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THE  LIBRARY  OF  THE 
UNIVERSITY  OF 
NORTH  CAROLINA 


THE  COLLECTION  OF 
NORTH  CAROLINIANA 


G37S 
A51 
v.  25 


This  book  must  not 
be  taken  from  the 
Library  building. 

mm 

Digitized  by  the  Internet  Archive 

in  2014 


https://archive.org/details/americanjewishti1959unse 


XL 


J934 


cAnnii/ersari/  QJear 
 — »  v — w 


1959 


1959  September  Kcsh  Haskomk 5720 


THE  GIANT  FOOD  FAMILY 
WISHES  YOU  AND  YOURS 

A 


i 


Gmrrr 

FOOD 


1 


SERVING  MARYLAND, 
VIRGINIA,  AND  THI 
DISTRICT  OF  COLUMBIA 


HAPPY 
NEW 

AR 


1959 


5720 


RnvSTQNE  trrhsfercorp. 


ROY  STONE 

TRANSFER  CORP. 

Collinsville,  Virginia 

Phone  Midway  7-5514 


We  Are  Proud  of  Our  Record,  Serving  All  the  Industries  In 
This  Area  For  Over  Twenty-seven  Years 

Overnight  Service  To  and  From 


•  Virginia 

•  West  Virginia 

•  North  Carolina 

•  South  Carolina 

•  Pennsylvania 

•  Maryland 

•  New  Jersey 

•  New  York 


•  Ohio 

•  Indiana 

•  Georgia 

•  Florida 

•  Alabama 

•  Tennessee 

•  District  of  Columbia 

•  Chicago 


The  Hotel  Association  of  Roanoke,  Va. 

"The  Star  City  of  the  South" 

WELCOMES  YOU 

and  invites  you  to  use  to  the  fullest  the  varied 
facilities  placed  at  your  disposal. 


HOTEL  ROANOKE 

425  ROOMS 

"A  Modern  Air-Conditioned  Version 
of  an  Old  English  Inn" 

KENNETH  R.  HYDE  GEORGE  L.  DENISON 
  Associate  Managers   


HOTEL 
PATRICK  HENRY 

300  ROOMS 

All  public  space  and 
125  bedrooms 

AIR-CONDITIONED 

JOHN  A.  SHIRES 
General  Manager 


HOTEL 
PONCE  DE  LEON 

200  ROOMS 
Completely  Air-Conditioned 
Located  in  the  heart  of 
Downtown  Roanoke 
Free  Parking  Lot 
adjoining  hotel 

GARLAND  W.  MILLER 
Manager 


There  is  no  clharge  for  children  under 
the  age  of  twelve  at  the  above  hotels 


MCHMOND  tiOTELT  Inc* 


M0DE.R.N      FIR.E.PR.00F-      GAR.AQE.  ACCOMODATIONS 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


3 


Lounging  comfort  comes  naturally  with 
this  down-cushioned  easy  chair  and  its 
handsome  companion  ottoman.  Versatile 
design  makes  it  appropriate  for  living 
room  or  boudoir.  And,  of  course,  you 
may  choose  upholstery  from  an  exten- 
sive collection  of  fine  fabrics. 


Henredon 


Henredon  Furniture  Industries,  Inc.,  Morganton,  North  Carolina 


AMERICAN 
Furniture  Co. 

Incorporated 
NORTH  W1LKESBORO,  N.  C. 

Manufacturers  of 
Promotional  Bed  Room  Furniture 

See  Us  at  the  Markets 

Permanent  Displays 

Southern  Furniture  Exposition  Building 
HIGH  POTNT,  N.  C. 
New  York  Furniture  Exchange 
NEW  YORK,  N.  Y. 
American  Furnit.  re  Mart 
CHICAGO.  ILLINOIS 
Dallas  Furniture  Mart 
DALLAS,  TEXAS 


"v 

i  > 


LIBERTY 
CHAIR  COMPANY 

Manufacturers  of 

CHAIRS  AND  DINETTE  SUITES 

LIBERTY,  N.  C. 

Permanent  Exhibits 

NEW  YORK  FURNITURE  EXCHANGE,  New  York 

AMERICAN  FURNITURE  MART,  Chicago 
SOUTHERN  EXPOSITION  BUILDING,  High  Point 


RELIABLE  mfg.  co. 

High  Point,  North  Carolina 

Manufacturers  of 
Living  Room  Suites,  Sofa  Beds  and  Sleepers 

PERMANENT  EXHIBIT— 207  S.  Main  Street,  High  Point,  N.  C. 
Adjoining  Southern  Furniture  Exposition  Building 
HIGH  POINT,  NORTH  CAROLINA 
NEW  YORK  SHOW  ROOM 
213  Lexington  Avenue  .  .  .  Phone  MUrray  Hill  0-20.18 
New  York,  N.  Y. 


I 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Greetings 


'4% 


FROM 

MUNDY 

MOTOR  LINES 

GENERAL  OFFICE:  ROANOKE,  VA. 

Regular  Daily  Schedule  Between 

NEW  YORK    -:-    PHILADELPHIA    -:-  BALTIMORE 
LYNCHBURG    -:-    STAUNTON     -:-  ROANOKE 
BRISTOL     -:-     HIGH  POINT 
CHARLOTTE 


"Nothing  To  Sell  But  Fast  Service" 

VIRGINIA-CAROLINA 
Freight  Lines,  Inc. 


MARTINSVILLE 


VIRGINIA 


¥11 

|-   01:--^.,— 

Virginia 


OVERNIGHT  SERVICE 
General  Commodities 

SERVING  THE  STATES  OF 
North  Carolina    -    Maryland    -    D.  C.  - 


Eastern  Penn. 


Main  Terminal: 
Martinsville,  Va.—  ME  2-5621 

Terminals: 
Baltimore,  Mary'and — 

Plione:  Mulberry  5-3330 
Charlotte,  North  Carolina — 

Phone:  FR  7-4697 
Richmond,  Virginia — 

Phone:  BE  2-6244 


UNITS  OPERATED: 

85  Tractors 
125  Semi-Trailers 
100   Van  Type 
25  Open  Top 
15  Pick-Ups 


J.  C.  STONE,  President  and  Manager 
TERRELL  C.  CLARK,  Executive  Vice-President 


Why  you  should  COOK  with  GAS 


Of  the  two  kinds  of  modern 
ranges,  both  have  an  equal 
amount  of  time-saving,  work- 
saving  automatic  features. 
But,  there's  one  big  difference 
.  .  .  GAS  COOKS  BETTER! 


Thousands  of  people  actually 
never  taste  flame-broiled  steak 
in  their  homes.  Why?  They 
cook  on  ranges  without  flames! 
So  when  you  buy  a  range,  re- 
member that  by  every  test  .  .  . 
GAS  COOKS  BEST! 


THE  CITY  OF  RICHMOND,  DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  UTILITIES, 


Turner  Togs 

SPORTSWEAR 
Top  Styling, 


Styled  To 
Please 

Made  To 
Wear 

Priced 
To  Sell 


IK 


Advertised  in 
I 

N  &  W  Industries  & 
Favorite  Garment  Co. 

LYNCHBURG,  VIRGINIA 


VOLUME  XXV 


SEPTEMBER  1959 

 =  EDITORIALS 


Thoughts  on  the  High  Holy  Days 

By  Rabbi  Joseph  Asher 
Temple  Emanuel,  Greensboro,  N.  C. 

While  the  Holy  Days  of  our  calendar  are  of  prime  concern 
for  Jews,  our  thoughts  and  aspirations  at  this  time  cannot  re- 
main confined  to  matters  of  personal  and  parochial  interest 
alone. 

We  utilize,  it  is  true,  these  days  for  intimate  contempla- 
tion. We  think  of  the  year  that  is  past,  its  joys  and  sorrows,  its 
rewards  and  disappointments.  We  also  take  time  to  voice  our 
hopes  and  aspirations  for  the  coming  year,  even  pledging  new 
resolves  that  will  vest  our  lives  with  greater  meaning  and  use- 
fulness. 


These  Holy  Days  are  also  to  bring  into  focus  our  lives  as 
Jews,  part  of  the  whole  complex  of  the  Jewish  people.  Another 
year  has  been  added  to  our  long  and  often  glorious  history.  The 
precarious  balance  of  history  has  so  conditioned  us  that  we  ask 
as  though  by  reflex:  is  it  good  or  bad  for  the  Jews?  As  we  look 
back  upon  this  past  year  we  may  say  that  it  represented  a  re- 
spite from  the  manifold  pressures  that  so  often  beset  our  people. 
Even  from  that  segment  of  our  people  most  exposed  to  religious 
prejudice  and  political  discrimination,  namely,  the  Jews  of  the 
Iron  Curtain  countries,  rays  of  light,  even  if  only  dim  ones,  are 
to  be  seen.  The  past  year  has  seen  Jews  emerging  from  the  iso- 
lation of  Rumania  and  Poland  to  rejoin  the  body  of  our  people 
here  or  in  Israel.  A  beginning,  we  hope,  of  a  greater  flow  to 
freedom  yet  to  come. 

The  State  of  Israel  in  its  12  th  year  continues  to  astound 
the  free  world  with  its  comparative  political  and  economic  sta- 
bility in  the  midst  of  a  sea  of  upheaval  and  churning  revolu- 
tions. 

Again  the  prognosticators  of  gloom  have  been  proven 
wrong  in  their  dire  predictions  for  the  future  of  American  Ju- 
daism. In  spite,  or  perhaps  because  of,  the  recurrence  of  attacks 
on  Jewish  institutions  in  different  parts  of  the  land  by  what  is 
sure  to  be  a  lunatic  fringe  of  hate-peddlers  the  American  Jew- 
ish community  emerged  unscathed,  testifying  to  its  increasing 
maturity  as  a  distinct  and  distinctive  cultural  and  religious  en- 
tity in  our  nation  of  many  cultures  and  religons. 

Thus  the  question:  is  it  good  or  bad  for  the  Jews?  might 
well  be  answered:  it  is  good  for  the  Jews. 

We  are  equally  concerned  with  the  state  of  the  world  as  a 
whole.  Not  only  because  we  know  from  long  and  often  bitter 
historic  experience  that  universal  equinimity  produces  tran- 
quility for  our  people,  but  also  because  we  are  inextricably 
bound  up  with  the  fluctuations  of  world  history.  If  we  have 
seen  during  this  year  a  lessening  of  international  tensions,  how- 
ever superficial  or  short-lived  they  may  be,  we  rejoice  at  these 
signs  and  fervently  pray  that  they  may  lead  to  a  continuing  im- 
provement of  world  conditions. 

Being  a  people  dedicated  to  the  highest  standards  of  mor- 
ality and  ethics,  regardless  of  the  consequences,  we  would  urge 


Chester  A.  Brown,  Editor 

that  the  price  of  the  lessening  of  tensions  shall  not  be  the  com- 
promising of  the  great  ideals  on  which  America  has  been  found- 
ed. No  peace  established  on  the  betrayal  of  the  essential  values 
of  our  republic  can  possibly  be  worthy  of  the  word  'peace.' 

In  order  to  comprehend  the  meaning  and  function  of  these 
Holy  Days  we  turn  to  the  prayers  of  its  liturgy.  To  their  ma- 
jestic language  urging  personal  and  universal  salvation  we 
must  add  the  fervor  of  our  own  prayers  that  flow  from  our 
hearts.  They  need  to  be  undergirded  by  a  sense  of  personal 
consecration  and  commitment  to  the  teachings  of  our  religion 
and  a  reaffirmation  of  our  loyalties  to  our  people  and  the  whole 
family  of  man. 

Wishing  alone  will  not  make  it  so,  but  actual  commitment 

may. 

As  the  awesome  tones  of  the  Shfoar  call  upon  us  to  serve 
God  and  our  fellow  man,  we  pray  that  they  will  reach  the  ears 
of  all  men  and  become  the  signal  for  another  step  toward  the 
Messianic  Age. 

L'shana  Tova  Tikatevu.  May  all  of  us  be  inscribed  for  a 
year  of  life  and  peace. 


The  12th  Annual  B'nai  B'rith  Institute 

A.  D.  Gordon,  Franz  Rosenzweig,  Kaufmann  Kohler,  Her- 
man Cohen,  A.  Kuk,  Ahad  Haam,  Solomon  Schechter,  Martin 
Buber  .  .  .  how  many  of  these  names  ring  a  bell  for  any  ex- 
cept the  scholars  among  us?  And  yet  they  are  all  men  who  have 
played  most  important  parts  in  the  advancement  of  Judaism 
in  this  country  and  abroad. 

It  was  among  these  notables,  and  others,  that  we  lived  at 
Wildacres  at  the  12th  annual  B'nai  B'rith  Institute  of  Juda- 
ism, August  2nd  through  the  6th.  Their  fascinating  stories 
were  told  to  us  by  the  able  faculty  of  the  Institute,  which 
this  year  included  Rabbis  Ephraim  Fischoff,  Emanuel  Rack- 
man,  and  Mordecai  Waxman.  In  carrying  out  the  theme, 
"Modern  Jewish  Thinkers,"  these  eminent  scholars  spoke 
before  a  rapt  audience  of  80  students  —  the  largest  Institute  of 
them  all.  As  the  past  and  current  Jewish  scene  unfolded,  there 
was  genuine  regret  that  this  banquet  of  choice  delicacies  had 
of  necessity  to  come  to  an  end. 

Incidentally,  the  over-capacity  attendance  poses  a  serious 
problem  for  the  Institute  management.  Since  it  seems  that  it 
will  be  impossible  to  add  to  the  accommodation  facilities  at 
the  Blumenthal  estate  —  and  since  holding  it  elsewhere  would 
deprive  the  event  of  so  much  of  its  charm,  the  question  be- 
comes one  of  how  to  take  care  at  future  Institutes,  of  all  those 
who  will  want  to  come.  This  is  a  relatively  new  situation,  as 
in  most  previous  Institutes  there  was  the  reverse  problem  of 
getting  an  adequate  attendance. 

The  only  suggestion  that  occurs  to  us  at  the  present  is  to 
limit  the  Institute  to  B'nai  B'rith  members  and  their  immedi- 
ate families.  After  all,  the  Institute  is  a  B'nai  B'rith  project, 

(P!ease  Turn  to  Page  18) 


The  Amskican  Jewish  Times-Outlook,  published  monthly  at  530  Southeastern  Building,  P.  O.  Box  1469,  Greensboro,  N.  C.  Chester  A.  Brown,  Editor;  David  Bernstein,  Pub- 
lisher; Nathan  Kesslcr,  Manager,  Virginia  Office;  Seymour  Messitte,  Associate  Editor;  Florence  Byers,  Virginia  News  Editor:  Broad  Grace  Arcade,  P.  O.  Box  701,  Richmond, 
Va.  Member  Seven  Arts  Feature  Syndicate,  Inc.  $2.00  per  year  payable  in  advance.  Entered  as  Second-Class  Matter  at  the  Post  Office  at  Greensboro,  N.  C,  under  Act  of  March 

jS.  1879.  The  views  expressed  by  contributors  are  not  necessarily  those  of  the  publishers,  but  may  be  published  in  the  interest  of  freedom  of  the  presfi.  Thi  American  Jewish 

~Fu»«B-0»TfcooK  is  owned  and  edited  solely  as  an  independent  enterprise  and  is  not  a  Jewish  community  undertaking. 


6 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


PLAIN  TALK 

By  ALFRED  SEGAL 


Contents 


Editorials            5 

Plain  Talk— Alfred  Segal      6 

Woman  of  the  Month — Jennie  Grossinger    8 

Reflections  on  the  American  Scene — Abba  Eban    9 

The  Return  to  Prayer — Harry  E.  Wedeck  H 

First  Love — William  Ornstein    13 

American  Notables — Major  Alfred  Mordecai — 

by  Harry  Simonhoff    15 

A  Visit  With  Justice  Frankfurter — Murray  Frank   20 

Zalmar  Schneour — Itzhak  Ivry       23 

Our  People  In  Europe — Jack  H.  Gordun  24 

Where  a  Synagogue  Used  To  Be — Trude  Dub    25 

Student  Services — Anita  Engle     .   28 

Why  Did  O.  Henry  Become  O.  Henry    30 

What  the  Shofar  Says — Rabbi  Samuel  M.  Silver  34 

Time  and  Judgement — Ben  Nathan   36 

Ray  of  Hope  in  the  Tunis  Ghetto — Paul  Lieber   38 

A  Sage  Has  Fallen — Dr.  Oscar  Z  .Fassman  _.   .  40 

A  Time  of  War — Barbara  M.  Ribakove     42 

A  Program  For  Jewish  Teen-Agers — Burton  Donner     44 

Inbal — Sara  Levi-Tanai        46 

Brynwood,  Greenwood  and  Kenwood — Rabbi  Joseph  L.  Baron   49 

The  Ultimate  Cruelty — Arnold  Forster    51 

A  Sermonette — Nathan  Ziprin       56 

The  Ceremony  Takes  18  Minutes — E.  L.  Levey  70 

"Nusach  Ari" — A  Strange  Ceremony. — Alfred  H.  Paul    71 

Rosh  Hashonah  Among  The  Indians — Ben  Schocher     73 

Seeming  Economic  Waste         74 

The  Frank  Lloyd  Wright  Synagogue — Philip  Rubin   ____  76 

Scientists  at  the  Hebrew  University — Lucien  Meysels      89 

North  Carolina 

Wilmington — Mrs.  Norma  May     43 

Around  Greensboro — Mrs.  Richard  Forman  and 

Mrs.  Daniel  Hollander    45 

Salisbury — Mrs.  S.  W.  Guyes      54 

Charlotte  Temple  Israel — Mrs.  Jerry  Fisher    57 

Weldon-Roanoke  Rapids — Miss  Louise  Farber      60 

Rocky  Mount — Mrs.  Louis  Wald    _    61 

Raleigh — Beth  Meyer  Synagogue — Mrs.  Oscar  Legum      62 

Gastonia — Pauline  B.  Chinn      64 

High  Point — Mrs.  David  Lafferman     . —  65 

Statesville — Mrs.  Milton  Steinberger     67 

South  Carolina 

Columbia — Mrs.  Bernard  Laden      55 

Charleston      57 

Spartanburg — Mrs.  Stan  Treinis  and  Mrs.  Joel  Tannenbaum    59 

Virginia 

Richmond  Jewish  War  Veterans — Bert  Simmons  _    69 

Richmond  Hadassah — Mrs.  Allen  Minko    _    69 

Richmond  J.W.V.  Auxiliary      71 

Roanoke   ._      °^ 

Norfolk — Mrs.  William  Schwartz   100 

Norfolk  J. W V.— Fred  Handel    _.   100 

Newport  News — Mrs.  Martha  B.  Shapiro       112 


THEY  RUN-AWAY 

Another  year  gone!  Another 
Rosh  Hashonah  come!  So  quick! 
So  quick!  It  seems  only  the  other 
day  that  mama  was  helping  me  to 
dress  up  in  my  best  little  suit  to  go 
with  her  and  papa  to  schul  .  .  .  and 
papa  asking,  "You  know  what  day 


ALFRED  SEGAL 


this  is?  It  is  Rosh  Hashonah,  and 
do  you  know  Rosh  Hashonah?  It 
is  a  new  year.  We  are  going  to  schul 
and  see  that  you  behave  yourself 
there."  I  was  about  six  years  old. 

Oh,  the  years  run  away  so  fast, 
and  in  no  time  it  was  Bar  Mitzvah 
year  for  me,  and  papa  was  telling 
me  that  morning,  "I  hope  you  truly 
understand  what  it  is  all  about.  To- 
day you  become  really  a  Jew.  Until 
now  you  have  been  a  Jew  only  be- 
cause you  were  born  that  way.  From 
here  on  you  become  a  Jew  who 
must  understand  what  being  a  Jew 
means.  Are  you  sure  you  under- 
stand?" 

And  I  replied,  "Yes,  I  got  to  put 
on  t'fillim  every  morning." 

"But  is  that  all  you  know  about 
being  a  Jew?  papa  asked.  "There's 
a  lot  more  to  it." 

Rosh  Hashonah  alter  Rosh  Has- 
honah —  like  today  coming  right 
after  yesterday,  and  tomorrow  al- 
ready in  sight!  Those  veirs  hurry 
one  through  school,  and  there  came 
running  a  year  when  I  was  old 
enough  to  be  thinking  of  what  to 
make  of  my  life. 

That  year  papa  asked  me:  "What 
do  you  think  you're  going  to  do 
with  yourself?  What  work,  what 
job,  what  profession?" 


Willy,  the  boy  who  lived  two 
doors  away  from  us  —  he  was  two 
years  older  than  I  —  had  started  to- 
ward the  purpose  of  becoming  a 
rabbi.  We  had  been  playing  base- 
ball together  and  he  was  a  good 
pitcher;  I  admired  Willy.  I  replied 
to  papa:  "I'll  go  along  with  Willy; 
I'll  try  to  be  a  rabbi,  too." 

So  I  entered  Hebrew  Union  Col- 
lege in  our  town,  to  be  educated 
into  the  Reform  rabbinate.  It  was 
a  time  when  the  college  was  taking 
high  school  boys  to  make  rabbis 
out  of  them  during  eight  years. 
But  there  were  only  two  of  those 
eight  years  for  me  in  the  college, 
and  I  was  put  out  of  there,  and 
papa  was  saying,  "Maybe  you  can 
still  help  yourself  to  be  a  worth- 
while Jew  after  all.  Why  don't  you 
try?" 

Rosh  Hashonah  .  .  .  and  another 
Rosh  Hashonah  .  .  .  and  another— 
one  running  into  the  next  in  a 
hurry:  but  in  that  time  of  my  life 
I  wasn't  noticing  the  swiftness  of 
the  years.  Years  go  more  slowly 
when  you're  young  and  it  seemed  a 
long  time  to  my  restive  soul  before 
I  found  a  job  as  reporter  on  a  news- 
paper —  a  long  time  before  I  was 
earning  enough  to  marry  Rose. 

More  than  50  Rosh  Hashonahs 
have  run  away  since  that  wedding 
day,  and  it  seems  no  time  at  all 
since  the  hour  I  first  looked  at  our 
first-born,  Joe,  in  the  hospital,  and 
after  him,  Bernie  and  Dilly,  and  to- 
day this  Segal  already  is  the  grand- 
pa of  seven  of  whom  all  but  one 
already  are  teen-agers.  (Only  the 
other  day,  it  seems,  these  grandchil- 
dren were  crawling  along  on  our 
living  room  rug.) 

When  crawling  on  the  rug  had 
tired  them,  this  grandpa  cuddled 
them  in  his  arms  and  thrilled  at 
the  joy  of  being  an  ancestor.  But 
now!  Those  kids  in  their  teens 
would  rather  go  their  own  ways  and 
grandpa  no  longer  means  much  to 
them.  Grandpa  merely  is  that  old- 
timer  whose  fluttering,  aging  heart 
feels  troubled  when  those  grand- 
sons go  driving  in  the  night;  just 
an  aging  guy,  and  what  does  he 
know  about  living  today?  What  can 
he  know  of  the  joy  of  driving  that 
last  on  the  roads?  Poor,  old  grand- 
pa! 


That's  the  way  all  those  hurrying 
Rosh  Hashonahs  leave  a  man  who 
only  the  other  day,  it  seems,  was 
looking  joyously  and  prayerfully  at 
his  first-born;  only  the  other  day 
he  was  on  Locust  Street. 

But  I  hope  that  no  one  who's 
reading  this  gets  the  idea  that  this 
is  a  sad  Rosh  Hashonah  for  this 


Segal  who  has  come  through  so 
many  Rosh  Hashonahs  in  a  hurry. 
Anyway,  through  all  those  quick 
years  he  has  managed  to  acquire  a 
bit  of  wisdom  .  .  .  not  much,  but 
just  enough  to  understand  what 
Rosh  Hashonah  is  all  about. 

Well,  in  schul,  in  this  new  year 
time,  maybe  I  shall  permit  my  mind 
(Please  Turn  to  Page  44*) 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


7 


MANUFACTURERS  OF  QUALITY  MERCERIZED  YARNS 


uASTONIA 

YARN 


DIVISION  OF 


BOTANY 
COTTONS 

Gasfonia.  Worth  Caraliaa 


Other  Divisions 

Jewell  Cotton  Mills  Irene  Mills  Gurney  Manufacturing 

Thomasville,  N.  C.  Taylorsville,  N.  C.  Prattville,  Ala. 

FINE  COMBED  AND  CARDED  YARNS 
NATURAL  —  BLEACHED  —  DYED 

New  York  Representative 
Botany  Cottons,  Inc.  389  Fifth  Ave.  New  York,  N.  Y. 


CHATHAM  MANUFACTURING  CD. 

ELKIN,  N.  C. 


3 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


JENNIE  GROSSINGER 


Woman  a£  ike  MosttA 

Jennie  Grossinger 


Fabulous  Woman 


Jennie  Grossinger  has  spent  so 
much  time  in  Durham,  N.  C.  in 
the  past  few  years,  that  the  Dur- 
ham community  would  like  to 
claim  her  as  one  of  its  own.  The 
facts  are,  however,  that  no  one 
community  can  claim  Jennie— for 
she  belongs  to  the  world. 

"When  we  started  the  hotel  45 
years  ago,  we  accommodated  only 
nine  guests  and  charged  nine  dol- 
lars a  week,"  Jennie  Grossinger 
said  in  a  recent  television  inter- 
view. "Then,  when  more  people 
came,"  she  continued,  "we  put  up 
tents  in  the  back  of  the  house  for 
them." 


From  those  humble  beginnings 
has  risen  the  giant  Grossinger 
Country  Club  at  Grossinger,  N.  Y., 
a  resort  that  Jennie  Grossinger 
and  her  family  started  as  a  farm 
in  1914  and  have  since  built  into 
one  of  the  world's  foremost  vaca- 
tion spots. 

Today,  the  Grossinger  Country 
Club  accommodates  more  than 
1200  guests  in  its  .32  buildings. 
There  are  more  than  900  staff 
members  at  the  resort,  which  is 
open  all-year-'round.  On  it's  1,000 
acres  are  facilities  ranging  from 
an  official  Olympic  swimming 
pool  to  an  18-hole  championship 


golf  course,  from  an  artificial  ice 
skating  rink  to  a  huge  private  air- 
port, from  a  beautiful  private  lake 
to  a  r  i  d  i  n  g  academy  with 
thoroughbred  horses  and  miles  of 
bridle  paths. 

There  are  eight  all-weather  and 
(lay  tennis  courts,  an  artificial 
snow-making  machine  for  the  ski 
slopes,  which  were  designed  by 
Hannes  Schneider.  There's  a  to- 
boggan with  a  trolley  to  transport 
guests  and  their  sleds  back  up 
the  hill  after  they've  zoomed 
down,  and  many  other  facilities 
lor  vacationers  to  enjoy  them- 
selves and  enable  the  resort  to 
live  up  to  its  famous  slogan: 
"Grossinger 's  Has  Everything." 

Struggled  To  Success 

Behind  it  all  is  the  story  of  a 
woman,  the  story  of  Jennie  Gross- 
inger, who  struggled  to  build  a 
resort  that  would  be  a  favorite 
with  vacationers  from  all  walks  of 
life.  And  she  has  succeeded.  At 
Grossinger's,  you'll  see  Hollywood 
and  Broadway  stars,  the  entertain- 
ment world's  new  laces  of  1 959, 
columnists  and  other  newspaper- 
men, sports  champions,  lads  and 
lasses  with  romance  in  mind,  tired 
business  men  and  tireless  youths. 

Although  her  husband,  Harry, 
prefers  to  remain  in  the  back- 
ground, he  has  contributed  con- 
siderably to  the  prosperity  of  the 
resort.  It  is  he  who  does  all  the 
buying.  Through  the  years,  he 
has  purchased  the  best  of  foods 
to  enable  the  Grossinger  chefs  to 
prepare  the  wonderful  cuisine  lor 
which  the  resort  is  world  famous. 
He  also  plans  and  supervises  all 
improvements   and  construction. 

He  recenth'  completed  a  $1,- 
500,00  indoor  swimming  pool  and 
two  health  clubs,  one  for  men  and 
the  other  for  women.  Florence 
Chadwick,  only  woman  ever  to 
swim  the  English  Channel  both 
ways,  is  the  Grossinger  aquatics 
director.  She  is  in  charge  of  the 
activities  at  the  resort's  four 
swimming  pools.  Miss  Chadwick 
gives  swimming  lessons  and  stages 
exhibitions. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Grossinger  have 
two  children,  a  son,  Paul,  and  a 
daughter,  Elaine,  both  of  whom 
are  married  and  have  three  young- 
sters each  of  their  own.  Paul,  who 
is  managing  director  of  the  resort, 
is  married  to  the  former  Ricelle 
(Runny)  Persky  of  Atlantic  City. 


V  J.  He  is  a  graduate  of  the  Cor- 
nell University  School  of  Hotel 
Administration.  Elaine  is  the  wile 
of  Dr.  David  Etess,  a  medical 
doctor  who  has  his  office  in  near- 
by Liberty,  N.  Y.  Mrs.  Etess  also 
participates  in  the  hotel's  manage- 
ment. Her  favorite  chore  is  plann- 
ing and  supervision  programs  for 
the  children,  teen-agers,  and 
young  adults  at  the  resort. 
Father  Comes  to  United  States 
Jennie  Grossinger  was  born  in 
Vienna  on  June  Hi,  1892.  She  is 
the  eldest  of  the  three  children  of 
Selig  and  Malka  Grossinger. 
There  is  a  sister,  Lottie,  and  a 
brother,  Harry.  The  father,  Selig, 
emigrated  alone  from  Austria  to 
the  United  States  in  1898.  Two 
years  later,  when  he  had  a  job  and 
enough  money,  he  sent  for  his 
family.  They  came  on  the  S.  S. 
Potsdam.  Upon  arriving  in  this 
country,  the  Grossingers  settled 
on  New  York's  teeming  East  Side. 

Within  a  few  years,  the  brother, 
Harry,  began  having  trouble  with 
his  hearing.  At  that  time  the 
world's  foremost  eye,  ear,  nose, 
and  throat  specialists  were  in 
Vienna;  so,  Malka  Grossinger  took 
him  back  to  the  old  country  for 
medical  care.  Lottie  went  along. 
Then  Jennie  and  they  send 
funds  to  the  other  members  of 
the  family  in  Austria.  To  do  this, 
he  woi\ed  very  hard  from  six  in 
the  morning  until  8  at  night,  six 
days  a  week.  Before  long,  he  be- 
gan to  feel  the  effects  of  the 
drudgery.  Noticing  this,  Jennie 
decided  to  get  a  job  so  that  she 
could  help  him  raise  the  money 
needed  for  the  family.  Jennie  was 
attending  grade  school  at  the  time, 
but  although  she  was  extremely 
anxious  to  get  a  good  education, 
she  felt  that  helping  her  father, 
mother,  sister  and  brother  was 
more  important. 

Jennie,  13,  Works  in  a  Factory 

The  law  called  for  children  to 
go  to  school  until  they  were  14 
vears  old.  Jennie,  who  was  only 
13,  sought  to  avoid  clashes  with 
the  truant  otiicer:  so,  she  made 
herself  look  older.  She  put  her 
hair  in  a  bun  and  donned  long 
skirts. 

Jennie  got  a  job  making  button- 
holes in  a  dress  factory.  The  hours 
were  from  7  a.  m.  to  6  p.  m.,  with 
a  half-hour  for  lunch.  She  didn't 
mind  the  hours  or  the  work.  She 
was  happy,  knowing  that  she  was 
helping  her  family. 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  83) 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Reflections  on 
the  American  Scene 


By  Abba  Eban 


This  address  was  delivered  by  Mr.  Eban  at  t'.ie  52nd  Annual  Meeting  of 
the  American  Jewish  Committee.  It  is  his  "swan-song",  as  (he  left  the  post  of 
Israel  Ambassador  to  the  United  States,  to  go  to  Israel  Because  of  its  im- 
portance we  want  to  reproduce  it  in  its  entirety,  and  for  that  purpose  have 
divided  it  into  two  parts,  of  which  this  is  Part  1.  Part  2  will  appeal*  in  our 
October  issue.  The  Editor. 


ABBA  EBAN 


I  am  now  near  the  end  of  a  jour- 
ney which  began  eleven  years  ago, 
when  I  first  came  to  the  United 
Nations  to  plead  for  Israel's  rights 
of  sovereignty,  statehood,  peace  and 
self-defense.  That  journey  broaden- 
ed out  into  another  highway  two 
years  later,  when  I  was  dispatched 
to  Washington  bearing  letters  of 
credence  from  President  Weizmann 
to  the  President,  Government  and 
people  of  the  United  States,  bid- 
ding me  labor  for  the  establish- 
ment and  reinforcement  of  friendly 
relations  between  these  two  democ- 
racies, so  different  in  all  the  ele- 
ments of  their  physical  strength, 
but  so  mysteriously  linked  by  the 
memories  of  a  common  historic  ex- 
perience. 

They  have  been  unforgettable 
years:  years  touched  by  tragedy  and 
exaltation— years  which  began  with 
our  people  stunned  by  grief  as  it 
stood  before  the  charred  remains 
of  six  million  of  our  kin;  and  years 
which  now  end  with  our  sovereign 
nation  striding  proudly  towards  the 
fulfillment  of  its  destiny. 

It  is  natural  that  a  warrior  leav- 
ing an  arena  such  as  this,  after  an 
epoch  so  full  of  travail  and  color, 
should  find  many  crowded  mem- 
ories arising  before  his  mind.  Some 
of  my  most  vivid  memories  belong 
:o  Israel's  exploits  and  progress  in 
the  United  Nations.  I  cannot  for- 
get our  moments  of  frustration  and 
defeat  in  the  international  tribunal. 

But  when  all  is  said  and  remem- 
bered, Israel  has  gained  far  more 
from  her  association  with  this 
union  of  sovereign  peoples  than  she 
has  ever  lost  in  occasional  moments 
of  disillusionment  and  defeat.  I 
know  not  what  the  story  of  our  Jew- 
ish generation  would  have  been  if 
Israel's  desperate  leap  forward  to- 
wards freedom  had  not  intersected 


with  another  line  of  historic  devel- 
opment —  that  which  brought  into 
existence  an  international  forum  in 
which  international  problems  could 
be  discussed  in  terms  transcending 
the  interests  and  strategy  of  any 
single  nation. 

Moreover,  our  people  has  learn- 
ed, throughout  its  long,  historic 
journey,  that  ideas  have  an  inde- 
pendent value  irrespective  of  de- 
fects in  their  implementation. 
There  is  no  concept  in  the  modern 
world  of  ideas  which  conforms 
more  closely  with  Israel's  prophetic 
tradition  or  with  her  hopes  of  free- 
dom, than  this  majestic  design  of  a 
family  of  nations  joined  together  in 
a  covenant  of  justice  and  peace. 

I  therefore  lay  down  this  part  of 
my  mission  in  the  conviction  that 
Israel  owes  gratitude  to  the  United 
Nations,  and  reverent  honor  to  its 
flag. 

A  similar  verdict  comes  to  my 
lips  as  I  look  back  on  the  other 
arena  in  which  I  have  been  my 
country's  sentinel.  Words  cannot 
express  the  value  which  American 
sustenance  and  support  have 
brought  to  Israel  throughout  the 
years  of  her  ordeal.  America  was 
first  to  recognize  Israel;  first  to  de- 
fine our  independence  and  integ- 
rity as  essential  elements  of  her 
own  international  policy;  first  to 
sponsor  Israel's  recognition  as  wor- 
thy of  emulation  by  other  nations; 
first  to  proclaim  and  first  to  uphold 
our  crucial  right  of  free  and  inno- 
cent passage  across  the  Gulf  of  Aqa- 
ba  —  thus  forming  the  bridge  on 
which  we  have  constructed  our  new 
fraternity  with  the  continents  of 
Asia  and  Africa;  first  and  unique 
in  the  massive  infusion  of  aid  which 
she  has  injected  into  the  veins  and 
arteries  of  our  own  economy,  socie- 
ty and  culture;  main  citadel  and 
central  reservoir  of  our  public  sym- 


pathies and  our  Jewish  solidarities. 
In  all  of  these  acts  of  friendship 
America  lias  shed  a  gracious  light 
upon  our  early  years. 

Jerusalem  and  Washington  have- 
not  always  seen  everything  alike. 
But  on  the  substantive,  crucial, 
lundamental  issues  —  of  our  sov- 
ereignty, our  survival,  our  state- 
hood, our  right  to  recognition,  our 
membership  in  the  international 
community,  our  hope  for  economic 
and  social  progress— there  has  been 
a  constant  stream  of  American  pol- 
icy and  sentiment  flowing  along  the 
road  of  our  salvation. 

As  I  lay  down  my  mission  to 
America  I  am  convinced  that  there 
are  no  differences  between  the  gov- 
ernments of  the  United  States  and 
Israel  which  cannot  be  resolved  by 
tenacious  and  friendly  discussion. 
For  the  theme  of  the  American- 
Israel  dialogue  no  longer  bears  on 
the  more  c  rucial  issues  of  our  state- 
hood, our  integrity  or  our  consoli- 
dation. These  have  been  common 
ground  between  us  for  several  years. 

There  is  far  less  of  crisis  and  ten- 
sion in  our  relations  than  a  nervous 
and  volatile  press  would  sometimes 
have  us  believe.  Indeed,  our  prob- 
lems spring  not  from  incompatibil- 
ity, but  from  perplexity  —  a  per- 
plexity common  to  America  and 
Israel,  as  each  faces  the  torrential 
gusts  of  conflict  and  passion  in  the 
Arab  world. 

America  and  Israel,  as  members 
of  the  democratic  family  of  nations, 
have  much  to  gain  from  contempla- 
tion of  each  other.  Can  Israel's  rise 
fail  to  strike  a  chord  of  memory  in 
the  heart  of  any  American  who  still 
cherishes  the  saga  of  his  own  revo- 
lution? Surely  our  nascent  society, 
despite  its  own  unique  and  specific 
attributes,  is  in  essence  a  repetition 
in  miniature  of  the  sweeping  events 
whereby  America  was  built  through 


the  immigration  and  pioneering 
movements  of  her  formative  years. 

Israel  has  been  much  contemplat- 
ed by  Americans.  Envoys,  econo- 
mists, tourists,  commissions,  sena- 
tors, representatives,  writers,  movie 
producers  —  all  have  examined  us, 
up  and  down.  Israel  has  been  bom- 
barded with  praise,  criticism,  and, 
above  all,  unlimited  advice. 

No  nation  has  ever  sustained  such 
a  constant  barrage  of  counsel.  Only 
a  rugged  people  could  have  sur- 
vived. 

Until  this  evening  we  have  never 
retaliated.  There  is  no  literature 
on  what  Israel  thinks  of  America- 
how  the  contemporary  life  of  your 
nation  reflects  itself  in  our  eyes. 
There  is  a  rich  tradition  of  com- 
ment left  by  emissaries  from  other 
lands.  Many,  even  the  brilliant  dc 
Toccjueville  and  the  perceptive 
Bryce,  fell  victim  at  times  co  the 
utter  incalculability  of  9  society  too 
vast  and  turbulent  for  portrayal,  let 
alone  for  prediction. 

No  one  could  fail  to  be  awed  by 
the  sheer  vastness  of  American  life; 
by  the  majestic  grandeur  of  her 
landscape       the  vastness  of  her 
lulls,  the  endless  expanse  of  her 
valleys;   the   inimitable  variety  of 
her  peoples;   the  mysterious  pro- 
cesses of  her  union,  creating  the  tap- 
estry of  a  new  civilization  out  of 
so  many  variant  and  seemingly  con- 
flicting threads.  The  genius  of  her 
freedom  and  the  overpowering  ele- 
ment of  her  size  create  a  condition 
in  which  almost  every  generaliza- 
tion can  be  at  once  true  and  mis- 
leading. Nor  is  her  true  temper 
always  visible  on  the  surface  of  her 
life. 

America  is  thus  the  most  studied 
and  the  least  understood  of  nations. 
Anyone  who  goes  through  this  lit- 
erature becomes  sharply  aware  that 
the  final  answer  has  not  been  given. 


lO 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


The  forecast  ol  America's  destiny 
still  challenges  the  political  schol- 
arship of  our  times. 

I  am  the  son  ol  a  nation  which 
has  had  many  prophets  in  its  his- 
tory. All  of  them  have  got  into  seri- 
ous trouble.  I  do  not  offer  you  my 
reflections  without  knowing  the 
acute  necessity  of  treading  warily. 

I  see  before  me  a  growing  society. 
The  United  States  to  which  I  came 
in  1948  was  a  people  of  140  million 
in  48  states.  Today  there  are  175 
million  in  50  states.  Thus,  within  a 
short  period  in  the  lifetime  of  a 
man  far  short  of  decrepitude,  Amer- 
ica has  increased  by  numbers  not 
far  less  than  the  total  population 
of  a  great  European  power. 

Even  at  the  appare  nt  pinnacle  of 
her  strength,  America  is  still  com- 
manded by  the  laws  of  growth.  This 
is  still  a  young  society,  even  though 
it  controls  the  greatest  aggregate  of 
materiat  power  ever  assembled  un- 
der any  government  amongst  men. 

The  consequences  are  manifold 
and  fundamental.  A  growing  peo- 
ple is  not  shackled  by  the  dead 
hand  of  tradition.  Its  eyes  are  on 
the  perspectives  which  lie  ahead, 
not  on  the  journey  it  has  already 
accomplished. 

This  forward-looking  outlook  is 
specifically  and  uniquely  congenial 
to  Israel's  tradition  and  tempera- 
ment. All  civilizations  contempo- 
rary with  ancient  Israel  had  in  their 
legend  and  philosophy  the  concept 
of  a  golden  age  in  which  the  con- 
flicts between  order  and  freedom 
were  transcended.  But  each  placed 
its  golden  age  in  the  past,  at  the 
very  beginning  of  history.  When 
they  compared  the  past  perfection 
with  the  failures  and  ills  of  their 
own  existence,  they  were  plunged 
into  a  deep  melancholy.  Human 
life  appeared  to  them  as  a  futile 
repetition,  a  wheel  going  round 
and  round,  coming  back  to  a  start- 
ing point  in  darkness  and  chaos. 

But  Israel  in  a  burst  of  lucid  and 
revolutionary  genius  put  this  gold- 
en age  in  the  future,  and  thus  con- 
ceived of  history  as  unfolding  itself 
across  time  in  a  pattern  of  prog- 
ress. This  was  the  deep  purport  of 
Jewish  Messianism.  Whether  di- 
rectly through  the  ancient  Jewish 
stream  or  through  its  vast  Christian 
tributary,  America  has  maintained 
this    forward-lookingness    as  her 


most  characteristic  attribute  of  tem- 
per and  spirit. 

In  the  old  world,  other  civiliza- 
tions once  more  powerful  than  the 
United  States  have  long  ceased  to 
advance  or,  at  most,  advance  slowly 
and  with  difficulty.  America  is  a 
society  still  moving  swiftly  in  a  con- 
tinual growth  to  which  the  re- 
sources of  this  continent  set  no  vis- 
ible limit. 

Beyond  this  strong  impression  of 
growth,  I  have  observed  the  en- 
largement and  deepening  of  Ameri- 
can libertarianism.  It  is  visible  in 
the  crumbling  of  barriers  between 
America's  own  races  and  classes, 
and  in  her  active  sponsorship  of 
national  freedom  in  the  awakening 
continents  of  Asia  and  Africa. 

Nothing  more  important  can  be 
said  about  America  than  that  it  is 


the  central  fortress  of  democracy. 
When  de  Tocqueville  wrote  his 
treatise,  he  made  it  clear  that  he  was 
not  writing  about  America  at  all. 
He  said,  "I  confess  that  in  America 
I  saw  more  than  America.  I  saw 
the  image  of  democracy  itself!" 

America,  as  conceived  by  its 
founders,  was  not  yet  a  nation  with 
deep  historic  roots  or  a  clearly  de- 
fined cultural  personality.  The  Dec- 
laration of  Independence  hardly 
speaks  of  creating  an  American  na- 
tion. It  was  concerned  with  a  peo- 
ple deprived  of  freedom  and  the 
object  was  to  create  a  society  in 
which  men  could  be  liberated  from 
each  other.  From  all  over  the  world 
men  would -come-to  America  —  not- 
to  be  Americans,  but  to  be  free. 

Later,  of  course,  a  national  tem- 
perament and  character  were  to 


emerge.  But  nationalism  was  only 
the  second  phase  in  the  develop- 
ment of  American  society.  Freedom 
was  the  purpose  of  its  existence; 
and  freedom  set  the  horizons  of  its 
progress. 

Israel,  too,  is  born  of  an  idea— 
the  idea  of  historic  reunion  be- 
tween a  people,  a  land  and  a  lan- 
guage. When  they  lived  together, 
these  three  achieved  an  incompar- 
able burst  of  intellectual  and  spir- 
itual radiance;  and  in  coming  to- 
gether again,  they  may  well  recre- 
ate their  previous  greatness. 

.  ^Because  democracy  is  an  inherent 
;md  organic  part  of  America's  very 
existence,  nothing  is  more  impor- 
tant  for  other  free  nations,  great 
and  small,  than  the  manner  in 
which  democracy  vindicates  itselt 
here.  America  is  the  crucial  labora- 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  41) 


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KOSHER  ©  PAREVE 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


1 1 


A  Ketum  Zo  Prayer 

A  Story  For  The  High  Holy  Days 


By  Harry  E.  Wedeck 


HARRY  E  WEDECK 


"You'll  be  a  good-for-nothing, 
Sam,"  his  father  rebuked  him. 
"Never  wanted  to  go  to  school. 
Never  a  prayer.  Nothing  but  sport 
and  cards.  What  is  to  become  of 
you?"  His  voice  rose  in  deep  anger. 

Sam,  just  seventeen,  stood  there 
before  his  father,  sulky,  resentful. 

"1  don't  want  to  study,  pop,"  he 
grumbled.  "Aw,  leave  me  alone. 
I  want  to  get  around,  to  make 
money.  Fast." 

"Fast,  Sam,"  "his  father  splut- 
tered." Have  I  made  money?  You 
can't  make  money  fast.  You  must 
give  before  you  get." 

"Aw,  pa,"  Sam  answered. 

"Let  the  boy  be,  Morris,"  Sam's 
mother  pleaded,  coming  in  from 
the  kitchen. 

"Let  him  be,"  Sam's  father 
shrieked.  "Let  him  be  what?  A 
thief?  A  criminal?  A  dope  fiend? 
A  racketeer?  I  tell  him  to  go  to 
school,  and  he  answers  me  like 
that." 

But  Sam  had  his  way.  In  a  few 
years  he  had  shrewdly  branched 
out,  bought  up  some  store  in  the 
town,  closed  a  deal  in  real  estate. 
He  became  a  partner  with  another 
enterprising  man,  and  together 
they  flourished. 

Sam,  in  his  thirties,  was  eager 
and  restless.  He  was  rarely  at  home. 
Always  out  with  someone  or  other, 
planning  a  deal,  consummating  a 
deal.  It  was  always  money  that  was 
involved;  large  sums  of  money.  And 
by  some  quirk  of  fate  Sam  was  in- 
variably lucky. 

His  wife  now  had  two  mink 
coats.  His  Cadillac  was  exchanged 
every  year.  He  bought,  without  a 
mortgage,  a  house  in  the  suburbs. 


People  came  to  visit  him:  acquaint- 
ances, a  business  men.  sometimes 
humble  men  in  search  of  a  favor. 

Sam  was  lavish.  He  was  generous. 
"We'll  soon  be  beggars.  Sam,  if  you 
hand  out  such  favors,"  his  wife 
sometimes  rebuked  him. 

"Nonsense,  Flo.  The  more  I  give, 
the  more  I  make.  I'm  in  a  deal 
just  now,  Wait.  You'll  see." 

Norman,  his  son,  now  eleven, 
went  to  a  private  school.  In  the 
summer,  he  was  sent  to  a  ranch 
in  Arizona.  There  were  two  maids 
in  the  house. 

"Would  you  like  a  car  for  a 
birthday  present,  Flo?"  Sam  asked. 

"A  Cadillac,  Sam.  Can  I  have  it 
ahead   of   time?   I'm   going   to  a 
Canasta  party  next  Wednesday." 
"You'll  have  it,  Flo." 

The  car  arrived,  sleek  and  glit- 
tering, on  Tuesday. 

One  wet  Sunday  Sam  was  at 
home.  He  looked  out  of  the  win- 
dow in  the  living  room.  The  driz- 
zle was  steady.  The  leaves  drooped 
wet  and  desolate. 

"What  a  day!"  Sam  exclaimed, 
going  into  the  bedroom. 

"What  do  you  mean,  Sam?"  Flo 
asked.  "What's  the  rain  got  to  do 
with  it?  Aren't  we  going  out  this 
afternoon  to  the  Minkins,  then 
drive  into  town  for  dinner?" 

"I  mean  now.  This  minute." 

"Can't  you  call  up  any  of  your 
business  friends,  Sam?" 

"I  don't  want  to." 

"Well,  then?" 

"I  think  I'll  go  and  see  the  old 
man." 

"See  your  father?  Now?  We've 
an  engagement  this  afternoon." 

"Never  mind  that.  Anyway,  I'll 
be  back." 

"As  you  please,"  she  answered, 
sulkily. 

Sam  brought  out  the  car,  opened 
the  engine,  and  started.  He  drove 


clown  into  the  Old  Town,  where 
his  father  had  remained  all  these 
years.  Even  after  his  wife's  death. 

He  had  never  wanted  to  leave, 
although  Sam  had  offered  him  a 
loom  of  his  own  with  the  family. 

"Don't  coax  him,  Sam,"  Flo  had 
said."  If  he  doesn't  want  to  come, 
let  him  stay  where  he  is." 

That  is  what  she  wanted,  actual- 
ly, that  is  what  happened. 

"Ah,  Sam,  it's  you?"  his  father 
looked  up  from  the  old  volume, 
yellow  and  stained  with  age,  that 
lay  spread  before  him. 

"How  are  you,  pa?  Need  any 
money?"  Sam  jingled  coins  in  his 
oxford  grey  pockets. 

"Money?  What  do  I  need  money 
for,  Sam?  I  have  this  already."  He 
pointed  with  an  arthritic  finger 
to  the  volume. 

Sam  smiled. 

"Same  old  father.  Well,  as  you 
like,  pap.  You  know.  You're  wel- 
come. Anything  you  want.  Just 
ask." 

"Anything,  Sam?  I'll  ask  you  one 
thing." 

"Go  ahead." 

"Will  you  go  to  Schul  this  Yom 
Kippur?" 

Sam  laughed. 

"Still  the  same  old  pa,  aren't 
you?  Always  worrying  about  me. 
What  good  will  it  do  you  if  I  go  to 
Schul?" 

"It  will  do  you  good,  Sam." 

Sam  shook  his  head.  Shortly 
after,  he  left. 

"Well,  I  tried,"  he  argued  with 
himself,  as  he  drove  back  home- 
ward. 

That  summer  was  unusual:  hot 
and  humid  for  long  days  on  end: 
and  over  the  country  sickness 
spread  moist,  clammy  tentacles. 
Particularly  among  the  youngsters. 


Toward  the  end  of  July  Sam 
received  a  letter  from  Norman's 
camp  director.  It  was  worded 
gently,  but  Sam  grew  alarmed. 

"Norman  must  be  pretty  sick, 
Flo.  They  wouldn't  write  otherwise, 
would  they?" 

"Oh,  don't  worry,  Sam.  Probably 
over-ate  at  an  outing  or  something." 

But  that  night  Sam  was  restless. 
He  couldn't  sleep.  In  the  morning, 
he  announced:  , 

"Flo,  I'm  going  to  fly  to  Arizona. 
I  must  know  how  Norman  is." 

"What  about  that  big  deal  you 
have  this  afternoon?" 
"It  will  have  to  wait." 
Arrived  at  Arizona,  he  quickly 
discovered  that  there  had  been  a 
polio  outbreak.  Mild,  but  requiring 
care.  Norman  came  back  with  Sam 
and  began  treatment.  The  treat- 
ments were  highly  beneficial.  Nor- 
man recuperated  satisfactorily.  By 
the  end  of  August,  he  was  con- 
valescing at  ease. 

"You  know,  Flo,  I'd  like  to  go 
down  to  the  old  schul  this  week, 
Sam  declared  one  breakfast  morn- 
ing a  little  later. 

"What's  the  matter,  Sam?  Got 
religious?  You  haven't  been  in  a 
schul  since  you  were  a  small  kid, 
have  yci?'' 

"No,  Flo.  That's  maybe  why  I 
want  (c  go  now." 
"Oh,  go  on,  then,  as  you  wish." 
She  nodded,  pondering. 
On  Yom  Kippur  eve  Sam  drove 
down  to  the  Old  Quarter:  parked 
his  car.  Then  he  walked  to  the 
Great  Synagogue.  It  was  already 
filled.   The   lamps   glowed  red, 
There  was  a  hush  as  men  put  on 
their  praying  shawls.  Prayer  books 
riffled.  Sudden  spurts  of  invoca- 
tion, sighs  broke  into  the  warm 
air. 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  55) 


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The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


*3 


First  Love 

By  William  Ornsfeiit 

We  welcome  the  return  to  our  columns  of  William  Ornstein,  gifted  story- 
teller whose  writings  take  us  back  to  the  days  of  our  youth.  Here's  another 
?em,  written  in  the  now  familiar  vein.  The  Editor. 


WILLIAM  ORNSTEIN 


Becky  Kornbloom  was  her  name 
and  she  was  my  first  love. 

She  was  not  a  good-looker,  as  the 
saying  went  in  those  days,  Her  fea- 
tures were  dark:  she  had  thick  black 
eyebrows  which  matched  the  color 
of  her  wavy  hair,  and  one  thing  I 
couldn't  help  noticing  about  her: 
she  was  neatly  dressed  at  all  times, 
the  essence  of  freshness:  her  blouses, 
dresses  and  skirts  always  pressed  to 
perfection. 

She  grew  up  with  her  friends, 
and  I  had  mine  on  the  same  block 
in  the  thick  of  Harlem  hard  by  the 
East  River.  Today  the  neighbor- 
hood has  grown  up,  rich  red  brick 
developments  projected  by  the 
City's  Low  Cost  Housing  Program 
having  shunted  the  time-worn  tene- 
ments into  memory  lane. 

I,  being  athletically  inclined,  nev- 
er paid  much  attention  to  Becky 
and  she,  in  turn,  coveyed  with  the 
girls  on  the  block  and  at  Union  Set- 
tlement where  they  formed  a  club 
called  The  Blue  Jays.  None  of  the 
members  could  say  why  they  picked 
on  this  particular  name  except  that 
it  sounded  nice. 

This  gave  the  boys,  the  crowd  I 
palled  out  with  on  the  block,  an 
inspiration.  And  soon  we  announc- 
ed that  we  had  organized  a  club  of 
our  own  known  as  The  Spartans. 
The  girls  held  to  themselves  and  us 
Spartans  naturally  ignored  them 
for  the  fun  of  basketball,  handball, 
longball,  softball,  as  well  as  base- 
ball, swimming,  and  other  activities 
which  fitted  the  glove  of  our  club 
name. 

Then,  out  of  one  of  those  spring 
clear  blue  skies  one  day,  Becky, 
who  lived  directly  above  us  in  the 
same  front  flat  and  now,  at  16,  was 
finishing  her  first  year  at  Walton 
High,  was  about  to  pass  me  as  I 
was  standing  on  the  stoop  of  our 
building.  Usually  she'd  say  hello 
and  continue  on  her  jaunty  way. 


But  today,  with  three  books  un- 
der her  arm  and  apparently  in  no 
hurry  to  rush  to  the  library,  she 
stopped  short  after  saying,  "Hello, 
David." 

I  returned  her  hello  and  she 
smiled  one  of  her  rare  smiles. 

Becky  looked  into  my  eyes  and  I 
couldn't  help  noticing  for  the  first 
time  that  she  had  brown  buttons  in 
hers. 

"The  Blue  Jays  are  going  to  hold 
an  outing.  Would  you  care  to 
come?" 

I  was  lost  for  words  and  the  best 
I  could  say,  after  I  caught  up  with 

my  tongue,  was,  "When  is  it?" 

"Two  weeks  from  this  Sunday. 
We're  planning  to  ride  over  to  the 
Hudson,  cross  over  on  the  125th 
Street  ferry  and  then  hike  up  the 
Palisades." 

"That's  not  bad,"  I  remember 
saying.  "Who  else  is  going  along?  I 
mean  from  the  Spartans." 

She  replied  she  didn't  know  but 
she  would  find  out;  she  was  sure 
some  of  my  crowd  would  be  accom- 
panying some,  if  not  all,  of  the  Blue 

Jays. 

I  told  her  I'd  let  her  know  as 
soon  as  she  learned  what  girls  were 
going  with  whom. 

About  a  week  later  she  paused 
again  on  the  stoop,  long  enough  to 
convey  the  information  that  at  least 
six  of  The  Spartans  had  agreed  to 
go  along  with  as  many  Blue  Jays.  I 
would  be  the  seventh,  she  said,  and 
I  then  and  there  gave  her  my  de- 
cision to  be  her  escort. 

"Thanks,  David,"  she  chirped. 
"I'll  be  seeing  you,"  and  off  she 
went,  clicking  her  heels  to  a  merry 
tune,  her  buttocks  taking  on  a  sud- 
den bounce  as  she  headed  arm-lad- 
en with  books  for  the  library  near- 
by. 


Becky  had  prepared  the  sand- 
wiches and  extras  so  there  was  noth- 
ing I  had  to  concern  myself  with 
on  the  day  of  the  maiden  date  with 
my  upstairs  neighbor.  By  this  time 
most  of  the  Spartans  had  collected 
in  front  of  the  Union  Settlement, 
less  than  a  handful  not  going  along 
for  one  reason  or  another. 

On  the  way  to  the  Palisades  out- 
ing grounds  we  sang  songs  that 
were  the  favorites  of  the  day,  told 
stories  like,  "Did'ja  hear  the  other 
day  about  so-and-so  getting  pinched 
for  stealing?  And  did  you  hear  the 
one  about  the  fella  who  sat  on  top 
of  a  flag  pole  for  a  week  and  when 
he  came  down  his  wife  told  him  to 
go  fly  a  kite?"  Some  of  the  boys 
talked  about  the  Yanks  and  the 
Giants  while  the  girls  talked  about 
Francis  K.  Bushman,  Maurice  Cos- 
tello,  and  John  Barrymore  as  the 
men  they'd  like  to  marry.  It  was 
things  that  were  uppermost  in  our 
minds  that  helped  us  while  away 
the  time  and  boredom  of  traveling. 

Finally,  after  a  few  miles  of  hik- 
ing, we  made  the  camping  and  play- 
ground sector,  immediately  digging 
into  the  food  packs  to  dispose  of 
our  hunger  pangs.  The  sandwiches 
and  thermos  of  lemonade  and  or- 
angeade were  a  delight  to  our  starv- 
ing stomachs  and  after  we  were  all 
smiles  again  someone  suggested, 
"Let's  play  a  game." 

I  was  for  playing  a  game  of  ball, 
but  stupidly,  us  Spartans  overlook- 
ed the  bringing  of  a  rubber  or  soft 
ball.  So,  when  one  of  the  girls, 
amorous-minded,  to  say  the  least, 
suggsted,  "Let's  spin  the  bottle," 
Abe  Shapiro,  my  closest  friend, 
came  up  with  a  pop  bottle  and 
didn't  lose  any  time  getting  the 
game  going. 

As  much  as  I  hoped  that  when  it 
came  my  turn  my  spin  would  point 
Becky,  or  her  spin  would  point  to 
me,  it  never  happened.  Joe  Benson 
and  Rudy  Clark  were  lucky  in  that 
way  and  all  Becky  would  permit 


was  a  pucker  on  the  cheek.  Like- 
wise, when  it  came  her  turn  to  take 
over  the  bottle,  a  non-Spartan  was 
the  lucky  fella  to  be  bussed  on  the 
forehead. 

It  was  happy  the  way  Becky  acted, 
believing  she  was  saving  the  real 
kiss  on  the  lips  for  me.  But  I  was 
sadly  disappointed,  for  when  we 
said  goodbye,  I  for  the  first  time 
taking  her  to  her  very  door,  she 
shook  my  hand,  standing  her  dis- 
tance, and  I  said,  "Thanks  for  ev- 
erything." 

She  left  me  with  a  smile  I  still 
remember,  a  certain  light  glowing 
from  her  eyes,  and  I  felt  then  and 
there  that  she  liked  me,  for  I  cer- 
tainly liked  her  and  admired  every- 
thing about  her. 

It  was  some  time  later,  I  don't 
remember  just  when,  that  Becky 
again  invited  me  to  be  her  date, 
this  time  on  a  picnic  to  Van  Court- 
land  Park.  The  faces  weren't  the 
same  in  the  group  that  went  along 
for  a  day  of  ball-playing,  boating 
and  singing.  Abe  Shapiro  came  with 
Stella  Adler,  with  whom  he  had 
gone  to  the  movies  several  times> 
now  that  he  was  working,  like  my- 
self, and  in  a  position  to  spend  the 
cost  of  an  extra  admission  with  a 
soda  afterwards  at  the  corner  store. 

Both  Abe  and  I  had  clerical  jobs 
in  the  same  company.  1  got  mine 
by  answering  an  ad  in  the  Times 
and  then  brought  Abe  in  when  my 
superior  said  he  could  use  an  extra 
hand. 

Well,  anyway,  Abe  was  dating 
Stella,  but  I  was  saving  my  money. 

I  don't  know  if  I  had  the  courage 
to  ask  Becky  to  go  out  with  me.  She 
was  always  so  much  in  a  hurry,  like 
a  fireball  headed  for  a  target,  that 
I  just  didn't  think  it  proper  to  stop 
her  and  ask  her  if  she'd  like  to  see 
this  movie  or  that,  or  attend  thai 
concert  or  see  a  certain  play  on 
Broadway. 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  32} 


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Hosiery  Mills 


Manufacturers  of 

INFANTS  AND  CHILDREN'S  HOSIERY 
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PILOT 


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The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


American  Notables 

Major  Alfred  Mordecai 

!  1854 

Conscientious  Objector 

By  HasTY  Simomhof  f 


If  AERY  SIMONHOFF 


In  the  early  years  of  the  strug- 
gling republic,  many  Jewish  vol- 
unteers enlisted  in  the  armed  forces. 
Some  rose  from  the  ranks  and  at- 
tained the  rank  of  Colonel.  But 
after  the  wars  each  soldier,  as  he 
was  mustered  out,  went  back  readily 
to  his  btisiness  or  occupation.  With 
the  possible  exception  of  Samuel 
Noah,  the  first  Jew  to  choose  the 
army  as  a  life  profession  was  Major 
Alfred  Mordecai;  and  he  might 
have  reached  the  rank  of  Major 
General  if  conscience  had  not  in- 
terfered. 

Born  in  1804  in  North  Carolina, 
Alfred  grew  up  care  free  and  well 
adjusted  in  Warrenton  near  the 
Virginia  border  and  remained  there 
until  1819.  His  father,  Jacob  Mor- 
decai, owned  and  operated  the 
famous  Warrenton  Female  Semi- 
nary. Disqualified  from  attending  a 
a  girls'  school,  Alfred  nevertheless 
managed  to  pick  up  from  the 
teaching  staff,  chiefly  his  own 
family,  sufficient  education  to  read 
ancient  classics  in  the  original  Latin 
and  Greek.  Grounded  in  history, 
geography,  French,  mathematics, 
and  literature,  he  was  perhaps  the 
best  prepared  cadet  when  admitted 
to  West  Point  in  this  15th  year. 

Graduating  first  in  his  class,  he 
was  detailed  as  assistant  professor 
at  the  U.  S.  Military  Academy  until 
relieved  several  years  later  to  be- 
come assistant  engineer  in  the  con- 
struction of  Fortress  Monroe  in 
Virginia  and  Fort  Calhoun  at  Nor- 
folk. On  completion  he  was  ap- 
pointed assistant  to  the  Chief  En- 
gineer of  the  U.  S.  Army  and  de- 
tailed to  construct  ballistic  pen- 
dulums. Made  asistant  inspector  of 
arsenals,  he  had  three  under  his 
direct  charge.  In  command  of  the 


Washington  arsenal,  he  was  raised 
to  the  rank  of  Major  for  meri- 
torious service  in  the  line  oi  duty 
during  the  Mexican  War. 

The  War  Department  considered 
Major  Mordecai  more  than  a  hard- 
working, efficient  officer.  He  was 
sent  on  a  mission  that  required 
penetration,  boldness,  and  honesty 
in  the  investigation  of  a  delicate 
issue  that  involved  good  relations 
between  governments.  As  part  of  the 
peace  treaty,  Mexico  agreed  to  pay 
American  citizens  in  her  territories 
such  of  their  losses  as  grew  out  of 
the  war.  The  Mexican  government 
had  paid  out  under  protest  an  ex- 
orbitant claim  which  it  was  now 
seeking  to  recover.  Alfred  Mordecai 
received  the  assignment  to  adjust 
this  claim.  He  went  into  the  wilds 
of  Mexico  and  made  a  report  which 
recommended  the  repayment  oi 
$500,000.  The  U.  S.  Government 
approved  Mordecai's  recommenda- 
tion and  paid  this  amount  to 
Mexico. 

When  the  Crimean  War  broke 
out,  Major  Mordecai  was  sent 
over  as  an  observer  together  with 
Capt.  George  B.  McCellan,  later 
to  become  the  top  ranking  com- 
mander of  the  Union  forces  in  the 
Civil  War  and  the  opponent  of 
President  Lincoln  in  the  1864 
campaign.  The  capable  but  reac- 
tionary Nicholas  I  Czar  of  all  the 
Russias  is  said  to  have  received 
the  American-Jewish  officer  at  a 
private  conference.  Mordecai's  ob- 
servations in  Europe  during  the 
war  in  Crimea  were  published  by 
order  of  Congress  in  the  Senate 
Executive  Document  No.  60. 

The  fates  had  been  singularly 
kind  to  Alfred  Mordecai.  Hand- 
some in  person,  with  the  social 


graces  and  easy  manner  derived 
of  a  refined  and  cultured  family 
well  integrated  in  its  milieu,  he 
never  knew  any  discriminations  in 
the  society  of  the  military  caste. 
As  a  student  in  West  Point  all  ref- 
erences to  religion,  except  in  philo- 
sophic discourse,  were  studiously 
avoided  by  his  class  mates.  More- 
oxer,  he  was  happily  married  and 
father  of  a  family.  His  peace  time 
services  packed  with  achievement 
were  recorded  and  reflected  in  the 
numerous  tracts,  digests,  manuals, 
and  reports  he  wrote  on  military 
and  scientific  techniques.  Secure  in 
the  estimate  of  his  superiors  as  an 
officer  of  high  merit  and  uncom- 
mon ability,  his  future  seemed 
bright  with  honors  and  promo- 
tions. 

But  his  sky  became  darkened  by 
the  same  clouds  that  overcast  the 
United  States  and  soon  broke  into 
a  furious  storm.  Like  many  another 
soldier  or  civilian,  Major  Mor- 
decai found  himself  in  the  quan- 
dary of  conflicting  loyalties  between 
his  State  and  the  Federal  Union. 
No  believer  in  secession,  he  never- 
theless could  not  force  himself  to 
shower  death  and  destruction  upon 
his  native  state,  the  home  of  his 
happy  childhood  and  adolescence. 
He  could  find  no  other  alternative 
than  to  resign  his  commission  and 
remain  in  Philadelphia.  Thus 
ended  suddenly  the  labors  of  a 
lifetime,  filled  with  valuable  mili- 
tary experience. 

After  a  career  of  42  years  in 
the  army,  the  Major  found  himself 
out  of  a  job.  Raising  a  family  on 
officer's  pay  hardly  left  much  re- 
serve in  the  savings  bank.  He  needed 
work,  but  at  57  good  jobs  are  not 
easily  obtained.  His  daughters  were 


teachers.  So  the  father  also  man- 
aged to  get  work  teaching  mathe- 
matics. Their  combined  salaries  en- 
abled the  family  to  maintain  their 
accustomed  living  standard. 

But  Allied  Mordecai  had  too 
much  ability  and  personality  to 
remain  in  eclipse.  He  was  offered 
by  the  Mexico  and  Pacific  Ralroad 
a  position  as  engineer  in  the  con- 
si  ruction  of  trunk  lines  from  Vera 
Cruz  to  Mexico  City  thence  to  the 
Pacific.  In  Mexico  he  lived  without 
hs  family,  moving  chiefly  in  the 
society  of  Confederate  expatriates. 
With  several  former  army  officers, 
he  was  presented  at  Court  to 
Maximilian  and  Carlotta,  the  ilt 
starred  Emperor  and  Empress  ot 
Mexico.  He  returned  to  Philadel- 
phia in  1867  and  for  the  next  20 
years  held  down  the  important 
position  of  Treasurer  and  Secretary 
of  Canal  and  Coal  Companies  con- 
trolled by  the  Pennsylvania  Rail- 
road. 

One  cannot  escape  t he  conclusion 
that  Major  Alfred  Mordecai's 
honest  scruples  cost  him  a  place  in 
American  history.  Few  professional 
soldiers  were  better  equipped  _  for 
high  service  when  tTie  Civil  War 
started.  Of  the  vintage  of  Lee  and 
Grant  and  as  well  trained,  he  could 
have  made  his  mark  on  either  side 
of  the  conflict.  His  less  sensitive  son 
and  namesake  joined  the  Union 
forces  in  1861  and  died  a  general. 
Alfred  Mordecai  is  forgotten.  And 
yel  he  might  have  been  mentioned 
in  the  same  breath  with  Philip 
Sheridan  and  Stonewall  Jackson, 
with  William  Sherman  and  Joseph 
Johnston.  Like  all  conscientious 
objectors,  he  was  a  victim  of  prin- 
ciple. To  him  applies  the  German 
maxim:  idealism  destroys. 


i6 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


How  a  NEWSPAPER 
Can  CURE  ULCERS 


■  ■  ■ 


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S     •     SUNSETS     •     SPORT  SHIRTS 


Virginia-North  uufolina  Representative 
MELVIN  LITCH 


South  Carolina  Representative 
IRVING  L.  ROBINSON 


Georgia  Representative 
HENRY  POSNER 


Alabama  Representative       Mississippi-Tennessee  Representative 
PETER  HURTIG  MELVIN  FURCHGOTT 


BIG-DAD 

Matching 
Twill  pants 
and 
Shirts  — 
Ivy  Pants — 
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Originals   —  Sportswear 
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Suzy   Jane  Originals 
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*7 


roan  nsiD  m 


Famous  Fashions  Labels  in  the  South 


Extend  Sincere  Greetings  To  Their  Many  Friends 


VZf^     REG.  U.S.PAT.  OFF. 


New  York  Show  Room  1350  Broadway 

JOE  McCREARY,  Representative 


New  York  Show  Room  1350  Broadway 

JOE  WEINTRAUB,  Representative 


juniors 


New  York  Show  Room  1350  Broadway 

ARTIE  GOLDMAN,  Representative 


New  York  Show  Rooms  1350  Broadway 

MAC  KAPLAN  and  JACK  NEWMAN,  Representatives 


New  York  Show  Room  1350  Broadway 

ARCHIE  KOTTLER,  Representative 


///oc/em 


New  York  Show  Room  1350  Broadway 

JOE  WEINTRAUB,  Representative 


i8 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


4 'America's  Fastest  Selling  Junior  Dresses" 


Shown  In  The  South 

by  JAKE  CAUSEY 


To  the  many  friends  we  have  already  made,  and  to  those  whose  friend- 
ship we  are  yet  to  earn,  we  extend  our  sincere  greetings  for  a 
very  happy  New  Year 


by  Ruth  Originals 


Dial  OX  2-1463 
2029  Asheville  Hwy. 
Hendersonville,  N.  C. 


Ruth  Originals 
Corporation 

Manufacturers  of  Children's  Dresses 


New  York  Show  Rooms : 

373  Fifth  Avenue 
New  York  Tel.  MU  3-3924 


SILVER'S 


5c,  10c  and  $1.00  STORES 

Owned  and  Operated  By 

H.  L.  GREEN  CO.,  INC. 

Stores  Located  in  the  Following  Cities: 

-  ■ 

DURHAM,  N.  C.  COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 

GREENSBORO.  N.  C.  GREENVILLE,  S.  C. 

WILMINGTON,  N.  C.  CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 

WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C.  SPARTANBURG,  S.  C. 


Fredrickson 
Motor  Express  Corp. 

"Serving  North  Carolina" 


Home  Office 
CHARLOTTE,  NORTH  CAROLINA 
PHONE  FR:  6-3661 


"BROTHERHOOD" — (A  LIVING  EXAMPLE  OF  THE  GOLDEN  RULE— 
J.  C.  Penney,  noted  merchant,  for  whom  his  stores  throughout  the  country 
are  named,  discussing  his  favorite  topic  with  Seymour  (Cy)  Messitte,  TIMES- 
OUTLOOK  Associate  Editor. 


EDITORIALS 

(Concluded  from  Page  5) 

and  as  a  consequence  it  would  be  perfectly  consistent  to  give 
B'nai  B'rith  members  preference.  Whereas,  heretofore  it  had 
been  unnecessary  to  grade  the  applications,  now  it  is  apparent- 
ly urgent  that  all  those  who  are  attending  because  the  cost  is 
relatively  low  for  a  "vacation,"  or  who  have  any  other  motive 
than  a  genuine  interest  in  the  program,  be  eliminated  in  order 
that  those  who  are  entitled  to  attend  may  do  so  in  comfort. 
.  -  .."We ;  assume  that  the  problem  will  be  recognized  by  the 
Adult  Education  Department  of  B'nai  B'rith,  and  others  di- 
rectly concerned,  and  a  solution  worked  out. 

The  answer  will  be  awaited  with  considerable  interest. 


Lineberry  Foundry 
&  Machine  Co. 

INCORPORATED 


Woodwork  Cutters        •       High  Speed  Router  Bits 
Milled  to  Pattern  Knives 
COMPLETE  CATALOGS  ON  REQUEST 


NORTH  WILKESBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


19 


F//?e  Fabrics  Since  1813 


SYNTHETICS  DIVISION  EXECUTIVE  OFFICES 
GREENSBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


Something  yon  don't  forget . . , 


EXECUTIVE  OFFICES:  GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


WE  BELIEVE 

IN  YOUR  JUDGMENT 


COMPARE  PET  WITH  ANY  OTHER 


NOW! 

AT  YOUR  LOCAL  MARKET 

Golden  Kosher 

POULTRY 

The  finest  strictly  kosher  poultry  obtainable.  Government 
inspected,  dressed  weekly,  and  quick  frozen.  Oven  ready 
- — no  more  cleaning  necessary. 

"FOR  THOSE  WHO  PREFER  THE  FINEST" 

DEALERS  CONTACT 

WALLACE  KOSHER  FOODS  521  E.  Trade  St. 

Dial  ED  2-6970  CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


20 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


9  Cylinder  High  Speed 

Slasher  for  all  type  yarns 


~~~ ~    High  Speed  Rayon  Slashers 

—     High  Speed  Section  Beam  Warpers  for  Cotton   

High  Speed  Spindle  Driven  Warpers  for  Rayon 

High  Speed  Balling  Warpers   

High  Speed  Tricot  Warpers 
High  Speed  Narrow  Fabric  Warpers 


—      High  Speed  Heavy  Duty  Collecting  Beamers 

High  Speed  Light  Collecting  Beamers 
_     High  Speed  Warpers  for  Dye  Beams 

  Magazine  Cone  Creels  for  Cotton  and  Rayon 

Special  Creels 
Warp  Gassing  Machines 
_____     Warp  Dyeing  Machines 
— —     Special  Warp  Handling  Equipment 


Stainless  Steel  Cylinders  and  Vats 
for  All  Textile  Purposes 

Stainless  Steel  Cooking  and 
Storage  Kettles 

Nemo  Jet  Cooker 


Also  Contract  Machine  and 
Stainless  Steel  Work 


A  Visit  With  Justice  Frankfurter 

By  Murray  Frank 

has  been  serving  longer  —  by  one 
year. 

Approximately  a  half  year  ago, 
Justice  Frankfurter  suffered  a  mild 
heart  attack  and  withdrew  from 
active  participation  in  the  delib- 
erations of  the  Court.  He  recovered 
quickly,  however,  and  returned  to 
his  judicial  duties.  There  were 
rumors  at  the  time  that  Justice 
Frankfurter  intended  to  resign  his 
position  on  the  Supreme  Court  and 
withdraw  from  public  life  because 
of  his  age  and  health.  A  number 
of  months  have  elapsed  and  Justice 
Frankfurter  is  still  serving  actively 
on  the  bench.  There  have  also  been 
unofficial  reports  that  Justice 
Frankfurter  has  substantially  cur- 
tailed his  activities  both  in  public 
life  and  on  the  Court. 

We  were  therefore  happy  to  have 
the  opportunity  of  visiting  and 
talking  with  Justice  Frankfurter, 
together  with  the  Farband  delega- 
tion. The  presentation  of  the  Far- 
band  Award  took  place  in  Justice 
Frankfurter's  chambers  in  the 
Supreme  Court  Building  on  Thurs- 
day, June  25th  at  4  p.  m. 

Present  were  Louis  Segal,  Gener- 
al Secretary  of  the  Farband,  Harold 
Grubart,  Treasurer,  Sam  Berke, 
Chairman  of  the  Finance  and  In- 
vestment Committee,  Saul  Kies, 
member  of  the  General  Executive 


MURRAY  FRANK 

It  was  recently  my  pleasure  to 
be  present  at  a  most  interesting 
event  in  Washington,  D.  C.  I  am 
referring  to  the  presentation  of  the 
second  Annual  Farband  Labor 
Zionist  Order  Award  for  distin- 
guished public  service  to  Justice 
Felix  Frankfurter. 

Justice  Frankfurter  is  now  the 
only  Jew  on  the  high  bench  and 
he  is  also  the  only  Justice  who  is 
directly  descended  from  immigrant 
parents.  Moreover,  Justice  Frank- 
furter is  now  the  oldest  member 
of  the  Supreme  Court,  having 
reached  the  age  of  76  last  Novem- 
ber. He  was  appointed  to  the  high 
tribunal  by  President  Franklin 
Delano  Roosevelt  in  January,  1939, 
and  has  thus  completed  over  20 
years  of  service  on  the  Supreme 
Court.  Only  Justice  Hugo  Black 


Congress  of  Motor  Hotels 

TRAVEL  GUIDE 


by    BILL  ROAME  R 


The   newest   and   largest   resort  motel  in 
Miami  is  the  APACHE,  a  truly  wonderful  spot. 
All  the  luxury  of  an  ocean-front  hotel.  It  features 
an    Olympic   swimming  pool, 
a  putting  green,  a  kiddy  play- 
land,    and    an  exotic  cocktail 
lounge  with  nightly  entertain- 
ment. Accommodations  are  su- 
perb,  rooms   individually  air- 
conditioned,  and  the  rates  are 
right.  I  heartily  recommend  the 


Apache  Resort  Motel 


COCKER  :m .a. chine  &  foundry  co. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


2  1 


Committee  and  Samuel  Lapin, 
Assistant  Secretary.  The  delegation 
was  joined  also  by  Kopel  Wein- 
stein  and  David  Shoirif,  Chairman 
and  Secretary  respectively  of  the 
Farband  Council  in  Washington, 
D.  C.  The  present  writer  was  the 
only  representative  of  the  press. 

Justice  Frankfurter  approached 
each  member  of  the  delegation  in- 
dividually with  a  warm  handshake 
and  with  a  personal  greeting.  After 
a  brief  general  discussion,  we 
proceed  to  the  presentation  of  the 
Award. 

Louis  Segal  was  the  spokesman 
for  the  delegation.  Mr.  Segal  stated 
that  the  Farband  considered  it  an 
honor  to  present  the  second  An- 
nual Farband  Award  to  Justice 
Frankfurter  in  the  name  of  the 
36,000  members  of  the  organization 
and  their  families. 

"We  of  the  Farband,"  Mr.  Segal 
declared,  "have  always  believed  that 
loyalty  to  the  Jewish  people  does 
not  detract  from  our  role  as  Ameri- 
cans. On  the  contrary,  we  have 
always  felt  that  the  Jew  who  is 
devoted  to  the  traditions  of  his 
people  and  to  its  aspirations  en- 
hances his  contribution  to  Ameri- 
ca as  a  whole." 

All  eyes  were  turned  to  Justice 
Frankfurter.  He  listened  intently 
to  Mr.  Segal's  remarks  and  was 
visibly  in  agreement  with  Mr. 
Segal's  statement  regarding  the 
Jewish  role  as  Americans.  Mr.  Segal 
then  pointed  out  that  "the  truth 


of  this  principle  is  exemplified  by 
the  life  of  Felix  Frankfurter.  The 
Jewish  people,"  he  concluded,  "is 
proud  that  Felix  Frankfurter,  to- 
gether with  Justice  Louis  D. 
Brandeis  and  others,  was  one  of 
the  pioneers  of  the  Zionist  move- 
ment in  the  United  States  and 
helped  pave  the  way  for  the  estab- 
lishment of  the  State  of  Israel.  As 
a  Jewish  organization  rooted  in 
American  life,  we  have  long  ad- 
mired Justice  Frankfurter  as  an 
American,  as  a  Jew,  and  as  a  great 
judge." 

Mr.  Segal  then  gave  Justice 
Frankfurter  a  bronze  plaque  with 
the  following  inscription: 

"Farband  Labor  Zionist  Order 
Award  presented  to  Justice  Felix 
Frankfurter  who  embodies  the 
highest  democratic  ideals  of  the 
American  and  Jewish  traditions: 
who  exemplifies  the  Jewish  unity 
of  law  and  ethics:  and  combines, 
in  his  outstanding  service  as  a 
justice  of  the  United  States  Su- 
preme Court,  rare  humanitarian- 
ism  with  profound  legal  erudition." 

As  Mr.  Segal  began  to  read  the 
citation  on  the  plaque,  Justice 
Frankfurter  rose.  It  was  evident 
that  he  was  deeply  moved  by  the 
Award.  There  was  silence  for  a 
moment  while  the  delegation  waited 
eagerly  for  Justice  Frankfurter's 
response.  During  the  interval,  we 
observed  the  famous  jurist.  Short 
of  stature  but  agile  and  active,  it 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  110) 


Just  Right  for  Fall! 

Blue  Gem  Pedal  Pushers 
and  Bermuda  Shorts! 


Boxer  Longies  &  Dungarees,  too! 

Now  for  the  Fall  fashions,  you  can  buy 
Blue  Gem  "tailored-to -fit"  Pedal  Pusher's 
and  Bermuda  Shorts  in  a  variety  of  colors. 

Also,    a    full    assortment    of    jeans  and 
dungarees     re  available  for  the  youngsters: 
regulars  or  westerns;   popular  colors.  Size- 
right   fit   in   Sanforized   materials.    Comfor-  > 
table.  Lon?  wearing.  t 

For  a   Tkue   Value— Look  for   Blue  Gem 
always.   Blue   Gem   work   and   play    clothes  ' 
have  satisfied  millions  for  20  years.  Buy  at 
your  favorite  store,  or  write  to* 

BLUE  GEM  MFG.  CO.,  Home  Office:  Greensboro,  N.C. 

NEW  YORK:  SUITE  5524,  EMPIRE  STATE  BLDG.  •  Factories  at  Greensboro,  Asheboro,  Stoneville,  N.C. 


NEW 


from  E  Lorillard  Company 

first  with  the  finest  cigarettes 
through  Lorillard  Research! 


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Greetings 


R.  H.  Bouli 

INCORPORATED 

ELECTRICAL 
CONTRACTOR 


433  West  Morehead  Dial  ED  4-6831 

Charlotte,  North  Carolina 


22 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Franklin-Suffolk,  Va. 


NEW 


Vaughan  &  Co. 

Bankers 


FRANKLIN,  VIRGINIA 


Established  1886 


HAPPY  NEW  YEAR 


NATIONAL  BANK  OF  SUFFOLK 

ESTABLISHED  1899 


Main  Office 
Washington  &  Main 


SUFFOLK,  VA. 


West  End  Branch 
Washington  &  Bosley 


Member  Federal  Deposit  Insurance  Corporation 
Federal  Reserve  System 


AMERICAN 

Bank  &  Trust  Co. 

Suffolk,  Virginia 


NEW  YEAR 
GREETINGS 


Vaughan  &  Co.,  Bankers 

A  Franklin  Success  Story 


C.  C.  Vaughan,  III 
President 


4k 


C.  C.  Vaughan,  Sr. 

The  growth  ol  an  industry,  a 
business,  or  a  financial  institution 
is  always  a  fascinating  evidence  of 
the  opportunities  that  exist  under 
our  democratic  way  of  life.  The  re- 
ward is  awaiting  those  who  have 
the  foresight  and  the  energy  to  ap- 
ply sound  business  principles. 

Franklin,  Virginia  has  such  an 
institution  in  Vaughan  &  Co., 
Bankers. 

Vaughan  and  Company,  Bankers, 
of  Franklin,  today  has  about  $10,- 
000,000  assets  and  a  brand  new 
home.  It  was  not  always  so.  When 
it  opened  for  business  in  1886  its 
assets  were  $20,000. 

The  new  building  on  Franklin's 
Main  Street  welcomed  the  public 
for  business  for  the  first  time  May 
25th. 

Included  in  the  new  building  is 
8,250  square  feet  of  floor  space 
upstairs  and  3,250  in  the  basement. 
This  compares  with  1,800  square 
feet  in  the  old  building  at  100 
North  Main  Street. 

The  new  building  is  designed  so 


C.  C.  Vaughan,  Jr. 

a  second  floor  can  be  easily  added 
should  it  become  necessary.  Plenty 
of  free  parking  space,  a  drive-in 
tellers'  window  and  a  night  depos- 
itory are  features  of  the  new  bank. 

The  outside  walls  of  white  Geor- 
gia marble  and  the  inside  walls  of 
walnut  panelling  are  indicative  of 
some  of  the  best  of  modern  bank- 
ing architecture. 

Hi-Fi  music  plays  over  amplifi- 
ers in  the  daytime  hours  and  the 
employees  have  a  special  lounge 
of  their  own  at  their  convenience. 

C.  C.  Vaughan  III  is  president 
of  Vaughan  and  Company,  Bank- 
ers. His  grandfather,  C.  C.  Vaugh- 
an, started  the  bank  in  1886  from 
the  original  Bank  of  Franklin,  or- 
ganized in  1882  with  Vaughan  as 
one  of  its  directors.  He  was  presi- 
dent until  1924,  when  his  son,  Gen- 
eral C.  C.  Vaughan,  Jr.,  took  over 
al  his  death.  C.  C.  Vaughan,  III 
became  president  in  1929  when  the 
General,  his  father,  died. 

Clifford  A.  Cutchins  III,  a  great- 
grandson  of  the  bank's  founder,  is 
now  vice-president  and  cashier. 


The  New  Vaughan  Bank  Building 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


23 


Zalman  Schneour 

Poet  of  a  Great  Epoch 

By  Itzhak  Ivry 


Literary  historians  of  the  He- 
brew renaissance  period  have 
classified  Zalman  Schneour  as  one 
of  the  Big  Three  in  Hebrew 
poetry,  together  with  Bialik  and 
Tchernichovsky.  Although  the 
three  poets  were  basically  different 
in  talents,  inclinations  and  creative 
patterns,  it  may  rightly  be  said 
that  since  Bialik's  and  Tcher- 
nichovsky's  demise.  Schneour  felt 
like  the  last  Mohican.  A  poet  with 
a  g  eat  sense  of  pride,  he  felt 
lonely  when  his  greatest  competi- 
tors left  the  stage. 

In  moments  of  quiet  reflection 
the  poet  must  have  said:  Give 
me  back  the  bright  and  shining 
moments  of  Odessa,  Warsaw,  Vilno 
;;nd  Belli:.-:,  :  ;;t  because  he  Yearned 
for  these  strange  and  desolate 
towns  whose  Jewish  population 
has  since  been  decimated  and  their 
cultural  monuments  destroyed,  but 
because  these  moments  meant  a 
period  of  ascendency,  a  period  of 


novel  and  memorable  creativity, 
not  only  for  him  but  also  for  his 
close  friends.  One  of  them  was 
Bialik,  whom  Schneour  unreserved- 
ly admired.  It  was  Bialik  who  first 
declared  in  his  famous  essay  "Our 
Young  Poetry:"  "And  here  is 
Schneour,  a  young  Samson,  whose 
all  seven  braids  grew  over  night,  a 
young  lion.  .  ."  This  was  Bialik's 
immediate  reaction  to  Schneour's 
first  poems  of  youth,  and  this  re- 
mained very  dear  to  Schneour's 
heart. 

Schneour,  a  man  of  keen  psycho- 
logical insight,  knew  well  —  when 

he  reached  his  seventies  —  that  "a 
generation  comes,"  and  that  you 
cannot  blame  the  young  too  much 
for  considering  the  poets  and  artists 
of  the  older  generation  as  belong- 
ing to  the  past.  He,  the  poet  of 
youth,  of  'Sturm  und  Drang,'  of 
passion  and  hedonism:  he.  the  rev- 
olutionary   and    lighter,    the  ad- 


mirer of  the  titans  and  the  super- 
man, suddenly  found  himself  in 
his  old  days  somewhat  neglected 
and  glossed  over,  especially  by 
youthful  and  inconsiderate  critics 
who  thought  that  there  was  no 
better  way  to  be  revolutionary  than 
to  belittle  the  greats  of  the  near 
past.  In  the  last  years  of  his  life 
Schneour,  who  always  took  pride 
in  his  mental  and  physical  prowess, 
was  also  beset  by  ill  health.  But 
he  bore  his  sufferings  with  pride 
and  courage,  and  to  his  last  day 
he  never  bent  his  head  to  late.  He 
departed  from  this  world  at 
seventy-two-still  a  young  lion. 

He  was  born  at  Shklov,  Russia, 
in  1887,  in  a  family  of  'Habad' 
Hassidim  and  scholars.  In  his  auto- 
biographical memoirs,  "My  Begin- 
nings as  a  Writer,"  Schneour  re- 
calls that  at  the  age  of  seven  or 
eight  years  he  began  to  write  poems 
in  Hebrew  and  Yiddish.  He  wrote 
not  only  poetry  but  also  prose, 
fables  and  "thoughts."  He  was  four- 
teen years  old  when  he  left  home 
and  came  to  Odessa,  which  was 
then  a  center  of  Hebrew  and  Yid- 
dish renaissance  literature,  and 
where  such  young  poets  as  Bialik 
and    Schneour    came    under  the 


strong  influence  of  Mendele.  Two 
years  later  Schneour  left  for  an- 
other literary  center  of  these  days, 
Warsaw,  and  published  his  first 
1  lebrew  and  Yiddish  poems  in 
Olam  Katan  and  in  the  Viddishe 
f'olkszeitung.  For  a  while  he 
worked  lor  the  Tushia  Hebrew 
Publishing  House  and  later  he  be- 
came J.  L.  Peretz'  private  sec- 
retary,  and  also  participated  in 
David  Frischman's  Hador.  Schneour 
wrote  his  wonderful  poem  "Vilno" 
in  the  period  of  his  stay  in  this 
city  (1904-0(1). 

In  the  years  1906-07  his  first 
books  of  poems  appeared;  the  first 
was  "Children's  Poems"  and  the 
second  was  "At  Sunset."  The  poet- 
wanderer  Schneour  left  in  1906 
lor  Western  Europe.  First  he  went 
to  Switzerland,  where  he  began  his 
poem  "In  the  Mountains."  From 
there  lie  went  to  Paris,  where  he 
studied  the  natural  sciences,  phi- 
losophy and  literature  at  the  Sor- 
bonne  University.  In  1914  a  volume 
<>l  his  poems,  written  during  a 
period  of  fourteen  years,  was  pub- 
lished in  Odessa.  A  few  years  earlier 
he  had  published  some  of  his  short 
stories. 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  106) 


4& 


24 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


TO  W1D  row 


Greetings 


EMPIRE 

Furniture  Corp. 

Manufacturers  of 

BED  ROOM  —  LIVING  ROOM 
am/ 

DINING  ROOM 
FURNITURE 


JOHNSON  CITY,  TENNESSEE 


Cochrane 

Furniture  Company,  Inc. 

★ 
*  ★ 


Manufacturers  of 

MAPLE  DINING  ROOM 
OCCASIONAL  FURNITURE 

★  ★ 
★ 


Our  People  In  Europe 

By  Jack  H.  Gordun 


Telephone  REgent  5-5431 


LINCOLNTON,  N.  C. 


About  two  miles  and  a  quarter 
east  of  Geneva  is  a  little  village 
called  Veyrier.  It  is  on  a  small  hill 
nestled  in  the  valley  on  the  Swiss- 
French  border,  and  customs  officials 
of  both  countries  patrol  it  con- 
stantly. 

You  can  reach  Veyrier  by  going 
to  the  large  cafe  in  the  square  in 
Geneva  and  taking  a  number  eight 
bus;  the  price  is  forty  centimes  or 
about  nine  and  one  half  cents. 

A  friend  of  ours  drove  my  wife 
and  me  to  the  Cafe  du  Mont-Saleve 
for  dinner  one  night.  It  is  on  the 
very  tip  of  Veyrier.  Though  it  was 
night,  the  moon  lit  up  the  entire 
area  and  we  could  see  clearly  for 
miles  about. 

"If  you  look  straight  ahead,"  my 
friend  pointed,  'you  can  see  the 
old  Jewish  cemetery  there  in 
France."  Several  markers  were 
plainly  visible  in  the  distance. 

"There  is  an  Interesting  story 
about  that,"  my  friend  continued. 
"That  graveyard  was  used  as  a  sort 
of  escape  hatch  during  the  war. 
So  many  Jews  and  political  enemies 
of  the  Nazis  hid  there  and,  at  night, 
when  the  moon  was  not  so  bright 
as  this  one,  they  would  run  through 
a  Nazi  cordon  stationed  here  as 
guards.  See  the  customs  officials 
there?  Well,  the  French  ones  along 
the  road  beyond  were  then  replaced 
by  machine-gunning  Nazis." 

He  took  a  deep  breath,  waiting 
for  all  this  to  sink  in,  before  he 
completed  his  story.  "You  know  the 
owner  of  Mont-Saleve  would  know 
something  about  it.  He  was  a  mem- 
ber of  the  underground  that  helped 
arrange  all  this." 

"What's  his  name?"  I  asked. 

"I  don't  know." 

After  we  entered,  my  friend  asked 
for  the  owner,  so  that  I  could  talk 
to  him  for  corroboration  of  his 
story  .  .  .  and  we  were  told  that 
he  was  expected  later. 

The  Mont-Saleve  turned  out  to 
be  a  mountain  restaurant  typical 


JACK  H.  GORDUN 

ol  those  we  had  read  about. 
Throughout  the  meal  we  were 
vaguely  troubled  by  the  fact  that 
something  seemed  to  be  missing. 
Just  as  we  were  finishing  our  cof- 
fee, a  man  walked  in  with  a  large 
St.  Bernard  dog.  The  picture  was 
complete. 

The  Swiss  dinner  had  been  deli- 
cious, but  the  owner  still  hadn't 
returned. 

I  returned  the  next  day  on  the 
number  eight  bus.  The  owner  was 
present,  but  he  said  in  French  and 
sign  language  that  he  could  speak 
no  English.  We  were  finally  able 
to  communicate  using  German 
(however  poorly  on  my  part)  as 
the  common  means  of  communica- 
tion. 

It  turned  out  that  he  had  been 
the  owner  of  the  cafe  for  just  nine 
years  and  was  not  connected  with 
any  heroic  rescues  at  all.  However, 
he  knew  something  of  the  previous 
owner  —  a  man  called  Arnold 
Schmidt  had  rescued  literally  hun- 
dreds of  Jews  from  the  hands  of 
the  Nazi  aggressor. 

I  asked  him  if  he  knew  why 
Schmidt  had  done  it.  Had  he  any 
affiliation  at  all  with  these  op- 
pressed people? 


Superior  Bolster  Company 

MANUFACTURERS  OF 
SPINNING  AND  TWISTER  BOLSTERS 


319  South  Linwood  Street  P.  O.  Box  1040  Dial  UN  5-4911 

GASTONIA,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


25 


"Yes,  he  had  a  strong  relation- 
ship," the  man  told  me.  "He  had 
the  same  dignity  as  a  man.  But  if 
you  mean  to  ask  by  your  question 
whether  he  was  Jewish,  he  was  not. 
He  was  Swiss.  During  those  extra- 
ordinary years,  we  Swiss  would  not 
lose  our  souls.  There  are  many 
Arnold  Schmidts." 


"It  must  have  been  very  dan- 
gerous." 

"I  do  not  think  so.  The  Nazis 
were  incredibly  stupid  —  or  per- 
haps, they  had  no  soul  and  that's 
what  made  them  seem  stupid." 
When  I  returned  to  Geneva,  I 
could  not  locate  Mr.  Schmidt.  He 
had  been  swallowed  up  in  the  past. 


Where  A  Synagogue  Used  To  Be 


By  Trude  Dub 


Last  year,  I  those  Austria  for 
my  holiday.  I  had  a  tremendous 
yearning  to  re-visit  the  continent 
after  nearly  20  years  of  exile,  but 
did  not  ever  again  wish  to  see 
my  native  Czechoslovakia,  where 
my  entire  family  perished. 

Austria  then  became  my  choice. 
It  is  only  next  door  to  my  former 
homeland,  with  a  similar  scenery 
and  I  know  the  language  well; 
last,  but  not  least,  it  is  the  cheapest 
country  in  Europe. 

And  I  was  not  disappointed.  The 
pine  forests  were  just  as  fragrant 
as  in  my  youth,  the  mountains  with 
their  majestic  peaks  filled  me  with 
awe  and  the  sight  of  the  brooks, 
cascading  like  thin  ribbons  down 
wooded  slopes,  thrilled  me  beyond 
words.  I  was  happy  and  carefree 
as  in  the  days  of  my  childhood, 
when  we  had  holidays  such  as  these, 
every  year.  I  felt  a  tremendous 
sense  of  release.  All  the  memories 
I  did  not  dare  to  touch,  became 
liberated  all  of  a  sudden  and  I 
was  able  to  re-live  them  with  my 
children,  whilst  we  were  picking 
wild  strawberries,  bilberries  and 
mushrooms. 


But  towards  the  end  of  the  week 
1  grew  restless  and  felt  hungry  for 
Jewish  people.  At  the  little  guest- 
house in  the  mountain  village, 
where  we  stayed,  we  did  not  en 
counter  a  single  Jew.  And  so  on  a 
Saturday,  my  husband,  I  and  our 
two  young  daughters,  set  out  for 
Innsbruck,  where  we  hoped  to  find 
a  synagogue. 

Well,  how  do  you  set  about  find- 
ing a  synagogue? 

We  arrived  at  the  station  and  my 
first  idea  was  to  consult  the  tele- 
phone directory.  We  looked  under 
"Hebrew,"  we  looked  under  "Jue- 
dische,"  we  looked  under  "Israel- 
itische,"  then  finally  decided  to 
search  for  a  Cohen  or  a  Levi,  alas 
in  vain. 

Whilst  we  were  so  occupied,  a 
man  appeared  with  a  bundle  of 
keys  and  some  instruments  to  test 
the  telephone  apparatus.  He  asked 
if  he  could  help  us  and  we  told 
him  of  our  quest.  He  got  in  touch 
with  the  operator,  but  there  was 
no  number  or  address  of  a  Jewish 
community  or  any  similar  organiza- 
tion. The  man  told  us  in  parting, 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS 

CHADBOURN 

Veneer  Company 

Manufacturers  of 

Single  Ply  Veneers  from  Southern  Hardwoods 

CHADBOURN,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


BOLING  CHAIR  COMPANY 

Manufacturers  of 

OFFICE  CHAIRS  —  SCHOOL  CHAIRS 
SILER  CITY,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


MAXWELL  ROYAL  CHAIR  CO.,  Inc. 

HICKORY,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


Bernard  LeBrun 


Sidney  LeBrun 


SOUTHLAND  WOOD  PRODUCTS  CO, 

FURNITURE  MANUFACTURERS 
GREENSBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


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Retail  Stores  In 


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AIKEN,  S.  C. 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


EASLEY,  S.  C. 
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BRISTOL,  VA. 
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of  Service  to  the  South 


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STOUT  CHAIR  COMPANY,  Inc. 

Manufacturers  of 

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for  the  Office,  Home  and  School 
LIBERTY,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


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26 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


RAND  FURNITURE  CORPORATION 

LIVING  ROOM 
FURNITURE 


Phone  4368 


ASHEBORO,  N.  C. 


Carver 

MANUFACTURING  COMPANY,  INC, 


Manufacturers  of 
QUALITY  FURNITURE 


Phone  1280 


Athens,  Tennessee 


STONEYILLE 
Furniture  Co.,  Inc. 

Manufacturers  of 

PLASTIC  —  CHROME 
BREAKFAST  ROOM  SUITES 
&  KITCHEN  CABINETS 

STONEVILLE,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


Brady  Furniture  Co.,  Inc. 

RURAL  HALL,  NORTH  CAROLINA 

Manufacturers  of  Maple  Living  Room 
and  Sup  Parlor  Suites 
and  Chairs 


Show  Rooms 

SOUTHERN  FURNITURE  EXPOSITION  BUILDING 
High  Point,  N.  C.  —  Third  Floor 

ATLANTA  MERCHANDISE  MART 
Atlanta,  Ga- 


that  there  used  to  be  a  synagogue 
in  the  Silzgasse,  but  it  was  destroyed. 

We  were  undismayed.  We  felt, 
there  must  be  some  Jews  left  in 
Innsbruck  and  we  were  going  to 
find  them.  But  how?  Of  course,  how 
silly  of  us,  why  did  we  not  think 
of  this  in  the  first  place?  The  police 
was  the  obvious  answer. 

My  husband  entered  the  grey, 
forbidding  building  and  was  gone 
for  some  time.  The  girls  grew  rest- 
less, but  I  thought  his  long  absence 
promising.  They  must  be  explain 
ing  to  him  where  the  new  syna- 
gogue is,  I  hoped. 

When  my  husband  reappeared, 
1  could  tell  from  the  look  on  his 
lace,  that  he  drew  a  blank,  but 
we  were  determined,  not  to  give 
up  so  easily. 

Then  my  husband  had  an  idea. 
I  le  slopped  a  taxi  driver  and  asked 
him  if  he  knew  of  a  Jew  in  Inns- 
bruck, or  the  synagogue.  The  man 
said:  "I  don't  know  of  a  synagogue 
since  the  old  one  was  destroyed, 
but  I  do  know  a  Jew.  Go  to  Sch., 
that  is  a  Jewish  firm,  he  will  be 
able  to  tell  you  all  you  want." 

So  with  great  excitement  we 
made  our  way  to  the  elegant  shop 
in  the  main  street  and  whilst  my 
husband  went  to  find  Mr.  Sch.,  I 
stood  outside  and  read  framed  cut- 
tings of  newspapers  from  the  time 
during  and  after  Hitler,  concerning 
the  takeover  of  the  business  by  the 
Nazis  and  the  subsequent  struggle 
lor  its  return  to  the  rightful  heirs 
The  captions  above  these  cuttings 
read:  "The  story  of  a  Jewish 
business." 

I  rejoiced.  Here  at  last  was  a 
real,  a  genuine  Jew  .  .  .  What  a 
pity,  he  wasn't  there,  that  Saturday 
morning.  His  employee  advised  my 
husband  to  visit  Mr.  B.,  another 
Jew,  who  owned  a  ^furniture  shop 
not  far  away. 


And  so  we  went  after  Mr.  B. 

We  found  his  shop  easily  enough. 
The  elegant  shopwindows  were  full 
of  expensive  furniture,  all  in  very 
good  taste,  both  the  traditional 
and  the  contemporary.  We  entered 
and  asked  for  Mr.  B. 

Oh,  what  joy:  He  was  actually  in 
and  all  we  had  to  do  was  to  wait 
a  few  minutes,  whilst  he  attended 
to  a  client  in  his  office. 

In  my  mind  I  formulated  all 
the  questions  I  was  going  to  ask. 
"How  many  Jews  are  there  in  Inns- 
bruck? How  have  they  survived  the 
Hitler  regime?  Are  they  Zionists? 
Are  they  in  touch  with  their 
brethren  in  Israel,  etc.  etc.?" 

At  last  Mr.  B.  appeared.  An  im- 
maculately dressed  tall,  middle-aged 
man,  whose  person  and  whole  bear- 
ing resembled  more  a  German  of- 
ficer than  a  Jew.  He  was  oh  so 
correct,  as  he  politely  inquired  after 
our  wishes. 

My  husband  said:  I  am  Dr.  Dub 
from  England  and  this  is  my  family. 
We  would  like  to  attend  a  Jewish 
service  and  wondered,  if  you  could 
help  us." 

The  man  stiffened  a  little. 
"There  is  no  Jewish  service  on 
Saturdays,"  he  answered.  And  we 
felt  as  if  we  had  inquired  after  a 
piece  of  furniture  that  was  no  long- 


TROUTMAN 

CHAIR  COMPANY 

Manufacturers  of 
CHAIRS 

TROUTMAN,  N.  C. 

Greetings 


BURTON-DIXIE 
CORPORATION 

Manufacturers  of 

COTTON  FELT  J 
•  SISAL  PADDING 

•  SPRING  UNITS 

BLACKSBURG,  S.  C. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


27 


If  in  fashion  "We  only  meet  on 
High  Festivals." 

And  that  was  that.  Somehow,  and 
to  this  day  I  do  not  know  how, 
we  found  ourselves  near  the  door, 
which  Mr.  B.  opened  for  us  and 
bowed  ever  so  politely,  as  he  usher- 
ed us  out. 

Of  course,  I  never  had  a  chance 
to  ask  my  questions,  but  I  was  no 
longer  interested  in  Mr.  B.  or  his 
fellow  congregants. 

The  children  thought  the  scene 
very  funny  and  mimicked  Mr.  B 
and  his  oh-so-  correct  manner,  but 
I  could  not  laugh  with  them. 

Where  was  the  proverbial  Jewish 
warmth  and  the  feeling  of  brother- 
hood between  Jew  and  Jew? 

Mr.  B.  and  ourselves  were  miles 
ajiart,  although  it  was  only  a  pane 
of  glass  that  divided  us  physically 
now.  Obviously,  Mr.  B.  held  no 
curiosity  for  Jews  in  other  lands. 

So  such  was  the  remnant  of 
Austrian  Jewry.  And  what  of  their 
children?  Without  a  religious  life 
and  relgious  education,  they  will 
very  likely  carry  things  to  the  log- 


9  i   D  0  t  )  t 


GROSSINSER'S 


GR0SS1NSER.  N.V. 


from 

KING  VENEER 
COMPANY,  INC. 

Manufacturers  0/ 
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and  Gum  Veneer 

Thin  Panels 

FLORENCE,  S.  C. 


ical  conclusion  and  disappear  al- 
together amongsi  their  gentile 
neighbours. 

Whilst  we  were  discussing  this 
with  my  husband,  we  were  wander- 
ing aimlessly  through  the  city,  when 
suddenly  my  eyes  alighted  on  a 
street  name.  SILZGASSE.  Was  this 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  94) 


Dr.  Richard  Feinberg 
Joins  Titmus 


DR.  RIC  HARD  FEINBERG 

Richard  Feinberg,  Ph.  D.,  na- 
tionally prominent  for  his  out- 
standing contributions  in  the  field 
of  optometric  education  and  in- 
dustrial vision,  has  joined  Titmus 
Optical  Company,  Inc.,  of  Peters- 
burg, Virginia,  and  will  be  assistant 
to  E.  Hutson  Titmus,  Jr.,  president 
of  the  firm. 

Originally  from  Rochester,  N.  Y., 
Dr.  Feinberg  received  his  Bachelor 
of  Science  degree  from  the  Univer- 
sity of  Rochester  in  1933,  and  his 
Doc  tor  of  Philosophy  degree  from 
Purdue  University  in  1947.  He  was 
supervisor  of  eye  service  for  the 
'he  Sperry  Gyroscope  Company 
subsequently  dean  of  a  prominent 
midwest  college. 

Dr.  Feinberg  has  written  a  num- 
ber of  papers  relating  to  occupa- 
tional vision  and  conservation  of 
vision.  His  Ph.  D.  dissertation  was 
on  "A  Study  of  Some  Aspects  of 
Peripheral  Visual  Acuity."  He  is 
a  noted  lecturer,  having  address- 
ed many  professional  and  educa- 
tional groups.  He  has  served  as  con- 
sultant on  occupational  vision  to 
several  industrial  concerns  and  the 
U.  S.  Public  Health  Service.  He  was 
on  the  educational  and  collegiate 
committee,  Chicago  Section,  of  the 
Illuminating  Engineering  Society. 

Dr.  and  Mrs.  Feinberg  and  their 
three  children  are  making  their 
permanent  residence  in  Petersburg. 


Southern  Homefurnishers  Since  1885 


Quality  Furniture  at  Reasonable  Prices 
43  Stores  in  Key  Cities  of  10  Southern  States 


Seat       G  reetings 


L.  A.  TRUAX,  President 


TRUAX  VENEER  and  PLYWOOD  CO. 

Manufacturers  of 
SOUTHERN  VENEEHS  and  PLYWOOD 

Burgaw,  North  Carolina 


Our  Sincere  Good  Wishes  to  all  of  Our  Jewish  Friends 
for  a  Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year 


Pilot  Life 
Insurance  Company 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


m 


THE  PILOT' 


Now  more  than  one  billion  dollars  life  insurance  in  force. 


9 


8 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


GEORGE  BLANKSTEIN 
COMPANY 

Hosiery 

for  MEN,  BOYS  and  MISSES 

THOMASVILLE,  N.  C- 


New  York  Office : 

Suite  1303  -  1304 
330  Fifth  Avenue 
New  York  1,  N.  Y. 


Greetings 


HILDEBRAN 

HOSIERY  MILLS 

MANUFACTURERS  OF 

Men's  Seamless  Hosiery 
HILDEBRAN,  N.  C. 


Ridgeview  Hosiery  Mill  Company 

Manufacturers  of 
Ladies'  Full  Fashioned  and  Seamless 
HOSIERY 

NEWTON,  NORTH  CAROLINA 

S.  D.  ARROWOOD  &  Co. 

EMPIRE  STATE  BLDG.  NEW  YORK,  N.  Y 


HOLIDAY  GREETINGS .... 

from 

LEA  -  WAYNE  KNITTING  MILLS 

Manufacturers  of 

Infants'  &  Children's  Hosiery 

DIAL  JU  6-7513  MORRISTOWN,  TENN. 


Student  Services 

By  Anita  Engle 


ANITA  ENGLE 

The  white  elephant,  like  syna- 
gogue on  the  Hebrew  Universitv 
campus  remains  closed,  except  for 
a  wedding  every  now  and  then. 
1  he  University  authorities  went 
to  a  great  deal  of  trouble  (and  no 
doubt  expense)  to  set  up  the 
framework  lor  a  spiritual  center 
which  they  thought  would  be  or- 
thodox enough,  and  yet  sufficient- 
ly modern  to  appeal  to  their 
strong-willed  and  independent 
charges. 

But  the  students,  like  bees  that 
inexplicably  turn  their  backs  on 
a  nice  new,  manufactured  hive, 
have  swarmed  in  a  spot  more  con- 
genial to  their  own  natures.  With 
the  young  Israel's  instinctive  dis- 
like for  over-sophistication  or 
anything  smacking  of  the  artifi- 
cial, they  have  chosen  instead  the 
quiet,  functional  Philip  Klutznick 
Auditorium  at  Hillel  House  to 
serve  as  their  place  of  prayer. 


It  is  just  over  a  year  since  a 
student  chapel  was  tentatively 
established  at  Hillel  House.  Initia- 
tors were  the  "Yavneh"  group, 
the  religious  students  organization 
of  the  Hebrew  University,  which 
is  one  of  the  most  active  on  the 
campus.  They  intended  to  hold 
Friday  and  Saturday  morning  ser- 
vices for  themselves,  and,  as  a 
daring  experiment,  for  the  High 
Holidays  were  close  at  hand,  to 
conduct  their  own  Rosh  Hashon- 
ah  Services  as  well. 

Today  these  services  have  be- 
come a  permanent  feature  of  stu- 
dent life,  and  the  largest  single 
activity  centered  on  Hillel  House. 
Between  200-300  students  attend 
on  Friday  evenings  and  Saturday 
mornings.  On  High  Holiday  rath- 
er less,  for  2/3  of  the  student  body 
comes  from  outside  Jerusalem, 
and  return  to  their  places  of  resi- 
dence during  the  University  holi- 
days. But  their  absence  is  com- 
pensated by  outsiders,  for  the  ser- 
vices have  become  a  pleasant  fea- 
ture of  Jerusalem  life  as  well. 
"The  Yavneh  services  lift  the 
heart,  and  somehow  unite  stransr- 
ers  in  a  common  aim,"  the  phi- 
losopher, Prof.  Sholom  Bergman, 
professor  emeritus  of  the  Hebrew 
University  wrote  recently. 

My  husband,  my  two  little  boys 
and  I  happened  to  be  in  on  the 
initial  Rosh  Hashonah  services, 
for  we  had  newly  arrived  in  Jeru- 
salem where  my  husband  was  tak- 


DAVIS  HOSIERY  MILLS 

Manufacturers  of 

Ladies'  Full  Fashioned  and  Seamless  Hosiery 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


125  E.  Market  St 


Dial  BR  3-1935 


Best  Wishes  For  A  Happy  New  Year 

SOUTHERN  PAPER  BOX  (0. 

Manufacturers  of 

QUALITY  FOLDING  PAPER  BOXES 


Office  and  Factory 
TAYLORSVILLE,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


29 


ing  up  a  post  with  the  Hebrew 
University.  Without  any  formal- 
ity, payment,  or  preliminary  ar- 
rangement, we  simply  walked  in, 
and  sat  down  wherever  there  were 
vacant  chairs. 

The  congregation  consisted  al- 
most entirely  of  young  people  be- 
tween the  ages  of  18  and  28.  Half 
of  them  were  girls.  Like  most  of 
the  girls  in  Israel,  they  were 
pretty  and  !resh  in  spite  ol  their 
lack  of  make-up  and  the  simplicity 
of  their  clothes.  The  chapel  is  an 
orthodox  one,  so  they  sat  in  the 
rows  reserved  for  women,  and 
were  "'called  up,"  but  otherwise 
they  participated  in  the  prayers 
and  singing  as  actively  as  the  men. 

In  that  almost  austere  auditori- 
um at  Hillel  House,  my  husband 
found  what  he  had  been  looking 
for  ever  since  we  emigrated  to 
Israel  ten  years  before.  An  authen- 
tic Israeli  service.  All  who  attend- 
ed did  so  because  they  wanted  to 
pray.  There  was  no  talking.  Every- 
one was  absorbed  in  their  prayers, 


MARTIN  AT 
HOSIERY 
MILLS 

H.  F.  MARTINAT 
Secretary  and  Treasurer 


Manufacturers  of 

MEN'S 
HIGH-GRADE  HOSIERY 


VALDESE,  N.  C. 


in  the  singing,  the  language  a 
fresh,  living  language,  the  songs 
meaningful  and  lovely. 

Their  students  conducted  the 
services  themselves,  under  the 
leadership  of  one  of  their  num- 
ber, a  voting  Israeli  who  was  pre- 
paring for  his  doctorate  in  Jewish 
studies.  Although  the  atmosphere 
was  easy  and  informal,  for  they  all 
knew  each  other,  their  approach 
was  dignified  and  serious. 

The  Yavneh  has  a  membership 
of  600.  That  is,  15%  of  the  student 
body  of  the  Hebrew  University 
finds  its  social  and  cultural  ac- 
tivities within  the  framework  of 
this  religious  students  organiza- 
tion. According  to  Rabbi  Bernard 
Casper,  Dean  of  Students,  there 
are  manv  more  students  who  are 
observing,  but  are  not  members 
of  Yavneh,  an  organization  dedi- 
cated to  a  better  understanding 
and  application  of  Jewish  values. 


Kinsion,  N.  €. 

MRS.  SOL  SCHECTER 
Correspondent 

Mr.  Charles  Morgan,  who  had 
a  heart  attack  on  June  29th,  and 
Mrs.  Sam  Fuchs,  who  was  operat- 
ed on  July  13th,  are  both  back 
home.  We  are  delighted  to  report 
1  hat  they  are  well  on  the  road  to 
recovery.  Keep  up  the  good  work! 

The  Sidney  Kanters  had  several 
visitors  while  on  vacation  at 
Wrightsville  Beach.  Their  daugh- 
ters and  son-in-law,  Jean  and  Jerry 
Cooper  and  Sylvia,  and  Ida's  sis- 
ter, brother-in-law  and  niece  from 
Xew  York,  Bea,  Arthur  and  Clin 
da  Klein.  They  all  had  a  grand 
time. 

Our  heartfelt  sympathy  is  ex- 
tended to  Mrs.  Charles  Morgan 
on  the  passing  of  her  devoted 
brother-in-law,  Mr.  Morris  Fried- 
man of  West  Orange,  N.  J. 


Greetings 


HICKORY  PAPER  BOX  COMPANY 

Incorporated 


Paper  Box  Manufacturers 


HICKORY,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  To  Our  Many  Friends 
For  a  Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year 


LYNCH 
HOSIERY  MILLS 

Phones:  BR  3-3496—3-3497 
P.  O.  Box  2796 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


J.  M.  LYNCH 
&  BRO. 

Hosiery 

1013-15  W.  Main  St. 

Dial  JU  7-6051 
LOUISVILLE,  KY. 


SOUTHEKH 

Elastic  Corporation 

Manufacturers  of 

QUALITY  ELASTIC  YARNS 

Dial  DI  5-3216  Hickory,  North  Carolina 


HUNTER  and  COMPANY 

Upholstering  Supplies— Auto  Trimmer  Supplies 

1502  S.  Main  Street  Dial  8993 

HIGH  POINT,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


Season  s  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  to  All 
Our  Many  Jewish  Patrons  and  Friends 
For  a  Happy  New  Year 

PICKETT  HOSIERY  MILLS 

INCORPORATED 

Manufacturers  of 

Fine  Seamless  Hosiery 

256  Trade  Street  Dial  CA  7-2716 

BURLINGTON,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS 


Halifax  County  Hosiery  Mills 


Manufacturers  of 

Boy's  and  Misses' 
HOSIERY 


SCOTLAND  NECK,  NORTH  CAROLINA 
New  York  Office  —  6  W.  33rd  Street 


no 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


SILVER  KNIT  HOSIERY  MILLS 

Incorporated 


HIGH  POINT,  N.  C. 


LANA  HOSIERY  COMPANY 

Commercial  Finishing  and  Binding  of 
Men's,  Boys'  &  Misses'  Hosiery 
P.  O.  Box  1571  Dial  DA  4-6710  Hickory,  N.  C. 


MID-STATE  PAPER  B 

OX  CO.,  Inc. 

Manufacturers 

of 

SET  UP  PAPER  BOXES 

ASHEBORO,  N. 

C. 

LINDY  HOSIERY  MILL 

Men's,  Women's  and  Children's  Fine  Hosiery 
BURLINGTON,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


LOREMER  HOSIERY  MILLS 

INCORPORATED 

Manufacturers 

Men  s  High  Grade 
HOSIERY 

BURLINGTON,  N.  C. 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS 

MILTON  HOSIERY  COMPANY 

Wholesale  —  Hosiery 

1001  S.  Elm  St.  Dial  BR  3-0561 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


KESTER  MACHINERY  COMPANY 

Serving  the  Industry  Since  1880 
FACTORY  AND  MILL  SUPPLIES 

•  PUMPS 

•  AIR  COMPRESSORS 

•  BALLBEARINGS 

•  SAWS  AND  PLANER  KNIVES 

Winston-Salem,  N.  C.  Branch  at  High  Point,  N.  C. 


Why  Did  0.  Henry  Become 
0.  Henry? 

Extension  of  Remarks  of  HON.  WRIGHT  PATMAN  of  Texas, 
in  the  House  of  Representatives,  Tuesday,  January  27,  1959. 

Mr.  Patman:  Mr.  Speaker,  it  has 
been  observed  before  that  great 
legal  minds  frequently  take  up 
hobbies  of  literary  detective  work, 
and  the  result  is  usually  entertain- 
ing as  well  as  instructive.  I  suppose 
this  is  because  lawyers  in  general, 
and  particularly  those  who  have 
risen  to  the  top  of  their  profession, 
have  cultivated  a  talent  for  ob- 
serving significant  details  and  solv- 
ing the  riddles  of  human  motiva- 
tion, all  from  the  written  word. 

I  believe  the  Members  may  be 
interested  and  amused  by  a  highly 
original  conclusion  that  Mr.  Jos- 
eph Borkin  has  reached  as  a  result 
of  his  literary  detective  work  on 
the  question  of  why  William  Sid- 
ney Porter  chose  the  pen  name  O. 
Henry.  Accordingly,  I  am  inserting 
a  clipping  from  the  Boston  Daily 
Globe  of  January  1,  1959,  which 
sets  out  Mr.  Borkin's  analysis. 

Perhaps  I  should  add  that  Mr. 
Borkin  has  engaged  in  literary 
detective  work  of  a  more  serious 
nature.  In  the  early  years  of 
World  War  II  Mr.  Bork  in  was 
Chief  of  the  Patent  and  Cartel 
Section  of  the  Department  of  Jus- 
tice, an  experience  which  led  to 


JOSEPH  BORKIN 

motive  lor  its  choice  have  baffled 
students  of  literature  lor  over 
half  a  century.  Why  did  William 
Sidney  Porter  employ  this  alia->? 
Was  it  more  than  a  random 
choice?  The  solution  presented 
here  was  of  the  quality  that  follows 
the  traditional  formula  for  an 
O.  Henrv  storv. 


one  of  his  more  famous  writings, 
"Gemany's  Master  Plan,"  which 
he  co-authored  with  Charles  A. 
Welsh  in  1943. 

My  own  interest  in  Mr.  Borkin 
was  first  aroused  on  reading  his 
article  on  "Impeachment"  in  the 
Encyclopedia  Britannica  and  on 
learning  that  he  had,  as  a  hobby, 
become  the  top  authority  on  this 
subject. 

The  clipping  from  the  Boston 
Daily  Globe  is  as  follows: 
Why  Did  Porter  Choose  O.  Henry? 
(By  Joseph  Borkin) 

Washington -The  origin  of  the 
pseudonym    O.    Henry    and  the 


Greetings 


NORRIS 
HOSIERY  MILL 

Manufacturers  of 

Infants',  Children's 
and 

Misses'  Anklets 
CLEVELAND,  TENN. 


ARROW  TRADE  MARK 

INCORPORATED 


Manufacturers  of  Hosiery  Transfers 


Dial  Dl  5-7173 

17th  Street  S.  W.  HICKORY,  N.  C. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


To  take  his  readers  by  surprise 
in  constructing  plausibility  out  of 
absurdity  and  contradiction  was 
in  the  essence  of  his  literary  charac- 
ter. We  should  not  be  astonished, 
therefore,  if  the  alias  O.  Henry 
betrays  what  it  was  designed  to 
hide. 

The  explanation  by  Porter  that 
ihe  sur  name  Henry  was  chosen 
at  random,  plucked  from  the  so- 
ciety columns  of  a  New  Orleans 
newspaper,  while  the  "O."  was 
added  as  the  easiest  letter  to  write, 
has  a  tongue-in-cheek  quality. 

A  theory  accepted  by  many  crit- 
ics and  biographers  is  that  the 
name  was  that  of  a  guard,  Orrin 
Henry,  who  was  employed  years 
earlier  at  the  Ohio  Penitentiary. 
It  is  surmised  that  Porter,  while 
a  convict,  saw  the  name  on  some 
•  prison  records  and  adopted  it. 

In  another  version,  Henry  was 
the  name  of  a  bar-tender  in  a  tav- 
ern frequented  by  Porter,  who 
would  indicate  his  thirst  by  call- 
ing, "Oh,  Henry!" 

Less  plausible  is  the  version  that 
O.  Henry  was  derived  from  an  old 
ballard  of  Kentucky  hills  and  may- 
have  been  a  favorite  song  of  Por- 
ter's. 

These  accounts  are  two-dimen- 
sional, and  none  is  in  the  tradition 
or  character  of  O.  Henry.  This  is 
apparently  what  led  Stephen  Lea- 
cock  to  remark  that  the  choice  ol 
pseudonym    lacked    aptness  and 


PERFECT  FOR 
CONDITIONING: 
THE  EXCEL  NO.  900 


1.  All  Aluminum  non-rusting  con- 
struction. 

2.  Welded  and  riveted  for  extra 
strength  and  durability. 

3.  Adequately  reinforced  with  tub- 
ing side  rails  and  tap  rail. 

4.  Sides,  ends  and  bottom  thor- 
oughly perforated  for  perfect 
saturation  and  drainage. 

5.  Extra  light  in  weight,  this 
truck  will  carry  extra  large 
loads. 


Excel,  Inc. 

"Excel  Trucks  Excel" 
LINCOLNTON,  N.  C. 


must  have  been  picked  in  a  mo- 
ment of  whimsy. 

Examine  the  portrait  of  Wil- 
liam Sidney  Porter. 

He  had  the  soul  of  a  poet,  the 
weakness  of  an  alcoholic,  and  the 
job  of  a  bank  clerk.  He  was  in- 
dicted in  Austin,  Texas  under  the 
Federal  Banking  Act  for  embezzl- 
ing funds  from  the  bank  in  which 
he  worked. 

He  stood  mute  at  his  trial,  un- 
willing to  help  his  attorneys  or 
himself. 

His  bored  and  disinterested 
manner  at  the  trial  helped  as- 
sure the  verdict  of  guilty  by  the 
jury.  An  eyewitness  who  saw  him 
off  to  prison  recalled  that  he  ap- 
peared to  have  welcomed  his  con- 
\  ic  tion.  Many  experts  today  are 
convinced  of  Porter's  innocence, 
however. 

Sentenced  to  5  years'  imprison- 
ment in  the  Ohio  Penitentiary, 
which  at  that  time  had  a  sub- 
leasing arrangement  with  the  Fed- 
eral Government,  he  actually 
served  3  years,  from  1896  to  1899. 

In  prison  he  utilized  his  talents 
as  a  writer  and  story-teller,  send- 
ing his  literary  products  to  pub- 
lishers via  an  intermediary,  the 
relative  of  a  fellow  prisoner.  It  is 
to  these  stories  written  in  prison 
that  Porter  first  attached  the  pseu- 
donym, O.  Henry,  indicating  no 
first  name.  With  these  devices  he 
was  able  to  disguise  his  place  of 
residence  as  well  as  his  identity 
as  the  convicted  embezzler,  Wil- 
liam Sidney  Porter. 

Writers  use  pseudonyms  to 
mask  authorship  while  criminals 
use  them  to  conceal  their  past 
records.  Although  O.  Henry  iits 
both  categories,  his  pseudonym 
does  not  appear  to  have  been 
designed  to  conceal  the  writer  but 
lather  to  hide  the  identity  of  the 
convict.  This  distinction,  I  believe, 
is  the  answer  to  the  riddle  of  O. 
Ffenry. 

A  police  department  could  not 
(Please  Turn  to  Page  86) 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS 

PIEDMONT  HOSIERY  MILLS,  Inc. 

Manufacturers  of 
MEN'S  SEAMLESS  HOSIERY 


Hickory,  North  Carolina 


The  Elastic  Corporation 

Manufacturers  of 

Quality  Elastic  Tarn 


Dial  DI  5-4106  212  12th  Ave.  N.  E. 


Hickory,  N.  C. 


GRIFFIN  SUPPLY  COMPANY,  Inc. 

"Serving  You  Is  Our  Privilege" 

—DISTRIBUTORS- 
MILL  AND 
ELECTRICAL  SUPPLIES 

813-815  E.  Franklin  Avenue  Phone  UN  7-6351 

GASTONIA,  N.  C. 


IDEAL  MACHINE  SHOPS,  Inc. 

MANUFACTURERS 
Flyers  —  Spindles  —  Pressers  —  Metallizing 
Developers  of  RCK  Finish  for  Flyers 


Ideal  Industries,  Inc. 

Higher  Quality  Drawing 
...  At  Lower  Cost 


Telephone  MAin  9-2241 


Bessemer  City,  N.  C. 


BUSH  TRANSFER,  Inc. 

MOTOR  FREIGHT  LINES 


P.  O.  Box  551 


Baltimore,  Md.,  Gllmor  5-7893 
Charlotte,  N.  C,  EDison  3-6406 


Furniture  Freight  Service 
General  Commodities 

Indiana,  Pa.,  3-8800 


LENOIR,  N.  C. 


Lenoir,  N.  C,  PLaza  4-5391 
Pittsburg,  Pa.,  SPalding  1-4885 


32 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


New  Year  Greetingi 


MONARCH  HOSIERY  MILLS,  Inc. 

Manufacturers 

HIGH  GRADE  SEAMLESS  HOSIERY 


331  E.  Elm  St.  GRAHAM,  N.  C. 


Dial  CA  6-1293 


Our  Sincere  Good  Wishes  to  all  of  Our  Jewish  Friends 
for  a  Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year 

CAROLINA  HOSIERY  MILLS 

Manufacturers  of  Men's  Seamless  Hosiery 

P-  0.  Box  888  Dial  CA  6-5581 

BURLINGTON,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


ATHENS 
Hosiery  Mills 

Incorporated 

* 

Manufacturers  of 

SEAMLESS  HOSIERY 

*  ★ 
★ 

ATHENS,  TENNESSEE 


First  Love 

(Continued  from  Page  13) 


Yet,  when  the  Blue  Jays  decided 
on  the  Van  Courtland  Park  picnic. 
Becky  slowed  down  long  enough 
to  ask  me  to  be  her  partner,  and 
I  accepted  most  willingly. 

It  was  at  Van  Courtland  that 
I  got  my  first  case  of  poison  ivy 
that  gave  me  the  miseries  for  a 
week,  missing  school  at  night  and 
work  by  day,  and  I'll  never  forget 
someone  saying,  "Once  you  get  it, 
it  comes  back  every  seven  years." 
I  thought  whoever  it  was,  was  nuts, 
that  he  was  thinking  of  breaking 
a  mirror  and  the  hard  luck  that 
is  supposed  to  follow  him  for  seven 
years.  But  whoever  said  it  was  right 
for  fourteen  years,  and  from  that 
picnic  on  I've  never  stooped  to 
pick  another  flower  no  matter  how 
enticing  or  imbued  I  may  be  with 
its  beauty. 

Regardless  of  the  itch  and  misery 
that  followed,  and  to  get  back  to 
the  Van  Courtland  Park  picnic,  I 
rented  a  boat  for  an  hour  so  that 
I  could  have  a  little  privacy  with 
Becky.  She  thought  it  was  a  good 
idea  so  we  could  talk  by  ourselves 
while  the  others  did  whatever  they 
wished  collectively  or  individually. 

Mid-lake  I  asked  Becky,  "What 
do  you  want  most  in  life?" 

It  was  not  a  casual  question.  I 
had  been  thinking  about  this  for 
a  long  time  and  I  was  anxious  to 
hear  what  she'd  say. 

Apparently  she  had  given  the 
question  a  lot  of  thought  before  I 
registered  it,  and  she  lost  no  time 
answering.  "I'd  like  a  hundred 
children  all  my  own,  to  guide  and 
do  with  them  as  I  please,  to  educate 


them  to  educate  others  on  the  fine 
things  in  life." 

Flabbergasted,  I  said,  "You  want 
to  raise  100  children?" 

"Why  not?  It's  not  difficult  once 
you  set  your  mind  to  it." 

"But  a  hundred  kids?  That's  at 
least  a  hundred  years  " 

"Oh,"  she  cut  me  short,  "I  didn't 
mean  my  own;  I  had  in  mind  a 
hundred  of  the  most  unfortunate, 
deprived  children  who  are  anxious 
and  willing  to  learn,  be  good  citi- 
zens and  want  to  devour  the  culture 
and  education  denied  them;  that 
they  in  turn  will  each  want  to 
select  a  hundred  children  and  im- 
plant the  same  ideals  so  that  we 
can  live  in  a  better  community, 
city  and  state." 

"Is  this  what  you've  been  study- 
ing?" 

"Day  and  night,  David.  Here  and 
there  I  take  time  off  for  recreation 
which  is  a  much  needed  vitamin 
for  the  mind  and  body.  And  you, 
David,  what  is  your  ambition,  now 
that  I've  told  you  mine?" 

I  didn't  know  whether  to  answer 
her  or  not,  it  was  so  ridiculous  by 
comparison.  Well,  outside  of  get- 
ting married  and  happily  raising  a 
family,  I  said,  "I'd  like  to  play 
trumpet  solo  in  a  Philharmonic 
Orchestra,  maybe  in  Carnegie  Hall 
or  with  some  other  renowned 
symphony." 

She  was  not  aware  of  my  studying 
the  cornet  which  I  intended  to 
trade  in  for  a  trumpet  as  I  advanced 
with  my  lessons. 

"That's  quite  an  ambitious  goal, 
David,  and  I  wish  you  a  lot  of 


Dura-Tred  Hosiery  Mills  Co. 

INCORPORATED 

Manufacturers  of 
MEN'S  FANCY  HALF  HOSE 

Burlington,  N.  C. 


PURITAN  FINISHING  MILLS 

INCORPORATED 

High  Class  Hosiery  Finishers 
Finishing  Men's,  Boys',  Infants'  and  Misses'  Hosiery 

BURLINGTON,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


33 


luck.  It  takes  many  years  before  . ." 
as  if  I  didn't  know  the  pains  and 

work  that  had  to  go  into  my  ambi- 
tion before  it  could  become  a  real- 
ity. 

Shortly  after,  Becky  and  her  fam- 
ily moved  to  the  Bronx  which  then 
was  regarded  as  one  of  the  better 
sections  to  live  in. 

That  morning,  when  the  moving 
men  were  hoisting  her  piano  out  of 
her  window,  Becky  was  downstairs 
waiting  for  me.  She  wanted  to  say 
goodbye. 

"It's  been  wonderful  knowing 
you,  David,"  she  said.  "We're  get- 
ting a  telephone  in  our  new  apart- 
ment in  the  Hunts  Point  section. 
Please  call  me  and  let  me  know  how 
you  and  your  mother  are  getting 
along  from  time  to  time." 

I  said  I  would,  shook  hands  with 
her,  and  was  on  my  way  to  the 
office  where  I  worked  in  Times 
Square.  I  thought  of  her  all  the 
way  downtown  on  the  Lexington 
Avenue  local,  on  the  shuttle  and 
the  walk  from  the  subway  to  the 
building  office  where  I  was  era- 
ployed. 

"Yes,"  I  repeated  several  times 
on  the  trip.  "I'll  call  you  once  in  a 
while,  maybe  even  get  to  see 
and  date  you." 

That  night,  when  I  returned 
home,  Ma  noticed  a  change  in  me. 
She  said,  "Are  you  sick?  Don't  you 
feel  well?  You  look  pale  as  paint." 

I  turned  away,  as  I  spoke  to  her, 
and  said,  "I'm  all  right.  I  have  a 
burning  headache,  but  it's  nothing 
to  worry  about." 

It  was  then  that  I  knew  this  burn- 
ing was  a  sign  that  I  was  in  love 


with  Becky  and  there  was  no  doubt 
l hat  I'd  be  missing  her.  There  were 
many  times  I  could  glance  out  the 
window  and  see  her  in  the  street, 
either  chatting  with  the  girls  or 
neighbors  without  her  noticing  me. 
This  was  all  gone  now.  The  picnics 
and  outings,  too. 

Several  weeks  later  I  called  Becky 
on  the  telephone  to  invite  her  to 
an  affair  Ma's  society  was  holding 
to  raise  funds.  It  was  an  annual 
event  that  took  place  in  a  lower 
Manhattan  hall  and  I  was  anxious 
for  Becky  to  be  my  date.  Ma 
thought  it  was  a  thoughtful  gesture 
when  I  told  her  who  I  had  in  mind 
taking  with  me.  She  felt  also  that 
I  his  would  give  her  an  opportunity 
to  keep  abreast  with  all  that  was 
new  with  the  Kornblooms,  her  for- 
mer neighbors  and  friends. 

On  the  first  call,  Becky's  mother 
said  her  daughter  wasn't  home  and 
I  let  it  go  at  that,  knowing  how- 
stud  ions  she  was  and  where  she 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  68) 


Dr.  Moshe  Davis,  Educator  and 
Historian,  will  head  a  Jerusalem 
Sflfiool  Unit  which  will  undertake  a 
World-Wide  study  of  Jewish  com- 
munities including  Israel,  probing 
their  social,  cultural,  intellectual 
and  spiritual  character. 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS 
from 

QUEEN  CITY  .RAILWAYS 


Greeting*  £x 

won  n»  nw5 


AMERICA'S  DEriNDAELE  FOOD  MERCHANT 


BIRTHDAY 


1859-1959 


BEST  WISHES. 

For  a  V ery  Happy  Day 
On  This 

Bosif)  2|a£f)ona 

AND  MANY  YEARS 
OF  HEALTH  AND 
HAPPINESS  AHEAD 


SUBURBAN  RULANE 
GAS  COMPANY 

Serving  Virginia  and  the  Carolinas  from  twenty-six  locations 
The  Gas  Company  Beyond  The  Gas  Mains 


34 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


UNITED  MILLS  CORPORATION 

MT.  GILEAD,  N.  a 
New  York  Office  — 180  Madison  Avenue 

Manufacturers  of 


ILEAD  LINGERIE 


eafoia^t  sups 


BRAS 


Season's  Greetings 


Jftre^tone 
tlexttle* 


Gastonia,  N.  C. 


Happy  New  Year 


Parkdale  Mill 

Manufacturers  of 
Combed  Yarns 
GASTONIA,  N.  C. 


"WE  DELIVER  WHILE  OTHERS  PROMISE" 

RELIABLE  TRUCKING  CO.,  INC. 

HIGH  POINT,  N.  C. 

Terminal— Newark,  N.  J.       HICKORY,  N.  C.        High  Point,  N.  C. 
Dial  BIgelow  8-7385         Dial  DAvis  4-8992  Phone:  2-6126  &  9932 


What  The  Shofar  Says 

By  Rabbi  Samuel  M.  Silver 


Is  the  shofar  a  musical  instru- 
ment? 

The  trumpet-like  object,  the 
ritual  item  identified  with  the  High 
Holyda  ys,  is  becoming  as  well 
known  to  the  general  public  as 
the  melody  of  Kol  Nidre. 

One  will  often  see  the  shofar 
on  TV  programs.  More  and  more 
non-Jews  also  see  it  on  display  in 
visits  to  synagogues. 

Invariably,  a  look  at  the  shofar 
elicits  a  battery  of  questions. 

If  the  shofar  is  to  be  labelled 
a  musical  instrument,  we  will  have 
to  agree  that  the  sound  it  produces 
is  both  limited  and  eerie. 

Another  shofar  "note"  is  the 
faci  that  it  has  been  the  target 
of  many  folklorisitc  stories  heavily 
tinged  with  superstition.  Any  old- 
timer  can  reel  off  a  series  of  stories 
about  the  difficulties  that  people 
have  had  in  blowing  the  shofar 
and  attributing  these  difficulties 
to  the  work  of  Satan. 

It  is  time  for  the  shofar  to  be 
liberated  from  these  diabolical 
fancies  and  also  the  widespread 
misunderstanding  about  its  signifi- 
cance. 

Once  we  clear  the  ram's  horn 
from  these  agglutinated  anecdotes 
we  discover  that  there  is  a  host 
of  worthy  reflections  which  we  can 
entertain  when  we  sit  in  shul  on 
the  High  Holydays  and  hear  the 
sound  of  the  shofar. 

First,  its  tone  is  deliberately  eerie, 
lor  one  function  of  the  shofar  is 
to  jar  us  out  of  our  moral  sloth- 


fulness  —  to  awaken  within  us  a 
realization  of  the  need  to  improve. 

Second,  the  difficulty  in  making 
the  shofar  produce  its  blasts  is 
also  instructive.  It  dramatizes  the 
fact  that  correcting  bad  habits  does 
not  come  easy.  There  are  faiths  in 
which  the  worshipper  is  promised 
automatic  salvation  through  a 
quick  formula.  Not  so  in  Judaism, 
which  declares  that  man  has  been 
granted  the  power  to  rise  morally, 
but  he  must  work  on  it,  must 
strive  mightily  to  achieve  it,  as 
one  strains  to  sound  the  shofar. 

Thirdly,  the  shofar  is  a  reminder 
of  Judaism's  abhorrence  of  human 
sacrifice.  The  story  of  Abraham's 
near-sacrific  of  Isaac  ends  with  the 
substitution  of  a  ram  in  place  of 
the  boy.  This  story  is  read  on  the 
High  Holydays  to  emphasize  the 
repugnance  which  sensitive  men 
must  feel  towards  carnage  and 
violence.  When  you  hear  the  shofar 
let  it  be  as  a  cry  in  your  ears 
against  any  tendency  on  your  part 
to  cause  a  fellow-man  any  kind  of 
sorrow  or  suffering. 

Fourthly,  the  very  sounds  of  the 
shofar  tell  their  story.  The  smooth- 
ness of  the  tekiah  may  symbolize 
the  innocence,  the  ethical  smooth- 
ness which  was  yours  at  birth,  for 
Judaism  adheres  to  a  belief  in 
Original  Goodness.  The  more 
"ruffled"  sounds  of  the  truah  and 
Shvorim  represent  the  roughness 
which  comes  to  our  spirit  during 
the  course  of  life.  The  reprise  of 
the  tekiah  is  the  shofar 's  way  of 


CHILDREN'S  DRESSES 


Pioneers  in  Automatically  Controlled 
DYEING  MACHINES 

GASTON  COUNTY  Dyeing  Machine  Co. 

Established  1921 


Designers  &  Builders 
of  Dyeing,  Bleaching 
Extracting  &  Drying 
Machines 


Dye  Tubes,  Dye  Springs, 
Dye  Cones,  Dye  Beams  and 
Multiple  Beam  Carriers 


STANLEY,  NORTH  CABOIJNA. 


BARKLEY  MACHINE  WORKS 


Manufacturers  of 

TEXTILE  MACHINERY  PARTS 


GASTONIA,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


35 


telling  us  that  you  can  restore  the 
original  smoothness  of  your  soul- 
despite  its  scarred  and  marred  con- 
dition if  only  you  make  an  effort 
to  recapture  your  ideals  and  trans- 
late them  into  action. 

Many  more  legitimate  and  valid 
lessons  can  be  learned  from  the 
shofar.  There  is  no  need  then  for 
the  cargo  of  superstition  which 
has  surrounded  this  unique  instru- 
ment which  we  know  as  the  call 


to  conscience.  Listen  carefully  to 
the  shofar  on  Rosh  Hashonah;  be 
especially  attentive  to  it  at  the 
close  of  the  Yom  Kippur  service. 
It  speaks  to  you;  it  says,  in  effect, 
"I  toll  for  you  and  the  promise  of 
spiritual  improvement.  Hearken  to 
my  voice  and  make  of  the  year 
5720  a  good  one  for  you  and  all 
those  you  love,  and  may  those  you 
love  include  all  the  children  of 
men  throughout  the  world." 


Former  President  Harry  S.  Turman  examines  B'nai  B'rifl )  President's  Medal 
presented  to  him  by  Philip  M.  Klutznick  past  president  of  B'nai  B'rith. 
The  award,  given  to  Mr.  Truman  at  a  luncheon  celebrating  his  75th  birth- 
day, cites  the  former  president  for  speaking  "the  blunt  language  of  courage 
and  greatness."  Several  members  of  Mr.  Truman's  Cabinet  and  a  large  num- 
ber of  governors  and  congressmen  participated  in  the  luncheon,  held  in 
Kansas  City  by  the  elder  statesman's  home-town  friends  and  neighbors. 


HARWELL  GARMENT  COMPANY 

and 

BELLCRAFT  MANUFACTURING  CO. 

Manufacturers 

Men's  and  Boys'  Sportswear,  Work  Clothing, 
Pants,  Shirts  and  Sport  Sets 

OFFICES  and  PLANTS  —  IIARTWELL,  GEORGIA 

New  York  Office   350  Fifth  Avenue,  New  York  City 

West  Ccast  Office  411  E.  9th  St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif 

Southwest  Office  Box  606,  Sherman,  Texas 


THE  SEASON'S  GREETINGS 

May  the  New  Year  Bring  You  Happiness  and  Contentment 

MARCUS  &  FARBER 

110  Hopkins  Place  Telephone  MUlberry  5-6332 

BALTIMORE,  MARYLAND 

Manufactu  e.s  of  'Jay  Ray"  Sportswear 

JAY  MARCUS  RAY  FARBER 


JOANNA  COTTON  MILLS  COMPANY 

Manufacturers  of 
WINDOW  SHADE  CLOTH 

JOANNA,  SOUTH  CAROLINA 


66-72  LEONARD  ST 


Selling  Agents 

H.  S.  PARKER  COMPANY 

NEW  YORK,  N.  Y. 


DACOTAH 
Cotton  Mills 

Incorporated 
LEXINGTON,  N.  C. 

Manufacturers 
SHEETING  and  DRILLS 

Selling  Agent 

J.  W.  VALENTINE  CO. 
1430  Broadway 
New  York 


Southern  Representative 

T.  HOLT  HAYWOOD 

612  S.  Main  Street 
Winston-Salem,  N.  C. 


Night  EM  6-0280 
Manufacturers 


Night  ED  4-3108 
Repair  Service 


Schachner  Leather  &  Belting  Company 
Charlotte  Leather  Belting  Co.,  Dlv. 

"Schachner  Belting  Makes  a  Good  Machine  Better" 

Dial  ED  2-7171  2601  Airport-New  Dixie  Rd. 

P.  O.  BOX  3205 
CHARLOTTE  3,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


HIGH  POINT  -  THOMASYILLE 
&  DENTON  RAILROAD 

Fast  -  Reliable  -  Responsible  -  Dependable 
FREIGHT  SERVICE 

"Nothing  But  Service  To  Sell' 
HIGH  POINT,  N.  C. 


Hardware  & 
BLUE  RIDGE         Supply Co.r  Inc. 

. . and  .  . 

Virginia  Machine  Tool  Company 

JOBBERS  .  .  . 

"We  Specialize  in  Your  Factory  Requirements" 

Mill  Supplies         •         Heavy  Hardware 
Woodworking  Machinery 
Machine  Shop  Supplies  •  Cabinet  Hardware 

Woodworking  Tools 

LENOIR,  N.  C.  and  BASSETT,  VIRGINIA 


Best  Wishes 
For  The 
New  Year 


J.  C.  Paddock  &  Company 

Manufacturers  of  Material  Handling  Equipment 

SPARTANBURG,  SOUTH  CAROLINA 


Time  And  Judgement 

By  Ben  Nathan 


The  primary  theme  of  the  New 
Year  is  Time.  The  secondary 
theme  is  Judgement. 

At  the  conclusion  of  a  major 
act  or  era  Time  and  Judgement 
coincide.  Such  a  juncture  is  al- 
ways one  in  which  disaster  is 
omnipresent.  It  is  also  a  juncture 
in  which  the  possibility  of  miracle 
is  also  omnipresent.  At  this  junc- 
ture, ours,  only  a  miracle  will 
suffice,  and  in  this  sense  ours  is  a 
holy  time  if  only  in  virtue  of  its 
necessity  to  draw  forth  holy 
powers.  Only  these  can  preserve 
it,  or  mitigate  its  agony. 

There  is,  alter  all,  the  possibil- 
ity that  the  archangels  will  render 
themselves  visible  at  their  stations 
on  the  four  corners  of  the  earth, 
or  that  one  of  the  celestial  hosts 
will  decimate  earthly  dominions 
via  the  vehicle  of  fire.  Each  nu- 


clear explosion  may  represent  the 
opening  of  just  one  more  latch 
in  the  gate  of  that  fiery  entrance. 

It  is  not,  however,  this  order  of 
miracle,  although  wondrous,  that 
our  time  is  prepared  for,  or  quite 
requires.  The  miracle  required 
must  stem  from  a  more  immediate, 
more  blunt  source,  as  must  its 
logic,  and  therefore  its  inevitabil- 
ity. Its  necessity  must  be  openly, 
and  in  this  instance  universally 
acknowledged.  That  necessity  can- 
not be  clouded  by  any  reasoning 
not  in  keeping  with  plain  every- 
day modalities,  open  to  all,  even 
to  children.  II  it  is  to  occur,  as  if 
must,  that  occurring  must  hold  no 
mysteries.  But  neither  can  it  there- 
fore hold  alternatives. 

The  inevitability  of  its  coming 
is  made  evident  by  the  nature  of 
the  basic  question— the  probabil- 


Thank  You,  North  Carolina 
Association  of  Jewish  Youth! 


The  American  Jwish  Times-Outlook 
Mr.  Chester  A.  Brown 
Greensboro,  North  Carolina 


June  16,  1959 


Dear  Mr.  Brown: 

On  behalf  of  the  North  Carolina  Association  of  Jewish  Youth  may  I 
extend  heartiest  congratulations  on  the  celebration  of  twenty-five  years 
of  publishing  a  most  informative  periodical  for  the  Jewish  people  of 
North  Carolina,  South  Carolina,  Virginia,  and  Tennessee. 

The  American  Jewish  Times-Outlook  offers  a  very  necessary  link 
between  distant  members  of  our  Association.  We  not  only  find  the  home- 
town news  sections  to  our  satisfaction,  but  believe  that  your  editorials, 
plus  the  columns  of  Alfred  Segal  and  Harry  Simonhoff  and  other  special 
articles  offer  rich  cultural  reflections  into  our  Jewish  heritage. 

May  your  next  twenty-five  years  be  as  fruitful  as  your  past. 

Again,  our  congratulations. 

Sincerely, 

BARRY  GREENSPON 
President,  NCAJY 


A  Sheet  Metal  Work  Serving  Textile  Plants 

Gastonia  Textile  Sheet  Metal  Works 

INCORPORATED 
Manufacturers  and  Rebuilders  of 
Spinning,  Twister,  Spooler  and  Quiller  Cylinders 
Card  Screens — Picker  Screens — Condenser  Screens 
j  Comber  Tins — Waste  Chutes — Lap  Aprons 

t   I  Aspirators 

MORE  PRODUCTION  AT  LOWER  COSTS,  WTH 
GASTONIA  TEXTILE  SHEET  METAL  PARTS 


An  Essential  Service  to  Combed  Yarn  Mills 

Gastonia  Comber  Needling  Co. 

Experienced  Specialists  in  Every  Branch  of 
Reneedling  of  All  Makes 
Half  Laps  and  Top  Combs  for  Cotton  Combing 
Gill  Combs  —  Faller  Bars 

SERVING  THE  SOUTH  SINCE  1914 


222  EAST  LONG  AVENUE  TELEPHONE  UN-7-6316 

GASTONIA,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


37 


itv  of  hum, m  duration  now  that 
the  vehicles  of  extinction  are  so 
plentiful.  Said  more  coarsely:  Will 
the  bombs  fall  or  not?  Does  the 
human  element  continue  or  does 
it  (ease?  Are  there  five  years  left? 
Said  even  more  coarsely:  Is  our 
time  up?  Nobody  really  thipks 
about  anything  else,  and  each 
man's  composure  is  in  part  resolv- 
ed by  the  attitude  adopted  to  that 
possibility. 

The  villainy  of  it  all  is  that  the 
answer  to  these  questions  rest  in 
the  hands  that  they  seem  to  rest 
in.  The  villaim  ol  it  all  is  that 
the  apparant  power  to  determine 
continuation  or  cessation  of  human 
destiny  is  a  power  threatened  to 
be  exercised  on  the  basis  of  politi- 
cal controversy.  What  authority 
does  government  hold  to  render 
valid  its  participation  in  the  de- 
cision of  human  survival?  The 
ambitions  of  the  state  are  by  con- 
fession never  so  pure  as  to  justifi- 
ably grant  its  hierarchic  voice  in  a 
determnation  of  this  kind.  In  their 
most  elevated  aspects  neither  an 
Eisenhower  nor  a  Khruschev 
holds  that  juridical  dignity.  Moses 
himself  was  not  possessed  of  the 
capacitv  for  such  status.  How 
much  less  a  Nixon,  a  Mikoyan  or 
a  Ko/lov? 

But  the  miracle  of  it  all  will 
be  the  admission  by  these  men  of 
their  unfitness  to  determine  hu- 
man survival,  if  only  by  virtue 
of  the  very  intensity  of  their 
worldly  concerns.  The  potentates 
of  the  material  order,  obsessed  as 
they  are  with  military  potentials 
and  industrial  capacities,  do  not 
merit  seats  on  that  ultimate  jury. 
"Nature"  will  not  allow  it,  and 
is  not  allowing  it,  now,  even  now. 


It  may  in  fact  be  said  that  the 
chief  disturbance  gnawing  at  the 
bones  of  the  contending  Levia- 
thans is  the  now  barely  conscious 
suspicion  that  the  power  to  make 
that  ultimate  decision  is  no  long- 
er theirs.  Thev  are  aware,  al- 
though darkly,  ol  the  seepage  of 
that  power,  but  cannot  account 
lor  it.  Their  recent  negotiations  — 
so  thin,  so  transparent  not  only 
to  the  actors  who  hold  the  stage, 
but  to  their  universal  audience  as 
well— bespoke,  if  nothing  else,  at 
least  the  first  authentic  glimmer 
of  how  badlv  miscast  these  Le\ia- 
thans  are. 

The  acknowledgement  of  their 
spiritual  unfitness  to  determine 
human  duration,  and  not  their 
cotentions  to  mutual  rights  in  one 
or  another  geographic  area,  will 
determine  with  what  dignitx  whal 
is  left  o!  their  present  positions 
is  retained.  That  determining, 
that  decision  belongs  elsewhere.'. 
The   continuity   ol    human  time 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  114) 


Roger  Wolf,  of  Cincinnati  Ohio  is 
t!ie  newly  elected  president  of  the 
National  Federation  of  Jewish  Youth, 
the  teen-age  arm  of  the  Union  of 
American  Hebrew  Congregations. 


WESTBORO  WEAVING  COMPANY 


MANUFACTURERS 

Tapes  and  Non-Elastics 

GREENVILLE,  S.  C. 


Bladenboro  Cotton  Mills,  Inc. 

Spinners  of  High  Grade  Hosiery,  Underwear  and  Warp  Yarns 
2's  to  30's,  Single  and  Ply 
BLADENBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


SEASON'S  GREETINGS 
FROM 


THE 


ATLANTA 


BRASSIERE  COMPANY 

NEW  YORK 


Greetings 


and  Best  Wishes  from 

BROWER  MILLS,  Inc. 

Manufacturers  of 

COTTON  YARNS 

HOPE  MILLS,  N.  C. 


Greetings 


Gambrill  &  Melville  Mills  Co. 

Manufacturers  of 

WIDE  COTTON  SHEETING 
Bessemer  City,  N.  C. 


HENNIS  FREIGHT  LINES,  Inc. 

Telephone:  PArk  4-9211  Winston-Salem,  N.  C. 

Serving — North  Carolina,  South  Carolina,  Virginia,  Georgia,  Maryland, 
Pennsylvania,  New  Jersey.  New  "7ork,  Indiana,  Ohio,  Michigan,  Illinois. 

WITH  DIRECT  CONNECTIONS  TO  THE  EAST,  WEST, 
AND  NORTHWEST 


38 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


GREETINGS 


THE 

Oakley  Company 


Manufacturers  of 
High  Speed  Sanding  Machinery 
for  the 

FURNITURE  INDUSTRY 

BRISTOL,  TENNESSEE 


Ray  of  Hope  In  The  Tunis  Ghetto 


Dixie  Loom  Reed  Co. 


"Let  Dixie  Loom  Reeds  Fulfill  Your  Weaving  Needs' 


Jobbers  for  MYSTIK  Tape 
Distributor  for  BERH-CAT  Tapes 


P.  O.  BOX  875    GREENSBORO,  N.  C.    PHONE  BR  4-5458 


E.  H.  BRADLEY,  Pres. 


L.  F.  HOLLAND,  Gen.  Mgr. 


BRADLEY  FLYER  &  REPAIR  CO. 

Fryers,  Cap  Bars,  Twister  Racks 
NEW  AND  USED  PARTS  ALWAYS  ON  HAND 


RAYFIELD  -  STEWART,  Inc. 

Textile  Spindle  Repair  Specialists 
FACTORY  WORKMANSHIP—  GUARANTEED  QUALITY 
1814  West  Second  Ave.  Dial  UN  6-1692 

GASTONIA,  N.  C. 


By  Paul  Lieber 


The  precise  origins  of  the  Jews 
of  this  recently  independent  North 
African  state  are  lost  in  obscurity. 
It  has  been  established,  however, 
that  there  were  Jews  in  Carthage 
when  that  challenger  of  Imperial 
Rome  was  at  the  height  of  its  pow- 
er. There  is  good  reason  to  believe 
that  Jewish  settlement  goes  back  to 
the  time  of  the  first  temple,  a  mil- 
lenium  before  the  arrival  of  the. 
Arabs. 

Whatever  historians  may  finally 
authenticate  as  to  the  Jewish  past 
in  Tunisia,  the  present  is  both  de- 
pressing and  precarious.  Fifteen 
years  ago,  there  were  more  than 
70,000  Jews  in  Tunisia.  There  are 
still  some  50,000  here  now.  About 
30,000  of  them  live  in  the  swarming 
hara,  the  ghetto  of  Tunis,  which 
adjoins  the  medina.  the  old  Arab 
quarter. 

The  fearful  and  the  enterprising 
have  gone  to  Israel;  the  wealthy  and 
cautious  have  gone  to  France. 
Those  who  remain  on  the  rue  des 
Negresses  or  about  the  square  of 
the  Great  Synagogue  belong  to  a 
<  olony  that  is  both  very  ancient  and 
very  poor. 

The  hara  is  Idled  with  the  sights 
and  sounds  of  the  bazaars.  The 
tailors  in  their  cave-like  enclosures, 
squat  in  a  gloom  so  dark  one  won- 
ders  how  the)  can  even  find  the 
needle's  eye.  Here  the  jewelers  chis- 
el silver  and  hammer  shapes  into 
soft  copper.  This  is  where  the  tink- 
ers, working  their  hand  wheels, 
send  thin,  sharp  sparks  into  the  air 
while  the  locksmiths  make  both 
giant  keys  and  tiny  jewel-like  locks. 

Commerce  is  regulated  by  anti- 
quated laws.  Whole  novels  could 
be  written,  for  example,  on  the  bi- 
zarre supply  system  by  which  goods 
reach  the  market  at  the  lower  end 


of  the  hara.  Or,  on  how  meat  that 
has  been  ritually  slaughtered  passes 
through  the  hands  of  wholesalers, 
sub-wholesalers,  semi-retailers  until 
it  finally  arrives  at  the  filthy,  fly- 
infested  market-stall  for  sale. 

Novels  could  be  written  also 
about  the  complex  rights  of  owners 
and  tenants  of  the  crumbling  dwell- 
ings, their  roofs  perforated  by  holes, 
open  to  the  stars  like  a  planetarium. 
In  a  house  of  12  rooms,  arranged 
in  a  square  about  an  interior  court, 
(here  are  a  dozen  families  whose 
liu man  population  is  bewteen  60 
and  80  persons. 

The  hordes  of  children  arc  only 
.1  bit  less  overwhelming  than  among 
neighboring  Arab  families.  The 
women  cook  under  the  open  sky 
when  weather  permits  and  all  to- 
gether in  one  common  room  when 
it  tains.  Water  is  a  precious  com- 
modity that  has  to  be  used  sparing- 
ly. 

Rent  for  these  caverns  runs  about 
.ij>5  monthly,  quite  a  bit  when  the 
man  is  out  of  work,  as  many  are,  or 


Rabbi  Maurice  N.  Eisendrath, 
President  of  the  Union  of  American 
Hebrew  Congregations  Announces 
the  appointment  of  Dr.  Chaim  Israel 
Essrog  as  a  new  director. 


Holiday 
Greetings 


CLEARWATER  FINISHING  PLANT 

CLEARWATER,  S.  C. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


39 


tails  to  bring  home  more  than  the 
doubtful  profit  derived  from  the 
sale  of  a  few  old  clothes  in  the 
bazaar. 

Those  who  have  lived  their  whole 
lives  in  the  hara,  illiterate,  super- 
stitious, cut  off  from  the  world  at 
large,  have  contracted  the  disease 
of  chalouk— begging.  It  is  a  disease 
which  is  not  easily  cured  and  those 
who  have  it  are  likely  to  remain 
forever  dependent  on  the  commu- 
nity. By  contrast,  among  the  refu- 
gees from  the  south,  who  have  come 
up  to  Tunis,  because  economic  ac- 
tivity has  deteriorated  badly  in  the 
semi-desert  areas,  there  is  more 
gaiety.  They  fill  the  air  with  songs 
and  laughter.  These  recent  arrivals 
aspire  to  better  things  and  are  more 
enterprising. 

The  Jewish  communal  aid  tries 
to  save  the  youth  from  being  sub- 
merged in  the  ghetto  way  of  life. 


Basically,  the  community  authori- 
ties put  their  hopes  in  vocational 
training,  which  here  means  the 
ORT. 

The  trade  school  for  boys,  run 
by  ORT,  trains  in  skills  on  a  Eu- 
ropean standard.  Many  of  the  in- 
structors come  from  the  Anieres 
Institute  near  Geneva,  where  ORT 
trains  a  great  part  of  its  staff. 

Young  Jewish  girls  of  Tunis  can 
also  register  for  courses  where  they 
will  be  trained  as  dressmakers,  sales 
girls,  laboratory  assistants,  typists. 

Two  professional  social  workers 
have  the  task  of  locating  promising 
youngsters  in  the  hara,  to  persuade 
the  parents  to  send  their  children 
to  the  ORT  school,  sometimes  of- 
fering a  small  stipend  for  the  time 
the  youth  is  in  training. 

And  lastly,  this  same  ORT  or- 
ganizes evening  courses  for  adults 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  78) 


Thank  You,  Oscar  Leonard! 

Mr.  Chester  A.  Brown 

Editor,  American  Jewish  Tunes-Outlook 

Greensboro,  N.  C. 

Dear  Mr.  Brown: 

So  you  are  celebrating  twenty-five  years  ol  American  Jewish  Times- 
Outlook  publication.  Mozel  Tov!  Congratulations! 

I  well  remember  the  first  issue  of  the  magazine.  Having  had  a  bit 
to  do  with  Jewish  journalism  in  the  past  half  of  a  century  or  more.  I 
realize  that  it  took  .grit,  idealism,  persistence  to  labor  this  quarter  of  a 
century  at  your  task. 

There  are  easier  ways  of  making  a  living  than  Jewish  journalism  and 
much  more  profitable  ones.  Only  those  who  have  had  anything  to  do 
with  Jewish  journalism  know  that  there  is  something  much  greater  than 
financial  interests  that  keep  a  man  busy  with  Jewish  journalism.  Alas, 
how  few  of  our  people  realize  that  devotion  to  communal  good  makes 
Jewish  journalists. 

You  have  done  an  excellent  job  especially  for  your  "neck  of  the 
woods."  May  it  be  given  to  you  to  continue  for  many  years  to  come.  , 

With  all  good  wishes, 

Yours  sincerely, 
Oscar  Leonard 


More  People  Buy 


rcaVictor 

Than  Any  Other  Television 
VISIT  YOUR  RCA  VICTOR  DEALER  TODAY 


"mis  namt  mir  r 


Southern  Radio  Corporation 

RCA  Victor  Distributor 
COLUMBIA,  S.  C.  CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


We  lake  this  opportunity  of  extending  our  greetings  and 
best  wishes  to  our  Friends  of  the  Jewish  Faith  for  a  Very 
Happy  New  Year  .  .  . 

FIRST  FIDELITY  COMPANY 

Investments 

Southeastern  Building  Dial  BR  4-7685 

GREENSBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


W.  G.  Jarrell  Machine  Company 


"Since  1906" 


NEW  MACHINES 
TO  ORDER 

GENERAL 
MACHINE 
REPAIRS 

Heliwelder  Equipment 


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•  Acetylene  and  Electric  Welding 

•  Portable  and  Stationary  Equipment 


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Box  2154 


1200  S.  Mint  Street 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


Anything  In  Textile  Replacement  Parts 


Speeder  Parts 
Bobbin  Gears 
Split  Gears 
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Chain  Drives 
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Shop  and 
Office  at 
Arlington 
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Spinning  Parts 
Drawing  Parts 
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Roller  Chain  Sprockets 
Silent  Chain  Sprockets 
V-Belts 

Lickerin  Belts 


Ball  Bearing  Comb  Boxes  —  Ball  Bearing  Units 
HOBS,  CUTTERS  &  REAMERS  SHARPENED 

TEXTILE  PARTS  &  MACHINE  CO.,  Inc. 


P.  O.  BOX  2615 


Phone 
UN  5-8564 


GASTONIA,  N.  C. 


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0  INCORPORATED 


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4© 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Season  s  Greetings 


TIE  -  RITE  NECKWEAR  COMPANY 


Manufacturers  of 

Fine  Neckwear  for  Men  and  Boys 


ASHEBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


©  NEW  YEAR 
$  GREETINGS 


Truitt  Manufacturing  Company 

MECHANICAL  SPECIALTIES  —  STEEL  FABRICATION 
WELDING  —  TEXTILE  MILL  EQUIPMENT 

GREENSBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


PAUL  STEWART  MACHINE  CO. 

Manufacturers  of 

Bolsters  —  Rings  and  Holders 
Spindles  —  Spindle  Repairs 

Wilkinson  Blvd.,  P.  0.  Box  14  Dial  UN  4-3205 

GASTONIA,  N.  C. 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS 


from 


North  Carolina  Dyeing  &  Finishing  Co. 

Finishers  of  Ladies'  Nylon  Hosiery 

Asheboro  Ext.      GREENSBORO,  N.  C.      Dial  BR  4-4836 


A  Sage  Has  Fallen 

Tribute  to  Chief  Rabbi  Isaac  Herzoq 

By  Dr.  Oscar  Z.  Fasman 

President  of  the  Hebrew  Theological  College 


Skokie, 

The  death  of  Chief  Rabbi  Isaac 
Herzog  in  Israel  removes  from  the 
world  scene  one  of  the  most  color- 
ful personalities  in  modern  relig- 
ious life.  An  acute  Talmudist  with 
an  Irish  brogue,  a  saintly  patri- 
arch with  an  interest  in  theoretical 
physics,  a  sturdy  champion  of  in- 
tensive Orthodox  Judaism  with  a 
warm  human  love  for  even  the 
most  unorthodox  individuals,  a 
profound  scholar  with  a  simple 
faith  in  the  essential  goodness  of 
men,  a  mild  and  benign  gentle- 
man almost  timid  in  his  ways  with 
unflinching  courage  to  enter  into 
places  of  physical  danger  in  order 
to  be  with  his  people,  Rabbi  Her- 
zog earned  a  position  of  esteem 
and  love  in  the  hearts  of  Jews  all 
over  the  world. 

The  first  chief  rabbi  in  the  in- 
dependent State  of  Israel,  he  had 
to  establish  the  dignity  and  author- 
ity of  his  office  amidst  the  com- 
plexities of  organizing  a  new  gov- 
ernment. The  delicate  relationship 
between  the  changing  political 
responsibilities  of  that  government 
and  the  eternal  spiritual  values  of 
the  Torah  could  be  kept  in  equi- 
librium only  by  the  broad  under- 
standing he  brought  into  his  field 


llli 


nois 


DR.  OSCAR  Z.  FASMAN 

of  duty.  Where  all  too  many  jump- 
ed hastily  to  the  conclusion  that 
the  ancient  tomes  of  Hebraic  law 
(otdd  not  meet  the  challenge  of 
contemporary  needs,  Rabbi  Herzog 
was  able  to  refute  that  contention 
by  what  he  was  even  before  he 
entered  the  realm  of  action.  In 
him  everybody  recognized  a  titan 
of  halachic  competence,  respected 
by  the  leading  rabbis  of  the  eastern 
European  Yeshivoth,  and  a  man  of 
extensive  cultural  attainments,  the 
peer  of  the  most  progressive  uni- 
versity professors.  If  it  was  patent- 
ly possible  to  blend  the  pious  wis- 
dom of  the  Talmud  with  the  most 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  102) 


HERMAN-SIPE  &  COMPANY,  INC. 

General  Contractors  .  .  .  Building  Material 
CONOVER,  N.  C. 


ALL  PESTS  KILLED  AT  ONCE— NOT  EXCUSES — "RESULTS" 
All  Services  Carry  a  Bona-Fide  Guarantee 


FREE  INSPECTIONS       dial  BR.  3-6253 


Fayetteville         High  Point         GREENSBORO,  N.  C.  Wilson 


Piedmont  Chemical  Industries,  Inc. 

OILS      -:-      SOAPS      -:-     FINISHES      -:-  BLEACH 
P.  0.  Box  790  Phone  2-4159 

HIGH  POINT,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


Colonial  Motor  Freight  Line,  Inc. 

SERVING  NORTH  CAROLINA  —  VIRGINIA 
DISTRICT  OF  COLUMBIA  —  MARYLAND 

General  Offices 
HIGH  POINT,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


4i 


Reflections  On  The  American  Scene 


(Concluded  from  Page  10) 


ton  ;  it  democracy  fails  here  to  real- 
ize its  lull  potentialities,  where  else 
will  it  prosper? 

As  we  look  around  the  world  we 
find  our  democratic  idea  embattled 
and  defensive.  It  has  its  sanctuary 
in  the  American  hemisphere.  It  still 
exists  on  the  northern  and  western 
fringes  of  Europe.  There  is  an  oc- 
casional lonely  outpost  in  Asia  and 
Africa.  But  let  us  not  forget  that 
the  majority  of  the  world's  popula- 
tion is  governed  by  autocratic  au- 
thoritarian and  despotic  regimes. 
Democracy  is  a  minority  system  of 
government  and  culture  in  the 
world. 

Let  us  remember  with  awe  that 
between  the  decline  of  the  Athenian 
city-state  and  the  American  Decla- 
ration of  Independence,  not  a  sin- 
gle democracy  with  any  general 
scope  of  influence  was  established 
anywhere  across  the  face  of  the 
globe.  If,  in  this  land,  democracy 
can  reconcile  freedom  with  security, 
all  mankind  will  follow  that  light. 
If  democracy  fails  here,  it  has  no 
future  in  the  world. 

Those  throughout  the  world  who 
conceive  democracy  to  be  the  high- 
est expression  of  man's  social  per- 
sonality cannot  regard  America's 
destiny  as  that  of  a  foreign  state. 
Multitudes  everywhere  are  deeply 
affected  by  the  currents  of  your  life. 

I  hold  the  constitutional  genius 
of  her  fathers  to  be  by  far  the  most 
impressive  of  America's  achieve- 
ments —  more  so,  I  venture  to  sug- 
gest, even  than  the  rivers  of  ma- 
terial abundance  which  have  been 
made  to  gush  forth  from  the  infi- 
nite sources  of  her  wealth  and  en- 
terprise. 


The  issue  for  humanity  is  not 
whether  it  can  have  freedom  or 
abundance  —  but  whether  it  can 
have  both,  united  in  a  joyous  equi- 
librium between  individual  enter- 
prise and  social  discipline.  Here,  I 
believe,  the  example  of  America 
will  be  more  important  than  her 
exertions.  Democracy  cannot  be  im- 
ported; it  cannot,  of  course,  be  sold 
01  enforced.  It  tan  only  be  radiated 
by  the  inherent  strength  of  a  suc- 
cessful example. 

That  is  why  the  great  constitu- 
tional issues  in  your  Republic  — 
civil  rights  and  the  full  flowering  of 
a  democratic  society  —  are  not  es- 
sentially domestic  issues.  They  af- 
fect international  issues  of  awesome 
scope. 

Israel  herself  has  recently  seen 
something  of  the  dynamic  force  of 
example.  There  is  now  a  great  pil- 
grimage to  Israel  from  representa- 
tives of  some  20  nations  in  Asia 
and  Africa,  younger  in  their  inde- 
pendence than  we.  They  are  seeking 
to  draw  upon  our  accumulated  re- 
sources of  pioneering,  to  find  out 
how  our  small  people  lias  managed 
10  reconcile  political  liberty  with 
economic  dynamism  from  an  aus- 
tere starting  point  of  scarcity  and 
travail. 

(To  be  concluded  in  our 
October  issue) 


Israel  is  the  51st  state  of  the 
United  States,  and  as  such  is  emu- 
lating that  country  "in  the  arms 
race  and  in  other  aspects  of  foreign 
policy,"  Moscow  charged  in  an 
Arab-language  broadcast  beamed 
to  the  countries  in  the  Middle  East. 


Greetings 


ODELL 

MILL  SUPPLY  COMPANY 

"Everything  for  the  Mills" 

300  North  Forbis  Street  Dial  BR  2-2113 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  New  Year 

SMITH,  CLANTON  &  COMPANY 

Profess'.onal  Investment  Service 

SOUTHEASTERN      EUILDIN 3 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


INDUSTRIAL  PIPING  SUPPLY  CO. 


All  Types  of 
PIPING  SUPPLIES 


1501  Dowd  Road  Dial  FR  6-5661 

CHARLOTTE,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


GASTON  ELECTRIC  COMPANY,  Inc. 

ELECTRICAL  SERVICE 

Industrial  Power  and  Wiring 
Fluorescent  Lighting 

MOTORS 

Rewound  —  Rebuilt  —  Repaired 

New  and  Used  Motors  Bought  and  Sold 

Phone  UN  7-7264     P.  0.  Box  921     419  W.  Main  Street 
Gastonia,  N.  C. 


GOSSETT  MACHINE  WORKS 

INCORPORATED 

Manufacturers  and  Repairers  of 

TEXTILE  PARTS 

Drawing  Rolls  a  Specialty 

PIONEERS  FOR  BIG  COILERS 
FOR  CARDS  AND  DRAWING 

W.  Franklin  Ave.  Telephones  UN  5-2368— UN  5-2369 

GASTONIA,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


42 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


HOLIDAY  GREETINGS  FROM 


MCO  SUPPLY,  INC. 


FASTENER  AND  TOOL  SPECIALISTS 
Shop  Equipment  —  Shelving  —  Storage  Racks 

1815  E.  Wendover  Ave.  GREENSBORO.  N.  C.  Dial  BR  3-3676 


hem 


Greetings 


Hickory  Foundry  and  Machine  Co. 

OUR  GREATEST  ASSET  -  YOUR  GOOD  WILL 
26  -  10th  St.,  S.  W.        HICKORY,  N.  C.  Dial  DA  2-4292 


Call  On  Us  for  Quick  Service 
on: 

RING  HOLDERS 
BOBBIN  SHAFT  GEARS 
BOBBIN  GEARS 
SPINDLE  SHAFT  GEARS 

MACHINE  AND 
FOUNDRY  CO. 
GASTONIA,  N.  C. 


KLUTTZ 


Hickory -Fry  Furniture  Co.,  Inc. 

Manufacturers  of 

Living  Room  Chairs  —  Sectional  Chairs 

Dial  DI  5-2227  HICKORY,  N.  C.  Box  688 


STANDARD  CHEMICALS  PRODUCTS,  Inc. 

JAMES  M.  MYERS 
Textile  Specialties  and  Textile  Consultant 

Wallace  Bldg.  SALISBURY,  N.  C.  Dial  ME  6-2081 


Piedmont  Mill  Supply  Company,  Inc. 

•  PLUMBING  AND  HEATING  SUPPLIES 

•  INDUSTRIAL  AND  MILL  SUPPLIES 

SALISBURY,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


Greensboro  Loom  Reed  Company 

Manufacturers 
GREENSBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


A  Time  Of  War 

By  Barbara  M.  Ribakove 


In  the  darkness  of  the  tunnel, 
people  moved  —  shifting  slightly, 
huddling  together  against  the  damp 
chill,  murmuring  —  and  falling 
silent.  The  air,  once  still  and  heavy, 
trembled  now  with  the  distant 
sound  of  whining  motors.  Men 
spoke  in  whispers  or  not  at  all, 
and  fear  crouched  beside  them. 

But  above  the  whine,  above  the 
murmurs,  a  voice  rose.  At  the  end 
ol  the  tunnel  a  candle  appeared, 
held  aloft.  In  its  glow  a  man  played 
a  tiny  portable  organ,  finding  the 
stops  by  candlelight.  Beside  him 
walked  another  man,  from  whom 
the  words  and  the  melody  came: 
"I  shall  know  no  fear  .  .  . 
The  Lord  is  with  me  .  .  . 
When  the  Lord  is  with  me 
Who  shall  stand  against  me  .  .?" 

Outside  the  sirens  wailed  and  the 
bombs  fell.  In  the  tunnel  people 
lifted  their  heads  and  listened  to 
the  song. 

The  year  was  1940,  the  place 
London.  The  singer  was  Jakob 
Goldstein,  once  Cantor  of  Vilna, 
now  the  beloved  Hazzan  of  Lon- 
don's Great  Synagogue,  and  he  was 
singing  to  the  greatest  congregation 
of  his  life,  the  twelve  thousand  men 
and  women  of  England,  lew  and 
non-Jew,  who  huddled  together 
every  night  in  the  Manor  House 
lube  Station  while  the  Luftwaffe 
roared  over  London. 

Life  had  not  been  easy  for  the 
Cantor  since  the  beginning  of  the 
war.  More  and  more  of  the  hard- 
pressed  Rabbi's  duties  fell  on  him. 
Daily  he  visited  members  of  the 
congregation  in  their  homes.  After- 
noons he  traveled  from  one  London 
hospital  to  another,  and  his  Polish- 
accented  English  became  known  in 
every  ward  and  infirmary.  At  night 
he  waited,  like  the  rest  of  the  city, 
lor  the  motors  and  the  bombs  — 
whenever  the  flames  of  a  hit  could 
be  seen  from  his  window,  Cantor 
Goldstein  left  his  home  and,  in  his 
white  clerical  collar  and  black  suit, 
dodged  fire  engines  and  lorries  to 
get  to  the  bombing  site.  Once  he 
estimated  that  he  saw  and  spoke 
to  three  thousand  people  in  a  single 
day;  ordinarily  he  had  no  time  to 
count. 

One  night  when  the  raid  was 
heavy,  Cantor  Goldstein  and  his 
wife,  Tiba,  took  shelter  in  the  Man 
or  House  Station.  Picking  their  way 
through  the  dark,  crowded  tunnel, 
they  were  recognized  by  a  congrega- 
tion member.  "Reverend,"  a  voice 


said,  "could  you  sing— maybe— just 
a  little  song?"  Cantor  Goldstein 
stopped.  He  peered  into  the  dark. 
"But  everyone  is  asleep,"  he  pro- 
tested. The  man  shook  his  head. 
"We're  really  not  sleeping.  Please, 
Cantor,  my  wife  is  not  taking  it 
so  well  ..."  The  Cantor  stooped 
down.  Very  softly,  he  began  a  song, 
a  Yiddish  song,  quiet  and  tender. 
His  eyes  grew  accustomed  to  the 
dark,  and  he  could  see  the  woman 
raise  her  face,  smiling.  Around  her, 
other  people  stirred,  sat  up.  The 
Cantor  finished  the  song,  and  rose. 
Instantly  another  voice  spoke  out. 
"Reverend  how  about  —  Die 
Sterne?"  This  time  he  didn't  hesi- 
tate. 

The  next  day,  he  found  a  man 
who  could  play  a  portable  organ 
by  candlelight. 

And  so  began  the  strangest  series 
of  Jewish  music  concerts  ever  given. 
Seven  nights  a  week  until  the  blitz 
of  London  was  over,  Cantor  Gold- 
stein sang  his  way  through  the 
tunnel  of  Manor  House  Station. 
He  sang  every  song  he  knew  — 
Israeli    folk    songs,    Russian  and 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  104) 


Catalina 

MOTOR  LODGE 


Recommended  by 
DUNCAN  HINES 


§ 

§ 
§ 
§ 

§  Super  Hwy.  U.  S.  29  North 


Continental  Breakfast 
Television — Colored 
Telephones  In  Every  Room 

—AIR-CONDITIONED— 
—  SWIMMING  POOL  — 
—PUTTING  GREEN— 


GREENVILLE,  S.  C. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


43 


Wilmington,  N.  C. 

MRS.  NORMA  MAY,  Correspondent 


MRS.  FRANKLIN  LEE  BLOCK 


Wendy  Hope  Barshay,  daughter 
of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Samuel  L.  Bar- 
shay of  Summerville,  S.  C,  became 
the  bride  of  Lt.  Franklin  Lee  Block, 
son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Charles  M. 
Block  of  Wilmington,  N.  C,  at 
Temple  Beth  Elohim,  Charleston, 
S.  C,  on  June  14th.  Rabbi  Allan 
Tarshish  performed  the  ceremony. 

The  bride  was  given  in  mar- 
riage by  her  father.  Elizabeth  Bar- 
shay was  her  sister's  maid  of  honor. 

Bridesmaids  were  Miss  Mary 
Elizabeth  Block  of  Wilmington, 
sister  of  the  bridegroom;  Miss  Jane 


Ester  Barshay,  sister  of  the  bride; 
Miss  Ann  Banks,  and  Mrs.  Thomas 
Simmons,  all  of  Summerville,  and 
Miss  Lynn  Dumas  and  Miss  Dena 
Segall,  both  of  Charleston. 

Lt.  Block's  father  served  as  best 
man. 

Ushers  included  [oy  Wilks  of 
Newport  News,  Va.;  Fred  and 
David  Block,  both  of  Wilmington; 
Howard  Guld  of  Raleigh;  Rupert 
Pate  of  Augusta,  Ga.;  Hayman 
Barshay  of  Wilson,  and  Maz  Brener 
of  Chattanooga,  Tenn. 


The  couple  are  making  their 
home  in  Fort  Sill,  Okla.,  where  Lt. 
Block  is  serving  with  the  Army. 

Mrs.  Block  is  a  graduate  of  Sum- 
merville High  School.  She  attended 
Ashely  Hall  in  Charleston,  and  also 
the  College  of  Charleston. 

Lt.  Block  was  graduated  from 
Admiral  Farragut  Naval  Academy 
at  Toms  River,  N.  }.,  and  from  The 
Citadel  at  Charleston. 

If  there  is  one  home  in  the  city 
of  Wilmington  that  has  entertain- 
ed more  beautiful  girls  than  any 
other,  it  would  certainly  be  that  of 


Mrs.  Hannah  Block.  And  this 
comes  as  no  accident,  because  the 
girls  themselves  beat  a  path  to  her 
door. 

For  the  past  several  years  Mrs. 
Block  has  made  a  hobby  of  train- 
ing girls  for  beauty  contests  on  a 
local,  state-wide,  and  national  basis. 
Wherever  you  find  a  prominent 
contest,  chances  are  that  Hannah 
wifl  be  the  coach  behind  the  scenes. 

The  work  does  not  end  in  her 
home,  for  on  most  occasions  she 
accompanies  her  protege  as  official 
chaperone.    Atlantic    City    is  no 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  63) 


.,.  FUNCTIONAL  SMARTNESS  AT  ITS  RELAXING  BEST  I 

Every  bit  as  restful  as  it  looks  .  .  .  Contour's  body-conforming 
design  provides  head-to-toe  support  and  elevates  your  legs  as 
prescribed  for  perfect  relaxation!  Then,  too  .  .  .  only  the  original 
Contour  adjusts  to  any  of  many  positions  without  changing 
correct  sitting  posture  .  .  .  and  tingling  Viveration,  overall  massage, 
that  stimulates  circulation  gives  you  the  ultimate  in  relaxation  . . . 

THf  OKICINAl 


TRY  A  CONTOUR  IN '-YOUR-  SIZE 


Otto  Gaskins,  Inc. 

316  S.  Greene  St. 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 


IOUNCI  CHAIR 

CALL 

BR  5-8454 


44 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Hendersonville,  N.  €. 


Greetings 


Mr.  &  Mrs.  ]ac\  Schulman 


Hendersonville,  N.  C. 


New  Year  Greetings 


Coca-Cola  Bottling  Co. 

HENDERSONVILLE,  N.  C. 


G  reetings 

Osceola  Inn 

JOE  RUBEN 
Owner  —  Manager 

Hendersonville,  N.  C. 


WHITLEY  DRUGS 

Prescription 
Specialists 

Dial  OX  3-9700 
117  Seventh  Avenue  East 
HENDERSONVILLE,  N.  C. 


Sharpe  Motor  Lines,  Inc. 

COURTEOUS  -:-  DEPENDABLE 

P.  O.  Box  Insured  Motor  Freight  Service  Dial 

517  HILDEBRAN,  NORTH  CAROLINA         EX  7-3837 

To  and  From 

The  Carolinas — The  Virginias — Maryland — New  York — New  Jersey 
Ohio — Pennsylvania — Indiana — Illinois — Michigan 
Kentucky — Tennessee — Georgia 


(ROSS  COTTON  MILLS  COMPANY 


Double  Carded  and  Combed 
KNITTING  YARNS 


MARION,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


A  Program  For  Jewish  Teen-Agers 

By  Burton  Donner 


During  the  past  nine  summers, 
more  than  125  Jewish  teen-agers 
put  in  long  hours  in  heavy  manual 
labor— and  have  gladly  paid  for  the 
opportunity  to  do  so. 

They  have  been  participants  in 
the  nine  work  camps  in  nine  states 
organized  by  the  American  Jewish 
Society  for  Service,  which  was  or- 
ganized in  1950  "to  put  into  prac- 
tice the  ideals  of  Judaism  by  con- 
crete acts  of  service,"  in  the  words 
of  the  Society's  president,  Henry 
Kohn,  a  New  York  attorney. 

The  Society  has  sent  these  young- 
sters to  points  throughout  the 
United  States  to  help  rebuild  dam- 
aged areas  or  to  construct  new 
buildings  where  a  need  existed  and 
the  budget  was  limited. 

They  have  built  toilet  and  show- 
er faciliites  for  Negro  children  in 


Winchester,  New  Hampshire;  they 
aided  in  rebuilding  an  area  in  an 
Indianapolis  slum;  they  helped  re- 
pair flood  damage  in  Winsted, 
Connecticut. 


The  idea  for  such  ^  "program  oc- 
curred many  years  'ago  uY'  three 
Reform  rabbis,  Ferdinand  Isserman 
of  St.  Louis,  Arthur  Lelyveld  of 
New  York,  and  Isador  Hoffman, 
Jewish  student  counselor  at  Colum- 
bia Unversity.  In  1949,  Rabbi  Is- 
serman, who  had  confirmed  Kohn, 
asked  the  attorney  whether  he 
would  undertake  to  establish  such 
a  program.  Kohn  assembled  a 
group  of  lay  people  and  the  Society 
was  launched. 

It  is  a  simple  operation.  Its  head- 
cpiarters  are  in  Kohn's  Manhattan 
law  office.  It  has  no  paid  staff,  no 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  92) 


Plain  Talk 

(Concluded  from  Page  6) 


to  wander  away  from  the  text  in  the 
book.  I  shall  be  thinking.  Anyway, 
I  have  learned  something  of  what 
I'm  in  the  world  for  during  those 
runaway  years.  I'm  here  to  try  to  be 
a  fairly  decent  person,  to  under- 
stand that  I'm  in  the  world  as  kins- 
man to  all  others  in  it,  to  care 
about  my  troubled  neighbors,  to 
know  how  much  is  enough  to  have 
in  my  pocket  or  in  the  safe  deposit 
box.  Isn't  that  about  all  of  being 
a  worthy  Jew  through  the  coming 
year? 

(Not  that  I  have  lived  up  to 
these  ideals  all  the  time.  Oh,  I  do 
fall  down  ever  so  often.) 

So,  it  appears  that  all  those  hur- 
rying Rosh  Hashonahs  have  left  me 
with  something  worthwhile,  after 
all  —  this  bit  of  wisdom,  three  good 
sons,  seven  grandchildren  —  but, 


oh,  if  those  kids  could  be  kept  from 
driving  cars  until  they're  30,  at 
least,  grandpa  would  feel  so  much 
happier. 

After  having  meditated  on  my 
own  in  the  Rosh  Hashonah  service 
in  the  temple,  I  shall  turn  to  page 
171  of  the  Union  Prayer  Book 
where  it  reads:  "Father  of  mercies! 
We  do  not  pray  for  ourselves  alone, 
but  for  all  Thy  children.  May  the 
recognition  of  our  own  failings 
lead  us  to  be  patient  with  the  short- 
comings of  others." 


KALMIA  DAIRY 

COOPERATIVE 

Everything  In  Dairy  Products 
HENDERSONVILLE,  N.  C. 


When  you  think  of 

HENDERSONVILLE 

and  The  Land  of  the  Sky — 
Think  of  .  .  . 

The  Skyland  Hotel 

When  you  visit  colorful 

HENDERSONVILLE 
Stop  at  .  .  . 

The  Skyland  Hotel 

Free  Parking     TV  Available 
Dial  OXford  3-4241 


New  Year  Greetings  .... 

Camp  Osceola 

Charles  Parmet,  Director 
Hendersonville,  N.  C. 


PACE  HEATING  & 
PLUMBING  CO. 


Heating  and 

Cooling 
Equipment 


Residential  —  Commercial 
131  4th  Ave.  E.       Dial  OX  3-7642 
HENDERSONVILLE,  N.  C 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


45 


Aroukd  Greensboro 

MRS.  RICHARD  FORMAN  and  MRS.  DANIEL  HOLLANDER, 
Correspondents 


Phil  Levine,  Joe  Rubin  and  Harvey  Goldberg; 


The  picture  above  shows  just  a 
few  of  the  many  members  of  the 
Greensboro  AZA-BBG  performing 
at  the  B'nai  B'rith  State  Conven- 
tion on  May  2.  These  youngsters 
put  in  many  long  hours  of  hard 
work  on  this  program  to  earn  our 
applause  on  a  job  well  done. 

Hie  North  Carolina  B.B.Y.O. 
.Summer  Convention  was  also  held 
in  Greensboro  June  ytlwith  at 
Woman's  College.  The  theme  of 
the  convention  was  Furthering 
Jewish  Education,  about  which  all 
oratory  and  debate  topics  centered. 
The  convention  co-chairmen,  Joe- 
Rubin  and  Michele  Gray,  who 
were  also  elected  to  represent 
Greensboro  as  Beau  and  Sweet- 
heart, respectively,  did  a  fine  job 
along  with  head  adult  advisor,  Mr. 
Richard  Forman.  The  schedule 
was  filled  with  religious,  cultural, 
athletic  and  social  functions.  Tro- 
phies were  presented  in  the  athletic 
and  cultural  events.  All  of  the 
Greensboro  AZA  -  BBG  members 
and  their  advisors  should  indeed 
be  proud  of  their  accomplishments 
the   past   season,   for   it   is  only 


through  their  cooperation  and  ef- 
fort that  the  convention  proved  to 
be  both  an  enlightening  and  an 
entertaining  experience  lor  all 
concerned. 

Sarah  fane  Weinstein,  daughter 
ol  Mr.  and  Mis.  Milton  Weinstein, 
was  married  at  noon  August  23rd 
at  home  to  Jay  Stanford  Goodman 
ol  Baltimore,  Md.,  son  of  Dr.  and 
Mrs.  Julius  S.  Goodman  of  Balti- 
more. 

Rabbi  Fred  I.  Rypins  of  Temple 
Emanuel  officiated  at  the  cere- 
mony. 

The  bride  was  given  away  by  her 
lather,  and  attended  by  her  sister, 
Miss  Anne  Harriett  Weinstein. 
The  bridegroom's  faher  was  best 
man. 

Our  heartfelt  congratulations  go 
to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  David  Zauber  on 
the  birth  of  their  son,  David  Nor- 
man Zauber  Junior,  April  28th. 

On  June  22nd,  Dr.  and  Mrs. 
Harvey  Rubin  became  the  proud 
parents  of  a  daughter,  Ruth  Ellen. 
I  hey  have  our  best  wishes. 


'□ran  nan)  m 


Greetings 


THE  BANK  OF  GREENSBORO 

Southeastern  Bldg.  621  S.  Elm  St. 

1804  Battleground  Ave.  936  Summit  Ave. 

3101  Spring  Garden  St. 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  Xew  Year  from  the  Folloiuing  Firms  in 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


AIONTALDO'S 

GREENSBORO 


I' 


Rare   Venetian  Glass 

.  .  .  inspiration  for  the  English  wool  jersey 
that  Jo  Copeland  of  Palullo  gently  manipu- 
lates into  one  of  this  autumn's  newest,  love- 
liest suits  — 


From  our  new  Designers  Collection 


Air-Conditioned  Television  Room  Telephones 

Tile  Bath  —  Tub  and  Shower  —  Wall-to-Wall  Carpets 


THE.  SEAL  OF  EXCELLENCE 


SWIMMING 
POOL 


TRAVEL  SUPERIOR 


ourney  s 

Highway  220  North 
2310  Battleground  Rd. 

Mrs.  Edith  C.  Price 
Owner-Manager 


End  Motel  Court 


Inside  City  Limits 
Near  Charcoal  Steak  House 

Dial  BR  3-8216 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 


46 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


RENT  —  WHY  BUY?  —  WE  SUPPLY 

GENERAL  LINEN  SUPPLY  SERVICE 

LOCALLY  OWNED  AND  OPERATED 

Why  Send  Your  Morey  Out  of  Town? 
123  W.  Lewis  Street       GREENSBORO,  N.  C.  Dial  BR  2-7182 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS  

TOMLINSON  COMPANY,  INC, 


Plumbing,  Heating,  and 
Industrial  Supplies 


Greensboro,  N.  C. 


Durham,  N.  C. 


Holiday  Greetings  .... 

The  Jac\  Smith  Realty  Co. 

REALTORS 

1057  Battleground  Avenue  Dial  BR  5-8551 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


RIC  CO. 


Contractors  &  Engineers 

Residential  —  Commercial  —  Industrial 

Electric  Service 
Wiring     •     Fixtures     •     Electric  Radiant  Heating 

1421  Battleground    GREENSBORO,  N.  C.    Dial  BR  5-4544 


•  A  HAPPY  NEW  YEAR  • 

Our  Very  Best  Wishes  to  Our  Many  Jewish  Friends 

Bullock  and  Humble 


year-round  Weathermaker  Distributor 
1027  Oakmont  Dial  BR  4-4050  Greensboro,  N.  C. 


Inbal:  An  Emerging  Israel  Folk  Dance 

By  Sara  Levi-Tanai 

Director,  Inbal  Dance  Theatre  of  Israel 

Returning  for  a  second  American  tour  this  Fall,  the  INBAL  dancers 
will  in  the  next  three  months  be  seen  in  some  twenty-five  American  and 
Canadian  communities,  extending  from  Boston  to  Vancouver,  and  from  New 
York  to  Los  Angeles,  as  a  feature  of  tine  cultural  exchange  program  of  the 
American-Israel  Cultural  Foundation,  sponsors  of  the  tour  which  will  he 
under  the  management  of  S.  Hurok.  In  this  article,  the  director  of  the  troupe 
tells  of  the  aims,  aspirations  and  philosophy  of  this  dance  group  which  John 
Martin,  dance  critic  of  the  New  York  Times,  called  "a  rich  and  rare  treat. 
Nothing  remotely  like  it  has  been  seen  in  these  pars  before."  THE  EDITOR. 

Ten  years  ago  a  group  of  young 
men  and  women  of  Yemenite  or- 
gin  met  in  a  small  hall  in  north 
Tel  Aviv.  They  themselves  weren't 
clear  about  what  they  wanted. 
Should  they  form  a  theatre  or 
dance  group?  Should  they  restrict 
themselves  to  Vemenite  folklore  or 
should  they  be  an  Israeli  group 
made  up  of  members  of  Oriental 
background? 

One  thing  wa 
there  was  a  great 
pression.  The  Yemenite  Jews  have 
a  rich  store  of  experience  and  folk- 
lore and  there  was  no  need  to  go 
looking  lor  material.  We  began 
to  sing  and  to  dance.  But  even 
from  the  beginning  it  was  clear 
to  us  that  our  Yemenite  Sources 
alone  would  not  be  sufficient.  Our 
aim  was  the  creation  of  a  perman- 
ent professional  group,  and  not  the 
occasional  union  of  people  who  are 
preparing  one  or  two  programs. 
What  course  then  should  we  take? 


certain:  that 
onging  for  ex- 


The  story  of  the  development 
ol  Inbal  cannot  be  told  in  a  few 
words.  Our  ideas  became  clearer 
to  us  as  we  worked.  Little  by 
little,  step  after  step,  the  project 
developed,  the  repertory  grew  and 
now  three  curents  can  be  distin- 


SAR  \  LEVI-TANAI 

guished  in  the  work  of  the  com- 
pany: 

(1)  The  Yemenite  current,  bas- 
ed upon  the  tradition  and  folk- 
lore of  the  Yemenites.  This  trend 
also  includes  original  songs  and 
stylized   Yemenite  movement. 

(2)  The  Biblical  current,  free- 
ly-shaped works  on  subjects  taken 
from  the  Bible.  Here,  also,  the 
movement  is  chiefly  Yemenite,  but 
is  is  augmented  by  a  tendency  to 
broaden  and  enrich  the  movement 
and  to  make  it  express  the  drama. 


Greetings 


From  The 


FRIENDLY  SHOPPING  CENTER,  INC 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Greetings 


from  the 

Starmouht  Compact 

Greensboro,  N.  C. 


1  lie  American  jewisn  iimm-uuiluuk 


(3)  The  Israeli  current.  The 
spiritual  tension  in  the  building 
of  the  new  Israel  naturally  in- 
fluences every  Israeli  artist  who 
shares  the  life  of  his  nation.  The 
feeling  for  the  old-new  landscape, 
the  joy  of  redeeming  the  land  and 
the  desert,  and  the  struggle  for 
existence— all  these  supply  a  rich 
mass  of  material. 

Ten  years  ago  the  whole  proj- 
ect seemed  a  daring  thing.  The 
pupils  had  never  studied  dancing 
or  acting.  All  came  from  religious 
families,  where  the  theatre  is  sy- 
nonymous with  idleness,  or  even 
profligacy.  The  teacher  herself  was 
not  over-burdened  with  artistic 
training.  She  had  only  directed 
performances  given  by  amateurs 
in  schools  and  kibbutzim,  and 
several  appearances  with  young 
groups  and  in  children's  theatres. 
None  of  us  had  any  conception  of 
the  dance  as  an  art  in  its  own 
right.  ~! 

However,  "the  Lord  watches 
lools."  Naive  as  we  were,  we  sang 
1  he  songs  of  Weraen  and  the  new 
songs  of  Israel.  We  performed  Ye- 
menite dances  and  Israeli  shep- 
herd dances.  Our  very  first  ap- 
pearances, with  all  their  unripe- 
ness, caught  the  public  interest 
especially  in  the  workers'  settle- 
ments which  felt  that  Inbal  was 
near  to  them  in  spirit.  After  every 
appearance  in  some  isolated  settle 


H.  L.  COBLE 

Construction  Co. 


Building  Construction 
Of  All  Types 

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1705  Battleground  Ave. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


merit  or  large  kibbutz  the  same  cry 
was  heard:  this  is  ours;  we  under- 
stand it.  Here  the  young  group 
found  much  encouragement. 

Then  through  the  American- 
Israel  Cultural  Foundation,  spon- 
sors of  the  American  tours  of 
Inbal,  came  great  help.  Artists  like 
Jerome  Robbins  and  Anna  Soko- 
low  were  sent  to  Israel  to  help 
develop  this  budding  enterprise. 
Miss  Sokolow  visited  Israel  several 
times,  trained  the  members  of  the 
group  and  laid  the  foundation  for 
organized  and  professional  work. 
She  helped  prepare  Inbal  for  the 
most  daring  of  all  our  dreams— 
our  first  tour  of  Europe  and  the 
United  Nations  and  Canada  in 
1957.  And  she  returned  this  past 
summer  to  work  with  us  in  pre- 
paration of  our  second  American 
tour  this  Fall. 

As  a  Jewish,  Israeli  and  Orient- 
al group,  Inbal  draws  from  rich 
spiritual  storehouses.  The  thou- 
sand-year-old culture  of  Isarel, 
which  has  stood  the  test  of  tor- 
ment and  shame,  supplies  every 
artist  participating  in  the  life  of 
his  nation  with  innumberable  top- 
ics. What  is  also  important  is  the 
spiritual  content  stored  in  every 
subject;  the  fruit  of  an  ancient, 
continuous  culture.  This  makes 
the  dramatic  touch  of  the  Jewish, 
Biblical  or  Israeli  subject  more 
poignant.  For  even  when  we  come 
to  deal  with  a  new  Israeli  subject 
we  are  imbued  with  the  feeling  of 
our  ancient  landscape.  The  figure 
of  the  modern  Israeli  farmer  and 
fighter  does  not  fall  short  of  its 
precursors  in  the  Bible,  for  the 
modern  Israeli  has  also  sprung  11  p 
faithful  to  our  ancient  sources. 


BUILDING 
MATERIALS 

WHOLESALE  —  RETAIL 
For 

Complete  Service 
On  Your  Building  Needs 
DIAL  BR  3-3491 

Guaranteed 
Waterproofing 
Company 

Building  Material  Division 
2203  Sullivan  St. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Greensboro's  friendliest  store  since  1 


On  Jefferson  Square 
Friendly  Shopping  Center 
Greensboro,  N,  C. 


Guilford  Galleries,  Inc. 

"COMPLETE  HOME  INTERIOR  DESIGNERS" 
*  Furniture       ::  Carpets       ::  Draperies      *  Accessories 
363  N.  Elm  St.  Dial  BR  4-5478 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


pHOTO-ENGRAVEr 


ail 


ZINC  AND  COPP€ft  ETCHINGS 
BEN  DAY_HALFTON€S  .COLOR  PIAT€S 


D€/IGnS 


DAILY  n€W/ 
B  V/ 1  LP  I  n  G  r-i—r- 


UTTCRinG 


GR€€n/60RO 

xz  noRTHCfiRtyirm 


F.  J.  McFADYEN  PLUMBING  (0. 

Heating  and  Plumbing  Contractors 
611  W.  Lee  St.     GREENSBORO,  N.  C.     Dial  BR  2-9953 


HOME  OF 

TIMEIAfiFSCLOTHES 


Johnson  &  Aulbert 

CLOT-HING  COAAPANY 

120  N.  Elm  St.  Greensboro,  N.  C. 


YOUNG'S  LANDSCAPE  SERVICE 

All  Types  Evergreens,  Shrubs,  Roses 
Landscape  Designing 

2708  Battleground  Avenue  Dial  BR  2-1010 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


TUCKER -JONES  FURNITURE  CO.,  Inc. 

Complete  Home  Furnishings 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C.        Dial  BR  3-1308 


341-343  S.  Elm 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Very  Happy  New  Year 

SOUTHEASTERN  ADJUSTMENT  (0, 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


48 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


LET  US  BEAUTIFY  YOUR  RUGS  FOR  THE  HOLIDAYS 

SERUNIAN  &  SONS,  INC. 

"Best  Known,  Known  As  the  Best" 
1131  Grove  St.         GREENSBORO,  N.  C         Dial  BR  2-2294 


Ambulance  Quick! 


1118  N.  Elm  Street 


BR  5-8408 

Forbis  &  Dick  Funeral  Service 

Greensboro,  N.  C. 


EGERTON  WHOLESALE  COMPANY 

CIGARS  —  CONFECTIONS 
Fountain  and  Institutional  Supplies 

224  N.  Forbis  St.  GREENSBORO,  N.  C.  Dial  BR  2-3161 


Sales  -  Service 


BLACK 
CADILLAC  -  OLDS  CO. 

304  E.  Market  St.    Dial  BE  5-9641 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


SUNSET  HILLS 
DRUG  CO. 

Prescription  Specialists 

1610  Madison  Avenue 

Dial  BR  2-5149 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


LAWNDALE 
PASTRY  SHOP 

Specializing  in 

Birthday  &  Wedding  Cakes 
Bread  -  Pastries  -  Pies 
Fresh  Daily 

2144  Lawndale      BR  5-3495 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


GATE  CITY  ROOFING  CO.,  Inc. 

APPROVED  BARRETT  ROOFERS 
SLATE  &  TILE  ROOFING 

402  Tipton  PI.        GREENSBORO,  N.  C.        Phone  BR  4-0166 


903  W.  Lee  St. 


DAVIS  TIRE  &  RECAPPING  CO 

HEADQUARTERS  FOR  U.  S.  ROYAL  TIRES 
RECAPPING  —  FRONT  END  AND 
BRAKE  SERVICE 

GREENSBORO,  N  .C.  Dial  BR  5-9633 


EDWARDS  SEAT  COVER  CENTER 

COMPLETE  AUTO  UPHOLSTERY  —  AUTO  TOPS 

234  E.  Gaston  St.       GREENSBORO,  N.  C.         Dial  BR  4-7489 


CURTIS  WOODWORK  —  BUILDERS  HARDWARE 
ROOFING  MATERIALS 

§  Guilford  Builders  Supply  Co.,  Inc. 

1621  Battleground  Ave.    Greensboro,  N.  C.    Dial  BR  3-9481 


As  a  Jewish  ethnic  group  whose 
place  of  exile  has  remained  the 
Orient,  we  have  at  our  command 
folklore  which  has  rich  ancient 
and  Oriental  traits.  It  can  be  said 
of  Inbal  that  the  problems  of  what 
to  do  and  what  material  to  draw 
on,  does  not  even  exist.  The 
sources,  the  material,  the  back- 
ground, and  the  stimulus  exist  in 
a  blinding  and  oppressive  abun- 
dance. There  is  a  feeling  that  the 
silence  of  generations  has  been 
broken  and  the  song  burst  forth. 

When  Yeshayahu,  Yehuda,  Sho- 
shanah  or  Margalith  sing,  one  can 
hear  in  their  voices  the  lamenta- 
tion of  the  desert  in  its  broad  ex- 
penses of  wasteland,  distress  of  the 
individual  in  the  burning  land- 
scape of  the  Orient,  the  same  in- 
tense and  charming  landscape 
which  brought  forth  stormy  pro- 
phets, stubborn  farmers  and  shep- 
herds, the  visionaries  of  one  great 
wide  world,  in  which  the  human 
species  lives  n  brotherhood  and 


the  Lord  of  Justice  is  his  Lord. 

On  such  a  spiritual  basis  almost 
every  dance  receives  a  deep  and 
symbolic  meaning.  Without  cut- 
ting itself  off  from  the  roots  of 
reality,  this  expression  rises  to 
exalted  heights. 

In  ten  years  we  have  created 
about  fifteen  dance-pieces  which 
form  the  basis  for  the  technique 
of  Inbal,  five  of  them  never  before 
seen  in  America.  This  is  a  treasure 
and  the  movements  have  broaden- 
ed during  the  years.  Now  it  is  also 
beginning  to  be  crystalized.  But 
the  act  of  branching  out  involves 
no  diminution  of  strength.  Cease- 
lessly new  movements  penetrated 
by  a  generally  Oriental  influence 
are  being  added  to  the  elements 
of  the  Yemenite  dance,  movement 
and  gesture.  Yemen  lies  in  the 
southern  part  of  the  Arabian  pen- 
insula and  it  is  near  Africa  and 
India;  what  wonder  then  that  the 
influence  of  these  nearby  coun- 
tries is  felt  in  its  song  and  dance? 


Thank  You,  B'nai  B'rith 

Mr.  Chester  Brown,  Editor 
The  Times  Outlook 
Southeastern  Bldg. 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 

Dear  Chester: 

It  is  my  pleasure  to  extend  congratulations  on  behalf  of  the  District 
and  myself  on  the  25th  anniversary  of  your  valuable  publication. 

I  want  to  congratulate  you  and  your  staff  on  the  excellent  manner 
in  which  this  publication  is  being  produced,  and  the  very  interesting  con- 
tents, that  your  subscribers  thoroughly  absorb  and  enjoy. 

The  items  carried  in  the  Times-Outlook  include  outstanding  articles 
by  some  of  our  most  prominent,  professional  and  lay  people,  news  of 
importance  to  B'nai  B'rith  and  other  organizations  and  personal  items 
that  everyone  looks  forward  to  reading  about. 

I  would  also  like  to  say  that  the  general  appearance  of  your  publi- 
cation is  not  only  beautiful,  but  lends  itself  to  stimulate  the  immediate 
reading  of  its  contents. 

As  the  years  go  on,  I  want  to  wi^h  you  the  greatest  success  in  con- 
tinuing your  fine  publication.  We  are  indeed  proud  that  this  is  produced 
in  the  southland  in  a  city  like  Greensboro.  I,  of  course,  attribute  the  fine 
quality  to  its  outstanding  editor,  Chester  A.  Brown. 

With  kind  personal  regards. 

Sincerely, 

Julius  Fisher 

Exec.  Secv.,  D.  G.  L.  5 


SPARKLING  CLEAN  IN  "3"  MINUTES 
STEAM  CLEANING,  WAXING,  BUFFING 

New  Management      —      New  Owners 
Marvin  (Red)  Autry  Arnold  T.  Richardson 

1703  Battleground  at  Northwood— Dial  BR  3-3852    'V^  J 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C.  \^ 


ftsso) 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


49 


Brynwood,  Greenwood,  And  Kenwood 

By  Rabbi  Joseph  L.  Baron 


Brynwood  and  Greenwood  are 
lemi-public  places  in  Milwaukee, 
serving  the  needs  of  Jewish  fam- 
ilies, and  pointing  to  the  opposite 
poles  in  the  orbit  of  human  in- 
terest. Brynwood  is  a  country  club. 
Greenwood  is  a  cemetery. 

Brynwood  betokens  life,  the  vig- 
or and  exuberance  of  health,  the 
zest  and  fun  of  youth.  It  is  carpet- 
ed with  rolling  meadows  for  golf- 
ing, equipped  with  a  sparkling 
pool  for  swimming,  supplied  with 
sumptuous  facilities  for  delectable 
refreshments.  It  resounds  with 
laughter  and  the  voice  of  joy. 

Greenwood  is  hushed  in  the  lap 
of  death.  It  is  the  oldest  function- 
ing Jewish  burial-ground  in  the 
city.  The  remains  of  some  of  our 
earliest  pioneers  have  rested  there 
lor  nearly  a  century,  and  period- 
ically its  gates  open  to  receive  a 
new-comer,  in  a  silence  sometimes 
pierced  by  a  sigh  and  a  sob. 

Obviously,  the  two  institutions 
exist  for  two  practical  purposes, 
for  the  need  of  recreation  and  the 
need  of  interment.  Yet  the  ques- 
tion occasionally  arises,  why  a 
specifically  Jewish  club,  why  a 
separate   Jewish  cemetery? 

There  is  a  negative  answer: 
Jews,  especially  where  they  are  in 
considerable  numbers,  find  it  dif- 
ficult to  feel  completely  at  home 
and  relaxed,  or  even  to  gain  ad- 


You'll  Enjoy 


"Potato  Chips" 
H.  W.  Lay  &  Co. 

Incorporated 


mittance,  in  non-sectarian  Chris- 
tian clubs.  And  cemeteries  have 
naturally  followed  a  traditional 
pattern  of  religious  symbols  and 
links. 

There  is  also  a  positive  answer, 
stemming  from  a  third  institution, 
the  synagogue,  of  which  the  most 
venerable  example  in  our  city  is 
located  on  Kenwood  Boulevard. 
And  if  the  "bryn"  in  Brynwood 
symbolizes  the  brine  and  brawn 
of  the  body,  it  the  "green"  in 
Greenwood  calls  to  mimd  the  Bib- 
lical comparison  of  man  to  "grass 
which  in  the  morning  groweth  up 
and  in  the  evening  is  cut  down 
and  withereth,"  then  let  the  "ken" 
in  Kenwood  suggest  the  knowl- 
edge of  God,  which  the  Temple 
has  endeavored  to  channel 
through  several  generations  of  our 
people,  and  which  in  a  measure 
helped  to  determine  the  character 
of  their  personal  lives  and  com- 
munal institutions. 

Judaism  has  distinct  attitudes  in 
matters  of  recreation  and  social  in- 
tercourse. The  Lav:  of  Moses,  for 
instance,  forbids  hunting  as  a 
spoil,  and  any  human  pleasure 
which  involves  the  wanton  inflic- 
tion of  pain  on  a  dumb  animal. 
The  rabbinic  code  has  much  to  say 
regarding  the  sensibilites  of  neigh- 
bors and  guests.  The  Hebrew  cal- 
endar offers  many  oportunities  for 
cultural  and  festival  delights.  Our 
traditions  of  ethics  and  etiquette 
reveal  a  wealth  of  beautiful  cus- 
toms and  profound  insights  on 
fellowship,  entertainment,  joy  and 
sobriety. 


David  L.  Ullman  of  Philadelphia 
was  reelected  chairman  of  National 
Community  Relations  Advisory 
Council  at  its  last  Plenary  Session  in 
Detroit. 


Ballard  Music  Company 

BAND  AND  ORCHESTRA  INSTRUMENTS 
Service  —  Music 

319  North  Ajrcock      GREENSBORO,  N.  C.       Dial  BR  4-7889 


"One  of  Greensboro's  Better  Drug  Stores" 

ELAM  DRUG  COMPANY 

6  DELIVERIES  DAILY 

2112  Walker  Ave.       GREENSBORO,  N.  C.       Dial  BR  5-7278 


•  N  GRLENSBORO 


BOOKS  —  STATIONERY 
GREETING  CARDS— GIFTS 

DIAL  BR  2-0175 
— 107  S.  Greene  Street— 
— Friendly  Shopping  Center — 


MATKIN'S  AUTO  GLASS  CO.,  INC. 

Auto  Glass  Specialists 

224  E.  Gaston  St.  Dial  BR  5-1359 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Hand-Made  Furniture  To  Fit  Your  Every  Need 
Refinishing  —  Kitchen  Cabinets 

Custom  Furniture  and  Fixture  Co. 

2416  Husband  St.     GREENSBORO,  N.  C.     Dial  BR  3-0098 


DIAL  BR  2-7209 

CENTRAL 
Floral  Gardens 

"Flowers  For  All  Occasions" 

WE  DELIVER 
1907  Spring  Garden  Street 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Arnold  Stone  Co. 

Manufacturers  of 
PRECAST  CONCRETE 
BUILDING  MATERIALS 

Dial  681-9501 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C  . 


THOMAS  ELECTRIC  COMPANY 

ELECTRICAL  CONTRACTORS 

Industrial  —  Commercial  —  Residential 
Electric  Installations  and  Wiring 

1660  Sullivan  Street  GREENSBORO,  N.  C.  Dial  BR  5-6459 


SOUTHSIDE  HARDWARE  COMPANY 

"Serving  the  Public  For  Half  a  Century" 
POWER  TOOLS  —  GENERAL  HARDWARE 
WATER  SYSTEMS 

523  S.  Elm  Street  GREENSBORO,  N.  C.  Dial  BR  2-2106 


Standard  Roofing  and  Sheet  Metal  Company 

BONDED  BUILT-UP  ROOFING  AND  SHEET  METAL  WORK 

Commercial  and  Industrial 

119  W.  Lee  Street  Dial  BR  3-2264 

GREENSBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


Call  for  .  .  .  Daily  Bread  Flour  —  Joy  Brand  Corn  Meal 
Security  Dog  Food 

NORTH  STATE  MILLING  COMPANY 

111  West  Bragg         GREENSBORO,  N.  C.         Dial  BR  5-1S55 


5° 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


The  Pied  Piper 
of  the 
Piedmont 


sends  greetings 
to  you  from 

WFMY-TV 

Channel  2 

Greensboro,  N.  C. 


N.  C.  MONROE 

Construction  Co. 

General  Construction 

•  INDUSTRIAL 

•  COMMERCIAL 

•  RESIDENTIAL 

Dial  BR  3-2589 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Home  Specialty  Shop 
FLOOR  COVERINGS 
SHADES  —  BLINDS 

Dial  BR  3-3736 
1300  Battleground  Ave. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


L  I  N  V  I  L  L  E 

Service  Station 

242  S.  Greene  Street 

Dial  BR  2-294J 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


WILLIAMS  STEEL  COMPANY,  INC. 

STEEL  FABRICATORS  —  ORNAMENTAL  IRON 

Call  Us  for  Estimates 
Dial  BR  5-7696  Greensboro,  N.  C. 


3 


CLOTHIERS  AND  FURNISHERS 

107  West  Gaston  Street 

Dial  BR  4-9764 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


W.  A.  SYKES 

NURSERY 
Camellias  —  Azaleas 

All  Plants  Grown  in  N.  C. 

615  Joyner  St.       Dial  BR  2-8788 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


"Set  Ou\  Signs  £Bc  Qjoui  Silent  Salesmen" 

(ALLEN'S  [NjlONDISPLAYS; 


Manufacturers  of  Neon  Signs  &  Letters 


Dial  BR  3-4924 
Plant  and  Main  Office 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 


Dial  2-2222 
Branch  Office 
High  Point,  N.  C. 


PLEASANTS  HARDWARE  CO. 

2  Locations  in  Greensboro 
519  South  Elm  Street  and  Friendly  Shopping  Center 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Fo  r  a  coolc/ean 
teste... 

Nothing  does  it 
like 
&&ven-Up! 

Seven-Up  Bottling  Co. 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


HUNT  &  CO.,  INC. 

Janitor  Supplies 


Distributor  of 
JOHNSON/SXWAX 
PRODUCTS 


321  W.  Lee  St.       BR  4-0076 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


This  is  very,  very  important. 
The  materialistic  trend  is  often 
[lightening,  and  a  country  club 
may  be  symptomatic  of  a  tragic 
degeneracy.  The  vulgarities  of 
affluence,  the  cruelties  of  snob- 
bery, the  debaucheries  of  pleasure, 
the  emptiness  of  pastime,  led  to 
the  ruin  of  many  an  empire,  and 
may  portend  the  most  serious  sub- 
version of  America.  It  may  be 
specially  disastrous  as  a  Jewish 
spectacle.  A  house  devoted  to 
physical  recreation  and  play  must 
have  the  balance  offered  by  the 
house  of  God.  Brynwood  needs 
the  constant  tie  with  Kenwood. 

I  have  faith  in  the  moral  fiber 
of  our  people,  which  accounts  for 
the  basic  strength  of  our  family 
and  community  patterns,  our 
civic  and  vocational  and  personal 
integrity.  I  was  therefore  not  sur- 
prised to  read  the  latest  resolution 
of  the  Brynwood  Board  that  every 
member  must  give  annually  to 
charity  a  sum  at  least  equal  to  the 
year's  aggregate  of  dues,  assess- 
ments and  taxes  imposed  by  the 
club.  It  was  not  surprising,  but 
heartening  as  a  spiritual  reaffir- 
mation of  a  Jewish  country  club, 

In  turn,  symbolically  speaking, 
Brynwood  and  Kenwood  need 
Greenwood. 

It  is  our  hallowed  custom  to 
visit  the  cemetery  during  the 
month  preceding  the  holy  days,  to 
keep  fresh  the  remembrance  of 
departed  ones,  to  maintain  the 
bond  that  is  mightier  than  the 
grave,  and  to  enter  into  the  season- 
al spirit  of  repentance  and  atone- 
ment by  the  contemplation  of 
death. 

A  truly  Jewish  cemetery  forti- 
fies this  purpose.  It  supports  that 
remembrance  and  bond  by  keep- 
ing our  dear  ones  within  their 
natural  frame  of  spiritual  refer- 
ence—the Jewish  community.  Its 
simplicitry  and  serenity  help  us  to 
find  peace  and  resignation.  Its  les- 
son is  that  our  body  cannot  be  pre 
served,  that  it  belongs  to  the  earth. 
And  who,  when  he  lays  to  earth 
that  we  are  but  dust,  can  remain 
puffed  up  by  conceit  and  greed? 

Rabbi  Lipman  Heilprin  of  Bie- 
lostok  once  heard  a  case  involving 
a  bitterly  disputed  piece  of  land. 
He  finally  suggested  that  they  go 
to  inspect  the  property;  and  when 
they  arrived  there,  he  bent  down 


with  his  ear  to  the  ground,  re- 
maining in  that  position  for  a 
little  while.  "What  are  you  do- 
ing?" asked  the  unyielding  liti- 
gants. "Let  me  explain,"  replied 
the  rabbi.  "You're  quarreling  over 
a  bit  of  earth.  Each  of  you  claims 
that  it  belongs  to  him.  So  I 
thought  I'd  consult  the  earth. 
Now,  what  do  you  suppose  I 
heard?  Why,  the  earth  claims  that 
you  both  belong  to  her." 

Unfortunately,  an  alien  drive 
has  invaded  our  cemeteries  and 
disturbed  their  essential  tradition. 
Costly  caskets  and  vaults,  as  if  the 
body  could  be  preserved.  Con- 
spicuous monuments  and  mousol- 
ums  to  stress  the  inequalities  of 
life.  The  vanities  of  our 
mundane  existence  which,  when 
carried  into  the  "home  of 
eternity,"  make  an  ugly  and 
ludicrous  jumble  of  extravagant 
idolatry.  And  now,  the  tendency 
to  run  to  "non-sectarian"  memori- 
al parks,  filled  with  non-Jewish 
motifs,  a  new  mode  of  escapism, 
recalling  Dorothy  Parker's  corn- 
met: 

"He  lies  below,  correct  in  cy- 
press wood, 

And  entertains  the  most  exclu- 
sive worms." 

I  need  not  belabor  the  point. 
There  is  an  exquisite  fewish  tradi- 
tion of  wisdom  and  humaneness 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  68) 


J.  Harold  Smith 
Studio 

Commercial  and  Portrait 

Photography 
1736  Batleground  Avenue 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


GREENSBORO 

Marble  and  Tile  Co. 

Marble  —  Tilework 

1711  Spring  Garden  St. 

Dial  BR  2-2309 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


New  Year  Greetings 

Ford  Body  Co.,  Inc. 

1200  Battleground  Avenue 
Dial  BR  2-1131 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


5» 


The  Ultimate  Cruelty 

By  Arnold  Forster 

(Reprinted  from  the  June,  1959  issue  of  the  A.  D.  L.  Bulletin) 


ARNOLD  FORSTER 

The  ultimate  cruelty  to  the  six 
million  Jews  killed  under  Hitler 
—the  denial  of:  the  fact  that  the\ 
ever  existed,  suffered,  and  died— is 
now  being  practiced  by  the  haters, 
professional  and  amateur,  here  and 
abroad.  It  is  a  constant  theme  in 
their  literature  and  speeches; 
through  repetition  it  is  beginning 
to  find  its  way  into  the  responsi- 
ble press  and,  presumably,  the 
minds  of  respectable  people. 

There  is  no  telling  just  when 
the  ultimate  cruelty  began  to  take 
form.  Probably  it  started  soon  af- 
ter the  facts  were  established  at 
the  International  Military  Tri- 
bunal held  in  Nuremberg,  Ger- 
many, after  World  War  II.  Then 
the   facts   were   made  hideously 


E.  A.  WOODELL 
and  CO. 

Printing  —  Engraving 

221  E.  Sycamore  St. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Electrical  Contractors 

Residential,  Commercial 
and  Industrial 

Lighting  and  Electrical 
Heating  Specialists 

TALLEY  ELECTRIC,  INC. 

C.  H.  TALLEY,  Owner 

DIAL  BR  4-1531 
1109  Battleground  Ave. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


clear.  Some  six  million  Jews  had 
been  murdered,  gassed  or  shot, 
beaten  or  starved  to  death.  The 
(igure— six  million  dead— was  de- 
termined in  many  ways.  Among 
them: 

The  Nazis  themselves  generally 
kept  good  records.  Adolf  Eich- 
mann,  one  of  those  in  charge  of 
the  Nazi  program  of  exterminat- 
ing Jews,  was  quoted  as  saying,  on 
the  basis  of  all  his  knowledge  and 
statistics,  that  four  million  jews 
had  been  killed  in  concentration 
camps,  another  two  million  killed 
by  Einsalz,  Nazi  task  force  units. 
(Also  at  Nuremberg,  another  high 
Nazi  official,  S.  S.  Sturmbannfueh- 
rer  Wilhelm  Hoettl,  said  thai 
Heinrich  Himmler  had  rejected 
the  six  million  figure  as  being  too 
low.) 

Allied  demographers  and  other 
population  experts  independently 
came  to  the  six  million  figure  as 
a  result  of  study  of  statistics  be- 
fore, during,  and  after  Hitler. 

Historian  Arnold  Toynbee, 
among  others,  reviewed  Nazi  rec- 
ords, statements  made  by  camp 
commandants,  and  others  and 
concluded:  "By  the  time  that  the 
Allied  Armies  had  gained  control 
of  the  whole  of  Europe,  approxi- 
mately six  million  Jews  had  per- 
ished." 

And  through  the  vears,  all  au- 
thoritative studies  and  documen- 
tation produced  the  same  figure 
—six  million  Jewish  dead. 

The  figure  is  so  huge  that  it 
eludes  the  imagination  and,  in  its 
enormity,  loses  meaning.  In  the 
Kishinev  Massacre  of  1903,  47 
Jews  were  killed.  You  can  think 
of  47  people  as  individual  men, 
women    and    children.    You  can 


GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Improve  Your  Dancing 
A  Few  Lessons  Is  All  You  Need  At  The 

ARTHUR  MURRAY  DANCE  STUDIO 

314  S.  Greene  St.        GREENSBORO,  N.  C.        Dial  BR  5-1618 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a  Happy  New  Year  From 


ERNEST  KALATHAS     «     ROY  HEMPHILL 


JOHN  COURIS 


SUNSET  HILLS  RESTAURANT 

Intersection  Friendly  Road  and  Madison  Avenue,  at  Aycock  Street 


CANTER  ELECTRIC  CO. 


2426  High  Point  Rd. 


ALL  TYPES  OF  WIRING 
QUALITY  AT  LOW  COST 

GREENSBORO.  N.  C. 


Dial  BR  4-3071 


FLOORS  AND  WALLS 
•INLAID  LINOLEUM       ® ASPHALT  &  CORK  TILE 
STAR  FIRE  CERAMIC  ON  STEEL  WALL  TILE 


427  English  St. 


L*™iA  low 

£a  in  t!  -1  B  Si  %k  Br  iejP  \B? 

GREENSBORO.  N.  C. 


Dial  BR  5-6727 


INFANTS'  WEAR— SUB-TEENS— CHILDREN'S  WEAR 

JUNIOR  CIRCLE  SHOP 

Friendly  Shopping  Center  Dial  BR  4-0758 

GREENSBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


"South's  Largest  and  Friendliest  Ford  Dealer" 

GREENSBORO  FORD 

"We  Service  After  We  Sell" 
315  N.  Elm    GREENSBORO,  N.  C.       BR  5-7264 


Our  Sincere  Wishes  for  A  Happy  New  Year  from 

HALL-KIMES  JEWELRY  CO. 

Specialists  in  Jewelry  Engraving 

513  North  Eugene       GREENSBORO,  N.  C.       BR  2-1310 


UPTOWN  STORAGE  GARAGE 

S.  W.  WILLIAMS,  Proprietor 
GAS  —  OIL  —  TIRES  —  OPEN  ALL  NIGHT 
Automobile  Storage — 24-Hour  Service — Day  and  Weekly  Rates 
Washing — Polishing — Lubricating — Battery — Tire  Sales 
and  Service — Road  Service 

301  North  Elm  St.  GREENSBORO,  N.  C.  Dial  BR  2-4577 


ALEXANDER  &  MANN  MOTOR  CO. 

Authorized  Dealer  For  All  Foreign  Makes  of  Cars 

Service  On  All  Cars 
234  Commerce  PI.       Greensboro,  N.  C.       Dial  BR  3-2882 


A  Complete  Line  of  Hardware 

Allen  Hardware  Co.,  Inc. 

2134  Lawndale  Drive  Dial  BR  5-6484 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


52 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


"Over  Sixty  Years  of  Service" 

JOSEPH  J.  STONE 
&  COMPANY 

•    Office  Outfitters 
•  Printers 
Makers  of 
Tags  and  Labels 

Dial  BR  2-0123 
225  South  Davie  St. 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 


SHOE'S 
Welding  Service 

"On  Call  Around  the  Clock" 

Dial  BR  3-5441 
1025  Westside  Dr.  (ORD) 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


W.  H.  Andrews,  Jr., 

C.  L.  U. 

Home  Office  Agency 
Jefferson  Standard  Life  Ins.  Co 
Manager  and  Associate 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


WEAVER 
REALTY  CO. 


Mortgage  Loans 
Property  Management 

Dial  BR  3-5516 
214  W.  Gaston  St. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


New  Year  Greetings  .  . 


Shop  At  Sears  and  Save 
Plenty  of  Free  Parking 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 


S.  T.  Wyrick  &  Co. 

Office  Equipment,  Supplies, 
Printing,  Engraving 

117  N.  Greene  St. 
Dial  BR  2-4133 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 

COBLE  SPORTING 
GOODS  CO. 

"Everything  jor  the  Sportsman" 
119  N.  Greene         Dial  BR2-0912 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Holiday  Greetings  .  .  . 

George  H.  Roach 
Realtor 

Piedmont  Building 
Dial  BR  3-6840 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Dodson  Auto 
Parts  Co. 

New  and  Used  Auto  Parts 

Dial  BR  4-4619 
Burlington  Road 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


(ornatzer  &  Mock 

MEN'S  WEAR 

121  West  Market  Street 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Please  Patronize  Our  Advertisers 


"Shoes  for  the  Family" 

SACH'S 
SHOE  STORE 

•  Rand  Shoes 

For  the  Men 

•  Trim  Tred 

For  the  Ladies 

•  Poll  Parrot 

For  the  Children 
2178  Lawndale 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Hatley's 
Upholstery  Shop 

All  Types  of 
Furniture  Upholstering 

Dial  BR  3-0122 
3511  E.  Market  Street 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


read  the  words  of  just  one  of  the 
six  million  killed  by  the  Nazis— 
an  Anne  Frank  or  Emanuel  Rin- 
gelblum— and  fathom  the  depths 
of  individual  tragedy.  Or  you  can 
think  of  family  or  friends  who 
died  under  Hitler.  But  the  figure 
—six  million— is  a  nameless,  face- 
less abstractor!.  It  is  so  large  that 
it  appears  incredible.  It  is  this 
fact  that  the  bigots  are  trying  to 
exploit  in  making  their  insanely 
cruel  charge— the  denial  that  the 
six  million  ever  existed. 

How,  in  the  face  of  all  histori- 
cal fact,  can  the  bigots  use  this  as 
a  persistent  propaganda  slogan? 
They  do  it  by  playing  a  weird 
kind  of  numbers  game,  without 
logic  or  context.  Look  at  the  rea- 
soning of  professional  anti-Semite 
James  Madole,  writing  in  his  "Na- 
tional Renassaince  Bulletin:" 

"Although  the  World  Almanac 
attests  to  the  fact  that  fewer  than 
600,000  Jews  ever  lived  in  Ger- 
many, the  Jews  persisted  in  their 
monstrous  lie  that  Nazi  Germany 
had  cremated  six  million  of  their 
co-racials  .  .  .  Many  Jews  alleged- 
ly roasted  by  Hitler  are  now  turn- 
ing their  talents  to  butchering 
Arab  women  and  children  in  the 
Gaza  strip." 

Madole  has  the  facts  right 
about  the  Jewish  population  or 
Germany.  But  the  overwhelming 
number  of  Jews  killed  under  the 
Nazis  were  not  German  Jews. 
Madole  completely  overlooks  the 
fact  that,  under  the  Nazis,  2,800,- 
000  or  85%  of  Poland's  3,300,000 
Jews  were  killed;  that  1,500,000  or 
71%  of  the  2,100,000  Jews  in  oc- 
enpied  portions  of  Russia  were 
killed;  that  425,000  or  50%  of  Ru- 
mania's 850,000  Jews  were  killed; 
that  260,000  or  82.5%  of  Czecho- 
slovakia's 315,000  Jews  were  kill- 
ed. To  say  nothing  of  Jews  killed 
in  Hungary,  Lithuania,  Holland, 
France,  Latvia,  and  Germany  it- 
self. These  figures,  too,  are  avarl- 


G  reelings 
New  Year 

Vh*mp« 

MAYRAND,  Inc. 

PHARMACEUTICALS 

1042  Westside  Drive 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 


able  in  various  editions  of  the 
World  Almanac. 

Madole  has  his  own  explana- 
tion of  why  the  figure  "six  mil- 
lion" is  used: 

"The  Jews  have  found  it  ex- 
tremely lucrative  to  maintain  the 
gigantic  swindle  of  atrocities  com- 
mitted by  the  German  people 
against  the  Jewish  race.  Each  year, 
World  Jewry  forces  Western  Ger- 
many to  pay  the  sum  of  $110,000,- 
000  in  reparations  to  the  State  of 
Israel.  The  entire  Isareli,  merchant 
marine  was  built  by  the  sweat  of 
German  labor.  .  ." 

Madole's  concern  for  the  Ger- 
mans includes  complete  sympathy 
lor  the  Nazis.  He  shows  this  in 
an  almost  classical  rewrite  of  his- 
tory when  he  seeks  to  prove  that 
Jews  flourished  in  Poland  despite 
Hitler: 

"In  late  1944,  the  Jews  of  War- 
saw, Poland,  fully  armed  with 
modern  war  material,  launched  an 
offensive  against  Nazi  troops  .  .  . 
How  could  these  Jews  have  been 
exterminated  during  five  years  of 
Nazi  rule  in  Poland  when  they 
were  able  to  launch  a  full  scale 
military  offensive  as  late  as  1944?" 

The  year  in  which  the  Jews  of 
the  Warsaw  ghetto  made  their 
epic,  desperate  fight  for  survival— 
in  which  the  ghetto  was  devastat- 
ed—was early  1943,  not  late  1944. 
Madole  calls  their  death  struggles 
against  the  might  of  the  Nazi 
army  "a  full  scale  military  offen- 
sive." 

Benjamin  H.  Freedman,  pro- 
Arab  propagandist  and  a  financial 
arrgel  for  Conde  McGinley's  anti- 
Semitic  "Common  Sense,"  has  his 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  78) 


Gross  Upholstering  Co. 

Upholsterers  —  Refinishing 
603  S.  Aycock    Dial  BR  2-2393 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


New  Year  Greetings  .  .  . 

Maisowjoline 

Women's  Apparel 

Jefferson  Bldg. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 

Charleston,  S.  C. 


53 


Judith  Becker,  daughter  of  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Nason  Becker  of  Dorches- 
ter, Mass.,  became  the  bride  ot 
Nahtan  Rephan,  son  of  Mr.  and 


Holiday  Greetings 
George  D.  Davis,  C.L.U. 

Associate 
General  Agent 

Connecticut 
Mutual 
Life  Insurance  Co. 

Wachovia  Bank  Bldg. 

Dial  BR  4-4614 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


H,  N,  SIMPSON 


Realtor  and  Builder 


207  S.  Ashe  St. 
Dial  BR  5-2878 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 


Mrs.  Jack  Rephan,  at  the  Clit 
House,  Winthrop,  Mass.,  on  June 
- 1 .  with  Rabbi  Hyman  H.  Fried- 
man officiating. 

The  bride  was  given  in  marriage 
by  her  lather.  Marcia  Gamm,  of 
Milton,  Mass.,  was  maid  of  honor, 
and  Herbert  Becker,  brother  of  the 
groom,  was  best  man,  with  Jules 
Leonard  Becker,  brother  of  the 
bride,  as  junior  best  man. 

Ushers  were  Charles  Levy,  Ah  in 
H.  White,  Robert  Becker,  Steven 
Gamm,  and  Arnold  Rodner. 

The  bride  is  a  graduate  of  He- 
brew Teachers'  College  in  Brook- 
line,  Mass.,  and  attended  Boston 
University  for  two  years.  She  is  a 
member  of  the  Zionist  Organiza- 
tion, and  Israeli  Students  Organi- 
zation. 

The  groom  is  a  graduate  of  The 
Citadel,  and  is  associated  with  the 
Monarch  Building  Supply  Co. 

Following  the  wedding  trip  to 
Provincetown,  Cape  Cod,  and  New 
York  City,  the  couple  are  at  home 
at  23-A  Moore  Drive,  Charleston, 
S.  C. 

Out-of-town  wedding  guests  in- 
cluded Mr.  Joseph  Lipsey,  Thom- 
aston,  Ga.;  Mrs.  Herbert  Stoloff  of 
Hartford,  Conn.;  Mrs.  Ben  Simon, 


Moving 
Packing  —  Storage 
By  MAYFLOWER 

Local  and  Long  Distance 

Champion  Storage 
&  Trucking  Co.,  Inc 

207  Walker  Ave.     Dial  BR  5-6492 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


GREETINGS 
AND  BEST  WISHES 


f 


rom 


G.  1. 1200 

and 

Associate 
Stores 


Prescription  Specialists 

TYSON'S  PLAZA 
DRUG  CO. 


Founta'n  Services  —  Magazines 
1726  Battleground         BR  4-8418 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 


Charles  H.  Stogner 
Mutual  Insurance 

"Save  up  to  20%  on  all  lines" 

251-A  N.  Greene  Street 
Dial  BR  2-8480 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


GREENSBORO 
Rubber  Stamp  Company 

Rubber  Stamp  1^7\anufacturers 
24-Hour  Rubber  Stamp  Service 

520  Walker  Ave.  Dial  BR  2-5718 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


MANOR  MOTEL 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  S.  T.  Dickinson 
FREE  ROOM  TELEVISION 
Air-Conditioned 
Circulating  Ice  Water 
Room  Telephones,  Radio 
Wall-to-Wall  Carpeting 
Beautyrest  Mattresses 
Tile  Baths 

1045  West  Market  Street 
Telephone  BR  3-2517 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


J.  N.  C0E  &  SON 

General 
Building  Contractors 


Watson  Building 
Dial  BR  3-4224 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


54 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


GREETINGS 


SOUTHERN  OPTICAL  CO.,  INC. 
Optical  Laboratories 

108  S.  Edgeworth  Dial  BR  2-0600 — BR  4-5228 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Rice  Auto  Sales 

FIAT 

Sales  &  Service 

FACTORY  TRAINED  MECHANICS 
1440  S.  Elm  St.  Dial  BR  2-2162 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


'Vic"   Sorenson,  Mgr. 

MONSEES  -  WRENN  LUMBER  CO. 

Complete  Building  Supplies 
517  Frescott  St.  Dial  BR  4-1577  Greensboro,  N.  C. 


MICKEL-HOPKINS  CO.'  Inc. 

MANUFACTURERS  and  JOBBERS 
HOTEL  —  RESTAURANT  —  INSTITUTIONAL 
FOOD  SERVICE  EQUIPMENT 
315  E.  Washington  GREENSBORO,  N.  C.  Dial  BR  2-3023 


COMMERCIAL  ELECTRIC  COMPANY 

C.  L.  ELLISON,  Owner 

ELECTRICAL  CONTRACTORS 
Residential  —  Commercial  —  Industrial 

1210  Grove  St.  Dial  BR  3-3641  Greensboro,  N.  C. 


BRADY  MOTORS,  INC. 

LINCOLN  —  EDSEL  —  MERCURY 


130  N.  Forbis 


ENGLISH  FORDS 
Sales  and  Service 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Dial  BR  3-6955 


SEASON'S  GREETINGS 

Southern  Electric  Service  Co.,  Inc. 

T.  PAUL  RHYNE,  President 
853  S.  Elm  St.  Dial  BR  4-2461 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Norfolk,  Va.;  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jack  P. 
Simon.  Springfield,  Mo.;  Mrs. 
Harry  Sabel,  Myrtle  Beach,  S.  C; 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Harry  Simon,  Mrs. 
Gus  Simon,  Mr.  Joseph  Simon,  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Jack  Rephan  and  Herbert 
Rephan,  all  of  Charleston,  S.  C-, 
and  Mr.  Alvin  H.  White,  Hadden- 
field,  New  Jersey. 


EVELYN  SOKOL 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Joseph  Sokol  of 
Moultrie  Street,  Charleston, 
S.  C.  and  Sullivan's  Island,  S.  C.  an- 
nounce the  engagement  of  their 
daughter,  Evelyn,  to  Mr.  Morton 
Xeedle,  son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Joseph 
Needle  of  82  Dunnemann  Avenue, 
Charleston,  S.  C,  and  the  Isle  of 
Palms,  S.  C. 

Miss  Sokol  attended  the  College 
of  Charleston  and  was  graduated 
from  the  University  of  Miami  in 
June,  1959,  from  which  she  received 
a  Bachelor  of  Education  degree. 
She  is  a  member  of  Alpha 
Epsilon  Phi  Sorority  and  several 
educational  associations,  and  will 
be  a  member  of  the  faculty  of  the 
M  a  m  i  e  Whitesides  Elementary 
School  this  coming  fall. 

Mr.  Needle  is  a  graduate  of  The 
Citadel,  military  college  of  South 
Carolina  where  he  received  a 
Bachelor  oi  Arts  degree.  He  also 
did  graduate  work  at  George 
Washington  University.  He  is  a 
member  of  the  Charleston  Junior 
Chamber  of  Commerce,  B'nai 
B'rith,  and  a  member  of  the 
Masons-Friendship  Lodge  No.  9. 

Mr.  Needle  is  a  partner  in  the 
firm  of  Needle  &  Appel  Realty 
Service. 


Buy  That  Israel 
Bond  —  Now! 
Don't  Delay! 


Salisbury,  N.  C. 

Mrs.  S.  W.  Guyes,  Correspondent 

The  Herman  Hymans  are  the 
proud  parents  of  a  baby  daughter, 
born  June  24th,  whom  they  have 
named  Sandra  Pali,  and  we  also 
offer  congratulations  to  Mrs.  K. 
Troutman  whose  daughter  Hinda 
(Mrs.  Paul  Farbstein)  gave  birth  to 
her  second  son  on  June  16th  in 
New  York  City. 

The  S.  W.  Guyes  had  as  guests 
the  family  of  Mrs.  Guyes'  sister,  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Al  Kendzur  and  daughter 
Shirley  from  New  Haven,  Conn. 
While  they  were  here  they  all  spent 
a  very  enjoyable  week-end  at  May- 
view  Manor,  Blowing  Rock. 

The  Ben  Kahns  drove  to  Chica- 
go for  a  two  weeks'  stay,  during 
which  time  they  attended  the  Elks' 
Convention.  Among  the  many  in- 
teresting sights  was  a  good  look  at 
Queen  Elizabeth. 

Buddy  Guyes  attended  the  Insti- 
tute, of  Judaism  at  Wildacres,  and 
returned  home  with  a  most  glowing 
report  of  both  the  inspiration  and 
enjoyment  he  received  there. 

Helen  Goldman  spent  several 
weeks  with  her  sister  and  other 
members  of  her  family  in  Birming- 
ham, Ala.,  and  Jett  Shapiro,  with 
(Please  Turn  to  Page  71) 


SUPER  MARKETS 

Stores  Located  at 

2803  E.  Bessemer  Avenue 

1320  Glenwood  Avenue 

403  Tate  Street 

2113  Walker  Avenue 

900  Gorrell  Street 

Liberty  Road  at  Pleasant 
Garden  Road 

3700  Lawndale  Drive 

Stokesdale,  N.  C. 

Guilf  ord,  N.  C. 

Pleasant  Garden,  N.  C. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


55 


The  Return  to  Prayer 

(Concluded  from  Page  11) 


Sam,  sleek  and  polished  in  his 
well  fitting  clothes,  his  gleaming- 
shoes,  his  general  air  of  assured 
prosperity,  stood  at  the  door.  Then 
he  slowly  entered.  An  eagle-eyed 
beadle  caught  sight  of  him,  and 
inarched  down  the  aisle  toward 
him. 

Sam  looked  around,  then  sat 
down  at  the  end  of  a  bench  nearest 
the  door. 

The  beadle  approached. 


"This  way,  sir,"  he  invited,  point- 
ing to  the  Ark.  "We  have  a  seat 
up  trout." 

"This  will  do,"  Sam  answered, 
remaining  on  the  bench. 

"That,"  spluttered  the  beadle," 
that's  not  for  you,  sir.  That's  the 
beggars'  seat." 

Sam  remained  seated.  He  looked 
up  at  the  beadle. 

"This  is  the  seat  for  me,  sham- 
mas,  I'm  a  beggar.  I've  come  to  beg 
.  .  .  forgiveness." 


Columbia,  S.  C. 

MRS.  BERNARD  LADEN,  Correspondent 


The  wedding  of  Miss  Laurel 
Lynne  Zalin,  daughter  of  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Abe  Zalin  of  Columbia,  and 
Dr.  J.  Joel  Milder,  son  of  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Howard  Milder  of  Omaha, 
Nebraska,  took  place  at  3:00  p.  m. 
July  19,  in  the  Hotel  Wade  Hamp- 
ton Ballroom.  The  double-ring 
ceremony  was  performed  by  Rabbi 
David  Karesh  and  Rabbi  David 
Grubei . 

John  Stedman,  organist,  and 
Miss  Phyllis  Joyce,  soloist,  present- 
ed the  wedding  music. 

The  chupah  was  decorated  with 
palms,  stands  of  emerald  and  plu- 
mousos  fern  and  baskets  of  white 
gladioli  were  arranged  to  form  an 
improvised  altar. 

The  ushers  were  Jack  F.  Burke, 
Jr.,  Dr.  Leonard  J.  Drazek,  and  Dr. 
Ronald  D.  Fortgang,  all  of  Sum- 
ter, and  Joseph  R.  Bolker  of  Bev- 
erly Hills,  California,  uncle  of  the 
bridegroom.  Mrs.  Howard  Vann  of 
Omaha,  Nebraska,  sister  of  the 
bridegroom,  was  matron  of  honor. 


FOOD  FOR 
THE  FAMILY 

Hot  Shoppes, 

Incorporated 

Drive'In  & 
Restaurant 

1100  Summit  Avenue 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


The  bridesmaids  were  Misses  Belle 
Lavisky  of  Columbia,  Joan  Leicht 
of  Fresh  Meadows,  Long  Island, 
Miriam  Karesh  of  Columbia,  and 
Jacquelyn  Novit  of  Walterboro, 
both  cousins  of  the  bride.  Miss 
Debbie  Baker  of  Columbia,  cousin 
of  the  bride,  was  junior  brides- 
maid. 

Howard  Vann  of  Omaha,  Neb., 
brother-in-law  of  the  bridegroom, 
was  best  man. 

The  bride  was  given  in  marriage 
by  her  father,  and  was  lovely  in  her 
wedding  gown  of  white  silk  organ- 
za over  tissue  taffeta.  Her  only  or- 
nament was  a  pair  of  cultured 
pearl  earrings,  gift  of  the  bride- 
groom. 

Immediately  following  the  cere- 
mony a  reception  was  held  in  the 
Hotel  Wade  Hampton  Ballroom. 
Assisting  the  bridal  couple  in  the 
receiving  line  were  their  parents, 
Mrs.  Helen  Bolker,  grandmother 
of  the  bridegroom,  best  man,  and 
the  matron  of  honor. 

Mrs.  Arthur  Silber  kept  the 
bride's  register,  and  assisting  in 
serving  were  Misses  Sara  Gross, 
Barbara  Bogeiv  Marsha  Berry,  and 
Barbara  Lapidus. 

Following  a  wedding  trip  to 
Miami  and  Nassau,  the  couple  are 
making  their  home  in  Sumter,  S.  C. 

The  Jewish  Center  Day  Camp 
visited  the  state  recently.  The  boys 
and  girls  were  Richard  Balser, 
Karen  Coplan,  Lana  Coplan,  Bar- 
ry Bluestein,  Kenneth  Denberg, 
Stanley  Hammer,  David  Kahn, 
Meryl  Kahn,  Kenneth  Koolkin, 
Larry  Koolkin,  David  Glass,  David 
and  Stanley  Rosenzweig,  Craig  and 
Scott  Sherman,  Albert  Zeitchick, 
and  Saul  Feldman,  camp  director. 
Counselors  attending  were  Sam 
Freed,  Lynne    Fleischman,  Paula 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  89) 


//  11  1 
%ggl 

m 

UNITED  SECURITIES  COMPANY 

Robert  B.  Dixon,  President 

8th  Floor 

Southeastern  Bldg. 

Dial  5-6476 

You'll  Enjoy  Dining  at  ...  . 

CASEY'S  BAR-B-Q  RESTAURANT 

STEAKS  —  CHICKEN  —  SEAFOOD 

Country  Park  Ranch,  Greensboro  Country  Park 
Dial  BR  5-2476 

1615  Madison  Ave.      GREENSBORO,  N.  C.        Dial  BR  4-7728 


MILLER  FURNITURE  COMPANY 

Good  Furniture  •  Reasonably  Priced 

314  South  Elm  Street  Dial  BR  3-3441 

GREENSBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


A  Delightful  Place  to  Dine 

MAYFAIR  SUBURBAN  RESTAURANT 

Specializing  in  Charcoal  Broiled  Steaks 
Friendly  Shopping  Center  Dial  5-5557 


George  W.  Kane 


General  Contractors 


GREENSBORO 
DURHAM 
ROXBORO 


Stanley  Shoes,  Inc. 

Featuring  Fine  Shoes 
for  Ladies  and  Children 

•  Paramount 
©  Vitality 

•  Sandler  of  Boston 

•  Buster  Brown 

•  Simplex 

•  and  many  others. 

Friendly  Shopping  Center 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 


YOU'LL  SAVE  MONEY  ON  YOUR 
ELECTRICAL  APPLIANCES 

AT 

SUMMERS  SUPPLY  COMPANY 


DEALERS 

TWO  LOCATIONS 


2919  Randleman  Road 
Dial  BR  2-9922 


Old  Burlington  Highway 
Dial  BR  2-1479 


GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


56 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


INC. 


Men  s  and  Boys'  Wear 

Friendly  Shopping  Center 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


ear 


Greetingi 


MADE  -  RITE 
SANDWICH  CO, 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS  .... 

HALL  -  PUTNAM  CLOTHING  CO. 

Clothes  and  Furnishings 
For  Men  and  Young  Men 

110  N.  Elm  Street  GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Dial  BR  2-6559 


SOUTHERN  WASTE  PAPER  COMPANY 

"Waste  Paper  Specialists" 

501  East  Washington  Street 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Dial  BR  2-1447 


For  the  Best  in 
Photography 

MARTIN'S 
STUDIO 

112  E.  Gaston         Dial  BR  2-7237 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Magic  Shoe  Service 

EXPERT  SHOE  REPAIRING 

2146  Lawndale  Drive 

Dial  BR  4-8041 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


For  The  Best  Buy  "All  Ways"  See 

Kinney-Keesee  Office  Supply,  Inc. 

"Everything  for  The  Office" 
Phone  BR  4-6341      255  North  Greene  St.      Greensboro,  N.  C. 


Kirkman's  Airport  Transportation 

AVIS  RENT  -  A  -  CAR  SYSTEM,  Licensee 

Phone  BR  3-7900  Phone  BR  5-7939         P.  O.  Box  3014 

Greensboro-H.  Point  Airport    Office:  O.  Henry  Hotel   Greensboro,  N.  C. 


LAMB 
Distributing  Co. 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 
Distributors  for 


Blatz,  Tempo,  Ballantine, 
Regent,  Champ  Ale,  and 
Sassy  Brew 


Throughout  the  Year 
Enjoy  Eating 

GRIFFIN  PIES 

Baked  Br 

Griffin  Baking  Co. 

W.  Market  Ext.— BR  3-3657 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


A  Sermonette 

By  Nalhan  Ziprin 


Having  spent  the  best  years  of 
my  life  in  the  tents  of  Jacob,  pre- 
paring lor  a  rabbinical  career 
which  would  have  been  the  crown- 
ing dream  of  my  parents  it  their 
b'chor,  their  firstborn  were  more 
amenable  to  parental  guidance,  the 
urge  to  sermonize  is  a  heritage 
whose  surfacing  at  times  is  difficult 
to  contain,  however,  hard  I  fight 
against  it. 

The  sermon  is  the  exclusive  do- 
main of  the  rabbinate,  and  not  even 
a  near-rabbi  may  cutter  it.  However, 
since  to  sin  is  epiite  human,  the 
rabbis  will,  1  am  sure,  forgive  me 
lor  unlawfully  entering  that  pardes 
litis  once.  Particularly  since  I  am 
prepared  to  promise  them  that  this 
will  not  happen  too  often,  or  per- 
haps even  never  again. 

Presumably  what  is  to  follow  has 
been  said  more  forcefully  by  our 
men  of  the  cloth  and  there  is  no 
intention  here  to  become  an  inter- 
loper. However,  I  am  convinced 
the  rabbis  will  be  most  tolerant  of 
this  effort,  remembering  as  they 
will  that  this  attempt  stems  from  an 
extension  and  variation  of  the  Tal- 
mudic  dictum  against  taking  lightly 
the  benediction  of  the  layman. 

This  sermonette  has  a  limited 
objective  —  Jewish  simchas,  Jewish 
festivities. 

There  was  a  time  when  Jewish 
rejoicing  had  a  unique  character. 
Circumcising  a  male  child  was  not 
only  an  occasion  for  complying 
with  Biblical  prescription,  but  of 
bringing  the  new  born  into  a 
cradle  of  almonds  and  raisins  on 
which  he  would  feed  into  learning, 


FOR  FUEL  OIL 

DIAL 

BR  2-1375 


PRODUCTS 

Fields  &  Leftwich 

2618  West  Ct. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


knowledge  and  piety.  Becoming 
bar  mitzvah  meant  not  leaving  but 
entering  the  sanctums  of  learning, 
and  becoming  wedded  was  not 
only  a  linking  of  two  people,  but  a 
linking  with  the  ages  and  the  sages. 

There  was  boundless  rejoicing 
among  Jews  on  those  occasions,  for 
the  festivity  took  on  a  character 
beyond  its  immediate  significance. 
The  birth  of  a  new  child  meant 
less  an  increment  in  the  family 
than  a  new  witness  to  an  eternal 
verity.  Becoming  bar  mitzvah  sig- 
nalized not  only  accjuisition  by  the 
communty  of  Israel  of  a  new  mem- 
ber but  of  a  new  dedication.  Mar- 
riage was  the  fruition  of  a  hope  to 
raise  sons  lor  chupah,  torah  and 
good  deeds.  The  rejoicing  centered 
therefore  less  around  the  individ- 
ual than  the  moment. 

One  would  have  to  be  complete- 
ly divorced  from  reality  to  expect 
Jewish  simchas  today  to  strike  the 
depth  of  former  days.  Our  ration- 
ale about  those  matters  is  com- 
pletely different  from  that  of  our 
ancestors,  to  whom,  incidentally, 
rejoicing  was  in  essence  an  uplift- 
ing, an  ascent,  an  association  with 
the  heights  where  He  alone  dwell- 
eth. 

We,  of  this  generation  of  Jews, 
have  lost  the  ancient  art  of  rejoic- 
ing. Instead  we  have  filled  our 
festivities  with  repulsive  vulgari- 
ties. Chanting  has  given  way  to 
boisterous  jazz;  sacred  rituals  to 
alien  forms;  sanctity  to  profanity 
and  assocation  with  tradition  to 
icy  disparity. 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  88) 


Bar\sdale 
Studios 


Interior  Designers 

Complete  Decorative 
Service 


606  N.  Greene  Didl  BR  2-4754 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


NEGATE  CITY  MOTOR  COMPANY,  Inc. 


"SERVING  GREENSBORO  SINCE  1914" 


CHRYSLER  •  PLYMOUTH 
320  North  Forbis  Street 


IMPERIAL 
§R1 


Sales  and  Service 
Dial  BR  2-0143 


GREENSBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


57 


Temple  Israel  —  Charlotte,  N.  C. 

MRS.  JERRY  FISHER,  Correspondent 


MR.  and  MRS.  CHARLES  M.  SCHACHER 


Heartiest  congratulations  go  to 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Aaron  Cohen  on  the 
marriage  of  their  daughter,  Jerri 
Sandra,  to  Charles  Michael  Scha- 


Greetings 

i.  A,  Palmgren 
&  Associates 

515  E.  Trade         ED  4-5541 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


(her,  son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Joseph 
Schacher  of  Far  Rockaway,  N.  Y. 

Jerri  was  given  in  marriage  b\ 
her  lather.  Rabbi  E.  A.  Levi  and 
Rabbi  Shipora  performed  the  cere- 
mony at  the  Cohen  home  August 
2nd.  A 'brunch  followed  at  the 
Amit)  Country  Club. 

Miss  niene  Chinn  ol  Gastonia 
was  maid  ol  honor.  Jim  Schacher 
was  his  brother's  best  man,  and 
David  and  Melvin  Cohen,  brothers 
ol  the  bride,  ushered. 

The  newly-weds  will  make  their 
home  in  Atlanta,  where  Mr.-  Scha- 
cher is  a  sportswear  contractor. 

Mrs.  Schacher  is  employed  as  a 
department  manager  at  Franklin 


L.  E.  WALDRON,  Owner 


Southern  Flooring  &  Acoustical 
Company 


931  E.  Morehead 


Flooring  and  Acoustical  Contractors 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C.         Dial  FR  6-3045 


Your  Time  is  Money  ...  FLY! 

Air  Taxi  .  .  .  Air  Ambulance  .  .  .  Flight  Training 
Anytime  ...  To  Any  Airport  .      .  Anywhere 

SOUTHERN  FLIGHT  AIR  TAXI 

DAY:  EX  9-6375  —•— NIGHT:  EX  9-6371 

Municipal  Airport  —  Charlotte,  N.  C. 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Charlotte,  N.  C. 


Charlotte,  N.  C. 


"Its  from  Montaldo's" 

Three  little  words 
with  a  ivorld  of  meaning! 


New  Year  Greetings  .... 

YOPP  INSURANCE  AGENCY, 

Fire  —  Casualty     1  Bonds 

Wilder  Building  CHARLOTTE,  N.  C.  Dial  FR  7-4551 


McALISTER  CARSON,  President 


H.  H.  DeARMON,  Secretary 


CARSON  AND  COMPANY 

REAL  ESTATE     —     INSURANCE     —    MORTGAGE  LOANS 

McCalister  Carson,  Jr. — Hugh  Houser — L.  R.  Teal — Toby  Wilson 
Dial  FR  6-1511  CHARLOTTE,  N.  C.  1228  Elizabeth  Ave. 


MURRAY  DISTRIBUTING  COMPANY 

Distributors  of 

BORDEN'S  CHEESE  and  MRS.  FILBERT'S  PRODUCTS 
Charlotte  —  Greensboro  —  Raleigh  —  Wilmington 


Please  Patronize  Our  Advertisers 


LEDBETTER'S  SHOE  STORE 

SHOES  FOR  WOMEN  AND  CHILDREN 

211  North  Tryon  Dial  ED  4-6912 

CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


THOMAS  &  HOWARD  COMPANY 

WHOLESALE  GROCERS 

411  S.  College  CHARLOTTE,  N.  C.  Dial  ED  3-0112 


58 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


N,  G.  SPEIR 
Incorporated 


Home  Loans 
Real  Estate  Sales 


130  East  Fourth  Street 
Dial  ED  4-5386 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


KIRK  COUSART  & 
ASSOCIATES 

Manufacturers' 
Representa  tives 

HEATING  and  POWER 
PLANT  EQUIPMENT 

715  W.  Morehead  FR  5-7737 

CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


A.  I  PRICE  &  ASSOCIATES,  INC. 

PLUMBING  —  HEATING  —  AIR-CONDITIONING 

FR  6-2466  CHARLOTTE,  N.  C.       206  S.  Church  St. 


YOU  WILL  ENJOY  OUR  FRENCH  DINING  ROOM 

jftlecfelenburg  Hotel 

JOE  L.  MATTHEWS,  Manager 
Outstanding  Southern  Hospitality  and  Service 
FREE  PARKING  CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


LEFLER 
CONCRETE 
BLOCK  CO, 

•  Concrete  Products 

•  Septic  Tanks 

•  Excavating  &  Grading 

•  Asphalt  Paving 

646  State  St.  Dial  FR  5-3359 

CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


ADROIT  CLEANERS 

1709  W.  Trade  Street 
ED  4-7826 

Charlotte,  N.  C. 


Your  Sasisfaction  is 
Our  Greatest  Interest 


7/te  cMoot  Mo*t 

RESTAURANT 


1427  E.  Fourth  St.       CHARLOTTE,  N.  C.       Dial  ED  2-9825 

CAROLINA  PAVING  COMPANY,  Inc. 

ASPHALT  and  CONCRETE  PAVING 
DRIVING  AREAS  —  DRIVEWAYS 
Free  Estimates  —  No  Job  Too  Large  or  Too  Small 

12216  Avondale  Ave.      CHARLOTTE,  N.  C.         Dial  ED  4-207511 


JOHN  CROSLAND 
COMPANY 

s=r.=  _  ©  Builders 
•  Developers 

Dial  ED  3-3703 
122  E.  Third  St. 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


BUTLER 
SEAFOOD 

"Everything  in  Fresh 
Seafoods" 

919  South  McDowell  St. 
Just  Across  from  the  Addison 
Dial  FR  5-4409 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


Simon.  We  wish  them  every  hap- 
piness. 

Temple  Israel  is  very  proud  to 
add  several  names  to  our  Cradle 
Roll.  Mazel  tov  to  the  parents  and 
grandparents  of  the  adorable  new 
arrivals:  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Milton 
Tager  on  the  birth  of  a  daughter, 
Bonnie  Rose;  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Al- 
vin  Levine  on  the  birth  of  a  son, 
David  Mark;  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Mor- 
ton Garber  on  the  birth  of  their 
son,  Alan  Michael. 

Many  thanks  go  to  Mr.  Philip 
Weinstein  for  donating  his  large 
collection  of  records  to  our  music 
department  which  is  under  the  di- 
rection of  Hazzen  Robert  Shapiro. 
We  now  have  the  beginnings  of 
a  fine  Jewish  and  secular  record 
library  which  may  be  played  in  our 
music  room  or  may  be  signed  out. 

We  extend  condolences  to  Mr. 
Morton  Garber  upon  the  death  of 
his  father,  Mr.  Abe  Garber;  to  Mrs. 
Isadore  Silverstein  upon  the  death 
of  her  mother,  Mrs.  Ethel  Cohen; 
to  Mrs.  I.  E.  Pittle,  upon  the  death 
of  her  mother,  Mrs.  C.  K.  Pope. 
Our  deepest  sympathy  to  the  be- 
reaved families. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  I.  D.  Blumenthal 
of  Charlotte,  on  Tuesday  evening, 
July  28,  were  cited  by  the  National 
Conference  of  Christians  and  Jews 
for  their  devotion  to  increased 
human  understanding  and  service 
to  human  need.  The  national  cita- 
tion, signed  by  NCC  President 
Lewis  Webster  Jones  and  National 
Co-Chairmen  Benjamin  F.  Fairless, 
Lewis  L.  Strauss,  and  James  F. 
Twohy,  was  presented  by  Dr. 
Leonard  P.  Aries,  Vice  President 
in  charge  of  the  Southeastern  Divi- 
sion of  the  Conference  at  the  an- 
nual NCC  J  Intergroups  Relations 
Institute  at  Wildacres  Retreat. 

The  national  award  acclaimed 
the  Blumenthals  for  their  leader- 
ship in  state  and  national  organiza- 
tions contributing  to  the  training 
of  better  citizens,  their  inaugura- 
tion and  maintenance  of  Wildacres 
used  for  fourteen  years  by  church, 
civic  and  fraternal  groups  for  youth 
and  adult  conferences  and  insti- 
tutes, contributing  to  better  inter- 
group  relations,  and  their  friendli- 
ness, sincerity  and  dedication  of 
purpose  to  better  human  under- 
standing, thus  advancing  the 
Brotherhood  of  Man  under  the 
Fatherhood  of  God. 

Now  in  its  fourteenth  season, 
Wildacres  is  made  available  to 
various  groups  for  conferences, 
with  emphasis  on  better  intergroup 
understanding. 


SPEIR  &  CO. 

Incorporated 

o 

Insurance — Bonds 


Dial  ED  3-1171 
130  East  Fourth 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


MECKLENBURG 
NURSERIES,  INC. 

COMPLETE 
LANDSCAPE 
SERVICE 

Easy  Monthly  Payments 

DIAL  EX  9-5641 

Thrift  Highway 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


JOE  P.  CRAIG  &  SON 

HOME  BUILDERS 

Dial  EM  6-0588 
Sharon-Amity  Road 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


Dayton  Tire  Sales  Co. 

Dayton  Tires  and  Tubes 
Recapping 

210  W.  Morehead  ED  3-3171 

CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


THOMAS 


Cadillac-Olds,  Inc. 

SALES  &  SERVICE 
214  N.  Church        Dial  ED  4-4656 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


RANCH  HOUSE 
RESTAURANT 

Specializing  in 

Guaranteed 
U.  S.  Choice 

and  Prime 
Western  Beef 
Charcoal- 
Broiled 

DIAJ, 
EX'  9-5411 


IN  TOWN 


Wilkinson  Boulevard 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 
U.  S.  Highway  29  South 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


59 


Spartanburg,  S.  C. 

MRS.  STAN  TREINIS  and  MRS.  JOEL  TANNENBAUM,  Correspondents 


Seated,  Mrs.  Earl  (Thelma)  Yoffe; 
Ralph  Tanenbaum. 

The  months  of  activities  in  our 
community  are  about  to  begin,  and 
rare  it  is  that  two  brothers  and 
their  sister  hold  presidential  offices 
at  the  same  time  and  give  such 
"naches"  to  their  parents. 

Joel  Tanenbaum  will  be  presi- 
dent of  the  Congregation;  Thelma 
Tanenbaum  Yoffe  accepted  the 
presidency  of  Sisterhood,  and 
Ralph  Tanenbaum  is  president  of 
B'nai  B'rith. 


left  to  rigfit,  Joel  Tanenbaum  and 

It  is  no  wonder  that  the  chil- 
dren have  taken  such  an  active 
part  in  our  community  work. 
Their  parents,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Harry 
Tanenbaum,  have  been  active  lead- 
ers in  the  organizations  and  Tem- 
ple work  for  over  twenty  years. 

Additional  visitors  this  summer 
to  our  community  were  Eve  Boy- 
arsky,  visiting  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Barney 
Gelburd;  Mr.  Ben  Frank,  visiting 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Marvin  Frank;  and 
Mr.  Irving  Treinis,  visiting  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Stan  Treinis. 


CALL  YOUR  CARPETS  FRIEND  .  .  . 

ROGER'S  RUG  &  CARPET  CO. 

WE  SELL  AND  INSTALL  OUR  OWN  CARPETS 
RUGS'  AND  CARPETS  CLEANED  RIGHT  IN  YOUR  OWN  HOME 
Dial  EM  6-4121  1520  Providence  Road  Charlotte,  N.  C. 


New  Year  Greetings  .... 

HOME  FEDERAL  SAVINGS 
&  LOAN  ASSOCIATION 

139  S.  Tryon 


'Charlotte's  Savings  Corner" 


Charlotte,  N.  C. 


See  All  The  '59  Models  At 

Don  Allen  Chevrolet  Co. 

Charlotte's  Most  Progressive  Dealership 


Radio  Television 
and  Appliance  Co. 

Expert  Television  Installa- 
tions and  Service 

1300  E.  4th  St.  Dial  ED  2-2435 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


BRUMLEY'S 
Flowers  &  Fruits 

Flowers  For  All  Occasions 
Fruit  Baskets  For  Hospitals 

• 

Dial  FR  6-1538 

925  East  Morehead 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


McCullough's  Transfer  Company 

PACKING     —    CRATING    —  STORAGE 
Reasonable  Rates  Free  Estimates 

1614  McCall  Street  CHARLOTTE,  N.  C.  Dial  ED  4-6336 


CAROLINA  RESTAURANT  SUPPLY  CO. 

"The  House  That  Undersells" 
Complete  Restaurant  Supplies  and  Equipment 
220  S.  College  St.      CHARLOTTE,  N.  C.  ED  4-3269 


Bailey  s 

Cafeteria 

Charlotte,  N.  C. 

Asheville,  N.  C. 

(Hotel  Selwyn  Bldg.) 

(West  Gate  Shopping  Center) 

MASTER  CLEANERS,  INC. 


1809  Commonwealth  Avenue 
Branch  Office — 605  Providence  Rd. 
Branch  Office — 5114  Park  Road 
Branch  Office— 3026  Eastway  Dr. 
Branch  Office — 2040  Hutchinson  Ave. 

CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


Dial  ED  4-5841 
ED  2-1833 

JA  3-1561 
FR  6-9505 
ED  2-9103 


Dial  FR  3-6177 

F.  &  R.  COAL 
AND  OIL  CO. 

624  S.  Cedar 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


Leo's  Delicatessen,  Inc. 

"Kosher  Food" 

Specialists  in  Imported 
Delicacies,  Party  Fare, 
and  Gift  Packages 

Phone  FRanklin  5-2400 
1503  Elizabeth  Ave. 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


"THE  TRUCK  OF  VALUE' 
Vz  to  20  tons 


Sales 


Service 


Hollingsworth's 
GMC  Trucks,  Inc. 

3027  N.  Tryon      —      ED.  2-8195 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


)  Store  Fronts 
)  Glass  For  All 

Purposes 
\  Paints 

Charlotte,  N.  C. 
Asheville,  N.  C. 
Durham,  N.  C. 
Raleigh,  N.  C 


6o 


The  American  Jeivish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


fa 


aunnsa 


V 


Folding  chairs 
Banquet  tables 
Punch  bowls 
Cocktail  glasses 


HOSPITAL  BEDS 
WHEEL  CHAIRS 


•  BABY  BEDS 

0   ROLL-AWAY  BEDS       «    WHJihJL  L'HAIHS  * 

Rent  these  items  by  day,  week  or  month 
Phone  FR  5-5725  for  other  items  1517  E.  Blvd. 


CARD  TABLES 
VACUUM  CLEANERS 


Charlotte,  N.  C. 


Gondola 
Restaurant 

Featuring 
PIZZA  AND  SPAGHETTI 

BEST  IN  THE  SOUTH 
Dial  FR  6-0361 
For  Pick-Up  Orders 
2238  Independence  Blvd. 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 

£.  C.  Griffith  Company 

—  Real  Estate  — 


Johnston  Bldg.   Dial  ED  2-7173 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 

CHARLOTTE 
BRACE  SHOP 

ED  3-0260 
Doctor's  Building 
CHARLOTTE,  N,  C. 

Private  Personnel  Service 

Headquarters  for  the 
Better  Positions 

916  Wilder  Bldg.     FR  6-4739 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


GARRISON  & 
HOPKINS  CO.,  Inc. 

PLUMBING  AND  HEATING 

1509  Camden  Road 
Dial  ED  3-6604 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 

%  MING  T»£€ 

FINEST  AMERICAN  and 
CHINESE  CUISINE 

For  Reservation  Call  ED  4-3028 

520  Providence  Road 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


McKEE  REALTY  CO 

Real  Estate  —  Insurance 
123  W.  4th  St.    Dial  ED  3-1134 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


SELWYN  HOTEL 

Air -Conditioned 
ONE  OF  CHARLOTTE'S 
FRIENDLIEST,  FINEST 
HOTELS 


Ernest  Ellison,  Inc. 

"JUST  INSURANCE" 
Since  1916 

Builders  Building 
Phone  ED  3-1146 

CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


W.  M.  MARTIN 
TRANSFER  CO. 

821  East  17th  Street 

Dial  ED  3-4377 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 

Burkhart 
Upholstering  Company 

Custom  Furniture  Upholstering 
Dial  FR  5-8411 
Located  at 
Mecklenburg  Furniture  Company 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


Please  Patronize  Our  Advertisers 


STANDARD 
TRUCKING  CO. 

Direct  Service  to  and  Between 
All  Points  in 

•  NORTH  CAROLINA 

and 

•  SOUTH  CAROLINA 

General  Commodities 

DIAL  ED  2-1107 

225  E.  16th 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


HAYES  NURSERY 

Quality  Nursery  Stock 
Tuckaseegee  Rd.       EX  9-1911 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 

MYERS  PARK 
PHARMACY 

Prescription  Specialists 
1340  Romany  Rd.   ED  2-7187 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


Weldon-Roanoke 
Rapids,  N.  C. 

LOUISE  FARBER,  Correspondent 

Stephen  Bloom,  son  of  Eugene 
and  Betty  Bloom  of  Emporia  and 
grandson  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  J.  Davis 
and  Mr.  Dave  Bloom,  was  Bar 
Mitzvah  at  Temple  Emanu-El  on 
Friday  and  Saturday,  July  14th  and 
15th.  Rabbi  Ralph  Weisberger  as- 
sisted by  Stephen  officiated  at  the 
services. 

The  Oneg  Shabat  was  given  by 
the  parents  at  the  Temple.  Im- 
mediately following  the  Bar  Mitz- 
vah on  Saturday  a  buffet  luncheon 
was  given  by  Betty  and  Eugene 
at  the  home  of  Louise  and  Ellis 
Farbcr.  On  Saturday  evening  the 
relatives,  friends  and  guests  were 
honored  at  a  dinner  and  dance  in 
Fmporia. 

Friends  and  relatives  came  from 
many  places  for  this  occasion. 
From  Baltimore  came  Mr.  G.  Hess, 
Miss  Betty  Himelford,  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Spleat,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  D. 
Caplin,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  I.  C.  Rosen- 
thal, Mr.  and  Mrs.  L.  Gerber,  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  H.  Davidson  and  chil- 
dren, Mr.  and  Mrs.  E.  Goldfarb 
and  Mr.  B.  Marcus.  From  Wash- 
ington came  Mrs.  Lola  Edlevitch, 
Dr.  and  Mrs.  I.  Franklin,  Mr.  H. 
Fox,  Jr.  and  Mr.  R.  Edwards.  From 
Houston,  Texas  came  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
A.  L.  Cohen  and  Elsa;  from  Sioux 
Falls,  South  Dakota  came  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  H.  Kapel;  from  Los  Angeles 
came  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jack  Hirscberg 
and  children,  Jill  and  Bobby;  from 
Fayetteville  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Harry 
Satisky  and  Howard  and  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Aron  Satisky;  from  Raleigh 
came  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Nat  Green,  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Isadore  Green,  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  George  Vinnick,  Mrs.  Fanny 
Satisky  and  Mrs.  Abe  Horowitz; 
from  Conway,  S.  C.  came  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Al  Soloman  and  Paul;  from 
Charlotte  Mrs.  Frank  Eisman;  from 
Norfolk  Mrs.  Harry  Zedd  and 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Theodore  Goldfarb; 
from  Wilmington  came  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  William  Kingoff;  from  Rich- 
mond Mr.  and  Mrs.  Morris  Bloom, 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hyman  Specter  and 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Harry  Sneider;  from 
Petersburg  Dr.  and  Mrs.  Herman 
Farber  and  children  Mark  and 
Jimmy,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Irving  Dorsk, 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Allen  Bloom  and 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Roland  Specter. 

Congratulations  to  Stephen,  his 
parents,  sister  and  relatives. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Harry  Kittner 
visited  relatives  in  Pennyslvania 
and  New  York.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Harry 
(Please  Turn  to  Page  67) 


Need  a  Plumber? 
Call  ED  3-6578 

John  Hutchinson 
Plumbing  Company 

1419  E.  4th  St. 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


H.  P.  SOSSOMON 
ENGINEERING  CO. 

BOILERS 

245  Tranquil  Ave.  ED  3-9285 

CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


UNITED 

Trading  Stamp  Co. 

112  E.  Morehead  FR  6-2675 

CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


A. A.  SHORT 
VARIETY  STORE 

Piece  Goods  —  Remnants 

1300  N.  Brevard        FR  5-2157 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 

CHESAPEAKE 

Paper  Stock  Co.,  Inc. 

Dial  ED  3-9512 
701  W.  5th  Street 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 

PROPHET  BROTHERS 

FUEL  OIL 
METERED  DELIVERY 

2521  Plaza  FR  7-5541 

CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 

H.  F.  PORTER 

Plumbing  Company 

3041  South  Boulevard 

Dial  JA  3-1212 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 

New  Year  Greetings 

DILWORTH 
MATTRESS  CO. 

242  W.  Tremont  Ave.        ED  3-9241 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 

McCLURE 
LUMBER  COMPANY 

Mt.  Holly  Road      EX  9-5681 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


61 


Rocky  Mount,  N.  C. 

MRS.  LOUIS  WALD,  Correspondent 


Rocky  Mount  Confirmation  Class  of  1959.  Left  to  right:  Bernard  Stanley 
Meyer,  son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Edward  Meyer;  Sandra  Phyllis  Sultan,  daughter 
of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Sigmund  Sultan;  Lawrence  Franklin  Katiin,  son  of  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Nathan  Katzin;  Rabbi  Benjamin  Kelson;  Marjorie  Fox,  daughter  of  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Albert  R.  Fox;  Alan  Howard  Brill,  son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Oscar  Brill. 


Stephen  Michael  Merritt,  son  of 
Mi.  and  Mrs.  Sidney  Merritt,  cele- 
brated his  Bar  Mitzvah  on  Friday, 
evening,  June  26,  at  Temple  Beth- 
El.  He  was  prepared  for  his  Bar 
Mitzvah  by  Rabbi  Benjamin  Kel- 
son. After  the  sermon  a  reception 
was  held  in  the  Social  Hall  of  the 
temple. 

The  following  evening  a  dinner 
was  held  at  the  Rio  Restaurant  for 
members  of  the  family  and  out-of- 
town  guests.  Guests  were  Mrs.  A. 
Greiss  of  New  York,  Stephen's 
great-grandmother;  Mr.  and  Mrs. 

One  of  the  Nation's  Finest 

LYERLY  S 

STERLING  SILVER 

Gifts  of  Rare  Beauty,  Guaranteed 
Quality,  and  Appreciated  Usefulness 

HICKORY,  N.  C 

RITCHIE 
CABINET  SHOP 

CABINETS  —  STORE  FIXTURES 
Any  Design  —  Any  Size 
CHURCH  FURNITURE 
Rt.  3  Dial  DA  7-2668 

HICKORY,  N.  C. 


S.  Hammel  of  Miami,  Stephen's 
grandparents*;  Mr.  and  Mrs.  M. 
Halem  and  Mr.  and  Mrs.  H.  Wolk 
of  New  Jersey;  Mr.  and  Mrs.  R. 
Kolotkin  and  Mr.  and  Mrs.  A. 
Greiss  of  New  York;  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Phil  Levy  of  Newport  News,  Va.; 
Dr.  and  Mrs.  Sam  Victor  of  Way- 
cross,  Ga.,  and  Mrs.  Jean  Laham 
and  daughter  Nora  of  Haiti,  West 
Indies. 

Rabbi  and  Mrs.  Benjamin  Kel- 
son are  vacationing  this  summer  in 
New  York. 

Many  Rocky  Mount  residents  en- 
joyed pleasant  vacations  this  sum- 
mer at  Wrightsville  Beach.  Among 
them  were  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Sidney 
Meritt  and  family,  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Oscar  Levy,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Ken- 
neth Berk  and  daughters,  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Aaron  Coplon,  and  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Sigmund  Sultan  and  family. 

SLOAN'S  CLEANERS 

Cleaners — Dyers — Tailors 
Hatters 
Household  Furnishings 

Rugs  —  Drapes 
STATESVILLE,  N.  C. 


Morrison  Furniture  6?  Fixture  Company 

Manufacturers  and  Designers  of 

Bank,  Store  and  Office  Fixtures 


Phone  TRiangle  2-2444 


STATESVILLE,  N.  C. 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Statesville-Hickory,  N.  C. 


Department  Store 

Dry  Goods,  Clothing, 
Notions,  Shoes, 
Ready-to-Wear 

STATESVILLE,  N.  C. 


HICKORY 
Rug  Cleaners 

John  McFarland,  Mgr. 

Western  North  Carolina's 
Oldest  Exclusive 
Rug  Cleaners" 

•  Free  Estimates 

•  Experienced  Craftsmen 
Everybody  Looks  at  Your  Rugs- 
Be  Proud  of  Yours 

221  Third  St.,  N.  E. 
DAvis  7-6826 
HICKORY,  N.  C. 


PARMER  PLUMBING  &  HEATING  (0. 

Plumbing         •         Heating         •  Air-Conditioning 


225  E.  Front 


Heating  • 
CONTRACTORS 

STATESVILLE,  N.  C. 


Dial  TR  2-2421 


CAROLINA  (RAFTS  COMPANY 

Manufacturers  of 
Wrought  Iron  Stools  &  Chairs 

STATESVILLE,  N.  C.  Dial  TR  3-7051 


903  Shelton  Ave. 


pai  nn®w  s 

HICKORY'S  LEADING  STORE 


You  are  always  welcome  at 

FRALEY'S 
Food  Fair 

STATESVILLE,  N.  C. 


When  Better  Automobiles 
Are  Built 
Buick  Will  Build  Them. 

Alex  Greene 
Buick,  Inc. 

207  W.  Front  TR  3-7296 

STATESVILLE,  N.  C. 


Statesville  Laundry 
and  Dry  Cleaning 

Dial  TR  3-4371 
350  S.  Greene  St. 
STATESVILLE,  N.  C. 

STATESVILLE 
INDUSTRIAL  BANK 


STATESVILLE,  N.  C. 


Perry  Armature 
Company 

Electric  Motor 

Repairing 
and  Rewinding 
Motor  Controls 
—  Drives  — 
Transformers 

509  Main  Avenue,  S.  W. 
Dial  DA  4-7592 
HICKORY,  N.  C. 


STANDARD 
GLASS  CO.,  Inc. 

All  Types  of  Glass 
Installation 
Residential  —  Commercial 

Glass  for  Every  Purpose 

Dial  DA  7-5571 
S.  Center  St.  &  1st  Ave.  SE 
HICKORY,  N.  C. 


62 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Raleigh,  N.  C. 


Raleigh  Beth  Meyer  Synagogue 

MRS.  OSCAR  LEGUM,  Correspondent 


Greetings 


THE  SIR  WALTER  HOTEL 

RALEIGH,  NORTH  CAROLINA 

400  Rooms 
100%  Air  Conditioned 
Bath,  Radio  and  Circulating  Ice  Water 

A  Meyer  Hotel  Arthur  E.  Buddenhagen,  Manager 


219  S.  McDowell 


Patterson  Travel  Service,  Inc. 

Representative  of  Major  Steamship  and  Airline 
Companies  for  World  Travel  Tours,  Cruises  and 
Travel  with  Hotel  Reservations  Everywhere.  Also 
Domestic  Facilities  for  Travel. 

NO  SERVICE  CHARGE 

"FOR  INFORMATION  CALL" 

TE  4-8431 

Raleigh,  N.  C. 


4?ht 

The 

House  of  g>tofeelp 

Food  brokers 

Greenville  Charlotte 

Raleigh 

BEER— 


THE  BEVERAGE 

OF  MODERATION 

North  Carolina  Association 
Of  Beer  Distributors 


MRS.  SANFORD  S.  HENICK 


The  wedding  of  Miss  Marilyn 
Shugar  and  Sanford  S.  Henick  took 
place  Sunday,  August  16,  at  Beth 
Meyer  Synagogue,  with  Rabbi 
Schoen  of  Raleigh,  and  Rabbi  Sel- 
berman  of  High  Point,  N.  C,  offi- 
ciating. 

The  bride  is  the  daughter  of  Mrs. 
Lillian  Shugar  of  Raleigh,  and  Mr. 
Shugar  of  Plymouth,  N.  C.  The 
bridegroom  is  the  son  of  Mr.  and 


Mrs.  Hyman  Henick  of  Brooklyn, 

N.  Y. 

Music  was  presented  by  Woody 
Hayes  of  Raleigh,  organist,  and 
Cantor  Bella  Herskovitz  of  Brook- 
lyn, N.  Y.,  soloist. 

Given  in  marriage  by  her  uncle, 
Mr.  Ben  Ganderson,  of  Plymouth, 
N.  C,  the  bride  wore  a  gown  of 
tulle  over  silk  organza  trimmed 
with  Chantilly  lace  and  pearls.  Her 


One  to  grow  on  •  • . 

Good  heolth  is  our  business.  We  take  a  deep 
personal  pride  in  watching  the  growth  and  devel- 
opment of  youngsters  raised  on  Pine  State's  good, 
health-giving  milk  and  dairy  foods.  We  feel 
great  satisfaction  in  the  knowledge  that  we 
contribute  to  the  growth  of  the  community  as  we 
do  to  the  growth  of  its  citizens. 
We're  proud  of  the  fact  that  we're  growing, 
too  .  .  .  that  more  and  more  families  are  asking 
for  Pine  State's  pure,  delicious  milk,  ice  cream 
and  other  fine  dairy  foods. 


North  Carolina's 
Choice  Since  1919 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


63 


veil  of  tulle  was  attached  to  a  seed 
pearl  tiara  and  she  carried  a  prayer 
book  topped  with  an  orchid. 

Mrs.  Ben  Ganderson,  aunt  of  the 
brick,  was  matron  of  honor.  She 
wore  a  gown  of  mint  green  organza 
and  carried  a  bouquet  of  mixed 
flowers.  The  bridegroom's  brother 
was  best  man.  Ushers  were  Harold 
Gutterman  and  Mose  Samet,  of 
High  Point,  N.  C. 

The  bride's  mother  wore  a  gown 
of  ice  blue  peau  de  soie  with  match- 
ing accessories  and  a  corsage  of  or- 
chids. The  bridegroom's  mother 
wore  a  gown  of  mauve  with  match- 
ing accessories  and  a  corsage  of  or- 
chids. 

Following  the  ceremony  Mrs. 
Shugar,  the  bride's  mother,  enter- 
tained at  a  wedding  dinner  in  the 
social  hall  at  the  Synagogue. 

The  bride  received  the  A.  B  de- 
gree in  June  from  Woman's  Col- 
lege at  Greensboro.  The  groom  is 
sales  manager  for  Monarch  Furni- 
ture Company,  High  Point,  N.  C. 
Following  their  wedding  trip,  the 
couple  will  make  their  home  at 
1313  Eaton  Place,  High  Point. 


refreshes  # 
without  filling 


With  September  and  school  ap- 
proaching, all  the  folks  who  have 
been  away  sometime  during  the 
summer  are  slowly  returning  to 
Raleigh  like  homing  pigeons.  Mrs. 
Elliott  Reiger,  Libby  Reiger,  and 
Stephanie  Doliner  have  returned 
from  a  Carribean  cruise;  the  W.  A. 
Heiligs,  Meyer  Macklers,  Oscar  Le- 
gums  and  Max  Banes  visited  in 
Miami  Beach;  Mrs.  Martin  Lit- 
wack  and  Barbara  and  Debbie  flew 
out  to  California  for  a  month's 
stay;  the  Louis  Greenspons,  the  I. 
J.  Greens;  Mrs.  Harry  Garbler  and 
Mrs.  Abe  Horwitz  from  Myrtle 
Beach;  Mrs.  Jules  Robinson  and 
Susan  and  Joyce  visited  in  Phila- 
delphia and  Atlantic  City;  the 
George  Vinniks,  who  visited  in 
Monticello,  New  York,  and  many, 
many  more. 

New  members  of  the  Beth  Meyer 
Synagogue  family  are  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Emil  Goldsmith  and  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Ezra  Mier.  We  are  happy  to  have 
you  worship  with  us. 

We  are  happy  to  report  that 
Rabbi  Abe  Schoen  has  recovered 
from  his  recent  operation  and  stay 
in  the  hospital. 


3705  Hillsboro 
Raleigh,  N.  C. 


Wilmington,  N.  C. 

(Concluded  from  Page  43) 
strange  place  as  she  is  very  familiar 
with  what  goes  on  during  the  big- 
gest beauty  contest  of  them  all. 

Just  recently  Mrs.  Block  accom- 
panied Miss  Wilmington,  Dotty 
McEwen,  to  Raleigh,  and  although 
Dotty  didn't  reach  the  finals,  she 
won  the  "Miss  Congeniality"  title, 
which  is  one  of  the  most  sought- 
after  honors. 

"Miss  North  Carolina"  (Judith 
Ann  Klipfel)  recently  flew  to  Wil- 
mington to  be  the  guest  of  Mrs. 
Block  lor  the  purpose  of  an  inten- 
sive training  period.  When  inter- 
^     viewed,  Miss  Klipfel  said,  "I  doubt 
if  1  11  be  able  to  get  in  any  recre- 
H      ation.  I  ve  got  a  lot  of  work  to  do 
■fj      So  the  best  of  luck  to  "Miss  North 
4      Carolina    and  the  lady  behind  the 
1     scenes,  Mrs.  Hannah  Block. 

Dr.  and  Mrs.  Robert  Seller  and 
I  son  Michael  of  Philadelphia  visited 
^  Mrs.  Seller's  parents,  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
I      B.  D.  Schwartz. 

Miss  Joyce  Checkner  of  Wash- 
ington, D.  C.  visited  her  parents, 
j|      Mr.  and  Mrs.  S.  Checkner. 

Mrs.  Clara  Warshauer  recently 
i      returned  from  a  trip  abroad. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Abe  Goldstein  an- 

Wt 

m  nounced  the  engagement  of  their 
m      daughter,  Eleanor,  to  Jack  Miller 

of  Baltimore,  Md.  An  early  Fall 

wedding  is  planned. 


The  Oldest  Building  Supply 
House  in  Raleigh 

Oldham  &  Worth,  Inc. 

Established  in  1912 
Building  Materials  -:-  Paints 
MILLWORK 

400  S.  West  St.       TE  2-2824 
RALEIGH,  N.  C. 


Roberts  Florist 

Flowers 

For  Every 

Occasion 

Dial  TE  2-8842 

716  St.  Marys  St. 
(Near  Rex  Hospital) 
RALEIGH,  N.  C. 


SIR  WALTER  OPTICIANS 

GREIG  L.  HICKS,  Manager 

Ground  Floor  Professional  Building  Dial  TE  3-4629 

RALEIGH,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS 


GARLAND  C.  NORMS  COMPANY 


PAPER  PRODUCTS 

122  Glenwood  Ave.  Raleigh,  N.  C. 


Dial  TE  2-0324 


"Raleigh's  Oldest  Furniture  Store" 

G.  S.  TUCKER  &  BROS.,  INC. 

Quality  Furniture  at  Reasonable  Prices 

112  E.  Hargett  St.  RALEIGH,  N.  C.  Dial  TE  2-2563 


CAL  -  TONE  PAINTS,  INC. 

Mtinujacturers  of 

THE  VERY  BEST  IN  PAINTS 

310  S.  West  St.  RALEIGH,  N.  C.  Dial  TE  4-7721 


"Home  Made  —  Always  Good" 

Roysfer's 

A  Standard  for  Quality  Candies 
Since  1865 

J.  E.  STETHACOS,  Manager 
RALEIGH,  N.  C. 


Clancy  Construction  Co. 

General  Contractors 
807  Edmund  St.  Dial  TE  3-8689 
RALEIGH,  N.  C. 


CAROLINA  HOTEL 

ROBERT  E.  LEE,  Mgr. 

250  Rooms 
Each  With  Bath  and  Radio 

FREE  PARKING  SPACE 

Cor.  Hargett  and  Dawson 
228  W.  Hargett     TE  2-8811 
RALEIGH,  N.  C. 


fa  %  coo/,  c/ean 
taste... 

Nothing  doss  it 
like 
&ven-Up! 

Seven-Up  Bottling  Co. 

RALEIGH,  N.  C. 


Mobilheot 


FUEL  OIL 

Dispatched  by  Two-Way  Radio 
For  Quicker  Delivery 
On  Ticket  Printed  Metered 
Ti' Licks 

White  Oil  Co.,  Inc. 

1115  W.  Lenoir       Dial  TE  2-4474 

RALEIGH,  N.  C. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  Neiv  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Gastonia,  N.  C. 


JACKSON  &  SMITH 


INVESTMENT  SECURITIES 


211  Commercial  Building 

GASTONIA,  N.  C. 


Dial  UN  5-2314 


FIRST  FEDERAL  SAVINGS  &  LOAN  ASS'N. 

INSURED  SAVINGS 
Main  Office  Akers  Center  Branch 

251  W.  Main  Ave.  1327  E.  Franklin  Ave. 

Dial  UN  7-7248  Dial  UN  4-4566 

GASTONIA,  N.  C. 


CAROTHERS  FUNERAL  HOME 

A  COMPLETE  DIGNIFIED  SERVICE 

AMBULANCE  —  DIAL  UN  7-6337 

312  West  Second  St.  GASTONIA,  N. 


C. 


SPENCER'S  INC. 

Office  Supplies 
Printing 

257  W.  Main       Dial  UN  5-2356 
GASTONIA,  N.  C. 


RICH'S  WELDING 
PLANT 

Dial  UN  5-3651 
224  East  Long  Avenue 
GASTONIA,  N.  C. 


NORRIS  SUPPLY  &  MACHINE  COMPANY 

Automatic  Heating  Plants  and  Mill  Supplies- Appliances 
232  East  Airline  Avenue  Dial  UN  7-7931 

GASTONIA,  N.  C. 


Organized  1905 


Gastonia  Mutual  Savings  &  Loan  Association 

1905 

31% 


Insured  Savings 
Home  Loans 


Current 
Dividends 


283  W.  Main  Avenue 


Gastonia,  N.  C. 


New  Year  Greetings 


GASTONIA  BELTING  AND 
SUPPLY  C0.r  Inc. 

Manufacturers  of 

ALL  TYPES  OF 

QUALITY  LEATHER  BELTING 

AND  SUPPLIES 

Distributors  of 
MANHATTAN  RUBBER  GOODS 


N.  Marietta  St. 


GASTONIA,  N.  C. 


Dial  UN  5-2732 


We  enjoyed  the  visit  of  Mrs. 
Cooper,  of  Norfolk,  Va.  She  is 
the  mother  of  Barbara  Planer, 
and  the  Henry  Fowler  family  of 
Louisville,  Ky.,  who  visited  the 
Mike  Planers. 

Congratulations  to  Evelyn  and 
Victor  Osborne,  on  the  birth  of  a 
lovely  little  girl.  Congratulations 
too,  to  the  grandparents,  Lee  and 
Harry  Sweetbaum. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  bill  Manning 
have  just  returned  from  a  trip 
to  Atlanta,  Ga.,  where  they  were 
to  attend  the  wedding  of  Elliot 
Manning  to  Gail  Washor  of  New 
York  City  and  the  Helen  Zimmer- 


Gastonia,  N.  C. 

PAULINE  CHINN,  Correspondent 

man  to  Frank  Hahn 
delphia,  Pa. 


of  Phila- 


At  this  writing  Oren  Manning 
is  getting  ready  to  leave  lor  a  trip 
to  Panama  City,  Panama  (for  you 
know  what)  on  August  13th,  and 
his  dad,  Bill  Manning,  went  down 
to  Panama  City  on  August  21st. 
They  both  flew  down  from  Miami. 

Things  are  beginning  to  buzz 
around  town  now  that  Phyllis 
and  Herbert  Girard  have  accepted 
the  job  of  working  as  co-superin- 
tendents of  our  Sunday  school.  Can 
hardly  wait  for  the  first  meeting 
with  the  teachers  so  I  can  find 
out  about  all  of  the  wonderful 
things  they  have  planned. 


Prime  Minister  Tage  Erlander  of  Sweden  (left)  opened  the  World 
Jewish  Congress'  Fourth  Plenary  Assembly  held  in  Stockholm  August  2nd 
to  12th.  The  opening  session  featured  a  presidential  report  by  Dr.  Nahum 
Goldmann  (right)  who  surveyed  the  situation  of  Jewry  throughout  the  world. 


WITTEN  SUPPLY  CO. 

BUILDING  MATERIALS 

310  E.  Long  Ave.  GASTONIA,  N.  C.  Dial  UN  5-8584 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


65 


High  Point,  N.  C. 

MRS.  DAVID  L AFFERM AN,  Correspondent 


Miss  Patricia  Ann  Rabhan, 
whose  marriage  to  Mr.  Jack  Bal- 
sar  of  Atlanta,  Ga.,  will  take  place 
the  sixth  of  September,  has  been 
honored  with  a  number  of  pre- 
nuptial  parties  in  Atlanta.  Miss 
Rabhan  was  accompanied  to  At- 
lanta by  her  mother,  Mrs.  A.  R. 
Rabhan,  and  her  sister-in-law, 
Mrs.  Harold  Rabhan. 

On  Saturday,  July  25th,  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Carl  Lew  is  had  a  dinner 
party  honoring  the  engaged 
couple.  On  Sunday  July  26,  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Ted  Schlossman,  sister 
and  brother-in-law  of  Mrs.  Harold 
Rabhan,  had  open  house  in  their 
new  home  in  Atlanta,  from  5  to  7. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Marvin  Harris 
had  a  barbecue  dinner  at  their 
home  on  Monday  evening  July  27. 
On  Tuesday  the  28th.,  Mrs.  Meyer 
Balsar,  the  groom's  mother,  honor- 
ed Miss  Toby  Dwoskin,  bride-elect 
and  close  friend  of  the  family,  at 
a  luncheon  and  the  Rabhans  were 
guests  at  this  affair.  On  Tuesday 
evening,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Sidney 
Marks  honored  Miss  Pat  Rabhan 
and  Mr.  Jack  Balsar  with  a  dinner. 


On  Wednesday,  July  29th,  Mrs. 
Marvin  Wender,  the  former  Diane 
Wagger  of  High  Point,  whose 
husband  is  first  cousin  of  the 
groom,  honoied  Miss  Rabhan  at 
a  luncheon.  Serving  as  co-hostess 
for  this  affair  was  Mrs.  Henry 
Harris,  also  a  cousin  of  the  groom. 
On  Wednesday  evening,  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  T.  A.  Rosenberg,  aunt  and 
uncle  of  the  groom,  had  a  dinner 
party  at  the  Mayfair  Country  Club 
to  honor  the  engaged  couple. 

On  Thursday,  July  30,  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Milton  Weinstein  entertain- 
ed with  a  dinner  party.  Friday 
evening,  July  31,  a  dinner  was 
given  by  Mi.  and  Mrs.  Hershel 
Hurwit/  and  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Max 
Orenstein. 

On  Saturday,  August  1,  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Oscar  Dwoskin  and  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Harry  Dwoskin  complet- 
ed this  series  of  entertainments 
with  a  dinner  party. 

Miss  Rabhan,  her  mother  and 
sister-in-law  returned  to  High 
Point  on  August  2. 


Durham,  N.  C. 


MRS.  SAM  FREEDMAN,  Correspondent 


Heading  Durham's  news  this 
month  is  the  reception  announcing 
the  engagement  of  Carolyn  Sue 
Fink,  daughter  of  Mr.  8c  Mrs.  Sam 
Fink,  to  Jerome  Hollander,  son  of 
Mrs.  Harry  A.  Hollander,  Water- 


TOBIAS 


HIGH  POINT,  N.  C. 


HIGH  POIHT 
CANVAS  SHOP 

Awnings  —  Truck  Covers 
Furniture  Pads 

835  W.  Burton        Dial  4306 
HIGH  POINT,  N.  C 


bury,  Conn.,  and  the  late  Mr.  Hol- 
lander, at  the  Beth-El  Synagogue 
Center. 

In  the  receiving  line  to  greet 
the  250  guests  were  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Sam  Fink,  Mrs.  Harry  A.  Holland- 
er,  Carolyn  Fink,  and  Jerome  Hol- 

LUACH 
Holidays  Begin  Sundown  of 
Previous  Day 
5719  -  1959 
5720  -  1959-60 

Yom  Kippur  Oct.  12 

Sukkot  (1st  day)„.      .  Oct.  17 

Hanuka  ^  Dec.  26 

Purim  March  13 

Pesach    April  12 

Shevuous ...   June  1 

CALDWELL  STAMP 
AND  PRINTING  CO. 

Rubber  Stamps  and  Printing 

209  E.  Russell  Dial  3976 

HIGH  POINT,  N.  C. 


SUNSHINE 
LAUNDRY 

Mothproof  Dry  Cleaning 

210-212  Pine  Street 
HIGH  POINT,  N.  C. 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

High  Point,  N.  C. 


North  State  Telephone  Co. 

Telephone  Facilities  Are  Available 
To  Suit  Your  Particular  Needs 
HIGH  POINT,  N.  C. 


KENNEDY  OIL  COMPANY 


Petroleum  Products 

1203  Try-on  High  Point,  N.  C. 


Dial  3027 


J.  R.  Graham  &  Son  Construction  Co. 

GENERAL  CONTRACTORS 


Telephone  2-8167 
Greensboro  Rd. 
HIGH  POINT,  N.  C. 


Efficient  Service  Guarantees  Insurance  Economy 

JONES  and  PEACOCK.  Incorporated 

INSURANCE 

118  OAKWOOD  CT.  HIGH  POINT,  N.  C.  DIAL  2-1716 


GENERAL  PAPER  COMPANY 

Manufacturers  and  Distributors  of 
PAPER  BAGS  FOR  ALL  PURPOSES 
409  Prospect  HIGH  POINT,  N.  C.  Dial  2-6868 


John  C.  Davis  Plumbing  &  Heating  Co. 

PLUMBING  —  HEATING  —  AIR  CONDITIONING 
CONTRACTORS 

1916  English  HIGH  POINT,  N.  C.  Dial  7240 


The  Sirloin  Sted\  House 


Charcoal-Broiled  Choice  Western  Steaks 
Poultrv  —  Seafood 


S.  Main  Ext.  on  Highway  No.  29 — Dial  7907 


High  Point,  N.  C. 


66 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Wilmington,  N.  C. 


YOPP  FUNERAL  HOME 

Established  1892 

FUNERAL  DIRECTORS 

Dial  RO  2-6666      WILMINGTON,  N.  C,  1207  Market 


"We  Clean  Suede  and  Leather  Jackets" 
808  S.  17th  St.  WILMINGTON,,  N.  C.  Dial  RO  2-1357 


W.  E.  STARNES  LUMBER  CO. 

LUMBER  -  BUILDERS  SUPPLIES 
ROOFING  -  PAINTS 
Kerr  Avenue  Dial  RO  2-8331 

WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 


Mutual 


OF  OMAHA 


John  A.  Moran's  Agency 

Eastern  Carolina  Division  Office 
26  N.  2nd  St.      WILMINGTON,  N.  C.       Dial  RO  3-4621 


Please  Patronize  Our  Advetisers 


TRUCK-TRACTOR  SALES,  Inc. 

Sales— WHITE  TRUCKS— Service 

1100  South  17th  Street  Dial  RO  3-6281 

WILMINGTON,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


TAILORED  FOR  YOU... 

SOUTHLAND 

SPORTSWEAR 

txury  Fabrics 
'  Handsome  Styling 
•  Washable  •  Popular  Priced 

Block-Southland 
Sportswear,  Inc. 

WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 


CAROLYN  SUE  FINK 

lander.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  I.  S.  Ruby 
of  Greensboro  and  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Richard  Ruby  of  Raleigh  were 
among  the  out-of-town  guests  at- 
tending this  gala  event. 

A  color  scheme  of  pink  and 
white  was  used  throughout  the 
table  decorations,  and  all  the  fancy 
cakes  and  cookies  had  been  espe- 
cially prepared  by  the  hostess, 
Jeannette! 

Carolyn  is  a  graduate  of  Durham 
High  School,  attended  the  Univer- 
sity of  Michigan  in  Ann  Arbor, 
and  will  be  a  rising  senior  at  the 
University  of  North  Carolina  this 
fall. 

Mr.  Hollander,  a  captain  in  the 
Air  Force  Reserve  was  graduated 
from  New  York  University  and  is 
a  graduate  student  working  for  the 
Ph.  D.  in  Chemistry  at  the  Univer- 
sity of  North  Carolina.  He  is  a 
member  of  Sigma  Xi,  national  re- 
search fraternity;  Alpha  Chi  Sig- 
ma, professional  chemistry  fratern- 
ity, and  Kappa  Nu.  He  is  also  a 
member  of  the  American  Chemical 
Society,  and  will  be  associated  with 
the  Allied  Chemical  Co.,  Morris- 
town,  N.  J.,  when  he  completes  his 
studies  at  Carolina. 

Mrs.  George  Lewin,  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  N.  Wolfe,  and  Mrs.  Sam 
Freedman  attended  the  wedding  of 
Carol  Bloomfield  to  Harold  Koot- 
chick  at  the  Breakers,  Atlantic 
City.  Carol  is  the  daughter  of  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  I.  Bloomfield,  former  res- 
idents of  Durham.  The  Durham 
party  was  joined  in  Atlantic  City 
by  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Leon  Moel  of  St. 
Louis,  Mo.  From  Atlantic  City, 
Mrs.  Moel  and  Mrs.  Freedman 
drove  to  New  York  City,  where 
they  spent  a  week. 

Congratulations  to  Dr.  Louis  D. 
Cohen,  who  has  been  promoted 
from  associate  professor  to  profes- 
sor of  medical  psychology  in  the 


Duke  University  Medical  Center's 
psychiatry  department! 

At  the  annual  U.  S.  Conference 
of  Mayors  at  Los  Angeles,  Mayor 
E.  J.  Evans  was  appointed  to  the 
Advisory  Board  for  the  United 
States  Conference  of  Mayors.  Con- 
gratulations to  the  mayor! 

The  Top  Salesman  award  was 
received  by  J.  C.  Margolis,  local 
representative  of  the  Mutual  Bene- 
fit Life  Insurance  Co.  Mr.  Margolis 
attended  the  annual  sales  meeting- 
held  at  Point  Clear,  Ala. 

A  budding  author,  Carol  Kap- 
lan, a  rising  senior  at  Durham 
High  School,  has  been  notified 
that  her  poem,  /  Have  A  Dream, 
will  be  published  in  an  anthology 
entitled  Songs  of  Youth,  by  The 
American  Poetry  Society.  Over  io,- 
ooo  poems  by  high  school  students 
in  the  nation  were  reviewed  by  the 
Society  in  compiling  those  to  be 
published.  We  are  proud  of  you, 
Carol! 

On  the  sick  list  and  for  whom 
we  wish  speedy  recovery  are  Louis 
Sher,  Nathan  Lieberman,  Nathan 
Strauss,  Sam  Fagan,  and  Charlie 
Sawolosky. 

The  pace  quickens  and  old 
friends  depart.  It  is  with  a  great 
deal  of  feeling  that  I  list  the  de- 
parture of  my  own  mother-in-law, 
Mrs.  Minnie  S.  Freedman,  who  was 
a  very  human  and  lovable  person. 
Condolences  are  also  extended  to 
the  Lieberman  family  on  the  death 
of  their  brother,  Louis  Lieberman, 
of  Wlmington,  N.  C,  and  to  the 
Eisenberg  family,  on  the  loss  of 
Morris  Eisenberg. 


Visit  Us  In  Our  New  Location 
9th  &  Market 

Lewis  Florist 

"Flowers  Whisper  What  Words 
Cannot  Say" 

Dial  RO  2-3807 
WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 


TELEVISION 


SALES-SERVICE 
Complete  Television  Service 
On  Any  Make  or  Model 
Dial  RO  3-6286 

Landen's 
Television  Center 

820  Market       Wilmington,  N.  C. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


6  . 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Burlington,  N.  C. 


Your  General  Electric  Dealer  —  Wholesale  and  Retail 

"We  Service  Everything   We  Sell" 

251  West  Front  Street  Dial  CA  6-0278 

BURLINGTON,  N.  C. 


Burlington,  N.  C. 


BETSY    RUTH  GOLDMAN 


Betsy  Ruth  Goldman,  daughter 
of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Isadore  Goldman, 
has  accepted  a  position  with  Dr. 
William  Green,  of  the  Children's 
Hospital  of  the  Howard  Medical 
School  in  Boston,  Mass.  She  will 
serve  as  research  assistant  to  Dr. 
Green's  Growth  Study  Research. 
Betsy  is  a  June  1959  graduate  of 
Duke  University. 


Statesville,  N.  C. 

MRS.    MILTON  STEINBERGER 
Correspondent 

Rain,  rain!  That  has  hit  our 
picturesque  little  town  for  over  a 
month  has  now  become  the  unin- 
vited guest,  but  in  spite  of  all  the 
rain,  it's  been  a  grand  summer  for 
most  of  our  community.  So  many 
Statesville  folks  have  been  vaca- 
tioning during  the  summer  months. 
Your  reporter  hopes  that  each  and 
every  one  had  an  enjoyable  sum- 
mer, and  will  be  ready  to  start  the 


Phone  CA  6-6226 

R.  E.  BOONE 
Laundry  and  Dry 
Cleaners 


306  North  Main  Street 
BURLINGTON,  N.  C. 


activities  oi  our  coming  year  with 
a  bang! 

We  welcome  back  to  Statesville 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Alfred  Faeber  and 
family  from  New  York.  Best  of  luck 
in  their  new  undertaking. 

Stan  Steinberger,  a  former  stu- 
dent at  the  University  of  Georgia, 
is  now  in  the  National  Guard,  sta- 
tioned at  Lackland  Air  Base,  San 
Antonio,  Texas.  He  expects  to  re- 
turn in  the  fall  to  complete  his 
senior  year  at  the  University  of 
Georgia. 

We  know  that  Sandra  and  Linda 
Polakavetz,  daughters  of  Mrs. 
Louis  Gordon,  are  happy  to  be  vis- 
iting relatives  and  friends  in  Balti- 
more, their  former  home. 

Barry  Jay  of  New  York,  is  spend- 
ing the  summer  with  his  grandpar- 
ents, Mr.  and  Mrs.  Joe  Jay.  Barry 
looks  forward  to  this  visit  every 
summer,  and  so  do  his  grandpar- 
ents. 

Miss  Toby  Starr  of  Birmingham, 
Ala.,  is  a  visitor  in  the  home  of  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Louis  Gordon  and  family. 
Tony  and  Kalman  Gordon  were 
students  at  the  University  of  Ala- 
bama. 


Weldon  -  Roanoke 
Rapids,  N.  G. 

(Concluded  from  Page  60) 
Freid  and  Josephine  Freid  motored 
to  New  York.  Recent  guests  of  the 
Morton  Fathers  were  Mrs.  S. 
Abrams  and  Reba  Abrains  of 
Richmond  and  Mrs.  Israel  Fleisch- 
er and  children  of  Philadelphia. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  M.  Josephson  and 
Miss  Evelyn  Josephson  attended 
the  funeral  of  their  brother-in-law 
Mr.  Israel  Siegel  of  Newport  News. 

The  Wild  Acres  Institute  was 
represented  by  the  largest  group 
ever  to  attend  from  this  community. 
Under  the  able  leadership  and 
director  of  the  Institute  Bob  Liver- 
man  and  Registrar,  Fanny  Roth 
the  following  members  and  guests 
attended  from  Temple  Emanu-El; 
Marcella  and  Bob  Liverman, 
Fannye  and  Seymour  Roth  and 
guests  Mrs.  Pearl  Schweab  and 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Max  Pollack  of  New 
York,  Ruth  and  Hy  Diamond  of 
Warrenton,  Reba  Abrams,  Joseph- 
ine Freid  and  Louise  Farber. 


Tourists  in  Israel  will  receive  a 
20  percent  cash  premium  over  and 
above  the  official  rate  of  exchange 
of  the  Israeli  pound,  it  was  an- 
nounced by  Yohanan  Beham,  dir- 
ector of  the  Israel  Government 
Tourist  Office. 


McCLURE 
FUNERAL 
SERVICE 

Dial  CA  7-2711 

141  S.  Main 
GRAHAM,  N.  C. 
Dial  CA  7-7448 
605  Webb  Ave. 
BURLINGTON,  N.  C. 


G.  MARVIN  HOLT,  Inc. 

FRIGIDAIRE 
Sales  —  Service 
Dial  CA  7-3661 
BURLINGTON,  N.  C. 


HARRY  L.  LYNCH 

ESSO  OIL  SERVICE 
Heating  Oil 

Dial  CA  8-8311 
1609  W.  Webb  Avenue 
BURLINGTON,  N.  C. 


Home  Refreshment  I 


BURLINGTON  COCA-COLA 
BOTTLING  CO. 

Burlington,  N.  C. 


Peele  Electrical  Co.,  Inc. 

Electrical  Contractors 

106  Stokes         Dial  CA  6-4441 
BURLINGTON,  N.  C. 


ALAMANCE 
Printing  Company 

COMMERCIAL  PRINTING 
Engraving  and  Photo-Offset 
720  S.  Main  St.  Dial  CA  6-1881 

BURLINGTON,  N.  C. 


"Don't  say  Taxi- 
say  Red  Bird" 

For  Prompt  and  Courteous 
Service,  Call  a 

RED  BIRD  CAB 

Burlington  —  High  Point 
Goldsboro  —  Wilson 


Build  With  Brick 

HANFORD 
Brick  Company 

1Y2  Miles  Beyond  City 
Limits  off  Liberty  Hwy. 
Dial  CA  6-3688 
BURLINGTON,  N.  C, 


68 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Plan  The  Future  Safely 
With  Carolina  Home  Life  Policies 
"The  Doorway  To  Complete  Family  Protection" 
&  Medical  and  Surgical  Reimbursement 


•  Health 
•  Accident 

•  Hospital- 
ization 

•  Surgical 
•  Franchise 


Home  Office 
Burlington,  N.  C. 


Life 

»  Endowment 

•  Retirement 
Income 

•  Term 

•  Group 


Burlington  Paint  &  Glass  Co.,  Inc. 

Paint,  Glass  and  Mirrors 

834  S.  Church  St.  Dial  CA  6-6341 

BURLINGTON,  N.  C. 


Burlington  Owned 


Burlington  Managed 

South  Main  Street  Burlington,  N.  C, 


A 


CALL  FOR 

MELVILLE  SOUR  CREAM 

Pasteurized  for  purity  and  homogenized  to  insure  that 
just-right  creamy  smoothness.  Delicious  in  salads,  on 
fresh  fruits,  for  baking  pies,  cakes  and  cookies,  or  to 
eat  just  so. 

home  delivery  —  on  sale  in  stores 


MELVILLE  DAIRY 


DIAL  CA  6-6391 


BURLINGTON,  N.  C. 


e 


Part  of  All  You  Earn  Is  Yours  to  Saiie 


(IMMUNITY  FEDERAL 


Sewtfig/i  and  £otzn  (ZMOcutiian 


3r~ 

445  S.  Spring  St.       Opposite  Post  Office       Dial  CA  7-3681 
BURLINGTON,  N.  C. 


HOOD  SYSTEM  INDUSTRIAL  BANK 

SAVINGS  -P-  LOANS 

BURLINGTON,  N.  C. 


CHANCE  PAVING  CO. 

DRIVEWAYS  AND  PARKING  LOTS 

2111  Maple  Ave.         BURLINGTON,  N.  C.         Dial  CA  6-1620 


might 


)e  pursuing  her  studies.  1 
called  back  the  next  day,  and  for 
several  days  before  the  society's  af- 
fair, the  response  being  the  same. 
Becky  was  not  at  home  regardless 
of  the  hour  I  telephoned  the  house. 

I  ended  up  taking  Ma  as  my  date 
and  I  couldn't  have  done  better  had 
Becky  answered  one  of  my  calls 
and  accepted. 

It  was  the  first  and  last  time  I 
danced  with  Ma.  No  one  else  did 
that  night,  not  because  I  wanted  to 
monopolize  her,  but  they  just  were 
not  asking  her. 

We  had  a  wonderful  time  and  as 
I  look  back  on  the  affair,  I  feel  it 
was  just  as  well  Becky  Kornbloom 
played  hard  to  get. 

Becky  Kornbloom,  I  said  to  my- 
self, as  1  was  reading  The  New  York 
Times.  It  can't  be  you! 

But  it  was,  for  I  couldn't  mistake 
the  picture  of  her  features  despite 
the  caption  which  read  : 

Becky  Korn,  native  New  Yorker, 
has  been  appointed  dean  of  ...  . 
University.  The  educational  insti- 
tution was  in  a  nearby  state  with  an 
"A"  rating.  I  didn't  know  it  then, 
but  laave  learned  it  since. 

I  was  happy  for  Beck:  it  was  what 
she  wanted  more  than  anything 
else,  only  more  than  a  hundred 
children  were  involved.  Several 
thousand  would  be  more  like  it. 
But  this  did  not  matter:  it  was  the 
thought  and  the  ambition  and  the 
energy  to  follow  through  that 
counted. 

As  for  myself,  I  had  never  gone 
to  college  and  never  wanted  to 
become  a  dean.  I  wanted  more  than 
anything  else  to  play  solo  trumpet 
in  a  philharmonic  or  symphony. 
And  I  failed. 

But  I  haven't  given  up  hope  for 


First  Love 

(Concluded  from  Page  33) 

the  future,  lor  I  have  a  son  going 
on  twelve  and  he's  been  practicing 
like  mad  on  my  old  cornet,  using 
my  old  sheet  music  and  stand  .  .  . 

Who  knows  how  long  that  will 
last? 


Brynwood, 
Greenwood, 
and  Kenwood 

(Concluded  from  Page  50) 
where  synagogue  and  cemetery 
have  collaborated  lor  ages.  The 
soul  of  the  departed  can  be  turned 
into  a  perpetual  blessing.  A  mon- 
ument can  be  erected,  not  with  a 
stone  but  with  a  fund,  lot  charity, 
lot  religion,  for  scientific  research, 
for  Jewish  learning.  Such  a  monu- 
ment lifts  its  head  heavenward, 
and  carries  mankind  along. 

This  season  brings  us  a  cluster 
of  three  holy  occasions:  Rosh 
Hashonah,  the  new  year  of  piety; 
Yom  Kippur,  the  solemn  reminder 
of  death;  Succoth,  the  joyous  feast 
of  life. 

In  Milwaukee,  their  counter- 
parts may  be  symbolized  by  three 
familiar  names:  Kenwood,  Green- 
wood and  Brynwood. 

Remember:  they  belong  together. 
If  they  are  Jewish,  they  have  their 
historic  at-one-ment. 


Ogden  R.  Reid,  new  United 
States  Ambassador  to  Israel,  pre- 
sented a  copy  of  his  credentials  to 
Prime  Minister  David  Ben  Gurion 
recently.  A  formal  ceremony  fol- 
lowed, at  which  time  Mr.  Reid 
made  an  official  presentation  of  his 
credentials  to  President  Itzhak  Ben 
Zvi. 


BURLINGTON  ROOFING  CO. 


159  E.  Ruffin 


Barrett  Roofing  —  All  Kinds  of  Sheet  Metal  Work 
Forced  Warm  Air  Heating 

Dial  6-5756 


BURLINGTON,  N.  C. 


Sykes  Foundry  &  Machine  Company 

INCORPORATED 
MHl  and  Industrial  Supplies 
BURLINGTON,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


69 


Mrs.  Charles  L.  Marcus,  nee  Linda  M.  Levin,  daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
David  R.  Levin  of  Portsmouth,  married  recently  to  Charles  L.  Marcus,  son 
of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Mack  Marcus. 

Richmond,  Va.  Jewish  War  Veterans 

BERT  SIMONS,  Correspondent 


Commander  Sam  Kornblau  has 
announced  the  election  of  a  new 
Board  of  Trustees  for  the  JWV 
Scholarship  Fund,  which  includes 
Irving  Koslow,  PC;  Arthur  Se- 
sholtz,  PSC;  and  Herman  Abady. 
Several  applications  are  already  be- 
ing processed,  and  plans  are  being 
formulated  to  increase  the  scope  of 
the  fund  activity. 

Delegates  to  the  National  Con- 
vention were  appointed,  and  the 
Commander  has  been  instructed  by 
the  post  to  request  that  the  i960 
JWV  National  Convention  once 
again  be  held  in  Richmond.  Col. 
Lewis  Held,  Mark  Schneider,  Ar- 
thur Sesholtz,  Larry  Sterling,  Alan 
Laskoe,  and  Commander  Sam 
Kornblau  will  head  up  the  special 
delegation.  More  than  twenty  vet- 


erans are  expected  to  represent 
Post  No.  155  at  the  1959  conven- 
tion. 

An  intensive  membership  cam- 
paign is  underway,  which  is  in- 
creasing the  size  of  the  Post.  Com- 
mander Kornblau  has  issued  spe- 
cial gift  lighters  to  the  new  mem- 
bers and  their  sponsors,  engraved, 
Get  On  For  Ben,'  in  honor  of  the 
retiring  national  executive  director, 
Congressional  Medal  of  Honor 
winner,  Ben  A.  Kaufman,  of  New 
Jersey. 

The  Richmond  Post  played  a 
very  important  part  in  doing  some 
historical  research  lor  the  Wash- 
ington office  of  JWV.  Saul  Viener, 
Richmond  historian,  was  of  inval- 
uable assistance,  and  provided  the 
necessary  information. 


Virginia  Softball 
Tournament 

The  reign  of  Richmond  teams 
as  kingpins  in  the  Virginia  Amateur 
Softball  Association's  Jewish 
Tournament  reached  an  end  on 
Sunday,  July  12,  1959.  Temple 
Israel  of  Norfolk  is  the  new  cham- 
pion in  the  slow  pitch  event. 

Temple  Beth-El  of  Richmond 
won  the  title  three  years  in  suc- 
cession when  the  tournament 
operated  on  a  fast  pitch  basis.  The 
past  two  seasons,  B'nai  B'rith  of 
Richmond  look  the  slow  pitch 
honors. 

Temple  Israel  captured  the  1959 
crown  by  edging  Manny  King's 
All-Stars  of  Richmond,  6-5,  and 
Dan  Sont's  Rovers  of  Richmond, 

9"7- 

In  other  tournament  games, 
King's  All-Stars  whitewashed  B'nai 
B'rith  ol  Richmond,  defending 
champions,  9-0,  and  the  Rovers 
eliminated  B'nai  Israel  of  Norfolk, 
9-5  ■ 

Temple  Israel  trailed  King's 
All-Stars,  5-3,  before  they  tied  the 
score  with  2  runs  in  the  seventh. 
They  added  the  winning  tally  in 
the  eighth.  A  big  first  inning,  in 
which  they  scored  7  runs,  was  the 
prime  factor  in  Temple  Israel's 
win  over  the  Rovers  in  the  decisive 
contest. 

The  beautiful  Thalhimers  De- 
partment Store  trophy  was  pre- 
sented to  Temple  Israel.  The  Rock- 
ingham Clothes  for  Men  award 
went  to  Harold  Burns,  the  cham- 
pions' manager,  and  two  Adiron- 
dack softball  bats  were  given  to 
Left  Fielder  Franklin  Swartz,  the 
outstanding  hitter  on  the  winning 
team. 

Members  of  the  championship 
Temple  Israel  team:  Nat  Leider- 
man  and  Morris  Cooper,  c;  Barry 
Fine,  Murray  Pell  and  Fred  Gor- 
don, p:  Harvey  Misel,  lb;  Lawr- 
ence Gutterman  and  Leo  Gould, 


2b;  Lou  Rosenbaum,  ss;  Burt  Hal- 
prin,  3b;  Eddie  Nesson,  sf;  Franklin 
Swartz,  if;  Jordan  Gutterman,  cf; 
Gary  Hutcher  andTJarl  Rosenthal, 
rf. 

By  winning,  the  Norfolk  players 
qualified  for  the  Virginia  Open 
Slow  Pitch  Tournament  in  Rich- 
mond on  Sunday,  August  30. 

The  Seventh  Annual  Virginia 
ASA  Jewish  Slow  Pitch  Softball 
Tournament  will  be  held  in  Rich- 
mond on  Sunday,  July  10.  This 
tournament,  which  is  affiliated 
with  the  Amateur  Softball  Associa- 
tion of  America,  is  also  open  to 
teams  in  North  Carolina,  Maryland 
and  District  of  Columbia. 


Richmond 
Hadassah 

MRS.  ALLEN  MINKO 
Correspondent 

Mrs.  Leo  R.  Burson  of  Memphis, 
Term.,  a  volunteer  worker  and  a 
member  of  National  Service  Com- 
mittee of  Hadassah,  also  immedi- 
ate past  president  of  the  Southern 
Region  of  Hadassah,  was  guest 
speaker  at  a  joint  meeting  of  the 
Boards  of  Richmond  Hadassah 
and  the  Business  and  Professional 
Chapter.  This  meeting  was  held  on 
Monday,  August  3,  at  8  p.  m.,  at 
the  Southern  Bank  Building,  3201 
W.  Cary  Street. 

Mrs.  Burson,  who  has  recently 
returned  from  Israel  where  she  was 
invited  by  Hadassah  to  participate 
in  a  leaders'  tour  of  Israel,  spoke 
of  her  varied  and  most  interesting 
experiences  and  observations  of  the 
Holy  Land.  This  meeting  also  took 
on  the  form  of  an  open  forum  and 
discussion  by  the  joint  boards  of 
the  many  problems  confronting 
Hadassah  organization  today. 

Mrs.  Julus  Siegel  of  Arlington, 
Va.,  Regional  chairman  on  Mem- 
bership, presided.  A  social  hour  and 
refreshments  followed  this  most  en- 
lightening session. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


|  f-m  XVilUxirn^L  &  Reed,  live. 

=  —  "-"       1 4th  &  Franklin  Sts.,  Richmond  19,  Virginia 


238  Court  Street 


Norfolk,  Va. 


Your  Headquarters  For 


LIBEE Y-OWENS- FORI)  GLASS 
1NSULUX  GLASS  BLOCKS 
CORRULUX-TRANSLUCENT  PANELS 
BR  ASCO  STORE  FRONTS 
GENERAL  BRONZE  SLIDING  DOORS 
GULFSPRAY  SHOWER  DOORS 
PARALLEL-O-PLATE  GLASS  MIRRORS 
AIR  SEAL  WINDOWS 
SUN-SASH  LOUVRED  WINDOWS 
SASH— DOORS— BLINDS 


3300  West  Leigh  Street         P.  O.  Box  1539 
Phone  EL  9-3201  Richmond,  Va. 

"SERVING  YOU  SINCE  SEVENTY-TWO" 


The  Ceremony  Only  Takes  18  Minutes 

By  E.  L.  Levey 


1  have  recently  married  off  a 
son  and  am  now  in  the  process  of 
doing  likewise  with  a  daughter.  I 
didn't  worry  too  much  about  the 
preparations  for  the  first  event. 
Why  should  I?  It  was  a  case  of 
lots  of  honor  and  no  work,  and 
most  of  the  honor  derived  from 
the  fact  that  I  had  borne  a  hand- 
some, likeable  son  who  had  the 
brilliance  to  pick  out  "their" 
daughter.  The  wedding  itself  was 
a  gem  of  perfection,  moving  with- 
out a  hitch  from  start  to  finish, 
even  to  the  point  of  the  appear- 
ance of  our  grandson  a  year  later. 

The  only  flaw  in  the  gem  was 
me.  It  has  to  do  with  my  peculiar 
nature,  which  makes  me  question 
a  procedure  which  has  been  ac- 
quired by  the  Jewish  community 
in  the  last  few  years.  It  must  be  an 
acquired  procedure  since  I  remem- 
ber nothing  like  it  in  my  time  nor 
do  I  remember  my  mother  telling 
me  about  such  events.  It's  this 
business  of  entertaining  for  the 
bride.  Since  I  am  going  through 
the  ordeal  for  the  second  time  in 
two  years,  I  no  longer  question. 
I  am  simply  in  complete  revolt 
against  the  system. 

For  a  while  I  fought  the  battle 
alone.  Why,  how,  what  brought 
Jewish  mothers  into  this  situation? 
Maybe  Dorothy  Thompson  (par- 
don the  expression)  was  right  when 
she  said  Jews  are  just  like  other 
people  only  more  so.  Maybe  it's 
our  nature  to  try  to  do  everything 
bigger,  better,  and  more  than  our 
neighbors,  I  thought.  But  I  don't 


/KA^l^  DESIGNERS  &  MANUFACTURERS  OF  ^iRlP^INC. 

BEDROOM  and  DINING 
ROOM  SUITES 

Wayne  sboro,Va. 

Manufacturers  of  Dependable  Furniture  for  over  70  Tears 

WAYNESBORO  VIRGINIA 

SIX  SHOWROOMS  FROM  COAST  TO  COAST 


#  New  York  Furniture  Exchange  Building 

206  Lexington  Avenue 
NEW  YORK 

#  Merchandise  Mart 
1781  Merchandise  Mart  Plaza 

CHICAGO  5,  ILLINOIS 

#  Southern  Furniture  Exposition  Building 

HIGH  POINT 


Los  Angeles  Furniture  Mart 
LOS  ANGELES,  CALIF. 


Dallas  Home  Furniture  Mart 
DALLAS,  TEXAS 


Western  Merchandise  Mart 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  CALIF. 


believe  it.  Probably  the  non-Jewish 
community  does  the  same  sort  of 
thing.  If  so,  then  all  mothers  arc- 
in  the  same  boat,  and  we  all  are 
about  to  be  sunk  in  the  seas  of 
ennui,  boredom,  and  bankruptcy. 

What  happens  is  this.  Your 
daughter  comes  home  one  evening 
and  announces  that  she  is  going 
to  marry  the  young  man  she  has  in 
tow.  If  this  sounds  as  though  you 
don't  know  him,  it  is  entirely 
possible.  She  is  a  pretty  girl,  quick, 
like  her  mother,  and  there  have 
been  boys  coming  and  going  since 
you  can  remember.  This  one  looks 
a  little  more  familiar  than  most, 
and  since  you  can  remember  that 
his  name  is  Leonard,  it  is  obvious 
that  you  have  met  him  before. 

After  the  first  shock  is  over,  the 
rules  call  for  you  to  get  in  touch 
with  the  parents  of  the  boy  and 
tell  them  how  pleased  you  are  that 
he  had  the  brains  to  pick  out  your 
beautiful,  talented  daughter.  There 
is  no  point  in  waiting  to  make  the 
call;  she  is  engaged,  you  just  have 
to  accept  the  horrible  news  with 
as  much  equanimity  as  you  can 
muster.  So  make  the  call.  Much 
to  your  surprise,  you  discover  that 
the  voices  of  the  parents  on  the 
other  end  of  the  wire  are  not  filled 
with  the  sounds  of  cymbal  and 
harp.  Here's  the  moment  to  be 
careful,  or  your  bitter  half  will 
get  the  best  of  you.  Remember, 
they  feel  just  as  you  do.  The  same 
thoughts  are  going  through  their 
minds  as  are  going  through  yours. 
"They  are  too  young,  he  has  to 
finish  school,  she's  a  darling  girl, 
but  who  knows  what  kind  of  a  wife 
she'll  make  for  our  Leonard."  The 
second  rule  is  that  every  parent 
has  to  get  used  to  the  idea  of 
his  child's  marriage,  and  this  takes 
more  than  ten  minutes.  There  are 
some  sad  cases  where  nobody  ever 
got  used  to  it. 

As  soon  as  you  hang  up  the 
phone  on  your  future  in-laws,  it 
rings  again.  Your  daughter's  girl 
friends  are  calling.  You  discover 
that  you  are  the  last  to  know 
about  the  important  event.  Every- 
one of  her  friends  has  seen  the  ring 
before  the  future  bride  and  prob- 
ably knew  to  the  minute  when 
Leonard  would  ask  the  question. 
That's  another  characteristic  of 
this  generation.  They  are  commu- 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  80) 

..•  i    -toM  .tie  .  u  venim 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Arthur  B.  Krim,  President  of  United  Artists  Corporation,  was  the  re- 
cipient of  a  Founder's  Plaque  of  the  American-Israel  Chamber  of  Commerce 
and  Industry.  He  was  cited  by  the  American-Israel  Trade  Group  for  his  ef- 
forts and  enthusiastic  support  in  promoting  the  economic  relations  between 
the  two  countries.  The  presentation  was  made  in  New  York  City  by  Nathan 
Straus  HI,  President  of  the  Chamber. 


William  A  London  Auxiliary  155 

Jewish  War  Veterans 


MRS.  BETTY  SILVER,  Correspondent 

narrations  were  supplied  by  Sears, 
Roebuck.  Models  were  the  Ladies 
of  the  Auxiliary  and  their  children, 
children. 


As  I  stated  in  a  previous  column 
the  William  A.  London  Auxiliary, 
Post  No.  155,  was  to  have  a  busy 
summer,  serviceable  as  well  as  so- 
cial. Each  month  we  strviced  the 
McGuire  Veterans  Hospital  and 
our  Ladies  were  chaperones  lor  the 
dances  at  Fort  Lee. 

In  July  a  successful  show  party 
was  held  at  the  Westhampton  The- 
ater for  our  Ladies  of  the  Auxil- 
iary. 

A  lawn  party  was  held  for  mem- 
bers and  prospective  members  at 
the  home  of  Mrs.  William  Spahn, 
6404  Hanover  Avenue.  I  am  happy 
to  say  this  too  was  a  delightful 
function. 

To  replenish  our  funds,  on  Aug- 
ust 25th  a  "6-60"  fashion  show 
was  held  at  the  Coca-Cola  Hos- 
pitality Room.  There  was  refresh- 
ments and  entertainment  to  round 
out  the  evening.  A  donation  of 
$1.00  for  adults  and  50c  for  chil- 
dren under  12  years.  Fashions  and 


This  Fall  we  plan  a  very  satisfy- 
ing and  full  schedule,  both  service- 
able and  social. 


Salisbury,  N.  C. 

(Concluded  from  Page  54) 
tier   mother,    Mrs.    Ruby  Simon, 
spent  a  very  enjoyable  week  with 
Ruby's  cousin,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Sol 
Bloomfield  of  Winchester,  Ky. 
ij    Gene  and  Lenny  Wolfe,  with 
ndaughter  Beverly  drove  down  to 
■spend  a  week  with  Lenny's  parents, 
JMr.  and  Mrs.  Harry  Wolfe,  of  St. 
BAu»iistine,  Fla. 


Our  deepest  sympathy  to  Phil 
'iLevenson,    whose    oldest  brother 


j  passed  on  in  Boston  on  May  30th. 

Obey  That  Impulse! 

Buy  An 
Israel  Bond  —  NOW! 


LUKHARD'S 
SUPER  MARKETS 


•  BROAD  ST.  AT  HORSEPEN  ROAD 

•  5418  LAKESIDE  AVENUE 


•  5710  GROVE  AVE. 
1229  BELLEVUE  AVE. 


RICHMOND,  VA. 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and\Prosperous  New  Year  from  the' Following  Firms  in 

ftichmond,  Va. 


GREETINGS 

The  HAPPIEST  Home 
Is  Your  OWNED  Home 

When  Thi  nking  of  Buying  or  Selling  a  Home 

— See — 

RALPH  H.  DUDLEY,  INC.,  Realtor 

5705  Grove  Avenue     —     Phone  AT  8-2871 
Opposite  Weshampton  Theatre,  Richmond,  Va. 


7Jm  Haley's  Original 

OCCIDENTAL  RESTAURANT 

For  Those  Who  Demand  The  Finest 
"JUST  GOOD  FOOD" 
5716  Grove  Ave.  #  RICHMOND,  VA. 


Greetings 

UNIVERSITY  PHARMACY 


Westhampton  Delivery  Service 

Dial  AT  8-4900 


5718  Grove  Avenue 


RICHMOND,  VA. 


Grove  Avenue 
Pharmacy 

4911  Grove  Ave. 
RICHMOND,  VA. 

For  Fast  Delivery 
DIAL  5-3405 

•  Prescriptions 

•  DRUGS 


WESTHAMPTON 
FLORIST . . . 

320  Libbie  Avenue 
RICHMOND,  VA. 

Specializing  in 
Artistic  Weddings, 
Decorations  of  All  Types 

Dial  AT  2-2460 

Mr.  &  Mrs. 
F.  N.  Hickeraell 


72 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


WOOD'S  LAWN 
GRASS  SEED 


Makes  Beautiful 
Lawns  •  .  . 

Nothing  adds  more  beauty  to  a 
home  than  a  lovely  lawn.  Plant 
WOOD'S  LAWN  GRASS  SEED 
for  a  lawn  that  stays  green  and 
beautiful  in  every  season  of  the 
year. 

WOOD'S  FALL  CATALOG— Get  Your  Copy  and  Learn  About  Best  Grass 
Seed,  Bulbs,  and  Other  Seed  for  Your  Property  Improvement  Plans. 

T.  W.  Wood  &  Sons 


326  N.  Fifth  St. 


RICHMOND,  VIRGINIA 


Greetings 


ROCKER  AND  RICHARDSON 

•  REALTORS 

Real  Estate  and  Insurance  —  Mortgage  Loans 

118  North  Eighth  Street 
RICHMOND,  VA. 


"Nusach  Ari"  -  A  Strange  Ceremony 


DIAL  RICH. 

EL  5-1745 


O^efA  the  finest 

IjtfILK 


RICHMOND'S 
MOST  MODERN  DAIRY 


And  other 

Dairy  Products 

Milk  Available  In  Famous  Pure-Pak 


Prompt,  Courteous     paper  Cartons  From  Your  Favorite  Dealer 

Delivery 

1600  ROSENEATH  ROAD 


§ 


INC. 


By  Alfred  H.  Paul 


During  the  Passover  season  next 
year,  as  for  many  years  in  the  past, 
there  will  be  a  strange  ceremony 
performed  in  our  town.  The  elders 
of  the  Morris  Steet  Shul;  a  congre- 
gation of  extreme  Orthodoxy  de- 
voted to  the  traditions  of  "Nusach 
Ari,"  will  gather  at  Mt.  Hope  ceme- 
tery. The  rendezvous  wiJ!  not  be 
in  one  of  the  sections  of  those 
large  burial  grounds  reserved  for 
the  Jewish  dead  and  consecrated  as 
such,  No.  The  men  with  the  beards 
and  curly  earlocks  will  line  in  front 
of  a  grave.  In  fact,  in  front  of  a 
stone  identified  clearly  as  the  rest- 
ing place  of  a  Christian  minister. 

There,  the  "Nusach  Ari"  men 
will  recite  a  prayer  and  perfom  a 
brief  ceremony.  One  of  them  will 
iay  a  wreath  on  the  grave.  Then 
they  will  disperse.  The  note  attach- 
ed to  the  wreath  will  read,  in  En- 
glish: 

In  grateful  memory  to  Rever- 
end Otto  Schluegel  from  the 
Congregation  of  the  Brother- 
hood of  Those  who  Worship 
In  the  Tradition  of  Ari. 

In  Hebrew  lettering,  the  same 
legend  will  be  repeated.  And,  in 
Hebrew,  there  will  be  added  the 
words:  "May  His  Soul  Rest  in 
Peace,  Amen." 

Few  Christians  in  out  town 
know  the  reason  for  this  annual 
ceremony.  I  think  that  few  of  to- 
day's members  of  the  "Nusach  Ari" 
congregation  know  exactly  why 
this  ceremony  is  observed.  The  di- 
rect participants  —  like  my  father, 
and  old  Reb  Meirson  —  are  gone 


Dr.  Saul  Blatman,  former  chief 
resident  at  Babies  Hospital,  Colum- 
bia-Presbyterian Medical  Center,  has 
taken  over  duties  as  chief  of  pedia- 
trics at  the  free-care,  nonsectarian 
National  Jewish  Hospital  in  Denver. 


now.  I'll  recall  the  story.  As  a 
child,  I  observed  the  events  which, 
later,  resulted  in  a  resolution  en- 
tered upon  the  formal  archives  of 
"Nusach  Ari"  congregation,  call- 
ing for  strict  observance  of  this 
ritual  every  year,  on  a  Sunday  dur- 
ing the  Passover  season,  "As  long 
as  our  Holy  Congregation  shall 
last,  Amen." 

It  all  goes  back  to  "The  Strike," 
a  labor  union  event  that  shook  our 
town  to  its  very  foundations  for 
about  18  months  ending  the  day 
after  Labor  Day  in  1913.  A  young 
man  named  Sam  Stillman,  a  cutter 
in  a  men's  clothing  factory  in 
Chicago,  had  organized  a  new 
trade  union  —  today,  we  call  that 
type  of  organization  "industrial 
unionism."  Into  his  union,  he  en- 
rolled large  numbers  of  clothing 
workers.  That  was  in  Chicago.  The 
center  of  the  industry,  however, 
was  in  our  town.  Unless  he  succeed- 
ed in  organizing  the  men's  cloth- 
ing workers  in  our  town,  his  union 
would  not  last.  Sam  Stillman  knew 
that.  With  a  handful  of  organizers 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  96) 


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The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


7S 


Rosh  Hashonah  Among  The 
American  Indians 

By  Ben  Schocher 


Well,  this  was  going  to  be  a 
different  Rosh  Hashonah  anyway. 
I  wondered  what  my  wife  would 
say  when  I  told  her  I  spent  Rosh 
Hashonah  among  the  American 
Indians.  All  around  me  as  far  as 
the  eye  could  see  there  were  nothing 
but  Indians  and  maybe  a  few  buf- 
faloes. Of  course,  the  Indians  don't 
live  as  bunched  up  as  the  whites, 
but  within  the  distance  of  my  eyes, 
I  could  see  at  least  four  or  five 
wigwams. 

I  wondered  what  tribe  of  Indians 
inhabited  this  area,  but  soon  I  saw 
an  Indian  coming  along.  I  would 
ask  him.  Then  I  reminded  myself 
I  didn't  know  any  of  the  Indian 
language,  but  I  thought  I  would 
try  some  of  the  American  words 
derived  from  Indian.  Succotash, 
moccasins,  Tammany  Hall,  I  said. 

The  Indian  looked  at  me  puzzled. 
I  saw  I  had  muffed. 

"Shana  Tova,"  I  said  desparing- 
ly,  turning  to  Hebrew. 

"Gam  Atem,"  he  replied  in  per- 
fect Hebrew. 

"Are  you  Jeioisli?"  I  asked. 

"Indians  Jewish?"  he  replied, 
"Indians  lost  ten  tribes." 

Well,  we  soon  got  into  quite  a 
conversation.  He  proved  a  very 
affable  Indian.  He  told  me  his 
name  was  Tomochichi.  I  told  him 
I  had  some  relations  from  Poland 
named  Tomoski,  but  he  said  he 
didn't  think  they  were  related. 

I  told  him  I  thought  he  ought 
to  Americanize  his  name.  With  a 
name  like  Tomachichi,  they  would 
think  him  a  foreigner.  He  ought 
to  change  his  name  to  Thompson. 
That  was  a  good  American  name. 
In  Cleveland,  I  said,  a  leading 
plumbing  firm  was  the  Thompson 
Company.  I  said  some  of  my  rela- 
tives, the  Tomoskis,  changed  their 
names  to  Thompson,  but  a  few 
called  themselves  Cadwallader. 

He  told  me  he  had  often  thought 
of  doing  that  —  of  changing  his 
name  and  becoming  American  but 
he  understood  all  the  Americans 
were  immigrants,  so  he  would  have 
to  first  go  to  Europe  and  then 
migrate  to  America  and  he  didn't 
have  time  for  all  of  that. 

He  said  if  I  had  nothing  better 
to  do,  he  would  be  glad  to  have 
me  come  down  to  his  wigwam. 
His  squaw,  he  said,  had  just  fetched 
a  jug  of  firewater  for  Kiddush  for 


Rosh  Hashonah,  and  we  might 
sample  it. 

It  was  real  good  stuff.  His  squaw 
had  gotten  it  and  two  blankets  in 
exchange  for  some  skins.  He  poured 
the  liquor  out  in  two  cups  and, 
raising  his  own  cup,  said,  "May 
it  be  a  good  year.  May  all  catch 
plenty  of  buffaloes." 

I  said,  "Tomachichi,  you  say  the 
Indians  are  the  lost  tribes.  How 
can  you  say  that  when  you  don't 
keep  our  religion?" 

"Pale  faces,"  said  Tomachichi, 
"always  talk  about  keeping  religion. 
They  keep  it  locked  up.  Religion 
was  made  to  be  lived  —  used.  In- 
dians live  religion." 

"Tomachichi,  but  Indians  don't 
live  our  religion." 

"Indians,"  said  Tomachichi, 
"worship  Great  Spirit,  same  as  you." 

"But  you  don't  keep  the  Sabbath 
as  a  rest  day,"  I  said. 

"Indians,"  said  Tomachichi,  "rest 
on  Saturday,  rest  on  Sunday,  rest 
on  Monday.  Indians  believe  in  rest. 
Indians  no  believe  in  work.  No 
slaves  to  labor  like  pale  faces." 

He  pointed  to  a  horn,  hanging 
on  the  Avail.  "Shofar  lor  Rosh 
Hashonah,"  he  said. 

As  we  were  sitting  inside  and 
talking,  I  could  hear  sounds  which 
grew  louder  and  louder. 

"Indians  dancing"  I  questioned. 

"Yes,"  said  Tomachichi,  "Indians 
a  ways  dance." 

"The  Hassidim  among  the  Jews," 
I  said,  "dance  at  their  prayers." 

"Yes,"  said  Tomachichi,  "Indians 
real  Hassidim.  Come  .  .  .  let's  go 
out  and  see  Indians  dance." 

We  went  out  and  stood  watching. 
Tomachichi  was  smiling  and  it  was 
a  very  happy  scene,  when  all  of 
a  sudden,  an  Indian  runner  came 
up  to  Tomachichi,  and  you  could 
see  a  different  look  on  his  face. 
"What's  the  matter?"  I  asked. 

"They  have  brought  the  holiday 
meal." 

From  a  distance,  I  saw  a  couple 
of  Indians  leading  a  pale  face.  Very 
plainly  he  was  to  be  boiled  for  a 
holiday  meal. 

"Don't,"  I  cried.  "You  mustn't 
do  that." 

Boy,  was  I  glad,  when  my  wife 
tugged  at  me.  "How  long  are  you 
going  to  sleep?  It's  time  to  go  to 
the  synagogue,  you  know.  It's  Rosh 
Hashonah. 


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Joseph  Saphir,  Chairman  of  the 
Executive  of  the  General  Zionist 
Party  in  Israel  who  from  1953  to 
the  middle  of  1,:>55  sat  in  the 
Israel  Cabinet  as  Minister  of 
Transport  and  is  at  present  a 
member  of  the  Knesset,  is  now 
visiting  in  the  United  Slates.  Mr. 
Saphir,  a  dynamic  personality  of 
brilliant  intellectual  qualities  and 
a  born  leader,  is  a  native  Israeli, 
a  "sabra"  of  the  fourth  genera- 
tion, who  looks  much  younger 
than  his  57  years.  He  is  the  father 
of  two  daughters  and  has  two 
grandchildren.  P>y  profession  he  is 
a  citrus-grower  and  farmer.  He 
is  a  resident  of  Petach-Tikva,  now 
a  city  of  50,000  population  where 
he  was  mayor  for  ten  years.  A 
graduate  of  the  Teachers'  Col- 
lege in  Jerusalem,  he  his  written 
many  articles  on  economic,  agri- 
cultural and  municipal  problems 
for  the  Israel  press.  Mr.  Saphir  is 
now  a  member  of  the  Finance 
Committee  of  the  Knesset  and 
one  of  the  leaders  of  the  Israel 
Farmers'  Federation.  T  h  o  u  g  h 
never  brought  up,  never  having 
even  studied  in  an  English-speak- 
ing country,  he  speaks  a  perfect 
English  with   an   Oxford  accent. 

In  a  recent  interview,  he  un- 
ravelled before  me  the  seemingly 
complex  economic  problem  which 
the  State  of  Israel  faces  today  and 
will  face  tomorrow7  and  how  the 
General  Zionists  believe  the  prob- 
lem should  be  met.  The  general 
impression  I  gathered  from  this 
interview  was  that  the  General 
Zionists,  alone  among  the  parties 
in  Israel,  might  als<>  be  called  the 
Party  of  Economic  Independence. 
As  the  interview  progressed,  Mr 
Saphir,  a  man  who  can  not  only 
think  quickly  but  also  clearly  and 
logically,  clarified  much  that  seem- 
ed puzzling  about  Israeli  economic 
life. 

We  began  with  the  problem 
posed  by  the  present  mass  im- 
migration of  Romanian  Jews  into 
Israel.  What,  I  asked  him,  are 
responsibilities  of  American  and 
other  Diaspora  Jews  in  this  con- 
nection and  what  t*re  the  respon- 
sibilities of  the  Government  of 
Israel?  Here  is  what  Mr.  Saphir 
said: 

"Mass  immigration  of  Jews  is 
a  mutual  undertaking  or  Israel 
and  world  Jewry,  and  the  World 
Zionist  Organization  has  a  specific 
responsibility  for  integrating  and 


establishing  the  immigrants.  The 
functions  of  both  partners  must 
be  coordinated  il  this  gigantic 
task  is  to  be  carried  out  properly. 
World  Jewry  and  its  largest  and 
most  powerful  component,  Amer 
ican  Jewry,  must  carry  its  share 
of  the  burden,  especially  in  times 
like  these  when  the  wave  of  im- 
migration is  so  large  as  to  be  be- 
yond the  capacity  of  the  existing 
economy  of  Israel  to  absorb  the 
immigrants  without  great  distor- 
tions in  the  economic  set-up." 

"On  the  other  h  a  n  d,"  he 
thought,  it  is  the  duty  of  Israel 
to  adopt  such  a  framework  ol 
economy  as  will,  with  the  aid  of 
world  Jewry,  permit  the  inte- 
gration of  '.he  immigrants  with 
a  minimum  of  sacrifice  and  waste. 
Thus  the  re-adjustment  of  the 
Israel  economy  is  also  important 
if  we  are  to  cure  the  inevitable 
ailments  of  an  expanding  economy 
in  a  rapidly  developing  country. 

"During  the  first  decade  of  Is- 
rael's existence  the  smooth  ab- 
sorption of  masses  of  immigrants 
into  the  country's  economy  was 
virtually  impossible,  because  die 
economic  basis  was  verv  limited 
and  weak:  there  were  then  re- 
quired very  costly  initial  invest- 
ments to  create  initial  conditions 
for  the  operation  of  an  economic 
frame-work.  But  today,  if  proper- 
ly conducted,  die  existing  econom- 
ic potential  is  already  sufficiently 
wide  and  deep  to  serve  as  a  good 
recipient  for  additional  immigra- 
tion, if  aided  by  world  Jewry.  If 
the  economy  is  properly  run,  wc 
can  now  create  in  Israel  work  op- 
portunities at  a  considerably  small- 
er expense,  with  a  much  smaller 
investment  of  public  funds  than 
was  the  case  formerly.  This  will 
depend  on  the  kind  of  govern- 
ment Israel  gets,"  said  the  Israel 
leader. 

Why  do  .'he  General  Zionists  in 
Israel  so  vigorously  oppose  the 
economic  policy  of  the  present 
Mapai-Histadrut-dcmiinatet!  gov- 
ernment? Why  did  thev  refuse  to 
enter  into  a  coalition  with  Mapai 
after  the  'as'  parliamentary  elec- 
tions? Was  it  just  mere  deviltrv 
on  their  pair,  just  for  the  pleas- 
ure of  being  "agin'  the  gov'nment?" 
Mr.  Saphir  went  on: 

"We  General  Zionists  say  that 
in  order  to  make  the  immigrants' 
absorption  smoother,  sounder, 
healthier,  we  must  use  every  pound 


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The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


75 


WILLIS/KENNY  &  AYRESJnc 

205  WEST  FRANKLIN  STREET    P.  O.  BOX  487.  RICHMOND;  VIRGINIA 
PHONE  Ml  4-0746 


of  money  from  Zionist  and  general 
Jewish  funds  and  from  the  Is- 
raeli budget  so  as  to  employ  the 
maximum  of  Jews  on  every  unit 
of  investment  by  selecting  those 
agricultural  and  industrial  pro- 
ducts where  we  can  get  die  maxi- 
mum of  real  values  from  a  unit 
of  land  or  a  unit  ot  manufacturing 
equipment.  If  we  intend  to  absorb 
immigrants  in  undertakings  which 
.ire  not  profitable  or  unsound  we 
defeat  our  own  purposes. 

"To  attach  the  immigrants  to 
die  existing  economy,  we'll  need 
a  lot  of  private  capital  in  addi- 
tion to  the  public  funds.  This 
new  flow  of  capital  needed, 
especially  in  the  present  interim 
period  not  so  much  for  basic 
investment  but  as  working  capital 
lor  existing  and  expanding  in- 
dustry. We  must  have  a  flow  of 
private  capit-'!  to  enable  basic  in- 
vestments to  become  efficient,  to 
run  smooth  lv,  wihout  too  high 
public  subsidies. 

"If  we  are  to  prevent  crises," 
he  continued,  "our  immigrants 
must  be  employed  mainly  in  in 
dustries  which  have  a  capital  for 
export.  To  sustain  a  population 
of  four  million  Jews,  as  we  hope 
to  have  in  Israel  in  the  years  to 
come,  you  have  to  produce  in- 
dustrially to  pay  for  needed  im- 
ports, food,  raw  materials,  etc.  11 
our  industry  is  to  be  geared  to 
export,  we  must  encourage  those 
industries  which  have  an  advan- 
tage, or  can  at  least  compete  on 
equal  terms,  in  the  world  market. 
Only  in  this  way  will  we  achieve 
both  the  sound  integration  of 
immigrants  into  the  economy  and 
economic  independence.  Mapai 
claims  that  the  two  things  are 
contradictory.  We,  on  the  other 
hand,  say  they  are  complement- 
ary." 

The  Mapai-Hist  jdrut  school  of 
thought  argues  that  Israel  is  in 
permanent  danger  of  an  economic 
blockade,  and  muse  therefore  pro- 
vide all  her  food  from  her  own 
production— even  if  this  means 
producing  at  an  exorbitantly  high 
cost  relatively  to  the  world  market 
price  of  the  item  concerned.  1 
asked  Mr.  Saphir  what  he  thought 
of  this. 

"I  claim  diat  this  attitude  is 
putting  the  Israel  economy  per- 
manently on  a  war  footing— and 
that  this  is  absurd,"  he  replied. 
"We  must  take  the  risk  of  a  short 
period  of  regional  war,  or  even  a 
more  lengthy  period  of  global  war 


into  account.  But  alter  all  possible 
allowances  for  this  lisk,  it  remains 
essential  that  we  build  our  econ- 
omy and  select  our  agricultural 
branches  on  the  solid  basis  of 
i heir  competitive  anility,  i.e.,  their 
capacity  !o  1  eep  prices  low  both 
lor  the  domestic  market  and  for 
export,  yer  10  produce  the  highest 
return  possibie  in  real  values." 

What  Mr.  Saphir  meant,  to  say 
here  was  that  the  General  Zion- 
ists, like  Mapai,  like  the  other 
parties  in  Israel,  realize  that  na- 
tional security  mu:,*  take  priority 
over  economic  efficiency,  so  that 
the  border  settlements,  as  an  ex- 
ample, though  thev  be  economic- 
ally inefficient  and  require  public 
subsidy,  do  serve  a  vital  national 
purpose.  But  they  do  not  agree 
that  other,  old-established  collec- 
tive settlements  situated  away  from 
the  frontier  whose  economy  is 
run  at  a  loss  must  be  publicly  sub- 
sidized, supported  either  by  public 
contributions  or  by  tax  exemp- 
tions, though  they  serve  no  specific 
public  purpose  anymore. 

Mr.  Saphir  gave  me  some  glar- 
ing examples  of  economic  waste, 
unprofitable  production  and  So- 
cialist economy  in  Israel.  For  in- 
stance, a  steel  industry  is  being 
set  up  in  Israel  in  which  some 
100  million  pounds  will  be  in 
vested.  "I  don't  think  that  Ave  are 
or  shall  ever  be  in  a  position  to 
compete  with  old-established  steel 
producing  countries,  which  have 
more-over  easier  access  to  raw  ma- 
terial sources,  a  large  domestic 
market  and  plentiful  low-interest 
(Please  Turn  to  Page  95) 


Rabbi  Bernard  J.  Bamberger,  spirit- 
ual leader  of  Congregation  Shaaray 
Tefila,  New  York,  N.  Y.,  has  been 
elected  president  of  the  Central  Con- 
ference of  American  Rabbis.  The 
Conference,  America's  oldest  and 
largest  rabbinic  group,  represents 
750  religious  leaders  of  Reform  con- 
gregations throughout  the  U.  S.  and 
Canada. 


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The  Frank  Lloyd  Wright  Synagogue: 
Its  Significance 


By  Philip  Rubin 


Elkins  Park,  Pa.,  is  one  of  many 
suburbs  which  ring  the  great  city 
of  Philadelphia.  Because  of  a  syna- 
gogue which  was  recently  erected 
there,  Elkins  Park  is  becoming  a 
particular  point  of  interest  for  all 
American  Jews.  The  synagogue  is 
that  of  Congregation  Beth  Sholom, 
formerly  located  in  Philadelphia 
proper.  It  was  designed  and  fin- 
ished, just  before  his  death  last 
April  in  his  ninetieth  year,  by 
Frank  Lloyd  Wright,  the  world's 
most  famous  architect  of  the  twen- 
tieth century,  the  pioneer  of 
modern  architecture  whose  every 
building  aroused  greater  discussion, 
greater  admiration  —  and  also 
greater  antagonism  —  than  any 
structure  that  would  be  erected  by 
any  other  master  builder.  In  de- 
signing this  synagogue,  Wright  was 
aided  by  the  rabbi  of  the  congrega- 
tion, Dr.  Mortimer  J.  Cohen,  well- 
known  in  American  Jewish  life  as 
a  Conservative  rabbi  and  author 
of  scholarly  Jewish  books,  who  first 
thought  of  getting  Wright  to  do 
the  building,  who  worked  with  him 
on  it  for  about  six  years  and  whose 
help  in  the  design  Wright  had 
publicly  acknowledged. 

As  might  have  been  expected  by 
anyone  at  all  acquainted  with 
Frank  Lloyd  Wright's  work,  this 
new  synagogue  is  vastly  different 
from  anything  we  have  hitherto 
seen  in  synagogue  architecture. 
What  are  the  ideas  behind  it? 
What  does  it  symbolize?  Here  is 
what  Wright  himself  had  to  say: 

"At  last  a  great  symbol!  Rabbi 
Mortimer  J.  Cohen  gave  me  the 
idea  of  a  synagogue  as  a  'traveling 
Mt.  Sinai  —  a  mountain  of  light.' 
We  chose  white  glass.  Let  God 
put  his  colors  on.  He's  the  great 
artist.  When  the  weather  is  sunny, 
the  temple  will  glitter  like  gold. 
At  night,  under  the  moon,  it  will 
be  silvery.  On  a  gray  day  it  will 
be  gray.  When  the  heavens  are 
blue,  there  will  be  a  soft  blue  over 
it.  And  when  you  go  into  a  place 
of  worship,  you  ought  to  feel  as 
if  you  were  in  the  hands  of  God." 

And  so  the  plan  of  Wright's 
$1,300,000  Beth  Sholom  Synagogue 
is  hexagonal  in  shape,  like  a  pair 
of  hands  cupper  around  the  con- 
gregation. Side  ramps  emerge  at 
prowlike  corner  buttresses  into  the 
main  hall,  which  seats  1,040  persons. 


The  interior  rises  over  80  feet  in 
a  great  translucent  tent  of  cor- 
rugated plastic  and  glass;  from  the 
top  of  the  tripod  structure  hangs 
a  single  chandelier  of  brilliant 
colored  glass  trimmed  with  spiky 
incandescent  lights.  Viewed  from 
outside,  the  new  synagogue,  rising 
like  a  mountain  of  light,  is  a  huge 
triangular  form  of  glass,  aluminum 
and  concrete,  upon  which  are 
groups  of  menorahs  with  their 
seven-branched  lighting  facing  you 
from  every  direction,  ready  to  cast 
their  glow  toward  the  sky  at  night. 
The  glass  and  plastic  tent  —  the 
roof,  if  you  like,  which  rises  above 
the  concrete  base,  is  almost  pyra- 
midal shaped,  while  in  the  interior 
triangularity  is  everywhere  empha- 
sized. 

The  synagogue  structure  has  al- 
ready been  photographed  and  de- 
scribed in  Time  Magazine,  in 
Architectural  Forum,  and  in  Life, 
and  in  the  future  probably  many 
other  publications,  large  and 
small,  general,  architectural  and 
Jewish,  will  devote  attention  to  it. 
It  was  the  last  building  which 
Wright  managed  to  see  completed 
before  his  death.  (The  interior  cm 
the  Guggenheim  Art  Museum  in 
New  York  City,  which  Wright  also 
designed  and  which  has  been  the 
subject  of  many  discussions  was  not 
completed  at  the  time  of  the  great 
architect's  demise.)  A  New  York 
Times  critic  said  that  the  Beth 
Sholom  synagogue  structure  is 
"more  exuberant  than  anything 
Wright  has  done  in  the  last  thirty 
years." 

I  have  visited  the  new  synagogue 
and  have  been  tremendously  im- 


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The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


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Left  to  Riglit:  Mrs.  Sarah  Prashker,  Mrs.  Hajnalka  Winer,  Miss  Nette 
Rabin,  and  Miss  Sadie  Lubin,  all  New  Yorkers,  and  all  alumnae  of  the 
Teachers  Institute  of  The  Jewish  Theological  Seminary  pose  with  a  cake 
at  a  fete  celebrating:  the  50th  anniversary  of  the  school. 


pressed  by  it.  I  believe  it's  the  most 
beautiful  synagogue  in  the  country 
today.  But  then  I  have  for  many 
years  been  an  admirer  of  Wright's 
art.  There  are  people  who  are  ir- 
ritated by  it,  who  find  its  modern 
contours  too  angular,  too  harsh. 
A  Zionist  leader  who  saw  it  charac- 
terized it  to  me  as  a  "monstros- 
ity." All  modernistic  art  —  painting, 
sculpture  and  music,  as  well  as 
architecture  —  is  a  controversial 
subject,  a  matter  on  which  there 
is  a  great  division  of  opinion  among 
art  connoisseurs. 

But  whether  thrilled  or  repelled 
one  cannot  remain  indifferent. 
Even  those  who  don't  like  the 
shape  of  Wright's  synagogue  struc- 
ture are  forced  to  pay  attention  to 
it,  for  a  number  of  reasons.  And 
herein  lies  its  great  significance  for 
the  future  of  synagogue  architec- 
ture, not  only  in  this  country,  but 
in  other  lands  as  well.  Since  it  is 
so  original,  so  different,  the  work 
of  a  great  genius  in  architecture, 
of  a  man  who  upon  his  death  was 
hailed  by  fellow-architects  as  an 
"immortal,"  the  "Michelangelo  of 
the  Twentieth  Century,"  an  archi- 


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tect  "who  swept  across  the  face  of 
the  land  like  some  vast  force  bend- 
ing both  men  and  nature  to  his 
will,"  the  first  thing  it  does  is  to 
awaken  in  us  an  interest  in  the 
whole  subject  of  synagogue  archi- 
tecture, an  interest  which  hitherto 
has  been  almost  non-existent, 
though  for  many  years  now  we've 
been  building  lavish  synagogue 
structures. 

Ought  synagogues  to  be  built  in 
traditional  or  in  modern  style?  If 
your  answer  is  traditional,  then  the 
question  comes  up:  Is  there  really 
a  tradition  of  synagogue  architec- 
ture, or  were  Jews  during  the  cen- 
turies in  building  their  synagogues 
only  copying  the  building  styles  of 
their  non- Jewish  neighbors?  The 
traditionalists,  I  believe,  would 
have  a  better  argument  if  we  at 
least  had  some  idea  of  the  architec- 
ture of  the  Temple  of  Solomon. 
After  the  destruction  of  the  Temple 
in  Jerusalem  we  lost  the  design 
and  were  thereafter  unable  to 
develop  a  tradition  of  synagogue 
uniquely  Jewish,  and  nothing  else. 

Has  Frank  Lloyd  Wright,  in  de- 
signing Beth  Sholom  for  us,  given 
us  some  standard,  or  standards,  for 
the  synagogue  architecture  of  the 
future?  Is  the  Mt.  Sinai  motif  the 
proper  one  for  architects  to  follow 
in  designing  Jewish  religious  struc- 
tures? Or  the  cupped  hands  to 
God? 

If  only  because  it  raises  these  and 
other  questions,  the  new  structure 
of  Congregation  Beth  Sholom,  how- 
ever we  may  react  to  it,  is  of  great 
significance,  and  American  Jews 
are  indebted  to  Rabbi  Mortimer 
J.  Cohen  for  prevailing  upon 
Frank  Lloyd  Wright  to  design  it. 


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78 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Ray  of  Hope  In  The  Tunis  Ghetto 

(Concluded  from  Page  39) 


who  wish  to  improve  their  occupa- 
tions. It  is  thrilling  to  watch  the 
serious  determination  with  which 
men  40  years  old  study  for  exami- 
nations as  technical  draftsmen,  ra- 
dio repairmen,  electricians  or  weld- 
ers. 

For  the  moment,  economic  stag- 
nation and  the  paucity  of  industrial 
enterprises  prevents  many  gradu- 
ates of  ORT  from  finding  employ- 
ment in  Tunis  proper.  Because  of 
this,  many  are  driven  to  emigrate. 


From  the  suburbs  of  Paris  or  Mar- 
sielles,  where  they  have  settled  in 
whole  colonies,  they  send  back  a 
steady  flow  of  money  order  remit- 
tances that  keep  whole  families 
alive. 

Gradually,  the  social  level  of  the 
hara  rises.  Most  important,  the  Jews 
have  the  possibility  of  spreading 
into  the  town  ...  or  abroad.  Thus 
they  escape  from  the  ancient,  stifl- 
ing ghetto. 


The  Ultimate  Cruelty 

(Concluded  from  Page  52) 
own  theory  about  the  fate  of  the     of  Nazi  brutality.  Some  years  ago, 
six  million.  Writing  in  "Common 


Sense,"  May  1,  1955,  under  the 
heading,  "Six  Million  Jew  Hoax," 
Freedman  plays  the  numbers  game 
to  suggest  that  there  are  millions 
more  Jews  in  the  United  States 
than  Jews  admit.  "The  difference 
in  these  figures,"  he  writes,  "ap- 
proximates the  6,000,000  so-called 
'Jews'  allegedly  put  to  death  in 
furnaces  and  in  gas  chambers  be- 
tween 1939  and  1945.  .  .  ."(Freed- 
man always  puts  quotation  marks 
around  the  word  "Jews"  because, 
he  claims,  today's  Jews  are  irn- 
posters,  really  descended  from  a 
tenth  century  "Kingdom  of  Kha- 
/ars"  in  Eastern  Europe.) 

Freedman  offers  a  dubious  ex- 
planation of  why  many  Jewish  or 
ganizations  opposed  inclusion  in 
the  United  States  census  of  a  ques- 
tion about  religion.  They  opposed 
it,  he  says,  in  order  to  difsgrace  the 
fact  that  "allegedly  put  to  death" 
Jews  are  now  in  the  United  States. 

The  notion  that  the  six  million 
are  now  in  the  United  States  is 
echoed  by  anti-Semite  Lincoln 
Rockwell  of  Arlington,  Virginia, 
who  says  that  many  of  them  "later 
died  happily  and  richly  in  the 
Bronx,  New  York"  and  the  whole 
thing  is  "a  monstrous  and  profit- 
able fraud." 

The  effort  to  deny  the  existence 
of  the  six  million  started  when 
former  Nazis,  still  active  in  Ger- 
many, sought  to  erase  the  memory 


neo-Nazi  school  teacher  [ohann 
Strunk  of  Dusseldorf  printed  a 
handbill  "Did  Hitler  Really  De 
stroy  Six  Million  Jews?"  (Strunk 
has  several  times  been  penalized 
by  West  German  authorities  for 
hrs  crimes.)  Strunk  and  others 
have  found  cooperation  among 
like-minded  people  throughout 
the  world. 

In  the  Jordanian  section  ol 
Jerusalem,  anti- Jewish  propagan- 
dist Antoine  F.  Albina  wrote  an 
article,  "Spotlight  on  the  Poor 
6,000,000  Dead  Jews,"  which  has 
been  picked  up  and  distributed 
by  anti-Semites  from  Einar  Aberg 
in  Sweden,  to  Gerald  K.  Smith  in 
in  Los  Angeles,  to  the  South  Afri- 
can Anglo-Nordic  Union.  Albina, 
who  calls  his  hate  mill  "World 
Truth,"  starts  off:  "Since  1945  the 
Gentile  world  has  not  for  one 
moment  been  allowed  to  forget  the 
6,000,000  alleged  to  have  been  kill- 
ed by  Hitler  in  World  War  II. 
Even  memorials  have  been  erected 
to  commemorate  these  6,000,000 
'dead'   Jews.  .  .  ." 

It  concludes:  "In  other  words, 
the  whole  story  of  the  6,000,000 
dead  Jews  is  pure  fiction."  In  be- 
tween, he  plays  his  own  numbers 
game,  with  extensive  calculations 
based  on  figures  from  the  World 
Almanac  and  from  a  1948  New 
York  Times  study  of  the  Jewish 
population  of  the  world.  (Benja- 
min Freedman,  in  his  article  on 


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79 


the  subject,  quoted  the  same  study 
but  used  a  different  set  ol  figures.) 
Albina's  calculations  defy  analy- 
sis; he  says  that  "as  there  are  now 
only  some  18,000,000  Jews  in  the 
world,  an  increase  of  9,000,000  in 
the  ten  years,  1938-1918,  repre- 
sents a  total  increase  of  popula- 
tion (in  only  ten  years)  of  fifty 
percent— an  impossibility  even  for 
a  race  so  immersed  in  sex  as  the 
Tews." 

This  turgid  reckoning,  with  its 
inaccurate  figures— the  world  Jew- 
ish population  is  generally  esti- 
mated at  about  12,000,000  today- 
;ipparently  so  impressed  Gerald 
!,.  K.  Smith  that  he  reprinted  it 
twice  in  his  "Cross  and  the  Flag." 
In  the  March,  1959  issue,  it  ap- 
pears with  the  introductions:  "We 
are  indebted  to  Antoine  R.  Albina 
of  Jerusalem,  Jordan,  for  a  very 
shrewd  analysis.  .  ."  Two  months 
later,  May,  1959,  the  South  Afri- 
can Anglo-Nordic  Union  for  pub- 
lishing a  very  telling  survey  con- 
(ering  the  falsehood  about  the 
six  million  Jews.  .  .  ." 

James   Madole,    in    New  York, 
'.  suggested    that   some   of   the  six 
million  were  really  in  the  Gaza 
strip.    But    propagandist  Albina, 
operating  out  of  Jordanian  Jeru- 
salem,   not   too   far   from  Gaza, 
shares  with   Breedman.  Rockwell 
I  and  others  the  theorv  tint  they're 
I  all  in  the  United  States.  He  quotes 
I  with  approval  the  1952  '•tatemenl 
of    one    W.    D.    Herrstrom,  an 
American  anti-Semite,  whose  "Bi- 
ble News  Flashes"  had  this  to  say: 


IA.  Whitney  Griswold,  president  of 
Yale  University,  was  designated  re- 
cipient of  the  1959  Universal  Brother- 
hood Medal  by  The  Jewish  Theologi- 
cal Seminary  of  America,  i,t  was  an- 
nounced by  Oscar  Dane,  chairman  of 
this  year's  annual  Brotherhood  din- 
ner which  was  held  on  Sunday,  May 
17,  at  the  Waldorf-Astoria  Hotel  in 
New  York.  Mrs.  Eleanor  Roosevelt 
was  the  other  recipient. 


"Senator  Pat  McCarran  says 
there  are  more  than  5,000,000 
aliens  in  this  country  who  got  in 
'illegally.'  He  doesn't  say  who  they 
are  but  most  'informed'  people 
believe  that  most  of  them  are 
Jews  .  .  No  use  looking  in  Shick 
elgruber's  ovens  for  them.  Walk 
down  the  streets  of  any  American 
city.  There  they  are." 

This  bit  of  fantasy  apparently 
caught  up  with  Gerald  L.  K. 
Smith's  "Cross  and  the  Flag"  late. 
The  notion  that  the  six  million 
are  in  the  United  States  appears 
in  its  June,  1959  issue  under  a 
heading  of  barbaric  flippancy: 
"Into  the  Valley  of  Death  Rode 
the  Six  Million.  Or  Did  They? 
Conde  McGinley  reprinted  the 
Herrstrom  item  back  in  1952. 

In  the  past  few  weeks,  this  line 
has  been  used  with  ever  greater 
frequency.  McGinley,  in  "Common 
Sense,"  prints  an  item  "From  our 
Asian  Correspondent"  which  of- 
fers a  brand  new  set  of  unrelated 
figures.  Others  come  closer  to  a 
semblance  of  truth  when  they  "re- 
veal" that  one  German  concentra- 
tion camp  or  another  had  no  gas 
chamber  on  its  premises.  (Some- 
times the  Nazis,  to  keep  prisoners 
from  rebelling,  concealed  the  fact 
that  they  were  doomed  by  build- 
ing gas  chambers  and  crematoria 
out  of  sight  of  the  camps.)  No 
matter  what  the  twist,  the  cam- 
paign to  deny  the  existence  of  the 
six  million  is  now  in  high  gear. 

How  effective  are  these  tales? 
Despite  the  weird  calculations  in 
this  macabre  number  game,  de- 
spite the  obvious  inhumanity  of 

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Dial  EL  9-5273 
2926  Ellwood  Avenue 
RICHMOND,  VA, 


OLD  „ 
MANSION 


Old  Mansion  INSTm 


come 


and  so  perfectly  simple  to  serve  .  .  .  just  one  teaspoon  of 
these  100%  pure  coffee  crystals  for  each  cup  of  hot 
water  .  .  .  and  100%  pure  pleasure  is  instantly  assured! 


'Taste  is  the  'Jest 


C.  W.  ANTRIM  &  SONS,  INC.,  Importers,  Richmond,  Vo. 


8o 


The  American 


Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


It's 
a 

beautiful 
beer! 


New  Year  .  .  . 

Greetings 


At  Your  Service 

•  THEO.  W.  KELLEY 

•  RALPH  S.  GOODE 

•  SAM  COHEN 


Julius  Straus 
&  Sons 

General  Insurance 
Insurance  Building 

10  South  10th  St. 
RICHMOND,  VA. 


R.  P.  WHITLEY 
ROOFING  CO. 

1802  Ellen  Road 
RICHMOND,  VA. 

JOHNS-MANVILLE 
BONDED  ROOFS 


Lyttle  &  Barnes 
Construction 
Company 

Office  and  Plant 
RICHMOND,  VA. 


The  Ceremony  Only  Takes  18  Minutes 


Belt  Blvd.  and  Hopkins  Road 
BE  2-2344 

•  SEWERS 

•  WATER  LINES 

•  SEWERAGE 

•  DISPOSAL  SYSTEMS 


(Concluded 

nity  minded.  Except  of  course, 
when  it  comes  to  parents. 

By  now,  you  are  beginning  to  be 
excited.  A  desire  to  share  the  news 
with  your  family  and  friends  takes 
hold,  and  you  make  telephone  calls 
to  tar  off  places  as  though  you 
have  stock  in  A.T.&T.  This  results 
in  some  slight  embarrassment,  since 
the  cousins  you  call  in  Tacoma, 
Washington,  or  Albuquerque,  New 
Mexico  don't  even  remember  you, 
let  alone  your  daughter. 

By  the  next  morning,  the  family 
has  simmered  down  a  little,  but  not 
before  there  is  a  row  between  the 
younger  children  as  to  who  is  going 
to  get  "her"  room  when  she  moves 
out.  They  have  already  divided  up 
those  of  her  possessions  which  she 
has  cherished  for  years:  the  Jap- 
anese umbrella,  the  collection  of 
stuffed  animals,  camp  pennants, 
and  a  strapless  formal  (size  7) 
which  her  younger  sister  (size  14) 
is  determined  to  fit  into  as  soon  as 
possible.  You  make  the  proper  pro- 
nouncements to  the  newspapers; 
you  are  a  good  ,solid  subscriber;  the 
least  they  can  do  is  to  print  it  on 
the  front  page  with  a  banner  head- 
line; you  breathe  a  sigh  of  relief. 
Now  you  are  through  until  the  wed- 
ding, and  that's  a  year  away. 

A  few  short  days  later,  the  leader 
of  the  opposition  calls  you.  She  is 
going  to  give  a  tea  for  your  daugh- 
ter. The  rules  call  for  a  tea  and 
she  is  going  to  follow  the  rules.  I 
have  nothing  against  teas,  as  such. 
I  realize  that  it  is  a  way  to  enter- 
tain a  lot  of  people  all  at  the  same 
time  without  mortgaging  your  life 
away.  As  a  public  function,  they 
are  fine.  But  as  a  vehicle  for  intro- 
ducing you  and  your  daughter  to 
595  people,  560  of  whom  you'll 
never  see  again,  I  say  fie  to  Emily 
Post  and  "feh"  to  teas. 

If  you  think  that  the  'tea"  in 
question  has  any  resemblance  to 
the  ancient  custom  of  sitting  down 
with  a  cup  of  tea  to  discuss  the 
questions  of  the  day  as  did  our 
forefathers,  let  me  give  you  the  pan- 
oramic view.  Equipped  as  we  are 
with  all  the  modern  conveniences, 
including  electrical  gadgets  of  every 
size  and  shape,  family  rooms,  silver 
tea  services  and  platters  without 
end,  it  has  become  de  rigeur  to  take 
the  "tea"  out.  A  hotel  with  an  in- 
timate dining  room  (about  as  inti- 
mate as  the  waiting  room  in  a  train 
depot)  is  the  answer.  As  the  mother 
of  the  bride,  you  arrive  early,  dress- 
ed to  kill  in  beige  chiffon,  dyed-to- 


from  Page  70) 

match  shoes,  and  tight  girdle.  No- 
tice the  words— dressed  to  kill,  dyed- 
to-match  shoes.  Before  the  after- 
noon is  over  you  are  hoping  for 
only  one  thing:  a  merciful  end  to 
your  misery.  You  stand  beside  your 
daughter,  who  is  completely  dis- 
gusted with  the  way  you  look, 
flanked  by  the  groom's  mother, 
grandmother,  and  a  visiting  aunt. 
The  tea  table  stretches  in  front  of 
you  like  one  of  Sam  Goldwyn's 
movie  spectaculars  in  color.  My 
hostess  is  no  fool.  Diet  or  no  diet, 
the  girls  like  to  eat,  and  she  is  pre- 
pared for  any  eventuality,  including 
drought  or  a  general  strike.  Cookies, 
candy,  nuts,  fruit  salad,  sandwich 
loaves,  cream  puffs,  petit  fours  and 
open  face  sandwiches  by  the  tens  of 
thousands  cover  every  inch  of  space 
on  the  table.  My  daughter's  name  is 
spelled  out  in  roses,  her  groom's  in 
camellias.  I  am  wearing  an  orchid; 
the  bride  is  wearing  two  orchids 
and,  naturally,  the  groom's  mother 
is  wearing  three.  We  are  quite  a 
sight. 

1  he  guests  begin  to  arrive,  and 
with  them  a  problem.  She  intro- 
duces me  to  her  friends.  I  introduce 
her  to  mine.  I  am  frantic.  What  do 
J  call  her?  I  have  forgotten  her  first 
name,  and  I'm  not  too  sure  of  her 
last.  "This  is  my  daughter's  mother- 
in-law?  She  isn't  yet.  This  is  my?" 
What  is  she  to  me,  anyhow?  This 
is  Leonard's  mother?  Somebody  is 
bound  to  ask,  who  is  Leonard?  Af- 
ter about  an  hour,  I  am  completely 
befogged.  The  smiling  mask  I  am 
wearing  has  set  permanently  upon 
my  face.  I  am  slowly  choking  to 
death  (the  girdle  was  too  tight)  and 


Harry  L.  Woll  of  New  Ifork  City 
was  elected  President  of  the  Nation- 
al Council  for  Jewish  Education  at 
a  meeting  of  the  Executive  Commit- 
tee held  on  June  20th.  Mr.  Woll  is 
Executive  Director  of  (tie  Board  of 
License  of  the  Jewish  Education 
Committee  in  New  York  City. 


Look  before  you  sip!  Let 
the  light  glint  through 
golden  clear  Richbrau. 
And  the  beautiful  part  is 
that  Richbrau,  one  of  the 
world's  great  beers,  is 
brewe  1  right  here.  Your 
prem'nm  be?r,  without  the 
premium  freight  charge! 


Take  Home 
a 

Six  Pack 
Beautiful 
of 

Richbrau 
Beer 


HOME  BREWING  CO. 
RICHMOND,  VA. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


8i 


I  now  understand  the  meaning  of 
Dante's  Inferno.  There  is  a  slight 
lull  while  the  guests  eat,  appraise 
each  others'  costumes,  the  amount 
of  money  spent  on  the  tea,  and  the 
chances  of  both  families  getting 
along  in  the  future.  Then  the  whole 
business  begins  all  over  again  as 
they  leave,  much  too  slowly. 


An  inkling  of  what  is  to  come, 
however,  seeps  through  the  miasma. 
In  the  days  ahead  you  will  attend 
24  showers  (and  yoti  fell  one  was 
more  than  enough);  13  luncheons, 
and  three  small  dinner  parties,  the 
latter  with  understanding  friends 


who  felt  your  husbands  should  be 
included  in  the  festivities.  Your 
daughter  will  have  collected  a  mag- 
nificent trousseau,  including  twelve 
place  settings  of  anything  you  can 
name.  She  will  have  lost  ten  pounds 
and  you  will  have  gained  ten 
pounds.  You  will  have  said  thank 
you  so  often  that  it  will  have  lost 
its  meaning;  and  you  are  obligated 
lor  i  lie  rest  of  your  life,  since  the 
only  decent  thing  is  to  do  the  same 
for  everyone  else's  children.  Oddly 
enough,  you  really  want  to  do  it, 
and  you  are  truly  grateful  for  the 
beautiful  parties  given  for  your 
child,  bin  .  .  .  there  must  be  an 
easier  way! 


The  real  "frosting"  on  Peter  Meyer's  birthday  cake  is  tfce  fact  ihat  he  is 
recovering  from  delicate  heart  surgery  at  National  Jewish  Hospital  at  Den- 
ver. Peter  celebrated  his  fifth  birthday  there  recently,  but  his  mother,  Mrs. 
Walfried  Meyer  of  Phoenix,  placed  an  extra  candle  on  the  cake  as  "one  to 
grown  on."  Before  the  operation,  Peter's  growth  lad  been  hampered  by  a 
congenital  heart  defect. 


ATTENTION!  WOMEN'S  ORGANIZATIONS! 
Is  your  Sisterhood  or  Hadassah  taking  advantage  of  this  easy  fund- 
raising  plan?  Obtaining  subscriptions  or  renewals  for  THE  AMERICAN 
JEWISH  TIMES-OUTLOOK  is  an  easy  way  of  raising  money  for  your 
projects  or  general  fund  '  {quiries  from  Virginia  should  be  addressed  to 
Box  701,  Richmond,  Va.  inquiries  from  all  other  states  should  be  ad- 
dressed to  Box  1469,  Greensboro,  N.  C. 


TARRANT 
PRESCRIPTION 
DRUGGISTS 

MOTORCYCLE  DELIVERY 

Foushee  and  Broad 
MI  3-3469  Richmond,  Va. 


Greetings 

CHARLES 
HABOUSH 

RICHMOND,  VA. 


NOLDE'S 


Quality  Bakers 

Since  1892 


1st  for  flavor  and  freshness 


JElbread 


1st  in  quality  since  1915 


-V 


General  Baking  Company 

Dial  MA  2-5756 
NORFOLK,  VA 


BOND  BAKERS 

General  Baking  Company 

Dial  L  5-8643 
RICHMOND,  VA. 


BRIDAL  PORTRAITS 
AND  CANDIDS  ARE 
OUR  SPECIALTY 


phone  EL  8-4826 
WENDELL  B>  POWELL  STUDIO 


,3201  GROVE  AVENUE  —  RICHMOND,  VA. 


WESTBROOK  ELEVATOR 


MANUFACTURING  CO.,  INC. 


Richmond,  Va. 

Milton  8-5394 


Danville,  Va. 

SWift  2-4736 


New  Installations 
and  Service  on 


LEVATORS 


82 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


WE  CARRY 
EVERYTHING  BUT 
THE  JANITOR 


Building 
Equipment 
&  Supply 
Corporation 

811-13  W.  Broad 
RICHMOND,  VA. 

PHONE  EL  8-4986 

DISTRIBUTORS  OF  .  .  . 

SANITARY  JANITOR'S 
SUPPLIES 

FRANKLIN'S  CLEANERS 
and  WAXES 

V-C  VICAR  CLEANSERS 

SANDING  and  POLISHING 
MACHINES 


EUROPE  2959 

OR  anywhere  in  the  world 


BY   SHIP  OR  PLANE 
ESCORTED  TOURS  OR 
INDEPENDENT  PLANS 
TRANSPORTATION— 

by  all  lines — we  are  bonded, 
authorized  agents. 

TOURS— 

We  have  them  all  —  Cook's 
American  Express,  Brownell, 
Olson,  Lissone  -  Lindeman, 
Exprinter  and  many  others. 

DON'T  DELAY  —  SEE  US 
NOW  FOR  EXPERT  AND 
EXPERIENCED  PLANNING 

C.  O.  Ulley 
Travel  Agency 

708  E.  Grace  —  Dial  MI  4-7848 
Oldest    and   Largest  Travel 
Service  in  Virginia — Est.  1920 

FREE  PARKING 


Dot's  Pastry  Shop 

3136  W.  Cary  Street 
RICHMOND,  VA. 
DIAL  EL  8-2011 

Bakers  of  Fancy  Pastries 


*  *  ★ 


New  Year  Greetings 


WM.  F.  GRAVINS  &  CO.,  Inc. 

25  S.  13th  St.  Phone  MI  8-4729  Richmond,  Va. 

•  BUTTER  •  EGGS 

•  POULTRY  •  FROZEN  FOODS 


Richmond  Office  Supply  Company 

Stationery,  Office  Furniture  and  Appliances 
816-818  E.  Main  Street  Dial  MI  4-4025 

RICHMOND  19,  VIRGINIA 


Our  Very  Best  Wishes  to  Our  Many  Jewish  Friends 
For  a  Happy  New  Year 

CONTINENTAL  BAKING  COMPANY 

^Bctkcrs  of 

WONDER  BREAD  and  HOSTESS  CAKE 

RICHMOND,  VA. 


The  Ultimate  Cruelty 

(Concluded  from  Page  78) 

the  aims,  the  lies  sometimes  get  Germany."  The  letter  writer  ap- 

ihrough.  parently  endorses  this   view  and 

It's  a  long  time  since  1945,  when  Roes  one  step  further:  "Pritchett 

the  facts   about   the  six  million  •  •  •  uses     the     old  propaganda 

were  first  exposed  to  the  world,  myth  that  millions  of  Jews  were 

when  Allied  leaders  first  visited  killed  by  the  national  socialists, 

the  Nazi  camps  and  saw  the  evi-  From  what  I  was  able  to  deter- 

dence  of  mass  death  at  first  hand.  mine   during   six   post-war  years 

The  horror  has  worn  off,  to  be  in   Germany   and   Austria,  there 

replaced    with    wonder— in    some  were  a  number  of  Jews  killed,  but 

cases  disbelief— that  it  ever  really  the  figure  of  a  million  was  certain- 

happened.  And  people  forget.  ly  never  reached."  Again  the  num- 

Austin  J.  App,  a  pro-Nazi  apolo-  bers  game,  this  time  in  a  reput 

gist    who    once    demanded    that  able,  respectable  medium. 
President   Eisenhower   be  hanged 


as  a  war  criminal,  writes  a  letter 
from  Philadelphia,  to  the  Catho- 
lic "Brooklyn  Tablet"  offering 
specious  "proof"  that  the  figure 
of  six  million  is  "a  bloated  libel." 
The  letter  is  printed  and  read  by 
thousands  who  may  be  innocent 
or  uninformed— about  App,  about 
the  truth  of  the  six  million. 


And  the  doubts  about  the  incred- 
ible truth  are  raised,  again  and 
again,  in  places  as  widely  scatter- 
ed as  New  York  and  St.  Benedict, 
Oregon,  and  in  the  general, 
special,  and  foreign  language 
press. 

Recently  from  Germany,  where 
it  all  started,  came  some  startling 


The  editor  of  a  Detroit  news-  news.  A  German  reporter  took  his 
paper  receives  a  batch  of  hate  television  equipment  into  twelve 
literature,  including  a  mimeo-  schools  in  five  widely  differing  re- 
shaped piece  from  the  Boniface  gions  of  the  land.  He  asked  the  15 
Press,  App's  Philadelphia  outlet,  to  17  year  old  pupils:  "What  do 
which  also  talks  about  "the  libel  you  know  about  Hitler?"  and 
of  six  million."  The  editor  is  "How  many  people  were  murdered 
mystified,  asks  A  DP  for  clarifica-  in  the  Nazi  era?"  He  found  that 
lion  of  the  subject.  nine  out  of  ten   students  either 

In    a    Southern    city,    another  knew  nothing  at  all  about  Hitler 

newspaper  editor  gets  a  batch  of  or  believed  that  he  had  done  more 

mail  from  Einar  Aberg,  a  source  good    than    harm.    The  highest 

of  embarrassment  to  the  govern-  estimate  of  the  number  of  Jews 

ment  of  Sweden  and  frequent  visi-  killed  by   the  Nazis  was  30,000. 

tor  to  its  jails.  Included  is  a  piece  Many    students    professed  total 

<alled  "The  Falsehood  About  Six  ignorance. 


Million  Jews  Said  to  Be  Gassed  by 
Hitler."  The  editor  asks  a  Jewish 
friend  if  he  can  really  document 
the  facts  about  Jewish  dead. 

A  letter  to  the  editor  appears  in 
the  June  14,  1959  issue  of  the  big- 
circulation  Catholic  weekly,  "Our 
Sunday  Visitor."  It  comments  on 
a  column  in  a  previous  issue  which 
had  criticized  V.  S.  Pritchett  for 
mentioning,  in  Holiday  Magazine, 
that  six  million  fews  had  been 
killed  bv  the  Nazis.  The  column 


The  answers  should  have  been 
anticipated.  German  parents  are 
not  apt  to  educate  their  children 
about  the  past.  The  schools  do 
not  do  much  better.  Here,  for 
example,  is  the  complete  account 
of  Nazi  persecution  of  Jews  in  a 
textbook  for  12  and  14  year  olds: 
"The  Jews  fared  worst  under 
Hitler.  They  were  expelled  from 
the  German  people.  They  were 
shipped    by    the    thousands  into 


concentration     camps.  Through 

said  that  "the  rehashing:  of  such     ,  ,  •  ,  . 

b  hunger,  diseases,  and  maltreatment, 

bitter  memories  would  hardly  help     many  died  " 

an  American  enjoy  his  holiday  in  (piease  Turn  t(j  pag£  gg) 


Send  FloWerS  ...     It  is  the  nice  thing  to  do. 

JOHN  L.  RATCLIFFE 


Phone  MI  8-7261 


FLORIST 

RICHMOND,  VA. 


206  North  Fifth  St. 


\The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Jennie  still  had  an  intense  de- 
sire for  an  edncation.  After  work- 
ng  hard  all  day  in  the  factory, 
,he  went  to  night  school.  During 
.he  summer,  when  there  were  no 
rlasses,  she  would  change  from 
ler  working  clothes  to  children's 
apparel  and  then  join  the  other 
voungsters  at  play  in  the  crowded, 
pushcart-lined  streets. 

A  touching  climax  to  Jennie's 
desire  came  last  June  when  Bran- 
deis  University  appointed  her  a 
Fellow  at  its  annual  commence- 
ment ceremonies  ;it  Waltham, 
Mass.  ■  "I7*] 

Marries  Cousin 

On  May  25,  1912,  Jennie  mar- 
ried her  cousin,  Harry  Grossinger. 
Not  long  after  the  wedding,  her 
lather  decided  to  open  a  restau- 
rant on  the  East  Side.  The  Gross- 
ngers  never  turned  away  some- 
one who  asked  for  something  to 
eat.  "No  one  must  ever  go  away 
hungry,"  said  Malka  Grossinger, 
1  he  mother.  The  restaurant  was 
not  a  success,  and  things  turned 
from  bad  to  worse  when  Selig 
Grossinger's  health  began  to  fail. 
The  hard  years  of  work  Avere 
taking  their  toll. 

Selig's  doctor  advised  him  to 
go  to  the  country;  so,  he  went  to 
Connecticut  the  following  week- 
end to  try  to  find  a  farm  that  would 
be  both  a  home  and  a  source  of 
income.  He  located  a  little  house 
with  some  acreage  that  he  liked, 
so  he  put  a  $25  deposit  on  it. 
Upon  returning  to  New  York,  he 
told  a  friend  what  he'd  done.  The 
friend,  however,  pointed  out  that 
the  CatskiJl  Mountains  in  New 
York  State  would  be  better  for 
his  health. 

Accordingly,  Selig  traveled  to 
the  Catskills.   He  liked  what  he 


Jennie  Grossinger 

(Continued  frmo  Page  S) 


Happy  New  Year 

CREERY 
SHIRT  SHOP 

Designers  and  Makers  of 
FINE  CUSTOM  SHIRTS 
1107  E.  Main    Richmond,  Va. 


New  Year    .    .  . 
Greetings    .  . 

■  EARL  PECK 

2314  Bells  Road 
RICHMOND,  VlA. 


saw  there.  The  area  reminded  him 
of  the  place  in  which  he  had  lived 
in  Austria.  The  climate,  terrain, 
and  other  qualities  -were  similar. 
He  was  also  impressed  with  what 
the  inhabitants  told  him  about 
that  section  of  the  Catskills. 

So,  he  started  a  new  search.  He 
finally  found  an  old  seven-room 
farmhouse  with  50  acres  of  land 
in  Ferndale,  N.  Y.  His  family 
pooled  its  resources  and  put  down 
a  deposit  of  $450.  The  $25  deposit 
for  the  Connecticut  farm  was  for- 
feited, as  the  people  there  refused 
to  return  the  money. 

Capacity  —  Nine  Boarders 

Pop  and  Mom  came  to  Ferndale 
with  their  son,  Harry,  in  the  win- 
ter of  1913.  That  spring,  Jennie 
and  Lottie  joined  them  to  help 
with  the  farm  work.  They  planned 
to  help  their  parents  establish 
themselves  in  the  country  and 
then  return  to  the  city. 

From  the  beginning,  the  little 
family  was  beset  with  difficulties. 
The  soil  was  not  as  good  as  they'd 
thought.  It  was  not  suitable  for 
productive  farming.  The  family's 
resources  began  to  dwindle.  In 
desperation,  they  sought  a  new 
source  of  income. 

They  knew  that  other  farmers 
in  the  area  were  taking  in 
boarders;  so,  the  Crossingers  de- 
ckled to  take  in  boarders  too. 
The  first  summer,  the  Grossinger 
family  was  host  to  nine  guests, 
who  paid  $9  each  a  week  for  a 
total  of  $81.  The  Grossnegrs  didn't 


Mrs.  Maxwell  Abbell  of  Chicago 
was  named  a  member  of  the  Na- 
tional Ramah  Commission  of  the 
United  Synagogue  of  America,  filling 
a  vacancy  created  by  the  passing  of 
her  husband  two  years  ago.  The  ap- 
pointment was  announced  by  Ber- 
naht  L.  Jacobs,  president  of  the  Unit- 
ed Synagogue. 


J.  J.  HAINES  AND  COMPANY,  INC. 

ESTABLISHED  1874, 
Wholesale  Distributors  of 

FLOOR  COVERINGS 


4800  E.  MONUMENT  ST. 


BALTIMORE,  MD. 


Branches 


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•  FLORENCE,  S.  C.     •  BRISTOL,  VA.  TENN.        •    ROANOKE,  VA. 

P.  O.  Box  187  1320  Newton  St.          1019  E.  Campbell  Ave. 


•  Fast  Delivery  Service 
Phone  MI  3-3431 

•  Wholesale  and  Retail 


Captain  Herbert's  Seafood  Boat 

FRESH  FROM  THE  BAY  EVERY  DAY" 
17TH  and  DOCK  STREETS  RICHMOND,  VIRGINIA 


a  very  happy 


HARWOOD  BROS.,  INC. 


•  PAINTS 

1013  E.  CANAL  STREET 


OILS 

RICHMOND,  VA. 


24-HOUR  TRUCK  SERVICE 

MAINTENANCE  LEASE  OPERATING 


SALES 

107  W.  Canal  Street 


PHONE  MI  3-9173 

Richmond,  Va. 


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"We  Deliver  the  Goods" 

1400  Brook  Road  RICHMOND,  VA. 

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SEASON'S  GREETINGS 


Mutual  Assurance  Society  of  Virilnia 


(FIRE) 

Founded  1794 
RICHMOND,  VIRGINIA 


84 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Food  Fair  and 
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AND  GET 


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RICHMOND,  VA. 


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Service 


realize  it  then,  but  they  were  in 
the  hotel  busness  to  stay. 
Boarding  House  Prospers 

The  Grossinger  family  had  at 
last  come  into  its  own.  The  board- 
ing house  began  to  prosper.  In 
1915,  the  little  house  was  filled 
all  summer.  As  a  matter  of  fact, 
more  guests  came  than  could  be 
accommodated;  so,  the  Grossinger 
family  put  up  tents  for  them  in 
back  of  the  house. 

Word  about  the  Grossinger  hos- 
pitality, service,  cleanliness,  and 
superb  cooking  was  being  spread 
by  an  increasing  number  of  peo- 
ple. 

Many  of  the  factors  that  had 
been  against  the  Grossinger  family 
in  its  previous  business  venture 
now  became  assets.  For  instance, 
they  had  been  told  that  one  of 
the  reasons  for  the  failure  of  their 
restaurant  was  that  they  were  too 
generous  to  the  poor  people  who 
came  to  them  for  food.  As  Mom 
Grossinger  always  said:  "No  one 
must  ever  go  away  hungry."  Here 
in  the  country,  where  food  was 
cheaper,  they  coidd  afford  to  be 
generous.  Their  experience  in  the 
restaurant  business  helped  them 
prepare  delicious  meals  that  be- 
came the  talk  of  New  York. 

Guests  continued  to  come  to  the 
farmhouse  in  the  autumn,  winter, 
and  spring.  It  was  no  longer  just 
a  summer  vacation  spot;  it, was  a 
year-round  resort.  Business  was 
so  good  that  Jennie's  husband, 
Harry,  gave  up  his  job  in  the  city 
and  came  to  the  country  to  stay. 

Before  long,  the  Grossingers 
realized  that  they  had  outgrown 
the  farm.  They  needed  a  larger 
place.  They  decided  to  search  for 
a  bigger  place  that  would  enable 
them  to  accommodate  a  great 
number  of  guests  and  provide 
better  facilities. 

The  Grossingers  didn't  have  far 
to  go.  Four  miles  away  was  the 
Nichols'  place,  which  had  three 
good  buildings  and  about  200 
acres  of  land.  The  old  Grossinger 
farmhouse  was  sold  for  $10,000 
and  that  went  toward  the  $25,000 
it  cost  to  purchase  the  Nichols' 
propery,  nucleus  of  the  present 
Grossinger's. 

Although  the  Grossingers  were 
very  happy  with  their  new  hotel, 
thev  were  far  from  satisfied  with 
it.  They  immediately  began  mak- 
ing improvements  and  additions 
and  thev  haven't  stopped  since. 
They  pioneered  in  adding  new 
facilities  by  the  score.  In  1927, 
golf  courses  were  literally  few  and 


far  between,  but  the  Grossinger 
family  was  looking  toward.  Gross- 
inger's was  the  first  Catskill  re- 
sort to  build  its  own  18-hole  links. 
Grossinger's  introduced  outdocfl 
dining  to  the  Catskills.  Grossin- 
ger's built  the  world's  first  private 
airport  for  the  use  of  guests  at  a 
resort  hotel. 

Champions  Train  at  Grossinger's 
Because  of  Grossinger's  health- 
ful location,  many  famous  athletes 
have  trained  there.  Nine  world 
boxing  champions,  including  In- 
gemar  Johansson,  Rocky  Marci- 
ano,  and  Barney  Ross,  have  con- 
ditioned themsel  ves  at  the  resort. 
Many  skating  champions  have 
trained  at  Grossinger's,  among 
them  being  Olympic  figure-skat- 
ing champions  Hayes  Alan  Jen- 
kins and  Tenley  Albright;  world 
figure  skating  titleholders  David 
Jenkins  and  Carol  Heiss,  Bob 
Paul  and  Barbara  Wagner,  world 
pair  skating  champs,  ind  world 
barrel  jumping  king  Leo  LeBel. 

Former  Olympic  speed-skating 
champion  Irving  Jaffee,  who  has 
been  head  of  the  Grossinger  win- 
ter sports  staff  for  25  years,  train- 
ed at  the  resort  for  many  of  his 
marathon  skating  efforts. 

Florence  Chadwick  has  condi- 
tioned herself  at  Grossinger's  for 
several  of  her  long-distance  swims. 

Cradle  of  Stars 

Through  th?  years,  many  stars 
of  the  entertainment  world  have 
gone  from  Grossinger's  where 
they  received  their  basic  training, 
into  the  spotlight  of  fame.  Sing- 
ing star  Eddie  Fisher  was  discover- 
ed at  Grossinger's  in  1949  by 
comedian  Eddie  Cantor.  Robert 
Merrill,  now  a  Metropolitan  Opera 
star,  was  a  member  of  the  Gross- 
inger staff  when  he  was  discover- 
ed at  the  resort  by  talent  agent 
Moe  Gale,  who  as  his  manager, 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  93) 


Seasons  Greetings 


Arnold  Bread  Distributor 

ED.  C.  MELTON 
Phone  EL  9^2710 
RICHMOND,  VA. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 

Roanoke,  Va. 


85 


MR.  and  MRS.  JACOB  BRENNER 


Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jacob  Brenner 
celebrated  their  Golden  Wedding 
^anniversary  Sunday,  June  21  at 
i  Hotel  Roanoke,  Roanoke  Va. 

Following  a  dinner  for  the  fam- 
ily, a  reception  was  held  in  the 
i  Shenandoah  Room  and  was  at- 
tended by  hundreds  of  friends 
who  came  to  honor  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Brenner. 

During  the  dinner  a  magnifi- 
cent Torah  was  presented  to  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Brenner  from  the  nieces 


Roanoke's  Leading 
Funeral  Director 
and 

Ambulance  Operator* 

Economical- 
Dependable 

Dial  DI  3-4451 


and  nephews  who  reside  in  North 
Carolina. 

The  mantle  for  the  scroll  was 
presented  by  Harry  Kirstein  of 
Hagerston,  Md.,  and  silver  adorn- 
ments were  presented  by  Mr.  Lee 
Schinburg  01  Washington,  D.  C, 
nephews  of  the  Brenners. 

During  the  dinner  it  was  an- 
nounced that  a  Brenner  Founda- 
lion  was  created  by  the  family  in 
memory  of  Harry  and  Toby  Bren- 
ner, parents  of  Jacob  Brenner. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Brenner  were  mar- 
ried June  29,  1909  in  Chambers- 
burg.  Pa.  They  have  resided  in 
Roanoke  for  42  years  and  have 
three  married  children,  Udell 
Brenner,  Mrs.  David  B.  Silverman, 
and  Mrs.  Milton  K.  Blank,  with 
eight  grandchildren,  all  living  in 
Roanoke. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Brenner  have  been 
members  of  Beth  Israel  Congrega- 
tion for  more  than  42  years.  Mr. 
Brenner  has  served  as  president  of 
the  Congregation  for  a  number  of 
years  and  has  been  actively  identi- 
fied in  Jewish  community  life, 
serving  in  many  important  posi- 
tions. 

Mr.  Julius  Fisher  served  as  toast- 
master  at  the  dinner. 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

ROANOKE,  VA. 


DISTRIBUTORS  OF 


FUEL  OIL  FOR  HOMES 
AND  INDUSTRY 


Day  and  Night 
Delivery 


DIAL  DIAMOND  5-8866 
2677  ROANOKE  AVE.  S.  W.  ROANOKE,  VA. 


C.  C.  BOVA  and  CO. 

Specialists  in  Wholesale  Fruits  and  Vegetables 
of  the  Finest  Quality  Since  1921 

CALL  DIAMOND  3-2425 

1001  3rd  SE  ROANOKE,  VA. 


HAPPY 


SKYLINE  LUMBER  CO.,  INC. 

BUILDING  MATERIALS 
MILLWORK 

1255  Third  Street,  S.  E.  Roanoke  6,  Virginia 


E.  V.  POFF  &  SON 
Incorporated 

2312  Franklin  Rd.  S.  W. 
ROANOKE,  VIRGINIA 

DI  2-3183 

Tile  —  Marble 
Terrazzo  —  Flagstone 
Monuments  —  Markers 


L  and  N  Stores 

L.  P.  MUNGER  and 
NICHOLAS  MUNGER 

Proprietors 
ROANOKE,  VIRGINIA 


86 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


gomc  to 


fl*C««'$  LOBSTC*  HOUS€ 

STEAKS  •    CHICKEN  •  SEAFOOD 


2  MILES  ROUTE  11.  NORTH  OF  ROANOKE 


ARCHIE'S  Lobster  House 

4  Miles  North  on  U.  S.  Route  11 
7130  Williamson  Road 


or 


Pearlman  -  Fisher 


ARCHIE'S 
TOWN  HOUSE 

2523  FRANKLIN  ROAD,  S.  W. 


ROANOKE,  VA. 


>  HOME  LOANS 

>  SAVINGS  ACCOUNTS 
)  CURRENT  DIVIDEND 

•  3>/2%  ANNUALLY 


NEW  YEAR 
GREETINGS 

And  Best  Wishes  From 

Best 
In 

Television 
and 

Radio 

CBS  in  Roanoke 

WDBJ 

960KC 
and 

WDBJ-TV 

(Ch.  7) 


SALE 


R.  R.  QUICK,  Owner 


REAL  ESTATE  AND  INSURANCE 
SALES  —  RENTALS  -  LOANS 

7    DI  3-8075 


I 


Quick,  Realtors 

132  West  Campbell  Ave.,  Roanoke,  Va. 


fcWIIII*   AN»    tlNT  COMPANY 


"Sunnyside  Means  Quality" 

•  VENETIAN  BLINDS  •  STORM  WINDOWS 

•  WINDOW  SHADES  •  AWNINGS 

•  ORNAMENTAL  IRON 
621  First  Street,  Southwest  Roanoke  10,  Virginia 


SARAH    LOUISE  FISHER 


Mr.  and  Mrs.  Julius  Fisher  oi 
Roanoke,  Virginia,  announce  the 
engagement  of  their  daughter, 
Sarah  Louise,  to  Mr.  Robert  Bruce 
Pearlman,  son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Jack  L.  Pearlman  of  Greensboro, 
North  Carolina. 

Miss  Fisher  will  enter  her  senior 
year  at  the  Woman's  College  ol 
the  University  of  North  Carolina. 

Mr.  Pearlman  is  a  graduate  of 
the  University  of  North  Carolina, 
where  he  was  a  member  of  Pi 
Lambda  Phi  Fraternity.  Mr.  Pearl- 
man has  just  returned  from  Ger- 
many where  he  served  in  the  United 
States  Army.  He  is  entering  Uni- 
versity of  North  Carolina  Law 
School  in  the  fall. 

A  December  wedding  is  planned. 


ATTENTION!  WOMEN'S  ORGANIZATIONS! 
Is  your  Sisterhood  or  Hadassah  taking  advantage  of  this  easy  fund- 
raising  plan?  Obtaining  subscriptions  or  renewals  for  THE  AMERICAN 
JEWISH  TIMES-OUTLOOK  is  an  easy  way  of  raising  money  for  your 
projects  or  general  fund  '  jquiries  from  Virginia  should  be  addressed  to 
Box  701,  Richmond,  Va.  Inquiries  from  all  other  states  should  be  ad- 
dressed to  Box  1469,  Greensboro,  N.  C. 


Why  Did  O.  Henry  Become  O.  Henry? 

(Continued  from  Page  31) 


function  properly  without  an  alias 
or  monicker  file.  Although  an 
alias  is  consciously  designed  to 
hide  criminal  identity,  it  so  often 
is  revealing  that  it  has  become 
standard  operating  procedure  to 
examine  it  lor  clues.  An  alias 
lends  distinction  to  the  individual. 

Sometimes  the  name  will  be- 
taken from  what  the  police  call 
the  "M.O.,"  or  modus  operandi, 
of  the  crime. 

Among  criminologists  and  psy- 
chologists, there  is  a  growing 
awareness  that  many  criminals 
may  engage  in  a  life  of  crime  in 
order  to  be  punished  due  to  an 
irrational  and  overwhelming  sense 
of  guilt.  They  are  constantly  seek- 
ing punishment  and  perform  in 
a  manner  designed  to  insure  cap 
ture.  ft  explains  the  masochistic 
components  of  most  persons  who 
lind  themselves  incarcerated  in 
prison. 

Alcoholics  seem  to  be  subject  to 
l he  same  mechanism.  It  is  possible 
that  the  compulsive  drinker  does 
so  in  order  to  be  punished  by  the 
inevitable  hangover.  O.  Henry 
gave  evidence  of  fitting  both 
masochistic  molds.  He  was  not 
only  a  convicted  embezzler  but 
also  an  alcoholic,  teetering  on  the 
border  of  skid  row,  and  ultimate- 
ly dying  of  cirrhosis  of  the  liver  at 


the  age  of  48  with  his  entire  for- 
tune of  2.'5  cents  in  his  pocket  and 


When  Next  You  Want  To 
Looli  Your  Loveliest  .  .  . 


SK  E  LU  N  D*S 

ESTABLISHED  1924 
Under  the  Personal  Supervision  of 

GLADYS  G.  GODSEY 


ETHICAL 
SERVICE 

Dial  Roanoke 

DI  4-6675 


For  the  Ultimate  in  Hair  Styling  and 
Permanent  Waving 

•  Natural  Wavy  Hair  Cutting 

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•  Scalp  Treatments 

•  Special  Attention  to  Children 

•  Experienced  Operators 

Located  Downtown  in  Patrick  Henry 
Hotel 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


87 


nine  empty  whiskey  bottles  under 
the  bed. 

Whether  guilty  or  innocent,  O. 
Henry's  criminal  record  haunted 
him  like  a  ghost,  and  its  conceal- 
ment was  apparently  one  of  his 
overwhelming  needs.  He  covered 
up  the  time  served  in  prison  by 
lalsifying  his  age  to  account  for 
ihe  missing  years.  In  interviews 
he  omitted  any  menton  of  his 
residence  in  Austin.  He  made  his 
close  friends  feel  that  there  were 
areas  in  which  they  were  not  per- 
mitted to  pry. 

Even  after  they  all  knev.  hi* 
secret,  he  acted  as  though  it  was 
still  hidden  from  them.  Will  Ir- 
win, the  writer  and  friend  of  O. 
Henry,  exclaimed,  "Why  didn't 
one  of  us  go  to  him  and  say, 
'Stop  trying  to  hide  yourself  from 
strangers  for  fear  of  running  across 
someone  with  knowledge  of  a  se- 
cret that  is  no  secret  at  all.'  " 

There  is  evidence  that  O.  Henry 
himself  was  responsible  for  ar- 
ranging the  conditions  whereby 
his  secret  was  no  secret  at  all, 
that  in  his  methods  of  conceal- 
ment he  was  preparing  his  self 
betrayal. 

To  Al  Jennings,  a  bank  robber 
and  close  prison-mate,  O.  Henry 
lesolved,  "I  will  bury  the  name 
of  Bill  Porter  in  the  depths  of 
oblivion.  No  one  shall  know  that 
the  Ohio  Penitentiary  ever  furn- 
ished me  with  board  and  bread." 

Could  it  be  that  with  the  re- 
verse irony  that  was  O.  Henry's 
trademark,  he  took  an  alias  that 
was  in  truth  a  "pen"  name? 


Columbia,  S.  C. 

(Continued  from  Page  55) 
Gross,  and  parents  were  Mrs.  Hen- 
ry Hammer,  Mrs.  Ernest  Koolkin, 
and  Mrs.  Irving  Zeitchick. 

Members  of  the  Columbia  Jew- 
ish Center  enjoyed  a  very  enlight- 
ening talk  by  Rabbi  David  Gru- 
ber  on  his  recent  visit  to  Europe 
and  Israel. 

Councilman  Hyman  Rubin,  as 
suming  the  role  of  assistant  mayor, 
represented  Columbia  as  Mayor 
Lester  L.  Bates'  substitute  at  the 
U.  S.  Conference  of  Mayors  in  Los 
Angeles.  He  was  accompanied  by 
Mrs.  Rubin.  While  there  they 
stayed  at  the  Stajtler  _Hilton  JHotel, 
and  visited  many  points  of  interest. 

Women's  golfing  was  in  the 
headlines  last  month,  when  -Miss 


Mollie  Roth  was  consolation  win- 
ner, third  flight,  at  the  Ft.  Jackson 
Handicap  Tournament.  Mrs.  Leo 
Silverfield  was  winner,  second 
flight,  and  Mrs.  William  Konrad 
was  runner-up,  third  flight. 

Columbia  was  saddened  by  the 
deaths  of  four  of  its  community 
during  July.  Jules  Seideman,  of  the 
Columbia  Organic  Chemical  Co., 
was  buried  on  July  10th.  Meyer 
Katz  died  July  gth  at  Johns  Hop- 
kins Hospital  in  Baltimore  after 
an  illness  of  two  weeks.  He  had 
lived  in  Columbia  the  greater  por- 
tion of  his  life,  and  operated  a  used 
metal  and  iron  business.  He  was 
active  in  civic  affairs  and  was  past 
president  of  B'nai  B'rith,  past 
chairman  of  the  United  Jewish  Ap- 
peal, a  member  of  the  Board  of 
Directors  of  the  Columbia  Jewish 


Center,  a  member  of  the  Columbia 
Chamber  of  Commerce,  a  Mason, 
and  a  member  of  the  American  Le- 
gion. 

Survivors  include  his  widow, 
Mrs.  Mildred  Kirsch  Katz;  a  son, 
Donald  Katz  of  Columbia;  a  daugh 
ter,  Mrs.  Alan  Frankel  of  Albu- 
qerque,  N.  M.;  three  grandchil- 
dren, and  three  sisters,  Mrs.  Anna 
Levinson  of  Fairmont,  N.  C,  Mrs. 
Joseph  Kirsch  of  Brooklyn,  N.  Y., 
and  Mrs.  Arthur  Brook  of  Lawr- 
ence, Long  Island. 

Ike  Berkowitz  died  at  his  home 
on  July  12.  He  had  lived  in  Colum- 
bia since  1907,  and  for  the  past 
several  years  was  manager  of  Moe 
Levy's  store.  He  was  a  member  of 
the  Elks  Club  and  the  House  of 
Peace  Synagogue.     His  wife,  the 


late  Mrs.  Fannie  Berkowitz,  died 
in  August,  1957. 

Survivors  include  one  daughter, 
Mrs.  Joe  Rothman,  of  Rome,  Ga,; 
two  grandchildren,  and  two  nieces 
in  Columbia,  Mis.  Sol  Katz,  and 
Mrs.  Moe  Levy. 

Waltei  David  Dreifuss  died  in 
the  Columbia  Hospital  July  28th 
following  a  brief  illness.  He  was  a 
native  of  Cincinnati,  Ohio,  having 
moved  to  Columbia  ten  years  ago, 
and  was  a  member  of  the  Tree  of 
Life  Synagogue.  He  was  buried  in 
Cincinnati. 

Survivors  include  his  widow, 
Mrs.  Ruth  Lindenburg  Dreifuss;  a 
daughter,  Mrs.  Robert  Levy,  of 
Cincinnati;  a  son,  David  Walter,  of 
Columbia;  two  sisters,  Mrs.  Helen 


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88 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS 
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ROANOKE,  VA. 


Reach  for  .  .  . 


.  .  .  and  Sunbeam  Cakes  and  Pies 

BOWMAN'S  BAKERY  •        •  ROANOKE,  VIRGINIA 


Marks  and  Miss  Norma  Dreifuss, 
both  of  Cincinnati;  and  two  broth- 
ers, Meyer  and  Philip  Dreifuss,  of 
Los  Angeles. 


Sammy  Laden  is  at  JCC  Camp 
Juniper  at  Cheraw.  Henry  Ray 
Wengrow  has  been  working  this 
summer  at  Baton  Rouge,  La. 


A  Sermonetle 


(Concluded  from  Page  56) 


This  writer  in  recent  weeks  has 
had  the  occasion  to  attend  a  num- 
ber of  Jewish  simchas,  and  they 
left  him  cold  and  sick  at  heart. 
They  were  empty  of  content  and 
even  of  form.  Strange  was  the  mu- 
sic and  strange  the  word  —  even 
when  the  bar  mitzvah  boy  deliver- 
ed his  piece  or  the  rabbi  his  ser- 
mon. 

One  synagogue  bar  mitzvah  cere- 
mony was  followed  the  next  clay  by 
a  reception  at  a  "Jewish"  night 
club  where  the  mistress  of  cere- 
mony, a  heavily  painted  and  even 
more  heavily  bosomed  woman  late 
in  her  sixties,  poured  out  filth  and 
profanity  of  the  most  degrading 
type.  Her  "act"  was  followed  by  a 
bit  of  nudity  by  a  strip-teaser 
whose  performance  was  a  model  of 
virtue  and  cleanliness  as  compared 
with  that  of  the  "lady"  who  intro- 
duced her.  There  were  three  simul- 
taneous bar  mitzvah  parties  going 
on  in  the  club,  but  for  the  lew 
skullcap  bearers  one  would  not 
have  known  that  this  was  a  gather- 
ing of  Jews.  The  Jewish  voice  was 
silent  and  there  was  no  Jewish 
song,  no  chant  nor  speech. 

Equally  depressing  was  a  wed- 
ding we  recently  attended.  By  the 
time  the  ceremony  was  to  be  per- 
formed most  of  the  wedding  guests 
were  too  exhausted  with  drink  and 
food  to  be  sober  witness  to  the 
most  sober  of  occasions.  And  when 
the  well-rehearsed  march  to  the 
altar  began  impatience  and  imper- 
tinence shouted  from  every  corner 
of  the  floor. 


Music  alien  to  Jewish  ears  clear- 
ed the  couple's  path  as  they  wend- 
ed slowly  to  their  destiny  —  to  be 
broken  only  by  the  weak  voice  of 
the  preacher  and  teacher  in  Israel 
who  appeared  unhappy  about 
playing  a  role  in  this  strange  per- 
formance.  Silence  fell  as  the  rabbi 
lifted  his  voice  and  raised  his 
hands  in  blessing  at  ceremony's 
end.  Before  long,  however  tumult 
and  confusion  and  meaninglessness 
again  engulfed  the  hall.  The  jazz- 
men had  taken  over  even  before 
the  benediction's  echo  vanished. 
When  the  chaleh  was  to  be  broken 
(here  were  no  hands  to  wash.  And 
when  the  cup  was  to  be  drunk 
there  were  none  to  lift  it.  The  rab- 
bi had  hoped  to  say  a  few  'Jewish 
words"  but  his  voice  was  drowned 
out  by  laughter  and  discordant 
notes. 

I  can  multiply  these  instances, 
but  only  to  the  extent  of  limning 
an  even  more  degrading  picture. 
Our  Jewish  pattern  is  ripped  in 
many  vulnerable  places.  The  vul- 
garity thai  has  replaced  ancient  re- 
joicing could  leave  a  repulsive 
stain. 

It  would  be  presumptuous  of  me 
to  give  counsel  to  the  ordained. 
But  if  I  were  a  rabbi  I  would  re- 
fuse to  off  iciate  at  a  birth,  bar  mitz- 
vah or  wedding  where  there  was 
no  pledge  to  Jewish  decorum, 
where  there  was  no  clear  under- 
standing that  there  would  "be  no 
vulgarization  ol  simcha. 


Obey  that  impulse! 
Buy  an  Israel  Bond! 


Good  fot  you,  too! 
RAIN  DO 


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ROANOKE,  VIRGINIA 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


89 


Scientists  At  The  Hebrew  University 


By  Iiiacien  Meysels 


Dr  fcrnest  D.  Bergman,  professor  of  organic  chemistry,  center,  shown 
with  associates  in  ins  laboratory  at  the  Hebrew  University,  of  Jerusalem. 
Dr.  Bergman  also  serves  as  Chairman  of  Israel's  Atomic  Energy  Commission 
and  as  Director  of  the  Scientific  Department  of  the  Government's  Ministry 
of  Defense. 


"How  is  it  that  a  small  univer- 
sity like  yours  manages  to  attract 
some  of  the  world's  leading  scien- 
tists and  scholars?"  an  American 
visitor  recently  asked,  on  being 
shown  around  the  Hebrew  Univer- 
sity of  Jerusalem.  "It  can't  be  the 
money,"  he  added,  "and  even 
though  you  are  building  a  very  fine 
new  campus,  your  facilites  don't 
compare  with  my  alma  mater,"  re- 
ferring to  a  famous  New  England 
university. 

Going  back  to  the  essential  point 
of  the  visitor's  remarks,  it  certainly 
is  not  money  that  brings  leading 
scholars  to  Jerusalem  or,  for  that 
matter,  the  physical  facilities,  al- 
though it  is  a  fact  that  on  the  new 
campus  only  the  best  is  good 
enough.  However,  it  is  certainly 
true  that  the  academic  staff  list  of 
the  Hebrew  University  reads  like  a 
page  out  of  the  Encyclopedia  of 
Learning. 


•  ROOFING 

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Let  us  just  leaf  through  this  list 
at  random.  There,  for  instance,  is 
the  name  of  Professor  Bernhard 
Zondek.  You  don't  have  to  be  a 
scientist  to  have  heard  his  name- 
particularly  the  ladies— as  the  origi- 
nator of  the  Aschheim  -  Zondek 
Pregnancy  Test.  His  international 
reputation  had  been  well  establish- 
ed long  before  he  came  to  Palestine. 
Yet,  when  the  Nazi  advent  to  pow- 
er in  Germany  caused  him  to  leave 
the  country,  he  turned  down  much 
more  lucrative  offers  from  universi- 
ties and  hospitals  the  world  over  to 
make  his  home  in  Jerusalem,  where 
at  the  time,  even  the  university's 
medical  school  existed  on  blue- 
prints only.  Lucrative  offers,  as  a 
matter  of  fact,  are  still  being  made 
10  Professor  Zondek.  For  instance, 
on  his  recent  visit  to  Latin  Amer- 
ica where,  incidentally,  he  was 
made  an  honorary  citizen  of  Rio 
de  Ja  nerio,  and  received  more  hon- 
orary doctorates  than  his  valise 
could  hold,  he  received  an  urgent 
call  from  a  very  excited  and 
wealthy  woman:  "Professor,  I  sim- 
ply must  see  you.  Money  is  abso- 
lutely no  matter!"  "In  that  case," 
the  Professor  replied,  "you  can  see 
me  at  my  office  at  the  Hebrew 
University  of  Jerusalem." 

One  of  Professor  Zondek's  next- 
door  neighbors  in  Jerusalem  is 
Italian-born  Professor  Guilio  Ra- 
cah,  head  of  the  university's  physics 
department  and  the  world"s  "last 
word"  in  the  field  of  atomic  spec- 
troscopy. As  Professor  of  Theoretic 
Physics,  and  a  man  more  interested 


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Dr.  Bernard  Zondek,  Professor  of  Gynecology  and  Obsteclrics  at  the 
Medical  School  of  the  Hebrew  University  of  Jerusalem. 


in  pure  than  applied  science,  he  is 
naturally  shy  of  publicity  and  will 
admit  only,  with  a  great  deal  of  re- 
luctance, that  he  is  the  originator 
of  the  "Racah  Coefficient  W,"  an 
internationally  accepted  term  in 
the  world  of  science.  On  his  desk— it 
is  not  a  particularly  orderly  one  at 
that— one  can  find  letters  and  quer- 
ies from  universities  and  scientists 
of  half  a  dozen  continents  asking  his 
advice  or  opinion  in  matters  relat- 
ing to  atomic  spectroscopy  —  the 
science  of  reading  and  evaluating 
the  spectrum  of  the  atom.  Professor 
Racah  is  a  member  of  numerous 
intellectual  atomic  bodies  but  his 
permanent  home  remains  in  Jeru- 
salem where,  it  might  be  interest- 
ing to  note,  his  office,  until  his  re- 
cent move  to  the  new  campus,  used 
to  be  less  than  a  stone's  throw  from 
the  Arab  snipers  on  the  Old  City 
wall. 

Sharing  Professor  Racah's  aver- 
sion for  publicity  is  the  head  of  the 
University's  Parasitology  Depart- 
ment, Professor  Saul  Adler,  famous 
for  his  work  in  the  control  of  leish- 
maniasis, who  was  recently  ap- 
pointed a  Fellow  of  Britain's  Royal 
Society. 

Still  working  in  the  neighbor- 
hood of  the  Arab  Legionnaires  on 
the  Old  City  Wall  and  feeling  no 
worse  therefore,  is  Professor  Leo 
Picard,  who  heads  the  university's 
famous  team  of  geologists.  As  a 
matter  of  fact,  he  is  not  in  Jerusa- 
lem right  now.  At  the  request  of 
the  United  Nations,  the  university 
agreed  to  "lend"  him  to  the  Gov- 
ernment of  Greece  to  act  as  advisor 
on  ground  water  resources.  Neither 


is  Greece  the  only  country  in  which 
he  has  been  active.  Shortly  after 
the  war  he  conducted  a  ground- 
water survey  in  far-away  Argentina, 
a  country  which  surely  coidd  have 
found  a  competent  geologist  closer 
at  hand  but  chose  him  nevertheless. 
Many  geologists,  moreover,  still  re- 
member the  paper  he  read  at  the 
International  Geological  Confer- 
ence at  Moscow,  shortly  before 
World  War  II,  in  which  he  under- 
scored the  as  yet  untapped  oil  po- 
tential of  Arabia— to  the  everlasting 
chagrin  of  certain  oil  companies 
who  did  not  believe  him  at  the 
time  and  let  American  prospectors 
get  there  first! 

Another  noted  Hebrew  Univer- 
sity scientist,  currently  abroad,  is 
(Please  Turn  to  Page  98) 


If  you  say  .  .  . 

HAPPY  NEW  YEAR 

.  .  .  Say  it 

with 
flowers 
from 


DI  5-7709 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


91 


Suffolk,  Va. 

MRS.  LARRY  RUDEN,  Correspondent 


The  Suffolk  community  has  been 
deeply  concerned  over  the  recent 
illness  of  a  beloved  member,  Leon 
Familant.  Now  recovering,  we  all 
hope  his  convalescence  will  be  a 
speedy  one,  and  that  his  return  to 
good  health  will  be  permanent. 

We  of  the  Ruden  family  are  very 
proud  of  our  new  addition  in  High 
Point,  N.  C.  Meredith  Loren, 
daughter  of  Bobby  and  Betty  Ann 
Ruden,  was  born  on  May  5th. 

Irving  January  is  spending  his 
teachers  vacation  touring  Europe 
this  summer.  Irving  is  visiting  an 
aunt  and  uncle  stationed  in  Ger- 
many, and  friends  living  in  several 
different  countries. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  George  Stein  com- 
bined business  and  pleasure  on 
their  northern  trip  in  July.  After 
buying  in  New  York  for  their  busi- 
ness they  traveled  on  to  New  Lon- 
don, Conn.,  to  visit  their  son  and 
daughter-in-law,  Sigmund  and  Let- 


tie  Lee,  and  granddaughter  Cindy. 
Sigmund  completed  in  July  his  two 
years  residence  in  pediatrics  at 
Western  Reserve  Hospital  in  Cleve- 
land, Ohio,  and  is  now  stationed 
in  New  London  as  a  captain  in  the 
navy. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Coleman  Davis  had 
as  guests  recently  Barbara's  par- 
ents, Mr.  and  Mrs.  Henry  Spitz, 
and  her  aunt  and  uncle,  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Henry  Brager  of  New  York 
City. 

We  are  happy  to  know  that  Mrs. 
Jules  Kurtzwile  is  home  again  after 
being  in  Medical  College  Hospital 
for  several  weeks. 

Rabbi  and  Mrs.  Murray  Kanort 
spent  their  vacation  traveling  in 
North  Carolina,  South  Carolina, 
and  Virginia. 

Larry  and  I  want  to  take  this 
opportunity  to  wish  all  the  readers 
of  the  Times-Outlook  a  very  happy 
and  healthy  New  Year. 


World  Jewish  Congress  Re-elects 
Dr.  N.  Goldman  President 


After  a  ten-day  conference,  the 
World  Jewish  Congress  Fourth 
Plenary  Assembly  concluded  its 
deliberations  in  Stockholm,  on 
August  11th  with  the  re-election 
of  Dr.  Nahum  Goldman  as  presi- 
dent of  the  organization. 

Dr.  Goldman  succeeded  the 
founder-presidnt  of  the  World 
Jewish  Congress,  Dr.  Stephen  S. 
Wise,  as  acting  president  upon 
Dr.  Wise's  death  in  1919,  and  was 
elected  president  of  the  World 
J fe^h' Congress  lor  his  first  term 
or  office  in  195#  at  the  Third 
Plenary  Assembly  of  the  World 
Jewish  Congress  in  Geneva. 


The  Stockholm  Assembly  elect- 
ed Dr.  Israel  Goldstein  (New 
York)  to  the  office  of  honorary 
vice-president.  Mr.  Samuel  Bronf- 
man (Montreal)  was  elected  chair- 
man of  the  Western  Hemisphere 
Branch  of  the  World  Execltive, 
Mr.  Israel  M.  Sieff  (London) 
chairman  of  its  European  Branch, 
and  Dr.  Arieth  Tartakower  (Jeru- 
salem) chairman  of  its  Israel 
Branch. 

Mr.  Ira  Guilden  (New  York) 
was  elected  Treasurer  of  the 
World  Jewish  Congress,  Mr.  Shad 
Polier  (New  York)  chairman  of  its 
Budget  Committee. 


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92 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

LYNCHBURG,  VIRGINIA 


To  you  and  yours  .  . 


HAPPY  NEW  YEAR! 


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Federal  Deposit  Insurance  Corporation 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  to  Our 
Many  Jewish  Patrons  and  Friends 
For  A  Happy 


W.  D.  CAMPBELL  &  SON 

Incorporated 
INSURANCE 

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A  Program  For  Teen- Agers 

(Continued  from  Page  44) 


fund-raiser,  no  publicity  director. 
A  project  is  organized  for  each  sum- 
mer and  city-bred  youngsters  go 
out  to  toil  in  the  hot  sun  at  hard 
physical  labor.  They  pay  fees  com- 
parable to  those  of  more  typical 
summer  camps. 

The  stereotype  of  Jewish  distaste 
for  hard  physical  effort  would  sug- 
gest that  the  most  difficult  task 
would  be  that  of  finding  campers. 
Kohn  replies  that  last  year  more 
than  200  inquiries  were  received 
from  interested  young  people. 

Most  of  them  were  Jews.  The  So- 
ciety, while  seeking  to  enroll  Jewish 
young  people,  has  accepted  non- 
Jewish  youngsters.  In  the  summer 
of  1956,  all  but  one  of  the  campers 
were  Jewish.  The  exception  was  a 
girl  from  a  mixed  marriage  home. 

The  notion  that  such  work  camps 
are  an  utterly  new  experience  for 
American  Jewish  youth  also  is  re- 
jected by  Kohn,  who  reports  that 
the  largest  single  denomination 
represented  for  many  years  in  the 
Quaker  work  camps  for  teen-agers 
was  the  Jewish  group. 

"One  of  the  reasons  we  organ- 
ized the  Society  was  because  we 
felt  that  there  should  be  a  program 
under  Jewish  auspices  in  this  area," 
he  said. 

All  wings  of  Judaism  are  repre- 
sented among  the  campers— Ortho- 
dox, Conservative,  and  Reform. 
Handling  of  the  problem  of  Kash- 
ruth  depends  partly  on  the  number 
of  campers  who  indicate,  in  their 
application  forms,  that  they  ob- 
serve the  dietary  laws,  and  partly 
on  the  location  of  the  work  project. 
Sometimes  the  projects  are  too  far 
away  from  a  Jewish  urban  concen- 
tration to  make  possible  provision 
of  kosher  meat. 

The  campers  observe  the  Sab- 
bath as  a  day  of  rest.  They  have 
Friday  evening  and  Saturday  morn- 
ing services  with  the  campers  con- 
ducting their  own  service.  The 
hardest  phase  of  the  program,  says 


Kohn,  is  getting  appropriate  proj- 
ects. Housing  must  be  available  for 
a  group  of  20  young  people,  Ade- 
quate sanitary  facilities  and  prox- 
imity to  a  fairly  substantial  com- 
munity also  are  required. 

In  recent  years,  this  problem  has 
become  more  difficult,  partly  be- 
cause of  American  prosperity  and 
partly  because  of  a  widespread  be- 
lief that  all  unknown  teen-agers  are 
juvenile  delinquents. 

A  more  long-standing  problem  is 
that  the  idea  of  unpaid  service  is 
an  unknown  concept  to  most  Amer- 
icans. Most  communities  are  skep- 
tical about  the  proposition  that 
there  are  teen-agers  who  are  not 
only  eager  to  give  such  service,  but 
also  willing  to  pay  fees  to  do  it. 

The  fees  do  not  pay  all  the  costs 
of  the  project.  The  1956  project 
for  example,  involved  Society  ex- 
penditures totalling  $4,000— what 
the  Society  spent  for  transportation, 
food  and  similar  essentials.  The 
deficits  are  made  up  by  contribu- 
tions from  individual  supporters  of 
the  idea. 


Albert  Z.  Elkes  has  been  appoint- 
ed national  director  of  Membership 
for  B'nai  B  nth,  it  was  announced 
by  Maurice  Bisg:yer,  executive  vice 
president  of  the  organization. 

He  succeeds  Max  N.  Kroloff,  51, 
who  died  July  4  as  previously  noted. 


Central  Virginia's 

FAMILY 
NEWSPAPERS 


The  newspapers  that  are  read  by 
nearly  everyone  in  the  large 
Central  Virginia  Area. 


The  News  and  The  Daily  Advance 


LYNCHBURG,  VIRGINIA 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


9. 


Paul  Ben  Haim,  Israeli  composer  now  visiting  United  States  as  part  of 
cultural  exchange  program  of  the  American  Israel  Cultural  Foundation, 
hears  his  "The  Sweet  Psalmist  of  Israel"  as  played  at  Its  United  States 
premiere  by  Leonard  Bernstein  and  the  New  York  Philharmonic  Orchestra 
win  acclaim  of  New  York's  music  critics.  Inspired  by  the  King  David  story, 
the  three  movement  symphony  features  harpsichord  and  harp  solos.  (1.  to  r.) 
Samuel  Rubin,  president  of  the  America  Israel  Cultural  Foundation;  Sylvia 
Marlowe,  who  played  the  harpsichord  solo;  and  Mr.  Ben  Haim. 

Jennie  Grossinger 

(Continued  from  Page  84) 

has  guided  him  to  the  success  he 
now  enjoys.  Among  other  Gross- 
inger alumni  are  producer  and 
writer  Doe  Schary;  movie  and  TV 
actors  Paul  Stewart,  Lew  Charles, 
Bob  Alda,  and  Everett  Sloan;  act- 
ress Shellev  Winters;  songwriters 
Jerry  Ross  and  Arnold  Horwitt; 
comedians  Phil  Foste  and  Hank 
Henry;  songstress  Elaine  Malbin, 
and  TV  producer  Ernie  Glucks- 
man.  Sam  Levenson,  the  humorist, 
was  given  his  first  big  break  at 
Grossinger's.  William  Herlands,  a 
Federal  judge,  was  a  tennis  pro 
at  the  resort. 


Famous  Guests 

Grossinger's  is  internationally 
famous.  This  past  year,  vacatipn- 
ers  have  come  to  the  resort  from 
19  foreign  countries  as  well  as  44 
states  in  this  country.  Baron  Ed- 
mond  de  Rothschild  flew  in  from 
Paris  recently. 

Prominent  visitors  from  the 
sports  world,  the  theater,  radio, 


TV,  public  life,  literary  field, 
press,  and  business  rub  elbows 
with  people  in  ordinary  callings 
whose  savings  through  the  year 
enable  them  to  have  a  vacation  at 
the  resort. 

The  guest  list  at  Grossinger's 
olten  looks  like  a  page  out  of 
"Who's  Who".  Sojourners  have  in- 
cluded Eleanor  Roosevelt,  Gov. 
Nelson  Rockefeller,  Dr.  Salman 
Waksman,  Gov.  Frank  Clement, 
Perry  Como,  Maestro  Leonard 
Bernstein;  Dr.  Ralph  Bunche,  Sen. 
Jacob  Javits;  Danny  Kaye,  Jackie 
Robinson,  Irving  Berlin,  Ambas- 
sador Arthur  Lall  of  India,  Yogi 
Berra,  Bob  Turley,  Lucille  Ball, 
and  Jack  Benny. 

Secret  of  Success 
To  many  people,  Jennie  Gross- 
inger is  known  for  her  gracious- 
ness  and  charm,  which  are  but  an 
expression  of  the  warm  feeling 
she  has  for  people.  "I  know,"  she 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  104) 


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Greetings 


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Established  1853 

LYNCHBURG 

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REAL  ESTATE  —  INSURANCE 

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94 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


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Miss  Jane  Evans,  Executive  Director,  National  Federation  of  Temple 
Sisterhoods  (at  right),  was  presented  with  a  miniature  Torah-like  scroll, 
with  silver  breastplate,  to  mark  her  25th  Anniversary  in  that  position,  at  the 
annual  meeting  of  the  NFTS  Board  of  Directors  in  New  York  City.  The  scroll 
includes  a  compilation  of  the  names  of  more  than  3,500  who  sent  "Union- 
gram"  messages  of  congratulations  from  all  parts  of  the  world.  Uniongram 
blanks  are  sold  by  Sisterhoods  of  Reform  congregations  to  help  finance  many 
activities  of  NFTS  through  its  "YES"  Fund  for  service  to  Youth,  Education 
and  Sisterhood.  Making  the  presentation  is  Mrs.  Morton  Goldstein  of  Balti- 
more, Md„  Chairman  of  the  NFTS  Committee  on  Uniongrams. 


Where  A  Synagogue  Used  To  Be 


(Concluded  from  Page  27) 


not  the  street  where  the  ruined 
synagogue  was  supposed  to  be? 

I  dragged  the  family  in  great 
excitement  up  and  down  the  street, 
but  there  was  no  trace  of  a  synago- 
gue. Finally  I  stopped  an  old  wom- 
an about  to  enter  a  shop  and  asked 
her  where  the  synagogue  used  to 
be.  "Over  there,"  she  waved  her 
arm  indifferently,  "where  the  empty 
space  is."  And  when  I  looked  at 
her  questioningly,  she  added: 
"Where  they  are  building  the  new 
block  of  flats." 

So  we  retraced  our  steps  to  the 
building  site,  which  we  passed  be- 
fore without  recognition,  and  there, 
amongst  weeds  and  rubble,  we 
found  a  few  pitiful  remains  of  a 
House  of  God.  A  broken  pillar,  a 
few  cornerstones  .  .  .  that  was  all. 
Oh  yes,  you  could  still  see,  if  you 


looked  for  it,  where  the  wall  must 
have  adjoined  the  neighbouring 
buiding. 

A  sense  of  desolation  swept  over ' 
me,  such  as  I  have  not  experienced 
since  the  day  I  was  told  that  my 
family  was  wiped  out.  There,  be- 
hind us,  a  new  building  was  going 
up,  the  hustle  and  bustle  typifying 
the  spirit  of  re-birth  pervading 
Austria. 

All  over  the  country  new  build- 
ings are  going  up,  the  country  is 
patching  up  its  war  wounds  and1 
life  is  going  on  as  before.  Who 
would  think  of  the  dead  and  who 
indeed  of  dead  Jews  and  Jewry? 

'ever,  this  was  Shabbos  and 
we  came  to  Innsbruck  to  pray.  So 
I  stood  on  the  place  where  the 
synagogue  used  to  be  and  silently 
recited  the  Shemone  Eare.  .  .  . 


J 


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The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


95 


Seeming  Economic  Waste 

(Continued  from  Page  75) 
capital  for  investment— all  of  which  standarized 


factors  enable  them  to  produce 
cheaply  for  the  world  market," 
the  said. 

In  agriculture  too,  most  ol  the 
so-called  "mixed  farming"  which 
lorms  the  oasis  of  the  cooperative 
agricultural  sector  is  able  to  main- 
tain  its   existence;   through  high 
J  walls  of   protection   guarding  it 
I  from   outside   competition.  This 
"mixed    farming,"    such    as  the 
raising   of   vegetables   and  dairy 
products,  is  intended  almost  ex 
leiusively  lor  the  domestic  market. 
1'iUt  on   the  other  hand,  cotton, 
groundnuts,  citrus,  flowers,  bulbs 
land  many  other  agricultural  pro- 
ducts which  can  compete  in  the 
, world  market  have  not  been  un- 
til very  recently  put  in  the  fore- 
front of  preferabiliry  by  the  gov- 
ernment  and    Hi«tadrut  author- 
ities. 

Too  high  taxes  have  been  de- 
Itrimental  to  production  and  have 
even  defeated  their  own  purpose 
by  actually  reducing  government 
jtax  collections.  "We  contend  that 
[lowering  income  tax  rates—espec- 
Ipally  in  the  middle  brackets  -will 
'increase   the   volume   of  income 
liable   to   taxation   and    lead  to 
Darger   tax   collections.   This  was 
([proved  during  the  last  few  years, 
when  a  number  of  minor  reduc- 
tions introduced  actually  had  this 
kesult;  in  the  fiscal  year  1958-59 
revenue  from  income  tax  has  risen 
thy  some  7  million  Israeli  pounds 
already  in   comparison   with  the 
corresponding    period    last  year, 
Mr.  Saphir  revealed. 

Israel's    economic     future,  the 
I'armer  Cabinet  Minister  believes, 
Jiies  in  secondary,  not  primary,  in- 
dustries. This,  he  savs,  has  been 


BROWN 
MORRISON 

COMPANY 
Fine  Printing  .  .  . 

Office  Supplies 

LYNCHBURG,  VA. 


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Florist 

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LYNCHBURG,  VA. 


or  primary  goods.  It 
can  compete  with  secondary  goods; 
since  there  "ttte  skill  of  our  hands, 
ingenuity  >l  design  and  Jewish 
marketing  ability  can  create  an 
advantage  for  Israel  products— 
not  only  in  under-developed  coun- 
tries but  perhaps  even  in  Europe 
and  America/  Israel  raincoats,  Ir.r 
example,  have  been  very  success- 
ful abroad  because  skilled  labor 
wages  abroad  are  higher  than  in 
Israel  and  because  the  elemenl 
of  design  and  ingenuity  in  this 
commodity  are  predominant  thus 
lowering  costs  per  unit.  But  a 
unit  of  steel  will  alwavs  cost  less 
in  Belgium,  and  through  no  fault 
of  the  Israeli  workers. 

Was  Mr.  Saphire  optimistic 
about  the  Genera)  Zionist  Party's 
chances  of  greatly  increasing  its 
strength  in  the  forthcoming  Knes- 
set election  and  thus  exerting; 
more  influence  over  the  Govern- 
ment of  Israel?  His  answer  was  a 
decided  "yes." 

"The  public  is  beginning  to 
realize  that  as  Israel  enters  the 
second  decade  of  its  existence  there 
is  need  for  a  radical  change  in 

C) 

the  way  things  are  run  in  the 
economic  sphere,  and  a  change 
in  social  mi  look.  It  understands 
that  we  are  approaching  serious 
crises  in  four,  or  perhaps  even  two 
years'  time.  1  he  people  know  that 
reforms  have  become  a  dire  neces- 
sity," he  asserted. 

Finally  the  General  Zionist 
leader  said  to  me: 

"I  assume  that  the  central  prob- 
lem of  the  next  decade  will  be 
the  diminishing  financial  aid  oui 
state  is  likely  to  receive.  This 
financial  aid,  in  its  various  forms, 
has  in  the  pa^t  been  virtually  the 
sole  mainstay  of  our  economic 
existence.  It  has  paid  for  both  the 
maintenance  of  our  present  stad- 
ard  of  living  and  for  develop- 
ment. The  shortage  of  disappear- 
ance of  such  aid  could  be  catastro- 
phic. Our  proposals  are  intended 
to  fortify  out  economy  and  raise 
our  productive  capacity  against 
this  eventuality— which  to  us  seems 
a  certainty— by  increasing  the  free- 
dom and  responsibilities  of  the 
individual  in  the  community,  and 
by  minimizing  unnecessary  con- 
trols and  pressures  exercised  by 
various  collective  institutions,  l-'or 
this,  I  believe,  we  shall  obtain  wide 
public  support." 


FOREHAND  REALTY  CO.,  Inc. 

Real  Estate  —  Insurance  —  Rentals 
Member  The  National  Association  of  Real  Estate  Boards 
80 1  Church  Street  Telephone  VI  7-773 1 

Lynchburg,  Virginia 


ANDERSON'S 

SUPER  MARKETS 

Lynchburg,  Va.  Danville,  Va. 

Alta-Vista,  Va. 


QUALITY'S 


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Get  the  Package  with  the  Big  Red  Check 

"SURE  SIGN  OF  FLAVOR" 

QUALITY  DAIRY  PRODUCTS,  INC 


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LYNCHBURG,  VA. 


J.  P.  BELL 
COMPANY 

Established  1859 
816  Main  Street 
LYNCHBURG,  VA. 


Office  Outfitters 
•  Stationers 
•  Printers 


Marvin  Moseley 

•  Plumbing 

•  Heating 

•  Contractor 

Ralph  Moseley 

•  Insulation 

•  Contractor 

1816  Park  Avenue 
LYNCHBURG,  VA. 


96 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


FOR  "The  Best  Deal  In  Town"  SEE 

JS*nr  VAUGHAN  tt^fKm^ 

Mtuflaq 


•  Sales 


•  Se 


rvice 


Lynchburg,  Va. 


CADILLAC 


FIRST  FEDERAL  SAVINGS 
&  LOAN  ASSOCIATION 

OF  LYNCHBURG 

JOHN  W.  FERGUSON,  JR.,  President 
Church  St.  at  Ninth         •  Lynchburg,  Va. 

—  •  Home  for  Your  Money  •  — 
=  •  Money  for  Your  Home  •  = 


Greetings 


"'IMUIUU  "  ■ 


S)ewtie^(9net 


"Taste  The  Difference" 


NEW  YEAR 
GREETINGS 


and  Best  Wishes  From 


Season  s  Greetings 
From 

C.  W.  HANCOCK  AND  SON 

General  Building  Contractors 

Allied  Arts  Bldg.  Lynchburg,  Va. 


Nusach  Aii"  —  A  Strange  Ceremony 


(Continued  from  Page  72) 


recruited  from  the  ranks  of  his 
union  in  Chicago  and  in  New 
York,  supplemented  by  a  few  brave 
souls  in  our  town,  he  invaded  our 
town. 

Significant  was  this  fact:  Nearly 
a  hundred  percent  of  all  involved 
directly  in  this  fight  —  employers, 
the  "contractors"  to  whom  the  big 
factories  fanned  out  much  of  their 
work,  and  the  employees^  nearly 
all  of  them  were  Tews. 

In  our  town,  the  employers 
would  take  no  guff  from  that 
young  "radical"  Sam  Stillman.  As 
soon  as  some  of  the  workers  went 
on  strike,  these  were  fired  sum- 
marily. More  work  was  given  to 
the  "contractors."  When  the  men 
and  women  working  in  the  sweat- 
shops  of  the  "contractors"  joined 
the  union  and  walked  out  — 
strikebreakers  were  employed  by 
the  hundred.  In  our  town,  most  of 
the  strikebreakers  came  from  the 
Gentile  population  —  some  were  of 
Polish  origin,  many  of  theme  were 
second  generation  Germ  an -.Ameri- 
cans. 

Two  problems  presented  them- 
selves. The  Gentiles  had  to  be  per- 
suaded not  to  act  as  strikebreakers 
against  the  Jewish  workers.  Second- 
ly, a  dormitory  and  kosher  soup 
kitchen  were  needed.  There  were 
already  three  soup  kitchens,  one  at 
strike  headquarters,  another  at  a 
Unitarian  church,  a  third  at  the 
town's  YMCA.  An  effort  had  been 
made  to  have  the  Young  Men's 
Hebrew  Association  permit  use  oL 
its  facilities  as  kosher  soup  kitchen 
and  dormitory.  (The  dormitory 
was  needed  because  manv  of  the 
strikers  had,  by  that  time  sent  their 
families  to  live  with  relatives  out  of 
town;  meanwhile,  evicted  from  the 
homes  for  nonpayment  of  rent, 
they  simply  had  no  place  to  sleep.) 
The  YMHA  had  refused  to  have 
anything  to  do  with  the  strikers  — 
that  organization's  principal  con- 
tributors came  from  the  ranks  of 
the  Jews  among  the  factory  owners 
?nd  "contractors." 

My  lather,  who  ran  a  dry  goods 
store  in  the  Jewish  neighborhood, 
had  a  brainstorm.  On  Morris 
Street,  there  stood  a  sizable  build 
ing  that  was  vacant.  The  building 
bad  housed  a  Lutheran  church.  Be- 
cause the  parishioners  of  that 
church  had  all  moved  out  of  the 
neighborhood,  when  it  was  innun- 
dated  by  Jews,  the  Lutheran  con- 
gregation had  erected  a  new  church 


building  in  another  part  of  town. 
The  Morris  Street  Lutheran 
church  building  was  vacant. 

My  father  approached  the  minis- 
ter of  that  church,  Reverend  Sch- 
luegel.  Together,  they  formed  a 
strikers'  aid  committee.  The  mini- 
ster got  his  board  of  trustees  to 
permit  use  of  the  vacant  church 
building.  On  the  main  floor,  cots 
were  set  up,  and  this  floor  was  used 
as  a  dormitory.  The  basement  be- 
came a  soup  kitchen.  And  it  was 
strictly  kosher.  My  father  had 
hired  two  "inashgichim,"  elderly 
members  of  his  own  shul  to  watch 
and  see  to  it  that  the  food  was  pre- 
pared and  served  with  strict  obser- 
vance of  kashruth. 

The  Strike  was  finally  settled  — 
and  a  big,  strong,  new  industrial 
labor  union  had  been  born.  The 
strikers'  aid  committee  was  dis- 
solved. The  strikers  had  cleared 
out  of  the  Morris  Street  church  so 
rapidly  that  they  had  not  even 
taken  the  time  to  clean  the  place,  i 
My  father  and  the  minister  recruit- 
ed a  lot  of  kids  —  I  was  one  of. 
them  —  to  clean  the  place. 

Oh  yes  —  about  those  strike- 
breakers; Reverend  Schluegel  had 
helped  through  other  ministers  to 
get  the  Gentile  strikebreakers  to 
quit,  thus  helping  the  union  mater- 
ially toward  its  ultimate  victory. 

Some  months  after  die  Strike, 
had  ended,  Reverend  Schluegel; 
had  come  to  his  old  church  for  a; 
final  inspection.  He  was  under 
orders  of  his  trustees  to  have  the 
building  listed  for  sale.  Sad,  be- 
cause he  was  leaving  forever  the 


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Route  501  West 

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Route  27  South 

LYNCHBURG,  VA. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


97 


church  where  he  had  spent  forty 
■years  as  a  minister,  the  minister 
left  the  place.,  locked  it  for  the  last 
'  time,  and  started  to  take  the  trol- 
ley car  home.  At  the  corner,  he  saw 
a  sign  painted  lettering  the  win- 
'dow  of  a  storefront.  The  sign  an- 
nounced   that    a    new  business 
'would  open  there  —  a  printing 
'shop.  The  name:  my  father's.  The 
minister  walked  in  for  a  reunion 
[with  his  old  friend  of  The  Strike 
days. 

It  was  a  joyous  reunion.  (I  was 
there,  with  mv  older  brother  Joha- 
nan,  unpacking  the  new  printing 
machinery.)  My  father  explained 
to  the  minister  that  he  had  had  to 

[give  up  his  dry  goodstore,  where 
he  had  faced  bankruptcy  because 
he  had  "sold"  so  much  dry  goods  to 
the  strikers  who  would  not  be  able 

[to  repay  their  credits  for  years,  if 

I  ever. 

The  Reverend  Schluegel  told 
my  father  of  his  sadness  about  leav- 
ing his  old  church.  He  feared,  said 
the  minister,  that  the  building 
•might  become  —  like  a  former 
Christian  church  in  the  piesent 
1  fewish  neighborhood,  a  junk-and- 
'rag  shop. 

"I'd  almost  give  my  church  away 
ho  someone,"  he  said,  "if  I  were 
[sure  it  would  be  used  for  a  House 
of  God." 

?  Then  the  minister  thought  of 
something.  Once,  during  The 
Strike,  he  had  accompanied  my 
'lather  to  the-  old  "Nusach  Ari"  syn- 
agogue, It  was  located  then  on  the 
second  floor  of  a  ramshackle  build- 
ing, over  a  bicycle  repair  shop. 
|Even  then,  the  street  where  this 
shul  was  located  was  in  the  center 
iof  the  slum  area.  In  answer  to  po- 
.lice  questioning,  my   father  had 


told  die  minister  that  his  congre- 
gation coidd  not  afford  to  move. 
The  "Nasach  Ari"  men  had  hoped 
that  some  of  the  richer  Jews  would 
contribute  money  to  help  them  get 
another  house  of  worship  some- 
where else.  Now.  because  the 
Nusach  Ari  men  had  aided  the 
strikers  —  such  contributions  from 
Jews  of  wealth  were  out  of  the 
question. 

The  minister  asked  my  father 
whether  an  Orthodox  congrega- 
tion would  be  allowed  to  use  a 
building  formerly  occupied  by  a 
Christian  church.  My  father  said 
that  reconsecration  was  a  very 
simple  matter.  Right  there  and 
then,' for  one  dollar,  my  father,  on 
behalf  of  "Nusach  Ari,"  bought 
the  old  Lutheran  church. 

The  Morris  Street  synagogue 
still  occupies  that  building  today. 
"Nusach  Ari"  took  possession  with- 
(Please  Turn  to  Page  111) 


The  appointment  of  Harold  P. 
Manson  as  director  of  public  rela- 
tions of  the  American  Friends  of  the 
Hebrew  University  was  announced 
by  Daniel  G.  Ross,  president  of  the 
AFHU. 


rare 


Progressive  Food  Markets 

■■■■■■■■■■BMW 


Green 
Stamps 


401  W.  BEVERLEY  ST. 

(GENERAL  OFFICES) 

542  GRANVILLE  AVE. 

(AMPLE  PARKING  SPACE) 

1509  W.  BEVERLEY  ST. 

(AMPLE  PARKING  SPACE) 

120  W.  BEVERLEY  ST. 

(MAIN  STORE) 

2303  N.  AUGUSTA  ST. 

(AMPLE  PARKING  SPACE) 


DIAL 
STAUNTON 

DIAL 
STAUNTON 

DIAL 
STAUNTON 

DIAL 
STAUNTON 

DIAL 
STAUNTON 


TU  6 
TU  6- 
TU  6- 
TU  6> 
TU  6 


6437 
7489 
9631 
9717 
2512 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Folloiving  Firms  in 

Staunton  -  Waynesboro,  Va. 


Greetings  from 


Staunton's  Progressive  Bank 


*  AUGUSTA 

NATIONAL  BANK 

STAUNTON,  VA. 

"MY  BANK"  TO  OVER  7500  CUSTOMERS 
Member  Federal  Deposit  Insurance  Corporation 


EARLY  DAWN 

Co-Operative  Dairy,  Inc. 

Quality  Dairy  Products 
WAYNESBORO,  VA. 


1 


St. 

NATIONAL 
BANK 

Waynesboro,  Va. 


—Main  Office- 
Main  at  Wayne  Ave. 

DRIVE  IN 
for  Your  Convenience 
WEST  MAIN  BRANCH 
Member  F.  D.  I.  C  . 


The  Citizens'Waynesboro 
Ban\  &  Trust  Co.  ...  . 

503  West  Main    —    Branch  Office:  300  North  Commerce 


Resources  Over  $9,000,000 


3%  Interest  on  Savings 


A.  W.  FRAME,  President 


C.  M.  LAMBERT,  Vice-President 

JAS.  W.  WRIGHT,  Executive  Vice-President 

E.  R.  COINER,  Assistant  Vice-President 

L.  L.  LOVEGROVE,  Cashier 

W.  H.  SAUFLEY,  Assistant  Cashier 

R.  M.  POOLE,  Assistant  Cashier 

J.  B.  STOMBOCK,. Trust  Officer 


98 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Petersburg,  Va. 


1959-60 


May  the  flew  year  bri^  you 
health  and  happiness 


ORKIN  EXTERMINATING  COMPANY 


XX 


Greetings  and  Best  Wishes 


BURTON  P.  SHORT  AND  SON 

Petersburg,  Virginia 


MASTER 
CHEVROLET  SALES,  Inc. 

35  East  Bank  St.,  Petersburg,  Va. 


•  Sales  •  Service 

CADILLAC 


NEW 
YEAR 
GREETINGS 


WELDING 

Portable  Electric  and 
Acetylene  Welding 


Phones:  REgent  2-4521 


GALE  WELDING  MACHINE  CO.,  Inc. 

•  PETERSBURG,  VA- 


415  E.  Bank  St. 


Scientists  At  The 

(Concluded 

Professor  Israel  Reichert  of  the 
Faculty  of  Agriculture.  Professor 
Reichert,  a  plant  pathologist,  is  an 
authority  on  citrus  virus  diseases. 
He  was  recently  asked  by  the  Med- 
iterranean Citrus  Growers  Associa- 
tion to  conduct  an  investigation  in- 
to these  diseases  over  the  entire 
area. 

In  the  university's  chemistry  lab- 
oratories the  visitor  may  have  met 
Professor  Erns  D.  Bergmann,  but  it 
is  doubtful  whether  the  Professor 
had  any  time  for  him.  Professor 
Bergmann,  in  addition  to  his  uni- 
versity post,  serves  as  chairman  of 
Israel's  Atomic  Energy  Commission 
and  as  head  of  the  "hush-hush" 
Scientific  Division  of  the  Ministry 
of  Defense.  Between  these  duties  he 
somehow  manages  to  find  time  to 
represent  Israel  on  the  World  Uni- 
versity Service.  How  he  does  it  is 
a  mystery! 

Yet  another  scientist  whose  work 
is  mainly  out  of  town,  is  the  uni- 
versity's vice-president,  Professor 
Michael  Evenari,  a  botanist,  en- 
gaged chiefly  in  efforts  to  reclaim 
th  Negev  desert  for  agricultural 
purposes  who,  by  the  way,  is  as  apt 
with  a  heavy  .45  on  his  desert  trips 
as  with  a  plant  sapling. 

It  is  perhaps  less  surprising  that 
the  university— in  view  of  the  es- 
sential learned  characteristics  of 
the  Jewish  people— should  have  a 
top-class  Faculty  of  Humanities 
and  particularly  an  outstanding  In- 
stitute of  Jewish  Studies.  Until  re- 
cently, the  Institute  was  headed  by 
Professor  Gershom  Scholem,  the 
leading  authority  in  the  field  of 
Jewish  Mysticism  and  Kabbala.  A 
late  member  of  the  Institute  was 
Professor  Umberto  Cassuto,  the 
famous  Bible  scholar  and  author 
of  the  Jerusalem  Bible,  the  first 
edition  of  the  Holy  Scriptures  to  be 
printed  in  the  Holy  City.  Now  on 
the  retired  list,  but  still  very  much 
around  are  Professors  Martin  Bri- 
ber, the  eminent  social-philosopher 
who  really  needs  no  introduction; 
Hugo  Bergman,  the  philosopher; 
Joseph  Klausner,  the  historian  and 
pioneer  Zionist;  and  Harry  Tur- 
Sinai  (Torczyner),  who  translated 
and  deciphered  the  famous  Lachis 
Letters,  the  importance  of  which 
ranks  with  the  Dead  Sea  Scrolls. 

In  a  country  with  a  history  like 
Israel's,  it  is  only  natural  that  spe- 
cial attention  should  be  paid  to 
archeology.  The  university's  presi- 
dent, Professor  Benjamin  Mazar,  is 


Hebrew  University 

from  Page  90) 

himself  an  archaeologist  who 
brought  to  light  the  magnificent 
Jewish  necropolis  of  Beth  Shearim 
in  Galilee.  One  of  his  associates  is 
Dr.  Yigael  Yadin  who  is  perhaps 
better  known  as  one  of  Israel's  most 
brilliant  generals  in  the  War  of  In- 
dependence. Dr.  Yadin  gave  up  his 
military  career  to  work  at  the  uni- 
versity and  to  follow  in  the  foot- 
steps of  his  father,  the  late  Profes- 
sor Eliezer  L.  Sukenik,  the  first 
man  to  realize  the  significance  of 
the  Dead  Sea  Scrolls. 

This  list  of  names  could  be  con- 
tinued almost  ad  infinitum.  But  we 
still  haven't  replied  to  our  visitor's 
original  question  as  to  why  these 
men  —  and  women  —  are  in  Jerusa- 
lem. The  answer,  of  course,  is  that 
they  find  a  degree  of  satisfaction 
in  working  in  Jerusalem  which  can- 
not be  measured  in  terms  of  mon- 
ey. At  the  Hebrew  University  they 
are  serving  not  only  the  State  of 
Israel  but  the  entire  Jewish  people, 
and  their  success  brings  pride  and 
joy,  credit  and  prestige  to  all  Jews, 
wherever  they  may  dwell,  and  to 
humanity  in  general. 


V' 


The  Soviet  Embassy  in  the 
United  States  has  circulated  a 
report  among  United  Nations  mem- 
bers dealing  with  Birobidjan.  The 
report,  covering  life  there  for  the 
past  25  years,  does  not  disclose  the 
extent,  if  any,  of  Jewish  cultural 
life  in  that  region. 


Solomon  Litt,  New  York,  who  has 
served  on  ttie  executive  committee 
of  the  National  Jewish  Welfare 
Board  since  1945  and  has  been  one 
of  its  vice-presidents  since  1954,  has 
been  elected  president  of  JWB  to 
succeed  the  late  Lloyd  W.  Dinkel- 
spiel. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 

NEW  Nil  B'RITH  HILLEL  DIRECTOR 


99 


Rabbi  Benjamin  M.  Kahn.  newly-appointed  national  director  of  flhe 
B'nai  B'rith  Hillet  Foundations,  brings  with  him  an  outstanding:  background 
in  religious  education.  The  former  Hillen  Foundation  director  at  Pennsyl- 
vania State  University  will  assume  his  new  duties  September  1. 


The  Ultimate  Cruelty 


(Concluded  from  Page  82) 


The  recent  German  trials  o£  SS 
guards  excited  great  interest  among 
German  youth.  The  facts  of  mass 
proceedings.  For  many  young  Ger- 
mans, this  was  the  very  first  time 
that  they  had  heard  any  details 
of  the  brutality  of  the  Hitler  years. 

This  month  the  monthly  organ 
of  the  General  Students  Committee 
at  Heidelberg  University  disclosed 
that  a  self-styled  students'  fascist 
group  was  "engaging  in  anti-demo- 
cratic and  anti-Semitic''  activities. 
In  their  paper,  "Student  Und 
Volk,"  the  fascist  students  had  pub- 
lished many  articles  supporting 
racist  theories  and  saying  that  the 


Brinkley  and  Co.,  Inc. 

PETERSBURG,  VA. 

Fruits  —  Vegetables  —  Produce 
Dixie  Margarine 
Light  White  Flour 

Bennett's  Mayonnaise 

Hunt  Club  Dog  Meal 
Sausage  and  Hams 


figure  of  6,000,000  Jews  extermi- 
nated by  Hitler  was  "grossly  exag- 
gerated." 

Joachim  Lipshitz,  West  Berlin 
senator,  had  an  answer  to  this  type 
of  thinking.  This  month  he  wrote 
in  a  Dusseldorf  newspaper:  "It  is 
tragic  that  today  we  still  debate 
the  consequences  of  the  horrible 
philosophy  of  Nazism.  When  there 
are  people  who  can  argue  whether 
it  was  six  million  or  only  four  or 
three  million  who  were  killed  — 
then  Hitler  still  lives.  When  there 
are  those  who  say  that  Hitler's 
murder  of  the  Jews  was  'a  big 
mistake,'  thus  reducing  the  murder 
of  six  million  to  the  status  of  a 
tactical  or  political  faux  pas— then 
too,  Hitler  still  lives." 


Egypt  continued  her  provocative 
policies  in  the  Suez  Canal  by  an- 
nouncing that  the  Egyptian  War 
Prize  Commission  had  upheld  the 
seizure  of  an  Israeli  cargo  bound 
for  Ceylon  aboard  the  Liberian 
ship  Kapitan  Manolis  at  Port  Said 
last  March. 


CONGRATULATIONS 
T  O 

DR.  RICHARD  FEINBERG 

Z7  and 

THE  T1TMUS  OPTICAL  COMPANY 

tKtjc  $rogres&-lnutx 

of  Petersburg,  Virginia 
"Southside  Virginia's  Daily  Newspaper" 


BEST  WISHES 

To  AH  Our  Many  Jewish  Patrons  and  Friends  For 
a  Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year. 

TITMUS  OPTICAL  (0.,  INC. 


TP 


Manufacturers  of  Ophthalmic  Instruments,  Lenses, 
Frames  and  Sun  Wear 

PETERSBURG,  VIRGINIA,  U.  S.  A. 


V      G  reetings 


City  Savings  & 
Loan  Corporation 

Operated  Under  the 
Stat*  Ranking  Department 

PETERSBURG,  VA. 


GOOD 

GAS  SERVICE 

•  MAKES 

•  WARM 

•  FRIENDS 

Petersburg-Hopewell 
Gas  Company 

PETERSBURG  rJHOPEWELL 
COLONIAL  'HEIGHTS  ~ 


Let  us  Be  Your  Stationers 


POWELL  -  COLE  STATIONERY  CO.,  Inc. 

11  North  Sycamore  Street  Phone  RE  3-6571 

PETERSBURG,  VIRGINIA 

"Everything  for  the  Office" 
Also  Artist  Supplies 


FURNITURE  —  ELECTRICAL  APPLIANCES  ...  See 

PETERSBURG  FURNITURE  C0.r  Inc. 

"OLD  RELIABLE" -Established  1887 
O.  L.  WINFIELD,  President  R.  P.  WINFIELD,  Sec.-Treas. 

100  North  Sycamore  St.,  Petersburg,  Virginia 


lOO 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Norfolk,  Va. 


Greetings 


BURROUGHS 
Drivedn  Restaurants 

4125  Granby  St.  Norfolk,  Va. 

OPENING  OCTOBER 

At  Southern  Shopping  Center 


(HAS.  SYER  &  COMPANY 

BROKERS 

DOMINO  SUGAR 


1215  E.  Water  St. 


Norfolk,  Virginia 


W.  D.  SAMS  and  CO.,  Inc. 

424  W.  21st  Street  Norfolk,  Va. 

PLUMBING  —  HEATING  —  AIR-CONDITIONING 
RESIDENTIAL  —  COMMERCIAL  —  INDUSTRIAL 


Greetings 


Edwards-Councilor  Co.,  Inc. 

Janitor's  Supplies 
121  Colley  Avenue  Norfolk,  Va. 


J\[ew  Tear  Greetings 


•    From  JACK  WHITE 
EZERA  STORM'S  SLEEP  PRODUCTS 

NORFOLK,  VA. 


Norfolk,  Va. 

MRS.  WILLIAM  SCHWARTZ,  Correspondent 


Louis  Mirvan,  chairman  of  the 
Community  Relations  Committee, 
and  Paul  G.  Caplan,  chairman  of 
the  "Qualify  and  Vote"  campaign, 
reported  a  successful  response  to 
the  Community  Relations  Commit- 
tee's interest  in  urging  that  each 
citizen  over  21  years  of  age  exer- 
cise his  voting  privilege.  "Perform- 
ing your  duty  at  the  polls  is  the  first 
requirement  of  a  responsible  citi- 
zen," Paul  Caplan  points  out.  "We 
are  not  interested  in  how  you  vote 
as  much  as  we  are  in  your  having 
visited  the  polls  on  election  day, 
and  planning  to  do  so  every  No- 
vember." In  order  to  bring  this 
responsibility  to  the  attention  of 
the  Jewish  community,  the  Com- 
munity Relations  Committee  di- 
rected a  clerical  effort  that  involv- 
ed compiling  lists  of  people  who 
were  thought  to  be  qualified  vot- 
ers. These  lists  were  turned  over 
to  members  of  a  telephone  squad 
who  reached  almost  every  name  on 
the  list  before  the  recent  July  14th 
election.  A  second  round  of  re- 
minder calls  was  made  on  election 
day,  and  several  people  who  were 
otherwise  unable  to  get  to  the 
polling  places  were  provided  with 
transportation.  "Between  July  14th 
and  November  3rd  we  will  try  to 
reach  every  person  who  has  not 
registered  and  advise  them  where 
they  should  go  and  what  to  do  in 
order  to  meet  this  requirement," 
announced  Louis  Mirman.  Further 
plans  are  being  made  on  a  long- 
term  basis  to  encourage  all  Jewish 
citizens  of  Norfolk  to  pay  their  poll 
taxes  and  register  if  they  have  not 
already  met  these  basic  require- 
ments. 

At  its  seventh  anniversary  party 
the  Golden  Age  Club  installed  the 
following  officers  for  the  coming 
year:  Mrs.  Frank  Banks,  president; 
Mr.  I.  Richels,  1st  vice-president; 
Mrs.  M.  B.  Kramer,  2nd  vice-presi- 
dent; Mrs.  Sam  Kantor,  3rd  vice- 
president;  Mrs.  Simon  Cohen,  treas- 
urer; Mrs.  Human  Kurkin,  record- 
ing secretary;  Mrs.  Morris  Kahn,  as- 
sistant treasurer;  Mrs.  A.  Berliner, 
assistant  recording  secretary;  Mr. 
Harry  Clark,  corresponding  secre- 


tary; Mrs.  Annie  Bernstein,  assist- 
ant corresponding  secretary;  Mrs. 
A.  Lissner,  chaplain,  and  Mrs.  Mor- 
ris Nelson,  assistant  chaplain. 

At  a  meeting  in  Wilkes-Barre, 
Pa.,  Miss  Sherry  Smith,  president 
of  the  J.  C.  C.-sponsored  Norfolk 
Jewish  Youth  Council,  was  elected 
vice-president  of  the  Jewish  Center 
Youth,  M.  A.  S.,  J.  W.  B.  This  is  a 
new  organization  for  Jewish  teen- 
agers with  the  sponsorship  of  Jew- 
ish Community  Centers  in  the  vari- 
ous cities  involved.  Norfolk  has 
been  elected  the  host  city  for  a 
conclave  of  this  new  teen-age  organ- 
ization in  September,  to  be  held  at 
the  Center  and  the  J.  C.  C.  recre- 
ation area. 

For  the  second  consecutive  year 
the  softball  team  of  Temple  Israel 
took  the  J.  C.  C.  championship  in  1 
the  "Slow  Pitch"  League.  They 
then  went  on  to  win  the  State  Jew- 
ish Softball  League  at  Richmond, 
a  first  for  Norfolk!  Under  the  lead- 
ership of  Harold  Burns,  they  had 
to  win  over  tough  competition 
from  B'nai  B'rith,  B'nai  Israel, 
UL.  P.  S.,  A.  Z.  A. 


Norfolk  Jewish 
War  Veterans 

FRED  W.  HANDEL 
Correspondent 

"Buy  a  watermelon  and  help 

send  a  child  to  camp"  was  the 
theme  for  the  posts  Summer  Fund 
watermelon  sale  drive  held  during 
the  early  part  of  August.  Through 
the  cooperation  of  Dave  Furman, 
a  post  member  and  owner  of  the 
Farm  Fresh  Supermarket  in  Nor- 
folk, space  was  obtained  in  his 
parking  area  for  a  large  flat  bod- 
ied truck  to  park  with  the  melons 
on  display.  A  two  day  sale  was 
held  during  which  time  the  local 
market  did  not  sell  any  water- 
melons of  their  own.  Profits  de- 
rived will  be  distributed  to  aid 
under  privileged  children  to  at- 
tend local  camps  during  the  sum- 
mer months.  Sid  Flum,  past  post 
commander  spearheaded  and  de- 
vised this  project  and  is  due  a  vote 
of  thanks  for  a  job  well  done. 

Commander  Nathan  Fouerstein 
reported  to  the  post  at  the  August 


€♦  Caltprt  Sc  &qu 

for  DECORATIVE  PAINTING 


Phone  MA  7-9279 


NORFOLK,  VA. 


808  W.  21st  St. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


101 


Rocky  Marciano,  retired  undefeated  heavyweight  boxing  champ,  strikes 
blow  for  great  humanitarian  cause  wi<fa  personal  contribution  to  Combined 
Jewish  Appeal  of  Boston.  Receiving  ring  great's  check  is  Joseph  M.  Linsey, 
chairman  of  Boston  campaign,  proceeds  of  which  go  aoward  national  1959 
twofold  drive  of  the  United  Jewish  Appeal.  UJA  is  currently  concentrating 
on  nationwide  $40,000,000  cash  drive  to  meet  immediate  needs  in  Israel  and 
elsewhere  overseas.  National  Cash  Conference  of  UJA  is  to  be  held  June 
20-21  in  New  York  City. 


BRACELETS 


Repousse  Bracelet   $4.00 

Plain  Bracelet   IL— $5.00 

Federal  Tax  Included 

Crafted  by  Kirk,  America's 
Oldest  Silversmiths,  these 
lovely  bracelets  are  of  sub- 
stantial weight  and  unusu- 
ally fine  finish.  Repousse  is 
the  original  Kirk  flower  and 
foliage  design.  The  plain  is 
ideally  suited  to  our  fine 
engraving.  Both  are  wonder- 
ful bridesmaid's  gifts. 

D.  P.  PAUL  CO. 

NORFOLK,  VA. 
DOWNTOWN 
231  Granby  St.       MA  2-4623 

WARDS  CORNER 
West  of  Granby  Street 
JU  7-7315 


meeting  on  the  activities  at  the 
National  Jewish  War  Veterans 
Convention  held  at  New  York 
City,  August  2nd  thru  the  9th. 

Helen  Levine,  auxiliary  Presi- 
dent also  gave  a  report  on  the 
happenings  at  the  Ladies  Auxil- 
iary National  Convention  which 
was  held  during  the  same  period. 
Norfolk  was  well  represented  at 
this  Convention  with  the  site  al- 
lowing more  people  from  this  area 
to  attend. 

The  ladies  are  now  busy  with 
their  annual  ad  book  which  is 
published  in  conjunction  with  the 
Veteran's  Day  dance  held  by  the 
post  in  November. 

Miss  Linda  Levinson,  daughter 
of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Sidney  Levinson, 
Norfolk,  was  sponsored  by  our 
ladies  as  one  of  the  thirty-three 
girls  from  eleven  high  schools  to 
be  sent  to  Radford  Woman's  Col- 
lege, Radford  Virginia  to  attend 
the  American  Legion  sponsored 
Girl's  State. 

Miss  Levinson  received  the  hon- 
or of  being  elected  State  Police 
Captain  from  Virginia.  Basis  for 
her  selection  to  attend  Girl's  State 
was  her  character  and  potential 
leadership  abilities. 


Don't  Forget! 
Buy  an  Israel  Bond! 


The 


Co.,  Inc. 


113  Brook*  Avenue  k  Norfolk,  Virginia 

COMMERCIAL  STATIONERS  OFFICE  FURNITURE 
FILING  EQUIPMENT  VISIBLE  RECORDS 

"Serefeg  Tidewater  Virginia  and  Norik  Carolina  Since  190V* 


ROYAL  SILVER  MFG.  CO.,  INC. 

REPLATING  SILVER,  GOLD,  NICKEL  and  CHROME 
QUALITY  PLATING  SINCE  1907 

NEW  LOCATION 

3135  Arizona  Avenue  —  Just  off  Chesapeake  Blvd. 
Fairmont  Park  NORFOLK,  VA.  Phone  LO  3-0262 


NEW  YEAR 
GREETINGS 

GROVES 

Self  Service  Markets 

Quality,  Only  the  Finest 

%  1517  Colley  Avenue 
#    4108  Hampton  Blvd. 

NORFOLK,  VIRGINIA 


4yU 


GREETINGS 

Overmeyer  &  Ennis 

MONUMENTS 

Forty  Years'  Experience 

MA  7-1822 
950  West  21st  Street 
Norfolk,  Va. 


1959 


5720 


NEW  YEAR 
GREETINGS 


from 


VIRGINIA  PILOT 
ASSOCIATION 

NORFOLK,  VIRGINIA  411  J  £ 

G.  ALVrN  MASSENBURG 

President 


102 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Charlottesville,  Va. 


Let  the  Banks  of  Charlottesville  Serve  You 

#  THE  CITIZENS  BANK  &  TRUST  CO. 

#  NATIONAL  BANK  &  TRUST  CO. 
A  THE  PEOPLE'S  NATIONAL  BANK 


CLARKE  D.  MANN,  Manager 
Invites  Your  Reservations 


100%  Air-Conditioned 

MONTICELLO  HOTEL 

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advanced  thought 
century  civilization,  then  why  dis- 
miss as  impractical  the  application 
of  the  divine  principles  in  the 
Written  and  Oral  Law  to  twentieth 
century  problems? 

In  order  to  implement  this  ap- 
proach to  the  development  of  the 
State  of  Israel,  Rabbi  Herzog  dedi- 
cated his  own  scholarly  gifts  to  the 
study  of  halacha  for  the  purposes 
of  guiding  the  infant  State  on  its 
destined  course,  and  he  gathered 
about  him  a  large  group  of  Tal- 
mudic  experts  to  grapple  with  the 
specific  issues  that  mushroomed  in 
every  city,  kibbutz  and  moshav. 
Admittedly,  not  every  problem 
could  be  solved  on  a  moment's 
notice,  and  many  impatiently  re- 
belled against  the  inevitable  delays, 
but  the  big  achievement  of  Rabbi 
Herzog  that  will  be  written  in 
golden  letters  into  the  story  of  the 
State,  was  his  determination  not 
to  avoid  the  burden  of  finding 
decisions,  but  rather  to  search  for 
them.  We  might  say  he  was  a  real- 
ist in  halachic  idealism.  Obviously, 
tact  had  to  be  joined  by  knowl- 
edge in  embarking  upon  so  vital 
an  intellectual  adventure,  and  no 
less  clearly,  the  demands  upon  the 
health  of  the  chief  rabbi  to  keep 
the  program  moving  forward  were 
extremely  exacting.  One  recalls 
Rabbi  Elazer  ben  Azaria  who  as- 
cended to  rabbinic  leadership  as 
a  youth  and  in  one  night  dis- 
covered his  black  beard  streaked 
with  gray. 

While  relentlessly  driving  ahead 
in  this  vast  effort,  Rabbi  Herzog 
busied  himself  with  a  thousand 
and  one  details  involved  in  his 
high  office:  assistance  to  dozens  of 
charitable  and  educational  institu- 
tions, administration  of  a  growing 
country-wide  system  of  rabbinic 
courts,  the  endless  round  of  recep- 
tions and  personal  interviews  (the 
hospitable  genius  of  his  noble  wife 


A  Sage  Has  Fallen 

(Continued  from  Page  40) 
of  twentieth  playing  here  a  wonderful  part,  the 
voluminous  correspondence  from 
every  portion  of  the  globe,  endless 
conferences  on  the  training  of  chil- 
dren (in  whose  merit,  one  can  be 
persuaded,  both  his  sons  became 
brilliant  servants  and  dedicated 
representatives  of  the  State,  and  his 
heroic  self-sacrificing  efforts  to 
rescue  the  victims  of  Hitlerism. 


In  this  brief  tribute  we  cannot 
even  touch  upon  all  the  aspects 
of  the  philosophy  that  supported 
the  manifold  expressions  of  his 
creative  compulsion.  Two  of  them, 
perhaps,  cany  to  us  a  special  mes- 
sage and  thus  help  kindle  an  im- 
mortal candle  to  the  sacred  mem- 
ory of  the  fallen  chief  rabbi. 

He  was  thoroughly  familiar  with 
the  doctrine  of  separation  of 
church  and  state.  In  his  days  the 
spiritual  leader  of  the  Jewish  com- 
munity in  Dublin,  Ireland,  he  rec- 
ognized instinctively,  following  his 
experiences  as  a  lad  with  the  tyr- 
anny of  czarism,  that  democracy 
requires  such  a  separation.  Then, 
how  did  he  justify  the  arrange- 
ment in  Israel  that  accorded  to 
the  rabbinate  politically  acknowl- 
edged status?  Rabbi  Herzog  built 
unique  characteristics  of  the  Jew- 
ish State.  Its  Biblical  background, 
its  origins  in  centuries  or  martyred 
history,  its  fulfillment  of  a  proph- 
ecy unlike  that  of  any  other  na- 
tion—all the  rules  that  could  and 
should  be  adopted  by  a  govern- 
ment for  the  protection  of  con- 
science do  not  apply  in  this  one 
and  only,  this  singular,  this  un- 
paralleled instance.  The  aim  of 
this  State  is  the  embodiment  of 
Torah  precepts,  the  concrete  mani- 
festation of  halachic  conscience. 
Its  government  shall  be  complete- 
ly tolerant  towards  all  creeds,  and 
the  rabbi  was  on  most  cordial 
terms  with  the  various  church  cler- 
gy leaders,  but  it  bears  the  sacred 
obligation  of  establishing  the  opti- 


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I 


mum  conditions  for  positive  and 
total  Jewish  religions  living.  To 
the  private  citizens  there  remains 
the  uninhibited  freedom  to  observe 
or  disregard  what  he  chooses  in 
the  ritual,  but  the  public  life  of 
Israel  ought  to  j)roclaim  tiie  ideals 
of  the  Hebrew  tradition;  the  pat- 
terns of  the  Torah  formulae  should 
be  worked  into  the  fabric  of  the 
Jewish  society.  Throughout  the 
speeches  and  writings  of  the  chief 
rabbi  this  theme  recurs. 

For  the  second  instructive  as- 
pect of  his  viewpoint  we  dwell 
upon  the  difference  between  his 
interpretation  and  that  of  certain 
other  rabbis,  of  the  place  that 
building  Zion  holds  in  the  Jewish 
religion.  Rabbi  Herzog  believed  as 
fervently  as  any  Jew  ever  did  in 
the  ultimate  arrival  of  the  Messiah. 
His  piety  was  as  strong  and  as  pure 
as  that  of  the  saints  of  the  ages. 
But  he  did  not  think  that  to  seize 
upon  every  opportunity  to  advance 
the  dignity  of  the  Jewish  people, 
to  weave  the  bonds  of  cooperation 
and  service  between  segments  of 
Jewry  brought  together  upon  an- 
cestral ground,  to  shape  a  govern* 
ment  to  the  high  point  where  ii 
could  take  its  proud  seat  among 
its  sister  nations  of  the  continents— 
to  do  these  things  he  did  think  to 
be  an  affront  to  the  Almighty  or 
a  dethronement  of  the  Davidic 
dynasty.  Yes,  in  his  heart  there 
was  a  song  of  gratitude  to  the  Cre- 
ator that  his  people,  stricken  down 
in  the  millions  before  his  kindly 
eyes,  could  raise  from  the  crema- 
toria in  moral  might  and  spiritual 
stature  to  present  to  civilization  an 
honored,  dynamic,  progressive  dem- 
ocratic State.  That  miraculous 
truth  could  only  be  the  result  of 
divine  approval,  not  heavenly 
wrath.  As  of  old,  the  God  of  the 
fathers  was  showing "  His  wonders 
on  the  soil  of  the  fathers,  "and  no 
amount  of  displeasure  with  the 
personal  irreligiosity  of  this  or  'that 
spokesman  in  the  process  of  the 
national  rebirth  could  diminish 
the  overwhelming,  transcendent 
spirituality  of  that  event. 

When  Rabbi  Herzog  visited  us 
at  the  Hebrew  Theological  College 
in  Chicago  in  1949,  he  told  us  that 
the  history  of  Israel  had"  taught 


I 


The  Late  Isaac  Halevy  Herzog 

him  the  meaning  of  the  difficult 
phrase  in  the  Hoshanna  prayers  of 
Succoth,  "Hoshanna  Shalosh  Sha- 
oth"—  grant  us  the  three  hours  of 
salvation.  A  vast  audience  was 
moved  to  tears  when  he  described 
the  day  in  Jerusalem  where  the 
Arab  legion  had  the  Israeli  forces 
completely  at  their  mercy,  for  the 
latter  had  exhausted  all  ammuni- 
tion and  supplies.  The  command- 
ing officer  of  the  defense,  not  a 
religious  man  by  and  of  the  usual 
connotations,  sent  a  message  to  the 
chief  rabbi  to  recite  prayers  in  ev- 
ery synagogue.  Rabbi  Herzog  re- 
ported to  us  who  listened  that  per- 
haps never  before  in  recent  centu- 
ries were  the  Psalms  recited  with  so 
much  fervor  in  so  many  places  of 
worship.  For  three  hours  did  the 
minstrel  king  furnish  the  sentences 
to  the  impassioned  lips  crying  out 
to  heaven.  And  for  three  hours  the 
Arabs  hesitated  to  advance,  for  no 
explicable  military  reasons.  Then 
the  reinforcements  arrived,  the  sup- 
plies came  through,  and  Jerusalem 
was  saved. 

.  Thus  spoke  the  man  of  Torah, 
the  man  of  faith,  the  man  of  cour- 
age, the  man  of  love  for  his  people. 

And  thus  shall  forever  live  the 
man  of  Torah,  the  man  of  faith, 
the  man  of  courage,  the  man  of 
love  for  his  people. 


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In  the  Heart  of  the  Business  Section 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 

Jennie  Grossinger 


(Concluded 

will  tell  you,  '"that  Emerson  was 
right  when  he  said:  'The  only 
way  to  have  a  friend  is  to  be  one.'" 
The  full  application  of  that  motto 
is  one  of  the  maiin  reasons  for  the 
success  of  Jennie  Grossinger  and 
the  Grossinger  Country  Club. 

Asked  by  a  newspaperman  i! 
she  could  explain  her  success, 
Mrs.  Grossinger  replied:  "My 
heart  is  my  compass.  We  have  al- 


from  Page  93) 

ways  used  our  heart  and  not  our 
head  in  dealing  with  people.  We 
feel  that  our  guests  and  our  staff 
are  friends  and  we  treat  them  as 
such." 

All  in  all,  Jennie  Grossinger  is 
a  rather  remarkable  person.  Da- 
mon Runyon  summed  it  up  neat- 
ly when  he  wrote:  "Jennie  Gross- 
inger is  one  of  the  fabulous  wo- 
men of  this  country." 


A  Time  Of  War 

(Concluded  from  Page  42) 

Polish  lullabies  remembered  from  when  to  stop, 
childhood,  the  Yiddish  songs  of 
every  country.  He  sang  in  Hebrew, 
from  the  liturgy,  in  Yiddish,  and 
in  English  —  but  to  his  surprise, 
there  were  almost  no  requests  for 
the  latter,  even  from  the  gentiles 
in  the  tunnel.  Though  they  under- 
stood few  words  of  the  Yiddish 
and  Hebrew  songs,  the  sound  of 
prayer,  of  faith  in  the  future,  of 
hope  pouring  out  of  sorrow  needed 
no  translation;  they  understood  — 
and  learned  the  songs  well  enough 
to  ask  for  favorites  again  and  again. 
While  the  Cantor  sang,  full-voiced 
now,  the  sick,  fearful  silence  van- 
ished from  the  tunnel.  When  a 
bomb  fell  close  by,  the  Cantor  sang 
louder.  When  the  tunnel  quivered, 
people  laughed  aloud  and  joined 
him  on  the  refrains,  shouting  them 
above  the  roar.  When  once  he 
broke  off  in  the  middle  of  a  song 
to  help  a  young  woman  give  birth 
to  a  baby,  the  people  around  him 
rushed  to  give  aid  —  and,  when  it 
was  over,  asked  him  to  sing  again. 
He  did.  British  newspapermen, 
descending  into  the  tunnel  to  hear 
him  and  report,  asked  when  he 
slept.  The  Cantor  answered  blankly 
that  he  didn't  know.  He  didn't  need 
to  know.  He  was  born  not  to  sleep, 
but  to  sing. 

Nineteen-forty  wore  on,  and  the 
Germans  now  flew  over  London  by 
day  as  well  as  night.  Just  before 
Yom  Kippur,  the  chief-rabbi,  Dr. 
Joseph  Herz,  called  the  Cantor 
aside.  "The  Yom  Kippur  service 
must  be  short,  Reverend.  Daven 
only  three-quarters  of  an  hour.  The 
officiating  Rabbi  will  signal  you 


Then  go  to  the 
shelter;  it  is  not  safe  for  the  con- 
gregation to  stay  longer."  Goldstein 
nodded  agreement.  But  on  his  way 
to  the  bima,  a  delegation  from  the 
congregation  stopped  him.  "Cantor 
—don't  cut  the  service  short.  Do 
it  as  you  do  it  every  year.  Anyone 
who  wants  to  leave  can  leave." 
Cantor  Goldstein  murmured,  "But 
the  Rabbi  has  said  .  .  ."A  member 
of  the  congregation  leaned  forward. 
"Don't  look  at  the  rabbi,"  he  sug- 
gested. "Sing." 

The  service  began.  The  Great 
Synagogue  holds  seats  for  1300  — 
but  that  day,  praying  for  them- 
selves and  their  country,  and  for 
all  the  Jews  of  Europe,  2500  En- 
glish Jews  packed  it  full.  When 
an  hour  had  gone  by,  the  warning 
siren  wailed  Take  Cover.  The 
Cantor's  eyes  searched  the  temple. 
No  one  moved.  He  dropped  his 
eyes  before  they  met  the  Rabbi's 
and  went  on  singing. 

The  drone  of  the  bombers  filled 
the  air.  The  anti-aircraft  batteries 
began  to  fire.  The  thud  of  bomb 
hits  began,  like  a  giant  walking  the 
earth.  As  the  Cantor  reached  Un- 
sane  Tokef,  a  land  mine  crashed 
into  Tottenham,  a  thousand  yards 
away.  A  window  shattered  behind 
the  choir  upstairs.  The  Cantor 
broke  off  the  prayer  and  looked 
toward  the  Rabbi,  but  an  emergen- 
cy had  called  him  from  the  syna- 
gogue. The  Cantor  spread  out  his 
arms  and  shouted  above  the  screams 
and  sirens  that  filtered  in  the  ruin- 
ed windown,  "The  service  is  overt 
Go  to  the  shelter!"  A  man  stood 
up.  "Please  continue  the  service, 


JOHN  W.  TALIAFERRO 

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IULLERY  nf  ilLlWI 


SERGEANT 

Meyer  Levin 

on  the  first  pay  jf  worlt  war 
h,  as  bombardier  in  the  plane 
pilotei  by  :aptain  :olin  kell/, 

lEVIN  .AUNCHEl  rHEWS  WHICH 
BLASB  THE  -JAPANESE  BATTLESHIP 
HARUNA  OFF  THF  PHILIPPINES. 
iATEk,AT  the  ?attle  jfthe  joral 

SFA,l|E  .AUTO  (HE  BOMBS  TROM 
THE  FLYING  FORTRESS  1HIEE 
SEATTLE,I/VHICH  SANK  A  15,000  TON 
xJAV  TRANSPORT  IN  JANUARY  1943, 
AFTER  MORE  THAI\J  SIXT>  20VIBAT 
MISSIONS  HE  PIFF  IN  AN  MTIOfi 
OVER  NEW  QUINEA.HE  WAS  AWARPEP 

THEPlSTINGUISHEt  FLYING  X, 
SILVER  STAR  X  OAK  LEAF  2LUSTER.& 
WAS  P0STHL1M0QSLV  AWARPEP  THE 
PURPLE  HEART, 4$  WELL  AS  A 
CERTIFICATE  OF  MERIT  SIGNEP 
BY  GENERAL  H.H.  ARNOLP. 


COURTESY  OF 
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JSTati  onal  Shrine 

For.  th£ 

xlewish  War  Dead 

WASHING-TON,  D.C, 


Cantor.  While  you  sing,  nothing 
will  happen  to  us!"  And  again, 
no  one  moved. 

Cantor  Goldstein  sang.  He  sang 
till  he  reached  the  Avodah  and 
then,  a  quarter  hour  into  the  ser- 
vice, exhaustion,  hunger  and  con- 
cern for  the  safety  of  his  congrega- 
tion proved  too  much,  and  he  faint- 
ed. A  doctor  ordered  the  congrega- 
tion out  and  had  Cantor  Goldstein 
carried  to  the  shelter  on  a  stretcher. 
Hours  later,  shaky  but  on  his  feet, 
Goldstein    led    the  congregation 


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back  to  the  synagogue  for  N'ilah. 
He  knew  now  that  whatever  he 
had  given  of  courage  and  faith  in 
those  dark  nights  in  the  Manor 
House  Tunnel,  had  been  returned 
in  full  measure  on  that  Yom  Kip- 
pur  day  of  bravery  and  prayer. 

A  time  of  war  breeds  many  her- 
roes.  Cantor  Goldstein  would  deny 
being  one  of  them.  "I  was  in  no 
greater  danger  than  anyone  else. 
And  it  was  easier  for  me.  Whatever 
happened,  I  could  sing."  He  could 
and  he  did.  Jakob  Goldstein  has 
sung  in  the  synagogues  and  concert 
halls  of  Paris,  London,  Poland,  Is- 
rael, South  America  and  the  United 
States;  he  has  sung  the  great  art 
songs  and  religious  music  of  his 
people  in  many  languages  and  to 
many  ears.  But  the  greatest  con- 
certs he  ever  gave,  the  ones  for 
which  he  will  be  longest  remember- 
ed and  most  beloved,  were  those 
that-  were  accompanied  by  the 
sounds  of  terror  in  the  tunnels  of 
war-time  England. 

Now  Cantor  Goldstein  serves  as 
Hazzan  of  the  Sons  of  Israel  Con- 
gregation in  Brooklyn,  New  York; 
having  made  the  U.  S.  his  new 
home  since  1951,  and  his  son,  Is- 
rael, going  in  the  cantorial  path 
of  his  father,  was  graduated  as 
cantor  this  year  from  the  Hebrew 
Union  School  for  Sacred  Music. 


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On  This  Rosh  Hashana 

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Zalman 

(Continued 

The  period  1908-1914  was  for 
Schneour  rich  in  wanderings  and 
impressions  and  blessed  in  creativ- 
ity. Some  of  his  best  poems  were 
written  during  this  period.  World 
War  I  found  him  in  Germany, 
where  he  was  detained  as  an  enemy 
alien,  and  only  in  1918  did  he  suc- 
ceed in  reaching  the  United  States. 
After  the  war  he  returned  to  Eur- 
ope and  settled  in  Berlin,  where 
he  established  the  publishing  house 
"Hasefer,"  together  with  Mr.  S. 
Salzman.  Here  he  published  his 
book  of  poems  "Bridges"  (1922), 
his  poem  "Vilno"  (1923),  his  book 
of  short  stories  "Bemetzar"  (1923) 
and  another  book  of  poems  "Hezio- 
not"   (Visions)  (1924). 

In  1923  he  settled  in  Paris,  where 
he  stayed  until  World  War  II.  In  his 
autobiographical  notes  Schneour 
writes  with  disappointment  that 
he  visited  Eretz  Israel  in  1925 
and  "looked  for  some  material 
anchor  either  in  the  literary  field 
or  in  some  other  profession,  and 
had  to  leave  the  country  with  a 
heavy  heart."  He  then  goes  on  to 
describe  the  period  of  his  participa- 
tion in  the  Yiddish  daily  Forward 
of  New  York  for  twenty-two  years. 
There  is  no  doubt  that  the  fact 
of  his  participation  in  this  daily 
contributed  in  no  small  degree  to 
the  growth  of  his  prose  work  in 
Yiddish  which  number  forty  vol- 
umes. 

Durng  the  Nazi  occupation 
period  of  Paris,  Schneour's  family 
went  through  many  bitter  moments. 
For  one-and-a-half  years  they  had 
to  hide  in  basements  until  they 
succeeded  in  escaping  to  Spain  and 
from  there  to  the  U.  S.  A.  He  ar- 
rived penniless  in  the  States,  but 
very  soon  he  settled  down  and 
established  a  fine  home,  as  in  Paris. 
Yet,  he  did  not  give  up  his  idea 


Schneour 

from  Page  23) 

of  settling  in  Israel,  and  succeeding 
in  realizing  this  dream  nine  years 
ago  when  he  became  a  citizen  of 
Ramat  Gan.  After  that  he  con- 
sidered himself  a  guest  whenever 
he  visited  the  United  States. 

Scheour  wrote  more  than  sixty 
volumes  of  poetry  and  prose  in 
Hebrew  and  in  Yiddish.  He  became 
famous  both  as  a  Hebrew  poet  and 
Yiddish  novelist.  Most  of  his  Yid- 
dish novels  he  reworked  into 
Hebrew  and  published  in  Israel 
during  the  last  ten  years.  With- 
out any  intention  of  detracting 
from  the  importance  of  his  novels 
or  from  his  talents  we  must  state 
here  that  his  real  greatness  was 
in  the  field  of  poetry,  and  that  his 
talent  as  a  poet  found  its  expres- 
sion almost  exclusively  in  a 
mighty  and  unique  form,  in  the 
Hebrew  language. 

We  will  not  analyse  here  all  the 
reasons  nor  count  all  the  causative 
factors,  but  we  will  mention  a  few 
circumstances  which  brought  this 
about.  It  is  in  the  nature  of  poetry, 
even  stormy  and  tempestuous 
poetry,  even  poetry  of  epic  propor- 
tions that  its  main  force  is  a 
concentrated  one  and  its  words 
are  the  quintessence  of  feeling  and 
thought,  both  in  the  short  and 
polished  verse  and  the  measured 
and  weighted  poem. 

Not  so  in  prose,  where  the  main 
role  is  given  to  the  broad  canvas, 
to  the  multicolored  landscape  and 
the  exhaustive  description. 

Schneour,  in  whose  soul  two 
lived,  not  without  permanent 
struggle,  a  poet  and  a  novelist, 
found  the  right  channel  for  his 
poetic  talent,  for  his  talent  as  a 
poet  in  Hebrew,  and  for  his  talent 
as  a  story-teller  in  Yiddish.  True 
in  his  later  years  he  made  consider- 
able   efforts    to    rework  several 


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107 


Yiddish  novels,  including  "Noah 
Pandre"  and  his  historical  novels 
like  "The  Emperor  and  the  Rabbi" 
into  Hebrew  and  they  were  quite 
a  success  in  Israel.  On  the  other 
hand,  he  wrote  Yiddish  poems,  as 
he  had  written  Hebrew  poems  in 
his  youth,  and  from  time  to  time 
he  demonstrated  his  bilinguality  on 
this  score.  And  yet  Schneour  re- 
mained in  the  main,  in  its  essence, 
la  Hebrew  poet  and  a  Yiddish  story- 
teller with  all  the  consequences  of 
such  a  double  track  creativity. 

And,  again,  we  do  not  intend 
to  analyze  the  reasons  for  it.  We 
will  only  state  certain  conclusions; 
Schneour  has  played  a  nonforget 
table  role  in  Hebrew  renaissance 
poetry.  He  is  one  of  the  very  great 
and  has  fulfilled  a  historic  mis- 
sion in  this  field.  Schneour,  the 
prose  writer,  is  a  story-teller  a 
la  Balzac;  colorful,  humoristic,  with 
a  humor  bordering  on  sarcasm  and 
satire,  and  psychologically  acute 
and  observing,  but  his  prose  cannot 
compare  with  his  poetic  stature. 
I  And  some  of  his  novels,  like  "The 
'Emperor  and  the  Rabbi",  did  not 
reach  the  innermost  soul  and  the 
'most  important  spiritual  qualities 
of  their  heroes,  although  even  in 
these  novels  Schneour  charms  the 
Header  with  all  the  colors  of  his 
palete  and  with  his  strong  descrip- 
tive ability.  Let's  state,  frankly,  that 
Schneour  is  one  of  the  lions  of 
:  modern  Hebrew  poetry,  but  he  is 
jnot  the  king  of  Yiddish  prose  and 
[surely  not  the  monarch  of  Hebrew 
'prose. 

Another  peculiarity  of  his  prose 
lis  that  his  first  stories,  written  in 
Hebrew  and  published  two  years 
'after  his  first  poems  in  1910,  do  not 
■  reveal  the  same  ripe  talent  as  is 
manifested  in  his  first  poems.  There 
His.  a  certain  limitation,  a  style  rem- 
■  iniscent  of  the  dark,  pessimistic  and 
b  ather  awkward  story-telling  of  that 
[time  without  the  broad  scope  and 
the  lively  style  and  the  full  colors 
of  his  later-day  novels.  Only  in  his 
middle  years  did  Schneour  begin  to 
write  his  ripe  prose  and  won  fame 
with  his  Shklov  novels.  But  this 
happened  much  later,  after  he  had 
reached  his  apogee  as  a  poet. 

Another  peculiarity  characteristic 
of  Schneour's  prose  is  that  it  is 
mostly  a  monument  to  the  past,  de^ 


scribing  Jewish  life  in  the  Pale, 
at  the  turn  of  the  century,  or  early 
in  the  19th  century,  not  with  an 
intent  to  glorify  it,  or  to  sing  the 
praise  of  the  shtetl,  but  to  describe 
it  realistically  with  a  realism 
bordering  on  naturalism,  and  at 
the  same  time  with  a  forcefulness 
and  liveliness  that  gave  it  symbolic 
significance.  He  is  in  love  with  the 
masses,  with  his,  now  almost  classi- 
cal type  of  Noah  Pandre.  On  one 
hand,  and  with  the  great  spiritual 
personalites  like  the  Vilno  Gaon  on 
the  other.  Yet.  at  the  same  time  he 
sees  the  weaknesses  of  the  shtetl 
and  is  not  loathe  to  describe  them. 
On  the  other  hand,  his  poetry  is 
in  the  main,  poetry  of  the  future 
or  of  the  legendary  past. 

His  role  in  Hebrew  poetry  can 
hardly  be  described  in  one  short 
essay.  He  began  as  a  revolutionary 
and  a  hedonist,  a  follower  of 
Nietzsche,  and  as  a  man  who  de- 
spised the  shackles  of  tradition  and 
conventions.  His  poems  were  full 
of  metaphysical  struggles  and 
doubts  manifestly  groppng  for  a 
goal  and  content  in  life.  Nature 
and  landscape  were  not  of  great 
interest  to  him;  he  devoted  his 
main  attention  to  the  fate  of  man, 
of  nation  and  universe.  He  de- 
scribed in  rather  sharp  terms  the 
eternal  man-woman  struggle  in  the 
spirit  of  Otto  Weininger's  theory. 
He  was  the  poet  of  the  city,  but 
he  was  no  stranger  to  nature.  What- 
ever he  had  to  say  he  said  with 
force,  with  vision  and  beauty  in 
masterly  verse  and  multicolored  and 
shining  language,  original  and 
mighty,  full  of  pathos  but  at  the 
same  time  without  the  slightest 
banality.  This  is  the  reason  why 
each  volume  of  his  poems  and  some- 


lutFcHTurnitttFe 


IMMM  nitw- 
it **4  MfkH  t»  am 

lutiMln  ♦»  tow*  t»*i. 
I  ti*f  C«t«*t. 


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times  a  single  poem  was  an  event 
in  Hebrew  literature  in  the  renais- 
sance epoch.  His  eroticism  had  a 
purely  physical  character.  In  this 
respect  he  did  not  change  from 
the  time  his  poem  "Pragim" 
(Poppy-Seed  Flowers),  the  poem 
which  may  be  termed  as  a  hymn 
of  passions,  appeared  and  until  he 
wrote  "Luchoth  Genuzim,"  one  of 
his  later  poetic  works  which  ap- 
peared first  in  the  United  States, 
and  was  supposed  to  serve  as  a 
mouthpiece  for  all  the  hedonistic 
elements  in  ancient  times,  for  all 
the  false  prophets  whose  words 
were  not  preserved  after  the 
biblical  traditionalists  won  a  vic- 
tory over  them.  But  his  over- 
emphasis of  eroticism,  as  his  Nietz- 
scheism,  mellowed  as  time  went  on. 
and  so  changed  his  almost  hateful 
attitude  towards  woman  in  the 
sense  of  enmity  of  the  sexes.  It  was 
none  other  than  Schneour  who  ex- 
claimed in  the  end,  "Woman  is  the 
golden  window  to  eternity  and  in- 
finity, and  in  this  is  her  great- 
ness." 

Attempts  have  been  made  to  pig- 
eonhole Schneour  as  a  neo-romanti- 
cist,  an  expressionist,  a  Schopen- 
hauer pupil  and  a  Nietzsche-fol- 
lower. He  was  each  of  these  things 
to  a  degree  in  certain  periods  of 
his  creativity  but,  in  the  main,  he 
was  himself,  Zalman  Schneour,  a 
poetic  personality,  full  of  contra- 
dictions and  pain,  proud  and  sar- 
castic and  at  the  same  time  soft  and 
lyrical,  lonely  and  bitter,  mild  and 
dreamy,  egocentrical,  yet  a  good 
comrade.  For  Schneour  could  be  a 
devoted  friend,  and  could  be  objec- 
tive if  it  was  a  matter  with  which 
he  was  not  concerned  directly,  in  a 
literary  or  personal  way.  Regret- 
tably, there  were  all  too  many 
things  with  which  he  was  concerned 
in  a  literary  and  personal  way,  and 
then  he  could  become  stormy  and 
cantankerous.  But  let  it  be  said  that 
even  in  his  moments  of  ire  he  never 
stepped  over  the  boundary  of  the 
threatening  posture.  His  bitter  at- 
tacks and  personal  emnities  will  be 
forgotten.  His  great  work  will  re- 
main. 


His  fame  as  a  national  poet  was 
won  very  early  in  life  with  his  'Tin  I 
Tslilei  Hamandolina"  (Listening 
to  the  Strains  of  a  Mandolin)  where 
he  was  one  of  the  first  to  develop 
in  Chapter  II  ("Neginot  Israel") 
the  theme  of  bitter  enmity  to  the 
people  of  Israel  on  the  part  of  the 
external  world,  based  largely  on 
biological  hedonism.  To  these  very 
days,  said  Schneour,  vengeance  is 
taken  on  the  Jewish  people  for  the 
victory  of  monotheism  over  the  old 
idols  .  .  .  They  cannot  forgive  it. 
The  solution  is  the  renaissance  ol 
the  Jewish  people  in  the  land  of 
their  fathers. 

Schneour  was  also  one  of  the 
first,  if  not  the  very  first,  who  fore- 
saw in  the  prophetic  spirit  of  a 
great  poet,  the  black  clouds  of  bar- 
barism which  began  to  threaten 
European  Jewry,  and  he  foresaw 
this  before  the  First  World  War. 
In  1913  he  wrote  a  poem  called 
"Y'mei  Habeinaim  Mitkarvim" 
(The  Days  of  the  Middle  Ages  are 
Approaching)  where  he  declared: 

The  Middle  Ages  are  approaching- 

'do  you  heed,  do  you  sense,  O' 

man  of  soul, 
The  stir  of  their  creeping  dust, 

their  distant  smell  of  sulphur? 
And  that  intangible  oppression  in 

the  air,  in  the  heart,  everywhere, 
As  if  at  an  oncoming  eclipse  - 

where  houses  turn  ashen-gray 

and  shaky, 
The  blue  sky— leaden;  the  cows  low 

restlessly  with  fear, 
And  grass  and  tree  assume  a  silvery 

hue,  the  tinge  of  cellar-damp, 
And  human  faces  freeze,  and  look 

strange  as  do  wax  masks? 

The  twenty-six-year-old  poet  felt 
that  the  dark  forces  of  reaction  and 
anti-semitism  are  threatening  de 
struction  for  the  Jewish  people, 
that  enlightenment  and  liberalism 
are  but  a  passing  dream  and  that 
the  Middle  Ages  are  sure  to  return 
as  night  follows  day.  He  foresaw 
the  beginning  of  the  European  hoi 
ocaust  in  times  of  deepest  quietude, 
buergerliche  Gemuetlichkeit,  and 
superficial  peace.  He  warns  the 
Jewish  people,  as  Bialik  warned 


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them  in  the  days  of  the  Nemirov 
'pogrom: 

Enough  dying  like  martyrs,  leaving 
the  world  to  the  unclean! 

;You  shall  die  the  death  of  all  cre- 
ators, who  consume  and  are  con- 

,    sumed  in  the  world 
For  the  sake  of  the  new  arising, 

i    with    innocence,    with  pristine 
mystery  in  their  eyes  .  .  . 
A  great  national  monument  is  his 

'poem  "Vilno."  It  was  written  in  a 
lyrical  tone  and  composed  in  a  pe- 
riod of  great  and  stormy  events. 
Schneour  tried  to  give  eternal  life 
in  his  poem  to  the  historical  Jewish 
monuments  in  the  town  of  Vilno, 
the  Jerusalem  of  Lithuania,  the 

[grave  of  the  Ger  Tsedek,  the  Polish 
nobleman,  Count  Potocky,  who 
embraced  the  Jewish  religion,  the 

printing  press  of  the  widow  Rom 

,and  other  symbols  of  Jewish  spirit- 
ual greatness.  He  gives  a  striking 

i  picture   of  the  invisible  struggle 

;  between  Ostra  Brama,  the  symbol 
of  the  ruling  Catholic  Church,  and 
the  center  of  Jewish  learning  and 
scholarship,  the  house  which 
spread  the  light  of  the  Book.  "Vil- 
no" is  a  great  lyrical  work  of  rare 
clarity  and  depth,  and  we  have  a 
feeling  that  the  poet's  eye  sees  from 
afar  the  destruction  of  "Lithuanian 
Jerusalem"  approaching  with  slow 
but  sure  steps  coming  some  thirty- 
odd  years  later. 

The  Russian  revolution  was  one 
'of  his  early  disappointments.  He 
|saw  in  it  an  awakening  of  danger- 
jous  and  negative  forces,  and  warned 
his  people  not  to  participate  in  this 


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"revolutionary  drinking  orgy"  of 
the  outside  world.  He  also  admon- 
ishes his  people  not  to  forgive  the 
pogrom  bands  of  the  Ukranians 
who  spilled  innocent  Jewish  blood 
because  "the  refuge  of  every  wicked 
man  is  —  forgiveness." 

In  Zion  he  saw  then,  as  in  later 
years,  the  real  solution  and  the  only 
answer  to  all  persecution  and  to  all 
evils  of  the  European  nations.  His 
hedonism  turns  more  and  more 
into  humanism  and  deep  love  for 
the  martyred  Jewish  people.  This 
makes  him  forget  his  earlier  the- 
ories of  supermen  and  titans.  It  is 
the  spirit  of  Israel  which  is 
destined  to  fight  and  conquer  idol- 
atry or,  as  he  stated  in  "The  Days 
of  the  Middle  Ages  are  Approach- 
ing:" 

Your  task  is  not  yet  fulfilled,  O 
eternal  people! 

The  play  has  not  yet  reached  its 
end. 

The  heavy  curtain  has  not  yet  been 
lowered;  millions  of  eyes  are  still 
uplifted 

To  you,  and  to  the  climax  of  the 
drama,  eyes  of  friend  and  foe 
alike. 

If  nations,  invidious,  whistle  in 
scoffing,  do  not  lose  heart; 

Remember,  their  uncircumcised 
hearts,  too,  secretly  look  forward 

To  the  end  of  the  sublime  perform- 
ance which,  for  thousands  ot 
years,  has  unfolded  before  them. 

Then  you  will  order  the  curtain  to 
come  down,  as  your  agitated  spir- 
it quiets; 

And  remain  alone  with  your  vic- 
tory, ere  the  whole  world 

(Please  Turn   to   Page  113) 


Prof.  I.  Rabi  of  Columbia  Uni- 
versity, world-renowned  nuclear  phy- 
sicist and  Nobel  Prize  winner,  will 
address  the  WJC  Plenary  Assembly 
in  Stockholm  this  August  on  "Inter- 
national Cooperation  in  the  Atomic 
Age." 


Mutually  Yours 


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Martinsville,  Virginia 


Rives  S.  Brown,  Sr. 
Rives  S.  Brown,  Jr. 
Ralph  E.  Westervelt 


W.  T.  TURNER,  Inc. 

GENERAL  INSURANCE 

Phone  ME  2-3427 

•  W.  T.  Turner 

•  Willis  C.  Milton 

•  Mildred  H.  Kidd 

•  Hilda  Barbour 

•  Frances  Lawrence 
•  Harold  Martin 

205  E.  Main  St. 
MARTINSVILLE,  VA. 


TOM  BURCH 

T.  J.  BURCH  &  CO. 

General  Insurance 
Real  Estate 

MARTINSVILLE,  VA. 


G.  T.  White  •  N.  R.  Burroughs 

Burroughs  -  White 
Chevrolet  Corp. 


MARTINSVILLE,  VA. 


•  NEW  YEAR 

•  GREETINGS 

Southwestern 
Virginia  Gas  Co. 

MARTINSVILLE,  VA. 


1  io 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a  Happy  and 
Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Martinsville-South  Boston,  Va. 


G  reetings 


MORRIS 


NOVELTY 

FURNITURE 

CORPORATION 


MARTINSVILLE,  VA. 
•     Manufacturers  of  Novelty  Furniture 


MARTINSVILLE 

Novelty  Corporation 

Table  Manufacturers 

Since  1929 

MARTINSVILLE,  VIRGINIA 

New  York  Representative 

HOBEL  BROS. 
206  Lexington  Avenue 
Permanent  Exhibits 
New  York  Furniture  Exchange        American  Furniture  Mart 


New  York 
Southern  Furniture  Exposition  Building 


Chicago,  II. 
High  Point,  N.  C. 


Greetings 


South  Boston  Bank  and  Trust  Co. 

SOUTH  BOSTON,  VA. 

RESOURCES  OVER  $7,500,000 

Member  Federal  Deposit  Insurance  Corporation 
Member  Federal  Reserve  System 


A  Visit  With  Justice  Frankfurter 

(Concluded  from  Page  20) 


44m 

|jg|||f   onan  mid  raw 

r959    -     -     -  5720 

LEE  TELEPHONE  COMPANY 

MARTINSVILLE,  VA. 

"Through  Service  We  Grow" 

was  difficult  to  believe  that  the 
Justice  is  more  than  76  years  of 
age  and  that  he  has  recently  suf- 
fered a  heart  attack.  His  hair  is 
completely  white  but  his  eyes  are 
lively  and  sparkling  and  every  re- 
mark that  he  made  was  clear  and 
incisive. 

Justice  frankfurter  began  his 
response  by  modestly  disclaiming 
Mr.  Segal's  words  of  praise.  Never- 
theless, he  expressed  his  gratitude 
lor  the  recognition  extended  to  him 
by  the  Farband.  We  had  the  im- 
pression that  he  was  particularly 
pleased  that  a  major  Jewish  organ- 
ization took  note  of  his  services  to 
the  Jewish  people. 

Justice  Frankfurter  devoted  a  few 
moments  to  Mr.  Segal's  remark 
about  the  Justice's  integral  role 
as  a  Jew  and  an  American.  He 
was  particularly  gratified  by  this 
part  of  Mr.  Segal's  citation,  he 
stated,  and  by  the  emphasis  on 
his  role  in  the  Zionist  movement. 
Justice  Frankfurter  acknowledged 
that  he  had  debated  with  himself 
whether  or  not  he  should  accept 
th  Farband  Award  because  of  his 
"strong  feeling  that  a  judge  is  not 
to  be  rewarded  in  any  way  for  his 
judicial  labors." 

"I  interpret  your  Award,"  he 
said,  "not  as  recognition  of  my 
work  as  a  member  of  the  Supreme 
Court  but  as  a  response  to  the  total 
endeavor  of  my  life  and,  more  par- 
ticularly, for  that  share  of  it  which 
relates  to  my  participation  as  an 
American  Jew  to  bring  to  pass  what 
is  now  Israel  with  its  decade  of 
glorious  achievement.  That  is  the 
bond  between  Farband  and  me  and 
I  am  grateful  to  you  for  the  Award 
which  strengthens  this  fellowship." 

This  concluded  the  official  part 
of  the  ceremony.  The  delegation 
remained  a  while  longer  tor  an 
informal  talk.  Mr.  Segal,  who  had 
just  returned  from  Israel  where 
he  had  participated  in  the  meeting 
of  the  Zionist  Actions  Committee 
related  to  Justice  Frankfurter  sev- 
eral new  developments  in  the  Jew- 
ish State.  Justice  Frankfurter  asked 
about  the  newly  appointed  Israel 
Ambassador  to  Washington,  Abra- 
ham  Harmon,  and  about  a  number 
of  other  matters.  It  was  clear  that 
the  Justice  is  well  informed  about 
Israel  and  Jewish  life  in  general. 

The  time  spent  with  Justice 
Frankfurter  will  long  remain  in 


the  memories  of  all  the  participants. 
As  we  left  his  chambers,  we  all 
had  the  feeling  that  we  had  been 
in  the  presence  of  one  of  the  great- 
est figures  of  our  generation,  a 
deep  thinker  and  scholar  and  one 
who  had  made  a  great  contribution 
to  American  life  over  many  decades. 

The  Farband  Labor  Zionist 
Order  may  be  proud  of  its  decision 
to  present  its  Annual  Award  to 
Justice  Felix  Frankfurter.  We  can 
think  of  no  one  who  deserves  it 
more. 


The  American  Jewish  Commit- 
tee has  moved  its  national  head- 
quarters to  the  recently-completed i 
Institute  of  Human  Relations,  an1 
eight-story  structure  on  he  north- 
west corner  of  56th  Street  and  3rd1 
Avenue  in  New  York  City,  it  was 
announced  by  Committee  President 
Herbert  B.  Ehrmann  of  Boston. 


I 


Brigadier  General  Ezer  Weizmann 
Commander  of  the  Israel  Air  Force 
has  arrived  in  the  United  States  foi 
a  tour  of  major  cities  on  behalf  01 
the  Israel  Bond  campaign. 


BOSTON 

Drug  Co. 

A.  B.  Glover,  Jr.,  Pharmacist 

The  Store  of 
Personal  Service 

Phone  2-0555 
SOUTH  BOSTON,  VA. 


J 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


1 1  i 


Mrs.  Richard  M.  Nixor.  (center),  wife  of  the  Vice-President  of  the 
United  States,  is  shown  with  Mrs.  Abba  Eban,  wife  of  the  former  Israel 
Ambassador,  at  a  "bon  voyage"  luncheon  for  Mrs.  Eban  sponsored  by  t|ie 
Women's  Division  of  the  Washington,  D.  C.  Committee  for  State  of  Israel 
Bonds.  Chairman  of  the  luncheon  was  Mrs.  Joseph  Cherner  (right),  Na- 
tional Cviairman  of  the  Israel  Bond  Women's  Division.  Leaders  of  the 
Washington  Israel  Bond  drive  joined  the  wives  of  nine  ambassadors  in 
saying  "Shalom"  to  Mrs.  Eban,  who  is  returned  to  Israel  with  her  husband. 

"Nusach  Ari"  —  A  Strange  Ceremony 

(Concluded  from  Page  97) 


in  a  few  weeks,  in  time  to  hold 
Passover  services  in  its  new  ciuart- 
ers.  There  Ins  been  a  good  deal  of 
renovation,  remodeling  and  expan- 
sion since  those  days.  But  the  build- 
ling  is  the  same  where  Reverend 
Schluegel  had  served  his  God,  in 
litis  way,  forty  years. 

All  this  happened  in  the  spring 
bf  1914.  When,  late  the  following 
summer,     the     Kaiser  launched 
World  War  I,  Reverend  Schluegel 
suddenly   remembered  something 
ne  had  overlooked  for  forty  years. 
He  was  not  an  American  citizen. 
[He  was  an  "alien."  The  conflict 
between  his  love  for  his  German 
?atherland  and  his  love  for  Ameri- 
an,  the  West  and  humanity  was 
■loo  much  lor  the  man.  Soon,  he 
|  lied  in  his  sleep  one  night  of  a 
lean  attack.  Some  men,  like  my 


lather,  said  he  had  died  of  a  brok- 
en heart. 

1  wonder  how  many  more  years 
this  graveside  ceremony,  during 
the  Passover  season,  will  continue 
to  be  observed  by  the  members  of 
Nusach  Ari.  1  hope  that  the  child- 
ren and  the  grandchildren  of  my 
father  and  of  old  Mr.  Meierson 
never  forget. 


According  to  a  local  communist 
daily  printed  in  Paris,  Moscow 
publishing  houses  have  issued  more 
than  50  books  by  Soviet  Jewish 
writers  in  the  last  two  years.  The 
report  in  Neue  Presse  did  not 
mention  any  books  published  in 
Yiddish,  declaring  only  that  Jewish 
works  had  been  published  in  the 
Russian  language. 


College  Pharmacy 

INC. 

WILLIAMSBURG,  VA. 
CA  9-1041 


Greetings 

CLAY 

OLDSMOBILE 
CADILLAC 
CORPORATION 

452  N.  Boundary  St. 
WILLIAMSBURG,  VA. 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a  Happy  and 
Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Williamsburg,  Va. 


Lafayette  Specialty 

Shish  Kebab  and  Pilaf 
Live  Maine  Lobsters 
From  Our 
Neptune  Tank 


WESTERN  CHARCOALED 
STEAKS  .  .  .  IMPORTED 
WINES  AND  CHAMPAGNE 
OUR  FAMOUS  LAFAY- 
ETTE SALAD  .  . 


Williamsburg 


Virginia 


Charcoal  Steak  and  Seafood 
Mouse 


RECOMMENDED 

For  Reservations  Call  Williamsburg  CA  9-3811  —  CA  9-9045 
WE  HAVE  BEEN  SERVING  GOOD  FOOD  FOR  OVER  30  YEARS 


AIR-CONDITIONED 

MEMBER  DINERS  CLUB 


1203  RICHMOND  ROAD 
GOURMET 


HOME-MADE  PARFAIT  AND  PECAN  PIES 


NEWPORT  NEWS,  VA. 

"FRIENDLIEST  LUMBER  YARD 
ON  THE  PENINSULA" 


COAL  FUEL  OIL 

PRINTED  METER  DELIVERIES 
PHONE  CH  4-8484  NEWPORT  NEWS,  VA 


BENSON  -  PHILLIPS  CO. 

READY-MIXED  CONCRETE  AND  INSULATION 
COAL  —  FUEL  OIL  —  BUILDING  SUPPLIES 
NEWPORT  NEWS,  VIRGINIA 
Since  1891 


•  W.  C.  BOWEN 

BOWEN  CO. 

•  G.  K.  McMURRAN 

•  F.  H.  COWLING 

Insurance  Consultants 

136  Twenty-eighth  St. 

Newport  News,  Va. 

Phone  Ch  4-1441 

112 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Newport  News,  Va. 


i 


From 


The  Entire  Personnel  Of 


WGH 

Affiliate  of 

American 
Broadcasting  Co. 

Serving  the 
Hampton  Roads  Area 


The  Daily  Press 
and 
Times-Herald 

"Hampton  Roads 
Newspapers" 

Newport  News  and 
Hampton,  Virginia 


1959  -  5720  Greetings 


THE  FIRST  NATIONAL  BANK 

NEWPORT  NEWS,  VA. 

Serving  Historic  Virginia  Peninsula 
For  Over  60  Years 


Newport  News,  Va. 

MBS.  MARTHA  B.  SHAPIRO,  Correspondent 


Very  Happy 

NEW  YEAR 
*  GREETINGS 


CROWN 
SAVINGS  BANK 

NEWPORT  NEWS,  VA. 


G  reetings 


PARKER  and  POWELL 

212-28th  Street  NEWPORT  NEWS,  VA. 


Peeping  through  the  loaves  of  bread  are  Pam  Berlin,  Belle  Zwerdling, 
Gail  Silverman,  and  Claudia  Firestone,  members  of  Jewish  Community 
Center  Camp  Kadima.  Tue  group  visited  the  City  Bakery. 


At  a  recent  meeting  of  the  Board 
of  Directors  of  the  Jewish  Com- 
munity Council,  the  members  went 
on  record  approving  the  appoint- 
ment of  a  committee  to  study  the 
possibility  of  purchasing  a  day 
camp  site  for  year-round  use.  Mr. 
Leroy  Spigel  has  been  appointed 
chairman  of  the  site  committee.  A 
proposed  site  has  been  located  in 
the  Williamsburg  area,  and  any- 
one interested  in  visiting  this  site 
may  obtain  information  by  calling 
Mr.  Spigel  or  the  Jewish  Center. 
Other  suggestions  are  also  welcome. 

The  Grand  Club  executive  com- 
mittee, headed  by  Mr.  Kenneth 
Arch,  president,  has  been  busy  the 
past  few  weeks  outlining  a  pro- 
gram for  the  coming  winter  months. 
Among  the  highlights  are  Yiddish 
films,  inter-city  trips,  and  the  an- 
nual Chanukah  luncheon  for  all 
Golden-Agers  from  Norfolk,  Rich- 
mond, and  Portsmouth.  Other 
programs  will  be  announced  later. 

The  Newport  News  -  Warwick 
Chapter  of  Senior  Hadassah  will 
hold  its  Fall  dance  on  Saturday 
evening,  September  19.  The  entire 
community  is  invited  to  attend. 


For  the  very  first  time  Jews  were 
invited  to  and  participated  in  the 
celebration  of  St.  John  the  Baptist 
Day,  a  French  Canadian  national 
festival,  in  Montreal.  The  invita 
lion  was  made  by  the  Societe  St. 
Jean  Baptiste,  which  sponsors  the 
annual  event.  According  to  reports, 
the  Jewish  delegates,  representing 
Cercle  Juif  de  Langue  Francaise, 
were  well  received. 


The  Jewish  Community  Center 
Nursery  and  Kindergarten  will  of- 
ficially open  on  Monday,  Septem- 
ber 14.  The  staff,  Mrs.  Charles  Nix- 
on and  Mrs.  Charles  Olshansky,. 
will  be  happy  to  answer  any  ques- 
tions about  the  Center's  Kinder- 
garten program. 


$10.00  Per  Month 


THOMAS 

Piano  Co. 

210  -  28th  Street 
NEWPORT  NEWS,  VA. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Advertising  Index 


rcran  mid  Raw 


Greeting's 


All  good  wishes  for  a  New  Year  of  Peace,  Happiness,  and  Prosperity. 
The  advertisers  listed  herewith  extend  to  their  friends  and  patrons 
their  most  sincere  holiday  greetings. 


A 


PAGE 


American  Furniture  Co.  Inc  _ 

Appalachian  Flectric  Power  Co.  

The  Great  Atlantic  &  Pacific  Tea  Co. 

Apparel,  Inc.       

Arrow  Exterminators,  Inc  

Arrow  Trade  Mark,  Inc.  

Cay  Artley 


3 
87 
33 
34 
40 
30 
17 


-m;-ire  Furniture  Corporation 
Excel,    Inc.  "...    


PAGE 


24 
31 


Athens  Hosiery  Co   _  32 

Atlantic  Rural 

Exposition     inside  back  cover 


Barkley   Machine   Worki    34 

Basic-Witz  Furniture  Industries  70 
Bassett  Furniture  Industries  back  cover 
Bellcraft  Manufacturing  Co.  35 
Binswanger  &  Co.  70 
Bladenboro  Cotton  Mills  _  •37 
George  Rlankstein  Co.  28 
Block's  Southland  Sportswear,  Inc.  fib- 
Blue  Gem  Manufacturing  Co  91 
Blue  Ridge  Hardware  ~ 

&  Supply   Co.  Inc. 
Boling  Chair  Co. 


 -  36 

  25 

  7 

  21 

 38 

  26 

47  &  67 
37 


Botany  Cottons,  Inc  

R.  H.  Boulighny,  Inc. 
Bradley  Flyer  &  Repair  Co.  .. 
Brc.dy  Furniture  Co.  Inc. 
Brick  and  Tile  Service 
Brower   Mills,  Inc. 

Brvant  Electric-  Repair  Co.  "  "s 

Burkyarns,   Inc   14 

Burlington  Industries,  Inc.  19 
Burruss  Land 

&  Lumber  Co.  Inc.  inside  back  cover 
Burton-Dixie  Corporation  26 
Bush  Transfer,  Inc.    _  31 


Carolina    Home   Life   Insurance  Co.   .  68 

Carolina  Hosiery   Mills   .  32 

Carolina  Power  &  Light  Co.  __  8 

A.  B.  Cr.rter,  Inc.    g 

Carver  Manufacturing  Co.  Inc.  26 

Catalina  Motor  Lodge    4? 

ChadboiiTn  Veneer  *Co.  "  25 

Chatham    Manufacturing    Co.  7 

Clearwater  Finishing  Plant  38 

Cochrane  Furniture  Co.  Inc.  24 

Cocker  Machine  &  Foundry  Co  20 

Colonial  Motor  Freight  Line    inc  40 

Colonial    Stores  '  IX 

Congress  of  Motor  Hotels  "  20 

Cross  Cotton  Mills  Co.  ..  44 

D 

Dacotah  Cotton  Mills.  Inc.  ....  35 

Davis  Hosiery  Mills      ....  28 

Deal  Printing  Co.  3g 

Dennrtment  of  Public  Utilities  4 
Dichmann,  Wright 

&  Push    inside  back  cover 

Dixie   Loom   Reeti   Co.  38 

Dura-Tred  Hosiery  Mill  32 

The   Elastic    Corporation  31 


First  Fidelity  Co       39 

Firestone  Textiles,  Inc.   ...  ._   ...34 

Fredrickson  Motor  Express 

Corporation         18 


Gambrill   &  Melville  Mills  _   37 

Otto  G'askins.  Inc   43 

Gasto.i  County  Dyein"  Machine  Co.  3i 

Gaston  Electric  Co.  Inc.   ....   ..41 

Gastonia  Belting  &  Supply  Co.  Inc.  l>' 
Gastoma  Textile  Sheet  Metal 

Works,,  Inc   36 

Giant  Food       ...   inside  front  cover 

Gossett  Machine  Works,  Inc.  41 

H.  L.  Green,  Co.   18 

Greensboro  Loom  Reed  Co   42 

Greensboro  News-Record  ..  16 

Griffin  Supply  Co.  Inc   31 

Grossir.ger's      _   27 

J.  J.  Haines  &  Co.     83 

Halifax  County  Hosiery  Mills  2a 
Hartwell  Garment  Co.  35 
Hennis  Freight  Lines,  Inc.  ..  37 
Henredon   Furniture  Industries,   Inc.  3 

Her  Grace  r, 

Herman-Snipe   &   Co.   Inc.  ...  40 

Hickory  Foundry  &  Machine  Co.  4? 
Hickory-FVv  Furniture  Co.  Inc.  42 
Hickory  Paper  Box  Co.  Inc.  29 
Hi"h   Point-Thomasville   Denton   R.R.  36 

Hildebran   Hosiery   Mills   28 

Heme  Beneficial 

t,  *Vfe  Ins'  Co   inside  back  cover 

Hotel  Association 

of  Ro-noke  inside  front  cover 

Hunter   ft   Co.  29 


Ideal    Industries  Inc. 
Industrial  Piping  Supply  Co. 


W.  G.  Jarrell  Machine  Co. 
Joanna   Cotton   Mills  Co. 


3" 
41 


K 

Kester    Machinery-    Co  an 

Kin?  Veneer  Co.  Inc.  27 

Klutt  Machine  &  Foundry  Co  42 


Lana  Hosierv  Co.  W 
Le=.-Wayne  Knitting  Mills  ?r 
Libertv   Ch,-ir   Co.  ""'  ■> 

Lindv   Hosiery  Mill 
Lineberrv  Foundry 

&  Mpchine  Co.  Ir  - 


3 


(Please  turn  to  P~c*e  114) 


18 


Zalman  Schneour 

(Concluded  from  Page  109) 


Passes  on  to  the  period  of  great 
brotherhood,  to  a  God  unfore- 
seen by  prophets, 

And  to  a  life  undreamed-of  by  sing- 
ers ..  .  Prepare  for  the  lofty  scene 
O  Israeli 

The  days  of  transition  are  ap- 
proaching. (*) 

In  the  last  resort  he  returned  to 
the  old  and  new  theory  of  the  Jew- 
ish mission  among  the  nations  as  a 
protagonist  of  the  godly  spirit  and 


he  accepted  Jewish  martryology  as 
an  unfavorable  historical  develop- 
ment. His  final  answer  was:  To  be 
stiff-necked  and  unyielding,  to  be 
daring  and  courageous! 

The  youth  of  Israel  has  definitely 
accepted  this  final  answer  by  our 
national  poet. 

(*)  The  translation  of  the  frag- 
ments from  the  poem  "The  Days  of 
the  Middle  Ages  Are  Approaching" 
is  by  Prof.  Simon  Halkin. 


113 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a  Happy  and 
Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Hampton  -  Phoebus,  Va. 


"Your  Financial  Friend" 

THE  CITIZENS  NATIONAL  BANK 

EMPORIA,  VIRGINIA 
Serving  this  community  since  1897 
Member  FDIC 


HAPPY  NEW  YEAR 


R.  F.  Slaughter  Lumber  Corp. 

Dealers  and  Manufacturers  of 
Lumber,  Millwork  and  Building  Materials 

Phone  PArk  2-4381  FHOEBUS,  VIRGINIA 


The  Lackey-Saunders  Co.,  Inc. 

REAL  ESTATE,  RENTAL  AND 
INSURANCE  AGENTS 


HAMPTON 


VIRGINIA 


J.  V.  BICKFORD,  INC. 

Pembroke  and  W.  Queen  St.  HAMPTON,  VA. 

0736 


•  LUMBER        •  MILLWORK 

•  BUILDING  SUPPLIES 


GREETINGS 
from 

HOTEL  LANGLEY 

AND 

COFFEE  SHOP 

HAMPTON,  VIRGINIA 


ROUNTREE 
FURNITURE  GO. 

Hampton's  Progressive 
Home  Furnishers 

General  Electric 
Major  Appliances 
HAMPTON,  VIRGINIA 


EARL  R.  HATTEN 

Handy  Oi!  Corporation 

Small  Boat  Harbor 
Phone  CH  4-1444 
NEWPORT  NEWS,  VA. 
SOCONY  -  MOBIL 
PRODUCTS 


ii4 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a  Happy  and 
Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

P®sr§sm@ufih,  Va. 


ADVERTISING  INDEX 


Use  Our  West  End  Branch  Drive-In  Teller  Windows 

NIGHT  DEPOSITORY  —  AMFLE  PARKING  SPACE 

CITIZENS  TRUST  (0. 

"The  Progressive  Bank" 
Member  Federal  Deposit  Insurance  Corporation 

Main  Office  West  End  Branch 

225  High  Street  3201  High  St.,  Corner  Vermont  Ave. 

PORTSMOUTH,  VA. 


HOTEL  GOVERNOR  DINWIDDIE 

NEWEST  HOTEL  IN  THE  NORFOLK-PORTSMOUTH  AREA 
100%  AIR-CONDITIONED 
FAMILY  PLAN  RATES       :-:       A  GRENOBLE  HOTEL 

One- A  ere  Guest  Parking  Space 
Telephone  EXport  3-2511  PORTSMOUTH,  VA. 


CITY  STEAM  LAUNDRY 

and  DRY  CLEANING 

Special  24-Hour  Service  On  Men's  Shirts — Cash  and  Carry 

614  Middle  Street  Portsmouth,  Va. 

P"V    7  17^1       1-Day  Cleaning  Service — Cash  and  Carry 
S->S\..  I  -  I  L  J  I    3  Days  Cleaning  Service — Call  For  and  Deliver 


(AFFEE'S  BAKERY 

Portsmouth's  Leading  Bakery  and  Pastry  Shop 
COMPLETE  LINE  OF  FANCY  BAKED  GOODS 


PORTSMOUTH,  VA. 


425  Coun'iy  St. 


Portsmouth,  EX  7-0753 


FERRELL  LINOLEUM  &  TILE  CO. 

INCORPORATED 


326  W.  21st  St. 

•  TILE  •  TERRAZZO 

VINYL  TILE  • 


NORFOLK,  VA. 
•  MARBLE 
RUBBER  TILE 


FUEL,  FEED 
&  BUILDING 
SUPPLIES 
CORP. 

Established  1927 

•  All  Departments 

•  At  Corner 

•  19th  and  Pacific 

•  Virginia  Beach, 
Virginia 


SNOW-WHITE 

Beautitone 

Dry  Cleaners  —  Launderers 

•  Virginia  Beach 
GA  8-5851 

•  Norfolk,  Va. 
JU  8-6796 

•  Bayside,  Va. 
Branch  Office 


(Continued  from  Page  113) 

Page 

Marcus  Loeb  fc  Co.  Inc  

P.  Lorillard  Co    21 

Lorimer  Hosiery  Mills  Inc   30 

The  Lovable  Brassiere  Co.  3; 

Lynch    Hosiery    Mills   __  29 

Marcus  &  Farber    33 

Meg   Marlowe      17 

Martinat  Hosiery  Mills  29 
Maxwell  Royal  Chair  Co.,  Inc.  25 
Mid-State  Pc.per  Box  Co.,  Inc.  30 

Milton   Hosiery  Co   30 

Mitcham   &   Co     14 

Modern  Classics  ..  17 
Monarch  Hosiery  Mills  3? 
Mothers   Food  ~  \q 

Mundy  Motor  Lines    4 

N 

N  &  W  Industries    4 

Norris  Hosiery  Mill  "30 
North   Carolina  Association  of  Beer 

Distributors    _  62 

North  Carolina  Dyeing  &  Finishing  Co.  40 

O 

The  Oakley  Co    38 

Odell  Mill  Supply  Co.  ..    41 

Old  Mansion  Coffee  79 

Orkin  Exterminating  Co.   98 


J.  C.  Paddock  &  Co  .36 

Parkdale   Mill      34 

Pet  Perkins      17 

Pet  Dairy  Products  _   19 

Philadelphia  Hosiery  Mills   .  14 

Pickett  Hosiery  Mills,  Inc.  _  ....  29 

Piedmont  Chemical  Industries  of 

High  Point,  Inc.    _   40 

Piedmont  Hosiery  Mills,  Inc.  _   31 

Piedmont  Mill  Supply  Co     42 

Pilot  Freight  Carriers,  Inc.  _  ....  14 

Pilot  Life  Insurance  Co.   ....  27 

Public  Service  Company  of 

North    Carolina,   Inc     8 

Puritan  Finishing  Mills  ..  32 

Q 

Queen    City    Trailways   .  ...  33 

R 

Rand  Furniture   Corporation   26 

Reliable  Manufacturing  Co  3 

Reliable    Trucking    Co.  ..34 

Remco  Supply  Co.,  Inc    42 

Rhodes,  Inc.     25 

Richmond  Hotels    inside  front  cover 

Ridgeview  Hosiery  Mill  Co.    _28 

Carol  Rodgers  Juniors  _17 

Ruth    Originals       18 


Schachner  Leather  &  Belting  Co.  35 

Sealtest  Southern  Dairies     16 

Sharpe  Motor  Lines  Inc.   44 

Siceloff  Manufacturing  Co.  Inc.  ...  16 
Silver  Knit  Hosiery  Mills,  Inc.  ._.  30 

Smith-Clanton   &  Co.   41 

Southern  Elastic  Corporation  .  __  29 

Southern  Paper  Box  Co.     ...  28 

Southern  Radio   Corporation   .  _  39 

Southland  Wood  Products  Co.  ...  25 

Standard  Chemicals  Products,  Inc.  42 
J.  P.  Stevens  &  Co.,  Inc.    19 


Page 

Paul  Stewart  Machine   Co.   ..   401 

Roy  Stone  Corp.  inside  front  cover 

Stoneville  Furniture  Co.,  Inc.  26 
.Stout  Chair  Co.,  Inc.  25 
Suburban  Propane  Gas  Corporation  33 
Superior  Bolster  Co.  ..  24 


Textile  Parts  &  Machine  Co.  Inc. 

Tie-Rite  Neckwear  Co  

Troutman   Chair  Co    ... 

Truax  Veneer  &  Plywood  Co. 
Truitt  Manufacturing  Co. 


U 

Union  Bag  Camp  Paper  Corp. 

United  Hias  Service  

United  Mills  Corporation   


Virginia-Carolina  Freight   _:    4 

W 

Wallace's  Kosher  Foods   19 

Westboro  Weaving  Co.  37 

Helen   Whiting      jg 

Williams   &   Reed     7^ 


NORTH  CAROLINA 

Burlington      67-88 

Charlotte    57-60 

Gastonia   _     64 

Greensboro        45-58 

Hendersonville   -    44 

Hickory  _   61 

High  Point   _   65 

Raleigh     [   _  62-68 

Statesville    61  I 

Wilmington      66 

VIRGINIA 

Alexandria      106-107 

Charlottesville  102-103 

Danville     108-109 

Franklin     22 

Fredericksburg   _  107 

Hampton         113 

Harrisonburg  104-105 

Lynchburg      92-96 

Martinsville    ~       110 

Newport   News    112 

Norfolk      100-101 

Petersburg     98-99 

Phoebus    _  .....113  j 

Portsmouth     -  114 

Richmond    _  _   70-84 

Roanoke     85-91 

Staunton  97 

Suffolk    _    22 

Waynesboro       .    97  1 

Williamsburg      Ill 


BUY  THAT 


ISRAEL  BOND  NOW! 


Time  And  Judgement 

(Concluded  from  Page  37) 
belongs  to  the  heart  of  the  seer 
and  the  prophet  and  not  to  the 
dictum  of  the  Ceasar,  ruthless  or 
benign.  In  fact,  it  may  be  cheering 
to  those  who  take  the  transition 
of  the  year  with  any  seriousness 
to  know  that  perhaps  this  year 
will  mark  the  first  major  exposure 
of  the  moral  incompetence  of 
worldly  powers  to  rule  aye  or  nay 
on  the  question  of  human  surviv- 
al. The  footstool  is  shaking.  There 
is  a  question  abroad.  It  is  sudden- 
ly everywhere  being  asked  whether 
or  no  those  empowered  to  deter- 
mine man's  begging  or  man's  end 
must  not  be  celestially  sanctioned. 

If  one  knows  where  to  look,  one 
can  behold  the  signs.  There  are 
unique  possibilities  in  the  judge- 
ment at  hand. 

There  are  no  alternatives  to  the 
miracle  that  ensues. 


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1959 


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Few  men  like  to  think  of  what  would  happen  to  their 
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Should  you  live,  this  same  plan  guarantees  an  income 
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Everything  about  these  classic  Bassett  suites 
speaks  of  luxury  .  .  .  from  the  authentic  Colonial, 
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designs  to  the  Grand  Rapids  "Guardsman"  finishes. 
The  Westover  (above)  offers  a  complete  range  of  i 
pieces,  including  Cannonball,  Spindle  or  bookcase  | 
beds  in  warm  Old  Dominion  Walnut  Veneer. 

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dining  room  pieces  and  living  room  tables. 
Finished  in  Antique  White  or  Natural  Cherry. 

Monticello— the  easy-to-own  price  alone  cannot 
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Send  20c  for  furniture  folders  to  Bassett 
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(I 


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VOLUME   XXV         •         NUMBER  2 


OCTOBER  1959 


EDITORIALS 


Chester  A.  Brown,  Editor 


Judaism  Will  Live  on  Forever 


Guest  Editorial  By  RABBI  NORMAN  N.  SHAPIRO 
of  Beth  El  Congregation 
Akron,  Ohio 

Somebody  once  quipped  —  "A  dictatorship  is  a  tired 
democracy."  As  I  pen  these  lines  I  recall  how  not  so  long 
ago  it  was  my  privilege  to  listen  to  a  distinguished  Presbyter- 
ian minister  from  Pittsburgh  describe  a  meeting  of  that  city's 
clergy  with  the  Office  of  Civilian  Defense.  The  gist  of  the 
talks  was  that  in  atomic  warfare  75  million  Americans  would 
be  incinerated  in  the  first  moments  of  battle.  In  addition, 
30  million  would  suffer  first  degree  burns  and  15  million 
would  experience  second  degree  burns.  These  are  the  reali- 
ties of  the  situation.  Total  annihilation  is  the  inevitable  re- 
sult of  today's  atomic  age.  This  is  the  grim  prospect  which 
awaits  all  of  us  —  the  specter  of  death,  ruin,  mangled  bodies 
and  tortured  minds. 


For  us  Jews  terrifying  news  like  the  above  comes  as  no 
new  or  novel  experience.  We  have  known  suffering,  persecu- 
tion, and  even  the  threat  of  total  obliteration  for  the  last 
12,000  years.  We  have  always  in  the  past  tried  to  objectify 
ourselves  be  being  realistic.  We  have  never  blinked  the  facts 
or  glossed  over  the  harsh  realities  which  faced  us. 

In  a  similar  vein  today  we  must  remain,  (  as  we  have 
peen  for  centuries  throughout  our  long  and  tortuous  history,) 
incurably  optimistic  despite  the  current  threat  of  atomic  attack 
and  the  disillusioning  experiences  our  Jewish  people,  particu- 
larly in  the  20th  century,  have  endured  under  the  Nazis, 
(Fascists,  and  Communists. 

It  is  interesting  and  reassuring  to  note  that  the  current 
'crisis"  theology  and  philosophy  of  Existentialism  with  its 
nood  of  pessimism  and  man's  helplessness,  its  feeling  of  futil- 
ty  and  purposelessness  (which  have  characterized  some  re- 
bent  Christian  theology  as  well)  have  had  little  impact  or 
effect  on  modern  Judaism.  Modern  Judaism  still  clings  to  its 
ige-old  faith,  and  represents  to  us  Jews  and  to  the  world  a 
partnership  between  God  and  man  to  promote  social,  scientific, 
ind  political  programs  leading  to  the  establishment  of  a  better, 
nore  livable  society. 

True,  Judaism  recognizes  that  civilization  today  stands 
In  the  shadow  of  doom  and  destruction.  We  know  that 
mmanity  is  facing  cataclysmic  changes,  political  and  economic 
evolutions  with  their  concomitant  social  upheavals.  We  are 
ware  that  the  unleashing  of  missiles  and  rockets  could  reduce 
jhe  world  we  live  in  to  rubble  and  devastation.  In  adhering 
o  our  religious  teachings  and  ethical  pronouncements,  we 
doggedly  persist  in  seeing  in  man  a  responsible,  moral  agent 
jrtio  has  the  power  to  choose  between  life  and  death.  The 
|,ew  remains  the  inveterate  optimist  regarding  the  future, 
ully  cognizant  of  man's  intermittent  moral  lapses  and  religi- 
ous backsliding. 


As  we  approach  the  High  Holydays,  we  remain  firm  in 
our  conviction  as  Jews  that  man's  divine  potential  can  build 
a  better  present  and  foster  a  securer  and  more  promising 
tomorrow.  The  Bible  enjoins  us,  "Uvacharta  Bachayim"  — 
"And  thou  shalt  choose  life." 

The  Jewish  survivors  of  the  Warsaw  Ghetto  during  the 
bleak  and  harrowing  days  of  World  War  II  still  sang  out  "Ani 
Maamin"  —  "I  believe  in  the  coming  of  the  Messiah,"  though 
the  Messiah  did  tarry.  Even  with  the  unforseeable  delays  and 
seemingly  insurmountable  obstacles,  "I  shall  continue  to 
believe,"  was  his  clarion  call  and  cry  for  survival. 

Judaism  rooted  in  optimism  has  always  understood  that 
we  must  not  get  too  tired,  impatient,  or  restless  with  the  slow 
process  of  a  Messianic  fulfillment,  with  a  democracy  which 
shows  stresses,  strains,  and  indecisiveness.  "Vaf  al  pi  sheyitmah- 
mea  bechol  zeh  ani  maamin,"  —  "Even  thought  at  times  we 
are  disappointed  we  shall  still  believe  in  the  ultimate  triumph 
of  good  over  evil;  of  freedom  over  tyranny;  of  right  over  wrong; 
of  a  free  America  and  a  free  world  over  the  myrmidons  of  evil; 
of  optimism  over  pessimism;  of  our  Jewish  way  of  life  over 
those  who  would  uproot  it." 

Our  credo  is:  "Am  yisroel  chai  vkayom  leolom  vaed"  — 
"that  Jews  and  Judaism  will  live  on  forever  and  ever."  Ours 
is  the  sacred  task  of  infusing  life  into  our  American  democ- 
racy at  every  turn  where  people  of  all  faiths  can  live  side 
by  side,  where  there  can  be  unity  in  diversity,  and  where 
each  person  can  sit  under  his  vine  and  fig  tree  and  none 
shall  make  them  afraid.  Ours  is  the  responsibility  to  revitalize 
the  state  of  Israel  in  every  way  possible.  Ours  is  the  privilege 
and  right  to  foster,  sustain,  and  nourish  democratic  institu- 
tions wherever  liberty-loving  peoples  need  help  or  encourage- 
ment. Ours  is  an  affirmative  belief  in  Judaism,  a  religious 
civilization  cradled  in  ancient  Palestine  and  finding  expres- 
sion wherever  the  ubiquitous  Jew  trods.  Ours  is  an  optimism 
nurtured  in  the  traditions  and  experiences  of  the  past  and 
predicated  on  our  ineluctable  trust  in  the  future  of  mankind. 

A  Tribute  to  the  Ladies 

The  biennial  convention  of  the  National  Council  of  Jew- 
ish Women,  recently  concluded  at  Los  Angeles,  markd  a  birth- 
day we  are  sure  will  not  be  overlooked  in  the  Jewish  commu- 
nity of  America— the  65th  anniversary  of  one  of  the  oldest  and 
in  many  ways  the  youngest  major  Jewish  women's  organization 
in  the  world. 

There  is  temptation  in  this  accolade  to  the  ladies  to  re- 
capitulate in  detail  some  of  the  milestones  of  the  organization, 
and  were  it  not  for  economy  of  space  we  might  do  just  that  at 
least  with  respect  to  some  of  its  achievements  last  year. 

One  of  the  most  rewarding  events  for  the  Council  last 
year,  in  our  opinion,  was  the  dedication  of  a  beautiful  new 
modern  building  for  the  School  of  Education  of  Hebrew  Uni- 

( Please  Turn  to  Page  16) 


ah  American  Jewish  Times-Outlook,  published  monthly  at  530  Southenstern  Building,  P.  O.  Box  1469,  Greensboro,  N.  C.  Chester  A.  Brown,  Editor;  David  Bernstein,  Pub- 
sner;  Nathan  Kessler,  Manager,  Virginia  Office;  Florence  Byers,  Virginia  News  Editor;  Broad  Grace  Arorde,  P.  O.  Box  701,  Richmond,  Va.  Member  Seven  Arts 
eaiure  Syndicate,  Inc.  $2.00  per  year  payable  in  advance.  Entered  as  Second-Class  Matter  at  the  Post  Office  at  Greensboro,  N.  C,  under  Act  of  M.-rch  5,  1879.  The 
lews  expressed  by  contributors  are  not  necessarily  those  of  the  publishers,  but  may  be  published  in  the  interest  of  freedom  of  the  press.  The  American  Jewsh  Times- 
'ltlook  is  owned  and  edited  solely  as  an  independent  enterprise  and  is  not  a  Jewish  community  undertaking. 


PLAIN  TALK 

By  ALFRED  SEGAL 


THE  LADY'S  HAIR 

In  this  column  I  am  always  get- 
ting complaints  on  Jewish  prob- 
lems, most  of  which  I  easily  solve  in 
the  way  of  my  wisdom.  But  this 
Jewish  problem  .  .  .  this  one  that 
the  mailman  has  just  dropped  on 
my  desk.  It's  all  about  Jewish  la- 
dies hair  .  .  .  and  what  do  I  know? 


ALFRED  SEGAL 


It  came  from  a  Jewish  lady  hair 
dresser  in  another  city,  and  all  I 
know  about  hair  dressing  is  my 
own  wife's.  Once  a  month  I  have 
to  drive  her  out  to  a  distant  suburb 
where  she  has  her  hair  dressed. 
That's  about  all  I  know  of  such 
matters. 

That  hair  dresser's  letter  calls  on 
this  column  to  institute  a  campaign 
against  Jewish  women  wearing  shei- 
tls  any  longer  .  .  .  those  wigs  that 
Orthodox  young  women  are  sup- 
posed religiously  to  put  on  their 
heads  after  their  weddngs  .  .  .  for 
marital  righteousness'  sake  ...  so 
that  no  other  men  should  be  at- 
tracted by  their  beauty. 

"In  other  words,"  says  this  hair 
dresser,  "a  Jewish  married  girl  is 
supposed  to  make  herself  as  unat- 
tractive as  possible  under  a  wig  or 
sheitel." 

What  caused  the  hair  dresser  to 
bother  herself  thus  is  something  she 
has  just  read  in  the  Jewish  press.  It 
was  about  the  wedding  of  the  beau- 
tful  daughter  of  a  very  Orthodox 
rabbi  in  New  York.  She  had  just 
been  married  at  a  gorgeous  affair 
at  the  Waldorf  Astoria. 

"The  paper  printed  her  picture, 
and  such  a  lovely  looking  girl!" 
this  hair  dresser  was  sayii^f.  "As  an 


expert  I  could  tell  at  a  glance  at 
the  picture  what  a  gift  of  beautiful 
hair  she  had  on  her  head  from  na- 
ture. 

"But  I  felt  so  sad  when  I  read 
that  shortly  after  her  wedding  she 
was  going  to  have  her  hair  cut  to 
be  replaced  by  a  sheitel.  Oh,  Mr. 
Segal,  can't  something  be  done  to 
stop  her?" 

The  nair  dresser  was  remember- 
ing her  own  grandma  .  .  .  "What  a 
pitiful  sight  grandma  was  under 
her  sheitel.  Often  it  was  on  her 
head  crooked.  And  so  were  sheitils 
on  other  heads  when  I  was  a  small 
girl.  You  yourself,  Mr.  Segal,  must 
be  old  enough  to  recall  sheitels  on 
many  grandmas,  and  how  awful  a 
poor  old  grandma  looked  under 
one.  My  own  grandma  made  me 
promise  I'd  put  a  sheitel  on  after  I 
married  and  I  hope  her  saintly 
character  up  there  in  heaven  will 
forgive  me  for  not  keeping  my 
promises.  Instead  of  wearing  a  shei- 
tel I  became  a  hair  dresser  to  help 
keep  ladies'  heads  beautiful." 

Yes,  she  admitted,  sheitels  have 
fallen  out  of  fashion  .  .  .  "But,"  she 
said,  "I'm  worried.  Will  this  rabbi's 
lovely  daughter  who  was  married  at 
the  Waldorf  start  the  fashion  all 
over  when  she  cuts  off  her  hair  and 
puts  on  a  sheitel  instead?  You 
know  how  women  are.  They  like 
to  follow  new  fashions  that  start 
out  of  high  places  like  the  Wal- 
dorf. And  if  sheitels  become  pop- 
ular again,  what  w\ll  become  of 
my  hair  dressing  business? 

"Oh,  Mr.  Segal,  let's  get  vigor- 
ously busy  on  that." 

As  a  columnist  who  likes  to  serve 
a  cause  in  a  scholarly  way,  I  first 
looked  up  the  history  of  sheitels. 
The  Talmud  cautions  women  nev- 
er to  go  out  with  their  heads  un- 
covered. Already  in  Talmudic 
times  women  covered  their  own 
heads  with  the  shorn  hair  of  other 
women  —  wigs,  that  is.  One  of  our 
books  of  wisdom,  The  Zohar,  calls 
the  covered  head  of  one's  wife  "the 
chastity  of  the  house." 

But,  not  always,  far  back  there, 
did  Jewish  women  wear  wigs  with 
which  to  cover  their  heads  after 
they  had  shaved  them.  In  the  mid- 
dle Ages  they  used  to  cover  their 
shorn  heads  with  coifs  which  were 
made  of  semi-stiff  silk.  On  the  front 
of  the  coif  they  wore  silk  braids, 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Editorials             3 

Plain  Talk— Alfred  Segal      _       4 

American  Jewry  On  The  Threshold — Dr.  Harry  M.  Orlinsky     5 

Reflections  On  The  American  Scene — Abba  Eban    6 

Man  of  the  Month — M.  B.  Kahn,  Columbia,  S.  C      7 

Murder  In  A  Chocolate  Box — E.  Davidson     10 

The  Community  and  the  Individual — Solomon  Litt    _  25 

Visiting  Old  Friends — Anita  Engle     15 

Should  The  Lohengrin  Wedding  March  Be  Played  at 

Jewish  Weddings? — Harry  Simonhoff     17 

Eva  and  Jewish  Identity — Meyer  Levin     21 

The  20th  Anniversary  of  World  War  II — Nehemiah  Robinson   23 

From  Dubuque  to  Israel — Bill  Forman     24 

The  Strange  Case  of  Joseph  Smith      25 

Lincoln  and  Herzl — Dr.  Miriam  K.  Freund     26 

VIRGINIA 

Newport  News — Martha  B.  Shapiro    11 

Roanoke  Hadassah — Mrs.  Edith  Lieberman   19 

Martinsville — Mrs.  Ralph   Hollander    _  27 

Norfolk  J.W.V. — Fred  Handel      28 

Richmond  B'nai  B'rith  Women — Betty  A.  Jaffoe  —   12 

Richmond  B  &  P  Hadassah — Shirley  Goldstein  _   44 

NORTH  CAROLINA 

Around  Greensboro — Mrs.  Daniel  Hollander  and 

Mrs.  Richard  Forman      30 

Durham — Mrs.  Sam  Freedman   32 

Jacksonville — Mrs.  Jules  Segerman     33 

Rocky  Mount — Mrs.  Louis  Wald     33 

Wilmington — Norma  May        34 

Fayetteville — Mrs.  Jack  A.  Mendelsohn   35 

High  Point — Mrs.  David  Lafferman    37 

Winston-Salem — Mrs.  Don  Mallins       _  39 

Gastonia — Mrs.  Pauline  Chinn     39 

Raleigh  Temple  Beth  Or — Mrs.  Harry  Caplan    39 

Williamston — Mrs.  Irving  M.  Margolis   42 

Statesville— Mrs.  Milton  Steinberger    42 

Roanoke  Rapids — Miss  Louise  Farber     43 

Charlotte  Temple  Israel — Mrs.  Jerry  Fisher   43 

Charlotte  B'nai  B'rith  Women — Mrs.  Gerald  Sinkoe   44 

Raleigh — Congregation  Beth  Meyer — Mrs.  Oscar  Legum      45 

SOUTH  CAROLINA 

Columbia — Mrs.  Bernard  Laden    48 

Spartanburg — Mrs.  Stan  Treinis  &  Mrs.  Joel  Tannenbaum   54 

TENNESSEE 

Johnson  City   38 


THE  COVER 

At  Wheelus  Air  Force  Base  in  Tripoli,  N~rth  Africa,  Jewish  m'li- 
tary  personnel  prepare  for  the  observance  of  the  High  Holy  Days.  Left 
to  right,  Lt.  Jerome  Hefter,  Airman  3/C  Neville  Summercorn  and 
Chaplain  Rapiae!  Miller  rehearse  the  Torah  reading  for  the  New  Year. 
The  chaplain  flew  more  than  1,000  miles  from  his  own  base  at  Nouas- 
seur  Air  Force  Base,  Casablanca  to  arrange  the  holiday  services  at 
Wheelus  and  then  returned  to  conduct  the  High  Holy  Day  rites  for 
his  men  in  Casablanca.  Arrangements  for  observances  of  all  Jewish 
holidays  and  the  sabbath  are  made  for  Jews  in  the  U.S.  Armed  Force- 
no  matter  where  H  ey  are  stationed  by  the  National  Jewish  Welfare 
Board  which  recruits,  endorses  and  serves  Jewish  chaplains  and  pro- 
vides religious  materials,  literature  and  kosher  foods. 


or  a  ring  sometimes  adorned  with 
p:arl,  sometmes  with  diamonds. 

In  fact,  it  was  later— several  hun- 
dred years  later  —  that  our  grand- 
mas began  to  wear  the  sheitel  — 
made  of  other  women's  hair  —  to 
cover  their  own  shaven  heads,  for 
virtue's  sake.  But  the  Chassidim 
were  all  against  the  sheitel.  They 
insisted  it  was  only  a  pretense,  that 


the  sheitel  looked  as  if  the  wearers 
had  their  own  hair  on,  uncovered. 
The  Chassidim  ordered  the  sheitel 
off  their  own  wives'  shaven  heads 
and  replaced  them  by  other  kinds 
of  covering. 

Well,  now  the  sheitel  has  become 
all  out  of  date  among  the  Jewish 
girls;  but  its  idea  remains  religious- 

( Please  Turn  to  Page  51) 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


5 


American  Jewry  on  the  Threshold 

By  Dr.  Harry  M.  Orlinsky 

Professor  of  Bible-Hebrew  Union  College 
Jewish  Institute  of  Religion 

Dr.  Orlinsky  originally  presented  these  remarks  on  accepting  the  1939 
Frank  L.  Weil  Award  of  the  National  Jewish  Welfare  Board  (JWB)  for 
"distinguished  contribution  to  the  development  of  an  American  Jewish 
culture."  The  Editor. 


DR.  HARRY  M.  ORLINSKY 


A  short  five  years  ago  American 
Jewry  celebrated  the  Tercentenary 
of  its  birth.  Much  was  written, 
orated,  predicted,  and  even  bally- 
hooed  in  the  observance  of  this 
memorable  event.  The  most  popu- 
lar topic  for  quite  a  time  dealt  with 
the  future  of  American  Jewry  and 
Judaism. 

I  should  like  to  comment  not  on 
our  destiny  but  on  the  lack  of  his- 
torical perspective  and  consequent 
immoderate  pessimism  or  opti- 
mism, displayed  by  not  a  few  of 
those  who  have  dealt  with  the 
theme.  It  is  of  intense  and  personal 
concern  to  each  of  us. 

You  have  heard  and  read  how 
the  Jews  of  Babylonia  eventuallv 
took  over  the  social  and  cultural 
ilife  of  the  Jews  of  Judea  when  the 
Second  Jewish  Commonwealth  was 
destroyed  by  Rome  in  the  year  70, 
jand  during  the  several  Jewish  re- 
volts which  followed  in  the  second 
icentury. 

You  are  quite  aware  that  the 
Babylonian  Jewish  way  of  life,  cov- 
ering the  entire  talmudic  and  ga- 
onic  period,  found  a  new  home  and 
expression  in  Spain,  so  that  in  less 
than  50  years  a  Golden  Era  of  Jew- 
ish activity  was  established  once 
|more. 

The  great  catastrophe  which 
struck  Spanish  Jewry  in  the  fif- 
teenth century,  in  the  form  of  the 
inquisition  and  the  Exile,  found 
P  growing  Jewish  community  in 
pastern  Europe  ready  to  take  up 
and  develop  further,  along  its 
pwn  lines,  the  Jewish  culture  of 
f>pain  and  Babylonia  and  ancient 
Judea  and  Israel. 

We  Are  the  Heirs 

In  turn,  the  largest  Jewish  com- 
munity in  the  world  today,  our 
>wn  American  Jewry,  and  the  most 
nergetic  and  learned  Jewish  com- 
nunity,  Israel,  are  now  looked  up- 
k  as  the  heirs  of  the  great  Jewish 
raditions  and  uvilization  which 
;he  Jews  of  Europe  had  produced 


during  the  past  several  centuries, 
for  us  to  develop  and  to  adapt  as 
we  see  fit,  to  serve  our  needs  and 
to  express  the  genius  of  our  gen- 
erations. 

The  matter  of  cultural  inherit- 
ance and  adaptation,  however,  is 
not  simple;  and  too  many  impor- 
tant, even  crucial  elements  tend  to 
be  overlooked  in  the  sweeping  gen- 
eralizations which  are  frequently 
made. 

For  one  thing,  Jewish  history  is 
not  confined  to  one  great  center  at 
a  time.  There  have  always  been 
several  contemporaneous  centers, 
some  greater  than  others,  but  all 
of  them  simultaneously  active  and 
mutually  beneficial.  The  Bible  it- 
self, the  unmatched  product  of  the 
the  Jews  when  they  lived  in  their 
own  land,  includes  the  writings  of 
two  great  prophets  who  were  active 
not  in  the  land  of  Israel  and  Judah, 
but  in  Babylonia,  namely,  Ezekiel 
and  the  author  of  the  second  part 
of  Isaiah. 

When  the  Second  Jewish  Com- 
monwealth was  at  its  height,  there 
flourished  in  Egypt,  chiefly  in  Alex- 
andria, a  monumental  Jewish  civ- 
ilization, one  which  produced  the 
Septuagint,  the  Old  Greek  transla- 
tion of  the  Bible,  and  the  theologi- 
cal and  philosophical  works  of 
Philo  of  Alexandria,  and  several  of 
the  books  which  came  to  constitute 
Jewish  Apocryphal  Literature. 
The  Jewish  community  of  Rome 
provided  the  environment  for  the 
priceless  historical  writings  of  Jo- 
sephus. 

When  Babylonian  Jewry  stood  in 
its  fullest  glory,  there  were  impor- 
tant Jewish  centers  of  learning  and 
activity  in  Palestine,  and  in  Egypt, 
and  in  northwest  Africa,  and  in 
southern  Europe.  During  the  Gold- 
en Era  in  Spain,  notable  Jewish 
communities  thrived  in  Egypt, 
France,  Germany,  Italy,  Bohemia, 
and  elsewhere. 


When  one  talks  of  Eastern  Eu- 
ropean Jewry,  one  cannot  even  for 
one  moment  overlook  the  very  sig- 
nificant Jewish  communities  in 
Germany,  France,  Holland,  and 
Palestine. 

A  Gross  Mistake 

Consequently,  it  is  a  gross  mis- 
take to  speak  nowadays  of  the 
United  States  and  Israel  without 
mentioning  in  the  same  breath 
Canada,  and  Latin  and  South 
America,  England  and  France,  and 
perhaps  in  the  not  very  distant  fu- 
ture, also  Poland,  Rumania,  and 
Russia. 

Argentina  alone  is  currently  pub- 
lishing as  many  Yiddish  books  as 


the  United  States,  and  our  numer- 
ous and  wealthy  American  Jewry 
has  not  equalled  the  very  much 
smaller  Jewish  community  of  Great 
Britain  in  putting  out  in  English 
dress  a  commentary  on  the  entire 
Bible  and  complete  English  trans- 
lations of  the  Mishnah,  the  Talmud, 
and  the  Midrash. 

Of  far  greater  importance,  how- 
ever, are  the  precise  circumstances 
under  which  one  Jewish  center 
breathed  in  the  life  which  another 
outstanding  Jewish  center  was  at 
that  time  giving  up.  Some  histor- 
ians have  turned  this  historical 
Jewish  transmission  into  something 

(Please   Turn   to   Page  12) 


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The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Parfi  Two 


Reflections  on  the 


American  Scene 


By  Abba  Eban 


This  is  the  second  installment,  the  first  having  appeared  in  the  Septem- 
ber issue  of  the  TIMES-OUTLOOK,  of  Mr.  Eban's  address  before  the  52nd 
Annual  Meeting  of  t  :e  American  Jewish  Committee,  as  he  was  leaving  his 
post  of  Ambassador  to  the  United  States  from  the  State  of  Israel.  The  Editor. 


ABB 4  EBAN 


If  Israel  can  communicate  to  oth- 
er nations  something  of  the  lessons 
other  democracy;  and  if,  as  a  result, 
awakening  Africa  and  Asia  make 
their  choice  for  freedom  and  not 
for  .despotism,  Israel  will  have  ren- 
dered a  service  to  the  free  world  far 
greater  than  all  the  aid  she  has 
received. 

We  thus  find  our  country  in  the 
position  of  being  at  once  the  recip- 
ient and  the  donor  of  aid  within 
the  concert  of  the  democratic  fam- 
ily of  nations.  There  is  no  real  con- 
tradiction in  this  double  capacity. 

I  have  spoken  of  growth  and  of 
democracy.  What  is  there  to  say  of 
the  intellectual  scene?  All  my  pred- 
ecessors in  the  daring  task  of  ana- 
lyzing America  have  acknowledged 
that  Americans  are  not  a  contem- 
plative people.  It  is  the  practical 
instinct  that  has  mattered  most 
here:  the  capacity  to  blaze  a  trail, 
build  a  railroad,  convert  villages  to 
cities,  fertilize  abandoned  lands, 
tame  the  adverse  forces  of  nature. 

There  was  little  time  in  all  these 
years  to  sit  back  and  look  upon  the 
scene  as  a  whole,  to  generalize  ex- 
perience into  laws  of  thought.  But 
those  who  agree  that  America  has 
shown  no  inclination  toward  phi- 
losophy in  theoretical  terms,  have 
acknowledged  her  consistent  and  al- 
most intuitive  tendency  to  follow  a 
logical  and  moral  system  of  con- 
duct, dictated  by  the  exigencies  of 
life  and  by  an  essentially  religious 
consciousness. 

America's  friends  hope  that 
amidst  the  bustle  and  turmoil  of 
your  nation's  life,  there  will  always 
be  cloisters  in  which  men  can  think 
not  only  of  action,  but  also  of  the 
larger  issues  of  human  purpose;  and 
that  out  of  America's  political  and 
and  economic  leadership  an  intel- 
lectual and  spiritual  fertility  will 
grow. 


I  have  said  that  Americans  are  a 
religious  people;  and  this  is  the 
fourth  of  my  impressions.  I  do  not 
refer  here  to  the  formal  background 
of  denominational  religion.  I  refer 
to  the  belief  that  all  human  action 
must  be  related  to  absolute  stand- 
ards of  conduct,  and  that  whatever 
a  man  performs  upon  earth  must  be 
acted  in  the  sight  of  eternity. 

The  contribution  of  the  Hebrew 
stream  of  thought  to  American  ci- 
vilization has  been  greatly  under- 
estimated. It  is  significant  that 
Thomas  Jefferson  and  Benjamin 
Franklin,  when  they  were  discuss- 
ing the  seal  of  the  American  Union 
shortly  to  be  established,  recom- 
mended that  it  should  portray  the 
Children  of  Israel  fleeing  across  the 
parted  waters  of  the  Red  Sea,  on 
their  way  to  liberty.  And  they  pro- 
posed that  the  slogan  and  title  of 
this  seal  should  contain  the  uncan- 
nily Hebraic  concept:  "Resistance 
to  tyrants  is  obedience  to  God." 

My  fifth  impression  relates  to 
America's  swift  rise  to  international 
responsibility.  Nothing  more  spec- 
tacular has  taken  place  in  the  life 
of  our  times  than  America's  eman- 
cipation from  a  tradition  of  detach- 
ment and  isolation,  and  her  emerg- 
ence to  the  assumption  of  leader- 
ship in  freedom's  embattled  cause. 

Across  the  39  states  of  this  Union 
which  I  have  journeyed,  endeavor- 
ing to  expound  some  of  the  ideas 
and  impulses  which  have  led  to 
Israel's  establishment,  I  have  found 
an  alert  and  lively  interest  in  the 
affairs  of  the  outside  world.  If  there 
are  any  bulwarks  of  isolationism 
left,  they  can  be  only  in  the  states 
which,  through  inadvertence,  I 
have  not  visited. 

I  find  an  American  people  which 
believes  that  its  partnership  with 
other  nations  in  a  world  of  freedom 
is  a  permanent  covenant  and  not 


the  accidental  consequence  of  the 
Second  World  War. 

There  are  many,  of  course,  who 
draw  attention  to  errors  in  policy  or 
diplomacy.  Precisely  because  the 
American  example  is  so  crucial, 
anything  that  seems  to  be  a  devia- 
tion from  prudence  or  wisdom 
evokes  a  reaction  of  almost  shud- 
dering fear.  But  none  in  the  family 
of  free  nations  believes  that  the 
cause  of  liberty  can  have  any  other 
leader,  or  that  the  ultimate  fortress 
of  the  free  world's  cause  can  be  es- 
tablished anywhere  than  here,  upon 
the  foundations  of  the  incompar- 
able strength  and  abundance  of  the 
American  Union. 

A  brief  time  has  elapsed  since  the 
age  when  the  United  States  had  no 
reason  to  care  about  the  world  be- 
yond the  oceans,  when  avoidance  of 
foreign  entanglements  appeared  to 
be  the  first  law  of  prudence.  Today 
America  exercises  an  intricate  duty 
of  leadership  in  the  family  of  the 
free  world.  The  progress  toward 
mature  understanding  of  interna- 
tional issues  and  responsibilities 
has  been  miraculously  swift. 

There  were  others  before  you, 
notably  Britain  and  France  in  the 
age  of  European  ascendancy  and  co- 
lonial expansion,  who  exercised 
leadership  in  inter-nation  coalitions 
But  history  allowed  them  to  evolve 
over  centuries  of  time  toward  as- 
sumption of  that  responsibility. 
Through  these  centuries  of  trial 
and  error,  their  perceptions  were 
sharpened  and  their  diplomatic  fac- 
ulties were  developed. 

In  the  United  States  the  transition 
from  a  virtual  backwater,  in  terms 
of  international  responsibility, 
to  the  very  summit  of  leadership 
was  accomplished  almost  overnight. 

Let  me  not  so  betray  the  spirit 
of  other  nations  as  to  indicate  that 
I  believe  America  has  nothing  to 


learn  in  the  field  of  political  or 
diplomatic  leadership.  But  an  his- 
toric appraisal  must  deal  with  pro- 
cesses, not  with  intermediate  con- 
sequences. The  American  people 
is  now  increasingly  aware  that  it 
must  live  within  a  world  society 
of  which  it  is  an  integral  part, 
not  within  the  walls  of  a  sheltered 
continent. 

Nothing  has  taught  this  more 
acutely  than  the  recent  scientific 
revolution.  The  conquest  of  space 
and  the  perfection  of  missiles  have 
destroyed  the  old  distinction  be- 
tween "safe"  and  "vulnerable"  na- 
tions, between  those  in  the  first 
line  of  fire  and  those  who,  in 
benevolence  and  condescension, 
could  previously  decide  whether  or 
not  to  rescue  more  vulnerable  na- 
tions from  peril. 

Today,  New  York,  San  Francisco 
and  Philadelphia  are  just  as  safe 
or  just  as  vulnerable  as  Rotterdam, 
London,  Coventry  and  Paris— and, 
yes,  Haifa  or  Tel  Aviv.  Every  na- 
tion is  joined  to  every  other  nation 
in  a  covenant  of  mutual  vulner- 
ability. 

To  take  part  in  the  defense  of 
a  world  order  and  of  a  family  of 
free  nations  is  therefore  not  an  act 
of  condescension,  but  the  dictate 
of  enlightened  self-interest. 

Amongst  all  the  gifts  which 
America  can  give  the  world,  there 
are  three  from  young  nations,  and 
Israel  in  particular,  can  derive 
inspiration. 

The  first  is  your  innate  genius 
for  freedom  under  law,  the  convic- 
tion that  democracy  is  the  highest 
expression  of  a  dignified  social 
order. 

The  second  is  your  talent  for 
harmonizing   diversities;  nowhere 
until  the  establishment  of  Israel 
has  there  been  a  commensurate 
(Please  Turn  to  Page  56) 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


7 


It's 
a 

beautiful 
beer! 


M.  B.  KAHN 


Man  of  the  Month 

At  B.  Kahn 

Columbia,  S.  C. 


Fifty-one  years  ago,  a  young  car- 
penter-cabinet maker  in  Kowel, 
Russia,  packed  his  best  clothes,  a 
few  pet  tools,  and  journeyed  across 
Europe,  across  the  Atlantic  Ocean, 
and  halfway  across  the  United 
States  to  earn  his  living  in  "the 
land  where  streets  are  paved  with 
gold." 

Today,  at  73,  M.  B.  Kahn  of 
Columbia,  S.  C,  heads  one  of  the 
largest  construction  companies  in 
the  South.  He  long  ago  learned 
that  the  "gold  paving"  was  mere 
exaggeration,  but  through  bad 
times  and  good  over  the  past  half- 
century  he  has  done  whatever  he 
could  to  make  this  a  better  country 
in  which  to  live— for  Jew  and  non- 
Jew  alike. 

M.  B.  Kahn  was  born  in  Kowel 
in  1886,  the  son  of  a  grain  mer- 
chant. While  still  attending  the 
Russian  equivalent  of  our  high 
school,  he  found  that  he  had  a 
talent  for  tools  and  a  love  for 


creating  furniture  and  houses  from 
raw  materials.  Rejecting  his  father's 
business,  he  became  a  carpenter 
and  cabinet-maker. 

By  1908,  reports  from  friends 
and  acquaintances  in  the  "New 
World"  had  convinced  Mr.  Kahn 
that  his  future  lay  in  America.  He 
arrived  in  New  York  that  year 
—  a  greenhorn  —  and  soon  struck 
out  for  Cleveland,  Ohio. 

In  Cleveland,  young  Kahn  con- 
tinued to  practice  his  carpenter's 
trade  for  eight  years,  meanwhile 
studying  construction  techniques  in 
his  spare  time.  By  1916,  he  had 
acquired  sufficient  confidence  and 
capital  to  launch  himself  into  the 
construction  field— building  houses 
and  apartment  buildings. 

When  the  Florida  boom  began, 
it  looked  to  Mr.  Kahn  as  if  the 
real  estate  developers  in  the  Sun- 
shine State  were  indeed  preparing 
to  pave  some  streets  in  gold  for 


construction  company  owners.  He 
packed  again  and  migrated  South. 

In  1929,  the  bubble  burst.  Mr. 
Kahn  found  himself  without  cus- 
tomers for  whom  he  could  build 
houses  or  stores,  and  soon  his  com- 
pany was  "on  the  rocks"  along  with 
the  hopes  of  the  Florida  developers. 

That  year  he  moved  to  Colum- 
bia, S.  C,  to  go  into  partnership 
with  W.  H.  Sellars  in  the  con- 
struction field.  Within  five  years, 
he  had  again  organized  his  own 
firm  —  the  M.  B.  Kahn  Construc- 
tion Company  of  Columbia.  Today, 
as  young  in  spirit  as  he  was  in 
1934,  he  is  still  active  head  of 
the  firm,  assisted  by  his  three  sons 
—  Irwin,  Bernard  and  Saul.  He 
also  has  one  daughter,  Mrs.  Sabina 
Goldstein,  also  of  Columbia. 

In  1929,  when  he  arrived  in 
Columbia,  there  was  only  a  small 
Jewish  community  in  the  city.  The 
synagogue  was  an  old  wooden 
building  in  a  rapidly-degenerating 
section  of  town.  A  drive  was  soon 
started  to  build  a  new  "shul"  and 
M.  B.  Kahn  soon  found  himself 
involved  not  only  in  helping  to 
raise  funds  for  the  project,  but  in 
constructing  the  building.  He  was 
one  of  the  largest  contributors  in 
the  fund  drive  and  his  company 
built  the  synagogue  at  actual  cost. 

Over  the  years,  he  has  taken  a 
great  deal  of  interest  in  synagogue 
affairs  and  served  as  president  of 
the  Beth  Shalom  congregation  from 
1949  to  1954.  When  "M.  B."  step- 
ped down  and  relinquished  the 
gavel,  his  oldest  son,  Irwin,  was 
elected  to  fill  his  place. 

Mr.  Kahn  has  also  served  as  chair- 
man of  th  United  Jewish  Appeal 
fund  drives  in  Columbia  for  a  least 
ten  years,  off-and-on,  since  its  in- 
ception. He  is  also  an  active  mem- 
ber of  B'nai  B'rith  on  a  local  and 
state  level  and  of  the  Zionist  Or- 
ganization of  America. 

His  interest  in  Israel  as  a  home- 
land for  the  Jews  was  recognized 
by  the  Israeli  government  in  1955 
when  he  was  invited  to  visited  that 
country  as  one  of  a  hundred  pro- 
minent Jewish  businessmen  of  the 
United  States.  As  an  official  guest 
of  Israel,  he  conferred  with  govern- 
ment officials  on  policy,  met  David 
Ben  Gurion,  and  toured  the  coun- 
try. 

He  was  initiator  and  guiding 
spirit  behind  the  creation  of  the 
Columbia  Jewish  Community 
Center.  Alhough  Columbia  Jews 
had  talked  for  years  about  how 
(Please  Turn  to  Page  22) 


Look  before  you  sip!  Let 
the  light  glint  through 
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that  Richbrau,  one  of  the 
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0 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Rawlings  &  Wilson,  Architects 


The  Jewish  Community  Center — 5400  Block  Monument  Avenue,  Richmond,  Va. 


Zhe  ffewisk  Community  Renter 


Richmond,  Virginia 


By  Albert  Goldstein 


The  modern  structure,  which  has  been  hailed  by  critics  as 
a  monument  of  simplicity  and  functionalism,  now  consists  of  a 
regulation  size  AAU  swimming  pool,  a  health  center,  a  youth 
lounge,  an  arts  and  crafts  room,  a  gymnasium,  a  lobby,  and  a 
Patio.  A  second  unit,  consisting  of  offices  will  be  started  shortly. 
An  auditorium  and  a  nursery  school  wing  are  to  be  added  later. 

The  Richmond  Jewish  Community  Center  is  aptly  named 
for  it  was  organized  for  and  by  the  entire  Jewish  community. 
Center  membership  is  a  cross  section  of  the  community,  and  the 
membership  is  open  to  all  regardless  of  age,  sex,  economic  status, 
social  affiliation,  religious  belief,  political  views  or  country  of 
origin.  All  members  are  expected  to  pay  dues,  but  inability  to 
pay  bars  no  one  from  participation. 

The  Jewish  citizenry  of  Richmond  faces  the  future  of  its 
new  Center  with  eagerness  and  participation.  It  is  with  a  feeling 
of  pride  that  we  review  the  faint  beginning  to  the  present  size; 
and  it  is  with  a  certain  humbleness  that  we  realize  the  Center  has 
become  a  community  agency  commanding  respect  and  maintaining 
a  high  status  while  serving  the  people  of  Richmond.  A  review  of 
the  Center's  long  history  brings  forth  a  deep  respect  past  and 
present,  to  the  many  people  who  have  served  on  Boards  and  com- 
mittees, and  to  the  many,  many  wonderful  volunteers  who  have 
served  so  faithfully  over  the  years. 


The  Jewish  Center  movement  has  lately  been  attracting  large 
numbers  of  people  seeking  satisfaction  for  social,  cultural,  educa- 
tional and  civic  needs  and  experiences.  They  are  finding  in  the 
Center  an  avenue  for  Jewish  identification,  a  fruitful  source  of 
Jewish  values  and  traditions,  and  a  practical  opportunity  for  exper- 
ience in  Jewish  communal  life.  These  things  help  to  strengthen 
the  capacity  of  the  Jew  to  assume  a  vital  role  as  a  citizen  in  the 
total  American  community. 

In  Richmond,  the  Center  movement  had  its  origin  after  World 
War  1;  it  gained  impetus  during  the  years  until,  in  June  of  this 
year,  the  first  unit  of  a  modern  three-quarter  of  a  million  dollar 
structure  was  opened  to  the  public. 

From  a  humble  beginning  in  the  old  Neighborhood  House 
in  one  of  the  oldest  sections  of  Richmond,  the  movement  spread, 
in  1941,  to  the  establishment  of  a  Center  building  further  west 
to  a  centrally  located  position.  In  the  early  formative  years  with 
little  professional  help  and  dues  totalling  $3,000  from  a  member- 
ship of  about  300  individuals,  the  program  was  limited  and  sketchy. 
Today,  a  Board  of  Directors,  (45  people)  sponsors  program  ac- 
tivities ranging  from  nursery  school  children  to  the  elderly  citizen 
— all  professionally  directed. 

With  the  opening  of  the  new  building  in  the  5400  block  of 
Monument  Avenue,  the  membership  has  increased  rapidly  and 
is  close  to  the  800  family  mark. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


9 


HORACE  S  FLOURNOY 

Plumbing  —  Heating  —  Air-Conditioning 

•  S.  T.  JOHNSON 

•  OIL  BURNERS 

•WE  SPECIALIZE  IN 

•  POWER  PLANT  WORK 


1607  High  Point  Ave. 


RICHMOND,  VA. 


OUu&i  Biotlield,,  9 no. 

Electrical  Contractors 
17  N.  Addison  St.  •  RICHMOND,  VA. 

For  All  Your  Electrical  Problems 

•  Commercial  •  Industrial 

•  Residential  Wiring 

•  Repairs  Call 

PHONES: 
ELgin  8-5682 
No  Answer,  ATlantic  8-6611  or  ATlantic  8-8392 


R.  A.  Siewers,  Inc. 

Office : 
122  South  Belvidere  St. 

Factory : 
600-612  Cumberland  St. 
Phone  MI  8-0176 
RICHMOND,  VA. 

M  I  L  L  W  0  R  K 

LUMBER 

and 

BUILDING 

MATERIAL 


N.  W.  MARTIN  &  BROS.,  INC. 

Roofing  6c  Sheet  Metal  Contractors 

17th  and  Byrd  Streets  P.  0.  Box  1179 

RICHMOND  9,  VIRGINIA 

Air-Conditioning  —  Heating  —  Ventilating 

Roofers  For  Over  45  Years 

•  BUILT  UP  ROOFING 

Barrett — Johns-Manville — Koppers,  etc. 

•  RESIDENTIAL  ROOFING 

Slate,  Shingles,  Tin  and  Tile 

•  CORRUGATED  ASBESTOS 
ROOFING  &  SIDING 

Johns-Manville — Keasby  &  Mattison — Ruberoid 


At  Your  Service  for 
Over  a  Quarter  Century 

MOVING 

Local  and  Long 
Distance 

Direct  Service — 36  States 


J'  STORAGE 

O^Dial  AT  2-4228 


4920  W.  Broad  St. 
RICHMOND,  VA. 


PLEASANTS 
HARDWARE 

Since  1915 

"Most  Anything" 
Display  Room: 
612  N.  Lombardy 
Store :  1607  W.  Broad 
RICHMOND,  VA. 

General  Hardware 
Industrial  Builders 
Phone  EL  9-4014 


READY-MIXED 

CONCRETE 

"One  Yard  or  a  Million" 

SAND  -  GRAVEL  -  SOLITE  -  SLAG 

TELEPHONE 

Milton  4-1981 


SOUTHERN  MATERIALS  COMPANY 


RICHMOND 


INC. 


VIRGINIA 


^  AND  idJ 

STEEL  CO.,  INC. 


1011  N.  Lombardy  Street 


RICHMOND  20,  VA. 


ELgin  5-2823 


lO 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a  Happy  and 
Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Emporia,  Va. 


•  WELDON 

•  MILLS,  Inc. 

•     Emporia,  Va. 


Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  to  Our  Friends 
"Your  Financial  Friend" 

THE  CITIZENS  NATIONAL  BANK 

EMPORIA,  VIRGINIA 


Serving  this  community  since  1897 
Member  FDIC 


EMPORIA  SASH 
And  DOOR  CO.,  Inc. 

EMPORIA    •  VIRGINIA 

#  WE  SPECIALIZE  IN: 

#  CUT-UP  WOOD  PRODUCTS 

#  POPLAR,  OAK  OR  PINE 

#  FOR  UPHOLSTERED  LIVING  ROOM 

#  AND  DINETTE  FURNITURE 

#  WE  SOLICIT  INQUIRIES: 

P.  O.  Box  551  EMPORIA,  VA. 

Established  1909 
Lumber,  Crates  and  Box  Shooks 
FLOORING  CEILING  LIME 

PLASTER  CEMENT  SIDING 


Murder  In  A  Chocolate  Box 

By  E.  Davidson 


The  guardian  of  the  Rathis- 
bone  Monastery  in  Jerusalem  re- 
ceived a  large  box  of  chocolates 
as  a  New  Year  present.  He  open- 
ed the  box  and  was  blown  to 
pieces.  When  the  police  discover- 
ed his  body,  or  what  was  left  of 
it.  they  found  chocolates  and 
sweets  stuck  to  it;  while  the  walls 
and  the  ceiling  of  his  room  were 
also  covered  with  sweets.  The  po- 
lice had  little  difficulty  in  recon- 
structing the  drama:  the  box  of 
chocolates  had  contained  a  Mills 
bomb  which  went  off  when  the 
b"d  was  removed.  Why  anyone 
should  have  thought  uo  this  origi- 
nal and  hideous  method  of  mur- 
der was  something  of  a  pu/zle. 
1  he  dead  man  was  a  harmless 
old  gentleman,  with  out  an  enemv 
in  the  world. 

A  few  days  later,  a  typewritten 
letter  arrived  at  the  Monastery, 
addressed  to  the  son  of  the  mur- 
dered man:  "You  are  resposible 
for  vour  father's  death.  I  hope  it 
will  haunt  you  to  the  end  of  your 
life."  Rut  the  son  had  left  Israel 
a  year  before  and  was  now  in 
Turkey,  happily  married.  Some 
one  in  Police  Headquarters  re- 
membered that  a  year  before  a 
bomb  had  been  thrown  at  some 
passers-bv  not  fifty  yards  from  the 
entrance  to  the  monastery.  Three 
people  had  been  slightlv  in  hired, 
but  the  person  who  had  thrown 
the  bomb  had  never  been  discover- 
ed. The  motive  for  the  crime  was 
a  mysterv  and  the  police  had  clos- 
ed the  file,  puzzled  and  bewilder- 
ed. Jerusalem  forgot  about  it. 

The  typewritten  letter  suggest- 
ed that  the  father  had  been  killed 
for  the  "sins"  of  his  son,  and  this 
Jed  the  police  to  asking  questions 
about  the  son.  For  it  was  pre- 
sumed, and  rightly,  that  the  earli- 
er bomb-throwing  was  intended 
for  the  son.  This  son  had  been 
engaged  to  a  young  Persian  girl 
with  the  musical  name  of  Bara- 
/ani:  Esther  Barazanii.  He  had 
left  her  and  gone  off  to  Turkey, 
where  he  had  fallen  in  love  with 
another  girl. 

Where  was  Esther  Barazani? 
She  was  serving  im  the  army.  At 
the  moment  she  was  in  Haifa. 
The  police  found  her  there  in  an 
army  camp  and,  more  to  the  point, 
(hey  came  upon  a  typewriter  in 


the  office  where  she  worked.  Cue 
test  showed  that  this  was  the  very 
one  which  had  typed  the  ven- 
geance note.  Meanwhile  it  was 
discovered  that  the  box  of  choco- 
lates and  sweets  had  been  bought 
at  a  well-known  shop  ip  Jaffa  Rd. 
in  the  heart  of  New  Jerusalem. 
The  people  who  had  served  the 
girl  remembered  her  well  for 
she  and  a  young  man  who  had  ac- 
companied her  had  asked  for  a 
specially  deep  box  in  which  to 
pack  the  sweets  and  had  caused 
a  lot  of  bother  unti,l  they  found 
the  box  that  suited  them. 

Esther  was  arrested.  She  put  on 
an  innocent  lace  and  wondered 
what  the  police  could  be  wanting 
her  for.  The  evidence  piled  up 
against  her.  The  young  man. 
Saleh.  who  had  accompanied  her 
to  the  chocolate  shop  was  unearth- 
ed and  before  very  long  both  were 
telling  the  full  story  to  the  in- 
vestigators. 

Esther  had  a  friend  in  the  army 
and  he  had  supplied  her  with  her 
first  bomb.  That  was  thrown  at 
the  lover  who  had  given  her  up  - 
but  it  had  been  thrown  at  the 
wrong  person!  Now  her  lover  was 
beyond  her  reach  but  his  father 
was  near  at  hand.  So  she  secured 
a  second  hand  grenade  from  the 
same  friend.  She  did  not  know 
how  to  plate  it  in  a  box  so  that  it 
should  explode  on  being  opened 
—but  her  friend  Saleh  did.  Tt  was 
he  who  had  gone  with  her  to  the 
>-fiocV!ate  shop,  had  chosen  a 
suitable  box,  had  accompanied 
her  to  a  hotel  in  a  neighboring 
street  and  on  the  stairway  had 
tied  uo  the  little  parcel  with  a 
handful  of  death  inside.  He  had 
i hen  left  Esther.  She  had  fjone 
back  to  the  shop  and  asked  the 
boy  to  take  the  gift  to  the  Mona- 
stery. Fond  of  sweets  and  suspect- 
ing nothing,  The  guardian  had 
opened  the  box  and  that  was  the 
end  of  him. 

Esther  and  Saleh  were  brought 
before  the  District  Court  in  Jeru- 
salem and  charged  with  premedi 
tated  murder.  Hers  was  no  face  to 
launch  a  thousand  ships.  She  is 
sickly,  pale  face.  How  she  per- 
suaded two  respectable  young 
men  to  help  her  commit  a  mur- 
der, is  not  very  clear.  The  case 
against  the  two  of  them  was  crys- 

(Please   Turn   to   Page  61) 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


->  • 
i  V 


Virginia^ 


Newport  News,  Va. 

MRS.  MARTHA  B.  SHAPIRO,  Correspondent 


Play  time  at  Camp  Kadima.  Counselor  Marsha  Rice  looks  on  as  umpire 
Philip  Ruben,  catcher  David  Familant,  and  Jeffrey  Wilks  at  bat  play  their 
same  of  soft  ball. 

A  Jewish  Center  Youth  conven-     in  Norfolk  on  Friday,  Saturday,  and 
tion  comprising  of  delegates  from     Sunday,  September  18-20. 
Virginia,   Maryland,   Washington,        The  following  report  has  been 
D.  C.  and  Pennsylvania  was  held     submitted    by    David  Zwerdling, 


GRACE  &  FIFTH  SHOE  SALON  ONLY 


27.95 

the  best  dressed  women  wear 

D'ANTONIO 

Here,  one  good  reason  why:  black 
calf  suiter  with  peau  de  soie  collar 
and  bow.  Hi  or  mid  heel. 
Also  in  hi  heel  Brandy  calf  with  black 
trim.  One  from  an  exclusive  D' Antonio 
collection.  From  22.95. 


local  Field  representative  of  the 
JWB-USO: 

Jewish  GIs  stationed  in  Virginia 
as  well  as  patients  at  Veterans  Hos- 
pitals will  participate  in  Rosh 
Hashanah  services  on  the  evening 
of  October  2  and  on  October  3  and 
4,  through  arrangements  made  by 


the  National  Jewish  Welfare  Board. 

The  government-authorized  agen- 
cy for  serving  the  religious  and 
morale  needs  of  Jewish  servicemen 
in  the  U.  S.  Armed  Forces,  JWB 
serves  on  a  non-sectarian  basis 
through  its  membership  in  USO. 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  29) 


MONTALDOS 

Grace  at  Fifth,   Richmond,  Va. 


New  mid-length  mink  stole  with  dramatically 
deep  notched  collar. 

All  furs  labeled  as  to  country  of  origin 
on  imported  furs. 


21 


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IS 


FLOWER  PHONES 

MI  8-0938 


304 

NORTH 
fehST. 


FLOWERS 


RICHMOND,  VIRGINIA 

An  Eloquent  Remembrance 


POLLARD  and  BAGBY 

INCORPORATED 
REAL  ESTATE  AND  INSURANCE 
IN  ALL  ITS  BRANCHES 

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RICHMOND,  VIRGINIA 


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CORN  MEAL 

FRESH  GROUND 


Richmond  Glass  Shop 

Distributors  for  the  Famous 

SUPER  VALSPAR 
Varnish  and  Enamels 
Glass  for  furniture  tops 
Safety  glass  for  automobiles 

814  WEST  BROAD  STREET 
Telephone  MI  3-7394 


Sally  Bell's 
Kitchen 

708  W.  Grace  St. 
Richmond,  Va. 
Dial  MI  4-2338 
Delicacies  for  the  Home, 
Picnics,  and  Parties 

•  Parking  Facilities 

•  For  Our  Customers 


AMERICAN 
CLEANING  CO. 

1-DAY  SERVICE 

718  East  Main  Street 
RICHMOND  24,  VA. 


Melvin  W.  Estes 


Servicenter 


CLEANING  AND  WAXING 

•  1801  W.  Broad  St. 

•  2301  W.  Broad  St. 
RICHMOND,  VA. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 
Richmond  B'nai  B'rith  Women 

Betty  A.  Jaffe,  Correspondent 

5,  Leadership  Committee,  and  Mrs. 
Jack  Molk,  Chapter  Service  Officer, 
from  Gaithersburg  and  Silver 
Spring,  Maryland,  respectively, 
speak  on  orientation  of  B'nai  B'rith. 
They  will  answer  questions  and 
help  the  membership  understand 
the  nature  of  their  unique  organ- 
ization. The  meeting  will  be  held 
from  10:30  a.m.  to  3:00  p.m.  at 
Curies  Neck  Dairy  and  members 
will  buy  their  own  lunches. 

On  October  28th,  lunch  will 
be  served  and  cooked  by  the  ladies 
of  B'nai  B'rith  Women  at  Temple 
Beth  Ahabah  at  12:00  noon.  This 
will  be  our  annual  Paid-up  Mem- 
bership Luncheon.  Arrangements 
are  not  complete  but  there  will 
be  a  speaker  of  great  interest. 


Approximately  100  youngsters 
were  served  a  picnic  lunch  at  the 
Union  Theological  Seminary  by 
two  of  the  B'nai  B'rith  Women: 
Mrs.  E.  Bub  Schuman,  President, 
and  Mrs.  Ben  Lerman,  Vice-  Pres- 
ident. The  occasion  was  the  An- 
nual Youth  Forum,  which  is  spon- 
sored by  the  National  Conference 
of  Christians  and  Jews.  The  after- 
noon keynote  speaker  was  Dr.  Mor- 
ton J.  Sobel,  Head  of  Department 
of  Colleges  and  Universities  of  the 
Anti-defamation  League  and  the 
topic  was  Understanding  —  Path- 
way to  Local  and  Global  Peace. 

On  October  14th  members  of 
B'nai  B'rith  Women  will  be  given 
an  opportunity  to  hear  Mrs. 
Maurice  A.  Goldberg,  Chairman  of 
B'nai  B'rith  Women,  District  No. 


American  Jewry  On  The  Threshold 

(Continued  From  Pabc  5) 


of  a  mysteroius  phenomenon,  some- 
thing inevitable,  which  will  always 
continue  to  happen  whenever  any 
major  Jewish  center  is  about  to  die 
out. 

Yet  the  facts,  properly  integrat- 
ed and  analyzed,  are  clear  enough. 

When  the  general  social  condi- 
tions in  a  country  begin  to  deteri- 
orate, so  as  to  result  in  increasingly 
widespread  anti-Jewish  feeling  and 
action,  the  Jews  are  compelled  in 
approximately  corresponding  pro- 
portion to  leave  that  country.  They 
naturally  move  to  the  region  or 
country  which  is  at  once  sufficient- 
ly near  and  friendly.  The  fact  that 
the  new  country  is  hospitable  is 
ample  indication  that  its  social  or- 
der and  economic  system  are  in 
good  enough  shape,  that  those  in 
power  recognize  that  there  was 
room  in  their  midst  for  increased 
commerce  and  prosperity.  Up  to 
our  own  days  this  was  always  the 
case. 

Babylonia  was  congenial  terri- 
tory for  the  Jews  after  the  destruc- 
tion both  of  the  First  and  Second 
Temples.  Moslem  Spain  accepted 
the  Jews,  and  gained  very  much 
prosperity   from    their  activities. 


Poland  and  Lithuania  were  rela- 
tively good  hosts  to  the  Jews,  when 
Christian  Spain  and  other  parts  of 
Western  Europe  drove  them  out. 
The  Jews  of  Germany  played  an 
important  role  in  the  tremendous 
growth  of  the  kingdom  of  Poland 
in  the  fourteenth  century  under 
Casimir  the  Great. 

Why  Millions  Died 

This  situation  no  longer  obtains. 
A  primary  reason  for  the  destruc- 
tion of  six  million  Jews  in  Europe 
is  that  no  country  was  willing  to 
open  its  doors  to  them;  the  Jews  of 
Europe  simply  had  nowhere  to  go. 
The  interrelationship  of  the  world 
is  no  longer  what  it  was  before  the 
depression  of  1929  and  the  subse- 
quent World  War  II,  a  collection 
of  relatively  independent  and  indi- 
vidual countries,  so  that  hundreds 
of  thousands  of  Jews  could  enter 
western  Europe  and  Latin  and 
South  American  countries  and  that 
millions  of  Jews  could  immigrate 
into  the  United  States. 

Cut  Off  Suddenly 

The  economic  and  social  condi- 
tions of  England,  France,  Holland, 
Belgium,  Germany,  Canada,  the 
United    States,    Australia,  South 


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13 


Africa,  Argentina  and  the  like  no 
longer  make  it  feasible  and  useful 
for  those  in  power  to  permit  wide- 
spread immigration. 

Consequently,  whereas  Baby- 
lonia was  able  to  draw  on  Palestin- 
ian Jews  when  conditions  in  Pales- 
tine began  to  deteriorate,  where 
Spain  and  Eastern  Europe  could 
receive  a  continuous  flow  of  Jewish 
families  from  the  considerable  res- 
ervoirs of  the  countries  which  were 
failing,  we  American  Jews  have 
been  cut  off  suddenly  and  com- 
pletely from  our  forefathers,  from 
our  immediate  sources  of  cultural 
nourishment,  from  the  Yeshivot 
and  Gymnasiums  of  Russia,  Pol- 
and, Lithuania,  Rumania,  Austria, 
Germany  and  Hungary. 

Cultural  Orphans 
For  us,  this  is  an  unparalleled 
catastrophe.  At  this  moment,  when 
we  should  be  receiving  the  quality 
and  quantity  of  the  millions  of 
Jews  who  lived  in  all  parts  of  Eu- 
rope and  Russia,  when  we  should 
be  striving  to  build  our  own  Amer- 
ican Jewish  culture  with  the  aid  of 
the  best  that  our  European  Jewish 
brothers  created  during  the  past 
several  hundred  years,  at  this  time 
we  find  ourselves  to  a  critical  ex- 
tent cultural  orphans,  bereft,  by 
the  uncouth  and  uncivilized,  of  our 
stimulating  and  sympathetic  broth- 
ers and  sisters  on  the  other  side  of 
the  ocean. 

A  Too  Hasty  Look 
it  is  not  generally  recognized  that 
in  the  earlier  epochal  changes,  the 
new  Jewish  centers  did  not  mature 
and  replace  the  old,  dying  centers, 
in  a  matter  of  a  few  years,  or  even 
decades. 


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The  generalizing  character  of 
writing  and  teaching  history  has 
given  most  people  the  impression 
that  virtually  at  the  very  moment 
that  fudea  was  passing  away,  Jew- 
ish Babylonia  became  the  grown- 
up father  of  the  household;  that  no 
sooner  did  Spanish  Jewry  breathe 
its  last,  than  did  Poland  and  Lith- 
uania replace  it  in  full  glory  and 
authority. 

This  is  so  far  from  being  true 
that  it  can  harm  us  if  we  fail  to  see 
the  historical  development  in  its 
proper  light. 

Not  aware  that  the  outstanding 
Jewish  centers  of  the  past  were  not 
the  only  great  centers  of  Jewish 
activity  at  the  time,  and  that  they 
did  not  come  into  being  overnight, 
as  it  were,  writers  and  lecturers 
have  taken  a  hasty  look  about 
them,  have  perceived  the  relatively 
low  level  of  Jewish  cultural  activ- 
ity in  this  country,  and  proceeded 
to  foresee  a  declining  American 
Jewry,  a  Jewry  of  some  five  million 
largely  unaware  of  its  extended  his- 
tory and  traditions,  blissful  in  its 
ignorance  of  Jewish  literature,  de- 
parting at  an  increasingly  rapid 
pace  farther  away  from  Jewish  in- 
terests and  living. 

The  lecturers  condemn  the  Jews 
of  America  for  being  uninterested 
in  Judaism,  they  accuse  them  of  as- 
similation and  frighten  them  with 
the  prospect  of  cultural  extinction. 

Underlying  this  atttude  is  not 
alone  an  incorrect  understanding 
and  application  of  our  past  history, 
but  also  a  marked  lack  of  respect 
for  and  appreciation  of  the  actual 
and  potential  ability  and  learning 
of  the  Jews  of  America. 

There  is  altogether  too  wide- 
spread an  opinion  that  right  now, 
and  for  all  time  to  come,  the  Amer- 
ican   Jewish    community  simply 

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The  Community  and  The  Individual 

By  Solomon  Lift 

President,  National  Jewish  Welfare  Board 


The  beautiful  gate  which  forms 
the  front  of  a  certain  synagogue's 
Ark  is  a  complicated  metal  net- 
work and  although  one  can  trace 
out  each  bronze  strand  from  top  to 
bottom,  each  part  of  the  design  is 
connected  to  every  other  part. 

This  isn't  any  accident  on  the 
part  of  the  artist.  There  is  an  im- 
portant symbolic  message  worked 
into  the  gate,  an  idea  which  goes 
back  into  Jewish  tradition  and 
which  at  the  same  time  conveys  an 
important  ideal  for  us  today— the 
idea  of  community,  of  countless  in- 
dividuals, each  with  his  own  path 
through  life,  each  touching  and  af- 
fecting the  paths  of  others.  It  is  a 
fundamental  Jewish  idea  for  Jews 
have  always  been  deeply  concerned 
with  the  individual— with  his  intel- 
lectual and  emotional  growth  and 
with  his  spiritual  well-being— and 
we  have  never  hesitated  to  mobil- 
ize the  resources  of  the  community 
to  provide  this  growth  and  well- 
being.  We  admonish  man  not  to 
separate  himself  from  the  commu- 
nity; likewise  we  never  permit  the 
community  to  forget  one  individ- 
ual. 

So,  on  this  occasion  of  the  New 
Year,  when  Jewry  examines  the 
events  of  the  past  twelve  months 
and  looks  forward  to  the  promise 
of  a  new  dcade,  5720,  I  express  my 
good  wishes,  and  those  of  my  fel- 
low officers  and  board  members  of 
the  National  Jewish  Welfare  Board 
with  this  hope:  that  the  coming 
year  may  bring  you  continued  pro- 
gress toward  the  fulfillment  of  your 
communal  aspirations  for  a  good 
life  for  all;  may  it  also  bring  us 
the  continued  opportunity  to  work 
with  you  toward  your  goal  and  to 
share  in  your  achievements. 

New  times  bring  new  problems— 
but  are  they  really  new?  Our  an- 
cients were  concerned  with  the  ne- 
cessity of  providing  food  and  shel- 
ter, spiritual  comfort  and  protec- 
tion from  enemies.  Each  man  did 
what  he  could  for  his  family,  but 


when  the  burden  grew  too  great, 
or  too  complicated,  he  turned  to 
the  community  for  aid.  Thankful- 
ly, we  today  find  food,  clothing, 
and  shelter  comparatively  easy  to 
provide,  although  we  remember  a 
few  decades  back  when  this  was 
not  so  ...  we  are  constantly  aware, 
also,  that  others  less  fortunate  to- 
day need  our  help  for  these  neces- 
sities. The  translation  of  slings  and 
spears  into  guided  missiles  with 
nuclear  warheads  has  complicated 
the  matter  of  protection;  it  also 
marks  an  era  when  spiritual  com- 
fort must  be  buttressed  by  warm 
understanding,  humanitarian  guid- 
ance, and  expert  assistance  for  peo- 
ple who  find  the  pressure  of  being 
"modern"  just  a  little  too  much. 

Whether  we  —  your  community 
and  JWB  —  help  a  teen-age  boy  or 
girl  find  outlets  for  his  normally 
rebellious  spirit,  or  whether  we 
bring  the  comfort  of  Jewish  tradi- 
tion and  observance  to  a  young  GI 
on  guard  with  U.  S.  troops  in  some 
obscure  corner  of  the  world,  or 
whether  ;i  grandmother  finds 
through  us  a  way  to  spend  a  few 
happy  hours  each  week  with  new 
friends  and  old  pastimes,  we  con- 
tinue in  our  tradition  of  concern 
for  the  individual  —  a  tradition 
which  was  born  anew  when  the 
American  Jewish  community  cre- 
ated the  National  Jewish  Welfare 
Board. 

As  we  express  our  ancient  holy 
day  sentiment,  "May  you  be  in- 
scribed for  a  good  year!"  let  us 
look  back  on  our  record  of  service 
for  the  last  year,  appraise  what  we 
were  able  to  do  in  terms  of  what 
we  wanted  to  do,  and  in  terms  of 
what  had  to  be  done,  and  go  for- 
ward with  a  resolve  to  make  the 
coming  year  one  which  sees  us  just 
a  step  further  ahead  toward  our 
mutual  goals. 

BUY  THAT 
ISRAEL  BOND 
NOW! 


Send  FloWers  ...     It  is  the  nice  thing  to  do. 

JOHN  L.  RATCLIFFE 


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FLORIST 

RICHMOND,  VA. 


206  North  Fifth  St. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Visiting  Old  Friends 

By  Anil  a  Engle 


ANITA  ENGLE 

My  11 -year-old  David  has  just 
come  back  from  a  visit  to  Tivon 
where  we  lived  for  five  years.  We 
are  all  feeling  rather  saddened, 
for  he  brought  back  a  bunch  of 
grapes  from  the  vineyard  which 
my  husband  had  planted,  and  the 
news  that  Zarizaleh  \s  grave  is 
covered  with  thistles. 

I  suppose  everyone  has  one 
house,  and  one  dog  which  will 
always  remain  imbedded  in  their 
heart.  The  house  in  our  lives  is 
ihis  little  cottage  in  the  mountains 
of  Lower  Galilee  which  we  had 
to  giive  up  when  we  moved  to 
Terusalem  a  year  ago.  The  dog  is 
Zarizaleh,  who  lies  buried  under 
the  oaks  in  the  back  garden  there. 


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We  had  Zarizaleh  for  two  years. 
He  was  a  well-mixed  type  of 
poodle,  with  brown  eyes  that 
sparkled  with  intelligence.  He  was 
rather  like  my  two  boys,  terribly 
bouncy  and  irrepressible,  and  con- 
genitally  averse  to  being  clean. 
If  he  saw  me  getting  the  tub  ready 
in  the  back  yard,  he'd  tear  off  in- 
to the  wadi  and  stay  there.  When 
I  did  manage  to  trick  him  into 
getting  washed,  as  soon  as  he  was 
out  of  my  hands,  he'd  run  into  the 
road  and  roll  in  the  dust  until 
his  thick  beige  hair  was  matted 
and  gray. 

The  shaggy  little  dcg  couldn't 
bear  to  let  me  out  of  the  yard 
without  following  me.  Yet  every 
time  he  came  anywhere  with  me. 
I  returned  a  nervous  wreck.  He 
fell  upon  dogs  three  times  his 
size.  He  threw  himself  headlong 
after  every  cat  he  saw.  He  raced 
after  motorcycles  and  lorries  like 
a  maniac. 

Perhaps  because  I  hate  so  much 
to  be  restricted  myself,  I  couldn't 
bring  myself  to  put  a  leash  on 
Zarizaleh.  I  finally  made  someone 
keep  him  in  the  house  whenever 
I  v  ent  shopping.  Zarizaleh  always 
knew  what  was  going  on  and 
would  cry  and  make  a  terrible 
fuss,  but  I  just  hardened  my 
heart. 

Then,  one  Friday  morning.  I 
decided  to  take  him  with  me.  It 
was  a  glorious  glittering  morning, 
after  a  rain.  Zarizaleh  was  beside 
himself  with  joy  and  gratitude 
when  he  saw  that  I  was  going  to 
let  him  come.  We  set  off  up  the 
hill,  our  first  stop  the  dairy  on 
the  corner  of  the  main  street.  As 
I  stood  for  a  moment  before  en- 
tering, a  cat  emerged  from  the 
bushes.  In  a  flash  Zarizaleh  was 
chasing  her  across  the  street.  A 
bus  approached.  Before  I  knew 
what  had  happened,  the  bus  was 
gone,  and  Zarizaleh  was  lying 
motionless,  looking  like  a  toy  dog 
that  had  been  dropped  on  the 
street. 

Fate  had  been  kind  to  the  little 
dog— and  to  me  too.  He  had  died 
instantly,  without  any  disfigure- 
ment, or  moment's  pain.  I  placed 
him  in  a  box  that  the  shopkeeper 
gave  me,  and  left  it  in  a  sheltered 
place  off  the  road.  When  the  boys 
returned  home  from  school  we 
came  with  the  base  of  my  shop- 


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EDITORIALS 

(Concluded  from  Page  3) 

versity.  This  school,  Israel's  leading  center  lor  the  training  of 
teachers,  has  been  sponsored  by  the  NCJW  since  1948.  It  was 
given  the  name  of  an  American  educational  philosopher— the 
John  Dewey  School  of  Education— in  recognition  of  a  U.  S. 
Government  grant  and  of  the  Council's  unwavering  support. 

On  the  domestic  scene,  last  year  saw  the  Council  honoring 
the  contrbutions  which  immigrants  have  made  to  the  United 
States,  by  naming  a  New  American  of  the  Year.  Possibly  the 
best  known  of  the  Council's  historic  programs  are  its  service 
to  the  foreign  born,  which  were  established  at  the  turn  of  the 
century  and  played  a  major  role  in  developing  the  Jewish 
community's  postwar  network  of  services. 

Of  lasting  importance  both  to  the  American  Jewish  and 
general  communities  is  the  nationwide  "community  leadership 
training  program"  which  the  Council  launched  last  year.  Mem- 
bers of  the  240  Council  Sections  have  been  surveying  the  huge 
population  and  other  changes  in  their  communities,  and  bring- 
ing together  civic  and  agency  leaders  to  discuss  how  to  meet 
the  human  needs  these  changes  are  creating.  The  effort  has 
been  meeting  enthusiastic  cooperation  everywhere,  and  is  al- 
ready providing  a  blueprint  for  the  future. 

Finally,  a  milestone  was  reached  in  the  past  year  when, 
in  recognition  of  the  Council's  services  to  the  well-being  of 
children,  from  its  early  struggles  against  child  labor  to  its 
hundreds  of  welfare  projects  today,  its  president,  Mrs.  Moise 
S.  Cahn  of  New  Orleans,  was  invited  by  President  Eisenhower 
to  serve  on  his  committee  for  the  White  House  Conference 
on  Children  and  Youth. 

The  theme  of  the  women's  65th  anniversary  convention, 
"Knowledge  our  strength,  service  our  tradition,"  expressed  the 
organization's  close  identification  with  the  familiar  Jewish  em- 
phasis on  tzdakah  and  education.  We  wish  the  Council  mem- 
bers strength  and  wisdom  as  they  prepare  for  the  two  years 
ahead. 


ping  cart  to  get  the  box.  With 
Jonathan  and  David  on  either 
side  of  me,  we  walked  slowly  and 
silenly  down  the  hill,  bringing 
Zarizaleh  home  for  burial. 

As  we  approached  the  house  of 
a  neighbor,  I  saw  their  white  dog 
standing  on  the  verandah  watch- 
ing the  road.  A  rather  fine,  well- 
cared  for  dog,  he  had  always  been 
Zarizaleh's  companion.  Just  be 
fore  we  came  to  their  gate,  the  dog 
ran  down  the  steps  as  if  he  had 
been  waiting  for  us.  I  expected 
firm  to  sniff  at  the  cart,  as  he 
usually  did,  when  1  passed  on  my 
way  from  shopping.  Zarizaleh  had 
been  dead  for  three  hours.  In  that 
heat  every  dog  in  the  neighbour- 
hood must  have  had  wind  of  it. 

But  Didi  ignored  the  cart.  Plac- 
ing himself  just  ahead  of  us,  he 
walked  slowly  and  wvjth  great 
dignity  up  the  road.  It  was  like 
someone  leading  a  funeral  pro- 
cession. I  watched  him  fascinated. 
"Is  he  going  to  turn  in  at  our 
house?"  I  wondered.  He  did.  With 
the  same  slow,  deliberate  pace  he 
turned  in  at  our  gate  and  preced- 
ed us  down  the  steps  to  the  lawn 


where  he  and  Zarizaleh  used  to 
have  such  fun  rolling  over  and 
over  each  other.  Then,  as  my 
husband  came  to  meet  us,  he 
broke  off  and  returned  home. 

For  days  I  puzzled  over  this, 
for  I  felt  that  something  had  hap- 
pened here  that  was  important 
for  me  to  understand.  Why  did 
Didi  ignore  the  cart  which  con- 
tained Zarizaleh's  dead  body?  Was 
it  possible  that  dogs  understood 
(Please  Turn  to  Page  19) 


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The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Should  The  Lohengrin  Wedding  March 
Be  Played  Al  Jewish  Weddings! 

By  Harry  Simonhof  f 

Mr.  Simonhoff  momentarily  leaves  his  American  Notables  to  present  his 
views  on  a  controversial  question.  The  Editor. 

Recently  I  attended  a  syna- 
gogue wedding.  As  the  procession 
started  down  the  aisle  the  organ 
pealed  the  bridal  chorus  from 
Lohengrin.  Richard  Wagner's 
music,  struck  me  in  the  face.  I  left 
outraged  as  if  someone  insulted  me. 
The  revulsions  experienced  on  see- 
ing Dachau  and  Bergen  Belsen 
came  back.  With  Wagner's  music. 
I  imagined  the  screams,  the  moans, 
the  dying  gasps  at  the  crematories. 

Sitting  next  to  a  bright  young 
fellow  I  remarked:  "Do  they  have 
to  play  Wagner's  music  at  a  Jew- 
ish wedding-and  in  a  Temple? 
The  young  man  looked  at  me  con- 
descendingly and  said:  "Why  not? 
You  want  music  to  be  chauvinis- 
tic?" I  answered:  "But  that  is  ex- 
actly what  Richard  Wagner's 
music  is.  Did  you  ever  read  his 
pamphlet  Judaism  in  Music?" 
Evidently  he  did  not  like  my  tone. 
"I  am  not  interested  in  Jewish 
propaganda."  It  was  now  my  turn 
to  be  withering.  "I  suppose  you 
Mould  also  class  Mein  Kamf  as 
Jewish  propaganda."  Obviously  I 
was  wasting  my  time.  Besides,  the 
ceremony  ended  with  Mendel- 
sohn's Wedding;  March.  I  did  take 
a  final  fling.  "You  fellows  seem  to 


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HARRY  SIMONHOFF 

know  everything  except  about 
matters  Jewish." 

The  intellectual  snob's  approval 
of  Wagner's  music  at  a  Jewish 
wedding  is  by  no  means  exception- 
al. It  is  shared  by  artists  and  rab- 
bis, by  refugees  and  professors. 
How  many  Jews  ever  heard  of 
Wagner's  pernicious  essay?  Or 
know  about  his  vicious  anti-Semi- 
tism? Are  they  aware  that  the  ren- 
egade Englishman,  Houston  Stew- 
art Chamberlain  married 
Wagner's  daughter?  This  arch 
anti-Semite's  Foundation  of  The 
Nineteenth  Century  became  a 
Bible  to  the  Nazis.  Was  it  merely 
accidental  that  Wagner's  daugh- 
ter-in-law, the  widow  of  his  son 
Siegfried,  was  among  the  first  in 
the  art  world  to  back  Adolf  Hit- 
ler? It  was  her  prestige  as  owner  of 
Wagner's  Music  Drama  Theatre 
at  Beyreuth  that  enabled  Shikel- 
gruber  to  meet  and  influence  the 
Cerman  intelligentsia. 

Wagner's  anti-Semitic  writings 
were  especially  vicious.  Until  the 
middle  of  the  igth  cenutry  the 
arts  were  singularly  free  of  Judeo- 
phobia.  Any  sensible  person  might 
ask  what  has  music  to  do  with 
race  liatred?  But  such  tolerance 
was  changed  by  Richard  Wagner, 
who  incidentally,  is  suspected  on 
pretty  strong  evidence,  to  be  the 
son  of  Ludwig  Geyer,  an  actor  of 
Jewish   descent   who   became  his 


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step-father.  The  Chief  of  Police, 
Karl  Friedrich  Wagner  and 
Johanna  were  estranged  for  good 
at  the  time  Richard  was  born. 

Unquestionably,  Richard  Wag- 
ner was  one  of  the  great  musical 
geniuses  of  all  time.  Yet  he  could 
be  spiteful,  envious  and  ungrate- 
ful. He  never  believed  in  paying 
an  honest  debt.  He  thought  noth- 
ing of  seducing  the  wives  of  his 
best  friends,  especially  of  those 
who  trusted  and  helped  him. 
When  Wagner  started  his  career, 
the  outstanding  names  in  music 
were  Mendelssohn,  Meyerbeer, 
Halevy,  Offenbach  and  others. 
They  happened  to  be  Jews.  When 
Wagner  saw  these  musicians  suc- 
cessful and  idolized  while  he 
struggled  in  poverty  to  gain  recog- 
nition, he  decided  to  get  even  for 
l  his  neglect.  In  the  tradition  of 
Haman,  he  took  revenge,  not  on 
his  competitors  alone  but  on  the 
entire  Jewish  people. 

Wagner's  vicious  pamphlet,  Ju- 
daism in  Music,  became  a  text 
book  for  anti-Semites  not  only  in 
Germany  but  throughout  Europe. 
And  as  he  emerged  from  obscurity 
to  international  fame  this  venomo- 
us tract  was  taken  more  and  more 
seriously.  It  established  Richard 
Wagner  as  the  anti-Jewish  Pope, 
the  godfather  of  Nazism.  The 
central  theme  of  his  creed  is  that 
Jews  as  an  alien  race  cannot  possibly 
comprehend  the  German  soul. 
Since  he  held  that  people  think 
with  their  blood,  a  Jewish  artist 
could  not  express  or  intrepret  the 
Germanic  spirit.  Thus,  if  he 
composes  music  he  introduces  an 
alien  element  which  corrupts 
the  pure  fountainhead  of  Teu- 
tonic Kultur.  It  follows  quite 
logically  that  all  music  written  by 
Jewish  composers  must  be  torn 
root  and  branch  out  of  German 
art.  This  poisonous  germ  grew  in- 
to a  catalysis  that  drove  the  Nazis 
to  burn  musical  works  by  Jewish 
composers  and  to  far  more  crimi- 
nal excesses.  Wagner's  dream  was 
symbolically  realized  with  the  de- 
struction of  Felix  Mendelssohn's 
marble  statue  at  Dusseldorf. 

Yet  Wagner  never  hesitated  to 
welcome  Jewish  assistance  in  pop- 
ularizing his  music  dramas.  The 
anti-Semite  is  seldom  a  whole- 
some or  consistent  person.  This 
becomes  apparent  when,  in  spite 
of  his  anti-Semitic  ravings,  Wag- 
ner utilized  the  talents  of  Herman 


Levi  to  conduct  the  international 
premiere  of  Parsifal  at  Beyreuth, 
an  historical  event  of  high  magni- 
tude in  the  musical  world.  But 
his  sub-conscious  wishes  were  com- 
pletely fulfilled  when  Jewish  sing- 
ers, conductors,  violinists,  pianists 
and  composers  were  either  banish- 
ed or  murdered  in  concentration 
camps. 

Wagner's  Judeophobia  did  not 
stop  with  music.  He  embraced 
racism  in  all  its  aspects.  Jews  be- 
came the  demons  exploiting  "the 
adorable  and  beautiful  Germans" 
as  described  by  his  "meistersinger" 
who  dogmatized  that  by  controll- 
ing the  banks  and  the  press  Jews 
dominated  the  entire  German  life. 
But  he  insisted  that  there  is  some- 
thing racially  mystical  about  the 
German  language  which  Jews 
could  never  hope  to  acquire.  In 
the  face  of  Heinrich  Heine's  ex- 
quisite handling  of  the  language 
in  poetry  and  prose,  Wagner  argu- 
ed that  Jews  could  never  feel, 
understand  or  create  in  German. 
Nazis  mouthed  this  slogan  until 
their  gas  chambers  were  seized  by 
the  allied  forces. 

A  good  example  of  Wagner's 
\irus  can  be  found  in  his  four 
gigantic  music  dramas  named  the 
Nibelungen  Ring.  It  opens  with 
the  three  maidens  swimming  in 
the  Rhine  while  guarding  the 
golden  treasure.  Alberich,  the 
"swarthy,  swampy  and  sulphur- 
ous" gnome  steals  the  hoard  and 
with  it  determines  to  dominate 
the  world.  (The  anti-Semite's 
snide  charge  of  Jewish  love  of 
gold  and  power.)  The  heroes  of 
the  saga  are  of  course  tall,  blond, 
strong,  brave,  courteous,  generous 
and  honorable,)  while  the  broth- 
ers Alberich  and  Mimi  are  describ- 
ed as  "gruesome,  grizzled  and 
gray,  cramped  and  crooked,  with 
hanging  ears  stretching,  bleary 
eyes  staring."  In  his  written  in- 
structions on  the  original  score, 
Wagner  directed  that  the  vocal 
delivery  of  the  two  Nibelungs 
should  be  "The  Jewish  manner 
of  speech  -  shrill,  hissing,  buzzing, 
a  wholly  foreign  and  aritrary  dis- 
tortions of  our  idiom." 

The  Wagnerian  poison  coursed 
through  the  German  nation  for 
three-score  years.  It  was  an  in- 
gredient in  the  Satanic  brew  that 
concocted  the  Third  Reich;  it 
also  became  a  factor  in  its  de- 

( Please  turn  to  Page  46) 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Roanoke  Chapter  of  Hadassah 

EDITH  LICHTENSTEIN,  Correspondent 


"Warm  greetings  and  best 
wishes  for  the  Holiday  Season  to 
all  our  Sister  members  from  the 
Roanoke  Chapter  of  Hadassah. 
We  launched  our  season  with  a 
stimulating  visit  from  Mrs.  Julius 
Siegel,  past  president  of  Arling- 
ton, Va.  Chapter,  now  Regional 
Vice-President  of  the  Seaboard  Re- 
gional Advisor.  In  the  afternoon 
she  addressed  our  summer  Board 
Meeting  held  at  the  Greenhill 
Country  Club  and  that  night 
spoke  to  the  members,  newcom- 
ers and  new  members  at  a  Pot 
Luck  Supper  held  at  the  home  of 
our  president,  Mrs.  Howard  Sel- 
man.  Mrs.  Siegel  gave  us  a  resume 
of  her  trip  to  Israel  and  of  her 
visits  to  the  schools  such  as  the 
Alice  Seligsburg  School  and  others 
which  are  aided  by  Hadassah  and 
of  their  importance  in  rehabilitat- 
ing the  youth  of  Israel.  Her  own 
15-year-old  son,  just  returned 
from  Israel  and  was  greatly  im- 
pressed with  the  facilities  that 
youth  enjoy.  Incidentally,  the  Pot 
Luck  Supper  was  much  enjoyed, 
served  out  doors,  illuminated  by 
Chinese  lanters,  with  hospitality 
by  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Howard  Selman. 

Our  First  Board  Meeting  was 
help  Sept.  21st  and  regular  meet- 
ing on  Sept.  28th.  the  September 
meeting  was  devoted  to  Member- 
ship and  Mrs.  Max  Rosenberg, 
chairman  reports  the  following 
new  members:  Mrs.  Robert  Rosen- 
berg, Mrs.  Sol  Katz,  Mrs.  Ruth 
Silverstein,  Mrs.  Sally  Maurice 
Grossman,  Mrs.  Pyrle  Gibson. 

The  first  meeting's  program 
was  in  charge  of  Mrs.  Irvimg 
Shear,   our  vice-president. 

The  Lynchburg  and  Roanoke 
Chapter  are  planning  a  joint 
board  meeting  at  a  future  date, 
to  be  announced  later. 

Officers  lor  this  Year:  Presi- 
dent, Mrs.  Howard  Selmar;  Vice 
President,  Mrs.  Irving  Sheer;  Vice 
President,  Mrs.  Malcolm  Rosenberg 
Financial  Secretary,  Mrs.  Gerald 
Glass;  Recording  Sec.  Miss  Mil- 
dred Shenkein;  Corresp.  Sec.  Mrs. 
Leon  Levine;  Treas.  Miss  Yetta 
Gershov;  Membership,  Mrs.  Max 
Rosenberg,  Nominations,  Mrs. 
Rayhoel  Ustrov.  Donor  Luncheon, 
Mrs.  L.  Lakon;  New  Youth  Alijah 
Chairman,  Mrs.  Sol  Katz;  Hadas- 
sah   Medical    Org.    Mrs.  Julien 


Sacks;  Jewish  National  Fund:  Blue 
Boxes,  Mrs.  Sam  Brumberg;  Treas. 
Mrs.  Ralph  Masinter  and  Mrs. 
David  Newman;  Medical  Center 
Births,  Mrs.  Morris  Diamond;  Med- 
ical Center  Cards,  Mrs.  Kate  Cohen; 
Historian,  Mrs.  Harry  Thames; 
Hospitality,  Mrs.  Sam  Halpern  and 
Mrs.  Robert  Loebl;  Telephone, 
Mrs.  Bernard  Diamond;  Book  of 
Life  Cards,  Mrs.  Abe  Jacobson. 


Visifimfj  Old  friends 

(Concluded  From  Page  15) 
instinctively  what  we.  with  all  our 
intelligence,  found  so  hard  to 
grasp:  that  the  body  was  perish- 
able, and  of  no  more  importance 
than  a  discarded  glove?  But  that 
even  a  shaggy  little  dog  had  an 
imperishable  something,  and  it 
was  this  that  Didi  was  honourng 
when  he  walked  with  such  dignity 
before  us  down  the  road? 


Two  Jewish  houses  of  worship  in 
Columbus,  Ga.  were  painnted  with 
swastikas  recently  by  unidentified 
vandals  who  are  believed  to  have 
set  fire  and  heavily  damaged  the 
Columbus  Museum  of  Arts  and 
Crafts.  The  police  found  six  swas- 
tikas scrawled  on  the  museum 
walls.  Local  police  officials  are  said 
to  incline  to  the  view  that  the  in- 
cident was  a  case  of  pure  vandal- 
ism unrelated  to  prejudice,  but  the 
Jewish  community  in  Columbus, 
estimated  at  1,000  people,  abstain- 
ed from  commenting  on  the  situa- 
tion. 

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The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


A  «.  C  X   i    T  «   C  T 


Roanoke's  New  and  Beautiful  Temple  Emanuel 

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The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Eva  and  Jewish  Identify 

By  Meyer  Levin 


MEYER  LEVIN 

From  the  first  survivor  whom  I 
interviewed  as  he  emerged  from 
months  of  hiding  in  a  cellar  in 
Paris,  through  hundreds  of  others 
whom  I  was  to  know  in  the  liber- 
ated concentration  camps  and  on 
the  secret  roads  and  the  illegal  ships 
on  their  way  to  Palestine,  and  from 
Eva  herself  when  I  met  her  in 
Ramat  Gan,  a  single  theme  was 
to  emerge.  This  was  the  search  for 
identity,  the  clinging  to  identity. 

It  was  the  Who  am  I?  that  comes 
so  sharply  to  every  individual  who 
has  survived  a  thousand  near- 
deaths.  It  was  the  Who  am  I?  that 
echoes  in  every  one  of  us,  and  that 
rings  so  loudly  in  the  entire  world 
today,  as,  on  the  one  hand,  sub- 
merged people  arise  to  assert  their 
identity,  and  as,  on  the  other  hand, 
regimentation  in  various  lands 
tends  to  submerge  this  identity. 

Who  is  Eva?  She  is  a  woman 
who  had  to  sacrifice  her  identity 
to  save  her  existence,  through  the 


Avar  years.  A  Jewish  girl,  she  had 
to  pose  as  a  Ukranian  maid.  But 
her  identity,  herself,  persisted,  more 
precious  even  than  existence.  In 
the  most  dangerous  circumstances 
in  the  conscripted  labor  camps 
within  the  enemy  land,  she  was 
impelled  to  reveal  that  she  was 
a  Jewess  to  those  who  became  close 
to  her.  She  had  to  be  herself. 

Her  inner  identity  was  inescap- 
ably Jewish.  That  it  was  indeed 
inescapable  was  proven  to  Eva 
when  she  finally  did  try  to  escape 
from  it.  For  to  Eva,  as  to  all  of  us, 
came  the  question:  Is  it  worthwhile 
to  continue  to  be  a  Jew?  The  same 
question  has  been  answered  by 
Boris  Pasternak,  in  rote  form,  in 
the  negative,  through  a  character 
in  Dr.  Zhivago.  Similarly,  after  the 
war,  believing  the  Jewish  commu- 
nity to  be  dead,  Eva  tried  to  find 
another  life  as  a  non- Jewish  citizen. 

An  assassination  of  a  loved  one 
proved  to  her,  once  and  for  all, 
that  she  could  only  live  in  a  posi- 
tive sense  as  a  Jew. 

Eva  is  anything  but  a  political 
novel,  and  yet  the  politics  of  the 
world  today  hinge  on  freedom  of 
identity;  and  often  it  is  Jewish 
identity  that  is  once  again  the  test 
case.  Eva  went  through  that  test 
in  post-war  Poland  and  made  her 
final,  inevitable  choice  to  seek  her 
home. 

The  story  of  each  Jewish  sur- 
vivor is  a  series  of  adventures,  ac- 
cidents, miracles.  To  each  we  say- 
unbelievable.     Every  Jew  out  of 
(Please  Turn  to  Page  54) 


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The  world  premiere  of  the  new  documentary  film  entitled  "Israel," 
written  and  produced  by  Leon  Uris,  author  of  "Exodus,"  and  starring  Ed- 
ward G.  Robinson,  was  held  at  the  National  Economic  Conference  for  Israel 
Bonds  in  Chicago  on  September  19.  Israel's  top  Cabinet  officials,  Levi  Eshkol, 
Minister  of  Finance,  and  Mrs.  Golda  Meir,  Minister  for  Foreign  Affairs  view- 
ed the  film  togetier  with  more  than  1,000  Jewish  leaders  from  communities 
throughout  the  United  States  and  Canada.  Produced  in  Cinema-Scope  and 
Technicolor,  the  film  a  so  has  a  special  musical  score  written  by  Elmer  Bern- 
stein, noted  Hollywood  composer.  The  film  premiere  was  a  highlight  of  the 
three-day  national  conference  which  officially  launched  the  Fall  campaign 
for  Israel  Bonds  to  accelerate  the  growth  of  Israel's  economy. 


Man  Of  The  Month 

(Concluded  from  Page  7) 


nice  it  would  be  to  have  a  social 
and  lecreational  center  at  which 
Jewish  boys  and  girls,  men  and 
women  of  Columbia's  two  syna- 
gogues could  meet,  nothing  was 
done. 

Several  years  ago,  M.  B.  Kahn 
organized  a  group  of  the  city's 
leading  Jewish  businessmen,  spear- 
headed a  drive  for  funds,  and  built 
one  of  the  most  beautiful  Jewish 
community  centers  in  the  South- 
east. Again  his  company  erected 
die  building  at  cost  and,  although 
Mr.  Kahn  was  one  of  the  largest 
contributors  to  the  Center  fund, 
he  continually  provided  material 
and  supplies  which  were  never 
charged  against  construction  costs. 

Mr.  Kahn  served  as  president 
of  the  Center's  board  of  trustees 
for  its  first  two  years,  stepping 
down  over  the  protests  of  its  mem- 
bers  only  after  major  financial 
problems  had  been  solved  and  the 
Center  well  on  its  way  to  becoming 
a  key  factor  in  Jewish  community 
life  in  Columbia. 


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Mr.  Kahn's  interest  have  not 
centered  alone  on  Jewish  organ- 
izations and  activities.  He  is  an 
active  Rotarian  and  has  served  with 
distinction  on  the  campaign  com- 
mittees of  the  United  Fund  and 
its  predecessor,  the  Columbia  Com- 
munity Chest. 

He  has  been  a  regular  contributor 
to  the  scholarship  fund  of  the  Uni- 
versity of  South  Carolina  and  to 
the  Clemson  College  Architectural 
Foundation,  of  which  he  was  a 
charter  member.  He  contributes  to 
a  number  of  other  Jewish  and  non- 
Jewish  charities.  Mr.  Kahn  is  also 
a  member  of  the  Carolinas  Chapter, 
Associated  General  Contractors. 

Mr.  Kahn  is  married  to  the 
tomer  Bsssie  Peskin  Rubin. 

Still  extremely  active  at  73,  he 
enjoys  boating  and  fishing  in  a 
lake  he  owns  outside  of  town,  two 
sports  he  learned  since  settling  in 
Columbia. 

His  reputation  for  extending  a 
helping  hand  and  for  participation 
in  worthwhile  activities  is  but  one 
mark  of  his  fine  character.  His 
fairness  in  all  dealings  is  testified 
to  by  the  large  number  of  members 
of  his  firm  who  have  been  with 
him,  without  a  break  in  service, 
since  he  first  organized  his  con- 
struction company  25  years  ago. 


Don't  Delay! 
Buy  That  Israel 
Bond  —  Now ! 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


The  20lh  Anniversary  of  World  War  Two 

By  Nehemiah  Robinson 


On  September  I,  1939,  the  Nazis 
moved  their  armies  against  Po- 
land thus  unleashing  the  Second 
World  War.  They  did  this,  as  ft 
soon  became  clear,  with  the  know- 
ledge and  connivance  of  the  USSR 
(which,  however,  did  not  prevent 
the  Third  Reich  from  marching 
less  than  two  years  later,  against 
Pvussial:  This  attack  on  Poland 
marked  the  start  of  the  third 
phase  of  Nazi  expansion,  that  of 
actual  warfare.  The  first  phase  of 
the  demolition  of  what  had  be- 
come known  as  "Versailles"— the 
political  structure  of  Europe  and, 
(o  some  extent,  of  the  world 
created  by  the  Allies  after  the 
end  of  the  First  World  War— con- 
sisted of  the  one-sided  abolition 
of  reparation  payments,  the  rc 
occupation  of  the  Rheinland  and 
the  repudiation  of  the  rearma- 
ment restrictions  of  the  Versailles 
Treaty.  Once  in  full  control  of 
the  German  territory  and  having 
expanded  its  armament  industry 
and  its  army,  the  Third  Reich 
was  ready  for  territorial  expansion 
by  threats  and  "peaceful",  or  rath- 
er unopposed,  occupation.  F^om 
1938  to  1939  thev  succeeded  in 
annex-'n"  Austria,  breaking  up 
Czechoslovakia  and  incorporating 
the  Sudetenland,  later  regaining 
the  Memel  territory,  occupying 
nuncated  Czechia  (Bohemia-  Mo- 
ravia") and  establishing  it  as  a 
German  "Protectorate"  and.  for 
all  practical  purposes,  reeainin*? 
control  over  the  Free  Citv  of 
Danzie.  In  the  second  half  of  1939, 
having  secured  their  rear  through 
the  afore-mentioned  annexations 
and  the  agreement  with  the  Soviet 
Union,  they  were  readv  for  the 
"big  kill",  the  war  no  longer  of 
nerves  but  of  guns. 

The  Nazis  made  as  little  secret 
of  their  hatred  for  "Versai'les" 
and  their  determination  to  seek 
revenue,  as  the)  did  of  their  Tu- 
dophobia.  How  then  was  it  pos 
sible  for  the  Third  Reich  to  be- 
come, within  the  short  span  of  a 
few  years,  the  Dominant  Military 
power  in  Europe  (or  even  in  the 
world)?  In  defiance  of  the  clear 
provisions  of  the  Versailles  Treaty, 
and  to  terrorize  nto  only  the  small- 
er nations  but  the  Great  Powers- 
France  and  Great  Britain? 

There  were  two  basic  reasons 
for  it.  One— again  as  in  the  case  of 


the  anti-Jewish  plan?— neither  the 
Allied  statesmen  nor  the  public 
believed  that  they  really  meant 
what  they  said.  As  late  as  1933. 
not  only  Neville  Chamberlain  but 
also  the  British  people  apparently 
thought  that,  by  sacrificing  Czech- 
oslovakia, they  would  secure  per 
manent  peace.  The  belief  that 
the  Nazi  expansion  had  only  limit- 
ed objectives  was  very  well  ex- 
pressed in  the  French  appealer's 
slogan  "Mourir  pour  Danzig?"  (Is 
it  worthwhile  to  die  to  maintain 
the  status  of  the  Free  City  of 
Danzig?),  as  well  as  in  the  Belgian 
refusal  of  full  military  coopera- 
tion with  the  French  (until  they 
were  invaded!) 


The  second  reason  was  that  the 
victorious  \lliance  of  the  First 
World  War  had  begun  to  disinte- 
grate almost  as  soon  as  the  war 
was  over,  not  to  speak  of  the  first 
breach  in  the  front  brought  about 
by  the  Communist  revolution  in 
Russia  which  led  to  a  separate 
peace.  The  U.S.A.,  in  the  grip  of 
renewed  isolationism,  neither  ac- 
cepted the  Versailles  Treaty  nor 
joined  the  League  of  Nations. 
Italy,  even  before  the  advent  of 
Mussolini,  had  begun  to  feel  that 
it  was  not  treated  fairly  by  the 
two  other  Big  Three  Powers- 
France  and  Great  Britain.  The 
estrangement  grew  until  Mussolini 
openly  defied  his  former  allies 
by  invading  Ethiopia.  Japan,  too, 
flouted  the  League  of  Nations  by 
invading  Manchuria.   The  rival- 


23 

ries  between  France  and  Great 
Britain  in  the  Midle  East  and 
elsewhere  also  contributed  to  the 
creation  of  a  power  vacuum  in 
Europe.  Great  Britain  was  prac- 
tically disarmed.  France  was  ob- 
sessed with  the  "impregnability" 
of  her  Maginot  Line  and  with  the 
fear  that  again,  as  in  World  War 
I,  Frenchmen  in  the  best  years  of 
their  lives  would  be  killed  off  by 
the  millions-a  traumatic  experi- 
ence from  which  she  had  never 
recovered.  Poland,  with  its  inef- 
ficient administration,  was  busy 
oppressing  her  minorities,  in  par- 
ticular the  Jews  but  also  the  Bye 
lorussians  and  Ukrainians.  Czech- 
oslovakia, the  only  country  in  that 
region  which  was  able  to  main- 
tain both  a  democratic  regime  and 
(Please  Turn  to  Page  47") 


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The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


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From  Dubuque  To  Israel 

By  Bill  Format! 


I'm  a  plain  average  citizen,  I 
guess.  I  come  from  Dubuque  — 
and  here  I  am  in  Israel.  I  came 
just  before  last  Rosh  Hashonah. 
I  expected  to  be  back  in  Dubuque 
a  long  time  ago,  but  I  keep  delay- 
ing. 

There's  fascination  about  Israel. 
Like  I  was  in  Ascalon  the  other 
day  —  the  town  where  Samson  had 
that  date  with  Delilah,  and,  so 
help  me,  the  cafe  there  is  named 
Delilah.  It  sort  of  does  something 
to  you  —  being  in  the  place  the 
Bible  wrote  about  and  it  all  comes 
to  life.  I  was  sort  of  expecting 
Delilah  to  pop  out  any  time  and 
ask  me  if  I  would  care  to  come 
into  her  parlor  and  have  my  locks 
shorn. 

Well,  I  saw  some  gals  as  good 
looking  as  Delilah  ever  was  but 
I  had  no  trouble  with  them.  Not 
far  from  Ascalon  by  the  way  is  the 
large  pipe  factory,  financed  by  Is- 
rael Bonds,  of  which  I  have  bought 
a  few.  As  you  know  they  have  been 
a  principal  means  of  building  up 
this  country. 

Last  week  I  was  at  Caesaria,  too. 
The  archaelogists  are  busy  there. 
You  always  thought,  I  bet,  that 
archaeologists  dig  in  the  earth. 
They  do,  but  those  at  Caesaria  dig 
in  the  water,  or  rather  they  skin 
dive.  Caesaria  is  famous  in  history 
—Roman,  Jewish,  Christian,  and 
the  sea  bottom  is  full  of  relics  of 
the  past  and  the  archaeologists  are 
bringing  to  the  top  the  remnants 
of  its  great  past. 

Just  before  the  holidays  in  Is- 
rael, Egged,  that's  the  name  of  the 
big  bus  company,  puts  on  hundreds 
of  extra  buses,  for  the  people  like 
to  travel  for  the  holidays.  Boy,  if 
you  want  to  see  traffic  you  should 
see  the  traffic  on  the  new  road 
from  Beersheba  to  Elat. 

Everybody  is  interested  in  Elat 
these  days.  Everybody  is  talking 
about  the  great  port  city  which 
will  connect  the  West  with  the 
Far  East.  In  the  days  of  King  Solo- 
mon the  ships  of  Israel  passed  from 
Elat  to  far-off  Chitim,  which  some 
take  to  mean  China,  and  it  was 
at  Elat  that  King  Solomon  put  out 
the  mat  for  the  Queen  of  Sheba. 

But  I  was  interested  in  what  a 
resident  of  Elat  told  me  about  the 
place.  He  said  there's  no  rheuma- 
tism or  asthma  in  Elat.  Even  if 
you  should  want  a  little  rheuma- 


tism, you  can't  get  it  there.  It  seems 
the  climate  just  won't  permit  it. 
As  I  was  saying,  I  was  told  this 
by  a  citizen.  It's  not  official.  If 
any  sufferers  from  these  sicknesses 
want  the  facts,  I  would  suggest 
that  they  get  in  touch  with  the 
Hon.  Hannoch  Nenner,  the  Mayor 
of  Elat.  I  had  the  good  fortune 
to  meet  His  Honor,  the  Mayor,  and 
he  is  a  very  fine  young  men  and 
I  am  sure  he  will  answer  any  in- 
quiries. 

There  is  another  thing  about 
Elat  which  should  bring  all  the 
housewives  there.  They  tell  me  that 
wash  hung  out  on  the  clothes  line 
there  dries  in  twenty  minutes.  Why 
invest  in  one  of  those  machine 
dryers?  After  you've  done  your 
washing,  just  take  a  jet  plane  to 
Elat  and  the  clothes  will  dry  before 
papa  is  home  from  business. 

Yes,  it's  warm  in  Elat— just  like 
in  Arizona,  but  there's  the  Red 
Sea  in  the  front  yard  where  you 
can  always  take  a  dip. 

Another  place  that  interested  me 
is  Ein  Hoc!.  That's  city  where  art- 
ists live.  Eisenhower  should  come 
here  and  paint  and  enjoy  himself 
instead  (,1  tiring  himself  out  with 
being  President,  which  anybody 
can  do  if  he  gets  enough  votes.  Ein 
Hod  is  like  the  American  Green- 
wich Village  except  that  at  Ein 
Hod  the  artist  doesn't  have  to 
paint  the  sky  from  the  imagination. 
There  are  no  tall  buildings  to 
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Th«  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


*5 


The^Strange  Case, 

Of  Joseph  Smith 


Pseudonyms  are  often  used  in 
theatrical  and  literary  circles;  im- 
migrants change  names  to  meet 
new  ways  in  new  lands;  criminals 
use  aliases  for  obvious  reasons.  But 
the  American  Jewish  Archives,  the 
historical  research  center  at  He- 
brew Union  College- Jewish  Insti- 
tute of  Religion  here  has  come  up 
with  a  mysterious  name  change:  a 
Jewish  Revolutionary  War  hero 
who  slid  in  and  out  of  a  pseudo- 
nym or  no  discoverable  reason  un- 
der the  sun. 

Passing  himself  off  as  "Joseph 
Smith,"  the  Jew  Elias  Pollock  ren- 
dered distinguished  military  service 
in  the  Revolutionary  War.  Return- 
ing to  civilian  life,  he  quietly  re- 
sumed his  original  identity.  Dr. 
Jacob  R.  Marcus,  director  of  the 
American  Jewish  Archives,  informs 
us  that  documents  acquired  from 
the  National  Archives  and  Records 
Service  in  Washington,  D.  C,  tell 
the  story  of  the  mysterious  pseudo- 
nym, and  prove  beyond  doubt  that 
Smith  and  Pollock  were  actually 
one  man. 

Pollock's  part  in  the  American 
Revolution  had  been  anything  but 
ignoble.  In  the  spring  of  1778,  giv- 
ing his  n&me  as  "Joseph  Smith," 
Pollock  enlisted  as  a  private  in  the 
3rd  Maryland  Regiment,  at  Balti- 
more. After  seeing  service  with  the 
army  in  Pennsylvania,  New  Jersey, 
and  New  York,  Pvt.  "Smith"  set 
out  for  Charleston,  S.  C,  with  his 
regiment  in  the  spring  of  1780.  In 
August  of  that  year,  according  to 


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Closed  Sunday 

W  right's 

TOWN  HOUSE 

513  East  Grace  St. 

Open  11:30  to  3  p  m. 
4:30  to  8  p.  m. 
Closed  Sundays  and  Holidays 


his  pension  file,  he  was  "engaged  in 
the  battle  of  Camden  (S.  C.)  when 
(the  American  commander)  Gates 
was  defeated,  deponant  (Pollock) 
wounded  in  the  side  and  taken 
prisoner,  carried  to  (British-occu- 
pied) Charleston  and  from  thence 
sent  as  a  prisoner  of  war  to  Saint 
Augustine,  East  Florida,"  where  he 
was  detained  "until  news  of  peace, 
then  sent  to  Halifax  and  liberated, 
returned  to  Baltimore." 

A  fellow  Baltimorean,  one  John 
Williams,  who  had  served  in  the 
army  with  "Joseph  Smth,"  declared 
years  later,  in  1818,  that  he  and 
"Smith"  had  been  together  until 
1780.  They  had  met  again  six  years 
later  in  Baltimore.  The  soldier  he 
had  known  as  Joseph  Smith,  said 
Williams,  "has  ever  since  been 
known  by  the  name  of  'Elias  Pol- 
lock.' " 

Not  much  else  is  known  about 
Elias  Pollock  alias  Joseph  Smith. 
There  is  no  doubt  of  his  religion; 
in  1818,  according  to  Pollock's  pen- 
sion file  in  the  National  Archives, 
when  he  applied  for  the  govern- 
ment pension  due  needy  veterans 
of  the  Revolutionary  War,  the  cus- 
tomary oath  was  "administered  to 
him  on  the  five  books  of  Moses,  as 
beng  a  Jew."  On  that  occasion,  the 
former  soldier  signed  himself  as 
"Elias  Pollock"—//?  Hebrew  charac- 
ters1. 

Pollock  had  been  born,  his  file 
indicates,  about  the  year  1755.  Mis- 
fortune apparently  haunted  him. 
Married  and  with  two  daughters, 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  51) 


Dr.  Yeshaiahu  Foerder,  Chairman 
of  the  Bank  Lcumi  Le-Israel,  the 
largest  bank  hi  Israel,  was  the  prin- 
cipal speaker  at  the  National  Econo- 
mic Conference  for  Isre\  held  at 
the  Sherman  Hotel  in  Chicago  the 
weekend  of  September  18  under  the 
auspices  of  State  of  Israel  Bonds. 


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..  .DAIRY  PRODUCTS 

The  Valley  of  Virginia 
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HARRISONBURG,  VIRGINIA 


YOUR  LOCAL  DISTRIBUTORS  OF 


Quality  Dairy  Products 

Farmers  Creamery 
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FREDERICKSBURG,  VA. 


OVER  A  CENTURY  OF  SERVICE 

J.  T.  MORRISS  &  SON,  INC. 

Funeral  Directors 

Adams  and  Wythe  Sts.  REgent  3-8511 

PETERSBURG,  VA. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

LYNCHBURG,  VIRGINIA 


Greetings 


First  National 
Trust  and  Savings  Bank 
of  Lynchburg 


The  City  wide  Bank  With  Five  Convenient  Locations 

1.  Main  Office  —  Main  at  Tenth 

2.  Trust  Branch  — 811  Main  Street 

3.  Installment  Loan  Office  —  816  Church  Street 

4.  Rivermont  Branch  —  2482  Rivermont  Ave. 

5.  Fort  Hill  Branch  —  Fort  Early  Theater  Bldg. 


THE  LYNCHBURG  NATIONAL  BANK 
AND  TRUST  COMPANY 

MAIN  OFFICE  —  NINTH  AND  MAIN  STREETS 

Drive-In  Branch  Chestnut  Hill  Branch 

9th  &  Commerce  Streets  5206  Fort  Avenue 

"MY  BANK"  ...  /or  thousands 

MEMBER  FEDERAL  DEPOSIT  INSURANCE  CORPORATION 


Co  -  Operative  Building 
and  Loan  Association 

J.  NEWTON  GORDON,  Executive  Vice-President 

•  Home  Office— 1001  Church  Street,  Lynchburg 

•  Chestnut  Hill  Branch — 5224  Fort  Avenue 


INSURED 


Amherst  County  Branch — U.  S.  Highway  20,  N. 


Designed  to  serve  Lynchburg  families  better  than  ever 
with  complete  Savings  and  Home  Financing  Service 


FUEL  OIL  FOR  HOMES  AND  INDUSTRY 

LYNCHBURG 
OIL  COMPANY,  Incorporated 


VI  7-8875 


2459  Campbell  Avenue 


Lincoln  and  Herzl 

By  Dr.  Miriam  K.  Freund 

National  President  of  Hadassah 


In  May  i860,  the  month  Abra- 
ham Lincoln  was  nominated  for 
the  Presidency  of  the  United  States, 
a  child  was  born  in  the  Austro- 
Hungarian  city  of  Budapest.  That 
child,  Theodor  Herzl,  was  destined 
to  become  the  father  of  modern 
Zionism,  whose  obsession  with  the 
situation  of  his  fellow  Jews  and 
whose  compulsive  desire  to  nor- 
malize their  status  was  to  bring 
about  the  re-emergence  of  Israel  as 
a  sovereign  state.  The  centennial 
of  both  events  will  be  marked  in 
May  i960. 

Lincoln  and  Herzl  assumed  the 
responsibility  of  liberating  human 
beings  from  the  tyranny  of  bigotry 
and  prejudice  as  their  mission  in 
life.  Neither  survived  to  see  the 
fruits  of  his  labor.  Yet  each  is  en- 
shrined in  history  and  revered  to- 
day despite  the  fact  that  during 
their  lifetime  they  were  controver- 
sial figures.  They  had  to  endure 
stinging  criticisms  uttered  in  the 
heat  of  passion  and  the  honor  they 
enjoyed  was  "not  quite  free  from 
ridicule." 

Herzl  was  the  first  man  since 
Biblical  times  who  became  a  na- 
tional Jewish  hero.  The  Jews  chose 
Herzl  because  it  was  he  who  re- 
awakened in  the  '  contemporary 
world  Jewish  community  a  national 
consciousness  at  a  time  when  the 
Jewish  people  had  sunk  into  the 
depths  of  despair  under  the  degre- 
dation  and  opprobrium  of  their 
anti-Semitic  oppressors.  The  Jews 
accepted  Herzl  as  a  guiding  load- 
star because  he  gave  new  life  to  the 
ancient  hope  within  their  breast 
and  gave  concrete  direction  to  their 
craving  for  a  return  to  Zion.  All 
through  their  long  exile  —  in  their 
prayers,  their  books,  their  writings 
—  was  expressed  their  innermost 
spirit:  "Next  Year  in  Jerusalem  " 
Herzl  articulated  their  yearning  for 
nationhood  in  the  ancient  home- 
land of  Palestine. 

In  the  moment  of  Czarist  po- 
groms and  the  odious  ani-Semi- 
tism  which  manifested  itself  so 
acutely  in  the  Dreyfus  Trial,  the 
Jews  needed  the  self-confidence 
Herzl  was  able  to  instill  in  them. 
The  mantle  of  Moses  seemed  to  fall 
upon  him  and  he  offered  surcease 
to  Jewish  sufferings  and  Jewish 
longings  thruogh  the  centuries.  In 
his  personality,  through  his  writ- 


ings, in  his  "Jedenstadt,"  he  made 
it  possible  for  Jews  to  look  for- 
ward to  and  to  mobilize  efforts  for 
a  Jewish  State  in  the  land  promised 
by  the  Lord. 

Although  Lincoln  and  Herzl  both 
now  "belong  to  the  ages,"  the  issues 
they  fought  for  are  as  vital  today 
as  when  they  were  first  defined. 
Despite  Israel's  establishment  as 
an  independent  Jewish  State,  there 
is  still  a  need  for  the  Herzlean 
dream  in  our  lives  —  a  need  for  be- 
lieving, as  he  did,  that  Zionism  has 
united  the  scattered  limbs  of  Jewry 
upon  a  national  basis  and  that  it 
means  "the  return  to  Judaism  even 
before  the  return  to  the  Jewish 
land."  For  he  maintained  that  only 
by  joining  forces  in  the  prepetua- 
tion  of  Jewishness  in  a  Jewish 
homeland  could  a  Jewish  nation 
raise  itself  as  an  equal  among  na- 
tions; the  very  existence  of  a  Jew- 
ish State  would  militate  the  bene- 
fit of  Jews  wherever  they  may  be. 

Max  Nordau,  one  of  Herzl's 
closest  colleagues,  has  called  him 
"our  Disraeli,"  who  was  endowed 
with  a  "genius  for  action."  In  the 
eight  years  prior  to  his  untimely 
death  in  1904,  Herzl  had  risen 
from  obscurity  in  Jewish  life  to  a 
position  of  unchallenged  leadership 
in  the  cause  of  Jewish  nationalism. 
In  that  period,  he  founded  the 
World  Zionist  Organization  and  in- 
stituted annual  World  Zionist  Con- 
gresses as  a  means  of  providing 
self-expression  to  the  political  as- 
pirations of  the  Jews.  He  organized 
the  Jewish  Colonial  Trust  and  the 
Anglo  -  Palestine  Company  as 
the  financial  instrument  of  the 
Zionist  Movement.  Not  only  did 
he  define  the  philosophy  of  Po- 
litical Zionism,  he  pondered  and 


FAUBER'S 


FUNERAL  DIRECTORS 
Dial  VI  5-2336  Lynchburg  ,Va 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


~7 


formulated  every  detail  of  a  mag- 
nifitant  plan  for  a  future  Jewish 
Commonwealth. 

As  early  as  1865,  Herzl  seems  to 
have  been  possessed  of  the  pre- 
monition that  his  time  might  be 
running  out.  "Who  knows  how 
soon  it  will  be  over?"  he  wrote.  He 
described  his  anxiety  in  the  words 
of  Heine: 

"I  tremble 
Lest  I  may  pass  away  this  night, 
Pass  away  before  I  bring  this  work 
to  a  close." 

Herzl  was  a  Prophet  and  yet  a 
man  of  action.  The  Herzl  that 
reaches  deepest  into  our  hearts 
and  minds  is  Her/1  the  Dreamer. 
It  was  his  dreams  that  propelled 
him— and  us— to  action  ;it  was  his 
dreams— in  the  imponderables— 
that  he  found  substance.  "Please 
believe  me,"  he  wrote  to  Barton 
de  Hirsch,  "'the  political  life  of  an 
entire  people— particularly  when 
that  people  is  scattered  through- 
out the  entire  world  —  can  be  set 
in  motion  only  with  imponderables 
floating  high  in  the  air.  What?  You 
do  not  understnad  imponderables? 
And  what  is  religion?  Bethink  your- 


self what  the  Jews  have  endured 
for  two  thousand  years  for  the  sake 
of  this  fantasy." 

This  was  Herzl's  language  of 
faith,  spoken  with  the  voice  which 
is  the  voice  of  the  Jews  through 
the  centuries. 

Today,  the  vision  is  a  reality. 
We  h:ive  seen  the  advent  of  the 
State  of  Israel -a  new  nation  born 
of  Jewish  idealism  and  faith,  of 
Jewish  courage  and  tenacity,  of 
Jewish  tragedy  and  persecution. 
The  major  objective  of  Herzl's 
Basle  Program  has  been  achieved. 
But  Her/el  saw  more  as  the  role 
of  Jewry  in  the  world. 

In  addressing  the  third  Zionist 
Congress,  he  declared:  "The  pres- 
ent condition  of  the  Jews  can 
lead  in  three  directions.  The 
first  is  the  dumb  endurance  of 
humiliation  and  need.  The  second 
is  a  fierce  rebellion  against  a  step- 
motherly society.  We  have  chosen 
the  third  way:  We  wish  to  lift 
ourselves  to  a  higher  level  or 
morality,  work  for  the  common 
weal,  build  new  roads  for  the  in- 
( Please  Turn  to  Page  38) 


Martinsville,  Va. 

MRS.  RALPH  HOLLANDER,  Correspondent 

On  Saturday  night,  September   

26th,  at  11:30,  a  Selichot  Service 
was  held  at  the  Ohev  Zion  Syna- 
gogue. Cantor  Alles  S.  Levin  of 
Roanoke  assisted  Rabbi  Thurman. 

The  Religious  School  held  its 
registration  on  September  6th. 
The  faculty  members  for  the  year 
are  Mr.  Jerome  Altschull,  Mrs. 
Leon  Globman,  Mrs.  Ralph  Hol- 
lander, Mrs.  Sam  J.  Kaplan,  Mrs. 
Anne  Kramer,  Mr.  Herman  Obst- 
ler,  and  Rabbi  Mordecai  M.  Thur- 
man. Mr.  Jack  Zachary  is  super- 
intendent of  the  religious  school. 

On  August  24th,  four  members 
of  the  Martinsville  United  Syna- 
gogue Youth  Chapter  left  to  attend 
an  institute  for  USY  members  of 
the  Seaboard  Region,  at  Camp 
White  Mountain  in  Highview, 
West  Virginia.  They  were  Naomi 
Altschull,  Marilyn  Sue  Altschull, 
Esther  Lynn  Kaplan  and  Ronnie 
Barbara  Kolodny. 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  33) 


Governor  Nelson  A.  Rockefeller 
was  the  recipient  of  the  sixth 
annual  presentation  of  the  Joint  De- 
fense Appeal  HUMAN  RIGHTS 
AWARD.  The  presentation  was  made 
on  September  22,  at  a  dinner  in  the 
Grand  Ballroom  in  the  Hotel  Plaza 
in  New  Yerk  City. 


BROWN 
MORRISON 

COMPANY 
Fine  Printing  .  .  . 

Office  Supplies 
LYNCHBURG,  VA. 


McKEE 

Funeral  Home 

INCORPORATED 
Funeral  Directors 
24-Hour  Ambulance  Service 
Phone  ME  2-3466 
Martinsville,  Virginia 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a  Happy  and 
Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Lynchburg  -  Danville  -  Martinsville,  Va. 


EXCLUSIVELY 


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Consult  Your  EYE  PHYSICIAN 
Then  See  Your  GUILD  OPTICIAN 

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NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS  

RICH  PETROLEUM  SALES,  Inc. 
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GULF  GAS  AND  OIL  DISTRIBUTORS 
•  MARTINSVILLE,  VA.         •  DANVILLE,  VA. 


THE  FIRST  NATIONAL  BANK 

of  Martinsville  and  Henry  County 

•  Collinsville  •  Fieldale 

•  Martinsville  •  South  Office 


28 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Norfolk  -  Portsmouth  -  Hampton,  Va. 


The  Place  to  Save" 
The  Place  to  Borrow" 


NORFOLK  FEDERAL 
Savings  &  Loan  Association 

239  Main  St.  NORFOLK  10,  VIRGINIA 

Wards  Corner  NORFOLK,  VIRGINIA 

600  Court  St.  PORTSMOUTH,  VIRGINIA 

5910  Virginia  Beach  Blvd.     NORFOLK,  VIRGINIA 


H.  D.  OLIVER 

Established  1875 


FUNERAL  DIRECTOR 

Dial  Norfolk  MA  2-7353 

COLONIAL  AND  SHIRLEY  AVENUES 


LET'S  MEET 
and  EAT  at 

THE 

COLONY  HOUSE 

•  CHOICE  STEAKS 

•  CHOPS  and 

•  CHICKEN  DINNERS 


3518  Colonial  Avenue 
NORFOLK,  VA. 


BRENNAN 

funeral  ^Morne 


Directors  and  Embalmers 

EXport  7-3851 

711  Washington  St. 
PORTSMOUTH,  VA. 


%12 


URQUHART'S 
BAKERY 

Specializing  in  Holidays,  Bar  Mitzvah 
Celebrations,  Birthday  and 
Wedding  Cakes 

1513  Colley  Ave.    Norfolk,  Va. 


J.  V.  BICKFORD,  INC. 

Pembroke  and  W.  Queen  St.  HAMPTON,  VA. 

PA  3-0736 


LUMBER  •  MILLWORK 
BUILDING  SUPPLIES 


Norfolk  Jewish  War 
Veterans  and  Auxiliary 

FRED  W.  HANDEL,  Correspondent 


Both  our  auxiliary  and  post 
share  a  bit  of  prestige  on  a  JWV 
and  JWVA  national  scale,  namely, 
through  the  recent  election  of  Mrs. 
Rose  Friedman  to  the  office  of 
national  auxiliary  chaplain  at  the 
national  convention  held  in  New 
York  City.  Our  post  is  represented 
nationally  by  Irving  Krukin,  now 
in  his  second  term  as  national  ex- 
exutive  committeeman  from  the  4th 
region,  which  covers  the  southern 
states. 

Mrs.  Friedman  has  held  national 
offices  for  three  consecutive  years. 
Previously  she  was  national  con- 
ductress and  national  patriotic  in- 
structor. 

Our  local  auxiliary  also  attained 
national  honors,  having  received 
a  citation  for  the  largest  increase 
in  membership  in  Virginia.  Mrs. 
Julius  Higger  received  a  special 
citation  for  her  efforts  in  bringing 
in  the  most  new  members. 

The  devoted  efforts  of  our  ladies 
for  the  Kecoughtan  Veterans  Hos- 
pital at  Kecoughtan,  Virginia  con- 
tinue undaunted.  A  night  group 
headed  by  Mrs.  Barney  Brittman 
makes  visitations  and  daytime  vis- 
its are  organized  by  Mrs.  Irvin 
Miller.  Besides  the  excellent  work 
accomplished  at  Kecoughtan,  local- 
ly, members  assist  at  the  St.  Mary's 
Infant  Home  and  the  Tidewater 
Vocational  Center. 

The  post's  annual  beer  party, 
held  at  the  Regant  Brewery  Sep- 
tember 15th,  signaled  the  start  of 
the  fall  season  of  activities. 

The  evening  was  designated 
"Bring  A  Member  Night"  and  the 
membership  was  treated  to  a  night 
of  good  fellowship  and  an  abun- 
dance of  food  and  drink. 

The  Sunday  Serviceman's  Brunch 
program  at  the  Jewish  Community 
Center  is  now  in  full  operation. 
Lou  Hornstone,  2nd  junior  vice- 
commander  as  chairman  of  the 
brunch,  is  responsible  for  obtain- 
ing the  necessary  workers  each 
Sunday  to  aid  in  preparations.  This 
project  has  been  highly  successful 
and  appreciated  by  the  servicemen 
in  the  Norfolk  area. 

Program  Chairman  Dick  Ornoff 
and  post  senior  vice-commander 
announced  at  the  September  meet- 
ing that  Chaplain  Sam  Sobel,  the 


new  Jewish  chaplain  in  our  area, 
would  be  guest  speaker  at  the 
October  meeting.  Our  auxiliary 
will  be  invited  guests.  The  com- 
bined memberships  of  our  organiza- 
tion will  have  an  early  opportunity 
to  become  acquainted  with  Chap 
lain  Sobel  who  holds  the  rank  of 
Lt.  Commander. 

November  16th  is  the  date  set 
for  the  6th  Annual  Veterans'  Day 
dance  sponsored  by  the  post.  This 
year  Myers  Hall,  Beth  El  Temple 
will  be  the  scene.  Proceeds  derived 
from  the  affair  are  placed  in  the 
post  Welfare  Fund  and  then  dis- 
tributed locally  to  worthy  causes. 
Lou  Hornstone  as  chairman  will 
have  serving  on  his  committee  with 
him,  Albert  Lynn,  Stanley  Rosen- 
berg, Artie  Epner,  Bernie  Breman, 
Raymond  Cohen  and  Fred  Handel. 

With  membership  still  the  life 
blood  of  any  organization  the  fol- 
lowing new  members  were  recently 
voted  into  the  post;  Albert  Lynn, 
Jacob  Chernitzer,  Bernie  Breman 
and  Howard  Nelson. 

With  the  coming  of  the  New 
Year  to  our  many  fellow  members 
throughout  the  state  may  I  extend 
on  behalf  of  our  post  and  auxiliary, 
best  wishes  for  good  health  and 
happiness  throughout  the  New 
Year. 


Obey  That  Impulse! 

Buy  An 
Israel  Bond  —  NOW! 


.  .  .  Let's  Go  To  .  .  . 

RODMAN'S 
BARBECUE 


High  St.  at  Hamilton  Ave. 
PORTSMOUTH,  VA 


•  Finest 

•  Sandwiches 

•  in  the 

•  South 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


29 


Former  Israel  Prime  Minister  Moshe  Shareit  (left)  and  American  Jew- 
ish historian  Prof.  Salo  Baron  discussed  "The  Jewish  State  and  t!he  Jewish 
People"  at  the  Plenary  Assembly  of  the  World  Jewish  Congress  in  Stockholm 
August  2-12.  About  300  delegates  from  the  W.IC's  global  affiliates  attended 
fcae  sessions  held  in  the  Swedish  Parliament  Building. 

Newport  News,  Va. 

(Conc'u-led  From  Pa^e  11) 


Chaplains  will  conduct  religious 
services  at  all  military  installations, 
while  JWB's  Armed  Services  Com- 
mittees, headed  by  Lt.  Co.  Sidney 
Lowenstern  of  Newport  News,  Mich 
ael  Kaplan  of  Petersburg,  Mrs.  Ben 
P.  Snyder  of  Norfolk,  Julian  Black- 
man  of  Portsmouth;  Mrs.  William 
Kochler  of  Norfolk,  and  Jacob  M. 


WURLITZER 
PIANO 
RENTAL 
P 


$10.00  Per  Month 


THOMAS 

Piano  Co. 

210  -  23th  Street 
NEWPORT  NEWS,  VA. 


Viener  of  Richmond,  have  arranged 
home  hospitality  for  all  Jewish  ser- 
vicemen who  obtain  holiday  leaves 
from  the  posts  or  hospital. 

The  Rosh  Hashonah  arrange- 
ments in  Virginia  are  part  of 
JWB's  world-wide  Rosh  Hashonah 
services  conducted  this  year  by  Jew- 
ish chaplains  in  Korea,  Japan, 
Hawaii,  the  Philippines,  Guam, 
Okinawa,  North  Africa,  Alaska, 
Greenland,  Iceland,  Newfoundland 
France,  Germany,  England,  Italy, 
Austria,  the  Caribbean  area  and 
the  United  States.  The  100  full- 
time  and  the  250  part-time  Jewish 
chaplains  involved  in  the  High 
Holy  Day  effort  were  recruited  and 
endorsed  by  JWB's  Commission  on 
Jewish  Chaplaincy,  composed  of 
representatives  of  the  three  major 
rabbinical  bodies;  The  Central 
Conference  of  American  Rabbis 
(Reform);  the  Rabbinical  Council 
of  American  (Orthodox);  and  the 
Rabbinical  Assembly  of  America 
(Conservative). 

Religious  supplies  and  kosher 
foods  used  at  religious  services  over- 
seas (in  addition  to  those  shipped 
to  installations  in  this  country) 
were  sent  out  in  June  and  carried 
on  Army  transports  or  flown  by 
the  Air  Force  to  the  remotest  posts. 
The    shipments    included  prayer 

.  books,  calendars,  holiday  leaflets, 

"S 

greetings  cards,  recording  discs, 
shofars,  wine,  gefilte  fish,  kosher 
meats  and  other  food  items.  Thou- 
sands of  holiday  gifts  have  been 
shipped  abroad  by  Serve-A-Commit- 
tees  of  JWB's  Women's  Organiza- 
tions Division  for  distribution  by 
Jewish  chaplains.  JWB  shipments 
will  make  possible  services  on  ships 
at  sea  during  the  Holy  Days. 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Newport  News-Hampton 
Virginia  Beach,  Va. 


WE  CORDIALLY  SOLICIT  YOUR  PATRONAGE      •       •  • 

•       •       •      COMPLETE  BANKING  SERVICE  SINCE  1891 


Citizens  Marine  Jefferson  Bank 

NEWPORT  NEWS,  VIRGINIA 
Member  of  the  Federal  Deposit  Insurance  Corporation 


Fruits 
Vegetables 
Delicatessen 
Bakery 
Fresh  Meats 

7500  Virginia  Ave. 
1115  Jefferson  Ave 
Warwick 

<st) MOST  COMPLETE  LIME  OH  PEMIMSUU 

noti»A  •e£nge 

-J2MWASHtNr,T«N  ^— 

COAL  FUEL  OIL 

PRINTED  METER  DELIVERIES 
PHONE  CH  4-8484  NEWPORT  NEWS,  VA 


DyDee  Wash 


NORFOLK  DIAL 
MADISON  5-0243 


424  CATALPHA  AVE. 
HAMPTON,  VA. 
PHONE  N.  N.  4-2041 

As  a  member  of  the  National  Institute  of  Diaper  Service,  our  diapers 
are  under  "National  Laboratory  Control"  —  periodically  checked 
by  chemists  —  bacteriologists  —  to  maintain  100  per  cent  safety. 

Only  this  diaper  service  ...  no  other  .  .  .  brings  you  Baby  Talk. 


BECK'S 


ewisj 


Qettyjh 


BREAD 

Baked  In 
NEWPORT  NEWS,  VA. 


SNOW-WHITE 

Bcautitone 

Dry  Cleaners  —  Launderers 

•  Virginia  Beach 
GA  8-5851 

•  Norfolk,  Va. 
JU  8-6796 

•  Bayside,  Va. 
Branch  Office 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


MRS.  JAY  STANFORD  GOODMAN 

The  former  Sara  Jane  Weinstein,  daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Milton 
Weinstein,  was  married  to  Jay  Stanford  Goodman,  son  of  Dr.  and  Mrs 
Julius  H.  Goodman,  of  Baltimore,  on  August  23rd  in  a  private  ceremony  at 
her  home.  Rabbi  Emeritus  Fred  Rypins,  of  Temple  Emanuel,  officiated. 


ummi 

All  the 
time  is 
toy  time 

w 


908  Summit  Ave. 


"OUR  ONLY  STORE" 

WE  DELIVER  ANYWHERE 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 


Dial  BR  4-6467 


Around  Greexsboro 


MRS. 


RICHARD  FORMAN  and  MRS.  DANIEL  HOLLANDER, 
Correspondents 


The  B.B.Y.O.'s  big  summer  con- 
vention was  held  at  the  Weil  and 
Winfield  dorms  on  the  Woman's 
College  campus,  here  in  Greens- 
boro, and  was  attended  by  a  good 
crowd  of  some  125  from  all  over 
the  state.  From  reports,  everyone 
had  a  marvelous  time.  Greensboro 
youths,  elected  as  incoming  officers 
for  the  1959-60  State  Council  are 
as  follows:  Joe  Rubin,  President; 
Frank  Sloan,  Secretary;  Jeff  Hol- 
lander, Treasurer;  Mike  Wise, 
Athletic  Chairman  and  Alan  Wein- 
berg, Chaplain.  Congratulations  to 
Michele  Gray  and  Joe  Rubin,  co- 
chairman,  for  a  job  well  done  and 
of  course  special  thanks  to  the  fine 
advisors  who  kept  things  running 
smoothly  at  all  times.  Incidently, 
the  local  Greensboro  Chapter  of 
A.Z.A.  has  as  new  officers,  Joe 
Rubin,  Pres.,  Frank  Sloan,  V-Pres., 


David  Schwartz,  Sec,  Jeff  Holland- 
er, Treas.,  and  Michael  Wise, 
Pledge  Master. 

Rabbi  Simcha  Kling  has  been 
invited  as  the  guest  speaker  of  all 
the  alumni  of  the  Hebrew  Bureau 
of  Jewish  Education  in  Cincinnati. 
It  is  a  testimonial  dinner  honoring 
the  Principal  of  the  school  who  is 
retiring  and  leaving  for  Israel. 

Incidently,  a  biography  on  one 
of  the  Zionist  personalities,  written 
by  Rabbi  Kling,  is  being  published 
in  essay  form  this  month  in  the 
Hertzel  Year  Book. 

Beth  David  welcomed  as  Bat 
Mitzvot  Carita  Melnikov,  daughter 
of  Mr.  &  Mrs.  Z.  Melnikov  and 
Judy  Lavine,  daughter  of  Mr.  8c 
Mrs.  H.  Lavine.  Judy  chanted  from 
the  Haftorah  in  Nashville,  Tenn. 
with  Rabbi  Kling  in  attendance. 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS 
w;      AND  BEST  WISHES 

Tropicana  Supper  Club 

DIAL  BR  5-3344  FOR  RESERVATIONS 
2700  High  Point  Rd.  Greensboro,  N.  C. 


RUST  ASSOCIATES 

Representing 


Fabricators  and  Erectors  of  Lighted  and  Unlighted 
LETTERS  and  SIGNS 
ALUMINUM  —  STAINLESS  STEEL  —  BRONZE  —  PLASTIC 
2103  W.  Lee  Ext.    GREENSBORO,  N.  C.    Dial  BR  5-7609 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


3» 


With  all  the  newcomers  arriving 
in  Greensboro  this  summer,  we  bid 
farewell  to  Mr.  &  Mrs.  Paul  Bines 
and  family  who  have  moved  to 
Miami.  We  welcome  the  many 
newcomers  to  Greensboro  and  shall 
write  more  about  them  in  subse- 
quent issues. 

Speaking  of  newcomers,  Lynn 
and  Chet  Stanius,  daughter  and 
son-in-law  of  Mr.  &  Mrs.  Murray 
Halpern  have  moved  here  recently. 
Rose,  as  we  all  know,  is  Secretary 
to  Rabbi  Kling. 

Two  new  baby  girls  have  made 
their  appearances  this  summer,  a 
daughter  born  to  Mr.  8c  Mrs.  Wil- 
lie Selman  and  one  born  to  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Al  Raush. 

Good  luck  to  the  following  in 
their  new  homes,  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Moe  Mandelkorn,  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Seymour  Sierachik  and  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Sidney  Wolvek.  Best  wishes 
also  go  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jack  Pearl- 
man  on  the  engagement  of  their 
son  Bob  to  Miss  Sarah  Louise 
Fischer. 

Michele  Gray,  Dorm  Leader  and 
Jeff  Hollander,  Area  Chairman,  of 
the  Southern  Region  B.B.Y.O.  have 
recently  returned  from  a  Leader- 
ship Training  course  in  Columbia, 
S.  C.  for  the  forthcoming  regional 
convention  to  be  held  in  Charles- 
ton, S.  C.  this  coming  December. 


We  feel  we  cannot  let  September 
go  by,  without  making  note  of  the 
fact  that  our  dear  and  beloved 
Rabbi  Fred  Rypins  has  assumed 
the  position  of  Rabbi  Emeritus. 
Both  the  Rabbi  and  Mrs.  Rypins 
have  our  sincere  thanks  for  the 
28  years  they  devoted  so  loyally 
to  Temple  Emanuel.  It  must  be 
indeed  gratifying  to  them  both,  to 


•  NEW  YEAR 

•  GREETINGS 
Bridges 

Furniture  Co. 

327  S.  Elm  BR  2-0165 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


The 


Art  Shop 


Inc. 


Representing  All  Leading 
Lines  in 

Cameras,  Projectors  and  Supplies 
Custom   Photo  Finishmg 

118  W.  Market'      Dial  BR  2-5315 

-..—■-GREENSBORO,  N.  G. 


know  they  have  contributed  so 
much  to  the  betterment  of  their 
congregation  and  community.  We 
know  we  shall  continue  to  benefit 
from  their  advice  and  wisdom  in 
the  coming  years. 

The  Piedmont  Federation  of 
Temple  Youth  held  its  first  camp 
conclave  August  23-28  at  Wildacres 
in  Little  Switzerland.  A.Z.A.  Vice- 
President,  Frank  Sloan,  attended 
this  conclave  and  submitted  the 
following  edited  report:  'Each  par- 
ticipant derived  a  greater  know- 
ledge of  the  true  essence  of  Judaism 
as  well  as  a  comparative  study  of 
the  faith  of  our  Christian  neigh- 
bors ...  A  new  venture  for  Jewish 
youth  in  this  area  .  .  .  the  gains 
horn  a  meeting  of  this  sort  are 
innumerable  .  .  .  helped  us  realize 
that  our  religious  studies  are  not 
terminated  at  Bar  Mitzvah  or  Con- 
firmation and  gave  us  the  stimulus 
to  delve  into  some  of  Judaism's 
basic  tenets.  We  are  proud  of  the 
contributions  made  by  Rabbi  Ry- 
pins and  Rabbi  Asher  in  the  dis- 
cussion groups  which  they  conduct- 
ed, the  committees  they  advised, 
and  their  general  helpfulness  .  .  . 
Thanks  are  due  to  Mrs.  A.  F.  Klein, 
counselor,  for  her  help  in  making 
this  conference  successful." 

We  are  hoping  for  a  most  suc- 
cessful year  for  the  Temple  Eman- 
uel Religious  School,  which  began 
with  registration  day  on  September 
13th.  The  school  will  be  under  the 
guidance  of  Rabbi  Joseph  Asher, 
who  has  done  a  great  deal  of  pre- 
paratory work  during  the  summer 
months  on  this  projects.  Rabbi 
Asher  has  introduced  a  new  school- 
uide  curriculum  to  the  teachers, 
prepared  by  Dr.  Edward  Zerin, 
Rabbi  of  Temple  B'nai  Jeshurun, 
Des  Moines,  Iowa.  This  experi- 
mental plan  of  teaching  has  been 
adopted  by  over  200  congregations, 
and  attempts  to  provide  the  child- 
ren with  an  intelligent  and  modern 
religious  education.  The  teachers 
for  the  coming  year  are:  Nursery, 
Miss  Donna  Hinshee;  First  Grade, 
Mrs.  Fran  Hinshee;  Second  Grade 
Mrs.  Richard  Forman;  Third 
Grade,  Miss  Renee  Sapero;  Fourth 
Grade,  Miss  Frances  Rypins;  Fifth 
Grade,  Mrs.  Mimi  Sachs;  Sixth  and 
Seventh  Grades,  Mr.  Jim  Lederer; 
Eighth  Grade,  Mr.  Richard  For- 
man; Confirmation  Class,  Rabbi 
Joseph  Asher;  Music,  Mr.  David 
Helberg;  Hebrew,  Rabbi  Fred 
Rypins.  Mrs.  Rypins  will  super- 
vise the  primary  grades. 

Many  Greensboro  youngsters  are 
leaving  for  school  soon,  our  best 
(Please   Turn   to   Page  34) 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


To  the  many  friends  we  have 
already  made,  and  to  those 
whose  friendship  we  are  yet 
to  earn,  we  extend  our  sincere 
greetings  for  a  very  happy 
New  Year. 


LUCAS 
TRAVEL  AGE 

108  Piedmont  Bldg. 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 


mOTEL 


©  53  Air-Conditioned  Rooms 
with 

©  Television — Room  Phones 
Q  Swimming  Pool 
©  Brautiful  Restaurant 
Adjoining 


QliAUtv 

COURTS 

UNITED. 


Approved 


Inside  City  on  U.  S.  Highway 
No.  29- A  North 

1118  Summit  Avenue 

Phone  BR  2-0107 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


PIANOS 

ELECTRIC  ORGANS  —  STEREO  PLAYERS 
MUSICAL  ACCESSORIES 
SHEET  MUSIC  AND  RECORDS 
CONVENIENT  TERMS 

WILBER  MUSIC  COMPANY 

"THE  COMPLETE  CONVENIENT  MUSIC  STORE" 
214  N.  Elm  St.  Phone  BR  5-7294 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Please  Patronize  Our  Advertisers 


CRUTCHFIELD  -  BROWNING 
DRUG  COMPANY 

Prescriptions  Carefully  Compounded 
"Quality  With  a  Reputation" 
Dial  BR  3-5553  Dial  BR  4-6308 

357  North  Elm  St.  2166  Lawndale  Dr. 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Harry  D.  Helleit,  Inc. 

Sales  -  DODGE-PLYMOUTH  -  Service 
DODGE  "Job-Rated"  TRUCKS 

449  W.  Market  St.        GEENSBORO,  N.  C.         Dial  BR  5-9541 


MELVIN'S£550  SERVICE 

WASHING.  WAXING,  LUBRICATION,  ETC. 

323  S.  Greene  GREENSBORO  Dial  BR  4-4518 


32 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Faithful  Service 

Use  of  our  complete  facilities  adds  nothing 
to  the  cost  of  the  service. 


Murray  funeral  Home 

AIR-CONDITIONED  CHAPEL 

515  N.  Elm  St.  Phone  BR  2-8165 

Greensboro,  N.  C. 


SAFETY  OF     k  A  Profitable  HOME  For  Your  Savings 

TOUt  5AVJN6S_\9ft  1 

HOME  FEDERAL  SAYINGS 
&  LOAN  ASSOCIATION 

Current  Divident  3  V2  %  Per  Annum 

Main  Office:  113  N.  Greene  St.  —  Plaza  Branch:  1702  Battleground  Ave. 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


"A  Health  Food" 

Dial  BR  2-6131 


PET  DAIRY 
PRODUCTS  CO. 

Pet  Milk  and  Dairy  Products 

At  Your  Favorite  Store  or 
Dur  Dependable  Home  Delivery 

410  Summit  Avenue 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 


New  Year  Greetings 


Sherwim-Wiluams 


HOUSE  PAINTS  —  INDUSTRIAL  MAINTENANCE 
PAINTS  —  INDUSTRIAL  PRODUCT  FINISHES 

Dial  BR  5-3331     335  Battleground  Ave.     Greensboro,  N.  C. 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  To  Our 
Many  Friends  For  A  Very  Happy  New  Year 

Traders  Chevrolet  Company,  Inc. 


215  E.  Market  St. 


GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Dial  BR  2-2146 


"The  Building  Supply  Company  of  Greensboro" 

PEGRAM  -  WEST,  INC. 

EVERYTHING  FROM  FOUNDATION  TO  ROOF 

South  Elm  Extension  at  Meadowview  Road 
Dial  BR  3-6958  GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Durham,  N.  G. 

MRS.  SAM  FREEDMAN.  Correspr  ndenl 


Frank."  An  information  booth  will 
be  manned  by  Hadassah  members 
in  the  lobby  of  the  theater  during 
the  entire  showing  of  the  film. 

Congratulations  to  Sallie  Levy, 
daughter  of  Mrs.  Mose  Levy  and 
the  late  Mr.  Levy,  on  her  engage- 
ment to  Norman  Leaf,  Chicago,  111. 

On  the  sick  list  we  find  Henry 
Swartz  who  is  still  in  the  hospital 
at  Virginia  Beach.  We  wish  him  a 
speedy  recovery. 

The  Bar  Mitzvah  of  Stanley 
Goldberg,  son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Harry  Goldberg,  was  celebrated 
(Please  Turn        ?.-g2  49) 


Mrs.  Isaac  Daniel,  of  Ramot-Gam,  Israel,  together  with  her  sister-in- 
law,  Mrs.  Sam  Daniel  at  an  afternoon  tea.  The  house  guest  was  honoree  at 
the  occasion. 

Honoring  Mrs.  Issa  Daniel  of 
Ramot-Gam,  Israel,  Mrs.  Sam  Dan- 
iel entertained  her  sister-in-law  at 
a  tea.  About  seventy-five  guests 
called  during  the  afternoon  to  meet 
Mrs.  Daniel,  a  charming  Israeli, 
whose  husband  has  charge  of  the 
physical  education  program  for  all 
the  schools  in  Israel. 

Another  Israeli  in  the  city  was 
Miss  Rivka  Peper  of  Natanya,  near 
•Tel  Aviv.  Rivka  is  the  cousin  of 
Nathan  and  Max  Lieberman.  Mrs. 
Nathan  Lieberman  and  Mrs.  Max 
Lieberman  entertained  for  Rivka 
at  a  luncheon  given  in  the  private 
dining  room  of  Howard  Johnson. 
To  meet  Rivka  came  Eileen  Rancer, 
Roslyn  Goldberg,  Barbara  Wish- 
nov,  Fabianne  Wolf,  Barbara 
Lieberman,  Neilda  Freedman, 
Lubah  Freedman,  Carolyn  Fink. 

Sisterhood  has  resumed  its  ac- 
tivities for  the  coming  year.  The 
first  meeting  was  held  September 
2nd  with  Mr.  I.  Zelon  presiding.  Ac- 
tivity reports  for  the  year  were 
given  by  the  chairman.  The  mem- 
bers voted  to  again  have  a  "break 
the  fast"  repass  after  the  Yom  Kip- 
pur  Services. 

The  kick  off  for  the  annual 
Hadassah  Youth  Aliyah  drive  will 
be  held  at  the  Center  Theater  with 
the  members  attending  the  prem- 
iere showing  of  "The  Diary  of  Anne 


In  Greensboro,  Winston-Salem 
or  High  Point 
USE  OUR  SERVICE 


Rent-A-Car,  Inc. 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 
250  E.  Market  St.     Dial  BR  5-6378 

WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 
5th  &  Spruce  Dial  PA  4-6559 

HIGH  POINT,  N.  C. 
117  S.  Wrenn  Dial  7975 


E.  M.  DAVIS 

Expert  Jewelry  Repair 
and  Engraving 

207  y2  W.  Sycamore       BR  2-3289 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Glendenin, 
Wrenn  &  Kirkman 

REALTORS 

218   W.   Gaston  Street 

Dial  BR  2-3183 
GREENSBORO,  N-  C. 


The  Ameritan  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


S3 


Jacksonville,  N.  C. 

MRS.  JULES  SEGERMAN,  Correspondent 


The  summer  is  over  and  our 
scattered  residents  are  slowly  com- 
ing back  to  town  to  settle  down 
once  again  to  normal  living.  After 
the  total  migration  it  seems  good 
to  see  them  all  again. 

Aside  from  the  local  beach-comb- 
ers there  were  some  like  Junie 
Katzin  and  children  who  spent 
iheir  long-distance  vacation  at  Bel 
Harbor,  N.  Y.  with  Junie's  parents. 
The  Maurice  Margolis  family  took 
a  trip  to  Florida,  and  the  Art  Sher- 
mans spent  some  time  in  the  Bor- 
sht  Belt  in  New  York  State.  Ellie 
and  Ike  Margolis  and  their  boys, 
who  moved  from  Jacksonville 
about  two  years  ago,  were  in 
town  last  Saturday.  They  were 
on  their  way  home  to  Holly- 
wood, Florida  from  New  York. 
Ike     Eisenhower     had  nothing: 


Rocky  Mount,  N.  C. 

MRS.  LOUIS  WALD 
Correspondent 

Congratulations  to  Miss  Barbara 
Lee  Sultan,  daughter  of  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Sigmund  Sultan,  who  was 
graduated  from  the  Richmond  Pro- 
fessional Institute  of  the  College 
of  William  and  Mary  with  a  Bach- 
elor of  Science  degree.  Barbara  will 
begin  teaching  the  second  grade  in 
Chesterfield  County,  Richmond, 
Va.,  this  fall.  We  certainly  are 
proud  of  her  and  wish  her  loads  of 
success. 

The  sincere  sympathy  of  the  com- 
munity is  expressed  to  the  follow- 
ing: Mrs.  Hattie  Adler  and  chil- 
dren, Bill,  Harry  and  Irvin,  of 
Tarboro,  on  the  loss  of  their  hus- 
band and  father,  Philip  Adler; 
Aaron  Copeland,  on  the  death  of 
his  mother,  Mrs.  Ethel  Schultz,  of 
Chicago. 


over  the  Margolises  as  far  as  a  re- 
ception was  concerned.  Every  one 
was  so  very  glad  to  see  them  again 
and  Junie  Katzin  was  hostess  at  a 
coffee  hour  at  her  home  honoring 
Ellie. 

Nathan  Leder  and  Susan  Seger- 
man  returned  from  Camp  Lakeside 
in  Hendersonville  after  having 
spent  a  wonderful  week  with  other 
members  of  Jewish  Youth  of  our 
state,  sponsored  by  the  North  Car- 
ol ina  Association  of  Jewish  Men, 
Women,  and  Rabbis.  Susan,  upon 
her  return  from  camp,  was  inform- 
ed by  the  principal  of  her  school 
that  the  results  of  the  National 
Merit  Scholarship  Test  she  took  last 
May  placed  her  in  the  top  five  per 
cent  of  the  nation's  high  school  stu- 
dents. Her  over-all  average  of  the 
five-category  test  was  ninety-seven. 
That's  our  little  girl! 


Martinsville,  Va. 

(Concluded  from  Page  27) 

CONGRATULATIONS  TO: 

Mrs.  Jack  Zachary,  upon  being 
chosen  to  serve  as  chairman  of  the 
Mayor's  Commission  on  Human 
Values,  Mr.  Abe  Eisen  upon  be- 
ing elected  president  of  the  local 
Lion's  Club,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Martin 
Kravitz  on  the  birth  of  a  son,  Ira 
Dale,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Gilmore  Rud- 
man  on  the  birth  of  a  grandson, 
son  of  Betty  and  Jay  Schwartz, 
Mr.  Sam  Goller  who  was  honored 
as  "Lion  of  the  Year"  by  the  local 
Lions  Club. 

Best  of  luck  to  Carol  Eisen, 
who  is  now  a  student  at  Carnegie 
Tech! 


BUY  THAT 
NOW! 


For  The  Best 

IN  EXECUTIVE  AIRCRAFT  CHARTER  SERVICE 
DIAL  BR  2-8993 

MID-ATLANTIC  AIRWAYS 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Industrial  Truck  Sales  &  Service,  Inc. 

CL4RK 


ROSS 


DEALER 


418  E.  Market  St. 


Dial  BR  4-4641 


GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


For 

FUEL  OIL 
Dial  BR  2-97 1 1 

Vanstory  Oil  Co, 

Distributors  of 

PRODUCTS 


1220  W.  Lee  St. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


INDUSTRIAL 


and 


INSTITUTIONAL 

CLEANERS 

Grant 
Che 

INCORPORATED 
Dial  BR  4-6789 
3903  E.  Market  St. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  to  Our  Many  Friends 
for  a  Very  Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year. 

PAUL  B.  WILLIAMS,  INC. 

313  N.  Aycock  Street  Greensboro,  N.  C. 

VERIFAX  COPIERS  BY  EASTMAN  KODAK 
DUPLICATING  EQUIPMENT 

"Offices  in  principal  cities" 


Bring  Your 
Prescriptions 
To  Eckerd's 

Creators  of  Reasonable 
Drug  Prices 


Thomas  M.  Siceloff 

Metropolitan  Insurance  Consultant 

Estate  Planning  and  Business 
Insurance 
METROPOLITAN  LIFE 
INSURANCE  COMPANY 

OFFICE: 
412  W.  Market  St.  BR  5-6661 

RESIDENCE: 
2618  Beechwood  St.        BR  2-3501 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Ask  Your  Grocer  For 


JONES  BROS.  BAKERY 
Greensboro  N.  C. 


Waikins  Quality 
Products  Co. 

THE  SHOPPING  CENTER  THAT 
COMES  TO  YOUR  HOME 

Extracts  —  Spices  —  Waxes 
Cleaners  —  Insecticides 

Established  1868 
934  Fairground  Avenue 

Dial  BR  5-4324 
GREENSBORO,  S.  C. 


SASLOW'S 
Jewelry  Store 

Greensboro's  Largest 
Credit  Jewelry  Store 


34 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK. 


Odell  Lambeth,  President 


Fred  Troxler,  Sec'y-Treas. 


^ambrtl|-(Lraxlcr  iFuuentl  Ilmne 

GREENSBORO'S  NEWEST  AND  MOST  MODERN 
WENDOVER  AT  VIRGINIA  STREET  —  DIAL  BR  3-3401 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


TELEVISION  SERVICE 

ALL  MAKES  —  SPECIALIZED  MOTOROLA  SERVICE 
DIAL  BR  2-2760 

ELLIS  TV  SERVICE  COMPANY 

3702  Lawndale  Dr.  Extension  Greensboro,  N.  C. 


'BEST  BY  TEST" 


SMITH  DRY  CLEANING 

Calvin  E.  Smith,  Proprietor 
209  E.  Sycamore  Phone  BR  2-0761 

207  North  Davie  Greensboro,  N.  C.  Phone  BR  2-8057 


WALTER  J.  BERNSTEIN 
Special  Agent  ■ —  Ordinary  Dept. 


,|  INSURANCE  COMPANY 


Southeastern  Bldg. 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C 


OF  AMERICA 

Dial  BR  4-6710 


ABC  JALOUSIE  COMPANY 

ALUMINUM  STORM  WINDOWS  AND  DOORS    *  JALOUSIES 
CARPORTS  PATIOS  SLIDING  GLASS  WALLS 

Dial  BR  4-4656       317  W.  Lee  Street       GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


PHIPPS  HARDWARE  COMPANY 

CHINA  &  GOURMET  SHOP  —  ELECTRICAL  APPLIANCES 
PAINTS  —  SPORTING  GOODS  —  GARDEN  SUPPLIES 
A  Complete  Line  of  Garden  Club  and  Mechanics  Supplies 

215  N.  Elm  St.        GREENSBORO,  N.  C.        Dial  BR  2-0179 


Battleground 
Cabinet  Shop 

U  &  L  Store  Fixtures — Millwork 
Kitchen  Cabinets  Custom-Made 

New  Garden  Road  at  Lawndale  Extension 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Dial  BR  3-0781 


"If  you  need  a  plumber  bad,  you  want  him  good" 

WHITE  PLUMBING  COMPANY 

Dial  BR  2-6518  for  Repairs  or  Installations 
2603  McConnell  Road  GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


NEW  HOME  BUILDING  SUPPLY  CO. 

WEST  COAST  LUMBER 

Millwork  —  Builders'  Supplies 

625  S.  Mendenhall         Dial  BR  2-4101         Greensboro,  N.  C. 


Wilmington,  N.  C. 

NORMA  MAY,  Correspondent 
Larry  Neuwirth  and  Bruce 
Fieisher  starred  in  Little  League 
baseball  and  each  one  more  than 
once  saved  the  game  for  his  re- 
spective team.  Joe  Friedman,  How- 
ard and  Marvin  Neuwirth  and  Gil- 
bert Karp  were  also  Little  Leaguers. 

Golf  seemed  to  attract  the  ma- 
jority of  the  fellows,  and  they  all 
gave  a  good  account  of  themselves 
in  the  various  tournaments.  Leslie 
Fieisher  won  the  City  Junior  Open 
championship.  Others  doing  well 
in  the  contest  included  Rocky  Ber- 
man,  Marvin  Neuwirth,  Michael 
Blakeman,  Howard  Stein,  and  Fred- 
die Neuwirth. 

Among  the  campers  Randy  May 
was  awarded  the  junior  Life-saving 
Certificate,  while  Leonard  May  was 
awarded  the  "Outstanding  Camp- 
er" award.  Susan  Schwartz  did  the 
entire  city  of  Wilmington  proud 
by  being  awarded  a  scholarship  to 
Western  Carolina.  Helene  Plisco 
and  Marsha  Jacobson  attended 
Lakeside  Camp  in  Western  Caro- 
lina, and  Hank  Blaustein,  Marilyn 
Alper,  Jill  Abrams,  Herbie  and 
Arlene  Zimmer  and  Sara  Warsh- 
auer  attended  Camp  Blue  Star. 

Friends  of  Mrs.  Annie  Abrams 
will  be  glad  to  know  she  is  recuper- 
ating nicely  after  her  recent  opera- 
tion at  James  Walker  Hospital. 

Miss  Rita  Lynn  Simon  was  a  pa- 
tient at  James  Walker  Hospital 
and  is  now  at  home. 


Around  Greensboro 

(Concluded  From   Page  31) 

wishes  for  a  successful  year  go  to: 
Deanna  Daktor,  Woman's  College; 
Shelia  Sapero  and  Charles  Rich- 
man,  Duke  University;  Anne  Wein- 
stein,  Smith  College;  Jean  Tannen- 
baum,  Ellis  School  in  Philadelphia; 
Babs  Landsburger,  Lausanne  School 
for  Girls  in  Memphis;  Louis  Wiley, 
Andover;  Steve  Israel,  Staunton 
Military  Academy;  Bob  Lands- 
burger,  Georgia  Military  Academy. 

May  we  offer  congratulations  to 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Sidney  J.  Stern,  Jr. 
on  the  birth  cf  their  daughter, 
Katherine  OctLi: :<rer  Stern,  August 
12. 

Th?  community  extends  its  sin- 
cere sympathy  to  Mrs.  Sidney 
Schreiber  and  family  on  the  loss 
of  her  father,  Charles  Steinhauser, 
of  Brooklyn,  N.  Y.  on  September 
14th. 


A  Thalhimer  Affiliate 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C- 


Dick's  Shoe  Shop 

Best  Quality 
Repairs 

208  N.  Elm  St.  Dial  BR  2-2459' 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 

Open  from  7  a.  m.  to  11  p.  m. 
every  day 

Dial  BR  3-6835 

HOTEL  PHARMACY 

O.  Henry  Hotel  Bldg. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 

WELBORN 
Electric  Company 

Commercial.  Industrial 
House  Wiring  Service 

High  Point  Rd.    —    Dial  BR-2-7911 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Two-Way  Radio-Dispatched  Taxis 
PROMPT,  COURTEOUS  SERVICE 

Blue  Bird  Taxi,  Inc. 

229  E.  Sycamore  S.      Dial  BR  2-5112 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Good  Furniture  at  Reasonable 
Prices 

BURTNER 
FURNITURE  CO. 

Established  1921 
312  S.  Elm  St.  Phone  BR  2-8417 

GREENSBORO.  N.  C. 


Yost  &  Little 
Realtors 

BR  2-0151      Piedmont  Bldg. 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 


THE  BOAR  AND 
CASTLE 

TASTY  SANDWICHES 
DELICIOUS  DRINKS 
CAR  SERVICE 

West  Market  Ext. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


DIXIE  SALES  CO. 

Automotive  Service 
Carburetor  and  Speedometer 
Specialists 
327  Battleground 
Dial  BR  3-6964 
GREENSBORO.  N.  G_ 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Fayetteville,  N.  C. 

MRS.  JACK  A.  MENDELSOHN,  Correspondent 


MRS.  ROBERT  CANTOR 


Miss  Selma  Mildred  Satisky  and 
Robert  Cantor  pledged  their  wed- 
ding vows  in  a  double-ring  cere- 
mony which  took  place  on  August 
17th  in  the  La-Fayette  Room  of 
the  Main  Post  Officers  Club,  Ft. 
Bragg.  Rabbi  Henry  Z.  Ucko  of- 
ficiated assisted  by  Dr.  Murry  Kan- 
tor  of  Suffork,  Va.,  cousin  of  the 
bride. 


Guilford  Mortgage  Co. 

Sidney  B.  Allen,  Pres. 
REAL  ESTATE  —  LOANS 
INSURANCE 
214  E.  Market         BR  2-8121 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


"ORCHID  SERVICE" 
Hand  Cleaning  and 
Finishing 

BLUE  BIRD 
CLEANERS,  Inc. 

E.  J.  PERRYMAN  &  SONS 
1G13  Madison  Avenue 
Dial  BR  3-2270 
Friendly  Shopping  Center 
Dial  BR  5-0055 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Mrs.  Sol  Linfield  of  Richmond, 
Va.,  cousin  of  the  bride,  was  ma- 
tron of  honor. 

Bridesmaids  were  Miss  Marv 
Lee,  Hudes  of  Baltimore,  Md., 
cousin  of  the  bride,  and  Miss 
Myra  Satisky,  sister  of  the  bride. 

Eddie  Cantor  of  Richmond,  Va., 
attended  his  brother  as  best  man. 
Ushers  were  Phillip  Satisky,  broth- 
er of  the  bride;  Ira  Blaustein,  Jay 
Swartz,  Phillip  Horwitz,  David 
Orlin,  cousin  of  the  bride;  Sol 
Cantor,  William  Cantor,  Louis  Buf- 
fenstein,  N.  Irwin  Shapiro,  and 
James  D.  McMullan. 

Following  a  wedding  trip  to 
Miami  and  Jamaica,  the  couple 
will  be  at  home  in  Richmond,  Va. 

The  bride  was  graduated  from 
Fayetteville  High  School  and  at- 
tended Virginia  Intermont  Col- 
lege in  Bristol,  Va.,  where  she 
was  a  member  of  Delta  Psi  Omega. 

Son  of  Mrs.  Frances  B.  Cantor 
of  Richmond,  and  the  late  Sam- 
uel Cantor,  the  bridegroom  re- 
ceived his  B.  S.  degree  in  electrical 
engineering  from  Virginia  Poly- 
technic Institute  and  his  L.L.B. 
degree  from  T.  C.  Williams  School 


Seasons  Greetings  To  Our  Many  Friends 
For  a  Very  Happy  New  Year 

PIEDMONT  PIE  COMPANY 

GREENSBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


"IT  PAYS  TO  PLAY' 


Greensboro  Sporting  Goods  Company 

WHOLESALE  AND  RETAIL 
Athletic  Outfitters  —  Sport  Clothes  —  Guns  —  Fishing  Tackle 
212  N.  Elm  St.  GREENSBORO,  N,  C.  Dial  BR  3-1081 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  to  Our  Many  Friends 
for  a  Happy  New  Year 

MILL  SIDE  FARM 

MR.  AND  MRS.  RALPH  C.  PRICE,  Owners 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 


SALES  &  SERVICE 


NEW  &  USED  CARS 


RICHARDSON'S  MOTOR  CO. 

WILLYS  JEEPS  —  MARK  IV  AIR  CONDITIONERS 

1524  Battleground         GREENSBORO,  N.  C.      Dial  BR  2-8885 


HART 
Hardware  Co. 


Your 


APPLIANCE  STORE 

Dial  BR  4-1948 
334  Tate  Street 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


BREWER 

Paint  &  Wallpaper 


SPECIALIZING  IN 
Painting  &  Wallpapering 

Residential 
^'Commercial 
♦Industrial 

1612  Madison  Avenue 

Dial  BR  4-5403 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


GREENSBORO  ELECTRIC  COMPANY 

RICHARD  G.  STANLEY,  Owner 
ELECTRICAL  CONTRACTING  AND  REPAIRING 
FIXTURES  &  APPLIANCES 

Dial  BR  5-2823  1410  Glenwood  Ave. 

Greensboro,  N.  C. 


FOR  FUEL  OIL 
Dial  BR  2-4195 


ATLANTIC 
COAL  &  OIL  CO. 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Bring  Your  Cars 
For  Expert  Repairing  To 

KIRK'S  SINEATH 
Motor  Company 

24-Hour  Wrecker  Service 

Dial  BR  2-3456 
420  BATTLEGROUND 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


36 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Hanes  Funeral  Home,  Inc. 

II  ANF^J  T  TTVF'RF'RI? Y 

FINEST  FACILITIES    puNERAL  SERVICE     MODERATE  COST 

401  W.  Market  St.    GREENSBORO,  N.  C.         Dial  BR  2-5158 


LEON'S  BEAUTY  SALON 

Two  Locations 


340  Tate  Street 
Dial  BR  2-6526 


Friendly  Shopping  Center 
Dial  BR  5-0663 


GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Bring  The  Family  and  Enjoy 
"SEAFOOD  AT  IT'S  BEST" 

LIBBY  HILL  SEAFOOD  RESTAURANTS 

No.  1 :  U.  S.  Hwy.  220  North  No.  2 :  3008  High  Point  Rd. 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 
1209  Waughtown  Rd.  Winston-Salem,  N.  C. 


LENNOX 


Indoor  Comfort  Systems 

811  Battleground  GREENSBORO.  N.  C. 


Aire-Flo  Heating  and 
Air-Conditioning 


Dial  BR  4-6538 


MATKIN'S  AUTO  GLASS  CO.,  INC. 

Auto  Glass  Specialists 

224  E.  Gaston  St.  Dial  BR  5-1359 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


'  mm. 


JEFFERSON  SQUARE 

FREE  DCIIVCRY  •  S  R  2-116* 


Free  Delivery 


GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


New  Year  Greetings  From  . 


JOHN  R.  TAYLOR  CO.,  INC. 

2910  E.  Bessemer  Ave.     Greensboro,  N.  C.     Dial  BR  4-8471 


QUALITY  CLOTHING  FOR  MEN 

AND  YOUNG  MEN 
Boys  Department  —  Second  Floor 

tFounts^LVBoe  Co. 

JT^VV HtKF,     QUALITY    IS   HIGHER.  THAN  PMCE^ 


GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


COX  RADIATOR  COMPANY 

Radiator  Service    •    Sales  and  Repairs 

430  Battleground  Dial  BR  2-7504 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


of  Law,  University  of  Richmond. 
He  is  a  partner  in  the  law  firm 
of  Cantor,  McMulland  and  Can- 
tor in  Richmond.  He  served  as  a 
first  lieutenant  in  the  army  and 
is  on  the  board  of  governors  of 
Beth  El  Temple,  Richmond. 

It  is  good  to  see  everyone  back 
from  their  summer  vacations.  We 
are  all  getting  into  the  swing  of 
our  fall  and  winter  activities.  Of 
those  who  took  far  away  trips, 
welcome  back  Mr.  and  Mrs.  j. 
Bernard  Stein  and  daughters, 
Marcia  and  Janet,  who  just  re- 
turned from  a  tour  of  Europe  and 
Israel.  We  are  certain  that  thev 
have  many  interesting  things  to 
tell  about.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Michael 
Kanzer  visited  Canada  as  did  Mrs. 
Rebecca  Rosenfeld.  W  e  1  c  o  m  e 
home  everyone. 

We  are  very  happy  to  welcome 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Martin  Wertheim 
and  family  of  Charlotte,  N.  C, 
into  our  community.  We  wish 
them  a  lot  of  luck  and  happiness. 
We  are  also  glad  to  welcome 
back  Captain  and  Mrs.  Jack  Spital 
and  four  small  Spitals.  ft  is  al- 
ways good  to  have  the  Spitals  re- 
turn. We  hope  their  stay  this 
time  will  be  a  long  and  happy 
one. 

Mrs.  Martin  Wertheim  and 
Mrs.  Jack  Spital  were  honored  at 
a  Coffee  given  to  welcome  them, 
at  the  Fort  Bragg  Officer's  Club 
on  September  10.  Hostesses  for 
this  lovely  affair  were  Mrs.  John 
Green  and  Mrs.  George  Baumgar- 
ten. 

Hadassah's  Youth  Aliah  Lunch- 
eon will  be  held  on  October  20 


at  the  Lion's  Civic  Center.  All 
Hadassah  members  are  urged  to 
attend.  An  excellent  speaker  has 
been  engaged. 

We  wish  to  extend  our  deepest 
sympathy  to  the  Shavitz  family 
on  the  loss  of  a  beloved  brother, 
Morris  Shavitz  of  Baltimore,  Md.; 
and  also  to  Mrs.  S.  M.  Fleishman 
on  the  death  of  a  beloved  sister, 
Mrs.  Leah  Hanover,  wife  of  Jack 
Hanover  of  Baltimore,  Md. 

Late  congratulations  to  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Irving  Lehrer  on  the 
birth  of  a  daughter.  We  hope  this 
new  addition  brings  them  much 
joy. 

A  Buffet  Dinner  was  given  at 
the  Beth  Israel  Center  on  Sunday 
September  13,  to  bid  on  Alyahs  for 
the  High  Holidays.  Mr.  Joe  Ban- 
was  in  charge  of  thijs  affaire. 


Dr.  Melvin  M.  Newman  of  New 
York,  associate  professor  of  surgrery 
at  the  State  University  of  New  York's 
medical  center,  has  assumed  the 
duties  of  chief  of  surgery  at  free- 
care  National  Jewish  Hospital  in 
Denver. 


KELLY  INSURANCE  SERVICE 


601  N.  Elm  St. 


'Insurance  With  Savings' 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Dial  BR  2-0265 


"GLASS  HEADQUARTERS  —  STORE  FRONT  SPECIALISTS" 


Macon  S1.. 


I    NCORP    OKA  E  D 

Greensboro,  N.  C. 


Dial  BR  5-5344 


Hodgin  Roofing  &  Supply  Company 

Authorized  Dealer  for  Ruberoid  Products 

ASPHALT  SHINGLES 
923  West  Lee  Street  Telephone  BR  2-4607 

GREENSBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


S7 


High  Poini,  N.  C. 

MRS.  DAVID  LAFFERMAN,  Correspondent 


MRS.  JACK  STANLEY  BALSER 


Miss  Patricia  Ann  Rabhan  be- 
came the  bride  of  Jack  Stanley 
Balser  at  B'Nai  Israel  Synagogue, 
on  September  6th.  Rabbi  Herbert 
Silberman  officiated. 

The  bride  is  the  daughter  of 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Alvin  Roy  Rabhan 
of  1509  BriarclKff  Court.  The 
groom's  parents  are  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Meyer  Balser  of  Atlanta,  Ga. 

The  bride  was  given  in  mar- 
riage by  her  father. 

Matron  of  honor  was  Mrs.  Har- 
old Rabhan,  sister-in-law  of  the 
bride.  Miss  Ellen  Balser,  sister  of 
the  groom,  was  maid  of  honor. 
Bridesmaids  were  Miss  Betty  Ja- 
cobs, Miss  Bunny  Jacobs,  and 
Miss  Barbara  Feen,  all  cousins  of 
the  bride;  Miss  Libby  Johnson: 
and  Mrs.  Robert  Friedman,  Flow- 
er girls  were  Minday  Rae  Rab- 
han, niece  of  the  bride,  and  Mary 
Ann  Trockman,  cousin  of  the 
bride. 

Miss  Linda  Rifkin  registered 
guests.  "1 

Best  man  to  the  groom  was  his 
brother,  Ronald  Balser.  Ushers 
were  Harold  Rabhan,  Ted  Schloss- 
inan,  Marvin  Harris,  Irving  Stone. 
Julia     Kossow,     Richard  Stone, 


Jack  Horowitz  and  Barry  Rosen- 
berg. 

The  bride  was  graduated  from 
High  Point  High  School  and  is  a 
member  of  the  Class  of  1960  of 
Emory  University.  She  was  pre 
sented  at  the  High  Point  Debu- 
tante Ball  in  1956  and  is  a  mem- 
ber of  Alpha  Epsilon  Pi  Sorority. 

The  groom  is  a  graduate  of  the 
Wharton  School  of  the  University 
of  Pennsylvania  and  a  member  of 
Sigma  Alpha  Mu  Fraternity.  He 
is  engaged  in  insurance  business 
in  Atlanta. 

Following  a  wedding  trip  to  Ja- 
maica, the  couple  will  live  in 
Atlanta. 

Congratulations  to  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Richard  Swartzberg  upon 
the  birth  of  a  daughter;  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Gene  Perlman  upon  the 
birth  of  a  daughter;  Mrs.  Rose 
Wagger  upon  the  birth  of  her 
first  grandchild,  a  daughter  born 
to  Dr.  and  Mrs.  Gerald  Wagger 
of  Baltimore,  Md. 

Best  wishes  to  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Sanford  Henich  upon  their  re- 
cent marriage.  Mrs.  Henich  is  the 


Our  Best  Wishes  for  a  Happy  New  Year 

FRIENDLY  TOY  &  HOBBY  SHOP 

605  Friendly  Shopping  Center  Dial  BR  4-6123 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


SUNSET  BARBER  SHOP 

Friendly  Road  at  Aycock  Dial  BR  4-4879 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Farabee  Machine  and  Paris  Company 


206  Walker  Avenue 


ENGINE  REBUILDING 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Dial  BR  4-0108 


Eye  Gloss  Prescriptions  Accurately  Filled 


206  N.  Elm 


OPTICAL  CO. 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C.  Dial  BR  3-9286 


PHIL  R.  CARLTON 

Incorporated 

Real  Estate  —  Rents 
Insurance  —Bonding 

Carlton  Building 
Opposite  Courthouse 

Dial  BR  2-8157 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Greetings 


ACROBAT 
SHOE  STORE 

Dial  BR  2-0729 
119  W.  Market 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 


J.  A.  WILLARD  CO. 

Machine  Work  —  Repairs 
• 

210  S.  Forbis  St.         BR  2-8735 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Seeds  —  Garden  Tools 

SCOTT  SEED  CO 

Dial  BR  3-8625 
235  N.  Greene  Street 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


THE  //  EXQUI SITE 


crosonic 


BY        B  A    L  U    tv  I  JV 


The  best  piano  you 
can  buy  is  the  one  you 
will  want  to  play. 
Come  in  and  hear 
it  today. 

Moore  Music  Co. 

615  W.  MARKET  ST. 
GREENSBORO.  N.  C. 


FLORIDA  STREET 
BAKERY 

A  complete  line  of  fine 
bakery  products. 

We  are  particularly 
proud  of  our 

RYE  BREAD 

Your  patronage  will  be 
appreciated  —  and  rewarded 
815  Florida  St- 
DialBR4-1075      Greensboro.  N.C. 


3« 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


NATIONAL  CASH 
REGISTER  CO. 

O.  L.  FRYMAN 

Branch  Manager 
116  East  Market  Street 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


t  G.  TRULL 
Distributing  Co. 
Inc. 

Wine  Distributors 

•  Taylor's  New  York  State 

•  Mogen  David 

•  Richard's  Catawba 

•  Horowitz  -  Margareten 

Dial  BR  3-3272 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 


MENDENHALL  LUMBER  COMPANY 

A  Complete  Stock  of  Lumber  and  Building  Materials 
533  S.  Ashe  Street  Dial  BR  2-0417 

BR  3-6643 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Please  Patronize  Our  Advertisers 


SEAMAN'S,  Inc. 

Since  1922 

•  Jalousies 

•  Aluminum  Window 
Screens 

•  Storm  Windows 

•  Modernfold  Doors 
Factory  and  Office 

1060  Battleground  Ave. 
Dial  BR  4-5405 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


AGRICO 

Manufactured  by 

AMERICAN 
AGRICULTURAL 
CHEMICAL  CO. 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Vestal's  Flower  Shop 

Your  Personal  Attention  Florist 

Flowers  For 
All  Occasions 

Dial  BR  5-7272 

Located  in 
Summit  Shopping  Center 
948  Summit  Avenue 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


New  Year  Greetings 


PAT  WINSTON 

REAL  ESTATE 

Dial  BR  2-5658 
112  N.  Mendenhall 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Local  and  Long  Distance 

MOVING 

'There  Is  a  Difference  In  Rates' 
Dial  BR  2-4266 

SECURITY 
VAN  LINES 

Ed  Thomas,  Owner-Manager 

1713  Elwood  Avenue 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


HUGHEY  TILE  CO, 

CONTRACTORS 

For  Estimates 
DIAL  BR  2-7090 
Burlington  Road 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


former  Miss  Marilyn  Shugar  of 
Raleigh. 

Congratulations  to  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Julius  Fine  upon  the  en- 
gagement of  their  son,  Paul  to 
MJiss  Ellen  Brodie  Eichhol  of 
Savannah. 

Our  deepest  sympathies  to  Mrs. 
Joe  Levine  upon  the  loss  of  her 
sister;  to  Julian  Josephson  upon 
the  loss  of  his  mother,  and  to 
Samuel  Shavitz  upon  the  loss  of 
his  brother. 

It  is  with  deep  regret  that  we 
record  the  passing  of  our  beloved 
member,  Al  Schwartz.  We  extend 
our  heartfelt  sympathy  to  the 
bereaved. 


Lincoln  and  Herzl 

(Concluded  From  Page  27) 
tercommunications  of  mankind 
break  a  new  path  for  social  jus- 
tice. And  even  as  our  beloved  poet 
Heine  turned  his  sorrows  into 
song,  so  we  out  of  our  sorrows 
will  bring  forth  advancement  for 
the  humanity  which  we  serve." 

This  is  the  utterance  of  a  man 
who,  like  Lincoln,  believed  in 
the  necessity  of  that  "new  birth 
of  freedom,"  which  is  so  vital  to 
all  mankind.  This  is  a  message 
fraught  with  meaning  and  signifi- 
cance to  us  all.  And  if  this  be 
dreaming,  then  let  us  dream  with 
all  our  might. 


Johnson  City,  Tenn. 

Dr.  Pierce  Amies  has  assumed 
his  duties  as  Rabbi  of  the  B'nai 
Sholom  congregation  made  up  of 
members  from  Johnson  City,  King- 
sport  and  Bristol. 

Dr.  Annes  was  born  in  Lomazy, 
Poland.  One  of  his  three  sons  is 
Rabbi  of  Temple  Israel,  New  Ro- 
chelle,  N.  Y. 

The  new  Rabbi  studied  in  var- 
ious Yeshiveth  in  Europe,  such  as 
Zitomir,  Hezerith,  Warsaw,  Wilno, 
and  the  famous  .^clobedka  Yeshi- 
yah.  He  received  the  highest  Rab- 
binic ordination  (Saichah)  which 
was  certified  and  confirmed  by  the 
Hebrew  Theological  Seminary  in 
Chicago,  111. 


BUY  THAT 
ISRAEL  BOND  NOW! 


SCOTTY'S 
CHILDREN'S 
SHOP 

"The  first  to  show  the  latest  in 
Children's  Wearing  Apparel" 

Dial  BR  2-0476 
2154  Lawndale  Drive 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


0.  K.  Rubber  Welders 

FOR  TIRES 

World's  Finest  Recanping 
Guaranteed  Nation-Wide 
1304  E.  Bessemer  Ave.,  BR  4-5832 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 


Rierson  Brothers 
Welding  Shop 

Electric  and  Acetylene 
Welding 

Phone  BR  2-0692 
248  E.  Sycamore 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


PIEDMONT 

Office  Suppliers 

Office  Supplies 

203  N.  Greene  St. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 
Dial  BR  4-1561 


Greensboro's  Only 
Drive-In  Pharmacy 

Medical  Center 
Pharmacy 

Prescription  Specialists 
City-Wide  Delivery 

Dial  BR  4-0134 

408  E.  Wendover  Ave. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


\jAFE 

AIR-CONDITIONED 

Specializing  in  .  .  . 

Western  Steaks 

Shis-Ka-Bob 
&  Louis  Salad 

dial  BR  3-3503 

124  Bellemeade 
Opposite  O.  Henry  Hotel 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


39 


Winston-Salem,  N.  C. 

MRS.  DON  MALLINS,  Correspondent 


Plans  for  the  coming  year  are 
in  full  swing  here  in  Winston- 
Salem.  At  the  present  time  Council- 
Sisterhood's  Annual  Harvest  Lunch- 
eon is  always  a  lovely  occasion  and 
a  wonderful  way  for  the  organiza- 
tions to  start  off  a  new  year  of 
activities. 

Then  on  September  26th  Wins- 
ton-Salemites  celebrated  H-Day. 
A  breakfast  was  served  at  the 
home  of  Mrs.  Don  Mallins  to  all 
the  solicitors.  Then  at  12:30  P.  M. 
the  women  in  the  community 
attended   lunch   at    the  Temple 


and  an  afternoon  of  learning  and 
fun. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Leonard  Clein  be- 
came parents  of  a  son;  and  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Martin  Levin  are  very 
happy  over  the  birth  of  their  third 
daughter.  Mazel  Tov  to  the  lucky 
parents  and  grandparents. 

Other  happy  occasions  during 
September  were  the  Bat  Mitzvahs 
of  Jan  Mescham,  daughter  of  Dr. 
and  Mrs.  I.  I.  Mescham;  and  of 
Barbara  Lavietes,  daughter  of  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Paul  Lavietes.  We'll  give 
you  all  the  details  in  next  month's 
edition. 


Gastesua,  N.  C. 

PAULINE  B.  CHINN, 
Correspondent 

Miss  Sheila  Ann  Farbman, 
daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Sol  Farb- 
man of  Panama  City,  Republic  of 
Panama,  became  engaged  to  Oren 
Reid  Manning,  son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
W.  G.  Manning  of  Gastonia,  N.  C, 
on  August  23,  1959.  A  reception 


refreshes 
without  filling 


Bottled  By 

Pepsi  Cola  Bottling  Company 
Greensboro,  N.  C-  Elkin,  N.  C. 
Winston-Salemr  N.  C. 


and  buffet  dinner  were  held  in  the 
Fern  Room,  Tivoli  Hotel  in 
Ancon,  Canal  Zone,  in  honor  if 
the  couple. 


SHEILA    ANN  FARBMAN 

Raleigh  Beth  Or 
Hafleigh,  N.  C. 

MRS.  JEAN  CAPLAN 
Correspondent 

The  dream  of  years  has  been  ful- 
filled. Temple  Beth  Or  is  now 
i  Lilly  air-conditioned.  We  shall  now 
be  in  a  position  to  receive  spiritual 
nourishment  under  ideal  weather 
conditions  in  summer  as  well  as  in 
the  rest  of  the  year.  We  are  greatly 
indebted  to  Mr.  E.  J.  Ellisberg 
and  Mr.  Sig  Schafer,  who  provided 
the  impetus  to  this  worthy  project 
and  to  all  other  generous  individ- 


Frank  Vogler 
&  Sons 

FUNERAL  DIRECTORS 
AMBULANCE  SERVICE 
Dependable  Since  1858 
Dial  PA  2-6101 
WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Winston-Salem,  N.  C. 


WALL'S 
GLADE  HILL  FUNERAL  HOME 

North  Carolina's  Most  Complete  Funeral  Home  and  Chapel 

1200  Glade  Street  Dial  PA  2-6117 

WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


MOTHER 


DAUGHTER 


FASHIONS 

The  very  newest  in  feminine  apparel. 

(Corner  Liberty  and  3rd  Streets) 

RALEIGH  in  WINSTON-SALEM 


WILSON 


MAPLE  GROVE  REST  HOME 

Member  of  the  National  Association  of  Nursing  Homes 
A  Pleasant  Peaceful  Home  for  the  Aged 
Walkertown  Road  Dial  LY  5-6711  Waughtown,  N.  C. 

Winston-Salem,  N.  C. 


WALL  -  TURNER  CO. 

HEATING  AND  AIR-CONDITIONING 
CONTRACTORS  AND  ENGINEERS 


587  S.  Stratford  Rd.     Winston-Salem,  N.  C. 


Dial  PA  4-0526 


Complete  Dry  Cleaning  Service 
Fur  Cleaning  and  Storage 

MITH  DRY  CLEANERS 


310  N.  Claremont  Avenue 

WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


Dial  PA  3-2491 


MORE  STYLE 


Expect  More  at  Stockton's 
-  MORE  QUALITY  —  MORE  SERVICE 


brmanStocktonlnc 


411  N.  Cherry  Street 
WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


Edwards  Metal  Shop,  Inc. 

ESSO  OIL  FURNACES 
Furnace  Cleaning  and  Repairing 
Guttering  and  Sheet  Metal  Work 

2933  Maplewood  Ave.    Winston-Salem,  N.  C.       Dial  PA  5-8377 


WACHOVIA  OIL  COMPANY 

Distributors  of  Gulf  Oil  Products 
Fuel  Oil  and  Burner  Service 

Ivy  Ave.  at  17th  Street 
Winston -Salem,  North  Carolina        Dial  PA  5-0557 


4o 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


BALDWIN 

"SINCE  1862" 


Liberal  Trade-In  Allowances 

Moxley  Piano  Co. 

Dial  PA  2-7381  673  W.  4th 

WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


•  New  Year 

•  Greetings 

from 

Benneft-Lewallen 
Co*f  Inc. 

Dial  PA  2-6119 
341  Witt  Street 
WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


THE  CAMEL  CITY  LAUNDRY 

"A  Bundle  of  Satisfaction" 
Plant  and  Office  Branch 
512  E.  Fourth  St.  281  S.  Stratford  Rd. 

WINSTON-SALEM,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


Enjoy  a  good  game  of  golf  at  the 

Reynolds  Park  Golf  Club 

Reserve  Starting  Time  By  Phoning  PA  2-9342 
WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


Carolina  Marble  and  Tile  Company 

Since  1921 

TILE,  MARBLE,  TERRAZZO,  RESILIENT  FLOORS 
1001  Northwest  Blvd.,  W.  Dial  PA  4-3641 

WINSTON-SALEM,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


319  Haled  St. 


BROOKBANK  and  STONE 

Rockwool  Insulating  and  Roofing  Co 
Bonded  Roofing  —  Slate  and  Tile 

WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


Dial  PA  3-1151 


SALEM  REFRIGERATION  CO.,  INC. 

We  Repair  Commercial  Refrigeration 
And  Air-Conditioners 

1650  Hutton  Street       Dial  PA  4-3431       WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


Gasoline  —  Fuel  —  Motor  Oil  —  Kerosene 

LEONARD  OIL  COMPANY,  INC. 

DIAL  PA  2-1353  or  2-4574 

For  Prompt,  Courteous  Delivery  of  Fuel  Oil  and  Kerosene 
2102  Vargrave  WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


Brake  Service 
(o«,  Inc. 


BRAKE  SPECIALISTS 
WHEEL  ALIGNMENT 

Dial  PA  4-9281 
183  Waughtown 
WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


FIVE  Complete  Stores 

in  ONE 
Roof-top  Parking  for 
Over  300  Cars 


801  W.  4th  St.  Dial  PA  4-4461 
WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


uals  who  contributed  to  this  most 
worthy  undertaking. 

Religous  School  resumed  its  ses- 
sions Sunday,  September  13th,  with 
a  good  enrollment  of  pupils.  Rabbi 
and  Mrs.  Harry  Caplan  prepared  a 
Religious  School  curriculum  for 
the  coming  year.  Mrs.  Leon  Scha- 
fer  is  chairman  of  the  Religious 
School  Committee  for  the  1959-60 
season. 

A  memorial  name  plate  in  mem- 
ory of  the  late  Mrs.  Stella  Seligson 
Cohen  was  dedicated  Friday,  Sep- 
tember 18.  Memorial  name  plates 
in  memory  of  the  late  Dr.  and  Mrs. 
David  Kleiman  were  dedicated 
Friday,  September  25. 

Rabbi  Caplan  addressed  three 
hundred  students  enrolled  at  the 
Transylvania  Music  Camp  at  Bre- 
vard, N.  C,  participating  in  the 
Child  and  Youth  Conference  held 
recently  in  Raleigh,  and  was  a  par- 
ticipant in  the  Wildacres  Confer- 
ence of  the  North  Carolina  Asso- 
ciation of  Rabbis  held  at  Wild- 
acres. 

Our  congratulations  to  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Isadore  Golden,  and  to  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Philip  Rothstein  on  their 
beautiful  new  homes.  May  joy  and 
happiness  be  their  lot  in  their 
pleasant  surroundings. 

We  are  pleased  to  report  that 
Mrs.  Hennie  Esser  is  doing  nicely 
after  her  recent  illness,  and  that 
Mr.  Charles  Kohn  is  making  fine 
progress. 

Miss  Betina  Rothstein  was  at 
Wildacres  in  August  attending  the 
National  Federation  of  Temple 
Youth  Camp  Conclave. 

The  opening  Fall  meeting  of  the 
Sisterhood  got  off  to  a  good  start 
Monday  evening,  Sepember  14th, 
with  the  president,  Mrs.  Harold 
Mark,  presiding.  Many  new  plans 
were  formulated  for  the  coming 
year,  among  them  the  manning  of 
a  booth  at  the  Raleigh  State  Fair 
the  early  part  of  October. 


Raleigh,  N.  C. 
Beth  Meyer 
Synagogue 

Correspondent 
MRS.  OSCAR  LEGUM, 

Beth  Meyer  Sisterhood's  year 
started  off  with  a  "bang"  with  its 
first  meeti:  g  in  the  form  of  a 
KITCHEN  iHOWER.  Mrs.  Jules 
Robinson,  president,  announced 
the  first  fund  raising  affair  for 
Sisterhood  was  the  card  party 
held  the  later  part  of  September. 

Our  Sunday  School,  under  the 
supervision  of  Mrs.  Richard  S. 
Ruby,  started  the  year  1 959-1960* 


New  Year  Greetings  From  .  .  . 

Hull-Dobbs  Co. 

World's  Largest  Fori  Dealer 

Authorized  Sales  and  Service 


Sales  Department  Open  Evenings 
Till  9  O'clock 

633  N.  Liberty  at  7th— PA  4-7441 
WINSTON-SALEM.  N.  C. 


TWIN  CITY 
DRY  CLEANING  CO. 

Evening  Dresses — Tuxedo  and  Tails 
Blankets  —  Draperies  —  Slipcovers 
612  W.  Fourth  Dial  PA  2-7106 

WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 

WARNER 
FLOORING  CO.,  Inc. 

FLOOR  COVERINGS 

LINOLEUM,  RUGS  and  CARPETS 
RUBBER  and  ASPHALT  TILE 

135  W.  End  Blvd.  Dial  PA  5-7531 
Winston-Salem,  N.  C.         PA  2-6023 


COX'S  SEED  STORE 

Seeds,  Bulbs,  Poultry  Feeds 
Fertilizers  and  Dog  Food 

600  North  Trade        Dial  PA  3-107J 
WINSTON-SALEM.  N.  C. 


Please  Patronize  Our  Advertiser* 

BOCOCK-STROUD 
COMPANY 

Your  Sporting  Goods  Center 

Dial  PA  4-2421 
Fourth  at  Spruce  Street 
WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 

We  Appreciate  Your  Patronage 
Complete  Auto  Service 

DOWNTOWN 
GARAGE 

Day — STORAGE — Night 

431  N.  Main  St. 
WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 

ELECTRIC  and  ACETYLENE 
WELDING 
Portable  Equipment — Machine  Work 
ORNAMENTAL  IRON  WORK 

DIXIE  WELDING,  INC. 

526  N.  Main  Dial  PA  4-1578 

WINSTON-SALEM.  N.  C 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


41 


on  September  13th,  with  a  Record 
Enrollment.  With  the  increased  en- 
rollment, there  are  now  seven  class- 
es with  the  following  teachers:  Mr. 
Milton  Blick;  Mrs.  Joel  Citron; 
Mrs.  Martin  Litwack;  Mrs.  M.  B. 
Dworsky;  Mrs.  Abe  Schoen;  Mrs. 
Mark  Sidnstein  and  Mrs.  Ralph 
Kaufman.  A  special  Consecration 
Service  will  be  held  for  the  younger 
children  attending  the  school  by 
Rabbi  Abe  Schoen. 

School  days  are  here  again— and 
the  college  students  have  left  for 
their  schools.  To  Chapel  Hill  - 
and  UNC,  Donald  Vinnik,  Phillip 
Horwitz  and  Melvin  Garr;  to  UNC 


Dental  School,  Burton  Horwitz;  to 
UNC-WC,  Rosalind  Legum,  and 
to  U  of  Va.,  Freddie  Greenspon. 

Visitors  to  our  community  recent- 
ly have  been  Dr.  and  Mrs.  Erwin 
Vinnik,  and  son,  from  Denver, 
Colorado,  visiting  their  parents, 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  George  Vinnik,  and 
Mrs.  Melvin  Shottenstein  and 
daughter,  visiting  their  parents, 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  I.  J.  Green.  It  is 
always  good  to  see  our  former  re- 
sidents return  for  visits. 

We  wish  much  happiness  to  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Howard  Prescott  and  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Emil  Goldsmith  who  have 
moved  into  their  new  homes. 


10th  Annual  Conference  of  the  North 
Carolina  Association  of  Jewish  Youth 


SURVEY  PROVED 
WINSTON-SALEM'S 
NO.  1  STATION 

WTOB 

RADIO 

WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


'The  Best  In  Television  Backed 
By  The  Best  In  Service" 

Dial  PA  4-0083 

Repairs  on  All  Household 
Appliances 

Salem  Electronics 

336  Waughtown 
WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


Using  the  theme,  "A  Look  at 
Our  Heritage,"  forty  young  boys 
and  girls  from  all  sections  of  the 
State  of  North  Carolina  attended 
the  10th  Annual  Conference  of  the 
North  Carolina  Association  of  Jew- 
ish Youth  at  Camp  Lakeside,  Hen- 
dersonville,  N.  G,  from  August  16- 
23rd. 

From  a  small  beginning  confer- 
ence at  Wild  Acres,  Little  Switzer- 
land, N.  C,  the  N.  C.  Association 
of  Jewish  Youth  has  grown  to  be 
an  organization  that  is  recognized 

Robert  E.  Lee  Hotel 
Barber  Shop 

F.  M.  WILLIS,  Prop. 
Air-Conditioned 
Dial  PA  2-5312  or  PA  2-6161 
for  Appointment 
Five  Expert  Barbers  —  Manicurist 
Shoe  Shine  Service 
WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


Department  Store 

WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


For  Fine  Food'"It's  The 

Town  Stea\  House 

No.  1  WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C.  No  2 

107  Lockland  Ave.  300  S.  Stratford  Rd. 


FRANK  L.  BLUM  CONSTRUCTION  COMPANY 

General  Contractors 

860  W.  41/2  Street  Dial  PA  3-1544 

WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


Your  Prescription  Headquarters 

Patterson  Drug  Co. 

City-Wide  Delivery 

112  W.  Fourth  Street 
Dial  PA  2-7194 
WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


Flowers  for  All  Occasions 

M.  McNULTY 

CUT  FLOWERS  —  CORSAGES 
POTTED  PLANTS 
Dial  PA  2-2504  858  W.  4th 

WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


DRY  CLEANERS 

LAUNDERERS 

SARTIN'S 

High  Point 

Winston-Salem 

Dial  4501 

Dial  PA  2-7101 

HIGHLAND 
Builders  Supply, 
Inc. 

For  Your  Building  Needs 

DIAL  PA  2-1173 

401  Knollwood 
Corner  S.  Stratford  Rd. 
WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


Greetings 

CUMBERLAND 

Mfg.  Co.,  Inc. 

©  Blue  Jeans 
•  Overalls 
•  Sportswear 

WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


Please  Patronize  Our  Advertisers 


IRVIN  MANUFACTURING  (0. 

MANTELS  AND  GENERAL  CABINET  WORK 

442  Brookstown  WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C.  Dial  PA  4-1821 


FRANK  R.  MYERS  —  E. 

L.  THOMAS 

\         SALEM  ELECTRIC 

COMPANY 

!  CONTRACTORS 

Anything  Electrical  —  Anytime 

—  24-Hour  Service 

315  South  Liberty 

Dial  PA  2-6174 

WINSTON-SALEM, 

N.  C. 

ZINZENDORF  LAUNDRY 

Dry  Cleaners  —  Rug  Cleaners 

Dial  PA  2-5178  WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


42 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a  Happy  and 
Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Asheville,  N.  C. 


ASHEYILLE 
Cleaners  &  Dyers 

The  Home  of  Fine  Cleaners 

EVENING  WEAR 
DRAPERIES  -:-  HATS 
RUGS  -:•  DYEING 

230  Merrimon  Avenue 
Dial  AL  4-2364 
ASHEVILLE,  N.  C. 


SHOP  &  SAVE 
At 


Your  Shopping  Center 

ASHEVILLE,  N.  C. 


LEARNING  TO  DANCE  IS  FUN 
AT  ARTHUR  MURRAY'S 

Arthur  Murray  School  of  Dancing 


71  Haywood 


Dial  AL  2-1884 


Asheville,  N.  C. 


S,  W.  Harrington,  Inc. 

New  —  Used  —  Rebuilt 
MACHINERY  —  MOTORS  —  MILL  SUPPLIES 

Acetylene  and  Electric  Welding 
71  Thompson,  Biltmore  Dial  AL  3-4752 

ASHEVILLE,  N.  C. 


E.  F.  Meadows  Sheet  Metal  Works 

ROOFING  &  SHEET  METAL  WORK 

Dial  AL  2-4291         ASHEVILLE,  N.  C.         291  Broadway 


Perry  M,  Alexander  Construction  Co. 

"Over  35  Years'  Experience" 
EXCAVATING  CONTRACTORS 
Sweeten  Creek  Road  Dial  AL  3-9323 

ASHEVILLE,  N.  C. 


Biltmore  Dairy 
Farm  Products 


MARSHALL'S 

Fuel  Oil  Company 

Metered  Fuel  Oil  Service 
AL  2-4181       585  Haywood  Rd. 
W.  ASHEVILLE,  N.  C. 


Morgan  Brothers,  Inc. 

Wholesalers  -  Distributors 
CANDY  —  CIGARS  —  DRUGS 
SUNDRIES — PAPER  PRODUCTS 
AND  SCHOOL  SUPPLIES 
AL  3-6416 
ASHEVILLE,  N.  C. 


BENNETT'S,  Inc. 

Asheville's  Exclusive 
Luggage  Shop 
Featuring 
Nationally  Advertised  Lines 
64  Patton         Dial  AL  2-6783 
ASHEVILLE,  N.  C. 


throughout  the  State.  Any  Jewish 
boy  or  girl  in  North  Carolina  be- 
tween the  ages  of  14  to  18,  is 
eligible  to  become  a  member  of 
the  NCAJY  by  sending  $1.50  dues 
to  the  treasurer,  Miss  Esther  Acker- 
man,  302  Banks  St.,  Fort  Mills, 
South  Carolina. 

The  objectives  of  the  North 
Carolina  Association  of  Jewish 
Youth  are:  to  uplift  and  educate 
themselves  in  the  heritage  of  Jud- 
iasm;  to  stimulate  higher  social 
and  cultural  aspects  of  living  and 
to  inculcate  into  their  character 
the  understanding  of  brotherhood 
of  man.  In  the  spring  of  the  year 
the  Association  holds  its  conven- 
tion along  with  the  North  Caro- 
lina Association  of  Jewish  Men, 
Women  and  Rabbis,  at  that  time 
business  meetings,  election  of  of- 
ficers take  place  and  social  affairs 
are  held.  Two  large  dances  and 
other  social  functions  are  held 
thoughout  the  year. 


Officers  of  the  North  Carolina 
Association  of  Jewish  Youth  are: 
Barry  Greenspon,  Raleigh,  presi- 
dent; Marilyn  Bernstein,  Fayette  - 
ville,  vice-president;  JoAnne  Mar- 
golis,  Raleigh,  secretary;  Esther 
Ackerman,  Fort  Mills,  S.  C,  treas- 
urer; Robert  Leder,  Whiteville, 
senior  sergeant-at-arms;  Steve 
Franken,  Durham,  parliamentarian 
and  Donna  Hinchee,  Greensboro, 
chaplain. 

During  intermission  at  the  Sat- 
urday night  dance,  The  Jerry 
Jacobs-Gerald  Waitman  Award  for 
the  best  camper  was  awarded  to 
Allan  Ackerman.  The  "Miss  and 
Mr.  N.C.A.J.Y.  Award,"  given  for 
the  first  time,  was  presented  to 
Allan  Ackerman  and  Hoda  Levine. 

The  recreational,  religious  and 
educational  program,  along  with 
the  friendships  developed  during 
the  week,  made  this  Conference 
a  long  remembered  experience  for 
the  Jewish  Youth  of  North  Caro- 
lina. 


Statesville,  North  Carolina 

MRS.  MILTON  STEINBERGER,  Correspondent 


The  excellent  Sunday  School 
teachers  who  master  minded  our 
Sunday  School  last  year  are  now 
ready  to  start  again.  We  wish  to 
thank  them  for  their  fine  effort 
and  services. 

Congratulations  to  our  first 
graders  who  started  public  school; 
Cheryl  Sosnik,  Charlotte  Gordon, 
Bobby  Faeber  and  Barry  Gordon. 
Though  it  leaves  the  mother  with 
a  lump  in  her  throat  and  a  tear 
in  her  eyes  the  first  day  of  school 
who  could  be  prouder  than  a  parent 
of  a  first  grader.  May  the  years 
ahead  for  these  youngsters  and 
parents  be  wonderful  years. 

Welcome  back  from  a  European 
trip  and  full  of  exciting  experi- 
ences, Mrs.  Lewis  (Flo)  Blumen- 
thal. 

Now  that  our  Temple  activities 
are  starting  again,  the  first  fall 
meeting  of  the  Ladies  Auxiliary 
will  be  held  at  the  home  of  Mrs. 
Wallace  Hoffman  and  Miss  Rose 
Stephany.  Mrs.  Nat  Lipshitz,  pres- 
ident will  preside.  From  all  in- 
dications, our  president  has  lined 
up  all  her  committees  and  we  are 
all  looking  forward  to  a  successful 
year. 

The  community  was  saddened 
by  the  untimely  passing  of  Maurice 
Jay,  son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Joe  Jay, 
who  passed  away  at  the  age  of  30 
years.  Funeral  services  was  held  in 
New  York.  Our  heartfelt  sympathy 


to  the  parents,  and  may  God  grant 
consolations  to  the  bereaved  par- 
ents and  family. 

Our  deepest  sympathy  goes  out 
to  the  family  of  Phillip  Adler  of 
Tarboro,  N.  C.  Who  recently  pass- 
ed away  in  Tarboro.  Mr.  Adler 
was  a  brother-in-law  of  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Dave  Lester,  and  uncle  of 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Saul  Gordon. 

To  all  our  friends,  the  congrega- 
tion wish  each  and  everyone,  A 
Healthy,  Happy  and  Prosperous 
New  Year. 


WHOLESOME 
SNACK! 

MADE  WITH  CRISP, 
CHUNKY  WALNUTS 
AND  THE  WORLD'S 
CHOICEST  DATES 


<4/A*  DR0MEDAM  CHOCOLATE-NUT  ROll 
f*        and  ORANGE-NUT  ROLL 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


43: 


Weldon-Hoanoke  Rapids,  N.  C. 

LOUISE  FARBER,  Correspondent 


Mr.  and  Mrs.  L.  Kittner  are  vis- 
iting in  Kingston,  New  York  and 
Philadelphia,  Pa. 

Among  those  enjoying  a  vacation 
at  Virginia  Beach  were  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Morton  Farber  and  children 
and  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Mike  Josephson. 

Miss  Susan  Bloom  of  Richmond 
visited  her  father,  Mac  Bloom  in 
Jackson. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bill  Kittner  and 
daughter  visited  in  Norfolk  recent- 

iy- 

Mrs.  M.  Freid,  Miss  Josephine 
Freid,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Harry  Freid 
and  daughter  were  recent  visitors 
in  New  Bern. 


Mr.  and  Mrs.  Harry  Kittner  and 
children  visited  in  Richmond  dur- 
ing the  Labor  Day  week-end. 

Among  those  who  journeyed  to 
Boston  to  attend  the  wedding  of 
Miss  Marilyn  Bell  to  Mr.  Ben  Levy 
were  Mrs.  Rosa  Marks,  Miss  Fannye 
Marks,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bob  Liver- 
mon  and  daughters,  Betty  and 
Nancy,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Sam  Marks, 
and  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Seymour  Roth. 

Miss  Harriet  Bloom  has  return- 
ed to  Boston  University. 

Preparations  are  now  being  made 
for  the  reopening  of  the  Education- 
al School  of  Temple  Emanu-El. 


Temple  Israel  —  Charlotte,  N.  C. 

MRS.  JERRY  FfSHER,  Correspondent 


Temple  Israel  is  literally  hum- 
ming with  activity  this  month  as 
final  preparations  have  been  com- 
pleted for  renewal  of  our  Religious 
School,  social  and  organizational 
work. 

It  is  with  pride  that  we  welcome, 
as  our  new  Educational  Director, 
Mr.  Emanuel  Baum  and  his  family 
to  Charlotte.  Mr.  Baum  was  born 
in  Chicago,  Illinois  on  October  27, 
1927.  He  was  graduated  from 
Teacher's  College  at  Yeshiva,  New 
York  and  was  ordained  Rabbi 
at  Yavne  Yeshiva,  Brooklyn,  New 
York  in  June  1952. 

It  was  in  New  York  that  Mr. 
Baum  met  his  charming  wife,  Ray, 
and  they  were  married  in  Septem- 
ber 1954.  The  Baums  have  two 
lovely  children,  a  son,  Ahmiel,  and 
a  daughter,  Tamar.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Baum  only  recently  moved  to 
Charlotte  from  Houston,  Texas 
where  Mr.  Baum  was  in  business 
with  his  brothers.  We  are  looking 
forward  to  a  year  of  accomplish- 
ment in  our  Religious  School  under 
Mr.  Baum's  direction  and  we  wish 
him  every  success. 

Congratulations  to  the  following 
children  of  our  Temple  who  won 
junior  Olympics  and  out-of-town 
Invitational  Swimming  Meets  this 
Summer:  Sandra  and  Barbara 
Wollman,  Phil  Levine,  Judy  King, 
Madelon  and  Sharon  Woller,  Jackie 
and  Gay  Slesinger,  Karen  Siegel, 


Michael  Joffee  and  Warren  Bin- 
nick. 

We  would  like  to  wisli  '  r  ; 
Tov  to  Arthur  Goodman,  Jr.  on 
having  passed   the   Carolina  Bar 
examination. 

Speedy  recoveries  to  Mrs.  Al 
Goodman,  Mrs.  Manny  Guller, 
Mrs.  Esther  Van  Vliet,  Mrs.  Jack 
Sosnick  and  Mrs.  I.  Nelson.  We 
hope  to  see  you  all  up  and  around 
very  soon. 

The  Temple  Board  of  Trustees 
have  planned  the  first  social  event 
of  the  season  for  September  19th. 
It  is  a  "Get  Acquainted"  Dance 
in  honor  of  our  new-comers,  with 
a  top  dance  Combo  and  light  re- 
freshments. It  promises  to  be  a 
very  gala  affair. 

In  closing,  we  record  with  sorrow 
the  passing  of  Mr.  Morris  Eisen- 
berg,  father  of  Mr.  Manny  Eisen- 
berg;  Mr.  Moe  Frank,  father  of 
Mr.  Arthur  Frank;  Mr.  Max 
Madans,  brother  of  Mr.  Leonard 
Madans. 


Mrs.  Ma  ?;M.  Rosenberg:  of  Wom- 
en's American  ORT  has  been  desig- 
nated Chairman  of  the  Fifteenth 
Biennial  National  Convention  of  the 
organization  to  take  place  in  tlie 
Mayflower  Hotel,  Washington  .D.  C, 
September  21st  through  the  24th. 


"YOUR  HOST  FOR  GRACIOUS  HOSPITALITY' 

Battery  Park  Hotel 

GEORGE  L.  CHUMBLEY,  JR., 
Manager 

Asheville's  Finest 

225  Modern  Rooms 
Air  Conditioned 
Superb  Cuisine 

For  Reservations 

DIAL  AL  2-8211 


BATTLE  SQUARE 
ASHEVILLE,  N.  C. 


NORTH  CAROLINA 


In  America's 
Beautiful  Southern 
Highlands 


WILLIAM  D.  TURNER,  JR.,  Mgr. 


Zhe  George  Vatiderbilt  Motel 


RATES: 
SINGLES  S4.50  UPN 
DOUBLES  $7.00  UP 


*  ASHEVILLE'S  MOST 
POPULAR  HOTEL 


Delightful  Buffet  Suppers  Every  Thursday 
Wonderful  Food  In  Our  New,  Air-Conditioned  Colonial  Room 


BLUE  RIDGE  TRUCKING  COMPANY 

Daily  Motor  Service  to  Points  West  and 
South  of  Asheville 

Office  and  Terminal — Simpson  Street — Koon  Development 
Dial  AL  2-1531  ASHEVILLE,  N.C. 


P tease  Paironize  Our  Advertisers 


ASHEVILLE  PAVING  COMPANY 

and  DRIVEWAYS,  Inc. 

DRIVEWAYS  AND  MUNICIPAL  PAVING 

7  Market  St.  ASHEVILLE,  N.  C.  Dial  AL  2-4464 


New  Year  Greetings  From  .... 

BROADWAY  HOSIERY  MILL 
& 

(MALES  &  COMPANY 

311  Sweeten  Creek  Road  Dial  AL  3-.644a  - 

ASHEVILLE,  N.  C. 


N 


44 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Charlotte,  N.  C.  B'nai  B'rith  Women 

MRS.  GERALD  SINKOE,  Correspondent 


The  B'nai  B'rith  women  and 
BBG  and  AZA  have  received  some 
top  awards  this  summer.  The 
Sidney  G.  Kusworm  Citizenship 
Award,  which  is  the  highest  award 
among  the  Southern  states  was 
given  to  our  Charlotte  Chapter  of 
B'nai  B'rith  Women,  and  whose 
President  is  Mrs.  Sol  Jaffa.  The 
chapter  was  cited  for  their  projects 
which  are  Sick  Loan  Chest,  two 
annual  Schools  for  the  Foreign- 
Born,  volunteer  work  at  the  Char- 
lotte Rehabilitation  Center  and 
Presbyterian  Hospital  and  help  in 
other  civic  projects.  The  chairmen 
for  these  local  projects  are  Mrs. 
Irvin  Miller,  Mrs.  Norman  Musler, 
Mrs.  Mark  Bernstein,  Mrs.  Alfred 
Schick,  Mrs.  Maurice  Neiman,  and 
Mrs.  Lou  Bernstein. 

At  the  past  District  5  BBG  - 
AZA  Convention,  held  June  21-26 
at  Camp  Osceola,  Charlotte  was 
represented  by  four  girls  and  one 
"boy.  Sarah  Cohen,  who  is  Regional 
Spirit  Chairman,  was  elected  BBG 
^isCrict^-Uepbfterr-Nonnie  Kraft, 
--winner  of:  the  Storytelling  Contest 
*tf-  the  Region,  placed  first  in  the 
District  '-"Contest  also. '  Charlotte 
BBG  had  another  first  place  win- 
der in  the  Oratory  Contest  -  Lois 
Raff,  who  had  already  attained  the 
Regional  Oratory  Championship. 
Ira  Madans,  the  new  President  of 
the  Charlotte  AZA,  went  as  a  dele- 
gate; and  Rochelle  Chariton  also 
represented  Charlotte  BBG. 


Camp  B'nai  B'rith  in  Starlight, 
Pa.  was  the  site  of  the  National 
BBG  -  AZA  Convention  the  week 
of  August  18-25.  Nonnie  Kraft  and 
Lois  Raff  represented  the  District 
as  well  as  the  Charlotte  Chapter 
at  this  convention;  both  girls  hav- 
ing won  in  the  Storytelling  and 
Oratory  Contests  at  District,  re- 
spectively. They  did  not  compete 
any  further,  but  merely  gave  pre- 
sentations of  their  winning  story 
and  oration.  For  AZA,  Ira  Madans 
attended  as  a  District  5  elected 
delegate. 


Richmond 
B&P  Hadassah 

MISS   SHIRLEY  GOLDSTEIN, 
Correspondent 

The  Business  and  Professional 
Chapter  of  Hadassah  held  their 
opening  paid-up  membership  din- 
ner, Wednesday,  September  8th, 
at  Thalhimers,  Richmond  Room 
at  6:00  P.  M.  Our  guest  speaker 
for  the  evening  was  Mrs.  Myer 
Her/berg,  who  spoke  on  H..MO. 


A  community  of  ultra-orthodox 
Jews  living  in  Brooklyn  has  con- 
tracted to  buy  land  and  to  es- 
tablish a  village  in  New  Jersey 
where  its  members  can  live  and 
adhere  to  the  demands  of  its  strict 
religious  code.  Some  1,260  Jewish 
families  belonging  to  Congregation 
Yetev  Lev  D'Satmar,  made  their 
decision  to  move  en  masse  as  a 
result  of  the  construction  of  housing 
projects  in  the  Williamsburgh  sec- 
tion of  Brooklyn  which  would  have 
forced  many  of  the  congregants  to 
move. 


UNITED  WASTE  MATERIALS  CO. 

ALL  TYPES  OF  WASTE  PAPER 
MILL  WASTE  —  WIPING  RAGS  —  BAGGING,  ETC. 
Phone  5221  611  S.  Hamilton  St.  HIGH  POINT,  N.  C. 


GUY  M.  BEATY  &  CO. 

Boiler  and  Pipe  Coverings  —  Asbestos  Mill  Boards 
POAMGLAS  —  INSULFIL 
??LEIliott  CHARLOTTE,  N.  C.  ED  3-8625 

1106  Carter  St.      CHATTANOOGA,  TENN.      AM  6-6481 


HOBART-DAYTON  SALES  &  SERVICE 


JAMES  C.  CLARK,  SR. 
District  Sales  Agent 


SCALES  &  FOOD  MACHINES 

Dial  ED  4-6532 


324  E.  5TH  ST. 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Charlotte,  N.  C. 


•  COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 

•  GREENVILLE,  S.  C. 

•  RALEIGH,  N.  C. 

•  FLORENCE,  S.  C. 


•  ATLANTA,  GA. 

•  ASHEVILLE,  N.  C. 

•  WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 

•  WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 

HENRY  V.  DICK  &  CO. 

Incorporated 

WHOLESALE  REFRIGERATION  —  HEATING 
AIR-CONDITIONING,  PARTS  and  SUPPLIES 

1423  South  Tryon  Street  Phone  ED  3-6665 

CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


"BUILT  ON  ACTUALITIES" 

BOB  ROBINSON'S  AUTO  SERVICE 

REPAIRS  and  AUTO  AIR-CONDITIONING 
Phone  1305  East  Fourth  St. 

ED  4-5091—4-3818  CHARLOTTE  2,  N.  C. 


24-Hour  Wrecker  Service 

Eastside  Bodyworks 
&  Wrecker  Service 

1121  E.  4th  St.  FR  7-5005 

CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


Holiday  Greetings  .  .  . 

CHAPMAN- 
HARKEY  CO. 

Toy  Distributors 

Dial  FR  5-8658 
225  S.  Caldwell  St. 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


WE  BUILD 
BEAUTIFUL  HOMES 
IN  CHARLOTTE'S 
MOST  DESIRABLE 
SUBDIVISIONS 

00000 

Construction  Co., 
Inc. 

Dial  FR  5-8431 
3400  Rozzells  Ferry  Rd. 
Branch  Office 
Dial  FR  7-2529 
4017  N.  Independence 
Branch  Office: 
Dial  JA  3-6425 
Pineville  Rd. 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


INDUSTRIAL  PIPING  SUPPLY  CO. 


All  Types  of 
PIPING  SUPPLIES 


1501  Dowd  Road  Dial  FR  6-5661 

CHARLOTTE,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 

Greensboro  N.  C.  Jewish 
Community  Calendar 


45 


October  5 
7 
8 

12 
14 
19 
20 
21 
26 

28 

November  2 
4 
5 
9 
11 
12 

16 
18 

23 

30 

December  2 
7 
10 


Council  Luncheon 

Hadassah  Board  A.  M. 

Council  Evening  Group  P.  M. 

Beth  David  Board  P.  M. 

Post  Yom  Kippur  Dance 

Beth  David  Sisterhood  Board  A.  M. 

Emanuel  Sisterhood  Luncheon 

Hadassah  P.  M. 

Emanuel  Sisterhood  Luncheon 

Council  Board  A.  M. 

Emanuel  Congregational  Dinner  P.  M. 

Council  Study  Group  A.  M. 


Temple 


Synagogue 

Temple 

Synagogue 

Temple 

Temple 


Synagogue 


Temple 


Temple 
Synagogue 

Synagogue 


H.  L.  KOESTER  &  SON 

Tobacco  Wholesaler 


231  Meeting    Dial  RA  2-8814 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 

Carolina  Dispa  ching 
Service,  Inc. 

LOCAL  &  LONG  DISTANCE 
MOVING 

Upper  King        Dial  RA  3-2701 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


SHAHID'S 

Department  Store 

493  King  St.  Dial  RA  3-9481 

CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


Council  Luncheon 
Hadassah  Board  A.  M. 
Hadassah  Educational  Day 
Emanuel  Sisterhood  Luncheon 
Beth  David  Sisterhood  Board  A.  M. 
Council  Evening  Group  P.  M. 
Beth  David  Board  P.  M. 
Hadassah  Luncheon 
Bsth  David  Sisterhood  Donor  P.  M. 
Council  Board  A.  M. 
Beth  David  Sisterhood  P.  M. 
Council  Study  Group  A.  M. 

Hadassah  Board  A.  M. 

Combined  Women's  Meeting  Luncheon  Synagogue 
Council  Evening  Group  P.  M. 
Beth  David  Board  P.  M. 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  53) 

Williamston,  N.  C. 

MRS.  IRVING  M.  MARGOLIS 

Correspondent 

During  the  Labor  Day  week- 
end Miss  Doris  Goldstein  of  Bos- 
ton, Mass.  visited  her  family  in 


Windsor. 

Mr.  and 
joined  by 
Raskin  of 


CAROLINA 
SKYWAYS  AIRPORT 

Flying  Instruction 

Dial  SO  6-7021       James  Island 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


Mrs.  Frank  Margolis, 
Mr.   and   Mrs.  Louis 
Tarboro,    spent  the 
weekend  at  Nags  Head. 

Mr.  and  C.  D.  Pittman  were 
in  Charleston  where  their  son 
James  had  come  up  from  Atlanta 
to  meet  them. 

(Please  Turn  to  Pag3  55) 

TAYLOR'S 
BAKERY  KITCHEN 

Established  1938 
Jewish  Bakery  Products 

42  Spring  St.       Dial  RA  2-0235 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 

TRIEST  &  SHOLK 

Insurance  —  Real  Estate 

59  Broad  Dial  RA  3-4889 

CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Charleston,  S.  C. 


FIRST  FEDERAL 

mm  tiuiur-e  •  LOAN  ASSN. 


^SAVINGS  & 


Celebrating  25  years  of  service  to  the  Charleston,  S.  C. 

Community 


SELLERS  TRANSFER  COMPANY 

SAFE  —  DEPENDABLE  —  FAST-MOVING  —  STORAGE 

6  Hasell  Street         CHARLESTON,  S.  C.         Dial  RA  2-8753 


JOE'S  ALIGNMENT  SERVICE 


45  Hayne  Street 


Alignment  specialists 
Modern  equipment  —  Experienced 

CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


Dial  RA  3-9496 


MICKELBERG'S  BAKERY 

Charleston's  New  York  Style  Bakery 

Rye     •     Pumpernickle     •     Corn  Bread     •  Challas 
Bagels     •     Assorted  Danish  Pastries 

South  Windemere  Shopping  Center  —  Dial  RA  3-5165 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


Certified  Dealer 


LENNOX 


Comfort  Craftsman 

Rice  &  Santos,  Inc. 

Dial  RA  3-4702 
2  Exchange  St. 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


For  a  coo/,c/ean 
teste... 

Nothing  (toes  it 
like 
Saven-Up! 

Seven-Up  Bottling  Co. 

CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


COPLESTON'S 

Quality 

Dry  Cleaning  .  .  .  Laundry 

Dial  RA  2-5505 
537  Meeting  Street 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


SAVE  A  LIFE 


f 


REPLACE  CRACKED  WINDOWS 
WITH  PITTSBURGH 

SAFETY  GLASS 


!ws^ 


i 

n 

c 

O  M 

FaA  H  Y 

Dial  RA  3-8631 
801  Meeting  St. 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


46 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Murray  Tile  Co. 

TILE  —  MARBLE 
TERAZZO 

543D  Rivers  Avenue 

Dial  SH  4-9871 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C, 


CHARLESTON 
REWEAVING 
SERVICE 

Burns,  tears,  moth  holes  rewoven 
86-A  Wentworth  RA  2-2441 

CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


WURLITZER  PIANOS 
AND  ORGANS 
NEW  —  USED 


Dial  SOuth  6-5521 

171  Savannah  Hwy. 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


Your  Safety  Is  Our  Business  At 

Jftregtone 

STORES 

Tires,  Batteries,  Accessories 
377  Meeting  RA  2-6524 

CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


Charleston,  S.  C. 

Charles  Ellison,  who  founded  the 
Globe  Shoe  Store  at  279  King  St. 
in  1923  and  managed  it  until  1948, 
died  on  September  14th  at  his 
home. 

Mr.  Ellison  had  been  in  the  shoe 
business  in  Charleston  for  many 
years.  He  had  previously  been  as- 
sociated with  his  brother,  the  late 
Morris  Ellison,  in  the  operation 
of  Ellison's  Shoe  Store.  His  son 
Arnold,  who  now  lives  in  Miami, 
Fla.,  assumed  the  management  of 
Globe  in  1948,  and  Mr.  Ellison 
continued  in  an  advisory  capacity 
and  as  buyer. 

Mr.  Ellson  was  born  April  20, 
1892,  in  Charleston,  a  son  of  Ezek- 
iel  Ellison  and  Mrs.  Rachel  Crum 
Ellison.  He  was  a  member  of 
Brith  Sholom  —  Beth  Israel  Syna- 
gogue and  Emanu-El  Synagogue. 
He  was  also  a  member  of  B'nai 
Brith,  the  Hebrew  Benevolent  So- 
ciety and  the  Zionist  Organization. 

Surviving  are  his  widow,  Mrs. 
Estair  Boostin  Ellison;  two  sons, 
E.  Richard  Ellison  of  Atlanta,  Ga. 
and  Arnold  D.  Ellison  of  Miami, 
Fla.;  three  brothers,  Aleck  Elli- 
son of  Charleston,  Moe  Ellison  of 
New  York,  and  Dan  Ellison  of 
Philadelphia,  and  three  grandchil- 
dren. 


Lohengrin's 
Wedding  March 

(Concluded  From  Page  17) 
struction.  Hitler  was  an  admirer 
of  Wagner.  He  refused  Roosevelt's 
terms  for  unconditional  surrender, 
regardless  of  German  suffering 
and  loss  of  life.  It  was  more  Wag- 
nerian to  crush  the  Reich  into  a 
mighty  ruin  in  keeping  with  the 
Gotterdamerung,  the  twilight  of 
the  Gods. 

In  the  last  paragraph  of  Ju- 
daism in  Music,  Wagner  address- 
es the  Jews:  "But,  think  you  that 
one  thing  only  can  redeem  you 
from  the  burden  of  your  curse: 
the  redemption  of  Ahasuersu—  an- 
nihilation." Can  psychotic  hate  go 
further?  This  was  carried  out  by 
Hitler  in  Buchenwald  and  Tre- 
blinka,  in  Auschwitz  and  Maid- 
nnek,  in  Dachau  and  Bergen-  Bel- 
sen. 

How  can  Jewish  parents  lead 
their  sons  and  daughters  to  the 
marriage  canopy  in  the  synagogue 
to  the  crashing  rhythmic  chords  of 
Wagner's  Wedding  March? 


Myers  P.  0.     Dial  RA  3-8381 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


BURBAGE 
TIRE  COMPANY 

Sinclair  Oil  Products 

524  Meeting  at  Lee 
Dial  RA  2-62P5 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 

SIRES  7 
LUMBER  COMPANY 

Lumber  —  Millwork  and 
Building  Materials 

790  Meeting  St.    Dial  RA  2-3863 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 

BUTT'S  ELECTRICAL 
SUPPLY  COMPANY 

WHOLESALE 

480  E.  Bay         Dial  RA  2-5786 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


POWERS  CARPET  CLEANING  and  RUG  CO. 

RUG  CLEANING— STORAGE— REPAIRS— REBINDING 

Call  For  and  Delivery  Service 
Folly  Road  Dial  RA  2-1468 

CHARLESTON,  SOUTH  CAROLINA 


J.  WHALEY  LEWIS  J.  FREDDIE  HESSE 

LEWIS  &  HESSE  SERYICENTER 

General  Repairs  On  All  Makes  of  Automobiles 
Specializing  in  Wheel  Alignment 

BATTERIES  —  TIRES  —  GAS  —  OIL 

131  Spring  St.  (Cor.  Ashley)    Dial  RA  3-0175  Charleston,  S.  C. 


Crosby  Sheet  Metal  and  Roofing  Works 

Sheet  Metal  and  Roofing  Contractors 

2757  Spruill  Ave.     CHARLESTON,  S.  C.     Dial  SH  7-1542 


Charleston  Trailer  &  Brake  Service 

TRUCKS  OF  VALUE 

Sales  &  Service 
Factory-Trained  Mechanics 

Meeting  St.  Rd.  CHARLESTON,  S.  C.  Dial  RA  3-6471 


BRADFORD'S  METAL  WORKS 

HEATING  AND  AR-CONDITIONING 

SHEET  METAL  —  ORNAMENTAL  IRON 
Remount  Road  CHARLESTON,  S.  C.  Dial  SH  4-1819 


ASHLEY  TRANSFER  &  STORAGE  CO. 

Agents  For 

U.  S.  VAN  LINES 

Local  &  Long  Distance  Moving  —  Packing  —  Crating  —  Storage 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C.  BEAUFORT,  S.  C. 

Dial  SH  4-2664  Dial  JA  4-3750 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


47 


The  Twentieth  Anniversary  °f 
World  War  II 

(Continued  From  Page  23) 


an  efficient  army  was  sacrificed 
for  the  "greater  good"  of  Europe. 

The  basic  philosophy  of  the 
Nazis  was  expressed  in  the  slogan 
"right  is  what  serves  the  German 
nation,  wrong  what  harms  it." 
They  thus  perverted  the  idea  of 
universal  right  and  justice  to 
mean  nothing  but  what  was  ex- 
pedient for  one  single  people. 
Since  they  believed  (or  pretended 
to  believe)  that  the  elimination 
of  their  Jewish  compatriots  (and 
later  of  all  Jews)  from  their  midst 
would  serve  the  purposes  of  Ger- 
many, there  was  nothing  to  pre- 
vent them  from  starting  to  paup- 
erize, degrade,  arrest,  torture  and 
expel  them  whenever  this  was  op- 
portune. The  initial  boycott  and 
discriminatory  legislation  was  ex- 
panded to  include  forced  transfer 
and  delivery  of  property,  pogroms, 
wholesale  arrest  and  confinement 
to  concentration  camps,  imposi- 
tion of  exorbitant  fines,  forced 
emigration  of  pauperized  persons 
etc.  Although  these  measures 
"shocked"  the  world  conscience, 
they  were  only  the  start  of  things 
(o  come  when  the  war  of  nerves 
became  a  shooting  war.  The  Ro- 
mans had  coined  a  dictum  "inter 
arma  tacent  leges"  (in  war  laws 
are  silent),  the  Nazis  "perfected" 
it  not  only  by  repudiating  the 
Hague  Convention,  which  pro- 
tected the  civilian  population  in 
occupied  countries  against  out- 
rages and  discrimination  and  to 
which  Germany  was  a  party,  but 
also  by  proclaiming  their  right  to 
pillage,  murder  and  annihilate  the 


"inferior"  races,  in  the  first  place 
the  Jews.  There  can  be  no  doubt 
that,  had  it  not  been  for  the  war, 
most  of  the  an ti- Jewish  measures 
outside  Germany  and  the  anni- 
hilation not  only  of  the  six  mil- 
lion Jews  but  even  of  those  in  the 
regions  which  were  or  would  have 
come  under  Nazi  domination  or 
influence  could  never  have  taken 
place.  It  could  become  reality 
only  under  the  smoke  screen  and 
the  stress  (on  other  nations)  of 
the  war,  probably  unleashed  in 
part  for  this  very  purpose.  This 
is  the  tragic  significance  of  the 
20th  anniversary  of  the  start  of 
the  last  war  from  the  Jewish  point 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  50) 


Charies,  Frost,  industrialist  and 
philanthropist,  of  Westport  and  Palm 
Beach,  has  been  named  Chairman 
of  the  National  Development  Fund 
Committee  of  the  Albert  Einstein 
College  of  Medicine  of  Yeshiva  Uni- 
versity, Dr.  Samue"  Belk'n.  univer- 
sity president,  has  announced. 


Gold-Tex  Fabrics  Corporation 

Manufacturers  of  Denim 

ROCK  HILL,  S.  C. 


FORT  ROOFING  &  SHEET  METAL  WORKS 

ROOFING  —  HEATING  AND  SHEET  METAL  FABRICATORS 
14  W.  Oakland  Avenue  SUMTER,  S.  C.  SPruce  3-9391 


COURTRIGHT  CHEVROLET  CO. 

SALES  Mmnj^»»M  SERVICE 

113  S.  Main  St.  SUMTER,  S.  C.  SPruce  3-9311 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Rock  Hill  -  Sumter,  S.  C. 


Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  to  Our  Friends 
For  a  Happy  New  Year 

THE  PEOPLES  NATIONAL  BANK 


Middle  of  Block 
Main  Street 


Drive-In  Branch 
South  Oakland  Avenue 


ROCK  HILL,  S.  C. 


COLA 


BEST  BY  TASTE -TEST 

RO*  AL  CROWN  COLA  BOTTLING  COMPANY 

198  S.  York  Rock  Hill,  S.  C. 


"York  County  Fresh  From,  York  County  Farms" 

SUPERIOR  DAIRIES 

Ice  Cream,  Milk,  Homogenized  Milk,  Cream, 
Buttermilk  and  Chocolate  Milk 
Dial  3559  ROCK  HILL,  S.  C.  1024  Saluda 


WEST  MAIN  HARDWARE  &  SUPPLY  CO. 

Hardware  and  Mill  Supplies 

Dial  3161  ROCK  HILL,  S.  C.  Ill  W.  Main  St. 


FIRST  FEDERAL  SAVINGS  &  LOAN  ASS'N. 

INSURED  SAVINGS 
Main  Office  Akers  Center  Branch 

251  W.  Main  Ave.  1327  E.  Franklin  Ave. 

Dial  UN  7-7248  Dial  UN  4-4566 

GASTONIA,  N.  C. 


WHITE  OIL  COMPANY 

Gas  —  SHELL  —  Motor  Oil 

Kerosene  and  Fuel  Oil 

148  S.  Oakland  4744 
ROCK  HILL,  S.  C. 


For  Radiator  Repairs,  See 

MERRITT 
Radiator  Service 

446  N.  Trade         Tel.  2435 
ROCK  HILL,  S.  C. 


Wfelcome 
home 


Del iciu u s  ;.in) 


CAROLINA  COCA-COLA  BOTTLING  COMPANY 

SUMTER,  S.  C. 


48 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Columbia,  S.  C. 


M.  B.  KAHN 
Construction  Co. 

General 
Contractors 


COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


To  You  and  Yours  .... 

HAPPY  NEW  YEAR! 


RICHLAND  WHOLESALE  LIQUORS,  Inc. 

Importers  and  Distributors 
FINE  WHISKEYS,  GIN  and  LIQUORS 

801  Gervais  St.  Dial  AL  4-5114 

COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


De  Luxe 

Gives  You  a  Complete  Laundry  and  Cleaning  Service 
ODORLESS  CLEANING 

Cash  and  Carry  —  Also  Called  For  and  Delivered 

Deluxe  Cleaners  &  Laundry 

310  State  St.  Dial  AL  2-8656       West  Columbia,  S.  C. 


'0W~C4tfttP  Greetings 
and  Best  Wishes  from 

McKesson  &  robbins,  inc. 

COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


Columbia,  S.  C. 

MRS.  BERNARD  LADEN,  Correspondent 

A  reception  in  honor  of  the  new    22nd,   at  Pinewood  Lake 


spiritual  leader  of  the  House  of 
Peace  Synagogue  was  given  on 
Sunday  evening,  August  30th,  in 
the  Social  Hall  of  the  shul.  In  the 
receiving  line  were  Rabbi  Abra- 
ham Herson  of  Miami,  Fla.,  his 
wife,  Bess,  and  daughter  Diane, 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Leonard  Bogen,  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  George  Gottlieb,  and 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Ted  Solomon. 

Rabbi  Herson  is  a  native  of  Win- 
nipeg, Canada,  and  attended  the 
public  schools  of  that  city  and  of 
Chicago,  111.  He  is  a  graduate  of 
the  Hebrew  Theological  Seminary 
of  New  York  and  holds  a  doctorate 
degree  from  that  institution.  He  is 
the  son  of  the  late  Rabbi  Chiam 
Tsvi  Herson,  who  was  chief  rabbi 
of  Winnipeg  and  western  Canada, 
and  is  a  brother  of  Rabbi  David 
Herson  of  Miami. 

Before  his  five  years  service  to  a 
Miami  congregation,  Rabbi  Her- 
son had  served  for  nearly  nine  years 
in  Tyler  and  Waco,  Texas.  He  had 
been  an  active  Lion  in  Tyler,  serv- 
ing as  chaplain,  and  is  a  member  of 
the  Board  of  Directors  of  that  or- 
ganzation.  Also  while  in  Texas  he 
served  as  auxiliary  chaplain  at  the 
James  Connelly  Air  Force  Base 
and  at  the  Veterans  Administra- 
tion Hospital  in  Waco  . 

He  is  a  regular  contributor  to 
the  religious  page  of  the  Jewish 
Floridian,  a  weekly  Miami  news- 
paper, and  ha  ~  appeared  frequently 
on  radio  and  television  programs 
in  that  area.  Rabbi  Herson  is  a 
member  of  the  Greater  Miami 
Rabbinical  Association  and  is  a 
vice-presdent  of  the  Rabbinical 
Conference  of  America.  He  is  a 
member  of  the  B'nai  B'rith  organi- 
zation, Knights  of  Pythians  and 
Optimist  Club. 

Rabbi  Herson  has  received  a  ci- 
tation in  recognition  of  his  lecture 
tours  on  behalf  of  the  Zionist  Or- 
ganization of  America,  following 
his  trip  to  the  new  state  of  Israel. 

The  B'nai  Brith  Organization  of 
Columbia  held  a  gay  Western  Barn 
Dance  on  Saturday  evening,  August 


Eddie 

Wooten  and  his  band  provided 
dance  music  and  a  caller  for  the 
square  dancing. 

Hadassah  held  a  Hospitality  Tea 
for  prospective  new  members  at 
the  home  of  Mrs.  Ben  Arnold  on 
August  25th.  Mrs.  David  Gruber, 
membership  chairman,  and  Mrs. 
Sam  Riebman,  co-chairman,  help- 
ed make  the  affair  a  success.  Home- 
made refreshments  were  served. 

The  Daughters  of  Israel  enter- 
tained at  a  Hospitality  Brunch  to 
welcome  this  year's  prospective 
members  and  to  honor  Mrs.  Abra- 
ham Herson,  wife  of  the  new  rabbi 
of  the  House  of  Peace  Synagogue. 

The  brunch  was  held  at  the 
home  of  the  Mrs.  Edwin  Coplan  at 
1 1:00  o'clock  Thursday,  August  27. 
Mrs.  Bernard  Kline,  Hospitality 
chairman;  Mrs.  Melton  Kligman, 
Membership  chairman,  and  Mrs. 
Nathan  Picow,  co-Membership 
chairman,  were  in  charge  of  the 
event.  The  chairmen  and  their 
commtttee,  Mrs.  Sidney  Taylor, 
Mrs.  Arnold  Levenson,  Mrs.  Lee 
Baker,  Mrs.  Henry  Marcus,  and 
Mrs.  Henry  Hammer,  served  a 
lovely  buffet  brunch  to  the  34 
guests  attending. 

Each  guest  was  greeted  with  fa- 
vors at  the  door  by  Mrs.  Nathan 
Picow.  Mrs.  Ted  Solomon,  presi- 


Shealy's,  Inc. 

Distributor 

MACK 
TRUCKS 


SALES— SERVICE 


2123  Main  St.  Dial  AL  2-2482 


COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


Holiday  Greetings  From  .... 

State  Machinery  &  Supply  Co. 

Contractors  Equipment 
Dial  AL  3-2241       1005  Meeting  St.       W.  Columbia,  S.  C. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


4£ 


dent  of  the  Daughters  of  Israel,  in 
her  speech  to  the  group,  welcomed 
everyone  and  introduced  the  of- 
ficers and  special  guest. 

Among  the  honored  guests  were 
the  past  presidents  of  the  organiza- 
tion, and  Mrs.  Sol  Feldman,  wife 
of  the  director  of  the  Columbia 
Jewish  Center. 

At  an  inter-city  swimming  meet 
held  in  Charlotte,  N.  C.  on  August 
30th,  the  Columbia  Jewish  Cen- 
ter swim  teams  placed  in  eleven 
of  the  twenty-four  events  in  which 
they  participated.  The  meet  was 
part  of  a  get-acquainted  week-end 
sponsored  by  the  Amity  Club  of 
Charlotte. 

First  place  in  the  eight-year-old 
boys'  free  style  was  won  by  Gary 
Mitchell;  2nd  place  in  eight-year- 
old  breast  stroke  was  won  by  Gary 
Mitchell  again;  11  to  12-year-old 
free  style,  Paul  Bookner,  winner; 
12-year-old  breast  stroke,  Nard 
Fleishman,  2nd  place;  12-year-old 
butterfly,  Nard  Fleischman,  ist 
place;  13  to  14-year-old  free  style, 
Harry  Sunshine,  3rd  place;  but- 
terfly, Harry  Sunshine  again;  free 
style,  2nd  place,  Larry  Kantor; 
back  stroke,  Larry  Kantor  placed 


The  14-year-old  relay  team  cop- 
ped first  place  in  free  style.  Those 
competing  were  Jimmy  Levkoff, 
Charles  Nadel,  Larry  Kantor,  and 
Harry  Sunshine. 

Accompanying  the  trip  to  Char- 
lotte were  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bernard 
Kahn,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Saul  Kahn, 
Mrs.  Roy  Mitchell,  Mrs.  Bernard 
Kline,  Mrs.  Bernard  Kline,  David 
Kahn,  Lana  Copland,  Kenny 
Koolkin,  and  Ilsa  Kahn. 

Our  Center  plans  to  hold  a  simi- 
lar event  next  summer. 

We  wish  a  speedy  recovery  to 
Saul  Kaplan  and  George  Stein  who 
have  been  in  the  hospital  recently. 

Mrs.  Mose  Richman  Cohen,  wife 
of  Sol  Cohen  of  Walterboro,  died 
August  26th  at  her  home  after  an 
llness  of  about  two  years.  She  was 
born  in  Beaufort  and  was  a  mem- 
ber of  Temple  Mt.  Sinai  in  Walter- 
boro. 

Funeral  services  were  held  from 
Beth  Israel  Synagogue  in  Beaufort 
by  Rabbi  Julius  Fisher.  Interment 
was  in  Beth  Israel  Cemetery  in 
Beaufort. 

Surviving  besides  her  husband  is 
her  son  David. 


Durham,  N.  C. 

(Continued  From  Page  32) 
Friday  evening,  August  21st  and 
Saturday  morning,  August  22nd  at 
the  Beth-El  Synagogue. 

Stanley  chanted  the  Kiddush  Fri- 
day evening  and  offered  a  Bar 
Mitzvah  prayer.  Reverend  H.  Merl- 


ing  of  Atlantic  City  was  the  guest 
Cantor  in  honor  of  the  Bar-Mitz- 
vah. 


HEATING 

SALES,  SERVICE 
AND  COMPLETE 
INSTALLATION 

ANY  MAKE,  GAS  OR  OIL 
FURNACES 
Cleaning  and  Repairing 

Frost  Heating  & 
Air  Conditioning 
Company 

Dial  AL  6-8546 
1910  Two  Notch  Rd. 
COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


STANLEY  GOLDBERG 


"See  Us  For  All  Your  Gifts" 

SAM  SOLOMON  COMPANY 

WHOLESALE  DISTRIBUTORS 
Toys  —  Luggage  —  Gifts  —  Appliances  —  Jewelry 
Silverware  —  Home  Furnishings  —  Housewares 
Write  For  Our  Large  Gift  Catalogue  to  P.  O.  Box  2121 
338-340  E.  Bay  St.       Dial  RA  2-8311       CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


1920  Blossom 


SHERWOOD 
STUDIO 

CHILDREN  —  COMMERCIAL 
COLOR  PORTRAITS 

WEDDINGS 
HOME  PORTRAITS 
Art  Downs  and  Wally  D^nny,  Owners 
ALpine  3-8805 
Nights  Phone  SUnset  7-9767 
or  SUnset  7-2164 

Columbia,  S.  C. 


Sales  —  Service 

BURTON  TRUCK 

&  EQUIPMENT  CO. 

1    iliwIgSl  1 

903  Huger                    Dial  AL  3-7001 

INTERNATIONAL 

COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 

Motor  Trucks 

FOR  QUALITY . . . 

Palmetto  Quarries  Company 


CRUSHED 
GRANITE 

COLUMBIA 


BLAIR 


CONCRETE 
PRODUCTS 


GREENWOOD 


Please  Patronize  Our  Advetisers 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS  .  .  . 

VAN  LOTT,  INC. 

Distributors  for 

ALLIS-CH ALMERS  INDUSTRIAL  EQUIPMENT 
Columbia  &  Greenville,  S.  C. 


"50  Years  of  Dependable  Service" 

CAPITAL  CITY  LAUNDRY 

PROSPERIZE  DRY  CLEANING 

2227  Sumter  Street  Dial  AL  2-4341  Columbia,  S.  C. 


COLUMBIA  MILLS  COMPANY 

Manufacturers  of 
COTTON  DUCK 

COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


BOYLE- VAUGHAN  AGENCY 

INSURANCE  -  SURETY  BONDS 
1222  Washington  St.       COLUMBIA,  S.  C        Dial  AL  2-2158 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


New  Year  Greetings 

from 

C.  D.  FRUNKE  &  CO.,  INC. 

Automotive  Equipment  &  Parts 
1929  Hampton  Dial  AL  4-6925  Columbia,  S.  C. 


iiirvCnrmtck  JJuneral  JSC  0  me 

"Always  the  same,  yesterday,  today,  and  tomorrow" 
24-HOUR  AMBULANCE  SERVICE 
1510  HAMPTON  STREET 
COLUMBIA,  S.  C.  DIAL  AL  6-1571 


THE  COMMERCIAL  BANK  &  TRUST  CO. 
of  South  Carolina 


Main  at  Gervais 

Forest  Lake  Shopping  Center 


COLUMBIA, 
SOUTH  CAROLINA 


J,  RUBIN  AND  SON  COMPANY 

WHOLESALE  DRY  GOODS  AND  NOTIONS 

1742  Blanding  COLUMBIA,  S.  C.  Dial  AL  2-3607 


EVERYTHING  FOR  WELDING  AND  CUTTING 

WELDING  GAS  PRODUCTS  COMPANY 

"SOUTH  CAROLINA'S  FIRST  COMMERCIAL 
OXYGEN  AND  ACETYLINF  PLANTS" 

Dial  AL  3-7024  Shop  Road  Columbia,  S.  C. 


Brasington  Plumbing  &  Heating  Co. 

Installations  and  Repairs 
Free  Estimates  —  AH  Work  Guaranteed 


1020  Cedar  St. 


COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


Dial  AL  2-9884 


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BIG  VALUES  IN  USED  CARS 

REED  ADDY  MOTORS 

WE  BUY  —  SELL  —  OR  TRADE 

Dial  AL  3-0373      1625  Edmund  Hwy.      W.  Columbia,  S.  C. 


LONG  SHEET  METAL  WORKS 

Roofing  and  Sheet  Metal  Contractors 

940  Holland  CAYCE,  S.  C.  Dial  AL  4-3965 


Commercial  Roofing  and  Sheet  Metal  Co. 

Complete  Roofing  and  Sheet  Metal  Service 
Dial  SU  7-8164     COLUMBIA,  S.  C.      1417  Pine  Belt  Road 


Mrs.  I.  Zelon,  President  of  the 
Sisterhood,  presented  Stanley  with 
the  Kiddush  Cup.  Rabbi  M.  Her- 
bert Berger  delivered  the  sermon 
"Growing  in  Responsibility." 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Harry  Goldberg 


were  hosts  at  the  Oneg  Shabat  fol- 
lowing the  services. 

Saturday  morning  Stanley  read 
the  Haftorah  and  acquitted  him- 
self with  great  credit  to  himself 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  52) 


The  Twentieth  Anniversary  of 
World  War  II 


(Continued  Fr 
of  view  in  particular.  From  the 
general  point  of  view  the  Second 
World  War  must  be  remembered 
for  the  unparalleled  losses  in  hu- 
man life,  estimated  at  over  26  mil- 
lion in  military,  and  almost  25 
million  in  civilian  deaths,  among 
them  6  million  Jews  (a  figure 
which  does  not  include  casualties 
among  the  over  1.4  million  Jews 
who  served  in  Allied  armies),  not 
to  speak  of  the  sufferings  of  those 
who  survived  the  holocaust  and 
the  cost  of  war  and  destruction, 
estimated  at  over  one  thousand 
billion  dollars. 

The  tragedy  of  the  First  World 
War,  with  what  seemed  at  the 
time  incredibly  high  casualties 
(almost  10  millions)  and  costs 
(nearly  300  billion  dollars)  in- 
spired many  to  a  repudiation  of 
war  as  expressed  in  the  slogan  "no 
more  war,  ever  again"  and  the 
creation  of  the  League  of  Nations 
—the  first  attempt  of  this  kind. 
Mankind's  tragedy  is  composed 
of  two  elements,  forgetfullness 
and  egotistic  policies  of  totalitarian 
nations,  willing  to  plunge  the 
world  into  new  wars  for  the  pur- 
pose of  their  own  expansion;  this 
eventually  resulted  in  the  Second 
World  War.  It  is  to  be  feared  that 
the  even  more  tragic  experiences 
of  that  war  may  not  deter  the  na- 
tions of  the  world  from  policies 
which  may  lead  to  a  third  world 
war,  which,  both  in  human  sacri- 
fice and  destruction,  will  un- 
doubtedly greatly  surpass  the  last 
war.  The  casualties  of  nuclear 
bombs,  each  of  which  probably 
exceeds  the  destructive  power  of 
all  the  bombs  thrown  by  both 
sides  in  the  Second  World  War 
during  its  entire  duration,  and 
the  biological  and  (more  humane) 
chemcial  warfare  will,  no  doubt, 
within  a  few  davs  dwarf  those  of 
the  last  war,  which  lasted  over 
five  years. 

It  was  with  this  in  mind  and 
having  regard  to  the  Jewsh  catas- 
trophe that  the  General  Assembly 


om  P?ge  47) 

of  the  World  Jewish  Congress, 
just  concluded  in  Stockholm,  ap- 
plied to  the  nations  of  the  world 
to  seek  all  measures  to  end  the 
present  cold  war  and  the  existing 
tension  in  the  world.  It  is  the 
duty  of  every  responsible  states- 
man, organization  and  citizen  not 
to  let  humanity  forget  the  calam- 
ity a  new  war  will  bring  with  it 
and  to  work  for  peace  and  secur- 
ity for  all.  There  is  nothing  in  the 
world  that  firmness  toward  would- 
be  aggressors,  cooperation  between 
peace-loving  nations,  realistic  ap- 
preciation of  the  proclaimed  or 
known  intentions  of  would-be 
violators  of  peace,  vigilance,  dedi- 
cation to  peace  and  good  will  can- 
not achieve,  and  that  includes 
peace  in  our  generation. 


An  Orthodox  Jew  who  refuses 
to  work  on  the  Sabbath  is  entitled 
to  unemployment  compensation,  it 
was  ruled  in  Boston  by  the  Board 
of  Review  of  the  Massachusetts  Di- 
vision of  Employment  Security. 


ROSE-TALBERT 
Paint  Company 

Manufacturers  of 

ROSE'S  QUALITY  PAINTS 

and  Distributors  of 
Paints,  Varnishes,  Walllpaper, 
and  Artists'  Materials 

1222  Taylor  St.        Dial  AL  4-6269 
Parkland  Shopping  Center 
AL  3-8496 
COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


Roy  McCulloch 

School  of  Dance 

Two  Studios 
Cayce  Theatre  Building 
Dial  AL  6-4156 
CAYCE  S.  C. 
811  Woodrow  Street 

Dial  AL  4-5482 
COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


The  Strange  Case  of  Joseph  Smith 


(Continued  From  Page  25) 


one  of  them  abandoned  by  her  hus- 
band, he  described  his  wife  in  1821 
as  "now  nearly  helpless"  at  the  age 
of  about  fifty-three.  He  had  been, 
by  his  own  testimony,  a  manufac- 
turer of  "black  balls  (shoe  black- 
ing) on  an  extensive  scale  by  which 
and  other  small  trade  had  support- 
ed myself  and  family  with  a  com- 
fortable home  until,  in  conse- 
quence of  becoming  bondsman  for 
another,"  he  had  had  his  "house, 
furniture,  and  property  of  every 
kind  seized  and  sold,  leaving  me  in 
such  a  state  of  penury  as  to  be  ab- 
solutely unable  to  support  myself 
or  family  without  the  benefit  of 
my  Revolutionary  pension,  or  from 
private  or  public  charity."  The  un- 
fortunate Pollock  tesitfied  in  1821 
that  all  his  property  came  in  value 
to  no  more  than  $20,  while  he  suf- 

Plain  Talk 

(Concluded  From,  Page  4) 

ly  observed  by  nuns  of  the  Roman 
Catholic  church.  Toward  observing 
the  same  idea  of  modesty  that's  in 
the  sheitel,  the  nuns  shave  their 
heads  and  cover  them  up  under 
the  black  hood. 

So,  having  studied  the  history  of 
the  sheitel,  I  went  back  on  to  the 
current  issue:  that  sheitel  which 
will  be  covering  the  head  of  the 
beautiful  New  York  girl  when  she 
cuts  off  her  lovely  tresses.  What 
for  me  to  do  about  that?  What  to 
say  to  that  indignant  hair-dresser 
who  is  demanding  that  I  go  with 
her  on  a  campaign  against  the 
revival  of  sheitels. 

I  asked  my  wife  who  all  her 
days  has  worn  only  her  own  hair 
which  she  keeps  cultivated  in  the 
beauty  shop  .  .  .  'What  do  you 
say,"  I  inquired  of  her.  "What  shall 
I  do?" 

All  she  would  answer  was:  "Don't 
be  such  a  fool." 


CALL  US 

.  .  .  for  responsible 
carpet  and  furniture  cleaning 
and  mothproofing  in  your  home 
or  in  the  plant. 

FLOOR  MASTERS 

OF  COLUMBIA 

723  Crowson  Road 
Dial  SU  7-7417 
COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


fered  "from  a  rupture  occasioned 
by  hardships  and  colds  experienced 
while  in  the  army  of  the  U.  S.  and 
from  a  bayonet  wound  received  at 
the  battle"  of  Camden. 

Why  Pollock  —  who  was  able  ap- 
parently to  sign  his  name  only  in 
Hebrew  letters  —  had  seen  fit  to 
enlist  in  the  army  as  "Joseph 
Smith"  is  nowhere  explained  in  the 
available  documents,  nor  does  the 
Government  seem  to  have  found 
his  action  questionable.  His  as- 
sumption of  an  alias  and  his  sub- 
sequent abandonment  of  it  in  favor 
of  his  true  name  are  reported  quite 
casually  in  the  governmental  rec- 
ords. But  why  did  he  do  it? 

Had  he  feared  anti- Jewish  preju- 
dice in  the  army  and  thus  sought 
to  conceal  his  Jewish  identity?  Cer- 
tainly this  is  possible,  although  Dr. 
Marcus  has  written  that  such  anti- 
Jewish  prejudices  as  abtained  in 
Revolutionary  America  "were  not 
crushing  or  keenly  felt."  According 
to  Dr.  Marcus,  "on  the  whole,  the 
early  American  Jew  was  accepted 
by  his  neighbors." 

Or  had  Pollock  been  born 
abroad,  and  was  it  this  he  wished 
to  conceal?  But  foreigners  were 
hardly  resented  in  America;  for- 
eigners who  had  flocked  here  to 

(Please  Turn  to  Fag?  60) 


Just  before  public  schools  opened 
Cms  fall  airports  all  over  the  na- 
tion witnessed  scenes  like  this  as  the 
Jewish  National  Home  for  Asthmatic 
Children  at  Denver  sent  home  its 
largest  class,  after  an  average  stay 
of  eighteen  to  twenty-four  months. 
This  made  room  for  oi  :er  intract- 
ably asthmatic  children,  whose  doc- 
tors certified  that  their  tiny  patients 
would  either  succumb  soon  or  linger 
painfully  as  hopeless  pulmonary 
cripples  un'ess  accepted  by  the  free 
i  ospital-home. 


Berry's 

"On  Main" 

1608  Main  Street 

B.  Berry's 
Dept.  Store 

1416  Assembly  Street 
COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


Auto  Electric  Exchange 

Generators  —  Starters 

Batteries 
Exchanged  or  Repaired 
1310  Taylor    Dial  AL  2-6655 
COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


Greetings 


Hiller  Hardware  Co. 

1401  Assembly  Street     AL  3-7583 

5  Points  Branch: 
608  Harden  AL  3-7504 

COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


Walker  Plumbing 
and  Heating  Co. 

Contractors  —  Repairing 

635  Elmwood     Dial  AL  4-6298 
COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 

CROWSON-STONE 
PRINTING  CO. 

PRINTERS 

LITHOGRAPHERS 

819  Main  St.       Dial  AL  3-7523 
COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


SERVICE  ON  ALL 
MAKES  &  MODELS 

Forest  Lake  Radio 
and  Television  Service 

DIAL  SU  7-3555 
Forest  Lake  Shopping  Center 
4809  Forest  Drive 
COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


Crystal 
Linen  Service 

COMPLETE  LINE  OF 
LINEN  RENTALS 
WHY  BUY?  — WE  SUPPLY 
"LOCALLY  OWNED?' 
Courteous  Service 

ALpine  2-3616 

805  Main 
COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


New  Year  Greetings  From  .  .  . 

G.  H.  Crawford  Co* 
Inc. 

Investment  Brokers 
Dial  AL  6-6326  Arcade  Bldg. 
COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


CAROLINA 
SHOE  REBUILDERS 

For  EXPERT  Shoe  Repairs 

1225  Main  St.     Dial  AL  2-7972 
COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


CABINET  MAKERS 

All  types  of  Cabinets,  Ward- 
robes, Chests,  Beds,  Porch  and 
Lawn  Furniture,  Store  Fixtures 
Church  Pews.  Also  Screens, 
Windows  and  Doors.  ,„ 
"No  Job  Too  Large  or  Too  Small 

IOHNNIE  McRANT 
CABINET  SHOP 

2501  Millwood  Ave.      AL  2-4954 
COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


Say  It  With  Flowers  From  The 

SHANDON 
GREENHOUSES 

3013  Millwood  Ave.    AL  4-5109 
COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


DREHER 

Packing  Co.,  Inc. 
MEAT  PACKERS 

COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


James  Battery 
Service,  Inc. 

Distributors  of 

Willard  Batteries 

Dial  AL  4-7883 
1227-29  Lady  St. 
COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


5* 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a  Happy  and 
Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Greenville,  S.  G. 


HAPPY 


DANIEL  CONSTRUCTION  CO.,  INC 

GENERAL  CONTRACTING 
Industrial  and  Commercial 

429  N.  Main  Dial  CE  9-1001 

Greenville,  South  Carolina 


Friendly  Food  Stores 
with 

Low,  Low  Prices 
There  Is  One 
Near  You 


IpiMipmiiiwfiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim  a 

Metal  of  A 11  Types  —  All  Light  G auge  Scrap  | 
Cast  Iron  —  Steel  —  Auto  Bodies  —  Cotton  Ties  j 

I  PIEDMONT  STEEL  &  METAL  CORP.  | 

|New  Buncombe  Road      GREENVILLE,  S.  C.      Dial  CE  2-7356 1 

^^^Bnwditu^vsrf  t  uiti  ti  ttitnnoiii  IJ1NII1UI14UII1I11I1I  ii  jiiiiiii^T'CJiti  i  viiiimTf  r/Tiii[<riiuf-!t  ifHHnT>?iirji!iiLii-;nTitiiiiu-rr>uj  nti.iijjrr:ii]riiiitiriifiii:iiiijjiiii!iii;n[ri-. -::!.;iiiiiiiruii]:-«M^frp;':iiiH  'Ji;  t  !iHi»&u«4iimu^ii9 


MMB  &  CO.,  IIC, 


CE  2-5621 


Members  of  the  New  York  Stock  Exchange 
INQUIRIES  INVITED 
South  Carolina  National  Bank  Bldg.  Greenville,  S.  C. 


T.  CECIL  BRACKEN,  Owner 

Shrubs  &  Tr 

"From  Planning  to  Planting" 
Dial  CE  2-0294 
New  Easley  Hwy. 
GREENVILLE,  S.  C. 


^>Bm*rrFmTirrnf  iniif  Miiim^if  m  inn  mi  nun  uiin  imitiiiiiii  i  -.m  uri  11 1  iui  1 1  jm  m  mrtj:-i  ■ :  iimiiiiir;  i;>m 

Gregory's 

Ambulance  ( 

Service  ( 

Radio-CcntrolLd  j 

24-HOUR  SERVICE  | 

MODERATE  RATES  I 


|  Each  Car  Equipped  With  Oxygen  | 
| Experienced  Qualified  Attendants! 

|      Registered  Nurse  Available  I 
1 206  Rutherford  St.— Dial  CE  5-4441  1 
GREENVILLE,  S.  C.  | 

^iiiiiiirni»iiiitsiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiuujiiiiHiuii<iiiiiiiiHtininiiiiitiinfiHiiiiiiiii*iif^ 


Durham,  N.  C. 

(Concluded  From  Page  50) 


and  his  teacher,  Rabbi  M.  Herbert 
Berger.  Mr.  I.  Zelon,  President,  pre- 
sented Stanley  with  a  Bar  Mitzvah 
Certificate.  A  luncheon  was  served 
after  the  services. 

Stanley  was  host  to  the  young 
people  of  the  community  with  a 
dance  given  at  the  Synagogue  Social 
Hall  Saturday  evening. 

Out-of-town  guests  for  the  Bar 
Mitzvah  were  Mrs.  Shirley  Gelberg, 
Mrs.  Bess  Neuwirth,  Staunton,  Va., 
Mr.  Harold  Greenstone,  Waynes- 
boro, Va.,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Sam 
Zemon,  Williamston,  N.  C,  and 
Mr.  Bennett  Denemark,  Sumter, 
S.  C. 

Coming  from  Melbourne,  Florida 
to  be  Bar  Mitzvah  in  the  city  of 
his  birth  was  Joseph  Brian  Wilson, 
son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  A.  Charles 
Wilson.  Joey  is  the  grandson  of 
Mrs.  Charlie  Wilson  and  it  was 
indeed  a  homecoming  celebration 
to  have  Muriel  and  "Brother"  with 
their  family  again  in  our  midst. 

Joseph's  Bar  Mitzvah  was  held 
Friday  evening,  August  28th  and 
Saturday   morning,   August  29th. 


Mrs.  Eleanor  Roosevelt  will  join 
<t:e  Brandefs  University  faculty  this 
fall  as  Visaing  Lecturer  in  Interna- 
tional Relations.  She  is  one  of  39  dis- 
tinguished academicians  from  the 
United  States  and  five  foreign  coun- 
tries who  have  bee:-  named  to  the 
University  faculty  for  tee  1953-60 
academic  year. 


V. 

M.  MauE&iitej 

Investments 

Dial  CE  2-8231 

s.  C 

National  Bank  Bldg. 

Greenville,  S.  C. 

JOHNSON 
TRANSFER  CO.,  Inc. 

Poinsett  Hwy.  Dial  CE  5-1631 
GREENVILLE,  S.  C. 


At  the  evening  services,  Jacob  Zuck- 
erman  chanted  the  services  and 
Joseph  made  the  kiddush  and  then 
offered  a  Bar  Mitzvah  prayer.  Mrs. 
I.  Zelon  presented  him  with  the 
Kiddush  Cup  after  which  Rabbi 
M.  Herbert  Berger  spoke  on  "My 
Son,  My  Son." 

After  the  services,  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Wilson  were  hosts  at  the  Oneg 
Shabat. 

Saturday  morning  Joseph  read 
the  Haftorah  and  Mr.  I.  Zelon, 
President  of  Beth-El  Congregation, 
presented  Joseph  with  a  certificate. 
A  luncheon  was  served  after  the 
morning  services. 

Sunday  afternoon,  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Joe  Eckstein,  aunt  and  uncle  of 
the  Bar  Mitzvah,  entertained  at 
open  house. 

For  the  happy  occasion,  Mrs.  M. 
Blumstein,  grandmother,  and  uncle, 
Stanley  Blumstein  of  Brooklyn,  N. 
Y.  came  to  join  the  community  in 
congratulating  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Wilson 
on  their  son's  Bar  Mitzvah. 


STOP 
CLIMBING 

STAIRS 


Avoid 
Heart  Strain 
and  Fatigue 
with  a 
Home  Elevator 


Inclin-ator  travels  up  and  down 
stairways — Elavette  fits  snugly 
into  closet  space.  Trlet>l  for  in- 
valids and  older  folks,  with  safe 
push-button  controls.  Uses  or- 
dinary house  current.  Used  in 
hundreds  of  nearby  homes.  Call 
or  write  today  for  free  survey. 


Freight  L.  J5cs«  jer  elevators 
Grer.nsboro,  CarcliRj 
ChcriePe  o  P.al&i^h 
Roar:oke  °  Augusta  •  Grtenville 


New  Year  Greetings 
SHOP  &  SAVE 

at 


Your  Shopping  Center 
GREENVILLE,  S.  C. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Greensboro,  N.  C.  Jewish  Community 
Calendar 


January  4 
6 

11 

13 
14 

18 

20 
25 

27 

February  1 
3 
8 
9 
11 

15 
22 


March 


April 


May 


24 
29 
2 
7 
9 
10 

12 
13 

14 
21 

23 
28 


4 
6 
14 

20 

25 

27 
3 
4 
9 
11 
12 

16 
23 


(Concluded  From  Page  45) 

Council  Luncheon  Temple 
Hadassah  Board  A.  M. 

Emanuel  Sisterhood  Luncheon  Temple 
Beth  David  Sisterhood  Board  A.  M. 
Council  Evening  Group  P.  M. 
Beth  David  Board  P.  M. 

Hadassah  Luncheon  Synagogue 
Beth  David  Sisterhood  Tora  Fund  Synagogue 
Council  Board  A.  M. 

Beth  David  Sisterhood  P.  M.  Synagogue 
Council  Study  Group  A.  M. 
Council  Luncheon  Temple 
Hadassah  Board  A.  M. 

Emanuel  Sisterhood  Luncheon  Temple 
Interfaith  evening  Temple 
Council  Evening  Group  P.  M. 
Beth  David  Board  P.  M. 

Hadassah  Luncheon  Synagogue 
Council  Board  A.  M. 

Beth  David  Sisterhood  Luncheon  Synagogue 
Conucil  Study  Group  A.  M. 
Emanuel  Sisterhood  Study  Group  A.  M. 
Hadassah  Board  A.M. 

Council  Luncheon  Synagogue 
Beth  David  Sisterhood  Board  A.  M. 
Council  Evening  Group  P.  M. 
Beth  David  Board  P.M. 
Purim  Dance  P.  M. 
Joint  Children's  Purim  Party  Temple 
Teen  Agers  Dance 
Emanuel  Sisterhood  Luncheon 
Hadassah  Luncheon 
Council  Study  Group  A.  M. 
Council  Board  A.  M. 
Emanuel  Sisterhood  Luncheon 
Beth  David  Sisterhood  P.  M. 
Council  Luncheon 

Hadassah  Open  Board  Meeting  A.  M. 
Council  Evening  Group  P.  M. 
Beth  David  Board  P.  M. 
Council  Study  Group  A.  M. 
Council  Board  A.  M. 

Beth  David  Sisterhood  P.  M.  Synagogue 
Hadassah  Donor 
Council  Luncheon 
Hadassah  Board  A.M. 

Emanuel  Sisterhood  Luncheon  Temple 
Beth  David  Sisterhood  Board  A.M. 
Council  Evening  Group  P.M. 
Beth  David  Board  P.M. 
Hadassah  Luncheon 

Beth  David  Sisterhood  P.  M.  Synagogue 


Synagogue 
&  Synagogue 

Synagogue 
Temple 
Temple 


Temple 
Synagogue 
Temple 


g'iiiii'iii!iiiiit,.iiiiiniiniiiii]iiiiiiiNini:;iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

1  DIAL  CE  2-5322 

j  YELLOW  CAB  CO.  | 

|    Quick  Dependable  Service  | 
|         Courteous  Drivers  | 
GREENVILLE,  S.  C. 

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Need  a  Plumber? 
Dial  CE  2-5012 

SAM  F.  FLOYD 

6  Duncan  Street 
GREENVILLE,  S.  C. 


Prescription  Specialists 

BRUCE  &  DOSTER 
DRUG  COMPANY 

Your  REXALL  Deaier 
GREENVILLE,  S.  C. 


Super  Supply  Co. 
Inc. 

^ . 

Conditioning 

Dial  CE  2-2494 
1833  Wade  Hampton  Blvd. 
GREENVILLE,  S.  C. 

Please  Patronize  Our  Advertisers 

Fire-Automobile  INSURANCE 

WHITE 

General  Insurance 
Agency,  Inc. 

200  W.  McBee  Dial  CE  2-2703 

GREENVILLE.  S.  C. 


General  Wholesale  Distributor,  Inc. 

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54 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

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Rabbi  and  Mrs.  Max  Stauber  an- 
nounced the  engagement  of  their 
daughter,  Naomi  Miriam,  to  Mr. 
Jay  Elliott  Finke  with  a  very  lovely 
Oneg  Shabbat  on  Friday  night, 
September  4.  The  couple  plans  to 
be  married  in  June. 

The  House  Committee  started 
the  season  with  a  bang-up  card  par- 
ty affair  on  August  30th.  Big  plans 
are  in  store  for  New  Year's  Eve. 

Due  to  the  hospitality  of  Mrs. 
Abe  Smith,  the  Young  Judeans  had 
a  terrific  party  at  the  Smith's  pool 
on  August  26.  There  were  swim- 
ming, games,  and  a  picnic  supper 
was  served. 

Everyone  is  still  talking  about 
Aliyah  Night  and  their  honors  for 


the  High  Holy  Days.  A  party  was 
held  on  September  16  prior  to  the 
sale  of  the  Aliyahs.  Refreshmnts 
and  "Schnaps"  were  served,  get- 
ting everyone  in  the  right  mood! 
The  ladies  who  helped  serve  were 
Mrs.   Earl    (Thelma)  Yoffe,  Mrs. 

Joel  (Rose)  Tanenbaum,  Mrs. 
Harry  (Pearl)  Tanenbaum,  Mrs. 
Marvin    (Dot)  Frank,     Mrs.  Joe 

(Margaret)  Wachter,  Mrs.  Barney 

(Millie)  Golburd,  and  Mrs.  Max 

(Sharon)  Massey. 

A  farewll  party  was  given  in  hon- 
or of  Mrs.  Pearl  Bernstein  on  Sep- 
tember 1st  at  the  Center.  She  is 
Spartanburg's  loss  and  Rock  Hill's 
gain. 


Eva  and  Jewish  Identity 


(Continued  F 

Europe  who  walks  in  the  world 
today  is  an  unbelievable  story. 
Curiously,  this  makes  for  a  certain 
typicality  in  Eva's  sequence  of  ad- 
ventures. 

For  the  American  reader,  I  hope 
that  Eva  will  prove  typical  in  an- 
other way.  She  is  the  typical  Jewish 
girl  of  the  little  town  in  the  shtetel 
that  nurtured  so  many  of  our  fami- 
lies —  the  bright,  flirtatious  daugh- 
ter of  a  storekeeper,  the  'modern' 
girl  of  her  circle.  She  had  uncles, 
cousins  in  America,  just  as  so  many 
of  us  had  cousins  and  uncles  who 
remained  in  the  Jewish  communi- 
ties of  Poland,  Hungary,  Rumania. 
By  a  flick  of  circumstance,  she 
might  so  easily  have  been  a  Hadas- 
sah  member  in  Lake  Forest,  Illi- 
nois. 

Could  there  have  been  Evas 
among  our  own  kin?  Doubtless 
this  same  energy,  this  same  per- 
sistent goodness  of  heart,  would 
have  saved  one  out  of  ten  among 
our  families,  too. 

And  in  Eva's  story  there  is  an- 
other element  that  was  of  utmost 
importance  to  me.  Eva  found  it 
hardest  to  exert  herself  to  survive 
when  she  was  alone.  Only  when 
she  was  also  helping  to  save  some- 
one else,  one  of  the  series  of  close 
friends  with  whom  she  joined 
forces  in  each  stage  of  her  adven- 


rom  Pag?  21) 

ture  —  only  then  did  her  life-urge 
emerge  at  its  most  powerful. 

I  wrote  this  story  in  the  hope 
that  it  would  clarify,  in  the  dra- 
matic terms  of  a  single  human  life, 
what  it  means  to  be  a  Jew.  I  have 
taken  part  in  this  fascinating  and 
endless  debate  through  almost  the 
entire  body  of  my  writing.  I  tried 
to  fill  out  my  own  definition  in 
my  autobiography,  In  Search.  I  felt 
the  meaning  to  be  expressed  in 
Eva's  life  because  it  is  expressed  in 
actions,  in  life-decisions  taken  out 
of  absolute  necessity. 

The  definition  in  terms  of  form- 
al Jewish  religion  is  for  Eve,  as  for 
most  of  her  generation,  quite 
vague.  The  definition  in  terms  of 
"Jewish  nationalism"  is  virtually 
beside  the  point,  for  Eva.  She  be- 
longed, in  a  social  way,  to  a  Zionist 
youth  group  in  her  home  town,  but 
she  was  no  militant  ideologist.  Eva 
is  simply  a  Jew  by  virtue  of  the  very 


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55 


I 


It  has  recently  been  revealed  that  Meyer  Levins  new  novel,  Eva,  is 
based  on  H  e  true  adventures  of  a  girl  who  escaped  from  Germany  during 
the  war.  The  heroine  of  the  novel,  Mrs.  Ida  Lev,  is  now  a  house-wife  in 
Israel.  She  is  shown  here  talking  wit  i  the  author. 


right  of  existence,  the  right  to  have 
a  continuing  identity  in  the  world. 
Without  it  Jew,  Hungarian,  Bantu 
—the  individual  is  lost. 

But  Eva  is  not  a  polemic  novel. 
It  is  the  story  of  a  young  woman's 
life,  of  the  persistence  of  the  need 
lor  love  even  for  laughter,  in  the 
most  difficult  of  circumstances,  and 
of  the  human  ability  to  soften 
them.  It  is  the  essential  human 
story  that  every  novelist  feels  lucky 
to  find. 

I  wrote  EVA  as  a  culmination 
of  fifteen  years  of  trying  to  under- 
stand and  explain  what  had  hap- 
pened to  the  Jews  of  Europe.  I 
wrote  this  book  to  celebrate  life 
itself,  the  immeasurable  survival 
force  that  is  the  God-urge  in 
humanity,  and  that  has  been  ex- 
emplified so  continuously  in  the 
Jewish  people. 

As  a  story  of  survival  it  had 
to  be  the  story  of  a  woman. 

And  this  story  had  to  contain 
all  that  I  have  learned  since  I 
went  to  Europe  as  a  war  corres- 
pondent in  1944,  to  find  out  the 
fate  of  the  Jews. 

It  was  my  sad  distinction  to  be 
the  one  writer  bearing  this  assign- 
ment. Today,  fifteen  years  later,  I 
am  still  trying  to  fulfill  it.  Many 


fine  works  have  appeared  on  the 
subject,  but  so  vast  was  this  human 
experience,  and  so  frightening,  that 
it  is  only  now  coming  to  be  widely 
comprehended. 

It  was  still  necessary  to  show 
how,  in  the  terms  of  a  single  in- 
dividual, the  catastrophe  could  be 
lived  through,  at  times  even  with 
friendship  and  love  and  humor. 

I  hope  everyone  loves  Eva. 


Williamston,  N.  C. 

(Continued  from  Page  45) 
Mr.  Irving  Margolis  spent 
several  days  at  Duke  Hospital, 
Durham,  where  he  went  for  exam- 
ination and  treatment.  During  his 
stay  Mrs.  Margolis  was  the  guest 
of  Mayor  and  Mrs.  E.  J.  Evans 
in  Durham. 

Recent  guests  of  Gail  and  San- 
dra Margolis  were  Sheila  Sapero 
of  Greensboro  and  Gary  Smiley 
of  Spartanburg  and  Chapel  Hill. 

Every  good  wish  to  our  college 
folk.  Gail  Margolis  left  for  Duke 
University,  Durham,  where  she 
."tended  the  pre-school  conference 
at  W.C.U.N.C.  Greensboro,  then 
later  returned  for  the  regular  ses- 
sion.  Jacob  Zemon,  after  a  visit 


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56 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

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with  friends  in  Florida,  has  re- 
turned to  Chapel  Hill  to  complete 
his  studies  at  the  University. 

Congratulations  and  best  wishes 
to  the  former  Marilyn  Shugar  and 


Sanford  Henich  of  High  Point 
upon  their  recent  marriage  in 
Raleigh.  Marilyn,  who  was  grad- 
uated from  W.C.U.N.C.  in  June, 
used  to  live  in  Plymouth. 


Reflections  On  The  American  Scene 


(Continued 

triumph  in  creating  a  national  per- 
sonality which  seeks  the  enrichment 
of  varied  cultural  sources. 

The  third  is  your  belief  in  the 
affirmative  qualities  of  technology 
and  science  —  your  conviction  that 
the  true  expression  of  the  scientific 
age  lies  in  its  response  to  the 
compassions  and  utilities  of  man- 
kind. 

There  is  one  feature  of  American 
life  about  which  neither  de  Toc- 
queville  nor  Bryce  said  a  word. 
Neither  of  them  spoke  of  the  Amer- 
ican Jewish  community.  You  would 
hardly  expect  of  a  similar  reticence 
in  me.  American  Jewry  has  stood 
in  the  very  center  of  my  experience. 

American  Jews,  more  than  others, 
have  seen  the  true  quality  of  our 
enterprises.  They  have  understood 
that  Israel  is  not  a  small  nation. 
A  nation  can  be  small  in  geography 
but  very  great  in  history.  Ancient 
Israel  was  surrounded  by  empires 
which  exceeded  her  in  material 
wealth,  in  military  power  and  in 
the  sophistication  and  refinement 
of  their  arts.  But  all  of  these 
empires  crumbled  into  ruin  and 
oblivion,  while  this  small  people 
of  shepherds  and  farmers  became 
the  first  to  see  the  vision  of  a 
united  creation;  to  become  aware 
of  invisible  forces  at  work  upon  the 
human  scene;  to  rebel  against  the 
apathy,  determinism  and  resigna- 
tion of  all  other  civilizations;  to 
proclaim  that  history  has  meaning, 
that  the  human  journey  has  a  di- 
rection and  that  its  sign-posts  point 
forever  forward  and  upward. 

From  the  moment  that  the  peo- 
ple of  Israel  first  comes  within 
view,  history  is  face  to  face  with 
a  people  of  intensive  genius,  touch- 
ed by  a  rich  and  joyous  vision  of 
human  destiny. 

American  Jews,  more  than  other 
Americans,  are  aware  of  these  ele- 
ments of  past  history.  They  have 
been  able  to  look  upon  Israel  with 
a  true  eye  of  historic  comparison. 
Israel  owes  American  Jewry  a  simi- 
lar benevolence  of  appraisal. 

I  believe  in  the  survival  of  Amer- 
ican Jewry.  I  believe  in  its  organic 
membership  in  the  pattern  of 
American  civilization.  My  percep- 
tion leads  me  to  the  conclusion 


from  Page  6) 

that  American  Jewry  is  not  some- 
thing grafted  onto  the  existing 
structure  of  an  American  nation, 
but  is  simultaneous  with  its  birth 
and  growth,  and  totally  inseparable 
from  its  destiny. 

The  founders  of  our  own  nation- 
al movement  constructed  an  ideo- 
logy which  was  based  on  a  somber 
but  accurate  diagnosis  of  the  un- 
tenability  of  Jewish  life  in  Europe. 
Who  can  look  upon  our  six  million 
graves  and  say  they  were  wrong? 
But  this  was  a  prophecy  of  Europe. 
Our  founding  fathers  had  no  ideol- 
ogy about  American  Jewry,  for  it 
did  not  come  across  the  horizons 
of  their  experience  and  perception. 

I  do  not  believe  that  the  concept 
of  every  Jewish  community  outside 
Israel  passing  inexorably  to  doom 
or  decline  can  be  the  basis  of  a 
covenant  of  trust  between  Israel 
and  the  Jewish  people.  Inevitable 
anti-Semitism  is  no  longer  the  basic 
promise  of  Israel's  hopes  of  ad- 
vancement. 

I  believe  that  we  must  look  for 
a  partnership  based  on  a  more 
equal  and  more  affirmative  con- 
cept: we  and  our  children  will  live 
in  a  world  in  which  a  growing 


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The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Israel  will  live  side  by  side  with 
an  American  Jewish  community 
which  will  also  grow  forever  strong- 
er, not  only  in  its  inherent  vigor, 
but  also  in  the  resilience  and  vital- 
ity of  its  Jewish  consciousness  and 
institutions. 

The  florescence  of  American 
Jewish  institutions  is  not  something 
alien  to  Israel's  destiny.  Assistance 
for  Israel  will  not  emerge  from  an 
American  Jewish  community  which 
shows  debility  in  its  autonomous 
Jewish  life  or  weakness  and  fragil- 
ity in  its  culture. 

I  have  not  hesitated  to  tell  my 
fellow  citizens  that  Israel  has  no 
cause  whatever  to  look  at  American 
Jewry  with  reproach  because  you 
presume  to  exist  outside  the  frame- 
work of  our  statehood.  Still  less 
do  I  think  we  should  surround  you 
with  predictions  of  your  inevitable 
extinction. 

I  cannot  imagine  any  circum- 
stances in  which  weakness  and  dis- 
aster could  come  to  American 
Jewry,  without  weakness  and  dis- 
aster coming  to  Israel  as  well.  This, 
I  think,  is  the  covenant  we  have 
with  each  other— mutual  and  paral- 
lel growth  and  strength,  together 
with  the  establishment  of  bridges 
of  interaction  and  fraternal  senti- 
ment. 

My  only  thought  for  American 
Jews,  therefore,  is  one  of  fervent 
prayer  for  their  continued  welfare, 
lor  the  deepening  of  their  harmon- 
ious relations  with  all  their  fellow 
citizens,  within  the  framework  of 
their  common  American  civiliza- 
tion. 

I  have  thought  of  you  much  in 
these  eleven  years.  I  know  that  who- 
ever speaks  for  Israel  holds  a  col- 
lective Jewish  prestige  and  trust 
within  his  hands.  For  what  is  mod- 


ern Israel  except  the  expression  of 
a  universal  Jewish  prestige?  I  have 
never  ascended  the  rostrum  of  na- 
tions without  echoing  the  prayer 
so  appropriate  for  the  envoys  of 
our  people:  "Eternal  God,  safe- 
guard my  tongue  from  error."  For 
on  the  consequences  of  this  error 
might  hang  the  trust  and  the  fate 
of  history's  most  anguished  people. 

I  take  away  with  me  as  my 
proudest  conviction— I  pray  that  it 
be  a  just  conviction— that  you,  the 
Jews  of  America,  and  I  have  under- 
stood each  other  very  deeply. 

In  gratitude,  therefore,  in  affec- 
tion—in memory  everlasting— I  bid 
you  farewell. 


DON'T  FORGET! 
BUY  AN  ISRAEL  BOND 

NOW! 


The  appointment  of  Rabbi  Mar- 
xian T.  Meyer  of  Norwich,  Connecti- 
cut, to  serve  as  Assistant  Rabbi  to 
the  Congregation  Israe'ita  in  Buenos 
Aires,  Argentina  has  been  announc- 
ed by  the  World  Council  of  Syna- 
gogues. 


Sales  —  OLDSMOBILE  —  Service 

The  Home  of  the  Famous  Rockets  —  The  "Queen"  of 
the  General  Motors  Cars 

RICE  OLDSMOBILE,  INC. 

"HOME  OF  QUALITY  SERVICE" 


1720  West  Cumberland  Dial  5-7103 

KNOXVILLE,  TENNESSEE 


Parkway  Laundry  & 
Dry  Cleaners 

"Satisfaction  a  Specialty" 
3705  Chapman  Hwy.  7-7521 
KNOXVILLE,  TENN. 


Easy  Method  Auto 
Driver  Training 
School 

935  N.  Central  Dial  4-3335 

KNOXVILLE,  TENN. 


"That  Friendly  Bank" 

Bdn\  of  Knoxville 

COMPLETE  BANKING  SERVICE 
KNOXVILLE,  TENN, 


HULL-DOBBS  CO. 

World's  Largest  Ford  Dealer 

Authorized  Sales  and  Service 


Telephone  5-5101 
835  Central  Avenue  N.  E. 
KNOXVILLE,  TENN. 


Lambert  Bros. 

Division  of 
Vulcan  Materials  Company 

CRUSHED  STONE 
All  Sizes 

Alcoa  Hwy.  Dial  3-9738 

KNOXVILLE,  TENN. 


'Prescription 
h  Specialists 

i 

LONG  S  DRUGSTORES 

Dial  8-0582 
4604  Kingston  Pike  S.  W. 

Dial  8-4682 
5941  Kingston  Pike  S.  W. 
KNOXVILLE,  TENN. 


ASK  FOR 


Gardner  Products  Co. 

2724  Bond  N.  W.    Dial  2-2816 
Knoxville,  Tenn. 


Fast  Local  Delivery  Service 

CONSOLIDATED  DELIVERY  COMPANY 

2101  Brooks  Rd.  S.  E.       Knoxville,  Tenn. 


Dial  2-8146 


FOUNTAIN  CITY  LUMBER  & 
BUrLDERS  SUPPLY  CO. 

4849  Broadway,  N.  E.  KNOXVILLE,  TENN.       Dial  MY  1-3308 


POWER  EQUIPMENT  COMPANY 

ALL  TYPES  OF  CONSTRUCTION  EQUIPMENT 

1430  Island  Home  Avenue,  S.  E.  Dial  3-1121 

KNOXVILLE,  TENNESSEE 


A.  J.  METIER 

•  All  Kinds  of  Steel  Erection 

•  Heavy  Hauling-Crane 

Service 

•  Car  Loading  and  Unloading 

•  Machinery  Setting 

MOTOR  CRANE  RENTAL 
15  to  35  Tons 

Phone  5-5183 
117  Chicamauga,  N.  E. 
KNOXVILLE,  TENN. 


School  ot  the 
Dance 


Specialized  Dance  Training 

Dial  2-3461 
2315  Broadway  N.E. 
KNOXVILLE,  TENN. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


'Know  the  Real  Joy 
of  Good  Living" 


The  Beer  That  Made 

Milwaukee  Famous 
Distributed  by 

PINNACLE 
SALES  CO. 

114  Depot  Ave.,  S.  W. 
Dial  2-9605 
Knoxville,  Tenn. 


American  Jewry  On  The  Threshold 


(Continued  From  Page  13) 


Volunteer  Portland  Cement  Company 

Manufacturers  of  "VOLUNTEER"  Brand  Cement 

Plant  Office:  John  Sevier  Yards  —  2-1171 
Sales  Office:  502  Gay,  S.  W.  —  4-0735 

KNOXVILLE,  TENN. 


INSTANT 

SPECIAL  COFFEE 


fat  Of 


Ask  For  It 
At  Your  Grocer 


The  Better  Kind  of 
Dry  Cleaning 
Service 


uxcocv 


614  Sevier  Ave.,  Dial  5-8114 
Branches : 
105  Union  Ave.  S.  W. 
Newcom  Ave.  N.  W. 
KNOXVILLE,  TENN. 


Mann 
Mortuary 

Established  1884 

DIAL  2-1129 

414  West  Church  Avenue 
KNOXVILLE,  TENN. 


BROADACRE 
DAIRIES,  INC. 

"Fresh  From  Our  Farm" 

Milk   *    Ice  Cream 

Cottage  Cheese 

All  Dairy  Products 

Dial  9,  then  4-2421 
KNOXVILLE,  TENN. 


Fresh,  Nutritious  Foods 


WHITE 

SiTiQRES 


^j&l  GREEN  STAMPS1 

Real  Money-Saving 

Prices 
KNOXVILLE,  TENN. 


lacks  the  learning  and  desire  to  de- 
velop into  a  major  Jewish  center, 
on  a  level  with  Eastern  Europe,  or 
Spain,  or  Babylonia. 

Some  persons  have  gone  so  far  as 
to  urge  strongly,  either  that  Ameri- 
can Jews  adapt  themselves  to,  and 
adopt  wholesale  the  culture  of  the 
State  of  Israel,  or  better  still,  that 
they  move  wholesale  to  Israel. 

Attitude  Wrong 

By  what  right  does  anyone  take 
such  an  attitude  toward  the  pres- 
ent generation  of  American  Jews? 
Certainly  there  is  nothing  in  his- 
tory to  justify  this  extreme  demand 
and  distorted  prospective! 

Forgotten  is  the  fact  that  the 
mass  immigration  ol  Jews  into 
America  did  not  begin  until  about 
60  years  ago.  The  American  Jew- 
ish community  is  really  only  two 
or  three  generations  old. 

What  did  the  United  States  at 
large  amount  to  culturally  during 
the  first  sixty,  and  twice  sixty  years 
of  its  existence?  And  what  a  pessi- 
mistic picture  would  have  been 
painted  by  our  current  prophets  of 
doom,  or  Babylonian  Judaism  after 
only  sixty  or  one  hundred  or  more 
years  of  existence,  or  of  the  Jews 
of  Spain,  or  of  Eastern  Europe! 

There  is  the  question  of  quality, 
the  substance,  of  American  Jewish 
culture.  Once  again,  much  that 
Jewish  history  is  capable  and  eager 
to  teach  us  is  disregarded.  Every 
one  knows  that  the  culture,  the  re- 
ligion, the  laws,  the  prayers,  the  lit- 
erature of  the  Jews  in  Biblical 
times  in  Israel  and  Judah  were  not 
all  the  same  as  those  which  the 
Jews  of  Babylonia  created,  and  by 
which  they  lived. 

Culture  Not  the  Same 
And  apart  from  the  Babylonian 
Gemara,  which    they    adapted  to 
their  own  needs,  the  Jews  of  Spain 


and  the  Province  developed  a  cul- 
ture which  was  quite  different  from 
that  of  their  Babylonian  Jewish 
predecessors. 

The  gap  is  even  greater  between 
the  kind  of  culture  which  was  cre- 
ated by  the  Jews  of  Spain  and  that 
which  characterized  the  civilization 
of  the  Eastern  European  Jews. 

As  a  matter  of  fact,  the  Jews  of 
Eastern  Europe  did  not  produce 
any  such  great  literary  masterpieces 
which  characterized  the  Golden 
Era  in  Spain,  the  travel  literature, 
the  chronicles,  the  ethical  works, 
not  to  speak  of  the  philosophical 
works. 

Even  the  great  mystical  Kabbal- 
istic  works,,  such  as  the  Zohar,  are 
essentially  Judeo-Spanish  products. 

The  Jews  of  Poland,  Lithuania 
and  Russia,  on  the  other  hand, 
lived  and  organized  the  kind  of 
daily  Jewish  life,  the  likes  of  which 
neither  the  Jews  nor  the  world  at 
large  ever  knew  before,  or  will, 
in  all  likelihood,  ever  know  again. 

Theirs  was  essentially  a  Jewish 
life  all  twenty-four  hours  of  the 
day.  Their  piety,  their  devotion  to 
the  commandments  of  Jewish  law, 
their  immersion  in  learning,  the 
study  of  the  Talmud  —  all  these 
set  the  Jews  of  Eastern  Europe 
apart  from  all  other  Jewries  and 
peoples. 

Never  in  the  history  of  mankind 
was  so  large  a  proportion  of  the 
population  able  to  read  and  write. 
Our  own  United  States,  or  England, 
or  Canada,  has  not  yet  achieved 
the  state  of  literacy  that  our  fathers 
and  grandfathers  achieved  and 
practiced  in  Eastern  and  Central 
Europe. 

The  competent  historian  does 
not  judge  the  relative  merits  and 
values  of  the  biblical,  Babylonian, 
Spanish  and  European  Jewish  cul- 
tures. His  task  is  to  describe  them 


BUY  AT  THE 

Esso 


FIRST  Choice  in  Gas  and  Oil 
LAST  Word  in  Dealer  oervice 
ALWAYS  Your  Best  Buy 

ESSO  —  ESSO  EXTRA  —  GOLDEN 
ESSO  EXTRA  —  UNIFLO  MOTOR  OIL 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


59 


and  to  account  for  them,  for  their 
points  of  agreement  and  of  dis- 
agreement. He  must  identify  the 
elements  which  are  common  to 
them  all,  the  features  which  mark 
the  cultures  of  these  different 
centers  in  time  and  space  as  Jew- 
ish, the  ingredients  which  go  to 
make  up  the  continuum,  in  Jewish 
history. 

Don't  Underestimate  Us 

In  this  light,  it  is  false  and 
harmful  to  underestimate,  and  well 
in  advance  at  that,  the  kind  of 
culture  which  the  Jews  of  America 
have  been,  and  will  in  the  future 
be  creating. 

There  is  not  the  remotest  pos- 
sibility that  our  culture,  and  the 
culture  of  our  children,  can  or  will 
be  the  same  as  that  of  our  fathers 
in  Europe.  We  live  under  entirely 
different  social  conditions. 

American  Jewry  is  maturing.  It 
is  developing  concepts  and  institu- 
tions and  qualities  that  are  distinc- 
tively its  own.  Thus  it  is  now  a 
commonplace  that  one  of  the 
unique  features  of  American  Jew- 
ish life  is  the  Jewish  Community 
Center,  a  phenomenon  not  readily 
discerned  in  Jewish  history  prev- 
iously. 

Or  take  the  field  of  Jewish 
education.  The  earlier,  purely 
secular  tendency  of  many  Yiddish 
schools  has  given  way  to  a  more 
sympathetic  approach  and  appre- 
ciation of  the  Jewish  past. 


PARAMOUNT 
CLEANERS 

itj  DO 

Complete  Cleaning  Service 

Draperies  and  Curtains 
Furs  Cleaned  and  Stored 
Dial  MA  2-1129 
2511  E.  Main  St. 
Chattanooga,  Tenn. 


Zemll 
Electric  Co. 

"EVERYTHING 
ELECTRICAL" 

Dial  MA  2-1136 
1104  McCallie 
CHATTANOOGA,  TENN. 


The  Reform  movement  in  Amer- 
ica, which  once  contented  itself 
with  a  one-day  Sunday  school,  now 
increasingly  supports  a  minimum 
of  three  days  a  week  of  Hebrew 
school  for  its  children  and  youth, 
in  addition  to  adult  Jewish  educa- 
tion. 

The  growth  of  the  all-day  schools 
is  further  evidence  that  a  number 
of  parents  want  a  maximum  Jew- 
ish education  for  their  children, 
alongside  the  regular  public  school 
education. 

Responsive  American  Jew 

All  these  are  reflections  of  a 
healthy,  growing  Jewish  life  in 
America,  and— no  less  important— 
they  indicate  that  far  from  being 
a  fossil  of  an  extinct  civilization, 
the  American  Jew,  democratically 
and  Jewishly  educated  and  minded, 
is  responding  vibrantly  to  the  chal- 
lenging stimuli  of  the  American 
scene.  This  means  that  the  need 
for  educators  and  teachers  is  be- 
coming increasingly  urgent. 

And  the  same,  at  long  last,  now 
holds  true  also  in  the  area  of 
Jewish  scholarship. 

Never  before  have  Jewish  schol- 
ars been  needed  in  this  country 


P.iilip  M.  iv.uizincK  oi  f^iK  forest, 
111.,  noted  American  Jewish  leader, 
was  today  elected  president  of  the 
American  Friends  of  the  Hebrew 
University  at  the  annual  member- 
ship meeting  of  the  organization,  held 
in  New  York  City  on  Sept.  17th. 


THE  THINKING  FELLOW 
CALLS  A 

YELLOW  or 
CHECKER  CAB 

Paul  F.  Gray,  Jr.,  Mgr. 

Dial  AM  6-2171 

"We  Cover  Chattanooga 
Like  The  Dew" 

CHATTANOOGA,  TENN. 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a  Happy  and 
Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Fallowing  Firms  iri 

CIaa£fianoogaf  Tenn. 


BURKART  -  SCHIER  CHEMICAL  CO. 

CHATTANOOGA,  TENN. 

NASHVILLE  KNOXVILLE 


INDUSTRIAL  CHEMICALS 
TEXTILE  SPECIALTIES 

Manufacturing  Chemists  for  the 

Textile  Industry 

PENETRANTS  —  DETERGENTS  —  SOFTENERS 
FINISHES  : 


"Large  Enough  To  Accommodate— 

Small  Enough  To  Appreciate" 

Ridgedale  Ban\  &  Trust  Co. 

Chattanooga,  Tenn.  — 

Offices  At 


Ninth  &  Georgia  at  Cherry 
1500  Dodds  Ave. 
3805  Ringold  Ave. 


Dial  Aiyi  7-3726 
Dial  MA  9-1412 
Dial  MA  2-2193 


SEE  AND  DRIVE  THE  NEW 
Imperials,  Chryslers  and  Plymouths 

^   RELIABLE  MOTORS,  Inc.  & 

CHRYSLER  Sales  —  Service  PLYMOUTH 

3500  Rossville  Blvd.  CHATTANOOGA,  TENN.  Dial  MA  2-1682 


'  Congress  of  Motor  Hotels 

m  TRAVEL  GUIDE 


by    BILL  ROAMER 


The   newest   and   largest   resort  motel  in 
Miami  is  the  APACHE,  a  truly  wonderful  spot. 
All  the  luxury  of  an  ocean-front  hotel.  It  features 
an    O'ympic    swimming  pool, 
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lounge  with  nightly  entertain- 
ment. Accommodations  are  su- 
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conditioned,  and  the  rates  are 
right.  I  heartily  recommend  the 


Apache  Resort  Motel 

10651  Biscayne  Blvd. 
Miami,  Florida 


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your  free  copy  of  the  1959  edition 
of  Congress  TRAVEL  GUIDE. 
Lists  over  700  fine  motels 

COAST-TO-COAST 
INSPECTED  and  APPROVED 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


MORNINGSIDE  CHEMICAL  CO.,  Inc. 

Textile  Chemicals  and  Softeners-Dyestuffs  and  Mornitex  Products 

2205  Holtzclaw  Ave.  Dial  MA  2-2702 

CHATTANOOGA,  TENNESSEE 


QUAKER  OATS  COMPANY 

Millers  of 

THE  NEW  AUNT  JEMIMA  CORN  MEAL  MIX 
CHATTANOOGA,  TENNESSEE 


DAWN  PRODUCE  COMPANY 

Fresh  Dressed  Poultry  —  Strictly  Fresh  Eggs 

2400  Baldwin  Dial  AM  6-0351 

CHATTANOOGA,  TENNESSEE 


AT  THE  STORE  ...  OR  ...  AT  YOUR  DOOR 

Grant'Patten 

DAIRY  PRODUCTS 

1220.  King  CHATTANOOGA,  TENNESSEE  Dial  AM  6-1284 


CAROLYN  CHENILLES,  INC. 

Manufacturer  of 
BED  SPREADS 

CHATTANOOGA,  TENNESSEE 


COOKE  PAPER  BOX  CO. 

Manufacturers  of 

HOSIERY,  UNDERWEAR,  HANDKERCHIEF 
CANDY  AND  HOLIDAY  BOXES 


Telephone  191 


Athens,  Tennessee 


CAPITAL  MOTOR  SALES 

You  See  RED  MULLINAX  We 

Want  It  Dial  OX  8-2424  Got  It 

5812  Lee  Highway  CHATTANOOGA,  TENN. 


DUNCAN  ELECTRIC  CO. 

COMMERCIAL  &  INDUSTRIAL 
WIRING  &  REPAIRS 

1701  E.  23rd  St.       Chattanooga,  Tenn.       Dial  MA  9-1418 


Chattanooga  Transfer  and  Storage  Co. 

Local  and  Long  Distance  Hauling — Agents  for  Allied  Van  Lines 

MOVING  —  PACKING  —  STORAGE 
2200  N.  Chamberlain  Ave.  Dial  MA  2-8341 

CHATTANOOGA,  TENN. 


as  now,  and  this  need  will  continue 
to  grow  greater.  The  existing  high- 
er Jewish  institutions  of  learning 
—  Dropsie  College,  Hebrew  Union 
College  —  Jewish  Institute  of  Relig- 
ion, Jewish  Theological  Seminary, 
Yeshiva  College  and  University, 
Brandeis  University,  the  several 
Hebrew  colleges  in  Boston,  New 
York,  Philadelphia,  Baltimore, 
Chicago,  and  elsewhere  —  are  in 
constant  need  of  younger  men  to 
replace  the  older  men  on  their 
faculties. 

Even  more,  several  secular  uni- 
versities are  opening  departments 
of  Hebraic,  Judaic,  and  Semitic 
Studies,  and  Jewish  scholars  are 
filling  the  posts.  I  have  in  mind 
New  York  University,  Cornell  Uni- 
versity, Wayne  State  University, 
University  of  Wisconsin,  University 
of  Kentucky,  and  University  of 
California. 

We  here  can  no  longer  depend 
on  European  Yeshivot  and  Gym- 
nasiums and  universities  to  produce 
our  Jewish  scholars;  neither  can 
Israel  fill  the  gap.  We  must  educate 
our  Jewish  scholars  ourselves.  There 
is  indeed  a  great  future  for  Judaism, 
and  for  Jewish  educators  and  schol- 
ars in  America. 

The  National  Jewish  Welfare 
Board,  along  with  such  other  na 
tional  non-political,  non-sectarian 
Jewish  organizations  as  B'nai  B'rith, 
Hadassah  and  Jewish  Publication 
Society,  has  before  it  a  remarkable 
opportunity,  in  fact,  a  duty  and  a 
task  that  it  should  be  proud  and 
eager  to  embark  on,  namely,  to 
take  active  part  in  deepening  and 
extending  the  specifically  Jewish 
culture  that  has  already  begun  to 
develop  before  our  very  eyes. 

This  is  No  Platitude 

This  is  no  platitude,  no  cliche. 
As  Americans  and  as  Jews,  we 
stand  on  the  threshold  of  what 
will  come  to  be  known  in  Jewish 
history  as  the  American  and  Is- 
raeli Epoch. 

We  and  our  descendants  will 
derive  the  benefits  from  this  deve- 
lopment in  proportion  to  the  part 
that  we  actively  play  in  it. 

The  lives  of  our  children  and 
children's  children  will  be  much 
better  integrated  as  Jews  and  as 


Americans  than  any  preceding 
generation. 

In  accepting  your  award  for  dis- 
tinguished contribution  to  the  deve- 
lopment of  American  Jewish  cul- 
ture, may  the  day  come  very  soon, 
as  it  will,  when  American  Jewish 
culture  will  have  real  identity  and 
substance,  and  the  National  Jewish 
Welfare  Board  will  be  able  to 
point  to  itself  with  pride  as  one 
of  the  notable  factors  in  that 
achievement. 


The  Strange  Case  ol 
Joseph  Smith 

(Concluded  from  Page  51) 

support  the  American  cause— Kos- 
ciusko, the  Marquis  de  Lafayette, 
General  von  Steuben,  among  oth- 
ers—had seen  to  that. 

Had  Pollock  been  trying  to  es- 
cape debts  contracted  in  civilian 
life?  One  wonders  then  why  he  re- 
sumed his  true  identity  after  the 
war  -  or,  if  this  is  what  motivated 
him,  had  his  creditors  meanwhile 
died  heirless? 

Whatever  it  was  that  prompted 
this  early  American  Jew  to  seek  the 
obscurity  of  a  name  like  "John 
Smith"  during  his  soldiering  years 
and  then  to  become  Elias  Pollock 
again  in  civilian  life,  it  has  defied 
historical  inquiry.  It  remains  a  mys- 
tery, one  of  the  numerous  curiosi- 
ties of  the  American  Jewish  past  to 
be  found  in  the  files  of  the  Ameri- 
can Jewish  Archives  on  the  Cin- 
cinnati campus  of  the  Hebrew 
Union-College  Jewish  Institute  of 
Religion. 


Don't  Forget! 
Buy  an  Israel  Bond! 


BROWN  BROS. 
Contractors 

Excavating  Concrete 
Grading  Roads 
Sewers  Driveways 
Surfacing  Parking  Lots 

Asphalt 

Crushed  Limestone 

Dial  AM  7-6642 
1701  Central  Avenue 
CHATTANOOGA,  TENN. 


J.  AVERY  BRYAN  CO.,  Inc. 

Funeral  Directors  —  Ambulance  Service 

747  McCallie  Ave.  Dial  AM  6-2131 

CHATTANOOGA,  TENN. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


6 1 


Flowers  of  Distinction 

Bush's 
Florist  Shops 

111  Pine  Grove  Ave.  W. 
N.  AUGUSTA,  S.  C  . 

Downtown  Shop : 
211  Tenth  Street 
AUGUSTA,  GEORGIA 


Starters  —  Generators 

Magnetos 
Exchanged — Repaired 

HECK  BOSWELL 

Auto  Electric  Co.,  Inc. 

125  Sand  Bar  Ferry  Rd. 
Dial  PA  4-1745 
AUGUSTA,  GA. 


AUGUSTA  MILL 
SUPPLY  CO, 

•  Industrial  Supplies 
®  Mil)  Supplies 

Dial  PA  2-4657 

New  Savannah  Rd. 
AUGUSTA,  GA. 


The  Champagne 
of  Bottle  Beer 


Southern  Beer  Distributors 

DIAL  PA  4-2441 
1107  TALCOTT  ST.  EXT. 
AGUSTA,  GA. 


Upholsterers 

QUALITY  WORK 
THROUGH  EXPERT 
WORKMANSHIP 

Custom  Made 
Furniture 
Made  To  Order 

O'NEAL  BROS. 

Upholstery  Co. 

Dial  PA  4-1538 

1919  Lazenby  Drive 
AUGUSTA,  GA. 


Murder  In  A 
Chocolate  Box 

(Continued  from  Page  10) 
ta]  clear,  but  it  took  eight  months 
before  the  judge  found  them  guil- 
>y.  In  Israel  the  death  sentence 
for  murder  has  been  abolished. 
They  were  sentenced  to  imprison- 
ment for  life  and  told  that  they 
had  a  right  to  appeal.  Esther  then 
opened  her  mouth  for  the  first 
time  during  the  trial  and  what 
she  said  was:  "I  hope  the  appeal 
will  come  on  quicker  than  the 
case." 

The  appeal  was  heard  in  the 
Supreme  Court  and  the  lawyer 
for  Saleh  argued  that  he  could 
not  be  found  guiltv  of  murder  be- 
cause all  he  had  done  was  to 
prepare  the  box  that  contained 
the  bomb-that  act  was  so  distant 
from  the  murder,  that  he  was  not 
responsible  for  the  fatal  effects- 
and  he  read  out  cases  from  Eng- 
land, from  the  United  States,  from 
Israel.  But  these  learned  argu- 
ments did  not  help  him.  The 
sentence  of  life  imprisonment  was 
upheld. 

The  lawyer  for  the  girl  took 
quite  a  different  line.  He  did  not 
say  the  girl  was  mad.  but  he  read 
reports  of  psychiatrists  which  said 
she  was  infantile.  He  said  that  if 
she  were  not  mad  she  was  psychotic 
and  if  she  were  not  psvchotic  she 
was  subject  to  irresistible  impulses. 
The  three  judges  listened  for  two 
long  days  to  this  ingenitous  de- 
defense.  Esher  Barazani  sat  in  the 
dock,  next  to  a  policewoman, 
listening  and  looking  not  a  little 


President  Label  Katz  of  B'nai 
B'rifci  was  the  guest  of  honor  at  a 
testimonial  dinner  given  in  his  home 
city  of  New  Orleans,  September  26 
by  the  National  Executive  Committee 
cf  the  Anti-Defamation  League  of 
B'nai  B'rith.  The  dinner  highlighted 
the  Committee's  annuil  meeting. 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Augusta,  Ga. 


MURRAY  BROTHERS,  INC. 

Distributors  of 
BORDEN'S  FINE  CHEESES 

and 

MRS.  FILBERT'S  MARGARINE 

and 

MAYONNAISE  PRODUCTS 

AUGUSTA,  GA. 


HOLIDAY  GREETINGS .... 

EVANS  BOX  &  (RATE  CO,  INC. 

W.  L.  NORRIS,  President 

Manufacturers  of 

Box  Spring  Frames,  Sofa  Boxes,  and 
All  Types  of  Wood  Bases  for  Furniture 

Box  82                                                        Dial  RE  3-0982 

EVANS,  GA. 

Buy  ClauSSen's  Bread,  the  Splendid  Bread! 


SPLENDID 
BECAUSE 


IT'S 
BLENDED. 


South' s  Finest  Since  1841 


HOLIDAY  GREETINGS .... 

SOUTHEASTERN 
Pine  Corporation 

PINE  .  .  .  HARDWOOD 
CYPRESS 

Dial  PA  6- 1 464  Sunset  Avenue 

Augusta,  Ga. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


"Service  That  Excels  At  Prices  That  Please" 

Seagos  Electric  Service 

ELECTRICAL  CONTRACTORS 
•  Commercial  •  Residential  •  Industrial 

Electrical  Appliances  Installed  —  Small  Appliances  Repaired 
Dial  RE  3-3631       423  Crawford  Avenue       Augusta,  Ga. 


Holiday  Greetings .... 


AUGUSTA  LUMBER  COMPANY 

Quality  Millwork  Since  1889 
Building  Materials 


903  8th  Street 


AUGUSTA,  GA. 


Dial  PA  2-1813 


RICHMOND  SUPPLY  (0. 

Mill  Supplies  &  Transmissions 
652  7th  Street  AUGUSTA,  GA.  Dial  PA  4-7792 


Charles  Trowbridge  Sheet  Metal  Co. 

ALL  TYPES  OF  SHEET  METAL  WORK 

•  COMMERCIAL         •  INDUSTRIAL         •  RESIDENTIAL 

Air-Confiitjpning  —  Duct  Work  —  Blow  Pipes  —  Skylights  —  Gutters 

Sjjauts  —  Hoodl*  . —  Ventilating  Systems  —  Roofing 
914  Fenwfcsk  Street  AUGUSTA,  GA.  Dial  PA  2-4091 


HARISON  -  GULLEY  CHEVROLET  CO. 

"Augusta's  O"'""  Authorized  Chevrolet  Dealer" 

SALES       ^^^0$^  SERVICE 

533  Broad  AUGUSTA,  GA.  Dial  PA  4-8224 


Guy  C.  Smith    —    General  Contractor 

"Established  1925" 
Commercial  —  Industrial 

Estimates  Freely  Given 

1355  Greene  St.  AUGUSTA,  GA.  Dial  2-7329 


CANS 


Mr.  Boh" 


M  &  M  Distributing  Company 


Dial  PA  2-8305 


347  Hale  Street 


Augusta,  Ga. 


AUGUSTA  MONUMENT  CO. 

JULE  W.  EA  VENSON 
GRANITE  —  MARBLE  MONUMENTS  —  MARKERS 
2064  Walton  Way  AUGUSTA,  GA.  Dial  RE  6-2595 


Advertising  Index 

Appalachian   Electric  Power  Co  2i 

Atlantis    Hotel     i 

Brick  &  Tile  Service     43  &  44 

Block-Southland    Sportswear,   Inc   i. 

Cobble  Brothers 

Machinery  Co   3ack  cover 

Colonial  Stores   Inside  front  cover 

Congress  of  Motor  Hotels   -  59 

Copel,  nd  &  Co   Back  covl- 

Crawl'ord  Hosiery 

Corporation    In-ic!e    tack  cove: 

Dromedary    42 

Home  Brewing  Company    7 

Industrial  Piping  Supply  Co    4  . 

Israel  Bond  Organization   .1„ 

Kline  Iron  &  Steel  Co   Back  cover 

'<"noxville  0nr>d  &  Gravel 

Company   _  Inside  back  cover 

Monarch  Elevator  &  Machine  Co  .52 

Pepsi  Cola 

Bottling  Co   Inside  front  cover 

Richmond   Dairy  Inside  front  cover 

Smith  Transfer 

Corporation    Inside  front  cover 

Sam  Solomon  Co  ..,     49 

Southern  Cast  Stone 

Company    .  _   Inside  back  cover 

Southern   Dairies   _  Back  cover 

Tennessee  Asphalt  Co.  Inside  back  cover 
Thompson    -  Arthur 

Paving  Co. 
United   Securities  Co. 
United  Waste  Material 


SOUTH  CAROLINA 


Charleston 


45-46 


Columbia  _   48-51 

Greenville   Z1S  "  ~  '  52-53 

Rock  Hill  ._  _   47 

Spartanburg      ..  54-55 

Sumter   _ 


TENNESSEE 


Chattanooga 
Knoxville  _.. 


Augusta 


GEORGIA 


VIRGINIA 


Charlottesville 

Danville    

Emporia   

Fredericksburg 

Hampton   

Harrisonburg 
Lynchburg 
Martinsville 
Newport  News 

Norfolk   

Petersburg   

Portsmouth   

Richmond   

Roanoke  

Salem    

Virginia  Beach 


47 


—  59-60 

 56-58 


  -  61-62 


.25 

27 

.12 
.25 

28-29 

25 

.  26-27 
27 
29 
28 
25 
28 

-11-17 
19-24 
19-24 
29 


 9 


bored.  The  judges  did  not  retire 
lor  long.  They  came  back  with 
the  same  verdict:  murder.  And 
unless,  after  some  years,  the  Presi- 
dent pardons  them,  Esther  and 
Saleh  will  spend  the  rest  of  their 
Jives  in  prison.  But  they  will  go 
down  in  the  history  of  Israeli 
crime  as  two  very  vicious  but 
very  original  murders. 


Obey  that  impulse! 
Buy  an  Israel  Bond! 


Inside  back  cover 
Inside  back  cover 

Co.    _.4i 

Venus  Slenderizing 

Salon    ..—  Inside  back  cover 

Helen  Whiting,  Inc.  Inside  back  cover 

NORTH  CAROLINA 

Asheville     42-43 

Charlotte     44 

Greensboro   _    30-38 

Winston-Salem  _    39-41 


•  Motor  Overhauls 
Frame  Straight- 
ening 

•  Brake  &  Ignition 

•  Wrecker  Service 

Use  Our  C  &  S  Charge 
Account  Service 

SATCHER'S 
AUTO  SERVICE 

1215  Reynolds       PA  2-0088 
AUGUSTA,  GA. 


McAULIFFE 
REALTY  CO. 

REAL  ESTATE— INSURANCE 
RENTING  —  SURETY  BONDS 
807  Broad  St.     Dial  PA  2-6086 
AUGUSTA,  GA. 


May  God  Grant 
You  Happiness 
Throughout  5720 


BLANCHE 
COTTON  MILLS 

AUGUSTA,  GA. 


Dixie  Beer  Distributors 

1111  Talcott  Ext. 

PA  2-7552 
AUGUSTA,  GA. 


MIDWESTERN 
Upholstering  Co. 

W.  C.  ARNOLD,  JR. 


Furniture  Refinishing 
All  Work  Guaranteed 

2034  Broad  St.       Dial  RE  6-2622 

AUGUSTA,  GA. 


Arnold  Marks  William  S.  Shrago 

Greensboro,  N.  C.  Rocky  Mount,  N.  C. 

Representing 

UNITED  SECURITIES  COMPANY 

Robert  B.  Dixon,  President 


8th  Floor 
Southeastern  Bldg. 


Dial  5-6476 


"Tap-Co"  Asphalt  Pavements 

MANUFACTURED  "HOT"  or  "COLD" 

USED  FOR 
Driveways  —  Parking  Lots  —  Roads 

For  Estimates  —  Call 

THOMPSON-ARTHUR 
PAVING  COMPANY 


GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 
Telephone  BR  2-2104 


DANVILLE,  VA. 
Telephone  3644 


Southern  

CAST  STONE 

COMPANY,  INCORPORATED 


SUTHERLAND  AVE. 
P.  0.  BOX  72 
DIAL  4-3352 


KNOXVILLE,  TENNESSEE 


ASPHALT  PAVING 

•  DRIVES 

•  PARKING  AREAS 

•  ROADS 

•  SUBDIVISIONS 

Dial  7-1633 

Tennessee  Asphalt  Co. 

Candora  Avenue 

Knoxville,  Tenn. 

"America's  Fastest  Selling  Junior  Dresses" 


Shown  In  The  South 

by  JAKE  CAUSEY 


Our  Salon  Offers: 

•  Mechanical  Massage 
•  Vibratory  Belts 

•  Passive  Exercise 

o  Voluntary  Exercise 

•  Vapor  Baths 


Courses  Designed 
For  You  

Free  Figure  Analysis 


For  Home  Use: 

•  Famous  Figurama 
Salon-At-Home 
Gently  Massages  and 
Reproportions  your  Figure 
in  the  privacy  of  your 
Home 

Phone  for  Demonstration 


Venus  Slenderizing  Salon 


Friendly  Shopping  Center 


Phone  BR  4-5778  or  BR  5-1878 


Knoxville  Sand  &  Gravel  Co. 

READY-MIX  CONCRETE 
SAND  -  GRAVEL  -  CEMENT 


Dial  3-2147  KNOXVILLE,  TENN. 


r>03  Blount  Ave 


Greetings 


CRAWFORD  HOSIERY  CORP. 

Manufacturers  of 
Misses'  Mor-Pul  Anklets  —  Men's  Cushion  Sole  Socks 

KERNERSVILLE,  N.  C. 


Cobble  Bros. 

Machinery  Co. 

Textile  Machinery 

•  GENERAL  MACHINE  WORK 
DESIGNING  —  REPAIRING 

e  MANV  UTURERS  OF  SPECIAL 
AT  Q^/l        'S'S  FOR  TEXTILE  MACHINERY 

*  YARDa^|0^        •  MACHINERY 


1  elephone 
OXford  8-348 


Riverside  Drive 


CHATTANOOGA,  TENN. 


Serving  the  Southeast  for  35  Years 

STRUCTURAL  STEEL 


DESIGNERS     •     FABRICATORS     •  ERECTORS 


KLINE 


IRON  &  STEEL  CO. 


Plain  and  Fabricated  Structural  Steel  and  Metal  Products  for  Buildings 

1225-35  Huger  Street        Columbia,  S.  C.  Dial  AL  4-0301 


MOTOROLA 
CAR  RADIO 


NOW  ONLY— 


installation,  aerial, 
■lightly  more 


SOUND  WON'T  FADE 

Motorola  Car  Radios  with  exclusive  Vol- 
umatic  won't  fade  out  under  bridges,  via- 
ducts or  among  tall  buildings. 


(OPELAND  &  COMPANY 

Wholesale  Distributors 
KNOXVILLE,  TENNESSEE 


Succah  at  Temple  Emanuel,  Greensboro,  N.  C. 

November  1959 


WOOD'S  LAWN 
GRASS  SEED 


Makes  Beautiful 
Lawns  .  .  . 

Nothing  adds  more  beauty  to  a 
home  than  a  lovely  lawn.  Plant 
WOOD'S  LAWN  GRASS  SEED 
for  a  lawn  that  stays  green  and 
beautiful  in  every  season  of  the 
year. 


WOOD'S  FALL  CATALOG— Get  Your  Copy  and  Learn  About  Best  Grass 


Seed,  Bulbs,  and  Other  Seed  for  Your  Property  Improvement  Plans. 


T.  W.  Wood  &  Sons 


)26  N.  Fifth  St. 


RICHMOND,  VIRGINIA 


VOTE  FOR 

l  McCarthy 
DOWNS,  JR. 

DEMOCRATIC  NOMINEE 
TO  BOARD  OF 

SUPERVISORS 


Tuckahoe  District  —  Henrico  County 
GENERAL  ELECTION 

Tuesday,  November  3,  1959 

For  a  representative  form  of  Government 
Thanks  for  your  Consideration 


Lafayette  Specialty 

Shish  Kebab  and  Pilaf 
Live  Maine  Lobsters 
From  Our 
Neptune  Tank 


WESTERN  CHARCOALED 
STEAKS  .  .  .  IMPORTED 
WINES  AND  CHAMPAGNE 
OUR  FAMOUS  LAFAY- 
ETTE SALAD  .  . 


Charcoal  Steak  and  Seafood* 
Mouse 


RECOMMENDED 


For  Reservations  Call  Williamsburg  CA  9-3811  —  CA  9-9045 


WE  HAVE  BEEN  SERVING  GOOD  FOOD  FOR  OVER  30  YEARS 


AIR-CONDITIONED 

MEMBER  DINERS  CLUB 


1203  RICHMOND  ROAD 
GOURMET 


HOME-MADE  PARFAIT  AND  PECAN  PIES 


VOLUME  XXV 


NOVEMBER  1959 


NUMBER  3 


V 


J 


EDITORIALS 


Chester  A.  Brown.  Editor 


Fttting  Retribution 

For  those  of  us  to  whom  the  memory  of  the  Hitler  holocaust 
is  still  a  poignant  ache,  any  news  that  would  seem  to  be  in  the 
nature  of  retribution  is  welcome  news. 

Such  an  item  comes  in  the  report  of  the  opening,  in  the 
latter  part  of  September,  of  a  new  Jewish  Community  Center 
in  the  city  of  Berlin. 

The  site  of  this  new,  ultra-modern  edifice  is  the  very  one 
on  which  stood  Berlin's  most  prominent  old  synagogue  before 
it  was  made  a  mass  of  ruins  by  Nazi  vandals  in  1938. 

Heinz  Galinsky,  leader  of  the  small  Berlin  Jewish  com- 
munity, referred  to  the  new  building  as  "a  monument  to  the 
many  innocent  victims  of  Nazi  persecution."  Said  Mr.  Galinsky. 
"The  building  on  these  blood-drenched  grounds  is  a  document 
of  a  new  spirit  in  Germany." 

We  are  certain  that  all  of  us  echo  the  sentiments  expressed 
by  Berlin's  mayor,  Willy  Brandt,  to  Mr.  Galinsky,  when  he 
presented  the  silver  key,  symbolic  of  the  opening,  at  the  dedi- 
cation ceremonies.  The  mayor  said,  "This  is  a  good  day  in  the 
life  of  our  city.  Let  us  hope  this  building  will  become  a  symbol 
of  tolerance." 

Interesting  Statistics 

The  United  States  Bureau  of  Population  Census  has  com- 
pleted a  survey  in  which  the  question,  "What  is  your  religion?" 
was  asked  of  35,000  householders  in  638  counties  and  cities  of 
the  country. 

An  abstract  of  this  survey  relating  to  Jews  has  been  made 
by  the  Union  of  American  Hebrew  Congregations.  It  reveals 
many  interesting  statistics.  Those  which  we  believe  will  be 
of  greatest  interest  to  our  readers  are  the  following: 

8  per  cent  of  the  Jews  in  the  country  live  in  the  south. 
This  contrasts  with  31  per  cent  of  the  total  population.  It  is  in 
sharp  contradiction  to  the  percentage  of  Jews  to  total  popu- 
lation in  our  area,  where  the  figure  runs,  in  many  communities, 
from  less  than  1  per  cent  to  not  more  than  3  per  cent. 

There  are  98,000  mixed  marriages  involving  Jews— 7  per 
-ent  as  against  22  per  cent  involving  Protestants  and  Catholics. 

In  mixed  marriages,  more  than  twice  as  many  raise  their 
children  in  the  religion  of  the  father  than  in  the  religion 
of  the  mother.  This  is  important  in  our  situation,  inasmuch 
as,  in  the  vast  majority  of  cases  of  mixed  marriages,  the  man 
is  the  Jew. 

Jews  are  over-represented  in  the  age  groups  over  44  years, 
and  under-represented  in  all  others. 

There  are  other  findings  of  perhaps  less  interest  to  us, 
yet  warranting  mention.  For  example:  Jews  are  declining  in 
absolute  numbers  and  relative  to  the  total  population,  and 
this  trend  appears  likely  to  continue  into  the  foreseeable 
future.    Catholics  and  Protestants,    particularly  the  former, 


are  gaining  population  rapidly.  And  another:  96  per  cent  of 
the  Jews  live  in  urban  areas;  only  64  per  cent  of  the  nation 
as  a  whole  does. 

While  these  statistics  are  unquestionably  authentic,  they 
may  not  coincide  with  our  individual  observation.  They  re- 
flect, of  course,  a  cross-section. 

To  our  way  of  thinking  the  figure  that  should  give  us  the 
greatest  concern  is  the  7  per  cent  representing  intermarriages 
involving  Jews.  How  serious  this  is  depends  on  the  individual 
viewpoint.  For  those  who  do  consider  it  important,  the  prob- 
lem becomes,  "What  can  be  done  about  it." 

Here  surely,  is  something  of  a  challenge  for  our  leaders 
and  thinkers.  We  would  be  happy  to  have  some  suggestions^ 


A  Conqueror  of  the  Negev 

For  hundreds  of  years,  Israel's  Negev  region  was  just  a 
blank  on  every  Biblical  map.  The  highest  authorities  believed 
that  the  southern  half  of  Israel  had  been  uninhabitable  during, 
most  of  history.  Now,  through  the  explorations  of  Dr.  Nelson 
Glueck,  president  of  Hebrew  Union  College— Jewish  Institute 
of  Religion  and  famed  Biblical  archaeologist,  the  map  is  being 
filled  in  and  the  historians  refuted.  In  a  thrilling  new  book, 
Rivers  in  the  Desert  (Farrar,  Straus  &  Cuday,  New  York,)- 
which  literally  makes  the  reader  see,  hear,  and  even  smell  the 
forces  of  history  at  work,  Dr.  Glueck  recounts  his  discoveries. 

Dr.  Glueck,  discoverer  of  King  Solomon's  copper  mines 
and  seaport  and  veteran  of  three  decades  of  archaeological 
study  in  the  Holy  Land,  made  his  discoveries  in  seven  seasons 
of  intensive  square-mile-by  square-mile  exploration  of  the 
Negev.  His  book  makes  fascinating,  dramatic  reading— as  in- 
teresting to  the  uninformed  layman  as  to  the  specialist.  Bible 
stories  come  to  vivid,  meaningful  life  as  he  relates  how,  using 
Scripture  as  a  guide,  he  traced  part  of  the  route  of  Exodus; 
discovered  the  tracks  that  Abraham  and  his  retinue  followed 
on  their  journey  from  Canaan  to  Egypt  and  back,  and  charted 
the  route  followed  by  the  caravans  of  the  Queen  of  Sheba  on 
the  trip  from  her  kingdom  in  Arabia  to  the  mountain  throne 
of  Solomon  in  Jerusalem.  Reading  history  in  pottery  fragments, 
he  located  Judaean  kingdom  villages  and  lortresses.  dating 
from  the  time  of  Solomon  to  the  6th  century  B.C.  when  Judah 
was  destroyed  by  the  Babylonians.  In  all.  some  400  ancient 
sites  were  discovered  and  restored  to  t lie  map  and  to  man's 
knowledge. 

Rivers  in  the  Desert  is  more  than  a  brilliant  and  exciting 
account  of  life  in  antiquity,  though  11  certainly  is  that.  It  is  also 
immensely  important. 

For  Christian  scholarship,  1  lie  book  opens  vast  new 
frontiers.  Henceforth,  no  one  (an  study  the  history  of  the 
church  or  the  spread  of  Christianity  without  examining  the 
impact  made  by  the  early  Byzantine  church  in  the  Negev  on 
the  religious,  economic  and  cultural  life  of  the  Byzantine 
empire. 

'Please  Turn  to  Page  19) 


The  American  Jewish  Times-Outlook,  published  morthlv  at  530  Sout^e'.stern  Building,  P.  O.  Box  1469,  Greensboro,  N.  C.  Chester  A.  Brown,  Editor;  David  Bernstein,  Pub- 
lisher- Nathan  Kessler  Manager,  Virginia  Office;  Florence  Byers.  Virginia  News  Editor;  Broad  Grace  Arcr.de,  P.  O.  Box  701,  Richmond,  Va.  Member  Seven  Arts 
Feature  Syndicate  Inc  $2.00  per  year  payable  in  advance.  Entered  as  Second-Class  Matter  ;;t  the  Post  Office  at  Greensboro,  N.  C,  under  Act  of  M'rch  5,  1879.  The 
vip-vs  exores  ed  by  contributors  are  not  necessarily  those  of  the  publishers,  but  may  be  publ-'shed  in  the  inter°~.t  of  freedom  of  the  press.  The  Amtr-can  Jewsh  Times- 
O i'  look  h  owned  and  e-litod  solelv  as  an  independent  enterprise  and  is  rot  a  Jewish  c">mmunit .-  1  ndertakin?. 


1 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


PLAIN  TALK 


Bv  ALFRED  SEGAL 


I  TAKE  A  WALK 

The  other  day  I  took  a  walk  up 
a  dying  street  which  long,  long  ago 
(that  is  to  say,  in  the  time  of  my 
remote  youth)  was  almost  all  Jew- 
ish. It  was  a  sort  of  memorial 


ALFRED  SEGAL 

stroll,  you  might  say.  We've  all  be- 
come so  much  richer  since  then 
but,  as  I  walked  along,  I  could  feel 
rich  enough  in  the  possession  of 
all  the  good  memories  that  crowd- 
ed around  me.  I  know  it  lovingly 
as  West  Sixth  Street  of  our  town. 

The  reason  I  took  the  walk  was 
that  I  had  met  an  elderly  friend 
who  was  looking  sad  .  .  .  "Segal," 
he  said,  "have  you  seen  what's  hap- 
pening to  our  street?" 

"What  do  you  mean  .  .  .  our 
.street?"  I  asked  him. 

"I  mean  Sixth  Street  .  .  .  your 
street  and  mine  in  that  good  old 
time  when  we  were  small  boys  and 
you  and  I  used  to  carry  live  chick- 
ens, for  our  mamas,  to  the  shochet 
on  Sixth  Street." 

"Yes,  the  shochet  charged  3  cents 
for  his  job  on  the  chicken,"  I  ex- 
claimed. "How  well  I  remember. 
The  shochet  did  his  job  in  the 
yard  back  of  Oscherowitz's  butcher 
shop;  he  gently  hung  the  dying 
chicken  on  the  fence  until  it  was 
dead  and  ready  for  our  Shabbos 
dinner  .  .  .  But  tell  me  what's  hap- 
pening to  Sixth  Street.  You  men- 
tioned that  so  sadly." 

"Well,"  he  replied,  "you  might 
say  it's  like  the  ancient  temple 
being  torn  down  ...  an  old,  old 
habitation  of  our  Jewish  life  being 


torn  down,  you  might  say  .  .  . 
wrecking  machines  tearing  down 
the  building  .  .  .  and  practically 
all  empty,  those  houses  which  are 
still  standing.  Dead  old  Sixth 
Street!  It  should  all  inspire  a  good 
column  for  you  to  cry  in  for  the 
good  past  of  our  youth  that's  all 
gone." 

So  I  said  to  my  friend  ...  he  is 
one  of  the  few  left  with  a  biblical 
name;  he's  Hezekiah  .  .  .  "Heze- 
kiah,  let's  take  a  walk  down  there 
together  on  our  dying  street." 

We  walked  slowly  through  this 
remnant  of  Jewish  life  that  had 
been  in  our  town  years  and  years 
ago  .  .  .  "Even  3  cents  for  schecht- 
ing  the  chicken  in  Oscherowitz's 
looked  like  big  money  then,"  he 
said. 

"Oh,"  I  exclaimed,  "how  well 
I  remember  thatl  How  tragic  it 
was  once  when  I  lost  the  3  cents 
on  the  way  with  the  chicken  to  the 
shochet  .  .  .  about  the  year  1890." 

"And  look  at  this  .  .  .  remember 
this?"  Hezekiah  asked.  We  had 
come  to  a  4-story  tenement  build- 
ing at  a  street  corner  .  .  .  "Remem- 
ber this  one?" 

"Sure,  Hezekiah,  that's  the  house 
that  was  called  Castle  Garden, 
though  the  tenants  pronounced  it 
Kessel  Garden  ...  in  memory  of 
the  place  at  the  Battery  of  New 
York  where  all  the  immigrants 
landed  in  those  days." 

Hezekiah  looked  up  lovingly  at 
the  old  house  .  .  .  "Yes,  right  here 
is  where  my  parents  lived  when 
they  came  over  ...  on  the  fourth 
floor,  in  two  rooms.  But  my  father 
came  in  time  to  have  a  house  of 
his  own.  In  those  two  rooms  my 
older  brothers  and  sister  were  born 
.  .  .  kids  out  of  the  4th  story  of 
this  tenement,  and  they  grew  up 
to  be  fine  people." 

We  went  on  .  .  .  "Know  this 
place?"  I  asked.  Sure,  Charek's 
grocery  was  here  .  .  .  Charek  fam- 
ous for  herring  .  .  .  herring  that 
tasted  as  good  as  the  herring  they 
had  eaten  in  Lithuania,  in  Poland, 
in  Russia  or  where  the  customers 
had  come  from  in  East  Europe. 

Hezekiah's  head  bowed.  He 
seems  to  be  thinking  a  prayer  of 
blessing  on  Mr.  Charek  .  .  .  "And 


Editorials     _      3 

Plain  Talk— Alfred  Segal      4 

The  Hero  In  Jewish  History — Dr.  Harry  Essrig     5 

Man  of  the  Month — Joseph  Mann     7 

VIRGINIA 

Newport  News — Mrs.  Martha  B.  Shapiro     6 

Richmond  B'nai  B'rith  Women — Betty  M.  Jaffee  6 

S.  W.  Virginia  B'nai  B'rith — Mrs.  Sidney  J.  Lenett  6 

Richmond  Beth  El  Sisterhood — Mrs.  Murray  H.  Lowenstein  „  14 

Suffolk — Mrs.  Larry  Ruden   14 

Richmond  B  &  P  Hadassah — Miss  Shirley  Goldstein   14 


NORTH  CAROLINA 

High  Point — Mrs.  Daniel  Lafferman   

Winston-Salem — Mrs.  Don  Mallins   


Charlotte  Temple  Beth  El — Mrs.  Maurice  Neiman 

Wallace   

Rocky  Mount — Mrs.  Louis  Wald   1  


 10 

 11 

 12 

 13 

 16 

Fayetteville     17 

Charlotte  Temple  Israel — Mrs   Jerry  Fisher  17 

Wilmington — Mrs.  Norma  May   18 

Whiteville — Mrs.  Martin  Bernstein   18 

Hickory— Phil  Datnoff   20 

Asheville — Mrs.  Gustav  Lichtenfels   22 

Kinston — Mrs.  Sol  Schechter   23 

Raleigh  Temple  Beth  Or— Mrs.  Harry  Caplan  26 

Raleigh  Beth  Meyer  Synagogue — Mrs.  Oscar  Legum  24 

Salisbury — Mrs.  S.  W.  Guyes   24 

Durham — Mrs.  Sam  Freedman   25 

Around  Greensboro — Mrs.  Richard  Forman  &  Mrs.  Daniel  Hollander  28 

Statesville — Mrs.  Miton  Sternberger   20 


SOUTH  CAROLINA 

Spartanburg — Mrs.  Stan  Treinis  and  Mrs.  Joel  Tannenbaum. 

Columbia — Mrs.  Bernard  Laden   

Charleston   


  8 

 8 

  9 

Anderson           16: 


TENNESSEE 


Chattanooga 


17 


THE  COVER 


Our  thanks  to  Walter  J.  Bernstein,  who  took  the  photograph  of 
Temple  Emanuel's  Succah. 


do  you  remember  that  house  across 
the  street?"  Hezekiah  asked. 

"Why  yes"  I  replied,  "there  they 
sold  t'fillim  and  mezuzahs  which 
were  on  every  forehead  there  and 
on  every  doorpost  in  this  neighbor- 
hood long  ago." 

"So  few  t'fillim  left  on  fore- 
heads these  days,"  Hezekiah  ob 
served,  clicking  his  tongue  sadly, 
"and  not  so  many  mezuzahs  on 
doorposts  either.  But  they  used  to 
do  a  good  business  with  t'fillim 
and  mezuzahs  in  that  store  those 
days.  By  the  way,  Segal,  do  t'fillim 
ever  get  on  your  forehead  nowa- 
days?" 

I  changed  the  subject  .  .  .  "Yes, 
it's  all  so  different  for  Jews  in 
these  times  .  .  .  maybe  much  better, 
too.  Long  ago,  the  Jews  moved 
away  from  Sixth  Street,  went  to 
places  in  town  where  grass  grows 
and  tulips  bloom  on  lawns  in  the 
springtime  and  their  houses  are  so 
lovely  .  .  ." 

Hezeikah  interrupted  .  .  .  "And 
look,  Segal,  in  this  here  house  1 


was  bar  mitzvah  ...  in  the  schul 
that  was  upstairs  on  the  second 
floor.' 

Hezekiah  and  I  walked  up  the 
rickety  stairway  to  the  big  room 
where  the  schul  once  was;  in  the 
recent  years  it  had  been  a  beer 
hall.  A  half  dozen  empty  beer  kegs 
stood  around  .  .  .  "That's  the  way 
it  goes,"  Hezekiah  murmured. 

But  now,  swinging  out  of  our 
sweet  memorial  mood,  I  spoke  up 
to  him.  "But  it's  all  for  the  better 
of  us  all  now,"  I  said.  "All  those 
lovely  synagogues  that  stand  in 
our  neighborhood  .  .  .  All  the  bet- 
ter living  we're  enjoying." 

"Yes,  better  living,"  mused  Heze- 
kiah, "but  is  it  better  life?" 

(I  should  have  explained:  The 
old  Sixth  Street  is  being  removed 
to  make  way  for  urban  renewal 
that  will  establish  a  wide  express- 
way which  will  get  us  faster  to 
where  we're  going.  But,  really, 
where  are  we  going  so  fast  .  .  . 
and  why?) 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


5 


The  Hero  In  Jewish 
History 

By  Dr.  Harry  Essrig 

In  this  article  the  author,  spiritual  leader  of  Temple  Emanuel  in  Grand 
Rapids,  Mich.,  and  chairman  of  the  Adult  Education  Committee  of  f)  e  Cen- 
tral Conference  of  American  Rabbis,  reviews  the  first  vol'im"  of  a  o-~-»t 
Book  Series  undertaken  by  the  adult  Jewish  education  program  of  B'nal 
B'rith.  The  Editor 


DR.    HARRY  ESSRIG 


The  Jewish  people  as  a  group 
hive  always  occupied  the  center 
of  die  stage  of  Jewish  history, 
iheir  trials  and  tribulations,  tri- 
umphs and  achievements,  serving 
as  the  main  burden  of  our  chroni- 
cles. Our  sense  of  community  and 
bonds  of  group  identity  may  have 
been  responsible  for  slighting  the 
sgreat  heroes  of  our  past.  Perhaps 
this  attitude  is  also  rooted  in  Jew- 
ish reluctance  to  exalt  the  role  of 
the  individual  as  against  the  group 
?nd  its  tradition.  Unlike  other 
faiths,  Judaism  resulted  from  the 
creative  forces  of  the  entire  people. 
Hence  no  single  individual  or 
-■roup  of  individuals  is  enshrined 
above  others.  No  one  great  figure 
is  indispensable  in  Judaism. 

And  yet  we  ought  not  lose  sierht 
of  the  great  personalities  who 
helped  shape  the  course  of  Jewish 
history,  who  left  the  deep  impact 
of  their  genius  on  the  centuries, 
and  who  gave  form  and  structure 
to  our  faith  and  culture. 

To  help  bring  this  aspect  of 
Jewish  history  into  clearer  per- 
spective for  the  average  adult  is 
(he  goal  of  the  first  volume  of  the 
B'nai  B'rith  Great  Books  Series. 
Great.  Jewish  Personalities  in  An- 
cient and  Medieval  Times,  edited 
bv  Dr.  Simon  Noveck,  B'nai  B'rith 
director  of  adult  Jewish  education 
treats  the  life  and  thought  of  a 
dozen  great  men  from  the  time  of 
Moses  through  the  Vilna  Gaon. 
The  first  of  a  five-volume  series,  it 
will  appear  early  in  November 
(Farrar,  Straus  and  Cudahy;  368 
pages;  $4.95).  The  entire  kaleido- 
scope of  25  centuries  of  Jewish 
experience  is  illuminated  by 
means  of  vivid  portraits  of  proph- 
ets, scribes,  sages,  philosophers, 
poets  and  mystics  —  all  of  whom 
helped  weave  the  tapestry  of  Juda- 
ism. 


The  book  is  divided  into  two 
sections.  The  first  begins  with  the 
classical  age  of  Judaism  and  con- 
cludes with  the  completion  of  the 
Talmud  in  the  fifth  century  of  the 
Common  Era.  Over  a  stretch  of  17 
centuries,  there  pass  in  review  the 
commanding  figures  of  the  pro- 
phetic age,  the  Hellenistic  and 
Rabbinic  eras  —  the  men  who  gave 
wing  to  the  Jewish  vision. 

Moses  emerges  against  the  back- 
ground of  modern  archeological 
discoveries  as  an  authentic  person- 
ality and  the  most  creative  genius 
in  the  formulation  of  the  mono- 
theistic view  for  mankind  and  not 
as  a  mere  borrower  from  Ikhna- 
lon  of  Egypt.  He  appears  in  full 
splendor  as  the  historic  founder 
ol  our  faith  and  the  architect  of 
our  national  destiny. 

The  scene  then  shifts  to  David, 
the  poet-warrior,  who  established 
the  kingdom  and  made  Jerusalem 
the  political  center  of  the  new 
nation.  Next  comes  a  chapter  on 
Jeremiah,  the  best  known  of  the 
Hebrew  prophets  as  a  personality. 
His  was  a  time  of  paradox:  the 
rise  and  fall  of  the  First  Common- 
wealth, accompanied  by  the  emer- 
gence of  the  Hebrew  prophets 
who  saved  Judaism  at  its  most 
critical  juncture.  It  was  an  unpre- 
cedented historical  phenomenon 
that  the  national  cataclysm  of 
Israel  led  not  to  extinction  but  in- 
stead to  a  resurgence  of  its  moral 
grandeur. 

While  the  genius  of  our  people 
(lowered  in  the  land  of  Israel,  the 
Diaspora  at  all  times  played  a 
significant  role.  Likewise,  our  faith 
did  not  lead  a  cacoon  existence, 
sheltered  from  the  cultural  and 
spiritual  forces  of  its  environment. 
As  a  lasting  testimonial  to  the 
resilience  of  Tudaism,  we  have  the 
writings  of  Philo  of  Alexandria, 


who  preserved  Jewish  values  in  a 
Gentile  world.  He  blended  the 
Jewish  and  Greek  traditions  of 
thought  and  withal  remained  a 
loyal  Jew. 

The  great  classical  era  of  Juda- 
ism is  climaxed  with  the  masterlv 
compendium  of  the  Talmud,  pri- 
marily the  contribution  of  Baby- 
lonian Jewry.  Akiba,  the  sage  and 
martyr,  symbolizes  the  vast  erudi- 
tion that  had  accumulated  among 
the  learned  and  the  growing  need 
to  arrange  the  legal  heritage  into 
a  patterned  whole.  By  the  end  of 
the  fifth  century  CE,  Judaism's 
foundations  were  firmly  laid.  The 
Torah.  the  prophetic  writings,  the 
Hellenistic  literature  and  the  Tal- 
mud had  permanently  established 
the  contours  of  our  faith.  Later 
generations  were  merely  to  inter- 
pret, adapt  and  sometimes  modifv 
the  original  formulations.  But  ii 
was  to  the  ideas  and  institu' ;ons 
of  Akiba's  period  that  Jews  hence- 
forth looked  for  guidance  and  in- 
spiration. 

In  the  hands  of  Harry  M.  Or- 
linskv,  Mortimer  J.  Cohen.  Erwin 
R.  Goodenough,  and  Louis  Fin- 
kelstein.  and  other  distinguished 
.scholars,  these  personalities  com  ■ 
to  life,  brimming  with  vigor  and 
vitality.  The  essays  are  written  in 
a  popular,  non-technical  style,  and 
ate  woven  together  by  means  of 
historical  "bridges"  or  introduc- 
tions, written  by  Dr.  Noveck, 
which  continue  the  thread  of  the 
narrative.  Thus  the  reader  is  able 
to  see  the  entire  panorama  of 
Jewish  history  while  focusing  his 
primary  attention  on  the  great 
men  of  the  past. 

The  second  part  of  the  volume 
is  concerned  with  Jewish  heroes 
of  the  Middle  Apes,  which  for 
our  people  extended  through  the 
18th  century.  The  area  and  scope 


ol  activity  now  widen  as  the  Jew- 
ish people  move  beyond  the  con- 
fines of  the  Oriental  world.  Baby- 
lonia and  Spain,  France  and  East- 
ern Europe  provide  the  back- 
ground for  achievements  in  poe 
try,  philosophy,  mysticism,  and 
other  aspects  of  Jewish  learning. 

We  are  first  introduced  to  Saadia 
Gaon,  "the  father  of  Jewish  philos- 
ophy," who  helped  Judaism  over- 
come the  challenge  of  Greek  philos- 
ophy in  Arabic  garb  as  well  as 
that  of  the  dissident  Karaitic  sect. 
He  was  the  first  to  develop  inte'- 
lectual  tools  such  as  dictionaries, 
grammars,  commentaries,  for  the 
understanding  of  the  tradition. 
Judaism  was  thus  enabled  to  re- 
tain its  meaningfulness  in  a  dy- 
namic cultural  milieu. 

In  the  11th  century  lived  the 
teacher  Rashi,  to  this  day  studied 
and  esteemed  as  the  author  of  the 
finest  commentary  on  the  Bible 
and  the  Talmud.  Rashi  raised 
the  function  of  teaching  to  a  high 
level  and  made  the  Torah  acces 
sible  to  the  masses.  He  thus  pro- 
vided the  key  to  what  might  have 
become  the  sealed  pages  of  oui 
heritage. 

At  approximately  the  same  time, 
the  Golden  Age  of  Spain  flourish- 
ed. Its  poet  laureate,  Judah  Hal- 
evi,  made  himself  the  troubador 
of  God  and  Israel,  and  waged  the 
polemic  defense  of  his  faith. 

The  persistent  struggle  to  rec- 
oncile Judaism  with  contempo- 
rary philosophy  and  to  solve  the 
conflict  of  religion  and  reason 
reached  its  apex  in  the  works  of 
Maimonides.  This  multi-faceted 
spiritual  leader  towered  over  all 
of  medieval  Jewry  and  left  a  deep 
imprint  on  the  larger  Christian 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  15) 


6 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Newport  News,  Va. 

MRS.  MARTHA  B.  SHAPIRO,  Correspondent 


The  last  of  the  outdoor  dances  given  weekly  by  the  Teen  Council  of 
the  Jewish  Community  Center,  Newport  News,  Virginia.  Music  was  furnish- 
ed by  the  Steve  Conn  combo. 


The  Jewish  Communty  Center 
Kindergarten  P.T.A.  held  its  first 
meeting  last  month  and  the  teach- 
ers in  charge,  Mrs.  Charles  Olshan- 
sky  and  Mrs.  Allan  Schwartzman, 
outlined  the  school's  program.  Mrs. 
Jack  Chonoles  and  Mrs.  Daniel 
Schliefer  were  appointed  the  class 
mothers.  The  children  attending 
Kindergarten:  Stephen  Chonoles, 
.Stephen  Cooper,  Steven  Friedman, 
Mark  Goldberg,  Mark  Gordon, 
Rebecca  Gregg,  Joey  Halperin, 
Jonathan  Lerner,  Nancy  Levin 
Jean  Ann  Mirmelstein  Dorothy  Dee 
Morewitz,  Stuart  Morewitz,  Marc 
Alan  Petock,  Susan  Posner,  Suzanne 
Richman,  Nettie  Rosenbaum, 
Harry  Saville,  Norman  Saville, 
Jackie  Schleifer,  Jay  Spector  and 
Laurie  Spector. 

Mr.  Morton  Spigel,  Program 
chairman  of  the  Jewish  Community 
Center,  has  announced  the  appoint- 
ment of  advisors  and  volunteers 
for  the  1959-60  season. 

Judean  Girls,  10  and  11  years, 
Mrs.  Sam  Gordon,    Mrs.  Marian 


Minkotf,  and  Miss  Nancy  Gordon; 
T.G.T.  Girls,  12  and  13  years,  Mrs. 
Jack  Chonoles,  Mrs.  Eugene  Litt- 
win,  and  Miss  Shirley  Neihouse; 
B'nai  B'rith  Girls,  Mrs.  Walter 
Segaloff;  Lt.  I.  E.  Nachman  Chap- 
ter A.Z.A.,  Mr.  Hy  Rosenwasser; 
Boys  -  1 1  and  1 2  years,  Herbert 
Silverman  and  Teddy  Sandler;  Boy 
Scouts,  Herbert  Bluestone,  Scout- 
master, and  Eagle  Scouts,,  Joe 
Frank  and  Steve  Conn;  Cub  Scouts, 
Alan  Workman  and  David  Ruben, 
Cubmasters;  Basketball  for  9  and 
10  year  boys,  Marvin  Posner,  and 
Robert  Soefer;  Basketball  for  1 1 
and  12  year  boys,  Harold  Richman; 
Basketball  for  13  to  15  year  boys, 
Stuart  Peltz;  Basketball  coach  — 
A.Z.A.,  Buddy  Levin;  Teen-Age 
Council,  Mrs.  Emanuel  Greenspon 
and  Mr.  Leroy  Spigel. 

Mrs.  Sol  Silverman  is  serving  as 
assistant  program  chairman. 

Heartiest  congratulations  to  the 
following  boys  on  the  occasion  of 
their  Bar  Mitzvah: 

Allen  Farber,  son  of  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Irving  Farber;  Arnold  Farber, 


son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Barney  Farber;  son  of  Mr.  Larry  Klein;  Michael 
Chester  Goldstein,  son  of  Mr.  and  Hirshman,  son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Mrs.  Irving  Goldstein;  Steven  Klein     Ira  Hirshman. 


Richmond  B'nai  B'rith  Women 

BETTY  A.  JAFFEE,  Correspondent 


We  have  proven  to  ourselves  that 
when  women  work  together  for 
any  given  project,  they  can  accom- 
plish wonders.  Our  annual  Donor 
Luncheon  is  a  case  in  point.  Not 
only  did  we  have  a  splendid  turn- 
out, but  donations  were  promised 
l)y  many,  many  other  members  who 
were  unable  to  attend  the  lunch- 
con.  Our  heartfelt  thanks  to  those 
1  Members  who  so  generously  pledg- 
ed their  donations,  and  especially 
to  the  chairman  of  the  Donor 
Luncheon,  Mrs.  Allan  Mullian,  and 
her  co-chairman,  Mrs.  Fred  Bisger, 
as  well  as  their  splendid  commit- 
tee, who  gave  so  much  of  their 
time  and  effort. 

The  many  members  who  did  at- 
tend the  luncheon  on  September 


23rd  enjoyed  a  most  delicious  meal 
in  Thalhimer's  Auditorium  as  well 
as  a  most  up-to-date  showing  of  the 
fall  fashions  by  Thalhimer's  own 
models.  If  this  affair  is  any  indi- 
cation (and  why  not?),  B'nai  B'rith 
Women  are  in  for  a  great  season. 

On  Thursday,  November  19, 
1959,  there  will  be  a  chance  for  the 
ladies  of  B'nai  B'rith  Women  to 
relax  in  the  pleasant  atmosphere  of 
the  Oak  Hill  Country  Club  -and 
get  to  know  each  other  better.  A 
delicious  $2  luncheon  will  begin  at 
noon  to  be  followed  by  an  after- 
noon of  Mah  Jong  and  cards.  Mrs. 
Ester  Fine  is  the  chairman  of  this 
affair,  assisted  by  Mrs.  Hyman  Hy- 
man  and  Mrs.  Leo  Levine. 


Southwest  Virginia  B'nai  B'rith 

MRS.  SIDNEY  LENETT,  Correspondent 


Mr.  H.  L.  Green,  a  charter  mem- 
ber of  the  Men's  Lodge,  retired 
recently  from  his  position  as  man- 
ager of  the  Harwood  Manufactur- 
ing Co.  in  Maron,  Va.  Mr.  Green 
was  honored  at  a  banquet  given 
by  the  Marion  Chamber  of  Com- 
merce, for  his  many  years  of  ser- 
vice both  at  Harwood  and  in  Mar- 
ion. He  is  now  living  near  his 
daughter  in  Los  Gatos,  California. 
Before  Mr.  Green  left,  he  donated 
his  set  of  Jewish  Encyclopedias  to 
the  Hillel  at  V.P.I,  in  Blacksburg, 
Va. 

A  number  of  our  children  have 
gone  away  to  college-among  them: 

Miss  Elaine  Sherman  who  is  at 
Woman's  College  in  Greensboro, 
N.  C. 


Sanford  Goldstein  —  who  is  at 
Columbian  College  in  Washington, 
D.  C. 

Bernard  Goldstein  —  who  is  at 
William  and  Mary,  Williamsburg, 

Va. 

Mr.  Arthur  Centor  is  teaching  a 
group  of  our  youngsters  Hebrew, 
in  order  to  prepare  them  for  their 
Bar-Mitzvah  and  Bas-Mitzvah. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Arthur  and  chil- 
dren of  Marion,  Va.  spent  Rosh- 
Hashonah  week-end  with  Dr.  and 
Mrs.  Ernest  Blumenberg  at  their 
new  home  in  Salisbury,  N.  C. 

Mrs.  Sam  Evens  of  Pulaski  visited 
with  her  daughter  and  son-in-law 
Dr.  and  Mrs.  Joel  Levy  at  Colum- 
bia, S.  C.  Mrs.  Levy  is  the  president 
of  the'  B'nai  B'rith  Women  of 
Columbia. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


7 


Man  of  the  Month 

Joseph  S.  Mann 

Whiteville,  N.  C. 


Joseph  Simon  Mann  arrived  in 
New  York  in  1913  at  the  age  of 
16,  from  Kretinga,  Lithuania,  near 
the  German  border,  with  $23  in 
his  pocket.  He  sent  $20  of  the  mon- 
ey back  to  his  parents,  as  he  knew 
they  needed  it,  and  then  set  out  to 
find  a  job.  With  Mazel  he  got  a  job 
in  a  butcher  shop  and  made  $1.50 
lor  the  three  days  he  worked  there, 
and  was  allowed  to  sleep  in  back 
pf  the  shop.  His  work  there  started 
at  4:00  a.  m. 

Joe  decided  he  was  going  to  fin- 
ish his  schooling,  so  he  got  another 
job  as  an  apprentice  in  a  jewelry 
factory  and  entered  night  school. 
He  changed  jobs  again,  each  time 
increasing  his  earnings  and  became 
a  men's  clothing  salesman  in  a 
wholesale  house. 

At  the  outbreak  of  World  War 
I,  he  enlisted  and  was  sent  to 
France  with  the  American  Expedi- 
tionary Forces,  and  in  August  of 
1919  was  discharged  with  the  rank 
of  first  sergeant. 

He  returned  to  his  job  of  cloth- 
ing salesman,  but  he  had  gotten 
the  urge  to  go  south.  In  November, 
1  (jig,  he  packed  his  trunk  and  came 
10  Wallace,  North  Carolina,  where 
he  stayed  one  month.  From  there 
he  moved  to  Burgaw,  North  Caro- 
lina, where  he  was  made  manager 
of  the  store  of  H.  Margolis  &  Broth- 
ers. Here  he  met  Lillie  Margolis  of 
Baltimore,  Maryland,  and  in  June, 
1920,  they  were  married.  By  this 
time  Mr.  Mann  had  bought  part 
interest  in  the  Margolis  store.  After 
their  first  child,  Beatrice,  was  born, 
they  moved  to  Whiteville,  North 
Carolina  in  1922,  where  he  was  in 
charge  of  the  business  of  Margolis- 
Mann,  &  Kramer,  known  as  the  One 
Price  Store.  Here  his  other  two 
children  were  born,  a  son,  Sol,  and 
another  daughter,  Etta  Rose. 

In  the  early  1920's  he  brought 
his  brother,  Israel,  to  Burgaw  from 
Europe,  and  in  1924,  another  broth- 
er, Irving,  was  brought  over.  Mr. 
Mann  helped  each  one  to  get  start- 
ed in  business  and  Israel  and  his 


family  now  live  in  Raeford,  North 
Carolina,  and  Irving  and  his  family 
are  in  Elizabethtown,  North  Caro- 
lina. In  1935  he  went  to  Lithuania 
to  bring  back  his  widowed  mother, 
and  set  her  up  in  an  apartment  in 
New  York  City  where  her  sister 
was  living. 

In  1928  he  bought  out  his  part- 
ners, and  the  store  became  known 
as  J.  S.  Mann's  Department  Store. 
Another  store,  The  Family  Shoe 
Store,  was  opened  in  Whiteville  in 
1954,  and  this  is  under  the  manage- 
ment of  his  son-in-law,  Si  Stein- 
berg, Beatrice's  husband.  The  de- 
partment store  is  now  managed  by 
Mr.  Mann's  son,  Sol. 

During  World  War  II,  Mr.  Mann 
was  one  of  the  most  active  people 
in  Columbus  County.  He  was  ap- 
pointed chairman  of  the  first  USO 
financial  drive  in  Whiteville  and 
received  a  citation  from  the  nation- 
al chairman,  Thomas  Dewey,  for- 
mer governor  of  New  York  state, 
for  surpassing  the  quota.  He  was 
also  area  supervisor  of  the  Aircraft 
Warning  Recognition  Army  Air 
Corps  from  1941  until  1944,  where 
he  served  as  a  volunteer  worker. 

Giving  charity  has  always  been  a 
very  important  thing  in  Joe  Mann's 
life.  Many  times  during  the  de- 
pression years  of  the  1930's,  he 
borrowed  money  from  the  bank  in 
order  to  keep  up  his  charity  con- 
tributions. His  checks  have  been 
sent  to  orphanages,  hospitals,  rab- 
binical colleges,  Yeshivas,  etc.  He 
has  also  given  to  many  non-  Jewish 
fund-raising  drives,  as  well  as  help 
raise  the  funds. 

He  has  for  many  years  worked 
with  the  United  Palestine  Appeal 
financial  drives,  and  now  helps  the 
United  Jewish  Appeal. 

In  1950,  just  a  few  days  before 
their  30th  anniversary,  Mr.  Mann's 
wife  passed  away.  In  Decembei, 
1951,  Mr.  Mann  remarried,  to  Mrs. 
Celia  Cooley  Patla  of  Henderson- 
ville,  North  Carolina.  His  youngest 
daughter  is  married  to  Stanley  Solo- 
mon of  Atlanta,  Georgia.  He  now 
has  eight  grandchildren 


JOSEPH  S.  MANN 


For  the  past  thirty  years  Mr. 
Mann  has  been  a  member  of  the 
B'nai  Israel  Congregation  in  Wil- 
mington, North  Carolina,  and  for 
many  years  served  as  a  member  of 
their  board. 

Recently  the  Whiteville  Hebrew 
Congregation  completed  a  new  cen- 
ter, of  which  Mr.  Mann  is  presi- 
dent. Mr.  Mann  was  instrumental 
in  securing  the  lot  for  the  center 
and  inspiring  the  community  to  go 
forward.  Services  are  held  on  Fri- 
day night  with  Mr  Mann  officiat- 
ing. 

Mr.  Mann's  hobby  is  singing.  His 
voice  has  been  heard  and  is  known 
in  almost  all  towns  of  North  and 
South  Carolina,  and  now  part  of 
Virginia.  He  has  been  conducting 
the  services  for  the  High  Floly  Days 
for  the  past  25  years  at  Dillon,  S. 
C,  Hendersonville  and  Weldon,  N. 
C,  and  this  year  in  Williamsburg, 
Va. 

Mr.  Mann  is  a  charter  member 
of  the  Whiteville  Rotary  Club, 
which  was  organized  35  years  ago, 
and  served  as  president  in  1946-47. 
He  is  a  charter  member  of  the  Vet- 
erans of  Foreign  Wars  and  a  mem- 
ber of  the  American  Legion  of 
Whiteville.  In  the  Legion  he  has 
been  a  very  active  member,  serving 
as  Commander  of  the  Whiteville 
Post,  and  various  other  offices.  He 


has  also  been  District  Commander 
and  Department  Vice-Commander 
in  1951,  and  received  a  beautiful 
trophy  for  his  outstanding  work 
that  year.  Mr.  Mann  is  now  De- 
partment Chairman  of  the  Boy 
Scout  Committee  in  the  American 
Legion. 

For  the  past  25  years  he  has  been 
an  active  Scouter,  and  served  as 
Commissioner  of  the  Cape  Fear 
Area  Council,  Boy  Scouts  of  Amer- 
ica .In  1949  he  received  the  Silver 
Beaver,  one  of  the  highest  honors 
in  Boy  Scout  work.  At  the  present 
time  he  is  serving  as  executive 
board  member  of  the  Cape  Fear 
Area  Council,  and  is  on  the  nation- 
al council  representing  the  Cape 
Fear  area. 

Mr.  Mann  has  for  many  years 
been  a  Mason  and  a  Shriner.  For 
the  past  seven  years  he  has  been 
Columbus  County  chairman  of  the 
financial  drive  for  the  North  Caro- 
lina Cancer  Society,  and  is  a  mem- 
ber of  the  North  Carolina  Cancer 
Institute. 

He  is  a  member  of  the  North 
Carolina  Association  of  Jewish 
Men,  and  a  member  of  their  execu- 
tive board.  For  the  past  ten  years 
he  has  attended  the  B'nai  B'rith 
Institute  of  Judaism  at  Wildacres, 
Little  Switzerland,  N.  C.  He  is  a 
member  of  the  B'nai  B'rith  and  the 
Zionist  organizations. 


0 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Spartanburg,  S.  C. 

MRS.  STAN  TREINIS  and  MRS.  JOEL  TANNENBAUM,  Correspondents 


was  held  Yom  Kippur  night.  Host-  Mrs.  Abe  (Pauline)  Smith,  Mrs. 
esses  for  the  evening  were  Mrs.  Joel  Max  (Sharon  Massey,  and  Mrs. 
(Rose)     Tanenbaum,     chairman;     Mike  (Jeanne)  Primost. 

Columbia,  S.  C. 

MRS.  BERNARD  LADEN,  Correspondent 


Kir.  ana  Mrs.  Harry  Tannenbaum  with  the  Torah  which  they  presented 
to  S  ;e  Spartanburg  Synagogue. 


We  want  to  express  our  deepest 
thanks  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Harry 
Tannenbaum  for  the  beautiful  To- 
rah ihey  presented  to  the  Temple 
last  mouth  in  memory  of  Fishel 
and  Gussie  Levy,  parents  of  Mrs. 
Tannenbaum.  It  was  without  a 
doubt  a  most  useful  gift  and  will  be 
cherished  by  all  who  use  it. 

The  first  Brotherhood  Dinner  of 
the  New  Year  will  be  held  on  Wed- 
nesday, November  4th,  at  the  Cen- 
ter. The  hostesses  preparing  the  de- 
licious dinner  will  be  Mrs.  Harry 


(Pearl)  Tanenbaum,  chairman; 
Mrs.  Earl  (Thelma)  Yoffe,  Mrs. 
Joel  (Rose)  Tanenbaum,  Mrs. 
Ralph  (Selma)  Tanenbaum,  Mrs. 
Abe  (Pauline)  Smith,  Mrs.  Stan 
(Toby)  Treinis,  Mrs.  Sylvan  (Dot- 
tie)  Cohen,  and  Mrs.  Lou  (Eve) 
Geller. 

Mrs.  Selma  Steinberg  of  Louis- 
ville, Ky.,  visited  her  son  and  his 
family,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jack  Stein- 
berg, last  month.  We  all  enjoyed 
her  visit  and  hope  she  comes  back. 

Sisterhood's  monthly  card  party 


The  Daughters  of  Israel  held 
their  first  meeting  of  the  year  in 
the  form  of  a  tea  Wednesday,  Sep- 
tember 16th  at  2  P.  M.  at  the 
House  of  Peace  Social  Hall.  The 
tea  honored  Mrs.  Abraham  Herson 
and  the  new  members  of  the  club. 

After  a  short  business  meeting, 
an  original  fashion  parade  of  hats 
was  held.  The  members  of  the 
Eoard  were  on  the  program  and 
each  hat  protrayed  the  positions 
and  offices  held  by  the  members. 

The  tea  was  in  charge  of  Mrs. 
Ernest  Koolkin  and  Mrs.  Sol  Silver. 
Mrs.  A.  M.  Lourie  and  Mrs.  Her- 
man Loewe  were  program  chair- 
men. In  the  receiving  line  were: 
Mrs.  Ted  Solomon,  President,  Mrs. 
Bernard  Kline,  hospitality  chair- 
man, Mrs.  Herson,  Mrs.  Melton 
Kligman,  vice  president,  Mrs.  Ed- 
win Coplan,  treasurer,  Mrs.  Henry 
Stern,  corresponding  secretary  and 
Mrs.  Ernest  Koolkin,  2nd  vice  pres- 
ident, and  Mrs.  Emil  Gross,  record- 
ing secretary. 

The  first  Hadassah  meeting  of 
the  new  season  was  held  Wednes- 
day, September  9th  at  the  Colum- 
bia Jewish  Center.  This  meeting 
was  a  membership  tea  sponsored 
by  the  Board  and  officers  of  Had- 
assah to  honor  new  members. 

A  skit  called  "Hadassah's  Fair 
Lady"  was  presented  by  Mrs.  Mar- 
shall Katz,  program  chairman  and 
her  committee;  Mrs.  Lee  Baker  and 
Mrs.  Harold  Kline. 

The  B'nai  B'rith  Membership 
Tea  was  held  at  the  Columbia  Jew- 
ish Center  on  Sept.  2.  A  musicial 
program  entitled  "The  Thirty  Min- 
ute Hour"  written  bv  Mrs.  Boris 


Gertz  was  presented.  The  play  was 
;  Lake  off  on  the  psychiatric  value 
of  B'nai  B'rith.  Mrs.  Steven  Mendel 
directed  the  play  and  Mrs.  Max 
Reevli  e  was  in  charge  of  the  music  . 

The  invocation  was  read  by  Mrs. 
David  Gruber  and  the  benediction 
was  read  by  Mrs.  Abraham  Herson. 

The  B'nai  B'rith  women  had  a 
coke  party  and  barbecue  at  the 
home  of  Mrs.  David  Wiener  for 
the  children  of  the  intermediate 
and  senior  group  of  the  Carolina 
Orphan  Home  on  September  16th. 
60  children  were  entertained  by  the 
Rambling  Rebels,  Buck  Bushel, 
Larry  Broom  and  Buddy  Hendricks. 
The  manager  of  the  Rambling 
Rebels  arranged  a  program  through 
the  courtesy  of  the  Carolina  Enter- 
tainment Bureau. 

The  members  of  B'nai  B'rith 
received    the    guests    and  helped 

serve. 

Thomas  Brownlee,  executive  di- 
rector of  the  Columbia  Chamber  of 
Commerce  was  the  guest.  Melton 
Kligman,  president  called  to  order 
a  short  business  meeting  prior  to 
the  program  and  refreshments  were 
served  afterwards. 

Bernard  Kline,  president  of 
Kline  Iron  and  Steel  Company, 
will  be  among  the  60  Americans 
flying  from  New  York  on  October 
16th  for  a  10-day  overseas  study 
tour  of  Radio  Free  Europe's 
broadcasting  facilities. 

Bernard  is  S.  C.  State  chairman 
for  the  Crusade  for  Freedom,  which 
sponsors  the  trip.  Members  of  the 
group  will  be  thoroughly  briefed 
on  all  RFE  operations  and  will 
study  the  network's  headquarters 
and  the  installations  in  Munich, 
Germany.  One  day  will  be  spent 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


9 


at  the  West  German-Czechoslovak 
border  studying  a  segment  of  the 
deadly  Iron  Curtain.  The  itinerary 
includes  visits  to  SHAPE  head- 
quarters outside  Paris  for  intensive 
briefings  on  the  European  defense 
program  and  to  Portugal  for  a  day's 
inspection  of  RFE's  shortwave 
transmitter  plant  near  Lisbon. 

Congratulations  to  Mr.  &  Mrs. 
Edward  Zahler  on  the  engagement 
of  Miss  Lois  Majorie  Schwadron 
of  Miami,  Florida  and  New  York 
City  to  their  son,  Dr.  Sanford 
Zahler.  The  Zahler 's  entertained 
at  a  lovely  reception  at  the  Center 


on  August  29th  in  their  honor. 
The  wedding  will  take  place  in 
November. 

Among  those  installed  as  Student 
Council  Representatives  of  Dreher 
High  School  recently  were:  Hyman 
Rubin  and  Joel  Gottlieb. 

Mrs.  Ruth  Gottlieb  was  elected 
treasurer  of  the  Players  Club  re- 
cently. 

Funeral  services  for  George 
Levkoff,  79,  former  Columbia 
businessman,  were  held  from  the 
Dunbar  Funeral  Home,  conducted 
by  Rabbi  David  Gruber  and  Rabbi 
David  Karesh.  Interment  was  in 


the  Hebrew  Benevolent  Society 
Cemetery. 

Mr.  Levkoff  died  at  the  home 
of  his  daughter,  Mrs.  Sylvan  Rosen. 
Three  sons  survive  Irvin  Levkoff 
of  Charleston,  Milton  Levkoff  of 
Columbia  and  Melvin  Levkoff  of 
Donaldson,  Tenn.,  a  brother,  David 
Levkoff  of  New  York  City,  a  sister 
Mrs.  Ricka  Wolfner  of  Detroit; 
13  grandchildren,  3  great  grand- 
children and  a  number  of  nieces 
and  nephews. 


Obey  that  impulse! 
Buy  an  Israel  Bond! 


Charleston,  S«  €» 

MAZELTOV 

Isaac  and  Ruth  Jacobs,  20  Tarle- 
ton  Dr.  are  happy  to  announce  the 
arrival  of  their  twin  daughters. 
Sharon  and  Naomi  born  October 
nth. 

Miss  Joan  Deborah  Goldberg 
and  Arthur  I.  Sarnoff  plan  to  be 
married  in  January. 

Their  engagement  has  been  an 
nounced  by  Miss  Goldberg's  par- 
ents, Mr.  and  Mrs.  Nathan  Gold- 
berg, Mr.  Sarnoff  is  the  son  of 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Irving  Sarnoff  of  New 
York  and  Yorktown  Heights,  N.  Y. 


With  "I  fm-Free* 


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AUTOMATIC  TEMPERATURE  CONTROL  enables  you 
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5-YEAR  FOOD  SPOILAGE  WARRANTY.  Written  war- 
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hours  following  power  interruption. 


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Dial  BR  2-9922 


TWO  LOCATIONS 
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The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Richmond,  Virginia 


High  Point,  N.  C. 

MRS.  DAVID  LAFFERMAN,  Correspondent 


BRIDAL  PORTRAITS 
AND  CANDIDS  ARE 
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WESTWOOD  CLEANERS  -  EL  8-4933 

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415  Ridge  Rd.  •  6702  W.  Broad 

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SALES 

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Gov.  Lufner  Hodges  gives  his  endorsement  to  a  statewide  campaign  by  the 
Junior  Chamber  of  Commerce  to  raise  funds  for  Boys'  Home  of  North 
Carolina  during  September.  With  him  are  I'red  Swartzberff  (center}  of 
HigU  Point,  state  chairman  of  the  drive,  and  Rube  McCrary,  director  of  the 
Boys'  Home  at  Lake  Waccamaw. 


Congratulations  to  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Edward  Silver  upon  the  birth  of 
a  daughter,  Lillie  M.  Best  wishes 
to  Mrs.  Milton  Silver  upon  the 
arrival  of  her  new  granddaughter. 

Best  wishes  to  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Irving  Silver  upon  the  birth  of  a 
son,  Phillip.  Mrs.  Phillip  Silver  is 
the  proud  grandmother. 

Congratulations  to  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Norman  Hekler  upon  the  birth  of 
a  daughter. 

Congratulations  to  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Leonard  Sattler  of  Arlington,  Va. 
upon  the  birth  of  a  son.  Mrs. 
Sattler  is  the  daughter  of  Mrs. 
Selma  Morris. 

Our  best  wishes  to  Norman 
Samet,  son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jacke 
W.  Samet,  who  has  left  for  El  Paso, 
Texas,  to  serve  as  2nd  lieutenant 
in  the  Army. 

Congratulations  to  Mrs.  Al 
Schwartz  upon  the  engagement  of 
her  son,  Norman,  to  Miss  Margerie 
Ellen  Meltzer  of  New  York.  The 
wedding  is  planned  for  November. 

Congratulations  to  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Hyman  Levine  upon  the  engage- 
ment of  their  son,  Sandy,  to  Miss 
Barbara  Stein  of  New  Jersey.  Hon- 
oring the  couple's  engagement,  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Hyman  Levine  and  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Ronald  Levine  entertain- 
ed with  a  lovely  reception  on  Sep- 
tember 18th.  A  summer  wedding 
is  planned. 

Good   luck   to   our  1959  high 


school  graduates  who  are  away  at 
college: 

Miss  Libby  Greenberg,  daughter 
ol  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Louis  Greenberg, 
who  is  attending  Sophie  Newcombe 
College  in  New  Orleans.  Libby  has 
pledged  the  STD  Sorority. 

Miss  Reene  Weiss,  daughter  of 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Stanley  Weiss,  who 
is  attending  Emory  University  in 
Atlanta,  Ga.  and  has  pledged  AE 
II  Sorority. 

Miss  Iris  Bloom,  daughter  of 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Israel  Bloom,  who 
has  pledged  SDT  Sorority  at  the 
University  of  Georgia. 


JERUSALEM  (WNS)  The  elec- 
tion campaign,  expected  to  be  one 
of  the  roughest  in  the  history  of 
Israel,  has  gotten  under  full  swing 
at  a  Mapai  rally  in  Tel  Aviv  where 
Foreign  Ministr  Golda  Meir  and 
former  Ambassador  Abba  Eban 
were  the  principal  speakers.  Prime 
Minister  David  Ben  Gurion,  who 
was  pronounced  in  good  shape  and 
a  good  insurance  risk  after  a  medi- 
cal check-up  at  the  Tel  Hashomer 
Govrenment  Hospital,  is  to  take  a 
two-week  vacation  before  embark- 
ing on  a  strenuous  campaign  he 
hopes  will  bring  clear  victory  to 
his  party.  The  campaign  was  also 
opened  by  left-wing  Achdut  Avo- 
dah  at  a  meeting  of  its  National 
Council  at  Tel  Aviv  where  General 
Yigal  Allon,  retired,  charged  gov- 
ernment bungling  of  the  Sinai  cam- 
paign advantages  and  the  Suez  Ca- 
nal issue.  Election  rallies  were  also 
held  by  other  parties  throughout 
the  country. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Thank  You,  N.  J,  W.  B.! 

Mr.  Chester  Brown,  Editor 
American  Jewish  Times-Outlook 
P.  O.  Box  1469 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 

Dear  Mr.  Brown: 

CARNEGIE,  PULITZER,  TRI-CENTENNIAL,  FREEDOM 
FOUNDATION  MEDALS,  CERTIFICATE  OF  ESTEEM  are  due 
to  the  American  Jewish  Times-Outlook  for  25  years  of  outstanding 
community  service ;  of  enhancing  the  highest  precepts  and  (Torah) 
values  of  American-Judeo  democratic  principles;  of  serving  as  a 
2-way  communication  media  and  process  of  reporting  and  record- 
ing; a  local  'grass  roots'  house  organ  and  also  a  chronicler  of 
international,  national,  regional,  and  area  news  events  and  high- 
lights; a  MAGAZINE  that  rates  with  the  highest  'dignity'  of 
journalism  and  yet  never  loses  the  'human'  touch;  unsurpassed 
editorials,  features,  and  timely  NEWS,  educational,  cultural  and 
spiritual  and  ethical;  where  HARMONY  and  non-contentiousness 
prevails ;  sans  sensationalism  and  gimmicks. 

Correspondents  and/or  reporters  are  conveyors  of  their  'com- 
munity abstracts'  and  choice  tidbits:  garnished,  relished  and  ex- 
pounded as  the  case  may  be. 

In  my  travels,  personal  visits,  conventions,  and  gatherings 
I  have  noted  that  the  A.J.T.O.  becomes  a  conversational  piece  and 
a  frame  of  reference.  Few  homes  are  without  their  HOUSEHOLD 
and  FAMILY  'required'  reading:  their  favorite  monthly  magazine. 
To  miss  even  one  issue  of  the  OUTLOOK  would  cause  a  'disturbance.' 

A  14  gun  salute  is  in  order  at  this  time  together  with  the 
L'Shono  Tovo. 

Ever  Yours  In  the  Faith, 
Irving  S.  Cheroff 
Area  Director 

National  Jewish  Welfare  Board 

Winston-Salem,  N.  C. 

MRS.  DON  MALLINS,  Correspondent 


These  have  been  busy  days  for 
members  of  Temple  Emanuel. 
During  the  past  month  we  were 
priveliged  to  witness  two  lovely 
Bas  Mitzvahs.  The  first  was  that 
pi  fane  Mescham,  daughter  of  Dr. 
.i'hI  Mrs.  b  Mescham.  It  was  a 
iremendous  thrill  to  see  and  hear 
fane,  and  all  those  who  were  on 
hand  for  this  event,  will  long  re- 
member it.  One  extra  thrill  for 
Jane  and  her  famiily,  was  the 
presence  of  her  Grandmother  who 
came  all  the  way  from  Australia. 

Two  weeks  later  Barbara  Lav 
fetes,  daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Paul  Lavietes,  conducted  a  lovely 
service,  and  we  were  all  so  proud 


to  watch  her.  Our  very  sincere 
congratulations  to  these  young 
ladies  and  their  parents. 

Hadassah  held  its  annual  H-Dav 
event  also  this  month.  It  was  a  full 
day  for  all  Hadassah  members. 
Beginning  with  a  breakfast  host- 
essed by  Mrs.  Don  Mallins;  then 
a  calvacade  of  cars  soliciting  new 
and  old  members,  finally  a  lively 
luncheon  at  Temple  Emanuel  ai 
noon.  For  a  final  touch  Mrs. 
Gerald  Liecher  presented  a  most 
enjoyable  program  with  several 
members  doing  take-offs  on  show 
business  personalities. 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  15) 


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MI  8-0938 


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12 


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Block-Southland 

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WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 


Charlotte  Beth-El  Sisterhood 

MRS.  MAURICE  NEIMAN,  Correspondent 


Stokes  Drug  Co. 

Prescription  Druggist 

PHONE  EL  5-4349 
3000  West  Cary  St. 
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TARRANT 
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Milk  Available  In  Famous  Pure-Pak 


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INC. 


The  opening  of  the  New  Year  for 
Sisterhood  was  held  in  the  Temple 
Vestry  with  President,  Mrs.  Walter 
Klein  presiding.  On  October  6th 
the  meeting  and  luncheon  honored 
the  new  members  of  Sisterhood. 
Colorful  plans  were  announced  for 
the  coming  year,  which  promises  to 
be  a  lively  season. 

The  Sunday  Morning  Discussion 
Group  met  at  the  Temple  with  a 
large  and  enthusiastic  turnout  at 
their  first  get-to-gether  for  the  new 
season.  The  year's  discussion  theme 
will  be  "The  Jew  of  the  Twentieth 
Century."  Mr.  Lewis  Bernstein  pre- 
sented the  facts  and  issues  of  the 
famous  "Trefer  Case"  in  a  most 
interesting  and  informative  man- 
ner. 

The  Temple  Brotherhood  held 
their  annual  Steak  Dinner  on  the 
Temple  grounds  last  month.  It  was 
a  delicious  "Cook-out"  and  fun  was 
had  by  all.  Mr.  Saul  Sausweet  and 
Mr.  Aaron  Jaffa  were  in  charge  of 
the  affair. 

The  younger  set  have  been  go- 
ing places  and  doing  things  for 
the  past  few  months,  and  we  are 
mighty  proud  of  these  ambitious 
young  men  and  women.  Miss  Lynn 
Lhalheiner  enjoyed  an  enlightening 
summer  in  Switzerland.  It  was  a 
part  of  the  "Experiment  in  Foreign 
Living."  She  is  now  back  at  Sophie 
Newcombe  College.  Barbara  Glazier 
was  elected  Regional  President  of 
the  Piedmont  Federation  of  Temple 
Youth  which  was  held  up  at  Wild- 
acres  in  August.  Joan  Fuerstman 
was  elected  President  of  the  Char- 
lotte chapter  of  NFTY.  .  .  Lois 
Raff  was  elected  President  of  the 
B'nai  B'rith  Girls.  Lois  was  also 
awarded  a  trophy  for  being  winner 
in  the  B'nai  B'rith  oratory  contest 
and  also  as  "Best  All-Around  B'nai 
B'rith  Girl"  in  North  Carolina.  .  . 
Martin  Ricker  who  was  a  finalist 
in  the  National  Merit  Scholarship 
Awards  is  now  a  freshman  at  the 
University  of  North  Carolina.  .  . 
Miss    Gwen  Neiman  experienced 
a  thrilling  summer  studying  art  at 
the  Fontainebleau  School  of  Arts 
and  Music  in  Fontainebleau,  France 
Gwen  was  fortunate  to  study  paint- 
ing twice  a  week  with  Monsiem 
Heuri  Goetz.  Switzerland,  Germany 
Holland,  and  Italy  were  the  coun- 
tries Gwen  was  able  to  travel  to 
while  living  in  France.  Now  a  rising 
Junior   at   Women's    College  of 
U.  N.  C,  Gwen  was  appointed  a 
junior  advisor    to    the  incoming 
freshmen.  Steven  Sobell  was  given 


the  lead  in  "Harvey,"  the  Lime- 
lighters'  openng  play  at  Myers  Park 
High  School.  Steven  also  was  voted 
the  "best  supporting  actor"  for  the 
past  year  in  his  high  school.  Bill 
Constanzy  was  awarded  a  prize  for 
his  essay,  "I  Speak  for  Democracy," 
at  East  Mecklenburg  High  School. 

Our  congratulations  to  the  proud 
parents,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Lambert 
Schwartz,  on  the  birth  of  their 
daughter,  Sonia  Lee;  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Mark  Bernstein,  on  the  birth  of 
their  daughter,  Carey  Jane;  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Murray  Schiffman  on  the 
birth  of  their  daughter.  The  Bar 
Mitzvah  of  Richard  Klein,  son  of 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Walter  Klein,  was  a 
lovely  and  beautiful  affair.  Best 
wishes  to  Ric  hard  who  indeed  made 
his  parents  and  friends  proud 
of  him.  Our  heartiest  congratula- 
tions to  Mr.  Max  Kahn  and  to  Dr. 
and  Mrs.  Jack  Levitan  upon  the 
marriage  of  Douglas  Allen  Kahn  to 
Judith  Mira  Bleich  of  New  York 
City.  Douglas  and  Judith  are  both 
attorneys  for  the  Department  of 
Labor  in  Washington,  D.  C.  Best 
wishes  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bert  Raff 
upon  the  marriage  of  their  son, 
Joseph,  to  Judith  Oberfelder,  of 
New  York  City,  The  wedding  was 
held  at  the  Essex  House,  and  the 
newlyweds  are  making  their  home 
in  Forest  Hills,  N.  Y.  Congratula- 
tions and  best  wishes  to  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Lews  Bernstein  on  the  mar- 
riage of  their  daughter,  Constance, 
to  Edward  Chobanian  of  Chicago. 
(Please  Turn  to  Page  19) 


B'nai  B'rith  has  announced  the 
election  of  Paul  Kapelow,  New  Or- 
leans builder  and  communal  leader, 
as  chairman  of  the  B'nai  B'rith 
Foundation  of  u  e  United  States.  The 
newly-estab'ished  Foundation,  chart- 
ered earlier  this  year  in  the  District 
of  Columbia,  is  a  tax-exempt  fund 
raising  arm  for  the  support  of  the 
educational,  philanthropic  and  re- 
ligious activities  conducted  by  B'nai 
B'ritli. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


if. 


Wallace,  N.  C. 


MRS.  MICHAEL  FOX 


In  a  candlelght  ceremony  at 
B'nai  Israel  Synagogue  in  Wilming- 
ton on  Sunday  night  September  6, 
Miss  Janice  Maxine  Kramer  be- 
came the  bride  of  Lt.  Michael  Fox. 
The  bride  is  the  daughter  of  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Harry  E.  Kramer  of  Wal- 
lace. Lt.  Fox  is  the  son  of  the  late 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Moses  Fox.  He  is 
the  nephew  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Otto 
Fox  of  Charleston,  South  Carolina. 

Officiating  at  the  double  ring 
ceremony  which  took  place  at 
seven-thirty  p.m.  was  Rabbi  Samuel 
A.  Friedman  of  Wilmington. 

Prior  to  the  ceremony  Miss  Merle 
Mallard  of  Wallace  presented  a 


For  Goodness, 
\ttractiveness, 
Uniqueness, 
nd  Friendli- 
ness Personal- 
ly Yours 


The  Village  Baker 

7015  Three  Chopt  Rd. 
RICHMOND,  VA. 
Dial  AT  8-3490 


program  of  wedding  music.  Mrs. 
Robert  Sheffield,  Wallace,  soloist, 
sang  "Because"  by  De'Harlot  and 
"Entreat  Me  Not  to  Leave  Thee" 
by  Gounod.  At  the  close  of  the 
ceremony  she  sang  a  traditional 
benediction. 

The  bride  was  given  in  marriage 
by  her  father. 

Serving  her  sister  as  maid  of 
honor  was  Miss  Natalie  Kramer  of 
Wallace.  Mrs.  Max  Offerman  of 
Wallace,  also  sister  of  the  bride, 
was  matron  of  honor.  Bridesmaids 
were  Mrs.  Pincus  Kolender  of 
Charleston,  South  Carolina,  sister 
of  the  groom  and  Miss  Shirley 
Leder  of  Whiteville. 

Lt.  Fox  had  as  best  man  his 
brother-in-law,  Mr.  Pincus  Kolen- 
der of  Charleston,  South  Carolina. 
The  groomsmen  were  Mr.  Max 
Offeman,  of  Wallace,  brother-in- 
law  of  the  bride,  Mr.  Larry  Kramer, 
of  Whiteville  and  Mr.  David 
Kramer  of  Baltimore,  cousins  of 
the  bride,  Mr.  Maurice  Fox  and 
Mr.  Harold  Fox  of  Charleston, 
cousins  of  the  groom. 

Immediately  after  the  ceremony 
the  bride's  parents  entertained  at 
a  reception  and  dance  at  the  Coven- 
ant Club  in  Wilmington.  There  the 
blue  and  white  decor  of  the  wed- 
ding was  further  emphasized  in 


JONES 
Motor  Car  Co. 


2923  West  Broad  -     Richmond,  Va. 


Sales  and  Service 


Cadillac  E  E  E 
Oldsmobile  === 

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Machine  &  Welding  Co. 


30  Years  Experience 

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Electric  and  Acetylene  Welding 
LARGE  OR  SMALL  —  WE  DO  THEM  ALL 

18  W.  7th  Street  •  South  Richmond 


Send  FloWers  ...     It  is  the  nice  thing  to  do. 

JOHN  L.  RATCLIFFE 


Phone  MI  8-7261 


FLORIST 

RICHMOND,  VA. 


206  North  Fifth  St. 


HENWOOD  &  WILSON 

"EVERLASTING  BEAUTY  IN  MONUMENTS" 

Designers  and  Manufacturers  of 
GRANITE  and  MARBLE  MONUMENTS— MEMORIALS 
413-415  S.  Cherry  St.  DIAL  MI  8-7340  Richmond,  Va. 


FLORSHEIM  SHOES 

803  E.  Main  St.  RICHMOND,  VA. 


WESTHAMPTON 
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320  Libbie  Avenue 
RICHMOND,  VA. 

Specializing  in 
Artistic  Weddings, 
Decorations  of  All  Types 

Dial  AT  2-2460 

Mr.  &  Mrs. 
F.  N.  Hickernell 


Serving 


Readers  of  this 
magazine  for  85  years  .  .  ■ 

Joseph  W.  Bliley 

Funeral  Home 

CONVENIENTLY  LOCATED 
THIRD  &  MARSHALL  STREETS 
RICHMOND,  VIRGINIA 


[ 


AMPLE  PRIVATE 
PARKING  SPACE 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Roanoke  -  Lynchburg  -  Norfolk 
Newport  News  -  Portsmouth,  Ya. 


DISTRIBUTORS  OF 


FUEL  OIL  FOR  HOMES 
AND  INDUSTRY 


Day  and  Night 
Delivery 


DIAL  DIAMOND  5-8866 
2677  ROANOKE  AVE.  S.  W.  ROANOKE,  VA. 


HARRIS  -  MARSHALL 
Hosiery  Kills 

Manufacturers  of 

MEN'S       •  BOYS'  HOSIERY 

GALAX,  VIRGINIA 


New  York  Office:    Empire  State  Building,  Room  No.  1519 


Two  Good  Places 

In  Richmond,  Va.  Featuring 

Seafood 
and  Steaks 

Raleigh  Grill 

(Hotel  Raleigh) 

Open — Monday  thru  Fridays 
11:30  to  2:30 
5:30  to  9 
Saturdays   5:30  to  9 

Wright's 

TOWN  HOUSE 

513  East  Grace  St. 

Open  11:30  to  3  p  m. 
4:30  to  8  p.  m. 
Closed  Sundays  and  Holidays 


Roanoke's  Leading 
Funeral  Director 
and 

Ambulance  Operators 


Economical- 
Dependable 

Dial  DI  3-4451 


the  decorations.  Palms  and  garlands 
of  magnolia,  white  flowers  and 
white  candelabra  were  included  in 
the  decorations. 

The  receiving  line  consisted  of 
the  bride  and  groom,  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Kramer,  the  bride's  parents,  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Otto  Fox,  uncle  and  aunt 
of  the  groom,  and  the  bride's  at- 
tendants. 

The  bride,  who  graduated  from 
Wallace-Rose  Hill  High  School, 
attended  Woman's  College  in 
Greensboro.  The  groom  is  a  grad- 
uate of  Rivers  Hgh  School  in 
Charleston,  South  Carolina.  He 
received  his  B.  S.  degree  in  Elec- 
trical Engineering  from  the  Citadel 
in  Charleston,  he  is  presently  ser- 
ving in  the  United  States  Army. 


Norfolk,  Va. 

Mrs.  William  Schwartz,  who 
writes  the  mon/hly  news  column 
from  Norfolk,  was  unable  to  pre- 
pare her  usually  chatty  news  for 
(his  month  by  reason  of  the  fact 
that  her  son,  his  wife  and  baby, 
were  in  a  motor  accident,  and  re- 
quired Mrs.  Schwartz  care  and 
attention.  We  wish  a  sppedy  re- 
covery to  all  concerned.  The  Edi- 
tor. 


Suffolk,  Va. 

MRS.   HVRRY  RUDEN, 
Correspondent 

The  months  of  activities  in  our 
community  began  in  September 
with  a  well  attended  Hadassah 
meeting  at  the  home  of  Mrs.  Jules 
Kurtzwile.  Mrs.  Maurice  Scherr, 
President,  presided  and  outlined 
the  projects  and  committees  for  an 
active  year.  Following  the  meeting. 
Mrs.  Kurtzwile  served  a  delicious 
desert  while  the  members  chatted 
and  learned  of  each  other's  sum- 
mer events.  It  was  a  delightful  be- 
ginning to  the  months  ahead  of 
work  in  our  community. 

I  am  proud  to  write  that  my 
father-in-law,  Al  Ruden,  was  elected 
President  of  the  Agudath  Achim 
Congregation  last  month  for  his 
twenty-second  year.  Serving  with 
him  on  the  board  is  Mr.  Israel 
Levy  of  Waverly,  Va.  as  Honorary 
Vice-President;  Mr.  Arthur  Kerple- 
man,  Vice-President;  Mr.  Jules 
Kurtzwile,  Secretary  (for  twenty- 
two  years  also!)  and  Mr.  Larry 
Ruden,  Treasurer.  In  accepting  his 
office,  the  president  told  of  his  de- 
sire to  launch  a  project  for  erect- 
ing a  new  synagogue  in  Suffolk. 
It  is  his  hope  that  by  beginning 
now  on  such  a  project,  the  ac- 


complishment of  this  dream  in  the 
years  to  come,  would  become  a 
reality. 

The  Sisterhood  of  the  Agudath 
Achim  Congregation  began  its  1959- 
60  schedule  helping  to  serve  re- 
freshments following  the  Selichos 
service  in  the  Synagogue.  In  honor 
of  their  daughter  Rose  Ellen's 
wedding  earlier  that  same  evening 
in  the  Synagogue,  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Morris  Bass  had  wedding  cake 
served  by  the  Sisterhood  women 
to  the  men  and  women  who  attend- 
ed the  Midnight  service. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Henry  Spitz  of 
New  York  City  spent  the  High 
Holidays  with  their  daughter  and 
son-in-law,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Coleman 
Davis. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Stanley  Mirman 
and  daughter,  Jeri  of  Norfolk,  spent 
the  Holidays  with  her  parents,  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Hank  Bernstein. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Richard  Staub 
traveled  to  Ohio  to  spend  the  Holi- 
days with  her  family  in  Columbus. 

Richmond  Beth  El 
Sisterhood 

MRS.  MURRAY  H.  LOWENSTGIN 
Correspondent 

The  Beth-El  Sisterhood  held  its 
annual  Donor  Luncheon  October 
21st  in  the  Temple's  newly  redec- 
orated Social  Hall.  Mrs.  Sara  Kas- 
dan,  of  Louisville,  Ky.,  author  of 
the  humorous  book,  Love  and 
Knishes,  was  the  guest  speaker. 

Richmond 
B&P  Hadassah 

MISS   SHIRLEY  GOLDSTEIN, 
Correspondent 

The  B  8c  P  Hadassah  Study 
Group  meeting  was  held  on  Octo- 
ber 7th  at  the  home  of  Mrs.  Fanny 
Rudlin.  During  our  meeting  Mrs. 
Rudlin  told  of  her  many  interest- 
ing experiences  of  her  recent  trip 
to  Israel;  her  talk  was  most  en- 
lightning  and  enjoyable. 

The  B&P  Hadassah  meeting 
was  held  on  October  14th  at  the 
Southern  Bank  Building,  at  which 
time  some  of  the  members  put  on 
a  little  skit. 


M.  C.  Baker 
Sales  Co. 

Distributor  of 
Radio  Parts  and  Sound 
Equipment 

JOHNS-MANVILLE 
Blown  Rock  Wool  Insulation 

19  Franklin  Rd.         Roanoke,  Va. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


15 


Winston  Salem,  N.  C. 

(Concluded  from  Page  11) 

We  know  President  Lillie  Lef-     Ina    Aran,  and 
kowit/  must  have  been  bursting 
with  pride  at  the  way  the  organiza- 
tion had  begun  another  year. 

This  week  everyone  is  going  to 
the  fair.  Hadassah  has  its  annual 
booth  in  operation,  and  if  the 
weather  holds  out  business  should 
be  good  as  usual. 

Council  Sisterhood  has  as  usual 
been  working  very  hard.  The  An- 
nual Harvest  Luncheon  was  a 
financial  and  also  social  success. 
A  delightful  Fashion  Show  featur- 
ing hats  and  bags  was  enjoyed  by 
all. 

Mazel  Tov  to  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Saul   Kapiloff,   Bobbi's  daughter, 


son-in-law,  Dr. 
Marvin  J.  Miller,  are  the  proud 
parents  of  a  baby  daughter,  Jill 
Robin. 

Our  deepest  sympathy  to  Minna 
Kurtk,  on  the  passing  of  her 
brother,  Max  Lauterstein. 

Good  health  to  Helen  Davis, 
Saul  Kapiloff  and  Lillian  Wald- 
man. 

Congratulations  to  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Max  Muller,  on  the  birth  of 
son . 

We  are  also  glad  to  report  thai 
Malcolm  Coplon,  son  of  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Harry  Coplon  is  feeling 
much  better. 


The  Hero  In  Jewish  History 

(Concluded  from  Page  5) 


and  Muslem  worlds  as  well.  He 
established  for  all  times  the  model 
of  the  authentic  Jew. 

But  the  creative  pursuit  of  learn- 
ing was  often  conducted  in  the 
midst  of  persecution,  expulsion 
and  wandering.  Thus,  Don  Isaac 
Abravanel,  scholar  and  statesman, 
witnessed  the  many  calamities  that 
destroyed  Spanish  Jewry.  Despite 
arduous  tasks  and  perpetual  fears, 
he  continued  to  write  Biblical 
commentaries  and  served  as  "for- 
tress and  shield  for  his  people." 

In  East  Europe,  Jewry  came  into 
its  own  in  the  18th  century.  Two 
great  men,  the  Vilna  Gaon  and  the 
Baal  Shem  Tov,  at  the  opposite 
poles  of  religious  experience, 
ought  each  in  his  own  unique 
style,  to  restore  balance  and 
strength  to  Jewish  life. 

This  galaxy  of  spiritual  giants 
of  medieval  Jewry  assured  our 
survival  as  a  people  and  as  a  faith. 


Their  lives  and  thoughts  are 
dramatically  presented  by  Trude 
Weiss-Rosmarin,  Samuel  M.  Blum- 
enfield,  Jacob  S.  Minkin,  Salo  W. 
Baron,  Louis  I.  Newman  and 
Mever  Waxman.  As  in  the  first 
part  of  the  volume,  the  historical 
background  is  filled  in  so  that  the 
achievements  of  individuals  are 
understood  in  proper  context. 

Ambitious  and  remarkable  as 
this  literary  project  is,  it  is  but 
the  first  of  a  larger  undertaking, 
f  our  other  volumes  are  scheduled 
lor  publication,  the  second  of 
which  will  appear  in  March,  1960. 
Of  the  B'nai  B'rith  Great  Books 
Series,  volume  two  will  deal  with 
twelve  great  Jewish  personalities 
of  modern  times.  It  will  be  follow- 
ed by  a  book  on  nine  modern  Jew- 
ish thinkers,  from  Ahad  Ha'am  to 
Martin  Buber,  with  a  companion 


1 


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The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Rocky  Mount,  N.  C. 


ALLAN  MIMS,  In 


Authorized  Sales  and  Service 

225  Tarboro  Street 
Dial  GI  2-2191 
ROCKY  MOUNT,  N.  C. 


P.  A.  MOORE'S 
ANTIQUE  SHOP 

•  Antiques 

•  Reproductions 

•  Accessories 

2800  Sunset  Avenue 
Dial  GI  2-1298 
ROCKY  MOUNT,  N.  C 


H.  H.  Strandberg,  President  M.  W.  Ivey,  Secretary-Treasurer 

H.  H.  Strandberg,  Jr.,  Asst.  Secretary-Treasurer 

Standard  Insurance  &  Realty  Corp. 

"Let  STANDARD  be  your  STANDARD" 

Phone  GI  6-6155  Rocky  Mount,  N.  C. 


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For  65  Years  Rocky  Mount's  Leading  Insurance  Agency 

WILKINSON- BULLOCK  &  CO. 

COMPLETE  INSURANCE  COVERAGE 

126  N.  Main  ROCKY  MOUNT,  N.  C.  Dial  GI  6-6121 


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IGNITION  PARTS  —  CARBURETORS 
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210  Hill  Street  Dial  GI  6-6145 

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volume  containing  an  anthology 
of  their  writings,  plus  introduc- 
tory references  and  explanatory 
notes.  The  final  text  in  the  series 
will  deal  with  "Basic  Beliefs  of 
Judaism." 

This  is  truly  a  project  of  great 
magnitude  and  marks  a  turning- 


point  in  the  development  of  adult 
education  in  the  American-Jewish 
community.  The  widespread  use 
of  this  series  in  synagogue  and  or- 
ganizational study  groups  as  well 
as  for  personal  reading,  it  is  hoped, 
will  make  possible  a  continuing 
devotion  to  Torah  in  our  time. 


Rocky  Mount,  N.  C. 

MRS.  LOUIS  WALD,  Correspondent 

Mrs.  Ben  Tonkel  had  as  her  vis-     Tarboro,   on  the 
itor  for  a  month,  her  sister,  Miss 
Sophie  Rocklin  of  Baltimore,  Mary- 
land. 


Mr.  and  Mrs.  Howard  Kouzel 
and  family  of  Washington,  D.  C. 
visited  Mrs.  Kouzel's  parents,  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Oscar  Levy,  for  the  Rosh 
Hashonah  holidays. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Nat  Katzin  and 
son  Larry,  spent  the  holidays  with 
Mrs.  Katzin's  parents,  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Philip  Kolodny  of  Winston-Salem. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  David  Eichner 
spent  the  High  Holy  Days  in  New 
York  City.  Mrs.  Eichner's  brother, 
Meyer  Tarro,  is  very  ill  in  the 
hospital  in  New  York.  Our  sincer- 
est  best  wishes  to  him  for  a  speedy 
recovery. 

Also  on  our  sick  list  is  Mrs. 
Justa,  mother  of  Dr.  Samuel  Justa. 
Mrs.  Justa  is  in  Park  View  Hos 
pital  in  Rocky  Mount.  We  wish 
a  speedy  recovery  to  her. 

We  are  happy  to  report  that 
Scott  Merritt,  son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Sidney  Meritt,  has  fully  recovered 
from  his  operation. 

Congratulations  and  best  wishes 
to:  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Irvin  Adler  of 


birth  of  their 
second  son,  Philip  Eric  Adler;  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Leon  Epstein  on  the  birth 
of  their  granddaughter,  Ellen  Ann 
Katzeff,  daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Julian  Katzeff. 

Our  good  wishes  to  our  new 
college  students  —  Diane  Nadelman 
who  is  studying  at  East  Carolina 
College,  and  Gail  Wald  who  is  at 
Duke  University. 


Anderson,  S.  C. 

On  October  6th,  1959  a  son  was 
born  to  Rosalyn  and  Phil  Silver- 
stein.  The  baby  was  named  Ben- 
jamin after  Phil's  father  who  passed 
away  about  a  year  ago  in  Winston- 
Salem,  N.  C. 


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The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Fayeiieville,  N.  C. 


LINDA  N.  ELFMON 


Doctor  and  Mrs.  Samuel  1..  Eli 
mon  of  Fayetteville,  N.  C.  an- 
nounce the  engagement  of  their 
daughter,  Linda  Nan  to  Mr.  Joel 
Fleishman,  son  of  Mr.  and  Mis. 
W.  Edward  Fleishman  of  Fayette- 
ville. The  wedding  will  be  in 
June.  Miss  Elfmon  is  a  sophomore 
at  Smith  College.  Mr.  Fleishman 
is  a  1958  graduate  of  the  Univer- 
sity of  North  Carolina  where  he 
was  elected  to  Phi  Beta  Kappa  and 
Beta  Kappa  Sigma.  He  was  also 
president  of  Pi  Lambda  Phi.  Mr. 
Fleishman  has  begun  an  executive 
training  course  at  Filene's  in  Bos- 
ton. 


Temple  Israel  —  Charlotte,  N.  C. 

MRS.  JERRY  FISHER,  Correspondent 


A   beautiful   program  entitled, 
'Key  to  the  Ark,,'  was  presented 
t    the    opening    Temple  Israel 
Sisterhood  meeting  on  Sept.  16. 
Vfter   a   warm   greeting  by  our 
president,   Mrs.  Ed  Hirsch,  Mrs. 
oe    Skleit,    Membership  Chair- 
nan,   introduced   seventeen  new- 
comers   to   our   community  and 
Temple.  Refreshments  and  a  so- 
ial   hour   followed   the  business 
portion  of  the  meeting.  It  was  very 
ice  seeing  so  many  families  and 
ew  faces  after  the  summer  lull. 

Congratulations  go  to  the  new 
officers  of  the  Couples'  Club:  Sey- 
more  Sussman,  President;  Harvey 
Diamond,  Vice-President;  Al  Rous- 

o,  Secretary  and  Mrs.  ferry  Mad- 

ns,  Treasurer. 

The  Men's  Club  had  their  first 
meeting  of  the  new  year  on  Sept. 

0  with  "kick  off  time"  as  their 
heme.  All  fathers  were  urged  to 
bring  their  teenage  sons.  Guests 

ere  Charlotte's  outstanding  foot- 
ball coaches  and  football  tickets 

ere  given  away  as  door  prizes. 

Mazel  Tov  and  Lots  of  Nachas 
go  to  Hazzan  and  Mrs.  Robert 
Shapiro  on  the  birth  of  their  twin 

aughters,  Shira  and  Tova;  to 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Harry  Swimmer  on 
the  birth  of  their  daughter  Tr>dv 
Gail;  and  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Wil- 

lam  Segal  on  the  birth  of  their 
son. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Leon  Greenberg 
invited  the  congregation  to  join 
them  in  worship  Friday  evening, 
Sept.  25th  and  Saturday  morning 
Sept.  26th,  when  their  son,  Alan 


Marshall,  participated  in  the  ser- 
vices on  the  occasion  of  his  be 
coming  a  Bar  Mitzvah.  The  con- 
gregation was  invited  to  the  Oneg 
Shabbat,  Friday  evening  and  to 
the   Kiddush   Saturday  morning. 


Chattanooga,  Tenn. 

Emial  Schwartzman,  age  62,  of  24 
Larchmont  Avenue,  Chattanooga, 
Tennessee,  passed  away  Saturday, 
October  3rd. 

Funeral  services  were  held  at 
Bryan  Funeral  Home  on  Tuesday, 
October  6th  and  burial  was  in 
Mizpah  Cemetery.  Mr.  Schwartz- 
man  bad  been  living  in  Chatta- 
nooga for  the  past  twenty-five  years 
and  was  a  member  of  Mizpah  Con- 
gregation. He  was  a  native  of 
Charleston,  South  Carolina  and 
was  associated  with  his  father  there, 
in  the  United  Bargain  House,  for 
a  number  of  years. 

Among  his  survivors  are  a  daugh- 
ter, Mrs.  Benjamin  Korngold,  New 
York  City;  son,  L.  Kent  Schwartz- 
man,  Menlo  Park,  Calif;  a  sister, 
Miss  Esta  Schwartzmann,  Chatta- 
nooga, and  two  brothers,  Elmore  B. 
Schwartzmann,  Chattanooga,  and 
M.  Lester  Schwartzmann,  Atlanta. 


Abram  Krivosheyev,  the  only 
Jew  on  the  Soviet  team  pitted  in 
Philadelphia  against  U.  S.  track 
and  field  athletes,  told  a  group  of 
local  citizens  there  that  he  had  nev- 
er heard  of  and  never  eaten  gefillte 
fish.  He  spoke  in  what  was  de- 
scribed as  a  stumbling  Yiddish. 

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Est.  1817 

THE  FAYETTEVILLE  OBSERVER 

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FAYETTEVILLE,  N.  C. 


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The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Wilmington,  N.  C. 

MRS.  NORMA  MAY,  Correspondent 


Randolph  Joseph  May  celebrated 
his  Bar  Mitzvah  at  B'nai  Israel 
Synagogue  on  Saturday  morning, 
September  12,  The  prayers  chanted 
by  Rand)  included  the  Musaph, 
Shachris,  and  the  reading  of  the 
Torah.  He  also  conducted  the  He- 
brew portion  of  the  Friday  even- 
ing  service.  Randy  was  tutored  by 
Rabbi  Samuel  Friedman. 

Following  the  Friday  night  ser- 
vice, a  reception  was  held  in  the 
synagogue,  and  a  luncheon  was 
served  after  the  Saturday  morning 
services.  A  dance  was  given  for  the 
teen  agers  on  Saturday  night. 
Randy  is  the  son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Aaron  May  and  the  grandson  of 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Ben  May,  all  of 
Wilmington. 

Home  for  the  holidays  and  also 
just  returned  from  a  Florida  honey- 
moon, were  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jack 
Miller  of  Baltimore.  Mrs.  Miller 
is  the  former  Eleanor  Goldsten. 
She  became  the  bride  of  Jack  Miller 


RANDOLPH  J.  MAY 

of  Baltimore  on  Sunday,  Sept.  20, 
at  Bluecrest  North  in  that  city. 
Rabbi  Morris  Leiberman  of  the 
Baltimore  Hebrew  Congregation 
officiated  in  a  double  ring  cere- 
monv.  While  in  Wilmington,  her 


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parents,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Abe  Gold- 
stein, entertained  with  a  reception 
at  the  Covenant  Club. 

Also  home  for  the  holidays  were 
Dr.  and  Mrs.  Ira  Goldberg  and 
daughters,  Cathy  and  Vicky,  of 
Augusta,  Ga.  Mrs.  Goldberg  is  the 
daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Harry 
Stein  and  the  grand  daughter  of 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  H.  Jaffee,  whom  the 
family  also  visited.  Melvin  Sch- 
wartz visited  his  parents,  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  B.  D.  Schwartz.  Misses  Joyce 
and  Rhoda  May  from  Miami,  Fla. 
visited  their  parents,  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Harold  May.  Michael  Alper,  from 


the  Citadel,  visited  his  parents,  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  George  Alper.  And  leav- 
ing home  were  Mannie  and  Joseph 
Friedman,  who  are  now  studying 
at  the  Yeshiva  in  Baltimore.  They 
are  the  sons  of  Rabbi  and  Mrs. 
Samuel  Friedman. 

The  many  friends  of  Mr.  Sam 
Berger  will  be  glad  to  know  that 
he  has  recuperated  from  a  recent 
operation.  Mr.  Berger  is  a  civic 
leader  of  Wilmington  and  past 
president  of  B'nai  Israel  Synagogue. 
Also  on  the  recovery  list  is  Mr. 
Sol  Checkner  who  recently  injured 
his  foot. 


Whiteville,  North  Carolina 

MRS.  MARTIN  BERNSTEIN,  Correspondent 


The  Whiteville  Zone  United 
Jewish  Appeal  held  its  annual  con- 
ference Sunday,  September  27,  in 
Whiteville.  The  conference,  which 
was  held  at  the  Beth  Israel  Center, 
began  at  11:00  a.  m.,  with  an  in- 
formal round-table  session,  follow- 
ed by  a  luncheon  at  1:00  p.  m.  We 
were  fortunate  in  having  as  our 
guest  speaker  the  Reverend  John 
Stanley  Grauel,  a  Christian  minis- 
ter who  served  as  a  member  of  the 
Hagamih,  and  also  was  a  volunteer 
crew  member  of  the  refugee  ship, 
Exodus,  during  its  historic  voyage 
from  Cyprus  to  Palestine. 

Representatives  from  Jackson- 
ville, Wallace,  Clinton,  Elizabeth- 


town,  Fairmont,  Holly  Ridge, 
Lumberton,  Tabor  City,  and  Loris 
attended. 

Members  of  the  community  cele- 
brated Rosh  Hashana  in  many  dif 
ferent  towns.  Mrs.  Hyman  Moskow 
to  Charleston,  S.  C;  the  Hyman 
Kramers,  the  Si  Steinbergs,  the 
Floyd  Baslows,  the  Herman  Leders, 
the  Wallace  Leinwands,  and  the 
Albert  Schilds  to  Wilmington;  the 
Sol  Manns  and  the  Joe  Manns  to 
Williamsburg,  Va.;  the  Irving 
Manns  to  Greensboro;  the  David 
Simons  to  Arlington,  Va.;  the  Bar- 
ney Wolperts  to  Florence,  S.  C, 
and  the  Martin  Bernsteins  to  New 
Bern. 


laiJiMoflUlllfTO 


SERGEANT 
SIDNEY  GUM PERTZ 

ON  SEPTEMBER  £6,1918  AT 
BOISde  FORGES, THE  l%nd  INF- 
ANTRY WAS  BEING  RAKEP  FROM 
A  GERMAN  MACHINE-GUN  NEST. 
SERGEANT  GUMPERTZ  AND  TWO 
MEN  Of  HIS  COMPANY  WENT  OUT 
AMID  A  HEAVY  BARRAGE  TO  SILENCE 
THE  GUN. THE  BURSTING  SHELLS  TOOK 
ONE,  THEN  THE  OTHER  OFGliMfWZ'S 
COMPANIONS-  ALONE,  HE  CONTINUED 
HIS  ADVANCE  WHILE  THE  MACHINE- 
GUN  BLA1EP  AT  HIM. HE  SLICCEEP- 
EP  IN  JUMPING  INTO  THE  MACHINE- 
GUN  NEST, SILENCING  THE  GUN  AND 
SINGLEHANPEP,  TOOK  THE  CREW 
OF  NINE.  FOR  HIS  VALOR, HE  WAS 
AWARPEP  THE  CONGRESSIONAL 
MEPALOF  HONOR. 


Courtesy  of 
hall.    of    heroes  " 


National  Shrine 

fopl  -rn£ 

xTewi$h  Wca*  Vead 

WASHINGTON  ,  X>.  C. 


\The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


its,  Mr. 
"(ilea* 

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ludyinj 
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-  - 

past 
■  ',;ue.| 
'  Mr. 


EDITORIALS 

(Concluded  from  Page  3) 

Finally,  through  its  reconstruction  of  the  civilizations  of 
iniquity  in  their  historic  setting,  the  book  dramatically  dem- 
onstrates the  inseparability  of  the  Negev  from  the  rest  of 
Israel.  No  one  who  reads  this  book  can  fail  to  grasp  the  geo- 
political importance  of  the  Negev  as  a  single  bridge-head  be- 
tween Asia  and  Africa,  meaningful  not  only  for  Israel  but  for 
Ithe  entire  Western  world.  Reading  the  ancient  past,  Dr. 
Glueck  finds  a  message  for  today:  Israel  in  the  past  has  never 
been  able  peacefully  to  develop  without  the  complete  control 
of  the  Negev  and  without  access  to  the  Red  Sea  through  the 
Gulf  of  Aquabah;  Israel  cannot  survive  without  the  possiblity 
of  peaceful  expansion  southward  into  the  broad  and  empty 
spaces  of  the  Negev  and  if  the  Negev,  or  any  part  of  it,  were 
ever  taken  from  Israel,  it  would  mean  the  end  of  the  foot- 
hold of  the  western  world  in  the  pivotal  area  of  the  Near  East, 
with  all  its  consequent  military  and  economic  results. 


ATTENTION!  WOMEN'S  ORGANIZATIONS! 
Is  your  Sisterhood  or  Hadassah  taking  advantage  of  this  easy  fund- 
raising:  plan?  Obtaining  subscriptions  or  renewals  for  THE  AMERICAN 
JEWISH  TIMES-OUTLOOK  is  an  easy  way  of  raising  money  for  your 
projects  or  general  fund  '^quiries  from  Virginia  should  be  addressed  to 
Box  701,  Richmond,  Va.  /nquiries  from  all  other  states  should  be  ad- 
dressed to  Box  1469,  Greensboro,  N.  C. 


Charlotte,  N.  C.  Temple  Beth-El  Sisterhood 

(Concluded  from  Page  12) 

Scottish  Right  of  Free  Masonry  for 
the  Southern  jurisdiction  elected 
recently  Mr.  Isadore  Silverstein  of 


The  young  couple  are  making  their 
home  in  Madison,  Wisconsin. 

Rabbi  Solomon  Foster  occupied 
the  pulpit  for  the  High  Holidays. 
Rabbi  Foster  is  rabbi  emeritus  of 
Temple  B'nai  Jeshurun  of  Newark, 
N.  }.,  and  served  that  community 
for  over  fifty  years.  We  were  hon- 
ored to  have  the  charming  Rabbi 
and  Mrs.  Foster  with  us  during  the 
holidays.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Emanuel 
Packard,  president  of  the  congrega- 
tion, held  a  beautiful  reception  in 
their  honor  at  their  home  on  Rosh 
Hashonah  Day. 

The  Supreme  Council  33rd  De- 
gree of  the  Ancient  and  Accepted 


BROWN 
DRUG  CO. 

Prescription  Specialists 

Complete  Line  of 
Drugs  and  Sundries 

130  E.  Walnut  Dial  RE  4-3351 
GOLDSBORO,  N.  C. 


Charlotte  among  others  to  the  rank 
of  33rd  degree  Mason. 

The  "growing  demand  for  kosher 
foods"  stems  from  "the  general  re- 
generation of  religious  observance" 
among  American  Jews  and  partly 
from  "pride  in  the  birth  of  Israel," 
the  Wall  Street  Journal  declared  in 
a  survey  of  the  kosher  food  market 
in  one  of  its  recent  issues. 

Referring  to  the  growing  interest 
of  the  general  shopper  in  kosher 
food,  the  publication  notes  that 
"advertising  and  supermarket  plays 
are  making  Gentiles  well  aware  of 
kosher  foods,  other  than  corned 
beef  and  pastrami,  and  not  without 
purpose." 


MOTORS 


Rebuilt 


Repaired 


•Rewound 

DIXIE  ELECTRIC 
MOTOR  SERVICE 

Dial  RE  5-4381 
1005  N.  William  St. 
GOLDSBORO,  N.  C. 


How's  It  working? 

If  ««y  «f  «vr  trtwwn  kin  ftoai 

that  they  can  brine  back  "like  new™ 
performance  to  their  radio  and  tele* 
'  vision  lets  for  the  small  cost  of  ais 
adjustment  or  repair  job.  Oftea 
just  a  lew  tube  doss  the  trick.  Taf 
•mr  prompt  low-aost  serriatv  ' 


610  N.  i..A«*cLsoxi     vd.     ^jl,  o-6o2\ 
GOLDSBORO,  N.  C. 


Goldsboro,  N,  C. 


J.  P.  TAYLOR  CO.,  Inc. 

LEAF  TOBACCO  DEALERS 

111  E.  Holly  GOLDSBORO,  N.  C.  Dial  RE  5-1581 


MAY'S  RADIATOR  SERVICE 

Auto  Radiator  Repairing 

313  N.  Center  Dial  RE  5-3517  GOLDSBORO,  N.  C. 


Williams'  Sheet  Metal  Works 

'Wo  Job  Too  Large  Or  Too  Small" 
ROOFING  AND  SHEET  METAL  WORK 
COMMERCIAL  —  RESIDENTIAL  —  INDUSTRIAL 
816  N.  Greenleaf        Goldsboro,  N.  C.        Dial  RE  4-5483 


WAYNE  DAIRY 

A  Complete  Line  of 
Select  Dairy  Products, 
Including  Eggs  and  Butter 

RE  4-0574  1105  N.  William 

GOLDSBORO,  N.  C. 


GOLDSBORO 
NURSERY 

Builders  of  Beauty 

ALL  TYPES  OF 
ORNAMENTAL  PLANTS 

Landscaping  Our  Specialty 

Raleigh  Hwy.  Dial  RE  5-2820 
GOLDSBORO,  N.  C. 


PERKINS 
MOTOR  PARTS,  Inc. 


> update 


/2> 


S.  George  Extension 

Dial  RE  5-1862 
GOLDSBORO,  N.  C. 


A  Goldsboro  Friend 
of 

The  State  of  Israel 
Urges  All  Who  Can 

To  Buy 
ISRAEL  BONDS 


Stanley 
Funeral  Home 

Since  1870 

Dial  RE  4-2544 
GOLDSBORO,  N.  C. 


E.  F,  TAYLOR 
COMPANY 

Contractors 

Serving  Eastern  Carolina 
Since  1917 
General  Building 
Commercial  —  Industrial 
Residential 

Dial  RE  4-5581  Bright 
GOLDSBORO,  N.  C. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


NEW  BERN,  N.  C. 


irst  Federal  Savings  & 
Loan  Association 

ALL  SAVINGS  INSURED 

417  Broad  Street 
NEW  BERN,  N.  C 


TO  BE  SURE  —  INSURE  WITH 

THE  DUNN  AGENCY 

JOHN  G.  DUNN,  Jr. 
Fire  —  Auto  —  Surety  Bonds  and  Allied  Lines 

310  Craven  St.        NEW  BERN,  N.  C.        Dial  ME  7-6155 


Craven  Deviled  Crab  Co. 

Four  Delivery  Routes  Each  Week  Covering 
Eastern  North  Carolina  to  the  Greensboro  Area 

M  City  Road  NEW  BERN,  N.  C.  Dial  ME  7-7422 


NEW  BERN  BUILDING  SUPPLY  CO. 

LUMBER  —  READY  MIXED   CONCRETE  —  CONCRETE  BLOCKS 
ROOFING  —  PAINTS  —  PLASTER  —  WINDOWS  —  DOORS 
SAND  —  BRICK  —  and  OTHER  BUILDING  MATERIALS 

110  CRAVEN  ST.  DIAL  ME  7-3143  NEW  BERN,  N.  C. 


COMPLETE  LINE  OF  TOP  QUALITY  LUMBER 

ROOFING  &  WHITE  SIDING  —  LOWE  BROTHERS  PAINTS 
DOORS — WINDOWS — MOULDINGS — .TOHNS-MANVILLE  PRODUCTS 
WEST  COAST  LUMBER 

CITY  LUMBER  CO. 


207  QUEEN  ST. 


Dial  ME  7-7158 


NEW  BERN,  N.  C. 


IVES  OIL  CO. 


GASOLINE 

Kerosene — Fuel  Oil 

Dial  ME  7-2197     Cypress  St 
NEW  BERN,  N.  C. 


Willis  &  Ballard 
Funeral  Home 

Established  1897 

COMPLETE  FUNERAL  SERVICE 
AMBULANCE  SERVICE 

226  Broad  St.  Dial  ME  7-3210 

NEW  BERN,  N.  C. 


EVERYTHING  FOR  THE 
BUILDERS 

B  &  B  Supply  Co. 

Kiln  Dried  Framing  and  Finished 
Lumber  •  Builders  Hardware  • 
Moulding  •  Southport — Patterson 

Sargeant  Paints 
LET  US  FINANCE  YOUR  HOME 
IMPROVEMENTS 
NO  DOWN  PAYMENT  — 

36  MONTHS  TO  PAY 
POLLOCKSVTixE  ROAD 
DIAL  ME  7-5710 
NEW  BERN,  N.  C. 


Sf  anion  Pharmacy 

PRESCRIPTION 
SPECIALISTS 

405  Broad  St.        Dial  ME  7-5732 
NEW  BERN,  N.  C. 


The  S.  B.  Parker  Co. 

LENNOX 

AIRE-FLO  HEATING 
J  215-17  Craven  Street 

Dial  ME  7-3397      NEW  BERN,  N.  C. 


Visitors  from  as  far  away  as 
Hendersonville  as  well  as  others 
from  Statesville,  Valdese,  Lenoir, 
Morganton  were  on  hand  Sunday 
September  13th,  for  the  dedication 
ceremonies  of  the  new  Hickory 
Jewish  Center.  Rabbi  E.  A.  Levi 
of  Charlotte  officiated  at  the  cere- 
mony. 


Groundbreaking  for  the  new 
house  of  worship  was  held  in  Jan- 
uary of  this  year,  and  the  formal 
dedication  of  the  temple  was  the 
culmination  of  many  years  of  work 
on  the  part  of  local  Jewry  to  es- 
tablish their  own  temple. 

The  processional  was  led  by 
Rabbi  Levy,  I.  D.  Blumenthal, 
President  of  the  North  Carolina 
Association  of  Jewish  Men,  officers 
of  the  Hickory  Jewish  Center  and 
members  of  the  board.  The  Torah 
was  placed  in  the  Ark  during  the 
processional. 

David  Kraus,  the  Center's  first 
president  and  chairman  of  the 
building  committee,  opened  the 
Ark  and  Rabbi  Levi  along  with  the 
congregation  recited  the  Hebrew 
prayer.  Mr.  David  I.  Witten,  was 
given  the  honor  of  lighting  the 
Eternal  Light.  Scripture  reading 
was  read  by  Marvin  Zerden,  follow- 
ing which  the  keys  to  the  Center 
were  presented  to  the  incoming 
president  Phil  Datnoff,  by  David 
Kraus. 

Plaques  "in  recognition  of  out- 
standing and  unselfish  efforts  in 
our  behalf,"  were  presented  to  Mr. 
I.  D.  Blumenthal,  and  Mr.  Morris 
Speizman  of  Charlotte;  Mr.  Henry 
Rem  and  Mr.  William  Blanksteen 
of  New  York  City;  Mr.  Sam  Solod 
of  Worcester,  Mass.,  and  to  the 
Lavitt  Foundation  of  Hickory,  by 
the  President  of  the  Center. 


Hickory,  N.  C. 

PHIL  DATNOFF,  Correspondent 

Special  guests  at  the  dedicatior 
were  the  Rev.  J.  T.  Melton,  presi 
dent  of  the  Hickory  Ministerial 
Association,  who  brought  greeting; 
from  the  local  ministry;  Past  Mayoi 
Donald  Menzies,  who  gave  a  wel 
come  from  the  city  of  Hickory;  and 
from  Mr.  I.  D.  Blumenthal,  whc 
gave  greetings  from  the  N.  C.  As 
sociation  of  Jewish  Men  and  Wom- 
en. The  dedicatory  address  wa« 
delivered  by  Rabbi  E.  A.  Levi. 


WILLIS  PLUMBING 
&  HEATING  CO. 

Plumbing  and  Heating 
Contractors 
General  Maintenance 
723  Queen  St.       Dial  ME  7-3545 
NEW  BERN,  N.  C. 


W.  C.  CHADWICK 

GENERAL  INSURANCE 

214  Clark  Building 

Dial  ME  7-3146 
NEW  BERN,  N.  C. 


Regular  Friday  night  services  are 
now  being  held  at  the  new  Hickory 
Jewish  Center  which  was  recently 
dedicated  and  nice  attendance  is 
being  had.  The  women  of  the  La- 
dies Auxiliary  have  been  fulfilling 
their  part  in  the  recent  Oneg  Shab 
bats  we  have  had. 

Sunday  School  is  being  handled 

under  the  capable  leadership  of 
the  following  teachers:  Mrs.  Marvin 
Zerden,  Mrs.  K.  H.  Berndt  and 
your  reporter.  The  school  comprises 
children  from  Lenoir,  Morganton, 
Valdese,  and  Hickory. 


State  B'nai  B'rith 
Groups  Meet 

Chapel  Hill  was  the  scene  of  a 
joint  meeting  of  the  Executive 
Board  of  the  North  Carolina  B'nai 
B'rith  Association  and  the  North 
Carolina  A.D.L.  Advisory  Board, 
on  September  27th. 

At  the  Executive  Board  meeting, 
president  S.  W.  Guyes  outlined 
plans  for  future  operations,  includ- 
ing an  organization  of  past  pres- 
idents, and  a  statewide  fund-raising 
projct. 

Maurice  A.  Weistein,  Supreme 
Grand  Lodge  Vice-president,  was 
the  speaker  at  the  Hillel-sponsored 
luncheon,  held  at  the  Hillel  House. 


NEW  BERN 

Goca-Qola 

BOTTLING  WORKS 

INCORPORATED 

NEW  BERN,  N.  C. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Gas! onia,  N.  C. 

PAULINE  CHINN,  Correspondent 

The  Jewish  community  of  Gas- 
tonia  wishes  all  of  our  friends  a 
very  Happy  New  Year. 


Mr.  and  Mrs.  Leon  Schneider 
and  son,  Elliot  attended  the  In- 
ternational Convention  of  Tau 
Epsilon  Phi  Fraternity  at  Gross- 
ingers,  N.  Y.,  and  at  the  conven- 
tion Leon  was  elected  to  the  Grand 
Council  of  TEP.  Congratulations, 
Leon! 

Our  Temple  has  been  renovated 
and  redecorated  and  it  is  SO  beau- 
tiful. Thanks  to  the  Building  Com- 
mittee for  doing  such  a  superb  job. 

Home  for  the  Rosh  Hashona 
Holiday  were  most  of  our  college 
.students,  from  U.N.C.  were  Ilene 
Chinn,  Melvyn  Fox,  Steve  Girard, 
Eddie  Manning,  Paul  Planer,  John 
Rosenberg,  and  Elliot  Schneider, 
and  Elliot's  guests  Al  Roseman  of 
Jacksonville,  N.  C.  and  Shelly  Fogle 
of  Brooklyn,  N.  Y.,  and  Phyllis 
Witten  from  the  University  of 
Georgia.  It  was  so  good  having  our 
young  'uns  home. 

Our  ex-Mayor,  Leon  Schneider 
did  himself  and  us  proud,  when 
of  September  12  th  he  gave  a  very 
informative  account  of  Gastonia 
and  Gaston  County  on  WSOC-TV, 
on  the  "Accents  on  Gastonia"  pro- 
gram. 

Congratulations  to  the  Rudolph 
Rosenberg  family,  Harry  Rosen- 
berg was  awarded  a  Graduate  Fel- 
lowship at  Brandeis  University. 
Good  Health  and  Success,  Harry! 


Joan  Hahn,  has  transferred  from 
W.  C.  to  the  University  of  Mary- 
land, and  reports  that  she  "just 
loves  it  up  there." 


McDAID  BROS.,  Inc. 

ELECTRIC  APPLIANCES 

35  Hayne  St.  Dial  RA  3-4561 

CHARLESTON,  S.  C 


RANCH  HOUSE 
RESTAURANT 

Specializing  in 

Guaranteed 
U.  S.  Choice 

and  Prime 
Western  Beef 
Charcoal- 
Broiled 

DIAL 
EX  9-5411 

Wilkinson  Boulevard 
U.  S.  Highway  29  South 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


Mrs.  Herbert  Girard  represented 
our  chapter  at  the  National  Hadas- 
sah  Convention  in  St.  Louis,  Mo., 
where  she  spoke  before  the  Con- 
vention on  her  "Experiences  in 
Israel"  while  on  a  visit  there  last 
year. 

Temple  President  and  Mrs.  Cy 
Girard  returned  home  from  a  trip 
to  Europe  and  Israel.  Their  en- 
thusiasm and  admiration  for  the 
State  of  Israel  is  boundless. 

Our  Rabbi  and  Mrs.  Utschen 
have  been  very  busy  this  summer 
attending  conventions.  They  at- 
tended the  Annual  Conference  of 
American  Rabbis  held  at  Bretton 
Wood,  N.  H.,  and  the  N.  C.  In- 
stitute of  Rabbis  at  Wildacres,  and 
the  Wildacres  Retreat  for  Ministers 
at  Wildacres. 


Genera"  David  Sarnott  r;ceived 
the  B'nai  B'rith  President's  Medal 
for  "creative  genius  in  'higher  com- 
munications' —  that  of  advancing 
knowledge  and  unierjtanSing  be- 
tween men  and  nations."  Libel  'A. 
Katz,  B'nai  B'rit'i  president,  made 
;he  presentation  Nov.  10,  at  a  din- 
ner in  New  York. 


PERI AL 

EANERS 


•  Laundry 
®  Cleaning 

"One-Day  Service" 
Plenty  of  Parking  Space 
For  Pick-Up  and  Delivery 
Dial  RA  2-0622 

223  Calhoun  St. 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


"We  Cater  to  Those  Who 
Care" 

Carolina  Auto 
Upholstery  Co. 

•  Tailored  Seat  Covers 

•  Convertible  Tops 
Complete  Interior  Trim 

139  W.  Morehead— ED  2-3998 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


N.  G.  SPEIR 
Incorporated 


Home  Loans 
Real  Estate  Sales 

• 

130  East  Fourth  Street 
Dial  ED  4-5386 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


Dial  FR  3-6177 


F.  &  R,  COAL 
AND  OIL  CO. 

624  S.  Cedar 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


Leo's  Delicatessen,  Inc. 

"Kosher  Food" 

Specialists  in  Imported 
Delicacies,  Party  Fare, 
and  Gift  Packages 

Phone  FRanklin  5-2400 
1503  Elizabeth  Ave. 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


CHARLOTTE'S  FIRST  COMPLETE 

ma 


•  Folding  chairs 

•  Banquet  tables 

•  Punch  bowls 

•  Cocktail  glasses 

•  CARD  TABLES 
«  VACUUM  CLEANERS 


9  BABY  BEDS  ©  HOSPITAL  BEDS 

©   ROLL-AWAY  BEDS      @   WHEEL  CHAIRS 

Rent  these  items  by  day,  week  or  month 
Phone  FR  5-5725  for  other  items  1517  E.  Blvd.  Charlotte,  N.  C. 


J.  HENRY  STUHR,  Inc.' 

FUNERAL  DIRECTORS 

Se  ving  Charleston  Over  j 
One-Half  Century 

Dial  RA  2-4064 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


Inc. 

Suite  1009,  Wachovia  Bldg. 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


FIRST  FEDERAL  SAVINGS  &  LOAN  ASS'N. 

INSURED  SAVINGS 
Main  Office  Akers  Center  Branch 

251  W.  Main  Ave.  1327  E.  Franklin  Ave. 

Dial  UN  7-7248  Dial  UN  4-4566 

GASTONIA,  N.  C. 


The  New  1960  Olds  now  on  display  at 

McKETHAN  OLDSMOBILE  INC, 

COMPLETE  ONE-STOP  AUTOMOTIVE  SERVICE 

652  King  St.  CHARLESTON,  S.  C.         Dial  RA  2-0594 


AMERICAN  ELECTRIC  COMPANY 

ELECTRICAL  CONTRACTORS 
Commercial  —  Industrial  —  Residential 

289  Calhoun  CHARLESTON,  S.  C.  Dial  RA  3-6541 


22 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Wilson,  N.  C. 


REFRIGERATOR  BODIES 


HACKNEY  BROS,  BODY  COMPANY 


P.  0.  Box  856 


WILSON,  N.  C. 


Dial  7-0105 


REECE  DEANS  -  -  Plumbing  -  Heating 


We  Install  —  We  Repair  —  We  Service 


Estimates  Given 


123  Kenan 


Dial  5100 

WILSON,  N.  C, 


BARNES  TRUCK  LINE,  Inc. 

INTERSTATE  AND  INTRASTATE  CARRIERS 
CARGO  INSURED 

506  Mayo  Street  WILSON,  N.  C.  Dial  7-0188 


IDEAL  PLUMBING  COMPANY 

PLUMBING  CONTRACTORS 

State  License  No.  1288 
PLUMBING  AND  PLUMBING  REPAIRS 
301  HIGHWAY  SOUTH  PHONE  5290  WILSON,  N.  C. 


Naflioimi  Bank 
©f  Wilson 

Complete 

Banking  Service 

MEMBER 
Federal  Reserve  System 


WILSON,  N.  C. 


HUNT 
Funeral  Home 

FUNERAL  DIRECTORS 


24-Hour  Ambulance 
Service 
DAY  or  NIGHT 

Dial  3148 

115  N.  Tarboro  St. 
WILSON,  N.  C 


BERGER  &  JONES 

Heating  and  Air-Conditioning 
Contractors 
•  RESIDENTIAL 
•  COMMERCIAL 
•  INDUSTRIAL 
646  S.  Tarboro  St.    Dial  5813 
WILSON,  N.  C. 


R.  E  T ownsend 

and  Company 

Serving  Wilson  and  Vicinity 
Since  1898 

Your  Real  Estate  Agent 

•  SALES  •  RENTALS 

•  INSURANCE 

•  Prompt       ©Friendly  Service 

107  N.  Douglas  St.  Dial  3216 

WILSON,  N.  C. 


Asheville,  N.  C. 

MRS.  GUSTAV  LICHTENFELS,  Correspondent 

Temple  Beth  Ha  Tephila  held     Riverside  Military 


its  threeday  observance  of  the  de- 
dication of  its  lovely,  new  11-room 
Religious  School  Building  the 
weekend  of  September  18-20.  The 
festivities  began  Friday  evening  at 
services  when  Rabbi  Julius  Mark, 
senior  Rabbi  of  Temple  Emanu 
El  in  New  York,  spoke.  Saturday 
evening,  a  fine  banquet  was  held 
in  the  Grove  Park  Inn,  where  over 
140  members  of  the  congregation 
heard  a  fine  talk  by  an  Asheville 
attorney,  Mr.  Francis  J.  Heazel, 
also  supreme  treasurer  of  the 
Knights  of  Columbus.  Sunday 
morning,  the  children  of  the  Re- 
ligious School  conducted  their 
own  services,  and  Sunday  evening 
the  final  phase  of  the  activity  was 
held.  AH  in  all,  it  was  a  splendid 
celebration  for  the  beautiful  new 
building  of  which  we  are  all  so 
proud. 

Miss  Susan  Gumpert,  a  gradu- 
ate of  Lee  Edwards  high  school, 
who  entered  Bryn  Mawr  College, 
spent  the  summer  in  Mexico  un- 
der the  auspices  of  the  Experi- 
ment In  International  Living. 
There,  she  lived  with  a  Mexican 
family,  learning  the  customs  and 
language  of  the  people.  Her  par- 
ents, Mr.  and  Mrs.  Rudolf  Gum- 
pert,  drove  to  Mexico  for  a  short 
vacation.  They  returned  home  to- 
gether. 

Miss  Barbara  Feldman  will  be 
a  freshman  at  Emory  University. 
Atlanta,  Ga.,  and  her  brother, 
Leon    Jr.    (Buzzy)    is  attending 


C.  Woodard  Co.,  Inc. 

Office  and  Reception  Room 
Furniture  —  Safes  —  Show 
Cases  —  Store  Equipment 

105  N.  Douglas  St.  Dial  2450 

WILSON,  N.  C. 


Academy, 
Gainsville,  Ga.  Their  older  sister, 
Ronda,  is  in  the  School  of  Phar- 
macy, University  of  Cincinatti. 
The  three  students  are  the  chil- 
dren of  Dr.  and  Mrs.  Leon  H. 
Feldman. 

Our  other  college  freshmen  are 
Carol  Lichtenfels,  University  of 
Miami;  Peggy  Bauer,  Hood  Col- 
lege, Fredricksberg,  Md.;  Ellen 
Dave,  Sydney  Levitch,  and  Claire 
Kalin,  Women's  College,  U.N.C.; 
Sharon  Willig,  University  of  Ga.; 
Ronnie  Bard,  Ronnie  Goldstein, 
Michael  Shulimson,  N.  C.  State; 
Benet  Kolman  and  David  Kronen- 
feld,  Harvard  Universitv. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  R.  S.  Abrahams  of 
Nashville,  Tenn.,  have  announced 
the  engagement  of  their  daughter, 
Jane  Linda,  to  Mr.  Robert  Daroff, 
of  Philadelphia,  son  of  Mrs.  May 
Daroff  of  New  York,  and  the  late 
Charles  Daroff.  The  young  couple 
are  both  attending  the  University 
of  Pennsylvania,  where  Miss  Abra- 
hams will  graduate  in  June  and 
Mr.  Daroff  is  in  his  third  year  of 
Medical  School.  The  wedding  is 
planned  for  December.  Miss  Abra- 
hams is  the  granddaug-hter  of  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  G.  Lichtenfels  of  Ashe- 
ville. 

Congratulations  to  Mr.  Bernev 
Goldstein  and  Dr.  Joseph  Schand- 
ler  who  have  been  elected  to  the 
position  of  president  and  presi- 
dent-elect of  Temple  Beth  Israel, 
respectively. 

HOME  BUILDERS 
SUPPLY  CO. 

Lumber  —  Millwork 
Building  Materials 

Black  Creek  Rd.  Dial  4225 

WILSON,  N.  C. 


FOR  THE  FINEST  IN  WATER  CRAFT 

BARBOUR  BOAT  WORKS 

COMPLETE  LINE  OF  MARTNE  HARDWARE 
NEW  ENGINE  RECONDITIONING  PLANT 
COMMERCIAL  VESSELS  and  PLEASURE  BOATS 
OUTBOARD  MOTORBOATS  in  NEW,  MODERN  DESIGNS 

"Service  With  Ability" 
Established  1903 


Dial  ME  7-2152 


New  Bern,  N.  C. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


2? 


The  engagement  of  Miss  Paula 
Ruth  Lachman  to  Mr.  Ralph 
Michael  Gilbert  of  Jamaica,  Long 
Island,  New  York,  son  of  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Arthur  Gilbert,  is  announc- 
ed by  her  parents,  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Lee  Lachman,  of  Asheville.  Miss 
Lachman  is  a  graduate  of  the  Uni- 
versity of  Wisconsin,  and  Mr.  Gil- 
bert, who  has  just  completed  his 
stay  in  the  army,  stationed  at  El 
Paso,  Texas,  is  a  graduate  of  MIT, 
'57.  The  wedding  will  be  held 
Saturday  evening,  November  28, 
in  Temple  Beth  Ha  Tephila.  A 
reception  will  follow. 


Congratulations  are  in  order  for 
a  few  special  September  and  Octo- 
ber birthdays.  To  Mr.  Gustav 
Lichtenfels  for  his  82nd  on  Sept. 
14;  to  Mrs.  J.  B.  Breman  for  her 
82nd  on  Sept.  16;  and  to  Mrs. 
Alice  Lichtenfels  for  her  80th  on 
October  17th. 

The  engagement  of  Miss  Susan 
Blomberg  to  Mr.  Harold  Issacs  of 
East  Orange,  N.  J.,  has  been  an- 
nounced by  her  parents,  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Bernard  Blomberg.  The 
bride-to-be  is  a  sophmore  at  the 
University  of  Alabama,  where  her 
fiancee  holds  an  Assistantship. 


ICmsion,  N.  C. 

MRS.  SOi,  SCHECTER,  Correspondent 

The  high  holy  days  brought  the 
guests,  coming 


usual  influx 


Rock  Hill,  S.  C. 


BRENDA  R.  KURTZ 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Benjamin  F. 
Kurtz  announce  the  engagement 
of  their  daughter,  Brenda  Rae,  to 
Charles  Phillip  Meltsner,  of  To- 
ronto, Canada  and  Chapel  Hill, 
N.  C.  A  family  wedding  is  plann- 
ed for  December  20th,  in  Temple 
Israel,  Charlotte,  N.  C. 


home  to  be  with  parents  and 
friends.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bernard 
Kahn  and  their  three  children 
from  Columbia.  S.  C.  visited  Mrs. 
Kahn's  parents,  Rabbi  and  Mrs. 
J.  G.  Tolochko. 

Alan  Heilig,  from  Winston- 
Salem,  visited  his  parents,  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Morris  Heilig.  The  Sidney 
Kantors  enjoyed  the  holidays  with 
their  children,  Sylvia  from  Atlanta 
and  Jerry  from  New  Orleans. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Herbert  Pearson 
and  family,  who  have  recently 
moved  to  Goldsboro,  spent  Rosh 
Hashonah  with  his  parents,  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Harry  Pearson. 

Mrs.  Ramund  Baydush  and 
daughter,  from  Norfolk,  Va.  are 
spending  ten  days  with  parents, 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Leo  Brody. 

Our  annual  rummage  sale  for 
Hadassah  and  the  Temple  Sister- 
hood, has  been  in  progress  since 
September  4th.  Mrs.  |oe  Gold 
wasser  and  Mrs.  Sol  Schechter 
are  in  charge,  and  as  usual,  this 
has  been  a  very  successful  venture. 


WJHWHWtW  1  [J 


DON'T  FORGET! 
BUY  THAT 
ISRAEL  BOND  NOW! 


r/unheani  § 

Bread 

**SruB/rurn  fireaa  3 


ENRICHED  Bread  ]jj 


Ask  For 
Made-Rite 
Sunbeam 
& 

Rolls 


Made-Rite  Bakery 


Goldsboro,  N.  C. 


KINSTON,  N.  (. 


Kinston's  Leading  Department  Store 

COMMERCIAL  NATIONAL  BANK 

The  Home-Owned  Bank 
Member  F.  D.  I.  C.  Member  Federal  Reserve  System 

KINSTON,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


Home  Federal  Savings  &  Loan  Association 

N.  Queen  St.  KINSTON,  N.  C.  Dial  JA  3-6165 

"Your  New  Home  For  Savings" 
3'/2%  Current  Dividend 

Member:  Federal  Savings  and  Loan  Insurance  Corporation 


MIDYETTE  HARDWARE  CO. 

BUILDING  MATERIALS 

Benjamin  Moore  Paints  —  Flintkote  Roofing  Materials 
111  N.  Queen  St.  Dial  JA  3-3742 

KINSTON,  N.  C. 


W.  M.  SUTTON  ELECTRIC  CO. 

ELECTRICAL  CONTRACTORS 

COMMERCIAL  —  RESIDENTIAL  —  INDUSTRIAL  WIRING 

Dial  JA  3-4715  558  N.  East  Street  KINSTON,  N.  C. 


GENERATOR  &  STARTER  SERVICE 

Generators  and  Starters  Rebuilt  or  Exchanged 
Voltage  Regulator  Service 

WILLARD  BATTERIES 

Wholesale  &  Retail 
Dial  JA  7-0203  123  W.  Blount  Street  KINSTON,  N.  C. 


CAROLINA  BUILDING  SUPPLY  CO. 

OF  KINSTON,  N.  C. 

EVERYTHING  FOR  YOUR  BUILDING  NEEDS 

Dial  JA  3-4681  1410  W.  Vernon  Avenue  KINSTON,  N.  C. 


BARRUS  CONSTRUCTION  CO. 

Paving  Contractors 
GRADING  —  DRAINAGE  —  READY-MIXED  CONCRETE 

New  Bern  Highway  Kinston,  N.  C. 


24 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK. 


EL  Ls 


r 


m 


Roofing  and  Sheet 
Metal  Contractors 

VENTILATORS 
LENNOX  FURNACES 
Winter  and  Summer 

Air-Conditioning 

Heating  -  -  Dial  JA  3-4732 
Roofing  -  -  Dial  JA  3-2110 
West  Vernon  Avenue 
KINSTON,  N.  C. 


CAROLINA  DAIRY 
CORPORATION 

GRADE  "A" 

PASTEURIZED  MILK 

CREAM  —  ICECREAM 

Prompt  Courteous  Service 

W.  Vernon  Avenue 

Dial  J  A  3-4U3 
KINSTON,  N.  C. 


Raleigh,  N.  G.  Beth  Meyer  Synagogue 

MRS.  OSCAR  LEGUM,  Correspondent 


3  </2%  "INSURED"  SAVINGS 

Mutual  Savings  and  Loan 
Association 

114  E.  Gordon  St.  KINSTON,  N.  C. 


"Everything  From  Foundation  To  Roof" 
Grady's  Building  Supply  &  Hardware 

Russwin  Builders'  Hardware  —  Du  Pont  Paints 
Johns  Manville  &  U.  S.  Gypsum  Products 

514  E.  Vernon  Ave.        KINSTON,  N.  C.  Dial  JA  3-2156 


White  Owl 
Motor  Co. 


Sales  —  Service 

Dial  JA  3-2161 
KINSTON,  N.  C. 


Kinston  Shoe  Hospital 

QUALITY 
SHOE  REPAIRS 

105  E.  North       Dial  J  A  3-2824 
KINSTON,  N.  C. 

AUNT  JENNIE'S 
BAKE  SHOP 

FRENCH  BREAD 
CAKES— PIES— ROLLS 

813  N.  Queen  St.  Dial  JA  3-4611 
KINSTON,  N.  C 


"Say  It  With  Flowers" 

RANDOLPH'S 
FLORIST 

Dial  JA  3-4148 
Day  or  Night 
710  West  Vernon  Ave. 
KINSTON,  N.  C. 


JACKSON  GLASS 
&TOP  WORKS 

•  Furniture  Refinishing 

•  Antique  Restoring 

Complete  Furniture  and 

Auto  Upholstering 

Blount  and  Heritage  Streets 
Dial  JA  7-0711       Kinston,  N.  C. 


Carolina  Cleaners 
and  Laundry 

Complete  Laundry  Service 

Beautiful  Cleaning 

"A  Modern  Plant  for 
Quality  Cleaning" 

Dial  J  A  3-2168 

121  N.  Heritage 
KINSTON,  N.  C. 


FOR  FUEL  OILS 

DIAL  JA  3-3127 

MARTIN  OIL  CO. 

Distributors  of 


PRODUCTS 

KINSTON,  N.  C. 


Mr.  and  Mrs.  Abe  E.  Oser  an- 
nounce the  marriage  of  their 
daughter,  Frances  I.ee,  to  Lester 
Henry  Frank,  son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Nathaniel  C.  Frank,  of  Woodmere, 
Long  Island,  New  York.  The  wed- 
ding took  place  at  the  Hotel  Shera- 
ton-East, New  York,  on  September 
13th.  Frances  and  Lester  have  re- 
turned from  a  European  honey- 
moon and  are  living  at  Washington 
Square  Village,  N.  Y. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Max  Bane  have 
announced  the  engagement  of  their 
daughter,  Sara  Evalyn,  to  David 
Moskowitz,  son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Morris  Moskowitz  of  Miami  Beach, 
Fla.  The  wedding  will  take  place  on 
November  28th. 

Our  congratulations  to  William 
Howard  Glass,  son  of  Mrs.  Hyman 
A.  Glass,  who  was  married  to  Mari- 
lyn Dee  Ka/low,  daughter  of  Mr. 


and  Mrs.  Seymour  Kazlow  of  Mi- 
ami Beach,  Fla.,  on  September  5th, 
at  the  Hotel  Deauville  in  Miami 
Beach.  Bill  and  Marilyn  are  now 
living  in  Atlanta. 

Beth  Meyer  offers  condolences  to 
the  Margulies  family  upon  the 
death  of  Mrs.  Gussie  Margulies, 
who  had  been  a  member  of  the  syn- 
agogue for  33  years.  She  is  survived 
by  three  sons:  Jesse,  of  Raleigh; 
Irving,  of  Norfolk,  Va.,  and  Sidney, 
of  Miami. 

We  wish  a  speedy  recovery  to  Mr. 
I.  J.  Green,  Roseann  Green,  Mi- 
chael Shor,  and  Joyce  Robinson, 
who  have  been  ill. 

Mazel  Tov  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  I.  J. 
Green  upon  the  birth  of  their  first 
grandson,  son  of  Lenorc  (Green) 
and  Mel  Stottenstein  of  Columbus, 
Ohio. 


Salisbury,  N.  C. 

MRS.  S.  W.  GUYES,  Correspondent 

The  S.  W.  Guyes  and  the  Ben     A  gratifying  representation  of  state 


Shapiros  went  to  Chapel  Hill  to 
attend  the  first  executive  board  and 
Hillel  meeting  of  the  new  adminis- 
tration of  B'nai  B'rith.  The  State 
President,  S.  W.  Guyes,  presented 
quite  a  lengthy  working  program 
for  the  year,  including  the  organ- 
ization of  all  past  state  presidents. 
It  was  decided  that  a  state  wide 
fund  raising  project  be  undertaken; 
and  a  uniform  method  of  billing 
dues  was  also  adopted.  The  Sunday 
afternoon  session  was  devoted  to 
the  Hillel  program.  The  main 
speakers  were  Maurice  Weinstein, 
of  Charlotte;  Louis  Mirman  of  Nor- 
folk, Va.,  and  Julius  Fisher,  Dis- 
trict Secretary,  from  Roanoke,  Va. 


Lodges  and  committees  was  pres- 
ent. 

Holiday  services  at  Temple  Is- 
rael were  conducted  by  Rabbi 
George  Ackerman  of  Gold  Hill, 
S.  G,  assisted  by  many  of  our 
local  members  and  many  visitors 
from  nearby  towns  were  with  us. 

Home  for  the  holidays  were  Roy 
Goodman,  Charles  Goldman  and 
David  Singer,  all  from  Fort  Jack- 
son, S.  C.  Gertrude  Bitzick  came 
in  from  Columbia,  S.  C.  to  visit 
the  Feits;  Mort  Lerner's  mother 
came  down  from  Philadelphia  to 
visit  Mort  and  Bernice,  and  Buddy 
and  Jack  Levine  came  in  from 
Oxford,  N.  C.  to  spend  the  Holi- 
days with  the  Leon  Steins. 


WHOLESOME 


MADE  WJTH  CRISP, 
CHUNKY  WALNUTS 
AND  THE  WORLD'S 
CHOSCEST  DATES 


Former  U.  S.  Ambessador  Edward 
B.  Lawson  who  served  as  Amercian 
envoy  to  Israel  from  1954-1959,  has 
been  named  1959  recipient  of  the  an- 
nual "America-Israel  Friendship 
Award''  of  the  Mizrpchi  Women's 
Organization  of  America. 


DROMEDARY  CHOCOLATE-NUT  ROLL 
fi-        ond  ORANGE-NUT  ROLL 


r, 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 

Durham,  N.  C. 

MRS.  SAM  FKEEDMAN,  Correspondent 

to  him  by  the  Sisterhood  President, 
Mrs.  I.  Zelon.  He  then  delivered 
a  fine  sermonette,  "The  Ten  Com- 
mandments for  Young  Men"  and 
promised  to  defer  to  them  in  his 
daily  living.  He  also  thanked  his 
parents,  and  teacher,  Rabbi  M. 
Herbert  Berger,  for  their  patience 
and  interest  in  him. 

Rabbi  Berger  then  presented  his 
sermon,  "Beauties  and  Duties  of 
Judaism." 

After  services,  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Gitelson,  Richard,  his  sister  Elaine 
and  Rabbi  Berger  formed  a  receiv- 
ing line  for  the  Oneg  Shabat  which 
was  held  in  the  social  hall. 

Saturday  morning  Richard  recit- 
ed his  haftorah.  He  had  diligently 
prepared  himself  for  this  auspcious 
occasion  and  it  was  indeed  gratify- 
ing not  only  to  himself,  but  to 
his  parents,  grandparents  and  teach- 
er. 

The  president  of  the  congrega- 
tion, Irving  Zelon,  presented  Rich- 
ard with  a  certificate  of  Bar  Mitz- 
vah  in  honor  of  this  occasion.  The 
traditional  kiddush  was  then  made 
and  luncheon  was  served.  The 
luncheon  was  really  a  gourmet's 
delight  -  all  kinds  of  fishes  were 
served,  and  Grandmother  Gitelson 
had  brought  from  New  York  deli- 
cious "kichel"  to  eat  with  the  fish. 

The  communty  joins  me  in  wish- 
ing Richard  lots  of  luck  and  hope 
that  his  family  will  always  have 
"nachus"  from  him. 

Out  of  town  guests  for  the  happy 
occasion  were:  Mrs.  J.  M.  Finkel, 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Abe  Schewel  and  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Ben  Schewel,  Lynchburg, 
Va.,  and  Mrs.  V.  Heiner,  Roanoke, 
Va.  From  New  York  came  Mr.  and 
■Mrs.  S.  Gitelson,  Brooklyn;  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  B.  Gitelson,  Louise  and 
Steven  Gitelson,  Cedarhust,  Long 
Island;  Mrs.  Jack  Mazo  and  Mr. 
Bertram!  Mazo  and  Mr.  Clem 
Hausman. 

The  songwriter  who  wrote,  "You 
will  have  the  time-the  time  of  your 
liie  .  .  ."  must  have  had  Hadassah's 
.National  Convention  in  mind.  Our 
delegate,  Mrs.  J.  Colvin,  Hadassah 
president,  gave  such  a  glowing 
report  of  the  St.  Louis  Convention 
that  all  members  will  be  anxious 
to  attend  the  next  one.  Durham's 
chapter  was  singly  honored  by  hav- 
ing one  of  its  own  members,  Sara 
Evans,  a  member  at  large  of  the 
National  Board,  to  be  chairman  of 
the  nominating  committee. 


33 


RICHARD  GITELSON 

With  beauty  and  dignity,  Rich- 
ard Gitelson,  son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Harry  Gitelson,  was  admitted  into 
the  realm  of  Jewish  Manhood,  Sep- 
tember nth  and  12th,  at  the  Beth- 
El  Synagogue. 

It  was  indeed  a  great  simcha  foi 
Richard's  grandparents,  Mrs.  }.  M. 
Finkel,  Lynchburg,  Va.,  and  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  S.  Gitelson,  Brooklyn, 
N.  Y.,  to  witness  the  proud  parents, 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Harry  Gitelson  place 
the  talis  on  their  son's  shoulders 
and  recite  the  blessings.  This  mark- 
ed the  beginning  of  the  consecra- 
tion ceremony. 

Richard  rendered  a  melodious 
kiddush,  using  the  silver  kiddush 
c  up  which  had  just  been  presented 


UPHOLSTERING 

CUSTOM  QUALITY 
INSIDE  rnd  OUT 

REFINISHTNG  —  REPAIRING 

ALL  WORK  GUARANTEED 
FREE  ESTIMATES 

JOHNSON'S 
Upholstering  Co. 

L  E.  Johnson  -  A.  C.  Johnson,  Jr. 
Terrell  Rd.  Dial  9-4962 

DURHAM,  N.  C. 


For  Better  Buildings 
Tomorrow 
Use  Solite  Blocks 
Today 

25T 


H&O 
Concrete  Block  & 
Pipe  Co. 

S.  Goley  St.  Dial  4-5291 

DURHAM,  N.  C. 


Durham  -  Raleigh,  N.  C. 


"Plans  the  Years  Ahead  Today 
.  .  .  The  Home  Security  Way" 

District  Offices  and  Service  Offices  Located  In  Principal 
Cities  and  Towns  Throughout  North  Carolina 

Life  Insurance  In  Force:  Over  $275,000,000 

Home  Security  Life  Insurance  Co. 

Bascom  Baynes,  President 
Geo.  Watts  Hill,  Chairman  of  the  Board 

DURHAM,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


WEST  DURHAM  LUMBER  COMPANY 

Custom  Millwork  —  Curtis  Millwork  Dealer 
Johns-Manville  Roofing  —  Masonite  Insulation 

310D  Hillsboro  Road  DURHAM,  N.  C.  Dial  8-2261 


Durham  Really  &  Insurance  Company 

"Service  With  Ability" 
Insurance  —  Real  Estate  —  Property  Management 
Established  1903 
109  Market  D  al  6961  DURHAM,  N.  C. 


Wm.  MUIRHEAD  CONSTRUCTION  CO. 

—GENERAL  CONTRACTORS— 

Industrial  and  Commercial 
Buildings  —  Paving  —  Public  Works  —  Asphalt  Products 

Phone  6701  E.  Trinity  Avenue  Durham,  N.  C. 


CREATORS  OF  REASONABLE  DRUG  PRICES 

ECKERD'S 

122  W.  Main  Forest  Hills  Shopping  Center 

DURHAM.  NORTH  CAROLINA 


World's 
Largest  Selling 
Beer 

DURHAM 

HMsfiribeif ing  Co., 
line 

Distributors 
PHONE  2-1139 
DURHAM,  N.  C. 


2'6' 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


DURHAM  BUILDERS  SUPPLY  COMPANY 

BUILDING  MATERIALS 

Office  and  Warehouse  —  Milton  Avenue  at  Main  Street 
Jjt.  R.  Slattery,  Mgr.       DURHAM,  N.  C.  Dial  4967 


Martin  Millwork  Co. 

PAINTS 
LUMBER  —  MILLWORK 

Dial  TE  3-1681 
200  Harrison  Avenue 

RALEIGH,  N.  C. 


In  Durham 

it's 

HARVEY'S 
CAFETERIA 

...  for  Good  Eating 


DAVID  G.  ALLEN 

Tiles — Marble  and  Terazzo 
307-0  N.  Harrington 
Dial  TE  2-2736 
RALEIGH,  N.  C. 


refreshes  , 
without  filling 

Hi 


Quality  &  Service 

New  Method  Laundry 
and  Dry  Cleaners,  Inc. 

Branch  —  1106  Broad  St. 

The  Quick  Service  Wash  Tub 
Roxboro  Rd.  at  Avondale  Dr. 

DURHAM,  N.  C. 


CAROLINA 
BLOCK  CO. 

GEORGE  D.  OWEN,  Prop. 

Dial  4-4022 
CONCRETE  BLOCKS 

SOLITE  BLOCKS 
For  All  Building  Purposes 
E.  Geer  and  Avondale 
DURHAM,  N.  C. 


3705  Hillsboro 
Raleigh,  N.  C. 


BEER  -  -  - 


THE  BEVERAGE 

OF  MODERATION 

North  Carolina  Association 
Of  Beer  Distributors 


A  special  installation  ceremony 
for  the  new  members  was  conduct- 
ed by  the  membership  chairmen. 
Mrs.  I.  T.  Reamer  and  Mrs.  S. 
Cohn. 

A  holiday  program  on  Rosh 
Hashonah  was  presented  by  the 
Mizrachi  Women  at  their  first 
meeting.  Mrs.  Mannie  }.  Blum, 
president,  called  on  the  project 
chairmen  to  report  on  their  plans 
for  the  coming  year. 

Mrs.  H.  Karesh,  Greensboro, 
President  of  the  Seaboard  Region 
of  the  National  Women's  League 
of  The  United  Synagogue  of  Amer 
ica,  was  the  guest  speaker  and  in- 
stalled the  new  members  of  the 
Sisterhood  at  the  Membership  Tea. 
Mrs.  Karesh  spoke  on  the  ideals 
and  aims  of  a  Sisterhood.  Mrs.  R. 
Lipton  introduced  Mrs.  Karesh. 

Looking  forward  to  a  year  of 
homework  and  extra-curricular  fun 
are  our  boys  and  girls  who  have 
gone  off  to  school  and  whom  we 
wish  a  successful  year.  Among  those 
away  are  my  own  daughters,  Lubah, 
a  senior  at  the  University  of  South 
Carolina  and  Neilda,  a  sophomore 
at  the  University  of  Georgia;  also 
at  Georgia  we  find  LeRay  Bergman, 


Fabianne  Wolff  and  Sandra  Myers. 
Carolyn  Fink  is  planning  to  matric- 
ulate at  the  University  of  North 
Carolina  in  January  and  will  be 
receiving  her  Mrs.  degree  in  Febru- 
ary. Also  at  Carolina  are  Harvey 
Peck  at  the  Dental  school  and  his 
brother,  Shelton,  a  freshman;  Eileen 
Rancer  chose  Elon  College  and 
Rosalyn  Goldberg  is  at  WCUNC, 
while  Barbara  Wishnov  plans  to 
make  nursing  her  career  at  the 
Nursing  School,  Duke  University. 
Also  at  nursing  school  at  the  Uni- 
versity of  Michigan  is  Myra  Cohen 
and  her  sister,  Beth  who  is  a  sopho- 
more at  Oberlin.  The  Roosevelt 
School  in  Conn,  attracted  Beverly 
Lieberman  for  her  senior  year  in 
high  school.  We  miss  them  all! 

Congratulations  to  Robert  I. 
Lipton  who  has  been  named  special 
assistant  to  the  president  of  District 
5  of  B'nai  B'rith,  a  newly-created 
post.  Mrs.  Sam  Freedman  has  been 
named  chairman  of  the  "School 
Luncheon  Fund"  sponsored  by  the 
Durham  Woman's  Club. 

Our  community  has  recently 
been  saddened  by  the  death  of 
Bernard  Katz  who  was  born  and 
reared  in  Durham.  Condolances 
are  extended  to  the  family. 


Temple  Befth  Or  —  Raleigh,  N.  C. 


MRS   HARRY  C API 

High  Holy  Day  Services  elicited 
the  most  favorable  comments  from 
the  large  and  reverent  congrega- 
tions present  at  these  services.  Im- 
mediately following  New  Year's 
Eve  Services,  a  reception  tendered 
by  the  Sisterhood  was  held  in  the 
Assembly  Rooms  of  the  Temple 
where  one  could  hear  the  tradi 
lional  "Happy  New  Year"  being 
repeated  on  all  sides.  We  are  most 
grateful  to  Mrs.  B.  S.  Aronson, 
hospitalitv  chairman  and  her  large 
committee  who  was  responsible 
for  this  annual  function. 

The  Holidav  choir  under  the 
able  direction  of  Dr.  Nell  Hirsch- 
berg  performed  beautifully;  the 
ushers  as  always  performed  their 
iob  in  a  most  efficient  manner. 
The  artistically  arranged  flowers 


AN,  Correspondent 

also  added  very  greatly  to  the 
impressiveness  of  the  services.  Our 
thanks  to  Alan  Levi  for  blowing 
the  shofar  at  the  Children's  ser- 
vices on  Sunday.  Our  appreciation 
is  extended  to  all  who  participat- 
ed in  our  services. 

On  Saturday  afternoon,  follow- 
ing Rosh  Hashonah  Services,  Rab- 
bi and  Mrs.  Harry  Caplan  held 
open  house  to  wish  members  of 
their  congregation  every  "good 
wish  for  the  year  5720". 

Succoth  Services  were  held  Fri- 
day, October  16th  at  which  time 
members  of  the  Religious  School 
held  a  service  under  the  Surrah. 
On  Friday,  October  23rd  the  Har- 
vest festival  and  Consecration 
Services  took  place  and  the  fol- 
lowing children  were  con^---Uf>d: 


BORDEN  BRICK 
&  TILE  COMPANY 


Plant?:  Durham  anH  Sanford,  N.  C 
Home  Office:  Goldsboro,  N.  C. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


*7 


Cynthia  Josephs,  Nancy  Fleischer. 
Randy  Schafer,  Russell  Wollman, 
Stephen  Satterwhite,  Linda  Sat- 
tervvhite,  Ellen  Mark  and  Pamela 
Mark.  The  children  brought  of- 
ferings of  fruit  which  was  dis- 
tributed to  a  local  hospital. 

We  cordially  welcome  into  the 
religious  fellowship  of  our  con- 
gregation Mr.  and  Mrs.  Samuel 
S.  Aronson  and  Dr.  and  Mrs. 
Slater  Newman.  It  is  our  firm 
conviction  that  this  relationship 
will  prove  spiritually  stimulating 
to  all  concerned. 

Rabbi  Caplan  has  resumed  his 
teaching  duties  at  Shaw  University 
where  he  teaches  6  hours  a  week. 
He  conducts  two  classes:  one  in 
"Introduction  to  Old  Testament" 
and  the  other  in  "Isaiah". 

The  following  individuals  have 
recently  joined  our  Religious 
School  faculty:  Mrs.  C.  Satter- 
white, Miss  Madeline  Kidman 
and  Miss  Suzanne  Kaye.  We  feel 
<iuite  certain  that  these  new  teach- 
ers will  make  a  significant  con- 
tribution to  the  enrichment  and 
progress  of  our  school. 

Syllabi  outlining  in  detail  the 
curriculum  for  the  year  and  pre- 
pared by  Rabin'  and  Mrs.  Harry 
Caplan   were   distributed   to  the 


HERTZ 
RENTAL  CARS 

Durham,  Raleigh, 
Chapel  Hill  and 
Raleigh-Durham  Airport 


U-Drive-It  Auto  Co. 

114-16  N.  Dillard 

Telephones  4993  or  4994 
DURHAM,  N.  C. 


CHINESE  AND 
AMERICAN  FOODS 

Temptingly  Prepared  in 
THE  ORIENTAL  MANNER 

(ANTON  CAFE 

Fully  Air-Conditioned 

408  Hillsboro  Dial  TE  2-7867 
RALEIGH,  N.  C. 


teachers.  These  syllabi  should 
prove  of  invaluable  aid  to  the 
teachers  in  the  preparation  of 
their  class  room  work.  Rabbi  Cap- 
lan also  met  with  the  teachers 
individually,  bringing  to  their  at- 
tention the  best  pedagogical  meth- 
ods to  be  employed  in  teaching 
the  pupils  of  their  respective 
classes. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Paul  Seligson 
presented  two  books  to  our  library 
in  honor  of  their  children,  Vnn 
and  Martin's  birthdays. 

Our  heartfelt  sympathy  is  ex- 
pressed to  Mrs.  Mortimer  Ellis- 
burg  on  the  loss  of  her  sister, 
Vivian  Keller  of  Norfolk,  Va. 

We  are  happy  to  report  that 
Mrs.  Celia  Goodman  has  fully 
recovered  from  her  recent  illness. 

A  large  crowd  attended  an 
open  house  for  Jewish  boys  from 
State  College,  sponsored  bv  the 
Sisterhood  of  Temple  Beth  Or 
and  he'd  at  the  home  of  Mrs. 
Albert  Levine.  Along  with  Mrs. 
Stanlev  Kahn.  her  co-chairman, 
these  hostesses  served  delicious  re- 
freshments to  the  young  men  and 
lovely  young  women  present,  from 
State  College,  Peace  College,  St. 
Mary's  College  and  Needham 
Brousjhton  High  School.  Everyone 
agreed  it  was  a  wonderful  affair. 


LUACH 
Holidays  Begin  Sundown  of 
Previous  Day 

5^0  -  1959-60 

Hanuka  H  Dec.  26 

Purim  March  13 

Pesach  April  12 

Shevuous  June  1 


Colonel  Solomon  Goren,  Chief 
Rabbi  of  the  Israel  Armed  Forces, 
is  now  in  the  United  States  to  par- 
ticipate in  the  intensified  effort  for 
Israel  Bonds. 


Edward's 

FLORIST 

Dial 
9-5707 


"The  Beauty  Of  Oar  Easiness 
Is  Flowers" 

DELIVERY  SERVICE 

912  W.  xVtain       DURHAM,  N.  C 


FOR  EVERY  PUJRPOSE 


W.  L.  McCLAMROCH 
TILE  CONTRACTOR 

Contractors  For 

Marble  ! 
Ceramic  and  Quarry  Tile  ' 

902  Arnette  Ave.         Dial  5-2551' 
DURHAM,  N.  C. 


C.  C.  MANGUM,  INC. 


3016  Hillsboro 


Grading  Contractor 

RALEIGH,  N.  C. 


Dial  TE  3-1831 


Suggs  Plumbing 
&  Heating  Co. 

Plumbing  —  Heating 
Air  Conditioning 

2122  Sovereign  Dial  8-1511 

DURHAM.  N.  C. 


PINE  STATE 

Electric  Supply  Company 
The  House  of  Better  Lighting 

522  Foster  St.  Dial  4-523? 

DURHAM,  N.  C.  3-724S 


WRENN-PHARR 

Boys'  Store 

Young  Men's  and  Boys' 

OUTFITTERS 

428  Daniels  St.       Dial  TE  2-2530 
Cameron  Village 
RALEIGH,  N.  C. 


7~ 

Corn's  TV  Service  Co. 

407  W.  Peace  Dial  TE  4-4991 
RALEIGH,  N.  C. 


UPHOLSTERING 


•  AN'ii^U^S 
•  CUSTOM  BUILT  FURNITURE 
•  LEATHER  WORK  A 
SPECIALTY 

Modern  Upholstering  Co 

DIAL  TE  4-1981 

210  Marsh  Avenue 
RALEIGH,  N.  C. 


Grade  "A"  Pasteurized  Milk 

Homogenized  Milk  —  Skim  Milk 
Buttermilk — Chocolate  Milk  and 
Drinks — Lactic  Whole  Milk — Half 
and  Half — Table  Cream — Whip- 
ping Cream — Eggs — Orange  Juice 

Delivered  from  Our  Farms 
To  You  Daily 

Ballenfine's  Dairy 

Home  of  the  Jersey  Cow 
Dial  TE  2-1801 
RALEIGH,  N.  C. 


STATE  DISTRIBUTING  CORPORATION 

Distributors  For 

OB  (ORANGE  BOOM)  IMPORTED  HOLLAND  BEER 
#  Imperial  Reserve 

•  Garrett's  Virginia  Dare 
9  Almaden  Vineyards  Rose 

O  Wurzburger  Hofbrau  imported  German  Beer 
•  Labatt's  Imported  Canadian  Ale 
O  Taylor's  New  York  State 


112  South  Blount  Streel 


Dial  TE  3-9715 


RALEIGH,  N.  C. 


28 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


GREENSBORO,  N 


M0NTALDOS 


GREENSBORO,   N.  C. 


Perfection  In  Black 

Very  French  —  with  great  Savoire  Faire  —  of 
supple  boucle  tweed,  bowed  and  silhouetted 
in  gleaming  satin.  Black.  Misses  sizes. 


isaatincj  Co.,  Inc. 

free  Inspection  &  Estimates  Without  Obligation 


Locally  DIAL 
Owned  &  Operated 


SILVER  FISH      ANTS      RATS  -  MICE  ROACHES  MOTHS 


1300  Elmer 


Greensboro,  N.  C. 


KENNEDY  OIL  COMPANY 


Petroleum  Products 

1203  Tryon  High  Point,  N.  C. 


Dial  3027 


Arou?\d  Greehsboro 

MRS.  RICHARD  FORMAN  and  MRS.  DlANIEL  HOLLANDER, 
Correspondents 


During  the  past  month,  the  com- 
mittees on  adult  education  repre- 
senting the  various  Temple  groups 
have  met  with  Rabbi  Asher  to 
formulate  plans  for  the  coming 
year.  The  interest  indicated,  not 
only  by  the  committees,  but  by 
various  members  wishing  to  parti- 
cipate in  these  meetings,  has  been 
gratifying.  Mrs.  Sam  Richman  and 
Mr.  Sidney  Schreiber,  co-chairmen, 
have  announced  the  two  programs 
that  have  been  decided  upon:  i)  A 
series  of  three  lectures  with  dicus- 
sions  to  follow,  to  be  held  on  three 
consecutive  Friday  nights  immedi- 
ately after  the  Sabbath  Service. 
This  will  take  place  sometime  in 
January  or  February.  The  subject 
will  be  "Development  of  Jewish 
Practices  and  Customs"  with  spe- 
cial references  to  the  fields  of  law, 
hygiene,  and  business  practice.  A 
layman  from  each  field  will  be  ask- 
ed to  present  some  aspects  of  this 
subject.  2)  A  bi-weekly  study  group 
to  meet,  which  began  on  Monday 
evening,  October  26th.  The  book, 
Where  Judaism  Differed,  by  Rabbi 
Abba  Hillel  Silver,  is  the  text  being 
used.  This  course  should  extend 
for  ten  sessions  over  a  20-week  pe- 
riod. 

The  Temple  Brotherhood  Edu- 
cation Committee  has  decided  on 
a  study  course  for  men  only  to  be 
offered  on  Sunday  mornings  at  10 
o'clock.  The  group  will  meet  on  the 
first  Sunday  of  each  month,  begin- 
ning November  1st.  This  course 
will  be  based  on  the  text,  Leading 
a  Jewish  Life  in  the  Modern  World 
by  Rabbi  S.  H.  Markowitz. 

Mrs.  Harold  Sachs  and  Mrs. 
Brandt  Levy,  co-chairmen,  have  an- 
nounced to  Temple  Sisterhood 
members  that  an  educational  pro- 


gram will  be  held  on  Wednesday, 
December  9th.  This  will  be  in  the 
form  of  a  panel  discussion  on  the 
subject,  "Should  Judaism  Engage 
in  a  Mission  for  Converts?"  Rabbi 
Asher  will  be  the  moderator  and 
discussants  will  be  a  Reform,  a 
Conservative,  and  an  Orthodox 
rabbi. 

Rabbi  Rypins  was  missed  by  all 
the  congregation  during  the  holi- 
day season.  Temple  Emanuel,  at 
Fort  Lauderdale,  Florida,  had  ex- 
tended an  invitation  to  him  to 
aid  Rabbi  Marius  Ranson  with  the 
High  Holy  Day  Services.  Our  best 
wishes  for  a  speedy  recovery  to 
Rabbi  Ranson  went  with  Rabbi 
Rypins,  who  left  Greensboro  on 
September  30th  and  returned  on 
October  14th. 

The  first  meeting  of  the  year  of 
the  Greensboro  Section  of  the  Na- 
tional Council  of  Jewish  Women 
was  held  on  October  5th  at  Tem- 
ple Emanuel.  A  program  entitled, 
"Council  Through  the  Decades," 
was  presented  by  four  past  presi- 
dents of  our  Section.  Mrs.  C.  L. 
Weill  spoke  about  the  20's,  Mrs. 
A.  F.  Klein  spoke  about  the  30's, 
Mrs.  Herbert  Falk  spoke  about  the 
40's,  and  Mrs.  A.  J.  Tannenbaum 
concluded  with  the  50's.  The  music 
was  provided  by  Mrs.  Sam  Prago. 
Surely,  all  who  attended  this  meet- 
ing could  not  help  but  be  amazed 
at  the  rapid  progress  and  develop- 
ment of  the  Greensboro  Section. 
The  worthwhile  work  of  this  or- 
ganization   has    covered  such  a 


0» 


108  Summit  Ave. 


"OUR  ONLY  STORE" 

WE  DELIVER  ANYWHERE 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 


Dial  BR  4-6467 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


»9 


broad  area  in  the  past  and  present, 
that  the  future  is  to  hold  many 
more  successful  endeavors. 

ORCHIDS  TO: 

Mrs.  Henry  Lavietes  and  Mrs. 
Meyer  Leader  for  their  enthusi- 
astic support  of  the  Council  rum- 
mage sale. 

Rabbi  Asher  for  the  thought-pro- 
voking sermons  he  delivered  on 
the  Holidays. 

We  welcome  to  Temple  member- 
ship the  families  listed  here,  and 
wish  them  health  and  happiness 
throughout  the  coming  year. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  A.  Brooks 

529  Audubon  Drive 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  William  Michalove 

830  W.  Bessemer  Avenue 

Mrs.  Lewis  Rosenberg,  Miriam 

and  Karl 

1004  Pembroke  Drive 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Donald  Wolf  and 

sons  Alan  and  Gary 

2018  Bluemont  Drive 

Congratulations  are  due  to  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Joel  Liebling  on  the  birth 
of  their  daughter,  Wendy  Ann, 
September  1  ith. 

Aaron  H.  Cohen,  67,  a  resident 
of  Greensboro  for  the  past  30  years, 
died  on  October  15th  at  Cone  Me- 
morial Hospital. 

Surviving  are  his  wife,  the  former 
Annie  Rubin,  and  two  sisters,  Mrs. 
Jennie  C.  Brenner  of  Winston-Sa- 
lem, and  Mrs.  Robert  Shapiro  of 
Keyser,  W.  Va. 

Beth  David  Synagogue  extends 
a  hearty  welcome  to  the  following 
new  members:  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Her- 
man Burich  of  Burlington,  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Albert  Cohen,  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
M.  Gladstone,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Harold 
Goltsman,  Mrs.  Mary  Kaplan,  Mr. 
William  Melnikof,  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Robert  Scheer,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Sam 
Seigle  and  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Samuel 
J.  Young.  May  their  lives  in  Greens- 
boro be  long,  healthy  and  happy. 


Mazel  tov  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Irving 
Pinsker  on  the  Bat  Mitzvah  of  their 
daughter  Barbara  Rae. 

Best  wishes  go  to  the  following 
in  their  new  homes:  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
George  Hoff,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jerry 
Hyman,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Willie 
Berklehammer  and  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Chet  Stanius. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Samuel  Geller  have 
announced  the  engagement  of  their 
son,  Leslie  Melvin  to  Miss  Phyllis 
Fisher  of  Philadelphia.  Pa.  and 
Bridgeton,  N.  J.  The  wedding  is 
planned  for  Sunday,  November  8th 
at  Brick  House  Farm,  the  Fisher 
home  in  Bridgeton.  Miss  Fisher  was 
graduated  from  Pennsylvania  State 
College  and  is  a  medical  secretary 
at  the  Foundation  for  Cardiovas- 
cular Research  in  Philadelphia.  Mr. 
Geller,  who  served  two  years  in 
the  Army,  is  a  magna  cum  laude 
graduate  of  Dartmouth  College 
where  he  was  elected  to  Phi  Beta 
Kappa.  He  has  done  graduate  work 
at  Columbia  University  and  rec- 
eived his  law  degree  from  Harvard 
Law  School.  At  present  he  is  prac- 
ticing law  in  Hackensack,  N.  J. 
Sincere  best  wishes  go  to  the  happy 
couple  and  their  parents. 


Mrs.  Joseph  C.  Gayl  of  Philadel- 
phia was  unanimously  re-elected  Na- 
tional President  of  Women's  Ameri- 
can ORT  at  the  final  plenary  session 
of  t'  e  Women's  American  ORT 
Biennial  Nationa".  Convention,  held 
September  21-24  at  the  Mayflower 
Hotel,  Washington,  D.  C. 


WrightsviDe  Sound 
Dial  AL  6-3383,  Wilmington,  N.  C. 


Wilmington,  N.  C. 


YOPP  FUNERAL  HOME 

Established  1892 

FUNERAL  DIRECTORS 


Dial  RO  2-6666      WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 


1207  Market 


ALEXANDER'S 


SAM  BERGER,  Pres. 
CLOTHING  FOR  MEN,  WOMEN  AND  CHILDREN 
USE  OUR  FAMILY  CHARGE  ACCOUNT 

118  MARKET  ST.  WILMINGTON,  N.  C.  DIAL  RO  3-3383 


You  Save  As  You  Spend  When  You  Buy  From 

FUTRELLE'S  PHARMACY 

DRUGS  —  FOUNTAIN  —  SUNDRIES 
COSMETICS  —  SICK  ROOM  SUPPLIES 
129  Princess  St.      WILMINGTON,  N.  C.      Dial  RO  2-4422 


mm 


OF  OMAHA 


John  A.  Moran's  Agency 

Eastern  Carolina  Division  Office 
26  N.  2nd  St.      WILMINGTON,  N.  C.       Dial  RO  3-4621 


Robinson  Alignment  Service 

Reasonable  Prices  —  All  Work  Guaranteed 
Specializing  in  WHEEL  ALIGNMENT 

\%\%  CASTLE  ST.         DIAL  RO  2-8 1Q7        WILMINGTON.  N.  C. 


MILLER  BUILDING  CORPORATION 

General  Contractors  and  Engineers 

Dial  RO  3-4159    WILMINGTON,  N.  C.    Insurance  Building 


In  Wilmington 
It's 


€sso 

DEALER 

Mohr's  Service 

Corner  12th  and  Market 
RO  2-9261 


NEWTON'S 
DRY  CLEANERS 

Cleaning  and  Laundry  Service 
1202  Princess  Street 

Dial  RO  2-1677 
WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 


TAXI? 

COASTAL  CAB  CO. 
RO  2-4464 

YELLOW  CAB  CO. 

RO  2-3322 

TOGETHER  WE  CAN 
SERVE  YOU  BETTER 
RADIO  DISPATCHED  CARS 
WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


CAPE  FEAR  HOTEL 

Sidney  J.  Rivenbark,  Mgr. 
WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 

Associate 

Hertfield  Hotels 


NEW  YORK  CITY 
Hotel  Woodstock 
BROOKLYN,  N.  Y. 

Hotel  Granada 
PHILADELPHIA,  PA. 
Penn  Sherwood  Hotel 
CINCINNATI,  OHIO 
Hotel  Alms 


HI*  -  Conditioning 
Heating 
Refrigeration 

SALES  &  SERVICE 

Residential,  Commercial,  and 
Industrial  Contractors 

Specializing  in  Typhoon 
Heat  Pumps 

Jordan  Blanton  Myers  Co. 

224  N.  7th       Dial  RO  3-5397 
WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 


"Where  Thousands  Are  Saving  Millions" 

Cooperative  Savings  &  Loan  Ass'n 

SAVINGS  —  INVESTMENTS 

Market  &  N.  2nd  St.    WILMINGTON,  N.  C.     Dial  RO  2-5233 


Reduce  Your  Insurance  Costs 
BUY  MUTUAL  INSURANCE 

H.  G.  LATIMER  &  SON,  Inc. 

128  Princess  Street  Dial  RO  2-9606 

WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 


GURR  JEWELERS 

Wilmington's  Fine  Jeweler 
and  Silversmith 

WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 


Dia 


WILMINGTON 
MUSIC  CO. 

Coin  Operated 
Music  Machines 
RO  2-1403    r^oq  Castle  St. 
Wilmington,   N.  C. 


Tinga  Nursery 

Azaleas  -  Camellias 
Broad-Leaved  Evergreens 

Dial  Wilmington 
Dial  RO  2-1975 
CASTLE  HAYNE,  N.  C. 


DIXIE  CONCRETE 
PRODUCTS  CO. 


Solite  Blocks 
Dial  RO  2-0368 

1502  N.  7th 
At  Seaboard  Roundhouse 
WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 


JOHN  KELLY 

Wilmington's 
Baby  Photographer 

Children  and  Family  Groups 
Are  Our  Specialty 

1506  S.  3rd      Dial  RO  2-5003 
WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 


H.  L.  GREEN  CO. 

5c— 10c  and  $1.00  Store 
WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


BRODY'S 
UPHOLSTERY  SHOP 

Specializing  in 
Furniture  Upholstering 

2607  S.  Front  St.       Dial  RO  2-7076 
WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 

JOHNSON 

Trimming  Shop 

Auto  Body  Repairing 
Convertible  Tops  Replaced 

3C6  Castle  St.      Dial  RO  2-9536 
WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 

Parks  Motor  Repair 
and  Rewinding  Co. 

Electric  Motor  Repairs 
924  S.  Third  St.   Dial  RO  3-1227 
WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 


Advertising  Index 


Page 

American  Electric  Co.  ~  -  21 

Atlantis  Hotel     Inside  back  cover 

Barbour  Boat   Works   22 

Block-Southland  Sportswear  .  12 

Bordan  Rrick  &  Tile  Co.  26 
Branch  Br.nking 

&  Trust  Co."  .    Back  cover 

Brick      Ti'e  Service    23  &  28 

C.M.C.  Finance  Group  Inc.  21 

Carolina  Auto  Upholstery    21 

Dixie  Bedding  Co.  Back  cover 

L.  McCarthy  Doras  Jr. 

I.iJde  front  cover 
Dixie  Bedding  Co.  Back  cover 

Drcmedarv  24 
F  &  R  Coal  &  Oil  Co.  21 
First  Citizens  Bank 

&  Trust  Co.    ..  Inside  back  cover 

First  Federal  Savings  &  - 

Association  21 
Hygrade  Food  Products  Inside  front  cover 
Imperial  Clea  ers  ; 
Kennedy  Oil  Co. 
The  Lafayette 
Leo's  Delicatessen 
Maderite  Bakery 
McCraeken  Supply  Co 
McDaid  Bros. 
McKeithan  Oldsmobile 


Page 

Pepsi  Cola  Bottlers 

of  Virginia  ..  ..  _.      Inside  back  cover 

Ranch  House   _   21 

Rent-It  Co.       21 

Southern  Dairies      Back  cover 

N.  G.  Speir  Inc.  ....  21 
J.  H.  Stuhr      .....  21 

Summers  Supply  Co.   g 

T.  W.  Wood  &  Sons       Inside  fro-.t  cover 


VIRGINIA 


Lynchburg  ... 
NeViTJort  News 
Norfolk 
Portsmouth 


14-15 
14-15 
14-15 
14-15 


Insid; 


—  28 

front  cover 

?i 

23 

Inside  ba:!;c  ver 

  21 

Inc     21 


Richmond       10-13 

Roanoke    14-15 

NORTH  CAROLINA 

Durham  _,  ....    25-27 

Fayetteville   17-18 

Goldsboro  19 

Greensboro   28 

Kinston    .    ..   23-24 

New  Bern   '.   20 

Raleigh  '  25-27 

Rocky  Mount  _  16 

Wilmington   ..  ..  29-30 

Wilson       22 


Our  holiday  services  were  once 
again  made  exceptionally  beauti- 
fully this  year  by  the  presence  of 
Cantor  Irving  Mann  of  Wilming- 
ton. He  was  in  fine  voice  and  his 
cantonal  renditions  thrilled  all 
who  worshipped  together.  Rabbi 
Simcha  Kling's  sermons  were  rich 
and  meaningful.  Many  out-of-town 
visitors  worshipped  with  us  this 
year.  May  the  New  Year  be  a 
good  one  for  all  of  us. 

After  Yom  Kippur  Services,  Sis- 
terhood invited  all  out  of  town 
vistors  to  a  break-the-fast.  In  the 
evening  our  Post  Yom  Kippur 
Dance  was  held.  It  was  a  very  fes- 
tive evening,  attended  by  a  very 
good  crowd. 


Stafiesville,  N.  C. 

MRS.  MILTON  STEINBERGER 
Correspondent 

Our  High  Holy  Days  services 
conducted  by  Rabbi  Alan  Fuchs, 
of  Cinninnati,  Ohio,  was  most  in- 
spiring. We  are  very  fortunate  to 
have  Rabbi  Fuchs  serve  our  con- 
gregation once  each  month  for  the 
coming  year.  He  will  visit  the  con- 
gregation from  Friday  through 
Sunday.  He  is  a  student  at  Hebrew 
Union  College  in  Cincinnati,  and 
is  a  native  of  Connecticut. 

Honoring  our  new  Rabbi,  the 
Ladies  Auxiliary  of  the  Temple 
entertained  at  the  Jewish  Com- 
mnniM  '  r.,ter  at  a  "Come  And 
M  et  1  lie  Rabbi  Party."  Hostesses 
for  the  lovely  a f fail  were  Mrs.  Al- 
fred Goidon,  Mr;.  Dave  Lester  and 
Mrs.  Milton  Stemberger.  The  lull 
attendance  made  die  affair  such  a 
huge  success. 


We  are  alwav; 
come  visitors  t  > 
with  us  in  om 
pleasure  to  s  t 


delighted  to  wei- 
nme  and  woi ship 
Liriple.  It  was  a 
^>   many  visitors 


here  again  this  year  during  the 
holiday. 

Mozel  Tov  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Dave 
Cronovet  on  the  birth  of  a  son, 
Alan  Bruce,  and  congratulations 
to  the  grand-parents,  of  New  York 
City. 

On  behalf  of  our  congregation, 
I  wish  to  take  this  occasion  to 
extend  our  congratulations  to  our 
neighboring  town  Hickory,  N.  C. 
on  their  beautiful  new  Jewish 
Center.  The  dedication  was  most 
impressive.  May  their  congregation 
continue  to  grow  and  grow. 


STATEMENT    OF    THE  OWNERSHIP, 

MANAGEMENT,  etc..  required  bv  the 
Acts  of  Congress  of  August  24,  1912,  and 
March  3,  1933.  of  the  Americ  n  Jewish 
Times-Outlook,  published  mo-'thlv  at 
Oreens^oro,  N.  C,  for  October  1,  1959. 
State  of  North  Carolina 
County  of  Guilford 

ss: 

Before  me,  a  Notary  Public,  in  and  for 
ihe  State  and  Countv  aforesaid,  personal- 
ly a^pe-red  David  Be^^em  who.  having 
been  duly  sworn  according  to  law.  de- 
poses and  says  that  he  i=  the  B"->ness 
Ma"a?er  of  The  American  Jewish  Times- 
Outlook.  Inc.,  and  the  following  is,  to 
the  best  of  his  knowledge  and  belief,  a 
true  statement  of  the  o  vner'h:o.  manage- 
ment, etc..  of  the  aforesai-i  publication 
for  the  date  shown  in.  the  abo>-e  m->tion, 
required  by  the  Act  of  March  3.  1933.  em- 
bodied as  Section  537.  Postal  Laws  find 
Regulations,  printed  on  the  reverse  side 
of  this  form,  to-wit: 

1.  Trrt  the  names  and  addre~=es  of  the 
publisher,  editor,  and  busi^es-  manager 
are : 

Publisher,  The  American  Jewish  Tim"  - 
Outloik,  Inc..  530  So'ithensNr  -  Bnildin<r, 
•  „.„,,.,  tst     r;.:    Editor.    Chester  A. 

^ ~>~"  N  Elm  St.,  Gree-suoi-o.  N.  C; 

Business  Manager,  David  Bernstein,  103 
W.  Avondale,  Greensboro,  N.  C. 

2.  That  the  owner  is:  (If  owned  by  a 
corporation,  its  nrme  an  1  address  must 
be  stated  and  also  immediately  there- 
under the  names  and  r>d^res<=<=^  of  stock- 
holders owning  or  holding  one  per  cent 
or  moi-e  of  tota'  amount  of  stn-v.  Tf  nol 
owned  by  a  corporation.  Ihe  "Pmes  a"d 

c'drec^e=  of  the  individual  ow"en  >^ust 
be  given.  If  owned  by  a  firm,  companv, 

or     other     im-'*'-'~Oroo~q1oH   *,  fl.o 

name  and  address,  as  well  as  those  of 
each  individual  member  must  1  ~'""er>L 
The  American  Jewish  Times-Outlook, 
Inc.,  Harry  N.  Bernstem,  975'  ''"-wn-e 
Dr.,  Tujunga,  Calif.;  Rit-  B.  We;-'°<-  3"»"5 
Dogwood  Dr.,  Greensboro.  N  C-  David 
Bernstein,  108  W.  Avondale,  Greensboro 
N.  C. 

3.  That  the  known  bondholders,  mort- 
gagees, and  other  security  holder?  own- 
ing or  holding  1  per  cent  or  more  of 
total  amount  of  bonds,  mortgages,  or 
other  securities  are:  None. 

DAVID  BKRNSTEIV 
Sworn  to  and  subscribed  before  m.  t.n.s 
I5th  day  of  Seotemher.  1Q59. 

BERNICE  L.  PIERCE 

Notary  Public 
(My  commission  expires  January  20th, 
1961). 


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7/ig Clwtiai/iJ^mMJ^ 

VOLUME  XXV        •        NUMBER  4     /  /  DECEMBER  1959 

»   EDITORIALS 


Chester  A.  Brown.  Editor 


The  Feast  of  Dedication 

Although  Chanukah  is  better  known  as  the  Feast  of  Lights, 
it  likewise  has  reason  perhaps  to  be  recognized  as  the  Feast 
of  Dedication.  In  addition  to  celebrating  the  victory  of  the 
Maccabees  over  the  pagan  Greco-Syrian  king,  Antiochus 
Ephipanes,  the  then  ruler  of  Judea,  thus  giving  it  the  identi- 
fication of  religious  freedom,  it  likewise  commemorates  the  re- 
dedication  of  the  Temple  to  God,  now  that  the  defilement 
of  the  pagan  had  been  eradicated  with  the  Maccabbean  vic- 
tory. 

It  is  this  rededication  that  has  particular  significance  to 
us  today.  Our  daily  press  is  replete  with  news  of  human 
failure  —  sins  of  commission  as  well  as  those  of  omission. 
These  violations  of  social  ethics  seem  to  stem  from  one  root— 
—  a  lowering  of  our  ethical  and  moral  standards.  This  is  true 
not  only  of  the  perpetrators  of  the  offense,  but  of  us  all  as 
individuals  as  well.  Our  "shrug-of-the-shoulders"  attitude  — 
our  willingness  to  condone  and  explain  away  deviations  from 
the  right  —  indicate  that  our  standards  have  been  lowered. 

Let  us  then  reflect  on  Chanukah  as  the  Feast  of  Dedica- 
tion and  resolve  to  re-dedicate  ourselves.  Let  us  get  back  on 
the  track  of  thinking  that  a  thing  is  either  right  or  wrong. 
Let  us  raise  our  standards  —  moral  and  ethical  —  and  expect 
society  to  respond  to  the  call  for  a  re-evaluation  of  right  living. 

The  Criterion— Living  Jewishly 

The  controversy  started  by  Israel  Prime  Minister  David 
Ben  Gurion  as  to  who  is  a  Jew  goes  on  unabated.  Millions  of 
words  have  been  spoken  and  written  and  the  answer  is  still 
not  in  sight. 

It  is  not  our  intention,  now  or  at  any  subsequent  time, 
to  add  to  these  words.  The  answer  that  suits  our  purpose  at 
this  time  is  "He  is  a  Jew  who  lives  Jewishly."  We  of  course, 
realize  that  this  is  merely  begging  the  question;  nevertheless 
it  serves  in  the  point  we  want  to  make. 

During  the  baseball  World  Series,  several  of  our  friends 
voiced  pride  in  the  fact  that  Larry  Sherry,  hero  of  the  series, 
and  Sandy  Koufax,  also  a  member  of  the  Los  Angeles  pitching 
staff,  together  with  Barry  Latman,  a  member  of  the  Chicago 
White  Sox  pitching  brigade,  are  all  Jewish.  And,  at  many 
previous  times,  we  have  heard  prideful  pointing  to  a  Dr.  Salk, 
or  some  other  individual  who  had  made  the  headlines. 

What  we  are  about  to  say  must  not  be  considered  in 
any  way  a  reflection  on  any  of  the  individuals  we  have  named. 
As  far  as  we  know  they  may  qualify  for  our  definition  of 
being  a  Jew  by  living  Jewishly.  We  frankly  don't  know.  The 
point  we  want  to  make  is  that  to  our  way  of  thinking,  accident 
of  birth  does  not  make  a  Jew.  We  have  many  instances  of 
where  men  who  had  been  born  Jews,  by  reason  of  parentage, 
have  converted  to  other  religions.  One  that  comes  to  mind 
because  of  his  recent  death,  was  Bernard  Berenson,  noted 
internationally  as  an  art  critic.  Mr.  Berenson,  born  a  Jew, 
converted  to  Catholicism,  and  he  was  buried  with  a  special 
papal  benediction,  as  a  Catholic. 


While  we  are  on  the  subject  of  conversions,  there  are 
two  recent  instances  involving  people  in  the  limelight  who 
converted  to  Judaism  from  Christianity.  They  are  Sammy 
Davis,  Jr.,  who  was  not  only  undaunted  by  his  problems  of 
being  a  Negro,  but  of  his  own  volition  added  those  of  being 
a  Jew,  and  Hollywood  luminary  Carroll  Baker.  Both  of  these 
headliners  refused  to  work  on  Yom  Kippur  at  their  respective 
tasks,  thus  putting  to  shame  some  of  their  bosses  and  associates, 
who  were  not  so  observant. 

Getting  back  to  our  original  premise.  Let  us  hold  our 
adulation  for  those  who  are  living  as  Jews,  rather  than  having 
been  born  into  the  faith.  To  do  otherwise  would  be  setting 
false  standards. 

Watching  Germany 

German-Jewish  relationships  are  entering  a  new  stage  — 
one  that  will  require  close  and  careful  scrutiny  by  all  men 
of  good  will  who  refuse  to  forget  the  crimes  of  the  Hitler 
regime. 

This  is  the  warning  contained  in  a  report  by  Dr.  Joachim 
Prinz,  president  of  the  American  Jewish  Congress,  who  visited 
Germany  this  summer  on  a  mission  to  study  reports  of  renewed 
anti-Semitism. 

Dr.  Prinz,  who  speaks  with  authority  on  the  problem, 
warns  in  his  report  that  the  emotional  involvement  of  leaders 
like  Chancellor  Adenauer  and  retiring  President  Heuss  in 
renewing  Germany's  ties  with  the  Jewish  people  and  in  atoning 
for  Germany's  crimes  toward  the  Jews  does  not  characterize 
the  new  political  generation  now  coming  to  power.  This  new 
generation,  he  said,  has  no  interest  in  keeping  alive  any  feel- 
ing of  guilt  for  the  crimes  of  the  Nazi  regime.  In  fact,  the 
new  German  President,  Heinrich  Luebke,  has  told  Dr.  Prinz 
in  a  private  interview  in  Bonn:  "We  want  to  forget  about 
the  past  .  .  .  We  have  made  adequate  restitution  payments 
and  we  must  start  afresh,  without  looking  backward."  And 
this  from  a  man  who  himself  was  imprisoned  by  the  Nazis 
for  22  months  as  an  enemy  of  the  state. 

If  this  is  to  be  the  official  government  policy,  what  can 
the  world  expect  from  the  overwhelming  majority  of  the  Ger- 
man people,  in  whom  anti-Semitism  remains  a  powerful  if 
quiescent  force  not  far  beneath  the  surface?  What  action