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THE  LIBRARY  OF  THE 
UNIVERSITY  OF 
NORTH  CAROLINA 


THE  COLLECTION  OF 
NORTH  CAROLINIANA 


FG296 
A51 


This  book  must  not 
be  taken  from  the 
Library  building. 


Digitized  by  the  Internet  Archive 

in  2014 


https://archive.org/details/americanjewishti1960unse 


a:  -\ 


77*'  0/  fJ&e  shofar  resounds  in  synagogues 
tlie  world  over  on  Rosh  Hashanah. 


U2J  Kosk  ttaskonak  -  September  I960 


t^*^s  '-<5^•-^^<5>,  t^X^X^i  ^X^X^J>-i  'S?~*4?vS2r.  ■-&-*^-*-6r>  vtfgf 


YOU  CAN  OWN  THIS  BEAUTIFUL  HOME 


YOU  SAW  IN 


LIVING 

FOR  YOUNG  HOMEMAKERS 
AND 

The  Saturday  Evening 

POST 


THE  HERBERT  HOOVER  from  »he  line  of  the  Pr»t!d*nh 


Make  this  your  new  home  year!  Make  it  a  Lesco 
Home,  beauty- planned  to  give  you  pride  of  owner- 
ship .  .  .  quality-built  to  give  you  and  your  family 
years  of  living  comfort.  Find  out  how  you  can  have 
your  dream  home  with  the  features  you've  always 
wanted  .  .  .  and  at  a  cost  you  can  afford. 


Call  or  write  TODAY  for  more  information 


LESTER  BROS.,  INC. 

Martinsville,  Va. 

Telephone  ME  2-5673 
Post  Office  Box  751 


§ 
§ 

§ 

§ 
§ 


KING  CARTER 


JOHN  MARSHALL 


New  Year 
Greetings 


RICHMOND 


CHAMBERLIN 
RICHMOND    HOTELS,  INC. 


"Nothing  To  Sell  But  Fast  Service" 

VIRGINIA-CAROLINA 

Freight  Lines,  Inc. 


MARTINSVILLE 


VIRGINIA 


Virginia 


OVERNIGHT  SERVICE 
General  Commodities 

Serving  the  States  of 
North  Carolina    -    Maryland    -    D.  C.    -    Eastern  Penn. 


Main  Terminal: 
Martinsville,  Va.  —  ME  2-5621 

Terminals: 
Baltimore,  Maryland — 

Phone:   Mulberry  5-3330 
Charlotte,  North  Carolina — 

Phone:  FR  7-4697 
Richmond,   Virginia — 

Phone:  BE  2-6244 


UNITS  OPERATED 

85  Tractors 
125  Semi-Trailers 
100  Van  Type 
25  Open  Top 

15  Pick-Ups 


J.  C.  STONE,  President  and  Manager 
TERRELL  C.  CLARK.  Executive  Vice-President 


G  reelings 


nran  ™  n:m 


America's  Showplace  of  Food  Values! 


September,  i960 


The  American  'Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


3 


In 


Mprtlt  Carolina  itoriatom  of  Jewish  Mm 

Circuit  Riding  Rabbi  Project  —  Inaugurated  July  27,  1954 


OFFICERS 

I.  D.  Blumenthal,  President 
P.  O.  Box  10628,  Charlotte 

A.  F.  Klein,  Secretary 
407  W.  Greenway,  Greensboro 

Nathan  Sutker,  Treasurer 
1108  Johnston  Bldg.,  Charlotte 


OFFICERS 

Chester  A.  Brown,  1st  Vice-President 
P.  O.  Box  1469,  Greensboro 

J.  Herman  Leder,  2nd  Vice-President 
S.  Franklin  St.,  Whiteville 

Harry  E.  Kramer,  3 rd  Vice-President 
Wallace 


1960  MEMBERSHIP  CAMPAIGN 

The  membership  year  has  been  changed  to  coincide  with  the  calendar  year. 
Your  membership  enables  the  Association  to  sponsor  the  following  projects: 

1.  CIRCUIT  RIDING  RABBI  PROJECT. 

In  operation  six  years.  Inaugurated  July  1954.  SIX  new  Temples  built  and  dedicated  as  a  result 
of  this  project.  Has  served  14  different  congregations  with  325  families  and  over  300  children. 
Featured  in  LIFE  Magazine  and  on  Eternal  Light  Radio  program. 

2.  JUDAICA  LIBRARY  PROJECT. 

To  build  up  a  collection  of  Hebraica  at  the  University  of  North  Carolina,  making  available  to 
thousands  of  students  and  faculty  a  storehouse  of  Jewish  history,  philosophy,  culture,  religion, 
tradition,  and  civilization.  Over  $2,000.00  already  turned  over  to  the  University  Librarian.  May 
lead  to  the  establishment  of  a  Chair  in  Hebrew  Letters  at  the  University. 

3.  N.  C.  ASSOCIATION  OF  JEWISH  YOUTH. 

NCAJM  makes  contribution  every  year  to  provide  adult  faculty  for  Youth  Association  summer 
conference. 

4.  STUDENT  LOAN  FUND. 

Established  in  August  1959  to  assist  worthy  students  further  their  education. 

5.  N.  C.  HOME  FOR  JEWISH  AGED. 

Co-sponsor  with  the  N.  C.  Association  of  Jewish  Women.  A  site  has  been  purchased  in  Winston- 
Salem  where  our  senior  citizens  may  spend  their  later  years  in  comfort  in  an  environment  with 
their  contemporaries,  where  they  will  feel  useful  and  wanted. 


NORTH  CAROLINA  ASSOCIATION  OF  JEWISH  MEN 
J.  Herman  Leder,  Membership  Chairman 
Whiteville,  North  Carolina 

I  am  heartily  in  favor  of  the  above  projects  and  want  to  do  my  part.  Please  enter  my  membership  for  the 
classification  indicated  below: 

Contributor  $5.00   Donor  $10.00    Patron  $25.00  

NAME  

V  ADDRESS    CITY   

DATE  


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


<^or-  ^-<y-yy-  yy-    yy-  yy-  yy    yy-  -y~-  y/  ■  yy-  yy-  yy  yy-  yy-  y>  -  yy-  yy-  yy-  y^-  '^y-  ~y  ~-  ^y-  '^y-  -^5 


SEASON'S  GREETINGS 

....  from  the  world's  largest 
distributor  of  plumbing, 
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and  electrical  supplies. 


§ 


NOLAND 


■ .  "II! .'.        I  ■  ' 


•  y--  yy-  -^y.  yy>  -yy.  yy.  yy-  -yy- 


SPORTSWEAR 

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Corduroy  Taper  Slim  Pants 
with  Matching  Tunics. 

Colors:  Bluebird,  Black, 

Loden  Green,  Gold 

Blouses  —  in  beautiful 

co-ordinated  prints. 


Suggested  Retail: 

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—  $3.98 

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Turner  Togs 


Headquarters  in  both  Lynchburg, 
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flavor 
per  cup  . . . 

more  cups 
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GILL'S 

HOTEL  SPECIAL 


With  Gill's  Hotel  Special  you  need  only  a 
teaspoon  measure  per  cup  to  brew  the  most 
satisfying  cup  of  coffee  ever!  That's  be- 
cause Gill's  seasons  its  fine,  full-bodied, 
full-flavored  coffees  with  just  a  touch  of 
chicory  to  bring  all  the  coffee  goodness 
through  to  your  cup.  Get  Gill's  Hotel 
special  today. 


[Why  you  should  COOK  with  GAS 


Of  the  two  kinds  of  modern 
ranges,  both  have  an  equal 
amount  of  time-saving,  work- 
saving  automatic  features. 
But,  there's  one  big  difference 
.  .  .  GAS  COOKS  BETTER! 


Thousands  of  people  actually 
never  taste  flame-broiled  steak 
in  their  homes.  Why?  They 
cook  on  ranges  without  flames! 
So  when  you  buy  a  range,  re- 
member that  by  every  test  .  .  . 
GAS  COOKS  BEST! 


THE  CITY  OF  RICHMOND,  DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  UTILITIES, 


VOLUME  XXVI  •  SEPTEMBER  1960 


NUMBER  1 


EDITORIALS 


Chester  A, 

So  That  History  May  Be 
Written  Anew 

A  Rosh  Hashanah  message  by  Dr.  Jerome  G.  Tolochko, 
Rabbi,  Temple  Israel,  Kinston,  N.  C. 

Offset  printing  is  much  less  expensive  than  regular  print- 
ing. In  conventional  printing,  type  has  to  be  set  either  by  hand 
or  linotype  machine,  forms  have  to  be  locked,  proofs  taken. 
In  offset  printing,  all  that  is  necessary  is  to  take  a  photograph  of 
already  printed  material,  burn  the  image  onto  a  plate,  and 
the  machine  is  ready  to  roll. 

It  occurs  to  me  that  it  would  be  far  less  expensive,  it 
would  take  less  manpower  and  less  energy  to  offset  some  pages 
of  history  rather  than  write  it  anew,  and  the  contents  would 
apply  to  current  days. 

We  are  quite  aware  of  the  fact  that  history  per  se,  must 
always  be  re-written;  yet,  howr  many  incidents  have  repeated 
themselves  so  many,  many  times,  until  it  has  almost  become  a 
pattern? 

How  many  history  pages  are  replete  with  this  statement?: 
"Never  before  has  the  world  faced  such  critical  times.  Never 
before  has  there  been  so  much  chaos,  so  much  uncertainty,  so 
little  security.  To-day,  the  wrorld  is  in  an  uproar;  it  is  nation 
against  nation,  people  against  people  and  religion  against 
religion." 

And  we  can  go  on  and  on  ad  infinitum.  It  applied  to  the 
first,  and  the  tenth,  the  fifteenth  and  the  eighteenth  century 
even  as  it  applies  today  in  the  twentieth  century. 

People  act  as  though  they  were  destined  to  live  forever. 
They  pick  up  arms  at  the  least  provocation.  Murder,  rape, 
pillage  and  arson  have  become  the  standard  practice  for  many 
newly-established  governments  and  nations. 

Man  is  judged  by  the  standard  of  money.  All  this,  in  an 
age  when  the  arts  and  sciences  have  catapulted  to  the  highest 
peak  of  advancement;  when  man's  brain  has  created  a  Mark 
III;  an  airoplane  that  travels  faster  than  light,  and  a  satelite 
that  can  take  pictures  of  the  other  side  of  the  moon  or  send 
back  Television  pictures  hundreds  of  thousands  of  miles  away 
from  the  earth. 

All  this  confusion  and  hatred  and  uncertainty  is  taking 
place  at  a  time  when  medical  science  enables  a  surgeon  to  take 
the  cornea  of  the  eye  of  one  person  and  put  it  into  the  eye  of 
another  and  make  him  see;  when  a  person  can  live  with  an 
artificial  heart  or  control  iron  fingers  which  replaced  his  own, 
by  the  movement  of  his  muscles. 

And  yet,  that  same  brilliant  mind,  that  same  brain  which 
is  the  image  of  God,  will  give  vent  to  inconsistant  expression 
of  superiority  by  reason  of  the  color  of  his  skin  or  the  way 
he  wrorships  God. 

Be  it  said  to  our  shame  that  in  this  age  of  technological 
advancement  it  is  still  necessary  for  a  man  seeking  high  public 
office  to  assure  and  reassure  the  public  that  he  will  not  permit 
his  religion  to  interfere  with  the  duties  of  his  elected  office. 
And  even  if  the  public  accepts  this  assurance  from  the  person 


Brown,  Editor 

of  one  minority  religion,  will  they  act  similarly  in  the  case  of 
a  person  of  another  minority  religion? 

This  is  the  condition  of  the  world  on  the  eve  of  our 
religious  New  Year  572  1,  and  we  are  part  of  it.  We  do  not  like 
much  of  it,  but  there  is  the  consolation  that  we  CAN  do 
something  about  it. 

It  is  not  the  premise  of  the  individual  man  or  woman  to 
bring  about  a  change  in  the  world  or  even  in  a  community; 
but  it  IS  the  premise  and  the  duty  of  each  individual  to  work 
on  his  own  improvement  and  thus,  through  his  or  her  own 
action,  act  in  such  a  manner  as  to  project  their  good  influences 
upon  others. 

Thus,  again,  the  importance  of  the  individual  as  empha- 
sized by  our  religion,  projects  itself  most  forcefully. 

Individual  man,  working  to  elevate  himself  spiritually, 
morally  and  culturally,  ascertains  his  own  peace  of  mind,  and, 
indirectly— if  not  directly— becomes  a  reflector  for  good  unto 
others. 

This  is  the  intent  and  purpose  of  Rosh  Hashanah.  Self- 
reflection,  self-analysis,  self-improvement;  and  thus  become  a 
better  member  of  society. 

Multiply  this  by  hundreds  of  thousands  of  individuals, 
and  perhaps  soon,  yet  in  our  own  days,  a  new  history  of  man 
will  be  written,  unlike  the  stereotype  of  the  past  which  can  be 
printed  in  offset. 

A  very  happy,  healthy,  joyous  and  contented  New  Year  to 
you  and  yours. 

B'nai  B'rith  Institutes  Bar  Mitzvah 

If  animated  discussion,  argument  and  controversy  can  be 
considered  a  gauge  of  success,  then  B'nai  B'rith's  13th  (Bar 
Mitzvah)  Annual  Institute  at  Wildacres,  July  24th  -  28th  could 
be  deemed  an  outstanding  achievement. 

The  faculty  comprised  Dr.  Abraham  Halkin,  Professor  of 
History  at  the  Teachers  Institute  of  the  Jewish  Theological 
Seminary  of  America;  Rabbi  Harry  Essrig,  of  Temple  Eman- 
uel, Grand  Rapids,  Michigan,  and  Dr.  Harold  Weisberg,  As- 
sistant Professor  of  Philosophy  at  Brandeis  University. 

Although  each  lecturer  had  assigned  topics,  the  principal 
interest  developed  when  they  more  or  less  digressed  from  their 
subjects  to  discuss  the  oft-repeated  charge  that  Jews  in  America 
were  losing  their  distinctive  Jewishness  in  the  process  of  as- 
similating into  the  American  way  of  life.  We  have  heard  this 
subject  discussed  many  times  and  have  yet  to  learn  of  a  practic- 
al remedy.  Nor  was  the  discussion  at  Wildacres  any  exception. 

To  our  own  way  of  thinking  we  do  not  see  the  necessity 
for  rejection  of  emancipation  and  returning  to  over-emphasis 
on  dogma,  ritual  and  tradition.  While  freely  admitting  that 
all  three  have  their  place  in  Jewish  life,  as  we  see  it  they  are 
not  essential  to  true  religiosity.  We  can  conceive  of  our  Jewish 
men  and  women  becoming  loyal  Americans,  contributing  to 
the  American  way  of  life,  without  necessarily  sacrificing  their 
true  Jewishness. 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  89) 


The  American  Jewish  Times-Outlook,  published  monthly  at  530  Southeastern  Building.  P.  O.  Box  1469,  Greensboro,  N.  C.  Chester  A.  Brown,  Editor;  David  Bernstein,  Pub- 
lisher; Nathan  Xesaler,  Manager,  Virginia  Office;  Florence  Byers,  Virginia  News  Editor;  Broad  Grace  Arcade,  P.  O.  Box  701,  Richmond,  Va.  Member  Seven  Arts 
feature  Syndicate,  Inc.  S2.00  per  year  payable  in  advance.  Entered  as  Second-Class  Matter  at  the  Post  Office  at  Greensboro.  N.  C,  under  Act  of  March  5,  1879.  The 
views  expressed  by  contributors  are  not  necessarily  those  of  the  publishers,  but  may  be  published  in  the  interest  of  freedom  of  the  press.  The  American  Jewish  Timis- 
uutloox  is  owned  and  edited  solely  as  an  independent  enterprise  and  is  not  a  Jewish  communitv  undertaking. 


6 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  iq6o 


PLAIN  TALK 

By  ALFRED  SEGAL 


§ 


/y.  yy.  y/-.  yy.  yy^yy  yy.  ^ .  yy.  yy.  .^y.       yy,  .yy  .yy.  yy^yy^yy.  yy,,yy.  yy.  .^y.       yy.  yy.  y/,yy.^ 

\  1 

§ 
§ 

§  Editorials           5 

§  Plain  Talk— Alfred  Segal    ._     6 

§  Candles  To  Light  The  Way— Hon.  John  F.  Kennedy      9 

£  The  Rabbi's  Wife  and  The  Torah  Mantles— Ethel  Levey  ..  10 

^  Our's  Must  Be  An  Enduring  Faith— 

I          Rabbi  Norman  N.  Shapiro     n 

I  Man  of  the  Month— Jules  Bank,  Columbia,  S.  C.  ..    12 

$  Ma,  Me  and  Milady— William  Ornstein  .....    13 

§  Bsn  Gurion  Challenges  the  Story  of  "Exodus"  

&         Joseph  Sokol      yi 

Z  A  Mother  In  Israel — Anita  Engle      19 

I  Freedom,  Progress  and  Heroic  Genius- 
es Rabbi  Samuel  Umen  _      21 

V  The  Civil  Liberties  Union— Harry  Simonhoff      33 

§  The  Zionist  Movement  In  Search  of  An  Image  

§         Dr.  Max  Nussbaum        _     39 

£  So,  You're  Going  To  Israel — A.  Letz      42 

£  Scientist  Turns  Detective — Meyer  A.  Kaplan       43 

J  Our  Mew  Bezalels:  19CC — Alfred  Werner  ...       44 

I  What  Is  A  Jew? — Janice  Moff   .__     46 

§  Parables  of  a  Modern  Prophet— Rabbi  Solomon  Jacobson  ..  ..  46 

§  A  Gifted  Jewish  Child  is  A  Challenge — Ben  Katan    __  53 

&  A  Jewish  Catholic  and  A  Catholic  Jew — 


Seymour  B.  Liebman       56  § 

V  Jane  Adams  and  the  Millionaire — Bernard  Postal    60  § 

j  Some  Odd  Jewish  Statistics — P.  Niber    63  §1 

§  My  Boss  Is  A  Part  Time  Chaplain— Patrick  J.  McGillicuddy    66 

§  The  School  That  Lived  In  Boxes — Irene  Myerson    71 

^  The  American  Jew — Joshua  Able    75  ., 

£  Research  At  The  Weizmann  Institute— Michael  Bar  Zohar   76  1 

r  Israel's  Atom  Reactor — Philip  Gillen    ___    78  § 

]?  Miracle  In  Manila — George  Perry    __     80  § 

I  80  Years  of  Technical  Assistance— Dr.  William  Horber    83  § 

^  Jewry's  Long  Chain  of  Books — Marvin  Lowenthal  84  & 

§  ■ 

§  NORTH  CAROLINA 

£    Around  Greensboro — Mrs.  Daniel  Hollander  and  § 

$         Mrs.  Edward  R.  Ricketts  _  __      88 

§    Winaton-Salem    _  __   80 

<|  Goldsboro      _     90 

^  Asheville — Mrs.  Gustav  Liohtenfels      92 

New  Bern — Mrs.  Lou  Elden        94 

Whiteville — Mrs.  Martin  Bernstein      ...TOO  % 

Raleigh — Beth  Meyer  Synagogue — Mrs.  Oscar  Legum   100  § 

Durham—  Mrs.  Sam  Freedman     102 

§   High  Point    __   111 

§  Statesville — Mrs.  Milton  Steinberger     112 

§   Charleston     88-91-95 

§  Columbia — Mrs.  Bernard  Laden         105 

§  VIRGINIA 

I  Richmond — Temple  Beth  El — Mrs.  Eddie  Cantor      45  § 

y  Portsmouth — Meyer  H.  Jacobson      45 

§  Richmond — Temple  Beth  Israel — Mrs.  Morton  Plotkin    45 

§  S.  W.  Virginia  B'nai  B'rith — Mrs.  S.  J.  Lenett      46 

&  Martinsville — Mrs.  A.  M.  Hollander      47 

£  Newport  News — Mrs.  Martha  B.  Shapiro  —    58  o 

)  Richmond  J.  W.  V.— Bert  Simons     106  § 

I  I 


SOUTH  CAROLINA 


PAPA'S  LONG  WHITE 
GARMENT 

On  Rosh  Hashona  my  father 
used  to  dress  up  to  go  to  schul.  He 
put  on  a  long,  white  linen  garment 
with  flowing  sleeves.  That  was 
long,  long  ago  .  .  .  when  I  was  a 
small  kid.  All  over  the  congrega- 


ALFRED  SEGAL 

fcion  papas  were  dressed  that  way 
.  .  .  to  bow  to  the  judgment  of  God 
on  the  New  Year  day. 

(In  these  later  times  some  of 
the  older  ones  still  present  them- 
sleves  to  the  Almighty  in  this  garb 
of  pure  white  .  .  .  as  if  to  tell 
Him,  "Here  I  am,  and  how  pure 
f  look!  I  hope,  good  God,  that  I 
look  to  you  just  as  white  inside.*') 

One  Rosh  Hashona  morning 
when  J  was  about  (i  years  old  and 
had  begun  to  ask  a  lot  of  questions 
about  things  in  the  world,  I  turn- 
ed to  my  father  in  schul;  I  was 
sitting  beside  him  there. 

"Papa,"  I  asked  him,  "why  are 
you  wearing  this."  I  meant  the 
white  gown  in  which  he  was  read- 
ing the  service. 

"Shush,  shush,"  he  replied  and 
kept  on  reading  out  of  the  book. 
He  paused  for  another  instant 
to  say,  "I  can't  tell  you  now. 
Later!" 

So,  later,  when  we  were  on  the 
way  home  from  schul,  he  began: 
"You  were  asking  me  why  I  was 
wearing  the  long  white  gown.  I'm 
happy  you  asked  that.  It's  good 
for  a  boy  to  learn  the  fine  things 
of  being  Jewish. 

"Well,  you  see,  Alfred,  it  has  to 
do  with  my  looking  all  right  be- 
fore God  on  this  day  which  is  the 
first  day  of  the  year  ...  to  look 
as  clean  as  the  white  I  was  wearing 


as  I  stood  there  before  Him  in 
the  schul." 

"But  you  have  that  nice,  new 
black  suit  on,"  I  replied.  "Isn't 
that  enough  to  wear?" 

Papa  replied:  "You  don't  under- 
stand. I  wore  that  long  white  shirt 
to  tell  God  how  clean  I  want  to  be 
through  the  year.  I  would  want 
to  be  as  white  as  that  alb  year  .  .  . 
every  day.  You  see,  on  Rosh 
Hashona  we  all  try  to  look  our 
best  before  God  who  judges  us 
that  day." 

"You  looked  so  nice,  papa,  in 
that  long  white  shirt,"  I  said. 
"You  must  have  looked  all  right 
to  God." 

But  papa  said  he  didn't  mean 
just  to  make  a  showing  to  God  on 
the  outside  .  .  .  "You  see,"  he  said, 
"the  main  thing  is  to  be  as  clean 
as  whiteness  inside  of  you.  It 
doesn't  make  you  clean  just  to 
look  white  and  clean  on  the  out- 
side." 

"But  you  sure  did  look  swell!" 
I  exclaimed.  "God  sure  must  have 
liked  the  way  you  looked.  I  like 
it,  too." 

Papa  went  on  to  say  that  a 
man's  outward  way  of  looking 
doesn't  mean  a  thing.  He  said  a 
king  may  be  wearing  golden 
clothes  on  the  outside,  but  he  may 
be  low-down  dirty  like  old  rust 
inside  of  him. 

"Yes,  Alfred,  that's  what  Rosh 
Hashona  is  all  about  ...  to  tell 
God  that  we're  going  to  keep  our- 
selves clean  and  good,  inside  of  us 
all  through  the  coming  year  .  .  . 
to  be  good  people  ...  to  be  kind 
to  other  people  .  .  .  never  to  tell 
a  lie  .  .  .  never  to  hurt  anybody. 
I  was  wearing  white  outside  to 
tell  God  how  white  I  hoped  to  be 
inside  all  through  the  year." 

I  asked  papa  why  he  didn't  let 
me  wear  one  of  those  white  things 
so  that  I  could  be  seen  by  God 
that  way  .  .  .  "Oh,"  he  replied. 
"You  don't  need  that.  You  are  so 
young  and  still  so  clean  .  .  .  no- 
thing bad  in  your  heart  or  head. 
Oh,  I  wish  you  could  stay  that 
way  all  through  your  days.  God 
sees  you  to  be  clean  through  and 
through,  you  being  so  young." 

Thus,  that  day  I  learned  the 
meaning  of  the  white  garments 
which  were  worn  all  over  the 
schul  on  Rosh  Hashona  .  .  .  and, 
of  course,  on~  Yom  Kippur,  too. 


Though  rabbinical  theology  may 
put  a  somewhat  different  meaning 
on  those  stately  white  gowns,  I 
keep  on  thinking  that  papa  had 
the  best  interpretation  of  the 
meaning. 

You  may  wonder  whether  papa's 
explanation  put  any  influence  on 
my  young  soul  that  Rosh  Hashona 
day  .  .  .  whether  I've  tried  to  live 


up  to  the  idea  .  .  .  whether  I'm 
really  pure  white  inside  of  me  as 
I  approach  God  this  Rosh 
Hashona. 

Oh,  when  you  come  to  the  many 
years  I've  attained  you  no  longei 
have  so  many  sins  to  be  son)'  for. 
At  my  time  of  life  one  doesn't  care 
much  about  enjoying  the  vices  .  . 

(Please  turn  to  Page  50) 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Best  Wishes  For 


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September,  i960 


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9 


Candles  Zo  Cight  Zke  Way 

By  The  Honorable  John  F.  Kennedy 


The  following  is  an  address  made  by  United  States  Senator  John  F. 
Kennedy,  Democratic  nominee  for  President,  maae  before  the  assemblage  at 
the  Fiftieth  Anniversary  Dinner  of  B'nai  Zion,  at  the  Hotel  Commodore, 
New  York  city.— THE  EDITOR 


JOHN  F.  KENNEDY 


It  is  a  great  pleasure  to  be  here 
tonight  in  tribute  to  the  fifty  years 
of  Bnai  Zion  and  in  honor  of  the 
special  mission  of  the  Jewish  Na- 
tional Fund. 

It  is  heartening  to  spend  an 
evening  where  the  focus  is  set  on 
works  of  peace  and  social  improve- 
ment —  on  the  courageous  and  far- 
sighted  efforts  your  organization 
has  made  to  alleviate  deep  human 
neetis.  For  the  years  of  crisis 
through  which  we  have  been  pas- 
ing  for  more  than  two  decades 
have  left  no  more  bitter  heritage 
than  the  homelessness  and  land- 
lessness  of  millions.  Your  works 
constitute  one  of  the  great  social 
achievements  of  our  time,  com- 
bining the  highest  idealistic  vision 
with  the  greatest  practical  vigor. 
And  what  work  could  be  more 
heartening  or  more  enduring  than 
the  great  forest  at  Jerusalem.  Your 
children  and  grandchildren,  when 
they  visit  Israel,  will  find  your 
monument. 

There  have  always  been  skeptics 
scoffing  at  the  possibility  of 
making  deserts  bloom  and  rocky 
soil  productive.  In  this  regard, 
our  own  country  as  a  nation  and 
Israel's  have  many  parallels  —  in 
the  diversity  of  their  origins,  in 
their  capacity  to  reach  the  unat- 
tainable, in  the  receptivity  to  new 
ideas  and  social  experimentation. 

In  this  country,  through  much 
of  the  19th  century,  warnings  were 
repeatedly  proclaimed  that  mid- 
America  and  its  plains  beyond  the 
moth  parallel  could  never  be 
settled  and  made  productive.  One 
writer,  travelling  from  Illinois  to 
Oregon  in  1839,  spoke  of  the  great 
American  Desert  "burnt  and  arid 
I  .  .  who  solemn  silence  is  seldom 
broken  by  the  tread  of  any  other 
animal  than  the  wolf  or  the  starv- 
ed and  thirsty  horse  which  bears 
the  traveller  across  its  wastes."  The 


sterility  of  the  plains,  and  their 
implacable  resistance  to  civilizing 
influence  or  settlement,  were 
themes  of  major  writers,  such  as 
Francis  Parkman  in  THE  ORE 
GON  TRAIL  and  Washington 
Irving  in  his  ASTORIA,  these 
writers  argued,  a  kind  of  nomadic 
existence  could  be  salvaged  from 
the  mid-American  land  mass,  from 
these  "bare"  and  "wasted"  plains 
with  their  "level  monotony." 

But  on  the  great  American 
Plains  —  as  decades  later  in  the 
great  Palestinian  Plains  and  val- 
leys —  determined  settlers  learned 
the  truth  of  the  epigram  that 
"Rain  Follows  the  Plough".  By 
1881  a  great  Western  town  build- 
er and  scientist,  Charles  Dana  Wil- 
ber,  was  saying:  "In  this  miracle 
of  progress,  the  plough  was  the  ad- 
vance messenger  —  the  unerring 
prophet  —  the  procuring  cause." 

These  words  sound  deep  re- 
sonances in  the  minds  and  mem- 
ories of  those  who  have  observed 
the  gradual  Zionist  fulfillment  in 
Israel.  History  records  several  such 
break-throughs  —  great  efforts  in 
which  spiritual  conviction  and 
human  endurance  have  combined 
to  make  realities  out  of  prophecies. 
The  Puritans  in  Massachusetts, 
the  Mormons  in  Salt  Lake  City, 
the  Scotch-Irish  in  the  Western 
territories,  were  all  imbued  with 
the  truth  of  the  old  Jewish 
thought  that  a  people  can  have 
only  as  much  sky  over  its  head  as 
it  has  land  under  its  feet. 

The  Jewish  National  Fund, 
which  for  forty-seven  years  fore- 
shadowed the  existence  of  an  in- 
dependent Jewish  state  and  as- 
sembled long  in  advance  a  perpet- 
ual trust  in  land  for  the  Jewish 
people,  symbolizes  this  magnifi- 
cent achievement.  Just  as  our  own 
West  has  sustained  progress 
against    the    impacts    of  serious 


farm  depressions,  crop  failures, 
credit  crises  and  droughts,  so,  too, 
Israel  has  had  to  exist  on  narrow 
margins  of  survival,  on  a  con- 
stant climate  of  hostility  and  out- 
side danger.  Yet  it  has  endured 
and  its  integrity  remains  unim- 
paired, and  this  success  can  be  in 
a  large  measure  attributed  to  tin 
Jewish  National  Fund. 

I  cannot  hope  —  nor  pretend  - 
to  solve  tonight  all  of  the  complex 
riddles  of  the  Middle  East.  But 
I  wotdd  like  to  suggest  some  per- 
spectives which  might  help  to 
clarify  our  thinking  about  the  area 


and  to  indicate  what  line  our 
longer-range  efforts  might  take. 
To  do  this  requires,  first  of  all, 
that  we  dispel  a  prevalent  myth 
about  the  Middle  East. 

This  myth  —  with  which  you  are 
all  too  familiar  —  is  the  assertion 
that  it  is  Zionism  which  has  been 
the  unsettling  and  fevered  infec- 
tion in  the  Middle  East,  the  be- 
lief that  without  Israel  there 
would  somehow  be  a  natural  har- 
mony through  the  Middle  East 
and  the  Arab  world.  Quite  apart 
from  the  values  and  hopes  which 
(Please  turn  to  Page  34) 


Lounging  comfort  comes  naturally  with 
this  down-cushioned  easy  chair  and  its 
handsome  companion  ottoman.  Versatile 
design  makes  it  appropriate  for  living 
room  or  boudoir.  And,  of  course,  you 
may  choose  upholstery  from  an  exten- 
sive collection  of  fine  fabrics. 


Henredon 


Henredon  Furniture  Industries,  Inc.,  Morganton,  North  Carolina 


lO 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  1960 


The  Rabbi's  Wife 
And  The  Torah 
Mantles 

By  Ethel  L.  Levey 


In  a  certain  village,  in  a  cer- 
tain country,  there  lived  a  young 
rabbi  and  his  wife.  The  Rabbi 
was  very  learned  for  so  young  a 
man,  as  was  his  wife.  She  had 
soft,  brown  eyes,  fair  skin,  and  a 
rather  delicate  air  about  her.  Her 
hair  was  fine  and  heavy,  although 
no  one  ever  saw  it,  for  she  wore 
a  wig  as  all  proper  Rabbi's  wives 
did  at  that  time,  in  that  certain 
country. 

She  was  indeed  a  most  proper 
wife  for  a  Rabbi.  She  spoke  to 
each  and  everyone  in  the  village, 
humbly  yet  proudly.  She  called 
on  the  sick,  brought  gifts  to  the 
new-born  children,  and  listened 
carefully  to  the  rambling  stories 
of  the  old  people. 

All  this  she  did  quietly,  in  the 
manner  of  all  well  taught  Rabbi's 
wives.  On  the  Sabbath,  she  was 
the  first  to  enter  the  Synagogue 
(after  the  Rabbi,  of  course)  and 
the  last  to  leave  (again,  after 
the  Rabbi).  She  prayed  carefully, 
not  too  loudly  nor  too  softly;  not 
too  knowingly,  nor  yet  too  un- 
wittingly. 

You  must  be  thinking  now, 
"What  a  jewel  of  a  Rabbi's  wife! 
Everyone  in  the  little  village  must 
have  loved  her!''  But  I  must  tell 
you  (it  saddens  me  to  do  so)  that 
this  was  not  so.  Respect?  Yes.  That 
she  had.  A  pious,  observant  Rab- 
bi's wife  deserved  respect.  Hon- 
or? Yes,  they  gave  her  this  too, 
for  performing  all  her  duties  as 
befitted  her  position.  Love?  That 
was  something  else  again. 

At  the  root  of  the  difficulty  lay 
this  fact.  She  went  among  the  vil- 
lagers perfect  in  manner  and  duty, 
thoroughly  informed  about  ritual, 
and  with  scrupulous  attention  to 
custom.  Yet,  never  did  they  feel 
that  she  was  one  of  them.  She 


stood  apart  —  not  above  them,  nor 
below  them  —  but  —  apart. 

So  matters  stood  until  a  terrible 
calamity  happened.  A  band  of 
fierce  robbers  fell  upon  the  little 
village  one  night.  They  ransacked 
Benjamin  the  Butcher's  shop,  and 
Simon  the  Shoeman's  store,  and 
finding  little  of  worth,  turned  up- 
on that  which  the  Jews  of  this 
village  seemed  to  treasure  most, 
the  Synagogue.  It  was  a  poor  vil- 
lage, but  the  robbers,  as  you  might 
guess,  didn't  beheve  that.  They 
burst  into  the  Synagogue,  knock- 
ed over  the  benches,  tore  away 
the  curtain  before  the  Ark,  and 
finally,  laid  their  grimy  hands 
upon  the  Torah  scrolls. 

The  Torah  Mantels  were  as  old 
as  the  Scrolls  and  the  Scrolls  were 
as  old  as  the  village,  but  they 
had  been  gently  handled  with  lov- 
ing hands,  so  that  the  Mantles 
still  sparkled  and  twinkled  in  the 
dim  light  of  the  moon.  The  ruf- 
fians cried  out  with  horse  vocies: 
"Jewels!  Jewels!"  and  ripped  the 
Mantels  from  the  Torah  Scrolls. 
Then,  rushing  out  into  the  street, 
the  evil  ones  were  gone. 

In  the  early  light  of  dawn,  the 
men,  women  and  children  of  the 
village  (the  Rabbi's  wife  with 
them,  of  course)  assembled  in  the 
Synagogue  and  thanked  God  that 
they  had  all  lived  to  see  the  day, 
but  when  they  opened  the  Aron 
Kodesh,  a  terrible  sigh  leaped  in 
their  throats.  "Oh!"  they  cried. 
"How  terrible!"  they  cried.  "I  can- 
not look!"  they  moaned.  As  they 
stood  moaning  and  crying,  the 
young  Rabbi's  wife  hesitantly  step- 
ped forward  (not  too  far).  "It  is 
not  so  terrible,"  she  said.  "We 
must  look!"  she  said,  and  hurried 
on,  "indeed,  we  must  make  new 
Mantles  for  the  Scrolls  at  once. 
Come,  we  will  T)egin  this  minute!" 


She  turned  and  left  the  Synagogue, 
and  everyone  followed  her.  That 
is,  everyone  except  the  Rabbi  and 
ten  men  who  had  to  begin  the 
morning  service. 

Otitside  the  Synagogue,  the  Rab- 
bi's wife  stopped.  "Menasha,  Zol- 
mon,"  she  said,  to  the  two  town 
carpenters.  "You  shall  make  new 
frames." 

"Miriam,  Rebecca,  Sarah,  you 
shall  call  together  all  the  women 
of  our  village  who  can  weave,  and 
weave  the  cloth  for  the  Torah 
Mantles." 

She  turned  to  the  older  women 
who  were  still  sobbing  and  la- 
menting. "Grandma  Hannah, 
Aunt  Ruth,  Mother  Esther,  you 
shall  plan  the  design  lor  our 
Torah  Mantles.  Then,  we  shall 
all  work  together  to  make  the 
most  beautiful  Torah  Mantles  in 
the  country.  We  will  begin  at 
once,"  she  said. 

That  is  when  the  village  began 
to  love  its  Rabbi's  wife. 

"Why?"  you  ask.  Ah,  surely 
now,  you  can  see  that. 

Do  you  mean  that  you  do  not 
understand  what  the  Torah  Man- 
tles had  to  do  with  it? 

Ah,  me! 

Here  is  the  way  it  happened. 
Menasha  and  Zolmon  were  to 
make  the  frames,  you  remember. 
After  all,  you  don't  disturb  the 
Rabbi,  busy  with  his  studies,  for 
something  like  that.  They  went 
to  the  Rabbi's  wife.  She  knew. 
She  knew  tire  size  and  the  shape, 
and  just  how  large  the  openings 
for  the  handles  of  the  Scrolls 
should  be.  Besides,  she  offered 
them  a  cup  of  tea  and  asked  after 
their  families,  mentioning  their 
children  by  name.  (Between  them, 
they  had  fourteen). 

Miriam,  Rebecca  and  Sarah 
were   to  find   those  women  who 


ETHEL  L.  LEVEY 

would  weave  the  cloth.  When  they 
came  toge  t  h  e  r,  they  simply 
couldn't  decide  whom  to  ask.  If 
Miriam  mentioned  one  name,  Re- 
becca said,  "A  foolish  woman." 
If  Sarah  called  out  a  name,  Mi-' 
riam  said,  "My  ten  year  old  Bessie 
weaves  better  than  she."  And  so 
on  and  so  forth.  They  were  just 
about  to  give  the  whole  thing  up, 
when  Sarah  said,  "Let  us  go  and 
ask  the  Rabbi's  wife.  Away  they; 
went;  it  was  only  a  walk  of  a  lew 
streets.  The  matter  was  settled 
in  no  time.  The  Rabbi's  wife  said 
"no"  to  this  one,  or  "yes,"  to  that 
one,  and  before  they  knew  it, 
everyone  who  could  weave  was  in- 
cluded. Then  she  offered  them  a 
piece  of  her  special  honey  cake 
and  gave  them  the  recipe  without 
being  asked.  She  remarked  on  the 
beauty  of  their  daughters  and  the 
cleverness  of  their  sons,  and  tire- 
women went  happily  on  their 
way. 

Now  Grandma  Hannah,  Aunt 
Ruth,  and  Mother  Esther  were  of 
the  older  generation.  Nothing 
wrong  with  them.  Not  at  all.  Just 
a  little  set  in  their  ways;  just  a 
little  sure  of  their  knowledge  and 
place  in  the  village  life.  Being 
chosen  to  design  the  Torah  Man- 
tles was  only  their  just  due  they 
felt.  After  all,  who  should  know 
better?  Who  had  more  experience? 
For  several  days  each  thought 
about  her  plan  of  design.  When 
they  met  in  Grandma  Hannah's 
house,  you  can  guess  what  happen- 
ed. Grandma  Hannah  said,  "I 
have  decided  to  place  a  saying 
from  the  Torah  across  the  top  of 
the  Mantles." 

Mother  Esther  said,  "It  would 
be  more  fitting  if  we  used  only 
the  word  Torah.  with  the  Lions 
of  Judah  on  eifher  side." 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  23) 


bo 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


1 1 


Ours  Must  Me  M  Suturing 

Jaitk 

By  Rabbi  Norman  N.  Shapiro 

Beth  El  Congregation,  Akron,  Ohio 


1!^ 


RABBI  NORMAN  N.  SHAPIRO 


A  widely  -  circulated  monthly 
letter  from  a  large  bank  in  Canada 
avers  that  "the  earth  has  suffered 
measureless  destruction  of  animals 
and  plants  by  the  uncalculating 
actions  of  both  savage  and  civilized 
men."  It  was  the  devastation  of 
their  surroundings  that  occasioned 
the  disappearance  of  salmon  from 
Lake  Ontario,  and  caused  the  bison 
to  vanish  from  our  western  plains, 
and  made  the  passenger  pigeon  ex- 
tinct in  North  America.  "We  have," 
in  the  words  of  Professor  A.  F. 
Coventry,  "for  a  long  time  been 
breaking  the  little  laws,  and  the 
big  laws  are  beginning  to  catch  up 
with  us." 

Nature,  we  are  told,  has  its  own 
laws  to  maintain  proper  balance. 
There  seems  to  be  an  interplay  of 
forces  —  better  still,  an  equilibrium 
—  in  the  natural  world  between 
hunter  and  hunted,  food  and  feed- 
er, so  that  the  resources  of  the 
earth  are  never  at  a  standstill. 

These  laws  with  their  compensa- 
tory actions  cannot  be  ignored 
without  resultant  serious  conse- 
quences. Nature  will  not  tolerate 
or  abide  ignorance  of  her  laws  as  a 
rationalization  for  violating  them. 
Nature's  laws  do  not  arbitrarily 
command  us  to  follow  certain 
courses  or  desist  from  others.  Na- 
ture's law  merely  underscores  the 
realities  of  life.  If  we  wish  to  avert 
or  mitigate  such  dire  consequences 
as  pain,  disability,  and  even  dissolu- 
tion, then  we  must  seriously  heed 
nature's  warnings.  For  nature  in 
the  final  analysis  is  the  totality  of 
iving  —  the  sum  total  of  the  princi- 
pal laws  and  conditions  which  af- 
fect the  existence  of  life  or  ani- 
mate objects. 

We  as  Jews  might  seriously  take 
a  "musar  hasechel,"  i.e.,  a  leaf  from 
the  laws  of  nature.  Human  beings, 
as  a  rule,  take  for  granted  and  are 


indifferent  to  the  daily  phenomena 
and  exciting  wonders  in  our  midst. 

Is  it  not  true  that  our  own  Bible 
is  replete  (in  the  Sidrot  which  deal 
with  the  Tochecha,  in  Behuchotai 
and  Ki  Tavoh  in  Leviticus  33:14-45 
and  Deuteronomy  28)  with  fore- 
warnings  and  admonitions  which 
are  constantly  being  invoked  not 
only  against  our  forebears,  but  for 
the  serious  consideration  of  poster- 
ity as  well?  The  preamble  to  the 
Tochecha  (literally,  warning)  in 
the  Bible  begins  on  a  gentle  note 
(Lev.  26: '-5):  "If  ye  walk  in  My 
statutes  and  keep  My  command- 
ments and  do  them,  then  will  I 
give  you  rains  in  their  season  and 
the  land  shall  yield  her  produce 
and  the  trees  of  the  field  shall 
yield  their  fruit  ....  and  ye  shall 
eat  your  bread  until  ye  have  enough 
and  dwell  in  your  land  safely." 
Shortly  thereafter  the  Bible  begins 
detailing  the  Tochecha  (Lev.  26: 
14-20):  "But  if  ye  will  not  harken 
unto  Me  and  will  not  do  all  these 
commandments  .  .  .  but  break  My 
covenant,  I  also  will  do  this  unto 
you.  I  will  appoint  terror  over  you 
....  and  ye  shall  be  smitten  be- 
fore your  enemies  ....  and  your 
strength  shall  be  spent  in  vain;  for 
your  land  shall  not  yield  her  pro- 
duce, neither  shall  the  trees  of 
the  land  yield  their  fruit." 

In  startling  and  even  in  terrify- 
ing form,  as  our  commentaries  on 
the  Bible  put  it,  God  the  Lawgiver 
attempts  to  utilize  man's  fears  and 
hopes  to  abet  His  sublime  princi- 
ple of  holiness  as  laid  down  to  the 
Hebrews  of  old:  "Ye  shall  be  holy 
for  I  The  Lord  your  God  am 
Holy.''  God  singles  out  the  bless- 
ings which  inevitably  must  follow 
in  the  wake  of  devotion  to  His 
statutes  and  ordinances.  At  the 
same  time,  details  of  the  dreadful 


consequences  of  disobedience  are 
also  graphically  cited. 

There  exists,  as  we  can  see,  a 
parallel  between  the  laws  and  rules 
which  obtain  in  the  world  of  na- 
ture and  in  the  higher  moral  law 
which  deals  with  duties  between 
God-and-man  and  man-and-man.  In 
both  spheres  these  dreadful  conse- 
quences may  be  expected  for  con- 
travening natural  law  and  for  the 
sins  and  transgressions  which  un- 
dermine the  principles  of  ethical 
faith.  In  the  natural  and  moral 


realms  we  see  the  effects  of  the 
terrible  devastation  and  chaos 
brought  about  by  human  perver- 
sity and  obtuseness. 

Thus  we  see  a  general  truth 
emerging  from  the  applications  of 
lessons  we  have  learned  in  the  na- 
tural world  and  in  higher  religion. 
History  and  the  experience  of  hu- 
manity subscribe  to  a  theory  of 
retributive  justice.  The  mills  of  the 
gods  grind  exceedingly  slowly,  but 
inexorably  nonetheless.  The  doe- 
( Please  Turn  to  Page  24) 


To  serve  you  Better. . 

JET-POWERED  FLIGHTS  from 
NORTH  CAROLINA,  VIRGINIA 

across  the  "TOP  OF  THE 

Fly  Piedmont  Airlines'  F-27  prop-jet 
next  time  you  take  a  trip!  This  modern, 
new  36-passenger  airliner  was  especially 
designed  for  fast,  convenient  regional 
flight  service.  It's  radar-equipped, 
air  conditioned  and  fully  pressurized  for 
maximum  passenger  comfort. 


piEomonr 


CALL  your  travel  agent  or  nearest 
Piedmont  Office. 


i2  The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 

NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS  FROM  THE  FOLLOWING 


"America's  Fastest  Selling  Junior  Dresses" 


Shown  In  The  South 

by  JAKE  CAUSEY 


juniors 


New  York  Show  Room  1350  Broadway 

ARTIE  GOLDMAN,  Representative 


New  York  Show  Room  1350  Broadway 

ARCHIE  KOTTLER,  Representative 


New  York  Show  Rooms  1350  Broadway 

ARTIE  GOLDMAN  and  ARCHIE  KOTTLER,  Representatives 


September,  i960 

Man  of  the  Month 
Jules  Bank 


Columbia,  S.  C. 


JUL.ES  BANK 


Jules  Bank  was  born  in  New 
York  City  and  attended  die  public 
schools  there.  He  was  graduated 
from  New  York  University  and 
obtained  his  Masters  degree  from 
the  Graduate  School  for  Jewish 
Social  Work.  He  also  attended 
the  N.  Y.  Psychoanalectic  Insti- 
tute, the  New  School  for  Social 
Work  and  Psychology.  He  later 
returned  to  New  York  University 
and  studied  for  the  Doctor  of  Phi- 
losophy degree,  completing  all  the 
academic  requirements  and  has 
but  to  complete  his  doctoral  dis- 
sertation for  that  degree. 

He  worked  in  an  experimental 
residence  for  disturbed  adolescents 
and  assisted  in  developing  a  pro- 
gram of  psychiatric  case  work  and 
group  work  which  has  been  the 
standard  for  many  years.  He  has 
Written  several  papers  on  this 
and  on  child  care  subjects  for  pro- 
fessional journals.  His  profession- 


al experience  also  included  work 
with  adult  criminals  in  New  York 
City. 

In  1937  he  married  Miss  Dena 
Citron  whom  he  met  at  the  New 
York  School  of  Social  Work  while 
both  were  students  there.  They 
have  a  daughter,  Barbara,  (Mrs. 
Herbert  Frank)  who  lives  with 
her  husband  in  Bala-Cynwyd, 
Penna. 

In  1942,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bank 
moved  to  Columbia,  S.  C,  where 
Mr.  Bank  was  employed  as  psycho- 
logist at  the  mental  hygiene  clinic. 
He  joined  the  wholesale  textile 
and  apparel  firm  of  M.  Citron  & 
Co.  where  he  is  now  vice-president. 
Successful  in  a  highly  competitive 
business,  he  has  found  time  also 
to  fulfill  obligations  to  his  fellow- 
men. 

Mr.  Bank  served  for  many  years 
on  the  operating  committee  of  the 
(Please  Turn  to  Page  98) 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


*3 


Ma,  Me  and  Milady 


Today,  more  than  25  years  later, 
I  can  understand  with  a  deep  sense 
of  pathos  why  Ma  was  hell  bent 
on  scrimping  and  economies  I 
could  not  fathom  at  the  time. 
The  sweet  nub  of  it  was  that  we 
were  a  poor  but  well-knit  family 
of  Ma  and  Me,  Ma  having  been 
widowed  several  years  earlier  and 
I  "a  school  one"  fastidiously  in- 
terested in  sports:  punchball, 
which  was  my  favorite,  handball, 
basketball  and  occasionally,  when 
we  —  the  boys  on  the  block  — 
could  get  enough  players  together. 
Softball  or  baseball. 

In  deference  to  the  tragedy  that 
took  my  father  —  it  was  a  sudden 
heart  attack  and  bing,  he  went 
just  like  that  —  Ma  felt  she  still 
wanted  to  be  independent  and 
carry  on  in  her  own  self-centered 
ways:  she  wanted  no  assistance  and 
would  ask  for  none,  come  the  cold, 
bitter  icy  winds  or  the  scorching, 
blistering  rays  of  the  opposite  sea- 
sons. 

The  echoes  of  her  warnings  for 
economy  'have  lingered  on,  and  it 
is  not  uncommon  in  this  day  and 
age  when  the  public  is  probably 
groping  for  a  new  apex  in  stock 
buying  that  I  should  admonish  my 
beloved,  "Turn  out  the  lights 
when  you're  through!  We  don't 
own  any  stock  in  the  gas  and  elec- 
tric company  and  I  have  no  in- 
tention of  making  them  rich,  if 
they  are  not  already." 

Using  electricity— and  gas— want- 
only can  be  a  costly  item  in  any 
family  budget.  Whether  the  thou- 
sands of  stockholders  in  gas  and 
electric  companies  feel  the  care- 
less use  of  the  utility  service  will 
directly  benefit  them  or  not,  I 
have  no  idea.  But  keeping  lights 
burning  in  excess  does  not  strike 
a  happy  note  with  me:  actually, 
it  is  a  waste  of  good  money,  hard 
earned  most  of  the  time,  even  by 
those  who  hold  shares  in  the 
utility. 


By  William  Ornstein 


But  to  spend  flagrantly  electric 
and  gas  without  the  thought  of  re- 
ceiving a  quarterly  dividend  check 
becoming  a  shareholder  was  just 
too  much  for  my  better  judge- 
ment, inherited,  of  course,  from 
Ma. 

Ma  had  an  expression  that 
went:  "If  a  man  can't  save  a  penny 
what  good  is  he  and  what  can  he 
look  forward  to  in  his  old  age?" 
There  was  nothing  smaller  in  Ma's 
figuring  than  a  penny,  yet  the 
expression  could  have  had  the 
same  significance  if  a  dollar  were 
mentioned  instead. 

Money  never  had  any  particular 
importance  to  me.  I  didn't  know 
how  hard— or  how  easy  for  some 
folks— it  was  to  earn,  or  what  it 
meant  to  come  by  in  large  num- 
bers. All  I  know  was  it  was  a 
means  of  barter  and  trade,  that  if 
Ma  had  f  100  she  was  as  rich,  or  as 
poor,  as  a  friend  or  neighbor  with 
nothing  or  Si, 000.  Money  was  just 
speaking  in  numerals,  the  larger 
the  figure  the  more  you  could 
buy.  But  since  I  hadn't  worked 
to  acquire  any  of  it.  money  was  a 
matter  of  addition  and  subtrac- 
tion, school  stuff',  and  what  you 
had  left  either  made  you  rich  or 
poor. 

That's  the  way  I  felt  about  the 
mention  of  money.  But  Ma,  she 
believed  in  it  deep-seatedly,  for, 
she  said,  if  one  had  to  take  care 
of  an  exigency— that,  incidentally, 
is  not  the  word  she  used— there 
was  a  complete  and  final  satisfac- 
tion no  friend  could  rival:  a  heart- 
felt gratification  that  she  would 
not  have  to  call  on  anyone  to  beg 
favor  or  obligation  that  must  be 
redeemed  at  a  later  date. 

She  said  she  could  not  sleep 
nights  if  she  owed  anyone,  and 
while  I  did  not  become  sensitized 
to  the  full  meaning  of  her  feelings 
then  I  do  now,  because  I  have 
developed  the  same  negative  reac- 


tion to  a  debt,  no  matter  how 
small  it  might  be. 

And  so  when  I  keep  telling 
Milady  and  Our  Brood,  "Turn  out 
the  lights,  I  don't  own  any  stock 
in  the  g.  and  e.  company!"  they 
will  obey  my  command— at  least 
two  of  them  have— and  then  salt 
it  away  on  the  shelf.  I  will  become 
aware  of  the  renewed  negligence 
in  due  time,  sometimes  four  or 
five  days  later,  admonish  them 
again,  this  time  informing  them 
as  politely  as  I  know  how  that  I 
have  no  intention  of  catapulting 
the  g.  and  e.  firm  into  the  richest 
in  the  country,  or  the  world,  for 
that   matter,   depending  on  how 


WILLIAM  ORNSTEIN 

much  my  dander  was  up  and  who 
was  the  culprit  at  the  time. 

Ma's  economies  were  not  leveled 
or  limited  to  the  utility  barons. 
Her  method  of  buying  things  was 
to  wait  until  she  heard  of  a  bar- 
gain from  a  friend  or  neighbor, 
in  dresess,  suits,  pants,  shoes,, 
shirts,  ties  and  her  own  proprie- 
tary accounterments. 

"If  I  can  save  five  dollars  on  a 
suit  for  you,"  she  would  say,  "this 
takes  care  of  the  table  for  three, 
four  days."  Or,  "I  have  a  day's 
(Please  Turn  to  Page  26> 


Sdcfy'Ray's 

HEALTH  STUDIOS,  Inc. 


Open  From 
10  A.  M.  TO  10  P.  M.  Daily 

Separate  Hours 
For  Men  and  Women 

WORLD'S  FINEST 
CHAIN  HEALTH 
STUDIOS 


For  Appointments  Dial  273-2511 
2114  Walker  Ave.,  Greensboro,  N.  C 


»4 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


RELIABLE  mfg.  co. 

High  Point,  North  Carolina 

Manufacturers  of 
Living  Room  Suites,  Sofa  Beds  and  Sleepers 

PERMANENT  EXHIBIT— 207  S.  Main  Street,  High  Point,  N.  C. 
Adjoining  Southern  Furniture  Exposition  Building 
HIGH  POINT,  NORTH  CAROLINA 
NEW  YORK  SHOW  ROOM 
213  Lexington  Avenue  .  .  .  Phone  MUrray  Hill  5-2088 
New  York,  N.  Y. 


A? 


LIBERTY 
CHAIR  COMPANY 

Manufacturers  of 

CHAIRS  AND  TABLES 

LIBERTY,  N.  C. 

Permanent  Exhibits 

NEW  YORK  FURNITURE  EXCHANGE,  New  York 
SOUTHERN  EXPOSITION  BUILDING,  High  Point 


AMERICAN 
Furniture  Co. 

Incorporated 
NORTH  W1LKESBORO,  N.  C. 

M anufadurers  of 
Promotional  Bed  Room  Furniture 

See  Us  at  the  Markets 

Permanent  Displays 

Southern  Furniture  Exposition  Building 
HIGH  POINT,  N.  C. 
New  York  Furniture  Exchange 
NEW  YORK,  N.  Y. 
American  Furniture  Mart 
CHICAGO,  ILLINOIS 
Dallas  Furniture  Mart 
DALLAS,  TEXAS 


GET  THE  BEST . . . 
GET 


Sealtesl  Foods  -  Southern  Division 


COLLINSVILLE 
DANVILLE 
NEWPORT  NEWS 
NORFOLK 

ALBEMARLE 
ASHEVILLE 
BREVARD 
BRYSON  CITY 
CHARLOTTE 
DURHAM 
ELIZABETH  CITY 


Virginia 


North  Carolina 


PETERSBURG 
RICHMOND 
ROANOKE 
WOODSTOCK 

FAYETTEVILLE 
GREENSBORO 

RALEIGH 
ROCKY  MOUNT 
SALISBURY 
WILSON 
WINSTON-SALEM 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


MANUFACTURERS  OF  QUALITY  MERCERIZED  YARNS 


tiASTONIA 

?(mded  YARN 


DIVISION  OF 


BOTANY 
COTTONS 

Gasionia.  Worth  Caralina 


Other  Divisions 

Jewell  Cotton  Mills  Irene  Mills  Gurney  Manufacturing 

Thomasville,  N.  C.  Taylorsville,  N.  C.  Prattville,  Ala. 

FINE  COMBED  AND  CARDED  YARNS 
NATURAL  —  BLEACHED  —  DYED 

New  York  Representative 
Cotton  Yarns,  Inc.  389  Fifth  Ave.  New  York,  N.  Y. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


OUT  DRAWS  'EM  ALLI  v  v, 


t 


TOP  GUN' 


WESTERN 
JEANS  by^ 


GEM 

Blue  Gem  'top  gun'  western  jeans  for  boys  and  young  men  are 
the  fleetest,  neatest  jeans  on  the  market.  They're  top  sales  draws 
all  over  the  country.  And  with  these  good  reasons: 

•  Saddle-worthy  styling.  Cut  for  slim,  yet  easy- 
riding  fit! 

•  Leads  the  posse  in  value  when  compared  along  side 
other  leading  brands! 

•  Priced  right:  you  seli  'em  more  profitably  for  less! 

Here's  the  showdown: 

Tough  13%.  oz.  coarse  weave  blue  denim.  Ruggedly  stitched,  rivet- 
reinforced  at  stress  points.  Swing  front  pockets,  heavy  duty  zipper 
fly.  In  regular,  slim  and  husky  proportions  for  boys'  sizes  4-16. 
Young  men's  sizes  28  to  34.  Men's  36  to  42. 

Draw  and  aim  for  the  top  sales  and  profit  target... 
ORDER  YOUR  'TOP  GUNS'  NOW! 

[BLUE  GEM  MANUFACTURING  COMPANY  •  Box  1559  •  Greensboro,  North  Carolina  j 
'New  York  Showroom:  Suite  5524,  Empire  State  Building,  New  York  Cityj 


Greensboro  Loom  Reed  Company,  Inc. 

Manufacturers 

GREENSBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


HERMAN-SIPE  &  COMPANY,  INC. 

General  Contractors  .  .  .  Building  Material 
CONOVER,  N.  C. 


HARWELL  GARMENT  COMPANY 

and 

BELLCRAFT  MANUFACTURING  CO. 


Manufacturers 

Men's  and  Boys'  Sportswear,  Work  Clothing, 
Pants,  Shirts  and  Sport  Sets 

OFFICES  and  PLANTS  —  HARTWELL,  GEORGIA 

New  York  Office   350  Fifth  Avenue,  New  York  City 

West  Coast  Office  411  E.  9th  St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif 

Southwest  Office  Box  606,  Sherman,  Texas 


HIAS  House  in  the  Negev  is  one  of  the  points  of  interest  visited  by 
Jewish  social  workers  during  their  Workshop  tour  of  Israel.  Preston  David 
(second  left),  Executive  Secretary  of  the  National  Conference  of  Jewish 
Communal  Service,  who  conducted  the  Workship,  is  shown  with  (1.  to  r.) 
Yitshaq  Vardimon,  the  Negev  Commissioner,  Menachem  Kraicer,  Director 
of  Israel  Operations  of  United  Hias  Service,  and  David  Tuviahu,  Mayor  of 
Beersheba.  The  tour  was  sponsored  by  the  Jewish  Agency  for  Israel  and  the 
Conference's  Committee  on  International  Jewish  Social  Welfare  of  which 
James  P.  Rice,  Executive  Director  of  United  Hias  Service,  is  Chairman. 
HIAS  House,  in  Beersheba,  provides  low-cost  accommodations  for  scientists 
and  technicians  who  are  devoting  their  activities  to  the  reclamation  of  the 
Negev. 

Jewish  Servicemen  in  N.  C.  Will 
Participate  in  High  Holy  Days 

By  Irving  Cheroff 

W elfare 


Jewish  servicemen  stationed  at 
Fort  Bragg,  Camp  Lejeune,  Sey- 
mour Johnson  AFB,  Cherry  Point 
Marine  Corps  Air  Station  as  well 
as  patients  at  Veterans  Hospitals 
in  Fayetteville,  Durham,  Salisbury 
and  Oteen-Swannamoa  will  partic- 
ipate in  Rosh  Hashanah  services  on 
the  evening  of  September  21st, 
and  on  September  22nd  and  23rd 
through    arrangements    made  by 


the    National  Jewish 
Board  (JWB). 

The  g  o  v  e  r  n  m  ent-authorized 
agency  for  serving  the  religious 
and  morale  needs  of  Jewish  ser- 
vicemen in  the  U.S.  Armed  Forces, 
JWB    serves    on    a  non-sectarian 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  70) 


SMART  STYLE,  INC. 

Real  Texan  Outfit 

"Everything  for  the 
Junior  Cowboy" 

Phone  6242 
ASREBORO,  N.  C. 


teton  rcro  nstff 

CUMBERLAND 
Mfg.  Co.,  Inc. 

©  Blue  Jeans 
•  Overalls 
©  Sportswear 

WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


Bush  Transfer,  Inc. 

Motor  Freight  Lines 

Furniture  Freight  Service 
General  Commodities 

P.  0.  Box  551  LENOIR,  N.  C.  PLaza  4-5391 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMEb-UU  1'LUUK 


^7 


Ben  Gurion  Challenges  The  Story  of 
"Exodus" 

By  Joseph  Sokol  of  Charleston,  S.  C. 


JOSEPH  SOKOL 


No  doubt  many  of  you  have  read 
about  the  controversy  created  when 
Ben-Gurion  declared  during  a 
news  conference,  that  the  actual 
exodus  by  the  Israelites  from  Egypt, 
is  not  as  it  is  depicted  in  the  Bible. 

The  Book  of  Exodus  explains 
that  the  Israelites  were  in  Egypt 
for  four  hundred  thirty  years;  it 


GROSSINGER'S 
,     GROSSINGER.  N.Y. 

I  


further  explains  that  six  hundred 
thousand  made  the  exodus  out  of 
Egypt.  These  six  hundred  thousand 
were  men  of  twenty  years  and  old- 
er only;  the  six  hundred  thousand 
did  not  include  women  and  chil- 
dren. This  would  mean  that  the 
total  making  the  exodus  would 
have  been  about  three  million  to 
four  million  people. 

Ben-Gurion  states  in  his  speech 
that  it  would  be  inconceivable  that 
so  many  people,  along  with  their 
herds  of  sheep  and  cattle,  could 
subsist  in  the  Sinai  desert. 

What  is  actually  true,  Ben-Gur- 
ion states,  was  that  only  six  hun- 
dred families  made  the  exodus,  the 
Israelites  having  been  in  Egypt  for 
only  two  generations. 

These  six  hundred  families  were 
of  the  tribe  of  Joseph.  The  bulk  of 
the  Israelites  had  been  concen- 
trated in  Canaan  all  this  while, 
and  when  the  six  hundred  Israelite 
families  came  to  Canaan,  they  re- 
joined their  brethren  of  about  four 
hundred  thousand.  The  Israelites, 
now  composed  of  the  two  united 
groups,  fought  with  the  inhabitants 
of  various  cities  and  towns  to  con- 
quer the  whole  of  Canaan. 

For  these  heretic  statements, 
Ben-Gurion  was  chastised  by  the 
religious  groups  in  the  Kneseth  and 
asked  to  resign.  Ben-Gurion's  reply 
to  this  was  that  he  was  speaking  as 
an  individual  and  not  as  the  prime 
minister  of  his  State.  We  wonder, 
however,  if  it  is  possible  for  a  man 
such  as  he,  a  famous  figure  and 
world  personality  who  belongs  to 
his  country  and  to  world  Jewry, 
to  speak  as  a  private  citizen.  Can 
(Please  Turn  to  Page  30) 


THE  SEASON'S  GREETINGS 

May  the  New  Year  Bring  You  Happiness  and  Contentment 

MARCUS  &  FARBER 

110  Hopkins  Place  Telephone  MUlberry  5-6332 

BALTIMORE,  MARYLAND 

Manufacturers  of  "Jay  Ray"  Sportswear 

JAY  MARCUS  RAY  FARBER 


HOLIDAY 
GREETINGS 
FROM 
P.  LORILLARD 
COMPANY 

first  with  the  finest  cigarettes 
through  Lorillard  Research! 


•  Strictly  kosher  food 

•  Cheerful  atmosphere  of  Israel 

See  Your  Travel  Agent  or  Owner's  Representative 
AMERICAN  ISRAEL  SHIPPING  CO.,  INC. 
42  Broadway,  New  York  4,  New  York 


?8 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


BURKYARNS 

INCORPORATED 


A 


Manufacturers  of 


Resist  Dyed  Acetate  Tarns 

A 


Valdese,  N.  C. 


-sy*  -y -•  -yy- -yy- 'yy-  -yy- -yy- -y- ' -yy-  -yy-  'yy- o ~  ■  yy  -yy-  -^y  ^y-  y^  -yy^ 

r 

§ 


Fine  Fabrics  Since  1813 


§ 


§ 

1 

§ 
§ 

1 


J*  R  Stevens  &  Co.,  inc. 


SYNTHETICS  DIVISION 


SYNTHETICS  DIVISION  EXECUTIVE  OFFICES 
GREENSBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


Judson 
Mills 


Manufacturers  of 

FINE  RAYON  AND 
COTTON  FABRICS 


GREENVILLE,  SOUTH  CAROLINA 

Selling  Agents 

DEERING,  MILLIKEN  &  CO.,  INC. 
240  Church  Street  New  York,  N.  Y. 


^        ^5^-  ust>    -<5>--  -<i>-.  -<c  s/-  ucr-  s/-.  vj^-  -^y- •-    jC^-  ^y-        -&~>'Or>    ■~^>_-  -j^- 


Sticking  Our  Necks  Out? 


Not  when  we  stick 
to  the  facts. 
And  the  quality 
of  Burlington 
fabrics  is  a  fact. 


Burlingfon 


INDV0TMIBS.  tMC. 

BXECUTIVE  OFFICES:  GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


ANITA  ENGLE 


Other  countries  may  have  sing- 
ing waiters,  but  probably  only  in 
Israel  can  you  find  a  hotel  man- 
ager who  is  a  professional  artist, 
with  time  off  for  painting  written 
into  his  contract. 

About  a  year  ago  a  young  artist 
pend  took  me  along  to  a  new 
gallery.  1  he  Jerusalem  Art  Cellar, 
it  was  called.  Without  any  attempt 
at  being  Bohemian  or  arty  crafty, 
it  was  simply  delightful.  Every- 
thing about  ir  was  just  right,  even 
to  the  neighborhood,  which  was 
in  the  old  quarter  of  Jerusalem. 

Right  next  to  the  gallery  was  a 
tough  Oriental  restaurant  which 
provided  a  pleasantly  vicarious  at- 
mosphere of  the  Paris  underworld. 
On  the  other  side  of  the  street  was 
a  hole-in-the-wall  affair  known  to 
the  students  of  the  Hebrew  Uni- 
versity who  frequented  it,  as  "Ali 
Baba's."  Hardly  more  than  a 
stone's  throw  awav  the  walls  of 
the  Old  City  rose  up  against  the 
sky  line,  grey,  mysterious,  and  sta- 
tic, like  the  backdrop  of  a  med- 
ieval Passion  Play. 

One  entered  the  gallery  through 
a  long,  narow  corridor  and  down 
a  flight  of  stairs.  There,  in  a  series 
of  rooms  which  had  previously 
served  as  a  biscuit  factory  were 
collected  some  of  the  most  in- 
teresting paintings  and  sculptures 
I  have  seen  in  Israel.  They  were 
ie  works  of  Israel's  younger  art- 
ists, among  them  the  only  Arab 
painter  in  Israel,  a  recent  graduate 
of  the  Bezalel  School  of  Arts  and 
Crafts. 

The  own:r  of  the  gallery,  Albert 
Goldman,  was  also  a  surprise. 
Slim,  grey-eyed  and  handsome,  he 
was  as  polished  and  mundane  as 
the  leading  man  in  a  Noel  Coward 
play.  An  a'tist  himself,  his  land- 
scapes and  street  scenes  had  the 
elegante  and  refinement  that 
seemed  characteristic  of  him. 

Graduallv  I  learned  the  story  of 
Mr.  Goldman's  remarkable  career. 
Although  only  38,  he  was  one  of 


A  Mother  In  Israel 

By  Anita  Engle 


the  most  experienced  hoteliers  in 
Israel.  Born  in  Egypt,  he  had 
studied  the  trade  from  the  age  of 
10  in  his  lather's  hotel  in  Alex- 
andria. Every  summer  holiday  he 
had  been  set  to  work  in  another 
department.  When  he  was  old 
enough  to  leave  home,  he  was  sent 
to  study  hotel  management  in 
France,  Italy  and  Switzerland.  By 
the  time  he  was  24  he  was  assist- 


ant manager  of  the  extravagant 
night  club  in  Cairo  where  ex-King 
Farouk  used  to  drink  himself  silly 
three  times  a  week. 

In  1948  he  was  running  the 
family  hotel  in  Alexandria  when 
he  was  stabbed  by  Arabs.  Shortly 
after  the  State  of  Israel  was  de- 
clared the  family  left  for  Israel. 
After  a  few  months  he  was  assist 
ant  manager  of  the  King  David, 


and  then  became  manager  of  the 
President  Hotel.  Variety,  accord- 
ing to  Goldman,  is  not  only  the 
spice  of  life.  It  is  essential  to  the 
career  of  a  first  class  hotelier. 
While  at  the  President  he  organ- 
ized courses  for  hotel  personel  for 
the  Ministry  of  Labor.  He  used 
as  his  training  manual  a  book  he 
had  written  in  Egypt  on  hotel 
(Please  turn  to  Page  32) 


NEW  DORMEYER 


cap 


★  WARMS 
★  HEATS 

*  BOILS 


MAKES  4  CUPS  OF  TEA, 
INSTANT  COFFEE,  OR 
OTHER  HOT  DRINKS 


BOItS  EGGS — ALUMINUM 
RACK  INCLUDED 


MAKES  HOT  SOUPS,  CHILI 
AND  STEWS 


WARMS  BABY'S  MILK, 
WATER  AND  FORMULA 


ADVEDTISiO  IN 


You'll  use  Hurri-Hot  a  dozen  times  a 
day,  and  bless  it  every  time.  Comes 
complete  with  removable  lid,  and  re- 
movable egg  rack. 
23-ounce  capacity. 
Guaranteed. 


95 


See  the  New  Dormeyer  HURRI-HOT  today 
SEE  . . .  HEAR  THE  NEW  PERRY  COMO  SHOW !  NBC-TV  SATURDAY  EVENINGS 

Mccracken  supply  company 

RALEIGH,  NORTH  CAROLINA 

"Your  Dormeyer  Appliance  Distributor" 

Tire  Sales  &  Service     Henderson  Vulcanizing  Co.  Saslows  Inc. 

Raleigh,  N.  C.  Henderson,  N.  C.  Greensboro,  N.  C. 


80 


The  American  Jewish  1 1MES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


IEW  YEAR  GREETINGS 
AND  BEST  WISHES 


Home-Made 

Chair  Co. 


Manufacturers 


Telephone  TRiangle  3-7301  P.  0.  Box  671 

STATESVILLE,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


BIG-DAD 

Matching 
Twill  pants 
and 
Shirts  — 
Ivy  Pants- 
Overalls-  - 
Dungarees — 

LIL-DAD 

Ivy    Pants — 
Dungaree- - 
Overalls — 

HAPPY  JIM 

Dungaree — 
Overalls — 

COWHIDE  BRAND 

Western  Jeans 


Write  For  Our 
Latest  Price  List 
On  Complete  Line 
Of  Work  Clothes 
And  Sportswear 

Sales  Offices : 

5822  Empire  State 
Building  —  New  York 
222  West  Adams  St. 
Chicago,  111. 

Siceloff  Mfg.  Co.,  Inc. 
Lexington,  N.  C. 

Big-Dad  Mfg.  Co.,  Inc. 
Starke,  Florida 


Greetings 

laran  naw  raw 


CASH  SAYINGS  ARE  BEST 

Shop  A  &  P  Often 

SEE  FOR  YOURSELF 


HEAVY  Hi 
&  RIGGING 

We  Haul  Textile  Machinery  Without  Dismantling 
DEPENDABLE  SERVICE 

Day  Phone  EX  9-0421  Night  Phone  ED  2-1072 

Old  Cannon  Airport 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OU  I  LUUK 


8  I 


Freedom,  Progress 
And  Heroic  Genius 

By  Rabbi  Samuel  Umen 


RABBi  SAMUEL  UMEN 


Our  sages  say  that,  .  .  .  "the 
more  a  man  tells  of  the  coming 
forth  from  Egypt,  the  more  is  he 
to  be  praised."  What  our  sages 
tried  to  impress  upon  the  Jewish 
mind  is  that  freedom  must  always 
be  regarded  as  a  highly  prized 
value.  It  is  the  basis  of  progress 
in  every  area  of  life.  Wherever 
freedom  is  curbed,  there  despotism 
and  slavery  prevail  and  progress 
stifled. 

The  question  arises,  is  progress 
possible?  When  a  child  is  born 
there  is  a  language  which  is  ready 
for  his  use.  His  religion  is  more  01 
less  predetermined.  The  form  of 
government  under  which  he  is  to 
live  is  already  established.  The 
educational  system  which  will  edu- 
cate him,  is  fully  prepared.  The 
child  is  practically  born  into  a 
mold.  He  has  little  choice  but  to 
accept  the  world  which  was  fash- 
ioned for  him  by  others.  Later,  as 
an  adult,  he  transmits  the  world 
he  inherited  to  his  offspring.  This 
being  the  case,  what  chance  is 
there  for  progress?  Yet,  a  study  of 
world  history  reveals  that  in  many 
situations  and  instances,  our  so- 
ciety is  far  above  those  of  the  past. 
We,  in  our  day,  especially  in  the 
western  world,  live  under  better 
political,  economic,  social,  and  cul- 
tural conditions.  We  enjoy  more 
liberty,  more  democracy,  greater 
opportunities  for  self-development 
and  self  fulfillment.  It  seems  that 
progress  is  possible.  How  does  an 
individual  or  a  group  break  the 
mold,  occasion  changes,  and  make 
improvements? 

Among  human  beings  there  are 
some  in  whose  hearts  burns  an  un- 
quenchable fire  for  righteousness, 
truth,  justice,  brotherhood,  love 
and  self-sacrifice.  Such  men  are  pre- 
sent in  every  age.  Such  men  are 
restless,  impatient,  discontented 
with  things  as  they  are.  They  see 
clearly  how  things  ought  to  be. 


and  proceed  regardless  of  conse-  whose  lives  may  be  said  to  be  syn- 
quences,  to  promulgate  patterns  onymous  with  freedom  and  pro- 
of life  according  to  their  own  vis  gress?  The  men  of  progress  are 
ion.  heroic  geniuses.  The  hero  speaks 
Who    are    these    fearless    souls  when  others  are  silent.  He  dares 


and  does  what  others  are  afraid 
to  dare  and  do.  "The  chief  of 
men,"  says  Carlyle,  "is  he  who 
stands  in  the  van  of  men;  fronting 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  74) 


ONE  MOTHER  TELLS  ANOTH&Hs 


"I  prefer  pure  whitefish...he  will  too!" 


A  .-L  no  wonder !  Only  precious  whitefish  has  such  an 
irresistibly  delicate  flavor.  It's  so  tender. . .so  tasty 
...so  incredibly  delicious!  Share  its  tantalizing 
goodness  with  your  family  and  guests. 

KOSHER  ©PAREVE 

Mother^ 

ALL  WHITEFISH 

Deluxe  Gefilte  Fish 

FROM  THE  SPOTLESS  KITCHENS  OF  MOTHER'S  FOOD  PRODUCTS,  INC..  NEWARK  5.  N.J. 


22 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


Dixie 
Products 

Incorporated 
MANUFACTURERS  OF 

DIXIE 

Gas  and  Electric 
Ranges 

Phone  GReenwood  6-8526 
Cleveland,  Tennessee 


ATHENS 
Hosiery  Mills 


Incorporated 


Manufacturers  of 

SEAMLESS  HOSIERY 


ATHENS,  TENNESSEE 


★  SAFE 

★  COURTEOUS 


★  DEPENDABLE 


28  Southern  and  Eastern  Terminals  and  Agencies 
"Service  Is  Our  Frame  of  Mind" 


PILOT 


BARLEY  MITCHAM  &  CO. 

(Formerly  Mitcham  &  Co. 

MILL  SUPPLIES 

Manufacturers  of 

Textile  Machine  Parts  —  Chain  Drives 

WRITE  FOR  CATALOGUE 
PLEASE  SPECIFY  YOUR  MAKE  OF  MACHINERY 
P.  0.  Box  271  Dial  UN  5-8547  Gastonia,  N.  C. 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


*3 


President  D wight  D.  Eisenhower  accepting  a  Torah  Scroll  from  Doctor 
Louis  Finkelstein,  Chancellor  of  The  Jewish  Theological  Seminary  of 
America.  Also  present  are,  left  to  right,  Joseph  S.  Wohl,  a  member  of  the 
Seminary  Board,  Dr.  Bernard  Mandelbaum,  Seminary  Provost,  and  Rabbi 
Isaac  Klein,  Buffalo,  New  York. 


The  Rabbi  and  The  Torah  Mantles 


on 


the 


Aunt  Ruth  said, 
all    the  Commandments 
iVIantles." 

In  another  moment  friendships 
of  years  would  have  been  over. 
But  just  then,  the  Rabbi's  wife 
knocked  on  the  door.  She  begged 
them  to  excuse  her  for  coming 
uninvited,  but  she  had  heard  that 
Grandma  HannaTi's  knee  was  ail- 
ing again.  "I  have  some  liniment 


"  GOOD  "1 
TREATING  j 

IS  ONLY  AN  INSTANT  AWAY  5 

when  you  stock  up  on  dark,  delicious  [ 

Dromedar 

SATE -NUT  ROLL 


THE 

READY-TO-SERVE  DESSERT 
CAKE  MADE  WITH  CRISP, 
CHUNKY  WALNUTS  AND  TH 
WORLD'S  CHOICEST  DATES 


LOOK  FOR  THE 
ON  THE  LABEL 
THAT  TELLS  YOU 
IT'S  KOSHER! 


(Concluded  From  Page  10) 
We  must  have  my  mother  gave  me  that  may  be 
helpful  to  you,  Grandma  Hannah. 
Please  try  it.  Rub  on  just  a  little, 
twice  a  day."  And  as  she  turned 
to  go,  "1  suppose  you  have  chosen 
the  designs  for  the  Torah  Mantles? 
We  are  so  lucky  to  have  your  wis- 
dom and  experience  at  a  time  like 
this."  With  that,  and  a  pleasant 
"Goodbye,"  she  left. 

The  three  stubborn,  old  wom- 
en stood  silent.  Then  Hannah 
said,  "Esther,  we  can  put  the 
Lions  of  Judah  on  either  side," 
and  Ruth  said,  "And  Torah  across 
the  top,"  and  Esther  said,  "And 
the  Commandments  on  one  or  the 
other,"  and  thev  smiled  at  each 
other  gently. 

Thus  the  Torah  Mantles  were 
made.  For  many  long,  lovely  years 
they  covered  the  Torah  Scrolls. 
Slowly,  the  Mantles  grow  older,  as 
did  the  Scrolls,  the  village,  the 
people,  and  even  the  Rabbi's  wife. 
How  the  village  folk  respected  her! 
How  they  honored  her!  How  they 
loved  her! 

And  all  because  of  the  Torah 
Mantles. 
Or  was  it? 


J(M  DROMEDARY  CHOCOLATE-NUT  ROLL 
and  ORANGE-NUT  ROLL  J 


If  you  enjoy  reading  the 

TIMES-OUTLOOK 
ask  a  friend  to  subscribe 


yy^^.yy.^ryy,yy.-y^.^ 


f 


Sharpe  Motor  Lines,  Inc. 


§ 

§ 
§ 
§ 
§ 
§ 

§ 

.y/-sS/~.  s/-.     yy-.  yy.      yy.  yy.  •  s/-.  yy.  yy.yy.  ^yy.  yy.  t,  y-.  yy.  yy  y?~-  ^5^-      -  0">  '^Or-  -s- 


O.  Box 
517 


COURTEOUS  -  -  DEPENDABLE 

Insured  Motor  Freight  Service 
HILDEBRAN,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


Dial 
EX  7-3837 


To  and  From 

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Ohio — Pennsylvania — Indiana — Illinois — Michigan 
Kentucky — Tennessee — Georgia 


9  Cylinder  High  Speed 

Slasher  for  all  type  yarns 


High  Speed  Rayon  Slashers 

—     High  Speed  Section  Beam  Warpers  for  Cotton   

High  Speed  Spindle  Driven  Warpers  for  Rayon 

High  Speed  Balling  Warpers   

High  Speed  Tricot  Warpers 
High  Speed  Narrow  Fabric  Warpers   


  High  Speed  Heavy  Duty  Collecting  Beamers 

High  Speed  Light  Collecting  Beamers 

  High  Speed  Warpers  for  Dye  Beams 

~ ~     Magazine  Cone  Creels  for  Cotton  and  Rayon 
Special  Creels 
Warp  Gassing  Machines 
_____     Warp  Dyeing  Machines 
  Special  Warp  Handling  Equipment 


Stainless  Steel  Cylinders  and  Vats 
for  All  Textile  Purposes 


Stainless  Steel  Cooking  and 
Storage  Kettles 


Nemo  Jet  Cooker 

Also  Contract  Machine  and 
Stainless  Steel  Work 


COCKER     MACHINE    <&    FOUNDRY  CO. 


IN  CANADA: 
Contact  W.  S.  Clark 


IN  MEXICO: 
Ins.  J.  Via,  Jr. 
I.  La  Catolica  45-911 
Mexico,  D.  F. 


PLANT  &  OFFICES 
at  Ranlo,  N.  C. 
'MAILING  ADDRESS: 
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WORLD'S  LARGEST  DESIGNERS 
AND  BUILDERS  OF  COMPLETE 
WARP  PREPARATORY  EQUIPMENT 


24 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  1960 


COLLECTION 


33231 


•  ■  ■      ...V  — 


ROYAL 


MR 


WORTH  C^°^ 

MAXWELL  ROYAL  CHAIR  CO- 

HICKORY,       NORTH  CAROLINA 


©inr's  Must  Ee  An  Enduring  Faith 

(Continued  From  Page  11) 
trine  of  reward  and  punishment  —     —  our  moral  obligation  - 


a  very  happy 


Greetinas 


§ 

§ 
§ 

CHAIRS  § 

§ 

Hickory,  N.  C.       Dial  DI  5-3864  § 


SOFAS 


Box  2367 


"schar  v'onesh"  —  is  basic  to  Juda- 
ism and  the  other  major  faiths. 
Religions  may  differ  as  to  the  in- 
terpretation of  the  concept  of 
Divine  Retribution,  but  the  funda- 
mental declaration  that  God  re- 
wards the  righteous  and  punishes 
the  wicked  is  essential  to  every 
higher  religion.  For  us  Jews,  the 
belief  that  right  is  rewarded  and 
wrong  punished  is  part  of  our 
ethical  faith.  We  believe  that  the 
world  rests  on  moral  foundations 
and  is  governed  by  a  greater  will 
and  purpose  which  we  call  "God." 
We  are  of  the  belief  that  in  the 
long  run  a  law  of  compensations 
sets  in  where  good  must  emerge 
triumphant  and  evil  and  injustice 
must  meet  their  ultimate  down- 
fall. 

The  benign  results  which  flow 
from  obedience  and  the  bitter 
fruits  or  consequences  of  disobedi- 
ence (Tochecha)  may  at  times 
sound  Utopian  and  suggestive  of 
wishful  thinking.  Yet  we  know  that 
the  promises  and  warnings  as  em- 
bodied in  the  Bible  and  reflected 
in  the  last  two  thousand  years  of 
Jewish  history  have  been  repeated- 
ly borne  out  and  confirmed.  The 
Holiness  ideal  —  our  ethical  faith 


|fhone  INgersoll  4-0251  CONOVER,  N.  C. 

Manufacturers  of 

UPHOLSTERED  FURNITURE  OF  DISTINCTION 


Early  American'"ls/Lodern'"i8th  Century  Styling 

Visit  with  us    High  Point — Space  750    Chicago — Space  1410 


retri- 
butive justice  —  have  been  vindi- 
cated and  attested  to  time  and 
again  by  the  workings  of  God,  the 
finger  of  history,  and  by  human 
experience. 

Possibly  an  incorrigible  optim- 
ism which  thrives  on  or  —  paradox- 
ically enough  —  flourishes  in  ad- 
versity has  given  the  Jew  through 
the  ages  the  tenacity  to  cling  to  the 
ideals  and  tenets  of  his  faith.  If  we 
are  inveterate  optimists,  it  is  a 
buoyancy  born  in  sorrow,  anchored 
in  courage,  and  rooted  in  tears  in 
the  "Emek  Habocha,"  the  valley  of 
tears  referred  to  in  the  Lecho  Dodi 
of  the  Friday  Evening  or  Sabbath 
Eve  Service. 

There  are  many  contemporarv 
testaments  and  attestations  to  our 
faith.  To  mention  but  a  few:  the 
reemergence  of  the  State  of  Israel 
out  of  the  ashes  and  ruins  of  World 
War  II  —  the  impending  trial  of 
Adolph  Eichmann,  the  grotesque 
image  and  embodiment  of  Nazi 
bestiality  and  inhumanity  to  man 
—  and  the  continued  existence  and 
survival  of  our  Jewish  people,  al- 
ready decimated  and  virtually  anni- 
hilated in  the  face  of  the  most  hein- 
ous, diabolical  crimes  of  the  Nazis 
against  our  people  and  the  rest  of 
mankind.  Who  are  we  to  question 
the  injustices  and  inequities  in  the 
world?  Surely  they  are  multitudin- 
ous in  character,  and  more  often 
than  not  the  wages  of  disobedience 
as  described  in  the  Bible  —  sick- 


TROUTMAN 

CHAIR  COMPANY 

Manufacturers  of 
CHAIRS 

TROUTMAN,  N.  C. 

BOLING  (HAIR  COMPANY 

Manufacturers  of 
OFFICE  CHAIRS  —  SCHOOL  CHAIRS 

SILER  CITY,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


STOUT  CHAIR  COMPANY,  Inc. 

Manufacturers  of 

CHAIRS 
for  the  Office,  Home  and  School 
LIBERTY,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


New  York  Representative :  Harry  Nechamen,  Pier  49,  North  River,  New  York,  N.Y. 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


ness  and  defeat,  famine,  wild 
beasts,  siege  and  exile,  existing  or 
widespread  evils  —  so  often  out- 
weigh and  seem  to  overwhelm  the 
forces  for  good. 

True,  these  are  the  dilemmas  of 
our  times  —  the  problem  of  good 
and  evil  —  "zadik  vra  loh,  rosho 
v'tov  loh"  —  the  perennial  and 
persistent  questions  —  why  do  the 
righteous  suffer  and  the  wicked 
prosper?  Why  does  it  take  so  long 
for  good  to  overtake  evil?  Why  is 
there  such  an  abundance  of  "tzores" 
-  sorrow  —  in  the  world?  Why  does 
truth,  harsh  as  it  is  in  its  unvarnish- 
ed form,  seem  to  crawl  so  slowly 
and  evolve  so  painfully? 

In  the  prevalence  of  so  much  ad- 
versity, ours  as  Jews  must  be  a  ma- 
ture, refined  faith  which  bears  wit- 
ness to  and  unyieldingly  believes 
in  the  regular  operation  of  God's 
laws  in  the  cosmos,  i.e.,  in  the 
world  about  us,  and  in  the  impera- 
tive character  of  our  moral  law  and 
ethical  faith.  We  must  at  all  times 
be  prepared  to  steel  ourselves  to 
the  continuing  tests  of  faith  and 
challenges  to  our  belief.  We  dare 
not  expect  God  to  suspend  the 
moral  law  or  abrogate  the  natural 
laws  at  our  whims  and  caprices,  at 
our  importunings  and  demands. 

We  know  and  should  realize  that 
laws  of  nature,  man,  or  higher  re- 
ligion cannot  be  disregarded  with- 
out eventual  disaster.  True,  our 
impatience  and  lack  of  faith  may 
get  the  better  of  us  at  times.  "Vaf  al 
pee  sheyitmahmea"  —  "Even 
though  The  Messiah  should  tarry"; 
"Even  if  my  faith  should  be  serious- 
ly undermined  on  occasion"  —  in 
spite  of  everything  I  shall  continue 
to  believe.  So  sang  the  hapless,  ill- 
fated  fighters  for  freedom  in  the 
Warsaw  Ghetto  during  World  War 
II.  We  should  take  our  lessons  from 
those  who  have  suffered  the  most. 
We  must  convert  every  disastrous 


event,  every  negative  experience, 
every  adversity  into  a  positive  affir- 
mation and  a  resounding  "Aye!"  — 
into  a  declaration  of  faith  whose 
reverberations  will  be  heard  and 
respected  throughout  the  world. 

Professor  A.  F.  Coventry  may 
have  been  expressing  a  profound 
Jewish  truth  and  may  have  given 
us  a  penetrating  insight  into  a 
working  philosophy  of  faith  when 
he  cautions  us  to  take  courage, 
when  evil  seems  to  engulf  us  and 
truth  seems  to  be  overpowered  and 
neutralized.  The  professor  offers 
no  comfort  to  those  who  would 
join  forces  with  evil  by  making 
compromises  with  the  truth,  by 
breaking  laws  under  the  guise  of 
making  league  with  the  devil.  "We 
have  for  a  long  time  been  breaking 
the  little  laws,  and  the  big  laws  are 
beginning  to  catch  up  with  us"  — 
so  opined  the  professor  in  Toron- 
to. Did  not  the  Pirke  Aboth,  the 
Ethics  of  the  Fathers,  teach  us  the 
same  compelling  truism  two  thous- 


^^^^^^ 


Dr.  Joseph  J.  Schwartz,  European 
vice-president  of  the  Joint  Distribu- 
tion Committee  is  shown  as  he  left 
on  the  American  Clipper  for  Lisbon. 
Dr.  Schwartz  flew  back  to  resume 
his  duties  directing  the  overseas  re- 
lief and  rehabilitation  work  of  the 
J.D.C. 


Hardware  &  f 
P^PfiPW*  Supply  Co.,  Inc.  I 

.  .and..  '  § 

Virginia  Machine  Tool  Company  § 

1 
§ 

§ 
§ 
f 
§ 

^  yy-  sy-     i0n  -^y-  i&t  t^j     •  /y^      s^.     -^y.  -j^ 


JOBBERS  .  .  . 

"We  Specialize  in  Your  Factory  Requirements" 

Mill  Supplies         •         Heavy  Hardware 
Woodworking  Machinery- 
Machine  Shop  Supplies  •  Cabinet  Hardware 
Woodworking  Tools 

LENOIR,  N.  C.  and  BASSETT,  VIRGINIA 


"Rhod 


oaes 

PURNI  T  U  R>  £ 


Retail  Stores  In 


AUGUSTA,  GA. 
BURLINGTON,  N.  C. 
DURHAM,  N.  C. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 
RALEIGH,  N.  C. 
WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 
AIKEN,  S.  C. 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


EASLEY,  S.  C. 
GREENVILLE,  S.  C. 
GREENWOOD,  S.  C. 
SPARTANBURG,  S.  C. 
BRISTOL,  VA. 
DANVILLE,  VA. 
MARTINSVILLE,  VA. 


Over  Three  Quarters  of  a  Century 
1 875  of  Service  to  the  South 


I960 


"WE  DELIVER  WHILE  OTHERS  PROMISE" 

RELIABLE  TRUCKING  CO.,  INC. 

HIGH  POINT,  N.  C. 

Terminal— Newark,  N.  J.       HICKORY,  N.  C.        High  Point,  N.  C. 
Dial  BIgelow  8-7385  Dial  DA  vis  4-8992  Phone  882-0196 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS 

CHADBOURN 

Veneer  Company 

Manufacturers  of 

Single  Ply  Veneers  from  Southern  Hardwoods 

CHADBOURN,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


STONEYILLE 
Furniture  Co.,  Inc. 

Manufacturers  of 

PLASTIC  —  CHROME 
BREAKFAST  ROOM  SUITES 
&  KITCHEN  CABINETS 

STONE VTLLE,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


2b 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September ,  i960 


Carver 

MANUFACTURING  COMPANY,  INC, 


Manufacturers  of 
QUALITY  FURNITURE 

ATHENS,  TENNESSEE 


BURKART  -  SCHIER  CHEMICAL  CO. 

CHATTANOOGA,  TENN. 

NASHVILLE  KNOXVILLE 


INDUSTRIAL  CHEMICALS 
TEXTILE  SPECIALTIES 

Manufacturing  Chemists  for  the 

Textile  Industry 

PENETRANTS  —  DETERGENTS  —  SOFTENERS 
FINISHES 


New  Year  Greetings  From  -  -  -  - 

Le  Brun  Brothers,  Inc. 

Manufacturers  of 

Early  American  Bedroom  Furniture 

GREENSBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


Superior  Bolster  Company 

MANUFACTURERS  OF 
SPINNING  AND  TWISTER  BOLSTERS 


319  South  Linwood  Street  P.  O.  Box  1040  Dial  UN  5-4911 

GASTONIA,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


Morrison  Furniture  &  Fixture  Company 

Manufacturers  and  Designers  of 

Bank,  Store  and  Office  Fixtures 

Phone  TRiangle  2-2444  STATESVILLE,  N.  C 


and  years  ago  by  saying,  "Hevey 
zaheer  bemitzvoh  kalah  k'vecha- 
murah  she'en  ato  yodeah  matan 
secharan  shel  mitzvot,"  (Pirke 
Aboth  2:1)  —  "And  be  careful  to 
adhere  to  minor  precepts  and  ob- 
serve the  lesser  commandments  as 
though  they  were  major,  for  thou 
knowest  not  how  the  rewards  of 
the  precepts  are  given."? 

Our  Jewish  tradition  commands 
us  to  accept  life's  suffering  and 
joys  without  losing  hope  and  faith 
in  God,  in  our  traditions,  and  in 
our  moral  duties.  However,  when 


all  is  said  and  done,  and  the  Bible 
sets  before  us  "Tov  v'rah  good  and 
bad,  "Ha  chayim  v'hamovet"  — 
life  and  death,  we  are  enjoined  in 
the  Book  of  Deuteronomy:  "Uvo- 
charto  bachayim"  —  And  thou  shalt 
choose  life. 

We  wish  Jews  everywhere 
throughout  the  world  the  choice  of 
life,  a  free  life  dedicated  to  God, 
Torah,  and  Israel  in  an  atmos- 
phere and  clime  where  freedom  is 
cherished  and  where  one's  liberties 
may  continuously  see  the  light  of 
day  and  be  practiced  without  fear. 


Me,  Ma  and  Milady 

(Continued  From  Page  13) 


table  in  pocket  by  buying  these 
shoes  for  you."  At  the  same  time 
she  always  asked,  "How  do  you 
feel?"  in  this  or  that,  making  sure 
I  was  definitely  satisfied  before  a 
coin  or  bill  changed  hands. 

She  would  even  go  to  lengths 
of  purchasing  clothing  and  under- 
garments out  of  season  because  of 
the  unusual  markdowns  in  prices, 
holding,  "If  a  bank  can  put  your 
money  away  in  a  vault  until  you 
need  it  and  pay  you  for  holding 
it"— she  was  referring  to  savings 
accounts— "then  why  can't  you 
store  a  suit  or  overcoat  in  moth- 
balls for  a  few  months?  Instead 
of  waiting  for  a  bank  to  give  you 
interest,  this  way  you  already  have 
it  in  your  pocket." 

I  remember  it  as  well  as  yester- 
day those  quarter  gas  meters  in 
our  flat.  We  had  three  rooms  with 
the  toilet  at  the  other  end  of  the 
hall  for  all  tenants  on  the  floor. 
This  flat  Ma  called  her  Castle. 
Everything  in  it  she  owned  out- 
right, nothing  on  instalments  like 
some  of  the  neighbors  had,  and 
that  made  her  Queen  of  her  own 
domicile,  a  province  of  three  box- 
shaped  rooms  two  flights  up  with 
a  view  to  the  front  where  the  rum- 
bling of  wholesale  produce  trucks 


day  and  night  left  little  for  a  light 
sleeper  to  enjoy.  Luckily  we  were 
not  in   this  category.  , 

But  this  was  Ma's  Castle.  A 
quarter  inserted  in  a  meter  which 
hung  on  the  kitchen  wall  syphon- 
ed a  measured  quantity  of  gas 
from  an  underground  pipe.  Ma 
had  it  pretty  well  figured  out  that 
a  quarter  should  provide  her  with 
sufficient  gas  for  a  week,  and  it 
usually  did.  ^Vhen  the  ugly  look- 
ing gas  tank  attached  to  the  meter 
ran  dry  a  day  or  two  ahead  of 
time,  pleading  for  another  coin, 
Ma  stormed,  "The  nerve  of  the 
thing!"  to  do  th~is  to  her. 

There  must  be  a  slow  leak,  she 
insisted.  If  not,  she  pointed  her 
eyes  at  me,  as  if  to  say  I'd  been 
lax  in  turning  off  the  jet  or  jets 
when  I  was  through  heating  up 
food  she'd  leTt  behind  for  me 
when  she  couldn't  join  in  what- 
ever the  meal  was  she  had  pre- 
pared. 

Of  course  we  knew  it  couldn't 
leak  because  one  or  both  of  us 
would  have  been  asphixiated.  We 
coiddn't  smell  anything  wrong.  I 
was  innocent,  Ma  realized,  and 
she  finally  wound  up  blasting  the 
g.  and  e.  company.  "The  crooks. 
The  dirty  crooks!  They  cheated 


Brady  Furniture  Co.,  Inc.  | 

RURAL  HALL,  NORTH  CAROLINA  S 

§ 

§ 


Manufacturers  of  Maple  Living  Room 
and  Sun  Parlor  Suites 
and  Chairs 


Show  Rooms 

SOUTHERN  FURNITURE  EXPOSITION  BUILDING 
High  Point,  N.  C.  —  Third  Floor 

ATLANTA  MERCHANDISE  MART 
Atlanta,  Ga- 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


27 


A  Jewish  chaplain  in  Hawaii  shows  a  serviceman  and  his  family  the 
shofar  which  will  usher  in  the  new  Jewish  year.  Throughout  the  year,  in 
all  parts  of  the  world,  Jewish  GIs  guarding  America's  freedom  observe  the 
holidays  and  festivals  of  the  Jewish  calendar,  led  by  Jewish  chaplains  re- 
cruited, endorsed  and  served  by  the  National  Jewish  Welfare  Board,  with 
religious  supplies  and  prayer  books  provided  by  JWB. 


us  out  of  a  nickel— or  dime's  worth 
—of  gas,"  depending  on  how  she 
felt  and  the  amount  of  cooking 
that  remained  for  the  given  week. 

At  the  same  time,  Ma  would 
shake  her  head,  mumble  in  oath 
or  two,  and  somewhere  along  the 
line  I  accepted  it  as  a  round-about 
warning  to  use  the  gas  sparingly 
on  future  food  warm-ups. 

Day  Olds  were  another  saving 
for  the  purse,  slim  as  it  was.  Ala's 
psychology  held  to  the  reasoning, 
"The  bread  you  buy  a  day  later 
tastes  better.  The  flour  is  settled 
and  who  needs  fresh  bread  that 
falls  apart  when  you  sink  your 
teeth  into  it."  The  savings  in 
pocket  amounted  to  a  copper  a 
day  and  these  coppers  added  up 
each  week,  enough  to  buy  me  a 
cut-price  tie,  hankies  or  an  under- 
shirt or  outefshirt. 


Then  there  were  bananas  which, 
when  overripe,  acquired  spots  and 
more  often  than  not  artless  brown 
designs  on  the  skin.  As  long  as 
the  contents  under  the  skin  held 
firm,  Ma  would  say,  "Bananas 
taste  sweeter  when  they're  over- 
ripe. One  more  day  and  what  can 
the  store  or  pushcart  peddler  do 
with  them?" 

She  was  right  in  both  specifics. 
The  fruit  had  a  deliriously  sweet- 
flavor,  a  treat  for  anyone  who 
liked  bananas:  and  T  loved  banan- 
as. Conveniently,  we  saved  a  lot  of 
money  over  the  years  as  Ma  went 
from  store  to  store,  pushcart  to 
pushcart,  foraging  lor  the  speckl- 
ed product  of  Cuba  that  would  be 
headed  for  the  garbage  can  if  not 
l  iken  off  the  dealers'  hands  in 
time.  , 

There  were  other  means  where - 


Pine  Hosiery 
Mills,.  Inc. 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS  FROM 

Brisco  Hosiery 
Mills 

Maker  of  Fine  Hose 
STAR,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


Best  Wishes  For  A  Happy  New  Year 

SOUTHERN  PAPER  BOX  (0. 

Manufacturers  of 

QUALITY  FOLDING  PAPER  BOXES 


Office  and  Factory 
TAYLORS VILLE ,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


raran  raw  nw 


CAROL-MAY  FINISHING  CO, 

Incorporated 
• 

Full  Fashioned  Hosiery  Finishers 

QUALITY  CONTROL 
plus 

UNEXCELLED  FINISHING 
• 

CONCORD,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


LORIMER  HOSIERY  MILLS 

INCORPORATED 

Manufacturers 

Men  s  High  Grade 
HOSIERY 

BURLINGTON,  N.  C. 


ARROW  TRADE  MARK 

INCORPORATED 


Manufacturers  of  Hosiery  Transfers 


Dial  Dl  5-7173  or  Dl  5-7174 

17th  Street  S.  W.  HICKORY,  N.  C. 


Greetings 

HILDEBRAN 

HOSIERY  MILLS 

MANUFACTURERS  OF 

Men's  Seamless  Hosiery 
HILDEBRAN,  N.  C. 


28 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


§ 
§ 

§ 

§ 
§ 
§ 


SILVER  KNIT  HOSIERY  MILLS 


Incorporated 


§ 
§ 


HIGH  POINT,  N.  C. 


LAUGHLIN  F.  F.  HOSIERY  MILLS,  INC. 

Manufacturers  of 

Ladies'  Full  Fashioned  and  Seamless  Hosiery 

Phone  7385 
RANDLEMAN,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


NEW  YORK  SALES  OFFICE 
Empire  State  Building,  Suite  2819 
LACKAWANNA  4-8172 


New  Year  Greetings  - 


MONARCH  HOSIERY  MILLS,  Inc. 

Manufacturers 

HIGH  GRADE  SEAMLESS  HOSIERY 


331  E.  Elm  St. 


GRAHAM,  N.  C. 


Dial  CA  6-1293 


Ridgeview  Hosiery  Mill  Company 

Manufacturers  of 
Ladies'  Full  Faslhioned  and  Seamless 
HOSIERY 

NEWTON,  NORTH  CAROLINA 

S.  D.  ARROWOOD  &  Co. 

EMPIRE  STATE  BLDG.  NEW  YORK,  N.  Y. 


by  Ma  counted  her  savings  at  the 
end  of  the  week.  She  felt  enor- 
mously happy  and  proud  because 
she  had  succeeded  in  "making  ends 
meet,"  as  she  so  aptly  expressed 
it,  without  seeking  succor  from  a 
relief  agency. 

In  our  neighborhood  were  quite 
a  few  families  on  relief  and  they 
thought  nothing  of  it.  If  they 
did,  Ma  couldn't  understand  why 
they  were  so  free  in  discussing  how 
much  this  family  got  each  week 
and  the  amount  that  son,  or  some 
other  neighbor,  received.  Individ- 
ual circumstances  proscribed  the 
limitations,  such  as  ailing  hus- 
band, no  husband,  and  the  num- 
ber of  children  who  had  to  be  fed. 
and  clothed,  and  housed  under  a 
roof  instead  of  being  "put  out" 
on  the  street. 

Ma  loathed  the  mere  mention 
of  "relief  agency,"  a  city  project 
which  periodically  sent  investigat- 
ors around  to  snoop  and  ask  a  lot 
of  embarrassing  questions.  "Who 
wants  them  knocking  on  my  door? 
Who  needs  them?  As  long  as  I 
have  these  two  good  hands"— and 
she'd  turn  palms  up— "and  two 
legs  that  don't  ^bother  me  so  I  can 
stand  on  my  feet,  I  will  never  call 
on  anyone  for  help." 

I  had  heard  her  tell  the  story 
to  one  or  two  of  the  impecunious 
cases  on  the  block:  she  never 
mentioned  it  to  me,  never  wanted 
me  to  know  how  a  "relief  agency" 
existed,  come  what  may. 

Her  pride  was  her  fortune.  She 
could  earn  a  living  for  both  of 
us  as  long  as  I  watched  the  dollar, 
she  insisted,  demanding  my  lull 
cooperation  by  eliminating  un- 
necessary expenses  and  waste,  not 
only  for  now  but  in  weaving  the 
skein  for  the  future,  when  I 
would  be  on  my  own  with  a  family 
to  guide  and  provide  for  in  my 
own  material  bailiwick. 

Athletics,  however,  were  the 
bane  of  Ma's  economic  structure. 

Being  athletically  inclined,  I 
would  get  regular  warnings  about 


wearing  out  my  shoes.  Playing 
ball  took  its  toll  on  my  heels  and 
soles,  and  while  I  didn't  care 
whether  I  wore  brogans  with  holes 
in  them  or  not,  Ma  would  call 
me  to  account  when  she  noticed 
the  need  for  repairs  or  replace- 
ments. 

"Can't  you  be  more  carelul? 
After  all,  I  don't  own  a  shoe 
factory.  I  wouldn't  mind  owning 
a  rubber  heel  plant  like  O'Sulli- 
van's  and  then  you  could  wear 
your  heels  away  like  nobody's 
business.  As  for  your  soles,  if  I 
couldn't  own  a  factory  I'd  like 
to  at  least  work  in  one  where  I 
can  get  the  leather  on  an  em- 
ploye's discount." 

Of  course  Ma  was  daydreaming. 
She  was  trying  to  make  me  feel 
good:  she  wanted  me  to  have 
as  much  fun  as  I  could  while  I 
was  young  and  at  the  same  time 
she  was  trying  to  ease  the  pain  of 
paying  out  her  savings  to  have 
my  shoes  fixed  so  often. 

On  numerous  occasions  in  the 
past  few  years  I  have  recalled 
these  incidents  and  sayings.  When 
I  see  my  boys  down-at-the-heel  in 
their  attire  from  athletics  I  say 
to  myself  this  is  a  happy  sign,  a 
healthy,  robust  pair  rather  than 
think  of  possible  bankruptcy  star- 
ing me  in  the  face  if  and  when  the 
pace  became  accelerated. 

The  youngsters  take  after  me 
on  the  ball  field  whenever  and 
where  ever  they  can  find  a  game 
to  participate  in  and  prove  their 
talent.  And  I  am  enormously 
proud  and  happy  for  them. 

But  with  Milady,  who  took  me 
For  better  or  worse,  I  take  every 
opportunity  of  reminding  her  to 
"Turn  out  the  lights!  we  don't 
own  any  stock  in  the  g.  and  e.  com- 
pany." 

This  has  been  going  on  for 
many  years  and  she  has  been  pass- 
ing on  the  warning  —  or  maybe 
I  should  call  it  suggestion  under 
the  circumstances  —  to  the  brood. 
They  pay  as  much  attention  to  her 


Best  Wishes  For  A  Happy  New  Year 

LEATH  HOSIERY  MILL,  INC. 


Manufacturers  of 
LADIES'  FULL  FASHIONED  &  SEAMLESS  HOSIERY 


Dial  CA  7-4226 


GRAHAM,  N.  C. 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


as  the  man  in  the  moon;  they 
just  don't  care  one  way  or  another. 

One  day  I  heard  our  oldest  off- 
shoot say  to  Milady,  "Aw  Mom, 
why  dontcha  stop  heckling  me 
about  the  lights?  Whatsit  mean, 
another  five  or  dime  a  day?  So 
what?  We're  not  going  to  get 
poor.  Pop  can  afford  it,  so  willya 
please  do  me  a  favor  and  please 
l-i)  off  reminding  me  about  the 
watts  and  ohms!  If  I  remember 
I'll  douse  'em  when  I  leave  the 
room,  and  if  I  forget  nobody's 
gonna  jump  off  the  George  Wash- 
ington bridge  or  out  of  a  40-story 
window." 

Milady  thought  it  over.  The 
oldest  offspring  of  ours  was  right, 
she  decided.  As  for  our  younger 
lad,  he  knew  from  nothing.  I  men- 
tioned the  situation  to  him  once, 
and  that  was  it.  The  tousle-hair- 
ed  chubby  had  an  alert  mind, 
sharp  on  the  answers.  His  im- 
mediate reaction  was,  "Eh,"  coupl- 
ed with  a  disdainful  shrug  of  the 
shoulder,  the  combination  spell- 
ing failure  on  my  part  to  reach 
the  ground  floor  of  his  interior. 
He  just  couldn't  be  bothered  with 
such  trivialities  and  I  knew  it  was 
hopeless  to  again  broach  such  an 
insignificant  economic  feat  as: 
"Lights  out  when  they're  not  be- 
ing used!" 

Rather  than  bring  up  the  econ- 
omy program  that  had  been  par- 
tially successful  up  to  now,  Milady 
would  turn  off  the  lights  herself, 
checking  the  boys'  room  each 
time  they  left  it.  It  was  so  much 
easier,  so  little  effort  and  she 
wouldn't  have  to  argue  about  sav- 
ing a  nickel  or  dime  a  day. 


Accidentally,  some  time  later, 
I  had  beat  her  to  the  boys'  room 
with  the  lights  on,  vacant  but 
piling  up  an  electric  bill  like  mad. 

"Look,"  I  said,  raising  my  voice 
unsuspectingly,  "I  don't  want  the 
lights  on  in  that  room  of  theirs 
when  they're  not  in  it.  Can't  they 
understand  I'm  not  saying  this  to 
hear  myseTf  talk.  Why  can't  they 
twitch  the  switch  when  they  quit 
the  room?  It's  so  easy  and  really 
it  doesn't  take  any  brains  to  ma- 
neuver the  first  finger  into  ac- 
tion." 

This  was  not  the  day  for  such 
kind  of  talk  I  found  out  soon 
enough. 

Milady    had    been    under  the 
weather  and  here  I  was  jabbing 
(Please  turn  to  Page  107) 


Rabbi  Herbert  S.  Goldstein,  the 
oldest  living  American  born  Ortho- 
dox rabbi,  will  be  honored  on  the 
occasion  of  his  70th  birthday,  at  a 
place  and  on  a  date  yet  to  be  set. 
The  testimonial  celebration  will  be 
tendered  by  the  World  Academy  in 
Jerusalem.  Chief  Rabbi  N«ssim  of 
the  State  of  Israel  is  the  Honorary 
Chairman. 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS  FROM 


NEWSOM  HOSIERY  MILL 

Manufacturer  of  JVJen's  Hosiery 
508  South  Main  Street  STAR,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


Dixie  Loom  Reed  Co. 

'Let  Dixie  Loom  Reeds  Fulfill  Your  Weaving  Needs" 


Jobbers  for  MYSTIK  Tape 
Distributor  for  BERH-CAT  Tapes 


P.  O.  BOX  875     GREENSBORO,  N.  C.     PHONE  274-5458 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  To  Our  Many  Friends 

For  a  Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year 

LYNCH 

1  M  LYNCH 
j.  n«  Limn 

HOSIERY  MILLS 

&BR0. 

Phones :  273-3496—273-3497 

Hosiery 

P.  0.  Box  2796 

1013-15  W.  Main  St. 

Dial  JU  7-6051 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 

LOUISVILLE,  KY. 

LEA  -  WAYNE  KNITTING  MILLS 


Manufacturers  of 


Infants'  and  Children's  Hosiery 


DIAL  JU  6-7513 


MORRISTOWN,  TENN. 


COOKE  PAPER  BOX  CO. 

Manufacturers  of 
HOSIERY,  UNDERWEAR,  HANDKERCHIEF 
CANDY  AND  HOLIDAY  BOXES 


Dial  SH  5-3231 


Athens,  Tennessee 


The  Elastic  Corporation 

Manufacturers  of 

Quality  Elastic  Tarns 

Dial  DI  5-4106  212  12th  Ave.  N.  E.  Hickory,  N.  C. 

Dial  TA  1-1571  Chattanooga,  Tenn. 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS  . 


from 


North  Carolina  Dyeing  &  Finishing  Co. 

Finishers  of  Ladies'  Nylon  Hosiery 

Asheboro  Ext.        GREENSBORO,  N.  C.       Dial  274-4836 


3° 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS 


Halifax  County  Hosiery  Mills 


Manufacturers  of 

Boy's  and  Misses' 
HOSIERY 


SCOTLAND  NECK,  NORTH  CAROLINA 
New  York  Office  —  6  W.  33rd  Street 


Ben  Gurion  Challenges  "Exodus" 


(Continued  From  Page  17) 


MASCOT  KNITTING  MILLS 

BOYS'  FANCY  SOCKS 

SWEETWATER,  TENNESSEE 


LINDY  HOSIERY  MILL 

Men's,  Women's  and  Children's  Fine  Hosiery 
BURLINGTON,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS 

MILTON  HOSIERY  COMPANY 

Wholesale  —  Hosiery 


1001  S.  Elm  St. 


GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Dial  273-0561 


MID-STATE  PUPER  BOX  CO.,  INC. 

Manufacturers  of 
SET  UP  PAPER  BOXES 

ASHEBORO,  N.  C. 


KESTER  MACHINERY  COMPANY 

Serving  the  Industry  Since  1880 
FACTORY  AND  MILL  SUPPLIES 

•  PUMPS 

•  AIR  COMPRESSORS 

•  BALLBEARINGS 

•  SAWS  AND  PLANER  KNIVES 

Winston-Salem,  N.  C.  Branch  at  High  Point,  N.  C. 


TEXTILE  LOOM  REED  CO.,  INC. 

Manufacturers  of 

Precision  Loom  Reeds  Since  1928 

Dial  273-6984         P.  O.  Box  2546         Greensboro,  N.  C. 


he  allow  himself  the  luxury  of  ex- 
pressing his  own  opinions  as  would 
any  other  man? 

It  would  seem  that  he  cannot, 
for  he  must  respect  the  feelings  of 
most  of  his  people,  who,  after  three 
thousand  years,  believe  wholeheart- 
edly in  the  story  of  the  exodus  from 
Egypt  as  it  is  written  in  the  Bible; 
who,  after  three  thousand  years 
still  base  most  of  their  holidays  and 
prayers  upon  the  Book  of  Exodus. 

Furthermore,  Ben-Gurion  has 
no  proof  upon  which  to  base  his 
findings.  He  is  not  the  first  to 
articulate  these  conclusions  which 
oppose  the  Bible.  German  Bible 
critics  did  this  long  before,  tearing 
apart  the  story  of  the  exodus  and 
claiming  that  the  entire  story  was 
a  fallacy. 

Ben-Girrion's  declaration  to  the 
reporters  encompassed  about  thirty 


premises.  Since  these  are  too  num- 
erous upon  which  to  elaborate,  we 
will  mention  but  a  few. 

Assuming,  says  Ben-Gurion,  that 
the  Israelites  while  in  the  Desert 
ate  manna  as  described  in  the 
Bible,  what  then  did  their  herds 
eat? 

Another  example  given  by  the 
prime  minister  is  Moses's  striking 
of  a  rock  with  his  staff  to  obtain 
water  for  his  people.  This,  he  says, 
is  impossible,  for  there  could  sure- 
ly not  be  enough  water  for  several 
million  people. 

Still  another  example  cited  by 
Ben-Gurion  is  the  fact  that  if  only 
seventy  people  came  to  Egypt  with 
Jacob,  how  could  they  multiply  to 
several  million  in  the  comparative- 
ly short  span  of  two  hundred  years? 
(Two  hundred  years  according  to 
Rashi.)  And,  even  if  there  were 
several  million  Israelites  in  Egypt, 
which  was  a  very  fertile  and  rich 
land,  why  did  they  not  assume  con- 
trol of  the  government  rather  than 
leave  such  a  country  for  the  poor 
land  of  Canaan? 

According  to  Ben-Gurion,  how- 
ever, only  one  family,  the  family  of 
(Please  Turn  to  Page  32) 


Symbolizing  the  blessing  of  health 
and  happiness  for  the  New  Year 
are  the  150  children  at  the  free,  non- 
sectarian  Jewish  Nat;onal  Home  for 
Asthmatic  Children  at  Denver. 
Shown  are  two  of  the  children,  Jef- 
frey Abramowitz,  8  New  York  and 
Jacob  Shaster,  9,  Tel  Aviv,  Israel, 
with  the  Home's  Religious  Educa- 
tion Director,  Rabbi  Chaim  David- 
ovich. 


MARTINAT 
HOSIERY 
MILLS 

H.  F.  MARTINAT 

Secretary  and  Treasurer 


Manufacturers  of 

MEN'S 
HIGH-GRADE  HOSIERY 


VALDESE,  N.  C. 


SEASON'S  GREETINGS  .... 

PIEDMONT  HOSIERY  MILLS,  Inc. 


Manufacturers  of 
MEN'S  SEAMLESS  HOSIERY 

Hickory,  North  Carolina 


September,  i960  The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


11 


ELECTRIC  CONTRACTING 
AND  ENGINEERING 

Motors,  Generators  and 
Transformers  Rewound, 
Repaired  and  Rebuilt 

Bryant  Electric  Repair  Company 

Dial  UNiversity  5-3466 

605-7-9  East  Franklin  Avenue 
GASTONIA,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


IN  CHARLOTTE  —  DIAL  FR  7-5875 


Member  National  Industrial  Service  Association 


MARCUS  LOEB  &  CO.,  INC. 


ATLANTA,  GEORGIA 


•>  styled  by  ^^memmmJi/  /  *C 


ATLANTA,  GEORGIA 


Virginia-North  Carolina  Representative 
MELVIN  LITCH 


South  Carolina  Representative 
IRVING  L.  ROBINSON 


Georgia  Representative 
HENRY  POSNER 


Alabama  Representative       Mississippi-Tennessee  Representative 
PETER  HURTIG  MELVIN  FURCHGOTT 

Florida  Representative 
CURTIS  P.  ROSENDORF 


PUBLIC  SERVICE  COMPANY 

of  NORTH  CAROLINA,  Inc. 


NATURAL  GAS 
from  Asheville  to  Raleigh 


"Naturally" 


IT'S 
GAS 
FOR 


RESIDENTIAL 
COMMERCIAL 
INDUSTRIAL  USES 


A.  B.  CARTER 


INCORPORATED 


GASTONIA,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


■8? 


Operating 


Carter  Traveler  Co. 

Ring  Travelers 
Gastonia,  N.  C. 


Mill  Devices  Co. 
Boyce  Weavers  Knotter 
Gastonia,  N.  C. 


32 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


Season's  Greetings 


textile* 

Gastonia,  N.  C. 


Beit  Gurion  Challenges  Exodus 

(Concluded  From  Page  30) 


PURITAN  FINISHING  MILLS 

INCORPORATED 

High  Class  Hosiery  Finishers 
Finishing  Men's,  Boys',  Infants'  and  Misses'  Hosiery 

BURLINGTON,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


1  *  -  0~-  S/-'       :      S/-  vj^.  i     S/-.  t  /?-.  ^/y-.  ^S/-.  -<C/~-  e« 


Happy  New  Year 


Parkdale  Mill 

Manufacturers  of 
Combed  Yarns 
GASTONIA,  N.  C. 


WESTBORO  WEAVING  COMPANY 

MANUFACTURERS 

Tapes  and  Non-Elastics 

GREENVILLE,  S.  C. 


Bladenboro  Cotton  Mills,  Inc. 

Spinners  of  High  Grade  Hosiery,  Underwear  and  Warp  Yarns 
2's  to  30's,  Single  and  Ply 
BLADENBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


Call  On  Us  for  Quick  Service 
on: 

RING  HOLDERS 
BOBBIN  SHAFT  GEARS 
BOBBIN  GEARS 
SPINDLE  SHAFT  GEARS 

MACHINE  AND 
FOUNDRY  CO. 
GASTONIA,  N.  C. 


KLUTTZ 


Joseph,  migrated  to  Egypt,  and 
only  six  hundred  families  made  the 
exodus  from  Egypt.  He  arrives  at 
this  conclusion  from  mention  in 
the  Book  of  Exodus  of  the  six  hun- 
dred "Aluphim"  who  left  Egypt. 
In  Hebrew,  Alef  can  mean  a  thous- 
and, or  it  can  mean  a  family  or  the 
head  of  a  family.  Therefore,  as 
Ben-Gurion  sees  it,  only  six  hun- 
dred families  along  with  the  heads 
of  the  families  left  Egypt. 

These  are  but  a  few  brief  ex- 
cerpts from  Ben-Gurion's  contro- 


versial speech.  Again,  Ben-Gurion 
is  not  the  first  to  conjure  up  these 
thoughts  nor  will  he  be  the  last. 
Long  ago  our  own  Chazal  (sages, 
blessed  be  their  memory)  provoked 
similar  questions  among  themselves 
but  answered  them  quite  adequate- 

My  closing  message,  dear  read- 
ers, is  to  reassure  you  that  we  Jews 
will  celebrate  Pesach,  read  the 
Hagadah,  and  retell  the  story  of 
Exodus  for  many  centuries  to  come, 
regardless  of  what  Ben-Gurion  says. 


A  Mother  In  Israel 

(Concluded  From  Page  19) 


management.  The  book  is  now  be- 
ing brought  up  to  date  to  suit 
Israel  conditions. 

But  why  the  art  gallery?  It  ap- 
peared that  although  Mr.  Gold- 
man hacTbeen  in  the  hotel  trade 
since  he  was  10,  his  painting 
"career"  had  begun  even  earlier 
-  from  the  age  of  8.  It  had  always 
been  his  intention  to  make  art 
his  business.  And,  as  soon  as  the 
opportunity  seemed  ripe  to  him, 
this  is  just  what  he  did.  With 
what  success  or  personal  satisfac- 
tion I  don't  know,  for  Mr.  Gold- 
man wasn't  the  type  of  person  who 
went  around  with  his  heart  on 
his  sleeve. 

Something  prevented  me  from 
calling  on  Mr.  Goldman  for  three 
mouths  or  so.  Then,  a  short  time 
ago,  I  ran  into  him  on  the  street. 
"How's  the  gallerv?"  I  asked.  "I've 
sold  it,"  he  said.  He  looked  as 
poised  and  imperturbable  as  ever. 
"I'm  back  in  the  hotel  business." 
He  was  manager  of  Ramat  Aviv, 
the  charming  cottage-style  hotel 
set  in  flowering  gardens  on  the 
outskirts  of  Tel  Aviv. 


"But  what  about  your  paint- 
ing?" 

"Oh,  that's  alright,"  he  replied. 
"The  directors  have  insisted  thail 
I  take  one  day  off  a  week  to  paint. 
It's  in  my  contract." 


Richmond'  Va. 
Jewish  War 
Veterans 

BERT  SIMONS, 
Correspondent 

Irving  Koslow  Senior  Vice-Com- 
mander for  Virginia  and  Morris 
Freelander  will  represent  the 
Richmond  JWV  Post  No.  155  at 
the  National  Convention  in  Mi- 
ami Beach  on  August  7.  An  invita- 
tion by  Commander  Sam  Korn- 
blau  to  hold  the  1961  National 
Convention  in  Richmond  will  be 
made  at  that  time. 

A  strong  public  response  to  a 
recent  announcement  regarding 
the  Jewish  Center  flagpole  presen- 
tation, has  opened  the  way  for 
public  donations,  said  Chairman 
Irving  Koslow.  All  those  wishing 
to  contribute  to  this  fund  may 
contact  me  directly. 


Gold  -  Tex  Fabrics  Corporation 

Manufacturers  of  Denim 
ROCK  HILL,  SOUTH  CAROLINA 


Colonial  Motor  Freight  Line,  Inc. 

SERVING  NORTH  CAROLINA  —  VIRGINIA 
DISTRICT  OF  COLUMBIA  —  MARYLAND 

General  Offices 
HIGH  POINT,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


The  Civil  Liberties  Union 

By  Harry  Simonhof  f 


That  canaille  such  as  John 
Rasper  could  select  anti-Semitism 
as  a  career  should  cause  little 
surprise.  After  all  it  is  easier  than 
hauling  trash  to  the  city  dump  on 
a  truck.  Hasn't  Parson  Gerald 
L.  R.  Smith  been  living  in  clover 
since  the  death  tof  Huey  Long, 
from  which  he  learned  how  to 
exploit  hatred?  The  holy  dema- 
gogue discovered  that  Judeopho- 
bia  could  bring  in  more  dollars 
than  pounding  a  pulpit  some 
where  in  the  sticks  out  in  the 
Bible  belt. 

Then  came  George  Lincoln 
Rockwell  who  had  been  reading 
Mein  Rampf.  When  mustered  out 
of  the  Marines  he  had  to  find  a 
job.  But  why  go  to  work?  Hitler, 
who  had  only  been  a  corporal, 
could  start  with  seven  hoodlums 
and  become  dictator  of  Gorman). 
He,  Rockwell,  had  been  a  lieu- 
tenant and  should  go  further  than 
a  house  painter  out  of  work.  The 
procedure  is  simple  enough.  Form 
an  American  Nazi  party  out  of 
several  rowdies,  stand  on  street 
corners  and  spew  forth  the  venom 
about  the  Jews  that  Hitler  has  in 
his  book. 

And  now  the  public  has  been 
treated  to  the  astonishing  spectacle 
of  a  public  spirited  organization 
committed  to  safeguard  civil  rights 
coming  to  the  assistance  of  a 
Rasper  and  Rockwell  when  such 
repulsive  delinquents  are  charg- 
ed with  breaking  the  law. 

Liberals  generally  have  been 
under  a  kind  of  taboo  about  criti- 
cising the  A.C.L.U.  since  its  incep- 
tion in  the  1920's.  Hasn't  its  de- 
fense of  communities  or  left-wine- 
ers  aroused  the  ire  of  reactionary 
elements  such  as  followers  of  the 
late  Joseph  McCarthy?  Then  this 


HARRY  SIMONHOFF 

sacred  cow  cV'in  do  no  wrong 
since  it  has  set  out  to  secure  free- 
dom of  speech,  regardless  who  it 
hurts  or  what  damage  poisonous 
ranting  might  cause. 

This  unqualified  worship  of  free 
speech  might  account  for  the 
A.C.L.U.  staggering  into  a  blind 
alley.  Idolatry  is  an  evil  not  be- 
cause it  worships  an  image  but 
because  it  fails  to  distinguish  be- 
tween a  symbol  and  the  living 
reality.  Free  speech  can  also  be- 
come an  idol  if  worshipped  with- 
out discrimination  or  evaluation. 
During  the  excesses  of  the  French 
Revolution,  Madame  Roland,  a 
revolutionary  and  intellectual,  was 
led  to  her  execution.  Standing  be- 
fore the  guillotine  she  made  a 
deathless  statement,  "O  Liberty, 
what  crimes  are  committed  in  thy 
name!" 

It  would  seem  that  the  A.C.L.U. 
has  fallen  under  the  spell  of  un- 
trammeled  free  speech.  Apparent- 
ly  these   idealists   think   little  of 


(Please  Turn  to  Page  109) 


§ 
§ 

§ 


Holiday 
Greetings 


CLEARWATER  FINISHING  PLANT 

CLEARWATER,  S.  C. 


JOANNA  COTTON  MILLS  COMPANY 

Manufacturers  of 
WINDOW  SHADE  CLOTH 

JOANNA,  SOUTH  CAROLINA 
Selling  Agents 

H.  S.  PARKER  COMPANY 


66-72  LEONARD  ST. 


NEW  YORK,  N.  Y. 


GREETINGS 


and  Best  Wishes  from 

BROWER  MILLS,  INC. 

Manufacturers  of 

COTTON  YARNS 

HOPE  MILLS,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


Sellers  Manufacturing  Company 

Durene — Fine  Egyptian — 
Spun  Nylon  and  Blended  Yarns 

Royal  Cotton  Mill  Company 

Soft  Spun  Combed  Cotton  Yarns 
Single  and  Plies 
4's  to  26's 


.  .  .  Sales  Office  .  .  . 
SAXAPAHAW,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


Lineberry  Foundry 
&  Machine  Co. 


INCORPORATED 


Woodwork  Cutters        •       High  Speed  Router  Bits 
Milled  to  Pattern  Knives 
COMPLETE  CATALOGS  ON  REQUEST 


NORTH  WILKESBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


34 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


BARKLEY  MACHINE  WORKS 


Manufacturers  of 

TEXTILE  MACHINERY  PARTS 


GASTONIA,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


GASTON  ELECTRIC  COMPANY,  Inc. 

ELECTRICAL  SERVICE 

Industrial  Power  and  Wiring 
Fluorescent  Lighting 

MOTORS 

Rewound  —  Rebuilt  —  Repaired 

New  and  Used  Motors  Bought  and  Sold 


Phone  UN  7-7264    P.  0.  Box  1361 


419  W.  Main  St. 


Gastonia,  N.  C. 


R^i  ^C-  j^r-.O^-  yy .  ^y.       :  Sr.  yy.  sy.  t^s  S^.  S/.       -^r.  i0r>  S/' 


E.  H.  BRADLEY,  Pres. 


L.  F.  HOLLAND,  Gen.  Mgr. 


BRADLEY  FLYER  &  REPAIR  CO. 

Flyers,  Cap  Bars,  Twister  Racks 
NEW  AND  USED  PARTS  ALWAYS  ON  HAND 


RAYFIELD  -  STEWART,  Inc. 

Textile  Spindle  Repair  Specialists 

FACTORY  WORKMANSHIP  —  GUARANTEED  QUALITY 


1314  West  Second  Ave. 
Gastonia,  N.  C. 


Dial  UN  5-1692 
Dial  UN  4-1690 


Candles  To  Light  The  Way 


(Continued  From  Page  9) 


the  State  of  Israel  enshrines  — 
and  the  past  injuries  which  it  re- 
deems —  it  twists  reality  to  sug- 
gest that  it  is  the  democratic 
tendency  of  Israel  which  has  in- 
jected discord  and  dissension  into 
the  Near  East.  Even  by  the  cold- 
est calculations,  the  removal  of  Is- 
rael would  not  alter  the  basic 
crisis  in  the  area.  For,  if  there  is 
any  lesson  which  the  melancholy 
events  of  the  last  two  years,  and 
more  have  taught  us,  it  is  that, 
though  Arab  states  are  generally 
united  in  opposition  to  Israel,  their 
political  unities  do  not  rise  above 
this  negative  position.  The  basic 
rivalries  within  the  Arab  world, 
the  quarrels  over  boundaries,  the 
tensions  involved  in  lifting  their 
economies  from  stagnation,  the 
cross-pressures  of  nationalism— all 
of  these  factors  would  still  be 
there,  even  if  there  were  no  Is- 
rael. 

The  Middle  East  illustrates  the 
twin  heritage  of  modern  national- 
ism. In  one  of  its  aspects  it  re- 
flects a  positive  search  for  political 
freedom  and  self-development;  in 
another,  it  is  the  residue  of  dis- 
integration and  the  destruction  of 
old  moorings.  The  Arab  states, 
though  some  have  had  significant- 
ly varying  lines  of  development, 
have  all  too  often  used  Israel  as  a 
scapegoat  and  anti-Zionism  as  a 
policy  to  divert  attention  away 
from  the  hard  tasks  of  national 
and  regional  development,  and 
from  special  area  problems. 

One  of  these  problems,  that  of 
the  Arab  refugees,  which  has  lain 
like  a  naked  sword  between  Israel 
and  the  Arab  states,  is  a  matter 
on  which  the  books  cannot  be 
closed  and  which  must  be  further 
resolved  through  negotiation,  re- 


settlement, and  outside  interna- 
tional assistance.  But  to  recognize 
the  problem  is  quite  different 
from  saying  that  the  problem  is 
insoluble  short  of  the  destruction 
of  Israel,  or  only  by  the  unilateral 
repudiation  of  the  1949  borders, 
or  must  be  solved  by  Israel  alone. 
Israel  today  stands  as  an  example 
for  all  of  the  Middle  East,  in 
spotlighting  how  economic  mod- 
ernization may  be  spurred  and  ac- 
celerated against  high  odds,  great 
physical  barriers,  and  constantly 
growing  population,  as  well  as 
against  all  Communist  blandish- 
ments. The  growing  influence  of 
the  Soviet  Union  in  the  Middle 
East  and  the  further  diminution 
of  direct  Western  influence  in  that 
area  as  a  whole,  we  shall  in  all 
likelihood  have  to  face  as  realities. 
And  it  is  sheer  delusion  to  under- 
estimate the  cutting  force  of  Arab 
nationalism  or  hope  to  create  re- 
gimes or  pocket  Western  kingdoms 
in  that  area.  This  would  only  in- 
tensify anti-Western  feeling  in  the 
Middle  East  and  imperil  Western 
relations  with  all  uncommitted 
states. 

Israel,  on  the  other  hand,  em- 
bodying all  the  characteristics  of 
a  Western  democracy  and  having 
long  passed  the  threshold  of  eco- 
nomic development,  shares  with 
the  West  a  tradition  of  civil  liber- 
ties, of  cultural  freedom,  of  par- 
liamentary democracy,  of  social 
mobility.  It  has  been  almost  un- 
touched by  Soviet  penetration. 
Some  of  the  leadership  groups  in 
the  Arab  states  also  draw  inspira- 
tion and  training  from  Western 
sources.  But  too  often  in  these  na- 
tions the  leadership  class  is  small, 
its  popular  roots  tenuous,  its  prob- 
lems staggering.  In  too  many  of 


New  Year  Greetings 


GASTONIA  BELTING  AND 
SUPPLY  C0.r  Inc. 

Manufacturers  of 

ALL  TYPES  OF 

QUALITY  LEATHER  BELTING 

AND  SUPPLIES 


Distributors  of 
MANHATTAN  RUBBER  GOODS 


N.  Marietta  St. 


GASTONIA,  N.  C. 


Dial  UN  5-2732 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


35 


Older  adults  enjoy  a  meeting  of  their  group  at  the  Jewish  Community 
Center.  Whether  it's  having  fun,  or  working  on  a  community  project,  older 
folks  like  the  feeling  of  being  needed  and  appreciated  which  comes  from 
taking  part  in  activities  at  Jewish  Community  Centers  affiliated  with  and 
provided  by  the  National  Jewish  Welfare  Board  (JWB). 


the  countries  of  the  Middle  East 
the  Soviet  model  holds  special  at- 
traction, the  more  so  since  the 
United  States  and  its  Western  al- 
lies have  not  been  able  to  develop 
more  than  tentative  and  often 
o  n  1  y  expedient  policies  which 
hardly  come  to  grips  with  the  root 
causes  of  political  disintegration 
and  economic  backwardness.  To 
countries  with  relatively  primitive 
or  top-heavy  economies  and  low 
industrial  capacity,  the  Russian 
and  even  the  Chinese  passage  to 
modernity  in  a  generation's  time 
inspires  confidence  and  imitation 
—  even  as  does  Egypt's  move  in 
less  than  ten  years  from  a  seem- 
ingly subjugated  state  to  at  least 
a  stratgeic  power.  We  now  know 
that  Soviet  attraction  is  not 
grounded  on  threat  or  bluster 
alone,  and  that  there  are  tensions 
and  critical  restlessness  which 
woidd  exist  even  if  there  were  not 
a  Communist  threat.  Communism 
presents  to  many  in  that  area  the 
glamor  of  novelty,  the  breaking 
of  fresh   ground,   of  seeming;  to 


offer  a  discipline,  coherent  and 
irresistible  answer  to  the  over- 
whelming problems  of  economic 
management  and  progress. 

In  this  light  a  simple  military 
response  is  not  adecpiate.  For, 
apart  from  bequeathing  to  the 
United  States  latent  anti-colonial 
resentments,  military  pacts  and 
arms  shipments  are  themselves 
new  divisive  forces  in  an  area  shot 
through  with  national  rivalries, 
without  historic  frontiers,  with- 
out, for  the  most  part,  skilled 
classes  and  political  administrat- 
ors who  can  pilot  the  new  state 
through  the  treacherous  tides  run- 
ning through  the  Middle  East. 

Military  pacts  provide  no  long- 
term  solutions.  On  the  contrary, 
they  tend  dangerously  to  polarize 
the  Middle  East,  to  attach  us  to 
specific  regimes,  or  isolate  us  very 
often  from  the  significant  nation- 
alist movements.  Eittle  is  ac- 
complished by  forcing  the  uncom- 
mitted nations  to  choose  rigidly 
between  alliance  with  the  West  or 


Night  EM  6-0280 
Manufacturers 


Night  ED  4-3108 
Repair  Service 


Schachner  Leather  &  Belting  Company 
Charlotte  Leather  Belting  Co.,  Div. 

"Schachner  Belting  Makes  a  Good  Machine  Better" 


Dial  ED  2-7171 


2601  Airport-New  Dixie  Rd. 
P.  0.  BOX  3205 
CHARLOTTE  3,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


UNITED  MILLS  CORPORATION 

MT.  GILEAD,  N.  C. 
New  York  Office  — 180  Madison  Avenue 

Manufacturers  of 

^iMmpOJidfo  <3 1  L_E AO  LINGERIE 


SLIPS 


BRAS 


CROSS  COTTON  MILLS  COMPANY 


<5>-.  yy.  -yy.  -sy~-  ^y  yy    yy  yy-  ^> 


Double  Carded  and  Combed 
KNITTING  YARNS 

2  yy.  yy.  yy  yy.  yy.  yy  ■.  yy.  y/~-  yy  ^y  ys  Sy  ■  yy-  y. 


MARION,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


Pioneers  in  Automatically  Controlled 
DYEING  MACHINES 

GASTON  COUNTY  Dyeing  Machine  Co. 

Established  1921 


Designers  &  Builders 
of  Dyeing,  Bleaching 
Extracting  &  Drying 
Machines 


Dye  Tubes,  Dye  Springs, 
Dye  Cones,  Dye  Beams  and 
Multiple  Beam  Carriers 


STANLEY,  NORTH  CAR^tjna 


^  ■     ^  ^y  sy  yy-  sy  -<y-     y^  <-Or>        •  v5>"-     ^  ^     jyy  -     yy-yy-  yy-  yy.  y. 


§ 
§ 

§ 


DACOTAH 
Cotton  Mills 

Incorporated 
LEXINGTON,  N.  C. 

Manufacturers 
SHEETING  and  DRILLS 

Selling  Agent 

J.  W.  VALENTINE  CO. 
1430  Broadway 
New  York 


Southern  Representative 

T.  HOLT  HAYWOOD 

612  S.  Main  Street 
Winston-Salem,  N.  C. 


§ 
§ 


y^ryy.yy~.yy.yy-yy.-^ 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


(.  HOWARD  HUNT  PEN  COMPANY 


I         NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS  FROM  | 

I 
§ 
§ 

§ 


Manufacturers  of 

Boston  Sharpeners 
Speed  Ball  Pens 


Dial  TRiangle  2-2491 


Statesville,  N.  C 


§ 


Mcleod  Leather  and  Belting  Co. 

Leather  Belting  —  Textile  Loom  Strapping 


910  Scott  Avenue 


Dial  272-7647 


GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Textile  Loom  Reed  Co. 

Reeds  and  Combs 
Victor  Place  Dial  273-6984 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


W.  G.  Jarrell  Machine  Company 


"Since  1906" 


NEW  MACHINES 
TO  ORDER 

GENERAL 
MACHINE 
REPAIRS 


•  Electric,  Acetylene  and  Heliwelding 

•  Portable  and  Stationary  Equipment 


Dial  ED  3-7189 
Box  2154 


1200  S.  Mint  Street 
CHARLOTTE  1,  N.  C. 


HENNIS  FREIGHT  LINES,  Inc. 

Telephone:  PArk  4-9211  Winston-Salem,  N.  C. 

Serving — North  Carolina,  South  Carolina,  Virginia,  Georgia,  Maryland, 
Pennsylvania,  New  Jersey.  New  York,  Indiana,  Ohio,  Michigan,  Illinois. 

WITH  DIRECT  CONNECTIONS  TO  THE  EAST,  WEST, 
ANT)  NORTHWEST 


"Servant 
of 

Industry" 


submission  to  international  Com- 
munism. Indeed,  it  is  to  our  self- 
interest  not  to  lorce  such  a  choice 
in  many  places,  especially  it  it  di- 
verts nations  from  absorbing  their 
energies  in  programs  of  real  eco- 
nomic improvement  and  take-off. 
In  the  Middle  East  we  are  moving 
perilously  close  to  an  arms  race, 
which,  in  the  long  run,  will  be  of 
benefit  to  no  one.  No  other  area 
stands  more  in  need  of  a  real  dis- 
armament effort.  The  real  mutual 
advantages  for  gradual  demilitari- 
zation rather  than  buildup  are 
unequaled.  Although  we  have  used 
the  area  for  a  pilot  test  of  the 
United  Nations  Emergency  Force; 
and  this  might  well  be  supple- 
mented by  a  similiar  international 
device  to  regulate  arms  traffic. 

The  contours  of  the  outstanding 
economic  and  political  issues  in 
the  Middle  East  lend  themselves 
uniquely  also  to  a  regional  ap- 
proach. The  project-by-project, 
country-by-country  pattern  of  as- 
sistance is  particularly  illadapted 
in  this  area.  The  great  river  bas- 
ins of  the  Middle  East  are  inter- 
national —  the  Jordan,  the  Nile, 
the  Tigris  and  the  Euphrates.  And 
there  are  other  nations  in  the  West 
besides  the  United  States  which 
can  make  important  contributions 
in  economic  and  technical  assist- 
ance. There  has  been  no  lack  of 
pointers  toward  what  a  regional 
policy  might  include  —  a  multi- 
lateral regional  development  fund 
tor  both  economic  improvement 
and  refugee  resettlement,  the  Jor 
dan  River  multi-purpose  scheme, 
a  food-pool  making  imaginative 
use  of  our  agricultural  surpluses, 
and,  as  a  coordinating  agency,  a 
Middle  East  Development  Author- 
ity to  pool  capital  and  technical 
aid  in  that  area.  This  would  en- 
courage and  provide  incentive  for 
realistic  and  constructive  plans 
and  projects,  encourage  a  higher 


and  more  diversified  level  of  pri- 
vate investment,  and  enable  Arab 
leaders  to  participate  in  economic 
planning   and  administration. 

Unfortunately,  all  these  and 
other  plans  have  so  far  lacked  the 
active  political  leadership  which 
can  break  the  paralysis  of  purpose. 
Only  external  Soviet  aggression, 
which  is  only  one  danger  to  the 
Middle  East,  has  been  the  subject 
of  high  level  policy-planning.  No 
greater  opportunity  exists  for  the 
United  States  than  to  take  the  lead 
in  such  an  effort  which  could 
diminish  the  internal  bickering 
in  that  tense  and  troubled  area, 
and  bend  new  energies  to  new, 
more  promising  and  more  con- 
structive ventures. 

Needless  to  say,  such  proposals 
and  programs  should  not  be  used 
as  veiled  techniques  for  placing 
new  economic  sanctions  and  pres- 
sures on  Israel.  Nor  should  the) 
detract  from  our  support  of  Is- 
rael's immediate  needs.  There 
is  no  reason  why  the  United  States 
should  not  conclude  at  once  the 
$75,000,000  loan  promised  through 
the  Export-Import  Bank,  and 
make  it  clear  that  we  will  not 
sanction  any  barrier  to  free  ship- 
ping on  the  Gulf  of  Aqaba,  which 
is  an  international  waterway.  The 
choice  is  not  between  either  the 
Arab  states  or  Israel.  Ways  must 
be  found  of  supporting  the  legiti- 
mate aspirations  of  each.  The 
United  States,  whose  President 
was  first  to  recognize  the  new 
State  of  Israel,  need  have  no  apolo- 
gies —  indeed  should  pride  itself 
—  for  the  action  it  took.  But 
neither  should  we  foreclose  any 
effort  which  promises  a  regenera- 
tion of  a  much  wider  segment  of 
the  Middle  East. 

The  Jewish  State  found  its  ful- 
fillment during  a  time  when  it 


Flyers 


•  Pressers 


Lift  Rods 


•  Spind'es 

•  Lap  Pins 

•  Bushi 


)usnmgs 


Flyer  Conversions  Spreading,  length- 
ening, and  strengthening  to  produce 
larger  packages  and  to  accommodate 
"Spobbins"  and  spools.  Shipments  can 
be  made  from  stock. 

Ideal  Machine  Shops,  Inc. 

Bessemer  City,  N.  C. 
Continuous  Service  To  Textile  Mills  Since  1925 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jexuish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


57 


wmm 


Mrs.  Avraham  Harman  (c,),  wife  of  Israel's  new  Ambassador  to  the 
United  States,  with  Dr.  Ernst  Simon,  former  Chairman  of  the  Board  of 
the  Hebrew  University  High  School  and  Mrs.  Charles  Hymes  of  Minneapolis, 
National  President  of  the  National  Council  of  Jewish  Women,  at  the  National 
Board  dinner  of  the  women's  organization  at  the  Park  Lane  Hotel  New 
York  City. 


bore  witness,  to  use  the  words  of 
Markham,  to 

".  .  .  humanity  betrayed, 

Plundered,  profaned  and  disin- 
herited." 

But  it  is  yet  possible  that  history 
will  record  this  event  as  only  the 
prelude  to  the  betterment  and  ther- 
apy —  not  merely  of  a  strip  of 
land  —  but  of  a  broad  expanse 
of  almost  continental  dimensions. 
Whether  such  a  challenge  will  be 
seized,  cannot  be  determined  by 
the  United  States  alone,  but  as  we 
observe  tonight  the  inspiring  ex- 
perience of  Israel,  we  know  that 
we  must  make  the  effort  —  and 
that  we  can  once  again  demon- 
strate, that  "Rain  Follows  the 
Plough". 

In  his  book  "One  Man's 
America",  Allistair  Cook  tells  the 
story  which  well  illustrates  our 
point.  On  the  19th  of  May,  1780. 
as  he  describes  it,  in  Hartford, 
Connecticut,  the  skies  at  noon 
turned  from  blue  to  gray  and  by 
mid-afternoon  had  blackened  so 
densely  that,  in  that  religious  age, 
men  fell  on  their  knees  and  beg- 
ged a  final  blessing  before  the 
end  came.  The  Connecticut  House 


of  Representatives  was  in  session. 
And  as  some  men  fell  down  in  the 
darkened  chamber  and  others 
clamored  for  an  immediate  ad- 
journment, the  Speaker  of  the 
House,  one  Colonel  Davenport, 
came  to  his  feet,  and  silenced  the 
din  with  these  words:  "The  Day  of 
Judgment  is  either  approaching  or 
it  is  not.  If  it  is  not,  there  is  no 
cause  for  adjournment.  If  it  is, 
I  choose  to  be  found  doinsr  my 
duty.  I  wish,  therefore,  that  can- 
dles may  be  brought." 

Members  of  Bnai  Zion!  You 
who  are  here  gathered  tonight 
deserve  thanks— for  you  have  in 
truth  brought  candles  to  illumi- 
nate your  Peoples'  way. 


Ezra  Taft  Benson,  U.S.  Secre- 
tary of  Agriculture,  arrived  in 
Jeruselem  for  a  four-day  visit  to 
discuss  agricultural  trade  problems 
with  Israeli  officcials.  He  had  just 
completed  similar  talks  with  mem- 
ber countries  of  the  European  Com- 
mon Market,  Egypt  and  Jordan. 
Mr.  Benson  initiated  his  talks  by 
meeting  with  Prime  Minister  David 
Ben  -  Gurion,  Foreign  Minister 
Golda  Meir  and  Minister  of  Agri- 
culture Moshe  Dayan. 


Anything  In  Textile  Replacement  Parts 


Speeder  Parts 
Bobbin  Gears 
Split  Gears 
Coupling  Gears 
Chain  Drives 
Spiral  Gears 
Cone  Belts 
Comb  Blades 


Winder  Parts 
Spinning  Parts 
Drawing  Parts 
Comber  Parts 
Roller  Chain  Sprockets 
Silent  Chain  Sprockets 
V-Belts 
Lickerin  Belts 


Ball  Bearing  Comb  Boxes  —  Ball  Bearing  Units 
HOBS,  CUTTERS  &  REAMERS  SHARPENED 

TEXTILE  PARTS  &  MACHINE  CO.,  Inc. 


1500  W.  May  Ave. 


Phone 
UN  5-8564 


GASTONIA,  N.  C. 


IDEAL 


Produces 


Highest  Q_uality  Sliver  at  Highest  Speeds  and  Lowest  Costs 
Investigate  Our  Liberal  Trade-In  Allowance 

Ask  us  for  quotations  on  quantity  precision  machining 
and  fabricating. 

•  New  •  Rebuilt 

Idea!  Industries,  Inc.,  Bessemer  City,  N.  C 


^  ■     ^  .  ^,  ^r.  ^r.  yy  jC-  s,  .  s^  -sy  ^      yy-y>  vs/^.  s^r.  ^s  -^cr. 


SEASON'S  GREETINGS 
FROM 


BRASSIERE  COMPANY  | 
NEW  YORK  I 

■^Or-  v5^vj^.  S/-.  -^5>~. -J?-.      ^5>~.  Sy>~-      '-£">"•      ■-  O^-  -O^-  ^Or-       /?-.  -^r. 


SILVER'S 


5c,  10c  and  $1.00  STORES 

Owned  and  Operated  By 

H.  L.  GREEN  CO.,  INC. 

Stores  Located  in  the  Following  Cities: 

DURHAM,  N.  C.  COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C.  CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 

WILMINGTON,  N.  C.  GREENVILLE,  S.  C. 

WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C.  SPARTANBURG,  S.  C. 


RICHTER  &  COCHRAN 

Distributors  of 

Americas 
Famous  Brand  Peaches 

835  N.  Tryon  •  Dial  FR  5-4491 

CHARLOTTE.  N.  C. 


38 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


GRIFFIN  SUPPLY  COMPANY,  Inc. 

"Serving  You  Is  Our  Privilege" 

—DISTRIBUTORS- 
MILL  AND 
ELECTRICAL  SUPPLIES 

813-815  E.  Franklin  Avenue  Phone  UN  7-6351 

GASTONIA,  N.  C. 


1     GOSSETT  MACHINE  WORKS  * 


INCORPORATED 

Manufacturers  and  Repairers  of 

TEXTILE  PARTS 

Drawing  Rolls  a  Specialty 

PIONEERS  FOR  BIG  COILERS 
FOR  CARDS  AND  DRAWING 
FOR  COTTONS,  WOOL  AND  WORSTEDS 


§    W.  Franklin  Ave.  Telephones  UN  5-2368 — UN  5-2369 

I  GASTONIA,  NORTH  CAROLINA 

^  <^">  ^/~'  •_  //-,       ^y-.       yy.       -      jf/-.  j^-.  yy~.  ^y-.  sy-. .      -^r.  jsy, 


INDUSTRIAL  PIPING  SUPPLY  CO. 


All  Types  of 
PIPING  SUPPLIES 


1501  Dowd  Road 


Dial  FR  6-5661 


CHARLOTTE,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


MY  GET  UP  AND  GO  - 
GOT  UP  AND  WENT 


— Unnonymous 


The  following  verse  was  contributed  by  Mrs.  Max  Zager,  having  received 
it  from  her  father  Samuel  Reeven,  now  on  the  west  coast,  and  reverently 
respected  by  his  many  friends  in  the  Carolinas. — The  Editor 

Mow  do  I  know  my  youth  is  all     Now  I  am  old  and  my  slippers  are 


spent? 


black, 


Well,  my  get  up  and  go  has  got     I  walk  to  the  store  and  puff  my 


up  and  went. 


way  back. 


But  in  spite  of  it  all  I'm  able  to     The  reason  1  know  my  youth  is 


FREDRICKSON 
Motor  Express  Corp. 

"Serving  North  Carolina" 


General  Office 
CHARLOTTE,  NORTH  CAROLINA 
PHONE  FR:  6-3661 


grtn 

When  1  think  of  where  my  get  up 

has  been. 
Old  age  is  golden,  so  I've  heard 

it  said, 

But  sometimes  I  wonder  when  I 

get  into  bed, 
Witli  my  ears  in  the  drawer,  and 

my  teeth  in  a  cup, 
And  my  eyes  on  the  table  until 

I  wake  up. 
Ere  sleep  dims  my  eyes  I  say  to 

myself, 

Is  there  anything  else  I  should  lay 

on  the  shelf? 
I'm    happy    to    know    when  life 

closes  the  door, 
The  Lord  will  receive  me  and  do 

even  more. 
When   I   was   young   my  slippers 

were  red 
I  could  kick  my  heels  right  over 
my  head. 


all  spent, 
My  get  up  and  go  has  got  up  and 
went. 

But  really  I  don't  mind  when  I 

think  with  a  grin 
Of  all   the  grand  places  my  get 

up  has  been. 
Since  I've  been  retired  and  had 

some  time  to  spare 
I've  learned  the  importance  and 

meaning  of  prayer. 
When  I  enter  heaven  some  glo- 
rious day 
And   Angels   rejoice    'Praise  the 

Lord"  I  will  say. 
"All  my  get   up   and  go  hadn't 

got  up  and  went 
Before  I  came  to  my  senses  and 

took  time  to  repent." 
I  get  up  each  morning,  dust  off 

my  wits, 
Pick  up  the  papers  and  the  obits: 


When   I  grew  older  my  slippers     If  my  name  is  still  missing,  T  know 


were  blue 


I'm  not  dead, 


But  still  I  could  dance  the  whole     So  I  cat  a  good  breakfast  and  go 


night  through. 


back  to  bed! 


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Southern  Radio  Corporation 

"Pioneers  Of  Color  Television  In  The  Carolinas" 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C.  COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


39 


The  Zionist  Movement  In 
Search  of  An  Image 

By  Dr.  Max  Nussbaum 


The  Zionist  Movement  has  re- 
cently been  under  attack  from  two 
opposite  quarters:  The  assimila- 
tionist  forces  in  the  United  States, 
on  the  one  hand,  and  members 
ol  the  Israeli  Government  —  par- 
ticularly the  Prime  Minister  and 
Foreign  Minister  —  on  the  other. 
As  far  as  the  American  Council 
for  Judaism  and  their  sympathiz- 
ers are  concerned,  it  is,  by  now, 
completely  superfluous  to  rehash 
old  arguments  or  even  to  dignify 
them  with  a  reply. 

The  attacks  on  the  Zionist 
Movement  by  the  Prime  Minister 
of  Israel,  however,  are  an  entirely 
different  matter  and  have  to  be 
given  serious  consideration.  At 
the  Mapai  Central  Committee 
meeting  early  in  June  Mr.  Ben- 
Gurion  said  that  Jews  all  over  the 
world  agreed  that  other  Jews  may 
lincl  a  haven  in  Israel  and  that  in 
this  respect  "There  was  no  dif- 
ference between  Zionists  and  non- 
Zionists."  He  then  went  on  to  ask 
"Will  the  Zionist  Movement  in 
America  organize  Aliyah  which  is 
Israel's  most  pressing  need,  or 
Hebrew  education,  which  is  what 
Jewry  elsewhere  needs  most?"  And 
apparently  concluding  that  the 
Zionist  Movement  will  do  neither, 
he  climaxed  his  remarks  by  saying 
that  the  Zionist  Movement  "cre- 
ates a  gulf  between  the  younger 
generation  of  Israel  and  the  Jew- 
ish people  —  for  how  can  we  ex- 


Golda  Meir,  Israel's  Minister  for 
Foreign  Affairs,  is  shown  on  her 
arrival  at  Idlewild  Airport  for  a 
three-week  coast-to-coast  tour  of 
major  cities  in  the  United  States 
and  Canada  in  behalf  of  the  State 
of  Israel  Bond  drive. 


plain  to  the  young  generation 
that  there  are  two  sorts  of  Jews, 
Zionists  and  others?"  Thus  Mr. 
Ben-Gurion's  latest  utterance  on 
the  future  of  Zionism. 

There  is,  it  seems  to  me,  a  basic 
fallacy  in  Mr.  Ben-Gurion's  logic: 
In  spite  of  appeals  and  much 
oratory,  of  public  declarations  and 
even  denunciations,  there  will  be 
no  mass  immigration  to  Israel 
from  the  American  Jewish  com- 
munity. American  Jews,  and  that 
goes  for  Zionists  also,  look  upon 
themselves  as  living  in  Chutz  La'- 
Aretz,  (a  historic  term  used  in 
Talmudic  Age  to  denote  free  and 
creative  communities  outside  Pal- 
estine) and  do  not  feel  that  their 
existence  in  the  United  States  is 
characterized  by  Gal  u  t.  The 
American  Jewish  community  feels 
solidly  at  home  in  these  United 
States,  and  considers  its  members 
first  class  citizens  functioning 
normally  in  the  fabric  of  America. 
The  sooner  this  realistic  view  is 
accepted  by  some  Israeli  leaders, 
the  better  for  Israel  and  the  better 
for  us. 

To  make  Aliyah  the  only  cri- 
terion of  a  Zionist  in  the  United 
States  is,  therefore,  not  only  un- 
realistic, but  simply  naive.  In  spite 
of  this,  however,  the  Zionist  Move- 
ment in  the  free  world  is  a  historic 
necessity  not  only  for  the  lands  of 
the  Diaspora,  but  specifically  lor 
Israel  itself.  For  what  the  Prime 
Minister  does  not  apparently  tin- 


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40) 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  following  Firms  in 

Franklin— Emporia— -Suffolk,  Va. 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS 

Vaughan  &  Co 

Bankers 


FRANKLIN,  VIRGINIA 


Established  1886 


HAPPY  NEW  YEAR 


NATIONAL  BANK  OF  SUFFOLK 

ESTABLISHED  1899 
Main  Office  West  End  Branch 

Washington  &  Main  Washington  &  Boslev 

SUFFOLK,  VA. 
Member  Federal  Deposit  Insurance  Corporation 
Federal  Reserve  Svstem 


Greetings 

from 

'Your  Financial  Friend' 


THE  CITIZENS  NATIONAL  BANK 


EMPORIA,  VIRGINIA 

Serving  this  community  since  1897 
Member  FDIC 


derstand  is  the  fact  that  every 
great  cause  in  history  needs  a  dedi- 
cated army  in  order  to  translate  its 
vision  into  reality. 

It  is  true  that,  with  minor  ex- 
ceptions, the  whole  ol  American 
Jewry  is  sympathetic  and  friendly 
toward  Israel,  but  there  is  a  vast 
difference  between  sympathy  and 
commitment  —  and  American  Jew- 
ry, with  all  its  friendship,  is  not 
committed  to  Israel,  while  the 
Zionist  Movement  is  an  organiza- 
tion of  committment.  There  is  a 
great  difference  between  organiza- 
tions which  were  founded  lor  an 
entirely  different  purpose  and 
which  have  now  added  an  Israeli 
project  to  the  many  projects  they 
had  undertaken  before  -  and  a 
Movement  which  is  wholly,  de- 
votedly ami  zealously  committed 
to  the  conception  ol  Jewish 
peoplehood  and  the  centrality  of 
the  State  of  Israel. 

This  psychological  difference 
has  emerged  clearly  again  and 
again  and  especially  during  the 
critical  period  of  the  Sinai  Cam- 
paign when  many  of  the  so-called 
friends  manifested  a  negatvie  at- 
titude towards  Israel's  move, 
whereas  Zionists  and  Zionists 
■done        stood   firm   and  proved 


to  be  Israel's  only  reliable  allies. 
The  young  Jewish  State  will, 
therefore,  be  in  need  of  a  strong 
and  influential  Zionist  Movement 
for  decades  to  come,  because  Is- 
rael is  a  great  historic  cause  and 
needs  not  only  friends,  but  allies, 
not  only  sympathy,  but  commit- 
ment. The  Zionist  Movement  is 
the  only  organization  in  the  free 
world  that  can  lullill  this  require- 
ment. 

When  political  thinking  will 
reach  the  state  of  greater  maturi- 
ty, even  some  Israeli  leaders  will 
come  to  the  conclusion  that  the 
Zionist  Movement  is  not  a  gulf, 
but  a  veritable  bridge  between 
the  Jewish  State  and  the  Jewish 
people. 

Having  stated  this  position,  one 
must,  in  all  fairness,  look  at  the 
problem  from  an  Israeli  view- 
point. The  Zionist  Movement  only 
warrants  its  existence  if  it  can, 
first,  continue  to  serve  the  State 
of  Israel  in  the  areas  of  its  needs, 
and,  secondly,  unify  the  dispersed 
Jewish  communities  under  the 
concept  of  peoplehood  through  a 
program  ol  intensified  Jewish 
Education  and  deepened  cultural 
Hebraization. 


Welcoming  the  New  Year,  the  congregation  of  GIs  and  their  dependents 
in  Korea  take  part  in  the  traditional  observance  of  Rosh  Hashanah.  For  Jew- 
ish men  and  women  with  the  U.  S.  Armed  Services  in  every  corner  of  the 
world,  the  Jewish  chaplain  recruited,  endorsed  and  served  by  the  National 
Jewish  Welfare  Board  (JWB)  provides  religious  activities  throughout  the 
year. 


AMERICAN 

Bank  &  Trust  Co. 

Suffolk,  Virginia 


NEW  YEAR 
>  GREETINGS 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


4i 


Seen  from  this  angle,  Aliyah  — 
not  in  its  old  European  connota- 
tion of  mass  immigration,  but  in 
American  terms  of  selectivity  — 
will  have  to  be  given  our  most 
serious  consideration.  In  Ameri- 
can terms,  Afiyah  would  connote 
middle-class  settlement,  lor  which 
a  growing  interest  can  be  observed, 
as  well  as  the  sending  of  experts 
in  various  fields  of  Israel's  econ- 
omy and  technology.  This  in  ad- 
dition to  the  exchange  program 
of  Israeli  High  Schools  or  at  the 
H  e  b  r  e  w  University  —  projects 
which  we  have  already  successful- 
ly undertaken  and  which  will  have 
to  be  greatly  enlarged. 

The  time  has  come  for  the  Zion- 
ist Movement  to  manifest  the 
courage  of  its  own  convictions  and 
project  this  type  of  American 
Aliyah,  directing  itself  to  the 
three  categories  of  the  middle 
class,  the  expert,  and  the  student. 
And  though  even  such  a  program 
will  never  lead  to  mass  immigra- 
tion, it  is  a  constructive  under- 
taking and  will  serve  the  basic 
needs  of  the  State.  It  may,  also 
be  stated  categorically  that  no 
other  organization,  here  or  abroad, 
will  compete  with  us  in  this  field 
of  endeavor  .  .  .  This,  then,  would 
be  a  unique  contribution  of  the 


Zionist  Movement  and  be  a  real 
challenge  to  Jewish  communities, 
not  only  in  the  United  States,  but 
in  the  whole  ol  the  .free  world. 
The  same  holds  true  for  spread- 
ing the  Hebrew  language  on  the 
youth  and  adult  level  via  the  mass 
media  of  radio  and  television,  as 
well  as  via  schools  and  adult  edu- 
cation projects.  Again,  it  is  an 
undertaking  which  we  have  hardly 
begun,  which  is  a  difficult  task, 
and  no  other  organization  will 
rush  into  battle  with  us  for  the 
honor  of  committing  itself  un- 
reservedly to  1  he  Hebraization  oi 
oui    Jewish  communities. 

It  is  within  this  frame  of  ref- 
erence that  one  has  to  discuss  the 
important  role  ol  the  Zionist  Or- 
ganization of  America  in  the 
United  States.  For  without  a 
strengthened  and  revitalized  ZOA, 
there  will  never  be  a  strong  and 
vital  Zionist  Movement  in  this 
country. 

The  critical  situation  in  which 
the  Zionist  Organization  finds  it- 
sell  is,  in  my  opinion,  the  effect 
of  four  causes:  Loss  of  prestige, 
lack  ol  program,  reduction  in 
membership,  and  precariousness 
in  finances  —  and  in  this  order. 
Because  I  am  convinced  that  an 


organization  that  has  prestige  and 
program  will  almost  automatical- 
ly also  enjoy  a  large  membership 
and  enough  income  to  cover  its 
operations.  We  have,  therefore, 
to  undertake  several  important 
steps  in  order  to  confront  the  or- 
ganization with  the  realities  of 
the  post-State  era.  One  cannot  go 
about  our  Zionist  Business  in  the 
normal  routine  of  functions  as 
if  it  were  a  period  prior  to  1948. 
The  situation  has  changed  radical- 
ly, and  it  is  about  time  that-with 
courage,  vision  and  imagination  — 
we  live  up  to  the  historic  challenge 
of  our  generation.  What  we  des- 
perately need  in  the  ZOA  today  is 
a  "New  Deal"  for  the  Zionist  Or- 
ganization. 

In  order  to  regain  prestige,  the 
first  step  to  be  taken  is  the  re- 
unification ol  the  Zionist  forces 
in  the  United  States.  We  have  lost 
too  many  important  names  in 
American  Jewish  leadership.  Some 
of  them  broke  away  from  us  and 
joined  the  "American  Jewish 
League  for  Israel."  Others  became 
active  in  U.J. A.  and  Bonds,  but 
severed  all  relations  with  the  Zion- 
ist Organization.  The  time  has 
come  to  reopen  serious  negotia- 
tions with  these  groups  and  in- 
dividuals in  order  to  enable  them 


to  return  to  the  fold  of  the  ZOA. 

The  disagreements  between  us 
have  become  meaningless,  and 
there  is  no  problem  between  us 
that  cannot  be  solved  in  a  spirit 
of  amity.  We  have  done  very  little 
practical  work  as  a  result  of  the  so- 
called  "Identification  Resolution", 
and  the  other  so-called  "Indepen- 
dent" side  Bas  not  entirely  closed 
its  lines  of  communication  with 
certain  corresponding  groups  in 
Israel  and  the  Diaspora. 

I  am,  therefore  firmly  convinced 
that  a  formula  can  be  evolved 
which  would  satisfy  us  as  well  as 
the  members  of  the  "League". 
Once  this  is  done,  the  recreation 
of  a  single  Confederation  of  Gen- 
eral Zionists  would  logically  fol- 
low in  its  wake.  Such  a  move 
would  not  only  strengthen  the 
leadership  of  the  ZOA,  but  would 
enhance  the  prestige  of  our  or- 
ganization by  the  tremendous  im- 
pact which  such  a  reunion  and 
such  a  consolidation  would  have 
upon  the  American  Jewish  com- 
munity. 

This  reunified  Zionist  Organiza- 
tion of  America  would,  then,  as 
the  second  step,  embark  upon 
a  program  which  serves  the  needs 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  50) 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


So  You're  Going  to  Israel! 


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By  A.  Letz 


First  thing  you  need  of  course 
is  a  ticket,  which  you  can  get  for 
the  proper  amount  of  currency 
or  travel  now,  pay  when  you  catch 
me. 

Then  you  will  need  a  passport 
and  get  a  smallpox  vaccination 
shot.  No  shots  out  of  a  bottle! 

And  that's  all.  You're  ready. 
II  you  are  an  American  citizen, 
there  is  no  need  to  apply  for  a 
visa,  since  it  will  be  granted  with- 
out asking  upon  your  entry  into 
Israel. 

What  should  you  take  along? 

Take  your  wife,  take  along  your 
children,  Aunt  Emma,  they  will 
all  enjoy  it,  you  may  be  sure. 

And  take  along  some  money. 
With  that,  you  can  get  pretty  near 
anything  you  want  in  Israel.  There 
are  shops  as  nice  as  those  on 
Broadway,  the  only  difference  is 
that  they  sell  in  Hebrew,  but 
you'll  get  used  to  that.  In  fact, 
you  will  enjoy  it.  For  instance, 
let  us  say  you  wish  to  buy  under- 
wear. In  Hebrew,  its  tah-to-nim. 
Isn't  it  more  fun  that  way?  You 
can  almost  sing  it. 

Tah-to-nim 
Tah-to-nim 

Also  take  along  your  Israel 
Bonds.  You  can  convert  them  into 
Israel  pounds  and  use  it  to  pay 
lor  your  hotel  and  other  expenses. 

It  would  be  a  good  thing  to  pre- 
pare yourself  with  a  short  course 
in  the  Hebrew  langauge  before 
raking  off.  It  can  be  very  brief. 
For  instance,  you  will  have  to  go 
to  the  bank  to  change  your 
American  money  into  Israeli 
money,  so  you  should  know  the 
Hebrew  word  for  bank. 

It  is  bank.  Only  in  Hebrew  you 
put  Ha  meaning  the  before  it. 


just  stop  anyone  in  Israel  and 
ask  where  is  ha-bank  and  they  will 
understand  and  in  fact  compli- 
ment you  on  your  perfect  Hebrew. 

Also  you  will  surely  want  to  go 
to  the  theatre.  It's  very  reasonable. 
The  best  orchestra  seat  will  only 
cost  you  about  Si. 50  in  American 
money.  The  Hebrew  theatre  is 
teatron.  That's  easy,  isn't  it?  You 
see  how  much  English  resembles 
Hebrew?  But  always  stick  in  a  ha. 
Just  like  you're  laughing  Ha-ha! 

There  are  a  couple  of  other 
Hebrew  words  that  you  will  need. 
There  is  bevakasha,  my  favorite- 
it  sounds  so  delicious  like  coca 
cola,  which  means  "please"  and 
there  is  Toda  Rabba,  which  has 
nothing  to  do  with  rabbis.  It 
means  many  thanks. 

With  those  four  words,  yon 
know  enough  to  get  by,  unless  you 
wish  to  take  a  course  at  the  He- 
brew University,  where  a  know- 
ledge of  English  would  be  help- 
ful. 

Now  about  hotels.  The  Israel 
Government  Tourist  office  divides 
them  into  three  categories,  A,  B. 
and  G.  If  you're  going  to  Israel  lor 
a  rest  and  a  change,  the  A  hotels 
will  give  you  the  rest,  but  they 
lake  most  of  the  change.  Theii 
charge  will  be  about  $20.00  a  clay. 
You  will  have  an  air  conditioned 
room,  an  indoor  swimming  pool 
and  you  will  fee!  very  important. 
But  you  can  get  hotels  all  the  way 
down  to  $2.50  per  day. 

The  hotel  that  the  patriarch 
Vbraham  used  to  operate  free  of 
charge  at  Beersheba  is  closed 
down.  However,  if  you  wish,  you 
can  sleep  out  in  the  open,  under- 
neath the  stars,  like  the  Bible  says 
Jacob  did.  The  climate  is  pleasant 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  48) 


HARRIS  -  MARSHALL 
Hosiery  Mills 

Manufacturers  of 

•  MEN'S       •  BOYS'  HOSIERY 
LADIES  400  -  NEEDLE  SEAMLESS  HOSE 

GALAX,  VIRGINIA 

New  York  Office:     Empire  State  Building,  Room  No.  1519 


September,  -i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


43 


Scientist  Turns  Detective 

By  Police  Superintendent,  Meyer  A.  Kaplan 


It  may  seem  unlikely,  perhaps 
even  incongrurous,  that  the  Weiz- 
mann  Institute  of  Science,  with  its 
almost  cloistered  atmosphere,  con- 
ducts investigations,  not  only  in- 
to the  laws  of  nature,  but  into  the 
nature  of  crimes  —  among  them, 
homicide,  arson,  rape  and  burg- 
lary. 

For  several  years  now,  the  In- 
stitute has  quietly  rendered  im- 
measurable assistance  to  the  police 
and  courts  of  Israel  for  whom  it 
has  unravelled  the  most  complex 
and  unorthodox  problems  of 
physical  evidence. 

Twentieth  century  crime  de- 
tection relies  largely  on  the  ap- 
paratus and  special  skills  of  the 
modern  world.  Clearly,  the  Israel 
Police  Force  could  not  afford  the 
scientific  personnel  or  equipment 
which  the  Weizmann  Institute  has 
frequently  placed  at  its  disposal. 
A  telling  example  of  this  coopera- 
tion is  in  the  sphere  of  emission 
spectrography  —  which  detects  and 
identifies  minute  traces  of  various 
materials,  such  as  glass  fragments, 
paint  smears  and  so  forth.  Here, 
not  only  did  the  Institute  carry 
out  hundreds  of  essential  exami- 
nations for  us,  but  an  Institute 
scientist,  Dr.  Joseph  Jaffe,  found 
us  a  used  spectrograph,  put  it  in 
good  order,  installed  it  and  train- 
ed some  of  our  men  in  its  use. 

The  celebrated  instance  of  a  po> 
lice  spectographic  examination 
conducted  at  the  Weizmann  In- 
stitute was  the  case  of  the  price- 
less antiques  stolen  from  the  Be- 
zalel  Museum  in  Jerusalem.  The 
golden  ceremonial  objects  had 
been  melted  down  in  order  to  pre- 
vent identification,  and  to  make 
easier  their  disposal.  We  suspect- 
ed that  this  was  done  at  an  up- 
holsterer's shop  wliere  they  had 
first  been  filed  down.  An  iron  file 
was  eventually  discovered  on  the 
premises,  and  sent  on  to  Dr.  Jaffe 
for  examination  in  the  Institute's 
large  Littrow  Spectrograph.  The 
spectral  lines  of  gold  were  clearly 
discernible  on  the  spectrograph, 
giving  us  circumstantial  proof  of 
our  suspicions. 

Dr.  Jaffe  has  worked  with  equal 
success  on  the  side  of  the  defense. 
Contrary,  perhaps,  to  rumor,  the 
Police  Force  is  eager  for  this  kind 
of  expert  defense  testimony  which 
forces  it,  more  and  more,  into 
rigorous  examination  procedures 
and  furthers  the  promotion  of 
justice. 


But  the  spectrographs  exami- 
nations are  only  one  aspect  of 
help  given  by  the  Institute.  In- 
stitute scientists  have  served  us 
well  also  in  an  unofficial  consul- 
tative capacity  particularly  in  in- 
tricate problems  of  physics,  to 
name  just  one  other  field.  A  man's 
body  was  once  found  at  some  dis- 
tance from  a  building.  The  patho- 
logical examination  revealed  that 
it  had  been  smashed  by  a  great 
force  which  might  be  explained 
either  by  a  traffic  accident,  or  by 
a  fall  from  a  building.  The  traf- 
fic accident  theory  was  ruled  out 
because  of  the  location.  It  seemed 
impossible  that,  at  this  particular 
spot,  a  car  could  work  up  suf- 
ficient speed  to  cause  physical 
damage,  or  that  the  body  had  fal- 
len from  the  nearest  building  be- 
cause the  distance  between  them 
was  too  large. 

Dr.  Jaffey  was  called  in.  He 
figured  out  that  if  the  deceased 
had  run  fast  enough  -  taking  a 
running  jump  from  the  nearest 
building  —  we  could  account  for 
the  state  of  his  body.  It  was  later 
ascertained  that  the  dead  man  had 
been  an  athlete  of  sorts,  and  that 
the  running  speed  estimated  by 
Dr.  Jaffe  had  been  well  within  his 
capacity.  Thus,  a  theory  of  suicide, 
strongly  suggested  by  motivational 
factors,  was  provecl  by  scientific 
calculations  which  could  only  be 
made  by  the  most  highly  quali- 
fied scientists. 


Rabbi,  Emanuel  Rackman,  presi- 
dent of  the  Rabbinical  Council  of 
America,  has  announced  the  appoint- 
ment of  Rabbi  Walter  S.  Wurzburg1- 
er,  spiritual  leader  of  Shaarei 
Shomayim  Congregation,  Toronto, 
Canada,  as  Chairman  of  the  Nation- 
al Convention  of  the  Rabbinical 
Council  of  America. 


THE  GIANT  FOOD  FAMILY 
WISHES  YOU  AND  YOURS 

A 


1 


GlMTT 
FOOD 


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HAPPY 
NEW 
YEAR 


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SUPERMARKETS 


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INC. 

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Family  of  Fine  Products 


44 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a  Happy  and 
Prosperous  Neiv  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Richmond,  Va. 


Martin  Chevrolet  Sales 

Corporation 

214  Cowardin  Avenue 
Richmond's  Largest  Chevrolet  Dealer 

SALES  •  SERVICE 

Service  Department  Open  7:30  A.  M.  to  Midnight 
Monday  —  Thru  —  Friday 


LUKH  ARD'S 
SUPER  MARKETS 


•  BROAD  ST.  AT  HORSEPEN  ROAD 

•  5418  LAKESIDE  AVENUE 

RICHMOND,  VA. 


•  5710  GROVE  AVE. 
•  1229  BELLEVUE  AVE. 


000  ]\jew  Year  Greetings 

WM.  F.  GRAVINS  &  CO.,  Inc. 

25  S.  13th  St.  Phone  MI  8-4729  Richmond,  Va. 

•  BUTTER  •  EGGS 

•  POULTRY  •  FROZEN  FOODS 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS  FROM 

DOMINION  CHEVROLET  (0. 

SALES 
SERVICE 


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NOW  LOCATED  IN 
THEIR  NEW  BUILDING 
4400  W.  BROAD  ST. 


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HEVROLET 


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RICHMOND,  VA. 


Our  New  Bezalels:  1960 

By  Alfred  Werner 


When  the  shooting  war  ended, 
in  the  fall  of  1945,  many  a  young 
American  of  Jewish  descent  felt 
that  the  time  had  arrived  to  turn 
a  personal  dream  into  reality  and 
lollow  in  the  footsteps  of  the  wise 
and  skillful  man  who  built  the 
Tabernacle  in  the  wilderness.  In 
other  words,  there  was  a  rush  to 
places  like  the  Art  Students 
League,  the  National  Academy's 
School  of  Fine  Arts,  the  Cooper 
Union  Art  School  and  other  in- 
stitutions where  painting  and 
sculpture  was  taught.  Some  of 
these  American  boys  and  girls 
were  just  finishing  high  school, 
while  others  were  returning  from 
what  had  been  the  battle  fields 
of  Europe  and  Asia.  They  were 
young  and  full  of  what  mad  ideal- 
ism required  of  any  one  embark- 
ing upon  the  hazards  of  a  career 
in  any  of  the  visual  arts. 

Now,  a  decade  and  a  half  later, 
let  us  look  at  them  again.  Have 
they  remained  true  to  their  high 
ideals?  Were  they  able  to  express 
in  whatever  medium  they  chose— 
their  individuality  in  such  a  way 
as  to  communicate  through  their 
work  their  subtle  feelings  about 
themselves,  the  world  a  r  o  11  n  d 
them,  their  fellow-men?  Being 
Tews,  have  they  been  influenced 
by  some  of  the  major  events  of  our 
era  (ranging  from  the  annihila- 
tion of  six  million  Jews  to  the 
creation  of  a  Tewish  state)  suf- 
ficentlv  to  transmute  lewish  senti- 
ments  into    tangible  creations? 

A  full  report  on  the  accomplish- 
ments of  living  American  Tewish 
artists  between  thirtv  and  forty 
is  not  possible  within  a  short 
article,  so  T  have  selected  fifteen 
oainters  and  eraphic  artists.  These 
have  achieved  some  prominence, 
due  to  their  unusual  talents,  and 


to  publicity  given  them  by  the 
Museum  of  Modern  Art,  the  Whit- 
ney Museum  of  American  Art, 
the  Jewish  Museum  and  other  in- 
stitutions of  national  influence. 
These  fifteen  have  a  few  things 
in  common.  All  but  three  are 
American-born,  and  even  these 
three  were  children  when  they 
were  brought  to  this  country. 
They  all  come  from  Jewish  homes, 
yet  none  of  them  had  to  experi- 
ence the  harassment  of  earlier 
Jewish  artists  who  were  forced  to 
wage  a  two-front  battle  against 
Gentiles  who  looked  askance  at 
the  infiltration  of  Jews  into  the 
art  world,  and  against  their  own 
tradition-bound  families  who 
maintained  that  the  pursuit  of  art 
was  in  violation  of  the  Second 
Commandment.  Because  I  have 
conviction  that  figurative  art  can 
be  as  valuable  and  as  modern  in 
spirit  as  abstract  art,  and  believe 
that  non-abstract  art  deserves  as 
much  attention  as  the  currently 
more  fashionable  non-objective 
trends,  I  have  deliberately  select- 
ed artists  whose  activitv  is  largely 
concerned  with  recording  their 
sentiments  and  ideas  about  the 
visible  Avorld. 

Herbert  Katzman,  the  Chicago- 
an  who  spent  the  war  years  in 
naval  service  and  studied  in  Eu- 
rope after  the  war,  seems  to  speak 
for  all  of  them:  "1  paint  things 
around  me  that  I  like  and  if  at 
times  the  paintings  move  it's  be- 
cause I  am  moved  by  the  world 
around  me.  ...  T  do  not  paint 
abstractly  because  if  T  give  up  the 
appearance  of  the  world  I  am 
unable  to  become  involved  in  it." 
Therefore,  he  uses  color  energe- 
tically and  rhythmically  to  record 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  49) 


JONES 
Motor  Car  Co. 


2923  West  Broad  -  -  Richmond,  Va. 


Sales  and  Service 


Cadillac  3==== 
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High  Grade  Used  Cars 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


45 


Richmond,  Va.  Beth-El  Temple 

MRS.  EDDIE  CANTOR,  Correspondent 


The  many  committees  compos- 
ed of  Beth-Elites  have  been  work- 
ing deligently  all  summer  so  that 
they  may  present  an  inviting,  in- 
teresting, and  well  rounded  pro- 
gram for  it's  membership  this 
fall  and  winter. 

To  start  things  off  with  a  bang, 
a  political  atmospnere  will  pre- 
vail at  our  sisterhood's  opening 
meeting.  They  will  have  an  out- 
standing, impartial  speaker  who 
will  analysis  and  help  to  enlighten 
our  ladies  with  the  Democratic 
and  Republican  party  platforms. 
Their    euest    sneaker    will  also 


furnish  them  with  comments  con- 
cerning the  respective  presidential 
nominees,  John  F.  Kennedy  and 
Richard    M.  Nixon. 

Beth  El  was  the  scene  of  nree 
marriages  this  past  month.  Our 
Rosalind  Lott  married  Kenneth 
[ay  Reichstein,  Phyllis  Ann  Engel 
married  Arthur  Lawrence  Alex- 
ander and  Harriet  Mae  Moore 
married  Bradford  Barshow. 

The  membership  of  Beth  El 
extends  to  the  entire  community 
their  wish  for  a  healthv,  happy, 
and   prosperous  new  year. 


Portsmouth,  Va. 

MEYER  H.  JACOBSON,  Correspondent 


RABBI  MILTON  A.  ROSENFELD 

Portsmouth  Jewry  is  manifest- 
ing most  of  its  interest  in  the 
coming  High  Holy  Days  which 
begin  Wednesday  evening,  Sep- 
tember 2i  st.  Rabbi  A.  David  Arzt 
of  the  Gomley  Cliesed  conservative 
congregation  and  Rabbi  Milton 
D.  Rosenfeld  of  the  Reform  Tem- 
ple Sinai  are  planning  impressive 
services  in  keeping  with  the  dig- 
nity of  the  holidays. 


RABBI  A.  DAVID  ARTZ 

Gomley  Chesed's  Man  of  the 
Quarter  Century  has  been  elected. 
Julian  M.  Blachman,  a  community 
figurehead  for  over  a  quarter  of  a 
century  was  elected  by  an  over- 
whelming majority  vote  of  the 
Congregation.  Mr.  Blachman  has 
been  active  in  Jewish  and  general 
community  work  in  Portsmouth, 
in  addition  to  having  served  as 
President    of    District    5,  B'nai 


B'rith.  A  testimonial  dinner,  cul- 
minating the  Congregation's  70th 
anniversary  will  be  held  on  Sun- 
day, October  30th  honoring  the 
congregation's  selectio  n.  Nat 
Meyer,  chairman,  and  the 
October  30th  committee  are  com- 
pleting plans  throughout  the  sum- 
mer months. 

Suburban  Country  Club's 
Day  Camp  ended  August  1 2th. 
Over  45  c  h  il  d  r  e  n  between 
the  ages  of  6  and  1 2  attended  the 
six  week  session  and  the  project 
the  first  for  the  club  was  declared 
a  success.  Plans  for  another  Day 
Camp  for  next  year  have  alreadv 
been  started. 

Stuart  E.  Katz,  son  of  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Louis  Katz  celebrated  his 
Bar  Mitzvah  on  Saturday,  August 
27th.  The  grandparents,  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Morris  Katz  reside  in  Ports- 
mouth. 

Congratulations:  To  Rabbi  and 
Mrs.  A.  David  Arzt  on  the  birth 
of  their  third  child,  Adam  Hillel. 

To   Mr.   and   Mrs.   George  A. 


STUART  E.  KATZ 

Moss,  grandparents  and  to  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  M.  J.  Moss,  great-grand- 
parents on  the  birth  of  a  son, 
Mark  Jay  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Burton 
Moss  of  Richmond. 

To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Myer  Jacobson 
on  the  marriage  of  their  daughter 
Beverley,  to  Mr.  Norman  Lazon 
ol   Washington,   1).  C. 


Richmond,  Va.,  Temple  Beth  Israel 

MRS.  MORTON  PLOTKIN,  Correspondent 


The  Temple  Beth  Israel  Sister- 
hood held  their  monthly  Board 
Meeting  Thursday  night,  July  29, 
19(30  at  the  home  of  Mrs.  Sam 
Sheer  4022  Monument  Avenue. 

The  Sistei'hood  officers  that 
will  reign  for  this  coming  year  are: 
Mrs.  Sam  Robbins,  president;  Mrs. 
Harold  Sidenberg,  first  vice  presi- 
dent; Mrs  Frank  Freidenberg, 
second  vice  president;  Mrs.  Irvin 
Plotkin,  recording  secretary;  Mrs. 
Wilbur  Bernstein,  financial  sec- 
retary; Mrs.  Sam  Sheer,  corre- 
sponding secretary;  Mrs.  Kenneth 
Rojas,  treasurer;  Mrs.  Slyvia  Sheer, 
registrar;  Mrs.  Benjaman  Eisen- 
berg,  honorary  adviser  and  chap- 
lain, Mrs.  David  Gordon;  program 
chairman  and  Mrs.  Morton  Plot- 
kin,  correspondent. 

Temple  Beth  Israel  will  start 


their  Hebrew  School  Tuesday. 
September  6,  19(10  and  Sunday 
School  will  start  Sunday,  Septem- 
ber 11th. 

Our  bowling  teams  are  really 
bowling  neck  to  neck  now.  A  tie 
for  first  place  between  the  Ros- 
nops  and  Freeland  Interprises. 
Plotkin  Realty  in  second  place, 
Asland  Furniture  third  place, 
Stars  and  Second  Street  Market 
tied  for  fourth  place,  Phil's  Food- 
land  fifth  place  and  City  Auto 
Wrecking  in  sixth  place.  It  was 
thrilling  to  have  seen  Mr.  Rubun 
Freelander  bowl  a  game  of  166. 


Premier  Hazzaz  Majali  of  Jor- 
dan asserted  recently  in  Amman 
that  the  Arab  League  was  domi- 
nated by  President  Nasser  of  the 
United  Arab  Republic  and  that  it 
was  a  failure. 


4*> 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Make  it  a 

Happy  New  Year 

for  someone  in 

ISRAEL 

Send  through 

JINITED  MAS  SERVICE 

a  Rosh  Hashonah  CARE 
Kosher  food  parcel 


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and 

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Contains: 
Meats,  Sugar,  Shortening, 
Cocoa,  Chocolate,  Assorted 
Dried  Fruits. 

For  delivery  by  Rosh  Hashonah 
place  your  order  now  with 

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425  Lafayette  St. 
New  York  3,  New  York 


BEST  WISHES 

For  a  Very  Happy  Day 
On  This 

fto£f)  itassfjotta 

AND  MANY  YEARS 
OF  HEALTH  AND 
HAPPINESS  AHEAD 

C.  O.  Alley 
Travel  Agency 

708  E.  Grace  —  Dial  MI  4-7848 
Oldest  and  Largest  Travel 
Service   in  Virginia — Est.  1920 
RICHMOND,  VA. 


What  Is  A  Jew? 

By  Janice  Moff 

Janice  is  the  17  year  old  daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Willie  Moff,  and  the 
grandaughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Louis  Baer,  of  Dunn,  N.  C.  This  was  an 
essay  written  for  her  school  work. — THE  EDITOR. 


The  question  we  are  going  to 
try  to  deal  with,  "What  Is  a  Jew?" 
is  one  which  both  Jews  and  non- 
Jews  ask.  The  universal  reason 
people  ask  that  question  today  is 
that  there  is  so  much  uncertainty 
about  the  term  "Jew".  This  was 
not  the  case  generations  ago,  be- 
cause in  those  days  one  could  de- 
line  Jew  very  clearly. 

One  must  consider  their  ideas 
about  what  they  think  a  Jew  is 
and  then  without  being  embar- 
rassed and  afraid  and  to  tolerate 
the  feeling  of  the  question  should 
accurately  include  their  true  feel- 
ings, not  abandon  from  mind  their 
thoughts  of  what  a  Jew  is.  Many 
people  have  a  closed  mind  and 
avoid  any  information  that  might 
enlighten  them  to  what  the  word 
'Jew"  means.  (Through  the  gen- 
erations many  customs  of  the  Jew- 
ish people  still  survive  and  those 
non-Jewish  people  of  today  dislike 
us  for  our  customs.) 

I  think  even  though  I  am  Jew- 
ish, many  of  the  Christians  dis- 
like the  Jewish  people,  because 
they  are  confused  and  do  not 
understand  our  beliefs.  Have  you 
as  a  Christian  ever  stopped  to 
analyze  your  thoughts  of  this  term 
or   do    you    remain    silent  with 


curiosity?  To  simplify  my  opinion 
of  what  a  Jew  is  goes  back  to  the 
five  books  of  Moses.  We  are  told 
thou  shaft  love  the  Lord  thy  God 
with  all  thy  heart,  with  all  thy 
soul,  and  with  all  thy  might.  How 
can  we  love  God  when  we  cannot 
see  Him  is  the  question  often  ask- 
ed. He  is  the  invisible  Spirit,  the 
intangible  Mind  of  the  Universe. 

Is  there  a  conflict  between  the 
Jewish  way  of  life,  the  Catholic, 
and  the  Protestant?  No,  to  me, 
there  should  not  be,  because  we 
are  all  God's  people  and  we  should 
proceed  in  a  pattern  that  He  has 
set  for  us  as  an  individual.  There 
is  so  much  information  that  we 
could  study  and  learn  about  this 
term  that  we  should  leave  a  va- 
cancy in  our  mind  and  heart  to 
learn  more. 

To  be  a  Jew  means  to  know  and 
preserve  the  great  spiritual  treas- 
ures for  the  future,  to  live  by  the 
rules  of  conduct  laid  down  by 
prophet,  lawgiver,  psalmist  and 
sage,  to  walk  humblv  in  the  pres- 
ence of  both  God  and  Man.  To  be 
a  Jew  means  to  be  a  disciple  of 
the  Torah,  a  lover  of  mankind 
and  worshipper  of  God,  for  it  is 
for  this,  and  no  other  reason  that 
the  Jew  was  created. 


S.  W.  Va.  B'nai  B'rith 

MRS.  S.  J.  LENETT, 
Correspondent 

Congratulations  to  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Sam  Baer  of  Mt.  Airy,  N.  C. 
on  the  Confirmation  of  their 
daughter,  Jo  Anne. 

Good  luck  to  the  following- 
families  who  have  moved  into  new 
homes  recently:  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Nathan  Potolsky,  Galax,  Va.;  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Sam  Baer,  Mt.  Airy, 
N.  C;  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Lester  Samet, 
Mt.  Airy,  N.  C. 

Mrs.  Leo  Shankman  and  boys 
of  Marion,  Va.  is  spending  six 
weeks  in  Ottawa,  Canada  with 
her  parents. 

Mrs.  Sidney  Lenett  and  children 
of  Wytheville,  Va.  spent  two  weeks 
with  her  family  in  Philadelphia. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Morton  Jacobson 
and  family,  of  West  Palm  Beach, 
Florida,  visited  with  her  parents, 
the  Sam  Evens  in  Pulaski,  Va. 
recently. 


Betty  and  Abe  Levine,  formerly 
of  Saltville,  Va.  and  now  living 
in  Miami,  Florida,  visited  in  this 
area  recently. 

The  Southwest  Virginia  B'nai 
B'rith  are  delighted  to  welcome 
two  new  members  to  their  midst. 
Dr.  and  Mrs.  Al  Linn,  who  have 
recently  become  members.  Dr.  and 
Mrs.  Linn  live  in  Wytheville,  Va. 


ISRAELI  ATHLETES 
IN  ROME 

Israeli  athletes  coming  for  the 
Olympic  games  are  to  be  provided 
in  Rome  by  the  Jewish  community 
with  all  possible  facilities,  includ- 
ing kosher-meal"  facilities,  religious 
services  and  a  special  information 
office  near  the  main  synagogue. 
Announcement  of  religious  and 
other  functions  will  be  broadcast 
over  special  loudspeakers  in  the 
Olympic  Village  where  Israel's  ath- 
letes are  to"be  lodged.  The  facili- 
ties will  be  open  to  Jewish  athletes 
from  other  countries  as  well. 


September,  i960 


/  ne  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


47 


Martinsville,  Va. 

MRS.  RALPH  HOLLANDER,  Correspondent 


MR.  AND  MRS.  S. 

On  Saturday  evening,  June  18th, 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  S.  M.  Schreibfeder 
were  honored  by  their  children  on 
their  golden  wedding  anniversary. 
Their  children  are  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Jack  Heyman  of  Baltimore,  VIr. 
and  Mrs.  Lewis  Fusfeld  of  Apple- 
ton,  Wis.,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Norman 
Schreibfeder  of  Stamford,  Conn.. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Alvin  Silverman  of 
Danville,  Va.,  and  Mr.  and  Mrs. 


M.  SCHREIBFEDER 

Joseph  Schreibfeder  of  Martins- 
ville. Also  present  were  their 
thirteen  grandchildren. 

Following  a  private  wedding 
ceremony  conducted  by  Rabbi 
Mordecai  Thurman,  about  175 
guests  attended  the  reception. 


Hud  gins  Drug  Co. 
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7  West  Grace  Street 
RICHMOND,  VA. 


Israel  will  receive  the  benefit  of 
expert  United  Nations  advice  to 
aid  her  in  planning  future  eco- 
nomic and  social  programs,  it  was 
reported.  William  Hurwitz  and 
Irving  Weiss,  both  with  the  United 
States  Bureau  of  the  Census,  will 
assist  Israel  in  preparing  for  her 
next  census,  while  Prof.  Rolf  F. 
Rutsch  of  Switzerland  will  work 
at  the  Government's  Geological 
Institute. 


ATTENTION!  WOMEN'S  ORGANIZATIONS! 
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dressed to  Box  1469,  Greensboro,  N.  C. 


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September,  i960 


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Once  upon  a  time  there  was  a 
land  whose  people  were  the  freest 
on  the  face  of  the  earth.  Being 
the  freest,  they  had  won  for 
themselves  every  manner  of  hap- 
piness and  enjoyment.  All  de- 
lights and  luxuries  poured  forth 
in  an  endless  stream.  But  the 
people's  appetites  could  not  be 
appeased  and  they  demanded  that 
the  king  of  the  land  provide 
them  with  more  and  more  of  the 
ceaseless  flow,  and  the  king  al- 
ways said  Yes,  until  one  day  the 
king  discovered  that  his  horn  of 
plenty  was  rapidly  emptying  and 
he  could  do  no  more  to  satisfy 
the  demands. 

The    king    then    said    to  his 


people,  "If  you  were  a  truly  free 
folk,  the  emptiness  of  my  supply 
would    create    no    problem  and 
your   happiness    would  continue 
unbated?"  The  people  were  amaz- 
ed with  the  king's  words  and  they 
vociferated,  "Are  we  not  the  freest 
people  on  the  face  of  the  earth? 
Has  any  nation  ever  been  more 
free?"  To  which  the  king  replied, 
"You   are   the   freest  people,  in- 
deed,  but   not   yet  a   truly  free 
people.  Only  a  people  which  can 
learn  to  say  No  to  itself  as  well 
as  Yes  is  free." 
Moral:  If  the  horn  of  plenty 
Is  freedom's  only  wish, 
How  will  it  survive 
On  any  lesser  dish? 


So,  You're  Going  To  Israel! 

(Continued  From  Page  42) 


and  you  won't  even  need  a  shower 
in  the  morning,  as  the  dew  in  Is- 
rael is  heavy  and  if  that's  good 
enough  a  bath  lor  a  rose,  why 
shouldn't  it  "dew"  for  you? 

Now  you  want  to  eat  of  course. 
For  breakfast,  I  recommend  you 
clo  not  have  poached  eggs.  The 
term  for  poached  eggs  is  ze-zah- 
a-lu-ma.  That's  a  little  difficult. 
Instead,  I  suggest  that  you  just 
ask  for  eggs  —  bezah  and  leave 
the  rest  to  the  restaurant.  That's 
what  they  are  there  for. 

Also  I  recommend  that  you  take 
grapefruit  juice  instead  oi  orange 
juice.  The  term  for  grapefruit  is 
esh-ko-lit,  much  simpler  than  miz- 
tap-u-zim,  the  term  lor  orange 
juice. 

Don't  go  to  Israel  to  get  past- 
rami. Do  you  get  chop  suey  in 
China?  But  there  are  many  ori- 
ental dishes  which  the  Israelis  de- 
light in  which  you  will  find  satis- 
factory substitutes,  like  taheena,  a 
paste  of  sesame  seeds,  garlic,  etc. 
with  peeta,  a  flat  pancake  shaped 
bread;  falafel,  small  balls  of 
ground  chick  peas;  mashi,  made  of 
peppers,  squash  or  eggplant  stuf- 
fed with  rice,  ground  meat  and 
potatoes.  The  oriental  Jews  have 
been  eating  these  dishes  for  cen- 
turies and  they  are  still  here. 


Of  course,  you  will  want  to 
phone  someone  in  Israel.  That's 
another  Hebrew  word  you  should 
learn.  The  Hebrew  for  telephone 
is  telephone.  The  last  syllable, 
phone  is  pronounced  "fun",  so 
have  fun  while  phoning  and  you 
should  have  it,  because  the  price 
of  a  phone  call  is  only  3  cents 
in  American  money. 

What  you  say  in  your  telephone 
conversation  is  of  course  your 
business. 

A  cake  of  soap  in  Israel  costs 
14  cents.  A  package  of  Virginia 
type  cigarettes  of  tobacco  grown 
in  Israel  is  33  cents.  A  glass  of 
orange  juice,  7  cents.  A  cup  of 
chocolate  and  cake  will  stand  you 
28  cents.  If  you  need  a  hair  cut, 
wait  until  you  get  to  Israel,  where 
the  charge  is  only  45  cents. 

You  will  wish  to  travel  about 
the  country? 

Where  should  you  go? 

That  depends  on  whether  you 
wish  to  go  —  high  or  low? 
There  is  no  place  in  the  world 
where  you  can  go  from  high  to 
low  so  quickly.  If  you  want  to  go 
high,  Jerusalem  and  Safad,  the 
latter  Israel's  Greenwich  Village, 
where  the  artists  congregate— are 
the  highest  parts  of  the  country 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  114) 


September,  i960 


Trie  /imerican  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


49 


Our  New  Bezalels:  1960 

(Continued  From  Page  44) 


"the  way  the  yellow-black  sky 
looks  over  the  Brooklyn  Bridge, 
the  way  a  sun  hits  a  building,  or 
the  way  my  wile  looks  in  an  ©chre- 
green  dress." 

His  work  might  be  called  Ex- 
pressionist, like  that  of  Gandy 
Brodie,  in  whose  portraits,  land- 
scapes and  still  life  with  scattered 
fruit  there  is  always  an  ardent  de- 
sire to  penetrate  th]e  veils  of 
reality,  to  fix  upon  the  canvas 
the  metaphysics  of  bodies.  No 
less  a  "chromaticist"  is  Jonah 
Kinigstein  whose  large  canvases 
are  baroque  in  the  treatment  of 
subject  and  in  the  use  of  the 
medium:  flickering,  swirling  im- 
pasto  transports  the  viewer  to 
the  altars  set  up  by  the  Counter- 
Reformation,  and  the  dolorous 
figures  are  reminiscent  of  Saints 
found  in  primitive  country 
churches  of  the  early  17th  century. 

Veering  in  the  direction  of 
Abstractionism,  though  still  with- 
in the  realm  ot  representation, 
are  Philip  Pearlstein  and  German- 
born  Wolf  Kahn.  Pearlstein's 
early  work  —  renderings  of  strange- 
rock  formations,  torrential  rivers 
and  wild  seas  —  recalls  the  fever- 
ish eye  and  the  electrically  charg- 
ed brush  of  a  Soutine.  The  late 
work  is  more  solidly  constructed 
—as  though  the  artist  had  paid 
more  attention  to  the  teachings 
of  Cezanne,  or,  quite  simply,  as 
if  he  had  matured  rather  quickly, 
With  a  palette  confined  main!} 
to  browns  and  greys  and  blues, 
he  creates  an  identification  with 
the  stones  and  trees  washed  up- 


SCHNEIDER'S 
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4th  and  Maury  St. 
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Phone  BE  2-1271 


rooted  by  the  surging  elements. 
Vehemence,  though  controlled,  is, 
nevertheless,  clearly  felt.  Wolf 
Kahn  is  more  lyrical,  more  gentle. 
He  has  learned  from  Monet 
(paintings  of  the  facade  ol  Rouen 
Cathedral,  where  substance  is  dis- 
solved into  atmospheric  vibrances) 
and  from  Whistler'?  almost  ab- 
stract "Nocturnes."  But  he  is  not 
hampered,  as  the  Impressionists 
were,  by  would-be-scientific  con- 
siderations. In  pale,  soft  color  he 
establishes  the  essence  of  Venetia 
vistas,  referring  faintly  to  the  con- 
tours of  celebrated  buildings,  yet 
letting  the  wise  expanses  of  ocean 
and  sky  do  all  the  mysterious 
whispering. 

Jan  Muller  was  German-born 
like  Kahn.  When  the  Nazis  came 
to  power,  the  Mullers  fled  to 
Switzerland,  Holland  and  France 
until  they  safely  arrived  in  the 
U.S.A.  Jan  studied  under  the  dean 
of  abstract  art,  Hans  Hofmann. 
Gradually  freeing  himself  from 
II  o  1  m  a  n  n's  overpowering  in- 
fluence, he  introduced  figures  in- 
to his  romantically  expressionist 
canvases  that  were  often  inspired 
by  the  Bible  or  by  literary  subjects 
(for  instance,  Goethe's  Faust).  "I 
hold  that  the  drive  to  art  should 
result  from  the  conscious  desire 
to  express  feeling,"  he  once  wrote, 
adding,  "it  may  be  that  through 
abstraction  such  expression  is  most 
readily  realized,  but  it  is  through 
other,  more  traditional  channels 
that  I  gain  my  satisfaction."  In 
1957,  his  work  was  exhibited  at 
both  the  Whitney  Museum  and 
the  Jewish  Museum,  but  a  year 
later  he  was  dead,  at  the  age  of 
thirty-five. 

Sattire,  expecially  about  the 
neurotic  restlessness  of  modern 
man,  can  be  felt  in  the  large  can- 
vases of  Sarai  Sherman  (the  only 
woman  in  our  group,  although 
American  women  have  played  a 
most  active  part  in  the  visual  arts 
during  the  last  fifteen  years').  Her 
figures,  slightlv  distorted  for  em- 
phasis, are  taken'  from  real  life 
and  rendered  in  subtle  color  with 

(Please  Turn  to  Tape  52) 

With  the  approval  of  President 
Ernesto  de  la  Guardia,  one  of  Pan- 
ama City's  public's  schools  has 
been  named  "State  of  Israel."  The 
move  had  the  approval  of  Minister 
of  Education  Ividio  de  Leon. 


Family  Stamp  Co. 

1615  W.  BROAD  ST.  RICHMOND,  VA. 

Jack  Greenberg,  Manager 

PREMIUM  REDEMPTION 
GIFT  STORES 


NORFOLK,  VA. 
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ROANOKE,  VA. 
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HUNTINGTON,  W.  VA. 
BRIDGEPORT,  W.  VA. 


SALISBURY,  N.  C. 
CONCORD,  N.  C. 
MACON,  GA. 
COLUMBUS,  GA. 
SALTSBURY,  MD. 
FRANKLIN,  KY 
HARRISBURG,  PA. 


New  Year  . 
Greetings 


At  Your  Service 

•  THEO.  W.  KELLEY 

•  RALPH  S.  GOODE 

•  SAM  COHEN 


Julius  Straus 
&  Sons 

General  Insurance 
Insurance  Building 
10  South  10th  St. 
RICHMOND,  VA. 


Dial  .  .  . 

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YES  .  .  . 

Now  is  the  time 
to  order  your 
winter's  fuel 

.  .  from  .  . 


W.  E. 
Seaton 
&  Sons 

INCORPORATED 

914  Hermitage  Road 
RICHMOND,  VA. 


Prevent 
Forest  Fires 

H.  J,  &  B=  H. 
BECKSTOFFER 

^  Lumber 

1209  N  28th  Street 
RICHMOND,  VA. 


Members  Coal 
Heating 

Service  | 


5° 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


"Nothing  To  Sell  But  Fast  Service" 


• OVERN ITE 
Transportation  Co. 


1100  Ninth  St.  Road 
RICHMOND,  Va.  9 


BE  3-9611 


Dot's  Pastry  Shop 

3136  W.  Cary  Street 
RICHMOND,  VA. 
DIAL  EL  8-2011 

Bakers  of  Fancy  Pastries 


T5TH  4  MAIN 
1  MEMBER  F.D.I.C. 


INTEREST 

ON  THE  ' 

ENTIRE  BALANCE 
OF  YOUR  SAVINGS 

REGARDLESS  OF  AMOUNT 


Ltkerri  Bank 

A>jp  TRUST  CO. 
Grace  at  Second        3201  w.  cary 

''    • ' .'  .  -  FEDERAL  RESERVE  SYSTEM 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS 

MORGAN  BROTHERS 
BAG  CO.,  Inc. 


Phone  EL  5-9108 


Richmond,  Va. 


Greetings 


EMRICK 

CHEVROLET  SALES  CORP. 

1801  Chamberlayne  Avenue  RICHMOND,  VA. 

SALES 


SERVICE 


Braille  watches  lor  the  buna:  lvirs.  inairy  Cahaiie,  rig/it,  president 
Women's  League  for  Israel  shows  David  Z.  Rivlin,  Israel  Consul  in  New 
York  shipment  of  braille  watches  she  is  bringing  to  Israel  where  the  womens' 
service  group  maintains  five  homes  for  young  people  in  key  cities. 


The  Zionist  Movement 

(Concluded  From  Page  41) 


of  Israel,  on  the  one  hand,  and 
corresponds  to  the  needs  of  the 
American  Jewish  community,  on 
the  other.  For  no  organization  can 
prosper  unless  its  programs  cor- 
respond to  the  need  of  the  com- 
munity. This  is  doubly  true  of  a 
Zionist  organization.  Among  our 
important  projects  in  Israel,  for 
instance,  the  ZOA  House  has  been 
the  most"  popular  and  most  suc- 
cessful, because  the  idea  of  an 
American  House  in  Israel  cor- 
responds to  the  psychological 
need  of  the  Israeli  as  well  as  the 
American  Jew  who  visits  the  State. 
The  role  that  the  ZOA  House  in 
Tel  Aviv  has  been  playing  in  re- 
cent years  makes  us  rightly  proud 
of  the  vision  of  our  organization, 
and  demands  of  us  at  this  hour 
to  proclaim  to  American  Jewry 
that  we  are  determined  to  con- 
tinue this  project  with  the  estab- 
lishment of  an  American  House 
in  Jerusalem  and  one  in  Haifa  as 
a  ten  or  even  twenty  year  project 
of  the  new  reunified  ZOA. 

The  same  is  true  of  middle  class 
Aliyah  which,  because  our  mem- 
bers come  from  this  social  stratum, 
we  could  manage  more  effective- 
ly than  any  other  organization 
within  the  Zionist  Movement.  And 
the  same  goes  for  private  invest- 
ments in  Israel  —  possibly  along 
the  line  of  investment  groups 
which  some  of  our  leaders  started 


in  different  parts  of  the  country 
—  by  which,  again,  because  of  the 
nature  of  our  organization  and 
the  over-abundance  of  business- 
men in  our  ranks,  the  ZOA  could 
not  only  become  the  spearhead  for 
an  enriched  Movement  lor  private 
investment  in  Israel,  but  would 
simultaneously  make  a  contribu- 
tion to  the  State  which  would 
satisfy  even  a  government  headed 
by  a  critical  Prime  Minister. 


PLAIN  TALK 

(Concluded  From  Page  6) 
and  increasing  wisdom  tells  one 
it  really  doesn't  pay  to  be  other 
than  perfectly  honest  all  the  time 
.  .  .  and  that  to  keep  on  hating  the 
other  guy  is  an  awful  disease  of 
the  heart  .  .  .  and  that  to  hurt 
and  to  undo  a  neighbor  is  a  sin 
that  stinks  up  to  heaven. 

So:  As  I  approach  the  altar  this 
Rosh  Hashona  I  won't  be  wear- 
ing a  white  gown  as  papa  did,  but 
I'll  feel  rather  white  inside  of  me 
...  as  a  guy  can't  help  feeling 
when  he  has  reached  an  age  of 
life  in  which  he's  old  enough  to 
put  aside  wicked  aspirations  which 
might  have  made  him  look  dirty 
to  God  when  he  was  much  young- 
er. I'll  not  have  the  look  of  a  saint, 
but,  anyway,  I  hope  to  appear  as 
white  as  papa  did  on  Rosh 
Hnshona  far  back  there. 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Correspondingly,  on  the  Ameri- 
can scene  the  Hebraization  ot  the 
Jewish  community  is  the  most  im- 
portant task  of  the  Zionist  Move- 
ment in  the  Diaspora.  We  ought, 
therefore,  to  come  to  the  Ameri- 
can Jewish  community  with  a 
long  range  program  for  the  estab- 
lishment of  a  chair  for  Hebrew 
in  every  single  state  university  in 
these  United  States.  In  addition 
to  the  fact  that  such  an  undertak- 
ing would  be  the  greatest  contri- 
bution that  we  could  make  both 
from  an  Israeli  and  a  Zionist  view- 
point, the  psychological  ramifica- 
tions are  immediately  in  evidence: 
Each  Region  would  undertake  the 
establishment  of  the  chair  at  their 
own  State  University  and  alma 
mater,  thus  involving  all  their 
districts,  the  Jewish  and  general 
community,  city  and  counfy,  state 
officials,  legislators,  and  Congress- 
men. In  short,  we  would  achieve 
an  involvement  of  thousands  of 
members  throughout  the  country, 
working  for  a  Zionist  goal,  yet  at 
the  same  time  for  an  American 
task,  enhancing  the  status  of  Zion- 
ism in  their  area,  and  simultane- 
ously malting  a  contribution  to 
the  spiritual  realm  of  America. 

This  is  a  good  example,  and 
there  are  many  others,  of  creating 
a  program  which  corresponds  to 
the  psychological  need  of  our 
members  in  expressing  themselves 
as  Jews,  Zionists,  and  Americans 
at  one  and  the  same  time.  If,  in 
addition  to  this  type  of  program- 


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ming,  the  ZOA  will  take  advant- 
age of  the  new  structure  of  the 
American  Zionist  Council  and  un- 
dertake the  implementation  of 
the  many  new  projects  which  will 
from  now  on  belong  to  its  juris- 
diction, it  can  develop  endeavors 
in  the  field  of  public  relation  and 
Zionist  education  to  keep  our 
members  busy  day  by  day. 

A  reunified  Zionist  Organiza- 
tion of  America,  which  has  re- 
gained prestige  and  has  developed 
a  challenging  program,  will  then, 
thirdly,  be  in  a  good  position  to 
strengthen  its  relationship  not  only 
with  the  American  Zionist  Coun- 
cil and  the  American  Israel  Public 
Affairs  Committee  —  but  also  with 
the  Hadassah,  the  strongest  Gen- 
eral Zionist  Organization  in  the 
United  States.  Together  with  Ha- 
dassah, and  through  the  help  they 
might  be  willing  to  extend  to  us 
via  the  enrollment  of  husbands 
in  a  reunified  and  revitalized 
ZOA,  we  could  create  a  General 
Zionist  Movement  in  the  United 
States  second  to  none,  both  in 
prestige,  membership  and  influ- 
ence. 

It  is  not  easy  to  get  Jews  who 
have  never  been  affiliated  with 
the  Zionist  Movement  to  join 
Zionist  organizations  at  this  par- 
ticular time.  But  where  one  mem- 
ber of  the  family  has  already  been 
active  in  Zionist  affairs,  it  is  not 
too  difficult  to  influence  the  part- 
ner in  marriage  to  join  the  cor- 
responding m  e  n's  organization 
which  manifests  the  very  same 
Zionist  ideology.  The  increase  in 
membership  alone  could  amount 
to  thousands  of  newcomers  into 
our  ranks,  and  we  could  then 
achieve  in  the  United  States  the 
realization  of  the  concept  of 
"Zionist  Families,"  by  which  a 
man  and  his  wife  belong  to  the 
men's  and  women's  organization, 
respectively,  of  the  very  same  colo- 
ration. 

Such  a  ZOA  —  with  prestige, 
program,  and  large  membership 
—  will,  in  my  opinion,  have  no 
difficulties  in  assuring  the  flow  of 
contributions  from  our  members, 
as  well  as  from  the  general  Jewish 
community  in  the  United  States. 
I  am  certain  that  by  presenting 
the  Zionist  Organization  of 
America  to  the  Jewish  community 
in  this  new  format,  one  can  tap 
new  resources  that  have  never 
been  opened  to  us  hitherto. 

The  large  number  of  new 
members  would  in  themselves  con- 
stitute a  new  source  of  revenue, 
and  the  good   impression  which 


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FRANKLIN 

Federal  Savings  &  Loan 


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24-HOUR  TRUCK  SERVICE 

MAINTENANCE  LEASE  OPERATING 


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107  W.  Canal  Street 


PHONE  MI  3-9173 

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Richmond  Office  Supply  Company 

Stationery,  Office  Furniture  and  Appliances 

816-818  E.  Main  Street  Dial  MI  4-4025 

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1600  ROSENEATH  ROAD 


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INC* 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  196) 


SEASON'S  GREETINGS 


Mutual  Assurance  Society  of  Virginia 


(FIRE) 

Founded  1794 

RICHMOND,  VIRGINIA 


Our  Very  Best  Wishes  to  Our  Many  Jewish  Friends 
For  a  Happy  New  Year 

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MERCHANTS  DELIVERY,  INC 

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Established  1946 


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Specializing  in 
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Dial  AT  2-2460 

Mr.  &  Mrs 
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Grove  Avenue 
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4911  Grove  Ave. 
RICHMOND,  VA. 

For  Fast  Delivery 
DIAL  5-3405 

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For  Quick  Delivery  of  Fine  Seafoods 
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FISH  &  OYSTEE  COMPANY 

105  N.  ROBINSON  ST.  RICHMOND,  VA. 


HENWOOD  &  WILSON 

"EVERLASTING  BEAUTY  IN  MONUMENTS' 

Designers  and  Manufacturers  of 
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2020  Lewis  Dial  MI  3-9116 

RICHMOND,  VIRGINIA 


this  "New  Deal"  in  Zionist  affairs 
would  make  upon  the  community 
at  large  would  open  the  heart  of 
many  a  Jew  in  America  to  lend  a 
helping  hand  in  the  execution  of 
our  program.  , 

Like  America  as  a  whole  and 


the  Zionist  Movement  on  the  in- 
ternational scene,  the  ZOA  is  in 
search  of  a  new  image.  I  pray  that 
we  may  be  privileged  to  rise  to  the 
challenge  of  the  hour  by  giving 
great  answers  to  the  great  ques- 
tions Destiny  has  placed  upon  us. 


Our  New  Bezalels:  1960 

(Concluded  From  Page  49) 


uncanny  mystery.  Satire  —  mild 
and  unobtrusive  —  is  also  the 
forte  of  Meyer  F.  Lieberman  (who 
makes  a  living  as  a  commercial 
lithographer).  In  his  emotion- 
fraught  work  Jewish  ghetto  types 
are  recaptured  with  extreme  care 
and  attention  to  minute  detail, 
though,  discarding  academic  rou- 
tine, he  puts  huge  heads  on  tiny 
bodies.  , 

Like  Lieberman,  Llias  Frieden- 
sohn  makes  use  of  the  figure  to 
communicate  his  interest  in  Bibli- 
cal lore  and  in  the  human  condi- 
tion in  general.  Far  from  conjur- 
ing up  the  "beautiful"  images  of 
the  Graeco-Roman  tradition,  he 
sees  man  ■'ugly,"  pitiable,  and 
full  of  that  mystery  that  came  with 
the  Judaeo-Christian  stress  on  in- 
wardness. Flis  hypnotic  canvases 
are  peopled  by  strange  creatures 
with  bloated  bodies  and  large 
expressive  heads.  David  Aronson, 
too  is  preoccupied  with  human 
qualities.  He  came  to  Boston  from 
Lithuania,  endowed  with  a  solid 
Hebrew  education.  His  is  'Jewish 
Art"  in  a  new  view.  Distorted  to  the 
point  of  grotesqueness,  his  weird 
figures  look  at  us  with  large  sad 
eyes  full  of  Judenschmerz,  with 
an  unforgettable  intensity  of  ex- 
pression. 

J  ides  Kirschenbaum,  the  young- 
est in  the  group  (he  is  barely 
thirty)  stands  entirely  by  himself. 
This  Surrealist  tops  them  all  in 
his  sheer  technical  skill,  which 
is  matched  by  an  unerring  sense 
for  composition.  In  his  works,  full 
of  self-torturing  cruelty,  one  feels 
the  terror  of  a  young  soul  that, 
in  a  round-about  way,  tries  to 
come  to  grips  with  the  metaphysics 
of  today.  His  stupendous  tech- 
nique is  reminiscent  of  that  of 
such  Old  Masters  as  Duerer  or 
Bosch. 


Carl  Zigrosser  of  Philadelphia's 
Museum  of  Art  is  very  hopeful 
concerning  Aubrey  Schwartz  who 
once  studied  with  Ben  Shahn. 
Schwartz,  he  notes,  is  "one  of 
America's  Angry  Young  Men— yet, 
he  can  be  ever  so  tender  when 
drawing  a  baby.  He  is  angry  with 
people  who  are  cruel,  cunning, 
ruthless,  predatory,  and  he  ex- 
poses them  in  the  guise  of  birds  or 
beasts.  His  lithographs  and  etch- 
ings, with  their  mordant  line, 
truly  have  a  fearsome  beauty." 
Equally  gifted  is  Misch  Kohn. 
Lions,  tigers,  hulls  stare  at  us 
from  his  wood  engravings.  Drama 
is  produced  through  the  opposi- 
tion between  glaring  whites  and 
pitch-like  blacks,  while  kaleido- 
sopic  whirling  lines  are  worked 
into  the  c  1  e  a  r  1  v  recognizable 
figures. 

I  wish  to  close  witn  a  reference 
to  Harvey  Dinnerstein  and  Burt 
Silverman  who  journeyed  to  a 
center  of  racial  tension  in  the 
South  in  order  to  "recapture  and 
revive  that  tradition  which  saw 
the  artist  as  reporter  and  commen- 
tator, the  tradition  ol  Goya,  Dau- 
mier  and  Kollwitz."  Again  and 
again  their  swift  pencils  succeed 
in  crystallizing  the  fear,  bitterness 
and  courage  of  the  simple  people 
who,  by  means  of  boycotts  and 
strikes,  are  fighting  for  elemen- 
tary rights  that  have  been  denied 
to  them. 


Scholarships  and  fellowships  to- 
taling Si  10,000  for  the  coming 
academic  year  have  been  granted 
to  167  students  and  scholars  who 
were  victims  of  Nazi  persecution. 
The  announcement  was  made  in 
new  York  by  Jacob  Blaustein. 
senior  vice-president  of  the  Con- 
ference on  Jewish  Material  Claims 
Against  Germany. 


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September,  i960 


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The  Gifted  Jewish  Child  is  a  Challenge 


By  Ben  Katan 


Could  there  be  a  greater  source 
of  undiluted  happiness  lor  Jewish 
parents  than  the  discovery  that 
their  children  are  in  the  rare  class 
of  the  intellectually  gifted? 

Happiness?  It  should  certainly 
be  so.  Jews  traditionally  have  priz- 
ed intellectual  gilts  and  even  in 
the  lush  materialism  ot  affluent 
America,  evidence  of  superior 
scholastic  achievement  remains  a 
source  of  pride  in  the  Jewish  com- 
munity. 

While  it  has  been  established 
that  Jews  have  more  gifted  chil- 
dren than  any  comparable  group, 
it  is  also  an  obvious  fact  that  such 
children  are  rare.  Most  Jewish 
parents  do  not  have  gifted  chil- 
dren and  their  assumptions  about 
the  nature  and  degree  of  the  hap- 
piness of  parents  who  -!o  have 
such  children  can  be  pretty  wide 
of  the  mark. 

How  far  off  the  mark?  Hon1  un- 
diluted is  the  happiness? 

Some  of  the  answers  have  been 
provided  by  Dr.  Boris  M.  Levin- 
son,  director  of  the  Psychological 
Center  of  Yeshiva  University  of 
New  York,  a  recognized  authority 
in  the  lield.  In  a  report  on  the  ;n- 
tellectually  gifted  Jewish  child, 
scheduled  for  publication  in  the 
fall  issue  of  Yeshiva  Education,  a 
quarterly  published  by  the  Nation- 
al Council  for  Torah  Education, 
Dr.  Levinson  has  analyzed  the 
impact  of  such  children  on  them- 
selves, on  their  classmates,  on  their 
teachers  and  on  their  parents. 

What  problems  does  a  gifted 
Jewish  child  present   to  himself? 

Dr.  Levinson  replies  that  the 
intellectually  superior  child  is  fre- 
quently "as  much  a  slave  to  his 
'giftedness'  as  the  dull  are  slaves 
to  their  dullness."  Moreover,  the 


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intellectually  gifted  child  does 
not  automatically,  as  many  assume, 
possess  the  "open  Sesame"  to  suc- 
cess. He  is  just  as  likely  "to  meet 
obstacles  and  difficulties  in  learn- 
ing as  the  dull  or  feeble-minded." 

Such  children  ;ire  sometimes 
found  in  the  category  of  the  "un- 
derachiever."  These  are  the  bright 
children  "who  are  achieving  be- 
low their  mental  age  level  in  one 
or  more  academic  subjects." 

How  could  it  possibly  be  that 
the  child  with  unusual  capacity 
for  learning  might  be  doing  less 
well  than  fellow-pupils  of  lesser 
capacities? 

Among  the  possible  explana- 
tions, Dr.  Levinson  reports,  is  the 
likelihood  that  the  intellectually 
gifted  child  may  find  school  life 
unrewarding  if  he  is  not  properly 
motivated.  "If  lie  is  forced  to  come 
to  school,  to  keep  quiet  and  sit 
still  for  45  minutes,  he  may  begin 
to  feel  bored  and  think  of  the 
school  as  a  prison."  He  may  start 
to  daydream.  His  daydreams  may 
become  more  satisfying  than  Ins 
school  work  and  soon  "this  young- 
ster will  become  deTicient  in  skills 
that  his  average  classmate  can 
h  audi  e  proficiently."  Profound 
and  lasting  personality  problems 
may  develop. 

What  problem  does  such  a  child 
present  to  his  teachers? 

Gifted  children,  says  Dr.  Levin- 
son, need  classroom  programs 
which  put  less  emphasis  on  learn- 
ing new  facts  and  new  techniques 
and  more  stress  on  helping  them 
to  learn  how  to  integrate  emotion 
a  I  responses  and  developing  intel- 
lectual response.  The  teacher  al- 
so   "should    encourage    all  spon- 


Dr.  Irving  Itkin  has  taken  over 
the  duties  of  chief  of  asthma  service 
at  the  National  Jewish  Hospital  in 
Denver  Colorado. 


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taneous  exploration  of  an  interest 
in  a  new  field"  by  such  children. 

Dr.  Levinson  emphasizes  that  in 
the  Jewish  day  school,  smaller 
classes  make  it  possible  for  the 
teacher  "to  differentiate  assign- 
ments within  the  class  and  to  offer 
the  intellectually  gifted  child  an 
enriched  program." 

The  cooperation  of  teachers 
in  the  special  situation  of  the  Jew- 
ish day  school  for  such  teaching 
programs  is  by  no  means  to  be 
assumed.  The  strong  possibility  of 
teacher  resistance  to  such  class- 
room innovations  is  indicated  in 
Dr.  Levinson's  warning  that 
"somehow,  it  must  be  made  clear 
to  the  teachers  that  this  program 
represents  no  threat  to  them."  The 
teachers,  he  adds,  "would  need 
sympathetic  handling,  encourage- 
ment and  inducements  to  intro- 
duce" such  programs. 

Assurance  of  teacher  support 
does  not  necessarily  mean  that 
such  programs  can  be  started; 
there  may  be  powerful  resistance 
from  other  sources,  such  as  the 
parents  of  the  less  gifted  children. 
Dr.  Levinson  cites  the  case  of  a 
large  and  progressive  day  school 
where  the  teachers  and  principal 
agreed  to  introduce  a  rapid  ad- 
vanced class  to  permit  the  more 
gifted  children  to  complete  three 
years  of  study  in  two.  The  plan 
was  announced  and  described  at  a 
Parent-Teachers  Meeting.  How 
die  the  ].arenls  react  to  this  admir- 
able advanced  idea? 

Some  parents  felt  that  some 
children,  including  presumably 
their  own  would  be  discriminated 
against  "because  they  were  on 
cither  full  or  part-time  scholar- 
ships. Others  thought  that,  since 
they  payed  lull  tuition,  their  chil- 
dren were  entitled  to  'all  the  bene- 
fits and  skipping'  that  other  chil- 
dren were.  Still  others  quoted 
chapter  and  verse  on  the  unrelia- 
bility of  tests  and  teachers'  grades." 
Upshot:  The  principal  and  the 
teachers  beat  a  hasty  retreat  and 
the  plan  was  abandoned. 

Another  aspect  of  relations  of 
teachers  to  gifted  children  is  that 
which  sometimes  develops  from 
the  fact  that  "it  is  not  unusual  to 
find  that  some  teachers,  as  well 


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as  some  parents,  Feel  insecure  in 
dealing  with  the  intellectually 
gifted  child  who  often  knows  more 
than  they  do." 

Ideally,  what  should  the  teach- 
er do  in  such  circumstances?  He 
should,  says  Dr.  Levinson,  "ac- 
knowledge frankly  his  ignorance 
and  call  upon  the  gifted  child  to 
supply  the  information."  What 
does  he  in  fact  actually  do?  If  he 
feels  his  authority  is  threatened, 
he  "may  turn  against  the  child, 
chastise  him  or  even  ridicule  him 
in  an  attempt  to  turn  the  whole 
class  against  him." 

What  problems  does  the  gifted 
Jewish  child  face  in  relation  to 
his  peers? 

The  case  of  Joshua,  a  third 
grader  in  a  Jewish  day  school,  is 
instructive.  Joshua,  possessing  an 
IQ  of  185,  was  big  for  his  age, 
well  adjusted  to  his  classmates  and 
a  happy  child.  But  he  was  bored 
with  his  classwork  and  the  prin- 
cipal decided  to  skip  him  a  grade. 

The  children  in  the  third  and 
fifth  grades  became  very  antago- 
nistic to  Joshua  because  their 
parents  assured  them  that  they 
were  just  as  smart  a  Joshua  and 
that  his  extra  promotion  was  not 
due  to  his  brilliance  "but  to  the 
fact"  that  Joshua's  parents  were 
mainstays  of  the  Yeshiva  and  were 
thus  in  a  position  to  secure  extra 
privileges  for  Joshua.  In  vain  did 
the  principal  protest  that  Joshua 
was  doing  extremely  well  in  the 
filth  grade. 

"The  children  began  to  ostracise 
him.  They  would  not  play  with 
him  or  even  talk  to  him.  Joshua 
was  no  longer  the  happy  go  lucky 
boy  he  used  to  be.  He  was  becom- 
ing bitter  and  morose,  a  child 
with  a  chip  on  his  shoulder.  At 
this  point,  we  recommended  that 
he  be  transfered  to  the  fifth  grade 
of  another  Yeshiva.  He  adjusted 
beautifully  there  and  later  won 
very  high   scholastic  honors." 

What  problems  does  the  gifted 
Jewish  child  present  to  his  par- 
ents? 

Some  of  these  are  suggested  in 
Dr.  Levinson's  advice  to  such 
parents.  They  must,  for  example, 
"consider  the  possibility  that  their 
child   mav   not   be   as  advanced 


Greetings 

CHARLES 
HABOUSH 

RICHMOND,  VA. 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


55 


socially,  physically  or  motorially 
as  he  is  intellectually."  Such  par- 
ents should  also  try  to  be  aware 
"of  their  own  feelings  of  insecurity 
or  inadequacy.  They  must  try  to 
think  through  some  of  their  feel- 
ings and  expectations  of  their 
children  as  well  as  how  they  be- 
have toward  their  children." 

Sometimes  the  results  are  start- 
ling: "We  find  that  some  parents, 
after  such  soul-searching,  discover 
that  they  do  not  like  their  gifted 
children.  Others  will  not  admit 
that  their  children  are  gifted  in 
the  mistaken  belief  that  such  ad- 
mission will  make  the  child  —  be- 
cause of  his  exaggerated  opinion 
of  himseh  —  unable  to  adjust 
socially  to  his  peers  and  develop 
friendships." 

There  are  other  problems,  in- 
cluding the  parents  who  are  over- 
ambitious  and  force  their  gifted 
children  to  overwork:  and  those 
who,  overprotecting  "their  prec- 
ious gift,"  tend  to  "infantalize" 
their  child  by  not  allowing  him 
to  engage  in  activities  normal  to 
children  of  his  age. 

And  there  are  still  others. 


Whether  viewed  from  the  tra- 
ditional Jewish  standpoint  of  pro- 
found respect  for  great  intellectual 
endowment,  or  from  the  more  gen- 
eral viewpoint  that  now,  perhaps 
more  than  ever  before,  society 
urgently  needs  such  intellects,  the 
Jewish  gifted  child  is  indeed  to  be 
prized.  But  an  attitude  of  general- 
ized respect  for  a  high  IQ  is  vir- 
tually useless  as  a  guarantee  —  il 
there  is  a  guarantee  —  that  such 
children  will  be  provided  with  a 
home,  play  and  school  environ- 
ment of  maximum  opportunity 
and  encouragement  to  develop  in- 
to well-adjusted  adults  capable  of 
using  their  superior  intellects  in 
creative  ways.  The  gifted  Jewish 
child,  apparently  no  less  than  his 
non- Jewish  contemporary,  must 
walk  a  rocky  road  of  development, 
not  only  intellectually  but  also 
socially  and  emotionally  —  largely 
because  he  is  intellectually  gifted. 

It  seems  safe  to  conclude  that 
such  Jewish  children  all  too  often 
are  not  getting  from  either  their 
parents  or  their  teachers  the  un- 
derstanding and  the  guidance  they 
so  desperately  need. 


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The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 

A  Jewish  Catholic  and  a  Catholic  Jew 

By  Seymour  B.  Liebman 


September,  i960 


Since  the  sixth  or  seventh  cen- 
turies, there  have  been  few  Jewish 
historians.  We  are  a  people  of 
history  but  often  lack  a  sense  of 
and  appreciation  for  recording 
present  history.  Unfortunately, 
there  are  many  blind  spots  in  the 
histories  of  Jews  dispersed 
throughout  the  world.  Not  only 
are  we  ignorant  of  what  happened 
during  decades  but  even  for  cen- 
turies. 

People  are  generally  familiar 
with  the  Inquisition.  However,  it 
required  the  19th  century  with 
its  Liberalism  and  Enlightenment 
to  inaugurate  extensive  research 
into  the  history  of  the  Inquisition. 
Scholars  who  were  able  to  read 
Latin  and  ancient  Spanish  and 
who  were  also  paleographers  be- 
gan to  bring  to  light  matters  that 
were  hidden  in  old  musty  tomes 
and  in  dark  corners  of  many 
churches    and  cathedrals. 

We  are  indebted  to  Professor 
Henry  C.  Lea,  for  His  work  on  the 
History  of  the  Inquisition  and 
the  History  of  the  Inquisition  in 
the  Spanish  Dependencies,  His 
contribution  in  English  in  part, 
inspired  Jewish  scholars  to  pur- 
sue Lea's  revelations.  George  Alex- 
ander Kohut  of  the  Amsterdam 
Jewish  Historical  Society,  was  one 
of  those  who  picked  up  the  figu- 
rative gauntlet  and  carried  on  the 
work  insofar  as  it  pertained  to 
Jewry. 

We  are  also  indebted  to  Dr. 
Cecil  Roth  for  his  History  of  the 
Marranos.  This  book  while  his- 
torical, has  all  the  elements  of 
not  one  but  literally  thousands 
of  human  dramas  more  exciting 
than  any  work  of  fiction,  more 
suspenseful  than  any  novel. 

Just  as  the  Rabbis  of  old  loved 
to  teach  and  moralize  from  para- 
bles or  the  "mashal",  so  the  re- 
cords of  the  Inquisition  are  an 
equal  source  for  lessons  that  each 
generation  of  Jews  should  learn. 
These  records  are  almost  fantastic 
in  the  wealth  of  detail  and  the 
completeness  of  some  of  the  trials. 
In  a  time  when  shorthand  was  un- 
known and  stenotype  machines 
unheard  of,  we  find  verbatim  re- 
ports of  lengthy  speeches.  Let  it 
be  said  for  the  records  of  these 
trials  that  they  did  not  omit  or 
change  the  tenor  of  the  language. 
Even  when  such  language  consti- 
tuted a  reflection  upon  the  valid- 
ity of  the   Church,   each  report 


had  to  be  signed  by  the  accused 
so  as  to  have  his  attestation  as  to 
the  correctness  of  The  reports. 

One  of  these  trials  was  that  of 
Francisco  Malonado  De  Silva.  He 
is  our  Catholic  Jew  and  was  born 
about  1593  and  was  baptized  as 
a  Catholic.  He  became  a  Jew 
some  time  about  1611  or  1612  and 
lived  in  Chile  and  Lima,  Peru, 
when  he  was  approximately  19 
years  of  age. 

It  is  now  necessary  to  introduce 
the  Jewish  Catholic,  who  was  al- 
ready an  adult  in  1406,  and  lived 
in  Spain,  some  7000  miles  from 
Peru.  Rabbi  Solomon  ha-Levi  was 
a  "converso"  and  had  voluntarily 
embraced  Christianity  in  order  to 
further  his  personal  ambitions,  ac- 
cording to  H.  Graetz.  He  was 
learned  and,  after  becoming  an 
"apostate,"  embraced  Christianity 
with  greater  vigor  than  those  who 
had  been  born  to  the  faith.  He 
resented  the  continued  existence 
of  the  "Mosiac"  faith.  Tlis  dreams 
for  personal  advancement  and 
high  office  were  fulfilled.  He 
adopted  the  name  Pablo  (Paul)  de 
Santa  Maria.  He  became  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Council  of  State  in 
Spain  and  co-regent  for  the  in- 
fant, King  Juan  II.  In  order  to 
have  Jews  follow  in  his  footsteps, 
he  wrote  a  book,  "Scrutinium 
Scripturarum,"  which  bore  his 
title  of  Bishop  of  Burgos.  He  was 
also  papal  delegate  to  the  Spanish 
court. 

Now  we  travel  200  years  in  time 
and  7000  miles  in  space  to  find 
ourselves  back  with  young  De 
Silva  at  the  age  of  18  in  approxi- 
mately 1611.  His  mother  came 
from  an  old  Catholic  family.  He 
had  been  christened  and  baptized 
at  birth  and  up  to  his  18th  year 
had  regularly  attended  Mass  and 
gone  to  confession,  and  had  other- 
wise observed  the  tenets  of  the 
Christian  faith. 

He  was  an  intelligent  man, 
studied  medicine,  and  ultimately 
became  a  leading  surgeon  in  the 
Kingdom  of  Peru.  At  18,  he  came 
across  the  work  of  the  infamous 
former  rabbi,  Pablo  de  Santa 
Maria,  and  read,  "Scrutinium 
Scripturarum."  The  book  disturb- 
ed him.  He  became  aware  of  in- 
consistencies and  fallacies  and  in- 
stead of  finding  confirmation  for 
his  faith,  he  felt  that  Judaism 
possessed  something  that  was  lack- 
ing in  Christianity. 


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American  Mai  d 

NOLDE'S 

B  R  E  A  D  &n  d  t  A  K  E  S 

-  At  y  our  SD  e  a  I  e  r's  • 


September,  i960 

Being  troubled  in  mind  and 
spirit,  he  sought  the  advice  of  his 
father.  He  then  iearned  for  the 
first  time  that  his  father  had  been 
born  a  Jew,  had  been  converted, 
had  been  brought  before  the  In- 
quisition as  a  heretic  in  1605,  and 
had  been  released  as  a  penitent 
and  suffered  only  a  monetary 
fine. 

His  father  had  never  revealed 
this  information  because  he  did 
not  want  his  son  to  be  exposed 
to  any  peril.  However,  in  view  of 
his  son's  statements,  he  told  him 
whatever  he  knew  of  the  religion 
of  Moses  which  the  father  still 
secretly  observed  and  they  began 
to  study  the  Bible  together. 

Young  Francisco  became  a  be- 
lieving Jew  but  still  outwardly 
observed  "certain  practices  and 
ceremonies  of  1 1  is  former  faith, 
attending  Mass  and  going  to  con- 
fession, although  he  no  longer 
held  either  essential  to  the  salva- 
tion of  his  soul.'' 

The  young  man  married  and 
had  a  daughter  but  did  not  reveal 
his  line  religion  to  his  wife  or 
child.  Subsequently,  he  attempt- 
ed to  convert  his  older  sister,  Isa- 
bel, who  was  a  spinster  and  a 
devout  Catholic.  She,  however, 
was  shocked  upon  learning  of  the 
heresy  of  her  younger  brother. 
His  sister  remained  unswerved  in 
her  devotion  to  Catholicism  and 
she   pleaded   with   him,    "not  to 


The  American  Jewish 

persist  in  his  madness,  for  she 
saw  therein  the  shadow  of  the 
stake."  , 

Ignorant  of  what  an  earlier 
martyr,  Rabbi  Aklba,  had  said 
1600  years  prior  thereto  and  what 
would  be  said  150  years  later  by 
another  martyr,  Nathan  Hale,  he 
told  her  that  "even  if  he  had  one 
thousand  lives,  he  would  gladly 
lose  them  in  the  service  of  the 
living  God." 

When  Isabel  saw  she  could  not 
bring  about  a  change,  she  told 
another  sister,  Donna  Felipa  Mal- 
tlonado,  who  advised  Isabel  to  re- 
veal all  to  her  Confessor.  His 
sister,  the  devout  Catholic,  re- 
ported all  this  10  her  Priest  at 
Confession,  who  told  her,  "she 
had  to  notify  the  chief  authorities 
of  the  Holy  Ollke  and  she  appear- 
ed before  them." 

Donna  Felipa  also  appeared, 
"in  the  gorgeous  robes  of  the  so- 
ciety of  Jesus  and  deposed  against 
her  brother,  repeating  all  that  she 
had  heard  from  her  sister,  Isabel." 
Among  the  detailed  information 
she  gave  was  that  her  brother, 
"observed  the  [ewish  feasts  and 
lasts,  put  on  a  clean  shirt  on  the 
Sabbath,  etc." 

Francisco  Maldonado  De  Silva 
was  arrested  in  1627  and  incarce- 
rated until  1(139  when  he  was 
finally  burnt  at  the  stake.  For 
over  1 1  years,  the  church  did  all 
in  its  power  to  re-convert  him  to 


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Christianity.  Fifteen  disputations 
and  debates  were  had  between 
him  and  leading  Catholic  authori- 
ties and  theologians  during  the 
years  1627  and  1633.  He  remained 
unconvinced  of  any  error  and 
took  the  affirmative  in  attempt- 
ing to  prove  to  his  opponents 
that  they  were  wrong.  He  adopt- 
ed the  name,  Eli  Nazaveno. 

He  reported  how  he  had  cir- 
cumcized  himself,  first  trying  to 
do  it  with  a  razor  and  then  with 
a  scissors.  He  confessed  to  having 
ridiculed  the  Doctrine  of  the  Trin- 
ity and  was  able  to  recite  by  heart 
portions  of  the  Bible,  the  Psalms 
and  the  18  Benedicts  (Shimoneh 
Esrei).  While  in  prison,  he  would 
fast  four  days  instead  of  one,  "Ask- 
ing God  for  remission  of  his  sins." 

In  1634,  he  fasted  for  80  days, 
breaking  the  fast  with  occasional 
bowls  of  porridge  and  became  so 
weak  "that  he  could  not  turn  in 
his  bed,  being  nothing  but  skin 
and  bones." 

After  his  convalescence,  he  be- 
gan to  collect  husks  from  the  corn 
for  which  he  had  asked  as  a  sub- 
stitute for  bread.  He  saved  the 
husks  and  ultimately  made  a  rope 
of  them  and  "somehow  contrived 
to  swing  himself  through  an  open- 
ing in  his  cell."  He  did  not  seek 
escape  from  the  jail  but  rather  in- 
vaded two  cells  where  other  Jews 
were  awaiting  trial,  strengthened 
their  fortitude  and  "actually  con- 
verted two  Catholics  to  Judaism, 
one  accused  of  "bigamy,  the  other, 
a  friar,  of  breaking  his  views  of 
celibacy." 

George  H.  Kohut  continues  as 
follows,  "The  plot  was,  of  course, 
discovered,  and  De  Silva  was 
brought  to  bay,  and  admitted 
everything,  pleading  excessive  re- 
ligious zeal  as  the  only  motive 
of  the  offense." 

"That  this  weak,  underfed,  and 
defenseless  man  was  a  tower  of 
strength,  occasioning  his  judges 
and  his  learned  opponents  much 
vexation  of  spirit,  may  be  seen 
from  the  following  passage  of  the 
official  report  of  the  trial,  which 
we  copy  literally,  'God  grant,'  so 
runs  the  pious  wish,  "that  the 
prisoner  had  become  mute  as  a 
result  of  his  memorable  eighty 
days  fast,  ere  the  great  conspiracy 
could  have  been  consummated; 
thus  stricken,  he  could  not  have 
prevailed  upon  the  many  impris- 
oned Judaizantes  awaiting  trial 
for  complicity  in  a  proselytizing 


heresy  in  the  dungeons  of  the 
holy  and  blessed  Tribunal." 

He  was  burnt  at  the  stake 
January  23,  1639.  It  was  a  great 
festive  day  and  great  masses  of 
peojjle  came  from  as  far  as  40 
leagues  from  the  capital.  The  pre- 
paration had  consumed  50  days  of 
uninterrupted  labor.  In  addition 
to  De  Silva,  there  were  1 1  other 
Judaizantes,  who  marched  to  the 
funeral  pyre.  The  very  last  in  this 
dismal  company  was  Francisdb 
Maldonado  de  Silva,  a  Nazarite 
indeed,  pale  and  emaciated,  a 
mere  bundle  of  bones,  his  long 
hair  and  "beard  forming  a  halo 
around  his  head,  with  the  precious 
little  books  he  wrote  fastened 
around  his  neck  in  mockery  as  it 
were  —  who,  when  the  death  sen- 
tence was  read,  exclaimed: 

"This  is  the  will  of  the  Lord. 
I  shall  see  the  God  of  Israel  face 

to  face!" 


Newport  News,  Va. 

MRS.  MARTHA  B.  SHAPIRO 
Correspondent 

The  Jewish  Community  Center 
slow-pitch  softball  team  has  had 
a  very  successful  season.  They  en- 
tered the  Newport  News  city  rec- 
reation softball  league  and  pro- 
gressed to  win  the  league  cham- 
pionship after  eliminating  the 
other  seven  teams  in  the  league. 
In  the  play-off  for  the  city  cham- 
pionship they  have  continued  to 
win  all  games,  and  as  this  article 
is  written  they  are  scheduled  to 
play  one  more  game  for  the  City 
championship.  Good  luck!  Thil 
Fox  is  coach  of  the  team  and  play- 
ers include:  Eddie  Cohen,  Buddy 
David,  Arthur  Eisenman,  jr., 
Arthur  Feinbaum,  Harold  Kles- 
mer,   Michael   Klesmer,  Al  Kine, 


Greetings 

White 

Hardware  Co, 

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RICHMOND,  VA. 

»  FULL  LINE  OF  GIFTS 
HOUSEWARES 

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Phone:  AT  8-4284 

We  Deliver 


September,  i960 

HI 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


59 


Arts  and  Crafts  period  at  Newport 
Day  Camp  Kadima.  Counselors  Bert 
assisting  the  children  (left  to  right) 
Levin,  and  Laura  Gessow. 

Melvin  Kurzer,  Leo  Leifer,  David 
Peltz,  Stuart  Peltz.  Marvin  Posner, 
Billy  Richman,  Dan  Sanders, 
Walter  Segalolf,  Arnold  Stern,  and 
Alan  Workman. 

The  Jewish  Center  Nursery  and 
Kindegarten  is  scheduled  to  open 
on  Monday,  September  12.  The 
staff,  Mrs.  Arthur  Lieverman  and 
Mrs.   Charles  Olshansky,  will  he 


News,  Va.  Jewish  Community  Center 
Anker  and  Mary  Claire  Gerber  are 
David  Eisenman,  Jo  Posner,  Stephen 


on  hand  to  greet  their  previous 
pupils  and  all  newcomers. 

Heartiest  congratulations  to 
Samuel  Edison  Vichness,  son  of 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jules  Vichness,  on 
the  occasion  of  his  recent  Bar 
Mitzvah. 

A  very  Healthy  and  Happy  New 
Year  is  extended  to  the  entire 
community. 


Virginia  Softball  Tournament 


B'nai  Israel  of  Norfolk  won  the 
Virginia  Amateur  Softball  Associa- 
tion's 7th  Annual  Tournament  for 
Jewish  teams  at  Richmond  on  Sun- 
day, July  10. 

There  were  five  ,  teams  in  the 
event,  three  from  Norfolk  and  two 
from  Richmond. 

B'nai  Israel,  with  George  Stein 
on  the  mound,  outclassed  Temple 
Israel,  also  of  Norfolk,  10-4,  in  the 
championship  game.  Temple  Israel 
won  the  title  last  year. 

In  earlier  games,  B'nai  Israel  beat 
Fine  Foods  of  Richmond,  8-5;  La- 
fayette Pharmacy  of  Richmond 
overwhelmed  Challengers  of  Nor- 
folk, 16-4,  and  Temple  Israel  elimi- 
nated Lafayette,  10-1. 


Thalhimers  Department  Store's 
championship  trophy  went  to  B'nai 
Israel's  Manager  Harold  J.  Good- 
man and  Pitcher  George  Stein. 
Catcher  Steve  Pitler,  outstanding 
batter  on  the  winning  team,  re- 
ceived two  Adirondack  softball 
bats. 

B'nai  Israel,  by  winning  the 
Jewish  championship,  qualified  for 
the  Virginia  Open  Slow  Pitch 
Tournament  in  Richmond  on  Sun- 
day, August  28,  i960.  The  State 
winner  will  be  eligible  for  the 
World  SP  Tournament  next  year. 

The  Jewish  tournament  started 
as  a  fast  pitch  event,  with  Temple 
Beth-El  of  Richmond  winning  in 
!954»  !955>  and  1956- 


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GREETINGS 

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The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September }  i960 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

ROANOKE,  VA. 


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•  FRIES,  VA.  •  GLASGOW,  VA.      *  COVINGTON,  VA. 

•  MARTINSVILLE,  VA.  •  INDEPENDENCE,  VA. 


Jane  Addams  and  The  Millionaire 

By  Bernard  Postal 


As  the  world  this  month  honors 
the  centennial  of  the  birth  of 
Jane  Addams,  social  reformer  and 
Nobel  Prize  winner,  this  article 
recalls  her  close  ties  with  Julius 
Rosenwald,  the  self-made  Jewish 
millionaire  and  philanthropist, 
and  other  leaders  of  the  Jewish 
Community  Center  movement  in 
Chicago. 

"One  teels  that  it  is  a  benedic- 
tion to  have  her  in  the  home." 

The  speaker  was  Julius  Rosen- 
wald, the  great  Chicago  philan- 
thropist whose  vast  benefactions 
resulted  in  major  social  changes. 
He  was  referring  to  Jane  Addams, 
famed  social  reformer,  and  one  of 
the  great  women  of  this  century, 
whose  centennial  year  is  being 
celebrated  throughout  the  world. 

The  unique  relationship  be- 
tween the  self-made  millionaire 
who  was  the  son  of  a  German- 
Jewish  immigrant  and  the  bank- 
er's daughter  who  devoted  her 
life  to  fighting  for  social  justice 
and  world  peace  was  a  decisive 
factor  in  ridding  Chicago  of  many 
of  its  worst  social  evils. 

Jane  Addams  fought  an  historic 
and  often  heroic  struggle  against 
sub-standard  health  and  sanitation 
conditions,  the  shame  of  child 
*abor,  sweat  shops  and  vice-breed- 
ing slums,  and  sordid  municipal 
corruption.  She  battled  for  high- 
er standards  of  education,  com- 
munity recreation,  social  services, 
woman  suffrage  and  world  peace. 
In  all  of  these  efforts  she  had  the 
unswerving  support  of  Rosen- 
wald, as  well  as  of  a  number  of 
other  prominent  Jews. 

Rosenwald  differed  from  many 
of  his  business  contemporaries 
who  sneered  at  Miss  Addams  as 
a  radical.  But  he  accepted  her  as 
an  honest  reformer  whose  ideas 
he  respected  and  generally  adopt- 
ed and  supported.  He  and  Mrs. 
Rosenwald  seldom  missed  the  din- 
ners Miss  Addams  gave  for  guests 
who  were  important  in  the  field 
of  social  work.  When  an  Ameri- 
can Legion  official  assailed  her  as 
subversive,    Rosenwald    not  only 


defended  her  publicly  but  de- 
manded an  apology  from  her  de- 
tractor. 

One  bitter  cold  night  in  1910, 
when  Miss  Addams  and  Rosen- 
wald were  attending  a  meeting  of 
the  Immigrant  Protective  League 
—  an  organization  that  protected 
immigrants  from  unscrupulous 
exploiters  —  she  had  to  hurry 
away  to  speak  at  a  meeting  of  a 
committee  raising  relief  funds  for 
the  striking  clothing  workers. 
Rosenwald  stopped  her  and  said: 
"You're  going  to  that  strike  meet- 
ing, aren't  you?"  She  said  she  was 
and  Rosenwald  smilingly  remark- 
ed that  he  probably  wouldn't 
agree  with  a  word  she'd  say,  but 
he  was  going  to  see  to  it  that  she 
didn't  catch  cold  on  the  way.  He 
then  took  Tier  down  to  the  street 
and  put  her  in  his  automobile  and 
sent  her  to  the  strike  meeting. 

Rosenwald  was  just  getting 
started  as  a  Chicago  clothing  mer- 
chant in  1884  when  Miss  Addams 
opened  Hull  House  to  serve  the 
newly-arrived  immigrants  of  all 
racial  and  religious  backgrounds. 
Located  in  the  heart  of  Chicago's 
West  Side  ghetto,  Hull  House  had 
a  tremendous  impact  on  the  Jew- 
ish newcomers.  Thirsting  for 
knowledge,  they  crowded  its  lec- 
ture halls,  library,  art  galleries 
and  classes. 

In  the  spring  of  1892  the  lead- 
ers of  the  German  Jewish  com- 
munity in  Chicago  called  a  con- 
ference at  Hull  House  to  establish 
"a  social  settlement  in  the  West 
Side  ghetto"  to  serve  as  a  center 
for  the  "enlightenment"  of  needy 
and  newly-arrived  Jewish  immi- 
grants. Among  the  participants 
were  Julian  W.  Mack  and  Lessing 
Rosenthal. 

Together  with  Miss  Addams 
they  were  among  the  most  power- 
ful and  liberalizing  influences  on 
Rosenwald.  To  Miss  Addams 
Rosenwald  looked  for  inspiration 
and  leadership.  To  Judge  Mack 
and  Lessing  Rosenthal  the  emi- 
nent philanthropist  turned  for 
guidance   in   selecting  causes,  in- 


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September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


stitutions  and  movements  to  which 
he  gave  his  name  and  his  support. 

Miss  Addams,  too,  was  present, 
primarily  as  an  observer.  She  was 
heartsick  as  she  saw  how  the 
wealthier  German  Jews  patronized 
their  less  fortunate  Russian  Jew- 
ish co-religionists.  She  was  equally 
shocked  Tjy  the  bitterness  between 
the  two  groups  of  Jews  and  at  a 
loss  to  understand  the  feeling  of 
some  of  the  Russian  Jews  that  the 
proposed  settlement  was  nothing 
but  a  scheme  to  introduce  Reform 
Judaism  in  their  midst.  Before 
the  meeting  was  over  she  had  to 
serve  as  arbitrator  but  had  the 
satisfaction  of  seeing  agreement 
on  a  plan  to  open  what  became 
Known  as  the  Maxwell  Street 
Settlement. 

In  this  earliest  Jewish  Commun- 
ity Center  in  Chicago  the  immi- 
grants found  classes  in  foreign 
languages  and  English,  bookkeep- 
ing, arithmetic,  American  history, 
commercial  practices,  debating, 
physical  culture,  art,  nature  study 
and  debating.  Similar  settlements 
had  been  established  in  New  York, 
Boston,  Philadelphia,  St.  Louis, 
Cleveland  and  other  cities  to  help 
Americanize  the  immigrants  and 
to  ease  their  adjustment  of  Ameri- 
can life. 

The  Maxwell  Street  Settlement 
was  short-lived  but  it  had  started 
something  important  which  was 
revived  in  1903  with  the  creation 
of  the  Chicago  Hebrew  Institute. 
By  that  time  Rosenwald  had  be- 
come an  active  supporter  of  Hull 
House  and  was  serving  on  its 
board.  Jane  Addams  encouraged 
the  founders  ot  the  Hebrew  In- 
stitute and  undoubtedly  influenc- 
ed Rosenwald  to  give  it  his  sup- 
port. Its  first  building  was  acquir- 
ed with  the  aid  of  a  substantial 
loan  from  Rosenwald.  On  the 
site  of  this  structure  now  stands 
the  Jane  Addams  Houses.  In  1910 
and  1911  Rosenwald  served  as 
president  of  the  Jewish  People's 
Institute,  as  the  agency  came  to 
be  known. 

A  year  later  Rosenwald  and 
Mack  went  to  New  York  to  help 
organize  the  first  permanent  na- 
tional association  of  YMHAs  — 
the  National  Council  of  Young 
Men's  Hebrew  and  Kindred  As- 
sociations. This  was  the  predeces- 
sor of  the  National  Jewish  Welfare 
Board,  which  merged  with  the 
Council  in  1921.  The  Council's 
first  executive  director,  Samuel 
A.  Goldsmith,  later  went  to  Chi- 
cago where  since  1930  he  has  been 
executive  vice-president  of  the 
Jewish  Federation  of  Metropolitan 


Chicago.  In  the  last  five  years  of 
Miss  Addams'  life,  Goldsmith  was 
actively  associated  with  her  in 
many  civic,  educational  and  rec- 
reational reforms. 

Rosenwald's  successor  as  presi- 
dent of  the  Jewish  People's  In- 
stitute, Jacob  M.  Loeb,  headed  the 
agency  for  22  years.  When  he  re- 
tired in  1933  as  president  and 
also  as  a  vice-president  of  the  Na- 
tional Jewish  Welfare  Board,  he 
was  given  a  dinner  at  which  Miss 
Addams  was  the  principal  speaker. 
Loeb's  grandson,  Hamilton  Loeb, 
Jr.,  is  now  president  of  the  Jewish 
Community  Centers  of  Chicago, 
which  grew  out  of  the  Jewish 
People's  Institute. 

Other  contemporary  leaders  of 
the  Jewish  community  of  Chicago 
and  of  the  Center  movement  also 
earned  their  social  service  spurs 
under    Miss    Addams'  inspiring 


tutelage.  Charles  Aaron,  a  former 
president  of  JWB  and  of  the  Jew- 
ish People's  Institute,  and  now 
president  of  the  Jewish  Federation 
of   Metropolitan   Chicago,   was  a 


volunteer  club  worker  at  Hull 
House  in  his  early  twenties  and 
knew  Miss  Addams  quite  well. 
For  several  years  he  directed  a  cur- 
rent events  class  at  Hull  House. 


Shown  lecturing  to  his  students  is  Professor  Isaac  C.  Michaelson,  head 
of  Hadassah's  Department  of  Ophthalmology  and  one  of  the  world's  promi- 
nent ophthalmologists,  awarded  the  Israel  Prize  for  I960  in  recognition  of 
outstanding  achievement  in  medicine. 


We  wish  you 
health, 
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and  prosperity 
for  the  cominf 


year 


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62 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  New  Year 
from 


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Mrs.  Florence  G.  Heller,  a  niece 
of  Julius  Rosenwald,  and  for 
many  years  a  vice-president  of  the 
Jewish  People's  Institute,  also 
served  a  youthful  apprenticeship 
at  Hull  House  before  she  became 
a  leader  of  the  Jewish  People's  In- 
stitute and  later  a  vice-president 
and  chairman  of  the  Jewish  Com- 
unity  Center  Division  of  the  Na- 
tional Jewish  Welfare  Board.  Jane 
Addams  would  have  been  pleased 
to  learn  that  Mrs.  Heller  has  made 
possible  the  Florence  Heller  Grad- 
uate School  for  Advanced  Studies 
in  Social  Welfare  at  Brandeis 
University. 

Jane  Addams'  ties  with  Jewish 
settlement  houses  and  the  early 
YMHAs  were  not  confined  to 
Chicago.  Whenever  she  came  to 
New  York  she  always  visited  the 
Educational  Alliance  which  had 
been  founded  in  1883  as  a  lower 
East  Side  branch  of  New  York's 
YMHA,  now  the  famed  92nd  St. 
YM-YWHA.  She  was  a  great  ad- 
mirer of  Dr.  David  Blaustein,  the 
Educational  Alliance's  executive 
director,  and  she  probably  had 
something  to  do  with  the  fact 
that  he  was  called  to  Chicago  in 
1908  to  head  the  Jewish  People's 
Institute.  Fernard  Horowich,  a 
founder  of  the  Jewish  People's  In- 
stitute, frequently  met  with  Miss 
Addams  to  get  her  help  in  de- 
veloping the  early  J  PI  program. 
Today,  the  Jewish  Community 
Centers  of  Chicago  is  erecting  a 
$2, 000,000  North  Westside  JCC 
named  for  him. 

When  JPI  opened  its  magnifi- 
cent new  building  in  the  Lawn- 
dale  section  of  Chicago  in  1927 
no  two  guests  were  prouder  than 
Jane  Addams  and  Julius  Rosen- 
wald. One  ol  the  speakers  at  the 
dedication  exercises  was  the  late 
Dr.  Phillip  L.  Seman,  who  was 
general  director  of  JPI  for  more 
than  30  years.  During  this  period 
he  worked  closely  with  Miss 
Addams  on  many  community  pro- 
jects. His  tribute  to  Miss  Addams 
in  the  JPI  Observer  when  she 
died  in  1935  epitomized  the  close 
ties  that  existed  for  more  than  a 
generation  between  one  of  the 
greatest  of  American  women  and 
the  Jewish  Community  Centers  of 
Chicago.  Wrote  Dr.  Seman: 

"The  Jewish  People's  Institute, 
which  she  knew  so  well,  which 
from  its  very  inception  was  her 
neighbor,  and  which  at  all  times 
she  treated  in  the  neighborly 
fashion  that  only  she  was  capable 
of,  pays  tribute  to  the  nobility  of 


her  character  and  for  the  privilege 
of  its  close  association  with  her 
during  the  last  35  years,  which 
represent  the  life  of  the  Institute, 
and  probably  the  most  fruitful 
years  of  her  life." 

One  of  the  few  survivors  of  the 
Jane  Addams  era  of  social  reform 
and  social  service  is  Mrs.  Alfred 
D.  Kohn,  an  octogenerian  lady, 
who  enlisted  under  Miss  Addams' 
banner  some  50  years  ago.  For 
nearly  30  years,  Mrs.  Kohn  lived 
and  worked  at  Hull  House,  help- 
ing immigrants  and  victims  of 
persecution,  whether  they  were 
Jewish  or  Irish,  Italian  or  Polish. 
All  found  help  at  Hull  House 
and  an  opportunity  for  self-expres- 
sion and  appreciation  of  their 
worth  as  human  beings. 

These  were,  and  are,  the  basic  j 
appeals    of    Jewish  Community 
Centers  in  Chicago  as  elsewhere 
in  the  country.  It  was  no  accident 
therefore    that    the    Golden  Age 
Hall  of  Fame  established  by  the 
Golden  Age   Department   of  the  j 
Jewish    Community     Centers    of  j 
Chicago,   chose   to  honor  in   the  j 
Jane  Addams  centennial  year  Mrs. 
Kohn  "in  recognition  of  her  manv 
years   of   devoted  service   to  the 
welfare  of  our  Jewish   and  gen- 
eral community  by  which  she  has 
inspired  our  city's  elder  citizens."  I 


Mr.  Sol  Rabkin,  director  of  the  I 
Anti-Defamation  League's  law  de- 
partment, told  a  group  of  teen-age  I 
regional  officers  of  the  B'nai  B'rith 
ifouth  Organization,  attending  the  I 
annual   leadership   training   insti-  j 
tute  at  Camp  B'nai  B'rith,  Star- 
light, Pa.,  that  unless  Jews  over- 
come  "Upper   Level"   discrimina-  I 
tion  within  the  near  future,  there  I 
is  a  "major  danger"   that  "Jews  I 
will  become  wholly  excluded  from  I 
the  power  structure"  of  the  Ameri-  I 
can  community. 


L  and  N  Stores 

L.  P.  MUNGER  and 
NICHOLAS  MUNGER 
Proprietors 

ROANOKE,  VIRGINIA 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Some  Odd  Jewish  Statistics 


By  P.  Niber 


Statistics,  it  is  often  said,  make 
for  dull  reading.  But  those  who 
are  capable  of  something  more 
than  a  mere  cursory  reading  of 
figures,  who  can  compare  figures 
or  put  them  together  or  place 
them  in  a  background  setting  with 
which  they  are  familiar,  can  often 
find  in  statistics  very  absorbing 
reading. 

A  pamphlet  published  not  long 
ago  by  the  Institute  of  Jewish 
Affairs  of  the  World  Jewish  Con- 
gress and  called  "The  Jewish  Com- 
munities of  the  World"  contains 
figures  and  general  information 
on  Jewish  communities  every- 
where, their  demography,  political 
and  organizational  status,  educa- 
tion and  press.  It  was  prepared 
and  edited  by  Dr.  Nehemiah  Rob- 
inson, Director  of  the  Institute. 
Though  this  pamphlet  of  74 
pages  can  hardly  pretend  to  give 
even  the  sketchiest  pictutre  of 
Jewish  life  in  various  countries, 
the  facts  and  figurse  that  it  does 
contain  are  full  of  interest  for 
those  who  know  how  to  read 
them,  if  only  for  some  of  the  od- 
dities of  Jewish  life  in  various 
countries  that  these  facts  and 
figures  reveal. 

Let  us  first  note  those  countries 
that  are  entirely,  or  virtually 
Jewless.  The  countries  which  con- 
tain no  Jews  whatsoever  are  Jor- 
dan, Saudi  Arabia  and  Yemen,  all 
three  Arab  countries  who  still 
maintain  an  implacable  hostility 
toward  the  State  of  Israel.  Yemen 
originally  contained  about  50,000 
lews,  but  all  but  a  few  hundred 


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of  them  emigrated  to  Israel  after 
the  establishment  of  the  Jewish 
state.  The  Yemen  government  it- 
self hastened  the  process  of  Jew- 
ish emigration  by  the  threat  of  ex- 
pulsion and  the  few  Jews  who 
wanted  to  remain  there  had  to  em- 
brace Islam  in  order  to  be  able  to 
stay  on. 

these  are  the  medieval,  fan- 
tical,  anti-Jewish  Arab  lands  who 
refuse  to  harbor  Jews  within  their 
borders.  But  there  is  another 
country,  a  very  progressive,  West 
European  country,  albeit  a  small 
one,  which  also  seems  to  contain 
no  Jews  whatsoever,  since  the 
pamphlet  doesn't  even  list  it. 
This  is  Iceland,  now  an  indepen- 
dent country  which  was  once  up- 
on a  time  a  colony  of  Denmark. 
Iceland  has  no  doubt  been  a  tem- 
porary residence  for  many  Ameri- 
can Jewish  servicemen,  since  the 
United  States  has  an  air  base 
there,  and  probably  many  Ameri- 
can Jewish  tourists  have  during 
the  years  paid  a  visit  to  this  large 
island  in  the  Atlantic  that  almost 
reaches  to  the  Artie  Circle.  But 
isn't  there  a  single  Jewish  perm- 
anent resident  in  Iceland?  Ap- 
parently not.  And  if  such  is  the 
case,  we  don't  know  the  exact 
reason  (or  it  —  whether  it's  be- 
cause the  Government  won't  ad- 
mit Jews  or  because  Jews  them- 
selves don't  care  to  settle  there. 

Two  small  countries  in  the 
heart  of  Asia  are  also  not  listed 
and  we  may  assume  that  they 
contain  no  Jews  they  are  Nepal 


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itself,  which  has  the  largest  popu- 
lation of  any  country  in  the  world, 
has  as  a  result  of  the  Communist 
take-over  of  China  dwindled  from 
about  30,000  at  the  beginning  ol 
World  War  II  to  about  300  now. 
In  Ceylon  too,  a  country  with 
many  millions  of  people,  there  are 
only  about  10  Jews  left  and  the 
former  synagogue  in  Colombo,  tin 
Ceylonese  capital  and  metropolis, 
has  been  turned  into  a  tea  house. 
Formosa  (Taiwan),  which  for  a 
time  served  as  a  temporary  haven 
lor  Jews  from  the  mainland  ol 
China,  by  now  has  only  a  few 
Jews  left,  without  any  communal 
or  other  organization. 

In  Africa,  too,  there  are  colonies 
and  independent  countries  which 
contain  hardly  any  Jews.  Basuto- 
land,  a  British  protectorate,  has 
only  2  Jews,  both  high  officials 
of  the  British  colonial  govern- 
ment. Liberia  contains  a  single 
Jewish  family  living  in  Monrovia, 
the  capital.  Nigeria,  the  largest  of 
the  newly-established  independent 
Negro  states  in  Africa,  has  only 
some  temporary  but  no  permanent 
Jewish  residents.  S  e  n  e  g  a  1  has 
about  10  Jewish  families  in  Dakar 
who  have  no  organizational  or 
educational  facilities. 

Then  there  is  the  oddity  of 
Jewish  communities,  mostly  small 
to  be  sure  but  larger  than  some 
others  who  do  maintain  rabbis, 
who  for  one  reason  or  another  re- 
main rabbiless.  The  largest  ol 
these  communities  which  has  "no 
ordained  rabbis,"  as  the  pamphlet 
informs  us,  is  that  ol  Iran  (Per- 
sia), the  classical  land  of  Esther 
and  Mordecai,  whose  present 
Jewish  population  numbers  about 
75,000  to  85,000.  Most  of  the  Jews 
of  Iran  are  among  the  poorest 
Jews  in  the  world.  Yet  they  do 
maintain  synagogues,  but  have  no 
rabbis  to  lead  them.  Neither,  by 
the  way,  is  there  a  Jewish  press 
in  Iran. 

Other  Jewish  communities 
which  have  no  rabBi,  though  their 
size  would  indicate  that  they  are 
able  to  support  one,  are  Spain,  with 
about  3,000  Jews,  Portugal  with 
1,500,  Paraguay  with  1,500,  Costa 
Rica  with  about  300  families  and 
Bolivia  with  about  4,000.  The 
Kinedom  of  Libya  in  North  Africa 
has  about  4,300  Jews  (all  Sephar- 
dirii);  the  Jews  there  even  have  a 
Day  School  in  the  city  of  Tripoli, 


besides  several  synagogues,  a  Tal- 
mud Torah  and  a  chazan  —  but 
no  rabbi.  Norway  is  another  coun- 
try for  which  no  rabbi  is  listed 
in  the  phamplet,  though  it  con- 
tains almost  a  thousand  Jews 
with  two  synagogues  and  one  Jew- 
ish afternoon  school.  Why  all 
these  countries  should  be  bereft  of 
a  spiritual  leader  we  can  only 
surmise,  though  in  the  case  of 
Spain  it  is  almost  certain  that  the 
restrictions  placed  by  the  Franco- 
Government  upon  flie  open  prac- 
tice of  non-Catholic  religions  is 
the  reason  for  it. 

Perhaps  the  biggest  surprise  in 
this  regard,  the  absence  of  rabbis, 
is  the  large  JewisTi  community  of 
Argentina  with  its  450,000  Jews. 
Though  it  is  true  that  Buenos 
Aires  with  its  280,000  Jews  has 
many  rabbis,  we  are  told  that  out- 
side the  capital  the  remaining 
1 70,000  Jews  of  Argentina  do  not 
have  a  single  spiritual  leader,  and 
that  includes  such  Jewish  com- 
munities as  that  ol  Rosario  (some 
15,000),  Cordoba  (over  8,000), 
and  Santa  Fe  (over  4,000),  in  the 
smaller  communities,  the  pamph- 
let reveals,  even  shochtim  (ritual 
slaughterers)  and  mohelim  (ritual 
circumcisers)  are  lacking.  These 
facts  and  figures  would  seem  to 
indicate  that  Jewish  religious  life 
in  Argentina  is  far  weaker  than 
in  other  Jewish  communities  of 
comparable  size.  England  has  the 
same  number  of  Jews  as  that  of 
Argentina  -  450,000  (the  London 
and  Buenos  Aires  Jewish  popula- 
tions too  are  about  equal).  Yet 
there  are  many  rabbis  in  small 
Jewish  communities  all  over  Great 
Britain. 

Yet  as  regards  Jewish  education 
the  Jewish  community  of  Argen- 
tina seems  to  come  off  much  better 
than  that  of  England.  The  Buenos 
Aires  Jewish  Community  pays 
subventions   to   a   network  of  56 


HOLDREN'S  INC. 

Virginias  Largest 
Frigidaire  Dealer 

29  Franklin  Road,  S.  W. 
ROANOKE,  VA. 
DI  5-1584    -:-    SP  4-0751 


THE  ROANOKE  TIMES 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


b0 


Jewish  primary  schools  with  a 
total  enrollment  of  about  10,000; 
about  35  to  40  percent  of  all  Jew- 
ish children  of  school  age  attend 
Jewish  schools  in  Buenos  Aires. 
In  England  there  are  at  present 
38  Jewish  primary  (including 
kindergarten)  and  second  a  r  y 
schools  with  a  total  enrollment  of 
about  7,000  pupils,  about  one  in 
every  eight  Jewish  children  of 
school  age,  though  there  are  in 
addition  a  number  of  Jewish  Sun- 
day schools  and  Yeshivoth  and  a 
certain  number  of  Jewish  children 
are  given  some  instruction  by 
youth  movements.  Yiddish  culture 
too  —  Yiddish  newspapers,  maga- 
zines, book  publishing  houses  — 
is  incomparably  stronger  in  Ar- 
gentina than  in  England,  where 
Yiddish  culture  has  been  in  grad- 
ual decline  during  the  past  two 
generations. 

So  here  are  two  important  Jew- 
ish communities  in  the  world  to- 


day, one  emphasizing  secular  Jew- 
ishness,  the  other  Jewish  religi- 
osity. In  one  important  aspect, 
however,  the  two  communities  are 
similar;  Both  are  among  the  best- 
organized  Jewish  communities  in 
the  world,  Argentin  a  Jewry 
through  its  "Daia"  and  British  Jew- 
ry through  its  Board  of  Deputies. 
These  all-embracing  Jewish  or- 
ganizations are  able  to  present  a 
united  Jewish  front  to  the  world, 
something  which  American  Jewry 
has  not  vet  achieved. 


LUACH 

Holidays  begin  sundown  of  previous 
day 

HOLIDAYS  AND  FESTIVALS 

5720  —  1959-60 

Selihot  -  Sept.  18 

5721  —  1960-81 

Rosh  Hashonah  Sept.  22 

Yom  Kippur  Oct.  1 

Rosh  Hashana  ..  ...  Sept.  22,  23 


Michael  Comay 


Dr.  Abram  L.  Sachar  Mike  Wallace 


Melvin  Dubinsky 


Morris  W.  Berinstein     Herbert  A.  Friedman 


AMONG  THE  SPEAKERS  at  the  National  Midyear  Leadership  Con- 
ference of  the  United  Jewish  Appeal  were  Ambassador  Michael  Comay, 
Israel's  Permanent  Representative  at  the  United  Nations  Dr.  Abram  L. 
Sachar,  President  of  Brandeis  University;  Mike  Wallace,  noted  commen- 
tator;  Morris  W.  Berinstein,  UJA  General  Chairman;  Melvin  Dubinsky;  \]J\ 
National  Cash  Chairman,  and  Rabbi  Herbert  A.  Friedman,  UJA  Executive 
Vice-Chairman. 


isnsn  mid  row 


NOBLE'S 
FLOWERS 


18  East  Campbell  Ave. 
DIAL  Ul  3-1567 
ROANOKE,  VA. 


INCORPORATED 

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ROANOKE  7,  VA. 


The  Hotel  Association  of  Roanoke,  Va. 

"The  Star  City  of  the  South" 

WELCOMES  YOU 

and  invites  you  to  use  to  the  fullest  the  varied 
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HOTEL  ROANOKE 

425  ROOMS 

"A  Modern  Air-Conditioned  Version 
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KENNETH  R.  HYDE  GEORGE  L.  DENISON 

Associate  Managers 


IPATRICK  HENRY! 
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JOHN  A.  SHIRES 
General  Manager 


HOTEL 

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GARLAND  W.  MILLER 
Manager 


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ROANOKE  10,  VIRGINIA 

Four  Plants  Located  on  N.  &  W.  and  A.  C.  L.  Railwavs 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


Celebrating  a  half-century  of  banking 
service  to  individuals,  business,  and 
industry  in  progressive  Roanoke  and 
Southwest  Virginia 


We  welcome  the 
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MAIN  OFFICE:  Jefferson  St.  at  Campbell  Avenue 

3  Convenient  Neighborhood  Branches 

ROANOKE,  VIRGINIA 

Member  Federal  Reserve  System 
Member  Federal  Deposit  Insurance  Corporation 


"I  bank  at  Mountain  Trust 
because  it's  a  good  place  to 
do  all  my  banking'' 


Samuel  W.  Scott,  "Scotty",  an 
Automobile  Service  Manager,  says 
the  service  you  can  expect  is  often 
the  major  factor  when  buying  a  car. 
"You  bank  at  a  certain  bank  for 
much  the  same  reason".  Mr.  Scott 
lives  at  6820  Greenway  Drive, 
North  Hills. 


ROANOKE  AND  VINTON,  VIRGINIA 


My  Boss  Is  a  Part-Time  Chaplain 

By  Patrick  J.  McGilXicuddy 

Assistant  to  Part-Time  Chaplain  Norman  M.  Goldburg 


My  boss  is  the  rabbi  of  a  con- 
gregation-plus. Maybe  your  rabbi 
is,  too,  if  he's  a  part-time  chaplain 
at  some  military  post  or  Veterans 
Administration  Hospital.  But  you 
may  never  knov.'  it  because  the 
275  part-time  Jewish  chaplains 
serve  with  amazing  self-efface- 
ment sacrificial  devotion,  little  fi- 
nancial recompense  and  less  pub- 
lic recognition. 

The  boss  insists  on  calling  his 
congregation-plus  a  "routine"'  but 
it's  anything  but  that  for  him  or 
any  other  part-time  Jewish  chap- 
lain who  is  a  civilian  rabbi  with 
responsibility  to  his  own  congre- 
gation. Voluntaiilv  these  part- 
time  chaplains  carry  the  addition- 
al burden  of  bringing  religious, 
morale  and  personal  services  to 
Jewish  GIs  and  their  families  and 
to  hospitalized  Jewish  veterans  at 
posts  and  hospitals  where  no  full- 
time  Jewish  chaplains  are  assign- 
ed. 

The  part-time  chaplaincy,  the 
boss  says,  lends  variety  to  his  life 


and  adds  spice  to  his  congregation- 
al and  other  community  activities. 
For  the  past  eleven  years  he  has 
been  part-time  chaplain  at  Fort 
Gordon,  Ga.,  serving  alone  and 
un-aided  about  half  the  time,  and 
the  rest  of  the  time  with  a  regular 
assigned  Jewish  chaplain.  He's  al- 
so the  Jewish  chaplain  at  Lenwood 
VA  Hospital,  Augusta,  Ga.,  and 
the  Forest  Hills  Annex,  which  he 
has  covered  tor  eleven  and  six 
years,  respectively.  For  four  years 
he  was  also  the  part-time  chaplain 
at  the  "Bomb"  plant  —  the  Anti- 
Aircraft  Artillery  of  the  Central 
Savannah  River  Project,  Aiken, 
S.  C.  On  the  latter  assignment  he 
travelled  almost  an  hour  each  way 
on  a  weekly  visit.  This  A.A.A.  in- 
stallation, he  always  said,  remind- 
ed him  of  a  military  assignment 
in  a  small  post  in  Oregon  during 
World  War  II  days.  "I  didn't  have 
a  minyan,"  he  said,  "Why  did  they 
send  me  there?" 

I  think  he  was  exaggerating:  he 
likes  to  do  that.  At  anv  rate,  I'll 


Governor  Nelson  A.  Rockefeller  presented  a  New  York  Slate  flag  to 
national  leaders  of  Hadassah,  the  Women's  Zionist  Organization  of  America. 
The  flag,  destined  for  Israel,  was  included  in  an  "Avenue  of  American  Flags" 
at  ceremonies  for  the  dedication  of  the  $25  million  Hadassah-Hebrew  Uni- 
versity Medical  Center  at  Kiryat  Hadassah  (Hadassah  Town),  of  the  west- 
ern outskirts  of  Jerusalem,  on  August  3rd.  The  flag  was  taken  to  Israel  by 
the  Hadassah  Pilgrimage  to  Israel.  Shown  receiving  the  flag  from  Governor 
Rockefeller  is  Mrs.  Herman  Shulman,  former  national  president  of  Hadassah, 
who  headed  the  Hadassah  Pilgrimage.  Looking  on  is  Dr.  Miriam  K.  Freund, 
national  president  of  Hadassah. 


SAVINGS      AND      LOAN  ASSOCIATION 

CHURCH  AT  FIRST,  S.  W.  •  itOANOKE,  VA.  •  Diamond  5-153S 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


67 


answer  for  the  tact  that  he  had 
few  men  of  the  Jewish  faith  at 
the  A.A.A.  site.  He  couldn't  con- 
duct regular  services.  Neverthe- 
less, he  had  regular  conferences 
with  the  boys.  He  made  arrange- 
ments for  Sabbath  and  holiday 
participation  in  Aiken  and  in 
Augusta.  He  worked  with  the  top 
brass  on  the  personal  problems 
which  come  to  the  fore  in  any  and 
every  military  or  VA  assignment. 
He  enjoyed  most  pleasant  con- 
tacts with  the  chaplains  stationed 
there. 

From  time  to  time,  at  A.A.A. 
as  at  other  installations,  he  at- 
tended a  Mass  or  a  Protestant 
service.  The  Catholic  chaplain 
gave  him  a  beautiful  Missal  — 
with  English  translation  —  and 
the  Rabbi  liked  to  sit  in  a  back 
row  of  the  chapel  translating 
Biblical  passages  from  Latin  to 
English  to  Hebrew.  He  always 
complained  that  the  chaplain  was 
"davening"  too  fast. 

The  close  association  with  the 
chaplains  resulted  in  an  unusual 
assignment  which  the  Rabbi  said 
"took  him  back  to  the  days  of 
his  Army  chaplaincy."  The  two 
resident  chaplains  were  scheduled 
to  be  away  from  the  post  for  a 
period  of  two  months.  Catholic 
boys  were  directed  to  go  to  Aiken 
for  religious  services.  The  Protes- 
tants had  a  service  scheduled  every 
Sunday  morning  on  Post,  under 
the  direction  of  a  sergeant-assist- 
ant musician.  The  Jewish  boys,  of 
course,  had  their  weekly  meetings 
with  the  Rabbi. 

"Would  the  Rabbi  come  over 
on  alternate  Sunday  mornings 
and  preach  at  the  Protestant  ser- 
vice?" Certainly,  he  would  and  he 
did.  Fine,  but  would  the  Chaplain 
come  over  earlier  on  Wednesdays 
and  give  the  "character-guidance" 
lectures?  Righto!  He  would  and  he 
did,  falling  into  the  old  military 
routine  once  again. 


Sometimes,  he  writes  a  letter  to 
JWB  headquarters  in  New  York, 
asking  for  a  "regular"  chaplain  to 
be  assigned  to  Fort  Gordon.  He 
makes  a  good  case.  I  ought  to 
know,  I  write  the  letters.  "Come 
on,  now,  Aryeh  (Rabbi  Aryeh 
Lev,  director  ot  JWB's  Commis- 
sion on  Jewish  Chaplaincy),  I 
can't  handle  this  all  by  myself. 
You  know  I  got  a  congregation 
of  my  own.  Send  us  a  regular 
chaplain." 

The  part-time  chaplains,  like 
those  on  full-time  duty  in  all  the 
branches  of  the  Armed  Forces,  are 
recruited,  endorsed  and  served  by 
JWB's  Commission  on  Jewish 
Chaplaincy,  and  together  with 
JWB's  Armed  Services  Commit- 
tees and  USO-JWB  workers  cover 
more  than  600  military  installa- 
tions and  hospitals  in  every  corner 
of  the  country. 

When  Rabbi  Lev  answers  and 
avoids  the  $64  question  by  telling 
the  Rabbi  of  the  good  reports 
they  are  getting  from  Fort  Gor- 
don, from  the  Post  chaplain  and 
from  the  CO.,  he  purrs  like  a 
kitten.  "Well,"  he  says  in  that 
annoying  ungrammatical  way  — 
"They  ain't  a  sending  a  chaplain 
to  Gordon.  I  reckon  I'll  have  to  go 
right  on  handling  it  all  by  my- 
self.  Hmmm." 

Yes,  it  takes  considerable  time 
-  but  he's  got  it  down  to  the  es- 
sentials. He  preaches  out  there 
two  Friday  evenings  at  7  o'clock. 
That's  an  hour  and  fifteen  min- 
utes before  his  own  services  in 
town.  He  goes  out  during  the  week 
for  hospital  calls  and  consulta- 
tions. Sometimes,  an  emergency 
calls  him  to  the  Fort  for  a  third 
time  during  the  week.  Sometimes, 
when  he  is  in  a  hurry,  he  asks  for 
and  sets  a  "Militarv  Police  escort." 
You'd  think  the  top  brass  was 
riding  in  from  Washington  when 
this  takes  place.  Oser!  It's  the 
chaplain  on  a  flying  visit,  sand- 


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September,  i960 


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wiching  in  an  extra  hour  between 
two  non-military  engagements. 
His  congregational  religious 
school  is  open  to  Army  personnel 
and  he  has  recruited  some  fine 
Sunday  School  teachers  from  Fort 
Gordon.  He  tc-rlls  his  congregation 
"We  get  some  fine  dividends  from 
the  Fort." 

They  no  longer  have  the  "Disci- 
plinary Barracks"  at  Fort  Gordon, 
but  when  they  had,  then  he  was 
in  his  element.  "An  old  prison 
chaplain,"  he  describes  himself, 
having  served  in  that  capacity  at 
Folsom  Prison  near  Sacramento, 
Calif.,  in  his  early  days  in  the  rab- 
binate. He  liked  to  work  with 
the  prisoners  and  I  do  believe  that 
he  was  sorry  to  see  his  favorites 
released. 

What  do  you  do  with  a  guy 
like  the  Chaplain?  He  does  get 
involved  emotionally  with  the 
soldiers,  the  prisoners  and  the 
patients  at  the  VA.  Nothing  is 
routine  as  tar  as  he  is  concerned. 

He  likes  the  freedom  he  now 
enjoys  in  taking  military  problems 
right  to  the  top.  "Remember  the 
Army  days,  Patrick,"  he  reminds 
me,  "when  we  used  to  go  through 
channels?"  I  remember  them.  He 
found  out,  the  hard  way,  that  you 
don't  just  walk  in  to  see  the 
Colonel  or  the  General. 

Ah,  but  lie  does  walk  in  today. 
He  does  phone  directly  to  the 
CO.  or  to  the  Chief  of  Staff,  and 
how  he  enjoys  the  new  freedom. 
He  sits  in  the  Post  Chaplain's  of- 
fice discussing  a  particular  prob- 
lem. It  is  involved;  it  is  diffi- 
cult; it  is  likely  to  be  fouled-up 
somewhere  along  the  line.  Ulti- 
mately, of  course,  it  must  be 
brought  to  the  attention  of  the 
"front  office." 

I  think  the  VA  is  his  most  very 
special  interest.  At  Lenwood  VA 
Hospital  we  have  a  number  of 
Jewish  patients,  somewhere  be- 
tween twenty  and  thirty  at  all 
times.  These  men  are  veterans 
of  World  War  TI,  mainly,  plus  a 
few  World  War  I  casualties  and 
several  Korea  conflict  men. 


Here,  too,  it  is  difficult  to  hold 
regular  services  for  all  the  men. 
The  Chaplain  finds  it  practicable 
to  schedule  group  meetings  and 
services  in  the  various  scattered 
wards.  Of  course,  there  are  men 
at  VA  who  are  not  in  condition 
to  participate  in  services. 

Occasionally,  they  fool  you.  For 
example,  at  a  holiday  service  when 
the  Rabbi  was  accompanied  by  a 
little  lady  of  the  Sisterhood  this 
is  what  happened.  The  Sisterhood 
gal  questioned  a  patient,  asking 
him,  pointedly,  "What  did  the 
Rabbi  say."  He  looked  her  in  the 
eye  and  asked  this  question,  "You 
Avere  there,  weren't  you?"  She  ad- 
itted,  somewhat  disconcerted,  that 
she  was.  "Well,"  said  the  patient, 
"he  said  the  same  thing  to  me  that 
he  said  to  you." 

A  death  among  the  old  timers 
who  have  been  at  Lenwood  for 
many  years  is  like  a  death  in  the 
congregation.  As  the  chaplain  says, 
"You  get  to  know  these  guys. 
Sometimes  you  meet  members  of 
the  family  (all  to  infrequently, 
alas).  The  men  confide  in  you. 
You  visit  them  quite  often.  In- 
deed, you  see  them  more  often 
than  you  see  some  members  of 
your  own  congregation. 

"Bonds  of  friendship  are 
strengthened  through  the  years. 
You  go  with  a  man  to  staff  meet- 
ings. You  have  consultations  with 
his  doctors.  You  discuss  the  mat- 
ter of  transfer,  of  trial  visits  at 
home,  of  discharge  from  the  hos- 
pital. 

"Sometimes  you  accompany  a 
patient  you  have  known  so  pleas- 
antly in  life,  to  his  last  resting 
place  —  and  read  the  funeral 
service. 

"Oh,  yes,  your  rabbinical  duties 
are  extended  far  beyond  the  con- 
fines of  the  congregation  and  the 
general  community  when  you  do 
chaplaincy  work.  You  have  a  com- 
mitment —  that's  the  right  word 
—  when  you  undertake  to  minister 
to  patients  at  a  VA  installation." 


EXCLUSIVELY 


For  Complete  Eye  Care: 
Consult  Your  EYE  PHYSICIAN 
Then  See  Your  GUILD  OPTICIAN 

A.  G.  Jefferson 


Ground  Floor  Allied  Arts  Bldg.       Lynchburg,  Va. 


o 
p 

T 
I 

C 
A 
L 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


69 


"And  don't  think,"  the  Rabbi 
reminds  me,  "that  you  are  minis- 
tering only  to  Jewish  personnel." 
He  is  available  for  the  Sunday 
preaching  schedule  when  one  of 
the  regular  chaplains  is  ill,  in- 
disposed or  out  of  the  city.  He 
preaches,  from  time  to  time,  and 
the  service  he  conducts  is  remini- 
scent of  the  "general"  service  and 
sermon  that  has  an  appeal  to  ALL 
men  of  all  faiths.  Also,  every 
Tuesday  morning  he  conducts  a 
devotional  service  on  the  hospital 
radio  hook-up. 

He  relishes  an  invitation  to 
preach  to  VA  patients.  They  are, 
he  claims,  most  discriminating. 

He  is  so  keen  about  his  work 
in  Augusta  because  it  is,  as  he 
says,  "a  wonderful  congregation- 
plus."  The  people  in  the  congre- 
gation understood  the  great  need 
which  exists  in  local  military  and 
VA  installations.  Many  of  them, 
men  and  women,  serve  as  volun- 
teer workers  in  all  of  the  local 
military   and  VA  facilities. 

And  because  the  members  of  the 
Rabbi's  civilian  congregation  — 
the  Walton  Way  Temple  in  Au- 
gusta —  have  this  warm  interest 
and  understanding,  they  are  never 
critical  about  the  hours  their 
Rabbi  spends  with  soldiers  and 
patients. 

The  congregation  invites  the 
participation  of  the  military  at  re- 
ligious and  social  functions.  Often, 
patients  from  the  VA  and  workers 
and  officials  come  to  the  services. 
Psychiatrists  and  other  staff  mem- 
bers belong  to  the  Rabbi's  con- 
gregation. Holiday  services  and 
Passover  seders  are  crowded  with 
visitors  from  military  and  VA  in- 
stallations. 

It  is  this  fine  cooperative  spirit 
which  makes  it  possible  for  the 
boss  to  work  a  lew  hours  each 
week  at  the  various  installations 
in  and  near  Augusta.  "Variety  is 
the  spice  of  life!"  he  likes  to  say 
and.  when  he  says  it,  I  know  ex- 
actly what  he  is  driving  at.  He  is 
saying  "Life  is  interesting  down 
here  in  Dixie.  It's  a  fine  congrega- 
tion —  a  wonderful  community  — 


and  there's  an  opportunity  to  re- 
live the  pleasant  military  ex- 
periences of  the  war  days  by  con- 
tinuing to  serve  the  'boys'  as  their 
part-time  chaplain." 

I  guess  he  has  been  on  the  JWB 
Chaplaincy  rolls  tor  more  than 
twenty-five  years.  Shea  Schwartz 
introduced  him  to  the  Army  Chap- 
laincy in  1934  in  San  Francisco. 
The  Rabbi  has  always  been  senti- 
mental about  Shea  who  guided  the 
destiny  of  [ewish  chaplains.  Arm- 
ed Services  workers  and  civilian 
\olunteers  during  the  early  days 
of  World  War  II  in  California  and 
the  Northwest.  Working  with 
JWB  personnel  has  always  been 
a  source  of  pleasure  and  satisfac- 
tion to  him.  He  numbers  many  of 
1  lie  JWB  "workers,"  as  he  calls 
them,  among  his  intimate  friends. 
He  haunts  jWB's  national  office 
in  New  York  on  his  rare  trips  to 
the  bio  citv.  He  maintains  close 
telephone  contact  with  the  region- 
al Armed  Services  office  in  At- 
lanta, presided  over  by  his  "cousin, 
Leon  Goldberg",  and  he  goes  to 
Atlanta  whenever  he  can  find  the 
slightest  excuse. 

The  New  York  Times,  in  a  re- 
port from  Moscow,  was  disclosed 
that  the  Soviet  press  is  cautiously 
siding  with   Israel  on   the  Adolf 


Eichmann  seizure 


B'nai  14  run  wiu  Jitmor  New  York 
industrialist  Abraham  Feinberg,  na- 
tional head  of  the  Israel  Bonds  cam- 
paign and  an  active  leader  in  other 
Jewish  courses,  at  its  117th  annual 
meeting  in  November. 


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7° 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


isran  nro  row 


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Published  by  The  Lynchburg  Daily  Advance,  Inc. 


A  favorite  "gripe"  of  his  has 
to  do  with  JWB.  "It  doesn't  re- 
ceive the  support  it  deserves  from 
the  American  Jewish  community," 
he  maintains.  "There  is  no  more 
important  organization.  No  Jew- 
ish institution  has  served  Ameri- 
can Jewry  with  greater  dedica- 
tion." Now,  he  Begins  to  warm  up 
to  the  theme  —  "How  come  we 
raise  millions  for  charity  and  mil- 
lions for  defense  agencies  —  and 
cannot  make  adequate  provision 
ior  the  one  American  Jewish  or- 
ganization which  cuts  across  re- 
ligious  lines,   across   all  partisan 


lines,  which  serves  partically  every 
Jewish  family  in  the  United 
States?" 

"Patrick,"  he  pounds  the  table 
to  get  my  attention  —  "Isn't  JWB 
a  perfect  combination  of  true  phil- 
anthropic and  so-called  defense 
work.  Isn't  it  the  greatest?"  Well, 
I'm  not  going  to  report  the  speech 
in  detail.  This  gives  you  a  little 
of  his  attitude  toward  the  organi- 
zation to  which  he  has  a  singular 
attachment  —  Take  it  from  me. 
Don't  get  the  guy  started  on  JWB 
and  the  part-time  chaplains. 


Jewish  Servicemen  in  North  Carolina 

(Concluded  From  Page  16) 
basis  through  its  membership  in 

uso. 

Chaplains  and  Auxiliary  Chtp 
lains  will  conduct  religious  ser- 
vices  at  the  Military  installations 
and  in  their  own  communities, 
while  JWB's  Armed  Services  Com- 
mittees in  m  any  communities 
headed  by  A.  M.  Fleishman  has 
arranged  home  hospitality  for  all 
Jewish  servicemen  who  obtain 
holiday  leaves  from  the  post  or 
hospital.  Coordinating  local  hos- 
pitality and  working  closely  in 
organization  of  holiday  activities 
with  the  Jewish  chaplain  is  Irving 
Cheroff,  USO-JWB  worker  in 
Fa^etteville,  N.  C. 

The  Rosh  Hashanah  arrange- 
ments in  North  Carolina  are  part 
of  JWB's  world-wide  Rosh  Hash- 
anah services  conducted  this  year 
by  Jewish  chaplains  in  Korea, 
Japan,  Hawaii,  the  Philippines, 
Guam,  Okinawa,  North  Africa, 
Alaska,  Greenland,  Iceland,  New- 
foundland, France,  Germany,  Eng- 
land, Italy  and  the  Caribbean  area 
and  the  U.  S^.  The  100  full-time 
and  270  part-time  Jewish  Chap- 
lains involved  in  the  High  Holy 
Dav  effort  were  recruited  and  en- 


dorsed by  JWB's  Commission  on 
Jewish  Chaplaincy,  composed  of 
representatives  of  the  three  major 
rabbinical  bodies  in  the  U.  S. 
Cooperating  with  the  chaplains 
in  the  global  project  are  also  the 
25  USO-JWB  field  representatives 
and  the  10,000  volunteers  on  local 
JWB  Armed  Services  Committees. 

Religious  supplies  and  kosher 
foods  used  at  religious  services 
overseas  (In  addition  to  those 
shipped  to  installations  in  this 
country)  were  sent  out  in  June 
and  carried  on  military  transports 
or  flown  by  the  Air  Force  to  the 
remotest  posts.  JWB  Rosh  Hash- 
anah arrangements  include  ship- 
ment of  thousands  of  prayer 
books,  calendars,  holiday  leaflets, 
and  greeting  cards,  hundreds  of 
recording  discs,  candlesticks,  sho- 
fars,  wine,  gel  i  he  lish.  kosher 
meats  and  other  food  items.  Thou- 
sands of  holiday  gifts  have  been 
shipped  abroad  by  Serve-A-Com- 
mittees  of  JWB's  Women's  organi- 
zations' Division  for  distribution 
by  Jewish  chaplains.  JWB  ship- 
ments wiTl  make  possible  services 
on  ships  at  sea  during  the  Holy 
Days. 

Please  Patronize  Our  Advertisers 


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COMPANY 

Established  1859 
816  Main  Street 
LYNCHBURG,  VA. 


•  Office  Outfitters 
•  Stationers 
•  Printers 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


The  School  That  Lived  In  Boxes 

By  Irene  Myerson 


This  is  a  story  of  a  Jewish  day 
school  which  began  life  living  out 
of  a  collection  of  boxes  and  which 
graduated  some  eight  years  into 
a  handsome  fully-equipped  build- 
ing near  Asbury  Park,  New 
Jersey. 

The  beginning  was  a  meeting 
in  Deal,  N.  J.,  in  April  1951  of  a 
small  group  of  individuals,  rabbis 
and  community  leaders  of  the 
area  organized  by  Rabbi  Morris 
Schmidman  of  Congregation  Sons 
of  Israel  of  Asbury  Park.  Attend- 
ing was  representative  of  Torah 
Umesorah,  the  national  socjiety 
for  Jewish  day  schools.  The  par- 
ticipants organized  the  Hillel 
Academy  of  the  Shore  area.  One 
month  later,  seven  children  were 
prepared  for  the  first  grade  for 
the  coming  September.  All  that 
was  lacking  was  classrooms,  facil- 
ities and  money. 

The  first  home  of  the  Orthodox 
school  was  the  Jewish  Community 
Center,  a  former  hospital.  As  the 
story  was  told  by  Principal  Jacob 
Mermelstein  in  The  Jewish  Pai- 
ent,  everybody  joined  in  convert- 
ing closets  into  offices,  a  coal 
shed  into  a  library  and  in  pro- 
viding exits  and  partitions. 

This  was  an  annual  job  be- 
cause each  year  meant  another 
grade  requiring  at  least  another 
room.  The  dark  and  rundown 
building  was  transformed  by  lov- 
ing labor.  Women  who  had  their 
cleaning  done  at  home  by  maids 
helped  to  scrub  floors  and  wash 
windows.  Furniture  was  provided 
on  a  similarly  informal  basis.  As 
Rabbi  Mermelstein  put  it,  "no 
child  could  mistake  another's 
desk  for  his  own;  there  were  hard- 
ly two  alike." 


BRENNAN 

3jutteral  Pome 


Directors  and  Embalmers 

EXport  7-3851 

711  Washington  St. 
PORTSMOUTH,  VA. 


Educational  services  were  do- 
nated, cajoled,  solicited.  These 
included  the  services  of  pedia- 
tricians, dentists,  optometrists, 
psychologists  and  much  more  — 
"all  were  given  freely  for  our 
children." 

Then  came  the  first  blow:  the 
local  housing  authority  needed 
the  land  and  the  building  was 
sold  in  1957.  Two  weeks  before 
school  opening  the  school,  despite 
frantic  searching,  was  still  with- 
out a  home.  The  haphazard  col- 
lection of  furniture  was  still 
stored  in  the  corrugated  card- 
board boxes  which  had  previous- 
ly served  as  furniture  and  storage 
containers   in   the  classrooms. 

Congregation  Sons  of  Israel  in 
Asbury   Park   offered    their  com- 


B'nai  B'rith  president  Label  A. 
Katz  presented  a  plaque  to  Mrs. 
M.  B.  Leschen  symbolizing  the  estab- 
lishment of  the  Maurice  B.  Leschen 
Youth  Fellowship  which  will  en- 
hance the  activities  of  B'nai  B'rith 
youth  work.  The  fellowship  was 
established  in  memory  of  the  late 
Mr.  Leschen,  long:  a  leader  in  civic 
and  Jewish  affairs  in  the  New  York 
area. 


Established  1896 

OGG 
STONE  WORKS 

Memorials 
MARBLE 
GRANITE 
BRONZE 

Over  200  Memorials 
on  Display 

818  Glasgow  Street 
PORTSMOUTH,  VA. 
Dial  EX  9-4651 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a  Happy  and 
Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Portsmouth,  Va. 


HOTEL  GOVERNOR  DINWIDDIE 

NEWEST  HOTEL  IN  THE  NORFOLK-PORTSMOUTH  AREA 
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FAMILY  PLAN  RATES       :-:       A  GRENOBLE  HOTEL 

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Telephone  EXport  3-2511  PORTSMOUTH,  VA. 


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"The  Progressive  Bank" 
Member  Federal  Deposit  Insurance  Corporation 

Main  Office  West  End  Branch 

225  High  Street  3201  High  St.,  Corner  Vermont  Ave. 

PORTSMOUTH,  VA. 


.  .  .  Let's  Go  To  .  .  . 

RODMAN'S 
BARBECUE 


High  St.  at  Hamilton  Ave. 
PORTSMOUTH,  VA 


•  Finest 

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•  in  the 

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AYERS 
&  SON 
SEAFOOD 

Foot  of  Elm  Avenue 
PORTSMOUTH,  VA. 


CAFFEE'S  BAKERY 

Portsmouth's  Leading  Bakery  and  Pastry  Shop 
COMPLETE  LINE  OF  FANCY  BAKED  GOODS 


PORTSMOUTH,  VA. 


425  Coun'iy  St. 


Portsmouth,  EX  7-0753 


CITY  STEAM  LAUNDRY 

and  DRY  CLEANING 

Special  24-Hour  Service  On  Men's  Shirts — Cash  and  Carry 

614  Middle  Street  Portsmouth,  Va. 

PT"V    7  17^1       1-Day  Cleaning  Service — Cash  and  Carry 

'  "  1       I    3  Days  Cleaning  Service — Call  For  and  Deliver 


72 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Norfolk,  Va. 


NEW  YEAR 
GREETINGS 


trom 


VIRGINIA  PILOT 
ASSOCIATION 

NORFOLK,  VIRGINIA 

G  ALVfN  MASSENBURG 


President 


Greetings 


Noon  Engineering  Co. 


INCORPORATED 


General  Marine  and  Industrial  Plant  Repairs 


545  Front  Street 


Norfolk,  Virginia 


The 


Inc. 


113  Brooke  Avenue   ::  Norfolk,  Virginia 

COMMERCIAL  STATIONERS  OFFICE  FURNITURE 
FILING  EQUIPMENT  VISIBLE  RECORDS 

"Serving  Tidewater  Virginia  and  North  Carolina  Since  1901 


munity  house.  Into  its  six  tiny 
rooms  would  have  to  go  eight 
grades  and  100  children.  There- 
was  no  alternative,  so  the  school 
moved  into  the  community  house, 
formerly  a  private  home.  Halls 
and  pantries  were  converted  into 
offices,  kitchens  into  storerooms, 
the  second  sanctuary  became  a 
kindergarten,  the  vestry  became  a 
lunchroom  and  the  sunporch  a 
classroom. 

Volunteer  labor  was  again  the 
mainstay  of  the  hasty  conversion. 
Yet  despite  the  difficulties  and 
the  inadequate  facilities,  "we  did 
not  lose  a  single  child,"  says 
Rabbi  Mermelstein.  "Even  those 
who  were  ideologically  opposed 
to  the  day  school  —  they  came, 
they  saw,  they  helped.  .  .  ." 

"And  always  the  boxes.  The 
rooms  could  hardly  hold  the  chil- 
dren." But  the  boxes  were  furni- 
ture as  well  as  storage  facilities. 
Life  at  the  Hillel  School  settled 
down  to  its  own  weird  kind  of 
normalcy.  Then  came  the  new 
blow.  In  the  nation-wide  furore 
which  followed  the  disasterous 
Chicago  school  fire,  inspection  of 
schools  were  ordered  everywhere. 
In  Asbury  Park,  the  Community 
House  was  condemned  and  barred 
lor   school  use. 

Another  urgent  hunt  followed 
and  consideration  turned  to  an 
offer  by  the  city  of  its  solarium 
buildings  on  the  boardwalk,  next 
to  the  ocean.  Built  on  a  terrace, 
the  two  buildings  consisted  of  a 
roof  and  four  walls  of  glass  each. 
There  was  no  water,  no  toilet 
facilities  and  a  separation  of  100 
yards  between  the  two  structures. 

So  they  moved  in  with  the 
boxes.  Partitions  were  hastily 
erected  to  provide  classroom 
space.  Passers-by  started  in  amaze- 
ment at  the  school  activities  in 
the  glass  houses.  In  the  winter, 
howling  winds  buffeted  pupils 
and  teachers  as  they  went  to  the 
North  Solarium  for  lunch  and 
back  to  the  South  Solarium  for 
classes. 

The  heat,  donated  by  the  city, 
unfortunately  did  not  come  up 
before  11  a.m.  from  8:30  in  the 


morning  until  11,  children,  teach- 
ers and  staff  sat  in  coats  and 
shivered.  When  the  heat  did 
come,  it  poured  in.  Long-unused 
valves  could  not  be  manipulated 
to  control  the  heat. 

When  the  weather  became 
warm,  it  brought  relief  from  such 
temperature  problems  but  it  also 
brought  a  merry-go-round  of  con- 
ventions, and  picnics.  Reported 
Rabbi  Mermelstein:  "they  all 
came,  looked  in,  took  pictures 
of  us." 

Eventually  there  developed  a 
firm  determination  to  provide  a 
permanent  home  for  the  school. 
Congregation  Sons  of  Israel  prom- 
ised 135,000  if  supporters  and  of- 
ficials of  the  school,  led  by  Presi- 
dent Zimel  Resnick  and  Treasurer 
Jacob  Kasfiner,  could  raise  an  ad- 
ditional 140,000. 

The  effort  was  started.  "Money 
came  in,  support  was  found. 
Where  we  expected  $400  they 
gave  us  $4,000.  Men  who  were 
alien  to  the  'parochial  school' 
came  in,  helped,  gave  and  made 
others  give.  Eventually  .$150,000 
was  pledged.  Plans  were  cut  to 
fit  the  funds:  Five  classrooms, 
maybe   six.   No  auditorium." 

Normal  bids  of  $200,000  and 
$220,000  came  in  for  the  job. 
Fantastically  enough,  an  accept- 
able bid  was  received  of  $150,000. 

The  troubles  were  not  over.  A 
suitable  site  was  found  but  a 
zoning  battle  developed.  Then, 
as  the  various  details  of  actual 
construction  unfolded  —  hamper- 
ed by  a  building  strike  —  it  be- 
came clear  that  the  new  building 
would  not  be  ready  lor  the  fall 
school  term  opening.  Once  again 
a  frantic  search.  This  time  Tem- 
ple Beth  El  offered  use  of  its 
school  building  on  condition  the 
rooms  were  cleared  after  each 
session  for  the  Temple's  after- 
noon classes. 

So  again,  Rabbi  Mermelstein  re- 
ported, it  was  "back  to  boxes." 
There  was  no  playground,  not 
enough  school  hours,  an  "entire 
block   to  walk  to  a  lunchroom." 

In  December,  the  Hillel  School 
moved  at  long  last  into  its  own 
home.  "We  burned  the  boxes  out- 
side our  new  building.  The  flames 
lit  up  the  building.  It  was  a  beau- 


ROYAL  SILVER  MFG.  CO.,  INC. 

REFLATING  SILVER,  GOLD,  NICKEL  and  CHROME 
QUALITY  PLATING  FJNCE  1907 

NEW  LOCATION 

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Fairmont  Park        NORFOLK,  VA.       Phone  LO  3-0262 


September,  1960 


Vhe  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


75 


tiful  sight.  Solid  brick,  enough 
classrooms,  a  kindergarten,  a  Bais 
Hamidrash,  a  library,  an  audi- 
torium, kitchen,  shower,  locker 
rooms  and  offices." 

Nothing  left  to  worry  about 
but  the  annual  budget  and  it  is 
a  safe  prediction  that  the  courage 
and    dedication    which  survived 


and  triumphed  over  such  incred- 
ible odds  would  be  adequate  to 
deal  with  such  a  comparatively 
normal  problem. 

Another  prediction  might  be- 
that  while  such  qualities  are  be- 
ing made  manifest  in  the  life  of 
American  Jewry,  that  Jewry  still 
has  a  bright  future. 


Thanks  from  the  Jacobys 


Arnold  and  Tessie  Jacoby,  were 
unable  to  attend  the  Bar  Mitzvah 
Institute  at  Wildacres  this  year, 
because  of  illness. 

The  many  friends  which  the 
line  old  couple  have  made  at 
Wildacres  over  the  years  sent  them 


a  volume  of  Dr.  Wallace  Hoff- 
man's   "Verses   and  Things." 


The  Jacobys  have  asked  the 
Times-Outlook  to  acknowledge 
the  gift  with  their  appreciation, 
as  per  the  following  letter: 

8  Parksdale  Court, 
Brooklyn  26 
August  19,  i960 


Dear  Brother  Brown: 


Mrs.  Jacob  (Tessie  to  you)  and  I  (Arnold  to  you)  are  grateful  to 
you  for  greetings  you  sent  us  via  the  book  "Verses  and  Things".  I  find 
it  very  difficult  owing  to  Tessie's  illness  (bedridden  since  January  i960) 
and  my  asthma  and  emphysema  to  write  my  thanks  to  all  our  friends. 

May  I  ask  you  to  publish  in  your  publication  our  heartfelt  thanks 
to  the  signatories  of  the  "Round  Robin"  appearing  on  two  flyleaves  of 
said  booklet,  published  by  Dr.  S.  Wallace  Hoffman,  of  Statesville,  N.  C. 
in  i960. 

Thank  you 

Tessie  and  Arnold  Jacoby 


To  Arnold  and  Tessie  Jacob 
with  love  from  Wildacres  Insti- 
tute— 1960: 

S.  Wallace  Hoffman,  Marcella 
and  Rob  Liverman,  Ellen  and 
Larry  Glassman,  Fanny  and  Sey- 
mour Roth,  Hy  and  Ruth  Dia- 
mond, Sol  and  Stella  Levin,  Sol 
and  Evelyn  Neidich,  Gerald  H. 
Elkan,  Jac  and  Dora  Biller,  Ger- 
trude Weil,  Chester  A.  Brown, 
Irene  Gurney,  Lillian  Swartz,  Phil 
Datnoff,  Marge  and  Sid  Maerov, 
Simon  Meyer,  Meyer  and  Sara 
Mackler,  Judith  Blumenthal,  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Sam  Blumenthal,  J.  S. 
and  Celia  Mann,  Ellis  Berlin, 
Harry  Berlin,  I.  D.  Blumenthal, 
M  a  d  o  1  y  n  Blumenthal,  Flora 
Hanchrow,  Joe  Hanchrow,  Rosa 
and  Maury  Weinstein  and  Rabbi 
and  Mrs.  E.  A.  Seir. 


The  appointment  of  Michael  M. 
Nisselson  as  consultant  to  the  Board 
of  Directors  of  the  American 
Friends  of  the  Hebrew  University 
has  been  announced  by  Philip  M. 
Klutznick,  president  of  the  organi- 
zation. 


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74 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
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Freedom,  Progress  and  Heroic  Genius 

(Concluded  From  Page  21) 

the  peril  which  frightens  back  all  horizons,  and  occasioned  changes 

others."  for  the  welfare  of  mankind. 

While    heroism    is    vital    and  "It  is  easy  in  the  world,"  says 

necessary  for  progress,  it  alone,  R.  W.  Emerson,  "to  live  after  the 

without  direction  can  be  a  force  world's  opinion;  it  is  easy  in  soli- 

for  destruction.  It  is  the  genius  tude  to  live  after  your  own,  but 

who    envisions    new    ways,    who  the  great  man  is  he  who  in  the 

comes  forth  with  new  values  and  midst  of  the  crowd  keeps  with  per- 

upon  whom  the  hero  depends  for  feet  sweetness  the  independence  of 

guidance.  The  hero  plus  the  geni-  solitude."  The  great  man  engen- 

us  or  the  heroic  genius  is  the  man  ders  hope,  strengthens  men's  faith 

of  progress.  in  man  and  God.  The  heroic  geni- 

Now,  let  us  consider  the  lives  us  &tirs  UP  the  bcst  in  man"  He 

of  a  few  men  who  may  be  classed  causes  progress.  He  promotes  free 

as  heroic  geniuses.  Moses  may  be  uom- 

regarded  as  one  of  them.  He  was  As  ****  are  specially  gifted, 

brought  up  as  a  prince  and  be-  dann&'   and   creatlve  individuals 

longed  to  the  class  of  the  privileg-  so  also<  there  are  nations  of  the 

ed.  Having  been  dissatisfied  with  hero  and  &enlus  llke  ^  At  a 

the  practice  of  slavery  in  his  land,  time  when  autocracY  was  consider- 

he  gave  up  a  life  of  luxury,  a  ed   the  onIy  form  of  rule'  and 

promising  future,  and  dedicated  when  the  word  of  kinSs  was  con" 

himself  to  the  ideal  of  freedom.  sldered  as  thc  word  of  God-  Ameri" 

Moses  succeeded  through  his  hero-  ca  showed  a  form  of  mle  which 

ism  and  genius  to  do  away  with  was  not  only  dlffc,ent,  but  offered 

slavery  in  his  country  and  made  it  more  haPPiness  to  the  ^led.  At  a 

clear  that  all  men,  everywhere  are  dme  when  European  philosophers 

entitled   to   the  innate  right  of  were  dlscussl«g  th«  ideals  of  hber- 

freedom.  Another  example  of  hero  equaIltY  and  fraternity,  and 

ic  geniuses  are  the  eighth  century  whcn   such   ldeals   aPPeared  far 

prophets  who  vehemently  castigat-  fetched  to  the  ave,a&e  European 

ed  king  and  subject,  rich  and  poor  mmd'  in  America  these  ideals  were 

alike  for  their  misconduct.  The  already  Part  of  the  supreme  law 

prophets    fearlessly    sought    and  of  ^  lamL  Builders  °f  America 

fought  to  improve  man's  spiritual  aeated  a  waV  of  life  far 

outlook  on  God  and  His  will.  and  a  ^eat  dcal  better  than  what 

was  known  in  the  Old  World. 

What  of  Ghandi  in  our  own  age?  Today  as  fa  the  past  the  Ameri. 

Was  he  not  of  the  heroic  genius  can   spirh    American  democracy, 

type?  He  could  have  chosen  the  and  American  freedonlj  are  in  the 

conventional   life   and   could   no  kad    However>   because   of  the 

doubt  have  met  with  great  success.  presem  confusion  and  unrest  in 

He  chose  rather  to  improve  the  ±e  world>  there  are  SQme  who  fed 

lot  of  his  countrymen.  His  life  be-  ^  ^  pristine  gJory  q£  ^  na. 

came  a  symbol  of  the  highest  and  ^  h  waning>  and  that  we  nQ 

noblest  principles  in  his  own  coun-  ,       r  pQSsess  the  ingenuity  and 

try  and  the  world  at  large.  Albert  heroism  of  the  past  Such  thinking> 

Schweitzer  is  another  who  we  may  of  course  is  detrimental. 

add  to  our  list  of  the  heroic  genius  At  ^  juncturC(  it  were  welI 

type.  Schweitzer  had  the  alterna-  for  eyery  dtizen    tQ  take  a  hint 

tive  of  choosing  the  way  of  the  from  ±f,  Jewish  sages  of  old>  and 

multitude,  or,  find  happiness  by  reyiew  the  early  chapters  of  j^^. 

making  life  easier  for  others.  He  can  histQry  For  in  SQ  doing  Qne 

chose  the  latter.  He  devoted  him-  wiu  discover  ^  the  secret  for 

self  to  the  reshaping  of  the  lives  the  progress  and         A  of  this 

of  thousands  in  the  wilds  of  Africa.  nation  h               in  the  apprecia- 

The  man  of  vigor  and  special  tjon  and  pursuit  of  freedom.  By 

mental  qualities  cannot  be  happy  keeping  alive  by  becoming  free- 

until  he  speaks  out  against  the  dom  conscious,  as  the  early  leaders 

ill  practices  around  him  and  at-  and  settlers  of  this  nation  were,  a 

tempts  to  correct  those  wrongs,  restoration  of  faith  in  American 

Here,  then,  we  have  a  few  ex-  democracy,  American  heroes  and 

amples  of  individuals  who  by  their  genius,  will  follow. 

manner,  sincerity,  insight,  and  de-   

termination,    emerged    from  the 

straight  jacket  in  which  they  were  7/  y°u  enJ°y  reading  the 

placed  at  birth  and  opened  new  TIMES-OUTLOOK 

avenues  of  thought,  created  new  ask  a  friend  to  subscribe 


September,  i960  T.'.e  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


The  American  Jew 

A  Partial  Profile 

By  Joshua  Able 


The  Bible  commentary,  "As  ye 
sow,  so  shall  ye  reap,"  seems  to  ap- 
ply with  particular  accuracy  to 
the  amount  of  unbiased  and  pro- 
fessional investigation  devoted  by 
American  Jews  to  themselves  in 
all  their  various  aspects.  The  sow- 
ing is  usually  scanty  and  the  reap- 
ing likewise. 

It  was  a  thin  crop  again  during 
the  Jewis  Year  of  5720  -  a  total  of 
four  publicized  reports,  two  of 
them  dealing  with  the  American 
Jewish  family,  one  with  the  prob- 
lem of  intermarriage  and  one  with 
historical  changes  in  the  birth- 
places of  American  Jews. 

The  most  striking  finding  to 
emerge  in  the  reports  was  that 
American  Jews  sho-  "disturbingly 
low  fertility  even  in  the  period  of 
the  baby  boom  and  regardless  of 
occupational  differences."  This 
was  reported  by  Dr.  Joshua  A. 
Fishman,  director  of  research  at 
the  University  of  Pennsylvania 
Albert  M.  Greenfield  Center  for 
Human  Relations. 

Addressing  the  National  Con- 
ference of  Jewish  Communal  Ser- 
vices, Dr.  Fishman  reported  on  a 
'959  survey  of  American  Jews. 
The  fertility  rate  among  them,  he 
said,  was  less  than  80  per  cent 
of  the  national  average. 

Dr.  Fishman  also  found  that 
American  Jews  continued  to  clump 
themselves  into  areas  of  high  ur- 
ban concentration  and  that  in- 
termarriage was  relatively  low,  7,2 
per  cent.  If  American  Tews  were 
not  reproducing  themselves  in 
adequate  numbers,  at  least  those 
who  were  being  added  to  the  com- 
munity via  the  cradle  were  mar- 
rying among  themselves  and  stav- 
ing in  the  community. 

The  sociologist  also  reported 
that  the  average  annual  income  of 
the  American  Tew  was  just  under 
$6,000  and  that  a  little  more  than 
one  out  of  everv  five  heads  of 
Tewish  households  was  a  college 
graduate.    Six   out   of   everv  ten 


were  high  school  graduates.  Three 
out  of  four  American  Jewish  wage- 
eairners  held  white  collar  jobs 
with  a  large  ratio  of  professionals. 

Many  of  Dr.  Fishman's  findings 
were  in  accord  with  those  in  an 
earlier  report  on  the  American 
Jewish  family  published  by  the 
Anti-Defamation  League  of  B'nai 
B'rith.  The  ADL  found  that  near- 
ly nine  out  of  ten  American  Jews 
over  the  age  of  14  lived  in  urban- 
ized areas  compared  with  50  per 
cent  lor  Catholics  and  about  25 
per  cent  lor  white  Protestants. 

The  ADL  also  reported  that  the 
American  Jewish  family  is  smal- 
ler than  Catholic  and  Protestant 
families  and  that  Jewish  parents 
on  the  average  are  somewhat  old- 
er. Total  marriage  rates  were 
found  to  be  higher  and  divorce 
rates  lower  for  American  Jews 
than  for  the  general  population. 
Juvenile  delinquency  rates  were 
found  lower  among  Jewish  adole- 
scents and  the  rate  of  alcoholism 
among  American  Jews  continued 
to  be  low. 

A  comparison  of  Dr.  Fisliman's 
findings  and  those  of  Rabbi 
Richard  L.  Rubinstein,  director  of 
the  B'nai  B'rith  Hillel  Foundation 
at   the   University  of  Pittsburgh. 


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76 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Charlottesville,  Va. 


1960-61 


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on  intermarriage  among  Ameri- 
can Jews,  indicated  a  difference 
of  data,  although  Rabbi  Rubin- 
stein dealt  only  with  the  problem 
among  college  students. 

The  rabbi,  spealdng  at  a  two- 
day  conference  on  the  subject  con- 
vened by  the  Theodor  Harzel  In- 
stitute in  New  York  City,  said 
that  intermarriage  seemed  to  be 
increasing  rapidly  among  Jewish 
college  students.  He  said  that  the 
single  biggest  reason  for  requests 
he  received  for  advice  from  stu- 
dents was  for  guidance  about  prob- 
lems involving  marriage  with  non- 
Jews.  He  reported  that  intermar- 
riage was  most  likely  to  occur  at 
the  graduate  and  professional 
school  level. 

The  impact  of  the  ending  of 
large-scale  Jewish  migration  to  the 
United  States  in  the  twenties  was 
highlighted  in  data  published  in 
the  American  Jewish  Year  Book. 


The  data  showed  that  the  propor 
tion  of  American-born  Jews  in  the 
total  American  Jewish  population 
rose  from  one  in  three  in  1900  to 
eight  in  ten  in  i960.  The  number 
of  American  Jews  grew  in  those 
six  decades  from  around  one  mil- 
lion to  the  present  estimated  five 
and  a  half  million.  , 

The  data  also  showed  that  if 
the  fertility  rate  has  dropped 
among  American  Jews  in  respect 
to  population,  it  definitely  has 
not  in  regard  to  organizational 
expansion.  In  the  six  decades  since 
1900,  the  number  of  national  Jew- 
ish groups  in  the  United  States 
jumped  from  20  to  200  —  a  2,000 
per  cent  increase.  Thus  has  been 
expressed  the  multiple  interests  of 
a  growingly  affluent  and  secure 
American  Jewry  in  culture,  edu- 
cation, religion,  community  rela- 
tions, overseas  aid,  social  welfare, 
fraternal  and  mutual  benefits, 
Zionism  and  Israel. 


Research  al  the  Weizmann  Institute 

By  Michael  Bar  Zohar 

The  scope  of  research  at  the  Weizmann  Institute  of  Science  in  Israel  has 
greatly  extended  in  recent  years.  In  this  article,  an  Israel  science  writer  re- 
views the  1958-59  Report  of  Rehovoth's  Research  Center. — THE  EDITOR. 


The  International  Conference 
on  Science  in  the  Advancement  of 
New  States,  now  in  session  at  the 
Weizmann  Institute  is  the  crown- 
ing feature  in  a  long  series  of 
scientific  activities  and  events 
which  have  been  taking  place  at 
the  world-famed  research  center 
during  the  past  two  year. 

Scientific  inquiry  has  developed 
in  new  fields  and  in  this  period 
has  encompassed  almost  200  pro- 
jects in  various  "branches  of  funda- 
mental research. 

A  significant  role  in  this  scien- 
tific effort  was  performed  by  the 
electronic  computer  at  the  Insti- 
tute, which  worked  on  a  24-hour 
daily  basis  throughout  the  year. 
At  the  same  time  as  the  computer 
completed  over  20,000  working 
hours  since  it  began  operating  in 
April  1958,  its  teams  have  been 
able  to  develop  new  mathematical 
and  technical  methods  which  have 
improved  the  efficiency  and  out- 
put of  the  "electronic  brain"  con- 
siderablv. 


As  a  result  of  such  improved 
systems,  the  members  of  the  In- 
stitute's Applied  Mathematics  De- 
partment and  other  units  have 
taken  a  foremost  place  in  the 
world  of  science  in  relation  to  a 
number  of  research  projects. 

Scientists  in  that  department, 
under  the  leadership  of  Prof. 
Chaim  Leib  Perkeris,  one  of  the 
world's  foremost  mathematicians, 
have  just  completed  a  three-year 
study  of  the  problem  of  ocean 
tides  which  has  baffled  mathema- 
ticians since  1775  —  a  year  before 
the  American  Revolutionary  War 
broke  out. 

The  investigation  was  started  in 
1957,  and  after  the  computer  be- 
gan working  in  April  19^8,  its 
programming  team  developed 
methods  of  harnessing  it  to  the 
task  of  handling  the  complex  com- 
putations required  for  the  ocean- 
tides  problem. 

Prof.  Pekeris  felt  that  with 
ocean  depths  nowadavs  reasonably 
well    fathomed,    except    for  the 


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Arctic  regions,  it  should  be  pos- 
sible to  predict  mathematically 
the  height  of  the  tide  along  the 
whole  coast. 

The  foundations  of  tidal  theory 
were  laid  over  150  years  ago  by 
the  French  mathematician,  the 
Marquis  Pierre  de  Laplace,  yet 
the  problem  was  so  abstruse  that 
no  one  had  succeeded  in  predict- 
ing the  height  of  the  tide  at  a 
single  port  on  the  basis  of  theory 
alone.  No  one,  that  is,  until  Prof. 
Pekeris  and  his  associates  began 
their  concerted  attack  on  the  prob- 
lem. In  the  latter  part  of  Inly 
1960,  Prof.  Pekeris  announced 
the  results  of  the  three-vear  project 
in  a  paper  which  he  read  at  the 
meeting  of  the  International 
Union  of  Geodesy  and  Geophysics 
held  in  Helsinki.  Finland. 

As  a  result  of  the  Rehovotli 
group's  investigations,  significant 
inferences  have  been  developed  on 
the   earth's   internal  constitution. 

Secrets  of  the  Atom 

The  secrets  oi  the  atom,  from 
a  different  aj:>proach,  were  studied 
in  other  departments  at  the  In- 
stitute during  the  two-year  period. 

The  Department  of  Nuclear 
Physics,  headed  by  Prof.  Amos  de 
Shalit,  carried  out  a  series  of 
theoretical  studies  in  nuclear 
structure.  As  a  result  of  this  re- 
search at  the  Weizmann  Institute, 
they  clarified  and  confirmed  cer- 
tain approaches  and  calculations 
undertaken  at  other  n  u  c  1  e  a  r 
physics  institutes  in  the  world. 

Several  men  in  the  department 
are  working  on  problems  concern- 
ed with  primary  cosmic  radiation 
and  the  nuclear  interactions  of 
various  elementary  particles  with 
atomic  nuclei. 

The  report  says:  "An  attempt  to 
measure  these  quantities  (cosmic 
tadiation  and  its  energy  spectrum) 
is  being  made  in  our  laboratory, 
by  studying  the  tracks  of  the  pri- 
mary cosmic  radiation  particles 
produced  in  nuclear  photographic 
emulsion  stacks  flown  bv  balloons 
to  the  top  of  the  atmosphere.  The 
analysis  is  being  done  by  use  of 
high-power  precision  nuclear  track 
microscopes." 

The  Isotopes  Department,  now 
in  more  spacious  premises  in  the 


Institute  of  Nuclear  Science,  where 
it  has  21  laboratories  for  its  work, 
has  continued  its  research  on  the 
preparation  and  separation  of 
various  isotopes,  the  determina- 
tion of  their  properties,  and  their 
practical  application,  as  well  as 
their  use  in  various  research  pro- 
grams. 

They  also  continued  work  on 
the  tracing  of  ground  water  with 
the  aid  of  radioisotopes  in  con- 
junction with  Tahal,  the  Israel 
Water  Planning  Authority.  A 
water  seepage  study  from  reser- 
voirs  was   also  undertaken. 

Plant  Gentics  Studies 
Another  study  of  practical  im- 
portance and  value  to  Israel  agri- 
culture was  undertaken  in  the 
Section  of  Plant  Genetics  under 
Dr.  Ezra  Galun.  Although  the 
scientists  of  this  section  devote 
considerable  time  and  attention  to 
pure  research,  they  also  helped  to 
develop  new  varieties  of  fruit  and 
vegetables,  which  will  bring  about 
larger  crops  of  higher  quality. 

Breeding  for  resistance  to  a 
number  of  plant  diseases  in  cu- 
cumbers, melons,  and  peanuts  was 
also  carried  on  bv  this  Section. 
After  several  years  of  breeding, 
the    first   commercial   hvbrid  cu- 


Dr.  Bernard  Bergman,  spiritual 
leader  of  the  Riverside  Jewish  Cen- 
ter and  a  member  of  the  Executive 
Board  of  the  llabbinical  Council  of 
America,  was  elected  president  of 
the  Religions  Zionists  of  America 
at  its  Golden  Jubilee  Convention  in 
Atlantic  City. 


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The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


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cumber  seeds  were  tested  for  yield 
and  quality,  and  proved  to  have 
signficant  advantages  over  stan- 
dard varieties  in  respect  to  both 
of  these  characteristics. 

Another  fruit  grown  in  Israel, 
the  avocado  pear,  was  the  subject 
of  research  in  the  Institute's  De- 
partment of  Experimental  Biol- 
ogy. The  discovery  that  mannohe- 
ptulose  —  a  sugar  found  in  avo- 
cado pears  —  induces  a  temporary 
diabetes-like  condition  when  in- 
jected into  animals,  was  made 
some  years  ago.  Evidence  has  now 
been  obtained  in  the  department 
by  Prof.  Ernst  Simon  that  this 
sugar  can  be  "phosphorylated"  by 
a  special  enzyme  system  in  a  man- 
ner similar  to  what  happens  with 
glucose  and  other  sugars.  This 
may  prove  to  "Be  an  important 
step  in  the  elucidation  of  its 
metabolism  in  the  body. 

Cancer  Causation  Research 

Fundamental  research  in  the 
problem  of  cancer-causation  and 
its  mechanism  has  been  going  on 
in  the  Department  of  Experiment- 
al Biology  for  the  past  ten  years 
under  the  direction  of  Prof.  Isaac 
Berenblum. 

Three  sections  in  the  depart- 
ment dealt  with  cancer  research— 
the  mechanism  of  tumor  induc- 
tion, tumor  viruses  and  genetics, 
and  radiobiology  and  immunologi- 
cal aspects  of  cancer:  and  three 
others  with  endocrine  and  repro- 
duction physiology  and  harmone 
research,  neuro-physiology  and 
pharmacology,  and  sugar  metabol- 


It  would  be  difficult  in  a  brief 
survey  to  include  the  numerous 
projects  being  done  in  the  Insti- 
tute's ten  departments  and  four 
sections  which  engage  in  applied 
mathefatics,  nuclear  physics,  nu- 
clear chemistry,  organic  chemistry, 
polymer  science,  biophysics,  ex- 
permental  biology,  and  electron- 
ics. Suffice  it  to  say  that  they  are 
contributions  to  the  fundamental 
knowledge  of  mankind. 

The  Weizmann  Institute's  scien- 
tists have  gone  beyond  the  sphere 
of  research  and  are  now  also 
teaching.  The  Graduate  School  in 
the  Natural  Sciences,  opened  in 
October  1958,  now  has  a  student 
body  of  nearly  80  holders  of  the 
Master  of  Science  degree,  who  are 
working  for  their  Ph.Ds.  These 
are  the  future  scientists  of  Israel. 

During  the  past  two  years  there 
have  been  several  Symposiums 
which  have  brought  eminent  scien- 
tists to  the  Weizmann  Institute 
from  all  parts  of  the  world.  They 
were  held  in  the  subjects  of  can- 
cer causation,  physics,  mathemat- 
ics, and  organic  chemistry. 

Eminent  scientists  from  various 
parts  of  the  world  are  gathered  at 
Rehovoth  to  discuss  how  science 
and  technology  can  be  harnessed 
to  the  development  of  the  emer- 
gent new  states  of  Africa  and  Asia. 
The  International  Conference,  of 
which  the  chairman  is  Mr.  Abba 
Eban,  Minister  of  Education  and 
Culture  in  the  Israel  Government 
and  President  of  the  Weizmann 
Institute,  will  demonstrate  how 
this  dynamic  country  is  contribut- 
ing in  a  measure  far  beyond  its 
size  to  human  progress. 


Israel's  Atomic  Reactor 

By  Philip  Gillon 


Israel's  Nuclear  Reactor  was 
activated  ('""because  critical")  to- 
wards the  end  of  June,  i960.  The 
activation  was  achieved  without 
any  untoward  incident  and  the 
Reactor  is  expected  to  reach  an 
output  of  1,000  kilowatts  by  the 
end  of  this  year. 

The  Reactor  is  designed  for  ex- 
periments involving  radio-activity 
and  will  be  used  by  the  scientists 
of  the  Atomic  Energy  Commission, 
the  Weizmann  Institute,  the  He- 
brew University  and  the  Haifa 
Technion.  It  will  be  used  for  re- 
search only  and  not  for  the  supply 
of  power.  The  fuel  elements,  con- 
sisting of  "enriched  Uranium"  or 
Uranium  235,  were  supplied  by 
the  United  States  as  part  of  Presi- 


dent Eisenhower's  program  to 
acquaint  newly  liberated  lands 
wdth  the  principles  of  nuclear 
energy. 

The  bieak-up  of  the  fuel  ele- 
ments through  fission  react  i  .n 
produces  both  heat  and  radiation: 
a  power  station  powered  by  atomic 
energy  uses  the  heat  generated 
just  as  a  normal  power  station 
uses  the  heat  produced  by  burning 


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September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


79 


Israel's  Reactor  situated  west  of 
mann  Institute. 

coal  or  petroleum.  A  research 
reactor  is  "open"  and  uses  only 
the  radiation.  Nevertheless  gigan- 
tic shields  are  essential  to  prevent 
the  slightest  danger  of  radio-active 
leakage. 

The  site  of  the  reactor  was 
chosen  so  that  there  could  be  no 
possible  danger  to  man,  water  or 
cultivated  soil.  It  stands  close  to 
the  sea,  on  a  lonely  stretch  of 
dunes  West  of  the  village  of 
Yavneh,  where  Joachnum  ben 
Zakaai  founded  his  famous  Aca- 
demy of  Learning  nearly  two  thou- 
sand years  ago.  It  is  perhaps  fit- 
ting that  this  mighty  tool  of 
science  should  be  at  the  same  site. 

From  the  point  of  view  of  isola- 
tion the  setting  is  certainly  ideal; 
Robinson  Crusoe  himself  did  not 
enjoy  such  solitude.  On  .ill  sides 
stietch  the  lonely  and  desolate 
dunes.  The  Reactor  was  placed 
near  the  sea  because  the  flow  of 
underground  water  in  Israel  for 
a  distance  of  5  kilometers  from  the 
.'hore  is  towards  the  sea,  while 
further  East  it  How-,  inland,  if 
the  underground  water  should  be- 
come radioactive  the  infected 
water  will  flow  harmlessly  into 
the  ocean. 

A  gaunt  grey,  concrete  structure 
dominates  one  of  the  dunes,  its 
sides  a  series  of  fluted  panels  and 
its  crown  a  great  dome.  The  en- 
trance of  this  formidable  temple 
of  scientific  worship  is  through 
two  great  doors  in  the  concrete 
wall  that  remind  one  somehow  of 
the  entry  into  a  prison. 

But  once  inside  the  building, 
one  finds,  somewhat  surprisingly, 
light  and  charm  in  the  laborato- 
ries that  lie  between  the  entrance 
and  the  Reactor  itself.  There  is 
a  wall  of  glass  and  a  gracious 
courtyard,  with  aesthetically 
shaped  columns  rising  from  nar- 
row bases.  In  the  floor  of  each 


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the  village  of  Yavneh,  in  the  Weia- 

laboratory  are  several  sealed  vent- 
holes  to  a  tunnel  which  runs  un- 
derneath them;  through  these 
holes  the  laboratories  will  receive 
electricity,  gas  and  whatever  utili- 
ties they  may  recquire. 

A  door  from  the  laboratories 
area  leads  to  a  vast  room  housing 
the  "swimming  pool"  containing 
the  Reactor.  Twenty-one  meters 
above  is  the  ceiling  of  the  dome: 
high  up  near  the  top  is  a  great 
beam  designed  to  support  a  twelve- 
ton  crane. 

The  "swimming  pool"  is  a  con- 
crete tube  which  contains  a  col- 
umn of  water  seven  meters  in 
height.  The  Reactor  itself,  the 
holy  of  holies,  is  only  60  cms.  high 
and  is  at  the  bottom  of  the  pool. 
Radio-activity  is  gradually  absorb- 
ed as  it  passes  upward  through  the 
water:  at  the  top  of  the  column 
there  is  no  radiation  at  all  and 
men  can  work  there  in  safety.  The 
concrete  walls  are  1.80  meters 
thick  and  are  made  of  a  special 
heavy  concrete  containing  barium 
sulphate  stone  imported  from  It- 
aly: the  resulting  mixture  is  one 
and  one  half  times  as  heavy  as 
ordinary  concrete  and  has  never 
before  been  used  in  Israel.  The 
giant  slab  of  cement  was  cast  non- 
stop for  loo  hours  under  vibra- 
tion. 

Inside  the  concrete  wall,  near 
the  base,  are  two  eight  inch  holes 
and  four  six  inch  holes  through 
which  the  scientists  can  draw  off 
supplies  of  radio-activity  for  their 
experiments.  The  fuel  itself 
weighs  only  about  two  kilograms 
but  a  time  comes  when  it  has  to 
be  renewed;  it  remains  radio-ac 
tive  for  six  months  after  burn-up. 
To  remove  those  two  kilograms 
from  the  pool  the  crane  lowers 
an  eight-ton  shield  of  lead  through 
the  water  andTthe  fuel  is  extracted 
under  this  guard  to  be  sent  to  the 
United  States  for  renewal. 

Professor  Israel  Dostrovsky, 
head  of  the  Weizmann  Institute's 
Department  of  Isotope  Research, 
on  loan  to  the  Israel  Government, 
was  recently  appointed  Director 
of  the  Scientific  Development  Pro- 


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8o 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
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jects  Division  of  Israel's  Ministry 
of  Defense.  He  is  also  Director 
of  Research  of  Israel's  Atomic 
Energy  Commission.  Dr.  Dostrov- 
sky  will  determine  the  work  to  be 
done  at  the  Reactor.  Another 
Weizmann  Institute  scientist,  Dr. 
Israel  Pelah,  will  serve  as  the 
Scientific  Director  of  the  Reactor. 
According  to  Dr.  Pelah,  the  React- 
or will  work  24  hours  a  day  and 
will  be  "cleaned"  every  ten  days. 

Israel  will  use  the  reactor  in 
several  ways.  One  of  the  primary 
purposes  is  to  train  a  generation 
of  scientists  completely  familiar 
with  reactors.  Research  will  be 
both  pure  and  applied.  Among  ap- 
plied research  projects  that  will 
be  facilitated  are  tests  of  materials, 
welds  and  castings.  Israel  is  also 
interested  in  the  production  of  iso- 
topes for  medical  purposes.  Every 
isotope  has  a  certain  life  expecta- 
tation;  its  "half-life"  is  the  point 
at  which  half  its  radio-activity  dis- 
appears. The  isotope  of  cobalt 
used  in  the  treatment  of  cancer, 
has  a  "halfTife"  of  five  years 
and  obviously  Israel  cannot  pro- 
duce cobalt  in  competition  with 
America.  But-  there  are  other 
isotopes  which  have  a  "Iialf-life" 
of  a  few  days  which  can  be  ad- 
vantageously produced  in  this 
small  country:  some  of  these  are 
of  considerable  medical  import- 
ance as  they  can  be  left  in  the 
body. 

Another  m  a  j  o  1  investigation 
will  be  into  the  effects  of  radiation 
on  plastics  and  the  production  of 
new  plastics.  Radiation  changes 
the  gene  structure  and  new  desir- 
able qualities  can  be  introduced 
into  plants.  The  Americans,  for 
instance,  have  produced  corn  con- 
taining sugar  instead  of  starch. 
Plants  can  be  made  disease-resist- 
ant and  sprouting  of  potatoes  or 
decomposition  ol  meat  delayed. 
Pests  may  be  eradicated.  In  Cen- 
tral America  a  certain  insect  was 
wiped  out  by  radiation  because 
the  females  mated  only  once  and 
the  males  (the  weaker  sex)  became 


sterile  after  being  subjected  to  a 
small  amount  of  radiation.  Food- 
stuffs can  be  preserved. 

Among  pure  research  projects 
will  be  the  investigation  of  the 
structure  of  the  atom  and  of 
crystals  and  the  location  of  single 
atoms  and  molecules. 

"Science  is  largely  playing 
around,"  says  Dr.  Bergman,  Chief 
of  the  Atomic  Energy  Commission 
of  Israel,  "And  Israel's  scientists 
are  thrilled  to  have  a  chance  to 
play." 

The  Reactor  was   designed  by 
American   architect   Philip  John- 
son.   A   young    Israeli,  Gideon 
jZiv,  was  sent  to  work  with  him. 
|The  reactor  parts  were  supplied 
jjby  the  American  Machinery  and 
Foundry  which  has  built  several 
research  reactors  in  various  parts 
of  the  world.  Part  of  the  electron- 
ics equipment  was  made  in  Israel. 
The  total  cost,  including  the  road 
and    other   development,    is  just 
over    83,000,000    towards  which 
sum  the  United  States  contributed 
8350,000    under    the  Eisenhower 
program. 

Israel  is  a  small  country  with 
limited  natural  resources.  When 
the  W  e  i  zm  a  n  n  Institute  was 
founded,  the  late  Dr.  Chaim 
Weizmann  stressed  the  role  that 
science  can  take  in  making  sub- 
stitutes or  synthetics  in  place  of 
raw  materials.  The  completion  of 
the  Reactor  marks  a  giant  stride 
in  the  effort  of  Israel's  voting 
scientists  to  use  the  genius  of  Man 
to  overcome  a  hostile  environ- 
ment. With  Israel  in  such  close 
contact  with  newly-liberated  coun- 
tries in  Africa  and  Asia,  the 
"Atoms  for  Peace  Program"  can 
be  expected  to  help  these  other 
emergent  nations. 


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September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


81 


Miracle  In  Manila 

By  George  Perry 


As  worshippers  enter  Temple 
Emil,  on  Taft  Avenue  in  Manila, 
for  Rosh  Rosh  Hashanah  services, 
they  will  also  be  observing  the 
Bar  Mitzvah  year  of  the  "miracle 
of  Manila."  This  is  how  the  Jews 
of  the  Republic  of  the  Philip- 
pines regarded  the  restoration  of 
the  only  synagogue  destroyed  in 
battle  on  American  territory  dur- 
ing World  War  II.  For  Temple 
Emil  —  the  only  synagogue  in  the 
Philippines  as  well  as  in  the  whole 
Western  Pacific  —  was  rebuilt 
through  the  efforts  of  thousands 
of  Jewish  GIs  who  had  helped 
liberate  the  Pilippines  from  the 
Japanese. 

In  the  lobby  of  this  synagogue 
is  a  modest  plaque  dedicated  "to 
all  men  and  women  of  the  Jewish 
faith  of  the  Armed  Forces  of  the 
United  States  and  Allied  Nations 
who  laid  down  their  lives  in  the 
defense  and  liberation  of  the 
Philippines  —  1941-1945—  and  in 
tribute  to  the  American  Jewish 
service  personnel  stationed  in  the 
Philippines  who  initiated  the 
drive  to  assist  the  local  community 
in  the  expenses  of  reconstruction." 

These  simple  words  axe  the 
final  chapter  of  a  story  that  be- 
gan in  1942  when  the  Japanese 
drove  the  last  American  for 
out  of  the  Philippines.  There  were 
then  about  1,800  Jews  in  the  Phil- 
ippines. More  than  1,300  were  ref- 
ugees from  Germany.  The  others 
were  American,  British,  French 
and  some  from  Syria,  Turkey  and 
China.  The  leaders  of  the  Jewish 
community  were  Rabbi  Joseph 
Schwartz,  a  refugee  who  had  been 
a  chaplain  in  the  Austrian  Army 
in  World  War  I,  and  Morton 
Netzorg,  director  ol  the  National 
Jewish  Welfare  Board's  Army  and 
Navy  Department  for  the  Philip- 
pines. 

The  Japanese  conquerors  im- 
mediately interned  all  Jews  who 
were  nationals  of  countries  at  war 
with  Japan.  The  German- Jewish 
refugees,  who  had  arrived  in  the 
mid-i 930's  had  German  passports 
stamped  "Jude',  in  red  ink.  At 
first  the  Japanese  regarded  them 


as  Germans  and  treated  them  as 
semi-allies.  Thus  the  refugees 
who  had  earlier  been  welcomed 
by  the  other  Jews  were  able  to 
aid  their  co-reliarionists  with  food 

o 

and  medicine.  Gradually,  the  Jap- 
anese changed  their  attitude  and 
treated   all  Jews   as  enemies. 

Rabbi  Schwartz  was  one  of  the 
few  who  escaped  interment.  All 
during  the  Japanese  occupation 
he  continued  to  hold  services  in 
an  abondoned  building  under  the 
watchful  eyes  of  Japanese  officers. 
But  Netzorg  and  his  wife,  who 
had  come  to  Manila  in  1915  from 
Detroit  as  honeymooners,  were  put 
in  the  dreaded  Santo  Tomas 
Camp.  Their  son  David,  who  had 
been  teaching  at  the  University 
of  Nebraska,  was  visiting  them 
when  the  war  broke  out  and  he 
joined  the  U.  S.  Army  Engineers. 
He  was  asigned  to  Bataan  where 
he  was  captured  and  later  died 
in  the  Capas  Prison,  a  victim  of 
the   infamous   'death  march'. 

When  American  troops  landed 
on  Leyte  in  October  1944,  the 
Japanese  ordered  all  Jews  not  in- 
terned to  leave  Manila.  Temple 
Emil's  community  hall  was  con- 
verted into  an  ammunition  dump. 
As  the  U.  S.  Eleventh  Airborne 


The  American  Jewish  Committee 
has  named  Mrs.  Carolina  K.  Simon, 
New  York  Secretary  of  State,  chair- 
man of  its  Committee  on  Jewish 
Communal  Affairs,  it  w*s  announc- 
ed by  Herbert  B.  Ehrmann,  Presi- 
dent of  the  organization. 


JOHN  W.  TALIAFERRO 

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82 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


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Division  neared  Manila  in  Feb- 
ruary 1945,  the  Japanese  sacked 
and  burned  the  city,  and  killed 
hundreds  of  civilians,  among  them 
at  least  80  Jews.  The  Japanese 
touched  off  the  stores  of  evplosives 
in  Temple  Emil's  community  hall 
and  blew  the  synagogue  and  com- 
munity house  to  rubble.  Only  the 
walls  of  the  synagogue  were  stand- 
ing when  American  and  Filipino 
forces  re-occupied  the  city. 

Immediately  after  his  release 
from  Santo  Tomas  Prison,  Netzorg 
became  the  head  of  the  Jewish 
community  .  His  first  task  was 
to  provide  shelter,  food,  clothing 
and  other  necessities  for  the  desti- 
tute Jewish  residents.  With  the 
aid  of  an  emergency  grant  of  $10,- 
000  from  the  Joint  Distribution 
Committee,  Netzorg  began  the 
task  of  reorganization.  Supplies 
flown  in  by  the  National  Jewish 
Welfare  Board  and  brought  in  by 
the  Jewish  chaplains  who  accom- 
panied the  American  forces  en- 
abled Netzorg  to  organize  a  huge 
Seder  for  civilians  and  military 
personnel.  Jewish  servicemen  co- 
operated magnificently  in  aiding 
the  civilian  Jews.  They  organized 
classes,  clubs,  lectures  in  the  USO- 
fWB  club  opened  under  Netzorg's 
direction.  The  Jewish  chaplains 
became  a  tower  of  strength  to  the 
reviving  Jewish  community. 

Inspired  by  the  leadership  of 
Netzorg  and  the  Jewish  chaplains, 
the  Jewish  GIs'  assembled  for  an 
open  air  religious  service  amid 
the  ruins  of  Temple  Emil  and 
pledged  themselves  to  rebuild  the 
synagogue  as  a  memorial  to  their 
comrades  who  diedin  the  Pacific. 
With  the  enthusiastic  backing  of 
Chaplains  Dudley  Weinberg,  Col- 
man  Zwitman,  Samuel  Silver,  Al- 
bert Gordon,  Perry  Nussbaum,  A. 
Herbert  Fedder,  Robert  I.  Kahn, 
David  Meltzer,  Jack  Levy,  Jacob 
Halevy,  Joseph  Weiss,  Jesse  Finkle 
and   Moshe   Gold,   a   huge  cam- 


New  Year  Greetings 


E.  W.  Barger  &>  Co. 

Dependable  Insurance 

WAYNESBORO,  VA. 
Telephone  WH  7-8189 


paign  was  organized  throughout 
the  Pacific. 

GIs  emptied  their  pockets,  con- 
tributed in  memory  of  a  father 
or  mother  or  the  safe  return  of  a 
brother  from  the  war.  Relatives 
at  home  sent  in  donations  in  a 
steady  stream.  Non- Jewish  service- 
men and  officers  rallied  to  the 
drive.  In  less  than  a  month  more 
than  $20,000  was  raised  by  the 
committee  headed  by  Chaplain 
Zwitman.  The  money  was  turned 
over  to  Netzorg  as  president  of 
the  Jewish  community  who  placed 
it  in  trust  with  the  JDC.  The 
civilian  Jewish  community  raised 
a  matching  sum. 

When  the  rebuilt  Temple  Emil 
was  dedicated  in  1947,  Netzorg 
was  not  among  the  congregation. 
He  had  died  in  October  1946  in 
Walter  Reed  Hospital,  Washing- 
ton, D.  C,  probably  from  the 
after-effects  of  his  imprisonment 
in  Manila  and  his  refusal  to  give 
up  his  work  with  the  Jewish  com- 
munity and  GIs  after  his  release. 

The  dedication  of  the  rebuilt 
Temple  Emil  came  one  year  after 
the  Republic  of  Philippines  be- 
came independent.  But  Jewish 
history  in  the  Philippines  goes 
back  to  the  16th  century.  An  In- 
quisition tribunal  functioned 
there  in  1590  and  there  are  eight 
known  cases  of  Marranos  who 
were  deported  to  Mexico  for 
punishment.  There  are  still  some 
Philipino  families  who  trace  their 
ancestry  back  to  these  Marranos. 

A  later  settlement  was  made  in 
the  1840s  by  Jews  from  Alsace- 
Lorraine.  After  the  United  States 
acquired  the  Philippines  as  a  re- 
sult of  the  Spanish-American  War 
in  1898,  a  number  of  Jews  who 
had  served  with  the  American 
Army  stayed  on  and  were  joined 
by  co-religionists  from  the  States 
and  from  Russia,  by  Sephardim 
from  the  Middle  East  and  the 
(Please  Turn  to  Page  86) 


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September,  i960 


The  American  Jeivish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


80  Years  of  Technical  Assistance 

By  Dr.  William  Haber 


Next  month  in  London,  dele- 
gates from  Jewish  communities  in 
25  countries  will  assemble  to  cele- 
brate the  eightieth  anniversary  of 
ORT,  Organization  for  Rehabili- 
tation through  Training,  one  of 
the  oldest  welfare  agencies  in  Jew- 
ish life. 

The  year  of  ORT's  founding  in 
1880  in  Czarist  Russia  seems  locat- 
ed in  the  far  distant  past.  But  it 
is  not  so  much  a  matter  of  the 
length  of  the  time  span  that  gives 
it  remoteness,  as  of  the  fullness  of 
events  which  have  effectively  trans- 
formed the  world  during  these 
intervening  decades. 

Yet,  eight  decades  ago,  the  ante- 
cedents of  the  great  majority  of 
todays  American  Jews  lived  in 
Eastern  Europe.  Nor  was  the  size 
of  this  population  much  less  than 
that  of  the  present  American  com- 
munity. But  the  conditions  of  life 
differed  drastically. 

All  but  a  few  select  categories 
of  Jews  were  restricted  to  the 
crowded  towns  and  villages  of  the 
Pale  of  Settlement.  Nor  were  they 
free  to  live  as  they  chose  within 
this  vast  ghetto.  In  a  predominat- 
y  agricultural  society,  they  were 
barred  from  land  ownership.  In 
what  was  still  a  handicraft  society, 
they  were  excluded  from  man) 
trades.  ? 

The  world  celebrated  by  Sholom 
Aleichem  and  I.  L.  Peretz  was  a 
place  of  destitution.  Jewish  eco- 
nomic activity  was  burdened  by 
legal  oppression  and  discrimina- 
tion. Jews  were  forced  into  margin- 
al occupations.  A  few  were  artis- 
ans. Most,  like  Tuvye  the  Dairy- 
man, were  "luftmenschen,"  ped- 
dlers, innkeepers,  petty  tradesmen. 
Large  numbers  were  paupers  on 
the  edge  of  "chronic  hunger. 

But  if  the  material  side  was 
bleak,  the  spiritual  existence  of 
the  "shied"  was  often  vivid  and 
creative.  Toward  the  latter  half 
of  the  century  a  fresh  spirit  was 
abroad  within  the  ghetto  confines. 
The  movement  known  as  the 
Haskala,  or  Enlightenment,  stir- 
red a  new  ferment  of  intellectual 


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excitement,  stimulating  a  desire 
to  action  for  equal  rights  and  Jew- 
ish emancipation. 

At  the  same  time,  the  tradition- 
al economy,  poor  as  it  was,  was 
being  battered  by  powerful  forces 
of  economic  modernization,  as  the 
industrial  revolution  spread  east- 
ward. The  small-town  pattern  of 
Jewish  life  was  undergoing  the 
dislocation  of  change.  The  times 
called  for  new  approaches  to  the 
social  problems  of  the  age. 

The  idea  of  ameliorating  the 
extremes  of  Jewish  poverty 
through  rendering  more  people 
economically  productive  had  long 
been  propagated  by  a  few  leaders 
of  the  community.  In  1880,  a 
group  of  Jewish  industralists  and 
intellectuals  of  St.  Petersburg 
petitioned  the  Czar  for  the  privi- 
lege of  establishing  a  fund  for  the 
purpose  of  "developing  artisanal 
and  agricultural  occupations 
among  the  mass  of  our  co-religion- 
ists," which  became  known  as 
ORT. 

Creation  of  a  vocational  train- 
ing agency  for  the  Jewish  people 
was  part  of  the  modernization  pro- 
cess of  Eastern  European  Jewry. 


The  Board  of  Directors  of  the 
Jewish  Agency  for  Israel,  Inc.  has 
invited  Dr.  Isador  Lubin,  distin- 
guished economist,  sdmlnistrator  and 
expert  in  government  and  interna- 
tional affairs,  to  organize  its  Jeru- 
salem Representative  office,  it  was 
announced  by  Dewey  D.  Stone, 
Chairman  of  the  Board. 


EARL  R.  HATTEN 

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84 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


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HAMPTON,  VIRGINIA 


By  undertaking  a  task  that  is 
customarily  the  function  of  gov- 
ernments, the  community  was  ex- 
pressing, in  this  as  in  so  many 
other  welfare  areas,  the  principle 
of  self-help  which  has  such  pro- 
found and  creative  roots  in  the 
Jewish  past. 

While  that  world  of  80  years 
ago  has  vanished,  the  need  for 
vocational  aid,  for  trade  schools 
and  training  in  technical  skills, 
has  acquired  heightened  relevance. 
Through  two  world  wars  and  their 
aftermaths,  such  programs  have 
proven  to  be  powerful  aids  for 
human  reconstruction,  for  re- 
kindling hope  and  the  ability  to 
work,  learn  and  be  productive 
once  more. 

But  it  is  the  continuing  tech- 
nological revolution  of  our  age 
that  has  given  particular  immedi- 
acy to  this  program.  In  Israel  vo- 
cational training  has  obvious  sig- 
nificance for  the  economic  integra- 
tion of  its  newcomers,  the  majority 
of  them  from  underdeveloped  so- 
cieties. Equally,  the  formation  of 
skilled  manpower  to  operate  the 
emerging  industries  of  Israel,  calls 
for  an  expanding  program  of  trade 
and  technical  schools.  And  so, 
ORT  has  had  its  most  extensive 
development  in  Israel.  Technical 
training  centers  are  operated  in 
•j2  localities  throughout  the  land, 
with  an  annual  enrollment  of  al- 
most 10,000. 


In  the  Moslem  lands  of  North 
Africa  and  Iran,  a  half-million 
Jews  live  today  under  conditions 
that  are,  if  anything,  even  more 
wretched  than  prevailed  80  years 
ago  in  Eastern  Europe.  These 
areas  are  no  longer  outside  the 
range  of  modern  influence  and 
the  trade  schools  have  opened  new 
horizons  for  large  numbers  of  the 
youth  of  these  ancient  ghettos. 

ORT  today  is  providing  train- 
ing to  some  40,000  persons,  an- 
nually, in  19  countries.  It  main- 
tains 650  training  units  and 
teaches  over  70  different  trades.  In 
doing  so  it  has  helped  to  alter 
the  occupational  pattern  of  large 
numbers,  opening  many  new  areas 
of  job  and  work  opportunity  to 
Jews. 

The  American  Jewish  commun- 
ity provides  a  large  portion  of  the 
funds  for  this  program,  most  of 
it  from  the  UJA  through  the  Joint 
Distribution  Committee.  But  fully 
half  the  budget  is  met  locally,  or 
by  groups  and  communities  out- 
side the  U.S. 

Thus,  an  idea  born  in  the  fer- 
ment of  Eastern  European  Jewry, 
in  an  age  gone  by,  remains  vital 
and  valid  for  the  world  of  today. 
In  our  current  idiom,  the  work 
of  ORT  has  been  characterized  as 
"technical  assistance."  And  it  is, 
indeed,  the  technical  assistance 
program  of  the  Jewish  people 
throughout  the  world. 


Jewry's  Long  Chain  of  Books 

By  Marvin  Lowenthal 


This  article  is  based  on  address- 
es given  by  Mr.  Lowenthal  at  the 
inauguration  of  the  Henry  Meyers 
Memorial  library  of  the  Detroit 
Jewish  Community  Center  and 
the  annual  meeting  of  the  Nation- 
al Jewish  Welfare  Board's  Jewish 
Book  Council.  The  full  text  of 
the  address  appears  in  Vol  18  of 
the  "Jewish  Book  Annual",  pub- 
lished by  the  Jewish  Book  Council. 

Whenever  a  Jewish  community 
opens  for  general  use  a  roomful 
of  pertinent  books,  it  constitutes 
the  latest  link  in  the  long  chain 
of  Jewish  libraries,  public  and 
private,  which  stretches  back  to 
a  misty  and  dateless  antiquity.  No 
one  any  longer  knows  the  nature 
or  the  precise  origin  of  the  first 
Jewish  or,  better  said,  Hebrew 
library.  Ancient  Israel  arose  in  a 
highly  civilized  region;  and  li- 
braries are  indispensable  to  civili- 
zation. Vast  collections  of  books, 
written  to  be  sure  on  clay  rather 


than  paper,  have  survived  from 
the  royal  libraries  of  Nineveh  and 
Babylon  —  collections  whose  earli- 
est material,  whose  first  editions, 
date  from  nearly  five  thousand 
years  ago. 

Of  Israel  itself,  only  hints  are 
left  us.  There  was  a  city  in  the 


Greetings 


CLAY 


OLDSMOBILE 
CADILLAC 
CORPORATION 

452  N.  Boundary  St. 
WILLIAMSBURG,  VA. 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


85 


MARVIN  LOWENTHAL 

territory  ot  Judah,  originally  a 
Canaanite  city,  which  Joshua 
calls  Kiriat-Sefer,  that  is,  Book- 
Town  —  a  name  later  changed  to 
Debir,  itself  perhaps  related  to 
the  Hebrew  term  lor  "word". 
When  the  prophet  Samuel  wrote 
a  book  on  the  character  of  the 
kingdom  which  the  Israelites  in- 
sisted upon  adopting,  he  "laid" 
the  book  "up  before  the  Lord" 
—  that  is  to  say,  he  put  it  into 
the  safekeeping  of  a  sacred,  priest- 
ly library  -  possibly  at  Shiloh. 
To  put  a  book  in  a  sacred-shrine 
was  a  way  of  preserving  not  only 
the  document  itself  but  the  in- 
tegrity of  its  text.  The  Greeks 
often  employed  the  same  safe- 
guards; it  was  the  ancient  equiva- 
lent of  taking  out  a  copyright. 

There  must  have  been  a  library , 
a  collection  of  archives  at  least, 
in  the  celebrated  First  Temple 
at  Jerusalem.  It  was  not  any  too 
well  run  -  or  so  circumstantial 
evidence  would  imply.  During  the 
eighteenth  year  of  his  reign  (621 
B.C.E.)  King  Joshia  ordered  the 
Temple  to  undergo  necessary  re- 
pairs. While  the  repairs  were  in 
progress,  probably  in  the  stack- 
ioom,  a  book  was  discovered 
which  had  long  been  lost  to  sight 
and  mind.  Tradition  holds  that 
it  was  the  Book  of  the  Law,  or 


New  Year 
Greetings 


The  PENINSULA 

FLORIST 
ASSOCIATION 

NEWPORT  NEWS 
AND  HAMPTON 


the  Torah;  modern  scholarship 
identifies  it  as  the  presumably 
newly-written  Book  of  Deuteron- 
omy. 

The  first  individual  Jew  credit- 
ed with  the  creation  of  a  public 
library  was  Nehemiah,  one  of  the 
happy  few  who  led  in  the  restora- 
tion of  Jerusalem  after  the  return 
from    the    Babylonian  captivity. 

The  Second  Book  of  the  Macca- 
bees tells  how  Nehemiah,  "found- 
ing a  library,  gathered  together 
the  acts  of  the  kings  and  the  pro- 
phets, and  of  David,  and  the  epis- 
tles of  the  kings  concerning  the 
kings  concerning  the  holy  gifts" 

(2:13).  Certainly  the  compilers  of 
the  two  Books  of  Chronicles,  the 
last  historical  writings  included  in 
the  canonical  Hebrew  Scriptures, 
had  at  their  disposal  a  rather  ex- 
tensive library  —  possibly  the  one 
founded  by  Nehemiah.  The  con- 
tents included  all  of  the  books 
now  contained  in  the  Hebrew 
Bible,  except  of  course  for  such 
miscellaneous  works  as  were  not 
yet  written.  It  also  included  a 
goodly  number  of  books  cited  and 
sometimes  tantalizing!)  described 
in  Kings  and  Chronicles,  but 
which  are  lost  forever.  I  count 
twenty-one  of  these  vanished  treas- 
ures. 

No  doubt  somebody  at  some- 
time or  other  must  have  borrow- 
ed these  fascinating  books  and, 
as  borrowers  will,  disappeared 
with  them  into  oblivion.  What 
says  Ben  Sirach?  "Many  persons, 
when  a  thing  is  lent  them,  reckon 
it  to  be  something  they  found." 

Yet,  despite  the  depredations  of 
borrowers,  books  multiplied  and 
libraries  grew.  Koheleth  has  an 
immortal  word  on  this  prolifera- 
tion: "of  making  many  books  there 
is  no  end".  Probably  the  speediest 
and  most  copious  output  in  the 
annals  of  the  ancient  publication 
trade  is  recorded  in  the  Second 
Book  of  Esdras  (14:44);  in  forty 
days  five  men  under  the  dictation 
of  Ezra  wrote  down  204  different 
books  composed  on  the  spot.  The 
last  seventy  of  them,  incidentally, 
were  placed  under  what  librarians 
today  call  restricted  circulation:  in 
this  instanqfe  they1  were  issued 
only  to  such  readers  "as  be  wise 
among  the  people."  But  the  ac- 
count smacks  more  of  Talmudic 
midrash  than  of  fact. 

When  the  Talmud  was  in  the 
process  of  composition  —  during 
the  first  two  centuries  before  and 
after  the  start  of  the  Common 
Era  —  the  rabbinical  schools  had 
at  their  command,  among  more 
(Please  Turn  to  Page  87) 


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86 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Danville-Martinsville,  Va. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 

Miracle  in  Manila 

(Continued  From  Page  82) 


September,  i960 


New  Year 


Greetings 


Swicegood 
Funeral 
Home 

"The  House  That 
Service  Built" 

Phone  SW  2-5611 
DANVILLE,  VA. 


Ask  For  FAULTLESS 
Dairy  Products 

Fresher  because  only 
FAULTLESS  Products  are 
Made  Here  in  Danville 

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PRODUCTS  CO. 

Phone  SW  2-2515 


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and  TRUST  COMPANY 

•  Main  Office :      524  Main  Street 

•  Branch  Office:  Riverside  Drive 

•  "Large  enough  to  serve  you 

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DANVILLE,  VIRGINIA 

MEMBER 

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INSURANCE  CORPORATION 


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DANVILLE,  VA. 


PERKINSON 
FOUNDRY  & 
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DANVILLE,  VIRGINIA 

Iron  and  Brass  Castings 

Machine  Work  of  Every 

Description 
Flour  Mill  Roll  Grinding 
and  Corrugating 


Balkans,  and  Jews  of  British, 
French  and  Polish  origin.  Most 
of  these  were  in  business,  some 
managing  substantial  enterprises. 
There  were  also  some  American 
Jews  who  served  in  governmental 
posts. 

Organized  Jewish  life,  however, 
was  virtually  non-existent.  There 
were  services  for  the  High  Holy 
Days  on  several  occasions.  A  can- 
tor was  brought  across  the  Pacific 
from  Shanghai  one  year  to  of- 
ficiate on  Yom  Kippur.  Jews  who 
wanted  their  new-born  sons  cir- 
cumcised had  to  take  them  to 
Hong  Kong. 

A  certain  Mr.  Sinsberg  of  Singa- 
pore, who  did  business  in  the  Phil- 
ippines, donated  two  Torah  Scrolls 
to  the  Jews  in  Manila  in  1908 
on  condition  that  services  be  held 
at  least  on  Rosh  Hashanah,  Yom 
Kippur  and  major  festivals.  When 
no  such  services  were  held  in  1909 
and  1910,  Mr.  Sinsberg  demand- 
ed the  return  of  his  Torah  Scrolls. 
He  got  them  back. 

The  beginning  of  a  permanent 
Jewish  community  dates  from  1917 
when  Mottell  Goldstein,  a  well-to- 
do  businessman,  rented  a  hall  and 
organized  a  permanent  congrega- 
tion. At  the  end  of  a  year 
the  congregation  numbered  150. 
In  1919  Goldstein  was  in  the  Unit- 
ed States  on  business  and  he  call- 
ed on  the  National  Jewish  Wel- 
fare Board.  He  came  back  to  Ma- 
nila as  the  representative  of  JWB, 
charged  with  organizing  religious 
services  for  Jewish  GIs  during  the 
High  Holy  Days  and  Passover  and 
providing  them  with  kosher  meals. 
Therefore,  JWB  regularly  sent 
supplies  to  the  Philippines  and  the 
welfare  and  religious  program  for 
Jewish  service  personnel  became 
permanently  established. 

In  1922,  JWB  named  Morton 
Netzorg  as  its  official  representa- 
tive in  Manila.  He  had  been  a 


teacher  in  the  Philippine  public 
schools  and  an  executive  of  an 
insurance  company.  Under  Net- 
zorg's  leadership,  the  Jewish  com- 
munity gained  stability  and  by 
1924  it  organized  Temple  Emil 
and  built  a  synagogue.  The  syna- 
gogue was  named  for  Emil  Bach- 
rach,  the  first  American  Jew  to 
settle  permanently  in  the  Phili- 
ppines. He  had  come  there  in  the 
189OS.  When  he  died  Mrs.  Bach- 
rach  gave  the  community  an  ad- 
ditional building,  Bachrach  Hall, 
which  became  the  center  for  all 
cultural,  social,  recreational  and 
educational  activities. 

In  the  1930s  the  community 
was  so  well-established  and  secure 
that  it  was  able  to  absorb  nearly 
1300  German-Jewish  refugees.  The 
newcomers  were  warmly  received 
and  became  an  important  part  of 
the  growing  Jewish  community. 
In  1932  Temple  Emil  had  to  build 
an  addition  to  accommodate  the 
growing  membership. 

Then  came  the  war  and  the 
miracle  of  Manila.  After  the  war 
about  a  third  of  the  Jewish  popu- 
lation emigrated.  The  move  than 
500  who  remained  opened  a  He- 
brew school,  established  a  Zionist 
club,  founded  an  old  folks  home 
and  acquired  a  cemetery. 

Since  Rabbi  Schwartz,  the  com- 
munity has  had  three  civilian  rab- 
bis-Simon Lowry,  Sydney  Lubin, 
who  left  last  April,  and  now  Max 
Warse.  Jewish  chaplains  on  duty 
in  the  Philippines  sime  the  end 
of  the  war  have  served  not  only 


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September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


87 


military  personnel  but  cooperated 
actively  with  the  civilian  Jewish 
community. 

The  last  Jewish  chaplain  was 
Herbert  Berger,  recently  transfer- 
red by  the  Air  Force  from  Clark 
Air  Force  Base  to  Westover  Field, 
Mass.  Five  years  ago  the  authori- 
ties at  Clark  Air  Force  Base  paid 
the  Jewish  community  and  the 
Jewish  chaplains  and  servicemen 
a  unique  tribute  when  they  named 
the  rebuilt  gymnaisum  at  the  base 
in  honor  of  Lt.  Meyer  Levin  of 
Brooklyn,  one  of  the  first  Jewish 
heroes  of  World  War  II.  Leaders 
of  the  Jewish  community  today 
cooperate  closely  with  USO  Club 
in  Manila  and  provided  hospitality 
for  Jewish  GIs.  The  community  is 
headed  by  Jack  Harberer.  E.  E. 
Simke  serves  as  Israeli  consul- 
general.  Ezra  Toeg  is  the  com- 
munity shochet. 

Periodically,  JWB';  Commission 
on  Jewish  Chaplaincy  arranges 
with  the  military  for  Torah  Con- 
vocations in  the  Pacific  and  the 


leaders  of  these  missions  provide 
the  Manila  Jewish  community 
with  a  major  tie  to  the  mainstream 
of  Jewish  life.  Such  missions  were 
led  by  Rabbi  Robert  Gordis,  the 
late  Rabbi  Leon  Lang,  Rabbi 
Julius  Mark,  Rabbi  Max  Eich- 
horn,  director  of  field  operations 
of  the  JWB's  Commission  on  Jew- 
ish Chaplaincy,  and  Rabbi  Aryeh 
Lev,  the  Commission's  director. 
In  1955,  S.  D.  Gershovitz,  fWB 
executive  vice-president,  visited 
the  Philippines  and  conferred 
with  Jewish  leaders,  military  of- 
ficials, chaplains  and  USO  person- 
nel on  GI  morale  needs. 

On  this  Bar  Mitzvah  year  of 
the  miracle  of  Manila  and  the 
14th  anniversary  of  Philippine  in- 
dependence, the  Jewish  commun- 
ity in  the  Philippines  is  a  strong 
Pacific  outpost  of  Jewish  life  be- 
cause of  its  own  will  to  survive 
and  because  Jewish  servicemen, 
Jewish  chaplains  and  JWB  pro- 
vide an  unbreakable  link  with 
Jewry  everywhere. 


Jewry's  Long  Chain  of  Books 

(Continued  From  Page  85) 


conventional  library  material, 
what  might  be  termed  a  talking 
book.  For  a  long  while  the  rabbis 
were  loath  to  commit  to  writing 
their  prime  source  material,  the 
Mishnah  or  Oral  Law,  which  was 
the  basic  subject  of  their  studies, 
commentaries,  opinions,  and  argu- 
ments. Writing  down  the  Oral 
Law,  they  felt,  might  impair  the 
authoritative  quality  which  came 
from  its  being  par  excellence  the 
"unwritten"  Law.  They  were  also 
afraid  that  scribes,  who  could  not 
be  checked  up  on  the  spot  and  at 
once,  might  be  led  into  making 
editorial  changes  or  else  what  we 
know  today  as  typographical  er- 
rors. So  they  trained  a  band  of 
young  men,  usually  not  bright 
enough  to  think  of  anything  di- 
vergent to  learn  the  Mishnah  by 


heart;  and  when  an  assembly  of 
scholars  wished  to  refer  to  this  or 
that  original  Mishnah  text,  about 
which  there  might  be  some  dis- 
pute as  to  how  it  ran,  one  of  these 
voung  men  would  reel  it  off  ver- 
batim. These  human  parrots  had 
powerful,  well-developed  memo- 
ries and  not  too  much  intelligence. 
Curiously  enough,  our  ultra-mod- 
ern libraries  are  resorting  to  this 
old  Talmudic  method,  though  for 
a  different  purpose;  we  have  trans- 
formed the  young  nu  n  into  robots 
known   as  tape-recordings. 

Independent    of    the  scholarly 
or  literary  merit  of  their  contents, 
the  Dead  Sea  Scrolls,  dating  from 
(Please  Turn  to  Page  96) 


•  NEW  YEAR 

•  GREETINGS 

Southwestern 
Virginia  Gas  Co. 

MARTINSVILLE,  VA. 


Alfred  Dobrof,  has  been  appoint- 
ed new  director  of  the  Department 
of  Jewish  Community  Center  Plan- 
ning of  the  National  Jewish  Welfare 
Board. 


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Greetings 


LEE  TELEPHONE  COMPANY 

MARTINSVILLE,  VA. 
"Through  Service  We  Grow" 


G.  T.  White  •  N.  R.  Burroughs 

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MARTINSVILLE,  VA. 


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•  Harold  Martin 

205  E.  Main  St. 
MARTINSVILLE,  VA. 


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Martinsville,  Va. 

BUICK  -  60 

•  SALES       •  SERVICE 


88 


Tin-  Awn-inn,  frwish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


Charleston,  S.  C. 


MRS.  PHILIP  D.  GINSBURG 


The  wedding  of  Miss  Rachel 
Widman  Rephan  and  Mr.  Philip 
Davis  Ginsburg  of  New  York  City 
took  place  on  July  16th  in  the 
Fort  Sumter  Hotel.  Rabbi  Lewis 
D.  Wientraub  officiated,  assisted 
by  Cantor  Jacob  L.  Renzer  of 
Synagogue  E-Manuel. 

Mrs.  Ginsburg  is  a  daughter  of 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hyman  Rephan. 
Mr.  Ginsburg  is  a  son  of  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Maynard  L.  Ginsburg  of 
Woon socket,  R.  I. 


Junior  bridesmaid  was  Tamara 
Jane  Solomon,  a  niece  of  the 
bride.. 

Mr.  Irving  Coven  of  Worch.es- 
ter,  Mass.,  a  brother-in-law  of  the 
bridegroom,  was  best  man.  Ush- 
ers were  Messrs.  Robert  D.  Asher 
of  Leominster,  Mass.,  Herbert 
Emers  of  Providence,  R.  I.,  Ches- 
ter Simmons  of  Jericho,  Long  Is- 
land, Irving  Solomon  of  Charles- 
ton and  Arthur  Schwartz  of  New 
York. 


Mexico  they  will  reside  at  70 
Irving  Place  in  New  York  City. 

Mrs.  Ginsburg  attended  Ohio 
State  University  and  was  graduat- 
ed from  Sophie  Newcomb  College 
in  New  Orleans. 

Mr.  Ginsburg  is  a  graduate  of 
the  University  of  Rhode  Island 
and  served  as  a  lieutenant  in  the 
U.  S.  Army.  He  is  associated  with 
the  Aaron  Ashley  Inc.  Art  Pub- 
lishers in  New  York. 

Out  of  town  guests  for  the  wed- 
ding include  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Ashley 
L.  Leavitt,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Aaron 
Ginsburg,  Miss  Debbie  Ginsburg 
and  Mr.  David  Leavitt,  all  of 
Scarsdale,  N.  Y.  From  New  York 
City  the  guests  included  Mr. 
George  Gottlieb,  Mr.  Gerald 
Brand,  Mr.  Walter  Robinson,  Mr. 
David  Pollock,  Miss  Helen  Wolfe 
and  Miss  HeTene  Plaut.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Maximillian  Gottlieb,  Dr. 
Saul  Wittes  and  Mr.  Paul  Gottlieb 
came  from  Woonsocket,  R.  I.  Mr. 


and  Mrs.  Harry  Sugely,  Sumter, 
S.  C. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Harry  Fass,  Miss 
Majorie  Fass;  Mrs.  Albert  Berry 
and  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Reubin  Gold- 
man were  guests  from  Dillon. 
Guests  from  Greensboro,  N.  C.  in- 
cluded Mr.  and  Mrs.  David  Bern- 
stein, Mr.  and  Mrs.  Irving  Weisler, 
Mrs.  A..  N.  Bernstein  and  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Walter  Bernstein.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Sydney  Epstein  and  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Harry  Epstein,  all  of  Rae- 
ford,  N.  C,  Mrs.  Marie  Sabel,  Mrs. 
Jean  Kahn,  Miss  Mamie  Rephan 
and  Mr.  Martin  Kahn,  all  of 
Myrtle  Beach,  were  also  among 
the  out  of  town  guests  for  the 
wedding. 

Others  from  out  of  town  in- 
cluded Mr.  and  Mrs.  Benjamin 
Asher  of  Leominister,  Mass.,  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Stanley  Gertzman  of 
Charlotte,  Dr.  and  Mrs.  Mordecai 
Nachman  of  Greenville,  Mrs.  Ben 
Simon  of  Norfolk,  Va.  and  Mrs. 
Jack  Spanier  from  Atlanta. 


Around  Greeksboro 

MRS.  DANIEL  HOLLANDER  and  MRS.  EDWARD  R.  RICKETTS, 

Correspondents 


The  bride  was  given  in  mar-  A  reception  followed  the  cere- 

riage   by   her   father.   Miss   June  mony  in  the  Fort  Sumter  Hotel. 

Rephan,  a  sister  of  the  bride,  was  Upon   Mr.   and   Mrs.  Ginsburg's 

maid  of  honor.  return   from   a  wedding   trip  to 


Barbara  Joy  Prago,  daughter  of 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  S.  J.  Prago.  has  be- 
come engaged  to  Arthur  A.  Sohn, 
son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jack  S.  Sohn, 
of  Patchogue,  N.  Y.  The  wedding 
is  planned  for  March  1 96 1 . 

Miss  Prago  attended  Sophie 
Newcombe  and  Woman's  College, 
receiving  a  degree  in  sociology 
from  the  University  of  North 
Catolina.  Mr.  Sohn  graduated 
from  Washington  &  Jefferson  Col- 
lege. He  was  a  first  lieutenant  in 
the  Army  Transportation  Corps 
and  is  presently  associated  with 
The  Drimel  Agency  of  the  Penn 
Mutual  Insurance  Co. 

The  Sol  Levins  of  Burlington 
are  receiving  congratulations  on 
the  birth  of  another  granddaugh- 
ter, Judith  Ann,  to  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
(the  former  Ruth  Levin)  Edward 


Geisenheimer,  of  Rockville  Cen- 
tre, NT.  Y. 

The  community  extends  its  best 
wishes  for  a  speedy  recovery  to 
Mrs.  Joseph  Shallant  and  Archie 
Kottler. 

Elaine  Maxine  Sherman,  daugh- 
ter of  Mrs.  Ethel  Sherman,  of  Pu- 
laski, Va.  and  George  Sherman,  of 
Tampa,  Fla.  was  married  to  Steven 
Erwin  Zager,  son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Max  Zager,  in  a  ceremony  held  at 
the  Zager  home  on  the  afternoon 
of  August  21st,  attended  by  the 
immediate  families.  Simcha  Kling, 
rabbi  of  Beth  David  Synagogue, 
officiated.  Following  a  family  din- 
ner, the  Zagers  received  friends. 

Rhea  Jacobs,  daughter  of  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Sol  Jacobs,  has  won 
second  prize  in  the  state-wide  Lat- 
in contest.  More  than  250  students 


September,  iy6o 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


participated,  Rhea  recently  re- 
turned from  that  never  to  be  for- 
gotten trip  to  Miami  and  Nassau 
Irith  the  Senior  High  School  Band. 

The  Youth  Leadership  Award, 
liven  by  the  National  Federation 
of  Jewish  Men's  Clubs,  has  been 
given  to  Michael  Ingber,  son  of 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Leo  Ingber,  for  the 
greatest  aptitude  for  leadership 
in  Jewish  life. 

Coming  a  little  late,  but  not 
too  late  to  be  mentioned  here, 
Beth  David  youth  brought  home 
many  honors  at  the  last  North 
Carolina  BBYO  Convention  held 
in  Charlotte.  The  following  were 
elected  to  office:  Joe  Rubin,  chap- 
lain and  Eddie  Feiner,  athletic 
chairman.  Mike  Wise  was  runner- 
up  in  tennis  and  Mona  Sorkin 
placed  second  in  story-telling. 
Barbara  Massel  won  the  "Best  All- 
around  BBG  Award"  and  the  boys 
matched  this  by  winning  the 
Winter   Sports   Cup.   Mike  Wise 


was  given  the  Alexander  Goode 
"Best  All-around  AZA  Award". 
Mike  is  the  first  Greensboro  boy 
to  win  this  award  in  its  six  year 
history.  Congratulations  to  all  the 
youth  of  Greensboro. 

Congratulations  to  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Jack  Fields  on  the  birth  of 
a  son  and  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Stuart 
Kaplan  on  the  birth  of  a  daughter. 


Winston-Salem,  N  C 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Samuel  Leazer 
Katzin  of  Winston-Salem  have  an- 
nounced the  engagement  of  their 
daughter,  Miss  Rachel  Malka  Katz- 
in to  Mr.  Stephan  Chodorov,  son 
of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Matthew  Radom 
of  Stamford,  Connecticut,  and  Mr. 
Edward  Chodorov  of  New  York 
City. 

The  wedding  is  planned  for 
September  1 1 . 

Miss  Katzin  is  a  graduate  of  the 
College  of  Fine  Arts  of  Carnegie 


EDITORIALS 

(Concluded  from  Page  5) 

Dr.  Weisberg  admitted  to  the  writer,  in  a  private  conver- 
sation, that  he  knowingly  was  propounding  a  theory  which  he 
realized  was  for  the  most  part  impractical  in  the  United  States 
of  America  in  the  year  i960.  He  contended  that  he  was  point- 
ing out  what  he  considered  deficiencies  in  our  current  Jewish 
community  living,  in  the  hope  that  by  calling  attention  to  and 
discussing  them,  we  would  become  more  aware  of  them,  and 
that  something  might  then  result  by  way  of  improvement.  That 
is  of  course,  good  provocative  technique,  which  has  frequently 
been  used  by  other  public  speakers. 

All  in  all,  it  was  a  fine  bar  mitzvah  and  if  there  had  been  a 
bit  more  sunshine  and  a  little  less  rain,  it  would  have  been 
even  more  enjoyable.  The  attendance  was  comfortably  good, 
and  there  was  a  fair  share  of  young  newcomers,  which  is  al- 
ways a  fine  sign  for  the  Institute. 

Phil  Datnoff,  of  Hickory,  was  over-all  chairman,  and  to 
him  and  his  assistants  go  approbation  and  appreciation  for  a 
job  well  done. 


tiron  mid  raw 


THE  BANK  OF  GREENSBORO 


Southeastern  Bldg. 
1804  Battleground  Ave. 


621  S.  Elm  St. 
936  Summit  Ave. 


3101  Spring  Garden  Street 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 

Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


MQNTALDO'S 

GREENSBORO,   N.  C 


Black  Beauty 

of  shapely  crepe  with  a  figure  flattering 
set-in  faille  sash  —  to  wear 
so  many  places 
so  elegantly.  8-14.  55.00. 

Colony  Shop 


We  take  this  opportunity  of  extending  our  greetings  and 
best  wishes  to  our  Friends  of  the  Jewish  Faith  for  a  Very 
Happy  New  Year  .  .  . 

FIRST  FIDELITY  COMPANY 

Investments 

Southeastern  Building  Dial  274-7685 

GREENSBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


9° 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


Season  s  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  New  Year 

SMITH,  (LANTON  &  COMPANY 

Professional  Investment  Service 

SOUTHEASTERN  BUILDING 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


tlfttlMi 


CDRPO RATED 


616-1B  SOUTH   ELM  ST.     •     PDST  OFFICE  BOX  412B 
GREENSBORO,    NORTH    CAROLIN  A 


Seasons  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  to  our  Many 
Friends  for  a  very  happy  and  prosperous  NEW  YEAR 

HARRY  L.  HILL 

GENERAL  CONTRACTOR 

"Builder  of  Beautiful  Homes" 

1007  Westridg-e  Road  Dial  299-2215 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Greetings 


ODELL 

MILL  SUPPLY  COMPANY 

"Everything  for  the  Mills" 

300  North  Forbis  Street  Dial  272-2113 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Institute  of  Technology.  She  has 
completed  work  toward  her  Mas- 
ter of  Fine  Arts  degree  which  she 
will  receive  at  Yale  University  in 
1961  upon  the  presentation  of  her 
Master's  show.  She  has  exhibited 
her  painting  at  the  Winston-Salem 
Gallery  of  Fine  Arts  and  the  N.  C. 
Museum  of  Art  in  Raleigh. 

Mr.  Chodorov  attended  the 
Cherry  Lawn  School  and  is  a  grad- 
uate of  Harveford  College.  He  al- 
so studied  at  Ludwig-Maxillian 
Universaet  in  Munich,  Germany, 
and  received  his  Bachelor  of  Laws 
University  Law  School. 


Goldsboro,  N.  C. 

Confirmation  services  were  con- 
ducted on  the  morning  of  June 
5th  by  Rabbi  Israel  J.  Sarasohn  in 


Temple  Oheb  Sholom  of  Golds- 
boro for  the  following:  Charles 
Leder,  Jennie  Ellis  and  Alan  Weil. 

On  June  17-18,  Bar  Mitzvah  ser- 
vices for  Joseph  W.  Strauss,  Jr., 
were  held  in  Temple  Beth-El  of 
Wilson  with  a  large  number  of 
relatives  and  guests  as  well  as  the 
congregation  present. 

Rabbi  Sarasohn  attended  the 
rabbinical  convention  in  Detriot 
the  week  of  June  21. 

Sidney  Gordon,  president  of 
Leopold  Zunz  Lodge  attended  the 
District  convention  of  the  B'nai 
B'rith  in  Norfolk  the  week  of 
June  20. 

Mannah  Shrago,  president  of 
the  Golds"boro  Elks  Lodge  attend- 
ed the  national  Elks  convention  in 
Dallas.  He  is  the  exalted  ruler  of 
the  Goldsboro  Elks  Lodge. 


Guilford  Galleries  Grows 


Guilford  Galleries,  which  last 
December  increased  its  floor  area 
to  32,000  square  feet  when  it  took 
over  a  former  bowling  alley  on 
North  Elm  Street,  is  the  subject  ol 
feature  articles  in  the  July  issue 
of  "Furniture  Retailer"  and  "Fur- 
niture South." 

The  store  also  was  written  up 
in  the  March  issue  of  "National 
Furniture  Review." 

"Hard  sell  with  a  velvet  voice" 
is  credited  by  Furniture  Retail- 
er lor  the  focal  firm's  rapid  growth 
in  three  year's  time.  The  article 
declares  that:  "Guilford  has  sold 
its  community  the  idea  that  'right- 
ness'  in  home  furnishings  need  not 
cost  a  fortune,  that  good  taste  and 
gracious  surroundings  are  not  de- 
termined by  the  sum  invested  but 
by  careful  selection  and  attention 
to  detail."  It  also  says  the  store 
draws  customers  from  a  100-mile 
radius  of  Greensboro. 

All  three  articles  describe  the 
firm's  redecoration  of  the  former 


bowling  alley  and  the  way  mer- 
chandise is  displayed  in  room  set- 
tings. All  carry  pictures  of  the 
remodeled  bowling  alley  entrance 
and  all  feature  numerous  pictures 
of  displays  in  the  new  area. 

Two  of  the  magazines  also  in- 
clude pictures  of  the  formal  open- 
ing of  the  new  addition  with  May- 
or George  Roach  cutting  the  rib- 
bon at  the  new  entrance  and  sur- 
rounded by  the  firm's  officers, 
President  Boyd  Barker,  Vice  Pres- 
ident Ben  W.  Jones,  and  Secretary- 
Treasurer  William  B.  Martin. 


New  Year  Greetings 

Jones  Automotive 
Company 

418  Battleground  Ave. 

Dial  273-5555 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Sherwin-Williams 


HOUSE  PAINTS  —  INDUSTRIAL  MAINTENANCE 
PAINTS  —  INDUSTRIAL  PRODUCT  FINISHES 

Dial  275-3331      335  Battleground  Ave.       Greensboro,  N.  C. 


SEDGEFIELD  GARDEN  CENTER 

"SPECIALISTS  IN  LANDSCAPE  BEAUTIFYING" 
FREE  ESTIMATES 

Visit  Our  Garden  Shop 
5000  High  Point  Rd.      Dial  299  -  5529      Greensboro,  N.  C. 


1 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Charleston,  S.  C. 


American  &  Southern  Insurance  Co. 

SPECIALISTS  IN  INCOME  PROTECTION 

#  Preferred  Risks  —  Sub-Standard  Coverage 

#  Guaranteed  Renewals  With  Life  Time  Benefits. 

#  Hospitalization  for  All  Ages. 

Protection  for  Age  65  and  Over 
Individual  and  Family  Major  Medical 


Greensboro,  N.  C. 


SUPER  MARKETS 

Stores  Located  at 

4703  High  Point  Road 

2803  E.  Bessemer  Avenue 

1320  Glenwood  Avenue 

403  Tate  Street 

2113  Walker  Avenue 

900  Gorrell  Street 

Liberty  Road  at  Pleasant 
Garden  Road 

3700  Lawndale  Drive 

Stokesdale,  N.  C. 

Guilford,  N.  C. 

Pleasant  Garden,  N.  C. 


Claire  Frieda  Mager,  a  daugh- 
ter of  Reverend  and  Mrs.  Morris 
D.  Mager  of  Miami  Beach, 
Florida,  and  Mr.  Herbert  Rephan 
a  son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  jack  Rep- 
han of  Charleston,  S.  C.  were 
married  August  7,  in  the  Brith 
Sholom-Beth  Israel  Synagogue  at 
Charleston,  S.  C.  Officiating  were 
Rabbi  Nachum  Rabinovitch,  Can- 
tor Koenig,  Cantor  Marcus  Dia- 
mond of  New  York  City  and  the 
bride's  father,  Cantor  Morris  D. 
Mager. 

The  bride  was  given  in  marriage 
bv  her  father.  Mrs.  Gerald  Mager 
of  Tallahassee,  Florida,  a  sister- 
in-law  of  the  bride,  was  matron  of 
honor.  Bridesmaids  were  Misses 
Susan  Warren  of  Miami  Beach, 
Rosaleen  Jacobs  of  Miami  Beach 
and  Myra  Altman  of  Charleston. 

Mr.  Nathan  Rephan  a  brother 
of  the  bridegroom  was  best  man. 
Ushers  were  Messrs.  Gerald  Mager, 
a  brother  of  the  bride;  Fredric  S. 
White,  a  cousin  of  the  bride- 
groom; Marvin  Brody,  Stanley 
Feinberg,  Jack  Karesh,  Maurice 
Krawcheck,  Avram  Kronsberg,  all 
of  Charleston. 

Following  the  wedding  trip  the 
couple  will  be  at  home  at  128-B 
Hester  Street,  Charleston,  S.  C. 
(Please  Turn  to  Page  108) 


AlUMINUMW^&jftfr 


Any  Type  HOME  IMPROVEMENT 

ALUMINUM  •  AWNINGS  •  DOORS 
■ALUM  .  WINDOWS  •  INSULATION 


SS28  HIGH  POINT  ROAD 

Greensboro , N . C 


FREE  ESTIMATES 

DIAL 

274-3723 


ALL  PESTS  KILLED  AT  ONCE— NOT  EXCUSES — "RESULTS' 
All  Services  Carry  a  Bona-Fide  Guarantee 

FREE  INSPECTIONS       dial  273-6253 

DAVE  GOFORTH,  MGR. 


Fayetitvme 


High  Point 


GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Wilson 


92 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


Arnold  Marks 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 


William  S.  Shrago 
Rocky  Mount,  N.  C. 


Representing 


UNITED  SECURITIES  COMPANY 

MEMBER:  PHILADELPHIA  —  BALTIMORE 
STOCK  EXCHANGE 


8th  Floor 
Dial  275-6476 


Southeastern  Bldg. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Asheville,  N.  C. 

MRS.  GUSTAV  LICHTENFELS,  Correspondent 


Best  Wishes  To  All  Our  Many  Jewish  Patrons  and  Friends  For 
a  Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year 

SOUTHERN  ELEVATOR  CO. 

Manufacturers  of  Freight  and  Passenger  Elevators 

P.  O.  Box  3423  Dial  274-2401  Greensboro,  N.  C. 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS  FROM 

PAUL  B.  WILLIAMS,  INC. 

313  N.  Aycock  Street  Greensboro,  N.  C. 

VERIFAX  COPIERS  BY  EASTMAN  KODAK 
DUPLICATING  EQUIPMENT 

"Offices  in  Principal  Cities" 


Please  Patronize  Our  Advertisers 


Ray  Harris  Wheel  Alignment 
&  Brake  Service 

Automatic  Transmission  Work 
The  Best  Motor  Tune  Ups 
Dial  272-7922  —  WRECKER  SERVICE 

431  Battleground  Ave.  GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


G  reetings 


May  the  New  Year  bring  you  health  and  happiness 

SOUTHERN  OPTICAL  CO.,  INC. 
Optical  Laboratories 

108  S.  Edgeworth  Dial  272-0600—274-5228 

GREENSBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


On  July  17th  the  Congregation 
Beth-Israel  held  their  annual  Con- 
gregational dinner  and  installa- 
tion of  officers  at  the  George  Van- 
derbilt  Hotel.  The  following  men 
were  installed:  Dr.  Joseph  Schand- 
ler,  president;  Irving  Landau,  vice 
president;  Milton  Lurey,  treasur- 
er; Morris  Fox,  secretary.  Rabbi 
Alexander  Gelberman  was  re- 
elected this  time  for  a  term  of 
seven  years. 

The  Council  of  Jewish  Women 
held  their  annual  Ship-A-Box 
party  on  June  20th  in  the  John 
Cecil  Room  of  the  Biltmore  Dairy. 
The  price  of  admission  was  a  toy 
or  money  to  be  sent  to  the  Kinder- 
garten classes  in  Israel.  After  the 
meeting  refreshments  were  served 
and  card  games  were  played.  The 
next  day,  at  the  same  place  the 
Cheerio  Club  held  its  monthly 
meeting  with  Mrs.  Elsa  Moser 
and  Mrs.  Max  Spear  as  hostesses. 
The  honored  guests  at  this  meet- 
ing were  Mrs.  Satisky  and  Mrs. 
Evans,  Officers  of  the  North  Caro- 
lina Association  of  Jewish  Wom- 
en, who  explained  the  plans  for 
the  new  Jewish  Home  for  the 
aged  which  has  been  accpiired 
near  Winston-Salem. 

On  July  17th  a  stone  was  un- 
veiled in  memory  of  Mrs.  Charles 
Book-Her.  Four  sons  and  daughter 
from  out  of  town  also  her  cousins 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Miller  from  Knox- 
ville  attended  the  ceremony. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jack  Schandler  of 
Hillsdale,  N.  J.,  are  visiting  their 
parents  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Davtid 
Schandler.  They  came  to  get  their 


Susan  and  David  Gumpert  are 
driving  to  Stanford  University  at 
Palo  Alta  California,  to  visit  their 
brother  and  sister  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Pete  Gumpert.  It  will  be  a  hurried 
trip  for  both  will  have  to  return 
in  time  for  school  and  college. 
Their  parents  Mr.  and  Rudolph 
Gumpert  will  take  an  auto  trip 
lo  the  Gaspe  Peninsular  and 
Canada. 

The  Hadassal  members  sold 
tickets  for  a  special  show- 
ing of  the  play  "Rashomon" 
August  3rd  at  the  Silo  Circle 
Playhouse.  The  proceeds  will  go 
to  the  Hadassah  Hospital  project 
in  Israel. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Joseph  Sternberg 
and  daughter  Miss  Ann  Sternberg 
are  enjoying  a  five  week  tour  of 
Europe. 

Mrs.  Edna  Cohen  of  Dallas 
Texas  is  spending  the  summer 
with  her  sister,  Mrs.  Florence 
Visanska,  who  has  moved  to  Ashe- 
ville from  Atlanta,  Ga.,  to  be  near 
her  son  and  daughter  Mrs.  Joseph 
Sternberg  and  Mr.  S.  A.  Visanska. 

Mrs.  Harold  Case  of  New  York 
City  is  spending  a  few  weeks  here 
visiting  her  sisters,  Mrs.  David 
Fater  and  Mrs.   Elizabeth  Fater. 

Miss  Carmel  Adler  and  Roger 
Malkin  were  united  in  marriage 
on  July  9th  in  a  traditional  set- 
ting in  Grove  Park  Inn,  with  Rab- 
bi Alexander  Gelberman  conduct- 
ing the  ceremony.  Frank  Edwin 
and  Mrs.  Maxine  Cauble  were 
musicians. 

The  bride  is  the  daughter  of 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  David  Adler  of  79 


BERRY'S  INC. 

Authorized 

Studebaker 
Lark 
Mercedes  -  Benz 
SALES  &  SERVICE 

811  South  Elm  Street 

273-8241 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


two  sons  who  have  been  attend-  Edgelawn  Rd.  She  attended 
ing  Camp  Osceola  this  summer. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Joseph  Litchen- 
fels  and  daughters  Frances  and 
Patsy  and  Miss  lsabelle  Palais 
have  returned  after  spending  a 
pleasant  three  weeks  at  Hotel  Cas- 
ablanca at  Miami  Beach  Florida. 
While  there  the  family  captured 
many  dancing  trophies. 


BUILDING 
MATERIALS 

WHOLESALE  —  RETAIL 
For 

Complete  Service 
On  Your  Building  Needs 
DIAL  273-3491 

Guaranteed 
Waterproofing 
Company 

Building  Material  Division 
2203  Sullivan  St. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish 


TIMES-OUTLOOK 


93 


MRS.  ROGER  MALKIN 


Sophie  Newcombe  College  and 
Barnard  College  in  New  York 
City. 

The  bridegroom  is  the  son  ol 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Samuel  Malkin  ol 
New  York  City  and  Westport, 
Conn.  He  is  a  graduate  of  Dart- 
mouth College  and  Amos  Tuck 
Graduate   School    of  Dartmouth. 

Mr.  Adler  gave  his  daughter  in 
marriage. 

Miss  Miriam  PJatcow  of  New 
York  was  maid  ol  honor  and 
bridesmaids  were  Mrs.  Lester 
Morse  Jr.  of  Stamford,  Conn.,  and 
Miss  Fay  Taft  Paynter  of  New 
York. 

Peter  Malkin  of  Stamford  was 
his  brother's  best  man  and  ushers 
were  Sherman  Adler  of  New  York, 


brother  of  the  bride,  and  Julian 
Edison  of  St.  Louis. 

The  bride's  parents  were  hostess 
at  a  dinner  immediately  follow- 
ing the  ceremony,  and  for  dancing 
to  the  music  of  Fritz  Albertson's 
Orchestra    after  dinner. 

Miss  Adelaide  Channa  Ben- 
ninga,  daughter  of  Dr.  and  Mrs. 
N.  Benninga  of  48  Ardoyne  Rd., 
and  Naftalie  Arnon  were  united 
in  marriage  in  Tesusalem  on  July 
7th. 

The  bridegroom  is  the  son  of 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  N.  Arnon  of  Tel 
Aviv. 

The  ceremony,  conducted  by  a 
rabbi  of  the  community,  was  held 
in  the  home  of  the  brother  and 
sister-in-law  of  the  "bridegroom, 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jigdal  Arnon. 


DIXON  &  CHRISTOPHER  CO.,  INC. 


Plumbing  and  Heating  Contractors 
Commercial — Industrial — Residential 


Located  in  0.  R.  D. 
1105  E.  Bessemer 


Dial  274-3208 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 


Greetings 


from  the 

SrARMOUTiT  Compact 

Greensboro,  N.  C. 


REMCO  SUPPLY,  INC. 

FASTENER  AND  TOOL  SPECIALISTS 
Shop  Equipment  —  Shelving  —  Storage  Racks 


1815  E.  Wendover  Ave. 


GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Dial  273-3676 


Southern  Tractor-Power  Mower  Co. 

W.  F.  POLLARD  &  CO. 

RIDING  POWER  MOWERS 
POWER  MOWERS  —  GARDEN  TILLERS 
SALES  &  SERVICE 

4821  High  Point  Rd.       Dial  299-5350       Greensboro,  N.  C. 


pflOTO-ENGRAVER 


ZINC  AND  COPP€ft  -ETCH-IN  GS 
BEN  DAY-HALFTONES  .COLOR  PLATES 


D€/IGn/ 


DAILY  n€W/ 
B  VI  LDinG 


Hasan 


KTTSRinG 


GR€€fl/SORO 

— , — ■ — ,  noRTH  cRRoynfl 


Ballard  Music 


BAND  AND  ORCHESTRA  INSTRUME1 
Service  —  Music 

617  Friendly  Center  Rd.     Greensboro,  N.  C.     Dial  274-7889 


REMODELING  SPECIALISTS 


}  A  DO  IT10**5 

*****   1  - 


RESIDENTIAL  —  COMMERCIAL  —  INDUSTRIAL 

YOUR  100%  SATISFACTION  IS  OUR  BEST  ADVERTISEMENT 
•  ADDITIONS  &  NEW  CONSTRUCTIONS  •  CARPORTS  &  UTILITY 
SHEDS  •  KITCHENS  RE-DESIGNED  •  ATTICS  FINISHED 
•  PORCHES  •  PAINTING  •  REPAIRS  OF  ALL  KINDS 

GLENN  CONSTRUCTION  CO. 


200  COUNTRY  CLUB  DR. 

Dial  274-1001 


GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 
After  6  P.  M.  Dial  274-0660 


94 


The  zimtitcan  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


"Set  Qui  Signs  2$e  ^oui  Silent  Salesmen' 

ALLEN'S  ffjp^DISPLAYS) 


Manufacturers  of  Neon  Signs  and  Letters 


Dial  299-5533 
Plant  and  Main  Office 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 


Dial  88-2-6413 
Branch  Office 
High  Point,  N.  C. 


New  Bern,  N.  C. 

MBS.  LOU  ELDEN,  Correspondent 


FORBIS  &  DECK  SERVICE 

AMBULANCE 

Two-Way  Radio  —  Oxygen-Equipped 

1118  N.  Elm  Street  275-8408 

GREENSBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


NEW  HOME  BUILDING  SUPPLY  CO. 

WEST  COAST  LUMBER 

Millwork  —  Builders'  Supplies 

625  S.  Mendenhall         Dial  272-4101         Greensboro,  N.  C. 


4  Brown-Gardiner  Drug  Co. 

PRESCRIPTIONS  OUR  SPECIALTY 

PHONE  274-0745 
110  E.  Northwood  St.       Greensboro,  N.  C. 


Connecticut  Mutual  Life  Insurance  Co. 

George  D.  Davis,  C.L.U.,  Associate 
General  Agent 

Agents:        BOB  MAYS      —      RALPH  C.  DAVIS 
Wachovia  Bank  Bldg.,  Dial  274-4614        Greensboro,  N.  C. 

High  Point  Office :  521  Main  Street  Dial  88  8-6545 

R.  DELBERT  KIRKMAN,  Agent 


Season  s  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  New  Year 

Traders  Chevrolet  Company,  Inc. 


215  E.  Market  St. 


SALES  —  SERVICE 

GREENSBOSO,  N.  C. 


Dial  272-2146 


Greetings  and  best  wishes  to  our  Friends  for  a  Very 


Guilford  Galleries,  Inc. 

"COMPLETE  HOME  INTERIOR  DESIGNERS" 
*  Furniture      *  Carpets      *  Draperies      *  Accessories 

363  N.  Elm  St.  Dial  274-5478 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Mr.  and  Mrs.  I.  Kenneth  Zacks 
of  New  Bern,  North  Carolina  an- 
nounce the  engagement  of  their 
daughter,  Donna  Gayle,  to  Lau- 
rence Edward  Harris,  son  of  Mil- 
ton Harris  of  Baltimore  and  Mrs. 
Helen  Harris  of  New  York  City. 
The  wedding  will  take  place  Sep- 
tember 4. 

Miss  Zacks  has  been  attending 
Emerson  College  in  Boston  Mass., 
where  she  was  majoring  in  Speech 
Therapy.  She  is  a  member  of 
Sigma  Alpha  Eta,  national  honor- 
ary speech  fraternity,  and  Kappa 
Gamma  Chi  social  sororitv.  She 
plans  to  enter  the  senior  class  of 
the  University  of  Maryland  fol- 
lowing her  marriage. 

Mr.  Harris  graduated  from  Co- 
lumbia University  where  he  had 
been  the  recipient  of  a  four  year 
Scholastic  Scholarship.  While  at 
Columbia  he  was  a  member  of  the 
crew  team  and  varsity  basketball 
team.  He  served  as  a  lieutenant 
in  the  U.S.  Navy  for  two  years, 
having  been  released  from  active 
duty  in  March.  He  plans  to  enter 
the  Law  School  of  Georgetown 
University  in  September  and  has 
accepted  a  position  with  the  Legal 
Department  of  the  U.  S.  Govern- 
ment. 

Confirmation  exercises  were 
held  at  Temple  B'nai  Sholem  on 
Sunday,  June  15th.  Confirmands 
were:  Helene  Myra  Howard, 
daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Louis 
Howard  and  Joan  Phyllis  Orring- 
er,  daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Harold  Orringer. 

Rabbi  Jerome  Tolochko  con- 
ducted the  service  assisted  by 
Helene  and  Joan.  Confirmation 
theme  was,  "Religion  and  De- 
mocracy." The  confirmands  pre- 
sented a  large  portrait  of  the  Rab- 
bi to  the  Temple  as  a  class  me- 
morial. 

Mr.  Murray  Fitterman,  presi- 
dent of  the  Temple  presented 
prayer  books  to  the  confirmands 
and  Mrs.  Ravmond  Goldman, 
president  of  Sisterhood  Hadassah, 
presented  each  white  Bibles. 

The  confirmation  was  a  very 
inspiring  event  for  the  manv  rela- 
tives and  friends  in  attendance. 
It  was  the  second  confirmation 
class  of  Temple  B'nai  Sholem  in 
40  vears. 

Following  the  services  the  par- 
ents of  the  confirmands  entertain- 
ed at  a  recention  in  the  Emrjire 
Room  of  the  Governor  Tryon 
Hotel.  Over  200  peonle  came  to 
give  congratulations  to  the  hon- 


DONNA  GAYLE  ZACKS 

orees.  In  the  receiving  line  with 
the  confirmands  and  their  parents 
were,  Mrs.  Louis  Pearson  of  Kins- 
ton,  grandmother  of  Helene  and 
Mrs.  Joseph  Orringer,  grand- 
mother of  Joan. 

Many  out  of  town  guests  were 
in  the  city  for  the  event. 

We  offer  hearty  congratulations 
to  Mrs.  HaroM  Orringer  on  her 


H,  L.  COBLE 

Construction  Co. 


Building  Construction 
Of  All  Types 

Dial  274-0137 
1705  Battleground  Ave. 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


BREWER 

Paint  &  Wallpaper 
Company 

SPECIALIZING  IN 
Painting   &  Wallpapering 

Residential 
*  Commercial 
industrial 

1612  Madison  Avenue 

Dial  274-5403 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


95 


recent  appointment  to  the  State 
Democratic  executive  committee. 
This  is  quite  an  honor.  She  will 
attend  a  meeting  of  the  committee 
in  the  Hall  of  the  House  of  Rep- 
resentatives, Capital  Building  in 
Raleigh,  Wednesday,  August  9th. 


Lumberton,  N.  C. 

ERNEST  FLEISHMAN 
Correspondent 

Deborah  Silverton,  daughter  of 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  George  Silverton,  was 
the  Salutatorian  of  the  i960  Lum- 
berton  High  School  graduating 
class.  She  made  an  outstanding 
speech  at  the  commencement  ex- 
ercises on  Thursday  night,  June 
2nd  before  an  overflowing  crowd. 
Deborah  Silverton  was  also  named 
the  Best  All  Around  Girl  in  her 
class  of  fifty  girls,  for  which  she 
received  a  loving  cup.  She  is  going 
to  attend  Goucher  College  of  Bal- 
timore in  the  fall. 

Sandra  Weinstein,  daughter  of 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Israel  Weinstein,  was 
also  one  of  the  graduates  of  this 
same  class.  Sandra  was  the  head 
cheer  leader  and  an  outstanding 
student  of  her  class,  receiving  the 
D.A.R.  Good  Citizenship  Award. 
She  is  planning  to  go  to  the  Uni- 
versity of  Alabama  this  fall  as  a 
member  of  the  freshman  class  and 
join  her  brother,  Joe  Weinstein, 
who  is  entering  his  junior  year. 
Frank  Schaeman  and  David  Wein- 
stein were  also  students  at  the 
University  of  Alabama  last  year. 


You'll  Enjoy 


"Potato  Chips" 
H.  W.  Lay  &  Co. 

Incorporated 


David  Weinstein,  son  of  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Max  Weinstein,  is  en- 
gaged to  marry  Karen  Kulbresh  of 
Columbus,  Ga.  The  wedding  is  to 
be  sometime  in  October. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Ernest  Fleishman 
announce  the  Bar  Mitzvah  of  their 
son,  Edward  Jay,  on  Saturday, 
Sept.  3rd  at  Temple  Beth  El  in 
Lumberton.  Friday  night  services 
will  be  held  Sept.  2nd,  conducted 
by  Rabbi  Samuel  Friedman  of 
Wilmington,  instructor  of  the  Bar 
Mitzvah  boy.  A  reception  will  al- 
so be  held  at  the  Pine  Crest  Coun- 
try Club  near  Lumberton  on 
Saturday  night,  Sept.  3rd  from 
nine   till  twelve. 

The  High  Holiday  Services  this 
year  at  Temple  Beth-EI  will  be 
conducted  by  student  Rabbi 
Daniel  Liefer  of  the  Jewish  Theo- 
logical Seminary  of  New  York 
City.. 

Dr.  and  Mrs.  Morris  Kramer  of 
Lumberton  are  the  proud  parents 
of  a  baby  girl. 

Alan  Sugar,  son  of  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Emanuel  Sugar,  now  living 
in  New  York  City,  has  accepted  a 
position  as  Cantor  of  Temple 
Emanuel  of  New  York  City,  to 
commence  on  Sept.  9th.  Alan  just 
recently  finished  a  vocal  course  at 
the  Juliard  School  of  Music  in 
New  York. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Paul  Rosenfeld 
are  welcomed  as  new  residents  of 
Lumberton.  Mr.  Rosenfeld  ope- 
rates the  new  Pembroke  Sports- 
wear Mfg.  Co.  at  Pembroke,  12 
miles  from  Lumberton. 


Charleston,  S.  C. 

Mrs.  Rebecca  Billies  Pearlstine 
will  celebrate  her  100th  birthday 
this  month.  She  is  now  living  with 
her  daughter,  Mrs.  Leonard  A. 
Goodman,  Nee  Miss  Evelyn  Pearl 
stine,  in  El  Paso,  Texas. 

Her  husband,  the  late  I.  M. 
Pearlstine,  founded  I.  M.  Pearl- 
stine  and  Sons  and  it  is  still  in 
operation  by  Milton  and  Edwin 
Pearlstine,  grandsons. 

Mrs.  Pearlstine  lived  in  Charles- 
ton many  years.  She  was  a  member 
of  the  K.  K.  Beth  Elohim  Temple 
and  a  charter  member  of  the 
Charleston  Council  of  Jewish 
Women.  Mrs.  Pearlstine  has  one 
son  and  three  daughters  surviving 
out  of  eight  children.  She  has 
twelve  grandchildren,  twenty 
eight  great  grandchildren  and 
three  great  great  grandchildren. 

John  Klein  Hornik  of  Charles- 
ton, S.  C.  passed  away  Julv  30th. 
Services  were  held  at  the  K.  K. 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  100) 


PATTERSON 
SEA  FOODS 

No.  1 

218  S.  Davie  272-8131 
No.  2 

1405  Sunset  Dr.  272-8132 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


George  W.  Kane 


General  Contractors 


GREENSBORO 
DURHAM 
ROXBORO 


Stanley  Shoes,  Inc. 

Featuring  Fine  Shoes 
for  Ladies  and  Children 

•  Paramount 

•  Vitality 

•  Sandler  of  Boston 

•  Buster  Brown 

•  Simplex 

•  and  many  others. 

Friendly  Shopping  Center 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 


Charles  H.  Stogner 
Mutual  Insurance 

"Save  up  to  20%  on  all  lines" 

251-A  N.  Greene  Street 

Dial  272-8480 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Please  Patronize  Our  Advertisers 


PHIPPS  HARDWARE  COMPANY 

CHINA  &  GOURMET  SHOP  —  ELECTRICAL  APPLIANCES 
PAINTS  —  SPORTING  GOODS  —  GARDEN  SUPPLIES 
A  Complete  Line  of  Garden  Club  and  Mechanics  Supplies 

215  N.  Elm  St.      GREENSBORO,  N.  C.       Dial  272-0179 


HUNT  &  CO.,  INC. 

Janitor  Supplies 


Distributor  ol 
JOHNSON  S  X  WAX 
PRODUCTS 


321  W.  Lee  St.  274-0076 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


.  N. (OE  &  SON 


General 
Building  Contractors 


Watson  Building 
Dial  273-4224 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Electrical  Contractors 

Residential,  Commercial 
and  Industrial 

Lighting  and  Electrical 
Heating  Specialists 

TALLEY  ELECTRIC,  INC. 

C.  H.  TALLEY,  Owner 

DIAL  274-1531 
1109  Battleground  Ave. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Vestal's  Flower  Shop 

Your  Personal  Attention  Floristl 

Flowers  For 

All  Occasions 

Dial  275-7272 

Located  in 
Summit  Shopping  Center 
948  Summit  Ave. 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


96 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  to  Our  Many  Friends 
for  a  Happy  New  Year 

HILL  SIDE  FARM 

MR.  AND  MRS.  RALPH  C.  PRICE,  Owners 
Greensboro,  North  Carolina 


Jewry's  Long  Chain  of  Books 

(Continued  From  Page  87) 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a  Hoppy  New  Year  From, 


ERNEST  KALATHAS 


ROY  HEMPHILL 


JOHN  COURIS 


SUNSET  HELLS  RESTAURANT 

Intersection  Friendly  Road  and  Madison  Avenue,  at  Aycock  Street 
Dial  272-4239  GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


CURTIS  WOODWORK  —  BUILDERS  HARDWARE 
ROOFING  MATERIALS 

Guilford  Builders  Supply  Co.,  Inc. 

1621  Battleground  Ave.     Greensboro,  N.  C.     Dial  273-9481 


SOUTHSIDE  HARDWARE  COMPANY 

"Serving  the  Public  For  Half  a  Century" 
Power  Tool  Division  Hardware  -  Water  Systems 

515  South  Elm  Street  523  South  Elm  Street 

272-1776  Dial  272-2106 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


SEASON'S  GREETINGS 

Southern  Electric  Service  Co.,  Inc. 

T.  PAUL  RHYNE,  President 

853  S.  Elm  St.  Dial  274-2461 

GREENSBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


Kirkman's  Airport  Transportation 

AVIS  RENT  -  A  -  CAR  SYSTEM,  Licensee 

Phone  299-0131  Phone  275-7939  P.  O.  Box  3014 

Greeneboro-H.  Point  Airport    Office:  O.  Henry  Hotel   Greensboro,  N.  C. 


Unique  Auto  Electric  Company 

Specializing  in 

AUTOMATIC  TRANSMISSIONS  &  TUNE  -  UPS 
WE  SERVICE  &  REPAIR  ALL  MAKES  OF  CARS 

619  English  St.  (ORD)  GREENSBORO,  N.  C.  Dial  27  2-4708 


Season  s  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Very  Happy  New  Year 

SOUTHEASTERN  ADJUSTMENT  (0, 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Sales  -  Service 


BLACK 
CADILLAC  -  OLDS  CO. 

304  E.  Market  St.    Dial  275-9641 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


just  before  the  dawn  of  the  Com- 
mon Era,  have  a  dramatic  interest 
which  has  captured  our  imagina- 
tions. The  drama  is  multiple.  The 
discovery  and  subsequent  adven- 
tures of  the  scrolls  is  exciting 
enough,  bi^t  it  is  more  than 
matched  by  what  must  have  been 
the  dramatic  scene  and  circum- 
stance of  their  original  entomb- 
ment in  the  remote  caves  above 
the  Wadi  Qumran.  Facing  dire 
peril  and  perhaps  extermination, 
the  devout  yahad  or  brotherhood, 
being  a  Jewish  community,  wrap- 
ped, double-wrapped,  sealed  in 
jars,  and  hid  away  their  most 
precious  possession  —  their  library. 
They  showed  in  this  a  true  and 
enviable  sense  of  community 
values. 

By  its  very  nature,  traditional 
Judaism  is  a  religion,  a  view  oL 
life  and  a  way  of  life,  inextricably 
dependent  upon  books;  and  with 
the  passage  of  time  and  with  the 
many  varied  and  changing  worlds 
to  which  the  Jews  found  they  had 
to  adapt  themselves,  the  necessary 
books  grew  more  numerous  and 
the  dependence  upon  them  more 
imperative.  Mohammed  called  the 
Jews  "the  people  of  the  book," 
meaning  of  course  the  Hebrew 
Bible,  but  "the  people  of  books," 
would  be  more  accurate.  Besides 
the  Bible,  an  adequate  Jewish  li- 
brary had  to  possess  the  many- 
volumed  Talmud,  a  whole  arsenal 
ol  later  digests,  commentaries  and 
case-books,  an  array  of  prayer- 
books  and  other  devotional  litera- 
ture, ami,  by  the  early  Middle 
Ages,  shelves  of  philosophic  specu- 
lations, mystical  and  cabbalistic 
works,  anthologies  of  fables,  para- 
bles, and  anecdotes  (the  Midra- 
shim),  moral  disquisitions,  as  well 
as  grammars,  dictionaries,  geo- 
graphies, astronomies,  travel  ac- 
counts, and  medical  treatises. 

Every  Jewish  community  in  the 
Middle  Ages  —  which  for  most 
Jews  lasted  well  into  the  1 8th 
century  —  possessed  a  library,  large 
or  small,  of  this  nature.  It  was 
usually  housed  in  the  synagogue, 
which  was  literal lv  the  community 
center,  or  else  in  the  Bet  Ha- 
midrash  or  House  of  Study.  The 
community  was  dependent  upon 
this  library  not  only  for  recreation 
and  lor  a  fruitful  wav  of  investing 
one's  time,  but  for  the  proper  ex- 
ercise of  Judaism  itself,  for  the 
maintenance  of  economic  and 
social  justice  within  the  commun- 
ity's gates,  for  the  adjustment  of 


a  thousand  private,  conflicting 
interests,  and  for  the  true  worship 
of  God.  Study  for  the  Jew,  is  also 
prayer.  Hillel  —  in  words  that  you 
will  find  in  your  Sabbath  prayer- 
book  said:  "Do  not  say,  When  I 
have  leisure  I  will  study;  perhaps 
you  will  have  no  leisure.  Yet  an 
empty-headed  man  cannot  be  a 
sin-fearing  man,  nor  can  an  igno- 
rant person  be  pious,  nor  can  a 
shamefaced  man  learn,  nor  a  pas- 
sionate man  teach,  nor  anyone 
who  is  overmuch  engaged  in  busi- 
ness grow  wise."  For  centuries  the 
Jews  transferred  these  words  from 
prayer-book  precepts  into  daily 
practice  in  the  synagogue  library 
or  at  home  by  a  book-laden,  can- 
dle-lit table. 

Besides  the  community  libraries 
there  were  naturally  certain  for- 
tunate individuals  possessed  of 
well-stocked  book  shelves.  Lists 
and  catalogues  have  survived  of 
private  medieval  collections.  Ju- 
dah  ben  Saul  Ibn  Tibbon,  a  fam- 
ous 12th  century  scholar  and  trans- 
lator, has  left  us  the  injunctions 
he  laid  upon  his  son  for  the  care 
of  his  library:  keep  the  books,  he 
enjoins,  well  covered  against  dust 


CLOTHIERS  AND  FURNISHERS 

107  West  Gaston  Street 
Dial  274-9764 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


FOOD  FOR 
THE  FAMILY 

Hot  Shoppes, 

Incorporated 

Drivedn 
Restaurant 

1100  Summit  Avenue 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


97 


and  damp  and  protected  from 
mice;  write  a  list  of  the  books 
placed  on  each  shelf,  affix  the 
list  to  the  shelf,  and  arrange  the 
books  in  the  same  order  as  on  the 
list;  check  over  the  Hebrew  books 
once  every  month,  the  Arabic 
books  every  two  months,  and  the 
cases  of  unbound  works  every 
three  months;  restore  and  have  re- 
stored all  loaned  books  on  Pass- 
over and  on  Succot.  It  was  Ibn 
Tibbon  who  wrote  some  of  the 
most  graciuos  and  inviting  words 
ever  applied  to  a  library:  "Let 
your  cases  and  shelves  be  your 
pleasure-grounds  and  orchards."  I 
would  like  to  see  this  motto  in- 
scribed in  every  Jewish  community 
library,  which  like  all  libraries 
should  be  enjoyed  for  both  its 
delisrhts  and  its  fruits. 

One  of  the  great  private  col- 
lectors was  the  17th-century  court 
—  Jew  of  Vienna,  Samuel  Oppen- 
heimer.  Eventually  his  7000  print- 
ed volumes  and  1000  manuscripts 
became  the  basis  of  the  Bodleian 
Library's  magnificent  collection 
of  Judaica  (at  Oxford).  The 
earliest  modern  communal  collec- 
tion of  which  the  precise  origin 
can  be  dated  was  that  of  Mantua 
in  Italy;  it  was  founded  in  1767 
upon  the  acquisition  of  4500  vol- 
umes from  the  private  library  of 
Raphael  Emanuel  Mendola. 

In  the  communal  libraries,  the 
study  halls,  of  old  Jewish  centers, 
whether  in  North  Africa  or  in 
Europe,  the  very  appearance  of 
the  books  piled  on  the  shelves 
or  scattered  on  the  tables  told  a 
story.  For  the  most  part  they 
looked  woe-begone,  draggled,  and 
worm-eaten  —  not,  however,  be- 
cause they  were  neglected  but  be- 


FOR  FINE  FOOD 

LEE'S 

Restaurant 
Delicatessen 

112  W.  Market  St. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 

Breakfast 

Luncheon 

Dinner 

All  Cooking  and  Baking 
done  on  our  premises 

Free  Parking  after  6  P.M. 
(Except  Fridays) 

S.W.  Corner  Market  & 
Greene  Streets 


cause  they  were  used  until  they 
were  virtually  used  up.  The  best 
books  are  the  worst  preserved, 
because  they  are  the  best  treated 
—  for  what  better  treatment  of  a 
book  can  there  be  than  to  read  it 
so  often  that  its  pages  fall  apart? 

The  National  Jewish  Welfare 
Board's  Jewish  Book  Council  of 
America  has  set  forth  eight  mini- 
mum requirements  which  must 
be  met  by  any  communal  library 
il  it  wishes  to  be  accorded  a  "Ci- 
tation of  Merit"  from  the  Coun- 
cil. I  would  urge  and  underline  a 
ninth  requirement:  that  a  fair 
proportion  of  its  books  be  read  to 
shreds. 

One  hundred  and  thirty  li- 
braries sponsored  by  Jewish  Com- 
munity Centers,  Synagogues.  Jew- 
ish schools  and  other  community 
agencies  have  received  citations 
of  merit  from  the  Jewish  Book 
Council  of  America. 

To  win  this  citation  a  library 
must  be  at  least  a  year  old;  have 
(Please  Turn  to  Page  110) 


Rabbi  Max  Schenk,  spiritual  leader 
of  Congregation  Shaari  Zedek,  Brook- 
lyn, N.  C,  and  chairman  of  the  execu- 
tive committee  of  the  New  York 
Board  of  Rabb's,  has  been  elected 
president  of  the  Alumni  Associa- 
tion of  Hebrew  IJn'on  College-Jew- 
ish Institute  of  Religion. 


771  Grecmboro.  Winston-Salem 
or  High  Point 
USE  OUR  SERVICE 


Rent-A-Car,  Inc. 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 
250  E.  Market  St.   Dial  275-6378 
WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 
510  N.  Marshall     Dial  PA  4-6559 

HIGH  POINT,  N.  C. 
117  S.  Wrenn  Dial  7975 


Air-Conditioned 


Room  Phones 


Television 


MAPLEWQOD  MOTEL 


On  U.  S.  220  North  near  City  Limits 
2500  Battleground  Avenue  Dial  272-5102 

GREENSBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


Season  s  Greetings  To  Our  Many  Friends 
For  a  Very  Happy  New  Year 

PIEDMONT  PIE  COMPANY, 

GREENSBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


GIRTS 

and 

ACCESSORIES 


Dial  274-9895 
2130  Lawndale  Drive 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 


§        YOUNG'S  LANDSCAPE  SERVICE  § 

§  All  Types  Evergreens,  Shrubs,  Roses  § 

§  Landscape  Designing  § 

§  2810  Battleground  Rd.  Dial  272  -  1010  § 

§  GREENSBORO,  N.  C.  | 


The  ]ac\  Smith  Realty  Co. 

iALTOR! 


1057  Battleground  Ave. 


Dial  275-8551 


GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


DAVIS  TIRE  &  RECAPPING  CO 

HEADQUARTERS  FOR  U.  S.  ROYAL  TIRES 
RECAPPING  —  FRONT  END  AND 
BRAKE  SERVICE 

903  W.  Lee  Street  GREENSBORO,  N.  C.  Dial  275-9533 


Good  Furniture  •  Reasonably  Priced 

314  South  Elm  Street  Dial  273-3441 

GREENSBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


"Over  Sixty  Years  of  Service" 

SIPH  Jo  STOP!  Pi  I 


OFFICE  EQUIPMENT  AND  SUPPLIES 

214  South  Greene  Street  272-0123 

PRINTING  DEPARTMENT 
1124  Church  Street  273-4448 
GREENSBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


GATE  CITY  ROOFING  CO.,  Inc. 

APPROVED  BARRETT  ROOFERS 
SLATE  &  TILE  ROOFING 

402  Tipton  PI.      GREENSBORO,  N.  C.      Phone  274-0166 


98 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


'Shoes  for  the  Family" 

SACH'S 
SHOE  STORE 

•  Rand  Shoes 

For  the  Men 

•  Trim  Tred 

For  the  Ladies 

•  Poll  Parrot 

For  the  Children 
2178  Lawndale 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


MANOR  MOTEL 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  S.  T.  Dickinson 
FREE  ROOM  TELEVISION 
Air-Conditioned 
Circulating  Ice  Water 
Room  Telephones,  Radio 
Wall-to-Wall  Carpeting 
Beautyrest  Mattresses 
Tile  Baths 


1045  West  Market  Street 
Telephone  273-2517 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Man  of  the  Month  —  Jules  Banks 

(Continued  From  Page  12) 


E.  A.  WOODELL 
and  CO. 

Printing  —  Engraving 

221  E.  Sycamore  St. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Clendenin, 
Wrenn  &  Kirkman 

REALTORS 

218   W.   Gaston  Street 
Dial  272-3183 
GREENSBORO,  N-  C. 


IN  GREENSBORO 


BOOKS  —  STATIONERY 
GREETING  CARDS— GIFTS 

DIAL  272-0175 
— 107  S.  Greene  Street— 
— Friendly  Shopping  Center — 


LAWNDALE 
PASTRY  SHOP 

Specializing  in 

Birthday  &  Wedding  Cakes 
Bread  -  Pastries  -  Pies 
Fresh  Daily 

2144  Lawndale  275-3495 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


McFall's  Sunset  Hills 
Drug  Co. 

Prescription  Specialists 

1610  Madison  Avenue 

Dial  272-5149 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


J.  A.  WILLARD  CO. 

Machine  Worli  —  Repairs 


210  S.  Forbis  St.  272-8735 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 

Home  Specialty  Shop 
FLOOR  COVERINGS 
SHADES  —  BLINDS 

Dial  273-3736 
1300  Battleground  Ave. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Bar\sdale 
Studios 


Interior  Designers 

Complete  Decorative 
Service 


606  N.  Greene  Dial  272-4754 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


GREENSBORO 

Marble  and  Tile  Co. 

Marble  —  Tilework 

1711  Spring  Garden  St. 

Dial  272-2309 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 

COBLE  SPORTING 
GOODS  CO. 

"Everything  for  the  Sportsman" 
119  N.  Greene        Dial  272-0912 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C 

(ornafzer  &  Mock 

MEN'S  WEAR 

121  West  Market  Street 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Gross  Upholstering  Co. 

Upholsterers  —  Refinishing 

603  S.  Aycock       Dial  272-2393 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


U.S.O.  and  was  vice-president  of 
that  committee  fo  several  years. 
He  has  been  and  presently  is  ac- 
tive as  a  member  of  the  U.S.O. 
Committee  responsible  for  the  co- 
ordination of  religious,  welfare 
and  several  activities  of  the  mem- 
bers of  the  armed  forces  at  near- 
by Fort  Jackson. 

He  also  served  as  chairman  of 
the  local  Jewish  Welfare  Board- 
Armed  Services  Committee  and  is 
South  Carolina  State  Chairman 
for  J.W.B.  He  is  also  first  vice- 
president  of  the  Regional  J.W.B. 
Armed  Services  Division  head- 
quartered in  Atlanta.  He  is  a 
member  of  the  National  Board  of 
J.W.B. 

Mr.  Bank  is  active  with  the 
United  Jewish  Appeal  in  Colum- 
bia and  has  served  as  an  officer 
of  that  organization  on  several 
occasions. 

He  is  a  member  of  the  Tree 
of  Life  Temple  in  Columbia,  a 
former  officer  and  trustee. 

B'nai  B'rith  has  been  of  great 
interest  to  him  and  he  has  served 
as  local  and  state  president,  been 
active  in  the  Fifth  District  and 
last  year  attended  the  B'nai  B'rith 
Convention  in  Jerusalem  as  a  del- 
egate for  this  district.  Mr.  Bank 
has  been  named  i960  South  Caro- 
lina "Man  of  the  Year"  by  the 
state  organization.  He  has  served 
as  state  chairman  for  the  Joint 
Defense  Appeal.  He  is  also  a  mem- 
ber of  the  American  Jewish  Com- 
mittee. For  sixteen  years  he  has 
been  senior  advisor  of  the  A.Z.A., 
the  vouth  organization  of  B'nai 
B'rith. 

In  the  post-war  years  along  with 
Mrs.  Banks,  he  served  as  state 
chairman  of  the  United  Service 
for  New  Americans  (now  United 
HIAS)  in  helping  place  Jewish 
displaced  persons  into  South  Caro- 
lina. The}'  traveled  and  spoke 
over  the  state  and  are  proud  of 
the  successful  adjustment  made  by 
these  former  refugees.  Mrs.  Banks 
was  made  a  member  of  the  na- 
tional advisory  committee  of 
USNA  and  wrote  "A  Manual  for 
Small  Communities"  which  was 
reprinted  several  times  and  re- 
ceived wide  national  circulation, 
helping  other  communities  to 
plan  for  displaced  persons  in  their 
home  towns.  Mr.  Bank  was  ap- 
pointed to  a  three  man  advisory 
committee  on  displaced  persons 
in  South  Carolina. 

Seven  years  ago,  he  became 
president  of   the   City   Board  of 


Health.  He  assisted  in  reorganiz- 
ing the  city  health  department 
and  tackled  the  city's  outstanding 
public  health  problem  —  its  slums. 
After  two  years  of  intensive  work 
and  much  opposition  the  City 
Council  passed  a  sub-standard 
housing  ordinance  and  created  an 
urban  rehabilitation  department 
which  has  been  responsible  for 
the  improvement  or  destruction  of 
thousands  ol  slum  houses. 
Through  the  enforcement  of  ra- 
bies control  ordinances,  Colum- 
bia has  been  free  of  rabies  for 
the  past  four  years  —  quite  a 
record  for  a  city  of  that  size.  The 
nursery  licensing  ordinance  of  the 
Board  has  been  used  as  a  model 
for  other  communities  in  the 
Southeast  wishing  to  protect  theit 
preschool  chTTdren.  Right  now, 
he  is  all  over  the  city  talking 
about  fluoridation  for  the  protec- 
tion of  children's  teeth.  His  vol- 
untary job  as  President  of  the 
City  Board  of  Health  takes  much 
of  his  leisure  time. 

As  a  member  of  the  Chamber 
of  Commerce,  he  has  served  on 
various  committees  over  the  years 
and  is  now  on  its  urban  renewal 
committee. 

He  has  been  active  in  the  Com- 
munity Chest  and  has  served  on 
the  Social  Planning  Division  of 
the  United  Fund. 


L  I  N  V  I  L  L  E 

Service  Station 

242  S.  Greene  Street 

Dial  272-2941 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Smileage/ 


Silvertown  125 
For  Safety  at  Turnpike 
Speeds 


B.  F.  Goodrich  Store 

348  North  Greene  Street 
Dial  272-3197 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


99 


Eddie  Cantor  (center),  famed  comedian,  takes  a  "straight"  role  as  he 
joins  the  ranks  of  JWB  ASSOCIATES,  national  membership  group  support- 
ing the  work  of  the  National  Jewish  Welfare  Board.  With  Mr.  Cantor  are 
Alvin  Malinow  (left)  and  Sanford  Sindeli,  volunteer  leaders  in  the  JWB 
Armed  Services  program  in  the  Los  Angeles  area. 


He  is  a  member  of  the  Kiwanis 
Club  and  on  its  boys  and  girls 
work  committee.  Last  year  after 
many  years  of  planning  the  Boy's 
Clubs  of  America  helped  form  a 
local  Boy's  Club.  Mr.  Bank  was 
a  member  of  the  organizing  com- 
mittee, one  of  its  incorporators 
and  is  now  the  treasurer  of  the 
Boy's  Club  of  Greater  Columbia. 

He  is  a  member  of  the  Board 
of  the  Richland  County  Mental 
Hygiene  Clinic. 

He  is  a  well  known  public 
speaker  and  is  invited  to  speak 
over  the  state  on  a  variety  of  sub- 
jects. 


FOR  FUEL  OIL 

DIAL 

272-1375 


PRODUCTS 

I'ields  &  Leftwich 

2618  West  Ct. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


When  asked  for  the  motivation 
for  his  public  service,  Mr.  Bank 
indicated  that  his  background  as 
a  child  and  youth  emphasized 
social  service  responsibilities.  The 
whole  atmosphere  of  his  eaJy  life 
was  centered  around  service  to 
others.  With  such  an  up-bringing 
plus  the  religious  background  of 
Judaism  which  teaches  the  broth- 
erhood of  man  and  the  fatherhood 
of  God,  plus  his  belief  in  the 
American  way  of  life  which  re- 
spects the  uniqueness  of  each  in 
dividual,  there  could  be  no  other 
course  for  him  than  to  serve  his 
fellow-man  to  the  best  of  his 
abilities. 


Prescription  Specialists 

TYSON'S  PLAZA 
DRUG  CO. 


Founta'n  Services  —  Magazines 
1726  Battleground  274-8418 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 


If  the  United  Jewish  Appeal 
campaign  continues  at  the  present 
pace  "there  is  every  reason  to  be- 
lieve that  by  the  year's  end  the 
i960  drive  will  approximate  the 
|68,ooo,ooo  raised  by  the  UJA  in 
its  successful  campaign  of  1959," 
it  was  declared  by  Rabbi  Herbert 
A.  Friedman,  executive  vice-chair- 
man of  the  United  Jewish  Appeal. 

Addressing  the  more  than  450 
Jewish  community  leaders  attend- 
ing the  two-day  UJA  mid-year 
leadership  conference  in  Washing- 
ton, D.  C.  Rabbi  Friedman  lauded 
"the  maturity  and  deep  sense  of 
responsibility  "that  has  been  dis- 
played by  the  American  Jewish 
community  in  response  to  the  i960 
campaign.''  He  oid  "there  were 
no  flaming  headlines  or  day-to-day 
newspaper  reports  of  Jewish  dis- 
asters to  spur  the  pace  of  last  year's 
effort,  yet  American  Jews  have 
shown  that  they  understand  very 
well  the  great  issues  which  still 
underlie  the  UJA, 


SOUTHERN  WASTE  PAPER  COMPANY 

"Waste  Paper  Specialists" 


501  East  Washington  Street 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Dial  272-1447 


WALTER  J.  BERNSTEIN 

Special  Agent  —  Ordinary  Dept. 


INSURANCE  COMPANY 
OF  AMERICA 


Southeastern  Bldg.  Dial  274-6710 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


AMOS  INSURANCE  AGENCY 


LLOYD  C.  AMOS 


HERMAN  L.  AMOS 


Complete  Insurance  Service 

2433  Fairview       GREENSBORO,  N.  C.       Dial  273-0593 


COMMERCIAL  ELECTRIC  COMPANY 

C.  L.  ELLISON,  Owner 

ELECTRICAL  CONTRACTORS 
Residential  —  Commercial  —  Industrial 

1110  Grove  St.  Dial  275-8579  Greensboro,  N.  C. 


QUALITY  CLOTHING  FOR  MEN  AND  YOUNG  MEN 
Boys  Department  —  Second  Floor 

yoimts-WBocGp. 

rt  WHEKL    QUALITY    IS  HIGHER.  THAW  fMCtJ| 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


PIANOS 

ELECTRIC  ORGANS  —  STEREO  PLAYERS 
MUSICAL  ACCESSORIES 
SHEET  MUSIC  AND  RECORDS 
CONVENIENT  TERMS 

WILBER  MUSIC  COMPANY 

'  THE  COMPLETE  CONVENIENT  MUSIC  STORE" 
214  N.  Elm  St.  Phone  275-7294 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


A  Complete  Line  of  Hardware 

Allen  Hardware  Co.,  Inc. 


2134  Lawndale  Drive 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Dial  275-6484 


"SERVING  GREENSBORO  SINCE  1914" 

NEGATE  CITY  MOTOR  COMPANY,  Inc.^ 

CHRYSLER  •  PLYMOUTH  •  IMPERIAL  Sales  and  Service 

320  North  Forbis  Street  Dial  272-0143 

GREENSBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


Open  from  7  a.  m.  to  11  p.  m. 
every  day 

Dial  273-6835 

HOTEL  PHARMACY 

0.  Henry  Hotel  Bldg. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


GREENSBORO 
Rubber  Stamp  Company 

Rubber  Stamp  Manufacturers 
24-Hour  Rubber  Stamp  Service 
520  Walker  Ave.  Dial  272-571* 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


IOO 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


LET  US  BEAUTIFY  YOUR  RUGS  FOR  THE  HOLIDAYS 

SERUNIAN  &  SONS,  INC. 

"Best  Known,  Known  As  the  Best" 
1131  Grove  St.       GREENSBORO,  N.  C.       Dial  272-2294 


VANSTORY  CLOTHING 

CO. 

"Why  Not  Buy  The  Best?" 

Men's  and  Boys'  Clothing 

Jefferson  Bldg.               GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 

Dial  272-5076 

CRUTCHFIELD  -  BROWNING 
DRUG  COMPANY 

Prescriptions  Carefully  Compounded 
"Quality  With  a  Reputation" 
Dial  273-5553  Dial  274-6308 

357  North  Elm  St.  2166  Lawndale  Dr. 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS  FROM 

PLEASANTS  HARDWARE 

Friendly  Shopping  Center  4813  High  Point  Road 

Dial  275-3308  Dial  299-1042 

GREENSBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


CANTER  ELECTRIC  CO. 


2420  High  Point  Rd. 


ALL  TYPES  OF  WIRING 
QUALITY  AT  LOW  COST 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Dial  274-3071 


VISIT  OUR  NEW  FURNITURE  DEPARTMENT 

APPLIANCE  AND  TV  CENTER,  INC. 

ELECTRICAL  APPLIANCES 
and 

TELEVISION  SETS 

1417  Battleground  GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Dial  275-4536 


MATKIN'S  AUTO  GLASS  CO.,  INC. 

Auto  Glass  Specialists 

224  E.  Gaston  St.  Dial  275-1359 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


COX  RADIATOR  COMPANY 

Radiator  Service    •    Sales  and  Repairs 

430  Battleground  Dial  272-7504 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


SALES  &  SERVICE  NEW  &  USED  CARS 

RICHARDSON'S  MOTOR  CO. 

WILLYS  JEEPS  —  MARK  IV  AIR  CONDITIONERS 

1524  Battleground     GREENSBORO,  N.  C.     Dial  272-8885 


Charleston,  S.  C. 

(Concluded  from  Page  95) 

Beth  Elohim  Cemetery.  Rabbi 
Allan  Tarshish  officiated. 

Mr.  Hornik  was  a  life  time 
resident  of  Charleston  and  a  part- 
ner in  M.  Hornik  and  Company. 

Surviving  are  his  widow,  the 
former  Miss  Mary  Pearlstine  of 
Charleston;  a  sister,  Mrs.  L.  Mar- 
shall Green  of  New  York  City; 
three  brothers,  Harry  Hornik  of 
New  York  City;  A.  Robert  Hornik 
of  Atlanta,  Ga.;  Marion  W.  Hor- 
nik of  Charleston,  S.  C.  and  several 
nieces  and  nephews. 


Whiteville,  N.  C. 

MRS.  MARTIN  BERNSTEIN 
Correspondent 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Herman  Leder 
and  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Joe  Mann  of 
Whiteville  and  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Joe 
Leder  of  Clinton  attended  the 
Board  Meeting  of  the  Association 
of  Jewish  Men  and  Women  at 
Wildacres,  July  17-20. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Si  Steinberg  and 
family  recently  returned  from  a 
trip  through  the  mountains  of 
North  Carolina. 

Marlene  Schild  of  Tabor  City 
and  Miriam  Steinberg  and  Gary 
Kramer  of  Whiteville  spent  the 
month  of  August  at  Camp  Blue 
Star. 

Mr.  and  Mis.  Stanley  Soloman 
and  family  of  Atlanta  are  visit- 
ing their  parents,  the  Joe  Manns, 
at  Wrightsville  Beach. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Wallace  Leinwand 
and  family  of  Elizabethtown  have 
returned  from  a  vacation  at  Myrtle 
Beach. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Irving  Mann  and 
family  of  Elizabethtown  are  va- 
cationing at  WrigTitsville  Beach. 


Raleigh,  N.  C. 
Bef h  Meyer 
Synagogue 

MRS.  OSCAR  LEGUM, 
Correspondent 

The  chairman  of  Beth  Meyer 
Sisterhood's  annual  dinner,  Mrs. 
Milton  Blick  and  Mrs.  Emil  Gold- 
smith are  working  hard  to  make 
this  first  fund  raising  affair  a  gala 
one.  We  are  looking  forward  to  a 
very  successful  dinner,  both  social- 
ly and  financially. 

We  offer  our  congratulations  to 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Howard  Prescott 
upon  the  birth  of  their  second 
son,  Bruce  Evan,  and  to  the  grand- 
mother, Mrs.  Beatrice  Prescott;  to 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Schlomo  Reutlinger 
upon  the  birth  of  a  daughter;  and 
to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Isadore  Hurwitz 


Large  or  Small  Groups 
Flown  Anywhere 

Any  Time 
BY  CHARTER  OR 
CONTRACT  IN  OUR 
26-Passenger  DC-3 
68-Passenger  DC  4 
or 

80  Passenger  Constellation 

Miami  Airline  Inc. 

"A  Supplemental  Air  Carrier" 
Dial  299-5622 
3300  HIGH  POINT  RD. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


SCOTTY'S 
CHILDREN'S 
SHOP 

"The  first  to  show  the  latest  in 
Children's  Wearing  Apparel" 

Dial  272-0476 
2154  Lawndale  Drive 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Ask  Your  Grocer  For 


JONES  BROS.  BAKERY 
Greensboro  N.  C. 


The  Pied  Piper 
of  the 
Piedmont 

sends  greetings 
to  you  from 

WFMY-TV 

Channel  2 

Greensboro,  N.  C. 


7"P 


Seven-Up  Bottling  Co. 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


101 


Charles  Rosengarten,  of  Waterbury,  Connecticut,  president  of  the 
American  Student  Center  in  Jerusalem,  Israeli  residence  hall  of  The  Jewish 
Theological  Seminary  of  America,  signs  the  contract  for  construction  of  the 
residence  hall,  first  unit  of  tne  new  center.  With  Mr.  Rosengarten  are  officers 
of  The  Jewish  Theological  Seminary  of  America  in  New  York.  Left,  seated, 
Dr.  Simon  Greenberg,  vice-chancellor,  and  standing,  Dr.  Bernard  Mandel- 
baum,  provost,  and  right,  seated,  Dr.  Louis  Finkelstein,  Chancellor  and 
Martin  M.  Grabois,  business  manager. 


upon  the  birth  of  their  first  grand- 
son, born  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Mervyn 
Weiner  (Shirley  Hunvitz)  of 
Washington. 

Our  condolence  to  Mr.  Joseph 
Miller  on  the  passing  of  his 
brother,  Mr.  Oscar  Miller  of  Balti- 
more, Maryland. 

We  are  very  proud  ol  Howard 
Rothstein,  son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Robert  Rothstein,  who  was  select- 
ed to  attend  the  Hebrew  Academy 
held  at  Wflacres.  The  lour  week 
session,  sponsored  by  the  North 
Carolina  Association  of  Rabbis, 
covers  extensive  Hebrew  studies 
as  well  as  recreation  activities.  The 


boys  attending  were  chosen  for 
excelling  in  Hebrew  studies  and 
Bible  studies. 

Rabbi  and  Mrs.  Abe  Schoen 
and  daughters  Gayle  and  Susan 
attended  the  annual  Teachers  In- 
finite at  Wildacres,  sponsored  by 
the  North  Carolina  Association  of 
Rabbis. 

Chapel  Hill,  N.  C. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Robert  Pearlman 
joyfully  announce  the  birth  of  a  son 
here,  on  August  28th.  The  proud 
grandparents  are  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Jack  Pearlman,  of  Greensboro,  N. 
C.  and  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Julius  Fisher, 
of  Roanoke,  Va. 


i  DAIRY  FOODS 

r 


\fine^tate 


MILK  AND  ICE  CREAM 

~k  At  your  nearby  store 

MILK  AND  DAIRY  FOODS 

•k  By  convenient  home  delivery 

PINE  STATE 

RALEIGH  •  OXFORD  •  HENDERSON 
DUNN  •  GOLDSBORO 


North  Carolina's  Choice  Since  1919 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  following  Firms  in 

Raleigh,  N.  C. 


yy-  ^  sy-  yy  y>  •  yy  yy.  yy.  yy  yy.  yy .  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy  yy  yy1 

y  § 

I  NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS  FROM  | 

I      ®t)e  Slousie  of  g>tokelj>  | 

§                      RALEIGH,  NORTH  CAROLINA  § 

^DISTRIBUTORS  OF  THESE  FINE  PRODUCTS! 

§  § 

0     Green  Giant  & 

#  Ocean  Spray  Cranberry  5, 

#  Puss  V  Boots  Cat  Food  | 

#  La  Choy  Chinese  Foods  § 

#  Morgan  -  Jones  Dish  Towels  § 

#  Lutz  &  Schramm  Kosher  Dill  Pickles  § 


STATE  DISTRIBUTING  CORPORATION 

Distributors  For 

AMSTEL  OF  AMSTERDAM   HOLLAND  BEER 
#  Imperial  Reserve 

#  Garrett's  Virginia  Dare 
0  Almaden  Vineyards  Rose 

•  Wurzburger  Hofbrau  Imported  German  Beer  . 
•  Labatf  s  Imported  Canadian  Ale 
•  Taylor's  New  York  State 

112  South  Blount  Street  Dial  TE  3-9715 

RALEIGH,  N.  C. 


Greetings  r 


THE  SIR  WALTER  HOTEL 

RALEIGH,  NORTH  CAROLINA 

400  Rooms 

WITH 

Bath,  Radio,  and  Circulating  Ice  Water 

A  Meyer  Hotel  Arthur  E.  Buddenhagen,  Manager 


BEER  — 


THE  BEVERAGE 

OF  MODERATION 

North  Carolina  Association 
Of  Beer  Distributors 


102 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


RALEIGH  FURNITURE  CO. 

Quality  Since  1901  in 
FURNITURE     —  CARPETS 
ELECTRICAL  APPLIANCES     —  BEDDING 
119  E.  Hargett  St.  RALEIGH,  N.  C.  Dial  TE  2-4431 


HOLIDAY  GREETINGS  FROM: 


SIR  WALTER  OPTICIANS 

GREIG  L.  HICKS,  Manager 

Ground  Floor  Professional  Building  Dial  TE  3-4629 

RALEIGH,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS  FROM 


The  Graphic  Press,  Ihc 

Distinctive  Printing  Is  Economy 


324  South  Blount  Street 

RALEIGH,  N.  C. 


Dial  TE  4-1335 


Metals,  Rags,  Steel,  Cast  Iron  and  Pipe 

American  Junk  and  Wreckage  Co. 

T.  L.  and  M.  J.  SILVERS 
1214  Fuller  Street     RALEIGH,  N.  C.       Dial  TE  2-6028 


New  Year 
Greetings 


C.  A.  HICKS 


Dial 

TEmple  3- 
8109 

NEON  SIGNS  —  PLASTIC  SIGNS 


212  E.  Franklin 
Raleigh,  N.  C. 

METAL  LETTERS 


The  Oldest  Building  Supply 
House  in  Raleigh 

Oldham  &  Worth,  Inc. 

Established  in  1912 
Building  Materials  - :-  Paints 
MILLWORK 

400  S.  West  St.       TE  2-2824 
RALEIGH,  N.  C. 


CLARK  ART  SHOP] 

Fashions  in  Framing 

Venetian  Blinds 
Awnings 

||300  Glenwood  Dial  TE  2-8319 
RALEIGH,  N.  C. 


For  a  coof,c/ean 
taste*.. 

Nothing  te  it 
Ilk 
5&ven-Up! 

Seven-Up  Bottling  Co. 

RALEIGH,  N.  C. 


New  Year  Greetings 

DAVID  G.  ALLEN 

Tile — Marble — Terrazzo 
RALEIGH,  N.  C. 
DURHAM,  N.  C. 


Martin  Millwork  Co. 

PAINTS 
LUMBER  —  MILLWORK 
Dial  TE  3-1681 
200  Harrison  Avenue 
RALEIGH,  N.  C. 


Durham,  N.  C. 

MRS.  SAM  FREEDMAN, 
Correspondent 

Estelle  Rose  and  Irwin  Ruben- 
stein  were  united  in  a  ceremony 
solomenized  in  the  Beth  El  Syna- 
gogue, July  17th.  Estelle  is  the 
daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Joseph 
L.  Rose  and  Irwin  is  the  son  of 
Mr.  Charles  Rubenstein  and  the 
late  Mrs.  Esther  Rubenstein  of 
Miami,  Fla.  Rabbi  M.  Herbert 
Berger  performed  Hie  double  ring 
ceremony. 

The  bride  was  given  in  marriage 
by  her  father.  , 

Miss  Marice  Katz  of  Asheville 
was  maid  of  honor.  Mr.  David 
Landau  or  Orange,  N.  J.  served 
as  best  man.  Ushers  were  Ralph 
Samuel  and  John  P.  Eck,  Wash- 
ington, D.  C;  Elliot  Rose,  Kew 
Gardens,  N.  Y.,  brother  of  the 
bride;  Maurice  Rose,  Durham, 
uncle  of  the  bride  and  Milton 
Viorst  of  Washington. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Rose  entertained 
at  a  reception  in  the  social  hall  of 
the  synagogue  following  the  wed- 
ding where  they  were  joined  by 
Mr.  Charles  Rubenstein,  the  bride 
and  groom  and  the  bride's  at- 
tendants, in  receiving  their  guests. 
Mrs.  Sara  Jacobs,  Miami,  Fla., 
grandmother  of  the  bride,  also 
received.  Mrs.  George  Lewin  was 
in  charge  of  the  bride's  book. 

Mrs.  Rubenstein  attended  Duke 
University  and  was  graduated 
from  the  Woman's  College  of  the 
University  of  North  Carolina  and 
obtained  her  master's  degree  from 
George  Washington  University. 

Mr.  Rubenstein  received  his 
B.  S.  at  Rutgers  University  and 
his  M.  A.  in  the  School  of  Ad- 
vanced International  Studies  of 
Johns  Hopkins  University. 

Estelle  and  Erwin  both  made 
their  homes  in  Washington,  D.  C. 
The  couple  will  live  in  Guayaquil, 
Ecuador,  where  Mr.  Rubenstein 
is  associated  with  the  Internation- 
al  Cooperation  Administration. 

Many  courtesies  were  extended 
Estelle  prior  to  her  wedding. 
Among  them  was  the  luncheon 
and  miscellaneous  shower  at 
Harvey's  Banquet  Hall.  Hostesses 
for  the  affair,  attended  by  more 
than  100  sruests,  were  Mmes.  I. 
Ornoff,  M.  Gergman,  N.  Wolfe,  H. 
Fruchtman  H.  Goldberg;,  D.  Dan- 
nerman,  S.  R.  Fink,  N.  Schultz,  N. 
Lieberman  and  M.  Rose. 

A  formula  for  a  happy  marriage 
was  read  in  rhyme  by  Mrs.  S. 
Fink. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Sam  Daniel  en- 
tertained at  their  home  for  Estelle 


Neiv  Year  Greetings 

Garland  C.  Norris 
Company 

PAPER  PRODUCTS 

Hillsboro  Road  Ext. 
Dial  TE  2-0324 
RALEIGH,  N.  C. 


WRENN-PHARR 

Boys'  Store 

Young  Men's  and  Boys' 

OUTFITTERS 

428  Daniels  St.       Dial  TE  2-2530 
Cameron  Village 
RALEIGH,  N.  C. 


Clancy  Construction  Co. 

General  Contractors 

807  Edmund  St.  Dial  TE  3-8689 
RALEIGH,  N.  C. 

refreshes  , 
without  filling 


l'Er^i-c  v^.i  nOTTLING  y,vj. 
3705  Hillsboro  Raleigh,  N.  C. 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


103 


MRS.  IRVIN 

and  Erwin,  and  all  out-of-town 
guests,  with  a  cocktail  party. 

The  bridal  party  and  out  of 
town  guests  were  entertained  Sun- 
day morning  with  a  brunch  at  the 
Beth  El  Synagogue  center.  Host- 
esses for  the  brunch  were  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Nathan  Lieberman,  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  J.  Margolis  and  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  [.  Robbins. 


New  Year  Greetings 

HOLIDAY  INN 
BEAUTY  SALON 

Dial  9-1979 
605  W.  Chapel  HiU  St. 
DURHAM,  N.  C. 


RUBENSTEIN 

We  are  proud  of  .  .  .  Horace 
Sher,  son  of  Mr.  M.  Sher,  a  me- 
chanical engineering  student  at 
N.  C.  State  College,  who  has  been 
selected  for  summer  employment 
by  Union  Carbide  Nuclear  Co.  at 
Oak  Ridge,  Tenn.  .  .  .  also,  Sonny 
Evans  who  is  achieving  quite  a  bit 
of  publicity  with  his  articles, 
especially  the  one  highlighting  his 
visit  to  Moscow  at  the  height  of 
the  U2  spy  plane  furor.  .  .  .  Mayor 
Evans  for  his  splendid  talks  before 
civic  groups  and  radio  on  his 
recent   visit    to    Russia   and  the 


For  Better  Buildings 

Tomorrow 

Use  Solite  Blocks 

Today 


H&O 
Concrete  Block  & 
Pipe  Go. 

5.  Goley  St.  Dial  4-5291 

DURHAM,  N.  C. 


TAKES  15  MINUTES 

MUFFLERS 

INSTALLED  FREE! 

Lifetime  Guarantee 


310  Foster  Street 

Phone  2-8546 
DURHAM,  N.  C. 


J.  C.  WINTERS  CONSTRUCTION  CO. 

♦  EXCAVATING  #  GRADING 

#  HOUSE  MOVING 

Phone  8-1023  or  8-2731    3521  Hillsboro  Rd.    Durham,  N.  C. 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  following  Firms  in 

Durham,  N.  C. 


Our  Best  Wishes  for  a  Happy  New  Year 

MECHANICS  &  FARMERS  BANK 

Member  Federal  Deposit  Insurance  Corporation 
Deposits  Insured  up  to  $10,000 

DURHAM,  N.  C. 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS 

''Quality  Baking  From  Sanitary  Kitchens' 
Cakes  for  every  occasion 


Rolls 
Cookies 

Dial  7-4231 


Pies 
Donuts 

2022  Chapel  Hill  Rd. 


Castle  Supper  Club 


COMPLETE  AIR-CONDITIONING 

FAMOUS  FOR  STEAKS  AND  SEA  FOOD 
I    3609  Hillsboro  Rd.  Durham,  N.  C.  Dial  8-7977 


Wm.  MUIRHEAD  CONSTRUCTION  CO. 

—GENERAL  CONTRACTORS— 

Industrial  and  Commercial 
Buildings  —  Paving  —  Public  Works  —  Asphalt  Products 
Phone  6701  E.  Trinity  Avenue  Durham,  N.  C. 


Edward's 

FLORIST 

Dial 

9-5707 

"The  Beauty  Of  Our  Business 
Is  Flowers" 
DELIVERY  SERVICE 

912  W.  Main      DURHAM,  N.  C. 


Dial  9-1956  for 
"Quality  You  Can  Taste" 

Meadow  Gold  Ice  Cream 
Homogenized  Milk 

Grade  "A"  Pasteurized 
Milk  and  Cream 

DURHAM  DAIRY 
PRODUCTS,  Inc. 

Durham,  North  Carolina 


BEST  WISHES 
To  All  Our  Many  Jewish  Patrons  and  Friends  For 
a  Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year. 


v° 


James  St.  DURHAM,  N.  C.  Dial  2-1171 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Charlotte,  N.  C. 


MOMTALDO'S 


Charlotte,  N.  C. 


"It's  from  Montaldo's" 

Three  little  words 
with  a  world  of  meaning! 


§ 

§ 
§ 

§ 


R.  H.  Bouligny 


i 

f 
§ 
§ 

§ 
§ 


INCORPORATED 


ELECTRICAL 
CONTRACTORS 


433  West  Morehead 


Dial  ED  4-6851 


Charlotte,  North  Carolina 


•  ATLANTA,  GA. 

•  ASHEVILLE,  N.  C. 

•  WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 

•  WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


•  COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 

•  GREENVILLE,  S.  C. 
0  RALEIGH,  N.  C. 

•  FLORENCE,  S.  C. 


HENRY  V.  DICK  &  CO. 

Incorporated 

WHOLESALE  REFRIGERATION  —  HEATING 
AIR-CONDITIONING,  PARTS  and  SUPPLIES 

1423  South  Tryon  Street  Phone  ED  3-6665 

CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


Mrs.  Milford  Schneiderman  who  before  her  marriage  was  Natalie 
Moel,  daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Leon  Moel,  now  of  St.  Louis,  Mo.  and 
formerly  of  Durham,  N.  C. 


Middle  East.  .  .  .  Neilda  Freed- 
man  whose  picture  was  selected  as 
one  of  the  finalists  in  the  National 
PhiEpsilon  Pi  Dream  Girl  Con- 
test. Neilda  is  a  junior  at  the  Uni- 
versity of  Georgia. 

Our  community  was  saddened 
by  the  sudden  death  in  New  York 
of  Dr.  Ralph  A.  Arnold,  Duke 
University  Medical  School  prui.ii 
sor  and  noted  eye,  ear  and  nose 
and  throat  specialist.  Funeral  ser- 
vices for  Dr.  Arnold  were  held 
in  Rochester,  N.  Y.,  his  former 
home. 


Memorial  sen  ices  tor  Dr. 
Arnold  were  held  at  the  Beth 
El  Synagogue.  Participating  in  the 
service  were  Rabbi  M.  Herbert 
Berger,  Mayor  E.  J.  Evans  and 
Dr.  Deryl  Hart,  president  pro  tern 
of  Duke  University. 


For  Quick  Delivery  Fine  Seafoods 

CHARLOTTE  FISH  AND  OYSTER  COMPANY 

300  E.  Trade  CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


B1SCAYNE  4-DOOR  SEDAN  (1119) 
See  All  The  '60  Models  At 

Don  Allen  Chevrolet  Co. 

Charlotte's  Most  Progressive  Dealership 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Columbia,  S.  C. 

MRS.  BERNARD  LADEN,  Correspnndent 


On  August  3rd  the  Columbia 
Chapter  of  Hadassah,  and  the 
Daughters  of  Israel,  the  Akiba 
Club  and  the  Sisterhood  of  the 
Tree  of  Life  Temple  marked  the 
dedication  of  the  Hadassah  He- 
brew University  Medical  Center 
at  Kiryat  Hadassah  in  Jersualem. 
The  program  was  held  at  the 
Center  and  featured  a  panel  dis- 
cussion on  medicine. 

The  panel  consisted  of  the  fol- 
lowing doctors:  Dr.  Abe  Robinson, 
whose  subject  was  skin  disease, 
Dr.  Harold  Miller,  new  drugs,  Dr. 
J.  J.  Alion,  Metabolic  diseases,  Dr. 
Bernard  Lapidus,  Gastro-Inteslin- 
al  diseases,  Dr.  Norman  Sollod, 
Heart,  and  Dr.  A.  E.  Cremer, 
Cancer.  Dr.  Cremer  also  acted  as 
moderator. 

Mrs.  Abe  Zalin,  president  of 
Hadassah,  introduced  the  speak- 
ers. Rabbi  A.  Herson,  who  was  in 
Israel  when  the  hopsital  was  be- 
gun, participated  in  the  program. 
Meyer  Abgott,  representative  of 
Israel  Bonds  from  the  Southeast- 
earn  region,  out  of  Atlanta,  spoke 
briefly. 

Mrs.  Zalin  paid  special  tribute 
to  Mrs.  Ted  Solomon,  president 
of  Daughters  of  Israel,  who  ten 
years  ago  conceived  the  idea  of 
putting  a  cardiograph  in  the  hos- 
pital. 

Refreshments  were  served  after 
the  program. 

Jules  W.  Lindau  III  has  been 
installed  as  president  of  the  Co- 
lumbia Family  Service  Association, 
which  is  a  United  Fund  Agency 
and  is  the  oldest  organization  of 
its  kind  in  America. 

The  40  children  at  the  Center 
Day  Camp  visited  Fort  Jackson 
recently.  They  traveled  in  military 
buses  and  were  escorted  by  M/Sgt 


George  L.  Carmona  of  the  Fort's 
3rd  Training  Regiment.  They 
saw  weapons  demonstrated  and 
visited  the  zoo  at  the  recreational 
area. 

Louis  N.  Gruber,  son  of  Rabbi 
and  Mrs.  David  S.  Gruber  of  the 
Tree  of  Life  Temple,  has  been 
awarded  a  March  of  Dimes  Schol- 
arship of  $600  for  special  research 
in  embroyology.  He  is  a  student 
of  the  Medical  College  of  S.  C.  at 
Charleston. 

Leon  Garber  has  been  elected 
president  of  the  Forest  Lake 
Merchants'  Association  and  Mrs. 
Mary  Gergel  has  been  elected 
secretary. 

Arnold  K.  Wengrow,  son  of  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Sam  Wengrow,  was 
awarded  a  $100  scholarship  to- 
wards his  expenses  for  a  five  weeks 
course  in  Dramatic  Arts  held  at 
the  University  of  N.  C.  He  was 
with  the  Jr.  Carolina  players. 
Arnold  is  a  student  of  Mary  Lou 
Kraemer  and  has  appeared  in 
Junior  Theatre  productions. 

Mrs.  Helen  Mendel  will  head 
the  new  department  of  Ceramic 
Arts  at  the  S.  C.  State  Fair. 

Rabbi  David  S.  Gruber  chair- 
man of  the  United  Fund  Planning 
Division  was  on  the  committee  to 
discuss  an  organized  sheltered 
workshop  for  physically  and  men- 
tally handicapped  persons. 

At  a  recent  national  convention 
at  Houston,  Texas,  Sigma  Delta 
Tau,  social  sorority  at  the  Uni- 
versity of  S.  C.  was  bestowed  with 
two  national  awards.  A  scholar- 
ship plaque  acknowledging  first 
place  scholastically  during  one  se- 
mester of  58-59  and  a  special 
"spirit"  cup  was  also  presented. 
The  local  chapter  Alpha  Kappa 
had  two  delegates  attending:  Miss 


MURRAY  DISTRIBUTING  COMPANY 

Distributors  of 

BORDEN'S  CHEESE  and  MRS.  FILBERT'S  PRODUCTS 
Charlotte  —  Greensboro  —  Raleigh  —  Wilmington 


INTERNATIONAL 

NEW  TRUCKS 

Service  -  Parts 
Accessories 


Greetings 

INTERNATIONAL 
HARVESTER  CO. 

1315  Hutchinson  Avenue 
Dial  4-2851        Charlotte,  N.  C. 


YOPP  INSURANCE  AGENCY,  INC. 

Fire  —  Casualty  —  Bonds 

Wilder  Building  CHARLOTTE.  N.  C.  Dial  FR  7-4551 


SERVING  CHARLOTTE  SINCE  1932 

REALTY  CO.,  INC. 


RESIDENTIAL     •     INDUSTRIAL     •     COMMERCIAL     •  INVESTMENTS 


MANAGEMENT 


221  S.  Church  St. 


MORTGAGE  LOANS 


CHARLOTTE  N  C 


INSURANCE 


f 


Dial  FR  5-7771 


YOU  WILL  ENJOY  OUR  FRENCH  DINING  ROOM 

Mecklenburg  Hotel 

JOE  L.  MATTHEWS,  Manager 
Outstanding  Southern  Hospitality  and  Service 
FREE  PARKING  CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


CALL  YOUR  CARPETS'  FRIEND  .  .  . 

ROGER'S  RUG  &  CARPET  CO. 

WE  SELL  AND  INSTALL  OUR  OWN  CARPETS 
RUGS  AND  CARPETS  CLEANED  RIGHT  IN  YOUR  OWN  HOME 
Dial  EM  6-4121  1520  Providence  Road,  Charlotte,  N.  C. 


FAYELL'S 
SHOE  SHOP 

Shoe  Service 
of  Character 

130  N.  College  Street 

Dial  ED  4-1733 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


ADROIT  CLEANERS 

1709  W.  Trade  Street 
ED  4-7826 
Charlotte,  N.  C 


Southern  Flooring  &  Acoustical  Co.,  Inc. 

L.  E.  WALDRON,  President 

Flooring  and  Acoustical 
Contractors 

931  East  Morehead   CHARLOTTE,  N.  C.  Dial  ED  3-7116-7-8 


A.  I  PRICE  &  ASSOCIATES,  INC. 

PLUMBING  —  HEATING  —  AIR-CONDITIONING 

FR  6-2466         CHARLOTTE,  N.  C.         2230  Park  Road 


TOOMEY  BROS. 
Plumbing  &  Heating  Co. 

Dial  ED  3-8248 
724  W.  Tremont  Avenue 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 

PROPHET  BROTHERS 

FUEL  OIL 
METERED  DELIVERY 

2521  Plaza  FR  7-5541 

CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


City  Chevrolet  Co. 

"Friendly  People" 


Sales  and  Service 

710  S.  Tryon         ED  2-7151 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


io6 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


WE  EXTEND 


GREETINGS 


TO  ALL  OUR  JEWISH  NEIGHBORS 

COURTESY  FORD  MOTORS,  INC. 

—  AND  EMPLOYEES  — 

Dial  FR  7-6581  for  SALES,  SERVICE  &  PARTS 
515  East  4th  Street  CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


Eat 
Foremost 
Ice  Cream 

*  DELICIOUS 


Drink 
Foremost 
Milk 


Enjoy 
Our 
Orange  Juice 

HEALTHFUL 


FOREMOST  DAIRIES,  INC. 

1224  N.  Tryon  Street  Dial  ED  2-7116 

CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


THOS.  GRIFFITH  &  COMPANY 

Insurance  Headquarters  Since  1875 
ALL  LINES  OF  INSURANCE  (Except  Life) 
805  Wachovia  Bank  Bldg.  Phones  ED  2-4195—2-4196 

CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS  

HOME  FEDERAT  SAVINGS 
&  LOAN  ASSOCIATION 

"Charlotte's  Savings  Corner" 
139  South  Tryon  Charlotte,  N.  C. 


Your  Satisfaction  is  Our  Greatest  Interest 

7l4e  eMooi  Man 
RESTAURANT 

1427  E.  Fourth  St.       CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


Dial  ED  2-9825 


McDEYITT  and  STREET  COMPANY 

GENERAL  CONTRACTORS 


505  Builders  Building  —  Post  Office  Box  1847 
Telephone  ED  4-2811  CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


Jane  Rubin  and  Miss  Nancy 
Grant,  both  of  Columbia. 

Susan  Lindau  spent  a  month's 
vacation  with  her  sister  in  Falls 
Church,  Va. 

Congratulations  to  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Sol  Kline  who  became  proud 
parents  of  a  girl  on  August  ist. 
Also  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jack  Gold- 
stein (former  Dorothy  Rose  Krug- 
man  of  Columbia)  who  have  a 
daughter. 

Congratulations  to  Miss  Belle 
Lavjsky,  daughter  of  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  M.  S.  Lavisky  upon  her  en- 
gagement to  Jerry  Jewler,  son  of 
Mrs.  Leon  Cherner,  and  the  late 
Morris  Jewler,  of  AA'ashington, 
D.  C. 

Funeral  services  were  held  at 
Hebrew  Benevolent  Society  Ceme- 
tery for  Sailing  Heyman,  formerly 
of  Chester,  who  died  at  the  Veter- 
an's Hospital  in  Coral  Gables, 
Fla.  Rabbi  J.  Aaron  Levi  of  Sum- 
ter conducted  the  services. 

Survivors  Tnclude  his  mother, 
Mrs.  Lucille  S.  Heyman  of  Chest- 
er, one  brother  and  sister-in-law, 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Sidney  Heyman  of 
Washington,  D.  C. 

Columbians  were  shocked  at  the 
sudden  death  of  Mrs.  B.  B.  Gold- 
berg. 


ISRAEL  RECOGNIZES 
CYPRUS 

Israel  has  extended  official  recog- 
nition to  the  new  Republic  of 
Cyprus  in  a  message  to  Archbishop 
Makarios,  President,  voicing  hope 
for  the  establishment  of  friendly 
relations  between  Jerusalem  and 
Nicosia.  The  message  was  cabled 
by  Foreign  Minister  Golda  Meir. 

At  the  same  time  it  was  announc- 
ed that  Zev  Levin,  Israeli  Consul 
General  at  Nicosia,  Cyprus,  had 
been  named  Ambassador  to  the 
republic.  He  will  present  his 
credentials  to  President  Makarios 
within  the  next  few  days. 

Students  of  history  here  were 
quick  to  recall  the  good  relations 
which  have  been  existing  between 


KIRK  COUSART  & 
ASSOCIATES 

Manufacturers' 
Representatives 

HEATING  and  POWER 
PLANT  EQUIPMENT 

715  W.  Morehead  FR  5-7737 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


September,  i960 

Israel  and  the  people  of  Cyprus 
every  since  the  ancient  biblical  days 
down  to  contemporary  times.  Be- 
tween the  end  of  the  war  and  the 
rebirth  of  Israel  as  a  state  in  1948, 
the  Cypriotes  displayed  most  laudi- 
ble  cooperation  with  Jewish  leaders 
and  organizations  in  connection 
with  the  so-called  "illegal"  immi- 
gration to  Palestine. 

Cairo  in  recent  weeks  has  been 
making  frantic  efforts  to  thwart 
establishment  of  diplomatic  rela- 
tions between  the  countries  as  well 
as  to  undermine  the  old  friendship 
between  Israel  and  the  Cypriote 
people.  Cairo  in  its  abortive  efforts 
to  breach  that  friendship  poured 
out  propaganda  that  Egypt  had 
helped  Cvorus  get  independence. 

The  new  government  of  Cyprus 
indicated  it  plans  naming  for  the 
time  onlv  four  ambassadors,  to 
London,  AVashington,  Athens  and 
Ankona. 


Ambassador  Michael  Comay,  Is- 
rael's Permanent  Representative  to 
the  United  Nations  was  among:  the 
prominent  speakers  at  the  United 
Jewish  Appeal's  National  Midyear 
Leadership  Conference,  at  the  Shore- 
ham  Hotel  in  Washington,  D.  C. 


New  Year  Greetings 

Franklin  Motor  Co. 

Lincoln  -  Mercury 

1220  South  Tryon 
Dial  ED  4-3073 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


THE  TRUCK  OF  VALUE' 
y2  to  20  tons 


Sales 


Service 


Hollingsworih's 
GMC  Trucks,  Inc. 

3027  N.  Tryon      —      ED.  2-8195 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OU  TLOOK 


WE  BUILD 
BEAUTIFUL  HOMES 
IN  CHARLOTTE'S 
MOST  DESIRABLE 
SUBDIVISIONS 

Select  Your  Home  Today!' 


Construction  Co., 
Inc. 

Dial  FR  5-8431 
3400  Rozzells  Ferry  Rd. 

Branch  Office 

Dial  FR  7-2529 
4017  N.  Independence 

Branch  Office: 

Dial  JA  3-6425 
Pineville  Rd. 

CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


Ernest  Ellison,  Inc. 

"JUST  INSURANCE" 

Since  1916 

Builders  Building 
Phone  ED  3-1146 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


PARKER  -  GARDNER 
COMPANY 

ORGANS  —  PIANOS 

Records  —  Sheet  Music 

118  W.  Trade  St.  ED  3-6674 

CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


SELWYN  HOTEL 

Air -Conditioned 
<~>NE  OF  CHARLOTTE'S 
FRIENDLIEST,  FINEST 
HOTELS 


Need  a  Plumber? 
Call  ED  3-6578 

John  Hutchinson 
Plumbing  Company 

1419  E.  4th  St. 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 

H.  F.  PORTER 

Plumbing  Company 

3041  South  Boulevard 

Dial  JA  3-1212 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


Ma,  Me  and  Milady 

(Concluded  From  Page  29) 
her  with  a  needle  she  didn't  relish. 
Enough  was  enough.  She  couldn't 
take  it  -  my  nagging,  my  piddling 
economy,  my  gross  immunity 
while  she  suffered. 

And  then  the  dam  broke. 

"Listen  Daddy-O,"  she  ex- 
claimed haughtily,  "please  do  me 
a  favor  and  lend  me  a  thousand 
dollars.  Please.  I've  had  it,  but 
good!" 

"You've  had  what?"  I  shot  back 
adamantly. 

My  question  was  ignored,  as  if 
I'd  never  mentioned  it. 

"You'd  better  lend  me  the 
money  because  tomorrow  I'm 
calling  Marilyns'  husband.  He's 
a  customer's  man  in  a  brokerage 
house  downtown  and  I'm  going 
to  tell  him  to  buy  me  as  many 
shares  in  g.  and  e.  as  he  can  for 
the  money.  This  simply  can't  go 
on,  this  peanut  economy  plan  of 
yours!" 

I  stared  at  her  but  to  no  avail. 
She  carried  on  unswervingly. 
"After  all,,  I'd  rather  do  this 
than  constantly  harp  at  my  chil- 
dren and  drive  them  to  an  asylum 
for  penny-pinchers,  all  because  of 
a  nickel  or  dime  saving  a  day.  And 
besides,  won't  it  be  a  wonderful 
feeling  to  know  that  the  more 
juice  you  use  the  better  the  likeli- 
hood of  an  increase  in  dividends?" 

Frankly  I  resented  Milady  tell- 
ing me  off  in  this  manner.  "I've 
never  bought  a  share  of  stock  in 
my  life.  Why  start  now?" 

Milady  had  the  undisputed  an- 
swer. "It's  about  time  you  did. 
Isn't  it  gratifying  to  know  that 
every  time  you  pull  the  light  chord 
or  twitch  the  switch  you  will  be 
contributing  to  the  good  and  wel- 
fare of  a  company  you  have  a  fi- 
nancial interest  in?" 

That  was  a  year  ago.  To  day, 
thanks  to  my  wife,  pardon  me,  Mi- 
lady, we  have  13,000  invested  in 
g.  and  e.,  proud  owners  of  100 
shares  of  common  which  nets  us 
$100  a  year  in  dividends.  Our 
utility  bills  get  bigger  and  bigger 
as  time  goes  on,  but  the  wav  Mi- 
lady figures  it  we're  way  ahead 
at  the  end  of  every  twelve  month 
period. 

Ma  had  the  right  idea  all  along, 
but  it  took  Milady  to  generate  it 
into  effect. 

That  is,  in  one  respect  only. 


BUY  THAT 
ISRAEL  BOND 
NOW! 


Dial  FR  3-6177 


F.  &  R.  COAL 
AND  OIL  CO. 

624  S.  Cedar 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


SPEIR  &  CO. 

Incorporated 
Insurance — Bonds 


Dial  ED  3-1171 
130  East  Fourth 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


CAROLINA  RESTAURANT  SUPPLY  CO. 

"The  House  That  Undersells" 
Complete  Restaurant  Supplies  and  Equipment 
220  S.  College  St.      CHARLOTTE,  N.  C.  ED  4-3269 


CHESAPEAKE 

Stock  Co.,  Inc. 


Paper 


Dial  ED  3-9512 
701  W.  5th  Street 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 

McKEE  REALTY  CO 

Real  Estate  —  Insurance 
123  W.  4th  St.    Dial  ED  3-1134 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


N,  G.  SPEIR 

Inc. 


Home  Loans 
Real  Estate  Sales 

• 

130  East  Fourth  Street 
Dial  FR  5-9871 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


Please  Patronize  Our  Advertisers 


FINEST  AMERICAN  and 
CHINESE  CUISINE 

5L  MiNG  Tft££ 

For  Reservation  Call  ED  4-3028 
520  Providence  Road 

CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


MYERS  PARK 
PHARMACY 

Prescription  Specialists 
1340  Romany  Rd.   ED  2-7187 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


Finance  Group, 
Inc. 

Suite  1009,  Wachovia  Bldg. 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


W.  M.  MARTIN 
TRANSFER  CO. 

821  East  17th  Street 

Dial  ED  3-4377 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


A. A.  SHORT 
VARIETY  STORE 

Piece  Goods  —  Remnants 
1300  N.  Brevard        FR  5-2157 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 

GARRISON  & 
HOPKINS  CO.,  Inc. 

PLUMBING  AND  HEATING 

1509  Camden  Road 

Dial  ED  3-6604 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


Nexv  Year  Greetings 

DILWORTH 
MATTRESS  CO. 

242  W.  Tremont  Ave.         ED  3-9241 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


Dayton  Tire  Sales  Co. 

Dayton  Tires  and  Tubes 
Recapping 

210  W.  Morehead  ED  3-3171 

CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


LEDBETTER'S  SHOE  STORE 

SHOES  FOR  WOMEN  AND  CHILDREN 

211  North  Tryon  Dial  ED  4-6912 

CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


Bailey  s  Cafeteria 

Charlotte,  N.  C.  Charlotte,  N.  C. 

(Hotel  Selwyn  Bldg.)  (Doctors  Bldg.,  Kings  Drive) 

Asheville,  N.  C.  (West  Gate  Shopping  Center) 


MECKLENBURG 
NURSERIES,  INC. 

COMPLETE 
LANDSCAPE 
SERVICE 

Easy  ivi on  Lilly  Payments 

DIAL  EX  9-5641 

Thrift  Highway 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


ENJOY  *S  &  F 

Peanut  Products 
Wherever  You  Go  ! 


REMEMBER  THIS  SEAL  .  .  . 
It's  Ycur  Assurance  of  the  Best 


Leo's 
Delicatessen,  Inc. 

"Kosher  Food" 

Specialists  in  Imported 
Delicacies,  Party  Fare, 
and  Gift  Packages 

Phone  FRanklin  5-2400 
1503  Elizabeth  Ave. 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


STANDARD 
TRUCKING  CO. 

Direct  Service  to  and  Between 
All  Points  in 

•  NORTH  CAROLINA 

and 

•  SOUTH  CAROLINA 

General  Commodities 

DIAL  ED  2-1107 

225  E.  16th 
CHARLOTTE.  N.  C. 


BUTLER 
SEAFOOD 

"Everything  in  Fresh 
Seafoods" 

919  South  McDowell  St. 
Just  Across  from  the  Addison 
Dial  FR  5-4409 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


Case  Brothers 

"The  House  of  Baldwin" 

Pianos— Organs 

4926  N.  Tryon        ED  3-4108 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


#  Store  Fronts 

#  Glass  For  All 
Purposes 

0  Paints 

Charlotte,  N.  C. 
Asheville,  N.  C. 
Durham,  N.  C. 
Raleigh,  N.  C. 


"We  Cater  to  Those  Who 
Care" 

Carolina  Auto 
Upholstery  Co. 

•  Tailored  Seat  Covers 

•  Convertible  Tops 
Complete  Interior  Trim 

139  W.  Morehead— ED  2-3998 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


Charleston,  S.  C. 

(Concluded  from,  Page  91) 

Mrs.  Rephan  was  graduated 
from  Miami  Beach  High  School 
and  attended  the  University  of 
Miami  where  she  was  a  member  of 
Sigma  Delta  Tau  Sorority. 

Mr.  Rephan  was  graduated  from 
Rivers  High  School  and  the  Col- 
lege of  Charleston  and  he  attended 
The  Citadel. 

He  is  associated  with  Monarch 
Building  Supply  Co.  in  Charles- 
ton. 

Out  of  town  guests  included: 
Mr.  Martin  Kahn,  Mrs.  Joseph 
Kahn,  Miss  Mamie  Rephan,  Mrs. 
Harry  Sabel  of  Myrtle  Beach,  S. 
C;  Mr.  and  Mrs.  David  Bern- 
stein, Mr.  and  Mrs.  Irving  Weisler 
of  Greensboro,  N.  C.  Mr.  Harry 
Bebergal  of  Lake  City,  S.  C,  Mr. 
Abe  Slovis  of  Knoxville,  Tenn.; 
Mr.  Joseph  Lipsey  of  Thomaston, 
Georgia;  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Harris 
Lipsey  of  Savannah,  Ga.;  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Alvin  H.  White  of  Hadden- 
ficld,  New  Jersey;  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Al  H.  Simon  of  New  York  City; 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jack  Simon  of  Mis- 
souri; Mr.  and  Mrs.  Lenchitz,  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Jack  Harris,  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Ben  Eisenberg,  Mrs.  Shirley 
Himmelstein  all  of  Miami  Beach, 
also  Cantor  and  Mrs.  Diamond  of 
New  York  City.  Also  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Nason  Becker,  Jules  Becker 
of  Boston,  Massachusetts,  also  Mr. 
Ben  Blatt,  Edward  Blatt  of  Co- 
lumbia, S.  C.  also  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Edgar  Doobrom  of  High  Point, 
N.  C,  Miss  Harriett  Laimer  of 
Penn.  also  Mr.  Phil  Noblinsky  of 
New  York. 


BUY  THAT 
ISRAEL  BOND  NOW! 


Rabbi  Paul  M.  Steinberg  has  been 
appointed  Executive  Dean  of  the 
New  York  School  of  Hebrew  Union 
College-Jewish  Institute  of  Religion. 
Dr.  Nelson  Glueck,  president,  has 
announced. 


RANCH  HOUSE 
RESTAURANT 


Specializing  in 

Guaranteed 
U.  S.  Choice 

and  Prime 
Western  Beef 

Charcoal- 
Broiled 

DIAL 
EX  9-5411 


Wilkinson  Boulevard 
U.  S.  Highway  29  South 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


LEFLER 
CONCRETE 
BLOCK  CO, 

•  Concrete  Products 

•  Septic  Tanks 

•  Excavating  &  Grading 

•  Asphalt  Paving 

646  State  St.         Dial  FR  5-3359 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


HOME 


is  where 


the 


HEAT,, 


With  Dependable 
COLUMBUS  HEATING  OIL 

Free-flowing,  clean-burn- 
ing Columbus  Oil  Co.  Heat- 
ing Oil  never  lets  you  down 
.  .  .  gives  wonderful,  even 
heat,  regardless  of  outside 
temperature.  It's  the  heating 
oil  with  7  big  extras: 

1.  ANTI-RUST  PROTECTION 

2.  REDUCES  SLUDGE 

3.  FREE-FLOWING 

4.  QUICK-FIRING 

5.  PROMPT.  DEPENDABLE  DELIV- 
ERY 

6.  EASY  BUDGET  TERMS 

7.  FINEST  DEGREE  DAY  SERVICE 

CALL  TODAY! 

ED  3-7511 

24  HOUR  SERVICE 

Columbus  Oil  Co. 

Distributor  Since  1924 


'Charlotte's  Pioneer  Fuel  Oil 
Dealer" 

2109  South  Boulevard 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


The  Civic  Liberties  Union 

(Concluded  From  Page  33) 


Solomon's  warning  in  Proverbs 
18:21,  "Death  and  life  are  in  the 
power  of  the  tongue."  In  some 
mysterious  way,  our  liberties,  or 
constitution,  or  democratic  way 
of  life  will  be  safe  as  long  as 
people  are  free  to  say  anything 
they  wish.  Thus  a  Kasper  might 
defy  the  injunction  of  a  Federal 
judge  by  haranguing  segregation- 
ists to  prevent  the  admission  of 
Negro  children  in  white  schools. 
The  A.C.L.U.  deems  it  a  matter 
and  defends  this  firebrand's  right 
of  conscience  to  rush  into  court 
to  harangue  a  mob  in  Clinton, 
Tenn.  A  public  school  is  dynamit- 
ed into  a  heap  of  rubble.  What 
of  it  as  long  as  the  rights  of  a 
demagogue  to  stir  up  passions  are 
upheld. 

If  anyone  concludes  that  this 
writer  is  indifferent  to  free  speech 
he  is  wrong.  But  the  difference 
between  liberty  and  license  has 
been  often  defined.  The  famous 
dictum  of  Justice  Holmes  about 
shouting  "fire"  in  a  crowded 
theatre  has  passed  into  current 
Americanese;  it  has  become  a 
popular  maxim.  My  quarrel  with 
the  A.C.L.U.  springs  from  a  fan- 
atical interpretation  of  the  1st 
or  14th  Amendments  that  leads 
to  dangerous  absurdities.  Freedom 
of  speech  like  any  other  rule  of 
life  or  conduct  must  be  construed 
with  reasonable  common  sense. 
The  courts  have  never  defined 
civil  rights  as  a  license  to  shout 
1 10111  the  house  tops  any  scurrility 

In  Wilmington 
Tf  c, 


€sso 

DEALER 

Mohr's  Service 

Corner  12th  and  Market 
RO  2-9261 


COASTAL 

Office  Equipment  Co. 

Office  Supplies 

Sales  &  Service 

For 

•  Olivetti  Printing  Calculators 
and  Adding  Machines 

•  National  Adding  Machines 

•  Stenorette  Dictating  Equipment 

•  Apeco  Photocopy  Equipment 

DIAL  RO  3  7326 

3926  Market 
North  17  Shopping  Center 
WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 


regardless  of  its  effect  or  conse- 
quence. Frank  Murphy,  one  of  the 
most  liberal  judges  ever  to  sit  on 
the  Supreme  Court,  wrote  an 
opinion  that  became  unanimous 
in  Chaplinsky  vs.  New  Hampshire 
(315  U.S.  568): 

Allowing  the  broadest  scope  to 
the  language  and  purpose  of  the 
Fourteenth  Amendment,  it  is  well 
understood  that  the  right  of  free 
speech  is  not  absolute  at  all  times 
and  under  all  circumstances. 
There  are  certain  well-defined  and 
narrowly  limited  classes  of  speech, 
the  prevention  and  punishment  of 
which  has  never  been  thought  to 
raise  any  constitutional  problem. 
These  include  the  lewd  and  ob- 
scene, the  profane,  the  libelous, 
and  the  insulting  or'Tighting" 
words— those  which  by  their  very 
utterance  inflice  injury  or  tend  to 
incite  an  immediate  breach  of 
the  peace.  Resort  to  epithets  or 
personal  abuse  is  not  in  any  prop- 
er sense  communication  of  in- 
formation or  opinion  safeguarded 
by  the  Constitution,  and  its  pun- 
ishment as  a  criminal  act  would 
raise  no  question  under  that  in- 
strument. 

Legal  aid  to  Rockwell's  Nazis 
is  even  more  absurd,  if  not  more 
dangerous,  than  support  to  Kasp- 
er. Surely  the  A.C.L.U.  has  leaders 
with  a  moral  sense  of  public  re- 
sponsibility. Are  they  blind  to 
the  implications  of  a  Nazi  move- 
ment in  America?  Did  they  ever 
read  Mein  Kampf?  Can  they  be 
insensible  to  the  perils  lurking  in 
anti-Semitism  as  a  political  weap- 
on? Are  they  ignorant  or  merely 
indifferent  to  the  events  that 
transpired  in  the  1930  and  40 
decades?  Is  it  a  matter  of  small 
moment  that  6,000,000  Jews  were 
eliminated  by  a  racist  philosophy 
now  taken  up  by  Rockwell?  Yet 
the  A.C.L.U.  furnishes  legal  pro- 
tection as  soon  as  a  Rockwell 
copperhead  is  arrested  for  spew- 
ing forth  venom  that  calls  for  ex- 
termination of  Jews  in  America 
and  elsewhere. 

The  Hebrew  word  saichel  has 
no  equivilent  in  English.  It  de- 
notes reason  together  with  com- 
mon sense  joined  to  intuitive  un- 
derstanding that  avoids  pitfalls 
and  leads  to  wise  decision.  The 
trouble  with  the  A.C.L.U.  is  that 
it  lacks  saichel.  And  the  Jewish 
lawyers  who  jump  to  the  defense 
of  Rockwell's  henchmen  are  the 
most  naive  of  the  lot. 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Wilmington,  N.  C. 


YOPP  FUNERAL  HOME 

Established  1892 

FUNERAL  DIRECTORS 


Dial  RO  2-6666      WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 


1207  Market 


jr 

A 

Li 

.E 

A 

N 

E 

Ri 

SHIRT  LAUNDRY 


"We  Clean  Suede  and  Leather  Jackets" 
808  S.  17th  St.  WILMINGTON,  N.  C.  Dial  RO  2-1357 


W.  E.  STARNES  LUMBER  CO. 

LUMBER  -  BUILDERS  SUPPLIES 
ROOFING  -  PAINTS 
Kerr  Avenue  Dial  RO  2-8331 

WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 


mm 


OF  OMAHA 


Eastern  Carolina  Division  Office 

John  21.  Moran's  Agency 

26  N.  2nd  St.         WILMINGTON,  N.  C.         Dial  RO  3-4621 


TRUCK-TRACTOR  SALES,  Inc. 

Sales— WHITE  TRUCKS— Service 
AUTOCAR 

1100  S.  17th  St.  Dial  RO  3-6281 

WILMINGTON,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


JOHNSON  TRIMMING  SHOP 

Auto  Body  Repairing      —      Convertible  Tops  Replaced 

306  Castle  St.       WILMINGTON,  N.  C,       Dial  RO  2-9536 


f  TAILORED  FOR  YOU... 

M    mil  I  SOUTHLAND 

}/\i//)CK^  Sf>ORT$WEAR 

T  § A^'V     '      *  Luxury  Fabrics 
V  I        '  Handsome  Styling 
•  Washable  ♦  Popular  Priced 

Block-Southland 
Sportswear,  Inc. 

WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 

NEW  YORK  OFFICE :  EMPIRE  STATE  BLDG. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Gastonia,  N.  C. 


Jewry's  Long  Chain  of  Books 

(Concluded  From  Page  97) 


Gastonia  Mutual  Savings  & 
Loan  Association 

Organized  1905 
HOME  LOANS  —  INSURED  SAVINGS 

283  W.  Main  Avenue  Gastonia,  N.  C. 


RICH'S  WELDING 
PLANT 

Dial  UN  5-3651 
224  East  Long  Avenue 
GASTONIA,  N.  C. 


SPENCER'S  INC. 

Office  Supplies 
Printing 

257  W.  Main       Dial  UN  5-2356 
GASTONIA,  N.  C. 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS  FROM 

JACKSON  &  SMITH 

INVESTMENT  SECURITIES 

211  Commercial  Building  Dial  UN  5-2314 

GASTONIA,  N.  C. 


WITTEN  SUPPLY  (0. 

BUILDING  MATERIALS 

310  E.  Long  Ave.  GASTONIA,  N.  C.  Dial  UN  5-8584 


NORRIS  SUPPLY  &  MACHINE  COMPANY 

Automatic  Heating  Plants  and  Mill  Supplies-Appliances 

232  East  Airline  Avenue  Dial  UN  7-7931 

GASTONIA,  N.  C. 


FIRST  FEDERAL  SAVINGS  &  LOAN  ASS'N. 

INSURED  SAVINGS 
Main  Office  Akers  Center  Branch 

251  W.  Main  Ave.  1327  E.  Franklin  Ave. 

Dial  UN  7-7248  Dial  UN  4-4566 

GASTONIA,  N.  C. 


one  room  set  aside  lor  its  exclu- 
sive use;  be  staffed  by  a  full  or 
part-time  librarian;  have  a  fixed 
annual  budget;  contain  a  mini- 
mum of  1,000  Jewish  books  in  any 
language;  acquire  a  minimum  of 
100  new  Jewish  books  during  the 
previous  year;  have  a  catalogue 
accessible  to  all  readers;  be  open 
at  least  10  hours  a  week;  and  par- 
ticipate actively  in  Jewish  Book 
Month  activities  and  other  pro- 
jects that  enrich  Jewish  culture.) 

The  purpose  of  a  library  is  to 
be  used;  a  library  without  readers, 
especially  zealous  readers,  is  just 
a  cut  above  a  library  that  doesn't 
exist.  There  is  no  public  prestige 
or  morale-boosting  to  be  gained 
from  the  mere  presence  of  a  col- 
lection of  books.  A  Jewish  com- 
munity library  has  a  unique  func- 
tion of  its  own  in  relation  to  the 
community  it  serves.  As  things 
stand  today,  every  Jewish  com- 
munity must  look  upon  itself  as 
a  reservoir  of  forces  devoted  to  the 
cultivation,  enrichment,  and  sur- 
vival of  Jewish  life.  Conceivably 
it  may  not  be  a  large  reservoir, 
but  it  will  be  deep,  and  it  will  be 
fed  by  unfailing  springs.  These 
springs  well  up  from  within  the 
books  which  contain  the  ever- 
living  waters,  the  mayim  hayim, 
of  the  Jewish  tradition.  Only  to 
the  degree  that  these  waters  are 
regularly  imbibed  by  the  individ- 


ual members  of  our  local  com- 
munities will  Jewish  life  thrive  in 
America. 

Life  in  any  Diaspora  land  sets 
up  powerful  currents  and  counter- 
attractions  against  the  mainten- 
ance of  an  informed,  vigorous 
Jewish  culture.  The  Jewish  li- 
brary, the  Jewish  school,  and  the 
Jewish  home,  even  when  working 
together,  will  have  a  hard  enough 
struggle  to  prevent  the  gradually 
complete  evaporation  of  Jewish 
knowledge  and  values.  Neither 
library,  school,  nor  home  can  af- 
ford to  go  it  alone,  and  victory 
can  be  had  only  at  the  price  of 
constant  cooperation  and  effort. 
We  can  hope  that  someday  this 
victory  will  be  seen  in  the  shabby, 
dog-eared,  dilapidated  condition 
of  the  books  stacked  in  every 
communal  library;  these  veterans 
will  bear,  like  trophies,  the  scars 
of  a  triumphant  campaign. 

A  book,  after  all,  is  chiefly  an 
instrucent  for  enabling  us  to  mas- 
ter the  art  of  living.  David  ben 
Gurion,  the  valiant  prime  minis- 
ter of  Israel,  summed  up  three 
thousand  years  of  history  when 
he  said,  "We  have  preserved  the 
Book  and  the  Book  has  preserved 
us." 


Make  a  Note! 
Buy  An  Israel  Bond 


PAUL  STEWART  MACHINE  CO. 

Manufacturers  of 

Bolsters  —  Rings  and  Holders 
Spindles  —  Spindle  Repairs 

Wilkinson  Blvd.,  P.  0.  Box  14  Dial  UN  4-3205 

GASTONIA,  N.  C. 


A  Sheet  Metal  Work  Serving  Textile  Plants 

Gastonia  Textile  Sheet  Metal  Works 

INCORPORATED 
Manufacturers  and  Rebuilders  of 
Spinning,  Twister,  Spooler  and  Quiller  Cylinders 
Card  Screens — Picker  Screens — Condenser  Screens 
Comber  Tins — Waste  Chutes — Lap  Aprons 
Aspirators 

MORE  PRODUCTION  AT  LOWER  COSTS,  WTH 
GASTONIA  TEXTILE  SHEET  METAL  PARTS 


An  Essential  Service  to  Combed  Yarn  Mills 

Gastonia  Comber  Needling  Co. 

Experienced  Specialists  in  Every  Branch  of 
Reneedling  of  All  Makes 
Half  Laps  and  Top  Combs  for  Cotton  Combing 
Gill  Combs  —  Faller  Bars 


SERVING  THE  SOUTH  SINCE  1914 


222  EAST  LONG  AVENUE  TELEPHONE  UN-7-6316 

GASTONIA,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


1 1 1 


Not  every  Bar  Mitzvah  youth  is  greeted  by  the  leader  of  a  nation.  Yet, 
this  is  what  took  place  when  Dan  Opatoshu,  ear-old  son  of  noted  Broad- 
way and  television  actor,  David  Opatoshu,  celebrated  his  Bar  Mitzvah  in 
Jerusalem  recently.  Israel  Prime  Minister  David  Ben-Gurion  presented  him 
with  a  personally-inscribed  illustrated  Bible  in  h's  office  (above). 


HIGH  POINT,  N.  C. 


Mr.  and  Mrs.  Israel  Bloom  an- 
nounce the  marriage  of  their 
daughter,  Iris  Rae,  to  Charles  W. 
Bach,  of  Fort  Knox,  Ky.  Mr.  Bach 
is  the  son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  R.  G. 
Bach  of  Westlake,  Ohio. 

The  bridegroom  is  at  present 
serving  in  the  United  States  Army 
at  Fort  Knox.  He  attended  the 
University  of  Ohio  and  the  Uni- 
versity of  Georgia  after  high 
school  graduation. 

Mrs.  Bach  was  graduated  from 
High  Point  Senior  High  School 
and  attended  the  University  of 
Georgia    at    Athens,    Ga.,  where 


24-Hour  Radio-Dispatched 
Taxi  Service 

CALL  88  8  4531  FOR 

BLUE  BIRD 

CALL  88-8-5041  FOR 

YELLOW  TOP 

HIGH  POINT,  N.  C. 


she  was  a  member  of  Sigma  Delta 
Tau  Sorority. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bach  are  making 
their  home  at  Fort  Knox. 

Harry  Doctor,  68,  died  July 
27th  at  Baptist  Hospital  in  Wins- 
ton-Salem aftei  a  long  illness. 

He  was  a  native  of  Newark, 
N.  J.  He  had  been  a  resident  of 
High  Point  for  38  years.  He  was 
a  veteran  of  World  War  I  and 
a  member  of  the  Jewish  War  Vet- 
erans. 

He  was  president  of  Vogue 
Cleaners.  He  was  a  member  of 
the  Woodmen  of  the  World,  Pied- 
mont Camp  62.  He  was  present- 
ed a  25-year  membership  pin  by 
the  organization  June  3.  He  was 
a  member  of  the  Kiwanis  Club, 
a  Mason  and  a  Shriner. 

Surviving  are  his  wife,  Mrs. 
Celia  London  Doctor;  one  daugh- 
ter, Mrs.  Anna  Lou  Cassell  of 
High  Point;  three  grandchildren; 
two  brothers,  Charles  Doctor  of 
Atlanta,  Ga.,  and  Jake  Doctor  of 
Macon,  Ga. 


Piedmont  Chemical  Industries,  Inc. 


OILS 


SOAPS 


FINISHES 


P.  0.  Box  790 


-:-  BLEACH 

Phone  88-2-4159 


HIGH  POINT,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


UNITED  WASTE  MATERIALS  CO. 

ALL  TYPES  OF  WASTE  PAPER 
MILL  WASTE  —  WIPING  RAGS  —  BAGGING,  ETC. 

Phone  88  8-5221  611  S.  Hamilton  St.  HIGH  POINT,  N.  C. 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  following  Firms 

High  Point,  N.  C. 


in 


PCS  CHARGE  PLAN 

Serving- 
Burlington  —  Chapel  Hill  —  Durham 
Greensboro  —  High  Point  —  Raleigh 
Thomasville  —  Winston-Salem. 


*  THE  MODERX  CHARGE-CARD  PLAN* 


GENERAL  PAPER  COMPANY 

Manufacturers  and  Distributors  of 
PAPER  BAGS  FOR  ALL  PURPOSES 
409  Prospect         HIGH  POINT,  N.  C.  Dial  88  2-6869 


Efficient  Service  Guarantees  Insurance  Economy 

JONES  and  PEACOCK.  Incorporated 

INSURANCE 

118  OAKWOOD  CT.  HIGH  POINT,  N.  C.  DIAL  88-2-1716 


r 


HUNTER  and  COMPANY 


Upholstering  Supplies— Auto  Trimmer  Supplies 
1502  S.  Main  Street  Dial  88-3-1988 

HIGH  POINT,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


See  and  drive  the 
Beautiful  1960  DODGES 

Horace  G.  Ilderton,  Inc. 
HIGH  POINT.  N.  C. 


SUNSHINE 
LAUNDRY 

Mothproof  Dry  Cleaning 

210-212  Pine  Street 
HIGH  POINT,  N.  C. 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS  FROM 

HIGH  POINT  -  THOMASVILLE 
&  DENTON  RAILROAD 

Fast  -  Reliable  -  Responsible  -  Dependable 
FREIGHT  SERVICE 

"Nothing  But  Service  To  Sell 
HIGH  POINT,  N.  C. 


112 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Statesville  —  Hickory,  N.  C. 


Ralph  C.  Sherrill.  President      Herbert  G.  Sherrill,  Sec.  k  Treas. 
Flake  A.  Sherrill,  Vice-President 

SHERRILL  LUMBER  COMPANY 

Building  Materials 

"Everything  from  Foundation  to  Roof 

Dial  TR  3-4319  1100  W.  Front  Statesville,  N.  C. 


HICKORYS  LEADING  STORE 


PARLIER  PLUMBING  &  HEATING  CO. 

Plumbing         •         Heating         •  Air-Conditioning 


225  E.  Front 


Heating  • 
CONTRACTORS 

STATESVILLE,  N.  C. 


Dial  TR  2-2421 


LAWS  STAINED  GLASS  STUDIOS 

Designers  and  Manufacturers  of 
Church  Windows  —  Steel  Frames  —  Ventilators 

Complete  Leaded  Glass  Service 
WE  INVITE  YOU  TO  VISIT  OUR  STUDIOS 
Dial  TR  3-8463  Turnersburg  Rd.  Statesville,  N.  C. 


Statesville  Venetian  Blind  Service 

Specializing  in 
Drapes  &  Venetian  Blinds 

Dial  TR  3-7323  1041  W.  Front  STATESVILLE,  N.  C. 


The  First  National  Bank 
of  Catawba  County 


HICKORY,  N.  C. 


Department  Store 

Dry  Goods,  Clothing, 
Notions,  Shoes, 
Ready-to-Wear 

STATESVILLE,  N.  C. 


SHELL 


Electric  Co. 

ELECTRIC  CONTRACTORS 

•  Motors  Repaired 

•  Industrial  Wiring 

Dial  TR  3-3451  or  TR  3-8070 
116  Chambers  St. 
STATESVILLE,  N.  C. 


Statesville,  North  Carolina 

MBS.  MILTON  STEINBERGER,  Correspondent 


MRS.  STANLEY  M 

The  beautiful  garden  of  the 
Linwood  Country  Club  in  Atlan- 
tic City,  N.  J.  made  a  lovely  set- 
ting for  the  wedding  of  Miss 
Joyce  Ellen  Shenknian,  daughter 
of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Morris  Shenk- 
man  of  Atlantic  City,  and  Mr. 
Stanley  Martin  Steinberg,  son  of 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Milton  Steinberger, 
of  Statesville,  N.  C. 

Rabbi  Harry  Jolt  of  Beth  Judah 
Temple,  Atlantic  City  conducted 
the  double  ring  ceremony  on  the 
club  lawn,  under  a  canopy  massed 
with  pink  carnations,  and  centered 
by  a  large  Star  of  David  of  white 
carnations,  surrounded  by  trees, 
ferns  and  palms.  Urns  of  white 
and  pink  flowers  and  pink  satin 
ribbons  designated  the  aisles. 

Jules  Lavan  of  Atlantic  City 
presented  a  program  of  music. 

The  bride  was  escorted  by  her 
father  who  gave  her  in  marriage. 

Miss  Gavle  Goldstein  of  Grif- 
fin, Ga.,  and  Miss  Phvllis  Whitten 
of  Gastonia,  N.  C.  College,  class- 
mates of  the  bride,  were  brides- 
maids with  Miss  Judi  Feinberg  of 
Atlantic  City  and  Miss  Judy  Draz- 
in   of  Philadelphia. 

Mr.  Norman  Steinberger  of 
Statesville  was  his  brother's  best 
man.  Ushers  were  Paul  Shenkman 
of  Atlantic  City,  the  brides  broth- 
er; Fred  Schiffer  of  Atlantic  City, 
cousin  of  the  bride;  David  Gordon 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  114) 


STEINBERGER 


EFIRD'S 
DEPT.  STORE 

VALUE  FOR  YOUR  DOLLARS 

STATESVILLE,  N.  C. 


You  are  always  welcome  at 


FRALEY'S 
Food  Fair 


STATESVILLE,  N.  C. 


Please  Patronize  Our  Advertisers 


MILK  AND  OTHER 
DAIRY  PRODUCTS 

Your  All  Star  Dairy 


"Your  Shield  of  Quality" 
Dial  TR  2-2464      1161  W.  Front 

STATESVILLE,  N.  C. 


September,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


113 


Advertising  Index 


unan  nm  tan 


Greetings 


All  good  wishes  for  a  New  Year  of  Peace,  Happiness,  and  Prosperity. 
The  advertisers  listed  herewith  extend  to  their  friends  and  patrons 
their  most  sincere  holiday  greetings. 


American  Furniture  Co.  Inc    —  14 

^rrow  Trade   Mark,   Inc     27 

Athens  Hoisery   Mills,   Inc.    22 

Atlantic  Rural  Exposition 

inside  back  cover 

The  Atlantis  Hotel  _    6 

B 

Barkley  Machine  Works  —    34 

Bellcraft  Mfg.  Co   16 

Blue  Gem  Manufacturing  Co   16 

Bladenboro  Cotton  Mills,  Inc.     32 

Block-Southland    Sportswear,   Inc  10E 

Bellcrpft  Mfg.  Co  _    1€ 

Blue  Ridge  Hardware 

and  Supply  Co.,  Inc    25 

Boling  Chair  Co.      24 

Botany  Cottons,  Inc.  _  _   15 

Bradley  Flyer  &  Repair  Co   34 

Brady  Furniture  Co.,  Inc.    26 

Brick  and  Tile  Service   _   95  &  104 

Briscoe  Hosiery  Mills      20 

Brower  Yarn  Mills  _..   33 

Brvant  Fle^tric  Repair  Co    31 

Burkart-Schier  Chemtcol  Co.  26 

EiiTkyarns,    Inc      18 

Burlington  Industries,  Inc.    18 

Burrus  Land  and  Lumber  Co. 

inside  back  cover 
Bush  Transfer,  Inc   16 


Carol-May  Finishing  Co.,  Inc   27 

Carolina  Power  &  Light  Co.   8 

A.  B.  Carter,  Inc.   31 

Carver  Mfg.  Co.,  Inc   ...  24 

Chadbourn  Veneer  Co.  _  _   25 

Chatham  Manufacturing  Co   15 

Clearwater  Finishing  Plant    33 

Cocker  Machine  &  Foundry  Co   23 

Colonial  Motor    Freight  Lines,  Inc   32 

Colonial  Stores  _  -  _  34 

Conover  Chair  Co.    24 

Cooke  Paper  Box  Co.   29 

Cross  Cotton  Mills  — -   35 

Cumberland   Manufacturing  Co.    16 

D 


Dacotah  Cotton  Mills  .. 

Dixie  Loom  Reed  Co  

Dixie  Products,  Inc   

Dromedary    

E 

Eddy-Ray's  Health  Studios,  Inc   13' 

The  Elastic  Corp.    


35 
29 
22 
23 


29 

32 

38 

35 

34 

34 

Gastonia  Textile  Sheet  Metal  Works 
Inc.  and  Comber  Needling  Co   110 


Firestone  Textiles    

Fredrickson  Motor  Express  Corp  

G 

gaston  County  Dyeing  Machine  Co. 
Gaston    Electric   Co.  . 
Gastonia  Belting  & 
Supply  Co.,  Inc. 


Peele  Electrical  Co.,  Inc. 

ELECTRICAL  CONTRACTORS 

106  Stokes         Dial  CA  6-4441 
BURLINGTON,  N.  C. 


G.  MARVIN  HOLT,  Inc. 

FRIGID  AIRE 
Sales  —  Service 
Dial  CA  7-3661 
BURLINGTON,  N.  C. 


BARKER'S 
TIRE  SERVICE 

"U.  S.  ROYAL  TIRES" 

274  W.  Davis  St.        Dial  CA  8-8383 
BURLINGTON,  N.  C. 


Gill's    Coffee  _  

Gold-Tex  Fabrics  Corp.    

Gossett  Machine  Works.  Inc.  

The  Great  Atlantic 

&  Pacific  Tea  Co  -  

H.  L.  Green  Co.,  Inc.  _  

Greensboro  Loom  Reed  Co.,  Inc.- 
Griffin  Supply  Co.,  Inc. 


4 
32 
38 

20 
37 
16 
38 

Grossinger   ..."   17 


Halifax  County  Hoisery  Mills 


30 


Harley  Mitcham  f.-  Co  __   22 

Hartwell  Garment  Co.       16 

Hennis  Freight  Lines,  Inc.     36 

Henredon  Furniture   Industries,   Inc..  _  3 

Her    Grace        12 

Herman-Sipe  &  Co.,  Inc   16 

High  Point-Thomasvillp  & 

Denton    Raiiroad    Ill 

Hildebran  Hoisery  Mills   -  27 

Home-Made  Chair,  Co   20 

Hotel   Concord   _   7 

C.  Howard  Hunt  Pen  Co.    36 


Ideal  Industries,  Inc.  __.  37 

Ideal  Machine  Shops,  Inc     36 

Industrial  Piping  Supply  Co.     38 

J 

W.  G.  Jarrell  Machine  Co.   3C 

Jenkins  Metal  Shops,  Inc   8 

Joanna  Cotton  Mills  Co  ..:   33 

Judson    Mills    18 

K 

Kester  Machinery   Co.   _   30 

L 

Lnughlin  F..  F.  Hosiery  Mills,  Inc.   28 

La  Vogue  Shop   _     back  cover 

Lea-Wayne  Knitting  Mills   29 

Leath  Hosiery  Mill,  Inc   36 

LeBrun  Bros.   _  _  26 

Lester  Bros.  __  inside  front  cover 

Liberty    Chair   Co.   .   14 

T  '^d  •  Hos;erv  Mill   30 

Lineberry  Foundry  & 

Machine    Co./  Inc   33 

P.   Lorillard    Co     17 

Lorimer  Hosiery  Mills,  Inc.  ..  27 

The  Lovable  Brassiere  Co.    37 

L"nch  Po'ierv   Mills    29 

Mc 

McCrackcn  Supply  Co.  19 
M 

Marcus  &  Farber   —    17 

Marcus  Loeb  &  Co.,  Inc.    31 

Martin  at  Hosiery  Mills   30 

Mascot   Knitting   Mills   ..  ...  30 

Maxwell  Royal  Chair  Co.,  Inc   24 

Michie   Co   inside  back  cover 

Mid-State  Paper  Box  Co.  ...  30 

Milton  TT^sierv  Co.  ...  30 

Monarch  Hosiery  Mills.  Inc.  ...   28 

Morrison  Furniture  &  Fixture  Co.    26 

Moss  Trucking  Co   20 

N 

N  X-  W  Industries     4 

Wp"  S"m  Hosiery   Mill   29 

Noland  &  Co.   4 

Norris  Supply  &  Machine  Co  110 

North  Carolina  Association  of 

Jewish   Men  _  _.  3 

North  Carolina  Dyeing  & 

Finishing  Co.  _  29 

O 

The  Oakley  Co   8 

P 

Parkdale   Mill     32 

Pat  Perkins        12 

Piedmont    Airlines    .     _  11 

  30 

  22 

  28 

  31 

  32 


Piedmont  Hoisery  Mills,  Inc. 
Pilot  freight  Carriers,  Inc. 

Pine  Hosiery  Mills  

Public  Servce  Company  of 
North  Carolina,  Inc.  .. 
Puritan  Finishing  Mills   


Reliable  Mfg.  Co    14 

Reliable  Trucking  Co.   25 

Rhodes,    Inc.     25 

Richmond  Department  of 

Public  Utilities   _    4 

Richmond  Hotels    inside  front  cover 

Richter  &  Cochran   37 

Ridge'-iew  Hosiery  Mill  Co   28 

Carol  Rodgers  Jrs.  ._   12 

Royal  Cotton  Mill  Co.     33 

S 

Schachner  Leather  &  Belting  Co.     35 

Sealtest  Southern  Dairies   14 

Sellers  Manufacturing  Co.    33 

Sherrill   Upholstering   Co   24 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a  Happy  and 
Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

BURLINGTON,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


Plan  The  Future  Safely 
With  Carolina  Home  Life  Policies 
"The  Doorway  To  Complete  Family  Protection 
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BURLINGTON,  N.  C. 


Executive  Offices 
JACKSONVILLE,  FLA. 


LILIEN  &  LEE,  INC. 


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Burlington,  N.  C. 


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V/2  Miles  Beyond  City 
Limits  off  Liberty  Hwy. 

Dial  CA  6-3688 
BURLINGTON,  N.  C. 


■Siceloff  Mfg.  Co.,  Inc   20 

:Si!ver  Knit  Hosicrv  Mill=   Inc  28 

Smart  Stvle,  Inc.  '           '  '  Tn 

Snyder  Paper  Corp.    1~  113 

Southern  Paper  Box  Co  27 

P-  Stevens  &  Co  ,  lnc   ,8 

Stoneville  Furniture  Co.  9* 

Superior  Bolster  Co.  _  26 

T 

Textile  Loom  Reed  Co.,  Inc.  30 

Textile  Parts  &  Machine  Co.,  Inc  37 

Troutman  Chair  Co               ...  '"'  24 

Union  r,mn  B-„  Co 

United  Mills  Corporation  35 
United  Waste  Materials  Co.  ZlU 

W  V 

Virginia  Carolina  Freight  Lines 

""ireinin  <5,.™,.  17.  ^  .insi<ie  front  cover 
•  "g'ma  bv.per  Food  Fair 

inside  front  cover 

V/ 

Westboro  Weaving  Co  „ 
Helen  Whiting,  Tnc.    " 

Zim  Israel  Navigation  Co.  Ltd.  17 

NORTH  CAROLINA 
Burlington   m-114 

Statesville,  N.  C. 

(Concluded  From  Page  112) 
of  High  Point,  N".  C.  and  Kalman 
^Gordon  of  Statesville,  cousins  of 
the  bridegroom. 

Following  the  ceremony  a  cock- 
tail party  and  dance  were  given  on 
the  patio  of  the  club,  where  the 
couple  and  the  wedding  party  greet- 
ed their  friends.  Afterwards  the 
bride's  parents  entertained  at  a 
dinner  dance  in  the  ballroom  of 
the  club.  Jules  Lavan  and  his 
orchestra  furnished  music  for  the 
evening. 

The  bride  is  a  graduate  of  At- 
lantic City  High  School  and  at- 
tended University  of  Georgia,  Ath- 
ens. Mr.  Steinberger  graduated 
from  Statesville  Senior  High  School, 
and  has  recently  graduated  from 
the  University  of  Georgia,  where 
he  was  a  member  of  Alpha  Epsilon 
Pi  Fraternity.  He  has  completed 
his  active  duty  in  the  Air  Force. 

Following  a  wedding  trip  to 
Miami,  Fla.,  the  couple  will  make 
their  home  in  Statesville,  where 
Mr.  Steinberger  is  connected  with 
his  father  in  business. 

The  Salisbury-Statesville  B'nai 
B'rith  Lodge  had  the  pleasure  of 
having  their  monthly  guest  speak- 
er in  Statesville,  Mr.  Moshe  Lesh- 
em,  Israel  Consul  for  Southeast 
of  U.  S.  A.  Following  his  most 
interesting  lecture,  a  social  hour 
was  held  in  the  Educational  Build- 
ing of  Temple  Emanuel  in  States- 
ville. 

Congratulations  to  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Alfred  Gordon,  the  proud 
parents  of  a  baby  boy,  named 
Richard  Edwin.  May  they  enjoy 
lots  of  naches  watching  him  grow 
to  manhooct  MazeT  Tov  to  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Louis  Gordon  of  States- 
ville and  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Louis 
Summerfield  of  Wilson,  N.  C.  the 
proud  grandparents. 


The  American  Jeivish 

Durham     _   103 

G'astonia    _     110 

Greensboro   89-100 

Hickory  _   \\% 

High   Point   .  .     m 

Raleigh   101-102 

Statesville   112 

VIRGINIA 

Alxeandria     78-79 

Charlottesville   76-77 

Danville    ...     86-87 

Emporia      40 

Franklin    40 

Fredericksburg   Z~_Z~.  78-79 

Harrisonburg      80-81 

Lynchburg   "~.Z...  67-70 

Martinsville   86-87 

Newport  Nov?  _   83-85 

Norfolk    72-73 

Petersburg    74-75 

Phoebus   '..  83-85 

Portsmouth    .   71 

Richmond     .  43-59 

Roanoke   _   60-66 

Staunton    .....  no 

Suffolk   40 

Virginia  Beach   ...  72-73 

Waynesboro     82 

WUliamsburg   :..  83.85 

So,  You're  Going 
to  Israel! 

(Concluded   From   Page  48) 
—while  Sodom  is  about  1500  feet 
below  sea  level,  the  lowest  point 
on  earth. 

You'll  see  plenty  in  Israel-the 
ancient  and  the  newest— and  don't 
forget  your  bathing  suit.  There  are 
so  many  bathing  beaches,  you'll 
be  able  to  say,  when  you  get  back, 
like  that  fellow  in  the  story,  "I 
come  clean  from  Pittsburgh." 


TIMES-OUTLOOK 


September,  i960 


Adolf  Eichmann  buried  more 
than  $280,000,000  in  gold  in  the 
Austrian  Alps,  the  Bonn  correspon- 
dent of  the  London  Sunday  Times 
reported.  The  gold,  taken  from 
Nazi  victims,  is  said  to  include  the 
proceeds  of  ransom  which  Eich- 
masn  exacted  from  thousands  of 
Jewish  victims.  According  to  the 
Bonn  correspondent,  there  are  also 
a  number  of  highly  incriminating 
documents  still  lying  at  the  bottom 
of  Lake  Toplitz,  near  where  the 
treasure  was  buried. 


Abraham  Barman,  Chairman  of 
the  Board  of  Directors  of  Food  Fair 
Markets,  Detroit,  Mich.,  has  been 
elected  to  the  Board  of  Trustees  of 
Yeshiva  University,  Dr.  Samuel  Bel- 
kin,  president,  has  announced. 


MEBANE  LUMBER  CO.,  INC. 

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Burlington  Managed 

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HARRY  L.  LYNCH 

ESSO  OIL  SERVICE 
Heating  Oil 

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BURLINGTON,  N.  C. 


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BURLINGTON,  N.  C. 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS  FROM 

Sykes  Foundry  &  Machine  Company 

INCORPORATED 
Mill  and  Industrial  Supplies 
BURLINGTON,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


BEST  WISHES  TO  OUR  MANY  FRIENDS  FOR  A  VERY  HAPPY 


SNYDER  PAPER  CORP. 

Distributors  of 

INDUSTRIAL  AND  FINE  PAPERS 
FOAM  RUBBER  AND  POLY  FOAM 


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ATLANTIC    RURAL  EXPOSITION 


September  23- 
Thru  October  1 

RICHMOND 

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BURRUSS  BRAND 
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VI  5-2343 
LYNCHBURG,  VIRGINIA 


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Publishers  of  Law  Books  Since  1897 
Post  Office  Box  57  Charlottesville,  Va. 

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October,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


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October,  ig6o 


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TO  DEC.  17 


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Fly  Piedmont  Airlines'  F-27  prop-jet  ■ 
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w  piEDmonr 


CALL  your  travel  agent  or  nearest 
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Electric  Power 
Keeps  on  the 
March! 

Right  on  the  heels  of  completing  two  huge  power-making 
units  at  SCEGCO's  eighth  generating  station  came  the  news 
of  the  construction  of  a  ninth  steam  electric  generating 
station  .  .  .  this  one  in  the  lower  section  of  the  state.  $23.1 
million  more  to  be  invested  in  South  Carolina's  progress, 
concrete  evidence  of  this  Company's  confidence  of  the  fu- 
ture growth  of  the  area  it  serves  and  of  the  state  as  a 
whole.  In  fact,  SCEGCO's  overall  construction  budget,  1960 
through  1962,  will  approximate  some  $66  million! 

South  Carolina 
Electric  &  Gas  Co. 


VOLLMNE   XXVI    •    OCTOBER  1960 


NUMBER  2 


EDITORIALS 


Chester  A.  Brown,  Editor 


Yom  Kippur,  A  Day  of  Spiritual 
Regeneration 

By  Rabbi  Simcha  Kling,  Beth  David  Synagogue, 
Greensboro,  North  Carolina 

One  of  the  principle  characteristics  of  Judaism  is  its 
optimistic  attitude  towards  life  and  towards  man.  It  realizes 
that  no  human  being  is  perfect;  yet  it  rejects  the  doctrine  of 
Original  Sin.  It  refuses  to  condemn  man  to  perdition  from 
birth  and  holds  out  the  possibility  of  perfecting  the  human 
being  and  perfecting  human  society.  Judaism  is  not  blind  to 
reality.  It  recognizes  the  evil  that  exists  in  the  world.  However, 
it  insists  that  the  evil  is  not  inherent  and  that  it  can  be  over- 
come. 

That  is  why  the  tradition  pictures  every  person  being  born 
with  two  impulses:  the  YETZER  TOV  and  the  YETZER 
RA,  the  good  inclination  and  the  evil  inclination.  Which  one 
will  dominate?  That  depends  on  the  individual,  himself.  He 
is  so  made  that  he  can  choose  which  YETZER,  which  inclina- 
tion will  have  the  upper  hand. 

I  find  this  teaching  the  key  to  Yom  Kippur.  What  is  the 
significance  of  this  awesome  day?  It  is  to  move  us  to  examine 
ourselves  very  carefully  and  to  bring  us  to  a  sincere  determina- 
tion not  to  repeat  the  errors  and  the  sins  we  have  committed 
in  the  past.  Indeed,  the  main  theme  of  the  High  Holy  Days  is 
TESHUVA  Repentance,  a  word  not  always  correctly  under- 
stood in  English  because  of  its  Christological  overtones.  The 
word  TESHUVA  really  mean  "to  return."  The  Hebraic  con- 
cept of  repentance  is  to  return  to  the  point  where  you  went 
wrong  and  then  to  continue  on  wihout  going  off  on  that  wrong 
road  again. 

At  the  High  Holy  Day  season,  inspired  by  the  ligurgy  and 
music  of  the  services,  many  of  us  leave  the  synagogue  in  re- 
pentance and  determined  to  improve  the  quality  of  our  lives. 
However  many  of  us  are  like  the  poor  woman  in  the  Hassidic 
story.  She  did  not  know  how  to  support  her  children,  but  once 
she  found  an  egg  and  eagerly  called  them  to  her.  "My  chil- 
dren." she  said,  "we  don't  have  to  worry  any  more.  I  have 
found  an  egg:  however,  since  I  am  a  practical  woman,  I  shall 
not  permit  the  egg  to  be  eaten.  I'll  ask  our  neighbor  to  let  me 
place  this  egg  under  her  hen.  Then  a  chicken  will  hatch  out  of 
it.  Since  I  am  a  wise  woman,  we  will  not  eat  the  chicken  but 
will  let  it  hatch  other  eggs  from  which  will  come  more  chick- 
ens. We  will  sell  these  and  buy  a  calf.  It  will  develop  into  a 
cow  which  will  give  birth  to  many  calves.  Then,  being  a  prac- 
tical woman,  I'll  sell  them  and  buy  a  field.  Then,  we  will  have 
a  field  and  cows  and  calves,  and  nothing  will  be  missing." 
While  the  woman  was  talking,  she  played  with  the  egg  —  and 
suddenly,  it  fell  and  broke." 

The  rebbe  who  told  this  tale  continued:  "So  are  we.  When 
the  Holy  Days  come  around,  everyone  examines  his  deeds  and 
regrets  his  wrongs.  But  the  days  pass  and  people  forget  their 
good  intentions.  Just  as  the  woman  made  good  plans  but 


permitted  carelessness  and  thoughtlessness  to  prevent  her  from 
accomplishing  even  a  little,  so  are  we.  Beware  lest  you  fall 
into  the  pit!" 

Let  us  heed  the  advise  of  the  rebbe.  Let  us  beware  lest  we 
fall  into  the  pit.  Let  Yom  Kippur  be  for  us  a  day  of  spiritual 
regeneration  from  which  we  will  go  forward  resolute  to  let  the 
yetzer  tov  overcome  the  yetzer  ra.  God  grant  that  the  solemn 
and  sacred  day  of  atonement  help  us  to  live  better  and  richer 
lives,  lives  of  goodness  and  Godliness. 

The  Festival  of  Succos 

Guest  Editorial  by  Abe  W.  Schoen,  Rabbi  of  Beth  Meyer 
Synagogue,  Raleigh,  North  Carolina 

In  many  spheres  of  American  life  there  has  been  a  grow- 
ing tendency  to  the  abdication  of  responsibility.  Hence  we 
find  a  situation  where  the  development  of  religious  attitudes, 
moral  values,  and  ethical  standards  is  completely  relegated  to 
people  and  institutions  outside  of  the  home.  Contemporane- 
ously, as  a  result  of  current  popular  psychological  notions, 
society  has  too  hastily  absolved  normal  individuals  from  the 
responsibility  for  their  behavior.  Unblushingly,  many  per- 
petrators of  anti-social  or  improper  behavior  have  attributed 
their  actions  to  the  unwholesomeness  of  their  environment  or 
society.  These  attitudes  are  contrary  to  Jewish  principles  and 
more  profound  psychological  and  socialogical  theories.  For 
although  Judaism  recognizes  the  effect  of  environment  and 
society  upon  personal  behavior,  it  still  states  emphatically  that 
under  normally  prevailing  conditions  an  individual  is  re- 
sponsible for  his  behavior.  Total  environment,  which  most 
certainly  includes  the  home,  determines  religious  attitudes, 
moral  values  and  ethical  standards.  The  home  environment  is 
probably  the  most  important  factor  in  these  areas. 

The  Festival  of  Succot  apparently  places  great  emphasis 
upon  home  environment  and  personal  responsibility  for  be- 
havior. The  command  and  the  duty  for  the  observance  of 
Succot  is  expressed  in  the  Torah  (Deut.  16:13)  in  an  individ- 
ual charge,  "Thou  (you  individually)  shall  make  for  yourself 
(observe)  the  Feast  of  Tabernacles  for  seven  days,  etc."  Al- 
though it  is  also  a  collective  command  and  precept  for  all  Isra- 
lites,  the  emphasis  is  placed  upon  the  individual  Jew,  "Toase 
Leha."  We  are  exhorted  to  be  participants  and  not  spectators 
of  Judaism.  The  observance  of  this  festival  or  any  other  festi- 
val, when  completely  confined  to  the  religious  school  or  syna- 
gogue will  ultimately  reduce  the  holy  day  or  holiday  to  a  fossil 
for  a  "religious  museum." 

Jewish  survival  and  the  survival  of  Jewish  values  is  de- 
pendent upon  vibrant  and  dynamic  observances.  Succot  and  all 
Jewish  observances  are  as  meaningful  today  as  they  have  al- 
ways been.  The  Succat,  the  etrog  and  the  lulav  are  symbolic 
of  eternal  values  and  concepts.  To  perpetuate  these  values  we 
must  "make"  Succot  in  our  homes,  as  well  as  our  religious 
schools  and  synagogues.  Among  other  attributes,  Succot  com- 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  26) 


The  American  Jewish  Times-Outlook,  published  monthly  at  530  Southeastern  Building,  P.  O.  Box  1469,  Greensboro,  N.  C.  Chester  A.  Brown,  Editor;  David  Bernstein.  Pub- 
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Feature  Syndicate,  Inc.  S2.00  per  year  payable  in  advance.  Entered  as  Second-Class  Matter  at  the  Post  Office  at  Greenshoro.  N.  C,  under  Act  of  March  5.  1879.  The 
views  expressed  by  contributors  are  not  necessarily  those  of  the  publishers,  but  may  be  published  in  the  interest  of  freedom  of  the  press.  The  American  Jewish  Times- 
; Outlook  is  owned  and  edited  solely  as  an  independent  enterprise  and  is  not  a  Jewish  community  undertaking. 


6 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


October,  i960 


PLAIN  TALK 

By  ALFRED  SEGAL 


yy.  -yy.  sC'.  yy  yy.  yy: -yy.  yy  .yy,  yy.  yy.y, ,  yy.  yy.  yy  -yy.  yy-yy .    ^<yy^.yy.yy  y/.  yy  yy  y^ 

§ Editorials    __                                                                 5  & 

Plain  Talk— Alfred  Segal    _____                                         6  £ 

§  Peace  In  The  Middle  East— A  Must —  £ 

£                           The  Honorable  Richard  M.  Nixon    __—    7  y 

J  Woman  of  the  Month — Margot  S.  Freudenberg     ___.  _  ___  _    8  & 

$  A  Disciple  of  Hillel— Harry  E.  Wedeck                                                9  r 

&  Can  Man  Improve? — Rabbi  Samuel  Umen                                        11  J 

§ American  Notables — Dr.  Samuel  Nunez — Harry  Simonhoff                    15  § 

Co-operation  Among  Small  Nations — Meyer  W.  Weisgal                  ..  17  £ 

§  Rosh  Kipper  and  Yom  Hashonah — Rabbi  Samuel  L.  Silver                  18  I 

^  Israeli  Youngsters — Anita  Engle  ___  _                                            23  y. 

J  The  Israel  Philharmonic — Henry  W.  Levy  __                                        46  & 

§  Israel  Helps  Ghana  Go  To  Sea                                                            47  r 

£  Where  Handicaps  Don't  Handicap — Bernard  Postal  ..                         49  a 

?  Greensboro  Jewish  Community  Calendar                                                50  § 

y  Science  Is  Transforming  Israel — Abba  Eban  _                               ____  51  £ 

&  Builders  of  Bridges    _____  _____                                        59  $ 

VIRGINIA  4 


Richmond  Temple  Beth  El — Mrs.  Eddie  Cantor   .  ___.  10  £ 

§  Richmond  Temple  Beth  Israel — Mrs.  Morton  Plotkin  ...   ____  10  ? 

r  Richmond  JWV — Bert  Simons      ____                       10  3 

j  Portsmouth — Meyer  H.  Jacobson    __..                                          57  & 

§  Richmond  Jewish  Community  Center — Stanley  J.  Reitser                  60  r 

X  Newport  News — Mrs.  Martha  B.  Shapiro   ...          _.  _.             61  £ 

?  Norfolk — Mrs.  Florence  Schwartz                                               .            62  3 

y  Richmond  B  &  P  Hadassah                                                                 ....  63  & 

&  Newport  News  J.  W.  B                                                  _                   64  I 

I  Norfolk  J  W  V  A 

§ 

§  SOUTH  CAROLINA 


&  Charleston    — _     13 


Columbia — Mrs.  Bernard  Laden    19  § 


NORTH  CAROLINA 


Raleigh  Beth  Meyer — Synagogue — Mrs.  Oscar  Legum      -    8  y 

Weldon-Roanoke  Rapids — Louise  Farber                                              12  § 

3  Wiliiamston — Mrs.  Irving  M.  Margolis   ._   __  20  £ 

^  Asheville — Mrs.  Gustav  Liohtenfels                                                      21  ? 

c   Around  Greensboro — Mrs.  Daniel  Hollander  and  3 

5  Mrs.  Edward  B.  Ricketts  __  __.__                       24  & 

§  Raleigh  Temple  Beth  Or — Mrs.  Harry  Caplan   ._._.  28  ? 

£   Salisbury— Mrs.  S.  W.  Guyes                                                                     33  3 

?  Goldsboro — Rabbi  Israel  J.  Sarasohn  ____    __..                35  ^> 

9  High  Point     ___                            36  £ 

§  Charlotte    _..  — -                                                  38  ? 

t   Winston-Salem — Mrs.  George  Green  and  Mrs.  Lewis  Wolberg              30  3 

3  Gastonia — Mrs.  Pauline  B.  Chinn                                                       37  & 

^  Wilmington — Mrs.  Norma  May  .__..  ___    ____ ______                   42  ? 

^  Fayetteville — Mrs.  Jack  A.  Mendelsohn    ____    44 

§ 

§  THE  COVER 

§ 

6  HIGH  HOLY  DAY  SERVICE  ? 
?  Abraham  Blum  (second  from  left),  Director  of  Jewish  Education,  3 
y  Municipal  Lodge  of  B'nai  B'rith,  New  York  City,  is  aiding  Chaplain  & 
§  (Col.)  Henry  Tavel  (cent(er),  in  conducting  High  Holy  Day  services  at  ? 
£  Ft.  Bragg,  N.  C,  headquarters  for  the  Strategic  Army  Corps  (STRAC),  y 
y  during  the  Jewish  High  Holy  Days.  Mr.  Blum,  also  technical  advisor  § 
§  to  the  President  of  the  New  York  City  Council,  the  Honorable  Abe  £ 
^  Stark,  is  visiting  with  his  son  Sgt.  Herman  Blum  (left).  Mr.  Irving  J 
I  Cheroff  (right)  is  the  Area  Director  for  the  USO-JWB.  PFC  Jerry  y 
3  Rolnick  (second  from  right)  is  Chaplain  Tavel's  assistant.  & 

f  y 

^yy-yy.yy.yy.y- . yy-  yy^yy. yy. yy  yy-yy-  yy.  ._^t^c^^t_^t^t^t^t_^c_^o;_^.i^at^«^x_^'! 


OH,  LET'S  STAY  HOME ! 

I  have  received  considerable 
wisdom  from  out  in  California  .  .  . 
from  a  lady,  Mrs.  Stella  Levy  of 
6040  Caivin  Avenue,  Tarzana, 
Cal.  (She  reads  this  column  in 
the  B'nai  B'rith  Messenger,  Los 
Angeles.) 


ALFRED  SEGAL 

It's  all  in  one  of  her  paragraphs, 
in  which  she  exclaims:  "Since  we 
can't  get  along  with  each  other 
on  this  earth,  how  futile  it  is  to 
spend  time  and  effort  trying  to 
find  out  what  goes  on  in  other 
planets." 

Mrs.  Levy  goes  on  to  suggest 
that  we  do  something  to  make  this 
earth  worthwhile  living  on,  in  ac- 
cordance with  the  prophet's  wis- 
dom which  asks:  "What  doth  the 
Lord  require  of  thee?  To  do  just- 
ly, to  love  mercy  and  to  walk 
humbly  with  thy  God." 

Yes,  I  myself  have  been  saying 
the  same  as  Mrs.  Levy  and  in 
fact,  I  so  agreecl  with  her  that  after 
reading  her  wisdom,  I  went  to  the 
study  of  the  renowned  Prof. 
Shlemiel  to  argue  him  down. 

You  don't  know  Prof.  Shlemiel, 
maybe?  Oh,  he's  one  of  those  who 
are  trying  to  reach  far  into  space 
.  .  ,  maybe  to  Venus  or  to  Jupiter, 
or  anyway,  to  the  moon. 

I  found  him  high  up  in  one  of 
those  telescopes  .  .  .  "Prof.  Shelem- 
iel!"  I  exclaimed,  as  I  approached 
him,  but  he  didn't  hear  me.  For 
more  than  an  hour  I  sat  there 
waiting  for  the  professor  to  come 
down  from  the  moon,  or  where- 
ever  he  was. 


Finally,  he  returned.  .  .  "How 
do  you  do,  Professor  Shlemiel? 
\ou've  been  up  there  a  long  time, 
and  what  have  you  found?" 

"Who  are  you?"  he  asked,  "and 
what  do  you  want?" 

"I  am  a  reporter,"  I  replied, 
"and  I'm  writing  about  all  you 
shlemiels  who  go  searching  away 
up  there  when  there's  so  much 
still  to  know  right  down  here. 
Professor  Shlemiel,  do  you  know 
anything  about  your  own  neigh- 
borhood?" 

"You're  insulting  my  scholarly 
mind,"  he  said.  "We  who  are  the 
big  minds  are  concerned  mostly 
with  what  goes  on  out  in  the  uni- 
verse." 

"But,  Professor  Shlemiel,  it's  my 
own  opinion  that  what  goes  on 
next  door  is  much  more  import- 
ant .  .  .  and  interesting  .  .  .  Do  you 
know,  professor"  .  .  .  and  I  start- 
ed to  report  to  him  on  what  goes 
on  right  around  the  corner  from 
his  own  house  .  .  .  "Professor,  do 
you  know  about  those  slums  next 
door  to  you,  almost.  There  was 
that  man  who  hanged  himself  in 
the  slum  only  the  other  day  be- 
cause he  couldn't  see  any  sense  in 
living  that  way  any  longer  .  .  . 
while  you  were  searching  the 
moon  and  other  planets." 

I  told  him  about  the  crying 
child  I  saw  on  the  dirty  front 
steps.  I  asked  him  why  he  was 
crying,  and  he  said  it  was  on  ac- 
count of  ITis  mama.  It  was  two 
days  since  he  last  saw  her,  going 
off  to  her  work. 

"Yes,  professor,  that's  how  dirty 
it  is  in  a  lot  of  places  down  here 
on  the  earth  .  .  .  even  next  door 
to  you  .  .  .  and  so  why  bother 
yourself  searching  the  moon?  .  .  . 
Oh,  Professor  Shlemiel!" 

I  recited  to  him  about  the  out- 
bursts of  hate  boiling  up  all 
around  the  world  .  .  .  races  hating 
each  other,  and  nations  hating  .  .  . 
religions  at  each  other's  throats 
.  .  .  "Oh,  professor,  what's  the  dif- 
ference then,  as  to  what  goes  on 
a  million  or  so  miles  up  there  on 
the  moon.  Why  not  let's  start 
scientifically  and  humanely  down 
here?" 

Prof.  Shlemiel's  eyes  were  look- 
ing up  and  far  off  .  .  .  "Only  to- 
day," he  safd  proudly,  "I  found 
a  mountain  on  the  moon.  I'm  al- 
ways finding  something  up  there." 


I  started  to  read  to  him  from 
the  letter  of  California's  Stella 
Levy  .  .  .  "Please  listen  to  this 
professor,"  I  said.  "It  has  to  do 
with  our  duties  down  here  and 
why  should  you,  Professor  Shle- 
miel .  .  .  you  and  all  those  other 
minds  ...  be  wandering  so  far 
away  up  into  space  when  there's 


such  a  big  unfinished  job  to  ful- 
fill on  this  earth."  Mrs.  Levy  was 
saying:  "Concentiating  on  learn- 
ing to  live  with  our  fellowman  is 
of  vital  importance.  We  should 
not  engender  hatred,  greed  and 
bigotry  because  of  differences.  We 

(Please  turn  to  Page  66) 


October,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


PEACE  IN  THE  MIDDLE  EAST— 

A  MUST 

By  The  Honorable  Richard  M.  Nixon 


The  following  is  a  message  to  the  Annual  Convention  of  the  Zionist  Organiza- 
tion of  America  by  Richard  M.  Nixon,  Republican  candidate  for  President  of 


the  United  States 

I  believe  it  is  most  fortunate 
that  both  candidates  for  the  Presi- 
dency agree  that  the  United  States 
is  committed  to  the  preservation 
of  the  independence  of  Israel,  the 
prevention  of  armed  aggression  in 
the  Near  East  ancl  the  use  of  our 
best  offices  to  bring  about  a  stable 
peace  between  Israel  and  the  Arab 
states.  Our  whole  policy  has  dem- 
onstrated this  bipartisan  effort. 

It  was  indeed  most  eloquently 
and  clearly  expressed  by  President 
Eisenhower  in  April  1956  when  he 
said: 

"The  United  States,  in  accord- 
ance with  its  responsibilities  under 
the  charter  of  the  United  Nations, 
will  observe  its  commitments  with- 
in constitutional  means  to  oppose 
any  aggression  in  the  area. 

"The  United  States  is  likewise 
determined  to  support  and  assist 
any  nation  which  might  be  sub- 
jected to  such  aggression.  The 
United  States  is  confident  that 
other  nations  will  act  similarly 
in  the  cause  of  peace." 

I  am  confident  that  no  matter 
who  occupies  the  White  House 
during  the  coming  administration 
this  firm  national  policy  will  re- 
main unchanged. 

But  we  must  recognize  that 
there  are  those  who  hope  to  profit 
by  fanning  enmities  in  the  Near 
East.  For  example,  stability  in  the 
area  which  is  a  necessary  precon- 
dition to  a  just  settlement  of  the 
tragic  Arab-Israel  conflict  has  been 
seriously  prejudiced  by  the  ir- 
responsibility of  Soviet  sales  of 
arms  and  by  the  Kremlin's  con- 
tinued meddling  in  the  internal  af- 
fairs of  Arab  countries  for  its  own 
Communist  purposes. 

The  Soviets  have  moreover  re- 
fused to  contribute  any  support 
whatever  to  the  United  Nations 


Emergency  Force  which  has  been 
the  major  stabilizing  influence  in 
the  Middle  East. 

In  addition  to  our  own  efforts, 
the  role  of  the  United  Nations 
must  be  emphasized.  It  should  con- 
tinue to  receive  the  greatest  sup- 
port we  can  provide.  We  have  had 
an  encouraging  demonstration  of 
what  it  can  do  in  the  way  Ambas- 
sador Lodge  successfully  brought 
about  a  formula  to  settle  the  sharp 
difficulties  between  Israel  and  the 
Argentine  over  the  Adolf  Eich- 
mann  case. 

As  long  as  the  Arab  boycott  and 
blockade  continue  notwithstand- 
ing our  strong  disapproval  and  re- 
peated protests,  as  long  as  Ameri- 
cans are  barred  from  certain  coun- 
tries because  of  their  religious 
faith,  as  long  as  Aran  refugees  are 
confined  to  camps  and  their  un- 
happiness  continues— as  long  as 
these  conditions  exist  the  Middle 
East  will  be  a  source  of  world  ten- 
sion and  a  continuing  threat  to  in- 
ternational peace. 

These  are  the  policies  I  believe 
we  should  follow  to  meet  these 
problems:  , 

Strong  and  unceasing  efforts  to 
establish  freedom  of  passage 
through  the  Suez  Canal  and  to  put 
an  end  to  discriminatory  practices 
throughout  the  area.  , 

Encouraging  ancl  supporting 
measures  making  it  possible  for  the 
Arab  states  to  develop  their  mater- 
ial resources,  raise  living  standards 
and  thereby  increase  opportunities' 
for  growth  and  for  the  resettle- 
ment of  Arab  refugees  where  their 
labor  and  skills  can  be  employed 
to  full  advantage. 

Continued  and  increased  sup- 
port of  the  courageous  and  success- 
ful efforts  of  the  people  of  Israel 
to  make  the  desert  bloom  and  to 


—The  Editor 

turn  their  country  into  a  new  land 
of  promise.  Israel  has  dramatically 
demonstrated  to  the  world  the  ef- 
fectiveness of  free  institutions  and 
the  democratic  way  by  these  efforts 
and  by  the  technical  aid  it  has  ex- 
tended to  the  newly  independent 
and  underdeveloped  nations  in 
Africa  and  Asia.  , 

Above  all,  continued  and  tireless 
search  for  practical  means  to 
achieve  a  solid  and  lasting  peace  in 


IB  •  0 

RICHARD  M.  NIXON 

the  Middle  East. 

This  means  the  avoidance  of 
glib  promises,  the  futility  of  which 
have  been  proven  many  times  over, 
and  concentration  on  persistent 
negotiations  through  every  dip- 
lomatic channel  available  to  us. 

The  time  has  come  when  we 
should  try  to  "bring  about  an  over- 
all   settlement    of    the  Palestine 

(Please  turn  to  Page  59) 


Best  Wishes  For  A 
Happy,  Healthy 
And  Prosperous 
New  Year 


From  DICK  POFF 

Your  CONGRESSMAN  6th  District  of  Virginia 
Lynchburg  Republican  City  Committee 

J.  P.  BURCH,  JR.,  Chairman 


8 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


October,  i960 


Wamau      f/ie  AfantU 
Margot  S.  Freudenberg 

CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


MRS.  MiARGOT  S.  FREUDENBERG 


Mrs.  Margot  Strauss  Freuden- 
berg was  named  Charleston's  Wo- 
man of  the  Year  at  the  annual 
dinner  meeting  of  the  Charles- 
ton Federation  of  Women's  Clubs 
in  the  Francis  Marion  Hotel. 

Mrs.  W.  C.  Kennerty,  president 
of  the  federation,  in  paying  tri- 
bute to  Mrs.  Freudenberg,  said, 
"We  salute  a  woman  who  has 
done  tine  and  noble  work  above 
and  beyond  personal  gain,  and 
work  which  benefits  the  entire 
community." 

Mrs.  Freudenberg  is  a  native  of 
Germany,  which  she  fled  when 
Hitler  began  his  purge  of  the  Jew- 
ish people.  She  came  to  this  coun- 
try 20  years  ago  with  her  late 
husband,  Walter,  and  son,  Henry. 


The  family  lived  in  New  York  a 
few  months,  then  moved  to 
Charleston,  where  Mrs.  Freuden- 
berg began  work  in  physical  re- 
habilitation of  the  handicapped. 

She  is  active  in  many  civic  and 
cultural  organizations.  For  the 
past  two  years,  she  has  been  chair- 
man of  the  women's  division  of 
the  Cancer  Crusade,  which  she 
will  head  again  next  year. 

She  also  single  handedly  or- 
ganized a  group  of  50  Foreign 
Language  Interpreters  who  speak 
22  different  languages.  The  volun- 
teer interpreters  are  on  call  to  aid 
visitors  or  newcomers  to  the  city 
who  have  language  problems. 

She  also  helped  to  organize  a 
YWCA-sponsored   project,  Exper- 


ience, Inc.,  a  job  referral  service 
for  persons  over  50.  She  is  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Women's  Division  of 
the  Greater  Charleston  Chamber 
of  Commerce,  was  chairman  of 
Charleston  Hadassah's  donor 
event  this  year,  and  is  active  in  the 
work  of  the  Federation  of  Wo- 
men's Clubs,  the  Charleston  Busi- 
ness and  Professional  Women's 
Clubs,  and  the  YWCA.  She  is  a 
member  of  Beth  Elohim  Congre- 
gation. 

She  is  serving  as  a  member  of 
the  Housing  Rehabilitation  sub- 
committee of  the  Charleston  Plan- 


ning Board  and  the  Citizens  Ad- 
visory Committee  to  the  Planning 
Board.  She  also  is  secretary  of  the 
Charleston  Symphony  Orchestra 
board  and  is  on  the  board  of  the 
Community  Concert  Association. 

But  her  primary  interest  lies, 
in  aiding  handicapped  persons. 
She  was  chairman  of  the  women's 
committee  for  the  adult  polio  in- 
oculation campaign,  serves  on  the 
Council  for  the  Retarded  Child  of 
Charleston  County  and  is  a  mem- 
ber of  the  County's  Association  for 
the  Blind. 


Raleigh,  N.  C.  Beth  Meyer  Synagogue 

MRS.  OSCAR  LEGUM,  Correspondent 


With  the  High  Holy  Days  draw- 
ing to  a  close  all  local  Jewish  or- 
ganizations are  concentrating  on 
their  Fall  and  Winter  activties.  A 
very  busy  season  is  expected  by 
all. 

The  first  affair  of  the  season  was 
the  Buffett  Supper  given  by  Sister- 
hood. Mrs.  Jules  Robinson,  presi- 
dent, reported  the  affair  a  huge 
success,  both  financially  and  social- 
ly. Mrs.  Robinson  extends  thanks 
to  the  committee  in  charge. 

Sunday  School  registration  was 
held  on  Sept.  11th  with  62  children 
being  registered.  Mrs.  Richard  S. 
Ruby,  Superintendent  of  Beth 
Meyer  Sunday  School  announced 
the  following  teachers:  Mrs.  Ralph 
Kaufman,  Mrs.  ABe  Schoen,  Mrs. 
Milton  Dworsky,  Mrs.  Emil  Gold- 
smith, Mrs.  Martin  Litwack,  Mrs. 
Joel  Citron,  and  Mr.  Milton  Blick. 
We  are  proud  of  our  record  enroll- 
ment at  Beth  Meyer. 

We  wish  a  speedy  recovery  to 
Mr.  Max  Bane  and  Ftev.  L.  Ruben- 
stein  who  are  ill  at  this  writing. 

Congratulations  to  David  Green, 
son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  I.  J.  Green, 
who  won  the  City  tennis  tourna- 
ment for  fifteen  years  and  under. 
We  are  very  proud  of  him. 

Donald  Vinnik,  son  of  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  George  Vinnik,  who  grad- 
uated UNC  this  summer  is  now 
serving  his  military  tour  at  Fort 
Jackson,  S.  C.  Our  college  students 
have  all  gone  back  to  their  schools 
—Burton  Horwitz  at  UNC  Dental 
School;  Stanley  Greenspon  is  doing 
graduate  work  at  University  of 
Georgia;  and  Freddy  Greenspon 
is  doing  graduate  work  at  the  Uni- 
versity of  Virginia;  and  Rosalind 
Legum  has  returned  to  Womans 
College  UNC. 

Beth  Meyer  Congregation  was 
pleased  to  have  a  number  of  out- 


of-town  people  and  students  from 
the  local  colleges  worship  with  us 
on  the  High  Holidays.  The  Rabbi, 
Abe  W.  Schoen,  the  board  of 
trustee  and  the  entire  membership 
of  Beth  Meyer  extend  New  Year 
Greetings  to  our  many  friends  in 
North  Carolina  and  Virginia. 


m 


South  Carolina 
Distributors 
SEAGRAM 
CALVERT 
BEEFEATER 
SMIRNOFF 
CHIVAS  REGAL 
HARVEY'S  BRISTOL 
CREAM 

Ben  Arnold 
Company,  Inc. 

COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


A  Disciple  of  Hillel 


By  Harry  E.  Wedeck 


HARRY  E  WEDECK 


"It's  a  quiet  little  place,  this 
Medford,"  Mr.  Sacks  announced, 
after  his  wife  and  young  son,  Stan- 
ley had  been  settled  in  the  New 
England  town  for  some  weeks. 

"I  like  it,"  Mrs.  Sacks  declared. 
"Just  small  and  cosy  enough.  1 
hope  Stanley  will  find  some  nice 
ftoys,  as  friends,  when  he  starts 
school  next  week." 

"You  can  be  sure  of  that,"  Mr. 
Sacks  rejoined.  "But  of  course  he 
has  to  expect  all  kinds.  That's 
what  a  community  is  made  up  of. 
Anyway,  he  knows  how  to  behave, 
and  now  he's  going  to  Hebrew 
school  as  well,  he'll  be  organized." 

They  talked  together  for  a 
while.  Then  Mr.  Sacks  went  into 
his  den  to  prepare  some  blue- 
prints. For,  as  engineer  on  the 
Jiew  construction  project  near  the 
dam,  he  was  going  to  be  busy. 

Enrolled  at  school,  Stanley  met 
his  companions,  all  in  the  same 
age  group,  about  ten  or  eleven. 

"There's  a  boy  who  lives  across 
the  street,  mom,"  Stanley  announc- 
ed a  few  days  later.  "Jim  Win- 
throp." 

"That's  good,"  his  mother  said. 
"You'll  be  friends  then." 

"Well,  mom,"  Stanley  hesitated. 
"What's  the  matter?  Don't  you 
like  him?" 

"I  like  him  all  right.  But  he's 
always  teasing  me.  Calls  me  Jew 
and  says  I'm  a  foreigner.  Am  I, 
mom?" 

His  mother  laughed.  "It  will  be 
all  right." 

But  it  wasn't  all  right.  A  week 
later  Stanley  came  home  one  after- 
noon, morose,  silent. 

"You're  late,  Stan.  What's  the 
matter?"  his  mother  asked.  "De- 
tention?" 

"No,  mom."  But  he  recalled  in 
his  mind  how  Jim  Winthrop  had 
called  him  names.  He  had  even 


thrown  a  blob  of  mud  at  him. 
Some  of  the  boys  had  wanted  a 
fight  between  Jim  and  Stanley. 
But  Jim  had  just  laughed. 

"I  wouldn't  fight  him,"  he 
sneered.  "He's  a  Jew." 

Stanley  had  grown  hot  and  ex- 
cited. Only  the  thought  of  his 
mother  waiting  anxiously  for  him 
kept  him  from  attacking  the  big- 
ger lad. 

He  did  his  school  work  in  si- 
lence. He  did  not  want  the  tele- 
vision that  night. 

When  Mr.  Sacks  came  home,  he 
asked:  "Where's  Stan?" 

"Gone  up  to  his  room,"  Mrs. 
Sachs  answered.  "He's  been  very 
quiet  all  day." 

"It's  just  the  newness,"  Mr. 
Sacks  laughed  it  off.  "He'll  get 
over  it  presently." 

On  Wednesday  afternoon  Mrs. 
Sachs  was  busy  at  the  stove,  bak- 
ing. There  was  to  be  a  friendly 
gathering  of  the  Ladies  Auxiliary 
of  the  Temple. 

Suddenly,  the  door  burst  open. 
Stanley,  flushed,  dashed  in. 

"There's  lieen  an  accident, 
mom."  he  gasped.  "A  terrible  ac- 
cident!" 

"What  is  it,  Stanley?" 

"Jim  Winthrop,  mom.  He  fell 
into  the  well  near  the  new  con- 
struction." 

"Where  your  father  is  work- 
ing?" 

"I  think  so,  mom." 

"How  did  it  happen?" 

"We  were  walking  home,  a  few 
of  us.  And  Jim  Winthrop  dared 
me  to  climb  down  inside." 

"Yes?" 

"He  said  I'd  be  a  coward  if  I 
didn't.  So  I  started  to  climb  down. 
But  some  of  the  other  boys  held 
me  back.  They  said  it  was  too 
dangerous.  Then,  as  we  were  talk- 
ing, Jim  rushed  over  to  the  well 
and  cried:  'Watch  me!'  His  foot 


slipped,  and  he  went  down.  We 
heard  him  calling.  He's  down 
there." 

Stanley  stopped  for  breath. 
"Sit  down,  Stan."  Mrs.  Sachs 
came  over  to  him  and  made  him 
rest  beside  the  kitchen  table.  She 
glanced  at  the  clock.  "Father  will 
be  home  any  minute  now.  Ah. 
there's  his  key." 

Mr.  Sacks  came  in.  "Hello, 
family.  Why  the  silence?" 

Then  he  caught  sight  of  Mrs. 
Sacks,  and  the  worried  look  on 
Stanley's  face. 

"What's  the  matter?"  he  asked. 

Rapidly,  Mrs.  Sacks  explained. 

"The  well!"  Mr.  Sacks  exclaim- 
ed. "That's  what  we're  using  lor 
the  water  pipes  in  my  construc- 
tion project.  I'd  better  go  down 
and  see.  It's  late,  all  my  men  are 
probably  gone.  But  I'll  see." 

"Pop."  Stanley  suddenly  looked 
up.  "It's  Jim  Winthrop,  you 
know.  I  don't  care  now  if  he 
never  gets  out." 

"Stanley!"  his  father  snapped, 
angered.  "Go  to  your  room!" 

He  dashed  to  his  car  and  as  he 
got  behind  the  steering  wheel 
Mrs.  Sacks  called:  "Be  careful, 
Philip!" 

"I  will,  Lillian!" 

He  started  the  car  and  in  a  few 
moments  he  was  driving  fast  to- 
ward the  well,  just  on  the  out- 
skirts ol  the  town. 

He  knew  the  well.  It  had  not 
yet  been  sounded,  but  he  estimat- 
ed that  it  was  deep. 

A  small  group  of  youngsters 
and  some  adults  stood  around. 

They  looked  up  as  the  car  ap- 
proached. 

It's  Jim  Winthrop,  Mr.  Sacks," 
one  man  explained."  He's  down 
there.  He's  been  calling  out.  But 
it's  quiet  now." 

"Here,  Peterson,"  Mr.  Sacks 
called  to  one  of  the  men.  "Rush 


to  my  office.  Get  me  a  long  rope. 
The  longest  there  is." 

"Right."  Petersen  was  off.  In  a 
few  minutes  he  returned,  with  the 
rope. 

Mr.  Sacks  began  to  coil  it.  He 
tied  one  end  to  an  iron  staple  he 
had  taken  from  the  rear  of  the 
car. 

Then  he  leaned  over  the  well. 

"Hello,  Jim.  Jim  Winthrop! 
Can  you  hear  me?" 

There  came  up  to  him,  faintly. 
A  boyish  frightened  wail. 

"Hold  on,  Jim!  This  is  Mr. 
Sacks.  I'm  coming  down  for  you." 

"I  hope  the  boy's  not  badly 
hurt,"  a  bystander  remarked. 

"Mr.  Sacks  will  have  him  out 
in  a  jiffy,"  another  added. 

The  rope  now  firmly  tied  to  the 
staple  fixed  solidly  into  the 
ground,  Mr.  Sacks  threw  off  his 
coat. 

"The  boss  himself  is  going 
down,"  the  whisper  went  round. 

There  was  a  silence,  as  Mr. 
Sacks  wound  down  and  down, 
gripping  the  rope  skilfully.  Sud- 
denly the  rope  stopped  twisting. 
It  came  to  rest. 

A  pause.  Then  once  again  the 
rope  started  to  wind  and  turn, 
slowly,  steadily,  as  if  strong  hands 
were  working  upward,  sure  of 
themselves. 

Then  a  head  appeared,  a  tousl- 
ed mop  of  hair,  and  a  tear-stained 
face,  and  Jim  Winthrop  rose  out 
of  the  mouth  of  the  well,  clutched 
close  and  safe  by  Mr.  Sacks. 

A  gasp  went  up,  of  relief  and 
gladness.  Not  a  few  eyes  are  tear- 
stained. 

A  waiting  ambulance  hurried 
Jim  to  hospital.  As  Mr.  Sacks 
drove  off,  a  warm-hearted  cheer 
followed  him. 

Jim  Winthrop  had  suffered 
shock  and  bruises,  and  remained 
(Please  turn  to  Page  61) 


io 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Richmond,  Va.f  Temple  Beth  El 

MRS.  EDDIE  CANTOR,  Correspondent 


Our  Beth  EI  program  is  now  in 
full  swing  and  our  membership 
is  looking  forward  to  a  year  full 
of  inspiring  activities.  Our  relig- 
ious school  is  happy  to  welcome 
two  new  members  to  it's  faculty, 
Mr.  Harold  B.  Ross  and  Mrs.  I. 
Friedlander. 

Mr.  Ross  was  graduated  from 
the  Baltimore  Hebrew  College 
with  a  degree  in  Hebrew  Peda- 
gogy, and  he  received  his  B.A.  in 
Psychology  from  the  Johns  Hop- 
kins University. 

Mrs.  Friedlander  is  a  graduate 
of  the  Rechavia  High  School  in 
Jerusalem.  She  was  a  member  of 
the  Israeli  Army.  Her  past  teaching 
experiences  include  schools  in  Is- 
rael and  in  Kansas  City,  Mo. 


Our  men's  club  is  again  sponsor- 
ing a  football  trip  to  Washington 
to  attend  the  game  between  the 
Redskins  and  the  Cleveland 
Browns.  This  is  always  an  event 
which  our  men  attend  quite  en- 
thusiastically. 

This  past  month  the  members 
of  our  sisterhood  were  honored  to 

attend  an  outstanding  program 
where  Charles  Daffen  presented 
his  views  on  the  forthcoming  elec- 
tions and  the  presidential  candi- 
dates Richard  Nixon  and  John 
Kennedy.  His  inspiring  presenta- 
tion left  us  with  many  new  views. 
Our  ladies  are  now  looking  for- 
ward to  their  annual  donor  lunch- 
eon which  is  always  one  of  the 
outstanding  events  of  the  year. 


Richmond,  Va„  Temple  Beth  Israel 

MRS.  MORTON  PLOTKIN,  Correspondent 


Temple  Beth  Israel  would  like 
to  take  this  opportunity  in  wish- 
ing our  entire  community  a  Happy 
and  Prosperous  New  Year. 

Our  Sisterhood  board  have  been 
working!  very  hard  during  the 
summer  meetings  planning  affairs 
for  the  coming  year.  A  tea  was 
given  for  the  new  members  of 
Sisterhood  on  September  15th  at 
the  home  of  Mrs.  Wilbur  Bern- 
stein, 4719  Fitzhugh  Avenue. 

Rabbi  Eisenberg  will  begin 
adult  classes  in  beginners  Hebrew, 
Advance  Hebrew,  liturgy  and  cus- 
toms and  ceremonies  after  the 
High  Holidays  on  October  17th. 

We  would  like  to  wish  our  new 
Hebrew  teacher,  Mr.  Simon  Herm- 
on  lots  of  luck  and  hope  he  will 
be  with  us  in  the  years  to  come. 

Congratulations  to  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Ruben  Freelander  on  the  Bar 
Mitzvah  of  their  son  Eric  which 
was  held  on  Saturday,  September 
3rd.  at  Temple  Beth  Israel.  He 


was  most  outstanding.  I  know  his 
parents  were  very  proud  to  have 
seen  him  carry  the  entire  services. 
A  kiddish  luncheon  was  given  in 
his  honor  In  the  Social  Hall  for 
the  entire  congregation  and  all 
out  of  town  family  and  friends. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Freelander  were 
host  to  a  lovely  reception  and 
dance  Sunday  night  in  the  Tem- 
ple's Social"  Hall. 

Congratulations  to  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Jutner  on  the  Bar  Mitzvah  of 
their  son  Benjamin  which  was  on 
Saturday,  September  10th.  They 
were  host  to  a  lovely  kiddush 
luncheon  following  the  services 
in  the  Temple's  Social  Hall. 

The  following  trophies  were 
awarded  at  the  banquet  held  at 
Wright's  Town  House  for  Temple 
Beth  Israel's  Mixed  Bowling 
League.  Teams  champions  were 
Plotkin  Realty;  Irving  Strauss, 
Mrs.  Helen  Russinsky,  Mrs.  Ber- 
tha Plotkin  Bernie  Goldman  and 


Allen  Stein.  Team  High  Set  to 
Free  Land  Interprises;  Beverly 
Howard,  Gimmel  Howard,  Mrs. 
Eva  Freelander,  Ruben  Freeland- 
er, Mrs.  Yetta  Goldstein,  and 
Morris  Goldstein.  Lady's  high 
game;  Mrs.  Barbara  Hubbard, 
Lady's  high  set;  Mrs.  Harriet  Gor- 
don, Most  improved  average; 
Mrs.  Barbara  Hubbard,  Man's 
high  game;  Mr.  Ruben  Freelander, 
man's  high  set;  Mr.  Ben  Soble, 
most  improved  average;  Mr. 
Ruben  Freelander.  The  Temple 
Beth  Israel  Womens  Bowling 
League  started  Tuesday,  Septem- 
ber 6th. 


Richmond,  Va. 
Jewish  War 
Veterans 

BERT  SIMMONS 
Correspondent 

Commander  Sam  Kornblau  of 

JWV  Post  No.  155  has  just  an- 
nounced the  election  of  Irving 
Koslow  to  a  3  year  term  as  Nation- 
al Executive  Committeeman  of 
the  JWV,  representing  the  4th 
region,  representing  Florida, 
Georgia,  North  and  South  Caro 
lina,  Alabama,  Tennessee,  Wash- 
ington, D.  C.  and^Virginia.  Koslow 
received  this  honor  at  the  65th  An 
nual  Convention  of  the  JWV  at 
Miami  Beach,  Tla. 


AiONTALDQfc 

Grace  at  Fifth,  Richmond,  Virginia 


WW 


Vogue  says  leopard  has  "even  more  than  its  usual 
slinked  allure"  this  year.    Here.  Somali  leopard,  ^ 
lavished  with  black-dyed  mink.  $895.  plus  tax.  ^\ 
All  furs  labeled  as  to  country  of  origin 


October,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


1 1 


Can  Man  Improve? 


By  Rabbi  Samuel  Umen 


During  the  holy  days  season  the 
thoughts  oT  a  Jew  center  on  his 
way  of  life,  For,  in  these  days  he 
is  urged  to  carefully  examine  his 
ways  and  exhorted  to  mend  and 
correct  whatever  in  his  behavior 
needs  to  "be  improved. 

In  this  connection  it  is  often 
asked  whether  man's  nature  is 
such  that  it  can  be  improved. 
There  are  individuals  who  con- 
tend that  man  is  utterly  hope- 
less. He  is  born  imperfect,  lives 
and  dies  in  the  same  state.  With 
the  whole  world  unto  themselves, 
brothers  Cain  and  Abel  could  not 
get  along  together  and  committed 
murder.  The  example  of  these  two 
has  repeated  itself  throughout  his- 
tory and  is  not  much  different 
in  our  own  day.  The  strong  take 
advantage  of  the  weak,  power 
and  might  are  enthroned.  Thus 
it  has  been,  some  argue,  and  so  it 
will  continue  to  be. 

However,  an  examination  of 
human  history  from  primitive 
times  to  the  present  will  reveal 
that  in  every  phase  of  life  pro- 
gress is  recorded.  The  desire  to 
improve,  the  capacity  to  reason, 
enabled  man  to  conceive  a  higher 
God  concept;  to  gain  a  deeper  un- 
derstanding of  his  environment; 
to  establish  better  forms  of  govern- 
ment; to  create  improved  labor 
conditions;  and  to  acquire  a  more 
profound  evaluation  of  human 
dignity  and  human  rights. 

If  history  records  man's  inhu- 
manity to  man,  it  also  records 
many  instances  of  heroism,  mart- 
yrdom, saintliness,  sympathy,  char- 
ity, love,   and  understanding. 

If  man  is  possessed  with  quali- 
ties of  the  beast,  he  is  also  fash- 
ioned a  little  lower  than  the 
angels.  "Individuals"  says  Rabbi 
Abraham  Kook  in  his  religious 
philosophy,  "and  even  groups  may 
stray  from  the  right  path  but  the 
human  path  is  constantly  rising 


and  approaching  the  good  which 
is  elemental  in  the  universe.  .  .  In 
every  generation  there  are  always 
a  number  of  men  who  strive 
wholeheartedly  toward  the  divine 
good  in  the  world  and  they  in- 
directly raise  even  the  weaker 
members  of  the  race  to  a  higher 
level.  .  .  .  Moreover,  there  is  still 
another  factor  which  contributes 
to  human  progress  namely,  the 
deeds  and  thoughts  of  the  great 
men,  of  the  past.  The  good  which 
these  men  of  the  past  acquired 
during  their  lives  does  not  disap- 
pear even  after  their  death.  In- 
directly and  by  devious  ways  the 
good  of  the  men  of  the  past  in- 
fluences the  lives  of  later  genera- 
tions and  conduces  to  their  eleva- 
tion." 

Yes,  man  can  improve.  He  has 
the  capacity  to  overcome  his  sav- 
age characteristics.  To  civilized 
people  today,  eating  human  flesh 
is  an  entirely  unnatural  thing.  Yet, 
there  have  been  peoples  to  whom 
it  seemed  natural  because  it  was 
socially  authorized  and  even  high- 
ly esteemed. 

Aristotle  spoke  for  an  entire 
social  order  as  well  for  himself 
when  he  said  that  slavery  existed 
by  nature.  He  would  have  re- 
garded efforts  to  abolish  slavery 
from  society  as  an  idle  Utopian 
effort. 

There  have  been  times  and 
places  in  which  land  was  held  in 
common  and  in  which  private 
ownership  of  land  would  have 
been  regarded  as  the  most  mon- 
strous of  unnatural  things.  There 
have  been  other  times  and  places 
when  and  where  all  wealth  was 
possessed  by  an  overlord  and  his 
subjects  held  wealth,  if  any,  sub- 
ject to  his  pleasure. 

"The  belieT  that  human  nature 
is  beyond  improvement,"  says 
John  Dewey,  "is  the  most  depres- 


sing and  pessimistic  of  all  possible 
doctrines.  For  according  to  it, 
persons  are  what  they  are  at  birth 
and  nothing  can  be  done  about 
it.  If  human  nature  is  unchange- 
able, then  all  our  aims  and  efforts 
to  educate  are  doomed  to  failure. 
For  the  very  meaning  of  education 
is  modification  of  nature  in  forma- 
tion of  those  ways  of  thinking 
and  believing  that  are  foreign  to 
primitive  man." 

Not  only  is  man  able  to  improve 
and  renew  himself  but  in  this 
enterprise  toward  newness  and  re- 
generation lies  the  very  meaning 
of  his  life.  Concerning  all  things 
which  God  created,  the  Bible 
states,  "And  God  said  that  it  was 
good."  But  of  the  creation  of  man, 
it  is  not  said  it  was  good.  Be- 
cause, say  the  Rabbis,  man  was 
not  created  perfect,  but  perfecti- 
ble. His  destiny  is  to  perfect  him- 
self and  his  world. 

A  person  who  is  intent  on  self 
improvement,  will  discover  that 
he  has  within  him  the  potentiali- 
ties of  becoming  "a  little  lower 
than  the  angels." 


RABBI  SAMUEL  UMEN 

Experience  and  observation  re- 
veal daily  glimpses  of  possibility 
and  resource  stored  away  in  the 
depths  of  consciousness  of  average 
men.  They  can  be  stirred  to  feats 
of  physical  strength  and  endur- 
ance: they  have  in  them  capacities 
for  art,  skill,  poetry,  idealism,  de- 
votion. You  never  can  tell  when 
these  gleams  of  a  higher  life  may 
not  shine  out.  These  gleams  and 
sparks  are  to  be  seen  in  the  hum- 
blest places.  Wake  a  man  up,  give 
him  a  hope,  set  a  great  purpose 
before  him,  let  him  feel  the  thrill 
of  the  heart-beats  of  his  fellow 
working,  fighting,  struggling,  co- 
operating with  him,  and  he  be- 
comes a  new  man. 

The  holy  days  call  the  Jew  to 
take  stock  of  his  gifts,  to  improve 
them,  to  use  them  and  use  them 
wisely  for  his  own  benefits  and 
that  of  his  fellow  man. 

May  we,  through  self  improve- 
ment and  worthy  deeds,  help  make 
the  New  Year  one  of  peace,  pros- 
perity and  good  will  for  all  man- 
kind. 


Mrs.  Leopold  Strauss,  Chairman  of  the  United  Order  of  True  Sisters  Cancer 
Service,  presents  a  check  for  $1,000  to  Milton  Hans  of  the  Israel  Supply  Mis- 
sion in  New  York  City,  renewing  a  grant  to  Government  Hospital,  Tel 
Hashomer,  Israel  for  radio-isotope  theropy  for  cancer  parents.  Looking-  on  is 
Mrs.  Maurice  Levin,  a  National  Trustee  of  the  United  Order  of  True  Sisters, 
which  was  founded  in  1846  and  is  the  oldest  national  Jewish  women's  organi- 
zation in  America. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


October,  iq6q 


WESLDON— iROANOSCE  HUPIDS  N.  C. 

LOUISE  FARBER,  Correspondent 


MRS.  THEODORE  FARBER 


The  marriage  of  Miss  Susan 
Frances  Bloom  daughter  of  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  M.  Bloom  of  Marion. 
Ma.,  and  the  late  Lillian  Freid 
Bloom  of  Weldon,  N.  C,  to  Mr. 
Theodore  Mylee  Father,  son  of 
Mrs.  Louis  Farber  and  the  late  Mr. 
Farber  of  Brooklyn,  N.  Y.,  took 
place  on  Sunday,  August  14,  i960 
at  the  Park  Inn  Hotel.  Rockaway 
Park,  N.  Y. 

Rabbi  David  Halpern  officiated. 

The  bride,  was  given  in  marri- 
age by  her  father. 

Miss  Harriett  Bloom  of  Roa- 
noke Rapids,  N.  C,  was  Maid  of 
Honor  and  Mr.  Herbert  Farber 
of  Brooklyn,  N.  Y.,  served  his  bro- 
ther as  best  man. 

The  Bride  attended  Peace  Jun- 
ior College  in  Raleigh,  N.  C,  and 


was  graduated  from  Richmond 
Professional  Institute  of  the  Col- 
lege of  William  and  Mary  in  Rich- 
mond, Va. 

The  groom  graduated  from 
Brooklyn  College  of  Pharmacy 
cum  laude  and  was  a  member  of 
Rho  Chi  and  Alpha  Beta  Omega 
fraternities.  He  is  now  a  candidate 
for  a  Ph.d.  in  Pharmacology  at 
Medical  College  of  Virginia  in 
Richmond,  Va.,  where  he  is  also 
a  member  of  the  faculty. 

After  a  trip  to  Puerto  Rico  and 
the  Virgin  Isles  the  couple  will 
make  their  home  in  Richmond. 

The  Congregation  of  Temple 
Emanu-El  was  saddened  by  the  un- 
timely death  of  Jake  Spire  of 
Roanoke  Rapids  on  July  7th  in  a 
Richmond   hospital.    He    wets  a 


member  ol  our  Congregation  for 
many  years  beginning  with  the 
Weldon  Sabbath  School,  the  He- 
brew Community  Center  and 
Temple  Emariu-El.  He  is  survived 
by  his  wife,  Rose;  a  daughter,  Mrs. 
I.ou  Volpecelli  of  New  York  City, 
and  two  grandchildren. 

Our  sympathy  to  Mrs.  Morton 
Farber  in  the  death  of  her  uncle, 
Bernard  Abrams  of  Washington, 
D.  C. 

The  annual  congregational 
meeting  of  Templc-Emanu-El  was 
held  in  July  with  the  following  of- 
ficers elected  for  the  year  1960- 
1961:  President,  Harry  Kittner; 
Vice-President,  Eugene  Bloom;  Sec- 
retary, Mrs.  Harold  Bloom;  Trea- 
surer, Mrs.  Jake  Spire. 


The  Sisterhood  has  elected  the 
following  officers:  President,  Mrs. 
Morton  Farber;  Vice-President, 
Mis.  Harry  Kittner;  Secretary, 
Mrs.  Bill  Kittner;  Treasurer.  Mrs. 
Harold  Bloom. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Morton  Stark  were 
iccent  visitors  of  the  Seymour 
Roths. 

Among  those  who  attended  the 
Wild  Acres  B'nai  Brith  Seminar 
were  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bob  Livermon. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Seymour  !'oth  and 
Miss  Fannye  Marks. 

Mrs.  Iz  Novev  lias  recuperated 
from  a  recent  thyroid  operation. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  L.  Kittner,  Mr. 
(Please  turn  to  Page  30) 


MOTOROLA 

CAR  RADIO 


NOW  ONLY— 


installation,  aerial, 
slightly  more 


SOUND  WON'T  FADE 

Motorola  Car  Radios  with  exclusive  Vol- 
umatic  won't  fade  out  under  bridges,  via- 
ducts or  among  tall  buildings. 

COPELAND  &  COMPANY 

Wholesale  Distributors 
KNOXVILLE,  TENNESSEE 


October,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


13 


Charleston,  S.  C. 


The    wedding   of    Miss  Janice 
I  Marilyn  Jaffee,  a  daughter  of  Mr. 
I  and  Mrs.  Meyer  Jaffee  of  East  Oak 
I  Forest,  and  Mr.  Barry  Goldstein,  a 
son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Joe  Goldstein 
of  297  Broad  St.,  took  place  Sun- 
la)   afternoon  in  the  K.  K.  Beth 
Elohini  with  Rabhi  Allen  Tarhish 
officiating. 

The  bride  was  given  in  marriage 
b\  her  lather.  Maid  of  Honor  was 
Beverly  Lynn  Jaffee,  a  sister  of  the 
bride. 

Bridesmaids  were  Misses  Carol 
Jo\  Jaffee,  a  sister  of  the  bride, 
Jud)  Ellen  Seigel,  a  cousin  of  the 
bride.  Lois  Laban,  a  cousin  of  the 
bridegroom,  and  Allyn  Gail  Rose- 
man, 

Lt.  Jack  Goldstein  ol  El  Paso, 
To...  a  brother  of  the  bridegroom, 
was  best  man.  Ushers  were  Messrs. 
Murray  Alan  Dan/  of  Brooklyn. 
X.  V..  Harvey  Yaschik,  a  cousin  ol 
the  bride,  Leon  RudTch  of  Charles 
ton  and  Norman  Karshmer  of  New 
Brunswick,  N.  J.  Junior  usher  was 
Harold  Davis  Jaffee,  a  brother  ol 
the  bride. 

Mrs.  Goldstein  was  graduated 
from  Rivers  High  School  and  prior 


Shahid's  Department 
Store 

493  King  S'.  Dial  RA  3-9481 

CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


c4L  BEAUTl  FU L  TRIBUTE 
-  THAT  LtVES  FORE  VECf 

£'J-m?CflRTHY$  SONS 

.     MEMORIALS  SINCE  iS60 


Magnolia  Crossing 
Dial  RA  3-8381 

CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


to  her  manage  was  employed  at 
Public  Savings  Life  Insurance  Co. 

Mr.  Goldstein  was  graduated 
from  Rivers  High  School  and  the 
University  ol  South  Carolina  with 
B.  A.  degree  in  political  science. 
He  is  a  member  of  Omicron 
Delta  Kappa,  honorary  leadership 
fraternity;  Pi  Sigma  Alpha,  honor- 
ary political  science  fraternity  and 
Epsilon  Pi,  social  fraternity.  Mr. 
Goldstein  plans  to  continue  his 
studies  at  the  University  where  he- 
received  an  assistantship  in  politi- 
cal science. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Nathan  Rephan 
proudly,  announce  the  birth  of 
David  at  the  New  Roper  Hospital 
on  Sept.  19th. 

Gerald?  Emanuel  Berendt,  son  of 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Benjamin  Berendt 
was  bar  mitzvah  at  Synagogue  Em- 
anu-E]  on  Sept.  3rd. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Sam  Sovelove  of 
i  165-A  King  St.  have  just  returned 
Irom  Alexandria,  Va.,  where  they 
visited  their  son  and  daughter-in- 
law,  Lt.  and  Mrs.  Jerome  M.  Sove- 
love and  their  new  son,  Jeffrey 
Lawrence,  who  was  born  July  26. 

Miss  Evelyn  Lois  Lipman,  a 
daughter  of  Mrs.  Hyman  Lipman 
of  46  Spring  St.  and  the  late  Mr. 
Lipman,  became  the  bride  of  Mr. 
Na'ehum  Hershel  Sarasohn  August 
21st  in  the  Brith-Shalom-Beth 
Israel  Synagogue  here.  Rabbi  Nac- 
hum  L.  Rabinovitch  officiated. 
Following  the  ceremony  a  recep- 
tion was  held  in  the  social  hall  of 
the  synagogue.  After  a  wedding 
trip  to  Miami  Beach,  Fla.,  the 
couple  will  reside  at  the  Carlton 
Arms  Apartments. 

The  Charleston  No.  143  of  the 
Aleph  Zadik  Aleph  of  the  B'nai 
B'rith  Youth  Organization  held  its 
fifteenth  annual  Sweetheart  Dance 
recently  in  the  Gold  Room  of  the 
Francis  Marion  Hotel  in  Charles- 
ton, S.  C.  The  dance  was  held  in 
honor  of  the  chapter's  newly 
elected  sweetheart,  whose  corona- 
tion took  place  during  the  even- 
ing. 

Miss  Sally  Sharnoff,  daughter  of 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Mose  Sharnoff,  was 
crowned  the  1960-61  sweetheart  by 
Mr.  Harold  Koslow,  a  member  of 
the  chapter's  advisory  board.  She 
was  then  pinned  with  the  official 
AZA  sweetheart  pin  by  the  reign- 
ing sweetheart,  Miss  Margie  Weiss, 
daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Joe 
Weiss. 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Charleston,  §.  C. 


COPLESTON'S 

Quality 

Dry  Cleaning  .  .  .  Laundry 

Dial  RA  2-5505 
537  Meeting  Street 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


'/-.  S^.  -Ss-.  S^,  S?~,       Ss-       ss-  ■ 


Ralph },  McCoy  \ 


JUST  INSURANCE' 


FIRE— AUTO— CASUALTY  f 
3  Avondale  Ave.  §. 


Dial  SN  6-6316 


CHARLESTON,  S.  C 


ROASTED  OYSTERS 
SEAFOOD,  STEAK  AND  CHICKEN  DINNERS 

OPEN  WEEK  DAYS  5:30  TO  MIDNiGHT 
SUNDAYS  NOON  TO  10'  P.  M. 


ANDRE'S 


Folly  Road  at  Folly  Beach,  S.  C. 
Telephone  JU  8-2890 


AIR  CONDITIONED  COMFORT 


"See  Us  For  All  Your  Gifts" 

SAM  SOLOMON  COMPANY 

WHOLESALE  DISTRIBUTORS 

Toys  —  Luggage  —  Gifts  —  Appliances  —  Jewelry 
Silverware  —  Home  Furnishings  —  Housewares 

Write  For  Our  Large  Gift  Catalogue  to  P.  O.  Box  2121 

338-340  E.  Bay  St.       Dial  RA  2-8311       CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


PORT  CITY 
Really  &  Insurance,  Inc. 

"Complete  Facilities  for  Efficient  Service" 
1026  Spruill  Avenue  Phone  SH  7-1586 

NORTH  CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


SAFETY 


SERVICE 


SECURITY 


Atlantic  Coast  Life  Insurance  Co, 


149  Wentworth  St. 


CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


"The  Golden  Rule  Company" 

ORDINARY— HOSPITALIZATION— WEEKLY  PREMIUM 

INSURANCE 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


October,  1960 


IF  IT'S 


ICE  CREAM 
Purity  Ice  Cream  Co. 

SH  4-6296 
N.  CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


BURBAGE 
TIRE  COMPANY 

Sinclair  Oil  Products 

524  Meeting  at  Lee 
Dial  RA  2-6295 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 

Your  Safety  Is  Our  Business  At 

Jftrestone 

STORES 

Tires,  Batteries,  Accessories 
377  Meeting  RA  2-6524 

CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


PRESCRIPTION 
CENTER 


M. 


C. 


C.  KENNEDY 
W.  DUCKER 
JAS.  BOBO 

"Where  Skill  and  Care 
Insure  the  Best" 

Prrmpt  City-Wide 
Motarized  Delivery 

Rutledge  at  Bull 
Dial  RA  3-8161 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


Nexu  Year  Greetings  From: 

Allen  &  Webb 

Mill  Supplies 

Dial  RA  2-7791 
176  Meeting  Street 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


STANDARD  OF  THE  WORLD 

Sales,  Service  &  Parts 

478  East  Bay  Street 
Phone  RA  3-1669 
Quality  Value  Cars 
379  Meeting  St. 
Phone  RA  3-9214 
Low  GMAC  Financing 

Miller 
Cadillac,  Inc. 

CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


Troy  I.  Smith 

General 
Contractors 


Personalized  Service 
We  Specialize  In  Building 
Beautiful  Homes 

Dial  SH  4-3712 
611  Durant  Avenue  & 
N.  CHARLESTON,  S.  C.  § 

^-5>-.      ~<C/~'  t-<^-      v5";  '^5^  -<5^-  -<5>~-  -V-  ^y-  -S/-> 


SELLERS  TRANSFER  COMPANY 

SAFE  —  DEPENDABLE  —  FAST-MOVING  —  STORAGE 

6  Hasell  Street  CHARLESTON,  S.  C.  Dial  RA  2-8753 


Seven-Up  Bottling  Co. 

CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


mm 


WURLITZER  PIANOS 
AND  ORGANS 
NEW  —  USED 

Dial  SNow  6-5521 

171  Savannah  Hwy. 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


Miss  Margie  Weiss  (right)  places  the  crown  on  Miss  Sally  Sharnoff  (left)  as 
the  1960-61  Charleston  AZA  Chapter  Sweetheart. 


Following  her  coronation,  Miss 
Sharnoff  and  Mr.  Neil  Draisin, 
president  of  the  Charleston  AZA 
Chapter,  led  in  a  dance  to  the  AZA 
Sweetheart  Song.  During  the  num- 
ber each  of  the  chapter  s  officers 
and  members  danced  with  their 
new  sweetheart.  Visiting  AZA 
chapter  sweetheart  and  past  sweet- 
hearts of  the  Charleston  Chapter 
were  introduced"  during  the  sweet- 
heart ceremony. 

Other  candidates  lor  the  crown 
were  Miss  Sandra  Levine,  daugh- 
ter of  Mr.  and"  Mrs.  Max  Levine; 
Miss  Faye  PoTis,  daughter  of  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Ben  Polis;  and  Miss 
Eileen  Wolper,  daughter  of  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Louis  Wolper.  All  three 
were  named  to  the  chapter's  1960- 
61  Sweetheart  Court  and  will  assist 
the  sweetheart  during  the  year. 

Balloting  for  the  new  sweetheart 
took  place  at  a  recent  meeting  of 
the  chapter  and  the  votes  were 
placed"  in  a  sealed  envelope,  which 
was  not  opened  until  the  dance. 
Chairman  of  the  committee  for  the 
dance  was  Mr.  Sam  Solomon.  As- 
sisting him  were  the  Messers.  Ber- 
nard  Steinberg,    Dennis  Yaschik, 


Jerry  Wearb,  Bobby  Krawcheck, 
Harold  Schraibman,  and  Eddie 
Raskind.  Advisor  to  the  committee 
was  Mr.  Harold  Koslow. 

Out  of  town  guest  from  Atlanta, 
Savannah,  and  Augusta,  Ga.; 
Columbia,  S.  C;  and  Charlotte, 
N.  C.  were  among  the  200  approxi- 
mate guests  attending  the  dance. 
The  dance  was  held  in  connection 
with  the  annuaL  sweetheart  week- 
end celebration  of  the  chapter.  An 
informal  bermuda  social,  a  pool 
party,  and  a  Hawaiian  luau  were 
held  along  with  the  Sweetheart 
Dance. 

J.  HENRY  STUHR,  Inc. 

FUNERAL  DIRECTORS 
Serving  Charleston  Over 
One-Half  Century 

Dial  RA  2-4064 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 

BUTT'S  ELECTRICAL 
SUPPLY  COMPANY 

WHOLESALE 

480  E.  Bay         Dial  RA  2-5786 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


FIRST 

SAVINGS  A  LOAN  ASSN. 


More  Than  a  Quarter  of  a  Century  of  Service  to  the 
Charleston,  S.  C.  Community 


October,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


>5 


Dr.  Samuel  Nunez 

The  First  Physician  In  Georgia— 1731 

BY  HARRY  SIMONHOFF 

About  the  time  when  the  powers 
above  were  deciding  to  send 
George  Washington  into  our 
world  to  change  the  course  of 
history,  Samuel  Nunez  lived  in  a 
mansion  on  the  Tagus  River  in 
Lisbon,  Portugal.  Wealthy,  head 
of  a  family,  socially  prominent, 
and  physician  to  the  king,  he  had 
every  reason  to  live  in  grateful 
contentment. 

Colleagues  envious  of  his  posi- 
tion and  success,  probably  whis- 
pered that  Dr.  Nunez  was  after 
all  but  a  New  Christian,  even  if 
his  ancestors,  who  fled  Spain  in 
1492,  had  been  saying  mass,  con- 
fessing sins,  and  receiving  com- 
munion for  more  than  two  cen- 
turies. Envy,  like  its  second  cousin 
jealousy,   feeding  upon  itself  and  HARRY  SIMONHOFF 

growing  into  a  green  monster,  ed  in  some  secret  cell  under  his 
perhaps  spread  rumors  about  pro-  imposing  hacienda.  Probably  these 
scribed  Jewish  rites  being  practic-    tales  reached   the   many  ears  of 

the  Inquisition.  One  unsuspect- 
ing day,  two  spies  suddenly  slith- 
ered into  the  living  room.  It  was 
too  late  to  hide  the  little  Hebrew 
books  in  the  hollow  seats  of  chairs 
worked  by  springs.  The  family 
and  prayer  books  were  cast  into 
prison.  On  lesser  showing,  sus- 
pects had  been  burned  at  Auto-da- 
Fes  lor  two  centuries. 

A  miracle  intervened.  Either 
the  king  needed  his  physician,  or 
the  refreshing  winds  of  the  18th 
century  enlightenment  (aufklae- 
rung)  were  blowing  across  the 
Spanish  peninsula.  Doctor  and 
family  got  off  with  mild  sentence: 
two  overseers  of  the  Holv  Office 
were  stationed  at  the  mansion  on 
the  river  front  to  supervise  the 
behavior  of  the  Nunez  family.  But 
it  must  have  been  rather  uncom- 
fortable to  live  in  the  shadow  of 
two  bigots  holding  the  menace 
of  death  or  prison  over  their 
heads.  The  doctor  hatched  up  a 
scheme,  which  might  lead  to  lib- 
eration or  the  burning  stake. 

The  Nunez  family  were  accus- 
tomed to  entertain  in  elaborate 
style.  So  it  caused  little  surprise 
and  much  comment  among  Lis- 
bon's socialites  for  the  king's 
physician  to  throw  a  gala  dinner 
party.  That  afternoon,  an  English 
sea  captain,  with  whom  the  doctor 
had  become  chummy,  invited  the 
entire  family,  several  friends,  and 
the  two  hounds  of  the  Inquisition 
to  come  aboard  his  ship.  It  was 
thoughtful  of  the  captain  to  en- 


TAYLOR'S 
BAKERY  KITCHEN 

Established  1938 
Jewish  Bakery  Products 

42  Spring  St.       Dial  RA  2-0235 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


Stephens 
Restaurant 

Serving 
THE  NORTH  AREA 
and 

GREATER  CHARLESTON 
Plenty  of  Free  Parking 

4923  Rivers  Ave. 
Dial  SH  7-2641 
CHARLESTON  HEIGHTS, 
SOUTH  CAROLINA 


McNAUGHTON 
Printing  Co. 

•  Wedding  Invitations 

&  Accessories 

•  Personalized  Stationery 

•  Christmas  Cards 

•  Printing 

•  Lithographing 

•  Carbon  Forms 

•  Plastic  Laminating 

Phone 
Day  SHerwood  4-2758 
Night  SHerwood  4-3677 
No.  I  in  the  North  Area 
Opposite  Southern  Ice  Co. 
731  Spruill  Avenue 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


yy-      >  yy>  -^T-  -<Cr-  yy-       yy  ■  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy .       'yy-.  yy-.  yy.  yy-.  yy.yy.  yy-.  yy.  yy. -yy-.  ■- 

DARLINGTON  APARTMENTS 

ENJOY  COMFORTABLE  LIVING  IN  AN 

"Efficiency"  or  "One  Bed  Room  Apartment" 
COMPLETELY  AIR-CONDITIONED 

AT  KING  AND  MT.  PLEASANT  STREETS  | 
[    TELEPHONE  RA  3-3627  CHARLESTON,  S.  C.  | 

-         'yy-  ■  y--  -yy.  yy  yy-  yy--  yy. t  sy-  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy.  -y.  yy.  yy.  yy  yy-  y^  ■  y-  y/--  yy  yy-  yy-  --y 


Public  Savings  Life  Insurance  Co. 

Industrial  —  Hospitalization  —  Ordinary 

HOME  OFFICE:  304  Meeting  Street 
Dial  RA  3-3682  CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


Charleston  Trailer  &  Brake  Service 

TRUCKS  OF  VALUE 

Sales  &  Service 
Factory -Trained  Mechanics 

Meeting  St.  Rd.  CHARLESTON,  S.  C.  Dial  RA  3-6471 


BRADFORD'S  METAL  WORKS 


Remount  Road 


HEATING  AND  AIR-CONDITIONING 

SHEET  METAL  —  ORNAMENTAL  IRON 

CHARLESTON.  S.  C.  Dial  SH  4-1819 


"HOUSE  OF  BETTER  V A  LUES 


King  at  Warren 


CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


W.  D.  Robinson 
Electric  Go. 

Electrical  Contracting 

2821  Rivers  Ave.  SH  7-2222 
CHARLESTON  HEIGHTS,  S.  C. 


ACE 
EMPLOYMENT 
AGENCY 

Complete  Service  to 
Employer  and  Employee 
65  Societv  St.      Dial  RA  3-4627 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


"CANVAS  A  SPECIALTY" 


W.  W.  CANVAS  &  UPHOLSTERY  CO. 

"WE  COVER  ANYTHING  UNDER  THE  SUN" 
Cor.  Calhoun  and  Lucas  Dial  RA  3-0934 

CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


Please  Patronize  Our  Advertisers 


Palmetto  Construction  Co. 

GENERAL  CONTRACTORS 

2728  Spruill  Ave.  CHARLESTON,  S.  C.  Dial  SH  4-5326 


ASHLEY  TRANSFER  &  STORAGE  CO. 

Agents  For 
U.  S.  VAN  LINES 
Local  &  Long  Distance  Moving  —  Packing  —  Crating  —  Storage 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C.  BEAUFORT,  S.  C. 

Dial  SH  4-2664  Dial  JA  4-3750 


i6 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


October,  i960 


K^yCr.yy-.yy.yy^.yy.yyr.-^ 

I       SOUTH  WINDERMERE  BAKERY 

Formerly  Mickelberg  Bakery 

Specializing:  in  the  Same  Style  Bakery  Products 

Dial  SN  6-0435  CHARLESTON,  S.  C.  88  Folly  Rd.  & 

Z^-yyyyy-'yy--'  C?~"*&~-<*Or'm-&~>,~Crx-&v-  <?^t^o^i^>t^5v?^t^1V?"-^<5^--!?-'«^'V^t  y,yy-.<yy-yy.  -yy.& 

;yy~.  yy-  yy  yy-  yy  yy>  yy-  y  v  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy  .-yy-.-yy-.yy  -yy^yy-^^y  j  yy.  yy.  -yy.  yy.  yy.  yyt  y^. 

%       DEAS  BROKERAGE  CO. 


8  State  Street 


FOOD  BROKER 


CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


Dial  RA  3-4876 


yyy-.:yy^.-yy-.yy^.\y-.-yy.yy^  yy-.-y^ 

ysy. yy. yy-. -yy. yy. yy-. yy. yy  -, yyy. yy.  -yy.  yfy.  yy-.  yy .  yy. yy-. yy-  yy  yy. y, yy. yy. yy  yy  yy.  yy -. yy* 

HOLSEBERG  AND  JENKINS  I 

PLUMBING  &  HEATING  CONTRACTORS 

Sales     —     Installations     —  Repairs 

212  Rutledge  Ave.  Dial  RA  3-3385 

CHARLESTON,  S.  C.  or    RA  3-5264 

C 

yy-yy-.-yy-  y.yy.-yy.-yy.yy--yy.>  y.yy.yyr.yy-,'yy~,<yyr..  y  yy.  yy  yy.  yy.  -yy. ■  y~.  -yy.  yy.  yy.  -yy.  yy > 
■.■yy.yy-.yy.-yy.yy  .yy.-yy.-yy.  yyyy,>yy .  yy.  yy.  yy  yy.  yy.  yy >  yy.  yy-  yy  yy-  yy  yy  yy-  yy-- <yy.  y 

L.  G.  FERGUSON 

GENERAL  PAINTING  CONTRACTOR,  INC. 

Industrial  —  Commercial  —  Residential 

10  Gillon  St.  CHARLESTON,  S.  C.  Dial  RA  3-8679  £ 

- yy. yy.yy.  yy.  y^.  yr.  yy. yy  -  y,  yy.  yy-.  yy-.  yy-.  yy. -  y-.yy-.yy-.  yy-.  yy-.yy-.:  cyyyy^yy-yy^yy^^o^ 


The  Art  Store 

Picture  Framing 
Artist's  Supplies 

Dial  RA  3-9523 
183  King  Street 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


Francis  Marion 
Hotel 
Barber  Shop 

L.  E.  CONGER,  Owner 
Charleston,  S.  C. 


RUG  &  CARPET  MART,  INC. 

"FORMERELY  MORRIS  FLOOR  COVERINGS" 

One  of  the  Largest  Selections  in  Stock 
Complete  Installation  —  36  Mo.  To  Pay 

177-B  St.  Andrews  Blvd.  Dial  SN  6-6218 

CHARLESTON,  SOUTH  CAROLINA 

y-yyyy-y^-yyy 

NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS  y 

MORSE  SEWING  CENTER  j 

DIAL  SN  6-9003  § 

1    25  Magnolia  Rd.  CHARLESTON,  S.  C.  § 

yy.  yy.  yy.-yy-.  -yy.  yy-'  y~-  yy--  yy.  yy-  yy-  yy--  ■-  y--  yy-  -yy-  yy.  yy-  -y/~-  <    -yy-  -yy-  yy^yy-  yy--  yy.  -yy-. 

-  yy.  yy.  yy-.  yy-.  -yy.  yy  yy.  yy  ^  yy-.  yy.  yy  yy.  yy.  yy .  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy  •■  yy.  yy-.  yy.  yy-.  yy~.yy 

RENKEN  FINANCE  CO.  ' 

UNLIMITED  LOANS 

390  Meeting  Street  Dial  RA  3-3603 

CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 

3  yy>  yy-.  <yy.  yy-.  yy  ■.  yy-.  yy-.  yy  -yy-.  yy.  yy  ■  yy-.  yy-.  yy.  yy-.  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy-.  yy-  -yy.  yy-.  yy>  yy.  yy.  yy-  -s% 
§    HOLIDAY  GREETINGS  FROM:  | 

PARKER'S  MEAT  MARKET 

We  Specialize  in  Western  Meats 
Fish  &  Poultry 

RAymond  3-1007  CHARLESTON,  S.  C.  614  Rutledge  Avenue  <S 
fy-.^yy^y^y^.yyy.  yy^.yyn'yyr.-yy-.y^ 


tertain  them  with  cocktails  and 
English  roast  beet.  And  what  re- 
lief to  escape  the  din  and  clatter 
of  the  officious  servants  in  their 
busy  preparation  for  the  evening 
banquet. 

While  the  party  were  exhilarat- 
ing below,  the  crew  cleared  the 
deck,  unfurled  the  sails,  and  raised 
the  anchor.  In  a  brisk  wind,  the 
boat  glided  out  of  Lisbon  harbor 
and  sailed  for  England.  The 
friendly  captain  received  the 
handsome  gift  of  1000  moidres 
for  his  trouble.  The  refugees 
carried  away  whatever  jewels  and 
money  they  could  secrete  about 
their  persons  without  exciting  su- 
spicion. Dr.  Nunez  left  his  man- 
sion, his  furniture,  plate,  and  all 
possessions  accumulated  in  two 
centuries  to  the  Holy  Office  of 
the  Inquisition. 

The  doctor  found  himself  in 
the  London  community,  which 
was  rapidly  succeeding  and  even 
displacing  Amsterdam  as  the  cen- 
ter of  world  Jewry.  Its  wealth  and 
prestige  were  attracting  destitute 
Jews  from  Germany  and  Poland. 
But  the  proud  Hidalgoes  did  not 
relish  the  strain  upon  their  phil- 
anthropy, at  least  not  from  lowlv 
Ashkenazim.  The  Sephardic  lead- 
ership saw  the  possibility  of  get- 
ting rid  of  their  poor  by  utilizing 
the  scheme  of  James  Oglethrope. 

The  idealist  General's  idea  was 
to  open  the  jails  and  send  the  im- 
prisoned debtors  to  start  a  new 
life  in  the  New  World.  King 
George  had  granted  the  land  be- 
tween Carolina  and  Florida  for  a 
new  colony;  Parliament  voted  10,- 
ooo  pounds  for  the  project;  The 
Trustees  for  the  Georgia  col- 
ony were  soliciting  donations  from 
the  wealthy  or  the  charitable. 

Collections  did  not  come  in  so 
rapidly.  So  when  a  letter  was  read 
at  a  Trustees'  meeting  from  Da 
Costa,  Salvador,  and  Suasso  offer- 
ing to  raise  money  in  the  Jewish 
community,  the  Board  accepted 
gratefully.  The  Jews  collected  a 
tidy  sum  but  imposed  a  condition. 
They  merely  requested  that  some 
of  their  own  coreligionists  be  per- 
mitted to  sail  with  the  indigent 
debtors  to  colonize  Georgia.  What 
audacity!  Did  they  think  Jews 
were  better  than  Catholics:  The 
by-laws  specifically  excluded  Pap- 
ists. Barring  out  the  Jews  was 
simply  overlooked.  Outraged,  the 
Trustees  demanded  Back  the  com- 
mission to  raise  funds.  Try  and 
get  it  was  the  Jewish  reply.  In 
February,  1733,  General  Ogle- 
thrope  landed  his  cargo  of  116 


settlers  near  the  mouth  of  the 
Savannah  River. 

Several  months  later,  a  second 
ship  docked  at  Savannah  harbor. 
On  board  were  about  40  Jewish 
settlers,  without  permissison  from 
the  all  powerful  Board.  What 
could  have  induced  the  Jewish 
committee  to  charter  a  boat,  know- 
ing full  well  the  hostility  of  the 
Trustees?  Why  did  the  passengers 
chance  a  long,  perilous  ocean 
voyage  without  proper  authoriza- 
tion? Perchance  they  banked  on 
Gen.  Oglethrope's  idealism?  Or 
did  they  simply  play  a  hunch? 

Governor  Oglethorpe  was  dis- 
turbed and  displeased.  His  first 
impulse  was  to  send  them  all  back. 
It  is  unpleasant  to  quarrel  with 
;i  Board,  whose  sentiments  he 
knew.  To  allow  them  to  land 
would  be  disobeying  orders.  But 
his  better  nature  asserted  itself. 
Perhaps  his  common  sense  point- 
ed to  the  absurdity  of  barring  im- 
migrants from  a  vacant  land  bad- 
ly in  need  of  colonists.  He  knew 
the  Spanish  enemies  in  Florida 
looked  with  jaundiced  eyes  upon 
an  English  colony  settling  on  land 
they  claimed.  Surrounded  by  In- 
dian savages  was  the  tiny  colony, 
v.-.cse  very  existence  was  now 
threatened  by  a  fatal  epidemic. 

A  fatal  epidemic!  And  the  col- 
ony without  a  single  doctor!  Need 
we  look  further  for  the  motive 
that  swayed  Gov.  Oglethrope  when 
he  heard  that  the  King  of  Portu- 
gal's physician  was  on  the  ship? 
He  decided  to  let  all  Jewish  pas- 
sengers land  and  then  ask  of  Lon- 
don to  confirm  his  act.  Evidently 
it  took  little  time  to  ascertain  the 
value  of  his  Jewish  colonists.  Long 
(Please  turn  to  Page  22) 


MOVING 

Pioneers  of 
Nation- Wide  Moving 

DIRECT  MOVERS  TO 
ALL  50  STATES 
Free  Estimates  &  Planning 

Serving  50  States  —  Canada 
Mexico  —  England  —  Germany 
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LONG  DISTANCE  MOVING 
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NATIONAL 
VAN  LINES,  INC. 

Dial  SHerwood  4-7121 

PALMETTO 
Moving  and 
Storage  Co. 

3717i/2  Rivers  Avenue 
Charleston  Heights,  S.  C. 


October,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Co-operation  Among  Small  Nations 

BY  MEYER  W.  WEISGAL 
Mr.  Weisgal  in  his  capacity  of  Chairman  of  the  Weizmann  Institute  wel- 
comed the  delegates  and  guests  of  the  International  Conference  on  Science 
in  the  Advancement  of  New  States  which  was  held  under  the  auspices  of 
the  Weizmann  Institute  of  Science  in  Rehovoth,  Israel.  This  is  the  text  of 
his  address  at  the  opening  session  over  which  he  presided.  — The  Editor. 

It  is  my  privilege  as  Chairman  as  well  as  their  problems.  In  the 

of  the  Weizmann  Institute  to  wel-  aggregate  we  represent  a  turning 

come  you  to  this  Conference.  If  point  in  world  history.  Historical- 

I  cherish  this  privilege,  it  is  be-  ly   speaking,   destiny   brought  us 

cause  I  find  in  it  the  means  to  together    simultaneously    on  the 

express  some  of  the  warmth  and  world  stage.  Mutual  regard,  and 

good-will  which  moved  us  in  the  the    understanding    born    of  it, 

planning  of  the  occasion.  should   guide   us   in    the  fulfill- 

We  have  always  felt  the  need  ment  of  that  destiny. 


Meyer  W.  Weisgal  addressing  International  Conference  on  Science. 


to  meet  together  with  the  other 
infant  nations  which,  like  us,  con- 
front the  world  with  their  promise 


CHICORA 
INVESTMENT  (0 


FOR  LOANS  GO  BY  ONE  OF 
THE  CONVENIENT  LOCATIONS 
LISTED  BELOW 

No.  1 

1820  Reynolds  Avenue 
Phone  SH  4-9857 
Charleston  Heights,  S.  C. 

No.  2 

5651  Rivers  Avenue 
Palmetto  Shopping  Center 
Phone  SH  7-4921 

No.  3 

Charleston  Downtown  Office 
623  King  Street 
Phone  RA  2-5721 
Phone  TU  4-8131 

No.  4 

Mount  Pleasant 
Highway  703 
Also  Offices  at: 

Beaufort  —  Georgetown 
Holly  Hill    —  Ellerbe 
Hampton  —  Summerville 
St.  Stephens 


The  age  of  patron  and  client 
peoples  is  gone.  A  new  spirit  has 
been  infused  into  the  relations  of 
all  people,  the  old  and  the  reborn. 
Therefore,  we  come  not  only  with 
our  needs,  but  also  with  our  in- 
dividual contributions  to  the  crea- 
tion of  the  new  era  and  the  new 
order. 

We  of  the  Weizmann  Institute 
have  been  nurtured  on  these  ideas. 
They  were  the  moving  force  in 
the  long  and  illustrious  career  of 
our  teacher  and  founder,  Dr. 
C  h  a  i  m  Weizmann,  statesman, 
scientist,  and  humanist.  From  his 
resting  place  within  these  precincts 
he  broods  serenely  over  the  be- 
ginnings of  the  fulfillment  of  his 
dream— the  coming  together  of  na- 
tions which  have  shaken  off  the 
frustration  of  the  past  to  enter  on 
the  universal  heritage  of  freedom 
and  the  pursuit  of  happiness. 

In  each  of  us  the  experience  of 
the  past  has  created  particular 
capacities  which  must  be  placed 
at  each  other's  disposal  and  at  the 
disposal  oT  the  world.  Individual- 
ly these  capacities  are  ineffective; 
pooled,  they  are  a  mighty  and 
beneficent  force.  We  have  in  com- 
mon the  enthusiasm  and  creative 
energy  of  reborn  nations;  let  us 
also  hold  in  common  our  special 
gifts  and  the  special  results  of  our 
separate  and  peculiar  histories. 

(Please  turn  to  Page  58) 


Ambulance 

Service 
USHER'S 

We  Never  Close 

DIAL  SH  4-5435 
2013  Reynolds  Ave. 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


Rent  A  Car 

Rent  A  Truck 


Dial  RA  3-4522 

141  Calhoun 
CHARLESTON 


§ 

§ 
§ 

§ 
§ 


Dial  RA  2-5784 

Charleston 
Florist,  Inc. 

LUCILLE  STYLES,  Pres. 

"Say  it  with  Flowers," 

Surely  With  Ours 

128  King  Street 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


Coulter  &  Lanford 

PLUMBING  and  HEATING 

CONTRACTORS 

814  Spruill  Ave.— Dial  SH  4-3948 
N.  CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


Murray  Tile  Co. 

TILE  —  MARBLE 
TERAZZO 

5439  Rivers  Avenue 

Dial  SH  4-9871 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


Certified  Dealer 


LENNOX 


Comfort  Craftsman 

Rice  &  Santos,  Inc. 

Dial  RA  3-4702 
2  Exchange  St. 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


You'll  Enjoy  Shopping  at  .  .  . 


517  King  St. 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


CAROLINA  '  < 
SKYWAYS  AIRPORT 

Flying  Instruction 

Dial  SO  6-7021       James  Island 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 

SIRES 
LUMBER  COMPANY 

Lumber  —  Millwork  and 
Building  Materials 

790  Meeting  St.    Dial  RA  2-3863 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


Thompson  -  Miler 
Hard  ware  Corp. 

WHOLESALE 

263  E.  Bay  St.       Dial  RA  2-2621 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


' y^- 


§ 

§ 
§ 
§ 
§ 
§ 
§ 
§ 

§ 


Claude  Meadows 
Servicenter 

(«so) 


590  Meeting  at  Huger  St. 
Dial  RA  2-9340 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


t^>  i0r>  S^'  ^i. 


j8 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES  OUTLOOK 


October,  i960 


§ 
f 
§ 

§ 

§: 

§ 

§ 
§ 
§ 
§ 
§ 

§ 

§ 
§ 

§ 
§ 

§ 

§ 

§ 
§ 
§ 

§ 
§ 

$ 
§ 

f 


/y.yy.  yy~.  yy.  yy.  y^y.     .  yy .  ^r.  yy^yy.  yy  yy.  yy ,  yy  yCs-  yy  -yy-      yy  -  yy  yy-  1^5  *tC*£ 


7960 

The  10th  Year 

of 

Israel  Bonds 


BUY  ISRAEL  BONDS 

For  A  New  Year 
Of  Progress 
For  Israel 


Information,  Prospectus  &  Bonds  may  be  obtained  at 


Israel  Bonds 


Virginia  &  North  Carolina  Region 
208  W.  York  St. 


Norfolk,  Va. 
MAdison  2-4631 


MONTY  BERGMAN,  Area  Manager 


Rosh  Kippur  And  Yom  Hashonah 


BY  RABBI  SAMUEL  M.  SILVER 


§ 


§ 
§ 


I 
§ 

§ 

^>~s-&*-&~s~C/~i'-<7~'~Gr'      -&'■<-&'■  t^st^x^a  ^Gr.     yy.  yy. yy-.  yy.  yyy-.  \ 


Sometimes  an  error  can  illu- 
minate a  situation  more  vividly 
than  an  accurate  statement. 

For  example,  think  of  the  im- 
port of  that  famous  typographical 
mistake  by  which  the  United  Na- 
tions was  once  rendered  "Untied 
Nations."  People  who  saw  the 
misprint  were  prone  to  say,  "Yes, 
ttie  nations  are  untied.  When  will 
they  finally  be  united?" 

Sometimes  the  eloquent  error 
is  a  stumble  into  an  idiom.  For 
example,  they  tell  the  story  of  the 
youngster  whose  mother  pleaded 
with  him  to  behave  properly.  "I'll 
be  good  for  a  quarter,"  bargained 
the  boy,  and,  according  to  this 
tale,  the  mother  replied,  "Why 
don't  you  be  like  your  father  and 
be  good  lor  nothing?" 

In  a  sense,  the  High  Holydays 
urge  us  to  be  "good  for  nothing." 
Other  holidays  are  associated 
with  some  event  or  some  individ- 
ual. On  Lincoln's  Birthday  we 
feel  the  tug  to  be  virtuous  because 
Lincoln  was.  On  Purim  and  Chan- 
ukah  we  are  inspired  to  be  brave 
because  of  what  Esther  and  Mat- 
tathias  did  for  us  and  our  faith. 
On  Sukkos,  Passover  and  Shavuos 
the  majestic  figure  of  the  Great 
Liberator  appears,  almost  sub- 
liminally,  appealing  to  be  "good 
for  Moses." 

But  on  the  High  Holydays  we 
are  importuned  to  be  "good  for 
nothing."  Be  righteous  not  as  a 
result  of  the  stimulation  of  some 
stirring  episode  or  personage,  but 
for  the  sake  of  righteousness  it- 
self, the  satisfaction  which  comes 
from  being  properly  attuned  to 
the  divinity  within  us. 

Like  comment  of  the  mother  in 


the  story  who  asked  the  child  to 
be  "good  for  nothing,"  so  another 
lapse  which  once  actually  happen- 
ed opens  up  new  insights  with 
regard  to  the  meaning  of  the  High 
Holydays. 

In  a  small  town  a  weekly  news- 
paper told  its  readers,  as  all  news- 
papers do  these  days,  about  the 
holydays.  But  when  the  article  ap- 
peared, there  was  a  lamentable 
verbal  mix-up,  and  the  paper  an- 
nounced that  the  ten  days  of 
penitence  began  with  "Rosh  Kip- 
pur" and  ended  with  "Yom 
Hashanah." 

After  the  first  chuckle,  one  can 
examine  this  mistake  with  a  cer- 
tain degree  of  spiritual  profit,  and 
scrutiny  will  spur  some  interest- 
ing observations. 

Rosh  Kippur  would  he  trans- 
lated, "Beginning  of  Atonement." 
And  that  might  make  a  good 
name  lor  the  observance  at  that, 
Actually  Yom  Kippur  for  many 
people,  is  the  only  time  for  in- 
dulging in  remorse  in  depth. 
True,  Yom  Kippur  is  an  import- 
ant day,  and  it  is  commendable 
that  it  is  observed  by  the  masses, 
v.  ho  flock  to  their  pews  for  pray- 
er and  song.  But  we  do  not  really 
carry  out  the  mandate  of  Judaism 
il  we  confine  our  admission  of 
fault  and  failing  to  that  one  day. 
It  is  too  much  to  load  on  one 
worship  experience.  The  mistake, 
Rosh  Kippur,  can  remind  us, 
therefore,  that  properly  Judaism 
pleads  with  us  merely  to  make 
Yom  Kippur  rosh  kippur,  the  be- 
ginning of  the  process  of  asknow- 
ledging  our  misdeeds,  the  com- 
mencement of  the  chain  reaction 
of  reflection  on  our  deficiencies, 

(Please  turn  to  Page  37) 


NEON  SIGNS 

Mazzell  Sign  Service 

Estimates  Furnished 
3356  Meeting  St.  Rd. 

Dial  SH  4-0206 
CHARLESTON,  S.  C. 


Buckler's  Studio 

Portraits   of  Distinction 
192  King  St.  Dial  RA  2-0792 

CHARLESTON,   S.  C. 


Greetings  For  The  New  Year 

J.  E.  TODD  AND  SON 

ROOFING  AND  GUTTERING  —  SHEET  METAL 
HEATING  AND  AIR-CONDITIONING 

 Repair  Work  A  Specialty  

196  E.  Bay  CHARLESTON,  S.  C.  Phone  RA  3-3544 


October,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


>9 


Columbia,  S.  G. 

MRS.  BERNARD  LADEN,  Correspondent 

The  Daughters  of  Israel  enter-    "Does   the  Modern 


gained  at  a  hospitality  brunch  and 
swim  party  for  this  year's  prospec- 
tive new  members  at  the  home  of 
Mrs.  Edward  Picow.  The  guests 
were  greeted  at  the  door  by  Mrs. 
Melton  Kligman  and  Mrs.  Nathan 
Picow,  co-chairmen  of  Membership 
committee.  Mrs.  Ted  Solomon, 
president,  spoke  on  what  is  done 
in  Daughters  of  Israel  and  what  it 
does  for  you. 

A  beautifully  appointed  table 
was  set  for  the  guests.  The  menu 
included  jello  molds,  whitefish 
salad,  deviled  eggs,  fruit  and  cot- 
tage cheese  salad,  luxon  kugel, 
cheese  biscuits,  coffee  and  cakes. 

Those  aiding  with  the  refresh- 
ments were:  Mrs.  Sam  Wengrow, 
Mrs.  Harvey  Rosen,  Mrs.  Arnold 
Levinson,  Mrs.  Sol  Silver,  Mrs.  Ed- 
ward Glasser  and  Mrs.  Mildred 
Kat7. 

The  B'Nai  B'Rith  Membership 
brunch  was  held  at  the  home  of 
Mrs.  Ben  Stern,  Mrs.  Joel  Levy, 
membership  chairman,  received 
with  Mrs.  Stern  and  welcomed  the 
guests. 

The  Dining  room  table  was  de- 
corated with  trays  of  assorted 
cheese  spread,  fish  delicacies, 
tossed  Greek  salad,  jello  molds, 
Danish  pastry  and  coffee.  Mrs. 
Eddie  Glasser  was  in  charge  of  re- 
freshments. 

Mrs.  Alvin  Levine,  president, 
spoke  informally  of  the  work  that 
B'Nai  B'Rith  is  doing  locally  and 
on  a  national  level. 

About  20  prospective  members 
attended  the  Hadassah  Coffee  hour 
held  at  the  home  of  Claire  Kline, 
Membership  chairman,  on  August 
18th.  Mrs.  Abe  Zalin,  president, 
gave  a  short  talk  on  the  activities 
of  Hadassah  in  America  and  Israel. 

The  S.  C.  Association  of  B'Nai 
B'Rith  Lodges  held  a  Jewish 
Educational  Institute  in  Charles- 
ton,  Sept.   2-5.   The  Theme  was 


World  need 
Judaism." 

Dr.  Trude  Waiss-Romarin  and 
Dr.  Jacob  Angus  were  guest  lec- 
turers. 

The  seminar  was  conducted  at 
the  Castle  Pinckney  Motel.  It  in- 
cluded religious  services  Saturday 
with  a  social  affair  in  the  even- 
ing, meetings  Sunday  morning  and 
afternoon  and  a  dance  that  even- 
ing. The  final  meeting  took  place 
Labor  Day  morning  with  adjourn- 
ment at  noon. 

Dr.  Norman  Sollod  was  in 
charge  of  reservations  from  Colum- 
bia. 

Rabbi  David  S.  Gruber  was  the 
guest  speaker  at  the  monthly  meet- 
ing of  the  Columbia  Association 
for  Retarded  children  held  at  the 
Happy  Time  Center.  Mrs.  Julius 
Green  is  president. 

Dr.  Albert  E.  Cremer  has  been 
named  1960  chairman  of  the  St. 
Louis  University  Alumni  Fund 
Council  for  the  state  of  S.  C. 

We  are  proud  of  Hyman  Rubin, 
Jr.,   who   climaxed   a  sensational 


Dr.  Irwin  Oder  has  been  appointed 
Assistant  to  the  Dean  of  Hebrew 
Union  College-Jewish  Institute  of 
Religion  in  New  York,  it  is  an- 
nounced  by  Dr.  Nelson  Glueck,  Col- 
lege-Institute president. 


CUSTOM  KITCHENS 

"From  the  Drab  to 
the  Beautiful" 

WE  DESIGN 
WE  INSTALL 
WE  DECORATE 
ONE  COMPLETE 
KITCHEN  SERVICE 
BUILT-IN 
APPLIANCES 
COUNTER  TOPS 
BARS— TABLES 


946  Harden 


Dial  ALpine  3-1431 


Columbia,  S.  C. 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Columbia,  S.  C. 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS  .  .  . 

VAN  LOTT,  INC. 

Distributors  for 

ALLIS-CHALMERS  INDUSTRIAL  EQUIPMENT 
Columbia  &  Greenville,  S.  C. 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS  FROM: 

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INSURANCE  -  SURETY  BONDS 
1222  Washington  St.       COLUMBIA,  S.  C.        Dial  AL  2-2158 


t/~-yy-y>  .yy.yy^.yyyy.yy.y  .  yy  yy.  yy.  yy  ,y  ■  y^ ,  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy.  ^  ■yy-.  'yy.  ^yy. 

New  Year  Greetings  ....  § 

G.  D.  FRANKE  &  CO.,  INC.  | 

Automotive  Equipment  &  Parts  r 


&    1929  Hampton 

*  172  Meeting  St. 

•  yy. yy.  y/~. t y.  yy.  yy  yy.  yy.  yy-  y.  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy. ■  y.  yy  yy.  y^. yy~-  yy~- ' *y~- yy~- <yy~-  yy~- yy~-  yy 


Dial  AL  4-6925 
Dial  RA  2-8321 


Columbia,  S.  C. 
Charleston,  S.  C. 


"50  Years  of  Dependable  Service" 

CAPITAL  CITY  LAUNDRY 

PROSPERIZE  DRY  CLEANING 

2227  Sumter  Street  Dial  AL  2-4341  Columbia,  S.  C. 


THE  COMMERCIAL  BANK  &  TRUST  CO. 
of  South  Carolina 

Main  at  Gervais 

Forest  Lake  Shopping  Center  Rosewood  Shopping  Center 

COLUMBIA,  SOUTH  CAROLINA 


BIG  VALUES  IN  USED  CARS 

REED  ADDY  MOTORS 

WE  BUY  —  SELL  —  OR  TRADE 

Dial  AL  3-0373      1625  Edmund  Hwy.      W.  Columbia,  S.  C. 


LUMBER  —  BUILDERS'  SUPPLIES 

Inglesby  -  Blume  Lumber  Company 

Millwork  —  Building  Materials  —  Sash  —  Doors  —  Flooring 

629  Hampton  Ave.  Dial  AL  3-7581  COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


Commercial  Roofing  and  Sheet  Metal  Co. 

Complete  Roofing  and  Sheet  Metal  Service 

Dial  SU  7-8164      COLUMBIA,  S.  C.      1417  Pine  Belt  Road 


LONG  SHEET  METAL  WORKS 

Roofing  and  Sheet  Metal  Contractors 
940  Holland  CAYCE,  S.  C.  Dial  AL  4-3965 


20 


The  American  Jexuish  1  1MES-OUTLOOK 


October,  i960 


performance  in  the  S.  C.  close  ten- 
nis championships  to  win  the  boys 
singles  title. 

The  Ladens  had  as  their  guests 
recently  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Alvin 
Mayne  and  daughter,  Evelyn  of 
Santurce,  Puerto  Rico.  Evelyn  will 
continue  her  education  at  the 
Charles  E.  Ellis  School  for  Girls 
at  Newton  Square,  Pa.  Mr.  Mayne 
is  Economic  Advisor  to  the  Gov- 
ernor of  Puerto  Rico  and  had  just 
returned  from  a  trip  to  Bellagio, 
Italy  where  he  presented  a  paper 
at  the  Study  Conference  on  Re- 
gional    Economic  Development 


held  there  from  June  20th  until 
July  2nd. 

Funeral  services  for  Mrs.  Rene 
C.  Goldberg  were  conducted  by 
Rabbis  Abraham  Herson  and 
David  Karesh.  Kurial  was  in  the 
Hebrew  Benevolent  Cemetery. 
Mrs.  Goldberg  is  survived  by  her 
husband,  Benjamin  B.  Goldberg, 
three  sons,  Jack  Landau  and  Ralph 
Landau,  both  of  Jacksonville,  Fla., 
and  Barnett  Goldberg,  of  Winston- 
Salem,  N.  C,  one  sister,  Mrs.  Kate 
Potak,  Brooklyn,  N.  Y.  and  one 
brother,  Alex  Caplan,  of  New  Or- 
leans, La.,  5  grandchildren  and  two 
great-grandchildren. 


Williams! on,  N.  C. 

MRS.  IRVING  M.  MARGOLIS,  Correspondent 


The  first  fall  meeting  of  the 
Jewish  Woman's  Auxiliary  was 
held  at  the  home  of  the  president. 
Mrs.  Ben  Ganderson,  in  Plymouth. 
Members  enjoyed  a  delightful  get- 
together  and  honored  one  of  their 
m  o  s  t-loved  members,  Mrs.  B. 
Goldstein  of  Windsor,  on  the  oc- 
casion of  her  72nd  birthday.  Our 
best  wishes  to  Mrs.  Goldstein  for 
many   more   happy  birthdays. 

Our  best  wishes  to  James  Pitt- 
man,  who  left  for  Fort  Jackson, 
S.  C,  to  begin  his  tour  of  duty 
with  the  U.  S.  Army.  His  parents, 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  C.  D.  Pittman. 
visited  him  over  Labor  Day. 

Congratulations  to  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Ben  Ganderson  upon  the 
wedding  of  their  niece  Marilyn 
Margolis  to  Dr.  Alan  Wasserman 
in  Atlanta,  Ga.,  on  August  28. 
Sandra  Ganderson  was  a  brides- 
maid. Marilyn  is  the  granddaugh- 


ter of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  L.  Jaffee  of 
Danville,  Va.,  formerly  of  Durham. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Irving  M.  Mar- 
golis, with  their  daughter  Gail 
and  their  mother  Mrs.  Jacob 
Levy  of  Tarboro,  visited  their 
daughter  and  son-in-law.  Sandra 
and  Gary  Smiley,  in  Chapel  Hill. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Frank  J.  Margolis 
spent  Labor  Day  weekend  with 
relatives  at  Virginia  Beach. 

Mrs.  Sain  Scheib  and  children 
<)f  Windsor  visited  her  family  in 
Brooklyn,  N.  Y. 

Elizabeth  Stern,  a  Jewish  girl 
who  survived  the  Warsaw  Ghetto 
and  was  reunited  with  her  father 
after  a  twenty-year  separation,  was 
chosen  this  month's  Miss  Subway, 
in  New  York  city.  Riders  in  the 
subways  were  reported  showing 
keen  interest  in  Miss  Stern's  back- 
ground as  well  as  her  looks. 


J,  RUBIN  AND  SON  COMPANY 

WHOLESALE  DRY  GOODS  AND  NOTIONS 

1742  Blanding         COLUMBIA,  S.  C.         Dial  AL  2-3607 


jOr.  yy  ^/'-    ■         y^-  sy-  ys-  ■-  y-  yy  yy  yy-  yy.  yy  - 


'  /y-^y-yr  y/~-yyys 


HOLIDAY  GREETINGS .... 

EVANS  BOX  &  (RATE  C0.r  INC. 


W.  L.  NORRIS,  President 


Manufacturers  of 

Box  Spring  Frames,  Sofa  Boxes,  and 
All  Types  of  Wood  Bases  for  Furniture 


Box  82 


EVANS,  GA. 


Dial  RE  3-0982 


Berry's 

"On  Main" 
1608  Main  Street 

B.  Berry's 
Dept.  Store 

1416  Assembly  Street 
COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


SHERWOOD 
STUDIO 

CHILDREN  —  COMMERCIAL 
COLOR  PORTRAITS 

WEDDINGS 
HOME  PORTRAITS 

Art  Downs  and  Wally  Denny, 
Owners 

Alpine  3-8805 

1920  Blossom 

COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


L.  G.  YERBY  Trading  as 

Key  Candy  & 
Tobacco  Company 

1231  Lincoln  S<.       Dial  AL  2-3851 
COLUMBIA.  S.  C. 


CAROLINA 
SHOE  REBUILDERS 

For  EXPERT  Shoe  Repairs 

1225  Main  St.     Dial  AL  2-7972 
COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


Sylvan  Bros.,  Inc. 

Established  1897 

Diamond  and  Jewelry 
Merchants 
Sterling  Silver 

We  Sell  Only  Fine 
Quality  Merchandise 

1500  Main  St. 
Dial  AL  4-6045 
COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


De  Luxe 


Gives  You  a  Complete  Laundry  and  Cleaning  Service 
ODORLESS  CLEANING 

Cash  and  Cany  —  Also  Called  For  and  Delivered 

DeLuxe  Cleaners  &  Laundry 

310  State  St.        Dial  AL  2-8656        West  Columbia,  S.  C. 


James  Battery 
Service,  Inc. 

Distributors  of 

Willard  Batteries 


Dial  AL  4-7883 

1227  -  29   Lady  Street 
COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


Soy  It  With  Flowers  From  The 

SHANDON 
GREENHOUSES 

3013  Millwood  Ave.    AL  4-5109 
COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


DREHER 

Packing  Co.,  Inc. 

MEAT  PACKERS 

COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


CROWSON-STONE 
PRINTING  CO. 

PRINTERS 

LITHOGRAPHERS 

819  Main  St.       Dial  AL  3-7523 
COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 

Hugh  Robinson 
Tile  Company 

1114  College  St.  Dial  AL  6-6339 
COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


ROSE  TALBERT 
Paint  Company 

Manufacturers  of 

ROSE'S  QUALITY  PAINTS 

and  Distributors  of 
Paints,  Varnishes,  Walllpaper, 
and  Artists'  Materials 

1222  Taylor  St.        Dial  AL  4-6269 
Parkland  Shopping  Center 
AL  3-8496 
COLUMBIA,  S.  C. 


October,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


2  1 


"LONG 

PRINTING  CO.,  INC. 

•  EXPERIENCED 

•  ECONOMICAL 

•  DEPENDABLE 

180  REIDVILLE  ROAD 
PHONE  3-5540 


SPARTANBURG,  S.  C. 


«GREE?<[EW  ALD" 

Incorporated 

Complete  Outfitters 
to  Men 

109-111  West  Main  Street 
SPARTANBURG,  S.  C. 


D.  N.  TINSLEY 
&  CO. 

New  and  Used  Auto  Parts 
We  Buy  Burned  and 
Wrecked  Cars 
Asheville  Hwy.  3-1488 
SPARTANBURG,  S.  C. 


The  J.  F.  Floyd 
Mortuary,  Inc. 

Serving  You  Since  1886 

Private  Family  Rooms 
Lady  Attendant 

Completely  Air-Conditioned 
Spacious  Parking 

235  N.  Church  St.  2-5451 
SPARTANBURG,  S.  C. 


The  Jones  Sign  Qo. 


INC. 

HENRY  C.  TURNER,  Owner 

Sign  Painting 
Outdoor  Advertising 
NEON 

Dial  3-7756     249  N.  Liberty 
SPARTANBURG,  S.  C. 


Asheville,  N.  C. 

MRS.  GUSTAV  LICHTENFELS, 
Correspondent 


■"wg't  :}  *■:,, 


-riil?ll|iy; 


CAPT.  HERBERT  Y.  SCHANDLER 

Captain  Herbert  Y.  Schandler  is 
spending  ;i  few  clays  with  his  par- 
ents, Mr.  and  Mrs.  D.  S.  Schand- 
ler of  45  Oak  Street  after  returning 
from  a  brief  tour  of  Spain,  Great 
Britain  and  France. 

For  the  past  three  years  Capt. 
Schandler  has  been  assistant  pro- 
fessor of  Political  Philosophy  in 
the  Department  of  Social  Sciences, 
U.  S.  Military  Academy,  at  West 
Point,  N.  Y.  While  at  West  Point, 
Capt.  Schandler  also  acted  as  dir- 
ector of  the  National  Debate  Tom 
nament,  and  contributed  several 
chapters  of  the  books,  NATION- 
AL CHAMPIONSHIP  DEBAT- 
ING, edited  by  Prof.  Russell  Win- 
des  of  Northwestern  Univ.  He  at- 
tended the  Third  East-West  Philo- 
sophers' Conference  at  the  Univer- 
sity of  Hawaii  in  1959. 

Captain  Schandler  was  appoint- 
ed to  West  Point  by  the  late  Sen- 
ator Clyde  R.  Hoey.  He  graduated 
in  1952  and  servel  in  Korea  with 
the  38th  Infantry.  He  was  award- 
ed the  Combat  Infantrymans' 
Badge,  Bronze  Star  Medal,  Korean 
Presidential  Unit  Citation,  and 
Netherlands  Badge  for  his  service 
there. 

Upon  his  return  from  Korea, 
Capt.  Schandler  attended  Harvard 
University  prior  to  his  assignment 
to  West  Point.  He  received  his 
masters  degree  and  is  a  candidate 
for  the  Ph.D. 

Capt.  Schandler  is  presently  en- 
route  to  his  new  assignment  at  the 
Infantry  School,  Fort  Benning,  Ga. 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  iind  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Spartanburg— Greenville,  S.  €. 


■gm.  ni'mi>M!tP'iM!i':i:,i/i!iiui  I'liinmiui1  smkiihiiiiiiiuimhiji;:.  c  i  'ii'!.ii'<.niiiiiii:iiim;i.iiiiiiii:I|';mi;i:   ■•  ui>iK.iHinnna)mi.i»M.:i:.:„::'.min»a;:eni:iiH»i»uiinmuime^r^ 

I  i 

Serving  the  Needs  of  the  Piedmont  Area 
1    LANDRUM,  S.  C.      JONESVILLE,  S.  C.      UNION,  S.  C.  I 

I  THE  COMMERCIAL  NATIONAL  BANK  I 


s  Main  Office 
I    Andrews  Bldg. 


OF  SPARTANBURG          Drive-in  I 

644  N.  Church  St.  f 

Trailer  Branch  J 

Corner  E.  Main  &  Pine  Streets  | 
I                 Member  Federal  Deposit  Insurance  Corporation 
I                            Member  Federal  Reserve  System 

g  = 

Ri!i|iiniiMillillii:'illiinilliiliiiliiiiiiiiiii:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiii!!!  ;ijiitii=.t4fiiiirTii...-|fiii::-iir!iifirit.:ftjiiiiirr)iiii:ii>£iiiMii:'tiiiiirLi:iiiiiLi:,i[iii]iiiiiiiiiiim-::;i:iiiiiriiiiif  ■-■riiiiis:^:j|ttl)fi:ai:iliilff  lilKtmilt?^ 


LIVE  BETTER— SAVE  MORE 

By  Food-Shopping  at  Your  Neighborhood 

COMMUNITY  CASH  STORES 


ERNEST  BURWE1  L,  Inc. 

"THE  OLD  RELIABLE" 


SALES 

265  N.  Church 


SERVICE 

Spartanburg,  S.  C. 


SALES 


SERVICE 


FRANK  P.  GARY 


AIR-CONDITIONING  •  HEATING  •  REFRIGERATION 

Telephone  2-0796  •  Night  2-3858    800  Howard  St.  •  Spartanburg,  S.  C. 


ANDREWS  CO, 


and 


ANDREWS 
BEARING  CO. 

SPARTANBURG,  S.  C. 


Bell  Laundry 

A  Complete  Laundry  Service 
To  Fit   Every  Family 
and  Every  Purse 

Finished  Family  Work 
Batchelor  Bundle 
RoitgJi  Dry 

448  Marion  Ave.    Phone  3-8668 
SPARTANBURG,  S.  C. 


Carolina  Foundry 
&  Machine  Works 

Founders  &  Machinists 

CAST  IRON  —  BRASS 
ALUMINUM 

Service  &  Quality  Since  1927 

S.  Church  Extension 
Dial  2-4504 
SPARTANBURG,  S.  C. 


REAL  ESTATE 
RENTALS 

Insurance 

Fire  &  Casualty 

CUDD  &  COAN 
Incorporated 

314  Pine  Dial  7501 

SPARTANBURG,  S.  C. 


22 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


October,  i  960 


FOR  BEAUTIFUL  FLOWERS 

See 

RUSS  GAFFNEY 

FLORIST 
410  E.  Main  St.      Phone  6922 
SPARTANBURG,  S.  C. 


Prescription  Specialists 

BRUCE  &  DOSTER 
DRUG  COMPANY 

Your  REXALL  Dealer 
GREENVILLE,  S.  C. 


HOLIDAY 


GREETINGS 


PALMETTO  BOX  COMPANY 


manufactuers  of 
QUALITY  PAPER  BOXES 


Dial  CE  5-1681 


Greenville,  S.  C. 


McCARLEY  &  CO.,  INC. 

Member  of  the  New  York  Stock  Exchange 
INQUIRIES  INVITED 
CE  2-5621       South  Carolina  National  Bank  Bldg.       Greenville,  S.  C. 


Aluminum  Awnings 

Manufactured  in  Greenvil'e    •    Factory  Prices 
"Invest  in  the  Best  for  Highest  Quality  and  Lowest  Price" 

Greenville  Aluminum  Awning  Go. 


1019  Poinsett  Hwy. 


GREEN ViLLE,  S.  C. 


Pleasanlburq 

Bakery,  Inc. 

We  Specialize  in 
Salt  Sticks 
Bagels  —  Onion  Rolls 
Chalah  —  Cheese  Cake 
Jewish  White  Sour  Rye 
DIAL  CE  5-8151 

Pleasantburg 
Shopping  Center 
GREENVILLE,  S.  C. 


DRAUGHON'S 

Business  College 

Serving  the 
Piedmont  Section 
Since  1910 

Dial  CE  2-1642 
300  S.  Main 
GREENVILLE,  S.  C. 


General  Wholesale  Distributor,  Inc. 

South  Carolina  Distributors  For 
Home  Heating  and  Cooling  YVeathertron  Units 
25  B  Augusta  GREENVILLE,  S.  C.  Dial  CE  3-6724 


Dial  CE  9-3261 


Friendly  Food  Stores 
with 

Low,  Low  Prices 
There  Is  One 
Near  You 


Mrs.  Molly  Fallick  Gelberman, 
43  years  old,  wife  of  Rabbi  Alex- 
ander Gelberman  of  Congregation 
Beth  Israel,  died  after  a  protracted 
illness  at  a  localTiospital.  The  fam- 
ily had  moved  to  Asheville  six 
years  ago  from  Lakeland,  Fla.,  and 
were  very  popular  with  their  con- 
gregation. The  Rabbi  was  recent- 
ly elected  to  serve  for  a  term  of 
seven  years.  The  children  were  do- 
ing well  in  high  school  and  were 
popular  with  all  their  classmates. 
Richard  who  hoped  to  graduate 
from  High  School  next  year  plan- 
ned to  enter  State  College  after 
graduation.  A  few  weeks  ago,  quite 
unexpectedly,  the  Rabbi  de- 
veloped tuberculosis  and  was  sent 
to  the  Western  Carolina  Sanitar- 
ium at  Black  Mountain  and  the 
children  went  to  their  aunt  in 
Miami,  Fla.  On  August  20th  ser- 
vices for  Mrs.  Gelberman  were 
held  at  Donn  &  Williams  Funeral 
Home  and  the  Rabbi's  who  offi- 
ciated were  Dr.  Sidney  Unger  of 
Asheville  Alexander  Gelberman 
and  Simcha  Kling  of  Greensboro. 
Burial  was  in  the  Lou  Pollock 
Memorial  Park  located  in  West 
Asheville.  Mrs.  Gelberman  was 
survived  in  addition  to  her  hus- 
band by  two  children  a  son  Rich- 
ard, 16,  and  a  daughter  Sherin,  13, 
who  was  Bas  Mitzvah  this  past 
May.  Also  several  sisters  and  a 
brother  who  live  in  New  York  and 
Florida. 

Rabbi  and  Mrs.  Sidney  Unger 
have  just  returned  from  their  sum- 
mer vacation  spent  on  Long  Is- 
land visiting  their  son  and  family. 


They  also  visited  Oquinquit 
Maine. 

Richard  Rosen,  son  of  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Philip  Rosen,  was  bar  mitz- 
vah at  Beth  Israel  Synagogue  on 
September  2nd  and  3rd.  A  recep- 
tion was  held  in  the  Jewish  Com- 
munity Center  following  the  Fri- 
day night  services,  and  a  brunch 
followed  the  Saturday  morning 
services. 


Dr.  Samuel  Nunez 

(Concluded  from  Page  15) 

before  hearing  from  the  Board, 
he  had  already  granted  to  some 
of  them  lands  in  Savannah. 

The  instructions  from  London 
were  unfavorable.  The  Trustees 
did  not  propose  "to  make  a  Jew's 
colony  of  Georgia."  The  Govern- 
or ignored  the  orders  and  replied 
that  Jews  were  by  no  means  a 
detriment  to  the  settlement.  He 
also  thanked  publicly  Dr.  Samuel 
Nunez  for  saving  the  plague 
stricken  victims  of  all  denomina- 
tions and  stamping  out  the  epi- 
demic. For  without  the  refugee 
from  Lisbon,  there  might  not  have 
been  enough  left  to  carry  on  Col- 
onization in  Georgia. 


Seven  hundred  Americans  who 
settled  in  Israel  last  year  brought 
into  the  country  a  total  of  $2,000,- 
000,  it  was  disclosed  in  Jerusalem 
by  the  Jewish  Agency.  This  does 
not  include  money  brought  in  by 
professionals  who  settled  in  Israel 
through  the  Agency's  Professional 
and  Technical  Workers  Aliya. 


Thousands  of  Kodackers  All  Over  Dixie 
Get  Better  Pictures  For  Less 

Let  Us  Develop  Your  Film 

JACK  RABBIT  COMPANY 

KENNEDY  STREET  NEAR  SOUTH  CHURCH 

Dial  5-1838  SPARTANBURG,  S.  C. 


HEATING 


Contractors 


En 


gineers 


AUTHORIZED  SALES  &  SERVICE 

FREEMAN 

HEATING  &  AIR-CONDITIONING  CO. 

300  River         GREENVILLE,  S.  C.         Dial  CEdar  9-3597 


October,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


*3 


Israeli  Youngsters 


By  Anita  Engle 


ANITA  ENGLE 


Biltmore  Dairy 
Farm  Products 


It  isn't  hard  to  discover  that 
most  people  who  write  about 
Sabras-Israeli  youngsters  —  have  a 
strong  partisan  belief  that  they  are 
different  from  all  other  young- 
sters. Not  only  just  different,  but 


KALMIA  DAIRY 

COOPERATIVE 

Everything  In  Dairy  Products 
HENDERSONVILLE,  N.  C. 


Baxter  Oil  Co. 

Supplier  of 
SINCLAIR  PRODUCTS 
S.  King  Dial  OX  3-8241 

HENDERSONVILLE,  N.  C. 


 |llliiNIIIIIIIII:i||!|[|l!,.llllllllllll!!!llll>'lllllllli:illllll|!llllll!!|l|l|||||||:'l||ii  [|l;il[|[lllraiMlllll,i' 


'illinium  !iiiililliiiiiiiiiiii!i;:-;:;;;:-,;:;iiiiiMiiiii:!"!:™iiiiiiiiiiij[iiiiiii  


mufto  Asheville  White  Sales,  Inc. 

Autocar  &  White  Mustang-Power  Trucks 
SALES  —  SERVICE  —  PARTS 
USED  TRUCKS  —  ALL  MAKES 

I  Sweeten  Creek  Road  ASHEVILLE,  N.  C.  Dial  AL  3-4726  I 

5«fmmioiiiiiBiuwiiiin»i|i|Hnitii!i![iiiiiiriniii[iiiiiiiLuiuuiLuuuuiLiiiiuiiin)  iiiiiimiiiiujiiiiiiiiiiiiiwiiidimiuiiiiiuiiiiisiiiiiiii  niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii:  11111111  iininuiii  niiiiirm  niimiHk 


PIEDMONT  LUMBER  CO. 

LUMBER  AND  MATERIALS 

Pinckney  Extension     GREENVILLE,  S.  C.        Dial  OE  2-1581 


BLUE  RIDGE  TRUCKING  COMPANY 

Daily  Motor  Service  to  Points  West  and 
South  of  Asheville 

Office  and  Terminal — Simpson  Street — Koon  Development 
Dial  AL  2-1531  ASHEVILLE,  N.C. 


because  of  their  phenomenal  na- 
tional feats-better  as  well. 

As  a  matter  of  fact,  Israeli 
youngsters  are  different  from 
young  people  everywhere  in  the 
world.  It  woidd  be  hard  to  prove 
that  the  young  people  of  other 
countries  would  not  behave  as 
the  Israeli  youth  have  done,  un- 
der the  same  circumstances. 

What  makes  them  a  unique,  and 
rather  special  product  in  today's 
noild  is  due  to  one  thing.  That 
is  their  study  of  the  Bible.  The 
Bible  is  taught  in  every  school  in 
the  country  as  a  subiect.  Israeli 
children  begin  their  study  official- 
ly from  Grade  2,  and  they  con- 
tinue until  they  leave  high  school. 
The  Bible  is  the  book  from  which 
they  learn  the  history  of  their 
people  and  their  land,  and  it  is  the 
book  from  which  they  learn  much 
of  their  literature.  Thus  nothing 
foreign  is  imposed  on  them.  It  is  a 
living  part  of  their  language  and 
their  country. 

My  childien  were  brought  up  in 
the  lovely  village  of  Kiryat  Amal 
in  Lower  Galilee.  Mt.  Carmel 
stretched  across  the  sky  line,  in 
full  view,  the  high  point  from 
which  the  Prophet  Elijah  called 
down  fire  to  confound  the  false 
prophets  of  Baal. 

All  around  us  were  the  re- 
mnants of  the  oak  forests  of  Bibli- 
cal times.  This  is  a  special  oak, 
called  the  Holy  Oak,  and  it  has 
varieties  of  enchanting  acorns.  I 
kept  looking  in  the  Bible  for 
some  reference  to  this  oak.  At 
last  I  was  thrilled  to  find  that 
Absalom  was  killed  when  he  took 
shelter  in  an  oak  forest.  If  you 
remember,  his  long  hair  got 
caught  in  the  branches.  This  was 


in  the  mountains  of  Ephraim.  The 
mountains  of  Ephraim  were  not 
far  from  where  we  lived,  and  these 
special  oaks  also  grew  there. 

That  was  enough  for  me.  I  used 
to  show  all  our  visitors  these  fasci- 
nating acorns,  and  tell  them  my 
wonderful  discovery.  One  day  my 
boys  were  in  the  room  when  I  was 
telling  this  story  to  a  visitor  from 
abroad.  David,  my  youngest,  who 


(Please  turn  to  Page  32) 


1 
I 


Catalina 

MOTOR  LODGE 


Recommended  by 
DUNCAN  HINES 


§ 
§ 

1 

S  Super  Hwy.  U.  S.  29  North  § 
I       GREENVILLE,  S.  C.  I 

1_™J 


Continental  Breakfast 
Television — Colored 
Telephones  In  Every  Room 

—AIR-CONDITIONED— 
—  SWIMMING  POOL  — 
—PUTTING  GREEN— 


24 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


October,  i960 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 

Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


RIC  CO. 


Contractors  &  Engineers 

Residential  —  Commercial  —  Industrial 

Electric  Service 
Wiring     •     Fixtures     •     Electric  Radiant  Heating 

1421  Battleground    GREENSBORO,  N.  C.     Dial  BR  5-4544 


Besides  other  good  eating,  you'll  enjoy  our  Charcoal  Broiled 

Steaks 

U.  S.  No.  1  Choice  Good  entertainment,  too. 

Visit  our  Oyster  Bar  Anytime 
Come  on  out  to  ...  . 

Tropicann  Supper  Club 

DIAL  27  5-3344  FOR  RESERVATIONS 
2700  High  Point  Road  Greensboro,  N.  C. 


Piedmont  Custom  Carpet  Mills,  Inc. 

GUILFORD,  NORTH  CAROLINA 

Fine  carpets  made  to  your  own  specifications,  any 
shape,  any  size,  any  color.  At  factory — direct — to  you 
prices. 

WE  INSTALL  ANYWHERE 

Phone  GREENSBORO  29  9-3647 


*Tap-Co"  Asphalt  Pavements 

MANUFACTURED  "HOT"  or  "COLD" 

USED  FOR 
Driveways  —  Parking  Lots  —  Roads 

For  Estimates  —  Call 

THOMPSON-ARTHUR 
PAYING  COMPANY 


GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 

Telephone  272-2104 


DANVILLE,  VA. 

Telephone  3644 


Around  Greexsboro 

MRS.  DANIEL  HOLLANDER  and  MRS.  EDWARD  R.  RICKETTS, 

Correspondents 


On  Sept.  2nd,  Beth  David  Sister- 
hood held  its  Sisterhood  Sabbath 
;ind  Newcomers  Welcome.  It  was 
nice  to  see  so  many  newcomers  pre- 
sent and  also  so  many  oldcomers 
to  help  everyone  get  acquainted. 
Special  thanks  go  to  Mesdames  Sol 
Eisenband,  Sol  Jacobs,  Howard  La- 
vine,  Lewis  Myers  and  William 
Zuckerman  for  participation  in  the 
Shabbot  services. 

Mazel  Tov  to  our  growing  fam- 
ily: Mr.  and  Mrs.  Adrian  Gaynor 
on  the  birth  of  a  daughter,  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Dave  Kaufman  on  the 
birth  of  a  son,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Wil- 
liam Fields  on  the  birth  of  a  son, 
and  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Robert  Pearl- 
man  on  the  birth  of  a  son  in 
Chapel  Hill. 

Also,  best  wishes  to  the  families 
of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Sam  Young  and 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Archie  Kottler  who 
have  recently  moved  into  new 
homes. 

We  hope  that  many  of  our 
friends  and  congragants  will  enjoy 
reading  the  recently  published 
book  by  Rabbi  Simcha  Kling.  The 
book,  NACHlTM  SOKLOW:  Ser- 
vant of  His  People,  is  a  biography 
of  one  of  the  most  distinguished 
Jewish  personalities  of  our  times 
Rabbi  Kling  is  the  first  to  present 
a  full-length  biography  (in  any 
language)  of  this  fascinating 
writer,  leader  and  communal 
worker. 

On  Sept.  10th  the  Beth  David 
Men's  Club  sponsored  a  Welcome 
Newcomers'  Dance.  A  sumptuous 


delicatessen  smorgasbord  was  ser- 
ved and  old  and  new  friends  got 
together  for  an  enjoyable  evening. 

William  Lewis  Karesh  and  the 
former  Jo  Ann  Brown  Miller  were 
married  on  Sept.  9th  in  a  private 
ceremony  at  Temple  Emanuel  in 
Dallas,  Tex.  Rabbi  Gerald  Klein 
officiated.  Among  those  attending 
were  the  bridgegroom's  parents, 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  I.  M.  Karesh  of 
Greensboro.  The  bride,  a  native  of 
Dallas,  is  a  daughter  of  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Joseph  E.  Brown.  She  attend- 
ed the  University  of  Alabama,  Tus- 
caloosa and  Southern  Methodist 
University.  Mr.  Karesh  attended 
Admiral  Farragut  Academy,  St. 
Petersburg,  Fla..  and  graduated 
from  the  University  of  North 
Carolina,  Chapel  Hill,  in  1952 
with  a  degree  in  business  admini- 
stration. At  UNC  he  joined  Zeta 
Beta  Tau  Fraternity  and  after 
graduation  he  was  commissioned 
and  served  in  the  Navy.  He 
is  asociated  with  his  father  in  oper- 
ation of  the  Fashion  Shop  in 
Greensboro.  After  a  honeymoon  in 
Ft.  Lauderdale,  Fla.,  the  couple 
will  reside  in  Greensboro,  N.  C. 

Frances  Natalie,  daughter  of 
Rabbi  and  Mrs.  I.  Rypins,  was 
united  in  marriage  with  Robert 
Henry  Meadows  of  Charlotte  on 
Sept.  10th  at  the  Rypins'  home. 
The  ceremony  was  performed  by 
the  bride's  father,  rabbi  emeritus  of 
Temple  Emanuel.  The  bride  was 
given  in  marriage  by  her  uncle, 
Charles  E.  Roth. 


UPTOWN  STORAGE  GARAGE 

S.  W.  WILLIAMS,  Proprietor 
GAS  —  OIL  —  TIRES  —  OPEN  ALL  NIGHT 
Automobile  Storage — 24-Hour  Service — Day  and  Weekly  Rates 

Washing  —  Polishing  —  Lubricating 
Battery  and  Tire  Sales  and  Service  —  Road  Service 

301  North  Elm  St.  GREENSBORO,  N.  C.  Dial  BR  2-4577 


Bullock  and  Humble 

Heating  and  Air  Conditioning  Contractors 


Year-round 


Carrier 


Weathermah.tr 


COMMERCIAL  SELF-CONTAINED  AIR-CONDITIONERS 

Sales,  Installation  and  Service 
STORES-OFFICE-HOMES-RESTAURANTS-FACTORIES 


1027  Oakmont         Greensboro,  N.  C. 


Dial  27  4-4050 


October,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Milton  Berle  records  a  radio  plea  in  behalf  of  the  Jewish  National  Home  for 
Asthmatic  Children's  campaign  for  public  support,  pointing  out  that  volun- 
tary donations  are  the  national,  non-sectarian  hospital-home's  sole  means  of 
caring*  for  the  nation's  emergency  cases  among  asthmatic  youngsters  Re- 
gional director  Gene  Gach  (left)  assists. 


The  Bridal  attendants  were  the 
bridegroom's  sister  and  brother-in- 
law,  Dr.  and  Mrs.  Howard  A.  Brit- 
ton  of  San  Antonio,  Tex.  The 
bride's  godmother,  Mrs.  Joseph 
Forman  of  Roanoke,  pianist,  pro- 
vide music. 

After  the  5  o'clock  ceremony, 
Rabbi  and  Mrs.  Rypins  entertain- 
ed 25  wedding  guests  at  dinner  at 
Greensboro  Country  Club.  In  the 


VERNON  L.  PENRY 

Jewelry  Repairing 
Watson  Bldg.  27  4-0380 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Kmjbf 

^Products 

art?  Co. 

Janitors'  Supplies 

"If  it  cleans,  we  have  it" 

BUILDING  AND 
FLOOR  MAINTENANCE 
SPECIALISTS  SINCE  1945 
Call  Us  for  Free  Survey  of 
Your  Maintenance  Needs 
and  Instructions  for 
Your  Personnel 

FREE  LOCAL  DELIVERY 

Dial  272-7294 

232  E.  Sycamore 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


group  were  the  bridegroom's  par- 
ents, Mr.  and  Mrs.  Samuel  Mea- 
dows of  Fall  River,  Mass. 

The  bridal  couple  will  live  in 
Charlotte  where  the  bridegroom  is 
textile  engineer  for  Cosa  Corp.  of 
Zurich,  Switzerland. 

The  bride  is  a  graduate  of  Cen- 
tenary College,  Hackettstown,  N.J., 
and  in  the  spring  completed  her 
junior  year  at  Guilford  College. 

Mr.  Meadows  holds  a  bachelor 
of  science  in  textile  engineering 
from  Bradford  Durfee  Technical 
Institute,  Fall  River.  He  also  at- 
tended Norwich  University,  North- 
field,  Vt.,  and  Boston  University. 

Joe  Shallant  is  a  busy  man  these 
days,  what  with  his  efforts  in  behalf 
of  Diversified  Services,  and  keep- 
ing things  going  at  the  Summit  Toy 
and  Hobby  Shop.  Incidentally,  we 
are  happy  to  be  able  to  report  that 
Barbara  is  back  home,  and  doing 
nicely. 

Rose  Abrams  has  recently  re- 
turned from  a  extensive  trip  cover- 
ing two  months,  in  which  she  visit- 
ed Savannah  and  Atlanta  Ga.,  Los 
Angeles,  San  Francisco,  Las  Vegas, 
Yosemite  National  Park,  and  New 
York  City. 

The  Sidney  J.  Stern  Lodge, 
B'nai  B'rith,  held  its  annual  elec- 
tion of  officers  at  Temple  Em- 
anuel on  the  night  of  September 
19th.  The  election  were  preceded 
by  a  buffet  supper  held  in  the  As- 
sembly Room  of  the  Temple.  Fol- 
lowing the  election,  the  officers 
were  installed  by  Phil  Datnoff,  of 
Hickory  N.  C,  the  president-elect 
of  the  North  Carolina  B'nai  B'rith 
Association. 

(Please  turn  to  Page  27) 


PET 

DAIRY  PRODUCTS 


"A  Health  Food" 

Dial  272-6131 


PET  DAIRY 
PRODUCTS  CO. 

Pet  Milk  and  Dairy  Products 

At  Your  Favorite  Store  or 
Our  Dependable  Home  Delivery 

410  Summit  Avenue 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 


For  GOOD  Printing 

Call  272-8809 

Acme  Printing  Company 

COMMERCIAL  PRINTERS 

809  Travis  Street  Greensboro,  N.  C. 


"The  Building  Supply  Company  of  Greensboro" 

PEGRAM  -  WEST,  INC. 

EVERYTHING  FROM  FOUNDATION  TO  ROOF 

South  Elm  Extension  at  Meadowview  Road 
Dial  273-6958  GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Bring  Your  Prescriptions  To  Eckerd's 

Creators  of  Reasonable  Drug  Prices 

2  STORES 

Northeast  Shopping  Center  Friendly  Shopping  Center 

E.  Bessemer  &  Summit  Ave.  Friendly  Road 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Faithful  Service 

Use  of  our  complete  facilities  adds  nothing 

to  the  cost  of  the  service. 


Murray  funeral  Momc 

AIR-CONDITIONED  CHAPEL 

515  N.  Elm  St.  Phone  272-8165 

Greensboro,  N.  C. 


Industrial  Truck  Sales  &  Service,  Inc. 


CLflgK 

1  toss 


DEALER 


418  E.  Market  St.  Dial  274-4641 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


26 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


October,  U)6o 


With  Best  Wishes  to  You  and  Yours 
for  a  Happy  Holiday  Season 


Ship'n  Shore 


B  L  6  U  S  E1  S  1 


W.  H.  Stott  &  Associates 


ED  KAPPEL 
MAC  GOLD 


SIG  LORIG 
TEMPLE  BARNARD 


Mr.  and  Mrs.  W.  S.  Corsbie 

GILLESPIE  PARK  KENNELS 

"POODLE  TRIMMING  A  SPECIALTY" 
2206  Asheboro  St.  27  2-6584  Greensboro,  N.  C. 


HOLIDAY  INN  Hotel  &  Restaurant 

The  Best  Place  For  Your  Friends  to  Stay 
While  Visiting  in  Greensboro 

TOM  KELLAM,  Innkeeper 

On  Highway  29  North    (Inside  City  Limits)    Phone  275-5371 
GREENSBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


Holiday  Greetings  .... 

The  ]ac\  Smith  Realty  Co. 

REALTORS 

1057  Battleground  Avenue  Dial  27  5-8551 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


RENT 


WHY  BUY? 


WE  SUPPLY 


GENERAL  LINEN  SUPPLY  SERVICE 

LOCALLY  OWNED  AND  OPERATED 
Why  Send  Your  Money  Out  of  Town? 

123  W.  Lewis  Street  GREENSBORO,  N.  C.  Dial  272-7182 


BOREN  BRICK 

Beautiful  —  Permanent  —  Economical 


Boren 
Clay  Products  Co. 

Pleasant  Garden,  N.  C. 


Modern  homes  and  industrial 
plants  use  BOREN  BRICK  for 
many  reasons  .... 
Beauty — Longer  Life — Warmer 
in  Winter — Cooler  in  Summer — 
Low-Cost  Maintenance  —  Low 
Insurance  Rates. 


Phone:  Greensboro  OR  4-2255 


EDITORIAL 

(Concluded  from  Page  5) 

memorates  the  temporary  shelters  which  our  ancestors  used  in 
the  wilderness,  in  their  exodus  from  Egypt.  It  reaffirms  the 
principal  of  man's  frailty  and  utter  dependence  upon  the  Al- 
mighty for  all  material  blessings.  It  expresses  man's  apprecia- 
tion and  gratitude  for  the  bounties  of  Nature. 

If  a  people  is  to  have  a  future,  it  must  perpetuate  its 
eternal  values  in  the  present,  and  it  must  forge  a  link  with 
its  historic  past. 

A  Crowning  Insult 

We  sincerely  trust  that  there  is  no  foundation  for  the  re- 
port current  that  the  United  States  is  planning  to  support  the 
United  Arab  Republic  for  representation  in  the  United  Na- 
tions Security  Council. 

If  this  were  to  eventuate  it  would  be  a  move  that  should 
be  repudiated  by  every  fair-minded  citizen  of  our  country, 
regardless  of  his  religious  belief. 

A  statement  sent  to  our  Department  of  State  by  I.  L. 
Feuer,  National  Commander  of  the  Jewish  War  Veterans  of 
the  U.S.A.  adequately  covers  the  situation,  Mr.  Feuer  stated: 

"This  dictatorship,"  he  said,  "which  has  flouted  Security 
Council  and  United  Nations  Assembly  decisions,  among  them 
its  refusal  to  implement  the  international  character  of  the 
Suez  Canal,  the  refusal  to  negotiate  a  peace  with  its  neighbor, 
Israel,  and  its  constant  effort  to  keep  a  state  of  tension  in  the 
Middle  East,  is  certainly  enough  evidence  that  this  nation 
does  not  have  the  responsible  attitude  that  is  required  for  the 
Security  Council." 

Commander  Feuer  pointed  out  that  "the  support  of  such 
a  nation  for  the  post  would  be  a  violation  of  American  tradi- 
tion and  principle.  It  would  seem  that  we  have  not  profited 
from  the  lessons  of  the  reverses  occasioned  by  our  support  of 
other  dictatorships  in  the  past." 

"President  Nasser  of  the  United  Arab  Republic  is  trying 
to  influence  the  entire  Middle  East  with  anti-American  propa- 
ganda, while  soliciting  favors  and  good  will.  It  is  offensive  to 
any  sense  of  justice  to  support  such  a  man  and  such  a  govern- 
ment for  a  seat  on  the  Security  Council  which  is  charged  with 
the  maintenance  of  world  peace,"  he  said. 


"THE 

YEAR 


'ROUND" 


WARREN'S  TOYLAND 

LAWNDALE  SHOPPING  CENTER 

2168  Lawndale  Dr.    GREENSBORO,  N.  C.    Dial  27  4-3551 


To  the  many  friends  we  have  already  made  and  to  those  whose 
friendship  we  are  yet  to  earn,  we  extend  our  sincere  greetings 
for  a  very  happy  Nexu  Year. 

DAVIS  HOSIERY  MILLS 

Manufacturers  of 

Ladies'  Full  Fashioned  and  Seamless  Hosiery 

125  E.  Market  St.     GREENSBORO,  N.  C.    Dial  27  3-1935 


October,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Around  Greensboro 

(Continued  from  Page  25) 


The  officers  elected  were:  Frank 
Lusky,  president;  Leonard  Guyes, 
first  vice  president;  William  Zuck- 
erman,  second  vice  president; 
Richard  Forman,  recording  secre- 
tary; Chester  A.  Brown,  secretary- 
treasurer;  A.  F.  Klein,  guardian 
and  Samuel  Richman,  Warden. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  David  Politis  an- 
nounce the  engagement  of  their 
daughter,  Serena  of  New  York 
City,  and  Victor  Guralnick  of 
Brooklyn,  N.  Y.,  son  of  Joseph 
Guralnick  of  Brooklyn  and  the 
late  Mrs.  Guralnick 

The  wedding  will  take  place 
Friday,  March  4,  at  Park  Manor 
in  Brooklyn. 

Miss  Politis  graduated  from 
Senior  High  School  and  is  em- 
ployed as  a  secretary  by  Perfumes- 
Marcel  Rochas  in  New  York. 

Mr.  Guralnick  graduated  from 
Thomas  Jefferson  High  School  in 
Brooklyn  and  is  employed  with 
his  father  in  S&D  Trucking  Co. 

Dr.  and  Mrs.  Ferdinand  Fetter 
of  Philadelphia,  Pa.,  announce  the 
engagement  of  their  daughter,  Ann 


CRUISES 

Book  Now 

Send  for  free  booklet 
listing  itineraries, 
rates  etc. 

FOR  INFORMATION 
CALL  275-4551 

Lucas  Travel  Agency 


109  Piedmont  Bldg. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Sidney  B.  Allen    David  W.  Allen 

Guilford  Mortgage  Co. 

220  W.  Market  St. 
Dial  27  2-8121 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Arnold  Stone  Co. 

Manufacturers  of 
PRECAST  CONCRETE 
BUILDING  MATERIALS 
Dial  299-3563 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C  . 


Lindsay,  and  Julius  Stephen  Fried- 
laender  of  New  York  City,  form- 
erly of  Greensboro,  N.C.,  elder  son 
of  Mr.  anl  Mrs.  Marc  Friedlaen- 
der,  who  moved  to  New  York  from 
Greensboro  a  year  ago. 

The  wedding  is  planned  for  De- 
cember in  Philadelphia. 

Felicitations  to  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Sidney  Magid  upon  the  birth  of 
a  daughter  on  September  6th.  Con- 
gratulations also  to  the  happy 
grandparents,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Moe 
Tanger. 

Best  wishes  to  the  boys  and  girls 
of  Temple  Emanuel  who  are  leav- 
ing for  their  first  year  ol  school 
away  from  home: 

Joy  Axelrad,  daughter  of  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Harry  Chandgie  who  will 
be  at  Dana  Hall,  Wellesley,  Mass. 

Frank  Sloan,  son  of  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Harry  Sloan  will  attend  Ober- 
lin  College,  at  Oberlin,  Ohio. 

Bill  Frank,  son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Stanley  Frank  will  be  at  Presbyter- 
ian Junior  College,  Maxton,  N.  C. 

Eugene  and  Sam  LeBauer,  twin 
sons  of  Dr.  and  Mrs.  S.  F.  LeBauer 
(Please  Turn  to  Page  45) 


Mr.  Samuel  Bronfman,  of  New  York, 
Chairman  of  the  North  American  Di- 
vision of  the  World  Jewish  Congress, 
has  announced  the  appointment  of 
Dr.  Moses  Cyrus  VVei'er  as  Chairman 
of  the  Adnv'nis'rative  Committer  of 
the  House  of  Je-v5sh  Communities, 
as  the  WJC  building  will  be  known. 


Holiday  Greetings  .  .  . 

George  H.  Roach 
Realtor 

Piedmont  Building 
Dial  273-6840 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


THE  BOAR  AND 
CASTLE 

TASTY  SANDWICHES 
DELICIOUS  DRINKS 
CAR  SERVICE 
West  Market  Ext. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Greetings 


MEYER'S 

•  m b  * r  e «   g  we (NSBOnot 

•*|At|»I  t'0<H 

Greensboro,  N.  C. 


G.  1. 1200 

3  Stores  To  Serve  You 

1200  E.  Bessemer  Ave. 
Lawndale  Shopping-  Center 
Florida  St.  Shopping  Center 

GREENSBORO.  N.  C. 


Bran-row  njtw 

TRAVEL  INN  MOTEL 

Highway  29  &  70  South  Dial  29  9-6131 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Allred  Printing  Company 

Commercial  Printers 

409  S.  Greene       GREENSBORO,  N.  C.       Dial  272-2554 


Cashions  Furniture  and  Upholstery  Shop 

Get  the  Best  In  Quality  Work  and  Material 

Dial  27  3-7319  or  27  3-2820 
1717  Battleground  Avenue  GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


CLIPPARD'S  BARBER  SHOP 

Eight  Barbers  to  Serve  You 
Manicurist 

DIAL  27  5-4732  FOR  APPOINTMENT 

Friendly  Shopping  Center  Greensboro,  N.  C. 


GOODWIN,  INC. 

Over  18  Years  Experience 

Plumbing  &  Heating 
Installation  &  Repairs 

All  Work  Guaranteed 

Dial  27  5-6924 

P.  O.  Box  Summit  Sta.  6011 
719  Winton 

Greensboro,  N.  C. 


Greensboro's  Only 
Drive-In  Pharmacy 

Medical  (enter 
Pharmacy 

Prescription  Specialists 
City-Wide  Delivery 

Dial  27  4-0134 

408  E.  Wendover  Ave. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


ummi 

All  f he 
time  is 
toy  time 


"OUR  ONLY  STORE" 
WE  DELIVER  ANYWHERE 
908  Summit  Ave.        Greensboro,  N.  C.        Dial  27  4-6467 


I  Jie  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


October,  i960 


RUST  ASSOCIATES 

Representing 


Fabricators  and  Erectors  of  Lighted  and  Unlighted 
LETTERS  and  SIGNS 
ALUMINUM  —  STAINLESS  STEEL  —  BRONZE  —  PLASTIC 

2103  W.  Lee  Ext.     GREENSBORO,  N.  C.     Dial  275-7609 


WILSON  -  LEGARE  INC. 


Wm.  WILSON 


MARVIN  LEGARE 


Residential  —  Commercial 
Realtors 

SALES  —  CONSTRUCTION 
MORTGAGES  —  LOANS 
INSURANCE 


517  W.  Gaston 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Dial  27  5-6373 
Dial  27  5-0639 


Greensboro's  friendliest  store  since  1 899! 

On  Jefferson  Square 


Friendly  Shopping  Center 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 


INFANTS'  WEAR— SUB-TEENS— CHILDREN'S  WEAR 

JUNIOR  CIRCLE  SHOP 

Friendly  Shopping  Center  Dial  274-0758 

GREENSBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


Coleman  Envelope  and  Printing,  Inc 

Joe  Coleman 
ALL  STYLES  OF  ENVELOPES 

Offset  and  Letter  Press  Printing 
Dial  272-5332  for  estimates 


3410  E.  Market  St. 


Greensboro,  N.  C, 


Roberts  Ornamental  Iron 
&  Welding  Co. 

WHOLESALE  and  RETAIL 


OUR  LOW  OVERHEAD  MEANS  SAVINGS  TO  YOU' 


Interior  and  Exterior 
Custom  -  Built 

•  Railings  and  Fences  •  Columns 
•  Wrought  Iron  Furniture 
Mail  Box  and  Lamp  Post 
Fire  Escapes  •  Steel  Stairs 
For  Frep  Estimates 

Dial  27  4-1549 

If  No  Answer  Dial  27  2-8518 
1316  E.  Bessemer  Ave. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Raleigh  Temple  Beth  Or 

MRS.  HARRY  CAPLAN,  Correspondent 


A  very  successful  and  gala  Patio 
Party  was  held  at  the  home  of  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Irving  Kaye  for  the  bene- 
fit of  Temple  Beth  OR  Sisterhood 
Everyone  seemed  to  enjoy  the  food 
and  camaraderie  of  this  Sisterhood 
function.  We  are  indebted  to  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Irving  Kaye,  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Sig  Schafer,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Ben 
Goldberg,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Harold 
Mark,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Leon  Schafer 
and  all  those  who  contributed  so 
much  for  the  happy  outcome  of 
this  project. 

The  opening  service  of  the  Fall 
Season  took  place  Friday,  Sept. 
2nd  with  the  choir  rendering  the 
musical  selections  of  the  service.  A 
large  congregation  was  present  at 
this  time. 

Religious  School  sessions  were 
resumed  Sunday  morning,  Sept. 
i  ith  at  which  time  a  Religious  Ser- 
vice and  registration  took  place. 
The  following  constitute  the  fac- 
ulty of  the  school:  Mrs.  Paul  Selig- 
son,  Mrs.  Harry  Caplan,  Mrs.  Ker- 
mit  Cooper,  Mrs.  C.  C.  Satter- 
white,  Miss  Suzanne  Kaye,  Mr. 
Arthur  Aronson,  Mr.  Harold 
Mark,  Mr.  Ben  Sauber  and  Mrs. 
Samuel  B.  Tove.  The  first  Family 
Worship  Services  of  the  year  took 
place  Friday,  Sept.  16.  A  number 
of  our  young  people  participated. 
These  services  imbue  our  children 
with  the  Temple  attendance  habit. 

Rabbi  Caplan  spoke  to  the  stu- 
dents enrolled  at  the  Transylvania 
Music  Camp  at  Brevard,  N.  C. 
participated  in  the  Memorial  Day 
Services  at  the  National  Cemetery 
and  addressed  two  church  groups 
in  Richmond  and  Baltimore. 

At  the  North  Carolina  Associa- 
tion of  Rabbis'  meeting  at  Wild- 
acres  during  the  week  of  August 
8-14,  a  sermon  entitled  "God  and 
Man"  was  delivered  by  Rabbi  Cap- 


lan at  the  Saturday  morning  ser- 
vices. He  is  the  vice-president  of 
this  body. 

We  cordially  welcome  into  the 
religious  fellowship  of  our  congre- 
gation. Mrs.  Max  Rosengarten, 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Stanley  Simon  and 
Mrs.  Weldon  T.  Allen  and  look 
forward  to  seeing  them  in  our  midst 
frequently  taking  part  in  the  many 
activities  of  our  congregation.  We 
would  like  to  commend  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Howard  Guld  and  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Leonard  Gilbert  on  the  excel- 
lent job  they  are  doing  of  welcom- 
ing each  and  every  newcomer  to 
the  community. 

Rabbi  and  Mis.  Harry  Caplan 
held  an  open  house  for  the  mem- 
bers of  the  Congregation  and  their 
friends  on  Rosh  Hashonah,  Thurs- 
day, Sept.  22nd  from  4  to  6  p.m. 

Those  present  at  the  Donor 
Luncheon  were  most  enthusiastic 
in  their  praise  of  Mr.  Ernest  Nei- 
man's  address  on  his  recent  trip 
to  Israel.  A  little  later  on  mem- 
bers of  the  Brotherhood  voiced 
similar  enthusiastic  sentiments. 

At  a  Friday  evening  service  dur- 
ing the  mouth  of  August  a  naming 
ceremony  was  held  in  honor  of 
Kerry  Ann  Baer,  daughter  of  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Austin  Baer. 


We  offer  to  solve  your  individ- 
ual hair  problem  with  one  of 
our  Natural  Hair  Pieces. 
Blended  to  Your  Individual 
Requirements 

M  Beach's 
Hair  Piece  Studio 

Battleground  Road 
Greensboro,  North  Carolina 

Dial  27  3-0317 
for  appointment 


Holidav  Greetings  From 

LAMB 

Distributing  Co.  | 

Greensboro,  N.  C. 

Distributors  for 
Blatz,  Tempo,  Ballantine, 
Regent,  Champ  Ale,  and 
Sassv  Brew 


y~.         ^  ^C/~-  ^? 


New  Year  Greetings  .  .  . 


Shop  At  Sears  and  Save 
Plenty  of  Free  Parking 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 


October,  i960 

We  are  most  happy  to  report 
that  Mr.  Michael  Mirman,  and 
Mr.  Jerome  Rosenthal  have  fully 
recovered  from  their  illnesses  and 
that  Mr.  Mac  Josephs  is  making 
excellent  progress.  Miss  Eva  Harris 
is  doing  nicely  and  Miss  Ellen  Seli- 
gson  is  doing  weir  after  her  recent 
surgery. 

The  community  suffered  a  griev- 
ous loss  in  the  passing  of  Mr. 
Charles  Kohn  and  Mr.  Emanuel 
Harris.  Both  of  these  gentlemen 
were  greatly  interested  in  the  wel- 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


*9 


fare  of  the  Temple  and  will  be 
sorely  missed.  They  were  held  in 
the  highest  esteem  by  everyone  and 
our  heartfelt  sympathy  is  extend- 
ed to  the  members  of  the  bereaved 
families. 

We  extend  our  heartiest  congratula- 
tion to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Michael  Mir- 
man on  their  marriage  on  Aug.  7th. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Al  Roths tein  have 
moved  into  a  beautiful  new  home 
and  we  want  to  wish  them  every 
happiness  in  it. 


A  key  symbolizing  the  dedication  of  the  Leah  and  Joseph  Rubin  Residence 
Hall  at  Yeshiva  University's  Main  Center,  Amsterdam  Avenue  and  186th  St., 
Manhattan,  is  presented  to  93-year-old  Brooklyn  businessman  and  Philan- 
thropist Joseph  Rubin  by  his  great-grandson,  Leigh  Rubin  Weiner  Looking 
on  during  ceremonies  made  possible  by  a  $500,000  gift  from  the  Rubin  Foun- 
dation, a  family  fund,  are  Dr.  Samuel  Belkin  (left),  president  of  Yeshiva  Uni- 
versity; Barbara  Rubin,  a  granddaughter;  and  William  Rubm  the  philan- 
thropist's son,  president  of  the  Sweets  Company  of  America,  Inc  Hoboken 
and  head  of  the  family  foundation. 


Dial  29  9-5242 

BRYAN'S  SHEET  METAL  SHOP 


•  Gas  or  Oil  Hot  Air  Heating 

•  Custom  Duct  Work  •  Guttering 

•  Stainless  Steel  or  Copper  Work 


111  Spring  Garden  Ext. 


Greensboro,  N.  C. 


McDANIEL  LEWIS  &  CO. 

Member  Midtvest  Stock  Exchange 
Investments  Since  1922 

528  Jefferson  Bldg.,  Greensboro,  N.  C.  27  4-1551 
High  Point  2-6425  Burlington  CA  7-4388 


"PRESCRIPTIONS  CAREFULLY  COMPOUNDED" 
Two  Locations  To  Serve  You 
EDMONDS  SUMMIT  EDMONDS  FRIENDLY 

CENTER  DRUGS,  INC.  ROAD  DRUG,  INC. 

27  4-1585  299-2233 
952  Summit  Ave.  5603  Friendly  Rd. 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


HOLIDAY  GREETINGS  AND  BEST  WISHES  FROM 

North  State  Chevrolet  Co.,  Inc, 


SALES 

451  N.  Eugene 


GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


SERVICE 


275-8471 


&yy^yy^--y?^yy^y?*yy^yy^yy.y?^yy>y/>yy^yy>yy 

|    HOLIDAY  GREETINGS  FROM:  | 

HALL  -  PUTNAM  CLOTHING  CO.  | 

Clothes  and  Furnishings  § 
For  Men  and  Young  Men  ^ 

110  N.  Elm  Steret  GREENSBORO,  N.  C.  Dial  272-6559  ^ 

'.  yy.  yy-  yy-  -yy-  yy-  yy-  yy  yy-  yy-  y-  yy-  yy-  yy-  yy-  yy-  ■  y-  y^-  yy-  yy-  yy-  yy~  <  y~-  yy  yy  yy-  yy- 

Please  Patronize  Our  Advertisers 


If  It's  Glass,  We  Have  It 

Southern  Plate  &  Window  Glass  Company 

Plate  Glass  and  Store  Front  Construction 

225-227  E.  Sycamore  St.         GREENSBORO,  N.  C.         Dial  272-3209 


~^y*<yy'^^<yy>'yy><4y-yy'-yy>'y/  >«. 


-  ■tyytyytyysyy-yy-yi  ■>yy-*yy--yy.'yy>-yy>'^3 


Mutual  Funds 

Investors 

MUTUAL,  INC. 

Investors 

STOCK   FUND,  INC. 

Investors 

SELECTIVE  FUND,  INC. 

Investors 

GROUP  CANADIAN 
FUND  LTD. 

Investors 

VARIABLE  PAYMENT 
FUND,  INC. 

For  Prospectuses  write 

Investors 

Joe   Shallant,  Representative 

DIVERSIFIED  SERVICES,  INC. 
102  Paisley  St.  272-4501 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Cleaning  Compounds 
for 

Institutions 
and 
Industry 

Grant  Chemical 
Co.,  Inc. 

Dial  27  4-6789 
1516  East  Bessemer 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


HOLIDAY  GREETINGS  FROM: 


FRANK  R,  HUTTON  &  SONS 


103  S.  Greene  St. 


Realtors 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Dial  27  2-6240 


§ 


$/~K&xsyxsyxsy><*^-sy>'yy>^^^^tyytsy-yy>t^^ 
-■yy.-yy,-yy.yy.yy.^ 

Our  Sincere  Wishes  for  A  Happy  New  Year  from  § 

HALL  -  KIMES  JEWELRY  CO.  "| 

Specialists  in  Jewelry  Engraving  ^ 

513  North  Eugene  GREENSBORO,  N.  C.  272-1310$ 

fy- yy-  yy- ^yy- yy-  yy. <yy. yy.  yy. -yy. t  y-.  yy> <yy-  yy.  yy.  yy- s.  y  yy  -sy. y^  yy-  y/-- ■  y.-yy.yy-yy,yy&} 

ATLANTIC  SIGNS,  INC. 

Manufacturers 
SIGNS  &  LETTERS 

•  NEON 

•  PLASTIC 

•  METAL 

•  PORCELAIN 

•  BILLBOARDS 
CRANE  RENTAL  SERVICE 

P.  O.  Box  1266  GREENSBORO,  N.  C.  Dial  272-5004 


MONNETT  CARPET  SHOP 

Specialists  in  All  Types  of 
RUGS  AND  CARPETS 
Home  —  Church  —  Commercial 
Free  Estimates  —  ALL  WORK  GUARANTEED 
Dial  27  5-9628  822  Spring  Garden  St  Greensboro,  N.  C. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


October,  i960 


HOME  OF 


TIM  E  LY,^  CLOTHES 

Johnson  &  Aulbert 


CLOT-HI  NS  COAAPANY 


120  N.  Elm  St. 


Greensboro,  N.  C. 


_<i-  5 


LEON'S  BEAUTY  SALON 

Two  Locations 

\.   340  Tate  Street  Friendly  Shopping  Center 

Dial  272-6526  Dial  275-0663 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 

^6>->L&-s^?~.  ^    -^r.      _<?-.^g>-.      ^-•y-i  s?''  'jy-,  yy.'         ^y-.  y/~.      yy.  c  sy.  yy,      y/-.  j^r. 


TUCKER -JONES  FURNITURE  CO.,  Inc. 

Complete  Home  Furnishings 

341-343  S.  Elm         GREENSBORO,  N.  C.         Dial  273-1308 


fif  GIBRALTAR^ 


WALTER  J.  BERNSTEIN 
pecial  Agent  —  Ordinary  Dept. 


INSURANCE  COMPANY 
OF  AMERICA 


Southeastern  Bldg.  Dial  274-6710 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


HOLIDAY  GREETINGS 


Mayfair  Cafeteria 

May! air  Suburban 
Restaurant 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


New  Year  Greetings 

Magic  Shoe  Service 

EXPERT  SHOE  REPAIRING 

2146  Lawndale  Drive 

Dial  274-8041 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


HOLIDAY  GREETINGS  FROM 

Greensboro  Sporting  Goods  Company 

Athletic  Outfitters  —  Sport  Clothes  —  Guns  —  Fishing  Tackle 


212  N.  Elm  St. 


GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Dial  273-1081 


JOHN  B.  NICHOLS  HAROLD  J.  SMITH 

BETHUNE  MOTOR  CO. 

Engine  Tune-Up,  Brake  Service,  Speedometer,  Carburetor  and 
Electrical  Repairing,  Power  Mower  Engine  Service 
1321  Headquarters  Dr.  (ORD)  Greensboro,  N.  C.  272-6023 


Call  for  .  .  .  Daily  Bread  Flour  —  Joy  Brand  Corn  Meal 
Security  Dog  Food 

NORTH  STATE  MILLING  COMPANY 

111  West  Bragg       GREENSBORO,  N.  C.       Dial  275-1355 


INSWANGER 


LASS  CO. 


Glass 
Headquarters 
Store  Front 
Specialists 


Weldon  -  Roanoke 
Rapids,  N.  C. 

(Concluded  from  Page  12) 
and  Mrs.  Harry  Kittner,  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Bill  Kittner  attended  the  Sie- 
gel  wedding  in  Norfolk. 

Among  those  vacationing  at  Vir- 
ginia Beach  in  August  were  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Isy  Novey  and  children, 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Eugene  Bloom  and 
children,  Mr.  Dave  Bloom,  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Harry  Freid  and  daugh- 
ter, Mr.  and  Mrs.  Harry  Kittner 
and  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bill  Kittner. 

Miss  Betty  Michal  Livermon 
will  attend  the  School  of  Nursing 
at  the  University  of  North  Carol- 
ina; Miss  Joan  Lee  Bloom  will  at- 
tend Peace  College  in  Raleigh; 
Miss  Harriet  Bloom,  a  recent  grad- 
uate of  Boston  University,  has  ac- 
cepted a  position  as  Speech  Thera- 
pist at  the  Medical  College  Hospi- 
tal in  Richmond. 

Recent  visitors  of  the  Harry 
Freids  were  Mr.  H.  Goldblatt,  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Mac  Bloom  of  Marion, 
Ala.,  and  Miss  Millie  Goldblatt  of 
Washington. 

Miss  Evelyn  Josephason  who  has 
been  doing  Graduate  Work  at 
Columbia  University  was  a  recent 
visitor  of  her  parents,  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Josephason. 

The  Bill  Tosephasons  had  as  re- 
cent visitor  their  son,  Dr.  Ben 
Josephason  and  family  of  Spring- 
field, N.  J.,  and  Mrs.  M.  Rosen- 
feld  of  Richmond. 

Miss  Josephinne  and  Mr.  Harry 
Freid  attended  the  Farber-Bloom 
wedding  at  Rockaway  Beach,  New 
York. 

Professor  Sol  Liptzin  of  City 
College  has  been  appointed  chair- 
man of  the  newly  re-established 
Commission  on  Jewish  Affairs  of 
the  American  Jewish  Congress. 


211-231  Macon  St.  GREENSBORO,  N.  C.  Dial  27  5-5344 


Max  Bresslcr,  of  Chicago,  111.,  was 
elected  president  of  the  Zionist  Or- 
ganization of  America  at  its  recent 
annual  convention. 


FOR  FINE  FOOD 

LEE'S 

Restaurant 
Delicatessen 

112  W.  Market  St. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 

Breakfast 

Luncheon 

Dinner 

All  Cooking  and  Baking 
done  on  our  premises 

Free  Parking  after  6  P.M. 
(Except  Fridays) 

S.W.  Corner  Market  & 
Greene  Streets 


4%  Per  Annum 
Proposed  Dividend  Rate 
On  Savings 

Your  Account  Invited 


Home  Federal 
Savings  &  Loan 
Association 

113  N.  Greene  St. — Plaza  Branch 
1702  Battlgeround  Ave. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


mOT£L 


•  50  Air-Conuitioned  Rooms 

with 

•  Television — Room  Phones 

•  Swimming  Pool 

•  Beautiful  Restaurant 

Adjoining 


Approved 


Inside  City  on  U.  S.  Highway 
No.  29-A  North 

1118  Summit  Avenue 

Phone  272-0107 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


October,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


U,  S.  0.  -  J.  W.  B.  Zonal  Meeting 


Plans  for  the  first  zonal  meeting 
for  the  North  Carolina  and  South 
Carolina  USO-JWB  State  Com- 
mittees will  be  held  in  conjunction 
with  the  JWB  Armed  Services  Re- 
gional Executive  Committee  (com- 
prising delegates  from  seven  South- 
ern States)  in  Columbia,  S.  C.  and 
Fort  Jackson,  S.  C.  on  Oct.  22  and 
23rd,  it  was  announced  by  Herbert 
R.  Elsas.  of  Atlanta,  Ga.,  over-all 
chairman  of  the  regional  USO- 
JWB. 

The  sessions  for  the  zone  will  be 
open  to  USO-JWB  volunteers, 
JWB  Armed  Services  Committee 
members,  USO  representatives  of 
JWB,  volunteer  workers  at  the 
V.A.  Hospitals,  Chaplains  and 
Auxiliary  Chaplains,  servicemen 
and  their  families.  JWB  Associate 
members  are  similarly  extended  a 
cordial  invitation  to  attend. 

For  further  information,  kindly 
contact  Irving  Cheroff,  USO-JWB 
Area  Director,  P.  O.  Box  897,  Fay- 
etteville,  N.  C.  or  Leon  Goldberg, 
Coordinator,  Forsyth  Bldg.,  Atlan- 
ta 3,  Ga. 

A  tentative  schedule  for  the  ses- 
sions scheduled  follows:  Saturday, 
Oct.  22:  at  7:00  p.m.:  Get-  Ac- 
quainted Party:  sponsored  by  the 
Columbia  JWB-ASC  at  a  private 
home:  from  8:15  p.m.:  Mobiliza- 
tion Rally  at  the  Temple  or  Cen- 
ter for  all  registrants. 

On  Sunday,  Oct.  23:  All  activi- 
ties will  be  held  at  Fort  Jackson: 
9:00  a.m.— G.I.  Service;  9:30  a.m. 
— Lox  and  Bagel  Brunch:  10:00 
a.m.— Joint  business  meeting  of 
North  and  South  Carolina  State 


STOP 
CLIMBING 
STAIRS 


Avoid 
Heart  Strain 
and  Fatigue 
with  a 
Home  Elevator 


Inclin-ator  travels  up  and  down 
stairways — Elevette  fits  snugly 
into  closet  space.  Ideal  for  in- 
valids and  older  folks,  with  safe 
push-button  controls.  Uses  or- 
dinary house  current.  Used  in 
hundreds  of  nearby  homes.  Call 
or  write  today  for  free  survey. 


E  LEVATOR  S 


Freight  &  Passenger  Elevators 
Greensboro,  North  Carolina 
Charlotte  «  Raleigh 
Roanoke   •   Augusta   •  Greenville 


Committees  with  Jules  Bank  (A.J.- 
T.O.'s  Man  of  the  Month,  Sept. 
i960)  and  A.  M.  Fleishman  of  Fay- 
etteville,  N.  C.  presiding;  Irving 
Cheroff  to  lead  discussion  on 
"Values  and  Functions  of  State 
Committees  and  ways  to  imple- 
ment structure." 

11:30  a.m.— Business  Meeting, 
Region  III,  ASD  Executive  Com- 
mittee; 1:00  p.m.— Joint  Luncheon 
Meeting  of  State  and  Regional 
Committees  with  Mr.  Benjamin 
Sternberg,  National  Executive  Dir- 
ector of  Armed  Services,  NJWB, 
presiding. 

3:00  Tour  of  Fort  Jackson 
Arrangements  are  being  made 
for  a  bus  to  leave  Fayetteville  on 
Oct.  22nd.  The  Guest  House  at 
Fort  Jackson  will  be  able  to  accom- 
modate delegates;  with  motels  and 
hotels  in  Columbia  affording  rea- 
sonable rates.  In  addition,  meals 
will  range  from  Si. 00  for  break- 
fast and  for  lunch:  not  over  $1.75 
which  includes  the  gratuities.  Mr. 
Jules  Bank,  S.  CT  State  Chairman 
for  JWB,  will  be  pleased  to  ex- 
pedite any  arrangements  in  Colum- 
bia. 

A  surprise  farewell  reception 
was  held  on  Friday  evening,  Sept. 
2,  following  the  regular  Friday 
evening  religious  service,  held  at 
Chapel  No.  8,  (Spring  Lake  Area) 
Fort  Bragg,  in  honor  of  Chaplain 
(Col.)  and  Mrs.  Henry  Tavel, 
highest  ranking  Jewish  Chaplain 
in  the  U.S.  Army,  who  will  be  re- 
tiring after  30  years  of  military 
service. 

Over  100  members  of  his  'flock', 
including  their  families;  his  collea- 
gues,  USO   Committee  members, 
(Please  turn  to  Page  34) 


Mrs.  Siegfried  Kramarsky  of  New 
York,  was  elected  national  president 
of  Hadassah,  the  Women's  Z'onist 
Organization  of  America,  at  Hadas- 
sah's  46th  national  convention  in 
New  York. 


Jfolfyjfiti 


GIFTS 

and 

ACCESSORIES 


Dial  274-9895 
2130  Lawndale  Drive 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 


COLUMBIA  LAUNDRY  CO. 

A  Complete  Service  in  Laundry  and  Dry  Cleaning 
ZONED  PICK-UP  AND  DELIVERY 
Try  Our  Counter  Service  PROMPT— COURTEOUS— EFFICIENT 

Dial  272-8193  901  Battleground  Avenue 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


REX  ALL  DRUGS 


WILKERSON  BRANCH 

ELM  ann  GASTON  ST. 
Phone  272-7123 

ON  THE  SQUARE 

ELM  and  MARKET  ST. 
Phone  272-1169 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS  FROM: 


f      McMillan's  Uniforms,  Inc.  f 

K     336  S.  Elm  St.  Dial  273-2935  § 

I                                         GREENSBORO,  N.  C.  ^ 

F^y-^y-,      yy.  yy.  yy-.-yy.  yy.  yy. t  q~.  yy.  yy-yy.  yy-     ■•    sy-  Ss-  Sy-  ^y9~'~t/~-  ^ 


Rierson  Brothers 
Welding  Shop 

Electric  and  Acetylene 
Welding 

Phone  272-0692 
248  E.  Sycamore 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Thomas  M.  Siceloff 

Metropolitan  Insurance  Consultant 

Estate  Planning  and  Business 
Insurance 
METROPOLITAN  LIFE 
INSURANCE  COMPANY 

OFFICE: 

412  W.  Market  275-6661 

RESIDENCE: 
2618  Beechwood  St.  272-3501 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


"BEST  BY  TEST" 

SMITH  DRY  (LEANING 

Calvin  E.  Smith,  Proprietor 

209  E.  Sycamore  Phone  27  2-0761 

207  North  Davie  Greessboro,  N.  C.  Phone  27  2-8057 


CALLOWAY  BUICK  COMPANY 


SALES 


SERVICE 


130  North  Forbis     GREENSBORO,  N.  C.     Dial  27  2-3148 


Hodgin  Roofing  &  Supply  Company 

Authorized  Dealer  for  Ruberoid  Products 
ASPHALT  SHINGLES 
923  West  Lee  Street  Telephone  272-4607 

GREENSBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


MENDENHALL  LUMBER  COMPANY 

A  Complete  Stock  of  Lumber  and  Building  Materials 
533  S.  Ashe  Street  Dial  272-0417 

273-6643 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK  October,  i960 


Payne 

Upholstery  Co. 

Reupholstering 
Wide  Selection  of  the 
Finest  Fabrics 
Custom  Built  Breakfast  Room 
and  Living  Room  Furniture 
Dial  27  4-4965 
Nights  Dial  29  9-5905 
CASH  OR  TERMS 
806  Winston  Street 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


"Our  Shop  At  Your  Door" 

Rolling 
Plumbing  Repair  Shop 

V.  R.  WARD,  Mgr. 

Renovations 

Repairs 
Replacements 

Home 
Improvements 

Guaranteed  Service  Since  1920 
We  Repair  .  .  . 
Kohter — Cr-  ne-  American  Standard 
and    other  brands 
Free  Estimates 
For  Fast  Service— Dial  272-0072 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 
808  Guilford  Ave. 


Harry  D.  Kelleftt,  Inc. 

SALES  —  DODGE  -  DODGE  DART  —  SERVICE 

DODGE  "Job-Rated"  TRUCKS 

449  W.  Market  St.         GREENSBORO,  N.  C.         Dial  275-9541 


Hanes  Funeral  Home,  Inc. 

FINEST  FACILITIES  FUNERA^S^R^CE  MODERATE  COST 
401  W.  Market  St.      GREENSBORO,  N.  C.      Dial  272-5158 


yy~-  y>>  y?~-  yy-  yy  yy-  yy-     •  yy-  yy-  yy.  yy-  yy.     :  y^r-  yy~-yy-  yy-  yy-  S>  ■  yy-       yy  ^  <-<R 

JONES  FUR  SERVICE 

'  Everything  a  Fur  Coat  Needs  —  Including  Storage" 
Two  Modern  Plants  Serving  Better  Stores 
From  The  Great  Lakes  To  The  Gulf 
1427  Westover  Ter.      Dial  27  2-8527      Greensboro,  N.  C.  i 

y~-  yy~-  yy- •  -5"-  yy  ^y  y^>  yy  y^  ■  y .  y^.yy.yy-yy.yy.-  ^x^K^x^Jc^w^a'^K^at^si^Tc^K^iS 
Eye  Glass  Prescriptions  Accurately  Filled 


206  N.  Elm 


OPTICAL  CO. 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C.  Dial  273-9286 


Please  Patronize  Our  Advertisers 


WILLIAMS  STEEL  COMPANY,  INC. 

STEEL  FABRICATORS  —  ORNAMENTAL  IRON 

Call  Us  for  Estimates 

Dial  CY  9-0451  Greensboro,  N.  C. 


DIXIE  SALES  CO. 

Automotive  Service 
Carburetor  and  Speedometer 
Specialists 
327  Battleground 
Dial  273-6964 
GREENSBORO.  N.  C. 

Good  Furniture  at  Reasonable 
Prices 

BURTNER 
FURNITURE  CO. 

Established  1921 
312  S.  Elm  St.  Phone  272-8417 

GREENSBORO.  N.  C. 


WELBORN 
Electric  Company 

Commercial,  Industrial 
House  Wiring  Service 

4729  High  Point  Rd.  299-4849 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


E.  M.  DAVIS 

Expert  Jewelry  Repair 

and  Engraving 

2071/2  W.  Sycamore  272-3289 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Israeli  Youngsters 

(Concluded  from  Page  23) 


was  8  years  old  then,  suddenly 
piped  up  and  said,  "Why  that's 
not  true,  Mummyl" 

We  produced  our  English-He- 
brew Bible,  and  we  found  that  we 
were  both  right.  According  to  the 
English  version,  the  tree  that 
Absalom  got  caught  in  was  oak. 
Oak  in  Hebrew  is  "alon."  Accord- 
ing to  the  Hebrew  text,  which  is, 
of  course,  the  original  version, 
the  tree  was  an  'aylah." 

"But  what's  an  aylah?"  I  asked, 
off  he  ran  to  the  woods  at  the 
back  of  the  house.  He  came 
running  back  with  a  spicy 
smelling  branch  of  a  tree 
which  I  knew  very  well  by 
sight,  but  had  never  heard  it  called 
by  name.  We  looked  up  it's  Eng- 
lish name  in  the  dictionary.  The 
tree  that  poor  Absalom  got  caught 
in  was  not  the  oak,  but  the  tere- 
binth tree.  That  is  the  same  tree 
that  Saul,  the  first  king  of  Israel, 
sat  under  when  he  Field  his  court. 
And  here  it  was,  growing  in  our 
back  yard,  just  like  any  ordinary 
tree! 

It  is  not  surprising  to  find 
youngsters  in  elementary  schools 
in  Israel  who  are  more  at  home  in 
the  Bible  than  many  people  who 
have  sweated  to  get  University  de- 
grees in  the  subject  in  other  coun- 
tries. "Gihgy,"  a  19-year-old  pri- 
vate in  the  Engineering  Corps  is 
an  example. 

Gingy  was  one  of  the  volunteers 
who  took  part  of  the  famous  ex- 
pedition to  the  Tudean  Desert 
when  Prof.  Yadin  found  the  Bar 
Kochba  letters.  This  stalky,  red- 
headed little  chap  showed  such 
phenomenal  strength  in  shifting 
boulders  about  in  the  cave,  they 
nicknamed  him  "The  Human 
Bull-dozer."  When  they  found  the 
first  scrap  of  parchment  scroll 
with  a  few  words  written  on  it  in 
ancient  Hebrew,  Prof.  Yadin 
hadn't  time  to  whip  out  his  con- 
cordance, to  check  its  source,  when 
Gingy  called  out  "Psalm  s," 
another  youth  called  out  "Num- 
ber 15,"  and  both  of  them  recited 
the  missing  passages  to  the  end. 


I  met  Gingy  at  a  reception  given 
by  the  President  and  Mrs.  Ben  Zvi 
in  honor  of  the  expedition.  He 
was  about  5  feet  5  inches  tall.  His 
arms  were  like  the  thighs  of  a 
steer.  Although  he  had  come  from 
North  Africa  as  a  child,  with  his 
flaming  red  hair,  broad,  freckled 
face,  and  good  natured  smile,  he 
looked  like  an  Irish  navvy. 

On  the  last  day  of  school  before 
Yom  Kippur,  my  7-year-old  Jona- 
than came  home  and  said  to  me: 
"Our  teacher  told  us  that  we  must 
ask  pardon  of  everyone  Ave  hurt 
or  caused  trouble  to  in  this  last 
year.  We  asked  her  pardon  for  be- 
ing so  noisy.  She  asked  our  pardon 
for  being  cranky  with  us,  and  the 
boy  who  threw  me  down  last  week 
and  cut  my  leg  came  up  and  asked 
me  to  pardon  him." 

Then  Jonathan  asked  my  par- 
don for  various  misdemeanors,  I 
asked  his,  we  exchanged  kisses, 
there  was  a  one-way  transfer  ot 
chocolate,  and  we  both  felt  well 
on  the  way  to  a  happy  New  Year. 


WBIG 


Your  Columbia 
Broadcasting 
Station 
• 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Arrow  Rents 

Everything  for  Parties 
Banquets  -  -  Meetings 

— ALSO— 
Sickroom  Supplies 

Nursery  Needs 

Dial  27  5-7254 
2610  Battleground 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


GREENSBORO  FORD 

"South's  Largest  and  Friendliest  Ford  Dealer" 

"We  Service  After  We  Sell" 
315  N.  Elm     GREENSBORO,  N.  C.     27  5-7264 


October,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


33 


Salisbury,  N.  C. 

MRS.  S.  W.  GUYES,  Correspondent 


Helen  Goldman  and  son  Charles 
spent  about  ten  days  in  Birming- 
ham, Ala.,  where  fhey  attended  the 
wedding  of  Helen's  niece  Rene 
Marcus,  which  took  place  on  Sept. 
1  ith. 

Mort  Lerner's  mother,  Mrs.  Ro- 
bert Lerner  of  Baltimore,  Md., 
visited  here  with  Mort  and  Bernice 
for  about  ten  days  in  August. 

Jett  and  Ben  Shapiro  took  a-  very 
enjoyable  ten  day  Carribean  cruise 
the  latter  part  of  August;  and 
while  they  were  away  their  son, 
Jerry,  was  in  Denver,  Colo.,  for  a 
week,  attending  a  ZBT  Conven- 
tion. Jerry  went  as  representative 
and  president  of  his  fraternity  at 
Chapel  Hill. 

The  Max  Nuricks  and  son, 
Aaron,  very  much  enjoyed  a  week's 
vacation  at  Asheville,  N.  C. 

As  a  courtesy  to  Eve  Prager 
(daughter  of  Dr.  and  Mrs.  Ernst 
Blumenberg)  who  on  Sept.  4th  be- 
came the  bride  of  George  Stern 
of  Nashville,  Tenn.,  Helen  Gold- 
man, Bertha  Stein  and  Bernice 
Lerner  were  hostesses  at  a  lovely 
luncheon  at  the  Country  Club. 
Eighteen  women  were  present,  and 
the  honoree  received  gifts  of  silver 
in  her  pattern,  as  well  as  a  lovely 
piece  in  crystal. 

I  flew  down  to  Miami  Beach  the 
early  part  of  August  to  spend  two 
weeks  with  our  daughter,  Betty 
Lou,  who  lives  there. 

The  Abe  Ereemans  have  had 
Roslyn's  mother,  Mrs.  Kitty  Slovak 
of  New  York  City  with  them  for 
the  summer.  Kittv  has  now  decided 
to  make  her  home  here  with 
Roslyn  and  Abe,  and  we  heartily 
welcome  her  to  our  community. 


Marsh's  Garage 
&  Body  Shop 

GENERAL  REPAIRS 
Wreck   Repairing   and  Painting 

215  W.  Lewis  273-4265 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


J.  Harold  Smith 
Studio 

Commercial   and  Portrait 
Photography 

1736  Battleground  Avenue 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


New  Year  Greetings 

Ford  Body  Co.,  Inc. 

1200  Battleground  Avenue 
Dial  272-1131 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


On  Eriday  night,  Sept.  2nd,  Dot 
Kahn  and  Syliva  Feit  were  hostes- 
ses at  a  very  lovely  Oneg  Shabbath 
at  Temple  Israel,  honoring  Eva 
Prager  and  her  fiance  George 
Stern.  The  table  appointments 
were  beautifully  replete  with  love- 
ly linen,  silver  and  flowers,  and 
the  dainty  refreshments  were  deli- 
cious. Buddy  Guyes  conducted  the 
services.  Quite  a  group  of  the  out 
of  town  guests  had  already  arrived, 
and  the  evening  was  a  very  enjoy- 
able one. 

The  Eric  Goodmans  and  S.  W. 
Guyes  were  hosts  and  hostesses  at 
the  wedding  breakfast  for  all  out 
of  town  guests  and  the  wedding 
party  for  the  Prager  wedding. 
Places  for  fifty  were  set  for  10:00 
o'clock  Sunday  morning  at  Holi- 
day Inn.  The  tables  were  very  fes- 
tive with  flowers  and  candles  in 
candelabra,  carried  out  in  colors 
of  green  and  white,  and  a  tradi- 
tional breakfast  with  all  the  trim- 
mings was  served. 


Benjamin  J.  Massell,  of  Atlanta,  a 
prominent  real  estate  developer  and 
builder,  has  been  named  a  recipient 
of  the  Louis  M-srshall  Award  of  The 
Jewish  Theological  Seminary  of 
America,  one  of  the  hJ<*h<»st  awards 
acortfed  to  laymen  by  the  Seminary. 


S.  T.  Wyrick  &  Co. 

Office  Equipment,  Supplies, 
Printing,  Engraving 

117  N.  Greene  St. 
Dial  272-4133 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 

Dick's  Shoe  Shop 

Best  Quality 
Repairs 

208  N.  Elm  St.  Dial  272-2459 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Seasons  Greetings 


E.  R.  ZANE 


Greensboro,  N.  C. 


fs-.  j^r,      vJ*-.      -^r-  -<^-  t&r&R 


Greetings 

ACROBAT 
SHOE  STORE 

Dial  27  2-0729 
119  West  Market 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


NATIONAL  CASH 
REGISTER  CO. 

O.  L.  FRYMAN 
Branch  Manager 
116  East  Market  Street 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


C.  G.  TRULL 
Distributing  Co. 
inc. 

Wine  Distributors 

•  Taylor's  New  York  State 

•  Mogen  David 

•  Richard's  Catawba 

•  Horowitz-Margareten 

Dial  273-3272 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 


W.  L.  Caudle  Boat  Manufacuturing 

Everything  For  Boat  Builders 

Materials  —  Fastenings  &  Fittings  ■ —  Fiberglass 
Epoxy  Paints  —  Trailers 


Dial  273-7862 


McLEANSVILLE,  N.  C. 


LENNOX 


Indoor  Comfort  Systems 

811  Battleground  GREENSBORO,  N.  C 


Aire-Flo  Heating  and 
Air-Conditioning 


Dial  274-6538 


<y     -  ^r  .  yy  .  yy.  sy-.  ss-  ■ss-yy-ss-  \ 

\    MODERN  ! 


MARKET 

QUALITY 
I  MEATS 

#  PRODUCE 
#  GROCERIES 

Dial  27  2-4633 
113  E.  Market  Street 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


ROYAL 
CLEANERS 

LAUNDRY  & 
CLEANING  SERVICE 

Pick-Up  &  Delivery 
DIAL  272-7335 
Lawndale  Shopping  Center 
2148  Lawndale  Drive 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


For  Fuel  Oil 
Dial 

27  3-8663 

BERRY 
COAL  &  OIL  CO, 

Greensboro,  N.  C. 


Hatley's 
Upholstery  Shop 

All  Types  of 
Furniture  Upholstering 

Dial  273-0122 
3511  E.  Market  Street 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


34 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES  OUTLOOK 


October,  i960 


(Sup  Hill 


INC. 


Men  s  and  Boys'  Wear 

Friendly  Shopping  Center 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Kjafe 

AIR-CONDITIONED 

Specializing  in  .  .  . 

Western  Steaks 

Shis-Ka-Bob 
&  Louis  Salad 

dial  273-3503 

124  Bellemeade 
Opposite  O.  Henry  Hotel 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


SASLOW'S 
Jewelry  Store 

Greensboro's  Largest 
Credit  Jewelry  Store 


"ORCHID  SERVICE" 
Hand  Cleaning  and 
Finishing 

BLUE  BIRD 
CLEANERS,  Inc. 

E.  J.  PERRYMAN  &  SONS 
1G13  Madison  Avenue 

Dial  273-2270 
Friendly  Shopping  Center 
Dial  275-0055 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Bring  Your  Cars 
For  Expert  Repairing  To 

KIRK'S  SINEATH 
Motor  Company 

24-Hour  Wrecker  Service 

Dial  272-3456 
419  Battleground  Ave. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


PHIL  R.  CARLTON 

Incorporated 

Real  Estate  —  Rents 
Insurance  —Bonding 

Carlton  Building 
Opposite  Courthouse 

Dial  272-8157 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


U.  S.  O.  -  JWB 


RUGS  &  UPHOLSTERY 
CLEANED  IN  YOUR 

OWN  HOME 

Duraclean 

REVIVES  COLORS! 
RESTORES  LUSTRE! 
RAISES  PILE! 
EVERYTHING  READY 
TO  USE  SAME  DAY! 
For  FR^E  Estimate 

Dial  27  4-4307 

Duraclean 
Home  Service 

2506  Westmoreland  Dr. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Two-Way  Radio-Dispatched  Taxis 
PROMPT,  COURTEOUS  SERVICE 


Blue  Bird  Taxi,  Inc. 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


r 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best 
Wishes  for  a  Happy  and 
Prosperous  New  Year 


§       The  Champagne 
§        of  Bottle  Beer 

/  .  ~S/~-  ~/?~-       S?'-  S/  -  J 


HART 
Hardware  Co. 


Your 


APPLIANCE  STORE 

Dial  274-1948 
334  Tate  Street 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


(Concluded 
Jewish  Welfare  Board  Armed  Ser- 
vice Committee  members  of  Fayet- 
teville,  the  Wives  Club,  Jewish 
Servicemen's  Council,  and  friends 
attended  the  collation. 

Irving  Cheroff,  Area  Director 
lor  the  USO:National  Jewish  Wel- 
fare Board,  in  paying  tribute  to 
Chaplain  Tavel  stated:  It  is  most 
befitting  that  we  gather  here  to- 
night to  pay  homage  and  respect 
to  the  Tavels  (Henry,  and  his 
devoted  wife:  Lotta)  who  are  gen- 
uinely dedicated,  earnest,  sincere, 
and  noteworthy.  He  called  Chap. 
Tavel  a  true  friend,  co-worker, 
helpmate,  colleague  and  'his  own  ' 
esteemed  spiritual  leader.' 

Cheroff  praised  the  support 
given  Chap.  Tavel  by  the  Service- 
men's Council,  Wives  Club,  the 
Beth  Israel  Congregation  of  Fayet- 
teville,  USO-JWB.  and  other  allied 
groups,  viz.  the  Chaplains'  Sections 
of  Fort  Bragg  and  Pope  AFB. 

In  response,  Chap.  (Col.)  Tavel 


rut:   i  1  xauisiTf: 


crosontc 


BY        B  A    L   tt    M '  /  A 


The  best  piano  you 
can  buy  is  the  one  you 
will  want  to  play. 
Come  in  and  hear 
it  today. 

Moore  Music  Co. 

615  W.  MARKET  ST. 
GREENSBORO.  N.  C. 


from  Page  31) 

thanked  all  the  designees  (afore- 
mentioned) for  all  they  have  done 
for  him,  vis  a  vis  the  servicemen, 
their  families,  the  combined  mili- 
tary and  civilian  communities,  and 
particularly,  the  National  Jewish 
Welfare  Board,  one  of  the  six  na- 
tional agencies  affiliated  with 
U.S.O. 


JACK  D.  WEILER 

Jack  D.  Weiler,  real  estate  inves- 
tor and  communal  leader,  has  been 
named  chairman  of  the  Board  of 
Overseers  of  the  Albert  Einstein 
College  of  Medicine,  it  was  announc- 
ed by  Dr.  Samuel  Belkin,  president 
of  Yeshiva  University.  He  succeeds 
former  New  York  State  Attorney 
Genera!  Nathaniel  L.  GoHstein  who 
was  elected  chairman  emeritus. 


GUILFORD  DAIRY 

"Your  Home  Town  Dairy" 


SUNSET  BARBER  SHOP 


Friendly  Road  at  Avcock 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Dial  274-4879 


Lambeth,  President  Fred  Troxler,  Sec'y- 

GREENSBORO'S  NEWEST  AND  MOST  MODERN 

WENDOVER  AT  VIRGINIA  STREET  —  DIAL  273-3401 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


October,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OU  TLOOK 


35 


Avraham  Harman  (center),  Israel  Ambassador  to  U.S.  joins  in  friendly 
handclasp  with  Sidney  Stackler  (left),  President  of  Hotel  Corporation  of 
Israel,  and  Irvine  Shubert,  senior  Vice  President  of  Sheraton  Corporation  of 
America.  Occasion  was  a  recent  meeting  in  New  York,  during-  which  Shera- 
ton Corp.  entered  into  agreement  to  operate  Hotel  Tel  Av-v,  modem  200-room 
luxury  hotel  which  will  be  Israel's  largest,  and  the  first  operated  by  the 
Sheraton  Corp.  outside  the  U.S.  and  Canada. 


Goldsboro,  N.  C. 

RABBI  ISRAEL  J.  SARASOHN,  Correspondent 


Mazzel  Tov  greetings  are  being 
onveyed  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Harry 
Shrago,  grandparents,  and  also  to 
their  aged  mother,  Mrs.  A.  M. 
Shrago,  a  great  grandmother  again, 
upon  the  birth  of  aT)aby  daughter 
to  the  William  Shragos  of  Rocky 
Mount. 

Bill  Bernstein  is  to  enter  the  ser- 
ice  soon. 

Mrs.  Ruth  Holloway  returned 
from  a  visit  to  her  sister  in  Wheel- 


TREASURE  CHEST 

Toys  —  Games 
Hobbies 
122  W.  Sycamore      27  5-7594 
GREENSBORO 


DIAL  273-6923 
For  Quality  Coal 
and  Fuel  Oil 

Colonial  Ice  Co. 

GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Colonial  Furniture 

House,  Inc. 
Fine  Furniture  &  Accessories 

Dial  299-4892 
3819  High  Point  Road 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


A  Thalhimer  Affiliate 
GREENSBORO,  N.  Cl- 


ing, where  she  was  called  on  ac- 
count of  her  illness  and  returned 
thankfully  upon  improvement  in 
her  health. 

Sympathy  is  expressed  for  Max 
Firnbacher  who  passed  away  in 
New  York  during  June. 

Mrs.  Sol  Kanikow  of  Detroit 
made  a  memorial  donation  in 
memory  of  her  parents  while  she, 
accompanied  by  Mr.  Konikow  and 
the  children,  visited  here.  They 
were  most  happy  to  find  her  aunt, 
Mrs.  Julia  Rosenfeld  improved  in 
health  and  progressing  satisfac- 
torily. 

The  Jack  Bernsteins  attended  a 
nephew's  wedding  in  New  York 
during  the  summer. 

Arnold  Leder  is  in  the  military 
service  in  Camp  Jackson,  S.  C. 

Robert  Korschun  is  among  the 
new  students  at  the  University  of 
North  Carolina,  having  completed 
his  preparatory  education  at  the 
Milford  Academy  in  Connecticut. 
His  brother,  Marshall,  accom- 
panied by  his  father,  Mr.  Charles 
Korschun,  are  planning  to  leave 
soon  for  the  north  where  Marshall 
is  to  be  enrolled  in  a  private  school 
near  Trenton,  N.  J. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Henry  Weil  spent 
a  vacation  in  the  far  west  at  Lake 
Louise  and  other  scenic  spots  in 
the  mountains. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  David  Weil  at- 
tended the  Boy  Scout  Jamboree  in 
Estes  Park,  Colo. 


DANJOHN'S 

NEW  LOCATION 
408  Delancey  St. 
Dial  27  5-1130 

CARPET  CLEANERS 
And  Sales  of  Famous  Brands 
*  Artloom         *  Doerr 
*  Philadelphia 

National  Spun  Padding 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Yost  &  Little 
Realtors 

272-0151      Piedmont  Bldg. 
Greensboro,  N.  C. 


W.  H.  Andrews,  Jr., 
C.  L.  U. 

Home  Office  Agency 
Jefferson  Standard  Life  Ins.  Co 

Manager  and  Associate 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


PIEDMONT 

Office  Suppliers 

Office  Supplies 

203  N.  Greene  St. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 

Dial  274-1561 


ROSCOE  GRIFFIN 
SHOE  CO.,  Inc. 

FLORSHEIM  SHOES 

123  South  Elm  Street 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


FLORIDA  STREET 
BAKERY 

A  complete  line  of  fine 
bakery  products. 

We  are  particularly 
proud  of  our 

RYE  BREAD 

Your  patronage  will  be 
appreciated  —  and  rewarded 

815  Florida  St- 

Dial  274-1075    Greensboro,  N.  C. 


For 
FUEL  OIL 
Dial  272-9711 

Vanstory  Oil  Co. 

Distributors  of 

PRODUCTS 

1220  W.  Lee  St. 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


For  the  Best  in 
Photography 

MARTIN'S 
STUDIO 

112  E.Gaston     Dial  27  2-7237 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Kyle's  Friendly  Service 

FUEL  OIL  AND 
SERVICE  STATION 
DIAL  274-4160 

611  Green  Valley  Road 
Friendly  Shopping  Center 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Watkins  Quality 
Products  Co. 

THE  SHOPPING  CENTER  THAT 
COMES  TO  YOUR  HOME 

Extracts  —  Spices  —  Waxes 
Cleaners  —  Insecticides 

Established  1868 
934  Fairground  Avenue 
Dial  27  5-4324 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


New  Year  Greetings 

Titcstoae  3tovts 

Dial  272-1151 
510  W.  Market  Street 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Typewriters 
Adding  Machines 
BOUGHT  —  SOLD 
RENTED  —  REPAIRED 

Greensboro  Typewriter 
Exchange 

2351/2  N.  Green  273-4098 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


3»" 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


October,  i960 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a  Happy  and 
Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

High  Point,  N.  C. 


High  Point,  N.  C. 


§ 

i 


EAT 
TIP  TOP 

BREAD  ©  CAKES  ©  ROLLS 


BEST  WISHES 

To  All  Our  Many  Jewish  Patrons  and  Friends  For 
a  Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year. 

North  State  Telephone  Co. 

Telephone  Facilities  Are  Available 
To  Suit  Your  Particular  Needs 

HIGH  POINT,  N.  C. 


§ 
§ 

§ 
§ 


J.  R.  Graham  &  Son  Construction  Co. 

GENERAL  CONTRACTORS 


Telephone  88-2-8167 
Greensboro  Rd. 
HIGH  POINT,  N.  C. 


LEWIS  MOTOR  (0. 

Lincoln  —  Mercury  —  Comet 
SALES  &  SERVICE 


115  S.  Wrenn  St.  HIGH  POINT,  N.  C.  Dial  88  8-5086 

'-■  yy^  y/~-  '-//~  yy-  yy  y~-    -<5^-  •yy-        -sy-    ^y-    -<c^-  sy  yy-    y/~-  ■  ^ 


KENNEDY  OIL  COMPANY 

XROWN; 

'       y  ""J 
Petroleum  Products 

SWITCH  TO  CROWN  AND  GO  TO  TOWN 

1203  Tryon         HIGH  POINT,  N.  C.         Dial  88  3-1027 


S.  TARO 
UT  US 


Let  Us  Do  it- 
We  Know  How! 


CHARLES  TARO 

Ceramic  Tile 
Marble  -  Terrazzo 
Contractors 


Southeastern  Marble  &°  Tile  Co.,  Inc. 

1233  Montlieu  Ave.         Phones:  88  3-1720  and  88  2-3811 
HIGH  POINT,  N.  C. 


MRS.  JEROME  I.  CHAPMiAN 

The  former  Bernice  Jacobs,  daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Harry  Jacobs,  of  High 
Point,  N.  C,  was  married  to  Jerome  Ian  Chapman,  son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Isaac 
Chapman,  of  New  Orleans,  La.,  at  B'nai  Israel  Synagogue,  High  Point  on 
September  11th,  with  Rabbi  Herbert  Silberman  officiating. 


Mr.  and  Mrs.  Louis  A.  O'Drezin, 
of  Savannah,  Ga.,  announce  the 
engagement  of  their  daughter, 
Rosalyn,  to  Bernard  Stadiem,  son 
of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Mose  Stadiem,  of 
High  Point.  The  prospective  bride 
is  the  grand-daughter  of  Mrs. 
Louis  Jacobs,  of  Charleston,  S.  C. 

Samuel  J.  Bogen,  69,  Eaton 
Place,  High  Point,  a  former  resi- 
dent of  Greensboro,  died  at  High 
Point  Memorial  Hospital  on  Sept. 
16th. 

He  had  been  In  declining  health 
for  several  months. 

A  resident  of  High  Point  for 
two  years,  he  was  owner  and  mana- 
ger of  Bogen  Department  Store.  He 
lived  in  Greensboro  for  six  years 
before  moving  to  High  Point.  He 
was  a  native  of  New  York. 

He  was  a  member  of  the  Beth 
David  Synagogue  in  Greensboro. 
He  was  also  a  member  of  the  Ma- 
sonic Lodge,  Dan  River  Lodge  129 
and  Sudan  Temple  in  New  Bern. 

Surviving  are  his  wife;  one 
daughter,  Mrs.  Henry  H.  Shavitz 
of  High  Point;  one  son,  Schenck 


Bogen  of  Monroe,  La.;  one  sister, 
Mrs.  Max  Felner  of  New  York;  one 
brother,  William  Bogen  of  New 
York;  and  one  grandchild. 


GOOD 


TREATING 

IS  ONLY  AN  INSTANT  AWAY 

when  you  stock  up  on  dark,  delicious 


r 


3ATE-NUT  ROLL 


THE 

READY-TO-SERVE  DESSERT 
CAKE  MADE  WITH  CRISP, 
CHUNKY  WALNUTS  AND  TH 
WORLD'S  CHOICEST  DATE 


LOOK  FOR  THE  (\h 
ON  THE  LABEL 
THAT  TELLS  YOU 
IT'S  KOSHER! 


A(A»  DROMEDARY  CHOCOLATE  NUT  ROU 
and  ORANGE-NUT  ROlt  1 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


37 


Rosh  Kippur  and  Yom  Hashonah 


(Concluded 
pi-chastisement    for    our  short- 
comings,   and    determination  to 
elevate  the  level  of  our  behavior. 

And  what  thoughts  are  suggest- 
ed by  the  typographical  error  (we 
almost  wrote  typographical  ter- 
ror), Yom  Hashanah?  In  Hebrew 
that  would  mean,  "The  Day  of 
the  Year."  Alas,  it  is  all  too  true 
that  for  multitudes  the  High 
Holyday  session  is  the  day  for 
worship,  frequently  the  only  day. 
So  Yom  Hashanah  has  a  sardonic 
note  to  it.  The  mistake  seems  to 
chide  us,  as  though  it  were  ask- 
ing, Do  you  really  think  that  the 
obligations  of  Judaism  can  be  dis- 
charged in  p  single  sitting?  Do 
you  cold-bloodedly  expect  to  dis- 
regard and  abandon  your  faith 
for  the  entire  year?  Do  you  think 
you  can  cram  into  one  period  of 
introspection  the  work  needed  for 
year-round  moral  rehabilitation? 
Indeed,  for  many  people  Rosh 
Hashanah  is  virtually  "Yom 
Hashanah"  the  one  occasion  dur- 
ing the  entire  year  when  they 
come  to  grips  with  themsevles, 
their  progress  in  life,  their  con- 


Prescription 
Specialists 


MAIN  DRUG  CO. 

CUT  RATE  DRUGS 

Phone  63  6-1241 
128  N.  Main 
SALISBURY,  N.  C. 


from  Page  18) 

science,  and  their  Maker.  For  so 
many  events  we  prepare  at  great 
lengths.  Think  of  what  we  do  to 
get  ready  for  a  dimmer  party, 
birthday  party,  a  trip.  And  yet 
for  a  reunion  with  our  Creator,  for 
the  journey  towards  His  spirit, 
we  often  do  little  during  the 
course  of  the  year  in  the  way  of 
proper  preparation.  We  save  it 
all  for  the  one  time  of  the  year. 

Wisdom,  they  say,  often  emerges 
from  the  tongues  of  children.  Odd- 
ly enough,  light  can  also  be  shed 
occasionally  by  slips  of  the  ton- 
gue. Perhaps  those  we  have  ex- 
amined will  save  us  from  serious 
slips  on  the  path  of  life. 

Gastonia,  N.  G. 

PAULINE  B.  CfflNN, 

Correspondent 

With  the  High  Holy  Days,  we 
extend  best  wishes  for  the  New 
Year  to  all  of  our  friends. 

Well,  our  college  students  have 
all  left  us  for  their  various  schools, 
Jennie  Lynn  Schneider  has  entered 
Florida  State,  Allen  Witten  enter- 
ed Winget  Jr.  College,  and  Myron 
Slutsky  has  gone  to  the  University 
of  N.  C.  Students  returning  to 
their  respective  schools  are:  Thea 
Berlin,  to  Georgia,  Melvyn  Fox, 
(Please  turn  to  Page  42) 


See  U s  For  Your  Printing  Needs 

\     SALISBURY  Printing  COMPANY 

130  E.  Council  St.  Salisbury,  A[.  C.  Phone  63  3-9071 


LINGLE  ELECTRIC 
REPAIR  SHOP 

Specializing  in 

•  REWINDING 

•  REPAIRING 

•  REBUILDING 

•  ELECTRIC  MOTORS 

104  E.  Franklin    63  6-5591 
SALISBURY,  N.  C. 


The  Gold  Shop 
Ladies' 

Wearing 

Apparel 

130  S.  Main 
SALISBURY,  N.  C. 


Holiday.  Greetings  From: 

Jake  Froelich 
Veneers 

Dial  88  8-4254 
331  North  Wrenn  Street 
HIGH  POINT,  N.  C. 


HIGH  POINT 
CANVAS  SHOP 


Awnings  —  Truck  Covers 
Furniture  Pads 

335  W.  Burton 
Dial  88  8-4306 
HIGH  POINT,  N.C 


\£r.  yy-,    .  yy-^yy.  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy  jc^5«^n^>-.-. 


HOLIDAY  GREETINGS  FROM: 


SUBURBAN  HOMES  COMPANY 

BENNY  BRAICA,  JR.,  President 
1244  Montlieu  Avenue  High  Point,  N.  C. 

^yy.     ^y~.  •  'y  y>~.  yy  y?-.  yy  yy  •    yy  /y  yy      S>~  y-  yy  ys  yy  <^  ^  ^  ^  ^  ^ 

^^■y^yy^y^yy^yyy^-^ 

DOBBINS  ELECTRIC  CO. 

ELECTRICAL  CONTRACTORS 

RESIDENTIAL  —  INDUSTRIAL  —  COMMERCIAL 
Call  88  8-5226      HIGH  POINT,  N.  C.      412  N.  Wrenn  St. 
^yyyyy  yyyyyyyyyyy^  <^^y>^ v5^^<^^<^^  -o- >~0*<0*  o^^^-o^o^^ 


L vies  Chevrolet  Co. 

SALES  -  SERVICE 


HIGH  POINT,  N.  C. 


TOBIAS 


HIGH  POINT,  N.  C. 


Highland  Motors, 
Inc. 

Cadillac  —  Oldsmobile 


Sales  and  Service 
Dial  88  2-0116 
805  N.  Main  St. 
HIGH  POINT  N.  C. 


UPTON  | 

§ 


SUPPLY  CO. 

Dial  88  8-6937 

•  Furniture 

•  Appliances 

Greensboro  Rd. 
High  Point,  N.  C. 


G  reetings 


laron  mid  m 

High  Point  Chemical  Manufacturing  Co. 

TEXTILE  OILS  and  CHEMICALS 

Taylor  St.  HIGH  POINT,  N.  C.         Dial  88  2-6018 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


October,  i960 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Charlotte,  N.  C. 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS 
from 

QUEEN  CITY  TRAILWAYS 


■yy.yyyy.sy<.y      t^5^.t^  ^      ^  syy.  yy.'yy.yy  sy.    5^^^v?n<?5!^  i  sy.yy.yy.- 

CHAPMAN  -  HARKEY  CO. 

Toy  Distributors 

See  us  at  our  new  location  1401  S.  Mint  St. 

Dial  37  5-8658  CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


K-y?~'  -yy.  yy-  yy.  yy-  yy.  «  y.  yy.  yy.  sy~.  yy.  yy.  «  -y.  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy.  ■  /y.  y^.  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy.  yy 


THOMAS  &  HOWARD  COMPANY 

WHOLESALE  GROCERS 

411  S.  College        CHARLOTTE,  N.  C.        Dial  33  3-0112 


GORDON  P. 
CHERRY 

GENERAL  CONTRACTOR 

"Custom  Home-Building 
At  Its  Finest" 

116  W.  Third  St.    Dial  376-1845 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


FOR  EXPERT 

MOVING 


Fidelity  Van  & 
Storage  Co.,  Inc. 

200  West  29th  Street 

Dial  334-5316 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


Greetings 


May  the  New  Year  bring  you  health  and  happiness 

Harry  P.  Sto\ely 

Food  Broker 

CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


Marc  E.  Samuels  New  Rabbi  al 
Charlotte's  Temple  Israel 


Succeeding  Rabbi  E.  A.  Levi, 
Marc  E.  Samuel  became  rabbi  at 
Temple  Israel,  Charlotte  in  July 
of  this  year.  He  came  from  Mid- 
land, Michigan,  where  he  had  oc- 
cupied the  pulpit  of  Temple  Beth 
El  since  1957. 

Ordained  at  the  Jewish  Theo- 
logical Seminary  in  New  York 
City,  Rabbi  Samuels  has  the  fol- 
lowing academic  background: 

B.A.,  Columbia  University, 
1951:  M.A.,  Columbia  University, 
Teachers  College,  1952  (in  Educa- 
tional Administration): 

B.R.A.,  Teachers  Institute,  The 
Jewish  Theological  Seminary  of 
America,  1952. 

Ordained  Rabbi  and  M.H.L.  de- 
gree from  the  Rabbinical  School 
of  the  Jewish  Theological  Semin- 
ary, 1957. 

Required  courses  completed  to- 
wards a  Ph.D.  at  New  York  Uni- 
versity. 

Guest  Lecturer  in  Religion  at 
Central  Michigan  University, 
Mount  Pleasant,  Michigan,  for  two 
years  during  Religious  Explora- 
tion Weeks. 

He  was  President  of  the  Society 
of  Religion.  Columbia  LJniversity 
1950  and  1951,  and  Civil  Defense 
Chief  Chaplain  of  Midland  Coun- 
ty, Michigan:  Baccalaureate  speak- 
er of  Mount  Pleasant  High  School, 
i960. 

In  1957  Rabbi  Samuels  married 
Carol  Marks,  and  diere  are  two 
children,  a  son  Steven  and  another 
son  Jonathan. 

P.  C.  Godfrey,  Inc. 

PLUMBING,  HEATING 
AIR  CONDITIONING 

DIAL  334-8605 

1816  RozzeUs  Ferry  Rd. 
CHARLOTTE,   N.  C. 

AUSTIN  ELECTRIC 
COMPANY 

Electrical  Contractors  j 

309  W.  Second  St.  332-4898  [ 
Charlotte,  N.  C.        334-3789  1 


RABBI  MARC  E.  SAMUELS 


E,  A,  Palmgren 
&  Associates 

515  E.  Trade         ED  4-5541 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


THOMAS 

Cadillac-Olds,  Inc. 

SALES  &  SERVICE 

214  N.  Church       Dial  334-4656 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


WAYLAND 
TRANSFER 

701  W.  4th  St.    Dial  332-2453 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 

Southern  Warehouse 
&  Distributing  Corp. 

934  N.  Poplar    Dial  375-2531 
CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


Enjoy  the  Finest  Food  in  Charlotte 
DELMONICO  PLAZA  CAFETERIA 

1426  Central  Avenue  CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 

DELMONICO  RESTAURANT 

301  W.  Trade  St.  Charlotte,  N.  C. 


October,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


39 


Winston  Salem,  N.  C. 


MRS.  GEORGE  GREEN  and  MRS.  LEWIS  WOLBERG,  Correspondents 

The  unauthorized  summer  sab- 
batical taken  by  your  correspon- 
dents has  unfortunately  resulted  in 
lots  of  catching  up  to  do.  Back- 
tracking to  June,  we  recall  that  it 
was  the  month  of  the  lovely  Bas 
and  Bar  Mitzvahs,  at  Temple  Ema- 
nuel, of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Albert  Kir- 
sch's  daughter,  Elizabeth,  and  of 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Milton  Goldberg's 
son,  Richard,  on  June  10  and  17, 
respectively.  To  Elizabeth's  joyous 
event  came  her  grandparents,  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  J.  I.  Teder,  of  Miami, 
Fla.,   while   Richard's   was  made 
memorable  by  the  attendance  of 
his  grandfather,  Mr.  George  Gold- 
berg,   of    Portsmouth,    Va.,  and 
many  other  out-of-town  relatives, 
including  Mr.  and   Mrs.  Morton 
Levy  and  son,  of  Portsmouth;  Mrs. 
Rose    Rich,    Mr.    and    Mrs.  Joe 
Freed,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Louis  Glass- 
man,  and  Mrs.  Milton  Bromberg, 
of  Paterson,  N.  J.;  Mrs.  Doris  Cre- 
gar  and  children,  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Harold  Duell,  Mrs.  Minnie  Ber- 
man,  Mrs.  Arthur  Ausenstein,  Mrs. 
Louis  Silk,  and  Mr.  and  Mrs.  D. 
Effrof  and  son,  of  Philadelphia, 
Pa.;  and  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Max  Sch- 
wartz, of  Richmond,  Va. 


Most  recent  Bar  Mitzvah  oc- 
casion taking  place  at  Temple  Em- 
anuel is  that  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Er- 
nest Lefkowitz's  son,  Howard,  on 


TRAVEL?4 


...  to  see  places,  things, 
and  people?  To  shop? 
Where?  When?  How? 

We  can  arrange  everything  for 
you,  make  reservations  for  ships 
or  planes,  hotels,  and  all  details. 
Independent  travel  if  you  wish, 
or  Brownell  escorted  tours. 

•  Europe  •  South  America 

•  Hawaii  •  Alaska 

•  Africa  •  Round  the  World 

For  Folders  and  Prices,  see: 
TRAVEL  DEPARTMENT 

Phone  PA  4-7773 

Wachovia  Bank  &  Trust 
Company 

WINSTON-SALEM,    N.  C. 


Sept.  2.  A  great  many  out-of-town 
relatives  and  friends  joined  the 
family  and  congregation  on  this 
momentous  evening.  They  in- 
cluded Howard's  grandparents, 
Mrs.  I.  Center,  of  Savannah,  Ga., 
and  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Abe  Lefkowitz, 
of  Orlando,  Fla.;  also  uncles,  aunts 
and  cousins,  among  them  Dr.  and 
Mrs.  Alvin  Savage  and  daughters, 
and  Mrs.  Billie  Jacobs,  of  Orlando; 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Leon  Goldberg  and 
family,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Sam  Kramer 
and  son,  of  Savannah;  Dr.  and  Mrs. 
Sam  Albert,  of  Beverly,  Mass.;  Mrs. 
Morris  Lefkowitz,  of  Miami  Beach, 
Fla.;  Mr.  Dave  Center,  of  Atlanta, 
Ga.;  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Louis  Center,  of 
Chattanooga,  Tenn.;  and  Mr.  Cas- 
per Center,  of  Miami  Beach. 

On  September  1,  the  marriage 
of  Henry  Augustus  Lowet,  son  of 
Mrs.  Fred  Lowet  of  this  city,  to 
Miss  Eleanor  Paula  Greenfield  of 
New  York,  took  place  at  the  Cot- 
tage of  Hampshire  House  Hotel, 
in  New  York,  with  Rev.  Dr.  Robert 
Gordis,  of  Temple  Beth-El  at 
Belle  Harbor,  officiating.  The 
bride  is  a  graduate  of  Vassar  Col- 
lege where  she  was  a  member  of 
Phi  Beta  Kappa  honorary  scholas- 
tic society.  The  groom  graduated 
from  the  University  of  North 
Carolina  where  he  was  a  Phi  Beta 


Be  Sociable"' 
Have  a  Pepsi 


Pepsi  Cola  Bottling  Co. 

Greensboro,  Elkin  & 
Winston-Salem 
North  Carolina 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Winston-Salem,  N.  C. 


GREETINGS  AND  BEST  WISHES 


Gay  &  Taylor  Insurance  Adjusters 


226  N.  Trade  St. 


Winston-Salem,  N.  C. 


[MOTHER 


DAUGHTER 


FASHIONS 

The  very  newest  in  feminine  apparel. 
(Corner  Liberty  and  3rd  Streets) 

RALEIGH  in  WINSTON-SALEM 


WILSON 


\ 


w»  ca«m  saw  _«irt 

Westinghousei 


WALL  ■  TURNER  CO. 

HEATING  AND  AIR-CONDITIONING 
CONTRACTORS  AND  ENGINEERS 


587  S.  Stratford  Road.   Winston-Salem,  N.  C.   Dial  PA  4-0526 


ZINZENDORF  LAUNDRY 

Dry  Cleaners  —  Rug  Cleaners 

Dial  PA  2--)  178  WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


Edwards  Metal  Shop,  Inc. 

DELCO  OIL  FURNACES 
Furnace  Cleaning  and  Repairing 
Guttering  and  Sheet  Metal  Work 

2933  Maplewood  Ave.    Winston-Salem,  N.  C.       Dial  PA  5-8377 


Carolina  Marble  and  Tile  Company 

/  Since  1921 

TILE,  MARBLE,  TERRAZZO,  RESILIENT  FLOORS 

1001  Northwest  Blvd.,  W.  Dial  PA  4-3641 

WINSTON-SALEM,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


'Know  the  Real  Joy 
of  Good  Living" 


The  Beer  That  Made 
Milwaukee  Famous 

Distributed  in  the 
Winston-Salem  trade  zrea  by 

THOMAS 
WHOLESALE  CO. 

PA  2-6513    Reynolds  Park  Rd. 
Winston-Salem,  N.  C. 


4° 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


October,  1960 


New  Year  Greetings  From: 

Benneft-Lewallen 
Co.,  Inc. 

Cigars 

Dial  PA  2-6119 
341  Witt  Street 
WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


HIGHLAND 
Builders  Supply, 
Inc. 

For  Your  Building  Needs 

DIAL  PA  2-1173 

401  Knollwood 
Corner  S.  Stratford  Rd. 
WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


Dial  PA  5-4251 


Ed  Kelly 
Electrical  Appliance,  Inc. 

•  RCA  RADIO  AND  TV  SETS 
•  Westinghouse  Electrical  Appliances 

1122  S.  Main        Winston-Salem,  N.  C. 


FRANK  L. 

BLUM  CONSTRUCTION  CO. 

General  Contractors 

860  W.  41/2  Street 

Dial  PA  2-1544 

WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 

FRANK  R.  MYERS  —  E.  L.  THOMAS 

SALEM  ELECTRIC  COMPANY 

CONTRACTORS 

Anything  Electrical  —  Anytime  —  24-Hour  Service 
315  South  Liberty  Dial  PA  2-6174 

WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


TWIN  CITY 
DRY  CLEANING  CO. 


Flowers  for  All  Occasions 

M.  McNULTY 

CUT  I^SE5?  ™  ™=SAGES  Eve™g  Dresses-Tuxedo  and  Tails 

POTTED  PLANTS  Blankets  —  Draperies  —  Slipcovers 

Dial  PA  2-2504                 963  Burke  612  W.  Fourth            Dial  PA  2-7106 

WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C.  WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


DRY  CLEANERS 

LAUNDERERS 

SARTIN'S 

High  Point 

Winston-Salem 

Dial  88-8-4501 

Dial  PA  2-7101 

Please  Patronize  Our  Advertisers 


Brake  Service 
Co.,  Inc. 

BRAKE  SPECIALISTS 
WHEEL  ALIGNMENT 

Dial  PA  4-9281 
183  Waughtown 
WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


Your  Prescription  Headquarters 

Patterson  Drug  Co. 

City-Wide  Delivery 
112  W.  Fourth  Street 
Dial  PA  2-7194 
WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 

"BOCOCK-STROUD 
COMPANY 

Your  Sporting  Goods  Center 

Dial  PA  4-2421 
Fourth  at  Spruce  Street 
WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


Kappa  member,  and  received  his 
law  degree  from  the  Yale  School 
of  Law.  He  is  presently  associated 
with  the  New  York  law  firm  of 
Cadwalader,  Wicter  sham  and 
Taft.  After  a  European  wedding 
trip,  the  couple  will  reside  in 
New  York  City. 

A  wedding  to  take  place  at 
Temple  Emanuel  on  October  8 
is  that  of  Miss  Ethel  Levin,  daugh- 
ter of  Mrs.  Dora  Levin  and  the 
late  Mr.  Simon  Levin,  to  Mr. 
Maury  Bernstein,  of  Miami  Beach, 
Fla.  Several  parties  feting  the 
couple  are  being  given  prior  to 
the  wedding  and  there  will  be  a 
reception  at  the  Temple  follow- 
ing the  ceremony.  The  bride-elect, 
a  native  of  Winston-Salem,  has 
made  her  home  in  Miami  Beach 
for  the  past  several  years. 

Doctors  Bert  and  Dorothy  Kalet, 
Winston-Salem's  only  husband- 
and-wife  D.V.M.  team,  recently  an- 
nounced the  opening  of  their  new 
Animal  Hospital  on  South  Strat- 
ford Road.  We  wish  them  a  "howl- 
ing" success,  and  are  delighted 
that  they  have  decided  to  settle 
here. 

A  warm  'Welcome  Home"  to 
Robert  Simons,  son  of  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Sidney  Simons,  who  has  just 
returned  from  Germany  upon  com- 
pletion of  a  two-year  tour  of  duty 
with  the  armed  forces.  Robert 
plans  to  continue  his  studies  at 
N.  C.  State  College. 

As  this  is  written,  plans  are 
under  way  for  the  annual  Council- 
Sisterhood  Harvest  Luncheon  at 
Temple  Emanuel  (Mrs.  Abe  Bren- 
ner, chairman),  and  for  Hadas- 
sha's  annual  "H-Day"  Luncheon 
(Mrs.  Sidney  Shapiro,  chairman). 
Both  kick-off  events  will  be  fully 
reported  in  the  next  issue. 

Also  in  progress  are  plans  for 
the  Hadassah  Kosher-Style  Food 
Booth  at  the  Dixie  Classic  Fair, 
Oct.  4-8.  Co-chairmen  are  Mrs. 
Ira  Julian  and  Mrs.  Bernard 
Agress. 


Frank  Vogler 
&  Sons 

FUNERAL  DIRECTORS 
AMBULANCE  SERVICE 
Dependable  Since  1858 
Dial  PA  2-6101 
WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


We  Appreciate  Your  Patronage 
Complete  Auto  Service 

DOWNTOWN 
GARAGE 

Day— STORAGE — Night 

431  N.  Main  St. 
WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


Cruise  news:  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Ben 
Cline,  together  with  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Jack  Waldman,  took  a  cruise  to 
Nova  Scotia,  stopping  off  in  Hali- 
fax and  Shelbourne.  Miss  Gail 
Robin,  daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Phil  Robin,  recently  returned 
from  a  tour  of  Europe  and  Israel 
following  her  graduation  from  the 
University  of  Wisconsin. 

At  one  o'clock,  the  Sunday  after- 
noon of  Sept.  11,  Mis  Rachel 
Malka  Katzin  became  the  bride  of 
Stephan  Chodorov.  The  bride  is 
the  daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Sam- 
uel Leazer  Katzin  of  this  city.  Mr. 
Chodorov  is  the  son  of  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Matthews  Radom  of  Stam- 
ford, Conn.,  and  Mr.  Edward  Cho- 
dorov of  New  York  City. 

Rabbi  Simcha  Kling  of  the  Beth 
David  Synagogue  in  Greensboro 
performed  the  ceremony  at  the 
Robert  E.  Lee  Hotel. 

Following  a  musical  program  of 
Bach  suites  and  three  songs  from 
Mozart's  Magic  Flute  which  was 
presented  by  Mr.  Charles  Medlin, 
'cellist  of  the  Winston-Salem  Sym- 
phony Orchestra,  Mr.  Katzin  gave 
his  daughter  in  marriage.  She  was 
attired  in  a  full  length  gown  of 
white  silk  organza  embroidered 
with  flower  sprays  and  fashioned 
with  a  high  neck,  elbow-length 
sleeves  and  deep  hem.  Her  short 
French  illusion  veil  was  attached 
to  a  small  pillbox  hat  appliqued 
with  Swiss  flower  sprays.  She  car- 
ried long-stemmed  calla  lilies. 

Mrs.  Mordicai  Katzin  of  Jack- 
sonville, N.  C,  attended  the  bride, 
her  sister-in-law.  Her  street-length 
dress  was  of  pale  turquoise  silk 
and  fashioned  with  scoop  neck 
and  flared  sleeves.  She  carried  a 
bouquet  of  yellow  and  bronze 
chrysanthemums  and  pom-poms. 
Miss  Marcy  Lynn  Katzin,  of 
Jacksonville,  was  flower  girl  for 
her  aunt. 


COX'S  SEED  STORE 

Seeds,  Bulbs,  Poultry  Feeds 
Fertilizers  and  Dog  Food 

600  North  Trade        Dial  PA  3-1073 
WINSTON-SALEM.  N.  C. 


WARNER 
FLOORING  CO.,  Inc. 

FLOOR  COVERINGS 

LINOLEUM,  RUGS  and  CARPETS 
RUBBER  and  ASPHALT  TILE 
435  W.  End  Blvd.         Dial  PA  5-7531 
Winston-Salem.  N.  C.         PA  2-6023 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


4i 


MRS.  STEPHAN  CHODOROV 


Mr.  Radom  was  best  man.  The 
ushers  were  Dr.  Mordicai  Katzin 
ol  Jacksonville  and  Emanuel  Kat- 
zin of  Winstom-Salem,  brothers  of 
the  bride  and  Norman  Falbaum  of 
Miami,   Florida  and  Jacob  Vosk 


cous- 


Falbaum  of  Winston-Salem, 
ins  of  the  bride. 

The  bride's  parents  entertained 
at  a  luncheon  after  the  ceremony. 

Mrs.  Chodorov  graduated  from 
Carnegie  Institute  of  Technology 


STEWART 
GLASS  CO. 

Plate  Glass  Fronts 
*  Auto  Glass  Installed 
*  Window  Glass 
*  Furniture  Tops 
*  Desk  Tops 
*  Mantel  Mirrors 
*  Mirrors  Resilvered 
Dial  PA  3-4988 
942  N.  Liberty  St. 
WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


FIVE  Complete  Stores 

in  ONE 
Roof-top  Parking  for 
Over  300  Cars 


801  W.  4th  St.  Dial  PA  4-4461 
WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


"The  Best  In  Television  Backed 
By  The  Best  In  Service" 

Dial  PA  4-0083 

Repairs  on  All  Household 
Appliances 

Salem  Electronics 

336  Waughtown 
WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


BALDWIN 


"SINCE  1862" 


L 


Liberal  Trade-In  Allowances 

Moxley  Piano  Co. 

Dial  PA  2-7381  673  W.  4th 

WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


HOLIDAY  GREETINGS  FROM: 

The  Hearing  Center 

JOHN  WADSWORTH 

'  20,000  Ears  of  Experience" 

108  Nissen  Bldg.  WINSTON-SALEM,  .  C.  Dial  PA  2-7072 


Enjoy  a  good  game  of  golf  at  the 

Reynolds  Park  Golf  Club 

Reserve  Starting  Time  By  Phoning  PA  2-9342 
WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


THE  CAMEL  CITY  LAUNDRY 

"A  Bundle  of  Satisfaction" 
Plant  and  Office  Branch 
512  E.  Fourth  St.  281  S.  Stratford  Rd. 

WINSTON-SALEM,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


HOLIDAY  GREETINGS  FROM: 

SAM  G.  TUDOR 


PIEDMONT  BRAKE  SERVICE 


176  Waughtown  WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


PArk  5-0481 


SALEM  REFRIGERATION  CO,  INC. 

We  Repair  Commercial  Refrigeration 
And  Air-Conditioners 

1650  Hutton  Street       Dial  PA  4-3431       WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


'Personalized  Service" 


JACK  JONES  SHELL  SERVICE 

Washing — Polishing — Shelluhrication 
Tires — Batteries — Road  Service 

1407  S.  Hawthorne  Rd.    Winston-Salem,  N.  C.    PA  5-9510 


Please  Patronize  Our  Advetisers 


Airtemp  Packaged 
Air-Conditioners 

AIRTEMP 

Division 
CHRYSLER  CORP. 

Climate  by  Chrysler  for  offices, 
stores,  homes  .  .  .  from  world's 
largest  maker  of  "Packaged  Air 
Conditioning."  Waterless  and 
water-cooled.  5-year  warranty. 
Free  survey. 

Griffin  Heating  & 
Air  -  Conditioning 
Company 

New  Rural  Hall  Rd. 
Dial  PA  ,5-6868 
WINSTON-SALEM,  N.  C. 


Holiday  Greetings  From: 

Hull-Dobbs  Co. 

World's  Largest  Ford  Dealer 

Authorized  Sales  and  Service 


Sales  Department  Open  Evenings 
Till  9  O'clock 

633  N.  Liberty  at  7th— PA  4-7441 
WINSTON-SALEM.  N.  C. 


4  2 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  following  Firms  in 

Wilmington,  N.  C. 


YOPP  FUNERAL  HOKE 

Established  1892 

FUNERAL  DIRECTORS 

Dial  RO  2-6666      WILMINGTON,  N.  C.         1207  Market 


"'Where  Thousands  Are  Saving  Millions" 

Cooperative  Savings  &  Loan  Ass'n 

SAVINGS  —  INVESTMENTS 

Market  &  N.  2nd  St.    WILMINGTON,  N.  C.    Dial  RO  3-8243 


CAPE  FEAR  MUSIC  CO. 

SUPER  HI-FIDELITY  MUSIC 
All  Types  Coin  Operated  Machines 
Dial  RO  2-9653  24  Hour  Service 

401  Mears  Street  WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 


Good  Food 
* 

Excellent 
Service 


RECOMMENDED  *  BY 


W rightsville  Sound 
Dial  AL  6-3383,  Wilmington.  N.  C. 


Reduce  Your  Insurance  Costs 
BUY  MUTUAL  INSURANCE 

H.  G.  LATIMER  &  SON,  Inc. 

128  Princess  Street  Dial  RO  2-9606 

WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 


Mutual 


OF  OMAHA 


Eastern  Carolina  Division  Office 

John  A.  Moran's  Agency 

26  N.  2nd  St.        WILMINGTON,  N.  C.        Dial  RO  3-4621 


Robinson  Alignment  Service 


Reasonable  Prices  —  All  Work  Guaranteed 
Specializing  in  WHEEL  ALIGNMENT 

1313  CASTLE  ST.         DIALRO2-81Q7         WILMINGTON.  N.  C. 


and  is  a  1961  candidate  for  the 
Master  of  Fine  Arts  degree  from 
Yale  University.  Her  husband, 
who  graduated  from  Haverford 
College  in  Haverford,  Pennsyl- 
vania, studied  also  at  Lutwig-Maxi- 


October,  i960 

millian  University  in  Munich, 
Germany,  and  received  his  law 
degree  from  Yale  University. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Chodorov  will 
live  in  Connecticut  near  Pound 
ridge,  New  York. 


Wilmington,  N.  C. 

MRS.  NORMA  MAY,  Correspondent 


People  We're  Proud  of: 

Mrs.  Seymour  L.  Alper  has  been 
named  local  chairman  of  the  "re- 
membrance" cards'  for  the  North 
Carolina  Association  of  Jewish 
Women.  These  cards  will  be  sent 
by  Mrs.  Alper  for  the  people  who 
wish  to  make  a  contribution  to  the 
North  Carolina  Home  for  the  Jew- 
ish Aged  in  honor  or  in  memory  of 
an  individual.  This  property  was 
recently  purchased  and  is  a  joint 
project  of  the  N.  C.  Asoc.  of  Jew- 
ish Men  and  N.  C.  Assoc.  of  Jew- 
ish Women. 

Rabbi  Samuel  Friedman  who 
made  the  editorial  page  of  the 
local  newspapers  when  he  spoke 
before  a  local  civic  group  and 
urged  all  the  people  to  take  a 
greater  interest  in  local  political 
life,  and  align  themselves  with 
progresive  organizations  that 
promote  our  area,  and  be  little 
chambers  of  commerce  in  our- 
selves. Rabbi  Friedman  feels 
strongly  that  our  thinking,  atti- 
tudes and  spirits  must  be  exuber- 
ant, effusive,  effervescent  and 
glowing. 

Ricky  Berman  for  his  very  fine 
showing  in  the  City  Golf  Tourna- 
ments and  just  recently  in  the 
North  State  Junior  Tournament 
held  in  Raleigh,  N.  C.  Berman 
brought  home  a  beautiful  trophy 
as  he  finished  second  in  the  first 
flight. 

Mrs.  Edith  Alper  for  her  guid- 
ance in  the  newly  formed  Youth 
Organization  B.B.G.  Mrs.  Alper 
has  guided  this  Organization  to 
perfect  attendance  and  a  high 
pitch  in  interest.  Officers  are:  Pres. 
Nat.  Kramer,  Vice-Pres.  Helene 
Plisco.  Corr.  Sec't,  Mark  Alper. 
R'cord.  Secft.  Sarah  Warshauer 
and  Treasurer,  Carol  Alpert. 

Mr.  George  Alper  for  his  inter- 
est and  guidance  in  the  boys  or- 
ganization which  would  be  a 
brother  organization  to  the  Girls 
mentioned  above.  It  is  largely 
due  to  the  time  and  effort  of  this 
family  that  the  Youth  Program  has 
met  with  such  success.  Pres.  of  the 
boys  is  Ricky  Berman,  vice  Pres. 


Mark  Alper,  Sec't,  Robert  War- 
shawsky  and  Treasurer,  Howard 
Stein. 

And  of  the  group  of  boys  and 
girls  that  went  to  Camp  Lakeside 
to  further  their  Jewish  Education 
and  Jewish  Ties  thru  out  the  State. 
This  local  group  was  composed  of 
Sarah  Warshauer,  Len  Harris, 
Helene  Plisco,  Mark  Alper  and 
Natalie  Kramer. 


Gasionia,  N.  C. 

(Concluded  from  Page  37) 

Eddie  Manning,  Paul  Plane,  John 
Rosenberg,  and  Elliot  Schneider  to 
the  University  of  N.  C,  and  Joan 
Hahn  to  the  University  of  Mary- 
land. 

Ilene  Chinn,  a  June  graduate 
from  the  University  of  N.  C.  is 
now  teaching  in  Edminson  High 
School  in  Baltimore. 

Recent  visitors  in  town  were  die 
Harold  Wynn  family  of  Miami, 
Fla.,  visiting  the  Leon  Schneiders 
and  Mrs.  Eli  Miller  and  Ina  Rose 
Silgofsky  of  Baltimore  visiting  the 
Bill  Chirms. 

Condolences  to  Abe  Garmise  on 
the  passing  of  his  brother. 

And  best  wishes  for  a  speedy  re- 
covery to  Mrs.  J.  Goldstein  and 
Mrs.  G.  Silverstein. 

We  wish  to  welcome  the  new- 
comers and  hope  they  will  stay 
with  us  for  a  long  time,  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Henry  Sweetbaum,  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Morris  Goldhammer,  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Lawrence  Mahl  and  children, 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jerry  Allweis,  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Irving  Goldfarb  and  Mrs. 
Harriett  Auerbach  and  children. 


Jewish  Agency  figures  released 
in  Jerusalem  disclosed  that  ap- 
proximately 1,000  American  Jews, 
among  them  148  halutzim  and  76 
hassiclim,  settled  in  Israel  during 
the  Jewish  year  5720. 


D 

if), 
(in. 
tnce, 
dJt, 
ol  si 
\\ 

IL 

so 


prise 
Fave 
Phi!. 
Wi> 
Free 

Cel.: 

Wo 
presi 
Spar 
Relij 
5tau 
iteiri 


\ 

(tin- 


October,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


43 


NCAJY  Hold  Eleventh  Annual  Jewish 
Youth  Conference 


LOIS  HARRIS,  Correspondent 


NCAJY  Conference  at 

The  North  Carolina  Association 
of  Jewish  Youth  held  its  Eleventh 
Annual  Summer  Youth  Confer- 
ence, August  21-28  at  Camp  Lake- 
side, Hendersonville,  N.  C.  A  total 
iof  sixty-two  members  attended. 

Mr.  Barry  Greenspon,  Raleigh, 
N.C.,  immediate  past  president  of 
NCAJY,  and  chairman  of  the  Con- 
ference was  afded  by  a  staff  of 
seven  members  which  was  com- 
prised of:  Mr.  Gerald  Waitman, 
Fayettevflle,  N.C.,  Director;  Mr. 
Philip  Satisky,  Fayetteville,  N.C., 
Assistant  Director;  Mrs.  Sam 
Freedman,  Durham,  N.C.,  Mrs. 
Gerald  Waitman,  North  Carolina 
Association  of  Jewish  Women  Re- 
presentatives; RaBBi  Max  Stauber, 
Spartanburg,  S.C.,  Director  of 
Religious  Instruction;  Mrs.  Max 
Stauber:  and  Mrs.  Seymour  Fein- 
stein  of  the  "Marian  School  of 
Dance",  Sparatanburg,  S.  C,  song 
and  dance  instructor. 

A  well-planned  program  was 
centered  around  tire  theme  of  the 


Sincere  greetings  to  our 
many  Jewish  Friends  for  a 
Happy  New  Year 

from 

THE  BAKERS  OF 

HOLSUN 

BREAD 


Hendersonville,  N.  C. 

conference,  "Youth  Today,  Adults 
Tomorrow."  Each  day  consisted  of 
a  lecture  by  Rabbi  Max  Stauber. 
Some  of  the  titles  of  the  lectures 
were:  "The  Role  of  the  Jewish 
Youth  in  Everyday  Society,"  'The 
Jewish  Youth— Relations  to  Cus- 
toms and  Ceremonies,"  'The  Jew- 
ish Youth— Relationship  to  Its 
Family,"  and  "The  Problems  of 
Jewish  Youth  in  Small  Towns." 
Our  director,  Gerald  Waitman, 
lectured  to  us  on  "Leadership 
Principles"  and  "Traits  of  Leader- 
ship." We  were  also  privileged  to 
have  several  guests,  Mr.  George 
Ackerman,  Fort  Mill,  S.  C,  who 
spoke  to  us  on  'The  Jewish  Youth 
—A  Member  of  the  Community," 
and  Mr.  Echud  BenYehude  whose 
topic  was  "The  Modern  Hebrew 
Language."  All  of  these  interest- 
ing lectures  were  followed  by 
question  and  answer  periods.  Dis- 
cussion groups  were  also  held  and 
reports  were  given  by  each  leader 
of  the  group. 

The  morning  was  started  by  at- 
tending services.  Although  for 
some  of  the  girls,  it  was  started  by 
attending  a  most  enjoyable  physi- 
cal fitness  class  led  by  our  dance 
instructor,  Miss  Marian.  The  rest 
of  the  afternoon  was  spent  in  com- 
petetive  athletics  between  blue  and 
white  teams.  A  daily  newspaper, 
reviewing  the  days  events,  was  put 
out  for  the  enjoyment  of  both  the 
members  and  the  staff.  The  even- 
ings were  concluded  by  a  social 
enioyed  by  everyone. 

The  Conference  proved  to  be 
both  educational  and  beneficial  to 
all  those  attending  and  we  are  all 
looking  forward  to  next  year's 
Conference. 


RENT!!  WHY  BUY? 

WILMINGTON  LINEN  SERVICE 


Dial  RO  3-24G6 


1313  S.  5th  Ave. 


WILMINGTON,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS 

Todds  Downtown 
Furniture  Co. 

WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 


IDEAL 
PLUMBING  CO. 

•  IDEAL  PLUMBING  • 

•  IDEAL  HEATING  • 

•  IDEAL  REPAIR  SERVICE  • 

Day  Phone  .  .  .  RO  2-7292 
Night  Phone  .  .  RO  2-7450 
126  S.  Front         Wilmington,  N.  C. 


Carolina  Millwork  Co. 

ARCHITECTURAL  MILLWORK 
731  S.  17th  St.       Dial  RO  3-2463 
WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 


JOHN  KELLY 

Wilmington's 
Baby  Photographer 

Weddings  and  Family  Groups 
Are  Our  Specialty 

1506  S.  3rd     Dial  RO  2-5003 
WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 


SHINN 

REALTY  CO. 

Realtor 
SALES  and  RENTALS 

Ocean  Front  Cottages 
and  Apartments 

Dial  GL  8-3511 
307  Lake  Park  Boulevard 
Carolina  Beach,  N.  C. 


TAXI? 

COASTAL  CAB  CO. 
RO  2-4464 

YELLOW  CAB  CO. 
RO  2-3322 

TOGETHER  WE  CAN 
SERVE  YOU  BETTER 
RADIO  DISPATCHED  CARS 
WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 


H.  L.  GREEN  CO. 

5c-10c  and  $1.00  Store 
WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 


GURR  JEWELERS 

Wilmington's  Fine  Jeweler 
and  Silversmith 
WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 


DOROTHY  OWEN 

Florist 

Flowers  for  Every  Occasion 
1619  Nun  St.       Dial  RO  2-5142 
WILMINGTON.  N.  C. 


PARKS 

ELECTRIC  MOTOR 
REPAIR  &   REWINDING  CO. 

924  S.  Third  Street; 

Dial  RO  3-1227 
WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 


Advertising  Solicitor 

Long  established  Anglo-Jewish 
magazine  offers  splendid  oppor- 
tunity to  a  qualified  advertising 
salesman.  Established  accounts. 
Weekly  drawing  against  liberal 
commission. 

Write  P.  O.  Box  1469 
GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


Tinga  Nursery 

Azaleas  -  Camellias 
Broad-Leaved  Evergreens 

Dial  Wilmington 
Dial  RO  2-1975 
CASTLE  HAYNE,  N.  C. 


GAS 

for 

Cooking — Hot  Water  Heating 
Air-Conditioning 

TIDEWATER 
GAS  (0. 

Market  and  Front  Streets 
Dial  RO  3-3305 
WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 


44 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


October,  i960 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Fayetteville,  N.  C. 


MRS. 


Insured  Accounts  .  .  . 
Friendly  Personal  Service 
And  Your  Savings  Earn 


0 


CURRENT  DIVIDEND 
RATE 


Two  Locations 
To  Serve  You  Better 

Home  Federal 

Savings  and  Loan  Association 

241  Green  Street       3107  Raeford  Rd. 
Fayetteville.  North  Carolina 


"22r.d  Year  of  Service" 

Faires  Trailer  Co. 

MOBILE  HOME  &  TRAVEL 
TRAILER  HEADQUARTERS 

Sales  —  Services  —  Accessories 
Offices  in 

CHARLOTTE— JACKSONVILLE 
FAYETTEVILLE  —  GOLDSBORO 
NORTH  CAROLINA 


S.  H.  LEA  &  CO. 

Painting  and  Wall  Papering 
Contractor 
Complete  Stock  of  Wallpaper 
112  Robeson  St.    Dial  HE  2-5954 
FAYETTEVILLE,  N.  C. 


A.  T.  Watson 
Transit  Co. 

Chartered  Bus  Service 
Dial  HE  2-7138 
FAYETTEVILLE 


HAMONT 
GULF  SERVICE 

Your  Complete  Car  Clinic 

Dial  HU  4-6241 
100  Broadfoot  Avenue 
FAYETTEVILLE,  N.  C. 


North  Carolina's  Oldest  Newspaper 

sap 


The  Fayetteville  Observer 


Published  Six  Days  Afternoons  and  Sunday  Morning 


A  GOOD  PLACE  TO  EAT 

NEW  YORK  RESTAURANT 

226  HAY  STREET 
Serving  Fayetteville,  N.  C.  Since  1932 


Ratcliffe  Welding  Service 

ADD  VALUE  AND  BEAUTY  TO  YOUR  HOME 
with  ornamental  iron 
Columns  —  Railings  —  Grills  —  Gates 
Lawn  Furniture  —  Fences 
Ph:  HE  3-1670    Elizabethtown  Rd.    Fayetteville,  N.  C. 


McMillan -Shuler  Oil  Co.,  Inc. 

FOR  FUEL  OIL 
DIAL  HE  3-2161 

Automatic  Ticket  Printing  Metered  Trucks 

—  Government  Inspected  — 
708  S.  Winslow  St.  —  Fayetteville,  N.  C.      Petroleum  Products 


"Complete  Pest  Control  Service" 

CAROLINA  EXTERMINATORS 

CHARLES  PEARSALL,  Mgr. 

Free  Inspection  &  Estimates  Without  Obligation 

Locally  DIAL 
Owned  &  Operated 


SILVER  FISH      ANTS      RATS  -  MICE  ROACHES  MOTHS 

Small  Monthly  Terms  to  Meet  Your  Budget 
210  Facility  Drive  FAYETTEVILLE,  N.  C. 


FRANK  L.  NELSON 


On  Saturday,  August  13,  Frank 
Larry  Nelson  chanted  his  Haf  Tor- 
rah  on  the  occasion  of  his  Bar 
Mitzvah,  at  the  Beth  Israel  Cen- 
ter. Frank  is  the  son  of  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Julius  Nelson  of  Fayetteville. 
He  has  a  beautiful  voice  and  did 
an  excellent  job.  He  also  assisted 
Rabbi  Henry  Ucko  in  conducting 
both  early  evening  services  on  Fri- 
day night  before  his  Bar  Mitzvah 
and  on  Saturday  morning.  On 
Friday  night  friends  and  out-of- 
town  guests  were  entertained  at  a 
social  given  by  friends  of  the 
parents.  On  Saturday  after  the  Bar 
Mitzvah  the  entire  congregation 
friends  and  out-of-town  guests 
were  entertained  by  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Nelson  at  a  delicious  luncheon. 
Out-of-town  guests  included  people 
from  Baltimore,  Md.,  Richmond 
and  Norfolk,  Virginia,  and  De- 
troit, Michigan. 

On  Saturday  night  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Julius  Nelson  gave  a  birth- 
day dance  for  Frankie  and  his 
friends,  and  out-of-town  guests,  at 
the  Officer's  Club  at  Fort  Bragg, 
N.  C.  Congratulations,  Marlyn  and 
Caesar,  may  Frankie  continue  to 
bring  you  pride  and  joy.  Congratu- 

M.  and  0. 

CHEVROLET  CO. 

SALES   -:-  SERVICE 
427  Franklin  St.  Dial  HE  3-1655 
FAYETTEVILLE.  N.  C. 


Fayetteville,  N.  C. 

JACK  A.  MENDELSOHN,  Correspondent 

lations  also  to  Mr.  Hyman  Zall, 
grand/father   of  Frankie. 

Congratulations  to  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Stanley  Tesler  on  the  birth  of  a 
daughter,  Wendy  Joy.  May  she 
bring  much  joy  to  her  parents  and 
to  her  grandmother,  Mrs.  Sadie 
Tesler. 

Congratulations  to  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
William  Kertzman  on  the  birth 
of  a  new  grandson,  Bruce,  son  of 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Howard  Prescott  of 
Raleigh.  All  our  best  wishes  on 
this  happy  occasion. 

We  are  happy  to  report  that 
Oscar  Vatz  is  home  from  the  hos- 
pital and  is  much  improved.  We 
hope  that  he  will  soon  be  com- 
pletely recovered.  All  our  prayers 
and  good  wishes  are  with  you 
Oscar. 

The  Beth  Israel  Congregation 
and  Sisterhood  entertained  at  a 
tea  on  Sunday,  September  4,  at  the 
Beth  Israel  Center  honoring  Chap- 
lain and  Mrs.  Henry  Tavel  and 
daughter,  Barbara.  Chaplain 
(Colonel)  Tavel  is  retiring  from 
the  service  and  has  accepted  a  po- 
sition as  Rabbi  of  a  congregation 
in  Riverdale,  California.  Mr.  A. 
M.  Fleishman  and  Mr.  Irvin 
Fleishman,  chairmen  of  the  Beth 
Israel  Congregation  conducted  a 
short  service  honoring  the  Chap- 
lain and  his  family.  Rabbi  Henry 
Ucko  gave  a  short  address  and 
blessings.  All  our  best  wishes  go 
with  this  family.  They  have  cer- 
tainly won  the  hearts  of  the  Fayet- 
teville community  and  will  be 
greatly  missed. 

Our  deepest  sympathy  to  Mrs. 
Irvin  Fleishman,  on  the  loss  of  a 
nephew  and  to  Mrs.  Bessie  Cohen 
(Please  turn  to  Page  47) 


NORMAN 

al  and  Save  t 
FROM 

Insurance  Service 


Buy  Mutual  and  Save  the  Difference 
FROM 


310  Hav  St. 
Dial  HE  2-7157 
FAYETTEVILLE,  N.  C. 


851  Bragg  Blvd.      Dial  HE  2-7111 
FAYETTEVILLE,   N.  C. 


Roscoe  L.  Blue 

BLUE 
Realty  Co. 

REALTOR 

A  Complete 
Realty  Service 

Dial  HU  4-2161 
111  Oakridge  Avenue 
Fayetteville,  N.  C. 


October,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


45 


Jewry  Mourns  S.  D.  Gershovitz 


Samuel  D.  Gershovitz,  executive 
vice-president  of  the  National 
Jewish  Welfare  Board  (JWBj, 
died  on  Sept.  5  in  New  Rochelle, 
N.  Y.,  after  a  brief  illness.  He  was 
53  years  old. 

Mr.  Gershovitz  was  appointed 
professional  head  of  JWB  in  1947, 
Prior  to  this  he  had  served  as 
executive  director  of  the  Jewish 
Community  Centers  of  Chicago. 
During  a  life-time  career  of  Center 
work  he  had  also  been  director  of 
Jewish  Community  Centers  in 
Lawrence,  Mass.,  Brooklyn,  N.  Y., 
and  Toronto,  Canada. 

A  native  of  New  York  City,  Mr. 
Gershovitz  was  educated  at  the 
University  of  Minnesota  and  the 
Minneapolis  Talmud  Torah.  He 
entered  the  Jewish  Community 
Center  camping  field  in  1929,  on 
his  graduation  from  the  University 


SAMUEL  D.  GERSHONITZ 

of  Minnesota  and  held  various 
posts  in  the  Center  field. 

Surviving  are  his  widow,  Marcia, 
a  son,  Jonathan  David,  two  daugh- 
ters, Amy  and  Mrs.  Lucy  Wright, 
his  mother  and  five  sisters. 


Goldsboro,  N.  C. 

(Concluded  from  Page  35) 

Iris  Levin  was  among  the  girls 
in  attendance  at  Blue  Star  Camp 
during  the  summer. 

Mrs.  Sidney  Reitman  of  New 
Jersey  visited  her  mother,  Mrs. 
Hilda  Weil. 

Mrs.  Ben  Ellis  is  recovering 
from  a  slight  hand  injury  which 
she  suffered  rceently. 

A  beautiful  mantle  for  one  of 
the  Torah  Scrolls  was  donated  by 
Jacob  P.  Shrago,  in  memory  of 
Ruth  Shrago.  He  also  donated 
prayerbooks  in  her  memory. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Harry  Shrago 
donated  prayer-books  in  her  mem- 
ory as  did  also  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Rex 
Teaney  of  Goldsboro  and  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  J.  V.  Burges  of  Mount  Olive. 
Home  Rebekah  Lodge  also  do- 
nated Union  Prayer  Books  in  her 
memory. 


First  Union 
National  Bank 

Complete 

Banking  Service 

MEMBER 
Federal  Reserve  System 


WILSON,  N.  C. 


Around  Greensboro 

(Concluded  from  Page  27) 

who  are  i960  Duke  graduates,  will 
separate  for  the  first  time,  when 
Eugene  goes  of  to  the  University  of 
Va.  Medical  School  while  Sam  re- 
mains at  Duke,  to  continue  the 
family  tradition. 

In  the  Freshman  class  at  Wo- 
man's College  will  be  Jeanne  Tan- 
nenbaum,  Cookie  Levy  and  Babs 
Landsberger.  Joe  Parish  will  at- 
tend the  Greensboro  Evening 
School  of  Guilford  College. 

Our  best  wishes  also  to  our 
recent  college  graduates  who  are 
now  in  their  first  year  of  school 
teaching: 

Jane  Markowitz,  daughter  of  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Nat  Markowitz,  who  is 
teaching  at  Aycock  School. 

Diane  Schwartz,  daughter  of  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Arthur  Schwartz,  a  new 
teacher  at  Central. 

Shelly  Morganstern,  son  of  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Irwyn  Morganstern,  who 
is  teaching  music  in  the  Cum- 
ming,   Ga.,  school  system. 

Mrs.  Nathan  Orleans,  mother  of 
Mrs.  Bernard  Weinstein,  died  in 
New  York  city  on  September  24th. 

She  is  survived  by  two  daughters, 
Mrs.  Min  Malis  of  New  York  City, 
and  Mrs.  Weinstein;  two  sons, 
Walter  Orleans  of  San  Antonio, 
Texas,  and  Sol  Orleans  of  New 
York  City;  five  grandchildren  and 
two  sisters. 


M**vL  Glotki&U 

"Nationally  Advertised  Brands" 


107  Hay  Street 
FAYETTEVILLE,  N.  C. 


223  N.  Front  Street 
WILMINGTON,  N.  C. 


Fayetteville  Laundry  &  Diaper  Service 

A   COMPLETE  LAUNDRY  SERVICE 
We  Launder  Any  Size  Cotton  Rug 
108  Drake       FAYETTEVILLE,  N.  C.       Dial  HE  2-3898 


Stuart  Martin 

Interior  Decorator 

Residential  —  Commercial 

DECORATIVE  FABRICS 
CUSTOM  CREATED 

•  Draperies   •  Slip  Covers 
•  Bedspreads   •  Rugs 
•  Accessories 

1218  Ft.  Bragg  Rd. 
Dial  HU  4-2980 

FAYETTEVILLE,  N.  C. 


SERVICE  ON  ALL 
MAKES  &  MODELS 

ON  ALL 
MAKES  &  MODELS 

"IT'S  YOUR  SET. 
BUT  IT'S  OUR  REPUTATION" 

Jones  Radio  & 
Television  Service 

116  Old  Street    Dial  HE  2-7151 
FAYETTEVILLE,  N.  C. 


WFNC 

Fayetteville's 
First  Station! 
Top  Power! 

CAPE  FEAR 
Broadcasting  Co. 

FAYETTEVILLE,  N.  C. 


Specializing  in 

ALL  AUTO  GLASS 

Window  6-  Table  Top  Glass 
Wholesale  &  Retail 

AUTO  GLASS 
COMPANY 

Dial  HE  2-8131 
925  Bragg  Blvd. 
FAYETTEVILLE,  N.  C. 


Please  Patronize  Our  Advertisers 


LET  US  MAKE  YOUR 
TRAVEL  RESERVA- 
TIONS ANYWHERE 
IN  THE  WORLD. 


CALL 
HE  3-2730 


"Your 
Travel 
Agent" 


VERA  BULLA 
Travel  Bureau 

Prince  Charles  Hotel  Bldg. 
Fayetteville,  N.  C. 


FAYETTEVILLE 

REALTY 
SERVICE,  INC. 

REALTORS  —  INSURERS 

'Specializing  in  Selling 

Homeowners  Property" 

Q.  K.  Nimocks,  III,  Realtor 
Owen  Fleming,  Sales  Mgr. 
Don  Adcox,  Jr.,  Associate 
Fred  Holland,  Associate 

DIAL  HU  4-7121 
Haymount  Point 
FAYETTEVILLE,  N.  C. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


October,  i960 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  folloioing  Firms  in 

Knoxville,  Tenn. 


MANUFACTURERS  OF 

PLASTIC  CABINET  TOPS 


Formica     •  Consoweld 
Micarta 

*  Fully  Formed  Tops 

*  No  Drip  Ledges 

*  Wide  Variety  of  Colors 

*  Reasonable  Prices 
Kitchens  —  Bathrooms 

Bars,  Etc. 
"Free  Estimates" 

Dial  3-2320 


HARRISON  MFG.  CO 


916  Sevier  Ave.,  S.  E. 


Knoxville,  Tennessee 


"Know  the  Real  Joy 
of  Good  Living" 


The  Beer  That  Made 
Milwaukee  Famous 
Distributed  by 

PINNACLE 
SALES  CO. 

114  Depot  Ave.,  S.  W. 
Dial  2-9605 
Knoxville,  Tenn. 


^Cr-  Ssr  -~t/ '  yy*'      sy-      y^-  -yy  >  yyr.      Sy.  yy .  .yy-  sy  y,  sy~.  sy-, -^*y.  ^ 


CLARK  ROOFING  COMPANY 

LEE  E.  CLARK,  Owner 
ALL  TYPES  OF  ROOFING 


§  *  SIDING  *  WATERPROOFING  1  SHEET  METAL  WORK  | 
§  Call  Day  or  Night  —  4-0505  ^ 


£    2515  Harvey  St.,  N.  E. 


Knoxville,  Tenn.  \ 


SUTHERLAND  AVE 
P.  0.  BOX  72 
DIAL  4-3352 


KNOXVILLE,  TENNESSEE 


The  Israel  Philharmonic  -  A  Nation's 
"Best  Ambassador  Abroad" 


BY  HENRY 

When  Carlo  Maria  Giulini 
mounts  the  podium  at  New  York's 
Metropolitan  Opera  House  and 
lifts  his  baton  on  Sunday  even- 
ing, Oct.  16th,  the  Israel  Philhar- 
monic Orchestra  will  launch  not 
only  its  second  American  tour,  but 
the  world  famous  orchestra  will 
begin  its  twenty-fifth  anniversary 
year. 

Twenty-five  years  ago,  in  a  con- 
verted exhibition  hall  adjacent  to 
the  Tel  Aviv  port,  another  great 
Italian,  the  late  Arturo  Toscanini, 
probably  the  world's  greatest  con- 
ductor, similarly  lilted  a  baton 
that  started  a  group  of  72  refugee 
musicians  on  their  way  to  fame. 

Maestro  Toscanini  had  gone  to 
Palestine  to  lead  a  new  orchestra 
organized  by  Bronislaw  Huberman 
from  among  the  survivors  of  Na- 
zism. He  gave  his  great  prestige 
and  talents  not  only  to  the  musi- 
cians he  had  known  in  the  leading 
concert  halls  of  Europe  but  also 
as  an  expression  of  his  fierce  hat- 
red of  dictatorship  and  his  faith 
in  the  development  of  a  Jewish 
state. 

Now,  one  of  the  world's  renown- 
ed orchestras,  the  Israel  Philhar- 
monic comes  to  these  shores  for  a 
seven  week  tour  of  the  United 
States,  Canada  and  Mexico  under 
the  auspices  of  the  America-Israel 
Cultural  Foundation  and  the  J.  M. 
Kaplan  Fund  Inc.  The  world's 
leading  impressario,  S.  Hurok,  has 
assumed  the  management  of  this 
tour  which  will  take  the  orches- 


W.  LEVY 

tra  to  some  thirty  communities. 

The  American  tour,  which  will 
be  inaugurated  with  a  concert  and 
ball  to  be  attended  by  leading  dig- 
nataries  of  the  world's  great 
powers,  will  be  dedicated  to  the 
United  Nations.  And  this  is  em- 
inently appropriate  both  because 
by  its  make-up  the  Israel  Philhar- 
monic is  a  United  Nations  in  mini- 
ature, and  the  principal  sponsor  of 
the  American  tour,  the  America- 
Israel  Cultural  Foundation,  has 
long  been  dedicated  to  the  cause  of 
cultural  exchange  as  an  aid  to 
world  peace. 

The  Orchestra  was  founded  at 
the  height  of  the  Arab  riots  of 
1936  and  it  has  seldom  played 
against  a  peaceful  background.  But 
untoward  events  have  not  been  al- 
lowed to  interfere  with  its  music 
making.  It  has  had  to  travel  in 
armored  trucks,  it  has  often  been 
fired  upon  but  it  has  always  got 
to  the  place  of  the  concert.  Only 
when  Jerusalem  was  severed  from 
the  rest  of  the  country  in  1947-48 
did  concerts  cease  there  and  then 
as  soon  as  the  beseiged  city  could 
be  reached,  the  Israel  Philhar- 
monic Orchestra  brought  its  music 
to  the  capital.  In  the  World  War 
it  grave  over  160  concerts  for  the 
Allied  Forces.  In  the  Israel  War 
of  Independence  it  gave  many  con- 
certs for  troops  in  remote  places. 
A  memorable  concert  was  that 
with  conductor  Izler  Solomon 
given  at  a  military  camp  on  the 

(Please  turn  to  Page  56) 


OLDSMOBILE 


Sales 

The  Home  of  the  Famous  Rockets  —  The  "Queen"  of 
the  General  Motors  Cars 


Service 
en 


RICE  OLDSMOBILE,  INC. 


"HOME  OF  QUALITY  SERVICE" 

1720  West  Cumberland 

KNOXVILLE,  TENNESSEE 


Dial  5-7103 


SUTTON  TRANSFER  &  STORAGE  CO. 

Agents 

North  American  Van  Lines.  Inc. 

"WIFE  APPROVED  MOVING  SERVICE  TO 
OR  FROM  ANY  PLACE  IN  THE  WORLD" 

1228  E.  Broadway  Dial  3-7980 

KNOXVILLE,  TENN. 


October,  i960 


I  tie  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


47 


Israel  Helps  Ghana  Go  To  Sea 


Two  generations  ago,  when 
Britannia  was  still  undisputed 
ruler  of  the  seas,  ships  of  many 
flags  had  about  them  the  distinc- 
tive air  of  Liverpool,  Bristol, 
London  or  Glasgow.  British 
merchant  mariners  in  charge  of 
vessels  of  Chinese,  Greek,  Turkish 
or  other  foreign  ownership  were 
a  common  feature  in  ports  around 
the  world.  Even  now,  most  Egyp- 
tian merchant  ships  are  staffed 
largely  by  Britishers.  And  Israel, 
during  the  early  years  of  her  in- 
dependence, employed  a  number 


of  experienced  British  captains, 
mates  and  engineers  to  man  her 
first  ships  while  Jewish  sailors  were 
learning  the  arts  of  navigation 
and  seamanship. 

Israel's  merchant  fleet  today  is 
the  second  largest  in  the  Middle 
East  in  point  of  tonnage  and 
easily  one  of  the  most  modern  and 
efficient  in  the  world.  It  is  man- 
ned almost  entirely  by  Israelis. 
This  alone  is  a  mark  of  great  pro- 
gress and  a  source  of  pride  to 
Israelis  and  Jews  all  over.  But 
there  is  more.  Israel,  in  a  small 


Fayeiteville,  N.  C. 

(Concluded  from  Page  44) 
on  the  loss  of  a  grandson,  Charles 
Benjamin    Cohen,    of  Baltimore, 
after  a  lengthy  illness. 

We  want  to  wish  all  the  readers 
of  this  magazine  a  Happy  Holiday 
and  may  the  New  Year  bring  us 
all  luck  and  happiness. 

Mrs.  Aaron  Satisky  announces 
the  engagement  of  her  daughter, 
Myra  Satisky  to  Kenneth  Murray 
Itchkow,  son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Charles  Itchkow  of  Great  Neck, 
N.  Y.  The  wedding  will  take  place 
on  December  4.  Congratulations 
Myra,  we  wish  you  much  luck  and 

haPPhleSS-  MYRA  SATISKY 


Southern  Linen  Service 

For  Linen  Service 

DIAL  3-8118 
1015  N.  Central 
KNOXVILLE,  TENN. 


KnoxTill*.  T.nn. 

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Manufacturers  of  "VOLUNTEER"  Brand  Cement 

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4» 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


October,  i960 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Chattanooga,  Tentt. 


PARAMOUNT 
CLEANERS 


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BROWN  BROS. 
Contractors 

Excavating  Concrete 
Grading  Roads 
Sewers  Driveways 
Surfacing  Parking  Lots 

Asphalt 

Crushed  Limestone 

Dial  AM  7-6642 
1701  Central  Avenue 
CHATTANOOGA,  TENN. 


MORNINGSIDE  CHEMICAL  CO.,  Inc. 

Textile  Chemicals  and  Softeners— Dyestuffs  and  Mornitex  Products 

2205  Holtzclaw  Ave.  Dial  MA  2-2702 

CHATTANOOGA,  TENNESSEE 


AVONDALE  UPHOLSTERING  CO. 

UPHOLSTERING  —  REFINISHING  —  REPAIRING 

We  Carry  a  Complete  Line  of  Upholstering  Fabrics 
OUR  PRICES  SELL  —  OUR  QUALITY  TALKS 
Dial  MA  2-0847      Chattanooga,  Tenn.      2720  Dodson  Ave. 


DAWN  PRODUCE  COMPANY 

Fresh  Dressed  Poultry  —  Strictly  Fresh  Eggs 


2400  Baldwin 


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CHATTANOOGA,  TENNESSEE 


Chattanooga  Transfer  and  Storage  Co. 

Local  and  Long  Distance  Hauling — Agents  for  Allied  Van  Lines 

MOVING  —  PACKING  —  STORAGE 
2200  N.  Chamberlain  Ave.  Dial  MA  2-8341 

CHATTANOOGA,  TENN. 


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Imperial?,  Chryslers  and  Plymouths 


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ESTABLISHED  1905 

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way  to  be  sure,  is  doing  what 
Britain,  with  all  of  her  vast  sea- 
power  and  centuries  of  maritime 
tradition,  has  done.  She  is  loaning 
her  deck  officers  and  engineers 
to  other  nations  that  are  just  be- 
ginning to  go  to  sea. 

1  learned  of  this  at  first  hand 
recently  when  I  visited  a  small 
freighter  docked  at  fndia  Street 
in  the  Greenpoint  section  of 
Brooklyn.  The  ship's  name  was 
"Tano  River"  which  meant  noth- 
ing to  me  until  I  was  informed 
that  the  Tano  is  a  major  river  of 
West  Africa.  Her  flag  was  one 
which  I  had  never  seen  before: 
green,  gold  and  red  with  a  black 
star  in  the  center,  the  flag  of  the 
newly  created  Republic  of  Ghana. 
The  occasion  of  my  visit  was  a 
press  reception  given  by  the 
Ghanaian  Ambassador  to  Wash- 
ington, WTilliam  Q.  M.  Halm,  to 
mark  the  opening  of  a  new  cargo 
service  between  his  nation  and 
the  United  States.  I  discovered  to 
my  surprise  and  delight  that  the 
co-host  was  the  ship's  Master,  one 
Sholem  Dulitzky,  a  native  of  Haifa 
whose  parents  came  to  Israel  from 
Odessa  and  who  has  been  serving 
in  Israel's  merchant  navy  ever 
since  the  state  was  formed. 

Captain  Dulitzky  is  36,  a  husky, 
barrel-chested  fellow  with  twink- 
ling brown  eyes,  round  rosy  face 
and  a  carefully  trimmed  brown 
beard  that  could  belong  to  a  yeshi- 
va  student  or  to  a  veteran  mariner 
of  the  old  salt  school.  Sitting  in 
his  comfortable  stateroom,  puff- 
ing a  large  cigar,  he  explained  in 
gruff,  good-humored  voice  how 
he  happened  to  be  in  command  of 
this  particular  freighter  and  her 
crew  of  forty,  most  of  them  young 
Negroes  from  Ghana. 

Captain  Dulitzky  is  employed 
by  the  Zim  Israel  Navigation  Com- 
pany, Israel's  largest  shipping 
firm  which  has  a  globe-circling 
fleet  of  its  own.  When  indepen- 
dence of  Ghana  was  proclaimed 
in  March,  1957,  one  of  the  first 
goals  of  the  new  nation,  stated  bv 
Prime  Minister  Kwame  Nkrumah, 
was  the  establishment  of  a  mer- 
chant marine.  Ghana  exports  co- 
coa, bauxite  and  other  products 
in  large  volume  and  hoped  to  be 
able  to  carry  a  fair  share  of  these 
valuable  cargoes  in  ships  of  her 
own.  A  steamship  company  was 
founded,  the  Black  Star  Line, 
Ltd.,  in  which  40  per  cent  of  the 
capital  was  supplied  by  the  Zim 
Lines.  Israel  also  sent  instructors 
to  establish  a  nautical  school  for 
Ghanaians    at   Accra,    capital  of 


the  country.  The  Zim  fleet  loaned 
a  number  of  its  officers  to  staff 
the  deck  and  engine  departments 
of  the  Ghanaian  ships.  Captain 
Dulitzky  was  selected  as  a  loan 
skipper  because  he  had  command- 
ed Zim  ships  in  the  West  African 
trade  and  is  throughly  familiar 
with  that  part  of  the  world.  He  is 
at  present  on  a  year's  leave  from 
Zim. 

The  captain  is  fluent  in  English 
as  in  his  native  Hebrew.  He  also 
likes  to  speak  Yiddish,  which 
makes  him  a  bit  unique  among 
Sabras.  He  has  a  good  working 
knowledge  of  the  various  native 
dialects  along  the  West  African 
coast  but  runs  his  ship  in  English. 

"We  have  rather  a  mixture  of 
nationalities  aboard,"  he  told  me. 
"All  deckhands  and  most  engine 
room  ratings  are  Ghanaian.  My 
first  mate  is  a  Pole,  my  third  a 
young  Dutchman  and  I've  got  an 
Italian  second  engineer,  a  sort  of 
United  Nations  in  miniature." 
The  "Tano  River's"  small  but 
cozy  lounge  was  packed  by  now. 
There  was  an  interesting  buffet 
table  where,  in  addition  to  the 
usual  sandwiches  and  drinks,  a 
number  of  steaming  hot  native 
dishes  of  Ghana  were  on  display 
for  the  tasting.  These  had  been 
prepared  by  the  wives  of  several 
members  of  the  Ghanaian  consul- 
ar staff  in  New  York  who  came 
aboard  the  ship  bright  and  early 
and  did  their  cooking  in  the  gal- 
ley. Toasts  were  in  order  all 
around.  Perhaps  the  most  stirring 
was  that  offered  by  Ambassador 
Halm  to  the  State  of  Israel  "to 
which  we  owe  so  many  thanks, 
for  without  its  generous,  unselfish 
help,  this  ship  would  not  be  here 
todav." 


The  appoi.  tment  of  Rabbi  Louis  M. 
Levitsky  of  South  Orange,  N.  J.  as 
Chairman  of  the  Board  of  Governors 
of  the  National  Academy  for  Adult 
Jewish  Studies  has  been  anounced  by 
Bernath  L.  Jacobs,  president  of  the 
United  Synagogue  of  America. 


October,  i960 


1  he  /rmerican  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


49 


Where  Handicaps  Don't  Handicap 


BY  BERNARD  POSTAL 


"I  did  it,  T  did  it,"  shouted 
Doris,  a  loveable  blonde  ten-year 
old  after  she  had  succeeded  in 
making  up  her  bed. 

Pauline,  age  5,  was  splashing 
happily  in  the  blue  green  pool 
but  her  clumsy  Mailings  showed 
ihe  was  just  learning  how  to  swim. 

Gathered  around  the  campfire 
for  a  cookout,  Frank  nudged  Peter 
and  Hank,  and  said,  "Look,  Milt 
is  making  his  own  hamburger. 
How  do  you  like  that!" 

Nothing  unusual  about  any  of 
these  incidents  except  that  Doris 
s  mentally  retarded  and  Pauline 
md  Milt  are  blind.  Once  they 
would  have  been  numbered 
among  the  hidden  children  — 
more  than  1,000,000  boys  and  girls 
suffering  from  some  physical, 
mental  or  emotional  handicap  — 
because  they  had  few  or  no  oppor- 
unities  for  the  kind  of  group 
experience  normal  to  all  children. 

Today,  happily,  the  world  of 
all  children  is  opening  to  more 
md  more  handicapped  youngsters 
:hrough  the  experimental  recrea- 
ion  programs  conducted  by  Jew- 
sh  Community  Centers  and  YM- 
VWHAs  affiliated  with  and  served 
by  the  National   Jewish  Welfare 


Board.  As  Moses  led  the  Jews  out 
of  spiritual  and  physical  enslave- 
ment to  the  freedom  of  the 
Promised  Land,  so  Jewish  Com- 
munity Centers  and  YM-YWHAs 
are  breaking  down  the  gates  of 
tradition  and  prejudice  that  bar- 
red handicapped  children  from 
the  freedom  to  enjoy  group  living 
and  playing  with  their  non-handi- 
capped contemporaries. 

The  country's  first  scientifical- 
ly controlled  integration  of  blind 
youngsters  into  summer  camps  for 
sighted  children  was  first  accom- 
plished three  years  ago  by  Bronx 
House  and  Camp  Wei-Met  in  co- 
operation with  the  New  York 
Guild  for  the  Jewish  Blind.  These 
camps  have  demonstrated  that 
blind  children  can  be  served  with 
in  the  existing  facilities.  At  these 
camps  the  blind  children  partici- 
pate in  the  full  camp  program, 
including  handicrafts,  dramatics, 
camp  signs,  hiking,  swimming, 
campfire  building,  ballplaying 
and  even  instruction  in  the  use  of 
saws,  hatchets  and  penknives. 

The  experience  in  these  camps 
has  proved  that  there  is  little  or 
no   need   for   special  equipment, 

(Please  turn  to  Page  54) 


NATIONAL 

BOHEMIAN 


 lond  of  pleasant  liuing 


M&M  Distributing 
Company 

347  Hale  St. 
PA  2-8305         Augusta,  Ga. 


AUGUSTA  MILL 
SUPPLY  CO, 

•  Industrial  Supplies 

•  Mill  Supplies 

Dial  PA  2-4657 

New  Savannah  Rd. 
AUGUSTA,  GA. 


May  God  Grant 
You  Happiness 
Throughout  5721 


BLANCHE 
COTTON  MILLS 

AUGUSTA,  GA. 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Augusta,  Ga. 


MURRAY  BROTHERS,  INC. 

Distributors  of 
BORDEN'S  FINE  CHEESES 

and 

MRS.  FILBERTS  MARGARINE 

and 

MAYONNAISE  PRODUCTS 

AUGUSTA,  GA. 


RICHMOND  SUPPLY  CO. 

Mill  Supplies  —  Tools  —  Machinery 
Bearing  &  Transmission  Specialists 

652  7th  Street  AUGUSTA,  GA.  Dial  PA  4-7792 


Holiday  Greetings  .... 


AUGUSTA  LUMBER  COMPANY 

Quality  Millwork  Since  1889 
Building  Materials 


'903  8th  Street 


AUGUSTA,  GA. 


Dial  PA  2-1813 


Buy  ClauSSen's  Bread,  the  Splendid  Bread! 


SPLENDID 
BECAUSE 


ITS 


South' s  Finest  Since  1841 


HOLIDAY  GREETINGS .... 

SOUTHEASTERN 
Pine  Corporation 

PINE  .  .  .  HARDWOOD 
CYPRESS 


Dial  PA  6-1464 


Augusta,  Ga. 


Sunset  Avenue 


So 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


October,  i960 


Smith's  Trahsfer  Corporation 

of  STAUNTON,  VIRGINIA 

and  its  subsidiary — H.  T.  Smith  Express  Co. 

Wallingford,  Connecticut 

Regular  and  Irregular  Route  Common  Carrier 
Cargo  Insurance  $1,000,000 

Connections  for  Upstate  Pennsylvania,  New  York,  and 
New  Jersey,  and  For  New  England  Points 


P.  O.  Box  1000 


Main  Terminal 


STAUNTON,  VA. 


TUxedo  6-6231 


Charlottesville,   Va.    2-8543 

Covington,  Va._     3371 

Harrisonburg,    Va.    -.4-4488 

Lynchburg,  Va...   8-2629 

Winchester,  Va   Mohawk  2-4139 

High  Point,  N.  C  _  461S 

Charlotte,  N.  C  ED  3-9801 

Greensboro,  N.  C  BR  9-1881 

Gastonia,  N.  C.   Univ.  4-1931 

Baltimore,  Md.   Peabody  2-8007 


Washington,  D.  C.  Otis  4-8008 

Philadelphia,  Pa  Garfield  3-9711 

Bluefield,  W.  Va.   Devenport  7-7184 

Beckley,  W.Va  6-204 

Princeton,  W.Va  Gardner  5-3771 

Charleston,  W.  Va  Walnut  5-2158 

Newark,  N.  J.  Market  3-0404 

New  Brunswick,  N.  J.  Charter  9-8700 

Trenton,  N.  J   5-7611 

New  York,  N.  Y.    Courtland  7-6255 


Greensboro  Jewish  Community  Calendar 

I960  -  1961 


October 

1  Sat.— YOM  KIPPUR  Break-Fast  Dance 

3  Mon. — Council  of  Jewish  Women  (Temple) 

4  Tues. — Hadassah  Area  Presidents  Lunch 

(at  Beth  David) 

5  Wed. — Hadassah 

6  Thurs.— SUCCOT 

7  Fri.— SUCCOT 

8  Sat. — Beth  David  Sisterhood  Ways  &  Means 
10  Mon. — Temple  Emanuel  Sisterhood  Lunch 

12  Wed.— Beth  David  Sisterhood  Board 

13  Thurs. — Last  Days  of  Succot 

14  Fri. — Last  Days  of  Succot 

17  Mon. — Hadassah  (Temple  Emanuel) 

18  Tues. — Begin  Beth  David  Adult  Education 

18  Tues. — Women's  League  Branch  Board  Meeting 

19  Wed. — Women's  League  Branch  Board  Meeting 

to 

20  Thurs. — Hadassah  Study  Group 

24  Mon. — Council  of  Jewish  Women  Board 

24  Mon. — Peth  Dav'd  S;^erhood  Luncheon 

25  Tues. — Temple  Emanuel  Sisterhood  Board 

26  Wed. — Council  of  Jewish  Women  Study  Group 

27  Thurs. — Hadassah  Study  Group 

27  Thurs. — Beth  David  Congregation  Board 


November 

1  Tues.- 

2  Wed.- 

2  Wed.- 

3  Thurs 
7  Mon.- 


9  Wed.- 

10  TTiurs 

14  Mon.- 

17  Thurs 

21  Mon.- 

24  Thurs 

26  Sat.— 

28  Mon 

28  Mon 


-Beth  David  Sisterhood  Board 
■Hadassah  Board 

-Temnle  Emanuel  Sisterhood  Donor 
— Hadassah  Study  Group 
•Council  of  Jewish  Women  Luncheon 
Meeting  (at  Beth  David) 
-Beth  David  Sisterhood  Donor 
— Hadassah  Study  Group 
-Temple  Emanuel  Sisterhood  Luncheon 

Hadassah  Study  Grouo 
-Hadassah  Meeting  (at  Beth  David) 
— Thanksgiving  Day 
Mens  Club  Dance 
-Council  of  Jewish  Women  Board 
-Joint  B°th  David  Sisterhood  and 
Mens  Club  Meeting 


December 

4  Sun. — Beth  David  Congreoation  Meeting 

5  Mon. — Joint  Luncheon  of  Womens'  Organizations 

(at  Temple  Emanuel) 
7    Wed. — Hadassah  Board 
14    Wed. — Beth  David  Sisterhood  Board 
18    Sun. — Childrens  Channka  Parties 
22    Thurs.— Beth  David  Board  Meeting 

January 

2    Mon. — Council  of  Jewish  Women  Luncheon 
(at  Beth  David) 

(Please  turn  to  Page  53) 


9:00 

PM 

12:30 

PM 

10:15 

AM, 

8:30 

PM 

10:15 

am  !: 

Noon 

A.M. 

8:00 

PM 

10:15 

AM 

3:00 

PM 

10:15 

AM 

10:15 

AM 

12:15 

PM 

10:00 

AM 

10:15 

AM 

10:15 

AM 

8:00 

PM 

10:15 
10:15 
12:30 
10:15 


AM 
AM 
PM 
AM 


12:30  PM 
12  -30  PM 
10:15  AM 
12:30  PM 
10:15  AM 
8:00  PM 

8:30  PM 
10:15  AM 

8:15  PM 


8:00  PM 


10:15  AM 
10:15  AM 


8:00  PM 


12:30  PM 


Help  Your  Church  or  Synagogue  Observe 
BROTHERHOOD  WEEK  *  *  # 

TITMUS  OPTICAL  CO.,  INC. 


it: 


Manufacturers  of  Ophthalmic  Instruments,  Lenses, 
Frames  and  Sun  Wear 

PETERSBURG,  VIRGINIA,  U.  S.  A. 


e 


Hi 


October,  i960 


Science  Is  Transforming  Israel 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


6» 


VRBA  EBAN 

Each  year,  a  hundred  thousand 
visitors  from  Israel  and  abroad 
find  their  way  to  Rehovoth.  As 
they  walk  across  our  lawns,  and 
through  our  buildings,  ;nd  pay 
homage  at  Dr.  Weizmann's  grave, 
they  fall  captive  to  a  sentiment 
compounded  both  of  gentleness 
and  awe.  It  is  probable  that  fe 
amongst  them  have  a  clear  know- 
ledge of  what  is  involved  in  funda- 
mental scientific  research.  But 
their  image  of  Israel's  nationhood 
is  indelibly  marked  by  what  they 
witness  here.  By 'his  very  existence, 
the  scientific  worker  gives  his  na- 
tion an  atmosphere  of  intellectual 
discipline,  truth,  and  spiritual  in 
tegrity.  A  national  society  which 
contains  such  men,  however  few, 
is  different  in  its  essential  nature 
from  a  national  society  in  which 
such  men  do  not  live  and  work.  In 
Israel's  renascent  life  the  Weiz- 
mann  Institute  of  Science  is  a 
factor  of  transformation,  not 
merely  of  adornment. 

It  is  only  now,  at  the  outset  of 
-)tir  Insitute's  second  decade,  that 
ts  centrality  in  Israel's  life  is  be- 
aming manifest  throughout  our 
nation  and  the  world.  The  vision 
:>f  its  founder  belongs  more  to  Is- 
rael's national  future  than  seem- 
ed to  be  the  case  a  few  years  ago. 
Between  the  blinding  flash  at  Hir- 
ashima  and  the  surge  of  man's 
groping  fingers  into  outer  space, 
ur  generation  has  come  to  learn 
nuch  about  the  primacy  of  science 
md  its  life  and  destiny.  The  or- 
lerliness  of  nature  is  the  largest 
5f  all  certainties  yet  few  men 
:ould  have  predicted  a  generation 


By  Abba  Eban 


Mr.  Eban,  President  of  the  Weizmann  Institute  of  Science,  has  recently 
been  elected  an  honorary  member  of  the  American  Academy  of  Arts  and 
Sciences.  He  is  the  initiator  of  the  International  Conference  on  Science  in 
the  Advancement  of  New  States  to  be  held  in  Rehovoth. 

The  Editor 


Westover:  This  historic  Virginia  Mansion  is  roofed  for  perm-nence  and  beauty  with  Bu"kingham 
Photo  by  Va.  C  of  C. 


Virginia  Slate 


For  over  five  generations  BUCKINGHAM  slate  has 
been  selected  as  the  best  roofing  material  for  many 
of  the  outstanding  examples  of  architecture  throughout 
America.  No  machine  made  roofing  product  has  ever 
surpassed  the  charm  and  permanence  of  this  hand- 
crafted product  of  nature. 

A  BUCKINGHAM  slate  roof  has  many  EXTRA- 
VALUE  features  .  .  .  unfading  color  and  lustre  can  be 
matched  after  any  length  of  time,  protection  from 
elements  for  life  of  building,  no  costly  repairs,  no  ulti- 
mate replacement,  higher  resale  value,  insurance  and 
loan  advantages,  safe  fire  protection,  lowest  average 
absorption  and  highest  resistance  to  acids  of  any  slate 
in  America. 

Proven  by  150  continuous  years  on  the  roof  without 
fading  or  decay,  BUCKINGHAM  slaje  can  be  specified 
with  confidence.  Architects  may  select  from  a  wide 


range  of  sizes  and  thicknesses,  and  prompt  shipments 
can  be  made  from  the  ample  stocks  of  our  quarries  at 
Arvonia,  Virginia. 

Because  of  their  insistence  upon  quality  materials 
today,  more  architects  than  ever  are  giving  their 
clients  the  benefit  of  this  lifetime  roof  economy.  See 
our  catalog  in  Sweet's  Architectural  File,  or  write 
for  samples  and  information. 


BUCKINGHAM  -  VIRGINIA 

SLATE  CORPORATION 

1103  E.  MAIN  ST.  RICHMOND,  VA. 


5* 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


BRIDAL  PORTRAITS 
AND  CANDIDS  ARE 
OUR  SPECIALTY 


phone  EL  8-4826 
WENDELL  B  POWELL  STUDIO 


3201  GROVE  AVENUE  —  RICHMOND,  VA. 


When  everything  must  he  —  Just  So 


Fashion  Cleaners.  .  .Custom  Launderers.  .  .EL  5-5726 
4501  W.  Broad  St.     Customer  Parking     Car  Service 

RICHMOND,  VIRGINIA 


SEASON'S 

GREETINGS 


Est.  1931 


KANE 


Dial  MI  9-0541 


PLUMBING  -  HEATING  -  AIR-CONDITIONING 
STOKERS  -  OIL  BURNERS  -  KITCHEN  EQUIPMENT 

403  E.  Laburnaum  Ave.  RICHMOND  22,  VA. 


Other  Suburban  Stores: 

•  3545  W.  Cary  Street 

•  5608  Patterson  Avenue 

•  401  Ridge  Road 

•  5071  Forest  Hill  Avenue 


Plant:  2920  West  Broad 
Dial  EL  5-4391 
City  Wide  Delivery  Service 


•  Malvern  and  Broad  Sts. 
RICHMOND,  VA. 

Bradley's  Willow  Lawn  Store 
On  the  Mall  —  Opp.  Bus 
Terminal 
Open  7  'til  9 — Saturday  'til  6 


Dot's  Pastry  Shop 

3136  W.  Cary  Street 
RICHMOND,  VA. 
DIAL  EL  8-2011 

Bakers  of  Fancy  Pastries 


of  all  certainties  yet  few  men 
could  have  predicted  a  generation 
ago  how  the  insights  and  con- 
clusions of  laboratories  would 
transform  the  lives  of  men,  the 
conditions  of  their  inter-relation- 
ship —  and  indeed  the  very  con- 
tours of  their  knowledge.  In  this 
sense,  the  influence  of  Rehovoth 
on  Israel's  future  is  still  incalcul- 
able. , 

As  the  second  decade  advances, 
the  role  of  scientific  research  in 
Israel's  future  will  become  even 
more  pervasive  than  hitherto.  Our 
economic  planning  accords  an  in- 
creasing weight  to  industrial  de- 
velopment. The  perfection  of  in- 
dustrial products,  especially  in  a 
world  where  publicity  and  com- 
petition create  constant  obsole- 
scence, can  only  be  achieved  by  a 
close  alliance  between  science  and 
industry.  There  will  be  a  greater 
market  for  scientific  research 
workers,  both  fundamental  and 
applied,  than  is  to  be  found 
through  their  absorption  in  aca- 
demic institutions.  In  plastics,  elec- 
tronics and  plant  genetics,  the  In- 
stitute has  already  Grossed  the 
somewhat  blurred  line  dividing 
fundamental  research  from  its  ap- 
plication. 

At  the  same  time  it  is  clear  that 
scientific  research  and  application 
rank  high  amongst  the  fields  in 
which  Israel  is  destined  to  co- 
operate with  other  nations 
The  scientific  movement  of  our 
age  is  not  the  monoply  of  the 
established  scientific  centers  in 
the  West.  Israel  may  be  destined 
to  become  the  meeting-place  in 
which  the  contemporary  scientific 
movement  intersects  with  the  na- 
tional liberation  movements  of 
the  neighboring  continents.  The 
political  and  juridical  inequali- 
ties which  used  to  exit  between 
nations  in  the  West  and  the  East 
are  disappearing  fast.  But  the  dif- 
ferences in  levels  of  knowledge 
and  of  technical  and  economic 
progress  could  create  tensions,  en- 
vies and  rancors  no  less  sharp.  Is- 
rael is  an  instructive  example  of  a 
pioneering  community  starting  out 
from  austerity  and  economic 
hardship,  but  nevertheless  achiev- 


October,  i960 

ing  an  honorable  place  in  the 
world's  scientific  community  and 
vigilantly  us  i  n  g  the  scientific 
method  in  the  solution  of  her  ur- 
gent material  problems.  The  eager 
response,  both  ol  eminent  scien 
tists  and  of  leaders  of  developing 
nations,  to  the  invitation  to  attend 
our  i960  International  Conference 
indicates  how  strongly  the  need  of 
this  encounter  is  felt  on  both  sides. 
Our  nation  stands  at  a  crossroad 
not  only  in  geography  but  also  in 
the  world  of  ideas.  Access  to  mod- 
ern science  and  technology,  and 
devotion  to  political  democracy 
mark  us  as  a  Western  nation.  But 
we  are  an  African-Asian  people  by 
geographical  fortune,  as  well  as  in 
terms  of  our  recent  national  free- 
dom, and  our  need  to  struggle 
hard  against  scarcities  and  handi- 
caps. Perhaps  no  other  nation  in 
the  world  is  more  strongly  marked 
by  this  fruitful  duality.  Here  in 
the  heart  of  the  Middle  East  at 
the  point  where  Africa,  Asia  and 
Europe  converge,  there  has  arisen 
since  the  beginning  of  its  days  that 
political  statehood  is  only  one  part 
of  a  nation's  destiny.  National 
freedom  may  well  peter  out  in 
disillusion  and  despair,  unless  it 
is  accompanied  by  fruitful  vision 
of  economic,  social  and  scientific. 

Our  institute  will  not  change  its 
essential  nature   as  a  center  for 


Jack  Davis  of  New  York,  noted  Re- 
form Jewish  layman  and  a  leader 
for  the  past  two  decades  in  Jewish 
religious,  welfare  and  refugee 
causes,  has  accepted  the  post  of  Gen- 
eral Chairman  of  the  nationwide 
Combined  Campaign  for  American 
Reform  Judaism. 


FLOWER  PHONES 

MI  8-0938 


304 

NORTH 
6»h  ST. 


FLOWERS 


RICHMOND,  VIRGINIA 

An  Eloquent  Remembrance 


a 


t 


S 


ip 


12 


October,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


53 


Greensboro  Jewish  Community  Calendar 

(Concluded  from  Page  50) 

4  Wed. — Hadassah  Board 

9  Mon. — Temple  Emanuel  Sisterhood  Luncheon 

11  Wed.— Beth  David  Sisterhood  Board 

16  Mon. — Hadassah  Lunch  (at  Beth  David) 

18  Wed.— Council  Study  Group  (Tent.) 

|23  Mon.— Council  Board 

|23  Mon.— Beth  David  Sisterhood  Lunch 

■24  Tues. — Temple  Emanuel  Board 

■  25  Wed.— Council  Study  Group  (Tent.) 

26  Thurs. — Beth  David  Congregation  Board 


February 

1  Wed.- 

6  Mon.- 

8  Wed.- 

13  Mon.- 

15  Wed.- 

20  Mon.- 

21  Tues.- 
23  Thurs 
27  Mon.- 
27  Mon.- 


-Hadassah  Board 

-Council  Lunch  (at  Temple  Emanuel) 

-Beth  David  Sisterhood  Board 

-Temple  Emanuel  Lunch 

-Beth  David  Torah  Fund  (or  22nd) 

-Hadassah  Meeting  (at  Temple  Emanuel) 

-Interfaith 

— Beth  David  Board 

-Council  of  Jewish  Women  Board 

-Beth  David  Sisterhood 


March 

1  Wed. — Hadassah  Board 

4  Sat.— Beth  David  Purim  Ball 

5  Sun. — Childrens'  Purim  Affairs 

6  Mon. — Council  Luncheon 
8  Wed.— Temple  Emanuel  Sisterhood  Board 

8  Wed. — Beth  David  Sisterhood  Board 

9  Thurs. — Hadassah  Study  Group 

12  Sun. — Beth  David  Congregation  Meeting 

13  Mon. — Temple  Emanuel  Sisterhood  Lunch 

16  Thurs. — Hadassah  Study  Group 

17  Fri. — Temple  Emanuel  Dinner  Service 
20  Mon.— Hadassah  Meeting  (at  Temple  Emanuel) 

22  Wed.— Council  Study  Group 

23  Thurs.— Beth  David  Board 
27  Mon. — Council  Board 
27  Mon.— Beth  David  Sisterhood  Lunch 
31  Fri.— First  Seder 

April 

3  Mon. — Council  Dessert  (at  Temple  Emanuel) 

5  Wed. — Hadassah  Board 

10  Mon. — Temple  Emanuel  Sisterhood  Lunch 

12  Wed. — Beth  David  Sisterhood  Lunch 

14  Fri. — Temple  Emanuel  Sisterhood  Sabbath 
17  Mon. — Hadassah  Lunch  (at  Beth  David) 
22  Sat.— Hadassah  Donor  (or  29th) 

24  Mon. — Council  Board 

24  Mon. — Beth  David  Sisterhood 

25  Tues.— Council  Final  Meeting  (or  26th) 
27  Thurs.— Beth  David  Board 
(May  1st,  2nd,  3rd  Hadassah  Spring  Conference  in  Washington) 


1  f\ 

10 

1  c 
15 

a  "i\/r 
AM 

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10 

:15 

AM 

1 9 

PM 
l  1VX 

10 

15 

AM 

12 

:15 

PM 

10 

15 

AM 

10 

15 

AM 

8 

:00 

PM 

10 

15 

a  i\/r 
AM 

12:30 

PM 

10 

15 

AM 

12 

:15 

PM 

12:30 

PM 

8 

:00 

DM 

r  1V1 

10 

15 

AM 

8 

:15 

"r>i\/r 
r  M 

10:15 

A  TVX 

AM 

8 

:30 

FM 

12:15 

FM 

10: 

15 

AM 

10: 

15 

AM 

8:00 

PM 

12:30 

PM 

10 

15 

AM 

10 

15 

AM 

8 

:00 

PM 

10:15 

AM 

12 

:15 

PM 

12 

:15 

nmvr 

PM 

10 

15 

A  TIT 

AM 

12 

:15 

PM 

12 

:15 

8 

:30 

PM 

10 

15 

AM 

8 

:15 

PM 

12 

:15 

PM 

8 

:00 

PM 

May 

Tues. — Council  Final  Meeting  (?)  12:15  PM 
Mon. — Temple  Emanuel  Sisterhood  Final  Lunch        12 :30  PM 

10    Wed. — Beth  David  Sisterhood  Board  10:15  AM 

15    Mon. — Hadassah  Final  Lunch  (or  17th)  12:30  PM 

25    Thurs.— Beth  David  Board  8:00  PM 

28  Sun. — Beth  David  Picnic  &  Final  Meeting 

29  Mon. — Beth  David  Sisterhood  Final  Lunch 

NOTE:  Each  Tuesday  morning  and  Wednesday  evening,  Adult 
Classes  are  held  at  Beth  David. 


THE  LIBERTY  PRESS 

Rush  Printing  Photo  Offset 

•  Specializing  in  Wedding  and  Bar  Mitzvah  Invitations 
Norman  L.  Williams,  Jr. 
1402  E.  Main  St.  RICHMOND  19,  VA.  Dial  MI  3-1103 


Lafayette  Specialty 

Shish  Kebab  and  Pilaf 
Live  Maine  Lobsters 
From  Our 
Neptune  Tank 


WESTERN  CHARCOALED 
STEAKS  .  .  .  IMPORTED 
WINES  AND  CHAMPAGNE 
OUR  FAMOUS  LAFAY- 
ETTE SALAD  .  . 


Charcoal  -Steak  and  Seafood 
Mouse 


RECOMMENDED 

For  Reservations  Call  Williamsburg  CA  9-3811  —  CA  9-9045 
WE  HAVE  BEEN  SERVING  GOOD  FOOD  FOR  OVER  30  TEARS 

AIR-CONDITIONED  1203  RICHMOND  ROAD 

MEMBER  AMERICAN  EXPRESS         HILTON  CARTE  BLANCHE 
HOME-MADE  PARFAIT  AND  PECAN  PIES 


SOUTHERN 
PAYS 


15TH  &  MAIN 

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INTEREST 

ON  THE 

ENTIRE  BALANCE 
OF  YOUR  SAVINGS 

REGARDLESS  OF  AMOUNT 


xxtkern  Bank 

™  AJNTp  TRUST  CO. 

Grace  at  Second         3201  w.  cary 

•  FEDERAL  RESERVE  SYSTEM 


PRESCRIPTION  SERVICE 


BEVERLY  HILLS 

Patterson  Ave.  at  Ridge  Road 

Dial  AT  2-4231 


LAFAYETTE 

1011  Lafayette  Street 

Dial  EL  5-1777 


WESTWOOD 

5805  Patterson  Avenue 

Dial  AT  8-1933 


SUBURBAN 

2369  Staples  Mill  Road 

Dial  EL  8-4929 


CRESTVIEW 

6516  Horsepen  Road 

Dial  AT  8-2831 


PROMPT  DELIVERY  IN  WEST  RICHMOND 


54 


The  America)!  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


October,  i960 


THOMAS  G. 

POWELL 

Successors  to 
Marvin  F.  Pollard,  Inc. 

Manufacturers  of 

Orthopedic  and  Surgical 
Appliances,  Artificial  Limbs 

411  W.  Broad  Street 
Dial  MI  3-8656 
RICHMOND,  VA. 


Air  View  Showing  Park-like  Grounds 
of  Terrace  Hiil  Nursing  Home 


AGED  *  CHRONICALLY  ILL 

•  67  bimmons  Bed  Capacity 

•  24  Hour  Daily  Skilled  Nursing  Care 

•  R.  N.  Supervision.  Trained  Orderlies 

•  Nutritious  Food.  Trained  Dietitian 

•  Private  and  Multiple  Bed  Rooms  with 
toilets 

•  Fire  Protected  by  Sprinkler  System 

•  Automatic  Elevator.  Spacious  Porches 

•  Weeklv  R-*es  from  $6n  to  $85.  Gen.  Care 

Write  or  Phone 
Bernard  Maslan.  President 

TERRACE  HILL  NURSING  fame 

2112  Monteiro  Ave.     Dial  MI  3-2777 
RICHMOND,  VA. 


POLLARD  and  BAGBY 

INCORPORATED 

REAL  ESTATE  AND  INSURANCE 

IN  ALL  ITS  BRANCHES 


1009  E.  Main  St. 


Dial  MI  3-9011 


RICHMOND,  VIRGINIA 


POHLIG 
BROTHERS 

Established  1866 
25th  and  Franklin  Sts. 
RICHMOND,  VA. 


Manufacturers  of  Quality  and 
Distinction  in  Paper  Boxes 

PLAIN  AND  FANCY 
SET-UP  &  FOLDING 
BOXES 
Stock  Sizes  —  Or  Made  to  Order 
Waxing — Laminating — Easels 
Mounting — Die  Cutting 


EANES  and  CO. 

Plumbing  -  Heating 

PROMPT  SERVICE 
FAIR  CHARGES 

DIAL  EL  3-4170 

Night  Calls:  MI  8-7538 

Specializing  in  All  Kinds  of 
Repair  Work 


1305  W.  Main  Street 
RICHMOND,  VA. 


HENWOOD  &  WILSON 

"EVERLASTING  BEAUTY  IN  MONUMENTS' 

Designers  and  Manufacturers  of 
GRANITE  and  MARBLE  MONUMENTS— MEMORIALS 

413-415  S.  Cherry  St.  DIAL  MI  8-7340  Richmond,  Va. 


NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS 

RICHMOND  YALETERIA 

Cleaning  and  Pressing 
For  High  Quality  Cleaning 
2705  W.  BROAD      DIAL  EL  5-2849      RICHMOND,  VA. 


L.  D.  JOHNSON'S  SONS 

Roof  Repairing  a  Specialty 

1407  W.  Cary  St.        RICHMOND,  VA.        Dial  EL  5-2911 


Where  Handicaps  Don't  Handicap 


(Continued  from  Page  49) 


walks,  guide  wires  and  other  ex- 
traneous paraphanalia. 
Do  I  really  behave  as  one  of  the 
brotherhood?  Haven't  I  been  push- 
ing away  other  Christians  because 
they  kneel  at  a  Christian  altar 
other  than  mine?  And  what  have  1 
ever  done  to  help  out  toward  the 
good  works  of  my  Jewish  neigh- 
bors?" 

Because  to  some  of  the  readers 
it  may  appear  that  I  am  setting 
myself  up  as  a  social  sort  of  Jew 
who  feels  bigly  Jewish  because  he 
has  handed  out  $5  to  a  worthy 
cause  of  Catholics,  I  should  tell 
you  of  something  that  frequently 
is  noticed  in  our  town: 

A  prominent  Jew  dies.  He 
leaves  a  considerable  estate  which 
isn't  all  for  his  kin.  The  news- 
papers print  the  contents  of  his 
will:  It  gives  to  Jewish  causes  and 
to  Christian  also  ...  to  Protest- 
ant and  Catholic  hospitals,  to 
Protestant  and  Catholic  orphan- 
ages ...  as  well  as  to  all  the  Jew- 
ish institutions. 

Parents  of  the  blind  children 
found  their  offspring  had  not 
only  learned  to  do  more  things 
for  themselves,  including  swim- 
ming, but  had  improved  their 
speech  and  lost  some  of  their 
1  right. 

A  day  camp  for  partially-sight- 
ed children  at  the  Pittsburgh  YM- 
YWHA  showed  conclusively  the 
ability  of  the  handicapped  child 
to  take  part  in  a  wide  range  of 
camp  activities,  including  those 
calling  for  muscular  development 
and  competitive  skill.  In  the  pool 
of  the  Philadelphia  YMHA  blind 
youngsters  are  now  being  taught 
to  swim. 

At  the  Cincinnati  Jewish  Com- 
munity Center's  day  camp  a  total- 
ly deaf  child  was  successfully  in- 
tegrated into  the  program.  A  per- 
sonalized approach  to  each  camper 
led  the  children  to  accept  and 
help  the  youngster  who  was  dif- 
ferent because  of  his  handicap. 
In  Omaha,  the  Jewish  Community 
Center  teaches  deaf  youngsters  to 
swim  by  combining  the  skill  and 
experience  of  a  trained  coach  with 
an  expert  in  sign  language  who 
transmits  the  instruction  from 
teacher  to  pupil. 

The  n  e  w  1  y-opened  Mosholu- 
Montefiore  Jewish  Community 
Center  in  the  Bronx  is  the  first  to 
provide  special  construction  facili- 


ties to  meet  the  needs  of  the  ordio 
pedically  handicapped  child.  The 
nursery  school's  doors  are  wide 
enough  to  admit  wheel  chairs  and 
a  special  entrance  and  ramp  from 
the  street  facilitates  going  and 
coming. 

One  of  the  most  exciting  recrea 
tion  programs  for  handicapped 
children  is  sponsored  by  New 
York's  Educational  Alliance.  At 
that  Center  there  are  groups  for 
the  retarded  and  for  victims  ol 
cerebral  palsy,  for  the  emotionally 
disturbed  and  the  blind,  for  the 
cardiac  and  those  with  speech  de 
fects.  So  far  as  possible  these  ac 
tivities  are  integrated  with  the 
Educational  Alliance's  normal  pro 
gram.  In  every  instance  the  Center 
works  closely  with  trained  experts 
from  specialized  agencies  as  well 
as  with  parents  who  originally 
asked  for  these  programs.  A  simi 
lar  program  is  sponsored  by  the 
Bronx  YMHA  where  groups  of 
children  suffering  from  cerebral 
palsy  are  involved  in  gymnasium 
and  swimming  pool  activities 

In  Hartford,  Conn.,  the  Jewish 
Community     Center     plays  hosl 


Sally  Bell's 
Kitchen 

708  W.  Grace  St 
Richmond,  Va. 
Dial  MI  4-2838 
Delicacies  for  the  Home, 
Picnics,  and  Parties 

•  Panting  Facilities 

•  For  Our  Customers 


MELVIN  W.  ESTES 
JEssq 


Servicenter 
NOW  LOCATED 


2301  W.  Broad  St. 
Phone  EL  5-9715 
RICHMOND,  VA. 


Richmond  Glass  Shop 

Distributors  for  the  Famous 
SUPER  VALSPAR 
Varnish  and  Enamels 

Glass  for  furniture  tops 
Safety  glass  for  automobiles 

?,)  4  WEST  BROAD  STREET 
Telephone  MI  3-7394 


Ope 


October,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


55 


WOOD'S  LAWN 
GRASS  SEED 


every  Sunday  morning  to  a  special 
religious  class  for  children  over  11 
who  are  mentally  retarded.  This 
is  the  group's  only  contact  with 
the  Jewish  community.  The  class 
is  organized  on  Sunday  school 
lines  and  has  rabbinical  aid. 
Members  of  this  Center  group 
have  made  substantial  progress 
and  even  manifested  social  con- 
sciousness. One  of  them  composed 
an  original  prayer  and  the  class 
as  a  whole  sent  a  contribution  to 
an  institution  for  mentally  retard- 
ed youngsters  in  Israel. 

Among  the  earliest  post-polio 
swimming  classes  were  those 
launched  bv  the  Jewish  Communi- 
ty Centers  in  Portland,  Ore.,  and 
Omaha,  Neb.,  and  the  Jewish 
Young  Men's  and  Women's  As- 
sociation of  Rochester,  N.  Y.  In 
all  three  communities  the  program 
so  includes  physical  therapy 
through  water  sports  for  children 
suffering  from  the  after-effects  of 
polio.  Special  programs  for  chil- 
dren suffering  from  muscular  dys- 
trophy are  conducted  at  the  Bronx 
YMHA.  The  nursery  school  of  the 
Toledo  Jewish  Community  Center 
has  integrated  a  number  of  blind 
children.  In  Minneapolis  the  Cen- 
ter cooperates  with  the  Jewish 
Family  Service  in  providing  recrea- 
tion programs  for  emotionally 
disturbed  children  who  are  under 
treatment  but  who  do  not  require 
institutional  care. 

New  York's  Federation  of  Jew- 
ish Philanthropies  offers  recrea- 
tional services  at  some  of  its  camps 
for  children  who  are  mentally  re- 
tarded. Blind  children  learn  to 
swim  every  summer  in  the  pool  of 
the  New  Orleans  Jewish  Commu- 


Two  Good  Places 

In  Richmond,  Va.  Featuring 

Seafood 

and  Steaks 

Raleigh  Grill 

(Hotel  Raleigh) 

Open — Monday  thru  Fridays 
11:30  to  2:30 
5:30  to  9 
Saturdays  5 :30  to  9 

V/right's 

TOWN  HOUSE 

513  East  Grace  St. 

Open  11:30  to  3  p  m. 
4:30  to  8  p.  m. 
Closed  Sundays  and  Holidays 


nity  Center.  The  North  Hills  YM- 
YWHA,  a  branch  of  the  Associat- 
ed YM-YWHAs  of  Greater  New 
York,  has  just  launched  a  recrea- 
tion program  for  retarded  children 
5-8.  Older  children  and  young 
adults  who  suffer  from  some  handi- 
cap are  programmed  for  at  the 
Educational  Alliance  and  the  New 
Haven  Jewish  Community  Center. 

Handicapped  people  of  all  ages 
were  once  limited  as  much  by  the 
attitude  of  society  as  by  their 
handicaps.  The  gradual  shift  from 
stress  on  disabilities  to  emphasis 
on  abilities  lias  resulted  in  wide- 
spread recognition  of  the  fact  that 
the  physical,  emotional,  social  and 
mental  needs  of  the  handicapped 
are  no  different  from  those  of  the 
non-handicapped.  The  need  to  be 
loved  and  wanted,  the  need  for 
achievement,  to  let  out  feelings 
and  to  paricipate  is  common  to  all. 

Group  work  services  lor  the 
handicapped  are  becoming  more 
general  and  the  integration  of  the 
handicapped  into  recreational  ac- 
tivities for  the  non-handicapped 
is  steadily  moving  out  of  the  ex- 
perimental stage.  The  growing  in- 
terest in  these  services  is  revealed  by 
the  mounting  demands  received  by 
JWB  from  Centers  planning  to 
undertake  such  activities.  The 
Jewish  Community  Centers  and 
YM-YWHAs,  who  have  done  so 
much  pioneering  in  this  Held, 
have  contributed  immeasurably 
toward  assuring  handicapped  chil- 
dren of  their  right  to  happiness 
through  freedom  to  enjoy  normal 
group  activities. 


Mindful  of  the  physically  deform- 
ing; effects  of  asthma,  Rabbi  Chaim 
Davidovich,  Director  of  Religious 
Education  at  the  Jewish  National 
Home  for  Asthmatic  Children  at 
Denver  instructs  these  two  young- 
patients  at  the  free,  non-sectarian 
Home  that  the  lulav  and  esrog  are 
symbolic  of  a  straight  back  and 
strong  heart  that  all  courageous  Jews 
have  developed  through  history. 
Jewish  youn^s'ers  conduct  their  own 
religious  services  here. 


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Science  Is  Transforming  Israel 


(Concluded  from  Page  52) 


pure  research  in  which  honest 
scientific  inquiry  constitutes  its 
own  justification.  But  the  history 
of  our  times  is  hound  to  knit 
Rehovoth  more  closely  into  the 
fabric  of  Israel's  national  life. 
Similarly,  the  Institute  is  certari 
to  become  increasingly  "interna 
tionalized"  in  response  to  the  im- 
pulses which  determine  Israel's 
role  in  the  world.  And  Israel's  role 
in  the  world  is  primarily  one  o! 
reconciliation  —  between  religion 
and  science;  between  the  old  in- 
heritance and  the  new  potential- 
ity; between  the  contrasting  pos- 
sibilities of  salvation  and  disastei 
embodied  in  the  newly  discovered 
sources  of  power  between  the  na- 
tional freedom  of  Asia  and  Africa, 
and  the  science  and  democracy  of 
Europe  and  America. 

It  might  have  been  possible  to 
envisage  a  State  of  Israel  without 
existance  of  a  center  devoted  ex- 
clusively to  fundamental  scientific 
research.  Even  today,  there  are 
more  than  fifty  states  which  live, 
work  and  survive  without  the 
special     grace     which  Rehovoth 


conlers  upon  our  society.  But  no 
one  can  doubt  that  Israel  with- 
out the  Weizmann  Institute  ol 
Science  would  lack  one  of  the 
major  dimensions  of  its  national 
and  international  personality.  It 
would  have  been  incongruous  il 
the  people  which  was  the  first  to 
be  haunted  by  the  question  of 
purpose  and  direction  in  the  life 
of  nature  and  of  man,  were  not 
now  to  be  centrally  involved  in  the 
quest  for  the  great  answers.  The] 
cjuest  may  be  unceasing.  There  ii 
no  mystery  in  nature  the  solution 
of  which  does  not  open  the  road  to 
a  mystery  greater  than  itself.  There 
comes  a  point  when  the  scientist, 
examining  the  origin  of  natural 
forces,  finds  himself  staring  help- 
lessly into  the  void.  His  helpless 
ness  becomes  most  profound  when 
he  seeks  to  define,  let  alone  ex- 
plain, the  meaning  and  nature  of 
life-.  But  the  more  he  pursues  th 
quest,  the  more  constantly  will  hi 
be  elevated  by  what  Whitehead 
once  called  "the  habitual  vision 
ol  greatness."  It  was  in  this  land 
after  all,  that  this  vision  was  seen 
in  its  first,  most  durable  radiance 


The  Israel  Philharmonic 

(Concluded  from  Page  46) 


night  ol  the  fight  for  Lydda  Air- 
port for  the  very  troops  who  later 
captured  that  important  poifrt. 
Another  unforgetable  "Military 
concert"  was  that  at  the  Biblical 
town  of  Beersheba  when  the  en- 
semble with  Leonard  Bernstein  at 
its  head,  played  for  thousands  of 
men  of  the  Negev  Forces. 

From  the  day  that  Toscanini 
conducted  the  orchestra's  first  per- 
formance in  Tel  Aviv,  the  orch- 
estra has  been  blessed  with  the 
leadership  of  the  world's  finest 
conductors  and  music's  most  out- 
standing soloists,  Among  the  noted 
conductors,  have  been,  to  mention 
just  a  few,  the  late  Dr.  Serge  Kous- 
sevitsky,  Leonard  Bernstein,  Josef 
Krips,  Charles  Munch  and  Eugene 
Ormandy. 

The  Music  Director  and  prin- 


cipal conductor  for  the  American 
tour  will  be  Carlo  Maria  Giulini. 
His  associate  conductor  will  be  Dr. 
Josef  Krips  who  will  conduct  six 
concerts.  Gary  Bertini,  young 
Israel  conductor  will  also  accom- 
pany the  orchestra. 

In  all,  the  1960  foreign  tour  of 
the  orchestra  will  see  it  playing 
some  fifty  concerts  in  five  nations 
of  the  world— the  United  States, 
Canada,  Mexico,  Japan  and  India. 
In  fulfilling  its  obligation  as  "Is- 
rael's best  ambassador  abroad"— a 
designation  given  it  by  the  late 
U.S.  Ambassador  to  Israel,  Mon- 
nett  B.  Davis— the  Israel  Philhar- 
monic will  have  travelled  around 
the  world  and  "be  away  from  its 
home  base  in  Tel  Aviv,  the  Mann 
Auditorium,  a  little  less  than  three 
months. 


TARRANT 
PRESCRIPTION 
DRUGGISTS 

MOTORCYCLE  DELIVERY 

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Highland  Park 
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Dial  MI  3-1847 
RICHMOND,  VA. 


October,  i960 


fhe  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


57-- 


Portsmouth,  Va. 

MEYER  H.  JACOBSON,  Correspondent 


MEYER   H.  JACOBSON 

Alter  a  busy  summer  season,  the 
ffilege  students  have  once  again 
eturned  to  study  at  their  respect- 
ve  schools,  while  here  at  home 
he  public  schools,  as  well  as  He- 
>rew  and  Sunday  Schools  have  be- 
;un  their  yearly  season.  Gomley 
]hesed  jumped  off  opening  its 
Hebrew  School  on  September  7th 
nd  its  Sunday  School  on  Septem- 
>er  1 1  th,  with  Temple  Sinai  open- 
ng  its  Religious  School  on  Septem- 
er  25th. 

Donor  luncheons  are  being  plan- 
ed by  the  many  organizations, 
rhe  Sisterhood  of  Temple  Sinai 
eld  the  first  on  September  14th 
t  the  Suburban  Country  Club. 
Am.  Zalmon  Blachman  is  the 
resident  of  the  sisterhood.  B'nai 
i'rith    Women    have  scheduled 


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Serving  the  city  and  adjoining 
counties  since  1926 

Charlottesville'* 
Oldest  F.  T.  D.  Member 


NATHAN  MEYER 

their  Donor  Luncheon  lor  October 
27th. 

The  inan\  committees  planning 
the  70th  anniversary  of  the  Gomley 
Ghesed  Congregation  have  been 
meeting  frequently  planning  the 
c  ulmination  banquet  scheduled  for 
Sunday,  October  30th.  Julian  M. 
Blachman.  winner  of  the  Man  of 
the  Quarter  Century  will  be 
honored  at  this  event.  A  week 
end  starting  with  late  evening  ser- 
\  ices  and  an  Oneg  Shabbat  of  Fri- 
day, October  28th  begins  the  week 
end,  a  special  family  service  on 
Saturday  followed  by  a  Kiddush 
and  the  banquet  Sunday  evening 
will  end  the  year  long  celebration 
of  the  congregation.  Meyer  H. 
Jacobson  has  been  general  chair- 
man of  the  entire  year  celebration, 
with  Nathan  Meyer  as  chairman 
>l   the  70th  anniversary  banquet. 

Rabbi  Milton  D.  Rosenfeld  was 
installed  at  Temple  Sinai  on  Sep- 
tember 17th  followed  by  a  com- 
munity reception  at  the  Suburban 
Country  Club.  R.  Marcus  Fass  is 
1  lie  president  of  Temple  Sinai. 

Suburban  Country  Club  closed 
its  busy  summer  season  with 
special  events  at  the  swimming 
pools  and  the  Labor  Day  week 
end  breakfast  d  a  n  c  e.  Ronnie 
Spindel  won  two  first  place  events 
at  the  pools  with  Donald  Levitin, 
Stevie  Rosen  and  Philip  Fried- 
man other  winners.  Leonard  G. 
Karp  was  re-elected  president  of 
the  Suburban  Country  Club  with 
Herbert  K.  Bangel  as  vice  presi- 
dent, Arthur  R.  Bloom  secretary 
and  Louis  Brenner  treasurer.  Nor- 
man Olitsky  will  head  the  all  im- 
portant entertainment  committee 
for  the  coming  year. 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Staunton— Harrisonburg 
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5» 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


October,  i960 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  folloiving  Firms  in 

Roanoke,  Va. 


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Member  Federal  Deposit  Insurance  Corporation 


SINCE  1918 


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PRESUMPTIONS 


MEDICAL  ARTS 
HX-.  PHARMACY,  INC. 

Medical  Arts  Building  Roanoke,  Va. 

Complete  Prescription  Service.  Get  where  they  have 
it  or  will  get  it  immediately  for  you. 

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Co-Operation  Among  Small  Nations 


(Concluded  from  Page  17) 


The  peculiarity  of  Israel's  his- 
tory lies  in  the  fact  that  we  have 
been  able  to  produce  in  this  small 
area— at  the  crossroads  of  Asia  and 
Africa— a  concentration  of  know- 
ledge and  techniques  acquired  in 
the  long  ages  of  our  dispersion. 
You,  our  guests,  bring  to  us  a 
youthful  zest  and  an  alertness  with- 
out which  our  particular  abilities 
must  languish  unused.  Let  us  to- 
gether, then,  devise  a  new  doctrine 
of    technical    cooperation  among 


small  nations.  In  more  human 
terms,  we  need  one  another,  and 
the  recognition  of  this  need  is 
the  foundation  of  our  future. 

Whatever  the  past  has  placed  in 
our  hands,  we  place  in  yours. 
Whatever  you  can  give  us  in  eM 
change,  we  will  gratefully  receive. 

May  these  days  be  long  and 
happily  remembered  not  only  for 
what  we  say  here,  but  for  the 
deeds  to  which  they  are  a  prelude. 


Builder  of  Bridges 


Brother  Bruno  Hussar,  of  the 
Dominican  Order,  has  one  great 
ambition  in  life:  to  build  bridges. 
As  a  qualified  engineer  he  learn 
how  to  build  concrete  bridges  over 
rivers  and  valleys;  since  taking  up 
holy  orders  his  desire  has  been  to 
build  bridges  over  the  gulf  which 
separates  the  Christian  and  Jew- 
ish peoples.  And  the  Hebrew  Uni- 
versity, he  thinks,  is  a  good  work- 
shop for  bridges  of  this  kind. 

Although  a  French  citizen, 
Brother  Bruno  feels  that  his  back- 
ground is  truly  international.  He 
was  born  in  Egypt  48  years  ago  of 
a  Hungarian  father  (who  later  be- 
came Italian  as  the  borders  shifted 
after  World  War  I)  and  a  French 
mother.  His  mother  tongue,  more- 
over, is  English. 

Brother  Bruno  first  studied  in 
one  of  the  Italian  Colleges  in 
Cairo  and  later  moved  to  France 
to  take  up  engineering.  On  join- 
ing the  Dominican  Order— more 
correctly  known  by  its  Latin  name 
"Fratres  Predicatores"— he  studied 
theology  for  seven  years  in  Paris. 

Six  years  ago  Brother  Bruno 
was  sent  by  his  order  to  Israel  and 
he  felt  immediately  that  he  had 
come  to  stay.  "This  is  where  I 
wish  to  spend  the  rest  of  my  days 
working  for  closer  relations  be- 
tween Christians  and  Jews."  Last 
year  he  enrolled  at  the  Hebrew 
University  to  study  Hebrew— of 
which  he  already  has  a  fluent  com- 
mand—and Jewish  History.  His 
particular  field  of  interest  is  the 
history  of  Jewish  Christian  rela- 
tions in  all  perods;  he  will  not 
hesitate  to  point  out  that  his  own 
order  in  centuries  gone  by  played 


an  important  part  in  the  Inquisi- 
tion, producing  from  its  ranks  the 
Spanish  Grand  Inquisitor  Torque- 
mada,  and  that  a  form  of  repara- 
tion may  be  justified.  At  the  He- 
brew University  Brother  Bruno 
came  to  hear  "the  other  side  of 
the  story,"  and  he  is  full  of  ap- 
preciation for  the  objective  way 
in  which  this  subject  is  being 
treated  by  the  teachers  of  Jewish 
History  on  Givath  Ram. 

At  the  moment  Brother  Bruno 
is  the  only  Dominican  at  the  He- 
brew University— or  in  Israel  for 
that  matter— but  he  hopes  that 
two  more  friars  of  his  Order  will 
join  him  shortly.  One  of  them 
wishes  to  study  Jewish  philoso- 
phy and  the  other  Biblical  He- 
brew. When  Brother  Bruno  left 
France  for  Israel  he  asked  his 
Superior  for  permision  to  change 
his  formal  title  of  "Father"  to 
"Brother."  'After  all,"  he  declar- 
ed, "I  hardly  feel  like  a  father  to 
the  people  of  Israel,  but  I  do  feel 
like  a  brother  to  one  and  all  in 
this  country. " 


,1 


H.  W.  Lay  &  Co. 

Manufactuiers  of 
Lay's  Perfect  Potato  Chips 

Made  Fresh  in  Richmond  Daily 


October,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


59 


PROPHET 


ORIGINAL  CREATIONS  BY  RABBI  SOLOMON  JACOBSON 
TEMPLE  BRITH  ACHIM,  PETERSBURG,  VA. 

A  Brick  At  A  Time 


In  a  very  distant  time  and  coun- 
try, there  was  a  king  who  had  the 
finest  palace  in  all  the  world.  It 
was  the  pride  and  joy  of  the  nation 
for  it  was  the  most  massive,  most 
impressive,  most  enchanting  such 
palace  ever.  It  became  the  symbol 
of  the  nation  and,  as  long  as  it 
stood  firm,  it  would  bespeak  pros- 
perity and  safety  for  the  entire 
land. 

The  country  did  prosper  exceed- 
ingly and  every  citizen  of  the  land 
was  able  to  bu£ld  a  miniature 
palace  of  his  own.  However,  in  this 
copious  construction  by  everyone 
of  his  own  little  domain,  they  ran 


into  a  shortage  of  bricks.  Everyone 
felt  that,  inasmuch  as  the  king's 
palace  was  so  vast  and  strong,  it 
would  not  mean  anything  if  they 
made  off  with  a  brick  or  two  from 
the  palace's  foundations  and  walls. 
Just  a  brick  or  two.  Thus,  everyone 
made  off  with  a  brick  or  two,  just 
a  brick  or  two.  And  the  time  came 
when  the  king's  palace  fell  to  the 
ground  merely  from  a  brick  or 
two,  just  a  brick  or  two,  taken  day 
by  day  by  all  the  people. 
Moral:  What's  a  brick  at  a  time 
Pried  from  the  foundation? 

Thus  brick  by  brick 
Liberty  is  lost  to  a  nation. 


Peace  In  The  Middle  East  —  A  Must 

(Concluded  from  Page  7) 


question  in  all  its  aspects.  I  refer 
to  the  status  of  the  Arab  refugees, 
the  development  of  the  waters  of 
the  Jordan,  and  other  relation- 
ships between  Israel  and  its  neigh- 
bors. 

Finding  a  settlement  of  these 
problems  with  justice  and  fairness 
to  all  is  important,  not  only  to 
Israel  and  its  neighbors,  but  to  the 
peace  and  security  of  the  United 
States  and  the  world. 

For  that  reason,  I  intend  if 
elected  President  to  give  this  prob- 
lem the  highest  priority  by  assign- 
ing responsibility  for  directing  ne- 
gotations  in  this  field  to  a  man 
who  has  so  magnificently  demon- 
strated at  the  United  Nations  that 
he  is  one  of  the  most  skilled  dip- 
lomats of  our  times— my  running 
mate,  Henry  Cabot  Lodge. 

There  will,  of  course,  have  to 
be  consideration  by  each  side  of 
the  problems  of  the  other  side. 
The  United  States  should  be  will- 


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MOTOR  CORP. 


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ing  to  contribute  generously  to- 
ward bringing  about  such  a  settle- 
ment. It  will  not  be  easy,  and  I 
promise  no  miracles  but  it  is  so 
imperative  to  the  nation's  interest 
that  a  solution  be  found  that  we 
must  devote  our  best  efforts  to  that 
end. 

As  I  conclude  this  message,  I  am 
reminded  of  the  words  of  the  late 
John  Foster  Dulles,  which  express 
so  well  my  own  attitude  toward 
U.S.—  Israel  relations.  Those  words 
are: 

"The  preservation  of  the  State 
of  Israel  is  what  I  regard  as  one  of 
the  essential  goals  of  United  States 
foreign  policy." 


The  decision  of  the  Central 
Board  of  Hungarian  Jews  to  pull 
out  from  the  World  Jewish  Con- 
gress after  three  years  of  coopera- 
tion was  termed  regrettable  by  Dr. 
Nahum  Goldmann,  president  of 
the  World  Jewish  Congress.  In  a 
letter  to  the  board,  Dr.  Goldmann 
said  he  hoped  "the  day  is  not  far 
off  when  you  and  other  Jewish 
communities  in  Eastern  Europe 
will  be  in  a  position  to  renew  your 
cooperation  with  all  Jewish  com- 
munities in  the  world  through  the 
World  Jewish  Congress." 


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MAIN  OFFICE:  Jefferson  St.  at  Campbell  Avenue 

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Member  Federal  Reserve  System 
Member  Federal  Deposit  Insurance  Corporation 


Greetings 


Magic  City  Mortgage  Company,  Inc. 

130  Church  Avenue,  S.  W. 

ROANOKE  11,  VIRGINIA 

BRANCH  OFFICES: 

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Serving  Roanoke  and  Vicinity  For  Over  36  Years 


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The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


October,  i960 


Killinger's  Linoleum  &  Carpel  Co. 


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ROANOKE,  VA. 


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Incorporated 

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ROANOKE,  VIRGINIA 

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of  the  Finest  Quality  Since  1921 

CALL  DIAMOND  3-2425 

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Bova  Distributing  Co.,  Inc. 

Distributors  of 

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Richmond  Jewish  Community  Center 

MRS.  STANLEY  J.  REITZER,  Correspondent 


As  the  summer  draws  to  a  close, 
Center  members  of  all  ages  are 
discussing  the  activities  that  oc- 
cupied their  time  this  season,  and 
the  memories  are  fond  ones. 

The  highlight  of  the  summer 
was  the  day  camp  at  Camp  Hil- 
bert.  This  year,  under  the  guid- 
ance of  Sherman  Harris,  the  Cen- 
ter's athletic  director,  and  the 
Camp  Committee,  headed  by  Rosie 
Grossman  and  Inge  Horowitz,  the 
camp  served  202  different  children 
from  two  to  eight  weeks  each.  The 
program,  which  featured  a  United 
Nations  theme,  spotlighted  many 
special  events,  such  as  the  junior 
Olympics  and  rausi  c-round-the- 
world.  The  climax  of  the  program 
came  in  the  final  week  at  a  gala 
carnival  with  games  of  skill,  re- 
freshments, a  water  ballet,  and 
live  pony  rides.  Many  parents  and 
friends  attended  and  observed 
the  camp  in  action. 

The  beautiful  Camp  Hilbert 
facilities  contributed  to  the  success 
of  the  tween  and  teen  programs. 
Tweens  had  a  4-day  a  week  pro- 
gram based  at  the  Center,  includ- 
ing skits,  tournaments,  bowling, 
dances,  and  parties.  There  was  a 
trip  to  Baltimore,  visits  from  two 
out-of-town  groups,  and  a  weekly 
outing  .at  Camp  Hilbert.  A  new 
activity  at  these  outings  was  the 
weekly  supper-time  discussion  pro- 
gram which  was  led  by  adults  and 
proved  both  popular  and  worth- 
while. Morton  Norman  and  his 
Tween  Committee  planned  these 
programs. 

The  teenagers  had  an  excellent 
opportunity  to  know  Dick  Gold- 
stein, our  new  Program  Director, 
who  will  develop  an  integrated 
and  efficient  system  of  inter-group- 
cooperation  for  progra  mming. 
Stuart  Grandis,  new  Presidents 
Council  chairman,  has  been  lead- 
ing the  effort  to  develop  a  con- 
stitution which  will  make  it  pos- 
sible for  the  Council  to  serve  the 
teenagers  and  their  clubs  to  best 
advantage.  Stanley  Goldstein  has 
been  heading  another  committee 
to  plan  a  cooperative  pledge  pro- 
gram for  the  boys'  groups.  Herbert 
Shapiro,  chairman  of  the  Adult 
Committee  which  oversees  the 
teen  program,  has  been  concen- 
trating on  organizing  a  committee 
which  will  broaden  and  improve 
the  activities  available  for  this 
age  group. 


The  highlight  of  the  season  was 
the  Camp  Hilbert  picnic,  where 
nearly  100  teens  had  a  barbeque, 
swam,  danced,  and  roasted  marsh- 
mallows  at  a  roaring  bonfire. 

Adults  used  Camp  Hilbert  with 
their  families  each  Sunday  through 
the  planning  of  the  Family  Club. 
Other  adult  activities  during  sum- 
mer took  place  in  the  gym,  pool, 
health  cTub  and  bowling  leagues, 
and  many  committees  were  busy 
planning  the  fall  program. 

More  than  50  Grand  Group 
members  made  an  exception  to 
their  usual  practice  of  not  meet- 
ing during  the  summer  and  took 
(Please  turn  to  Page  64) 

A  call  on  the  Jewish  youth  of 
America  to  dedicate  itself  to  the 
development  of  a  creative  Jewish 
life  was  made  at  Starlight,  Pa.  by 
representatives  of  nineteen  Zionist 
and  non-Zionist  youth  organiza- 
tions at  the  Regional  Conference 
of  Jewish  Youth  of  the  United 
States  and  Canada.  The  appeal 
counselled  the  youth  to  dedicate 
itself  "towards  the  goal  of  the  crea- 
tion of  a  rich  Jewish  life,  which 
was  given  a  new  purpose  by  the 
creation  of  Israel." 


1 


A  Friend 
of 

The  State 
of 
Israel 
Urges  You 
To  Buy 
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and 

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Economical- 
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1 


I 


October,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Newport  News,  Va. 

MRS.  MARTHA  B.  SHAPIRO,  Correspondent 


Members  of  the  Grand  Club  of  the  Newport  News,  Va.  Jewish  Community 
Center  departing  for  Richmond,  Va.,  where  they  were  the  guests  of  the  Gold- 
en Agers  at  the  Richmond  Jewish  Community  Center.  Shown  in  the  photo- 
graph is  Mr.  Charles  Olshansky,  Executive  Director  of  the  Newport  News 
Jewish  Community  Center. 


A  dance  honoring  all  recent 
ligh  school  graduates  who  are  just 


A  Disciple  of  Hillel 

(Concluded  from  Page  9) 

in  hospital  for  some  time.  Then 
ae  returned  home  to  convalesce. 
Mrs.  Winthrop  came  over  to  thank 
Mr.  Sacks.  "Tell  your  husband," 
she  said,  "how  grateful  we  are." 

Then  one  evening  Mr.  Win- 
throp himsel(f  arrived.  "May  I 
ome  in?"  he  asked. 

"Of  course,"  Mr.  Sacks  smiled 
o  him,  leading  him  into  the  living 
oom. 

"I've  been  hearing  a  lot  from 
im  these  last  few  days,"  Mr.  Win- 
hrop  began.  "Seems  that  he's  been 
innoying    Stanley.    Calling  him 
lames  and  so  on." 

"It  was  worrisome,  I  admit," 
vlr.  Sacks  admitted.  "We  didn't 
mite  know  how  to  cope  with  it." 

"Jim  wants  to  apologize.  Would 
itaniey  come  over?"  He  waited, 
lesitant. 

Stanley  did  go  over  to  Jim,  and 
he  boys  talked  together. 

At  home,  when  Stanley  return- 
d,  Mrs.  Sacks  turned  to  her  hus- 
>and. 

"Wasn't  there  one  of  our  old 
ages,  Philip,  who  said  that  re- 
igion  means  treating  your  neigh- 
>ors  as  you  wanted  to  be  treated?" 
"That  was  Hillel." 
"We've  always  taught  Stanley  to 
ct  like  that." 

"Now,"  concluded  Mr.  Sacks 
Rth  a  smile,  as  he  regarded  Stan- 
ey.  "Jim  Winthrop  will  know 
hat  too." 


entering  college  was  held  during 
the  past  month  at  the  Jewish  Com- 
munity Center.  This  terminated 
the  weekly  summer  outdoor  dance 
programs  for  teenagers  sponsored 
by  the  Youth  Council.  Music  was 
furnished  by  Steve  Conn  and  his 
combo  and  an  exhibition  of  the 
latest  dance  steps  was  presented  by 
the  Arthur  Murray  studio  dancers. 

A  number  of  programs  are  now 
getting  under  way  for  the  coming 
season.  The  United  Hebrew  School 
has  started  its  program  of  instruc- 
tion. The  staff  consists  of  Rabbi 
Nathan  Bulman,  Rabbi  Jesse  Fin- 
kle,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jonah  Gold.  A 
Political  Forum  will  soon  be  or- 
ganized and  sponsored  for  the  en- 
tire community.  The  Chamber 
Music  Committee,  with  Mrs.  E.  J. 
Binder,  chairman,  Mrs.  Harold 
Chapman,  musical  director,  Dr. 
Irving  Berlin,  coordinator,  are 
meeting  to  outline  their  next  pro- 
gram of  chamber  music. 

Mrs.  Arthur  Lieverman  and  Mrs. 
Charles  Olshansky,  teachers  in 
charge,  report  the  JCC  Nursery 


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62 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Lynchburg,  Va. 


COMPLETE  BANKING 
AND  TRUST  SERVICE 


FIVE  CONVENIENT  LOCATIONS 

Main  Office,  Main  at  10th 

Trust  Branch,  811  Main  Street 

Fort  Hill  Branch,  Fort  Early  Building 

Rivermont  Branch,  2482  Rivermont  Avenue 

Installment  Loaa  Office,  816  Church  Street 


FIRST  NATIONAL 

TRUST  AND  SAVINGS  BANK 


Irochburg,  Virginia 

Member  F»d«ral  DopmN  Insurance  Corporation 


'4% 


per  annum 


YOUR  SAVINGS  CURRENTLY  EARN 
COMPOUNDED  SEMI-ANNUALLY 

Money  invested  before  the  10th  of  the 
month  earns  full  month's  dividend. 

WHERE  YOU  SAVE  ... . 
....  DOES  MAKE  A  DIFFERENCE 

FIRST  FEDERAL  SAVINGS 
&  LOAN  ASSOCIATION 

HOME  OFFICE :  Church  St.  at  Ninth 
FUTURE  BRANCH  OFFICE 
Memorial  Ave.  &  Wadsworth  St.  Lynchburg,  Va. 

Home  for  Your  Money  •  •^^s^^^j 
Money  for  Your  Home  •  ^-o^^^ 


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I.C.C.  No.  99698 

S.C.C.  No.  F203 

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Phone  VI 

6-4651 

Inter  and  Intra-State  Authority 

DAILY  SERVICE 

TO  AND  FROM: 

Altavista,  Virginia 

Kenbridge 

Blairs 

Keysville 

Brookneal 

Lunenburg 

Charlotte  Courthouse 

Lynchburg 

Chatham 

Madison  Heights 

Colony 

Phenix 

Danville 

Rustburg 

Drakes  Branch 

Schoolfield 

(Interstate  only) 

South  Boston 

Dry  Fork 

South  Hill 

Gladys 

Sycamore 

Gretna 

Victoria 

Halifax 

Volens 

Hurt 

CONNECTIONS  I  P°ints  in  Virginia 

^nnLL  1 \   Points  North,  East,  South,  West. 

School  and  Kindergarten  has 
gotten  off  to  a  good  start. 

A  self-study  committee  has  been 
organized  at  the  Jewish  Commun- 
ity Center  with  Mrs.  E.  J.  Binder 
and  Dr.  Emanuel  Greenspon  ac- 
cepting the  overall  chairmanship. 
A  complete  study  of  the  programs 
of  all  organizations  and  their  re- 
lationship to  the  total  Jewish  com- 
munity will  be  carefully  reviewed. 
The  purpose  of  the  study  will  be 
to  discuss  duplication  of  efforts, 
to  learn  about  current  practices 
in  other  Jewish  communities,  and 
to  achieve  a  better  appreciation 
of  our  own  community's  program 
and  gain  planning  and  evaluation 


October,  i960 

experience.  There  will  be  three 
sub-committies  —  (A)  Develop- 
ment and  Interpretation  Commitee 
with  Allen  Conn  and  Dr.  Cyril 
Mirmelstein,  co  -  chairmen;  (B) 
Campaign  Organization  Commitee 
with  Martin  Lee  and  Mayer  Sar- 
fan,  co-chairmen;  (C)  Leadership 
Development  Committee  with 
Alan  Diamonstein  and  Stanley 
Drucker,  co-chairmen. 

Heartiest  congratulations  to  the 
following  on  their  recent  Bar  Mitz- 
vahs:  Joe  Lieberman,  son  of  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Lawrence  L.  Lieberman; 
Michael  Weisman,  son  of  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Mac  Weisman. 


Norfolk,  Va. 

MRS.  WILLIAM  SCHWARTZ,  Correspondent 


Although  the  waning  weeks  of 
summer  brought  torrid  weather 
to  Norfolk,  the  Jewish  Community 
carried  on  many  activities.  Organi- 
zations held  swim  parties  and  thus 
enticed  members  to  continue  with 
their  numerous  projects  as  was 
successfully  demonstrated  by  Nor- 
folk Chapter  H  a  d  a  s  s  a  h,  B'nai 
B'rith  and  the  Denver  League. 

The  Phyllis  Blachman  Chapter 
of  B'nai  B'rith  held  an  evening 
cook-out,  which  included  their 
lodge  groups  as  well  as  the  ladies 
chapters.  B'nai  B'rith  Lodge  No. 
1195  held  their  annual  carnival, 
open  to  the  community,  to  raise 
funds     for    additional  improve- 


ments at  the  Kempsville  Recrea- 
tion Area. 

A  large  Norfolk  delegation  of 
Hadassah  attended  the  annual 
Convention  at  New  York's  Wal- 
dorf d  11  r  i  n  g  September  1  ith 
through  15th. 

A  reception  at  Norfolk  Jewish 
Community  Center  on  August  1st. 
was  tendered  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Dan 
Stein  by  Center  Board  members 
and  Center  staff.  Mr.  Stein,  who 
served  as  Executive  Director  of 
the  Center  for  several  years  has 
transferred  to  a  position  in  Hack 
ensack,  New  Jersey.  With  our  fare- 
well to  the  Stein  family,  went  our 
best  wishes  in  his  new  assignment 


pu 

Is, 

(01 

kl 


it-! 


Senator  Lyndon  B.  Johnson  of  Texas,  Democratic  Vice-President  candidate, 
(second  from  right),  stressed  the  importance  of  investment  aid  for  the  de 
velopment  of  Israel  and  other  new  nations  dedicated  to  freedom,  at  an  Israel 
Bond  dinner  in  his  honor  held  in  Houston. 


EXCLUSIVELY 


For  Complete  Eye  Care: 
Consult  Your  EYE  PHYSICIAN 
Then  See  Your  GUILD  OPTICIAN 

A.  G.  Jefferson 


Ground  Floor  Allied  Arts  Bldg.       Lynchburg,  Va. 


o 
p 

T 
I 

C 
A 
L 


October,  i960 


The  American  Jewish 


TIMES-OUTLOOK 


63 


Recent  Bar  Mitzvah  celebrants 
t  Beth  El  Temple  were  Ronald 
i.  Shere,  son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
erome  Shere;  Andrew  N.  Cohen, 
nd  Maury  O.  Handel,  son  of  Mr. 
on  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  David  Cohen 
nd  Mrs.  Fred  Handel.  At  Beth 
Ms  annual  installation  of  officers, 
ield  on  Sept.  nth,  Joseph  L.  Kan- 
or  was  re-elected  as  President. 

The  Iota  Gamma  Phi  Sorority 
ave  a  very  successful  dance  on 
ept.  4th,  highlighting  a  most  at- 
ractive  and  unusual  theme,  called 
Around  the  World." 

The  DeBra  Chapter  of  B'nai 
B'rith  Girls  a  n  n  u  a  1  cook-out 
jrought  a  fine  attendance  of  60 


^irls.    New    members,  aged 
hrough  17  were  welcomed. 
Another  farewell  party  to  Mr. 
nd  Mrs.  Dan  Stein  was  given  by 
he  Golden  Age  Club  in  apprecia- 
ton  for  understanding  given  this 
aut-standing  group  of  older  citi- 
zens. Also  a  hearty  welcome  was 
xtended  to  Mr.  Harry  Rosen,  who 
has  taken  over  the  reins  of  Ex- 
ecutive  Director   at   the  Norfolk 
ewish  Community  Center. 

Richmond,  Va. 
Business  and  Profes- 
sional Group  of 
Hadassah 

MRS.  RICHARD  FINKLEMAN, 
Correspondent 

The  Business  and  Professional 
Group  of  Hadassah  held  their  first 
meeting  of  this  season  at  The  Ter- 
race Room  of  Thalhimers.  At  this 
paid-up  membership  dinner,  we 
M    enjoyed    the    interesting  and 


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MORRISON 

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LYNCHBURG,  VA. 


FAUBERS 


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outstanding  film,  "People  of  Israel 
Line." 

The  following  will  hold  office 
for  the  coming  year:  President, 
Miss  Beulah  Bratman;  vice-presi- 
dent fund  raising,  Miss  Sadie 
Gary;  vice-president  membership, 
Mrs.  John  Tebrich;  vice-president 
program  and  education,  Miss 
Ruby  Braver;  treasurer,  Mrs.  Eli 
Spector;  financial  secretary,  Mrs. 
Eugene  Laden;  recording  secre- 
tary, Miss  Lily  Laster;  assistant  re- 
cording secretary,  Mrs.  Rose 
Greenspoon;  historial  and  publici- 
ty,   Mrs.    Richard  Einkleman. 

The  committees  have  been 
working  all  summer  and  we  know 
this  year  will  be  an  exciting  and 
fruitful  year  for  B  fe  P. 


Monty  Bergman, 
New  Israel  Bonds 
Representative 


MONTY  BERGMAN 

Succeeding  Al  Zeno,  who  has  re- 
tired to  private  business,  Mr. 
Monty  Bergman  has  been  named 
new  Area  Manager  of  the  Bonds 
lor  Israel  Campaign,  with  head- 
quarters in  Norfolk,  Va. 

Mr.  Bergman  has  eight  years  of 
experience  with  the  New  York  Of- 
fice of  the  Bonds  for  Israel,  and 
has  had  prior  employment  with 
the  New  York  City  UJA,  the  Joint 
Distribution  Committee  and  the 
New  York  Federation  of  Jewish 
Philanthropies.  He  is  a  Past  Vice 
President  of  Zionist  District  No. 
28,  and  currently  is  a  member  of 
the  B'nai  B'rith.  Arnold  Gamsey 
Lodge  No.  1195  and  Beth  El  Tem- 
ple in  our  own  community. 

"Monty",  as  he  wishes  to  be  call- 
ed, and  his  wife,  Marsha,  with 
their  children,  Mark  (6  years),  and 
Maria  (10  months)  have  settled  on 
Sandpiper  Lane,  Norfolk,  Va. 


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601-603  12th  St.  Lynchburg,  Virginia 

MANUFACTURERS  OF 

9    INFANTS  ®  CHILDREN'S 

•    MISSES  •  SHOES 

The  Most  Outstanding 
POPULAR  PRICE  LINE 

NOT  THE  BIGGEST  LINE  BUT  THE  BEST  SELLER 


The 


Wmti  .... 
"liieep  in  sajeiy  in  a  Modern  Fireproof  Homelike  Hotel" 
N.  D.  PAGE,  Resident  Manager 


«4 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Norfolk— Portsmouth 
Newport  News,  Va. 


The  Place  to  Save" 
The  Place  to  Borrow" 


NORFOLK  FEDERAL 
Savings  &  Loan  Association 

239  Main  St.  NORFOLK  10,  VIRGINIA 

Wards  Corner  NORFOLK,  VIRGINIA 

600  Court  St.  PORTSMOUTH,  VIRGINIA 

105  Janaf  Shopping  Center    NORFOLK,  VIRGINIA 


H.  D.  OLIVER 

Established  1875 


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

T 

FUNERAL  DIRECTOR 

Dial  Norfolk  MA  2-7353 

COLONIAL  AND  SHIRLEY  AVENUES 


URQUHART'S 
BAKERY 

Specializing  in  Holidays,  Bar  Mitzvah 
Celebrations,  Birthday  and 
Wedding  Cakes 

1513  Colley  Ave.     Norfolk,  Va. 


C  Caltgart  & 

for  DECORATIVE  PAINTING 

NORFOLK,  VA. 


Phone  MA  7-9279 


808  W.  21st  St. 


NEW  YEAR 
GREETINGS 

GROVES 

Self  Service  Markets 

Quality,  Only  the  Finest 

$  1517  Colley  Avenue 
•     4108  Hampton  Blvd. 

NORFOLK,  VIRGINIA 


Greetings 

Overmeyer  &  Ennis 

MONUMENTS 

Forty  Years'  Experience 
MA  7-1822 
950  West  21st  Street 
Norfolk,  Va. 


1960 


5721 


October,  i960 

Richmond  Jewish  Community  Center 

(Concluded  from  Page  60) 


a  trip  to  Buckroe  Beach  as  guests 
at  a  picnic  given  by  the  Newport 
News  Golden  Age  Group.  The 
Grand  Group  Board,  along  with 
workers  for  the  National  Council 
of  Jewish  Women  and  their  new 
staff  adviser,  Hilda  Altbush,  are 
now  planning  the  fall  program 
which  will  be  the  biggest  and  best 
in  their  history. 

Saul  Viener.  president  of  the 
Jewish  Community  Center,  has 
set  his  program  committees  to 
work  on  plans  for  the  coining  sea- 
son's activities,  with  refinement  of 
program  as  their  primary  goal. 
Each  committee  is  concentrating 
on  the  development  of  new  ac- 
tivities of  highest  quality  and  in- 
terest, and  on  revising  current  pro- 
grams to  bring  out  their  full  poten- 
tial. 

Hortense  Wolf  and  Sadie  Engel- 

berg,  with  several  sub-committees 
to  asist  them,  have  designed  new 
programs  to  supplement  the  suc- 
cesful  adult  activities  schedule  of- 
fered last  season.  Definite  plans 
have  been  made  for  morning 
g  roups  in  painting,  beginners 
bridge  instruction,  choral  singing, 
and  modern  dance.  Evening  groups 
will  include  beginners  bridge  in- 
struction for  men  and  women, 
ballroom  dancing  for  couples, 
weekly  duplicate  bridge  tourna- 
ments for  both  newcomers  and 
seasoned  players,  and  a  music  ap- 
preciation class,  as  well  as  a  litera- 
ture study  group. 

A  special  feature  of  the  adult 
program  will  be  the  Tuesday 
evening  special  events  series.  Be- 
ginning early  in  October,  a  series 
of  four  programs  entitled  "We 
Elect  a  President*',  will  investigate 
the  potential  effect  of  the  election 
on   international,   national,  state, 


BRENNAN 

Jfimeral  JMmttc 


Directors  and  Embalmers 

EXport  7-3851 

711  Washington  St. 
PORTSMOUTH,  VA. 


and  local  affairs.  These  presenta 
tions  will  be  in  the  nature  of  ar 
open  forum  to  give  the  partici 
pants  a  full  opportunity  to  aii 
their  views 


The  next  event  will  be  four  Jew 
ish  Book  Month  programs  dealing 
with  biographies  of  Jewish  per 
sonalities.  Later  in  the  year,  a 
family  life  series  will  be  presented 
also,  classes  in  dramatics,  compara 
live  religions,  painting  for  men 
and  women,  ceramics,  and  enam 
eling,  provided  the  membership 
displays  sufficient  interest  to  su 
stain  such  activities. 


Plans  are  now  being  discussed 
by  the  committee,  Dick  Goldstein 
the  new  program  director,  and  a 
number  of  special  groups  through 
out  Richmond,  for  exhibitions  re 
lating  to  art,  culture,  and  history 

Newport  News  JWB 

On  the  dreary,  forbidding  island 
of  Adak  in  the  Aleutians,  a  rock 
bound  sentinel  against  Soviet 
power  —  where  the  williwaws,  the 
80-knot  Aleutian  winds,  sweep  and 
sandblast  the  quonset  huts  of  this 
American  outpost,  a  little  group  of 
American  Jews  in  uniform  took 
time  out  to  mark  the  High  Holy 
Days.  Ten  thousand  miles  or  so  to 
the  South,  in  the  warmer  Medi 
terranean  waters,  you  could  also 
see  —  if  you  had  a  magic  carpet 
the  ancient  prayers  recited  aboard 
the  mighty  ships  of  the  U.  S., 
thirty  of  whose  vessels  sailed  out 
of  Norfolk,  Va.,  fully  stocked  with 
Break-the-Tast  supplies  as  well  as 
religious  articles. 

Jewish  servicemen  and  patients 
at  Veterans  Hospitals  observed  the 
holidays  on  the  eve  of  Wednesday, 
September  21st  and  Thursday  and 
Friday,  September  22nd  and  23rd, 


BECK'S 


—  y     /  / 

$ettyjeu 


BREAD 

Baked  In 
NEWPORT  NEWS,  VA. 


m'tober,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


65 


hrough  arrangements  made  by  the 
National  Jewish  Welfare  Board 
(JWB)  governm  ent-authorized 
t^ency  for  serving  the  religious, 
ecreational  and  welfare  needs  of 
Tewish  servicemen  and  patients  in 
•eterans  hospitals.  JWB  is  also  a 
nember  of  USO. 

JWB  has  provided  for  the  needs 
)f  men  on  the  high  seas,  and  has 
orwarded  individual  prayer  kits 
o  isolated  units  (radar,  air  warn- 
ing, anti-aircraft  and  missle  sta- 
ions),  which  in  some  instances 
vill  get  the  supplies  by  helicopter 
)r  parachute  drops.  Jewish  chap- 
ains  on  special  High  Holy  Day 
missions  flew  to  remote  United 
itates  Posts  in  the  Arctic  and  the 
Caribbean  carrying  JWB  supplies. 


In  addition,  JWB  provided  for 
the  High  Holy  Day  needs  of  Jew- 
ish personnel  who  took  part  in 
Army,  Navy  and  Marine  exercises. 

Involved  in  JWB's  total  pro- 
gram for  approximately  150,000 
GIs  and  hospitalized  veterans  are 
over  370  full  and  part-time  Jewish 
chaplains,  JWB-USO  field  staff 
and  265  local  JWB  Armed  Serv- 
ice Committees  numbering  some 
10,000  persons.  Services  were  con- 
ducted at  all  VA  hospitals  where 
patients  received  Rosh  Hashanah 
holiday  packages.  In  some  hospi- 
tls,  recordings  of  the  services  were 
brought  to  the  bedside  of  the  pa- 
tients by  means  of  the  institution's 
public  address  system. 


Norfolk  J.W.V.  Auxiliary 


MRS.  ROSE  L.  FRIEDMAN 

The  33rd  National  Convention  of 
he  Ladies'  Auxiliary,  Jewish  War 
/eterans  of  the  United  States  of 
America,  was  held  jointly  with  65th 
Vational  Convention  of  the  Jewish 
iVar  Veterans  of  the  USA,  on  the 
veck  of  August  7th  to  the  14th  at 
he  Deauville  Hotel,  Miami  Beach, 
Fla. 

Mrs.  Bertha  W.  Krause  of  New 
fork,  was  unanimously  elected  to 
he  highest  office  of  National  Pres- 
dent  and  Mrs.  Rose  L.  Friedman, 
)f  Norfolk,  Va.,  was  unanimously 
lected  to  serve  as  National  Junior 
/ice  President  for  the  year  1960- 
961 . 

Mrs.  Friedman  has  held  elective 
National  offices  for  the  past  4  con- 


secutive times,  namely:  Immediate 
National  Chaplain;  National  Con- 
ductress; National  Patriotic  In- 
structor; National  Junior  Vice 
President  (at  the  present  time). 

Rose  Friedman  has  held  many 
National  appointive  offices  and 
chairmanships  such  as:  National 
Cultural  Chairman;  National 
Americanism  Chairman;  National 
Pages  and  Seating  Committee 
Chairman;  National  Musician 
(Songstress)  for  many  years;  Na- 
tional Banner  Bearer;  National 
Color  Bearer;  National  Hospital 
Chairman,  at  the  present  time. 

Delegates  from  the  State  of  Vir- 
ginia were:  Mrs.  Gladys  Davidson, 
Department  President  of  Newport 
News;  Mrs.  Lillian  Feuerstein, 
President  of  Ladies  Auxiliary  Old 
Dominion  Post,  Norfolk,  Va.;  Mrs. 
Fay  Harris,  Newport  News;  Mrs. 
Shirley  Hornstone,  Norfolk;  Mrs. 
Mollie  Gordon,  Norfolk;  Mrs. 
Ethel  Meyers,  Norfolk;  Mrs.  Claire 
Novick,  Norfolk;  Mrs.  Tarn  Sol- 
berg,  Norfolk;  Mrs.  Helen  P. 
Smith,  Norfolk. 

Mrs.  Friedman,  is  the  first  to  at- 
tain this  high  National  office  in 
the  South. 


A  new  record  album  comprising 
highlights  of  United  Nations  his- 
tory—from 1945  to  the  Congo  crisis 
in  i960— has  been  written  and  pro- 
duced by  Saul  Carson. 


COAL  FUEL  OIL 

PRINTED  METER  DELIVERIES 
PHONE  CH  4-8484  NEWPORT  NEWS,  VA 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a 
Happy  and  Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  following  Firms  in 

Newport  News— Hampton,  Va. 


Surety-Bonded  TERMITE  CONTROL 
Complete  PEST  CONTROL 

CALL 

w 


THE 
ORKiN 
MAN 


ORKIN  EXTERMINATING  COMPANY,  INC. 

World's  Largest  Pest  Control  Company 
Consult  the  Classified  Directory  For  Orkin  Office  Nearest  You 


WE  CORDIALLY  SOLICIT  YOUR  PATRONAGE      •      •  • 

•      •      •      COMPLETE  BANKING  SERVICE  SINCE  1891 


Citizens  Marine  Jefferson  Bank 

NEWPORT  NEWS,  VIRGINIA 
Member  of  the  Federal  Deposit  Insurance  Corporation 


won  mid  raw 


THE  FIRST  NATIONAL  BANK 

NEWPORT  NEWS,  VA. 
Serving  Historic  Virginia  Peninsula 
For  Over  60  Years 


DyDee  Wash 


NORFOLK  DIAL 
MADISON  5-0243 


424  CATALPHA  AVE. 
HAMPTON,  VA. 
CHestnut  4-2041 

As  a  member  of  the  National  Institute  of  Diaper  Service,  our  diapers 
are  under  "National  Laboratory  Control"  —  periodically  checked 
by  chemists  —  bacteriologists  —  to  maintain  100  per  cent  safety. 

Only  this  diaper  service  ...  no  other  .  .  .  brings  you  Baby  Talk. 


Fruits 
Vegetables 
Delicatessen 
Bakery 
Fresh  Meats 

7500  Virginia  Ave. 
1115  Jefferson  Ave 
Warwick 


66 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


October,  i960 


Season's  Greetings  and  Best  Wishes  for  a  Happy  and 
Prosperous  New  Year  from  the  Following  Firms  in 

Martinsville  Danville 
Petersburg— Fredericksburg,  Va. 


Greetings 


MARTINSVILLE 

Novelty  Corporation 
Table  Manufacturers 

Since  1929 
MARTINSVILLE,  VIRGINIA 

New  York  Representative 
HOBEL  BROS. 
206  Lexington  Avenue 
Permanent  Exhibits 
New  York  Furniture  American  Furniture 

Exchange  Mart 
New  York  Chicago,  111. 

Southern  Furniture  Exposition  Building — High  Point,  N.  C. 


GREETINGS 
from 

C.  P.  KEARFOTT 
&S0N 

MAYNARD  H.  SHELTON 

DRUGS 

MARTINSVILLE,  VA. 


Your  Insurance 
Friend  and  A  dviser 
Since  1908 


Ford  Insurance 
Co. . . . 


MARTINSVILLE,  VA. 


THE  FIRST  NATIONAL  BANK 

of  Martinsville  and  Henry  County 
9  Collinsville  %  Fieldale 


Martinsville 


South  Office 


OVER  A  CENTURY  OF  SERVICE 

J.  T.  MORRISS  &  SON,  INC. 


Funeral  Directors 


Adams  and  Wythe  Sts. 
REgent  3-8511 
PETERSBURG,  VA. 


W.  Broadway  &  9th  Ave. 
GLenview  8-8516 
HOPEWELL,  VA. 


YOUR  LOCAL  DISTRIBUTORS  OF 
Quality  Dairy  Products 

Farmers  Creamery 
Company,  Inc. 

FREDERICKSBURG,  VA. 


Advertising  Index 


urcn  n:iD  raw 


Greetings 


All  good  ivishes  for  a  New  Year  of  Peace,  Happiness,  and  Prosperity. 
The  advertisers  listed  herewith  extend  to  their  friends  and  patrons 

their  most  sincere  holiday  greetings. 


PAGE 

Ben  Arnold  Co.,  Inc.    —  8 

Asheville  White  Sales,  Inc.   23 

Atlantis   Hot_l   4 

Battery  Park  Hotel       4 

W.  A.  Baxter  Oil  Co    23 

Biltmore  Dairy  Farms      23 

Blue  Ridge  Trucking  Co.     23 

Brick  and  Tile  Service    42  &  43 

Buckingham  Virginia  Slate  Corp.  51 

Colonial  Stores   Inside  front  cover 

Copeland  Co    _  12 

Democratic  National 

Committee  _  Back  cover 

Dixie  Beuai  .g  Co.   Inside  back  cover 

Eddy  Ray  Hep  1th  Studios    3 

Evans  Box  and  Crate  Co.  ... _  21 

First  National  Bank  of  Wilson    .45 

Gold  Shop  .       37 

Greensboro   News-Record     3 

Guyes  3' 

Israel  Bonds    18 

Kalmia   Dairy      _  23 

Kingan  Co         50 

Kline  Iron  &  Steel  Co   3 

Lester  Bros   Inside  front  cov^r 

Lingle  Electric  Repair  Shop  37 

Main  Drug  Co.   .   37 

Montaldo's  of  Richmond,  Va  _10 

Old  Mansion  Pnffee       Inside  front  cover 

Piedmont  Airlines  .      4 

Piedmont  Lumber  Co.   23 

Dick  Poff   _      7 

Richmond  Pai-v     Inside  front  covei 

Salisbury  Printing  Co  _.    .....37 

Sea'test  c0'  tv"irrl  n-iries   J 

Smith   Transfer   Corp.   50 


 23 

.38 


Pag 

South  Carolina  Electric  Co. 

George  Vanderbilt  Hotel  

SOUTH  CAROLINA 

Charleston  13-11 

Columbia  19 

Greenville     ..21-2: 

Spartanburg    ....21-2: 

NORTH  CAROLINA 

Asheville   

Charlotte   

Fayetteville  44-4: 

Greensboro  _  24-3! 

Hendersonville  _  23 

High  Point  _  ...  36-3' 

Salisbury   .37 

Wilmington   _  -42-4,' 

Winston-Salem   _     39-4 

TENNESSEE 

Chattanooga  48 

Knoxville     46-4( 

GEORGIA 
Augusta     _  49 

VIRGINIA 

Charlottesville   .     _  _57 

Danville     66 

Fredericksburg    66 

Hampton      ._  65 

Harrisonburg  57 

Lynchburg    62-6: 

Martinsville    ....66 

Newport  News    64-6 

Norfolk   _    64 

Petersburg  _.  66 

Portsmouth  _    ..64 

Richmond  52-51 

Roanoke  —   58-6 

Staunton   _   57 


Plain  Talk 

(Concluded  from  Page  6) 

should  rather  make  an  effort  to 
live  with  the  differences  which 
are  here  and  very  likely  will  con- 
tinue to  be  .  .  .  Peace  in  the  World 
.  .  .  can  come  only  through  the 
laws  of  Divine  Power  within  us. 
Many  should  concentrate  on  these 
laws  and  resolve  to  establish  a 
peace  in  the  world  .  .  .  can  come 
only  through  the  laws  of  Divine 
Power  within  us.  Many  should 
concentrate  on  these  laws  and  re- 
solve to  establish  a  peace  that  will 
lead  to  an  understanding  of  our 
fellowman." 


earth  decent,  I  won't  mind  you 
going  to  the  moon.  I'll  go  along 
What  do  you  say,  professor?" 

There  was  no  answer.  Prof 
Shlemiel's  eyes  were  traveling  t( 
the  moon  again  with  his  mind. 

McKEE 

Funeral  Home 

INCORPORATED 
Funeral  Directors 
24-Hour  Ambulance  Service 
Phone  ME  2-3466 
Martinsville,  Virginia 


"Yes,  my  dear  professor,  "I  went 
on  to  say,  "that's  it  .  .  .  that's 
what  we're  in  the  world  for  .  .  . 
and  it's  so  shlemiel-like  for  you 
and  other  professors  to  be  worry- 
ing yourselves  about  the  moon 
rather  ...  or,  maybe,  Venus."  (I 
winked  at  this  on  the  idea  that 
rnaybe  I  couldn't  find  as  much 
fault  in  Prof.  Shlemiel  if  he  went 
hunting  for  Venus.) 

I  paused  a  moment,  then  went 
on:  "So,  professor,  are  you  coming 
down  from  the  moon  to  do  what 
scholars  should  be  doing  down 
here  for  the  good  of  earth.  Yes, 
after  we've  finished  making  the 


W.  D.  ROWE  CO. 

E.  W.  MYERS,  Pres.-Treas. 


Monuments  of  Distinction 

2322  N.  Main  St. 
DANVILLE,  VA. 


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THE  TIMES  CALL  FOR 

GREATNESS 

ELECT  KENNEDY-JOHNSON 
•  •  .  NOVEMBER  8th 


Once  in  a  decade  a  great  man 
appears— a  man  with  courage, 
intelligence,  and  the  vigor  to  do 
the  things  that  have  to  be  done 
for  a  nation's  welfare  and  peace 
in  the  world.  Senator  John  F. 
Kennedy  believes  in  the  need 
for  greatness.  If  you,  too,  be- 
lieve the  American  people  have 
a  destiny  in  the  New  Frontiers 
of  the  '60's,  support  John  Ken- 
nedy and  the  Democratic  Party 


Julian  M.  Blachman 
Portsmouth,  Virginia  Man  of  the  Quarter  Century 

November  7960 


WHY  THOUSANDS  OF  VIRGINIA 
DEMOCRATS  WILL  VOTE  FOR 

NIXON-LODGE 


BECAUSE 

WE  MUST  HAVE  a  President  who  is  qualified  to  lead 
this  Nation  —  and  the  Free  World  —  through  these 
critical  times  and  to  wage  an  effective  fight  to  protect  and 
strengthen  America  in  the  face  of  mounting  Communist 
pressures. 

BECAUSE 

Our  next  President  and  his  Vice  President  must  have  ex- 
perience, maturity  and  firmness  in  leadership,  must  know 
and  command  the  respect  of  world  leaders  and,  above  all, 
must  understand  the  nature  of  the  Communist  threat  to  our 
very  existence  as  a  free  country. 

BECAUSE 

We  need  leaders  with  the  judgment,  coolness  and  inner 
force  to  stand  up  to  —  and  not  be  bluffed  or  intimidated 
by  —  the  Red  dictators.  Our  ne>*t  President  must  strong- 
ly and  skillfully  assert  America's  position  in  these  times 
of  crisis. 

BECAUSE 

We  all  remember  that  it  was  Richard  Nixon  who  spoke  up 
vigorously  for  America  in  the  famous  Moscow  debate  with 
Khrushchev  .  .  .  and  that  it  was  John  Kennedy  who  would 
have  "apologized"  to  Khrushchev  over  the  U-2  incident. 

BECAUSE 

Vice  President  Nixon  for  8  years  has  stood  high  in  the 
councils  of  government,  has  participated  in  hundreds  of 
critical  decisions,  has  traveled  to  trouble  spots  of  the  world 
in  54  different  countries  and  has  had  to  meet — on  his  own — 
the  same  type  of  problems  which  will  confront  our  next 
President.  Ambassador  Lodge  has  been  our  chief  represen- 
tative in  the  United  Nations,  where  he  has  been  a  respected 
policy  maker  as  well  as  an  able,  aggressive  negotiator  and 
advocate  for  America.  It  cannot  be  denied  that  Nixon  and 
Lodge  have  incomparably  greater  experience  in  dealing  with 
the  problems  of  the  Cold  War  than  have  Kennedy  and 
Johnson. 

BECAUSE 

It  makes  no  sense  at  this  critical  time  to  reject  a  tried  and 
tested  leader  in  favor  of  a  young  candidate  with  no  execu- 
tive experience  and  no  demonstrated  capacity  for  leader- 
ship, who  shows  a  lack  of  understanding  of  the  Communist 
menace. 


BECAUSE 

THE  1960  DEMOCRATIC  PLATFORM  is  the  most 
radical  platform  ever  adopted  by  a  major  American 
party.  It  violates  principles  dear  to  Virginia  Democrats 
It  makes  an  unprecedented  appeal  to  the  special  interest  at 
the  expense  of  the  national  interest.  This  Platform  calls 
for  a  dramatic  increase  of  control  by  the  Federal  Govern- 
ment over  every  area  of  national  life,  reduces  the  States  to 
inconsequential  satellites  and  promises  vast  "giveaways"  to 
almost  every  pressure  group.  It  dishonestly  calls  for  12 
billions  of  new  expenditures  without  any  increase  in  taxes. 
It  expressly  and  specifically  pledges  to  abolish  by  Federal 
fiat  the  right-to-work  laws  of  Virginia  and  19  other  States, 
and  thereby  force  thousands  of  our  workers  into  the  "closed 
shop"  and  the  enforced  payment  of  union  dues.  It  con- 
tains provisions  for  increased  Federal  direction  of  business 
(large  and  small),  and  also  for  vast  "welfare  state"  pro- 
grams of  many  types  which,  in  effect,  constitute  a  plan 
for  the  socialization  of  American  life. 

BECAUSE 

Kennedy  backs  this  left-wing,  spendthrift  and  divisive 
Democratic  Platform  100f/<'  !  In  his  acceptance  speech  on 
July  15,  he  called  it  a  solemn  "pledge"  and  "a  platform  on 
which  I  can  run  with  enthusiasm  and  conviction."  Again, 
in  a  Los  Angeles  speech  on  September  9,  Kennedy  em- 
phasized: "I  am  proud  of  our  platform;  I  believe  in  our 
platform". 

BECAUSE 

Kennedy  is  the  "yes  man"  of  Walter  Reuther  and  the 
national  labor  bosses.  Kennedy  acknowledged  this  when, 
in  his  Detroit  speech  on  Labor  Day,  he  promised  Reuther 
and  the  bosses  that  "whatever  you  oppose,  I  oppose." 
Indeed,  Kennedy's  record  proves  his  subservience:  Gover- 
nor "Soapy"  Williams,  another  Reuther  protege,  recently 
boasted  that  "Senator  Kennedy  has  a  perfect  record"  on 
15  key  issues  important  to  Reuther  and  Williams,  while 
Nixon  was  "right  on  only  one  of  these  issues"  (New  York 
Times,  September  6,  1960).  Kennedy  has  consistently  op- 
posed measures  designed  to  curb  the  union  bosses  and  make 
the  unions  truly  democratic  and  responsible.  If  Kennedy 
is  elected  President,  he  will  not  be  free  to  act  in  the  best 
interest  of  all  of  the  people.  Both  he,  and  the  platform 
which  he  supports  enthusiastically,  are  committed  to  ac- 
complish the  selfish  wishes  of  this  small  group  of  mono- 
polistic  union  bosses. 


BECAUSE 

THE  NOMINATION  of  Kennedy,  as  many  leaders  of 
the  National  Democratic  Party  repeatedly  proclaimed 
prior  to  Los  Angeles,  was  not  in  the  best  interest  of  our 
'Country: 

,  Ex-President  Harry  Truman :  "Senator,  are  you  certain  that 
|  you  are  quite  ready  for  the  country  or  that  the  country  is 
ready  for  you  in  the  role  of  President  in  January,  1961? 
I  am  greatly  concerned  and  troubled  about  the  situation  we 
are  up  against  in  the  world  now  and  in  the  immediate 
i  future.  That  is  why  I  would  hope  that  someone  with  the 
greatest  possible  maturity  and  experience  would  be  avail- 
able at  this  time."  (New  York  Herald  Tribune,  7-3-60) 

iSen.  Robert  C.  Byrd  (D-W.  Va.) :  "Kennedy  lacks  the 
age  and  experience  to  be  president  in  these  perilous  days. 

!  I  find  it  difficult  to  be  secure  in  the  thought  of  his  sitting 
down  with  the    Adenauers,  the  DeGaulles,  the  MacMillans 

,  and  the  Khrushchevs  as  our  country  wrestles  with  imnort- 

;  ant  problems  in  the  field  of  international  affairs."  (Balti- 

t  more  Sun  4-14-60) 

(Rep.  Sam  Rayburn  (D-Tex.)  :  "It's  easy  for  someone  to  say, 
I  T  can  lead  a  great  cause,'  but  untested  we  cannot  put  faith 
and  confidence  and  our  perpetuity  in  hands  like  that."  (New 
jYork  Times,  7-14-60) 

Sen.  Wayne  Morse  (D-Ore.)  :  "His  statements  in  regard 
to  campaign  expenses  are  further  evidence  as  to  his  lack 
of  qualifications  for  the  Presidency.  The  American  people 
should  make  clear  to  Senator  Kennedy  that  the  White 
House  will  never  be  put  up  for  sale  ...  it  is  obvious  that  the 
truth  is  not  in  him."  (Baltimore  Sun,  5-29-60) 

Sen.  Lyndon  B.  Johnson  (D-Tex.)  :  (Shouting  to  a  Wash- 
ington State  Democratic  Convention  at  Spokane)  :  "I  am 
not  prepared  to  apologize  to  Mr.  Khrushchev  —  I  am  not 
prepared  to  send  regrets  to  Mr.  Khrushchev — Are  You?" 
(New  York  Times,  5-31-60) 

Sen.  Hubert  Humphrey  (D-Min.)  :  In  switching  his  con- 
vention vote  from  Kennedy  to  Stevenson :  "This  is  anything 
else  but  a  protest  vote — it  is  concern  for  my  country."  (As- 
sociated Press,  7-13-60) 

Thus,  Kennedy  is  condemned  and  his  lack  of  qualifications 
deplored — not  only  by  Republicans,  but  by  the  leading 
National  Democrats  who  know  him  best! 

BECAUSE 

Kennedy  has  repeatedly  shown  his  contempt  for  the  South. 
Prior  to  his  nomination  (while  seeking  left-wing  support 
in  New  York) ,  Kennedy  boasted  to  the  labor  bosses  that  he 
had  "little  support  in  the  South"  and  if  elected  would 
break  "the  present  coalition  of  Southern  Democrats  and 
Northern  Republicans"  (New  York  Times,  June  18,  1960) . 


BECAUSE 

Robert  Kennedy,  also  campaigning  in  New  York  for  his  bro- 
ther, recently  "assailed  the  Southern  Democrats  in  Con- 
gress," designated  Senator  Byrd  and  Representative  Ho- 
ward Smith  of  Virginia  as  "the  chief  culprits"  of  the  past 
session  of  Congress  and  accused  both  of  these  distinguished 
Virginians  of  "deliberately  sabotaging  legislation"  (Wash- 
ington Star,  August  26,  1960) . 

BECAUSE 

Although  Kennedy  sometimes  talks  one  way  in  the  North 
and  another  in  the  South  while  seeking  the  votes  he  now 
needs  so  desperately,  Kennedy's  record  and  the  Democratic 
Platform  constitute  a  pledge  to  pass  a  series  of  punitive 
Federal  laws  which  would  be  the  most  flagrant  invasion  of 
States'  rights  in  our  history.  Thus,  it  is  essential  to  the 
South  and  all  America  that  the  Executive  Branch  of  the 
Federal  Government  remain  moderately  conservative  and 
free  from  radicals  and  extremists  who  would  surely  domi- 
nate a  Kennedy  Administration. 

BECAUSE 

WE  BELIEVE  that  Richard  Nixon,  a  strong,  decisive 
leader,  is  uniquely  qualified  by  his  experience  in 
Congress  and  as  Vice  President  to  assume  the  duties  of 
the  Presidency.  As  President  Eisenhower  has  said: 
"There  is  no  man  in  the  history  of  America  who  has  had 
such  a  careful  preparation  as  has  Vice  President  Nixon  for 
carrying  out  the  duties  of  the  Presidency  .  .  .  there  hasn't 
been  a  principal  administrative  meeting  among  the  heads 
of  Government  that  he  has  not  attended  as  an  active  parti- 
cipant. He  has  gone  on  behalf  of  the  United  States,  to 
many  foreign  countries.  And  in  every  country  he  has 
visited  . . .  the  United  States  has  gained  many  additional 
friends." 

BECAUSE 

We  resent  the  shameful  charge  made  at  Los  Angeles  and 
repeated  by  Kennedy,  in  his  campaign  speeches,  that  the 
United  States  has  become  a  "second  class  power".  President 
Eisenhower  (who  is  better  qualified  to  judge  than  the  inex- 
perienced Kennedy)  has  solemnly  assured  us  that  America 
is  the  most  powerful  nation  on  earth.  Kennedy's  irrespon- 
sible charge  is  not  only  untrue,  but  is  being  used  for  sel- 
fish political  advantage  to  the  detriment  of  our  world  po- 
sition at  a  time  when  America  is  under  relenting  propagan- 
da attack  from  the  Reds. 

BECAUSE 

In  1952  and  1956  many  thousands  of  Virginia  Democrats 
supported  General  Eisenhower  for  President  —  now  they 
believe  Richard  Nixon  is  best  qualified  to  be  his  successor. 
Join  the  thousands  of  DEMOCRATS  who  will  vote  for 
NIXON  AND  LODGE. 


PUT  PRINCIPLES 
ABOVE  POLITICS 


VIRGINIA  DEMOCRATS  FOR  NIXON  -  LODGE 


801-A  EAST  MAIN  STREET 


E.  B.  SYDNOR,  JR. 
STATE  CHAIRMAN 


HEADQUARTERS 

RICHMOND,  VIRGINIA 
OFFICERS: 


TELEPHONE  MI-8-4496 


MRS.  DOUGLAS  SOUTHALL  FREEMAN 
STATE  WOMAN'S  CHAIRMAN 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


November,  ig6o 


PLAIN  TALK 


By  ALFRED  SEGAL 


ALL  ABOUT 
"KITCHEN  JUDIASM" 

Oh,  I'm  so  thankful  to  Rabbi 
Samuel  Rosinger  of  2355  Rusk 
Avenue  in  Beaumont,  Tex.,  who's 
doing  this  column  for  me.  It's 
a  hot  midsummer  day  and  I'd 
much  rather  be  out  there  in  the 


ALFRED  SEGAL 

breezy  coolness  of  a  lake  or 
river  than  to  be  sitting  at  my 
typewriter  trying  to  think  some- 
thing for  the  column.  It's  a  tough 
life,  writing  a  column,  particular- 
ly on  a  day  so  hot! 

Well,  I  was  laboring  in  vain,  in 
all  this  heat,  wrestling  for  an  idea 
when,  all  of  a  sudden,  I  remem- 
ber Rabbi  Rosinger  of  Beaumont. 
Sometime  before  he  had  sent  me 
a  piece  titled  "Kitchen  Judaism" 
which  was  both  scholarly  and  full 
of  fun  ...  all  about  kneidlach, 
lokschen  soup,  borscht,  etc. 

Rabbi  Rosinger  thus  was  re- 
sponding to  one  of  my  columns  in 
which  I  had  written  sentimentally 
about  "Kosher  Grandma's  Cook- 
ing," I  dug  through  the  heap  on 
my  crowded  desk  and  there,  deep 
in  it  all,  lay  Rabbi  Rosinger's 
essay  on  "Kitchen  Judaism." 

This  column  hasn't  room  for  it 
all,  but  I  feel  so  thankful  to  have 
Rabbi  Rosinger's  wisdom,  smiles 
and  eye-winks  with  which  to  fill 
this  column  on  this  hot  day.  Says 
he:  "There  was  a  time  when  pro- 
tagonists of  Reform  Judaism  con- 
temptuously hurled  at  Orthodoxy 
the  epithet  of  Kitchen  Judaism.' 
This  phrase  contains  a  sneering 
allusion  to  the  large  place  the 
dietary  laws  occupy  in  the  scheme 


of  traditional  Judaism.  I,  for  one, 
without  being  an  epicure,  consider 
the  slightest  slur  on  the  Jewish 
kitchen  as  bordering  on  blasphemy 
.  .  .A  treatise  of  profound  scholar- 
ship could  be  written  on  the  in- 
fluence of  the  Jewish  kitchen  upon 
the  Jewish  soul.  I  am  convinced 
that  while  Abraham's  piety  had  a 
great  deal  to  do  with  the  visit  of 
the  angels  to  his  tent,  the  irresis- 
tible fragrance  of  Sarah's  freshly 
baked  cakes  floating  in  the  air, 
was  in  no  small  measure  respon- 
sible for  the  landing  of  the  wing- 
ed messengers  under  the  terebinth 
of  Mamre." 

Rabbi  Rosinger  goes  on  with  a 
delightful  wink.  (I  like  to  see 
rabbis  winking  rather  than  just 
looking  scornfully  at  our  poor 
sins.)  The  rabbi  winks:  "And  so 
throughout  Jewish  history  piety 
and  pastry  maintained  an  intimate 
connection.  The  reason  why  Gen- 
tile critics  persist  in  regarding  the 
Rabbinic  Sabbath  with  its  intimate 
observance  and  restriction  a  day  of 
unrelieved  gloom,  is  due  to  their 
ignorance  of  the  supreme  delight 
with  which  the  superb  Sabbath 
dishes  saturated  the  soul  of  the 
Jew.  What  Jew  who  has  tasted  the 
chalent  and  kugel  and  other  de- 
lectable dishes  which  Kitchen 
Judaism  created,  thinks  of  the 
Sabbath  otherwise  but  as  a  day 
of  intense  joy  and  pleasure  .  .  ." 

The  rabbi  brings  up  Purim  .  .  . 
the  occasion  when  we're  so  thank- 
ful to  Queen  Esther,  the  Jewish 
girl,  whose  persuasions  saved  the 
Jews  of  Persia  from  that  awful 
Hainan  .  .  .  The  rabbi  says:  "The 
beauty  and  grace  of  Esther,  yes  .  .  . 
but  the  strudel  and  the  bagels  and 
the  fladels  which  Esther  fed  her 
loyal  spouse  .  .  .  who  dares  deny? 
.  .  .  must  have  had  their  due  share 
in  changing  his  majesty  from  a 
rabid  Jew-hater  into  a  passionate 
pro-Semite.  What  male,  I  pray, 
would  not  have  a  warm  heart  for 
a  people  that  can  produce  such 
heavenly  pastry?" 

Then  Rabbi  Rosinger  looks  at 
Jewish  homes  all  around.  So 
few  divorces  in  them!  He  exults: 
"If  you  want  to  know  the  truth, 
thle  felicity  and  permanency  of 
Jewish  marriages  are  due  to  the 
Jewish  kitchen.  If  Gentile  women 
could  cook  as  well  as  Jewish 
house-wives,  the  divorce  evil,  the 


%  I 

1  1 

&  Plain  Talk  —  Alfred  Segal                                                                     4  | 

?  Editorial;                                                                                              5  $ 

y  Man  of  the  Month  —  Julian  Blachman    ._                      7  & 

"  1 


Barney  Glazer's  Hollywood      9 

Parables  of  A  Modern  Prophet  —  Rabbi  Solomon  Jacobson    19 

NORTH  CAROLINA 


§ 
§ 

<S>  Salisbury  —  Mrs.  S.  W.  Guyes    -    6  . 

?  Winston-Salem — Mrs.  George  Green  and  Mrs.  Lewis  Wolberg             6  § 

y  New  Bern  — .  Mrs.  Lou  Elden    .    9  & 

$  Durham  —  Mrs.  Sam  Freedman                                                        10  ^ 


Jacksonville  —  Mrs.  Jules  Segerman 


10  1 


§  Asheville — Mrs.  Gustav  Lichtenfels    14  § 

§  Charlotte  Temple  Israel  —  Mrs.  Ted  Valenstein    17  X 

£  Around  Greensboro  —  Mrs.  Daniel  Hollander  and  J 


§ Around  Greensboro  —  Mrs.  Daniel  Hollander  and 
Mrs.  Edward  G.  Ricketts    18  § 

y  Charlotte  B'nai  B'rith  Women  —  Mrs.  Norma  Musler    19 

&  Rocky  Mount  —  Mrs.  Samuel  H.  Justa      20 

?  Goldsboro  —  Rabbi  Israel  J.  Sarasohn      22 

j  Wilmington  —  Mrs.  Norma  May      24 

§  Whiteville  —  Mrs.  Martin  Bernstein      24 

^  Raleigh  Temple  Beth  Or  —  Mrs.  Harry  Caplan     25 


,  _    ,  ...    ^  I 

Raleigh  Beth  Meyer  Synagogue  —  Mrs.  Oscar  L?gum    25  § 

VIRGINIA 


  8  4 

Beth  Sholom  Home  of  Virginia  _      8  § 


Newport  News  —  Mrs.  Martha  B.  Shapiro  _ 


§ 

§  Richmond  Hadassah  —  Mrs.  Alan  G.  Minko    

y  Roanoke  Hadassah  —  Mrs.  Sol  S.  Katz    - 

§  Roanoke  Beth  Israel  Synagogue  —  Mrs.  Sal  S.  Katz   

§  Richmond  Temple  Beth  El  —  Mrs.  Eddie  Cantor     

§  Richmond  Council  of  Jewish  Women  —  Mrs.  Nancy  P.  Thalhimer 

^  Portsmouth  —  Meyer  H.  Jacobson 

^  Richmond  B'nai  B'rith  Women 


§ 

§ 
§ 
§ 
§ 
§ 
§ 


Mrs.  Allen  Mallion   

Norfolk  —  Mrs.  William  Schwartz     

Martinsville  —  Mrs.  Ralph  Hollander    27 


§ 

Charleston          9  § 

Columbia  —  Mrs.  Bernard  Laden      26  § 

TENNESSEE 


SOUTH  CAROLINA 


Knoxville        29 


solution  of  which  baffles  imprac- 
tical moralists,  would  speedily  van- 
ish from  the  land.  Kitchen  Juda- 
ism far  from  being  an  epithet  of 
scorn,  is  a  crown  of  glory!" 

Yes,  and  more,  the  rabbi  says, 
even  the  Reform  Jews  are  taking 
up  kitchen  Judaism  which  they 
used  to  scorn.  Says  he:  "Ever  since 
the  community  center  has  become 
a  vital  adjunct  of  Reform  Judaism, 
Kitchen  Judaism  is  very  much  evi- 
dent in  the  Temple  precincts,  and 
from  all  indications,  it  bids  fair 
to  loom  larger  in  the  Reform 
scheme  of  salvation  than  the  place 
it  has  ever  held  in  the  Orthodox 
discipline.  Ask  any  Reform  Jew  or 
Jewess  what  are  the  most  effective 
means  wherewith  to  induce  people 
to  attend  meetings  of  the  congre- 
gation or  of  any  club  or  organiza- 
tion connected  with  the  Temple. 
Is  it  to  invite  a  silver  -  tongued 
speaker,  a  thrushthroated  singer  or 
any  other  distinguished  entertain- 


er? People  have  to  be  pulled  with 
ropes  to  listen  to  the  performers. 
They  are  surfeited  with  speeches. 
But  let  the  Temple  sisters  pre- 
pare a  good  dinner  or  supper!  The 
sensitive  Jewish  nostril  instincti- 
vely responds  to  the  aroma  of  the 
traditional  dishes.  At  no  time  are 
the  members  in  a  more  receptive 
mood  to  listen  to  presidential 
messages,  reports  of  committees 
and  appeals  for  charities  than 
after  the  consumption  of  the  de- 
licious courses." 

And  the  rabbis  adds:  "It  is  a 
wonder  to  me  that  Reform  rabbis 
who  constantly  complain  of  the 
chronic  emptines  of  the  pews, 
have  not  yet  hit  upon  the  idea  of 
asking  the  Sisterhood  to  serve 
after  services  an  old-fashioned 
meal." 

Well  this  is  about  all  the  room 
this  column  has  for  Rabbi  Rosin- 
ger's wise  and  winking  piece.  I'm 

(Please  Turn  to  Page  13) 


VOLUME  XXVI  •  NOVEMBER  1960 


NUMBER  3 


EDITORIALS 


Chester  A.  Brown,  Editor 


Double  -  Header 

The  date  October  30th,  i960  will  be  a  red-letter  day  in 
the  archives  of  the  Portsmouth,  Virginia,  Jewish  Community. 

It  was  on  that  date  that  the  Gomley  Chesed  Congregation, 
of  Portsmouth,  held  a  dinner  celebrating  the  70th  anniversary 
of  the  founding  of  the  synagogue,  and  simultaneously  honored 
Julian  Blachman  as  the  "Man  of  the  Quarter  Century." 

A  70th  birthday  is  an  important  milestone  in  the  life  of 
a  group,  just  as  it  is  for  an  individual  who  has  achieved  his 
biblical  span  of  life.  An  organization  has  to  be  nurtured  and 
cared  for  just  as  the  child  has  to  be  guided  through  all  of  the 
vissitudes  of  life.  And,  when  a  ripe  old  age  has  been  reached, 
those  who  have  been  responsible  for  the  splendid  growth  are 
to  be  congratulated  and  commended,  just  as  the  parents  of  the 
individual  are  worthy  of  citation. 

In  paying  tribute  to  Julian  Blachman  the  congregation 
has  honored  itself,  just  as  much  as  it  has  honored  the  recipient 
of  its  recognition. 

May  Gomley  Chesed,  and  Julian  Blachman.  continue  to 
"grow  from  strength  to  strength." 

Milton  Weinstein 

In  the  untimely  passing  of  Milton  Weinstein,  on  October 
2nd,  the  Greensboro  Jewish  Community  lost  one  of  its  most 
dedicated  members. 

As  president  of  Temple  Emanuel,  he  had  only  just  as- 
sumed this  role,  after  years  of  prior  service.  As  president  of 
the  Greensboro  United  Jewish  Charities,  he  was  performing 
efficiently  for  an  organization  to  which  he  had  also  given 
prior  service  His  loss  in  both  capacities  will  leave  a  void  dif- 
ficult to  fill. 

His  tragice  demise  at  the  early  age  of  53  deprives  his  fam- 
ily and  friends  of  a  potent  influence  on  their  lives.  The  over- 
flow attendance  at  his  funeral  rite  in  Temple  Emanuel  was 
silent  tribute  to  the  love  and  esteem  in  which  he  was  universal- 
ly held.  This  should  be  a  source  of  comfort  and  consolation  to 
those  who  knew  him. 

May  his  soul  rest  in  peace. 

Bermuda  Joins  The  New  Trends 

Recent  reports  by  the  Anti-Defamation  League  of  B'nai 
B'rith  indicate  noteworthy  progress  in  the  direction  of  dimin- 
ishing discrimination  at  the  country's  leading  resorts,  notably 
in  Florida. 

Now  comes  a  statement  from  the  League  giving  a  rosy 
picture  on  what  has  been  an  outstanding  sore-spot  for  these 
many  years  —  Bermuda,  a  British  Crown  Colony. 

This  report  is  based  on  personal  observations  of  staff- 
member  Harold  Braverman  who  recently  visited  this  island 
paradise.  He  talked  with  local  merchants,  officials  and  hotel 


executives,  and  now  advances  the  opinion  that  religious  dis- 
crimination there  has  dwindled  to  the  vanishing  point. 

This  is  indeed  significant,  for  it  was  not  too  many  years 
ago  that  the  most  ingenious  schemes  were  activated  to  keep 
Jews  from  Bermuda  hotels.  Official  Bermuda  has  always  claim- 
ed that  it  had  not  part  in  these  machinations,  but  that  they 
were  the  doings  of  travel  and  resort  agencies.  One  such  plan 
used  code  words  which  identified  for  the  hotel  managers  re- 
ligions and  races  on  applications  for  accomodations. 

Mr.  Braverman  now  finds  all  this  changed.  He  reports  a 
definite  desire  on  the  part  of  all  involved  to  make  Jews  welcome 
to  the  island.  He  gives  it  as  his  opinion  that  the  Bermuda 
problem  is  no  longer  a  religious  one,  but  racial. 

Of  course  Bermuda  was  never  essential  to  the  happines 
of  a  Jew.  However,  it  is  a  pleasant  spot,  endowed  with  all  of 
the  attactive  features  of  a  resort,  and  it  is  at  least  nice  to  know 
that  we  can  go  there,  if  we  want  to,  without  hindrance. 

As  in  most  similar  instances  credit  must  go  to  the  ADL 
for  handling  a  difficult  situation  in  exemplary  fashion. 

Who  May  Speak  For  Whom  ? 

The  Eichmann  case  has  again  raised  the  important  ques- 
tion as  to  whether  the  State  of  Israel  has  the  right  to  represent 
itself  as  the  authority  to  speak  and  act  for  world  Jewry.  Israel 
has  made  this  claim  on  other  occasions,  notably  when  the 
Cologne  incident  of  last  December  sparked  a  world-wide  anti- 
Semitic  demonstration.  At  that  time,  David  Ben  Gurion  sent 
communications  simultaneously  to  all  countries,  including  the 
United  States,  condemning  the  acts  of  vandalism  that  were 
being  perpetrated.  While  Jews  all  over  joined  in  this  con- 
demnation, it  brought  up  the  question  as  to  whether  Israel 
was  justified  in  the  action  it  took,  inferring  as  it  did,  that  it 
was  speaking  for  Jews  everywhere. 

The  Anglo-Jewish  Association  of  Great  Britain,  a  non- 
Zionist,  (but  not  anti-Zionist)  organization  took  exception  to 
the  Ben  Gurion  communication;  upon  which  Golda  Meier 
stated  dogmatically  that  Israel  would  continue  to  protest  all 
actions  that  had  to  do  with  world  Jewry. 

Now  comes  the  Eichmann  case,  with  Israel's  insistence  on 
its  right  to  jurisdiction,  and  the  World  Jewish  Organization 
among  others,  is  making  the  point  that  Israel  alone  has  no 
right  to  speak  for  the  Jews  of  the  world,  nor  to  adjudicate  cases 
that  involve  Jews  outside  its  own  borders. 

There  is  parallel  confusion  in  our  own  country  when  a 
voice  is  needed  to  speak  for  American  Jewry.  This  leads  us  to 
comment  on  the  address  made  by  Rabbi  Israel  Goldstein  be- 
fore the  Rabbinical  Assembly  of  America,  in  which  he  again 
brings  up  the  urgency  of  revitalizing  the  ill-fated  American 
Jewish  Conference.  Criticism  has  been  made  of  this  sugges- 
tion, as  we  have  from  time  to  time  reported,  on  the  score  that 
such  an  attempt  would  fail  now  because  no  "crisis"  exists. 
It  is  felt  by  some  that  a  crisis  is  a  condition  necessary  to  or- 
ganization. While  there  might  be  some  merit  in  this  conten- 

Please  Turn  To  Page  23 


■  .  The  Amucan  Jewish  Times-Outlook,  published  monthly  at  530  Southeastern  Building,  P.  O.  Box  1469.  Greensboro,  N.  C.  Chester  A.  Brown,  Editor-  David  Bernstein  Pub- 
^1.  ?,r,;o  1^5?  ,^6S3t  r'  i^,^ager'  Vu-Sinia  Office;  Florence  Byers,  Virginia  News  Editor;  Broad  Grace  Arcade,  P.  O  Box  701,  Richmond,  Va.  Member  Seven  Arts 
feature  Syndicate  Inc.  S2.00  per  year  payable  in  advance.  Entered  as  Second-Class  Matter  at  the  Post  Office  at  Greensboro,  N.  C,  under  Act  of  March  5  1879  The 
n^i^XF-Te^'e  *  yJco?£,!?uto,rs,  are  no^  neces^rUy  those  of  the  publishers,  but  may  be  published  in  the  interest  of  freedom  of  the  press.  The  American  Jewish  Times- 
Outlook  i=.  owned  and  edited  solely  as  an  independent  enterprise  and  is  not  a  Jewish  community  undertaking. 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


November,  i()6o 


Salisbury,  M.  C. 

MRS.  S.  W.  GUYES,  Correspondent 


Winston-Salem,  N.  C. 

MRS.  GEO.  GREEN  and  MRS.  LEWIS  WOLBERG,  Correspondents 

a  very  active  and 


MRS.  GEORGE  S.  STERN 

The  former  Eva  Prager,  daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Ernst  M.  Prager,  be- 
came the  bride  of  George  Salo  Stern,  son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Albert  Stern,  of 
Nashville,  Tenn.,  on  September  4th,  at  Temple  Israel,  with  Rabbi  Joseph 
Asher,  of  Temple  Emanuel,  Greensboro,  officiating. 


Let  me  start  by  extending  to  all 
our  good  friends  and  neighbors, 
from  our  entire  community,  a  very 
Healthy  and  Happy  New  Year. 

Our  Holiday  services  at  Temple 
Israel  were  conducted  this  year  by 
Mr.  Jake  Pressman  of  Charlotte, 
who  was  ably  assisted  by  Buddy 
Guyes,  Ben  Shapiro  and  Dr.  Solo- 
mon Singer. 

The  Ben  Shapiros  had  as  their 
guests  for  a  week  Mr.  &  Mrs.  Leon- 
ard Wolfe  and  daughter  Beverly 
of  Raleigh,  N.  C,  and  during  the 


early  part  of  October,  Jett's  cousin 
Sidney  Simon  of  Mobile,  Ala.,  was 
with  them  for  about  a  week. 

Buddy  Guyes  spent  about  a  week 
in  Miami  Beach,  Fla.,  attending  a 
Style  Show,  at  which  time  he  also 
visited  with  our  daughter,  Betty 
Lou  who  lives  there. 

Sylvia  Feit  and  Dot  Kahn  went 
to  Birmingham,  Ala.  for  several 
days  to  attend  the  wedding  of 
Rene  Marcus,  daughter  of  Yankee 
and  Seymour  Marcus,  who  was 
married  on  Sept.  nth. 


(Open  letter  from  one  reporter 
to  the  other). 

Dear  Carolyn: 

To  think  I  had  a  hand  in  your 
admission  to  Baptist  Hospital  the 
weekend  this  column  was  due! 
Some  favor  T  did  myself— I  must 
have  been  out  of  my  cotton-pickin' 
mind.  But  you  called  me  at  the 
office  one  day  and  said,  "Your 
boss  doctor  wants  you  to  get  me 
a  bed  so  he  can  get  this  thing  off 
my  foot.  I'll  have  to  be  in  for  only 
two  days  and  since  it's  my  foot  and 
not  my  head,  I  can  still  work  with 
you  on  the  report."  You  know 
when  a  double  positive  makes  a 
negative?  "Yeh,  yeh."  Because  next 
thing  I  knew  you  were  giving  me 
the  exciting  news  about  the  newly- 
arrived  addition  to  the  Rabbi  Rose 
family— Daniel  Hyman,  born  Oc- 
tober 6th— and  as  for  anything  else, 
you  said  to  count  you  out.  This, 
two  days  after  the  deadline  yet! 

Serves  me  right,  I  thought,  for 
opening  my  mouth  and  letting  you 
stick  your  foot  in  it.  Nevertheless, 
I  stopped  at  your  house  after  leav- 
ing you  "resting  comfortably"  with 
all  those  good-looking  interns  and 
residents,  and  just  as  you  said,  I 
found  the  B.B.G.  report  in  the 
pink  envelope  —  after  ransacking 
only  four  rooms!  It  went  like  this: 

"The  Gloria  J.  Horwitz  Chapter, 
B.B.G.,  got  into  full  swing  with 
new  officers  as  follows:  Sheila 
Lund,  president;  Sandy  Kaplan, 
vice-president;  Beverly  Davis,  re- 
cording secretary;  Esther  Hor- 
witz, corresponding  secretary;  Mar- 
lyn  Saks,  treasurer;  Merel  Silver- 
man, reporter;  Joanne  Baer, 
chaplain.  Rabbi  David  Rose  spoke 
at  a  cultural  program  on  the  sub- 
ject of  Jewish  education,  which  was 
quite  informative  and  interesting. 
We  are  very  happy  that  we  have 
several  new  members  and  are  look- 


ing forward  to 
successful  year." 


Nothing  else  in  your  mail  was  of 
any  help,  although  I  did  find  a 
note  about  the  Morris  Brenners 
and  the  Phil  Michaloves  leaving 
on  a  European  trip  sponsored  by 
the  Chamber  of  Commerce.  So  I 
next  decided  to  make  a  few  well- 
placed  phone  calls  —  right  to  the 
top.  Elaine  Simons,  Council-Sister- 
hood President,  was  glad  to  hear 
from  me  and  promptly  offered  the 
good  news  about  the  birth  of 
Daniel  Hyman  to  Rabbi  David 
and  Vivian  Rose.  "Anything  else?" 
I  asked.  "I'll  call  you  later,"  she 
said.  Becky  Sindler,  Hadassah 
Chapter  President,  also  bubbled 
over  —  about  the  Rose  baby.  "Isn't 
it  wonderful,"  she  said,  "two  darl- 
ing little  girls  and  now  a  boy!" 
She,  too,  would  call  me  back  when 
she  could  think  of  anything  else. 
Others  I  called  also  gave  the  glad 
tidings  about  the  new  arrival 
(needless  to  say,  everybody  is 
thrilled  about  baby  Daniel)  and 
after  that  I  sat  back  and  waited 
for  the  promised  phone  calls.  Well, 
not  exactly.  Actually,  I  cleaned 
the  whole  house,  washed  my  hair, 
baked  a  cake,  read  the  Sunday  New 
York  Times,  and  ironed  the  week's 
laundry.  The  phone  rang  at  last. 
It  was  Elaine  Simons  with  all  the 
details  of  the  beautiful  wedding 
that  took  place  at  Temple  Eman- 
uel on  October  8th  when  Ethel 
Levin  married  Maury  Bernstein  of 
Miami,  Fla.,  with  Rabbi  Rose  of- 
ficiating. The  bride,  in  dreamy 
Dior  blue  chiffon,  was  given  away 
by  her  uncle  Israel  Levin  of  Roan- 
oke, Va.  John  Soifer,  of  Winston- 
Salem,  was  the  best  man,  and  Mrs. 
Norman  Maron,  of  Miami  Beach, 
was  matron-of-honor.  Guests  were 
from  far  and  wide:  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Israel  Levin  and  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Bernard    Levin    and    son,  from 

(Please  turn  to  Page  28) 


November,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


7 


"Honor  a  man  for  wliat  he  is; 
Rut  honor  him  more  for  ivliat  he 
Does." 

For  the  past  ten  months,  these 
words  from  the  Talmud  have  ser- 
ved as  a  source  of  inspiration  to 
the  oficers  and  members  of 
the  Gomley  Chesed  Congrega- 
tion in  their  search  for  the  man 
who  has  done  the  most  for  the 
Jewish  and  general  communities 
of  Portsmouth  in  the  past  twenty- 
five  years— Gomley  Chesed's  Man 
of  the  Quarter-Century.  The 
choice  was  not  a  difficult  one  to 
make.  One  name  suggested  itself 
to  an  overwhelming  majority  of 
the  members  of  the  Congregation, 
as  they  marked  their  ballots  this 
past  June.  The  name  was  that  of 
Julian  M.  Blachman,  who  is  not  , 
only  one  of  the  most  active  and 
outstanding  members  of  the  con- 
gregation, but  also  finds  time  to 
be  a  devoted  worker  in  a  variety 
of  phases  of  the  General  Com- 
munitv  of  Portsmouth. 

[ulian's  selection  comes  at  the 
climax  of  the  year-long  celebra- 
tion of  Gomley  Chesed's  70th  An- 
niversary. In  recalling  the  seven- 
ty years'  history  of  the  Congrega- 
tion, remembering  its  early  be- 
ginning in  the  downtown  section 
of  Portsmouth,  its  acquisition  of 
a  building  in  1900  which  was  to 
serve  as  its  home  for  fifty-five  years, 
and  finally  its  completion  of  a  new 
Synagogue  building  in  1955  in  the 
rapidly  growing  suburban  area  of 
the  city,  the  Board  of  the  Congre- 
gation voted  unanimously  to  have 
the  membership  select  the  "Man  of 
the  Quarter-Century".  The  bal- 
lot, which  every  member  of  the 
Congregation  received,  read  as  fol- 
lows: 

"Over  the  past  25  years,  this 
outstanding  personality  should 
have  the  following  qualifications: 

(1)  Outstanding  in  Synagogue 
activity 

(2)  A  leader  in  Jewish  com- 
munity work 

(3)  Presently  active  member  of 
Gomley  Chesed  Congrega- 
tion 

(4)  Active  and  interested  in 
general  community  pro- 
jects" 

"Honor  not  a  man  for  his  pos- 
sessions alone; 

Honor  him  most  for  the  use  he 
makes  of  them." 


MAN  of  the  MOTiTH 

Julian  Blachman 


Portsmouth,  Virginia 


70th  ANNIVERSARY  COMMITTEE 
GOMLEY  CHESED  CONGREGATION 

Front  L  to  R  —  Mrs.  Walter  Brandt,  Mrs.  Martin  Amdusky,  Mrs.  Moe 
H.  Glazer,  Mrs.  Elias  Friedman,  and  Mrs.  Dan  Inson.  Second  row  —  Rev. 
Paul  Grob,  Rabbi  A.  David  Arzt,  President  Robert  Rosenfeld  and  Joseph 
Reshefsky.  Third  row  —  Julian  M.  Blachman  (Man  of  the  Quarter-Century), 
Arthur  Bloom,  Nathan  Schlussel,  Meyer  H.  Jacbson  (Ceneral  Chairman), 
Joe  Freedman  and  Nathan  Meyer  (Testimonial  Banquet  Chairman). 


Julian  Blachman  has  endeared 
himself  to  everyone  with  whom  he 
has  come  into  contact  through  his 
many  activities  and  interests  in 
both  the  Jewish  and  general  com- 
munities of  Portsmouth,  and  in- 
deed of  the  entire  Seaboard  Reg- 
ion. A  native  of  Portsmouth,  and 
a  product  of  its  schools,  Julian  as 
a  boy  was  a  charter  member  of  Boy 
Scout  Troop  204.  In  his  early 
youth,  he  was  active  in  the  Esther 
Bible  Class  and  the  Clover  Club 
and  Beth  El  Temple  Club  of  Nor- 
folk. 

Since  1948,  Julian  has  been  a 
board  member  of  the  Suburban 
Country  Club,  and  since  1951  has 
been  president  of  the  Suburban 
Club  Incorporated,  a  stock  hold- 
ing corporation.  He  has  been 
Portsmouth  chairman  of  the  Jew- 
ish Welfare  Board  since  1941,  sup- 
ervising the  entertainment  and 
providing  for  the  religious  needs 
of  the  thousands  of  young  Jewish 
men  and  women  who  have  been 
stationed  in  the  Hampton  Roads 
area.     For  these   efforts,  he  re- 


ceived a  citation  from  the  Navy 
Department  in  1948.  He  has  been 
a  member  of  the  Board  of  the  USO 
for  many  years,  and  of  the  Ki 
wanis  Club  since  1939,  also  serv- 
ing on  its  Board  of  Directors.  He 
is  active  in  the  Child  and  Family 
Service  and  the  Travelers  Aid  So- 
ciety, and  is  the  treasurer  of  the 
Portsmouth  Chapter  of  Red  Cross. 

Julian  has  neglected  no  phase 
of  community  life  in  his  efforts  to 
contribute  his  share  toward  world 
peace,  happiness  and  security.  His 
work  has  been  outstanding  in  the 
Community  Chest  and  United 
Jewish  Appeal.  He  has  been  the 
chairman  of  the  latter  in  past  years, 
and  has  served  in  the  local  Cham- 
ber of  Commerce  as  a  member  of 
its  board  and  chairman  of  its  Fire 
Prevention  Committee.  During 
World  War  II,  he  was  active  in 
Civil  Defense,  and  was  a  zone  com- 
munications officer. 

Julian's  devotion  to  Gomley 
Chesed  has  been  constant,  dating 


from  his  early  Hebrew  School  years 
as  a  pupil  of  Rev.  Harry  Miller, 
and  following  in  the  footsteps  of 
his  father,  the  late  Morris  J.  Blach- 
man. At  the  age  of  18,  he  became 
the  Secretary  of  the  Congregation 
and  has  been  a  member  of  its 
Board  ever  since.  For  the  past 
twenty  years,  he  has  been  its  Treas- 
urer and  has  been  a  member,  at 
different  times,  of  its  Pulpit,  Ex- 
ecutive and  Finance  Committees. 
He  was  most  influential  in  the 
planning,  building  and  financing 
of  Gomley  Chesed's  present  mod- 
ern synagogue  building.  He  has, 
for  a  number  of  years,  served  as  a 
member  of  the  Chevra  Kadisha, 
and  is  active  on  the  Cemetary 
Committee. 

Portsmouth  was  honored  in  1956 
when  District  5,  B'nai  B'rith,  em- 
bracing the  District  of  Columbia 
and  the  states  of  Maryland,  Virgin- 
ia, North  &  South  Carolina,  Geor- 
gia and  Florida,  elected  Julian  as 
its  president.  He  has  served  two 
terms  as  president  of  the  Virginia 
State  Association  of  B'nai  B'rith, 
and  at  present  is  president  of  the 
local  lodge  for  the  third  time.  He 
is  an  active  member  of  the  Ad- 
visory Committee  of  the  Anti-De- 
famation League  of  the  State  Hillel 
Committee.  But  the  highlight  of 
his  long  career  in  B'nai  B'rith, 
which  began  in  1938  with  the  or- 
ganization of  the  local  Sol  Fass 
Lodge,  came  in  1959,  when  Jul- 
ian and  his  wife,  Ella,  attended  the 
international  Convention  of  B'nai 
B'rith  in  Jerusalem. 

Julian  is  married  to  the  former 
Ella  Caplan  of  Clarksburg,  West 
Virginia.  They  have  recently  cele- 
brated their  twenty-fifth  wedding 
anniversary.  The  Blachmans  have 
a  son,  Morris  J.,  who  is  at  present 
a  senior  at  Brandeis  University. 

A  testimonial  dinner  to  Julian 
M.  Blachman  was  held  on  Sunday 
evening,  October  30,  i960  in  the 
A.  H.  Goodman  Auditorium  of 
Gomley  Chesed  Synagogue.  Rela- 
tives from  far  and  near,  as  well  as 
many  B'nai  B'rith  friends  repre- 
senting the  entire  Fifth  District 
joined  the  members  of  the  Jewish 
community  of  Portsmouth  in  hon- 
oring the  "Man  of  the  Quarter- 
Century".  Indeed,  it  may  well  be 
said  of  Julian  Blachman: 

"Happy  is  the  man  who  is  rich 
in  good  deeds, 
For  he  shall  be  honored  in  life, 
And  be  remembered  long  af- 
terwards For  his  goodness." 


8 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


November,  1960 


Newport  News,  Va. 

MRS.  MARTHA  B.  SHAPIRO,  Correspondent 


The  Newport  News,  Va.  Chamber  Music  Society  committee  planning 
their  program  for  the  coming  season.  Left  to  right  are  Mrs.  E.  J.  Binder, 
chairman;  Dr.  Irving  Berlin,  coordinator;  Mrs.  Harold  Chapman,  musical 
director. 


Mr.  Louis  Rosenfeld  of  the 
Hampton  Institute  is  conducting 
the  Art  Class  at  the  Jewish  Com- 
munity Center  this  year.  The  class 
meets  every  Tuesday  afternoon  and 
anyone  interested  in  painting  is 
welcome  to  join  the  group.  Paint- 
ings made  by  members  of  the  class 
have  been  selected  and  forwarded 
for  showing  at  the  exhibition  at 
the  Middle  Atlantic  Section- Jewish 
Welfare  Board  Conference  which 
was  held  in  Harrisburg,  Pa. 

The  Jewish  community  of  New- 
port News  was  deeply  shocked  to 
hear  of  the  untimely  passing  of 
Samuel  D.  Cershovitz,  Executive 
Vice-President  of  the  National  Jew- 
ish Welfare  Board.  Mr.  Gershovitz, 
a  frequent  visitor  to  Newport 
News,  had  for  many  years  been 
helpful  in  the  development  of  the 
local  Jewish  Center  program.  New- 
port News  Jewry  will  miss  these 
very  happy  associations. 

The  Grand  Club  of  the  Jewish 
Community    Center    has    on  its 


agenda  a  trip  to  Miami  Beach,  Fla.. 
for  the  latter  part  of  November. 
They  will  be  joined  by  the  Golden 
Agers  from  Norfolk  and  they  will 
travel  by  train  to  Miami  Beach 
where  they  will  spend  9  happy 
days  basking  in  the  sunshine. 

A  political  symposium  has  been 
scheduled  to  be  held  at  the  Jewish 
Community  Center  on  Wednesday, 
November  2.  Mr.  Bert  Nachman, 
a  local  attorney,  will  be  the  mod- 
erator, and  guest  speakers  will  be 
Mr.  Thomas  Downing,  Congress- 
man from  the  First  District,  and 
his  opponent,  Richard  A.  May,  Re- 
publican candidate.  The  entire 
community  has  been  invited  to  at- 
tend. 

Committees  have  been  organized 
and  plans  are  in  the  making  for  a 
Children's  series,  Foreign  Film 
Series,  and  Yiddish  Film  series.  All 
programs  are  sponsored  by  the 
Jewish  Community  Center.  The 
Boy  Scouts  have  started  their  pro- 


gram for  the  1960-61  season  under 
the  capable  direction  of  Mayer 
Sarfan,  Scoutmaster,  and  asssit 
ant,  Raphael  Saville. 

Heartiest  congratulations  to  the 
following  on  their  recent  Bar  Mit- 
zvahs: 


Richard  Lee,  son  of  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Martin  T.  Lee;  Bruce  Spigel, 
son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jack  Spigel; 
George  Fenigsohn,  son  of  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Sol  Fenigsohn;  Richard  Gott- 
lieb, son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Morris 
Gottlieb. 


Beth  Sholom  Home  of  Virginia 


Governor  Almond  has  appointed 
Leon  R.  Cantor,  Executive  Di- 
rector of  Beth  Sholom  Home  of 
Virginia,  to  serve  as  a  member  of 
the  delegation  which  will  repre- 
sent the  Commonwealth  of  Vir- 
ginia at  the  White  House  Confer- 
ence on  Aging  in  Washington,  D. 
C.  from  January  9th  to  12th,  1961. 
President  Eisenhower  has  called 
the  Conference  to  enable  the  Fed- 
eral government  to  work  jointly 
with  the  States  and  citizen  groups 
in  formulating  recommendations 
and  plans  for  action  to  meet  the 
needs  of  older  people.  The  50 
States  will  be  represented  by  1,740 
delegates  selected  by  their  Gover- 
nors. In  addition  there  will  be 
660  delegates  from  national  volun- 
tary organizations  and  representa- 
tives from  departments  of  the  Fed- 
eral Government.  Among  the  spec- 
ial problems  of  older  people  to  be 
considered  are  economic  security, 
preservation  of  health,  adequate 
housing,  meaningful  use  of  leisure 
time,  employment  and  retirement, 
and  family  relationships. 

The  White  House  Conference 
is  being  preceded  by  a  series  of 
local  and  State  conferences  all  over 
the  country  to  enable  communities 
and  States  to  develop  facts  and 
recommendations  for  action  at  the 
local  level  and  to  pool  their  know- 
ledge for  mutual  planning  on  a 
national  basis.  In  Virginia  Gov- 
ernor Almond  designated  the  Com- 
mission on  the  Aging  as  the  agency 
through  which  the  Commonwealth 
would  study  its  own  problems  and 
plan  its  participation  at  the  White 
House  Conference.    Several  state- 


wide and  local  meetings  have  al- 
ready been  held  in  Richmond,  Nor- 
folk and  Roanoke.  Cantor  is  serv- 
ing as  Chairman  of  the  Sub-Com- 
mittee on  Institutional  Living  Ar- 
rangements and  as  a  member  of  the 
Co-ordinating  Committee  of  the 
Commission.  He  also  delivered  a 
paper  on  "Rehabilitation  of  the 
Aging"  at  the  Governor's  Confer- 
ence in  Richmond  on  Dec.  15,  1959 
and  made  one  of  the  Keynote  ad- 
dresses at  the  Richmond  Metropoli- 
tan Area  Conference  on  Oct.  3rd. 

All  of  this  interest  and  activity 
in  problems  of  aging  is  caused  by 
the  tremendous  growth  in  the 
population  of  older  people  in  the 
U.S.  Today  there  are  50,000,000 
Americans  who  have  passed  their 
45th  birthday  and  16,000,000  over 
65  yrs.  In  Virginia  there  are  about 
300,000  people  over  65  of  whom 
2,000  to  3,000  are  Jewish.  The 
predictions  are  that  the  high  pro- 
portion of  older  people  in  the 
population  will  continue  to  in- 
crease at  an  accelerated  rate.  The 
attendant  problems  have  caused 
serious  concern  everywhere,  ind- 
cluding  Virginia.  Inadequate  in- 
come, poor  health,  disrupted  fam- 
ilv  relationships,  insufficient  pre- 
paration for  premature  retirement 
and  many  other  difficulties  in- 
flict the  aged.  At  the  same  time 
planning  and  creation  of  facilities 
and  services  to  meet  the  needs  of 
older  people  at  local,  state  and  na- 
tional levels  have  fallen  way  be- 
hind what  is  required.  It  is  hoped 
that  the  White  House  Conference 
will  stimulate  greater  interest  and 
action. 


November,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


9 


BARNEY  GLAZER'S 

Hollywood 


Hollywood,  Calif.— The  reason 
Oscar  Levant  resumed  his  tv  pro- 
gram in  Hollywood  instead  of  in 
New  York  is  simple.  He  has  more 
enemies  in  Hollywood.  . .  .  There's 
plenty  of  heat  in  Bobby  Breen's 
latest  record,  "Summer  Place"  .  .  . 
Jerry  Hoffman,  filmland's  public 
relations  expert,  says  don't  miss  the 
Jewish  Community  Center  in  Mex- 
ico City.  It's  a  magnificent  minia- 
ture of  the  U.  of  Mexico's  fabulous 
architecture  .  .  .  Joel  Grey,  Mickey 
Katz'  son,  is  a  listening  blessing 
with  his  Capitol  album,  "Songs  My 
Father  Taught  me."  My  Yiddisha 
momma,  bless  her,  used  to  cradle 
me  with  one  of  these  melodies. 

Sidney  Skolsky,  after  two  panel 
appearanes  with  David  Susskind 
on  "Open  End"  says  of  D.S.: 
"What  a  brain!"  .  .  .  Jeff  Chandler 
says  the  stewardess  on  Israel's  El- 
Al  airline  fed  him  so  well  he  gain- 
ed 10  pounds  in  21  hours. 

George  Jessel  writes  like  he  talks 
in  his  book  "Jessel  Anyone?"  It's 
for  you  to  decide  if  that's  good  or 
bad  ...  In  this  volume,  Jack  Benny 
relates  how  Jessel  made  his  audi- 
ence cry  while  conducting  funeral 
services  for  James  Mason's  cat  . .  . 
Despite  the  fact  that  Walter  Slezak 
loves  to  eat  gefilte  fish  and  corned 
beef  sandwiches  in  Moskowitz  and 
Lupowitz'  restaurant  in  N.  Y.'s 
lower  East  Side,  and  despite  the 
secondary  fact  that  the  cafe  pre- 
served Walter's  footprints  in  their 
lobby  in  chicken  fat,  we  regretfully 
make  it  clear  for  the  records— he 
isn't  Jewish. 

Ricky  Layne,  who  keeps  Velvel 
stocked  with  an  accent,  used  to  be 
a  Florida  bellboy,  so  try  to  remem- 
ber. Did  he  carry  your  bags?  .  . . 
That  picture  made  by  Noonan  and 
Marshall,  "The    Shnook,"  was  ori- 


ginally slated  for  Dean  Martin  and 
Jerry  Lewis. 

Did  you  ever  hear  Eddie  Fisher 
sing  "The  Star  Spangled  Banner?" 
A  singer  of  popular  songs,  Fisher 
is.  A  singer  of  our  National  An- 
them, he  isn't  .  .  .  Lenny  Maxwell, 
N.  Y.  born  comedian,  told  me  at 
the  Cocoanut  Grove,  his  full  name 
is  Lenny  Maxwell  Gordon  ...  I 
say  that  Lenny  will  be  the  next 
Jack  Benny  . . .  Jack  Benny  says: 
"Will  you  cut  that  out"  .  .  .  Law- 
ence  Welk's  singer-violinist,  Alad- 
din, is  Italian  but  as  a  kid  in  New 
York  he  had  his  heart  set  on  being 
a  chazzen.  Stemmed  from  his  ad- 
miration for  Cantor  Rosenblatt. 

Arlene  Martei,  real  name  Neu- 
bauer,  was  a  Lawrence  Welk  one- 
night  champagne  lady.  She's  from 
Indianapolis;  ditto  Ralph  Port- 
nor,  Welk's  publicist  and  radio  an- 
nouncer .  .  .  Goodbye,  Frank  Sil- 
ver, 58,  who  wrote  "Yet,  We  Have 
No  Bananas'  'and  thank  you  for 
the  many  laughs  you  gave  us  while 
we  sang  your  rib-tickling  tune. 

Next  time  you  see  Dane  Clark 
ask  him:  "Mr.  Simon,  what's  with 
you  and  Barney  Glazer?"  He'll  tell 
you  how  he  starred  in  a  live  tv 
show  and  portrayed  a  boxer.  "I 
fought  the  entire  10  rounds  and 
thought  I  would  drop  from  a 
heart  attack,"  Dane  will  continue. 
"Then  I  searched  the  newspapers 
the  next  day  and  all  the  critics 
said:  'Eh!'  Finally,  one  critic  nam- 
ed Barney  Glazer  said  it  was  the 
greatest  live  tv  performance  of  all 
times."  Which  is  why  Dane  and 
Barney  are  as  CLOSEASTHIS. 

Patricia  Morison  is  studying  He- 
brew just  in  case  she  gets  that  star- 
ring role  in  "Kiss  Me  Kate"  in  Tel 
Aviv. 


Charleston,  S.  C. 


A  Charleston  Chapter  of  B'nai 
B'rith  Girls  has  been  organized, 
operating  on  a  temporatry  charter 
and  recognized  officially  by  na- 
tional, regional  and  local  BBYO. 
The  group  has  been  welcomed  by 
Charleston  AZA  and  will  work 
closely  with  that  organization. 

Mrs.  Adelaide  I.  Triest,  widow 
of  Montague  Triest,  died  in  a  local 
hospital  on  October  6th.  Mrs. 
Triest  was  born  in  Charleston  Nov. 
4,  1877,  a  daughter  of  Morris  Israel 


and  Mrs.  Rebecca  Elias  Israel.  She 
was  a  member  of  K.K.  Beth  Elo- 
him  Congregation  in  Charleston. 

Surviving  are  two  daughters,  a 
son,  a  sister,  a  grandchild,  and 
three  great-grandchildren. 

David  T.  Odrezin,  39,  died  at 
Memorial  Hospital  after  a  short 
illness  September  25,  i960. 

He  was  a  native  Savannahian 
and  a  merchant,  a  member  of  Con- 
gregation B.  B.  Jacob,  the  Savan- 
nah Symphony,  Clinton  Lodge,  the 


Humane  Society,  J.E.A.,  American 
Federation  of  Musicians  and  a 
veteran  of  World  War  II. 

Survivors  include  his  wife,  Anita 
Schwartzman  Odrezin;  a  daughter, 
Susan;  a  son,  Steven,  both  of  Sa- 
vannah; his  parents,  Mr.  and  Mrs. 


Abraham  I.  Odrezin,  of  Savannah; 
a  brother,  Gilbert  Odrezin,  Sa- 
vannah; and  a  grandmother,  Mrs. 
Ida  Eisenberg,  New  York  City. 

Edward  Morton  Kramer,  son  of 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Otto  A.  Kramer  was 
bar  mitzvah  at  Brith  Sholom-Beth 
Israel  Synagogue  on  October  23rd. 


New  Bern,  N.  €. 

MRS.  LOU  ELDEN,  Correspondent 


The  first  Sisterhood  -  Hadassah 
Meeting  of  the  season  was  held  at 
the  home  of  Mrs.  Louis  Elden  with 
Mrs.  Harry  Vatz  as  Co-Hostess. 
Mrs.  R.  Kline  of  Miami  Beach, 
Fla.  was  welcomed  as  a  guest.  Plans 
for  the  coming  year  were  formu- 
lated. A  social  hour  followed. 

High  Holy  days  services  were 
conducted  by  Student  Rabbi 
Jerrald  Goldstien  of  the  Hebrew 
Union  College  in  Cinn.  Ohio.  Fol- 
lowing Rosh  Hashannah  services, 
a  beautiful  reception  was  given  in 
the  recreation  room  of  the  Temple 
by  the  Sisterhood. 

A  Breakfast  which  followed  Yom 
Kippur  services  was  held  at  the 


Gov.  Tryon  Hotel  with  about  45 
guests  present.  A  gift  from  Sister- 
hood-Hadassah  was  presented  to 
the  Rabbi,  by  Mrs.  Lou  Elden. 

Visiting  for  the  Holidays  were: 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  M.  Bernstien  of 
Whiteville,  N.  C;  Mr.  and  Mrs.  J. 
Kline,  Richmond,  Va.;  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  A.  Sandman,  Chapel  Hill, 
N.  C;  Miss  Judy  Steinberg,  Wom- 
an's College,  Greensboro,  North 
Carolina,  Miss  Suzan  Orringer, 
Peace  College,  Raleigh,  N.  C. 

The  community  extends  its  sin- 
cere sympathy  to  the  family  of 
Shelton  Steinberg  who  died  in  an 
automobile  accident  on  October 
15th.  He  was  the  son  of  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Louis  Steinberg. 


He  have  offices  in 

Eastern  Carolina 
Communities 

To  serve  you  .  .  . 


Whatever  your  banking  needs,  you  will  find 
Branch  Banking  &  Trust  Company  thorough, 
efficient,  and  ready  to  serve  you.  Branch 
Services  arc  designed  to  make  your  financial 
affairs  run  easily  and  smoothly.  The  experience 
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since  1872  is  vours  for  the  asking:. 


ELM  CITY 

FREMONT 

MAGNOLIA 

PLYMOUTH 

RALEIGH 

WALLAC  E 


FA  I  S  O  N 
GOLOSBORO 
FAYETTEVI  LLE 
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TRENTON 
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MEMBER    FEDERAL    DEPOSIT    INSURANCE  CORPORATION 


*o  The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 

DURHAM,  N.  C. 

MRS.  SAM  FREEMAN,  Correspondent 


BETH  EL  CHILDREN  IN  SUCCAH 


Children  of  the  Beth  El  Hebrew  School  Durham,  are  shown  as  they  ob- 
served the  Succoth  rituals  with  the  traditional  palm  branch,  myrtle  twigs  and 
willow.  Lett  to  right:  Howard  Lipton,  Rabbi  Herbert  M.  Berger,  Johnathan 
Pine,  Susan  Dworsky,  Ann  Lapkin  and  Mrs.  Samson  Gross,  Superintendent. 


Some  folks  do  their  work  in 
such  a  quiet,  efficient  manner  that 
one  can  scarcely  tell  that  there  is 
any  effort  involved.  It  was  in  such 
a  manner  that  the  new  superin- 
tendent of  the  religious  and  Sun- 
day Schools,  Mrs.  Samson  Gross— 
"Hoodie"  to  all— worked  with  the 
education  committee  all  summer 
with  the  dependability  of  a  well-re- 
gulated clock  and  produced  a  cur- 
riculum over  which  the  entire  com- 
munity is  elated.  The  Education 
Committee  is  composed  of  Mrs. 
Gross,  Rabbi  Berger,  Dr.  Mel 
Shim,  Dr.  Larry  Slifkin,  Mrs.  }. 
Hockfield,  Mrs.  R.  Lipton. 

Mrs.  Samson  Gross,  whose  hus- 
band is  connected  with  Duke  Uni- 
versity, is  a  native  New  Yorker.  She 
received  the  A.B.  Degree  from 
Brooklyn  College,  M.  A.  Degree 
from  Columbia  University,  teach- 
er's certificate  from  Beth  Jacob's 
Teacher's  Seminary  and  has  taught 
Hebrew  in  all  clay  Hebrew  schools. 
She  was  also  head  counseller  at  the 
Massad  Hebrew  Speaking  Camp. 

The  Beth  El  Sunday  school  now 
numbers  130  children— ten  grades, 
from  nursery  to  confirmation,  are 
conducted  every  Sunday  morning. 
On  the  staff  are  twelve  qualified 
teachers:  Carol  Kaplan;  Mrs.  H. 
Somberg;  Eileen  Rancer;  Mrs.  L. 
Dworsky;  Mrs.  A.  Greenberg;  Mrs. 
H.  Campbell;  Mrs.  H.  Gitelson; 
Mrs.  M.  Weinstein;  Dr.  L.  Slifkin; 


Leon  Dworsky;  Dr.  Mel  Shimm 
and  Rabbi  M.  Hebert  Berger.  We 
are  indeed  fortunate  to  have  the 
benefit  of  professionals  from  Duke 
University  and  the  University  of 
North  Carolina  teach  our  youth! 

Since  it  is  in  the  primary  grades 
that  a  child  receives  a  foundation 
of  Jewish  experienies  upon  which 
learning  in  later  years  can  be  built, 
it  is  the  aim  of  the  teachers  to  in- 
still a  love  for  things  Jewish  and 
to  stimulate  the  child's  natural 
curiosty  as  to  who  and  what  he  is. 

In  the  upper  grades,  emphasis 
will  be  given  to  historical  develop- 
ments providing  the  background 
lor  understanding  the  present 
status  of  the  Jewish  people,  parti- 
cularly in  America  and  Israel. 

Although  classes  have  just  start- 
ed last  month,  already  the  sixth 
grade  is  working  on  an  original 
script  for  a  puppet  show  which  will 
be  presented  Chanukah  for  the 
Sunday  School  and  Sisterhood 
Bazaar.  Mrs.  Morton  Bogdonoff, 
a  professional  puppeteer,  is  assist- 
ing the  children  with  the  puppets. 

Rabbi  Berger  and  Mrs.  Gross, 
who  will  assist  him,  in  the  religious 
school,  will  stress  Hebrew  as  a 
vital,  living  language,  not  just  as  a 
tool  to  read  and  comprehend  pray- 
ers. Basic  Hebrew  words,  in  con- 
junction with  the  holidays,  will  be 
taught  and  used  as  often  as  pos- 
sible during  the  Hebrew  classes 
and  Sunday  School. 


We  congratulate  the  Beth  El 
congregation  and  Sisterhood  for 
helping  to  provide  the  necessary 
facilities  for  our  Sunday  School 
and  Religious  School. 

A  'Welcome  Newcomers  Sab- 
bath" was  observed  Sept.  16th  at 
the  Beth  El  Synagogue,  during  the 
Friday  evening  services.  Rabbi 
Berger  welcomed  the  following: 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  H.  Blumenthal;  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Wm.  Caffin;  Dr.  and 
Mrs.  H.  Campbell:  Dr.  and  Mrs. 
Rashi  Fein;  Dr.  and  Mrs.  S.  Gross; 
Dr.  and  Mrs.  S.  Levine;  Dr.  and 
Mrs.  N.  Schupper;  Dr.  and  Mrs.  L. 
Hart;  Mr.  and  Mrs.  E.  Smueli  and 
Mr.  and  Airs.  S.  Somberg.  Jacob 
Zuckerman  chanted  the  service  and 
Norman  Lieberman  sang  the  Kid- 
dush.  Dr.  Sidney  Markman,  Mem- 
bership Chairman,  opened  the 
Ark.  The  Congregation  was  host 
for  the  Oneg  Shabat. 

The  High  Holy  Day  Services, 
conducted  by  Rabbi  Berger  and 
Cantor  Theodore  Birnbaum  of 
Brooklyn,  N.  Y.,  who  was  the  guest 
of  the  congregation  for  the  Holi- 
days, were  very  inspiring.  May  this 
New  Year  be  one  of  good  health 
and  happiness  for  all. 

Immediately  after  the  close  of 
the  Yom  Kippur  Services,  the  Beth 
El  Sisterhood  was  host  to  a  Break- 
the-Fast-Repast. 

Children  of  the  Hebrew  School, 
Sunday  School  and  parents  attend- 
ed the  Succoth  party,  sponsored  by 
the  Education  Committee  of  the 
Synagogue.  The  party  was  held  im- 
mediately after  the  Succoth  Ser- 
vices, which  were  conducted  by 
Rabbi  Berger  and  Jacob  Zucker- 
man. 


Jacksonville  has  had  very  poor 
coverage  in  this  magazine  lately 
and  all  due  entirely  to  its  reporter 
and  certainly  not  to  lack  of  events 
or  news.  My  New  Year  resolution, 
one  of  the  many  I  have  in  mind, 
will  be  to  strive  for  better  report- 
ing. 

We  wish  to  welcome  the  new 
Chaplain  Martin  Siegel  of  Camp 
Lejeune.  We  hope  The  Marine 
Corps  won't  mind  if  we  share  their 
Chaplain  for  he  has  certainly  co- 
operated and  helped  a  great  deal 
already  with  organizing  the  Sun- 
day School  for  the  coming  year. 
We  also  wish  to  welcome  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Ralph  C.  Bigio  and  their  two 
children  into  our  community. 


November,  1960 

In  true  Sisterhood  spirit,  the 
members  of  the  Beth  El  Sisterhood 
turned  out  "en  masse"  to  welcome 
the  new  members  at  the  October 
meeting.  The  President,  Mrs.  Mur- 
ray Brandt,  thanked  the  members 
for  the  unusual  large  attendance, 
particularly  in  view  of  the  fact  that 
there  was  a  downpour  of  rain  out- 
side—but that  did  not  dampen 
the  spirits  of  the  members! 

In  the  festive  mood  of  Succoth, 
Mrs.  R.  Bernson,  Membership 
Chairman,  welcomed  the  following 
fourteen  new  members:  Mesdames, 
N.  Baumna,  H.  Blumenfeld,  A. 
Bromberg.  Wm.  Caffin,  H.  Camp- 
bell, D.  Danneman,  S.  Danovitsh, 
R-  Fein,  S.  Gross,  L.  Hart,  S.  Le- 
vine, M.  Liebling,  N.  Schupper 
and  S.  Somberg. 

Mrs.  D.  Weinstein  presented  a 
short  resume'  of  the  Succoth  Holi- 
day, which  was  followed  by  a  musi- 
cal skit,  "The  Sisterhood  Story." 
Participants  in  the  skit  were:  Mrs. 
H.  Lefkoff,  Mrs.  J.  Zuckerman, 
Mrs.  D.  Danneman,  Mrs.  J.  Rose 
and  Mrs.  J.  Plasse.  Mrs.  L.  Dworksy 
was  the  piano  accompanist. 

Hostesses  for  the  evening  were 
the  membership  committee:  Mrs. 
R.  Bernson,  Mrs.  A.  Finn,  Mrs.  E. 
Wishnov  and  Mrs.  D.  Weinstein. 

Whoever  it  was,  who  stated  that 
women  should  stay  out  of  politics, 
would  have  changed  his  mind  if 
he  had  attended  Hasassah's  panel 
discussion  on  major  issues  facing 
the  United  States.  The  panel  was 
composed  of  Representatives  Hor- 
ace Kornegay  of  Greensboro  and 
Holland  Robb,  Chapel  Hill, 
Democratic  and  Republican  candi- 
Please  Turn  To  Page  22 


The  exodus  back  to  school  is 
completed  with  the  following  stu- 
dents having  left:  Ronnie  and 
Stephen  Trachtenberg  to  Univer- 
sity of  North  Carolina,  Helene 
Roseman  to  East  Carolina,  Alvin 
Roseman  to  U.N.S.,  Susan  Seger- 
man  to  Woman's  College  in  Green- 
sboro, Harold  Peck  to  Riverside 
Military  Academy  in  Gainsville, 
Ga.,  and  Stephen  Sherman  to  N.  C. 
State. 

The  High  Holy  Days  Services 
were  held  in  our  own  Center  with 
Student  Rabbi  Perlstein  of  New 
York  conducting  our  services.  We 
hope  the  New  Year  brings  Health 
and  Happiness  to  our  entire  con- 
gregation, and  to  all  Jewish  Peo- 
ple everywhere. 


Jacksonville,  N.  €. 

MRS.  JULES  SEGERMAN,  Correspondent 


November,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Richmond  Chapter  of  Hadassah 


MRS.  ALAN  MINKO,  Correspondent 


With  theme  "JOIN  HADASSAH 
FOR  YOUR  KEY  TO  A  RICHER 
LIFE",  Richmond  Chapter  Senior 
Hadassah  launched  its  membership 
campaign  with  a  membership  tea, 
Tuesday,  September  27  at  2  P.M. 
at  the  home  of  Mrs.  A.  W.  Gran- 
dis;  301  Roslyn  Road. 

In  addition  to  the  invitations  ex- 
tended to  prospective  members, 
each  Hadassah  member  who  en- 
rolled a  new  member  was  elegible 
to  attend  this  "Hadassah  Star 
Event."  There  were  several  lucky 
key  numbers  drawn  from  a  "Sur- 
prise Chest"  therefore  each  guest 
was  urged  to  bring  the  lucky  key 
enclosed  in  their  invitation.  A 
most  stimulating  and  enjoyable  af- 
ternoon was  made  possible  with 
the  renditions  by  Mrs.  Robert  Can- 
tor, guest  vocalist. 

This  summer,  19(50  Hadassah  re- 
alized one  of  it's  greatest  hopes  and 
achievements  with  the  official  de- 
dication of  the  new,  brilliant, 
modern  Hadassah-Hebrew  Univer- 
sity medical  center.  The  center 
comprises  a  complete  500  bed 
Hadassah  teaching  hospital;  an 
undergraduate  medical  school  for 
450;  clinical  and  preclinical  re- 
search laboratories  with  every 
modern     facility;     and  outpati- 


WE  CARRY 
EVERYTHING  BUT 
THE  JANITOR 


Building 
Equipment 
&  Supply 
Corporation 

811  -  13  W.  Broad 
RICHMOND,  VA. 

PHONE  EL  8-4986 

DISTRIBUTORS  OF  .  .  . 

SANITARY  JANITOR'S 
SUPPLIES 

FRANKLIN'S  CLEANERS 
and  WAXES 

V-C  VICAR  CLEANERS 
SANDING  and  POLISHING 
MACHINES 


ent  department  servicing  200,- 
000,  and  the  new  Henrietta  Szold 
School  of  Nursing  for  150  students. 

New  treatments,  techniques, 
drugs,  equipment  and  specialized 
personnel  keep  Hadassah  Medical 
work  in  Israel  on  par  with  Amer- 
ican Achievements. 

Mrs.  Leon  Grossman,  President 
Richmond  Chapter  Hadassah; 
Mrs.  A.  W.  Grandis  and  Mrs.  E. 
Berman  are  Chairman  and  co-chair- 
men of  Membership  for  the  chap- 
ter. 

HADASSAH'S  FIRST  MEET- 
ING, PAID-up  Membership  Des- 
sert and  Coffee  Luncheon  was  held 
at  Talhimers'  Richmond  Room,  on 
Tuesday,  October  11,  at  12:30  P.M. 

By  special  request  the  T.V.  Spec- 
tacular that  was  presented  at  the 
March  i960  meeting  was  repeated 
as  program  of  the  day.  This  was 
considered  the  outstanding  pro- 
gram of  the  1959-1960  year. 

This  T.  V.  Spectacular  had  such 
notable  stars  as;  Sophie  Knucker; 
Helen  Morganstein;  Dale  Efsher; 
Marilyn  Monroevitz,  with  Betty 
Farmished  as  Commentator.  Mrs. 
Joel  Sharon  was  the  Director;  Miss 
Fannie  Passamaneck  the  Pianist; 
and  the  cast  consisted  of  the  fol- 
lowing Hadassah  members;  Mrs. 
Paul  Cohen;  Mrs.  Frank  Frienden- 
berg;  Miss  Stella  Blanck;  Mrs.  Rob- 
ert Cantor;  Mrs.  Malcom  Levet; 
Mrs.  Will  Shocket;  and  Mrs.  Rob- 
ert Lipman. 


Roanoke,  Va. 
Hadassah 

MRS.  SOL  S.  KATZ,  Correspondent 

Roanoke  Chapter  of  Hadassah 
played  host  in  August  to  the 
Lynchburg  and  Harrisonburg 
Chapters  at  a  leadership  training 
workshop  at  Hotel  Roanoke. 

It  started  at  10:30  A.M.  with 
Mrs.  Yette  Segal  of  Washington, 
D.  C.  in  charge.  She  was  accom- 
panied to  Roanoke  by  Mrs.  Jules 
Berseld,  Seaboard  Regional  Ad- 
visor and  Vice  President. 

The  morning  session  was  follow- 
ed by  luncheon  at  noon.  The  mem- 
bers of  the  Roanoke  Chapter  pre- 
sented a  model  meeting  in  the 
afternoon  session. 


ITS  PERFORMANCE 
THAT  COUNTS 


§ 

§ 
§ 


Re-Elect 

Joel  T.  Broyhill 

YOUR  CONGRESSMAN 

Republican  Nominee,  Tenth  Congressional  Dist.  of  Virginia 


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PHONE  MI  3-9173 

Richmond,  Va. 


19 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


November,  i960 


Richmond,  Ya. 


Roanoke,  Va.  Beth  Israel  Congregation 

MRS.  SOL.  S.  KATZ,  Correspondent 


An  Eloquent 
Remembrance 

FLOWERS 
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Our  Only  Location  In  Richmond 


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magazine  for  86  years  .  .  . 

Joseph  W.  Bliley 

Funeral  Home 

CONVENIENTLY  LOCATED 
THIRD  &  MARSHALL  STREETS 
RICHMOND,  VIRGINIA 

I AMPLE  PRIVATE 
PARKING  SPACE 


Dot's  Paslry  Shop 

3136  W.  Cary  Street 
RICHMOND,  VA. 
DIAL  EL  8-2011 

Bakers  of  Fancy  Pastries 


HENWOOD  &  WILSON 

"EVERLASTING  BEAUTY  IN  MONUMENTS" 

Designers  and  Manufacturers  of 
GRANITE  and  MARBLE  MONUMENTS— MEMORIALS 
413-415  S.  Cherry  St.  DIAL  MI  8-7340  Richmond,  Va. 


We  express  a  hearty  Mazel  Tov 
to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Julius  Fisher  on 
the  birth  of  their  first  grandchild. 
The  proud  mother  and  father  are 
Sara  Louise  and  Bob  Pearlman 
who  are  now  living  in  Chapel  Hill; 
to  Mr  .and  Mrs.  Sam  Kane  the 
birth  of  a  grand-daughter  and  the 
ones  responsible  are  Alan  and  Bess 
Kane  (Bess  is  formerly  of  Greens- 
boro, N.C.)  and  to  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Nat  Goldstein  on  the  birth  of  a 
grandson. 

Our  very  best  wishes  to  Miss  Lu 
Schram  who  was  recently  married  in 
Greensboro,  N.  C.  to  Mr.  Morton 
Bergen  of  Oxford,  N.  C.  The  young 
couple  will  make  their  home  in 
Oxford  where  Morton  is  in  busi- 
ness. Also,  our  best  wishes  to  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Oscar  Goldstein  on  their 
recent  marriage. 

We  express  our  deepest  measure 
of  sympathy  and  condolences  to  Mr. 
Sam  Ellenberg  on  the  loss  of  his 
father;  to  Mrs.  Franklin  Raflo  on 
the  loss  of  her  beloved  sister;  to 
Mrs.  Julien  Sacks  on  the  loss  of  her 
mother;  to  the  Lightman  family  on 
the  loss  of  Sidney  Lightman  and 
also  to  the  Diamond  family  on  the 
loss  of  Max  Diamond. 

We  welcome  back  into  our  midst 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Rolf  Manko  who 
have  recently  returned  from  their 
voyage  to  Europe,  and  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Isadore  Fox  who  have  re- 
turned from  visiting  the  holy  land. 

A  special  testimonal  dinner  was 
held  for  Mr.  Julius  Fisher  in  Nor- 
folk, Virginia  in  June  in  honor 
of  his  devoted  leadership  and  pub- 
lic service  as  Executive  Secretary 
of  B'nai  B'rith  Distric  Lodge.  We 
join  in  wishing  him  many  more 
years  of  active  leadership. 

Our  best  wishes  for  success  in 
their  new  surroundings  are  ex- 
tended to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Rudolph 
Berliner,  who  have  recently  moved 
to  New  Orleans;  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Burt 
Levine  who  took  up  residence  in 
Richmond,  Virginia;  and  to  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Julian  Sharlet  who  made 
their  new  home  in  Youngstown, 
Ohio. 

Although  we  have  lost  several 
families,  Beth  Israel  has  gained 
two:  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jack  Green 
and  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Albert  Diener. 
We  are  happy  to  welcome  them  in 
our  communitv. 

We  are  very  happy  to  have  with 
us  our  new  instructor,  Mr.  Bar- 
nett  Hasden,  who  has  recently  be- 
come associated  with  our  congrega- 
tion.   Mr.  Hasden's  experiences  in 


the  field  of  Hebrew  education  are 
rich  and  varied.  He  obtained  his 
religious  training  at  the  Yeshivah 
Torah  Vodaath  in  Brooklyn,  N. 
Y.  and  held  positions  as  Hebrew 
School  instructor  in  Chattanooga, 
Duluth,  Monticello  and  South 
Fallsburgh. 

The  seldom  witnessed  ceremony 
of  a  Torah  dedication  was  held  in 
our  Synagogue  on  Sunday,  August 
2ist  in  a  most  impressive  manner. 
Mr.  Jacob  Brenner,  in  whose  honor 
the  Torah  was  dedicated,  was  pre- 
sented with  a  special  citation  of 
recognition. 

Spirit  was  brought  back  to  our 
local  U.S.Y.  Chapter  by  the  fol- 
lowing representatives  who  attend- 
ed Camp  White  Mountain:  David 
Kaplan,  Joan  Kaplan,  Marilyn 
Lee,  Richard  Lerner  and  Chickie 
Silverman.  Through  daily  services, 
numerous  study  groups,  work 
shops  and  fellowship  with  other 
Jewish  youth,  the  three  fold  pro- 
gram of  U.S.Y.  (religious,  cultural 
and  social)  was  carried  out. 


A  records  Center  of  American  Jew- 
ish Life  and  Institutions  at  the  He- 
brew University  of  Jerusalem  has 
been  initiated  by  Dr.  Moshe  Davis, 
head  of  the  Institute  of  Contempor- 
ary Jewry  of  the  Hebrew  University. 


TARRANT 
PRESCRIPTION 
DRUGGISTS 

MOTORCYCLE  DELIVERY 

Foushee  and  Broad 
MI  3-3469  Richmond,  Va. 


Flowers 


SCHOOL  EQUIPMENT  CO.,  Int. 
337  W.  Main.  Richmond.  Va. 


November,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


IS 


WOOD'S  LAWN 
GRASS  SEED 


Richmond,  Va.  Beth-El  Temple 

MRS.  EDDIE  CANTOR,  Correspondent 


The  members  oi  Beth  El  Con- 
gregation were  very  inspired  dur- 
ing the  high  holy  days  by  our  Rab- 
bi Milgrom's  correlated  sermons. 
Jn  addition,  after  the  Sukkah  ser- 
vices a  party  was  held  in  our 
beautiful  Sukkah  which  was  deco- 
rated by  the  members  of  our  Sister- 
hood. The  Men's  Club  and  the 
Sisterhood  again  sponsored  their 
annual  Sukkah  and  Simchas  Torah 
Flag  Contests.  The  sukkah  contest 
was  judged  by  members  of  the 
Men's  Club,  and  prizes  were 
awarded  the  most  original  and  most 
creative  Sukkahs.  The  Sisterhood 
committee  judged  the  flags  for 
originality. 

The  ladies  of  our  Sisterhood  at- 
tended two  Sabbath  institutes. 
Under  the  chairmanship  of  Mrs. 
Jack  Paul  Fine,  the  committee 
demonstrated  the  various  rituals, 
recipes,  decorations,  and  songs  of 
the  Sabbath.  A  museum  at  the  in- 
stitute displayed  many  of  the  mem- 
bers prized  Sabbas  articles. 


Dedication  was  held  for  the  new 
Sefer  Torah  which  was  purchased 
by  the  friends  and  the  family  of 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Reuben  Goldman  in 
honor  of  their  fortieth  anniversary. 
A  special  observance  of  completing 
the  torah  scroll  preceded  the  dedi- 
cation ceremonies.  Beth-Elites  were 
called  up  to  the  open  Torah  Scroll 
to  fill  in  the  outline  of  the  last 
letters  of  the  Torah. 

The  members  of  our  Sisterhood 
were  entertained  at  their  Donor 
Luncheon  by  Rabbi  Shlomo  Carle- 
bach,  a  singing  rabbi,  who  ac- 
companied himself  on  a  guitar.  He 
crooned  his  songs  of  the  Bible  in  a 
soft,  husky  voice.  This  was  a  mem- 
orable experience  which  thrilled 
all  of  us.  To  Mrs.  Norman  Sisisky, 
and  Mrs.  Stanley  Linas,  and  their 
committee  we  give  our  thanks. 

Mazel-tov  also  goes  to  our  Mrs. 
Herman  Rothenberg  on  her  ap- 
pointment as  Assistant  Professor 
of  Social  Case  Work  at  RPI. 


Richmond  Section 
National  Council  of  Jewish  Women 

NANCY  P.  THALHIMER,  Correspondent 


Forty  members  of  The  Rich- 
mond Section,  National  Council 
of  Jewish  Women  attended  a  train- 
ing session  Tuesday,  Sept.  27th,  to 
learn  their  jobs  as  part-time  librar- 
ians at  Memorial  Guidance  Clinic. 
A  remedial  reading  library  at  the 
Clinic,  containing  300  specialized 
volume  and  audio-visual  aids  open- 
ed Monday,  Oct.  17th,  with  the 
volunteers  helping  from  1:30-4:30 


Two  Good  Places 

In  Richmond,  Va.  Featuring 

Seafood 
and  Steaks 

Raleigh  Grill 

(Hotel  Raleigh) 

Open — Monday  thru  Fridays 

11:30  to  2:30 
5:30  to  9 
Saturdays  5 :30  to  9 

Wright's 

TOWN  HOUSE 

513  East  Grace  St. 

Open  11:30  to  3  p  m. 
4:30  to  8  p.  m. 
Closed  Sundays  and  Holidays 


every  afternoon.  Mrs.  David  Bear 
is  chairman  of  volunteers,  and  Mrs. 
Andrew  J.  Asch,  Jr.  is  project 
chairman.  The  Council  plans  to 
use  funds  from  the  Thrift  Shop- 
which  by  the  way,  has  moved  to 
larger  quarters  at  2525  W.  Main 
St.  to  purchase  the  books  and 
records  for  the  library. 

There  was  a  coffee  for  new 
members  at  the  home  of  Mrs. 
Neilson  November  recently,  and 
was  well  attended. 

Plans  are  getting  underway  for 
Council's  Ways  and  Means  pro- 
ject, to  be  held  sometime  in  Feb- 
ruary. More  news  of  this  project 
next  month. 


Plain  Talk 

(Concluded  From  Page  4) 
so  thankful  to  him  for  being  en- 
abled to  put  in  this  column  some- 
thing better  than  usual,  but  especi- 
ally it  saves  me  so  much  of  my 
own  time  away  from  the  suffering 
of  this  hot  day.  Thanks,  thanks, 
thanks  again  to  Rabbi  Rosinger. 
All  through  with  the  column,  I  can 
now  stretch  out  comfortably  on  the 
couch  under  the  air-conditioner  in 
our  living  room. 


Makes  Beautiful 
Lawns  .  .  . 

Nothing  adds  more  beauty  to  « 
home  than  a  lovely  lawn.  Plant 
WOOD'S  LAWN  GRASS  SEED 
for  a  lawn  that  stays  green  and 
beautiful  in  every  season  of  the 
year. 

WOOD'S  FALL  CATALOG — Get  Your  Copy  and  Learn  About  Best  Grass 
Seed,  Bulbs,  and  Other  Seed  for  Your  Property  Improvement  Plans. 

T.  W.  Wood  &  Sons 


326  N.  Fifth  St. 


RICHMOND,  VIRGINIA 


CRUISING  IS  FUN! 

Why  Not  Try  It  This  Winter? 

Sail  with  your  own  group — or  alone — you'll 
meet  new  people — make  new  friends,  and  en- 
joy the  finest  vacation  ever.  Join  in  a  full 
program  of  activities  or  just  relax  on  sun- 
bathed decks.  Living  at  its  best  while  visiting 
fascinating  ports  of  call. 

CARIBBEAN  —  MEDITERRANEAN 
AFRICA  —  AROUND  THE  WORLD 
See  us  now  for  details  and  reservations 
PLAN  NOW  FOR  EUROPE  IN  1961 

C.  O.  ALLEY  TRAVEL  AGENCY 

708  E.  Grace  Seaboard  Bldg. 

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MOST  MODERN  DAIRY 


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Milk  Available  In  Famous  Pure-Pak 


Prompt,  Courteous     paper  Cartons  From  Your  Favorite  Dealer 

Delivery 

1600  ROSENEATH  ROAD 


?4 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


November,  i960 


PORTSMOUTH,  VA 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Walter  Brennan 

Wishes  to  extend  Heartiest  Congratulations 
to  the  Officers  and  Members  of  Gomley  Chesed 
Synagogue  on  their  70th  Anniversary  and  to  Mr 
Julian  M.  Blachman,  for  being  selected  the  TVlan 
of  the  Quarter  Century  of  Portsmouth. 


We  are  proud  to  Salute  Julian  M.  Blachman,  the 
Quarter  Century  Man,  selected  for  the  City  of  Ports- 
mouth. 

MEDLIN'S  MEMORIALS 

•  MARBLE       *  GRANITE       *  BRONZE 

3800  King  Street  Portsmouth,  Va. 


Portsmouth  is  proud  of  our  own  Julian  Blachman, 
and  we  congratulate  him  on  being  selected  the  M an  of 
the  Quarter  Century. 

PINE  GROVE  DAIRY 

A  Major  Dairy  in  Tidewater  That 
Produces  Its  Own  Milk  on  Its  Own  Farms 

Well  deserved  Congratulations  to  Julian  M.  Blach- 
man for  having  ben  chosen  the  Man  of  the  Quarter 
Century  for  the  City  of  Portsmouth. 

PARKER'S  FLORAL  CO. 

Everything  in  Flowers  EX  7-5886 

2626  High  PORTSMOUTH,  VA. 


Asheville,  N.  C. 

MRS.  GUSTAV  LICHTENFELS,  Correspondent 


Due  to  the  illness  of  Rabbi  Alex- 
ander Gelberman,  the  members  of 
the  Congregation  Beth  Israel  are 
carrying  on  his  work  and  are  read- 
ing the  Friday  night  services  as 
well  as  the  Holiday  services. 

The  Sisterhood  of  Temple 
BETH-HA-Tephila  held  their 
first  fall  meeting  on  Monday  Sep- 
tember 25th  in  the  Temple  As- 
sembly Hall.  Mrs.  Ira  Spears  of 
Baltimore,  Past  President  of  Dis- 
trict 8  was  the  guest  speaker  and 
brought  the  members  much  infor- 
mation, about  our  organization  on 
State  and  National  levels.  A  des- 
sert course  was  served  at  the  be- 
ginning of  the  meeting.  In  the 
evening  Mrs.  Spear  attended  a  din- 
ner meeting  of  the  Board  to  dis- 
cuss their  local  problems.  The 
Sisterhood  runs  an  active  Thrift 
Shop,  the  proceeds  of  which  pays 
off  the  debt  of  the  new  Religous 
School,  which  has  recently  been 
completed. 

Dr.  &  Mrs.  Feldman  and  daugh- 
ter Rhonda,  recently  flew  to  Mexi- 
co for  a  ten  day  visit  in  Mexico  and 
Acapulco.  While  there  they  were 
extensively  entertained.  Dr.  Feld- 
man is  Medical  Advisor  for  the 
American  Boxing  Commission  and 
attended  a  meeting  of  this  organi- 
zation. 

EDWARD  GOLDSMITH,  per- 
ennial Treasurer  of  Asheville 
Lodge  No.  714  B'NAI  B'RITH, 
(having  held  that  office  for  almost 
20  years)  has  been  confined  to  his 
home  for  the  past  few  months  for 
a  much  needed  rest;  but  is  show- 
ing some  improvement.  "Ed"  is  a 
Life  member  and  Trustee  of 
Temple  Beth-Ha-Tephila,  of  which 
Rabbi  Sidney  Unger  is  Spiritual 
Leader,  also  a  Life  member  of  the 
Temple  Brotherhood  and  a  Life 
Member  of  Asheville's  B'nai  B'rith 
Lodge.  He  is  widely  known 
throughout  this  area  and  extends 
NEW  YEAR  GREETINGS  to  his 
many  friends  and  acquaintances 
who  wish  him  a  speedy  recovery. 

Mrs.  Jerry  Sternberg,  and  Mrs. 
Eugene  Shapiro  are  chairman  and 
co-chairman  of  the  monthly  par- 
ties sponsored  by  the  Council  of 
Jewish  Women,  for  mentally  and 
physically  handicapped  adults. 
These  evenings  are  in  many  cases 
the  only  social  contact  of  the  han- 
dicapped person.  The  programs 
have  included  games,  Bingo,  a 
magician,  singing,  and  professional 


entertainers  of  all  sorts.  Mrs.  Stern- 
berg reports  an  attendance  of  15 
to  20  with  parents  and  friends  mak- 
ing the  group  much  larger. 

Each  month  on  the  fourth  Mon- 
ter  at  7:30,  there  is  fun,  fellowship, 
clay  at  the  Jewish  Community  Cen- 
and  refreshment  for  handicapped 
persons.  The  September  meeting 
will  feature  Bingo  with  prizes. 

A  salute  to  Mrs.  Sternberg,  Mrs. 
Shapiro,  the  Jewish  Community 
Center,  the  ladies  of  the  National 
Council  of  Jewish  Women,  and  the 
entertainers  who  have  made  this 
undertaking  a  success! 

New  members  were  introduced 
at  first  fall  meeting  of  the  Ashe- 
ville Chapter  of  Hadassah 
in  the  Jewish  Community  Cen- 
ter. They  include:  Mrs.  Louis 
Rothstein,  Mrs.  Francis  Schoen- 
feld,  Mrs.  Hyman  Koling,  Mrs. 
Julius  Doloboff  and  Mrs.  Ben 
Kootcher. 

Please  Turn  To  Page  20 


Professor  Martin  Buber  in  a  re- 
cent interview  in  his  study  in  Israel, 
expressed  the  belief  that  a  liberal 
Jewish  movement  will  first  begin  to 
flourish  in  Israel  during  the  next 
generation. 


Our  Highest  Regard  to 
Julian  M.  Blachman,  Man  of 
the  Quarter  Century  for  the 
City  of  Portsmouth. 

KILBY'S,  INC. 

FLOWERS  FOR  ALL 
OCCASIONS 

EX  7-5853 
409  Court  Portsmouth 


November,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


»5 


Portsmouth,  Va. 

MEYER  H.  JACOBSON,  Correspondent 


Gomley  Chesed  Congregation's 
70th  Anniversary  Year  celebration 
reached  its  cl  imax  on  the  evening 
of  October  30,  i960  when  the  A.  H. 
Goodman  Auditorium  of  the  Syna- 
gogue was  filled  over  flowing 
with  relatives  and  friends  from  far 
and  near  as  Julian  M.  Blachman, 
was  honored  as  the  Congre- 
gation's Man  of  the  Quarter-Cen- 
tury. Mr.  Blachman  received  a  va- 
riety of  tributes  for  his  many  ac- 
complishments and  activities  in 
Synagogue  and  community  life. 
On  Friday  evening,  the  Sisterhood 
dedicated  a  pulpit  chair  in  his 
honor  at  the  service,  which  was  at- 
tended by  his  many  friends  in  the 
community  of  Portsmouth.  Mr. 
Blachman  was  also  presented  with 
a  plaque  by  the  Congregation  in 
recognation  of  his  devtion  to 
Gomley  Chesed  during  the  past  25 
years,  and  a  surprise  gift  by  a  group 
of  his  friends.  Guest  speaker  of  the 
evening  was  Dr.  Max  Arzt,  Vice 
Chancellor  of  the  Jewish  Theolo- 
gical Seminary  of  America.  Tri- 
butes from  Mr.  Label  Katz,  Nation- 
al President  of  B'nai  B'rith,  Dr. 
Louis  Finklestein,  Chancellor  of 
the  Jewish  Theological  Seminary 
of  America,  Dr.  Bernard  Segal, 
President  of  the  United  Synagogue 
of  America,  Mayor  Irvine  Smith  of 
Portsmouth  were  included  in  a 
souvenir  book  received  by  every- 
one attending  the  banquet. 


B'nai  B'rith  Women  of  Ports- 
mouth announce  plans  for  a  new 
and  different  Donor  affair  to  be 
held  on  Thursday  evening,  No- 
vember 3  at  the  Suburban  Coun- 
try Club.  This  "Ladies'  Night 
Out"  affair  will  feature  a  promin- 
ent guest  speaker  as  well  as  a  pa- 
rade of  Kitchen  Gadget  Fashions 
presented  by  Portsmouth's  young 
married  group.  Chairmen  of  the 
evening  are  Mrs.  Meyer  H.  Jacob- 
son  and  Mrs.  Hyman  Kates. 

Gomley  Chesed  Sisterhood  and 
Men's  Club  will  hold  a  joint  Thea- 
tre Party  on  Thanksgiving  Eve, 
November  23rd  in  the  Synagogue's 
A.  H.  Goodman  Auditorium.  A 
presentation  by  the  players  of  the 
Portsmouth  Little  Theatre  will  be 
followed  by  refreshments  and 
dancing.  The  entire  community 
is  invited  to  attend. 

Mazeltov  to:  Mrs.  Ruth  Salasky 
on  the  Bar  Mitzvah  of  her  son, 
Stan;  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Carl  Marc  on 
the  Bar  Mitzvah  of  their  son,  Ken- 
neth Hal;  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Joseph 
Markmam  on  the  Bar  Mitzvah  of 
their  son,  Stephen;  Dr.  and  Mrs. 
I.  Leonard  Kaplan  on  the  birth  of 
their  second  daughter,  Bonnie  Sue. 

Our  sympathy  to:  Mrs.  T.  R. 
Goodman  and  the  Legum  family 
on  the  recent  loss  of  their  mother, 
Mrs.  Bessie  Legum. 


Richmond,  Va.  B'Nai  B'Rith  Women 

MRS.  ALLEN  MULLIAN,  Correspondent 


B'nai  B'rith  Women  of  Rich- 
mond had  a  most  successful  mem- 
bership tea  at  the  lovely  home  of 
Mrs.  Philip  Cohen.  Mrs.  Samuel 
Batt,  Membership  Chairman,  and 
her   committee   did   a  wonderful 


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PORTSMOUTH,  VA. 


job  and  this  affair  and  their  ef- 
forts paid  off,  thus  far,  to  the 
tune  of  23  new  members. 

In  September  we  also  held  our 
first  regular  meeting  at  Temple 
Beth  Israel.  "The  Fashionable 
Women  of  B'nai  B'rith"  was  the 
theme  of  a  skit  written  and  direct- 
ed by  Mrs.  Julian  Shapiro.  The 
ladies  in  the  skit  wore  adorable 
hats  depicting  the  project  they  are 
working  on  for  the  year  in  B'nai 
B'rith.  We  hate  to  brag,  but  the 
hats  and  skit  were  wonderfully 
original  and  a  good  time  was  had 
by  all. 

On  and  on  we  go  on  our  merry 
way,  and  where,  to  Washington, 
D.  C.  In  October  our  women  raved 
about  the  wonderful  trip  to  our 
nation's  capital.  We  visited  the 
beautiful  B'nai  B'rith  Building 
and  the  Israeli  Embassy.  , 
Please  Turn  To  Page  20 


A  Choice  Man  selected  for  a  Rare,  Choice  Position. 

Congratulations  to  Julian  M.  Blachman,  selected 
by  the  City  of  Portsmouth  as  the  man  of  the  Quarter 
Century. 

AMERICAN  NATIONAL  BANK 

of  Portsmouth 

•  PORTSMOUTH'S  LARGEST  BANK 

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We  salute  Gomley  Chesed  Synagogue  on  their  70th  Anniver- 
sary and  Congratulations  to  Julian  M.  Blachman,  the  man 
selected  as  the  Quarter  Century  Man  for  Portsmouth. 


The  South's  Foremost  Specialty  Shop 
High  &  Court 
Portsmouth,  Virginia 


Congratulations  and  Best  Wishes  to  our  Friend 
Julian  M.  Blachman  for  the  honor  accorded  him  on 
being  selected  the  Man  of  the  Quarter  Century  for  the 
City  of  Portsmouth. 


G00DE  OLDSMOBILE,  INC, 


914  High 


PORTSMOUTH,  VA. 


Well  deserved  Congratulations  to  Julian  Blach- 
man for  having  been  chosen  by  the  City  of  Portsmouth 
as  Man  of  the  Quarter  Century. 

PORTSMOUTH  LUMBER  CORP, 


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2511  High  Street 


LUMBER  MILL  WORK 

Portsmouth,  Va. 


i6 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


November,  i960 


Norfolk— Lynchburg— Staunton 
Newport  News— Roanoke,  Va. 


Norfolk,  Va. 

MRS.  WILLIAM  SCHWARTZ,  Correspondent 


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Following  a  very  successful  1959- 
1960  season,  the  Lecture  Series 
Committee  of  the  Jewish  Com- 
munity Center  enthusiastically  an- 
nounced their  plans  for  the  coming 
program  year.  Dr.  Harold  Bur- 
stein,  chairman  of  the  Committee 
noted  that  the  Series  will  be  co- 
operatively sponsored  with  all  our 
Norfolk  synagogues.  The  opening- 
program  will  feature  Mr.  Maurice 
Samuel  (author  of  "The  World  of 
Sholom  Aleichem")  on  Sunday, 
November  13th  at  Temple  Israel. 

A  banquet,  honoring  Rabbi 
Malcolm  H.  Stern  of  Ohef  Sholom 
Temple,  was  given  by  the  Tem- 
ple's Men's  Club  and  Sisterhood 
on  October  5th,  celebrating  the 
Rabbi's  recently  published  book, 
"Americans  of  Jewish  Descent". 
The  volume,  eleven  years  to  com- 
pile, contains  genealogical  charts 
of  every  well-known  American 
Jewish  family  from  1650.  the  time 
of  the  coming  of  the  first  Jews  to 
the  colonies,  to  1840.  Many  of  the 
charts  have  been  brought  down  to 
the  present  time.  The  book  was 
printed  by  the  Hebrew  College 
Press  and  will  be  distributed  by 
the  University  Publishers  of  New 
York.  , 

Temple  Israel  Sisterhood  held  a 
luncheon  in  September  in  honor 
of  its  new  members.  The  program, 
a  "first"  for  Sisterhood,  included 
a  workshop  and  orientation  period 
to  acquaint  new  members  of  the 
various  chairmanships. 

Mr.  Hillel  Friedman,  Senior 
Student  at  the  Jewish  Theological 
Seminary,  spoke  in  behalf  of  the 
Torah  Fund  luncheon  meeting  of 
the  Beth  El  Sisterhood,  October  4, 
honoring  new  members.  Bar  Mitz- 
vah  celebrants  at  Beth  El  Temple 
were  Jesse  C.  Zedd,  son  of  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Ben  Zedd  and  Mark  L.  Faver- 
man,  son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Sam 
Faverman.  , 

The  annual  Donor  Luncheon  of 
the  Norfolk  Chapter  of  Hadassah 
will  be  held  on  November  8th  at 
Temple  Israel.  Guest  speaker  for 
this  event,  will  be  famous  author, 
Robert  St.  John.  The  Norfolk 
Chapter  was  duly  proud  that  at 
the  recent  National  Convention, 
Mrs.  Philip  Kroskin  was  elected 
for  a  four  year  term  to  the  Nation- 
al Board  of  Hadassah.  , 

The  Jewish  War  Veterans,  Old 
Dominion  Post  No.  158  and  the 
J.W.V.  Ladies  Auxiliary  are  hard 
at  work  on  their  annual  ad  book 
and  preparing  for  their  yearly 
Veterans  Day  Dance.  Proceeds  of 


this  annual  event  enable  the  Post 
and  Auxiliary  to  continue  with 
weekly  visits  to  the  Kecoughtan 
Veterans  Hospital  and  the  weekly 
servicemen's  programs. 

Irwin  Berger,  President  of  the 
Jewish  Community  Center  an- 
nounced the  appointment  of  Harry 
Rosen  to  the  position  of  Dhector 
of  the  Center.  Mr.  Rosen,  formerly 
from  Essex  County,  N.  J.,  where 
he  was  Director  of  Women's  Di- 
vision of  U.J. A.  and  Secretary  of 
Women's  Service  Group,  and  also 
served  as  Program  Director  of  the 
Center  in  Nashville,  Tennessee. 
Welcome  aboard,  Harry. 

The  first  annual  Tidewater 
Jewish  Welfare  Board  Day  took 
place  in  October  at  the  Norfolk 
Jewish  Community  Center.  Origi- 
nated and  chaired  by  LCDR  Wil- 
liam J.  Jasper,  DC,  USN,  the  pro- 
gram included  discussion  and  ex- 
ploration of  the  activities  of  the 
Jewish  Welfare  Board  locally,  na- 
tionally and  overseas,  as  well  as 
a  Seminar  on  the  relationships  be- 
tween the  civilian  and  military 
communities.  Captain  Frederick 
H.  Wahlig,  Commanding  Officer, 
U.S.  Naval  Station,  Norfolk  pre- 
sented a  mural  of  the  Commodore 
Levy  Chapel  (  Jewish  Chapel  at  the 
Naval  Base)  to  the  Jewish  Com- 
munity Center. 


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November,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


17 


Charlotte  Temple  Israel 

MRS.  TED  VALENSTEIN,  Correspondent 


TEMPLE  ISRAEL  CHOIR 


Late  Friday  night  services  were 
esumed  at  Temple  Israel  on  Sept. 
)th  with  a  double  celebration.  A 
•eception  was  given  honoring 
labbi  Marc  E.  Samuels,  the  new 
piritual  leader  of  our  Temple, 
ind  his  charming  wife,  Carol. 

Rabbi  Samuels  was  ordained  at 
he  Jewish  Theological  Seminary 
1957  and  served  in  Midland, 
dich.,  before  coming  to  Charlotte. 
.Ve  wish  Rabbi  and  Mrs.  Samuels 
-very  happiness  in  our  community 
md  extend  a  heartv  Mazel  Tov  to 


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them  on  the  very  recent  birth  of 
their  second  son. 

Friday  evening  was  also  the  oc- 
casion of  celebrating  the  Bar  Mitz- 
vah  of  Paul  Ivan  Levine,  son  of 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  William  Levine.  On 
Saturday  morning,  the  congrega- 
tion was  invited  by  the  proud  par- 
ents to  attend  the  Kidclush  follow- 
ing the  Services  in  which  Paul  so 
ably  participated. 

The  first  Sisterhood  meeting 
took  place  on  Sept.  14th  with  Mrs. 
Sol  Fligel,  Sisterhood  president 
presiding.  Rabbi  Samuels  was  the 
guest  speaker.  , 

On  Friday  and  Saturday,  Sept. 
16th  and  17th,  I'enina  Ackerman 
participated  in  the  Services  on  the 
occasion  of  her  becoming  Bas  Mitz- 
vah.  Congratulations  to  Penina 
and  her  very  proud  parents,  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  George  F.  Ackerman. 

Before  the  traditional  Slichos 
Service  at  midnight,  Sept.  17th. 
Hazzan  Robert  Shapiro  led  the 
Congregation  in  chanting  the  High 
Holy  Day  melodies.  Refreshments 
were  served  after  the  Service. 

Saturday  night,  Oct.  1st,  the  an- 
nual Yom  Kippur  Dance  was  held 
at  the  Temple,  honoring  all  the 
new  members.  There  was  a  won- 
derful turnout,  congenial  atomo- 
sphere  and  fun  was  had  by  all. 

A  very  special  event  took  place 
on  Sunday,  Oct.  2nd.  A  most  in- 
spiring program  entitled  "Song  of 
the  New  Year"  was  presented  on 
television  over  station  WBTV,  serv- 
ing Charlotte  and  surrounding 
communities.  This  half  hour  pro- 
ram  was  an  original  dramatization, 
written  and  directed  by  our  own 
Hazzan  Robert  Shapiro  and  the 
Please  Turn  To  Page  21 


CHARLOTTE,  N.  C. 


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i8 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


November,  i960 


GREENSBORO,  N.  C. 


,1 


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GREENSBORO,   N.  C 


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MRS.  DANIEL  HOLLANDER  and  MRS.  EDWARD  R.  RICKETTS, 

Correspondents 


On  October  23,  Ulla  Fahre, 
daughter  of  Mrs.  Oscar  Fahre,  and 
the  ltae  Mr.  Fahre,  of  Sweden,  and 
New  York  City,  was  married  to 
Barry  Morton  Farber,  elder  son  of 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Raymond  Farber. 

Rabbi  Joseph  Asher  of  Temple 
Emanuel,  Greensboro,  conducted 
the  6  o'clock  ceremony  in  Hamp- 
shire House  New  York  City,  where 
later  the  bride's  mother  and  the 
bridegroom's  parents  were  recep- 
tion and  dinner  hosts. 

The  bride  attended  the  Swedish 
Red  Cross  Academy  in  Stockholm, 
where  she  worked  with  Dr.  Clar- 
ence Craford,  surgeon  and  profes- 
sor, at  the  Red  Cross  Hospital  be- 
fore coming  to  New  York. 

Mr.  Farber,  a  native  of  Greens- 
boro, was  correspondent  for  the 
Greensboro  Daily  News  in  Russia. 
He  is  a  Phi  Beta  Kappa  graduate 
of  the  University  of  North  Caro- 
lina, Chapel  Hill,  where  he  was 
editor  of  the  Daily  Tar  Heel  and 
president  of  the  athletic  associa- 
tion. He  is  currently  with  radio 
station  WINS. 

Charles  Stewart  Rogers,  son  of 
Dr.  and  Mrs.  S.  S.  Rogers,  celebrat- 
ed his  Bar  Mitzvah  on  October  14, 
at  Sabbath  Services  at  Temple 
Emanuel. 

The  intermediate  grades  of  Holy 
Trinity  Episcopal  Church  and  the 
Starmount  Presbyterian  Church 
were  the  guests  of  Temple  Eman- 
uel Religious  School  for  the  Succos 
service  on  Sunday,  October  9th. 

The  U.S.Y.  held  their  progres- 
sive dinner  on  Saturday  night, 
Sept.  17th,  with  about  50  teen- 
agers attending.  They  started  with 
the  appetizer  at  the  home  of  the 
Seller's,  went  to  the  Pinsker  home 
for  the  main  course,  and  finished 
with  the  dessert  meeting  and  danc- 
ing at  the  home  of  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Morris  Myers.  A  wonderful  time 
was  had  by  all  and  U.S.Y.  is  look- 
ing forward  to  a  really  big  year. 

The  first  meeting  of  this  sea- 
son of  Beth  David  Sisterhood  was 
held  in  the  synagogue  lounge  on 
Sept.  26th.  "Bride  and  Groom," 


revolving  around  new  members 
marriage  to  Sisterhood,  was  ably 
produced  by  Mrs.  Irvin  Acker  and 
Mrs.  Harold  Goltsman,  program 
chairmen.  Mrs.  Harry  Karesh  pro- 
vided piano  accompaniment  to  the 
cast  which  included  Mrs.  Irvin 
Acker,  Mrs.  Irving  Berkelhammer, 
Mrs.  Albert  Cohen,  Mrs.  Maury 
Jacobs,  Mrs.  Albert  Jacobson,  Mrs 
Zol  Kutchei,  Mrs.  Sam  Lyon,  Mrs 
Lewis  Myers,  Mrs.  Chet  Stanion 
and  Mrs.  Sidney  Sutker.  Much 
credit  was  due  to  our  decorating 
committee  for  the  beautiful  wedd 
ing  motif. 

We  would  like  to  welcome  the 
following  who  have  recently  joined 
our  Beth  David  family:  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Carl  Brotman,  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Mel  Greenberg,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Abe 
Kaplan,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Marvin 
Neiditz,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Elliot  Pearl 
man,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Chet  Stanion, 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  William  Weitz,  Mr 
and  Mrs.  Arnold  Helman,  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Bernard  Kleinman,  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Ken  Schneiderman,  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Murray  Silfen,  Mr.  and  Mrs 
Sam  Steinberg,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Burt 
Romer  and  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Sam 
Korenberg.  Incidentally,  a  baby 
o-irl  was  born  to  our  new  members, 

o 

Please  Turn  To  Page  30 


4* 


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November,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


PARABLES  OF  A 


ORIGINAL  CREATIONS  BY  RABBI  SOLOMON  JACOBSON 
TEMPLE  BRITH  ACHIM,  PETERSBURG,  VA 

The  Best  Of  All  Orbits 


Once  upon  a  time  there  was  a 
ing  who  had  vanquished  the  en- 
ire  world.  All  nations  were  under 
lis  dominion  and  he  sought  new 
worlds  to  conquer.  He  was  in- 
pired  by  the  majestic  concept  of 
nding  his  people  out  into  space 
eyond  the  confines  of  the  earth, 
nd  thus  he  would  bring  the  cos- 
rios  under  his  rule,  too.  He  put 
is  scientists  to  work  on  the  pro- 
ct  and  it  was  not  long  before 
hey  had  devised  methods  of  circl- 
ng  the  earth.  It  was  called:  put- 
ing  man  in  orbit. 

This  undertaking  proved  most 
uccessful  and  many  were  the  king's 
ubjects  who  went  into  orbit  a- 
ound  the  earth.  The  excitement 
nd  exhilaration  were  tremendous. 
Tired  of  the  ordinary  orbits,  the 
eople  demanded  bigger  and  deep- 
r  circuits  that  would  enable  them 
o  encompass  larger  and  wider  por- 
ions  of  the  universe.  There  was 
10  end  to  the  prospect.  The  king 
ncouraged  his  scientists  to  follow 
le  matter  to  its  utmost  potential 
3  that,  in  due  course,  orbits  could 
e  established  around  the  planets 
nd  the  stars.  "Let  the  road  lead 
^here  it  may,"  ordered  the  king, 
but  I  want  the  most  magnifi- 
ent  and  extensive  orbit  imagin- 
ie." 

This  is  how  it  happened  that  a 
ertain  prophet  came  to  the  king, 
lying,  "The  orbits  which  are  now 
operation  or  in  preparation  are 


THE  SUN-JOURNAL 

"The  Paper  That 
Goes  Home" 

NEW  BERN,  N.  C. 


very  insignificant,  petty,  diminu- 
tive and  minuscule.  I  can  suggest 
an  orbit  which  will  outshadow  and 
outdistance  any  orbit  on  the  plan- 
ning boards,  yet  it  is  a  very  simple 
and  inexpensive  one." 

The  king  was  enthralled  by  the 
prophet's  statement  and  he  pressed 
for  a  diagram  of  this  last-word  or- 
bital system. 

Said  the  prophet,  "If  you  can 
prevail  upon  the  people  in  the 
kingdom  to  make  an  orbit  around 
themselves  and  each  one  to  get  the 
most  out  of  the  wonderful  world 
that  lies  within  him,  you  will 
have  the  best  orbit  that  ever  was 
or  ever  will  be." 

Moral:  An  orbit  which  encircles 
planet  or  star  cannot  equal  the 
orbit  we  ourselves  are. 


Charlotte  Chapter 
B'nai  B'rith  Women 

MRS.   NORMAN  MUSLER, 
Correspondent 

On  October  5th  the  Charlotte 
Chapter  had  the  first  regular  meet- 
ing. The  membership  chairman, 
Mrs.  Edwin  Ooodman  and  Mrs. 
Robert  Kurtz  and  the  ADL  chair- 
man, Mrs.  Shelton  Gorelick,  were 
in  charge.  All  new  members  were 
welcomed  and  there  was  a  com- 
plete business  session  with  reports 
on  some  of  our  new  projects,  which 
include  work  to  be  done  on  the 
Nevins  School  for  Retarded  Chil- 
dren. 

Upon  completion  of  the  meeting 
we  were  introduced  to  our  speaker 
for  the  afternoon— Mr.  Robert  C. 
Kohler,  Director  of  the  Virginia, 
North  Carolina  Regional  Office  of 
the  ADL.  He  gave  us  an  enlighten- 
ing appraisal  of  current  anti-semit- 
ism. 

BBG  EXTRA-Charlotte  BBG  No. 
552  was  honored  again  this  year  by 
having  two  delegates  appointed 
by  5th  District  to  attend  the  Inter- 
national Convention  of  BBG  held 
in  August  of  this  year.  They  were 
Sara  Cohen,  Southern  Regional 
President  and  Susan  Naumoff  Pre- 
sident of  the  Charlotte  BBG. 


First  Federal  Savings  & 
Loan  Association 

ALL  SAVINGS  INSURED 

417  Broad  Street 
NEW  BERN,  N.  C 


new  b: 

EMM  MR  SUHVICE  INC. 

FLIGHT  INSTRUCTIONS 

Cessna 

Charter  Service  &  Passenger  Rides 

DEALER  c 

Simmons-iNOU  Airport 

Box  1231                     NEW  BERN,  N.  C. 

NEW  BERN  BUILDING  SUPPLY  CO. 

LUMBER  —  READY  MIXED   CONCRETE  —  CONCRETE  BLOCKS 
ROOFING  —  PAINTS  —  PLASTER  —  WINDOWS  —  DOORS 
SAND  —  BRICK  —  and  OTHER  BUDLDING  MATERIALS 

110  CRAVEN  ST.  DIAL  ME  7-3143  NEW  BERN,  N.  C. 


Stanton  Pharmacy 

PRESCRIPTION 
SPECIALISTS 

405  Broad  St.         Dial  ME  7-5732 
NEW  BERN,  N.  C. 


W.  C.  CHADWICK 

GENERAL  INSURANCE 

214  Clark  Building 

Dial  ME  7-3146 
NEW  BERN,  N.  C. 


IVES  OIL  CO. 


GASOUNE 

Kerosene — Fuel  Oil 

Dial  ME  7-2197     Cypress  St 
NEW  BERN,  N.  C. 


EVERYTHING  FOR  THE 
BUILDERS 

B  &  B  Supply  Co. 

Kiln  Dried  Framing  and  Finished 
Lumber  •  Builders  Hardware  • 
Moulding  •  Southport — Patterson 

Sargeant  Paints 
LET  US  FINANCE  YOUR  HOME 
IMPROVEMENTS 
NO  DOWN  PAYMENT  — 

36  MONTHS  TO  PAY 

POLLOCKSVTLLE  ROAD 
DIAL  ME  7-5710 

NEW  BERN,  N.  C. 


Willis  &  Ballard 
Funeral  Home 

Established  1897 

COMPLETE  FUNERAL  SERVICE 
AMBULANCE  SERVICE 

226  Broad  St.  Dial  ME  7-3210 

NEW  BERN,  N.  C. 


NEW  BERN 

Coca-Cola 
BOTTLING  WORKS 
INCORPORATED 

NEW  BERN,  N.  C. 


20 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


November,  1960] 


ROCKY  MOUNT.  N.  C. 


Rocky  Mount,  N.  C. 

MRS.  SAMUEL  H.  JUSTA,  Correspondent 


H.  H.  Strandberg,  President 


M.  W.  Ivey,  Secretary-Treasurer 


H.  H.  Strandberg,  Jr.,  Asst.  Secretary-Treasurer 

Standard  Insurance  &  Realty  Corp. 


"Let  STANDARD  be  your  STANDARD" 


Phone  GI  6-6158 


Rocky  Mount,  N.  C. 


MEADOW  BROOK  DAIRY 

GRADE  A 
Pasteurized  and  Homogenized  Milk 

Dial  GI  2-1714  ROCKY  MOUNT,  N.  C. 


Send  Your  Dry  Cleaning 
TO 

Imperial  Cleaners 

573  Raleigh  Street 
ROCKY  MOUNT,  N.  C. 


FOR  MUSIC 
in  your  home 

W.  C.  REID 
&  COMPANY 

PIANOS 
MUSICAL  INSTRUMENTS 

143  S.  Main  St. 
Dial  GI  6-4101 
ROCKY  MOUNT,  N.  C. 


to 


SWIFT 

LUXURIOUS 

LIVELY 

SAILING 

From  New  York  every  third  week: 

S.S.  Israel  and  S.S.  Zion,  stopping 
en  route  at  the  Azores  and  Greece 
From  Mediterranean  ports  weekly: 

S.S.  Theodor  Herzl  and 
S.S.  Jerusalem  (in  season) 


•  Stabilizer-equipped  for 
smooth  sailing 

•  Tempting,  strictly  kosher 
cuisine 

•  Lively  Israeli  atmosphere 

Consult  your  travel  agent 
— he's  your  best  source  of  advice 

Owner's  Representative:  AMERICAN  ISRAELI  SHIPPING  CO.,  INC.  •  42  B'WAY,  N.  Y.  4  •  01  4-7600 


We  thoroughly  enjoyed  the  line 
chanting  of  our  new  Rabbi  Charles 
Heilpern  during  regular  and  High 
Holy  Day  services  at  Beth  El. 

The  sisterhood  continues  its 
busy  money  making  projects  under 
its  new  president,  Mrs.  Harry 
Kornfeld.  The  new  Ways  and 
Means  Chairman,  Mrs.  Ruth  Ep- 
stein, reports  a  huge  success  for 
the  season's  first  Sunday  buffet 
dinner.  Shortly  the  B'nai  Brith 
will  dine  with  them. 

Out  of  town  guests  lor  High 
Holy  Days  included  the  Isaac 
Rosenblooms  of  Burlington,  N.  C, 
the  Howard  Kouzels  of  Washing- 
ton, D.  C,  Barry  Baker  of  New 
York,  Mrs.  Lottie  Berk  of  Miami 
Beach,  Mrs.  Lillie  Leipman  of 
Miami  Beach  and  the  Eddie  Leip- 
mans  of  High  Point,  N.  C.  and 
the  Robert  Reinhards  of  Rich- 
mond, Va.  The  Sam  Justas  attend- 
ed Yom  Kippur  services  in  Colum- 
bia, S.  C.  with  their  son  Ed,  who  is 
studying  pre-medicine  at  the  Uni- 
versity of  S.  C.  , 

We  are  glad  that  Jules  Kluger 
is  well  again. 

Congregation  Beth  El  is  happy  to 
welcome  new  members:   the  Mr. 


and  Mrs.  Irving  Adler,  Leonard 
Schiff,  Marvin  Levin,  and  Ben 
Greenberg.  , 

Mrs.  Norman  Gold  visited  her 
daughter,  Gloria,  in  Washington 
D.  C.  Mrs.  Harry  Kornfeld  spent 
the  weekend  with  her  son,  Stanley 
in  Washington,  D.  C.  The  Jules 
Klitzners  dropped  in  on  their 
daughter,  Linda,  at  Mary  Wash 
ington  College  in  Fredericksburg 
Va. 


Richmond 
B'nai  B'rilh  Women 

Concluded  from  Page  15 

But  the  best  is  yet  to  come  and 
the  date  is  November  qth.  Ladies 
pay  your  dues  and  enjoy  a  de 
licious  free  luncheon.  All  of  out 
wonderful  new  members  will  be 
officially  installed  at  this  lunch 
eon.  The  program  of  the  day 
will  include  an  informative  talk 
and  movie  pertaining  to  our  B'nai 
Brith  Philanthrophies.  We  are  sure 
you  will  find  insurmontable  pleas 
ure  in  viewing  the  tangible  result 
of  your  membership  in  B'nai 
B'rith. 


Asheville,  N.  C. 

Concluded  from  Page  14 

Special  guests,  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Naftaly  Armon  of  Israel  dis- 
cussed that  country.  Mrs.  Armon 
is  the  daughter  of  Dr.  and  Mrs. 
Noah  Benninga. 

Past  presidents  of  the  chapter 
were  honored  and  a  plaque  was 
presented  to  the  first  president, 
Mrs.  Gustav  Lichenfels.  This 
session  was  the  25th  anniversary 
of  the  founding  of  the  group. 

A  skit  written  by  Mrs.  David 
Marder,  "The  Case  of  the  New 
Member,"  was  presented. 

The  Asheville  Chapter  of  Hadas- 
sah  is  planning  to  form  a  Young 
Judea  group  for  boys  and  girls, 
ages  10  to  13  years. 

Raphael  Salmon,  executive  di- 
rector of  the  Seaboard  Region  of 
Young  Judea,  spoke  to  a  com- 
mittee for  the  project  Wednesday 
afternoon  in  the  home  of  Mrs. 
Lou  Kaplan  at  8  Alclare  Dr. 

The  board  for  Hadassah's  an- 
nual School  for  a  Day  met  that 
night  with  Mrs.  David  Marder  in 
the  Edgewood  Knoll  Apts.,  and 
completed  plans  for  that  event  held 
October  17  in  the  Jewish  Commun- 
ity Center. 


The  appoimment  of  Rabbi  Cnarles 
J.  Shomson  as  Sec  etary  of  Com 
mumty  Relations  of  the  Jewish 
Braille  Insiitute  of  America  has 
been  announced  by  Mrs.  Harry  J 
Finke,  President  of  th?  organization 


ROCKY  MOUNT 
AIR  SERVICE 

FLIGHT  INSTRUCTION 
CHARTER  FLIGHTS 

DIAL  GI  6-8052 

ROCKY  MOUNT,  N.  C. 


Holbrook  Motor  Co. 

DODGE  SALES  &  SERVICE 
DODGE    JOB-RATED  TRUCKS 

607  S.  Church  St.  Dial  GI  2-6173 
ROCKY  MOUNT,  N.  C. 


November,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


2  1 


Temple  Israel,  Charlotte,  N.  C. 


(Concluded  from  Page  17) 


first  local  Jewish  choral  music 
presentation  of  it's  kind  to  be 
televized  in  this  area. 

The  mood  of  the  High  Holy 
Days  was  expressed  in  the  music 
of  the  telecast.  It  was  both  jubi- 
lant and  serious.  Hazzan  Shapiro 
chanted  portions  of  the  traditional 
liturgy,  beautifully  assisted  by  the 
Temple  Israel  Choir.  Rabbi  Sam- 
uels was  the  narrator.  Mrs.  Sol  Fli- 
gel  and  Mrs.  Edward  Hirsch  were 
shown  at  the  traditional  table  set- 
ting for  Rosh  Hashanah  and  the 
Shofar  was  sounded  by  Mr.  Irwin 
Wayne.  Mr.  Arthur  Yolkoff  was 
the  accompanist. 

The  volunteer  choir,  who  also 
Enhanced  our  high  Holy  Day  Ser- 
vices, consists  of  Mrs.  Milton  Bayer, 
Sam  Sodden,  Mrs.  Joe  Greenspan, 
Mrs.  Irvin  Wayne,  Mrs.  William 
Levine,  Mrs.  Leonard  Berger.  Fred 
Stern,  Harold  Pollard,  Arthur 
Pressman,  Eric  Sternberg,  Arthur 
Goldberg  and  George  Ackerman. 

Since  our  last  report,  the  Char- 
lotte community  has  increased  and 
we  would  like  to  congratulate  the 
following:  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Eugene 
Schaffer  on  the  birth  of  a  daugh- 
ter, Stacy  Leigh,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  El- 
liott Woller  on  the  birth  of  a  son, 
Scott  Clay;  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Milton 
Feldman  on  the  birth  of  a  daugh- 
ter, Tamara;  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Sol  Jaf- 
fa on  the  birth  of  a  daughter,  Dale 
Ellen.  Mazel  Tov  also  to  Rev.  and 
Mrs.  H.  N.  Friedman  on  the  birth 
of  a  granddaughter,  Sharon  Joy, 
daughter  of  Dr.  and  Mrs.  Philip  R. 
Bernanke. 


Kinston  Shoe  Hospital 

QUALITY 
SHOE  REPAIRS 

113  E.  North  Street 
KINSTON,  N.  C. 


Carolina  Cleaners 
and  Laundry 

Complete  Laundry  Service 

Beautiful  Cleaning 

"A  Modern  Plant  for 
Quality  Cleaning" 

Dial  JA  3-2168 

121  N.  Heritage 
KINSTON,  N.  C. 


Congratulations  also  to  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Manuel  Eisenberg  on  the 
marriage  of  their  daughter  Jerrie 
Lynn  to  Charles  E.  Robertson,  Jr.; 
to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Irving  Fogelson 
on  the  marriage  of  their  son, 
Joseph  to  Miss  Daisy  Giles;  to  Mrs. 
Florence  Pressman  on  the  marriage 
of  her  son  Alan  to  Miss  Fredda 
Pailet  of  Memphis,  Tenn.,  and  to 
Mrs.  Ann  Shubkin  on  the  recent 
marriage  of  her  daughter  Bonnie 
Sue  to  Jack  Lazarus. 


Dr.  Ephraim  Fsschoff  of  Agudath, 
Sholom  Congregation  in  Lynchburg, 
Va.,  represented  the  Jewish  Chautau- 
qua Society  as  lecturer  at  The  Wo- 
man's College  of  the  University  of 
North  Carolina  in  Greensboro,  N.  C. 
on  Oct.  16,  1960.  The  rabbi  delivered 
a  sermon  on  the  subject  "Two  Great 
Lives." 


"Say  It  With  Flowers" 

RANDOLPH'S 
FLORIST 

Dial  JA  3-4148 
Day  or  Night 
710  West  Vernon  Ave. 
KINSTON,  N.  C. 


E.  L  SCOTT 

ROOFING  CO. 

Roofing  and  Sheet 
Metal  Contractors 

VENTILATORS 
LENNOX  FURNACES 
Winter  and  Summer 
Air-Conditioning 

Heating  -  -  Dial  JA  3-4732 
Roofing  -  -  Dial  JA  3-2110 
West  Vernon  Avenue 
KINSTON,  N.  C. 


Kinston's  Leading  Department  Store 


COMMERCIAL  NATIONAL  BANK 

The  Home-Owned  Bank 

Member  F.  D.  I.  C.  Member  Federal  Reserve  System 

KINSTON,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


"Everything  From  Foundation  To  Roof 
Grady's  Building  Supply  &  Hardware 

Russwin  Builders'  Hardware  —  Du  Pont  Paints 
Johns  Manville  &  U.  S.  Gypsum  Products 

I  514  E.  Vernon  Ave.        KINSTON,  N.  C.  Dial  JA  3-2156 


Dial  JA  3-3161  for 


CITIES  ©SERVICE 


Fuel  Oil 


Gasoline  —  Kerosene  —  Oils  and  Greases 
Fields  and  Dennis  Sts.  Kinston,  N.  C. 


State  License  1655 

Cauley  and  Pit! 
Plumbing  &  Heating  Co.,  Inc. 

COMMERCIAL  —  INDUSTRIAL  —  RESIDENTIAL 
CONTRACTING  &  REPAIRING 

Dial  JA  3-4850  KINSTON,  N.  C. 


GREETINGS 

G.  W.  CARTER 
TILE  COMPANY 

502  E.  Vernon     Dial  JA  3-3587 
KINSTON,  N.  C. 


JACKSON  GLASS 
&  TOP  WORKS 

Furniture   Repairing  & 
Upholstering: 
Auto  Upholstering 

Blunt  at  Heritage 
JA  7-0711 

FUTURE  HOME 
2000  Green       KINSTON,  N.  C. 


FOR  FUEL  OILS 

DIAL  J  A  3  3126 

MARTIN  OIL  CO. 

Distributors  of 


PRODUCTS 

KINSTON,  N.  C. 


BAKER 
Furniture  Co. 


Interior  Decorating 
—    Furniture  — 
Electrical  Appliances 


100  N.  Queen    Dial  JA  3-4034 
KINSTON,  N.  C. 


22 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


November,  i960 


Goldsboro,  N.  C. 

RABBI  ISRAEL  J.  SARASOHN,  Correspondent 


Goldsboro— Wilson,  N.  C. 


Temple  Sisterhood  meeting  for 
October  was  held  October  4th  (day 
before  yomtov)  with  Mrs.  M. 
Shrago  presiding.  Program  was 
presented  by  Mrs.  David  Weil  on 
"Sholom  Aleichem."  Mrs.  I.  Bark- 
er was  hostess. 

Leopold  Zunz  Lodge  held  its 
October  meeting  on  the  9th,  in 
the  social  center.  A  joint-meeting 
of  the  lodges  of  this  section  of  the 
state  is  scheduled  to  be  held  in 
Goldsboro  at  the  request  of  the 
State  Association.  Details  to  be  an- 
nounced later.  District  officers  are 
to  be  the  main  speakers. 

Much  interest  was  shown  in  the 
harvest  service  held  on  Succos 
evening  at  Oheb  Sholom,  October 
5th.  The  post-confirmants,  Jenny 
Ellis  and  Alan  Weil  participated 
in  the  reading  of  the  service  for 
Succos.  A  procession  directed  by 
Sunday  School  teachers,  Mrs.  Ro- 
bert Gottlieb  and  Mrs.  Jack  Bern- 
stein with  bountiful  baskets  of 
fruit-offerings  for  the  altar  sym- 
bolized the  ancient  processions  of 
pilgrims  to  the  sacred  sanctuary. 


An  attractively  decorated  Succah 
put  up  by  Robert  Baura,  featured 
the  Kiddush  in  the  social  center 
followed  by  refreshments  served 
by  the  Temple  Sisterhood  Com- 
mittee consisting  of  Mrs.  M.  Kir- 
schner  and  Mrs.  L.  Edwards.  The 
offerings  were  later  distributed  to 
various  institutions  by  Miss  Ger- 
trude Weil  and  Mrs.  M.  Rabino- 
witz.  The  music  for  the  service 
was  directed  by  Mrs.  David  Weil 
with  Mrs.  Sanford  Korschun  at 
the  organ.,  Miss  Gertrude  Weil 
furnished  the  flowers  for  the  Altar 
for  the  month  of  October. 

Jacob  P.  Shrago  took  ill  the 
evening  before  Yom  Kippur  and 
was  rushed  to  the  Hospital.  He  is 
reported  progressing  satisfactorily. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Max  Firnbacher 
attended  the  funeral  of  Mr.  Firn- 
bacher's  brother,  David  Frazer 
Firnbacher,  in  New  York.  It  was 
incorrectly  stated  in  our  October 
issue  that  Mr.  Max  Firnbacher  had 
passed  away.  We  regret  the  error, 
and  are  happy  to  be  able  to  make 
the  correction. 


Durham,  N.  C. 

Continued  From  Page  10 


dates  for  Congress,  and  Hadasah 
members  Mrs.  N.  Wolff  and  Mrs. 
D.  Weinstein,  who  directed  it.  An 
interesting  question  and  answer 
period  followed. 

Mrs.  J.  Colvin,  Hadassah  presi- 
dent, welcomed  the  guests  and  gave 
a  short  account  of  her  attendance 


at  the  National  Hadassah  Conven- 
tion in  New  York.  The  following 
new  members  were  also  welcomed 
and  introduced  by  the  membership 
chairman,  Mrs.  A.  Greenberg: 
Mesdames:  N.  Shupper;  D.  Danne- 
man;  Wm.  Caffin;  S.  Danovitch; 
L.  Hart;  H.  Campbell;  S.  Somberg; 
S.  Gross;  H.  Aidem;  S.  Levine  and 
H.  Blumenfeld. 


TREATING 

IS  ONLY  AN  INSTANT  AWAY 

when  you  stock  up  on  dark,  delicious 


tiATE-NUT  ROLL®1 


THE 

READY-TO-SERVE  DESSERT 
CAKE  MADE  WITH  CRISP, 
CHUNKY  WALNUTS  AND  THE 
WORLD'S  CHOICEST  DATES 


I  LOOK  FOR  THE  fift 

ON  THE  LABEL 

THAT  TELLS  YOU 
I  IT'S  KOSHER! 

*  Al&O-  DROMEDARY  CHOCOLATE-NUT  ROLL  J 
and  ORANGE-NUT  ROLL  J 


MR.  AND  MRS.  JACK  SLAVIN 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Ben  Rose  of 
Raleigh,  N.  C,  announce  the  mar- 
riage of  their  niece,  Helen  Blanche 


W.  T.  LORIMORE  &  SON 

GENERAL  CONTRACTORS 

Mt.  Olive  Hwy.  Dial  RE  4-4421 

GOLDSBORO,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


J,  P.  TAYLOR  CO.,  Inc. 

LEAF  TOBACCO  DEALERS 

111  E.  Holly  GOLDSBORO,  N.  C.  Dial  RE  5-1581 


Insured  Savings 


Home  Loans 


(A 


Citizens 
Saving 

VLOAN  ASSOCIATION 


7 


GOLDSBORO 


E.  S.  WATERS,  President       S.  S.  WEATHERS,  Secretary-Treasurer 

WAYNE  ROOFING  &  SHEET  METAL  CO.,  Inc. 

APPROVED  RUBEROID  ROOFERS 
ROOFING  AND  SHEET  METAL 

Phone  RE  4-5475  GOLDSBORO,  N.  C.  1000  N.  Herman 


MAY'S  RADIATOR  SERVICE 

Auto  Radiator  Repairing 

313  N.  Center  Dial  RE  5-3517  GOLDSBORO,  N.  C. 


WAYNE  DAIRY 

A  Complete  Line  of 
Select  Dairy  Products, 
Including  Eggs  and  Butter 

RE  4-0574  1105  N.  William 

GOLDSBORO,  N.  C. 


GOLDSBORO 

NURSERY 

Builders  of  Beauty 

ALL  TYPES  OF 
ORNAMENTAL  PLANTS 

Landscaping  Our  Specialty 

Raleigh  Hwy.  Dial  RE  5-2820 

GOLDSBORO,  N.  C. 


B 
J 

fo, 

IJli 

J! 


HUNT 
Funeral  Home 

FUNERAL  DIRECTORS 


24-Hour  Ambulance 
Service 
DAY  or  NIGHT 
Dial  243-3148 

115  N.  Tarboro  St. 
WILSON,  N.  C. 


E.  F.  TAYLOR 
COMPANY 

Contractors 

Serving  Eastern  Carolina 
Since  1917 
General  Building 
Commercial  —  Industrial 
Residential 

Dial  RE  4-5581  Bright 
GOLDSBORO,  N.  C. 


November,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


Editorials 

Concluded  From  Page  5 

tion  —  our  philanthropic  organizations  find  the  going  rougher 
when  there  is  no  critical  condition  facing  us  —  it  might  be  off- 
set by  the  thought  that  additional  man-power  is  available  in 
non-crisis  times,  to  work  on  organization. 

Surely,  it  is  apparent  that  there  is  an  urgent  need  for  an 
answer  to  the  question,  both  internationally  and  locally,  as  to 
who  has  the  right  to  speak  for  whom.  The  sooner  that  such  a 
question  can  be  answered,  the  better  it  will  be  for  Jews  the 
world  over. 


Balsom  to  Mr.  Jack  Slavin,  Miami 
Beach,  Florida. 

Visitors  in  the  city  for  the  High 
Holy  Days  were  Dr.  Fred  J.  Fried- 
man, son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Sigfried 
Friedman,  who  is  practicing  den- 
tistry in  Union  City,  New  Jersey; 
and  Elliot  Rose,  son  of  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  J.  Rose,  an  accountant  in 
New  York. 

It  is  with  a  great  deal  of  sorrow 
what  I  report  the  passing  of  Mari- 
lyn Ornoff,  daughter-in-law  of  Mr. 


and  Mrs.  I.  Ornoff.  and  Mrs.  Mel 
Cohen,  my  sister.  May  the  New 
Year  have  in  store  only  good  tid- 
ings for  our  community. 

Congratulations  are  extended 
to  .  .  .  Barbara  Wishnov,  daughter 
of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  E.  J.  Wishnov,  on 
being  "capped"  as  a  nurse  in  Duke 
Nursing  School  .  .  .  Eddie  Hock- 
field,  son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  J.  Hock- 
field,  on  being  elected  Vice-Presi- 
dent of  his  class  in  Junior  High 
School. 


WELDON— ROANOKE  RAPIDS  N.  C. 

LOUISE  FARBER,  Correspondent 


For  the  High  Holy  Days,  Congre- 
gation Temple  Emanu-El  was  for- 
tunate in  securing  the  services  of 
Mr.  Raphael  Ostralsky,  a  student 
of  the  Jewish  Theological  Semin- 
ary of  America.  His  services  were 
inspiring. 

Sunday  School  opened  with  a 
record  attendance  of  students  and 
adults  under  the  leadership  of 
Harry  Kittner  and  Stanly  Schlenk- 
er. 

Visitors  who  came  for  the  holi- 
days were  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Joe  Kittner 
and  daughter,  Miss  Dorothy  Kitt- 
ner and  Miss  Millie  Goldblatt  of 
Washington;  Mr.  Margolies  of  New 
York;  Mr.  and  Mrs.  David -Kittner 
and  children,  Miss  Natalie  Goddes 
of  Philadelphia;  Mrs.  Clare  Haskell 


Firs!  Union 
A7@£ional  Bank 

Complete 

Banking  Service 

MEMBER 
Federal  Reserve  System 


WILSON,  N.  C. 


and  Mr.  L.  Kornblau  of  Richmond, 
Dr.  Herman  Farber  and  children 
of  Petersburg;  Miss  Evelyn  Joseph- 
son  of  Baltimore;  Mrs.  Rosa  Marks 
of  Virginia  Beach. 

Mrs.  Sam  Marks  is  visiting  her 
son,  Bootsie,  in  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

We  are  very  happy  to  have  in 
our  community  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Mur- 
ray Levy  and  children,  Barry, 
Maralyn  and  Barbara,  who  have  re- 
cently moved  from  New  York.  Mr. 
Levy  is  general  manager  of  the 
Carolina  Sleepwear  Mfg.  Company 
located  in  Weldon. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Morton  Farber  and 
children,  Miss  Louise  and  Ellis 
Farber,  Miss  Josephine  Freid  visit- 
ed in  the  home  of  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Ray  Farber  of  Greensboro.  The 
Farbers  had  as  their  guests  their 
parents  Mr.  and  Mrs.  William 
Farber  (Uncle  Will  and  Aunt 
Celia)  and  daughter,  Selma  of 
Miami  Beach,  Ellis  and  Mildred 
Farber  of  New  York  and  Jerry  Far- 
ber of  Atlanta. 

Congratulations  to  the  Harry 
Freids  upon  the  birth  of  a  daught- 
er on  October  4th. 

Mrs.  M.  Freid,  Mrs.  Harry 
Freid  and  Miss  Josephine  Freid  en- 
tertained at  a  reception,  Sunday, 
September  1 1  th,  honoring  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Theodore  Farber  of  Rich- 
mond. Mrs.  Farber  is  the  former 
Susan  Bloom  of  Jackson,  the  grand- 
daughter of  Mrs.  M.  Freid. 


Ask  For 
Made-Rite 
Sunbeam 
Bread  & 
Rolls 


Made-Rite  Bakery 


Goldsboro,  N.  C. 


CASEY'S  LAUNDRY 
&  CLEANERS 

— Fine  Cleaning — 
The  Best  in  Laundry  Service 

Dial  RE  5-1199 
1109  N.  Williams 
Branch:  Adamsville,  Hwy.  70 
GOLDSBORO,  N.  C. 


HOME  BUILDERS 
SUPPLY  CO. 

Lumber  —  Millwork 
Building  Materials 

Black  Creek  Rd.   Dial  24  3-4225 
WILSON,  N.  C. 


MOTORS 


•  Rebuilt  •  Repaired 

•Rewound 

DIXIE  ELECTRIC 
MOTOR  SERVICE 

Dial  RE  5-4381 
1006  N.  William  St. 
GOLDSBORO,  N.  C. 


J.  H.  Caison 

Roofing  and  Sheet 
Metal  Works 

the 
new 

ALUMINUM  AWNINGS 
Anchor 

Canvas  Awnings 

726  N.  John  St.       Dial  RE  4-4806 
GOLDSBORO,  N.  C. 


IDEAL  PLUMBING  COMPANY 

PLUMBING  CONTRACTORS 

State  License  No.  1288 
PLUMBING  AND  PLUMBING  REPAIRS 
301  HIGHWAY  SOUTH  24  3-5290  WILSON,  N.  C. 


GARR 
DRY  (LEANER 


•  A   Complete  Cleaning  Service 

•  One  Hour  Emergency  Service 

•  Formal  Gowns  Cleaned 

Specializing  In 

•  Draperies 

•  Slipcovers 

Dial  RE  4-5311 
208  N.  Center 
GOLDSBORO,  N.  C. 


Stanley 

Funeral  Home 

ft 

Since  1870 

ft 

Dial  RE  4-2544 
GOLDSBORO,  N.  C. 


A  Goldsboro  Friend 
of 

The  State  of  Israel 
Urges  All  Who  Can 
To  Buy 

ISRAEL  BONDS 


Carrier 
BERGER  &  JONES 

Heating  and  Air-Conditioning 
Contractors 
•  RESIDENTIAL 
•  COMMERCIAL 
•  INDUSTRIAL 
646  S.  Tarboro  St. 
Dial  24  3-5813 
WILSON,  N.  C. 


24 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


November,  i960 


Wilmington,  N.  C. 

MRS.  NORMiA  MAY,  Correspondent 


The  B'nai  Israel  Sisterhood  re- 
cently held  a  membership  tea  at 
the  Synagogue  which  was  followed 
by  the  first  business  meeting  of 
the  year.  The  members  were  wel- 
comed by  Mrs.  Arnold  Neuwirth, 
President.  Mrs.  Abe  Drapkin  gave 
a    short    talk    on    the  Holidays. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Seymour  L.  Alper, 
1125  Hawthorne  Rd.,  will  join  a 
group  of  140  top  Jewish  communi- 
ty leaders  for  a  three  week  tour 
of  Israel.  The  group  will  check 
into  the  needs  of  immigrants  in 
Israel  and  distressed  Jews  in 
European  and  Moslem  countries 
for  the  United  Jewish  Appeal.  Al- 
per is  N.  C.  State  Chairman  of  the 
Ufnited  Jewish  Appeal,  has  served 
as  president  of  the  Wilmington 
chapter  of  B'nai  B'rith  and  as 
board  member  of  the  Great  Neck, 
N.  Y.  chapter  of  the  Zionist  Or- 
ganization of  America. 


Curtis  Motor  Co. 

Johnson  Outboard  Motors 
Lone  Star  Boats 
Dial  AL  2-3886 
46  Banks  Ave.       Asheville,  N.  C. 


The  Southland  Mfg.  Co.  won 
the  award  for  hiring  and  co-operat- 
ing the  most  in  working  with  han- 
dicapped. This  award  was  received 
in  the  name  of  the  Company  by 
Mr.  Charles  Block.  Mr.  George 
Alper  and  Mr.  Bernard  Warshauer 
presented  the  award  which  is  given 
by  the  Marcus  W.  Jacobi  B'nai 
Birth  Organization  of  Wilming- 
ton. In  this  case  we  can  be  double 
proud,  both  of  the  giver  and  the 
receiver  of  this  fine  award. 

And  welcome  to  the  few  families 
in  Wilmington.  T  hey  are  a  bunch 
of  grand  people  already  participat- 
ing in  the  Jewish  affairs  of  the 
community.  David  and  Ruby  Zips- 
er  hail  from  Baltimore,  Md.  Have 
two  children,  Janet  and  Michael. 
Have  recently  entertained  Minnie 
Carroll  and  Mr.  and  Mrs.  George 
Lebetkin  of  Hartford,  Conn., 
mother  and  sister  of  Mrs.  Zipser. 
Hobby,  fishing. 

Welcome  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Mel- 
vin  Mach  from  Baltimore.  Chil- 
dren Marilyn  and  Edward.  Ed- 
ward is  in  his  first  year  at  State 
College,  Mr.  Mach  has  been  promi- 
nent in  Jewish  Scout  work. 


FEATURING:  BANQUETS,  WEDDING  RECEPTIONS,  BRIDGE 
LUNCHEONS,  AND  CLUB  AFFAIRS  IN  THE 
FINE  ATMOSPHERE  OF  OUR  VARIETY  DIN- 
ING ROOMS. 


&J)t  Jfflanor 


CALL 
AL  2-5371 


265  Charlotte 
Asheville,  N.  C. 


FREE  PARKING 


MOTOR  ENTRANCE       CENTRAL  LOCATION 


CAROLINA  HOTEL 


STEPHEN  W.  EDMONDS,  Manager 
35  Broadway — Corner  Broadway  and  Walnut  —  Phone  AL  3-3361 
ASHEVILLE,  NORTH  CAROLINA 


7  Market  St. 


ASHEVILLE  PAVING  COMPANY 
and  DRIVEWAYS,  inc. 

DRIVEWAYS  AND  MUNICIPAL  PAVING 

ASHEVILLE,  N.  C.  Dial  AL  2-4464 


ASHEVILLE 

Welding  ComDany 

GUARANTEED  WELDING 
"Satisfactory  Service  Since  1919" 
13  Southside         Dial  AL  3-8191 
ASHEVILLE,  N.  C. 


MARSHALL'S 
Fuel  Oil  company 

METERED  FUEL  OIL  SERVICE 

AL  2-4181       585  Haywood  Rd. 
W.  ASHEVILLE,  N.  C. 


Left  to  right:  Mrs.  W.  R.  Zinuner,  Mrs. 
Berger  and  Mrs.  Arnold  Neuwirth. 


Harry  J.  Stein,  Mrs.  Sam 


And  welcome  to  Mrs.  M.  Miller 
and  daughter  Patty,  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Robert  Lippitz  and  children 
Merle  and  Stuart,  from  Scranton, 
Pa. 

Best  regards  for  a  quick  recovery 


had  to  undergo  surgery  while  visit- 
ing home  on  a  vacation.  And  we 
can't  close  without  adding  "How 
about  that  Hannah  Block  bringing 
in  Miss  N.  C.  so  close  to  the  top." 
As  everyone  knows  by  now  Hannah 


to  Miss  Rhoda  May  of  Miami  who    was  the  coach,  and  one  of  the  best. 

Whiteville,  N.  C. 

MRS.  MARTIN  BERNSTEIN,  Correspondent 

ewish  Appeal  lead-    ville;  and  secretary-treasurer,  Her- 
man Leder  of  Whiteville. 

It  was  decided  by  the  partici- 
pants that  a  conference  would  be 
held  in  the  near  future  with  mem- 
bers from  the  communities  of  the 
Whiteville  zone  attending. 

Mr.  Joe  Mann  conducted  High 
Holy  Day  services  in  Williams- 
burg, Virginia,  for  congregation 
Temple  Beth  El  and  students  of 
the  William  and  Mary  College. 

Irving  Mann  assisted  Rabbi 
Simcha  Kling  in  conducting  ser- 
vices at  the  synagogue  in  Greens- 
boro. 


A  Unitec 
ership  meeting  was  held  at  the 
Hotel  Whiteville  on  the  evening 
of  October  4.  Attending  the  meet- 
ing were  outstanding  UJA  work- 
ers of  the  Whiteville  zone. 

The  purpose  of  this  annual  get 
together  was  to  discuss  ways  and 
means  of  sustaining  and  increas- 
ing the  i960  drive.  Natan  V.  Bert- 
man,  UJA  field  representative, 
was  on  hand  to  lead  the  discussion. 


New  officers  were  elected  for  the 
coming  year.  They  are:  president, 
Sam  Leder  of  Jacksonville;  vice 
president,  Si  Steinberg  of  White- 


ASHEVILL 

Cleaners  &  Dyers 

The  Home  of  Fine  Cleaners 

EVENING  WEAR 
DRAPERIES  -:-  HATS 
RUGS  -:-  DYEING 

230  Merrimon  Avenue 
Dial  AL  4-2364 
ASHEVILLE,  N.  C. 


Duncan's 
Upholstering  Co. 

Furniture  Re-Upholstered 
Re-Finished  And  Repaired 
Pick-Up  And  Delivery  Service 
Dial  AL  3-8570 

169  Charlotte  St. 
Asheville,  N.  C. 


HYATT  ELECTRIC  CO. 

ELECTRICAL  CONTRACTOR 

RESIDENTIAL  —  COMMERCIAL 
600  Haywood  Rd.     West  Asheville,  N.  C.     Dial  AL  3-0111 


November,  i960 


The  American  Jewish  TIMES-OUTLOOK 


*5 


Raleigh  Temple  Beth  Or 

MRS.  HARRY  CAPLAN,  Correspondent 


The  new  Torah  donated  by  Mrs. 
Sidney  Oberdorfer  of  Richmond, 
Va.,  and  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Ernest  Nei- 
man  was  dedicated  Friday,  Oct.  14. 
The  beautiful  new  scroll  and  the 
resplendent  Torah  Mantles  adorn- 
ing our  Torahs  contributed  greatly 
to  the  impressiveness  of  our  ser- 
vices during  the  recent  High  Holy 
Days  and  evoked  the  unstinted 
praise  of  everyone  present.  We  are 
profoundly  grateFul  to  the  above 
mentioned  individuals  for  their  ex- 
tremely appropriate  and  most  gen- 
erous gift. 

The  Holy  Days  are  now  a  pleas- 
ant memory,  but  we  wish  to  take 
this  opportunity  to  thank  the  mem- 
bers of  our  congregation  for  their 
many  expressions  of  appreciation 
that  they  were  kind  enough  to 
convey  to  us.  We  would  be  remiss 
were  we  not,  in  turn,  to  express 
our  special  gratitude  to  all  those 
individuals  and  groups  who  con- 
tributed so  much  to  the  splendid 
spirit  of  devotion  and  prayerful- 
ness  that  prevailed  at  our  services. 

Our  thanks  to  Mrs.  B.  S.  Aron- 
son  and  her  committee  for  provid- 
ing the  splendid  reception  follow- 
ing the  Rosh  Hashonah  Eve  Ser- 
vices, giving  an  opportunity  to  all 
our  members  and  their  guests  to 
mingle  and  exchange  New  Year 
good  wishes;  our  thanks  to  the 
Holiday  choir  under  the  direction 
of  Dr.  Nell  Hirschberg  for  present- 
ing to  us  the  musical  portions  of 
our  services  in  an  inspiring  man- 
ner; to  the  ushers  under  the  gui- 


dance of  Mr.  Isaac  Schwartz,  who 
as  always  performed  their  job  in  a 
most  efficient  manner;  and  to 
Jerry  Sauber  lor  making  the  Sho- 
far  service  so  very  meaningful  by 
blowing  the  Shofar  so  well.  The 
artistically  arranged  flowers  also 
added  very  greatly  to  the  impres- 
siveness of  the  services.  Our  ap- 
preciation is  extended  to  all  who 
participated  in  the  services. 

A  memorial  name  plate  in  mem- 
ory of  the  late  Mrs.  Milton  Thorn 
was  dedicated  Friday,  Oct.  7th. 

We  were  proud  to  have  one  of 
our  own  girls,  Sarah  Levine,  as  one 
of  the  debutantes  of  the  season.  It 
couldn't  have  happened  to  a  love- 
lier young  lady. 

Rabbi  Caplan  has  resumed 
teaching  two  classes  at  Shaw  Uni- 
versity, one  in  Isaiah,  the  other  in 
Great  Personalities  of  the  Old 
Testament. 

Glad  to  inform  everyone  that 
Mr.  Ben  Ginsberg.  Mr.  Harold 
Mark,  Mr.  Irving  Kaye,  Mrs.  Eva 
Glass  Fowler,  Mrs.  Max  Rosengar- 
ten  and  Mr.  Ike  Reinheimer  are 
fully  recovered  or  are  well  on  the 
road  to  recovery  from  their  recent 
illnesses.  Happy  to  report  that 
Mrs.  Oscar  Goodman  and  Mrs. 
Paul  Seligson  are  doing  nicely  after 
their  recent  surgery. 

Temple  Beth  Or  suffered  an  ir- 
reparable loss  in  the  recent  passing 
of  Miss  Eva  Harris.  It  can  truly 
be  said  that  nothing  Jewish  was 
alien  to  her.  She  brought  glory  and 
honor  upon  the  fewish  people. 


Raleigh,  N.  C.  Beth  Meyer  Synagogue 

MRS.  OSCAR  LEGUM,  Correspondent 


Worshippers  at  Beth  Meyer  en- 
joyed the  many  traditional  melo- 
dies chanted  by  the  choir,  who 
gave  of  themselves  and  of  their 
time  so  that  our  services  were  more 
beautiful.  At  the