloride from 
Eaglebrook, an Ontario company. A leading petroleum refiner reported that it sources less 
than 25% of its wastewater treatment equipment requirements from outside the province. 

There are certain other water and wastewater treatment products, such as 
rotating biological contactors and certain drive units, aerators and anaerobic treatment 
equipment, which are imported from the U.S., since the Canadian market is too small to 
support such firms. Gravity-belt filter presses for slurries and bio-sludges are imported 
from West Germany, the U.K. and the U.S., and patent protection prevents Ontario 
manufacturers from producing similar products. Specialized pumps tend to be imported 



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from Europe, although a considerable amount of value-added in servicing these pumps is 

handled by local branches of pump manufacturers. 

One firm we contacted is a highly competitive Ontario manufacturer of 
chemical metering pumps directed toward any industry using chemicals in its process. They 
achieve an Ontario content of up to 80% depending on the type of pump and the amount of 
local machining. The local availability of spare parts is a significant, though decreasing 
competitive advantage for this firm. 

The clean-up of petroleum-related spills involves a range of equipment and 
materials including oil booms, pumps, and absorbents. Sorbants are materials that absorb 
oil and petroleum base wastes without absorbing water. They are lightweight materials, 
easily shipped, and some are imported. Some skimmers and booms are also imported. 

5,4.4 Impact of Free Trade 

Ontario manufacturers of water and wastewater treatment equipment 
contacted by Woods Gordon were divided on whether or not free trade would be beneficial 
to their operations in the province. Many firms appeared to be uncertain as to how the 
agreement will ultimately affect their operations. Among those who expressed a viewpoint, 
the overall balance of opinion was somewhat in favour of the agreement. 

In particular, companies that have already carved a niche in the U.S market 
appear to be the most receptive to reduced trade barriers. For example, one company who 
was in the process of shipping venturi tubes to Rhode Island felt that the trade agreement 
would help to reduce the 'buy local' pressures which exist in Pennsylvania and other 
states. The same company however cautioned that a Canadian dollar in the range of $0.80 
(U.S.) was necessary to remain competitive. 

Among the foreign owned subsidiaries where the product line of the parent 
company is being represented in Canada, a minority expressed the view that free trade may 
incite the domestic manufacturers to "eliminate some equipment manufacturing here if it can 
be brought in cheaper from the parent". Another subsidiary felt that the maintenance of 
separate administrative personnel in Canada could be affected by free trade, and that the 
maintenance of a plant of only 25 people would also be brought into question by the parent 
executives. Other heavy equipment manufacturers felt that freight costs and favourable 



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Canadian wage rates relative to the Northern U.S. would permit continued local 
manufacturing for the Ontario and Canadian market under free trade, although there was a 
broadly- based concern that exchange rates must remain favourable for Ontario 
manufacturing to be viable. 

Our findings concur with those of the the Department of Regional Industrial 
Expansion, which has also interviewed firms in this industry, and argued in its Trade 
Impact Assessment that free trade would be a positive development for Canadian water and 
wastewater treatment manufacturers on balance. 

5.5 Solid and Hazardous Waste Equipment 

5.5.1 Current Trade Pattern 

Canadian exports of solid and hazardous waste equipment are not 
segmented in official trade data, but are estimated by DRIE at $10 million for 1986, of 
which Ontario is thought to account for about $7 million. Our mail survey respondents, in 
a broader category which included instruments and supplies, reported exports of $30 
million, although some of these firms may be exporting other EP products and these 
exports would be included in our total. 

Imports under the category "garbage disposal units" were $8 million in 
1986, of which close to $6 million were into Ontario. The federal industry department 
believes that Ontario runs a slight surplus in overall trade in this area with the United 
States. 

5.5.2 Current Trade Barriers 

Local purchasing preferences by municipal waste disposal agencies were 
cited by industry participants as one of the more important non-tariff barriers in this area. 
As we have already noted, only federal level purchasing procedures were explicitly 
addressed in the Free Trade Agreement, although further discussions on procurement 
policies will take place if the treaty is approved. Equipment manufacturers in the hazardous 
waste industry also expressed concerns over the lack of bilateral acceptability of test data. 
The duplication of testing and application for approval from the U.S. Environmental 
Protection Agency (EPA) and the Canadian provincial authorities imposes a costly burden 
on producers competing outside their home market. 

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Table 11: TARIFFS ON SELECTED SOLID AND HAZARDOUS WASTE 

DISPOSAL EQUIPMENT 


Commodity 1988 Tariff 


Years to Duty-Free 
Status Under FTA 


Canadian Exports to the U.S. 






Sorting, screening, separating, washing 
crushing, grinding, mixing machinery and 
associated parts 


2.9% 


3 


Tankers and other trailers 


3.1% 


10 


Trucks Fitted with lifting/handling 
equipment, self-propelled, non-electric 
(excl. LPG powered fork lifts for factories) 


0.0% 





Conveyers 


2.0% 


3 


Bulldozers, mechanical shovels 
compactors, etc. 


2.5% 


3 


Electric Furnaces (for PCB destruction) 


2.5% 


3 


Iron/Steel Containers 

U.S. Exports to Canada 


0.0% to 
5.0% 


10 


Sorting, screening, separating, washing 
crushing, grinding, mixing machinery and 
associated parts 


9.2% 


3 


Tankers and other trailers 


15.0% 


10 


Trucks fitted with lifting/handling 
equipment, self-propelled, non-electric 
(excl. LPG powered fork lifts for factories) 


9.3% 


3 


Conveyers 


9.2% 


3 


Bulldozers, mechanical shovels 






compactors, etc. 


9.2% 


3 


Electric Furnaces (for PCB destruction) 


11.2% 


3 


Iron/Steel Containers 


7.8% to 
10.6% 


10 


Source: Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement, appendixes. 



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5.5.3 Competitiveness of the Ontario Industry 

Ontario has a strong capability in the solid and hazardous waste industries. 
In the area of containers, Ontario firms are competitive manufacturers of fibre drums for 
incineration of hospital waste and steel drums to hold hazardous liquid waste and to prevent 
spills. Freight costs make international trade in this area virtually non-existent. 

There is significant Ontario capability in the manufacturing of garbage 
trucks, with companies such as Jaeger, Frink, Demster, Sanitech, Amertek and Capital 
Disposal being mentioned by survey respondents as being prominent in the industry. 
Estimated annual production of garbage trucks in Ontario is 200 vehicles worth $20 
million. Ontario content for rear loader garbage packers and recycle material pick-up 
vehicles ranges from 50-90 percent depending on the company and type of truck. The trend 
in the manufacturing area, like that in the service area, is toward recycling trucks as 
opposed to conventional rear loader refuse trucks. 

Capability for the destruction of PCB's and other highly toxic wastes has 
been developed in Ontario, though one such technology was subsequently purchased by 
Westinghouse in the U.S. and its development was shifted to their American offices. A 
recent tender let by the MOE for PCB destruction in Smithville was believed (by an 
industry participant) to have received all American bids, which could indicate a weakness in 
the Ontario capability in this high growth area, although Ontario Hydro has used local 
firms. Recent findings by researchers funded by the National Research Council appears to 
show some promise for new approaches for the safe treatment and disposal of PCB's. 

While expertise on hazardous wastes currently rests in the U.S, it is likely 
that the establishment of firm guidelines by MOE, combined with an emphasis on achieving 
high local content, would lead to the rapid development of an Ontario based industry. 
Currentiy, for example, one Niagara Falls firm has the expertise to manufacture plasma arc 
furnaces capable of achieving the temperature and resident time necessary to bum and break 
up organic chemicals. There are also indications of strong future demand for such 
expertise in the future; an industry participant estimated that there are 100 major hazardous 
waste sites in the Great Lakes basin, of which at least 10 are in Ontario. 



Woods Gordon 

5.5.4 Impact of Free Trade 

As in other areas, the tariff barriers into Canada in solid and hazardous 
waste equipment are much higher than those facing Ontario exports in the United States. 
The federal industry department believes that free trade will nevertheless be beneficial to 
Ontario manufacturers in this industry, based on their ability to manufacture at competitive 
costs. 

Our interview respondents generally felt that free trade would not have a 
significant impact in this area. This was disputed by one manufacturer of garbage trucks, 
who felt that the current tariff was needed and that U.S companies would swamp the 
Canadian companies under free trade. Given the scale economies that are generally 
achievable in manufacturing heavy machinery, there may well be some significant 
adjustments required by smaller Ontario manufacturers that have historically been geared 
for the domestic market. 

5.6 Control, Sampling and Monitoring Equipment 

5.6.1 Current Trade Pattern 

As we have noted, Canada runs a significant trade deficit with the U.S. and 
other countries in control, sampling and monitoring (CSM) equipment used in 
environmental protection. Even where production is taking place in Ontario, many of the 
components used are imported from the U.S., Europe or the Far East. Table 12 captures 
the trade flows for selected types of CSM equipment. 



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Table 12 

1986 CANADA-U.S. TRADE IN SELECTED CSM EQUIPMENT 

(Millions of Canadian Dollars) 


Commodity Canadian Exports 

to the U.S. 




Canadian Imports 
from the U.S. 


Industrial Control Equipment 
Electrical Measuring/Testing Instr. 
Physical Properties Testing Equip. 
Thermal Measuring/Control Equip. 


$10 

23 

10 

1 




$122 

134 

96 

12 


Source: DRIE (1987b) 



5.6.2 Current Trade Barriers 

Similar to other areas of the EP sector, tariffs on Ontario exports to the U.S. 
are generally lower than those facing U.S. exports to Canada, although there are 
exceptions. Effective duties into Canada tend to be lower than those indicated, due to 
special exemptions on products not available from Canadian sources. Most of the duties in 
this area will be phased out over 10 years under the Free Trade Agreement, leaving some 
time for adjustments to take place. 



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Table 13 

TARIFFS ON SELECTED CONTROL, SAMPLING AND 

MONITORING EQUIPMENT AND INSTRUMENTS 



Commodity 1988 Tariff Years to Duty-Free 

Status Under FTA 



Canadian Exports to the U.S. 

Electrical meters for liquid 

flows or levels 4.9% 10 

Electrical gas or smoke analysis apparatus 4.9% 10 

Optical gas or smoke analysis apparatus 10.0% 10 

Chromatographs, electrophoresis 

instr., spectrometers, spectrophotometers etc. 

(electrical) 4.9% 10 

Thermographs, hygrographs 

and other recording instr. 3.0% 10 

Automatic regulating and 3.1% to 

controlling instruments 4.9% 10 

U.S. Exports to Canada 

Electrical meters for liquid 

flows or levels 10.3% 10 

Electrical gas or smoke analysis apparatus 0.0% 

Optical gas or smoke analysis apparatus 7.5% 10 

Chromatographs, electrophoresis 

instr., spectrometers, spectrophotometers etc. 0.0% or 

(electrical) 10.0% 10 

Automatic regulating and 9.0% to 

controlling instruments 10.0% 10 



Source: Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement, appendixes. 



Ontario firms in this area also mentioned government procurement 
preferences, and the difficulties, time and costs faced in attempting to "find one's way 
around" the complex regulatory corridors of the EPA, the Food and Drug Administration 



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and other U.S. agencies, as non-tariff barriers to trade. Canadian firms have found that 
U.S. companies have more lobbying contacts and resources to spend in winning contracts 
with these agencies; one prominent firm has formed a joint venture with a U.S. firm to 
assist in marketing its product to American government agencies. 

5.6.3 Competitiveness of the Ontario Industry 

Based on our discussions with industry participants, it appears that less than 
10% of the Ontario private and public sector demand for CSM equipment and instruments 
is met by Ontario manufacturers, although much of it is sold through local distributors. 
Very little in the way of process control equipment, pressure and temperature monitoring 
devices, and data acquisition and control devices is manufactured in the province. 

In these instrumentation areas, where transport costs tend to be quite low 
relative to the value of the product, the small size of the Canadian market represents a very 
real problem for Ontario manufacturers. Competitors from the U.S and other nations are 
generally larger and have greater resources to devote toward product development and 
marketing. Furthermore, in those areas where Ontario is competitive, a feeling of domestic 
inferiority often works against the likelihood of native companies winning the contract. 
More than one respondent suggested that, quite simply, there are many monitoring, 
sampling and testing equipment areas where domestic demand will not justify the 
development of native expertise. 

We understand that there are exceptions, and that some Ontario suppliers 
have successfully established themselves in the export market as well. Ontario 
manufacturing appears to be focussed on the production of small numbers of very high- 
priced, high technology units (trace atmospheric gas analyzers etc.) rather than on more 
general monitoring and testing equipment for which mass production offers scale 
economies. These latter types of equipment are available from some Ontario suppliers, but 
purchasers suggested that imported goods are offered at more competitive prices. 

In the higher volume items, the movement away from more basic systems to 
higher technology devices may hurt Ontario suppliers, who are characterized (by 
purchasers) as suppliers of more basic high-volume equipment. Continuous emission 
monitoring (CEM) equipment, which tends to be quite expensive (close to $100,000 per 
system), would likely be imported, according to purchasers we contacted. Consulting 



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engineers expect that the CEM field will be among the fastest growing segments of the air 
pollution equipment industry, as tightened enforcement generates the need for data. 

One Ontario manufacturer of air and gas quality electronic sensors 
competes successfully against U.S, Japanese and European companies. This company 
maintains an ongoing R&D department and it directs its products toward the oil, paper, 
refrigeration, building maintenance and other industries concerned with air and gas quality. 
This particular company's product has an 80% Ontario content; in other instrumentation 
products made in Ontario, a significant proportion of the components (in some cases, 
nearly 100% of them) are imported . 

Another Ontario manufacturer of instrumentation achieves close to 100 
percent Ontario content. The company competes successfully in the U.S market and 
devotes a great deal of effort to that market. Domestically, the company feels that on 
certain occasions it has lost sales to U.S, British and German competition because of 
reverse discrimination resulting from the feeling of Canadian inferiority. It feels that wage 
rates are comparable between Ontario and U.S labour, with Ontario perhaps enjoying a 
slight advantage. 

In the area of sampling, analyzing, and control instruments for water and 
wastewater treatment, the small size and more technological nature of the products relative 
to water pollution control equipment places added importance on scale and market factors. 
The companies in Ontario that competitively produce instrumentation generally have found 
a technological niche and are enjoying success in both Ontario and the U.S. For the most 
part, however, the limited size of the Ontario and Canadian market works against the 
development of a significant instrumentation industry in the water and wastewater field. 

Foreign firms with operations in Canada generate some Canadian content 
through local services and occasionally assembly. For example, according to DRIE, 
atomic absorption spectrometers which measure trace levels of mercury are supplied in 
Ontario by Varian (an Australian company) with 40% Canadian content, by Perk and Elmer 
(U.S.) with 60% Canadian content, by Ingram and Bell (Japan) with 70% Canadian 
content and by Hadley Tekscience (U.S.) with 70% Canadian content. Note that at least 
one-half of these local content values are typically generated simply from taxes, labour, 
overhead and profit, rather than from purchases of local raw materials or parts, and thus the 
import content of subcomponents may still be quite high. 

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5.6.4 Impact of Free Trade 

Suppliers in this industry generally felt that free trade would not have much 
of an impact on their Ontario operations. Canadian firms believe themselves to be quite 
competitive in the selective niches in which they now operate, and their access to the U.S. 
market will not be dramatically improved by tariff reductions, although they may be able to 
gain some market share at the expense of European competitors who will continue to face 
tariffs on their U.S. sales. The harmonization of product standards could also enhance the 
two-way flow of trade in instruments. 

One firm also felt that its share of the U.S. public sector market might be 
enhanced by the agreement. Another noted the possibility of reduced Canadian production 
costs by being able to import parts duty free, although they would lose duty remissions on 
parts imports from Europe and the Far East on their exports to the United States. 

One innovative instrument manufacturer describes the Free Trade 
Agreement as a "double-edged sword" offering both benefits and challenges, with a net 
positive benefit from their perspective. Its products face average tariffs of 6 percent and 
these will be eliminated under free trade. Furthermore the company uses a subsidiary in 
order to reduce the amount of the purchase price to which the duty is applied. The costs and 
paperwork associated with this process would also be eliminated under free trade. 

5.7 Consulting, Engineering, and Waste Management Services 

5.7.1 Current Trade Pattern and Competitive Position 

We were unable to identify any useful data on trade in environmental 
services. In consulting and engineering services, Ontario firms are thought to have a very 
strong competitive position internationally, although American immigration procedures 
pose a barrier to the export of such services to the United States. Most firms were 
confident that Ontario would have a trade surplus with the rest of the world in this sector, 
and some felt that a trade surplus existed in Ontario-U.S. trade as well. Our mail survey 
identified over $60 million in annual exports by EP service sector firms, excluding sales of 
recycled products. 

For the most part, the trade barriers discussed in the next section have meant 
that Ontario firms have established American offices, staffed largely by U.S. residents, to 

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serve the American market. Similarly, U.S. EP service firms have set up operations in 
Ontario, employing Canadian workers. 

Canadian engineering firms appear to enjoy somewhat more success in the 
U.S. market than do American firms in Canada. As a rough indication of this success, the 
Association of Consulting Engineers of Canada directory lists 32 Canadian firms with U.S. 
offices, while indicating only 2 American firms with Canadian offices, although neither list 
may be fully comprehensive. 

In the hauling of solid and hazardous waste, both Canadian and American 
firms are active with branch operations in the other country. In the Ontario market, 
Laidlaw and Wasteco are prominent domestic firms while Browning Ferris and Waste 
Management are prominent U.S-based competitors. These firms typically have operations 
in many cities and they haul solid waste, toxic waste or all types of waste. 

5.7.2 Current Trade Barriers 

The most important trade barrier in this sector relates to the difficulties 
professionals face in crossing the border for work purposes. Employees of engineering 
consulting firms or service companies seeking to work in the United States are required to 
have temporary work permits or green cards. The inconvenience, time and delays involved 
in obtaining such documents have resulted in the widespread practice of lying at the border. 
Occasionally, blueprints and other documents have been seized at the border, although 
these are increasingly being transferred electronically. 

A more problematic issue that is unlikely to be easily addressed under the 
Free Trade Agreement is the difficulty facing Canadian and American engineers in 
becoming accredited as professional engineers. Ontario engineers must be accredited in 
each state in which they work, a process which requires the setting and passing of exams. 
Specialized Canadian engineers in mid-career find it difficult to pass a comprehensive exam 
that covers all aspects of a broad field of engineering. The Ontario accreditation of U.S. 
engineers simply requires an application to the Association of Professional Engineers of 
Ontario. 

The lack of standardization among design codes and the lack of bilateral 
acceptance of test data for the purpose of obtaining permits was also cited as costly and 



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time-consuming barriers to the free movement of EP services, particularly in rapidly 
changing areas such as toxic wastes. In the more traditional EP industries, this is less of a 
problem, as more uniform, international standards have been derived over time. The Free 
Trade Agreement proposes continued efforts to harmonize standards between Canada and 
the United States. 

5.7.3 Impact of Free Trade 

Federal government officials at DPJE feel that the Ontario engineering and 
consulting services in the EP sector are world-competitive, and that they will benefit from 
the removal of trade restrictions. Consultants we spoke with were less confident that any 
significant benefits would be achieved. Some felt that more work now handled by their 
U.S. offices would be undertaken by Canadians. Others believe that local residents will 
continue to provide the bulk of the services in both countries. 

In other service areas, the need for local employees for waste hauling and 
disposal guarantees that most of the Ontario demand will be met by Ontario branches of 
waste management firms, whether these firms are based in Ontario, other provinces, or in 
the U.S. 



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CHAPTER 6 
EP INDUSTRY ISSUES AND THE ROLE FOR GOVERNMENT 

6.1 Introduction 

In addition to the issues raised in the course of our review of the EP 
industry's growth prospects and competitiveness, we were asked by the Ministry of the 
Environment to survey both purchasers and suppliers in the Ontario market to identify areas 
of concern on both sides of the market. Although we understand that the Ministry has 
already been engaged in a comprehensive consultation process with industry 
representatives in designing the new legislation, we were asked to speak to purchasers 
from a range of industries for their views on the technological needs posed by tightening 
government regulations on water pollution (under the Municipal-Industrial Strategy for 
Abatement, or MISA) and air quality (under the Clean Air Program, or CAP). Suppliers 
were also questioned on their views of current government policies in this area, and on the 
potential for government initiatives to foster the growth of Ontario EP industry capabilities. 
In this chapter, we report on the varied responses received in the course of our interviews. 

In addition to the concerns raised by purchasers and suppliers, this study 
points to the need for a more thorough effort by Statistics Canada to track both 
expenditures and production in the field of environmental protection. Production data 
would be improved if environmental protection equipment was classified as a separate 
industry within the machinery and equipment industry sector. Since environmental 
protection appears to be an issue of growing importance in Canada and other countries, 
improving our knowledge of activity in this sector is likely to be of significant benefit to 
public policy-makers in the future. 

6.2 Purchaser Concerns 

In general, environmental officials with the major industries involved in 
pollution control remain uncertain as to the ultimate implications of the trend towards tighter 
regulations in Ontario. Beyond the need for improved monitoring of effluents, industry 
engineering personnel felt that the actual abatement procedures that will be followed under 
both MISA and CAP are currently undefined 



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In particular, while industry officials are aware of the general concept of the 
regulations, requiring the adoption of the Best Available Technology Economically 
Achievable (BATEA), how these regulations will work in practice is still unclear. Should 
the regulations go no further than the process now underway in the United States, there 
should be no major technological difficulties. Otherwise, the prevailing view is that long 
lead times will be required to implement the new standards economically. The remainder of 
this section provides some examples of particular industries in which we conducted 
interviews that capture the general views of industry as a whole. 

In the pulp and paper industry, for example, respondents viewed the 
MISA and CAP programs as being adaptations of existing American legislation. U.S 
regulatory authorities have defined BATEA for wastewater control as extended aeration and 
sludge treatment. 

Should the requirements be similarly defined in Canada, the technology to 
treat effluents will generally be available to the industry, including some products that could 
be purchased from local manufacturers. However, there are some areas where the simple 
adoption of U.S. technology designed for American applications that will not work well in 
Ontario. For example, effluents from thermo- mechanical pumping plants are treated in 
aeration basins, but at lower temperatures, the biological activity involved in aeration drops 
to ineffective levels. As a result, according to one wastewater treatment equipment 
purchaser, some techniques that detoxify effluents in the United States will work for as 
little as six weeks per year in Northern Ontario. 

Furthermore, some industry participants are concerned that the regulations 
will be interpreted as requiring much more stringent controls than now practiced in the 
United States. They interpret statements by the Minister as indicating the government's 
intention to require the removal of all toxic material from effluent. Should this be the case, 
their view is that the required technology would not be available, either in Ontario or 
elsewhere. While the industry has moved towards process changes and reduced usage of 
chlorine in bleaching, they believe that such measures cannot succeed in entirely eliminating 
chlorinated hydrocarbons in their effluents. 

There is also a concern that the previously cooperative spirit between 
Ministry regulators and the industry is giving way to a more confrontational approach that, 
in these purchaser's views, will lead to less effective consultation towards efficient 

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regulations. Their view is that some sort of "political saw-off between environmental 
concerns and industry economics, of the variety they perceive to have been reached in the 
U.S., is necessary for the regulations to work. 

Petroleum refining companies we contacted shared the general uncertainty 
concerning the implications of regulatory change for their sector, although industry 
participants appear to be somewhat more confident concerning how the process will 
ultimately work itself out. The MIS A regulations are not viewed by the industry as 
requiring significant new control efforts, as the petroleum industry is already ahead of 
municipalities in adopting secondary biological treatment technologies and feels it should 
not be required to go any further until other emittors have caught up. There is less 
understanding of how the more recently-announced CAP will affect the industry. 

Many firms in this industry are able to self-supply much of the design work 
that has been required in the past to meet environmental regulations. With the exception of 
laboratory services, one major refiner reported that they have designed all of their own 
water treatment facilities, sulphur plants and soil clean-up projects. Laboratory services 
are thought to be somewhat under-supplied, with slow turn-around times for analyses. As 
in other areas, petroleum refiners usually have to import much of their instrumentation and 
analytical equipment. 

Chemical industry environmental officials were less certain that the 
technologies would exist to meet the yet-to-be-defined regulations, even in the area of 
monitoring. In common with firms in the petroleum industry, some of the major chemical 
firms are able to self-supply some of the engineering design work that would be required to 
alter processes for improved environmental performance. However, there is a general 
concern over the degree to which existing facilities will have to retrofit to comply with new 
regulations, since wholesale changes could make some existing operations unprofitable. 
Our respondents shared the view of those in other industries that the technologies would 
exist if MISA and CAP merely require the Ontario industry to meet U.S. standards, but 
doubt whether they could soon go much beyond these standards using presently available 
technologies without facing prohibitive costs. Chemical industry respondents also 
mentioned their concerns that the overall regulatory process is becoming more adversarial 
and in their view, less effective as a result. 



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Even where abatement expenditures are made, pollution control in the 
industry is thought by industry participants to be a difficult task, since most chemical 
manufacturing processes leave trace levels of reactants. Using scrubbers to remove them 
from the air leaves contaminated water behind. Biological treatment of effluent water 
removes what is believed by chemical industry engineers to be an acceptable percentage of 
contaminants, but presents the problem of disposing of the sludge and the "bugs" that 
remain suspended in the run-off. 

Mining and Metals firms confirm the general level of uncertainty over 
the new regulations. Industry officials noted that most of the discussion between the 
industry and the Ministry to date has been focussed on sampling and analysis, rather than 
on the technologies that will be adopted for abatement and control. Again, these 
respondents stressed the difficulties they would have in finding technologies to exceed 
prevailing U.S. categorical effluent standards. 

6.3 Supplier Concerns and the Role for Government 1 

In general, the industry believes that government regulations play a key role 
in shaping the environmental protection industry in both Canada and the United States. A 
change by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in specifications for residual 
chlorine in wastewater, for example, would be sufficient to trigger activity among firms 
selling UV light systems, ozonation equipment and sulphur dioxide de-chlorination 
equipment. The proposed changes to Regulation 308 and MISA are expected by Ontario 
industry participants to be the key future driving forces for local manufacturers and service 
firms. 

Most suppliers felt confident that they could meet many of the technological 
requirements arising from the new regulations, as they expect that the ultimate regulations 
will not require industries and municipalities to exceed the standards already in place, if not 
always enforced, in the United States. Ontario, in turn, is viewed as setting the stage for 
parallel legislation in other provinces. Many feel that industries could retrofit and clean up 



L It should be noted that in this section, we report the concerns and perceptions of suppliers we contacted. 
We have not attempted to independently verify the accuracy of these perceptions. 

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processes to meet legislated targets, and that this need not involve the large dollar figures 
which the affected industries will inevitably claim. 

The approach of following the American lead was thought to be detrimental 
to the EP industry in Ontario. By taking the lead in regulations, if not in enforcement, the 
U.S. stimulates its firms to lead in the development of technologies, which can then be 
exported. In some fields of pollution control, the U.S. is viewed as being five years ahead 
of Ontario. When seen against the views of purchasers, it appears that the most beneficial 
approach for both suppliers and purchasers involves being at the leading edge in terms of 
announcing future targets for environmental protection, but allowing sufficient lead times 
before new standards come into effect to allow for the efficient design and development of 
appropriate technologies in Ontario. 

Both the approvals process handled by the Ministry, and the design 
specifications made by consulting engineers, are perceived by EP suppliers to reinforce the 
adoption of existing U.S. technologies in Canada and forestall the development of new EP 
technologies in Ontario. Some firms felt that although the regulations specified by the 
Ministry mention only end-use performance, in practice approvals are granted on the basis 
of meeting design requirements. The perception of suppliers (which we have not verified) 
is that new systems being tried in the U.S. on experimental, pilot projects would not be 
approved in Ontario. 

Thus, while encouraging research on the one hand, the Ministry is viewed 
by suppliers as promoting the conservative use of existing technologies through its 
approvals process (by favouring the adoption of old technologies over experimental 
systems), and by lagging behind the U.S. in promulgating new regulations. A similar 
conclusion was reached by the Task Force on Environmental Protection Technologies 
(1983). Consulting engineers also promote this conservatism, according to equipment 
manufacturers, by specifying existing technologies and resisting innovative Ontario 
equipment that has not been applied elsewhere. Similarly, engineers at multinationals tend 
to copy designs used in parent company plants, reinforcing the use of imported equipment. 

A problem that was mentioned by a few respondents concerned the lack of 
attention given to Canadian content by virtually all municipalities. It was suggested that 
price-advantage policies would help domestic manufacturers and would bring Ontario 
municipalities more in line with those of other countries. Others also suggested that 

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municipalities should be given less latitude by the Ministry, since what they view as lax 
standards have sometimes led municipalities to adopt low-cost, but ineffective equipment to 
the detriment of suppliers of better, but more expensive technologies. 

There is considerable government involvement in many of the 'high tech' 
aspects of solid and hazardous waste disposal. Individual departments within the federal 
government are responsible for environmental assessment and maintenance of federal 
lands, with Environment Canada having the mandate to establish general guidelines and 
standards. Provincial governments are responsible for provincial lands and each is 
establishing guidelines and legislation. The environmental assessment personnel and 
chemists with whom we spoke felt that it was very difficult to 'nail down' the provincial 
ministries regarding what is and is not acceptable in the area of hazardous waste disposal. 
The provincial ministries, on the other hand, have to receive public input into the 
establishment of the guidelines and this is proving to be a time consuming process. As a 
result, highly toxic chemicals such as PCB's have yet to be destroyed in Canada and they 
continue to accumulate and be stored on a temporary basis. 

In terms of direct government assistance to the EP industry, participants felt 
that this was of secondary importance to the timely development and enforcement of 
environmental legislation. Grants and research funding cannot have the impact that will be 
produced by EP legislation, by tougher fines placed on violators, and by ensuring that 
enforcement is not a cyclical phenomenon that is neglected each time there is a business 
slowdown. However, a number of firms we contacted had already participated in existing 
federal and provincial programs for research and development, and there was a fairly 
broad-based support for a greater Ontario government role in encouraging the development 
of new EP goods and services in the province. 

One successful Ontario manufacturer of instrumentation developed its 
product in conjunction with personnel from the National Research Council and maintained 
company representation on the board of the Canadian Standards Association. This 
company felt that the strong competition of American, German, Japanese and British firms 
merited the active involvement of the Ontario government in support of increased R&D and 
exports. 

The Trade Export Fund (of the Ministry of Industry, Trade and 
Technology), the Export Manager for Hire program, and the College Intern program were 

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all felt to be very useful and of great value to this company. Others cited the federal 
government's IRAP program as being particularly effective. However, these programs 
were felt to be small relative to the kind of push to the industry provided by the American 
Superfund program. 

Research and development assistance appears to be more of a concern in 
select, high technology components of the EP industry. Most air pollution firms are 
involved in the production of fairly standard products with minimal innovation and 
undertake only modest R&D expenditures as a result Trade volumes are quite low in these 
industries because of the local fabrication and air content of most products, and thus the 
requirement for government export assistance is also limited. These two limitations, 
however, do not apply to instrumentation manufacturers where technological and trade 
assistance would be of great value. 

Most of the foreign-owned companies with whom we spoke have very little 
R&D capability in Ontario, though occasional product improvements are not unusual. 
Coupled with the absence of a mandate to export for these branch plants, this feature of 
branch plant operations in the EP areas is thought to be a factor limiting the potential 
success of government policies designed to promote Ontario exports from these 
multinationals. By taking the lead in developing regulations, the government might be in a 
better position to use other incentives to encourage multinationals to undertake research and 
product development in Ontario, rather than following the lead of their parent companies 
who have already reacted to earlier U.S. regulations. The export performance of 
domestically-based firms might also be similarly enhanced. 

In some high technology areas where Canadian companies or branch plants 
feel that they cannot compete with large U.S. research budgets, industry participants feel 
that the government should encourage technology licensing agreements. 

Several respondents felt that government R&D and export assistance 
programs involved too much paperwork and were thus ironically restricted to bigger 
companies who could afford to have an individual dedicated full-time to completing forms 
and communicating with the appropriate individuals within the government. Ironically, 
large multinational companies also felt that they were unlikely to qualify for government 
initiatives, which were viewed as favouring domestically-based firms. As one respondent 



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stated, the message they receive is that "you're not Canadian and you have profits; if you 
want to do something, you are on your own". 

Other respondents echoed this view that the government was reluctant to 
support anything that had too strong a possibility for success, viewing the possibility of 
profits as a sufficient reward despite considerable risks to be faced by the company 
undertaking the development of a new technology. In general, the industry feels it would 
benefit from greater support for pilot projects, both in funding and in granting approval for 
the use of new technologies. Such support already exists in the United States. Lorenz and 
Ropes (1986) cite an EPA program under the Clean Water Act which has provided over 
$140 million federal funding over the last 8 years for innovative municipal wastewater 
treatment plants. 

Equity roles are felt to be too risky for government in a political sense and 
such ownership positions often burden the company's momentum and flexibility with 
unwanted bureaucracy. Tax incentives for R&D are described as desirable though subject 
to abuse by people who "don't raise a test tube". In instances where small companies are 
struggling to get products to market, tax concessions are generally the last thing on 
people's minds, while grants would potentially play an invaluable role in helping the 
company achieve its goal. The Ontario Technology Fund was described by one company as 
"a real shot in the arm" at an opportune time. Most firms felt that direct grants for R&D, 
prototype development and pilot projects were the most effective methods of government 
support. 

Others noted that support for basic research has the potential for industrial 
development as well. Many of Ontario's small, entrepreneurial Firms in the EP sector were 
spinoffs from University research projects. 

In the area of marketing, there is general support in the industry for 
government assistance. This could include trade missions and assistance in the making of 
connections with knowledgeable foreign distributors and domestic design engineers. The 
provision of financial and other assistance to link up with distributors and partners in the 
U.S was also thought to be a valuable role for the Ontario government by some, but others 
felt strongly that incoming missions (trade shows put on for visitors from other countries) 
would provide better return for the government's expenditure than would outgoing 
missions (Canadian trade shows put on in foreign countries). In smaller companies, it is 

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often difficult for the key executive or marketing manager to leave the office for 2 weeks to 
"go flit around some foreign country". Furthermore, incoming missions allow companies 
to put on top quality displays of products, laboratories, plants, and personnel. 

Government purchasing is also an area of potential support to the domestic 
industry. The Ontario government funded numerous water and wastewater projects during 
the 1970's, contributing to the high capability which generally exists in the industry today. 
Further construction, expansion, and upgrading of treatment facilities will obviously 
benefit this branch of the EP industry, which supports this policy. 

One specific suggestion regarding solid and hazardous waste disposal was 
that MOE should be offering special packages to private carriers to encourage recycling. 
Currently the ministry offers packages to municipalities aimed at encouraging recycling. 
For example, in Simcoe, MOE recently offered equipment write-off and purchase 
incentives to the municipality, according to an official with a private sector waste hauling 
company. 

The feeling expressed to us was that MOE should also provide incentives to 
private haulers. It is currendy not in the interests of private haulers to use compactors or to 
recommend the use of compactors to its shopping centre or industrial accounts, as this 
reduces the volume of waste hauled, the frequency of pick-ups, and the dollars of hauling 
revenue. Yet, it is clearly in the interests of the government to promote waste volume 
reductions. The industry advocates rapid compactor write-offs, for example, or grants 
toward the purchase of compacting or recycling equipment by haulers, as a means of 
encouraging the efficient handling of solid wastes. 

In evaluating the merits of recycling versus conventional garbage disposal, 
it was suggested by many companies that MOE must consider societal goals and landfill 
longevity as well as direct costs and benefits. By incorporating landfill longevity into 
evaluations, recycling proposals and their respective costs and benefits will be cast in a 
different light. In general, the waste disposal industry also needs the Ministry's support to 
counter the not-in-my-backyard sentiment that prevents projects from going ahead. 



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CHAPTER 7 
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION IMPACT MODEL 

7.1. Introduction 

7.1.1 Purpose 

In developing and defending its policies, The Ontario Ministry of the 
Environment is often called upon to evaluate the economic implications for the province 
arising from environmental protection regulatory changes. A standard, straightforward 
approach for measuring economic impacts which is often employed in this context is the 
use of multipliers derived from an input-output framework. Based on this approach, 
Woods Gordon has developed an Environmental Protection Impact Model (EPIM) to assist 
the Ministry in deriving required impact estimates. In this case, the impacts are in the form 
of jobs and income created in the supply of environmental protection products, that could 
help to offset some of the economic costs to the province of tighter environmental 
regulations. 

The EPIM, described in this chapter and incorporated into a Lotus-based 
spreadsheet on the accompanying diskettes, is designed to assist policy-makers in 
estimating the impacts arising from a wide range of potential regulatory changes which the 
Ministry of the Environment might consider, including those affecting air quality, solid and 
liquid wastes and water treatment standards. For any such regulatory change, the step-by- 
step guide to data collection and analysis outlined in this chapter will lead to an estimate of 
the direct and indirect job and income creation generated in the province by Ontario 
purchases of pollution control products. These economic spinoffs, and the direct benefits 
of an improved environment, can then be set against the claims of economic costs from 
tighter environmental standards to help justify environmental legislation. 

Of course, for any proposed regulatory change, the actual expenditures that 
will be required to meet the regulation will be known only approximately in advance of the 
regulation coming into force. In addition, the model outlined herein can only be expected 
to approximate the spinoff effects from environmental expenditures, as would be the case 
with any alternative approach. Thus, estimates obtained using the EPIM, should be viewed 
as "orders of magnitude" values for the actual economic impacts of environmental 
protection spending. 



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7.1.2 Organization 

Including this Introduction, the chapter is divided into four Sections (plus 
appendixes). It provides documentation for the microcomputer-based EPEM model which 
has been provided to the Ministry on a computer diskette containing the multiplier data and 
the EPEM structure. Section 7.2 contains a brief description of the overall theoretical 
approach - input-output modelling - including a short summary of the assumptions and 
caveats that underlie this standard method of economic impact assessment. 1 The reader 
who is already familiar with input-output analysis may choose to skip this section. Section 
7.3 describes the EPEM and reviews the steps that will be followed in estimating the impact 
of specific environmental regulatory changes, and serves as a guide to the data included on 
the diskette and in Appendix II Section 7.4 discusses how the EPIM can be updated in the 
future. The Appendix I contains the survey formats necessary to implement the approach 
outlined in Section 7.3, and Appendix II provides a copy of the printout from the EPEM. 

7.2 Input-Output Methodology 

7.2.1 Introduction 

The Environmental Protection Impact Model (EPIM) uses Statistics 
Canada's Interprovincial Input-Output Model to derive appropriate multipliers to estimate 
the impacts of environmental protection expenditures on the Ontario economy. In this 
section, we briefly review the assumptions, benefits and caveats that underlie this approach 
to economic impact modelling. 

Input-output modelling is one of the leading approaches to estimating the 
impact of government policies and other developments on employment and incomes. It is a 
special case of a more general (but far more costly) modelling approach known as general 
equilibrium analysis, which attempts to model all of the linkages between the various 
sectors of the economy. Thus, general equilibrium models account for the fact that, as one 
industry increases its output of a particular commodity, it will at the same time increase its 
demand for labour and the various commodities that serve as inputs into its production 
process (i.e., raw materials, machinery and equipment). The firms that provide the 



'See for example. Management Information Systems Inc. (1986) 

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additional inputs will, in turn, have to purchase additional quantities of commodity inputs 
and labour. 

Input-output models track all of these linkages, but make the simplifying 
assumption that all of the relationships are linear: each unit of output by a given industry or 
of a given product uses a constant mix and proportion of inputs from other industries, and 
a constant labour input. Thus, the model ignores the possibility of economies (or 
diseconomies) of scale - i.e., decreases (or increases) in input requirements per unit of 
output as production expands. 

Similar to other general equilibrium approaches, input-output modelling 
assumes that suitable excess resources are available to meet any increase in demand. The 
model therefore ignores the potential for labour shortages or capacity constraints, and is 
thus most applicable during periods in which the economy is not running at full steam. 



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FIGURE 7.1 
SIMPLIFIED REPRESENTATION OF THE INPUT-OUTPUT MODEL 



Purchase of 
machinery 



Imported 
machines 




Ontario 
machines 



Other Canadian 
Machines 



T 



assembly of 
machinery 



assembly of 

machinery 



_E 



X 



X 



wages, profits, 
other income 



production of 
machine parts 



wages, profits, 
other income in 
other province 



production of 
Ontario inputs 
into machinery 



I 



, 



household 
spending 



wages, profits, 
other income 



household 

spending on 

Ontario products 



income in Ontario 



household 
spending 




production 

of goods, 

etc. 



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The chief advantage of input-output models over broader macroeconomic 
models is that they allow for a high level of industry detail to be captured. In addition, 
unlike dynamic, macroeconomic models, input-output models depict long-run equilibrium 
positions. The advantage of this approach in this case is that the models are essentially 
dateless. Except for the need to make a straightforward adjustment for inflation (since a 
given nominal amount of spending will have a lesser job-creation impact over time), the 
model can be applied in any year, and does not have to be constandy updated to provide a 
reasonably accurate picture of the economic impacts that result from environmental 
protection spending. 

The method of economic impact assessment proposed here has the virtue of 
being consistent with the usual practice of obtaining such estimates for other purposes. In 
particular, most economic impact analyses conducted for industry groups make use of this 
technique to account for the economic spinoffs of increases in their production in Ontario, 
or the job losses in the province as their own activity is reduced. Thus, it likely that if an 
industry group estimates the negative job spinoffs of production declines resulting from EP 
requirements, they would be most likely to be using an input-output framework to account 
for spin-off effects. The Ministry's estimates of the positive spinoffs 

of EP spending would therefore be on a consistent basis with most 
estimates of job losses from environmental costs. 

While we focus on the positive spinoffs of EP spending in this Chapter, the 
model could be used by the Ministry to calculate the negative spinoffs of reductions in 
business investment spending or output caused by tighter environmental regulations. This 
would entail entering negative values in the expenditure columns, representing reductions 
in purchases by Ontario firms of their production inputs or machinery and equipment. 

Input-Output Models have been applied in other jurisdictions to estimate the 
economic spinoffs of environmental protection spending. For example, a study by 
Management Information Systems Inc. (1986) used a U.S. I/O model to simulate the 
output and job creation associated with American investment in pollution abatement and 
control. 



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7.2.2 How Input-Output Models Work 

Input-output models are based on data derived in National Income 
Accounting, the basis for estimates of the volume of economic activity in a country (or 
province). The model is based on detailed estimates of the inputs used by each industry in 
the production of individual types of commodities. As noted above, the production of any 
one unit of a commodity is assumed to require a constant mix of inputs of labour and other 
commodities used as raw materials, machinery or equipment. 

Statistics Canada's Interprovincial Input -Output Model l tracks the input 
requirements for the production of each of 92 different commodities by 41 industry groups. 
Some of the commodity classifications of particular relevance to the environmental 
protection sector include scientific equipment, business services, fabricated structures, 
boilers and tanks and various categories of metal, plastic and rubber products. 

The model also tracks the province of production for each unit of the inputs 
used in supplying a purchaser in a given province. Thus, for example, the model allocates 
each dollar spent on boilers and tanks in Ontario to the production of inputs from Ontario, 
the other provinces, and imports. 

Given these estimates, the model is able to derive the economic impact of 
the purchase of $1 of any of the 92 commodities in Ontario The initial purchase is traced 
back to the input content used in meeting Ontario demand. The production of the final 
product and its inputs in turn generates incomes, which are then spent on other 
commodities, creating further economic activity and thus further incomes and spending; 
these indirect effects are incorporated into the "closed" version of the model used here. The 
final model estimates give the total direct and indirect job and income creation that resulted 
from the initial $1 purchase, broken down by province. 

These commodity-based estimates assume that only the location of the 
purchase (i.e., Ontario) is known; the model uses the average distribution of production for 
each commodity to estimate where the product will actually be produced. As a result, for 



* We have applied the "closed" version of the model. This version includes ihe induced impacts on GDP 
resulting from the spending by households of the income received in satisfying each increase in demand. 

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some commodities that are usually imported from outside the province, the GDP and 
employment impact in Ontario will be quite small, while products that are usually produced 
locally (particularly services) the multipliers are much higher. 

The accuracy of our approach will depend on the degree to which 
environmental protection commodities are similar to others in the same group in terms of 
their geographical distribution of production. The model implicitly assumes, for example, 
that purchases of water quality testing instrumentation entail the same degree of Ontario 
content as the average of all scientific instruments. Based on the necessarily approximate 
results of our survey of purchasers, we believe that the impact multipliers appear to be 
reasonable. The model also relies on structural relationships between industries (i.e., the 
degree to which each industry serves as a supplier to the others) that existed in 1979 to 
estimate spinoff effects; while these relationships do change over time, they are likely to 
remain sufficiently stable to permit 1979 values to proxy for the current industrial structure. 

In some cases, the government will know that the product is in fact going to 
be produced in Ontario. In these cases, since the commodity-based model assumes only 
the usual portion of the product would be Ontario produced, the model would 
underestimate the economic impact on the province. 

In these cases, a second set of multipliers should be used. These translate 
each dollar of production or revenue of Ontario industries (divided into 43 industry groups) 
into total direct, indirect and induced GDP and employment in Ontario. The multipliers in 
this second input-output table are higher, since the product is being produced in Ontario. 



O"? 



A third type of impact will arise if the firm employs additional staff (e.g 
environmental engineers) as a part of its response to environmental regulations. A 
multiplier translating the total direct, indirect and induced employment and GDP creation in 
Ontario is included in the model to capture the impact of such hiring. 

7.3 Using the Environmental Protection Impact Mode! 

7.3.1 Introduction 

The EPIM translates estimates for expenditures on environmental protection 
(broken down into repeat purchases and one-time expenditures) into estimates of permanent 
and one-time employment and GDP impacts, using multipliers derived from an input- 

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output framework and appropriate adjustments for inflation. The basic structure of the 
EPEM is illustrated in Figure 7.2. 

FIGURE 7.2 
The Environmental Protection Impact Model 



INPUT: 

EP Expenditures 



MULTIPLIERS 

and 
DEFLATORS 



OUTPUT: 

OnL employment 
and GDP created 



The model diskette provides all of the general input-output data necessary 
for estimating the Ontario impact of the environmental protection expenditures of Ontario 
companies and municipalities. In addition to these general data, the application of this 
model to a specific environmental policy change will require the assembly of data on the 
spending generated by the policy. In this section, we provide a detailed, step-by- step guide 
to obtaining the necessary data, applying it to the model, and interpreting the results. 

There are two basic steps to be undertaken in estimating the impact of 
changes in environmental protection spending on the Ontario economy: 

(1) Translation of a regulatory policy change into expenditure requirements 
by major classes of equipment or services; 

(2) Translation of Ontario purchases of commodities into total direct and 
indirect job and income creation. 

7.3.2 From Regulations to Expenditures 

The first step in the process will be undertaken by the Ministry of the 
Environment on a case-by-case basis, using the approach we outline in this section. The 
approach will vary depending on the information already in the Ministry's hands at the time 
the regulatory change is instituted. 

In some cases, where the regulatory change mandates the use of a particular 
good or service, the Ministry may already know the total expenditures that the policy will 



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require to a reasonable degree of accuracy. In such cases, the Ministry could proceed 
directly to step (2) in the analysis. 

In other cases, however, while the Ministry may be aware of the general 
nature of the expenditures that will be required to meet the regulation, it will not know the 
cost of instituting the changes or the extent that service purchases will be required along 
with the equipment. In these cases a survey of the affected firms or municipalities will be 
required. 

This survey would be conducted as follows: 

(1) The Ministry would use the Certificates of Approvals list to identify the 
universe of affected establishments or municipalities. These certificates will identify all 
establishments engaged in processes that emit the type of pollutant in question. 

(2) In the event that a very large number of establishments are involved, a 
sample would be selected from each of the representative industries. Dun and Bradstreet or 
other corporate directories would be used to ascertain the share of the industry represented 
by the sample. 

(3) Each establishment in the sample would be surveyed in writing or by 
telephone (where the number of firms is very small), and will be asked to estimate the 
expenditures that will be required (by commodity category) to meet the new regulation. If 
the source of the purchases is known to be an Ontario company, the firm would be asked to 
indicate the name of the supplier. A possible standard form for a written survey is 
provided in Appendix I to this report. The covering letter for the survey should emphasize 
that the Ministry requires their cooperation in order for the government to have an 
understanding of the potential costs of the new regulation to their establishment. In fact, in 
view of the detailed information that the Ministry will be seeking, we would recommend 
that potential respondents to a written survey be contacted by telephone first, in order to 
explain the purpose of the survey and gain their cooperation. 

(4) Where only a sample of firms is surveyed, the results would have to be 
grossed up to be representative of the universe of companies or municipalities. The method 
to be applied will depend on whether or not the required goods and services vary with the 
size of the firm. This will have to be ascertained through discussions with industry 



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participants or officials from EP suppliers. Where the expenditures are thought to be 
roughly proportional to output, the gross-up will divide the sample expenditures by the 
share of industry output accounted for by the surveyed firms. In other cases, each firm 
will require the same expenditure regardless of their size. In these cases, the gross-up will 
be accomplished by dividing by the proportion of firms surveyed to the total number of 
firms. 

(5) An alternative approach, for a rougher economic impact assessment, 
would be to rely on industry associations, consulting engineers, and EP industry officials 
to identify an estimate for the required expenditures by category. Industry officials should 
be advised that if they wish to claim that the regulatory change will impose major costs for 
their industry, they must identify what expenditures will be required. In this way, the 
Ministry will obtain data on the potential spinoffs (i.e. Ontario purchases) of EP regulations 
whenever they receive concerns on the costs of EP programs to polluters. 

This process will yield a table of expenditures classified into 92 
commodities, broken down into repeat purchases and one-time expenditures, and divided 
into those products that will be purchased from a known, Ontario supplier and others. 
Table 14 below provides a listing of these commodities, including a description of some of 
the types of environmental protection goods and services that fit into the particular 
commodity. In most cases, the expenditures will be concentrated in a fairly small number 
of categories. Where a secondary or tertiary good is purchased (e.g.waste hauling 
services), only the final good category is used, rather than the many categories that make 
up its inputs (trucks, tires, steel etc.). Where a construction firm or engineering consulting 
firm makes major goods purchases as a part of a contract with the company undertaking the 
environmental protection activity, it will be more accurate (although not essential) to 
separate out large expenditure items from the overall cost of the service provided, and then 
enter them in the appropriate commodity category. 

Our experience has been that while one should take care in classifying 
expenditures, the choices made between similar categories will usually not appreciably alter 
the order of magnitude of the impact estimates. The purpose of economic impact estimation 
is not to develop a precise point estimate, but rather to obtain an understanding of the range 
of possible employment and income spinoffs associated with a project. 



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Table 14 



Environmental Protection Impact Model 
Commodity Categories 


Commodity Class 


Examples of EP Goods and Services 


1. Grains 




2. Live Animals 




3. Other Agricultural Products 




4. Forestrv Products 




5. Fish Landings 




6. Hunting and Trapping Products 




7. Iron Ores and Concentrates 




8. Other Metal. Ores/Concentrates 




9. Coal 




10. Crude Mineral Oils 




11. Natural Gas 




12. Non-Metallic Minerals 




13. Services incidental to Mining 




14. Meat Products 




15, Dairy Products 




16. Fish Products 




17. Fruits/Vee. Preparations 




18. Feeds 




19. Flour, Wheat, Meal, other Cereals 




20. Breakfast Cereals 




21. Sugar 




22, Misc. Food Products 




23. Soft Drinlcs 




24. Alcoholic Beverages 




25. Tobacco Processed Unmanufactured 




26. Cigarettes & Tobacco Mfe 




27. Tires and Tubes 


Truck tires 


28. Other Rubber Products 


Rubber hoses and tubina 


29. Plastic Fabricated Products 


Plastic hose, pipe sheet and fitting, containers 


30. Leather &. Leather Products 




31. Yams and Man-made Fibres 




32. Fabrics 




33. Other Textile Products 




34. Hosiery and Knitted Wear 




35. Clothing and Accessories 




36. Lumber and Timber 




37. Veneer and PIvwood 




38. Other Wood Fabricated Materials 


Prefab wood buildings, wood containers 


39. Furniture and Fixtures 




40. Pulp 




41. Newsprint and Other Paper Stock 




42. Paper Products 


Paper baas, boxes 


43. Printing and Publishing 




44. Advertising. Print Media 




45. Iron and Siecl Products 




46. Aluminum Products 




47. Copper and Copper Allov Products 




48. Nickel Products 




49. Other Non-Ferrous Metal Products 




50. Boilers, Tanks and Plaies 


boilers, tanks, water/steam heating equip. 


51. Fabricated Structural Metal Products 


scaffokline. metal prefabricated buildincs 



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Woods Gordon 



52. Other Metal Fabricated Products 


metal pipes, fittings, sidings, pails, ash cans, containers, wire, 
chains, hardware, air heating eq, water tank heaters, fuel burning 
eq, custom metal working, forgings, valves, non-ferrous 

pipe fittings, gas/water meters, collapsible metal tubes 


53. Agricultural Machinery 




54. Other Industrial Machinery 


pumps, compressors, blowers, conveyers, hoists, 
ind. trucks/tractors/trailers fans, air circulators, air units, 
lubr. eq, ind. furnaces/kilris/ovens, refrigeration/cooling eq. 
scales, other machinery 


55. Motor Vehicles 


commercial trucks 


56. Motor Vehicle Parts 


truck parts 


57. Other Transport Equip 


rail cars 


58. Appliances/Receivers - household 




59. Other Electrical Products 


data transmission equip, electronics, transformers, ind. electr. eq., 
electric wire 


60. Cement and Concrete Products 


concrete, sand lime bricks, cement 


61. Other Non-Metallic Mineral Prod. 


asbestos filters, insulation, porcelain insulators & plumbing. glass 


62. Gasoline and Fuel Oil 




63. Other Petroleum and Coal Prod. 




64. Industrial Chemicals 


Chlorine, other chemicals 


65. Fertilizers 




66. Pharmaceuticals 




67. Other Chemical Products 


Boiler chemicals, agricultural chemicals, , ind. chem. preo'tions 


68. Scientific Equipment 


lab apparatus, measuring and control instruments 


69. Other Manufactured Products 




70. Residential Construction 




71. Non-Residential Construction 


contracting for EP facilities construction 


72. Repair Construction 




73. Pipeline Construction 




74. Transportation and Storage 


Waste hauling, storage, barges, rail 


75. Radio and Television Broadcasting 




76. Telephone and Telegraph 


data transmission services 


77. Postal Services 




78. Electnc Power 


electrical utilities 


79. Other Utilities 


water, j>as utilities 


80. Wholesale Margins 




81. Retail Margins 




82. Imputed Rent-Owner Occ. Dwellings 




83. Other Fin., Insurance, Real Est. 




84. Business Services 


consulting eneineerine. DP equip, rentals 


85. Education Services 


employee training 


86. Health Services 




87. Amusement and Recr. Services 




88. Accommodation and Food Services 




89. Other Personal and Misc. Services 


construction eqiup. rentals 


90. Transportation Margins 




91. Operating, Office, Lab and Food 


lab supplies, spare parts and machinery maintenance services 


92. Travel, Advertising and Promotion 





7.3.3 From Purchases to Economic Impact 

The second stage in the analysis entails using the input/output model 
supplied by Woods Gordon to identify the direct and indirect job and income creation in 
Ontario that results from the purchases of EP goods and services. This estimate includes 



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Woods Gordon 

the direct job and income creation for EP suppliers, the indirect job and income creation 
among firms supplying raw materials and other factors of production to these EP firms, 
and the jobs and income induced by the spending of the income generated by the EP 
industry and its suppliers. 

Guide to the Model Structure 

The accompanying diskettes provide the framework for calculating both the 
employment and income impact of purchases in each of the 92 expenditure categories, or 
for products that are certain to be supplied by Ontario producers, for each of 43 industry 
groups. Since general price inflation implies that any given dollar expenditure creates 
fewer jobs over time, the model incorporates an adjustment for the inflation that has taken 
place since 1979. 

The Environmental Protection Impact Model includes 175 rows and 27 
columns (labelled A to AA). (A sample print-out is appended to this manual.) The purpose 
of the columns is as follows: 

Column A: Name of Commodity or Ontario Industry producing it. There are 92 
commodity rows, used for goods purchased in Ontario and 43 industry 
rows, used for purchasers where the product or service is known to be 
produced in Ontario. Each industry name is followed by numbers in 
parentheses indicating the commodity categories produced by that industry. 
In row 169, if the firm being regulated will hire internal staff in response to 
environmental regulations, data on this employment is entered in this row. 
The final element in the first column is a total of the above. 

Column B: One-time expenditure. The dollar values of purchases to be made on a one- 
time basis (e.g. for the purchase and installation of equipment) are entered 
in this column, either by commodity, or for goods known to be produced in 
Ontario, by the industry supplying them. In row 135, the wages to be paid 
to employees hired by the firm for the installation period only are entered. 

Column C: Repeat purchases. The annual expenditures required on materials, supplies 
and other items to be purchased repeatedly as a part of environmental 
protection activities are entered in this column. Again, the expenditures are 
separated into commodities purchased in Ontario but not necessarily 
produced here, products to be purchased from Ontario manufacturers or 
service providers, and the annual wages of long-term environmental 
protection employees. 

Column D: GDP multipliers. These multipliers are used in calculating the total direct, 
indirect and induced impacts of expenditures or production on Ontario's 
economic output. The data have already been entered, and will not need 



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Woods Gordon 



Column E: 



Column F: 



Column G: 



Column H: 



Column I: 



Column J: 



Column K: 
Column L: 



alteration unless Statistics Canada releases a revised version of the 
Interprovincial model, which it does only every few years, 

1979 employment multipliers. These multipliers, which are the most recent 
available, are used in calculating total Ontario employment impacts. The 
data have already been entered, and will not need alternation unless 
Statistics Canada releases a revised version of the Interprovincial model, 
which it does only every few years. 

Employment deflators. These adjust the employment multipliers for the fact 
that inflation implies that each dollar of expenditures creates fewer jobs over 
time. The deflators are drawn from the Industry Selling Price Index or the 
GDP deflator that corresponds to the industry or commodity in that row 1 . 
A related part of the model that allows the Ministry to periodically update 
these deflators as new data becomes available is discussed below. 

1987 (or later year if deflators have been updated) employment deflators. 
These are calculated automatically by the model as the product of Columns 
E and F. 

Once the expenditure data have been entered, columns H to M will show the 
one-time and continuous, annual employment and GDP impacts. Column 
H shows the one-time impact on Ontario GDP generated by one-time 
investments in environmental protection goods and services. 

Shows repeated, annual GDP impact of continuous expenditures on EP 
goods and services. For example, if a regulation requires a firm to spend a 
given amount annually on chemicals for water treatment, the entry in this 
column shows the amount by which Ontario's annual GDP will be 
(permanently) raised. 

Total GDP impact. Shows the sum of columns H and I, which can be 
interpreted as the increase in annual GDP in the first year of the EP 
program, assuming all of the one-time investments were expended in the 
first year. 

One-time employment impacts. The number of person-years of 
employment tied to the one-time GDP impacts shown in Column H. 

Annual employment impact. Employment in person-years tied to the 
annual, repeated GDP impacts shown in Column I. 



L Technically, the precise deflator for each row is a function not only of the inflation in the prices for the 
particular commodity being purchased, but is also, to a lesser extent, dependent upon inflation in all other 
sectors which are affected by the economic spinoffs from sales of the commodity. We will ignore this 
complication, and fotlow our usual practice of deflating by the price index (GDP deflator or Industry Selling 
Price Index) which applies most direcdy to the production of the commodity bemg purchased or the industry 
producing it. 



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Woods Gordon 

Column M: Total employment impact. Shows the sum of columns K and L, which can 
be interpreted as the job creation corresponding to the GDP impact shown in 
Column J. 

The remaining columns are used to update column F as new inflation 
figures are released in the future. This updating feature of the model is discussed in 
Section 7.4. The rows in the model (excluding those used for titles and underlines) are 
organized as follows: 

Rows 14-105: 

Used to enter data and compute results for expenditures on environmental 
protection goods and services by Ontario firms, where the source of the 
products is not known. Each row corresponds to one of 92 commodities. 

Row 106: Calculates subtotals, equal to the sum of entries in rows 14-105 (excepts for 
multiplier and deflator columns). These subtotals capture the total spending 
on commodities not known to be supplied by Ontario firms and the total 
GDP and employment impacts generated by such purchases. 

Rows 118-160: 

Used to enter data and compute results for expenditures on Ontario 
manufactured goods or services known to be provided by Ontario-based 
firms. Each row corresponds to one of 43 Ontario industries. 

Row 163: Calculates a subtotal, equal to the sum of entries in rows 1 18 to 160. These 
subtotals capture the total spending on commodities known to be supplied 
by Ontario firms and the total GDP and employment impacts generated by 
such purchases. 

Row 169: Used to enter data and calculate the total employment and GDP impact 
generated by the wages paid to in-house EP personnel. 

Row 173; Calculates the sum of rows 106, 163 and 169. The GDP and employment 
impact entries in these rows are overall totals for the impacts of 
environmental protection spending. 

The estimates for job creation generated by the model are adjusted for 
inflation to average 1987 prices. If the Ministry wishes to approximate employment 
impacts for 1988, it could deflate the estimates produced by the model by 4% (i.e., divide 
all employment estimates generated by the model by 1.04) the average, year-over-year 
growth in the overall GDP deflator expected to be shown for 1988. 

The individual industry/commodity deflators for 1988 will be available in 
the spring of 1989. To enable the Ministry to be able to easily update the model for use in 



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Woods Gordon 

subsequent years, we have created a second spreadsheet linked to the EPIM, which updates 
the appropriate deflators for each row that appear in column F. The use of this updating 
spreadsheet, which appears in columns O to AA, is discussed below in Section 7.4. 

Using the Model 

Step 1: Data Entry 

The user enters the estimated direct expenditures (in dollars) arising from a 
change in environmental protection standards in columns B and C, with one-time 
expenditures entered in column B and the annual value of expenditures to be repeated each 
year entered in column C Rows 14-105 are used for commodities that will be purchased by 
Ontario companies to meet environmental standards, where the source of the product or 
service is unknown. 

In other cases, the Ministry will have been able to ascertain that the products 
will be produced by an Ontario manufacturer or supplied by a local service firm. In such 
cases, the value of the items to be purchased is entered in rows 1 18 to 160, according to the 
industry responsible, (The commodities produced by each industry are indicated by their 
commodity number - 1 to 92 - in parentheses beside the industry name.) In the case of 
manufactured goods, only items known to be locally manufactured (as opposed to 
distributed) should be entered by industry rather than commodity. For high-value items, 
the Ministry may wish to check that suppliers listed by survey respondents as the source of 
Ontario-made goods in fact manufacture these products in Ontario. The publication Made 
In Ontario, produced by the Ontario Ministry of Industry, Trade and Technology, could be 
used to do this as an alternative to contacting the suppliers direcdy. 

In some cases, the firm may hire in-house personnel to run the EP facilities. 
The direct hiring of an EP employee in Ontario will have spin-off benefits as a result of the 
employee's spending of his or her wages. 

These employees are not generally typical of production employees, since 
the purchases of materials that accompany their employment may be quite different from 
those in the main production end of the business. We believe that the impact of hiring these 
employees would more closely approximate the impact of additional labour income in the 



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Woods Gordon 

business services sector, rather than the industrial sector in which the person is actually 
employed. 1 

In the EPIM, these additional impacts are calculated by entering the total 
annual wages paid to in-house EP personnel hired in response to the regulation under 
consideration in row 169 in columns B (for temporary employees) and C (for permanent 
additional employment). The appropriate impact multipliers to translate these labour 
income figures into employment and GDP creation are already entered in the model, and the 
total job and income benefits appear in columns H to M. 

Columns D and E contain the employment and income multipliers for 
Ontario purchases of each commodity or for production by each industry. These need not 
be changed. From time to time (about once every five years; the 1979 version dates from 
1984) the Input-Output Division of Statistics Canada does provide updated multiplier 
estimates. These often do not show large changes from earlier estimates. Should the 
Ministry wish to update its model, it could select to use the revised Statistics Canada 
multipliers for Ontario. 

Step 2; Interpreting the Results 

Estimates for the total GDP and employment generated directly and indirectly by 
expenditures on environmental protection are displayed by the EPIM in columns H to M. 
The data in each row correspond to the impact of expenditures on the commodity (or 
industry) listed in the first column of that row. The totals for all expenditures are given in 
line 173, in columns H to M. The interpretation of these columns is as described in the 
previous Section. 

As noted above, employment estimates assume that the expenditures under 
consideration occurred at average 1987 prices, the most recent year for which price 



Note that the multiplier applied here is the one relating to production of Service to Business in Ontario 
(i.e., from the industry dimension of the model) rather than the purchase of business services as in the 
commodity classification used to measure the impact of outside consultants. The multiplier on the former 
is higher, because one is assuming that the initial production of the service takes place in Ontario (since we 
know that the employee is an Ontario resident). In the case of the commodity multiplier applied on outside 
consulting services, only the purchase is assumed to be in Ontario; on average, some of the work may be 
done by individuals not resident m the province, and the model allows for the resulting diminution of the 
Ontario impact. 



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deflators are available. To approximate results for expenditures at 1988 prices, (in lieu of 
individual deflators which will not be available until early 1989) the Ministry could divide 
the employment estimates generated by the model by 1.04, based on an expected year-over- 
year rate of inflation for 1988 of 4%. It is not necessary to adjust the GDP estimates for 
inflation; these estimates are automatically expressed in the same nominal terms (current 
dollars) as the expenditures used to generate them. 

7.3.4 An Example 

The use of the model can be best understood by seeing its application in a 
hypothetical case. Suppose, for example, that a new regulation would lead to the following 
mix of expenditures: 

Uncertain Sources of Supply: 

Tanks (one-time purchase) S 1 ,000,000 

Machinery (one-time purchase) $2,000,000 

Industrial Chemicals (repeat purchase, annual spending) $500,000 

Will Be Purchased From Ontario Manufacturers or Service Firms 

Scientific Instruments (one-time purchase) $500,000 

Construction (one-time purchase) $ 1 ,000,000,000 

Repair Construction (repeat, annual purchase) $500,000 

In -House EP Staff Hired in Response to Regulation 

1 Temporary Construction Project Manager (1 year wages) $45,000 
1 Permanent Engineer (annual wages) $60,000 

The tables appended show how the data are entered in the EPIM and how 
the results would appear for this example. Note that the products known to be purchased 
from Ontario companies are entered in the corresponding industry row. The construction 
purchases, for example, are entered in the row for the "Construction Industry", rather than 
in the rows for the commodities "Non-Residential Construction" or "Repair Construction". 
Items where the source of supply is not known are entered in the commodity rows. 



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Woods Gordon 

The final row of the printout shows that, if the one-time expenditures occur 
in the first year after the regulation takes place, there would be a total of 26,142 jobs 
created in that year in Ontario as a result of the EP spending, which would be associated 
with the generation of $1,031 million in GDP in the province. In subsequent years, the 
employment of the in-house engineer, and the purchases of industrial chemicals, continue 
to generate 23 jobs in Ontario, and $0.8 million in GDP annually. 

The employment estimates assume the expenditures are evaluated at average 
1987 prices. If they in fact were to occur in 1988, the job creation estimates would be 
reduced by roughly 4%. 

7.4 Updating the Model for Inflation After 1987 

The deflators in the model are based on two sets of industry price indexes. 
For some industries, we have used the Industrial Product Price Index (IPPI) (formerly 
known as the Industry Selling Price Index), which was available for 1987 at the time this 
model was created. For other industries, for which no suitable IPPI exists, we have used 
the GDP price deflator for that industry to account for inflation from 1979 to 1984, (the 
most recent year for which the required nominal GDP data by industry are available) and 
the overall GDP price deflator (covering the aggregate production by all industries) to 
capture inflation from 1984 to 1987. 

By the spring of 1989, the IPPI and the overall GDP deflator will be 
available for 1988, while industry level nominal GDP data will be available for 1985. A 
linked spreadsheet has been created to update the model for inflation in 1988 (and for 
further updates in later years). This table, which calculates the employment deflator in 
column F of the impact model, is found in columns O to AA and rows 1 to 175. 

There are four steps involved in using the updating tables: 

(1) For rows with entries now appearing in columns V to AA, the average current 
year (i.e., in the first updating, 1988) level of the Industry Price Index (1981 
base year) named in column V should be entered. These statistics are extracted 
from Statistics Canada catalogue 62-011. Entering these index levels will 
automatically update the deflators in column F of the EPIM for those rows. 
Rows with no entries in columns V to AA should not be altered in this step. 

(2) For all other rows, with entries now appearing in columns O to U, three steps 
are required. First, one enters the 1985 real GDP for that industry in column 
Q. This data is extracted from Statistics Canada catalogue 15-001. 



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Woods Gordon 

(3) The second step for these rows is to enter the 1985 nominal GDP for that 
industry in column S. This data is extracted from Statistics Canada catalogue 
15-512. 

(4) The final step for these rows is to enter the 1985 and 1988 levels for the overall 
GDP deflator in row 175, in columns T and U respectively. These are 
extracted from the Bank of Canada Review, Table H4. The completion of 
steps (2) to (4) will automatically update the remaining entries in column F of 
the EPIM. 

For the interested reader, the following is a brief description of the structure 
of the updating model: 

The 1979 employment multiplier is deflated using either the industry price 
index or the GDP deflator, depending upon which most closely matches the commodity or 
industry description of the input-output model. Columns O to U contain the calculations 
based on GDP at factor cost. Columns V to AA contain those calculations based on the 
industry price index. The definitions of these columns are as follows: 

Column O: Industry or commodity classification corresponding to GDP at factor cost. 
This description roughly corresponds with the industry / commodity class in 
the input-output model. 

Column P: This column contains the 1979 GDP at factor cost in 1981 constant dollars 
This figure need not be updated unless Statistics Canada releases a new 
input-output model requiring the base year of the employment multiplier to 
be changed. 

Column Q: GDP at factor cost in constant 1981 dollars for the most recent year for 
which GDP in current dollars is also available by industry. Currently, this 
column contains 1984 data. 

Column R: GDP at factor cost for the industry in current (1979) dollars. This figure 
need not be updated unless Statistics Canada releases a new input-output 
model requiring the base year of the employment multiplier to be changed. 

Column S: GDP at factor cost for the industry in current dollars for the most recent year 
available. Currendy, this column contains 1984 data. 

Column T: GDP deflator (1979 = 1) for the industry in the year used in columns P and 
S, currently 1984. This is automatically calculated as the product of the 
entries in column S divided by the entries in column Q times the entries in 
column P divided by the entries in column R. 

Column U: Estimated GDP deflator (1979 = 1) for the industry in 1987 (or the year for 
which the model is being updated). This is calculated as the product of the 
column S (currently 1984) level times the growth in the overall GDP 
deflator over 1984 (or more recent year if column S has been updated) to 



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1987 (or more recent year). The latter is calculated automatically once the 
GDP index levels for the year used in columns P and S (currently 1984) and 
for the current year (1987 in the current version) have been entered in cells 
T175 and U 175 respectively. 

Column V: The name of the Industrial Product Price Index used in columns W and X. 

Column W: The 1979 Industrial Product Price Index (base year 1971). This number 
does not need to be updated unless Statistics Canada releases a new input- 
output model. 

Column X: Current year Industrial Product Price Index (base year 1981). 

Column Y: The TPPI has been reclassified in the last several years and not all of the data 
have been revised back to 1979. This column, the link factor, converts 
current indexes back to the 1971 base year in order that a continuous series 
can be calculated. This column does not need to be changed. 

Column Z: This column contains the current year's data, indexed to 1971 and is 
calculated automatically by multiplying the entries in columns X and Y. 

Column AA: The deflator is calculated by dividing the current year's price index 
(1971=100) by the 1979 price index (1971=100). 

The employment deflator in column F of the EPIM will automatically be set equal to 
column U if the GDP deflator is used or column AA if the industry price index is used. 
The calculations for each deflator appear on the same row as the corresponding industry or 
commodity category in the EPIM. 



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APPENDIX I 

SURVEY OF POLLUTION CONTROL EXPENDITURES 

This form should be completed by the Engineer or other official who is most directly 
responsible for environmental protection measures at your establishment. Enter data 
applicable to your establishment (plant, refinery etc.) only, rather than for your company as 
a whole. 

Title of Person Completing This Form: 

Description of Our Establishment (Plant): 

Our establishment is primarily in the following industries (list in order of importance): 

1. 



Other 



Our total annual sales of Ontario-made products is (this information will be used only to 
ensure that our survey sample is representative of the industry) 

to $1 million □ $1 to $9 million □ 

$10 to $49 million □ $50 to $199 million □ 

$200 to $499 million □ $500 million or over D 

Expenditures Required to Meet Proposed New Regulation: 

While it may be too early to precisely identify how your establishment will meet the new 
regulations, we ask you to give us your best estimate of the costs you will face in doing so. 
We of course recognize that these may be rough estimates only. 



We expect to spend $ annually on the wages of permanent 

employees (e.g., engineers, other staff) hired in order to comply with the new regularion 

We will also spend S annually on the wages of temporary 

employees (to be employed 1 year or less) hired in order to comply with the new 
regulation . Enter zeros if appropriate. Include only in-house employees, 
rather than consultants. 



On the accompanying forms, record estimates of the expenditures that you anticipate 
your establishment will have to make in order to meet the new regulation, broken down by 
commodity category. While the form is quite detailed, it is likely that most of the categories 
will not apply. The form is accompanied by a guide to the commodity classes, which lists 
commonly purchased environmental protection products in the appropriate classes. One- 
time expenditures are entered in the first column; continuing, annual expenditures are 
entered in the second column. Please do not use abbreviations (K, M) for thousands or 
millions. 

If more than one commodity category appears to apply, use the one that corresponds 
closest to the finished product purchased. For example, an aluminum tank should be 
classified under "Boilers, Tanks and Plates" rather than "Aluminum Products". If you are 
uncertain as to which category an expenditure belongs, please describe the product and the 
dollar amount purchased in the space provided at the bottom of the form. 

Both end-of-line pollution control spending and spending on changes in the production 
process designed to meet new regulatory requirements should be included. For the latter, 
include both one-time capital spending and any repeat purchases of additional volumes of 
raw materials that would otherwise not be needed in your current production process. 
Should these process changes lead to reduced purchasing of other commodities, enter these 
reductions as negative values in the table. 



GUIDE TO COMMODITY CLASSES 
EXAMPLES OF POSSIBLE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION GOODS 


Commodity Class 


Examples 


27. Tires and Tubes 


Truck tires 


28. Other Rubber Products 


Rubber hoses and tubing 


29. Plastic Fabricated Products 


Plastic hose, pipe sheet and fitting, containers 


38. Other Wood Fabricated Materials 


Prefab wood buildings, wood containers 


42. Paper Products 


Paper bags, boxes 


50. Boilers, Tanks and Plates 


boilers, tanks, water/steam heating equip. 


51. Fabricated Structural Metal Products 


scaffolding, metal prefabricated buildings 


52. Other Metal Fabricated Products 


metal pipes, fittings, sidings, pails, ash cans, containers, wire, 
chains, hardware, air heating eq, water tank heaters, fuel burning 
eq, custom metal working, forgings, valves, non-ferrous 

pipe fittings, gas/water meters, collapsible metal rubes 


54. Other Industrial Machinery 


pumps, compressors, blowers, conveyers, hoists, 
ind. trucks/tractors/trailers fans, air circulators, air units, 
lubr. eq, ind. fumaces/kilns/ovens, refrigeration/cooling eq. 
scales, other machinery 


55. Motor Vehicles 


commercial trucks 


56. Motor Vehicle Parts 


truck parts 


57. Other Transport Equip 


rail cars 


59. Other Electrical Products 


data transmission equip, electronics, transformers, ind. electr. eq. 
electric wire. 


60. Cement and Concrete Products 


concrete, sand lime bricks, cement 


61. Other Non-Metallic Mineral Prod. 


asbestos filters, insulation, porcelain insulators &. plumbing, glass 


64. Industrial Chemicals 


Chlorine, other chemicals 


67. Other Chemical Products 


Boiler chemicals, agricultural chemicals, . ind. chem. prep'tions 


68. Scientific Equipment 


lab apparatus, measuring and control instruments 


71. Non- Residential Construction 


contracting for EP facilities construction 


72. Repair Construction 




74. Transportation and Storage 


Waste hauling, storage, barges, rail 


76. Telephone and Telegraph 


data transmission services 


78. Electric Power 


electrical utilities 


79. Other Utilities 


water, gas utilities 


84. Business Services 


consulting engineering, DP equip, rentals 


85. Education Services 


employee trainine 


1 89. Other Personal and Misc. Services 


construction eqiup. rentals 


|91. Operating, Office, Lab and Food 


lab sutrolies, snare parts and machinery maintenance services 



PURCHASES REQUIRED TO MEET THE PROPOSED REGUUATORY 
CHANGE - BY COMMODITY PURCHASED 


Commodity Class 


One-Time 

Purchases 

($ at Current Prices) 


Annual, Repeat 

Purchases 

(Annual $ of Spending 

at Current Prices) 


1. Grains 






2. Live Animals 






3. Other Agricultural Products 






4. Forestry Products 






5. Fish Landings 






6. Hunting and Trapping Products 






7. Iron Ores and Concentrates 






8. Other Metal. Ores/Concentrates 






9. Coal 






10. Crude Mineral Oils 






11. Natural Gas 






12. Non-Metallic Minerals 






13. Services Incidental to Mining 






14. Meat Products 






15. Dairv Products 






16. Fish Products 






17. Fruits/Veg. Preparations 






18. Feeds 






19. Flour, Wheat, Meal, other Cereals 






20. Breakfast Cereals 






21. Sugar 






22. Misc. Food Products 






23. Soft Drinks 






24. Alcoholic Beverages 






25. Tobacco Processed Unmanufactured 






26. Cigarettes & Tobacco Mfg 






27. Tires and Tubes 






28. Other Rubber Products 






29. Plastic Fabricated Products 






30. Leather & Leather Products 






31. Yams and Man-made Fibres 






32. Fabrics 






33. Other Textile Products 






34. Hosierv and Knitted Wear 






35. Clothing and Accessories 






36. Lumber and Timber 






37. Veneer and Plvwood 






38. Other Wood Fabricated Materials 






39. Furniture and Fixtures 






40. Pulp 






41. Newsprint and Other Paper Stock 






42. Paper Products 






43. Printing and Publishing 






44. Advertising, Print Media 






45, Iron and Steel Products 






46. Aluminum Products 






47. Copper and Copper Allov Products 







48. Nickel Products 






49. Other Non-Ferrous Metal Products 






50. Boilers, Tanks and Plates 






51. Fabricated Structural Metal Products 






52. Other Metal Fabricated Products 






53. Agricultural Machinerv 






54. Other Industrial Machinery 






55. Motor Vehicles 






56. Motor Vehicle Parts 






57. Other Transport Equip 






58. Aopliances/Receivers - household 






59. Other Electrical Products 






60. Cement and Concrete Products 






61. Other Non-Metallic Mineral Prod. 






62. Gasoline and Fuel Oil 






63. Other Petroleum and Coal Prod. 






64. Industrial Chemicals 






65. Fertilizers 






66. Pharmaceuticals 






67, Other Chemical Products 






68. Scientific Equipment 






69. Other Manufactured Products 






70. Residential Construction 






71. Non- Residential Construction 






72. Repair Construction 






73. Pipeline Construction 






74. Transportation and Storage 






75. Radio and Television Broadcasting 






76. Telephone and Telegraph 






77. Postal Services 






78. Electric Power 






79. Other Utilities 






80. Wholesale Margins 






81. Retail Margins 






82. Imputed Rent-Owner Occ. Dwellings 






83. Other Fin.. Insurance, Real Est. 






84. Business Services 






85. Education Services 






86. Health Services 




j 


87. Amusement and Recr. Services 




j 


88. Accommodation and Food Services 






89. Other Personal and Misc. Services 






90. Transportation Margins 






91. Operatine. Office. Lab and Food 






92. Travel. Advertising and Promotion 






UNABLE TO CLASSIFY: 

Desrlption of Product/Service: 

(Attach Additional Sheet if Necessary) 


PLEASE REMEMBER TO ENT 
PRODUCTS 


LR EXPENDITURES FOR THESE 



Sources of Supply: Please check one of the following boxes: 

A: I — I All of the above commodities will be purchased from suppliers outside 
Ontario or from Ontario distributors of imported products: 

B: I — I Some or all of the above commodities will be purchased from Ontario 
suppliers, excluding Ontario distributors of foreign products. 

C: ! — I We do not know where any of the commodities will be purchased 



If you checked B, please list the Ontario suppliers and the commodities to 
be purchased from each on the next page. Include products that you will 
buy from an Ontario firm if you are uncertain whether they are made here. 

Use a separate entry for each commodity or supplier. Attach additional sheets if necessary. 



. 



# (1-92) 



Commodity 



Name 



$ of Purchases 
One-Time Annual 



Expected Supplier 
(Name of Company) 



APPENDIX II 

SAMPLE OUTPUT FROM THE ENVIRONMENTAL 
PROTECTION IMPACT MODEL 



EHPLOTHEHI OtFlAIOKS 



CQHHOOITf / INDUSTRY 



GDP Deflator 



GDP >t Factor Cost GDP at Factor Cost 
(H981 constant) (Current Dollars) 



1979 



Deflator 

1984 



Deflator Industry Price Indices 
Current Tear 



Table I 

IHPAC1 Of PURCHASE OF EKVlBOMHf. Hitl 

PROTECTION GOODS/SERVICES 



Current year 
1979 (196?) 

1971=100 i9ai=ifio 



Link 

f he tor 



Current year 

M9B7) Current year 
1971=100 Deflator 



Grain* 

L ive Animals 

Other Agricultural Products 

Forestry Product! 

Fish landings 

Hunting 1 Trapping Products 

Iron Ores I Concentrates 

Other Metal. Ores/Concent rates 

Coal 

Crude Mineral Oils 

Natural Gas 

Non-Metallic Minerals 

Services Incidental to Mining 

Heal Products 

Dairy Products 

Fish Products 

Fruits t Vegetables Preparations 

Feeds 

Flour Wheat, Meal, other Cereals 

Breakfast Cereals 

Sugar 

Miscellaneous Food Products 

Soft Drinks 

Alcoholic Beverages 

Tobacco Processed Urmanufactured 

Cigarettes 1 Tobacco Mfg. 

Tires and lubes 

Other Rubber Products 

Plastic Fabricated Products 

Leather L Leather Products 

Tarns and Man-made Fibres 

Fabric* 

Other Teittile Products 

Hosiery and Knitted Wear 

Clothing and Accessories 

lumber and Timber 

Veneer end Plywood 

Other Uood Fabricated Materials 

Furniture and Fixtures 

Pulp 

Newsprint and Other Paper Stock 

Paper Products 

Printing and Publishing 

Advertising, Print Media 

iron and Steel Products 

Aluminum Products 

Copper and Copper Alloy Products 

nickel Products 

Other Non-Ferrous Metal Products 

Boilers, Tanks and Plates 

Fabricated structural Metal Products 

Other Metal fabricated Products 

Agricultural Machinery 

Other Industrial Machinery 

Motor Vehicles 

Motor Vehicle Paris 

Other Transport Equipment 

Afxjl I antes/Receivers ■ household 

Oilier Electrical Produ*rs 

Cement Jin* concrete products 
Olhei Hon i.jt-l.il I it Hinei al Precfuc 
Gasoline <ii id Fuel Oil 
Other Pen ulomp and Coal Products 



Services Related to Mineral Extract 1,545.5 1.980.1 1,217.8 2,354.1 



Plastic products 



950.0 1.180.4 763.1 1,300.6 



Printing i Publishing 
Business Service Industries 



2.B90.I 3,154.7 2,318.8 4,134.4 
7,3B0.9 111264.4 7;iOJ.2 13:270.8 



1.65 
1.22 



Iransportdt ion Equipment Industries 7,5U6l 6,515.6 5,725.4 10,657.7 



1.45 



1.52 



Vegetable Products 

Annul 1 Animal Products 

Vegetable Products 

Uood 

Animal i Animal Products 

Animal I Annul Products 

Ferrous Metals 

Non-ferrous Metals 

Mineral Fuels 

Mineral Fuels 

Mineral Fuels 

Hon Metallic Minerals 

Meat 1 Heat Products Industry 

Dairy Products Industries 

Fish Products Industry 

Canned t Preserved fruit I Vegetabl 

Feed Industry 

Flour I Prepared Cereals Industries 

Flour I Prepared Cereals Industries 

Cane 1 Beet Sugar Industry 

Food 1 Beverages Industries 

Soft Drink Industry 

Distillery Products Industry 

Tobacco Products Industries 

Tobacco Products Industries 

lire* and Tube Industry 

Miscellaneous Rubber Products Indus 



1.81 
1. 34 



Leather 1 Allied Products Industrie 

Wool Tarn 1 Woven Cloth Industries 

Uool Tarn I Woven Cloth Industries 

Wool Tarn 1 Woven Cloth Industries 

Hosiery Industry 

Men's 1 toys' Clothing Industries 

Sawmill 1 Planing Mill Products Ind 

Veneer 4 Plywood Industries 

Wood Industries 

furniture t Fixtures Industries 

Pulp £ Paper Industries 

Newsprint, Domestic Market 

Paper t Allied Products Industries 



Primary Metal Industries 
Aluminum Rolling, Casting 1 ExtruUi 
Copper Rolling Casting I Extruding 
Non-ferrous Metal Smelting t Refin] 
Non-ferrous Metal Smelling I Setinl 
Power Boiler I Heat Exchuntjer Indus 
Fabricated Metal Products 
Fabricated Metal Products 
Agricultural Implement Industry 
Miscellaneous Machinery i, Equipment 
Motor Vehicles Industry 
Molar Vehicle Carts 1 Accessor its 

Record Player, K.idiu I 1 .V. Receive 
Electrical and clectionit PredkiCta 
hnn Krl.il I ii Mineral ProtftJct* Indus 
Nnm Hl-ijI I u Mineial froducfes Irakis 

Refined Petrol eta i C<ul l'i i. L . 

Kefintd Petroleum 1 Co.il h kIu is 



114. B 


84. 6 


1.359 


114.97 


1.00 


141.7 


119.0 


1.558 


185.40 


HI 


114. | 


84.6 


1.159 


114.97 


142.0 


121.1 


1.504 


1B2.11 


!:i» 


145.7 


119.0 


I.55B 


185.40 


141. 7 


119.0 


I.55B 


185.40 


1.29 


135.9 


108.8 


1.170 


149.06 


1.10 


162.2 


102.3 


1.779 


181.99 


1.12 


131.1 


93.9 


2.126 


218.41 


1.64 


131.1 


93.9 


2.126 


218.41 


1.64 


I1J.1 


91.9 


2.326 


213.41 


1.64 


116.0 


127.9 


1.654 


211.55 


1.82 


243.1 
222.9 


11B.0 


2,596 


306.33 


1.26 
1.76 


136.0 


2.880 


391.68 


294.2 


141.2 


3.270 


461.72 


1.57 
1.75 


204.3 


115.8 


2.629 


356.88 


219.0 


95.0 


2.574 
5.241 


244.53 


1.12 


246.6 


119.5 


587.50 


1.57 


246.6 


119.5 


5.241 


387.30 


1.57 


216.6 


100.2 


2.775 


277. as 


1.28 
1.52 


211.7 


124.6 


2.828 


352.37 


210.6 


124.9 


3.085 


385 32 


1.67 


147.4 


112.0 


1.814 


219.45 


1.62 


159.6 


151.9 


1-952 


293.47 


1.84 


159.6 


151.9 


1.932 


293.4 7 


1.84 


158. 4 


107.6 


2.128 


228.97 


1.45 


183.0 


125.8 


2.550 


518.27 


1.74 


239.3 


128.2 


2.604 


333.81 


1.40 


204.9 


120.6 


2.485 


299.69 


1.46 


204.9 


120.6 


2.485 


299.69 


1.46 


204.9 


120.6 


2.485 


299.69 


1.46 


116.1 


122.0 


1.618 


197.40 


1.45 


196.0 


121.8 


2.426 


295.49 


1.51 


274.7 


119.2 


2.309 


275.21 


1.00 


242.2 


115.1 


2.556 


294.20 


1.21 


260.8 


121.8 


2.410 


295.97 


1.13 


208.9 


152.8 


2.645 


151.26 


1.68 


25B.2 


126.5 


3.340 


422.51 


1.64 


224.4 


136.2 


2 891 


193.75 


1 .75 


239.6 


128.1 


1.085 


395.55 


1.65 


258. 8 


112. fl 


3 Oil 


341.90 


1.32 


234.0 


117.0 


2.844 


332.75 


1.42 


201.8 


108.5 


2.101 


228. IB 


1.13 


305.9 


106.5 


3.495 


172.22 


1.22 


103.9 


106.5 


1.495 


372.22 


1.22 


274.9 


141.5 


1.055 


432.28 


1.57 


211.5 


126.5 


2.576 


325. 86 


1.54 


211.5 


126.5 


2.576 


125.86 


1.54 


206.0 


115.7 


2.526 


142. 7B 


1.64 


198.6 


129.1 


2.495 


253.20 


1 .27 


161.4 


i is a 


1.862 


252. 86 


1 .57 


189.0 


122.1 


2.36B 


289.13 


1.53 


1 IV. 6 


99. 5 


1 105 


109.73 


0.92 


172.4 


121.8 


2 04 


248.47 


1 .44 


210 


154.5 


? 766 


371.4? 


1 . 7? 


2 1 , ll 


154.! 


2 166 


371.4/ 


1 77 


$21 ! 


101.8 


■j c.L'fl 


572. 1? 


1. 7H 


321 5 


101. U 


5 620 


572. 12 


1. 78 



mvlSUHHHtUL PHulKTIUN IHl-'ALT MXtl 



LuHHUUIT / IKUUS1H 



Table 1 

IMPAC! Of PURCHASE OF I HV I «.*M| . : II 

PROTECTION GOOOS/StSVlCES 



0NE-I1ME 

KPtNOITlJJtt 
<»> 



•<hu. 
tKPEHOIIUKl 

(IS 



COP 
multipi :n 



1MH KIMtN 

MllTIPl IC« 
(1979) 



rHKOTMtm 

OEFLATOD 

(1987) 



UK! ll» ANNUAL IOIAL 

Lf^If^I g"t; TlHt ANNUAL IOTAI EMPIOTMENT LMPlOYMcNI EHPLOlMtNl 

MUITIPL ER U)P IMPACT LDP IMPACT OOP IMPACT IMPACT IMPACT IMPACT 

(1987) <*) (*) (S) (persofryeaisl (peison years) (perSDn-ycmtl 



1. Grams 

2. Live Arnneli 

3. Other Agricultural Products 

4. forestry Product* 

5. Fish Lendinga 

6. Hunting 1 Trapping Products 
7 Iron Ores 1 Concentrates 

8. Other Metal. Ores/Concentrates 

9. Coal 

10. Crude Mineral OlU 

11. natural Gil 

12. Non-Metallic HineraU 

13. Services incidental to Mining 
K. Meat Product! 

15. Dairy Product* 

16. fish Product! 

17. fruit! 1 Vegetables Preparations 

18. fetdi 

19. flour. Wheat, Heal, other Cereal! 

20. ire.ll.it Cere. Is 

21. Sugar 

22. Miscellaneous Food Products 

25. Soft Or inks 

24. Alcoholic leverage* 

25. Tobacco Processed Unaanuractured 

26. Cigarette! i tobacco Mfg. 

27. Tires and lubes 

28. Other lubber Products 

29. Plastic Fabricated Product! 
50 Leather I leather Products 
51. Tarns and Man-made Fibres 
92. Fabrics 

53. Other lentil* Products 

34 Hosiery and Knitted year 

35. Clothing and Accessories 

36. Lunger and Tiaiber 

37. Veneer and Plywood 

58. Other wood Fabricated Materials 

39. Furniture and Futures 

40. Pulp 

41. Newsprint and Oiher Paper Stock 

42. Paper Products 

43. Printing and Publishing 

44. Advertising, Print Media 

45. Iron and Steel Products 

46. Aluminum Products 

47. Copper and Copper Alloy Products 

48. Nickel Products 

49. Other Non-Ferrous Metal Products 

50. Boilers Tanks and Plates 

51. Fabricated Structural Metal Products 

52. Other Metal Fabricated Products 

53. Agricultural Machinery 

54. Other Industrial Machinery 

55. Motor Vehicles 

56. Motor Vehicle Parts 

57. Other Transnor t i-guipinc-rii 

58. A(<}1 I ances/lteceivers • household 

59. Other electrical Products 

60. Cc-ffn-nt and Concrete Products 

61. Other h. .■-,.-. i >! i I, Mineral rVoduCts 

62. Gasoline uttl Fuel oil 

63 Olht-r PerrulL-un L n*J Cujl Product! 



2,000.000 



17 



0. 
0. 

5. 

o. 

0.268 

|:i 

0.160 
195 
0.321 

078 
0.136 
0.336 

0.204 
279 
0.185 
0.221 
0.216 
0.207 
0.295 
0.164 
0.099 
0.174 
0.177 
0,202 
0,170 
0.134 
0.296 
0.321 
0.118 
0.173 
0.251 
0.110 
0.457 
0-220 
0.152 
0.159 
166 
0.136 
0.23a 
290 
0.231 
0.067 
0.O77 
0.077 
013 
0.117 
0.096 
0.K? 
0.295 
0.204 
0.089 
101 



a 


0.118 
0.181 


Li 


2 


I 


| 


0.174 
0.282 
0.095 







2 


0.000 





:i 


0.055 





.t 


0.105 





6* 


0.002 





6- 


0.010 





. 6-< 


0.015 








0.098 





6 


0.224 
0.206 





2 





. 7 


0.153 





. i 


0.021 


i 


( 


IS 


A 


0.124 
0.204 


! 


. ? 


0.061 





.5 


0.089 







0.201 





ft 


0.126 
0.152 
0.101 
0.153 






i ft 





Fi 





0,124 
0.156 





i 





0.211 

> 0.112 





,i 





At 


> 0.068 





1.46 


0.119 





1.45 


0.122 





1.51 


0.134 





1.0C 
1.21 

1.1. 


0.170 





0.110 





0.261 





\M 


0.191 





1.64 


0.072 





1.75 


0.099 





1-65 


0.152 





1.81 


0.171 





1.36 


0.336 





1.32 


0.167 





1.42 


0.107 


n 


in 


0.141 





1 .22 


0.136 





1.22 


0.111 





1.57 


0.151 


595,000 


1.54 


0.188 


8 


1 54 


0.150 


1 U 


0.040 





1.2? 


0.060 


4(16, 000 


1.5; 


0.049 





1.53 


0.022 





1 N 


066 





0.92 


0. 105 


i 


1.44 


0.099 





1.77 


0. 167 


11 


1 7? 


U. 115 


II 


1.78 


OlbO 


a 


i n 


0.(157 


11 







595.000 




406,000 


[J 



8 





I) 

15 



i 

1 

12 



IJ 








ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION IMPACT MODEL 



COHHQOITr / INDUSTRY 



ONE- TIME 
EXPENDITURE 

til 



Industrial Chemical! 

Fertilizers 

Pharmaceut icels 

Other Chemical Products 

Scientific Equipment 

Other Manufactured Product* 

Residential Construction 

Noo residential Construe 1 1 an 

Repair Construction 

Pipeline Construction 

Transportation and Storage 

Radio and Television Broadcasting 

Telephone and Telegraph 

Postal Services 

Electric Power 

Other utilities 

Wholesale Margins 

■etail Margins 

Imputed Rent-Owner Occ 

Other fin.. Insurance, 

Business Services 

Education Services 

Health Services 

Amusement arid Recr. Services 

Accommodation and Food Services 

Other Personal and Misc. Services 

Transportation Margins 

Operating, Office, lab and Food 

Travel, Advertising and Promotion 



Dwell ings 
Real Estate 



ANNUAL 

EXPENDITURE 

(*> 



500,000 



GDP 
MULTIPLIER 



0.317 
.512 



EMPLOtMfNI 

MULTIPLIER 

(197V) 



■ 



:i 



EMPLOIMENI 

DEFLATOI) 

(1987) 



1.62 
1 -25 

1.41 
1.41 

'■*! 

1.(1 

1.63 
1-57 

1.57 

1.57 

1.79 

1.79 

I. to 

1.58 

1.74 

1.74 

1.16 

1.40 

.84 

.79 

.69 

:| 

1.16 
1.M 



(MPLOTHENI 
MUIIIPUER 

(1987) 



0.070 
0.139 
0.080 
0.0" 



0.250 
O.SoO 
0.286 
0.040 

:I 

0.210 
0.597 
0.137 
0.149 
0.251 
0.426 
0.041 
0.146 
0.266 
0.382 
0.205 
0.286 
0.376 
0.367 
0.140 
0.181 
0.278 



ONE- I IHf 

CDP IMPACT 

It) 



ANNUAL 

COP IMPACT 

<*> 



158,500 




ONE -TIME ANNUAL TOTAL 

TOTAL EMPLOYMENT EMPIOTMENI EMPIOTHEN1 

GOP IMPACT IMPACT IMPACT IMPACT 

(S) (person years) (person years) (person- year s) 



158.500 




1,000.000 



1.001,000 



158,500 



table 2 

IMPAC1 OF PURCHASING GOODS/SERVICES FROM 

IN ONTARIO MANUFACTURING OR SERVICE FIRM 



Agriculture (1-1) 

Forestry (4) 

Fishing. Hunting 1 Trapping (5-6) 



ishirn 
etal Mi 



Metal Mines (7.1) 
Mineral Fuels (9-11) 
■ml Mines (12) 
Jes Incidental |i_ 
Food t Beverage Industr 



Non- 
Services Incidental To Mining 111) 

lustry (14-24) 
Tobacco Products (25 26) 
Rubber 4 Plastics (27-29) 
Leather (30) 
Textile (31-11) 
Knitting Mills (14) 
Clothing (15) 
Wood (16- IB) 
Furniture I Fixtures (39) 
Paper 1 Allied Products (40 42) 
Printing i Publishing (43) 
Primary Metal Products (45) 
Metal Fabricating (46-50) 



cat ing 
Machinery (51-54) 
Transportation Equipment (55-57) 
Electrical Projects (56-59) 

Nonim-iall ic Mineral* (60.61) 
Petroleum I Coal Products (62 61) 
Chemical *. thi'inkul luin.n u-. U ;./) 
Miscellaneous H^i,i.„- ny (68.69) 



1.17 
1.21 

0.81 
1.04 
J. 64 
1.04 
1.65 
1.52 

1.84 
.74 
.40 
.46 
.46 
1.51 
1.13 
1.68 
1.65 
1.81 
1.32 
1.54 
1,27 
1.53 
1.44 
1.77 
1 78 
1.62 
1.80 



li 

n 
iv/ H'.n 



(i 

IvV.USO 



tNvmMHENUL PCOTECIION IMPACT Uttl 



commoditi / ihousikt 



</".> 



Construction (70-71) 

r i anspor t ■ t 1 0*1 and Storage 

Coan»#iication (75 7?) 

Electric Power, On (78,79) 

Uhotesale Trade (SO) 

Retail Trade (SI) 

Owner -Occupied Owel lings (SZ) 

Other Finance, Insurance (US 

Education t Health (85,86) 

Amusement t Heereation (67) 

Services to Business (44 84) 

Accoraodtit ion end Food (88) 

Other Personal and Misc. Services(S9) 

Transportation Margins (90) 

Operating. Office, Lab and food (91) 

Travel t Advertising (92) 



ONf-llMt 

EIPF.N0 1 TINE 

(f) 



1,000,000,000 



ANNUAL 

eipenoitum 
(») 



500,000 



Subtotal 1.000,500,000 



iuo.uoo 



Table 1 

IMPACT QF INHUUSE EP EMPLOYMENT 



avaaaca 



Services to Business 



45,000 



COP 

l I IPMtii 



1.029 
1.106 

0:939 

1.237 
1 522 

0,711 

:i 

1.096 
1.345 
1.117 
1.245 
0.711 
0.581 
0,844 



1.832 



EMpLorMEai 

MULTIPLIES 

(1979) 



EMPtOrwENI 

DEFLATOR 

(1987) 



. > 



EMPLOYMENT 
MLH.TIPLIEJ 

(1*87) 



0.261 

0.218 
0.319 
0,141 
0.J56 

128 
0.042 
0,201 
0.220 
0,289 
0.48? 
0.179 
0.411 
0-162 

1 1S3 
0.278 



1.16 



ONE TIME 

OOP IMPACT 

(t) 



1, 02V, 000, 000 



o 












1.114 



1,029,197,850 



82,440 



annual 

GDP IMPACT 

(t) 



514,500 



U«E TIME ANNUAL lulAl 

TOTAl IMPluTMENI LMPLOTMENl EMPLOTMEnI 

OOP IMPACT IMMC1 IMMi 1 IHpiil 

() (person-years) (person years) (person years) 



1,029.514,400 



26,076 


■J 

a 















514,500 1,029,9)2,150 



109,920 192,160 



26,08/ 



1) 




















IS 



26,089 



12 



avteAu total 1,001,5*5,000 



1,060,000 



1,010,481,290 782,920 1,011,264,210 



26,142 



IMPLOTHfNT DEFLATORS 



lOHMOOIIr / INDUSTRT 



GOP Deflator 



COP gl factor Cost COP it Factor Coat 
(11981 constant) (Current Oollart) 



Industrial Chemicals 

Fertiliiers 

Pharmaceuticals 

Other Chenicsl Product! 

Scientific Equipment 

Other Manufactured Products 

Residential Construction 

Ron- residential Construction 

Repair Construction 

Pipeline Construction 

Transportation and Storage 

Radio and Television »• oadcist in« 

Telephone and Telegraph 

Postal Services 

Electric Power 

Other Utilities 

wholesale Margins 

Retail Margins 

Imputed Dent Outer Oct. Duel lings 

Other Fin., Insurance, Real Estate 

•usiness Services 

Education Service* 

Health Services 

Amusement and leer. Services 

Accommodation and Food Services 

Other Personal and Misc. Services 

Transportation Margins 

Operating, Office, Lab and Food 

Travel, Advertising and Promotion 



197V 



Other Manufacturing Industries 
Other Manufacturing Industries 
Construct on 
Construct on 
Construct on 
Construct on 
Transportation 1 Storage 
Comuiication Industry 
Communication Industry 
Connunlcation Industry 
Other utility Industries 
Other Utility Industries 
Wholesale Trade 
Retail Trade 
Owner-occupied Duel lings 
Finance, Insurance i Heel Estate 
■usiness Service Industries 
Education Service Industries 
Health Services Industries 
Amusement i Recreation Services 
Accomodation ft food Services 
Personal ft Household Services 
Transportation Industries 
■usiness Service Industries 
■usiness Service Industries 



A 

19 
IS 

I nil 
t 

5 

1 

7 

1 

7 
7 



19 8-4 



879.7 
879.7 
460.7 
460.7 
460.7 
460.7 
467. 1 
196.2 
196.6 
196.6 
939.6 
939.6 
294.7 
162.9 
507.9 
321.4 
264.4 
730.4 
989.5 
961.5 
448. S 
441.4 
496.9 
264.4 
264.4 



197V 



I9B4 



288.4 
288.4 




Deflator 
1984 



Deflator Industry Price Indices 
Current Tear 



1979 
1971=100 



Current year 
1981=100 



so 

80 



Chemical t Chemical Products Indust 
Agricultural Chemicals industries 
Pharmaceutical I Medicine Industry 
Chemical I Chemical Products Indust 



.57 
,79 
.79 
.46 
58 
.74 
.74 
.56 
.40 

:£ 

.69 

:S 

.56 
.14 



214.9 
229.0 
153.1 

2H.9 



120.2 
102.2 
158.2 
120.2 



Link 
Factor 



Current year 

(1987} Current year 
!97l=l6o Deflator 



2.900 
2.810 
1.941 

2.900 



ica sa 

287.18 
1D7.07 
148.58 



1.62 
1.25 
2.01 
1.62 



able 2 

IMPACT OF PURCHASING GOODS/SERVICES FROM 
in ONTARIO MANUFACTURING OR SERVICE FIRM 



Agriculture (1-11 
forestry (4) 

Fishing, Hunting ft Trapping 
Metal Mines (7,1) 
Mineral Fuels (9-1 
Non-metal Mir 



15-41 



9-11) 
(12) 



Services Incidental to Mining {13) 
, (14 24) 
(25 26) 
(27-29) 



Food ft leverage Industr 
lobacco Products ' 
Rubber ft Plastics 

Leather (30) 
leitile (31-31) 
Knitting Mills (34) 
Clothing (15) 
Wood (36 38) 

Furniture t Fixtures (39) 
Paper ft Allied Products (40-42) 
Printing ft Publishing (41) 
Primary Metal Products (45 > 
Metal Fabricating (46-50) 
Machinery (51-54) 
Transpor tat Ion Equlrinent (55 57) 
. Electrical Products (58 59) 
Non-metallic Minerals (60.61) 
Peltaleuw I Coal Prciicls (62,64) 



Agriculture ft Related Service* 
Logging ft forestry 
Fishing Hutting, I Trapping 
Mining Industries 

Mining Industries 

Services Related to Mineral Extract 



9,190.5 

2,061.5 

478.6 

6.204.1 



Printing i Publishing 



ChL-micali I tlnrii*ual linlustr le-slj^ -h/) 

Mlstd I aiieijus Hanuf m. lui mtj (68,t9, Other HtifMsf *<. turwrg I iniVi^i r u % 



t 54 



10,677.3 

2,451. f 

516.4 

7.011.0 

7.011.0 
1.980.1 



8,267.1 
1 911.4 

*.81:J 

5.411.5 
037.8 



10,105.6 
2 504.1 

S.ffrt 

5,952.1 
2 354.1 



2,890.1 5,154.7 2,118.8 4,134.4 



1.661,8 1.8/9.7 1.208.4 2,1U2,S 



1.05 

1.09 
0.75 
0.94 

0.94 
1.48 



1.63 



1.17 
1.21 
0.8] 
1.04 

1.04 
1.65 



Mineral Fuels 



Food ft Beverages Industries 
lobacco Products Industries 
Miscellaneous Rubber Products Indus 
Leather ft Allied Products Industrie 
Wool Tarn ft Woven Cloth Industries 
Uool Tarn 1 Woven Cloih Industries 
Men's ft Roys' Clothing Industries 
Uood Industries 

Furniture ft Fixtures Industries 
Paper ft Allied Products Industries 
1.81 

Primary Metal Industries 
fabricated Metal Products 
Miscellaneous Machinery ft Equipment 
Motor vehicle Paris ft Accessories 
Electrical and Electronic Prtxlucti 
Nan Metallic Mineral Pi nduc 1 s Indu:, 
ReiiiK.i i : ti:„i,ni ft coal products 

Chemical a (hemual Prowls hidu^l 

l.liu lutdl. All I lodll p. ■-. 



151.1 



91.9 



218.41 



231.7 


124.6 


2.828 


352.37 


1.52 


159.6 


151.9 


1.932 


291.47 


1.84 


181.0 


125.8 


2.530 


31B.27 


1.74 


239.3 


128.2 


2.604 


3)1.83 


1.40 


204.9 


120.6 


2.485 


299.69 


1.46 


204.9 


120.6 


2. 485 


299.69 


1.46 


196.0 


121.8 


2.426 


295.49 


1.51 


260. S 


121.8 


2.450 


295.97 


1.13 


208.9 


152.8 


2.645 


351.26 


1.68 


239.6 


128.3 


3.0B3 


195 . 55 


1.65 


25SB 


112. B 


3.011 


141.90 


1.32 


211.5 


126.5 


2,576 


325.86 


1.54 


198.6 


129. 1 


2.4*5 


251.20 


1.27 


189.0 


122.1 


2,368 


289.13 


1.51 


172.4 


121. B 


2,040 


248.47 


1.44 


210.11 


134 1 


2.766 


371 47 


1.77 


321.3 


101. B 


5.620 


5?.'. 12 


1.7B 


214.9 


t?i) 2 


2.91)11 


na.^a 


1.62 


21/. 9 


mi .4 


2.694 


297,4.1 


1. it 



EWlOtHtNT UEFUIQUS 



COMNuDHT I IKOUSIRT 



OOP Deflator 



Construction (70-73) 
Transportation and Storage (74) 
Communlcat ion (75-77) 
Electric Power, On (76.7V) 
Wholesale Trade (BO) 
Detail Irade (SI) 
Owner -Occupied Dwellings <B2) 
Other Finance, Insurance (S3) 
Education 1 Health (65, 86) 
Amusement I Recreation (87) 
Services lo Business <ti Si) 
Accomodation and food (So) 
01 her Personal and Misc. Services 
Transportation Margins (90) 
Operating Office, lab and Food 
Travel t Advertising (92) 



Ui^ at Factor Cost 
(11981 constant) 

1979 



GOP at Factor Cost 
(Current dollars) 



Construct i un 21 

Transportation I] 

Cunranication Industry 

Other util ity Industries 6 

Wholesale Irade IS 

detail Trade 19 

Owner -occupied Dwellings 15 

Finance, Insurance t Heal Estate In41 
Education t Health Services (aggreg 5 



Anusement I Recreation Services 

Business Service Industries 

Accomodation t Food Services 
l8V)Personal 1 Household Services 

Transportation Industries 
IVDBusiness Service Industries 

Business Service Industries 



,440.4 
,044,2 
,196.7 
.420.8 
,448 6 
,738.1 
,378.9 
,314 9 
579.1 
,785 
,180.9 
,701.7 
,980.4 
,044.2 
,180 9 
.160.9 









Deflalur 


Deflator 


1984 


1979 1984 


1984 


Current fee 


21,440.7 


17.551.8 24,1)6.0 


1.27 


1 41 


11 


496.9 


10,411.4 17,761-2 


1.65 


1 6i 
1.57 


i 


196.6 


4,887.9 12,094.6 
6,941.0 13,221.2 
11,648.9 18,796.0 


1.41 


9 


919.6 


1.61 


1.79 


14 


294.7 


1.31 


1.46 


i\ 


362.9 


IS, 584.1 24,014.8 


1.42 


1 IS 


IV 


507.9 


12.762.5 25 391.9 


1.57 


1.74 


,6 


321.4 


34.251.0 40,146 X 


1.57 


1.74 


6 


720.1 


4,472.0 8,484.8 


1.61 


1.79 


1 


961.5 


1,490.1 2,447.7 


1.62 


1.79 


11 


264.4 


7,101.2 11,270.8 


1.22 


1.16 


! 


468.8 


4,494.6 9,553 


1.52 


1.69 


f 


441.6 


1,416.4 2 876.9 


1 41 


1.58 


M 


(96.9 


10,411.6 15,182.1 
7,101? 11 270 8 
7,101.2 11 270.8 


1.41 


1.57 


11 


264.4 


il 


1 16 


It 


264.4 


1.16 



Industry Price Irtliccs 



197V 

ivn = iu>i 



rrent year Current year 

[1987} link (196/1 Current year 

1981-100 factor 1971=100 Deflator 



lable 1 

IHPACI OF IK HOUSE EP EHFIOIHEHI 

Services to Business 



Business Service Industries 7,180.9 11,244.4 7,101.2 13,270.8 1.22 1.36 



UDP Implicit Price Indei 



1984 1987 

iis.o iii!i 



APPENDIX III 

LISTING OF FIRMS IN THE ONTARIO 
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION LNDUSTRY 



FEB 22. 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABET ICAlL' 9Y COMPANY 



2.6 

3-L FILTERS LIMITED 

P.O. BOX 371 

CAMBRIDGE ON. NIR 5VS 
MR. JCHN A. KADaR 



(519) 621-9949 



6.2 

40 COMPUTER CONSULTING 

P.O. BOX 1269 

RICHMOND ON KOA 2:0 
MR. C. 1 . DUFFET 



(613) 838-5655 



3.1 



'4i6, 789-1156 



a 1 a liquid haste removal 

1217 laurence avenue west 
toronto on m6a ie2 
vcr simmcns 
general manage? 



2.6 

A AND 8 PRECAST MFC LTD 

R.R. NO. 5 

BELLEVILLE ON K8N 425 
IK. C. ANDERSON 
PRESIDENT 



(6i3) 962-91 



9.0 

A REVZEN 5 CO LTD 

50 CLARENCt ST 
P BOX 271 
SRANTFORD ON N3T 2V8 
SYD MORRIS 



5 9) 756-9840 



A- 1 SEWERAGE SERVICES LTD 

R R 5 

HIGHWAY 17 

THUNDER SAT ON. R7C 5M9 



6. I (519) 966-4006 

A. A. BOSCARIOL AM) ASSOCIATES 

2881 WALKER ROAD 

WINDSOR ON. N8W 3R2 



6.2 

A.A.C. APPOINTMENTS 

102-4 3 EGLINTON E. 



TORONTO ON 
MR. CLIVE R 
PRESIDENT 



M4P IA2 

CROWE 



1416) 487-4441 



6.i 

A.B. BROGOEN LIMITED 

105 ONTARIO ST. 

SARNIA ON N7T IK9 
MR. ALLAN 9RCG0EN 
PRESIDENT 



(519) 34A-I67? 



6. 1 (416) 49I-95C8 

A.B. SCHWARTZ I ASSOCIATES INC. 
92 WHITEHORN ORES. 

WILLQWDALE ON M2J 382 
MR. ARTHUR 8. SCHWARTZ 
PRESIDENT 



6. I (613) 822-1052 

A.J. GRAHAM ENGINEERING CONSULTANTS LTD 

2724 fENTON ROAD 

GLOUCESTER ON, KIG 3N3 



6. I (613) 592-6060 

A.J. ROBINSON I ASSOCIATES INC 

CONSULTING ENGINEERS 
P.O. BOX 13130 
KANATA ON K2K 1X3 
A J ROBINSON 
PRESIDENT 



6.1 



(416) 446-1425 



A. P.O. I ASSOCIATES LTD. 

29 CERVIAS DRIVE 

SUITE 302 

OON MILLS ON M3C IT? 

P R FJRNESS 

VICE PRESIDENT ENGINEERING 



AASS AEROSPACE INC. 

1685 FLINT ROAD 

DOWNSVIEW ON M3J 2W8 
MR. FRANCIS N. SHEN 
GENERAL MANAGER 



(416) 736-7070 



2.5 

ABART ENGINEERING LTD 

505 EGLINTON AVENUE WES" 
TORONTO ON. M5N 182 



M'S' «e:-" ; 



2.5 

ABC GROUP 

I BRYDON DR. 

REXOALE ON -9W 1M7 
MR. MIKE SCHMIDT 



(416)747-9301 6.1 (705)748-6316 

A8RIC0 ENERCT MANAGEMENT SERVICES LTD. 
P.O. 80X 1090 

LAKEFIELD ON KOL 2«0 
DR. f.H. KRENZ 
MANAGING DIRECTOR 



(416) 438-389 1 



ACAOIA EQUIPMENT LTD 

2100 ELLESMESE RD 
STE 208 

SCARBOROUGH ON MIH 337 
JIM CHALLIS 



3.1 (416) 223-436 

ACCURATE INDUSTRIAL WASTE LTD. 

163 JARDIN DRIVE 
CONCCRD ON. L4K 1X5 
FRANK PASSER 
OWNER 



6.2 

ACHIEVE ENTERPRISES LTD. 

WESTF1ELD BUSINESS COURT 
6315 SHAWSON DRIVE SUITE 
MISSISSAUGA ON L5T 1J2 
MR. R.A. (ART) MCNEIL 
PRESIDENT AND CEO 



(416) 673-3377 



8.0 

ACLO COMPOUNDERS !NC 

49B EAGLE ST NORTH 
CAMBRIDGE ON. N3H 4T] 
D R YOUNG 



[St9) 653-5011 



6. I (416) 595-2170 

ACRES DAVY HCXEE ENGINEERING INC. 
480 UNIVERSITY AVE. 

TORONTO ON MSG IVJ 
MR. S. TIBSHIRANI 
PRESIDENT 



6.1 

ACRES INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

480 UNIVERSITY AVENUE 

TORONTO ON, M5G IV2 



(416) 595-20DD 2.6 'SIR 1 853-1529 

ACTON PRECAST CONCRETE LIMITED 
R.R. 12 

ACTON ON L7J 2LS 
MR. DAVID J. TURNER 



6.0 (416) 483-6442 

ADJUDICATION SERVICES LIMITED 

2281 YONGE STREET. 

SUITE 202 

TORONTO ON M4P 2C6 

MICHEL G PICHER 

PARTNE" 



6.2 
AOLOG 

17 MARLBOROUGH 

OTTAWA ON. KIN 8E6 
M. HARL HCKINNON 
PRESIDENT 



(613) 563-1850 



2.6 (41 

AEF ALUMINUM STRUCTURES INC 

49 PASSMORE AVE 
SCARBOROUGH ON IIS 3B2 



299-:?! 1 



2.6 

AfR-O-FLO MANUFACTURING 

MANUFACTURING 

1175 APPLEBY LINE. IC3 

BURLINGTON ON. L7L 5H9 

HARRY J. MARSHALL 

PRESIDENT 



(4161 335-5944 
HINT* 



i4l6i "81-5261 



AEROOUIP CANADA INC 

287 SRIDGELANO AVE 
TORONTO ON. M6A 127 



6.2 [613 '37-3370 

AETOS INTERNATIONAL TRAINING GROUP INC. 
1379 BANK STREET 

OTTAWA ON KIH 8N3 
MR. R.M. MEHAfiEY 
PRESIDENT 



FEB 22, 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABETICALLY Br COMPANY 



ANNEX G 
APPENDIX 2 



2.6 

AG TRONIC MFC LTD 

53 WESTMORE OP 
REXDALE ON. n9V 3T6 



(416) 745-6369 



AGO* GROUP 

400-116 ALBERT ST. 

OTTAWA ON, KIP 5C3 
R.A. ALLAN 
PRESIDENT 



(613) 237-3022 



2.6 

AGE INSTRUMENTS INC. 

P.O. BOX 15784 STATION T" 

OTTAWA ON K2C 3S7 
MR. ELLIS G. ASHWORTH 



(613) 283-6424 



3.1 ) 

AGGREGATE RECYCLING WESTERN 
INC 

15 ELIZABETH 
COnBER ON NOP IJO 



6-2 (519) 433-2101 

AGRANOVE ASSOCIATES LIMITED 
I 10 OUNDAS ST. SUITE 5 

LONDON ON, N6A IS I 
OR. LARRY It, ACRANOVE 
PRESIDENT 



6.2 

AGRODEV CANADA INC. 

222 SOMERSET STREET WEST 
SUITE 600 

OTTAWA ON S2P 2C3 
MR. R. BUCHANAN 



(613) 234- = 7a 1 



2.7 

AIN ZYTRON CORP. 

65 IRONDALE DRIVE 
WESTON ON, M9L 2S6 



(416) 741-5220 



8.0 

aihco solbec ltd. 

425 morabel drive 
milton on l9t 4n6 
martin o'hera 

MANAGER 



(416) S78-2627 



AINLEY t ASSOCIATES LTD 

280 PRETTY RIVER PARKWAY 
COLLINGWCOD ON, L9Y 4J5 



(705) 445-345: 



2.5 

AIR MIST CANADA LTD. 

3291 MAtNHAY UNIT 5 S 6 

BURLINGTON ON L7M IA6 
MR. PHIL FITZPATRICK 
VICE-PRESIDENT 



(416) 335-5668 



AIR PRODUCTS 

2090 STEELES AVE 
8RAMPT0N ON L6T 
HENRY FRESE 



(416) 791-2530 2.5 («J3) 932-5237 

AIR REFINER [CANADA] LIMITED 

115 BOUNDARY TOAD 

CORNWALL ON K6H 6H7 
MR. H. DAHLSTROM 
VICE PRESIDENT ANO CM 



2.5 

AIR TRAC CORP. 

P.O. BOX 9099 

STONEY CREEK ON L8G 3X7 
MR. M. VANOOORSLAER 



(416) 664-5517 4.1 (416) 791-1666 

AIRCRAFT APPLIANCES i EQUIPMENT LI HI TED 

50 EAST DR. 

BRAMALEA ON L6T ICI 
MR. W.J. WHITE 



2.5 (416) 624-2133 

AIRFLOU DEVELOPMENTS (CANADA) 



244 NEWKIRK ROAD 
RICHMOND HILL ON, 



_4C 307 



5.7 

AIRFLOW DEVELOPMENTS LTD 

128! MATHESON BLVD 

MISSISSAUGA ON L4W IR; 
BRIAN F. CORNWALL 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 624-2133 2.7 (416) 683-9501 

AJAX MATERIAL HANDLING LIMITED 

570 F1NLEY AVENUE 

AJAX ON, LIS 2E3 
MR. J.F. HANSEN 
PRESIDENT 



2.6 

AL CORE FABRICATING CORP 

65 NEWKIRK BO 

RICHMOND HILL ON, L4C 3G4 



(416) 339-4923 



3.1 (1 

AL LUCIER S SON SANITATION INC 

R R I 

MCGREGOR ON, NOR IJO 



2.6 



ALBANY PUMP COMPANY LIMITED 

320 OAKDALE RD. 

DOWNSVIEW ON M3N IW5 
MR. R.S. 8ENNET 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 741-5102 



6.2 M16) 446-142S 

ALBERT FULLER ITS DICXSON i 

ASSOCIATES 

29 GERVAIS OR 

DON MILLS ON. M3C I Y9 



8.0 ( ) 

ALCAN CANADA PRODUCTS LTD 

P BOX 269 

TORONTO DOMINION CENTRE 
TORONTO ON MSK IK I 
J GAGNE 



2.10 

ALCHEM INC. 

1055 TRUMAN ST. 

30X 5002 

BURLINGTON ON L7R 3Y9 

MR. P.E. MCHANUS 

PRESIDENT 



(416) 632-8791 2. 10 (416) 273-3344 

ALCOA INTERNATIONAL CANADA LTD 

MISSISSAUGA EXECUTIVE CENTRE 
2 R08ERT SPECK PKWY SUITE 770 
MISSISSAUGA ON L42 IH8 
STEVEN WACNER 



2.6 

ALCORE FABRICATING CORP. 

65 NEWKIRK ROAO 

RICHMOND HILL ON, L4C 3C4 



(416) 889-4923 



2.6 

ALEXAMJER SMART LTD 



(4 16) 474-550 



351 STEELCASE RD W. UNIT 3 
MARKHAM ON. L3R 4H9 



2.5 

ALFA PLASTICS 

2 BAKER RO 

BRAMPTON ON L6T 4E3 
MR. G. JUNGEBLUT 



(416) 792-80CS 



2.6 

ALFA-LAVAL LIMITED 

INDUSTRY DIVISION 

101 MILNER AVENUE' 

SCARBOROUGH ON MIS 4S6 

DAVE NICHOLS 

PRESIDENT 



(416) 299-6101 



2. 10 

ALXAHII CHEMICALS LTD. 

3265 WOLFEDALE ROAO 
MISSISSAUGA ON L5C IV8 
J C SCHILL 
MANAGER POLYMER DIVISION 



(416) 270-5534 2.6 (416) 669-1606 

ALL-RITE CUSTOM STEEL PRODUCTS [1978] LT 

171 MAPLECRETE ROAD 

CONCORD ON L4K 2B4 
MR. S. DASGUPTA 
PRESIDENT 



FEB 22. 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABETICALLY BY COMPANY 



ANNEX C 
APOEND!! 2 



2.6 

ALLAN FYFE EQUHtlNT LTD 

261 BOWES RD 
CONCORD ON. L4K IH8 



(416) 669-1313 



6,2 (416) 362-1022 

ALLAN U. FOSTER t ASSOCIATES LIMITED 

80 FRONT ST. E, SUITE 605 

TORONTO CN. USE FM 



3.1 ( ) 

ALLEN GARNET CONSTRUCTION CO 

LTD 

n b a 

H fNCSTON ON. K7L *V4 



2.10 

ALLIED COLLOIDS (CANADA 

II AUTOMATIC ROAD 
BRAHPTON ON L6S 4K6 
PETER NICHOLS 
SALES MANAGER 



(416) 793-9473 2.5 

LTD. ALLIS-CHALNERS CANADA INC 

AAF DIVISION 
34 HANSEN ROAD SOUTH 
9RAMPTQN ON L6H 3H4 
MR. WILLIAM E. MCQUADE 
PLANT HANACER 



(416) 456-3432 b.2 Ml£) <77- 

ALPHA CONTROLS AM) INSTRUMENTATION 

361 STEELCASE RD 
UNIT 13 

MARKHAH ON L3R 3V8 
BRUCE BRADSHAW 



7.0 

ALPHA LABORATORIES 

285 LE SKILL ROAO 
DON HILLS ON, M3B 2VI 

n scod 



(416) 449-2166 



8.0 

ALPHABET LIMITED 

I I BOULTON AVENUE 
TORONTO ON. I14M 2J4 



( ) 



6.2 (519) 433-315! 

ALTEX MANAGEMENT LIMITED 
199 QUEENS AVE. SUITE 200 

LONDON ON N6A I J I 
MR. KENNETH F. HEARD 
PRESIDENT 



8.0 

ALUHIIMI DROSS AND METAL 

RECYCLING CO 

55 WATERLOO AVE 

DOUNSVIEW ON H3H 3T1 

LEON SNIATOWSKI 



(416) 476-7516 



8.0 

ALUMINUM REDUCTION CO 



31 FRESHWAY DR 
CONCORD ON L4K 
I L1SSACK 



:SI 



(416) 669-2347 2. I0 '*'6i 544- 

ALUNPROCX RESOURCES LTD. 

52 IMPERIAL STRE" 
HAMILTON ON L8L 7H2 
308 SROWN 
OPERATOR 



2.6 

AfUC EOUIPICKT LIMITED 



(416) 884-1423 



110 INDUSTRIAL RD P BOX 265 
RICHMOND HILL ON. L4C 4T2 



8.0 

ANALCAHET CANADA LTD 



(4 16) 366-3954 



P BOX 95 COMMERCE COURT W 
TORONTO ON M5L IC9 
K V HANSEN 



6.2 

AMBIANCE INTERNATIONAL 

P.O. SOX 761 

WATERLOO ON, N2J 4C2 



(5191 B86- , ' , 63 



2. 10 

AHCHEN PRODUCTS INC 

BOX 2097 



(519) 252-2737 



WlNDSOR/UALKERVILtE ON. N8Y 4R5 
MR. B. JUSTIC 
SALES MANAGER 



2.1 M16) 45 1 -926 1 

AMERICAN HOIST OF CANADA LTD 

145 HEART LAKE ROAD S 
BRAMPTON ON. L6W 3K 3 



6.2 (613) 234-: 9t 

AflERIE O'CONNELL LXICAN INC. 
350 SPARKS ST. SUITE 1003 

OTTAWA ON KIR 7S8 
DR, E.R. AMERIE 
CHAIRMAN S C.E.6. 



2.7 (519) 539-7475 

AflERTTK INC. (BELCIUH STANDARD INC.) 
P.O. BOX 865 

WOODSTOCK ON N4S 8A3 
MR. WILLIAM C. THOMAS 
PRESIDENT 



2.7 

AMI STEEGO LIN1TED 

2520 HAINES ROAD 
MISSISSAUCA ON. L4Y IT6 



(416) 279-1930 



2.5 

AIKO SYSTEMS INC 

57 PATRICE CRESCENT 
THORNHILL ON. L4J 3R6 
OHN KOSCH 



( 4 1 6 1 



-3274 



6.2 

AMTEK KAKACEICKT INC. 

493 RICHMOND ROAD 

OTTAWA ON. K2A 0G3 
MR. RON NASH 
PRESIOENT 



(613) 728-1831 



6.2 

AJ1Y E.A.C. t SONS LTD. 

SUITE 202-280 ALBERT ST 

OTTAWA ON, KIP 5C8 
MR. W.A. HILROY 
PRESIDENT 



(613) 234-7711 



8.0 



ANAOCMIA SOLVENTS LIMITED 

3S49 MAVIS ROAO 
MISSISSAUCA ON. L5C IT7 
GEORGE WENTLANDT 
SALES MANAGER 



(416) 2^9-5 1 22 



2.5 

ANALTCAS STSTtHS LTD. 

215 NANTUCKET BLVD. 

SCARBOROUGH ON HIP 2P2 
MRS. J.C. RICHARDSON 
PRESIOENT 



(416) 759-2241 2.5 



ANCASTER TOOL COMPANT INC 

HIGHWAY NO. 6 

CALEDONIA ON NOA IA0 
MR. VLADIMIR RUSK I A 
CEO 



MI6) 765-2247 2.6 <b\V 5*6-6663 

ANCHOR CONCRETE PRODUCTS LTD 

SYDENHAM ROAO 
R.R. NO. 8 

KINGSTON ON K7M 5P8 
MR. H. BRADFIF.LD 
OWNER 



2.10 

ANCO CHEMICALS LTD. 
85 MALMO COURT 
P.O. BOX 400 
MAPLE ON. LOJ ITS 
JACK KINCH 



(416) 832-2276 



6.2 

ANDERSEN MANAGEMENT 

174 KING ST. W. 

KITCHENER ON N2G IA9 
MR. NORMAN R. ANDERSEN 



1519) 576-4550 



8.0 I 

ANDERSON RODDY TOWINC SERVICE 

746 SYNDICATE AVENUE N 
THUNDER BAY ON P7C 3X4 



FEB 22. 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABETICALLY BY COMPANY 



ANNEX C 
APPENDIX 2 



2.6 (416' t>27-9233 

ANDERSON HATER SYSTEMS L1H1TED 

44 HEAD ST. 

DUNDAS ON L9H 3H3 
MR. P.J. HHEATLE'f 
PRESIDENT 



3, i '416) 466-3418 

ANDRES BROS TRUCKING LTD 

CREEK 

NIAGARA-ON-THE-LAXE ON. LOS IJO 



6, ; (416) 339-6^5? 

ANDREW BRCCIE ASSOCIATES INCORPORATED 
24 RIVERSIDE BOULEVARD 
P.O. BOX 42S 
THORNHILL ON L3T 4A2 



6.2 

ANDROS CONSULTANTS LTD. 

22 ST. CLAIR AVE. E. 

■4TH FLOOR 

TORONTO ON .14T 2S3 

MR. QAV1D E.C. HUGGINS 

PRESIDENT 



(416) 960-5588 2.6 (416) 291-3336 

ANGLO CANAOIAN SCIENTIFIC CO. 

85 NUGGET AVENUE 
ACINCOURT ON. MIS 381 
R C WILLiAKS 
PRESIDENT 



6.1 

ANNECTRON LIMITED 

P.O. BOX 13205 

KANATA ON. K 2K 1X4 
MR. RON PRICE 
PRESIDENT 



(613) 726-6=5? 



2. 10 (4 16) 523-1850 

ANTHLAFILTER NEDIA t COAL LTD. 

!85 NIAGARA STREET 
HAMILTON ON L8L 6A8 
DAVID J LONEY 
PRESIDENT 



6.1 

APD AND ASSOCIATES 

29 GERVAIS DRIVE 

SUITE 302 

OON MILLS ON M3C I T9 



(416) 446-1425 



APflEL INC. 

38 ANT ARES DRIVE 

NEPEAN ON K2E 7V2 
DR. JACEK J. WOJCIK 
PRESIDENT 



(613) 727-0334 



3. 

AQUABLAST CORP. 

52 PRODUCTION DRIVE 
SCARBOROUGH ON MIH 2X8 
JOHN EECLOO 
V.P. GENERAL MANAGER 



(416) 438-6706 6.2 (613) 591-0228 

AQUARIUS AUDIO VISUAL SERVICES LTD. 
P.O. SOX 5533 STATION "F" 

OTTAWA ON K2C 3HI 
MR. WILL I An POMFRET 
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 



2.6 

AQUAROBIC LTD. 

P.O. BOX NO. 704 



f705) §4f~7±0l 



PENETANQUISHENE ON LGK IPC 

MR. P. PAVON 

PRESIDENT 



6.2 

ARA CONSULTANTS 

702-350 SPARKS ST. 

OTTAWA ON. KIR 7S8 
MR. MURRAY GLOW 



(613) 238-3215 



2.6 

ARBRUX LIMITED 

P BOX 10 UNIT 55 
UXBR1DGE ON, LOC 1K.0 



(416) 852-5417 6.1 (416) 491-2525 

ABCON ENGINEERING CONSULTANTS LIMITED 
352 CONSUMERS ROAD 

HILLOHDALE ON, M2J IP8 
MR. R.A. BIRD P.ENC, 
PRESIDENT 



6.2 

ARCTEC CANADA LIMITED 

31 1 LEDGETT DRIVE 



KANATA ON. K2K 
MR. I . GLEN 
PRESIDENT 



128 



(613) 592-2830 6.2 (416) 629-4050 

AREHBURG CONSULTANTS LIMITED 

1425 DUNDAS ST. E. SUITE 208 

MISSISSAUGA ON L4X 1L3 
ANNELIESE ARENSURC 
PRESIDENT 



3.1 ( ) 

ARESCUE ROOTER SEWER CLEANING 

i REPAIR 

73 WORSLEY 

STONEY CREEK ON, L=E 2G2 



8.0 

ARCO PLASTICS 

67 KENNEDY ROAD SOUTH 
BRAMPTON ON L6H 3E4 
DON CLARKE 



(4161 451-6593 3.1 ( ) 

ARIZON DISPOSAL SERVICES LTD 

78 ULSTER STREET 
TORONTO ON. H5S IC7 



2.6 

ARJAY ENGINEERING LTD 

2495 HAINES RD 
MISSISSAUGA ON. 14Y IY7 



(416) 277-4541 



2.6 

ARLAT INC. 

150 EAST DRIVE 

BSANALEA ON L6T ICI 
MR. E.W, LATAL 
PRESIDENT 



(4 16) 458-8220 



8.0 ( 

AfiLEN SCRAP NETALS INC 

719 YONGE STREET 
TORONTO ON M4Y 2B5 



6.2 

ARM CONSULTANTS 

I404-3S FOUNTAINHEAD RD 

OOUNSVIEW ON, M3J 2V7 
JACK KAMINSKI 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 663-3938 



2.6 

ARMSTRONG JONES LTD 



83 SUNRISE AVE 
TORONTO ON, M4A 



81 



(416) 751-2380 



2.6 

ARMSTRONG S A LTD 

1400 O'CONNOR DR 
TORONTO ON. M4B 2T9 



(416) 755-2291 



2.6 
ARHTEC IMC 

15 CAMPBELL RD 
P BOX 3000 
GUELPH ON NIH 6P2 



( I 



2.7 

ARNOLD FARM-VET LTD 

58 DAMSON ROAD 
GUELPH ON. NIH 6P9 



'519; 836-3330 



2.6 

ARO CANADA INC 

5 WORCESTER RD 
REXDALE ON M9U 4K2 
MR. G.T, KREIL 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 675-561 I 



6.2 

ARTHUR ANDERSEN S CO. 

P.O. SOX 29 33RD FL. 
TORONTO-DOMINION CENTRE 
TORONTO ON N5K IB9 
MR. W.S. BARNARD 



(4 16) S63-I54.0 



FEB 22. 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABET I CALL* BY COMPANY 



ANNEX G 
APPEND U 



2.6 (705) 526-5*96 

ARTHUR S. LEITCH COWANY LTD.. TIC 

[HEAD OFFICE] 
999 WILLIAM STREET 
niOLAND ON L4R 4L7 
MR. J.D. LEITCH 
PRESIDENT AND CH 



2.6 

ASDOR LIMITED 

977 ALNESS STREET 
DOHNSVIEH ON. M3J 2J I 
RAY NEWMAN 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 661-3981 



3.1 

ASSELIN TRANSPORTATION t 

STORAGE LIMITED 

HIGHWAYS I I J 71 

fORT FRANCES ON '9A 3f12 



(907) 274-6255 



8.0 ( 

ASSOCIATED ICTAL PRODUCTS 

3 VALLEY CRESCENT 
TORONTO ON. H6N U6 



2.7 

ASTRO PYROTECHNICS LTD- 

P.Q. BOX 908 

CUELPH QN nih 6M6 

NR. J. 3. EDWARDS 

VICE PRESIDENT AND G.H. 



15191 822-2133 2.5 '519) 684-059C 

ASTROH SPECIALTY fCTALS LTO. 
30 DURWARD PLACE 

WATERLOO ON N2L 4E4 

pir. s. schat: 

PRESIDENT 



2.10 
ATKEMX INC. 

P.O. BOX 1085 
BRANTFORO ON N3T 5T2 
ROBERT J SCOTT 
BUSINESS MANAGER 



(519) 756-6181 



6.1 

ATKINSON ENGINEERING INC. 

786 KING ST. E. 

HAMILTON ON L8M IA6 
MR. A.H. ATKINSON 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 523-1988 



9.0 r 4 1 6> 293-5307 

ATLANTIC PACKAGING PRODUCTS 

111 PROGRESS AVE 
SCARBOROUGH ON, ft IP 2Y9 
flAC HACFARLANE 



2.6 (416) 368-30D3 

ATLAS ENGINEERING AND I1ACHINC CO LTD 
16 EASTERN AVENUE 

TORONTO ON USA IH4 
MR. S.M. FINKELSTEIN 
PRESIDENT 



4. 1 

AUTO-CHLOB INCORPORATED 

5161 TOMKEN ROAO 

H1SS1SSAUCA ON. L4W IPI 
MR. R. JAMES 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 624-0919 



2.7 

AUTOMATIC COW ACTORS 

75 ROOINEA RO 
P SOX 509 
MAPLE ON LOJ ICO 
MR. L. SOLOMON 
PRESIDENT 



1416) 832-226 



3.1 [J 

BID ENTERPRISES 



DORSET ON, POA 1E0 



8.0 (613) 824-9364 

B AND 8 WASTE RECYCLINC AND 

DISPOSAL LTO. 
1908 BELMORE LANE 
GLOUCESTER ON K IB 423 
BERNARD POIRIER 
PRESIDENT 



2,7 (416) 259-4611 

B G S BEARINGS t EQUIPTCNT LTD 

21 BELVIA ROAD 
TORONTO ON, M8W 3R2 



6.1 

B N ROSS I ASSOCIATES LTD 

62 NORTH ST 
GOOERICH ON, N7A 2T4 



(519) 524-2641 



3.1 

B WILLS DISPOSAL SERVIQ 

133 NORTH BONNINGTON 
TORONTO ON. ft IK 1X8 



(416) 261-8931 



3.1 

B-LINE EXPRESS LTD. 

35 ORIOLE PARKWAY EAST 

P.O. BOX 5 

ELM IRA ON N3B 215 

BRYAN BOUMAN 

PRESIDENT 



(519) 669-1588 



2.6 

BABCOCX AND UILCOX INC. 

BAILEY CONTROLS DIV. 

860 HARRINGTON CRT 

BURLINGTON ON L7N 3N4 

m, W.R. CAMPBELL 

VICE-PRESIDENT 



(416) 639-8840 
LTD. 



2.6 

BABCOCX SUPPLY CO LTD 

R.R. NO. 5 



DRESDEN ON NOP 
MR. WES 3ABCOCK 
PRESIDENT 



'MO 



(519) 683-2696 2.3 (41« 261-6948 

BAKER (H.H.) CONSULTANT CLIMATE APPLIC 
62 SLOLEK ROAD 



SCARBOROUGH ON. 
MR. W.M. BAKER 
PRESIDENT 



MIM ICS 



2.6 

BAKER IKSTRUnENTS LIMITED 

UNIT I 349 BOWES RD 

CONCORD ON. L4K IJ3 



(416) 738-4780 



8.0 
BAKERICT INC 

2555 SHEFFIELD ROAD 
OTTAWA ON KIB 3V6 
MORRIS PALMER 



(613) 745-7006 



2.7 

BARBER-GREENE CANADA LTD 

4S3 WYECRCfT ROAO 

P BOX 445 

OAKVILLE ON. L6J 5A8 



6.1 



BARKER TERP GIBSON LIMITED 

160 DUNCAN HILL ROAO 



(416) 4S5-2IOO 



DON MILLS ON. 
MR. DONALD C. 
PRESIDENT 



M3B IZ5 
BARKER 



6 I (4 16) 245-7501 

BARMAN COULTER SHALLOW ASSOCIATES 

I GREENSBORO OR. SUITE 401 

REXCALE ON M9W ICS 
MR. MOHAN BARMAN 



2.6 

BARNES DIV. 

GSW INC. 

83 WEST DRIVE 

BRAMPTON ON L6T 2J6 

MR. A.G. RANCID 

MANAGER 



'613) 457-6223 



3.1 ( 

BARNES CEO 1 SONS LTD 

R B 2 

DUNNVILLE ON. NOA IKO 



2.5 
BARROAT INC 

BOX 790 



(519) 621-3620 



CAMBRIOGE/'GALT ON NlR 5U6 
MR. 8.S. SMITH 
PRESIDENT 



8.0 

BARBIE METAL 1 SALVAGE LTD 

204 TIFFEN ST 
BARRIE ON L4N 2N4 
P FELDMAN 



(70S.) "29-29S3 



FEB 22. 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABETICALLY 8V COMPANY 



ANNEX C 
APPENDIX 2 



3.1 ( 

BARRIE PAPER RECYCLING 

MIOHURST 

BARRIE ON. LOL IXO 



6.2 

BARRINCER MAGENTA LTD 

304 CARLINGVIEU OR 

TORONTO ON M9W 5G2 
MR. ALAN L1PSKI 



(416) 675-3870 



7.0 

BARRINGER RESEARCH LTD. 

304 CARLINGVIEU DRIVE 

REXDALE ON 
J. DAV1ES 



(416) 675-3870 



9.0 ( ) 

BARRY HUMPHRY ENTERPRISES LTD 

HIGHWAY 20 

8INBROCK ON LOR ;C0 



6.2 

BARRY INTERNATIONAL 

P.O. BOX 737 1 

OAKVILLE ON L6J 6L6 
DR. PAUL BARRY 



C4W1 342-623S 



2.; 



BAHTELL INDUSTRIES LiniTED 

219 TORVORK DRIVE 

WESTON ON M9L !T2 
I1R. LEE BARTELL 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 74?-i233 



2.6 (416) 735-510 

BASIC HYDRAULICS I INDUSTRIAL 

EOPT LTD 

490 WEST SIDE RO 

WELLANO ON L3B 5X7 



8.0 

BASIC HETAL CO 

608 MCGREGOR ROAD 
SARNIA ON N7T 7H5 



(519) 332-6082 



6.2 

BAY CONSULTING GROUP 

102 8LCOR ST. H, SUITE 305 

TORONTO ON, H5S IMS 
MR, V.W. fEARON 
P4RTNER 



(416) 964-6479 



2.6 



BBC BROWN BOVERI CANADA INC. 

KENT INSTRUMENTS 

2401 DIXIE ROAD 

MISSISSAUCA ON L4Y 2A3 

DAVID C TIDY 

SALES REPRESENTATIVE 



(416) 848-3034 



2. 10 (416) 255-8521 

BOH CHEMICALS CANADA LTD. 

350 EVANS AVENUE 
TORONTO ON K8Z 1K5 
ROBERT KAMJNO 
V.P. SALES AND MARKETING 



8.0 ( ) 

BEACH ROAD METALS t EQUIPMENT 

1900 BRAMPTON RCAD 
HAMILTON ON, L8H 3S5 



6.2 

BEAK ANALYTICAL SERVICES 

6870 GOREWAY OR. 



(416) 671-2600 



MISSISSAUCA ON L4V 
MR, J.F. SL I MINSK I 



P! 



6.2 

BEAK CONSULTANTS LIMITED 

6870 GOREWAY DRIVE 

MISSISSAUGA ON. L4V 1P1 



(416) 671-2600 2.7 (416) 751-4255 

BEAVERTCN INDUSTRIAL DIVISION 
ANTRADE LTD. 
I 16 MANVILLE ROAD 
SCARBOROUGH ON MIL 4J5 
MS. R, BRAUNE 
CONTROLLER 



6.! (416) 928-1600 

BECHTEL CANADA ENGINEERS LTD. 

250 BLOOR STREET EAST 
TORONTO ON M4W 3K5 
R M HARMER 
PRESIDENT 



2.6 

BECKBAH INSTRUMENTS INC 

901 OXFORD ST 
TORONTO ON. MB2 5T2 



(416) 25I-52S1 2.7 (519) 539-7475 

BELGIUM STANDAROS INDUSTRIES 

DIVISION OF AMERTEK INC 

873 DEVONSHIRE AVENUE BOX 865 

WOODSTOCK ON N4S 3A3 



8.0 

BELKIN PAPER STOCK INC 

475 COMMISSIONERS STREET 
TORONTO ON M4M IAS 
PETER MCMAHON 



(416) 461-924 



3.1 ( ) 

BELLEVILLE CONTAINER SERVICE 

r n 2 

BELLEVILLE ON, K8N 422 



2.5 



BENOIX ELECTRONICS LIMITED 

P.O. BOX 2014 

CHATHAM ON, N7M 5f17 
MR. M.H. MCGREGOR 



(519) 352-6700 



3.1 

BERN I WHAN SLURRY SYSTEMS 



WELLINGTON ST. MARINE TERMINAL 
HAMILTON ON. L8L 419 
RICK KRAMER 
MARKETING 



(416) 528-7924 



3.1 (416) 383- 

BEST LIQUID WASTE DISPOSAL LTD 

125 KING'S FOREST DRIVE 
HAMILTON ON L8T 4J8 
JAMES D BEST 
OWNER/MANAGER, SPILL SUPVSOR. 



2.6 

BESTOBELL CANADA LTD 

245 NORSEMAN ST 
TORONTO ON, M8Z 2R5 



(416) 231-9216 



2.6 
BESTPIPE LTD 



(SI9) 745-8406 



245 STRAUSBURG RD P BOX 335 
KITCHENER ON. N2G 3Y9 



2.6 
BETZ INC 

3026 SOLANDT P,0 
KANATA OK. K2K 2A5 



(613) 592-SOSO. 2.6 (416) 668-1132 

BEUT METAL RECOVERY SYSTEMS LTD. 
1390 HOPKINS ST. UNIT 4 

WHITBY ON LIN 2C3 
MR. ROY ORUCE 



2.5 

BI-TENP LIMITED 

BOX 1448 

BELLEVILLE ON, KBN 5J1 
MR, GEORGE PARRY 
PRESIDENT 



(613) 967-1066 2.6 (519) 621-8410 

BIB8Y - STE CROIX FOUNDRIES INC. 
P.O. BOX 279 
202 BEVERLY STREET 
CAMBRIDGE ON NIR 5T8 
MR. RAYMOND WHITE 



2.6 (416) 781-6105 

BIE. DIV OF GENERAL SIGNAL LTD 

100 MIRANDA AVE 
TORONTO ON M6B 3W7 



-37- 



FEB 22. 1 988 



"WINCES LISTED ALPHABETICALLY 8' COMPANY 



ANNE I G 

APPfJDi* 2 



2.6 

BIG '0' INC 

P 0- BO* 970 
25* THAMES RD E 
ExETES ON, NCn :S0 



(519) 235-870 3. I '705) 726-837 

BILL GITHOHS LIQUID DISPOSAL 
LTD 
P, R 5 
BARBIE ON 1411 4S7 



2.7 f4l6l 738-1553 

BILT-RITE DISPOSAL EQUIPMENT INC 

I 12 MAPLECRETE ROAD 

UNIT C 

CONCORD ON L« IA4 

IfR. C. SALVATOHE 

PRESIDENT 



6.; (416) 638-1086 

BIO NUCLEAR DIAGNOSTICS INC. 

3986 CHESSWCCO DRIVE 
DOUNSViEH ON, H3J 2R8 
S K. CHOUDHRY 
PRESIDENT 



2. 10 

BIO-GUAHD CAHAOA LTD 

BOX 219 

STATION S 

TORONTO ON MSN 4L7 
MR. A.T. CHANDLER 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 752-30C8 



6.0 

BIRD AND HALE LIMITED 

'263 BAY STREET 

TORONTO ON. M5R 2C: 

LINDA HELLAS 

DIRECTOR. WASTE MANAGEMENT 



(416j 925- 1 147 



2.10 

BIRD ARCHER INC. 

P.O. BOX 2008 
COBOURC ON K9A 4r2 
ROSS TRESIDEER 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 372-3344 2.5 MI6) 3B2-3I53 

BLACK CREEK METAL NFC ENTERPRISES LTD 

2991 TOHNLINE ROAD 



STEVENSVILLE ON, 
MR. LEWIS SEAN 
PRESIDENT 



LOS ISO 



3.1 '4161 

BLACK RIVER SCRAP METAL 1 

DISPOSAL LTD 

66 - IfiTH STREET 

RICHMOND HILL ON L3T 3P2 



33-4 132 



2.6 
BLACX-CLAHSON-KENNEDT LTD 

I 144 FIRST AVE h 

OuEN SOUND ON. N4K 5P9 



(519) 376-8860 



2.7 

BLAOCSTONE EQUIPMENT LTD 

3015 KENNEDY RD 
UNIT 14 

AGINCOURT ON, I-I1V l£7 
S H DEANS 



(416) 292-7635 



2.6 

BLACKHCOD HOOCE EQPT LTD 

ONTARIO DIVISION 
P 30X 1004 STN A 
WESTON ON. H9N 3N5 



'416) 244-253' 



9.0 ( 

BLUE nCOH ENTERPRISES 

375 NORTH ST 
STOUFFVILLE ON. L4A 4Z4 



3.1 1 ) 

BLUEUATER SANITATION INC 

R R ! 

TIVERTON ON. NOG 2T0 



2.6 (416) 668-1 32 

BUR BUT METAL RECOVERY 
SYSTEMS LTD. 

390 HOPKINS STREl* UNIT 5 
WHITBY ON LIN 2C3 
ROY DRUCE 
GENERAL MANAGER 



3.1 (416) 282-3082 

BOB GARBUTT SERVICES LIMITED 

24 EUCLID AVENUE 
TORONTO ON, MIC U6 



BOHAG CANADA. ARCA 1HTL 

1300 AEROUCOD DRIVE 
NISSISSAUGA ON. L4U 187 



(416) 625-661 I 



3.! 

BOND HEAD SANITATION 

43 PARK 

BRADFORD ON. LOG ISO 



( ) 



7.0 (613) 749-2220 

BOWAB-CLEGG t COHPAflT LTD 

5420 CANOTEK ROAD 
OTTAWA ON KIJ 8X5 
PETER HAULENA 



2.3 

BCOJUH RESEARCH LTD. 

139 AHELIA STREET 



TORONTO ON N4X 
MARGARETE KAL II* 



IE6 



(416) 963-9420 6.2 (416) 362-2457 

BOOTH AQUATIC RESEARCH GROUP 
INC. 

532 QUEEN STREET EAST 
TORONTO ON MSA IV2 
GILLIAN M BOOTH 
PRINCIPAL 



2.6 

BOSCH ROBERT INC 

68 1 1 CENTURY AVE 
NISSISSAUGA ON. L5N IRI 



(416) 826-6060 



2.6 

BOYD BROTHERS 

BOX 130 

OSGCODE ON KOA 2W0 
MR. P. SCHOENFELD 
PRESIDENT 



(613) 826-2319 



8.0 



(416) 886-3999 



BRADWICK INTERIOR GROUP LTD 

155 WEST BEAVER CREEK ROAD 
RICHMOND HILL ON. L4B IEI 



8.0 



BRAKTFORO IRON ( METAL LTD 
247 BRUCE ST 
P BOX 222 
BRANTFORD ON N3S 4Z8 
A NORRIS 



(519) 752-4351 



3.1 i 1 

BRAZIAU CONTAINER SERVICE LTD 



CYRVILLE ROAD 
ORLEANS ON. KIJ 



S7 



2.6 



(4161 6"-OI40 



BRIM PUHPS AND SYSTEMS LTO. 
1320 BRITANNIA RD. E. 

kississauga on L4w ice 

MR. BRIAN J. HULVIH'ILL 



2.10 (416) 421-6000 

BRISTOL -NYERS PRCOUTS CANADA 

99 VANOERHCOF AVENUE 
TORONTO ON. M4G 2H6 
WALTER HUCULAK 
TECHNICAL CONSULTANT 



9.0 (4161 355-3954 

BRITISH KTAL CANADA 

01 V OF PREMETALCO INC STE 2860 

COMMERCE COURT U BOX 95 

TORONTO ON M5L 1C9 



6.2 Jit' !)6'-O005 

BRITTOH MANAGEMENT PRCf ILES INC. 
400 DUNDAS ST. E. 

TORONTO ON MSA 2A5 
MP. DAVID G. BRITTON 
PRESIDENT 



-38- 



FEB 22. 1989 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABET I CALL* BY COMPANY 



ANNEX G 
APPENDIX 2 



B.O 

BROADWAY IRC* S PETAL 

!9i BROADWAY 
WELLAND ON. L3C 5L6 



( ) 



8.0 
3RCKOH IHC 

2349 FAIRV1EH 

BURLINGTON ON, L7R 2E3 



( ) 



2.6 (416) 655-3311 

BRCOKLIH CONCRETE PRODUCTS LTD 

BOX 370 

5ROCKL1N ON LOB ICO 
MR. R.A. MCCOY 
PRESIDENT 



2.6 : 4 1 6 

BROOKS INSTRUMENT DIVISION 

EMERSON ELECTRIC CANADA LTD. 
P.O. BOX 150 
.MARKHAM ON L3P 3J6 
BRENT RYNARO 
TECHNICAL SALES REP. 



J94-9340 6.1 

BR0S7. 1 ASSOCIATES 

34 71 KENNEDY ROAD 



(416) 299-4224 



SCARBOROUGH ON MIS 3B2 
ffl. HELMUT G. SROSZ P.ENG. 
PRESIDENT i C.E.O 



2.6 <Ht>) 476-431 i 

BRCUWER TURF EQUIPMENT LTD 

WOODBINE AVE 
KESWICK ON. L4P 3E9 



3.1 ) 

BROMHING-FERHIS INDUSTRIES 

161 BRIDGELANO AVENUE 
TORONTO ON, M6A IZI 



3-1 ( ) 

BBOHNING-fERRIS INDUSTRIES OF 

WINDSOR LTD 

3 R 3 

BLENHEIM ON, NOP 1 AO 



6. i C4I6J 222-6600 

BRUCE A. BROHN ASSOCIATES LIMITED 
148 WILLOWDALE AVE. 

WILLOWDALE ON H2N 4Y4 
DR. 8RUCE A. BROUN P.ENG. 



6.2 

BRYAN HALTON S ASSOCIATES 

380 ASPEN FOREST DR. 

OAKVILLE ON. L6J 6H5 
MR. BRYAN WALTON 
OWNER 



(416) 345-1075 



6.2 

BRYON J U1EBE LIMITED 

96 COURT ST 
SIMCCE ON. N3Y IRS 



(519) 426-1750 6. I (613) 74S-37S2 

BUCHAN LEUTON PARENT LTD. 
5370 CANOTEK RD. 

OTTAWA ON KU 8X7 



3.1 (705) 939-6311 

BUCXHAH ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES 

LTD. 

P.O. BOX 601 

PETERBOROUGH ON K9J 67.3 

STEPHEN BARR 

MANAGER 



2.7 

BUCXHOfiN MATERIAL HANDLING 

PRODUCTS INC 
7512 BATH ROAD 
M15S1SSAUGA ON L4T IL2 



(416) 678-6545 



2.7 

BUH.ER-MIAG CANADA LTD 

59 CURLEW DRIVE 

DON MILLS ON, M3A 2P9 



(416) 445-69 !0 



6.2 ■ (416) 783- 

BUNYAfl NALENFANT (ONT) LTD. 
1947 AVENUE ROAD SUITE 202 

TORONTO ON MSM 4A2 
MR . MICHAEL 8UNYAR 



135 6.2 (613) 996-1392 

BUREAU MS CONSEILLERS EN GESTION 
365 LAUR1ER AVE. W. 
SUITE S19 

OTTAWA ON KtA OSS 
M. SEYMOUR ISENBERG 
OIRECTEUR GENERAL 



6.2 

BURL -OAK DESIGN LTD. 

P.O. BOX 792 STATION "S 

BURLINGTON ON L7P 3f13 
MR. LESLIE S. HORVATH 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 335- 



6.2 (416) 366-R654 

BURSEY INTERNATIONAL CONSULTANTS 
347 BAY STREET SUITE 502 

TORONTO ON M5H 2R.2 
MR. JAMES H. BURSE V 
PRESIDENT 



2-6 ( ) 

BURVELL CANADA C0BPANY LTD 

91 STEELCASE RD E 
MARKHAM ON. L3R IE9 



8.0 

Busconse a dooos 

123 EASTS 10E DRIVE 
UNIT 7 

TORONTO ON. MSZ 5S5 
PETER J MCMAHON 



(416) 231-7772 



2,5 

BVA MANUFACTURING LTD. 

2215 M10LAND AVE. 

SCARBOROUGH ON Ml? 3E7 
MR. J. FRANK GUENTHER 



(416) 291-7371 3.1 (416) 668-2563 

C A COULTER HASTE DISPOSAL LTD 

R R 2 

WHITBY ON. LIN SR5 



2.6 

C A E FIBERGLASS LTD 
219 JAMIESON BOWE RD 
P BOX 548 
BELLEVILLE ON. K8N 5B2 



(613) 966-3C96 



2.6 

C E HIOCEY t SONS CO LTD 

830 OUNN AVE P SOX 84 
STN B 

HAMILTON ON L8L 7T5 



(416) 549-4666 



2. 10 

C E K HFG LTD 

6660 CAHPOBELLO ROAD 

MISSISSAUGA ON LSN 2L9 
MR. B. BRAHMS 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 826-8240 



2.7 

C-E BAUER 

COMBUSTION ENGC. CANADA INC 
435 ELGIN STREET 
3RANTF0RD ON N3T 5S4 
T PHILLIPS 
PRESIDENT 



(519) 756-3800 



2.7 

C-E RAYBOND COMBUSTION 
ENGINEERING CANADA INC 
435 ELGIN ST P BOX 910 
BRANTFORD ON, N3T 5S4 
A HEUSOME 



(519) 755-250 



2.10 
C-l-L LTD. 

P.O. 80X 200 STATION A 

NORTH YORK ON, M2N 6H2 
MR. C.H. HANTHO 



(416) 229-8000 6.1 (416) 385-3234 

C.C. PARKER CONSULTANTS LIMITED 

I40O RYMAL RD.E. 

HAMILTON ON LOR IPO 
MR. D.C. CRAHM 
CHAIRMAN 



FEB 22. 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABETICALL" BY COMPANY 



ANNE/ G 
APPENDIX 2 



2.6 

C.J. PINK AM) SON LID 

!38 CLARKE SICE ROAD 

LONDON ON N5U 5E 1 
MR. C.H. PINK 
'RESIDENT 



(519) 455-6680 



2.6 

C.H.S. ROTOR DISK INC. 

5266-12 GENERAL RD. 

ni ss i ssauca on L4« \Tt 

MR. MICHAEL CRCSTCN 



(.416) 625-8916 



2, n 

CALGOJI CANADA INC 

2 1 FHILEY RCAO 

BRAHALEA ON L6T 182 
Mt. 0. THATTE 
GENERAL MANAGER 



(416) 457-53 10 



3.1 

CALGON CARBON COA. 

6303 AIRPORT ROAD 
MISSISSAUGA ON. 1.4V :E3 
LINDEN MASLEN 



.416) 673-7173 



2.7 
CALTRa LTD. 

2 THORNCLIFFE PARK DRIVE 

UNIT 21 

TORONTO ON. M4H I Hi 

DAVID J URJGHT 

P.ENG. 



' 4. ?6 > 423-692 2.6 - JJ J3S-22 

CALVON ROBINSON INDUSTRIES LTD (Soft RICH) 

P.O. BOX 110 

SHALLOW LAKE ON. NOH 2K0 

MR. C. ROBINSON 

OWNER 



6.1 

CAMBRIAN PROCESSES 

ENGINEERING GROUP LTD. 
2200 ARGENT 1 A ROAD 
MISSISSAUGA ON L5N 2K7 
PETER SLEGGS 
PROCESS MANAGER 



(416) 358-9010 1.0 '514) 623-4322 

CAMBRIDGE ItTAL RECTCLINC CORP 

R R 16 HIGHWAY 97 
CAMBRIDGE ON NiR 537 
SOL EHREN 



2.6 (416) 332-2293 

CAN CULVERT I METAL PROD LTD 

P BOX 579 
MAPLE ON, LOJ ICO 



2.6 

CAN-AM INSTRUMENTS LTD. 

2495 HAINES ROAD 
MISSISSAUGA ON. L4Y I !- 7 
HANS LEYGRAAF 
ENV. SALES 



(416) 277-331 



6.2 

CAH-ASF.AN CONSULTANTS LTD 

6453 SNOW GOOSE LANES 

MISSISSAUGA ON L5N 4J6 
MR. R.C. MANN 
DIRECTOR 



(41*) 824-3874 



i4i6) S25-3633 



CAN-ROSS ENV I R0NMEN7AL 
SERVICES LTD. 
1476 SPEERS ROAD 
QAKVILLE ON L6L 2X6 
TED EDGAR 
V.P. MARKETING 



2.7 

CAN-ROSS INDUSTRIES INC. 

44 1 UTECROFT RD. 

OAKVItLE ON L6K 2H2 
MR. GENE FARCUHAR 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 849-6038 



9.0 

CAN- SOL ENTERPRISES 

1161 PARKWAY OR 

OTTAWA ON K2C 2141 
MR. RICHARD 1NCRAM 
PRESIDENT 



(613) 726-0116 2. 10 '416) 449-""E.C- 

canada colors ano otmicals 

limited 

80 scarsoale road 

don mills on m3b 2?" 

d j robertson 

sales manager 



2 7 (416) 628-2233 

CANADA MACHINERY CORPORATION 
50 HATT STREET 

DUNDAS ON L9H 5P9 
MR. J. (I. SINCLAIR 
PRES DENT 



8.0 

CANADA METAL CO LTD 



721 EASTERN AVE 
TORONTO ON N4M 
R S GRAHAM 



E6 



(416) 465-4684 



2.5 



(416) 733-8205 



CANADIAN APPLIED TtCHNOLOCT 

10 PLANCHET ROAD 

UNIT 21 

CONCORD ON L4K 2C~ 

B E FisCHE= 
ENV. SALES 



U (416) 678-1750 

CANADIAN SEARINGS CO LTD 

31 10 AMERICAN DRIVE 
MISSISSAUGA ON. L4V IRS 



2.6 '519) 744-8111 

CANADIAN SOWER CANADA PUMPS 

LTD 

90 WQODS1DE AVE 

KITCHENER DN N2G 4K I 



2 7 '416) 675-^285 

CANADIAN DISPOSAL EQUIPMENT CO 

1940 ALBION ROAD 
REXDALE ON. M9U 5T2 



3.1 ( 

CANADIAN DISPOSAL SERVICES LTD 

35 ORMSKIRK 
TORONTO ON. M6S 1A8 



2.6 



CANADIAN EFFLUENT TRTMT INC 



(519) 579-8807 



99 WEST AVENUE 
KITCHENER ON, N2M 
PAUL STEVERS 
PRESIDENT 



X4 



2 5 '4'6l 248-0125 

CANADIAN FILTER MANUFACTURING CO LTD 

45 IRON STREET 

REXDALE ON M9U 5E3 
MR. K.B. PHILLIPS 
PRESIDENT 



2 7 (416) 530-5000 

CANADIAN GENERAL ELECTRIC CO 

940 LANSDOWNE AVENUE 
TORONTO ON. M6H 3Z4 



2 10 '416) 251-2233 

CANADIAN GERMICIDE COMPANY LIMITED 

ROCHESTER MIDLAND CHEMICALS 

591 THE OUEENSWAT 

TORONTO ON M8T U8 

MR. 8.S. WJLSON 

PRESIDENT 



8.0 

CANADIAN IRON METAL CO 

94 CANNON ST U 
HAMILTON ON LSR 2B6 
N LEVITT 



(416} 527-4369 



2.7 

CANADIAN KENUORTH CO 

560 ROCHESTER STREET 
OTTAWA ON, KIS 4M2 



(613) 236-691' 



2.6 

CANADIAN LLKENS LIMITED 

50 TABER ROAD 
REXDALE ON, M9W 3A9 
JIM SALNEK 



4l6i 747-4669 2.6 

CANADIAN METER 

CO OF CAN LTD 
3037 DERR) RD - 
HILTON ON L9T 2X6 



416 e~S-236l 
V OF SINGER 



-40- 



FEB 22. 1988 



PROVINCES LIS'EO ALPHABETICALLY 8V COMPANY 



ANNE* G 
APPENDIX 2 



6.2 

CANADIAN NINE DEVELOPMENT 

35 VAN KIRK OR. UNIT 20-9 

BRAMPTON ON L7A I A<5 
MR. tt. VCORO 
PRESIDENT 



(4l6i 456-0734 



q n 

CANADIAN OIL COMPANY I'rO. 

309 CHERRY STREET 
TORONTO ON. MSA 3L3 
DAVID A FISHER 
BUSINESS MANAGER 



(416) A6l- 7 5l 



3.0 

CANADIAN HASTE MATERIALS 

EXCHANGE 

SHERIDAN PARK 

MISSISSAUCA ON. L5K I S3 

80B LAUCHLIN 

MANAGER 



(4 16) 322-9480 



3.3 4 16 49C-9SQ2 

CANADIAN WASTE TECHNOLOGY INC. 
160 TORBAY ROAO 

MARK HAM ON, L3fl 1 06 
OAVID KROFCHAK 



CANADIAN HEATHER SERVICES 
74 FINLAYSON OR 

THAMESFORD ON NOM 2HC 
MR. 8RAD FINCH 
PRESIDENT 



2.6 



(ITl) Z<)--'i-\ 



CANADIAN WORCESTER COffTRCLS 

LTD 

20 MID DOMINION ACRES 

SCARBOROUGH ON MIS 4A5 



2.7 

CANAICQUE EQUIPMENT CTXTD 

147 HEART LAKE ROAD S 
BRAMPTON ON L6H 3K I 
BRUCE GARNETT 



(416) 457-1862 



2.7 

CAHBAH INC. 

P.O. BOX 260 
I CANBAR STREET 
WATERLOO ON N2J 4A7 
LARRY F BRADLEY 
SALES MANAGER 



(519) 986-2880 6.2 (416) 292-2080 

CANEDCOM INTERNATIONAL UNITED 
55 NUGGET AVE. SUITE 226 

SCARBOROUGH ON IIS 3L I 
OR. E. ROSS AMERIE 
PRESIDENT 



2.5 (4 16) 985-9257 

CANTAB STEEL FABRICATORS LTD 

BOX 489 

PORT HOPE ON, LIA 324 
MR. ft, MCCANN 
PRESIDENT 



3.1 (519) 862-2216 

CAHTLOU ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES 

PO BOX 803 
204 HILL STREET 
CORUNNA ON NON I GO 
JOHN REGAN 



2.7 

CAHLAB AHS CANADA INC. 



(416) 923- 



2390 ARGENT I A SOAO 
MISSISSAUGA ON L5N 3P1 
STEVE LONG 
REGULATORY AFFAIRS MANAGER 



6.2 
CAHPOLAH INC 

42! EGLINTON AVE. UEST 

SUITE *4 

TORONTO ON M5N IA4 

MR. JAMES R. ROSS ITER 

PRESIDENT 



(416) 487-IS8I 



7.0 

CANPRO LABORATORIES 

77 CHAMPAGNE DRIVE 
DOWNSVIEW ON M3J 2C6 
DIANE PRYOE 



(416) 635-9692 



6. I 

CAHREDE LIMITED 

1210 SHEPPARD AVENUE EAST 

SUITE 401 

WILLOUDALE ON M2K IO 



(416) 497-5636 



CANSULT CROUP LTD. 

275 DUNCAN MILLS ROAO 

DON MILLS ON M3B 3H9 
MR. JAMES A. METCALFE 
PRESIOENT S C.E.O 



(416) 445-9431 2.6 (416) 275-9800 

CANTECH ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS INC. 
2345 STANFIELD ROAO 

MISSISSAUCA ON, L4Y 3Y3 
MR, NASEER A. KHAN 
PRESIDENT S GENERAL MANAGER 



2.7 

CANTESCO CORPORATION 

5200 DIXIE ROAD 

UNIT 36 

MISSISSAUGA ON, L4U IE4 

RICHARD U DOORNINK 

PRESIDENT 



(416) 624-5463 



6.0 

CANVIRO CONSULTANTS LTD. 

178 LOUISA STREET 

K I TCHENER ON N2H 5M5 

H J RUSH 

VICE PRESIOENT 



(519) 579-3500 2.7 (416) 675-7285 

CAPITAL DISPOSAL EQUIPMENT INC. 

1940 ALBION ROAD 

REXDALE ON M9W 5T2 
MR. QUINTO OE " 1 L IP° i 
PRESIDENT 



8.0 (416) 236-1 169 

CARBON AND FILTRATION PRODUCTS 

COMPANY 

9 8RYNSTON ROAD 

ISLINCTON ON M9B 3C5 

KARL PHILIP 

SALES MANAGER 



2.6 

CARBORUNDUn ENVIRONMENTAL 

SYSTEMS CANADA LTD. 
2345 STANFIELD ROAD 
MISSISSAUGA ON L4Y 3Y3 
PETER FINN IS 
GENERAL SALES MANAGER 



(416) 275-9800 6. I (416) 363-7294 

CARR I DONALD * ASSOCIATES LTD. 

55 YONGE STREET SUITE 305 

TORONTO ON M5E IJ4 
MR. JOSEPH CARR 
PARTNER 



2.7 

CARR MCLEAN LTD 

461 HORNER AVENUE 
TORONTO ON M8W 4X2 



(416) 252-3371 



6.1 

CAftR-SAHYER INCORPORATED 
1895 WILSON AVE. 

WESTON ON M9M IA2 
MR. ALAN C. CARR 
PRESIDENT 



i4l6) 741-4733 2.5 (416) 791-K 

CARTER AUTOMOTIVE CANADA LID. 
109 EAST DR. 



BRAMPTON ON L6T 
MR. K.A. DRESSER 



B6 



2.7 (416) 298-1628 

CASSIER ENGINEERING SALES LTD, 

1 1 PROGRESS AVENUE 
SCARBOROUGH ON, M1P 4S7 
BILL O'BRIEN 
VICE PRESIOENT 



8.0 { ) 

CAUGWY AUTO PARTS 

R R I 

PENETANGUISHENE ON LOK IPO 



e.o f ) 

CEDARDALE SCRAP IRON AND METALS 

DIVISION OF LASCO STEEL 
500 UATERLOOCOURT 
OSHAWA ON LIH 3X1 



2.5 

CEILCOTE CANADA 

DIV. OF GENERAL SIGNAL LTD. 
7065 FIR TREE DRIVE 
MISSISSAUGA ON. L5S IG7 
R.N. HAY 
GENERAL SALES MANAGER 



(416) 67I-I79C 



-41- 



FEB 22, 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABETICALLY BY COMPANY 



ANNE J 
APPENDIX 2 



6.1 

CEHCORP LTD. 

1300 BAY STREET 

TORONTO ON. N5R 3*8 
MR MICHAEL A. COULTER 
MANAGING DIRECTOR 



(416) 922-4 180 



3J 

CENTRAL DISPOSAL 

6 ANNE 

HILLSBURGH ON. NOB 'CO 



' ) 



9 (416) 368-2364 

CENTRAL ONTARIO IHD. RELATIONS INSTITUTE 
85 RICHMOND ST. u. SUIT! 2CC 

TQRCNTn ON M5H 2C5 
fIR . DAVID P. 3YERS 
PRESIDENT 



2 5 (519) 395-6721 

CENTRAL ONTARIO NETAL AM) CONSTRUCTION L 
HIGHWAY 19 

9RUNNER ON NOK ICO 
m, OONALD B. HART IN 
PRESIDENT 



2.5 
CtNTRO-nOflGAROSHAmAR INC 

220 HUM9ERL Nf. OR. UNIT 
RExDAlE ON. M9W 5Y4 



(4i6t 675-2662 



2.5 [4'6) 33* 

CENTURY ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS INC 

BOX 1*26 

STATION g 

BURLINGTON ON L7P 4C5 

I-IR. BRUCE STHONACH 

GENERAL MANAGER 



6 2 (613) 234-2155 

CGI INFORMATION SYSTEMS 1 NGflT. COKSULT- 
35 ALBERT ST. SUITE 1 100 

OTTAWA ON KIP 6A4 
MR. SERGE COOIN 
CHAIRMAN 



3.1 

CHAMBERS ROAO OIL LTD. 

915 MUSKCKA ROAD NORTH 
GRAVENHURST ON, POC ICO 
LEO CHAMBERS 
PRESIDENT 



(705) 637-2629 



2 6 i4I6! 298-944-1 

CHANCE A B CO Cf CANADA LTD 

100 HCWOEN RD 
SCARBOROUGH ON. MtR 30 1 



6.2 

CHARLES E. NAPIER CO. LTO. 

425 GLOUCESTER STREET 

OTTAWA ON KIR 5E9 
H. LEMMON 



(613) 594-3010 



CHARLES N. MAUDSLEY 
69 ROBINSON ST. 

FORT ERIE CN L2A 4B1 
MR. CHARLES N. HAUOStE I 
PROPRIETOR 



[416) 871-1440 



8.0 

CHEH-ECOL LiniTED 

650 VICTORIA STREET 
COBOURG ON K9A 4K7 
B J MILNER 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 372-2251 



3.3 

chen-king inc. 

R.R. 13 

BARRIE ON L4M 4SS 

JAMES W STEWART 

PRESIDENT 



(705) 737-1221 



3. 



(416) 688-516 



CHEH-SERV ASSOCIATES INC. 

P.O. BOX 1254 

2 CUSHMAN ROAD UNI' »3 

ST- CATHARINES ON LZP 7A7 

GARY 3ELLH0USE 

PRESIDENT 



2.7 '416; 438-9266 

CHEMICAL EQUIP FABRICATORS LTD 

16 ESTATE DRIVE 
TORONTO ON. MIH 221 



8 

CHEMICAL SALVAGE LIMITED 

2! DALE AVENUE 
SUITE 919 

TORONTO ON M4W IK3 
L J HULFF 
VICE PRESIDENT 



(416) 961-3092 



2.6 

CHEMLINE PLASTICS LTD 

5S GUARDSMAN RO 
THORNHILL 3N. L3T 6L2 



(416) 889-7890 3. I I ) 

CHENIER F C t SONS DISPOSAL 

LTD 

R R 2 

CUMBERLAND ON. KOA 3ED 



2.7 

CHEVRON ASPHALT LINITED 

43 INDUSTRIAL STREET 
TORONTO ON. M4G 122 
HUGH GRAHAM 
SALES MANAGER 



(416) 421-2552 



6.2 ("6) 291 

CHISHOLM. FLEMING 1 ASSOCIATES 

3025 KENNEDY RD UNIT 2 
ACINCOURT ON. MIV IS3 



■9983 2.6 

CHRCfWLOX CANADA INC 

210 REXDALE BL'.'O 
REXDALE ON. M9W iR4 



(416) 743-3CCC 



6 2 (416) 423-1744 

CIAH GLOBAL MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS 

2 NILEPOST PLACE SUITE 603 

TORONTO ON. M4H IC7 



4.1 (416) 465-7591 

CINCO DIV. Of TCROMCHT INDUSTRIES LTD. 

65 VILLIERS ST. 

TORONTO ON. MSA 3S I 
MR. S.D. MCLEOD 
PRESIDENT 



6 2 -: 4 1 6 5 967-69CO 

CINI-LITTLE INTERNATIONAL INC. 

593 YONCE ST. SUITE 200 

TORONTO ON M4Y 124 
MR. JAMES H. LITTLE 
PRESIDENT 



2.7 

aA-VAL (CANADA) LTD 

2 CHRISTIE DRIVE 

P BOX 10 

BEAMSVILLE ON LOR IBQ 



(416) 563-4963 



2.6 

CLAESSEN PUMPS LTD 



P BOX 370 
BRADFORD ON. 



L37. 2A9 



i 4 16) 775-4699 



3.3 

OAHKAT ENV SERVICES LTD. 

1906 SIHCOE STREET NCPTH 
OSHAWA ON LIC 4X3 
DONALD PATTERSON 
PRESIDENT 



MI6> 579-600 



6.2 

CLArTON CONSULTANTS LTD. 

291 CEDARHOLME AVE. 

KESWICK ON L4P 2W5 

MR. THOMAS CHARLES CLAYTON 

PRESIDENT 



(416) 476-3311 



6 2 - 5 1 9 y 255-979" 

CLAYTON ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS LTD. 

JOO HURON CHURCH ROAD 

WINDSOR ON. N9C 2J9 



-42- 



2.6 

CLEARfLO SX1NHERS INC 

6 PRQTEA GARDENS 
UILLOUDALE ON. M2K 2U6 



(416! 224-99! 



FEB 22. 1988 



B ROVINCES LISTED ALPHABETICALLY St COMPANY 



ANNEX G 
APPENDIX 2 



2.6 (416) 881-3215 

CLEARWATER HARINE INDUSTRIES LTD. 
P.O. BOX 254 STN "S" 

TOflONTO ON. M5M 4L7 
MR . MICHAEL A. OXENHAr. 



2.7 (519) 884-4320 

CUMMER INDUSTRIES {1964) LTD 

P BOX 130 
WATERLOO ON N2J 4A 
DOUG SCHEIFLE'r 



2.7 

CLIMAX BALER CO LTD 

4 3 BURTON 

HAMILTON CN L8L Mi 

V K ROBINSON 



(416) 527-3360 



2.6 

CJ1S ROTOROISK INC. 

5266 GENERAL ROAD 
UNIT 12 

MISSISSAUGA ON. L4W 
T G SMITH 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 625-8916 9.0 f 4 1 6 1 741-6249 

CO-DESIGN TRAINING SERVICES INC. 
88 LANYARD ROAD SUITE ! 

WESTON ON M9M I Y 9 
MR. WILLIAM H. TRANTER 
PRESIDENT 



6.1 f4l6) 491-4503 

COLE SHERMAN S ASSOCIATES LIMITED 
2025 SHEPPERD AVE. E. 

HILLOUDALE ON, M2J 1W3 
MR. R.J. COL- 
PRESIDENT 



8.0 

COLEMAN V t SON 

12 BRAN COURT 
BRAMPTON ON. L6W 3R6 



(416) 454-5078 



COB DEV LTD 

!55 SHELDON DR 

CAMBRIDGE ON. NIR 7H6 
MR. R.A. RAAB 



(519) 622-2300 6.1 (416) 878-2371 

CCflCOR A DtV. Of 625588 ONTARIO INC. 
400 MAIN ST. E. 

MILTON ON L9T 4X5 
MR. O.C. COMRIE 
PRESIDENT 



2.6 

COBPAIR CANADA !NC 

2195 N SHERIDAN HAY 
MISSISSAUGA ON. L5K IA4 



C416) 822-7350 



8 

COMPRESSED METALS CO 

DIVISION OF INTERMETCO 
595 COMMISSIONERS 
TORONTO ON M4M IA6 
JERRY GOLDBLATT 



(416) 469-5500 6.0 (416) 286-127! 

COH-TEST DIV Of CONTAMINATION 

CONTA(Nr£NT TECHNOLOGY i NC . 
345 KINGSTON ROAO 
TORONTO ON, L IV IAI 
R HUBBARD 
PRESIDENT 



6.2 

CONCOTO SCIENTIFIC CORP. 

2 T1PPETT ROAO 
DOUNSVIEU ON. M3H 2V2 
A J CHANDLER 
SENIOR ENGINEER 



(416^ 630-633! 



2.6 
CONCORtMJAIGLE INC 

77 MAPLE CRETE RD 
CONC0R0 ON L4K IAS 



(416) 738-1818 6. I (519) 884-0510 

CONESTCCA-flCVERS t ASSOCIATES LIMITED 
651 COLBY DRIVE 

WATERLOO ON N2V 1C2 
MR. FRANK A. ROVERS 
PRESIDENT 



CONSOLIDATED FIBRES LTD 

95 COMMISSIONERS ST 
TORONTO ON MSA 1A6 
EN COOPER 



1 4 1 6 | 461-21 i5 



2. 



CONSOLIDATED RECKLING INC 

3402 MAVIS RD 
MISSISSAUGA ON L5C ITg 
HY ACKERMAN 



(416) 277-471 



2.7 (519) 742- 

CONSTRUCTION MACHINERY CO OF 

CANADA LTD 
P BOX 231 
WATERLOO ON N2J 3Z9 



6.1 

COMSOLTEC LTD. 

4180 DUNDAS STREET WEST 

TOflONTO ON, M8X 1X8 



(416) 236-2426 



8 

CONSUMERS GLASS CO. LTD. 

401 THE WEST MALL 

ETOBICOKE ON M3C 5J7 
MR, St. B, MORiSON 
PRESIDENT AND CEO 



(4 16) 232-3000 



3.1 



(613) 966-5516 



CONTAINER SERVICE DIVISION 

OUINTE SANITATION SERVICES 

R R 3 

BELLEVILLE ON. K8N 4Z3 



2.7 (416) 6-74-56! I 

CONTINENTAL DCCAL INDUSTRIES 

INC. 

191 I AL8ION ROAO 

REXDALE ON M9W 5S8 

JAKE ALLY 

PRESIDENT 



2.6 (416) 626-841 

CONTROL AND METERING LIMITED 



I WESTS IDE DRIVE 
ETOBICOKE ON M9C 
T FAHUNBOCK 
PRESIDENT 



82 



2.6 (416) 665-8960 

CONVAL EQUIPMENT 

A DIVISION OF PROVAL EQUIPMENT 
1111 FINCH AVE W. UNIT 139 
TORONTO ON M3J 2E5 



2.7 (416) 845-347 

CONVERTING EQUIPMENT SALES 

P 80X 151 
OAKVILLE ON L6J 4Z5 
J E MACALLISTER 



2.5 

CORD TURBO BLOWERS LTD 

2101 TESTON ROAD 

MAPLE ON LOS IE0. 
MR. R, WILLIAMS 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 832-31 14 



3. I 

CORE INDUSTRIES LTD 

2037 GORE ROAD 
LONDON ON. N6A 4C3 



(519) 453-Sica 



2.6 (613) 933-2290 

CORNWALL CONCRETE PRODUCTS LTD 
460 SEVENTH STREET WEST 

CORNWALL ON X6H 5T2 
MR. A. LOUGH 
PRESIDENT 



6.2 (416) 599-9466 

CORPORATE ENVIRONMENT CONSULTANTS INC. 

72 HAYTER STREET 

TORONTO ON M5G IJ3 
MR. KLAUS D. HOFFMAN 



2.6 (416) 630-2600 

CORROSION SERVICE COMPANY LTD. 

369 RtMROCK RD. 

DOUNSVIEW ON M3J 3C2 
MR. T.R.B. WATSON 
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD 



-43- 



FEB 22. 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABETICALLY BY COMPANY 



ANNEX C 
APPENDIX 2 



2.6 

corrucato pipe co ltd 

362 iorne ave e 
stratford on n5a 6t t 



(519) 271-5553 8.0 (4(6) 245-8338 

CORUNDOL OIL t GREASE INC 

55 VULCAN STREET 
REXDALE ON, M9U 111 
DR A » HASSAN 
P°ESIBENT 



2,7 (613) 142-9750 

COS ELECTRONICS CORPORATION 

9 BROCK STREET 

BROCKVILLE DN K6V 1E6 
mr, D.I. SNElL 

oo e:ioent 



6.2 Mlii 474-455 

C0S3URN PAnERSON WARDMAH LTD 

7270 WOODBINE AVE STE 20 1 
HARKHAH ON. L3R 4B9 



3. ! '51?) 839-4232 

COSGROVE MECHANICAL CONTRAC- 
TORS LTD 
R R 4 
uCODSLEE CN NOR I BO 



3.1 519) 725-607 

C0UNTRTS1DE DISPOSAL SERVICE 
LIMITED 

P R I 

MCGREGOR ON. NOR I JO 



3.1 (416) 277-1494 

COURTESY DISPOSAL SERVICE INC. 

3525 MAVIS ROAD 
MISSISSAUGA ON L5C IT7 
P MANCIALARDI 
GENERAL MANAGER 



6.2 (613) 729-9925 

CPER RANACEntHT CONSULTING INC. 
18 L1NWOO0 AVE. 

OTTAWA ON K'Y 2B3 
MR. ERIC A. COUAN 
PRESIDENT 



CRANCO SOLDER ALLOYS LTD 

80 SINNOTT RD 
SCARBOROUGH ON MIL 4M7 
BOB RATCLIFFE 



(416; 757-2B~6 



2.6 (416) 356-22S5 

CHAMFORO FITTINGS (CANADA) LTD 

4605 KENT AVE 

P BOX 36 

NIAGARA FALLS ON L2E 6S8 



2.6 'i!6) 299-6666 

CRITERION INSTRUMENTS LTD CAN 
RESEARCH INSTITUTE IV 
30 PROGRESS AVE 
SCARBOROUGH CN MIP 4w9 



2.6 

cncfiAc chemical cr ltd 

289 BPIDGELAND AVE 
TORONTO ON "6A 116 



(416) 7S9-720 I 



(416) 221-311 



CROSSEY ENGINEERING LTD. 
4141 VONCE 5TGEE" 
SUITE 104 
UILLOWDALE ON M2 9 2A8 



CROTHERS LTD 
I CROTHERS OPIVE 
P BOX 551 I 
:ONCOR0 ON L4K IE2 



'416) 667-5511 



2.6 

CTKJHLE FITTINGS LTD 



15 3LAIR CR 
BRAMPTON ON. 



.6T 2H4 



(416) 457-5080 



2.10 

CSL SILICONES INC. 

144 UOOOLAUN RD. M. 

GUELPH ON NIH 185 
MR. S.J. FREEMAN 



(519) 836-9044 



2.10 

CULLICAN OF CANADA LTD. 

22I3NORTH SHERIDAN --■ 

MISSISSAUGA DN L3K '45 
MR. 3RTON HI IVALA 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 822-160! 



6.1 

CUWINC COCXBURN LIMITED 

145 SPARKS AVE. 

WtLLOWDALE ON, M2H 255 



(416) 497-2929 



2.5 (519) 351-2252 

CUNNINCHAn SHEET METAL WORKS LTD 
325 MERRITT AVENUE 

CHATHAM ON, N7N 302 
BR. W.A. WALKER 
PRESIDENT 



6.2 

CUPPY KATZ ENTERPRISES INC 

SUITE 6C8 105 MAIN ST E 
HAMILTON ON LBN IG6 
CUPPV KATZ 



(416) 528-1797 



2.7 

CUSCO INDUSTRIES 

305 ENFORD ROAD 

RtCHMONO HILL CN. L4C 3E9 

WILF STEMMLE 

PRESIDENT 



(416) 833- i 2 ' i 



8.0 (416) 876-4717 

CUSTOM CRYOGENIC GRINDING CORP 

420 MOROBEL DR 
MILTON ON L9T 4N6 
J E O'NEIL 



2.7 

CUECO CANADA 



INC. 



40 TITAN ROAD 

Toronto on. her 

P KNOX 
V.P. SALES 



2JB 



(416) 231-5605 



2.10 

CTANANID CANADA INC. 

88 MCNAB STREET 
MARKHAM ON L3R 6E6 
R E 9REISCH 
SALES MANAGER 



(416) 470-3600 



2.6 (613) 283-4518 

D B H PIPE THAWING MACHINES 

P BOX 1002 

SMITH FALLS ON. K7A 5A5 



8 

O-K TRADING CORP INC 

I rONGE STREET 
SUITE 1801 
TORONTO ON M5E IE5 
JONATHAN UR1CHT 



•4161 364-5866 6.1 (416) 335-39M 

D. GREENFIELD ASSOCIATES LTD 

2500 INDUSTRIAL STREET 

UNIT 204 

BURLINGTON ON L7P IAS 

MR. 0. GREENFiELD 

PRESIDENT 



6.2 



D. SNJEDOEN MANAGEMENT INC. 
P.O. BOX 1000 

MANOTICK ON KOA 2ND 
MR. DON SNEDDEN 
PRESIDENT 



(613) 692-4690 



' 4 1 6 > 279-1629 



O.J. PINCHIN TECHNICAL 

CONSULTING LTD. 

2 ROBERT SPECK PKyr SUITE "SO 

MISSISSAUGA ON L4; IMS 

DONALD J PINCHiN 

PRESIDENT 



D.L.D. ASSOCIATES 

100 MAIN ST. E. SUITE 220 

HAMILTON ON. LBN 3U4 
DIANA MCCLURE 
SENIOR ASSOCIATE 



(416) 528-5951 



-44- 



FEB 11. 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABETICALLY 8Y COMPANY 



ANNEX C 
APPENDIX 2 



DA-LEE OUST CONTROL 

350 JONES ROAD 
FRUITLAND ON LOR ILO 
DAVE ROGERS 



(416) 64 3-1! 35 



2.5 

DACE INDUSTRIES LTD. 

P.O. SOX 550 

WINDSOR ON N9A 4MB 
f!R. R. GRANT WHITEHEAD 



(519) 256-5762 6.1 i4l6) g£0-8SS7 

DALE UALFORD ENGINEERING CO. LTD 

2375 THE COLLEGEWAY ST7 

MISSISSAUGA ON L5L 2E8 

OR. KENNETH DALE WALFORD P.ENC 

PRESIDENT 



6. I (4 16 i 935-9407 

DALHOUSIE MATERIALS ENGINEERING LTD. 
20 CANAL STREET 

ST. CATHARINES ON L2N 4S8 

MR. KEN MACKENZIE 

P.ENG. 



2.6 '4 16) 274-23! 

DANFOSS MANUFACTURING CO LTD 

!230 LAKESHORE RD E 
MISSISSAUGA ON. L5E 2E9 



90 (416) 826-4856 

DANGEROUS GOODS CONSULTING 

98 FALCONER DRIVE, UNIT 72 
MISSISSAUGA ON. L5N !Y2 
LEN NIELSON 
MANAGER 



6.2 

DANHIS MANAGEMENT LIMITED 

80 ALBERT STREET SUITE 505 

OTTAWA ON KIP 6A4 
LINDA MOUATT-CHALU 
PRESIDENT 



(613) 238-2362 



8 

DARLING t COMPANY, LTD. 

97 COMMISSIONERS STREET 
TORONTO ON (15 A 3V9 
JON E GRAYSON 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 463-1167 8.0 (416) 663-6544 

DADOED CORPORATION LTD 

26 STONE DENE 
TORONTO ON. M2R 3C7 



2.6 



OART UNION CO OF CANADA LTD 

8 VANSCO 30 
TORONTO ON. M8Z 5J4 



(416) 259-7836 



6.2 

DATACAP LTD. 

220 LAURIER AVE. WEST 

SUITE 600 

OTTAWA ON KIP 5Z9 

MR. BRIAN WESTON 

PRESIDENT 



(613) 238-6363 3.1 (70S) 656-P343 

DAVE HOLT CONSTRUCTION 

R R I 

APSLEY ON. KOL IAO 



6.2 (416) 368-2787 

DAVID KRCfCHAK AND ASSOCIATES 

52 MITCHENER COURT 
TORONTO ON. M6J 3R6 
DAVIO KROFCHAK 
PRINCIPAL 



2.6 

DAVIS CONTROLS LTD 

P BOX 160 
ISLINGTON ON. M9A 4X2 



(416) 233-321! 



2.6 

DAVIS ENERGY SYSTEMS 



(416) 677-3499 



2299 DREW RD UNITS 8-9-10 
MISSISSAUGA ON. LSS IA3 



4. I (416) 245-1700 

09 ENGINEERS « CONSTRUCTORS -UN IT Of AHCA 

200 RONSON DRIVE SUITE 607 

REXDALE ON. M9U 5Z9 

MR WW WARD 

VICE-PRESIDENT I GENERAL MANAG 



3,3 (416) 747-7322 

DCON medio. HASTE SYSTEMS INC. 

S TABER ROAO 
REXDALE ON. M9U 3A4 
DAVID BAKER 
ONTARIO REPRESENTATIVE 



2.10 (416) 279-2222 

DEARBORN CJCntCAL COMPANY LIMITED 
P.O. SOX 3060 STATION A 
3451 ERINOALE STATION RO. 
MISSISSAUGA ON LEA 3T5 
S. PAUL 



7.0 (416) 279-2222 

DEARBORN ENV CONSULT SERVICES 

3451 ERINOALE STATION ROAD 
MISSISSAUGA ON L5A 3T5 
RAY KISSEL 



3.1 (519) 582-2069 

DEDRICX BROS EXCAVATING LTD 

R ft I 

DELHI ON, N4B 2H4 



2.6 



DELAVAL TURBINE CANADA LTD 

P BOX 850 
2101 TESTON RO 
MAPLE ON LOJ IE0 



(416)' 332-2741 



6.1 

OELCAH. DCLEUU CATHER, 

133 WYNFORD DRIVE 

DON MILLS ON. M3C IK1 
MR. J.M. MAIN 
PRESIDENT 



(4 16) 441-41 It 
CANADA LTD. 



DELCANDA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

133 WYNFORD DRIVE 

NORTH YORK ON M3C IK I 
MR. E.R. BENNETT 
CHAIRMAN 



(416) 441-6354 



2.5 

DELHI INDUSTRIES 

523 JAMES ST. 

DELHI ON N48 2Z3 
MR. WALTER E. WOODS 
PRESIDENT 



(519) 582-?i40 



6.2 (416) 865-031 

DELOITTE HASKINS t SELLS ASSOC. 
P.O. BOX 6 ROYAL BANK PLAZA 

TORONTO ON M5J 2JI 
MR. GILES R. MEIKLE 
CHAIRMAN/SENIOR PARTNER 



3. I 

DELTA CONTRACTING 



DELTA ON. KOE ICO 



(613) 928-2045 



3.1 

DELTA DISPOSAL SYSTEMS 

II THURsriELD CR 
TORONTO ON. f!4C 2N4 



(416) 421-9227 



3. I :5I9) -35-3631 

OENCO DEMOLITION 1 SALVAGE CO 

(1984) INC 
P BOX 3036 
TEOJrtSEH ON NOR IKO 



2.7 

DEMPSTER SYSTEMS LTD. 

260 NEW TORONTO ST. 

TORONTO ON M8Z 2E8 
MR. DAVE MURRAY 



(416) 253-1750 9.0 (613! 728-5819 

DEHTEK TRAINING SYSTEMS LTD- 
1565 CARL1NG AVENUE SUITE 102 

OTTAWA ON KIZ SR I 
MR. LLOYD DEMERS 
PRESIDENT 



•45- 



FEB 22. 1 9B8 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABETICAL!.! BY COMPANY 



ANNEX C 
APPENDIX 2 



3. I 

DCNBT t SON 

R R 1 

UOODSTOCK ON N4S 7 V6 



(5191 537-2832 



3. I 

DENCO LEASING 

01 V. Of 318253 ONTARIO LTD 

R.R. t3 

80THWELL ON NOP ICO 

DENIS MARCUS 

PRESIDENT 



(519) 695-2805 



5.9 (613) 725-29: 

DENDRON RESOURCE SURVEYS LTD. 

B80 LADY ELLEN PL. SUI T E 206 

OTTAWA ON K IZ 5L9 

OR. L. SAW-UITTG£NSTriN 

PPESiDENT 



3. 

DENIZ FREIRE DISPOSAL 

BS4 EMBASSY 
CLARKSON ON. L5J 2Y2 



(4 16) 822-601 



D£NSO Of CANADA Lin I TED 

33 COMMANDER BL-'D 
AGlNCOURT ON. MIS 3E" 



(AI6> 291-7756 2.5 (416) 93 

DESOfl ENGINEERED SYSTEMS LTD. 

P.O. BOX 94 
TOTTENHAM ON. LOG 1UC 
JOHN A DAVIS 
MANAGING DIRECTOR 



2.6 

KVILBISS CANADA LTD 

P 80* 3000 
BARRIE ON. L4M 4V6 



(705) 72B-550I 



2.6 

DEVINE I ASSOCIATES LTD 

375 STEELCASE RD E 
MARKHAM ON. L 38 IC3 



1 4 16) 479-2130 



2.6 

OCZURIK Of CANADA 

365 FRANKLIN BLVD. 



f 5T9 1 62'-89?0 



CAMBRIDGE [GALT] ON. nir SV5 



6. I 

DFA ENGINEERING LltllTED 

450 FRONT STREET WEST 

TORONTO ON. MSV IB6 



(416) 896-6666 



9.0 

DC STSTEltS AW SUPPLIES 

2455 CAUTHRA ROAD 

UNIT 28/29 

MISSISSAUGA ON. L5A JF! 

ANDY K LI 

V.P. AND GENERAL MANAGER 



(416) 279-4807 7.0 (416) 445-53C9 

DIAGNOSTIC RESEARCH LABS 

1885 LESLIE STREE T 
DON MILLS ON M3B 3.4 
ROY 7MITH 



S.O 

DIAMOND BALING CO LTD 



GRONDIN 

NC GREGOR ON. NOR 



JO 



(519) 726-6221 2.6 (416) 335-0321 

DIAMOND CANAPC4CR 
OIV Of BABCCO I WILCOX 
P BOX 505 T 1 122 PIONEER RD 
BURLINGTON ON L7R 4A7 



2. 10 (4l6'i 525-4660 

DIAMOND SHANROCK CANADA LTD. 

o.O. BOX 784 

HAMILTON ON LBN 3M8 
DR. K.T. BURGOINE 



2.6 

DIANCO STEEL LTD 

45 OBSERVATORY LANE 

RICHMOND HILL ON. L4C IT4 
MR. D. SUUALA 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 883-3100 



3.1 

DIEMER DISPOSAL LTD 

14 CHURCH 

HOOOSLEE ON. NOR IVO 



(519) 975-2180 3.1 (519) 451-3342 

DISCOUNT DRAIN SERVICES 

113 EAST 

LONDON ON. NSL 2R 1 



3.1 (416) 757-7407 

DISCOUNT RUBBISH REMOVAL 

147 VAUXHALL DRIVE 
TORONTO ON. M1P IR5 



2.10 '416) 822-351 I 

OIVERSEY ENV'L PRODUCTS INC. 

2645A ROYAL WINDSOR DR 
MISSISSAUCA ON. L5J III 
BRENOA REES 



7.0 

DIVERSIFIED RESEARCH 

LABORATORIES LTD. 
1047 YONGE STREET 
TORONTO ON M4U 2L2 
DR ROSS LAWFORD 
GENERAL MANAGER 



(416) 922-5'CC 



2.6 

DON X PLASTICS CORP 



(416) 961-4888 



48 ST CLAIR AVE U STE 1100 
TORONTO ON. M4V 2Z2 



3.1 

DOMINIC Dl CARLO DISPOSAL 

SERVICE 
236 1 OENISE 
COOKSVILLf ON L4X IJ2 



(4 16) 277-8509 



2.7 

DOMINION BRIDGE -ONTARIO 

665 THETHEHEY DRIVE 

P.O. BOX 310 TERMINAL A 

TORONTO ON M5y IC3 

JIM URAY 

MANAGER PROCESS EQUIPMENT 



(4J6) 249-9'5 



8.0 

OOHINIOH IRON I HETAL C 

2725 TOWARD 
WINDSOR ON. N8x 3X4 



(519) 966-1682 



1.0 



(416) B44-8770 



DOMINION NICKEL ALLOTS LTD 

235 SPEEflS ROAD 
OAKVILLE ON. L6K 2E8 



8.0 1416' 231-25Z 

DOHTAR PACKAGINC/RECYaiNG OIV 

66 SHORNCLIf^E ROAO 
TORONTO ON M9A 423 
HERB LAMBACHER 



6.2 
DCfTTREC LTD 

5763 MATTAWA AVE 
MISSISSAUCA ON. L4X IKS 



(416) 277-334 



DONUS SOFTWARE LTD. 
303 WAVERLE Y STREET 

OTTAWA ON KIP 0V9 
MR. RICHARD MOXLEY 
PRESIDENT 



(613) 230-6285 



8.0 

DON HILLS STEEL 1 METAL 

LTD 

R R 2 

GORMLEY ON LOH 1G0 



4 >t 887-5821 

: 1974) 



-46- 



FEB 22, 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABETICALLY BY COMPANY 



ANNEX G 
APPENOI*. 2 



2.6 

OONW1LL SALES 

122 BRUNSWICK ST 

8RANTFORD ON, N3T 



CS 



(513) 7S6-3089 



*. I 

DORAN CONTRACTORS LIMITED 

25 1 BANK STREET SUITE 500 

OTTAWA ON. K2P 1X3 
MR. DAVID J. PARKE 3 
PRESIDENT 



(613) 230-8500 



2.6 (70S) 325-61 

DORR-OLIVER CANADA 

174 WEST STREET 

SOUTH ORILLIA ON L3V Si 4 
MR. LORNE C. VARCOE 



DOVER SCRAP DEALERS LTD 

194 WOODS 
CHATHAM ON, N7L 3RS 



(519) 352-7250 



8.0 

DQWNSVIEH IRON I METAL CO 

1460 JANE STREET 
TORONTO ON. «9N 2R1 



(416) 249-8918 



2.6 (416) 926-341 

DRESSER CANADA INC 
INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS DIVISION 
6688 KITIHAT RD 
MISSISSAUGA Oft. L5N IPS 



2.6 

DRESSER CANADA INC 

DRESSER PUMP DIVISION 
SOX 40 

BRANTS" ORD ON N3T 5M5 
m R.C. DAVIS 
GENERAL MANAGER 



(519) 753-73BI 



2.10 

DREU CHEMICAL LIMITED 

t DREW COURT 
AJAX ON LIS 2E5 
8 RE TON 
SALES MANAGER 



(416) 683-0150 



2.6 
DRlf-CON INC 

280 BELFIELD ROAD 
SUITE 22 

REXDALE ON M9W 1H5 
D A LIOOIARD 



(416) 675-7008 



6.1 

DS-LEA ASSOCIATES LTD. 

1240 ELLSMERE ROAD 

SCAR80ROUGH ON flip 2X4 



(416) 299-9050 



DSI CANADA LTD. 
65 BOWES RO. UNIT 8 



CONCORD ON L4K 
MR, DON WARD 
PRESIDENT 



H5 



(416) 669-4952 



OSMA INTERNATIONAL INC. 
6655 AIRPORT RO. 

MISSISSAUGA ON L4V I V8 
MR. GEORGE V. MEAGHER 
CHAIRMAN 



(416) 672-3600 



2.6 

DTE INDUSTRIES UNITED 

69 CDMSTOCK RD. 

SCARBOROUGH ON MIL 2C9 
MR. G.P. METTNER 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 757-6278 



3.1 

DUAL REMOVAL SYSTEMS LTD 

6 TOWNSLEY 

TORONTO ON. M6N IH6 



(416) 656-7052 2.7 (416) 749-720 

DUBOIS CHEMICALS OF CANADA LTD 

DIVISION OF CHEMED CORP. 

64 KENHAR DRIVE 

WESTON ON M9L IN3 

FRANK KOTSQVQLOS 

NATL MCR. INDUST LUBRICANTS 



2.6 (416) 681 

DUOtCK CORROSION PROOF LTD 

4104 FAIRVIEW ST UNIT 3 
BURLINGTON ON, L7L 4T8 



1669 3.1 

DUFFER IN DISPOSAL LTD 

65 MILVAN DRIVE 
TORONTO ON, M9L I re 



(416) 746-2290 



3.1 

DunOUCHELLE BROTHERS 

GRONDIN 

MCGREGOR ON, NOR UO 



(519) 726-652! 



2.5 (416) 247-2144 

dunhah-bush of canaoa limited 
140 wendell ave 

weston on n9n 3r2 
mr. p. sklar 



2.7 ( 

DONLOP INDUSTRIAL LTD 
DUNLINE D IV 
II CUR 1 TY AVE 
TORONTO ON. P14B 1X5 



2.6 

DUPAR CANADA LTD 


(519) 893-7979 




42 KEVCO PL 
KITCHENER ON. N2C 2G5 







2.6 

DURAflETALLIC CANAOA INC 

130 EDWARD ST 

ST THOMAS ON. N5P IZI 



(519) 631-99*6 



2.6 

DURATRON SYSTEMS LTD 

75 NUGGET AVE 
SCARBOROUGH ON, MIS 3B1 



(416) 299-4370 



8.0 

DURHAN IRON I METAL 

R R 1 

AJAX ON. LW 2P8 



(416) 686-3775 



2.6 

DURIRON CANADA INC 

[HEAD OFFICE] 

120 VINYL COURT 

HOODBRIDGE ON, L4L 4A3 

MR. P. LAVIN 

VICE PRESIDENT AND GM 



(416) 749-6633 



2.6 

DUSTBANE ENTERPRISES LTD 



250 TREMBLAY RD P BOX 8381 
OTTAWA ON MO 3KI 



(613) 745-6861 



3. I (416) 692-3333 

DUVALL BROS OF BINBROOK LTD 

2471 GUYATT 
BINBROOK ON. LOR ICO 



2.7 

DUOR METAL CO (1983) LTD 

170 UELLAND ST 

P BOX 37 

PORT COLfiORNE ON L3K 5V7 

S J DHOR 



(416) 834-3653 2.6 



DYER I MILLER BROS DIV OT 

CRONIN FIRE EOMT LTD 
1705 MEYERSIDE OR 
MISSISSAUGA ON LST 1B9 



(416) 677-5122 



3. 1 

DYNAHYO EQUIPMENT LTD 

35 MAPLECRETE 
THORNHILL ON. L4K I AS 



(416) 669-2266 



-47- 



FEB 22. 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABETICAL!.* il COMPANY 



ANNE' G 
APPENDIX 2 



4.4 

DYNATEC 5ININC UNITED. 

P.O. BOX 267 

RICHMOND HILL ON L4C 4Y2 
nfi. w.R. DENGLER 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 983-4022 



2.6 



DTttSCO EQUIPMENT SALES LTD 

923 OXFORD ST 
TORONTO ON. "8Z 5T3 



(416) 252-5601 



6.2 (416) 48"- 3474 

E R BBOUCtfON ASSOCIATES LTD 

199 BLtThhCOD ROAD 
TORONTO ON H4N 1*5 
ERIC R BROUGHTCN 



2.6 

E T F MANUFACTURING 



(416) 684-4368 



P BOX 128 21 WCC09URN AVE 
ST CATHARINES ON. L2R 6R4 



6.2 '613! 728-0123 

E. BRIAN KELLT ASSOC. HUMAN RESOURCE 
210 SHERWOOD DR. 

OTTAWA ON, KIT 3V8 

MR. E. BRiAN KELL* 
PRESIDENT 



6.1 

E. FEARNLET LIMITED 

19 HENASTAN GARDENS 

WILLOWDALE ON. M2K I 
MR. E. FEAfiNLE f 

PRESIDENT 



I 4 1 6 ) 



6. I (416) 226-0507 

E. HOWARD LAflBERT t ASSOCIATES LIMITED 

5927 TONCE ST. 

WILLOWDALE ON F12M 3V7 
MR. E.H. LAMBERT P. ENG. 
PRESIDENT 



6.2 1613) 233-71 

E.C.P. PUBLISHING 1 MARKETING INC. 
190 8RONSQN AVE. 

OTTAWA ON KIR 6H4 
ELUABETH CAMPBELL -PACE 
PRESIDENT 



6.2 

E.E. BERRY AND ASSOCIATES 

BOX 7261 

OAKVILLE ON L6J 6..6 

DP, E E BERRf 

PRESIDENT 



r4l6j 349-49 15 



4.1 {416) 449-5300 

E.G.N. CAPE t COMPANY LTD. 
180 DUNCAN MILL RD. SUITE 501 

DON MILLS ON M38 3K2 

MR. J. MORTON 

PRESIDENT 1 GENERAL MANAGER 



6. I (416) 489-0345 

E.I. ROBIHSKT ASSOCIATES LTD. 

175 ST. CLAIR AVENUE EAST 

TORONTO ON M4T IN9 
MR. ELI I. ROBINSKf 
PRESIDENT 



6. I (4'6) 437-3474 

E,R. BROUCHTON ASSOCIATES LTD. 
199 BLTTHUCOD ROAC 

TORONTO ON H4N I AS 
MR. ERIC R, SROUGHTON 
PRESIDENT 



2.6 

E.S. FOX LTD. 

4935 KENT AVENUE 

NIAGARA FALLS ON. L2H IJ6 
MR. E.S. FOX JR. 



(416) 356-2493 6.1 (807) 345-9099 

E.S. RESOURCE ENGINEERING INC. 
P.O. BOX 3074 



THUNDER BAf ON 

m, D.8. SMITH 
PSESIOENT 



P7B 5CS 



2. 10 



EAGLEBSCOX ENVlRONnENTAL 

CORPORATION 

2 LANSING SQUARE SUI" 208 

NORTH YORK ON. M2J 4PB 

NORM UFFEN 

SALES MANAGER 



(4 16) 497-6660 



3.1 



EAST-MEST DISPOSAL StRVICES 

CO LTD 

55 POLSON 

TORONTO ON M4F 2F 1 



(416) 691-2626 



6.2 (416) 928-9408 

F ASTON P.J. I ASSOCIATES LTD. 

22 ST. CLAIR AVE. E. 
FOURTH FLOOR 
TORONTO ON M4T 2S3 
MR. PATRICK W. EASTON 
PRESIDENT 



2.6 

ECO-TEC LIMITED 

925 BROCK ROAD SOUTH 
PICKERING ON. I'U 2X9 
MIKE DEJAK 
GENERAL SALES MANAGER 



(416) 831-3400 



6.2 

ECOCIfiN INC. 

4 NURSEWOOO ROAO 
TORONTO ON M4E 3R8 
OAVID LEWIS 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 699-6045 



2.6 

ECODTNt LINITED 

2201 SPEERS ROAD 

OAKVILLE ON L6L 
MR. PAUL KITCHEN 



!X9 



'416) 827-9821 



2.7 

ECOLAD CORPORATION 

1680 BERNARD ROAD 

WINDSOR ON N8t 4K" 
MR. GARY AHAD 



(519) 945-3103 



2.7 (416) 622-2785 

ECOLO ODOUR CONTROL SYSTEMS INC 

1222 FEWSTER DRIVE 

UNIT 8 

MISSISSAUGA ON L4W 1AI 

MR. CALVtN SAGER 

PRESIDENT 



6.2 

ECOLOGICAL SERVICES FOR 

PLANNING LTD. 

530 WILLOW ROAD. UNIT 10 

GUELPH ON. NIH 7G4 

JEROME HAGARTT 

GENERAL MANAGER 



(519) 836-6050 



6.2 

ECOLCCISTICS LINITED 

50 WESTMOUNT ROAD NORTH 

SUITE 225 

WATERLOO ON N2L 2R5 

DAVE CRESSMAN 

PRESIDENT 



(519) 986-520 



6.2 

ECONOHE CONSULTANTS INC 

150 METCALFE ST SUITE 206 
OTTAWA ON K2P IP I 
VICTOR GROSTERN 



(613) 233-4005 



6.2 

ECOPLANS LINITED 

544 CONESTOGA ROAD WEST 
WATERLOO ON N2L 4E2 
CAMERON KITCHEN 
PRESIDENT 



(5191 884-7200 6. 1 (613) 236-3920 

ECS POWER STSTEHS INC. 

1500 - I 12 KENT ST, TOWER "B" 

OTTAWA ON KIP 5P2 
MR. A.G. MACDONALD 
PRESIDENT 



6.2 

EDA COLLABORATIVE INC. 

356 QUEEN STREET WEST 
TORONTO ON M5V 2A2 
BRUCE E CUDMORE 
PRINCIPAL 



(4 16) 596-6647 



2.5 

EDA INSTRUMENTS INC 

4 TKORNCUFFE PARK DRIVE 
TORONTO ON. H4H IHI 



■4 161 425-780H 



EDWARD ENGINEERING 

1 - 210 SOMERSET ST. E. 

OTTAWA ON KIN 6V4 
MR. ED CHIESA 
PRESIDENT 



'501 232-9692 



-48- 



ns 22. 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABETICALLY BY COMPANY 



ANNEX 
±PPENOIS 2 



6.2 (416: 

EDWARD J. FARXAS OtmCAL AND 

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERS 
34 LYONSCATE DRIVE 
COWNSVIEW ON. f13H IC3 
EDWARD J FARKAS 
"RESIDENT 



633-6801 



6.2 

EFW SYSTEMS 



NC. 



(4 16) 294-6036 



P.O. BOX 299 

MARKHAM ON L3P 3J7 

ROBERT S LAMP IE 

VICE PRESIDENT 1ARKETINC 



EIDT'S TRANSPORTATION 

SERVICES INC 

R R 2 

WALKERTON ON NOG 2V0 



(519) B8I-1 1-18 



2.6 (4I6 1 625-6070 

Einco process equip, div. baker intl cda 

5155 CREEKBANK RD. 

MISSISSUGA ON L4W I X2 
MR. s.n. STYCH 
PRESIOENT 



E1RICH MACHINES LTD 

10243 KEELE ST 
MAPLE ON. LOJ IE0 



£416) 832-2241 



6.2 

ELI ECO LOGIC INC. 

R.H.L *2 

ACTON ON i,7J 2L3 

DOUGLAS J HALLETT 

PRESIOENT 



(416) S7"-9653 



6.1 

ELLAHO-WILLSON LIMITED 

3640 VICTORIA PARK AVE. 

WILLOUDALE ON N2H 382 
MR. P.C. ELLARO 
PRESIOENT 



(416) 497-2520 



ELSTON INDUSTRIES LTD 

100 3RQNOCO AVENUE 
TORONTO ON M6E 4:2 



(416) 651-2330 



6.2 

ELTEK ENVIRONHENTAL 

218 ALEXANDRA AVE 

WATERLOO ON N2L IM7 
DR. GLORIA ELLENTON 
PRESIOENT 



(519) S86-5737 



2.6 

EHCO LIMITED 

I 108 DUNDAS STREE" 

LONDON ON, N6A 4N7 



(519) 451-1250 



EMPO ENTERPRISES LTD 

5158 EVEREST DRIVE 
M1SSISSAUGA ON L4W 2R4 
OLIVER LEE 



(416) 625-6305 



2.6 

ENOUR SYSTEMS INC. 

A25 ENFIELO RD. 

BURLINGTON ON L7T 2X5 
MR. DONLEY IV. UATKINS 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 6J2-7827 



5.7 

ENERCORP INSTRUnENTS LTD 

25 SHORNCLIPFE ROAD 

ISLINGTON ON, M98 3S4 
MR. GARY MCNALLY 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 231-5335 



ENERCETEX ENGINEERING 

498 ALBERT STREET 

SUITE 7 

WATERLOO ON, N2L 3V4 

ED 7WARDUS 

PRESIOENT 



(519) 743-7191 



6,2 

EHERCY PATHWAYS INC. 

25! LAUR1ER AVENUE WEST 

SUITE 304 

OTTAWA ON KIP SJ6 

BILL ARMSTRONG 

V.P. 



(613) 235-7976 



2.7 

ENERVAC CORPORATION 

700 FRANKLIN BOULEVARD 

BOX 721 

CAMBRIDGE ON NIR 5W6 

JOHN CHESHIRE 

VICE PRESIDENT SALES 



(519) 623-9890 8.0 (416) 727-3191 

ENGELHARD INDUSTRIES OF CANADA LTD. 
P. 0. BOX 340 

AURORA ON L4G 3N I 
MR. TED M. HALAHEL 



2,5 (4)6) 727-1317 

ENGINE CONTROL SYSTEMS LIMITED 
BOX 4 58 

AURORA ON L4G 3L5 
MR. ROBERT FRASER 
PRESIDENT 



2.7 

ENGINEERED VACUUM INC 

171 BRANT STREET 
HAMILTON ON. LBL 4C9 
DAVID SABINE 



(416) 521-202 6.1 (613) 237-6729 

ENGINEERING S ECONOMICS RESEARCH TECH. 

350 SPARKS ST. SUITE 601 

OTTAWA ON KIR 75S 
MR, M. COLLEEN CURRIE 
DIRECTOR 



2.S 

ENGINEERING DYNAMICS LTD. 

HIGHWAY 15 S. R.8. NO. I 

CARLETON PLACE ON K7C »\ 

MR. W.E. "ICK 

PRESIOENT 



(613) 257-5450 



2.6 

ENGINEERING SERVICES 

HiNDE MANUFACTURING 
1175 APPLEBY ROAD UNIT *C3 
BURLINGTON ON, L7L 5H9 
R A BUDD 



(416) 335-8944 



6.2 

ENGRAil INDUSTRIES 

20 MAITLAND ST. 

TORONTO ON M4Y 1C5 
MR. RICHARD CORBETT 
PRESIDENT 



(4161 968-3399 

div. of on. nan. 



2.5 

ENHET CANADA LTD. 



(416) 276-2202 



S 100 2600 F.DENHURST DRIVE 
MISSiSSAUGA ON. LEA 3Z8 
ROSS HUMPHRY 
GENERAL MANAGER 



2,6 

ENPOCO ULTRONIC 

405 MIDWEST SOAD 
SCARBOROUGH ON, M IP 3A6 



(416) 75I-90C7 3.0 (519) 332-430 

ENTROPEX CORPORATION INC 

1290 LOUGAR AVE 
SAfiNIA ON N7T 7H3 
OEREK SMITH 



7,0 

ENVIRCCUAN LABORATORIES 

DIV. MACLAREN PLANSEARCH 
320 ADELAIOE STREET SOUTH 
LONDON ON N5Z 3L2 
DR ROY WHITEHEAD 
MANAGER 



(519) 696-571 



2.6 

ENV1ROOATA LTD 

2162 WINCHESTER COURT 

BURLINGTON ON L7P 3K7 

DR. E.O. ONCLEY 



4!6i 566 -; 09 



2.6 

ENVIROGINEERING LTD. 

1 110 SHEPPARO AVENUE EAST 

SUITE 212 

NORTH YORK ON, M2K 2W2 

RALPH BENNER 

PRESIDENT 



"116) 222-1665 



2.7 

ENVIRCflAN LTD 
962 ALLIANCE ROAD 

PICKERING ON L1W 3M9 
MR. W. BRAUER 
PRESIDENT 



(4 16) 2B4-4770 



-49- 



TIB 22. 1988 



PROVINCES UST£D ALPHABETICAL!.' Bl COMPANY 



ANNE* C 
APPEND l * 2 



6.2 (416) 

ENV1RONHENTAL APPLICATIONS 

CROUP LTD. 

6126 tONGE STREET, 2ND FLOOR 

WILLOWDALE ON, M2M 3N7 

3 KOLOMEYCHU* 

VICE PRESIDENT 



'24-0701 6.2 <6I7,1 238-1057 

ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL 
CONSULTANTS [ I 98 I ) LTD. 
t>5 BANK STREET, 4T'H fLOOP 
OTTAWA ON, It-IP SK4 
WM, J THURLCU 
PRESIDENT 



3.1 

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT 

CORPORATION iLONCONl 
2128 RIVER PCAD 
LONDON ON, N6A 4C3 
TED S3RC*CAS 
PRESIDENT 



tSi^l 451-6630 



ENVIRONMENTAL NEDIAT1CN 
INTERNATIONAL INC. 
171 NEPEAN STREET SUITE 
OTTAWA ON K2P 0B4 
GEOFFREY GRENVILLE-UOOO 
VICE PRESIDENT 



1.613) 232-2244 



>0O 



2.7 (519- J95-290 

ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS CANADA 

PO BOX 370 

INGERSOLL 3H. N5C 3V3 

GLEN 5IUESY 



6.2 

ENVIROSEARCM LIMITED 

P.O. 8QX 1000 
ROCK HOOD ON. NOB 2K0 
G A PEARCE 
PRESIDENT 



»I6 : ?54-}^ 



B.O 

CNVIRCS1TE INC. 

178 LOUISA STREET 
KITCHENER ON N2H 5f15 
JOHN SELDON 
SECTION MANAGER 



(519) 579-812! 



6.1 

EPCJ1 SERVICES LTD. 

2404 HAINES BO. SUITE 19 

rilSSISSAUGA ON. in 4B8 
MR. R.S. JICKLING 
PRESIDENT 



'416) 273-3388 2. 10 (416) 239-"' H 

ERCO INDUSTRIES LltllTCO 

2 GIBBS ROAD 
ISLINGTON ON «9B IP l 
GEOFF HOLIDAY 
SALES MANAGER 



4.1 

ERIE MANUFACTURING CO. 

P.O. BOX 380 

STOUFFVILLE ON LOU ILO 
MR. R.A. KANERVA 
PRESIDENT 



(4 16) 640-2363 
(CANADA) LTD. 



e.o 

ERIE SALVAGE 



NC. 



7 ENDICOTT TERRACE 
HELLAND ON L3C 5B I 
L G BELL 
PRESIDENT 



MI6) 732-1 142 



2.6 

ERIE! OF CANADA LTD 

133 OAhDALE RO 
OOUNS'JIEU ON, M3N IU2 



(416) 742-999:- 



6.2 

ERNST ( UHINNET 

P.O. BOX 87 

COMMERCE COURT POSTAL STN 

TORONTO ON M5L IC6 

MR. T. ROBERT TURNBULL 

CHAIRMAN 



(4 161 864-9520 



3 3 '416) 335-1361 

ES ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES LTD. 

1150 NORTHS IDE RCAD 
BURLINGTON ON. L7M TUB 
LEONARD KNAP 
PRESIDENT 



2.7 

ETF MANUFACTURING 

P BOX 129 

2! UOOOBURN AVENUE 

ST CATHARINES ON, L2R 6R4 



(416) 634-43*3 



2.6 

ETS TOUERS INC 

494 UENTTUORTH ST N 
HAMILTON ON. L8L 5U9 



(416) 522-3614 2.6 (416) 

EURODRIVE CO OF CANADA LTD 

210 WALKER DR 
BRAMPTON ON, L6T 3W I 



'91-1553 



EWIO UNITED 

945 WILSON AVENUE 

UNIT 6 

DOWNSVIEW ON. M3K 

R STAROBA 

GENERAL MANAGES 



:E3 



(416) 636-391 



8.0 

EXALLOY NETALS 



INC 



I 123 LOR 1 MAR DR 

Ml SSISSAUCA ON. L5S IK* 

BRIAN EMON 



(4 16) 677-4895 



2.7 

EXPLOSAFE AMERICA INC. 

230 NEW TORONTO STREET 
TORONTO ON. M8V 2EB 
DOUGLAS MARTIN 
GENERAL MANAGER 



'416) 255-9193 



2.6 

F E MTERS CANADA LTD 

269 TRILLIUM DR 
BOX 38 STATION C 
XITCHENEP ON N2G 3H9 
MR. A.W. NOBLE 
PRESIDENT 



(519) 393-"65 



2.7 

F T GERSON LTD 

55 QUEEN ST E 
STE 409 

TORONTO ON M5C IR6 
r T CERSON 



(416) 364-2457 



3.1 

F W CUNNINGHAM 1 SONS LTD 

726 ONTARIO 
COBOURG ON. X9A 3C5 



(416) 372-9491 6. I (416) 45~-i6i? 

F.J. REINDERS AND ASSOCIATES CANAOA LTD 

7665 HURONTARIO STREET 
P.O. BOX 278 
BRAMPTON ON L&V 8.1 



2.6 

FABRICATED PLASTICS LTD 

2175 TE5T0N RD 
MAPLE ON. LOJ IE0 



(416) 832-9161 



2.5 

FALCON FABRICATORS LTD 

BOX 9299 

STONE" CREEK ON L?C :'? 
MR. H.S. GARRIXH 
PRESIDENT 



1416) 56I-02M 



3.1 

FALL-LAND FIELDS LIMITED 

p a y 

BRESLAU ON. NOB IMC 



;5I9> 6AB-2710 



3.1 

FALLS IRON 1 HETAi 

UPHILL 

SMITHS FALLS ON, X7A 4Z9 



(613) 283-2240 



2.7 

FANOTECH INDUSTRIES INC. 

P.O. BOX 1538 
MUSKOKA ROAD NO. * 
BRACEBRIOCE ON "09 ICO 
MR. C. SCHERPENBERC 
SALES MANAGER 



1 7051 645-3045 



2.5 

FARCOTECH INCORPORATED 

I tOO INVICTA DRIVE 

UNIT 12 

OAKVILLE ON. L9H 2X9 

MR. LORNE SIMMONS 

PRESIDENT 



■416' 344-5551 



-50- 



FEB 22. 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABET I CALL) BY COMPANY 



ANNEX G 
APPENDIX 2 



6.2 
FARR1NGTON 

LTD. 

P.O. 30X 6797 STATION 
OTTAWA ON K2A 3A7 
MIKE FARRiNGTON 
CORPORATE SECRETARY 



(6H) 226-7314 
LOCKUOOD COMPANY 



i, I 

FAST DISPOSAL SERVICE 

37 LINOEN 

TORONTO ON. NIK 3H6 



(416) 261-245 



2.6 

FAST SYSTEMS LTD. 

305 LAKESHORE ROAO -AST 

OAKVILLE ON L6J IJ3 
MR, ALAN RUSSELL 



(4 16) 842-4640 



2.6 

FEDERAL PIONEER LTD 

19 WATERMAN AVE 
TORONTO ON. M48 IY2 



(416) 752-5020 



a.o 

FEDERATED CENCO LIMITED 

4480 HARVESTER ROAD 
BURLINGTON ON. L7L 4X3 



(4 16) 637-S203 



2.6 

FELCO' INDUSTRIES LTD 

15 CONNIE CRESCENT 
UNITS 25 - 26 
CONCORD ON L4K IU 
MR. TOUT DICLEMENTE 
PRESIDENT 



(4l6j 665-:95C 



2,5 

FELL-FA8 PRODUCTS LI II I TED 

P.O. BOX 3303 
STATION "C" 
HAMILTON ON LBE 2U8 
Mfi, D.R, FELL 



(416) 560-9230 



6.1 

FENCO ENGINEERS INC. 

33 TONCE STREET - 6TH FLOOR 

TORONTO ON. USE 187 
I1R. ARflAND COUTURE 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 365-9955 



9.0 { 

FERN P1CHE t SONS LIMITED 

OLD CALLANDER ROAD 
NORTH BAY ON. POH 2E0 



705) 176-2760 



8.0 (70S) 776-2593 

FERtUNO PICHE ENTERPRISES LTD 

RUTHERGLEN 

BONFIELD ON. POH IEO 



8.0 

FERRONOVA METALS INC 

R R *1 BROWN ROAO 
WELLAND ON L3B 5N4 
A WINTER 



(416) 735-4000 



2.5 (416) 477-9791 

FES INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

3160 STEELES AVF. E. UNIT * I 

MARKHAM ON L3R 409 
MR. JOHN E. SAUNDERS 



2.7 

FIATALLIS (CANADA) LTD 

3230 AMERICAN DRIVE 
MISS1SSAUGA OH. L4V IB3 



(416) 677-3020 



2.6 

FIELDING GROSSMAN 1 

ASSOCIATES LIMITED 

I 140 3ELLAMY RD. NO. 

SCARBOROUGH ON MIH 

G.F. CROSSMAN 

PRESIDENT 



(416) 497-9111 



2.6 

F1LCHEH INC. 

I I 10 SHEPPARD AVENUE EAST 

SUITE 212 

NORTH YORK ON M2K 2W2 

STEPHEN R BENNER 

VICE PRESIDENT 



(416) 223-1102 



8.0 

FILEK SCRAP l*TAL LTD 

R R 8 

LONDON ON. N6A 4C3 



(519) 455-7068 



2.5 
FtLTERFAB INC. 

P.O. BOX 2231 STATION "B" 

ST. CATHARINES ON L2M 6P6 
MR, R.J. ROMANOWSKY 



(416) 684-8363 



2.10 



(416) 438-6070 



FINNAN ENGINEERED PRODUCTS 

I 149 BELLAMY ROAO NORTH 

UNIT 22 

SCARBOROUGH ON MIH 1H7 

MR. J.C. FINNAN 

PRESIDENT 



2.7 

FIRING INDUSTRIES LTD. 



(416) 638-962 



P.O. BOX 596 

ST. CATHARINES ON. L2R 6W8 

LARS FIRING 

PRESIDENT 



2.6 (416) 667-9800 

FISCHER AND PORTER (CAKAOA) 

LTD. 

134 NORFINCH DRIVE 

DOWNSVIEW ON MSN 1X7 

5 TAYLOR 

PRESIDENT 



8.0 (416) 7tl-17lB 

FISHER t C0LDS8IE 1ND. LTD. 

139 DUN8LAINE AVENUE 
TORONTO ON M5M 2S4 
C GOLD SB IE 
GENERAL MANAGER 



2.6 (519) 622-2240 

FISHIR CONTROLS CO OF CANADA 

4S C0WANSV1EW RD 
CAMBRIOGE ON, NIR 7L2 



2.7 (613) 226-8874 

FISHER SCIENTIFIC LIKITED 

1 1 2 COLONNADE ROAD 
NEPEAN ON. K2E 7L6 

MANAGER 



2.5 (416) 669-5620 

FIVE SEASONS COMFORT LIMITED 

351 NORTH RIVERMEDE ROAO 

CONCORD ON L4K 3N2 
MR. HOWARD DAVID 



2.5 (416) 624-1478 

FL AEROSPACE CORP. SURFACE COMBUSTION 

5215 TIM6ERLEA BLVD. 

MISSISSAUGA ON L4JJ 2S3 
MR. W.H. MOSELEY 
VICE-PRESIDENT & GENERAL MANAG 



2.5 

FLAKT CANADA LTD. 

P.O. BOX 5060 STN. 

OTTAWA ON K2C 3P9 
MR. BOB MELVILLE 
PRESIDENT 



.. r . 



(613) 226-3300 



2.5 

FLEMING GRAY LIMITED 

P.O. BOX 3146 

CAMBRIDGE ON N3H 4S6 
MR. DAVID C. GRAY 
PRESIDENT 



(519) 653-2400 



6. I (416) 239-7632 

FLETCHER ASSOC. CONSULTING ENG. t PLANN 

64 GRENVIEW BLVD. N. 

TORONTO ON M8X 2K4 
MR. ROY H. FLETCHER 
PRESIDENT 



8.0 C6I3) 745-9437 

FLORENCE PAPER COMPANY LIMITED 

2475 SHEFFIELD ROAO 
OTTAWA ON MB 3V6 
A L SMITH 



2.6 

FLOVAL EQUIPMENT LTD 

250 RAYETTE RO UNIT I 
CONCORD ON. L4K 2G6 



(416) 669-4500 



-51- 



FEB 22. 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHA8ETICALLT BT COMPANl 



ANNE' G 

APPEND I* 2 



2.6 

flow CONTROLS DIV OF 

H A N-LEPPER .NC 
291 PROGRESS AVE 
SCARBOROUGH ON HIP 212 



(4161 291-4461 



2.5 

FLUIOTNAM1C DEVICES LTD 

5100 rlAINCATE DR. UNIT U 
HISSISSAUGA ON L4U 1x6 



[416) 625-9501 



(51?) 539-9844 



FNC Of CANADA LTD 

P BOX 190 
WOODSTOCK ON N4S 7*3 
D E CRAS8S 



6. i 

FOOOR ENGINEERING LTD. 

275 DUNCAN HILL 3CA0 

DON nlLLS ON. H3B 2Tt 



(416) 449-2880 6.2 '6131 ^63-Q2i6 

rCCTTIT MITCHELL 1 ASSOCIATES 
SUITE 807 7- HETCAL^E ST, 

OTTAWA QN KIP 5L6 

*R, C. DAVID OUARTERHAN 

PRESIDENT 



6.1 Hi 62.2-304 

FORENSIC ENCSNEERINC INC. 
1C22 UATERDOWN ROAD 

BURLiNGTON ON 1ft 1S3 
HR. HAROLD J. WILKINSON 
PRESIDENT 



2.S 

FOR* RITE LTD. 

925 BRADLEY AVE. 

LONDON ON. N6E 3C2 
HR. ANGELO REA 



(519) 681-0550 



8 MI6) 871-3456 

FORT ERIE SCRAP SRC* t METALS 



THOflPSON 
fORT ERIE 



>N. L2A 4J5 



2.6 

FOSTER t«ELER LTD. 

P.O. BOX 3O07 



(416) 668-5192 



ST. CATHARINES ON. L2R 737 
HR. J,R. HURRAT 



g (416) 449-8838 

FOUNDATION FOR I HTERKAT I ONAL TRAINING 
200 - 1262 DON HILLS ROAD 

DON HILLS ON. H3B 2W7 
HR. RANJIT KUMAR 
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 



6.2 

FOUR ELEMENTS INC 

75 HA I ST AVENUE 
WOOOBRIOGE ON. L4L 4C3 
KENNETH LYON 



(416) 856-944 



3.1 

FOUHES ENTERPRISES 

R R 3 

NORTH BAT ON. P IB 504 



(705' 472-6C09 



6.2 

FOX JONES * ASSOCIATES 

SO PRINCE ARTHUR AVE. 

SUITE 107 

TORONTO ON H5R IB5 

MR. JEREHY FOX 

PARTNER 



(4 16) 928-1003 



2.6 

FRAJ1 CANADA INC. 

P.O. BOX 550 

305 ROMEO STREET SOUTH 

STRATFORD ON NSA 6V4 

JOHN GROOTHuiZEN 

HANAGER INDUSTRIAL DIVISION 



(519) 271-3470 



9.0 

FRANCCZ METAL CORP LTD 

35i WEST S 

QRILLIA ON. L3V 5H I 



|7C5) 325- 20 1 



3.1 



(416) 563-7076 



FRANCIS STADCLNIER LIMITED 



8 LAKE 
GRIMSBY ON. 



L3M 2G5 



3.1 

FRAN* CRIECO t SONS LTD 

963 ROSELAUN AVENUE 

TORONTO ON H63 IB 7 



(416) 789-7439 6.2 (416) 927-0777 

FRANK HOLHAN ASSOCIATES INC. 
74 ST, CLAIR AVE. W. 
SUITE 200 

TORONTO ON H4V INI 
HR. TRANK UOLHAN 
PRESIDENT 



2.7 

FRED CHESSMAN SALES INC. 

264 SUNVtEW STREET 
WATERLOO ON N2L 3V9 
FRED D CRESSHAN 
PRESIDENT 



(519) 944-3225 



6.2 



FREEDBERG E.J. i ASSOCIATES 

5799 TQNCE STREET SUITE 302 

TORONTO ON H2fl 3V3 
HR. EDMUND J. FREEDBERC 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 223-3334 



2 7 '519) 653-6234 

FRINK CANADA. DtV. OF COMPRO LIMITED 

P.O. SOX 3040 

CAMBRIDGE ON. N3H 4S3 
MR. G.U. JACQUEHA1N 
PRESIDENT 



3.1 

FRWrrtHAC ENVIROWtNTAL 

SERVICES OF CANADA 
l VULCAN STREET 
REXDALE ON M9U IL3 
ERNEST LATAL 
DIRECTOR 



(416) 245-4104 



2.7 

FRTSTON CANADA INC. 

1515 HATHESON BLVD. 
SUITE B- 10 

HISSISSAUGA ON. L4W 2P5 
HIKE BRANDON 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 629-4421 



2 6 '6131 629-2612 

FULCHER BROS CONCRETE PRODUCTS 

LTD 

R R 5 

EGANVILLE ON, KC* I TO 

HR. G. FULCHER 

PRESIDENT 



2.6 

FULLER-TRATLOR LIMITED 

10 THORNMOUNT DRIVE 

SCARBOROUGH ON. NIB 3J4 
KB. H.M. MARSHALL 
VICE PRESIDENT 



(416) 284-8200 



2.7 

FUO CORP (CANADA) LTD 

145 OTONABEl OfUVE 
KITCHENER ON. N2H 4K6 



(519) 893-6010 



2.6 

C A T X - FULLER LIMITED 

10 THORNMOUNT DR 

SCARBOROUGH ON. MlB 3J4 



(416) 2S4-S200 



2.7 

G C DUKE EQUIPMENT LTD 

I 184 PLAINS ROAD E 
BURLINGTON ON. L7S IW6 



(416) 637-5216 



2.6 

GET INDUSTRIES INC 

P BOX 640 
BRAMPTON ON. L6V 2L6 



(416) 451-9900 



3.1 

G E TURCOTTE t SONS 

29 COUDY 

KINGSTON ON. K7K 3VS 



(613) 542-53:3 



-52- 



FEB 22. I9S8 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABET ICALLV BY COMPANY 



ANNEX C 
APPEND IX 2 



2.6 

C F SEELEY 1 SONS LTD 

108 SKYWAY AVE 
REXDALE ON. M9U 5E7 



8.0 

G JENKINS S SONS 



76 BIRCH 
HAMILTON ON. 



.8L 6H7 



(416) 549-B369 



G LACOHBE S SCN 

5573 POWER ROAD 

OTTAWA ON. K I G 3N4 



(613) 733-33J? 



2,5 

G M AM) H HOLMES LTD 

BOX 935 

STATION F 

THUNDER BAY ON ?7C 4XS 

MB. R. L. HOLIES 

PRESIDENT AND GM 



(807) 345-2395 



2.6 (416) 457-6223 

G S U INC WATER PRODUCTS DIV 



8 3 WEST OR 
3RAMAIEA ON, 



_- T 2J6 



3. ! 

G WAKELY CARTAGE LTD 

373 UARD 

PORT HOPE ON L I A 4A4 



(416; 3BS-2S0I 



C.E.T. INDUSTRIES INC. 

P.O. 80X 640 



(4 16) 451-9900 



BRAMPTON ON, L6V 216 

MR. U. DAVID MARTIN P. ENG. 



6. I M|6) 634-5509 

B.I. RUSSELL AND COMPANY LTD. 

I 144 PLAINS RD. E. 

BURLINGTON ON L7S IU6 
MR. G.I. RUSSELL 



2.5 

U.K. INDUSTRIES LTD. 

17 CANSO ROAD UN F T # 

REXOALE ON, M$W 4MI 
MR. GERRY KAMINSKY 



(416) 249-S5I7 



6.1 (416) 259-6323 

G.n. SERNAS S ASSOCIATES LTD. 

85 THE EAST MALL 

SU I TE It 

TORONTO ON (IflZ SW4 

G M SERNAS 

PRESIDENT 



6.2 lili) 243-9974 

G.H. LEVASSEUD I ASSOCIATES 
P.O. SOX 145 STATION "X" 

UESTCN ON M9N 3M6 
MR. G.U. LEVASSEUR 
PRESIDENT 



6.2 rl!6 ! 252-648 

GA GIB8 ENGINEERING LlniTED 



2200 LAKESHORE 3CULEVARD 
TORONTO ON MSV IA4 
TONY GIB3 
PRESIDENT 



,'ES' 



2.6 

CACO SYSTEMS L1HITED 

54 MORTON AVENUE EAST 
P.O. 80X 1810 
8RANTF0RD ON N3T 5U4 
P KHURANA 
PRESIDENT 



(519) 759-0270 



2.6 

SALT ENERGY SYSTEMS LTD 

73 WATER ST N 
CAMBRIDGE ON, N!R 7L6 



(519) 623-1390 



4. I 

GAMBREL STRUCTURES LTD. 

52 i/2 SIMCOE ST. N. 

OSHAWA ON LIG 4S1 
MR. J.H. FREETHY 
VICE-PRESIDENT 



.'416) 436-76 



6.1 (SI9) 824-9150 

GAMS8Y AND MAfflEROH LIMITED 
409 WOOLWICH STREET 

GUELPH ON. N!H 3X2 



GARDEN CHEMICALS CO LTD 

3 MUSGRAVE STREET 
TORONTO ON M4E 2H3 
PETER PEPLICHKOVSK 



(AI6) 694-6901 



6.2 

GARTNER LEE LTD. 

140 RENFREW DRIVE 
(1ARKHAM ON L3R 6B3 
JIM PHiMISTER 
SENIOR HYDROCECLOCIST 



(4l6) 477-84QC 



2.6 

GASBOY Of CANADA LTD 

P 80X 6185 STN 
4 30 INDUSTRIAL RD 
LONDON ON N5H 5R6 



(519) 453-5340 6.2 (613) 744-0317 

GASTON R. LEAL AND ASSOCIATES 

2122 MONSON CflES. 

GLOUCESTER ON K1J 6A8 
MR. G.R. LEAL 
PRESIDENT 



6.2 

GATES TO CHINA INC. 

4 19 COLLEGE ST. 

TORONTO ON M5T IT I 
MR. KEES DE ZUACER 
PRESIDENT 



16) 363-5300 



G8C CANADA INC 

49 RAILS IDE ROAD 
DON MILLS ON, H3A 



33 



(416) 447-4951 2.6 (416) 396-9595 

GENERAL CHEMICAL CANADA LTD 

201 CITY CENTRE OR 
MISS1SSAUGA ON, L5B 3A3 



2.6 (416) 924-721 

GENERAL FILTRATION DIVISION Of 

LEE CHEMICALS LTD. 
II 19 TONCE STREET 
TORONTO ON M4U 2L7 
PAUL LAURENCE 
SALES MANAGER 



2.7 (4 16) 662-5200 

GENERAL LIQUID ENGINEERING INC 
327 HILTON DRIVE 

STONE Y CREEK ON L9E 2N4 
MR. ED COTSULSKY 
PRESIDENT 



2.5 (416) 629-1999 

GENERAL REFRIGERATION DIV. INTERNETCO LTD 
5320 TIM8ERLEA BLVD. 

M1SS1SSAUGA ON L4U 2S6 
MR. MICHAEL J. GILHESPY 



3.0 

GENOR SERVICES 

A DIV OF ENNIS-SCORY FI8RES 
401 ELGIN ST 
8RANTF0RD ON N3T 5W5 
NORMAN HAAC 



(519) 756-526-1 



2.7 

GENSCO EQUIPMENT CO LTD 

53 CARLAH AVE 
TORONTO ON M4H 2R6 
AL ZELUNKA 



(416) 4.65-7S21 



6.2 

GEO-ANALYSIS INC. 

P.O. BOX 13010 
KANATA ON K2K 1X3 
JACQUES SAURIOL 
HYOROGEOLOGIST 



(613) 592-3900 



6.2 

GEO-ENVIRON LIMITED 

P.O. BOX 36 
AURORA ON. L4G 3HI 
BRYAN R WHITEHEAD 
PRESIDENT 



(4 161 T73-S225 



-53- 



FEB 22. 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABET I CALL* Br CONPAN! 



ANNE* G 
APPEND!" 2 



6.1 

GEOCON INC. 

33 TONCE ST. 

TORONTO ON H5E l|7 
NR. MARCEL OUFOUR 
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD 



(416) 673-1664 



1.1 

gconics united 

1745 heyerside drive 

UNIT f8 

MISSISSAUGA ON, L5T 1C5 

F B SNELSROVE 

J. P. MAfiKE'lNG AND SALES 



(416) 676-9580 



GEORGE HILL CARTAAGE 

R R 21 

GALT ON. NIR 3P5 



(519' 621-9053 



4. 1 14 161 233-58 1 I 

george wirfu canada limited 

80 NORTH QUEEN S T. 

TORONTO ON M8Z 2C9 
MR. STUART S, JAROINE 
CHAIRMAN I CEO 



2." 15191 376-6120 

GEORGIAN BAY EIRE AND SAFETY 

SUPPLIES LTD. 

P.O. BOX 90 3 

OUEN SOUNO ON. N4X 5U9 

NELS MCKAY 

PRESIDENT 



3.1 1 70 

GEORGIAN BAY SANITATION 

P BOS 1559 
PENETANGUISHENE ON. LQK IPO 



549- 



3.1 (-416) 372-2334 

GERALD F INLAY CONSTRUCT I OR LTD 



R R 3 
C080URG ON. 



KOK ICO 



GESTEC INC. 

368 RUE SLATER 

BUREAU 201 

OTTAWA ON, KIR 5C I 



(613) 234-6290 



3.1 

GIANT DISPOSAL LTD 

145 MILVAN DRIVE 
TORONTO ON. M9L I 29 



(416) 743-751 



CIFFELS ASSOCIATES LTD. 

30 INTERNATIONAL 8LV0, 

REXDALE ON M9W SP3 
MP, J. P. UANKO B.AH.E 
CHAIRMAN 



(4 16) 675-5950 



P.ENG. 



2.S 



(41*) 7B I -6 166 



CIFFIN SHEET METALS LIITITEO 

133 BRIDGELANO AVE. 

TORONTO ON N6A IY7 
NR. O.P. GifFIN 
PRESIDENT 



a.o 

GILBAT METALS LTD 



45 RODINEA 
MAPLE ON. LOJ 



IEC 



'416! 3 32- '94? 



3.1 

GILBERT STEWART LTD 

2136 MANNING ROAO 
TECUfSEH ON. N8N 2L9 



(519) 735-665 



3.1 

GILLES IUYER SANITATION 

115 RICHER 

HAUXES3URY ON, K.SA 1*7 



(6131 632-2561 



6.2 

CILKftE I ASSOCIATES 

150 3LOOR STREET HES~ 

SUITE 340 

TORONTO ON MI5S 2*9 

NR, .BLAKE N, GILMOPE 

PRESIDENT 



2.6 (519) 836-0500 

GLEGC WATER CONDITIONING INC. 
29 ROYAL ROAD 

GUELPH ON NIK IG2 
MR. ROBERT GlEGG 



3. I 

GLENVTEU IRON 1 METAL LTD 

HIGHWAY 43 WEST 

SMITHS FALLS ON. K7A 4S9 



(613) 283-5230 



Z.S 

GLITSCH CANADA LTD. 

P.O. BOX 880 

UX8RIDGE CN LOC IKO 
1R. MAURICE MADE 



(416) 364-1 106 



3. I 

GLOBAL WASTE SERVICE INC 



(416) 532-7992 



40 WABASH 
TORONTO ON M6R 



N2 



GLOS ENGINEERING LTD. 
3155 HURON CHURCH ROAD 

WINDSOR ON. N9E 4H6 



(519) 966-6750 



3.1 

GOLDEN TRANSFER 

1370 WALLACE 30AD 

UNIT 5 

OAKVILLE ON. L6L 2Y2 

D U MARTIN 

PRESIDENT 



(416) 825-493 



6.2 

COLDER ASSOCIATES 

3151 WHARTON WAY 
MISSISSAUGA ON L4X 286 
DENYS REAOES 
PRINCIPAL 



(416) 675-7341 



8.0 

CCLOLUST IRON t METAL LTD 

116 TORYORK DRIVE 
TORONTO ON. M9L 1X6 



(416) 741-5962 



6.2 



GCOOfELLOU CONSULTANTS INC 

65150 MISSISSAUGA ROAD N 
MISSISSAUGA ON L5N IA6 
HOWARD COOOFELLOW 



(416) 858-4424 



2.7 

GOOOrtAR CANADA INC. 

21 FOUR SEASONS PLACE 
ISLINGTON ON M9B 6G2 
DAVE LAUCHTON 
CUSTOMER SERVICE REP. 



(416) 626-4611 2.7 (416) 249-7151 

GORDON A HACEACHERN PRODUCTS 

40 RON SON DRIVE 

LINiT I 

REXDALE ON M9W 183 



6.2 

GORE AND STORRIE LTD. 



1416) 485-7715 



1670 BAYVIEH AVENUE 

TORONTO ON M4G 3C2 

N J PERKINS 

MANAGER ENG'i i HASTE W T DIV 



3.1 



GORTWCS PLUMBING 1 HEATING 

LTD 

32 TIMBER ROAO 

ELLIOT LAKE ON L5A 2AB 



(705) 648-3393 



2.6 i5l?) 63I-2B70 

GORMAN-HUPP Of CANADA LIMITED 
70 BURUELL ROAD 

ST. THOMAS ON. N5P 3R7 
NR. W.B. HORN 
VICE-PRESIDENT AND GM 



3.1 1 61 3) 836-6069 

GOULBORN STinSVILLE 

SANITATION LTD 
P BOX 266 
KANATA-STITTSVILLE ON KOA 2G0 



-54- 



FEB 11. 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABETICALLY BY COMPANY 



ANNEX G 
APPEND U 2 



2.6 (519) 622-3600 

GOULDS PUMPS CANADA IMC 

285 SHELDON OR 
CAMBRIDGE ON. NIT 1A6 



GRAND RIVER DISPOSAL LTD 

fi R 2 

SSHMEKEN ON, NCA IMC 



(519) 44S-4228 



6.2 

GRAPHIC UNLIMITED 

275 BAY ST. 

OTTAWA ON Kifl 27.5 
MR. PAUL AKEHURST 
PRESIDENT 



(613) 238-4075 



2.6 

GREENING DONALD CO LTD 

BOX 430 55 QUEEN ST N 
HAMILTON ON. L8N 3J3 



(416) 528-5971 



5.0 

GREENL/NE RESINS LTD 

2150 STEELES AVE EAST 
3RAHALEA ON LIT IA7 
CECIL G GREEN 



< 4 1 6 J 791-9444 



3.0 

GREENSPOON BROS LTD 

P BOX 430 
SUDBURY ON P3E 4P6 
HORT PLISXCW 



:705'; 566-SOO@ 



8.0 

GREENSPOON IRON 1 HETAL 

7 80LING3ROOKE 
TORONTO ON. M6B 3L5 



(416) 782-2755 



2.6 

GREET LIGKTNIN 

UNIT OF GENERAL SIGNAL LTD 

100 MIRANDA AVE 

TORONTO ON M68 3W7 

MR. D. FRASER 

PRESIDENT 



(416) 781-6105 



5.9 

GREGORY GEOSCIENCE LTD. 

1794 COURTUOOO CRESCENT 

OTTAUA ON K2C 295 
DR. A.F. GREGORY 
PRESIDENT 



(613) 224-9565 



2.7 

GREIF CONTAINERS INC 

P.O. BOX 27 

4219 PARK STREET 

NIAGARA FALLS ON L2E 4S8 

MR S TIMSANS 

PRESIDENT 



(416) 358-3271 



3.1 (705) 445-460 

GRET-SINCOE CONTAINER SERVICE 

P BOX 251 
COLLINGHOOO ON. L9Y 3Z5 



2.6 (416) 251-41 

GRINNELL CORP OF CANADA LTD 

10 NORTH QUEEN ST 
TORONTO ON. M8Z 2C5 



(416) 560-5220 



GRON-OYHE INDUSTRIES LTD. 

505 KENORA AVENUE 
HAMILTON ON L8E 3P2 
ANDREW GRONDIN 
OWNER 



(613) 521-0348 



GROUP DELTA INTERNATIONAL 

2301 ST. LAURENT BLVD. 

SUITE '00 

OTTAWA ON K !C 4J7 

Hfl. JEFrHEr A. WHITE 

PRESIDENT 



2.6 

GRUNOEOS PUHPS CORP 

200 WEST BEAVER CREEK RD 

UNIT 8 

RICHMOND HILL ON. L48 134 



(416) 731-7350 



7.-0 

GUELPH CHEHICAL LABS LTD 

246 SILVERCREEK PARKWAY N 
GUELPH ON NIH IE7 
RN PANOEY 



(519) 336-2313 



(519) 821-9805 



GUELPH INDUSTRIAL DISPOSAL 

SERVICE 

578 YORK 

GUELPH ON NIE 3J4 



6.2 ' fSI9) 837-0280 

GUELPH INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT CNSLTNT 
212 SPEEDVALE AVE. W. 

GUELPH ON NIH IC4 
DR. D.G. HOWELL 
CHAIRMAN 8 CEO 



8.0 (519! 822-58 

GUELPH SUBURBAN METALS LTD 

74 SUBURBAN AVD 
GUELPH ON NIE 685 
C GREEN 



3. I 

GWfRlCH ENTERPRISES 

850 WTANDOTTE W 
WINDSOR ON. N9A 5X9 



(519) 253-8700 



2.7 

GUNDLE LINING SYSTEMS 

295 ALLIANCE ROAD 
MILTON ON L9T 4W8 
ROBERT T JOHNSTON 
SALES MANAGER 



(416) 876-'549 



6.2 

H 1 H CUSTOM WORK 

63 SYRACUSE CRESCENT 

WEST HILL ON MIE 207 
MR. U.H. HUXHOLD 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 292-2241 



3. I 

H HELLUOOO t SONS LTD 



(705) 253-5352 



134 RANKIN 

SAULT STE MARIE ON. P6A 4R8 



6. I (416) 449-8200 

H.H. ANGUS AND ASSOCIATES LTD. 

(127 LESLIE STREET 

DON MILLS ON, M3C 2J6 



6. I (416) 828-0817 

H.H. BUSH AND ASSOCIATES LIRITED 
2171 OUNUIN DR. UNIT 1 I 

rllSSISSAUCA ON LSL 1X2 
MR. J.C. GRAY B.A.SC. 
CHAIRMAN 5 DIRECTOR 



6.2 (416) 964-1892 

H.R. FARRELL t ASSOCIATES INC. 
92 ELM AVE. 

TORONTO ON M4W |P2 
MR. HUGH R, FARRELL 
PRESIDENT 



8.0 mm 768-1 i 16 

HAGERSVILLE RECYCLING LTD 

P BOX 598 

RR 2 

HAGERSVILLE ON, NOA I HO 

MARTIN GOLLEN 



9.0 (613) 737-3917 

HALL ( SLOAT TRAINING CONSULTANTS LTD. 
205-1355 BANK ST. 

OTTAUA ON KIH 8K7 
MR. TON SLOAT 
PRESIDENT 



2.6 

HALPEN ENGINEERING INC. 

I ELROSE AVENUE 

WESTON ON, M9M 2H5 
MR. ARTHUR 5. HALPENNY 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 743-8533 3.1 (416) 

HALTON SANITATION SERVICES 

145A CONFEDERATION 
GEORGETOWN ON. L7G 3S3 



7642 



-55- 



FEB 22. 1 996 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABET ICALL* 9* COMPANY 



ANNEX G 
APPENDIX 2 



8.0 



(416) 335-2193 



HALTON'S RECYCLED RESOURCES 

236* INDUSTRIAL STREET 
P BOX '174 STATION B 
BURLINGTON ON L7P 3S9 
GEORGE OISCEPOLC 



8.0 '416) 529-2229 

HAMILTON IRON I METAL CO LTD 

239 CAROLINE N 
HAMILTON ON. L9R 2S3 



I 7 '»I6| 547-;?<! 

HJUTWHT CAR 1 EhCINEERING LTD 

29 DUNBAR AVE 
HAMILTON ON. L9H 3E3 

> HAPHANT 



2 6 

HANMORTHY CANADA LTD. 

i 13 CUSHMAN B0, UNIT 3 



(4I6> 688-4922 



ST. CATHARINES OH L2M 6S9 
HP. DERRICK JEANES 



J.? '4 16; 6^5- 860 

HANDY I HARMAN Of CANADA LTD 

290 CARLINGVIEW DR 
= E<DALE OH 19W 50 i 
MRS i THCHAS 



2,6 (416 293-27 

HA* IN ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS 

INC. 

40 RICGETCP "CAD 

SCARBOROUGH ON N1R 4G2 

m.. B.L. 7UCKE' 

PRESIDENT 



6.0 

HAMNA PAPER FIBRES LTD 

2750 JOHN STREE T 
NARK HAW ON L3R 2W4 
GEORGE MILLAR 



(416) 475-9844 2.6 (416) 255-1371 

HANSON INC. FINISHING EQUIPMENT DIV. 

45 VANSCC RO. 

TORONTO ON "61 5J 7 
«R. F.J. oiLLE 



3. I 

HAROLD MARCUS LIMITED 

R.S. 13 

BOTHUEll ON NOP iCO 
BERNARD WILLSON 
OPERATIONS MANAGER 



(513) 695-2": ■ 



2.6 (416) 259-3281 

HARPER DETROIT DIESEL LTD 

10 DIESEL OR 
TORONTO ON. H8W 2T8 



3.1 

HARRISON DISPOSAL CO LTD 

320 CLARENCE 
BRAMPTON ON. L6W ITS 



(416) 453-6950 



3.1 

HARRY JENKINS t SON 

1039 ONTARIO STREET 
CCBOURC ON. KM 3C9 



'4l6.i 372-;Q2 ! 



8.0 

HARRY RUBIN I SON LTD 

SUITE 105 

I 1 BONO 

ST CA'HARINES ON L2R 4ZA 



(416) 684-1 161 



HATCH ASSOCIATES LTD. 
21 ST, CLAIR AVE. t. 



TORONTO ON f!4T 
HR. G.G. HATCH 
PRESIDENT 



L9 



1416) 962-6350 6.2 (416) 863- 

HAY MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS 

330 BAY STREET SUITE 900 

TORONTO ON, MSH 2S8 
NK. CHRIS ?.. nATTHE«lS 
PARTHER ! PRESIDENT 



•71 



2.6 

HAYWARO CORDON LTD 



7485 3ATH RD 
NISSI3SAUGA ON. 



L4T 113 



(4 16) 677-6400 



2.7 

HA2ENAC CANADA INC. 

P.O. BO> 439 

MAPLE ON LOJ 1E0 
MR. DAVID F . HAWKER 
VICE PRESIDENT 



'416) 832-1711 



6.2 

HEATH CONSULTANTS LIMITED 

954 LiATHORNE STREET 
LONDON ON N52 3M5 
WAYNE HENNICAH 
PRESIDENT 



'519) 686-6"6 



6.1 f 70S) 567-3295 

HEATHUOOO ENGINEERING (PRODUCTS) LIMITED 
P.O. BOX 190 

MRKLAND LAKE ON P2N 3H7 
MR. E.P. SMITH P. ENG. 
PRESIDENT 



HEAVT METAL PROCESS INC 

389 DIEP"E 

WELLANO ON. L3B 4V5 



(416) 734-3294 2.' £416) 534-H57 

NEIL REFUSE PACKER PARTS 

1024 OUPONT STREET 

TORONTO ON. H6H 1 26 



3.1 (519) 324-9280 

HENDERSON HAULAGE I COLLISION 

LTD 

20-22 ALMA S 

GUELPH ON. NIH 5W5 



3 I '5191 836- 

HENOERSON'S ROLL-Ofr SERVICES 
LTD 

ISO VICTORIA S 
GUELPH ON N IE 3C3 



1610 6.1 (519) 376--6I2 

HENDERSON PADOON I ASSOCIATES LIMITED 
945 THIRD AVE EAST. SUITE 2'2 

OWEN SOUND ON N4K 2K8 
MR. R.J. HENDERSON P. ENG. 
PRESIDENT 



3.1 

HERBY ENTERPRISES LTD. 

P.O. BOX 1254 
SUDBURY ON P3E 4S7 
HERBERT J LINDSAY 
PRESIDENT 



(705) 673-8044 8,0 : US' 1 934-34 

HEVNET RECOVERY LTD 

P BOX 279 

PORT COLBORNE ON. L 3K SHI 

H MANN 



Z.b ' * !6 1 678-941 

HEHLETT -PACKARD (CANADA) LTD 

6877 GOREUAY DR 
MISSISSAUGA ON. L4V IMS 



2.10 (613) 

HT SCIENTIFIC CANADA INC. 
26 CONCOURSE GATE 

NEPEAN ON K2E 7T7 
HR. C.A. PILKINCTON 



727-0440 2." 

HIHSLEY ENGINEERING LTD 

250 MERTON STPEET 
TORONTO ON. M4S IB I 



r4i6i 4R^-444i 6.2 (416 "27-436! 

HISEY AND BARRINGTON LIMITED 

R.R. «2 

KING CITY ON LOG IKO 

J HISEY 

PRESIDENT 



-56- 



FEB 22. 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABET ICALLf BY COMPANY 



ANNEX C 
APPENDIX 2 



2.7 

HOBART CANADA .INC. 

190 RAILSIDE RO. 

NORTH YORK ON M3A 1 B ' 
MR. ELDON JACKSON 



(411) 447-64 32 2.6 Ml6j 763-4681 

HOFFMAN INDUSTRIES OF CANADA 

58 3ERTAL RO 
TORONTO ON. ftSS 4M4 



2.7 f4l6; 24 3-1700 

HOFSTETTER BUSINESS PRODUCTS 

10 VULCAN STREET 
REXDALE ON. M9U IL2 



2.7 

HOHENER ENTERPRISES LTD 

II I C COMPANY 

216 DUNCAN ROAD 

RICHMOND HILL ON. L4C 6J9 

MR. HERB HOHENER 

PRESIDENT 



(416) 889-6653 



HOKE CONTROLS LTD 

2240 SPEERS RD 
OAXVILLE ON. L6L 2X6 



(416) 827-9807 6. I (4l6.i &K- UJ93 

H0LDER8ANK CONSULTING LTD. 
2310 LAKESHORE ROAD WEST 

NtSSISSAUCA ON LSJ IK2 
MR, WILLI JUSTRICH 
PRESIDENT 



2.5 

HOLLERAH SHEET NETAL 

243 CHURCH STREET 



;4I6) 682-0220 



ST. CATHARINES ON. L2R 3E9 
MR. WALTER GRABATJN 



2.6 
HOCYUELL LTD 

155 GORDON BAKER RO 
NORTH YORK ON, M2H 3N7 



(416) 499-6! II 2.6 (416) 252-6216 

HOOPER WELDING ENTERPRISES LIMITED 
55 FIMA CRESCENT 

TORONTO ON M8H 3R 1 
MR. ROSS L. HOOPER 



5.9 

HORLER 1NFORHATION INC 

116 ALBERT ST 

OTTAWA ON. KIP 5G3 



(613) 594-51 55 



5.9 

HORLER INFORMATION INC. 

116 ALBERT ST. SUITE 601 

OTTAWA ON MP 503 
DR. O.N.H. HORLER 
PRESIDENT 



(613) 594-5155 



6. I 

HORtC ENGINEERING LTD. 

56 SUNNYLEA E. 

TORONTO CN, W 2K* 
m. ALEX HORNE ? ENG. 
PRESIDENT 



.(416) 233-355 



6.2 (519) 252-0024 

HORtCU INTER ASSOCIATES LTD. 

100 OUELLETTE AVE. 

SUITE 712 

WINDSOR ON N9A 6T3 

MR. GARY D.T. UINTERMUTE C.M.C 

PRESIDENT 



2.6 

HORTON C B I LTD 

PO 80X 139 T D CENTRE 
TORONTO ON M5K 1H6 



(416) 364-7213 



2.7 

HOSXIN SCIENTIFIC LTD. 

1156 SPEERS ROAD 
OAKVILLE ON. L6L 2X4 
J MATHESON 
SALES MANAGER 



(4!6) 842-237- 



8.0 

HOUSE OF METALS CO LTD 

45 COriNERCIAL ROAD 
TORONTO ON M4G IZ3 
TOM LOBEL 



(416) 421-1572 



2.6 

HOVEY INDUSTRIES LTD. 

2378 HOLLY LANE 

OTTAWA ON, K IV 7PI 
MR. R. WILLIAMS 
PRESIDENT 



(613) 731-1200 



6.1 

HOME INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

310 - 77 METCALFE STR£; 



(613) 233-6264 



OTTAWA ON KIP 5L6 

MR. S.R. ROESSLER 

PRESIDENT S CHIEF EXECUTIVE OF 



8.0 (416) 362-2192 

HUDSON BAY MINING I SMELTING 

P BOX 2S 

TORONTO DOMINION CENTRE 
TORONTO ON MSK IBB 
J D PURVIS 



6.2 (519) 657-3000 

HUMAN ACHIEVEMENT ASSOCIATES 

22 COTTONWOOD CRES. 

LONDON ON N6G 2Y8 
MR. KERRY A. HILL 



6.2 

HUMAN FACTORS NORTH INC. 

118 BALDWIN STREET 
TORONTO ON M5T IL6 
ALSON SMILEY 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 596- 1 252 



3. I (807) 663-3291 

HUMPHREY SANITATION SUPPLIES 

LIMITED 

357 GRENVILLE AVENUE 

THUNDER BAY ON P7A 2B5 



6.2 

HUNTER AND ASSOCIATES 

6350 NORTHWEST DRIVE 
HISS1SSAUGA ON L4V IJ7 
GARRY T HUNTER 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 678-6844 



8.0 
HURCOL INC 

P BOX 226 STN S 
TORONTO ON MST 200 
AL BAUER 



(416) 422-4385 



6.1 (613) 749-21 

HURTERCONSULT INCORPORATED 

5450 CANOTEK RD. UNIT 51 

OTTAWA ON K I J 903 
MR. R.W. HURTER 
PRESIDENT 



6.2 

HUTCHINSON SMILEY LIMITED 

10 ST. MARY ST. SUITE 604 

TORONTO ON N4Y IP9 
MR. ROBERT U, SYD'A 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 967-6654 



3.1 



HYDRA-OYNE INDUS. CLEAN INC 
SERVICES INC. 
1407 PLANK ROAD 
SARNIA ON N7T 7 H3 
JOE DYNES 



(519) 336-5340 



2.7 

HYDRA-PMC SYSTEMS LTD 

2501 BERYL 

OAKVILLE ON, L6J 4Z2 
MR. K. MOLTNER 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 844-7844 



2.7 
HYDBOHANTIS; INC 

108 GEORGE STREET 
HAMILTON ON. L8P IE2 



'416) 529-M21 



3. I 

I B PEDERSEN LTD 

R R ? 

UXBRiDGE ON, LOC IKO 



(416) 852-6S00 



-57- 



HI 22. 1986 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABETICALLY Br COMPANY 



ANNE< G 
APPENDIX 2 



I COHEN t CO LTD 

P BOX 290 
KINGSTON ON K 7 L 4V8 
N SUCABMAN 



(613) 548-4472 



3.1 

I ft SELL 1 SON 

300D COPELANO ST 
CORNWALL ON k6H 6PT 
SSIE BELL 



(613) 933-1119 



B.O 

I U I S FERROUS LIMITED 

WINDERMERE ROAD 
HAMILTON ON. L8H 3*2 



(416) 3t4-i5! 



2 7 (416) 523-1855 

I.T.S. 1 LIQUIHTROL COMPANY 

".0. BOX 672 
HAMILTON ON L8N 3K, 7 
ROBERT J MATZ 
OWNER 



6.2 

IAN ELL ion LTD 

425 UNIVERSITY AVENUE 
SUITE 401 

TORONTO ON ISO ! T6 
DAVID SMITH 
LIABILITY CONSULTANT 



■416) 599-5440 



6.2 

I DON CORPORATION 

375 CARL INC AVE 

2ND FLOOR 

OTTAWA ON. K IS 2E9 

MR. jAMES FEEL' 



613) 



6.2 (416) 671-2600 

IEC BEAK CONSULTANTS LTD. 

6970 GOREWAY DRIVE 

MISSISSAUGA ON L4V IPI 

DR JERRY FITCHKO 

MANAGER ENVIRONMENTAL SRVICES 



6.2 

inat,\ systems corp. 

47 clarence street suite 301 

ottawa on kin 9k1 
mr. lann> g. klassen 
president 



(613) 238-2364 



6.2 (4'6) 4?'-46-g 

I MET INDEPENDENT MEASUREMENT 

AND TECHNOLOGY INC. 

58 1271 DENISCN STREET 

MARKHAM ON. L3R 485 
JOHN TROUGHT 
PRESIDENT 



2.6 

I HO DEVAL INC. 

UNIT I. 6845 REJWOQD ROAD 

MISSISSAUGA ON. L4V IR2 



(416) 678-6141 



6.2 

IMPACTS MANAGEMENT INC. 

424 QUEEN ST, 

OTTAWA ON KIR 5A8 
MR. MARCE'. E. GOULET 



(613) 222-5622 6.1 <4i6j 822-3322 

IHCO TECH, A UNIT OF INCO LTD. 

2060 FLAVELLE SL'JO 

MISSISSAUGA ON LSK '29 
DR. CHARLES E. O'NEILL 



2.6 

INOAL TECHNOLOGIES INC 

3570 HAWKESTONE RO 
MISSISSAUGA ON, L5C 2V8 



(416) 275-5300 



8.0 (416) 743-1080 

INOALLOT DIVISION OF IHDAL LTD 



7 ALLOY COURT 
NORTH YORK ON, 
LEON KOZIEROK 



M9M 3A2 



8.0 



<4i6l J2 i-9225 



INDUSTRIAL CHEFIICAL REFINERS 

24 INDUSTRIAL STREET 
TORONTO ON. MAG IY9 
RON INN IS 
PRESIDENT 



3.1 

INDUSTRIAL DISPOSAL 

151 CHERRY STREET 
TORONTO ON, MSA 3K8 



(416) 469-5571 



2.7 

INDUSTRIAL MECHANICAL 

SPECIALTIES LTD. 

33 GLEN CAMERON ROAD. UNIT 8 

THORNHILL ON. L3T 5U7 

P J AH1ER 

PRESIDENT 



(416) 889-5237 



3 I (416) 547-1204 

INDUSTRIAL DISPOSAL COMPANY 

160 BROCKLE' DR l«t 
HAMILTON ON. L8E 3CS 



8.0 f*l6) 461-6391 

INDUSTRIAL METAL CO OF CANADA 
DIVISION OF LAKE ONTARIO 
176 CHERRY STREET 
TORONTO ON M5A 3L I 



2 5 (4 161.543-5625 

INDUSTRIAL FILTER FABRICS LIMITED 
663 WOODWARD AVE. 



-i'2 



HAMILTON ON 


L8H 6P3 




MR. DEREK P. 


KELLY 




CHAIRMAN 






2.7 




(4I6> 87 


INDUSTRIAL PLASTICS CAN LTD 


84 HINTEMUTE 


STREET 




P BOX 93 






FORT ERIE ON 


L2A 5M6 




S U PRINCE 






PRESIDENT 







8.0 



IWUSTRIAL SURPLUS LIHITED 



(416) 741-8700 



245 BOWES ROAD 
CONCORD ON. L4K 



S4 



6.2 

IHFORESULTS LIRITED 

P.O. BOX 327 

BRAMPTON ON. L6V 2L3 
DR. JAMES WHITE 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 453-1)74 



6.2 

INFORMATION SYSTENS GROUP 

606-255 ALBERT ST. 

OTTAWA ON KIP 6A9 
MR. ALEX 8ERASK0W MBA 
B ENG 



(613) 230-3691 



6.2 

IWORNETRICA LINITED 

P.O. BOX 828 STATION 3 

OTTAUA ON KIP 5P9 

MR. MICHAEL C. MCCRACKEN 

PRESIDENT 



(613) 238-4831 



3.1 

INCRAfl DISPOSAL LTD 

50 INGRAM DRIVE 
TORONTO ON. 16M 2L8 



UI6) 244-5092 6.2 <416> l"5-:e63 

INISHANNON MANAGEMENT SERVICES INC. 
2900 JOHN STREET 
SUITE B SECOND fLOOR 
MARKHAM ON L3R 5G3 
MR. MICHAEL L. MOLONT 
PRESIDENT 



B.O 



INLAND ( MAR IPC SALVAGE LTD 



(4t6i 365-6564 



P BOX 239 
SUTTON WEST ON. 
WILLIAM SCOTT 



LOE IRQ 



6.2 (613! 722-2655 

INBARINT INTL. MARKETING ! INVESTMENT 

120 HOLLAND AVE. SUITE 202 

OTTAWA ON. K1Y 0X6 
MR. PAUL G. MULLER 
PRESIDENT 



3. I 

INNISFIL DISPOSAL 

S R I 

STROUO ON, LOL 2M0 



(7051 4 36-5461 



-58- 



FEB 22. 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABETICALLY ST COMPANY 



ANNEX G 
APPENDIX 



2.7 

INNOVAC INC. 

P.O. BOX 116 

PORT PERRY ON LOB I NO 
MR. S.N. ZIMMERMAN 



6.2 

INTERGON PRODUCTIVIT 

194 LAURENCE AVE. E. 

TORONTO ON M4N 1 T I 
MR. LIONEL J. BOXER 
PRESIDENT 



f4l6) 985-8441 


2.7 

INSTA-fOAfl PRODUCTS INC. 


(416) 622-6344 


6.1 
INTELCC 

505 GUELPH ST. 




P.O. BOX 21 
ETOBICOKE ON M9C 4V2 
P 3LUDD 
DISTRICT SALES 




NORVAL ON LOP IKO 
MR. CARLO TESTA 
PRESIDENT 


4! 6,' 482-3203 
HOVE It NTS 


INTEfWTCO LTD 


(416) 522-5252 


6.2 

INTERNATIONAL AERADiO LTD 

23 EAST UILMOT ST 




P BOX 70 

HAMILTON ON. L3N 384 

H BROWN 




RICHMOND HILL ON L4B 1A3 
MR. R. OE CHANCENOTTE- 



(416) 37 



'076 



4 161 721-1300 



PRESIDENT 



2.7 (416) 681-1311 

INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER CANADA 

3390 SOUTH SERVICE ROAD 
BURLINGTON ON, L7N 3J5 



8.0 (4.16) S3S-I203 

INTERNATIONAL NARINE SALVAGE 

3 LAKE 

PORT COLBORNE ON. L3K IA2 



6.2 (613) 233-3691 

INTERNATIONAL SERVICE FOB ENVIRONMENT 
P.O. BOX 4065 STATION "E" 

OTTAWA ON K IS 5BI 
MR. PAUL G. WOLF 
EXEC. DIRECTOR 



6.2 

INTERNATIONAL HATER 

CONSULTANTS LTD. 
342 BAYVIEW OR. P.O. 
BARRIE ON L4M 4T5 
D R TURN8ULL 

MANAGER 



(416) 889-3639 



BOX 3 10 



6. 

INTERPLAN LTD. 

75 THE DONUAY WEST 

SUITE 1408 

CON HILLS ON M3C 2E9 



(416) 447-9146 



2.7 

INTOOLS LIMITED 

73 GALAXY 8LVD 

UNIT I 

REXOALE ON M9W 5T4 

TOM HILL 

SALES MANAGER 



(4 16) 675-1025 



6.2 

IOTA CONSULTING LTD. 

P.O. BOX S556 STATION F 

OTTAWA ON K2C 3MI 
KB. A. CAP I TAN I 
MANAGING DIRECTOR 



(613) 225-8512 6.2 (613) 238-8674 

IRVING R. SILVER ASSOCIATES 

38 ELM ST. 

OTTAWA ON, KIR 6N1 
MR. IRVING R. SILVER 
OWNER 



6.2 (416) 364-0240 

IRWIN KIBR1CX S ASSOCIATES LTD. 

1202-181 UNIVERSITY AVENUE 

TORONTO ON, MSH 3M7 
MR. j.U. IRWIN 
PRESIDENT 



3.1 

ISAACS REFUSE SERVICE 

CROSSCUT 

RED LAKE ON. POV 2M0 



(307) 727-2877 6.2 (519) 843-4908 

I SR CONSULTANTS INTERNATIONAL INC. 

12 WOODLAND CRT. 

8ELFOUNTAIN ON LON 1B0 
MR. ROBERT H. YOUNG 
PRESIDENT 



2.6 fSI9) 821-'90O 

ITT FLUID PROOUCTS-GUELPH DIV OT ITT I NO 

55 ROYAL RD. 

GUELPH ON NIH ITI 
MR. J. A. BURNSIDE 
GENERAL MANAGER 



2.6 (416) 485-4441 

IWT-HINSLEY INTERNATIONAL LTD 

250 MERTON STREET SUITE 8 305 

TORONTO ON M4S I B I 
MR. A. HlflSLEY 



J KOVINSXY t SONS LTD 

110 HILLS ST P BOX 7188 
WINDSOR ON N9C 3ZI 
L KAIMAN 



(519) 254-5188 



9.0 

J SYVRET t CO LTD 

916 ZELCO DRIVE 
BURLINGTON ON. L7L 4Y3 



( ) 



2.5 (416) 751 

J. NORTHCOTT IWUSTRIES LTD. 
ISO NANTUCKET BLVD. 
UNITS 2 4 3 

SCARBOROUGH ON HIP 2PI 
MR. JOHN NORTHCOTT 



•8338 6.2 (613) 230-8800 

J.C. COOPER * ASSOCIATES INC. 

436 MACLAREN ST. SUITE 100 

OTTAWA ON K2P 0M8 
MR. J.C. COOPER 
PRESIDENT 



6.1 (613) 

J.L. RICHARDS AW ASSOCIATES 

LTD. 

864 LADY ELLEN PLACE 

OTTAWA ON KIZ 5M2 

ART FEE 

WASTE MANAGEMENT ENGINEER 



•■28-357 I 



2.6 

JACUZZI CANADA LTD 

330 HUNBERLINE OR 
REXDALE ON, M9W IRS 



(416) 675-3333 



6. I 

JAD ENGINEERING LTD. 

Ml - 7TH ST . E . 



(519) 371-9330 



OWEN SOUND ON N4K IHfr 

MR. JAMES A. DEAKINS P. ENC. 

PRESIDENT 



2.7 (519) 631-5100 

JAEGER EQUIPMENT CANADA LTD. 
43 GAYLORD ROAD 

ST. THOMAS ON N5P 3S1 
MR. ROBERT W. MCBAIN 
PRESIDENT 



6.2 

JAIDCO CONSULTANTS INC. 

2415 SOUTHVALE CRESCENT 

SUITE 33 

OTTAWA ON K IB 4T9 

MR. JOSE J. AYALA 

PRESIDENT 



(613) 521-1773 6.2 (613) 237-2220 

JANES r. HICKLING HOT. CONSULTANTS LTD. 
605-350 SPARKS STREET 

OTTAWA ON MR 7S8 
MR. JAMES F. HICKLING 
CHAIRMAN 



2.6 (7051 759-3470 

JANES FITZPATRICX INDUSTRIES LIMITED 
1244 GREAT NORTHERN 

RD. SAULT STE. MARIE ON P6A 5K7 
MR. JAHES W. FITZPATRICK 
PRESIDENT 



-59- 



FEB 22. 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABETICAL!, i St COMPANY 



ANNE* G 
APPENDIX 2 



3. I 

JANES FLAKE I SOIIS LTD 

967 ARTHUR 

TORT ERIE ON L2A 4J I 



(416) 871-5913 



6.2 '416) 968-21 14 

JAflES SCURR I ASSOCIATES INC. 
1200 BAY ST. SUITE 1003 

TORONTO ON NSfi 2A5 
MR. JAflES SCUfifl 

PRESIDENT 



6. I .416) 945-S30I 

JAH H. RE IPOS AMD ASSOCIATES INC. 
221 LAKE SHORE R9. t, 

OAKVtLLE ON. L6j ;H7 
MR. JAN M, RE inESS 
'RESIDENT 



6.2 

JOT CONSULTANTS INC. 

491 EGLINTON AVE. U. 

SUITE 402 

TORONTO OH P14N I A3 



1*16 3 486-42" 



JENCO EQUIFftNT INC 

1043) KEELE STREET 
MAPLE ON, LOJ 'ED 



416) 832-12-2 



JERRT BENSON EXCAVATING 

R R 3 

XIRKF IELD 

CAMBRAY ON. hom I EC 



2.5 

JF HETAL PRODUCTS LTD. 

12 MELANIE OR. UNIT ItS 

BRAHPTON ON L6T 4K9 
m. JOSEPH TENNINGER 



(416) 792-3806 3. I (519) 336-7717 

JftS TRANSPORTATION SERVICES 
LTD. 

402 MCCRECOR ROAD P.O. 975 
SARNIA ON, K?T 7J9 
KENT DARBY 
GENERAL 1ANAGER 



2.6 

JOHN BROOKS CANADA LTD 

1260 SAMATO RO 
MISSISSAUGA ON. L4U I rl 



i 4 16) 624-4? 00 



6.2 (4161 921-4181 

JOHN C. WILLIANS CONSULTANTS LINITEO 
S84 CHURCH ST. 

TORONTO ON M4Y 2E5 
MR. JOHN C. WILLI AMS 
PRESIDENT 



2.6 

JOHN CRANE CANADA INC. 

P.O. BO* 3248 STATION C 
HAMILTON ON LBH 7L3 
J PUTNINS 
GENERAL MANAGER 



(416) 662-6191 



6. I (613) T28-3S': 

JOHN 0. PATERSON I ASSOCIATES LIMITED 

1479 LAPERRIERE AVE. 

OT'AHA ON KI2 "S8 
MR. L. BREOESCN 
PRESIOENT 



6.1 (613) 233-8716 

JOHN D. POOTflANS I ASSOCIATES LTD. 
27 KILBARRT CRES. 

OTTAWA ON K IK 0G9 
MR. JOHN D. POOTMANS 



JOHN DEERE LTD 

INDUSTRIAL DIVISION 
P BOX 999 
CRIMSBY ON _2M JS9 



(4!b) 945-7399 6.1 [416) 32 

JOHN E. COU1AN 1 ASSOC. LTD. 

1485 SHAMROCK LANE 

OAKVILLE ON L6L IR1 
MR. JOHN E. CCLMAN 
PRESIDENT 



6.2 (519) 744-7503 

JOHN JACKSON AND ASSOCIATES 

25 GLEN ROAD 
KITCHENER ON. N2M 3E7 
JOHN JACKSON 
PRINCIPAL 



6.2 '416) 489-1221 

JOHN H.P. HAMILTON CONSULTANTS LTD. 

I 18 EGLINTON AVE. U. 

SUITE 400 

TORONTO ON. M4P I A3 

MR. JOHN ti'.P. HAMILTON 

PRESIDENT 



6.2 (416) J66-OI89 

JOHN MCDONALD AND ASSOCIATES 

IS TORONTO ST. STE. 401 

TORONTO ON. H5C 2E3 
MR. JOHN flACDONALD 
PRESIDENT 



3.1 

JOHN hOCOT CARTAGE LTD 

80 HINUK ACRES 
TORONTO ON. MIU 4*6 



(416) 281-6072 



1.7 

JOHN T. HEPBURN LIMITED 
914 OUPONT ST. 

TORONTO ON M6H IZ2 
MR. JOHN T, HEPBURN 



416) 671-2200 2.6 (416) 

JOHN VtSSERS SALES CORP. 
8481 KEELE STREET 
UNIT t4 

CONCORD ON. L4K 1Z7 
TIMOTHY MCNAMA 
SALES 



6.2 

JOHN H COLBERT COHSULTINJ 

30 BOXBURY ROAD 
ETOBICOKE ON. M9C 2W2 



(416) 622-5582 



6.0 

JOHN ZUBICX LTD 

105 CLARKE SIDE ROAD 
LONDON ON NSH 5C9 
J ZU8ICK 



5191 451-5470 



3.1 

JOHN'S CARTAGE LIMITED 

HIGHUAY 35 SOUTH 
LINDSAY ON. K9V 4S I 



(70S) 324-2989 



6.2 

JOHNSTON 1 PARTNERS INC, 

P.O. BOX 569 STATION "A" 

TORONTO ON NSW IE4 
MR. ROBERT F. JOHNSTON 



(416) 961-1338 2.6 -4l6i 624-2035 

JOROfN -HER-CURE" CONTROLS INC 

966 PANTERt DRIVE 

MISSISSAUGA ON L4U 2S 1 
MR. ROY M. GIBSON 
PRESIDENT 



2.6 

JOSAfl NTG CANADA 

271 PROGRESS AVE 
SCARBOROUGH ON. MlP 2:2 



(416) 291-6444 



8.0 

JOSEPH AND JOSEPH INC 

257 VICTORIA ST NORTH 
KITCHENER ON N2H SC9 
ALEX JOSEPH 



(519) 743-2C5 



6.2 

JOSEPH ME IN t ASSOCIATES 

55 TOWN CENTRE COURT 
SUITE 515 

SCARBOROUGH ON MlP 4X4 
MR. JOSEPH ME IN 
PRESIDENT 



1 4 id ?9i-O0S8 2.S *5 9' 578-640Q 

JOT MANUFACTURING CO. (CANADA) LTD. 

P.O. BOX 9023 

KITCHENER ON N2G 4N6 
MR. JOHN E. COE 



-60- 



FEB 22. 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABETICALLY BY COMPANY 



ANNEX G 
AP"ENOU 2 



6.1 (6131 236-69! 

JSt SYSTEMS ENGINEERING DtV, Of JATOH 
500- I SO KENT ST, 

OTTAWA ON KIP 5P4 
MR. T.A. SKINNER 
PRESIDENT 



JT DONALD CONSULTANTS LTD 

251 BAHTLEY DRIVE 
TORONTO ON M4A 2N7 
GEORGE ALiLOT 



1,416) 751-5230 



3. I i'4I6) 33A-?94l 

K H CONTAINERS LIMITED 

35 PROSPER I T i 

PORT COLBORNE ON L3K 5X5 



3. I 

K PIULROONEY TRUCKING L'/' 

MCAOOO LANE 

S NGSTQN ON, K7f1 1VI 



[41 & 543-442- 



S.O (519) 254-51 

K SCRAP RESOURCES 

DIV OF J KOViNSKY AND SONS LTD 

1 10 HILL 

WINDSOR ON N9C 3B8 



3. i (519) 634-3 n lO 

KARL SNIDER TRUCKING LTD 

R R 2 

BADEN ON. NOB 2H0 



6.2 

KASSIRER t ASSOCIATES LTD. 

111-12 fO- SHEPPARD AVE. E. 

NORTH YORK ON M2K IE 3 
MR. n, DAVID KASSIRER 



MI6) 494-6665 2.7 (613) 395-2819 

KEATING METAL MANUFACTURING LTD. 

P.O. SOX 1201 

STIRLING ON, KOK 3EG 
MR. DAVID KEATING 



6.2 
KEDCHFJ1 INC. 

215 CONFEDERATION STREET 
P.O. BOX 2020 
SARNIA ON, N7T 7L I 
J MALCOLM JAMES 
MANAGER 



(519) 344-24-4 



2.5 

KEEPRITE INC. 
P.O. BOX 1356 

BRANTFORD ON N3T ST6 
MR. H.J. FORREST 



'519) 756-8050 6. I . (416) 889-1976 

KEITH PH1LP0TT CONSULTING LIMITED 
P.O. BOX 938 

THORNHILL ON L3T 4A5 

MR. KEITH L. PHILPOTT P. ENG. 

PRESIDENT 



KEITH R. THOMPSON LTD. 

1494 SOUTHVIEW DRIVE 
SUDBURY ON P3E 2Mi 
KEITH THOMPSON 



705) 522-2900 



6.2 

KELRESEARCH CORPORATION 

850A ALNESS ST 

SUITE 9 

OOUNSVIEW ON M3J 2H5 

DR. TOPI 8. LOW 

PRESIDENT 



(416) 736-052! 6. I (807) 344-3952 

KENBUR ENGINEERING CONSULTANTS LTO. 

521 MEMORIAL AVE, 

THUNDER BAY ON. P7B 3Y6 
MR. WALTER 8URYNIUK 
PRESIDENT 



6.2 

KEN HYMN I ASSOCIATES 

366 ADELAIDE ST. E. 
SUITE 321 

TORONTO ON M5A 3X9 
m. KEN WTMAN 
DIRECTOR 



(416) 362-2926 



3. I (705) 726-6B95 

KEN'S FIREUOOO t SNOU REMOVAL 

320 SUNN I DALE ROAD 
8ARR1E ON. L4N 5P2 



KEN'S SALVAGE CO LTD 

210 ALLANBRUG ROAD 
THOROLD ON L2V IJ9 
KEN JACOB 



(416) 227-414! 2.6 (416) 352-7501 

KENNETH F PERKINS ENTERPRISES 

P SOX 848 
UXBRIDCE ON. LOC IKO 



2.7 

KENTAIN PRODUCTS LIN1TED 

I ADAM STREET 
KITCHENER ON N2H 5P6 
KEN LIPPERT 
GENERAL MANAGER 



(519) 576-994 5.9 (613) 521- 

KENTINC EARTH SCIENCES INTL. LTD. 

P.O. BOX 8250 - TERMINAL P.O. 

OTTAWA ON KIG 3H7 
MR. JOSEPH E. SAUVE 
PRESIDENT 



1630 2.6 (4 16) 449-6060 

KERAHCHEHIE (CANADA) LTD. 

80 SCARSOALE ROAD 
DON MILLS ON M3B 2R7 
R PLASHKES 
GENERAL MANAGER 



2.10 (416) 749-5220 

KERT CHEH1CAL INDUSTRIES INC. 
171 FENMAR DRIVE 

HESTON ON M9L IMS 
MR. JERRY ELUCK 



2.7 

KEVEX CANADA LTD 

P BOX 505 
THORNHILL ON L3T 4A2 
KARL L R MAHLER 



(416) 731-2161 2.6 (416) 681-1 !00 

KEYSTONE VALVE CANADA LTD 

1 00 J CENTURY OR 
BURLINGTON ON. L7L 5J8 



2.6 (519) 894-3440 

KEYTECH HATER MANAGEMENT INC. 
20-20 STECKLE PLACE 

KITCHENER ON N2E 2C3 
MR. RAYMOND HALBERT 



KILBORN LIMITED 

2200 LAKESHORE BLVD, WEST 
TORONTO ON M8V I 44 
J B MITCHELL 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 252-5311 2.7 (519) 539-b I I 

KING EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURING 

P SOX 518 

1401 DUNOAS STREET 

WOODSTOCK ON N4S 713 



3. I (519) 759-4370 

KINCSHOCO HASTE SYSTEMS LTD 

9 GARNET 

BRANTFORD ON, N3T IN-5 



6.2 



KLE1NFELDT CONSULTANTS LTD. 

4 MELANIE DRIVE 
SUITE 12 

BRAMPTON ON L6T 401 
STEPHEN BLANEY 



(416) 792-9000 



2,6 

KLCCKNER MOELLER LTD 

3S25 NASHUA DR 
MISSISSAUGA ON. L4V IRI 



(416) 677-2B51 



-61- 



FEB 22. 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABETICALLY 8Y COMPANr 



ANNEX 
APPENDIX 2 



6.2 



KNOX MARTIN KRETCH L I Ml TED 

220 ADVANCE BOULEVARD 
BRAMPTON ON. L6T 4J5 
P J HCORENERE 

'.ICE PRESIDENT 



(416) 459-4780 



6,2 

KNOX JOHN L. PHD 

295 OELORAfNE AVE 

TORONTO ON HSflBT 
MR. jOHN L. KNCX 
9RESI0ENT 



(416) 488-4256 6. I (416) 293-3666 

KOCH ENGINEERING COMPANY INC 

4750 SHE Bp ARD AVENUE [A3* 
ACINCGURT ON. MIS }V7 



2.6 

KOOON CONTROLS LTD 

2750 SLOUGH ST 
"1SSISSAUGA ON. L4T 1G3 



(4161 676-1042 



2.6 

KOTIATSU CANADA LTD 

1725 SISHET RD 
fllSSISSAUGA ON L4U '"9 



(416; 625-62S2 



2.6 

KOHL I NE -SANDERSON LTD. 



72 OfiENDA ROAD 
9RArP T 0N ON L6» 
G D iE"P 
GENERAL MANAGER 



-■ 



1416.) 



6.2 

KCNSULT INTERNATIONAL INC. 

44 GEMINI ROAD 

UILLOWQALE ON. M2K 2G6 



(416) 223-7750 



6.1 

KOSTUCH ENGINEERING LTD. 

P.O. BOX 663 

8R0CKV1LLE ON K6V 5V3 
MR. O.P. SEXSMlTH P. ENG. 
PRESIDENT 



(613) 342-1223 



2.5 i*i6j 

KRAENER TOOL t HFC. CO. LTD. 
190 MILVAN DP. 

UESTON ON. M9L '29 
MR. PHILIPP KRAEMEP 
PRESIOENT 



-49- ; 7C" 



6. I (705) 942-2612 

KRESIH ENGINEERING AMO PLANNING LlftlTED 
523 WELLINGTON ST . E . 

SAULT STE MARIE ON. P6A 2M4 
MR. H. KRESIN 

PRESIDENT 



2.5 (519) 653-6858 

KST CHEMICAL. PROCESSES LTD. 

105 LOUTKER STREET NORTH 
CAMBRIDGE ON. N3H IX? 
J HOLLY 
PRESIDENT 



2.6 1*16) 4^5-1090 

KUBOTA TRACTOR CANADA LTD 

1495 BEN I SON ST 
HARXHAM ON. L3R SHI 



KHN ENGINEERS LTD. 

50 SERVAIS DRIVE 

DON MILLS ON. M3C I Z3 



(4 16) 444-6656 



3. I 

L AND B SANITATION INC 

90 DIVISION 

COL BORNE ON. KCK ISO 



(416! 355-2812 



2.6 

L J FLENINC LTD 

4 NICHOLAS ST BOY 367 
LEAMINGTON ON. NgH 3U3 



'519) 326-4*96 



3.1 

L H SANDERSON 1 SONS LTD 

HIGHUAT 7 WEST 
BRAMPTON ON, L6V 2K7 



(416) 459-2716 



6. I '416) 632-9040 

L.H. SCHUINDT i COMPANY LTD. 
1134 PLAINS RD. EAST 

BURL !NGTON ON ITS 1U6 
MR. H.L. HILLCARTNER 
PRESIDENT 



6.2 '416) 681-964 

L.N. BARTHOLOHEU AND ASSOC. 

24 1 GOOORAN DRIVE 
BURLINGTON ON L7L 2J6 
MILLY BARTHOLOnEU 
PRESIDENT 



6.2 

L.U. UARD LINITED 


(416) 277-4891 


2345 HAINES ROAD 
MISSISSAUGA ON, L4Y ITS 
L U UARD 
PRESIDENT 




3.1 

LAIOUH UASTE SYSTEMS 

CORPORATE HEAD OFT ICE 

3221 NORTH SERVICE "OAO 

BURLINGTON ON L7N 3G2 

DOUG COULANO 

PRESIDENT 


(4f6) 336-5151 



(519) 966-2250 
BURATTO I ASSOC LTD. 



LA/ONTAINE COHIE 
3260 DEVON DRIVE 

WINDSOR ON N8x 4L* 
MR, E.O. LAFONTAINE 
PRESIDENT 



8.0 (416) 461-6391 

LAKE ONTARIO STEEL CO LTD 

INDUSTRIAL METAL DIV 
176 CHERRY ST 
TORONTO ON M5A 3L I 
A JENSEN 



6.1 (519) 966-Z250 

LAFONTAINE INTERNATIONAL ENG. LTD. 

3260 DEVON DRIVE 

UINDSCR ON N8X 4L* 
MR, E.O. LAFONTAINE 
PRESIDENT 



9.0 

LAKEHEAD SCRAP METAL CO 

404 BL'RBRIDGE ST 

THUNDER BAY ON. P7g ;R7 
IRVING SCHACTER 



(807) 344-9196 



6.1 (519) 542-2695 

LAHBTOH ENGINEERING CONPANr LTD. 
1519 LAKESHORE RD. 

SARNIA ON N7T 7H6 
MR. C. MAK P. END. 



6.2 

LA«TOW SCIENTIFIC INC 

215 CONFEDERATION STREET 
P BOX 2020 
SARNIA ON NTT 7L I 
J MALCOLM JAMES 
MANAGER 



(519) 344-3628 6.1 (4165 890-670 

LANPINEN SELBY ENGINEERS LTD. 
400 MAThESON BOULEVRD EAST 
UNIT 19 

MtSSlSSAUDA ON L*l 1N3 
L LAMPINEN 
PRESIDENT 



6. 



LANARK COATING SERVICES LTD. 
130 'NOUSTRIAL AVE. 

CARLETON PLACE ON. K7C 3T2 
MR. DAVID GRAHAM 
PRESIDENT 



(613) 257-2792 



2 -t (519) 633- ?600 

LANSOOUNE MACHINE AND FABRICATING LINITE 
6 CURRAH ROAO 



ST. THOWAS ON N5P 
MR. ROBERT LUSHER 
PRESIDENT 



3P9 



LARCCOUE BROS LINITED 

t I HARRY 

PETAUAUA ON. K8H 2A3 



(613) fr8 T -6l '0 



-62- 



FEB 22, 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABETICALLY BY COMPANY 



ANNEX G 
APPENDIX 2 



2.5 (519) 894-1300 

LAU DIV. OF PHILIPS AIR i STR I BUT 1 0N LTD 

P.O. BOX 301 

KITCHENER ON N2G 3Z 1 
MR. T. REX CLARK 



6.2 (519) 658-9436 

LAUCALTS MANAGEMENT CONSULTATIONS 

R R *2 

PUSLINCH ON NOB 2J0 
MR. ZIGMANTAS LAUGALYS 



2.10 

LAURASON'S OtMICALS LTD. 

180 ADELAIDE ST. S. 

LONDON ON N6A 4C3 
MR, R.E. KARNS 
CHAIRMAN AND CEO 



(519) 666-9335 



6. 1 (416) 252-5331 

LAURENCE FLEW1ING AND ASSOCIATES LTO. 

365 EVANS AVENUE 

SUITE 604 

TORONTO ON M8Z IK2 



8.0 

LAX IRON 1 STEEL LIMITED 

80 BRANT STREET 
HAMILTON ON. L8L 4C8 



(416; 923-2244 3. I (416) 54?- 

LEADER DISPOSAL S RECYCLING 
SERVICES 
3525 MAVIS ROAD 
COCKSVILLE ON L5V !T7 



LEAMINGTON SANITATION INC 

138 OAK STREET U 
LEAMINGTON ON. N8H 2B6 



(519) 326-5644 



6.1 

LECOHPTE ENGINEER INC LTD. 

23) BANK STREET 

SUITE 301 

OTTAWA ON K2P 1X3 



(613) 236-666-2 



6.1 

LEDCE ENGINEERING INC. 

179 LANSDOWNE AVENUE 
KINGSVILLE ON, N9Y 3J2 
JOHN BERCIK 
PRESIDENT 



(519) 733-312; 



2.7 (416) 675-7700 

LEEDS AND NORTHRUP CANADA 

DIV, Of GENERAL SIGNAL LIMITED 
41 CONSTELLATION COURT 
REXDALE ON M9W IK4 
MR. V. 2ABARYLO 
PRESIDENT AND Gfl 



3.1 (416) 877-3942 

LEFERIHK DISPOSALS UNITED 

R R I 

GEORGETOWN ON. L7G 4$4 



6.1 

LEICHTON t KtDD LTD. 

P.O. SOX 940 STATION U 

TORONTO ON M8Z ;P9 
MR. A.J.G. LEICHTON 
PRESIDENT & DfRECTOR 



(416) 252-6407 



2.5 
LEHBO-HIDLANO LTD. 

P.O. BOX 610 

MIDLAND ON. L4R 4L3 
MR. THOMAS H. LEMBO 



(705) 526-9388 



2.6 

LENPAR CORP 

200 WEST BEAVER CREEK RD 

UNIT 8 

RICHMOND HILL ON. L4B IB4 



(416) 731-7850 2.5 (519) "43-0311 

LEO KRAEMER ( COMPANY LIMITED 
3 HOFFMAN ST. 

KITCHENER ON N2M 3M5 
MR. GEORGE KRAEMER 



3.1 

LES SCHELL PUMPING 

R R 2 

HAL I BURTON ON, KDM ISO 



(705) 457-1 152 



LE7HAN LTD. 
P.O. SOX 67 



(519) 336-4292 



SARNIA ON N7T 7H8 

MR. ROGER D. LETHAM P. ENG. 

PRESIDENT 



2.7 

LEVITT-SAFETY LIMITED 

22 LAIRD DRIVE 
TORONTO ON M4G 2S9 
J VALiOUETTE 
MARKETING MANAGER 



(416) 525-8700 



9.0 

LEWIS IRON I METAL CO 

24 NASHVILLE 
TORONTO ON. M6M I J I 



(416) 653-6045 2.7 (416) 249-8361 

LEXCAN INDUSTRIAL SUPPLY LTD. 

85 VULCAN STREET 
REXDALE ON M9W IL4 
JOHN V WILSON 
VICE PRESIDENT 



3.f 

LEYSER ENTERPRISES INC 

985 ERIE 

STRATFORD ON, N4Z IAI 



(5!91 SRI 



6.1 

LGL LINITED 

22 FISHER ST. 

KING CITY ON, LOG IKO 
MR. R.A, DAVIS PH.D. 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 833-1244 



2.6 

LIHITOBQUE OF CANADA LTD 



1351 MATHESON BLVD UNIT 5 
MISSISSAUGA ON. L4W 2AI 



(416) 624-1371 



6.2 
LIHHOTERRA 

35-A SHIRK PLACE 
KITCHENER ON, N2K 1R3 
DR. JOHN R. PLANCK 
PRESIOENT 



(519) 743-I7B0 



2.6 ( 

LINCOLN ELEC CO Cf CAN LTD 

179 WtCKSTEED AVE 
TORONTO ON. M4G 2B9 



2.6 

LINDEN ALinAK INC 

3070 LENWORTH DR 
MISSISSAUGA ON. L4X 2GI 



(416) 625-1380 7.0 (416) 742-691 

LINEMAN'S TESTING LABORATORIES 
OF CANADA 
100 RIVALDA ROAD 
TORONTO ON M9M 2MB 
JOHN T BURGESS 
MANAGER 



6.2 (613) 237-6668 

LINK DEVELOPMENT t TRADE 

470 LAURIER AVE. W. SUITE 607 

OTTAWA ON KIR 7W9 
MR. MORLEY MINUK 
MANAGING DIRECTOR 



3.1 

LINTON DISPOSAL 

77 ALBERT 

UXBRIDGE ON. LOC IKO 



(416) 852-6343 6.2 (4161 923-3930 

LIONEL D. FELDMAN CONSULTING LTD. 
M5 DAVENPORT ROAD 

TORONTO ON MSR IJI 
MR. LIONEL D. fELDMAN 
PRESIDENT 



FEB 22. (988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABETICALLY BK COMPANY 



ANNEX G 
1P«N0]> 2 



2.6 (416) 249-9151 

LISLE -HETRIX LTD. FIELDING CSOSSJUN DIV. 
49 SHEFFIELD STREET 

TORONTO ON M6N 3E5 
MR. T.S- MEDLANC 
"RESIDENT 



2.6 

LISTER PETTER CANADA LTD 

56 CHAUNCEY AVE 
TORONTO ON. «8 Z 2Z4 



(416) 239-232! 2,7 (416) 665- *0 1 

LOBAR ALTTOnCTIVE PRODUCTS LTD. 

105 BRISBANE ROAD 

UNIT I 

DOUNSVIEW ON H3J 2K3 

PETER J MARC'TTf 

PRESIDENT 



2." (519) 453-B880 

LONDON HACK INERT COHP ANT LTD 

485 1CC0RMICK SOULEVASD 

BOX 605 STATION A 

LONDON ON N6A 4G« 

MR. P.W.E, HODGSON 

"RESIDENT 



8.0 151") 451-6B0 

LONDON SALVAGE I TRADING CO 

3 33 ECERTON ST 
LONDON ON N5W 5J6 
LARRY MW1ER 



'4 16 1 678-2 



LTS SALES LIMITED 

■325 SHAUSON DRIVE 
MISSISSAUGA ON L4W 
U G JONES 
"RESIDENT 



3.1 (519: 

LUCIER HASTE SYSTEMS INC 

P BOX 1402 
CHATHAM ON, N7M 5W8 



354-1456 4.) 

LlttlUS CANADA INC. 

255 CONSUMERS ROAD 

HILLOUDALE ON H2J 4H4 
MR. H. S0NNEN8ERG 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 493-4123 



8.0 

nin STEEL INC 

3510 RUSSELL 
WINDSOR ON. N9C IE6 



(519) 256-9691 



3.1 - 

MIS LUND 

2ND CONCESSION N 

1/2 LOT I MCCART TOUNSHIP 

IROQUOIS FALLS ON. POK I GO 



(705) 232-4712 



2.5 

M MB G MILLWRIGHTS LTD 

BOX 247 

ELMIRA ON N39 2Z6 
MR. CLIFFORD GINGRICH 
PRESIDENT 



(519) 669-5105 6.2 (4!6) 862-M62 

H R COHMNiCATION CONSULTANTS INC. 
I FIRST CANADIAN PLACE 
P.O. BOX 162 
TORONTO ON KSX IC7 
MR. MERVYN RCSENZVE'G 
01 RECTOR 4 PRESIDENT 



2.5 (416) 625-8551 

Ml HEAT TRANSFER PRODUCTS LTD. 

1375 AltlCO BLVD. UNITS 9 1 10 



MISSISSAUGA ON L4W 
MR. DIPT! KB. OATTA 



IBS 



4. 1 (519) 966-7500 

M.B.L. INTERNATIONAL CONTRACTORS INC. 

P.O. BOX I 120 

WINDSOR ON N8X 3Y4 
MR. H.T. MARENTETTE 
PRESIDENT 



4. I 

N.J. LA8ELIE CO. LTD. 

P.O. BOX 610 

CXHRANE ON POL ICO 
MR. MARCEL J. LABE'J.E 
PRESIDENT 



(705) 272-4201 



2.7 (519) 969- 

B.t. METAL PRODUCTS LIMITED 

BOX 1054 

WINDSOR ON N9A 6P4 
MR. C.G. KFJL 
PRESIDENT 



1533 



6.1 



(416) 229-4646 



n.n. DILLON LINITED 

P.O. BOX 1850 - STATION "A" 

WILLOUDALE ON M2N 6H5 
MR. J.H. KEARNEY 
PRESIDENT 



6.2 (416) 632-804* 

M.R. BTRNC t ASSOCIATES LTD. 

480 CUELPH LINE 
BURLINGTON ON l7R 911 
M R 3TRNE 
PRESIDENT 



6 1 (416) 632-6044 

N.R. BTRNE AND ASSOCIATES LINITED 
480 GUELPH LINE 

BURLINGTON ON. L7R 3MI 



6.1 (613) 933-5602 

M.S. THOMPSON t ASSOCIATES LTD. 

345 ROSEMOUNT AVE. 

CORNWALL ON K6J 3E5 
MR. M.S. THOMPSON 
PRESIDENT 



2 7 (416) 661-8C03 

H.U. METAL SPINNING I STANP1NC CO. 
60 ALNESS ST. 

DOHNSVIEW ON. M3J 2C9 
MR. MURRAY UINER 



2.5 (519) 653-5795 

HACOONALD STEEL (1976) LTD. 

1556 INDUSTRIAL ROAD 

CAMBRIDGE ON N3H 4S6 

K J MACDONALD 

PRESIDENT I GENERAL MANAGER 



4.4 (705) 522-1430 

MACISAAC MINING I TUNNELLING CO. 

2070 OLD 8URWASH ROAD 

SUDBURT ON P3E 4Z4 
MR. J.C. MAC ISAAC 
PRESIDENT 



2.7 

fUCX CANADA INC 

1455 NORTH SERVICE RD E 
OAKVILLE ON. L6J 5A7 
JOHN ALLAN 



(416) 344-1700 



2.3 

MACKENZIE AND BROUN INC. 
ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERS 
533 ARBOR ROAD 
MISSISSAUCA ON. L5J 2J6 
H.F.H. BROWN 



(416) 278-8848 



6. I 

HACLAREN ENGINEERS INC. 

33 YONGE ST. 

TORONTO ON M5E l£7 
MR. A. COUTURE 
CHAIRMAN 



-4 16) 365-7337 



6.1 

MCLAREN PLANSEARCH INC. 

DIVISION OF LAVALIN INC. 

33 YONGE STREET 

TORONTO ON, M5E IE 7 

VICTOR J MORRIS 

PRESIDENT 



(416) 365-*2?S 



2.5 



NAOOK NANUFACTURING LIMITED 

P.O. BOX 322 

BRANTFORD ON N3T 5N3 
MR. K.C. BOOINE 



(519) 756-5760 



2.6 '4l6i 678-2720 

NACNETROL INTERNATIONAL LTD 

6291 DORMAN RD. UNIT 18 
MISSISSAUGA ON. L4V IH2 



3.1 (416) 669-4039 

BANnONT DISPOSAL STSTEMS LTD 

8940 JANE STREET 
THORNHILL ON. LOJ I EO 



-64- 



FEB 22. 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABET [CALL ' 8^ COMPANY 



ANNEX C 
APPENDIX 2 



6.2 (613) 232-6156. 

MANAGEMENT COUNSEL I NIL. INC. 
901-275 SLATES ST. 

OTTAWA ON KIP 5H9 
MR. E.P. FITZGERALD 
PRESIDENT 



S„"2 :S!9) 856-9566 

HANDEL SCIENTIFIC COMPANY LTD 

M3 DENNIS ST 

ROCK WOOD 0N_ N08 2*0 
MS. BARBARA HUMf 



6.2 (416) ;63-4-"34 

MAHDCV CONSULTING (INTERNATIONAL) LTD. 

38 WELLINGTON ST. E. 

SUITE 201 

TORONTO ON USE ICT 



6.2 (4 16) 553-701 

MANIFEST COMMUNICATIONS IMC. 

172 JOHN ST. 3RD "LOOK 

TORONTO ON, .1ST 1X5 
MR. MARK SARNES 
DIRECTOR 



1.'} Ml 61 890-253 

MANN TESTING LABORATORIES LTD. 

S550 MCAOAM ROAD 

MISSISSAUGA ON L4I IPI 
MR, JOHN U. MARTIN 
PRESIDENT 



MANVILLE CANADA INC 

295 THE WEST MALL 
E T OSICCKE ON, M9C IE 



(4 16) 626-3175 



4. I [41SJ 457-1618 

MAPLE ENGINEERING t CONSTRUCTION CDA LTD 
P.O. BOX 278 

BRAMPTON ON L6V 2L i 

MR. F.J. REJNOERS P. ENG. 

PRESIDENT 



flARANATHA S/R LTD. 

P.O. BOX 391 
30LT0N ON LOP IAO 
JAMIE URE 
PRESIDENT 



[416) 857-273S 6.2 {$13.) 523-734 

MARBEK RESOURCE CONSULTANTS 

2211 RIVERSIDE DR SUITE 407 
OTTAWA ON K 1H 7X5 
BRIAN KELLY 



6.2 (416) 274-4301 

MARCOS A. IGLESIAS CONSULTING 

1 174 SPRINGHILL DRIVE 

MISSISSAUGA ON L5H INS 
MR. MARCOS A, iGLESIAS 
PRESIDENT t OWNER 



6.2 (519) 888-6570 

MARK L. DORFMAN PLANNER INC. 

541 CONESTOGO RD . 

WATERLOO ON N& 4E2 
MR. MARK L. DORFMAN 
=RESiOENT 



2.5 

MARKHAM ENGINEERING INC 

2295 ERIN MILLS PARKWAf 
MISSISSAUGA ON. LSK I T9 



(4 16) 528-2302 



MARKHAM METALS 

01 V OF MAGNA INTERNATIONAL 
8081 WOODBINE AVENUE 
UNIONVILLE ON L3R 2PI 



(416) 479-2S35 



I .1 (4 16) 625-0930 

MARKLANO SPECIALTY ENRG LTD. 
3216 WHARTON HAY 

MISSISSAUGA ON L4X 2C I 

R TANSONY 

PRESIDENT 



2.7 

NARKHASTER-MOHETTE 

2395 CAUTHRA ROAD 

UNIT 

MISSISSAUGA ON L5A 2W8 

ROBERT MONETTE 

PRESIDENT 



(416) 277-27^1 



2.7 

HARLAN INDUSTRIES LTD 

1035 RANGEVIEW ROAD 

MISSISSAUGA ON L5E IH2 
MISS L. MARTIN 
MANAGER 



(416) 274-23': 



2.6 

BARLEY PUNP COMPANY 

126 EAST CR 

8RAMPTON ON. L6T IC2 



( ) 



2,7 

BARMAC HYDRAULICS 

DIVISION OF MAflMAC LTO 
S6 MCCULLOCH AVENUE 
REXDALE ON M9W 4M6 



(416) 249-7227 



2.6 

MARSH ENGINEERING LIMITED 

P.O. BOX 7 



(416) 934^3624 



PORT COLSORNE ON 
MR. JOHN MARSH 
PRESIDENT 



.3K 5V7 



3.1 (416) 774-7568 

MARSHALL FEEDS I FARM SUPPLIES 

205 SOUTH CAYUGA I 
DUNNVILLE ON NIA IC5 



6. 1 {416) 449-2500 

MARSHALL. HACKLIN, MONACHAN LIMITED 

275 DUNCAN MILL RD. 

DON MILLS ON M3B 2YI 
MR. P. A. MONAGHAN 
CHAIRMAN 



2.7 

MARTEN MANUFACTURING LTD 

P SOX 134 
HAVELOCK ON. KOL s ZO 



(7051 778-337! 



3. I 

MART I NO RECYCLING INC 

65 SHAW 

HELLAND ON. L33 5U9 



(416) 734-3711 2.7 (416) 751-2380 

MASDOH CORPORATION (197?) LTD 

83 SUNRISE AVENUE 
TORONTO ON M4A SB I 



3. I (4!6'i 673-7766 

MASTER ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES 

LTO. 

1445 BONHILL ROAD UNIT 14 
MISSISSAUGA ON L5T IV] 
MERVIN NOBEL 
PRESIDENT 



3. 

MASTER SERVANT 

12 HAVELOCK 
GUELPH ON NIE 4G5 



(519) 837-2466 2.7 C 4 T 6 1 474-7500 

MATERIAL HANDLING SYSTEMS OIV 

FMC OF CANADA LIMITED 
SUITE 650 2 HOOD ROAO 
MARKHAM ON L3R 4S7 



6.1 '519 664-3325 

MAURICE 6. DUSSEAULT CONSULTING 

DEPARTMENT OF EARTH SCIENCES 
UNIVERSITY Of WATERLOO 
WATERLOO ON N2L 3G1 
MR. MAURICE B. DUSSEAULT 



2.5 '4 16s 277 

MAVIS WELDINC AND FABRICATING LTD 
3466 MAVIS ROAO 



MISSISSAUGA ON L5C 
MR. EDDIE CHIAPPINC 
PRESIDENT 



T8 



9555 2.7 

MAYFRAN CANADA LTD 

5955 AIRPORT ROAO 

SUITE 200 

MISSISSAUGA ON L4V IR9 



1416) 461-4100 



-65- 



FEB 22. 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABET I CALLr 31 COMPANY 



ANNE* G 
APPENDIX 2 



6.2 

PBC INTERNATIONAL 

4019 SHE 'PARC AVE. I, 
SUI T E 200 

AGINCCURT ON mis IS? 
MR. ASGAR ALLT 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 291-945 



2.5 

MCCARTHY ROBINSON INC. 

321 PROGRESS AVENUE 

SCARBOROUGH ON PI IP 22" 

mr. r.l. dope'" 
president 



'416) 298-1630 



6. I 

NCCAVOUR ENGINEERING LTD 

:69 THE 4EST -ALL 
ETOBICC^E ON. "9C ICJ 



41*1 622-662 



6.1 



;4I6i B45-3497 



MCCOrlMXL NAUCHAN LIMITED 

407 SPEERS RCAO 

SUITE 2C9 

QAKVILLE ON L6K 3TS 



2.6 

MCCOY FOUNDRY CO 

S R I 

TRO' ON. ^OP 2B0 



'519 64 -- 34 r |i. ' i 70S 325-967 

MCGILL ENVIFT0W1EHTAL SERVICES 

P BOX 314 

OR ILL I A ON. .37 IC2 



6. i (6131 729-0845 

HCJNTYRE ENGINEERING CONSULTANTS LTD. 
630 MANSFIELD AVE. 

OTTAWA ON X2A 2T4 
HART-JEAN WIGHTMAN 
PRESIDENT 



6.1 (519) 673-0540 

rCINTYRE FORD CIVIL ENGINEERS 
165 1/2 OXFORD ST. E. 

LON00N ON N6A IT4 
MR. GREG FORD 
PRESIDENT 



6.2 


(416) 


88?-; 


; " 


MOCAY, G.A. 








122 BRCOE SI 









THORNHILL ON. L4J IT9 
G.A. MCKAT 



6 i 



PICNEELr ENGINEERING LIMITED 

39 ROBERTSON ROAD 

SUITE 2!7 

NEPEAN ON. K2H BR2 



(613) 820-6438 



MEAFORD AUTO URECXERS 

R R 1 

MEAFGRO ON, NOH I TO 



(5191 S 23- 1259 



HECHENG LTD. 

4630 DUFFERIN ST. SUITE 

TORONTO ON M3H 5S4 
HR. DA*; K. SIMPSON 
PRESIDENT 



|4I6' 663-6400 



2.6 

HECHWW ENERGY LTD 

2437 KALADAR AVE 
OTTAWA ON. KW 889 



(6131 733-3355 



2.6 
necorsys inc 

57 - 15! nashe-ene pd 
scarborough on. m1v 2t3 



(416) 298-21 10 



(416' 465-56J 



MEETING EXPECTATIONS INC. 
2 10 MESTON STREET 

TORONTO ON. MAS I A 
MR. T. MCMAHON 
DIRECTOR 



6. I 

M£L COHSULTANTS INC. 

230 SHE p PARO ave. E. 

HILLOHDALE ON M2N 3A9 
MR. KENNETH R, KENT 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 229-6070 



3.1 

BENARY CONTRACTORS LTD 

1 I KENYON 

BRANTFORD ON. N3S 6x8 



'519) 752-4574 



6.2 

M£P COflPAMY 

70SO WOODBINE AVENUE 

SUITE 100 

MARKHAM ON. L3R 4G3 



(416) 477-08" 



8.0 

PETAL RECOVERY INDUSTRIES 



670 STRATHEARNE AVENUE NORTH 

HAMILTON ON L8H 7N7 

ED ROGERS 

VICE PRESIDENT J GENERAL MGR. 



(416) 549-9894 



2.6 

METCAN FABRICATORS INC. 

51 BENTLEr AVE. 

NEPEAN ON. K2E 6T7 
MR. WAYNE C. HOVET 
PRESIDENT 



(613! 226-6674 2.5 '4:6) 738-235S 

rTETCON SALES I ENGINEERING LTD, 

329 NORTH RIVERMEDE RD. 
UNIT *9 

CONCORD ON. L4K 3A6 
MR. AHRON NAHMIAS 



5.7 (416) 477-0870 

NETEOROLOCICAL t ENVIRONTCNTAL PUUWING 

7050 WOODBINE AVE. 

SUITE 100 

MARKHAM ON L3R 4G8 

MR. M. HIRT 

EXPORT MANAGER 



2.6 

METEX CORPORATION LTD. 

12 PENN DRIVE 
UNIT I 

WESTON ON M9L 2A9 
J K PUDNET 
SALES MANAGER 



(4161 749-1210 



2.10 

METHOT SALES LTD 

1373 OOILVIE ROAD 

OTTAWA ON, KIJ 7P5 
MR. ARTHUR METHOT 



(613) "41-3*30 



2.5 

METRE* IKSTRirENTS LTD 

201 WILKINSON ROAO 
BRAfiPTCN ON L6T 4H2 
J. MOTYCHA 



(416) 453-1 I 10 8.0 (416) 283-267 

NETS CHEMICAL COMPANY LIMITED 

404-A OLD KINGSTON ROAO 
TORONTO ON MIC IB6 
L W GASCOICNE 

PRESIDENT 



2.10 

microbe inc. 
35 midpark road 

LONDON ON. N6N 1B2 
MR. JANES INSELL 



•,519! 666-1005 



6.2 



HIHALT INTERNATIONAL CANADA 

169 MAJOR ST. 

TORONTO ON M5S 2K9 
MR. JOHN H. WALKER 
PRESIDENT ANO CHIEF EXECUTIVE 



(416) 920-5019 



8.0 

HILL PAPER FIBRES LIMITED 

20 TRINITY STREET 
TORONTO ON M5A 3C5 
PETER MATTER 



(4l6i 364-6255 2.10 (4lti 637-9496 

MILLAfi-UILLIAflS HYDRONICS LTD. 
4060 FAIRVIEW STREET 
UNIT \2 

BURLINGTON ON, L7L 4Y3 
G k WILLIAMS 
SALES MANAGER 



-66- 



FEB 22. 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABETICALLY BY COMPANY 



ANNEX G 
APPENDIX 2 



2.6 
NILLTROHICS 

P BOX 422S 
PETERBOROUGH ON. 



(70S) 745-2431 



K9J 7BI 



2.6 (705' 

tllLTOH ROY INDUSTRIES LTD 

300 HILROT OR 

P BOX 2260 

PETERBOROUGH ON, K9J 7Y3 

MR. DAVID LEE 

PRESIDENT 



743-6550 6.2 

US SYSTEMS 

44 CHARLES ST. U. 
SUITE 4101 
TORONTO ON M4Y IRg 
MR. MICHAEL SCHWAB 



(4 16) 927-9498 



3.0 MI6) 624-7260 

MISSISSAUGA PAPER FIBRES LTD 

1260 FEUSTER DRIVE 

UNIT 10 1 II 

MISSISSAUGA ON L4W IA5 

DON JENNINGS 



6. I '416) 883-1500 

MITCHELL POUND AND BfiAODOCK LTD. 

4 CHURCH STREET. SOUTH 

RICHMOND HILL ON. L4C IW2 



5.9 '416) 4*3-2500 

HMH SURVEYS S CONSULTANTS LIMITED 
275 DUNCAN MILL ROAD 

DON HILLS ON M38 2t1 
MR. J.H. O'DONNELL 
PRESIDENT 



2.5 (416) 738-0820 

MOBILE CLIMATE CONTROL INC. 

131 CITATION DR. UNIT 123 

CONCORD ON L4K 2R3 
MR. GUNNAR MANNERHEIM 



2.7 ( ) 

MOBILE COMMUNICATIONS 

CANADIAN GENERAL ELECTRIC CO 
100 WINGOLD AVENUE 
TORONTO ON M6B IR2 



6.1 (519) 944-722' 

MODERN ENGINEERING DESIGN ASSOCIATES 

7610 TECUMSEH RD. E. 

SUITE 20! 

WINDSOR ON N8T 1E9 

MR. MEL LAWN 

PRESIDENT 



2.7 

NOOOHEKAN (CANADA) LTD 

200 WHITE OAK ROAD 
LONDON ON, N6A 4B8 



(519) 686-1771 



2.6 

BOOUDATA SYSTEMS LTD 



BOX 365 
NEWMARKET ON. 



L3Y 4X7 



(416) 773-6414 2.5 (416) 995-3262 

MOMENTUM A DIV. OF KEVIN JOHNSON LTD. 
48 PROSPECT ST, 

NEWMARKET ON L3Y 3S9 
MR. KEVIN J. JOHNSON 
PRESIDENT 



2.10 

MONARCH CHEMICALS LTD 

35 CITRON COURT 

CONCORD ON L4K 2S7 

MR. L.D. BAER 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 738-0055 



3.1 

MONARCH DISPOSAL 

309 ARMSTRONG 
GEORGETOWN ON. L7G 4X6 



(416) 873-1321 



2.6 

MONARCH PROPANE LTD 



169 FENMAR DR 
WESTON ON. M9L 



IM7 



(416) 741-3530 



2-5 ( 

MOHETEX ENGINEERING LTD 

133 THE WESTMALL UNIT 6 
ETOfilCOKE ON, H9C tC2 



2.5 

HONITEQ LIMITED 

630 RIVERMEDE ROAD 

CONCORD ON L4K 2H7 
MR. D.A, WHITEMAN 



(416) 669-5334 



2.6 

MONSANTO CANADA INC 

2OO0 ARGENT I A RO 
MISSISSAUGA ON. L5M 2G4 



(416) 826-9222 



6.1 

HONSERCO LIMITED 

6620 KITIHAT RD. UNIT 4 

MISSISSAUGA ON, L5N 2B8 



(416) 824-3887 6.1 (519) 882-2140 

HONTE1TH INGRAM GRAHAM LTD. 

360 CENTRE STREET 

PETROL I A ON. NON 1RO 



3.1 



MOOSE CREEK CEMENT PRODUCTS 

LTD 

MOOSE CREEK ON. KOC 1WO 



(613) 538-2381 



3.1 (519) 595-8536 

MORRIS GER8ER EXCAVATING 



MILVERTON ON. NOK I HO 



6.1 

MORRIS MAGNETICS INC. 

R.R. *2 

LUCAN ON NOM 2J0 
MR. W.A. MORRIS 



(519) 227-1106 



6.1 

MORRISON BEATTY LIMITED 

4500 DIXIE ROAD 

UNIT I2A 

MISSISSAUGA ON L4U IV7 

B W SEATTY 

PRINCIPAL 



(416) 624-9308 



MORRISON HERSHFIELD LTD. 

4 LANSING SQUARE 
NORTH YORK ON M2J IT I 
A, J. BURGESS 
CHAIRMAN 



(4)6) 499-3MO 



MORTON REVZEN * CO LTD 

210 WELLAND AVE 
P BOX 923 

ST CATHARINES ON L2^ 6Z4 
LEONARD R FEN1G 



(416) 685-4825 



8.0 (416) 755-92 

HOSTEL METALS CO Of CANADA 

371 COHSTOCK RD 
SCARBOROUGH ON MIL 2H3 
STEVEN J LEVY 



2.7 

MOTOROLA CANADA LTD 

3125 STEELES AVENUE E 
NORTH YORK ON, M2H 2H6 



(416) 499-1441 



8.0 

MOULD TREK INC 

733 PROGRESS AVE 
SCARBOROUGH ON MIH 2W7 



< ) 



3.1 (519) "49-1240 

1« PICK-UP WASTE DISPOSAL LTD 

38 FORWELL 

KITCHENER ON. N2B 3E8 



-67- 



FEB 22. 1988 



MSA CANADA INC. 

148 NOPFINCH DRIVE 
DOHNSV1EU ON. *3N 1X8 
K H BROUN 
PRESIDENT 



PROVINCES L'STED 4LPHABCTICALL: 9' CWAN1 



(4161 667-9400 2.6 (416,1 661-5646 

USE ENGINEERING SYSTEMS LTD, 

265 CANARCTIC DRIVE 
DOUNSVIE^ ON M3J 2N7 
R fRASER 
MARKETING MANAGE* 





ANNE' j 
AP"ENDIX 2 


2.6 

HSU MISSISSAUGA LTD 


(416, B23-4340 


2222 S SHERIDAN UAT 
MISSISSAUGA ON, L5T 


2M4 



MUELLER CANADA INC 

80 MARKET DP 
BOX 1001 

MILTON ON. L9T 4R6 
MR. M.A. BROWN 
CROUP VICE-PRESIDENT 



MI6I 878-0541 



2.6 

HUE SCO CANAOA INC 

3006 OSLER ST 
LONDON ON. N5V IV3 



(519) 451-7650 



4 it 



MULLEN RUBBISH HAULAGE LTD 

266 KINCSUW! 

TORONTO ON. M2J 3G8 



2.6 

IW.TI FITTINGS 

1055 UILTON GROVE RO 
LONDON ON, N6A 4K3 



( ) 



6.2 



1416) 961-2800 



HURRAY AXHITH I ASSOCIATES 

I ST. CLAIR AVE. E. 
SUITE 701 

TORONTO ON. M4T 2V7 
MR. MURRA1 AXMITH 
PRESIDENT 



6.2 ?*I6i 

MURRAY HIHER t ASSOCIATES INC 

100 UNIVERSITY AVE SUITE 500 
TORONTO ON. MSJ IV* 



592-9367 



3.1 

NUSXOKA CONTAINERIZED 

SERVICES LTD 
DISTRICT ROAD 4 
BRACEBRIDGE ON POB ICO 



(705) 645-4453 



8.0 

HYER SAL IT LTD 



(416) 354-5692 



7771 STANLEY AVE P BOX 937 
NIAGARA FALLS ON. L2E SV6 
L COHEN 



2.5 

N R MURPHY LIMITED 

430 FRANKLIN BOULEVARD 

PO BOX 218 

CAMBRIDGE ON NiR 5 T 3 



(519) 621-62-7 



6.1 (519) 258-0052 

H.K. BECXER 1 ASSOCIATES LTD. 

300 GILES BLVD. E. 

WINDSOR ON NSA 4C4 
DR. N.K. BECKER P.ENG. 
PRESIDENT 



2.5 

H.H. MURPHY LIMITED 

430 FRANKLIN BLVD. 

SOX 218 

CAMBRIDGE ON »flR ST8 

MR. N.R. MURPHY 

PRESIDENT 



(519) 621-6210 



2.6 

NAPIEH-REIO LTO. 

10 ALDEN ROAD 

UNIT 2 

MARK HAM ON 1 3R 2S ■ 

LAURENCE E YE1GH 



[416) 



B.O 

NAT PALUR LTO 

3191 ALBION RD 

OTTAUA ON KIV 8Y3 
NAT PALMER 



(613) 521-5971 8,0 (416) 633-6026 

NATE'S SCTAP METAL LIMITED 

33 VINCI CR 
TORONTO ON. M3H 2Y6 



2 5 (416) 625-7321 

NATIONAL COMPRESSED AIR CANADA LIMITED 
1 165 FEUSTER DRIVE 

MISSISSAUGA ON L*W I AS 
MR. DAVID ^E"D i E 
PRESIDENT 



8.0 

NATIONAL RUB8ER CO LTD 

394 SYMINGTON AVE 
TORONTO ON M6N 2U3 
JULES GROSS 



(416) 657-M II 2.6 

NATIONAL SEHER PIPE LTD 

BOX 1800 

OAKVILLE ON. L6J 5C7 



(416) 822-7900 



2.10 

NATIONAL SILICATES LTD. 

429 KIPLING AVENUE 
TORONTO ON M8Z 5C7 
PAUL CORSCADDEN 
SALES MANAGER 



'4l6i 25S-TT7 T 



2.7 

NATIONAL TRAILER t 1RUCX 

EQUIPMENT INC 

I860 MEYERSIDE DRIVE 

MISSISSAUGA ON LST IB4 



(416) 677-4781 



2.6 



MI6) 823-8557 



NATURE POOL (CANAOA) INC. 
25 - 2133 ROYAL WINDSOR OR. 

MISSISSAUGA ON L5J IKS 
MR. A.J.D. HUTCHINS 



2.6 

NEC VALVES LTD 

465 NORFINCH OR 
DOUNSVIEU ON. MjN 2S3 



(4i6) 661-6020 



2.6 

NEOVAC LIMITED 

29 PASSMORE AVE UNIT 16 
SCARBOROUGH ON. MIV 3H5 



(4161 297-57H 2.6 (70S) 326-9751 

NEPTUNE CHEMICAL PUMP CO. (CANAOA) LTD. 

P.O. BOX 171 

OH ILL I A ON L3V 5J3 

MR. ALLEN APTER 



2.6 

NEPTUNE METERS LTD 

3526 LAKE SHORE BLVO U 
TORONTO ON M9U IN" 



f4l6l 259-421 



8.0 (416) 786-2046 

NEWCASTLE RECYCLING LIMITED 

R R I 

MEUTONVILLE ON. LOZ i HO 



2.7 

NEE CANADA LIMITED 

P.O. BOX 1277 

STATION B 

BURLINCTON ON L 7 P 3S9 



(416) 634-2342 2.6 4I6> 93J-3224 

NIAGARA PRE -CAST CONCRETE LTD 
3233 SNIDER ROAD 

R.R. NO. 3 

"CAT COLBORNE ON L3K 5VS 

MR. R. MACLEAN 

PRESIDENT 



-68- 



FEB 22. 1986 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABET I CALL T II COMPANY 



ANNEX G 
APPENDIX 2 



NICK FERRARO t SOUS LTD 

504 EVANS AVENUE 
TORONTO ON, M8Z 5C5 



(4 16) 251-9054 



2.5 

N1LFISK LTD. 

200 CONNIE CRESCENT 
UNIT tl 

CONCORD ON UK tltl 
PAUL DESROSIERS 
GENERAL MANAGER 



(4 16) 669-6003 



3.1 

Nlfl DISPOSAL LTD 

R R 2 

CALLANDER ON. P!B 9J 



(705) 7S2-2U0 



B.O 

NORANOA SALES CORP LTD 



(416) 967-7046 



P SOX 45 COflflEHCE COURT U 
TORONTO ON, N5L IB6 
JOHN COULTON 



NORCAST INC 

6B YONCE ST SUITE 208 
TORONTO ON H5E IL 
RET SENNET 



(416) 869-1087 6.2 (5i9' 433-7COS 

NORDEX CROUP MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS 
P.O. BOX 720 i STATION "E". 

LONDON ON NS'i 4X5 
MR. KIMBLE F. AINSLIE 
PRINCIPAL CONSULTANT 



2.7 

NORCAY EKTREPR1SE5 LTD 

345 EVANS AVE 

TORONTO ON M8Z IK2 
MR. JIM CALLAN 



(416) 259-9663 3. I (416) 772-5502 

NOftTI SHROPSHALL 1 SONS CO LTD 

R 3 I 

CAYUGA ON NOA l£0 



6,2 (519) 

NORTIAN PEARSON 1 ASSOC LTD. 

P BOX 5362 

STATION A 

LONDON ON N6A 4L6 

OR NORMAN PEARSON 

PRESIDENT 



! I -3040 



6.2 



NCWUM REBIN ASSOCIATES INC. 
BOX 1240 

ALMONTE ON KOA IA0 
MR. NORMAN REBIN 
PRESIDENT 



(613) 256-1080 



2,6 

NORMAN WADE CO LTD 

75 MILNER AVE 
SCARBOROUGH ON. HIS 3R7 



MI6) 291-4211 8.0 5*tl-) 227-61 I 

NORMETAL SCRAP CO LTD 

416 GLENOALE 

ST CATHARINES ON, L2R 5VI 



6.1 

NORR/SHSG LTD. 

40 UNIVERSITY AVENUE 

SUITE 400 

TORONTO ON H5J 2G3 

MR. H.E.H. ROY 

PRESIDENT 



(416) 977-3642 



2.1 



NORSEMAN STEEL FABRICATORS 

DIVISION OF J F SMITHSQN 
216-3 NORSEMAN 
TORONTO ON M8Z 2R4 



(416) 236-2097 



2.7 (4161 622-7830 

HORTECH CONTROL EQUIPMENT INC. 

135 THE WEST MALL 

UNIT 4 

ETOBICCKE ON M9C IC2 

E ROGERS 

PRESIDENT 



(705) 474-6690 



NORTH BAT SCRAP DIVISION 

LASCO STEEL 

OLD CALLANDER ROAD 

NORTH BAY ON, PIB 8K I 



6.1 (705) 474-2720 

NORTHLAND ENGINEERING LIMITED 

528 CASSELLS STREET 

NORTH BAY ON PIS 3Z7 
SB, M.D. MCLEAN 
PRESIDENT 



2.5 



NOVAVENT NORTH AMERICA INC. 
3550 WOLFEDALE RD. 

MISSISSAUGA ON L5C 2V6 
MR. P.J. O'LEARY 



(416) 273-164C 



3. I 

NUHN BIO-TECH 



(519) 393-5770 



R R I 

SEBRINCVILLE ON. NOK IVO 



NUHET ENGINEERING LTD. 
P.O. BOX 1776 

PETERBOROUGH ON K9J 7X6 
MR. C.C. ADAMSON 
PRESIDENT 



(7D5) 743-2708 3. I (416) 675-1642 

O.C. LIQUID HASTE HAULERS OF 
ONTARIO LTD. 

P.O. SOX 162 MALTCN POST OFF. 
MISSISSAUGA ON. L4T 385 
JAMES HELLTER 
PRESIDENT 



3. I (613) 342-3703 

O.E. HACOOUGAEL LIQUID HASTE 

SERVICE S SYSTEMS LTD. 

1845 PARKEDALE AVENUE 

BROCKVILLE ON, K6V SUI 

EARL MACDOUGALL 

PRESIDENT 



6. I (4 16) 823-4286 

O.J. MCCULLOCH ENGINEERING CONSULTANTS 

1564 RANDOR DRIVE 

MISSISSAUGA ON, L5J 3C7 
MR. URBAN f. MCCULLOCH 
PRESIDENT 



2.5 (416) 884-9072 

O.J1-P. AIR EQUIPMENT LIMITED 

36 SHELLEY ROAD 

RICHMOND HILL ON L4C 5C3 
MR. OR I MAMBER 
PRESIDENT 



2.10 (416) 791-1628 

CAK1TE PRODUCTS Of CANADA LTD 
115 EAST DRIVE 

BRAMALEA ON L6T IB7 
MR. j.R. MCLACHLAN 
VICE PRESIDENT 



2.6 

OAKS PRECAST INDUSTRIES 

351 ELIZABETH GT 
GUELPH ON. NtE 2X9 



'519) 322-3820 



8.0 

OAKSIDE CHEMICALS LTD. 

97 WHITE OAK ROAD 
LONDON ON N6E !L8 
MR SHARON KELLY 
TECHNICAL DIRECTOR 



(519) 681-1103 



2.5 

ODOHASTER CANADA 

5892 SHAUSON DRIVE 
MISSISSAUGA ON L4H 3U5 
ARNOLD ZLOTN1K 
SALES DIRECTOR 



(416) 671-1010 2.7 ?6I3) 347-2483 

OHIO LOCOMOTIVE CRANE CO INC 

P 80X 610 
LANCASTER ON K.0C I NO 
JOHN RE ID 



3.1 

OILCO MAINTENANCE COMPANY 

P.O. BOX 191 

460 TAUNTON ROAD EAST 

OSHAHA ON LIH 7LI 

EARL NEWELL 

SERVICE MANAGER 



(416) 579-451 ! 



-69- 



FEB 22, 1998 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABET iCAL.t »Tf COMPANY 



ANNE J G 
APPENDIX 2 



3 1 [5I9> 652-2892 

OILFIELD CLEANUP SERVICES LTD 

19 MAIN STREET -EST 
LAMBETH ON NOL ISO 



6 I (613) 225-994C 

OLIVER MANCICNE. MCCALLS 1 ASfOC LTD. 

154 COLLONNAOE »OAO SOUTH 

NEPEAN :n. ^iE "^5 



OHTAIGOLD METAL INC 

1896 SOUGH BEECHES 
CDOKSVtLLE ON . '_4W ZJ7 



;4l6i 624-56 : >2 



6 l i s . g i 3S4-6S83 

ONTARIO CENTRE FOR FASH MACHINERY 1 FOOO 
870 RICHMOND ST. 

CHATHAM ON N7M 5J5 



J, 3 4 ! 6 ■62-7251 

OHTAHIO IRON I METAL CO LTD 

3S34 DUNDAS STREET . 
TORONTO ON »6S 2S I 



t- : 



ONFAHIO PAPER COMPANY 

AL.ANBURC POAD 
P 3QX ! 040 
THOROLD ON L2V 3Z5 
3 F ALLE"* 



6.2 (416) 822-411' 

ONTARIO RESEARCH FOUNDATION 

SHERIDAN PARK RESEARCH 

COMMUNITY 

M1SSISSAUGA ON. L5K i S3 

308 LAUGHLIN 

MANAGER 



B.O 

ONTARIO SALVAGE LTD 

2! BROADVIEW AVENUE 
TORONTO ON. 14M 2E-! 



(416) 463-1121 3. I M!6i 746-852 

ONTARIO HASTE MANAGEMENT ASSN 

55 TENNAR 0R1VE 
TORONTO ON. »% M4 



3.3 (416) 923-291* 

ONTARIO WASTE MANAGEMENT CORF. 

2 BLOOR STREET WEST IITH FLOOR 

TORONTO ON N4W 3E2 

KEN BSADLE'' 

MANAGER WASTE REDUCTION 



3. I (416) 896-581 

ONTARIO WASTE OIL COMPANY 

213 WHITCHURCH MEWS 
1ISSISSAUGA ON L5A 492 

ROBES sat: 

PRESIDENT 



2-6 
ONTOH LTD 

12 LESWfN SO 
TORONTO ON, M6A IK. 3 



(416) 7?l-!2?S 



z.; 



(416) 475-9292 



OROAN THERMAL PRODUCTS LTD. 

21 AMBER STREET UNIT 9 

MASK HAM ON L3R 423 

fIR. CM. bzousk; 
REGIONAL MANAGER 



2,5 i'i6j 934-7321 

OSXAM [J] STEEL FABRICATORS LTD 
BOX 307 



"CRT CDL3C D NE 
MR. J. OSKAM 
PRESIDENT 



.3* 5W! 



2.6 (416) 671-2304 

CUTOKUMPU EQUIPMENT CANADA 

LTD. 

6495 NORTHAH DRIVE 
MISSISSAUC-i 7N .4, „2 
MATT I TARVAINFN 
GENERAL MANAGER 



8.0 

OXFORD METAL REMOVAL LTD 

R R 3 

WOODSTOCK ON. N4S 7V7 



(519) 539-6742 



2.6 

OZONATOR SYSTEMS INC 

5233 GENERAL R'JAD 

UNIT NO. 5 

MlSSISSAUGA ON L4W 29 

MR. JACK JOHNSTON 

VICE PRESIDENT 



'416) 625-2490 



3.2 

P SCHACHTER i SONS LTD 

124 COLBORNEE 

OR ILL I A ON. L2V IV3 



;705,i 326-2292 



8.0 

P UAOIAN I SONS LTD 

14 1 LIMESTONE OR 
TORONTO ON. M2J 2R I 



(416) 667-1807 2.7 '4161 743-9601 

P. A. P. PROCESS ENGINEERING 

SERVICES 

34 JASMINE ROAD 

WESTON ON »9M 2P9 

PAT A PRIORELLO 

PRESIDENT 



6.2 

P/S I ASSOCIATES 

10 ST. MARY STREE' 

TORONTO ON M4i |f$ 

MR. ROBERT H. RUSHOWT PH.: 

PRESIDENT 



(416) 961-92" 



5.2 
PACS 

3425 HARVESTER RO. 
SUITE 202 

BURLINGTON ON L7N 3NI 
MR, EDWARD H. CLUTTON 



(416) 632-7232 



2.6 

PALL CANADA LTD 

BOX 1496 

1380 CALIFORNIA AVE 

BROCXVILLE ON K6v 5(6 

MR, P. DOUTRE 

PRESIDENT 



(613) B90-I013 3. I f 519) 756-9200 

PAUKJ LIQUID WASTE REMOVAL LTO 

66 MOHAWK ROAD 
BRANTFORD ON N3T 5L9 
LES PALLAGI 
PRESIDENT 



2.6 

P AGUES LAVAL IN 

33 YONGE ST. 

TOflONTO ON. M5E IE7 
MR, DERK Z. MAAT 



(4 16) 365-T294 



2.6 

PARAMETER CONTROL LTD 

9 - 250 TRILLIUM DP 
KITCHENER ON, N2E 1X2 



(5191 893-9121 



3.3 

PATHOLOGICAL WASTE 

MANAGEMENT ( PUM 1 

2620 EGLINTON AVENUE EAST 

SCARBOROUGH ON, NIK 2S3 

WA1NE fEO 

PRESIDENT 



(416) 267-4907 



6. I '4l6i 236-2569 

PAUL B. WALTERS i ASSOCIATES 

LTD. 

4166 DUNOAS STREET WEST 

TORONTO ON M8X 1X3 

PAUL B WALTERS 

PRESIDENT 



6. I 

PAUL TH1EL ASSOCIATES LTD 

700 BALMORA. DK 
8RAMALEA ON. L6T 1X2 



4 16) "92-2215 



3.1 

PAUL WEBtR SEPTIC TANK 

INSTALLATIONS 

R R 2 

BRESLAU ON, NOB I HO 

0IV1SION OF PAL-MAfi 



15191 64=-25IO 



-70- 



FEB 22. 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABET I CALL f BY COMPANY 



ANNEX G 
APPENDIX 2 



8.0 



PAZHtF SCRAP HETALS CO LTD 

1276 CflOUtLLARD RD 
P BOX 20!0 
WALKERVILLE ON N8Y 1R5 
SEN PAZNER 



(SKH 54-1-5880 



2.6 -.416; 625-1550 

PEA800Y ENGINEERING CANADA 

1225 MATHESON 9LVD 

fl I SS 1 SSAUGA ON. L4W IY9 



6.2 t lft-3 

PEAT NARWICX AND PARTNER 

P.O. BOX 31 COMMENCE COD' U. 

TORONTO ON. MSL 102 



2.7 

PEDSCC (CANADA) LTD. 

12 PRINCIPAL ROAD 

UNIT 2 

SCARBOROUGH ON MIR 

306 PEDERSON 

PRESIDENT 



(4.16) 755-3852 3. I f4l6; 275-7110 

PEEL PETROCHEMICAL SERVICES 

3513 MAVIS ROAD 
MISS1SSAUGA ON L5C 1 T 7 
PHILiP ABRAHAM 
SERVICE MANAGER 



2.7 f4i6i 29-8-3 14 ( 

PEGASUS INDUSTRIAL SPECIATIES 

LTD. 

4470 SHEPPARD AVE . E . BO* 3 ' 9 

ACINCOURT ON MIS SB'S 

N TRENT 

PRESIDENT 



6.2 

PENCON CORPORATION 

1359 LANSDOWNE AVE. 

TORONTO ON H6H 213 
MR, FRANK PENNATE 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 654-3277 2.6 (416) 632-2235 

PENINSULA WATER TREATMENT INC 
80X 818 

BURLINGTON ON L7R 3Y7 
HR. I . PARSONS 
CHIEF EXECUTIVE 



7.0 (416) 356-7667 

PENNINSULA CHEdlCAL ANALTSIS 

PO BOX 810 

8407 STANLEY AVE UNIT 10 
NIAGARA FALLS ON L2E 6V6 
RICHARD SMYTHE 



2.6 
PENMKOTE LTD 

251 STATION ST 
AJAK ON. LIS IS3 



(416) 683-6447 



2.6 

PENNUALT CANADA INC. 

SHAHPLES-STOKES DIVISION 
365 EVANS AVE. SUITE 302 
TORONTO ON 3T8Z IK2 



(416) 252-5441 



2. 10 
PENNHALT INC. 

(WALLACE AND TIERNAN] 
925 WARDEN AVE 
SCARBOROUGH ON MIL MM 
MR. U.S. MOIR 
'RESIDENT 



(4 16 > 751-7561 



3. I 

PENNY t CASSON CO. LTD. 



(416) 298-1 144 



3039 KENNEDY ROAD 

ACINCOURT ON HIV 1S7 

LOU CERRUTI 

ENVIRONMENTAL OPERATIONS MCR 



6.2 (613) 233-71 15 

PERJ1AX MANAGEMENT INC. 
190 BRONSON AVE. 

OTTAWA ON KIR 6H4 
MR. JACQUES OUSSEAULT 
PRESIDENT 



6.2 



PETER n ITCHES 1 ASSOCIATES 

LIMITED 

350 RIDOUT STREET SOUTH 

LONDON ON N6C 3Z5 

PETER T HITCHES 

PRESIDENT % CHIEF ENGINEER 



(519) 633-SSSC 



6.2 (416) 223-2948 

PFTEH T. BUDZIK AW ASSOCIATES 

INCORPORATED 

163 CHURCH AVENUE 

HILLOMOALE ON M2N 4G4 

PETER T BUOZIK 

PRESIDENT 



PETERBOROUGH METAL CO LTD 

840 ARMOUR 

PETERBOROUGH ON. K9H 2A2 



(705) 743-3557 



6. I 

PETO HACCALLUtl LTD. 

165 CARTURlGHT AVENUE 

TORONTO ON M6A IV5 

B R GRAY 

MANAGER. GEOTECHNICAL ENGG 



(416) 789-4105 



6.2 

PH.Q ASSOCIATES INC 

4700 KEELE ST 

NORTH YORK ON M3J IP3 
OR. FRANK E. BUNN 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 736-5295 



3.1 

PHIL GRCCNEVELD I SONS 

DISPOSAL SERVICES LIMITED 
1220 SKAE DRIVE 
OSHAUA ON LtJ 7A1 



(416) 666-3668 



6.2 

PHILIP A. LAPP LTD. 

14A HAZELTON AVENUE 
SUITE 302 

TORONTO ON, M5R 2E2 
OR. P. A. LAPP 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 920-1994 



2.5 < 5 i 9 > 894-1300 

PH1LIPS-LAU PRODUCTS LTD 

3B5 FAIRWAY ROAO SOUTH " 

KITCHENER ON N2G 3Z I 
MR. REX CLARK 
GENERAL MANAGER 



3.1 

PHILLIP ENTERPRISES INC. 

237 BRANT STREET 

P.O. BOX 423 STATION B 

HAMILTON ON, L8L 7U2 

WYNN HARDING 

MARKETING 



(416) 544-6687 2.5 (416) 

PHOTOVAC INCORPORATED 

134 DONCASTER AVENUE UNIT 7 
THORNHILL ON L3T IL3 
MR. R. LEVESON 
PRESIDENT 



1-8225 



6.2 MI6) 366-S795 

PILORUSSO RESEARCH ASSOCIATES 

INC. 

347 BAY STREET, SUITE 603 

TORONTO ON M5H 2R7 

F PILORUSSO 

PRESIDENT 



2.7 



PITMAN HAHUFACTUR I NC CO INC 



740O WOODBINE AVENUE 
rtARKHAM ON L3R I A6 



(416) 475-121 I 



4.1 (4 16^ 474-04^4 

PITTS ENC. CONSTRUCTION DIV. 8ANISTER 
7500 WOODBINE AVE. SUITE 300 

MARKHAM ON L3R 4M8 
MR. J.J.F. LOEUEN 
PRESIDENT 



6. I (4i6i 259-C566 

PLANHAC CONSULTANTS LIMITED 
3055 LAKESHORE BLVD. WEST 

TORONTO ON, M8V IK6 



2.5 

PLASTICAIR SYSTEMS 

DIV. OF 442829 ONT. INC. 
4611 - 4613 BURGOYNE ST. 
MISSISSAUGA ON L4W IC3 
MR. RICHARO SIXSMITH 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 626-9164 2.7 (4161 831-1)44 

PLASTIGLASS INDUSTRIES LTD 

880 DILLINGHAM ROAD 

PICKERING ON LIW IZ9 
MR. S. BAKER 
PRESIDENT 



-71 



FEB 22 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABET! CALL' 91 COMPANf 



ANN£< C 
aPPf.NO I* 2 



2 ; (4161 673-2540 

PLASTISONICS EQUIPMENT UNITED 

I 175 MEyERSIDE DRUE 

UNIT C5 

MISSISSAIJGA ON. LET IH3 

JERRY JA CHKOUSK 

POfSiOENT 



PLIBRICO (CANADA) LTD 

♦ 355 TAIRVIEM STRE[ T 
BURLINGTON ON. L?L 2A4 



I i 



2.6 

PNEUVEYOR SYSTEMS ltd 

6*3 "EEL ST 

WOODS TXK ON N4S "5 



C S 1 9 : 539-2054 



POLLUTECH LIMITED 
090 SPEERS SB. 

OAKV1L.E ON L6L 2X4 
MR. JOHN D. NORMAN 



(4161 944-1900 



3.5 

POLTSAP LTD. 

ENVIRONMENTAL SERI7ES 01 

VI DAL STREET SOUTH 

SARNIA ON N7T 7N2 

r P REHAL'6 



Si9 J37-82SI 



POLYTECHNIC LABORATORIES 

194 7 NATTAUA AVENUE 
rtlSSlSSAUCA ON L4x 'K9 
S M COWAN 
LABORATORY OIRECOS 



9.0 (70S) 232-4750 

POPLAR (RON t METAL CO 

HIGHWAY II 

IRQOUOIS FALLS ON, POK l£0 



POSHES PCTALS LTD 

610 BEACH ROAD 
HAMILTON ON L8H XI 
FRED POSNER 



(416) 544-1391 3. : 507' ,3?-:934 

POTTER PUMPING SERVICES LTD 

R 3 I 

2400 ROSSLYN ROAD 

THUNDER BAt ON. PTC 4 T 9 



POVERTY 

P SOX 1829 

STATION A 

LONDON ON N6A 5H9 



(519) 432-5000 



613) 476-2948 



POWER CONCRETE PRODUCTS LTD 

S.R. NO. 3 

PlCTQN ON. KOK 2 T 
MR. E.S. MAXWELL 
PRESIDENT 



2." 

POWER PLANT SUPPLY CO 

P SOX 715 

124 WILSON STREET 

OAX'vlLLE ON L6J 501 



[416 B45-79S 



2.6 

POUERAIR OF CANADA LTD. 

949 CLYDE AVENUE 
OTTAWA ON Kl| 5A2 
RAYMOND FARLEf 
GENERAL MANAGES 



(6131 722-4226 2.5 '416) 789-3*61 

POUERFLOW PROOUCTS LIMITED 
21 APEX ROAD 

TORONTO ON M6A 2<6 
MR. O.L. 9EVANS 
PRESIDENT 



2.7 (416) 745-31 I 

pomlesland engineering limited 

23 kESThqre drive 

UNIT 400 

REXDALE ON M9'V 3Y7 

J J "CULESLAND 

PRESIDENT 



2.6 

PPG CANADA INC 

(PITTSBURGH PAINTS) 
3730 LAKE SHORE BLVD W 
TORON'O ON M9W 1P3 



(416) 259-4241 3.3 (416) 364-1919 

Pt»n CANADA INC. 
1 TONGE STREET 

SUITE 90! TORONTO STAR 9LDC. 
TORONTO ON MEE E5 
DAVID R ALAN] 2 
PRE 3 I OE NT 



2.6 .' 7 C5"! 472-2109 

PRECAST TAW AND VAULT CO LTD 

773 LAURENT I AN AVENUE 

NORTH BAT ON. P1B 772 
MR. J.C. MUNRO 
VICE PRESIDENT 



2.6 

PRECISIONEERING UNITED 

303 NANTUCKET BLVD. 

SCARBOROUGH ON M1P 2P2 
MR. J.K.O. RICHARDSON 



(416) 751-9200 



2.6 

PRESTON MANUFACTURING LTD 

BOX 3097 

CAMBRIDGE ON. M3H 4$; 

MS. A. CCRNEiL 

VICE PRESIDENT AND GM 



■519) 653-7143 2.6 («I6] 

PRESVAC SYSTEMS BURLINGTON 

LTD. 

4l3t MORRIS DRIVE 
3URL:NCTCN ON. L7L ELS 
JOHN MACSREGOR 
SALES MANAGE? 



6.1 

Pfll-TEC INTERNATIONAL INC. 

P.O. 90X 13090 

KANATA ON K2K 1X3 
MR. RICHARD H. LALANDE 
PRESIDENT 



(613) 939-3020 6.2 (613) 238-8200 

PRICE WATERHOUSE MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS 

P.O. BOX 51 

TORONTO-DOMINION CENTRE 
TORONTO ON M5K 161 
MR. £.H, NETTEN 
MANAGING PARTNER ;ANADA 



5.3 

PRIOR DATA SCIENCES LTD 

240 MICHAEL COWPLAND OR 

KANATA ON K2M IP6 
MR. JACK "II OR 
PRESIDENT 



(613) 59! 



>35 



6,2 (4161 679-5550 

PRIORITY 01 COMPUTER EDUCATION SERVICES 
190 WORTLEY RD. SUITE 206 

LONDON ON N6C 4T7 
MR. DAVE PATRICK 
PRESIDENT 



9.0 (416) 498-5948 

PHITCHARD STEEL PRODLICTS LTD 



3 SILVERGROVE PD 
WILLOUDALE ON M2i 
LORNE PRITCHARD 



2N5 



2.6 

PROCESS STRAINERS LTD. 

I ELHOSE AVE. 

WESTON ON M9M 2H5 
MR. ARTHUR S, HALPENN^ 



-2196 



2.6 (416) 793-6800 

PROCHEN NIXING EQUIPMENT LTD. 
B032 TORBRAH RD. 

BRAMPTON ON L6T 3T2 
MR. KURT W. SCHNEIDER 



6.' 

PROCTOR i REDfERN CROUP 

45 GREEN SEL" DR 

DON MILLS ON. M3C 3K3 
MR. DONALO BLAINE REDFERN 



it 1 445-3600 



PROENCO SYSTEMS L INI TED 
14 - 1 9>n MUt . IT uEST 

BRAMPTON ON, L7A 1A2 
MR, A. WHIKE 
D I RECTOR 



-7 2 - 



FEB 22, 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABETICAL!.* BY COMPANY 



ANNEX G 
APPENDIX 2 



PROJECT PLANNINC LIMITED 
80 3L0OR ST. H. 

TORONTO ON MSS 1/1 1 
MR. fl.L. HANCOCK 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 925-1411 



2.6 

PffCTIAC CONTROLS INC 

1375 MORNINGS IDE AVE 
SCARBOROUGH ON. MIB 3CS 



(416} 284-8440 



M (416) 635-2150 

PROMINENT ELUID CONTROLS LTD 



22. 1030 KANATO RD 
MISSISSAUGA ON. L4W 



■ ci 



PflOPAK LIMITED 

77 MERCHISON AVENUE 
HA/1IL70N ON L8H 3E2 
H KEITH HUNT 



(416) 547-5745 2.5 -416) 291-9531 

PTOTECTIVE PLASTICS LIMITED 

SO PASSHORE AVE. 



SCARBOROUGH ON, 
MR, ?.G. SZAS2' 
'RESIDENT 



■IIS 332 



PROVINCIAL SMELTING t PETALS 

COMPANY 

37 CREDITSTCNE 

THORNKILL ON. L4K 181 



4l6j 669-2332 



2.6 

PULTRUSICHS CANADA LTD 

247 ARMSTRONG AVE 
UNITS I S 2 
GEORGETOWN ON, L70 4X6 



(416) 877-0177 



PUBPS I SOFTENERS LTD. 

P.O. BOX 5332 TERMINAL 

LONDON ON N6A 4N8 
MR. J.M. STEVENS 
PRESIDENT AND CEO 



(519) 672-0330 



2.7 

PYROLYSIS SYSTHES INC. 

61 THOROLD ROAD EAST 
WELLAND ON L3C 379 

E s rox JR 
PRESIDENT 



; d r 6 ; "35-240: 



8.0 (416) 669-4590 

QUALITY [RON AND METAL 

DIVISION OF 246495 ONTARIO LTD 
24 5 BOWES ROAD 
THORNHILL ON. L4K 1B ! 



6. I (416) 858-8010 

QUAN CARRimCRS KINGSQUAN CONSULTANTS LT 

2200 ARGENT I A ROAD 

MISSISSAUGA ON L5N 2K7 
MR. A. COLUMBIA 



8.0 f5'9) 893-840 

QUANTEX CHEMICAL SERVICES INC. 

29 TRILLIUM PARK 'LACE 
KITCHENER ON N2E IX I 
3C8 8RAID 
SALES MANAGER 



6. I (416) 633-5869 

QUANTUM INSPECTION AND TESTING LIMITED 
916 GATEWAY 

BURLINGTON ON L7L 5K7 
MR. UN. I . MARCOV1TCB 
PRESIDENT 



2, :o 

QUATIC CHEMICALS LINITED 
P.O. SOX 952 

GUELPH ON, NIH 6M6 
MR. KENNETH R. FAIR 
PRESIDENT 



(519) 321-7730 2.5 (SIS) 723-0960 

QUATROSENSE ENVIRONMENTAL LTD. 
18-1 ENTERPRISE AVE. 

NEPEAN ON K2G 0A6 
MR. DAVID H. JENKINS 



3.1 

QUEENSUAY TANK LINES INC 

635 INDUSTRIAL AVE 

OTTAWA ON. KIG 021 



■b '•) T3 1-2330 



6.2 



quiacBORWR team canaoa ltd. 

P.O. SOX 2714 STATION "3" 

KITCHENER ON N2H 6N3 
MR. CLAUS D. STANG 
PRESIDENT 



(519) 746-1372 



0U1NDAR PRODUCTS LTD 

106 RAYETTE RD 
CONCORD ON. L4K 20 3 



(416) 669-1272 



2.6 (613) 962^8671 

QUtNTE PRECAST CONCflETE LTD 

SOX 517 

BELLEVILLE ON, K8N 582 
lift. C.A. MCCOY 
PRESIDENT 



3. I (613) 968-9534 

QUINTE SANITATION SERVICES LTD 

R H 7 

BELLEVILLE ON, K3N 422 



2.5 

ft A B DEDCSCO LIMITED 

106 SCHNEIDER ROAD 

KANATA ON K2K V'2 
MR. R. BARKLEY 
PRESIDENT 



(.613) 592-3C26 



2.7 



R AND I RAflTITE CANADA LTD 

C E REFRACTORIES 

BOX 220 

WELLAND ON L3B 5P4 

MR. F.W. LUTES 

VICE PRESIDENT AND CM 



(416) 732-4441 



7.0 (705) 748-1506 

R AND R LABORATORIES LTD. 

1557 FAIR AVENUE 
PETERBOROUGH ON K9K IT I 
OR ROBERT A STAJRS 
PRINCIPAL 



3. I (519) 426-2670 

R D COOKSQN DISPOSAL LIMITED 

R R 3 

S1MCOE ON. N3Y 4K2 



2.6 

R H NICHOLS CO LTD 

80 VINYL CRT 
UOODBRIDGE ON, L4L 4A3 



(416) 661-3190 6.2 ("613) 232-3745 

R L HALKER S PARTNERS LTD 

65 BANK ST 

OTTAWA ON. KIP 5K4 



6.2 

R MEO i ASSOCIATES INC 

10 MERCER STREET 
WINDSOR ON N9A IM4 
RALPH MEO 



(519) 252-5563 



R UAKELY t SONS LTD 



45 LAVINfA 
PORT HOPE ON 



LIA 2A7 



(416) B85-43I6 6-2 I 705 1 T 59-623 

R. G- RYCXKAN ASSOCIATES LTD. 
629A OUEEN STREET EAST 
SUITE 202 

SAULT STE. MARIE ON P6A 2A6 
ROBERT G RYCKMAN 
PRESIDENT 



6. I 

R.E. CLIPSHAM LTD. 

16 MOUNTAINVIEW ROAD SOUTH 

SUITE 10 

HALTON HILLS ON L"G 4K ! 



(416) 457-2002 



-73- 



FEB 22. 1986 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABETICALLY BY COMPANY 



ANNEX ": 
APPEND 1 1 2 



6. I (*'6l 270-0 1 10 

R.E. WINTER AND ASSOCIATES LTD. 

4255 SHERWCCOTOUNE BOULEVARD 

NISSISSAUGA ON HZ ITS 



2.7 (613) 764-5417 

R.G.D. FIBERAL 01 V. Of 656887 OUT. INC. 
P.O. BOX 733 

CASSELMAN ON KOA INO 
MR. jOE ClAnflARIA 



6. I i 51?) 941-533 

R.J. BURNSIDE 1 ASSOCIATES LTD. 
29 CENTENNIAL R0- 

0RAN6EVIU.E ON L9W IRI 

MR. ROBERT J. BURNS I DC 
PRESIDENT 



6.1 

R.P.A. CONSULTANTS LTD. 

40Q MOUNT PLEASANT ROAD 

TORONTO ON M4S 2L6 
MR. R.J. FLOTD 
PRESIDENT 



1 4 16 > 485-423! 6.1 '613) 692-2501 

R.S. WALLACE i ASSOCIATES LTD. 
P.O. BOX "49 

MANOTICK CN KOA 2 NO 
OR. R.S. WALLACE 
PRESIDENT 



1.2 uifi J-"--- 

R.V. ANDERSON ASSOCIATES LTD. 

1210 SHEPPARD AVENUE EAST 
UILIOUDALE ON H2X tea 
PETER LAUCHTCN 
DIRECTOR WATER POLLUTION CTRL 



R.H.F. INDUSTRIES 

I JOHN STREET 
rnBRO ON. NOJ IJO 



(519) 475-4101 



8.0 

RACCO IRON 1 METAL LTD 

GOODWOOD 

UXBRIOCE ON. LOC 1A0 



1 4 16) 852-7908 2.6 '"OS: 692-4734 

RAMSEY LAKE INDUSTRIAL LTD 

WALDEN PLAZA UNIT 9 

BOX 1 58 

LIVELY ON, POM 2E0 



3. I 

RAPIDES DES JOACHIMS 



ROLPHTON ON, KOJ 2H0 
JANES DALT 



(613) 586-2304 



RATDEL ACR I -SERVICES 

R R 4 

ELMIfiA ON. N3B 223 



(5191 669-5858 



6.2 

RTJf ENERGY RESEARCH INC. 

36 YORK MILLS ROAD 
TORONTO ON. 12P 284 
RKD SACHSE 
VICE PRESIDENT 



(416) 224-5500 



6. I (416) 445-4360 

HEAD VOORWES 1 ASSOCIATES UNITED 

160 DUNCAN NILL ROAD 

DON "ILLS ON PI3B 125 
MR. A.-. READ 
PRESIDENT 



3.0 
RECHEH LTD. 

55 SINCLAIR AVENUE 

UNIT 4 

GEORGETOWN ON L7G 4x4 

BILL GASCOICNE 

PRESIDENT 



(416) 877-8771 



6.2 

RECON INTERNATIONAL 

*67 RICHMOND STREET EAST 
TORONTO ON MSA lit I 
DEREK STEPHENSON 



t, 4 ; & ) 366-25" 



8.0 

RECOVERS X INC 

P BOX 1261 

STATION B 

FREE-TON ON L7P 3S9 



(416) 659-3600 



8.0 

RECTCO SERVICES INC 

P BOX 2126 STN 8 
KITCHENER ON. M2H 6K8 
A DAVIS 



(519) 745-4790 3. I (613) 443-2B45 

RED SANITATION LIMITED 

LIMOGES 

EMBRUN ON. KOA IWO 



2.5 

REDUCTION EMISSION TECH 



(416) 733-2855 



5075 YONCE STREET SUITE 403 
WILLOWDALE ON M2N 6C6 
MIKE KILBRIDE 



6.2 

REFTECH LIMITED 

7835 HIGHWAY 50 
R.R. II 

WOODBRIDGE ON L4L 
J DUTFIELD 
PRESIDENT 



4 = 



(416) 851-2881 8.0 (416) 786-2070 

REGIONAL RECLAIMERS LIMITED 

P BOX 358 
NEWCASTLE ON, LOA [HO 



3.1 

REGIONAL WASTE DISPOSAL 

(KITCHENER) LTD 
257 VICTORIA N 
KITCHENER ON N2H 5C9 



(519) 743-9341 6.2 '519) 337-7335 

REGULATORY MANAGE ME NT SYSTEMS 

819 MICHIGAN AVENUE 
SARNIA ON N7V IL5 
JOHN HOSTY 



2.6 

REHAU INDUSTRIES INC 

1149 PIONEER RD 
BURLINCTON ON. L7M IKS 



(4i6l 335-3294 



(^05) 726-014 1 



REID AND ASSOCIATES LIMITED 

143 fERNDALE DR. R.R- 12 

BARPIE ON L4M 4S4 
MR. J.D. REID 
PRESIDENT 



(519) 756-9770 



RETEK RESOURCE RECOVERY INC. 

66 MOHAWK STREET 

BUILDING IB 

BRANTFORD ON N3T 5V5 

ALLEN T SROKA 

PRESIDENT 



2.6 

REXNORD CANADA LTD. 

81 MAYBRCOK DRIVE 



(416 29~-686S 



SCARBOROUGH ON HIV 322 
MICHAEL A DOUCETTE 
MANAGER SALES I MAPKE T ING 



6. I (416) 475-1392 

RCP PROJECT MGHT. t PERSONNEL SERVICES 

170 ESNA PARK UNIT 2 

MARKHAH ON L3R IE3 
MR. SAND IP KUMAR HEHTA 
PRESIDENT 



6,2 

RIS RESOURCE INTEGRATION 

SYSTEMS LTD. 

467 RICHMOND ST. EAST 

TORONTO ON MSA IRI 

DEREK STEPHENSEN 

PRESIDENT 



(416 I 366-2578 



3.1 

RIVERSIOE ENTERPRISES 

92 STATION ROAD 
ESPANOLA ON. POP ICO 



,755! its-ijij 



-74- 



FEB 22. 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABETICALLY BY COMPANY 



ANNEX G 
APPENDIX 2 



2.6 

RNG EQUIPMENT 

32 STOFFEL DRIVE 
REXOALE ON !T?W IA8 
BRUCE JACKSON 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 249-7363 



3, I 

ROADRUNNER CONTAINERS 

520 BIG BAY POINT ROAD 
8ARRIE ON. L4N 325 



(705) 722-3383 2.6 (51?) ^52-5*47 

R0B8INS 1 MYERS CANADA. LTD 

P BOX 290 17 WOODY ATT OP 
8RANTF0R0 ON. N3T 5N6 



6.1 

ROBERT OOOOS LIMITED 

1060 RiVERDALE ROAD 

THUNDER BAY ON P7C 4V2 
MR. ROBERT 8. DODDS 
PRESIDENT 



{807)475-5717 6.1 C 6 1 3 ) 966- 1 37 

ROBERT G. (1CEHEN S ASSOCIATES LIHITED 
208 JOHN ST, 

BELLEVILLE ON K8N 3G I 
flR, ROBERT MCEUEN 
PRESIDENT 



6. I :'4I6) "187-525 

ROBERT HALSALL t ASSOCIATES LlfllTED 
20 HOLLY ST. SUITE 206 

TORONTO ON N4S 3B I 
MR. ROBERT HALSALL 
PRESIDENT 



2.7 (416! 528-7936 

ROBERT SOPER LTD. 

144 CHATHAM STREET 

P.O. BOX 277 

HAMILTON ON LBN 3E8 

LINOLN GALLAGHER 

VICE PRESIDENT MANUFACTURING 



2.7 (416) 625-605 

ROBERTSHAH CONTROLS CANADA INC 

5! 18 EVEREST DRIVE 
MISSISSAUGA ON. L4U 2R4 



6. I (613) 239-4625 

ROBERTSON NIQCERSON LIMITED 

75 ALBERT ST. SUITE 610 

OTTAWA ON KIP 5E7 

MR. GEORGE ft. ROBERTSON 

PRESIDENT 



6.2 (416) 96 l 

H08IN T. HAZELL t ASSOCIATES 

76 ST. CLAIR AVE. W. 

TORONTO ON, M4V IN? 
MR. ROBIN T. HAZELL 
PRESIDENT 



■3700 



3. ! 



ROBfiAN CONSTRUCTION LIHITED 

77 BERRYMAN 

ST. CATHARINES ON. L2R 7M5 



(416) 684-6337 



S 3 

ROBSON SCRAP METALS LTD 

CARL I NO 

ST MARYS ON NOM 2V0 



(519) 2S4-290I 



3.1 (519) 68 

RCCKHALL CONCRETE FORMING 

(LONDON) 

525 EXETER ROAD 

LONDON ON N6E IL3 



-6910 2.6 (705) 737-416 

ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL Of CANADA LTD. 

MEASUREMENT AND CONTROL OIV. 
P.O. BOX 8400 214 BAYVIEW OR, 
3ARHIE ON L4M 5N2 



3. I (416) 476-4998 

ROCER LARUE ENTERPRISES LTD 

287 HOLLYWOOD DRIVE 
KESWICK ON, L4P 2Z9 



6.2 (416) 482-6316 

ROGERS PORTER TURCOTTE I ASSOCIATES INC. 
522 EGLINTON AVE. EAST 

I 
TORONTO ON M4P IN6 
MS. THOMAS H. ROGERS 
PRESIDENT 



2.6 

ROHN AND HAAS CANADA INC 

2 MANSE RD 

WEST HILL ON. M IF 3T9 



(416) 284-471 I 



8.0 

RONDAR INC. 



(416) 561-2808 



333 CENTENNIAL PARKWAY NORTH 
HAMILTON ON L8E 2X6 
NORM STEWART 



8. a 

ROSEN METAL CO 

61 BALZER 

KITCHENER ON. N2C 1X5 



(519) 456-309 6.2 (613) 733-7822 

ROSS A. COUAN MARKETING INC. 
Bl RAMSGATE 

OTTAWA ON K IV 8M4 
MR. ROSS A. COWAN 
PRESIDENT 



3.0 

ROSS RECYCLING LTD 

•345 PARKEDALE 
BROCKVILLE ON. K6V SV6 



(613) 342-7378 



3.1 (705) 7H-I062 

RCSSEV CONSTRUCTION LTD 



MILFORO BAY ON. POB IE0 



3. I 



RCSMELL'S CONCRETE PRODUCTS 

R R 3 

SCOTLAND ON. NOE IRO 



(519) 446-2749 



8.0 

ROTBLOTT t SONS LIHITED 

560 FRONT STREET WEST 
TORONTO ON. M5V ICI 



(416) 363-456 



3. I 

ROTO-RCOTER SEMER SERVICE 

25 ABERDEEN 
OTTAWA ON. KIS 3J3 



(613) 232-8417 



2.7 (416) 888-1927 

ROT06ALE COMPACTION SYSTEMS 



GORMLEY ON LOH I GO 
HERB WELLS 



6.2 (519) 823-1311 

ROMAN UILLIANS, DAVIES AND IRWIN INC. 
650 HOODLAWN ROAD. WEST 

GUELPH ON NIK 188 
DR. ANTON DAVIES 



6.1 

ROY LITTLEleOD 

665 GAYNE BLVD. 

BURLINGTON ON L7T 3W1 
DR. ROY LITTLEHOOO 



(416) 637-7403 6.2 (613) 73I-I90U 

ROYGOLD MARKETING SYSTEMS LTD. 

1970 SARNHAfiT PL 

OTTAWA ON KIH 5B6 
MR. M.M. ROYTENBERG 
PRESIDENT 



2.S 



(807 i 623-4445 



RUGGED AIR SYSTEMS LIMITED 

710 NORAH CRESCENT 

THUNDER BAY ON P7C 4T8 

MR. C. RACCO 

MANAGER 



-75- 



FEB 22. 1=188 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABET [CALL* BT COMPANY 



ANNE» G 
APPENDIX 2 



2.6 (416) 252-524 

RUHL H MACHINERY CO LTD 

30 QUEEN ELIZABETH BLVD 
TORONTO ON. H8Z 2T6 



6.; (416! 364-3812 

RUKZHEIHER CANADA INC. 
33 TONCE ST. SUITE I 150 

TORONTO ON N5E IC4 
»R. ALAN P. TOPPING 
VlCE-^ESIOENT AND GENERAL IAN 



6 2 

RUPXE I ASSCCSATE3 LTD 

471 D'ARCT STREET 
newmarket on L3< in9 
J - GERALD RUPKE 
PRESIDENT 



«I6) 853-'223 



6.2 (4161 961 

RURAL DEVELOPMENT CONSULTANTS 

P BOX 56 

AURORA ON. L4G 3H1 



S CRONISH 1 SON LTD 

284 UNUIN 

TORONTO ON. N5A l A3 



'+I6i 46l-?5iR 6. I 511 2"2- "~- 

S.L. ROSS EKVIROWUMTAl RESEARCH LIMITED 
346 FRANK ST. 

OTTAWA ON. *2P 0'' I 

m. s.l. Ross 

PRESIDENT 



2.6 
SATESET-BCX 

220 MUflKRUNt DRIVE 

UNIT I 

REXOALE ON M9W 5T4 



(416) 675-2662 2.7 MI6) 789-631 

SAFETY HOUSE OF CANADA LIMITED 

1275 CASTLEFIELD AVENUE 
TORONTO ON 163 154 
GERALD J TAFTE 
PRESIDENT 



2.7 

SAFETY SUPPLY CANADA 

90 UEST BEAVER CREEK ROAD 
RICHMOND HILL ON. L4B I [7 



(416) 222-411 



2.7 

SAFETY WORLD INC. 

5 - 45 LAHR DRIVE 
BELLEVILLE ON. K8N 5EB 
BRIAN SHENTON 
PRESIDENT 



(613) 962-4501 



2.6 

SALA MACHINE HOWS LTD 

3136 nAv IS RD 
nlSSISSAUGA ON, L5C ITS 



(416) 270-2170 



6.2 

SALMON DR. JATtS R. 

24 HE SLOP DR 

TORONTO ON M8U 4R ' 
DR. JAflES R. SALMON 
'RESIDENT 



[416) 255-5349 



8.0 

SAfl ADELSTE1N 1 CO LTD 

492 WELLAND AVE 

ST CATHARINES ON L31 5V5 

A ADELSTEIN 



(416) 684-6365 



2.7 I 1 

SAflUEL STRAPPING STSTEHS LTD 

2350 DIXIE RD 
NlSSISSAUGA ON. L4T 127 

SALES NANACER 



3. ! '416) "3 ' -373' 

SANCO DISPOSAL 1 SCRAP METAL 

LTD 

26 RUCGLES 

THOfiNHILL ON L3T 206 



3.1 



SANITARY COLLECTION SERVICE 

LTD 

« R 7 

ST THOMAS ON. N5P 3Y2 



(519) 631-7970 3.1 



(519) 657-407D 



SAHITARY SEWER CLEANING CO 

R R 9 

LONDON ON. N6A 4C3 



SARNA/IL CANADA LTD. 

75 HORNER AVENUE 
TORONTO ON M8I 4X7 
lt U READ 
GENERAL MANAGER 



(416) 259-9203 



2.6 

SCADA SYSTEMS INC. 

14 - 44 FASKEN DR. 

REXOALE ON M9W 5118 
DR. BERNARD FLEET 



(416) 674-0726 6.1 



'416) 842-3633 



SCABAOA CONSULTANTS LIHITEO 
446 REYNOLDS ST. 

QAKVILLE ON L6J 3D4 

m. ROBERT E. PUTTS '.ENG. 

PRESIDENT 



8.0 
SCANLUBE 

PO SOX 909 

405 D0B8IE DRIVE 

CAMBRIDGE ON MIR S»9 



(519) 622-2040 



2.6 (416) 752-1331 

SCARBOROUGH PUPP NFC CO LTD 

49 CKCCKFORD BLVD 

SCARBOROUGH ON MIR 387 
MR. H. BARBEITO 
PRESIDENT 



2.6 (416) 752-2200 

SCEPTER MANUFACTURING CO LTD 

807 PHARMACT AVE 
SCARBOROUGH ON. MIL 3K2 



8.0 (6131 432-4365 

SCHAENFIELD IRON I NETAL LTD 

O'BRIEN ROAO 
RENFREU ON, K.7V 4A2 



2.5 (705) 472-2851 

SCHAUENBURC INDUSTRIES LIMITED 
P.O. BOX 26i 

NORTH BAT ON P IB 8G8 
DR. H. HACKENBERG 



3.1 

SCHAUS SANITATION SERVICE 

P BOX 3 

HANOVER ON N4N JE 3 



(519) 364-4592 



3.1 (519' 658-257-6 

SCHEERER SEPTIC SYSTEMS LTD 

R R 21 

HESPELER ON. N3C 2T3 



2.7 (519) 539-8567 

SCHElTTnA MANUFACTURING LTD 

R.R. NO. I 

WOODSTOCK ON N4S 7V6 
m. U. SCHELTEflA 
PRESIDENT 



2.5 '416) 891-4646 

SCIEX-OIVISION Of NOS HEALTH CROUP LTD. 
55 GLEN CAMERON RD. UNIT 202 

THORNHILL ON. L3T IP2 
MR. J. A. REXNOLOS 
VICE-PRESIDENT AND GM 



2.5 
SC1NTREX LTD 

222 SNIDER CROST ROAD 
CONCORD ON. L4K IBS 



(4 16) 669-2280 



- T 6- 



FES 22, 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABET I CALL* BY COMPANY 



ANNEX C 
JpPFNCTf 2 



6.2 

SCRUBBER SERVICES 



BOX 40 

UNIONVILLE ON, 



L3R 2LS 



(416) 477-99 



6.2 

SEA SCAN 

i6065 FIFTH LINE 

R.R. #3 

CALEDON EAST ON. LON 

MR. 3RIAN UANNAMAKER 

PRESIDENT 



(416) 880-0528 



EO 



3.1 

SEBBEN CONSTRUCTION 

6717 MONTROSE 

NIACARA FALLS ON. L6E 6S5 



(416) 354-3223 



2.7 (416) 244-953 

SEC-HAT EQUIPMENT ( MACHINERY 

3 NOR9Y CRES 
WESTON ON H9P IL7 
THOMAS PARKER 



S,0 ( 4 f 6j 746-328 

SECURITY RECYCLING LTD 

503 GARYRAY 
TORONTO ON. H9L IP? 



2.6 (416) 4?4-<* ! 60 

SEEMARS ENGINEERING EQPT 

431 ALCEN 3D UNIT 7 
NARKHAM ON. L3R JL* 



3.1 

SELECT DISPOSAL SYSTEMS 

503 OARYRAY DRIVE 
TORONTO ON. M9L IP9 



(4 16) 745-225! 



3.1 

SELKIRK SEPTIC SYSTEM 

R R I 

SELKIRK ON. NOA IPO 



(416) 776-2507 



SELTECH LTD 

260 RICHMOND ST WEST 
SUITE 400 

TORONTO ON. N5V IH5 
MR. DAVID MACDONALO 



(416) 597-2299 



2.5 (416) 678-9301 

SEMCO PNEUMATIC SYSTEMS LTD. 
6999 ORDAN OR, 

HISSISSAUGA ON LSI IK6 
MR. R.F. O'HEARN 



6.2 

SENES CONSULT ANTS LIMITED 

499 MCNICOL AVENUE 
H1LL0WDALE ON. M2H 2C9 
DR DONALD M CORBER 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 499-5030 



2.7 ! 

SEPARATOR ENGINEERING LTD 
2220 POLAND AVENUE 
UNIT 65 ADMIN PARK 
SCARBOROUGH CN NIP 3E6 



16) 292-8822 



2.6 


(613) 


523- 


1641 


3.1 


SEPROTECH SYSTEMS INC. 








SEPTEC 


2378 HOLLY LANE 








249 - I0TH STREET U 


OTTAWA ON K IV 7P 1 








OWEN SOUND ON. N4K 3R3 


MR. H.fl. TOUZEL 










PRESIOENT 











(519) 371-1033 



3.1 

SERGE * MARC SEGUIN 

78 PR I NO I PALE 
HAUKESBURY ON. KOB 130 



(613) 632-9751 



8.0 (613) 938-4740 

SERVAAS RUBBER CANADA INC 

P BOX 308 
CORNWALL ON K6H 5T! 
REAL LAUZON 



3. 1 (716) 284-431 

SEVENSON CONSTRUCT I ON CO LTD 

PO BOX 570 

NIAGARA FALLS ON L2E 6V2 

LAURENCE EltA 



2.6 (416) 293-3IOC 

SHADRACK ENGINEERING [1978] LTD. 

3251 KENNEDY ROAD 

UNIT 8 

SCARBOROUGH ON HIV 2J9 



2.7 

SHANAHAN Of PHELPSTON 

PHELPSTON 

ELMVALE ON. LOL IPO 



(705) 322-1094 8.0 (416) 525-5623 

SHEARflET (DIV OF IRON * METAL 
RECYCLING LTD) 
700 MONTREAL ST BOX 175 
THUNDER BAY ON. P7C 4V8 
YURI 1 1RK IN 



2.6 (416) 676-1700 

SHERMAN SiJPERSONIC INDUSTRIES CORP. 
3133 ORLANDO OR. 

MISSISSAUGA ON L4V IC5 
MR. SEYMOUR TECHNER 



6.2 



SHIHHERHAN PENH, HEITIrtAN 

12 SHEPPARD ST. 3RD FLOOR 

TORONTO ON M5H 3AI 

MR. ALAN SHIMMERMAN BSC C.A. 



(416) 364-748! 



7.0 

SHRADER ANALYTICAL AND 

CONSULTING LABORATORIES LTD 
3418 MAVIS ROAD 
MISSISSAUGA ON L5C IT8 
G B SLEMIN 
BUSINESS MANAGER 



(416) 277-9418 



2.7 
SHRED-PAX LTD 

201 BEVERLY STREET 
CAMBRIDGE ON NIR 7G8 
ROGER VENNING 



(519) 621-3560 



2.7 

SHRED-TECH LI HI TED 

P.O. SOX 1508 

CAMBRIOGE ON NIR 7G8 
MR. JOHN K. BELL 
PRESIDENT 



(519) 62I-3S60 8.0 (4 16) 283-2427 

SHUHAN PLASTICS Of CANADA LTD 

595 BAY ST SUITE 300 
TORONTO CN M5G 2C2 
HOWARD LEviNE 



2.5 (519) 822-3913 

SILCCfAB DIVISION RO8C0 INC. 
P.O. BOX 63 

GUELPH ON NIH 6J6 
MR. PAUL VALERICTE 



6.1 (416) 286-2285 

S1NCCC ENGINEERING CROUP LIMITED 
345 KINGSTON RD. S1KC0 BLOG. 

PICKERING ON L1V 1A! 
HR. T. FOWLE P. ENG. 
DIRECTOR 



2.7 (5191 822-9881 

SIMPLICITY MATERIALS HANDLING 

650 WOODLAWN RD U 
GUELPH ON, NIH 6J9 
C P SIHOLA 



2.7 (4i6) seg-as I 

SINCLAIR MACDONALD PRODUCTS 
I !2 DONCASTER AVENUE 

THORNHILL ON L3T IL3 
SINCLAIR MACDONALD 
PRESIDENT 



-77- 



FEB 22. '986 



PROVINCES USTEO ALPHABETICAL^ B> COMPANY 



ANNE ■ C 
APPENDIX 2 



2.7 
SINTERIS INC 

BOX 28C 

BLENHEIM ON NOP 
MR. F. PRUITT 
PRESIDENT 



(519) 676-8161 



10 



6.2 

SIRMAN ASSOCIATES LTD. 

8 CLAOIATOR ROAD 
MARKHAM ON. L3P I J* 
IVAN SIRHAN 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 479- 1600 



2.6 

sistMiicni inc. 

2596 JEFFERSON BLVD. 

UINDSOR ON. N8T 2H6 
MR, IAN N l[!" I 



5 1 9 > 944-Q662 



6.2 (705) B87-57B6 

SXELTOft (C.B.) TECHNICAL SERVICES LTD 

RURAL ROUTE II 

8QSCAYCECN CN KOM liB 
MR. G.3. SKELTON 
PRESIDENT 



6. 1 ■ "05; 726- 

SKELTOH BRUMWELL I ASSOCIATES 

INC. 

49 NARY STREET BOX 940 

3ARRIE ON L4f1 4Y6 

C DENTON SRUflUtLL 

V ICE PRESIDENT 



6.2 '5'' 

SLANET MANAGEMENT CONSULTING 
P.O. BOX 367 

SIMCOE ON N3T 4L2 
CARMEN M. SLANE' 
PRESIDENT 



8.0 (416) 549-4774 

SLATER STEEL CORP (HAMILTON 

SPECIALTY BAR 01 V) 
319 SHERflAN AVE N P BOX 9*3 
HAMILTON ON LBN 3P9 
ALLARO B LOOPSTRA 



1. I 

SHALL BROS CONTRACTORS 

451 ADELAIDE 
KINCARDINE ON. NOG 2G0 



(519) 396-2797 



2.6 

SMART TURNER LIMITED 

P.O. BOX 2027 

191 BARTON STHEE T 

HAMILTON ON l8N JS3 

MR. E. SIKORA 

PLANT MANAGE? 



'416:: 52 7 -4567 



6.2 

SKIT, DR. B, 

19 MALVERN CRESCENT 

CUE LP* ON NIH 6H8 
SUIT DR. B. 
PRESiDENT 



(519) 836-2654 



6.2 

SfllTH HOFFMAN ASSOCIATES 

143 UYNDHAH NORTH 
SUITE 203 

GUELPH ON NIH 4E9 
MICHAEL K HOFFMAN 
V.P. 



(519) B22-750 



6.2 

SOLID HASTE MAHAGEMENT 

CONSULTANTS INC. 

1222 FEWSTE" DRIVE. UNIT 

M1SSISSAUGA ON L4U 'A' 

CALVIN SAGE' 

GENERAL MANAGER 



(416) 625-9664 



B.O 

SaCflON DIVISION 

LASCO STEEL 

55A FENMAR 0R1VE 

TORONTO ON N9L IIM 



(416) 745-3233 3.0 r 5 1 9 ^ 455-9000 

SONOCO LTD (RECYCLING PLANT) 

SI4-IST STREET 
LONOON ON N5V IZ3 
GORO LEWIS 



8.0 I 70S) 254-3401 

SCO DISPOSAL (SAULT) LTD 

1560 PEOPLES ROAD 

SAULT STE MARIE ON. »6A 5*5 



2.7 (416) 528-7936 

SOPER'S ENGINEERED FABRIC PRODUCTS 

P.O. BOX 277 

CHATHAM STREET 

HAMILTON ON L8N 3EB 

NR. STEVEN COX 

TECHNICAL SALES CONSULTANT 



6.2 

SOPHOS INC. 

23 GCRON ROWE CRESCENT 

RICHMOND HILL ON. L4C 8R8 



(416) 737-5360 



6.2 

SOTECH PROJECTS LTD. 

1003-350 SPARKS STREET 

OTTAWA ON KIR 7S8 
MR. STEPHEN CALLAPY 
PRESIDENT 



(613) 23C-6370 



2.6 (5191 352-1431 

SOUTHERN CONCRETE PRODUCTS LTD 

80x 603 

CHATHAM ON N7M 5K8 
MR. J. ERtC COX 
PRESIDENT 



3. I 

SPADE RAN" S HASTE REMOVAL 

HIGHWAY 47 

STOUFFVILLE ON. LOH ILO 



(416) 640- 1870 



2.10 

SPECIALTY CHEMICALS LTD 

270 INDUSTRIAL 'ARKWAY 

AURORA ON L4G 3T9 
MR. J.R. REEVES 
PRESIDENT 



'4l6i 773-6333 



8.0 

SPECTRALUN NETALS LTD 

P BOX 99 

KESUICX ON L4P XI 
rURI MURK IN 



(4 16) 476-2901 6.1 ('05) 743-7520 

SPECTRUM ENGINEERING CORP. LTD. 
P.O. BOX 687 

PETERBOROUGH ON K9J 6Z9 
MR. BRUCE STRUTHERS 
PRESIDENT 



SPRIET ASSOCIATES 

722 TORK ST 
LONDON ON N5W 2S3 



i 519) 672-A ICO 



6.2 



SQUARE ONE MANAGEMENT LTD. 

302-340 GLADSTONE AVE 

OTTAWA ON K2P 0Y8 
MR. RUBEN NELSON 
PRESIDENT 



(613) 236-9712 



2.7 

SRP CONTROL SYSTEMS LTD 

62 GUIDED COURT 
REXDALE ON, «9V 4K6 



■416) 746-117 8.0 [SI9I 

ST THOMAS SCRAP METAL LTD 

6 PEARL W 

ST THOMAS ON. N5P 2N8 



631-1370 



2.7 

STAFF LINERS INC. 

I I POPLAR PLAINS CRESCENT 
TORONTO ON M4V IE9 
DON COL BOURNE 



(4 16) 920-5090 



6.2 



'416) 820-J648 



STAN ADAMS J ASSOCIATES INC. 
2624 DUNWIN DR. SUITE 16 

MISSISSAUGA ON LSL 3T5 
MR. STAN ADAMS 
PRESIDENT 



2.6 '4i6' 640-515 ' 

STANDARD PRESSURE PIPE COMPANY 
A DIV OF STANDARD INDUSTRIES 
P BOX 1420 
STOUFFVILLE ON LOH ILO 



-78- 



FEB 22. 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABETICALLY BY COMPANY 



ANNEX G 
APPEND U 2 



3.1 (416) 832-2213 

S7ARCON DISPOSAL INDUSTRY INC 

10525 KEELE STREET 
MAPLE ON. LOJ IEO 



8.0 

STARK IRON AND METAL CO 

D I V OF BENNY START LTD 

200 UNION 

TORONTO ON M6N 3M9 



(416) 654-3464 2.6 (416) 493-4S26 

STARQUIP INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS 

LTD. 

6 LANSING SQUARE 

WILLOWDALE ON f12J 1 T5 

R P STELLA 

MANAGER SALES ANO SERVICE 



2.6 

STAT I FLO INTERNATIONAL 

l 4l STRADA DR. 

WOO06RI0GE ON L4L 5V9 
MR . M.U. NESSiTT 



(416) 851-3666 
INC. 



7.0 

STEETLEY INDUSTRIES LTD 

PQ BOX 2029 

60S JAMES STREET NORTH 

HAMILTON ON L8N 3S9 

NICK SOUL TON 



(416) 527-3671 S.I ;5I9! 6Z'-9" 

STEGCfl CONSULTANTS LIMITED 
225 SHELDON DR. 

CAMBRIDGE ON NIT IA1 
MR. STEPHEN K. MADER 
PRESIDENT 



8.0 ( ) 

STELCO INC 

STELCO TOWER 100 KING ST 
P SOX 2030 
HAMILTON ON L8N 3TI 
DONALD C GLENN IE 



2.7 (613) 962-341 I 

STEPHENS-ADABSON 

DIV OF ALLIS-CHALMERS CAN LTD 
P SOX 5900 30 FRANKLIN ST 
BELLEVILLE ON K8N 5C8 



2.10 

STERHSON LIMITED 

22 MOHAWK STREET 
P.O. BOX 130 
8RANTFORD ON N3T SSI 
MR. M.T. BRIGHT 
PRESIDENT ANO CEO 



(519) 759-6600 



2.6 (416) 785-1224 

STEVE PLACEK COWANT LIMITED 

P.O. BOX 10 STATION Z 
TORONTO ON MSN 223 
STEVE PLACE* 
PRESIDENT 



6.1 (416) 493-0844 

STEVENSON HLUCHAN ASSOCIATES LIMITED 
THO LANSING SQUARE SUITE 1106 

WILLOWDALE ON M2J 4P8 
MR. C.A. STEVENSON P. ENG , 
PRESIDENT 



6.2 (416) 483-4313 

STEVENSON KEU.QGC ERNST AND WHIHNEY 

2200 COMMERCE COURT W. 

TORONTO ON M5L IC6 
MR. PIERRE VALLEE 
PRESIDENT 



6.2 

STOKER MR. KLAAS J.L. 

S -81 KING STREET EAST 

KINGSTON ON K7L 2Z6 
MR. KLAAS STOKER 
PRESIDENT 



(613) S44-67IO 



STONE I WEBSTER CANADA LTD. 

2300 YONGE STREET 
YOUNG EGLINTON CENTRE 
TORONTO ON M4P 2W6 
MR. J.J.H. PLEY 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 482-8500 



8.0 (4 16) 335-6337 

STRASSER ALLOY STEELS LTD 

4375 CORPORATE DRIVE 
BURLINGTON ON. L7L 5P7 



6. I (416) 44I-2S60 

STRATA ENGINEERING CORPORATION 

170 THE DONWAY WEST SUITE 410 

DON MILLS ON. M3C 203 
MR, CAM MIRZA P. ENG. 
PRINCIPAL 



STRATFORD SALVAGE CO 



706 LORNE E 
STRATFORD ON. 



N5A 6T3 



(519) 271-6272 



6,1 

STREXX LTD. 

24 OUEEN ST. E. SUITE 610 

BRAMPTON ON L6V 1A3 
MR. STEVE C. SOUL IS 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 451-9270 



8.0 

SUDBURY IRON I COPPER L' 

1273 KELLY LAKE ROAD 
SUDBURY ON. P3E 5P5 



(705) 673-1313 



6.2 (807) 345-5303 

SUEN, m, SAN06ERG t ASSOCIATES LTD. 

920 MEMORIAL AVE. 

THUNDER BAY ON. P7B 3Z9 
MR. WILLIAM NG 
MANAGING PARTNER 



2.6 (416) 923-2034 

SUL2ER CANADA INC. 

60 BLOOR STREET WEST 

SUITE 803 

TORONTO ON M4W 3B8 

WALTER BERNARD 

MANAGER. BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT 



8.0 

SUNOHIO CANADA INC. 



87 TELSON ROAD 
MARKHAM ON L3P 
DR NAS HIJA2! 
GENERAL MANAGER 



IE4 



(416) 479-1433 2.5 (416) 856-0400 

SUMLL ENGINEERING COMPANY LIMITED 
180 CASTER AVE. 

WOODBRIDGE ON L4L 5Y7 
MR. V. GOLDSTEIN 
PRESIDENT 



3.1 



SUPERIOR PRECAST CONCRETE 

PRODUCTS 

SHEGUIANDAH 

LITTLE CURRENT ON. POP IKO 



(705) 368-2015 



2.6 



SUPERIOR SEHER SERVICES LTD 

510 CORONATION DR. UNIT 26 
SCARBOROUGH ON. MIE 4X6 



(416) 284-9226 



2.7 

SUPPLIES CANADA CO 

33 FULLER ROAO 
AJAX ON. LIS 3C4 



(416) 683-1700 



2.6 

SUECO CANADA INC. 

40 TITAN ROAD 

TORONTO ON M8Z 2J8 
MR. J. PARISELLI 



(416) 231-5605 



2.6 


(416) 270-2282 


3.3 (416) 227-7872 


2.7 


(519) 743-6665 


SYTJLO INC 




SYNTATH LIMITED 

SERVICE Of TRICIL (SARNIA) LTD 


SYSTEMS PLUS 




578 MINETTE CIRCLE 




PO BOX 188 


P.O. BOX 339 




MISSISSAUGA ON L5A 388 




THOROLD ON L2V 3Y9 


NEW HAMBURG ON NOB 2G0 




SYD LOVE 




ALEX 8ESENYO 


GARRY R RUTTAN 








MANAGER 


PRESIDENT 





-79- 



FEB 22. '986 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABET! CALL 1 BY COMPANY 



annEy b 
AporsC: ' 



J.7 (416) 624- 

T S L PROFESSIONAL SERVICES 

I 140 FEWSTER DR 
NISSISSAUGA ON. L4W IAI 

PE T ER MLADENO'JICH 



6.2 

T.A.L. ASSOCIATES 

I '22 ST. GERMAIN 

ORLEANS ON. MC 2L8 
TERRY KACMILLAN 

PREStOtW 



(6(3) 824-5744 i. | f6|| J .«-5884 

T.D. OVERHILL ENCINEERII ! LTD. 
2C0-280 METCALFE ST. 

OTTAWA ON K2P IR7 
MR. T.D. DVSRHILL 
"RESIDENT 



2.6 

T.D. ROCHE ASSOCIATES LTD. 

05 MIRANDA AVENUE 
TORONTO ON M63 -US 
ROOKE "ERRv 
SALES MANAGER 



{416) 78S-i46 



T.S. MANUFACTURING CO. 
P.O. BOX 487 

LiNDSAr ON, »9V 4S5 
MR. TED SMJTH 



■'05 -2J-3"62 



TATOfllH ( CO SANITATION 

R R 5 

L.EAMING7CN ON. Ng* JV8 



?29 



2.5 

TECHNECJUIP LiniTED 

297 GARTRAT OR. 

WESTON ON, M9L IPZ 
MR. NORflAN A. JULL 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 749-3991 2.5 '4 16) 826-7752 

TECHNICAL MARKETING ASSOCIATES LIH1TED 

6022 KITIHAT RD. UNIT 6 

MISSISSAUGA ON. L5N 288 
MR. R.H. DANIELS 
PRESIDENT 



2.6 (416) 7?i-i666 

TECHNICAL SALES AND SERVICE 

AIRCRAFT APPLIANCES/EQUIPMENT 
150 EAST DR 
BfiAflALEA ON l6T ICI 
GORDON 3ATTAGLIA 



7.0 (416) 625-1544 

TECHNICAL SERVICE LABORATORIES 

13-01 FEWSTER DRIVE 
MISSISSAUGA ON L4W 1*2 
P NLAOENOVICH 
SPEC'AL SERVICES 



7.0 

TEOWITROL EXPERTISE INC. 

637 PETROL! A ROAD 
DOUNSVIEW ON M3J 2X6 
BARBARA KOVENSKY 
MANAGER 



(416) 665-2134 



2.7 

TECHSTAR PLASTICS INC 

1950 ELLESMERE »D 
SCARBOROUGH ON *>» ;; 
BILL BARNES 



(41*1 43?-*' I ( 



6.2 

TED BROAD ASSOCIATES 

P.O. BOX 1564 STN. "ft." 

WINDSOR ON, N9A 6R5 
MR. "ED BROAD 



(5)9) 256-4030 



6.2 I ) 

TEEPEE TECHNICAL SERVICES LTD 

P BOX 296 
UESTON ON tm 3M7 
THOS A PARKER 



2.5 '4'6» 67?- 

TENPRITE INDUSTRIES LINITED 

5 CENTENNIAL DRIVE 

ORANGEVILLE ON L9H IRI 
fSt, ROBERT F. ARfl'-iGE 
PRESIDENT 



-30 



5.9 

TERRA SURVEYS LTD. 

2060 WALKLEY ROAD 

OTTAWA ON KIG 3P5 
MR. J.R. DEPPER 
PRESIDENT 



(6135 731-9571 6.2 (416) 278-7504 

TERRY SEAtniCHT ASSOCIATES LTD. 
7 HELENE STREET S. 

fllSSISSAUGA ON L5C 3A8 
MR. TERRY SEAWRIGHT 
PRESIDENT 



2-7 -6'3) 225-95-1 

THE ARMSTRONG flONITORINC CORP. 

215 COLONNADE ROAD SOUTH 
NEPEAN ON H2E 7K3 
L J ARMSTRONG 
PRESIDENT 



6.2 (613) 237-4820 

THE CANADIAN BUREAU FOR I HTL . EDUCAT I ON 

85 ALBERT STREET SUITE 1400 

OTTAWA ON. KIP 5A4 
MARNlE GIRVAN 
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 



6.2 

THE CANFUF COMPANY 

54 ELVINA GAROENS 
TORONTO ON H4P 1X9 
CLINTON C KEMP 
V.P. ANO CENERAL MANAGER 



(416) 4B7-3I2B 6.2 (613) 237-3702 

THE COOPERS t LTBRAND CONSULTING GROUP 
99 SANK ST. 

OTTAWA ON, KIP 6B9 

MR. KENNETH R, STEVENSON 

CHAIRMAN S CHIEF EXECUTIVE PAS 



6.1 

THE ECE GROUP LTD- 

205 LESMILL RD. 

DON MILLS ON, M3B 2V I 
MR, G. GRANEK 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 449-1030 



2.7 

THE ENERCAN CROUP INC 

105-1200 SHEPPARD AVENUE EAST 

WILLOWDALE ON M2K 2SS 
MR. ARTHUR H. BRADLEi 



(416) 495-1200 4. I (416) 36I-J6I 

THE FOUNDATION COMPANY OF CANADA LIMITED 
I YONCE ST. 13 FLOOR 

TORONTO ON M5E IEB 
MR. ROLF MNDBOM 
PRESIDENT AND C.E.O. 



6.1 

THE IBI GROUP 



(416) 596-1930 



240 RICHMOND STREET W 6 FLOOR 
TORONTO ON M5V IWI 



2.6 

THE INTERFACE CROUP INC 



'416) 675-2863 



151 CARLINGVIEW DR. UNIT 5 
REXDALE ON. M9W 5E7 



6.2 1416) 884-^1 

THE LATHEfl CROUP INC. 
IO620 YONCE STREET 
OXFORD SQUARE SUITE 201 
RICHMOND HILL ON L4C 308 
KEITH W LATHEM 
PRESIDENT 



1.0 



THE LEVIS PAPER FIBRES LTD 

199 EASTERN AVENUE 
TORONTO ON MSA IH7 
DENE SMITH 



(416) 364-724 



2.7 

THE MACHINE KNIFE COMPANY 

240 BEACH RD 
HAMILTON ON L9L 4B2 
PHIL IMRE 



416 i 545- 7J77 



6.2 '4: 

THE MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE 

I DUKE ST. SUITE 212 

HAMILTON ON. LBS IP9 
PATRICIA P. SCOTT 
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 



i a^ 



-60- 



FEB 22. 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABETICALLY Br COMPANY 



ANN£j C 
IPPENDi ' 2 



M (4 '6) 339-4 32' 

THE PERFORMANCE nAKAGEMEHT GSCUP 
88 ADVANCE RD. 

TORONTO ON fl8Z JfT7 
MR. EUGEN 6, HAWRfM 
PRESIDENT 



the PERttnir co or canaoa 

777 WARDEN AVE STt 4 
SCARBOROUGH ON. MIL 4C3 



[4 16) 751-6920 



6.2 (416) '936-1907 

Tit POLLUTION PROBE FC CATION 

12 HADISON AVENUE 

T CRONTO ON M5R 2S 
COLIN ISAACS 
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 



s<2 (416) 44S-360C 

THE PROCTOR AHO REDFERN CfiOOT 

45 GREENBELT DRIVE 
DON MILLS m, M3C 3K5 
H D GOODINCS 
VICE PRESIDENT 



M ;6I3) 523-2733 

THE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE 
1202 SANK STREt" 

OTTAWA ON KIS 3Y* 
MR. ALA I.N ?. HAflTiN 



4.2 (416) 74t-0i" 

THE SELF MANAGEMENT RESOURCES CORP. 

155 REXDALE 30ULEVARQ 

SUITE 407 

tTOBICOKE ON "^U SZa 

.MR. PETER S. KWCLL'Y 

PRESIDENT 



9.0 (416) 360-556 

THE TRADE AND TRANSPORTATION 

GROUP 

133 RICHMOND STREET i STE SO 

TORONTO ON M5H 2L3 

FRED U LOFT IN 

PARTNER 



2.1 , (4 16) 368-4400 

THE TRAVELON OIL CO. (CANADA) 

P.O. BOX 246 
AOELAIDE STREET STATION 
TORONTO ON MSC 2J4 
HOWARD TRAVERS 



6.2 

THE WASTEWATER TECHNOLOGY 

CENTRE (UTC) 

867 LAKE SHORE ROAO 

BURLINGTON ON, l7R 4A6 

OR BRUCE JANX ' 

DIRECTOR 



(416) 336-459? 



8.0 ' 5 I q ; 

THERH-0-COMFORT CO LTD 

85 FOREST STREET 
AYLMER ON N5H IA5 
BERNARD wiLEY 



'3-8498 2. 10 (416) 445-7301 

THERNIDAIRE CORPORATION [1974] LTD 

31 RAILS IDE ROAD 

DON (tlUUS ON «3A 82 

MR, G.R. BRITTAI* 
PRESIDENT 



2.6 

THERMOGENICS INC. 

6 SCANLON CRT 

AURORA m. L^G 309 
MR, D.C. RUKI 



(4 16) 669-2797 



3-1 (416) 624-1264 

THOMAS ENVIRONMENTAL GROUP 

S369 MAINGATE DRIVE 
MISSISSAUGA ON L4W IC6 
JACK SHAU 
GENERAL MANAGER 



6.2 (416) 625-1612 

THOMAS SHAFFER ASSOCIATES INC. 

3625 GOLDEN ORCHARD DR. 

MISSISSAUGA ON L4Y 3J2 
MR. THOMAS F . SHAFFER 
PRESIDENT 



3.1 (7C 

THOMPSON MARINE LTD 

BAYFIELD INLET 

POINTt AU BARIL ON. POG IJvO 



-;££_ -.-■■*-- 



3. I 

THOMSON METALS 

948 2ELCO DRIVE 
BURLINGTON ON. L7L 4Y3 



(4(6) 637-8832 



THUCtR BAT ANALYTICAL LABS 

BALMORAL COMPLEX 
1081 BARTON STREET 
THUNDER BAY ON tfi 5N3 
ROBERT MATTHEWS 



(907) 623-5273 



6.2 

TIEN CANAOA INC. 

1855 MINNESOTA COURT 

MISSISSAUGA ON L5N IK7 
MR. CD. SCOTT 
CHAIRMAN 



(416) 921-6313 



3.1 (705) 267-1 132 

TfltllNS DISPOSAL SYSTEMS LTD 

41 I RAILWAY 

T I MM INS ON. P4N 2P5 



6- I (519) 354-0400 

TOOCHAH AND CASE ASSOCIATES INC. 

P.O. SOX 1326 

CHATHAM ON N7M 5R9 
MR. C.Utt. CASE 
PRESIDENT 



2.7 

TOLEDO SCALE DIVISION 

RELIANCE ELECTRIC LTD 
5220 CREEK6ANK ROAO 
MISSISSAUGA ON L4U IX 



(416) 625-81 12 



TOIWA SYSTEMS INC 

188 STRONACHE CRIES 
LONDON ON N5V 3AI 
ERNIE MARTIN 



(5191 455-3710 



8.0 

TONCO STEEL SU?PLUS LTD 

355 RAYETTE 
THORNHILL ON. L4K 2G2 



(416) 738-1441 



TONOLLI CANADA LTD 

1333 TONOLLf ROAD 
MISSISSAUGA ON L4Y 
PAUL H ICG INS 



2AA 



(416) 622-6500 



7.0 

TORONTO RESEARCH LABS 

250 AOELAIDE STREET WEST 
TORONTO ON M5H 1X6 
JOHN STEVENS 



(416) 977-388 1 6. I (4 16) ?9$-'??J5 

TORONTO TRANSIT CONSULTANTS (1981) LTD 

900 YONCE ST. 



TORONTO ON M4S 
1R. 1 .C. SMITH 
PRESIDENT 



122 



8.0 

TORONTOPAPER FIBRES LTD 

1299 ST MARYS AVENUE 
MISSISSAUGA ON L5E IH9 
ROBERT HAYHARD 



(116) 



2.6 

TORflID OVEN LIMITED 

P.O. BOX 6500 

TORONTO AMF ON L5P ICI 
MR. ROBERT U. CORCORAN 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 67S-Z20TJ 6, I 4 16- 669-9363 

TOTTEN SINS HUBICXI ASSOC. (1981) LTD 

1500 HOPKINS ST. 

UHITBY ON. LIN 2C3 
MR. R.L. WINDOVER 
PRESIDENT 



6.2 fil6'j 599-5399 

TOUCHE ROSS ( PARTNERS 

SUN LIFE TOUER 

150 XING STREET H. SUITE 800 

TORONTO ON M5H U9 

MR. J.E. MARTIN 



TEB 22. 1998 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABETICAL:.' ?v COMPAN- 



ANNE* 



is. 2 



(416) 423-9035 



TCURPRO MANACfNENT LIHITED 
10 BRENDAN HO. 



TORONTO ON, M4G 
MR. DAVID Zlt* 

president 



TX I 



3.1 * 1 6 ) 225-7701 

TOUER DISPOSAL SERVICES LTD 

349 JOHN STREET 
TH0RNH1LL ON. L3T 2*1 



3. i '519: 578-774* 

TCWt i COUNTRY HASTE Dl OSAL 

LTD 

NANHE IN 

* ITCHENfP ON. NOB 2HC 



6.2 '416' '33-HOC 

tohne i countrye zm.mrt.tn SERVICES INC 

6464 ^ONGE ST. SUITE S-6 

WILLOWOALE ON 12*1 3<4 
MR. FRED S. 8ERC 
PRESIDENT 



TCW* CARTAGE LID 

STEWART 

BROCKVILLE ON. K6V 3K6 



(613) 342-341? 



(705 " 3 - V 



TRADERS MtTAL CO LTD 



139 OUEEN ST w P 30i 459 
SAULT STE MARIE ON P6A 5N1 
ROBERT COHEN 



9.0 (416) 483-4333 

TRAINING STRATEGIES CANADA LTD. 
95 CLENCAlRN AVE. 

TORONTO ON M4R IfO 
MR. DONALD A. YOUNG 
PRESIDENT 



2.5 

TRANE CANADA 01 V. 

401 HORNER AVE. 

TORONTO ON, "BW 2A5 
MR. E. SCHELLlNBERS 



(416) 259-6221 
UABCO-STANOARO INC. 



6. 1 (416) 2"2-3:C6 

TRANSPOLAH HYDROCARBON ENGINEERING LTD. 

MISSISSAUGA EXECUTIVE CENTRE 

SUITE 7S0 2 ROBE'T SPECS PSWf 

MISSISSAUGA ON .41 HS 

MR. EMI L 10 B. COCO 

PRESIDENT 



2.6 

TRANSHAY SYSTEMS INC. 

330 LEAS IDE AVE. 

STONEY CREEK ON L3E 2N7 
MR. JOHN POSTA 



C4I6) 662-5435 



2.5 

TRECAH COMBUSTION LIMITED 

4540 DIXIE ROAO 
MISSISSAUCA ON L4U ' N? 
P B MILLER 
GENERAL MANAGER 



(416) 625-4030 



2.5 

TRENT METALS LTD. 

p. o. box ices 

PETE B BOROL'GH ON *9J 7H4 
MR. BRIAN CLARK 



f 705 1 743-4"i6 



B.O 

TRI SNITH RECTO. IHG INC 

81 LLINAU LANE 
TORONTO ON. L3T 5NI 



(416) 733-4593 



2.7 

Tfll-PAK Of COA. 

6 CURRAH RO. 



(519) 633-3500 
DIV.OF LANSOOUHE flACH. 



ST. THOMAS ON N5P 3RI 
MR. R. LUSHER 



2.7 '519) 994-933" 

TRIANGLE mo EQUIPMENT LTD 
656 COLBY DRIVE 

WATERLOO ON N2V !A2 
MR. G. KRE3S 
PRESIDENT 



2.7 (416) 335-1361 

TRICAN ENERGY STSTENS UNITED 

I 1 50 NORTHS I OE ROAD 
BURLINGTON ON. L7N IUB 
LEONARD KNAPP 
PRESIDENT 



3.3 

TRICIL LIMITED 

89 QUEENSUAT WEST 
HISSISSAUGA ON .SB 2V2 
MAURICE C BRADLEf 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 270-8280 



2.5 

TRION CANADA INC. 
90 WEBSTER RO, 

KITCHENER ON N2C 2E5 
MR. P.L. STRCUTH 



(519) 393-3310 



3.1 (519) 692-4764 

TRIPLE -S- SANITATION LTD. 

R.S. 17 

THAMESV1LLE ON NOP 2K0 

GEORGE M SMITH 

PRESIDENT 



8.0 (416) 67B-I49I 

TRIPLE n METAL (I9B0) INC 

1856 ROMAN I COURT 
MALTON ON. L5T IY6 



6. I '519) 941-330 

TRITON ENGINEERING SJIVCS. LTD. 

51 TOUNLINE 

ORANGEVILLE ON L9W I VI 
R WILLCXKS 
PROJECT ENGINEEP 



2.6 

TROJAN CHEMICALS 

41 RACINE RD 
REXDALE ON. M?H 216 



( ) 



2.6 

TROJAN TECHNOLOGIES INC 

845 CONSORTIUM COURT 

LONOON ON N6E 2S8 
MR. H.J. VANDER LAAN 
PRESIOENT 



(519) 685-6660 



6. I 

TROM LTD. 

1595 CLARK BLVO. 

BRAMPTON ON L6T 4V 
MR. U.A. TROW 



(416) 793-9600 



2.6 (416) 673-9450 

TRUTEC INDUSTRIES (CANADA) INC. 

3965 NASHUA DR. 

MISSISSAUCA ON L4V IP3 
MR. K. kUME 



2.6 

TRll PLEUCER OF CANADA LTD 

6650 einch ave u 
REXOALE ON. H9W 5 '6 



(416)675-1666 6.2 (4 16)669-9540 

TSI TRINTEC SYSTEMS (0N7AHI0) 

INC. 

10 PLANCHET ROAD UNIT 15 
CONCORD ON L4K 208 
H08ERT B LAUSON 
PRESIDENT 



2.5 

TURBO BLAST [CANADA] INC 

20 LINDSAY ROAO 

CAMBRIDGE ON NIR 7K6 
MR. EDGAR GOL2 
PRESIDENT 



(519) 623-3420 



2.5 

TURBOTAK INC. 

550 PARKSIDE DR. UNIT |- 

WATEflLCC ON NZL 5V4 
DR. DONALD R. SPINK 



(519) 885-5513 



S.3 

TYDAC TECHNOLOGIES 

1600 CARLING AVE. 

SUITE 310 

OTTAWA ON K 12 9P 1 



i613) 722-^4" 



-82- 



FEB 22. 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABET I CALL r Br COMPANY 



AKKO i 
APPEND I * 2 



2.5 

TYXRON INDUSTRIES LTD. 

3241 KENNEDY ROAD ON IT 9 

SCARBOROUGH ON HIV 2J8 
MR, P.L. HEWF.7T 

PRESIDENT 



(416) 296-6923 6.2 (4)£) 246-949'! 

TYSON SHARPE CHAMBERS NKTG. I INFO. LTD. 

99 flARKHAM ST 

TORONTO ON, H6J 2G4 
MR. 3RYAN U. TYSON 
PRESIDENT 



2.o 



U S ELECTR CAL MOTORS DIV 

EMERSON ELECTRIC CANADA LTD 
P BOX 15(1 
NARKHAM ON. L3P 3J6 



(Sift.) 475-9470 



3. i (£13) 626-2774 

U-CALL DISPOSAL t TRUCXINC 

SERVICE LTD 

OSGOOOE ON. KOA 2U0 



3. I 

U-HAUL CO LTD 

301 THOROLO 
JElLAND ON. L3C 3C7 



(416; 788-61 



LhPAK DISPOSALS LTD 

255 CARRIER DRIVE 
TORONTO ON. riSU 5 T 9 



fiisj 6~i-|7 



2.6 (4 16' 

UNDERWATER TEL-EYE SEWER 

SERVICES LTD 

510 CORONATION DR. UNIT 24 

SCARBOROUGH ON, HIE 4X6 



294-221 



2.6 
UN1-TEL LTD 

167 HUNT STREET 

AJAX ON. LIS IP6 



(416)683-8200 2.5 !5!9i tS-f-0230 

UHIFIN INTERNATIONAL DIV. OF KEEPR1TE INC 
P.O. BOX 5395 - STATION "J" 

LONDON ON N6A 4P4 
MR. T.G. PHILLIPS 



UMIFLO SEWER SERVICES 

75 ELGIN 

HAMILTON ON. L8L 4X9 



(416) 522-522 



3.: 

UNIQUE WASTE SYSTEM 

61 PENDRiTH 
TORONTO ON. M6G iR6 



(416) 531-1954 



2.5 

UNISEARCH ASSOCIATES INC. 

222 SNIDERCROfT ROAD 

CONCORD ON L*S ! B5 
OR. HAROLD' I . SCHIFF 



(416) 669-2250 



2.6 (4161 625-50B2 

UNITED ELECTRIC CONTROLS LTD 

5320 BRADCO BLVO 
MISSISSAUGA ON. L4W 1 07 



2.6 

united Emus ions ltd 

33 CENTENNIAL RD 
ORANGEVILLE ON L9U IRI 



(519) 941-5175 2.6 ;416) 89"<-5882 

UNITED FLEXIBLE OF CANADA LTD 

128 CENTRE ST I 

RICHMOND HILL ON, L4C IA6 



3. 



UNIVERSAL DISPOSAL SERVICES 
LIMITED 
114 RODINEA 
THORNHILL ON L4K 181 



(4 16! 669-2776 



2.5 (416) 898-7741 

UNIVERSAL FILTER MEDIA LIMITED 

570 STEVEN COURT 

NEWMARKET ON, L3Y 4Wt 
MR. LEO J. LANDRY 



2.7 (416) 547-0161 

UNIVERSAL HANDLINC EOPT CO LTD 

100 BUflLAND CRESCENT 

P BOX 348B STATION C 

HAMILTON ON L9H 7L5 

MR. M. GERARD 

PRESIDENT 



3.1 (416) 384-9677 

UNIVERSAL PNEUMATIC SERVICES 

LIMITED 

P.O. BOX 720 

NIAGARA FALLS ON L2E 6V5 

U A WURSTER 

PRESIDENT 



6.1 

URE. DOUGLAS AND SONS 

66 QUEEN STREET 

ST. CATHARINES ON. L2R SHI 



(416) 685-5931 



USARCC LTD 

363 WELLINGTON ST N 
HAMILTON ON L8L 582 
MONTE LEW 



(416) 528-1 



6.2 (416) 964-9126 

V.S. CHEW i ASSOCIATES INC. 
350 DAVENPORT RO. 

TORONTO ON H5R IK6 
MR. VICTOR S. CHENG 
PRESIDENT 



VALCON LTD 

175 SOUTHGATE OR 

GUELPH ON NIH 6L3 
MR. BILL BURTENSHAW 



(519) 824-3220 



2.10 



VAN CANP PRODUCTS AND SALES 

60 CLARK SON AVENUE 

TORONTO ON M6E 2T6 
MR. H.B. VAN CAMP 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 787-0356 



6.2 (416) 637-2746 

VEGETATION MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS 

306-421 MAPLE AVENUE 

BURLINGTON ON, L7S 1L9 
MR, ft.C. STEVENS 
MANAGER 



2.7 (519) 737-6943 

VENTURE TOOL CO [WINDSOR] LTD 

5130 WALKER ROAD 

UINOSOR ON N9A 6J3 
MR. HIKE RADOVANOV 



3. I (a 16) 665-505 

VIA DISPOSAL SERVICE CO LTD 

4325 STEELES AVENUE W 
TORONTO ON. H3N IV" 



2.6 



VICTAULIC CO OF CANADA LTD 

65 WORCESTER RD 
REXDALE ON, M9W 5N7 



(416) 675-5575 



2.6 

VIRO MART LTD 

P SOX 182 
BURLINGTON ON, L7R 3Y2 



(416) 632-7807 



2.6 
VOLUMETRIC LTD 

37 YONGE ST N 
AURORA ON, L4G IN6 



(416) 7?7-l 103 



-83- 



rii 22. 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABETICALLY 9T COMPANY 



ANNEX 5 
1P°EN0I< 2 



3. I 

U C RAYtCR CO 

284 'ARK U 

DUNDSS ON. L9H il' 



(416) 628-6029 



2.7 

. H BRADY INC 

10 NARNAC DRIVE 
=rxDALE ON. »9W l£{ 
Pf'ER niHINSKI 



:4t6) 675-7 1 ll 2.7 (51?) 653-9721 

U H REYNOLDS [CAMBRIDGE] LTD 
90* 3144 

CAMBRIDGE ON N3H *S6 
MR. C.A. THOMSON 
PRESIDENT 



3. I 

W fl I HASTE MANAGEMENT OF 

CANADA INC 

55 <"ENMAfi DRIVE 

TORONTO ON H9L if 4 



(4 16 i 741-1500 



U R MEADOWS OF CANADA LTD 

130 TOflYOflfc 3R 

WES T ON ON N9L 1X6 



:416} 741-2220 



6,1 416 

U. STRCK I ASSOCIATES LIMITED 

9 HELENE STREET SOUTH 

MISSISSAUGA ON .50 3A8 
MR. W. STRC* P.ENG. 
PRESIDENT 



6.2 

U. TAYLOR ENGINEERING LTD. 

42 COLONIAL CRES. 

OAKVILLE ON. L6J 4k9 
MR. WILFRED TAYLOR 
PRESIOENT 



(416)844-8412 6.2 4 16)486-0360 

U.D. JAMIESON CONSULTING SERVICES LTD. 
6I 1 MOUNT PLEASANT RD. 

TORONTO ON f14S 2N5 
MR. WM. D. JAMtESCN 

PRESIDENT 



2.6 

H.E. yiLXINSCN LTD. 

1815 - »6 HHY. N. 

HAMILTON ON L9J lEi 
MR. J. 14. WILKINSON 



(416) 526-9466 



6. I (613) 225-6560 

U.F. BAIRO II ASS. COASTAL ENGINEERS LTD. 

38 ANT ARES DR. SUITE 150 

OTTAWA ON K2E 7V3 
MR, U ILL I AM BAIRO 



6.2 



U.H. PUNT ENTERPRISES INC. 
356 KING STREE T WEST 

KINGSTON ON K7L 2*4 
MR. W.H. PUNT 
PRESIDENT 



■'613) 549-4475 



6. I (416) 356-1543 

U.P. LONDON AND ASSOCIATES LTD. 
4056 DORCHESTER SCAD 

NIAGARA FALLS ON L 21 6V9 
MR. H.W. PEARSON 
PRESIDENT 



6.2 (416) 

U.R. CAMPBELL PARTNERS INC. 

"0 UNIVERSITY AVENUE 

SUITE 620 

TORONTO ON, M5J 2M4 

MR. W.R, CAMPBELL 

PRESIDENT 



397-2 1 98 6. I '613) 748-5500 

U.R. DAVIS ENGINEERING LINKED 
1260 OLD 'NNES RD. 

OTTAWA ON K IB 3V3 
MR. U.R. DAVIS 
PRESIDENT 



2.6 

UACKER CANADA LTD 

5270 CRE-KBANK RC 
MISSISSAUGA ON. L4W IN* 



'416) 625-""54 



MADC-TECH LIMITED 

P.O. BOX 730 
8RQCXVILLE ON K6V 5V8 
JOHN OOOOENOUCH 
PRESIDENT 



(613) 342-3142 



2.6 
UAINBEE LTD 

131 C I T Y VIEW DR 
REXQALE ON H9W 5A9 



(416) 243-1900 



2.6 

UAJAX INDUSTRIES LTD 

3S0 SPARKS ST STE I 105 
OTTAWA ON KIR 7S8 



'613) 23e-'29l 



3.3 

WALKER INDUSTRIES 

P.O. 90X IDO 
THOROLD ON, L2V 3Y8 
MORRIS W WALKER 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 227-4142 2.6 (416) 751-7561 

WALLACE AND TIERNAN DIVISION 

PENNHAlT INC. 
925 HARDEN AVENUE 
SCARBOROUGH ON MIL 4CS 
D A PRESLAND 
SALES MANACER 



6.2 

MALLI ENGINEERING INC. 

P.O. BOX 1419 STATION "S" 

OSHAWA ON LIJ 6P9 
MR. RICHARD A. WALL I 
PRESIDENT 



416) 579-3432 



6.2 

WALTER BROW ASSOCIATES 

533 ARBOR ROAD 
MISSISSAUGA ON L5G 2J6 
WALTER F n BROWN 
PRESIOENT 



(416) 278-8848 6.1 (519) 576-2150 

WALTER FEDY MCCARCAfl HACHBORN 

5*6 BELMONT AVENUE WEST 
P BOX 368 
KITCHENER ON N2G 3Y9 
J FEDY 
P. ENG. 



6.1 

WALV1N LTD. 

152 HARWOOD AVENUE 

P.O. BOX I 

AJAX ON LIS 3C2 



'416) 683-3991 



2.7 

WARD IRONWORKS LTD 

BOX 511 

WELL AND ON L3B 5R3 
MR. M. WARD 
PRESIOENT 



(416) 732-7591 



3. I 

WASTE BROKERS GROUP 

4316 VILLAGE CENTRE COURT 
C0O.SVILLE ON. L47. IS2 



(416) 276-4968 3.1 (4i6) "4 1- I6C0 

WASTE MANAGEMENT Of CANADA INC 

DISPOSAL SERVICES DIVISION 
55 fENMAR DRIVE 
WESTON ON M9L IM4 
ROBERT WEBB 
GENERAL MANAGER 



2.7 
HASTE C 

12 ERLANE AVENUE 
MARKHAM ON L 3P 
ROBERT S LAURIE 
PRESIDENT 



C9 



(416) 294-6036 



3. I 

UASTECO SANITATION 

76 MILLUICK DRIVE 
TORONTO ON. H9L 1*3 



'416) 74?-fr2l I 



6.2 

UASTEK CONSULTING LIMITED 



•1016 - 2076 SHER09EE RCAD 
MISSISSAUGA ON L5A 4C4 
JOHN M SEXTON 
PRESIDENT 



'416) 2"5-54A.J 



-84- 



FEB 22, 1988 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABET I CALL* Bl COMPANY 



ANNEX G 
APPENDIX 2 



6. 1 (613) 831-1683 

WATER I EARTH SCIENCE ASSOCIATES LIMITED 

P.O. BOX 430 



2.6 :4:6) 335-4085 

WATER QUALITY rtANAGEMEMT 01 V. PHOTOZOHE 

I I7S APPLEBY LINE JNIT 03 



2.6 4!6) 

WATER REFINING COMPANY L 1 

39' ROWNTREE DAIRY ROAD 



CARP ON KOA ILO 

MB. DEREK P. SMITH fl.SC. 

PRESIDENT 



BURLINGTON ON. LTL 5H9 
MR. BARRY NELSON 



UOQDBRIDGE ON L4L 4E4 
HR. B.W. ELDER 
PRESIDENT 



WATERS SCIENTIFIC 

3688 NASHUA DRIVE 
MISSISSAUGA ON L4V IK5 
BRETT KAHLER 



(416) 677-350 2.6 '4.6: 951 

WATTS P1UESC3 CANADA INC. /WATTS 
REGULATOR OF CANADA LTD. 
44 1 HANLAN ROAO 
WOO0BRI0GE ON L4L 3TI 



3591 6. I (4 16; 3J«t-.fr|44 

WATTS GRIFF I S AND MCCUAT Li (II TED 

9 KING ST. E. SUITE 400 

TORONTO ON NSC 185 
MR. j.F, MCCUAT 
PRESIDENT 



8.0 

HAXRAN RECYCLING IW) L' 

401 BCWES ROAD 

CONCORDE ON, L4K IJI 
A WAXMAN 



v 4 f 6 i 669-2690 2.7 (416) 560-1 1 00 

UAXnAN []] AW SOUS LIMITED 

500 CENTENNIAL PKUY NORTH 



STONET CREEK ON. 
MR. M.J, HAXHAN 
PRESIOENT 



L8E 2X5 



6.2 (416) 963-798! 

HEATHER CONSULT Of CANADA CO LTD 

65 MARLBOROUGH AVE 

TORONTO ON MER 1X5 
MR. MORRIS KESTIN 
PRESIDENT 



6.2 

HEATHER RESEARCH HOUSE 

P.O. BOX 1397. STAT B 

DOUNSVIEH ON M3H 5U3 
DR. ANBURY STUART 
PRESIOENT 



(4 16) 226-3675 



6.2 

HEATHER TRENDS NORTH 

R.R, « 4 

ALMONTE ON, KOA IAO 
MR. IAN BLACK 
PRESIDENT 



(613) 256-2974 



7.0 

HEBB LABORATORIES 

27 HARLECH COURT 
"HORNHILL ON L3T 2*1 
JAMES SZETO 



(416) 3SI-983C 



B.O (519) 822-5280 

HE1SZ IRON t HETAL (1974) LTD 

415 ELIZABETH 
GUELPH ON. NIE 2Y2 



2.7 



(416) 372-6885 



HELD-LOC STSTEDS Of CAHAOA 

P BOX 576 
COBOURG ON K9A 4L3 
EO DAMN 



8.0 

HELLAND IRON t BRASS LTD 

130 NIAGARA ST 
WELLANO ON L3C IJ3 
C M NC1NTYRE 



(416) 735-5626 



B.O (416) 384-9794 3. 

HELLAW IRON ( METAL CO LTD 

P BOX 10 SOUTH ST N R R 4 

WELLANO ON L38 5G4 HELLAND ON 

B ENNIS 



HELLAND HASTE DISPOSALS LTD 



L3B 5N7 



(416) 735-211 I 



6.2 (519) 822-2J36 

HELLINGTON ENVIRONMENTAL 

CONSULTANTS INC. 

291 WOODLAHN RD., W., UNIT 2 

GUELPH ON, NTH 6N6 

BROCK G CHITTIH 

MANAGER 



2.6 (519) 668-0500 

HELLNASTER PIPE 1 SUPPLY INC. 
P.O. BOX 456 

TILLSONBURG ON N4G 4J1 
MR. JAMES MCKENZIE 



8.0 (416) 527-1707 

HENTHORTH METAL RECTO. INC LTD 

SAM'S AUTO WRECKING CO LTD 
495 UENTWORTH STREET N 
HAMILTON ON L8L 5X1 
KENNETH ROCHUERC 



2.7 

HESTINGHOUSE CANADA 

P BOX 510 

STATION A 

HAMILTON ON. LBN 3K2 



INC 



(416) 528-361' 



6.2 (613) 225-0226 

UESTON CTAHArt 1 ASSOCIATES LTD. 

200 - 146 COLONNADE RD . 

OTTAWA ON K2E 7J5 
MR. WILLIAM W. GRAHAM 
PRESIDENT 



2.5 (416) 844-1550 

HHEELABRATOR CORP OF CANADA LTD 

[HEAD OFFICE] 
BOX 1000 

MILTON ON, L9T 4B7 
MR, G.O. ALLEMANO 
GENERAL MANAGER 



2.7 (416) 

UHEELS BRAKES I EQUIPMENT LTD 

1901 BARTON STREET E 
P BOX 411 STATION B 
HAMILTON ON L8L 7W6 



544 - 576 3 



1.2 C ) - 

UICKUARE (G.fl.) AND ASSOCIATES INC 



BURLINGTON ON 



.0 



(416) 747-5130 



HIL-PTT fCTAL SERVICES INC 

145 MILVAN DRIVE 
TORONTO ON. M9L IZS 



6.2 (613) 320-9663 

WILLIAM 0. LEVY CONSULTING SERVICES INC. 
P.O. BOX 1 1310 STATION "H" 

OTTAWA ON K2H 7VI 
HR. WILLIAM 0. LEW 
PRESIDENT 



3.1 

HILLIAfl GILBERT t SONS 

EXCAVATING LTD 

R R 3 

GANANGOOUE ON K7G 2V5 



!6I3) 382-4616 6. I ;416> 662-'997 

HILLIAN L. SEARS AND ASSOCIATES LTD. 

455 SEAMAN ST. 



STONE Y CREEK ON 
MR. WM.L. SEARS 
PRESIDENT 



L8E 2F2 



2.6 



(4 16) 683-9400 



HILLTAfl R. PERRIN CO. LTD. 

4 32 MONARCH AVE. 

AJAX ON LIS 2G7 
MR. O.J. HUTCHISON 
PRESIDENT 



-85- 



F£9 22. 1986 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABET I CALL 1 IK COMPANY 



ANNE? C 
*PP>rNOI< 2 



8.0 (4I6| 272-<983 

HILLIAN SinS INDUSIRIES LTD 

758 SOUTHOCUN ROAD 
C0C*SVILLE ON. LSJ 2Y4 



6.2 (519) 837-2701 

WILLOUBAHK rWMCi.MHI INC. 
P.O. 8CX 5 

GUELPH ON NIH 6J6 
MR- R.J- 3ROUGHTON 
PRESIDENT 



2.6 -416: 733-350C 

WILSON I COUSINS CANADA LID 

6 BAKER RD 

3RAMPTQN ON. L6T 4E ? 



WIWSCR ELECTRIC EEL 

4210 HOWARD 
WINDSOR ON. N9G P3 



'5:9' 252-1983 3 I 519) *53-74(- z.i 

WISER WASTE INDUSTRIAL SERVICE UlTCO CANACA INC 

EAST REMOVAL LTD 

? 80* 4187. STATION C 2 LANSING SO 

LONDON ON. N5W 5H6 WILLOWDALE ON. M2J 47.4 



t i % ■ 



2.6 

UIX FILTEPS DIV 

HAYES DANA FILTERS INC 
925 8ROCK RD S 
PICKERING ON LIW 2*9 



(416) 839- I US 



6. 1 f5'9) 354-1280 

UB. 0. COLBY Hi ENGINEERING LTD. 

4 5 GRAND AVENUE WEST 

CHATHAM ON N7L 184 
MR. Wfl. D. ' COLBY ! I 1 
PRESIDENT 



3.3 

W. MENART CONTRACTORS 

(BRANTFORO) LIMITED 
II KENYQN STREET 
BRANTFORD ON N3 T IP I 
W ILL! AM J MENARD 
PRESIDENT 



i9: 



6. I [70S) 942-2070 

m. R. WALKER ENGINEERING INC. 

369 QUEEN STREET EAST 

SUITE 302 

SAULT STE MARIE ON P6A I Z4 

MR. W.3. WALKER f, ENG. 

PRESIDENT 



8.0 

WOLFE IRON t NETA1 LTD 

4DI FPONT STREET E 
TORONTO ON. M5A 1C4 



(4tft) 363-4777 



2.5 IS! 

WOLVERINE TUBE (CANADA) INC. 
P.O. BOX 6515 STATION "0" 

LONDON ON N5W 50? 
MR. L.H. ilf>? 



455-0770 



3.1 

UOOOINGTON SYSTEMS INC. 

P.O. SOX 100 
TNOBOLD ON L2V 3Y9 
TIM NCVICAS 

OPERATIONS MANAGER 



(416i 262-4227 6.2 '613) 236-7467 

WOODS GORDON 

SUITE 1200 160 ELGIN STREET 

OTTAWA ON K2P 2C4 
MR. J.C, WIlSON 
CHAIRMAN 



6.1 

WOODSTOCK ENGINEERING 

CONSULTANTS 

I 100 OUNOAS ST. E. 3CX 6*0 

WOODSTOCK ON N4S 725 

K T BULLEN 

MANAGER 



:519) 539-20'; 



6.2 

WORLD WEATHERHATCH 

7050 WOODBINE AVE 
SUITE 100 

MARKHAM ON L 3R 408 
MR. MORY S. HlftT 
RPESIOENT 



(416) 477-4120 



2. 10 

UORBALD CTJN INC. 

2421 HOLLY uANE 

OTTAWA ON KIV 7P2 
MR. GEORGE OOWAN 



(613) 526-0435 



2.6 

UOTHERSPCON FOUNDRY LTD 

P BOX 400 148 CROSS AVE 
OAKVILLE ON. L6J 5A8 



(416) 845-23" 



8.0 (519) 621-9840 

WOZNUK BTOS LTD STEEL t METAL 

HIGHWAY 97 

GALT ON, NIH 5S9 



WRIGHT 1 BARKER CO. LTD. 

390 BAY STREET 5TH FLOOR 

SAULT STE. MARIE ON P6A 1X2 

MR. M.R, WRIGHT 

PRESIDENT 



(705) 949-6372 



6. I 

UYLLIE AND UFNAL LIMITED 

80 BIRMINGHAM STREET 

TORONTO ON. M8V 3W6 



'4 16 i 



-5*51 



6.2 

UTLY SOFTWARE INC 

679 3ATHURST ST 

TORONTO ON. M5S 2R2 
MR. UHATT B. MACOONALD 
PRESIDENT 



(416) 532-8059 



8.0 

K.I.B. RESOURCES LTD. 

COBALT REFINERY LTO. 

SOX 496 

COBALT ON POJ ICO 

R RICE 

MANAGER 



2. 10 '416) 363-02(2 

XEKTEX OCfllCAL INDUSTRIES INC. 

P.O. BOX 220 

STREETSVILLE P.O. 

MISSISSAUGA ON, L5N 2B7 

MR. HARK C. FE''Z 



XTCO CANADA LIMITED 

175 STRONACH CRES. 



(519) 453-3330 



LONDON ON N5V 3G5 

MR. J. ROBERT MORTON P.ENG- 

V ICE-PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MAN 



6.2 14 161 869-0381 

YARNXLL TRUSTY ASSOCIATES INC. 

F IRST CANADIAN PLACE 
P.O. BOX 161 
TORONTO ON, M5x IC7 
MR. W.B. TRUSTi 

PRESIDENT 



■31 226-4454 



YEOMANS NETWORKING SERVICES 

63 OAKRIDGE BLVD. 

NEPEAN ON K2G 2T7 

MR. ROBERT D.E. rEOMANS 



3 



(416) 669-1900 



TOW DISPOSAL SERVICES LTD 

131 FRESHUAY DRIVE 
THORNHILL ON, L4K IB 



2.6 

YORK INSTRUMENTS 

1262 DON MILLS RD STE '0 
DON MILLS ON, M3B 2W7 



(416' 445-1255 



YORK SANITATION 
DIV OF WMI WASTE HCHf OF 
55 FENMAR DRIVE 
TORONTO ON, M9L IM4 



. s t 1 ao;-4: ll 34 



-86- 



FEB 22. 1968 



PROVINCES LISTED ALPHABETICALLY 8Y COMPANY 



ANNEX 
APPENDIX 2 



8.0 [416) 469-5907 

YOUTH VENTURES RECYCLING INC 

33 POLSON ST 
TORONTO ON H5A IA4 
OEBORAH LONC 



6.2 



(416) 270-3919 



ZAFAR t CAO ASSOCIATES INC. 

P.O. BOX 2007 STATION 3 

SCARBOROUGH ON R1N IfS 
MR. SAID ZAFAR II . 3 . A . 
PARTNER. 



8.0 

ZALEV BROTHERS LTD 

100 GRAND MARA IS RD E 
P BOX 609 
WINDSOR ON N9A 6N5 
DEAN ZALEV 



(519) 966-6620 



6.2 

ZAREJt RAFMCEHENT {DIV, 

810-121 BLCOR ST. E. 


07 


(416) 968-033$ 

EZZRON CORP.) 


ZEHIN INTERNATIONAL LTD 

307-4316 VILLAGE CENTRE 


(416) 
CRT. 


272 


3447 


2.6 

ZENON ENVIRONMENT IMC. 

845 HARRINGTON COURT 


i4I6j 639-6320 


TORONTO ON M4W 3M5 
HR. LESLIE I. RUPf 
PRESIDENT 










fllSSISSAUGA ON L4Z 1S2 

MR. DEREK H. BETTY 
PRESIDENT 








BURLINGTON ON, L7N 3P3 
MR. A. BENEDEK 
PRESIDENT 




2.S 

ZETOH INC. 

4129 HARVESTER RE. 




1.416) 


632- 


3123 


zicnAN netals ltd 


(613) 


342- 


2929 


3.0 
ZIKHARX INC 


(416) 63Z-S4 i rj 



BURLINGTON ON L7L 5113 
MR. G.S. WATT 



P SOX a34 70 CENTRAL AVE H 
BROCKVILLF. ON. K6V 5WI 
SAM Z I OMAN 



2349 FAIRV1EH STREET 
BURLINCTON ON, L7R 2E3 



2.6 

ZONTEC STSTEHS INC. 

2 GLADSTONE AVENUE 

SMITHS FALLS ON K7A i R3 
MR, U.C. CQNNERTY SR. 
PRESIDENT 



(613) 283-662! 3. 1 (4I6) 892-2634 

ZUIERSQKE BROTHERS LIHITED 

STATION 

PELHAfl ON. LOS ICO 



-97- 



APPENDIX IV 
MAIL SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE 



SURVEY OF ONTARIO PRODUCERS OF 
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION (EP) GOODS AND SERVICES 

Title/Position of Person Completing This Form: 



Products/Services: 

Using the EP product codes provided on the accompanying sheet, please show ail the 
products or services your firm produces in Ontario. (Use the most narrowly-defined codes 
that apply.) For manufactured products, include only those with some Ontario content in 
manufacture or assembly, and omit products which you only distribute or repackage. 
Exclude equipment for which environmental protection uses do not constitute a significant 
portion of your sales. 

Product Code Approx.1987 Share 

of Total EP Sales 

Highest Selling Product : % 

2nd Highest Selling Product : % 

3rd Highest Selling Product : % 

All Other EP Products: (List Codes in rough order of importance): 



If codes 1 12, 213, or 316 are listed anywhere above, please provide brief description of the 
product(s) in the space below (attach additional sheet if necessary.) Also, if you were in 
doubt as to which was the right code to use for any product, please describe the problem in 
the space below (or on additional sheet is necessary). 




Our Firm Does Not Produce EP Goods/Services in Ont. O ( If so, please 
Return Form Without Completing the Remaining Questions. Otherwise Please Continue.) 

PLEASE TURN OVER -> 



Employment: We have roughly 



equivalents) involved in producing EP goods and services in Ontario. 



full-time employees for 



5 Year Sales Revenue: Our estimated sales revenue from Ontario-produced 
Environmental Protection goods and services, including exports and sales to other 
provinces: (ENTER ZERO WHERE APPROPRIATE) 



Year* 


Codes 100-112 


Codes 200-213 


Codes 300-316 


1983: 


$ 


S 


$ 


1984: 


S 


$ 


S 


1985: 


s 


$ 


$ 


1986: 


s 


s 


$ 


1987: 


s 


$ 


$ 



_% of our EP sales revenue from our Ontario 



Exports: We estimate that ; 

establishments in the most recent year was attributable to export sales outside of Canada. 



Ontario Content: On average, the Ontario content of our Ontario-produced EP products 
and services is in excess of 50% of the production cost: 

YES LJ NO LJ 

Growth: We expect our sales-revenue from EP goods and services produced in Ontario to 

grow at a rate of % per year over the next 5 years (use negative rate if a 

decline is expected). 

If you would like a summary of the results of the survey, enter your name and 
return address below. Individual responses will be kept strictly confidential. 

Name: 



Address: 



PRODUCT CODES: Please use the most narrowly-defined codes applicable. Note that 
incinerators are listed by the type of waste burned, rather than under air pollution control. 
Noise pollution control and nuclear or radioactive waste management are excluded from 
the terms of reference for this studv. 



Air Pollution Control/Monitoring 

Electrostatic Precipitators, Precipitator 100 
Controls and Conditioners, Electrostatically 

Augmented Devices, Sonic Homs, Settling 
Chambers, Catalytic Equipment 
Wet/Dry Scrubbers and Washers, Nozzles 
Baghouses, cloth and fibre filters, special 

filter media and leak detectors 
Cyclones, Mechanical Centrifugals and 

Impingement Separators 
Flares 

Gas Absorption Equipment 
Vapour Condensation Equipment 
Odour Counteractants/Destructors 
Sampling/Collecting Instruments 

(Samplers, Collectors, Impactors, Dust Jars, 

Gas Sampling Pumps and Hoses, and 

Personal Monitors) 
Analytical Instruments/Equip (Mass 

Spectrometry, Chemilluminescence, 

Infrared, Calibration Devices, etc.) 
Other Instruments (meters, combustion 
monitors, telemetry equip, etc.) 
Consulting, Monitoring and 

Testing Services 
Other Air Pollution Products/Services 
(include description on reverse) 



112 



Water/Wastewater Treatment 

Aerators 200 

Agitators and Mixers 201 

Gravity Sedimentation Systems Equip. 202 

(Clarifiers, Flocculators, Lagoons, etc) 
Filters, Screens, Strainers 203 

Centrifuges 204 

Chemical Feeding and Mixing 205 

Equip. (Chlorination etc.) 
Sludge Processing Equipment 206 

(collectors, conveyors, digesters, 
incinerators, shredders, 
thickeners and disposal units such as 
heat treatment, wet-air oxid. or pressure filter) 
Liquid Waste Incinerators 207 

Instruments (testing, measuring, and 208 

control instr., meters, gauges, analyzers) 
Chemicals and other supplies 209 

Consulting, Testing Services 210 

Specialized Pumps, blowers, valves 2 1 1 

and other water system components - 
exclude equipment for which EP 



uses are not a major application; 
Private Water Treatment Systems 
Other Water/Wastewater equipment 

or services (include description on 

reverse) 



212 
213 



101 


Solid Waste Disposal/Treatment 




102 


Bailers 


300 




Compactors, Crushers, Grinders, 


301 


103 


Pulverizers, Shredders, Packers 






Composting Plants 


302 


104 


Containers 


303 


105 


Transfer Stations 


304 


106 


Hoppers, Conveyers 


305 


107 


Solid Waste Incinerators 


306 


108 


Loaders 


307 


ars. 


Recycling/Resource Recovery Equip. 


308 




Vehicles, Bodies and Trailers 


309 




Waste Disposal Systems 


310 


109 


Vacuum Equipment 


311 




Magnetic Systems 


312 




Solid & Toxic Waste Disposal Services 


313 


no 


Recycling Services 


314 




Consulting Services 


315 


111 


Other Solid Waste equipment or 


316 




services (incl. description on reverse). 





ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Canadian Recyciers Directory 1987-88. (Recoup Publishing: Ottawa) Fourth edition. 

This annual publication lists suppliers of recycling services and equipment by type of product or 
service provided and by province, and also includes a glossary of terms relating to recycling. The 
document also includes a description of the Canadian Association of Recycling Industries, who 
represent 300 companies generating $1.3 to S2 billion in sales and employing 8,000 workers across 
Canada 

Cox, David, and Richard Harris (1984). "A quantitative assessment of the economic 
impact on Canada of sectoral free trade with the United States". Ontario Economic 
Council Working Paper. (OEC: Toronto). 

This paper uses a general equilibrium trade model to measure the industry level impacts of sectoral 
free trade and comprehensive free trade between Canada and the United States. 

Department of Regional Industrial Expansion (1986). Competitiveness Profile: 
Environmental Equipment. (Ottawa: mimeo). 

This report assesses the competitiveness of Canadian environmental equipment manufacturers relative 
to their counterparts in the United States, including makers of equipment for potable and wastewater 
treatment, air pollution control, solid waste handling and noise pollution abatement. Partial 
statistics from Statistics Canada data are reported for sales and imports of these products, and factors 
affecting the current trade performance are identified. 

Department of Regional Industrial Expansion (1987a). Capital Investment Intentions 
Survey. (Ottawa). 

Reports on a survey of investment spending intentions of large, Canadian firms. 

Department of Regional Industrial Expansion (1987b). Environmental Equipment 
Industry. (Ottawa: mimeo) 

This report profiles certain aspects of the Canadian environmental equipment industry, and reports 
estimates for imports and exports of EP equipment, based on the available Statistics Canada data. 

Environment Canada (1987). International Opportunities for Canada's Environmental 
Industry. (Ottawa: mimeo). 

This report assessed the opportunities for Canadian exports of goods and services used for 
environmental protection and conservation. 'It concluded that the industry in Canada is extremely 
capable but very diffuse, that international markets provide a good opportunity to mobilize this 
industry, and that market opportunities relate to the provision or rehabilitation of public health 
engineering facilities, and developing areas in conservation, reclamation, hazardous waste 
management and environmental assessment. Funding assistance is already available through CIDA, 
die World Bank, and some provincial government programs. 

Environment Directorate, Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The 
Promotion and Diffusion of Clean Technologies in Industry. (OECD: Paris, France: 
mimeo). 



This report highlights international obstacles to the diffusion of clean technologies in industry and 
the present policies in place in OECD countries to promote their use. it finds that clean 
technologies have thus far seen limited use, and advocates a cooperative effort between industry and 
government to develop incentives in an integrated industrial and environmental policy. 

Federation of Associations on the Canadian Environment (FACE) (1984). The Water 
Pollution Industry: A Strategic Profile. (Ottawa, Ontario). 

This report presents the results of a Statistical Analysis of Statistics Canada data on expenditures on 
waterworks and sewage treatment facilities, together with the results of a survey of 43 firms in this 
sector. The study included firms supplying the full range of equipment and services for these fluid 
systems, including pumps, valves, pipes and tanks, as well as specialized EP equipment. Case 
studies are presented on four firms in this sector. 

Glenn, William M. (1987a). Environmental Protection Industry Inventory of Firms. 
(Corpus Information Service of Southam Communications: Don Mills, Ontario: 
mimeo). 

This document provides a listing of 2,777 EP industry firms across Canada, drawn from trade 
journals, trade association membership directories, and other listings. 

Glenn, William M. (1987b). Jobs and the Environment: Some Preliminary Number 

Crunching. (Corpus Information Service of Southam Communications: Don Mills, 
Ontario: mimeo). 

This paper attempts to use a mix of public and private sector data and various rules-of-thumb to 
measure the total private and public sector employment generated in the widely defined environmental 
protection industry. Across Canada, the paper estimates that total employment is on die order of 
125,000 to 150,000, with governments accounting for one-third of the total. Income tax data on 
accelerated capital cost allowance claims on pollution control equipment formed the basis for some of 
the estimates; Woods Gordon was advised by federal government officials that the data could not be 
reliably used for this purpose. 

Institute for Research on Public Policy (1987). Defining the Environmental Protection 
Industry. (IRPP: Ottawa, Ontario). 

This report surveys the available data sources on the Canadian environmental protection industry, and 
concludes that only limited data are currendy available. Two approaches for developing additional 
data are recommended: a survey of purchasers and a survey of suppliers, but the development of 
comprehensive data is thought to be a task best suited for S tatistics Canada. The report also 
recommends the use of Input-Output analysis as a tool to model the economic impacts of EP 
spending, and reviews the possibilities for the the use of other analytical techniques (cost-benefit 
analysis, macroeconomic modelling, general equilibrium models) that generally have more stringent 
data requirements. 

Maclaren, James F. Ltd. (1979) Potential for Expansion of the Pollution Equipment 
Manufacturing System. (Willowdale, Ontario) 

This report estimated the size of the pollution control equipment industry in Canada in 1978 at S369 
million in sales, based on a series of 275 interviews. Exports were found to be low, but the export 
market was cited as the major opportunity for expansion of the the Canadian industry. 



Management Information Systems Inc. (1986) Economic and Employment Benefits of 
Investments in Environmental Protection. (Washington, D.C.) 

This report uses an input-output model to estimate the employment and income generated by 
expenditures on environmental protection in die United States. 

Ontario Ministry of Treasury and Economics (1986). Ontario Statistics. (Toronto, Ontario) 

This book provides general economic statistics for Ontario. 

Ropes, Allison L. and William T. Lorenz (1986) 1986 Update: Water Pollution Control 
Industry Outlook. (William T, Lorenz and Company: Concord, New Hampshire) 

This document presents a comprehensive report on the status of, and outiook for, the U.S. water 
pollution control industry. It includes a discussion of the growth prospects of each segment of the 
industry (industrial, municipal, etc.). 

Smith, R.E. (1978). The Pollution Control Industry in Ontario. (Ministry of the 
Environment, Program Planning and Evaluation Branch, Toronto). 

This report analyzes the historical demand for pollution control in Ontario, makes projections for 
future demand, assesses the structure of, and problems facing, the Ontario EP equipment industry and 
makes recommendations designed to increase the future Canadian content of EP purchases in Canada. 
The report estimates that imports accounted for 38% of the S 189.3 million in Canadian EP 
equipment spending in 1.977. Only air and water treatment equipment are covered. Certificates of 
Approval Data were used to track expenditures and the installed equipment base. The report 
concluded that air pollution equipment manufacturing accounted for 795 jobs, and that in total, 
including construction, design, importing and supplies, the air pollution sector employed 1,671 
Ontarians in 1978. Total water treatment employment, primarily in construction and in operating 
municipal and provincial treatment facdities, was estimated at close to 19,000. Opportunities for 
improving domestic content include ensuring mat duty remissions are restricted to equipment truly 
not available in Canada, attacking U.S. trade barriers posed by the Buy America provisions in the 
Clean Water Act, promoting Canadian made products and creating an enhanced awareness of Canadian 
alternatives to imports among buyers. The report also recommended provincial government financial 
support for new Canadian equipment 

Statistics Canada (1987a). Construction in Canada: 1985-87. (Minister of Supply and 
Services Canada: Ottawa) Catalogue 64-201. 

This publication provides data on expenditures on waterworks and sewage systems by private and 
public organizations. 

Statistics Canada. (1987b) The Daily, July 3, 1987. (Statistics Canada: Ottawa). Catalogue 
11-001E. 

This edition of the Daily reported on Capital Expenditures on Machinery and Equipment in Canada, 
which includes a category for Pollution Abatement and Control. 



Stothart, Paul. (1985) "Medium Term Status Report on the Pollution Control Equipment 
Foreign Investment Prospecting Project". (Department of Regional Industrial 
Expansion: mimeo) 

This document reports on the initial stages of efforts by DRIE to stimulate Canadian manufacturing 
by global EP equipment manufacturers. The report includes a brief review of the status of the EP 
equipment manufacturing industry in Canada, and the export market potential. 

Task Force on Environmental Technologies (1983) Report to the Minister of State for 
Science and Technology. (Minister of Supply and Services Canada: Ottawa) 

This report examines the possibilities for economic benefits from the development of new 
technologies for environmental protection. It identified promising opportunities in monitoring and 
testing equipment, remote data gathering, automated control technologies and pollution control 
equipment designed for use in frontier regions, as well as the development of new processes for 
municipal wastewaters and solid waste. Factors inhibiting domestic R&D in environmental 
protection include the fact that many of the manufacturers are small branches of multinationals who 
do research in their home countries, and the fact that the environmental protection aspect of a new 
facility is a small portion of the total cost and is therefore not given a great deal of attention in 
design. The regulatory process is also thought to promote conservatism by favouring the use of 
proven technologies. The Task force recommended government financial assistance for prototype 
installations, and other methods for increasing the degree of innovation in Canada. 

Water and Pollution Control. (Southam Business Publication) Quarterly. 

This trade journal publishes and annual buyers directory, which includes a listing of firms providing 
equipment and services for water and wastewater treatment. The November/December 1979 edition 
also included a survey article on environmental spending in Canada.