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University  d'Ottawa 

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GOVERNMENT  PUBLICATIONS 

University  oi  Owawa 

BfBLIOTHeOMF  DE  WW 

U.d'O. 

O.U. 

LAW  ttBRAR* 


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DOMINION  OF  CANADA 


ANNUAL 

DEPARTMENTAL 

REPORTS 


1928-29 


VOL.  IV 


OTTAWA 

F.  A.  ACLAND 

PRINTER  TO  THE  KING'S  MOST  EXCELLENT  MAJESTY 

1930 


ANNUAL   DEPARTMENTAL 
REPORTS 


VOLUME  I 

Liiditor  General,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1929. 

VOLUME  II 

Public  Accounts,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1929. 

National  Revenue,  Department  of,  (Customs  and  Excise),  containing  accounts  of  Revenue 
with  statements  relative  to  the  Imports,  Exports,  and  Excise  of  the  Dominion  of  Canada, 
for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1929. 

National  Revenue,  Department  of,  (Shipping  Report,  Customs),  containing  the  Statements 
of  Navigation  and  Shipping  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1929. 

Trade  and  Commerce,  Department  of,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1929. 

Weights  and  Measures  Inspection  Service  (Trade  and  Commerce),  for  the  fiscal  year 
ended  March  31,  1929. 

Electricity  and  Gas  Inspection  Services  (Trade  and  Commerce),  for  the  fiscal  year  ended 
March  31,  1929. 

Board  of  Grain  Commissioners  for  Canada  (Trade  and  Commerce),  for  the  crop  year 
ended  August  31,  1929. 

Interior,  Department  of  the,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1929. 

Immigration  and  Colonization,  Department  of,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1929. 

Indian  Affairs,  Department  of,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1929. 

Mines,  Department  of,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1929. 

Agriculture,  Department  of,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1929. 

National  Defence,  Department  of,  (Militia  and  Air  Service),  for  the  fiscal  year  ended 
March  31,  1929. 

National  Defence,  Department  of,  (Naval  Service),  for] the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31, 1929, 


Pensions  and  National  Health,  Department  of,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,   1929 

VOLUME  III 

Superintendent  of  Penitentiaries,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1929. 

Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police,  for  the  year  ended  September  30,  1929. 

Secretary  of  State,  Department  of  the,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1929. 

Commissioner  of  Patents,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1929. 

Archives,  for  the  year  1929. 

Civil  Service  Commission,  for  the  calendar  year  ended  December  31,  1929. 

External  Affairs,  Department  of  the  Secretary  of  State  for,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March 
31,  1929. 

Labour,  Department  of,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1929. 

VOLUME  IV 

Public  Printing  and  Stationery,  Department  of,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1929. 
Marine  and  Fisheries  (Marine),  Department  of,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31, 1929. 
Marine  and  Fisheries  (Fisheries),  Department  of,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1929. 
Post  Office,  Department  of  the,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1929. 
Public  Works,  Department  of,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1929. 
Railways  and  Canals,  Department  of,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1929. 
Board  of  Railway  Commissioners  for  Canada,  for  the  calendar  year  ended  December  31,  1929. 
Chief  Electoral  Officer  (By-elections  for  the  year  1929). 

VOLUME  V 


Trade  of  Canada  (Imports  for  Consumption  and  Exports),  for  the   fiscal  year   ended 
March  31,  1929. 


DOMINION  OF  CANADA 
DEPARTMENT 

OF 

PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


ANNUAL  REPORT 

FOR  THE  FISCAL  YEAR  ENDED  MARCH  31 

1929 


OTTAWA 

P.  A.  ACLAND 

PRINTER  TO  THE  KING'S  MOST  EXCELLENT  MAJESTY 

1929 


To  His  Excellency  the  Right  Honourable  Viscount  Willingdon,  G.C.S.I.,  G.C.M.G., 
G.C.I.E.,  G.B.E.,  Governor  General  and  Commander  in  Chief  of  the  Dominion 
of  Canada. 

May  it  Please  Your  Excellency: 

The  undersigned  has  the  honour  to  present  to  Your  Excellency  the  Annual 
Report  of  the  Department  of  Public  Printing  and  Stationery  for  the  year  ended 
March  31,  1929. 

I  have  the  honour  to  be, 

Your  Excellency's  most  obedient  servant, 

FERNAND  RINFRET, 

Secretary  of  State  and  Minister  charged  with  administration  of 
Department  of  Public  Printing  and  Stationery. 

Ottawa,  October,  1929. 


91900-1* 


INTRODUCTORY  STATEMENT 

Sir, — In  practically  every  branch  of  activity  the  fiscal  year  1928-29  showed 
increased  production  or  business  as  compared  with  the  preceding  year,  the 
record  of  which  also  had  been  high.  The  gross  cash  turnover  for  the  year, 
$7,450,996.03,  shows  an  increase  over  the  preceding  year  of  $158,522.16, 
this  increase  being,  however,  less  marked  than  that  of  the  fiscal  year  1927-28 
over  the  preceding  year  when  the  increase  in  the  cash  turnover  reached  the 
high  figure  of  $820,422.73. 

The  work  of  printing  the  Revised  Statutes  of  Canada,  1927,  English  and 
French,  was  mentioned  in  last  year's  report  as  representing  one  of  the  important 
features  of  that  year.  As  then  stated,  the  four  volumes  including  the  Statutes 
proper  had  been  printed  and  distributed  before  the  close  of  the  fiscal  year  1927-28 
and  the  Statutes  Revision  Commission  had  in  hand  the  task  of  preparing  the 
index  volume;  this  volume  did  not  reach  the  printer  as  early  as  had  been  hoped, 
but  the  copies  were  received  in  time  to  permit  distribution  during  January, 
1929.  The  record  for  the  completed  work,  English  and  French,  falls  within 
the  fiscal  year  1928-29,  and  is  as  follows:  English  Statutes:  6,000  sets  of  five 
volumes  each,  four  volumes  containing  the  Statutes  proper  in  4,302  pages, 
and  an  index  volume  of  620  pages;  total  number  of  printed  pages,  approxi- 
mately, 30,000,000;  cost,  $74,409.11.  French  Statutes:  1,500  sets  of  five  volumes 
each,  four  volumes  containing  Statutes  proper  in  4,544  pages  and  an  index 
volume  of  638  pages;  total  number  of  printed  pages,  7,773,000;  cost,  $39,105.18. 
The  distribution  and  sale  of  sets  of  the  Revised  Statutes  of  Canada  at  $10 
each  per  set  proceeded  on  the  lines  anticipated.  The  volumes  were  bound 
generally  in  stiff  buckram;  a  few  volumes  in  leather  at  a  higher  price  are  stocked, 
but  experience  has  shown  there  is  little  demand  for  the  same.  The  supply 
on  hand  will  probably  be  adequate  to  meet  all  needs  for  the  next  year  or  two. 

The  Printing  Branch  records  appreciable  increase  of  work  in  practically 
all  lines  and  closed  the  year  with  a  profit  of  $40,583.85;  the  aim  is  of  course 
to  work  at  cost  and  in  so  large  a  business  this  amount  of  profit,  though  somewhat 
above  the  average,  cannot  be  regarded  as  unreasonable. 

The  Stationery  Branch  reports  increased  sales  with  satisfactory  conditions; 
the  profit  of  $46,088.12  reported  for  the  year  will  no  doubt  permit  a  reduction 
in  commissions  hitherto  imposed  on  certain  lines  of  goods. 

The  business  of  the  Distribution  Division,  now  styled  for  convenience 
the  Division  of  Documents,  continues  high.  The  burden  of  the  distribution 
of  documents  to  libraries,  etc.,  under  P.C.  1471,  August,  1927,  falls  of  course 
on  this  division,  and  while  the  work  involved  is  considerable,  ample  evidence 
comes  from  representatives  of  the  legislative,  university  and  public  libraries 
of  Canada  to  show  that  the  new  system  introduced  under  that  regulation 
and  explained  in  last  year's  report  is  working  out  very  satisfactorily.  The 
report  of  this  branch  shows  that  during  the  year  607  separate  documents  were 
mailed  on  this  list,  the  list  including  approximately  175  libraries  (of  all  classes) 
and  official  personages  and  institutions  entitled  under  the  regulation  to  receive 
all  documents  not  of  a  confidential  nature.  It  is  of  interest  to  note  that  the 
Department  of  Agriculture  is  much  in  the  lead  in  the  number  of  publications 
thus  despatched  to  libraries,  being  responsible  for  no  less  than  133  documents, 
or  more  than  one-fourth  of  the  total;  the  House  of  Commons  publications 
number  89,  the  Department  of  the  Interior  76,  the  Department  of  Mines  68,  and 
the  Dominion  Bureau  of  Statistics  44,  with  smaller  numbers  for  other  depart- 
ments; in  the  case  of  eight  departments  the  only  publication  distributed  is  the 
annual  report. 


6  DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 

The  increased  activities  of  the  department  have  necessitated  some  minor 
additions  to  personnel.  In  the  past  the  personnel  figures  appearing  in  these 
pages  have  been  quoted  as  for  December  31,  statistics  for  previous  years  having 
been  on  a  calendar  year  basis.  Hereafter  the  figures  as  for  December  31  will 
be  continued  down  to  the  year  1921,  and  beginning  with  the  year  1922  figures 
will  be  quoted  for  the  close  of  the  fiscal  year,  namely,  March  31.  The  personnel 
statement  of  previous  years,  modified  thus  from  1922  onwards,  and  with  the 
figures  as  for  March  31,  1929,  added,  is  therefore  as  follows: — ■ 

1891  (December  31) 341      1921 730 

1901 511      1922  (March  31) 742 

1911 861      1923 705 

1915 1, 160      1924 719 

1916 1,240       1925 685 

1917 1,300      1926 689 

1918 1, 169      1927 690 

1919 1,134      1928 696 

1920 703      1929 714 

As  was  mentioned  in  the  report  of  last  year  the  position  list  established 
by  the  Civil  Service  Commission  at  the  time  of  re-organization  in  1920  and 
numbering  705  positions  had  become  confused  and  complicated,  and  with 
the  co-operation  of  the  commission  a  new  list  of  691  positions  was  established 
with  effect  as  from  August  1,  1927.  Increased  activities  in  different  branches, 
however,  have  compelled  the  addition  of  six  new  positions,  five  of  which  relate 
to  the  Copperplate  Map  Engraving  Branch  and  one  to  the  Stationery  Branch. 
The  Copperplate  Map  Engraving  workers  constitute  a  group  whose  actual 
duties  are  performed,  save  in  the  case  of  one  employee,  outside  the  department, 
an  arrangement  having  been  effected  some  years  ago  with  the  Department  of 
the  Interior,  the  Department  of  Marine  and  Fisheries,  and  the  Department 
of  Mines,  whereby  copperplate  map  engravers  whose  services  might  be  needed 
by  these  departments  respectively  would,  while  retaining  their  connection  with 
the  Department  of  Public  Printing  and  Stationery,  be  attached  for  duty  to 
the  department  concerned,  interchanges  between  the  departments  to  be  made 
as  conditions  might  require;  as  a  matter  of  fact  occasions  for  interchange  have 
been  few  and  the  members  of  the  group  have  seldom  shifted  from  the  particular 
department  to  which  they  were  first  assigned.  On  the  other  hand  the  work 
of  the  group  has  increased  considerably  and  several  new  appointments  have 
been  necessary.  First  the  Department  of  Marine  and  Fisheries  and,  during 
the  past  year,  the  Department  of  Mines,  required  additional  help,  and  the 
Civil  Service  Commission  was  requested  to  make  the  necessary  appointments. 
The  commission  reported  it  impossible  to  secure  the  additional  workers  in 
Canada  and  one  copperplate  map  engrager  was  brought  from  Great  Britain 
in  1924  for  employment  in  the  Department  of  Marine  and  Fisheries  and,  during 
the  past  fiscal  year,  a  second  was  engaged  in  Switzerland  for  employment  in 
the  Department  of  Mines.  The  difficulty  of  securing  assistance  of  this  class 
and  the  prospect  of  this  difficulty  increasing  as  the  demands  of  the  departments 
grow  and  as  replacements  of  present  employees  may  become  necessary  caused 
action  to  be  taken  looking  to  the  training  of  copperplate  map  engravers  in 
Canada  by  means  of  a  system  of  apprenticeship  in  this  department  and,  with 
the  co-operation  of  the  Civil  Service  Commission,  four  apprentice  positions 
were  accordingly  created  and  three  appointments  made  thereto,  the  fourth 
apprenticeship  position  remaining  unfilled  for  the  present. 

The  difference  between  the  position  list,  thus  increased  to  697,  and  the 
number  of  employees  (714)  on  the  payroll  as  on  March  31,  1929,  is  due  to 
vacancies  at  that  date  on  the  one  hand  and  temporary  workers  on  the  other; 
vacancies  at  that  date  totalled  11  and  temporaries  28,  leaving  a  net  excess 
of  17  over  the  position  list;  it  is  not  unlikely  that  in  a  number  of  cases  these 
temporaries  may  be  converted  into  further  permanent  positions  because  of 


ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29  7 

increasing  activities.  A  review  of  the  year  shows  13  separations  and  31  appoint- 
ments, a  net  increase  of  18,  the  appointments  representing  6  replacements, 
4  new  positions,  and  21  temporaries. 

The  amount  expended  on  new  plant  during  the  year  was  below  the  average 
and  consisted  only  of  one  motor  truck  purchased  in  replacement,  in  accordance 
with  the  practice  now  obtaining  for  some  years,  and  a  number  of  machines 
for  the  Bindery  Branch,  also  chiefly  in  replacement;  the  principal  features 
of  the  new  bindery  equipment  were  3  book  sewing  machines  and  1  oversewing 
machine  with  motor,  also  a  gluing  machine  newly  on  the  market.  All  these 
and  other  items  of  new  equipment  will  aid  in  securing  an  increased  production 
without  addition  to  personnel.  The  items  of  new  equipment  and  their  respective 
costs  were  as  follows: — 

Shipping  and  Receiving  Division — 

1  utility  express  motor  truck SI,  890  00 

Bindery  Division — 

3  book  sewing  machines 8, 360  08 

1  oversewing  machine  with  motor 4, 148  00 

1  scoring  machine  with  motor 504  00 

1  book  sander  with  motor 985  00 

1  gluing  machine '. 1,383  07 

Total $17, 270  15 

For  plant  repairs  and  renewals  there  was,  out  of  an  appropriation  of  $30,000, 
an  expenditure  of  $29,791.11,  some  of  the  larger  purchases  being  200  lumber 
platforms  for  the  Chief  Mechanic's  Division  ($516.85);  2  moulds  and  various 
parts  for  monotype  machines  ($5,358);  matrices  and  parts  for  Linotype 
Division  ($3,388.16);  quoins  and  type  cabinets  for  the  Hand  Composing  Div- 
ision ($1,707);  1  moulding  base  for  the  Stereotype  Division  ($210);  185  num- 
bering machines,  1  steel  cabinet,  100  perforating  blades,  etc.,  for  the  Press 
Division  ($3,684.84);  and  24  cutters  and  extractors,  14  guillotine  knives,  1 
cutting  machine,  2  dies,  etc.,  for  Bindery  Division  ($718.89). 

As  was  mentioned  in  an  earlier  report,  the  department  availed  itself  some 
years  ago  (1926)  of  the  federal  Act  respecting  compensation  for  injuries  to 
employees  during  work,  and  since  that  date  all  such  cases  have  been,  as  the 
statute  requires,  referred  to  the  Workmen's  Compensation  Board  of  Ontario. 
Four  cases  were  referred  during  the  year  and  compensation  was  awarded  by 
the  Provincial  Board  in  three  cases  only.  The  only  case  of  a  serious  nature 
was  that  in  which  the  illness  of  an  employee  in  the  Chief  Mechanic's  Division 
was  reported  to  have  arisen  from  lead  poisoning;  the  workman,  who  had  been 
but  a  few  years  in  the  employ  of  the  department,  had  been  a  painter  all  his 
life  but  the  disease  had  not  developed  until  after  his  employment  in  this  depart- 
ment where  he  had  done  but  little  work  in  the  painting  line.  The  illness  of 
the  workman  in  question,  Mr.  J.  C.  Stewart,  had  been  intermittent,  permitting 
him  to  return  from  time  to  time  to  light  employment.  Mr.  Stewart  passed 
away  on  January  31.  The  matter  of  allowances  rests  with  the  Provincial 
Board. 

Apart  from  accidents  and  illnesses  thus  dealt  with  under  the  Workmen's 
Compensation  Act  there  are  naturally  in  a  large  industrial  establishment 
many  minor  injuries  and  ailments  arising,  and  these  are  dealt  with  by  the 
Welfare  Supervisor.  Miss  Margaret  Brankin,  a  trained  nurse  who  had  seen 
service  in  the  Great  War,  had  filled  this  position  since  its  creation  in  1921, 
but  her  health  compelling  her  resignation  during  the  past  year,  the  commission 
appointed  her  sister,  Miss  Agnes  Brankin,  also  O.A.S.,  temporarily  as  her 
successor;  at  the  date  of  writing  it  may  be  added  that  Miss  Agnes  Brankin 
was  later  appointed  permanently  to  the  position.  The  year's  record  of  work 
in  this  small  but  important  division  shows  972  cases  of  treatment  of  employees, 
208  visits  to  employees  at  their  homes,  and  31  visits  to  hospitals. 


8  DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 

As  relating  to  these  matters  mention  may  be  here  fittingly  made  of  a  group 
insurance  system  established  as  among  the  officers  and  employees  of  the  depart- 
ment, under  the  terms  of  which  nearly  450  men  have  been  enabled  to  secure 
life  insurance  at  an  attractively  low  premium.  The  system  is  of  course  wholly 
voluntary  and  entirely  unofficial;  that  is,  no  departmental  responsibility  arises. 
The  desirability  of  some  such  plan  springs  quite  naturally  from  the  fact  that 
the  payroll  of  the  department  includes  several  hundred  men  and  women  of  the 
printing  trades  paid  on  the  prevailing  rates  basis  and  for  whom  there  is  no 
official  system  of  superannuation  relief  or  benefit  on  retirement  from  work 
or  death,  save  only  that  on  death  two  month's  salary  is  payable  to  the  estate 
of  the  deceased.  Whilst  it  is  not  surprising  that  most  of  the  members  of  the 
group  thus  insured  are  of  the  prevailing  rates  classes,  yet  members  of  the 
clerical  service  who  are  protected  by  superannuation  systems  being  equally 
eligible  have  in  many  instances  in  this  way  increased  the  protection  for  their 
families.  The  group  insurance  system,  which  became  effective  late  in  1927, 
is  for  a  stated  period  only,  and  the  premium  per  thousand  is  susceptible  of 
adjustment  from  time  to  time  as  the  death  rate  may  fluctuate.  The  arrange- 
ment is  of  course  with  a  private  company  and  a  policy  may  be  taken  for  $1,000 
or  $2,000;  the  insuring  company  declines  to  extend  the  benefits  of  the  system 
to  female  workers.  The  amount  of  insurance  thus  in  force  at  the  present  time 
is  approximately  $750,000. 

F.  A.  ACLAND, 

King's  Printer. 

Hon.  Fern  and  Rinfret, 

Secretary  of  State  and  Minister  charged  with  the  administration  of 
Department  of  Public  Printing  and  Stationery. 

Ottawa,  Canada, 
September,  1929. 


!' 


10 

k      F.  A.  Acland,  Esq., 

King's  Printer  and  Controller  of  Stationery. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  a  report  of  the  work  executed  for 
Parliament  and  the  various  departments  in  the  Government  Printing  Bureau 
and  in  commercial  lithographing,  engraving  and  printing  establishments  during 
the  fiscal  year  ending  March  31,  1929,  contained  in  the  following  tabulated 
statements : — 

1.  Annual  reports. 

2.  Supplementary  reports. 

3.  Routine  parliamentary  work. 

4.  House  of  Commons  and  Senate  Debates. 

5.  Statutes. 

6.  Canada  Gazette. 

7.  Voters'  lists. 

8.  Pamphlets  and  miscellaneous  book-work. 

9.  Statement  of  other  letterpress  departmental  work. 

10.  Statement  of  books  bound. 

11.  Pads  made. 

12.  Making  and  stamping  of  prepaid  Post  Office  envelopes. 

13.  Die  stamping  of  letter  and  note  headings  and  envelopes. 

14.  Loose-leaf  work. 

15.  Lithographed  maps,  plans,  cheques  and  forms. 

16.  Half-tones,  line  cuts,  electros  and  dies  made. 

17.  Lithographing  and  Engraving  Division — Eecord  of  Work    for    fiscal 
year  1928-29. 

18.  Comparative  statement  of  presswork. 

Respectfully  submitted, 

P.  M.  DRAPER, 

Director  and  Superintendent  of  Printing. 

Ottawa,  August  3,  1929. 


10 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


Table  No.  1 — Annual  Eeports  to  Parliament  completed  during  the  Fiscal  Year 

1928-29 


Title  of  Document 


English 

Agriculture,  1927-28. 

Civil  Service  Commission,  1927 

Commissioners  of  Patents,  1927-28 

Health,  1927-28 

Immigration  and  Colonization,  1927-28 

Indian  Affairs,  1927-28 

Interior,  1927-28 

Labour,  1927-28 

Marine  and  Fisheries  (Fisheries  Branch),  1927-28 

Marine  and  Fisheries  (Marine),  1927-28 

Mines,  1927-28 

National  Defence  (Militia  and  Air  Services),  1927-28  . 

National  Defence  (Naval  Service),  1927-28 

National  Revenue,  1927-28 

Pensions  and  National  Health,  1927-28 

Postmaster  General,  1927-28 

Public  Accounts,  1927-28 

Public  Printing  and  Stationery,  1927-28 

Public  Works,  1927r28 

Railway  Commission,  1927 

Railways  and  Canals,  1927-28 

Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police,  1927-28 

Secretary  of  State,  1927-28 

Secretary  of  State  for  External  Affairs,  1927-28 

Trade  and  Commerce,  1927-28 

Weights  and  Measures,  Electricity  and  Gas  Inspection 

Services,   1927-28 

Weights  and  Measures  Inspection  Service,  1927-28 

Bilingual 

Auditor  General— Auditeur  general,  1927-28  (Vol.  I). . 

Auditor  General— Auditeur  general,  1927-28  (Vol.  II). 

National  Revenue — Shipping  Report  (Customs  Divi- 
sion)— Revenu  National — Navigation  (Services 
des  Douanes) ,  1928 

Trade  of  Canada,   1926-27 — Commerce  du  Canada, 

1926-27 

French 

Affaires  Indiennes,  1926-27 

Agriculture,  1926-27 

Commissaire  des  brevets,  1927-28 

Commission  des  chemins  de  fer  du  Canada,  1926 

Chemins  de  fer  et  Canaux,  1926-27 

Commission  du  Service  Civil,  1927 

Comptes  publics,  1927-28 

Defense  Nationale  (Service  Naval),  1927-28 

Defense  Nationale  (Services  de  laMilice  etde  l'Aero- 
nautique) ,  1927-28 

Defense  Nationale  (Services  de  la  Milice  et  de  l'Aero- 
nautique),  1926-27 

Immigration  et  Colonisation,  1926-27 

Impressions  et  Papeterie  publiques,  1927-28 

Interieur,  1926-27 

Marine  et  Pecheries  (Marine),  1927-28 

Marine  et  Pecheries  (division  des  Pecheries),  1927-28. 

Penitenciers,  1926-27 

Postes,  1927-28 

Retablissement  des  soldats  dans  la  vie  civile,  1926-27. 

Revenu  National  (Services  des  Douanes  et  de  1' Accise) , 
1926-27 

Royale  gendarmerie  a  cheval  du  Canada,  1926-27 

Royale  gendarmerie  a  cheval  du  Canada,  1927-28 

Sante,  1926-27 

Secretaire  d'Etat,  1926-27 

Secretaire  d'Etat  aux  Affaires  exterieures,  1927-28 

Services  d'inspection  de  l'electricite  et  du  gaz,  1927-28 

Service  d'inspection  des  poids  et  mesures,  1927-28 

Travail,  1926-27 

Travaux  publics,  1927-28 

Totals 

Totals  (March  31,  1928) 


Total 

Number 

Number 

Number 

of 

of 

of  Printed 

Cost 

Copies 

Pages 

Pages 

$     cts. 

5,470 

144 

787,680 

794  59 

737 

100 

73,700 

755  02 

1,065 

16 

17,040 

212  87 

1,485 

80 

118,800 

395  10 

2,497 

102 

254,694 

753  24 

895 

70 

62,650 

412  08 

1,230 

144 

177,120 

760  48 

2,975 

200 

595,000 

1,151  94 

1,025 

210 

215,250 

1,041  89 

775 

180 

139,500 

866  12 

3,410 

72 

245,520 

448  03 

675 

104 

70,200 

505  17 

625 

28 

17,500 

117  18 

1,025 

112 

114,800 

743  00 

1,915 

58 

111,070 

264  67 

1,075 

112 

120,400 

922  68 

1,375 

168 

231,000 

1,199  19 

400 

98 

39,200 

545  27 

675 

220 

148,500 

1,134  56 

675 

538 

363,150 

2,065  60 

1,000 

134 

134,000 

764  61 

1,375 

144 

198,000 

681  38 

725 

658 

477,050 

3,858  27 

850 

24 

20,400 

108  38 

1,000 

46 

46,000 

283  58 

725 

70 

50,750 

424  84 

600 

16 

9,600 

114  00 

1,672 
1,590 

376 
1,264 

628,672) 
2,009,760/ 

13,922  34 

650 

122 

79,300 

831  53 

1,643 

754 

1,238,822 

12,290  33 

146 

74 

10,804 

259  62 

1,847 

148 

273,356 

686  83 

195 

16 

3,120 

44  86 

191 

248 

47,368 

1,157  80 

239 

124 

29,636 

573  51 

226 

106 

23,956 

570  57 

215 

152 

32,680 

692  80 

200 

32 

6,400 

106  74 

171 

106 

18,126 

447  03 

141 

100 

14, 100 

463  33 

420 

84 

35,280 

359  43 

150 

98 

14,700 

357  55 

180 

136 

24,480 

519  57 

250 

192 

48,000 

952  09 

250 

234 

58,500 

1,003  35 

241 

44 

10,604 

205  86 

225 

112 

25,200 

329  09 

197 

84 

16,548 

433  39 

208 

120 

24,960 

350  41 

228 

116 

26,448 

544  08 

227 

154 

34,958 

765  41 

312 

80 

24,960 

342  13 

145 

680 

98,600 

2,668  74 

260 

24 

6,240 

110  83 

165 

72 

11,880 

205  57 

140 

16 

2,240 

66  30 

1,101 

170 

187,170 

816  05 

195 

228 

44,460 

1,341  67 

50,299 

10,114 

9,949,902 

64,742  55 

47,730 

8,012 

7,679,676 

47,347  19 

ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29 


11 


Table  No.  2 — Supplementary  Reports  to  Parliament  completed  during  the 

Fiscal  Year  1928-29 


Title  of  Document 


English 

Board  of  Pension  Commissioners,  1927-28. 
Public  Archives,  1928 


Bilingual 

Report  of  the  Chief  Electoral  Officer,  By-Elections 
held  during  the  Year  1928 — Rapport  du  Directeur 
general  des  elections,  elections  partielles  tenues 
pendant  l'annee  1928 

French 

Archives  publiques,  1928 

Commission  des  pensions,  1926-27 

Totals 

Totals  (March  31,  1928) 


Number 

of 
Copies 


385 
1,360 


630 


645 
111 


3,131 
3,113 


Number 

of 

Pages 


208 
106 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 


7,700 
108,800 


5,040 


51,600 
2,220 


175,360 
68,360 


Cost 


%     cts. 

108  35 
423  29 


54  01 


277  06 
80  56 


943  27 
462  42 


Table  No.  3 — Statement  showing  the  Routine  Parliamentary  Work,  Year 

1928-29 

*  In  this  table  and  in  other  tables  which  contain  a  column  giving  the  total  number  of  printed  pages, 
the  figures  in  the  total  column  coincide,  as  a  rule,  with  those  obtained  by  multiplying  the  number  of 
copies  by  the  number  of  pages.  In  some  cases,  however,  a  printing  job  includes  different  sections  or 
series  which  vary  as  to  the  number  of  copies  and  number  of  pages;  the  two  first  columns  do  not  therefore 
multiply  into  the  figures  shown  in  the  column  representing  the  total  number  of  pages  printed.  Cases  of 
this  class  are  denoted  by  an  asterisk  (*). 


Title  of  Document 


Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 

of 

Pages 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 


Votes  and  Proceedings 

Proces-verbaux 

Orders  of  the  Day 

Feuilleton 

Senate  Minutes 

Proces-verbaux  des  Seances  du  Senat 

Public  Bills 

Bills  d'interet  public 

Private  Bills 

Bills  d'interet  prive 

Third  Reading  Bills  (Commons) 

Bills  en  troisieme  lecture  (Communes) 

Third  Reading  Bills  (Senate) 

Bills  en  troisieme  lecture  (Senat) 

Returns  (for  distribution  or  Sessional  Papers,  either  or  both) 

Reponses  (pour  distribution  ou  pour  insertion  aux  documents  parle 

mentaires,  ou  pour  l'une  ou  l'autre) 

Divorce  cases 

Printing  of  Various  Committee  sittings 

House  of  Commons  Journals,  1928 

Journaux  de  la  Chambre  des  Communes,  1928 

Senate  Journals,  1928 

Journaux  du  Senat,  1928 

Totals 

Totals  (March  31,  1828) 


tl,797 

t457 
tl,681 

f327 
14,450 

f317 
tL743 

f477 
tl,108 

f364 
fl,269 

t314 
fl,052 

f402 
10,925 

5,687 
87,125 
102,422 
540 
187 
525 
194 


220,363 
142,224 


1,264 

1,072 

1,638 

1,684 

752 

752 

850 

920 

682 

1,124 

564 

958 

688 

996 

498 

848 
3,352 
6,302 
734 
708 
620 
612 


27,618 
20,691 


2,271,408 
489,904 

2,753,478 
550, 668 

1,090,400 
238,384 

1,481,550 
438,840 
755, 656 
409,136 
715,716 
300,812 
723,776 
400,392 
*508,250 

*365,676 
1,424,600 
9,757,576 
396,360 
132,396 
325,500 
118,728 


25.649,206 
13,799,612 


t  Average  number  of  copies  printed. 


12 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


Table  No.  4 — Statement  of  the  Work  on  the  House  of  Commons  and  Senate 

Debates,  Year  1928-29 

*  In  this  table  and  in  other  tables  which  contain  a  column  giving  the  total  number  of  printed  pages, 
the  figures  in  the  total  column  coincide,  as  a  rule,  with  those  obtained  by  multiplying  the  number  of  copies 
by  the  number  of  pages.  In  some  cases,  however,  a  printing  job  includes  different  sections  or  series  which 
vary  as  to  the  number  of  copies  and  number  of  pages;  the  two  first  columns  do  not  therefore  multiply 
into  the  figures  shown  in  the  column  representing  the  total  number  of  pages  printed.  Cases  of  this  class 
are  denoted  by  an  asterick  (*). 


Title  of  Document 

Number 

of 
Copies 

Number 

of 

Pages 

Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 

Cost 

House  of  Commons  Debates — 

til, 555 

f2,232 

671 

152 

212 

fl,732 

532 

99 

145 

4,190 
3,929 
4,412 
2,654 
4,352 

736 
712 
472 
706 

*32,355,824 

*4, 958, 272 

2,960,452 

403,408 

922,624 

*1, 217, 500 

378,784 

46,728 

102,370 

$       cts. 
21,019  89 

13,575  22 

Revised  Edition,  1928,  3  Vols,  and  Index  (English) 

Revised  Edition,  1926-27,  2  Vols.  (French) 

Revised  Edition  1928  3  Vols.  (French) 

10,566  07 
4,631  05 
6,508  91 

Senate  Debates — 

2,491  57 

Revised  Edition  1928  (English) 

1,439  12 

Revised  Edition,  1926-27  (French) 

1,953  01 

Revised  Edition,  1928  (French) 

3,102  63 

Totals 

17,330 
18,571 

22,163 
9,080 

43,345.962 
49,512,676 

65,287  47 

Totals  (March  31, 1928) 

33,164  47 

Speeches:  Extra  copies  ordered  by    Members    and 
Senators 

399,850 
243,400 

922 

854 

*6, 740, 700 
*2, 339, 800 

3,739  36 

Speeches:  (March  31,  1928) 

1,733  73 

jAverage  number  of  copies  printed. 


Table  No.  5 — Statement  of  the  work  on  the  Statutes,  Year  1928-29 


— 

Number 

of 
Copies 

Number 

of 

Pages 

Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 

Cost 

The  Statutes 
English 
Parts  I-II,  1928 

7,000 

5,968 
5,981 
5,987 
5,969 
6,015 

1,500 

1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 

796 

1,130 

1,102 

1,164 

906 

620 

816 

1,188 

1,164 

1,230 

962 

638 

5,572,000 

6,743,840] 
6,591,062 
6,968,868 
5,407,914J 
3,729,300 

1,224,000 

1,782,000) 
1,746,000[ 
1,845, 000 ( 
1,443,000J 
957,000 

$       cts. 
8,489  62 

Revised  Statutes  of  Canada,  1927 — 
Volume  I 

Volume  II 

Volume  III 

68,900  52 

Volume  IV 

Volume  V 

5,508  59 

French 
Parties  I-II,  1928 

3,650  03 

Statuts  revises  du  Canada,  1927 — 
Volume  I 

Volume  II 

Volume  III 

36,091  41 

Volume  IV 

Volume  V 

3,013  77 

Totals 

45,920 
5,065 

11,716 
1,518 

44,009,984 
3,832,230 

125,653  94 

Totals  (March  31 ,  1928) 

8,938  67 

ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29 


13 


Table  No.  6 — Statement  of  the  work  on  the  Canada  Gazette  for  the  Fiscal  Year 

1928-29 


Abrogate 

Annual 

Issue 


Number  of 
Pages  in 
Volume 


Canada  Gazette 

Supplements 

Extras 

Totals 

Totals  (March  31,  1928) 


113,100 

8,700 

50,525 


172,325 
150,435 


4,350 
162 

242 


4,754 
4V598 


Table  No.  7— Voters'  Lists.     (None  printed  in  1928-29) 


Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work,  1928-29 

*  In  this  table  and  in  other  tables  which  contain  a  column  giving  the  total  number  of  printed  pages, 
the  figures  in  the  total  column  coincide,  as  a  rule,  with  those  obtained  by  multiplying  the  number  of  copies 
by  the  number  of  pages.  In  some  cases,  however,  a  printing  job  includes  different  sections  or  series  which 
vary  as  to  the  number  of  copies  and  number  of  pages;  the  two  first  columns  do  not,  therefore,  multiply 
into  the  figures  shown  in  the  column  representing  the  total  number  of  pages  printed.  Cases  of  this  class 
are  denoted  by  an  asterisk  (*). 


Description 


Advisory  Board  on  Tariff  and  Taxation — 
English 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  65) — Paints  and   Varnishes, 

May  16,  1928 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  2)— Iron  and  Steel,  October  2, 

1928 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  105) — Cement,  September  25 

and  26,  1928 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (References  3  and  44) — Coal  and  Coke, 

September  27,  1928 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  106) — Parts  of  Stoves,  October 

30,  1928 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  83) — Sewing  Machines,  June 

19,  1928,  and  October  30,  1928 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  2) — Iron  and  Steel,  November 

27,  28  and  29,  1928 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (References  3  and  44) — Coal  and  Coke, 

November  21,  22  and  23,  1928 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  105) — Cement,  November  20, 


1928. 


Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  99)— Celotex,  October  31,  1928 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  108) — Sardines  and  Herrings, 
November  6,  1928 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  60) — Aluminum  and  its  Pro- 
ducts, October  18,  1927,  and  December  6,  1927 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  60) — Enamelled  Ware  and  Alu- 
minum Ware,  May  17,  1928 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  87) — Copper  Rods,  June  20, 
1928 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  87) — Copper  Rods,  January  28, 
1929 

Record  of  Public  Sittings  (Reference  91) — Ethylene  Glycol,  Janu- 
ary 24,  1929;  (Reference  114)— Thin  Plate  Glass,  January  28, 
1929 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  3) — Coal  and  Coke,  January  29, 
1929 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  60) — Enamelled  Ware,  Sep- 
tember 15,  1927 


Carried  forward, 


Number 

of 
Copies 

Number 

of 

Pages 

525 

48 

525 

56 

525 

120 

525 

32 

575 

32 

575 

24 

575 

192 

575 

208 

575 
575 

64 
40 

575 

32 

575 

56 

575 

24 

575 

16 

575 

16 

575 

32 

575 

16 

575 

64 

10,150 

1,072 

Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 


25,200 

29,400 

63,000 

16,800 

18,400 

13,800 

110,400 

119,600 

36,800 
23,000 

18,400 

32,200 

13,800 

9,200 

9,200 

18,400 

9,200 

36,800 

603,600 


14 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work, 

1 928-29 — Continued 


Description 


Brought  forward 

Advisory  Board  on  Tariff  and  Taxation— Concluded 
English — Concluded 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (References  2,  9b,  103  and  106)— Iron  and 
Steel,  January  29,  30  and  31,  1929 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  69b)— Cigars,  September  20, 
1927 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  47)— Staves  and  heading,  Sep- 
tember 26,  1927 •  •  •  • 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  84)— Mining  Machinery,  Janu- 
ary 25,  1929 

Record  of  Public  Sittings  (Reference  69)— Cigarettes,  June  22, 1927, 
and  October  26,  1927 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  60)— Aluminum  and  its  Pro- 
ducts, February  1,  1929 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  37)— Sugar,  October  25,  1927, 
and  May  17,  1928 

French 

Comptes  rendusdes  audiences  publiques  (requete  n°  65) — Peintures 
et  vernis,  16  mai  1928 

Compte  rendu  d'une  audience  publique  (relative  aux  requetes  n°  3 
et  n°  44) — portant  sur  le  charbon  et  le  coke,  27  septembre 
1928 


Agriculture — 


English 


Experimental  Sub-station,  Beaverlodge,  Alta. — Report  of  the 
Superintendent,  1926 ; 

Some  Flowering  Bulbs  (Bulletin  No.  95 — New  Series) 

The  Canadian  Record  of  Performance  for  Pure-bred  Poultry, 
1926-27 — Regulations,  Standards  and  Records  of  Fowls  quali- 
fied for  Certificates  (Report  No.  8) 

Eighth  Annual  Live  Stock  Market  and  Meat  Trade  Review,  1927. 

Surface  Taint  Butter  (Pamphlet  No.  91 — New  Series) 

The  Care  of  Cream  for  Buttermaking  (Pamphlet  No.  37 — New 
Series) 

An  Act  respecting  Live  Stock 

Sheep  Husbandry  in  Canada  (Bulletin  No.  75 — New  Series) 

Experimental  Station,  Charlottetown,  P.E.I. — Report  of  the  Super- 
intendent, 1927 

Buttermaking  on  the  Farm  (Bulletin  No.  57 — New  Series) 

Joint  Beef  Committee — Report  of  the  Proceedings  and  the  Recom- 
mendations of  the  Eastern  and  Western  Committee,  etc 

Register  of  Fully  Accredited  Herds,  arranged  by  Breeds,  as  re- 
corded to  March  31,  1928 

Crop  Rotations  and  Soil  Management  for  the  Prairie  Provinces 
(Bulletin  No.  98— New  Series) 

Studies  on  Moulds  and  Yeasts  in  Creamery  Butter  (Pamphlet  No. 
92— New  Series) 

The  Meat  and  Canned  Foods  Act  and  the  Regulations  thereunder 
governing  the  Inspection  of  Meats,  etc 

An  Argument  in  the  Kitchen— A  Playlet  for  Children  in  One  Act. 

Insects  of  the  Flower  Garden  and  their  Control  (Bulletin  No.  99— 
New  Series) 

Regulations  under  the  Destructive  Insect  and  Pest  Act 

The  Artificial  Brooding  of  Chicks 

The  Origin  and  Quality  of  Commercial  Live  Stock  marketed  in 
Canada,  1927  (Report  No.  8) 

Soybeans  in  Canada  (Pamphlet  No.  93 — New  Series) 

List  of  Wholesale  Dealers  in  Fruits  and  Vegetables  in  Canada,  1928 
—Revised  Edition  (Bulletin  No.  101) 

The  Manufacture  of  Ice  Cream  (Bulletin  No.  102 — New  Series) 

Carried  forward 


Number 

of 
Copies 


10,150 


575 

152 

575 

24 

575 

32 

575 

32 

575 

64 

575 

56 

575 

100 

125 

52 

125 

32 

6,700 
20,000 


8,000 
3,000 
5,000 

10,000 

500 

10,000 

13,000 
2,000 

500 

175 

20,000 

4,000 

5,000 
1,500 

25,000 
5,000 
5,000 

2,000 
10,000 

5,000 
4,000 


179,800 


Number 

of 

Pages 


1,072 


60 


100 
80 
16 


112 

64 
12 

32 

32 

56 

16 

112 
16 

56 

8 

16 

48 
16 

40 

32 


2,652 


ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29 


15 


Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work 

1928-29— Continued 


Description 


Brought  forward . 


Agriculture — Continued 


English—  Concluded 


Forest  Entomology  and  its  Development  in  Canada  (Pamphlet 
No.  97) 

An  Act  respecting  the  Testing,  Inspection  and  Sale  of  Seeds 

An  Act  to  Regulate  the  Sale  of  Agricultural  Fertilizers 

Regulations  under  the  Destructive  Insect  and  Pest  Act  as  they 
apply  to  the  Importation  of  Plants  and  Plant  Products 

Preserving  Fruits  and  Vegetables  in  the  Home  (Bulletin  No.  77 — 
New  Series) 

Stable  Book— Record  of  Tuberculin  Test 

The  Western  Cedar  Borer  (Pamphlet  No.  94 — New  Series) 

Bovine  Tuberculosis 

The  Fertilizers  Act  with  Amendments  and  Regulations — Acts, 
Orders  and  Regulations  No.  9  (Office  Consolidation) 

The  Fruit  Act  and  Regulations — Acts,  Orders  and  Regulations 
No.  7  (Revised  1928) 

Simple  Methods  for  the  Storage  of  Ice  (Pamphlet  No.  2 — New 
Series) 

Report  of  Special  Committee  appointed  to  investigate  market 
outlets  for  Alberta's  hog  and  bacon,  etc 

The  Grading  and  Marketing  of  Dressed  Poultry 

List  of  Cheese  Factories  and  Creameries  in  Canada  and  Registered 
Numbers  (Bulletin  No.  109 — New  Series) 

Barley  Culture  in  Canada  (Pamphlet  No.  99 — New  Series) 

Seedling  Blight  and  Foot-Rots  of  Oats  (Bulletin  No.  105— New 
Series) 

Directions  for  Collecting  and  Preserving  Insects  (Pamphlet  No.  14 
— New  Series) 

Regulations  made  under  the  provisions  of  the  Live  Stock  and  Live 
Stock  Products  Act,  respecting  the  Grading  and  Marking  of 
Eggs _ 

Register  of  Fully  Accredited  Herds  arranged  by  Breeds  as  re- 
corded to  September  30,  1928 

The  Seeds  Act  with  Amdnments  and  Regulations — Acts,  Orders 
and  Regulations  (No.  24),  October,  1928  (Office  Consolidation) 

Commercial  Bent  Grasses  (Agrostis)  in  Canada 

Fertilizers  Analyses,  1927-28  (Pamphlet  No.  98— New  Series) 

Home-made  Frozen  Desserts  (Pamphlets  No.  49 — New  Series) . . . 

Why  and  How  to  Use  Cheese  (Pamphlet  No.  7 — New  Series) 

The  Agricultural  Pests'  Control  Act,  1927,  with  Regulations — 
Acts,  Orders  and  Regulations  (No.  22) 

The  Meat  and  Canned  Foods  Act  and  Regulations — Acts,  Orders 
and  Regulations  (No.  25) 

Federal  Assistance  to  Horse  Breeding 

An  Act  respecting  Live  Stock 

List  of  Publications,  1929  (Pamphlet  No.  101— New  Series) 

The  Canadian  Record  of  Performance  for  Pure-Bred  Cattle — 
Regulations,  Standards  and  Records  of  Cows  qualified  for 
Registration  (Report  No.  20) 

Report  of  the  Veterinary  Director  General,  1927-28 

The  Advanced  Registry  Policy  for  Pure-Bred  Swine 

Cold  Storage  for  Creameries  (Bulletin  No.  61 — New  Series) 

The  Bertha  Armyworm  in  the  Prairie  Provinces  (Pamphlet  No. 
103— New  Series) # 

Nitrogen,  Phosphoric  Acid  and  Potash  Starvation  at  Different 
Stages  of  the  Growth  of  Fragaria  (Pamphlet  No.  96 — New- 
Series)  

Ninth  Annual  Live  Stock  Market  and  Meat  Trade  Review,  1928. . 

The  Army  Cutworm  (Pamphlet  No.  102 — New  Series) 

Experimental  Farm,  Brandon,  Man. — Report  of  the  Superintendent, 
1928 

Seasonable  Hints 

Seed,  Feed  and  Fertilizer  Markets 

Bulletin  of  the  Canadian  Tuberculosis  Association 


Carried  forward 1 ,  130, 725 


Number 

of 
Copies 


179,800 


1,000 
500 
500 

6,025 

30,000 

43,500 

3,000 

1,500 

23,000 

15,000 

10,000 

10,000 
10,000 

2,000 
10,000 

5,000 

5,000 

30,000 

200 

20,000 

200 

3,000 

25,000 

25,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

1,000 

30, 000 


6,000 

7,000 

10,000 

1,000 

1,500 


5,000 
3,000 
1,500 

7,500 
215,000 
224,000 
144,000 


Number 

of 

Pages 


2,652 


84 
8 

48 

16 

8 
32 

112 

24 

48 

8 

16 

20 

56 
32 
16 
16 


160 
50 


16 


54 

16 

256 

40 


4,282 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 


9,795,400 


20,000 
8,000 
8,000 

*193,120 

1,680,000 

2,784,000 

60,000 

12,000 

*460,000 

720,000 

80,000 

80,000 
80,000 

168,000 
80,000 

240,000 

80,000 


240,000 

6,400 

1,120,000 

4,800 

144,000 

200,000 

400,000 

100,000 

280,000 

160,000 

16,000 

480,000 


960,000 

350,000 

80,000 

8,000 

24,000 


70,000 

240,000 

12,000 

405,000 
3,440,000 
4,792,000 
"1, 152,000 


28,232,720 


16 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work, 

1928-29 — Continued 


Description 


Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 

of 

Pages 


Brought  forward 

Agriculture— Continued 

French 

Rapport  du  service  des  plantes  fourrageres,  1926 

L'essai  du  lait,  de  la  creme  et  des  sous-produits  du  lait  au  moyen 
du  procede  Babcock  et  determination  de  la  densite  du  lait 
(bulletin  n°  14 — nouvelle  serie) 

Reglements  gouvernant  l'inspection  des  conserves  de  fruits,  de 
legumes  et  de  lait  (Extrait  de  la  Gazette  du  Canada) 

Loi  concernant  les  animaux  de  ferme 

L'elevage  artificiel  des  poussins 

Service  de  la  production  de  la  filasse — Rapport  du  chef  de  service 
1926 

Rapport  de  l'horticulteur  du  Dominion,  1926 — 

Le  controle  de  la  ponte  au  Canada  pour  les  volailles  de  race  pure, 
1926-27  (rapport  n°  8) 

Liste  des  marchands  de  gros  de  fruits  et  de  legumes  au  Canada  (bul- 
letin n°  101) 

Le  soja  au  Canada  (feuillet  n°  93 — nouvelle  serie) ... ; 

Comment  combattre  les  moustiques  au  Canada  (circulaire  n°  62). . 

Loi  contre  les  parasites  de  l'agriculture,  1927,  et  reglements — Lois 
arretes  et  reglements  (.n°  22) 

Loi  des  insectes  destructeurs  et  autres  fleaux  et  reglements  etablis 
sous  son  empire 

L'elevage  du  mouton  au  Canada  (bulletin  n°  75 — nouvelle  serie). 

Etude  des  moisissures  et  de  levures  dans  le  beurre  de  beurreries 
(feuillet  n°  92— nouvelle  serie) 

Beurre  a  surface  gatee  (feuillet  n°  91 — nouvelle  serie) 

L'etuvage  (deshydratation)  des  fruits  et  des  legumes  au  Canada 
(bulletin  n°  90— nouvelle  serie) 

La  conversion  des  fourrages  sees  en  un  aliment  succulent — Une 
etude  du  procede  "Sugar  Jack"  (bulletin  n°  96 — nouvelle  serie). 

L'origine  et  la  qualite  des  bestiaux  de  commerce  vendus  au  Canada 
en  1927  (rapport  n°  8) 

Sous-station  experimentale,  Beaverlodge,  Alta. — Rapport  du  regis- 
seur,  1926 

Les  assolements  et  la  culture  du  sol  dans  les  provinces  des  prairies 
(bulletin  n°  98 — nouvelle  serie) 

Loi  des  engrais  chimiques  avec  amendements  et  reglements — Loi, 
arretes  et  reglements  (n°  9) — Consolidation  de  bureau 

La  fabrication  de  la  creme  a  la  glace  (bulletin  n°  102 — nouvelle  serie) 

Plantes  bulbeuses  a  fleurs  (bulletin  n°  95 — nouvelle  serie) 

Station  experimentale,  Kentville,  N.-E. — Rapport  du  regisseur, 
1926 

Rapport  du  Directeur  general  veterinaire,  1927-28 

Liste  des  publications,  1929  (feuillet  n°  101 — nouvelle  serie) 

Chambres  froides  de  beurreries  avec  plans  et  devis  (bulletin  n°  61 
— nouvelle  serie) 

La  loi  des  semences  avec  amendements  et  reglements — Lois,  ar- 
retes et  reglements  (n°  24) ,  octobre  1928 

Rapport  du  surveillant  en  chef  sur  les  stations  federates  de  demons- 
tration en  Colombie-Britannique,  Alberta,  Saskatchewan  et 
Manitoba,  1927. 

L'enregistrement  superieur  pour  les  pores  de  race  pure 

Insectes  qui  nuisent  aux  fleurs  et  moyens  de  les  detruire  (bulletin 
n°  99 — nouvelle  serie) 

Conseils  pour  la  saison 

La  revue  des  marches  des  semences,  des produits  alimentaires  pour 
les  animaux  et  des  engrais  chimiques. 

Bulletin  de  1' Association  Canadienne  Antituberculeuse 


1,130,725 


2,300 


Archives — 


English 


The  Canadian  Historical  Association — Report  of  the  Annual  Meet- 
ing held  at  Winnipeg,  May  24-25,  1928,  with  Historical  Papers. 


2,011 


800 


4,282 


40 


48 


1,000 

500 

5,000 

16 
12 
20 

2,200 
3,000 

24 

84 

1,000 

100 

2,000 
3,000 
1,000 

40 

16 

8 

1,500 

24 

1,500 
5,000 

32 
120 

2,500 
3,000 

16 
16 

2,011 

32 

1,000 

40 

1,000 

48 

1,000 

100 

5,000 

64 

10,000 
2,500 
4,000 

24 
32 
56 

1,000 
3,000 
8,000 

104 

52 
16 

1,000 

8 

5,000 

56 

1,000 
5,000 

88 
8 

5,000 
23,000 

64 
32 

98,000 
10,000 

112 
16 

128 


Carried  forward >it 454, 547 


5,978 


ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928- 


17 


Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work, 

1928-29— Continued 


Description 


Brought  forward 

A  rchives — Concluded 

French 

Collection  Northcliffe 

Auditor  General — 

Bilingual 

Auditor  General's  Report — Rapport  de  l'Auditeur  general,  1927-28 
(published  in  separate  parts) 

Canada  Gazette — 

English 

Index  to  the  Canada  Gazette,  1927-28 

Chief  Electoral  Officer— 

English 

Special  Election  Instructions  for  certain  By-Elections  with  a  Dis- 
cussion of  the  Rights  and  Obligations  of  Candidates  (Book  A), 
February  1,  1928 

Dominions  Elections  Act  (Book  B) — For  the  Use  of  Urban  Regis- 
trars  

Dominion  Elections  Act  (Book  C) 

Election  Instructions  (Complete)  with  a  Discussion  of  the  Rights 
and  Obligations  of  Candidates  and  the  Dominion  Election  Act 
(Book  A),  July  16,  1928 

French 

Instructions  electorales  speciales  pour  certaines  elections  partielles 
avec  commentaires  sur  les  droits  et  obligations  des  candidats 
(cahier  A),  ler  fevrier  1928 

Loi  des  Elections  federales  (cahier  B) — Cahier-index  a  l'usage  des 
registrateurs  urbains 

Loi  des  elections  federales  (cahier  C) 

loi  des  elections  federales  (cahier  E) — Cahier-index  a  l'usage  des 
registrateurs  ruraux 

Instructions  electorales  (completes)  avec  commentaires  sur  les 
droits  et  obligations  des  candidats  et  la  Loi  des  elections 
federales  (cahier  A),  16  juillet  1928 

Civil  Service  Commision — 

English 

Informations  respecting  Examinations  for  the  Postal  Service 

Sample  Examination  Papers 

French 

Reseignements  sur  les  examens  du  service  des  Douanes 

Diamond  Jubilee  Committee — 

English 

Confederation  and  After  Sixty  Years  of  Progress,  1867-1927 

Exchequer  Court — 

English 

Confidential  document 

Carried  forward 

91900—2 


Number 

of 
Copies 


1,454,547 


478 


40 


2,050 


3,000 

5,000 
30,000 


1,000 


1,000 

7,800 
6,500 

2,000 
1,000 


5,000 
1,000 


3,000 


150 


100 


,525,665 


Number 

of 

Pages 


5,978 


486 


1,250 


90 


232 

44 
40 


260 


244 

88 
40 

44 

276 


12 


224 


12 


376 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 


34,870,800 


232,308 


50,000 


184,500 


696,000 

220,000 
1,200,000 


780,000 


244,000 

'343,200 
260,000 

88,000 
276,000 


60,000 
48,000 


24,000 


33,600 


1,200 


39,611,608 


18 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work, 

1928-29— Continued 


Description 


Brought  forward . 
Experimental  Farms — 


English 


Experimental  Station,  Rosthern,  Sask. — Report  of  the  Superintend- 
ent, 1927 

Experimental  Station,  Scott,  Sask. — Report  of  the  Superintendent, 
1927 

Experimental  Station,  Harrow,  Ont. — Report  of  the  Superintendent, 
1927 

Experimental  Station,  Morden,  Man. — Report  of  the  Superintend- 
ent, 1927 

Experimental  Station,  Farnham,  Que.— Report  of  Superintendent, 
1927 

Experimental  Station,  Swift  Current,  Sask.— Report  of  the  Super- 
intendent, 1927 

Experimental  Station,  Sidney,  B.C.— Report  of  the  Superintend- 
ent, 1927 

Experimental  Station,  Lennoxville,  Que. — Report  of  the  Superin- 
tendent, 1927 

Experimental  Station,  Invermere,  B.C. — Report  of  the  Superin 
tendent,  1927 

Experimental  Station,  Fredericton,   N.B. — Report  of  the  Super- 
intendent, 1927 m. 

Experimental  Station,  Kapuskasing,  Ont. — Report  of  the  Superin 
tendent,  1927 

Experimental  Station,  Summerland,  B.C. — Report  of  the  Superin 
tendent,  1927 

Experimental  Station,  Kentville,  N.S. — Report  of  the  Superintend- 
ent, 1927 

Experimental  Station,  La  Ferme,  Que. — Report  of  the  Superintend 
ent,  1926  and  1927 

Experimental  Station,  Ste.  Anne  de  la  Pocatiere,  Que. — Report  of 
the  Superintendent,  1927 

Experimental  Station,  Lethbridge,  Alta. — Report  of  the  Superin- 
tendent, 1927 

Experimental  Station,  Lacombe,  Alta. — Report  of  the  Superintend 
ent, 1927 

Experimental  Farm,  Brandon,  Man. — Report  of  the  Superintend 
ent,  1927 

Experimental  Farm,  Indian  Head,  Sask. — Report  of  the  Super- 
intendent, 1927 

Experimental  Farm,  Agassiz,  B.C. — Report  of  the  Superintendent 
1927 

Experimental  Farm,  Nappan,  N.S. — R.eport  of  the  Superintendent 
1927 

Experimental    Sub-Station,    Beaverlodge,    Alta. — Report   of    the 
Superintendent,  1927 

Experimental   Fox    Ranch,   Summerside,   P.E.I. — Report  of  the 
Superintendent,  1926  and  1927 

Dominion  Experimental  Farms— Report  of  the  Director,  1928. . 

Report  of  the  Dominion  Animal  Husbandman,  1926-27 

Report  of  the  Dominion  Field  Husbandman,  1927 

Report  of  the  Dominion  Poultry  Husbandman,  1927 

Report  of  the  Dominion  Chemist,  1926-27 

Report  of  the  Dominion  Cerealist,  1927 

Report  of  the  Dominion  Botanist,  1927 

Report  of  the  Dominion  Horticulturist,  1927 

Rust    Research    Laboratory,    Winnipeg,    Man.— Reports    of    Dr. 
D.  L.  Bailey  and  Dr.  C.  H.  Goulden 

The    Soils   of   Prince   Edward    Island    (Bulletin    No.    100—  New 
Series) 

Canadian  National  Egg-Laying  Contest 

Report   of  the  Tobacco  Inquiry  Commission  in  the  Provinces 
of  Ontario  and  Quebec 

Tables   for   Computing   Yields   of    Forage Crops— Experimental 
Methods  I  (Bulletin  No.  37— New  Series) 

Carried  forward 


Number 

of 
Copies 


1,525,665 


5,500 

23,500 

8,700 

6,000 

3,500 

6,000 

5,000 

6,000 

5,500 

8,500 

5,000 

6,500 

6,500 

3,500 

3,500 

4,500 

8,600 

7,500 

13,000 

7,500 

5,040 

11,000 

15,000 

10,100 

13,000 

10,000 

15,000 

6,500 

8,500 

4,500 

11,000 

5,000 

10,000 
1,500 

8,500 

2,011 


1,806,616 


Number 

of 

Pages 


£,376 


120 
96 
40 
64 
84 
40 

248 
48 

24 

20 


52 
100 


11,764 


ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29 


19 


Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work, 

1928-29— Continued 


Description 


Brought  forward 

Experimental  Farms — Concluded 

English — Concluded 

Annual  Flowers  with  Lists  of  Varieties  for  Special  Purposes  and 

Districts,  (Bulletin  No.  60 — New  Series) 

The  Illustration  Stations  in  Ontario,  Quebec,  New  Brunswick, 

Nova  Scotia  and  Prince  Edward  Island — Report  of  the 

Chief  Supervisor,  1927 

Tomato  Diseases  (Bulletin  No.  51 — New  Series) 

Bee  Division — Report  of  the  Dominion  Apiarist,  1927 

Marquis  Wheat — Description  of  the  Standard  Type  (Pamphlet 

No.  95 — New  Series) 

The  Illustration  Stations  in  British  Columbia,  Alberta,  Saskat 

chewan  and  Manitoba — Report  of  the  Chief  Supervisor 

1927 

Studies  in  Forest  Pathology  (Bulletin  No.  104 — New  Series). . 

Poultry  Breeding  Records  (Bulletin  No.  103 — New  Series) 

Lime  in  Agriculture  (Bulletin  No.  86 — New  Series) 

Standard    Descriptions    of    Vegetables — Peas — A    Guide    to 

Seed-Growers  (Bulletin  No.  17 — New  Series) 

Studies  in  Cereal  Diseases — Stem   Rust  in  Western  Canada 

(Bulletin  No.  106— New  Series) 

Mushrooms  and  Toadstools 

Breeding  and  Feeding  the  Market  Hog  (Pamphlet  No.  74 — 

New  Series) 

Fall  Litters — The  Breeding,  Feeding  and  Management  of  Pigs 

for   Winter   Pork    Production    (Pamphlet    No.    63 — New 

Series) 

Tomato  Culture  (Pamphlet  No.  100 — New  Series) 

Reprint  from  the  Report  of  the  Dominion  Botanist,  1927 

Report  of  the  Division  of  Forage  Plants,  1927 

Studies  in  Strawberry  Bud  Differentiation  (Bulletin  No.  110 — 

New  Series) 

Reprint  from  the  Report  of  the  Dominion  Botanist,  1927 — 

Section  I  and  II 

Reprint  from  the  Report  of  the  Dominion  Botanist,  1927 — 

Section  III 

Reprint  from  the  Report  of  the  Dominion  Botanist,  1927 — 

Section  IV 

Seasonable  Hints 


French 

Station  experimentale,  Ste-Anne  de  la  Pocatiere,  Que. — Rap- 
port du  regisseur,  1926 

Station  experimentale,  Farnham,  Que. — Rapport  du  regisseur, 
1926 

Station  experimentale,  Lacombe,  Alta. — Rapport  du  regisseur, 
1926...... 

Station  experimentale,  Harrow,  Ont. — Rapport  du  regisseur, 
1926 

Station  experimentale,  Harrow,  Ont. — Rapport  du  regisseur, 
1927 

Station  experimentale,  Farnham,  Que. — Rapport  du  regisseur, 
1927 

Station  experimentale,  Charlottetown,  I.P.-E. — Rapport  du 
regisseur,  1927 

Station  experimentale,  Morden,  Man. — Rapport  du  regisseur, 
1927 

Station  experimentale,  Lennoxville,  Que. — Rapport  du  regis- 
seur 1927 

Station  experimentale,  Fredericton,  N.-B. — Rapport  du  regis- 
seur, 1927 

Station  experimentale,  Brandon,  Man. — Rapport  du  Regis- 
seur, 1927 


91900-21 


Carried  forward 


Number 

of 
Copies 


1,806,616 


30,000 


5,000 

10,000 

9,000 

10,000 


12,000 

8,000 

18,000 

10,000 

10,000 

8,000 
10,006 

25,000 


25,000 

25,000 

4,000 

6,000 

5,000 

1,000 

3,000 

3,000 
858,000 


3,300 
3,500 

1,111 

1  100 

1,000 

2,500 

1,000 

1,000 

3,500 

3,500 

750 

2,923,883 


Number 

of 
Pages 


11,764 


52 


84 
40 
24 
16 

52 

32 
274 

24 


13,618 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 


58,266,868 


1,560,000 


420,000 
280,000 
216,000 

160,000 


1,008,000 
320,000 
432,000 
160,000 

520,000 

256,000 
2,741,644 

600,000 


200,000 
200,000 
224,000 
360,000 

80,000 

40,000 

240,000 

252,000 
*13,728,000 


264,000 
84,000 
88,880 
35  200 
48,000 
80,000 
68,000 
72,000 
294,000 
252,000 
60,000 


83,610,592 


20 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work, 

1928-29 — Continued 


Description 


Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 
of 


Brought  forward 

Experimental  Farms — Concluded 

French — Concluded 

Fermes  experimentales  federates — Rapport  du  directeur,  1927- 
1928 

Ferme  experimental  de  Nappan,  N.-E. — Rapport  du  regis- 
seur,  1927. . ., 

Rapport  du  cerealiste  du  Dominion,  1926 

Rapport  du  chimiste  du  Dominion,  1925-26. 

Rapport  du  bactereologiste  agricole  du  Dominion,  1926 

Rapport  du  botaniste  du  Dominion,  1926 

Rapport  du  chimiste  du  Dominion,  1926-27 

Rapport  de  l'agriculteur  du  Dominion,  1927 

Rapport  de  l'apiculteur  du  Dominion,  1927 

Rapport  du  botaniste  du  Dominion,  1925 

Rapport  de  l'aviculteur  du  Dominion,  1927 

Stations  federates  de  demonstration — Ontario,  Quebec,  Nou- 
veau-Brunswick,  Nouvelle-Ecosse  et  He  du  Prince- 
Edouard — Rapport  du  surveillant  en  chef,  1927 

Arbres  et  arbrisseaux  d'ornement  et  plantes  grimpantes  (bulle- 
tin n°  89— nouvelle  serie) 

Les  plantes-racines  au  Canada — Classification,  amelioration  et 
production  de  la  graine  (bulletin  n°  84 — nouvelle  serie) 

Fumiers  et  engrais  chimiques — Nature,  fonctions  et  applica 
tion  (bulletin  n°  92 — nouvelle  serie) 

Les  maladies  des  tomates  (bulletin  n°  51 — nouvelle  serie) 

La  culture  et  l'emploi  des  racines  (bulletin  n°  94 — nouvelle 
serie) 

Le  fraisier  et  sa  culture  au  Canada  (bulletin  n°  80 — nouvelle 
serie) 

Fleurs  annuelles — Liste  de  varietes  pour  certains  emplois  et 
pour  certains  districts  (bulletin  n°  60 — nouvelle  serie) 

Service  de  l'exploitation  animale — Rapport  de  1'eleveur  du 
Dominion,  1926-27 

Laboratoire  des  recherches  sur  la  rouille,  Winnipeg,  Man 

Les  sols  de  l'He  du  Prince-Edouard  (bulletin  n°  100 — nouvelle 
serie) 

Conseils  pour  la  saison 


Norwegian 

Landbrugsmuligheder  I  Canada 

External  Affairs — 

English 

Convention  and  Protocol  between  Canada  and  the  United 
States  regarding  the  Niagara  Falls  and  the  Niagara  River, 
Ottawa,  January  2,  1929 

Convention  signed  at  Washington,  March  2,  1899,  between  Her 
Majesty  and  the  United  States  of  America  relative  to  the 
Disposal  of  Real  and  Personal  Property,  etc 

St.  Lawrence  Waterway  Project 

Proposals  for  a  Multilateral  Pact  for  the  Renunciation  of  War, 
1927-28 

Passport,  Canada 

British  and  Foreign  Government  Representatives  in  Canada, 
October,  1928 

Proceedings  of  the  Special  Committee  appointed  to  Inquire 
into  the  Development  and  Improvement  of  the  St.  Law- 
rence River 

General  Treaty  for  the  Renunciation  of  War— Signed  at  Paris, 
August  27,  1928 

Report  of  the  Canadian  Delegates  to  the  Ninth  Assembly  of 
the  League  of  Nations,  September  3  to  26,  1928 


2,923,883 


5,000 

1,000 
2,400 
2,206 
2,106 
2,300 
2,500 
3,000 
4,000 
1,806 
6,500 


2,000 
10,110 

1,006 

6,000 
5,000 
8,011 

10,200 

10,080 

3,500 
2,000 

4,000 
224,000 


10,000 


200 

500 
1,100 

800 
43,000 

300 

50 
150 
200 


13,618 


128 

64 
32 

104 
16 

160 
96 
40 
24 

128 
64 


32 


32 

8 
64 

32 

64 

16 

408 

8 

24 


Carried  forward. 


3,298,908 


15,810 


ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29 

Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work 

1928-20— Continued 


21 


Description 


Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 

of 

Pages 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 


Brought  forward 

External  Affairs — Concluded 

French 

Rapport  des  delegues  canadiens  a  la  neuvieme  assemblee  de  la 
Society  des  Nations,  du  3  au  26  septembre  1928 

Convention  et  protocole  entre  le  Canada  et  les  Etats-Unis  con- 
cernant  les  Chutes  Niagara  et  la  riviere  Niagara,  Ottawa 
le  2  Janvier  1929 

Projet  de  canalisation  du  Saint-Laurent 

Propositions  en  vue  d'un  pacte  multilateral  de  renonciation  a  la 
guerre,  1927-28 

Representants  des  gouvernements  britannique  et  etrangers  au 
Canada,  octobre  1928 

Traite  general  de  renonciation  a  la  guerre — Signe  a  Paris  le  27 
aoftt  1928 , 


Finance — 


English 


Terms  and  Conditions  of  Tenders  for  Engraving,  etc.,  Dom 
inion  Notes,  Dominion  Bonds,  Postal  Supplies,  Custom; 
and  Excise  Supplies  and  Trade  and  Commerce  Revenue 
Stamps  for  His  Majesty 

List  of  Lost,  Stolen  and  Destroyed  Dominion  of  Canada  Bonds 
including  Bonds  issued  at  New  York,  etc 

Estimates  of  Canada,  1929 

Estimates  of  Canada,  Supplementary,  1928-29 , 

French 

Expose  du  budget,  16  fevrier  1928 

health-  English 

Information  for  Young  Women  about  Sex  Hygiene  (Publication 
No.  25) 

Information  for  Parents — Teaching  of  Sex  Hygiene  to  Children 
(Publication  No.  26) 

Regulations  under  the  Food  and  Drugs  Act 

Manual  for  Guidance  of  Physicians  (Publication  No.  26) 

Outline  of  the  Principles  used  in  the  Construction  of  the  Regu- 
lations of  the  Various  Provinces  of  Canada  governing  the 
control  of  Communicable  Diseases 

Sanitation — Sewage  Treatment  for  Isolated  Houses  and  Small 
Institutions  where  Municipal  Sewage  is  not  Available 
(Publication  No.  1) _ 

Maternal  Mortality  in  Canada — Report  of  an  enquiry  made  by 
the  Department  of  Health,  July  1, 1925,  to  July  1, 1926 

Living  in  the  Open  Air 

The  Canadain  Mother's  Book  (National  Health — Publication 
No.  2) 

Report  of  the  Narcotic  Division 

Morphinism 

A  System  of  Diagnostic  Standards  in  Tuberculosis 

The  Problem  of  the  Narcotic  Drug  Addict 

Medical  Examination  of  Immigrants — Instructions  to  Medical 
Officers 

The  Little  Blue  Book  (Home  Series)— 

Beginning  a  Home  in  Canada — Publication  No.  7 

How  to  Build  the  Canadian  House — Publication  No.  8. . . . 

How  to  Make  our  Canadian  Home — Publication  No.  9 

How  to  Make  Outpost   Homes  in  Canada — Publication 

No.  10 

How  to  Avoid  Accidents  and  Give    First    Aid — Publi- 
cation No.  11 

Carried  forward 


3,298,908 


100 

100 
500 

300 

100 

75 


500 

15,000 
700 
300 


3,500 


5,000 

5,000 
20,000 
10,000 


,000 


3,000 

2,500 
10,000 

50,023 

10,000 

8,000 

1,000 

8,000 

1,000 

5,000 
5,000 
5,000 

5,000 

10,000 


15,810 


16 


110 
16 


36 


100 
32 


64 


72 
16 

164 
24 
36 
24 
16 

52 

20 
16 
48 

56 

48 


94,738,720 


3,200 

2,000 
*16,000 

9,600 

1,600 

600 


8,000 

*480, 000 

77,000 

4,800 


126,000 


40,000 

40,000 

2,000,000 

320,000 


512,000 


*64,000 

180,000 
160,000 

5,203,772 

240,000 

288,000 

24,000 

128,000 

52,000 

100,000 

80,000 

240,000 

280, 000 

*240,000 


3,491,606 


17,124 


108,659,292 


22  DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 

Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work, 

1928-29 — Continued 


Description 


Brought  forward . 


Health — Concluded . 


Eng  lish —  Concluded 


The  Little  Blue  Books  (Household  Series) — 

Canadians  Need  Milk— Publication  No.  12 

How  We  Cook  in  Canada — Publication  No.  13. 

How  to  Manage  Housework  in  Canada — Publication  No.  14. 

How  to  Take  Care  of  Household  Waste — Publication  No,  15 

Household  Cost  Accounting  in  Canada — Publication  No.  16. 
The  Little  Blue  Books  (Mother's  Series)— 

The  Canadian  Mother's  Book — Publication  No.  1 

How  to  Take  Care  of  the  Baby— Publication  No.  3 

How  to  Take  Care  of  the  Mother — Publication  No.  4 

How  to  Take  Care  of  the  Children — Publication  No.  5 

How  to  Take  Care  of  the  Father  and  the  Family — Publica- 
tion No.  6 

The  Little  Blue  Books  (National  Series) — 

A  Little  Book  for  Women — Publication  No.  38 

Mother — A  Little  Book  for  Women — Publication  No.  38 

Mother— A  Little  Book  for  Men— Publication  No.  39 

Children  not  in  their  Own  Homes— Publication  No.  40 


de  pu- 


Bilingual 

Abstracts  of  Current  Public  Health  Literature — Extraits 
blications  courantes  sur  la  sante  publique — 

Abstract  (March,  1928) 

Abstract  (April,  1928) 

Abstract  (May,  1928) 

Abstract  (June,  1928) 

Abstract  (July,  1928) 

Abstract  (August,  1928) 

Abstract  (September,  1928) 

Abstract  (November,  1928) 

Abstract  (December,  1928) 

Abstract  (January,  1929) 

Abstract  (February,  1929) 

French 

Hygiene  (approvisionnement  d'eau) — Alimentation  en  eau  potable 

des  maisons  isolees  et  des  petits  etablissements  depourvus 

d'aqueduc  municipal  (publication  n°  17) 

Comment  former  des  dents  saines  (publication  n°  30) 

Loi  concernant  le  ministere  des  Pensions  et  de  la  Sante  Nationale. . 
Hygiene — Traitement  des  matieres  souillees  dans  les  maisons  isolees 

et  dans  les  petits  etablissements  depourvus  d'egout  municipal 

(sante  nationale — publication  n°  1 ) 

Pateurisation  du  lait  pour  les  centres  peu  peuples  (sante  nationale — 

publication  n°  36) 

Maman — Une  brochure  pour  les  hommes  (sante  nationale — publica- 
tion n°  39) 

Les  petits  livres  bleus  (serie  nationale)— Maman — Une  brochurette 

pour  les  femmes — publication  n°  38 

Les  petits  livers  bleus  (collection  maternelle) — 

Comment  prendre  soin  de  bebe— publication  n°  3 

Comment  eiever  les  enfants — publication  n°  5 

Comment   prendre  soin  de  papa  et  de  la  famille— publication 

n°6 

Les  petits  livres  bleus  (collection  domestique) — 

La  cuisine  canadienne — publication  n°  13 

Comment  tenir  maison  au  Canada— publication  n°  14 

Les  ordures  menageres— publication  n°  15 

Les  petits  livres  bleus  (collection  du  foyer) — 

Comment  construire  une  maison  canadienne — publication  n°  8.. 

Comment  fonder  un  foyer  canadien— publication  n°  9 

Les  foyers-vedettes  au  Canada— publication  n°  10. 


Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 

of 

Pages 


3,491,606 


5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 

10,000 
5,000 

10,000 
5,000 

5,000 

10,000 

10,000 

20, 000 

7,511 


Carried  forward 3, 754, 728 


1,511 

10,000 

200 


1,500 

2,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 
5,000 

5,000 

3,000 
5,000 
5,000 

5,000 
5,000 
5,000 


17,124 


12 
52 
48 
20 
36 

164 
24 
48 
40 

32 


400 

32 

9,400 

32 

9,400 

24 

9,400 

24 

9,400 

32 

9,400 

36 

400 

32 

9,800 

36 

9,800 

52 

10,000 

48 

10,000 

64 

36 
100 

48 

48 

32 
56 

40 

72 
68 
12 

20 

20 
24 


18,880 


108,659,292 


119,747,324 


ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928- 


23 


Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work, 

1928-29— Continued 


Description 


Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 

of 

Pages 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 


Brought  forward. 
House  of  Commons — 


English 


St.  Lawrence  Waterway  Project 

An  Act  respecting  the  Departments  of  Health  and  Soldiers'  Civil 

Re-Establishment 

An  Act  to  regulate  the  Sale  and  Inspection  of  Root  Vegetables.. 
Annual  Report  of  the  Board  of  Grain  Commissioners  for  Canada, 

Crop  Year  ended  August  31,  1927 

Estimates  of  Canada,  Supplementary,  1928-29 

List  of  Acts,  Session  1928 

Index  to  the  House  of  Commons  Debates   (Unrevised  Edition) 

Session  of  1928 

Index  to  the  Sixty-fifth  Volume  of  the  Journal  of  the  House  of 

Commons 

Quebec  Harbour  Commissioners — Report  on  Investigation,  Janu 

ary  16,  1928 

Report  of  the  Superintendent  of  Insurance  of  the  Dominion  of  Can 

ada,  1927  (Vol.  I) 

Railway  Transportation — Members  of  the  House  of  Commons 

Canada,  Sixteenth  Parliament,  1929 

List  of  Reports  and  Returns  to  be  made  to  the  House  of  Commons 

by  Public  Officers  and  Private  Corporations,  Session  of  1929. . . 
General  Treaty  for  the  Renunciation  of  War — Signed  at  Paris, 

August  27,  1928 

Estimates  of  Canada,  1929-30 

Convention  and  Protocol  between  Canada  and  the  United  States 

regarding  the  Niagara  Falls  and  the  Niagara  River — Signed 

at  Ottawa,  January  2,  1929 


Bilingual 


Canal  Statistics,  1927— Statistique  des  canaux,  1927 

Abstract  of  Statements  of  Insurance  Companies  in  Canada,  1927 — 
Releve  des  etats  des  compagnies  d'assurance  au  Canada,  1927. . 

List  of  Shipping,  1927 — Liste  des  navires,  1927 

List  of  Members  of  the  House  of  Commons  with  their  Constituen- 
cies and  Post  Office  Addresses — Liste  des  membres  de  la 
Chambre  des  Communes  avec  les  districts  electoraux  et 
adresses  postales  (Corrected  to  February  7,  1929) 

List  of  Members  of  the  House  of  Commons  with  their  Constituen- 
cies and  Post  Office  Addresses — Liste  des  membres  de  la 
Chambre  des  Communes  avec  les  districts  electoraux  et 
adresses  postales  (Corrected  to  February  20,  1929) 


French 

Projet  de  canalisation  du  Saint-Laurent 

Collection  Northcliffe 

Budget  du  Canada,  supplementaire,  1928-29 

Rapport  concernant  les  reglements  etablis  conformement  aux  dis- 
positions de  la  loi  des  pensions  de  vieillesse  de  1927 

Traite  general  de  renonciation  a  la  guerre — Signe  a  Paris  le  27  aotit 
1928 

Budget  du  Canada,  1929-30 

Convention  et  protocole  entre  le  Canada  et  les  Etats-Unis  con- 
cernant les  Chutes  Niagara  et  la  riviere  Niagara — Signes  a 
Ottawa  le  2  Janvier  1929 


Immigration  and  Colonization- 


English 


Farm  Opportunities  in  Canada 

Estimates  for  1928-29 

The  Houseworker  in  Canada — Opportunities  for  Success, 
and  Wages,  Where  to  Go  and  What  to  Take 


Work 


3,754,728 


4,000 

1,191 
1,191 

240 

1,073 

50 

3,666 

29 

500 

251 

300 

400 

400 
1,000 

400 

212 

163 
116 

300 

500 


1,500 

50 

163 

150 

125 
250 


125 


211,750 
250 

50,000 


18,880 


04 


120 

84 

8 

1,338 

44 


112 
32 

64 

384 

272 

64 

64 

32 

486 

16 

12 

8 
112 

20 


119,747,324 


428,000 

19,056 
19,056 

11,520 

17..  168 

400 

439,920 
2,436 
4,000 

335,838 

13,200 

3,200 

3,200 
112,000 

12,800 


13,568 

62,592 
31,552 


19,200 


32,000 


48,000 

24,300 

2,608 

1,800 

1,200 
28,000 


2,500 


6,776,000 
4,000 

1,200,000 


Carried  forward 


4,035,073 


22,408 


129,116,438 


24 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work, 

1928-29 — Continued 


Description 


Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 

of 

Pages 


Brought  forward 

Immigration  and  Colonization — Concluded 

English — Concluded 


Information  for  Settlers 

Norwegian-Danish  Press  Association — Excursion  Through  Western 

Canada 

Land  Settlement,  Canada — Where  to  go  for  Advice 

New  Brunswick,  Canada 

Boy  Settlement  in  Canada 

The  House  worker  in  Canada — Opportunities  for  Success 


French 

Les  avantages  du  Canada  au  point  de  vue  agricole . 

Indian  Affairs — 

English 


Schedule  of  Indian  Reserves  in  the  Dominion  of  Canada  (Part  I). 
Prize  List 


Insurance- 


English 


List  of  Insurance  Companies  Licensed  to  do  Business  in  Canada 

under  the  Insurance  Act, 

Statistical  Report  of  Fire  Losses  in  Canada 

Annual  Conference  of  the  Association  of  Canadian  Fire  Marshals 


etc. 


List  of  Insurance  Companies  Licensed  to  do  Business  in  Canada 
under  the  Insurance  Act  (Extract  from  the  Canada  Gazette 
July  7,  1928) 

Abstract  of  Statements  of  Loan  and  Trust  Companies  in  Canada, 
1927 

The  Insurance  Act  with  an  Index  thereto,  1928 

The  Loan  Companies  Act  and  the  Trust  Companies  Act 

Annual  Statement  required  from  Canadian  Companies  Licensed  to 
transact  Business  of  Insurance,  other  than  Life  Insurance,  in 
the  Dominion  of  Canada 

Annual  Statement  required  from  British  and  Foreign  Companie 
licensed  to  transact  Business  of  Insurance,  other  than  Life  In- 
surance, in  the  Dominion  of  Canada 

Report  of  the  Superintendent  of  Insurance  of  the  Dominion  of 
Canada,  1927  (Vol.  I) 

Schedule  of  Classification  of  Fire  Insurance  Risks  for  the  Year 
ended  December  31,  1927,  and  aggregate  experience  for  the 
years  1923  to  1927,  inclusive 

List  of  Insurance  Companies  Licensed  to  do  Business  in  Canada 
under  the  Insurance  Act  (Extract  from  the  Canada  Gazette, 
January  5, 1929) 

Report  of  the  Superintendent  of  Insurance  of  the  Dominion  of 
Canada,  1927 — Loan  and  Trust  Companies 

An  Act  to  amend  the  Insurance  Act 

List  of  Securities  held  by  Insurance,  Loan  and  Trust  Companies  in 
Canada,  as  at  December  31,  1928 

The  Insurance  Act  and  the  Winding-up  Act  with  Indexes  thereto, 
etc 


4,035,073 


10,000 

161 
20,000 
10,000 
30,500 
25,000 


25,000 


800 
100 


14,000 
1,000 

200 


700 

500 

5,000 
250 


450 

1,250 
3,800 

2,200 


Bilingual 

Abstract  of  Statements  of  Insurance  Companies  in  Canada,  1927 — 
Releve  des  etats  des  compagnies  d'assurance  au  Canada,  1927 

Carried  forward 


6,750 


22,408 


32 


40 


16 


24 
158 
106 


48 

32 
1,338 

12 


700 

20 

300 
1,000 

180 

8 

800 

320 

600 

200 

384 


4,196,134 


25,614 


ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29 


25 


Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work 

1928-29— Continued 


Description 


Brought  forward. 


Interior 


Emglish 


Pacific  Drainage — British  Columbia  and  Yukon  Territory,  Cli- 
matic Year  1925-26  (Water  Resources  Paper  No.  53) 

Nineteenth  Report  of  the  Geographic  Board — Decisions  from 
April  1,  1924,  to  July  31, 1927 

Camping  in  -Canada 

Tree-Planting  on  the  Prairies  of  Manitoba,  Saskatchewan  and 
Alberta  (Forest  Service — Bulletin  No.  1) 

The  Woodland  Fairy 

Forest  Facts 

School  Programme 

"The  Trees  of  the  Lord" 

Geographic  Board  of  Canada — Place-Names  of  Alberta 

An  Act  to  provide  for  the  Government  of  the  Yukon  Territory 

The  Preservation  of  Niagara  Falls — Interim  Report  of  the  Special 
International  Niagara  Board 

The  Preparation  of  Pelts  for  the  Market 

Reports  on  Tests  of  the  Relative  Strength  of  Green-cut  and  Fire- 
killed  Western  Cedar  Pole  Timber  (Forest  Service — Circular 
No.  22). 

Dominion  Water  Power  and  Reclamatoin  Service — Annual  Report 
1926-27 

Wood  Preservation  in  Canada 

Timber  Pathology  in  Relation  to  Wood  Utilization  in  Canada ... 

Tree  Planting  in  the  Prairie  Provinces  of  Canada 

The  Kicking  Horse  Trail 

Silvicultural  Research  in  Canada 

Avicraft  in  Forestry  containing  Air  Operations  for  Forest  Fire 
Protection 

Pulp  and  Paper  Research  in  Canada 

Forest  Fire  Protection  in  Canada:  Progress  since  1923 

Timber  Physics  Research  in  Canada 

State  Forests  in  Canada 

The  Forests  of  Canada — Their  Extent,  Character,  Ownership,  Man- 
agement, Products  and  Probable  Future 

Softwood  Resources  in  Canada 

Timber  Testing  in  Canada 

Regulations  governing  the  Issue  of  Leases  to  Dredge  for  Minerals 
in  the  Beds  of  Rivers  in  Manitoba,  Saskatchewan,  Alberta,  etc. 

Annual  Report  of  the  Director  of  the  Geodetic  Survey  of  Canada, 
1926-27 

Prince  Edward  Island \ 

Prince  Albert  National  Park 

Rocky  Mountain  Circle  Tour  through  Rocky  Mountains,  Yoho  and 
Kootenay  National  Parks 

Forest  Facts 

Arctic  and  Western  Hudson  Bay  Drainage  (and  Mississippi  Drain- 
age in  Canada,  in  Alberta,  Saskatchewan,  Manitoba  and  West- 
ern Ontario,  Climatic  Year  1925-26  (Water  Resources  Paper 
No.  54) 

Annual  Report  of  the  Topographical  Survey,  1926-27 

Regulations  for  the  Leasing  and  Administration  of  Lands  containing 
Limestone,  Granite,  Slate,  Marble,  etc 

Regulations  for  the  Disposal  of  Quartz  Mining  Claims  on  Dominion 
Lands  in  Manitoba,  Saskatchewan,  Alberta  and  the  Northwest 
Territories  (effective  April  1,  1929) 

The  Hudson  Bay  Region 

Convention  and  Protocol  between  Canada  and  the  United  States 
regarding  the  Niagara  Falls  and  the  Niagara  River,  Ottawa, 
January  2,  1929 

National  Parks  of  Canada — Report  of  the  Commissioner,  1926-27. 

Report  of  the  Director  of  Forestry,  1926-27 


Carried  forward 4, 694, 363 


Number 

of 
Copies 


4,196,134 


1,800 

1,000 
25,000 

10,000 

200,000 

15,000 

28,000 

16,000 

4,018 

500 

2,000 
25,000 


3,011 

2,400 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
25,000 
2,000 

1,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 

3,000 
2,000 
3,000 

3,000 

1,200 
10,000 
10,000 

50,000 
1,500 


1,800 
700 

5,000 


10,000 
15,000 


1,800 
2,500 
2,000 


Number 

of 

Pages 


25,614 


234 

64 
12 

64 
16 
24 
16 
8 
288 
32 

28 
12 


1G 


296 
40 

16 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 


141,383,574 


421,200 

64,000 
300,000 

640,000 

3,200,000 

360,000 

448,000 

128,000 

*578,592 

16,000 

56,000 
300,000 


48,176 

230,400 
16,000 
32,000 
32,000 
1,200,000 
40,000 

16,000 
32,000 
32,000 
32,000 
32,000 

168,000 

16,000 

144,000 

24,000 

38,400 
120,000 
240,000 

400,000 
24,000 


532,800 
28,000 

80,000 


640,000 
960,000 


57,600 

80,000 

104,000 


27,520  153,294,742 


26 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work, 

1928-29— Continued 


Description 


Brought  forward 

Interior—  Continued 

English — Continued 

Dominion  Lands — Hand-Book — For  the  Information  of  the  Public 

(Edition  of  June  15,  1928) 

The  Migratory  Birds  Convention  Act  and  Federal  Regulations  for 

the  Protection  of  Migratory  Birds 

Guide  to  Fort  Anne,  Annapolis  Royal,  N.S 

Regulations  for  the  Disposal  of  Quartz  Mining  Claims  on  Dominion 

Lands  in  Manitoba,  etc 

Report  of  an  Exploratory  Trip  in  the  Area  covered  by  Halfway 

River   and    Prophet    River    Sheets    (Topographical    Survey 

Bulletin  No.  61) 

The  Peace  River  Country,  Canada 

Precise  Levelling  in  Nova  Scotia,   New  Brunswick,  and  Prince 

Edward  Island  (Publication  No.  16) 

Regulations  for  the  Disposal  of  Petroleum  and  Natural  Gas  Rights 
Kootenay  National  Park  and  the  Banff -Windermere  Highway.  . 
Alberta  and  British  Columbia  Boundary  (Part  II)  1917  to  1921.. 

Forestry  Lessons 

An  Act  respecting  Forest  Reserves  and  Parks 

Yukon  Quartz  Mining  Act  (Consolidated  for  office  purposes) 

The  Dominion  Forest  Reserves  and  Parks  Act,  etc. — Edition  of 

September  1,  1928 

Regulations  for  the  Disposal  of  Quartz  Mining  Claims  on  Dominion 

Lands  in  Manitoba,  Saskatchewan,  Alberta  and  the  Northwest 

Territories 

Report  on  the  Absorption  of  Moisture  by  Kiln-dried  Lumber  (For- 
est Service — Circular  No.  23) 

A  Summary  of  Regulations  and  Departmental  Rulings  relating  to 

Dominion  Lands  for  the  Guidance  of  Agents,  Sub-Agents  and 

other  Officials  (No.  20),  Edition  of  October  15,  1928 

Potash  Regulations 

The  Conversion  of  Latitudes  and   Departures  of  a  Traverse  to 

Geodetic   Differences  of  Latitude  and  Longitude   (Geodetic 

Publication  No.  25) 

Regulations  for  the  Disposal  of  Coal  Mining  Rights 

Dominion  Lands  Act  (Consolidated  for  office  purposes  only) 

The  Strength  of  Reinforced  and  Unreinforced  Butter  and  Cheese 

Book  (Forest  Service — Circular  No.  24) 

The   Dominion  Water  Power  Act  and   Dominion  Water  Power 

Regulations,  etc 

A  Study  of  the  Dominion  Standard  Yard  and  other  Standards  of 

Length  (Topographical  Survey — Bulletin  No.  60) , 

Canada  Natural  Resources 

Regulations  for  the  Control  and  Management  of  the  Waterworks 

System  for  the  Town  of  Jasper 

List  of  School  Lands  to  be  offered  for  Sale  by  Public  Auction  at — 

Provost,  Alta.,  June  25,  1928 

Coronation,  Alta.,  June  28,  1928 

Stettler,  Alta.,  July  3,  1928 

Grande  Prairie,  Alta.,  July  14,  1924 

Red  Deer,  Alta.,  July  6,  1928 

Drumheller,  Alta.,  November  8,  1928 

Youngstown,  Alta.,  November  5,  1928 

Cardston,  Alta., November  22,  1928 

Nanton,  Alta.,  November  24,  1928 

Lethbridge,  Alta.,  November  19,  1928 

Calgary,  Alta.,  November  13,  1928 

Vulcan,  Alta.,  November  16,  1928 

North  Battleford,  Sask.,  March  28,  1929. 

Punnichy,  Sask.,  March  21,  1929 

Carlyle,  Sask.,  March  25,  1929 

Regina,  Sask.,  March  22,  1929 

Assiniboia,  Sask.,  April  1 ,  1929 


Carried  forward 4  889  140 


Number 

of 
Copies 


4,694,363 


30,125 

18,000 
10,130 

5,000 


1,000 

5,000 
2,000 


1,000 
3,000 


1,200 
3,000 
1,000 

5,000 

700 

500 
10,000 

500 

2,000 


500 

,000 

,500 

,000 

,000 

,500 

1,500 

1,500 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

1,500 

2,000 

2,000 

2,500 


Number 

of 

Pages 


27,520 


96 


40 


1,000 

20 

25,000 

96 

511 

58 

6,100 

32 

25,000 

48 

1,011 

176 

2,000 

72 

500 

52 

3,000 

48 

128 

40 
16 


20 


20 


29,154 


153,294,742 


161,697,996 


ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29 

Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work 

1928-29— Continued 


27 


Description 


Brought  forward 

Interior — Concluded 

English — Concluded 

Saskatoon,  Sask.,  April  1,  1929 

Prince  Albert,  Sask.,  April   1,  1929 

Swift  Current,  Sask.,  March  21,  1929 

Biggar,  Sask.,  March  25,  1929 

Moose  Jaw,  Sask.,  March  25,  1929 

Kerrobert,  Sask.,  April  9,  1929 

Wadena,  Sask.,  April  11,  1929 

Humboldt,  Sask.,  April  9,  1929 

Melfort,  Sask.,  April  4,  1929 

Rosetown,  Sask.,  April  4,  1929 

Wevburn,  Sask.,  March  27,  1929 

Davidson,  Sask.,  March  30, 1929 

Shaunavon,  Sask.,  April  5,  1929 

Maple  Creek,  Sask.,  March  18,  1929 

Wolseley,  Sask.,  March  20,  1929 

Yorkton,  Sask.,  March  18,  1929 

Natural  Resources,  Canada 

Geographic  Board  of  Canada — Decisions 

Publications  of  the  Dominion  Astrophysical  Observatory 

French 

Dix-huitieme  rapport  de  la  Commission  de  geographie  du 
Canada,  contenant  toutes  les  decisions  jusqu'au  31  mars, 
1924 

Le  thuya  (cedre  de  Test) 

Le  pin  Murray 

Le  pin  gris 

L'epinette  de  Sitka 

Programme  scolaire 

Le  thuya  geant 

Le  pin  a  bois  lourd 

Le  sapin  baumier 

La  preparation  des  peaux  pour  le  commerce 

Loi  de  la  convention  concernant  les  oiseaux  migrateurs  et  regle- 
ments  federaux  pour  la  protection  des  oiseaux  migrateurs. . 

La  region  de  la  Riviere-la-Paix,  Canada 

Service  administratif  des  terres  federates — Renseignements 
pour  le  public,  15  juin  1928 

Ressources  naturelles,  Canada 

Justice — 

English 


Factum 

Reference  re  Water  Powers. 


Labour- 


English 


The  Recidivist  Group  and  Custodial  Care 

Proceedings  of  the  Sixth  Canadian  Conference  on  Child  Wel- 
fare, Vancouver,  B.C.,  May  23  to  26,  Victoria,  B.C.,  May 
27,  1927 

Sex  Education  in  the  Child  Welfare  Program 

An  Old  Age  of  Comfort  and  Happiness  is  Guaranteed  by  the 
Steady  Income  of  Canadian  Government  Annuities 

Labour  Organization  in  Canada — Seventeenth  Annual  Report, 
1927 

Choosing  a  Life  Work — Bricklaying 

Recreation — A  Suggested  National  Program 

Choosing  a  Life  Work — Carpentry 

Carried  forward 


Number 

of 
Copies 


140 


,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,500 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
500 


2,000 
1,500 
2,500 
2,000 
1,500 
2,000 
482,525 
1,158 
5,511 


506 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
9,600 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
5,000 

2,500 
7,500 

3,000 
123,525 


670 
123 


1,000 


1,200 
1,000 

30,011 

5,000 
6,000 
1,000 
6,000 


5,628,469 


Number 

of 

Pages 


29,154 


16 

32,000 

16 

32,000 

16 

32,000 

16 

32,000 

16 

40,000 

16 

32,000 

16 

32,000 

8 

16,000 

16 

32,000 

24 

60,000 

16 

32,000 

8 

12,000 

24 

60,000 

16 

32,000 

8 

12,000 

16 

32,000 

44 

*494,100 

20 

*7,720 

162 

*99,420 

396 
12 


208 

8 

48 


312 
16 


20 


31,416 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 


161,697,996 


12 

208,472 

8 

16,000 

8 

16,000 

8 

16,000 

8 

16,000 

16 

153,600 

8 

16,000 

8 

16,000 

8 

16,000 

12 

60,000 

40 

100,000 

00 

750,000 

72 

216,000 

44 

*494,100 

*32,30O 
1,476 


1,000 


249,600 
8,000 

*480, 176 

1,560,000 

96,000 

8,000 

120,000 


167,476,960 


28 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work, 

1928-29 — Continued 


Description 


Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 
of 
Pages 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 


Brought  forward 

Labour — Concluded 

E  nglish — Concluded 

What  Technical  Schools  have  done  to  Meet  the  Recommenda- 
tions of  the  Royal  Commission  on  Technical  Education. 

Unemployment,  Sickness  and  Invalidity  Insurance  in  Canada 
— Report  of  Committee  adopted  by  House  of  Commons.. 

League  of  Nations  International  Labour  Organization- 
Eleventh  Session  of  the  International  Labour  Conference. 

Seventh  Report  on  Organization  in  Industry,  Commerce  and 
the  Professions  in  Canada,  1928 

Choosing  a  Life  Work— Stenography 

Choosing  a  Life  Work — Office  Work — General 

First  Annual  Report  on  Co-Operation  Associations  in  Canada, 
1928 

Report  of  Board  in  Dispute  between  the  Quebec  Railway, 
Light  and  Power  Company  and  its  Motormen  and  Con- 
ductors, etc 

Wages  and  Hours  of  Labour  in  Canada,  1920  to  1928  (Supple- 
ment to  the  Labour  Gazette,  January,  1929) 

Prices  in  Canada  and  other  Countries,  1928  (Supplement  to  the 
Labour  Gazette,  January,  1929) 

Index  to  the  Labour  Gazette,  Vol.  XXVIII,  1928 

Twenty-First  Report  of  the  Registrar  of  Boards  of  Conciliation 
and  Investigation  of  Proceedings  under  the  Industrial 
Disputes  Investigation  Act,  March  31,  1927-28 

First  Report  of  the  Administration  of  Old  Age  Pensions  in 
Canada 

Fourth  Report  of  the  Registrar  of  the  Combines  Investigation 
Act  of  Proceedings  under  The  Combines  Investigation 
Act,  1923  (1926-27) 

Strikes  and  Lockouts  in  Canada  and  other  Countries,  1928 

Factum 

Tenth  Report  of  the  Employment  Service  Branch  of  the 
Department  of  Labour,  Canada,  on  the  Operations  Under 
the  Employment  Offices  Co-ordination  Act,  1927-28. . . 

Ninth  Report  of  the  Technical  Education  Branch  of  the  De- 
partment of  Labour,  Canada,  on  the  Operations  of  the 
Technical  Education  Act  assented  to  July  7,  1919,  1927-28. . 

The  Labour  Gazette,  Nos.  4  to  12,  Vol.  XXVIII,  and  Nos.  1  to 
3,  Vol.  XXIX 

Vocational  Education 


French 

Legislation  ouvriere  au  Canada,  1926 

L'assurance — chomage,maladie,  invalidite  au  Canada — rapport 
d'une  commission  parlementaire  adopte  par  les  Communes 

Index— Gazette  du  Travail,  Volume  XXVII,  1927 

Une  vieillesse  de  confort  et  de  bonheur 

Dix-septieme  rapport  annuel  sur  les  associations  ouvrieres  au 
Canada,  1927 

L'organisation  internationale  du  travail  de  la  Societe  des 
Nations 

Prix  au  Canada  et  a  l'etranger,  1928,  (Supplement  a  la  Gazette 
du  Travail,  Janvier  1929) 

Salaires  et  heures  de  travail  au  Canada,  1920  a  1928  (Supple- 
ment a  la  Gazette  du  Travail,  Janvier  1929) 

Septieme  rapport  sur  l'organisation  de  1' Industrie  du  Com- 
merce et  des  professions  liberates  au  Canada,  1928 

Premier  rapport  annuel  sur  les  societes  cooperatives  au  Canada, 
1928 

La  Gazette  du  Travail,  Nos.  3  to  12.  Vol.  XXVlii,'  and  Nos.'i 
and  2,  Vol.  XXIX 


Carried  forward 5, 891, 319 


5,628,469 


250 

1,000 

300 

2,200 
6,000 
6,000 

2,000 

100 

17,950 

16,950 
11,000 

300 
250 


100 
850 
200 


250 


4,700 

133,464 
15,200 


311 

200 

1,800 
10,000 

900 

100 

2,550 

2,550 

300 

300 

24,775 


31,416 


16 

32 

128 
20 
20 

80 


208 


32 

182 


16 


56 


1,450 
84 


64 

16 
48 
16 

312 

32 

72 

208 

130 

84 

1,560 


36,470 


167,476,960 


2,000 

16 ,  000 

9,600 

281,600 
120,000 
120,000 

160,000 

800 

1,866,800 

*610,200 
396,000 

10,800 
5,000 


800 
27,200 
36,400 


4,000 


263,200 

16,134,372 
*332,400 


19,904 

3,200 

86,400 

160,000 

280,800 

3,200 

*91,800 

*265,200 

39,000 

25,200 

*3, 160,700 


192,009,536 


ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29 

Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work, 

1928-29— Continued 


29 


Description 

Number 

of 
Copies 

Number 

of 

Pages 

Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 

Brought  forward 

5,891,319 

550 
250 

3,011 
5,011 

19,011 

1,811 

1,011 

1,211 
811 
500 

12,000 

500 

14,229 

5,000 
32,000 

3,500 
200 

1,000 
150 

750 

300 
500 
500 

3,000 
3,000 

1,325 
1,500 

36,470 

188 
40 

32 
32 

64 
330 

84 
160 

no 

16 

48 

128 
96 

24 
80 

44 
40 

16 
16 

24 

48 
20 
24 

52 
64 

48 
36 

192,009,536 

103,400 
10,000 

96,352 
160,352 

*608,352 

597,630 

84,924 

Library  of  Parliament — 

Bilingual 

Supplementary  Catalogue  to  the  Library  of  Parliament,  1927 — 
Supplement  annuel  au  catalogue  de  la  bibliotheque  du 
parlement,  1927 

Extract  from  Annual  Supplement  to  the  Catalogue  of  the 
Library     of    Parliament,    1927 — Extrait    du    Supplement 
annuel  au  catalogue  de  la  bibliotheque  du  parlement,  1927. 

Marine  and  Fisheries — 

English 

Abridged  Edition  of  Tide  Tables  for  Charlottetown,  P.E.I. , 
Pictou,  N.S.,  and  Strait  of  Canso,  with  Tidal  Differences 
for  Northumberland  Strait,  1929 

Abridged   Edition  of  Tide  Tables  for  Quebec,  and   Father 
Point,  with  Tidal  Differences  for  the  St.  Lawrence,  1929. . 

Abridged  Edition  of  Tide  Tables  for  St.  John,  N.B.,  with 
Tidal  Differences  for  the  Bay  of  Fundy,  and  Time  of 
High  Water  at  Windsor,  N.S.,  1929 

List  of  Lights  and  Fog-Signals  on  the  Atlantic  Coast  including 
the  Gulf  of  St.  Lawrence  to  Head  of  Ocean  Navigation  of 
the  Dominion  of  Canada — Corrected  to  April  1,  1928 

List  of  Lights  and  Fog-Signals  of  the  Dominion  of  Canada  on 
the  Pacific  Coast  and  the  Rivers  and  Lakes  of  British 
Columbia — Corrected  to  April  1,  1928 

List  of  Lights  and  Fog-Signals  on  the  Inland  Waters  (West  of 
Montreal  and  East  of  British  Columbia)  of  the  Dominion 
of  Canada — Corrected  to  April  1 ,  1928 

193,760 

Tide  Tables  and  Information,  connected  with  the  Ship  Channel 
from  Father  Point  to  Montreal,  1928 

89,210 

Regulations  for  the  River  St.  Lawrence  from  Father  Point  to 
the  Victoria  Bridge,  at  Montreal 

8,000 

Abridged  Edition  of  Tide  Tables  for  Vancouver  and  Sand 
Heads,  B.C.,  and   Slack  Water  for  First  Narrows  and 
Active  Pass  with  Tidal    Differences   for   the    Strait   of 
Georgia,  1929 

576,000 

Report  of  the  Royal  Commission  Investigating  the  Fisheries 

of  the  Maritime  Provinces  and  the  Magdalen  Islands 

Tide  Tables  for  the  Eastern  Coast  of  Canada,  1929 

64,000 
1,365,984 

Abridged  Edition  of  Tide  Tables  for  Prince  Rupert,  B.C., 
with  Tidal  Differences  for  the  Northern  Coasts  of  British 
Columbia,  etc 

120,000 

Tide  Tables  for  the  Pacific  Coast  of  Canada,  1929 

2,560,000 

Catalogue   of   Marine   Charts   Sailing    Directions  and   Tidal 
Informations    issued    by    the    Canadian    Hydrographic 
Service,  etc. — Corrected  to  April,  1928 

154,000 

By-Laws  of  the  Pilotage  District  of  Quebec 

8,000 

Radio    Stations    of    Canada,    1927-28 — Final    Supplement    to 
Official  List 

16,000 

Index  to  Notice  to  Mariners,  1927  (Nos.  1  to  98  inclusive) 

Report  of  the  International  Fisheries  Commission  appointed 
under  the  Northern  Pacific  Halibut  Treaty 

2,400 
18,000 

Results  of  Observations  at  the  Canadian  Magnetical  Observa- 
tions, Agincourt  and  Meanook,  1923 

14,400 

Rules  of  the  Roads  for  the  Great  Lakes,  etc 

10, 000 

International  Rules  of  the  Road 

12,000 

Special  Fishery   Regulations    for    the    Province    of    British 
Columbia 

156,000 

Special  Fishery  Regulations  for  the  Province  of  Nova  Scotia. . 

Fundamental  Principles  of  Chemistry  and  Physics  (Bulletin 

No.  XI) 

192,000 
63,600 

Special  Fishery  Regulations  for  the  Province  of  Manitoba 

54,000 

Carried  forward 

6,003,950 

38,334 

199,347,900 

30 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work, 

1928-29 — Continued 


Description 


Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 

of 

Pages 


Brought  forward 

Marine  and  Fisheries — Concluded 

English — Concluded 

International  Radiotelegraph  Convention  of  Washington,  1927. . 

An  Act  respecting  Fisheries  and  Fishing 

Special  Fishery  Eegulations  for  the  Provinces  of  Saskatchewan 

and  Alberta  and  the  Territories  North  thereof  (Office  Con- 
solidation)   

Special    Fishery    Regulations     for     the     Province     of     Ontario 

(Office  Consolidation) 

Special  Fishery    Regulations  for   the   Province    of    New    Bruns 

wick  (Office  Consolidation) 

Special  Fishery  Regulations  for  the  Province  of  Prince  Edward 

Island  (Office  Consolidation) 

Special  Fishery  Regulations  for  the  Province  of  Quebec  (Office 

Consolidation) 

Annual  Report  on  Fish  Culture,  1927 

Report  of  the  Royal  Commission  to  Inquire  into  Pilotage  in  British 

Columbia  Waters 

Annual  Report  of  the  Radio  Branch,  1927-28 

Special  Fishery  Regulations  for  Yukon  Territory  (Office  Consoli 

dation) 

Official  List — Radio  Stations  of  Canada 

Report  of  the   Royal  Commission  to  Inquire  into  Pilotage  in 

British  Columbia  Waters 

Canadian  Raks  and  Regulations  relating  to  the  Examination  of 

Masters  and  Mates  of  Coasting  and  Inland  Vessels,  1924  (Official 

_      Copy) 

Index  to  Notice  to  Mariners,  1928  (Nos.  1  to  100  inclusive) 

List  of  Lights  and  Fog-Signals  on  the  Inland  Waters   (West  of 

Montreal  and  East  of  British  Columbia)  of  the  Dominion  of 

Canada— Corrected  to  March  1 ,  1929 

List  of  Lights  and  Fog-Signals  of  the  Pacific  Coast  and  the  Rivers 

and  lakes  of  British  Columbia— Corrected  to  March  1,  1929 
Tables  of  Hourly  Direction  and  Velocity  of  the  Currents  and  Time 

of  Slack  Water  in  the  Bay  of  Fundy  and  its  Approaches 

Official  List  of  Radio  Stations  of  Canada,  1929  Edition  (Supple 

ment  No.  1 ) 

Discoloration  of  Halibut  (Bulletin  No.  XII) 

Quarterly  Bulletin  of  Ssa  Fishery  Statistics 

Monthly  Record  of  Meteorological  Observations 


6,003,950 


2,500 
500 


2,500 

1,000 

2,500 

1,500 

1,000 
600 

250 
500 

500 
1.5C0 

250 


300 
100 


1,111 

1,011 

5,000 

1,500 
1,000 
3,000 

8,477 


Bilingual 


List  of  Shipping,  1927— Liste  des  navires,  1927 

Supplement  to  List  of  Vessels,  1927— Supplement  a  la  liste  des 
navires.  1927 


French 


Lists  officielle  des  stations  de  radio  au  Canada,  30  juin  1927 

Loi  relative  aux  viandes  et  conserves  alimentaires  et  reglement 
etabhs  sous  son  empire,  etc 

Rapport  de  la  Commission  Royale  chargee  de  1' investigation  rela- 
tive aux  peches  propres  aux  Provinces  Maritimes  et  aux  lies  de 
la  Madeleine 

Loi  relative  a  l'inspection  des  poissons,  etc .... . . . . .............. 

Reglements  internationaux  pour  prevenir  les  abordages 

Reglements  de  peche  particuliers  a  la  province  de  la  Nouvelle- 
Ecosse 

Carried  forward 


700 
861 


1.C00 
500 


500 
500 
500 

200 


38,334 


120 

28 


160 
84 
16 

16 

28 
64 

582 


272 
56 


138 
24 
20 


6,046,310 


40,554 


199,347,900 


201,749,674 


ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29 


31 


Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work, 

1928-29— Continued 


Description 


Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 

of 

Pages 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 


Brought  forward 


Mines — 


English 


Report  of   the   Canadian   Arctic   Expedition,    1913-18    (Vol.   IV: 

Botany,  Part  B) 

Oil  Prospects  near  Bragg  Creek,  Alta 

Milling  Plants  in  Canada 

Annual  Report  of  the  Explosives  Division  of  the  Department  of 

Mines,  1927 

Contributions  to  Canadian  Palaeontology  (Bulletin  No.  49) 

Investigations  in  Ceramics  and  Road  Materials,  1926 

Investigations  of  Fuels  and  Fuel  Testing,  1926  (Part  I) 

Investigations  of  Fuels  and  Fuel  Testing,  1926  (Part  II) 

Investigations  of  Mineral  Resources  and  the  Mining  Industry,  1926. 

Interim  Report  of  the  Dominion  Fuel  Board,  1923 

Natural  Gas  and  Petroleum  Wells 

Geology  of  Anticosti  Island  (Memoir  154) 

Silica  in  Canada — Its  Occurrence,  Exploitation  and  Uses — Part  II. 

Western  Canada 

Gold  Mines  in  Canada  (List  No.  2-1) 

Investigations  in  Ore  Dressing  and  Metallurgy,  1926 

Investigations  of  Fuels  and  Fuel  Testing,  1926 

Archaeological  Investigations  in  Bering  Strait,  1926 

The  Lepturini  of  America  North  of  Mexico — Part  I  (Bulletin  No. 

52) 

Restoration  of  Totem-Poles  in  British  Columbia  (Reprinted  from 

Annual  Report,  1926) 

The  Mineral  Industries  of  Canada  reach  from  Coast  to  Coast 

Uren  Prehistoric  Village  Site,  Oxford  County,  Ont 

National  Museum  of  Canada— Annual  Report  of  1926  (Bulletin  No. 

50) 

Commercial  Bent  Grasses  (Agrostis  in  Canada) — Reprinted  from 

Annual  Report  for  1926,  National  Museum  of  Canada 

Oil  and  Gas  in  Western  Canada  (Economic  Geology  Series  No.  5) 
Publications  of  the  Geological  Survey  and  National  Museum  of 

Canada,  Ottawa 

Report  of  the  Canadian   Arctic   Expedition,   1913-18    (Vol.   XV: 

Eskimo  Language  and  Technology,  Part  A) 

Advisory  Board  on  Tariff  and  Taxation — Record  of  Public  Sitting 

(References  3  and  44)— Coal  and  Coke,  November  21,  22  and 

23,  1928 

The  Geology  of  North  Mountain,  Cape  Breton 

Summary  Report,  1927,  Part  C 

The  National  Museum  of  Canada  (Reprinted  from  Annual  Report 

for  1926) 

Diatomite — Its  Occurrence,  Preparation  and  Uses 

Price  List  of  Mines  Branch  Publications 

Summary  Report,  1927,  Part  A 

Summary  Report,  1927,  Part  B 

Dominion  Fuel  Board— Second  Progress  Report,  1923-1928 


French 


Avantages  qu'offrirait  l'isolation  thermique  de  votre  maison 
(deuxieme  edition) 

Rapport  annuel  de  la  division  des  explosifs  du  ministere  des  Mines, 
1927 

Liste  des  publications  francaises  du  ministere  des  Mines 

La  region  de  Saint-Urbain,  district  de  Charlevoix,  P.Q.  (memoire 
152) 

Carried  forward 


6,046,310 


4,506 

500 

1,000 

2,000 
1,511 
4,000 
500 
500 
4,011 
1,150 
1,500 
1,006 

4,011 
1,000 
4,168 
4,000 
100 

1,000 

100 
2,800 
1,000 

3,500 

300 

2,511 

1,000 
5,011 


1,000 

200 

2,821 

1,000 
4,000 
1,000 
2,961 
3,026 
25,000 


5,000 

1,000 
800 


,007 


40,554 


24 
80 
72 
92 
56 
88 
32 
16 
490 

64 

8 

138 

148 

16 


20 
106 

128 

36 
160 

16 

136 


208 

36 

128 

64 
198 

10 

80 
104 

60 


201,749,674 


135,180 

12,000 

8,000 

48,000 

120,880 

288,000 

46,000 

28,000 

352,968 

36,800 

24,000 

492,940 

256,704 

8,000 

575,184 

592,000 

1,600 

86,000 

800 

56,000 

106,000 

448,000 

10,800 
401,760 

16,000 

681,276 


208,000 

7,200 

361,088 

64,000 
792,000 

10,000 
236,880 
314,704 
,500,000 


120,000 

24,000 
6,400 

76,532 


6,147,810 


43,656 


210,303,370 


32 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  ST  A  TIONERY 


Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work, 

1928-29 — Continued 


Description 


Number 
of 

Copies 


Number 
of 


Brought  forward . 
National  Defence — 


6,147,810 


English 


Index  to  General  Orders,  1927 

Air  Regulations,  1920,  with  Amendments  to  December  31, 1927. . . . 

Proceedings  at  the  Dedication  of  the  Monument  erected  by  the 

Government  of  Canada  in  Honour  of  the  Citizens  of    the 

United  States  who  served  in  the  Canadian  Army  and  gave 

their  Lives  in  the  Great  War,  1914-18 

Index  to  Militia  Orders,  1927 

Memorandum  for  Camps  of  Instruction,  1928— Part  I.  Training. . 
The  Canadian  Navy  List,  June,  1928  (Corrected  to  May  22,  1928). 
Royal  Canadian  Air  Force — Sequence  of  Flying  Instruction,  1928. . 

Regulations  for  Rifle  Associations,  1924 

Report  on  Civil  Aviation  and  Civil  Government  Air  Operations, 

1927 

List  of  Officers— Militia  Service  and  Air  Service,  July,   1928 — 

Part  I  (.Corrected  to  July  1,  1928) 

Regulations  for  the  Cadet  Service  of  Canada,  1928 

An  Act  respecting  the  Militia  and  Defence  of  Canada 

Royal  Canadian  Air  Force — Information  relating  to  Pay,  Allow- 
ances, Qualifications,  General  Conditions  of  Service,  Future 

Prospects,  etc.,  of  Airmen 

Priced  List  of  Stores  authorized  for  use  by  the  Canadian  Militia, 
Rifle  Associations  and  Cadet  Corps — 

Small  Arm  Instructional  Stores,  etc.  (Section  B3) 

Oil  Paints,  Chemical  and  their  Containers  (Section  HI), 

1928 

Surviving  and  Drawing  Instruments  and  Watches  (Section 

V2j  1928 

Harness,  Saddlery  and  Packsaddlery  (Section  Dl) 

Barrack  and  Hospital  Equipment  (Section  K),  1928 

Barrack  and  Hospital  Equipment  (Section  L),  1928 

Regulations  and  Instructions  for  the  Clothing  of  the  Non-Perman- 
ent Active  Militia,  1928 — Reprint  with  Amendments  to  Decern 

ber  31 ,  1928 

The  Canadian  Navy  List  for  February,  1929  (Corrected  to  Febru 

ary ,  1929) 

Militia  Orders,  1928-29 

Militia  General  Orders,  1928-29 


French 

Rapport  sur  l'aviation  civile  et  les  operations  aeriennes  du  gouverne- 

ment  civil,  1927 

Reglements  concernant  les  services  des  cadets  du  Canada,  1928 

Ordres  de  la  milice,  1928-29 

Orderes  generaux  de  la  milice,  1928-29 

National  Gallery  of  Canada— 

English 

Catalogue,  1928 

National  Research  Council— 

English 

Report  of  the  President  and  Financial  Statement,  1926-27 

The  Storage  of  Apples  in  Air-cooled  Warehouses  in  Nova  Scotia, 

(Report  No.  23) 

An  Experimental  Study  of  Sieving  (Report  No.  22). .... .. ......... 

Carried  forward 


500 
5CC 


2,000 

200 

242,650 
69,150 


1,000 

1,000 

13,600 

1,900 


1,011 


3,  COO 

4,000 
1,000 


43,656 


2,400 
2,000 

16 

48 

511 
2,411 
5,000 

156 
3,000 
1,150 

20 
20 
88 
40 
16 
40 

2,500 

96 

1.2G0 
3,000 
6,000 

384 
62 
32 

3,000 

16 

400 

16 

400 

8 

5C0 

500 

16 
16 

16 


40 

40 
574 
400 


80 

56 

678 

220 


208 


144 

24 

22 


6,523,449 


47, 100 


215,481,738 


ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29 


33 


Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work 

1928-29— Continued 


Description 


Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 
of 

Pages 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 


Brought  forward, 
National  Revenue — 


English 


Customs  Statistical  Classification  (Imports)  in  effect  April  1,  1928 

Customs  Statistical  Classification  (Exports)  in  effect  April  1,  1928 

Memorandum  No.  87 — Supplement  "A" 

Memorandum  No.  107 

Customs-Excise — List  of  Forms,  April  1,  1928 

An  Act  to  Authorize  the  Levying  of  a  War  Tax  upon  Certain  In- 
comes  

Official  List  of  Licensed  Manufacturers  and  Bonded  Warehouses 
1928-29 

Regulations  in  respect  to  Tobacco  and  Cigars  for  Guidance  of 
Dealers  and  others  concerned 

Circular  No.  661-C 

An  Act  to  Amend  the  Customs  Tariff 

An  Act  to  Supplement  the  Revenue  required  to  meet  War  Expend- 
itures  

Circular  No.  679-C 

The  Customs  Act  (Office  Consolidation) 

Customs  Sale,  Wednesday,  November  21,  1928 

Canada  Customs  Tariff,  1907,  with  Amendments,  September  15, 
1928  (Office  Consolidation) 

An  Act  to  amend  The  Special  War  Revenue  Act,  1915 

Memorandum  No.  188 

Factum 

Memorandum  No.  149 

An  Act  to  Supplement  the  Revenue  required  to  meet  War  Expend- 
itures  '. 

Denatured  Alcohol  and  Specially  Denatured  Alcohol,  February, 
1929 

Canada  Gazette  Supplement 

The  National  Revenue  Review,  April,  1928.  to  March,  1929 

French 

Alcool  denature  et  alcool  specialement  denature  (circulaire  n' 
488C— revisee) 

Memoire  No  87 — Supplement  "A" 

Loi  portant  automation  de  lever  un  inpot  de  guerre  sur  certains  re- 
venus 

Reglements  concernant  le  tabac  et  les  cigares  pour  la  gouverne  des 
marchands  et  autres  interesses 

Memoire  n°  2 — revise 

Loi  modifiant  le  tarif  des  douanes 

Memoire  n°  77 

Memoire  n°  107 

Memoire  n°  132 

Memoire  n°  135 , 

Memoire  n°  149 

La  Revue  du  Revenu  National,  April,  1928,  to  March,  1929 

Patent  and  Copyright  Office — 

English 

An  Act  respecting  Trade  Marks  and  Industrial  Designs 

An  Act  respecting  Copyright 

Patent  and  Copyright  Office  of  Canada — Rules  and  Forms 

An  Act  respecting  Trade  Marks  and  Industrial  Designs 

The  Patent  Act — Revised  Statutes  of  Canada,  1927 

An  Act  respecting  Copyright 

Rules  and  Forms 

The  Canadian  Patent  Office  Record 

Carried  forward * 

91900-3 


6,523,449 


2,500 
2,500 
10,000 
8,000 
1,200 

4,000 

1,100 

5,000 
6,000 
1.2C0 


400 
500 
000 
550 


2,700 

100 

14,000 

50 

10,000 

500 

4,000 

5G0 

75,000 


1,000 
2,000 

10,000 

1,500 
1,500 
700 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
7,000 
14,400 


300 
1,000 
1,000 
2,000 
5,000 
1,000 
3,000 
54,594 


47,100 


116 

20 
32 
20 
32 

32 

72 

8 

104 

16 

36 

8 

100 


32 


24 
292 


20 
36 
16 
24 
32 
36 
16 
,914 


215,481,738 


290,000 

50,000 

*160,000 

160,000 

38,400 

128,000 

79,200 

40,000 

624,000 

19,200 

14,400 

36,000 

300,000 

4,400 

831,600 

1,600 

*1 12, 000 

3,400 

240,000 

2,000 

64,000 

4,000 

=1,850,400 


16,000 
32,000 

320,000 

12,000 

24,000 

11,200 

20,000 

32,000 

8,000 

8,000 

168,000 

"350,400 


6,000 
36,000 
16,000 
48,000 
160,000 
36,000 
48,000 
*3, 957, 154 


6,790,243 


53,086 


225,843,092 


34 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work, 

1928-29 — Continued 


Description 


Brought  forward 

Patent  and  Copyright  Office— Concluded 

French 

Bureau  des  brevets  du  Canada— Regies  et  reglements  et  formules 

— En  vigueur  le  ler  septembre  1923 

Loi  concernant  les  marques  de  commerce  et  lesdessinsde  fabrique 
Bureau  des  brevets  et  des  droits  d'auteur — Reglements  et  formules 

Loi  concernant  le  droit  d'auteur 

Acte  des  bravets— Statuts  refondus  du  Canada,  1927 


Pensions  and  National  Health- 


English 


Government  Insurance  for  All  who  Served 

An  Act  respecting  the    Department   of    Pensions   and    National 

Health : . : 

Pay  and  Allowance  Rates,  September  1,  1928 

An  Act  to  provide  Pensions  to  or  in  respect  of  Members  of  the  C  a 

nadian  Naval,  Military  and  Air  Forces 

Regulations  of  the  Department  of  Pensions  and  National  Health . 

Bilingual 

Abstracts  of  Current  Public  Health  Literature — Extraits  de  publi- 
cations courantes  sur  la  sante  publique 


French 

Assurance  du  gouvernement  en  faveur  de  tous  ceux  qui  ont  fait  du 
service 


Post  Office— 


English 


Number  of  Householders  at  Rural  Post  Offices  and  on  Rural  Routes 

in  the  Maritime  Provinces  (Third  Revision) 

Useful  Information  for  Postmasters  in  charge  of  Post  Offices  on  the 

Revenue  Basis,  1928 

Schedule  of  Mail  Trains  and  Water  Services — East  of  Port  Arthui 

(Eastern  Districts),  1928 , 

Schedule  of  Mail  Trains  and  Water  Services— West  of  Port  Arthur, 

June,  1928 

Schedule  of  Mail  Trains  and  Water  Services — East  of  Port  Arthui 

(Central  Districts),  June,  1928 

Alberta,  British  Columbia  and  Yukon  Territory  Distribution  List, 

1928 

Postal  Information,  1928 

Schedule  of  Mail  Trains  and  Water  Services — East  of  Port  Arthur 

(Eastern  Districts) ,  October,  1928 

Schedule  of  Mail  Trains  and  Water  Services— West  of  Port  Arthur, 

October,  1928 | 

Schedule  of  Mail  Trains  and  Water  Services — East  of  Port  Arthur 

(Central  Districts),  October,  1928 

Postal  Note  Rules  and   Regulations — For  Postmasters  at  Non- 
Accounting  Offices 

Canada  Official  Postal  Guide,  1929 

Canada  Official  Postal  Guide,  1929— Part  I 

Canada  Official  Postal  Guide,  1929— Part  II 

Number  of  Householders  at  Rural  Post  Offices  and  on  Rural  Routes 

in  the  Western  Provinces  (Third  Revision); 

Monthly  Distribution  List,  1928-29 

Monthly  Supplement  to  Canadian  Official  Postal  Guide,  1928-29..  . 
Monthly  Supplement  to  Canadian  Official  Postal  Guide  and  Money 

Order  Information,  1928-29. 


Carried  forward 7, 532, 054 


Number 

of 
Copies 


,790,243 


1,000 

1,250 

500 

500 

2,000 


80,000 

500 

150 

1,000 
1,000 


19,200 


8,000 


1,200 

12,000 

1,100 

1,200 

1,400 

2,000 
335,700 

1,100 

1,200 

1,400 

1,000 

17,605 

3,805 

35 

2,000 

42,366 

131,000 

70, 600 


Number 

of 

Pages 


53,086 


24 


16 


48 
178 
144 
144 
144 

134 

24 

152 

144 

144 

20 
604 
224 
376 

68 

60 

192 

266 


56, 572 


225,843,092 


254,607,744 


ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29 

Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work 

1928-29— Continued 


35 


Description 


Brought  forward 
Post  Office—  Continued 


Bilingual 


Number  of  Householders  at  Rural  Post  Offices  and  on  Rural  Route 
in  Quebec  Province  (Third  Revision) — Nombre  de  chefs   de 
maison  par  bureaux  de  poste  ruraux  et  routes  de  distribution 
rurale  de  la  province  de  Quebec  (troisieme  edition — revue  et 
corrigee) 


French 


Le  Service  postal  illustre 

Liste  des  bureaux  de  mandats  de  poste  du  Dominion  du  Canada, 

ler  Janvier,  1928 

Renseignements  postaux,  1928 

Reglements  relatifs  aux  bons  de  poste — A  l'usage  des  mai'tres  de 

poste  des  bureaux  non-comptables 

Renseignements  utiles  pour  les  maitres  de  poste  des  bureaux    a 

commission,  Ottawa,  1928 

Guide  officiel  du  service  postal  canadien,  1929 

Supplement  mensuel  au  guide  officiel  du  service  postal    canadien, 

1928-29 

Supplement  mensuel  au  guide  officiel  du   service   postal  canadien 

et  renseignements  sur  les  mandats  de  poste,  1928-29 


•[Public  Printing  and  Stationery- 


; 

.Hi  i 

13  I 

•nil  ! 


English 


Child  Welfare  Legislation  in  Canada,  1926-27 

National  Research  Council — Report  of  the  President  and  Financial 
Statement,  1926-27 

Forest  Facts 

Rust  Research  Laboratory,  Winnipeg,  Man. — Reports  of  Dr.  D.  L. 
Bailey  and  Dr.  C.  H.  Goulden 

Farm  Opportunities  in  Canada 

Pacific  Drainage — British  Columbia  and  Yukon  Territory,  Cli- 
matic Year  1925-26  (Water  Resources  Paper  No.  53) 

Nineteenth  Report  of  the  Geographic  Board — Decisions  from 
April  1,  1924,  to  July  31,  1927 

Experimental  Sub-Station,  Beaverlodge,  Alta. — Report  of  the 
Superintendent,  1926 

Some  Flowering  Bulbs  (Bulletin  No.  95 — New  Series) 

Camping  in  Canada 

Tree — Planting  on  the  Prairies  of  Manitoba,  Saskatchewan  and 
Alberta  (Forest  Service — Bulletin  No.  1) 

The  Canadian  Record  of  Performance  for  Pure-Bred  Poultry, 
1926-27 — Regulations,  Standards  and  Records  of  Fowls 
qualified  for  Certificates  (Report  No.  8) 

Special  Election  Instructions  for  certain  By-Elections  with  a 
Discussion  of  the  Rights  and  Obligations  of  Candidates 
(Book  A),  February  1,  1928 

Experimental  Farm,  Brandon,  Man. — Report  of  the  Super- 
intendent, 1927 

The  Woodland  Fairy 

Proceedings  of  the  Sixth  Canadian  Conference  on  Child  Wel- 
fare, Vancouver,  B.C.,  May  23  to  26,  Victoria,  B.C.,  May 
27,1927 

Eighth  Annual  Live  Stock  Market  and  Meat  Trade  Review, 
1927 


Trade  of  the  African  Sub-Continent 

List    of    Licensed    Elevators    and    Warehouses    in 

Grain  Inspection  Division,  1927-28 

Experimental     Station,     Scott,     Sask.— Report     of 

intendent,  1927 


the    Western 


the     Super- 


31900— 3§ 


Carried  forward 7, 751 ,  685 


Number 

of 
Copies 


7,532,054 


1,100 


75,000 

2,511 

80,600 

250 

3,000 
4,345 

30,000 

19,200 


1,000 

150 
125 

125 
125 

125 

250 

125 
125 
125 

150 
125 

100 

125 
125 

150 

150 
150 

150 

125 


Number 
of 

Pages 


56, 572 


64 


16 

116 

24 

20 

188 
866 

148 

264 


24 

144 

24 

24 
32 

234 

64 

96 
60 
12 

64 
100 

232 

72 
16 

208 

80 
88 

160 

80 


60,092 


Total 

Number 

of 

Printed 

Pages 


254,607,744 


70,400 


1,200,000 

291,276 
1,934,400 

5,000 

564,000 
3,762,770 

*370,000 

*422,400 


24,000 

21,600 
3,000 

3,000 
4,000 

29,250 

16,000 

12,000 
7,500 
1,500 

9,600 


12,500 


23,200 

9,000 
2,000 


31,200 

12,000 
13,200 

24,000 

10,000 


263,496,540 


36 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work, 

1928-29 — Continued 


Description 


the 


Brought  forward 

■[Public  Printing  and  Stationery — Continued 

English — Continued 


Manufactures  of  the  Non-Ferrous  Metals  in  Canada,  1926. 
Experimental    Farm,    Indian    Head,    Sask. — Report    of 

Superintendent,  1927 

Information  for  Settlers 

Experimental  Station,  Harrow,  Ont  —  Report  of  the  Super 

intendent,  1927 

Insects  of  the  Flower  Garden  and  their  Control  (Bulletin  No 

99— New  Series) 

The    Houseworker    in    Canada— Opportunities    for    Success 

Work  and  Wages,  Where  to  Go  and  What  to  Take 

Royal  Canadian  Air  Force — Sequence  of  Flying  Instruction 

1928 

List  of  Acts,  1928 

Annual  Statistics  of  Fruit  and  Floriculture,  1927. . . . 

Dominion  Water  Power  and    Reclamation   Service — Annual 

Report,  1926-27 

Wood  Preservation  in  Canada 

Timber  Pathology  in  Relation  to  Wood  Utilization  in  Canada 

Tree  Planting  in  the  Prairie  Provinces  of  Canada 

Manual  for  Guidance  of  Physicians  (Publication  No.  28) 

Regulations  for  Rifle  Associations,  1924 

The  Artificial  Brooding  of  Chicks 

Trading  with  Colombia  and  Venezuela  with  Notes  on  Curacao 
The  Origin  and  Quality  of  Commercial  Live  Stock  marketed  in 

Canada,  1927  (Report  No.  8) 

Soybeans  in  Canada  (Pamphlet  No.  93 — New  Series) 

An  Act  respecting  Trade  Marks  and  Industrial  Designs 

Experimental  Station,  Morden,  Man. — Report  of  the  Super 

intendent, 1927 

The  Kicking  Horse  Trail 

Report  of  the  Dominion  Animal  Husbandman,  1926-27 

List  of  Wholesale  Dealers  in  Fruits  and  Vegetables  in  Canada 

(Revised  Edition),  1928  (Bulletin  No.  101) 

Report  on  Civil  Aviation  and  Civil  Government  Air  Opera- 
tions, 1927 

Catalogue  of  Official  Publications  of  the  Parliament  and 

Government  of  Canada,  April,  1928 

Labour  Organization  in  Canada — Seventeenth  Annual  Report, 

1927 

School   Programme 

Choosing  a  Life-Work — Bricklaying 

'  'The  Trees  of  the  Lord" 

St.  Lawrence  Waterway  Project 

Report  of  the  Royal  Commission  Investigating  the  Fisheries 

of  the  Maritime  Provinces  and  the  Magdalen  Islands 

An  Act  respecting  the  Departments  of  Health  and  Soldiers 

Civil  Re-Establishment 

An  Act  to  regulate  the  Sale  and  Inspection  of  Root  Vegetables 

Statistical  Report  of  Fire  Losses  in  Canada,  1927 

Sheep  Husbandry  in  Canada  (Bulletin  No.  75— New  Series) 
Experimental  Station,  Charlottetown,  P.E.I.— Report  of  the 

Superintendent,  1927 

Geographic  Board  of  Canada— Place— Names  of  Alberta 
The  Preservation  of  Niagara  Falls— Interim   Report  of  the 

Special  International  Niagara  Board 

Choosing  a  Life  Work — Carpentry 

Official  List  of  Licensed  Manufacturers  and  Bonded  Ware 

houses,  1928-29 

Annual  Report  of  the    Board  of  Grain    Commissioners    for 

Canada,  Crop  Year  ended  August  31,  1927 

Regulations  under  the  Food  and  Drugs  Act 


Carried  forward . 


Number 

of 
Copies 


7,751,685 


150 

125 
125 

125 

125 

125 

125 
100 
125 

150 
150 
150 
150 
125 
1,150 
150 
150 

150 

125 
500 

125 

150 
150 

150 

150 

3,000 

125 
125 
150 
150 
625 

325 

675 
675 
150 
125 

125 

280 

150 
150 

150 

285 
125 


7,763,875 


Number 

of 

Pages 


60,092 


90 

56 

8 

48 

56 

24 

16 

8 

20 

96 
8 
16 
16 
32 
40 
16 
48 

48 
16 
20 

68 
48 
96 

40 

96 

48 

312 

16 

16 

8 

32 

128 

16 

16 

8 

112 

64 
144 

28 
20 

72 

48 
100 


62,310 


ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29 

Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work, 

1928-29— Continued 


37 


Description 


Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 

of 

Pages 


Total 
Number 

of  . 
Printed 

Pages 


Brought  forward 

t Public  Printing  and  Stationery — Continued 

English — Continued 

Memorandum  for  Camps  of  Instruction,  1928 — Part  I.  Training 

Estimates  of  Canada,  Supplementary,  1928-29 

Buttermaking  on  the  Farm  (Bulletin  No.  57 — New  Series) . . 
Joint  Beef  Committee — Report  of  the  Proceedings  and  the 

Recommendations   of    the   Eastern    and    Western    Com 

mittees,  etc 

Register  of  Fully  Accredited  Herds  arranged  by  Breeds  as  re 

corded  to  March  31,  1928 

Proposals  for  a  Multilateral  Pact  for  the  Renunciation  of  War, 

1927-28 

Crop  Rotations  and  Soil  Management  for  the  Prairie  Provinces 

(Bulletin  No.  98— New  Series) 

Experimental  Station,  Rosthern,  Sask. — Report  of  the  Super 

intendent,  1927 

The  Preparation  of  Pelts  for  the  Market 

Studies  on  Moulds  and  Yeasts  in  Creamery  Butter  (Pamphlet 

No.  92— New  Series) 

The  Meat  and  Canned  Foods  and  the  Regulations  made  there 

under  governing  the  Inspection  of  Meats,  etc 

The  Soils  of  Prince  Edward  Island  (Bulletin  No.  100— New 

Series) 

Schedule  of  Indian   Reserves  in  the   Dominion  of  Canada 

(Parti) 

Oil  Prospects  near  Bragg  Creek,  Alta 

An  Argument  in  the  Kitchen — A  Playlet  for  Children    in    One 

Act 

Milling  Plants  in  Canada 

Annual  Report  of  the  Explosives  Division  of  the  Department 

of  Mines,  1927 

The  Manufacture  of  Ice  Cream  (Bulletin  No.  102 — New  Series) 
Experimental  Station,  Farnham,  Que. — Report  of  the  Super- 
intendent, 1927 

Report  of  the  Dominion  Field  Husbandman,  1927 

Report  of  the  Tobacco  Inquiry  Commission  in  the  Provinces 

of  Ontario  and  Quebec 

Department  of  National  Revenue  (Circular  No.  661-C) 

List  of   Lost,   Stolen   and    Destroyed    Dominion  of   Canada 

Bonds  including  Bonds  issued  at  New  York,  etc 

Government  Insurance  for  All  Who  Served 

Prooceedings  of  the  Special  Committee  appointed  to  Inquire 

into  the  Development  and  Improvement  of  the  St.  Law- 
rence River 

Index  to  the  House  of  Commons  Debates  (Unrevised  Edition) 

Session  of  1928 

Forest  Entomology  and  its  Development  in  Canada  (Pamph 

let  No.  97) 

Silvicultural  Research  in  Canada 

Pulp  and  Paper  Research  in  Canada 

Aircraft  in  Forestry  containing  Air  Operations  for  Forest  Fire 

Protection 

Forest  Fire  Protection  in  Canada — Progress  since  1923 

Timber  Physics  Research  in  Canada 

State  Forests  in  Canada 

The  Forests  of  Canada — Their  Extent,  Character,  Ownership, 

Management,  Products  and  Probable  Future 

Softwood  Resources  in  Canada 

Radio    Stations   of    Canada,    1927-28 — Final    Supplement   to 

Official  List .• 

Experimental  Station,  Swift  Current,  Sask.— Report  of  the 

Superintendent,  1927 

Timber  Testing  in  Canada 


7,763,875 


150 
450 
125 


150 

125 

125 

125 

125 
150 

125 

125 

125 

50 
150 

125 

150 

125 
125 

125 
125 

125 
150 

150 
300 

650 

2,600 

150 
150 
150 

150 
150 
150 
150 

150 
150 


150 

125 
150 


62,310 


32 

32 

32 

56 

64 
12 

16 

112 

20 

80 
24 

16 


24 
32 

32 

40 

52 
104 

32 
16 


48 

120 

20 
20 
16 

16 
16 
16 
16 

56 

8 

16 

52 

48 


264,068,540 


13,200 
7,200 
1,500 


4,800 

4,000 

4,000 

7,000 

8,000 
1,800 

2,000 

14,000 

2,500 

4,000 
3,600 

2,000 
1,200 

3,000 
4,000 

4,000 
5,000 

6,500 
15,600 

4,800 
*2,400 

31,200 

312,000 

3,000 
3,000 
2,400 

2,400 
2,400 
2>400 
2,400 

8,400 
1,200 

2,400 

6,500 
7,200 


Carried  forward , 


7,772,500 


63,730 


264. 581. 541" 


38 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work, 

1928-29 — Continued 


Description 


Brought  forward 

t Public  Printing  and  Stationery — Continued 

English — Continued 

Regulations  under  the  Destructive  Insect  and  Pest  Act  as  they 
apply  co  the  Importation  of  Plants  and  Plant  Products 

Report  of  the  Tobacco  Inquiry  Commission  in  the  Provinces 
of  Ontario  and  Quebec  —  , 

Annual  Report  of  the  Director  of  the  Geodetic  Survey  of 
Canada,  1926-27 

Investigations  in  Ceramics  and  Road  Material,  1926 

Land  Settlement,  Canada— Where  to  go  for  Advice 

Preserving  Fruits  and  Vegetables  in  the  Home  (Bulletin  No 
77— New  Series) 

Report  of  the  Dominion  Poultry  Husbandman,  1927 

Prince  Edward  Island 

Prince  Albert  National  Park 

Report  of  the  International  Fisheries  Commission  appointed 
under  the  Northern  Pacific  Halibut  Treaty 

Carillon — Programmes  of  Summer  Recitals,  1928 

Condensed  Preliminary  Report  on  the  Trade  of  Canada,  1928 

Seventh  Report  on  Organization  in  Industry,  Commerce  and 
the  Professions  in  Canada,  1928 

The  Old  Age  Pensions  Regulations 

Preliminary  Report — Vital  Statistics  of  Canada,  1927 

Choosing  a  Life  Work — Office  Work — Stenography 

Report  of  the  Dominion  Chemist,  1926-27 

Rocky  Mountain  Circle  Tour  through  Rocky  Mountains,  Yoho  and 
Kootenay  National  Parks 

Bovine  Tuberculosis 

Alphabetical  List  of  Employees,  July  1,  1928 

Abstract  of  Statements  of  Loan  and  Trust  Companies  in  Canada, 
1927..... . 

Arctic  and  Western  Hudson  Bay  Drainage  (and  Mississippi  Drainage 
in  Canada)  in  Alberta,  Saskatchewan,  Manitoba  and  Western 
Ontario,  Climatic  Year,  1925-26 

Experimental  Farm,  Agassiz,  B.C. — Report  of  the  Superintendent, 
1927 

Experimental  Station,  Lennoxville,  Que. — Report  of  the  Superin- 
tendent, 1927 

Annual  Flower  with  Lists  of  Varieties  for  Special  Purposes  and 
Districts  (Bulletin  60 — New  Series) 

The  Illustration  Stations  in  Ontario,  Quebec,  New  Brunswick, 
Nova  Scotia  and  Prince  Edward  Island — Report  of  the  Super- 
visor, 1927 

Experimental  Station,  Invermere,  B.C. — Report  of  the  Superin- 
tendent, 1927 

Tomato  Diseases  (Bulletin  No.  51 — New  Series) 

The  Fertilizers  Act  with  Amendments  and  Regulations — Acts, 
Orders  and  Regulations,  No.  9  (Office  Consolidation) 

The  Western  Cedar  Borer  (Pamphlet  No.  94 — New  Series) 

Marquis  Wheat— Description  of  the  Standard  Type  (Pamphlet 
No.  95— New  Series) 

Preliminary  Report  on  the  Mineral  Production  of  Canada— Six 
months  ending  June  30,  1928) 

Studies  in  Forest  Pathology  (Bulletin  No.  104—  New  Series) 

The  Highways,  the  Motor  Vehicle  and  the  Tourist  in  Canada 
(Circular  No.  9) 

Report  on  the  Grain  Trade  of  Canada,  for  the  Crop  Year  ended 
July  31  and  to  the  close  of  Navigation,  1927 

Index  to  the  Canada  Gazette,  1927-28 

Canada  Year  Book,  1927-28 

List  of  Officers— Militia  Service  and  Air  Service,  3\i\y,  1928— 
Part  I  (Corrected  to  July  1,  1928) 

Regulations  for  the  Cadet  Services  of  Canada,  1928 


Carried  forward ' 17,792,800 


Number 

of 
Copies 


7,772,500 


125 

300 

150 
125 
150 

125 
125 
150 
150 

150 

14,125 

150 

125 
1,000 
150 
150 
125 

150 

150 

75 

150 


150 
125 
125 
125 

125 

125 
125 

150 
125 

150 

150 

125 

125 

150 
125 
125 

150 
125 


Number 

of 

Pages 


63,730 


32 

52 

32 
72 
24 

56 
64 
12 

24 

24 

24 

120 

128 

8 

16 

20 

84 


40 
24 

296 
48 
80 
52 

84 

48 

28 

20 
20 

16 

24 
40 

32 

208 

90 

1,134 

384 
62 


67,268 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 


264,581,540 


265,405,390 


ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29 


39 


Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work, 

1928-29— Continued 


Description 


Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 

of 

Pages 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 


Brought  forward 

t Public  Printing  and  Stationery — Continued. 

English — Continued 

The  Peace  River  County,  Canada 

Regulations  for  the  Disposal  of  Petroleum  and  Natural  Gas  Right 

Kootenay  National  Park  and  the  Banff  Windermere  Highway. . . 

Forestry  Lessons 

Prices  and  Price  Indexes,  1913-1927 

Quarterly  Report  of  the  Trade  of  Canada,  months  of  April,  May 
and  June,  1928,  and  three  months  ending  June,  1927  and  1928. . . . 

The  Fruit  Act  and  Regulations — Acts,  Orders  and  Regulations, 
No.  7  (Revised  1928) 

Barley  Culture  in  Canada  (Pamphlet  No.  99 — New  Series) 

Experimental  Station,  Kapuskasing,  Ont. — Report  of  the  Super- 
intendent, 1927. 

Seedling  Blight  and  Foot- Rots  of  Oats  (Bulletin  No.  105— New 
Series) 

Fundamental  Principles  of  Chemistry  and  Physics  (Bulletin  No. 
XI).! 

Quebec  Harbour  Commissioners — Report  on  Investigation,  Jan- 
uary;^, 1928. .'.' .■■■•.•• 

Proceedings  of  the  Special  Committee  appointed  to  Inquire  into 
the  Development  and  Improvement  of  the  St.  Lawrence  river. 

British  North  America  Act  and  Amendments,  1867-1927 

The  Customs  Act  with  Index  (Office  Consolidation) 

Gold  Mines  in  Canada  (List  No.  2-1) 

Special  Fishery  Regulations  for  the  Province  of  British  Columbia. 

Special  Fishery  Regulations  for  the  Province  of  Nova  Scotia 

Supplement  to  Catalogue  of  Government  Publications,  September, 
1928.; 

Directions  for  collecting  and  Preserving  Insects  (Pamphlet  No.  14 — 
New  Series) 

British  and  Foreign  Government  Representatives  in  Canada, 
October,  1928... 

Dominion  Experimental  Farms — Report  of  the  Director,  1928 

Yukon  Quartz  Mining  Act  (Consolidated  for  Office  purposes) 

The  Lepturini  of  America  North  of  Mexico — Part  I  (Bulletin  No.  52) 

Sanitation — Sewage  Treatment  for  Isolated  Houses  and  Small  In- 
stitutions where  Municipal  Sewage  System  is  not  Available 
(Publication  No.  1) 

The  French-Canadian  Homespun  Industry 

The  Illustration  Stations  in  British  Columbia,  Alberta,  Saskat- 
chewan and  Manitoba — Report  of  the  Supervisor,  1927 

Annual  Report  of  the  Topographical  Survey,  1926-27 

Annual  Survey  of  Education  in  Canada,  1926 

Results  of  Observations  at  the  Canadian  Magnetical  Observations, 
1923 

National  Parks  of  Canada — Report  of  the  Commission,  1926-27. . . . 

Report  of  the  Director  of  Forestry,  1926-27 

Natural  Gas  and  Petroleum  Wells 

Dominion  Lands — Hand-book — For  the  Information  of  the  Public 
(Edition  of  June  15,  1928) 

Choosing  a  Life  Work — Office  Work — General 

The  Migratory  Birds  Convention  Act  and  Federal  Regulations  for 
the  Protection  of  Migratory  Birds 

Rules  of  the  Road  for  the  Great  Lakes,  etc 

International  Rules  of  the  Road 

Experimental  Station,  Fredericton,  N.B. — Report  of  the  Superin- 
tendent, 1927. 

The  Insurance  Act  with  an  Index  thereto,  1928 

First  Annual  Report  on  Co-operative  Associations  in  Canada,  1928. 

Regulations  for  the  Disposal  of  Quartz  Mining  Claims  on  Dominion 
Lands  in  Manitoba,  etc 

Carried  forward ". '. 


7,792,800 


125 
150 
150 
125 
100 

150 

150 
150 

125 

125 

150 

225 

650 
,000 
300 
150 
100 
100 

500 

125 

150 
125 
300 
150 


150 
125 

125 

150 

1,500 

150 
125 
125 
150 

5,000 
150 

125 
125 
125 

125 
200 
100 

150 


67,268 


96 
32 

48 

72 

136 

402 

48 
8 

72 

48 

48 


140 

100 

8 

52 

62 

16 

16 

16 
120 

48 


32 
20 

84 

40 

260 

48 
32 
52 
16 

48 
20 


20 
24 

68 

158 

80 

40 


265,405,390 


12,000 
4,800 
7,200 
9,000 

13,600 

60,300 

7,200 
1,200 

9,000 

6,000 

7,200 

1,800 

5,200 
140,000 
30,000 
1,200 
5,200 
6,200 

8,000 

2,000 

2,400 
15,000 
14,400 
12,900 


4,800 
2,500 

10,500 

6,000 

390,000 

7,200 
4,000 
6,500 
2,400 

240,000 
3,000 

4,500 
2,500 
3,000 

8,500 

31,600 

8,000 

6,000 


7,806,875 


70,036 


266,528,190 


40 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


Table  No.  8. — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work, 

1928-29— Continued 


Description 


Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 

of 

Pages 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 


Brought  forward 

t Public  Printing  and  Stationery — Continued 

English — Continued 

Report  of  an  Exploratory  Trip  in  the  Area  covered  by  Halfway 
River  and  Prophet  River  Sheets  (Topographical  Survey 
Bulletin  No.  61) 

The  Storage  of  Apples  in  Air-cooled  Warehouses  in  Nova  Scotia 
(Report  No.  23) 

An  Experimental  Study  of  Sieving  (Report  No.  22) 

Investigations  in  Ore  Dressing  and  Metallurgy,  1926 

Investigations  of  Fuels  and  Fuel  Testing,  1926 

First  Annual  Report  on  Co-operative  Associations  in  Canada,  1928. 

International  Radiotelegraph  Convention  of  Washington,  1927 

Canada  Customs  Tariff,  1907,  with  Amendments,  September  15, 
1928  (Office  Consolidation) 

Experimental  Farm,  Nappan,  N.S. — Report  of  the  Superintendent, 
1927 

Poultry  Breeding  Records  (Bulletin  No.  103 — New  Series) 

The  Dominion  Forest  Reserves  and  Parks  Act,  etc. — Edition  of 
September  1,  1928 

The  Mineral  Industries  of  Canada  reach  from  Coast  to  Coast 

Lime  in  Agriculture  (Bulletin  No.  36 — New  Series) 

Standard  Descriptions  of  Vegetables — Peas — A  Guide  to  Seed- 
Growers  (Bulletin  No.  107 — New  Series) 

Royal  Canadian  Air  Force — Information  relating  to  Pay,  Allow- 
ances, Qualifications,  General  Conditions  of  Service,  Future 
Prospects,  etc.,  of  Airmen 

The  Loan  Companies  Act  and  the  Trust  Companies  Act 

Uren  Prehistoric  Village  Site,  Oxford  County,  Ont 

National  Museum  of  Canada — Annual  Report  for  1926  (Bulletin 
No.  50) 

Simple  Methods  for  the  Storage  of  Ice  (Pamphlet  No.  2 — New 
Series) 

The  Fertilizers  Act  with  Amendments  and  Regulations — Act, 
Orders  and  Regulations,  No.  9  (Office  Consolidation) 

Experimental  Station,  Summerland,  B.C. — Report  of  the  Superin- 
tendent, 1927 

Studies  in  Cereal  Diseases — Stem  Rust  in  Western  Canada  (Bulle- 
tin No.  106 — New  Series) 

Living  in  the  Open  Air 

Report  of  the  Superintendent  of  Insurance  of  the  Dominion  of 
Canada,  1927  (Vol.  I) 

The  Customs  Tariff  and  Amendments  with  Index,  to  September 
15,  1928 

Report  of  Special  Committee  appointed  to  investigate  market 
outlets  for  Alberta's  hog  and  bacon,  etc 

List  of  Cheese  Factories  and  Creameries  in  Canada  and  Registered 
Numbers  (Bulletin  No.  109— New  Series) 

Regulations  for  the  Disposal  of  Quartz  Mining  Claims  on  Dominion 
Lands  in  Manitoba,  Saskatchewan,  Alberta  and  the  Northwest 
Territories 

Schedule  of  Classification  of  the  Fire  Insurance  Risks  for  the  Year 
ended  December  31,  1927,  and  aggregate  experience  for  the 
Years  1923  to  1927,  inclusive 

Catalogue  of  Government  Publications  (Cumulative  Supplement), 
May-October,  1928 

Report  on  the  Absorption  of  Moisture  by  the  Kiln-dried  Lumber 
(Forest  Service— Circular  No.  2) 

The  Seeds  Act  with  Amendments  and  Regulations— Acts,  Orders 
and  Regulations,  No.  24,  October,  1928  (Office  Consolidation). 

Publications  of  the  Geological  Survey  and  National  Museum  of 
Canada,  Ottawa 

Commercial  Bent  Grasses  (Agrostis)  in  Canada. ............... .. 

Report  of  the  Dominion  Botanist,  1927 


7,806,875 


150 


150 

150 

500 

150 

125 

150 
150 
125 


70,036 


20 


150 
150 
125 
125 
150 
150 

24 

22 

138 

148 

80 

120 

125 

308 

125 
150 

64 
24 

150 
150 
150 

128 
20 
16 

125 

52 

150 
100 
150 

16 
106 
106 

125 

128 

150 

8 

450 

24 

125 

64 

125 
150 

32 
16 

300 

1,338 

2,500 

308 

150 

8 

150 

84 

40 

12 

20 

16 

56 

16 
24 

248 


266,528,190 


Carried  forward 7, 814, 975 


73,870 


268,005,740 


ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29                                                    41 

Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book- work 

1928-29— Continued 

Description 

Number 

of 
Copies 

Number 

of 

Pages 

Tola! 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 

7,814,975 

125 

150 

125 

150 
150 

150 

225 

125 

150 
150 

150 

150 

125 
150 

125 
125 
150 
150 

450 
150 
150 
150 
675 
150 

400 

1,700 

50 

1,000 
300 

200 
500 

625 
150 
125 
125 
125 

125 

150 
150 
150 

73,870 

56 
24 

8 

68 
136 

16 

64 

16 

128 
164 

40 

160 

72 
128 

52 

32 

8 

16 

8 

36 
32 
96 
112 
24 

24 
604 
176 

408 

88 

56 

8 

48 
16 
50 
8 
60 

16 

96 
96 

48 

268,005,740 

7,000 

3,600 

1,000 

10,200 
20,400 

2,400 

■[Public  Printing  and  Stationery — Continued 

English — Continued 

Experimental   Station,    Kentville,    N.S. — Report  of   the  Superin- 
tendent, 1927 

Breeding  and  Feeding  the  Market  Hog  (Pamphlet  No.  74: — New 

Fall  Litters — The  Breeding,  Feeding  and  Management  of  Pigs  for 
Winter  Pork  Production  (Pamphlet  No.  63 — New  Series) 

Experimental  Station,  La  Ferme,  Que. — Report  of  the  Superin- 
tendent, 1926  and  1927 

Manufactures  of  the  Non-Metallic  Minerals  in  Canada,  1926 

The  Precious  Metals  Marking  Act,  1928,  with  Regulations  to  date, 
January  1,  1929  (Office  Consolidation) 

Experimental   Fox   Ranch,    Summerside,   P.E.I. — Report  of  the 
Superintendent,  1926  and  1927 

14  400 

2  000 

The  Canadian  Historical  Association — Report  of  the  Annual  Meet- 
ing held  at  Winnipeg,  May  24-25,  1928,  with  Historical  Papers 
Iron  and  Steel  and  their  Products  in  Canada,  1926 

19,200 
24,600 

A  Study  of  the  Dominion  Standard  Yard  and  other  Standards  of 
Length  (Topographical  Surveys — Bulletin  No.  60) 

6,000 

The  Canadian  Record  of  Performance  for  Pure-Bred  Dairy  Cattle 
Regulations,   Standards  and   Records  of  Cows  qualified  for 
Registration  (No.  20) 

24,000 

Experimental  Station,  Ste.  Anne  de  la  Pocatiere,  Que. — Report  of 
the  Superintendent,  1927 

9,000 

Summary  Report,  1927,  Part  C  (Geological  Survey) 

19,200 

Experimental  Station,  Lethbridge,  Alta. — Report  of  the  Superin- 
tendent, 1927 

6,500 

Canada's  Natural  Resources. 

4,000 

Italian  Customs  Requirements  and  Regulations 

1,200 

Invoice  Requirements  and  Customs  Regulations  of  Cuba 

2,400 

gust,  27,  1928 

3,600 

Morphinism 

5,400 

Boy  Settlement  in  Canada 

4,800 

Official  List — Radio  Stations  in  Canada 

14,400 

Estimates  of  Canada,  1929 

75,600 

A  System  of  Diagnostic  Standards  in  Tuberculosis 

3,600 

Catalogue  of  Government  Publications  (Cumulative  Supplement) , 
May-December,  1928 

9,600 

Canada  Official  Postal  Guide,  1929 

1,026,800 

Annual  Survey  of  Education  in  Canada,  1927 

8,800 

Proceedings  of  the  Special  Committee  appointed  to  inquire  into 
the  development  and  improvement  of  the  St.  Lawrence  River 

Dominion  Lands  Acts  (consolidated  for  Office  purposes  only) 

The    Meat    and    Canned    Foods    Act    and     Regulations    made 
thereunder,  etc. — Acts,  Orders  and  Regulations  No.  35 

An  Act  respecting  the  Protection  of  Navigable  Waters 

408,000 
26,400 

11,200 
4,000 

Report  of  the  Canadian  Delegates  to  the  Ninth  Assembly  of  the 
League  of  Nations,  September  3  to  26,  1928 

*15,000 

The  Problem  of  the  Narcotic  Drug  Addict 

2,400 

Report  of  the  Veterinary  Director  General,  1927-28 

6,250 

The  Advanced  Registry  Policy  for  Pure-Bred  Swine 

1,200 

7,500 

Studies  in   Strawberry  Bud   Differentiation    (Bulletin   No.  110 — 
New  Series) 

2,000 

A  Summary  of  Regulations  and  Departmental  Rulings  relating  to 
Dominion  Lands  for  the  Guidance  of  Agents,  Sub-Agents  and 
other  Officials  (No.  20),  Edition  of  October  15,  1928 

Coal  Statistics  for  Canada,  1927 

14,400 
14,400 

Fertilizer  Analysis,  1927-28  (Pamphlet  No.  98— New  Series) 

Carried  forward 

7,200 

7,825,200 

77,168 

269,855,390 

42 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work, 

1928-29— Continued 


Description 


Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 

of 

Pages 


Brought  forward. 


7,825,200 


f  Public  Printing  and  Stationery — Continued 

English — Continued 

Annual  Report  on  the  Mineral  Production  of  Canada,  1926 

Annual  Report  on  Fish  Culture,  1927 

Report  of  the  Royal  Commission  to  Inquire  into  Pilotage  in  Brit- 
ish Columbia  Waters 

Home-made  Frozen  Desserts  (Pamphlet  No.  49 — New  Series) . 

The  Conversion  of  Latitudes  and  Departures  of  a  Treverse  to 
Geodetic  Differences  of  Latitude  and  Longitude  (Geodetic 
Survey  Publication  No.  25) 

Report  of  the  Superintendent  of  Insurance  of  the  Dominion  of 
Canada,  1927 — Loan  and  Trust  Companies 

Report  of  the  Dominion  Horticulturist,  1927 

Regulations  for  the  Disposal  of  Coal  Mining  Rights., 

Annual  Survey  of  Education  in  Canada,  1927. 

Why  and  How  to  Use  Cheese  (Pamphlet  No.  7 — New  Series) 

The  Agricultural  Pests  Control  Act,  1927,  with  Regulations — Acts 
Orders,  and  Regulations  (No.  22) 

The  Meat  and  Canned  Foods  Act  and  Regulations,  etc. — Acts, 
Orders  and  Regulations  (No.  25) 

Experimental  Sub-Station,  Beaverlodge,  Alta. — Report  of  the 
Superintendent,  1927 

List  of  Securities  held  by  Insurance,  Loan  and  Trust  Companies 
in  Canada,  as  at  December  31,  1928 

The  Strength  of  Reinforced  and  Unreinforced  Butter  and  Cheese 
Boxes  (Forest  Service — Circular  No.  24) 

The  Dominion  Water  Power  Act  and  Dominion  Water  Power 
Regulations,  etc 

Canadian  Official  Postal  Guide,  1929 

Experimental  Station,  Lacombe,  Alta. — Report  of  the  Superintend 
ent,  1927 _. 

Regulations  for  the  Leasing  and  Administration  of  Lands  contain- 
ing Limestone,  Granite,  Slate,  Marble,  etc 

Regulations  for  the  Disposal  of  Quartz,  Mining  Claims  on  Dominion 
Lands  in  Manitoba,  Saskatchewan,  Alberta  and  the  Northwest 
Territories— Effective  April  1,  1929 

Canadian  Rules  and  Regulations  relating  to  the  Examination  of 
Masters  and   Mates  of  Coasting  and  Island  Vessels,   1924 
(Official  Copy) , 

Annual  Report  of  the  Commissioner  of  Highways,  1927-28  (Bulletin 
No.  11) 

Convention  and  Protocol  between  Canada  and  the  United  States 
regarding  the  Niagara  Falls  and  the  Niagara  River— Signed  at 
Ottawa,  January  2,  1929 

Summary  Report,  1927,  Part  A  (Geological  Survey) 

Summary  Report,  1927,  Part  A  (Geological  Survey) 

Rules  and  Regulations  of  the  Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police, 1928 

Quarterly  Report  of  the  Trade  of  Canada  (Imports  for  Consump- 
tion and  Exports),  Months  of  October,  November  and  Decem- 
ber, 1928,  and  Nine  Months  ending  December,  1927  and  1928. 

The  Board  of  Railway  Commissioners  for  Canada — Judgments 
Orders,  Regulations  and  Rulings 

Advisory  Board  on  Tariff  and  Taxation- 
Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  65)— Paints  and  Varnishes 

May  16,  1928 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  2)— Iron  and  Steel,  October 

2,  1928 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  105)— Cement,  September 

25  and  26,  1928 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (References  3  and  44)— Coal  and  Coke, 

September  27,  1928 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  106)— Parts  of  Stoves, 
October  30,  1928 


150 


77, 168 


150 
150 

384 
36 

150 
125 

16 

8 

150 

32 

150 
125 
150 
125 
150 

180 
48 
16 

176 
16 

150 

20 

150 

56 

125 

64 

150 

320 

150 

8 

15C 
125 

80 
604 

125 

80 

150 

16 

61 


150 

24 

225 

32 

425 
150 
150 
150 

32 

80 

104 

352 

150 

402 

27,060 

870 

325 

48 

725 

56 

725 

120 

325 

32 

325 

32 

Carried  forward 7,858,935 


81,576 


ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29 


43 


Table  No.  8- — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work, 

1928-29— Continued 


Description 


Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 

of 

Pages 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 


Brought  foward 

f  Public  Printing  and  Stationery — Continued 

Fnglish — Continued 

Advisory  Board  on  Tariff  and  Taxation- 
Record  of  Public  Sitting   (Reference  83)— Sewing  Machines, 

June  19,  1928,  and  October  30,  1928 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  87) — Copper  Rods,  June  20, 

1928 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  87) — Copper  Rods,  Janu 

ary  28,  1929 

Record  of    Public   Sitting    (Reference  91) — Ethylene  Glycol, 
January  24, 1929— (Reference  114)— Thin  Plate  Glass,  Janu 

ary  28,  1929 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  60) — Enamelled  Ware  and 

Aluminum  Ware,  May  17,  1928 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  2) — Iron  and  Steel,  No- 
vember 27,  28  and  29,  1928 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  105) — Cement,  November 

20,  1928 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  2) — Iron  and  Steel,  No- 
vember 27,  28  and  29,  1928 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (References  3  and  4) — Coal  and  Coke, 

November  21,  22  and  23,  1928 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  105) — Cement,  November 

20,  1928 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  99) — Celotex,  October  31, 

1928 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  108) — Sardines  and  Har 

rings,  November  6,  1928 , , 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  60) — Aluminum  and  its 

Products,  October  8,  1927,  and  December  6,  1927 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  60) — Enamelled  Ware  and 

Aluminum  Ware,  May  17,  1928 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  3) — Coal  and  Coke,  Janu- 
ary 29,  1929 

Record  of  Public  Sitting   (Reference  60) — Enamelled  Ware, 

September  15,  1927 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (References  2,  9b,  103  and  106)— Iron 

and  Steel,  January  29,  30  and  31,  1929) 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  696) — Cigars,  September 

20,  1927 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  47) — Staves  and  Headings, 

September  26,  1927 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  84) — Mining  Machinery, 

Jannary ,  25,  1929 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  69) — Cigarettes,  June  22, 

1927,  October  26,  1927. . . ' 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  60) — Aluminum  and  its 

Products,  February  1,  1929 

Record  of  Public  Sitting  (Reference  57) — Sugar,  October  25, 

1927  and  May  17,  1928 

Seasonable  Hints 

Bulletin  of  the  Canadian  Tuberculosis  Association 

Commons  Debates  of  various  dates 

Senate  Debates  of  various  dates 

Guide  to  Fort  Anne,  Annapolis  Royal ,  N.S 

The  Canadian   Navy  List  for     February,    1929    (Corrected     to 

February,  1929) 

List  of  Lost,  Stolen  and   Destroyed   Dominion  of  Canada  Bonds 

including  Bonds  issued  at  New  York,  etc 

Preliminary   Report  on  the  Mineral  Production  of  Canada,  1928 

Farmer's  Account  Book , . . . , 

Sample  Examination  Papers 

Rules  and  Forms — (Patent  and  Copyright  Office) 


7,858,935 


81,576 


270,979,030 


325 
625 
625 

625 

500 

500 

500 

725 

950 

325 

325 

325 

625 

325 

625 

625 

625 

625 

625 

625 

625 

625 

625 
500 
125 
1,915 
100 
150 

150 

150 
125 
150 
150 
125 


24 
16 
16 

32 
24 

192 
64 

192 

624 
64 
40 
32 
56 
24 
16 
64 

152 
24 
32 
32 
64 
56 

100 

64 

8 

228 
20 
16 

40 

32 
40 
32 
48 
16 


7,800 
10,000 
10,000 

20,000 

12,000 

96,000 

32,000 

139,200 

197,600 

20,800 

13,000 

10,400 

35,000 

7,800 

10,000 

40,000 

95,000 

15,000 

20,000 

20,000 

40,000 

35,000 

62,500 
*8,000 
*1,000 
105,880 
2,000 
2,400 

6,000 

4,800 
5,000 
4,800 
7,200 
2,000 


Carried  forward 17, 875, 500 


84,060 


272,077,210 


44 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work, 

1928-29— Continued 


Description 


Brought  forward 

■{Public  Printing  and  Stationery — Continued 
English — Concluded 


Chemicals  and  Allied  Products  in  Canada,  1927 

The  Bertha  Armyworm  in  the  Prairie  Provinces  (Pamphlet 
No.  103— New  Series) 

Nitrogen,  Phosphoric  Acid  and  Potash  Starvation  at  different 
Stages  of  the  Growth  of  Fragaria  (Pamphlet  No.  96 — 
New  Series) 

Order  in  Council  in  respect  to  the  Approval  by  the  Dominion 
Government  of  the  Plans  of  the  Beauharnois  Light,  Heat 
and  Power  Company 

An  Act  to  amend  the  Companies  Act 

The  Textile  Industries  of  Canada,  in  the  Decade  1917-26 

Catalogue  of  Government  Publications  (Cumulative  Supple- 
ment), May  1,  1928— February  28,  1929 

The  Hudson  Bay  Region 

Dominion  Fuel  Board— Second  Progress  Report,  1923-1928. 

Trade  of  Canada  (Imports  for  Consumption  and  Exports),  1928 

The  Army  Cutworm  (Pamphlet  No.  102 — New  Series) 

Experimental  Farm,  Brandon,  Man. — Report  of  the  Super 
intendent,  1928. 

Tables  of  Hourly  Direction  and  Velocity  of  the  Currents  and 
Time  of  Slack  Waters  in  the  Bay  of  Fundy  and  its  ap 
proaches 

The  Textile  Industries  of  Canada,  in  the  Decade  1917-26 

Official  List  of  Radio  Stations  of  Canada,  1929  Edition  (Supple 
ment  No.  1) 

Canada  Gazette  Supplement 

Discoloration  of  Halibut  (Bulletin  No.  XII) 

Vocational  Education 

Monthly  Supplement  to  Canadian  Official  Postal  Guide, 
1928-29 

Quarterly  Report  on  Coal  and  Coke  Statistics  for  Canada. . . 

Various  Acts  reprinted  for  stock 

Printing  of  various  Committee  sittings 

The  National  Revenue  Review,  April,  1928,  to  March,  1929. . 


Bilingual 

Census  of  Alberta,  1926,  Population  and  Agriculture— Recense- 
ment  de  1' Alberta,  1926,  population  et  agriculture 

Statistics  of  the  Civil  Service  of  Canada— Numbers  Employed 
and  Expenditures  on  Salaries  by  Departments,  March  31, 
1927— Fonctionnaires  et  employes  de  l'administration 
federate  du  Canada,  personnel  et  sa  remuneration  par 
ministeres,  31  mars  1927 

Financial  Statistics  of  Provincial  Governments  in  Canada- 
1926 — Statistique  financiere  des  gouvernements  provin- 
ciaux  du  Canada,  1926 

At>Sioo7t  u  Statements  of  Insurance  Companies  in  Canada, 
1927— Releye  des  etats  des  compagnies  d 'assurance  au 
Canada,  1927 

Census  of  Industry,  1926,  Central  Electric  Stations' in  Canada 
(Fart  I,  Statistics)— Recensement  industriel,  1926,  pro- 
duction et  distribution  de  l'electricite  (lere  partie,  statis- 
tique)  

Census  of  Industry,  1926,  the '  Lumber*  Industry—  Recense- 
ment  indu3tnel,  1926,  Industrie  du  bois 

Report  on  the  Fur  Farms  of  Canada,  1926^Elevage' des  ani- 
maux  a  fourrure,  1926 

Canal  Statistics,  1927— Statistique  des  canaux,'i927 

List  of  Shipping,  1927— Liste  des  navires,  1927  


Number 

of 
Copies 


7,875,500 


150 
150 


Carried  forward . 


125 


500 
500 
100 

500 
150 
125 

150 
125 

125 

150 
150 

150 

25 

150 

425 

17,350 
600 

82,750 
6,775 
8,675 


150 

325 
150 
175 

250 

150 

150 
175 
365 


7,997,290 


Number 

of 

Pages 


84,060 


136 
16 


14 


16 

62 

146 

24 
64 
60 

402 

8 

54 

16 
146 

16 

8 
28 

48 

180 

64 

6,337 

938 

296 


272 

112 

80 

384 

88 

82 

100 

64 

272 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 


94,593 


272,077,210 


20,400 
2,400 


1,750 


8,000 
31,000 
14.600 

12,000 
9,600 
7,500 

60,300 
1,000 

6,750 

2,400 
21,900 

2,400 

200 

4,200 

*6,500 

*260,800 

*9,600 

*2, 078, 300 

*304,350 

*233,900 


40,800 

*18,200 
12,000 
67,200 

22,000 

12,300 

15,000 
11,200 
99,280 


275,475,040 


ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29 


45 


Table  No.  & — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work 

1928-29-— Continued 


Description 


Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 

of 

Pages 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 


Brought  forward 

■\Public  Printing  and  Stationery — Continued 

Bilingual— Concluded 

Live  Stock  and  Animal  Products  Statistics,  1927 — Statistique 

du  betail  et  des  produits  animaux,  1927 

Annual    Report    of    Juvenile    Delinquents,    1926-27 — Rapport 

annuel  sur  les  jeunes  delinquants,  1926-27 

Census  of  Trading  Establishments,   1924 — Recensement  des 

etablissements  de  commerce,  1924 

Fisheries  Statistics  of  Canada,  1927 — Statistiques  des  peche- 

ries,  1927 

List  of  Members  of  the  House  of  Commons  with  their  Con- 
stituencies and  Post  Office  Addresses — Liste  des  membres 

de  la  Chambre  des  Communes  avec  les  districts  electoraux 

et  adresses  postales  (.Corrected  to  February  7,  1929) 

Statistics  of  Electric  Railways  of  Canada,  1927 — Statistique 

des  tramways  electriques  du  Canada,  1927 

Statistics  of  Steam  Railway  of  Canada,  1927 — Statistique  des 

chemins  de  fer  du  Canada,  1927 

Annual  Report  of  Statistics  of  Criminal  and  other  Offences 

September  30,   1927 — Rapport  annuel   sur   la  statistique 

de  la  criminalite,  30  septembre  1927 

Statistics  of  Dairy  Factories,  1927 — Statistique  de  l'industrie 

laitiere,  1927 

Abstracts  of  Current  Public  Health  Literature — Extraits  de 

publications  courantes  sur  la  sante  publique 

Census  of  Industry,  1927,  The  Pulp  and  Paper  Industry — Recen- 
sement industriel,  1927,  industrie  de  la  pulpe  et  du  papier. . 
Auditor   General's    Report — Rapport   de   l'auditeur  general, 
1927-28— 

Part  A — Agriculture  Department 

Part  E — External  Affairs  Department 

Part  H — Immigration  and  Colonization  Department 

Part  I — Indian  Affairs  Department 

Part  K — Interior  Department 

Part  L — Justice  Department .• 

Part  M — Labour  Department 

Part  O — Marine  and  Fisheries  Department 

Part  P — Mines  Department 

Part  Q — National  Defence  Department 

Part  R — National  Revenue  Department 

Part  S — Post  Office  Department 

Part  T — Public  Printing  and  Stationery  Department 

Part  V — Public  Works  Department 

Part  W — Railways  and  Canals  Department 

Part  X — Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police 

Part  GG — Health  Department 

Part  YY — Soldiers'  Civil  Re-Establishment  Department. 

Part  ZZ — Trade  and  Commerce  Department 

French 

Rapport  du  c6realiste  du  Dominion,  1926 

Station  exp6rimentale,  Ste-Anne  de  la  Pocatiere,  Que. — Rap- 
port du  regisseur,  1926 

Rapport  du  service  des  plantes  fourrageres,  1926 

Liste  officielle  des  stations  de  radio  du  Canada,  30  juin  1927 

Expose  du  budget,  16  fevrier  1928 

Instructions  electorates  sp6ciales  pour  certaines  elections  par- 
tielles  avec  commentaires  sur  les  droits  et  obligations  des 
candidats  (cahier  A),  ler  fevrier  1928 

Commission  royale  des  Douanes  et  de  l'Accise — Rapports 
interimaires  (Nos  1  a  10) 

Le  thuya  (cedre  de  Test) 

Carried  forward 


7,997,290 


175 
175 
150 
150 

100 

175 
175 

365 
150 
150 
150 


40 
15 
15 

340 
40 
15 
15 
60 
25 
50 

100 
75 
25 
60 
35 
10 
35 
10 
25 


94,593 


244 
124 


275,475,040 


132 

23,100 

64 

11,200 

40 

6,000 

200 

30,000 

64 

6,400 

56 

9,800 

184 

32,200 

426 

155,490 

96 

14,400 

64 

9,600 

104 

15,600 

60 

2,400 

10 

150 

36 

540 

68 

23,120 

82 

3,280 

30 

450 

12 

180 

76 

4,560 

16 

400 

76 

3,800 

142 

14,200 

170 

12,750 

16 

400 

146 

8,760 

86 

3,010 

28 

280 

16 

560 

40 

400 

42 

1,050 

1,600 

4,000 
2,000 
3,000 
1,800 


9,760 

6,200 
400 


8,000,585 


97,799 


275,897,880 


46 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work, 

1928-29— Continued 


Description 


Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 

of 

Pages 


Brought  forward 

•[Public  Printing  and  Stationery—  Continued 

French — Continued 


Le  pin  Murray 

Le  pin  gris 

Station  experimental ,  Farnham,  Que. — Rapport  du  regisseur,  1926 

L'elevage  des  poussins 

Service  de    la    production    de    la    filasse — Rapport    du    chef   de 

service,  1926 

Rapport    concernant    les    reglements    etablis    conformement    aux 

dispositions  de  la  loi  des  pensions  de  vieillesse  de  1927 

Loi  concernant    les    marques    de    commerce    et    les    dessins    de 

fabrique 

L'epinette  de  Sitka 

Programme  scolaire 

Projet  de  canalisation  du  Saint-Laurent 

Le  thuya  geant 

Budget  du  Canada,  supplemental,  1928-29 ! 

Le  pin  a  bois  lourd 

Le  sapin  baumier 

Avantages    qu'  off  rait    1' isolation    thermique    de    votre    maison 

(deuxieme  edition) 

Dix-huitieme     rapport    de    la    Commission    de    geographe    du 

Canada — Contenant  toutes  les  decisions  jusqu'au  31  mars  1924 

Budget  du  Canada,  1929-30 

Carillon — Programme  des  recitals  de  l'ete  1928 

Le  controle  de  la   ponte   au   Canada  pour   les  volailles   de   race 

pure,  1926-27  (rapport  n°  8) 

Liste  des  marchands  de  gros  de  fruits  et  de  legumes  au  Canada 

(bulletin  n°  101) 

Le  soja  au  Canada  (feuillet  n°  93 — nouvelle  serie) 

Catalogue  de  publications  omcielles  du  parlement  et  du  gouver- 

nement  du  Canada,  avril  1928 

Une  vieillesse  de  confort  et  de  bonheur 

Fumiers    et    engrais    chimiques — Nature,    fonctions    et    applica 

tions  (bulletin  n°  92 — nouvelle  serie) _ 

Comment  combattre  les  moustiques  au  Canada  (circulaire  n°  62). 
Loi  contre  les  parasites  de  l'agriculture,  1927,  et  reglements — Lois, 

arretes  et  reglements,  n°  22 

Loi  des  insectes  destructeurs  et  autres  fleaux  et  reglements  etablis 

sous  son  empire 

La  conversion  des  fourrages  sees  en  un  aliment  succulent — Une 

etude  du  procede  "Sugar  Jack"  (.bulletin  n°  96 — nouvelle  serie) 
Station  experimentale,  Harrow,  Ont. — Rapport  du  regisseur,  1926. . 
La  fabrication  de  la  creme  a  la  glace  (bulletin  n°  102 — nouvelle 

serie) 

La  loi  de  faillite  ainsi  que  les  regies  et  formules  s'y  rattachant 

Rapport  de  l'horticulteur  du  Dominion,  1926 

Ferme  experimentale  de  Brandon,  Man. — Rapport  du  regisseur,  1927 
Station  experimentale  de  Harrow,  Ont. — Rapport  du  regisseur,  1927 

Les  maladies  des  tomates  (bulletin  n°  51 — nouvelle  serie) 

Propositions  et  vue  d'un  pacte  multilateral  de  renonciation  a  la 

guerre,  1927-28 

La  preparation  des  peaux  pour  le  commerce 

Rapport  sur  l'aviation  civile  et  les  operations  aeriennes  du  gouverne- 

ment  civil,  1927 

Apercu  annuel  sur  1' instruction  publique  au  Canada,  1926 

Rapport  annuel  de  la  division  des  explosifs  du  ministere  des  Mines, 

1927 > 

Rapport  de  la  Commission  Royale  chargee  de  l'investigation  rela- 
tive aux  peches  propres  aux  Provinces  Maritimes  et  aux  Iles- 

de-la-Madeleine 

Assurance  du  gouvernement  en  faveur  de  tous  ceux  qui  ont  fait  du 

service 


Carried  forward 8, Oil ,  660 


!,  000,585 


50 
50 
50 
50 

50 

50 

100 
50 
50 
1,150 
50 
25 
50 
50 

50 

50 

100 

4,550 

1,000 

.  50 
50 

500 

50 

50 
1,000 

50 

50 


50 

100 
100 


97,799 


24 

412 
112 

24 

100 

40 
16 

32 
16 


50 

40 

50 

32 

50 

32 

>00 

224 

50 

84 

50 

80 

50 

48 

50 

20 

50 

32 

50 

12 

50 

80 

50 

264 

24 

138 
16 


100,089 


275,897,8S0 


276,475,880 


ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29 

Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work 

1928-29— Continued 


47 


Description 


Brought  forward 

\Public  Printing  and  Stationery—  Continued 
French— Continued 


Reglement  concernant  les  poids  et  mesures 

Loi  relative  a,  1' inspection  des  poissons,  etc. 

Dix-septieme  rapport  annuel  sur  les  associations  ouvrieres  au   Ca 

nada,  1927 

Reglements  internationaux  pour  prevenir  les  abordages 

Acte  de  l'Amerique  Britannique  du  Nord  et  ses  modifications 

1867-1927 _ ; 

Loi  de  la  convention  concernant  les  oiseaux  migrateurs  et  reglements 

federaux  pour  la  protection  des  oiseaux  migrateurs 

L'elevage  du  mouton  au  Canada  (bulletin  n°  75 — nouvelle  serie). 
Etude  des  moisissures  et  des  levures  dans  le  beurre  de  beurreries 

(feuillet  n°  92 — nouvelle  serie) 

La  petite  industrie  de  la  laine  au  Canada  Francais 

Septieme  rapport  sur  l'organisation  de  l'industrie  du  commerce  et 

des  professions  liberales  au  Canada,  1928 

Reglements  pour  prevenir  les  abordages  sur  les  Grands  Lacs 

Commission  consultative  du  tarif  et  de  l'impot — Comptes  rendus 

des  audiences  publiques  (requete  n°  65)  peintures   et   vernis 

16  mai,  1928 

Rapport  du  botaniste  du  Dominion,  1926 

Plantes  bulbeuses  a  fleurs  (bulletin  n°  95 — nouvelle  serie) 

Rapport  du  chimiste  du  Dominion,  1926-27 , 

Rapport  de  l'agriculteur  du  Dominion,  1927 , 

Rapport  de  l'apiculteur  du  Dominion,  1927 

La  region  de  la  Riviere-la-Paix,  Canada 

Representants  des  gouvernements  britannique  et  etrangers  au  Ca- 
nada, octobre, 1928 

L'origine  et  la  qualite  des  bestiaux  de  commerce  vendus  au  Canada 

en  1897  (rapport  n°  8) 

Sous-station  experimental ,  Beaverlodge,  Alta. — Rapport  du  regis- 

seur,  1926 

Les  assolements  et  la  culture  du  sol  dans  les  provinces  des  prairies 

(bulletin  n°  98 — nouvelle  serie) 

Reglements  concernant  les  services  des  cadets  du  Canada,  1928... . 
Station  experimentale,  Farnham,  Que. — Rapport  du  regisseur,  1927. . 
Hygiene — Traitement  des  matieres  souillees  dans  les  maisons  isolees 

et  dans  les  petits  etablissements  depourvus  d'egout  municipal 

(sante  nationale — publication  n°  1) 

Loi  des  engrais  chimiques  avec  amendments  et  reglements — Loi, 

arretes  et  reglements  n°  9  (consolidation  de  bureau) 

Station  experimentale,   Kentville,   N.-E. — Rapport  du  regisseur, 

1926 


Station  experimentale,  Charlottetown,  I.P.-E. — Rapport  du  regis- 
seur, 1927 

Station  experimentale,  Morden,  Man. — Rapport  du  regisseur,  1927. 

Fermes  experimentales  federales — Rapport  du  directeur,  1927-28. .  . 

Service  de  l'exploitation  animale — Rapport  de  l'eleveur  du  Domi- 
nion, 1926-27 

Service  administratif  des  terres  federales — Renseignements  pour 
le  public,  15  juin  1928. ;■•;•.••-. 

Rapport  du  directeur  general  veterinaire,  1927-28 

Liste  des  publications — Agriculture  (feuillet  n°  101 — nouvelle  serie) 

Traite  general  de  renonciation  a  la  guerre — Signe  a  Paris  le  27  aout 
1928 


Chambres  froides  de  beurreries  avec  plans  et  devis  (bulletin  n°  61 
— nouvelle  serie) 

Premier  rapport  annuel  sur  les  societes  cooperatives  au  Canada, 
1928 

Station  experimentale  de  Lennoxville,  Que. — Rapport  du  regisseur, 
1927 


Carried  forward . 


Number 

of 
Copies 


,011,660 


400 


100 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 

50 

50 

50 
50 
50 


50 
350 

50 

50 
50 
50 

50 

50 
50 
50 

50 

50 

50 

50 


014,260 


Number 

of 

Pages 


100,089 


24 
24 

312 
20 

152 

40 
120 

16 
20 

130 
24 


52 
160 
56 
96 
40 
24 
100 

16 

48 

100 

64 
56 
32 

36 

48 

104 


72 
128 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 


276,475,880 


1,200 
1,200 

15,600 
1,000 

60,800 

2,000 
6,000 

800 
1,000 

6,500 
1,200 


5,200 
8,000 
2,800 
4,800 
2,000 
1,200 
5,000 

800 

2,400 

5,000 

3,200 
2,800 
1,600 

1,800 

%400 

5,200 

3,400 
3,600 
6,400 

4,800 

3,600 

2,600 

800 

400 

400 

4,200 

4,200 


102,691   276,667,780 


48  DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 

Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work, 

1928-29 — Continued 


Description 


Brought  forward 

t  Public  Printing  and  Stationery—  Concluded 
Fbench — Concluded 

Commission  consultative  du  tarif  et  de  l'impot—  Compte  rendu 
d'une  audience  publique  (relative  aux  requetes  n°  3  et  n°  44) 
portant  sur  le  charbon  et  le  coke,  27  septembre  1928 

Laboratoire  des  recherches  sur  la  rouille,  Winnipeg,  Canada 

Station  experimentale,  Fredericton,  N.-B  —  Rapport  du  regisseur, 
1927 

Stations  federates  de  demonstration — Ontario,  Quebec,  Nouveau- 
Brunswick,  Nouvelle-Ecosse  et  He  du  Prince-Edouard — Rap- 
port du  surveillant  en  chef,  1927 

Rapport  de  l'aviculteur  du  Dominion,  1927 

Les  sols  de  l'He  du  Prince-Edouard  (bulletin  n°  100— nouvelle  serie) 

Ferme  experimentale,  Nappan,  N.-E.— Rapport  du  regisseur,  1927. 

La  loi  des  semences  avec  amendments  et  reglements — Lois,  arretes 
et  reglements  (n°  24) ,  octobre  1928 , 

Rapport  du  surveillant  en  chef  sur  les  stations  federates  de  demons 
tration  en  Colombie-Britannique,  Alberta,  Saskatchewan  et 
Manitoba,  1927 

Catalogue  de  publications  officielles  du  parlement  et  du  gouverne 
mentdu  Canada  (supplement  cumulatif,  mai  1928-fevrier  1929) 

Guide  officiel  du  service  postal  canadien,  1929 

L'enregistrement  superieur  pour  les  pores  de  race  pure. . 

Insectes  qui  nuisent  aux  fleurs  et  moyens  de  les  detruire  (bulletin 
n°  99 — nouvelle  serie) . < 

Rapport  des  delegues  canadiens  a  la  neuvieme  assemblee  de  la 
Societe  des  Nations,  du  3  au  6  septembre  1928 < 

Convention  et  protocole  entre  le  Canada  et  les  Etats-Unis  concer 
nant  les  Chutes  Niagara  et  la  riviere  Niagara — Signes  a  Ottawa 
le  2  Janvier  1929 

Supplement  mensuel  au  guide  officiel  du  service  postal,  1928-29. . 

Bulletin  de  1' Association  Canadienne  Antituberculeuse 

Pasteurisation  du  lait  pour  les  centres  peu  peuples  (sante  nationale 
— publication  n°  36) 

Conseils  pour  la  saison , 

La  Revue  du  Revenu  National,  April,  1928,  to  March,  1929 


Public  Worki 


English 


Tariff  Book — For  Telegraph  and  Telephone  Lines,  Province  of 
Quebec,  1928 

Carillon — Programmes  of  Summer  Recitals,  1928 

Addendum  to  Votes  and  Proceedings,  Friday,  March  8,  1929 

Dominion    Government    Telephone    Directory,    Ottawa,    Ont 
February,  1929 


Feknch 

Carillon— Programmes  des  recitals  de  l'ete,  1928 

Railways  and  Canals — 

English 

Regulations  and  Tariff  governing  the  Operation  of  the  Government 
Grain  Elevator  at  Port  Colborne,  Ont 

The  Highway,  the  Motor  Vehicle  and  the  Tourist  in  Canada  (Cir- 
cular No.  9) 

Proceedings  of  the  Special  Committee  appointed  to  Inquire  into 
the  Development  and  Improvement  of  the  St.  Lawrence  River 

Annual  Report  of  the  Commissioner  of  Highways,  1927-28  (Bulletin 
No.  11) 


Carried  forward . 


Number 

of 
Copies 


,014,260 


50 


50 


200 

225 

50 

16 

1,728 

8 

50 

64 

50 

32 

250 

200 

50 

20 

168 

8 

50 
300 
600 

100 
96 

288 

500 

1,000 

500 

5,011 


500 


1,000 

3,000 

500 

2,000 


,031,796 


Number 

of 

Pages 


102,691 


00 

32 

50 

24 

50 

72 

50 

88 

50 

64 

50 

20 

50 

64 

56 


24 


16 

32 

408 

32 


106,403     277,736,728 


ANNUAL  REPORT.  1928-29 


49 


Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work, 

1928-29— Continued 


Description 


Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 
of 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 


Brought  forward. 
Railway  Commission — 


English 


Index  to  Vol.  XVII — Judgments,  Orders,  etc. 
Judgments,  Orders,  etc 


Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police — 

English 

Regulations  respecting  Correspondence,  Reports,  Telegrams, 
Registration,  Fyling  and  Records,  1928 

Rules  and  Regulations  of  the  Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police 
1928! 


Secretary  of  State 


English 


1928. 


Guide  to  Relative  Precedence  at  Ottawa 

Boards  of  Trade 

An  Act  respecting  Companies 

An  Act  respecting  British  Nationality,    Naturalization   and 

Aliens 

Confidential  document 


»  French 

Commission  royale  des  Douanes  et  de  l'Accise — Rapports  in 
terimaires  (n°8  1  a  10) 


Senate  Of  Canada — 


English 


Senators  of  Canada,  according  to  Seniority,  March,  1928 

Proceedings  of  the  Special  Committee  appointed  to  Inquire 
into  the  Development  and  Improvement  of  the  St.  Law 
rence  River  (5) 

Proceedings  of  the  Special  Committee  appointed  to  Inquire 
into  the  Development  and  Improvement  of  the  St.  Law 
rence  River  (11) , 

Railway  Transportation  to  Senators  of  Canada,  1929 

Senators  of  Canada,  according  to  Seniority,  January,  1929 

An  Act  to  amend  the  Companies  Act 


Soldier  Settlement  Board — 


English 


Farmer's  Account  Book. 


Supreme  Court- 


English 


Rules  of  the  Supreme  Court  of  Canada,  1929 

Canada  Law  Reports — The  Supreme  and  Exchequer  Courts 
Of  Canada — 

Part  III— March  31,  1928 i 

Part  IV— April  30,  1928 

Part  V— May  31, 1928 

Part  VI— June  30,  1928 

Part  VII— September  30,  1928 

Part  VIII— October  31,  1928 

Part  IX— November  30,  1928 

Part  X— December  31,  1928 

Part  I— January  31,  1929 

Part  II— February  28,  1929 


91900—4 


Carried  forward . 


,031,796 


611 
2,005 


1,500 
1,520 


932 
300 
500 

2,000 
100 


50 

300 
1,000 


1,000 
175 
100 
150 


10,000 


1,511 


6,761 
6,773 
6,761 
6,761 
6,761 
6,761 
6,798 
6,761 
6,750 
6,750 


106,403 


24 
570 


24 
352 

160 

8 

80 

16 
28 


124 


32 


32 


277,736,728 


14,664 
*32,860 


36,000 
535,040 


149,120 

2,400 

40,000 

32,000 
2,800 


6,200 

6,000 
48,000 


8,000 
2,100 
1,200 
9,600 


320,000 


48,352 


96 

649,056 

96 

650,208 

98 

662,578 

40 

946,540 

48 

1,000,628 

88 

594,968 

90 

611,820 

14 

770,754 

76 

513,000 

32 

891,000 

8,123,187 


109,095 


303,656 


50 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work, 

1928-29— Continued 


Description 

Number 

of 
Copies 

Number 

of 

Pages 

Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 

8,123,187 

1,125 
1,000 

800 

500 
250 

7,200 

1,000 

200 

1,000 

1,461 
500 

1,000 

2,300 
2,200 
1,400 
1,000 
5,800 
2,000 
1,500 

1,700 

1,600 

7,250 

800 

1,450 

48 
100 
600 
500 

1,250 
500 
1,500 
1,300 
2,500 
66 
1,700 

7,400 

2,000 

1,300 

500 

500 

109,095 

152 

88 

160 

48 
32 

16 

90 

8 

64 

344 

48 

8 

28 
120 
16 
16 
40 
20 
260 

24 

208 

1,134 

136 

402 

16 
20 
20 
16 

402 
16 

136 
96 

384 
48 

176 

20 

16 

164 

8 

16 

286,303,656 

Trade  and  Commerce — 

English 

171,000 

Trade  of  the  African  Sub-Continerit 

88,000 

List  of  Licensed  Elevators  and  Warehouses  in  the  Western 
Grain  Inspection  Division,  1927-28 

128,000 

Annual   Report  of  the  Board   of   Grain   Commissioners  for 
Canada,  Crop  Year  ended  August  31,  1927 

24,000 
8,000 

Monthly  Bulletin  of  Agricultural  Statistics  (Volumes  19  and 
20),  January  1926,  to  December,  1927,  with  table  of  Con- 

115,200 

Manufactures  of  the  Non-Ferrous  Metals  in  Canada,  1926 

Legislation  respecting  Combinations  in  Restraint  of  Trade 

The  Manufacturing  Industries  of  Canada,  1925 

90,000 

1,600 

64,000 

Quarterly  Report  of  the  Trade  of  Canada  (Imports  for 
Consumption  and  Exports,  Months  of  January,  February 
and  March,  1928,  and  Twelve  Months  ending  March,  1927 
and  1928 . . 1 

502,584 

Trading  with  Columbia  and  Venezuela  with  Notes  on  Curacao . 

Dominion    Grain    Research    Laboratory,    Winnipeg,    Man. — 

Annual  Report 

24,000 
8,000 

64,400 

Index  to  the  Commercial  Intelligence  Journal — Six  Months 
ending  June  1928  (Commercial  Intelligence  Journal  Nos. 
1249  to  1274)  Volume  XXXVIII 

Condensed  Preliminary  Report  on  the  Trade  of  Canada,  1928. . 
Preliminary  Report — Vital  Statistics  of  Canada,  1927 

264,000 
'      22,400 

The  Fertilizer  Trade  in  Canada,  June  1,  1926-June  30,  1927 

The  French-Canadian  Homespun  Industry 

16,000 
*116,000 

Annual  Statistics  of  Fruit  and  Floriculture,  1927 

40,000 
390,000 

Annual  Survey  of  Education  in  Canada,  1926 

Preliminary  Report  on  the  Mineral  Production  of  Canada — 
Six  Months  ending  June  30,  1928 

40,800 

332,800 
8,221,500 

Report  on  the  Grain  Trade  of  Canada,  for  the  Crop  Year  ended 
July  31  and  to  the  close  of  Navigation,  1927 

Canada  Year  Book,  1927-28 

Prices  and  Price  Indexes,  1913-1927 

108,800 

582,900 

768 

Quarterly  Report  of  the  Trade  of  Canada,  Months  of  April, 
May  and  June,  1928,  and  three  Months  ending  June,  1927 
and  1928 

Rules,    Regulations  and   Instructions  to  be  carried   out  by 
Weighmen,  their  Assistants  and  Trackmen  in  the  Perform- 
ance of  their  Duties  in  the  Weighing  of  Grain 

Canadian  Trade  in  Farm  Products,  1927-28 

2,000 

Trading  with  Germany — Points  for  Exporters 

12,000 
8,000 

502,500 

New  Zealand  Customs  Regulations 

Quarterly  Report  of  the  Trade  of  Canada,  Months  of  July, 
August   and    September,    1928,   and    Six   Months   ending 
September,  1927  and  1928 

Trading  with  the  Netherlands — Points  for  Exporters 

8,000 

Manufactures  of  the  Non-Metallic  Minerals  in  Canada,  1926. . . . 
Coal  Statistics  for  Canada,  1927 

204,000 
.   124,800 

Annual  Report  on  the  Mineral  Production  of  Canada,  1926 

Private  Supplement  to  Bently's  Code,  Ottawa,  January,  1929. . 
Annual  Survey  of  Education  in  Canada,  1927 

960,000 

3,168 

299,200 

Index  to  the  Commercial  Intelligence  Journal — Six  Months 
ending  December  1928  (Nos.  1275  to  1300) 

148,000 

The  Precious  Metal  Marking  Act,  1928  with  Regulations  to 
date,  January  1,  1929  (Office  Consolidation). . . 

32,000 

Iron  and  Steel  and  their  Products  in  Canada,  1926 

213,200 

Italian  Customs  Requirements  and  Regulations. . . 

4,000 

Invoice  Requirements  and  Customs  Regulations  of  Cuba 

8,000 

Carried  forward 

8,189,987 

114,111 

300,275,236 

ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29 


51 


Table  No.  & — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work 

1928-29— Continued 


Description 


Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 

of 

Pages 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 
Pages 


Brought  forward 

Trade  and  Commerce — Concluded — 

English — Concluded 

Quarterly  Report  of  the  Trade  of  Canada  (Imports  for  Con- 
sumption and  Exports),  Months  of  October,  November 
and  December  1928,  and  Nine  Months  ending  December 
1927  and  1928 

Points  for  Exporters  to  New  Zealand , 

Preliminary  Report  on  the  Mineral  Production  of  Canada 
1928 

Chemical  and  Allied  Products  in  Canada,  1927. 

Trade  Possibilities  of  the  Baltic  States 

Trade  of  Canada  (Import  for  Consumption  and  Exports) ,  1928 

The  Textile  Industries  of  Canada,  in  the  Decade  1917-26 

Quarterly  Report  on  Coal  and  Coke  Statistics  of  Canada,  1928. 

Monthly  Bulletin  of  Agricultural  Statistics,  1928-29 

Supplement  to  the  Commercial  Intelligence  Journal 

Commercial  Intelligence  Journal 


189,987 


114,111 


286,303,656 


Bilingual 

Census  of  Alberta,  1926,  Population  and  Agriculture — Recense- 
ment  et  agriculture,  1926,  population  et  agriculture 

Canal  Statistics,  1927 — Statistiques  des  canaux,  1927 

Statistics  of  the  Civil  Service  of  Canada — Numbers  Employed 
and  Expenditures  on  Salaries  by  Departments,  March  31, 
1927 — Fonctionnaires  et  employes  de  l'administration 
federate  du  Canada,  personnel  et  sa  remuneration  par 
ministeres,  31  mars  1927 

Financial  Statistics  of  Provincial  Governments  in  Canada, 
1926 — Statistique  financiere  des  gouvernements  provin- 
ciaux  du  Canada,  1926 

Report  on  the  Fur  Farms  of  Canada,  1926 — Elevage  des  ani- 
maux  a  fourrure,  1926 

Census  of  Industry,  1926,  Central  Electric  Stations  in  Canada 
(Part  I — Statistics) — Recensement  industriel,  1926,  Pro- 
duction et  distribution  de  l'electricite  (lere  partie — Sta- 
tistique)   i 

Sixth  Census  of  Canada,  1921  (Volume  III — Population) — 
Sixieme  recensement  du  Canada,  1921  (Volume  Ill- 
population) 

Census  of  Industry,  1926,  the  Lumber  Industry — Recensement 
industriel,  1926,  industrie  du  bois 

Annual  Report  of  Juvenile  Delinquents,  1926-27 — Rapport 
annuel  sur  les  jeunes  delinquents,  1926-27 

Live  Stock  and  Animal  Products  Statistics,  1927 — Statistique 
du  betail  et  des  produits  animaux,  1927 

Census  of  Trading  Establishments,  .192-4—  Recensement  des 
etablissements ;de  commerce,  1924 

Fisheries  Statistics  of  Canada,  1927 — Statistique  des  p&che- 
ries,  1927 j [ 

Statistics  of  Electric  Railways  of  Canada,  1927 — Statistique 
des  tramways  electriques  du  Canada,  1927 

Statistics  of  Steam  Railways  of  Canada,  1927 — Statistique  des 
chemins  de  fer  du  Canada!,  1927 

Annual  Report  of  Statistics  Of  Criminal  and  other  Offences, 
September  30,  1927 — Rapport  annuel  sur  la  statistique  de 
la  criminalite,  30  septembre  1927 

Statistics  of  Dairy  Factories,1 1927 — Statistique  de  1' industrie 
laitiere,  1927. 

Census  of  Industry,  1927,  The  Pulp  and  Paper  Industry— 
Recensement  industriel,  1927,  industrie  de  la  pulpe  et  du 
papier L 


1,250 
800 

2,000 

1,000 

500 

1,650 

1,500 

4,000 

80,822 

6,511 

123,200 


1,000 
750 


800 

1,200 
2,000 

2,100 

3,487 
1,350 
1,300 
3,000 
1,900 
2,000 
600 
800 

900 
2,000 

1,200 


402 


40 
136 

36 
402 
146 

64 
452 

76 
1,968 


272 
64 


56 

80 
100 


602 
82 
64 

132 
40 

200 
56 

184 

436 

96 

104 


502,500 
6,400 

80,000 

136,000 

18,000 

663,300 

219,000 

*64,000 

*2, 978, 007 

*143,464 

*4, 664, 000 


272,000 
48,000 


44,800 

96,000 
200,000 

184,800 

2,099,174 
110,700 

83,200 
396,000 

76,000 
400,000 

33,600 
147,200 

383,400 
192,000 

124,800 


Carried  forward . 


8,439,607 


120,497 


314,641,581 


91900-4* 


52 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


Table  No.  8 — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work, 

1928-29— Continued 


Description 


Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 

of 

Pages 


Brought  forward 

Trade  and  Commerce — Continued — 

Bilingual — Concluded 

Statistics  of  the  Civil  Service  of  Canada— Numbers  employed 
and  Expenditures  on  Salaries,  1927-28— Statistique  du 
service  civil  du  Canada — Personnel  et  remuneration,  1927-28 

Monthly  Review  of  Business  Statistics — Revue  mensuelle  de 
la  situation  economique 


8,439,607 


French 


Inspection  des  camions  reservoirs 

Table  des  matieres  du  Bulletin  des  renseignements  commer 
ciaux — Pour  les  six  mois  termines  avec  juin  1928  (numeros 
1249  a  1274) . 

Apercu  annuel  sur  l'instruction  publique  au  Canada,  1926 

Reglements  concernant  les  poids  et  mesures 

La  petite  industrie  de  la  laine  au  Canada  Francais 

Le  commerce  des  engrais  au  Canada,  ler  juillet  1926 — 30  juin  1927. 

Table  des  matieres  du  Bulletin  des  renseignements  commerciaux — 
Pour  les  six  mois  termines  avec  decembre  1928  (numeros  1275 
a  1300) 

Bulletin  mensuel  de  la  statistique  agricole,  1928-29 

Bulletin  de  renseignements  commerciaux 


700 
31,966 

50 


450 
500 
100 
1,500 
100 


450 

9,172 

23,400 


Totals. 


Totals  (March  31,  1928). 


,507,995 
,618,748 


120,497 


56 
384 


16 

264 

32 

20 


16 
452 
836 


122,589 
100,696 


NOT  EXECUTED  IN  PRINTING  BUREAU 


Immigration  and  Colonization — 

English 

Canada— The  New  Homeland 

150,000 
200,855 

32 
32 

4,800,000 

Canada  West  (British  Edition) 

6,427,360 

Norwegian 

Canada — The  New  Homeland 

10,573 

32 

338,336 

Czecho-Slovakia 

Canada — The  New  Homeland 

21,244 

64 

*679,808 

German 

Canada — The  New  Homeland 

21,375 

64 

*680,800 

Magyar 

Canada— The  New  Homeland 

10,620 

32 

339,840 

Serbian 

Canada — The  New  Homeland 

10,665 

32 

341 , 280 

Croatian 

Canada— The  New  Homeland 

10,630 

32 

340, 160 

Carried  forward 

435.962 

320 

13.947,584 

ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29 

Table  No.  & — Statement  of  Pamphlet  and  Miscellaneous  Book-work, 
1928-29— Concluded 


53 


Description 


Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 

of 

Pages 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 


Brpught  forward 

Interior — 

English 

New  Brunswick 

National  Revenue — 

English 

Sales  Catalogue 

Bilingual 

Customs  Sale  of  Unclaimed  Goods — Ventes  de  douane  de  mar 
chandises  non-reclamees 

Totals 

Totals  (March  31,  1928) 

fFor  sale  purposes. 


435,962 


25,000 


1,500 


,500 


463,962 
507,002 


320 


16 


44 


54 


434 
226 


13,947,584 


400,000 


*38,000 


*38,000 


14,423,584 
18,661,172 


54 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


Table  No.  9 — Statement  of  other  Letterpress  Departmental  Work  for  the  Fiscal 

Year  1928-29 


Department 

Executed 

in 

Printing  Bureau 

Not  Executed 
in 
Printing  Bureau 

Envelopes 

Copies 
other 
work 

Envelopes 

Copies 
other 
work 

Advisory  Board  on  Tariff  and  Taxation 

3,000 

4,828,284 

13,500 

5,400 

327,300 

476,715 

5,000 

13,052,884 

11,950 

59,900 

3,888,001 

1,047,485 

2,500 

2,125 

1,151,450 

546,570 

1,722,385 

10,000 

47,588 

455,140 

212,310 

3,949,356 

567,300 

211,400 

6,017,136 

189,185 

1,500,700 

2,203 

4,462,120 

442,769 

5,875,018 

6,000 

32,800 

38,740,062 

376,380 

40,540 

1,793,065 

114,520,092 

9,272 

7,837,411 

2,261,882 

1,339,035 

128,615 

2,009,850 

2,000 

770,055 

90,507 

170,500 

247,550 

6,249 

5,085,349 

< 

60,000 
5,200 

4,444,275 

Chief  Electoral  Officer 

742,774 

25,150 

680,550 

15,000 
4,500 
243,600 
566,970 
391,240 
121,862 

761,300 

External  Affairs 

Government  Contracts  Supervision  Commit- 

Health. . .          

175 

17,000 

1,000 

10,000 

35,025 

10,100 

Indian  Affairs 

2,000 

Interior 

1,947,208 

33,900 

202,000 

8,000 

1,249,775 

233,840 

2,340,588 

5,000 

18,000 

3,799,892 

67,000 

10,000 

743,529 

7,678,226 

1,760 

2,331,133 

504, 160 

199,665 

55,000 

502,600 

550,675 

Labour 

13,100 

Library  of  Parliament 

Marine  and  Fisheries 

32,147 
5,000 

31,000 

Mines 

5,819 

National  Defence 

1,030,751 

National  Gallery  of  Canada 

National  Research  Council 

National  Revenue 

597, 135 

Patent  and  Copyright  Office 

20,955 

Penitentiaries 

Pensions  and  National  Health 

4,900 

Post  Office 

27,671,766 

Privy  Council 

Public  Printing  and  Stationery 

Public  Works 

5,000 

Railways  and  Canals 

11,035 

Railway  Commission 

Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police 

Royal  Mint 

Secretary  of  State 

117,315 

45,345 

9,000 

Senate  of  Canada 

Soldiers'  Civil  Re-Establishment 

Soldier  Settlement  Board 

8,000 

Supreme  Court 

64,015 
1,009,134 

Trade  and  Commerce 

1,687,540 

Totals 

31,621,930 
29,857,349 

220,899,689 
193,974,750 

165,547 
166,600 

36,855,351 
25,752,388 

Totals  (March  31,  1928) 

ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-2U  55 

Table  No.  10 — Statement  of  Books  Bound  during  the  Fiscal  Year  1928-29 


Executed  in 
Printing  Bureau 

Not  Executed  in 
Printing  Bureau 

Department 

Full 
Leather 

Half 
Leather 

Quarter 
Leather 

Cloth 

Full 
Leather 

Half 
Leather 

Quarter 
Leather 

Cloth 

Advisory  Board   on  Tariff  and 
Taxation 

2 

54,477 

1 

42 
1 

20 
1 

3 

2 

15 

1  036 

Archives 

Auditor  General 

54 

6 

30 

2 

5 

10,611 

39 

282 

5 

254 

2,200 

590 

2,468 

11,971 

17,120 

4 

152 

201 

29,437 

3,929 

13,267 

10 

9,978 

283 

Chief  Electoral  Officer 

Civil  Service  Commission 

Diamond  Jubilee  Committee. . . . 

Exchequer  Court 

1 

10 
97 
38 
44 
2 
2 
31 
83 
62 
10 

425 

41 

1,248 

727 
15 

150 
93 

"3 

44 

27' 

22 

64 

13 

222 

2 

2 

67 

73 

12 

4 

Experimental  Farms 

302 

External  Affairs 

43,000 

Finance 

Governor  General's  Secretary. . . 

Health                                 

22 

House  of  Commons 

1 

Immigration  and  Colonization. . . 

Indian  Affairs 

1 

6 

200 

55 

151 

27 

10 

52 

9 

25 

Labour 

Library  of  Parliament 

1 

51 

National  Gallery  of  Canada 

44 
6 

2,630 

185 

78 

2 

1,012 

1 

341 

143 

70 

19 

6 

•  67 

28 

3,112 

24' 

""'932' 

134 
26 
22 

'■32' 

8 

150 

1,945 

Patent  and  Copyright  Office 

Penitentiaries 

Pensions  and  National  Health . . . 

2,688 

84, 199 

1 

60,713 

5,277 

2,820 

309 

3,670 

24 

487 

360 

37,740 

12 

18,549 

Post  Office  .               

1 
9 
1 

Privy  Council 

Public  Printing  and  Stationery. . 

35 
2 

i2' 

8 

Railway  Commission 

Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police 

1,664 

Secretary  of  State 

Senate  of  Canada 

Soldiers'  Civil  Re-Establishment 

Soldier  Settlement  Board 

6 

15 

25 

276 

57' 

Supreme  Court 

49 

91 

Totals 

43,687 
325 

8,040 
6,069 

4,914 
4,786 

374,226 
243,920 

50 

9 
61 

150 
5 

5,136 

Totals  (March  31,  1928).. 

13,753 

56  DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 

Table  No.  11 — Number  of  Pads  made  during  the  Fiscal  Year  1928-29 


Department 


Agriculture 

Archives 

Civil  Service  Commission 

Experimental  Farms 

External  Affairs 

Governor  General's  Secretary 

Health 

House  of  Commons 

Immigration  and  Colonization 

Indian  Affairs 

Insurance 

Interior 

Justice 

Labour 

Murine  and  Fisheries 

Mines 

National  Defence 

National  Research  Council 

National  Revenue 

Patent  and  Copyright  Office 

Penitentiaries 

Pensions  and  National  Health 

Post  Office.. 

Privy  Council 

Public  Printing  and  Stationery 

Public  Works 

Railways  and  Canals 

Railway  Commission 

Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police. . . 

Secretary  of  State 

Senate  of  Canada 

Soldiers'  Civil  Re-Establishment.. 

Soldier  Settlement  Board 

Supreme  Court 

Trade  and  Commerce 

Totals 

Totals  (March  31,  1928) 


Executed 

in  Printing 

Bureau 

Not  Executed 

in  Printing 

Bureau 

Quantity 

Quantity 

42,547 

20 

550 

282 

53,968 

200 

945 

1,012 

5,985 

2,076 

522 

18,554 

1,400 

1,647 

8,333 

470 

81,330 

70 

6,490 

210 

1,190 

7,396 

160, 158 

144 

173,178 

7,979 

3,385 

1,040 

2,316 

1,230 

1,210 

190 

600 

70 

22,789 

10,230 

100 

25 

21,075 

3,500 

135,619 

20,004 

654 

609,486 
583,008 

191,207 
162,598 

Table  No.  12 — Statement  of  Prepaid  Post  Office  Envelopes  made  and  stamped 

during  the  Fiscal  Year  1928-29 


Executed 

in  Printing 

Bureau 

Not  executed 

in  Printing 

Bureau 

Quantity 
made  and 
stamped 

Quantity 
made  and 
stamped 

One-cent  envelopes 

3,080,074 
10,979,640 

1,766,500 

Two-cent  envelopes 

1,208,200 

Five-cent  envelopes 

5,000 

Ten-cent  envelopes 

51,768 

Totals 

14,059,714 
13,905,350 

3,031,468 

Totals  (March  31,  1928) 

5,450,473 

ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29 


57 


Table  No.  13 — Statement  of  the  Die  Stamping;  of  Letter  and  Note  Headingi 
and  Envelopes  during  the  Fiscal  Year  1928-29 


Department 

Executed  in  Printing  Bureau 

Not  Executed 

in  Printing 

Bureau 

Foolscap, 

Half  Cap, 

Letter 

and 

Half  Letter 

Note 

and 

Half  Note 

Envelopes 

Number 

of 

Impressions 

Note 
and 
Half 
Note 

En- 
velopes 

Agriculture 

36,000 

1,125 
1,500 

153,073 

190, 198 

1,500 

5,000 

2,000 

12,285 

50 

2,000 

157,480 

33,500 

5,000 
119,030 

9,800 

522,226 

40,000 

7,250 
11,000 
86,000 
74,700 
10,000 
35,500 
25,100 
53,125 
14,000 
14,000 
41,080 
11,000 
89,700 
54,500 
49,925 
62,750 
63,500 
66,000 

2,000 
10,000 

5,000 

82,300 

156,485 

3,000 

7,000 

36, 100 

Archives 

Auditor  General 

5,000 

Chief  Electoral  Officer 

2,000 
6,000 

Civil  Service  Commission 

Diamond  Jubilee  Committee. . . 

285 

6,000 
50 

Exchequer  Court 

2,000 
74,500 
23,000 

External  Affairs 

24,280 

58,700 
10,500 

Finance 

Government    Contracts    Super- 
vision Committee 

5,000 

43,230 

800 

17,526 

Governor  General's  Secretary. . 
Health 

38,000 

9,000 
30,800 
40,000 

6,000 
11,000 
60,000 
48,000 

8,000 
18,500 
11,600 
24,900 

5,000 

7,000 
17,000 

9,000 
65,500 
32,500 
30,500 

5,000 
37,000 
60,000 

2,000 

37,800 

1,000 

House  of  Commons 

473,900 

Immigration  and  Colonization. 
Indian  Affairs 

250 

1,000 

Insurance 

I  nterior 

26,000 
23,000 

2,000 
17,000 
13,500 
22,975 

9,000 

7,000 
21,700 

2,000 
16,000 
20,000 

2,800 
57,500 
25,000 

6,000 

Justice 

3,700 

Labour 

Marine  and  Fisheries 

Mines 

National  Defence 

5,250 

National  Research  Council 

2,380 

Patent  and  Copyright  Office 

Pensions  and  National  Health . . 
Post  Office 

8,200 

2,000 

16,625 

250 

1,500 

Privy  Council 

Public  Printing  and  Stationery . 
Public  Works 

Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police 
Royal  Mint 

10,000 
5,000 
7,000 

70,400 

1,000 
1,500 
5,000 

Secretary  of  State 

73,300 
15,325 

2,000 

5,000 

31,000 

2,000 
70,760 

Senate  of  Canada 

Soldiers'     Civil    Re-Establish- 

Supreme  Court 

500 
100 

Totals 

846,425 
627,750 

207,261 

257,582 

1,117,398 

987,725 

2,171,084 
1,873,057 

1,000 

Totals  (March  31,  1928) 

900 

58 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


Table  No.  14 — Statement  of  the  Loose-Leaf  Work  performed  during  the  Fiscal 

Year  1928-29 


Executed  in  Printing  Bureau 

Not  Executed  in  Printing  Bureau 

Binders 

Loose 
Leaves 

Index 
Leaves 

Index 
Cards 

Binders 

Loose 
Leaves 

Index 
Leaves 

Index 
Cards 

Agriculture 

118 

294,532 

6,100 

86,100 

23,750 

51,400 

107,325 

93,100 

1,000 

3,100 

500 

86,520 

29,860 

2,775 

383,097 

12,500 

241,500 

2,000 

505,175 

22,550 

1,245,462 

648,527 

1,000 
12,050 

104,100 
281,996 

1,252 

13,500 

1 

990 

58 

Auditor  General 

30 

5 

78 

4 

218 

1 

4 

12 

69 
11 
13 

614 

8 

12 

2 

208 
15 

662 

717 

3 
13 

61 

86 

1 

50 

40 

132 

106 

286 
10 

388 

Civil    Service   Commis- 

5,100 

Experimental  Farms 

External  Affairs 

63 
981 

Finance 

Governor  General's  Sec- 
retary  

Health 

136 

House  of  Commons 

Immigration  and  Colon- 
ization   

1,394 
505 
347 

3,421 

534 

238 

■       28 

1,508 
78 

7,371 

3,256 

29 
122 

92 

778 

10,000 

Indian  Affairs 

Insurance 

Interior 

Justice 

Labour 

Library  of  Parliament.. . 

Marine  and  Fisheries. . . . 

2,000 

300 

2,000 

10,000 

Mines.. 

National  Defence 

National  Revenue. ...... 

1 

1 

1,000 
600 

29 

Patent    and    Copyright 
Office 

Penitentiaries 

Pensions    and    National 
Health 

20,125 
142,950 

Post  Office. 

Privy  Council 

Public  Printing  and  Sta- 
tionery  

2,943,560 

41,135 

370,900 

50,700 

262,250 
2,404 
10,000 

16,750 

72,145 

500 

1,757,860 

1,271 

1,476 

1,192 

93 

120 

69 

1,156,100 

2,000 

200 

3,000 

Public  Works 

145 

Railways  and  Canals 

Railway  Commission.... 

Royal  Canadian  Mount- 
ed Police 

Secretary  of  State 

Senate  of  Canada 

Soldiers'  Civil  Re-Estab- 
lishment  

16 

58 

3 

452 

60 

Soldier    Settlement 
Board 

20,000 

Supreme  Court 



Trade  and  Commerce. . . 

423 

Totals 

4,118 
3,775 

9,774,223 
9,067,736 

27,225 
19,397 

1,359,175 
245,725 

3 
6 

25,590 
11,525 

87 
9,216 

5,245 
163 

Totals  (March  31 ,1928) 

ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29 


59 


Table  No.  15 — Statement  giving  the  Number  of  Maps,  Plans,  Cheques  and 
Forms  Lithographed  during  the  Fiscal  Year  1928-29 


Department 

Not  Executed 

in 

Printing  Bureau 

Maps 

and 

Plans 

Cheques 

and 
Forms 

Advisory  Board  on  Tariff  and  Taxation 

1  000 

Agriculture 

500 

202,940 
600 

Archives 

Auditor  General 

360 

Civil  Service  Commission 

470 

Exchequer  Court 

200 

Experimental  Farms 

117  125 

External  Affairs 

450 

12,200 
597  100 

Finance 

Governor  General's  Secretary 

13,700 

23,389 

845,820 

22  000 

Health 

House  of  Commons 

Immigration  and  Colonization 

Indian  Affairs 

47,650 

3,700 

2,257,248 

14,471 

Interior 

943,080 

Justice 

Labour 

22,290 

Library  of  Parliament 

500 

Marine  and  Fisheries 

429,460 
143,569 

73,996 

185,485 
254,795 

National  Defence 

National  Research  Council 

5,000 

474,564 

Patent  and  Copyright  Office 

77,458 

15,000 

Pensions  and  National  Health 

1,112,717 

243,900 

Privy  Council 

1,250 

150 
5,175 

125,485 

Public  Works 

88,485 

95,074 

Railway  Commission 

2,860 

117,850 

Secretary  of  State 

26,750 

9,000 

3,200 

Soldiers'  Civil  Re-Establishment 

425 

8,105 

Supreme  Court 

700 

12,541 

1,961,325 

1,560,400 
810,926 

9,057,187 

Totals  (March  31,  1928) 

19,580,297 

60 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


Table  No.  16 — Statement  of  the  Number  of  Half-tones,  Line  Cuts,  Electros 
and  Dies  made  during  the  Fiscal  Year  1928-29 


Department 


Not  Executed  in  Printing  Bureau 


Half-tones      Line  Cuts       Electros 


Dies 


Agriculture 

Archives 

Canada  Gazette . 

Civil  Service  Commission 

Experimental  Farms 

External  Affairs 

Finance 

Government  Contracts  Supervision  Committee. 

Governor  General's  Secretary 

Health 

House  of  Commons 

Immigration  and  Colonization 

Indian  Affairs 

Insurance 

Interior 

Justice 

Labour " 

Marine  and  Fisheries 

Mines 

National  Defence 

National  Research  Council 

National  Revenue 

Patent  and  Copyright  Office 

Pensions  and  National  Health 

Post  Office 

Public  Printing  and  Stationery 

Public  Works 

Railways  and  Canals 

Railway  Commission 

Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police 

Supreme  Court 

Trade  and  Commerce 


Totals 

Totals  (March  31, 


1928), 


111 


501 

22 


391 

"24 


25 


1,291 
1,235 


31 


35 


168 

8 

47 

22 

107 

2 


4 
123 


,545 

,857 


65 


24 


120 


115 


3 
319 
129 

1 
5 


1,041 
1,486 


Table  No.  17 — Lithographing  and  Engraving  Division — Record  of  Work  for 

Fiscal  Year  1928-29 


Sketches  for  steel  dies 40 

Engraved  steel  dies 66 

Sketches  for  Invitation  and  Christmas  cards 29 

Engraved  Invitation  and  Christmas  cards 69 

Sketches  for  card  plates 23 

Engraved  card  plates 70 

Sketches  for  forms — Cheques,  etc 7 

Engraved  forms — Cheques,  etc 9 

Engraved  patches  for  cheques 183 

Making  diagrams  for  line  cuts 5 

Transfers  from  map  plates 1 ,  386 

Proofs  from  map  plates 717 


ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29 


61 


.Table  No.  18 — Comparative  Statement  of  the  Number  of  Letterpress  Impres- 
sions for  the  last  Eight  Years 


1921-22 
1922-23 
1923-24 
1924-25 
1925-26 
1926-27 
1927-28 
1928-29 


94,482,190 
98,789,239 
109,417,386 
96,879,527 
97,011,711 
113,973,666 
111,908,011 
112,475,762 


ACCOUNTANTS  BRANCH 

Ottawa,  August  1,  1929. 

F.  A.  Acland,  Esq., 

King's  Printer  and  Controller  of  Stationery. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  the  following  report  of  the  transactions 
of  this  branch  of  the  department  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  March  31,  1929, 
Complete  details  of  the  financial  operations  of  the  department  will  be  found 
under  the  following  heads: — 

1.  General  Financial  Statement. 

2.  Letter  of  Credit  Account. 

3.  King's  Printer's  Advance  Account. 

4.  Printing  Branch  Account  and  comparative  statements. 

5.  Stationery  Branch  Account  and  comparative  statements. 

6.  Votes,  detail  of  expenditure. 

7.  Canada  Gazette,  comparative  statement  of  Revenue  and  Expenditure. 

8.  Casual  Revenue  Account. 

Respectfully  submitted, 

F.  G.  BRONSKILL, 

Chief  Accountant. 


63 


64 


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68  DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 

2.  LETTER  OF  CREDIT  ACCOUNT 

Amount  received  by  letters  of  credit  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  March  31,  1929 $  3,597,660  52 

Amount  received  by  bills  of  exchange 19, 886  00 

Amount  received  by  cheques  on  New  York 43, 999  65 

Amount  received  by  cheques  on  France 225  23 

Amount  received  by  cheques  on  Holland 14  04 

Amount  received  by  cheques  on  Belgium 1  64 

Amount  received  by  cheques  on  Germany 194  25 

Amount  received  by  cheques  on  India 21  55 

Amount  received  by  cheques  on  Switzerland 4  18 

Amount  received  by  cheques  on  Denmark 1  29 

Amount  received  by  cheques  on  Spain 3  61 

Amount  received  by  cheques  on  Manilla,  P.I 10  20 

Total $  3 ,  662 ,  022  16 

Detail  by  accounts  of  net  expenditure  drawn  on  above  credit  account — 

Printing  Branch  Account $  2, 180, 256  11 

Stationery  Branch  Account 1 ,284,825  91 

Printing,  binding  and  distributing  the  Annual  Statutes 10, 000  00 

Canada  Gazette 34, 907  92 

Plant — Repairs  and  Renewals 29, 791  11 

Plant— New # 17,270  15 

Distribution  of  Parliamentary  Documents. . . .' 49, 789  37 

Printing  and  binding  Government  Publications  for  sale  and  distribution  to  departments 

and  the  public 36,724  60 

Gratuities 242  67 

Printing,  binding  and  distributing  the  Revised  Statutes  of  Ganada,  1927 17,248  97 

$  3,661,056  81 
Refunds  deposited  to  respective  accounts — 

Printing  Branch  Account $623  96 

Stationery  Branch  Account 333  87 

Plant — Repairs  and  Renewals 7  52 

965  35 

$  3,662,022  16 

3.  KING'S  PRINTER'S  ADVANCE  ACCOUNT 

Advances  to  King's  Printer  during  fiscal  year  1928-29 — 

For  Printing  Branch $2, 180,880  07 

For  Stationery  Branch 1,285,159  78 

$  3,466,039  85 

Amount  received  for  printing,  etc.,  in  excess  of  expenditure  on  same 40, 583  85 

Amount  received  for  stationery  in  excess  of  expenditure  on  same 46,088  12 

86, 671  97 

$  3,552,711  82 


Deposits  to  credit  of  Receiver  General  made  by  the  King's  Printer  to  cover  advances  made 
during  the  fiscal  year  1928-29 — 

Amount  received  from  Parliament  and  departments  for  printing,  etc $  2,188,208  39 

Amount  from  sale  of  empty  spools 9  65 

Amount  from  sale  of  electros 12  15 

Amount  from  sale  of  sanitary  towels 2  65 

Amount  from  sale  of  discarded  material 107  98 

$  2,188,340  82 

Amount  of  refunds— Printing  Branch 623  96 

%  2,188,964  78 
Amount  received  from  Parliament  and  departments  for  stationery,  etc.  .$  1,338,945  63 

Amount  from  sale  of  discarded  typewriters 4, 971  80 

Amount  from  sale  of  discarded  material 109  95 

*  L    *     *   ^      «      .  $  1,344,027  38 

Amount  of  refunds— Stationery  Branch 333  87 

1,344,361  25 

.  .  ,     ,  %  3,533,326  03 

Amount  by  which  the  stock  of  the  Printing  Branch  was  increased  during  the  fiscal 

year  1928-29 * 32>499  14 

.  L  ,         ,  .  .     ,  $  3,565,825  17 

Amount  by  which  the  stock  of  the  Stationery  Branch  was  decreased  during  the  fiscal 

year  1928-29 13, 113  35 

%  3,552,711  82 


ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29  69 

4.  PRINTING  BRANCH  ACCOUNT 

Inventory  on  April  1 ,  1928 %      384 ,  482  35 

Expenditure  for  the  fiscal  year  1928-29 — 

Wages $  1,047,022  00 

Printing  material $    86,555  83 

Customs  duties  (rechargeable) 2, 209  54 


88,765  37 

Paper  stock 681,256  40 

Outside  work 324, 505  81 

Office  printing 19, 716  26 

Office  stationery 1 ,  780  53 

Freight 691  27 

Brokerage 56  00 

Motor  supplies,  repairs,  gasoline,  etc.,  50%  of  cost 1,232  72 

Char  service  and  cleaning  material 14, 629  75 


38,106  53 


2,180,256  11 
Profit  for  the  fiscal  year  1928-29  transferred  to  Casual  Revenue  Account 40,583  85 

$  2,605,322  31 


Revenue  for  the  fiscal  year  1928-29— 

Sale  of  inside  work,  printing,  etc.,  to  Parliament  and  departments $  1,853,834  92 

Sale  of  outside  work  to  Parliament  and  departments 334, 373  47 

$  2,188,208  39 

Sale  of  empty  spools 9  65 

Sale  of  electros 12  15 

Sale  of  sanitary  towels 2  65 

Sale  of  discarded  material 107  98 


132  43 


$  2,188,340  82 
Inventory  on  March  31,  1929 416,981  49 

$  2,605,322  31 


Note. — Printing  supplied  during  the  fiscal  year  and  not  paid  by  departments  when  books  closed  on 
May  31,  1929:— 

Agriculture,  $60,692.58;  Civil  Service  Commission,  $7,036.00;  External  Affairs,  $7,135.49; 
Health,  $1,252.34;  Interior,  $44,170.99;  Justice,  $1,699.90;  Marine  and  Fisheries,  $4,264.71; 
National  Defence,  $5,776.40;  Public  Printing  and  Stationery,  $2,139.65;  Public  Works, 
$740.92;  Railways  and  Canals,  $3,604.20;  Railway  Commission,  $292.07;  Secretary  of 
State,  $2,686.79;  Trade  and  Commerce,  $35,319.17 $      176,811  21 

Detail  of  Inventory  of  Printing  Branch  as  on  March  31,  1929 

Work  in  process— Labour  and  burden — 

Hand  composition $        48, 392  58 

Monotype  composition 40, 008  32 

Linotype  composition 14, 520  18 

$      102,921  08 

Stereotyping 2, 023  72 

Presswork 20, 533  03 

Binding 22,992  87 

Die-stamping 270  93 

Engraving 1,126  25 

$      149,867  88 

Work  in  process — Material — 

Press  division— Ink $  566  04 

Bindery  division 585  63 

Engraving  division 444  79 

Paper 87, 333  23 

Salvage 71  44 

$        89,001  13 

Materials,  etc.,  on  hand  in  different  divisions — 

Paper  Stores  division $        88,946  43 

Printing  Stores  division 62, 743  01 

Mechanical  division 1 ,  292  19 

Hand  composing  division 40  41 

Monotype  composing  division ■ 36  60 

Linotype  composing  division 8  53 

Stereotype  division 76  02 

Press  division 1 ,  126  38 

Bindery  division 8,838  06 

Engraving  division 433  13 

$      163,540  76 

Amount  for  lithographing,  printing,  binding,  etc.,  paid  to  outside  firms  and  not  charged  to 

Parliament  and  departments  on  March  31 ,  1929 14,571  72 

$      416,981  49 


70 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


Statement,  by  Departments,  of  accounts  paid  for  Printing,  Binding,  Litho- 
graphing, etc.,  done  outside  the  Department,  during  the  fiscal  year  ending 
March  31,  1929. 


Department 


Duty, 
Freight,  etc., 

paid  to 

transportation 

companies 

etc. 


Printing, 
Binding  and 
Litho- 
graphing 


Total 


Advisory  Board  on  Tariff  and  Taxation 

Agriculture 

Archives 

Auditor  General 

Civil  Service  Commission 

Exchequer  Court 

External  Affairs 

Finance ; 

Government  Contracts  Supervision  Committee. 

Governor  General's  Secretary 

Health 

House  of  Commons 

Immigration  and  Colonization 

Indian  Affairs 

Insurance 

Interior 

Justice 

Labour 

Library  of  Parliament 

Marine  and  Fisheries 

Mines 

National  Defence 

National  Research  Council 

National  Revenue 

Post  office 

Privy  Council 

Public  Printing  and  Stationery 

Public  Works 

Railways  and  Canals 

Railway  Commission 

Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police 

Secretary  of  State 

Senate  of  Canada 

Soldiers'  Civil  Re-Establishment 

Soldier  Settlement  Board 

Supreme  Court 

Trade  and  Commerce 


cts 


72  35 
1  60 


1  50 


22  66 
10  18 


12  36 
149  20 


4  50 


62  53 
19  34 

17  51 

18  90 


2,481  50 


3  65 


23  82 


$       cts 

14  17 

20,987  14 

386  75 

11  54 

97  36 

19  05 

398  51 

4,249  74 

1  80 

754  94 

851  17 

3,859  05 

41,067  91 

339  84 

156  03 

53,274  30 

391  17 

1,151  78 

19  06 

18,643  09 

22,927  80 

2,138  80 

71  81 

12,505  77 

102,403  22 

90  40 

999  76 

926  34 

1,660  82 

66  97 

1,650  30 

12,447  65 

1,345  58 

2,215  19 

223  30 

36  55 

13,219  55 


$       cts. 

14  17 

21,059  49 

388  35 

11  54 

97  36 

19  05 

400  01 

4,249  74 

1  80 

754  94 

851  17 

3,881  71 

41,078  09 

339  84 

168  39 

53,423  50 

391  17 

1,156  28 

19  06 

18,705  62 

22,947  14 

2,156  31 

90  71 

12,505  77 

104,884  72 

90  40 

999  76 

926  34 

1,664  47 

66  97 

1,650  30 

12,447  65 

1,345  58 

2,215  19 

223  30 

36  55 

13,243  37 


Total. 


2,901  60 


321,604  21 


324,505  81 


ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29 


71 


Statement  of  Printing,  Lithographing,  etc.,  and  Paper,  supplied  to  Parliament 
and  Departments,  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  March  31,  1929. 


Department 


Outside 
Work 


Inside 

Printing, 

Binding, 

etc. 


Paper 


Total 


Advisory  Board  on  Tariff  and  Taxation. . 

Agriculture 

Archives 

Auditor  General 

Chief  Electoral  Officer 

Civil  Service  Commission 

Diamond  Jubilee  Committee 

Exchequer  Court 

External  Affairs 

Finance 

Govt.  Contracts  Supervision  Committee. 

Governor  General's  Secretary 

Health 

House  of  Commons 

Immigration  and  Colonization 

Indian  Affairs 

Insurance 

Interior 

Justice 

Labour 

Library  of  Parliament 

Marine  and  Fisheries 

Mines 

National  Defence 

National  Gallery  of  Canada 

National  Research  Council 

National  Revenue 

Penitentiaries 

Post  Office 

Privy  Council 

Public  Printing  and  Stationery 

Public  Works 

Railways  and  Canals 

Railway  Commission 

Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police 

Royal  Mint 

Secretary  of  State 

Senate  of  Canada 

Soldiers'  Civil  Re-Establishment 

Soldier  Settlement  Board 

Supreme  Court 

Trade  and  Commerce 


21 


\       cts. 

14  17 

499  74 
85  79 
11  54 


97  36 


19  05 
400  01 
801  56 
1  80 
754  94 
739  07 
710  55 
977  53 
339  84 
168  39 
547  61 
368  94 
168  78 

19  06 
700  90 
202  00 
143  39 


12 

117 

1 

1 
1 


98  80 
521  58 

14-29 
329  11 
111  00 
099  50 
889  21 
019  84 
109  14 
707  46 


13,058  72 

'2,"" 


13 


148  82 

223  30 

44  49 

226  19 


$   cts 

7,262  94 

104,597  71 

5,365  50 

14,009  80 

11,985  10 

4,406  50 

374  81 

162  17 

17,760  30 

9,296  09 

26  78 

1,689  95 

16,554  85 

106,255  38 

13,206  61 

4.691  64 
24,056  22 
73,551  86 

9.692  47 
36,256  38 

6,623  45 
61,154  43 
38,512  58 
44,006  32 

778  78 
1,098  95 

78,156  42 

1,673  92 

121,956  66 

779  40 
119,136  51 

11,190  98 

9,211  57 

6,470  57 

7,830  98 

20  17 

33,261  83 

8,167  68 

9,772  87 

3,041  04 

5,961  67 

133,934  10 


cts, 


cts. 


296  26 

7,573  37 

76,367  27 

202,464  72 

350  93 

5,802  22 

1,453  87 

15,475  21 

19,941  29 

31,926  39 

4,034  40 

8,538  26 

34  16 

408  97 

34  78 

216  00 

5,803  75 

23,964  06 

10,089  60 

23,187  25 

64  69 

93  27 

1,349  77 

3,794  66 

10,739  24 

28,033  16 

18,316  32 

127,282  25 

24,711  77 

78,895  91 

2,670  70 

7,702  18 

3,264  58 

27,489  19 

55,606  68 

182,706  15 

1,689  59 

11,751  00 

12,706  01 

50,131  17 

124  30 

6,766  81 

22,791  48 

102,646  81 

12,338  76 

74,053  34 

29,597  76 

75,747  47 

301  57 

1,080  35 

560  58 

1,758  33 

100,041  13 

190,719  13 

1,079  27 

2,767  48 

118,629  53 

357,915  30 

306  60 

1,197  00 

58,023  04 

178,259  05 

7,437  66 

19,517  85 

5,041  70 

15,273  11 

908  09 

7,487  80 

9,604  36 

19,142  80 

21  85 

42  02 

9,407  89 

55,728  44 

209  99 

8,377  67 

12,106  06 

24,027  75 

2,454  86 

5,719  20 

3,649  67 

9,655  83 

45,729  17 

192,889  46 

Total. 


334,373  47 


1,163,943  94 


689,890 


2,188,208  39 


72 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


Comparative  Statement  of  Printing,  Binding,  Lithographing,  etc.,  and  Paper 
supplied  to  Parliament  and  Departments,  for  the  last  five  fiscal  years, 
1924-25,  1925-26,  1926-27,  1927-28,  and  1928-29. 


Department 

1924-25 

1925-26 

1926-27 

1927-28 

1928-29 

$    cts. 

$    cts. 

$    cts. 

979  65 
160,705  29 
18,593  11 
15,756  12 

$    cts. 

921  01 

192,344  88 

4,004  30 

13,049  01 

$    cts. 
7,573  37 

180,905  07 
4,423  64 
15,810  73 
223  69 
7,712  77 
6,217  34 

153,160  51 

1,398  83 

16,471  20 

202,464  72 

5,802  22 

15,475  21 

Chief  Electoral  Officer 

59,854  84 
7,217  68 

36,609  23 
6,807  83 

8,696  34 

8,970  92 

11,382  74 

447  87 

19,591  11 

22,697  88 

187  34 

4,302  55 

24,479  23 

97,356  21 

114,293  04 

8,051  72 

27,379  44 

163,991  88 

5,588  18 

46,061  26 

6,412  97 

99,989  10 

66,054  54 

74,187  04 

269  31 

2,056  87 

216,908  60 

31,926  39 

8,538  26 

408  97 

217  58 

11,360  75 

38,024  67 

96  05 

1,800  38 

19,705  13 

177,574  10 

143,775  51 

8,852  68 

30,298  81 

155,836  30 

25,944  33 

41,004  15 

8,056  40 

91,313  40 

74,747  59 

63,186  35 

1,262  14 

995  74 

137,174  79 

706  72 

38,296  99 

2,743  96 

364,098  14 

646  28 

140,612  94 

22,989  34 

14,724  32 

3,738  83 

9,104  87 

77  01 

9,450  84 

9,143  09 

13,383  30 

5,581  99 

8,215  41 

137,200  49 

447  95 

19,913  20 

21,416  43 

542  69 

2,201  70 

14,280  50 

151,772  22 

100,695  87 

5,579  34 

26,422  15 

135,266  56 

6,345  58 

37,186  78 

5,239  22 

82,753  26 

98,909  24 

61,096  29 

396  48 

2,017  92 

174,370  38 

224  99 

16,194  29 

23,180  91 

114  77 

5,021  37 

19,873  19 

165,109  39 

30,626  33 

8,140  51 

28,688  30 

154,334  71 

5,618  83 

46,333  63 

5,021  02 

89,262  81 

85,302  70 

59,156  31 

356  62 

2,710  51 

159,616  21 

216  00 

23,964  06 

23,187  25 

Government  Contracts  Supervision  Committee 

93  27 
3,794  66 

Health 

28,033  16 

127,282  25 

78,895  91 

7,702  18 

27,489  19 

182,706  15 

11,751  00 

50,131  17 

6,766  81 

102,646  81 

74,053  34 

75,747  47 

1,080  35 

1,758  33 

190,719  13 

43,125  53 

3,019  10 

287,342  21 

608  33 

127,966  70 

18,529  03 

12,939  56 

5,013  80 

37  10 
10,941  24 
7,013  62 
12,872  53 
4,530  12 
9,575  70 
165,470  18 

36,594  61 

2,541  90 

349,987  95 

1,014  30 

137,269  84 

20,970  09 

13,530  74 

4,004  33 

141  67 
8,977  72 
4,574  45 
14,551  57 
3,903  26 
9,127  96 
175,367  24 

2,935  80 

360,334  60 

1,754  59 

248,739  14 

20,204  43 

31,406  53 

9,157  69 

4,765  39 

150  35 

41,008  99 

2,297  20 

16,143  91 

4,084  10 

10,056  82 

204,900  93 

2,767  48 

Post  Office 

357,915  30 

1,197  00 

Public  Printing  and  Stationery 

178,259  05 
19,517  85 

15,273  11 

7,487  80 

19,142  80 

42  02 

55,728  44 

8,377  67 

24,027  75 

Soldier  Settlement  Board 

5,719  20 

Supreme  Court 

9,655  83 

Trade  and  Commerce 

192,889  46 

Total 

2,027,234  61 

1,899,373  91 

1,936,730  31 

2,197,615  81 

2,188,208  39 

ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928  29 


5.  STATIONERY  BRANCH  ACCOUNT 


73 


Inventory,  April  1 ,  1928 %      136,762  43 

Amount  of  goods  purchased  during  the  fiscal  year  1928-29 — 

Canadian $  1,103,144  88 

United  Kingdom 18,546  35 

United  States 27, 677  88 

Other  countries 324  64 

( 'ustoms  (rechargeable) 4, 385  33 

Postage  (rechargeable) 4, 400  00 

Freight  (rechargeable) 12, 557  14 

21,342  47 

1,171,036  22 

Amount  of  other  expenditure  during  the  fiscal  year  1928-1929 — 

Wages  (direct) 99, 754  53 

Wages  (indirect)  mechanical  repairs  and  upkeep 1, 010  61 

100,765  14 

Office  Printing 493  81 

Office  Stationery 3, 592  37 

4,086  18 

Brokerage 125  50 

Freight,  etc 5, 626  69 

Char  service  and  cleaning  material 2, 446  56 

Motor  supplies,  repairs,  renewals,  gasoline,  oil,  etc.,  30  p.c.  of  cost 739  62 

113,789  69 

Profit  for  the  fiscal  year  1928-29  transfered  to  Casual  Revenue  Account 46, 088  12 


$  1,467,676  46 


Amount  of  goods  issued  to  Parliament  and  departments  during  the  fiscal 

year  1928-29 $  1,338,945  63 

Amount  of  sale  of  discarded  typewriters 4, 971  80 

Amount  of  sale  of  discarded  material 109  95 

1,344,027  38 

Inventory,  March  31,  1929 123,649  08 


$  1,467,676  46 


The  stock  of  goods  has  been  decreased  $13,113.35  during  the  fiscal  year. 

Note: — Stationery  supplied  during  the  fiscal  year  and  not  paid  by  departments  when  books  closed 
on  May  31,  1929:— 

Agriculture,  $18,871.48;  Civil  Service  Commission,  $8,336.87;  External  Affairs,  $3,739.71;  Governor 
General's  Secretary,  $349.28;  Health,  $547.11;  Interior,  $42,400.40;  Justice,  $3,318.00;  Marine  and  Fisheries, 
$5,304.94;  National  Defence,  $4,786.83;  Public  Works,  $1,762.55;  Railways  and  Canals,  $9,525.70;  Railway 
Commission,  $674.50;  Secretary  of  State,  $1,987.77;  Trade  and  Commerce,  $15,520.02 $117,125.16 

Statement  of  Goods  purchased  and  Goods  issued  to  Parliament  and  Depart- 
ments in  each  month  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  March  31,  1929. 


Month 


Canadian 


United 
Kingdom 


United 

States 


Other 
Countries 


Total 


Goods 
Issued 


1928 

April 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1929 

January 

February 

March 

Refunds  on  goods  purchased 

Total   of   goods   purchased 
and  goods  issued 


$   cts 

56,899  56 
103,809  08 
80,353  52 
90,431  32 
85,057  70 
76,952  71 
85,578  77 
105,818  21 
92,566  35 


85,231  43 

85,081  93 

176,822  07 


1,124,602  65 
115  30 


$   cts. 
337  95 


2,060  09 


3,437  26 
2,983  27 
2,814  31 
1,271  18 
1,758  00 


684  88 
1,473  43 
1,725  98 


$   cts 

219  07 

683  59 
2,400  60 
1,487  83 
1,098  24 

777  32 
1,340  37 

813  42 
1,469  55 


5,496  54 
2,784  97 
9,163  38 


cts, 

21  54 
17  65 

1  29 
35  02 

7  02 
52  22 

6  83 
15  84 
67  88 


43  08 
43  15 
13  12 


$   cts, 

57,478  12 
104,510  32 
84,815  50 
91,954  17 
89,600  22 
80,765  52 
89,740  28 
107,918  65 
95,861  78 


91,455  93 

89,383  48 

187,724  55 


18,546  35 


27,734  88 
57  00 


324  64 


1,171,208  52 
172  30 


1,124,487  35 


18,546  35 


27,677  88 


324  64 


1,171,036  22 


$   cts. 

80,594  26 

80,592  07 

142,376  43 

97,973  93 

80,878  99 

123,562  57 

115,652  11 

92,587  29 

81,412  99 


162,134  89 
103,060  88 
178,119  22 


,338,945  63 


74 


DEPARTMENT  OF  P.UBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


Comparative  Statement  of  amount  of  Goods  issued  to  Parliament  and  Depart- 
ments for  the  last  five  fiscal  years,  1924-25,  1925-26,  1926-27,  1927-28  and 
1928-29. 


Department 

1924-25 

1925-26 

1926-27 

1927-28 

1928-29 

$    cts. 

$    cts. 

$    cts. 

2,856  57 

72,294  02 

5,818  37 

4,687  55 

724  61 

7,551  95 

7,616  69 

558  30 

4,534  99 

10,301  73 

1,108  57 

2,842  19 

9,842  88 

21,256  18 

25,643  58 

35,557  62 

2,423  97 

96,551  68 

21  77 

8,935  05 

6,562  16 

835  43 

49,123  19 

17,158  49 

87,399  80 

225  88 

853  75 

110,518  53 

$    cts. 

4,233  55 

75,777  93 

4,759  69 

4,497  82 

182  52 

3,283  70 

7,896  66 

665  99 

7,880  85 

13,399  32 

584  07 

2,218  45 

10,371  32 

18,944  00 

24,755  19 

45,648  07 

3,252  09 

96,907  13 

1  58 

8,336  03 

7,957  26 

1,045  90 

58,481  19 

19,682  93 

102,971  71 

186  79 

1,144  34 

118,350  30 

$  cts. 
1,515  95 

61,530  69 

2,870  80 

3,253  64 

2,621  49 

1,022  95 

5,747  14 

319  34 

4,661  95 

19,488  46 

261  68 

1,925  90 

7,924  24 

12,388  41 

28,623  70 

33,251  04 

2,375  44 

77,971  07 

20  97 

6,038  70 

3,385  17 

894  73 

34,280  95 

19,423  09 

72,718  15 

70  81 

1,330  90 

77,638  16 

1,797  68 

8,062  54 

7,731  48 

115,996  55 

1,129  60 

56,790  20 

32,648  13 

24,796  70 

5,201  39 

12,315  16 

181  94 

8,796  02 

6,306  99 

35,948  09 

14,959  82 

714  84 

30,332  34 

67,985  35 

4,904  61 

4,861  17 

1,517  21 

10,419  34 

5,243  56 

375  21 

4,271  70 

10,355  94 

951  15 

2,910  89 

10,219  50 

10,682  25 

26,820  00 

25,588  15 

3,700  20 

84,138  39 

41  44 

6,956  91 

4,884  44 

638  55 

36,177  29 

18,121  82 

76,057  69 

146  77 

2,287  61 

108,440  16 

81,197  41 

7,356  54 

5,429  62 

140  64 

Chief  Electoral  Officer    

339  61 

8,336  87 

814  58 

7,515  73 

10,674  81 

Government  Contracts  Supervision  Committee 

640  31 
3,227  17 

Health                  

11,208  79 

17,029  95 

32,910  62 

43,165  00 

2,857  03 

111,485  21 

20  35 

7,408  38 

9,047  80 

957  93 

54,870  11 

23,632  29 

119,885  86 

80  67 

1,990  12 

119,006  32 

9,255  02 

9,555  26 
181,487  63 

1,213  57 
59,740  43 
35,518  94 
35,685  33 

7,306  12 

20,032  77 

280  63 

8,392  68 

5,108  47 
36,570  01 
17,462  01 

1,257  12 
34,034  26 

9,568  57 

8,574  39 
219,409  87 

1,564  09 
69,672  29 
31,651  31 
28,167  88 

7,161  32 

23,700  13 

351  66 

8,337  93 

5,859  57 
40,456  82 
20,306  21 

1,207  31 
45, 127  67 

8,838  60 
231,393  14 

1,561  34 
66,362  82 
35,096  75 
38,056  02 

8,555  67 

18,197  92 

342  90 

12,068  81 

6,580  93 
41,401  53 
26,876  78 

1,901  16 
56,922  35 

9,646  32 

Post  Office      

244,012  96 

1,725  31 

80,597  06 

37,725  50 

41,714  69 

7,758  60 

41,630  49 

Royal  Mint 

377  01 

17,371  42 

6,467  63 

69,791  23 

31,488  03 

2,454  04 

Trade  and  Commerce 

63,439  67 

Total 

845,749  04 

1,001,597  55 

1,114,922  52 

1,197,573  10 

1,338,945  63 

ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29  75 

6.  DETAIL  OF  EXPENDITURE  OF  APPROPRIATIONS 

Vote  No.  23 — Civil  Government  Salaries $    80, 1 90  00 

Detail  of  expenditure — 

Salaries  paid  during  the  year $    79,855  97 

Unexpended  balance 334  03 

80, 190  00 

Vote  No.  23 — Civil  Government  Contingencies %    15, 000  00 

Detail  of  expenditure — 

Window  cleaning $  342  00 

Washing  office  towels  and  welfare  linen 237  50 

Office  printing 5,805  25 

Office  stationery 6, 163  98 

Travelling  expenses 1 ,  346  87 

Telephone  and  telegraph 469  28 

Taxi  hire  and  street  car  fare 123  90 

Postage 91  00 

Newspapers  and  periodicals 233  11 

Advertising 96  50 

Sundries 28  15 

%    14,937  54 
Unexpended  balance 62  46 

15,000  00 


Vote  No.  261 — Printing,  binding  and  distributing  the  Annual  Statutes  , $    10, 000  00 

Detail  of  expenditure — 

English  edition,  7,000  copies: 

Printing  and  binding $      5,994  12 

Paper 2 ,  495  50 

$      8,489  62 

French  edition — 1,500  copies: 

Printing  and  binding $      3, 108  35 

Paper 541  68 

3,650  03 

$    12,139  65 


Note. — The  excess  of  $2,139.65  in  the  amount  of  the  expenditure  was  covered  by  a  supplementary 
vote  in  the  fiscal  year  1929-30. 

Vote  No.  262— Canada  Gazette $    35, 000  00 

Detail  of  expenditure — 

57  regular  editions  with  5  supplements  and  index  and  23  extra 
editions,  from  March  3,  1928,  to  March  30,  1929— 

Printing  and  binding $  25,438  25 

Paper 4,469  67 

Editing  and  translating — Salaries  of  the  Editor  and  Assistant  Editor 5, 000  00 

$    34,907  92 

Unexpended  balance 92  08 

$    35,000  00 

Vote  No.  %3— Plant— Repairs  and  Renewals $    30,000  00 

Detail  of  expenditure — 

Offices $  131  81 

Paper  Stores  Division 14  68 

Printing  and  sundry  stores  division 437  71 

Shipping  division 3  50 

Chief  mechanic's  division 2,439  52 

Hand  composing  division 1, 753  00 

Monotype  division 5, 582  82 

Linotype  division 3, 877  53 

Stereotype  division 350  63 

Press  division 10, 676  09 

Bindery  division 1, 971  25 

Ruling  division 104  39 

Die  stamping  division 32  20 

Envelope  division ; 221  86 

Divisions  generally 1, 085  09 

Customs  duties 798  37 

Brokerage 83  00 

Freight 227  66 

$    29,791  11 

Unexpended  balance 208  89 

.. $    30,000  00 


76  DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 

Vote  No.  264— Plant— New $    18,650  00 

Detail  of  expenditure — 

Shipping  division $  1 .  890  00 

Bindery  division 14,385  33 

Customs  duties 950  31 

Brokerage 2  00 

Freight 42  51 

$    17,270  15 

Unexpended  balance 1 ,  379  85 

$    18,650  00 


Vote  No.  265 — Distribution  of  Parliamentary  Documents $    50, 000  00 

Detail  of  expenditure — 

Office  printing 

Office  stationery 

Office  stationery  (addressograph  equipment) 

Postage 

Express  and  freight 

Char  service  and  cleaning  material. 

Motor  supplies,  repairs,  renewals,  gasoline,  oil — 20  p.c.  of  cost 

Sundries 

Salaries  (direct) 30,499  12 

Salaries  (indirect)  mechanical  repairs  and  upkeep 


Unexpended  balance. 


% 

1,920  83 

2,516  36 

7,364  83 

2,059  00 

636  90 

1,036  24 

493  10 

3  00 

30,499  12 

3,259  99 

% 

49,789  37 

210  63 

Vote  No.  266 — Printing  and  binding  Government  Publications  for  sale  and  distribution 

to  departments  and  the  public $    40, 000  00 

Detail  of  expenditure — 

Printing,  binding,  etc. — 

Acts,  public  and  private 

Bills,  public  and  private 

Postal  Guide  and  supplements,  1928 

Annual  Reports 

Debates 

Votes  and  Proceedings,  etc 

Reports  of  special  committees 

Members'  speeches. 

Senators'  speeches 


Unexpended  balance. 


$   6,482  92 

1,324  20 

1,009  13 

5,090  65 

8,192  84 

1,914  75 

9,206  47 

3,287  71 

215  93 

$  36,724  60 

3,275  40 

$  40,000  00 

Gratuities  under  Chap.  22,  Sec.  56,  R.S.C.,  1927 $  242  67 

Detail  of  expenditure — 

Gratuity  of  two  months'  salary  paid  to  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Stewart,  widow  of 

John  Charles  Stewart,  labourer,  died  January  31,  1929 $  242  67 


Vote  No.  495— Printing,  binding  and  distributing  the  Revised  Statutes  of  Canada,  1927 $    25, 000  00 

Detail  of  expenditure — 

English  Edition— 6,000  sets  of  5  volumes  each- 
Printing  and  binding %      9, 812  87 

Paper lt 068  91 

«     JA  gg^  yg 

French  Edition— 1,500  sets  of  5  volumes  each- 
Printing  and  binding $      6,107  81 

Paper ; 259  38 

6,367  19 

$    25,000  0C 


TT              ^   J  U   1  17-248  97 

Unexpended  balance 7  751  03 


Note.— See  Annual  Report  of  1927-1928  for  initial  expenditure  of  $96,265.32. 


ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29 
7.  "CANADA  GAZETTE' 


77 


Comparative  Statement  of  Revenue  and  Expenditure  on  account  of  Canada 
Gazette  from  the  year  1874  to  the  fiscal  year  ending  March  31,  1929 


Year 

Expenditure 

Revenue 

Printing 

Editing 

Copies 

Sub- 

Paper 

and 

and  Trans 

Subscrip- 

Advertising 

Loss 

Gain 

Gratis 

scribers 

Distributing 

lating 

tions 

$    cts. 

$    cts. 

$    cts. 

$    cts. 

$    cts. 

$    cts. 

$    cts. 

1874.... 

1,045 

77 

1,142  17 

2,416  40 

119  45 

242  20 

931  43 

2,504  39 

1875.... 

1,077 

85 

1,177  17 

2,414  00 

135  53 

242  80 

843  74 

2,640  16 

1876.... 

1,049 

88 

1,195  98 

2,301  51 

184  80 

241  80 

578  41 

2,862  08 

1877.... 

1,084 

81 

1,292  25 

2,323  45 

141  80 

224  75 

681  62 

2,851  13 

1878.... 

1,108 

79 

1,016  65 

2,139  48 

125  80 

268  40 

683  47 

2,330  06 

1879.... 

1,115 

85 

1,195  21 

2,293  81 

123  90 

246  50 

739  82 

2,626  60 

1880.... 

1,170 

70 

1,208  48 

2,357  72 

106  30 

243  90 

865  38 

2,563  22 

1881.... 

1,251 

68 

1,197  38 

2,132  20 

137  40 

353  65 

1,028  04 

2,085  29 

1882.... 

1,238 

92 

1,346  42 

2,449  58 

199  00 

378  44 

2,706  28 

910  28 

1883.... 

1,250 

109 

1,414  24 

2,181  48 

215  30 

367  25 

2,181  53 

1,262  24 

1884.... 

1,290 

85 

1,411  33 

2,231  23 

148  24 

414  67 

1,921  82 

1,454  31 

1885.... 

1,321 

69 

250  00 

2,291  74 

150  05 

289  85 

1,264  65 

1,137  29 

1886.... 

1,318 

77 

2,302  00 

2,288  57 

62  20 

299  70 

2,007  82 

2,345  25 

1887.... 

1,366 

84 

1,797  21 

2,537  79 

389  10 

321  40 

2,831  04 

1,571  66 

1888.... 

1,369 

81 

2,164  85 

2,933  57 

349  80 

307  35 

2,909  72 

2,231  15 

1889.... 

1,367 

83 

1,883  83 

2,859  19 

103  60 

308  60 

4,637  49 

99  47 

1890.... 

1,429 

71 

1,758  50 

3,128  36 

204  00 

487  95 

2,777  03 

l,'825-88' 

1891.... 

1,436 

84 

1,492  62 

2,060  45 

211  85 

139  38 

3,293  84 

331  70 

1892.... 

1,429 

86 

1,480  19 

2,069  36 

188  98 

313  47 

3,436  32 

11  26 

1893.... 

1,426 

84 

1,485  71 

2,826  07 

240  54 

306  50 

4,612  37 

366  55 

1894.... 

1,418 

82 

1,183  66 

2,485  08 

265  10 

298  73 

3,545  87 

*"89'24' 

1895.... 

1,425 

75 

1,153  87 

2,704  36 

232  50 

281  65 

4,015  64 

206  56 

1896.... 

1,428 

72 

1,129  52 

3,007  00 

259  75 

276  65 

4,678  69 

559  07 

1897.... 

1,492 

83 

1,129  07 

3,003  51 

245  40 

298  55 

4,992  94 

913  51 

1898.... 

1,438 

87 

1,450  21 

3,803  11 

337  10 

312  70 

5,574  45 

296  73 

1899.... 

1,486 

89 

940  43 

3,273  01 

255  30 

329  95 

3,948  65 

'   i9014 

1900.... 

1,529 

96 

1,092  72 

3,640  17 

289  50 

350  00 

4,679  98 

7  59 

1901.... 

1,528 

97 

1,349  79 

4,267  81 

256  60 

329  65 

4,370  82 

i;i73  73 

1902.... 

1,553 

97 

1,430  89 

3,858  22 

284  00 

361  80 

4,451  39 

759  92 

1903.... 

1,545 

105 

1,315  56 

3,999  78 

253  60 

371  85 

5,667  65 

470  56 

1904.... 

1,559 

116 

1,427  48 

4,368  81 

309  80 

430  40 

4,523  25 

I,i52  44 

1905.... 

1,573 

177 

1,684  85 

5,950  35 

364  80 

604  12 

6,997  50 

398  38 

1906. . . . 

1,559 

191 

1,629  58 

6,909  57 

460  85 

750  00 

7,644  35 

605  65 

1907.... 

1,616 

184 

1,322  63 

4,248  17 

329  20 

524  27 

6,821  20 

1,445  47 

1908.... 

1,625 

200 

1,805  72 

7,484  48 

709  80 

762  15 

8,472  51 

"76534' 

1909.... 

1,665 

185 

2,053  45 

7,319  99 

587  60 

721  20 

8,684  40 

555  44 

1910.... 

1,692 

208 

2,158  56 

7,983  10 

815  80 

775  25 

14,219  41 

4,037  20 

1911.... 

1,725 

250 

2,548  44 

9,532  19 

918  55 

949  85 

15,844  95 

3,795  62 

1912.... 

1,742 

258 

2,943  28 

9,600  27 

438  60 

979  15 

21,077  11 

9,074  11 

1913.... 

1,754 

271 

4,385  03 

19,349  44 

3,261  07 

1,034  20 

30,804  59 

4,843  25 

1914.... 

1,791 

284 

2,720  83 

15,477  24 

3,842  06 

1,090  05 

23,062  88 

2,112  80 

1915.... 

1,907 

293 

4,102  28 

22,579  68 

4,202  56 

1,121  45 

18,322  04 

ii,44i  03 

1916.... 

1,901 

424 

3,018  22 

14,978  79 

2,905  34 

1,505  58 

28,357  80 

8,961  03 

1917.... 

991 

484 

4,088  93 

14,248  76 

2,658  00 

1,677  20 

35,885  58 

16,567  09 

1918.... 

1,000 

600 

6,966  17 

28,214  72 

3,764  71 

2,335  35 

29,671  57 

-6]938'68' 

1919.... 

1,303 

797 

5,249  59 

28,743  33 

3,007  00 

3,071  10 

26,342  60 

7,586  22 

1920.... 

1,278 

722 

4,693  32 

42,850  34 

3,268  00 

2,746  00 

47,579  26 

486  40 

1921.... 

1,259 

1,321 

11,716  53 

29,295  91 

2,508  62 

5,251  00 

56,230  57 

17,960  51 

1922.... 

1,037 

1,088 

8,721  43 

31,463  74 

3,160  00 

4,331  35 

73,498  94 

34,485  12 

1923.... 

1,086 

1,039 

5,600  45 

29,019  07 

3,900,00 

4,092  69 

78,754  52 

44,327  69 

1924.... 

1,122 

1,003 

4,410  90 

26,175  61 

4,140  00 

3,973  35 

68,194  09 

37,440  93 

1925.... 

1,006 

969 

3,537  35 

21,137  13 

3,290  00 
4,210  00 
4,340  00 

4,522  69 
3,442  45 

72,900  87 
63,442  70 

49,459  08 

1926.... 

1,102 

698 

3,052  08 

21,481  34 

38,141  73 

1927. . . . 

1,248 

752 

3,527  95 

21,688  15 

3,767  48 

64,544  49 

38,755  87 

1928.... 

1,364 

686 

3,664  24 

22,451  58 

4,589  52 

3,407  02 

77,835  60 

50,537  28 

1929.... 

1,496 

554 

4,469  67 

25,438  25 

5,000  00 

2,773  25 

77,440  71 

45,306  04 

Translating  and  editing  from  1913. 


78  DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 

8.  CASUAL  REVENUE  ACCOUNT 

Detail  of  proceeds  of  Casual  Revenue  sales  made  during  the  fiscal  year  ending  March  31,  1929. 

Sales  of  parliamentary  and  other  publications  to  Parliament  and  departments. .  .$     18,834  11 

Sales  to  the  public 47, 772  76 

$    66,606  87 

Sales  of  Canada  Gazette  and  advertising 77, 440  71 

Sales  of  subscriptions 2, 773  25 

80,213  96 

Sales  of  paper 13,900  04 

Sales  of  packing  cases 491  25 

Sales  of  discarded  office  equipment 560  04 

Sales  of  waste  twine 40  00 

14,991  33 

Sales  of  printing  to  Parliament  and  departments — Amount  received  in  excess  of  expenditure 

during  the  fiscal  year  1928-29 40, 583  85 

Sales  of  Stationery  to  Parliament  and  departments — Amount  received  in  excess  of  expenditure 

during  the  fiscal  year  1928-29 46, 088  12 

Total $  248,484  13 

Note 

Parliamentary  publications  supplied  during  the  fiscal  year  and  not  paid  by  departments  when 
books  were  closed  May  31,  1929 — 

Agriculture,  $408.80;  Civil  Service  Commission,  $120.85;  External  Affairs,  $453.25;  Finance, 
$4.20;  Interior,  $1,216.20;  Justice,  $478.95;  National  Defence,  $300.20;  Public  Works,  $11.00; 
Railways  and  Canals,  $497.45;  Railway  Commission,  $33.85;  Secretary  of  State,  $27.50; 
Soldiers'  Civil  Re-Establishment,  $0.50;  Trade  and  Commerce,  $417.60 $      3,970  35 


STATIONERY    BRANCH 

Ottawa,  September  14,  1929. 

F.  A.  Acland,  Esq., 

King's  Printer  and  Controller  of  Stationery. 

Dear  Sib, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  for  your  information  the  general 
statement  of  the  accounts  of  this  office  from  April  1,  1928,  to  March  31,  1929: — 

Inventory,  April  1,  1928 $      136, 762  43 

Expenditure — Net : — 

Wages = : $      100,765  14 

Expense 13, 024  55 

Stationery  stock 1, 171, 036  22 

1,284,825  91 

$  1,421,588  34 

Sales- 
Departments  and  Parliament 1 ,  338, 945  63 

Sundries 5, 081  75 

1,344,027  38 

Inventory,  March  31,  1929 123, 649  08 

1,467,676  46 


Profit  for  the  fiscal  year  1928-1929 $       46, 088  12 


Business  of  this  year  (1928-29)  was  considerably  in  excess  of  that  of  the 
previous  year,  or  of  any  year  save  during  the  war  period.  Conditions  arising 
from  increase  of  business  were  met  very  favourably.  The  stock  has  been  kept 
up  and  very  little  inconvenience,  if  any,  has  been  experienced  by  any  of  the 
departments  owing  to  delay. 

Your  attention  is  directed  to  the  number  of  packages  sent  by  mail  and 
otherwise,  which  have  not  been  included  in  the  report  for  some  years: — 

Letters  received 3, 489 

Letters  sent 15,829 

Requisitions  received 24,423 

Parcels  sent  by  mail 3, 082 

Parcels  sent  by  freight  and  express 4, 466 

The  whole  respectfully  submitted. 

Yours  respectfully, 

EDMUND  RYDER, 

Superintendent  of  Stationery. 


79 


DIVISION   OF  DOCUMENTS 


F.  A.  Acland,  Esq., 

King's  Printer  and  Controller  of  Stationery. 

Dear  Sir.- — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  for  your  information  the  report 
of  this  division  from  April  1,  1928,  to  March  31,  1929. 

The  total  sales  during  the  fiscal  year  were  as  follows:  To  the  Houses  of 
Parliament  and  departments,  $17,525.36.  To  the  public,  $47,778.58.  A  total] 
of  $65,303.94. 

During  the  year,  1,073  requisitions  were  received  from  departments.  From 
September  1,  1928,  to  March  31,  1929,  10,124  letters  were  received  and  4,835 
letters  answered.  Of  these  letters,  5,138  were  requests  for  publications  accom- 
panied by  remittance. 

The  activities  of  the  departmental  sub  post  office  increased  considerably 
during  the  year,  and  the  mail  matter  handled  being  shown  in  the  following! 
statement : — 

1927-28  1928-29 

Number  of  registered  letters 2, 556  2, 639 

Number  of  insured  parcels 6, 105  8, 135 

Number  of  letters 107, 719  157, 665 

Mail  bags  sent  to  railway  station 19, 634        19, 580 

Mail  bags  sent  to  post  office  for  final  sortation 4, 463  5, 145 

24,097        24,725 

It  will  be  observed  that  with  respect  to  mail  bags  the  figures  for  the  last 
fiscal  year  show  an  increase  of  628  bags  over  those  of  the  previous  year. 

A  complete  catalogue  of  all  official  publications  of  the  Parliament  and 
Government  of  Canada  was  printed  as  for  April,  1928,  the  same  being  brought 
up  to  date  by  cumulative  supplement  published  from  time  to  time.  The  cata- 
logue has  been  of  service  to  the  public  in  supplying  the  latest  information  as 
to  documents  available  from  this  office  as  well  as  those  distributed  by  thej 
different  departments. 

A.  L.  NORMANDIN, 

Chief,  Division  of  Documents. 


80 


ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29 
Statutes  of  Canada,  1928 


81 


The  following  tables  show  the  distribution,  without  charge,  of  Statutes 
of  Canada,  being  18-19  George  V,  Second  Session,  Sixteenth  Parliament,  1928, 
bound  in  cloth;  also  the  number  of  sales. 


To  whom  sent 

English 

French 

Parliament 
Cabinet  Ministers 

17 

72 
187 

5 

20 
54 

Members  of  the  House  of  Commons 

Alberta 
The  Lieutenant-Governor 

276 

79 

7 
27 
80 

Members  of  the  Government 

Officials  of  the  Provincial  Government 

Police  Magistrates 

British  Columbia 
The  Lieutenant-Governor 

115 

1 

12 
36 
29 
58 
6 
1 

Members  of  the  Government 

:    Police  Magistrates 

Sheriffs 

Judges'  Chambers 

Manitoba 
The  Lieutenant-Governor 

143 

1 
8 

83 

36 

6 

Members  of  the  Government 

Officials  of  the  Provincial  Government 

Police  Magistrates 

Sheriffs 

The  Lieutenant-Governor 

134 

1 

11 
16 

42 
8 

Members  of  the  Government 

Police  Magistrates 

Sheriffs 

Nova  Scotia 
The  Lieutenant-Governor 

78 

1 
6 
5 

55 
18 

Members  of  the  Government 

Officials  of  the  Government. ....         

Stipendiary  Magistrates 

Ontario 

85 

1 
10 
21 

2 

209 

49 

27 

3 

Members  of  the  Government 

Deputy  Judges 

Sheriffs 

Clerks  of  the  Peace 

91900—6 

322 

82 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


To  whom  sent 


Prince  Edward  Island 

The  Lieutenant-Governor 

Members  of  the  Government 

Officials  of  the  Provincial  Government 

Police  Magistrates 

Stipendiary  Magistrates 

Chief  Magistrate 

Sheriffs 

Prothonotaries 


Quebec 

The  Lieutenant-Governor 

Members  of  the  Government 

Officials  of  the  Government 

Magistrates 

Sheriffs 

Recorders 


Saskatchewan 

The  Lieutenant-Governor 

Members  of  the  Government 

Officials  of  the  Provincial  Government 

Police  Magistrates 

Sheriffs  and  Local  Registrar 


Yukon 

Members  of  the  Government 

Officials  of  the  Provincial  Government 

Police  Magistrates 


Judges,  Libraries,  Consuls  General,  Departmental  Lists,  etc 

Judges 

Libraries 

Consuls  General 

Departmental  Lists 

Outside  of  Canada 


English 


1 

2 

4 

6 

1 

1 

3 

2 

20 

4 

6 

34 

116 

2 

10 

7 

27 

8 

38 

56 

197 

1 

5 

13 

11 

28 

58 

1 

3 

1 

5 

245 

43 

205 

52 

22 

2 

182 

31 

111 

4 

765 

132 

Recapitulations 


Parliament  of  Canada. 

276 

115 

113 

134 

78 

85 

322 

20 

56 

58 

5 

765 

79 

Province  of  Alberta 

Province  of  British  Columbia 

Province  of  Manitoba 

Province  of  New  Brunswick 

Province  of  Nova  Scotia 

Province  of  Ontario 

Province  of  Prince  Edward  Island . . . 

Province  of  Quebec 

197 

Province  of  Saskatchewan 

Province  of  Yukon 

Judges,  Libraries,  Consuls  General,  etc. ...                                                   

132 

General  Distribution 

2,057 
2,211 
1,657 

408 

Sales 

83 

Balance  on  hand 

984 

Total  number  received 

5,925 

1,475 

ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29  83 

Statutes  of  Canada,  1928 — Concluded 

Distribution  of  Statutes  of  Canada 

The  following  table  shows  the  distribution  of  Statutes  of  Canada,  being 
18-19  George  V,  Second  Session,  Sixteenth  Parliament,  1928,  bound  in  \  Calf, 
also  the  sales:- — ■ 


To  whom  sent 

English 

French 

Ministers 

21 

•     3 

51 

7 

1 
7 

Sales 

Balance  on  hand 

Number  of  copies  printed 

75 

15 

Statutes  of  Canada  1928  (English)  Separate  Chapters 


Chapters 


Number 

of  copies 

Sales 

received 

500 

375 

500 

375 

500 

375 

300 

12 

300 

171 

300 

40 

300 

13 

300 

60 

300 

300 

133 

250 

206 

300 

45 

200 

91 

300 

61 

200 

92 

300 

30 

1,000 

52 

300 

47 

2,000 

864 

300 

161 

200 

125 

500 

90 

300 

50 

300 

36 

1,300 

951 

1,200 

857 

300 

10 

300 

92 

2,200 

1,158 

200 

57 

1,700 

1,460 

200 

72 

300 

211 

200 

99 

200 

75 

300 

49 

300 

12 

1,235 

715 

2,000 

535 

2,025 

527 

300 

132 

300 

43 

200 

145 

500 

72 

600 

71 

300 

46 

300 

49 

500 

192 

300 

113 

1 

2 
3 
71 
66 
55 
72 
67 
76 
13 
11 
56 
3 

68 
14 
77 
15 
57 
16 
17 
18 
19 
58 
69 
20 
21 
78 
59 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
60 
73 
29 
12 
30 
31 
61 
32 
33 
34 
62 
74 
35 
75 

91900—61 


Act. 


Appropriation  Act  No.  1 

Appropriation  Act  No.  2 

Appropriation  Act  No.  3 

Anchor  Cap  and  Closure  Corporation  Ltd. 

British  Empire  Assurance  Act 

Calgary  and  Fernie  Railway  Co.  Act 

Canadian  Cinch  Anchoring  System  Ltd.  Act 

Canadian  Commerce  Insurance  Company  Act 

Canadian  Credit  Institute  Act 

Canadian  National  Railway  Act 

Canadian  Northern  Income  Charge  Act 

Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Act 

C.  P.  R.  &  C.  N.  R.  Agreement  Act 

Canadian  Surety  Company  Act 

Canteen  Funds  Act 

Central  Finance  Corporations  Act 

Copper  Bounties  Act 

Cumberland  Railway  and  Coal  Company  Act 

Customs  Act 

Customs  Tariff  Act 

Czechoslovak  Convention  Act 

Dairy  Industry  Act 

Detroit  River  Canadian  Bridge  Company  Act 

Dominion  Fire  Insurance  Company  Act 

Dominion  Forest  Reserves  and  Park  Act 

Dominion  Land  Act 

Eastern  Bank  of  Canada  Act "._. 

Edmonton,  Dunvegan  and  British  Columbia  Railway  Act. 

Electricity  Inspection  Act 

Exchequer  Act 

Excise  Act 

Experimental  Farm  Station  Act 

Federal  District  Commission  Act 

Fertilizers  Act 

Halifax  Harbour  Loan  Act 

High  wood  Western  Railway  Company  Act 

Jean  Baptiste  Hurteau  Act 

Immigration  Act 

Income  Tax  Act 

Income  Tax  Act 

Intoxicating  Liquors  Act 

Interprovincial  and  James  Bay  Railway  Company  Act 

Lac  Seul  Conservation  Act 

Live  Stock  and  Live  Stock  Products  Act 

Loan  Act 

Manitoba  and  North  Western  Railway  Company  Act 

Douglas  J.  Martin  Act 

Militia  Pension  Act 

William  H.  Millspaugh  Act 


84  DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 

Statutes  of  Canada  1928  (English)  Separate  Chapters- — Concluded 


Chapters 


Number 
of  copies 
received 


36 
37 
63 
79 

4 
38 
39 
80 
40 
41 

5 
42 
43 

6 
44 
45 

7 

64 
46 

8 
81 
65 
47 
82 
48 
49 
50 

9 
51 
52 
10 
83 
53 
84-322 


National  Battlefields  Act 

National  Revenue  Department  Act 

Nipissing  Central  Railway  Company  Act 

Northwest  Canada  Conference  Evangelical  Church  Act 

Patent  Act 

Pensions  Act 

Pensions  and  National  Health  Department  Act 

People's  Thrift  Corporation  Act 

Precious  Metals  Marking  Act 

Prisons  and  Reformatories  Act 

Public  Printing  and  Stationery  Act 

Quebec  Harbour  Loan  Act 

Railway  Act 

Railway  Belt  Water  Act 

Regulations  and  Order  in  Council  Act 

Returned  Soldiers'  Insurance  Act 

Royal  Military  College  of  Canada  Act 

Saint  Clair  Transit  Company  Act 

Saint  John  Harbour  Loan  Act 

Saint  John  and  Quebec  Railway  Act 

Saint  John  River  Storage  Act 

Saint  Lawrence  River  Bridge  Company  Act 

Seeds  Act 

Sisters  of  Charity  of  the  North  West  Territories  Act. . . 

Soldier  Settlement  Act 

Spanish  Treaty  Act 

Special  War  Revenue  Act 

Supreme  Court  Act 

Toronto  Terminals  Railway  Company  Act 

Trade  Agreements  Act 

Trade  Mark  and  Design  Act 

United  Theological  College  of  Montreal  Act 

Yukon  Quartz  Mining  Act 

Divorce  Acts — 12  each 


200 
400 
300 
300 
500 

2,500 
700 
300 
500 
710 
300 
200 

1,100 
200 
200 

1,020 
200 
300 
200 
200 
300 
300 
500 
300 
500 
300 

2,000 
420 
420 
300 

1,200 
300 

1,000 

2,868 


Statutes  of  Canada  1928  (French)  Separate  Chapters 


Chapters 



Number 
of  copies 
received 

Sales 

71 

Loi  concernant  Anchor  Cap  &  Closure  Corporation 

100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
400 
100 
400 
100 
100 
200 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 

1 

Subsides  No.  1 

2 

Subsides  No.  2 

54 

Subsides  No.  3 

66 

Loi  concernant  British  Empire  Assurance  Co 

55 

Loi  concernant  Calgary  &  Fernie  Ry.  Co 

67 

Loi  concernant  Canadian  Commerce  Insurance  Co 

76 

Loi  concernant  Credit  Institute 

13 

Chemins  de  Fer  Nationaux  du  Canada 

n 

Charges  sur  le  Revenu  du  Canadian  Northern 

3 

Contrat  du  P.C.  &  C.N 

56 

Loi  concernant  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Co 

68 

Loi  concernant  Canadian  Surety  Act 

14 

Fonds  des  Cantines 

77 

Loi  concernant  Central  Finance  Corporation 

15 

Primes  sur  le  cuivre 

57 

Loi  concernant  Cumberland  Railway  and  Coal  Co 

16 

Douanes 

208 

17 

Tarif  des  Douanes 

18 

Convention  avec  la  Tch6coslovaquie 

3 

19 

Industrie  laitiere 

58 

Loi  concernant  Detroit  River  Canadian  Bridge    . 

69 

Loi  concernant  Dominion  Fire  Insurance  Co 

20 

Reserves  forestieres  et  pares  federaux 

3 

21 

Terres  federates 

1 

78 

Loi  concernant  Eastern  Bank  of  Canada. . . 

ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29  85 

Statutes  of  Canada  1928  (French)  Separate  Chapters— Concluded 


Chapter 


59 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
60 
73 
32 
33 
34 
62 
79 
35 
75 
36 
37 
63 
74 

4 
38 
39 
40 

5 
41 
42 
43 

6 
44 
45 

7 

64 
46 

8 

81 
65 
47 
82 
49 
50 

9 
51 
52 
10 
83 
33 


Ry. 


Loi  concernant  Edmonton,  Dunvegan  &  Brit.  Col. 

Inspection  de  l'61ectricit6 

Cour  de  l'Echiquier 

Accise 

Stations  Agronomiques 

Commission  du  district  federal 

Engrais  chimiques 

Halifax,  pret  au  port  d' 

Loi  concernant  Highwood  Western  Ry.  Co 

Loi  concernant  Hurteau,  Jean-Baptiste 

Conservation  du  Lac  Seul 

Animaux  de  ferme  et  leurs  produits 

Emprunt 

Loi  concernant  Manitoba  &  North  Western  Ry 

Loi  concernant  Martin,  Douglas  J 

Pensions  de  la  Milice 

Loi  concernant  Millspaugh,  Wm.  H 

Champs  de  batailles  nationaux 

Revenu  National 

Loi  concernant  Nipissing  Central  Ry.  Co 

Loi  concernant  Northwest  Canada  Conference  Evangelical  Church. 

Brevets 

Pensions 

Pensions  et  sante  nationale 

Poinconnage  des  metaux  precieux 

Impressions  et  Papeterie  publiques 

Prisons  et  maisons  de  correction 

Quebec,  pret  au  havre  de 

Chemins  de  fer 

Eaux  de  la  zone  du  chemin  de  fer 

Reglements  et  arretes  en  conseil 

Assurance  des  soldats  de  retour 

College  militaire  royal 

Loi  concernant  St.  Clair  Transit  Co 

St.  Jean,  pret  au  port  de 

Chemin  de  fer  Saint  John  and  Quebec 

Loi  concernant  St.  John  River  Storage 

Loi  concernant  St.  Lawrence  River  Bridge  Co 

Semences 

Loi  concernant  Sisters  of  Charity  of  the  N.W.  Territories 

Traite  avec  l'Espagne 

Revenus  de  guerre,  (loi  speciale  de) 

Cour  Supreme 

Toronto  Terminals 

Traites  du  Commerce 

Marques  de  Commerce  et  dessins  de  fabriques 

Loi  concernant  United  Theological  College  of  Montreal 

Extraction  du  Quartz  dans  le  Yukon 


Number 
of  copies 
received 


100 
600 
100 
600 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
200 
100 
100 
200 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
250 
500 
100 
100 
180 
100 
100 
300 
100 
100 
200 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
200 
100 
100 
,200 
100 
100 
100 
600 
100 
100 


Sales 


100 

97 

455 


123 

141 

51 


45 


50 
1,309 


50 
313 


36                   DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 

Annual  Departmental  Reports  1928 

The  table  printed  herewith  shows  the  number  of  copies  received  of  each 
publication  and  the  general  disposition  of  the  same.     Many  copies  of  each 
document,  sometimes  practically  all,  are  delivered  direct  to  the  ordering  Depart-j 
rnent;  in  some  cases  copies  are  requisitioned  by  the  Clerk  of  the  House  of  Com-j 
mons  for  distribution  to  Members  of  Parliament.     Often  considerable  numbers! 
are  mailed  direct  to  addresses  supplied  by  the  Clerk  of  the  House  and  by  the 
Department  interested.     Copies  of  all  publications  not  confidential  in  character- 
are  mailed  to  important  libraries,  etc.,  under  P.C.  1471,    a  regulation  enacted; 
on  August  4,  1927,  and  operative  since  September  4,  1927.     The  system  indi- 
cated applies  not  only  in  the  case  of  annual  reports  but  to  practically  alii 
publications  other  than  the  Statutes  of  Canada. 

Number 
received 

Distribution 

Sales 

— 

Delivered 

Mailing  List 

P.C. 
1471 

Parlia- 
ment 

Departr 
ments 

Parlia- 
ment 

Depart- 
ments 

Annual  Departmental  Reports, 
1928— English 

Agriculture,  1928 

5,353 
1,230 
1,507 
1,425 

40 
15 
35 
15 
340 
40 
9 
9 
60 
15 
17 
35 
38 
25 
55 
35 
10 

10 

25 

478 

900 

412 

612 

900 

742 

2,392 

1,819 

1,823 

1,250 

1,806 

1,360 

400 
2,397 
770 
961 
1,271 
7,119 
1,085 

250 
566 

302 
280 

200 
100 
234 
450 

5,000 

1,000 

512 

196 

92 

92 

118 

118 

3 

2 

154 

200 

26 

Archives,  1928. 

Auditor  General,  1928— Vol.  I 

248 
248 

Vol.  II 

Separates — 

Agriculture 

External  Affairs 

Health 

24 

Immigration  and  Colonization 

Indian  Affairs 

312 

1 

6 

6 

41 

10 

10 

34 

36 

1 

5 

1 

Interior 

Justice 

Labour 

Marine  and  Fisheries 

Mines 

National  Defence 

National  Revenue 

Post  Office 

Public  Printing  and  Stationery 

Public  Works 

Railways  and  Canals 

Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police. . . 

Department  Soldiers'  Civil  Re- 
Establishment 

Trade  and  Commerce 

% 

36 

132 

497 
423  i 

20; 

53 

3 
3 
18 
13 
23 
30 

Chief  Electoral  Officer,  1928 

100 
300 

"ioo" 

200 
350 
143 
•350 

118 
92 

118 

86 

National  Revenue,  1928 

"l2 

44 

87 

Shipping  Report,  1928 

Civil  Service,  1927 

Civil  Service  Examinations,  1929... 

External  Affairs,  1928. . . 

200 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

500 

150 

25 

"200 
100 
250 
250 
50 
150 

350 
700 
300 
300 
500 
1,500 
1,200 

250 

2,000 
251 
200 
356 

1,208 
440 

92 
92 

Estimates,  1930 

Further  Supplementary 

73 

73 

Public  Accounts,  1928. . . 

92 
92 
92 

92 
92 
92 
89 
118 
113 
92 

113 

Health  and  Pensions,  1928— D.S.C.R... 

Health  and  Pensions,  1928,  Health. . . 

Health  and  Pensions— Board  of  Pension 
Commissioners 

Immigration  and  Colonization,  1928 

Indian  Affairs,  1928 

"113' 

269 
314 
196 
5,573 
340 

Insurance,  1927— Vol.  I 

Vol.11 

Insurance  Abstract,  1927 

Interior,  1928 

Geographic  Board,  April  1,  1924  to  July 
31,1927 

Geographic  Board,  1925 

6 
24 

500 

Geographic  Board  Decisions- 
Supplement  No.  5 

278 

Supplement  No.  6 





1 

1 

ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928- 


87 


add 


Annual  Departmental  Report, 
1928 — English — Concluded 

Labour,  1928 

Marine  and  Fisheries,  1928 

Marine,  1928 

List  of  Vessels,  1927 

Mines 

National  Defence — Militia  and  Air  Ser- 
vice, 1928 

Naval  Service,  1928 

Postmaster  General,  1928 

P.  P.  &  S.,  1928 

Public  Works,  1928 

Railways  and  Canals,  1928 

Railway  Commission,  1927 

R.  C.  M.P.,  1928 

Secretary  of  State,  1928 

Trade  and  Commerce,  1928 

Trade  of  Canada,  1927 

Trade  of  Canada,  Calendar  Year  1928. . 

Trade  of  Canada,  Condensed,  1928 

Criminal  Statistics,  1928 

Weights  and  Measures,  1928 

Electricity  and  Gas  Inspection,  1928.. . . 
Board  of  Grain  Commissioners,  1927. . . 
Commissioner  of  Patents,  1928 

Annual  Departmental  Reports 
1928— French 

Affaires  des  Sauvages,  1927 

Affaires  Exterieures,  1928 

Agriculture,  1927 

Archives,  1928 

Budget,  1929 

Budget,  1930 

Chemins  de  fer  and  Canaux,  1927 

Commissaire  des  Brevets,  1928 

Commissaires  des  Chemins  de  fer  1926 . 

Commission  des  Pensions,  1927 

Commission  du  Service  Civil,  1927 

Comptes  publics  1928 

Defense  Nationale,  Milice  1928 

Service  Naval  1928 

Immigration  et   Colonisation  1927 

Imprimerie    et     Papeterie      publiques 

1928 

Interieur,  1927 

Marine  et  Pecheries — 

Marine  1928 

Pecheries  1928 

Penitenciers  1927 

Postes,  1928 

Retablissement  des  soldats  dans  la  vie 

civile  1927 

Revenu  National  1927 

Royale  Gendarmerie  a,  cheval  1927 

1928 

Santel927 

Secretaire  d'Etat,  1927 

Travail,  1927 

Travaux  publics 

Miscellaneous  Publications — 
English 

Absorption  of  Moisture  by  Kiln-dried 
Lumber 

Act  to  supplement  the  Revenue  required 
to  meet  War  Expenditures 


Number 
received 


2,880 

900 

633 

1,016 

3,322 

550 
500 
934 
272 
547 
877 
550 

1,260 
588 
875 

1,373 

1,450 
650 

1,094 
475 
588 
900 
640 


107 
220 
1,813 
605 
188 
362 
199 
155 
151 
111 
186 
175 
131 
156 
380 

110 
157 

210 
211 
193 
177 

157 
168 
188 
190 
277 
96 
1,109 
155 


150 
500 


Distribution 


Delivered 


Parlia-    Depart- 
ment     ments 


200 
200 
200 
100 
150 

200 
200 
300 

25 
200 
200 
100 
150 
200 
200 

50 


150 
150 
200 
500 


50 
50 
50 
50 
150 
250 
25 
100 
50 
50 
25 
50 
50 
50 
50 

10 
50 

50 
50 
25 
50 

50 
50 
25 
25 
200 
25 
50 
50 


2,500 
456 
300 
306 

3,000 

172 
122 

429 
494 
144 
465 

248 


225 
253 
354 
183 


700 
123 
250 
246 


36 

100 

1,750 

500 


100 

'75' 


100 
50 
25 
50 

250 

40 
26 

100 
100 
100 

72 

50 

50 

100 

87 


52 

1,000 
50 


Mailing  List 


Parlia-    Depart- 
ment     ments 


43 


70 


13 


11 


94 


394 


56 

35 

2 

199 


247 

601 

1,042 

500 


254 


13 


P.C. 

1471 


92 
92 
92 
113 
94 

92 
92 
92 
92 
92 
92 
92 
94 
92 
86 
113 
120 
86 
118 
92 
92 

"86* 


118 


88 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


Number 
received 

Distribution 

— 

Delivered 

Mailing  List 

P.C. 
1471 

Sales 

Parlia- 
ment 

Depart- 
ments 

Parlia- 
ment 

Depart- 
ments 

Miscellaneous  Publications — 
English — Continued 

Advance  Registry  Policy  for  Pure-bred 

125 

150 
150 

1,200 

1,200 

125 
150 
175 
125 
150 
125 
150 
125 

150 

50 

1,125 

150 

500 
125 

150 
125 

150 

150 
3,185 
150 
125 
150 

250 
594 
400 
150 
53 
125 
150 

20 
125 
150 

150 
125 
150 

150 
150 
150 

1,137 

14,000 

20 

900 

1,250 

1,400 
250 

2,275 
125 
150 
150 

92 

118 
113 

92 

120 

86 
113 

92 

86 
113 

87 
113 

86 

113 

Agricultural  Pest  Control  Act,  Orders 
and  Regulations,  No.  22 

Aluminum  and    its  Products,  1st  Hear- 

85 
79 

490 
471 

20 

Aluminum  and  its  Products,  4th    Hear- 

16 

Annual   Statistics  of  Fruit  and   Flori- 
culture  1927     . 

Annual  Survey  of  Education,  1927 

Annual  Flowers 

Animal  Husbandry  Division 

Annual  Survey  of  Education,  1926 

8 

Artificial  Brooding  of  Chicks 

An  Argument  in  the  Kitchen 

Assistance  that  can  be  given  by  Cana- 
dian Trade  Commissioners 

Bankruptcy  Act,  Interleaved 

Paper 

86 
113 

682 

Beauharnois  Power  Co. — Order  in  Coun- 
cil   

127 

Bee  Division 

86 

120 

92 

118 
113 

Bertha  Armyworm  in  the  Prairie  Pro- 
vinces  

Beware — Re  Detonators 

Biological     Board — Discolouration     of 
Halibut 

Biological  Board — Bull.   No.   11,   Fun- 
and  Physics 

Birds  of  Western  Canada 

1,089 

Boy  Settlement  in  Canada 

118 

86 
113 

118 

Bovine  Tuberculosis. . 

British  and  Foreign  Representatives  in 
Canada 

British  North  America  Act,  paper. . . . 

119 

cloth .... 

7 

Breeding  and  Feeding  the  Market  Hog 

*    118 

Budget  Resolutions  No.  87A 

18 

Buttermaking  on  the  Farm 

86 
118 

Butter  and  Cheese  Boxes,  Cir.  No.  24. . 

C.A.M.C.  with  Canadian  Corps  during 
the  last  100  days  of  War 

3 

Camping  in  Canada 

86 
119 

113 
92 

118 

113 
118 
118 
113 

86 

Canadian  Navy  List 

Canada's  First  Farmers'   Marketing 
Tour 

Canada's  Natural  Resources 

Canadian  Historical  Association,  1928. 

Canadian     Magnetical     Observatories, 
1923 

Canadian  Trade  to  Buenos  Aires. . . 

Canadian  Trade  to  France . . . 

Canal  Statistics,  1927 

100 

612 

112 

128 

12 

1,922 

5 

Carillon  programmes 

Catalogue  of  Motion  Pictures. . . 

Celotex 

85 
49 
50 

490 
476 
490 

92 

92 

92 

113 

92' 

86 
120 

138 

327 

85 

12 

Second  Hearing 

Central  Electric  Stations,  1926.. 

Ceramics  and  Road  Material,  No.  690.. 
Cereal  Divisions,  1927... 

941 

1,234 

Chemical  and  Allied  Products,  1926... 

8 

Chemical  and  Allied  Products,  1927. 

ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29 


Miscellaneous  Publications — 
English — Continued 

Choosing  a  Life  Work — Stenography. 
Choosing  a  Life  Work — Office  Work. 
Choosing  a  Life  Work — Carpentry. . . 

Choosing  a  Life  Work 

Changes  in  the  Fuel  Situation  in  Canada 

Cigarettes 

Cigars 

Census  of  Trading  Establishments,  1924 

Census  of  Alberta 

Circular  re  Copyright  Act 

Civil  Aviation,  1927 

Coal  Statistics,  1927 

Coal  and  Coke,  First  Hearing 

Second  Hearing 

Third  Hearing 

Coal  and  Coke  Statistics — 

April-June,  1928 

July-Sept.,  1928 

Jan-March,  1928 

Coal  Mining  Rights 

Commissioner  of  Highways,  1928 

Commercial  Bent  Grasses 

Correspondence  re  Diversion  of  Waters 

of  the  Great  Lakes 

Convention   between   Canada  and   the 

United  States  re  Sock-eye  Salmon. . . 
Convention  and  Protocol,  Canada  and 

the  United  States — Re  Niagara  Falls. 
Conversion  of  Latitudes  and  Departures 

of  a  Traverse  to  Geodetic  differences 

of  Latitude  and  Longitude 

Control  of  Loose  Smut  in  Wheat 

Co-operative  Associations  in  Canada — 

Copper  Rods,  First  Hearing 

Second  Hearing. . . 

Copper   and    Nickel-Copper    Mines    in 

Canada 

Crop  Rotation  and  Solid  Management 

for  the  Prairie  Provinces 

Customs  Act,  Consolidation,  Index 

Customs  Statistics  Classification,  April, 

1928 

Customs  Tariff  Paper 

Customs  Tariff,  Cloth 

Dairy  Factories,  1927 

Diagnostic  Standards  in  Tuberculosis... 

Diatomite 

Directions  for  Domestic  Use  of  Peat 

Fuel 

Division  of  Forage  Plants,  1927 

Division  of  Field  Husbandry 

Division  of  Horticulture 

Director  of  Geodetic  Survey,  1927 

Diamond  Jubilee  of  Confederation 

Division  of  Botany,  1927 

Destructive  Insects  and  Pest  Act  and 

Regulations  thereunder 

Diseases    of    Rye,    Grains    and    other 

Grasses 

Director  of  Forestry,  1927 

Directions  for  Collecting  and  Preserving 

Insects 

Dominion  Lands  Act 

Dominion  Water  Powers,  1927 

Dominion    Water    Powers,    Manitoba, 

Saskatchewan  and  Alberta 

Dominion  Fuel  Board,  1928 

Dominion  Lands  Handbook,  April,  1928 
Dominion  Lands  Administration 


Number 
received 


150 

150 

150 

150 

150 

1,200 

1,200 

150 

150 

150 

550 

150 

950 

1,525 

1,200 

150 
150 
150 
150 
225 
150 

1,325 

50 

3,425 


30 

125 

250 

1,200 

1,200 

150 

125 
300 

50 

2,300 

200 

150 

150 

1,840 

125 
125 
125 
125 
150 
125 
125 

125 

125 
125 

125 
300 
150 

150 
125 
125 
150 


Distribution 


Delivered 

Mailing  List 

P.C. 

1471 

Parlia- 
ment 

Depart- 
ments 

Parlia- 
ment 

Depart- 
ments 

113 

113 

113 

113 

'■"in 

496 

118 

120 

92 

115 

79 
79 

117 

113 

326 

113 

118 

49 

85 
85 

476 
490 
490 

113 

92 
92 

113 

118 

113 

118 

92 

118 

500 

200 

86 

675 

1,825 

92 

92 

113 

85 
85 

490 
490 

92 
92 

113 

86 

118 

118 

1,684 

118 

92 

92 

86 

92 

113 

92 

92 

86 

92 

86 

89 

113 

118 

92 

86 

118 

90 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


Number 
received 

Distribution 

Sales 

— 

Delivered 

Mailing  List 

P.C. 
-     1471 

Parlia- 
ment 

Depart-  Parlia- 
ments     ment 

Depart- 
ments 

Miscellaneous  Publications — 
English — Continued 

Dominion  Forests  Reserves  and  Parks 
Act             

150 

150 

125 

150 

1,125 

25 

175 

1,400 

1,200 

10 

1,200 

150 

225 

725 
125 

125 
125 
125 
125 
125 
125 
125 
125 
125 
125 
125 
125 
125 
125 
125 
125 
125 
125 
125 
125 
125 
125 
150 

150 
450 
150 

150 
150 
125 
150 
150 

25 

150 
125 
225 
150 
150 
150 
150 
125 

1,300 
125 
150 

1,600 

118 

113 
86 

119 
86 

1 

1 
22 
20 

5 

1 

3 

Dominion  Fuel  Board,  Interim  Report 
1923 

Economic  Conference,  1927 

500 

Electric  Railway  Statistics,  1925 

1927 

118 

92 

119 

Enamel  Ware,  First  Hearing 

85 
79 

490 

471 

Errors  of  Astronomical  Positions  due  to 
Deflection  of  the  Plumb  Line 

Ethylene  Glycol— Thin  Plate  Glass. . . . 
Examinations  of  Masters  and  Mates 

79 

496 

92 

118 

92 

86 
86 

86 
86 
86 
86 
86 
86 
86 
86 
86 
92 
86 
94 
86 
86 
86 
86 
92 
92 
86 
92 
86 
92 
118 

113 
118 
118 

113 
113 
86 
118 
118 

Experimental  Fox  Branch 

Exporters  of  Electric  Power  to  United 
States 

Explosives  Division 

Experimental  Farm  Stations 

Agassiz,  B.C 

Farnham,  Que 

Indian  Head,  Sask 

Rosthern,  Sask 

Invermere,  B.C 

Lennoxville,  Que 

Morden,  Man 

Nappan,  N.S 

Charlottetown,  P.E.I 

Brandon,  Man 

Beaverlodge,  Alta 

St.  Anne  de  la  Pocatiere,  Que. . 

Scott,  Sask 

Harrow,  Ont 

Lacombe,  Alta 

Kentville,  N.S...' 

Sidney,  B.C 

Summerland,  B.C 

Swift  Current,  Sask 

Lethbridge,  Alta 

Farmers'  Account  Books 

Farmer  who  Produces    and    Markets 
Dirty  Eggs  is  Hurting  the  Market  for 
his  own  Product 

Fertilizers  Act  and  Amendments. . . 

Fertilizers  Analysis,  1928 

Financial  Statistics,  Provincial  Govern- 
ments, 1926 

Fire  Record,  1927... 

Fish  Culture  in  Canada,  1926 

1927 

Fisheries  Statistics,  1927... 

Fishery    Regulations   for    Province    of 
Manitoba 

Forest  Entomology  and   its   Develop- 
ment  

113 
86 
86 
113 
113 
113 
113 
86 

Forets  Facts 

Forestry  Lessons 

Forest  Frie  Protection  in  Canada. . . 

Forests  of  Canada 

Four  Rules  re  Eggs . . . 

Fruit  Act  and  Regulations. . . 

French  Canadian  Homespun  Industry. 

Fuel  and  Fuel  Testing,  No.  689... 

Fully  Accredited  Herds. . . 

86 
113 
119 

Fur  Farms  of  Canada,  1926. . . 

General  Treaty  for  Renunciation  of  War 

1,000 

150 ' 

ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928- 


91 


Number 
received 

Distribution 

— 

Delivered 

Mailing  List 

P.C. 

1471 

Sales 

Parlia- 
ment 

Depart- 
ments 

Parlia- 
ment 

Depart- 
ments 

Miscellaneous  Publications — 
English — Continued 

Geodetic    Survey,    Report   of    Superin- 
tendent, 1926 

50 
150 
125 
150 
175 
150 

150 
125 
125 

125 
150 
150 

125 
125 

125 

200 

150 

150 
125 
150 

125 
1,879 
1,461 
2,018 

125 

1,000 
125 

150 
150 
150 

1,750 
1,250 
1,250 
150 
150 
150 
175 
150 
150 
125 
125 
150 
625 
125 
125 
100 

150 

150 
815 
150 
150 

Gold  Mines  in  Canada 

113 
86 
113 
113 
113 

118 
92 
86 

86 
113 
120 

86 
86 

86 

Goose  Raising,  No.  55 

Government  Insurance  for  all  who  served 

Grain  Trade  of  Canada,  1927 

12 

Guide  to  Fort  Anne 

Hints  for  Canadian  Exporters  to  British 
Isles 

Home-made  Frozen  Desserts 

Houseworker  in  Canada 

How  to  make  and  use  Hotbeds  and 
Cold  Frames 

How  to  enter  Canada 

Hudson  Bay  Region 

Illustration  Station,  B.C.,  .Alta.,  Sask., 
and  Man 

Illustration  Station,  East 

Insects  of  the  Flower  Plant  and  their 
Control. 

Insurance  Act,  with  Index 

57 

Italian  Customs  Requirements  and 

1j8 

113 

86 

118 

86 

120 

118 

86 

86 
86 

118 
113 
118 

92 

86 

93 

113 

83 

86 

113 

113 

113 

94 

86 

113 

92 

86 

86 

International    Radiotelegraph    Conven- 
tion at  Washington,  1927 

International  Rules  of  the  Road 

Invoice  Requirements  for  Cuba 

Investigations  of  Fuel  and  Fuel  Testing, 
1926 

Investigations — Mineral  Resources  and 
Mining  Industry,  1927 

6 

320 
100 
684 

1,325 
1,289 
1,234 

Investigations — Mineral  Resources  and 
Mining  Industry,  1926 

Investigations  in  Ore  Dressing  and  Me- 
tallurgy, 1926,  No.  688 

Investigation — Quebec    Harbour   Corn- 

Industrial  and  International  Relations, 
1928 

750 

Information  for  Settlers 

Information  relating  to  pay  and  allow- 
ances of  Airmen 

Iron  Mines  in  Canada. . . 

Iron  and  Steel  Products,  1926 

Iron  and  Steel — 

First  Hearing 

79 
49 
25 

496 
476 
490 

1,278 

Second  Hearing 

280 

Third  Hearing 

201 

Joint  Beef  Committee 

Journals  of  the  Senate,  1928 

1 

Journals  of  the  House  of  Commons,  1928 

Juvenile  Delinquents,  1927. . 

Kootenay  National  Park 

Kicking  Horse  Trail.   . 

Labour  Gazette,  March,  1929 

Labour  Organizations,  1927 

11 

Land  Settlement 

League  of  Nations,  9th  Assembly 

Lepturina  of  America,  North  of  Mexico 

List  of  Licensed  Insurance  Companies. . 

List  of  Members,  1929  . 

33 

Live  Stock  Markets  and  Meat  Trade 
Review 

113 
119 

1 

List   of   Lost,    Stolen   and    Destroyed 
Bonds 

List  of  Licensed  Elevators  1927-28 

498 

List  of  Boards  of  Trade 

113 
118 

Limestone  in  Agriculture 

92 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


Number 
received 

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1471 

Sales 

Parlia- 
ment 

Depart- 
ments 

Parlia- 
ment 

Departr 

ments 

Miscellaneous  Publications — 
English — Continued 

List  of  Cheese  and  Creameries  in  Can- 

150 
150 

125 
150 
125 
150 
100 
156 
150 

150 
125 
150 
350 

200 
50 

150 
185 

125 
1,200 
150 
150 
150 

150 

125 
125 
125 
150 
125 
150 
150 
125 
125 
150 
150 

125 
150 
150 
150 
150 

125 
850 
900 

125 
125 
125 
150 
280 

150 
125 
150 
125 

30 

1,650 

125 

100 

150 

118 
118 

92 
118 

86 
113 

Living  in  the  Open  Air 

List  of  Publications,   Agriculture    De- 

List  of  Securities 

Loan  and  Trust  Companies,  1926 

10 

Loan  and  Trust  Companies,  1927 

Loan  and  Trust  Companies  Act 

Lumber  Industry,  1926 

113 
113 

118 

86 

113 

118 

14 

Manual  for  the  Guidance  of  Physicians. 

Manufacturers  of   Non-Metallic  Miner- 
als, 1926 

Manufacturers  of  Ice  Cream . 

Marquis  Wheat 

Meat  and  Canned  Foods  Act 

Meeting  of  the  Committee  of  the  Privy 
Council,  March  16,  1928 

Memorandum  re  Judges  Salaries 

Militia  and  Air  Service,  List  of  Officers. 

113 
113 

92 

93 

118 

113 

113 

113 

86 

86 

86 

119 

86 

113 

113 

86 

86 

113 

113 

92 
113 
113 
113 
113 

86 
86 
92 

Mineral  Production  of  Canada,  1926. . . . 

3 

Mineral  Production,  1928,  Preliminary 

Mining  Machinery,  First  Hearing 

Mines  Summary,  Part  "C" 

79 

496 

Mining  Plants  in  Canada 

Mineral  Production,  June,  1928 

1 

Molybdenum,  Antimony  and  Tungsten 
Mines  in  Canada 

Motor   Vehicle    Registration    by   Pro- 
vinces  

Mother — A  Little  Book  for  Men 

Mother — A  Little  Book  for  Women 

Morphism 

Mosquito  Control  in  Canada 

Memo  for  Camps  of  Instruction 

Metallurgical  Works  in  Canada 

National  Parks  of  Canada,  1927 

National  Museum,  1926 

National  Research  Council,  No.  22 

National  Research  Council,  1927 

Nitrogen,  Phosphoric  Acid  and  Potash, 
etc 

Non-Ferrous  Metals  in  Canada 

3 

Oil  Prospects  near  Bragg  Creek,  Alta.. . 

Origin  and  Quality  of  Live  Stock 

Organization    in    Industry,    Commerce 
and  the  Professions 

Paints  and  Varnishes 

49 
99 

476 
476 

200 
94 

Parts  of  Stoves 

Patent     and     Copyright— Rules     and 
Forms 

Peas,  A  Guide  to  Seed  Growers. . . 

92 

86 

113 

113 

118 
86 

118 
92 

Peace  River  Country 

Petroleum  and  Natural  Gas  Rights. . . 

Place  Names  of  Alberta 

38 

Points  for  Canadian  Exporters  of  Jam- 
aica   

Poultry  Division,  1927. . . 

Poultry  Breeding  Records 

Pork  Production  No.  63  (Fall  Litters).  . 

Precise  Levelling  in  Nova  Scotia,  New- 
Brunswick  and  Prince  Edward  Is- 

5 

Precious  Metals  Marking  Act.. . . 

1,500 

Preservation  of  Niagara  Falls. . . 

86 

1 

Prices  and  Price  Index,  1913-1927. . . 

3 

Preparation  of  Pelts  for  Market 

113 

ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928- 


93 


Number 
received 

Distribution 

— - 

Delivered 

Mailing  List 

P.C. 

1471 

Balee 

Parlia- 
ment 

Depart- 
ments 

Parlia- 
ment 

Depart- 
ments 

Miscellaneous  Publications — 
English — Continued 

Proposals  for  Treaty  for  Renunciation 
of  War 

325 
150 
150 

150 
125 
150 
150 

125 
150 

150 
150 
150 
150 
1,425 
150 

725 
150 
150 

125 
125 
125 
125 
150 
125 
150 
125 
125 
150 

100 
150 
125 
625 

125 
625 
625 

1,000 

150 

150 

150 

1,725 

125 

50 
925 

150 
125 
925 
125 

150 
150 
150 

150 
150 
150 
325 

86 
113 
113 

118 

86 

118 

113 

86 
113 

118 
118 
118 
118 
92 
86 

86 
113 
120 

86 
86 
86 
86 

113 
86 

113 
86 
86 

113 

21 

Pulp  and  Paper  Research  in  Canada. . . . 

Producers  of  Mineral  Pigments  in  Can- 
ada  

Protection  of  Migratory  Birds 

Problems  of  the  Narcotic  Drug  Addict 

Prince  Albert  National  Park 

Preserving  Fruits  and  Vegetables  in  the 
Home 

Prince  Edward  Island  Tourist  Folder. . 

Publications  of  Geological  Survey  and 
National  Museum 

Pure  Bred  Dairy  Cattle 

Publication  No.  25  re  Latitudes 

Pulp  and  Paper  Industry,  1927 

24 

Postal  Guide,  1929 

1,325 

Quarterly  Bulletin — Sea  Fisheries 

Quebec  Harbour  Commission  Investi- 
gation   

500 

Radio  Stations  in  Canada,  1928 

Radio  Stations  in  Canada,  Supplement. 

Regulations,  Insect  and  Pest  Act — 
No.  17 

No.  32 

No.  16 

No.  14 

No.  11 

No.  10 

No.    9 

No.    7 

No.    2 

No.    1 

Regulations  for   Fisheries  for  British 
Columbia 

Regulations  for  Rifle  Associations 

113 

86 
86 

86 
86 
86 

119 

118 

118 

118 

86 

86 

Regulations  Under  Food  and  Drug  Act 

Regulations  re  Soldier  Settlement  Act. . 

500 

Poultry,  1927 

Return  No.  116,  Feb.  13th,  1928. . . 

500 
500 

3 

Return  No.  92,  Feb.  13th,  1928 

Renunciation  of  War,  General  Treaty, 
Kellogg,  1928 

Regulations  re  Petroleum  and  Natural 
Gas                              

Regulations  re  Quartz  Mining  Claims. . 
Regulations  re  Leasing  of  Lands 

Regulations  re  Old  Age  Pensions 

Report  of  the  Director  of  Experimental 
Farms,  1928 

500 

100 

501 

Report  of  Committee  on  60th  Anniver- 

Report  of  W.  H.  Moore  re  Tariff  1927 

500 

86 

113 
86 
86 

89 

118 
118 
118 

117 
113 

118 
86 

Report  on  Exploratory  Trip  in  the  Area 

Regulations  for  Cadet  Services,  1928 . . . 
Return,  March  12,  1928 

500 

Regulations  re  Mining  Rights  and  School 

Regulations  re  Quartz  Mining  Claims. . 
Regulations  re  Coal . . . 

Regulations — National  Research  Coun- 
cil.  ... 

Royal  Military  College  Pamphlet 

Royal  Commission  re  Fisheries 

122 

94 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


Number 
received 

Distribution 

Sales 

— 

Delivered 

Mailing  List 

-  P.C. 

-  1471 

Parlia- 
ment 

Depart 
ments 

-  Parlia- 
ment 

Depart 
ments 

Miscellaneous    Publications — Eng- 
lish— Con  tinned 

Royal  Commission  on  Reconveyance  o 
land  to  British  Columbia 

325 

125 

1,200 

155 
125 
150 
150 
900 
125 

150 
310 
150 

125 
125 
125 
150 
900 
125 
125 

150 

1,861 
150 
150 
150 
125 
125 
150 
650 
100 

100 
3,125 

625 

250 

1,200 

150 

150 

175 
150 

125 
125 
125 
150 
150 
225 

125 
150 
350 
150 
150 

150 

150 
1,200 

150 

160 

86 
86 
94 

119 
86 
113 
113 
92 
86 

118 

206 

50 

1 

1 

816 
29 

■ 

Rust  Research  Laboratory 

Rubber,  1st  and  2nd  Hearing 

Rules   and    Regulations  of    R.C.M.P. 
1928 

Rules  of  the  Road — Great  Lakes 

Safety  Rules 

Sanitation 

Sardines  and  Herrings 

85 

490 

School  Program 

Schedule  of  Classification  of  Fire  In- 
surance Risks 

Sea  to  Sea  Radio  Broadcasting 

Sea  Fisheries,  Statistics,  Jan.-Dec.,192£ 

118 

92 
86 
86 
118 
92 
86 
86 

114 

113 
113 
113 

86 

86 

113 

Seasonable   Hints— No.   43,   Western 
Prairie  Division 

Seasonable  Hints,  No.  41 

Seasonable  Hints 

Seed  Act— Oct.,  1928 

Sewing  Machines 

83 

492 

Seedling  Blight  and  Foot  Rot  of  Oats. . 

Sheep  Husbandry  in  Canada 

Sixth   Canadian   Conference   on   Child 
Welfare 

Silica  in  Canada 

1,621 

Silver  Mines  in  Canada 

Silver-Lead- Zinc  Mines  in  Canada 

Silviculture  Research  in  Canada 

Soils  of  Prince  Edward  Island 

Soy  beans  in  Canada 

Softwood  Resources  of  Canada 

Special  Committee  on  Pensions 

500 

Special  Election  Instructions 

86 

Special  Fisheries  Regulations  for  Nova 
Scotia 

St.  Lawrence  Waterwavs  Project 

1,500 
500 

88 

92 
113 
92 

113 

113 

120 
113 

93 

86 

92 

118 

113 

118 

86 
118 
118 
118 
118 

113 

118 

94 

114 

120 

St.    Lawrence    River   Project,    Special 
Committee  of  the  Senate 

Standing  Committee  on  Bill  "D" 

Staves  and  Heading,  1st  Hearing 

Statistical  Report  of  Fire  Losses  in  Can- 
ada, 1927 

79 

496 

Statistics  of   the   Civil   Service   Com- 
mission, 1927 

Statistics  of   the   Civil   Service  Com- 
mission, 1928 

i 

1 

Storage  of  Apple  Warehouses,  N.S... 

Studies  in  Strawberry  Bud  Differentia- 
tion  

Studies  in  Forest  Pathology. . . 

Stem  Rust  in  Western  Canada. . . 

Storage  of  Ice . . . 

State  Forests  in  Canada. . . 

i 

Steam  Railway  Statistics,  1927... 

Studies  on  Moulds  and  Yeasts  in  Cream- 
ery Butter 

Summary  Report,  Mines,  1927. . 

Summary  Trade  of  Canada,  Nov.,  1928. 
Dec,  1928. 

300 

11 

a                                                 Jan.,  1929.. 

Suggestions  re  Frying  or  Broiling  Chick- 
ens  

Supplement  to  Catalogue  of  Maps. 

Sugar,  First  and  Second  Hearings. 
Sweden  as  a  Market  for  Canadian  Pro- 
ducts  

79 

496 

2! 

Tables  of  Weight  at  different  heights 
and  ages 

ANNUAL  REPORT 

,   1928-29 

95 



Number 
received 

Distribution 

Delivered 

Mailing  List 

P.C. 

1471 

Sales 

Parlia- 
ment 

Depart- 
ments 

Parlia- 
ment 

Depart- 
ments 

Miscellaneous  Publications — 
English — Concluded 

Textile  Industries  in  Canada,  1917-1926. 

Tide  Tables,  Quebec  and  Father  Point, 

1929                         

250 

5,011 
19,011 
14,229 

12,000 
5,000 

32,200 
150 
150 
150 
425 
150 
125 
175 
150 
150 
150 
150 

150 
125 
125 
150 
150 

1,125 
150 
125 
150 
125 
150 
150 
150 
150 

150 

300 
4,200 

50 
935 
50 
50 
50 

50 

50 
50 

50 

225 

50 

50 

100 

50 

50 
50 

50 
50 

120 

113 

113 
113 

86 
118 

86 
113 
113 
114 
114 
118 

119 

86 

92 

113 

118 

4,636 
17,686 
10,029 

10,779 

4,906 

26,083 

Tide  Tables,  St.  John,  1929 

Tide  Tables,  Eastern  Coast,  1929 

Tide    Tables,    Vancouver,    and    Sand 
Heads   1929 

Tide  Tables,  Prince  Rupert,  1929 

Tide  Tables  Pacific  Coast,  1929 

Timber  Physics  Research  in  Canada. . . 

Topographical  Survey,  Bull.  No.  60  — 

7 

Tree  Planting  of  the  Prairie  Provinces. . 

'  Trading  with  Colombia  and  Venezuela. 

1 

Uren  prehistoric  Site,  Oxford  County, 
Ont.,  Bull.  No.  51 

i  United  States  Federal  Import  Milk  Act 

Veterinary  Director  General,  1928 

Vital  Statistics,  1927 

3 

1 

War  Economic  Conference,  Final  Report 
1927 

134 

113 

86 
113 

86 
118 
118 
118 
113 

113 

No.  54 

Western  Cedar  Borer 

Why  and  How  to  Use  Buttermilk 

Why  and  How  to  Use  Cottage  Cheese.. 

Wood  Preservation  in  Canada 

Wholesale  Dealers  in  Fruits  and  Veget- 

Yukon  Quartz  Mining  Act,  with  Rules 

Year  Book,  1927-28 

200 

1,882 

86 

33 

"33' 
33 
33 

33 

33 
33 

32 
33 
32 
33 
33 

980 

Miscellaneous  Publications — 
French 

Annuaire  du  Canada  1927-28 

461 

374 

14 

1 

Assolements  et  la  culture  du  sol 

Assurance  pour  ceux  qui  ont  fait  du  ser- 
vice   

Avantages  qu'offrirait  l'isolation  ther- 

Chambres  froides  de    beurreries    avec 

Charbon  et  le  Coke 

20 

95 

i  College  Militaire  royal  du  Canada 

Comment  combattre  les  moustiques. . . 

Commission  royale  sur  les  pecheries 

Col.   Brit,   retrocession   de   certaines 

28 

Conference   economique,   rapport   final 

33 
33 

33 
32 

Conseils  pour  la  saison  (.Prairies) 

Conseils  pour  la  saison  (.Colombie  Bri- 

Conseils  pour  la  saison,  No.  43 

96 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


Number 
received 

Distribution 

Sales 

— 

Delivered 

Mailing  List 

P.C. 

1471 

Parlia- 
ment 

Depart- 
ments 

Parlia- 
ment 

Depart- 
ments 

Miscellaneous  Publications — 
French — Continued 

50 
50 

770 

50 

50 

400 
50 
50 

1,050 
50 
50 
50 
40 

50 
50 
50 
50 

250 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

594 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 

50 

300 

50 

50 

50 

101 

288 
50 

200 
50 

50 

50 
4,600 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

32 

32 

33 

8 



2C 

«<                     << 

Convention  et  protocole  re  Chutes  Nia- 

425 

300 

Conversion   des   Fourrages  sees  en   un 

33 

33 

33 
33 
33 

33 
33 
33 
33 
33 

33 
33 
33 
33 

33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
32 
33 
33 
33 
32 
33 
32 
33 

33 

33 
33 
33 

33 

33 

Couches  chaudes    et    couches    froides, 
comment  les  faire  et  comment  s'en 

Detournement  des  eaux  des  Grands  Lacs 
par  le  district  sanitaire  de  Chicago, 

250 

Douanes  et  de  1' Accise,  commission  roy- 

400 

50 

Elections,  instructions  speciales 

Enregistrement  superieur  pour  les  pores 

Etude  des  levures  dans  le  beurre 

Explosifs,  1927 

150 

Fabrication,  creme  a  la  glace 

Fee  des  bois 

Fumiers  et  engrais  chimiques 

Gadelier  a,  fruits  rouges  et  blancs 

Hygiene 

Insectes  nuisibles 

Inspection  des  poissons 

Instruction  publique  au  Canada  1926. . . 

Loi  de  Faillites,  papier 

Loi  des  Pecheries 

Loi  des  Semences 

Laboratoire  des  recherches  sur  la  houille 

Liste  des  marchands  de  gros  de  legumes 
de  fruits 

Liste  de  publications,   Department  de 
la  sante 

Loi  des  engrais  chimiques 

Loi  contre  les  parasites  de  l'Agriculture. 

Loi  federale  des  Etats-Unis  concernant 
le  lait  importe 

Loi  des  insectes  destructeurs  et  autres 
fleaux 

Loi    de    l'Amerique    Britannique    du 
N  ord ,  toile 

Loi    de    l'Amerique    Britannique    du 
Nord,  papier 

Maladies  des  tomates 

33 
33 
33 

33 

33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 

M6moire  re  salaires  des  juges 

150 

Mefiez-vous  des  detonateurs 

L'Organisation  et  l'industrie  du  com- 
merce   

Origine  et  qualite  des  bestiaux  de  Com- 
merce   

Programme  de  carillon , 

Programme  scolaire. . , 

Pacte  multilateral  1928. . . 

Pin  de  Murray 

Pasteurisation  du  lait. . . 

Pin  gris 

ANNUAL  REPORT,  1028-29 


97 


Number 
received 


Distribution 


Delivered 


Parlia-    Depart 
ment      meijits 


Mailing  List 


Parlia-    Depart- 
ment     ments 


P.C. 

1471 


Sales 


Miscellaneous  Publications- 
FRENCH-r-Continued 


Pin  a  bois  lourd : . . 

Plantes  bulbeuses  a  fleurs j . . 

Preparation  des  peaux j . . 

Projet  de  canalisation  du  St.  Laurent. . 
Protection  des  oiseaux  migrateurs ..... 

Peintures  et  vernis 

Prix  au  Canada  et  a  l'etranger 

Petite  industrie  de  la  laine  au  Canada 

francais 

Region  de  la  riviere  la  Paix 

Reglements  pour  prevenir  les  abordages 
Representations    des    Gouvernements 

Bretagne  et  etranger 

Reglements,  Poids  et  Mesures 

Reglements  concernant  les  cadets 

Reglements  de  la  loi  des  insectes  (etran- 
gers)— 

le  rev 

2e  rev 

No.  16 

No.  17 

No.  14 

No.  10,  5e  rev 

No.    7 [... 

No.    3 ; 

No.  2,  domestique,  7e  rev 

Retablissement  des  soldats  dans  la  vie 

civile,  enquete  1927 

Reponse,  13  fevrier,  1928 

12  mars,  1928.. :.. 

Rapport  de  M.  W.  H.  Moore  re  Tarif . .  . 
Rapport  du   service   des  plantes  four- 

rageres 

Renonciation  a  la  guerre,  traite  general 

Kellogg,  1928 

Reglements  internationaux  pour  prevenir 

les  abordages 

Reclamation  des  tribus  indiennes 

Salaires  et  heures  de  travail 

Service  de  l'agriculture 

Service  de  l'aviculture 

Service  de  la  botanique 

Service  des  cereales,  1926 

Service  de  la  Chimie 

Service  de  l'exploitation  animale 

Service  de  la  grande  culture  1927 

Service  de  l'horticulture 

Service  de  la  production  de  la  filasse . . . 
Societes  cooperatives  au  Canada,  1928.. 
Societe  des:  Nations,  9ieme  Assemblee. 

Soja  au  Canada 

Sols  de  l'ete  de  rile  du  P.E 

Sous-Stations  Experimentales — 
.    Charlottetown,  P.E 

Farnham,  Que 

Fredericton,  N.B 

Harrow,  Ont 

Kentville,  N.S 

Lennoxville,  Que 

'     Morden,  Man 

Nappan^,  N.S 

Stations  federates  de  demonstration 

Stations  de  Radio  au  Canada 

Systeme  de  notes  pour  l'elevage  des 

volailles 

Torres  federates,  15  juin  1928 

Thuya  (cedre  de  Test) 

Thuya,  geant 

Tourbe  combustible. 

91900—7 


50 
50 
50 

150 
50 

275 
50 

50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 


50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
|  50 

450 
200 
250 
250 

50 

370 

50 
316 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 


400 
150 
200 
150 


294 


12 


33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 

33 
33 

32 

33 

33 

32 
33 


33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
32 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 

33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 

32 
33 
33 
33 
33 


98 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


Number 
received 


Distribution 


Delivered 


Parlia-    Depart- 
ment      ments 


Mailing  List 


Parlia-    Depart- 
ment      ments 


P.C. 
1471 


Sales 


Miscellaneous  Publications 
French — Concluded 


Traitement  du  charbon  de  ble 

Une  vieillesse  de  comfort  et  de  bonheur 

Vieil  age  (pamphlet) 

Volailles  de  race  pure 


Reports  of  Committees— English 

Agriculture  and  Colonization  re  Immi- 
gration App.  No.  8,  1928 

Agriculture  and  Colonization  re  Grading 

of  Wheat,  App.  No.  7,  1928 

Banking  and  Commerce,  1929,  No.  1. . 

Privileges  and  Elections 

Agricultural  and  Colonization,  re  Immi 
gration,  1928— 

No.    6 

No.    7 

No.   8 

No.    9 

No.  10 

No.  11 

No.  12 

No.  13 

No.  14 


No.  15. 
No.  16. 
No.  17. 

No.  18. 


No.  19... 

No.  20 

No. 21 

No.  22 

No.  23 

No.  24. 

No.  25 

Banking  and  Commerce,  1928 — 

No.  1 

No.  2 

No. 3 

No.  4 

No.  5 

No.  6 

St.  Lawrence  River,  1928— 

No.  1 

No.  2 

No.  3.. 

No.  4 

No.  5 

No.  6 

Judges  Salary,  1928— 

No.l 

No.  2 

No.  3 

No.  4 

No.5 

Final 

Barley,  1929,  No.  1 

Dairy  Industry,  1929,  No.  1 

Marine  and  Fisheries,  1929,  No.  1 

Grading  of  Wheat,  1929,  No.  1 

Public  Accounts,  1929,  No.  1 

Dominion  Elections  Act  and   Corrupt 

Practices  Act — 

No.l 

No.  2 

No. 3 

No. 4 

Railway  and  Shipping,  1928,  No.  2. . , 


1,125 

325 

1,350 

357 


750 
750 
750 
750 
750 
750 
750 
750 
750 
750 
750 
750 
750 
750 
750 
750 
750 
750 
750 
1,250 

1,875 
1,875 
1,875 
1,875 
1,875 
1,875 


100 
100 


500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
5C0 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 

1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 


2,125 

1,100 

2,625 

1.000 

2,625 

1,000 

2,625 

1,000 

2,625 

1,000 

2,625 

1,000 

750 

500 

750 

500 

750 

500 

750 

500 

750 

500 

750 

500 

750 

500 

750 

500 

750 

500 

750 

500 

750 

500 

550 

300 

550 

300 

550 

300 

550 

300 

750 

500 

93 

86 

147 
114 

118 

118 

• 

113 

66 

113 

67 

113 

65 

113 

54 

113 

67 

113 

66 

113 

96 

113 

100 

113 

81 

113 

69 

113 

69 

113 

97 

113 

93 

113 

88 

113 

86 

113 

68 

113 

68 

113 

67 

113 

67 

113 

153 

86 

167 

86 

188 

86 

181 

86 

193 

86 

191 

86 

191 

113 

96 

113 

96 

113 

100 

113 

100 

113 

101 

113 

76 

113 

11 

113 

8 

113 

8 

113 

7 

113 

20 

113 

20 

120 

13 

120 

53 

120 

6 

120 

2 

120 

120 

120 

120 

120 

113 

ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29 


99 


Number 
received 

Distribution 

— 

Delivered 

Mailing  List 

P.C. 

1471 

Sales 

Parlia- 
ment 

Depart- 
ments 

Parlia- 
ment 

Depart- 
ments 

Reports  of  Committees  (French) 

40 
3C0 
300 
300 

100 

300 

300 

3,300 

300 

33 
33 
33 
33 

32 

32 
32 
32 
32 

Banque  et  Commerce,  1929— No.  1 

No.  2 

250 
250 
250 

No. 3 

Agriculture  et  Colonisation,  proces  ver- 
baux,  temoignages  et  rapport  re  classe- 
ment  du  ble,  App.  No.  7,  1928 

Relations  industrielles  et  internationales 
1929 — No.  1  

250 

250 
250 
250 

No.  2 

No.  3                   

Pensions,  3ieme  et  4  ieme  rapports,  1928. 

91900- 


100  DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 

Periodicals 


— 

Number 
received 

To 
Dept. 

To 

Subs. 

Free 

P.G.  1471 

Sales 

Abstract  of  Public  Health,  monthly 

112,800 

80.7CC 

6,400 

5,500 

18,732 

113,100 

80,216 

72,800 

25,200 

128,190 

67,100 

127,800 

403 

1,300 

1,690 

4,544 

42, CC0 

23,400 

50 

225 

42,100 

15.0C0 

16,416 

7,800 

60,600 

101,051 

132 
132 
44 
132 
132 

504 

90,364 
5,156 
11.176 
13,800 
100,516 
72,040 

60 

111 

4,200 

113 

2,318 

132 

72 

72,800 

Commercial  Intelligence  Journal,  w'kly. 

105,508 

127, 3C8 

63,924 

132 
132. 

1  200 

National  Revenue  Review,  monthly  — 

10,476 
127,620 

1,032 

87 

132 

310 

"                 "           paper 

Railway  Judgments,  semi-monthly 

1,300 

8,242 

6,240 

209,868 

22,779 

286 
132 
132 

121 

2,938 

461 

210,000 

53 

Tuberculosis  Bulletin,  monthly 

Periodicals  (French) 

396 

Guide  postal   1929    toile    .             

11 

18 

15,132 

1,240 

132 

121 

572 

61 

12,060 

16,284 

828 

52,524 

6 

Bulletin,  Tuberculose 

396 

Number 
received 

Distribution 



Delivered 

Mailing  List 

P.C. 

1471 

Sales . 

Parlia- 
ment 

Depart- 
ments 

Parlia- 
ment 

Depart- 
ments 

Official  Reports  of  Parliament 
(Bound  Volumes) 

Journals,  House  of  Commons,  1928 

"         Senate,  1928 

544 
530 

540 
537 

664 
674 
676 
680 
99 

158 
156 

213 
213 
154 

194 

138 

125 
125 
99 
99 
99 
89 

24 
25 
40 
40 

290 
290 

290 

8 

396 

396 

396 

396 

72 

136 
136 

136 
136 

65 

36 
97 

"92 

"         House   of  Commons,  App.    2 
and  3 

159 

Senate  Debates,  1928 

326 

83 

House  of  Commons  Debates,  1928 — 
Vol.1 

"% 

137 
137 
137 
137 

Vol.11 

Vol.  Ill 

Index 

Debats  du  Senat 

Debatsde  la  Chambre  des  Communes, 
1927— 

Vol.1 

4 
4 

Vol.11 

1928— 

Vol.1 

1 

1 

75 

24 

30 

84 
83 
82 
82 
83 
83 

6 
6 

33 
33 
33 

32 

32 

Vol.11 

Journaux  du  Senat,  1928 

Journaux  de  la  Chambre  des  Communes, 
1928 

103 
103 

Journaux  de  la  Chambre  des  Communes, 
App.  1928 

Bound  Annual  Reports 
\nnual  Reports,  1926-27,  Vol.  I 

Vol.V 

Annual  Reports,  1925-26,  Vol.  II. 

Vol.V 

Vol.  Ill 

Vol.  IV 

Rapports  annuels  des  Departements: 
1925-26,  Vol.2 

13 
13 
19 
20 

Vol.4 

1926-27,   Vol.  1 

Vol.5 

ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928-29 
Parliamentary  Papers — Part  Sessions  1927-28  and  1928-29 


101 


English 

Senate  Debates 

House  of  Commons  Debates 

Senate  Minutes 

Votes  and  Proceedings,  House  of  Commons 

Orders  of  the  Day,  House  of  Commons 

Bills,  Senate 

Bills,  House  of  Commons 

French 

Debats  de  la  Chambre  Communes 

Proces-Verbaux,  Minutes  du  Senat 

Proces-Verbaux,  Chambre  des  Communes. . 
Ordres  du  Jour,  Chambre  des  Communes. . 

Bills,  Senat 

Bills,  Chambre  des  Communes 


Number 
received 


145,360 
498,411 
59,430 
144,886 
131,548 
,521,750 
,352,880 


88,319 
12,978 
33,880 
24,948 
361,075 
363,460 


Distributed  Order  of 
Parliament 


House  of 
Commons 


45,360 
88,165 
29,610 
41,910 
59,675 
1,187,750 
700,720 


16,170 

6,510 

25,410 

9,660 

242,550 

211,680 


Mailing 
List 


3,520 

114,586 

154 

26,277 

26,277 

210,350 

144,240 


32,571 

113 

7,084 

7,034 

33,760 

22,080 


P.C.  1471 


1,148 
4,048 
1,148 
4,048 
4,048 
35,250 
29,614 


2,464 
1,344 
2,464 
2,464 
8,800 
7,680 


Number  of  Subscribers  to  Parliamentary  Papers,  March  31,  1929 


Senate- 
Debates  of 

Minutes  of  Proceedings 

House  of  Commons — 

Debates   of 

Votes  and  Proceedings 
Orders  of  the  Day . . . . . 

Bills  of  both  Houses 


To  Departments 


English 


440 
348 

811 
455 
408 

242 


French 


To  the  Public 


Knglish 

French 

136 

68 

1,252 

113 

127 

4 

92 

134 

REPORT  OF  THE  CONTROLLER  OF  PURCHASES 

Fiscal  Year  1928-29 

F.  A.  Acland, 

King's  Printer, 
Ottawa,  Ont. 

Dear  Sir,- — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  report  of  the  Purchasing  Branch 
for  the  fiscal  year  1928-29.  The  total  amount  of  money  paid  for  purchases 
made  by  the  three  divisions  of  this  branch  is  $2,209,602.47,  sub-divided  as  fol- 
lows : — 


Canadian 


United 
Kingdom 


United 
States 


Other 
Coun- 
tries 


Total 
Material 
Purchased 


Customs 
Duty  and 
Brokerage 


Freight 

and 
Express 


Grand 
Total 


Stationery  and 
Paper  Stores 
Printing  Stores 
Lithographing 
Printing, 
Binding,  En- 
graving, etc. 

Totals. . . . 


$       cts. 

1,674,942  53 
113,132  69 


321,018  51 


$       cts. 
19,309  30 


cts, 


27,677  88 
16,417  12 


$    cts. 
324  64 


576  70 


00 


$       cts. 

1,722,254  35 
129,549  81 


321,604  21 


$       cts. 

4,692  86 
4,099  22 


126  28 


$       cts. 

23,538  98 
961  44 


2,775  32 


$       cts. 

1,750,486  19 
134,610  47 


324,505  81 


2,109,093  73 


19, 


00 


44,104  00 


324  64 


2,173,408  37 


,918  36 


27,275  74 


2,209,602  47 


The  above  mentioned  purchases  were  made  from  1,559  firms  or  individuals; 
31,960  invoices  were  received,  audited  and  certified  ready  for  payment;  28,739 
individual  orders  were  issued  and  1,067  special  specifications  for  tenders  were 
prepared.  Sale  of  discarded  equipment,  machines,  etc.,  amounted  to  $1,225.00. 
Metal  dross  exchanged  for  virgin  metal,  21,968  pounds  to  the  value  of  $1,280.70. 
Customs  entries  for  import  and  export,  368;  number  of  express  and  freight 
slips  audited  and  cleared  for  payment,  2,599. 

Work  performed  or  supervised  by  the  Lithographing  and  Engraving  Division 
lis  as  follows:  Cheques  lithographed,  4,404,560;  maps  lithographed,  1,379,486; 
forms,  posters,  etc.,  10,376,911;  lithographed  money  orders,  17,397,680;  booklets, 
549,083;  printed  cards  and  tags,  8,108,838;  line  engravings  and  halftones, 
11,018;  electros  and  dies,  910;  heliotype  prints,  341,240;  cartons  and  enve- 
lopes, 2,968,703. 

Government  Newspaper  Advertising 

The  total  amount  of  the  invoices  audited  and  passed  for  payment  by  this 
department  for  Government  advertising  during  the  fiscal  year  ending  March 
31,  1929  is  $195,815.16;  the  details  of  which  are  set  forth  in  statement  on  the 
next  page.  These  accounts  were  paid  by  the  several  departments  for  which 
the  advertising  is  done  and  the  amount  is  therefore  not  included  in  the  state- 
ment of  expenditure  of  this  department. 

The  number  of  advertising  accounts  audited  is  7,099;  orders  issued,  4,977, 
of  which  3,679  were  for  transient  advertising  and  1,298  for  space  contract  adver- 
tising. 


103 


104 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  PRINTING  AND  STATIONERY 


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* 

ANNUAL  REPORT,  1928- 


105 


Below  is  a  statement  of  the  total  amount  of  advertising  accounts  audited 
by  this  department  from  the  year  1876  to  the  fiscal  year  ending  March  31,  1929, 
inclusive. 


Calendar  Year 

1876 $  12,529  27 

i  1877        12,751  56 

1878 20,583  77 

11879 39,676  60 

11880 63,092  50 

11881 30,015  44 

!  1882 50,604  71 

1883 30,149  31 

1884 39,401  48 

1885 « 33,782  53 

- 1886 25,102  83 

1887 48,596  03 

1888 44,520  30 

1889 35,939  47 

1890 26,102  48 

,1891 27,519  59 

'1892 24,819  54 

1893 26,704  27 

1894 26,423  72 

1895 27,424  68 

1896 30,760  76 

1897 35,138  54 

1898  (6  mos.  to  June  30,  1898) 16,312  58 


Fiscal  Year 


1898-1899 %  27, 699  72 

1899-1900 46,317  74 

1900-1901 50,790  40 

1901-1902 53,850  75 

1902-1903 41,078  02 

1903-1904 57,898  72 

1904-1905 102,848  11 

1905-1906 107,812  56 

1906-1907 89,329  77 


(March  31) 

1907-1908 141,200  45 

1908-1909 156,673  50 

1909-1910 102,841  15 

1910-1911 144,081  66 

1911-1912 166,224  26 

1912-1913 204,762  87 

1913-1914 247,477  61 

1914-1915 200,441  19 

1915-1916 210,818  48 

1916-1917 295,694  98 

"1917-1918 496, 645  77 

1918-1919 622, 197  21 

1919-1920 235, 663  93 

1920-1921 183,656  65 

1921-1922 98,663  02 

1922-1923 224,885  07 

1923-1924 129,611  43 

1924-1925 77,434  09 

1925-1926 105,021  81 

1926-1927 72,961  95 

1927-1928 110,551  20 

1928-1929 195,815  16 


"Includes  advertising  of  Victory  Loan,  1918,  amount  $184,064.59,  contracted  for  with  Canadian  Press 
Association. 

J.  O.  PATENAUDE, 

Controller  of  Purchases. 


DOMINION  OF  CANADA 
SIXTY-SECOND  ANNUAL  REPORT 

OF  THE 

DEPARTMENT  OF  MARINE 
AND  FISHERIES 

FOR  THE 

FISCAL  YEAR  1928-29 


MARINE 


OTTAWA 

F.  A.  ACLAND 

PRINTER  TO  THE  KING'S  MOST  EXCELLENT  MAJESTY 

1929 


To  His  Excellency  the  Right  Honourable  Viscount  Willingdon,  G.C.S.L, 
G.C.M.G.,  G.C.I.E.,  G.B.E.,  Governor  General  and  Commander  in  Chief 
of  the  Dominion  of  Canada. 

May  it  Please  Your  Excellency: 

I    have   the    honour   to    submit    herewith,    for    the    information   of   Your 
j  Excellency  and  the  Parliament  of  Canada,  the  Sixty-second  Annual  Report  of 
the  Department  of  Marine  and  Fisheries,  Marine  Branch. 

I  have  the  honour  to  be, 

Your  Excellency's  most  obedient  servant, 

P.  J.  ARTHUR  CARDIN, 

Minister  of  Marine  and  Fisheries.. 

Department  of  Marine, 
Ottawa. 


88174-a 


TABLE    OF   CONTENTS 

REPORT  OF  DEPUTY  MINISTER.    Subjects  paged  in  summary  below. 

A 

Page 

Agencies'  reports 70-97 

Halifax,  N.S.,  agency 70-74 

Sydney,   N.S.,  sub-agency 74,  75 

Pictou,  N.S.,  sub-agency 74 

Victoria,  B.C.,  agency 75-78 

Prince  Rupert,  B.C.,  agency   79, 80 

Charlottetown,  P.E.I.,  agency 80-84 

Fort  William,  Ont.,  sub-agency 84,  85 

Parry   Sound,  Ont.,  agency 85-87 

Kenora,  Ont.,  sub-agency 87 

Montreal,  P.Q.,  agency 87, 88 

Quebec,  P.Q.,   agency 88-93 

Saint  John,  N.B.,  agency 93-97 

Appropriation  and  expenditure 191 

B 

Bagobville,  Port  Alfred 148 

Belleville  Harbour  Commission  report 148 

Board  of  Steamboat  Inspection,  report  of  chairman 157-159 

Board  meetings 157 

Engineer  examinations 157 

Senior  Steamship  Inspectors 158 

Inspectors  acting  in  dual  capacity 158 

Inspectors  of  boilers  and  machinery 158 

Inspectors  of  hulls  and  equipment 158 

Inspectors  of  ships'  tackle 158 

Table  showing   number   of   inspections   made,  fees  collected,  etc.,   during  year 

ending  March  31,  1929 159 

Burrard  Dry  Dock  Co.,  Ltd.,  operations  of 13 

C 

Canadian  Government  Merchant  Marine 9-11 

Comparison  of  operations,  1927  and  1928 9, 10 

Disposition  of  fleet  during  1928 10 

Voyages  completed'  during  the  year 10 

Regular  sailings  during  the  year 10, 11 

Canadian  shipbuilding  plants,  operations  of 11-13 

Canadian  Viekers,  Ltd.,  operations  of 13 

Charlottetown  agency  report 80-84 

Chicoutimi  Harbour  Commission  report 147, 148 

Chief  Engineer's  report .• 20-25 

New  aids  to  navigation 20, 21 

Changes  and  imiprovements 21, 24 

Publications 24 

Ice-t>reaking 24 

Removal  of  obstructions  to  navigation 24 

v 


vi  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

C 

Page 
Chief  Engineer's  Report— Concluded 

Maintenance  and  repairs  to  wharves 24 

Dominion  steamers 25 

Dominion  Lighthouse  Depot,  Prescott,  Ont 25 

Commissioner  of  Lights'  report 25, 26 

Statement,   b\r    districts,   showing   the   number   of   lights   of   the   several   orders, 

lightships,  lightkeepers,  fog  signals,  buoys,  submarine  bells,  etc 26 

Comparison  (by  countries)  of  tonnage  in  hand  at  close  of  1928,  with  1928  output...  8,9 

Correspondence 192 

Countries  for  which  the  merchant  vessels  launched  in   Great  Britain  and  Ireland 

during  1928  have  been  built 4 

D 

Davie  Shipbuilding  and  Repairing  Co.,  Ltd.,  operations  of 12 

Denmark,  mercantile  shipbuilding 6 

E 

Expenditure  and  revenue 49, 50 

F 

Fort  William,  sub-agency  report 84,  85 

France,  mercantile  shipbuilding 7 

G 

General  statistics 8 

Germany,  mercantile  shipbuilding 6 

H 

Halifax  agency  report 70-74 

Halifax  Harbour  Commission  report 148-150 

Halifax  Shipyards,  Ltd.,  operations  of , 11 

Harbour  Commissioners'  reports 124-157 

Quebec 124-130 

Montreal 130-137 

Three  Rivers 137-140 

New  Westminster 140-143 

Vancouver 143-147 

Chicoutimi 147, 148 

Bagotville 148 

Belleville 148 

Halifax 148-150 

Saint  John 150-157 

Holland,  mercantile  shipbuilding 6 

Hydrographic  Service— Report  of  Chief  Hydirographer 102-116 

Headquarters 102, 103 

Division   of  Hydrography 103 

Atlantic  coast  and  inland  waters 103 

Pacific  coast 103 

Gulf  of  St.  Lawrence 103-105 

Bay  of  Fundy 105 

Hudson  Bay  (Port  Churchill)  Survey 105, 106 

Lake  St.  Clair  survey 106 

Great  Slave  Lake  survey 107 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  v;; 

H 

Page 
Hydropraphic  Service — Concluded 

Pacific  coast  survey 107, 108 

Precise  water  levels  division 108, 109 

Monthly  mean  water  surface  elevations  of  the  Great  Lakes,  by  precise  water 

levels  division,  during  1928 1 10 

Monthly  mean  water  surface  elevations  of  the  St.  Lawrence  river,  by  precise 

water  levels  division,  during  1928 HI 

Division  of  chart  construction 112, 113 

Division  of  chart  distribution 113 

Division  of  tides  and  currents 113, 114 

Seasonal  tide  gauges — Atlantic  coast 114 

Pacific  coast 114 

Investigation  of  currents — Atlantic  coast 114 

Pacific  coast 115 

Reports  on  currents 115 

Tide  tables 115 

Information  service  and  other  available  publications 116 

Staff 116 

I 

Inspection,  Board  of  Steamboat,  report  of  chairman 157-159 

Italy,  mercantile  shipbuilding 7 

Idle  steam  and  motor  shipping  of  principal  maritime  countries  on  January  1,  1928 

and  January  1,  1929 9 

J 

Japan,  mercantile  shipbuilding 6, 7 

K 

Kenora,  sub-agency  report 87 

L 

Legislation,  new 192 

Live  stock  shipments,  1928 102 

Lloyd's  returns — Register  shipbuilding  for  the  quarter  ended  March  31,  1928 1 

"            "         Register  shipbuilding  for  the  quarter  ended  June  30,  1928 2 

"         Motor  shipbuilding  at  June  30,  1928 2 

"           "         Tankers  under  construction  at  June  30,  1928 3 

"            "         Mercantile  shipbuilding  in  1928 £-9 

"         Number  and  tonnage  of  merchant  vessels  'launched  in  Great  Britain 

and  Ireland  during  the  two  years  1927  and  1928 3 

"  "         Size   of  merchant  vessels  launched  in  Great  Britain  and  Ireland 

during  1928 4 

11         Countries  for  which  the  merchant  vessels  launched  in  Great  Britain 

and  Ireland  during  1928  have  been  built 4 

"           "         Size  and  type  of  vessels 5 

"            "         Vessels  fitted  with  turbines 5 

"         Vessels  fitted  with  internal  combustion  engines 5 

"           "         Output  of  leading  shipbuilding  centres 5 

"           "         Germany 6 

Holland 6 

"           "         Denmark 6 

"           "         Sweden 6 

"         Japan 6, 7 

United  States 7 


viii  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

L 

Page 
Lloyds's  returns — Concluded 

"            "         France 7 

Italy 7 

"           "         Summary 7 

"           "         General  statistics 8 

"  "         Comparison  ('by  countries)  of  tonnage  in  hand  at  close  of  1928  with 

1928  output 8, 9 

"  "         Idle  steam  and  motor  shipping  of  principal  maritime  countries  on 

January  1,  1928  and  January  1,  1929 9 

M 

Marine  Department  correspondence 192 

Masters  and  Seamen  Branch — report  of  Superintendent 65 

Mercantile  shipbuilding  in  1928 3-9 

Merchant  marine,  Canadian 9-11 

Meteorological  Service,  report  of  Director 51-60   j 

Forecast  division 51   ! 

Division  of  climatology 51,  52 

Physics  division 52, 53 

Earth  temperatures,  Toronto 53,  54 

Terrestrial  magnetism 54 

Summary  of  results  of  magnetic  observations  at  Agincourt  for  the  fiscal  year 

1928-29 55   ! 

Summary  of  results  of  magnetic  observations  at  Meanook  for  the  fiscal  year 

1928-29 56 

Astronomy 56, 57 

Seismology 57 

Quebec  Observatory — report  of  director 58 

St.  John  Observatory — report  of  director 58,  59 

Victoria  Observatory — report  of  director 59, 60 

Midland  Shipbuilding  Co.,  Ltd.,  operations  of 11 

Montreal  agency  report 87, 88  i 

Montreal  Harbour  Commission  report 130-137   i 

Motor  shipbuilding  at  June  30,  1928 2  ! 

New  legislation 192 

New  Westminster  harbour  commission  report 140-143 

Number  and  tonnage  of  merchant  vessel's  launched  in  Great  Britain  and  Ireland 

during  the  two  years  1927  and  1928 3 

O 

Operations  of  chief  Canadian  shipbuilding  plants 11-13 

Output  of  leading  shipbuilding  centres 5 

p 

Pacific  Salvage  Co.,  report 98 

Parry  Sound  agency  report 85-87 

Pictou  sub-agency  report 74 

Pilotage — report  of  director 65-68 

District  of  Montreal 65,  66 

District  of  Quebec 66   ! 

( ieinT.i]  Montreal  and  Quebec 66, 67 

District  of  Saint  John 67 

District  of  Halifax IT  67 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  \x 

P 

Page 
Pilotage — Concluded 

District  of  Sydney 68 

British  Columbia 68 

General 68 

Port  Arthur  Shipbuilding  Co.,  Ltd.,  operations  of 12 

Port  Wardens'  reports 116-118 

Prince  Rupert  agency  report 79,  80 

Prince  Rupert  Dry  Dock  and  Shipyard,  operations  of 12 

Q 

Quebec  agency  report 88-93 

Quebec  harbour  commission  report 124-130 

Quebec  Salvage  &  Wrecking  Co.,  report 97, 98 

R 

Radio  Branch — report  of  director 160-190 

Number  of  radio  stations  in  the  Dominion 160 

Licences 160 

Licence  fees - 160 

Government  coast  stations 160, 161 

Radiotelegraph  aids  to  navigation  broadcasts 161 

Radiotelephone  aids  to  navigation  broadcasts 161 

Time  signals  (East  coast) 162 

(West  coast) 162 

Spring  patrol,  Cabot  straits,  gulf  of  St.  Lawrence 162 

Radio  direction  finding 162 

Bearings  given  1928-29 163 

Radio  beacon  service 163, 164 

Radio  aid  to  navigation  in  relation  to  marine  insurance 164 

Commercial  ship  service 164 

Radiotelephone  service  to  small  craft  on  the  Pacific  coast 165 

Ship's  emergency  apparatus 165 

Number  of  ships  exercised  1928-29 165 

Traffic  section. 165 

Messages  handled  by  the  coast  station  services •. . .  165, 166 

Revenue 166 

Inspections 166, 167 

Examinations  for  certificate  of  proficiency  in  radiotelegraphy 167 

Fees  for  examinations 167 

Radio  broadcasting 167, 168 

Broadcasting  wavelength  arrangements  with  the  United  States 168 

Commercial  activities  (Imperial  Communication) 168, 169 

Transatlantic 169 

Canada  eastern  zone  to  Great  Britain  and  Ireland 169 

Transpacific 169 

Canada  to  Australia 169 

Communication  with  isolated  points 169 

Work  undertaken  on  behalf  of  other  departments  of  the  government 169, 170 

Radio  (short  wave)  conference  held  in  Ottawa,  January  21,  1929,  to  January  25, 

1929 170 

An  agreement  between  United  States,  Canada,  Newfoundland,  and  Cuba  relative 

to  the  assignment  of  frequencies  on  the  North  American  Continent 171,172 

North  American  radio  conference,  1929 173 

Dis     bution  of  general  communication  channels 174, 175 

88174-b 


x  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

R 

Page 
Radio  Branch— Concluded 

Summary 175 

General  summary 176 

The  International  radiotelegraph  conference 176 

The  Royal  Commission  on  radio  broadcasting 176, 177 

The  International  telegraph  conference 177-180 

Article  9  (VIII)  Code  Language 177, 178 

Proceedings   of   the   conference 17&-180 

Inductive  interference  section 180-184 

New  construction,  additions  and  alterations 184 

(West  coast) 185 

(Great  Lakes) 185 

(East  coast) , 186 

(Hudson  Bay  and  Strait) 186, 187 

Special  assistance  rendered  to  ships  during  the  year  by  government  radio  stations 

(West  coast— Bull  harbour) 187 

Cape  Lazo 187, 188 

Pachena  point  direction  finding 188 

Point  Grey 188 

Vancouver 188 

East  coast— North  Sydney,  N.S 188, 189 

Sable  Island,  N.S 189 

Cape  Race,  Newfoundland 189 

Point  Amour,  Belle  Isle 189 

Great  Lakes—- Point  Edward  &  Tobermory,  Ont 190 

East  coast  visual  signal  service 190 

Returns  of  shipping  masters 99-101 

Quebec 99 

New  Brunswick 99 

Nova  Scotia 99-101 

Prince  Edward  Island 101 

British  Columbia 101 

Recapitulation 101 

Revenue  and  expenditure 49, 50 

S 

Sable  island — report  of  Superintendent 70 

Shipbuilding  returns  for  the  quarter  ended  March  31,  1928  (Lloyd's  statement) 1 

Shipbuilding  returns  for  the  quarter  ended  June  30,  1928  (Lloyd's  statement) 2 

Shipments,  Jive  stock ; 102 

Shipping  masters,  returns  of 99-101 

Signal  Station,  Halifax — record  of  shipping 69 

Size  and  type  of  vessels 5 

Size  of  merchant  vessels  launched  in  Great  Britain  and  Ireland  during  1928 4 

Sorel  Shipyard 191 

Statistics  of  Canadian  shipping 14-19 

Statement  of  vessels  built  in  Canada  and  registered  during  the  year  1928 14 

Statement  showing  number  of  vessels  and  number  of  tons  on  registry  books  of  the 

Dominion  of  Canada  on  December  31,  1928 15, 16 

Statement   showing   number   of   vessels   removed   from    the    registry   books   of    the 

Dominion  of  Canada  during  year  ended  December  31,  1928 17 

Statement,   comparative,  showing  number   of  vessels  and   number  of   net  tons   on 

registry  books  of  the  Dominion  of  Canada,  on  December  31,  in  each  year  from 

1919  to  1928,  both  inclusive 18 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  xj 

S 

Page 

Statement,  comparative,  of  vessels  built  and  registered  in  the  Dominion  of  Canada 
and  their  net  tonnage  during  the  year  ended  December  31,  in  each  year  from 

1919  to  1928,  both  inclusive 19 

Steamboat  Inspection — Board  of — report  of  Chairman 157-159 

St.  John  agency  report 93-97 

St.  John  Dry  Dock  and  Shipbuilding  Co.,  Ltd.,  operations  of 12 

St.  John  harbour  commission  report 150-157 

St.  Lawrence  Ship  Channel— report  of  Superintending  Engineer 27-48 

History  of  the  river  St.  Lawrence  Ship  channel 27, 28 

Thirty-foot  channel 28, 29 

Thirty-five  foot  channel 29 

The  ship   channel  below  Quebec : 29 

-   South  channel  (30  ft.  at  E.L.W.) . . . 30 

North  channel  (35  ft.  at  E.L.W.) 30 

Dredging  operations,  season  1928 31-33 

Progress  of  dredging  operations  at  the  end  of  season  1928 33 

Tidal   Semaphores 33, 34 

Sweeping  operations 34 

Height  of  water 34 

Accidents  in  the  river  (St.  Lawrence,  season  of  navigation  1928 34, 35 

Marine  Signal  service 35, 36 

East  coast  visual  signal  service 37 

Brief  summary  of  work  performed 37, 38 

Icebreaking,  1928-29 38-40 

Average  depth  for  each  month  in  the  27^  foot  channel 40 

Average  depth  for  each  month  in  the  30  foot  channel 40 

Cost  of  ship  channel  to  date 41 

Progress  of  dredging  operations  at  the  close  of  the  season  1928  (30  foot  project).  42,43 

Progress  of  dredging  operations  at  the  close  of  the  season  1928  (35  .foot  project).  43,44 

Abstract  of  work  of  dredging  fleet  during  fiscal  year  ending  March  31,  1929 45, 46 

Classification  of  disbursements  for  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1929 47 

Details  o'f  dredging,  locality  and  cost  per  cubic  yard 48 

Summary,  mercantile  shipbuilding,  1928,  by  countries 7 

Supervisor  of  Harbour  Commissions'  report — including  reports  of  Harbour  Commis- 
sioners   118-124 

Harbour  Commissions 118, 119 

General 120 

Comparative  table  showing  revenue  and  capital  receipts  and  expenditures,  etc., 

if  or  the  harbour  of  Montreal,  Quebec  and  Vancouver  during  the  year  1928..  121,122 
Table  showing  comparative  grain  shipments  for  the  years  1927  and  1928  from  the 

harbours  of  Montreal,  Quebec  and  Vancouver 122 

Comparative  table  showing  total  number  of  ocean  vessels,  with  their  total  regis- 
tered tonnage,  using  the  five  larger  harbours  of  Canada,  during  the  years 

1927  and   1928 122, 123 

Public  harbours  and  harbour  masters 123 

Changes  in  personnel  of  harbour  masters  during  calendar  year  1928 123, 124 

Summary  of  harbour  dues  for  the  year  1928 124 

Sweden,  mercantile  shipbuilding 6 

Sydney,  sub-agency  report 74, 75 


T 

Tankers  under  construction  at  June  30,  1928 3 

Three  Rivers  harbour  commission  report 137-140 


xii  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

U 

United  States,  mercantile  shipbuilding 7 

V 

Vancouver  harbour  commission  report 143-147 

Vessels   fitted    with   turbines 5 

Vessels  fitted  with  internal  combustion  engines 5 

Victoria  agency  report 75-78 

W 

Wreck  Commissioner's  report 60-G6 

Investigations  and  inquiries 60-65 

Wrecking  Companies  reports 97, 98 


REPORT 


OF  THE 


DEPUTY  MINISTER  OF  MARINE 


To  the  Hon.  P.  J.  Arthur  Cardin, 
Minister  of  Marine  and  Fisheries. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  herewith  my  report  for  the  fiscal  year 
ended  March  31,  1929. 

At  the  beginning  of  1928  there  was  an  increase  in  the  shipbuilding  activity 
of  practically  every  maritime  country  with  the  exception  of  the  United  States 
— as  shown  by  the  subjoined  Lloyds  table. 


Country 

Tonnage  in  hand  at 

Jan.  1.  1928 
(Lloyds  statement) 

Tonnage  output 

1927 

(Lloyds  statement) 

Great  Britain  and  Ireland. 

gross  tons 

1,579,713 
472,295 
183,216 
174,887 
115,029 
100,700 
97,710 
97,370 

gross  tons 

1,225,873 

289,622 

Italy  . 

101,076 

Holland 

119,790 

France 

44,335 

67,361 

Denmark 

72,038 

United  States 

179,218 

It  will  be  seen  from  this  table  that  Great  Britain  and  Ireland,  Germany, 
Italy,  and  Holland,  had  all  substantial  increases  of  tonnage  in  hand  at  the 
beginning  of  1928  over  their  1927  outputs,  and  France  in  particular  had  in 
hand  on  January  1,  1928,  a  building  program  nearly  three  fold  her  1927  output. 


Lloyds  Register  Shipbuilding  Returns  for  the  Quarter  ended  March  31,  1928 

March  31,  1928 
gross  tons 

Great  Britain  and  Ireland 1,440,842 

Germany 443,939 

Italy 171 ,  016 

HoLand 162,973 

France 103,494 

Sweden 91,075 

Denmark 103, 110 

United  States 56,049 

Russia 94, 658 

Japan 91 ,  775 

In  comparing  this  table  with  the  first  it  will  be  seen  that  Great  Britain 
and  Ireland,  Germany,  Italy,  Holland,  France  and  Sweden  all  show  slight 
declines,  Denmark  a  slight  increase,  and  the  United  States  as  before  a  marked 
decline. 

88174—1 


2  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

Russia  and  Japan  are  not  included  in  the  first  table  but  as  the  Russian 
output  in  1927  amounted  to  43,917  tons  (Lloyds  statement)  and  as  her  tonnage 
in  hand  at  March  31,  1928,  was  94,658  tons,  she  has  more  than  doubled  her 
building  program  in  the  course  of  a  few  months.  This  is  the  more  remarkable, 
as  during  the  post  war  period  Russia  did  no  building  until  1926. 

As  Japan's  1927  output  was  42,359  tons  (Lloyds  statement)  and  her  ship- 
ping in  hand  at  March  31,  1928,  was  91,775  tons,  her  building  program  has! 
also  been  doubled. 

Lloyds  Register  Shipbuilding  for  the  Quarter  ended  June  30,  1928 

June  30,  .928. 
gross  tons 

Great  Britain  ana  Ireland 1,202,610 

Germany 407,534 

Holland 173, 190 

Italy 154,111 

France 125,984 

Russia r 115,298 

Japan 111,325 

Sweden 101,700 

Denmark 98,403 

United  States 55,502 

Compared  with  the  March  returns,  building  in  Great  Britain  and  Ireland  i 
shows  a  drop  of  238,232  tons,  1,202,610  as  against  1,440,842  tons;  in  Germany j 
a  drop  of  36,405  tons,  407,534  tons  as  against  443,939  tons;  in  Italy  a  drop  of 
16,905  tons,  154,111  tons  as  against  171,016  tons;  in  Holland  a  gain  of  10,217; 
tons,  173,190  tons  as  against  162,973  tons;  in  France  a  gain  of  22,490  tons;i 
125,984  tons  as  against  103,494  tons;  in  Sweden  a  gain  of  10,625  tons,  101,700 j 
tons  as  against  91,075  tons;  in  Denmark  a  drop  of  4,707  tons,  98,403  tons  as; 
against  103,110  tons;  United  States  show  a  slight  decline  of  about  500  tons;i 
Russia  a  gain  of  20,640  tons;  115,298  tons  as  against  94,658  tons;  and  Japan 
a  gain  of  19,550  tons;  111,325  tons  as  against  91,775  tons. 

Total  gross  tonnage  of  world  building  at  the  close  of  June,  1928,  amounted 
to  2,660,462  tons,  as  against  2,893,251  tons  at  the  end  of  March,  1928,  a  drop; 
of  232,789  tons. 

Total  world   tonnage   in   hand   at  the   close   of  June,   1927,   amounted   to 
2,840,545  tons   (Lloyds  statement);  it  will  thus  be  seen  that  in  the  course  of  j 
a  year,  world  building  had  undergone  a  slight  decline  of  180,083  tons. 

Motor  Ship  Building  at  June  30,  1928 
(Lloyds  Statement) 

At  the  end  of  June,  1928,  there. were  building  in  the  world  276  motor  ships, 
gross  tonnage,  1,500,444  tons.  Of  these  totals  there  were  being  built  in  Great 
Britain  and  Ireland  75  ships,  tonnage  546,826  tons,  and  in  the  rest  of  the 
world  201  ships,  tonnage  953,718  tons. 

The  British  and  Irish  motor  tonnage  amounted  to  about  84  per  cent  of 
the  steam  tonnage  then  under  way,  which  was  649.482  tons. 

At  the  same  time  the  other  maritime  countries  combined  were  building 
488,981  tons  of  steam  tonnage  or  a  little  more  than  one-half  of  their  motor 
tonnage   in   hand,  which   as   already   stated   amounted   to   953,718   tons. 

In  Germany  there  were  being  built  at  the  end  of  June,  two  motor  ships 
of  over  30,000  tons  each,  and  in  Britain,  one  motor  ship  of  between  25,000 
and  30,000  tons. 


i 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER 

Tankers  under  Construction   at  June  30,   1928 
(Lloyds  statement) 


Countries  of  build 


Great  Britain  and  Ireland. 

Danzig 

Denmark 

France 

Germany 

Holland 


No. 


Gross 
tonnage 


202,896 
11,500 
63,868 
79,420 
22,200 
32,100 


Countries  of  build 


Italy 

Japan 

Russia 

Sweden 

United  States. 

Total . . 


N< 


80 


Gross 

tonnage 


25,308 

7,280 
24,000 

58,500 
12,700 


539,772 


The  above  table  shows  the  marked  superiority  still  maintained  by  Great 
Britain  and  Ireland  in  the  building  of  this  type  of  vessel. 

This  superiority  is,  however,  not  so  apparent  as  it  was  a  year  ago,  when 
the  tanker  tonnage  in  hand  of  Great  Britain  and  Ireland  was  somewhat  more 
than  that  of  the  other  maritime  countries  combined. 

Lloyds  Register  shipbuilding  returns  for  the  quarter  ended  September 
30,  1928,  show  a  falling-off  of  tonnage  in  hand  in  Great  Britain  and  Ireland 
of  112,850  tons,  as  compared  with  tonnage  building  at  June  30,  1928;  viz., 
1,089,760  tons  as  against  1,202,610  tons. 

As  the  tonnage  building  at  September  30,  1927,  amounted  to  1,536,416 
tons  (Lloyds  statement)  there  was  in  the  course  of  a  year  a  drop  of  446,656 
tons  in  the  British  and  Irish  building  program. 

The  tonnage  of  shipping  under  construction  abroad  was  about  the  same 
for  the  June  and  September  quarters,  the  former  being  about  26,000  tons  in 
excess  of  the  latter,  the  figures  being  respectively  1,457,852  tons  and  1,431,582 
tons  (Lloyds  statements). 

Mercantile  Shipbuilding  in  1928 

These  returns  are  from  Lloyds  Register  Annual  Summary,  are  in  gross 
tons  and  comprise  only  merchant  ships  of  100  gross  tons  or  upwards. 

Table  showing  the  Number  and  Tonnage  of  Merchant  Vessels  Launched  in 
Great  Britain  and  Ireland  during  the  two  years  1927  and  1928 


1928 

District 

Steamers 

Motorships 

Sail  and 
Barges 

Total 

1927 

No. 

Gross 
tonnage 

No. 

Gross 
tnonage 

No. 

Gross 
tonnage 

No. 

Gross 
tonnage 

No. 

Tons 

12 

1 
6 

5,581 

870 
12,331 

2 

1,586 

14 

1 
13 

3 

1 

10 
77 
45 

9 
54 
11 
15 

33 

70 
8 

50 
6 

7,167 

870 

75,738 

626 

734 

31,060 

352,286 

219,662 

39,743 

17,448 

21,742 

73,197 

93,223 

300,508 

2,675 

207,646 

1,595 

11 

2 
21 
3 
1 
8 

87 
44 
13 
23 
11 
13 

18 
61 
11 
37 

7 

7,720 

Barrow ,  Maryport  and 

22,300 

Belfast 

7 
1 

63,407 
349 

107,181 

Bristol. .              

2 

277 

425 

Dublin 

1 

10 
51 
35 

9 
54 

9 
11 

28 
56 

1 
42 

4 

734 
31,060 
222,100 
156,790 
39,743 
17,448 
20,609 
66,310 

49,648 

217,957 

271 

170,106 

1,216 

1,080 

23,567 

/-m   j       (Glasgow 

20 
9 

128,410 
62,400 

6 
1 

1,776 
472 

263,455 

Clyde     (Greelock 

160,268 

Hartlepool 

65,588 

Hull  . 

14,852 

Leith 

1 
4 

4 
14 
6 
8 
2 

570 

6,887 

43,169 

82,551 

2,254 

37,540 

379 

1 

563 

16,707 

Liverpool 

36,636 

Middlesboro',  Stockton 
and  Whitby 

1 

406 

64.783 

Newcastle 

274,056 

1 

150 

3,206 

Sunderland 

162,770 

Other  districts 

1,279 

330 

1.012.774 

76 

427.916 

14 

5,230 

420 

1,445,920 

371 

1,225,87.3 

88174— 1J 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 


Table    showing    size    of    Merchant   Vessels    Launched    in    Great    Britain    and 

Ireland   during    1928 


Tonnage 


100  and  under        500  tons 

500  "  1,000  " 

1.000  "  2,000  " 

2,000  "  3,000  " 

3,000  "  4,000  " 

4,000  "  5,000  " 

5.000  "  6,000  " 

6,000  "  8,000  " 

8,000  "  10,000  " 

10,000  "  12,000  " 

12,000  "  15,000  " 

15,000  "  20,000  " 

20,000  "  25,000  " 

25,000  tons  and  above 


Steam 


330 


Motor 


76 


Sail  and 
Barnes 


14 


Table  showing   the   Countries   for  which   the   Merchant  Vessels  Launched   in 
Great  Britain   and   Ireland   during   1928   have   been   built 


Countries  for  which  Intended 


Great  Britain  and  Ireland 

British  Dominions 

Argentina 

Belgium 

Brazil 

Finland 

France 

Greece  

Holland 

Honduras 

Hungary 

Italy 

Jugo-Slavia 

Norway 

Panama 

Poland 

Roumania 

Soain 

United  States 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 

Other  countries 

Total 


No. 


310 
46 


420 


Gross 
tonnage 


153,636 

122,972 

5,617 

695 

483 

1,216 

8,981 

8,436 

20,908 

5,200 

4,251 

180 

?,180 

25,398 

8,947 

6,755 

6,394 

5,233 

32,094 

1,620 

18,869 

855 


1,445,920 


In  1927  Great  Britain  and  Ireland  supplied  to  the  British  Dominions  45 
ships,  gross  tonnage  113,254  tons;  in  1928  the  figures  as  shown  in  the  above 
table  were  46  ships,  gross  tonnage  122,972  tons.  It  will  be  seen  from  the 
above  table  that  Great  Britain's  and  Ireland's  total  building  on  foreign  account, 
apart  from  that  for  the  British  Dominions,  amounted  to  64  ships,  total  gross 
tonnage  169,312  tons;  a  little  more  than  two-thirds  of  the  building  on  foreign 
account  of  Great  Britain  and  Ireland,  both  in  the  number  of  ships  and  tiheir 
gross  tonnage,  went  to  the  British  Dominions. 

Great  Britain's  and  Ireland's  building  on  foreign  account  in  1928  amounted 
to  20-2  per  cent  of  the  total  tonnage  output;  in  1927  the  percentage  was  21-8; 
in  1926,  14;  in  1925,  16-5;  in  1924,  15-5;  and  the  average  was  22  per  cent  for 
the  five  pre-war  years,  1909-1913. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  5 

SIZE    AND    TYPE    OF    VESSELS 

The  returns  for  1928  show  that  97  vessels  of  between  5,000  and  10,000  tons 
each  and  16  vessels  of  10,000  tons  and  upwards  were  launched.  The  largesl 
are  the  turbine  steamers  Duchess  of  Bedford  (20,123  tons),  Duchess  of  Rich- 
mond and  Duchess  of  York,  (each  of  20,022  tons);  the  turbo-electric  vessel 
Viceroy  of  India  (19,000  tons);  and  the  motorship  Rangitiki  (18,000  tons). 

Excluding  vessels  of  less  than  1,000  tons,  51  vessels  of  300,348  tons  (24 
steamers  of  113,490  tons  and  27  motorships  of  186,858  tons)  for  the  carriage 
of  oil  in  bulk  were  launched  during  1928.  Of  these,  41  vessels  of  about  265,000 
tons  were  built  on  the  Isherwood  system  of  longitudinal  framing.  Included  in 
the  latter  figures  are  15  tankers  of  90,297  tons,  built  upon  the  "  Bracket  less 
System  ",  a  modification  of  the  Isherwood  longitudinal  system. 

The  tonnage  of  steamers  fitted  for  burning  oil  fuel,  launched  during  the 
year,  amounts  to  over  310,000  tons. 

The  tanker  tonnage,  including  4  vessels  of  less  than  1,000  tons  each,  repre- 
sents 21  per  cent  of  the  total  tonnage  of  the  steamers  and  motorships  launched 
during  1928. 

The  returns  include  a  number  of  vessels  designed  for  channel,  coasting, 
fishing   (54  vessels),  towing,  harbour  service,  and  other  special  purposes. 

The  average  tonnage  of  steamers  and  motorships  launched  during  the 
year  is  3,548  tons.  If  the  vessels  of  less  than  500  tons  are  excluded,  the 
average  is  increased  to  4,656  tons,  as  compared  with  4,193  in  1927,  4,486  in 
1926,  4,439  in  1925,  3,777  in  1924,  and  3,805  in  1923. 

VESSELS    FITTED    WITH    TURBINES 

Further  progress  was  recorded  in  the  use  of  steam  turbines  during  1928, 
when  15  vessels  with  a  total  tonnage  of  138,094  tons  were  launched,  which 
will  be  fitted  with  this  method  of  propulsion.  These  figures  include  one  vessel, 
of  19,000  tons,  fitted  with  turbines  in  conjunction  with  electric  motors;  and 
two  vessels,  of  7,777  tons,  which  have  a  combination  of  steam  turbines  and 
reciprocating  engines.  It  may  be  stated  that  the  four  largest  vessels  launched 
during  the  year  are  fitted  with  steam  turbines. 

VESSELS    FITTED    WITH    INTERNAL    COMBUSTION    ENGINES 

The  tonnage  of  vessels  fitted  with  internal  combustion  engines  is  steadily 
increasing  in  comparison  with  the  total  output.  The  tonnage  of  such  vessels 
launched  during  1919  was  32,936  tons,  while  during  1926  it  amounted  to 
201,913  tons,  and  to  355,779  tons  during  1927.  During  the  year  1928,  76 
motorships  of  427,916  tons  were  launched,  this  tonnage  equalling  42^  per  cent 
of  the  steam  tonnage  launched.  The  largest  motorship  launched  during  the  year 
is  the  Rangitiki.  of  about  18,000  tons,  and  it  may  be  of  interest  to  note  that 
while  the  average  gross  tonnage  of  the  steamers  of  500  tons  gross  and  upwards 
launched  during  1928  is  4,112  tons,  the  similar  average  for  motorships  reaches 
I    6,732  tons. 

OUTPUT    OF    LEADING    SHIPBUILDING    CENTRES 

The  Clyde  district  occupies  first  place  amongst  the  shipbuilding  centres, 
i  showing  an  output  of  571,948  tons.  Then  follow  the  Tyne  (300,508  tons),  the 
Wear  (207,646  tons),  the  Tees  (132,966  tons),  Belfast  (75,738  tons),  and  the 
Mersey  (73,197  tons).  The  largest  increase,  as  compared  with  1927,  has  taken 
place  on  the  Clyde,  the  figures  for  which  are  148,225  tons  higher  than  those 
for  the  previous  year.  The  increase  on  the  Wear  amounts  to  44,876  tons,  on 
the  Mersey  to  36,561  tons,  and  on  the  Tyne  to  26,452  tons;  the  figures  for 
Belfast  show  a  decrease  of  31,443  tons. 


6  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

Germany 

During  the  year  under  review,  81  vessels  of  376.416  tons  were  launched.     As  j 
compared  with  the  output  for  1927,  the  present  figures  show  an  increase  of   j 
86,794  tons  and  represent  30  per  cent  of  the  total  output  abroad  during  1928,  as 
compared  with  27£  per  cent  in  1927. 

These  figures  include  15  vessels  of  164,813  tons  to  be  fitted  with  steam  j 
turbines,  including  the  two  largest  vessels  launched  in  the  world  during  1928,  | 
viz.,  the  Bremen  and  Europa,  each  of  about  46,000  tons.  The  totals  for  turbine 
vessels  include  nine  vessels  of  45,069  tons  which  will  have  a  combination  of  j 
reciprocating  engines  and  steam  turbines.  The  total  figures  comprise,  also,  36  j 
vessels  of  177,338  tons  to  be  fitted  with  oil  engines,  the  largest  being  the  motor-  j 
ships  Kungsholm,  of  20,223  tons,  and  St.  Louis,  of  about  15,500  tons.  Two 
tankers,  of  14,109  tons — one  a  motorship  of  11,500  tons — were  launched. 

The  totals  include  12  vessels  of  between  6,000  and  8,000  tons,  eight  of 
between  8,000  and  10,000  tons,  and  the  five  vessels  specified  above  exceeding 
10,000  tons   each. 

Holland 

The  total  tonnage  launched  during  1928—166,754  tons— is  46,964  tons 
higher  than  the  1927  figures.  As  usual,  the  figures  for  this  country  do  not 
include  craft  exclusively  intended  for  river  navigation,  the  total  tonnage  of 
which  vessels  reaches  a  high  figure. 

Ten  vessels  of  ovar  6,000  tons  each  were  launched,  of  which  three  steamers, 
of   24,486  tons,    are   fitted  with   steam   turbines,   including   the   largest   vessel   j 
launched  in  the  country,  viz.,  the  Nieuw  Zeeland,  of  10,906  tons. 

The  totals  for  the  year  include  43  vessels  of  85,132  tons  to  be  fitted  with   I 
internal  combustion  engines.    Seven  motorships  are  of  6,000  tons  and  upwards, 
the  largest  being  the  Poelau  Laut  and  Poelau  Roebiah,  of  about  10,000  tons- 
each. 

Excluding  ships  of  less  than  1,000  tons,  seven  vessels,  of  41,925  tons,  are 
intended  for  the  carriage  of  oil  in  bulk.  Five  of  these,  of  36,744  tons,  are 
motorships. 

Denmark 

The  tonnage  launched  during  1928—138,712  tons— is  66,674  tons  higher 
than  last  year,  and  is  the  highest  recorded  in  this  country,  exceeding  the  com- 
bined output  for  the  six  pre-war  years  1908-1913.  The  total  is  composed  j 
almost  entirely  of  motorship  tonnage  (133,768  tons).  Eleven  motorships  of 
between  5,700  and  9,200  tons  were  launched.  All  these,  together  with  another 
motorship  of  3,100  tons,  are  intended  for  the  carriage  of  oil  in  bulk,  nine,  of 
67,824  tons,  being  built  on  the  longitudinal  framing  system. 

• 
Sweden 

The  output  for  1928—106,912  tons— is  39,551  tons  more  than  that  for 
1927,  and  is  the  highest  ever  recorded  in  this  country,  being  slightly  in  excess  | 
of  the  total  output  for  the  ten  pre-war  years  1904-1913.  Nearly  97  per  cent 
of  the  total  is  composed  of  motorships,  of  which  six  are  of  between  5,000  and 
8,000  tons,  and  six  between  8,000  and  10,000  tons  each=  The  tankers  launched 
—all   motorships— amount  to  ten,  of  81,060  tons. 

Japan 

The  output  for  this  country— 103,663  tons— shows  an  increase  of  61,304 
tons  over  the  total  for  1927,  and  is  the  largest  figure  recorded  for  this  country 
since  1921. 


REPORT  OF  THE  &EPUTY  MINISTER  7 

The  1928  totals  comprise  18  motorships,  of  58,784  tons,  including  the 
Asama  Maru,  of  16,780  tons,  and  four  others,  exceeding  6,000  tons  each.  Two 
turbine  steamers,  of  10,325  tons,  were  launched,  and  three  vessels,  each  exceed- 
ing 7,000  tons,  for  carrying  oil  in  bulk. 

United  States 

The  output  for  the  year  1928,  namely,  91,357  tons,  compares  with  179,218 
tons  launched  during  1927,  and  is  the  lowest  recorded  during  the  last  thirty- 
two  years. 

Of  the  tonnage  launched,  22  steamers  and  motorships  of  53,195  tons  and  30 
barges  of  24,805  tons  were  built  on  the  Atlantic  coast,  six  steamers  and  motor- 
ships  of  5,265  tons  on  the  Great  Lakes,  and  five  vessels  of  8,092  tons  on  the 
Pacific  coast. 

The  largest  vessels  launched  during  1928  were  the  turbo-electric  vessel 
Virginia,  of  20,773  tons,  built  at  Newport  News,  and  the  motorship  Mary  Ellen 
O'Neil,  of  11,628  tons  built  at  Chester,  Pa.,  with  the  exception  of  a  motor 
tanker,  of  8,942  tons,  launched  at  Chester,  Pa.,  no  other  ship  exceeding  4,000 
tons  was  launched. 

Two  turbine  steamers  of  23,865  tons  were  launched  in  this  country  during 
1928,  including  the  above-mentioned  Virginia,  which  is  fitted  with  turbines 
in  conjunction  with  electric  motors.  Internal  combustion  engine  tonnage 
launched  amounts  to  28,085  tons.  Of  oil  tankers  of  1,000  tons  and  upwards, 
three  of  23,505  tons  were  launched. 

The  totals  include  four  vessels  of  21,770  tons  built  on  the  Isherwood  sys- 
tem of  longitudinal  framing. 

France 

The  output  for  the  year — 81,416  tons — is  37,081  tons  higher  than  that 
for  1927. 

The  motorship  tonnage  launched,  54,764  tons,  is  more  than  double  the 
steam  tonnage,  and  includes  three  vessels  of  between  8,000  and  8,300  tons 
each,  and  four  between  6,000  tons  and  8,000  tons. 

Two  steamers   exceeding   7,000  tons   each   were   launched. 

Seven  vessels,  of  53,863  tons,  are  intended  to  carry  oil  in  bulk,  and,  with 
the  exception  of  one  steamer,  of  7,670  tons,  are  fitted  with  internal  combus- 
tion engines. 

Italy 

The  total  figures  for  this  country — 58,640  tons — are  42,436  tons  lower  than 
those  for  1927,  and  are  lower  than  in  any  year  since  1917. 

Of  the  total  output,  19  vessels  of  48,436  tons  were  launched  in  the  Trieste 
district. 

The  totals  for  Italy  comprise  three  steamers  of  18,417  tons,  intended  for 
carrying  oil  in  bulk,  including  the  Juvenal  of  13.247  tons,  launched  at  Trieste. 
There  were  also  launched  15  motorships,  of  35,552  tons. 

SUMMARY 

Great  Britain  and  Ireland 1,445,920 

Germany 376,416 

Holland 166,754 

Denmark 138, 712 

Sweden 106, 912 

Japan 103,663 

United  States 91, 357 

France 81,416 

Italy 58, 640 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 
General  Statistics 


Total  world  output  of  merchant  shipping  during  1928  reached  2,699,239 
tons  (Lloyds  statement) ,  this  is  an  increase  of  413,560  tons  over  the  1927  out- 
put During  1928  Great  Britain  and  Ireland  contributed  53-6  per  cent  of  the 
total  world  output;  in  1927  their  percentage  of  world  output  was  also  53-6 
per  cent.  It  will  thus  be  seen  that  in  two  successive  years  Britain  has  been 
responsible  for  a  trifle  more  than  one-half  of  world  shipbuilding. 

During  1928  vessels  totalling  1,183,229  tons  have  been  launched,  fitted 
with  internal  combustion  engines;  the  1927  figures  were  863,694  tons.  The 
1928  total  is  about  80  per  cent  of  world  output  of  steam  tonnage ;  in  1927  the 
percentage  of  motor  tonnage  output  to  steam  tonnage  output  was  62-8  per 
cent. 

At  the  beginning  of  1929,  however,  the  motor  ship  tonnage  building  in  the 
world  exceeded  the  steam  tonnage  under  construction  by  184,000  tons,  which 
shows  the  continued  and  rapid  increase  in  the  former  mode  of  propulsion. 

Of  the  total  world  steam  tonnage  launched  in  1928,  viz.,  1,477,092  tons, 
some  560,000  tons  refer  to  steamers  fitted  for  burning  oil  fuel  under  the  boilers, 
so  that  the  tonnage  depending  exclusively  on  coal  for  propulsion  is  less  than 
34  per  cent  of  the  world  total  for  1928. 

Tanker  tonnage  launched  during  1928  amounted  to  646,851  tons;  in  1927 
tanker  tonnage  was  542,437  tons. 

During  the  last  five  years  (1924-28)  the  average  tonnage  launched  annu- 
ally in  the  world  is  about  268,000  tons  less  than  the  average  for  the  five  pre- 
war years   (1909-1913). 

The  gross  tonnage  of  sea-going  steel  and  iron  steamers  and  motor  ships  in 
June,  1914,  was  42,514,000  tons;  in  June,  1928,  it  was  61,594,000  tons  (Lloyds 
statement),  an  increase  of  roughly  nineteen  million  tons. 

This  increase  has  been  very  marked  in  certain  types  of  vessels;  tankers 
which  in  1914  totalled  1,479,000  tons,  now  amount  to  6,544,000  tons.  Motor 
ships  which  only  reached  234,000  tons  in  1914,  now  amount  to  5,432,000  tons 
(including  auxiliaries) . 

Comparison    (by  countries)    of  tonnage  in  hand   at  close  of  1928  with   1928 

output 


Country 

Tonnasre  in  hand  at 

Dec.  31,  1928 
(Lloyds  statement) 

Tonnage  output 

1928 

(Lloyds  statement) 

Great  Britain  and  Ireland 

gross  tons 

1,242,794 
382,422 
±82,229 
16i,566 
118,580 
99,244 
98,048 

93,316 
82,780 
47,949 

gross   tons 
1,445,920 

Oiormany 

376,416 

Holland 

166,754 

France 

81,416 

Japan 

103,663 

Sweden 

106,912 

Russia 

(not  given  for  1928 
43,917  in  1927) 
58.640 

Italy 

Denmark 

138,712 

United  States 

91  357 

The  above  table  shows  a  decline  in  the  shipbuilding  program  of  Great 
Britain  and  Ireland  at  the  end  of  1928  as  compared  with  the  1928  output  of 
203,126  tons;  Sweden  shows  one  of  7,668  tons;  Denmark,  55,932  tons;  and 
United  States,  43,408  tons. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  9 

On  the  other  hand  Germany  shows  an  increase  of  6,006  tons;  Holland, 
one  of  15,475  tons;  France,  80,150  tons;  and  Japan  14,917  tons.  The  1928 
figures  for  Russian  output  are  not  given,  but  as  her  output  in  1927  was  43,917 
tons,  in  two  years  she  has  increased  her  shipbuilding  program  by  54,131  tons 
and  more  than  doubled  it. 

Idle  Steam  and  Motor  Shipping  of  Principal  Maritime  Countries  on  January  1, 

1928,  and  January  1,  1929 


Country 


United  States 

Great  Britain  and  Ireland 

Italy 

France 

Greece 

Japan 

Spain 

Norway 

Belgium 

Sweden 

Netherlands 

Denmark 

In  foreign  countries 

Grand  total.. 


1928 


tons 


4,302,000 


1929 


tons 

!, 816, 000 

467,000 

281,000 

132,000 

94,000 

53,000 

22,000 

20,000 

4,000 

2,000 


76,000 


3,947,000 


The  above  table  is  taken  from  "  Commerce  Reports  ",  a  weekly  publication 
issued  by  the  United  States  Department  of  Commerce.  The  figures  are  not 
!  absolutely  accurate  but  substantially  so. 

It  will  be  noted  that  in  the  world  at  large  there  is  a  slight  improvement 
in  the  amount  of  shipping  laid  up  in  1929  as  compared  with  the  1928  figures. 
The  United  States,  Great  Britain  and  Ireland,  Italy,  Japan,  and  Norway  all 
showing  improvements  in  this  respect. 

As  entire  world  shipping  laid  up  on  January  1,  1929,  amounted  to  3,947,000 

tons,  of  which  the  United  States  total  was  2,816,000  tons,  it  will  be  seen  that  a 

little  more  than  70  per  cent  of  the  entire  world  shipping  laid  up  at  that  date 

was  United  States  shipping;  of  the  2,816,000  tons  of  idle  United  States  shipping. 

!  2,160,000  tons  were  operated  by  the  United  States  Shipping  Board. 

Canadian  Government  Merchant  Marine 
Comparison  of  Operations,  1927  and  1928 


Year  1928 


Year  1927 


Total  revenue 

Total  operating  expenses 

Operating  ioss  for  year 


$  9,112.511 
10,321,594 


1,209,083 


$10,233,964 
10,954,699 


720,735 


The  net  operating  loss  for  1928  was  $1,209,083,  as  compared  with  $720,735 
for  1927. 

This  adverse  showing  was  due  largely  to  reduction  in  rates,  increased  com- 
petition on  certain  routes,  Antwerp  strike  during  the  summer  months,  and  reduced 
buying  power  in  South  Wales  due  to  the  limited  coal  mining  operations. 


10 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 


. 


Study  is  being  given  to  the  reorganization  of  certain  services  looking 
securing  better  results  in  future. 

The  only  accidents  to  report  are  the  grounding  of  the  Canadian  Mariner\ 
and  collisions  met  with  by  the  Canadian  Explorer  and  the  Canadian  Rover. 

In  connection  with  the  West  Indies  services,  arrangements  are  being  made 
to  transfer  seven  vessels  of  the  fleet  from  the  companv's  accounts  to  those  ofi 
the  Canadian  National  (West  Indies)  Steamships,  Limited. 

The  three  new  vessels  for  the  West  Indies  Service  Eastern  Route,  namely,; 
Lady  Nelson,  Lady  Hawkins  and  Lady  Drake,  were  delivered  by  the  buildersi 
in  1928,  the  first  two  named  steamers  sailing  from  Halifax  on  December  12  and1 
28  respectively.  As  neither  of  these  steamers  completed  a  voyage  in  1928,  thei 
voyage  results  will  be  included  in  the  West  Indies  Company  report  for  1929. 

The  two  steamers  intended  for  the  Western  route,  namely,  Lady  Somers  and) 
Lady  Rodney,  have  just  been  delivered.  When  they  commence  operating  Canada 
will  have  fulfilled  her  obligations  as  regards  the  provision  of  steamship  services! 
under  the  West  Indies  Trade  Agreement  of  1925. 


Disposition  of  Fleet  During  Year  1928 

Vessel: 

United  Kingdom  and  Continent 8 

Australia 8 

New  Zealand o 

West  Indies 10 

Vancouver — Coastal 4 

Intercoastal 4 

Newfoundland 1 

Chartered 2 

South  America 3 


45 

Voyages  Completed  During  the  Year 

ATLANTIC 

Voyages 

United  Kingdom  and  Continent 49 

West  Indies— Passenger  and  freight  (Eastern  Group) 27 

West  Indies— Freight  (Eastern  Group) 26 

West  Indies— Passenger  (Western  Group) 17 

South  America 4 

Newfoundland 7 

Australia 19 

New  Zealand . ... .    ........................  12 

Intercoastal ; 12 

Charters 3 

176 
PACIFIC 

Coastal  to  California ,% 

REGULAR   SAILINGS  DURING  THE   YEAR 

From  the  Atlantic 
United  Kingdom — 

Fortnightly  service  to  Cardiff  and  Swansea. 

Fortnightly  service  to  London  and  Antwerp— January  and  February. 
Ten-day  service  to  London  and  Antwerp— March  to  December. 
West  Indies — 

From  Montreal  (summer),  Halifax  (winter). 

Three-weekly  passenger  and  freight  service  to  Bermuda,  Nassau,  Kingstor 
and  Belize. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  11 

West  Indies— Concluded 

From  Halifax  and  Saint  John — 

Fortnightly  freight  service  to  Bermuda,  St.  Kitts,  Antigua,  Montserrat, 
Dominica,  St.  Lucia,  Barbados,  St.  Vincent,  Grenada,  Trinidad  and 
Demerara. 
From  Halifax  and  Saint  John — 

Monthly  passenger  service  to  Bermuda,  St.  Kitts,  Antigua,  Monserrat, 
Dominica,  St.  Lucia,  Barbados,  St,  Vincent,  Grenada,  Trinidad  and 
Demerara. 
From  Halifax — January,  February,  March,  April  and  December. 
From  Montreal — May  to  November. 

Fortnightly  freight  service  to  St,  Kitts,  Antigua,  Barbados,  Trinidad   and 
Demerara. 

Australia — 

Three-weekly  service  to  various  Australian  ports. 

New  Zealand — 

Monthly  service  to  various  New  Zealand  ports. 

Newfoundland — 

Three-weekly  service  from  Montreal  in  summer  to  St.  John's,  Newfoundland, 
via  Charlottetown,  P.E.I.     (Discontinued  August). 

Intercoastal — 

Monthly  service  to  Vancouver. 

!  South  America — 

Monthly  service  to  South  American  ports  commencing  June. 

From  the  Pacific 
Pacific  Coast — 

Weekly  service  to  San  Pedro  and  San  Francisco. 

Intercoastal — 

Monthly  service  to  St.  Lawrence  ports,  in  summer;   but  to  Halifax  and 
St.  John  in  winter. 

Operations  of  Chief  Canadian  Shipbuilding  Plants 

halifax  shipyards  limited,  halifax,  n.s. 

No  new  shipbuilding  was  done  during  the  fiscal  year  1928-29.  Repair  work 
to  the  value  of  $1,384,441.49  was  carried  out. 

MIDLAND  SHIPBUILDING  CO.,  LTD.,   MIDLAND,   ONT. 

New  Construction. — Steel  package  freighter  Fernie,  258  feet  by  42  feet 
nine  inches,  by  twenty-six  feet  6  inches;  deadweight  2,150  tons  on  14  feet  draft; 
gross  tonnage  2,418-61;  registered  tonnage  1,455-09. 

Repair  Work. — Converted  steamer  Midland  Prince  from  upper  lake  bulk 
freighter  into  conveyer  self-unloader. 

Repair  of  shell  damages,  etc.,  of  varying  dimensions  to  the  several  steamers 
of  the  Canada  Steamship  Lines,  Limited,  etc. 


12 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 
ST.  JOHN  DRY  DOCK  AND   SHIPBUILDING  CO.,  LTD.,  ST.   JOHN,   N.B. 


Number  of  ships  repaired  in  dry  dock. 
"  "  "  on  slipway.. 
"  "  "     afloat 


26 

39 

108 


PORT   ARTHUR   SHIPBUILDING   CO.,    LTD.,    PORT   ARTHUR,   ONT. 


Repair  Work — 


Total  number  of  boats  entering  plant  for  repairs. 

Number  of  hull  repair  jobs  involved 

Number  of  engine  repair  jobs  involved 

Number  of  boiler  repair  jobs  involved 

Number  of  miscellaneous  repair  jobs  involved . . 


79 
39 
26 
24 
23 

112 


Dry  Dock  Report- 


Number  of  boats  docked— tonnage  basis:  20 — gross  tonnage 71,256 

tugs  docked             "                      3—             '*           1,357 

"          scows  and  dredges  docked 4 —                         1 ,  200 

27 


DAVIE   SHIPBUILDING  AND  REPAIRING    CO.,   LTD.,   LAUZON,  LEVIS,   P.Q. 

New  Construction — April  1,  1928,  to  April  1,  1929 


Name  of  Vessel 


Type 


Tonnage 


I.H.P. 


Tadoussac. 

Quebec 

Geo.  M.  McKee... 
Foundation  Fasolt. 
Foundation  Fafnir. 


T.S.  passenger  steamer. 
T.S.  passenger  steamer. 

Dil  engined  tug 

Sand  dump  scow 

Sand  dump  scow 


7012-51 

7015-59 

220-94 

326-59 

326  59 


500(1 
5000 


700  B.H.P. 


The  "Tadoussac,"  "Quebec"  and  "Geo   M.  McKee"  were  delivered  in  May,  1928. 
The  "Foundation  Fafnir"  and  "Foundation  Fasolt"  were  delivered  in  July,  1928. 

The  following  vessels  were  commenced  since  April  1,  1928,  and  are  now 
under  construction: — 


City  of  Windsor,  ss.  package  freighter 
Donnacona  No.  3,  ts.  oil  engined  barge 
Hull  503,  ss.  oil  engined  bulk  freighter 
Graham  Bell,  ss.  tug 


about  1,800  1,100 

600  B.H.P.     240 

"     2,700  B.H.P.     800 

"        220    about      750 


PRINCE  RUPERT  DRY  DOCK  AND  SHIPYARD,  PRINCE  RUPERT,  B.C. 

Ship  Repairs — 

One  hundred  and  fifty-six  vessels — docked,  cleaned,  painted,  miscellaneous 
hull  and  machinery  repairs. 

Four  hundred  and  twenty  vessels — miscellaneous  hull  and  engine  repairs  not 
requiring  docking. 

Ship  Construction — 

One  270-foot  steel  car  barge  constructed  for  Canadian  National  Railwavs. 

One  44-foot  tug  boat  for  John  Currie  &  Son. 

One  52-foot  halibut  fishing  boat  for  Dan  Larsen. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER 

CANADIAN  VICKERS  LIMITED,  MONTREAL,  P.Q. 

Shipbuilding 


13 


Yard 
No. 

Vessel 

Built  for 

Dimensions 

Remarks 

107 

Car  transfer  barge. . . 

O.P.R.  Kootenay  Lake, 
B.C. 

230'x43'x8'G" 

Built  at  our  works,  knocked 
down,  shipped  to  Kootenay, 
B.C.,  re-erected  and 
launched. 

108 

Customs  patrol  boat 

Dept.  of  National  Reve- 

165'x21'x 13'  0" 

Under  construction  for  delivery 

("Fleurdelis"). 

nue. 

in  June,  1929. 

109 

Customs  patrol  boat 

Dept.  of  National  Reve- 
nue. 

165'x21'x  13'  0" 

Under  construction,  for  deli- 
very in  September  1929. 

Ship  Repair  Work 

A  total  of  57  vessels  were  dry-docked  during  the  season  of  1928,  including 
ocean  liners,  tankers,  lake  and  canal  vessels  and  miscellaneous  smaller  craft. 
Repairs  covered  from  extensive  bottom  damage  to  minor  jobs.  In  addition  to 
vessels  dry-docked,  a  considerable  number  of  vessels  were  repaired  afloat. 

BURRARD  DRY  DOCK  CO.,  LTD.,  NORTH  VANCOUVER,  B.C. 

During  the  fiscal  year  1928-29,  this  company  docked  on  its  floating  dry- 
dock,  and  repaired  90  vessels  totalling  189,201  gross  tons. 

Docked  on  marine  railway  and  repaired,  53  vessels  totalling  32,311  tons. 

Repaired  vessels  which  did  not  require  docking,  23 — totalling  38,454  tons. 

Carried  out  repairs  on  vessels  at  Vancouver  wharves  and  in  the  stream — 
178  vessels  totalling  1,100,764  gross  registered  tons. 


14 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 


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HHPOlir  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MIX  1ST  Eli 


15 


Statement  showing  the  Number  of  Vessels  and  Number  of  Tons 
Books  of  the  Dominion  of  Canada  on  December  31, 

on  the  Registry 
1928 

Ports 

Sailing  vessels 

Steam  vessels 

No. 

Gross 

tons 

Net, 

tons 

No. 

Gross 
tons 

tone 

New  Brunswick — 

Campbellton 

1 65 
2 

140 
5,056 

8 

76 

Chatham 

Dorchester 

Moncton 

274 

2 

2 

20 

1 

105 

85 

8,028 

277 

28 

363 

12 

1,690 

10,497 

7,741 

262 

26 

353 

12 

1,678 

10,168 

3,075 
6 

25 

1 

47 

94 

454 

16 

946 

13,568 

33 1 

Sackville 

St.  Andrews 

St.  John 

Nova  Scotia — 

Amherst 

Annapolis  Royal 

Arichat 

Barrington  Passage 

Canso 

Digby 

Guysboro 

Halifax 

LaHave 

Liverpool 

Lunenburg 

Maitland 

11 
686 

8,970 

489 

20,895 

20,240 

339 

20, 188 

13,155 

2 

9 
52 
24 
31 
47 

1 

'    106 

24 

17 

130 

4 
38 

6 
18 

4 
24 
57 

9 
22 
36 

97 

2,399 

1,257 

553 

910 

1,387 

103 

8,168 

6,098 

1,902 

16,198 

569 

11,349 

1,775 

259 

226 

1,221 

3,110 

2,920 
11,907 

878 

80 

2,122 

1,210 

523 

857 

1,366 

97 

7,583 

4,752 

1,686 

12,238 

514 

10,317 

1,603 

259 

226 

1,207 

3,030 

2 
9 
26 
51 
19 
30 

59 
662 
425 

1,028 
260 

1 ,  165 

64,175 
1,402 
1,203 
6,480 

88 

1,920 

2,212 

229 

26 
1,540 
4,221 

18 
1,753 
4,148 
8,079 

5(1 
417 
391 
917 

239 

845 

175 

10 

24 

194 

1 

13 

12 

8 

2 

28 

75 

1 

23 

18 

54 

38,408 

833 

740 

5,07* 

59 

1,331 

Pictou 

Port  Haw  kesbury 

1,457 

195 
25 

Shelburne 

Sydney 

Truro 

Weymouth 

1,181 
2,322 

2,573 

10,971 

836 

1,193 

2,590 

Ontario— 

Amherstburg 

Belleville 

4,100 

661 

73,286 

64,050 

775 

101,093 

62,378 

4 
2 

1 
1 

7 

"% 

"b 

1 
1 
4 
3 

7 

50 

12 

1 

1 

108 

6 

22 
5 

65 

602 
72 
146 
819 
900 

460 

403 
87 
413 
675 
807 
572 

9,147 

9,559 

121 

29 

16,704 

2,708 

1,744 

2,066 

22,273 

602 
72 
146 
751 
890 

460 

370 

57 

413 

675 
780 

572 

8,221 

8,531 

121 

26 

15,707 

2,436 

1,744 

1,885 

21,948 

10 
10 

1,134 
232 

607 
138 

Brockville 

Chatham 

Collingwood 

Cornwall 

Deseronto 

14 

8 

"49 
5 

Q 

22 

27 
20 
94 
1 
105 
12 
62 

530 
337 

339 

228 

16,285 

266 

31 

66,030 

1,606 

7,450 

3,875 

19 

9,922 

397 

90,173 

10,726 

133 

22 

Fort  William           •     

43,818 

Goderich 

Hamilton 

1,026 

4,662 

2,454 

13 

5,754 
271 

Napanee 

Ottawa 

Owen  Souud 

57,828 

234 
33 

48 
8 

80 
8 

10 

37,099 
4,364 
1,023 
2,596 

25,818 
285 
304 

18.507 

2,728 

700 

Pictou 

Port  Arthur 

1.769 
15,353 

Port  Burwell 

Port  Dover 

146 
178 

1 

213 

190 

Port  Stanley 

St.  Catharines 

24 
12 

16 

996 
2,672 
1,892 

590 

8 
20 

1,323 
5,660 

1,195 
4,983 

1,803 
1 ,  229 

16                                                   MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

Statement  showing  the  Number  of  Vessels  and  Number  of  Tons  on  the  Registry 
Books  of  the  Dominion  of  Canada  on  December  31,  1928— Concluded 

Sailing  vessels 

Steam  vessa 

Is 

Ports 

No. 

Gross 
tons 

Net 
tons 

No. 

Gross 
tons 

Net 
tons 

Ontario— Concluded 

8 

41 

2 

65 
3 

1,988 

8,111 

36 

1,780 

7,910 

36 

31 

39 

1 

8 
227 

7 

21,281 

9,6^5 

20 

282 

104,699 

224 

13,537 

5,699 

8 

191 

69, 157 

7> 

1'7,245 
795 

15,319 
760 

Whi+hv                                       

14 

3,362 

3,166 

18 

9,876 

5,569 

470 

109,040 

101,746 

1,276 

421,343 

265,261 

Quebec — 

9 
8 

282 
8 

295 
25 

338 

409 

96,918 

140 

28,755 
8,757 

308 
400 

93,267 
130 

28,153 
7,666 

5 

3 

466 

30 

200 

42 

341 

989 

575,557 

537 

32,127 

11,197 

23C 
55€ 

347,511 

425 

18,379 

5,199 

Sorel                  

627 

135,317 

129,924 

746 

620,748 

372,300 

British  Columbia — 

6 

153 

13 

651 

144 

545 

25,014 

1,503 

116,231 

31,231 

545 

24,985 

1,503 

114,867 

30, 198 

4 

303 

167 

1,241 

330 

563 

11,044 

23,964 

139,729 

76,041 

201 

6,138 

13,445 

79,712 

42,057 

967 

174,524 

172,098 

2,045 

251,341 

141,553 

1 

145 

145 

5 

7,519 

588 

341 

Saskatchewan — 

Manitoba — 

26 

5,549 

5,549 

72 

8,073 

5,135 

Yukon  Territory — 

7 

1,621 

m 

1,621 

■ 

7 

2,917 

2,029 

Recapitulation 


Province 

Sailing  vessels 

Steam  vessels 

No. 

Gross 
tons 

Net 
tons 

No. 

Gross 
tons 

Net 
tons 

New  Brunswick 

489 

661 

470 

627 

967 

89 

1 

26 

7 

20,895 

73,286 

109,010 

135,317 

174,524 

5,377 

145 

5,549 

1,621 

20,240 

64  050 

10i,746 

129,924 

172,098 

4,991 

145 

5,549 

1.621 

339 

775 

1,276 

746 

2,045 

43 

5 

72 
7 

20, 188 

101  093 

421,343 

620,748 

251,341 

7,519 

588 

8,073 

2,917 

13,155 

62,378 

265,261 

372,300 

141,553 

3,558 

341 

5,135 

2,029 

Nova  Scotia 

British  Columbia 

Piince  Edward  Island 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Yukon  Territory 

3,337 

525,754 

500,364 

5,308 

1,533,810 

865,710 

REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  17 

[tatement  showing  number  of  vessels  removed  from  the  registry  books  of  the 
Dominion  of  Canada  during  the  year  ended  December  31,  1928 

Sold  to  Foreigners 1 .", 

Wrecked 17 

Stranded 11 

Lost 

Broken  up SO 

Foundered 13 

Burnt 

Transferred  to  St.  John's,  Newfoundland IS 

Transferred  to  Great  Britain .: 

Transferred  to  Hong  Kong 2 

Collision 2 

Abandoned  at  Sea :; 

Missing 1 

Seized  and  sold  by  United  States  Court 4 

Transferred  to  Biitish  West  Indies 1 

Registry  no  longer  required 3 

Total 195 

It  is  estimated  that  44,872  men  and  boys,  etc.,  inclusive  of  masters,  were 
mployed  on  the  ships  registered  in  Canada  during  the  year  1928. 


SS174— 2 


18 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 


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Comparative    Curves  Showing    the  Number  of  Vessels  on  the  Registry  Books  of  the  Dominion 
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Combarative     Curves    Showing    the  Number  of  Vessels  on  the  Registry   Books  of  the  dominion 
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Comparative    Curves    Showing   the    Number  of    Net    Tons  on  the  Registry     Books  of  the  Dominion 
of  Canada,  on  December  51 ,  ,n  each   Year  from   1874  to  1925,    both    inclusive. 


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Combative  Curves  Showing  H,.  Number  of  Net  Tons  on  the    Registry    Books  of  the  Dominion- 
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REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER 


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20  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

REPORT  OF  L.   E.   COTE,  B.A.Sc,   M.E.I.C.,   CHIEF   ENGINEER 
Work  of  the  Chief  Engineer's  Branch 

This  branch  has-  charge  of  the  construction  of  lighthouses,  fog  alarir 
and  other  aids  to  navigation;  of  the  design  and  manufacture  of  lighthouse  ai 
fog  signal  apparatus,  and  research  work  in  connection  with  the  improveme 
of  same;  the  administration  of  shops  and  Dominion  Lighthouse  Depot, 
Prescott,  Ontario;  of  the  construction  and  repairs  of  piers,  wharves  and  built 
ings  owned  by  the  Department.  Examines  and  reports  on  all  projects 
connection  with  the  development  and  improvement  of  harbours  operated  unc 
Harbour  Commissions.  Has  charge  of  all  surveys  and  transfers  of  land  owm 
by  the  Department,  and  waterlots;  of  the  publication  of  Lists  of  Lights  ai 
Notices  to  Mariners,  of  the  removal  of  wrecks;  ice  breaking,  and  other  wor] 
in  connection  with  aids  to  navigation,  such  as  the  river  regulating  dams  no 
being  established  between  Sorel  and  Montreal. 

New  Aids  to  Navigation 

Nova  Scotia  Agency 

Coddles  Harbour,  unwatched  light. 
Stony  Patch,  unwatched  light. 

New  Brunswick  Agency 

Centreville,  unwatched  light. 

Prince  Edward  Island  Agency 
Echourie,  light. 
Entry  Cliff,  light. 
Inverness  Harbour,  range  lights 
Mutton  Bay,  range  lights 

Quebec  Agency 

Agouanish,  new  range. 

Anse  aux  Canards,  small  light  on  mast. 

Anse  a  Valleau,  range  lights. 

Anse  St.  Jean,  hand  fog  horn. 

Cannes  des  Roches,  light  on  mast, 

Cawee  Island,  combined  lighthouse  and  dwelling  and  fog  alarm. 

Frigate  Point,  range  lights. 

L'Anse  a  Brilliant,  mast  light. 

Lower  Caraquet  wharf,  mast  light. 

Maguasha,  light. 

Riviere  a  Claude,  light. 

Riviere  Nouvelle,  mast  light, 

St.  Fulgence,  mast  light. 

Tadoussac  bay  wharf,  light 

Montreal  Agency 

Lachine,  range  lights. 
La  Tortue,  range  lights. 
Vieille  Eglise,  range  lights. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  21 

)ntario 

Brule  Point,  unwatched  light. 

Gibbons  Point,  range  of  day  beacons. 

Kemp  Narrows,  N.  Light,  small  light. 

Kemp  Narrows,  S.  Light,  small  light. 

Lamb  Island,  fog  alarm  established  and  repairs  to  buildings. 

Maybury  Highway,  unwatched  light. 

Needles  Eye,  unwatched  light. 

Quick's  Island,  unwatched  light. 

Squirrel  Island,  unwatched  light. 

Town  Point,  mast  light. 

Valleyfield,  float  light. 

Wades  Creek,  unwatched  light. 

Victoria  Agency,  B.C. 

Canal  Island,  unwatched  light. 

Dillon  Rock,  unwatched  light. 

East  Bay,  unwatched  light. 

False  Bay,  unwatched  light. 

Gibson's  landing,  mast  light. 

Mears  Spit,  float  light. 

Nootka,  fog  alarm. 

Powell  River,  unwatched  light. 

Rocky  Pass,  unwatched  light. 

Round  Island,  day  beacon. 

Sand  Spit,  unwatched  light. 

Stubbs  Spit,  lighted  float. 

Tahsis  Narrows,  N.E.  end,  unwatched  light. 

Prince  Rupert  Agency,  B.C. 

Hyde  Rock,  unwatched  light. 
Lucy  Island,  fog  alarm. 
Porpoise  Harbour,  day  beacon. 

Changes  and  Improvements 

[Yora  Scotia  Agency 

Beaver  Island,  small  light  on  mast. 

Canso,  erection  of  combined  lighthouse  and  dwelling. 

Charlo,  lantern  installed. 

Chebucto  Head,  light  increased  in  power. 

Chester  Island,  unwatched  light  installed. 

Eddy   Point,    construction   of   fog   alarm   building   and    installation    of    a 

diaphone  and  engine. 
Freels  Cape,  installation  of  a  diaphone. 
Isaac's  Harbour,  combined  lighthouse  and  dwelling. 
Little  Hope  Island,  repairs  to  crib  protection  work. 
Marjorie  Island,  pole  light,  repairs  to  shelter  shed. 
Northeast  arm,,  pole  light  and  new  lantern. 
Pearl  Island,  combined  lighthouse  and  tower. 
Sable  Island,  East  end,  repairs 
St.  Paul  island,  boat  slip  constructed  and  hand  winch  provided. 


V 


ew  Brunswick  Agency 

Alma,  pressed  lens  lantern. 
Ellenwood  Island,  rebuilding  spindle. 
Fourchu,  Cape,  repairs. 


22  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

New  Brunswick  Agency — Concluded 

Gannet  Rock,  repairs. 

Machias  Seal  Island,  repairs. 

Marks  Point,  lens. 

Saint  Mary,  Cape,  diaphone. 

Sailers  Head,  light. 

Wolf  Point,  light  moved. 

AVoods  Harbour,  repairs  to  breakwater. 


Prince  Edward  Island  Agency 
Anguille,  Cape,  repairs. 
Bauld,  Cape,  repairs  to  landing. 
Belle  Isle,  repairs. 
Charlottetown,  repairs  to  wharf, 
.flower  Island,  repairs. 
Georgetown,  back  light  re-aligned. 
Miminegash,  repairs. 
Panmure  Head,  light  improved. 
Pictou  Island,  new  apparatus. 
Savage  Harbour,  range  lights  moved. 
Upper  Fox  Island,  lantern. 
Whittle,  Cape,  light,  fog  alarm  and  radio  beacon  (to  be  finished  next  season 

Quebec  Agency 

Algernon  Rock,  changed  to  unwatched  light. 

Godbout,  4,  tow  lanterns. 

Goose  Cape,  storage  tank. 

Griffin  Cove,  range  lights  moved  to  new  location. 

Heath  Point,  repairs  to  tower. 

Magpie  Bay,  lights  improved. 

Isles  de  Mai,  light  made  unwatched. 

Matane,  range  moved  to  new  location. 

Mille  Vaches  bay,  two  lanterns. 

Miscou  Island,  dwelling. 

Newport  Point,  fog  horn. 

Peribonka,  range  lights. 

Point  Peter,  fog  horn. 

Petit  Cap,  protection  work. 

Rimouski,  day  marks,  etc. 

St.  Alphonse,  lantern  reconstructed. 

West  Point  Anticosti,  light  improved. 

Montreal  Agency 

He  Deslauriers,  construction  of  concrete  pier. 

Dorval,  light  improved. 

Grenville,  two  lanterns. 

He  de  Grace,  new  range  lights. 

Hochelaga,  two  lanterns. 

Lake  St.  Peter,  repairs  to  pier. 

La  Perade,  erection  of  steel  tower. 

Longue  Point  Traverse,  steel  skeleton  tower. 

Louiseville,,  two  lanterns. 

He  du  Milieu,  two  lanterns. 

Oka,  apparatus  changed. 

Petite  ile  Course,  two  lanterns. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  23 

Montreal  Agency — Concluded 
Portneuf-en-Haut,  repairs. 
Rigaud,  two  lanterns, 
lie  St.  Ours,  new  front  tower. 
St.  Pierre  les  Becquets,  lantern. 
St.  Roche,  two  lanterns. 
St.  Valentine,  rebuilding  front  light  pier. 
Tetreaultville,  light  improved. 
Vercheres  Village,  light  improved. 
Way  Shoal  Traverse,  two  lanterns. 

Ontario 

Amherstburg,  repairs  to  wharf. 

Centre  Brothers,  light  made  unwatched. 

Cobourg,  electric  light  re-established. 

Davieaux  Island,  fog  horn,  shelter  shed. 

Point  Edward,  reflector  with  electric  light. 

Goderich,  range  lights  increased  in  power. 

Griffith  Island,  fourth  order  lens  installed. 

Icelandic  River,lights  made  unwatched. 

Leamington,  fourth  order  lens. 

Michipicoten  Harbour,  fog  horn. 

Mohawk  Island.,  whitewashing  tower. 

Needles  Eye,  unwatched  light. 

Owen  Sound,  two  red  lights. 

Point  Peter,  fog  alarm  improved. 

Point  aux  Pins,  fog  bell. 

Port  Arthur,  repairs  to  tower. 

Port  Hope,  duplex  electric  lantern. 

Port  Maitland,  fog  alarm  on  west  breakwater  and  repairs. 

Port  Stanley,  fog  alarm  in  concrete  beacon. 

Prescott,  repairs  to  scow  Amherstburg. 

Prescott,  new  roof  to  depot  building. 

Rainy  River,  inner  light  improved. 

South  Baymouth,,  lights  improved. 

South  River,  light  changed  to  unwatched  light. 

Sulphur  Island,  light  changed  to  unwatched  light. 

Valleyfield,  floating  light. 

Warrens  Landing,  Man.,  front  light  moved  and  back  light  raised. 

Trenton,  light  electrified. 

AVindmill  Point,  light  electrified. 

'ictoria  Agency,  B.C. 

Active  Pass,  light  improved,  also  repairs. 
Amphitrite  Point,,  dwelling  and  water  supply. 
Annacis  Island,  new  lighting  equipment. 
Burnaby  Shoal,  pile  beacon  rebuilt. 
Fisgard,  light  made  unwatched. 
Kootenay  Landing,  small  lantern. 
Lennard  Island,  dwelling. 
Portlock  Point,  extension  to  dwelling. 
Race  Rock,  installation  of  new  engine. 
The  Needles,  lantern. 
Victoria,  repairs  to  wharf. 
Yellow  Island,  dwelling. 


24 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 


Prince  Rupert  Agency,  B.C. 

Barrett  Rock,,  diaphone  plant  duplicated. 
Casey  Point,  lighting  system  changed. 
Egg  Island,  apparatus  improved. 
Ivory  Island,  apparatus  improved. 
Prince  Rupert,  repairs  to  wharf. 


PUBLICATIONS 

Publications   Office,   Chief  Engineer's  Branch 

One  hundred  and  one  notices  to  mariners,  comprising  271  subjects,  were 
published  during  the  past  year. 

The  following  may  be  especially  noted: — 

Regulations  for  Second  Narrows,  B.C.,  bridge. 

Regulations  for  St.  Lawrence  river,  from  Father  Point  to  Victoria  bridge  a^ 
Montreal. 

Notice  regarding  Regulations  for  Protection  of  Aids  to  Navigation  h 
Canadian  waters. 

Ice  Patrol  in  Gulf  of  St.  Lawrence. 

Description  of  dredging  done  by  the  Department  of  Public  Works. 

The   annual   edition   of  the   "  List   of  Lights   and   Fog  Signals "   in   thn 
sections,  was  issued. 

ICE  BREAKING 

The  Dominion  Towing  and  Salvage  Company  contracted  to  keep  tht 
harbours  at  the  head  of  lake  Superior  open  for  navigation  until  December  17; 
and  open  them  in  the  spring  as  soon  as  the  canal  at  Sault  Ste.  Marie  is  oper 
for  navigation. 


REMOVAL  OF  OBSTRUCTIONS  TO  NAVIGATION 

During  the  last  season  this  branch   attended  to  the   removal   of   sixteer 

obstructions  to  navigation  which  comprised  boats,  scows  and  floating  cribs,  etc! 

Ten  were  removed  by  the  owners  and  the  balance  by  the  department. 


MAINTENANCE  AND  REPAIRS  TO  WHARVEB 


Wharves  were  repaired,  etc.,  at  the  following  places: — 


Nova  Scotia — 

Baddeck 

Hampton 

Hanbourville 

Kingsport 

Tiverton 

West    Arichat 
A' Cio   Brunswick 

IT :  imp  ton 

L  mifk 

Lorneville 

Whites   Bluff 

Wollfville 


Prince   Edward  Island 

Grindstone    Island,    M.I. 

Hickey's  wharf 

North   Cardigan 

Summerside 
Ontario 

Coekburn  Island 

Little  Current 

Port  Rowan 
Quebec 

Anse  St.  Jean 

Cap  Chat 

Montmagnj' 

Perce 


St.  Alphonse 
St,  Denis 
St.  Nicholas 
St.  Ulric 
Seven  Islands 
British   Columbia 
Alice  Arm 
Port  Hard}' 
Quatsino 
Sidney 
Union  Bay 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  25 

DOMINION  STEAMERS  AT  PRESCOTT,  ONT. 

C.G.S.  Concretia. — The  C.G.S.  Concretia,  after  being  fitted  out  ai  Prescott, 
went  into  commission  on  April  18,  1928.  Her  work  consisted  in  charging  and 
placing  the  buoys  between  Prescott  and  the  head  of  lake  Ontario,  inspecting 
buoys  and  beacons  at  regular  intervals  and  delivering  supplies  to  the  variou- 
light-stations. 

The  Concretia  assisted  with  the  erection  of  new  lights  at  Needles  Eye, 
Centre  Brothers  and  Point  Peter. 

At  the  close  of  the  season  the  Concretia  lifted  the  buoys  and  placed  markers. 
She  was  laid  up  at  Prescott  on  December  13,  1928. 

C.G.S.  Scout. — The  C.G.S.  Scout,  after  being  fitted  out  at  Prescott,  went 
into  commission  on  April  4,  1928,  to  maintain  the  lights  between  Prescott  and 
Coteau.    Her  work  was  of  the  same  nature  as  that  of  the  Concretia. 

At  the  close  of  the  season  the  Scout  lifted  the  buoys  and  placed  markers. 
She  was  laid  up  at  Prescott  on  December  18,  1928. 

DOMINION  LIGHTHOUSE  DEPOT,  PRESCOTT,  ONT. 

Lighthouse  apparatus,  fog  alarm  accessories  and  other  material  required 
for  the  various  Agencies  of  the  Department  and  for  Dominion  lightstations 
have  been  manufactured.  Necessary  repairs  have  been  made  to  the  hulls, 
engines,  etc.,  of  Prescott  Division  steamers  and  to  the  depot  plant. 

The  work  of  the  manufacturing  departments,  which  included  repairs  to 
Dominion  steamers,  represent  this  year  an  amount  of  $88,324.44  divided  as 
follows: — 

Material $40,017   10 

Labour ' 34,907  40 

Overhead 13,399  94 

The  latter  item  included  expenses  in  connection  with  the  engineering  staff, 
a  proper  portion  of  the  cost  of  general  administration  and  other  incidentals  to 
manufacturing. 

The  principal  works  of  the  manufacturing  departments  have  been  as  fol- 
lows: The  making  of  buoy  superstructures,  buoy  lanterns,  buoy  whistles,  steel 
towers,  large  and  small  headlights  complete  with  hoisting  gears,  reflectors, 
mercury  float,  revolving  apparatus,  vapour  burners  and  accessories,  diaphones, 
pistons  and  other  fog  alarm  parts,  also  repair  and  spare  parts  for  the  different 
Agencies. 

Articles  have  been  manufactured  for  the  Meteorological  Service  to  the 
amount  of  $555.81. 

Stores. — The  cost  of  the  administration  of  Stores  has  been  $6,420  and  new 
stock  to  the  amount  of  $128,22(5.63  has  been  added.  The  total  amount  of  stores 
distributed  to  the  Maintenance  and  Construction  Branches  as  well  as  to  the 
various  Agencies  was  $102,215.69. 

COMMISSIONER  OF  LIGHTS  BRANCH 

Report  of  J.  G.  Macphail,  B.A.,  B.Sc,  M.E.I.C,  Commissioner  of  Lights 

The  principal  work  performed  during  the  fiscal  year  ending  March  31. 
1929,  has  been  an  extension  of  the  buoy  and  beacon  services,  together  with 
the  maintenance  of  lights  and  other  aids  to  navigation  throughout  the  Dominion, 
and  the  maintenance  and  inspection  of  public  wharves.  These  operations  are 
set  forth  in  tabular  form  in  statement  attached. 


26 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 


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REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  M  INI  ST  E  It  27 

RIVER  ST.  LAWRENCE  SHIP  CHANNEL 
Report  of  V.  W.  Forneret,  B.A.Sc,  M.E.I.C.,  Chief  Engineer 

HISTORY    OF    THE    RIVER    ST.    LAWRENCE    SHIP    CHANNEL 

The  St.  Lawrence  river,  owing  to  its  situation,  is  the  natural  route  from 
the  Atlantic  to  the  northern  and  northwestern  half  of  the  North  American 
continent.  The  possibility  of  converting  Montreal  into  a  deep  water  seaport 
was  first  suggested  in  the  year  1825,  when  the  Lachine  canal  was  completed 
connecting  Montreal  with  the  Great  Lakes  and  establishing  the  route  commer- 
cially. 

Light  draught  sailing  vessels  could  then  reach  Montreal  without  trouble 
except  during  a  few  weeks  in  the  autumn  when  they  resorted  to  lightering. 
Surveys  were  made  with  the  object  of  increasing  the  depth  of  water  in  the 
waterway.  After  these  were  completed,  the  question  of  which  channel  to  adopt 
through  lake  St.  Peter  was  hotly  discussed,  some  favouring  the  natural  channel 
or  old  Ship  channel  and  others  the  straight  channel  through  St.  Frances  bank. 
Finally  it  was  decided  to  proceed  with  the  work  of  deepening  the  straight 
channel,  the  aim  being  to  obtain  a  channel  150  feet  in  width  and  to  a  depth 
of  14  feet  at  the  lowest  water  instead  of  10  feet  6  inches  at  lowest  water  as 
existed  in  the  old  Ship  channel  which  covered  the  available  depth  for  navigation 
between  Quebec  and  Montreal.  The  "Board  of  Works"  of  Canada  was  entrusted 
with  the  task  and  began  operations  in  the  spring  of  1844  continuing  until  the 
month  of  June,  1846,  when  the  work  was  suspended,  the  management  was 
changed  and  the  execution  of  the  work  was  transferred  from  the  Board  of  Works 
to  the  control  of  the  Commissioners  of  Public  Works. 

The  dredging  was  again  resumed  in  the  month  of  September  of  the  same 
year.  Owing  to  continued  opposition  the  work  of  cutting  the  straight  channel 
was  finally  suspended  on  the  16th  of  September,  1847,  and  subsequently  aban- 
doned. 

It  is  now  considered  that  the  straight  channel  as  commenced  would  have,' 
been  preferable. 

Nothing  was  done  on  lake  St.  Peter  by  the  Commissioners  of  Public  Works 
for  three  years. 

The  Harbour  Commissioners  of  Montreal  then  came  forward  and  offered  to 
complete  the  project  expeditiously  and  economically.  The  proposal  was  accepted 
and  an  Act  passed  in  August,  1850,  transferring  the  work  of  improving  the  Ship 
channel  from  the  Commissioners  of  Public  Works  to  the  Harbour  Commissioners 
of  Montreal,  who  were  empowered  to  charge  a  tonnage  duty  sufficient  to  pay 
8  per  cent  interest  upon  the  outlay,  with  a  2  per  cent  contribution  to  the  sink- 
ing fund. 

This  plan  was  adopted  in  August,  1850,  and  the  Commissioners  were  author- 
ized to  proceed  in  the  manner  they  should  deem  best,  the  Government  plant 
being  transferred  to  them. 

The  Harbour  Commissioners  after  examination  and  the  best  advice  obtain- 
able, adopted  the  location  of  the  deepest  natural  channel  in  lake  St.  Peter.  The 
result  is  the  present  chanel  with  five  tangents  instead  of  two  straight  courses 
as  at  first  commenced. 

The  original  depth  through  lake  St.  Peter  was  10  feet  6  inches  at  ordinary 
low  water,  the  plan  adopted  by  the  Montreal  Harbour  Commissioners.  The 
present  extreme  low  water  datum  adopted  for  the  35-foot  channel  is  the  actual 
observed  lowest  water  during  the  season  of  1897  which  corresponds  to  a  depth 
of  9  feet  4  inches  on  the  Lake  St.  Peter  flats.  This  level  of  1897  was  the  lowest 
ever  observed  except  the  extraordinary  low  water  of  1895,  which  at  lake  St. 
Peter  went  6  inches  lower. 


28  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

The  channel  through  lake  St.  Peter  is  now  practically  completed  to  35  feet 
at  E.L.W.  of  1897,  there  remaining  a  short  distance  at  He  au  Raisin  traverse 
yet  to  be  deepened  to  35  feet  E.L.W. 

From  1850  the  channel  was  deepened  from  stage  to  stage  until  in  1888  when 
the  debt  amounted  to  over  three  million  dollars,  the  Government  decided  to 
complete  the  project  as  a  national  work  and  to  assume  the  debt,  and  from  that 
day  the  Ship  channel  has  been  open,  free  to  the  commerce  of  the  world. 

The  Harbour  Commissioners  carried  on  operations  for  the  Department  of 
Public  Works  until  the  end  of  the  season  of  1888,  when  the  official  connection 
of  the  Commissioners  with  the  Ship  channel  ceased,  after  having  continued  for 
over  thirty-eight  years. 

In  January,  1889,  the  control  and  management  of  the  work  was  assumed 
by  the  Department  of  Public  Works.  During  the  winter  extensive  repairs  were 
made  to  the  dredging  plant,  which  on  the  opening  of  navigation  was  set  to  work 
at  Cap  a  la  Roche,  Pouillier  Rayer  and  Cap  Charles  deepening  the  channel  to 
27|  feet  at  low  water,  spring  tides.  From  this  date  to  1898,  the  Department  of 
Public  Works  continued  operations  and  completed  the  difficult  rock  work  at 
Cap  a  la  Roche  and  Cap  Charles  channel  to  27-J  feet  at  low  water.  In  addition 
many  portions  of  the  chanel  were  cleaned  up,  straightened  and  several  curves 
and  narrow  places  widened. 

THIRTY-FOOT  CHANNEL 

The  unusually  low  water  of  1897  and  the  increased  size  of  vessels  called 
for  a  wider  and  deeper  channel,  and  larger  and  more  powerful  dredges  and 
plant  were  required.  In  1899  the  dredging  plant  was  in  a  condition  to  warrant 
a  more  extensive  plan  of  operation. 

The  low  water  of  1897,  the  lowest,  except  the  short  period  of  unusually  low 
water  during  1895,  was  adopted  as  the  new  datum  for  the  30-foot  channel.  This 
datum  is  from  1^  to  2  feet  lower  than  the  ordinary  low  water  of  the  27-2-foot 
channel.  The  object,  therefore,  was  to  realize  in  the  shortest  time,  a  channel 
450  feet  wide  on  the  tangents,  and  500  to  750  feet  on  the  curves,  An  anchorage 
800  feet  in  width  was  to  be  provided  at  White  Buoy  curve  in  lake  St.  Peter.  The 
work  also  included  much  straightening  of  the  channel.  The  Ship  channel  con- 
tinued under  the  control  of  the  Department  of  Public  Works  until  1904,  when 
an  Order  in  Council  was  pasesd  on  March  11  transferring  the  management  and 
control  of  the  River  St.  Lawrence  Ship  Channel  together  with  the  dredging  and 
shipbuilding  plant  to  the  Department  of  Marine  and  Fisheries  in  order  to  place 
the  supervision  of  the  improvements  to  navigation  on  the  St.  Lawrence  route 
under  the  department  directly  responsible  for  the  pilotage  and  aids  to  naviga- 
tion. Under  this  department  the  work  was  vigourously  continued  so  that  the 
end  of  season  1907  saw  the  completion  of  the  channel  from  Montreal  to  Batiscan 
to  30  feet  E.L.W.  of  1897,  a  distance  of  101  miles.  The  dredging  operations  were 
carried  on  with  renewed  energy.  The  Cap  a  la  Roche  channel  is  now  widened 
from  300  to  450  and  550  feet,  and  the  Cap  Charles  channel  widened  from  300 
to  450  feet  in  the  straight  part  and  to  600  feet  width  at  the  curve. 

At  the  end  of  the  season  1928,  the  Cape  a  la  Roche  channel  was  completed 
to  30  feet  depth  at  extreme  low  water,  with  the  exception  of  a  short  distance  on 
the  south  side  of  the  channel  yet  to  be  widened  but  this  will  probably  be  com- 
pleted during  the  season  of  1929.  There  still  remains  some  cleaning  up  to  be 
done  before  the  whole  width  of  30  feet  at  low  water  of  1897  is  attained. 

The  only  place  that  requires  to  obtain  30  feet  dredging  between  Cap  a  la 
Roche  and  Quebec  is  at  St.  Augustin  bar,  14  miles  above  the  latter  place. 
Advantage  must  still  be  taken  of  the  tide  by  deep  draught  vessels  to  pass  this 
place,  the  range  of  tide  being  16^  feet  at  springs  and  11  feet  at  neaps,  the  avail- 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  29 

able  depth  at  the  present  being  22  feet  at  extreme  low  tide.  It  is  proposed  to 
commence  this  work  as  soon  as  a  suitable  dredge  is  available  for  work,  which 
will  probably  be  next  season,  when  one  of  (lie  dredges  now  under  construction  at 
the  Sorel  Shipyard  is  completed. 

THIRTY-FIVE  FOOT  (  IIA.WKL 

In  1910  the  question  of  further  deepening  \v:is  considered  because  the  rapid 
increase  in  the  size  of  vessels  was  likely  to  find  the  30-foot  channel  too  shallow. 
The  Government  therefore,  resolved  to  proceed  immediately  with  the  deepening 
of  the  Ship  channel  to  35  feet  at  extreme  low  water  of  1897.  The  35-foot  pro- 
ject has  been  carried  on  at  different  points  ever  since.  During  the  season  1917, 
owing  to  existing  conditions  and  for  the  sake  of  economy,  the  dredging  operations 
were  considerably  cut  down.  This  state  continued  until  the  Season  of  1925, 
when  the  department  decided  to  carry  on  the  dredging  operations  on  the  river 
St.  Lawrence  on  a  more  extensive  scale  in  order  to  expedite  the  work  of  deepening 
of  the  channel.  More  dredges  were  put  into  commission  and  the  whole  dredg- 
ing fleet  was  again  operated  day  and  night.  At  the  end  of  the  season  of  1928, 
the  35-foot  channel  was  completed  from  Longue  Pointe  to  Sorel.  Above  Longue 
Pointe  the  widening  and  deepening  at  Longueuil  and  Forsyth  shoals  remains 
to  be  carried  out. 

From  Sorel  to  Three  Rivers  the  work  has  been  completed  with  the  exception 
of  short  stretches  at  Nipigon  shoal,  He  au  Raisin  traverse  and  at  Iron  shoal.  It 
is  expected  these  will  be  finished  next  season. 

This  season  has  seen  considerable  progress  in  deepening  the  Ship  Channel 
to  35  feet  at  E.L.W.  below  Three  Rivers  and  despite  the  hard  material  encount- 
ered satisfactory  progress  was  made  at  Becancour  Lower  traverse,  Cap  a  la 
Roche  curve  and  Cap  Charles  channel. 

THE   SHIP    CHANNEL    BELOW    QUEBEC 

In  the  spring  of  1901  the  shipping  interests  of  Montreal  drew  to  the  atten- 
tion of  the  Honourable  the  Minister  of  Public  Works  the  fact  that  deep  draught 
vessels  had  to  wait  for  the  tide  to  pass  St.  Thomas  and  Crane  island  shoals 
(Beaujeu  bank),  which  caused  vessels  to  lose  a  great  deal  of  valuable  time. 

The  officers  of  the  Marine  and  Fisheries  Department  at  Quebec,  who  had 
intimate  knowledge  of  this  part  of  the  river,  strongly  recommended  improving 
the  North  channel  by  way  of  cap  Tourmentine  and  Goose  cape  as  being  much 
better,  more  easily  navigated  and  having  less  ice  in  winter  than  this  south 
channel.  Orders  were  given  the  Ship  Channel  staff  to  make  a  survey  and 
examination  with  a  view  to  reporting  on  the  practicability  and  cost  of  improving 
the  route  and  adapting  it  to  navigation.    This  survey  was  carried  out  in  1901..- 

In  1902  a  similar  survey  was  made  of  the  south  channel  to  ascertain  what 
improvements  would  be  required  to  make  a  30-foot  channel  on  the  line  of  the 
existing  route. 

A  comprehensive  report  was  made  in  1903  by  Mr.  F.  W.  Cowie,  who  was 
then  superintending  engineer,  but  the  report  did  not  recommend  the  adoption  of 
either  route  but  advised  that  the  choice  should  meet  with  the  approval  of  the 
underwriters,  shipping  interests  and  the  pilots.  The  Transportation  Commis- 
sion visited  the  locality,  going  over  each  channel  and  took  evidence  on  the 
subject.  It  was  finally  decided  to  improve  the  south  channel  by  dredging  it  to 
30  feet  at  extreme  low  tide  and  to  a  width  of  1,000  feet. 


30  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

SOUTH  CHANNEL    (30  FEET  AT  E.L.W.) 

The  Government  having  decided  to  improve  the  south  channel,  pre- 
parations were  made  to  start  the  work.  The  project  had  in  view  a  channel  30 
feet  in  depth  at  extreme  low  water  at  Beaujeu  bank  and  St.  Thomas  flats,  with  a 
width  of  1,000  feet, 

The  changes  and  improvements  to  the  sea-going  suction  dredge  Galveston, 
which  had  been  purchased  for  work  below  Quebec,  were  made  at  the  Govern- 
ment Shipyard  at  Sorel,  P.Q.,  where  she  was  rechristened  No.  9.  This  dredge 
left  Sorel  August  11,  1906,  and  proceeded  to  Beaujeu  channel  where  she  began 
work.  The  material  consisted  of  coarse  sand  and  gravel  with  some  layers  of 
soft  blue  clay. 

The  new  hopper  dredge  No.  8  was  launched  at  the  Government  Shipyard, 
Sorel,  on  December  2,  1906.     Was  completed  on  November  1,  1907. 

With  these  two  powerful  dredges,  good  progress  was  made  with  the  work. 
The  Beaujeu  Bank  channel  was  completed  to  a  depth  of  30  feet  at  extreme  low 
tide  in  1909,  and  to  a  width  of  1,000  feet  in  1912.  The  channel  was  then  opened 
to  navigation. 

The  St.  Thomas  channel  was  completed  to  a  depth  of  30  feet  at  extreme 
low  tide  and  to  a  width  of  1,000  feet  during  the  season  of  1912.  The  channel  was 
then  marked  with  gas  buoys  and  opened  to  navigation.  This  was  considered 
a  great  improvement  as  deep  draught  vessels  were  not  obliged  to  wait  in  order  to 
pass  Beaujeu  bank  or  St.  Thomas  flats;  consequently  much  valuable  time  was 
saved. 

NORTH  CHANNEL    (35  FEET  AT  E.L.W.) 

The  south  channel  being  now  completed,  the  powerful  dredge  Beaujeu  (No. 
8)  was  set  to  work  on  the  north  channel  where  dredge  Galveston  (No.  9)  had 
already  been  working  for  a  season,  as  the  Government  had  decided  to  dredge  the 
north  channel  between  St.  Jean  (island  of  Orleans)  and  Goose  cape  to  a  depth 
of  35  feet  at  extreme  low  tide  with  a  width  of  500  feet  which  would  eventually 
be  widened  to  1,000  feet. 

Good  progress  was  made  but  the  Government  in  order  to  hasten  the  work  as 
much  as  possible,  gave  a  contract  on  October  30,  1914,  to  the  Canadian  Vickers 
Limited,  Montreal,  to  build  one  of  the  largest  sea-going  elevator  dredges  in  the 
world.  Owing  to  the  Great  War  the  completion  of  the  dredge  was  delayed  very 
much.  It  was  launched  on  November  18,  1916,  but  not  finally  completed  until 
1922  when  it  was  set  to  work  in  the  north  channel  deepening  to  35  feet  a)t 
extreme  low  tide. 

Owing  to  financial  conditions  the  dredging  operations  were  cut  down. 
Dredge  Galveston  (No.  9)  was  sold  leaving  but  one  dredge  the  Beaujeu  (No.  8) 
in  commission  below  Quebec.  This  dredge  was  operated  only  in  daylight  hours 
during  the  seasons  of  1919,  1920  and  1921. 

As  the  work  had  come  to  a  more  or  less  clearing  up  stage  and  as  this  could 
not  be  done  economically  by  dredge  No.  8,  this  vessel  was  laid  up  at  Sorel  in 
1922  and  replaced  by  the  new  elevator  dredge  No.  16  which  had  been  built  at 
Vickers,  Ltd.,  Montreal.  From  1922  to  1924  this  dredge  operated  only  during 
daylight  hours,  but  from  1925  to  date  a  double  shift  has  been  maintained  and 
work  carried  on  twenty-four  hours  per  day. 

As  dredge  No.  8  could  no  longer  be  operated  economically  as  a  hydraulic 
dredge  it  was  decided  to  have  her  converted  to  the  elevator  type.  This  was  done 
at  the  Government  Shipyard,  Sorel,  and  she  was  again  put  into  commission  in 
1928,  and  has  been  working  very  satisfactorily  since  that  date. 

The  St.  Lawrence  Ship  channel  commences  at  Lock  No.  1  (Lachine  canal) 
and  extends  to  Father  Point,  a  distance  of  340  statute  miles. 


REPORT  OF  Till']  DEPUTY  MINISTER  31 

The  St.  Lawrence  Ship  Channel  proper  is  divided   into   five  divisions 
follows: — 

Statute  miles 

Division     I — Montreal  to  Sorol 45 

Division   II — Sorel  to  Batiscan  (not  including  Lake  St.  J'eter) 36 

Division  III— Lake  St.  Peter 20 

Division  IV — Batiscan  to  Quebec 59 

Division    V — Quebec  to  Goose  Cape 70 

230 

The  completed  channel  between  Montreal  and  Quebec  has  a  minimum 
width  of  450  feet  on  the  tangents  and  500  to  800  feet  on  curves. 

Below  Quebec  the  completed  channel  has  a  minimum  width  of  1,000  feet. 

Dredging  Operations,  Season  1928 

In  order  to  expedite  the  work  it  was  decided  to  again  operate  the  dredges 
day  and  night. 

The  fleet  consisted  of  10  dredges  and  attending  plant,  1  rock  breaker,  1 
stone  lifter,  1  sweeping  steamer  and  1  sweeping  scow. 

Notwithstanding  many  breakages  and  consequent  delays  for  repairs,  good 
progress  was  made. 

The  larger  portion  of  the  fleet  was  operated  below  Three  Rivers  but  con- 
;  siderable  work  was  also  carried  out  at  Longue  Pointe  and  Longueuil  shoal. 

The  material  generally  was  very  hard,  causing  great  wear  and  tear  on  the 
plant. 

Cap  a  la  Roche. — One  powerful  elevator  dredge  worked  for  half  the  season 
at  Cap  a  la  Roche  cleaning  and  widening  the  30-foot  channel.     The  rock  breaker 
;  was  also  employed  and  1  stone  lifter  was  used  as  required  for  picking  up  stones 
I  and  boulders. 

The  total  number  of  cubic  yards  dredged  during  the  season  of  1928 
I  amounted  to  40,700  at  a  cost  of  $108,116.51  or  $2.656%0o  cents  per  cubic  yard. 

Cap  Charles  Channel. — One  powerful  elevator  dredge  was  employed  in 
deepening  Cap  Charles  channel  to  35  feet  E.L.W.  for  a  period  of  four  months. 
!  Considering  the  nature  of  the  material,  solid  unbroken  shale  and  hard  pan,  the 
progress  was  good. 

The  total  number  of  cubic  yards  dredged  amounted  to  47,250  at  a  cost  of 
$77,431.27  or  $1.6388/i0o  cents  per  cubic  yard. 

Champlain  Channel. — The  deepening  of  Champlain  channel  to  35  feet  was 
carried  on  this  year  by  three  dredges  during  most  of  the  season  of  1928.  The 
curve  at  Pointe  Citrouille  below  the  part  widened  last  year  was  further  widened. 
This  additional  improvement  will  be  a  great  advantage  at  this  point. 

The  material  dredged  was  clay,  stones,  hard  pan  and  a  little  shale  rock. 

The  total  number  of  cubic  yards  dredged  amounted  to  735,610  cubic  yards 
i  at  a  cost  of  $343,619.22  or  0-467%oo  cents  per  cubic  yard. 

Champlain  Upper  Course. — One  powerful  elevator  dredge  worked  for  most 
;  of  the  season  at  Champlain  Upper  course  to  35  feet  E.L.W. ,  the  material  being 
1  clay  and  sand. 

The  number  of  cubic  yards  removed  was  76,150  at  a  cost  of  $66,382.25  or 
0-873%00  cents  per  cubic  yard. 

Port  St.  Francis. — A  powerful  elevator  dredge  worked  for  most  of  the  season 
'  at  Port  St.  Francis,  deepening  the  channel  to  35  feet  E.L.W.  The  material  con- 
sisted of  clay,  stones  and  boulders.     Excellent  progress  was  made. 

The  total  number  of  cubic  yards  removed  amounted  to  233,305  at  a  cost 
of  $116,633.48  or  0-49J)9/10o  cents  per  cubic  yard. 


32  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 


Xicolet  Traverse  (Lake  St.  Peter). — One  powerful  elevator  dredge  worked! 
for  more  than  three  months  at  Nicolet  traverse,  widening  and  deepening  the! 
channel  to  35  feet  E.L.W.  and  completed  this  work.  The  material  dredged  wasl 
clay  and  stones. 

The  total  amount  of  cubic  yards  removed  was  152,250  at  a  total  cost  oi 
S02.766.88  or  0-412%0o  cents  per  cubic  yard. 

Sorel  to  He  de  Grace. — Two  powerful  elevator  dredges  worked  between! 
Sorel  and  He  de  Grace,  one  for  ten  days  and  one  for  three  months  deepening  the) 
channel  to  35  feet  E.L.W.  and  making  good  progress.  The  material  dredged 
was  clay. 

The  total  yardage  amounted  to  106,965  at  a  cost  of  $123,307.72  oij 
$1.152%0o  cents  per  cubic  yard. 

Cap  St.  Michel  Curve. — One  of  the  elevator  dredges  was  employed  foi 
about  five  weeks  widening  Cap  St.  Michel  curve.  This  work,  when  completed, 
will  prove  of  great  benefit. 

The  total  number  of  cubic  yards  dredged  amounted  to  49,000  at  a  total! 
cost  of  $26,525.22  or  0-541%Oo  cents  per  cubic  yard. 

Longue  Pointe  Curve. — Four  powerful  elevator  dredges  were  operated  foij 
short  periods  at  Longue  Pointe  curve  widening  on  the  south  side  and  deepening! 
to  35  feet  at  E.L.W.  and  almost  completed  this  work.  The  material  dredged  wl 
clay  and  stones  with  a  little  solid  rock. 

The  total  number  of  cubic  yards  dredged  amounted  to  41,740  at  a  total  cost! 
of  $46,893.61  or  $1.123%oo  cents  per  cubic  yard. 

Longue  Pointe  Traverse. — One  powerful  elevator  dredge  worked  for  a  short 
period  at  Longue  Pointe  traverse  widening  and  dredging  to  35  feet  E.L.W.  or 
the  north  side  upper  end.  This  work  was  completed,  the  material  being  clay  and 
stones. 

The  total  amount  of  cubic  yards  dredged  was  46,340  at  a  total  cost  of 
$28,181.15  or  0-6081/100  cents  per  cubic  yard. 

Longueuil  Shoal  (including  Forsyth  Shoal  at  Poulier  a  Gagnon) . — Widening' 
and  deepening  to  35  feet  E.L.W.  was  carried  out  at  this  point  as  follows: — 

Dredge  No.  4  for  32  days,  dredge  No.  5  for  29  days,  and  dredge  No.  13  foij 
49  days,  the  material  dredged  being  hardpan,  stones  and  shale. 

The  total  number  of  cubic  yards  dredged  amounted  to  66,375  at  a  total  cost 
of  $87,003.28  or  $1.3108/100  cents  per  cubic  yard. 

North  Channel  Below  Quebec. — The  powerful  sea-going  elevator  dredgei 
No.  16  was  operated  all  season  in  the  north  channel,  dredging  to  35  feet  extreme 
low  tide  and  to  500  feet  width,  following  out  the  department's  policy  of  com- 
pleting the  channel  to  this  width  as  soon  as  possible,  opening  it  to  navigation, 
and  then  eventually  widening  to  1,000  feet.  In  addition,  the  converted  powerful 
sea-going  elevator  dredge  No.  8  was  engaged  on  this  work  for  a  month. 

Almost  a  mile  of  channel  was  completed  to  a  width  of  500  feet  and  the 
material  consisted  of  sand,  clay  and  stones.  As  dredge  No.  8  worked  during 
the  season  of  1928  by  day  only  but  will  next  season  work  clay  and  night,  pro- 
gress  during  the  coming  year  should  be  considerably  increased. 

The  total  number  of  cubic  yards  dredged  in  the  North  channel  below 
Quebec  (West  Sand)  by  dredge  No.  16  amounted  to  1,004,800  at  a  total  cost  of 
$252,554.22  or  ()-25l:ft00  cents  per  cubic  yard. 

The  total  number  of  cubic  yards  dredged  by  dredge  No.  8  in  the  north 
channel  below  Quebec,  Madame  Reef  shoal,  amounted  to  27,500  at  a  total  cost 
of  -S29r441.16  or  $1.07°%Oo  cents  per  cubic  yard. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  33 

The  total  number  of  cubic  yards  dredged  by  the  fleet  below  Quebec  amounted 
to  1,032,300  at  a  total  cost  of  $281,995.38  or  0-2732/100  cents  per  cubic  yard; 
material  consisting  of  clay,  stones  and  sand. 

The  total  number  of  cubic  yards  dredged  by  the  whole  fleet  of  dredges 
above  and  below  Quebec  amounted  to  2,627,985  at  a  cost  of  $1,368,885.97  or 
0-52°%oo  cents  per  cubic  yard. 

PROGRESS   OF   DREDGING   OPERATIONS   AT   END   OF   SEASON    OF    1928 
30-FOOT  PROJECT 

Total  length  of  dredging  done  (statute  miles) 66-85 

Total  length  of  dredging  yet  to  be  done  (statute  miles) 1-20 

Total  number  of  cubic  yards  dredged 53,951, 332 

Total  number  of  cubic  yards  yet  to  be  dredged 1 ,  350, 000 

35-FOOT  PROJECT 

Total  length  of  dredging  done  (statute  miles) 60-52 

Total  length  of  dredging  .yet  to  be  done  (statute  miles) 31-37 

Total  number  of  cubic  yards  dredged 53, 067, 511 

Total  number  of  cubic  yards  yet  to  be  dredged 21 , 422, 620 

The  total  cost  from  1851  to  the  end  of  the  fiscal  year  March  31,  1929,  of 
the  St.  Lawrence  Ship  Channel  from  Montreal  to  Father  Point,  including  plant, 
shops,  surveys;  etc.,  is  as  follows: — 

Dredging $22,409, 244  57 

Plant,  shops,  surveys,  etc 12,286,504  02 

Grand  total $34, 695, 748  59 

The  total  number  of  cubic  yards  dredged  in  the  River  St.  Lawrence  Ship 
Channel  from  1851  to  the  end  of  the  season  of  1928  amounted  to  134,604,153, 
the  material  varying  from  very  hard  shale  rock  to  soft  blue  clay. 

Tidal  Semaphores 

Cap  a  la  Roche. — The  tidal  semaphore  at  Cap  a  la  Roche  (Deschaillons, 
P.Q.),  situated  on  the  south  shore  of  the  St.  Lawrence  river  and  which  indi- 
cates the  available  depth  of  water  in  the  dredged  channel  was  put  in  operation 
May  4,  1928. 

Pointe  Citrouille. — The  tidal  semaphore  at  Pointe  Citrouille  situated  on  the 
north  shore  of  the  St.  Lawrence,  10J  miles  above  Cap  a  la  Roche,  was  put  into 
operation  the  same  day.  This  semaphore  is  connected  with  Cap  a  la  Roche 
semaphore  by  special  telephone  line  to  enable  the  operator  at  Cap  a  la  Roche 
to  telephone  the  operator  at  Pointe  Citrouille  every  three  inches  of  rise  or  fall 
of  tide,  as  the  case  may  be.  The  Pointe  Citrouille  semaphore  shows  the  depth 
in  feet  by  large  figures,  and  inches  by  small  semaphore.  This  semaphore  enables 
the  pilot  of  a  deep  draught  vessel  outward  bound  to  judge  if  there  is  sufficient 
depth  of  water  in  the  dredged  channel  at  Cap  a  la  Roche  to  pass  in  safety.  If 
not,  it  gives  him  time  to  get  ready  to  anchor  below  Pointe  Citrouille  where  there 
is  good  anchorage  or  where  he  can  wait  for  the  tide  to  rise  sufficiently  to  enable 
him  to  pass  at  Cap  a  la  Roche. 

St.  Nicholas. — The  tidal  semaphore  at  St.  Nicholas  point,  on  the  south  side 
of  the  St.  Lawrence  river,  a  distance  of  15  miles  above  Quebec,  shows  the  depth 
of  water  available  in  the  undredged  channel  over  St.  Augustin  bar — commenced 
operations  May  4,  1928. 

88174-3 


34 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 


Crane  Island. — On  recommendation  made  to  the  department  by  the  Ship- 
ping Federation  of  Canada,  it  was  decided  to  establish  a  tidal  semaphore  on 
Crane  Island  wharf  to  show  the  depth  of  water  available  in  the  dredged  channels 
at  Beaujeu  and  St.  Thomas. 

Semaphore  arms  were  fitted  to  the  lighthouse  at  the  end  of  the  wharf  at 
Crane  island  and  the  signals  are  similar  to  those  shown  at  Cap  a  la  Roche  and 
St.  Nicholas.  This  semaphore  was  first  employed  July  28,  1925,  and  gave  satis- 
faction.    It  commenced  operations  for  the  season  of  1928  on  April  26,  1928. 

Sweeping  Operations 

The  usual  sweeping  of  the  channel  was  carried  out  by  sweeping  steamer 
Detector  and  no  obstructions  of  a  serious  nature  were  found.  It  is  expected 
next  season  that  an  additional  sweeping  outfit,  consisting  of  a  tug  and  sounding 
scow  will  be  employed  in  proving  the  35-foot  dredged  channel  so  far  completed. 
The  Detector  also  was  engaged  in  proving  dredging  both  above  and  below 
Quebec. 

Height  of  Water 

The  following  table  gives  the  monthly  averages  of  the  height  of  water  in 
the  ship  channel  at  Sorel,  P.Q.,  by  which  it  will  be  seen  that  the  averages  of 
season  1928  compare  most  favourably  with  those  since  1920: — 


Year 

May 

June 

July 

August 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Highest 

Lowest 

ft.  in. 

ft.  in. 

ft.  in. 

ft.  in. 

ft.  in. 

ft. 

in. 

ft.  in. 

ft.  in. 

ft.  in. 

1920. . . . 

35   9 

33   0 

32   4 

31   8 

31   5 

31 

4 

31   6 

37   5 

30   1  I 

1921.... 

35   6 

32   9 

31  10 

31   4 

30  10 

31 

4 

31   6 

37   8 

30   1 

1922.... 

37   1 

34   9 

33   4 

32   3 

31   7 

31 

4 

30  11 

40   5 

30   1 

1923.... 

38   2 

34   3 

32   1 

31   2 

31   1 

30 

8 

30   9 

39   8 

29   9  [ 

1924.... 

38   8 

34  10 

32   6 

31  10 

31  11 

32 

4 

31   3 

40   0 

30   1  | 

1925.... 

35   3 

33   9 

32   5 

31   9 

31   0 

31 

3 

31  11 

43   4 

30   2 

1926.... 

37   4 

34   6 

32  10 

31   8 

31   1 

31 

3 

33   3 

41   5 

30  6 ; 

1927.... 

34   3 

33  10 

33   2 

32   5 

31   3 

31 

4 

34   9 

39   8 

30   5  ' 

1928.... 

40   3 

36   7 

34   0 

33   0 

33   0 

34 

1 

34   4 

43   8 

31   6  j 

The  lowest  reading  for  last  season  was  31  feet  6  inches,  this  occurring  in; 
September. 

During  the  most  important  months  of  navigation,  the  level  of  the  wateri 
was  higher  than  last  year. 

Accidents  in  the  St.  Lawrence  River,  Season  of  Navigation 
between  montreal  and  quebec 

June  8. — Trawler  Manon  L.,  inward  bound,  stranded  on  the  south,  outside 
the  channel,  near  Contrecceur,  sustaining  slight  damage. 

June  16. — SS.  Calumet,  outward  bound  from  Montreal,  failed  to  answer  hei 
helm  and  grounded  on  the  south  bank,  outside  the  channel  near  Cap  St.  Michel 
sustaining  no  damage. 

June  16. — SS.  Agga,  inward  bound,  passed  to  the  south  of  black  spar  buoys 
at  upper  end  of  Bellmouth  curve  and  stranded  outside  the  channel  on  the  soutl 
bank. 

July  8. — SS.  Meaford,  inward  bound,  stranded,  with  some  damage  to  th< 
vessel,  outside  of  the  channel  below  Cap  Magdeleine. 

July  11. — SS.  Idjefjord  and  tug  Chicoutimi  in  collision  at  Batiscan  whil( 
former  was  passing  latter  vessel.  Only  very  slight  damage  was  sustained  by 
the  Chicoutimi. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  35 

July  25. — SS.  Daghild,  inward  bound,  fouled  a  wire  of  dredge  No.  8,  working 
at  Nipigon  shoal,  sustaining  no  damage. 

July  27. — SS.  Montrose,  inward  bound,  collided  with  ss.  Rosecastle,  outward 
bound,  at  Becancour  Upper  traverse,  through  the  fault  of  the  Montrose,  with 
considerable  damage  to  both  vessels. 

August  4. — SS.  Laurentic,  outward  bound,  collided  with  ss.  Artena,  inward 
bound,  near  Buoy  17-L,  curve  No.  3,  lake  St.  Peter,  with  some  damage  to  both 
vessels.    The  steering  gear  of  the  Artena  was  out  of  order. 

August  14. — SS.  Glitra,  outward  bound,  went  aground  in  a  rain  squall  on 
the  north  bank,  outside  the  channel,  below  curve  No.  3,  lake  St.  Peter,  sustaining 
only  slight  damage. 

August  15. — SS.  Key vive,  inward  bound,  stranded  in  the  fog  while  anchoring 
near  Buoy  Q-34,  outside  of  the  channel,  sustaining  slight  damage. 

September  3. — SS1.  Bothwell,  inward  bound,  collided  slightly  with  a  schooner 
near  Quebec  bridge,  only  slight  damage  being  sustained. 

October  12. — SS.  Spilsby,  outward  bound,  grounded  in  a  squall  of  hail  and 
sleet,  on  the  north  bank,  outside  the  channel,  above  Vercheres,  and  was  pulled 
off  two  hours  later  without  damage. 

October  19. — SS.  Starmount,  inward  bound,  stranded  on  the  north  bank  in 
the  Richelieu  rapids  sustaining  some  damage. 

October  19. — SS.  Letitia  and  ss,  Brookton,  both  outward  bound,  collided  in 
lake  St.  Peter,  near  curve  No.  2,  with  some  damage  to  the  Brookton. 

October  28. — SS.  Iossofoglu,  outward  bound,  stranded  outside  the  channel 
off  He  Ste.  Therese  when  her  steering  gear  failed,  incurring  very  slight  damage. 

November  1. — SS.  Angelo  Toso  stranded  outside  the  channel  in  Montreal 
harbour,  while  getting  under  way,  sustaining  no  damage. 

QUEBEC    TO    FATHER    POINT 

July  16. — SS.  Adour,  outward  bound,  collided  with  ss,  Newton  Beech  about 
two  miles  below  Lower  Traverse  lightship,  while  the  Newton  Beech  was 
anchored.  Considerable  damage  incurred  by  Adour  and  some  damage  by 
Newton  Beech. 

July  17. — SS.  Michael  L.  Embiricos,  inward  bound,  stranded  in  fog  2  miles' 
southwest  of  Father  Point,  sustaining  considerable  damage. 

August  18. — SS.  Canadian  Mariner,  inward  bound,  stranded  on  Red  Islet 
bank  through  an  error  in  navigation,  incurring  considerable  damage. 

November  4. — SS.  Panaghis  M.  Hadoulis,  inward  bound,  stranded  on  south 
bank  of  White  island  through  an  error  in  navigation,  considerable  damage  being 
sustained. 

It  will  be  noted  that  none  of  the  accidents  occurring  during  the  season 
could  be  attributed  to  any  defect  in  the  Ship  channel  or  in  the  aids  to  navigation. 


Marine  Signal  Service 
March  31,  1929 

Signal  stations  have  been  established  for  the  purpose  of  maintaining  com- 
munications between  ship  and  shore  by  means  of  flag  signals. 

This  system  of  stations  extends  from  cape  Race,  Nfld.,  and  Belle  Isle  up 
the  gulf  and  river  St.  Lawrence  and  through  the  Great  Lakes  to  Port  Arthur 
and  Port  William,  Ontario. 

88174-34 


36 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 


Following  is  a  complete  list  of  stations: — 

EAST  OF  QUEBEC 


Name  of  Station 


Location 


Nautical 

miles  from 

Quebec 


Means  of  Communication 


(R)— Quebec 

St.  Jean  d'Orleans 

Crane  Island 

L 'Islet 

Cape  Salmon 

Father  Point 

Little  Metis 

Matane 

Pointe  des  Monts 

Cape  Chat 

Riviere  a  la  Martre 

Cape  Magdalen 

Fame  Point 

Cap  des  Rosiers 

Pointe   Maquereau 

Cap  d'Espoir 

West  Point  (Anticosti) 

South  West  Point  (Anticosti). 

South  Point  (Anticosti) 

Heath  Point  (Anticosti) 

Point  Escuminac,  N.B 

St.  Paul's  Island,  C.B 

Cape  Ray,  Nfld 

Cape  Race,  Nfld 

Point  Amour,  Labrador 

Belle  Isle.... 


Custom  House 

Shore  end  of  wharf 

Lighthouse 

100  yards  east  of  Church 

Lighthouse 

Shore  end  of  wharf 

Lighthouse 

(< 

(( 
u 
tt 
tt 
11 

Main  Station 

Lighthouse 


0 
14 
32 
40 
81 
157 
175 
200 
219 
234 
260 
294 
325 
349 
400 
377 
332 
360 
415 
438 
462 
540 
553 
826 
673 
734 


Telephone 


Telegraph 

Telephone  and  Telegraph. 

Telegraph. 


Telephone. 

Wireless  and  Telephone. 

Telegraph. 

<< 

Wireless  and  Telegraph. 
Wireless  and  Telegraph. 


WEST  OF  QUEBEC 


Name  of  Station 

Location 

Nautical 

miles  from 

Quebec 

Means  of  Communication 

Bridge  Station 

£  mile  above  Quebec  bridge 

6 
12 
31 
41 
45 
55 
68 

100 

110 

125 
134 
139 

Telephone. 

St.  Nicholas 

At  Tidal  Semaphore 

Portneuf 

u 

Grondines 

In  old  Windmill  Tower 

At  Tidal  Semaphore 

a 

St.  Jean  Deschaillons 

u 

Pointe  Citrouille 

u 

Three  Rivers 

Upper  end  of  Bureau  Wharf . 
Lower  end  of  Government 
Wharf • 

tt 

Sorel 

tt 

Bellmouth 

About  500  feet  east  Contre- 
coeur  Course  Low  Light. . 

Abreast  East  end  He  des 
Lauriers 

Cap  St.  Michel 

u 

tt 

Longue  Pointe 

Point  between  Wharves 

La  Sauvegarde  Building 

« 

(R)  Montreal 

tt 

WEST  OF  MONTREAL 


Name  of  Station 

Location 

Nautical 

miles  from 

Montreal 

Means  of  Communication 

(R)  Lachine  Canal 

Lock  No  2 

0 

8 

21 

33 

62 

99 

298 

321 

820 

(R)  Lachine  Canal 

(R)  Soulanges  Canal 

u 

(R)  Soulanges  Canal 

it 

(R)  Cornwall  Canal 

Cornwall 

u 

(R)  Galops  Canal 

Lift  Lock 

Telegraph. 
u 

(R)  Welland  Canal 

Port  Dalhousie 

Port  Colborne 

(R)  Welland  Canal 

(R)  Soo  Canal 

Sault  Ste.  Marie 

Stations  marked  (R)  are  repoi 

"ting  stations  only  and  are  no 

t  equipped  fo 

r  signalling  purposes. 

REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  37 

East  Coast  Visual  Signal  Service 
Fiscal  year  1928-29 

Signal  stations  on  the  east  coast  are  under  the  administration  of  the  Radio 
Branch  and  under  the  direct  jurisdiction  of  the  Division  Superintendent  of  Radio 
at  Halifax.  All  radio  stations  report  ships  communicated  with  and  this  is 
supplemented  by  reports  of  ships  sighted  by  the  following  visual  signal  stations 
which  are  organized  to  tie  in  with  the  east  coast  radio  service: — 

Magdalen  Island. — Including  Grindstone,  Amherst  Island,  Pleasant  Bay, 
Grosse  Isle,  and  Etang-du-Nord.    Wireless  to  Sydney. 

St.  Paul  Island. — Signal  agent  part-time.    Wireless  to  Sydney. 

Aspy  Bay. — Signal  agent  part-time.     Landline  to  Sydney. 

Scatari  Island. — Signal  agent  part-time.     Landline  and  telephone  to  Sydney. 

Flat  Point. — Signal  agent  part-time.     Private  telephone  to  Sydney. 

Point  Tupper. — Signal  agent  part-time.  Landline  to  Sydney;  ice  reports 
to  Canso. 

Sydney,  C.B. — The  duties  of  signal  agent  are  undertaken  by  Captain 
MacKenzie,  Superintendent  of  Pilots,  who,  upon  receipt  of  reports,  analyses 
same  and  forwards  to  central  offices  at  Halifax  and  Quebec  as  requisite. 

Halifax,  N.S. — This  station  is  located  at  the  Citadel  and  maintains  a  con- 
tinuous watch  day  and  night  and  is  in  direct  communication  with  Chebucto 
Head  Radio  and  Signal  Station  by  a  private  telephone,  which  was  installed 
during  the  present  year.  A  summary  of  ships  reported  by  the  Citadel  Station 
appears  in  the  Department's  Annual  Report. 

Chebucto  Head. — This  station  is  situated    at    the    entrance  to   Halifax 

harbour  and  reports  the  passing  of  all  vessels  to  the  Signal  Station  at  the  Citadel. 

■  Two  full-time  signal  agents  are  maintained  for  visual  signalling.     The  D/F 

Station  situated  at  the  same  point  reports  all  vessels  communicated  with  by 

i  wireless,  giving  position  and  probable  time  of  arrival.     The  station  is  organized 

:  for  lamp  signalling  at  night  to  vessels  not  fitted  with  wireless. 

Sambro  Head  Light  Vessel. — This  lightship  keeps  a  lookout  and  reports  all 
:  passing  vessels  not  fitted  with  wireless  to  Chebucto  head. 

St.  John,  N.B. — The  Signal  Station  at  St.  John  is  situated  in  the  Customs 
building  and  is  connected  by  telephone  to  the  Red  Head  D/F  Station.  Two 
full-time  signal  clerks  are  employed. 

Lurcher  Lightship. — Reports  all  ships  spoken  or  sighted  by  wireless  to  Red 
Head,  St.  John. 

Seal  Island. — A  signal  clerk  part-time  reports  by  wireless  to  Red  Head,  St. 
John,  all  ships  spoken  or  sighted. 

Partridge  Island. — Signal  agent  part-time.    Telephone  to  St.  John,  N.B. 

BRIEF    SUMMARY    OF    WORK    PERFORMED 

1.  Stations  report  movements  of  vessels  to  Montreal  and  Quebec. 

2.  Stations  report  weather  conditions  daily  to  Montreal  and  Quebec. 

3.  Montreal  and  Quebec  publish  daily  bulletins,  giving  weather  and  ice 
conditions  and  movements  of  vessels. 

4.  Montreal  and  Quebec  publish  daily  bulletins  showing  depths  of  water  at 
various  points  in  the  River  St.  Lawrence  Ship  Channel. 


38  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

5.  The  Signal  Service  offices  at  Montreal  and  Quebec  are  open  day  and 
night  for  the  purpose  of  furnishing  the  public  with  information  of  shipping 
matters. 

6.  The  telegraph  system  of  the  Department  of  Public  Works  on  the  north 
shore  of  the  gulf  of  St.  Lawrence  report  the  movements  of  vessels  engaged  in 
the  coasting  trade  to  the  Signal  Service  at  Quebec. 

7.  The  Government  grain  elevator  at  Port  Colborne  reports  to  Montreal  the 
arrival  and  departure  of  vessels  engaged  in  the  Upper  Lakes  grain  trade. 

8.  The  collectors  of  customs  at  Fort  William,  and  Port  Arthur  report  to 
Montreal  the  arrival  and  departure  of  vessels  engaged  in  the  Canadian  grain 
trade. 

9.  The  collectors  of  customs  at  all  the  seaports  in  the  river  and  gulf  of  St. 
Lawrence  on  the  Atlantic  coast,  report  the  arrival  and  departure  of  vessels 
engaged  in  the  overseas  trade. 

10.  Lloyd's  agent  at  Quebec  is  furnished  daily  with  full  information  of  the 
movements  of  vessels  engaged  in  the  overseas  trade  to  and  from  ports  in  the 
province  of  Quebec. 

ICEBREAKING,     1928-29 

REPORT  OF   MR.    N!   B.    MCLEAN,   ASSISTANT    CHIEF   ENGINEER,   ON   THE   ICE  REMEDIAL 

WORK   PERFORMED   BY    DR.    HOWARD    T.    BARNES    ON    THE   RIVER   ST. 

LAWRENCE  DURING  THE  WINTER  OF   1929 

During  the  spring  of  1928,  floods  occurred  at  Montreal  and  vicinity  causing 
considerable  damage  and  inconvenience  as  well  as  an  unsanitary  condition  owing 
to  sewers  backing  up. 

A  number  of  letters  and  petitions  were  received  by  the  department  asking 
for  relief  and  that  action  be  taken  to  ensure  the  non-recurrence  of  these  floods. 

It  had  been  reported  that  Dr.  Barnes'  ice  remedial  work  by  means  of 
Thermit,  etc.,  had  been  very  successful  in  connection  with  power  plants,  etc., 
and  there  was  a  request  from  the  Montreal  Board'  of  Trade  that  he  be  given 
an  opportunity  to  demonstrate  what  he  could  do  on  the  St.  Lawrence. 

It  was  my  opinion,  as  well  as  the  opinion  of  other  officials  of  the  Ship 
Channel  staff,  that  any  scientific  development  to  the  end  that  the  St.  Lawrence 
might  be  opened  earlier,  that  jams  and  floods  resulting  therefrom  might  be| 
prevented,  or  that  the  work  of  icebreakers  might  be  materially  reduced,  would 
be,  not  only  of  the  greatest  value  to  the  Ship  Channel,  but  also  to  the  whole 
country,  provided  always  that  this  could  be  done  at  reasonable  cost. 

In  order  to  ascertain  whether  the  situation  might  be  improved,  the  depart-, 
ment  decided  to  give  Dr.  Barnes  an  opportunity  to  demonstrate  his  method  of 
ice  remedial  work.  It  was,  however,  understood  that  this  work  was  purely  i 
experimental. 

A  contract  was  made  with  Dr.  Barnes  to  carry  out  these  operations  at  a  cost 
not  to  exceed  $60,000.  This  amount  included  all  payments  to  be  made  to  Dr.  j 
Barnes  for  services  performed  and  materials  used  as  well  as  equipment  ordered; 
by  the  department  in  his  behalf. 

Dr.  Barnes,  under  the  contract,  agreed  to  burn  out  the  channel  in  the  St., 
Lawrence  river  to  allow  a  free  passage  of  water  and  to  open  along  the  surface ; 
of  the  ice  lines  of  non-resistance  for  preventing  ice  jams  in  the  spring  break-up;, 
the  principal  work  to  be  concentrated  between  Sorel  and  Lanoraie  and  between 
Varennes  and  Longue  Pointe  as  these  are  the  locations  where  the  main  ice  jams; 
occur,  causing  back  water  and  flooding  at  Montreal.  It  was  also  agreed  that  a 
narrow  channel  should  be  opened  through  the  surface  ice  between  Lanoraie  andi 
Varennes,  where  the  underhang  does  not  exist  to  guard  against  the  pressure1 
resulting  from  the  Spring  debacle. 

The  work  was  carried  out  by  Dr.  Barnes  during  the  months  of  January,; 
February  and  March,  the  ice  being  treated  with  Thermit,  Calcium  Carbide  and* 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  39 

Calcium  Chloride.  The  localities  where  the  treatment  was  applied  were  changed 
somewhat  from  the  original  proposal  owing  to  the  nature  of  the  ice  encountered, 
some  work  being  done  between  Vickers  and  Longue  Pointe  and  also  between 
Sorel  and  in  the  Sorel  islands. 

After  the  treatment  of  the  ice  was  completed,  certain  sections  of  the  river 
were  opened  by  means  of  ice-breakers.  No  perceptible  difference  in  the  ice  in 
the  treated  and  untreated  sections  could  be  noticed. 

The  results  obtained  from  the  use  of  Thermit,  etc.  consequently  were  dis- 
appointing, and  until  some  other  method  is  developed,  icebreakers  will  have  to  be 
depended  upon  in  the  future  as  in  the  past  to  prevent  jams  and  to  open  the  river 
in  the  spring. 

Though  the  results  obtained  from  the  use  of  Thermit,  etc.,  in  the  St. 
Lawrence  were  disappointing,  this  does  not  necessarily  indicate  that  this  method 
would  be  unsatisfactory  when  used  in  connection  with  power  plants  especially 
when  there  was  open  running  water  immediately  below  the  point  of  application 
which  would  carry  away  the  ice  dislodged  by  the  chemicals. 

Icebreakers  are  essential  for  the  St.  Lawrence  to  prevent  jams  at  certain 
points  and  to  keep  the  river  open  as  far  above  Quebec  as  possible.  Keeping  the 
river  open  in  this  way  prevents  floods  and  ensures  a  longer  season  of  navigation. 
This  work  cannot  be  done  by  any  other  known  method.  It  is  expected,  when  the 
two  icebreakers  now  being  constructed  are  put  into  commission,  that  much  more 
efficient  work  will  be  possible  with  corresponding  advantageous  results  through- 
out the  river  from  Montreal  to  Quebec. 

REPORT  OF  MR.  A.  LAFLECHE,  ENGINEER,  RIVER  ST.  LAWRENCE  SHIP  CHANNEL,  ON  THE 

WORK  OF  THE  ICEBREAKING  STEAMERS   "  MIKULA  "   AND  "  LADY  GREY  " 

DURING  THE  WINTER  OF   1928-29 

The  close  of  the  season  of  1928  was  comparatively  mild,  with  only  a  small 
number  of  ships  to  go  to  sea. 

The  Lady  Grey  took  up  her  station  at  Three  Rivers  on  November  22 
followed  by  the  Bellechasse  on  December  3  to  take  charge  of  the  traffic  in  that 
section  of  the  river,  and  the  Mikula  and  Montcalm  were  on  'stand-by'  at  Quebec 
to  take  care  of  any  emergency  that  might  devlope  in  that  vicinity. 

The  Bellechasse  escorted  the  ss.  Boreas  from  Lake  St.  Peter  to  Quebec  on 
December  8,  and  the  Lady  Grey  performed  the  same  service  for  the  last  vessel, 
the  ss.  Rein,  on  the  following  day.  On  December  11  the  Lady  Grey  convoyed 
the  Boreas  and  the  Rein  to  Murray  Bay,  returning  to  Quebec  December  12. 

The  ice  bridge  formed  in  Sorel  Islands  January  8,  at  the  transmission  line 
above  Three  Rivers  January  11  and  by  January  14  the  river  was  frozen  over 
from  Three  Rivers  to  Montreal. 

Only  two  ice  jams  occurred  at  Quebec  bridge  during  the  winter,  and  these 
were  easily  dealt  with  by  the  Mikula  and  Lady  Grey.  The  latter  vessel  made 
two  trips  to  Portneuf  for  the  purpose  of  slicing  the  battures. 

The  river  remained  open  all  winter  to  above  the  transmission  line  at 
Three  Rivers. 

On  March  3,  about  three-quarters  of  a  mile  above  the  transmission  line  at 
Three  Rivers,  the  Mikula  began  the  work  of  opening  the  upper  reaches  of  the 
river.  By  March  10,  the  channel  had  been  opened  to  about  three-quarters  of  a 
mile  below  Yamachiche  bend  in  lake  St.  Peter.  On  the  latter  date  this  vessel 
was  withdrawn  to  Quebec  in  order  to  look  after  Quebec  bridge  in  case  battures, 
lifted  off  by  spring  tides,  should  cause  a  jam.  The  Lady  Grey  came  up  from 
Quebec  on  March  11  to  carry  out  widening  operations  throughout  the  length  of 
the  cut  made  by  the  Mikida.  By  March  18  the  Mikula  had  resumed  her  work 
in  lake  St.  Peter  and  on  March  20  she  carried  away  a  blade  on  the  port  pro- 
peller. This  necessitated  a  return  to  Quebec  as  she  had  to  be  docked  in  order 
to  replace  the  blade.     On  March  26  work  was  again  in  progress  in  lake  St. 


40 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 


Peter  and  on  March  30  Sorel  was  reached.  On  the  same  date  another  blade  was 
carried  away.  As  it  was  most  important  that  the  work  should  be  pushed,  the 
Mikula  continued  working  at  about  half  power  and  by  April  5  she  had  succeeded 
in  cutting  out  4  miles  of  the  heavily  jammed  ice  between  Sorel  and  Lanoraie. 
On  April  6  as  conditions  above  were  improving,  she  was  ordered  back  to  Quebec 
to  get  ready  for  ice  patrol  in  the  gulf.  On  April  8  the  last  of  the  Lanoraie  jam 
moved  down  and  two  days  later,  on  April  10,  the  Lady  Grey  came  up  in  clear 
water  to  Montreal. 

Instructions  were  issued  on  May  26  to  send  the  Lady  Grey  to  open  the 
Saguenay  river.  She  left  Quebec  May  27  arriving  at  Tadoussac  the  following 
morning.  This  river  was  opened  from  two  miles  above  Baie  St.  Jean  to  two 
miles  below  East  Cape,  a  distance  of  19  nautical  miles,  the  work  being  performed 
between  April  28  and  May  1.  Baie  St.  Jean  and  Ha  Ha  bay  were  both  cleared 
of  ice  and  the  wharves  made  available  for  vessels.  Above  East  cape  the  river 
had  been  open  for  some  time.  The  first  vessel,  the  Saguenay,  arrived  at 
Tadoussac  on  May  2,  the  day  after  the  Lady  Grey  had  completed  her  work 

Average  depth  for  each  Month  in  the  27^  foot  Channel  (27^  feet  at  Ordinary  Low 
Water)  from  Sorel  Gauge  each  Year  May  to  November 


Year 

May 

June 

July 

August 

Septem- 

October 

Novem- 

Highest 

Lowest 

ber 

ber 

ft.  in. 

ft.  in. 

ft.  in. 

ft.  in. 

ft.  in. 

ft. 

in. 

ft.  in. 

ft.  in. 

ft.  in. 

1897. . . . 

35   6 

32   6 

30   3 

29   3 

28   0 

27 

0 

27   6 

37   0 

26   4 

1898.... 

31   6 

30   9 

29   8 

28   2 

28   2 

28 

3 

28   6 

32   1 

26   9 

1899.... 

36   2 

31   9 

30   3 

28   6 

27   6 

28 

0 

27   9 

37   9 

26   9 

1900.... 

33   6 

30   9 

30   6 

29   6 

28   1 

28 

9 

29   2 

35   9 

27   4 

1901.... 

34   3 

31  10 

29   2 

28   3 

27   7 

27 

4 

27   3 

36   3 

26   6 

1902.... 

32   2 

32   2 

32   2 

29   4 

28   1 

28 

1 

29   0 

34   1 

27   6 

1903.... 

33   0 

30  11 

30   5 

29   5 

28   4 

29 

0 

27  11 

32   8 

26  11 

1904.... 

36   3 

34   5 

30   9 

29   5 

29   5 

30 

4 

29   3 

37   4 

28   1 

1905.... 

31  10 

30   8 

29   7 

29   0 

28   0 

28 

5 

28   1 

33   6 

27   1 

1906.... 

32   4 

31   5 

29   3 

27  11 

27   3 

27 

4 

27   6 

33   3 

26   9 

Average  depth  for  each  Month  in  the  30  feet  Channel  (30  feet  at  Extreme  Low 

Water  of  1897) 


Year 

May 

June 

July 

August 

Septem- 
ber 

October 

Novem- 
ber 

Highest 

Lowest  ! 

ft. 

in. 

ft. 

in. 

ft. 

in. 

ft. 

in. 

ft.  in. 

ft. 

in. 

ft.  in. 

ft. 

in. 

ft. 

in. 

1907. . . . 

37 

1 

35 

9 

34 

3 

32 

10 

32   4 

32 

9 

33   7 

38 

3 

31 

™ 

1908.... 

41 

5 

37 

10 

33 

10 

32 

10 

32   0 

31 

0 

30   6 

42 

4 

30 

0 

1909.... 

40 

6 

37 

6 

33 

10 

33 

2 

32   7 

32 

4 

31   6 

42 

7 

30 

11 

1910.... 

35 

7 

34 

5 

32 

3 

31 

7 

31   6 

31 

6 

31   7 

37 

1 

30 

H 

1911.... 

36 

6 

34 

6 

32 

1 

31 

3 

30   9 

30 

2 

30   3 

38 

1 

29 

4 

1912.... 

37 

9 

37 

6 

33 

6 

32 

8 

32   6 

32 

6 

34   9 

40 

11 

31 

3 

1913.... 

37 

0 

34 

4 

32 

8 

31 

10 

31   6 

32 

1 

32   7 

38 

6 

31 

1 

1914.... 

35 

2 

33 

0 

32 

4 

31 

4 

31   3 

30 

11 

31   0 

36 

10 

30 

3 

1915.... 

34 

7 

32 

6 

31 

6 

31 

4 

31   1 

30 

11 

30   8 

37 

4 

30 

1 

1916.... 

38 

9 

37 

2 

34 

0 

32 

5 

31   7 

31 

9 

31  10 

40 

0 

30 

9 

1917.... 

36 

8 

36 

6 

34 

10 

33 

6 

32   3 

32 

6 

33   0 

38 

2 

31 

3 

1918.... 

36 

1 

34 

1 

33 

10 

32 

0 

32   3 

33 

7 

34  11 

38 

1 

31 

3 

1919.... 

39 

7 

36 

7 

33 

5 

32 

4 

32   3 

32 

8 

33   5 

41 

1 

31 

3 

1920.... 

35 

9 

33 

0 

32 

4 

31 

8 

31   5 

31 

4 

31   6 

37 

5 

30 

1 

1921.... 

35 

6 

32 

9 

31 

10 

31 

4 

30  10 

31 

4 

31   6 

37 

8 

30 

1 

1922.... 

37 

1 

34 

9 

33 

4 

32 

3 

31   7 

31 

4 

30  11 

40 

5 

30 

1 

1923.... 

38 

2 

34 

3 

32 

1 

31 

2 

31   1 

30 

8 

30   9 

39 

8 

29 

9 

1924.... 

38 

8 

34 

10 

32 

6 

31 

10 

31  11 

32 

4 

31   3 

40 

0 

30 

1 

1925.... 

35 

3 

33 

9 

32 

5 

31 

9 

31   0 

31 

3 

31  11 

43 

4 

30 

2 

1926.... 

37 

4 

34 

6 

32 

10 

31 

8 

31   1 

31 

3 

33   3 

41 

5 

30 

6 

1927. . . . 

34 

3 

33 

10 

33 

2 

32 

5 

31   3 

31 

4 

34   9 

39 

8 

30 

5 

1928.... 

40 

3 

36 

7 

34 

0 

33 

0 

33   0 

34 

1 

34   4 

43 

8 

31 

6 

REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER 
COST  OF  SHIP  CHANNEL  TO  DATE 


41 


Table  Showing  the  Total  Cost  of  the  Dredging  and  Plant  and  the  Quantities 

Dredged  to  March  31,  1929 


Cost  of 
dredging 


Expenditure 
for  plant, 

shops,  sur- 
veys, etc. 


Quantities 
dredged 


Montreal  Harbour  Commissioners  1851  to  1888 

Dredging  Montreal  to  Cap  a  la  Roche  to  27£  ft.  at  O.L.W. 
and  from  Cap  a  la  Roche  to  Quebec  to  27§  ft.  at  half  tide. 

Department  of  Public  Works 

Dredging  consisting  of  widening  and  cleaning  up  of  channel, 
deepening  Cap  a  la  Roche  to  Cap  Charles  to  27?  ft.  at 
O.L.W.  and  dredging  at  Grondines,  Lotbiniere  and  Ste. 
Croix  1889  to  June  30,  1899 


Project  of  1899 

Dredging  Channel  between  Montreal  and  Quebec  to  30  ft.  at 
lowest  water  of  1897,  also  widening  to  a  minimum  width 
of  450  ft.  and  straightening — 

Fiscal  year  1899-1900 

Fiscal  year  1900-1901 

Fiscal  year  1901-1902 

Fiscal  year  1902-1903 

Fiscal  year  1903-1904 

Department  of  Marine  and  Fisheries 

This  includes  the  work  below  Quebec 

Fiscal  year  1904-1905 

Fiscal  year  1905-1906 

Fiscal  year  1906-1907  (July  1,  1906,  to  March  31,  1907) 

Fiscal  year  1907-1908 

Fiscal  year  1908-1909 

Fiscal  year  1909-1910 

Fiscal  year  1910-1911 

Fiscal  year  1911-1912 

Fiscal  year  1912-1913 

Fiscal  year  1913-1914 

Fiscal  year  1914-1915 

Fiscal  year  1915-1916 

Fiscal  year  1916-1917 

jFiscal  year  1917-1918 

Fiscal  year  1918-1919 

Fiscal  year  1919-1920 

Fiscal  year  1920-1921 

Fiscal  year  1921-1922 

Fiscal  year  1922-1923 

Fiscal  year  1923-1924 

Fiscal  year  1924-1925 

Fiscal  year  1925-1926 

Fiscal  year  1926-1927 

Fiscal  year  1927-1928 

^Fiscal  year  1928-1929 

Total  to  March  31,  1929 


$  cts. 


3,402,494  35 


839,583  08 


100,191  91 
136,680  83 
185,429  80 
255,776  55 
276,958  59 


311,087  93 
431,768  30 
302,677  37 
478,209  66 
497, 686  03 
572,950  71 
576,838  02 
588,697  60 
663,229  74 

895.235  59 
,036,846  65 

976, 622  03 
,030,550  60 
618,399  69 
350, 152  92 
422,107  05 
446, 134  85 
464,660  74 

465.236  80 
550,612  71 
557,863  56 
996,554  42 

,240,044  98 
,369,075  54 
,368,885  97 


$  cts 


534,809  65 


486,971  79 


265,270  78 
287,040  04 
479,731  47 
277,703  50 
308, 765  44 


277,225  69 
317,327  37 
275,003  61 
417,390  22 
340,861  86 
321,375  80 
488,248  88 
499,799  58 
702,071  86 
740,664  26 
549,369  91 
809,443  95 
353,152  12 
156,112  57 
82,480  60 
132,747  20 
151,422  99 
102,710  14 
446,933  08 
130,481  97 
333,345  19 
600, 199  42 
343,901  27 
548,716  68 
525,225  13 


Cubic  yards 


19,865,693 


3,558,733 


1,107,894 
2,479,385 
3,098,350 
6,544,605 
4,619,260 


2,716,220 
4,047,530 
3,001,010 
4,831,875 
5,896,737 
6,354,285 
5,600,050 
4,509,904 
6,929,344 
6,140,867 
6,225,143 
8,462,957 
7,800,555 
2,517,376 
628,060 
517,305 
715,895 
1,167,100 
793,350 
1,314,050 
1,373,420 
2,754  770 
3,146,125 
3,258,320 
2,627,985 


22,409,244  57 


12,286,504  02 


134,604,153 


42 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 


Progress  of  Dredging  Operations  at  Date  of  Writing,  the  Close  of  the  Season 

1928 

THIRTY-FOOT  PROJECT 


Locality 


Distance 

English 

miles 


Total 

length 

requiring 

dredging 


Length 
dredged 
in  1928 


Total 
length  of 

30-foot 
channel 
dredged 


Length 
yet  to  be 
dredged 


miles 


Division  No.  1 — 

Montreal  to  Sorel 

Division  No.  2 — 

Sorel  to  Batiscan 

Division  No.  3 — 

Lake  St.  Peter 

Division  No.  4 — 

Batiscan  to  Quebec 

Division  ATo.  5 — 

Quebec  to  the  Traverse 

Totals 


220 


miles 
22-90 
12-45 
18  00 
10  05 
4-65 


miles 


68-05 


miles 

22-90 

12-45 

18-00 

8-85 

4-65 


miles 

All  com- 
pleted. 


All  com- 
pleted 


66-85 


1-21 


Progress  of  the  Dredging  Operations  at  the  Date  of  Writing,  the  Close  of  th( 

Season  of  1928 

THIRTY-FOOT  PROJECT 


Locality 

Length  of  Dredging 

Cubic  yard' 

yet  requir-i 

ed  to  be 

done 

Required 

Done 

Division  No.  1 — 

miles 

miles 
110 
505 
0-40 
300 
4-50 
1-10 
1-70 
605 

Longue  Pte.  to  Pte.  aux  Trembles  (en  haute) 

He  Ste.  Therese 

Varennes  to  Cap  St.  Michel 

Cap  St.  Michel  to  Vercheres 

Vercheres  Traverse 

Vercheres — Contrecoeur 

Contrecoeur  Channel 

Total 

22-90 

Division  No.  2 — 

Sorel  to  lie  de  Grace 

4-40 
1-10 
0-25 

Stone  Island 

He  au  Raisin  Traverse 

Lake  St.  Peter  (See  Div.  3) 

Port  St.  Francis 

0-50 
0-50 
1-55 
2-25 
1-30 
0-60 

Three  Rivers 

Cap  Magdeleine  to  Becancour 

Becancour  to  Champlain 

Champlain  to  Pte.  Citrouille 

Batture  Perron 

Total 

12-45 

Division  No.  8 — 

Lake  St.  Peter 

18-00 

Total 

18  00 

Division  No.  4 — 

Batiscan  to  Cap  Levrard 

300 
205 
1-20 
0-90 

Cap  a  la  Roche  Channel 

Poulier  Rayer 

Cap  Charles 

REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER 


43 


Progress  of  the  Dredging  Operations   at  the   Date   of  Writing,  the  Close  6i 
the  Season  of  1928—  Concluded 

THI RT Y-FOOT  PROJECT— Concluded 


Locality 


Division  No.  4 — Concluded 

Grondines 

Lotbiniere 

Cap  Sante 

Ste.  Croix 

St.  Augustin 


Total. 


[Division  No.  5 — 

Quebec  to  the  Traverse. 


Total.. 
Totals. 


Length  of  Dredging 


Required 


0-60 
0-60 


1-20 


1-20 


1  >one 


0-80 
0-40 
0-20 
0-30 


■85 


4-65 


4-65 


66-85 


Cubic  yards 
yet  requir- 
ed to  be 
done 


300,000 
500,000 


800,000 


550,000 


550,000 


1,350,000 


Progress  of  Dredging  Operations  at  Date  of  Writing,  the  Close  of  the  Season 

'      1928 

THIRTY-FIVE-FOOT  PROJECT 


Locality 

Distance 

English 

miles 

Total 

length 

requiring 

dredging 

Length 
dredged 
in  1928 

Total 
length  of 

35-foot 
channel 
dredged 

Length 
yet  to  be 
dredged 

Division  No.  1 — 

Montreal  to  Sorel 

miles 
45 
36 
20 
59 

70 

miles 
26-80 
20-44 
18-32 
15-54 

10-79 

miles 
0-25 
2-14 
0-18 
0-08 

0-92 

miles 

24-47 

13-63 

17-80 

0-13 

4-49 

miles 
2-33 

Division  No.  2 — 

Sorel  to  Batiscan 

6-81 

Division  No.  3 — 

Lake  St.  Peter 

0-52 

Division  No.  4 — 

Batiscan  to  Quebec 

15-41 

Division  No.  5 — 

Quebec  to  Goose  Cape  (North  Chan- 
nel)  

6-30 

Totals 

230 

91-89 

3-57 

60-52 

31-37 

44 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 


Progress  of  the   Dredging  Operations   ait  the1  Date  of  Writing,  the  Close  of 

the  Season  of  1928 


THIRTY-FIVE  FOOT  PROJECT 

Locality 

Length  of  dredging 
in  miles 

Cubic  yards 
yet  to  be 
dredged 

Cubic  yards 
dredged 

Yet  to  be 
done 

Done 

Division  No.  1 — 

miles 
1-60 

miles 

0-28 
0-47 
1-20 
3-07 
1-12 
2-14 
0-56 
4-72 
0-72 
1-91 
8-28 

363,529 

357,925| 
394,300 
786,415 

1,239,975| 
358, 950; 

2, 666, 560 i 
176, 50C 

2, 048.85C: 
306,595j 

L157.70C 

5,159,02*: 

0-12 

447,466 

He  Ste  Therese  Channel 

0-61 

159,215 

Totals — Division  No.  1 

2-33 

24-47 

970,210 

14,652,79* 

Division  No.  2 — 

0-58 

4-40 
211 
2-09 
0-90 
011 

523,381 

3,186,67(1 

983, 66( 

974, 0& 

924, 39( 

32,66( 

He  au  Raisin 

Port  St.  Francis 

0-20 
0-61 
2-40 
0-87 
0-92 
1-23 

256,695 

500,532 
1,348,578 

684,000 
1,237,646 

684,600 

Three  Rivers 

Cap  Magdeleine  to  Becancour 

Becancour  to  Champlain 

1-35 

2-67 

949,21(1 
l,394,71(j 

Champlain  to  Pte.  Citrouille 

Batture  Perron 

Totals — Division  No.  2 

6-81 

13-63 

5,235,432 

8,445,40.': 

Division  No.  3 — ■ 
Lake  St.  Peter 

0-52 

17-80 

530,320 

11,966,83: 

Totals— Division  No.  3 

0-52 

17-80 

530,320 

11,966,83: 

Division  No.  4 — 
Batiscan  to  Cap  Levrard 

4-48 
1-27 
2-06 
191 
0-83 
0-47 
1-51 
1-47 
1-41 

2,386,168 
781,666 

1,836,859 
996,291 
513,332 
321,480 
655,561 
798,518 
826,207 

Cap  Levrard 

Cap  a  la  Roche  Curve 

Cap  Charles  Channel 

0-13 

81,12; 

Grondines 

Lotbiniere 

Cap  Sante 

St.  Croix 

St.  Augustin 

Totals— Division  No.  4 

15-41 

013 

9,116,082 

81,12; 

Division  No.  5 — 
Quebec  to  Goose  Cape  (North  Channel)— 
Madame  Reef  Shoal 

4-43 

1-87 

011 

4-38 

3,716,306 
1,854,270 

66.1CX 
17,855,25; 

West  Sand  and  East  Narrows  Shoal. 

Totals — Division  No.  5. . . 

*6-30 

*4-49 

5,570,576 

17,921,351 

Totals 

31-37 

60-52 

21,422,620 

53,067,51 

*This  Channel  is  being  dredged  500  feet  wide;  is  at 
be  opened  at  same  width  for  35  feet  depth  when  comp 
Mileage  is  shown  on  a  basis  of  500  feet  width. 

present  op< 

med  at  this 
vill  be  wid 

3  width  for  25  f( 
ened  eventually 

;et  depth;  wil 
7  to  1,000  feet 

REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER 


45 


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REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER 
EXPENDITURE  AND  REVENUE 

STATEMENT  OF  EXPENDITURE,  MARINE  DEPARTMENT,  1928-29 


49 


Service 


Appropriation 


Expenditure 


Balance 


Ocean  and  River  Service — 

Allowance  re  Alfred  Callow 

Allowance  re  J.  B.  Fontigny 

Allowance  re  Joseph  Lemay 

Dominion  steamers 

Distressed  seamen 

Masters  and  mates 

Investigation  into  wrecks 

Schools  of  navigation 

Registry  of  shipping 

Removal  of  obstructions 

Cattle  inspection 

Subsidy  to  wrecking  plants 

Unforeseen  expenses 

Life  saving  service 

Radio  service 

Radio  reception 

Hydrographic  survey 

Hudson  Bay  patrol 

Radio  Broadcast  Commission 

Icebreaker  for  Hudson  bay 

Icebreaker  for  St.  Lawrence  river 


Public  Works  (Capital)— 

Ship  channel 

Sorel  shipyard 

Hopper  barge 

Sorel  wharf  No.  4 

St.  Lawrence  river  dams 

Allowance  re  Mde.  M.  Champagne 

Allowance  re  O.  Lamothe 

Allowance  re  R.  A.  Cournoyer 


Lighthouse  and  Coast  Service — 

Agency,  rents  and  contingencies 

Salaries,  lightkeepers 

Maintenance  of  lights 

Construction  of  lights 

Administration  of  pilotage 

Repairs  to  wharves 

Pensions  to  pilots 

Icebreaking 

Signal  service 

Harbour  Master  Amherstburg. . 

Allowance,  J.  Davidson 

Allowance,  Louis  Madore 


Steamboat  Inspection — 

Steamboat  inspection. . 

Scientific  Institutions — 

Meteorological  Service . 

Civil  Government — 

Salaries 


Contingencies. 


Miscellaneous — 

Gratuities 

Salary,  J.  C.  Patterson. 


1 
3 

,650 

5 

20 

6 

9 

3 

5 

4 

45 

12 

80 

790 

190 

530 

500 

25 

500 

400 


$  cts 

497  85 
050  00 
777  00 
000  00 
f>00  00 
000  00 
000  00 
000  00 
000  00 
000  00 
500  00 
000  00 
000  00 
000  00 
865  00 
000  00 
000  00 
000  00 
000  00 
000  00 
000  00 


1 

3 

1,649 

2 

19 

4 

7 

2 

1 

3 

45 

4 

53 

710 

166 

386 

289 

24 

305 


$  cts, 

497  85 
050  00 
777  00 
336  48 
384  57 
999  76 
921  40 
815  82 
161  71 
095  40 
643  73 
000  00 
966  04 
379  63 
057  76 
775  89 
739  07 
463  97 
946  14 
243  33 


4,781,289  85 


3,683,255  55 


1,895,000  00 

154,000  00 

315,000  00 

89,280  00 

1,000,000  00 

3,050  00 

525  45 

3,050  00 


1,894,911  65 
150,035  68 


11. 


95 


3,050  00 

525  45 

3,050  00 


3,459,905  45 


2,063,555  73 


236,000  00 

750,000  00 

900,000  00 

725,000  00 

250,000  00 

10,000  00 

10,800  00 

30,000  00 

110,000  00 

600  00 

500  00 

250  00 


223,280  33 

718,776  75 

889,222  76 

683,011  80 

141,657  35 

6,057  33 

9,550  00 

30,000  00 

109,993  63 

600  00 

500  00 

250  00 


023,150  00 


2,812,: 


95 


142,980  00 


141,485  39 


300,000  00 


287,908  21 


$  cts. 


663  52 

3,215  43 

0  24 

1,078  60 

1,184  18 

838  29 
3,904  60 

856  27 


7,033  96 

26, 620  37 

80,807  24 

23,224  11 

143,260  93 

210,536  03 

53  86 

194,756  67 

400,000  00 


1,098,034  30 


88  35 

3,964  32 

315,000  00 

77,297  05 

1,000,000  00 


1,396,349  72 


12,719  67 

31,223  25 

10, 777  24 

41,988  20 

108,342  65 

3,942  67 

1,250  00 


6  37 


210,250  05 


1,494  61 


12,091  79 


418,195  00 
60,000  00 


392,453  25 
54,797  62 


478,195  00 


447,250  87 


25,741  75 
5,202  38 


30,944  13 


2,634  47 
2,400  00 


2,634  47 
2,200  00 


5,034  47 


4,834  47 


200  00 


200  00 


83174—4 


50 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 
EXPENDITURE  AND  REVENUE— Concluded 

STATEMENT  OF  EXPENDITURE,  MARINE  DEPARTMENT,  1928-29—  Concluded 


Service 


Appropriation 


Expenditure 


Balance 


$    cts. 


Investments — 

Quebec  Harbour  Commission 

Montreal  Harbour  Commission. . . 
Vancouver  Harbour  Commission. 

Halifax  Harbour  Commission 

Chicoutimi  Harbour  Commission. 
St.  John  Harbour  Commission  — 


$  cts. 

,888,000  00 
,110,000  00 
,596,000  00 
30,000  00 
500,000  00 
602,000  00 


726,000  00 


$    cts 


Recapitulation  of  Services 


4,781,289  85 

3,459,905  45 

3,023,150  00 

142,980  00 

300,000  00 

478,195  00 

5,034  47 

3,683,255  55 

2,063,555  73 

2,812,899  95 

141,485  39 

287,908  21 

447,250  87 

4,834  47 

1,098,034  3i 

Public  Works  (Capital)  

1,396,349  7; 

210,250  0 

1,494  6, 

12,091  7j 

30,944  l1 

200  0; 

12,190,554  77 

9,441,190  17 
8,726,000  00 

2,749,364  6! 

18,167,190  17 

STATEMENT  OF  REVENUE  FOR 

FISCAL  YEA 

R  1928-29 



Gross 
Revenue 

Refunds 

Net 
Revenue   ! 

Radio 

$    cts. 

81,760  02 

2,146  70 

44,209  15 

5,181  25 

137,551  53 

15  00 

122,004  25 

3,827  85 

1,234  00 

34  35 

285,313  90 

361  00 

2,584  96 

$    cts. 

$      Ctf 

81,760  ( 

Harbour  dues 

2,146  9 

Piers  and  wharves 

478  14 

43,731  ( 

Masters  and  mates 

5,181  | 

Steam  boat  inspection 

619  50 

136,932  (1 

Pilots  license  fees 

15  (| 

Casual  revenue 

14  60 
100  00 

121,989  (! 

Fines  and  forfeitures 

3,727  V. 

1,234  ( 

34  l\ 

271,526  ]! 

361  ( 

2,584  <; 

Marine  register 

"   13! 787' 78' 

W/A  license  fees 

W/O  examination  fees 

Capital  account 

686.223  96 

15,000  02 

671,223  j 

REPOliT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  51 


METEOROLOGICAL  SERVICE 


Report  of  Sir  Frederic  Stupart,  Director 

The  observing  stations  for  the  year  numbered  865  of  all  classes.  At  371  of 
these  stations  the  observer  is  paid  an  amount  ranging  from  an  allowance  of  $12 
per  annum  for  recording  rainfall  only,  to  a  salary  of  $2,100  at  a  chief  station. 
At  494  stations  the  work  is  performed  without  remuneration  by  voluntary 
observers  who  furnish  climatological  data  which  is  used  for  the  benefit  of  the 
country  at  practically  no  cost  but  that  of  the  instruments. 

There  are  118  storm  signal  stations  where  the  agent  is  paid  either  $75  or 
$100  per  year  according  to  the  length  of  the  season  of  navigation. 

FORECAST  DIVISION 

The  scope  and  duties  of  the  forecast  division  continue  to  increase.  Charts 
have  been  prepared  and  forecasts  issued  twice  daily,  Sundays  and  holidays 
included,  throughout  the  year,  and  storm  warnings  displayed  at  ports  on  the 
Great  Lakes  and  in  the  gulf  and  Maritime  Provinces.  Of  the  daily  forecasts 
86-1  per  cent  were  verified  and  of  the  storm  warnings  98-0  per  cent. 

Owing  to  an  improved  system  of  collecting  the  reports  from  Canadian  and 
United  States  stations  the  charts  are  completed  and  the  forecasts  issued  and 
dispatched  from  three-quarters  to  an  hour  earlier  than  heretofore. 

Special  forecasts  were  issued  during  the  Spring  and  Summer  to  the  fruit 
growers  of  the  Niagara  peninsula  with  a  view  to  assisting  them  in  spraying 
operations. 

Numerous  special  forecasts  were  issued  to  shippers  of  perishable  goods, 
aviators  and  others. 

During  the  year  a  service  was  inaugurated  by  w'hich  special  observations  of 
surface  and  upper  air  conditions  at  Toronto  and  Kingston  together  with  a  fore- 
cast were  supplied  to  the  air  mail  service  between  Toronto  and  Montreal. 

The  forest-fire  weather  service  has  been  extended  to  the  Maritime  Provinces 
and  three  Observing  stations  have  been  established  in  New  Brunswick  and  four 
in  Nova  Scotia.  Forecasts  were  issued  throughout  the  fire-weather  season  to 
the  Forestry  officials  in  Ontario,  Quebec,  Alberta  and  British  Columbia. 

DIVISION  OF  CLIMATOLOGY 

During  the  year  information  was  supplied  in  answer  to  about  one  thousand 
inquiries  regarding  the  climate  or  the  past  weather  of  Canada  and  in  some 
instances  of  other  countries.  The  type  of  information  demanded  varies  from 
statements  of  the  weather  factors  at  a  particular  place  on  a  few  given  dates  in 
a  particular  year,  to  complete  histories  of  temperature  and  rainfall  over  the  full 
period  of  record  for  specified  districts.  Where  possible  inquiries  regarding  climate 
are  answered  by  supplying  figures  of  averages  and  extremes  which  are  computed 
for  all  stations  as  soon  as  the  period  of  observation  has  extended  over  ten  years. 
Inquiries  by  telephone  were  numerous  but  this  type  of  request  is  usually  satisfied 
by  verbal  statements  or  by  the  quoting  of  a  few  figures  for  the  districts  in  ques- 
tion, usually  places  in  Canada,  the  United  States  or  the  West  Indies. 

To  meet  the  increasing  demand  for  information  regarding  the  climate  of 
the  north,  material  is  being  prepared  for  a  booklet  giving  the  results  of  observa- 
tions in  the  Mackenzie  valley,  the  Hudson  bay  and  Labrador  regions  as  far  back 
as  the  records  go. 

88174— 4| 


.52  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

Besides  supplying  tables  for  reports  by  other  departments  and  for  provincial 
departments,  an  analysis  of  Canadian  climate  is  under  preparation  for  an 
encyclopaedia  of  the  climates  of  the  world  edited  by  the  well  known  climatologist  i 
Dr.  Kopper,  to  be  published  in  Germany. 

Monthly  reports  on  the  weather  were  issued  in  two  forms.  The  first,  the 
Monthly  Weather  Map  issued  about  the  close  of  the  first  week  of  each  month,  i 
gives  a  general  summary,  both  graphically  and  by  tables,  of  the  weather  of  the 
preceding  month.  This  summary  is  based  on  telegraphic,  wireless,  and  posted! 
reports  from  some  150  to  200  stations  throughout  Canada  (the  number  varying] 
according  to  seasons).  These  show  where  the  month  was  warm  or  cool,  dry  or 
wet,  in  terms  of  average  weather.  Some  remarks  upon  the  condition  of  cropsj 
or  the  progress  of  agricultural  operations  are  included  as  received  from  observers. 
This  interim  report  is  followed  some  months  later  by  a  monthly  record  of  about 
85  pages,  giving  detailed  daily,  in  some  cases  twice  daily,  and  in  a  few  case 
hourly  or  bi-hourly,  data  of  the  principal  weather  factors  for  all  stations  through- 
out Canada  whose  detailed  reports  have  been  received  in  time  to  be  included.! 
Averages  extremes  and  differences  from  normal  are  given  for  over  five  hundred| 
stations. 

Library  Division. — During  the  year  202  volumes,  198  periodicals  anc 
numerous  pamphlets  were  received. 

The  distribution  of  office  publications  to  institutions  and  individuals  include 
514  copies  daily  of  the  daily  weather  map,  732  copies  monthly  of  the  Monthly 
Weather  Map,   647   copies   monthly   of  the   monthly   record   of   meteorologic 
observations  and  237  .copies  of  the  1927  Toronto  Year  Book. 

PHYSICS  DIVISION 

Balloon  Sonde.— As  March,  1928,  and  December,  1929,  have  been  designatec 
as  the  International  Months  by  the  International  Commission  for  the  Explor- 
ation of  the  Upper  Air  with  balloons  carrying  instruments,  there  were  only  two 
periods   (July  17-19,  and  November  12-17),  with  six  ascents  each  during  the 
year.     Ascents  were  made  from  Goderich,  Ontario,  and  from  Calgary,  Alta. 
on  these  days  and  ten  instruments  were  recovered  from  the  former  place  ai 
seven  from  the  latter.    The  greatest  height  reached  in  the  Goderich  ascents  wi 
8-1  miles  on  the  17th  November,  when  a  temperature  of  68  F.  below  zero  wj 
recorded.     The  highest  ascent  at  Calgary  occurred  on  the  16th  November,  ai 
a  temperature  of  60  F.  below  zero  was  registered. 

Pilot  Balloons. — The   equipment   which  was   assembled   last  year   at  tl 
request  of  the  Royal  Canadian  i\.ir  Force  permitted  the  establishment  during  tl 
year  of  a  chain  of  stations  equipped  with  pilot  balloon  apparatus  for  the  detei 
ruination  of  the  upper  wind  currents.   Modern  meteorological  practice  has  shew 
that  a  knowledge  of  these  currents  is  of  great  assistance  in  the  preparation 
adequate  forecasts  for  aeroplane  services,  and  the  information  obtained  fr( 
a  chain  of  stations  of  this  kind  is  invaluable  in  making  plans  for  long  distanc 
flights.    In  view  of  the  approaching  visit  of  the  Airship  R.  100,  the  first  units 
the  chain  of  pilot  balloon  stations,  in  addition  to  Toronto,  have  been  establishec 
in  Eastern  Canada  and  Newfoundland  at  the  following  points:  St.  Hubert,  P.Q 
(Montreal)    Quebec,  P.Q.,  Father  Point,  P.Q.,  Fame  Point,  P.Q.,  Red  Head 
N.B.  (St.  John),  Rockville,  N.S.  (Yarmouth),  Chebucto  Head,  N.S.   (Halifax), 
Sable  Island,  N.S.,  St.  Paul  Island,  N.S.,  Cape  Race,  Nfld.,  Belle  Isle,  Nfld. 

Observations  are  taken  each  morning  at  these  stations  of  the  wind  directioi 
and  velocity  at  various  levels  up  to  the  base  of  the  clouds,  or  as  high  as  thi 
balloon  can  be  seen,  of  the  clouds  and  cloud  altitude,'  and  of  the  visibility  an( 
general  weather  conditions.     The  results  of  these  observations  are  telegraphec 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER 


53 


to  the  Toronto'  office  in  code  and  arc  used  in  the  preparation  of  a  special  chart 
of  upper  air  conditions.  The  reports  from  selected  stations  are  forwarded  to  the 
United  States  Weather  Bureau  at  Washington,  and  in  exchange  reports  are 
received  at  Toronto  from  a  number  of  pilot  balloon  stations  in  the  Eastern 
United  States. 

At  Toronto  balloons  were  sent  up  on  56  days  for  the  determination  of  low 
cloud  heights  only  and  on  210  days  for  the  direction  and  velocity  of  the  wind  as 
well.  The  longest  flight  in  Toronto  during  the  past  eight  years  was  obtained 
on  May  8,  when  the  balloon  was  sighted  in  the  theodolite  for  105  minutes,  from 
which  the  height  was  determined  as  10-6  miles.  The  greatest  wind  velocity 
recorded  was  66  miles  per  hour  at  10,000  feet  on  March  26,  1929. 

Sea  Water  Temperatures. — Thermographs  have  been  maintained  on  the 
routes  Vancouver  to  Hong  Kong,  Vancouver  to  Australia  and  Montreal  or  Hali- 
fax to  Bermuda  and  the  West  Indies  throughout  the  year.  A  study  was  made  of 
the  boundary  of  the  warm  water  of  the  Japanese  current  and  of  the  position  of 
the  coldest  water  occurring  along  the  steamer  lanes  in  the  North  Pacific.  It  was 
found  that  in  summer  the  warm  water  extended  much  farther  to  the  northeast 
than  in  winter  and  the  line  of  minimum  temperature  is  south  of  the  Aleutian 
islands  at  a  very  considerable  distance  from  the  line  of  transition.  In  winter 
this  distance  is  very  much  less  showing  that  the  transition  from  the  warm  to  the 
cold  water  is  then  much  more  abrupt.  Another  interesting  feature  is  that  the 
line  of  minimum  temperature  lies  East  and  West  for  the  greater  part  of  the  year 
where  it  might  have  been  expected  to  lie  north  and  south. 

Earth  Temperatures. — Daily  readings  to  0-01  F  of  platinium  thermometers 
at  eight  depths  were  taken  throughout  the  year.  The  minimum  and  maximum 
temperatures  with  the  dates  on  which  they  occurred  and  the  range  at  each  depth 
are  given  in  the  table. 

EARTH  TEMPERATURES— TORONTO 




Highest 

Date 

Lowest 

Date 

Amplitude 

Surface 

81° 
70° 
71° 
70° 
67° 
59° 
57° 
49° 

June    30,   1928 

July    29,   1928 

July    29,   1928 

Aug.     1,   1928 

Aug.    13,   1928 

Sept.    4,   1928 

Sept.  28,   1928 

Nov.  22,   1928 

22° 
25° 
30° 
37° 
38° 
38° 
42° 
43° 

Feb.    25,   1929 

Feb.    25,   1929 

Feb.    28,  1929 

Mar.   13,   1929 

Mar.   26,   1929 

April    6,   1928 

April  14,   1928 

May    30,   1928 

59° 

4" 

45° 

10" 

41° 

20" 

33° 

40" 

29° 

66" 

21° 

9" 

15° 

15" 

6°' 

in 


Evaporation. — The  amount  of  water  evaporated  from  a  free  water  surface 
i*  a  tank  about  six  feet  square  and  three  feet  deep  sunk  in  the  ground  has  been 
measured  daily  during  the  growing  season  in  Toronto  and  Winnipg.  The 
amount  of  water  evaporated  per  month  is  given  below. 


Month 

Toronto 

Winnipeg 

April 

inches 

1-06  (15  days) 

2-91 

305 

3-60 

2-59 

2-23 

1  -22 
0-32  (10  days) 

inches 

May 

411 

June 

2-72" 

July 

2-64 

August 

3-18 

September 

2-47 

October 

0-73  (16  days)- 

November 

Total 

16-98 

15-85 

54  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

Solar  Radiation. — The  amount  of  heat  received  from  the  sun  was  measured 
by  an  Augstorm  Pyrlehiometer  about  noon  on  all  days  that  were  sufficiently  free 
from  cloud  and  thick  haze  to  permit  of  observation.  There  were  only  fifty- 
six  occasions  when  observations  were  possible  between  the  hours  of  11  a.m.  and 
1  p.m.  The  greatest  amount  of  heat  received  on  a  square  centimetre  (-16  sq. 
inch)  perpendicular  to  the  sun's  rays  was  1-473  gramme  calories  per  minute,  as 
against  1-437  in  1927  and  1-453  in  1926. 

Wind  Equipment. — The  new  anemographs  which  have  been  under  con- 
struction for  some  time  were  completed  during  the  year  and  are  now  being 
issued.  They  are  giving  very  satisfactory  results.  Two  dry  cells  are  sufficient 
to  operate  them  for  three  or  four  months  at  least,  and  thus  the  upkeep  of  the 
instruments  will  be  less  than  the  express  charges  on  the  battery  recharges  of  the 
previous  instruments.  Several  improvements  have  been  made  in  the  mechanism 
of  the  combined  anemometer  and  wind  vane  and  a  new  supply  of  these  instru- 
ments is  now  being  manufactured.  The  method  of  mounting  the  instrument  on 
the  towers  has  also  been  improved  and  standardized. 

TERRESTRIAL   MAGNETISM 

Both  the  Agincourt  and  Meanook  Magnetic  Observatories  were  maintained 
in  operation  throughout  the  fiscal  year  with  no  material  loss  of  record.  Some 
small  interruptions  occurred  in  the  continuous  photographic  records  due  to 
mechanical  trouble  and  also  while  scale  values  were  being  redetermined.  A  new 
master  time  clock  of  non-magnetic  materials  was  constructed  in  our  workshop 
and  installed  in  the  Agincourt  observatory  in  place  of  the  former  one  which  had 
broken  down  through  long  service. 

Large  magnetic  disturbances  were  of  frequent  occurrence  during  the  year. 
The  most  important  ones  were  recorded  on  May  10  to  14,  27  to  29;  June  12,  13, 
22,  and  23;  July  7  to  11,  22  to  24;  August  5,  7,  12,  26  and  27;  September  7,  8,  10, 
11,  19,  and  25;  October  2,  5,  7,  18,  22,  24,  25  and  27;  November  2,  3,  10,  13,  16 
and  17;  December  6  and  12;  January  9;  February  9,  10,  17  to  19,  27  and  28; 
March  8,  12,  13,  15  to  17,  21  and  22. 

At  Agincourt  the  range  in  declination  during  disturbance  was  from  2  to  3 
with  a  maximum  variation  of  3-25  being  recorded  in  the  July  8,  storm.  A1 
Meanook  the  declination  range  usually  exceeded  3  and  during  the  July  8,  stor: 
reached  3-50.  The  range  of  disturbance  in  the  horizontal  force  at  Agincourt 
also  reached  a  maximum  on  July  8,  when  the  variation  reached  1,019  gammas 
and  also  in  Vertical  Force  when  the  variation  was  842  gammas.  At  Meanook 
the  range  in  Horizontal  Force  was  greatly  in  excess  of  that  at  Agincourt  being 
greater  than  1,500  gammas  in  the  May,  July,  February  and  March  storms. 

The  regular  program  of  absolute  observationis  was  made  as  usual  at  both 
observatories  and  the  reductions  and  computations  made  in  the  office  at  Toronto. 

The  magnetic  report  for  1923  wias  issued  and  the  1924  report  is  in  the 
printers  hands.     Work  on  the  1925  report  is  progressing. 

Magnetic  character  tables  for  1928  were  prepared  and  forwarded  to  the 
International  Commission  on  Terrestrial  Magnetism  at  De  Bilt.  Index 
corrections  were  determined  for  (41)  forty-one  surveyors'  theodolite  compasses 
at  the  request  of  the  Surveyor  General  and  results  forwarded  to  him  at  Ottawa. 

Assistance  was  given  to  members  of  the  staff  of  the  Dominion  Observatory 
in  standardizing  their  instruments  for  use  in  field  work,  and  the  photographic 
records  were  made  available  to  the  Dominion  Observatory  and  the  Topographi- 
cal Survey's  branch  for  use  in  reducing  their  field  results  to  selected  epoch. 

Special  reports  on  magnetic  disturbances  are  being  prepared  for  Com- 
mander Edwards  in  order  to  make  a  study  of  correlation  with  Radio  reception. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER 


55 


The  accompanying  tables  summarize  the  results  at  Agincourt  and  Meanook 
or  the  fiscal  year  1928-29. 


UMMARY  OF  RESULTS  OF  MAGNETIC  OBSERVATIONS  AT  AGINCOURT  FOR  THE 

FISCAL  YEAR  1928-29 


Month 


Mean  Monthly  Values 


D.  West 


II 


1928 


pril 

!-ay 

;ine 

f£v 

jugust 

ioptember. 

ctober 

fovember. 

>ecember. 


1929 


muary . . 
ebruary. 
i  arch.... 


19-9 
19-3 
19-4 
20-4 
20-7 
21-1 
220 
22-1 
220 


22-4 
22-9 
23-7 


15,647 
15,641 
15,639 
15,620 
15,615 
15,611 
15,602 
15,606 
15,612 


15,614 
15,602 
15,586 


57,335 
57,315 
57,314 
57,313 
57,296 
57,291 
57,296 
57,289 
57,267 


57,270 
57,272 
57,262 


74 


450 


45-0 
45-7 
46-4 


AGINCOURT  DAILY  AND  MONTHLY  RANGES 


D 

H 

Z 

Month 

Mean  Daily 
Range 

Abso- 
lute 
Month- 
ly 
Range 

Mean  Daily 
Range 

Abso- 
lute 
Month- 
ly 
Range 

Mean  Daily 
Range 

Abso- 
lute 
Month- 
ly 
Range 

From 
Hour 
Read- 
ings 

From 
Max. 
and 
Min. 

From 
Hour 
Read- 
ings 

From 
Max. 

and 
Min. 

From 
Hour 
Read- 
ings 

From 
Max. 
and 
Min. 

1928 
tpril 

140 
12-0 
14-0 
14-9 
17-8 
13-4 
10-6 
6-2 
6-4 

7-5 

80 

11-3 

18-9 
28-6 
22-9 
32-5 
27-2 
23-8 
23-3 
15-7 
12-4 

10-8 
25-1 
30-9 

o           / 

1  7-0 

2  16-0 

0  52-0 

3  250 
2    9-6 

1  4-9 

1  57-8 
0  39-9 
0  45-6 

0  33-8 

2  44-5 
2  57-5 

7 

55 
76 
48 
61 
61 
60 
48 
30 
30 

32 
48 
50 

7 

80 

144 

99 

140 

113 

98 

98 

63 

54 

49 
113 
106 

7 

167 
877 
301 
1,019 
448 
242 
331 
245 
153 

120 
730 
709 

7 

6 
24 
19 
22 
17 
14 
15 
10 

6 

3 
13 
21 

7 

16 
53 
40 
68 
43 
42 
42 
23 
13 

8 
36 
42 

7 
4#6 

lay 

une 

264 

uly 

842 

■*  •  •  ■ 

LUgUSt 

355 

i-eptember 

208 

)ctober 

378 

sovember 

127 

December 

92 

1929 
,anuary 

66 

February 

346 

Ilarch 

347 

56 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 
MEANOOK  DAILY  AND  MONTHLY  RANGES 


D 

H 

Month 

Mean  Daily 
Range 

Abso- 
lute 
Monthly 
Range 

Mean  Daily 
Range 

Abso- 
lute 
Monthly 
Range 

From 

Hour 

Readings 

From 

Max. 

and  Min. 

From 

Hour 

Readings 

From 

Max. 

and  Min. 

1928 

15-4 
16-7 
17-6 
17-5 
18-3 
14-2 
12-0 
9-8 
5-5 

6-4 

8-9 

11-4 

27-9 
52-7 
39-2 
47-0 
43-2 
39-4 
49-2 
41-6 
28-1 

18-6 
45-7 
55-8 

o                    / 

1  42-4 
3      30-7 

2  16-8 

3  49-7 
3      21-5 

2  41-5 

3  20-1 
2      51-7 

2  571 

0      58-5 

3  41-0 
3      43-6 

7 

43 

131 

124 

128 

74 

73 

79 

93 

56 

29 
108 
127 

7 

148 
383 
311 
357 
267 
272 
332 
276 
165 

116 
282 
373 

7 
812 

1,590 

1,286 

1,697 

1,341 

1,083 

1,139 

1,053 

918 

1929 
January 

807 
1,663 

March..  .            

1,530 

SUMMARY  OF  RESULTS 

OF  MAGNETIC  OBSE 
THE  FISCAL  ^ 

:rvations 

fEAR  1928-1 

3  AT  MEANOOK,  ALBERTA,  FOR 
>9 

Month 

Monthly  Mean  Values 

D  East 

H 

Z 

I 

1928 

26    46-0 

48-3 
48-8 
47-9 
48-9 
48-8 
48-2 
48-0 
47-4 

48-6- 

47-7 

43-9 

7 

12,810 
12,794 
12,799 
12,784 
12,786 
12,782 
12,772 
12,784 
12,799 

12,798 
12,787 
12,777 

7 

59,796 
59, 679 
59,702 
59,624 
59,709 
59,665 
59,737 

o                / 

77    54-5 
540 
54-0 
53-9 
54-8 
54-5   ' 
55-9 

May 

July 

September 

October 

November 

59,744 

59,757 
59,790 
59,863 

54-fi 

54-7 

1929 
January 

February 

55-7 

March 

57-1   • 

ASTRONOMY 

Observations  were  made  on  one  hundred  and  eleven  days,  for  the  purpos( 
of  obtaining  correct  time  by  meridian  transits  of  stars,  with  the  3-inch  Troughtoi 
and  Sims  transit  telescope.  Positions  of  stars  used  were  taken  from  the  Britisl 
Nautical  Almanac  or  the  American  Ephemeris. 

Instrumental  constants  were  redetermined  by  observation  with  selected  star;! 
and  least  square  solution  of  the  resultant  equations  at  least  once  a  month. 

Time  signals  are  telegraphed  to  Agincourt  once  a  week  for  the  purpose  o 
controlling  errors  and  rates  of  the  clocks  and  chronometers.  Each  week  day  a 
11.55  a.m.  a  time  signal  is  transmitted  over  the  fire  alarm  system  for  the  citj 
of  Toronto.  Time  is  also  given  out  over  the  telephone  to  watch  makerej 
jewellers  and  an  increasing  number  of  the  general  public. 

Time  exchanges  were  made  once  a  month  with  Quebec,  St.  John,  N.B.,  and 
McGill  Observatories.  The  results  of  these  exchanges  show  an  average  differ 
ence  of  less  than  half  a  second. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER 


57 


Observations  of  sun-spots  with  the  6-inch  equatorial  were  made  on  155 
days  and  on  only  one  occasion,  November  24,  was  the  sun  free  of  spots.  The 
mean  relative  numbers  for  the  months  of  the  civil  year  1928  as  deduced  from 
these  observations  were  as  follows:  January,  96-7;  February,  94-4;  March, 
84-0;  April,  81-1;  May  99-3;  June  95-2;  July,  109-2;  August,  105-1;  September, 
100-8;  October,  67-2;  November  58-2;  December  74-9;  yearly  mean  87-2,  an 
increase  of  13-7  over  the  year  1927.  Towards  the  end  of  the  year  there  was  a 
decided  reduction  in  the  number  of  spots  and  the  maximum  of  this  cycle  is  quite 
evidently  past. 

A  large  number  of  visitors  were  privileged  to  view  the  heavens  through  the 
equatorial  telescope. 

SEISMOLOGY 

The  Milne  Shaw  seismographs  have  been  kept  in  successful  operation 
throughout  the  year  with  very  little  loss  of  record.  The  electric  shutter  on  the 
N  &  S  component  was  troublesome  at  times,  but  is  now  working  satisfactorily. 

The  total  number  of  earthquakes  recorded  during  the  year  was  259  which 
is  23  less  than  last  year.     They  were  distributed  as  follows: — 


April 

May 

June 

July 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Jan. 

Feb. 

Mar. 

25 

27 

29 

22 

17 

24 

20 

22 

21 

17 

15 

20 

Sixteen  of  these  would  rank  as  very  large,  the  approximate  location  of 
the  epicentres  being: — 

April    9— Lat.  13°  S.  69°  W Colombia. 

April  13—         13°  N.  95°  W S.W.  Coast  of  Mexico. 

April  14 —  Bulgaria. 

April  17—         16°  N.95°-5W Off  S.  W.  Coast  of  Mexico. 

April  18 —  (Disastrous) Bulgaria. 

April  27 —          Violent,  reported  from  Peru. 

May   14—  5-4°  S.  78-5°  W Northern  Peru. 

May  27 —         Sea  of  Japan. 

June   17—  14°  N.  96°  W Off  S.W.  Coast  of  Mexico. 

June  21—  60°  N.  151°  W Alaska. 

July   18—  6°-5S.  79-5°  W 

Aug.    4—  14°  N.  98°  W S.W.  Coast  of  Mexico. 

Oct.    9—  15°N.97°W 

Dec.   1—  35°  S.  74°  W Off  Coast  Southern  Chili. 

Jan.   24—  12°  N.  90°  W Coast  of  Honduras. 

Mar.    7—  51°  N .  170°  W East  of  the  Aleutian  Islands. 


In  connection  with  the  very  large  earthquake  of  December  1,  the  British 
ship  Magdala  in  latitude  35°  35'  south  and  longitude  72°  54'  W.  experienced 
three  heavy  shocks  from  the  earthquake  in  70  to  100  fathoms  of  water. 

A  marked  feature  of  the  year  was  the  destructive  earthquakes  in  south- 
east Europe  on  April  14,  18  and  on  the  22nd,  when  Corinth  was  destroyed.  The 
earthquake  of  June  17  was  about  as  large  a  disturbance  as  we  ever  recorded. 

We  continue  to  issue  the  monthly  bulletins  for  Toronto  and  Victoria,  B.C., 
giving  measurements  of  the  most  important  phases  of  the  records.  These  are 
forwarded  to  a  number  of  seismological  stations  throughout  the  world.  There 
has  been  a  marked  increase  in  the  requests  for  these  bulletins  during  the  year. 
They  afford  material  in  conjunction  with  the  records  of  various  stations  through- 
out the  world  for  the  study  of  the  speed  of  the  different  waves,  and  a  better 
comprehension  of  the  material  which  composes  the  earth.  Bromide  copies  of 
records  are  often  sent  by  request  to  various  stations  and  in  some  instances  the 
originals  are  loaned.  We  continue  to  supply  information  to  public  and  press 
regarding  the  distance  and  location  of  large  earthquakes,  shortly  after  the  records 
are  developed. 


58  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

APPENDIX    A 

The  Director  of  the  Quebec  Observatory  reports  as  follows: — 

The  duties  performed  at  this  observatory  have  been  the  same  as  in  former 

years. 

Besides  the  usual  meteorological  observations  which  were  recorded  without 
interruption,  statements  and  extracts  from  the  records  of  this  station  were  pre- 
pared and  given  to  transportation  companies  carrying  perishable  goods  and  also 
to  insurance  companies  with  respect  to  accidents  in  the  city. 

Inquiries  respecting  the  weather  conditions  were  very  numerous  and  special 
reports  were  also  furnished  to  the  public  through  the  newspapers  and  otherwise. 

The  correct  time,  which  was  obtained  from  observations  of  stars  and  of  the 
sun,  was  given  by  means  of  the  noon-gun,  the  telephone,  and  during  the  season 
of  navigation,  by  means  of  the  time-ball. 

In  the  month  of  June  last,  in  compliance  with  your  instructions,  I  have 
given  to  the  wireless  operators  for  stations  in  Hudson's  Straits  the  necessary 
instructions  in  taking  the  meteorological  observations. 

APPENDIX    B 

The  Director  of  the  St.  John,  N.B.,  Observatory  reports  as  follows: — 

The  regular  meteorological  observations  have  been  taken  at  9  a.m.,  3  p.m. 
and  9  p.m.  Atlantic  standard  time.  The  morning  and  evening  readings  were 
coded  and  telegraphed  to  Toronto.  Hourly  abstracts  from  the  recording  instru- 
ments have  been  made,  means  computed  and  copies  forwarded  to  Central  Office. 
The  monthly  returns  from  all  observers  in  the  Maritime  Provinces  were  checked 
and  recorded  for  future  reference. 

The  weather  bulletin  with  tabulated  readings  and  weather  forecasts  have 
been  issued  daily,  prominently  displayed  for  public  use,  mailed  to  those  inter- 
ested and  also  published  in  the  daily  press. 

Broadcasting  of  the  weather  forecasts  from  station  CFBO,  Saint  John, 
890  kilocycles,  has  been  carried  on  successfully  during  the  year.  Fore- 
casts were  put  on  the  air  at  6  a.m.,  8  a.m.,  and  noon.  The  6  a.m.  forecasts  have 
recently  been  inaugurated  and  the  noon  forecasts  discontinued.  There  have 
been  many  requests  for  a  continuation  of  the  noon  forecasts. 

Storm  warnings  have  been  displayed  on  the  signal  mast  of  the  Custom 
House  and  at  Point  Lepreaux,  N.B.,  on  receipt  of  telegrams  from  Central  Office. 

Inauguration  of  the  experimental  air  mail  service  during  January,  February 
and  March  between  Saint  John  and  Montreal  and  Saint  John  and  Halifax  indi- 
cated the  practicability  of  the  experiment.  Special  officers  were  appointed  al 
various  ground  stations  on  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  and  in  Nova  Scotia. 
The  method  of  telegraphic  communication  in  this  class  of  work  leaves  much  to 
be  desired  and  direct  communication  from  the  ground  stations  to  the  observa- 
tory, and  vice  versa,  by  telephone  or  radio  telephone  would  greatly  facilitai 
the  forwarding  of  weather  conditions. 

Numerous  telephone  calls  for  correct  time,  weather  forecasts,  meteorological 
observations  for  engineers,  railway  companies,  electric  power  commission,  etc., 
have  been  cheerfully  furnished. 

Maritime  Province  Time  Service. — Sidereal  observations  have  been  made  as 
frequently  as  possible  on  available  clear  nights  with  the  Troughton  and  Simms 
meridian  transit  for  the  establishment  of  clock  rates. 

Comparisons  of  the  mean  time  transmitting  clock  and  the  Riefler  sidereal 
clock  were  made  daily  at  9  a.m. 

The  mean  time  transmitting  clock  was  cleaned  and  adjusted  and  is  giving 
excellent  service.  The  daily  time  signals,  which  reach  most  of  the  important 
centres  in  the  Maritime  Provinces,  have  been  automatically  transmitted  from 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  59 

he  mean  time  clock  through  connection  with  the  lines  of  the  Canadian  Pacific 
jlailway  and  the  Western  Union  Telegraph  Company.  The  signals  are  also 
';ent  over  the  lines  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  to  Chebucto  Head  for 
broadcasting. 

The  synchronizing  of  the  local  clocks  and  the  dropping  of  the  time  balls 
n  Halifax  and  Saint  John  have  been  operated  as  previously  reported  and  the 
master  clock  in  Halifax,  synchronized  by  wire  from  Saint  John,  serves  the  pur- 
pose of  automatically  dropping  the  time  ball  and  sends  an  hourly  signal  for 
Electrically  correcting  clocks  in  Halifax. 

The  interchange  of  clock  signals  with  the  Toronto  Observatory  have  been 
,nade  on  nine  occasions  during  the  year. 

APPENDIX    C 

The  Director  of  the  Gonzales  Heights  Observatory,  Victoria,  reports  as 
'ollows: — 

During  the  past  year  the  regular  meteorological  and  seismological  observa- 
tions have  been  taken  here,  and  daily  weather  forecasts  issued  for  the  following 
districts:  Vancouver  island,  the  Lower  mainland,  Kamloops,  Okanagan  and 
Kootenay. 

Storm  warnings  are  issued  from  here  and  signals  displayed  at  Victoria, 
Vancouver  and  Nanaimo,  and  recently  Esquimalt  has  been  equipped  so  that  the 
dgnals  are  displayed  from  the  Bickford  tower  where  they  are  well  seen  from 
:he  Naval  base,  all  shipping,  and  the  new  dry  dock. 

Special  wind  and  weather  forecasts  are  issued  daily  through  the  Dominion 

Radio  Station,  at  9.30  a.m.  for  the  benefit  of  small  craft  and  towing  interests 

on  the  straits  of  Fuca  and  Georgia,  and  at  10  p.m.  a  summary  of  the  weather 

nd  a  general  forecast  of  the  wind,  etc.,  is  broadcasted  through  the  above  station 

o  shipping  on  the  coast  extending  from  Alaska  to  Vancouver  island. 

During  the  summer  months  special  weather  forecasts  and  humidity  data 
received  from  various  parts  of  the  province  are  furnished  the  Provincial  Forestry 
Department,  and  similar  information  is  broadcasted  each  night  from  the  Victoria 
]Radio  Station  CFCT.  In  advance  of  probable  dangerous  forest  fire  conditions 
idue  to  approaching  abnormally  dry  spells,  special  telegrams  have  been  sent  to 
;the  Dominion  Forest  Inspector  at  Kamloops  who  is  in  charge  of  the  Railway 
Forest  Belt  in  British  Columbia  and  the  Press  is  also  notified  of  these  dangerous 
conditions. 

Time  Service. — The  clocks  and  chronometers  have  given  good  service  as  to 
rates,  errors  and  electric  time  keeping  on  the  three  seismographs  situated  in  the 
basement.  The  time  gun  at  Military  Headquarters  has  been  fired  regularly  by 
signal  from  here  both  Noon  and  at  9.30  p.m.  and  the  time  ball  on  the  high  city 
building  has  been  dropped  daily  at  1  p.m.  The  correct  time  is  also  sent  out 
daily  at  10  a.m.  and  7  p.m.  on  our  automatic  radio  time  sender  in  connection 
with  the  Gonzales  Radio  Station  and  the  larger  station  at  Estevan. 

Seismology. — The  two  Milne-Shaw  seismographs  have  been  in  continuous 
operation  and  have  recorded  a  large  number  of  important  earthquakes.  When 
[these  occur  certain  details  of  our  records  are  wired  promptly  to  Science  Service, 
Washington,  to  assist  in  locating  the  position  of  these  quakes  shortly  after  they 
have  occurred.  The  Vertical  Seismograph  has  also  been  in  constant  operation, 
but  not  being  so  sensitive  as  the  horizontal  type  fewer  earthquakes  are  recorded 
lupon  it.  The  daily  slow  movements  of  the  original  N-S  and  E-W  horizontal 
pendulums  have  been  observed,  and  these  still  show  a  marked  tilting  of  this 
coast  and  apparently  towards  the  southeast. 

Inspections. — During  the  past  year  I  have  inspected  certain  stations  on  this 
lisland,  including  Duncan  and  Nanaimo,  and  on  the  mainland,  New  Westminster; 


60 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 


at  Steveston  a  new  anemograph  was  installed,  a  new  temperature  and  precipita- 
tion station  started  at  White  Rock,  and  other  stations  inspected  were  Kamloops, 
Tranquille,  Golden  and  Invermere,  and  the  University  of  British  Columbia  at 

Vancouver.  .  .»,,.... 

Several  addresses  have  been  given  on  the  work  of  this  institution,  and  a 
meeting  of  the  Royal  Astronomical  Society  of  Canada  was  held  at  the  observa- 
tory. 

In  March  I  had  the  honour  of  addressing  the  Western  Forestry  Association 
meeting  at  Seattle  on  long  range  weather  forecasts,  which  was  very  favourably 
received. 

The  work  of  this  institution  is  increasing  considerably,  and  particularly 
one's  correspondence  and  the  steady  growth  of  visitors  who  come  not  through 
idle  curiosity  but  for  instruction  which  appears  to  be  greatly  appreciated. 


REPORT  OF  L.  A.  DEMERS,  DOMINION  WRECK  COMMISSIONER 

Statement  of  Formal  Investigations  and  Preliminary  Inquiries  held  during  the 

Fiscal  Year  1928-29 


Name  of  Ship 

and 

Official  Number 


Port 
of 

Registry- 


Remarks 


Agga,  62280. 


Arran  Firth,  146262  . 


Bergen,  Norway.. 


Vancouver,  B.C. 


Barrie,  151045 

and 
Hansa,  71584 


Canadian  Mariner, 
141861 


Montreal,  P.Q... 
Bergen,  Norway 

Montreal,  P.Q. .. 


Clearwater,  147798. 


Middlesborough, 
Eng. 


On  June  16,  1928,  stranded  near  Bellmouth  curve,  river  St.  Law- 
rence. Formal  investigation  was  held  at  Montreal,  on  July 
17,  before  Capt.  L.  A.  Demers,  F.R.A.S.,  Dominion  Wreck 
Commissioner,  assisted  by  Capt.  C.  Lapierre  and  Capt 
J.  P.  Dufour,  acting  as  nautical  assessors.  Finding:  Master 
and  second  officer  exonerated  from  blame.  Pilot  Louis 
Phillip  Daigle  in  default;  fined  $400. 

On  November  20,  1928,  stranded  on  the  south  end  of  Texad 
island,  B.C.  Formal  investigation  was  held  at  Vancouv 
on  December  19  and  20,  before  Capt.  J.  D.  Macphersoi 
Deputy  to  the  Dominion  Wreck  Commissioner,  assisted  b; 
Capt.  S.  Vint  and  Capt.  R.  Archibald,  acting  as  nautica 
assessors.  Finding:  The  Court  finds  the  primary  cause  fori 
stranding  due  to  an  abnormal  current  setting  the  vessel  to 
the  Northward  of  her  course.  The  Master,  Eugene  McMul- 
len,  was  not  in  default  and  his  certificate  No.  4533  is  re- 
turned. Certificate  No.  3122  is  also  returned  to  Samuel 
Hall  Bilton,  Mate  (in  charge  at  time  of  casualty),  with  ai 
severe  censure  and  a  warning  to  be  more  careful  in  future. 

On  June  26,  1928,  collided  in  Soulanges  canal.  Formal  investiga- 
tion was  held  at  Montreal  on  October  17  and  18,  before 
Capt.  Demers,  assisted  by  Capt.  C.  Lapierre  and  Capt.  L. 
Beaupre  acting  as  nautical  assessors.  Finding:  Hansa  alone 
to  blame.  Master,  Capt.  Erling  Netteland  over-confident, 
hence  in  default  only  through  error  of  judgment.  Master  of 
Barrie,  Roy  Anderson,  is  exonerated,  also  his  officers. 

On  August  18,  1928,  stranded  near  Red  Island  Bank,  River  St. 
Lawrence.  Formal  investigation  was  held  at  Montreal  on 
October  22  and  23,  before  Capt.  Demers,  assisted  by  Capt. 
C.  Lapierre,  and  Capt.  N.  Martorell,  acting  as  nautical 
assessors.  Finding:  Master  in  default,  error  of  judgment 
being  apparent.  Having  clean  record,  his  certificate  is  not 
dealt  with,  but  he  is  reprimanded,  cautioned  and  ordered 'i 
to  pay  $100  towards  cost  of  investigation.  Pilot  Armand 
Lachance  in  default.  His  license  is  not  dealt  with,  his  re- 
cord being  good,  but  he  is  fined  $100. 

On  May  20,  1928,  stranded  10  miles  east  of  Pointe  des  Monts, 
Lower  river  St.  Lawrence.  Formal  investigation  was  held 
at  Montreal  on  June  1  before  Capt.  Demers,  assisted  byj 
Capt.  Martorell  and  Capt.  Sprague,  acting  as  nautical  asses- 
sors. Finding:  The  Court  finds  Master,  George  H.  David- 
son not  to  blame  for  stranding;  but  he  is  severely  repri- 
manded for  permitting  faulty  look-out.  1st  Mate,  Charles 
N.  Tattersall,  in  default  for  indifferent  look-out,  his  certifi- 
cate suspended  for  6  months;  2nd  Mate's  certificate  granted 
in  interim. 


2 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER 


61 


'Statement  of  Formal  Investigations  and  Preliminary  Inquiries  held  during  the 
Fiscal  Year  1928-29—  Continued 


Name  of  Ship 

and 

Official  Number 


Port 

of 

Registry 


Remarks 


Canctco,  141478. 


Montreal,  P.Q. 


City  of  Montreal, 
66734. 


Cairntorr,  145508... 


Toronto,  Ont. 


Newcastle,  Eng. 


Deepwater,  147797 


Middlesborough , 
Eng. 


Elfstone,  147708 
:  and 

!  Chicago  Tribune, 
146589. 


Gallier,  125. 


London,  Eng.. . 
Montreal,  P.Q. 


Antwerp. 


Huronic,  107168. 


Collingwood,  Ont. 


i  Laurentic,,  149642 

and 
1  Artena,  63513 


L 'Orient,  53081. 


Liverpool,  Eng. 
Genoa,  Italy. 

Nantes,  France 


On  May  16,  1928,  stranded  near  Fox  Point,  Lake  Michigan. 
Formal  investigation  was  held  at  Collingwood  on  May  29, 
before  Capt.  Demers,  assisted  by  Capt.  Bassett  and  Capt. 
Playter,  acting  as  nautical  assessors.  Finding  Master  in 
default,  through  seeming  indifference  to  responsibilities, 
in  keeping  watch  in  the  wheelhouse  instead  of  on  bridge. 
Certificate  is  not  suspended  due  to  plea  made  by  Company's 
counsel,  but  he  is  ordered  to  pay  costs  of  investigation. 

On  August  12,  1928,  stranded  near  Doran's  Island,  Upper  river 
St.  Lawrence.  Formal  investigation  was  held  at  Montreal 
on  September  7,  before  Capt.  Demers,  assisted  by  Capt. 
C.  Lapierre  and  Capt.  A.  Bouvier,  acting  as  nautical  asses- 
sors. Finding:  Second  Mate,  Jules  Traversy,  in  default  for 
indifferent  navigation,  and  over-confidence;  his  certificate 
suspended  for  balance  of  present  season.  Master  Neree 
Legault  exonerated  from  blame 

On  October  23,  1928,  stranded  abeam  of  Outer  Island,  Coacoacho 
bay,  West  of  Cape  Whittle,  gulf  of  St.  Lawrence.  Formal 
investigation  was  held  at  Montreal  on  November  2,  before 
Capt.  Demers,  assisted  by  Capt.  N.  Martorell  and  Capt.  J. 
McCalmont,  acting  as  nautical  assessors.  Finding:  Ship 
struck  an  uncharted  rock.  Court  finds  Captain  Thomas 
James  Baker  in  default  for  unwarranted  close  sailing.  Care- 
lessness also  apparent  in  loss  of  ship's  papers.  The  Captain's 
certificate  is  suspended  for  six  months.  First  Mate's  cer- 
tificate recommended  by  the  Court  in  interim. 

On  October  27,  1928,  stranded  on  or  near  Sugar  Loaf  Shoal, 
about  half  a  mile  west  of  Port  Colborne.  Formal  investiga- 
tion was  held  at  Montreal  on  November  10,  before  Capt. 
Demers,  assisted  by  Capt.  C.  Lapierre  and  Capt.  F.  Ouel- 
lette,  acting  as  nautical  assessors.  Finding:  Master  at  fault 
for  returning  to  sleep  on  making  Pt.  Colborne  harbour.  Cer- 
tificate suspended  until  end  of  year  1929.  Mate's  certificate 
granted  in  interim.  Second  Officer  failed  to  follow  instruc- 
tions given  by  Master;  certificate  suspended  until  July  1, 
1929. 

On  July  29,  1928,  collided  in  vicinity  of  Buoy  39  in  ship  channel 
of  Lake  St.  Louis.  Formal  investigation  was  held  at 
Montreal  on  August  2,  3  and  6.  before  Capt.  Demers,  as- 
sisted by  Capt.  Lapierre  and  Capt.  N.  Martorell,  acting  as 
nautical  assessors.  Finding:  Elfstone  was  not  navigated 
with  care  expected.  Officer  Carter  is  severely  reprimanded 
for  inefficiency.  Sailing  Master  Ernest  Chartier  in  default 
for  failing  to  sound  danger  signal,  license  suspended  for  1 
month.    Master  H.  Long  is  exonerated. 

On  September  18,  1928,  stranded  on  Anticosti  island,  west  of 
South  Point,  Shallop  creek.  Preliminary  inquiry  was  held 
at  Quebec  on  September  28,  by  Capt.  Demers.  Decision: 
Stranding  due  to  inset  which  drove  ship  inward,  hence 
accident  can  be  attributed  to  an  Act  of  God. 

On  August  6,  1928,  stranded  on  or  near  Lucille  island,  Lake 
Superior.  Formal  investigation  was  held  at  Port  Arthur 
on  August  24,  before  Capt  Demers,  assisted  by  Capt.  A. 
Livingston  and  Capt.  C.  B.  Kirk,  acting  as  nautical  asses- 
sors. Finding:  Master  T.  Selby  Patterson  in  default  for 
indifference;  his  certificate  No.  7830  is  suspended  for  3 
months.  First  Mate  H.  A.  McLellan  in  default  for  not 
taking  bearings,  and  failing  to  call  Master.  His  certificate 
is  suspended  for  3  months. 

On  August  4,  1928,  collided  in  Lake  St.  Peter.  Formal  investi- 
gation was  held  at  Montreal  on  August  10,  11,  28  and  Sep- 
tember 10,  before  Capt.  Demers,  assisted  by  Capt.  C. 
Lapierre  and  Capt  J.  Dufour,  acting  as  nautical  assessors. 
Finding:  Neither  Pilot  Angers  or  Pilot  Perron,  nor  the 
officers  of  the  Laurentic  are  to  blame.  Both  pilots  are  ex- 
onerated, likewise  the  Laurentic. 

On  June  20,  1928,  stranded  on  Janvrin  shoal  in  the  strait  of 
Canso.  Formal  investigation  was  held  at  Montreal  on  July 
10,  before  Capt.  Demers,  assisted  by  Capt.  Lapierre  and 
Capt.  Dufour,  acting  as  nautical  assessors.  Finding:  Court 
finds  that  Master  erred  grievously  in  judgment  caused  by 
first  experience  in  straits,  which  induced  nervousness.  A 
copy  of  Report  and  Judgment  sent  to  French  government. 


62 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 


Statement  of  Formal  Investigations  and  Preliminary  Inquiries  held  during  the 
Fiscal  Year  1928-29— Continued 


Name  of  Ship 

and 

Official  Number 


Lauzon,  126843 

and 
Le  Progres,  134138 


Quebec,  P.Q. 
Quebec,  P.Q. 


Manasao,  93932. 


Owen  Sound,  Ont.. 


Martian,  131057 

and 
Fortwildoc,  153114. 


Meaford,  151043. 


Michael   L.    Embiri- 
cos,  Greek. 


Monarch,  116668. 


Montrose,  145919 

and 
Rose  Castle,  137438. 


Port 

of 

Registry 


Port  Arthur,  Ont.. 
Fort  William,  Ont. 


Montreal,  P.Q. 


Andros,  Greece. 


Midland,  Ontario. 


Liverpool,  Eng. 
Montreal,  P.Q 


Remarks 


On  October  5,  1928,  collided  in  or  near  the  Harbour  of  Three  ' 
Rivers.  Formal  investigation  was  held  at  Three  Rivers  or 
March  26,  before  Capt.  Demers,  assisted  by  Capt.  Lapierre  a 
and  Capt.  Marchand,  acting  as  nautical  assessors.  Finding 
Camille  Biron,  Master,  in  default,  his  certificate  suspended 
for  3  months.  Hector  Duval,  Mate  of  the  Lauzon,  is  founc 
in  default  and  his  certificate  No.  2625  as  Master  of  a  Stean 
Ferryboat  is  suspended  for  the  season  of  Navigation  of  1929 
after  which  it  is  recommended  that  said  certificate  be  can 
celled  and  a  certificate  as  Master  of  a  Tugboat  be  grantee 
him  instead.     Donat  Lemay's  certificate  is  not  dealt  with 

On  September  15,  1928,  foundered  off  Griffiths  Island,  Georgiai 
bay,  sixteen  lives  were  lost.  Formal  investigation  was  hek 
at  Owen  Sound  on  October  3,  4  and  5,  before  Capt.  Demer 
assisted  by  Capt.  Waugh  and  Capt.  Nicoll,  acting  as  nau 
tical  assessors.  Finding:  Owners  exonerated  from  blame 
Loss  of  ship  and  lives  attributed  to  bad  stowage,  indiffer 
ence,  neglect  and  carelessness  on  part  of  those  in  charge 
Therefore  cancels  certificates  of  Master  John  Mackay 
No.  10730,  and  First  Mate  Osburn  Stephen  Long,  No.  11823 
who  are  found  in  default  and  who  have  proved  incompeten 
to  meet  responsibilities  incumbent  on  them. 

On  June  30,  1928,  collided  in  the  River  Kaministiqua,  off  th< 
C.P.R.  Coal  Dock.  Formal  investigation  was  held  a 
Toronto  on  July  27  and  28,  before  Capt.  Demers,  assisted  b; 
Capt.  J.  B.  Foote  and  Capt.  J.  Williams,  acting  as  nautici 
assessors.  Finding:  The  Court  finds  that  Fortwildoc 
solely  at  fault.  Master  not  in  default  for  situation  ove 
which  he  has  no  control,  but  Court  feels  a  reprimand,  ; 
rebuke  as  well  as  a  warning  is  in  order  for  having  a  speed  i: 
violation  of  regulations. 

On  July  8,  1928,  stranded  at  or  near  Cap  Magdeleine,  River  St 
Lawrence.  Formal  investigation  was  held  at  Quebec  o 
July  18th,  before  Capt.  Demers,  assisted  by  Capt.  C 
Lapierre  and  Capt.  A.  Landry,  acting  as  nautical  assessors 
Finding:  Pilot  F.  X.  Rivard  in  default  for  neglect  in  th 
performance  of  his  duties.  Having  regard  for  his  seventee 
years'  successful  service,  the  Court  suspends  his  license  fo 
12  months. 

On  July  17,  1928,  stranded  at  Point  A.  Pouliot,  2  miles  west 
Father  Point,  in  River  St.  Lawrence.     Formal  investig: 
tion  was  held  at  Montreal  on  July  19,  25,  and  August 
before  Capt.  Demers,  assisted  by  Capt.  N.  Martorell  arn 
Capt.  J.  McFadyen,  acting  as  nautical  assessors.     Finding 
Court  finds  August  Santerre,  Pilot,  in  default.     If  ordina 
common  sense  and  foresight  had  been  used  accident  woul 
not  have  occurred.     Pilot  is  also  in  default  for  desertin 
ship  after  stranding  occurred.     Owing  to  good  service,  an> 
extenuating  circumstances  which  are  apparent,  Court  doe 
not  exercise   severity,   but   suspends  his   certificate  for 
months,  and  he  stands  severely  reprimanded  and  warned. 

On  August  24,  1927,  foundered  off  Port  Dalhousie,  Lake  Ontaric 
Formal  investigation  was  held  at  Toronto  on  December  1 
and  13,  before  Capt.  Demers,  assisted  by  Capt.  John  Wi 
Hams  and  Capt.  John  Ewart,  acting  as  nautical  assesso: 
Finding:    The    Court   declares   and    finds   that: — 1st,   t 
Dredge   was  unseaworthy;  2nd,    that  the   tug   Gerald  h 
Russell  did  not  adopt  prudential  measures  in  the  task 
towing.     Captain  Crawford's  certificate  is  not  dealt  wit 
but  he  stands  severely  reprimanded.     The  Master  of  tl 
tug   Forothy  May   is  absolved   from   any   blame.     Unde: 
writers  were  ordered  to  pay  the  cost  of  the  investigation. 

On  July  27,  1928,  collided  in  River  St.  Lawrence,  in  neighbou 
hood  of  Gas  Buoy  39-C  on  Becancour  Traverse.  Form: 
investigation  was  held  at  Montreal  on  August  7,  8,  9,  14,  1 
and  16,  before  Capt.  Demers,  assisted  by  Capt.  J.  Mackii 
tosh  and  Capt.  N.  Martorell,  acting  as  nautical  assessor; 
Finding:  Court  finds,  1st,  Master  Luke  Holmes,  of  Rot 
Castle  justified  in  being  in  his  room  in  view  of  weatht 
conditions,  and  duties  to  be  discharged.  Therefore  Cap 
ain  Holmes  is  exonerated.  2nd,  Pilot  Ferdinand  Marchan 
had  navigated  ship  in  his  own  waters,  performed  in  extrem 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER 


63 


Statement  of  Formal  Investigations  and  Preliminary  Inquiries  held  during  the 
Fiscal  Year  1928-29—  Continued 


Name  of  Ship 

and 

Official  Number 


Port 

of 

Registry 


Remarks 


Montrose,  145919 

and 
Rose  Castle,  137438 


Liverpool,  Eng. 
Montreal,  P.Q. 


Newton  Beech, 

148139, 
Adour. 


Newcastle 

Oslo,  Norway 


Panaghis  M.  Hadou- 
lis,  I.G.K.R. 


Andros,  Greece. 


Queens  County. 


Robert  H.  Merrick, 
148183. 


Berten,  Norway. 


Vancouver,  B.C. 


Saskatoon,  84327. 


Montreal,  P.Q. 


Starmount,  145609. 


Montreal,  P.Q. 


and  rightly  hard-to-port  movement,  and  full  speed  astern. 
He  is  therefore,  not  in  default.  3rd,  Nothing  can  be  said 
for  or  against  Second  Officer  Evan  Owen,  of  the  Rose 
Castle."  Therefore  Rose  Castle  not  in  default  for  collision. 
For,  Captain  A.  H.  Notely  of  Montrose,  his  absence  from 
bridge  is  considered  permissible.  He  is  in  default  for  not 
offering  assistance.  His  certificate  is  suspended  for  a  period 
of  1  month,  Second  Officer  Thomas  Jones  is  warned  for  not 
advising  Master.  Montrose  solely  to  blame  for  collision. 
She  violated  articles  18,  25,  27,  28  and  29  of  Rules  of  the 
Road.  Pilot  Fortunat  Hamelin  is  found  in  default,  license 
suspended  for  remainder  of  season. 

On  July  16,  1928,  colided  whilst  Newton  Beech  was  anchored 
midway  between  Lower  Traverse  Lightship  and  Buoy  56, 
River  St.  Lawrence.  Formal  investigation  was  held  at 
Quebec  on  July  19  and  20,  before  Capt.  Demers,  assisted 
by  Capt.  C.  Lapierre  and  Capt.  A.  Landry,  acting  as  nauti- 
cal assessors.  Finding:  The  Court  exonerates  Master  of 
the  Newton  Beech,  C.  H.  Laing,  B.  of  T.  Certificate  023649, 
and  Second  Officer  MacKay  from  all  blame;  also  Master  of 
Adour,  Inghart  Danielsen  and  Second  Officer,  are  held 
blameless.  Pilot  Ernest  Gourdean,  is  held  in  default  for 
poor  judgment  in  attempting  to  cross  bow  of  vessel  whilst 
tide  of  2  or  3  knots  was  running.  His  license  is  suspended 
for  a  period  of  two  months. 

On  November  4,  1928,  stranded  near  South  Bank  of  White 
Island,  River  St.  Lawrence.  Formal  investigation  was 
held  at  Montreal  on  November  15,  before  Capt.  Demers, 
assisted  by  Capt.  Lapierre  and  Capt.  N.  Martorell,  acting 
as  nautical  assessors.  Finding:  The  Court  finds  Pilot  Alex. 
Larochelle  in  default  on  four  counts.  Due  to  his  excellent 
service  heretofore,  his  license  is  returned  to  him;  but  he  is 
ordered  to  pay  a  fine  of  $300.00.  The  Master  and  Officers 
being  strangers,  are  exonerated." 

On  August  18,  1928,  stranded  on  Cormorant  Rocks  of  Whitely 
Bay,  Gulf  of  St.  Lawrence.  Preliminary  inquiry  was  held 
at  Miontreal  on  September  7  and  10,  by  Capt.  Demers. 
Decision:  Master  in  default  for  indifferent  lookout  induced 
by  over  confidence.  First  Officer  erred,  in  not  carrying  out 
instructions,  and  not  exercising  necessary  vigil. 

On  November  25,  1928,  stranded  in  Esperanza  Inlet  West  Coast 
of  Vancouver  Island,  B.C.  Formal  investigation  was  held 
at  Vancouver  on  January  22  and  23,  before  Capt.  J.  D.  Mac- 
pherson,  assisted  by  Capt.  S.  Vint  and  Capt.  R.  Archibald, 
acting  as  nautical  assessors.  Finding:  The  Court  finds 
cause  of  stranding  due  to  wrongful  act  of  the  First  Mate, 
Kenneth  M.acleod,  and  finds  him  solely  in  default  and  sus- 
pends his  certificate  No.  11278  as  Mate  of  a  Passenger 
Steamship  in  the  Coasting  Trade  for  a  period  of  four  months 
from  date  of  casualty.  No  blame  attached  to  Master, 
Stewart  Noel,  who  was  asleep  at  time,  and  whose  orders  to 
be  called,  if  fog  set  in,  had  been  ignored  by  the  M!ate. 

On  May  10,  1928,  stranded  on  or  near  Rock  of  Ages  Reef,  Lake 
Superior.  Formal  investigation  was  held  at  Montreal  on 
June  8,  before  Capt.  Demers,  assisted  by  Capt.  Miller  and 
Capt.  Sears,  acting  as  nautical  assessors.  Finding:  The 
Court  finds  that  Master,  Frederick  Robinson  Irish,  Certi- 
ficate No.  7975,  failed  to  adopt  measures  of  caution,  through 
over-confidence.  His  certificate  is  returned  to  him,  but 
he  is  severely  reprimanded  and  warned.  He  is  ordered  to 
defray  full  costs  of  investigation. 

On  October  24,  1928,  stranded  near  or  at  Richelieu  Rapids, 
River  St.  Lawrence.  Formal  investigation  was  held  at 
M'ontreal  on  October  24,  before  Capt.  Demers,  assisted  by 
Capt.  C.  Lapierre  and  Capt.  N.  Martorell,  acting  as  nautical 
assessors.  Finding:  Court  finds  that  Pilot  Wilbrod  Ga,u- 
thier  failed  to  detect  range  lights  of  Lotbiniere,  his  presence 
of  mind  and  acumen  failing  him.  He  is  found  in  default, 
and  fined  $100.00.  Court  further  recommends  the  accept- 
ance of  his  resignation. 


64 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 


Statement  of  Formal  Investigations  and  Preliminary  Inquiries  held  during  the 
Fiscal  Year  1928-29— Continued 


Name  of  Ship 

and 

Official  Number 


Port 

of 

Registry- 


Remarks 


Swiftwater,  147749.. 


Blyth,  Eng. 


Seapool,  135891, 


West  Hartlepool, 
England. 


Stillwater,  147799. 


Middlesborough. 


Twickenham,  85658. 


London,  Eng. 


Thousand  Islander, 
141756. 


Montreal,  P.Q. 


Vesuvio  P.L.F.S. 

and 
Older  L.B.R.H. 


Greece,  Italy. . . . 
Bergen,  Norway 


On  May  10,  1928,  stranded  on  or  near  Sisters  Island,  River  St. 
Lawrence.  Formal  investigation  was  held  at  Montreal  on 
May  22,  before  Capt.  Demers,  assisted  by  Capt.  J.  K. 
McFayden  and  Capt.  J.  A.  Ouellette,  acting  as  nautical 
assessors.  Finding:  Court  finds  Master  justified  in  seeking 
rest,  after  lengthy  vigil,  and  leaving  ship  in  charge  of  certi- 
ficated officer.  His  certificate  is  returned  to  him.  First 
Officer  Earle  Gavey  Dolbel,  in  default  for  allowing  himself 
to  be  overwhelmed  by  sleep.  His  certificate  is  suspended 
for  balance  of  season  of  navigation. 

On  October  25,  1928,  stranded  off  Channel  Rocks,  in  Eastern 
Channel  of  Barkley  Sound.  Formal  investigation  was  held 
at  Victoria  on  November  9,  and  10,  before  Capt.  Macpher-- 
son,  assisted  by  Capt.  Vint  and  Capt.  Fleming,  acting  as 
nautical  assessors.  Finding:  The  Court  finds  stranding  was 
not  caused  by  any  wrongful  act  or  default  on  part  of  vessel'] 
Master,  Vivian  Forth,  2nd  Officer  Norman  Spouse,  or  Pilot 
Wm.  J.  Boyce.  The  evidence  of  H.  D.  Parizeau,  Chief 
Hydrographer,  of  the  Dominion  Government,  established 
beyond  doubt,  that  a  hitherto  unknown  and  uncharted 
obstruction  exists  some  few  cables  South  Magnetic  of 
Channel  Rocks  Gas  Buoy,  and  it  is  opinion  of  Court  that 
it  was  this  obstruction  Seapool  struck.  Certificates  of 
Master,  Officers  and  Pilot  are  returned  to  them. 

On  November  12,  1928,  stranded  on  South  Point  of  MelvilL 
Shoal,  Lake  Ontario.  Formal  investigation  was  held  al 
Montreal  on  December  4,  before  Capt.  Demers,  assisted  bj< 
Capt.  C.  Lapierre  and  Capt.  N.  Martorell,  acting  as  nautica' 
assessors.  Finding:  The  Court  finds  Captain  Waltei 
McBroom  in  default,  through  omission  of  prudential  mea 
sures.  His  services  having  been  dispensed  with  by  hi.<i 
employers,  his  certificate  is  not  dealt  with ;  but  he  is  orderec 
to  pay  $150.00  towards  cost  of  investigation. 

On  July  2,  1928,  stranded  in  the  Harbour  of  Sydney,  Capfj 
Breton.  Formal  investigation  was  held  at  Sydney,  N.S.i 
on  September  17,  before  Capt.  Demers,  assisted  by  Capt! 
O.  A.  Lewis  and  Capt.  I.  H.  Lewis,  acting  as  nautica ; 
assessors.  Finding:  Court  finds  Master  in  default  for  no 
showing  presence  of  mind  expected.  He  is  mulcted  part  oj 
costs  of  investigation.,  $200.00.  Pilot  William  D.  Morrison 
found  in  default.     License  suspended  for  balance  of  season.  • 

On  November  21.  1928,  foundered  in  Lake  Hiron  whilst  ei 
route  from  Sarnia  to  Midland  in  tow  of  S.S.  Collingwooa- 
Formal  investigation  was  held  at  Toronto  on  January  31 
and  February  1,  before  Capt.  Demers,  assisted  by  Capt 
J.  B.  Foote  and  Capt.  John  Williams,  acting  as  nautica 
assessors.  Finding:  The  Court  finds  no  indications  c 
carelessness,  or  malicious  intent  in  behaviour  of  Master  o 
Officers  of  either  vessels;  but  an  error  of  judgment  was  coir 
mitted  on  the  part  of  Captain  G.  W.  Pearson.  Captai 
H.  J.  Clarke,  of  the  Thousand  Islander  has  not  shown  himse 
to  have  been  possessed  of  any  resourcefulness  such  a 
expected  from  a  shipmaster.  The  certificates  of  eithe 
Master  are  not  dealt  with.  Their  respective  behayioi 
and  actions  not  being  praiseworthy  they  are  cautione 
to  exercise  better  judgment  and  advised  to  acquire  moil 
initiative. 

On  September  20,  1928,  collided  in  Port  of  Montreal,  in  tbj 
vicinity  of  Laurier  Pier.     Formal  investigation  was  held  t 
Montreal  on  September  25,  26  and  27,  before  Capt.  Demer 
assisted  by  Capt.  Lapierre  and  Capt.  Bouvier,  acting  i 
nautical   assessors.     Finding:   The   Court   finds   the   Old* 
alone  to  blame  for  the  collision,  having  deliberately  place 
herself  in  such  a  position  as  to  drift  into  stem  of  Vesuvi 
Pilot  Damien  Paquet,  who  was  at  wheel  directing  operatioi 
is  suspended  for  remainder  of  year  1928.     Master  equally 
default  for  permitting  a  maintenance  of  actions  violatii 
Art.  19.     His  certificate  cannot  be  dealt  with;  but  a  copy 
the  Report  is  sent  to  Norwegian  Consul. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER 


65 


Statement  of  Formal  Investigations  and  Preliminary  Inquiries  held  during  the 
Fiscal  Year  1928-29— Concluded 


Name  of  Ship 

and 

Official  Number 

Port 

of 

Registry 

Remarks 

Vigilant,  117070 

(  Htawa,  Ont 

On  May  20,  1928,  while  docking  at  Halifax,  damaged  De  Wolf 
Wharf,  Bennett  Wharf  and  herself.     Formal  investigation 
was  held  at  Charlottetown  on  June  28,  before  Capt.  Demers, 
assisted  by  Capt.  T.  G.  Taylor,  and  Capt.  M.  C.  Allenby, 
acting    as    nautical    assessors.     Finding:    Court    declares 
Master  in  default,  not  for  an  error  of  judgment,  but  for  poor 
judgment.     It  is  suggested  a  test  be  made  of  workings  of 
propeller,  out  of  fairness  to  Master  and  authorities  over  him. 
The  Master's  certificate  is  returned,  and  other  Officials  of 
vessel  are  exonerated  from  blame. 

MASTERS  AND  SEAMEN  BRANCH 


Report  of  B.  F.  Burnett,  Superintendent 

Navigation  Schools  were  in  operation  at  Saint  John,  N.B.,  at  Halifax  and 
Yarmouth,  N.S.,  at  Quebec,  P.Q.,  at  Prince  Rupert,  B.C.,  and  at  Kingston,  Ont., 
and  marine  lectures  were  delivered  at  Collingwood,  Ont.,  and  at  Vancouver,  B.C. 

Examinations  for  masters'  and  mates'  certificates  were  held  at  Halifax, 
Yarmouth  and  North  Sydney,  N.S.,  at  Borden,  P.E.I. ,  at  Saint  John,  N.B.,  at 
Quebec  and  Montreal,  P.Q.,  at  Ottawa,  Kingston,  Midland,  Toronto,  Collingwood, 
Port  Arthur  and  Kenora,  Ont.,  at  Selkirk  and  Winnipeg,  Man.,  at  Prince  Rupert, 
Vancouver  and  Victoria,  B.C. 

Issued  during  the  year,  34  masters',  6  mates',  and  11  second  mates'  sea-going 
certificates  of  competency;  83  masters'  and  120  mates'  coasting  certificates  of 
competency;  39  masters'  and  78  mates'  inland  waters  certificates  of  competency; 
28  masters'  and  12  mates'  minor  inland  waters  certificates  of  competency,  and  40 
masters'  temporary  certificates. 

Twenty-eight  thousand  seven  hundred  and  forty-eight  seamen  were  shipped 
and  twenty-five  thousand  seven  hundred  and  sixty-three  seamen  were  discharged 
at  sea-ports. 


PILOTAGE  REPORT 

Captain  G.  E.  L.  Robertson,  Director  Pilotage 

The  Honourable  the  Minister  of  Marine  and  Fisheries  is  the  Pilotage 
Authority  for  the  Pilotage  Districts  of  Montreal,  Quebec,  Saint  John,  Halifax 
and  Sydney,  and  all  matters  relating  to  pilotage  in  these  districts  are  dealt  with 
through  the  local  superintendents  at  the  above  mentioned  places. 


DISTRICT  OF   MONTREAL 

At  the  opening  of  the  1928  season,  there  were  58  pilots  and  22  apprentices 

in  this  district.     During  the  season  three  pilots  retired  and  three  apprentices 

'  were  examined  and  satisfactorily  passed  as  pilots,  making  a  total  of  58  pilots, 

and  as  one  apprentice  was  also  added,  making  19  apprentices  on  March  31,  1929. 

The  first  arrivals  at  Montreal  at  the  commencement  of  the  season  were  a 
coasting  vessel  on  April  26,  an  ocean  going  vessel  on  the  same  date,  and  an 
inland  water  vessel  on  May  4. 

88174-5 


66 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 


The  gross  earnings  of  the  pilots  were  $329,282.72  for  the  season  as  compared 
with  $317,561.47  for  the  1927  season;  an  increase  of  $11,721.25  over  1927. 

The  total  number  of  vessels  piloted  inward  was  2,290,  and  outward  2,250, 
which  make  a  combined  total  of  4,540  vessels  with  a  net  tonnage  of  12,982,710 1 
as  compared  with  4,387  vessels  with  a  net  tonnage  of  11,866,275  in  1927.     This  ] 
is  an  increase  of  153  vessels  with  a  net  tonnage  of  1,116,435. 

The  last  departures  from  the  port  of  Montreal  at  the  end  of  the  season 
were:  an  inland  vessel  on  December  2,  a  coasting  vessel  on  December  4,  and  anj 
ocean  going  vessel  on  December  8. 

In  this  district  5  per  cent  of  the  gross  earnings  of  the  pilots  is  deducted  fori 
the  Montreal  Decayed  Pilots'  Pension  Fund,  which  fund  is  administered  by  the 
Department  of  Finance.    The  fund  amounted  to  $112,973.57  on  March  31,  1929.) 

DISTRICT  OF  QUEBEC 

At  the  opening  of  the  1928  season,  there  were  47  pilots  and  19  apprentice 
in  this  district,  one  pilot  having  been  retired  on  account  of  failure  in  the  annual 
eyesight  examinations.  Two  pilots  retired  during  the  season  and  three  apprentices' 
were  examined  and  given  their  pilot's  license,  and  six  apprentices  were  appointed. 
This  made  a  total  of  48  pilots  and  22  apprentices  on  March  31,  1929. 

Father  Point  Pilotage  Station  was  opened  on  April  18  with  the  first  vessel 
inward  bound  on  April  19. 

The  gross  earnings  of  the  pilots  were  $304,590.95  for  the  season  as  comparec 
with  $299,060.46  for  the  season  of  1927,  an  increase  of  $5,530.49. 

The  total  number  of  ships  piloted  inward  and  outward  was  4,045  with  a| 
total  net  tonnage  of  15,123,330  as  compared  with  4,087  vessels  of  12,112,511 
net  tons  in  1927.    This  is  a  decrease  of  42  vessels  but  an  increase  of  3,010,81: 
net  tons. 

The  Pilotage  Station  at  Father  Point  was  closed  on  the  December  14,  191 
after  the  last  vessel  passed  out.  The  pilot  tender  Jalobert  was  brought  to  Queb< 
for  the  season. 

During  the  season  of  1928  a  new  50  ft.  motor  launch  was  built  and  nam* 
the  Abraha?7i  Martin.  This  launch  proceeded  to  Father  Point  on  October  1! 
1928. 

In  this  district  7  per  cent  of  the  gross  earnings  of  the  pilots  is  deducted  f< 
the  Pension  Fund.    This  fund  is  administered  by  the  Quebec  Pilots'  Corporatioi 
and  amounted  to  $112,286.79  on  December  31,  1928.    In  addition  to  the  pensk 
received  from  the  Corporation,  certain  retired  pilots  (38  in  number)  received 
annual  allowance  from  the  Government  of  $300  each. 


GENERAL MONTREAL  AND  QUEBEC 

Mr.   R.   A.   Wiallard,   Montreal,    is   the   Acting  Superintendent    for   thi 
districts,  and  Mr.  F.  J.  Boulay,  Quebec,  is  the  Assistant  Superintendent. 

All  expenses  for  the  Pilotage  Service  at  Montreal  and  Quebec  are  paid  Ob, 
of  public  funds.     These  amounted  to  $15,054.31  for  the  District  of  Montreal 
and  $67,184.42  for  the  District  of  Quebec,  the  latter  including  the  cost  of  tl 
maintenance  of  the  pilot  tender  Jalobert,  and  the  cost  of  construction  and  mail 
temance  of  the  new  motor  launch  Abraham  Martin. 

The  pilot  tender  Jalobert  and  launches  in  addition  to  the  pilotage  worj 
attend  also  to  the  Quarantine  Station,  doctors  being  attached  to  the  Jalobd 
allowing  of  pratique  being  given  to  ships  provided  there  is  no  contagious  diseas' 
nn  board.    This  docs  away  with  delays  to  ships  having  to  stop  at  Grosse  Isle. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  67 

The  Jalobert  lands  the  mails  for  all  eastern  points,  and  also  handles  between 
ship  and  aeroplane  and  vice  versa  for  the  aerial  mail  service  which  was  started 
during  the  season  of  1927.  This  included  5,199  bags  and  1,766  baskets,  a  consider- 
able quantity  of  loose  mail,  also  780  bags  for  the  air  mail  inwards,  and  820  bags 
I  for  the  air  mail  outwards.  The  customs  officers  are  also  put  on  board  and  taken 
off  ships.  Five  services  are,  therefore,  centralized  at  Father  Point,  which  mean^ 
a  considerable  economy  to  the  Federal  Government  and  satisfaction  to  shipping. 

DISTRICT   OF   ST.   JOHN 

At  the  beginning  of  the  season  there  were  13  pilot-  and  2  apprentices  in  the 
district;  during  the  year  one  pilot  died,  and  one  pilot  having  reached  the  retire- 
ment age  retired  and  accepted  his  pension.  This  left  the  district  with  11  pilots 
and  2  apprentices  on  March  31,  1929. 

The  gross  revenue  of  the  district  for  1928-29  was  $54,843  and  the  expenses 
including  the  upkeep  of  the  pilot  vessel  and  motor  launch,  the  repayment  on 
loans,  and  the  amount  paid  into  the  pension  fund  amounted  to  $17,272.18, 
leaving  a  balance  to  be  divided  among  the  pilots  of  $37,570.82. 

The  total  number  of  vessels  piloted  inward  was  475,  and  outward  482,  a 
total  of  957  vessels  with  a  total  net  tonnage  of  2,701,004,  as  compared  with  935 
vessels  of  2,436,787  net  tons  in  the  previous  year,  an  increase  of  22  vessels  of 
264,217  net  tons. 

In  this  district  12  per  cent  of  the  gross  revenue  is  deducted  for  the  Super- 
annuation Fund.  This  fund  is  administered  without  charge  for  the  Saint  John 
pilots  bv  the  Department  of  Finance.  The  fund  amounted  to  $43,354.85  on 
March  31,  1929. 

During  the  season  the  pilot  tender  Monarchy  was  sold  out  of  the  service, 
and  a  new  auxiliary  power  pilot  schooner,  named  Glooscap,  was  built  and  put 
into  condition.    A  motor  launch  is  also  used  as  a  pilot  tender  on  the  station. 

Mr.  J.  C.  Chesley,  Saint  John,  is  the  Acting  Superintendent  of  Pilots. 

The  expenses  incurred  by  the  department  for  the  upkeep  of  the  office  and 
J  staff  were  $3,010.75. 

DISTRICT   OF    HALIFAX 

There  were  20  pilots  and  3  apprentices  in  this  district  at  the  commencement 
of  the  1928-29  season.  No  new  pilots  or  apprentice  pilots  were  licensed  during 
the  year. 

The  gross  revenue  for  the  1928-29  season  amounted  to  $102,229.53,  an 
increase  of  $3,100.68  over  the  previous  year.  The  total  expenses  including 
repayment  on  loans,  general  maintenance  of  the  two  pilot  tenders  and  the  amount 
paid  into  the  Superannuation  Fund  amounted  to  $31,129.53,  leaving  a  balance 
to  be  divided  among  the  pilots  of  $71,100. 

The  total  number  of  vessels  piloted  inward  was  1,434,  and  outward  1,425,  a 
total  of  2,859  vessels  of  a  total  net  tonnage  of  9,132,930,  as  compared  with  3,105 
vessels  of  a  total  net  tonnage  of  7,902,319,  a  decrease  of  246  vessels,  though  the 
tonnage  was  increased  by  1,230,611  net  tons  over  1927-28. 

The  new  pilot  tender  Hebridean  was  put  into  commission  so  that  the  Port 
of  Halifax  now  'has  two  very  able  vessels  that  are  a  credit  to  the  port  and  the 
pilotage  service,  viz.,  the  Nauphila  and  the  Hebridean. 

In  this  district  5  per  cent  of  the  gross  revenue  is  deducted  for  the  Super- 
'annuation  Fund.  This  fund  is  administered  without  charge  for  the  Halifax 
|Pilots  by  the  Department  of  Finance,  and  on  March  31,  1929,  amounted  to 
$82,368.55. 

Captain  P.  C.  Johnson  is  the  Superintendent  of  Pilots  at  Halifax. 

The  expenses  incurred  by  the  department  for  the  upkeep  of  the  office  and 
staff  were  $6,665.21. 

88174-5* 


68  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

DISTRICT  OF  SYDNEY 

There  were  18  pilots  and  no  apprentices  at  the  commencement  of  the  season; 
of  navigation.  During  the  season  one  pilot  died,  leaving  17  pilots  on  March  31, 
1929. 

The  season  commenced  on  April  16,  1928,  and  closed  on  January  18,  1929.; 

The  gross  revenue  of  the  district  amounted  to  $60,360.35,  an  increase 
$5,429.69  over  the  previous  year.    The  total  expenses,  including  the  amount  pai 
into  the  Superannuation  Fund,  general  maintenance  and  upkeep  of  pilot  vessel] 
and  the  repayment  of  part  of  the  money  for  the  building  of  the  pilot  vessel  am 
the  building  of  the  new  pilot  station  was   $16,133.51,   leaving   a   balance 
$44,226.84  to  be  divided  among  the  pilots. 

The  total  number  of  vessels  piloted  inward  was  1,176  and  outward  1,176, 
making  a  total  of  2,352  vessels  with  a  total  net  tonnage  of  2,257,544,  as  coin- 
pared  with  a  total  of  2,218  vessels  with  a  net  tonnage  of  2,076,248  for  the  seasoi 
of  1927-28,  an  increase  of  134  vessels  of  181,296  net  tons. 

During  the  season  a  new  pilot  station  was  built  at  the  Piers. 

In  this  district  15  per  cent  of  the  gross  revenue  is  deducted  for  the  Pilots' 
Superannuation  Fund  which  is  administered  without  charge  by  the  Department 
of  Finance.    On  March  31,  1929,  the  fund  amounted  to  $42,421.08. 

The  auxiliary  vessel  H.  M.  Whitney  is  the  pilot  tender  on  the  station. 

Gaptain  J.  D.  Mackenzie  is  the  Superintendent  of  Pilots  for  this  district. 

The  expense  incurred  by  the  department  and  paid   out  of  public   func 
amounted  to  $5,551.28. 

BRITISH   COLUMBIA 

Chief  Justice  Aulay  Morrison   was   appointed   a   Royal   Commissioner 
inquire  into  pilotage   conditions   in  British   Columbia.     Sittings  were  held 
Victoria,  Vancouver,  Nanaimo  and  Prince  Rupert.    I  had  the  honour  of  attendii 
His  Honour  in  an  advisory  capacity. 

The  commissioner  reported  his  findings  and  recommendations  to  the  depai 
ment   on  December  20,   1928.     The   report  was   presented   to   Parliament 
February  21,  1929. 

GENERAL 

Of  the  36  Pilotage  Authorities  constituted  under  the  authority  of  th*| 
Governor  General  in  Council  in  pursuance  of  the  provisions  of  the  Canad: 
Shipping  Act,  12  have  forwarded  returns  for  1928. 


REPORT' OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER 


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70  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

ANNUAL  REPORT  ON  SABLE  ISLAND 
H.  F.  Henry,  Superintendent 

Various  necessary  repairs  carried  out  at  all  stations  and  buildings  painted. 

Life  boats,  surf  boats  and  beach  apparatus  kept  in  good  condition. 

Mr.  Lee,  of  the  Tidal  Survey  Department,  Ottawa,  visited  island  by  spring 
boat  and  instructed  me  in  building  wharf  and  installing  tide  gauge.  The  wharf 
was  built  on  north  side  of  island  at  main  station,  and  tide  gauge  placed  in  com- 
mission on  June  6,  and  kept  in  commission  until  August  12,  when  wharf  was 
carried  away  by  strong  wind  and  sea.  As  Tidal  Survey  department  only  wanted 
three  months'  record,  I  thought  it  too  late  to  rebuild  wharf  and  place  spare  tidal 
instruments  in  commission. 

Dr.  Smith,  of  the  Meterorological  Service,  Toronto,  visited  island  by  August 
steamer  and  stayed  six  days  on  island.  He  brought  instruments  and  necessary 
instructions  to  commence  pilot  balloon  ascents;  this  was  placed  under  my  charge. 

Stock. — Stock  on  hand — 34  head  horned  cattle,  40  trained  horses,  about  150 
wild  ponies,  1  sow,  and  1  boar. 

Population. — The  population  is  now  37,  comprising  the  following: — 

Main  Station — 

Sup.  Henry,  wife  and  family 5 

Cook,  Altman;  Coxswain,  T.  Keating;  Staffmen,  C.  Pye,  C.  Topple,  R.  McDow, 

C.  Sigston,  C.  Blackadar;  R.  Palmer 8 

No.  2  Station — 

Keeper  Gregoire,  wife  and  family 8 

No.  3  Station- 
Keeper  Mackenzie,  wife  and  Assistant  Gill 3 

West  Light — 

Keeper  Stoddard,  wife,  child  and  Assistant  H.  Stoddard 4 

East  Light — 

Keeper  Mason,  wife,  family  and  Assistant  E.  Kerwin 4 

Wireless  Station — 

Chief  operator,  G.  A.  Raine;  Assistants,  D.  Currie  and  J.  Lynch,  Mrs.  Lynch 

and  child 5 

Carried  out  life  boat  drill  14  times,  and  beach  apparatus  drill  10  times. 
Island  patrolled  75  times  on  account  of  fog,  snow  or  heavy  rain. 
Visited  all  stations  twelve  times  during  year. 


REPORTS  OF  AGENCIES 

Halifax,  N.S.,  Agency 

During  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1929,  this  agency  maintained 
152  lighthouses,  1  light  from  private  dwelling,  2  lightships,  7  unwatched  lights, 
20  pole  lights,  9  electric  lights,  79  wharves,  27  storm  signals,  20  diaphones,  1 
steam  fog  alarm,  1  explosive  fog  alarm,  2  mechanical  fog  bells,  6  life-saving 
stations  and  1  humane  station  at  Sable  island;  46  hand  horns,  20  combined  gas 
and  whistle  buoys,  18  combined  gas  and  bell  buoys,  7  gas  buoys,  23  whistling 
buoys,  58  bell  buoys,  2  day  beacons,  76  can  buoys,  54  conical  buoys,  12  spherical 
buoys,  976  spar  buoys,  16  bushes,  2  barrels,  13  casks,  14  stakes,  four  Government,! 
stealers,  Lady  Laurier,  Stanley,  Aranmore  and  J.  L.  Nelson. 

All  loo;  alarms  and  lights  were  inspected  during  the  year  as  well  as  a  greater 
number  of  harbour  buoys  and  wharves. 

All    buoys    landed    at    this    station    were    overhauled    and    repaired    when! 
necessary.     All  were  cleaned  and  painted,  minor  repairs  were  made  at  a  number 
of  the  light,  stations. 


REPORT  OF  Til/''  DEPUTY  MINISTER  71 

(MANGES    IN    AIDS    TO    NAVIGATION 

Chester  ironbound  light  was  changed  from  a  fixed  white  light  to  an 
unhitched  occulting  white  light  acetylene  automatically  occulted.  Hand  fog 
horn  discontinued. 

Musquodoboit  harbour  conical  buoy  replaced  by  bell  buoy. 

Spar  marking  south  extreme  of  shoal  off  Grove  point  replaced  by  can. 

Marie-Joseph  bell  buoy  changed  to  new  position. 

Character  of  light  at  Chebucto  head  changed. 

Cockerwit  passage  spar  changed  to  conical  buoy. 

Barrington  passage  spar  changed  to  can. 

Coddles  harbour  bell  moved  to  new  position. 

NEW  AIDS  ESTABLISHED 

Indian  island  bell  buoy. 

False  La  Have  bell  buoy. 

Little  Liscomb  bell  buoy. 

Little  Bras  d'Or  entrance  bell  buoy. 

Lunenburg  harbour — one  can  and  five  spars. 

Port  Nova  gas  and  whistle  buoy. 

Green  gas  buoy  marking  wreck  of  Trawler  Good  Hope  temporary. 

New  mechanical  fog  alarm  established  at  Eddy  point. 

Red  conical  buoy  on  west  extreme  of  shoal  three-quarters  of  a  mile  south 
west  off  Chappell  point. 

Unwatched  light  on  summit  of  stony  patch  entrance  Guysboro  harbour. 
Occulting  white  acetylene  gas  automatically  occulted  operated  by  sun  dial. 

One  new  storm  signal  at  Arichat  and  one  at  White  head. 

Unwatched  light  established  at  Coddles  harbour.  Occulting  white  acety- 
lene gas  automatically  occulted  operated  by  sun  dial. 

New  lighthouses  were  built  on  the  following  stations:  Pearl  island,  Harts 
island  and  Isaac  harbour. 

'  CONSTRUCTION   AND   REPAIR   WORK 

Cape  Freels  F.  A. — A  new  type  F.  diaphone  and  3  pistons  were  supplied  and 
installed  at  this  station  and  old  one  placed  in  Dartmouth  depot  stores.  An  oil 
tank  was  also  installed  at  this  station. 

St.  Pauls  Island. — Boatslip  at  main  station  was  repaired. 

Marjorie  Island. — A  new  standard  pole  light  was  erected  and  repairs  to 
shed  made. 

Beaver  Island,  St.  Peter's  Inlet. — A  new  standard  pole  light  was  built  for 
this  station. 

Black  Rock  Pt. — A  hand  fog  horn  was  supplied  to  this  station. 

Eddy  Point. — A  new  fog  alarm  plant  has  been  built  attached  to  lighthouse, 
and  a  one  and  a  half  inch  diaphone,  operated  by  air,  compressed  by  oil  engines, 
installed. 

Guysboro. — An  unwatched  light  has  been  installed  on  the  beacon,  stony 
patch,  entrance  to  Guysboro. 

Canso. — The  old  dwelling  and  light  on  Hart's  island,  Canso,  was  removed 
and  a  new  combined  dwelling  and  light  built. 

Sable  Island. — A  new  deck  was  put  up  on  tower  at  East  end,  Sable  island, 
lantern  set,  and  other  repairs  to  tower  and  dwelling  carried  out. 


72  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

Three  Top  Island. — New  storm  doors  were  put  in,  drain  repaired  and  other 
minor  repairs  carried  out. 

Charlo  Cove. — One  new  headlight  complete  was  installed  at  this  station. 

Coddle  Harbour. — A  new  unwatched  lightstation  has  been  installed  on  small 
Thrumcap  islet,  entrance  to  Coddle  harbour. 

Isaac's  Harbour. — The  old  combined  dwelling  and  lighthouse  was  demolished 
and  a  new  dwelling  and  light  station  built.     An  outside  shed  was  also  built. 

Sheet  Harbour,  North  East  Arm. — New  mast  was  provided  and  set  up  for 
the  pole  light  at  this  place,  other  repairs  carried  out  and  new  light  provided  and 
installed. 

M auger's  Beach. — Logs,  etc.,  were  purchased  for  repairs  to  breakwater, 
and  the  work  carried  out  as  far  as  possible  in  the  late  fall.  Piling  remains  to 
be  done  in  summer. 

Chebucto  Head. — A  new  double  flash  reflector  was  provided  and  set  up 
instead  of  the  quadruple  flash  reflector  previously  used. 

Pearl  Island. — A  new  combined  dwelling  and  lightstation  has  been  built, 
the  old  tower  removed,  and  the  former  dwelling  converted  into  a  storehouse. 

Chester  lronbound. — An  unwatched  light  has  been  substituted  instead  of  the 
former  apparatus  which  required  the  care  of  a  keeper. 

Arichat. — A  new  storm  signal  station,  consisting  of  mast  and  shed  was  built 
at  this  place. 

Whitehead. — A  new  storm  signal  mast  and  shed  were  built  at  this  place. 

Sydney  Anemograph  Station. — The  old  steel  tower  was  removed,  and  a 
new  one  erected,  as  well  as  new  apparatus  installed. 

Eastern  Passage. — New  brick  building  laboratory  was  put  up  under  super- 
vision of  this  agency. 

DOMINION    STEAMERS 

C.G.S.  Aranmore. — April  2  to  May  15 — Under  repairs  and  testing  com- 
passes. May  16 — To  Sambro  lightship.  May  17  to  25 — Loading  buoys;  fog 
and  storm.  May  26  to  June  8 — On  eastern  buoy  program.  June  9 — At  North 
Sydney  loading  for  Cape  Anguille.  June  10  to  14 — Landing  coal  at  Cape 
Anguille.  June  15  to  17 — At  St.  Pierre  for  shipwrecked  fishermen.  June  18-22 
— At  agency  discharging  coal — loading  supplies.  June  23  to  July  11 — On  j 
Eastern  supply  trip.  July  12  to  August  15 — Under  Prince  Edward  Island  agency,  j 
August  16  to  20--At  North  Sydney  loading  for  Newfoundland  trip.  August  21 
to  September  2 — Landing  supplies  at  Newfoundland.  September  4 — Salving 
buoys  at  High  Beach,  etc.  September  5  to  7— Bunkering  at  North  Sydney.  Sep- 
tember 8— Returned  to  Halifax;  repairs  and  loading  buoys.  September  12— 
Placed  Sheet  Harbour  buoy.  September  13-14— To  Sable  Island  for  sick  man. 
September  15— Loading  for  western  stations.  September  17  to  26— On  western 
supply  trip.  September  28  to  31— Salving  buoy  at  Sheet  Harbour.  October  1 
to  6— Blown  down  for  cleaning  boilers.  October  8  to  December  7— Under  Prince 
Edward  Island  agency.  December  8  to  lO^Coaling  at  North  Sydney.  Decem- 
ber 12— Landing  supplies  at  Ingonish.  December  14— Salved  Neil's  Harbour 
buoy.  December  16— Arrived  at  Halifax;  transporting  motor  boats,  December 
20  to  26— On  western  buoy  trip;  landing  barrels  and  coal.  December  27  to 
January  1— Salving  Liscomb  buoy.  January  5— To  Sambro  and  Chebucto  head. 
January  8—  Replacing  Halifax  buovs.  January  9  to  19— On  eastern  buoy  pro- 
gram.   January  25— Blown  down  for  annual  overhaul. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  73 

C.G.S.  Stanley.— From  October  7  to  22— At  Halifax,  bunkering;  under 
jepairs,  and  testing  compasses.  October  23  to  November  10— On  western  pro- 
gram. November  13  to  15 — Boiler  repairs  and  loading  for  Sable  island. 
November  16  to  22 — At  Sable  island.  November  24 — At  Chebucto  head  and 
Terrence  bay.  November  26 — Loading  for  St.  Paul's  and  other  ports.  Novem- 
)er  27  to  December  13 — On  eastern  program.  December  14-15 — To  lightship 
md  Chebucto  head.  December  21-22 — To  Sambro  lightship.  January  3  to  19 
— Retubing  boilers.  February  13 — Assisting  Terne,  icebound.  February  19 — 
.oading  buoys  at  North  Sydney.  February  20 — Salved  Glace  bay  ball  buoy. 
February  24— Arrived  at  Halifax.  February  26  to  28 — Icebreaking  at  Sheet 
larboiir.  March  1 — New  keeper's  supplies,  Chebucto  head.  March  9 — Light- 
ship and  Sisters  buoy.  March  11 — Loading  western  buoys.  March  12  to  14— 
halving  Lunenburg  buoys.  March  20  to  21 — Icebreaking  at  Sheet  harbour. 
March  22  to  23 — Loading  buoys  for  West.  March  27  to  29—On  western  buoy 
rip. 

C.G.S.  J.  L.  Nelson. — From  April  2  to  14 — On  harbour  duties;  to  Sambro 
ightship.  Apri  16  to  19 — To  Chebucto  head  with  construction  supplies.  April 
!>1  to  25 — To  Mauger's  beach.  May  4  to  8 — To  Chebucto  head;  harbour  duties. 
Vlay  11  to  31 — Harbour  duties  and  Eastern  Passage.  June  1 — Towing  lightship 
o  agency  wharf.  June  11 — To  Chebucto  head.  June  13  to  15 — On  buoy  pro- 
-am. June  28— To  lightship  No.  24.  June  29— To  Eastern  Passage.  July  20 
-To  Mauger's  beach.  July  26-27— West  with  supplies.  July  28— To  Devil's 
sland.  July  30-31— To  Prospect.  August  1— To  lightship  No.  24.  August  7— 
To  Devil's  island  and  Chebucto  head.  August  15  to  16 — To  Chester  Ironbound 
vith  new  apparatus.  August  21  to  23 — with  supplies  to  Eastern  lights.  August 
57— To  lightship  No.  24  and  Chebucto  head.  August  28  to  30--To  McNab's 
sland.  September  5 — To  George's  island.  September  6 — To  Halifax  lightship. 
September  7 — to  McNab's  island.  September  24 — To  Halifax  lightship.  October 
{—Placing  Neverfail  buoy.  October  5 — To  Halifax  lightship.  October  9  to  18 
—To  Mauger's  beach;  harbour  duties;  transporting  supplies.  October  25 — 
ending  supplies  from  ss.  Larch.  October  26 — To  Mauger's  beach.  November  1 
-Relighted  Thrum  cap  buoy.  November  19 — At  Mauger's  beach.  November  22 
—To  Devil's  island.  November  28  to  December  11 — To  Mauger's  beach;  on 
larbour  duties.  December  12 — To  Devil's  islsand.  December  13  to  31 — To 
Mauger's  beach;  harbour  duties.  January  8 — To  Sambro.  January  9 — To 
Vlauger's  beach.  January  15 — To  Sambro;  harbour  duties.  January  21 — To 
George's  island.  January  25  to  March  13 — Mauger's  beach;  harbour  duties; 
nspecting  harbour  buoys,    March  14-30 — To  Chebucto  head;    harbour  duties. 

C.G.S,  Lady  Laurier. — April  2  to  5 — on  eastern  buoy  program;  discharging 
moys.  April  19 — Replaced  Sambro  buoy.  April  13  to  26 — On  eastern  buoy  pro- 
Tain;  bunkering.  April  27-29 — Sable  island  with  supplies.  May  3  to  30 — On 
astern  program;  landing  coal,  loading  buoys;  cleaning  boilers.  June  2 — On 
■  vestern  buoy  program,.  June  6 — To  Sambro  and  Chebucto  head.  June  9-12 — 
Eastern  buoys  and  Sable  island.  June  15 — With  supplies  to  Sambro  lightship, 
une  16-18 — On  eastern  buoy  program.  June  20 — To  Chebucto  head  with  coal. 
fuly  6 — On  western  supply  trip.  July  9-12 — Bunkering  and  loading  supplies, 
uly  13  to  August  6 — On  eastern  supply  trip.  August  7-8 — Loading  for  Sable 
sland.  August  9 — Replaced  Thrum  cap  buoy  and  bunkering.  August  10-12 — 
Vith  Sable  island  supplies.  August  13-14— Loading  Newfoundland  supplies. 
August  15-20 — Placed  buoy  at  Cran  rock;  transferred  supples  to  Aranmore. 
August  21 — At  Sambro  lightship.  August  22-23 — Placing  new  gas  buoy  at 
saac's  harbour.  August  28  to  September  6 — On  western  buoy  trip;  loading 
moys.  September  7  to  14 — Preparing  for  overhaul.  December  24 — At  ship- 
rard's  wharf.    December  25 — At  agency  under  repairs.    February  3 — On  eastern 


74  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

buoy  program  February  9— Relit  Saul's  island  light.  February  11— Proceeded 
to  assist^  schooner  Fieldivood..  February  12-15— With  Sable  island  supplies. 
February  21  to  March  7— On  eastern  buoy  program;  discharging  buoys;  instal- 
ling new  compass.    March  9-10— Placing  new  buoy  at  Egg  island.    March  14-20 

On  western  buoy  program.     March  21 — At  Chebucto  head.     March  25-30— 

On  western  buoy  program;    discharging  buoys. 

PICTOU,    N.S.,    SUBAGENCY 

The  deep-water  channel  from  Abercrombie  point  to  New  Glasgow  was 
marked  and  marks  kept  in  position  by  contractor  during  season.  Operation  of 
East  river  range  lights  was  supervised  during  season. 

Harbour  and  roadstead  buoys  were  placed  in  position  by  ss.  Brant  May  16, 
and  lifted  December  4. 

Steamers  Vigilant,  Margaret,  Connesota  and.  Brant  were  in  port  during 
season  on  lighthouse  and  patrol  service. 

Lighthouse  keepers  were  notified  regarding  lighting  and  extinguishing  lights. 

Oil  furnished  lighthouse  keepers  when  required. 

SYDNEY,    N.S.,   SUBAGENCY 

All  aids  to  navigation  in  this  harbour  have  been  maintained;  neither  col-i 
lisions  nor  groundings  took  place,  notwithstanding  the  very  extensive  shipping 
entering  and  leaving  the  ports  of  Sydney  and  North  Sydney  night  and  day;| 
during  the  shipping  season  generally  from  April  to  January.  The  pilotage  ser- 
vice as  well  as  the  aids  referred  to  have  each  contributed  to  the  gratifying  results! 
secured;  together  with  a  fleet  of  some  18  steamers  whose  carrying  capacity  is 
from  8  to  12,000  tons  employed  by  the  Dominion  Coal  Company;  there  is  alsc 
a  bunker  trade  by  steamers  running  between  Montreal  and  European  ports  tc| 
quite  some  extent,  increasing  the  business  of  the  port. 

A  new  public  landing  has  been  built  in  the  port  of  Sydney  which  will 
accommodate  vessels  of  the  largest  draught.  This  is  a  decided  advantage  to  the 
port,  as  heretofore  the  want  of  terminal  facilities  did  not  permit  of  the  possi 
bility  of  Sydney  being  used  as  a  port  of  call  by  deep  draught  steamers. 

The  requirements  of  the  port  with  regard  to  her  buoy  and  light  service  ha 
been  given  attention  by  the  C.G.  steamers  Lady  Laurier  and  Montcalm,  am 
from  time  to  time  the  above  steamers  carried  supplies  to  light  and  wireles: 
stations  along  the  coast  as  well  as  those  on  the  west  coast  of  Newfoundland 
together  with  the  islands  adjacent  to  the  mainland  where  light,  fog  and  wireless 
stations  have  been  erected.  C.G.S.  Montcalm  was  again  assigned  to  ice  dut; 
at  North  Sydney  and  Louisburg  during  the  winter  season,  and  rendered  valuable 
service  to  ice-bound  shipping  on  and  off  the  coast,  as  well  as  keeping  the  port; 
open  for  general  traffic.  When  no  longer  required  in  port  this  ship  joined  th 
C.G.S.  Mikula  in  patrol  duty  in  Cabot  strait,  and  together  rendered  valuabl 
assistance  to  shipping  bound  up  the  St.  Lawrence  by  directing  their  cours 
through  ice  fields,  and  relieving  them  from  jams  very  often  endangering  thei 
safety.  The  patrol  service  performed  by  these  ice  breakers  is  highly  commente( 
"ii  by  St.  Lawrence  shipping,  and  arrivals  at  Quebec  and  Montreal  are  possibl 
a  week  earlier  by  this  help. 

The  ship  repair  shops  at  Sydney  and  North  Sydney  had  certain  small  repair 
to  make  to  boilers  and  machinery  of  some  steamers  and  in  a  few  instances  ha( 
propellers  to  replace,  and  in  all  cases  prompt  and  satisfactory  service  was  given 
Certain  matters  in  connection  with  the  Quebec  and  Charlottetown  agencies  wer 
referred  here,  and  received  attention. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  75 

SHIPPING  RETURNS  FOR  THE  PORTS  OF  SYDNEY,  NORTH  SYDNEY, 

AND  LOUISBURG 

Number 

Port  of  Sydney —  of  ships  Tons 

Foreign  inwards 302  571,902 

Foreign  outwards 421  866, 20f) 

Coastwise  inwards 1 ,  182  1 ,  579, 024 

Coastwise  outwards 1,080  1,283,502 

Port  of  North  Sydney — 

Foreign  inwards 906  373, 891 

Foreign  outwards 902  315, 358 

Coastwise  inwards 859  387, 342 

Coastwise  outwards 904  372, 002 

Port  of  Louisburg — 

Foreign  inwards 132  34,242 

Foreign  outwards 137  44,468 

Coastwise  inwards 154  62,497 

Coastwise  outwards 152  51 ,  205 

VICTORIA,    B.C.,    AGENCY 

List  of  light  stations,  fog  alarms,  fog  bells,  etc.,  in  the  Victoria  Agency: — 

3  light  stations  of  the  first  order. 

3  light  stations  of  the  third  order. 

9  light  stations  using  catoptric  reflectors. 
8  light  stations  of  the  fourth  order. 
8  light  stations  of  the  fifth  order. 
1  light  station  of  the  sixth  order. 

12  light  stations  of  the  seventh  order. 
Fog  alarms — 

24  fog  alarms  of  the  diaphone  type. 
1  fog  alarm  of  the  Strombos  compressed  air  type. 

4  fog  alarms  of  the  reed  tvpe. 

10  fog  bells. 

1  fog  electric  siren. 

List  of  buoys  and  beacons,  maintained  in  the  agency: — 

Lighted  buoys — 

1  type  11  gas  and  whistling  buoy. 

5  type  9^  gas  and  whistling  buoy. 
1  type  9J  gas  and  bell  buoy. 

4  type  8-j  gas  and  bell  buoys. 

11  type  8^  gas  lighted  buoys. 

3  type  wooden  platform  buoys  with  Aga  gas  lanterns. 
3  type  wooden  platform  buoys  with  oil  lantern. 

Unlighted  buoys — 

3  automatic  whistling  buoys. 

4  surface  bell  buoys. 
22  steel  conical  buoys. 
38  steel  can  buoys. 

3  small  steel  mine  buoys. 
112  wooden  spar  buoys. 
16  wooden  platform  buoys. 
Lighted  beacons — 

31  automatic  acetylene  gas  beacons. 

8  Aga   acetylene   gas   range   beacons   using  type   F.R.   20A,   flasher 
with  ^  cu.  ft.  burner. 

6  Aga  acetylene  gas  beacons  using  200  m/m  lanterns. 
45  Aga  acetylene  gas  beacons  using  150  m/m  lanterns. 
20  electric  lighted  beacons. 

13  oil  lighted  beacons. 

Unlighted  day  beacons,  range  marks,  dolphins,  etc.:  65. 


76  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

MAINTENANCE   AND    CONSTRUCTION    WORK 

Amphitrite  Point. — A  lightkeeper's  dwelling  was  constructed.  A  wood  shed! 
built;  a  wooden  water  cistern  for  fog  alarm  purposes  was  erected  and  a  telephone] 
line  is  now  being  erected  to  connect  the  dwelling  with  the  village  of  Torino. 

Activie  Pass. — New  lighting  apparatus  with  electrically  operated  revolving' 
reflector  and  electric  light  was  installed.  A  duplicating  charging  plant,  consist-' 
ing  of  engine  and  electric  generator  for  the  above  is  now  being  installed.  Repairs' 
to  lightkeeper's  dwelling. 

Buoy  Service. — Large  expenditures  were  incurred  for  Aga  equipment  for  thej 
changing  in  Victoria  of  automatic  buoys  to  the  Aga  type.     This  work,  no^ 
nearing  completion,  covers   all   automatic  buoys,  both   in  Prince  Rupert  an< 
Victoria  agencies. 

Burnaby  Shoal. — Two  protection  dolphins  were  driven,  The  main  beacoi 
was  reinforced  by  the  driving  of  additional  piling. 

Canal  Island. — An  unwatched  Aga  light  supported  by  a  concrete  beacon  was 
constructed. 

Cape  Mudge. — A  road  was  constructed  to  connect  the  lightstation  to  the 
public  road  three  miles  away. 

Cape  Beale. — The  lightkeeper's  dwelling  was  reshingled  and  other  repainj 
were  made. 

Discovery  Island. — Extensive  repairs  to  the  buildings  and  reservoir  belong] 
ing  to  the  lightstation  made. 

Dillon  Rock. — An  Aga  light  was  established. 

East  Bay,  Sidney  Inlet. — A  concrete  beacon  surmounted  by  an  Aga  lighl 
was  erected. 

Fiddle  Reef  Station. — Repairs  to  the  foundations  of  the  station  and  boat 
ways  carried  out. 

False  Bay. — An  unwatched  Aga  light  and  concrete  beacon  established. 

Fraser  River. — Unwatched  lights  were  established  and  beacons  erected  a] 
Annacis  island  and  Woodward's  channel;  and  beacons  were  redriven  opposit; 
Deas  Island,  Annacis  island  east. 

Three  additional  gas  buoys  were  established  betwen  Steveston  and  th! 
mouth  of  the  Fraser  river. 

Fisgard  Station. — The  lighting  apparatus  was  exchanged  for  unwatched  Agj 
equipment. 

Gibson's  Landing. — An  electric  light  established  on  the  wharf. 

Mears  Spit. — An  Aga  lantern  and  equipment  supplied. 

Nootka. — A  diap'hone  fog  alarm  established. 

Portlock  Point  Station. — An  extension  made  to  the  lightkeeper's  dwellin;; 

Pine  Island. — Repairs  made  to  fog  alarm  building. 

Quatsino.— Repairs  to  lightstation. 

Race  Rocks. — A  10-horsepower  engine  was  installed  at  the  fog  alaim,  r<; 
placing  one  of  6-horsepower. 

Rocky  Pass.— An  unwatched  Aga  light  installed. 

Stubbs  Spit.— An  Aga  light  installed. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  77 

Scarlett  Point. — Repairs  to  tramway. 

Sandheads  Lightship. — Overhauled  both  hull  and  maehinery. 
Sheringham  Point. — Repairs  to  lightkeeper's  dwelling. 
Saturna. — New  floors  laid  in  the  lightkeeper's  dwelling. 

Tahsis  Narrows  North. — A  concrete  beacon  supporting  an  Aga  light  con- 
structed. 

Ucluelet. — A  day  beacon  was  built. 

Sandspit,  Tahsis  Canal. — An  Aga  light  was  installed.  All  Government 
steamers  under  the  jurisdiction  of  this  agency  were  thoroughly  overhauled  during 
the  year. 

LIFE-SAVING   AND   SALVAGE   OPERATIONS   FOR   YEAR  ENDING   MARCH   31,    1929 

The  life-saving  stations  at  Banfield  and  Clayoquot  were  in  continuous 
commission  with  the  exception  of  short  periods  required  for  annual  overhaul  to 
the  life-boat  at  the  respective  stations. 

Extra  patrol  vessels  were  stationed  at  Banfield  during  the  winter  months 
and  patrolmen  were  on  duty  on  the  west  coast  trail  operating  from  Pachena 
and  Carmanah  lighthouses. 

The  following  is  a  list  of  shipping  casualties: — 

July  6. — Log  carrying  barge  Biyamon  burnt  to  a  total  loss  on  Nootka  sound. 

August  30. — SS.  Redwood  went  ashore  at  Christie  pass,  refloated  with  small 
damage. 

November  22. — SS.  Albion  Star  went  ashore  at  Race  rocks,  salvaged  by 
,  Pacific  Salvage  Company. 

November  30. — SS.  Chief  Maquilla  foundered  at  sea,  580  miles  from  Victoria. 

December  18. — SS.  Princess  Adelaide  in  collision  outside  Vancouver  harbour 
with  ss.  Hamphold.  All  passengers  were  taken  off  Adelaide  successfully  and 
vessel  saved. 

March  16,  1929. — SS.  A.  L.  Kent  went  ashore  in  Johnson  strait,  salvaged  by 
Pacific  Salvage  Company. 

DOMINION  STEAMERS 

C.G.S.  Estevan. — April  1  to  4. — Coaling  and  overhauling  Gossip  reef  buoy. 
April  4  to  May  14 — Circled  Vancouver  island,  overhauling  and  recharging  buoys 
:  and  beacons,  and  installed  a  permanent  lightkeeper  at  Nootka  station.  May  16 
to  June  9 — Overhauling  and  recharging  gas  buoys  on  the  Fraser  river  and  gulf  of 
Georgia.  June  9  to  June  12 — Working  at  buoy  work  in  gulf  of  Georgia;  coaled 
ship  and  took  on  cargo  of  oil  for  delivery  to  west  coast  stations.  June  14  to 
July  27 — Under  supervision  of  Superintendent  of  Lights  landed  annual  supplies 
at  all  west  coast  stations.  Established  new  lights  at  Canal  island,  Tahsis  narrows 
north,  East  bay,  Dillon  rock,  Mears  and  Stubb  spit.  Recharged  acetylene 
beacons  en  route.  Performed  necessary  buoy  work  and  called  at  Government 
wharves  so  same  could  be  examined  by  Superintendent  of  Lights.  July  30  to 
August  28 — Proceeded  north  and  worked  in  Prince  Rupert  agency.  August  28 
to  August  30 — Placing  new  gas  buoys  in  Fraser  river.  August  30  to  September 
13 — Undergoing  boiler  repairs  at  Victoria.  September  13  to  October  11 — Landing 
construction  material  for  new  fog  alarm  at  Nootka.  Transferring  lightkeepers 
on  west  coast  and  performing  necessary  buoy  work.  October  14  to  October  25 — 
Landing  coal  at  Gulf  lightstations  and  recharging  and  overhauling  Gulf  buoys. 
October  27  to  November  10 — Confirming  position  of  Channel  rock  buoy.  Landing 


78  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

supplies  at  Carmanah,  Pachena  and  Banfield  life-saving  station.  November  13 
to  November  20— Overhauling  large  unlighted  buoys  Strait  of  Georgia.  Novem- 
ber 21  to  December  20 Landing  Government  and  private  supplies  at  west  coast 

lightstations,  radio  and  life-saving  stations.  Performing  necessary  buoy  work  en 
route  and  recharging  Aga  beacons.December  20  to  January  3 — Boiler  being  re- 
paired at  Victoria.  January  3  to  January  23— Overhauling  gas  buoys  on  Fraser 
river  and  Strait  of  Georgia.  Landing  supplies  at  lightstations,  Strait  of  Georgia. 
January  24  to  February  28 — Overhauling  large  unlighted  buoys  on  west  coast. 
Erecting  a  day  beacon  at  Ucluelet  and  landing  lighthouse  and  radio  supplies 
en  route.  Recharged  acetylene  lights,  picked  up  construction  material  at  Nootka 
and  Pine  island.     February  28  to  March  31 — Ship  laid  up  for  overhaul. 

C.G.M.  Berens. — April  1  to  April  7 — Employed  making  repairs  to  stations. 
Strait  of  Georgia.     April  7  to  May  7 — Undergoing  annual  overhaul.     May  7  tc 
May    14 — Landing   construction   material   at   Port-lock   point   and   Active   pass 
stations,  also  recharged  Aga  beacons  on  Fraser  river.     May  14  to  June  16— 
Annual  recharge  of  automatic  acetylene  beacons  from  Victoria  to  north  end  o) 
Vancouver  island.     June  16  to  June  23 — Landing  Government  and  private  storm 
at  lightstations,  Yellow  rock,  Entrance  Island,  Ballenas,  Sisters,  Merry  island  and 
Active  pass.     Transferring  construction  men  and  materials  under  supervision  o: 
Mr.  W.  H.  Trowsdale,  foreman  of  construction  from  Portlock  to  Yellow  rockj 
Performing  sundry  buoy  work  en  route.     June  23  to  June  30 — Landing  light-i 
house  supplies  at  stations  between  Victoria  and  Vancouver.     July  2  to  July  13— 
Landing  annual  supply  of  illuminating  and  fuel  oils  at  stations  in  Strait  o 
Georgia.     July  15  to  July  23 — Working  on  boatways  and  foundation  of  Fiddh 
reef  lightstation.     July  23  to  July  25 — Repairing  whistle  and  bell  strikers  oi 
buoys  at  San  Juan  and  Clo-oose.    July  25  to  July  28 — Recharging  Aga  beacons 
on  Fraser  river.     July  29  to  August  6 — Placing  spar  buoys  in  Sooke  harbour 
August  6  to  August  16 — Performing  sundry  buoy  and  beacon  work  in  strait  o 
Georgia.     August   18  to  September   1 — Working   on   beacons   on   Fraser   river' 
September  1  to  September  15 — Landing  supplies  at  strait  of  Georgia.     Overt 
hauling  buoys  on  north  end  of  Strait  of  Georgia.     Brushing  out  growth  in  fron 
of  range  lights  leading  over  Comox  bar.     Painted  range  lights,     September  1,' 
to  September  29 — Recharging  lights  on  Fraser  river  and  overhauling  small  buoyj 
in  Strait  of  Georgia.     September  29  to  October  27 — Landing  supplies  at  certaii 
stations  in  Strait  of  Georgia.     Continuing  with  buoy  work  in  Strait  of  Georgia 
October  27  to  Nevember  10 — Overhauling  buoys  between  Victoria  and  Nanaimo 
November  10  to  December  3 — Wrorking  on  gas  beacons  in  Fraser  river.     Decern 
her  3  to  December  21 — Landing  Christmas  supplies  at  lightstations  betweei 
Victoria  and  Cape  Mudge,  and  performing  sundry  buoy  work  en  route.     Decern 
her   26    to    January    3 — Repairing   wheelhouse.     January    3    to    January    19- 
Annual  holiday.     January   19  to  January  26 — Recharging  beacons  on '  Frase 
river.     January  26  to  February  6 — Overhauling  and  replacing  buoys  in  Strait  o 
Georgia.     February  6  to  February  21— Working  at  Calamity  spit  and  takin 
temporary  keeper  to  Sisters  station.     Performing  sundry  buoy  work.     Februar 
21  to  March  1 — Landing  construction  material  at  Discovery  island.     March  | 
to    March   9— Under  Superintendent   of   Lights,   making   annual   inspection   o 
Government  wharves  in  Strait  of  Georgia.     March  9  to  March  16— Transferrin! 
lightkeeper's  furniture,  and  effects  from  station  to  Victoria,     March  18  to  Marc 
30— Recharging  Fraser  river  Aga  beacons. 

GOVERNMENT  WHARVES 

All  Government  wharves  were  inspected  during  the  past  vear  and  small 
repairs  made  where  required. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  79 

Prince  Rupert,  B.C.,  Agency 

GENERAL 

The  general  work  of  the  agency  during  the  year  comprised  purchase  and 
delivery  of  supplies  to  lighthouses,  maintenance  of  aids  to  navigation,  super- 
vising of  construction  and  repairs  to  lighthouses  and  wharves  and  reporting  on 
wharves  and  foreshores. 

CONSTRUCTION  AND  MAINTENANCE 

A  masonry  protection  wall  was  constructed  to  protect  the  foundations  of 
the  dwelling  at  Barrett  rock. 

Repairs  were  carried  out  to  the  trestle  leading  to  the  lighthouse  at  Langara 
ilightstation. 

Repairs  were  carried  out  to  the  deck  and  machinery  of  the  C.G.M.  Birnie, 
and  annual  overhaul  of  ship  at  the  Prince  Rupert  dry  dock. 

Alterations  were  made  to  the  machinery  at  Triple  island  fog  alarm. 

Repairs  were  carried  out  to  the  dwelling,  trestle  and  walks  at  Lucy  island. 

Several  repairs  at  cape  St.  James  lightstation. 

The  C.G.S.  Newington  was  docked,  cleaned,  painted  and  overhauled  at  the 
Prince  Rupert  dry  dock. 

A  new  telephone  cable  was  installed  from  the  wireless  station  to  the  Marine 
station. 

Annual  overhaul  of  engine  and  hull  was  completed  on  the  Agency  launch 
Rhona. 

New  lighting  apparatus  installed  at  Ivory  island  lightstation. 

Automatic  light  placed  on  Hyde  rock. 

Repairs  carried  out  on  the  concrete  wharf  at  the  Marine  agency. 

Permanent  beacon  constructed  at  Casey  point,  replacing  buoy. 

Compressed  air  diaphone  established  in  a  new  building  at  Lucy  island  light- 
station. 

New  lighting  apparatus  installed  at  Egg  island  lightstation. 

LIGHTS,  FOG  ALARMS,  ETC. 

All  lights  and  fog  alarms,  all  lighted  and  unlighted  aids  to  navigation  were 
maintained  in  proper  order  throughout  the  year. 

DOMINION    STEAMERS 

The  C.G.S.  Estevan,  captain  H.  R.  Bilton,  arrived  at  this  agency,  August  12, 
to  attend  to  the  overhauling  of  the  large  buoys  in  this  district.  After  loading 
the  necessary  buoys,  anchors,  chain,  etc.;  she  overhauled  Rose  spit,  Lawn  point, 
Deadtree  and  Browning  entrance  buoys.  After  having  completed  these  she  over- 
hauled Hodgson  reef,  Alford  reef,  Spire  ledge  and  Georgia  rock  buoys;  after 
which  she  left  to  attend  to  her  work  at  the  Victoria  agency. 

The  C.G.S.  Newington,  captain  H.  A.  Ormiston,  has  been  engaged  throughout 
the  year  attending  to  the  outside  work  of  the  service,  including  landing  supplies 
uit  lightstations,  charging  the  lighted  beacons,  overhauling  unlighted  aids  to  navi- 
gation and  other  incidental  work. 

The  C.G.M.  Birnie,  captain  J.  Peterson,  was  engaged  throughout  the  year  in 
[recharging  beacons,  landing  mail  and  supplies  at  the  inside  lightstations,  on 
linspection  work,  etc. 


30  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

Launch  Rhona,  under  captain  H.  Calderwood,  has  been  continuously  engage* 
throughout  the  year,  exclusive  of  the  time  for  overhauling,  in  the  service  betweei 
Prince  Rupert  and  the  agency;  transferring  mail,  passengers  and  supplies  for  th 
agency  and  wireless  station;  making  from  two  to  three  regular  trips  every  da:1 
and  extra  trips  as  required,  including  regular  calls  at  the  wireless  station  float 

GOVERNMENT    WHARVES 

Five  Government  wharves  in  this  district  are  under  the  jurisdiction  of  thi1 
agency,  located  at  the  following  places:  Alice  arm,  B.C.;  Queen  Charlotte  eitj 
and  Massett,  Queen  Charlotte  islands ;  .  Refuge  bay  on  Porcher  island,  an 
Stewart,  B.C. 

Each  wharf  has  been  regularly  inspected  and  the  condition  reported  thereor 

PUBLIC  WHARF,  STEWART,  B.C. 

The  above  mentioned  wharf  has  been  operated  throughout  the  year  undc 
the  supervision  of  a  wharfinger,  Mr.  H.  C.  Bennett,  the  traffic  consisting  mainl 
of  passenger  and  freight  vessels  of  the  Canadian  National  Steamship  compan 
and  the  Union  Steamship  company,  and  the  Ore  Carriers,  of  the  Coastwie 
Steamship  and  Barge  Company,  Limited. 

Freight  shipments  inward  were  approximately  the  same  as  last  year.  Ou 
ward  shipments  of  ore,  including  concentrates,  amounted  to  approximatel. 
129 ,,608  tons,  which  is  a  little  in  excess  of  the  previous  year. 

Tolls,  leviable  in  accordance  with  the  regulations  and  tariff,  have  been  dul 
collected,  and,  less  the  Wharfinger's  remuneration  of  25  per  cent,  been  forwardc 
to  the  department  monthly,  accompanied  by  the  regular  statements. 

Collections  for  the  fiscal  year  1928-29  amounted  to  $2,683.25,  gross,  which  , 
less  than  the  amount  of  collections  for  the  previous  year  due  to  a  certain  amour 
of  traffic  diverted  to  the  Crawford  wharf. 

To  keep  the  wharf  open  to  traffic  has  necessitated  the  expenditure  of  $281.4 
for  labour  for  the  removal  of  snow  during  the  winter  season.     This  amount 
$5§.80  less  than  the  amount  spent  during  the  preceding  year  for  the  same  purpos 

The  mining  district  adjacent  to  this  wharf  is  being  developed  gradually,  ar 
shipments  of  freight,  machinery,  and  ore  portend  a  considerable  increase  in  tl 
near  future. 

MASSETT  WHARF,  B.C. 

This  wharf  was  operated  throughout  the  year  under  the  direction  of  M 
E.  H.  Simpson  as  wharfinger.  The  shipping  is  comprised  of  a  passenger  ai 
freight  vessel  of  the  Canadian  National  Steamship  Company,  Which  maintai: 
a  regular  schedule,  also  an  occasional  freighter  and  a  number  of  smaller  g 
boats. 

Tolls  levied  in  accordance  with  the  regulations  and  tariff,  amounting 
8937.68,  were  duly  collected  and  forwarded  to  the  Department  monthly. 

Charlottetown,  P.E.I. ,  Agency 

GENERAL 

During  the  fiscal  year  this  agency  maintained:  15  combined  light  and  I 
alarm  stations,  48  lights  over  4th  order,  100  small  lights  other  than  pole  ligh 
75  pole  lights,  3  Aga  lights,  6  electric  lights,  10  hand  fog  horns,  3  lifesavi 
stations,  1  direction  finding  station  and  two  radio  beacons,  2  signal  statioi 
3  meteorological  stations,  15  storm  signal  stations,  1  tidal  gauge,  2  governme 
steamers. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  81 

BUOY    SERVICE 

All  the  buoys  under  the  supervision  of  this  agency  under  contract,  as  well 
s  those  maintained  by  dominion  steamers,  were  well  maintained  during  the 
ear. 

The  following  buoys  were  maintained  under  contract:  282  cans,  conicals  and 
.isks;  588  spars,  825  stakes,  894  bushes,  6  beacons,  27  winter  spars,  2  gas  buoys, 
bell  buoy,  and  1  gas  and  bell. 

The  following  buoys  were  maintained  by  dominion  steamers:    10  bells,  3 
as  and  bell,  5  whistlers,  4  gas  and  whistlers,  2  gas  buoys,  21  conicals,  18  can-. 
oasks,  9  spars  and  6  beacons. 

CHANGES  IN  AND  ADDITIONS  TO  BUOY  SERVICES 

Antigonish,  N.S. — Twenty-four  hardwood  bushes  placed  on  starboard  side  to 
i ark  channel  in  harbour. 

Clyde  River,  Queen's  Co.,  P.E.I.— Twenty  bushes  placed  to  mark  channel 
com  junction  with  Elliot  river  to  Clyde  river  bridge. 

East  Point,  P.E.I. — Red  steel  cylindrical  whistle  buoy  established  June  2, 
928,  off  East  Point,  P.E.I. 

Hillsboro  Bay,  P.E.I. — Eighteen  additional  bushes  placed  marking  channel 
i  upper  reaches  of  Elliot  river. 

Miramichi  Bay,  N.B. — Three  hardwood  bushes  on  starboard  side  and  three 
pruce  bushes  on  port  side  to  mark  channel  in  French  river. 

Neguac  Gully,  N.B. — The  black  can  buoy  at  entrance  to  Gully  replaced  by 
red  steel  conical  buoy.    Two  red  wooden  spar  buoys  at  entrance  to  Gully  and 
ne  red  spar  north  side  channel  inside  discontinued. 

Port  Borden,  P.E.I. — Another  spar  buoy  placed  to  mark  edge  of  bank  show- 
is;  dredging. 

Pugwash,  N.S. — Two  black  wooden  spar  buoys  discontinued  and  two  red 
;rooden  spar  buoys  established. 

Richibucto,  N.B. — Bell  buoy  at  entrance  to  harbour  replaced  by  gas  buoy 
bowing  occulting  light  at  opening  of  navigation  1928. 

Savage  Harbour,  P.E.I. — Placed  red  steel  conical  and  black  can  buoys  on 
iar  and  black  wood  spar  and  red  wood  spar  to  mark  channel. 

Shemogue,  N.B. — Black  can  and  red  conical  at  entrance  to  hafbour  discon- 
inued  and  steel  conical  with  black  and  white  vertical  stripes  established  at 
pening  of  navigation  1928. 

CHANGES  IN  AND  ADDITIONS  TO  LIGHTHOUSE  SERVICE 

Eastern  Harbour,  N.S. — Temporary  red  light  on  pole  erected  while  ware- 
ouse  is  being  erected  on  wharf. 

Echowie,  Alright  Island,  M.I. — New  lighthouse  and  shelter  shed  erected  and 
pparatus  installed. 

Georgetown  Harbour,  P.E.I. — Set  of  pole  range  lights  established  on  railway 
'harf  and  shore. 

Inverness  Harbour,  N.S. — Set  of  pole  range  lights  established  on  western  side 
f  east  breakwater. 

Kouchibouguac,  N.B. — Ranges  relocated  to  mark  new  channel  June  12,  1928. 

88174-6 


82  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

Mutton  Bay,  Labrador. — Set  of  pole  range  lights  established  on  west  side 
entrance. 

Panmure  Island,  P. El. — Light  apparatus  changed. 

Pictou  Island,  East  End  Light,  N.S. — New  4th  order  clock  work  installed. 
Savage  Harbour,  P.E.I. — Range  lights  moved  across  harbour  and  blocked  up.! 
St.  Louis  Gully,  N.B. — Ranges  relocated  to  mark  new  channel  June  22,  1928  j 
Tracadie,  P.E.I. — Temporary  ranges  discontinued  from  June  18,  1928. 

REPAIRS,   ETC. 

Amour  Point  Light. — Material  supplied  for  new  barn. 

Annandale  Light. — Lighthouse  painted. 

Bay  du  Vin  Light.— 'Chimney  repaired. 

Belle  Isle  Northeast  Light. — General  repairs  to  station.  Concrete  docl; 
repaired.    New  hoisting  winch  supplied  and  installed. 

Belle  Isle  Southwest  Light. — Material  supplied  for  general  repairs  to  station 

Bird  Rocks  Light. — Installed  water  tank  for  dwelling. 

Blockhouse  Light. — Wire  fence  along  right-of-way  repaired.  Lighthous 
tower,  dwelling  and  outbuildings  painted. 

Cape  Anguille  Light. — Tower  foundation  block  repaired;  renewed  nv; 
windows  and  wooden  door  of  tower;  double  doors  for  coal  sheds  and  storn 
window  for  fog  alarm  building. 

Cape  Bauld  Light. — Concrete  repairs  to  face  of  landing  dock. 

Cape  Egmont  Light. — Road  leading  from  lighthouse  to  main  road  repaired 

Cape  Norman  Light. — Kitchen  floor  of  dwelling  renewed ;  fog  alarm  f oundai 
tion  repaired;  plank  walk  repaired. 

Cape  Ray  Light. — Verandah  flooring  and  steps  renewed;  roof  reshingled 
gutter  and  conductor  renewed;  four  window  frames  and  sashes  renewed  in  dwell 
ing;  chimney  rebuilt  from  roof  up. 

Cape  Try  on  Light. — Lantern  deck  recanvassed;  flashing  around  lantern  basj 
renewed;  unused  chimney  taken  down  and -hole  boarded  in;  leaks  in  roof  an 
plaster  in  dwelling  repaired. 

Entry  Island  Light. — Fence  repaired. 

Escuminac  Light. — Concrete  repairs  effected  to  protection  wall  in  front  < 
lightstation. 

Ferolle  Point  Light. — Roofs  of  dwelling,  fog  alarm  building,  oil  shed  an 
boathouse  repaired.     Road  gravelled  and  otherwise  repaired. 

Flowers  Island  Light. — Roof  of  dwelling  repaired;  flue  rebuilt  from  roof  lev* 

Grand  Etang  Light.— Lighthouse  re-erected. 

Henry  Island  Light.— Foundation  and  chimney  repaired. 

Little  Channel  Rg.—New  foundation  placed  under  front  light. 

Margaree  Island  Light— Road  repaired.  New  floor  in  kitchen  and  dmii 
room.     Upstairs  in  dwelling  sheathed. 

Mitninegash  Rg.  Lights.— Foundation  of  back  light  renewed. 

Mullins  Point  Light.— Dwelling  flue  rebuilt. 

Murray  Harbour  Lights.— -Timber  breastwork  repaired. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MIS  1ST  El;  83 

Northport  Rg.  Lights. — Flashing  above  sill  of  back  light  renewed. 

Pictou  Island  East  End  Light. — Repairs  to  foundation.     New  fence  erected. 

Pompquet  Island  Light. — Galvanized  pipe  rail  around  lantern  deck  renewed. 

Preston  Beach  Light. — Repairs  effected  to  protection  work  at  front  light. 

Richibucto  Channel. — New  pole  and  hut  erected  replacing  back  light  which 
was  demolished  by  storm. 

Richibucto  Head  Light. — Fencing  renewed. 

Richibucto  North  Beach  Lights. — Sill  of  front  light,  roofs  of  huts,  plank 
platform  renewed.    Shelter  shed  relocated.    Service  dory  supplied. 

St.  Mary  Island  Light. — Roofs  of  dwelling  and  boathouse  reshingled ;  end  of 
Slipway  renewed.     Plank  walks  repaired. 

St.  Peter's  Harbour  Ranges. — Front  light  rebuilt. 

St.  Peter's  Island  Light. — Tower  painted. 

Sea  Cow  Head  Light. — Roof  reshingled;  floor  in  room  of  dwelling  replaced. 

Souris  Light. — Old  well  filled  in. 

Tracadie  Light,  P.E.I. — Placed  new  supports  and  foundation  under  tower. 

Warren  Farm  Rg.  Lights. — Both  range  towers  painted. 

METEOROLOGICAL    SERVICE 

Most  of  the  storm  signal  stations  were  inspected,  and  the  following  repairs 
were  effected: — 

Beach  Point,  P.E.I. — Signal  shed  reshingled  and  painted.  Hasp  and  padlock 
placed. 

Georgetown,  P.E.I. — Mooring  posts  placed  on  concrete  blocks.  Shed,  mast. 
etc.,  painted. 

Point  Du  Chene,  N.B. — Deck  of  wharf  in  front  of  storm  signal  shed,  also 
mast,  repaired. 

LIFE-SAVING    STATIONS 

The  equipment  of  the  life-saving  stations  in  the  district  Avere  inspected, 
i Repairs  were  effected  to  the  roof  of  the  lifeboat  house  at  Charlottetown  station. 

DOMINION    PIERS 

Repairs  were  effected  to  the  following  wharves:  Charlottetown,  North  Cardi- 
gan, Hickey's,  Summerside. 

DOMINION    STEAMERS 

The  C.G.S.  Aranmore  arrived  at  Charlottetown  on  July  12,  1928,  to  load 
(supplies  for  the  Belle  Isle  trip.  Finished  loading  on  July  20  and  proceeded  to 
peliver  these  supplies.  Finished  landing  at  Cape  Ray  light-station  on  August  15 
and  proceeded  direct  to  Sydney  to  come  under  the  Halifax  agency.  Arrived  at 
pharlottetown  from  Sydney  on  October  11.  Loading  supplies  for  the  Belle 
Isle  trip  October  12  to  17.  Sailed  on  October  18  to  deliver  the  supplies  and 
finished  landing  same  on  November  13.  She  proceeded  direct  from  Cape  Ray 
lightstation  to  Sydney  to  obtain  coal  and  supplies  for  the  Anticosti  lightship  and 
bunker  coal  for  the  ship.  Supplied  the  lightship  on  November  19  and  proceeded 
to  Charlottetown,  lifting  the  Magdalen  island  and  Eastern  Strait  buoys  en  route. 

88174— H 


84  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

Arrived  Charlottetown  November  22.  Discharging  empties,  etc.,  until  November 
27  when  she  proceeded  to  lift  the  remainder  of  the  large  buoys  of  this  agency. 
Completed  work  December  7  and  proceeded  that  same  day  to  Sydney,  coming 
under  the  Halifax  agency. 

The  C.G.S.  Bayfield  was  laid  up  at  the  marine  wharf,  Charlottetown,  during 
the  winter  of  1928-29  under  the  supervision  of  this  agency. 

The  C.G.S.  Brant  (new)  went  into  commission  on  April  28,  1928,  and  from 
that  date  until  May  30  she  was  engaged  in  placing  the  Charlottetown  harbour, 
Georgetown  and  Pictou  buoys.    June  1  to  9  placing  the  Magdalen  island  buoys, 
and  from  June  14  to  July  1  she  was  supplying  lighthouses  around  New  Bruns- 
wick and  the  eastern  part  of  Prince  Edward  Island.     July  6  to  August  10, 
supplying  lights  in  New  Brunswick,  Nova  Scotia  and  Magdalen  islands.     August 
10  to  25  at  marine  wharf  part  of  the  time,  crew  cleaning  ship,  etc.,  and  the 
balance  of  that  time  she  was  on  the  slip  at  Pictou.     August  25  to  November  9 
delivered  supplies  to  lights  in  Hillsboro  Bay,  Miminegash,  Crapaud  and  others; 
inspected  buoys  at  Richibucto,  relighted  West  Point  and  Tryon  shoal  buoys,  and 
inspected  the  Nova  Scotia  buoy  services  which  come  under  the  jurisdiction  of! 
this  agency;  relighted  Miscouche  shoal  buoy,  painted  the  storm  signal  mast  at; 
Summerside,  and  assisted  two  schooners  out  of  Summerside.     November  9  to  | 
December  18,  at  Pictou  Island  East  End  light  with  Foreman  Mechanic  Hobbs; 
changing  the  characteristic  of  that  light,  also  lifted  some  of  the  buoys  in  that 
vicinity.     December  18  to  January  15,  ship  being  laid  up  for  the  season,  the! 
men  being  paid  off  on  January  15,  1929. 

The  C.G.S.  Brant  (old)  was  laid  up  at  the  marine  wharf,  Charlottetown, 
during  the  fiscal  year  1928-29. 

The  C.G.S.  Montcalm  arrived  at  Charlottetown  on  May  5,  1928,  to  place 
the  large  buoys  of  this  agency.  She  commenced  placing  them  on  May  7  and! 
completed  her  work  on  May  11,  proceeding  towards  Quebec  that  same  date. 

The  C.G.S.  Ostrea  was  reconditioned  and  launched  at  the  marine  wharf,; 
Charlottetown,  at  the  opening  of  navigation  under  the  supervision  of  this  agency; 
and  was  then  handed  over  to  the  Fisheries  Branch  for  operation.  She  was  laidj 
up  at  the  marine  wharf  at  the  close  of  navigation  and  looked  after  by  the  wharfj 
staff  during  the  winter  season. 

Fort  William,  Ont.,  Stjbagency 

On  April  16,  the  tug  James  Whalen  started  icebreaking  in  Thunder  bayi 
reaching  open  water  April  19  at  Thunder  cape. 

On  May  1,  all  lightkeepers  were  sent  to  their  stations  numbering  10  stations] 
and  17  persons. 

On  May  2,  all  the  ice  was  blown  out  of  Thunder  bay  with  a  strong  north- 
west wind,  the  Saskadoc,  Soodoc,  Canadoc  and  Vandoc  were  the  first  vessels  to 
leave  for  eastern  ports. 

On  May  4,  the  C.P.R.  ss.  Assinihoine  was  the  first  vessel  arrival  from, 
eastern  ports,  and  all  harbour  and  shore  lights  were  put  in  commission  at  Port, 
Arthur  and  Fort  William. 

On  May  7  and  8,  all  spar  buoys  were  placed  in  both  harbours. 

On  May  9,  sent  tug  to  Angus  island  lightstation  for  erector  James 
McDonald. 

On  May  14,  placed  gas  and  bell  buoy  at  Port  Arthur  main  entrance,  gae 
and  bell  buoy  at  Hare  island  reef,  gas  buoy  at  Welcome  shoal,  gas  and  bell  buoy 
;i<  South  Fort  William  entrance  and  gas  buoy  at  Fort  William  north  entrance. 

On  May  15,  placed  gas  accumulators  at  Thunder  cape  and  Pie  island  Aga 
lights!  al  ions. 

On  June  9,  removed  C.  D.  Lockwood,  Slate  island  lightkeeper  from  his 
station  to  R.  M.  and  G.  Hospital  at  Port  Arthur. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  85 

On  August  2,  ss.  Grenville  arrived  at  Port  Arthur,  after  supplying  all  light- 
stations  in  this  district  left  August  6,  for  eastern  ports. 

On  September  3,  the  Murray  Stewart  arrived  at  Fort  William  from  Lamb 
island  after  discharging  a  cargo  of  fog  alarm  supplies.  After  taking  on  a 
quantity  of  supplies  and  oil,  left  September  5,  calling  at  Angus  island  and  Slate 
island  discharging  supplies. 

On  September  20,  the  new  fog  alarm  station  went  in  commission  at  Lamb 
island. 

On  October  29,  some  new  repair  work  was  done  to  the  foundation  of  the 
Port  Arthur  main  lightstation  at  Port  Arthur,  Ont. 

On  December  6,  Hare  island  reef  gas  and  bell  buoy  also  Welcome  shoal 
gas  buoy  were  removed  for  the  winter. 

On  December  12,  Fort  William  and  Port  Arthur  gas  bell  and  gas  buoys  were 
all  removed  for  the  winter.  Hired  tug  to  convey  wire  to  lightkeeper  Allen 
Murray  at  Trowbridge  island  of  the  death  of  his  sister.  Steamers  Fitch,  Warner, 
Thompson,  Squire  and. Shaughnessy ,  the  last  vessels  to  leave  for  eastern  ports. 

On  December  18,  ss,  Doris  last  vessel  to  arrive.  The  tug  James  Whalen 
immediately  left  to  remove  the  lightkeepers  from  the  north  shore,  returning 
December  21,  with  all  Canadian  keepers  including  Passage  island,  U.S.A.  ' 

On  December  22,  all  shore  and  harbour  aga  lights  were  discontinued. 

Fifty  spar  buoys  were  established  and  maintained  in  this  district  including 
three  at  Victoria  island  surroundings,  also  3  gas  and  bell  buoys  and  2  gas  buoys. 

There  are  6  aga  lightstations,  one  set  of  oil  ranges,  one  set  of  electric  ranges, 
one  electric  light  also'  eleven  manned  lighthouses  maintained  in  this  district. 

Five  gas  buoy  lanterns  were  shipped  to  Parry  Sound  for  repairs. 

Parry  Sound,  Ont.,  Agency 

The  agency  maintained  with  the  launch  Duncan  all  Parry  Sound  unwatched 
I  lights,  and  the  spar  buoy  service  in  the  inner  channel  between  Parry  Sound, 
!  Waubaushene,  Fesserton,  Coldwater,  and  the  channel  north  of  Parry  Sound  as 
far  as  Shawanaga  bay. 

During  the  winter  of  1929,  twenty-nine  Aga  and  sixty  Pintsch  buoy  lanterns 
j  were  overhauled  and  tested  in  the  agency,  after  which  they  were  reshipped  to 
!  their  localities  for  service. 

BUOYS  AND   BEACONS 

During  the  year  there  were  maintained  in  the  district:  2  bell  buoys,  1  conical 
buoy,  19  gas  buoys,  283  spar  buoys,  and  55  day  beacons. 

CONSTRUCTION   AND  REPAIRS 

Town  Point,  Gore  Bay. — Established  pole  light. 

Kemps  Narrows. — Established  pole  light. 

Pointe  aux  Pins,  Lake  Superior. — Installed  fog  bell. 

Angus  Island. — Installed  machinery  in  new  light  and  fog  alarm  station. 

Stribling  Point. — Repaired  tower  of  back  light, 

Gibbons  Point  Beacons. — Installed  two  day  beacons. 

Extended  carbide  house  and  boat  shed. 


86  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

DOMINION    STEAMERS 

C.G.S.  Grenville. — April  23  to  June  21.— Landed  all  lightkeepers  at  out- 
lying stations,  restored  the  buoy  service,  relighted  beacons,  etc.,  in  the  Georgian 
bay  and  upper  end  of  lake  Huron.  Served  steam  coal  to  fog  alarm  stations. 
Adjusted  compasses.  Endeavoured  to  recover  gas  buoys  which  went  adrift  in 
1927.    Cleaned,  painted  and  prepared  ship  for  annual  supply  trip. 

ANNUAL    SUPPLY   TRIP 

Commenced  the  trip  on  June  22  and  finished  on  September  12.  All  light- 
stations  and  fog  alarm  stations,  buoy  services,  lightships,  etc.,  in  the  division 
were  inspected  and  served  with  the  usual  supplies,  as  detailed  below. 

June  22-July  7. — Lake  Huron  and  lower  end  of  Georgian  bay. 

July  10- July  21. — Georgian  bay  upper  end,  and  Manitoulin  island,  also 
part  of  North  channel. 

July  24-August  8. — Lake  Superior. 

August  9- August  11. — Lower  end  North  channel. 

August  17- August  18. — Lake  Huron. 

August  20-August  22. — St.  Clair  river  and  lake,  also  Detroit  river. 

August  23-September  10. — Lake  Erie. 

From  September  10-12  the  vessel  en  route  to  Parry  Sound. 

From  September  12  on  to  the  close  of  navigation  the  vessel  was  employed 
advantageously  in  connection  with  general  buoy  and  lighthouse  work  in  the 
immediate  district.  She  was  in  drydock  at  Midland  for  underwater  inspection 
and  repairs  from  'September  17-24. 

She  commenced  withdrawing  buoys  and  outlying  lightkeepers  around 
November  18,  and  terminated  this  work  on  December  16. 

Laid  up  at  Midland  for  the  winter. 

C.G.S.  Murray  Stewart. — May  3-June  5. — Landed  all  outlying  keepers  in 
lake  Superior  east  end  and  assisted  in  restoring  the  buoy  service  in  the  Soo 
vicinity.  Installed  apparatus  Sulphur  island,  also  at  Town"  point  and  Soutf 
Baymouth,  Manitoulin  island.    Adjusted  compasses  at  Parry  Sound. 

June  7-16. — Dredged  at  Parry  Sound  wharf. 

June  17-23. — Delivered  sailboat  at  Collingwood  for  repairs. 

At  Owen  Sound  for  ship  repairs.  Installed  new  apparatus  at  Griffith  island, 
and  back  to  Parry  Sound. 

June  26. — Served  supplies  to  Cabot  head  and  Tobermory. 

July  11. — Whitewashed  Cove  island  tower,  etc.  Painted  Midland  range 
lights.  Repaired  front  range  Honey  harbour,  and  placed  spar  buoy  in  vicinity. 
At  Parry  Sound  July  7.  Cleaned  and  painted  ship.  Did  more  dredging  at 
Parry  Sound  wharf.  Attended  to  Cove  island  fairway  reported  out,  ah 
O'Brien  Patch  gas  buoy,  and  returned  to  Parry  Sound. 

July  12-August  12.— Re-erected  boat  lift  at  Western  island. 

August  1. — Examined  into  Minnicoganashene  channel.  Repaired  Toby 
rear  range  and  replaced  buoys  Honey  harbour.  Whitewashed  Nottawasag* 
island  tower.     Relighted  Candlemas  shoal  buoy  reported  extinguished. 

August  3— August  25.— In  dry  dock  at  Midland  for  underwater  inspection 
and  repairs.  Installed  wireless  set  on  board  and  general  repairs  done  to  ship. 
Relighted  Candlemas  shoal  gas  buoy,  and  back  to  Parry  Sound. 

August  27-October  10.— Prepared  for  Lamb  island  trip,  lake  Superior. 
Repaired  diaphonc  at  Parisian  island.  Landed  supplies  Quebec  harbour  and 
arrived  Lamb  island  September  2.  Visited  several  stations  Port  Arthur  vicinity 
for  certain  repair  work  to  be  done,  and  arrived  Soo  September  8.     Served  coal 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  87 

to  Gros  Cap  lightship.  Installed  fog  bell  at  Point  aux  Pins.  Repaired  Strib- 
iing  point  tower.  Inspected  Sulphur  island  uuwalched  light.  Whitewashed 
Great  Duck  island  tower.  Inspected  O'Brien  Patch  gas  buoy,  and  back  to 
Parry  Sound  October  10. 

From  October  10  on  to  the  close  of  navigation  this  vessel  was  also 
employed  as  best  possible  in  connect  ion  with  the  lighthouse  ami  buoy  service  of 
ill/  immediate  division. 

In  December  she  removed  all  the  outlying  keepers  as  well  as  some  of  the 
buoys  in  the  east  end  of  lake  Superior,  terminating  this  work  on  December  17, 
when  she  laid  up  for  the  winter  at  Sault  Ste.  Marie. 

The  wireless  set  installed  on  the  vessel  last  summer  proved  a  great  help 
and  comfort  during  the  vessel's  last  trip  in  the  fall. 

Kenora,   Ont.,  Sub-Agency   Report 

Rainy  Lake. — The  steamer  Laura  A  was  engaged  from  May  22,  to  June 
3,  painting  and  replacing  buoys.  Fifty-two  buoys  were  painted  and  seven 
replacements  were  made. 

Lake  of  the  Woods. — The  steamer  Redwing  was  engaged  from  June  9  to 
.June  27,  painting  and  replacing  buoys.  Three  hundred  and  two  were  painted, 
and  fifty-six  were  replaced,  and  thirteen  new  buoys  were  established.  The 
character  of  the  ldghtstation  at  the  mouth  of  Rainy  river  was  changed  from  a 
range  light  to  a  fixed  white  light.  At  the  close  of  navigation,  new  unwatehed 
lights  were  established  at  Quick's  island,  and  at  Bruel  point.  Owing  to  the  late- 
ness of  the  season,  these  were  not  put  into  operation. 

Shoal  Lake. — The  steamer  Redwing  was  engaged  on  June  28-29,  painting 
and  replacing  buoys.  Twenty-two  buoys  were  painted,  and  four  replacements 
were  made. 

Winnipeg  River. — The  launch  Moose  was  employed  June  9-11  painting 
buoys.    Thirty-two  buoys  were  painted. 

Lac  Seul. — Examination  was  made  of  Lac  Seul,  and  reports  made  on  the 
de-irabiLity  of  aids  to  navigation  being  established. 

No  Government  vessels  were  employed  on  any  of  the  lakes. 

Montreal,  P.Q.,  Agency 

Total  expenditure  for  the  fiscal  year  amounted  to  $457,357.15,  an  increase 
of  $6,778.04,  over  the  1927-28  expenditure. 

REPAIRS 

He  de  Grace  Front. — Construction  of  new  range  to  replace  old  one  which 
was  in  danger  of  falling  into  the  river  owing  to  undermining  of  bank. 

He  Deslauriers  Front. — Erection  of  new  concrete  pier  and  light,  to  replace 
one  carried  away  by  action  of  ice. 

He  St.  Ours  Course  Front. — Construction  of  new  front  light  and  move  back 
present  high  light  to  new  site.    Erection  of  new  range. 

Lake  St.  Peter  Curve  No.  2. — Repairs  to  pier  which  was  damaged  by  Spring 


ice. 


La  Perade  Range. — Erection  of  four  section  steel  skeleton  tower 
Longue  Pointe  Traverse  Range. — Reconstruction  of  range. 


88  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

Lachine-Caughnawaga  Channel— Installation  of  new  lighting  apparatus. 

Lake  St.  Peter  Curve  No.  2  and  Ptc.  du  Lac  F. — Reconstruction  of  steel  sub- 
structure so  that  they  could  be  used  with  gas  installations  during  high  water. 

Pointe  du  Lac  and  Lake  St.  Peter  Curve  No.  2. — Reconstruction  of  steel, 
substructure  so  that  they  could  be  used  with  gas  installations  during  high  water.] 

Portneuf  en  Haut. — General  repairs  to  dwelling,  lantern,  outbuildings,  etc. 

St.  Valentin  Range. — Rebuilding  front  light,  pier  and  lantern. 

Vieille  Eglise. — Establishment  of  range  lights. 

MAINTENANCE    AND   REPAIRS    TO    WHARVES 

St.  Denis  wharf. — Repairs  to  wharf. 
Papineauville  wharf. — Electric  lighting. 
L'Orignal  wharf. — Electric  lighting. 

DOMINION    STEAMERS 

C.G.S.  Argenteuil. — Employed  in  buoy  service,  lighthouse  construction.; 
painting,  supplies  and  other  repair  work  on  lake  St.  Louis,  Ottawa  and  Riche-i 
lieu  rivers;  also  was  used  quite  extensively  for  minor  repairs  to  wharves. 

C.G.S.  Emilia. — Was  used  with  buoy  service,  such  as  recharging  gas  buoys.i 
painting  and  repairing  lighthouses,  as  well  as  general  construction  work  and  i?| 
practically  a  floating  work  shop. 

C.G.S.  Shamrock. — Was  used  for  general  buoy  service  work,  delivery  oi 
lighthouse  supplies  in  the  lower  end  of  the  district,  and  owing  to  the  large  num- 
ber of  floating  aids  to  navigation,  was  kept  constantly  busy.  This  vessel  was 
destroyed  by  fire  on  September  29,  1928. 

C.G.S.  Vercheres. — Was  used  in  such  work  as  maintaining  and  painting  oi 
bank  beacons,  lighthouses,  and  night  and  day  patrol  and  inspection  work.  Re- 
charging and  maintaining  in  order  all  shore  gas  stations,  towing  of  scows  with 
construction  and  maintenance  material,  and  in  conjunction  with  the  scow 
Acetylene,  the  buoy  service  work. 

Tug  Lanoraie  and  scow  Acetylene  were  used  for  buoy  service  work  aftei 
buoy  steamer  Shamrock  was  destroyed  by  fire. 

C.G.S.  Berthier,  tugs  Becancour,  Lavaltrie,  Lac  St.  Pierre,  Laviolette,  and| 
Varennes,  also  coal  barges  No.  6  and  No.  5,  were  used  spring  and  fall  for  buoy 
laying  and  raising  purposes. 

Quebec,  P.Q.,  Agency 

The  district  under  control  of  this  agency  is  a  very  large  one  and  comprise 
many  important  waterways.  It  extends  from  Portneuf ,  38  miles  above  Quebec! 
along  the  north  shore  of  the  St.  Lawrence  river  to  Natashquan,  a  distance  oi 
530  miles  below  Quebec,  and  Platon,  opposite  Portneuf,  along  the  south  shore  ol 
the  St.  Lawrence  river  to  cap  d'Espoir,  a  distance  of  455  miles,  and  thence  up  the 
north  shore  of  Chaleur  bay  along  the  Restigouche  river  to  one  mile  abov( 
Campbellton,  and  then  along  the  south  side  of  the  bav  around  Miscou  island  to 
Shippigan  gully,  N.B.,  all  the  coast  of  Anticosti  island,  which  is  120  miles  long; 
bold  shores  of  the  Saguenay  river,  from  Tadoussac  to  a  point  about  five  mile^ 
above  Chicoutimi,  P.O.,  all  around  lake  St.  John,  which  lake  is  about  30  mile- 
diameter,  and  all  the  bays,  sounds  and  navigable  rivers  in  the  above  regions. 


REPORT  OF  77/  E  DEPUTY  MINISTER  89 

The  total  shore  line  of  the  district  is  about  1,800  miles,  and  it  comprises 
many  water  routes  varying  from  the  main  gulf  routes  and  the  St.  Lawrence  river 
to  many  small  intricate  and  comparatively  shallow  channels. 

In  the  sections  above  described  the  following  aids  to  navigation  are  main- 
tained under  the  control  of  the  agency:  — 

Number  of  lights 328 

Number  of  machine  operated  fog  alarms,  hand  fog  horns  and  fog  bolls 48 

Number  of  bomb  signal  fog  alarms 2 

Number  of  gas  buoys 80 

Number  of  combined  gas  and  bell  buoys 10 

Number  of  bell  buoys 1 

Number  of  unlighted  buoys 260 

Number  of  stakes  and  bushes 4(> 

Number  of  unlighted  beacons (II 

The  following  vessels  are  maintained  in  the  service:  — 

Mikula Jalobert    (pilot   tender) ..  Lower   Traverse    lightship 

Montcalm Relief   lightship   No.   25..  Red   Island   lightship 

Druid White    Island    lightship.  .  Isle-aux-Coudres   lightship 

Loos Prince    Shoal    lightship.. 

(All  self-propelling,  excepting  Prince  Shoal  lightship) . 

There  are  also  maintained:    81  wharves  and  32  storm  signal  stations. 

The  total  expenditure  of  the  agency  for  the  past  fiscal  year  was  $1,150,225.30. 

AIDS    TO    NAVIGATION 

New  establishments: — 

Lower  Caraquet  wharf  light. 

Fauvel  light. 

Riviere  Nouvelle  light. 

Anse  aux  Canards  light. 

Chandler  channel  1  can  buoy  (red  conical  buoy  discontinued) . 

Cannes  des  Roches  light. 

Point  Peter  stronger  hand  foghorn. 

L'Anse  a  Brillant  light. 

Cape  Whittle  light. 

Agouanish  range  lights. 

Anse  au  Vallon  range  lights. 

Fregate  point  range  lights. 

Riviere  a  Claude  light. 

Ste  Anne  des  Monts  river,  2  day  beacons  (spar  buoy  discontinued) . 

Cawee  Island,  light  and  fog  alarm  (unwatched  gas  occulting  white  light 
discontinued) . 

Chat  river,  light  established  outer  end  new  extension  to  wharf. 

Outardes  point  range  lights. 

Portneuf  river  gas  buoy  (25^-B)   off  mouth  of  river. 

Tadoussac  light. 

St.  Fulgence  light. 

St.  Fulgence  riv.  Saguenay,  1  conical  buoy  4-S. 

Peribonca  river  range  lights  (Peribonca  inner  and  outer  ranges  discon- 
tinued) . 

St.  Roch  Traverse  56-B  gas  and  bell  buoy  instead  of  gas  buoy. 

Channel  Patch  black  gas  buoy  63-^-B  white  occulting  light. 

Algernon  rock,  unwatched  gas  white  occulting  light  (oil  lamp  discon- 
tinued) . 

St.  Michel  range  lights. 


90  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

Discontinued:  — 

Big  shippigan  hand  fog  horn. 

Chandler  channel,  1  red  conical  buoy  (1  black  buoy  established). 

Cape  d'Espoir  red  spar  buoy. 

Heath  point  light  fog  signals. 

Ste.  Anne  des  Monts  river,  spar  buoy   (2  day  beacons  established). 

Chat  river  red  spar  buoy. 

Chat  river  range  lights  (light  established  on  outer  end  new  extension  to 

wharf) . 
Cawee  island,  unwatched  gas  occulting  white  light  (new  light  and  fod 

alarm  established) . 
Chicoutimi  wharf,  transferred  to  Chicoutimi  Harbour  Commission. 
Chicoutimi  basin  wharf      " 
Ste.  Anne  de  Chicoutimi      " 

Riviere  aux  Vases  wharf     "  "  "  " 

Peribonca  inner  and  outer  ranges,  (Peribonca  river  range  established).! 
56-B  gas  buoy  (gas  and  bell  buoy  established). 
Algernon  rock,  oil  lamp  (gas  unwatched  light  established) . 

REPAIRS,    ALTERATIONS,    IMPROVEMENTS    AND   CHANGES 

Big  Shippigan  Light. — New  oil  shed,  demolished  old  tower,  old  dwelling 
and  shed,  clockwork,  one  new  small  flat  bottom  boat. 

Caribou  Cove. — Back  light  heightened. 

Marcelle  Point. — Lighthouse  lantern  repaired. 

St.  Omer  Light. — Moved  to  outer  end  of  wharf. 

Little  Bonaventure. — Light  moved  to  outer  end  new  extension  to  wharf. 

St.   Godfroy. — Light  moved  to  outer  end  new  extension  of  wharf,   lighl 
changed  from  red  to  white. 

Anse  aux  Gascons. — Light  moved  to  outer  end  of  wharf. 

Paddy  Shoal. — Clock  work  repaired. 

Heath  Point  Lightship. — New  steam  fog  whistle. 

Heath  Point  Lighthouse  tower  repaired  by  Construction  branch. 

West  Point,  Anticosti. — Second  order    dioptric    replaced    by    long  focuf 
reflectors,  light  flashing  instead  of  fixed. 

He  au  Marteau. — New  fresh  water  steel  tank  outside  fog  alarm. 

Griffin  Cove. — Position  range  lights  changed. 

lies  de  Mai. — Oil  lamp  discontinued  (unwatched  gas  white  occulting  ligh 
instead) . 

Chat   River. — Range   lights   discontinued,   one  light  established   on   oute: 
end  new  extension  of  wharf. 

Mechins  Wharf. — Light  moved  to  outer  end  new  extension  to  wharf. 

Matane  Light. — Clock  work  repaired. 

Matane.— Range  lights  moved  and  heightened. 

Rimouski  Harbour  Range. — Lights  improved,  day  beacons  established. 

Grandes  Bergeronnes.— Vertical  black  stripe  painted  on  white  day  mark. 

St.  Alphonse  Wharf.— New  freight  shed  built. 

St.  Alphonse  Light. — New  lantern  built. 

lie  au  Belier  Front  Light.— Shed  rebuilt. 

Pointe  Bleue.—0\\  shed  and  mast  rebuilt. 


REPORT  OF  77/ A'  DEPUTY  MINISTER  91 

Brandy  Pots. — Two  station  boats  repaired,  concrete  landing  slip  repaired. 
Cape  Dogs. — Landing  platform  repaired. 

Goose  Cape  Fog  Alarm. — Additional  oil  storage  steel  tank  installed. 
Ste.  Felicite. — Old  fog  alarm  air  steel  tank  replaced  by  a  new  one. 
Upper  Traverse  Pier. — Two  unwatched  gas  lights  established  in  the  fall 
in  lieu  of  flashing  white  light, 

Montmagny  Range. — Front  light  rebuilt. 

Minor  repairs  were  also  carried  out  as  follows,  on  wharves,  lights,  storm 
signals  and  small  boats. 

During  the  past  fiscal  year,  this  agency  maintained  5  lightships,  328  lights 
including  23  fog  alarms,  also  unwatched  gas  and  electric  lights,  53  buoy  services 
by  contractors,  consisting  of  298  buoys  and  stakes,  83  government  wharves, 
inspected  33  storm  signals,  maintained  by  government  steamers  146  gas  and 
other  buoys,  12  unwatched  gas  beacons,  61  day  beacons. 

WHARVES 

Eighty-one  wharves  are  under  the  control  of  the  Quebec  agency;  one  new 
I  wharf  having  been  transferred  to  this  agency  viz.:   Pointe  aux  Orignaux,  and 
three  wharves  transferred  to  Chicoutimi  Harbour  Commission;  Chicoutimi  basin, 
Riviere  aux  Vases  and  Ste.  Anne  de  Chicoutimi. 

DOMINION   STEAMERS 

C.G.S.  Mikula. — This  very  powerful  ice-breaker  was  under  the  charge  and 
command  of  captain  John  Hearn  for  the  periods  of  time  she  was  in  commission 
during  the  fiscal  year.  Her  full  crew  consisted  of  82  officers  and  men.  At  the 
beginning  of  the  fiscal  year  she  was  occupied  in  opening  the  St.  Lawrence  river 
I  channel  between  Quebec  and  Montreal.  Left  Quebec  on  April  28  on  ice  patrol 
i  duty  in  Cabot  straits  and  returned  on  May  22.  Three-quarters  of  her  crew 
about  were  then  paid  off,  after  which  she  entered  the  dock,  and  then  brought  to  at 
our  wharf  where  preparations  were  commenced  to  lay  her  up  for  the  summer. 
I  At  the  end  of  June  there  remained  aboard  only  two  watchmen.  Throughout 
the  summer  months  contracting  firms  performed  work  aboard.  On  September 
24  the  Chief  Engineer  resumed  his  duties,  a  few  days  later  the  Mikula  engineers 
were  recalled  from  the  Stanley,  and  6  firemen  started  on  October  1,  and  also  on 
October  12  the  12  men  belonging  to  the  Mikula  who  were  returned  from  the 
Stanley  went  aboard.  By  December  1  her  full  crew  had  joined.  This  ship 
rendered  valuable  services  in  keeping  vessels  coming  through  the  gulf  St. 
Lawrence  in  the  spring  duly  informed  as  to  the  state  of  the  weather  and  the 
ice  conditions  prevailing,  and  also  in  connection  with  the  assistance  she  gave 
to  steamers  in  passing  through  the  large  ice  fields. 

C.G.S.  Druid. — During  the  whole  of  the  navigable  season  of  1928  this  vessel 
was  under  the  charge  and  command  of  captain  Edgar  Pelletier.  As  in  the  past 
she  was  engaged  in  buoy  service  work  in  general  from  Platon  (above  Quebec) 
to  Father  point  (below  Quebec) ,  covering  a  distance  of  186  miles.  The  crew 
of  this  ship  consisted  of  35  men.  Her  crew  was  completed  on  April  3,  and  she 
made  her  first  trip  on  the  13th  of  that  month  and  her  last  on  December  13.  She 
jWas  laid  up  for  the  winter  on  December  15.  From  the  very  beginning  of  the 
fiscal  year,  therefore,  she  was  on  active  service,  and  was  kept  regularly  and 
constantly  engaged  in  the  work  of  keeping  buoys  of  all  kinds  in  their  positions, 
examining  and  looking  after  the  numerous  gas  and  other  buoys  in  this  district, 
as  well  as  maintaining  quite  a  number  of  beacons  and  day  marks.     It  is  to  be 


92  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

noted  that  this  steamer  is  the  regular  buoy  service  tender,  and  that  she  made 
119  trips  during  the  time  she  was  in  commission,  covering  a  distance  of  6,800 
miles.  Her  services  were  also  utilized  in  the  towing  of  lightships  to  their 
respective  stations  in  the  spring,  and  in  towing  them  back  to  Quebec  in  the  Fall, 
as  well  as  in  keeping  them  supplied  with  necessaries  of  all  kinds  during  the 
season  of  navigation.  Delivery  of  lighthouse  supplies  and  transportation  of 
workmen  and  labourers  effecting  repairs  to  lighthouses  in  this  district  is  also 
attended  to  by  this  vessel.  The  Druid  is  at  all  times  kept  under  steam,  ready 
to  leave  at  a  moment's  notice  when  reports  reach  the  agency  that  gas  or  other 
buoys  or  lights  are  reported  out  of  position  or  either  defective  or  extinguished, 
or  else  for  any  other  need  pertaining  to  navigation  arising  in  the  river  St. 
Lawrence  between  the  points  mentioned.  The  only  time  that  this  ship  was  not  in 
active  service  during  1928  was  when  she  entered  the  dry  dock  on  July  13  for  the 
purpose  of  having  her  main  deck  caulked,  her  hull  scraped  and  painted,  her 
propellers  removed,  tailshafts  drawn,  etc.,  etc.  She  came  out  of  the  dock  on  the 
26th  of  July. 

C.G.S.  Loos. — This  vessel  was  under  the  charge  and  command  of  captain 
Amedee  Caron,  of  ITslet,  P.Q.,  during  the  whole  of  the  navigable  season  of  1928. 
Her  crew  consisted  of  20  men,  and  it  was  completed  on  April  5.  The  ship  w 
laid  up,  or  rather  put  in  her  Winter  quarters  on  December  7.  Of  small  car; 
capacity  she  is  principally  utilized  in  connection  with  lighthouse  service,  bo< 
for  the  conveyance  of  materials  for  the  Construction  branch  and  Maintenance 
Lighthouses,  and  is  also  employed  on  duty  work  relative  to  other  aids  to  navi 
gation.  She  is  also  engaged,  from  time  to  time  on  buoy  service,  as  an  aid  to  the 
regular  buoy  ship  Druid.  All  told  she  made  21  trips,  covering  a  distance  of 
10,143  miles. 

C.G.S.  Stanley. — At  the  beginning  of  the  fiscal  year  this  vessel  was  still  laid 
up  in  the  St.  Charles  river,  Quebec.  On  May  21  she  was  transferred  to  the 
King's  wharf  by  the  C.G.S.  Druid,  and  on  the  28  of  the  same  month  was  towed 
over  to  Lauzon  (across  the  river),  where  considerable  repair  work  was  effected  on 
her  at  the  dry  dock  gate  by  the  Davie  Shipbuilding  and  Repairing  Co.,  and  also 
by  departmental  labour.  She  entered  the  dry  dock  on  June  16,  and  came  out  on 
the  23  of  that  month,  and  berthed  at  the  dock  gate  to  complete  her  repair  work. 
Coming  back  to  the  King's  wharf  on  June  28,  general  repair  work  done.  By 
July  12  her  crew  of  45  officers  and  men  had  been  completed,  over  two-thirds  being 
members  of  the  crews  of  the  Mikula,  Montcalm  or  Loos.  On  July  23  coaling 
was  commenced,  and  on  July  25  she  started  loading  for  a  lighthouse  supply  trip 
to  the  North  shore,  Anticosti  island  and  Gaspe  coast,  and  left  in  the  afternoon 
of  July  28  heavily  laden.  She  returned  to  Quebec  on  August  24,  and  preparations 
were  immediately  made  to  load  her  again  in  connection  with  the  supplying  of 
the  remainder  of  the  Gaspe  coast  lights  and  stations  on  both  sides  of  Baie-des- 
Chaleurs.  She  left  again  on  Septemiber  10,  and  on  October  2  the  master  of  the! 
Stanley  received  instructions  from  Ottawa  to  proceed  with  his  ship  to  Halifax 
where  the  vessel  arrived  on  October  7,  after  which  she  was  under  the  direct 
supervision  of  the  Halifax  agency  of  the  Department. 

C.G.S.  Relief  No.  25. — This  ship,  with  a  crew  of  20  men,  was  under  the 
charge  and  command  (during  the  whole  of  the  time  she  was  in  commission)  oil 
captain  Diogene  Dcspres.  She  was  employed  in  giving  assistance  to  the  light- 
house and  buoy  steamer  Druid,  delivering  lighthouse. and  light  supplies  between 
Platon  (above  Quebec)  and  Father  point  (below  Quebec)— a  distance  of  about; 
200  miles— repairing  and  painting  buoy  beacons,  placing  and  attending  to  ga^ 
and  other  buoy  services,  coaling  lightships,  transporting  construction  materials 
replacing  lightships  brought  up  to  Quebec  to  be  docked  for  annual  overhaul 
replacing   the   pilot-tender  Jalobert   at  Father  point,   and   miscellaneous  other 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  93 

1  services    respecting    aids    to    navigation.      On    November    12    she    entered    the 

'  Champlain  dry  dock  at  Levis,  and  shortly  afterwards  was  made  use  of  in  con- 

i  nection  with  the  buoy  service   preparatory  to  the  closing  of  navigation.     On 

i  December  12  she  entered  her  winter  quarters  in  the  Louise  basin,  Quebec,  her 

i crew  being  paid  off  with  the  exception  of  the  required  number  of  men  to  lay  up 

t.he  engines  and  this  was  finally  accomplished  on  December  31.    Throughout  the 

winter  months  contracting  firms  performed  necessary  work  under  the  supervision 

of  the  steamboat  inspectors. 

C.G.S.  Montcalm. — At  the  commencement  of  the  fiscal  year  this  vessel  was 
at  Louisburg,  N.S.,  under  the  temporary  charge  of  captain  I.  C.  Rhude,  who  was 
|  relieving  captain  Oscar  Mercier  while  he  was  on  leave  of  absence.  Captain 
Mercier  rejoined  his  vessel  on  April  11,  and  shortly  afterwards  she  was  employed 
on  ice  patrol  duties,  returning  to  Quebec  on  May  13.  The  Montcalm  entered 
the  Lauzon  dry  clock  in  the  afternoon  of  May  15  for  extensive  repairs  preparatory 
to  her  trip  to  Hudson  strait.  She  came  back  to  our  wharf  about  the  middle  of 
June,  and  left  on  her  Northern  expedition  voyage  to  Hudson  strait  on  June  24, 
under  the  charge  and  command  of  captain  John  Hearn.  She  returned  to  Quebec 
on  November  14,  entering  the  dock  a  few  days  later.  On  November  19  captain 
John  Hearn  relinquished  the  charge  of  the  Montcalm  to  captain  Oscar  Mercier, 
and  assumed  the  charge  and  command  of  the  ice-breaker  Mikula.  The  Montcalm 
on  coming  out  of  dock  attended  to  the  lifting  of  buoys  in  connection  with  the 
closing  of  the  navigable  season,  and  also  attended  to  the  removal  of  aids  in 
general  as  regards  navigation,  and  was  thus  employed  until  December  15  when 
she  wras  ordered  to  have  completed  the  overhauling  of  her  machinery  and  boilers 
in  order  to  be  ready  for  sea  by  January  3,  1929.  She  finally  left  on  January  7 
for  North  Sydney  and  Louisburg,  N.S.  to  spend  the  winter  at  these  ports,  arriving 
at  the  former  port  on  January  20,  and  at  the  end  of  the  fiscal  year  she  was  at 
Louisburg,  N.S. 

Saint  John,  N.B.,  Agency 

During  the  past  year  all  aids  to  navigation  in  this  division  have  been 
inspected  by  the  district  engineer.  The  usual  annual  repairs,  cleaning  and 
painting  have  been  carried  out  at  the  various  stations. 

There  are  under  the  supervision  of  this  agency  one  hundred  and  seventy- 
three  light,  fog-alarm  and  fog-bell  stations,  classified  as  follows: — 

6  umvatched  lights — using  A.G.A.  acetylene. 
3  fog-alarm  stations  only. 

1  fog  bomb  station. 

2  fog-bell  stations  operated  by  machinery. 

7  electric  light-stations,  one  of  which  is  a  combined  light  and  fog-bell 
station. 

1  station  using  a  Banner  burner. 
7  stations  having  Piper  lanterns. 
28  vapour  light-stations,  16  of  which  are  light  and  fog-alarm  stations 

combined. 
116  stations  using  duplex  lamps,  6  being  combined  light  and  fog-alarm 
stations. 

At  Peasses  island  a  Mammoth  No.  3  lamp  is  maintained  in  addition  to  the 
55  m/m  diamond  vapour  light. 

At  Mitchener  point,  wrhere  we  have  a  duplex  lamp,  a  second  light  is  main- 
tained of  the  Mammoth  No.  3  type. 

Also,  the  Lurcher  lightship,  a  red,  steel  steamer  with  two  masts,  each  showing 
a  white  light,  equipped  with  diaphone,  submarine  fog-bell,  and  radio-telegraph 
apparatus,  and  manned  by  a  crew  of  fifteen  is  located  on  the  Lurcher  shoal, 
seventeen  miles  from  Yarmouth,  N.S. 


94  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

CHANGES  IN  LIGHTHOUSE  AND  FOG-ALARM  SERVICE 

Courtenay  Bay  Breakwater  Light,  N.B. — The  light  on  the  outer  end  of 
Courtenay  bay  breakwater  was  moved  150  feet  shoreward,  and  re-erected  on 
the  centre  light  of  the  breakwater. 

Centreville  Light,  N.S. — An  occulting,  white,  acetylene  light,  automatically 
occulted  at  short  intervals,  shown  from  a  lens  lantern,  was  established  near  the 
outer  end  of  the  government  wharf  at  Centreville. 

Joggins  Light,  N.S. — Pending  repairs  to  the  outer  end  of  the  breakwater  at 
Joggins;  the  lighthouse  has  been  removed,  and  replaced  temporarily  by  a  pole 
with  a  white  target  attached,  from  which  the  light  will  be  exhibited. 

Salter  Head  Light,  N.S. — The  fixed,  white  light,  shown  from  a  pressed  lens 
lantern,  on  the  shore  at  the  end  of  Salter  head,  was  re-established. 

Ships  Stern  Light,  N.S. — An  occulting,  white,  acetylene  light,  automatically 
occulted  at  short  intervals,  showfr  from  a  lens  lantern,  was  established  on  the 
north  end  of  Ships  Stern,  Yarmouth  harbour,  N.S. 

MAINTENANCE  OF  BUOYS  AND  BEACONS 

All  the  buoys  and  beacons  under  the  supervision  of  this  agency,  including 
those  under  contract  as  well  as  attended  by  departmental  steamers,  have  been 
well  maintained  during  the  past  year. 

The  following  is  a  list  of  those  maintained  under  contract: — 

3  barrels  6  cans 

3  dropping  buoys  15  bushed  stakes 

7  casks  7  miles  bushing 

3  spindles  517  bushes  and  stakes 

8  corneals  334  spars. 

Our  departmental  steamers  have  attended  to  the  following: — 

4  gas  55  cans 
35  bell  59  conicals 

7  whistle  107  spars 

6  gas  and  bell  25  spindles 

16  gas  and  whistle  20  stakes. 

At  Reeds  point,  Saint  John  city,  an  electric  beacon,  showing  a  red  and  white] 
light,  is  exhibited  from  a  three  branched  lamp-post. 

CHANGES  AND  ADDITIONS  TO  BUOY  SERVICE 

Benson  Cove  Gas  and  Bell  Buoy,  N.B. — A  gas  and  bell  buoy,  painted  black; 
and  white  vertical  stripes,  and  exhibiting  an  occulting,  white  light,  was  estab-; 
lished  in  the  middle  of  the  channel  at  the  eastern  entrance  to  Benson  or  Seal! 
cove,  and  3  cables  15°  30'  (N.  36°  E.  Mag.)  from  Joe's  Point,  N.B. 

Chance  Harbour  Bell  Buoy,  N.B. — This  bell  buoy  was  moved  to  a  new  posi-j 
tion  about  J  mile  109°  (S.  48°  30'  E.  Mag.)  from  Chance  harbour  light. 

Chegoggin  Point  Bell  Buoy,  N.S— A  bell  buoy,  painted  red,  was  established, 
about  i  mile  216°  30'  (S.  56°  30'  W.  Mag.)  from  the  southwest  extreme  ofj 
Chegoggin  point,  N.S. 

Cockerwit  Passage  Buoys,  N.S.— The  red,  wooden,  spar  buoy,  in  3  fathoms 
of  water  off  Barneys  ledge,  has  been  replaced  by  a  red,  steel,  conical  buoy. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  95 

Dollard  Rock  Spar  Buoy,  N.S. — A  red  and  Mack  horizontally  banded, 
wooden,  spar  buoy  was  established  on  the  western  side  of  uncharted  shoal  spot, 
about  2  miles,  9  cables  238°  30'  (S.  79°  W.  Mag.)  from  the  lighthouse  on  White- 
head island.    This  rock  is  known  as  "Dollard  Rock". 

Ox-Eye  Rock  Bell  Buoy,  N.S. — A  hell  buoy,  painted  in  black  and  white 
vertical  stripes,  was  established  in  6  fathoms  of  water,  about  1  mile  273°  30' 
(N.  66°  W.  Mag.)  from  Cape  Sable  lighthouse,  N.S.  This  buoy  will  be  main- 
tained from  June  1  to  January  15  of  each  year. 

Port  Greville  Gas  <fc  Whistling  Buoy,  N.S. — A  gas  and  whistling  buoy, 
painted  black,  and  showing  an  occulting,  white  light,  was  established  in  25 
fathoms  of  water,  1J  miles  182°  (S.  24°  W.  Mag.)  from  Port  Greville  light,  N.S. 
This  buoy  was  afterward  moved  to  a  new  position  northward  \  mile,  and  is  now 
located  li  miles  182°  (S.  24°  W.  Mag.)  from  Port  Greville  light, 

Saint  Andrews  Buoys,  N.B. — A  black,  wooden,  spar  buoy,  was  established 
in  two  fathoms  of  water  on  the  south  side  of  the  eastern  entrance  to  Saint 
Andrews  harbour,  1,750  feet  334°  34'  (N.  5°  W.  Mag.)  from  Navy  Bar  light. 

A  reel,  wooden,  spar  buoy  was  established  in  two  fathoms  of  water  on  the 
north  side  of  the  outer  end  of  the  dredged  channel  at  the  eastern  entrance  to 
Saint  Andrews  harbour,  3,100  feet  322°  30'  (N.  17°  W.  Mag.)  from  Navy  Bar 
light. 

Saint  John  River  Buoys,  N.B. — Three  additional  spar  buoys  have  been 
placed  at  each  turn  in  the  dredged  channel  at  Indian  point  and  the  entrance  to 
Maquapit  lake,  so  that  the  channel  is  now  marked  on  both  sides. 

Yarmouth  Harbour  Buoys,  N.S. — The  three  (3)  red,  spar  buoys,  formerly 
maintained  on  the  east  side  of  the  dredged  channel  between  Hen  and  Chickens 
and  Cornish  rock,  in  Yarmouth  sound,  have  been  re-established.  These  buoys 
will  be  maintained  in  future  from  about  April  1  to  December  31  of  each  year. 

METEOROLOGICAL    SERVICE 

There  are  under  the  supervision  of  this  agency  eight  signal  stations,  all  of 
which  have  been  inspected  by  the  District  Engineer.  Various  repairs  have  been 
carried  out,  where  found  necessary. 

LIFE-SAVING  SERVICE 

The  two  life-saving  stations  under  the  direction  of  this  agency,  viz.,  Bay 
View,  N.S.,  and  Little  Wood  island,  N.B.,  have  been  inspected  by  the  District 
Engineer. 

Repairs  have  been  made  where  found  necessary. 

The  station  at  Clarks  harbour,  N.S.,  was  discontinued  on  November  20. 
1928,  and  the  equipment  removed  to  St.  John. 

CONSTRUCTION    AND   REPAIRS 

Alma,  N.B. — An  8-inch  pressed  lens  lantern  wras  installed,  to  replace  the 
old  lantern  which  was  worn  out.  » 

Cape  Fourchu  Light  and  Alarm,  N.S. — Repairs  to  Cape  Fourchu  station 
which  was  badly  damaged  during  a  severe  storm  in  January,  1928. 

Cape  St.  Mary  Alarm,  N.S. — A  new  type  "  B  "  diaphonc  installed  at  Cape 
St.  Mary  Alarm,  N.S. 

Cape  Spencer  Light  and  Alarm,  N.B. — A  new  building  was  erected  to  take 
the  place  of  the  fog-alarm  building  which  was  burned  to  the  ground  November 
29,  1927.     New  diaphone  and  accessories  installed. 


96  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

Centreville  Light,  N.S. — An  unwatched  light  was  established  on  the  public 
wharf. 

Ellenwood  Island  Spindle,  N.S.— Replaced  the  spindle  at  the  head  of  Ellen- 
wood  island,  N.S.,  which  was  carried  away  by  a  storm  during  the  winter. 

Gannet  Rock  Light  and  Alarm,  N.B. — Extensive  repairs  carried  out  at  the 
station  on  Gannet  rock  which  was  badly  damaged  by  the  storm  of  January 
25,  1928. 

Hampton  Wharf,  N.S. — Minor  repairs  to  the  public  wharf. 

Harbourville  Wharf,  N.S. — Minor  repairs  carried  out. 

Kingsport  Wharf,  N.S. — Minor  repairs  to  wharf. 

Lepreau  Fog-alarm,  N.B. — Repairs  carried  out  on  the  oil  engine  at  Lepreau 
alarm. 

Machias  Seal  Island,  N.B. — Repairs  to  tramway  at  the  station  on  Machias 
Seal  island,  which  was  damaged  by  the  storm  of  January  25.  Rebuilding  drain 
and  chimneys. 

Marks  Point  Light,  N.B. — The  lens  at  Marks  Point  light  was  repaired. 

Point  Wolfe  Light,  N.B.— The  light  at  Point  Wolf  was  moved  off  the  old 
breakwater,  which  had  rotted  out  so  as  to  endanger  the  light,  and  re-erected 
17  feet  to  the  southwest. 

Salter  Head  Light,  N.S. — The  old  lighthouse  was  repaired  and  placed  in 
commission  again. 

Ships  Stern  Light,  N.S. — An  unwatched  light  was  established. 

Tiverton,  N.S. — Minor  repairs  carried  out  to  the  warehouse  on  the  public 
wharf. 

Woods  Harbour  Light,  N.S. — The  breakwater  protecting  the  lighthouse  at 
Woods  harbour  was  repaired. 

MAINTENANCE   OF   WHARFS 

There  are  under  the  supervision  of  this  agency  one  hundred  and  thirty- 
three  public  wharves,  Beaver  harbour,  N.B.,  and  Scotts  bay,  N.S.,  having  been 
added  during  the  year.  All  these  wharves  have  been  inspected  by  the  District 
Engineer,  and  repairs  made  where,  found  necessary. 

.  PARTRIDGE    ISLAND   SIGNAL    STATION 

Statement  of  vessels  reported  from  Partridge  Island,  giving  total  tonnage  of 
same,  from  April  1,  1928,  to  March  31,  1929:— 

Tonnage 

114  steamers 319, 120 

5  three-masted  schooners 2,484 

7  four-masted  schooners 5, 931 

Total    126  vessels.  327,535 

DOMINION   STEAMERS 

C.G.S.  Dollard. — This  steamer  was  constantly  employed  during  the  fiscal 
year  1928-29  in  buoy  and  lighthouse  service,  landing  coal  and  supplies  at  the 
various  stations  under  the  jurisdiction  of  this  agency. 

During  the  year  the  steamer  was  laid  off  duty  at  the  following  times  for 
repairs  as  specified:  July  14  until  August  2 — at  the  Saint  John  Dry  Dock  and 
Shipbuilding  Co.,  for  annual  overhaul.    December  10  to  21 — cleaning  boilers. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  97 

C.G.S.  Laurentian. — Was  employed  continuously  in  lighthouse  and  buoy 
service  under  the  New  Brunswick  agency  during  the  fiscal  year  1928-29.  During 
the  following  periods  this  steamer  was  laid  off  for  repairs,  as  stated:  March  27  to 
April  7 — cleaning  boilers.  August  20  to  October  9 — at  the  Saint  John  Dry 
Dock  and  Shipbuilding  Co.,  for  anunal  overhaul.  January  24  to  28,  1929 — at 
Lewis'  slip,  Saint  John,  for  repairs  to  broken  propeller  blade. 


SALVAGE  SERVICES  RENDERED  BY  THE  QUEBEC  SALVAGE  AND 

WRECKING  COMPANY,  LIMITED,  FROM  APRIL  1,  1928, 

TO  MARCH  31,  1929 

1928 

May  21-27. — Canadian  steamer  Clearwater — This  steamer  ran  aground 
one  half  mile  east  of  Trinity  bay,  loaded  with  pulpwood,  we  went  to  her  assist- 
ance, jettisoned  part  of  cargo,  landed  one  compressor  and  two  six-inch  pumps 
on  board  but  owing  to  heavy  storm,  vessel  was  shifted  further  on  the  beach  and 
sustained  considerable  further  damage  and  was  flooded  full  length  of  ship.  Under- 
writers' representative  ordered  us  to  return  Quebec  as  he  was  calling  for  tenders 
on  no  cure  no  pay  basis. 

July  16-17. — Norwegian  steamer  Adour — this  steamer  had  been  in  colli- 
sion with  ss.  Newton  Beach  in  the  Traverse  and  was  anchored  by  the  stern  with 
ss.  Newton  Beach's  anchor  chain  foul  of  her  propeller  and  machinery  damaged, 
we  went  to  her  assistance,  cleared  anchor  chain  and  towed  her  to  Quebec. 

July  17-19. — Greek  steamer  Michael  L.  Embiricos — this  steamer  ran  ashore 
bne  mile  west  of  Father  point,  we  went  to  her  assistance  but  steamer  released 
herself  and  proceeded  Quebec. 

July  27-August  2. — Canadian  steamer  Rose  Castle — this  steamer  had  been 
in  collision  with  ss.  Montrose  and  was  beached  off  Becancourt,  we  went  to  her 
Assistance,  rendered  necessary  work,  pumped  her  out,  refloated  her  and  brought 
per  to  dry  dock,  Quebec. 

August  19-28. — Norwegian  steamer  Queens  County — this  steamer  loaded 
with  general  cargo  bound  Europe  stranded  on  Egg  rock  off  cape  Whittle,  Labra- 
dor, we  went  to  her  assistance  and  landed  one  6-inch  motor  pump  on  board 
put  after  thorough  examination  by  Underwriters'  representative,  he  ordered  us 
;o  return  Quebec  and  called  for  tenders  on  no  cure  no  pay  basis.  We,  therefore, 
)icked  up  crew  of  stranded  vessel  and  returned  Quebec. 

September  18-26 — French  steamer  Gallier — this  steamer  loaded  with  grain 
•an  aground  off  Shallop  creek  near  South  point,  Anticosti.  we  went  to  her  assist- 
ance, partly  discharged  her,  rendered  necessary  work,  refloated  her  and  towed 
;ier  to  Quebec. 

October  20-21. — Can.  steamer  Starmount — this  steamer  loaded  with  rails 
tnd  nails  from  Sydney,  on  way  to  Montreal  struck  bottom  in  Richelieu  rapids 
ind  was  beached  off  Batiscan,  we  went  to  her  assistance  and  by  use  of  pumps, 
efloated  her  and  convoyed  her  to  Three  Rivers  for  diver's  examination  where 
liver  decreased  leaks  by  caulking  rivets  which  permitted  ship  to  proceed  to 
(lestination  under  her  own  steam  with  our  two  pumps  and  wreckers  in  attend- 
ance to  take  care  of  the  leaks. 

October  23-30. — British  steamer  Cairntorr — this  steamer  loaded  with  general 
argo  for  United  Kingdom  grounded  on  uncharted  rock  off  Wolf  island,  Labra- 
dor, we  went  to  her  assistance  when  Underwriters'  representatives  decided  vessel 
>eyond  salvage  and  requested  us  to  take  crew  on  board  and  return  Quebec. 

88174—7 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 


November  5-7.— Italian  steamer  Panaghis  M.  Hadoulis— this  steamer  in 
ballast  bound  Montreal  ran  aground  south  side  White  island,  we  went  to  her 
assistance  rendered  necessary  work,  refloated  her  and  vessel  proceeded  up  under 
her  own  steam. 

The  SS.  Lord  Strathcona  schooner  G.T.D.  properly  manned  with  all  salvage 
gear,  in  good  order,  have  been  kept  in  constant  commission  during  the  seasoE 
of  navigation  to  proceed  to  any  accidents  or  mishaps  to  ships  at  very  short 
notice. 


REPORT  OF  SALVAGE  SERVICES  RENDERED  BY  THE  PACIFIC 

SALVAGE  COMPANY,  LIMITED,  DURING  THE  YEAR 

ENDING  DECEMBER  31,   1928 

December  11,  1927,  to  January  30,  1928. — SS.  Northwestern  ashore  at  Cap* 
Mudge,  B.C.  Salvage  operations  carried  out  by  Salvage  King  and  Salvag< 
Queen  and  vessel  finally  floated  and  towed  to  Vancouver,  B.C. 

May  17,  1928. — Salvage  King  left  port  proceeding  to  the  assistance  of  th 
ss.  Nevada  ashore  at  Point  Wilson,  Puget  Sound.    Succeeded  in  floating  vessel 

July  6  to  10. — Salvage  King  left  port  July  6  for  Muchalat  arm,  Nootk 
sound,  to  assistance  of  the  barge  Bingamon  which  had  caught  fire  and  sun 
there.    Returned  to  port  July  10. 

July  14  to  August  8. — Salvage  King  left  port  July  14  proceeding  to  Wrange 
Narrows  to  aid  the  ss.  Oaxaca  ashore  between  Spike  Rocka  and  Burnt  islanc 
After  extensive  operations  succeeded  in  refloating  the  vessel  and  towing  her  t 
Vancouver,  B.C. 

August  30. — SS.  Redwood  ashore  at  Scarlet  point,  Queen  Charlotte  island! 
Salvage  King  left  port  to  proceed  to  her  assistance  but  returned  as  vessel  refloate 
without  assistance. 

September  2  to  4. — Salvage  King  left  port  to  assist  ss.  Floridian  in  colli 
sion  off  Grays  harbour.    Vessel  sank  and  was  lost,  however. 

September  6. — Vessel — name  unknown — reported  ashore  'off  Flatter} 
Salvage  King  left  port  to  search  for  same  but  could  find  no  trace  so  returnee 

September  11. — Salvage  King  proceeded  to  the  aid  of  the  ss.  Nicthero 
with  engine  trouble  off  Race  rocks.    Convoyed  the  vessel  to  William  head. 

November  22. — Salvage  King  proceeded  to  assistance  of  ss.  Albion  Stc 
ashore  on  Race  rocks.  Vessel  floated  without  assistance  but  was  taken  in  to 
to  Esquimalt. 

November  30  to  December  5. — Salvage  King  proceeded  to  the  assistance  ( 
the  Chief  Maquilla  in  sinking  condition,  latitude  50-25  N.,  longitude  175-15  V 
When  585  miles  from  Victoria,  however,  Salvage  King  recalled  as  the  Chit 
Maquilla  had  sunk. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER 


99 


RETURNS  OF  SHIPPING  MASTERS  FOR  THE  YEAR  ENDING 

DECEMBER  31,  1928 

Note.— The  Collector  of  Customs  acts  as  shipping  master  where  no  shipping  master  is  appointed. 

QUEBEC 


Name  of  Ports 

Name  of  County 

Name  of 
Shipping  Master 

Seamen 
shipped 

Seamen 

dis- 
charged 

Amount 

Gaspe 

$    cts. 

Saguenay 

Hochelaga 

I.  O.  Grey 

9,460 

8,590 

7,307  00 

Magdalen  Islands 

Bonaventure 

Gaspe 

E.  W.  LeGallais 

Nil 
Nil 
1,212 

Nil 
Nil 
670 

Nil      .. 

Phil.  LaBoutellier 

T.  Beland 

Nil      .. 

1,042  40 

St  Johns 

St.  Maurice 

J.  P.  Gariepy 

60 

73 

51  90 

10,732 

9,333 

8,401  30 

NEW  BRUNSWICK 


Albert 

Alma 

Baie  Verte 

Bathurst 

Chatham 

Dalhousie 

Dorchester 

Fredericton 

Grand  Harbour. 

Harvey 

Hillsborough 

Lepreau 

Musquash 

New  Brandon . . . 

Newcastle 

,  Riverside 

I  Rockport 

\  Sackville 

i  St.  Andrews 

!  St.  George 

!  St.  John 

;  St.  Martins 

j  St.  Stephen 

|  Shediac 

Shippigan 


Albert 

Albert 

Westmoreland . . . 

Gloucester 

Northumberland . 

Restigouche 

Westmoreland . . . 

York 

Charlotte 

Albert 

Albert 

Charlotte 

St.  John 

Gloucester 

Northumberland , 

Albert 

Westmoreland . . . 
Westmoreland . . . 

Charlotte 

Charlotte 

St.  John 

St.  John 

Charlotte 

Westmoreland. . . 
Gloucester 


J.  E.  White 

R.J.Walls 

John  B.  Delaney. 


H.  W.  Crocker. 


John  Russell. 


J.  O.  Spinner. 
B.  S.  Purdy.. 


Nil 

1 

Nil 


16 


Nil 


22 
1,181 


1,225 


Nil 
Nil 


16 
987 


1,019 


4  50 


Nil 
10  4Q 
Nil 


0  90 


15  80 

886  60 


918  20 


NOVA  SCOTIA 


Advocate  Harbour 

Amherst 

Annapolis  Royal... 

Antigonish 

Apple  River 

Arichat 

Baddeck 

Barrington 

Barton 

Bayfield 

Belliveau  Cove 

!  Bear  River 

88174— 7i 


Cumberland. 
Cumberland. 

Annapolis 

Antigonish . . . 
Cumberland. 
Richmond . . . 

Victoria 

Shelburne 

Digby 

Antigonish . . . 

Digby 

Digby 


J.  L.  Warren. 


15 


12 


11  10 


103 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 


RETURNS     OF    SHIPPING     MASTERS     FOR    THE     YEAR     ENDING 
DECEMBER  31,  1928— Concluded 


NOVA  SCOTIA—  Continued 


Name  of  Ports 

Name  of  County 

Name  of 
Shipping  Master 

Seamen 
shipped 

Seamen 

dis- 
charged 

Amount 

Lunenburg 

C.  N.  Corkum 

57 

13 

$    cts. 
32  40 

Kings 

Guysborough 

Digby 

E.  M.  Hurst 

92 

99 

75  70 

Shelburne 

Annapolis 

Hants 

W.J.Wood 

Nil 
Nil 

27 
Nil 

5 

Nil 

10 
Nil 

1  50 
Nil 

16  50 
Nil 

Richmond 

P.  Poirier  (Act.) 

W.  J.  McMahon 

Digby 

Colchester 

Cape  Breton 

J.  S.  Henderson 

Colchester 

Guysborough 

H.  S.  Drake 

6,387 

1 

5,883 

4,958  40 
0  80 

Hants 

Antigonish 

W.  D.  Comstock 

Guysborough 

Shelburne 

*Lahave 

Lunenburg 

Guysborough 

Wm.  Maschke 

R.  Hemlow 

84 

1 

153 

27 

300 

17 

78 

1 

91 

45 
273 

80  40 

0  80 

146  50 

27  00 

411  90 

13  50 

J.  F.  Seldon 

Locke  port 

Shelburne 

W.  D.  Sutherland 

W.  W.  Lewis 

Cape  Breton 

B.  C.  Knock 

Lunenburg 

Cape  Breton 

F.  Hollo  way. . . 

Mainadieu 

Margarets  ville 

Annapolis 

Margaree 

Inverness 

Merigomish 

Pictou 

Meteghan . . . 

Digby 

L.  T.  Melanson 

34 

20 

23  66 

New  Campbellton 

North  East  Harbour 

Shelburne. . . 

North  Sydney 

Cape  Breton 

Cumberland 

Pictou 

Cumberland 

M.  J.  Ross 

337 

169 

111 

33 

105 
161 
114 

38 

200  00 

132  80 

89  70 

27  9C 

Parrsboro 

C.  Cook 

Pictou 

W.  E.  Jones 

Port  Greville 

J.  S.  Henderson 

Port  Hawkesbury 

Port  Hastings 

Port  Hood 

Port  Latour 



Port  Lome 

Port  Med  way 

Port  Morien 

Port  Mulgrave 

Port  Wade 

Port  Williams 

Pubnico 

Pugwash 

River  Hebert 

Riverport 

J.  L.  Himmelman 

D.  M.  MacAskill 

25 
Nil 

20 
Nil 

18  5( 
Nil 

St.  Anns 

St.  Peters 

Salmon  River 

Digby. . 

E.  P.  Deveau 

Nil 
5 

Nil 

7 

Nil 

4  61 

Sandy  Point 

A   S  Goodick 

Sheet  Harbour 

Halifax 

Shelburne 

Shelburne 

29 

7 

16  61 

ftherbrooke 

Guysborough 

Spencers  Island 

Cumberland 

Cape  Breton 

Annapolis. . 

Nil 
465 

1 
395 

0  3i 
351  0i 

Sydney 

J   D  McMillan 

Thorne  Cove 

Truro 

Colchester 

'■"::::::. 

Tatamagouche 

Colchester 

Wallace 

Cumberland 

Hants 

A.  D.  Macfarlane 

Nil 

Nil 

.... 

Nil 

Walton 

*Fee  from  fishing  vessels,  $15.        f60  fishing  vessels  at  $3.00.        {Shipping  2  fishing  crews,  $5.00. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER 


101 


RETURNS    OF    SHIPPING     MASTERS    FOR    THE     YEAR    ENDING 
DECEMBER  31,  1928— Continued 

NOVA  SCOTIA— Concluded 


Name  of  Ports 

Name  of  County 

Name  of 
Shipping  Master 

Seamen 
shipped 

Seamen 

dis- 
charged 

Amount 

West  Arichat 

Richmond 

$    cts. 

Weymouth 

Digby 

Hants 

A.  H.  Spence  (acting)... 

31 

25 

23  00 

Wolfville 

Kings 

Yarmouth 

Geo.  L.  Wetmore 

237 

272 

216  10 

8,637 

7,676 

6,880  00 

PRINCE-EDWARD  ISLAND 


Alberton 

Prince 

Charlotte  town 

Queens 

J.  D.  MacMiilan 

Neil  Waddell 

11 
Nil 

8 
Nil 

7  90 

Crapaud    (Outport    of 

Queens 

Nil 

Georgetown 

Kings 

Malpeque 

Prince 

Murray  Harbour 

Kings 

Montague 

Kings 

Queens 

Port  Hill 

Prince 

St.  Peters 

Kings 

Souris 

Kings 

Summerside 

Prince 

Prince 

M.  L.  Bradshaw 

2 

14 

5  20 

Tignish 

13 

22 

13  10 

BRITISH  COLUMBIA 


Aboucet 

Vancouver 

Clayoquot 

Comox-Atlin 

Hesquiat 

Comox-Atlin 

Kyoquot 

Comox-Atlin. . . 

Massett 

Comox-Atlin 

New  Westminster 

New  Westminster.. . 
Atlin 

Percy  P.  Peele 

8 
169 

6 
159 

5  80 

Prince  Rupert 

J.  R.  Elfert 

132  20 

Tofino 

Ucluelet 

Nanaimo 

Vancouver 

New  Westminster.. . 
Victoria 

J.B.Campbell 

6,339 
1,625 

5,899 
1,649 

5,139  10 

Victoria 

Geo.  Kirkendale 

1,307  20 

8,141 

7,713 

6,584  30 

RECAPITULATION 


Province 

Seamen 
shipped 

Seamen 

dis- 
charged 

Amount 

Quebec 

10,7.?° 

1,225 

8,637 

13 

8,141 

9,333 
1,019 
7,676 

22 
7,713 

$     cts. 
8,401  30 

New  Brunswick 

918  20 

Nova  Scotia 

6,880  00 

Prince  Edward  Island ...                         

13  10 

British  Columbia 

6,584  30 

28,748 

25,763 

$22,796  90 

■j  02  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

LIVE  STOCK  SHIPMENTS 

List  of  Live  Stock  shipped  to  ports  in  Great  Britain,  Russia,  and  South  Africa 

during  the  Year  1928 

QUEBEC 


Months 


September. 
November. 


Sheep 


Cattle 


Horses 


962 
1,068 


2,030 


Buffaloes 


MONTREAL 


June 

July 

August 

November. 


304 
101 


405 


ST.  JOHN 


January. 


CANADIAN  HYDROGRAPHIC  SERVICE 

Report  of  Captain  F.  Anderson,  M.E.I.C.,  Hydrographer 

The  C.G.S.  Bayfield  being  still  under  loan  to  the  Preventive  Service  of  the 
Department  of  National  Revenue  the  hydrographic  and  charting  operations 
were  carried  out  on  the  Atlantic  coast  and  Inland  waters  with  two  hydrographic 
steamers,  with  the  minor  field  parties  employing  motor-launches:  on  the  Pacific 
coast  by  the  employment  of  one  steamer  and  a  shore  party. 

The  addition  during  the  year  of  eight  junior  assistants  in  the  Division  oi 
Hyrography,  and  four  in  other  divisions  assisted  materially  towards  bringing 
the  staff  up  to  normal  strength  and  in  consequence  the  major  ship  surveys 
were  enabled  to  carry  on  uninterruptedly  with  gratifying  results.  Also,  bj 
reason  of  this  essential  increase  in  the  field  staff,  provision  was  automatically 
made  for  the  releasing  from  ship  surveys  of  experienced  senior  assistants  tc 
take  charge  of  minor  surveys  in  other  territory,  on  work  which  had  beer 
urgently  requested. 

HEADQUARTERS 

Under  the  direction  of  Mr.  R.  J.  Fraser,  Principal  Assistant  to  the  Hydro-i 
grapher,  the  following  work  was  carried  out:  Preparation  of  new  or  specia 
surveys;  establishment  of  compass-testing  beacons  at  Sydney  harbour;  exami- 
nation of  site  of  grounding  of  H.M.  ship  in  Halifax  harbour;  examination  o 
reported  obstruction  in  lake  Ontario;  examination  of  Cobourg  harbour  for  char 
revision;  preparation  of  Sailing  Directions  and  Pilots. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  103 

In  connection  with  the  latter  undertaking,  it  is  pointed  out  that  prior  to  the 
year  1923  the  Hydrographic  Service  contained  a  division  engaged  upon  the  pre- 
paration and  publication  of  Sailing  Directions,  Pilots,  etc.,  in  charge  of  an 
experienced  field  officer.  The  increasing  demand  for  field  work  has  required  the 
services  at  sea  of  those  formerly  employed  in  this  work,  and  for  the  past  five 
years,  the  Service  has  been  obliged  to  practically  discontinue  this  important 
phase  of  hydrographic  work,  and  it  has,  in  consequence,  fallen  many  years  in 
arrears,  and  is  continuing  to  do  so. 

At  the  present  time  the  work  urgently  demanding  attention  comprises  the 
following: — 

The  revision  of  the  five  existing  volumes  of  Pilots  and  Sailing  Directions 
for  the  Atlantic  coasts  and  Great  Lakes:  the  editing  of  three  new  volumes  for  the 
Pacific  coast  and  Great  Lakes:  and,  the  preparation  of  three  volumes  for  the 
Atlantic  coast  and  Hudson  bay. 

In  addition,  the  British  Admiralty  sailing  directions  and  pilots  of  Canadian 
waters  are  submitted  to  this  office  for  correction  and  revision. 

In  order  to  overtake  this  branch  of  the  work,  and  to  continue  to  publish  the 
Pilots  and  Sailing  Directions  as  in  the  past,  the  need  is  felt  for  the  addition  to 
the  present  staff,  of  the  following: — 

Sailing  Directions  and  Editorial  Division. — 1  hydrographer,  Grade  3;  1 
hydrographer,  Grade  2;  1  stenographer. 

DIVISION  OF  HYDROGRAPHY 

In  this  division  operations  were  carried  on  from  seven  separate  parties 
using  three  sea-going  steamers,  three  motor-launches  and  one  house-boat,  with 
the  usual  complement  of  auxiliary  craft  and  equipment. 

The  following  gives  the  general  distribution  of  the  field  staff  and  equip- 
ment:— 

ATLANTIC   COAST   AND   INLAND   WATERS 

1".  Gulf  of  St.  Lawrence,  North  Shore. — C.G.S.  Acadia  under  the  command 
of  Mr.  J.  U.  Beauchemin. 

2.  Bay  of  Fundy. — C.G.S.  C artier,  under  the  command  of  Mr.  Georges  A. 
Bachand. 

3.  Hudson  Bay,  Port  Churchill. — Motor-launch  in  charge  of  Mr.  F.  C.  G. 
Smith. 

4.  Lake    St.    Clair. — Motor-launch    Boulton    in    charge    of    Mr.    Edouard 
Fhysens. 

5.  Great  Slave  Lake. — Motor-launch  Pilot  No.  1,  in  charge  of  Mr.  H.  L. 
Leadman. 

PACIFIC  COAST 

6.  Pacific  Coast. — C.G.S.  Lillooet,  under  the  command  of  Mr.  H.  D.  Pari- 
zeau. 

7.  Minor  Surveys. — House-boat   Somass,   in   charge   of   commander   J.   H. 
Knight,  R.N.,  under  the  direction  of  Mr.  H.  D.  Parizeau. 

GULF   OF   ST.    LAWRENCE 

The  C.G.S.  Acadia,  a  vessel  of  some  1,000  tons  displacement,  with  Mr.  J. 
U.  Beauchemin,  officer  in  charge;  assisted  by  Messrs.  M.  A.  MacKinnon,  R.  W. 
Bent,  E.  D.  Bent,  and  E.  F„  May;  Captain  F.  V.  Ryan,  sailing  master;  and  Mr. 
J.  B.  Cann,  chief  engineer;  fitted  out  and  sailed  from  Halifax  on  May  13,  pro- 


104  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

ceeding  to  the  Saguenay  river.  On  arrival  work  was  commenced,  but  owing 
to  the  high  stage  of  the  river  and  the  strength  of  the  spring  freshets  sweeping  i 
operations  in  Chicoutimi  channel  were  temporarily  discontinued,  and  the  time, 
up  to  June  15,  devoted  to  the  survey  of  Ha  Ha  bay  for  the  purpose  of  preparing 
a  chart  of  that  area  on  a  scale  suitable  for  marine  traffic  to  Port  Alfred  and 
Bagotville. 

On  June  15  the  sweeping  of  Chicoutimi  channel  was  resumed,  the  five 
channel  ranges  being  tested  for  shoal  water  to  a  width  of  80  feet  on  both  sides 
of  the  centre  line,  and  special  attention  given  the  curves  in  the  channel  at  range 
intersections.  Aids  to  navigation  were  checked  for  their  positions,  and  a  plan 
prepared  for  the  guidance  of  dredging  operations. 

In  connection  with  the  channel  survey  and  the  charting  of  Ha  Ha  bay,  a 
triangulation  net  was  carried  down  the  Saguenay  to  join  up  Chicoutimi  with 
Port  Alfred. 

On  the  completion  of  work  in  the  Saguenay  river  the  ship  proceeded  to 
Father  point,  where,  from  June  26  to  July  10,  the  staff  conducted  sweeping 
operations  with  the  object  of  locating,  if  possible,  the  wreck  of  the  SS.  Vulcano, 
which  sank  off  Father  point  in  the  fall  of  1927.  An  examination  of  an  area  of  15 
square  miles  was  made  and  the  reported  locality  of  a  possible  obstruction  was 
thoroughly  tested,  it  being  found  that  there  existed  no  menace  to  navigation. 

The  principal  work  of  the  season,  in  the  St.  Lawrence  district,  consisted 
of  the  charting  of  the  north  shore  of  the  gulf  and  contiguous  waters  for  a 
distance  of  90  miles  between  Pentecote  and  Sheldrake  rivers.  Undertaken  on 
July  11  the  work  was  completed  by  the  7th  of  November,  as  a  result  of  which 
a  new  chart  has  been  placed  in  the  hands  of  the  engraving  division  for  printing, 
and  which  will  be  ready  for  distribution  to  the  public  next  year.  The  new 
chart  covers  the  previously  uncharted  area  lying  between  the  mouth  of  the  St. 
Lawrence  at  Pointe  des  Monts  on  the  west  and  Anticosti  island  on  the  east. 

During  the  progress  of  the  charting  of  this  territory,  large-scale  surveys 
were  made  of  the  approaches  to  Shelter  bay,  and  the  anchorage  behind  the 
Cawee  islands;  and  in  the  latter  part  of  September  a  visit  was  made  to  St. 
Nicholas  harbour,  inside  the  mouth  of  the  St.  Lawrence,  where  the  various 
range  lights  were  located  and  the  entrance  channel  examined  and  sounded. 

On  November  7  the  Acadia  proceeded  to  the  eastward  in  the  neighbour- 
hood of  Cape  Whittle  on  the  Belie  Isile  transatlantic  route  and  also  occupied 
four  days  where  an  uncharted  rock  had  been  reported  to  exist  and  which  had 
caused  the  wreck  of  the  SS.  Cairntorr. 

An  examination  of  the  locality  resulted  in  the  locating  of  an  uncharted  shoal 
with  6  feet  of  water  over  it  and  with  the  wreck  of  the  above  ship  lying  imme- 
diately north  of  it. 

Before  laying  up  for  the  winter,  the  vessel  and  staff  completed  the  cali- 
bration of  the  direction-finding  radio-telegraph  station  on  Chebucto  head,  Nova 
Scotia.  On  November  14  the  ship  was  laid  up  at  Halifax  and  the  staff  returned 
to  Ottawa. 

A  gyro-compass  of  the  latest  type,  installed  on  the  Acadia  in  the  spring,  was 
found  to  be  most  satisfactory  and  a  valuable  acquisition  to  this  vessel's  chart- 
ing and  navigating  equipment.  It  is  especially  valuable  for  conducting  D.F. 
calibration  work  for  those  stations  with  which  in  other  years  difficulty  was 
experienced  in  locating  the  observing  vessels's  position  with  the  requisite  degree 
of  ^  accuracy.  The  season's  experience  and  the  gratifying  results  obtained  with 
this  instrument  will  aid  to  its  usefulness  in  similar  work,  as  well  as  for  mag- 
netic variation  investigation  and  general  survey  work  in  Hudson's  bay  should 
this  ship  be  detailed  for  work  in  northern  waters. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  105 

Following  is  a  summary  of  the  charting  operations  completed  during  the 
season: — ■ 

Number  of  linear  miles  sounded  by  the  ship 1,314 

Number  of  linear  miles  sounded  by  boats 620 

Number  of  miles  of  coastline  surveyed 98 

Area,  in  square  miles,  charted 1 ,  560 

The  duration  of  the  season's  operations  was  186  days,  twenty-five  per  cent 
of  which  period  was  lost  to  the  service  on  account  of  fog,  rain,  or  otherwise 
inclement  weather. 

BAY  OF  FUNDY 

Operations  in  this  locality  were  carried  out  with  the  C.G.S.  Car  tier,  a  vessel 
of  some  900  tons  displacement  built  especially  for  this  service.  The  ship  was 
fitted  out  in  Halifax  and  commissioned  on  May  5,  the  headquarters  for  the 
season  being  Saint  John,  N.B. 

This  survey  was  under  the  command  of  Mr.  Georges  A.  Bachand  with 
Messrs.  Norman  Wilson,  K.  V.  Kierstead  and  W.  F.  Elliott  as  assistant  engi- 
neers, with  Captain  J.  J.  Roach,  isailing  master,  and  Mr.  J.  E.  Belanger,  chief 
engineer  of  the  Cartier. 

The  season  was  occupied  in  the  main  portion  of  the  bay  extending  from 
Grand  Manan  island  to  cape  Chignecto.  The  coasts  for  the  most  part  are  bold 
and  steep-to  and  the  scarcity  of  soundings  on  the  old  Admiralty  chart  of  the 
vicinity  did  not  give  sufficient  indication  of  the  proximity  of  the  shore  for  the 
safety  of  vessels  during  the  prevalent  foggy  weather.  The  area  was  closely 
sounded  with  the  result  that  Quaco  ledge,  lying  about  9  miles  from  the  nearest 
land  was  the  only  outstanding  danger  in  the  fairway,  its  position  being  care- 
fully located. 

The  charting  of  the  locality  was  greatly  assisted  by  the  use  of  the  triangu- 
lation  stations  established  by  the  Geodetic  Survey  of  Canada,  also  the  large 
scale  British  Admiralty  charts  where  recharting  will  be  unnecessary  will  be  used 
in  the  compilation  of  the  finished  chart. 

During  the  past  season  2,300  miles  of  lineal  sounding  from  the  ship  and 
boats,  was  carried  out,  covering  an  area  of  1,750  square  miles. 

As  a  result  of  the  past  two  seasons  operations  charts  will  be  available  in  the 
near  future  extending  from  Grand  Manan  island  to  cape  Chignecto. 

In  addition  to  the  above  an  uncharted  rock  was  located  in  the  approaches 
to  Tusket  river,  east  of  Yarmouth  where  a  least  depth  of  \\  feet  was  found, 
the  old  chart  showing  5  fathoms. 

The  calibration  of  Red  Head  Radio  Direction-Finding  station  in  the 
approaches  to  the  harbour  of  Saint  John,  N.B.,  was  also  carried  out. 

HUDSON   BAY    (PORT    CHURCHILL)    SURVEY 

In  order  to  make  adequate  preparation  for  a  regular  ship  .survey  of  the 
approaches  to  Port  Churchill,  Hudson  bay,  and  of  the  coast  in  the  vicinity,  and 
owing  to  the  extremely  short  season  available  for  survey  purposes  in  this  region, 
a  shore  party  was  detailed  to  go  overland  and  carry  out  the  preliminary  shore 
work.  Mr.  F.  C.  G.  Smith,  officer  in  charge,  assisted  by  Mr.  C.  P.  Warkentin 
and  four  men,  left  Winnipeg  on  July  4  and  proceeded  by  rail,  canoeis,  and  the 
Department  of  Railways  and  Canals  tug,  by  way  of  Port  Nelson,  to  Churchill, 
arriving  at  their  destination  on  July  15. 

A  motorboat,  camp  and  survey  equipment,  and  supplies  were  shipped  by 
steamer  from  Halifax  and  delivered  at  Churchill  on  August  15. 

The  available  length  of  season  for  conducting  survey  work  was  necessarily 
short  but  in  the  three  months  spent  in  the  north,  the  44  miles  of  coast  from  the 


106  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

harbour  eastward  to  cape  Churchill  was  thoroughly  surveyed,  the  'basis  of  a  chart 
of  the  area  was  constructed,  and  all  the  preliminary  shore  work  completed  so 
that  in  the  next  season  a  survey  may  proceed  to  this  district  for  the  efficient 
prosecution  of  a  regular  survey ,~  and  concentrate  on  hydrography  that  a  com- 
plete chart  may  be  prepared  at  a  minimum  expenditure  of  money  and  time. 

By  working  along  the  coast  with  motor-boats  and  camping  on  the  shore, 
this  small  party  was  enabled  to  successfully  carry  out  the  following  important 
work: — 

The  extension  of  a  complete  triangulation  from  a  base  at  Port  Churchill 
for  44  miles  to  the  cape;  the  traversing  and  sketching  in  detail  of  the  coastline 
to  within  three  miles  of  the  cape;  the  establishing  and  locating  of  sounding  and 
surveying  marks  for  the  proposed  ship  survey;  and  the  locating  and  erecting 
of  four  large  navigation  beacons  at  regular  intervals  along  the  coast  between 
the  harbour  and  the  cape,  for  the  assistance  of  vessels  frequenting  this  shore, 
as  well  as  for  the  use  of  a  survey  ship  in  sounding  the  off-shore  waters  next 
season. 

The  beacons,  though  of  wood,  are  of  a  permanent  nature,  strongly  con- 
structed and  well  supported,  with  heights  varying  from  62  feet  to  111  feet  above 
high  water,  and  should  serve  as  valuable  aids  to  navigation  on  a  coast  which  is 
low  and  otherwise  lacking  in  prominent  natural  features.  The  beacons  and  the 
survey  marks  were  permanently  marked  and  referenced. 

During  the  course  of  the  season,  additional  data  of  the  following  nature 
were  obtained: — 

Astronomical  Observations  taken,  the  results  of  which  agree  so  closely  with 
those  previously  observed  by  the  Hydrographic  Service  18  years  ago  that  it  is 
not  necessary  to  publish  any  change  in  the  latitude  and  longitude  of  the  port. 

Tidal  Records. — A  self-registering  tide  gauge  was  placed  and  continuously 
operated  in  Churchill  harbour  for  forty-six  days.  From  the  records  obtained 
the  Tidal  Survey  branch  was  enabled  to  establish  a  reliable  low  water  datum 
for  soundings,  and  the  Department  of  Railways  and  Canals  engineers  to  obtain 
a  datum  for  their  dredging  operations. 

This  gauge  is  being  re-established  on  a  permanent  basis  and  will  be  operated 
as  a  principal  tidal  station  for  the  bay. 

^  On  October  6  Mr.  Smith  and  his  party  sailed  from  Churchill  on  the  ss.  Odile 
arriving  at  Halifax  on  the  20th  of  the  same  month,  with  the  exception  of  Mr 
Warkentin,  who  returned  to  the  end  of  steel  by  aeroplane. 


LAKE    ST.    CLAIR   SURVEY 


The  work  of  charting  the  Canadian  section  of  lake  St.  Clair,  which  was 
commenced  last  season,  under  the  charge  of  Mr.  Edouard  A.  Ghysens,  assisted 
by  Mr.  J.  L.  Foreman,  was  continued  on  May  11  and  carried  out  to  completior 
by  October  15. 

As  in  the  year  previous  the  motor  cruiser  C.G.S.  Boulton  was  fitted  out  all 
Belle  River  and  utilized  throughout  the  season. 

The  result  of  the  two  seasons'  work  is  the  preparation  for  engraving  of  s\ 
large-scale  first  edition  Canadian  chart  of  the  whole  of  the  lake,  that  portior 
within  the  territory  of  the  United  States  having  been  taken  from  recent  survey 
made  by  the  United  States  Lake  Survey  Office. 

Following  is  a  summary  of  the  work  accomplished: — 

Number  of  linear  miles  sounded 1,020 

Area  charted  (square  miles) 110 

Number  of  miles  of  coastline  surveyed. ... 75 

Number  of  Survey  Stations  erected 50 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  107 

GREAT  SLAVE  LAKE  SURVEY 

In  the  summer  of  this  year  preparatory  charting  work  was  commenced  along 
the  south  shore  of  Great  Slave  lake,  MacKenzie  river  district,  as  part  of  a 
broad  scheme  of  operations  that  will  eventually  embrace  the  whole  of  this 
lake,  lake  Athabasca  and  the  connecting  waterways,  and  the  MacKenzie  river 
route  to  the  Arctic  ocean,  in  the  interests  of  increasing  navigation  and  the 
development  of  fisheries,  other  natural  resources  and  the  necessary  water  trans- 
port connected  therewith. 

There  being  no  suitable  vessel  procurable  in  the  territory,  a  40-foot  auxiliary 
schooner,  the  C.G.S.  Pilot  No.  1,  was  built  for  the  service  at  Edmonton,  and 
under  the  command  of  Mr.  H.  L.  Leadman,  assisted  by  Mr.  W.  R.  Young,  it 
was  taken  down  the  Athabasca  and  Slave  rivers  to  Fort  Resolution,  a  distance 
of  600  miles,  where  survey  work  was  commenced  on  the  31st  of  July. 

Headquarters  for  the  season  were  established  at  Fort  Resolution  and  Buffalo 
river  on  the  south  shore,  and  during  the  one  and  one-half  months  of  open  season 
remaining  the  party  carried  out  a  triangulation  and  shore  survey  between  these 
two  points,  explored  that  section  of  the  route  for  suitable  sites  for  harbours  of 
refuge  for  the  shallow-draft  lake  steamers,  whilst  at  the  same  time  considerable 
sounding  work  was  conducted. 

On  September  26,  when  ice  began  to  form,  the  schooner  was  laid  up  at 
i  Fort  Smith  on  the  Slave  river  and  the  survey  party  returned  south  on  the 
last  steamer  of  the  season. 

Gauges  and  bench-marks  were  established  at  a  number  of  points  on  the 

lake  and  arrangements  made  to  obtain  water  level  data,  the  records  of  which 

will  be  most  valuable  for  navigation  and  wharf  construction  on  this  route  where 

!  the  waters  are  generally  shallow  and  the  levels  fluctuate  several  feet  in  a  single 

season. 

During  the  period  of  forty-eight  days  spent  on  Great  Slave  lake  the  party 
traversed  12  miles  of  coastline  and  sounded  324  linear  miles,  in  addition  to  the 
investigatory  and  preparatory  work  accomplished.  This  survey  will  be  con- 
tinued next  summer  on  the  opening  of  navigation. 

PACIFIC   COAST  SURVEY 

The  C.G.S.  Lillooet  was  commissioned  at  Victoria,  B.C.,  on  April  15,  under 
the  command  of  Mr.  H.  D.  Parizeau,  who  had  for  an  assisting  staff  Commander 
J.  H.  Knight,  R.N.,  and  Messrs.  L.  R.  Davies,  W.  K.  Willis,  and  R.  H.  Etter- 
shank,  and  Captain  J.  J.  Moore,  sailing  master,  and  Mr.  A.  R.  Borrowman,  chief 
engineer  of  the  Lillooet. 

A  camp  party  was  established  at  Sooke  inlet  and  the  ship  party  proceeded 
to  Vancouver  where  operations  for  the  completion  of  the  resurvey  of  that  port 
and  a  new  survey  of  Burrard  inlet  were  carried  on  from  the  16th  of  April  to 
the  10th  of  June.  At  the  same  time  minor  surveys  were  made  in  Snug  cove, 
Deep  bay,  on  the  east  coast  of  Bowen  island,  Howe  sound. 

The  following  week  was  spent  in  the  locating  and  examining  of  reported 
dangers  in  Barkley  sound. 

On  the  19th  of  June  the  Lillooet  took  on  board  the  camp  parties  and  sailed 
from  Victoria  for  Milbanke  sound,  with  the  launch  Thistle  in  tow.  A  minor 
survey  was  carried  out  en  route  at  Nanaimo,  and  on  the  24th  of  June  the  main 
charting  work  of  the  season,  in  Milbanke  sound,  was  commenced  and  con- 
it  inued  until  the  25th  of  September. 

In  the  fall  the  ship  party  resumed  work  at  Vancouver  and  Burrard  inlet 
and  also  located  reported  dangers  in  Howe  sound  and  Barkley  sound. 

The  houseboat  Somass  was  commisioned  on  June  24  and  the  detached  party, 
under  Commander  J.  H.  Knight,  carried  out  surveys  of  Sooke  inlet,  Blair  inlet, 
Reid  passage,  Port  Blakeney,  Matheson  channel,  Percival  narrows  and  Moss 
■passage. 


108  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

During  the  season  complete  automatic  tidal  records  were  obtained  at  Port 
Blakeney  and  Goose  islands. 

Summarized,  the  season's  work  comprised: — 

Lillooet— 

Number  of  working  days 205 

Number  of  miles  (lineal)  coastline  surveyed 148 

Area  (square  miles)  charted 197 

Somass — 

Number  of  working  days 199 

Number  of  miles  (lineal)  coastline  surveyed 87 

Area  (square  miles)  sounded 18 

PRECISE    WATER    LEVELS    DIVISION 

This  division,  engaged  upon  the  investigation  of  the  vertical  movements  ofj 
the  water  surfaces  of  the  Great  lakes  and  St.  Lawrence  river  and  the  systematic 
continuous  recording  of  the  water  levels  thereof,  conducted  its  work  efficiently 
and  to  the  constantly  high  standard  of  precision  of  past  years.  The  work  of 
this  division  is  under  the  direction  of  Mr.  Charles  A.  Price,  assisted  by  Messrs. 
Wm.  J.  Miller,  A.  S.  Matthewman,  H.  P.  Williams,  and  A.  G.  Tuttle,  Junior 
Assistant. 

The  addition  of  one  junior  assistant  during  the  year  assisted  materially  in 
the  carrying  out  of  the  tabulation  and  compilation,  a  greatly  increasing  quan- 
tity of  which  is  required  from  year  to  year  as  new  data  is  collected  and  addi- 
tional requests  for  information  received. 

There  were  operated  and  maintained  throughout  the  Great  lakes  and  St. 
Lawrence  systems,  from  Port  Arthur  to  Quebec,  forty-four  permanent  automatic 
gauges,  one  more  than  in  the  previous  year.  Two  new  automatic  gauges  were 
installed  and  put  into  operation  at  Sault  Ste.  Marie,  the  cost  of  these  being 
borne  by  the  Dominion  Water  Power  and  Reclamation  Service  of  the  Depart 
ment  of  the  Interior;  one  gauge,  at  Port  Colborne,  was  discontinued,  part  of 
its  equipment  to  be  utilized  at  a  new  location  at  the  Port  Weller  terminus  of  the 
New  Welland  canal. 

Within  the  past  ten  years  the  total  number  of  such  gauging  stations  has 
increased  from  32  in  1918  to  44  at  the  present  time. 

All  of  these  stations  were  operated  continuously  throughout  the  twelve 
months  of  the  year,  with  the  following  exceptions:  Gros  cap,  at  the  lower  enc 
of  lake  Superior,  was  discontinued  during  the  closed  season  when  high  watei 
and  severe  storms  caused  the  demolition  of  the  understructure,  and  the  gauge 
was  removed  for  the  winter  so  as  to  be  relocated  in  the  spring:  at  Port  Dal- 
housie,  where  operations  were  carried  out  during  the  open  season  only,  whicl 
station  will  be  abandoned  after  substantial  relations  have  been  made  with  th( 
proposed  new  station  at  Port  Weller:  on  the  St.  Lawrence,  seven  gauges  wen 
temporarily  discontinued  during  the  closed  season  on  account  of  ice  and  extremt 
high  water.  In  most  instances,  continuous  records  were  obtained  at  these  point: 
from  staff  gauge  readings  for  the  remaining  months  of  the  season. 

The  usual  inspection  of  gauging  stations  was  carried  out,  repairs,  altera- 
tions or  improvements  where  found  necessary  in  the  interests  of  efficiencv  aiw 
economy,  were  made  to  cribs,  gauge  houses,  wells  and  inlets,  at  six  of  the  abov 
stations. 

The  combined  products  of  the  44  self-registering  gauges  were  483  month: 
of  continuous  water  level  records,  or  hvdrographs,  from  which  over  5O0,00< 
observations  were  computed.  The  reductions  that  are  made  and  the  evidenc:! 
obtained  from  these  records  and  observations  continue  to  increase  in  value  ii 
the  study  and  solution  of  international  problems  concerning  fluctuations  of  wate 


REPORT  OF  THE  DHPUTY  MINISTER  109 


levels  of  the  Great  Lakes,  in  projects  for  developing  hydro-electric  power  on  the 
St.  Lawrence  river,  in  adjustment  of  chart  datums  and  of  land  levels,  and  (lie 
improvement  of  the  waterways  for  navigation.  They  are  of  value  to  marine 
interests  and  to  general  engineering  projects  concerned  with  the  harbours.,  shores 
and  connecting  streams  of  the  Great  Lakes  and  St.  Lawrence  waterways  system. 
Requests  for  general  information  and  for  special  data  relating  to  the  water 
i  levels  were  greater  than  in  preceding  years.  The  regular  monthly  bulletins  were 
'issued  before  the  10th  of  each  month  and  the  annual  bulletins  for  1928  on  the 
!  16th  of  January,  1929.  A  relation  curve  of  seiche  ranges  and  data  of  a  special 
'nature  dealing  with  extraordinary  and  abnormal  fluctuations  that  affect  the 
available  depths  for  vessels  in  some  localities  have  been  prepared  and  can  be 
issued  on  request. 

Precise  Water  Level  Transfers. — The  special  reductions  of  observations  for 
the  purpose  of  checking,  and  for  the  assistance  of  the  Geodetic  Survey  of  Canada 
in  the  establishment  of  the  net  of  precise  levels  and  elevations,  were  continued, 
with  most  gratifying  results.  The  strengthening  and  proving  of  the  values  of 
other  years,  by  means  of  the  addition  of  another  year's  transfer  of  water  eleva- 
tions across  certain  sections  of  the  lakes,  the  accuracy  of  which  method  was 
once  considered  as  doubtful,  has  proved  to  be  of  such  a  degree  of  precision  and 
accuracy  that  the  Geodetic  Survey  have  definitely  given  infinite  weight  to  the 
precise  gauging  data,  in  their  final  publication  of  adjusted  values  for  the  eleva- 
tions of  Canadian  bench-marks. 

During  the  year,  this  division  of  the  Hydrographic  Service  issued  to  the 
public  24,551  sheets  of  the  prepared  data  on  water  levels,  an  increase  of  2,487 
over  that  of  the  preceding  year. 

Appended  are  the  following  publications: — 

I.  Monthly  mean  water  surface  elevations  of  the  Great  Lakes  during 
1928. 

II.  Monthly   mean   water   surface   elevations   of  the   St.   Lawrence  river 
during  1928. 

III.  List  of  Automatic  Gauges,  and  their  locations,  maintained  in  opera- 
tion during  1928. 


110 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 


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112 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 


During  1928  automatic  gauges  were  maintained  at  forty-four  locations  on 
the  Great  lakes  and  the  St.  Lawrence  river,  as  follow®: — 

A— Port  Arthur Lake  Superior Jan 

A— Michipicoten  Harbour "(  

A— Gros  Cap .     

A— Soo  (above  lock) St.  Marys  river 

A— Soo  (below  lock) "  

A— Soo  (below  dam,  Canada) 

A— Soo  (below  dam,  Mich.) "  

A— Thessalon Georgian  bay 

A— Collingwood 

A— Goderich Lake  Huron 

A— Point  Edward St.  Clair  River 

A — Port  Lambton 

A— Tecumseh Detroit  river 

A — LaSalle "  

A— Port  Stanley Lake  Erie 

A— Port  Colborne "         

A— Port  Dalhousie Lake  Ontario April 

A— Toronto  (by  Harbour  Com.) 

A — Kingston "  

A — Prescott St.  Lawrence  river 

A— Lock  27  (above  lock) 

\— Lock  25  (below  lock) "  

A— Lock  24  (above  lock) 

B— Lock  23  (below  lock) 

B — Lock  21  (above  lock) 

B— Cornwall "  

B— Summertown Lake  St.  Francis 

A — Coteau  Landing  (above  lock) 

B— Coteau  du  lac St.  Lawrence  river 

B— Cedars  (P.  P.  Plant) "  

B — Cascades  Pte.  (below  lock) 

B— Ste.  Arnss  (above  lock) Lake  of  Two  Mountains 

A — Pointe  Claire Lake  St.  Louis 

A — Lock  5  (above  lock) "  

A — Montroxl  (below  lock  1) St.  Lawrence  river May 

(Harbour  Comm.  registering  gauge  used  balance  of  year) 

A — Longue  Pointe St.  Lawrence  river Jan. 

A — Varennes "  May 

(Staff  gauge  readings  9  a.m.  and  3  p.m.  for  balance  of  year) 
A — Lanoraie St.  Lawrence  river May 

(Staff  gauge  readings  9  a.m.  and  3  p.m.  for  balance  of  year) 

A — Sorel St.  Lawrence  river Jan. 

A— Range  Light  No.  2 Lake  St.  Peter June 

C — Three  Rivers St.  Lawrence  river Jan. 

C — Batiscan "  April 

C— Cap  a  la  Roche "  May 

C— Neuville "  April 


Jan. 

1— Dec 

31 

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1— 

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30 

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4— Nov.  21 

L.Dec.  31 
1— Nov.  23 

1— Nov.  20 

1— Dec.  31 

21— Nov.  18 
1— Dec.  31 

26— Nov.  19 
1— Nov.  16 

27— Nov.  17 


Note.— "A"  denotes  a  Haskell  self-registering  graphic  gauge,  hourly  readings,  daily  means,  and 
monthly  mean  compiled. 

"B"  denotes  a  Gurley  printing  register;  half-hourly  readings,  daily  means,  and  monthly  means  com 
piled. 

"C"  denotes  a  Haskell  self-registering  graphic  gauge;  half-hourly  readings,  daily  means,  monthly 
means,  time  and  elevation  of  high  and  low  waters  compiled. 


DIVISION    OF   CHART   CONSTRUCTION 


This  division,  under  the  direction  of  Mr.  Gordon  L.  Crichton,  with  Major 
F.  Delaute  as  assistant  in  charge,  and  the  following  staff  of  cartographers  and 
draughtsmen:  Messrs.  Paul  E.  Parent,  Alexander  J.  Pinet,  Henri  Melancon,  W. 
L.  Andrews,  and  M.  Isabelle,  was  continuously  engaged  upon  the  preparation 
and  compilation  and  construction  of  new  charts,  the  computations  in  connection 
therewith,  and  the  revision  and  correction  of  existing  charts. 

The  work  accomplished  by  the  draughting  section  included  the  production 
of:  — 

23  new  editions  of  engraved  charts. 

10  new  editions  of  photo-lithographed  charts. 

1  first  edition  of  photo-lithographed  chart. 

5  new  catalogue  index  maps. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  113 

All  published  charts  issued  during  the  year  were  corrected  to  the  date  of 
issue  to  the  public,  there  being  70  different  charts  affected,  19,519  individual 
copies  being  handled,  and  102,419  corrections  made.  The  introduction  of 
mechanical  apparatus  for  erasures  for  hand  corrections  proved  of  great  assistance 
in  this  feature  of  the  work. 

In  connection  with  the  chart  revisions,  there  were  received  and  entered  in 
the  files  of  the  divisions  479  plans,  tracings,  blue-prints,  etc.,  used  in  the  com- 
pilation or  correction  of  new  and  existing  charts. 

At  the  present  time  there  are  11  different  charts  under  revision  or  in  course 
of  construction,  and  13  others  awaiting  revision  for  new  editions. 

The  engraving  section  carried  out  the  following  copper-plate  work  during 
the  year: — 

13  new  chart  plates  engraved. 
3,859  small  corrections  to  plates  of  existing  charts. 
6  large  corrections  to  plates  of  existing  charts. 

In  addition  to  the  foregoing  tabulated  results  there  is  expected  to  be  placed 
in  the  hands  of  the  cartographers  from  four  to  six  new  charts,  as  received  from 
the  field  divisions,  for  engraving,  or  printing  by  photo-lithography. 

The  expansion  of  the  work  of  this  division  increases  the  urgent  need  for 
additional  trained   draughtsmen  or  cartographers. 

DIVISION  OF  CHART  DISTRIBUTION 

Under  the  direction  of  Mr.  Charles  McGreevy,  the  distribution  of  Canadian 
charts,  sailing  directions  and  pilots  was  conducted  with  efficiency  and  dispatch. 
The  year  just  ended  has  seen  an  unprecedented  demand  for  these  publications, 
there  being  issued  to  the  public  14,360  copies  of  charts,  an  increase  of  3,105  over 
that  of  the  preceding  year. 

Since  the  year  1916,  the  number  of  charts  distributed  annually  has  twice 
doubled,  and  the  total  number  issued  in  the  past  13  years  amounted  to  107,993 
copies  computed  in  periods  of  every  three  years,  the  following  results  are  shown: 

Years  1917  to  1919 16,427  copies  issued 

"       1920  to  1922 21,806 

"       1923  to  1925 28,566 

"       1926  to  1928 37,543 

There  were  216  copies  of  sailing  directions  and  pilots  issued  during  the  past 
year. 

Additional  space  for  the  stocking  of  charts  and  publications  has  been  pro- 
vided temporarily  by  a  readjustment  of  the  facilities  at  hand  in  the  Distribution 
Division,  but  it  is  strongly  felt  that  in  a  very  short  while  the  available  accom- 
modation will  be  wholly  inadequate  for  the  purpose.  The  office  is  fast  becoming 
a  repository  for  published  matter  of  a  nautical  nature  dealing  with  charting  and 
nautical  information  all  over  the  world. 

There  were  307  different  Canadian  charts  and  plans,  products  of  this 
Service,  available  for  issue  to  the  public.  Of  this  number,  some  four  or  five, 
the  edition  of  which  has  been  expended,  will  not  be  re-published,  but  will  be 
either  suspended  or  absorbed  by  new  charts  on  a  different  scale.  In  addition,  it  is 
expected  that,  during  the  coming  year,  there  will  be  six  entirely  new  charts  of 
|  recently  surveyed  waters  placed  in  the  hands  of  the  printers. 

DIVISION  OF  TIDES  AND  CURRENTS 

The  work  of  this  division  is  familiar  to  the  shipping  industry  and  all  our 
maritime  population  principally  through  the  annual  publication  of  the  tide  tables 
for  both  the  Atlantic  and  Pacific  coasts.    For  the  improvement  of  these  and  for 

88174—8 


114  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

other  practical  and  scientific  reasons  twelve  principal  tidal  stations  are  main- 
tained in  continuous  operation  in  our  principal  harbours,  or  in  isolated  situations 
for  regional  purposes.  Seasonal  gauges  are  set  up  in  localities  where  additional 
data  is  required,  and  further  investigation  of  tides  and  currents  are  made  during 
the  summer  months.  The  data  obtained  is  reduced  and  incorporated  in  the  tide 
tables  and  other  publications.    The  tidal  stations  are  as  follows: — 

Atlantic  Coast  Pacific  Coast 

Quebec,  P.Q.  Vancouver,  B.C. 

Father  Point,  Rimouski  Co.,  P.Q.  Caulfeild,  B.C. 

Point  Peter,  Gaspe  Co.,  P.Q.  Victoria,  V.I.,  B.C. 

Charlottetown,  P.E.I.  Esquimalt,  V.I.,  B.C. 

Saint  John,  N.B.  Clayoquot,  V.I.,  B.C. 

Halifax,  N.S.  Prince  Rupert,  B.C. 

Fort  Churchill,  Man.  (not  yet  operated  through  the  winter). 
The  records  from  these  have  been  carefully  checked  and  prepared  for  tabu- 
lation.   Inspection  was  made  and  repairs  attended  to  as  usual. 

SEASONAL  TIDE  GAUGES — ATLANTIC  COAST 

Four  seasonal  tide  gauges  were  operated  in  the  upper  reaches  of  the  bay  of 
Fundy  in  the  neighbourhood  of  the  dyked  lands,  to  obtain  records  for  comparison 
with  similar  records  to  be  obtained  after  the  installation  of  the  proposed 
Passamaquoddy  bay  power  project,  so  that  any  possible  alteration  in  the  tidal 
range  may  be  noted,  as  follows:  In  Nova  Scotia,  near  the  head  of  tide  in  the 
Salmon  river  below  Truro,  N.S.;  in  New  Brunswick,  in  the  Memramcook  river 
above  College  bridge,  in  the  Petitcodiac  river  below  Salisbury  and  at  Moncton.  | 

Because  of  inquiries  by  fishermen  for  tidal  information  at  Sable  island,  N.S., 
a  seasonal  gauge  was  set  up  and  six  of  records  were  obtained  before  the  sea 
carried  away  the  gauge  structure.  This  will  afford  the  time  and  height  of  tide 
relatively  to  the  standard  port  of  Halifax  for  reference  in  the  tide  tables.  A 
member  of  the  staff  went  over  with  the  equipment  by  the  first  lighthouse  supply 
ship  in  April  and  instructed  the  Superintendent  of  the  island  in  what  was 
required.  Another  seasonal  gauge  was  set  up  in  the  Big  Bras  d'Or,  N.S.  in 
connection  with  current  work  there. 

At  Fort  Churchill  a  gauge  was  erected  by  a  Hydrographic  Survey  party  and 
excellent  records  were  obtained.  This  harbour  will  be  made  a  principal  tidal 
station  for  the  prediction  of  tides  in  this  region. 

PACIFIC   COAST 

Attention  was  given  principally  to  current  work  and  only  one  seasonal  gauge 
was  erected  at  Otter  pass  in  connection  with  the  work  there. 

INVESTIGATION  OF  CURRENT — ATLANTIC    COAST 

The  equipment  for  obtaining  the  turn  of  the  tidal  streams  automatically  day 
and  night,  that  served  so  well  in  the  strait  of  Canso,  was  transferred  to  the  Big 
Bras  d'Or,  N.S.  The  same  attendant  was  employed  and  the  result  for  the 
season  was  very  satisfactory.  Ships  have  difficulty  in  making  this  passage  in 
thick  weather,  and  to  know  in  advance  which  way  to  expect  the  current  would 
be  a  great  help.  When  sufficient  data  is  obtained  predictions  will  be  published 
in  the  tide  tables. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  115 


PACIFIC    COAST 


An  observer  was  placed  in  camp  at  Otter  pass  between  Banks  and  Estevan 
island  to  obtain  the  relation  between  the  tide  and  the  turn  of  the  tidal  streams. 
A  gauge  was  set  up  which  served  also  the  tidal  requirements  of  the  Hydrographic 
Survey  locally  in  progress. 

Lightkeepers  in  Boundary  pass  and  at  Race  rocks  were  commissioned  as 
observers  to  time  the  turn  of  the  tidal  streams  at  these  places;  the  first  to  check 
the  predictions  as  now  published  in  the  current  tables  for  Turn  Point,  and  the 
other  to  obtain  tidal  data  for  the  tide  tables  and  charts  as  to  the  reversal  of  the 
currents  at  Race  rocks.  These  are  dangerous  reefs,  the  most  outlying  in  the 
path  of  shipping  to  Victoria,  Vancouver  and  the  strait  of  Georgia  ports. 

REPORTS  ON   CURRENTS 

Reports  on  tidal  currents  for  assistance  to  shipping  are  available  on  request. 
They  are  as  follows: — 

The  Currents  in  the  Gulf  of  St.  Lawrence. 

The  Currents  in  the  Entrance  to  the  St.  Lawrence. 

The  Currents  in  Belle  Isle  Strait. 

The  Currents  of  the  Southeast  Coast  of  Newfoundland. 

Tables  of  Currents  in  the  Bay  of  Fundy. 

TIDE   TABLES 

The  annual  tide  tables  were  calculated  and  printed  as  usual.  The  1929 
iistribution,  except  a  reserve  held  for  later  demands,  was  sent  out  before  the 
beginning  of  the  year  and  numbered  90,000  copies  of  the  different  editions 
Combined. 

The  large  editions  now  contain  tables  for  four  adjacent  United  States  ports: 
Boston  and  New  York  are  included  in  the  Eastern  book,  and  Seattle  and  Port 
Townsend  in  the  Pacific  publication.  It  is  intended  that  the  complete  editions 
diall  serve  the  larger  shipping,  while  the  less  costly  abridged  editions  are  to  fill 
!he  needs  for  distinct  localities  where  the  complete  editions  are  unnecessary: 
these  small  books  are  more  convenient  for  fishermen  and  shore  people  gener- 
tlly:— 

Atlantic  Tide  Tables 

Eastern  Coast  of  Canada  (unabridged) 
Quebec  and  Father  point  (abridged) 
Saint  John  and  Bay  of  Fundy  (abridged) 
Charlottetown  and  the  Strait  of  Canso   (abridged). 
Fort  Churchill,  Nelson  and  Hudson  Bay. 

Pacific  Tide  Tables 

Pacific  Coast  of  Canada  (unabridged) 
Vancouver  and  Sand  Heads  (abridged) 
Prince  Rupert  and  Northern  B.C.  (abridged). 


88174 


116  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

INFORMATION  SERVICE  AND  OTHER  AVAILABLE  PUBLICATIONS 

Information  on  tidal  matters  has  been  furnished  in  answer  to  frequent 
requests  from  engineers  in  the  Government  service  and  in  private  practice  as 
well  as  to  others  interested.  In  addition  to  the  tide  tables  and  current  reports 
there  are  other  publications  which  are  mailed  when  written  for:  These  are: — 

Tide  Levels  and  Datum  Planes  in  Eastern  Canada 

Tide  Levels  and  Datum  Planes  on  the  Pacific  Coast 

Tides  at  the  Head  of  the  Bay  of  Fundy 

Tides  and  Tidal  Streams 

Temperatures  and  Densities  Canadian  (Atlantic)  waters. 

STAFF 

The  permanent  staff  of  this  division  of  the  Hydro-graphic  Survey  numbers 
five  in  addition  to  the  outside  tidal  observers  of  whom  there  are  six  on  each  coast. 
There  are  two  seasonal  current  observers  and  temporary  tidal  observers  are 
employed  during  the  summer  according  to  the  work  undertaken.  During  the 
winter  an  additional  technical  man  is  detailed  to  assist  in  the  work  at  head- 
quarters. 

H.  W.  Joness,  B.Sc,  M.E.I.C,  Senior  Tidal  and  Current  Surveyor;  under  the 
hydrographer  supervises  the  work  at  headquarters,  which  covers  the  reduction 
of  data  etc.,  the  preparation  of  all  the  tide  tables,  attention  to  correspondence 
and  the  work  of  both  coasts  generally. 

Mr.  S.  C.  Hayden,  Senior  Tidal  and  Current  Surveyor,  with  headquarters 
at  Vancouver  supervises  the  fieldwork  and  inspects  the  permanent  tidal  stations 
on  the  Pacific  coast,  arranges  for  secondary  stations  and  assists  in  the  prepara- 
tion of  the  Pacific  Coast  tide  tables. 

Mr.  R.  B.  Lee,  Junior  Tidal  and  Current  Surveyor;  assists  in  the  work  of 
headquarters  and  the  east  coast  generally.  Most  of  his  time  is  given  to  the 
preparation  of  the  tide  tables. 

Miss  L.  R.  Brown,  Clerk  Stenographer;  gives  general  office  assistance  in 
addition  to  help  with  the  tide  tables. 

Miss  E.  Campbell,  Stenographer,  assists  with  typing,  inking  and  test  checking 
of  tidal  records,  tabulations,  etc. 

In  conclusion  I  wish  to  express  my  appreciation  of  the  efficient  service 
rendered  by  all  the  members  of  the  Canadian  Hydrographic  Service  during  the 
past  fiscal  year. 


PORT  WARDENS'  REPORTS  FOR  THE  YEAR  ENDED 
DECEMBER  31,  1928 

Reports  were  received  from  fourteen  port  wardens:  eight  from  Nova  Scotia 
port  wardens,  two  from  Quebec  port  wardens,  and  four  from  British  Columbia 
port  wardens. 

The  total  amount  of  fees  collected  at  the  port  of  Montreal  for  the  year  ended 
December  31,  1928,  amounted  to  $21,185.32;  at  the  port  of  Vancouver  tc 
$27,110.77;  at  the  port  of  Halifax  to  $4,163;  at  the  port  of  Quebec  to  $2,430 
at  the  port  of  Sydney,  C.B.,  to  $1,312;   and  at  the  port  of  Victoria  to  $1,440. 

PORT   OF   MONTREAL 

April  26. — SS.  Gaspcsia  arrived  in  port;  the  first  vessel  to  arrive  this  season 
SS.  Bay  State,  Furness  Line,  was  the  first  overseas  vessel  to  arrive  thisj 
season.    Docked  nine  days  later  than  season  1927. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  117 

April  27. — R.M.S.  Montclare  was  the  first  passenger  overseas  vessel  to 
arrive,  four  days  later  than  season  1927. 

April  30. — SS.  Montclare  was  the  first  passenger  overseas  vessel  sailed,  two 
days  later  than  last  year. 

May  7. — Geo.  M.  Enbirico  received  first  certificate  of  readiness  to  load  full 
grain  cargo,  sixteen  days  later  than  last  year. 

May  11. — SS.  Hounslow  first  vessel  to  clear  with  full  grain  cargo,  seventeen 
days  later  than  season  1927. 

No  damage  reported  through  ice  in  gulf  and  river  this  season. 

November  29. — T.SS.  Minnedosa  sailed  for  Liverpool,  the  last  of  the  pas- 
senger sailings  for  this  season,  three  days  later  than  1927. 

December  1. — SS.  Grelwen  sailed  for  overseas,  the  last  full  grain  vessel 
loaded  at  Montreal,  same  date  as  last  year. 

December  3. — SS.  Canadian  Scottish  sailed  for  overseas,  the  last  freight 
liner  to  leave,  three  days  earlier  than  last  year. 

December  4. — SS.  Atherton  arrived  from  sea,  the  last  arrival  for  this  season 
and  one  day  later  than  1927;   loaded  and  sailed  December  6. 

December  8. — SS.  Rein  loaded  part  grain  cargo  Buffalo  and  completed  grain 
cargo  here,  sailed,  the  last  sailing  overseas,  two  days  later  than  1927. 


OVERSEAS  VESSELS  REPORTED 


Vessels,  1,202;  aggregate  tonnage  4,681,066  tons,  an  increase  of  41  vessels 
and  469,320  tons  as  compared  with  the  1927  figures. 

Of  the  total  overseas  vessels  769  were  British,  119  being  registered  in 
Canada.    Vessels  of  other  nationalities  433. 


LOWER   PORT   VESSELS   REPORTED 


Vessels  391;  aggregate  tonnage  775,020  tons,  an  increase  of  51  vessels  and 
109,331  tons  as  compared  with  the  1927  figures. 

EXPORTS   OF   GRAIN 

Exports  of  grain  for  1928  amounted  to  202,575,931  bushels  against  185,- 
067,087  bushels  for  1927,  an  increase  of  17,508,844  bushels  in  1928. 

CASUALTIES  REPORTED   BETWEEN   MONTREAL   AND   QUEBEC 

June  16 — SS.  Calumet  touched  on  bank  at  St.  Michel;  no  damage.  SS. 
Agga  grounded  at  Bellmouth;   no  damage. 

July  8. — SS.  Meaford  stranded  at  cap  Madeleine ;   vessel  damaged. 

July  11. — SS.  Idefjord  collided  with  tug  in  Batiscan  traverse;  slight  damage. 

July  14. — SS.  Glitra  grounded  in  lake  St.  Peter;   no  damage. 

July  27. — SS.  Montrose  collided  with  Rosecastle;  serious  damage  to  both. 
vessels. 

August  4. — SS.  Artena  collided  with  Laurentic  in  lake  St.  Peter;  both 
damaged. 

August  10. — SS.  Innerton  grounded  at  Isle  aux  Vaches;  no  damage.  SS. 
Illingworth  collided  with  Aldebaran,  cap  St.  Michel;  slight  damage  to  Aide- 
baran. 

September  20. — SS.  Vesuvio  collided  with  Older  near  Laurier  pier;  both, 
vessels  damaged. 


118  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

October  19. — SS  Letitia  collided  with  Brcokton  near  buoy  97L;  slight 
damage  to  both  vessels.  SS.  Starmount  grounded  at  Richelieu  rapids;  vessel 
damaged. 

October  28. — SS.  Iossifoglu  touched  near  Isle  St.  Therese;    no  damage. 

November  1. — SS.  Angelo  Toso  grounded,  Montreal;  lightened  and  refloated 
November  2;    surveyed,  apparently  no  damage. 

November  9. — SS.  Grelbank  touched  in  lake  St.  Peter;  anchor  lost;  no 
damage. 

SHIP   CHANNEL 

The  water  in  the  ship  channel  was  considerably  higher  during  1928  than  for 
a  number  of  seasons,  and  no  difficulty  was  experienced  in  completing  loading  of  j 
heavy  draft  vessels. 


REPORT  OF  A.  R.  T1BBITS,  SUPERVISOR  OF  HARBOUR  COMMISSIONS, 
PUBLIC  HARBOURS,  AND  HARBOUR  MASTERS 

The  activities  of  the  two  classifications  of  the  department's  work  handled  in 
my  branch  have  been  described  in  some  detail  in  my  previous  report,  these 
being- 
First,  the  supervision  of  the  administration  of  those  major  harbours  that 
have  been  placed  under  the  commission  form  of  management;  and, 

Second,  the  supervision  and  direction  of  the  harbour  masters  appointed  at 
each  public  harbour  that  has  been  proclaimed  under  Part  XII  of  the  Canada 
Shipping  Act,  who  are  charged  with  the  enforcement  of  the  regulations,  made 
under  the  authority  of  the  Act  mentioned,  for  the  government  and  control  of 
approximately  175  public  harbours  of  Canada,  the  movement  of  ships  in  the 
harbour,  their  berthing  and  mooring,  the  enforcement  of  provisions  for  the 
manner  of  loading  and  discharging  of  cargo,  and  for  the  safety  of  ship  and 
cargo  while  at  berth  as  well  as  surrounding  harbour  property.  These  officers  also 
collect  from  the  ships  a  charge  known  as  harbour  dues,  which  is  made  accord- 
ing to  the  registered  tonnage  of  the  ship  at  the  first  two  ports  she  may  enter  in 
any  one  year,  any  entries,  after  the  first  two  in  one  year  have  been  paid  for,  at 
any  port  being  thereafter  free. 

From  these  harbour  dues  the  harbour  master  receives  his  remuneration,  and 
as  in  some  of  the  smaller  harbours  the  traffic  is  limited  and  the  ship  has  very 
often  paid  her  two  annual  payments  for  harbour  dues  at  some  other  port,  the 
amounts  collected  as  their  fees  by  the  harbour  masters  are  frequently  very  small 
and  fall  far  short  of  the  amount  they  would  be  entitled  to  retain  if  collections 
might  be  made  from  each  ship  on  every  entry  into  a  public  harbour  during  the 
year.  In  a  great  many  cases  the  harbour  master  discharges  valuable  public 
services  for  a  very  small  remuneration.  The  country,  consequently,  receives  the 
benefit  of  an  organized  public  service  for  a  consideration  much  less  than  its 
actual  value.  The  service,  nevertheless,  as  a  whole,  is  operated  at  a  profit  to 
the  Government — the  amount  collected  during  the  last  calendar  year  being 
$2,095.70  in  excess  of  the  total  remuneration  allowed  the  harbour  masters. 

Harbour  Commissions 

The  fiscal  year  of  all  the  harbour  commissions  is  the  calendar  year,  and  all 
annual  reports  and  financial  statements  received  from  them  are  based  on  the 
preceding  twelve  months  ending  on  December  31. 

There  has  been  great  activity  in  the  operations  of  the  different  harbour 
commissions  during  the  calendar  year  1928,  the  results  of  which  will  be  found 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  119 

in  detail  in  the  summary  of  the  annual  reports  of  these  commissions  appearing 
later  in  this  publication.  The  harbours  of  Halifax  and  Saint  John  have  been 
particularly  busy  with  organization  work,  building  up  a  competent  staff  to 
handle  the  operation  of  the  different  harbour  facilities  and  services,  a  system  of 
accounting  for  the  proper  care  and  recording  of  their  receipts  from  revenue  and 
expenditure  on  operating  accounts  and  maintenance,  and  of  loans  received  from 
the  Government  to  be  applied  to  capital  expenditure  in  the  further  development 
of  the  harbour,  for  all  of  which  monthly  returns  must  be  made  to  the  department 
by  all  the  harbour  commissions  who  receive  aid  by  the  way  of  loans  for  harbour 
development,  or  whose  revenue  receipts  are  in  excess  of  $50,000  annually. 
Through  these  monthly  returns,  a  constant  check  is  kept  in  the  department  on 
the  commissioners'  expenditure,  and  a  knowledge  is  gained  through  the  increase 
or  decrease  of  their  revenue  earnings  of  the  corresponding  trend  of  the  business 
of  the  harbour.  For  each  of  the  six  harbours  of  major  importance,  namely, 
Halifax,  Saint  John,  Quebec,  Montreal,  Toronto  and  Vancouver,  the  results  of 
operations  in  the  year  1928  showed  a  very  satisfactory  increase  in  the  harbour 
business  so  indicated. 

The  harbours  of  Chicoutimi  and  Three  Rivers  in  the  province  of  Quebec, 
Hamilton  in  Ontario,  and  New  Westminster  in  British  Columbia,  are  becoming 
increasingly  important  under  the  administration  of  their  respective  harbour  com- 
missions, and  developments  are  being  carried  on  in  each  under  these  commissions 
to  supply  a  needed  increase  in  the  harbour  facilities,  the  reports  of  shipping 
arriving  and  departing  showing  a  considerable  increase  over  previous  years,  and, 
in  some  cases,  it  has  been  difficult  to  give  proper  accommodation  required  with 
the  existing  facilities. 

Frequent  inspections  of  the  progress  of  the  works,  with  a  check  of  the 
expenditures  in  the  books  of  the  commissions,  are  made  by  the  supervisor  during 
visits  to  the  different  harbour  commissions  throughout  the  year,  at  which  time 
proposals  and  plans  for  a  new  development  are  discussed,  and  proposals  for 
improved  systems  of  accounting  are  gone  into.  In  this  connection  it  is  a  pleasure 
to  acknowledge  the  uniform  and  courteous  co-operation  received  from  the  com- 
missioners and  their  officers  at  these  inspections,  and  to  record  that  the  utmost 
harmony  exists  in  the  relations  between  the  officer  having  charge  of  the  super- 
vision of  the  commissioners'  affairs  and  the  commissioners  and  their  officers. 
Every  facility  is  accorded  to  make  the  inspections  thorough  and  comprehensive, 
and  every  disposition  is  evidenced  to  meet  the  wishes  of  the  department  head  in 
all  details  of  the  commissioners'  work. 

During  the  year  some  changes  have  occurred  in  the  personnel  of  the  different 
commissions.  The  regretted  passing  of  Mr.  Emilien  Daoust,  a  valued  member 
of  the  Harbour  Commissioners  of  Montreal  caused  a  vacancy  on  that  board, 
which  was  filled  by  the  appointment  of  Mr.  Alfred  Lambert,  a  well  known 
citizen. 

Mr.  John  O'Connor,  Chairman  of  the  Toronto  Harbour  Commission,  re- 
signed during  the  year,  and  Commissioner  Jenkins  was  elected  chairman  by  his 
confreres. 

Mr.  George  P.  Smith,  a  prominent  business  man  of  Hamilton,  was  appointed 
to  the  Hamilton  Harbour  Commission  in  place  of  Mr.  William  B.  Sheppard, 
resigned,  and  was  later  chosen  chairman  of  the  commission,  in  place  of  Mr. 
William  Ainslie,  who  retired  from  the  chairmanship  but  remains  a  commissioner. 
Another  regretted  change  was  caused  by  the  resignation  of  the  Hon.  Walter 
E.  Foster,  President  of  the  Saint  John  Harbour  Commission,  to  accept  appoint- 
ment to  the  Canadian  Senate,  he  being  succeeded  as  President  by  Commissioner 
W.  E.  Scully,  Mr.  Robert  T.  Hayes,  also  a  well  known  Saint  John  business  man, 
being  appointed  to  the  vacancy  caused  by  Mr.  Scully's  elevation  to  the  presi- 
dency. 


120 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 


General 

An  analysis  of  the  financial  returns  for  the  year  1928  received  from  the 
different  harbour  commissions,  details  of  which  will  be  found  in  tabulated  form 
farther  on  in  this  report,  shows,  in  the  comparative  results  of  revenue  receipts 
and  expenditures  for  the  three  commissions  which  have  been  in  operation  suffi- 
ciently long  to  make  comparative  figures  available,  a  very  considerable  increase 
in  revenue  earnings,  these  being  the  Montreal,  Quebec  and  Vancouver  Harbour 
'Commissions.  While  in  the  case  of  Montreal  and  Vancouver,  there  was  a  satis- 
factory decrease  in  the  operation  costs  over  the  previous  year — this  decrease 
being  all  the  more  noticeable  compared  with  the  increase  in  the  revenue  receipts 

in  the  harbour  of  Quebec,  although  the  revenue  receipts  showed  an  increase, 

there  was  also  an  increase  of  something  over  9  per  cent  in  the  operation  costs. 

The  commissions  in  charge  of  the  harbours  of  Saint  John  and  Halifax  have 
not  been  in  operation  sufficiently  long  to  show  comparative  results  of  operation 
revenues  and  expenditure's  for  two  complete  years.  The  Saint  John  Harbour 
Commission's  balance  sheet  shows  a  satisfactory  surplus  of  revenue  receipts  over 
operation  expenditures  for  the  year  1928,  after  paying  interest  charges  on  bonded 
indebtedness  of  $100,031.65,  of  $60,308.81.  The  Halifax  Harbour  Commissioners 
had  not  been  in  operation  sufficiently  long  to  show  complete  returns  for  the 
twelve  month  period  at  December  31  last,  as  their  taking  over  and  operation  of 
facilities  there  did  not  become  effective  until  November  1. 

The  financial  results  of  the  four  major  commissions  from  which  returns 
covering  the  complete  year  1928  were  received,  are  shown  in  the  following 
table: — 


Montreal 


Quebec 


Vancouver 


Saint  John 


Total  operating  receipts 

Total  operating  expenditures  (including  cost  of  admin- 
istration and  interest  paid  on  funded  indebtedness) 

Surplus 


$    cts. 
5,589,327  12 

5,314,466  50 


$    cts. 
788,490  18 

643,131  30 


$    cts. 
2,095,650  87 

1,725,687  66 


$    cts. 
304,181  45 

243,782  64 


274,860  62 


145,358  88 


369,963  21 


60,398  81 


Following  in  tabular  form  will  'be  found  the  usual  comparative  statistics 
showing  the  results  of  the  various  activities  of  the  larger  harbour  commissions, 
with  the  exception  of  those  administering,  Toronto,  Halifax  and  Saint  John,  in 
regard  to  revenue  and  capital  receipts  and  expenditures,  operation  costs,  interest 
on  capital  loaned  by  the  Government  and  on  similar  loans  made  from  the  public, 
together  with  tables  showing  the  number  and  tonnage  of  ocean  vessels,  tramps 
and  liners,  that  made  use  of  the  different  larger  ports,  .and  cargo  returns  with 
regard  to  grain  shipments.  It  is  to  be  noted  again  that  these  statistics  cover 
the  calendar  year  for  the  years  given,  the  fiscal  year  of  each  of  the  harbour 
commissions  closing  December  31,  as  before  stated. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER 


121 


Comparative  Table  showing,  respectively,  Revenue  and  Capital  Receipts  and 
Expenditures;  Total  Funded  Indebtedness;  Interest  Charges  on  Same  for 
the  Year;  with  the  Total  of  Grain  Shipments  in  Bushels;  for  the  Harbour- 
of  Montreal,  Quebec  and  Vancouver  during  the  year  1928. 


Harbour  Commis- 
sioners of  Montreal 


Quebec  Harbour 
Commissioners 


Vancouver  Harbour 
Com  m  issioners 


:ross  revenue  for  year — 


1928. 
1927. 


)perating  expenditures, 
administration — 

1928 

1927 


including  cost  of 


Inc. 


Dec. 


'apital  expenditure — 

Loans  received  1928 

Loans  received  1927 

nterest  paid  on  debentures — 

To  Government  1928 

To  Government  1927 

To  Public  1928 

To  Public  1927 

nterest  due  Government  for  1928,  unpaid, 
j'otal  debenture  indebtedness — 

To  Government 

To  Public 


%    cts 

5,589,327  12 

5,453,951  56 

135,375  56 


3,287,152  00 
3,418,932  00 


Inc. 


$    cts. 
788,490  00 
702,310  00 

86,180  00 


640,131  00 
585,539  00 


Inc. 


131,780  00 

2,640,000  00 
835,000  00 

2,023,448  98 
1,916,004  44 

Nil 

Nil 

Nil 

50,350,000  00 
Nil 


Inc. 


54,592  00 

2,186,000  00 
1,138,000  00 

Nil 

Nil 
43,000  00 
46,000  00 
470,011  00 

12,701,800  00 
1,000,000  00 


Dec. 


$  cts. 
2,095,650  00 
2,003,889  00 

91,761  00 


915,239  00 
988,196  00 


72,957  00 

1,965,000  00 
1,542,000  00 

816,895  00 

711,686  00 

97,500  00 

97,500  00 

Nil 

17,317,900  00 
1,950,000  00 


There  was  again  an  increased  activity  in  (the  building  program  of  harbour 
levelopments.  Further  work  was  done  in  the  extension  of  the  wharves  in  their 
mrbour  by  the  Chicoutimi  Harbour  Commission,  and  new  developments  for  the 
extension  of  the  wharves  in  the  harbour  of  Three  Rivers  were  initiated.  A  new 
levator  was  completed  and  put  in  operation  by  the  New  Westminster  Harbour 
Commissioners  and  an  area  with  a  frontage  of  1,200  feet  on  the  harbour  was 
reclaimed  by  means  of  bulkhead  and  hydraulic  fill  around  the  elevator  structure, 
jvhich,  it  is  expected,  will  eventually  be  developed  into  a  general  industrial 
erminal  on  the  South  side  of  the  harbour. 

Construction  also  was  started  during  the  year  on  a  new  pier  by  the  Saint 
fohn  Harbour  Commissioners.  This  pier  is  situated  in  West  Saint  John,  and  with 
he  contemplated  future  construction  of  another  pier  and  a  quay  wall,  will  be 
in  extension  of  the  existing  terminal  system  there.  The  first  unit  will  be  800  feet 
ong  by  300  feet  wide  and  a  new  grain  elevator  of  1 ,500,000' bushels  capacity  will 
!>e  built  at  the  rear  of  the  pier  with  conveyor  gallery  connection  to  all  berths. 
Extensive  additional  property  for  harbour  purposes  is  also  being  acquired  in  the 
ocality,  part  of  which  will  eventually  be  developed  by  the  filling  of  what  was 
jnown  as  the  old  mill  pond  into  industrial  areas,  which  will  necessitate  the  closing 
If  the  existing  street  along  the  waterfront  and  the  development  of  a  new  street 
little  farther  back. 

Plans  were  completed  during  the  year,  also,  by  the  Halifax  Harbour  Com- 
missioners for  the  construction  of  a  new  landing  shed  and  an  addition  to  the 
resent  grain  elevator  of  1,000,000  bushels  capacity,  also  for  extensive  repairs  to 
pasting  facilities, — and  the  work  on  these  is  well  under  way.  These  Cominis- 
'.oners,  also,  have  in  contemplation  the  construction  of  a  new  pier  adjoining 
"ier  "A"  at  the  ocean  terminals,  to  be  known  as  Pier  "B". 

In  the  harbour  of  Quebec,  the  Commissioners  made  good  progress  in  the 
instruction  of  the  new  Wolfe's  Cove  Terminal,  and  at  the  same  time  carried 
p  considerable  development  work  at  the  St.  Charles  river  basin  terminals  in 


122 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 


dredging  of  basins  and  approach  channels,  in  the  construction  of  a  new  landin 
shed,  and  also  the  construction  of  a  storage  addition  of  2,000,000  bushels  capacity 
with' necessary  additional  facilities,  to  their  grain  elevator  system. 

In  the  harbour  of  Montreal  very  little  new  work  was  initiated  but  thei 
was  great  activity  in  the  carrying  to  completion  of  extensions  to  the  gener; 
harbour  facilities  which  had  previously  been  initiated,  including  the  continuatio 
of  the  high  level  wharves,  dredging  operations,  railway  construction,  extensio 
of  the  Bickerdike  pier,  and  different  sections  of  wharf  construction,  including  tb 
completion  of  industrial  wharf  at  section  100,  the  reconstruction  of  Jacqut 
Gartier  pier  superstructure  and  also  the  up-stream  side  of  King  Edward  pier,  an 
the  completion  of  the  3,000,000  bushel  extension  to  grain  elevator  No.  3.  Exter 
sions  also  were  constructed  to  different  sheds,  and  there  were  minor  improvemenl 
to  wharf  and  shed  structures  and  to  the  sewerage  and  drainage  system  of  tr 
harbour. 

The  grain  shipments  for  the  year  from  all  harbours  show  a  marked  increas 
while  in  the  harbour  of  Montreal  there  was  a  record  shipment  of  211,000,OC 
bushels,  in  round  numbers. 

Table  showing  comparative  grain  shipments  for  the  years  1927  and  1928  froi 
the  harbours  of  Montreal,  Quebec  and  Vancouver. 


— 

Harbour 
Commission- 
ers of 
Montreal 

Quebec 
Harbour 
Commission- 
ers 

Vancouvei 
Harbour 
Commissio 
ers 

Grain  Shipments — 

1928 

bushels 

211,295,379 
195,247,914 

bushels 

10,267,079 
9,773,370 

bushels 

97,250,5 
42, 006, S 

1927 

Increase 

16,047,465 

493,709 

55,243,6 

Comparative  Table  showing  total  number  of  ocean  vessels,  With  their  tot; 
registered  tonnage,  using  the  five  larger  harbours  of  Canada  during  the  yea 
1927  and  1928. 




Number  of  Vessels 

— 

Net  tonnage 

Montreal,  P.Q.— 

1928 

1,222 
1,231 

4.693.S 
4,252,2 

1927 

Quebec,  P.Q.— 

1928 

Decrease .               9 

577 
449 

Increase..      441,  I 
3,894,2 

1927 

3,445  S 

Vancouver,  B.C. — 
1928 

Increase. .            128 

1,344 
1,123 

Increase..      448,  ( 

4,674,( 
3,779,( 

Increase. .      895,  ( 

3,761,? 
3,610,1 

1927 

Halifax,  N.S.— 

1928 

Increase . .            221 

1,690 
1,584 

1927 

Saint  John,  N.B.— 
1928... 

Increase . .                6 

410 

427 

Increase..        61, » 

1,182,' 
1,222, i 

Decrease         40,  ( 

1927 

Decrease              17 

REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  123 

The  steady  and  consistent  increase  in  the  business  of  the  harbours  that  have 
been  put  under  the  Commission  form  of  management,  subject  to  a  parental 
Departmental  control,  may  be  taken  as  conclusive  evidence  of  the  success  of  this 
form  of  harbour  administration,  and  of  the  wisdom  of  the  Government  in 
providing  the  means  by  which  the  harbours  may  be  developed,  even  in  advance 
of  actual  requirements  without  undue  burden  on  shipping,  and  experience  points 
that  a  reasonable  development  in  advance  of  present  requirements  is,  in  most 
cases,  soon  followed  by  business  sufficient  to  occupy  the  full  capacity  of  the 
facilities  furnished,  and  in  a  growing  country  like  ours,  is  it  not  well  to  provide 
for  future  development,  even  at  the  cost  of  some  possible  mistakes? 

A  full  summary  of  the  reports  of  the  different  Harbour  Commissions  to  the 
Department,  will  be  found,  under  their  own  heading,  elsewhere  in  this  publication. 

Public  Harbours  and  Harbour  Masters 

Several  changes  have  been  made  in  the  personnel  of  the  Harbour  Masters 
in  charge  of  the  different  harbours  during  the  year,  but  no  new  harbours  have 
been  proclaimed. 

LIST   SHOWING    CHANGES    IN    PERSONNEL    OF    HARBOUR    MASTERS    DURING    CALENDAR 

YEAR    1928 

Nova  Scotia 

Guysboro. — Position  of  Harbour  Master  temporarily  vacant  since  June, 
1926.    Robert  Leary  appointed  to  fill  vacancy  in  May,  1928. 

Mahone  Bay. — T.  F.  Mader  resigned  in  March,  1928.  Francis  Holloway 
appointed  as  successor  in  April,  1928. 

White  Point. — Position  temporarily  vacant  since  1924.  Alfred  Briand 
appointed  harbour  master  May  10,  1928. 

New  Brunsivick 

St.  Stephen. — Theodore  Holmes   died.     William  Horan  appointed  to   the 
!  position  July  12,  1928. 

Ontario 

Oshawa. — Jackson  Smith  resigned  May  3rd  and  H.  L.  Gifford  appointed  to 
the  position  in  September,  1928. 

Prince  Edward  Island 
Miminigash. — M.  D.  Lacey  died  December  29,  1928.    Position  now  vacant. 

Quebec 

Amherst. — James  Cormier  resigned  November  4,  1928. 

House  Harbour. — J.  C.  Delaney  appointed  harbour  master  May  7,  1928, 
but  declined  to  accept  the  position.  Appointment  cancelled  August  1,  1928. 
Position  vacant. 

Rimouski. — E.  P.  St.  Laurent  died.  Ubald  Lavoie  appointed  February  4, 
1928. 

Some  idea  of  the  extent  of  the  maritime  territory  of  Canada  will  be  gained 
by  the  numbers  of  smaller  harbours — many  none  the  less  are  important — in  the 
following  recapitulation  of  the  proclaimed  harbours  in  Canada,  by  Provinces: — 

On  the  Atlantic  Seaboard. — Nova  Scotia,  90;  New  Brunswick,  36;  Prince 
Edward  Island,  27;  Quebec,  40. 

On  the  Pacific  Seaboard. — British  Columbia,  13. 
On  the  Great  Lakes. — Ontario,  22. 


124 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 


No  harbours,  it  will  be  noted,  have  yet  been  proclaimed  in  the  Hudson  Bay 
areaf  but  it  is  expected  that  the  completion  of  the  railway  to  tidewater  there, 
will  soon  lead  to  the  proclamation  of  one  or  more  harbours  and  the  establishment 
of  a  Harbour  Master  for  each.  It  is  interesting  to  note  in  this  connection  that 
one  or  two  applications  for  the  latter  position  at  Churchill  and  Port  Nelson  have 
already  been  received  from  expatriated  Britishers  in  other  parts  of  the  Empire, 
in  anticipation  of  the  development  there; — those  pioneer  adventurers,  who  seek 
the  outposts  of  the  Empire's  civilization  in  search  of  new  adventure,  and  leave 
the  impress  of  their  sturdy  hardihood,  at  least  in  sentiment,  on  following 
generations. 

SUMMARY  OF  HARBOUR  DUES  FOR  THE  YEAR  1928 


Province 


Amount 
collected 


Remuner- 
ation 


Expenses 


Amount 
remitted 


Ontario 

Quebec 

New  Brunswick 

Nova  Scotia 

Prince  Edward  Island 
British  Columbia 

Total 


$    cts. 

1,547  50 
1,526  00 

511  20 
2,860  00 

254  50 
4,908  50 


$    cts. 

1,412  50 
1,298  00 

510  00 
2,390  00 

254  50 
3,647  00 


$    cts. 


$    cts. 

135  0( 

228  (X 

1  2( 

470  0( 


1,261  5( 


11,607  70 


9,512  00 


2,095  7( 


Quebec  Harbour  Commissioner's  Report 
continued  growth  of  port 

During  the  last  decade  Quebec  has  made  marked  progress  as  a  grain  shipping 
port.  In  1920  the  port  handled  884,450  bushels  of  grain  and  in  the  navigation 
season  of  1928,  11,063,761  bushels,  an  increase  of  1,622,063  bushels  over  grair 
handled  in  1927.  It  is  anticipated  that  with  a  doubled  elevator  capacity  next 
year  an  additional  impetus  will  be  given  to  the  port's  grain  shipping  trade. 

There  was  a  substantial  increase  both  in  the  imports  and  exports  of  1928 
over  those  of  1927. 

The  surplus  of  revenue  over  expenditure  in  1927  amounted  to  $70,770.28: 
in  1928  to  $145,358.88. 

COMPARISON  OF  REVENUES  1928  AND  1927 

Revenue,  1928 $788, 490  18 

Revenue,  1927 702,310  01 

Increase,  1928 $86, 180  17 

COMPARISON  OF  OPERATING  EXPENDITURES  1928  AND  1927 

Expenditure,  1928 $643, 131  30 

Expenditure,  1927 631,539  73 

Increase,  1928 $11,591  57 


The  surplus  of  revenue  over  expenditure  for  1928  was  $145,358.88. 


HARBOUR    MASTER'S    REPORT 

January  4— the  C.G.S.  Montcalm  left  port  for  Sydney,  C.B.,  via  lower  St 
Lawrence  ports  and  north  shore. 

January  19— the  ice-bridge  between  the  island  of  Orleans  and  the  main  lane 
open  to  traffic.  The  ss.  Island  of  Orleans,  ferry  boat,  laid  up  in  her  winte] 
quarters  for  the  remainder  of  the  winter  months. 


I 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  125 


February  16 — the  C.G.S.  Mikula  left  for  north  shore,  via  Ellis  bay,  Anti- 
costi  island. 

March  2 — the  C.G.S.  Mikula  arrived  from  north  shore  and  lower  gulf  ports. 

March  12 — the  ss.  Sable  I.  of  the  Bras  d'Or  Bay  Company,  left  for  lower 
St.  Lawrence  and  north  shore. 

March  23 — the  ss.  Gaspesia,  of  the  Clarke  Steamship  Co.,  left  for  Gaspe. 
The  gasoline  yacht  Ouganda  arrived  from  St.  Laurent,  island  of  Orleans. 

March  26— the  schooner  Eboulement  arrived  from  Les  Eboulements,  first 
schooner  to  arrive  from  below  this  season. 

March  31 — the  ss.  Sable  I,  of  the  Bras  d'Or  Company,  arrived  from  north 
shore,  via  lower  St.  Lawrence  ports.     First  arrival  of  the  season. 

April  15 — the  ss.  Philip  T.  Dodge  arrived  in  port  from  Newcastle-on-Tyne. 
First  transatlantic  freight-carrying  steamer  to  arrive  from  sea  this  season. 

April  22 — the  ss.  Aurania,  of  the  Cunard  Line,  arrived  in  port  from  Liver- 
pool, being  the  first  transatlantic  liner  to  arrive  this  season. 

The  ss.  Montroyal,  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Ocean  Service,  arrived  from 
Southampton,  being  the  first  company  steamer  to  arrive  this  season  with  terminal 
at  this  port. 

April  23 — owing  to  the  great  quantity  of  ice  in  the  channel,  from  this  port 
to  Montreal,  the  first  transatlantic  fleet  of  passenger-carrying  steamers  had  to 
take  on  their  cargoes  at  this  port  for  the  overseas  voyages. 

April  26 — the  ss.  Arvida,  of  the  Canada  Steamship  Line,  arrived  from  Mont- 
real.   First  arrival  from  that  port  this  season. 

April  27 — the  channel  from  Montreal  to  Quebec  clear  of  all  ice. 

April  28 — the  C.G.S.  Mikula,  ice-breaker,  left  for  Cabot  strait,  for  ice  patrol 
duties. 

May  6 — the  ss.  Laurentic,  of  the  White  Star-Dominion  Line,  arrived  in  port 
from  Liverpool  on  her  maiden  trip  to  the  St.  Lawrence  waters. 

May  22 — the  C.G.S.  Mikula  arrived  from  ice  patrol  duties,  Cabot  strait. 
'  June  8 — the  liner  ss.  Duchess  of  Bedford,  owned  by  the  Canadian  Pacific 
Ocean  Rprvice.  arrived  in  port  on  her  maiden  voyage  to  the  St.  Lawrence  waters. 

October  27 — the  Right  Honourable  W.  L.  Mackenzie  King,  Prime  Minister 
of  Canada,  arrived  from  Europe  on  board  the  Canadian  Pacific  liner  Empress  of 
Scotland. 

November  14 — the  C.G.S.  ice-breaker  Montcalm  arrived  Hudson's  bay 
cruise. 

November  24 — the  Empress  of  Australia,  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Ocean 
Service,  left  for  New  York  to  take  on  her  round-the-world  cruise.  Last  passen- 
ger liner  to  sail  from  this  port  this  season. 

November  25 — the  ss.  Minnedosa,  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Ocean  Service, 
arrived  from  Glasgow,  being  the  last  passenger  liner  to  arrive  this  season. 

November  26 — the  ice  began  to  form  in  inner  basin.  The  ss.  Daghild,  of 
the  Black  Diamond  Company,  arrived  from  Sydney,  C.B.,  being  the  last  collier 
from  that  port  this  season. 

December  2 — the  ss.  Bochum,  of  the  Canada  Steamship  Line,  left  port  for 
Hamburg,  Germany,  being  the  last  cargo  steamer  to  depart  from  this  port  this 
season. 

December  11 — the  Norwegian  steamers  Boreas  and  the  Rein,  from  Montreal 
on  their  way  to  sea,  bound  for  Norway,  passed  down  river.  These  two  tramp 
steamers  were  last  out  this  season. 

December  25 — the  ss.  Sable  I,  of  the  Bras  d'Or  Bay  Company,  arrived  from 
lower  St.  Lawrence  on  her  last  trip  of  the  season. 

December  6 — Messrs.  The  Clarke  Steamship  Company  of  this  port  have  this 
winter  inaugurated  a  new  service  on  the  north  shore  between  Murray  bay  and 
Seven  islands,  and  up  to  date  the  enterprise  has  proved  to  be  a  success. 

December  31 — owing  to  the  mild  temperature  during  the  month  of  Decem- 
ber, the  St.  Lawrence  river  including  the  gulf,  is  practically  clear  of  all  ice, 
from  Quebec  to  Cape  Race. 


126  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

CHIEF    ENGINEER'S    REPORT 

Princess  Louise  Docks 

Dredging. — The  Commission's  bucket  ladder  dredge,  No.  2,  was  not  placed 
in  commission  during  the  past  season.  The  suction  dredge  No.  3  was  operated 
during  the  months  of  July  and  August  dredging  at  Atkinson's  wharf  to  a  depth 
of  fifteen  feet  at  low  water  and  in  the  customs  pond  and  adjacent  coal  berth 
to  a  depth  of  eighteen  feet  at  low  water. 

This  suction  dredge  was  also  operated  in  the  inner  basin  from  September 
1  to  November  28,  removing  the  silt  and  accumulations  in  order  to  maintain 
a  minimum  depth  of  25  feet  with  closed  gates. 

Grain  Elevator  No.  2  Additions. — Plans  for  an  additional  storage  capacity 
of  2,000,000  bushels  to  Grain  Elevator  No.  2  with  a  new  receiving  and  shipping 
house,  lofter  house,  two  travelling  marine  towers  on  the  outer  basin,  and  addi- 
tional shipping  galleries  on  the  St.  Charles  river  front  were  prepared  by  the 
firm  of  John  S.  Metcalf  Co.  Ltd.,  of  Montreal,  during  last  winter;  tenders 
called  for  in  May  and  contract  awarded  to  the  Atlas  Construction  Co.,  of 
Montreal,  in  the  same  month. 

The  storage  bins  are  circular  reinforced  concrete  bins  resting  on  a  pile 
foundation,  and  the  receiving  and  shipping  house  and  lofter  house  are  of  steel 
frame  construction,  sheathed  with   corrugated   asbestos. 

The  machinery  installation,  of  the  latest  design,  is  being  carried  out  by 
the  Commissioners'  own  construction  staff  under  the  supervision  of  the  John 
S.  Metcalf  Co.,  Ltd. 

The  construction  of  this  addition  to  grain  elevator  No.  2  was  started  in 
the  latter  part  of  May  and  sufficiently  advanced  to  allow  grain  to  be  placed  in 
the  new  storage  house  about  the  middle  of  November. 

That  part  of  the  quaywall  on  the  north  side  of  the  outer  basin  used  for 
the  two  new  marine  towers  had  to  be  rebuilt  from  the  low  water  level  to  the 
top  of  the  wharf  for  a  distance  of  210  feet  in  order  to  provide  a  solid  founda- 
tion for  the  marine  towers.  The  timber  crib  was  replaced  by  a  cellular  rein- 
forced concrete  structure  tied  to  an  anchorage  by  steel  rods.  This  foundation 
is  now  completed  and  the  erection  of  the  two  marine  towers  will  be  proceeded 
with  this  winter. 

An  additional  550  linear  feet  of  4-belt  grain  gallery  is  being  constructed 
at  the  western  extremity  of  the  present  grain  shipping  galleries  on  the  St. 
Charles  river  front  and  will  provide  an  additional  berth  for  grain  loading. 

Cold  Storage. — Improvements  in  the  cold  storage  plant  during  the  past 
year  consisted  of  the  installation  of  meat  handling  tracks  in  the  main  ware- 
house; replacing  the  wooden  floor  in  fish  shed  No.  7  by  a  concrete  floor  with 
suitable  drainage  and  the  construction  of  an  ice  storage  box  in  this  shed. 

Landing  Stage  No.  18.— To  replace  the  old  wooden  shed  No.  18  which  was 
destroyed  by  fire  in  1927,  the  Commissioners  decided  to  erect  at  that  location 
on  the  breakwater  a  landing  stage  for  the  accommodation  of  ocean  liners 
carrying  passengers  and  immigrants,  which  vessels  only  stop  for  a  few  hours  on 
their  inward  voyage  to  Montreal. 

Tenders  were  called  for  in  the  month  of  August  and  the  contract  awarded 
to  the  firm  of  A.  Deslauriers  Ltd.,  of  Quebec,  in  the  same  month. 

Work  was  started  in  August  and  the  landing  stage  including  the  overhead 
passageway  connecting  with  the  Immigration  building  will  be  completed  before 
the  opening  of  navigation  next  year. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  127 

This  new  structure  is  a  two-storey  steel-framed  fireproof  construction 
measuring  440  feet  in  length  and  36  feet  in  width.  The  sheathing  is  of  pro- 
tected metal  and  both  sides  of  the  landing  stage  are  provided  with  continuous 
sliding  doors. 

The  upper  storey  is  connected  to  the  Immigration  building  by  a  steel-framed 
ioverhead  passageway,  the  sides  of  which  are  sheathed  with  protected  metal. 

Shed  No.  29. — The  work  of  replacing  the  pedestals  supporting  the  north 
row  of  columns  in  this  shed  with  a  continuous  reinforced  concrete  slab,  was 
completed  last  winter  by  the  continuation  of  this  wall  through  sections  3  and 
4,  thus  providing  a  continuous  concrete  slab  on  the  north  side  of  the  shed, 
which  will  greatly  improve  the  stability  of  the  shed  and  the  superimposed  grain 
conveyors. 

General  Improvements. — Works  of  minor  importance  carried  out  during 
the  past  year  were  as  follows: — 

New  foundations  and  rails   for  the  draw  bridge. 

Renewing  the  ties  on  the  Bascule  railway  bridge. 

The  demolishing  of  shed  No.  22  to  make  room  for  new  grain  storage 
elevator. 

The  removal  of  a  portion  of  shed  No.  20  at  the  southwest  corner  to  make 
room  for  new  marine  towers. 

Repairs  to  roofs  of  sheds  25,  26  and  27. 

Refilling  and  reflooring  three  sections  of  shed  No.  29. 

A  general  rearrangement  of  tracks  rendered  necessary  by  the  grain  elevator 
and  galleries  extension. 

The  installation  of  a  Durham  heating  system  in  the  garage  and  police 
station,  and  complete  rewiring  of  garage  in  metal  conduit. 

The  Commissioners'  floating  equipment  was  overhauled  and  the  plant 
generally  has  been  maintained  in  good  working  order. 

The  cross-wall  bridge  was  operated  for  the  first  time  during  the  season  on 
April  12  and  for  the  last  time  on  December  12. 

The  water  was  retained  in  the  wet  dock  for  the  first  time  during  1928  on 
April  24  and  for  the  last  time  on  December  4. 

Wolfe's  Cove  Terminals 

The  Federal  Government  having  voted  last  spring  the  balance  of  the  money 
required  for  the  complete  construction  of  the  first  section  of  Wolfe's  cove 
terminal  port  extension,  the  Commissioners  in  the  month  of  May  extended  the 
contract  of  the  Northern  Construction  Company  and  J.  W.  Stewart  to  include 
ithe  550  feet  of  quaywall  at  the  south  end  of  the  first  section,  which  was  not 
part  of  the  original  contract. 

Satisfactory  progress  was  made  during  the  year  by  the  contractors,  which 
can  be  summarized  as  follows: — 

Dredging. — The  suction  dredge  General  Wolfe  dredged  during  the  year  a 
total  quantity  of  1,147,043  cubic  yards,  the  material  being  deposited  in  the 
rear  of  the  rip-rap  embankment  and  the  quaywall  between  stations  30+00 
and  43+60. 

The  dredge  started  operation  on  May  2  and  stopped  work  on  December  2. 

During  the  months  of  July  and  August  the  dredge  was  loaned  to  the* 
hicoutimi  Harbour  Commissioners  for  pressing  works  at  Chicoutimi. 

Timber  Cribs. — Six  new  cribs  were  built  and  sunk  in  position  from  station 
56+66  running  diagonally  into  the  river  for  a  distance  of  550  feet. 


12s  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

The  total  quantity  used  in  the  construction  of  these  cribs  was  4,062,267 
f.b.m.  of  B.C.  fir. 

A  total  quantity  of  78,377  cubic  yards  of  stone  from  Victoria  and  Chateau 
Richer  quarries  was  placed  in  the  cribs  during  the  year. 

Anchor  Rods. — Six  anchor  rods  of  3-inch  steel,  each  456  feet  in  length,; 
have  been  placed  in  position  between  station  30+00  and  station  43+60  as 
called  for  by  the  general  plan. 

Concrete  Superstructure. — The  concrete  wall  on  top  of  the  cribs  has  been 
constructed  during  the  year  from  station  30+00  to  station  44+09.  The  19- 
foot  reinforced  pre-cast  concrete  blocks  are  now  in  place  from  station  30+00! 
to  station  46+11.  The  15-foot  reinforced  pre-cast  concrete  blocks  are  in  place' 
from  station  30+00  to  station  45+10. 

The  total  quantity  of  concrete  in  place  amounts  to  20,662  cubic  yards. 

Stone  Ballast  Back  of  Cribs. — 21,566  cubic  yards  of  stone  have  been  placed 
on  the  lower  step  of  the  cribs  to  counterbalance  the  weight  of  the  concrete  wall.: 

Stone  Rip-Rap. — Three  thousand  two  hundred  and  ninety  cubic  yards  of! 
stone  rip-rap  have  been  placed  at  the  foot  and  back  of  the  concrete  wall  to 
reduce  the  pressure  of  the  filling. 

'  Mooring  Posts. — Fourteen  mooring  posts  have  been  placed  in  position. 

Rip-Rap. — Embankment  cut-off  at  station  43  +  60  is  completed  to  within 
60  feet  of  the  quaywall,  which  is  left  open  to  allow  for  passage  of  scows  and 
other  floating  equipment. 

General  Remarks. — The  contractors  have  instructions  to  start  work  early 
next  spring  in  order  to  complete  as  soon  as  possible  the  stone  filling  of  the  cribs 
sunk  this  year. 

The  concrete  wall  will  be  extended  next  year  over  all  the  cribs  now  in  place. 

The  program  of  work  for  next  year  also  calls  for  the  building  and  sinking  in 
position  of  the  cribs  from  station  19+06  to  station  30+00,  which  will  complete 
the  crib  works  called  for  in  the  first  section  of  the  Wolfe's  cove  terminal. 


WHARFINGER  S  REPORT 

The  traffic  at  the  St.  Charles  river  docks  and  wharves  was: — 

LOWER  PORT  STEAMERS 

Inwards 4, 307  tons  general  cargo 

Outwards 14, 885  tons  general  cargo 

396,336  f.b.m.  fir  and  dressed  lumber 

QUEBEC-MONTREAL 

Inwards 21, 183  tons  general  cargo 

Outwards 1, 192  tons  general  cargo 

There  are  winter  stored  on  Louise  docks  lumber,  laths,  coal,  etc. 

There  are  stored  in  the  different  sheds  spoolwood,  salt,  lumber,  fertilizers, 


etc. 


The  docks  are  occupied  during  the  winter  months  by  vessels  of  various 
tonnage,  where  they  find  safe  quarters  until  the  opening  of  navigation. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  129 

ELEVATOR   SUPERINTENDENT'S   REPORT 

Grain  Elevator  No.  2 

GRAIN  RECEIVED 

Bushels  Bushels 

In  store  at  end  of  year  1927 1,332, 661 

Wheat 7,848, 061 

Corn 54 1 ,  563 

Oats 1,968,583 

Barley 704, 028 

Other  grain 1,526 

11,063,761 

Total 12,396,422 

GRAIN  DELIVERED 

By  conveyors 8, 068,997 

By  cars 324, 798 

By  teams 130, 553 

By  bags 1, 742, 734 

10,267,082 

In  store  December  31,  1928 2, 129, 340 

From  total  of  grain  delivered,  2,198,085  bushels  were  local  deliveries. 

TRAFFIC  MANAGER^  REPORT 

Loaded  cars  received 8, 589 

Loaded  cars  forwarded 12, 659 

21,248 

Empty  cars  received 11,488 

Empty  cars  forwarded 7, 357 

18,845 

Total  number  of  cars  handled 40, 093 

Loaded  passenger,  mail  and  baggage  cars  handled 3, 341 

Total  number  of  cars  coal  handled 7, 833 

The  Commissioners'  four  locomotives  are  being  cared  for  by  the  staff  in 
the  shop. 


PRINCIPAL  COMMODITIES  STORED  IN  THE  COMMISSIONERS'  COLD  STORAGE 

WAREHOUSE  DURING  1928 

Apples barrels  and  boxes  19, 948 

Other  fruits boxes  20,298 

Vegetables lbs.  1 ,  051 ,  686 

Fish,  frozen  and  salted lbs.  1 ,  577 ,  386 

Meat lbs.  1,171, 338 

Eggs doz.  422, 160 

Frozen  eggs lbs.  24, 000 

Butter lbs.  1, 114, 722 

Groceries lbs.  539,878 


PORT  OF  QUEBEC— SUMMARY  OF  NUMBER  OF  VESSELS  ARRIVED  AND  GROSS  TON- 
NAGE DURING  1928 

Vessels  Tonnage 

Coasting  vessels  inward  from  sea 288  372, 972 

Coasting  vessels  from  Montreal  and  Great  Lakes 230  281 ,  318 

Ocean  steamers  inward  from  sea 577  3, 894, 331 

Ocean  steamers  outward  for  sea  via  Montreal  and  Quebec 546  3, 791  996 

Total 1,641  8 ,  340  617 

88174-9 


13o  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

POT?T  OF  QUEBEC  (LEVIS)— SUMMARY  OF  NUMBER  OF  VESSELS  ARRIVED,  AND  NET 
±-UK±  ^yur.  TONNAGE  DURING  1928 

Vessels  Tonnage 

75 166,300 


COMPARISON  OF  IMPORTS  AND  EXPORTS  1927  AND  1928  (OCEAN  AND 

COASTING  VESSELS) 


Imports 


1927  1928 

tons  tons 


Grain  received 283, 250  33 1 , 913 

Coal       405,037  408,305 

Fuel  oil 1 10, 048  128, 675 

Other  cargo 148,841  138,693 


947,176  1,007,586 


Increase  in  1928:  60,410  tons. 


1927  1928 

Lumber  and  timber 13,331, 630  f.b.m.     10, 366,090  f .b.m. 

EXPORTS 

1927  1928 

Grain  delivered 293,201  tons  308,012  tons 

Other  cargo 106, 286  tons  144, 333  tons 

399,487  tons  452,345  tons 

Increase  in  1928:  52,858  tons 

Lumber  and  timber 8, 449, 088  f.b.m.     12, 502, 831  f.b.m. 

Horses 2, 810  head  2, 041  head 

IMMIGRANTS 
Landed  in  1927—64,381  Landed  in  1928—74,644 

VISITS  OF  WARSHIPS 

June  29. — The  H.M.S.  Champlain  arrived  in  port  from  St.  John,  N.B.,  on 
her  annual  visit  to  Quebec.  Lieut.-Commander  J.  C.  S.  Edwards,  R.N.R.  in 
command. 

August  15. — The  H.M.S.  Australia,  flag-ship  of  the  Australian  navy,  arrived 
at  this  port,  and  remained  until  the  22nd,  Vice  Admiral  George  Francis  Hyde, 
C.V.O.,  C.B.E.  in  command. 

September  2. — The  H.M.S.  Heliotrope,  of  the  North  Atlantic  and  West 
Indies  Squadron,  arrived  in  port,  and  left  on  the  6th  for  Montreal. 

September  11.— The  H.M.S.  Wisteria,  of  the  North  Atlantic  and  West 
Indies  Squadron,  arrived  in  port,  and  left  for  Montreal  on  the  17th. 

September  17. — The  Ville  D'Ys,  French  cruiser,  of  the  French  navy,  arrived 
in  port  from  Montreal,  on  her  annual  visit  to  the  St.  Lawrence  waters,  Com- 
mander H.  F.  Belloc  in  command.  September  27.— The  Ville  D'Ys  left  for  S$ 
John's,  Newfoundland. 

Montreal  Harbour  Commissioner's  Report 
personnel 

President,  W.  L.  McDougald;  Harbour  Commissioners,  Milton  L.  Hersey, 
and  Alfred  Lambert  (appointed  in  the  place  of  the  late  Mr.  Emilien  Daoust). 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER 


131 


PORT  ACTIVITIES,   1928 

The  increased  revenues  of  the  port  for  a  period  of  years  are  shown  in  the 
subjoined  table: — 

1921       $2,891,274  42 

1922  3,460,810  87 

1923    3,721 ,  159  99 

1924 4, 382, 115  25 

1925    4, 749, 100  69 

1926  4,632,599  92 

1927      5,453,951  56 

1928 5,589,327  12 


SHIPS  AND  SHIPPING  TONNAGE 

The  total  number  of  ocean  ships  which  traded  to  the  harbour  in  1928  was 
practically  the  same  as  in  1927,  but  the  net  registered  tonnage  of  ocean  vessels 
was  approximately  500,000  tons  greater  than  in  the  previous  year.  The  number 
of  inland  vessels  decreased  by  35  from  1927,  but  in  this  instance  also  net 
registered  tonnage  increased  by  about  1,360,000  tons.  The  statement  which 
fallows  shows  the  steady  progress  being  made  by  Montreal  as  an  ocean  port 
during  the  past  few  years: — 


Year 

Ocean-going 
Vessels 

Net 

Registered 

Tonnage 

Total 
Ocean-going 
and  Inland 

Vessels 

Total 

Net  Regd. 

Tonnage 

1923 

1,082 
1,223 
1,255 
1,421 
1,610 
1,607 

3,683,720 
4,096,332 
5,104,313 
4,221,730 
4,992,486 
5,494,062 

6,691 
7,014 
7,212 
7,618 
7,798 
7,480 

11,879,028 

1924 

15,312,096 

1925 

14,782,476 

1926 

16,667,324 

1927 

17,322,444 

1928 

19,229,465 

TONNAGE  OF  IMPORTS  AND  EXPORTS 

The  tonnage  of  merchandise  handled  through  the  harbour  of  Montreal  in 
1928  was  greater  than  in  any  previous  year.     Exports  alone  are  responsible  for 
the  greater  part  of  the  increase,  being  some  660,000  tons  more  than  in  1927. 
Imports  decreased  by  about  150,000  tons,  due  in  great  part  to  smaller  importa- 
tions of  British  coals.     Domestic  tonnage  increased  by  about  155,000  tons.  The 
ensuing  statement  shows  the  gradual  increase  under  this  head  during  the  past 
several  years: — 

< 

Imports 

Exports 

Domestic 

Total 

1921 

tons 

851,444 
1,702,580 
1,421,295 
1,472,933 
2,965,557 
2,028,162 
2,693,535 
2,543,685 

tons 

4,122,253 
5,043,877 
4,270,226 
5,594,310 
5,265,151 
4,549,835 
6,175,485 
6,838,108 

tons 

1,250,227 
1,838,674 
1,815,351 
1,918,346 
906,573 
2,632,702 
3,052,153 
3,207,333 

tons 
6,223,924 

1922 

8,585,131 
7,506,872 

1923 

1924 

8,985,589 
9,137  281 

1925 

1926 

9,210,699 

1927 

11,921,173 

1928 

12,589,126 

GRAIN  EXPORTS 


For  the  eighth  successive  year,  the  harbour  of  Montreal  exported  more 
grain  during  its  season  of  navigation  than  any  other  ocean  port  in  the  world 
shipped  in  the  entire  twelve  months  of  1928.  For  the  first  time  in  its  history, 
or  in  that  of  any  ocean  port,  grain  exports  in  1928  exceeded  200,000,000  bushels. 

88174-91 


132  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

A  statement  follows,  giving  a  comparison  of  grain  deliveries  from  the 
elevators  at  Montreal  and  those  at  competing  United  States  Atlantic  and  Gulf 
coast  ports,  which  clearly  shows  the  supremacy  of  Montreal  in  this  respect: — 

bushels 

Montreal 211,295,379 

New  York 84,782,462 

Baltimore 24, 167, 184 

Galveston 22 ,  432, 287 

New  Orleans 15, 336, 537 

Philadelphia 13,240,767 

Boston 5, 260, 227 

Norfolk,  Va 4,054,662 

Portland,  Me 2,992,349 

COAL  IMPORTS 

Coal  imports  to  the  harbour  in  1928  reached  the  considerable  total  of  2,161,- 
968  tons.  This  was  not  as  great  as  the  total  for  1927,  which  amounted  to 
2,500,147  tons,  but  the  imports  of  Nova  Scotia  bituminous  coal  reached  a  new 
high  figure  with  1,659,206  tons.  The  decrease  in  total  coal  imports  was  due  to 
a  decline  in  imports  of  British  anthracite,  which  only  am  Ainted  to  359,253  tons 
in  1928  as  compared  with  683,090  tons  in  1927.  TotaJ  ?oal  imports  in  1928 
were  as  follows: — 

Tons 

Canadian  bituminous 1 ,  659, 206 

British  anthracite 359, 253 

American  bituminous 65,039 

British  bituminous » 61 ,  471 

American  anthracite 9, 664 

Russian  anthracite 5, 904 

German  anthracite 1 ,  103 

South  African  anthracite 328 

STAFF  CHANGES 

On  July  17,  1928,  Mr.  Thomas  W.  Harvie,  General  Manager  and  Secretary, 
relinquished  his  secretarial  duties,  and  Mr.  L.  H.  A.  Archambault,  formerly 
Assistant  Secretary,  was  appointed  Secretary. 

On  the  same  date  Mr.  George  Smart,  Comptroller,  asked  to  be  allowed  to 
retire  from  the  position  of  Comptroller,  after  having  been  for  45  years  in  the 
service  of  the  Harbour  Commissioners.  This  request  was  acceded-  to  by  the 
Board,  on  condition  that  he  should  continue  actively  to  assist  his  successor 
during  the  pleasure  of  the  Commissioners. 

Mr.  Alex.  Ferguson,  Assistant  General  Manager,  was  ppointed  Assistant 
General  Manager  and  Acting  Comptroller. 

NEW  WORKS 

Amongst  the  more  important  items  undertaken  were: — 

Completion  of  new  storage  annex  to  Grain  Elevator  No.  3,  including 
3,000,000  bushel  house,  and  necessary  delivery  galleries  spanning  the  harboui 
railway  tracks  and  connecting  the  Tarte  pier  sheds. 

Construction  of  two  single-storey  shed  extensions  on  Alexandra  pier  and 
King  Edward  pier,  and  a  two-storey  shed  extension,  complete  with  conveyor 
gallery,  on  Jacques  Cartier  pier. 

Construction  of  about  1,200  feet  of  new  concrete  high  level  wharf  al 
Bickerdike  pier;  two  now  500  feet  sawtooth  high-level  wharves  at  sections  32-3c 
with  respective  75  feet  return  ends;  1,000  feet  of  new  high-level  wharf  at  section 
57  (below  Canadian  Vickers  Basin) ;  a  225  foot  extension  of  the  Canada  Cemenl 
wharf,  section  99,  on  the  downstream  end;  and  a  wharf,  112  feet  6  inches  long 
at  section  99  for  the  Frontenac  Oil  Co. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  133 

NEW   MONTREAL-SOUTH   SHORE  BRIDGE 

Rapid  advances  were  made  during  1928  on  the  erection  of  steel  on  the  main 
piers,  and  the  statistics  of  the  engineers  show  that  up  to  the  end  of  the  year 
24,600  tons  of  steel  were  erected,  and  29,354  tons  fabricated,  representing  77  and 
92  per  cent  respectively  of  the  finished  job. 

GRAIN  ELEVATOR  SYSTEM 

The  new  storage  and  working-house  annex  to  Grain  Elevator  No.  3,  which 
has  capacity  of  3,000,000  bushels,  was  put  into  operation  in  1928.  Grain  was 
first  received  in  this  new  annex  on  October  24,  after  which  date  it  was  completely 
filled,  and  was  used  during  the  remainder  of  the  year  as  an  intergral  part  of 
the  Grain  Elevator  system.  The  following  is  the  capacity  of  the  various  grain 
elevators  owned  and  operated  by  the  Harbour  Commissioners  of  Montreal: — 

Grain  Elevator  No.  1 4,000,000  bush. 

No.  2 2,662,000     " 

No.  3 5,000,000     " 

"B" 3,500,000     " 

Total 15,162,000     " 

The  outstanding  feature  of  the  year's  business  in  the  port  of  Montreal  was 
the  shipment  of  grain  for  export.  With  the  seemingly  inevitable  growth  which 
has  been  so  typical  of  the  past  eight  years  in  this  respect,  the  total  grain  de- 
liveries reached  a  figure  never  before  attained.  Exports  of  grain  in  1928  passed 
the  two  hundred  million  bushel  mark  with  deliveries  from  all  four  elevators  of 
211,295,379  bushels.  The  deliveries  from  each  of  the  four  grain  elevators  were 
as  follows: — 

Grain  Elevator  No.  1 • 46,393,901  bush. 

No.  2 62,517,346     " 

No.  3 47,856,010     " 

"B" 54,528,122     " 

Total 211 , 295, 379     " 

RECORD  OF  RECEIPTS   AND  DELIVERIES  OF  THE   MONTREAL   HARBOUR  COMMISSIONERS* 
GRAIN  ELEVATOR  SYSTEM  FOR  1928 

GRAIN  ELEVATOR  No.  1 
Receipts  Deliveries 

Water 41,301,142  bush.        Conveyor 43,949,413  bush. 

Rail 5,382,582     "             Cars 1,562,299     " 

Teams 849,423     " 

Bags 32,766     " 


46,683,724     "  46,393,901 

First  vessel  unloaded  April  24,  1928. 
Last  vessel  unloaded  December  12,  1928. 

504  steamers 1509  vessels. . .     41 ,  301 ,  142  bush. 

5  barges / 

1,406  C.N.R.  cars..  \.3, 105  cars...       5,382,582     " 
1,699  C. P. R.  cars    / 


46,683,724 


GRAIN  ELEVATOR  No.  2 
Receipts  Deliveries 

Water 46,554,513  bush.        Conveyor 58,014,946  bush. 

Hail 16,360,801     "  Cars 2,435,536     " 

Teams 638,374     " 

Bags 1,428,490     " 

62,915,314     "  62,517,346     " 

First  vessel  unloaded  April  25,  1928. 
Last  vessel  unloaded  December  3,  1928. 

602  steamers 1609  vessels 46,554,513  bush. 

7  barges / 

1,629  C.N.R.  cars..\8,783  cars.. . .     16,360,801     " 
7,154  C.P.R.  cars    J  

62,915,314     " 


134 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 


Receipts 
"Water 

Rail 13,824,354 


GRAIN  ELEVATOR  No.  3 
36,998,543  bush.        Conveyor 46,267,901  bush. 


Cars 1,503,248 

Teams 84,861 


50,822,897     " 
First  vessel  unloaded  May  12,  1928. 
Last  vessel  unloaded  December  5,  1928. 

509  steamers 1519  vessels.. .     36,998,543  bush. 

10  barges / 

1,198  C.N.R.  cars. .W,456  cars....     13,824,354     " 

6,258  C.P.R.  cars    / 


47,856,010     f 


50,822,897     " 
GRAIN  ELEVATOR 


'B' 


Receipts 

Water  38,575,025  bush. 

Rail..'.:! 18,319,914     " 


Conveyor. 

Cars 

Teams 

Bags 


Deliveries 


53, 
1, 


196,743  bush. 
138,258     " 
193,121     " 


56,894,939     " 
Tirst  vessel  unloaded  May  2,  1928. 
Last  vessel  unloaded  December  3,  1928. 

503  steamers 1519  vessels.. .     38,575,025  bush. 

16  barges J 

10,887  C.N.R.  cars  110,887  cars...     18,319,914     " 
C.P.R.  cars   /  

56,894,939     " 

SUMMARY  OF  GRAIN  HANDLING  ELEVATORS  1,  2, 


54,528,122 


AND   "B' 


Receipts 

Water  163,429,223  bush. 

Rail 53,887,651  bush. 


Deliveries 


Conveyor. 

Cars 

Teams 


201, 
6, 
1, 
1, 


429,003  bush 
639,341     " 
765,779     " 
461,256     " 


217,316,874     " 
First  vessel  unloaded  April  24,  1928. 
Last  vessel  unloaded  December  12,  1928. 

2,118  steamers 12,156  vessels.   163,429,223     " 

38  barges / 

15,120  C.N.R.  cars\30,231  cars...     53,887,651      " 
15,111  C.P.R.  cars/  

217,316,874     " 
Stock  in  elevators  (at  December  31,  1928)  13,400,464  bush. 

GRAIN  EXPORTS 

Countries  of  Destination 


211,295,379 


Country 

Wheat 

Barley 

Rye 

Oats 

Corn, 
American 

Buck- 
wheat 

Belgium 

14,578,037 

278,222 

4,790,784 

17,143 

716,790 
170,937 

3,890,413 

6,544 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

4,485,345 

34,166,684 

11,226,604 

7,913,546 

18,190,760 

1,135,147 

28,242,512 

253,867 

112,608 

164,267 

1,898,065 

61,599 

2,299,711 

1,114,945 

6,631,913 

1,567,410 

596,364 

766,474 

7,747,561 

28,235 
4,022,783 
1,011,041 

Great  Britain 

3,469,119 
11,474,055 

291,429 
6,746,227 

327,232 

Germany 

Greece 

Holland 

8,994,248 
75,233 

2,258,718 

4,382,207 

189,089 

1,177,320 

25,714 

17,57? 

Ireland 

Italy 

India 

Morocco 

Malta 

Norway 

246,609 

2,697,819 

102,512 

19,979 

Palestine 

":::::.. 

Portugal 

Russia 

Spain 

Svvoden 

422,756 

Syria 



Turkey 

Unknown 

19,118 

Total  (bushels) 

143.431,641 

29,050,048 

13,321,819 

14,822,718 

372,925 

24.81 

REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  135 

COLD     STORAGE    WAREHOUSE 

No  exceptional  features  of  operation  were  experienced  during  the  year.  The 
seasonal  activities  in  various  commodities  were  taken  care  of  adequately. 
Export  shipments  of  carload  lots  of  meats  and  packing  house  products  again 
demonstrated  the  importance  to  the  port's  equipment  of  this  terminal  ware- 
house situated  on  the  harbour  front,  within  easy  distance  of  the  central  berths 
and  piers,  The  foreign  market  demand  for  Canadian  cheese  was  unusually  brisk 
in  1928,  storage  stocks  of  this  commodity  passing  in  a  steady  stream  through 
the  warehouse,  and  this  was  reflected  in  an  increase  in  exports  of  cheese  from 
the  harbour. 

The  trend  towards  centralization  of  buying  in  the  retail  produce  trade, 
evidenced  by  the  ever-growing  number  of  "  chain  grocery  stores  ",  is  of  import- 
ance to  warehousemen.  Stocks  of  perishable  foodstuffs  are  now  warehoused 
in  proportionately  larger  unit  quantities,  and  are  released  to  the  individual 
stores  as  the  demand  warrants.  This  has  conferred  benefits  not  only  on  the 
trade,  but  on  the  consumer,  whose  merchandise  is  assured  of  the  care  and  good 
!  quality  which  competent  warehousing  gives. 

During  the  year  1928,  the  total  tonnage  of  merchandise  handled  in  and 
out  of  the  Commissioners'  warehouse  amounted  to  32,688  tons.  The  average 
quantity  of  goods  in  store  during  the  year  was  about  6,000  tons. 

HARBOUR    RAILWAY    TERMINALS 

The  total  mileage  of  harbour  railway  tracks  in  1928  was  67-99  miles  as 
compared  with  67-44  miles  in  1927. 

The  total  number  of  cars  handled  by  the  Commissioners  in  1928  was 
240,622  cars,  as  compared  with  195,853  cars  handled  in  1927. 

The  increased  movement  of  rail-borne  grain  represents  40  per  cent  or 
6,236  cars  of  the  total  year's  increase  in  revenue  cars  received.  An  unusual 
feature  of  this  traffic  movement  was  the  large  volume  of  midsummer  rail- 
hauled  grain,  over  2,000  cars  having  been  received  during  the  month  of  August. 
In  1927,  practically  no  grain  in  cars  was  received  at  the  terminals  during  the 
I  same  month.  This  had  a  beneficial  effect  on  the  operations  of  the  system  by 
furnishing  a  traffic  movement  of  large  proportions  during  a  period  which  is 
usually  noticeable  for  a  temporary  lull  in  the  operations  of  the  railway  system 
— a  prelude  to  the  fall  rush. 

The  new  3,000,000-bushel  extension  to  Grain  Elevator  No.  3  was  completed 
in  time  to  take  care  of  the  late  fall  rail-borne  grain  traffic.  Almost  twice  as 
many  cars  were  handled  at  that  elevator  as  in  the  previous  season. 

The  expension  of  interchange  traffic  between  the  Western  and  Eastern  ter- 
minals of  the  Canadian  National  Railways  represented  a  large  portion  of  the 
year's  increase,  about  40  per  cent,  the  general  export  traffic  making  up  the 
balance. 

There  was  also  recorded  a  substantial  increase  in  the  number  of  revenue 
cars  forwarded  from  the  harbour,  attributable  to  the  augmented  movement  of 
general  import  and  domestic  coal  shipments. 

A  general  idea  of  the  import  and  export  rail  traffic,  exclusive  of  grain,  may 
be  obtained  from  the  returns  of  cars  handled  at  the  harbour  sheds,  the  figures 
—approximate — being  28,046  cars  unloaded  and  15,432  cars  loaded,  as  com- 
pared with  24,141  and  14,348  cars  in  1927. 

HARBOUR  POLICE  DEPARTMENT 

During  the  season  of  navigation  the  force  consisted  of  a  chief,  three  cap- 
tains, and  sixty-three  constables.  In  the  winter  season  the  number  of  constables 
was  reduced  to  twenty-seven. 

During  the  year  119  arrests  were  made  for  various  offences  in  the  har- 
bour, including  eight  infractions  of  Customs  laws.  This  number  also  included 
25  arrests  for  dangerous  speeding  by  drivers  of  motor  vehicles  on  the  wharves. 


136                                                 MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

An  unusually  large  number  of  deaths  occurred  during  1928  on  the  harbour  | 
front,  the  total  of  38  including  9  accidental  deaths,  17  drownings,  9  suicides, 
3  sudden  deaths. 

Ninety-two  accident  cases  were  rendered  first  aid  by  the  police  department 

during  the  year. 

The  motor  car  and  two  motor  cycles  attached  to  the  police  department  were 
in  constant  use  during  the  year,  and  covered  a  total  of  39,635  miles. 

Carters  to  the  number  of  8,551,   loading  and   delivering  merchandise   at 
various  points  along  the  waterfront,  were  checked  by  the  traffic  constables. 

Police  supervision  was  maintained   during  the   arrival   and   departure   of 
passenger  vessels,  all  taxicabs  and  other  vehicles  being  lined  up,  and  the  number 
of  each  vehicle  leaving  the  wharf  with  passengers  or  baggage  being  noted.    Dur-  ' 
ing  the  season  numerous  lost  articles  were  returned  to   owners  through  this 
system. 

FRESH    WATER    SERVICE 

The  Commissioners'  service  of  fresh  water  to  vessels  was  extensively  availed 
of  during  1928.    The  following  statement  gives  the  number  of  services  rendered 
by  this  department,  and  the  volume  of  water  supplied  to  vessels,  for  the  past 
ten  seasons  of  navigation: — 



No.  of 
services 

Volume 
of  water 

1919 

382 
507 
520 
617 
567 
731 
803 
682 
838 
1,020 

cu.  ft. 

1,423,000 
2,179,550 
1,885,900 
2,900,000 
2,300,000 
2,684,100 
3,379,900 
2,579,200 
3,004,000 
5,260,000 

1920. .           

1921 

1922. .           

1923. 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 

1928 

Statement  showing  the  Number,  Nationalities,  and  Net  Tonnage  of  Sea-going 
Vessels  that  arrived  in  the  Port  during  the  season  of  1928,  navigated  by 
106,290  seamen. 

Nationality 

Number 
of  vessels 

Net 
tonnage 

British 

1,153 

134 

90 

58 

42 

30 

28 

25 

15 

14 

4 

4 

3 

3 

2 

1 

1 

4,224,268 

286,445 

306,786 

156,410 

112,298 

54,309 

127,166 

96,338 

36,337! 

27,184 

17,076 

13,382 

15,309 

11,006 

6,473  : 

3,106: 

169 

Norwegian 

Italian 

Dutch 

Greek 

Danish 

American 

German 

French 

Swedish 

Japanese 

Spanish 

Danzig 

Jugo-Slav 

Mexican 

Belgian 

Irish  Free  State 

Total 

1,607 

5,494,062 

Of  the  above,  1,585  were  built  of  iron  or  steel  with  a  net 
qf  5,491.541  and  22  were  built  of  wood  with  a  net  registered  1 

registerec 
.onnage  of 

I  tonnage 
2,521. 

REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  137 

DISTINGUISHED  VISITORS   IN    1928 

On  June  1  the  port  was  visited  by  members  of  the  Lighthouse  and  Buoyage 
sub-committee  of  the  League  of  Nations.  There  were  delegates  present  from 
many  foreign  nations  piloted  by  John  Romaine,  Secretary,  and  headed  'by  Mr. 
Parke,  U.S.  Lighthouse  Service;  Dr.  G.  Meyer,  Germany;  Dr.  P.  van  Braam 
von  Vloten,  The  Netherlands;  H.  R.  MacKenzie  and  H.  M.  Marler,  Auckland, 
N.Z.;  A.  de  Rouvelle,  France;  and  F.  P.  Dillon,  Genl.  Supt.  U.S.  Lighthouse. 

On  August  16  the  Hon.  H.  H.  Stevens,  M.P.,  Vancouver,  was  entertained  by 
the  Commissioners  at  an  elaborate  inspection  and  survey  of  the  harbour.  He 
was  accompanied  by  Senators  Simeaton  White  and  J.  P.  B.  Casgrain,  and  by 
Messrs.  R.  S.  White,  L.  G.  Bell  and  C.  H.  Cahan,  K.C.,  Members  of  Parliament. 

On  August  11  the  port  was  visited  by  H.M.S.  Australia,  Flagship  of  the 
Australian  Squadron,  under  command  of  Rear-Admiral  G.  F.  Hyde.  Officers  and 
men,  numbering  upwards  of  300  individuals,  were  guests  of  the  city  of  Montreal 
and  were  entertained  by  individual  citizens  during  a  stay  of  several  days  in  port. 

On  August  27  a  large  delegation  from  the  Empire  Parliamentarian  Associa- 
tion visited  the  port  and  were  guests  of  the  Commissioners  on  board  the  yacht 
Sir  Hugh  Allan.  At  the  head  of  the  delegation  was  the  Rt.  Hon.  Viscount  Peel, 
its  chairman  who  was  supported  by  Sir  Robert  Sanders,  Major  Guy  Kindersley, 
and  Sir  William  Lane-Mitchell. 

On  August  29  the  harbour  was  visited  by  His  Eminence  Cardinal  Luigi 
Sincero,  accompanied  by  Mgr.  G.  Giacinto  Parisio,  D.D.,  Secretary,  and  <by 
distinguished  local  ecclesiastics  headed  by  Mgr.  E.  V.  J.  Piette,  Rector,  University 
of  Montreal;  Canon  Adelard  Harbour,  Cure  de  la  Basilique;  Canon  Adolphe 
Sylvestre,  and  Cure  Oscar  Gauthier;  and  by  Dr.  Louis  de  Lotbiniere  Harwood. 

On  November  9  the  Foreign  Secretary  of  Great  Britain,  Rt.  Hon.  Sir  Austin 
Chamberlain,  P.C.,  M.P.,  accompanied  by  Lady  Chamberlain  and  members  of 
their  family,  visited  the  harbour  and  were  guests  of  the  Commissioners  on  board 
SS.  Sir  Hugh  Allan. 

Three  Rivers  Harbour  Commissioners'  Report 

personnel,  1928 

Chairman,  Robert  F.  Grant;  Commissioners,  Jos,  L.  Fortin,  and  Norman 
Labelle;  Harbour  Master,  U.  P.  Bureau;  Secretary-Treasurer,  Joseph  J.  Ryan. 

PORT  OF  THREE  RIVERS 

Three  Rivers,  P.Q.,  is  situated  in  46°  22"  north  latitude  and  72°  31"  longi- 
tude west  of  Greenwich;  her  position  near  lake  St.  Peter  on  the  north  shore  of 
the  river  St.  Lawrence  and  at  the  mouth  of  the  river  St.  Maurice,  has  the  par- 
ticular advantage  of  being  at  the  head  of  the  natural  deepwater  navigation  on 
the  St.  Lawrence  and  of  commanding  the  vast  territory  of  the  St.  Maurice  whose 
superficies  exceeds  17,000  square  miles. 

The  population  of  Three  Rivers  according  to  the  last  census,  amounts  to  over 
37,000. 

Principal  industries:  lumber,  pulp,  paper,  cotton,  machineries,  footwear, 
gloves,  caskets,  biscuits,  wearing  apparel,  etc. 

Commercial  centre  of  a  large  agricultural  district  of  over  1,470,000  acres. 

DEVELOPMENT  OF  PORT 

The  post  war  years  have  seen  a  gratifying  growth  of  trade  and  population 
throughout  the  entire  Dominion,  but  it  is  doubtful  if  any  one  locality  has 
experienced  more  rapid  development  than  the  St.  Maurice  Valley  district. 

The  remarkable  expansion  of  the  pulp  and  paper  trade  has  been  particularly 
beneficial  to  the  district,  as  it  has  resulted  in  the  construction  of  several  large 


138 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 


new  mills  -and  the  extension  of  those  previously  existing.  The  district  now  manu- 
factures a  total  of  2,100  tons  of  newsprint  and  kraft  paper  a  day,  making  it  the 
centre  of  the  world's  pulp  and  paper  trade. 

Corresponding  increase  has  been  shown  in  the  other  industries  of  the  valley. 
At  Shawinigan  falls,  the  electro-chemical  subsidiaries  of  the  Shawinigan  Water 
and  Power  Company  have  made  rapid  progress,  and  are  now  undergoing 
expansion.  In  Three  Rivers,  the  Wabasso  Cotton  Company  has  become  the 
largest  cotton  mill  operating  under  one  roof  in  the  Dominion,  while  the  Canada 
Iron  Foundries,  Casket  and  Boot  factories  have  all  flourished  greatly. 

All  this  development  has  been  reflected  in  the  greater  volume  of  water 
borne  trade  passing  through  the  port  of  Three  Rivers.  Year  by  year,  the 
Harbour  Commissioners'  report  has  disclosed  a  steady  and  speedy  growth  in  the 
tonnage  handled. 

Not  only  are  immense  quantities  of  raw  material  required  for  the  operations 
of  the  local  paper  and  other  mills,  but  a  considerable  volume  of  finished  products 
is  being  exported  direct  from  Three  Rivers. 

To  such  lengths  has  this  development  proceeded  that  the  existing  facilities 
at  the  disposal  of  the  Harbour  Commission  have  been  strained  to  their  utmost. 

In  view  of  these  significant  developments,  steps  have  been  taken  to  enlarge 
the  present  harbour  facilities.  Plans  have  been  drawn  up,  and  submitted  to  the 
competent  authorities,  providing  for  additional  accommodation  for  deep  draught 
vessels  in  the  harbour.  These  plans  have  been  submitted  to  the  different 
shipping  interests  concerned,  and  have  received  unqualified  approval. 

In  view  of  the  steady  growth,  reflected  in  the  Harbour  Commission's  annual 
reports  for  the  past  five  or  six  years,  and  in  view,  also,  of  the  continuous  and 
increasing  industrial  development  of  the  territory  served  by  the  port  of  Three 
Rivers,  it  is  sincerely  hoped  that  the  necessary  steps  will  be  taken  to  increase 
Three  Rivers  harbour  facilities,  and  thereby  stimulate  the  reciprocal  expansion 
of  both  the  district  and  the  port. 

Statement  of  Numiber  and  Tonnage  of  Steamers  and  other  Vessels  reported 
"inward"  and  "outward"  at  the  Port  of  Three  Rivers,  Que.,  for  the  Yeai 
1928. 


Ocean  Traffic:  Vessels  "Inward" 

Ocean  Traffic:  Vessels  "Outward" 

Nationality 

Number 

Reg.  tons 

Cleared  for: 

Number 

Reg.  tons 

English 

86 
15 

12 
3 
3 

2 

1 
1 
1 

232,711 
45, 199 
32, 740 
6,085 
5,142 
3,621 
3,185 
3,184 
1,899 

Inland  ports 

46 

78 

100,551 
233,201 

Canadian 

Sea  ports 

Norwegian 

Dutch 

Swedish 

Danish 

American 

Italian 

German 

124 

333,766 

124 

333,76' 

United  States  Traffic 

Inland  Traffic 

Canal  boats  and  M/S 

144 

68,314 

Steamboats,  tugs  and  barges 

1,878 

1,915,26, 

Ocean  traffic 

RECAPIT 

ULATION 

124 

144 

1,878 

333,76 

68,31 

1,915,26 

2,317,34 

United  States  traffic 

Inland  traffic 

Grand  total 

2.146 

REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER 
MERCHANDISE 

Ocean  Traffic 


139 


Inward 


Outward 


Lumber 12, 428, 857  ft.  b.m 

Bricks 2,054,000  bricks 

Pulpwood 56, 868  cords 

Coals— 

(Bituminous) 351 ,  581  tons 

(Coke) 26,882     " 

(Anthracite) 14, 157     " 

Sulphur 17,373     " 

Saltcakes 10,080     " 

Pig  iron 11,240     " 

Salt 889     " 

Rails 118     " 

Rice 20     " 

Canned  goods 875  lbs. 


Lumber 713,933  ft.  b.m. 

Newsprint  paper 40, 057  tons 

General  cargo 757     " 

Bog  ore 300     " 


United  States  Traffic 


Coals— 

(Bituminous) 40, 919  tons 

(Anthracite) 6,854     " 

Moulding  sand 2, 252     " 

Paper  cores 5, 224  pieces 


Newsprint  paper. 
Woodpulp 


54,032  tons 
11,161     " 


Inland  Traffic 


Inward 


Outward 


Lumber 8, 783, 129  ft.  b.m 

Bricks 1,746,200  bricks 

Fuel  oil 845, 757  I.  galls 

Pulpwood 143,957  cords 

Laths 35, 600  laths 

Apples 2, 800  bush. 

Potatoes 900     " 

Cord  wood 1 ,  631  cords 

General  cargo 27, 505  tons 

Sulphite 648     " 

Canned  goods 389     " 

Machineries 72     " 


Lumber 1 ,  631 ,  254  ft.  b.m. 

Bricks 5, 000  bricks 

Gasoline 675  I.  galls. 

River  sand 64, 800  tons 

General  cargo 15,815 

Coal  (bituminous) 352 

Hay 171 

Cast  iron  pipes 125 

Machineries 13 


RECEIPTS  AND  DISBURSEMENTS  FOR  THE  YEAR  1928 


Receipts 

January  1,  1928— Cash  on  hand $    12, 137  16 

January  1,  1928 — Accounts  receivable 5, 671  96 

Harbour  dues $    45, 442  05 

Tonnage  dues 12,499  40 

Moorage  dues 1 ,  057  53 

Wharves  rentals 5, 100  00 

Sheds  rentals 4, 770  00 

Water  lots  rentals 675  05 

Sundries 120  00 

$    69,664  03 

Grand  total $    87,473  15 


140  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

RECEIPTS  AND  DISBURSEMENTS  FOR  THE  YEAR  1928—  Concluded 

Disbursements 

Interest  on  debentures $     J 2, 375  00 

Maintenance  and  general  repairs 12, 925  23 

Salaries ?>000  00 

Office  expenses I  70 

Exchange,  etc 6  73 

Travelling  expenses 72  80 

35,476  83 

Profit  and  loss 5  15 

Dec.  31,  1928— Accounts  receivable 4,883  37 

Dec.  31,  1928— Cash  on  hand 17, 107  80 

Cash  from  "Current  Account"  to  "Surplus  for  Maintenance" 30,000  00 

Grand  total $    87,473  15 


New  Westminster,  B.C.,  Harbour  Commissioners'  Report 

PERSONNEL   OF    1928   COMMISSION 

F.  J.  Coulthard,  Chairman;  Geo.  Blakeley  and  C.  A.  Welsh,  Commissioners. 
The  Consulting  Engineer  is  W.  G.  Swan,  C.E.,  M.E.I.C.;  the  Secretary,  W.  B. 
English,  and  the  Harbour  Master,  Capt.  John  Slater. 

Business  of  Port  in  1928 

Exports. — Lumber  to  the  extent  of  201,307,000  board  feet,  representing 
about  26  per  cent  of  total  water-borne  shipments  from  all  British  Columbia  ports, 
was  shipped  to  world  markets,  valued  at  $3,900,000.  This  shows  a  slight  decrease 
from  1927  when  the  figures  were  211,000,000  board  feet. 

Shipments  of  bar  metal — lead  and  zinc — amounted  to  60,320  tons,  valued  at 
$5,500,000,  as  compared  with  18,581  tons  the  previous  year,  a  very  substantial 
increase,  distributed  as  follows:  Japan,  32,690  tons,  United  Kingdom,  27,630 
tons. 

The  remaining  exports  included  flour,  31,430  barrels;  apples,  41,238  boxes; 
hides,  209  tons;  pulp,  563  tons;  general,  290  tons. 

Total  value  of  exports  for  the  year  approximate  $9,800,000. 

Imports. — Amounted  to  5,942  tons,  valued  at  $208,000. 

ship  channel 

Depth  of  Channel. — While  the  natural  depth  of  the  Fraser  river  is  approxi- 
mately 30  feet  at  low  tide,  there  are  certain  stretches  (not  more  than  three 
miles  altogether),  where  the  river  broadens  out,  that  do  not  reach  that  depth. 
These  stretches  are  having  the  attention  of  the  authorities  and  by  the  building 
of  jetties,  retaining  walls,  etc.,  so  as  to  confine  and  control  the  flow  of  water 
through  its  proper  channel,  gradual  improvement  is  being  made,  with  the  ultimate 
object  of  establishing  a  30-foot  minimum  depth  at  low  tide  from  the  entrance 
to  the  river  to  New  Westminster. 

The  controlling  depth  of  the  channel  at  the  present  time  from  its  entrance 
to  New  Westminster,  on  the  ordinary  high  tide  (12-foot  tide  at  Sandheads) 
remains  at  28  feet,  or  at  low  tide  18  feet. 

PORT    DEVELOPMENT 

Pacific  Coast  Terminals  Limited:  Recently  completed  and  now  under  opera- 
tion is  the  huge  cold  and  cool  storage  plant  of  the  Pacific  Coast  Terminals 
Limited.     This  most  modern  of  modern  cold  storage  plants  is  located  in  the 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  141 

heart  of  the  Fraser  valley,  the  most  fertile  and  productive  area  of  British 
Columbia,  and  will  be  served  by  a  fleet  of  fad  moving  motor  vehicles  in  con- 
junction with  a  modern  river-boat  service.  The  plant  measures  190,000  square 
feet  with  a  cubic  capacity  of  189,000  cubic  feet,  divided  into  four  floors,  each 
floor  being  sub-divided  into  a  varied  number  of  rooms  with  a  view  to  giving 
that  particular  type  of  cold  or  cool  storage  accommodation  most  beneficial  to  any 
of  the  many  lines  of  perishable  products. 

The  machine  plant  serving  the  cold  storage  rooms  is  fully  modern  and 
is  such  that  it  is  possible  to  control  to  a  degree  the  temperature  and  humidity 
of  each  room.  All  cold  storage  rooms  are  subjected  to  an  ozonization  service 
and  can  be  brought  to  a  temperature  of  15  degrees  below  zero  F.  Of  particular 
note,  also,  is  the  forced  air  circulation  system  available  in  the  room  for  the 
storage  of  fruit  and  eggs. 

Located  on  the  banks  of  the  Fraser  river,  at  the  port  of  New  Westminster, 
the  Pacific  Coast  Terminals  Limited  occupies  a  strategic  position  for  the  receiv- 
ing and  distribution  of  oversea  and  overland  cargo,  both  from  an  import  and 
export  standpoint,  and  served  with  direct  rail  connection  to  the  two  great 
Canadian  Transcontinental  Railway  Systems — the  Canadian  Pacific  and  Cana- 
dian Nationl  Railways — as  well  as  the  Great  Northern  Railway,  whose  lines 
reach  all  the  markets  of  the  United  States,  an  economy  of  distribution  is  offered 
that  cannot  be  surpassed. 

Goods  are  handled  with  the  utmost  speed  commensurate  with  safety  by 
experts  at  such  handling,  who  have  at  their  disposal  the  most  modern  equip- 
ment available.  Any  and  all  forms  of  distribution  service  is  offered,  including 
loading,  unloading,  packing,  sorting,  re-packing,  ship-marking,  trans-shipment 
and  bills  of  lading  service. 

The  huge  stretch  of  dock  controlled  by  the  Pacific  Coast  Terminals  Limited 
is  3,000  feet  in  length,  providing  accommodation  for  seven  deep  sea  vessels,  to 
which  is  offered  a  most  modern  unloading  service.  Dock  equipment  includes  a 
25-ton  crane,  a  fleet  of  motor  driven  vehicles  for  dock  handling  of  cargoes, 
and  35,000  square  feet  of  accommodation  for  general  cargo,  with  seven  acres  of 
ground  for  the  assembling  of  lumber  for  water  shipment. 

Fraser  River  Elevator  No.  1. — This  modern  grain  elevator,  located  at  South 
Westminster,  opposite  the  city  of  New  Westminster,  was  completed  and  in 
operation  early  in  1929.  Constructed  by  the  Harbour  Commissioners,  the  plant 
has  been  leased  to  the  Fraser  River  Elevator  Limited,  a  company  sponsored  by 
a  well  known  group  of  business  men  with  the  following  directorate:  President, 
John  Coughlan;  Vice-President  and  Treasurer,  C.  E.  Coughlan;  Secretary  and 
Solicitor,  E.  R.  Sugarman;  Managing  Director,  Samuel  McClay.  Mr.  J. 
Maclnnes  is  also  associated  with  the  management. 

The  elevator  has  a  wharf  frontage  of  1,100  feet  and  river  frontage  of  1,800 
feet  and  the  site  covering  64  acres  is  ideally  situated  to  take  full  advantage  of 
transportation  facilities,  both  rail  and  water,  and  provides  opportunity  for 
future  development. 

The  elevator  is  served  by  the  Canadian  National  Railways  and  the  Great 
Northern  Railway,  whose  main  lines  run  close  to  the  property,  and  will  also 
have  the  facilities,  by  switching,  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  and  the  major 
United  States  railways  serving  the  Pacific  Northwest,  as  well  as  having  excellent 
facilities  for  deep-sea  shipping. 

The  elevator  has  a  storage  capacity  of  750,000  bushels,  which,  together  with 
other  equipment  contemplated,  will  enable  the  plant  to  handle  up  to  30,000,000 
bushels  of  wheat  during  the  grain  season.     It  can  also  receive  maize  ex-ship. 


142 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 


Comparative  Record  of  Deep  Sea  Shipping  1927  and  1928   (including  vessels 
trading  outside  Cape  Flattery) 


Number 

of 

ships 


Net 

Registered 

tonnage 


Gross 
tonnage 


1927. 
1928. 


153 
198 


486,603 
625,271 


776,229 
1,004,622 


NATIONALITY  OF  DEEP  SEA  VESSELS,  1928 

British 79 

Japan 52 

United  States 40 

12 

10 

2 

2 


Norway . . 
Denmark. 
Sweden . . . 

Italy 

Panama. . 


Total 198 

Comparative  Record  of  Lumber  Produced  and  Shipped  by  Manufacturers  on 
the  Lower  Fraser  River,  1923-1928 


Year 

Production 

Approximate 
value 

Shipments 

Water 

Rail 

Local 

1923 

Board  feet 

290,000,000 

322,086,000 

417,952,785 

459,806,957 

491,163,000 

494,692,143 

$ 
7,250,000 
8,052,000 
7,941,000 
8,736,000 
9,419,000 
9,474,000 

Board  feet 
78,600,000 
119,469,000 
171,459,665 
211,230,950 
212,045,613 
201,307,000 

Boardfeet 

168,000,000 

153,736,000 

176,787,793 

178,779,482 

196,451,199 

234,024,755 

Board  feet 
43,200,000 

1924 

40,527,000 

1925 

62,386,550 

1926 

56,750,612 
55,620,559 

1927 

1928 

59,795,602 

In  1928  the  production  of  shingles  amounted  to  1,569,113,000  shingles,  valued 
at  approximately  $4,315,000,  as  compared  with  1,427,095,218  shingles  in  the 
previous  year. 

The  total  quantity  of  lumber  exported  (water-borne)  from  all  British 
Columbia  ports  in  1928  (exclusive  of  logs  and  bolts)  amounted  to  750,097,609 
board  feet,  over  26  per  cent  of  which  was  shipped  via  the  Fraser  river. 

Below  is  given  the  destination  of  lumber  exported  from  the  Fraser  river  in 
1928,  with  the  percentage  for  each  country,  viz.: — 

United  States  Atlantic  coast 40% 

Orient 29% 

United  Kingdom 11% 

Canadian  Atlantic  coast 8% 

Australia 5% 

Other  countries 7% 

DEEP  SEA  EXPORTS,  1927-1928 


Commodity 

Quantity 

Approximate  Value 

1927 

1928 

1927 

1928 

Lumber  and  lumber  products,  board  feet 

Ore  concentrates,  tons 

212,046,000 

1,163 

17,418 

201,307,000 

$      4,306,115 

$        3,900,000 

Bar  metals  (lead  and  zinc),  tons... 

60,320 

41,238 

31,430 

563 

209 

290 

2,125,000 

5,500,000 

67,000 

140,000 

Apples,  boxes 

Flour,  barrels 

Pulp,  tons 

26,000 

Hides,  tons 

84,500 

General,  tons 

186 

16,000 

76,468 

$      6,447,115 

$        9,793,968 

REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER 
DEEP  SEA  IMPORTS,  1927-1928 


143 


Commodity 

Quantity 

Approximate  Value 

1927 

1928 

1927 

1928 

Corn,  tons 

Tons 
6,841 
1,765 

Tons 

1,003 
1,093 
1,598 
2,188 

$        300,000 

Phosphate  rock, tons 

Cork, tons 

1,838 

10,444 

5,942 

$       208,000 

Vancouver  Harbour  Commissioners'  Report 
personnel,  1928 

President,  F.  R.  Med.  Russell,  K.C.;  Commissioners,  A.  M.  Pound,  and 
B.  Geo.  Hansuld. 

TONNAGE 

The  number  and  tonnage  of  vessels  entering  the  port  eclipsed  all  past 
records.  In  the  deepsea  class  1,344  vessels  entered,  being  221  more  than  in 
1927,  with  more  than  a  corresponding  increase  in  tonnage.  This  makes  an 
average  of  112  deepsea  vessels  per  month. 

In  1909,  the  first  year  on  record  at  the  offices  of  the  Commissioners,  the 
total  number  of  vessels  of  this  class  to  enter  the  harbour  during  the  entire  year 
was  71  and  this  comparison  tells  a  story  of  Vancouver's  progress  in  twenty 
years. 

The  vessels  visiting  the  port  represent  practically  every  part  of  the  world. 
Vessels  of  British  register  lead  and  United  States  and  Japanese  vessels  are 
next  in  number. 

The  total  shipping  of  all  classes  was  22,084  with  a  net  tonnage  of  11,742,571 
tons,  showing  an  increase  of  1,721  vessels  and  an  increase  in  net  tonnage  of 
1,438,314  tons  over  the  1927  figures, 

EXPORTS  AND  IMPORTS 

A  notable  feature  of  the  year's  operations  was  the  increase  in  exports,  and 
particularly  in  deep  sea  exports.  The  volume  of  this  trade  in  1927  was  2,683,013 
tons  while  in  1928  the  business  expanded  to  4,358,091  tons,  making  the  remark- 
able increase  of  over  a  million  and  a  half  tons  or  an  advance  of  more  than 
sixty  per  cent.  All  classes  of  exports,  deepsea,  foreign  and  local  coastwise, 
showed  a  most  encouraging  improvement. — the  total  for  1928  being  5,053,621 
tons  as  against  3,296,272  in  the  former  year.  The  total  1928  imports  also 
showed  a  substantial  advance  although  not  to  the  same  extent  as  the  exports, 
the  comparison  being  4,846,166  tons  as  against  4,513,355  tons  in  1927. 

It  is  an  interesting  fact  that,  for  the  first  time  since  the  Commissioners 
began  the  preparation  of  statistical  records,  exports  exceeded  imports  in 
volume,  the  excess  of  exports  over  imports  being  207,455  tons. 


grain 


The  movement  of  grain  up  to  the  end  of  the  year  was  more  than  double 
the  amount  shipped  in  1927,  the  comparative  figures  being  97,561,716  bushels 
in  1928  as  against  43,602,210  in  the  previous  year.  The  grain  handling  facili- 
ties were  increased  by  the  construction  of  a  new  elevator  with  a  storage  capacity 
of  2,400,000  bushels  for  the  Alberta  Pool  Elevator  Company.     It  is  situated 


144  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

just  west  of  the  South  end  of  the  Second  Narrows  bridge  and  is  served  by  a 
storage  yard  provided  by  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company  with  accom- 
modation for  341  cars.  It  is  also  equipped  with  mechanical  unloading  and  all 
the  most  up  to  date  appliances  for  expeditious  operation. 

Another  addition  was  an  elevator  for  the  Midland  Pacific  Elevator  Limited, 
with  an  initial  capacity  of  500,000  bushels  and  capable  of  expansion  to  a 
storage  of  1,500,000  bushels.  This  was  a  matter  of  particular  interest  in  view 
of  the  fact  that  it  was  the  first  grain  elevator  to  be  constructed  on  the  North 
side  of  the  harbour  and  its  location  there  was  made  possible  by  the  Commis- 
sioners constructing  an  industrial  area  in  that  vicinity  which  is  served  by  the 
harbour  terminal  railway. 

With  these  additions  the  grain  storage  capacity  of  the  port  is  now  10,635,000 
bushels  and  a  further  extensive  increase  is  under  contemplation.  Closely  allied 
to  the  grain  business  and  of  even  more  advantage  to  the  country,  from  a  revenue 
vewpoint,  is  the  export  of  flour  and  it  is  pleasing  to  note  an  advance  of  42  per 
cent  in  the  export  of  this  commodity. 

In  1927  the  amount  shipped  was  1,260,530  barrels  and  1,789,640  in  1928. 
Over  one  million  barrels  went  to  China  and  about  300,000  barrels  to  Japan.  The 
increasing  volume  of  trade  in  this  commodity  would  seem  to  give  assurance  of 
an  expanding  market,  particularly  in  the  Orient. 

LUMBER 

The  foreign  export  of  lumber  and  logs  in  1928  was  about  the  same  as  in 
the  previous  year — about  496,000,000  feet  B.M.  This  was  distributed  over 
forty-one  countries,  the  largest  quantities  going  to  Japan  and  the  United  States, 
the  former  receiving  approximately  276,000,000  f.b.m.  and  the  latter  95,000,000 
f.b.m. 

FISH 

Canned  fish  exported  in  1928  was  also  about  the  same  in  quantity  as  in 

1927.  The  total  was  1,522,577  cases,  France  taking  344,491  cases,  the  United 
Kingdom  262,272  cases  and  Australia  248,932  cases,  the  balance  being  distributed 
over  more  than  ninety  different  countries. 

Cured  fish  export  increased  from  49,000  tons  in  1927  to  over  70,000  tons  in 

1928,  the  bulk  of  this  commodity  going,  as  usual,  to  the  Orient. 

DEVELOPMENTS,  NORTH  SHORE 

During  the  year  the  extensive  industrial  and  railway  development  on  the 
north  shore  which  has  been  in  hand  for  over  a  year  was  brought  to  a  successful 
completion.  The  subway,  which  was  devised  for  the  purpose  of  extending  the 
terminal  railway  system  to  the  territory  west  of  Lonsdale  avenue  was  virtually 
completed  and  by  this  mean  a  level  crossing  over  Lonsdale  avenue,  which  is  the 
principal  street  in  the  city  of  North  Vancouver  and  the  approach  to  the  passenger 
ferries,  has  been  averted. 

The  subway  construction  was  begun  in  January  1928.  It  consists  of  rein- 
forced concrete  throughout.  The  covered  section  is  1,500  feet  in  length  and 
taking  in  the  uncovered  approaches  the  full  length  is  approximately  3,020  feet. 
It  is  served  by  one  track  and  will,  in  the  meantime,  be  used  exclusively  for 
freight  traffic,  as  an  integral  part  of  the  harbour  terminal  railway  system,  which 
now  extends  from  the  Canadian  National  terminals  in  False  Creek  on  the  south 
shore  to  a  point  west  of  Lonsdale  avenue  on  the  north  shore,  where  it  is  intended 
to  connect  with  the  Pacific  Great  Eastern  Railway  and,  after  this  is  accom- 
plished, the  entire  north  side  of  the  harbour  east  from  the  First  Narrows  will 
have  rail  connection  with  the  transcontinental  railroads. 


k  REPORT  OF  Till)  DEPUTY  MINI8TER  145 

The  first  structure  to  be  built  at  the  reclaimed  area,  which  is  pan  of  thifl 
dustrial  development  scheme,  was  the  Japan  wharf.  It  is  500  feet  in  length, 
50  feet  in  width  and  is  served  by  tracks  connected  with  the  terminal  railway.  It 
was  built  by  the  Commissioners  and  leased  to  the  Canadian  Transport  Company 
Limited  and  is  used  mainly  for  the  export  of  lumber  although  other  business  is 
also  transacted  by  the  Company.  Records  indicate  that  66  vessels  have  berthed 
at  this  wharf  in  a  period  of  eight  months. 

As  mentioned  elsewhere,  the  Midland  Pacific  Grain  elevator  was  constructed 
on  this  reclaimed  area,  with  an  initial  storage  capacity  of  500,000  bushel-, 
although  its  capacity  was  limited  by  the  company  on  account  of  the  fact  that 
it  was  to  some  extent  an  experimental  undertaking  to  locate  the  first  grain 
elevator  on  the  north  side  of  the  harbour,  it  was  so  planned  that  another  million 
bushels  of  storage  may  be  conveniently  and  economically  added.  This  is  the 
third  business  concern  to  avail  itself  of  the  advantages  of  the  reclamation  carried 
out  on  the  north  shore  and  the  Commissioners  feel  that  their  expenditures  on 
the  development  of  the  north  slide  of  the  harbour  have  been  already  justified  and 
will  prove  to  be  of  increasing  benefit  not  only  to  the  communities  on  the  north 
shore  but  also  to  the  port  as  a  whole. 

DEVELOPMENTS,  SOUTH  SHORE 

Construction  of  the  first  section  of  a  waterfront  roadway  was  begun  in 
October,  1928.  This  will  extend  from  Victoria  drive  to  Nanaimo  street  and  will 
give  vehicular  connection  with  the  business  centre  of  the  city  to  a  section  of  the 
harbour  that  was  formerly  isolated  and  incapable  of  being  developed.  Numerous 
improvements  have  been  carried  out  in  the  harbour  by  private  interests  on  the 
south  shore,  conspicuous  among  them  being  the  new  grain  elevator  constructed 
by  the  Alberta  Pool  Elevator  Company  at  the  south  end  of  the  Second  Narrows 
bridge,  particulars  of  which  will  be  found  in  a  previous  section  of  this  report. 

CAR  STORAGE 

Early  in  the  year,  particularly  on  account  of  the  increasing  grain  traffic,  it 
was  found  that  extensive  car  storage  accommodation  would  be  necessary.  Con- 
sequently negotiations  were  entered  into  with  the  Great  Northern  and  the 
Canadian  National  railways  with  the  result  that  the  necessary  land  was  secured 
at  False  Creek,  and  a  yard  was  constructed  with  a  capacity  of  450  cars.  This 
has  proved  of  very  great  advantage  to  the  operation  of  the  terminal  railway. 

MAINTENANCE 

During  the  year  maintenance  has  been  carefully  attended  to  and  the  Com- 
missioners' facilities  and  equipment  kept  in  good  order.  In  addition  to  the 
minor  repairs  that  require  attention  from  time  to  time,  the  west  side  and  north 
end  of  Lapointe  pier  were  replanked  at  considerable  cost. 

PUBLICITY 

A  publication  in  illustrated  booklet  form  is  issued  monthly  by  the  Com- 
missioners. The  first  issue  was  made  in  July  1928  and  it  has  a  circulation  of 
1,500.  It  contains  up  to  date  information  about  the  port  and  its  business  and  it 
reaches  to  practically  every  place  of  commercial  importance  in  the  world. 

88174-10 


146 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 


ELEVATORS 

Capacity,  Unloading  and  Loading  Capacity 

bushels 

No.  2  Elevator:  Ballantyne  pier— 

Storage  and  workhouse  capacity 1 ,  625, 000 

Unloading  capacity  per  hour  to  ships 60, 000 

Loading  capacity  per  hour  to  storage 18, 000 

Shipping  berths  available — 4 

No.  S  Elevator:  Burrard  Elevator  Company- 
Storage  and  workhouse  capacity 1 ,  650, 000 

Unloading  capacity  per  hour  to  ships 30, 000 

Loading  capacity  per  hour  to  storage 9, 000 

Shipping  berths  available — 2 

No.  1  Elevator:  Pacific  Terminal  Elevator  Company — 

Storage  and  workhouse  capacity. 2, 050, 000 

Unloading  capacity  per  hour  to  ships 60, 000 

Loading  capacity  per  hour  to  storage 22, 500 

Shipping  berths  available — 4 

Vancouver  Terminal  Grain  Company — 

Storage  and  workhouse  capacity 2, 250, 000 

Unloading  capacity  per  hour  to  ships 60, 000 

Loading  capacity  per  hour  to  storage 18, 000 

Shipping  berths  available — 3 

Columbia  Grain  Elevator  Company — 

Storage  and  workhouse  capacity 160, 000 

Unloading  capacity  per  hour  to  ships 15, 000 

Loading  capacity  per  hour  to  storage 6, 000 

Shipping  berths  available — 1 

Alberta  Pool  Elevator — 

Storage  and  workhouse  capacity 2, 400, 000 

Unloading  capacity  per  hour  to  ships 100, 000 

Loading  capacity  per  hour  to*  storage 24, 000 

Shipping  berths  available — 3 

Midland  Pacific  Elevator — 

Storage  and  workhouse  capacity 500, 000 

Unloading  capacity  per  hour  to  ships 35, 000 

Loading  capacity  per  hour  to  storage 6, 000 

Shipping  berths  available — 1 

COMPARATIVE  RECORD   OF   SHIPPING   1927   AND    1928 

DEEP  SEA 

(Includes  all  vessels  passing  outside  of  Cape  Flattery) 


— 

Number  of  vessels 

Gross  tons 

Net  tons 

1927 

1,123 
1,344 

6,066,504 
7,481,479 

3,779,015 

1928 

4,674,091 

Increase 221 

Increase. . . .1,414,975 

Increase...       895,076 

FOREIGN  COASTWISE 
(Includes  all  vessels  trading  to  Puget  Sound  and  Alaska) 


1927 

1,470 
1,470 

3,757,699 
4,146,312 

1,897,362 
2,109,982 

1928 

Increase....     388,613 

Increase...       212,620 

LOCAL  COASTWISE 
(Includes  all  vessels  trading  in  British  Columbia  waters  only) 


1927 

Increase. . . 

17,770 
19,270 

Increase. . 

7,267,444 
7,885,433 

Increase. . 

4,627,880 
4,958,498 

1928 

1,500 

..     617,989 

330,618 

REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER 

TOTAL  SHIPPINC 


147 




Number  of  vessels 

Cross  tons 

Net  tons 

1927    

20,363 
22,084 

17,091,647 
19,513,224 

10,304,257 
11,742,671 

1928 

Increase. ...         1,721 

[norease 2,421,577 

Increase  .. .   1,488,314 

COMPARISON  OF  PASSENGER  TRAFFIC,  1927  A XI)  1928 


1927— Passengers  landed 478, 024 

1928— Passengers  landed 528 ,  743 


Passengers  shipped 499,  148 

shipped 639,928 


Increase. 


50,719 


Increase . 


40,780 


Chicoutimi  Harbour  Commissioners'  Report 
personnel,  1928 

Commission: — President,  Vincent  Dubuc;  Commissioners  Adelard  Tremblay 
and  Adjutor  Boulianne. 

Chief  Corporation  Officials: — Secretary-Treasurer,  Armand  Viau;  Engineer, 
Edouard  Lavoie;  and  Harbour-Master,  Francois  Boulianne. 

GROWTH  OF  THE  PORT 

Although  recent  improvements  made  to  the  Chicoutimi  wharf  have  con- 
siderably increased  the  loading  and  unloading  facilities,  ocean  freighters  are 
still  delayed  for  want  of  accommodation.  This  will  be  partly  rectified  in  the 
fall  of  1929  when  a  wharf  extension  will  be  available. 

The  total  tonnage  of  the  port  of  Chicoutimi  in  1928  was  double  that  of  the 
previous  year,  and  the  annual  revenue  for  1928,  50  per  cent  more  than  that  for 
1927. 

engineer's  report 

Chicoutimi  Wharf. — In  the  spring  of  1928,  dredging  was  carried  out  on  the 
eastern  side  of  the  Qhicoutimi  wharf.  A  trench  of  250  feet  in  length  by  50  feet 
wide,  with  a  depth  of  ten  feet  at  low  tide  was  dredged. 

The  purpose  of  this  was  in  order  to  give  wharfage  accommodation  to 
schooners,  so  as  to  relieve  congestion  and  allow  the  north  side  of  the  wharf  to 
be  used  exclusively  for  the  unloading  of  coal. 

In  the  autumn  of  1928,  more  dredging  was  done  in  front  of  the  wharf  in 
order  to  increase  the  depth  of  water.  We  are  now  assured  of  a  depth  of  twenty- 
one  feet  six  inches  at  extreme  low  water,  on  a  length  of  three  hundred  and  fifty 
feet. 

New  Wharf. — The  Robertson  and  Janin  Company,  who  were  awarded  the 
contract  for  the  new  wharf,  commenced  operations  in  the  spring  of  1928.  The 
suction  dredge  General  Wolfe  had  dredged  to  depth  of  32  feet  below  low  water, 
for  the  bed  of  the  new  wharves. 

At  the  same  time,  your  Commission  were  having  built  a  revetment  wall  of 
2,000  feet  in  length. 

The  earth  from  dredging  was  driven  back  by  the  suction  dredge  behind  this 
wall,  so  that  the  filling  in  is  partly  done. 

Five  cribs  measuring  103  feet  each  were  built  and  sunk  during  the  fall  of 
1928.  All  probable  settling  which  might  occur  will  take  place  during  the  winter, 
so  that  in  the  spring  they  will  be  ready  to  receive  the  concrete  wall. 

St.  Anne  and  St.  Fulgence  Wharves:  Important  repair  and  maintenance 
work  was  made  to  the  St.  Anne  and  St.  Fulgence  wharves  during  the  autumn. 
Among  other  things,  a  landing  stage  was  built  to  the  St.  Anne  wharf,  which 
allows  the  fery  boat  to  motor  early  in  the  spring  and  late  in  the  fall,  when  ice 
conditions  do  not  permit  the  installation  of  pontoons. 

881  74—10* 


148  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 


The  arrivals  of  small  and  large  vessels  in  the  port  numbered  986  for  the 
year.  Thirty-five  ships  of  large  tonnage  carried  95,179  tons  of  coal  and  4,800 
tons  of  sulphur. 

There  were  61  moorings  by  boats  of  the  Canada  Steamship  Lines  Limited, 
carrying  tourists  and  freight.  These  boats  carried  4,253  tons  of  general  mer- 
chandise. 

The  coasting  trade  by  schooners  and  other  vessels  carried  8,383  tons  of 
merchandise,  3,194  cords  of  wood  and  6,343,546  feet  of  lumber. 

There  are  no  marine  accidents  to  report  with  the  exception  of  a  small  fire 
aboard  a  schooner. 

OPERATING  ACCOUNT,  DECEMBER  31,  1928 

Income  on  Revenue  Account — 

Wharfage  fees,  harbour  dues  and  sundry  receipts  from  Harbour  Master $17, 114  59 

Sale  of  supplies 1, 141  22 

Blue  print  machine 331  82 

$18,587  63 

Expenditures  on  Revenue  Account — 

Salaries,  maintenance  and  sundry  disbursements  on  revenue  account $5,497  13 

Surplus  (reserve  fund  1928) 13,090  50 

$18,587  63 

Bagotville — Port  Alfred — (Ha  Ha  Bay) 

During  1928  Port  Alfred  showed  a  tonnage  of  over  387,000  tons,  and 
Bagotville  had  more  than  50  ships  of  the  Canada  SS.  lines. 

The  Chamber  of  Commerce  is  considering  the  problem  of  the  development 
of  these  ports. 

Report  of  Belleville  Harbour  Commissioners 

Balance  in  bank  from  1927 $  1,889  12 

Harbour  dues  collected,  1928 1 ,  949  90 

Interest  on  savings  account 30  58 

Receipts $  3,869  60 

Total  disbursements 1,406  13 

Balance  in  bank  January  1,  1929 $  2,463  47 


During  the  season  127  craft  of  all  sorts,  including  motor  boats  entered  the 
harbour. 


Halifax  Harbolr  Commissioners'  Report 

In  submitting  this  report  the  Commissioners  are  unable  to  furnish  a  detailed 
statement  of  the  activities  of  the  port  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  December  31, 
1928,  by  reason  of  the  fact  that  their  administration  of  the  port  did  not  properly 
commence  until  late  in  the  year  1928.  They  wish,  however,  to  record  briefly  the 
progress  they  have  made  in  the  negotiations  leading  up  to  the  transfer  of  pro- 
perties  and  port  facilities  to  them  by  departments  of  the  Federal  Government 
and  m  the  preliminary  organization  work  done  by  them  for  the  future  adminis- 
tration of  the  port. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  149 

Pursuant  to  chapter  58  of  17  George  V,  "The  Halifax  Harbour  Commis- 
sioners Act,  1927  ",  an  Order  in  Council  was  passed  en  January  1 1,  L928,  appoint- 
ing Peter  R.  Jack  a  Commissioner  and  President  of  the  Hoard  of  Commissioner* 
for  Halifax  harbour,  and  Charles  W.  Ackhursl  and  John  Murphy,  Commissioners. 

Immediately  following  their  appointment,  the  Commissioners,  on  instruction! 
from  the  Deputy  Minister  of  Marine  and  Fisheries,  proceeded  bo  Ottawa  and 
there  conferred  with  him  and  other  officials  of  the  Department  of  Marine  and 
Fisheries  and  of  other  departments  respecting  the  administration  of  the  pert  of 
Halifax.  These  negotiations  were  renewed  from  time  to  time  and  on  September 
15,  1928,  the  first  transfer  of  Dominion  Government-owned  port  facilities  was 
made  to  the  Harbour  Commission,  when  the  Department  of  Trade  and  Commerce 
leased  the  grain  elevator  at  Halifax  for  a  period  of  five  years  to  the  Halifax 
Harbour  Commissioners.  The  next  transfer  of  property  to  the  Harbour  Com- 
missioners took  place  on  November  1,  1928,  when  the  Department  of  Railway- 
and  Canals  and  the  Canadian  National  Railway  transferred  to  the  Commis- 
sioners all  their  extensive  properties  at  Halifax  located  within  the  limits  of  the 
jurisdiction  of  the  Commissioners,  as  denned  by  section  6  of  the  Halifax  Harbour 
Commissioners  Act.  This  latter  transfer  meant  that  from  the  first  day  of  Novem- 
ber there  was  vested  in  the  Commissioners  the  greater  part  of  the  Dominion 
Government-owned  property  on  the  shores  of  Halifax  harbour. 

It  will  thus  appear  that  until  the  first  of  November  the  Commissioners  did 
not  have  under  their  control  such  properties  and  facilities  as  to  bring  under  their 
direction  the  port  traffic  for  the  first  ten  months  of  1928.  The  activities  therefore 
of  the  Commissioners  up  to  November  1,  1928  were  restricted  to  the  details  of 
organization,  negotiations  respecting  the  transfer  of  properties  to  them  and  the 
formulating  of  plans  and  policies  for  the  future  of  the  port. 

The  Commissioners  were  fortunate  in  securing  the  services  of  Mr.  A.  G. 
Tapley,  who  was  appointed  Acting  Chief  Engineer  for  the  Commission  on  October 
1,  1928.  He  had  previously  been  employed  as  an  engineer  of  the  Public  Works 
Department  and  as  such  had  surveyed  the  port  facilities  of  Halifax  for  his  depart- 
ment and  was  possessed  of  full  knowledge  of  everything  pertaining  to  this  port. 
Subsequent  to  his  appointment,  Mr.  Tapley,  with  the  assistance  of  such  staff  as 
he  required  from  time  to  time,  made  a  careful  survey  of  all  the  port  facilities 
and  prepared  plans  and  data  respecting  the  same.  Under  his  direction  a  new 
roof  was  placed  on  the  south  side  of  pier  2  and  this  building  was  otherwise 
renovated  by  the  addition  of  new  windows  and  doors.  The  Immigration  fittings 
were  removed  from  the  interior  of  the  shed  and  work  was  commenced  pre- 
liminary to  fitting  the  upper  floor  for  storage  of  perishable  goods.  He  also  pre- 
pared plans  for  a  liner  freight  shed  on  the  quay  wall  at  South  terminals.  This 
shed  is  very  urgently  required  for  port  traffic  and  its  construction  will  com- 
mence early  in  1929. 

In  addition  to  the  lengthy  negotiations  carried  on  by  the  Commissioners 
with  the  Deputy  Minister  and  officials  of  the  Department  of  Marine  and 
Fisheries  and  with  other  departments  of  Government,  they  visited  the  ports  of 
Montreal  and  Quebec  in  Canada,  and  the  ports  of  Philadelphia,  Baltimore,  and 
New  York  in  the  United  States.  At  each  of  these  ports  they  made  a  careful 
study  of  administration  by  the  respective  port  authorities  and  inspected  the  port 
facilities  at  each  place. 

On  November  1,  1928,  it  became  necessary  to  organize  a  police  force  to 
patrol  the  various  harbour  properties  transferred  to  the  Commission  by  the  rail- 
way. During  the  month  of  November  these  properties  were  policed  by  Cana- 
dian National  Railway  police.  Commencing  December  1,  the  police'  force 
organized  by  the  Harbour  Commissioners  took  over  and  have  since  that  time 
been  taking  care  of  the  properties  of  the  Commission.     On  November  1  the 


150  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

Commissioners  also  were  in  a  position  to  provide  the  necessary  wharf  foremen 
and  other  employees  to  attend  to  the  traffic  over  the  wharves  operated  by  the 
Commissioners.  .      ' 

The  Commissioners  secured  an  accountant  early  in  the  summer  or  1928, 
who  has  organized  an  office  staff  to  take  care  of  the  accounts  and  details  respect- 
ing the  financial  transactions  of  the  Commission,  and  the  office  records.  From 
time  to  time  the  Commissioners  have  taken  on  such  further  staff  as  required  for 
their  operations. 

The  first  grain  received  by  the  Commissioners  after  taking  over  the  elevator 
was  on  December  3,  1928,  and  the  first  shipment  of  grain  by  the  Commissioners 
was  made  on  December  14,  1928.  This  shipment  provided  a  full  cargo  for  the 
ss.  Lingan  and  consisted  of  238,285  bushels.  It  may  be  added  that  the  Com- 
missioners have  already  negotiated  with  the  proper  authorities  for  the  shipment 
of  large  quantities  of  grain  through  the  port  of  Halifax  during  the  winter  of  1929. 

It  is  not  proposed,  at  this  time,  to  discuss  the  tonnage  through  the  port  of 
Halifax  for  the  year  1928,  nor  to  estimate  the  values  of  freight  passing  through 
this  port.  Heretofore  Board  of  Trade  officials,  with  the  assistance  of  the  Col- 
lector of  Customs,  the  Harbour  Master  and  other  port  officials,  estimated  the 
traffic  of  the  port.  The  Commissioners  propose  to  employ  an  official  to  compile 
accurate  and  complete  statistics  respecting  the  shipping  through  the  port.  When 
their  by-laws  have  been  duly  sanctioned  by  the  Governor  in  Council,  this 
official  will  be  in  a  position  to  secure  the  necessary  information  from  steamship 
companies  and  others,  and  it  is  confidently  expected  that  he  will  be  appointed 
early  in  1929,  and  that  he  will  be  able  to  furnish  a  detailed  report  of  such  activi- 
ties for  the  year  1929. 

STATEMENT   OF   REVENUE  AND  EXPENDITURE   FOR  THE   YEAR 
ENDED  DECEMBER  31,  1928 

Operating  revenue — 

Wharfage $15, 170  74 

Storage 410  35 

Side  wharfage 10, 838  02 

Rentals 6,340  14 

Harbour  Master's  fees 3,466  50 

Elevator 7,909  34 

Miscellaneous 45  05 

$44,180  14 

Operating  expenditures — 

Interest  on  bank  overdraft $      673  20 

Harbour  Master's  salary 3, 000  00 

Administration,  salaries  and  office  supplies 21, 183  83 

Maintenance  wharves  and  sheds 11, 031  78 

Elevator  operating. ■ 10, 115  28 

Elevator  maintenance  and  repairs 678  77 

$46,682  86 

Balance  of  expenditures  over  revenue $2, 502  72 

Report  of  the  Harbour  Commissioners  of  Saint  John,  N.B.,  for  the 

Years  1927  and  1928 

The  control  of  the  harbour  of  Saint  John  was  taken  over  by  the  Commis- 
sioners on  August  1,  1927.  Previous  to  this  date,  the  operation  of  the  port  was 
under  the  dual  control  of  the  city  of  Saint  John  and  the  Department  of  Marine, 
and  the  Public  Works  of  Canada  carried  out  the  necessary  construction  and 
maintenance  work  for  the  properties  operated  by  the  Department  of  Marine,  in 
addition  to  performing  necessary  dredging  and  other  assistance  to  the  properties 
under  the  control  of  the  city. 

The  city  properties  were  taken  over  at  a  cost  of  $2,135,118  on  August  1, 
1927,  and  comprise  wharves  and  sheds  situated  on  both  sides  of  the  harbour, 
in  addition  to  such  lands  bordering  on  the  harbour  as  were  vested  in  the  city. 
In  taking  over  these  properties,  such  of  the  operating  and  maintenance  staff 
as  the  Commissioners  considered  necessary  was  retained. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  151 

PERSONNEL,  1928 

President,  W.  E.  Scully;  Commissioners,  Lieut.  Col.  A.  McMillan  and 
R.  T.  Hayes. 

WHARVES   AND   SHEDS 

These  wharves  and  sheds,  with  their  dimensions,  are  as  follows: — 

On  the  East,  or  city  side,  of  the  harbour —  Floor  area  of  shed 

_,...-  M.  ft. 

Reed  s  point  wharf 410  feet  long 

New  pier  wharf 380  feet  long 18,766 

Pettingill  wharf 400  feet  long 25,098 

McLeod  wharf 370  feet  long 22,704 

On  the  West  side  of  the  harbour — 

Berth  No.  1 380  feet  long 28, 928 

Berth  No.  2 460  feet  long 29,638 

Berth  No.  3 410  feet  long 22,791 

Berth  No.  4 485  feet  long 25,293 

Berth  No.  5 525  feet  long 3o! 099 

Berth  No.  6  and  6  Ext 1,083  feet  long 50,382 

On  November  1,  1927,  the  properties  under  the  control  of  the  Marine  and 
Fisheries  department  were  taken  over  and  the  operation  placed  under  the 
board's  staff.    The  wharves  and  sheds,  with  their  dimensions,  are  as  follows: — 

On  the  West  side  of  the  harbour — 

Floor  area  of  shed 
sq.  ft. 

Berth  No.  7  and  7  Ext 1,055  feet  long 38,320 

8,720 

Berth  No.  14 702  feet  long 10,094 

30,382 

Berth  No.  15 865  feet  long 54,942 

47,347 
Berth  No.  16 800  feet  long 68,721 

All  wharves  are  served  with  railroad  sidings  at  the  rear  of  the  sheds,  which 
facilitates  the  transfer  of  freight  from  vessel  to  railway. 

Owing  to  the  wharves  and  sheds  taken  over  from  the  city  being  very  old 
structures,  and  little  maintenance  having  been  performed  on  them  in  previous 
years,  considerable  expenditures  were  required  to  put  them  in  first  class  con- 
dition. The  government  properties,  being  of  a  later  type  of  construction  and 
well  maintained,  required  very  much  less  expenditure. 

Up  to  first  November,  1928,  the  only  deep  water  wharf  outside  of  the 
jurisdiction  of  the  Commissioners  was  the  Long  Wharf,  owned  and  operated 
by  the  Canadian  National  Railways.  Satisfactory  arrangements  having  been 
concluded  with  the  Canadian  National  Railways  as  to  the  operation  of  this 
property,  pending  construction  of  a  bridge  to  give  them  access  to  the  west  side 
piers,  full  control  of  same  was  placed  under  the  Board's  jurisdiction  on  the 
above  date. 

This  pier  is  545  feet  long,  with  two  sheds,  each  500  feet  long  by  40  feet  in 
width,  with  railroad  tracks  on  each  face  of  pier  and  between  the  two  sheds. 
The  draft  of  water  at  both  sides  of  the  pier  is  30  feet. 

For  the  first  year,  little  or  no  change  was  made  in  the  general  operating 
policy  formerly  in  force,  it  being  felt  that  any  changes  to  be  made  should) 
receive  consideration  after  the  experience  of  at  least  one  shipping  season's 
operation. 

Advantage  was  taken  of  the  experience  of  other  harbour  commissions  in 
the  operation  of  their  ports,  and  in  order  that  there  would  be  uniformity,  both 
in  the  operation  and  control  of  Saint  John,  with  the  other  harbours  under 
commission,  by-laws  for  the  collection  of  wharfage,  etc.,  were  adopted  to  con- 
form, so  far  as  practicable,  with  those  of  Montreal  and  Quebec. 


152  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

GRAIN   FACILITIES 

There  has  been  a  steady  increase  in  the  quantity  of  grain  shipped  annually. 
Up  to  1915,  there  was  only  about  seven  and  one-quarter  million  bushels  shipped 
from  the  port,  but  with  the  construction  of  additional  conveyor  galleries  at 
Berths  15  and  16,  the  amount  gradually  increased,  the  maximum  grain  ship- 
ments being  during  the  season  1926-27,  when  25,885,000  bushels  were  shipped. 

Feet 

Grain  conveyor  lengths,  berths  1,  2,  3 1,530 

berths  5  and  6 2,251 

berth  15 1 ,  210 

berth  16 1 ,  160 

Bushels 

C.P.R.  elevators,  West  Saint  John,  "A"  concrete 1,000,000 

"B"  wooden 600, 000 

1,600,000 
C.N.R.  elevator,  East  side  harbour 500, 000 

Total 2, 100, 000 

On  account  of  the  elevators,  West  Saint  John,  not  being  connected  up  so 
that  grain  could  be  shipped  from  any  one  elevator  over  all  the  conveyor 
galleries,  it  was  found  necessary  to  erect  a  conveyor  gallery  between  the  two 
elevators,  in  order  that  grain  could  be  transferred  from  one  elevator  to  the 
other,  and  from  thence  shipped  over  any  conveyor  gallery. 

This  work  was  carried  out  in  the  fall  of  1927,  at  a  cost  of  $55,000  and  con- 
siderably facilitated  the  movement  of  grain  through  the  port,  as  a  vessel  lying 
at  any  berth  equipped  with  a  conveyor  gallery,  could  receive  grain  from  either 
elevator  without  the  vessel  having  to  be  moved  from  her  berth. 

The  bulk  of  the  grain  shipped  through  the  port  has  been  handled  through 
the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company's  elevators,  West  Saint  John.  Elevator 
"A"  is  of  modern  concrete  construction,  while  elevator  "B"  is  of  older  wood 
construction,  but  in  a  good  state  of  repair. 

The  Canadian  National  Railways'  elevator  on  the  east  side  of  the  harbour  is 
a  concrete  structure,  with  conveyor  galleries  1,560  feet  in  length. 

POTATO  STORAGE  FACILITIES 

In  the  fall  of  1922,  at  the  request  of  potato  growers  throughout  the  prov- 
ince, a  frost-proof  warehouse,  210  feet  long  by  80  feet  wide,  was  provided  on 
berth  No.  14  for  this  business.  After  the  first  year's  operation,  the  business 
increased  so  that  an  extension  of  94  feet  was  made  to  the  orginal  shed.  This 
latter  extension,  however,  was  not  sufficient  to  meet  the  demands  of  the  trade, 
and  eventually,  in  the  fall  of  1925,  another  extension  of  66  feet  was  made  to 
the  buildings.  The  total  floor  frost-proof  area  now  available  for  shipment  of 
potatoes  during  the  winter  season  is  40,000  square  feet. 

The  maximum  potato  shipments  from  the  port  for  a  winter  season  amounted 
to  2,508,000  bushels,  in  1924-25.  The  storage  capacity  on  the  west  side  of  the 
harbour  is  31,000  barrels,  and  on  the  east  side,  New  Pier  Wharf,  15,000  barrels. 

CATTLE   SHIPPING  FACILITIES 

Late  in  1921,  the  shipment  of  cattle  through  the  port  was  resumed,  and  for 
that  purpose,  modern  facilities  were  provided  by  the  Dominion  Government,  the 
first  shipment  in  that  year  having  arrived  on  December  24. 

During  1922,  and  subsequent  years  up  to  1925,  the  shipment  of  cattle  in- 
creased from  2,464  head  in  1922,  to  31,218  head  in  1925. 

The  cattle  business  increased  so  rapidly  that  the  facilities  available  were 
very  soon  found  to  be  inadequate,  and  during  1926,  extensive  additions  to  the 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  153 

cattle  shed  were  constructed  and  equipped  with  every  modern  convenience, 
including  weigh  scales,  water  supply  and  roping  and  branding  facilities.  I'n- 
fortunately,  after  the  improvements  were  completed,  the  cattle  business  gradually 
dwindled  and  no  cattle  have  passed  through  the  port  for  the  pasl   two  years. 

The  main  cattle  shed  had  35  pens  capable  of  accommodating  20  head  cadi, 
and  the  western  extension  19  pens  each  accommodating  25  head  and  5  pen- 
accommodating  18  head,  a  total  accommodation  for  1,265  head  of  cattle.  This 
accommodation  has  been  materially  reduced,  in  order  to  provide  for  fertilizer 
storage. 

FERTILIZER  STORAGE 

On  account  of  the  cattle  exportation  having  disappeared,  and  the  gradually 
increasing  importation  of  fertilizer,  it  was  found  necessary,  in  order  to  take 
care  of  this  business,  to  dismantle  the  major  portion  of  the  cattle  shed  and  equip 
same  for  the  reception  and  storage  of  fertilizer. 

Owing  to  the  long  haul  from  the  ship's:  side  to  the  storage  shed,  three  gasoline 
tractors  and  twenty  trailers  were  purchased,  in  order  to  facilitate  the  dis- 
charging of  the  fertilizer  cargo.  This  equipment  is  rented  to  the  importer  at  a 
per  ton  charge. 

ELECTRIC    CRANE 

The  lack  of  cranes  for  handling  heavy  lifts  from  and  to  vessels  has  caused 
considerable  inconvenience  to  shipping  companies,  consequently,  late  in  1927, 
an  electric  crane  of  capacity  of  40  tons  at  80  foot  radius  was  installed  at  the 
end  of  No.  15  wharf.  The  crane  is  located  so  that  lifts  can  be  conveniently 
handled  from  holds  of  steamers  directly  on  to  railway  cars  on  the  wharf. 

GENERAL  REPAIRS 

All  the  harbour  structures  being  constructed  of  wood,  considerable  renewals 
are  required  annually.  These  consist  of  renewing  floors  in  sheds,  and  platforms 
on  face  of  wharves,  in  addition  to  replacement  of  decayed  timbers  in  the  wharves 
between  low  water  and  top  of  wharves. 

In  addition  to  ordinary  repairs,  the  properties  taken  over  from  the  city, 
particularly  the  substructures  of  wharves  on  the  eastern  side  of  the  harbour, 
required  practically  full  renewal  from  low  water  up.  This  work  has  been  carried 
on  in  annual  installments,  and  it  is  anticipated  that  all  structures  will  be  in  a 
state  of  good  repair  within  two  years. 

The  face  of  No.  1  wharf,  which  was  completely  destroyed  in  a  heavy  storm 
on  January  25,  1928,  was  renewed  for  a  length  of  112  feet  from  low  water  up. 
The  substructures  of  portions  of  Sheds  2  and  3  were  also  renewed  from  low 
water  up. 

The  roof  of  Pettingill  shed,  on  the  east  side  of  the  harbour,  and  No.  14  shed, 
on  the  west  side  of  the  harbour,  were  completely  renewed  during  1928. 

LIGHTING 

The  entire  lighting  in  the  sheds  taken  over  from  the  city,  both  on  the  east 
and  west  sides  of  the  harbour,  was  completely  renewed,  and  the  amount  of 
lighting  supplies  considerably  increased.  Sufficient  lighting  was  also  installed 
on  the  various  wharves,  so  that  the  harbour  front  property  is  adequately  lighted 
for  night  work. 


154  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

DREDGING 

Deep  Water  Berths. — Owing  to  the  large  amount  of  silt  coming  on  the  flood 
tides,  and  also  brought  down  the  river  during  freshet,  considerable  dredging  has 
to  be  performed  annually.  The  experience  has  been  that  each  berth  silts  up 
from  two  to  four  feet  in  the  course  of  two  years,  and  it  has  been  found  necessary 
to  have  each  berth  dredged  at  least  once  every  two  years.  The  amount  of 
dredging  per  annum  averages  about  50,000  cubic  yards. 

Channel  Entrance. — While  considerable  dredging  is  required  in  the  various 
berths,  the  experience  is  that  there  is  no  filling  in  in  the  channel  entrance,  which 
maintains  a  depth  of  30  feet  below  low  water  for  its  full  length. 

New  Facilities. — The  facilities  taken  over  by  the  Commissioners  were 
totally  inadequate  to  handle  the  amount  of  business  offering  the  port.  Conse- 
quently, the  first  work  undertaken  was  a  complete  study  of  the  requirements  of 
the  trade,  and  plans  were  prepared  with  a  view  to  developing  the  port  to  the 
fullest  extent.  The  plans  prepared  provide  for  facilities  for  ocan  tonnage  suffi- 
cient to  double  the  present  capacity.  These  were  approved,  and  authority  was 
given  by  parliament  to  proceed  with  the  scheme  prepared,  and  an  anitial  expendi- 
ture of  $5,000,000  was  voted  in  the  session  of  1927-28. 

Tenders  were  called  during  the  summer,  and  in  August  1928,  work  was 
commenced  on  the  construction  of  a  pier,  800  feet  long  by  300  feet  wide,  and 
also  on  the  construction  of  a  grain  elevator  of  one  and  one-half  million  bushels 
capacity.  The  necessary  land  for  trackage  purposes,  etc.,  is  being  purchased, 
and  the  completion  of  the  works  now  under  construction  will  complete  the  first 
unit  of  the  final  scheme. 

The  site  selected  for  the  works  is  between  berth  No.  7  and  Navy  island. 
This  site  was  selected  on  account  of  its  sheltered  position,  no  protection  by 
breakwaters  being  required.  It  will  be  easily  accessible  to  both  railways,  the 
Canadian  National  Railways  by  a  bridge  across  the  harbour  at  Navy  island,  and 
the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  by  an  extension  of  their  present  tracks. 

The  full  scheme  contemplates  the  construction  of  two  piers,  each  1,250  feet 
in  length  by  300  feet  in  width,  and  one  quay  wall,  1,250  feet  in  length.  The 
width  of  the  berth,  between  the  piers,  is  400  feet  at  the  outer  end,  converging  to 
300  feet  at  the  inner  end,  the  draft  of  water  being  35  feet  below  extreme  low 
water.  The  piers  will  be  of  reinforced  concrete  caisson  construction  up  to  6 
feet  above  low  water,  the  caisson  being  filled  with  rock,  and  from  top  of  concrete 
caisson,  the  construction  will  be  timber  cribwork.  The  piers  and  quay  wall  are 
to  be  equipped  with  modern  fireproof  warehouses  and  grain  conveyor  galleries 
on  each  pier. 

It  is  proposed  to  fill  in  the  area  behind  the  quay  wall,  and  connect  same 
with  Navy  island,  so  that  sufficient  space  may  be  provided  for  industrial  and 
other  purposes.  In  order  that  adequate  railway  facilities  may  be  provided  to 
serve  the  piers,  the  whole  water  front  area  of  West  Saint  John,  to  the  east  of 
Market  Place,  will  be  required.  This  includes  the  fiilling  in  of  the  property 
known  as  the  "  Mill  Pond",  and  the  taking  over  of  the  ferry  property,  now 
operated  by  the  city  of  Saint  John,  in  addition  to  the  Shore  Line  Railway 
premises  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company. 

On  the  area  to  be  acquired  for  trackage,  a  strip  of  land  along  Market  Place, 
for  the  full  length,  will  be  reserved  for  industrial  purposes. 

The  pier  at  present  under  construction,  on  which  considerable  progress  has 
been  made  in  excavation  for  the  foundation,  is  to  the  north  of  the  pier  to  be 
erected  on  the  ferry  property.  On  account  of  considerable  rock  excavation,  this 
work  is  being  carried  out  within  a  cofferdam  surrounding  the  whole  work. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER 


155 


ELEVATOR 

The  proposed  elevator  will  have  a  capacity  of  (luce  million  bushels,  and  is 
to  be  equipped  with  the  latest  equipment  for  the  handling  of  grain,  both  receiving 
and  discharging.  The  elevator  work  at  present  under  construction  will  provide 
for  one  and  a  half  million  bushels  capacity,  provisions  being  made  for  further 
extension  to  three  millions,  when  required. 

It  is  proposed  to  connect  up  the  new  elevator  system  with  the  existing 
elevators,  so  that  a  vessel  at  any  berth  in  the  harbour  may  receive  grain  from 
either  elevator. 

Good  progress  has  been  made  in  the  works  under  contract,  and  it  is  fully 
anticipated  that  they  will  be  available  for  use  by  January  1,  1931. 

Statement  Showing  the  Nationalities  and  Net  Tonnage  of  Sea-Going  Vessels 
that  Arrived  in  the  Port  of  Saint  John,  during  the  Year  1928 


Nationality 

No.  of 
vessels 

Tonnage 

64 

192 

19 

4 

1 

9 

1 

26 

81 

13 

148,361 
751  823 

Danish 

25,990 
4,706 
2,546 

19,771 
1  941 

Dutch    

French 

Greek 

89  117 

123,711 

Swedish 

14,784 

410 

1,182,750 

PROFIT  AND  LOSS  ACCOUNT  FOR  THE  FIVF^  MONTHS  ENDED  DECEMBER  31,  1927 


Operating  income $ 

Wharfages $        22,276  35 

Harbour  dues 5, 376  13 

Harbour  railway 207  50 

Rentals 6,582  72 


34,442  70 


34,442  70 


Operating  expenses 

$ 

70,689  05 

Sheds  and  wharves 

Engineering  salaries 

Insurance 

Heating,  etc 

Telephones 

Electric  crane 

$ 

57,607  47 

2,750  10 

5,128  91 

850  37 

635  86 

820  00 

2,896  34 

70,689  05 

15,467  73 

5,000  03 

4,595  82 

1,050  29 

3,021  45 

398  00 

720  60 

67  86 

204  05 

13  69 

395  94 

Motor  car 

Administration  Expenses 

$ 
$ 

Office  salaries 

Furniture,  etc 

Rent  of  offices ...                                           

Travelling 

Postage 

Entertaining 

Light 

General 

$ 

15,467  73 

Interest 

41,947  92 

On  bank  loans  (Administration) 

On  bonds 

$ 

558  27 
41,389  65 

$ 

41,947  92 

Net  loss,  five  months  ended  December  31,  1927 

93,662  00 

$      128,104  70  $  128,104  70 


156  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

PROFIT  AND  LOSS  ACCOUNT  FOR  THE  TWELVE  MONTHS  ENDED  DECEMBER  31, 1928 

Operating  Income $      304, 181  45 

Wharfages *  251,423  13 

Harbour  dues 19,377  50 

Harbour  railway 898  00 

Freight  hoists 889  00 

Rentals 28,275  67 

Grain  conveyor 3, 318  15 

$      304,181  45 


Operating  expenses $      115, 892  87 

Sheds  and  wharves $  104,248  27 

Engineering  salaries 4, 646  11 

Insurance 41  45 

Heating,  etc 3, 099  70 

Telephones 1,796  86 

Electric  crane 598  25 

Motor  car '. 641  33 

Workmen's  compensation 2, 103  56 

$  115,892  87 


Administration  expenses $ 

Commissioners'  salaries $  10, 000  08 

Office  salaries 13,425  18 

Stationery  and  printing 750  41 

Furniture,  etc 2,282  29 

Rent  of  offices 2,072  75 

Travelling 120  00 

Postage 141  59 

Entertaining 302  20 

Light 109  66 

Legal 235  35 

General 2,983  19 


27,858  12 


27,858  1. 


Interest $      100, 031  65 

On  bank  loans  (Administration) $  696  49 

On  bonds 99, 335  16 

$      100,031  65 

Net  profit:  Twelve  months  ended  December  31,  1928 $        60, 308  81 

$      304,181  45    $  304,181  45 


CUSTOMS  RETURN  OF  INCOMING  VESSELS 


Transatlantic 

Coastwise 

Total 

In  ballast 

No.  of 
vessels 

Tons 
register 

Tons 
freight 

No.  of 

vessels 

Tons 
register 

No.  of 

vessels 

Tons 
register 

*Tons 
freight 

No.  of 

Tons 

vessels 

register 

1916-17... 

449 

879,013 

377, 678 

600 

461,420 

1,919 

434,181 

2,968 

1,774,614 

377,678 

1917-18... 

318 

693,801 

233,494 

663 

387,329 

1,797 

391,921 

2,778 

1,473,051 

233,494 

1918-19... 

213 

470, 637 

202,043 

333 

413,037 

1,584 

355, 606 

2,130 

1,239,280 

202,043 

1919-20... 

264 

742,540 

269,406 

339 

364,861 

1,531 

381,606 

2,134 

1,489,007 

269,406 

1920-21... 

286 

740,045 

290,942 

535 

291,774 

1,773 

405,108 

2,594 

1,436,927 

290,942 

1921-22... 

381 

823,750 

442,426 

270 

185,862 

1,578 

350,093 

2,229 

1,359,711 

442,426 

1922-23... 

388 

925,852 

501,460 

465 

269,437 

1,876 

422,099 

2,729 

1,617,388 

501,460 

1923-24... 

427 

926,310 

443,884 

502 

166,990 

1,812 

409,015 

2,741 

1,502,315 

443,884 

1924-25... 

423 

969, 150 

405,533 

381 

222,892 

1,823 

426, 767 

2,627 

1,618,809 

405,533 

1925-26... 

464 

1,044,742 

529,209 

394 

366,208 

1,732 

396, 342 

2,590 

1,807,292 

529,209 

1926-27... 

448 

1,053,473 

507,584 

684 

461,723 

1,813 

440,056 

2,945 

1,955,252 

507,584 

1927-28... 

509 

1,097,731 

437, 152 

459 

237, 797 

1,803 

382,548 

2,771 

1,718,076 

437, 152 

♦Coastwise  freight  not  available. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER 
CUSTOMS  RETURN  OF  OUTGOING   VESSELS 


157 


Transatlantic 

Coastwise 

Total 

In  ballast 

No.  of 

Tons 

Tons 

No.  of 

Tons 

No.  of 

vessels 

register 

freight 

No.  of 

vessels 

Tons 
register 

vessels 

register 

vessels 

registei 

freight 

1916-17... 

852 

1,075,543 

1,342,997 

78 

44,595 

1,995 

621,265 

2,925 

1,741,401 

[,342,997 

1917-18... 

803 

876, 756 

1,577,769 

73 

41,451 

1,872 

633,975 

2,748 

1,462, 182 

1,577,768 

1918-19... 

438 

772,466 

1,173,740 

64 

50, 668 

1,588 

378,872 

2,090 

1,202,006 

1,173,740 

1919-20. . . 

527 

978,683 

1,281,788 

85 

59, 193 

1,531 

432,749 

2, 143 

1,470,626 

1,281,788 

1920-21... 

679 

851,802 

843,068 

107 

61,398 

1,826 

542,112 

2,612 

1,465,312 

843,068 

1921-22... 

448 

739, 792 

674, 198 

118 

81,424 

1 ,  669 

538,467 

2,235 

1,359,683 

674,198 

1922-23... 

662 

955, 756 

894,540 

125 

70,161 

1,921 

587,617 

2,708 

1,613,634 

804 .  640 

1923-24... 

697 

927,312 

858,016 

162 

84,928 

1,897 

575,902 

2,756 

1,588,142 

868,016 

1924-25... 

585 

961,545 

822,462 

122 

66,815 

1,932 

602, 198 

2,639 

1,603,558 

822,462 

1925-26. . . 

604 

1,111,389 

860, 143 

162 

103,447 

1,779 

577,716 

2,545 

1,792,552 

860, 143 

1926-27... 

749 

1,404,972 

1,204,974 

206 

112,104 

1,976 

616,641 

2,931 

2,133,717 

1,204.974 

1927-28... 

594 

1,004,897 

972,409 

239 

66,571 

1,950 

662,300 

2,783 

1,733,768 

972,409 

*Coastwise  freight  not  available. 

(Note. — When  a  transatlantic  vessel  leaves  Saint  John  to  call  at  Halifax,  it  is  "coastwise"  and  no 
record  is  kept  by  the  Customs  of  the  tonnage.) 

SUMMARY  OF  GRAIN  HANDLED,  1928 


1928 

Receipts — bushels 

Deliveries — bushels 

Canadian 
grain 

American 
grain 

Total 
receipts 

Canadian 
grain 

American 
grain 

Total 
deliveries 

January 

1,198,441 
2,047,399 
2,689,348 
1,820,361 

2,571,032 

1,729,960 

1,579,211 

801,424 

3,769,473 
3,777,359 
4,268,559 
2,621,785 

1,071,382 
1,960,503 
2,670,136 
2,352,082 

2,652,331/40 

2,220,652 

1,787,058 

921,975 

3,723,713/40 

February 

4,181,155 

March 

4,457,194 

April 

3,274,057 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

358,796 
3,183,018/40 

706,680 
4,136,482 

1,065,476 
7,319,500/40 

5,600 
2,963,838/40 

75,900 
4,530,311 

81,500 

December 

7,494,149/40 

11,297,363/40 

11,524,789 

22,822,152/40 

11,023,541/40 

12,188,227/40 

23,211,769/20 

BOARD  OF  STEAMBOAT  INSPECTION 
Report  of  Chairman,  Frank  McDonnell,  M.E.I.C. 

BOARD  MEETINGS 

Board  meetings  for  the  purpose  of  dealing  with  questions  arising  out  of  the 
administration  of  the  regulations  governing  steamboat  inspection,  for  considering 
the  qualifications  of  candidates  for  the  position  of  steamboat  inspector,  and  for 
the  approval  of  plans  of  hulls,  machinery,  boilers  and  equipment  for  use  in  ships 
coming  under  inspection  were  held  during  the  year. 

ENGINEER  EXAMINATIONS 

During  the  fiscal  year  305  candidates  for  certificates  of  competency  were 
granted  certificates  as  marine  engineers.  In  addition,  69  temporary  engineer 
certificates  were  issued,  also  26  certificates  to  motor  engineers. 

Appended  will  be  found  a  list  of  the  Steamboat  Inspection  staff  during  the 
fiscal  year,  also  table  showing  the  number  of  inspections  made,  fees  collected,  etc. 


158 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 


STEAMBOAT  INSPECTION   STAFF   FOR  THE  DOMINION    OF   CANADA  DURING  THE  FISCAL 

YEAR   ENDED    MARCH    31,    1929 

SENIOR  STEAMSHIP  INSPECTORS 


Name  of  Inspector 

Headquarters 

Division 

Halifax,  N.S 

Nova  Scotia. 

P  W   Lvon                     

Toronto,  Ont 

Western  Ontario — Toronto,  Collingwood 

H.  G.  Robinson 

and  Midland. 
British  Columbia. 

INSPECTORS  ACTING  IN  DUAL  CAPACITY 


A.  I.  Ross 

S.J.Hill 

C.  E.  Dalton 

J.  A.  Samson 

F.  X.  Hamelin... 
J.  H.  Fontaine  — 

*F.  Bridges 

S.  Gruzelier 

B.  Mantrop 

J.J.  Moffat 

A.  K.  Venables.. , 

W.  P.  Craig 

W.  L.  MacKenzie 

R.  C.  Blyth 

W.  J.  Vigars 

A.  Farrow 

T.  M.  Stephen.... 
J.  T.  Mathews.... 

J.  Brydon 

J.  T.  Edmond.... 


Halifax,  N.S 

Halifax,  N.S 

Saint  John,  N.B.. 

Quebec,  P.Q 

Sorel,  P.Q 

Montreal,  P.Q.... 
Montreal,  P.Q.... 
Montreal,  P.Q.... 

Kingston,  Ont 

Toronto,  Ont 

Toronto,  Ont 

Toronto,  Ont 

Midland,  Ont 

Collingwood,  Ont 
Port  Arthur,  Ont. 
Vancouver,  B.C. 
Vancouver,  B.C. 
Vancouver,  B.C. 
Vancouver,  B.C. 
Victoria,  B.C 


Nova  Scotia. 
Nova  Scotia. 
New    Brunswick    and    Prince    Edward 

Island. 
Quebec. 
Sorel. 
Montreal. 
Montreal. 
Montreal. 
Kingston. 
Toronto. 
Toronto. 
Toronto. 
Midland. 
Collingwood. 
Port  Arthur. 
British  Columbia. 
British  Columbia. 
British  Columbia. 
British  Columbia. 
British  Columbia. 


*Mr.  Bridges  left  the  Steamboat  Inspection  Service  on  appointment  to  the  position  of  Superintendent 
of  the  Government  Shipyard,  Sorel,  on  July  10,  1928. 


INSPECTORS  OF  BOILERS  AND  MACHINERY 


D.  J.  Stevens... 
J.  T.  Gardham. 


Halifax,  N.  S.. 
Montreal,  P.Q. 


Nova  Scotia. 
Montreal. 


INSPECTORS  OF  HULLS  AND  EQUIPMENT 


D.  K.  O'Brien 

Capt.  W.  R.  Bennett. 


J.  C.  Beaudoin. 
M.  R.  Davis... 
A.  A.  Young.. . 
E.  M.  Sleigh... 


Halifax,  N.S 

Saint  John,  N.B. 


Quebec,  P.Q.... 
Kingston,  Ont... 
Toronto,  Ont.... 
Vancouver,  B.C. 


Nova  Scotia. 
New    Brunswick 

Island. 
Quebec. 
Kingston. 
Toronto. 
British  Columbia. 


and    Prince    Edward 


INSPECTORS  OF  SHIP'S  TACKLE 


I).  K.  O'Brien 
J.  M.  Martin... 
A.  Duval 


Halifax,  N.S.... 
Saint  John,  N.B 
Montreal,  P.Q.. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER 


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160  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

RADIO  BRANCH 
Report  of  C.  P.  Edwards,  O.B.E.,  F.I.R.E.,  A.M.E.I.C.  Director 

NUMBER  OF  RADIO  STATIONS  IN  THE  DOMINION 

The  total  number  of  licensed  stations  in  operation  in  the  Dominion  and  on 
ships  registered  therein  was,  on  March  31,  1929,  as  follows: — 

Coast  Stations 30 

Direction  Finding  Stations 11 

Beacon  Stations 8 

Radiophone  Stations 4 

Land  Stations 1 

Government  Ship  Stations 37 

Commercial  Ship  Stations 296 

Aircraft  Stations 2 

Limited  Coast  Stations 3 

Public  Commercial  Stations 4 

Private  Commercial  Stations 98 

Private  Commercial  Broadcasting  Stations 79 

Amateur  Broadcasting  Stations 12 

Radiotelegraph  Training  Schools 5 

Experimental  Stations 46 

A-mateur  Experimental  Stations 584 

Private  Receiving  Stations  (including  472  licences  issued  free  to  the  blind) 297,398 

Total 298, 618 


LICENCES 


Under  the  provisions  of  section  3  of  the  Radiotelegraph  Act,  chapter  43, 
statutes  1913,  every  radio  transmitting  and  receiving  set  must  be  licensed  by 
the  Minister  of  Marine  and  Fisheries.  The  licences  are  issued  through  the 
medium  of  the  Radio  Branch  in  accordance  with  the  Radiotelegraph  Regulations, 
copies  of  which  may  be  obtained  from  the  department,  price  ten  cents  (10c). 

LICENCE    FEES 

The  annual  fees  charged  in  respect  of  radio  licences  issued  by  the  Minister 
of  Marine  and  Fisheries,  are  as  follows: — 

1 .  Limited  Coast  Stations $  50  00 

2.  Public  Commercial  Stations 50  00 

3.  Private  Commercial  Stations 10  00 

4.  Experimental  Stations 5  00 

5.  Amateur  Experimental  Stations 2  50 

6.  Broadcasting  Stations,  Private  Commercial 50  00 

7.  Broadcasting,  Stations  Amateur 10  00 

8.  Private  Receiving  Stations 1  00 

9.  Technical  or  Training  School  Stations 5  00 

10.  Ship  Stations 10  00 

1 1 .  Aircraft  Stations 10  00 

GOVERNMENT   COAST   STATIONS 

"  Coast  Station  "  is  the  term  used  to  designate  a  radio  station  established 
on  shore  to  communicate  with  ships  at  sea.  Canada's  extensive  coast  line 
demands  a  large  number  of  stations  to  cover  all  its  coasts  and  approaches  thereto.  | 
The  complete  system  consists  of  fifty-four  stations  located  as  follows:— 

I  .it  (  oust  (includes  six  radio  beacons) 24 

(  .icil   Lakes  (includes  one  radio  beacon) 9 

Pacific  (  oast  (includes  one  radio  beacon) 15 

Hudson  Bay  and  Strait 6 

54 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  161 

The  coast  station  system  consists  of  two  chains,  one  extending  from  Van- 
couver to  Prince  Rupert  on  the  Pacific,  and  the  other  from  Port  Arthur  to  tin- 
Atlantic  ocean  in  the  east,  and,  for  the  purposes  of  administration,  is  divided 
into  three  divisions,  Pacific  Coast,  Great  Lakes  and  East  Coast.  The  stations 
of  the  Great  Lakes  division  communicate  with  those  of  the  East  Coast  division, 
but  there  is  no  direct  radio  connection  between  the  Great  Lakes  and  the  Pacific 
Coast. 

Of  the  above  stations  nineteen  on  the  East  coast  and  Great  Lakes  are  oper- 
ated by  the  Canadian  Marconi  Company  under  contract  with  the  department, 
and  the  balance  of  thirty-five  on  the  East  and  West  coasts  and  Hudson  hay  and 
strait  are  operated  directly  by  the  department. 

The  primary  aim  of  the  coast  station  organization  is  to  provide  radio  facili- 
ties whereby  any  ship  within  500  miles  of  the  Canadian  coast  can  establish  instant 
touch  with  the  shore.  Constant  watch,  24  hours  a  day,  365  days  a  year,  is  main- 
tained at  practically  all  of  the  stations,  which  during  the  year  handled  a  total 
of  8,942,945  words. 

RADIOTELEGRAPH  AIDS  TO   NAVIGATION   BROADCASTS 

Twice  daily,  at  advertised  hours,  eight  stations  on  the  East  coast,  seven  on 
the  Great  Lakes  and  one  on  the  West  coast  broadcast  information  to  navigators 
covering  weather  forecasts,  position  and  nature  of  dangers  to  navigation,  etc. 
In  addition,  urgent  information,  such  as  hurricane  warnings,  etc.,  is  broadcast 
immediately  upon  receipt. 

Details  of  the  times  of  transmissions,  call  signals,  wave-lengths,  etc.,  are 
given  in  the  current  Notice  to  Mariners  in  this  reference. 

RADIOTELEPHONE  AIDS  TO  NAVIGATION  BROADCASTS 

A  radiotelephone  service  to  fishermen  has  been  inaugurated  on  the  East 
coast. 

Three  stations  are  used  for  this  purpose:  Louisburg  (VAS),  Halifax  Light- 
ship (VCX),  and  St.  John,  N.B.  (CFBO).  Louisburg,  using  a  4,000  watt  radio- 
telephone transmitter,  braodcasts  on  434.8  metres  at  3  a.m.  and  12  noon,  E.S.T., 
daily,  a  message  to  fishermen  which  includes  weather  forecasts,  storm  warnings 
and  a  synopsis  of  information  in  regard  to  the  market  prices  of  fish,  the  amount  of 
bait  on  hand  at  various  points,  and  any  other  outstanding  items  of  interest  to 
fishermen  generally. 

The  power  used  by  this  station  enables  fishermen  to  receive  these  messages 
as  far  East  as  the  Grand  Banks. 

The  Halifax  Lightship  Station  broadcasts  on  434.8  metres  at  7  a.m.  and 
12.30  p.m.,  E.S.T.,  daily,  and  transmitts  the  same  message  as  Louisburg,  it  has 
a  range  of  approximately  150  miles. 

Station  CFBO,  St.  John,  broadcasts  weather  forecasts  and  storm  warnings  to 
fishermen  in  the  Bay  of  Fundy  on  337.1  metres  at  5  a.m.  and  7  a.m.,  E.S.T., 
daily. 

This  service  will  be  augmented  during  the  summer  of  1929  by  the  C.G.S. 
Anas  (CGFD)  which  will  accompany  the  fishing  fleet  and  broadcast  by  radio- 
telephone on  434.8  metres  storm  warnings  and  weather  forecasts  at  6  a.m., 
E.S.T.,  daily  and  a  message  to  fishermen  the  same  as  that  of  Louisburg  at  1.30 
p.m.,  E.S.T.,  daily  and  will  have  a  range  of  approximately  150  miles. 

The  transmission  from  this  network  of  stations  provides  reception  at  any 
point  along  the  Atlantic  seaboard  as  well  as  on  the  banks  fished  by  Canadian 
vessels. 

88174-11 


162  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

TIME   SIGNALS 

East  Coast 

Chebucto  Head. — Daily,  except  Sunday,  at  2  p.m.,  G.M.T.,  on  600  metres. 
The  inclusion  of  the  long  distance  Radiotelegraph  Station  at  Louisburg  in 
the  time  signal  organization  is  contemplated. 

West  Coast 

Gonzales  Hill. — Twice  daily  at  10  a.m.,  and  7  p.m.,  P.S.T.,  on  900  metres. 
Estevan — Twice  daily  at  10  a.m.,  and  7  p.m.,  P.S.T.,  on  600  metres. 

SPRING  PATROL,   CABOT   STRAITS,   GULF  OF   ST.   LAWRENCE 

The  patrol  service  maintained  in  the  Cabot  straits  at  the  opening  of  navi- 
gation was  undertaken  this  year  by  the  ice-breakers  Mikula  and  Montcalm  and 
commenced  on  April  14. 

The  patrol  ships  cruise  in  the  vicinity  of  Cabot  straits  observing  the  ice 
condition0  and  the  senior  ship,  every  few  hours,  obtains  from  all  incoming  and 
outgoing  ships,  and  from  all  radio  and  signal  stations,  a  detailed  report  on  the 
ice  conditions  in  the  different  areas.  These,  in  conjunction  with  her  own  obser- 
vations are  complied  and  analyzed,  and  based  thereon,  a  broadcast  message, 
containing  a  synopsis  of  location  and  drift  of  the  ice,  together  with  recommenda- 
tions as  to  the  best  route  for  ships  to  follow,  is  broadcast  four  times  daily  from 
the  patrol  ship,  using  the  general  call  sign  VCQP. 

The  coast  Radio  Stations  at  North  Sydney  (VCO)  and  Grindstone  (VCN) 
copy  this  message  and  are  prepared  to  pass  the  same  to  ships  requesting  it. 

In  addition,  the  following  stations  broadcast  a  brief  summary  of  the  above 
mentioned  message: — 

Station  G.M.T.  Wavelength 

Louisburg— VAS 0400  2,800  C.W. 

1600 
Cape  Race— VCE 02-15  600  Spk. 

14-15 

Every  vessel  spoken  is  advised  of  the  location  and  nature  of  the  ice  she  may 
expect  to  encounter  on  her  particular  course,  and  the  best  route  to  follow. 
The  total  number  of  words  handled  by  the  patrol  this  year  was: — 

Mikula    32,246 

Montcalm   7,348 

39,594 

The  patrol  was  discontinued  on  May  21,  1929. 

RADIO  DIRECTION  FINDING 

Eight  Direction  Finding  Stations,  seven  on  the  East  coast  and  one  on  the 
West  coast,  were  operated  throughout  the  year.  These  stations  maintain  "con- 
stant watch"  and  give  bearing  to  any  ships,  fitted  with  radio,  free  of  charge. 

The  Canadian  Direction  Finding  Stations  continue  to  enjoy  a  good  repu- 
tation for  efficiency  and  accuracy,  many  comments  on  the  same  having  been 
received  from  navigators. 

The  number  of  bearings  given  by  the  station  varies  from  month  to  month, 
being  dependent  on  weather  conditions.  The  average  number  continues  to 
increase,  and  has  risen  from  2,800  per  month  last  year  to  3,150  per  month  this 
year. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER 


163 


BEARINGS  GIVEN  1928-29 
Station — 

Chebucto  Head,  N.S 7,or,2 

Canso,  N.S 5,232 

Yarmouth,  N.S 9,158 

St.  Paul  Island,  N.S 3,715 

( 'ape  Race,  Nfld 10,  1 22 

St.  John,  N.B 1 , 686 

Pachena  Point,  B.C 8,836 

Belle  Isle,  Nfld 1 ,537 

Total 37, 788 


RADIO  BEACON  SERVICE 


There  are  now  approximately  362  ships  fitted  with  radio  direction  finding 
apparatus  plying  to  and  from  Canadian  ports. 

The  Radio  Beacon  system  of  the  department  comprises  eight  stations, 
located  as  follows: — 


Cape  Bauld,  Nfld. 
Heath  Point  Lightship. 
Cape  Ray,  Nfld. 
Halifax  Lightship. 


Seal  Island,  N.S. 

Lurcher  Lightship. 

South  East  Shoal,  Lake  Erie  (new). 

Race  Rocks,  Vancouver  Island  (new) 


A  new  type  of  beacon  has  been  developed  six  of  which  have  been  delivered 
by  the  Canadian  Marconi  Company,  the  contractors.  The  new  beacons  deliver 
200  watts  power  to  the  antenna  and  have  a  reliable  range  of  approximately  75 
miles.  They  differ  from  the  old  beacon  in  that  they  are  entirely  automatic  in 
their  operation  and  do  not  rely  on  the  fog  alarm  engines  for  their  power  supply. 

The  old  beacons  were  operated  only  during  fog,  whereas  the  new  beacons  are 
operated  once  an  hour,  day  and  night,  and  continuously  during  fog. 

The  control  of  the  apparatus  rests  in  a  master  clock  which  by  making 
electrical  contacts  in  proper  sequence  and  at  regular  intervals  starts  the  engine, 
the  motor  generators,  the  transmitter  itself,  and  governs  the  period  during  which 
the  signals  are  automatically  sent  out  on  the  air.  This  new  beacon,  which  is 
the  result  of  several  years'  experience  in  beacon  operation,  is  now  adopted  as 
standard. 

Direction  finding  apparatus  on  board  ship  is  accepted  as  one  of  the  regular 
aids  to  navigation,  and  an  increase  in  the  number  of  beacon  stations  is  anti- 
cipated. 

For  the  uninitiated  it  might  be  remarked  that  the  difference  between  a 
radio  beacon  and  a  direction  finder  is  in  the  case  of  a  beacon  the  ship  must  be 
fitted  with  direction  finding  apparatus  whereby  she  can  take  her  own  bearings, 
whereas  in  the  case  of  the  direction  finder  ashore  any  ship  fitted  with  radio  can 
secure  her  bearings  from  the  operator  ashore  who  transmits  the  information  back 
to  the  ship  by  radio. 

The  first  one  has  been  installed  and  is  now  in  operation  at  Seal  Island,  N.S., 
and  will  give  service  to  ships  bound  to  and  from  Bay  of  Fundy  and  Nova  Scotia 
ports. 

During  the  coming  fiscal  year  it  is  proposed  to  install  ten  new  beacons,  located 
as  follows: — 


Gulf  of  St.  Lawrence — 

Pointe  des  Monts. 
West  Point  Anticosti. 
Cape  Whittle. 

88174-1!  J 


Great  Lakes — 

Main  Duck. 
Long  Point. 
Michipicoten  Island. 
Cove  Island 


West  Coast— 

Entrance  Island. 
Green  Island. 
Langara. 


164  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

In  addition  to  the  above  facilities,  any  ship  can  obtain  signals  for  the  pur- 
pose of  taking  bearings  from  any  of  the  stations  of  our  Coast  Station  system 
free  of  charge.  Four  thousand  one  hundred  and  thirty-three  requests  for  sig- 
nals for  D/F  purposes  were  handled  by  the  coast  stations  during  the  past  year. 

RADIO   AIDS   TO   NAVIGATION   IN    RELATION   TO    MARINE   INSURANCE 

With  a  view  to  making  Canadian  territorial  waters  safe  for  shipping,  this 
branch  has  developed  a  Radio  Aid  to  Navigation  service  which  has  been 
declared  by  navigators  to  be  unexcelled  elsewhere. 

Originating  from  a  nucleus  of  four  Direction  Finding  Stations,  which  were 
commissioned  during  the  Great  War,  additional  stations  have  been  erected  at 
strategic  points  augmented  by  a  chain  of  Radio  Beacon  Stations  for  the  benefit 
of  ships  carrying  their  own  direction  finding  apparatus. 

A  full  service  is  maintained  at  considerable  expense  to  the  department,  and 
it  is  with  great  pleasure  that  we  quote  an  extract  from  a  Report  of  the  Imperial 
Shipping  Committee  indicating  that  the  value  of  these  radio  aids  has  been  recog- 
nized and  that  no  additional  Insurance  premium  will  be  charged  for  vessels 
calling  at  St.  John,  N.B.,  which  was  hitherto  the  case: — 

5.  The  Canadian  Department  of  Marine  have  supplied  us  with  records  of  (fog  in  the 
Bay  of  Fundy  during  the  past  five  years,  and  have  completed  to  date  the  list  of  the  aids 
to  navigation  which  they  have  installed  in  the  bay  and  its  approaches.  These  tables  will 
be  found  in  Appendices  HI  and  IV. 

It  is  probable  that  the  improved  facilities  which  have  been  provided  for  wireless  direc- 
tion finding,  and  the  fact  that  those  facilities  are  offered  to  shipping  free  of  cost  have  had 
something  to  do  with  the  relative  immunity  from  casualties  which  has  characterized  the 
past  four  years. 

6.  In  view  of  the  foregoing  facts,  the  Joint  Hull  Committee  have  agreed  to  recommend 
to  the  market  that  no  additional  premiums  should  be  charged  for  vessels  calling  at  Saint 
John,  if  properly  fitted  with,  and  equipped  for  the  use  of,  wireless  direction  finding  appar- 
atus. We  are  informed  that  this  recommendation  was  submitted  to  and  confirmed  by  the 
Institute  of  London  Underwriters,  the  Liverpool  Underwriters'  Association  and  Lloyd's 
Underwriters'  Association.  It  has,  therefore,  been  decided  to  add  the  following  note  to  the 
North  America  Agreement  (1929): — 

Note. — No  additional  premium  to  be  charged  for  vessels  calling  at  Saint  John,  New 
Brunswick,  if  properly  fitted  with  and  equipped  for  the  use  of  wireless  direction  finding 
apparatus. 

(N.B.— This  amendment  to  the  Agreement  is  ante-dated  to  the  1st  May,  1929.) 

7.  It  appears  to  us  that  this  is  a  reasonable  settlement  of  the  question.  The  Under- 
writers have  expressed  the  desire  that  the  wireless  stations  situated  in  the  Bay  of  Fundy, 
should  keep  a  record  of  all  vessels  bound  for  or  from  Saint  John,  applying  for  wireless 
directional  instructions,  so  that  statistics  may  be  compiled  and  periodically  published.  If 
the  Canadian  Government  can  see  fit  to  direct  the  compilation  and  publication  of  such 
records,  we  think  that  they  would  prove  of  value  when  questions  arise  in  future  as  to  navi- 
gation in  foggy  waters. 

COMMERCIAL  SHIP  SERVICE 

Each  of  the  regular  thirty  coast  stations  handles  commercial  traffic  to  and 
from  ships  and  in  addition  four  of  the  Direction  Finding  Stations — Belle  Isle, 
Yarmouth,  Chebucto  Head,  and  St.  John — combine  commercial  service  with  their 
direction  finding  work. 

Long-distance  service  to  ships  on  the  Atlantic  is  provided  by  the  licensed 
station  at  Louisburg,  N.S.,  owned  and  operated  by  the  Canadian  Marconi  Com- 
pany, and  on  the  Pacific  by  the  departmental  station  at  Estevan,  Vancouver 
Island.  The  traffic  returns  from  these  stations  indicate  that  the  route  of  com- 
mercial traffic  continues  to  shift  from  the  low  power  short  wave  coast  stations 
to  the  high  power  long  wave  stations. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  M  j 

RADIOTELEPHONE    SERVICE   TO   SMALL   CRAFT   ON    THK    PACIFIC    COAST 

The  radiotelephone  system  has  completed  another  year's  work  and  is  being 
used  to  a  gratifying  exent.  The  shore  telephone  stations  are  located  at  Van- 
couver  (Merchants'  Exchange),  Merry  Island,  Alert  Bay,  and  Cape  Laso. 

In  addition  the  four  life-saving  radio  telephone  stations  on  the  weai  coari 
of  Vancouver  island  at  Banfield,  Cape  Beale,  Pachena  Point  and  Carmanah 
are  available  for  this  service.  Approximately  forty-nine  tugs  and  other  -mall 
craft  are  now  equipped  with  radiophone  apparatus.  The  sets  in  these  boats  aw 
operated  by  the  captain  or  engineer  and  most  of  them  are  installed  by  an 
operating  company  on  a  rental  basis  which  includes  service.  The  number  of 
paid  radio  telephone  calls  handled  numbered  12,540. 

ship's  emergency  apparatus 

The  department  has  in  effect  an  arrangement  whereby  its  coast  stations 
call  upon  Canadian  and  certain  British  ships  to  operate  their  emergency 
apparatus  whilst  at  sea,  in  order  to  check  their  efficiency. 

NUMBER  OF  SHIPS  EXERCISED  1928-29 

Total 381 

Failures Nil 

Average  time  taken  to  change  over 11-08  sees. 

Time  allowed 30       sees. 

TRAFFIC  SECTION 

This  section  of  the  Radio  Branch  handles  the  preparation,  rendering  and 
collection  of  accounts  for  commercial  ship  to  shore  and  inter-station  messages 
handled  by  the  departmental  ships  and  stations  and  the  auditing,  rendering  and 
collection  of  international  accounts  to  various  operating  companies  and  foreign 
administrations  for  radiotelegrams  exchanged  by  foreign  ships  through  Canadian 
coast  stations  and  by  Canadian  ships  through  foreign  coast  stations. 

The  number  of  accounts  handled  by  the  branch  was  150,000  representing 
$188,000  in  tolls. 

MESSAGES  HANDLED  BY  THE  COAST  STATION  SERVICES 

The  total  number  of  messages  and  words  handled  during  the  year  ending 
March  31,  1929  (including  retransmissions)  was  as  follows: — 




Messages 

Words 

East  Coast 

178,465 
35,144 

219,170 
23,460 

3,268,485 

Great  Lakes 

500,739 

West  Coast 

4,284,775 

Hudson  Bay  and  Strait 

888,946 

456,239 

8,942,945 

The  business  handled  by  the  East  Coast  system  (operated  partly  by  the 
Canadian  Marconi  Company  under  contract  and  partly  by  the  department) 
shows  an  increase  of  22,355  messages  with  an  increase  of  492,742  words. 

The  Great  Lakes  System  (operated  directly  by  the  Canadian  Marconi 
Company  under  contract)  shows  an  increase  of  2,298  messages  with  an  increase 
of  22,157  words. 

The  West  Coast  system  (operated  by  the  department)  shows  an  increase  of 
13,404  messages  with  an  increase  of  220,013  words. 


166  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

The  Hudson  Bay  and  Strait  system   (operated  by  the  department)  shows 
an  increase  of  14,038  messages  with  an  increase  of  512,276  words. 
•     Total  increase  52,095  messages,  1,247,188  words. 

REVENUE 

The  net  radio  revenue  accruing  to  the  Radio  Branch  from  all  sources  during 
the  year  amounted  to  $352,178.43  against  $316,582.74  in  1927-28  an  increase  of 
$35,595.69.     This  revenue  is  apportioned  as  follows: — 

Traffic  Revenue— 

East  Coast $      7, 555  88 

Great  Lakes 1,067  27 

West  Coast 66,339  42 

Hudson  Bay  and  Strait 4, 605  31 

$    79,567  88 

Other  Revenue — 

Licence  fees 272,249  55 

Examination  fees 361  00 

272,610  55 

$  352, 178  43 

The  East  Coast  traffic  shows  an  increase  of  $1,056.44,  the  Great  Lakes  an 
increase  of  $285.13  and  the  West  Coast  an  increase  of  $7,210.26.  Total  traffic 
revenue  increase  $13,157.14. 

The  license  fees  show  an  increase  of  $22,562.55  and  the  examination  fees  a 
decrease  of  $124  or  a  net  "  other  revenue  "  increase  of  $22,438.55. 

INSPECTIONS 

The  administration  of  the  Radiotelegraph  Act  has  been  carried  on  as 
usual  and  no  evasions  or  attempted  evasions  of  section  7  of  the  Act  (Revised 
Statutes  of  Canada  1929,  chapter  195),  calling  for  compulsory  equipment  of 
radiotelegraph  apparatus  on  board  passenger  steamers,  have  been  reported. 

Permanent  inspection  establishments  are  now  maintained  at  Victoria,  Van- 
couver, Winnipeg,  Calgary,  Regina,  Toronto,  Hamilton,  London,  Kitchener, 
Ottawa,  Halifax,  Montreal,  Quebec,  and  St.  John. 

Inspectors,  in  addition  to  inspecting  all  ships  and  licensed  stations  in  their 
district,  also  undertake  the  examination  of  operators  for  Certificates  of  Profi- 
ciency. All  land  stations  are  inspected  at  least  once  a  year,  and  all  ships  when 
they  visit  Canadian  ports.  Supervision  of  broadcasting  comes  under  their 
jurisdiction  and  now  comprises  a  considerable  part  of  their  duties. 

The  policy  of  utilizing  the  services  of  qualified  radio  operators  as  "  part 
time  "  inspectors  to  look  after  small  localities  or  areas  and  to  assist  permanent 
inspectors  in  the  larger  centres  continues  to  prove  satisfactory.  These  "  part 
time  "  inspectors  are  paid  a  nominal  salary  of  $15  to  $30  per  month,  and  are 
located  at  the  following  points: — 

Nova  Scotia. — Halifax  (Dartmouth),  (vacant),  Glace  Bay,  and  Sydney, 
N.S.,  and  district. 

Prince  Edward  Island. — Charlottetown  and  Summerside. 

New  Brunswick. — St.  John,  Moncton  and  Fredericton,  N.B. 

Quebec. — Montreal,  St.  Lambert,  Quebec  (vacant),  Sherbrooke  (vacant), 
and  Three  Rivers. 

Ontario. — Brantford,  Fort  William,  Port  Arthur,  Hamilton,  Kingston,  Peter- 
borough, Sarnia,  Toronto  (2),  Windsor,  Chatham,  North  Bay  (vacant),  Sault 
Ste.  Marie,  Kenora-Keewatin,  Oshawa,  St.  Catharines  (vacant),  Niagara  FaMs 
(vacant),  and  Gananoque  (vacant). 

Manitoba. — Brandon  and  Winnipeg. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  167 

Saskatchewan. — Moose  Jaw  (vacant),  Saskatoon,  and   Prince  Albeit. 
Alberta. — Calgary,  Edmonton  (vacant),  and  Lethbridge. 
British   Columbia. — Vancouver,   Kamloops    (vacant),    and    Prince    Rupert 
(vacant). 

Yukon. — Dawson. 

The  number  of  inspections  carried  out  during  the  fiscal  year  was: — 

Coast  and  land  stations I  HI 

Ship  stations 2 ,  239 

Amateur  experimental  and  private  receiving  stations 20, 205 

Total 22, 590 


EXAMINATIONS  FOR  CERTIFICATE  OF  PROFICIENCY  IN  RADIOTELEGRAPH Y 

Protection  for  the  safety  of  life  at  sea  demands  the  employment  of  compe- 
tent operators  on  ship  and  at  shore  stations,  while  interference  problems  necessi- 
tate a  similar  requirement  in  the  case  of  amateur  and  land  stations.  To  secure 
this  the  radio  regulations  provide  that  all  operators  must  satisfy  the  minister 
as  to  their  ability  to  operate  the  class  of  station  on  which  they  are  working.  In 
the  more  important  classes  of  service  the  operators  must  be  the  holders  of  first, 
second  or  other  prescribed  class  of  certificate,  while  in  the  case  of  stations  of 
lesser  importance,  not  likely  to  become  a  source  of  interference,  the  operators 
must  satisfy  a  radio  inspector  that  they  are  capable  of  handling  their  equipment 
in  an  efficient  manner. 

One  hundred  and  forty-one  operators  were  examined  for  Commercial  Cer- 
tificate of  Proficiency  in  Radio  during  the  year,  including  fifty-four  re-examina- 
tions; eighty- four  candidates  were  successful  and  fifty-seven  failed.  Forty-eight 
holders  of  certificates  were  examined  on  additional  types  of  equipment;  forty- 
three  were  successful  and  five  failed. 

One  hundred  and  one  candidates  for  Amateur  Radio  Certificates  were  also 
examined,  of  whom  one  hundred  were  successful  and  one  failed. 

Two  thousand  two  hundred  and  ninety-six  Certificates  of  Proficiency  in 
Radio  have  been  issued  by  the  department  up  to  the  end  of  March,  1929. 

FEES  FOR  EXAMINATIONS 

1.  Extra  First  Class  Certificate $5  00 

2.  First  Class  Certificate 2  50 

3.  Second  Class  Certificate 1  00 

4.  Third  Class  Certificate 1  00 

5.  Experimental  Certificate 2  50 

6.  Amateur  Certificate 0  50 

7.  Emergency  Certificate,  any  class 5  00 

8.  Radiotelephone  Certificate 2  50 


RADIO  BROADCASTING 

Radio  broadcast  reception  on  the  whole  showed  a  slight  improvement  over 
the  signal  level  which  prevailed  during  the  year  1927-28,  especially  during  the 
winter  months.    Eighty-nine  broadcasting  stations  were  licensed  during  the  year. 

Active  stations 71 

Phantom  stations 14 

Inactive  stations 4 


(A  phantom  license  is  one  which  authorizes  the  licensee  to  use  the  appara- 
tus of  an  existing  station  under  a  special  call  sign.) 


168  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

The  total  number  of  licences  issued  for  receiving  sets  was  297,398,  an  increase 
of  28,978,  and  the  net  revenue  from  broadcasting  licence  fees,  after  deducting 
commissions  to  radio  dealers,  and  to  the  Post  Office  Department  for  the  sale  of 
licences,  and  the  subsidy  of  $9,413.50  for  station  CKY,  Winnipeg  (50  cents  in 
respect  of  each  licence  issued  in  Manitoba),  amounted  to  $266,307.05. 

BROADCASTING   WAVELENGTH    NEGOTIATIONS   WITH    THE   UNITED   STATES 

The  negotiations  entered  into  with  the  United  States  Government  in  Feb- 
ruary, 1927,  with  a  view  to  formal  division  of  the  broadcast  channels  between 
Canada  and  the  United  States  on  a  equitable  and  mutually  satisfactory  basis 
having  failed,  there  has  been  no  change  in  the  frequencies  used  by  Canadian 
stations  which  are  as  follows: — 

Used    conjointly    ivith    Stations    in       Used  exclusively  by  Canada — 
United  States — 

1210  K/C— 247-9  M  1030  K/C— 291-3  M 

•1200  K/C— 250      M  960  K/C— 312-5  M 

1120  K/C— 267-9  M  910  K/C— 329-7  M 

1010  K/C— 297      M  840  K/C— 357-1  M 

930  K/C— 322-6  M  730  K/C— 411-0  M 

890  K/C— 337-1  M  690  K/C— 434-8  M 
880  K/C— 340-9  M 
780  K/C— 384-6  M 
630  K/C— 476-2  M 
600  K/C— 500  M 
580  K/C— 517-2  M 

*   (Amateur) 

A  formal  communication  from  the  Department  to  the  International  Bureau 
at  Berne  in  regard  to  the  matter  was  circulated  at  our  request  by  the  Bureau  to 
all  nations  on  February  1,  1929.    It  reads  as  follows: — 

The  question  of  the  division  of  frequencies  in  the  broadcast  band  between  the  broad- 
casting stations  in  the  North  America  area  has  been  the  subject  of  negotiation  between  the 
interested  countries,  but,  so  far,  no  agreement  has  been  reached.  The  International  Radio- 
telegraph Convention  of  Washington,  1927,  becomes  effective  on  January  1,  1929,  and  in 
submitting  Canada's  list  of  broadcasting  stations  for  publication  in  the  Official  List,  in 
accordance  with  the  provisions  of  the  Convention,  the  Canadian  administration  has  refrained 
from  notifying  the  temporary  and  inadequate  assignment  on  which  its  broadcasting  stations 
are  now  operating  and  desires  it  to  be  understood  that,  pending  the  consummation  of  am 
agreement  between  the  administrations  in  the  North  America  area  in  regard  to  broadcasting, 
the  Canadian  administration  in  no  way  waives  the  right  it  considers  it  enjoys  under  the 
International  Radio  Convention  in  regard  to  the  use  of  a  reasonable  proportion  of  the  broad- 
cast frequencies  available  in  the  above  mentioned  area. 

COMMERCIAL  ACTIVITIES 

Imperial  Communication 

In  pursuance  of  the  recommendation  of  the  Imperial  Wireless  and  Cable 
Conference  held  in  London  in  February,  1928,  at  which  the  Dominion  of  Canada 
was  represented  by  Sir  Campbell  Stuart,  K.B.E.,  assisted  by  J.  L.  Gaboury, 
Deputy  Postmaster  General,  representing  the  Post  Office  Department  and  C.  P. 
Edwards,  Director  of  Radio,  representing  the  Department  of  Marine,  a  Merger 
Company  was  formed  for  the  purpose  of  acquiring  the  stock  of  the  cable  and 
wireless  companies  concerned.  A  Communications  Company  was  also  formed  to 
acquire  all  the  communication  assets  of  these  companies  also  certain  Government 
cables  and  a  lease  of  the  Wireless  Beam  stations  owned  by  the  British  Govern- 
ment. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  169 

The  transfer  of  the  Pacific  Cable  Board  undertaking  in  which  Canada  held 
;i  share,  is  dealt  with  in  the  Imperial  Telegraphs  Act  (Great  Britain)  1928.  This 
Act  received  the  royal  assent  on  February  5,  1929,  it  authorized  the  Pacific 
Cable  Board  with  the  consent  of  and  on  terms  approved  by  .-ill  the  partner 
Governments,  to  sell  to  the  Communications  Company,  the  Pacific  Gable  under- 
taking and  the  West  Indies  Cable  undertaking. 

Suitable  legislation  to  give  authority  for  the  sale  of  Canada's  share  in  these 
undertakings  is  to  be  brought  down  in  the  Dominion  Parliament  before  the  end 
of  this  session,  and  under  the  settlement  it  is  anticipated  that  there  will  be 
returned  to  Canada  in  cash  an  amount  substantially  equivalent  to  her  outlay  on 
the  Pacific  Cable  during  the  twenty-five  years  of  Government  control. 

Transatlantic 

The  Marconi  Beam  Service  between  Drummondville,  P.Q.,  and  Bodmin, 
England,  which  was  inaugurated  on  October  25,  1926,  continues  in  permanent 
operation.     The  rates  in  effect  via  this  circuit  are  as  follows: — 

CANADA  EASTERN  ZONE  TO  GREAT  BRITAIN  AND  IRELAND 

Fully  paid  messages 18c.  per  word. 

Deferred  messages 8c.  per  word. 

Nightletter  messages $1.00  for  25  words  or  less  and  4c.  for  each  extra  word. 

Week-end  letter  messages 75c.  for  25  words  or  less  and  3c.  for  each  extra  word. 

Post  letter  messages 60c.  for  20  words  or  less  and  3c.  for  each  extra  word. 

Transpacific 

The  Marconi  Beam  Service  between  Drummondville,  P.Q.,  and  Ballan, 
Victoria,  Australia,  which  was  inaugurated  on  June  16,  1928,  continues  in 
permanent  operation.     The  rates  in  effect  via  this  circuit  are  as  follows: — 

CANADA  TO  AUSTRALIA 

Fully  paid  messages 35c.  per  word. 

Deferred  messages 17fc.  per  word. 

Nightletter  messages $2.70  for  20  words  or  less  and  13|c.  for  each  extra  word. 

Week-end  letters $2.10  for  20  words  or  less  and  10^c.  for  each  extra  word. 

COMMUNICATION  WITH  ISOLATED  POINTS 

The  utility  of  radio  as  a  means  of  communication  writh  isolated  points  not 
reached  by  telegraph  or  telephone  lines  is  now  fully  appreciated  by  private 
enterprise,  during  the  year  thirty-one  licences  were  issued  to  companies  and 
private  individuals  for  stations  of  this  class.  Thirty-six  licences  were  also 
issued  to  public  utilities  and  power  companies  for  the  establishment  of  radio 
stations  at  their  power  plants  and  distribution  centres  for  emergency  com- 
munication in  case  of  interruption  of  the  normal  telegraph  or  telephone  com- 
munications. 

WORK  UNDERTAKEN  ON  BEHALF  OF  OTHER  DEPARTMENTS  OF  THE  GOVERNMENT 

Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police 

Prior  to  sailing  on  an  extended  cruise  to  the  Western  Arctic  the  R.C.M.P. 
auxi'liary^  schooner  St.  Roch  was  fitted  with  long  and  short  wave  transmitting 
and  receiving  apparatus  in  order  to  maintain  contact  with  its  headquarters. 

An  operator  from  this  branch  was  detailed  as  special  officer  in  charge  of  the 
radio  equipment. 

Department  of  Railways  and  Canals 

The  station  at  Port  Nelson  operated  by  this  branch  on  behalf  of  the  Depart- 
ment of  Railways  and  Canals  in  connection  with  the  construction  of  the  Hudson 
Bay  Railway  was  closed  on  November  25,  1928. 


170  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

On  May  1,  1928,  a  station  situated  at  mile  356  Hudson  Bay  Railway,  was 
opened  to  maintain  constant  communication  with  the  station  at  Port  Churchill. 

This  station  is  used  in  connection  with  the  development  of  the  Hudson  Bay 
route  and  was  built  and  is  manned  by  personnel  of  this  branch. 

Two  eighty-foot  steel  masts  were  erected  and  a  standard  100  watt  C.W. 
Marconi  transmitting  set,  together  with  a  2  K.W.  polar  automatic  generating 
plant,  was  installed. 

The  radio  equipment  of  the  steamer  Larch  (supply  ship),  the  dredges 
Churchill  Nos.  1  and  2,  the  tug  Dainty  and  the  hopper  barge  Chesterfield  en- 
gaged in  connection  with  the  construction  of  Port  Churchill  harbour  works,  is 
mainlined  and  operated  by  personnel  of  the  Radio  Branch. 

Department  of  Public  Works 

The  Radio  equipment  of  the  cable  ship  Tyrian  is  maintained  and  operated 
by  members  of  this  branch. 

Department  of  Fisheries 

The  radio  installations  of  the  Fisheries  patrol  steamers  Givenchy  and 
Malaspina  on  the  West  coast  and  Arras  and  Arleux  on  the  East  coast  are  main- 
tained and  operated  by  this  branch. 

Department  of  National  Revenue 

Acting  on  behalf  of  the  Customs  Preventive  Service,  this  branch  operates 
and  maintains  the  radio  equipment  of  the  Customs  cruisers  Baroff,  Bayhound, 
Constance,  Margaret,  Vigilant  and  Pathfinder. 

Other  Departments  of  Canadian  Government  Operating  Stations 

The  Department  of  National  Defence. — The  Royal  Canadian  Corps  of 
Signals  of  the  above  Department  operates,  in  addition  to  its  purely  military 
activities,  stations  on  behalf  of  the  following  Departments  and  civil  activities  of 
the  Department  of  National  Defence: 

Interior  Department  (N.W.T.  and  Yujion  Branch). — Seven  Permanent 
stations  and  one  Summer  station  situated  along  the  McKenzie  river  and  in  the 
Yukon  Territory. 

National  Defence  Civil  Government  Air  Operations. — Nine  Permanent  and 
five  Summer  stations  in  connection  with  its  forestry  and  other  air  activities. 

National  Defence  Civil  Aviation  Branch. — One  Permanent  station  situated 
at  St.  Hubert  Airport,  Montreal. 

RADIO   (SHORT  WAVE)   CONFERENCE  HELD  IN  OTTAWA,  JANUARY  21,  1929,  TO  JANUARY 

25,  1929 

The  conference  was  a  reassembly  of  the  adjourned  Washington  Conference 
held  in  August,  1928,  and  was  called  for  the  purpose  of  dealing  with  the  "  con- 
tinental" or  "intermediate  band  of  radio  channels"  (1500  to  6000  K/C)  (200 
to  50  metres),  stations  which  only  work  a  limited  distance,  and,  generally 
speaking,  would  not  be  subject  to  interference  from  stations  located  on  another 
continent,  such  as  Europe. 

The  nations  invited  to  attend  were  the  United  States,  Mexico,  Cuba  and 
Newfoundland,  all  of  which,  with  the  exception  of  Mexico,  sent  representatives. 
The  conference  resulted  in  the  following  agreement: — 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  171 

AN     AGREEMENT    BETWEEN     UNITED    STATES,     CANADA,     NEWFOUNDLAD,     AND     CUBA 

RELATIVE    TO   THE   ASSIGNMENT    OF    FREQUENCIES    ON    THE    NORTH     AMERICAN 
CONTINENT. 

(1)  The  sovereign  right  of  all  nations  to  the  use  of  every  radio  channel  Is 
recognized. 

Nevertheless,  until  technical  development  progresses  to  the  stage  where 
radio  interference  can  be  eliminated,  it  is  agreed  that  special  administrative 
arrangements  are  essential  in  order  to  promote  standardization  and  to  minimize 
radio  interference. 

(2)  The  Governments  agree  that  each  country  shall  he  free  to  assign  any 
frequency  to  any  radio  station  within  its  jurisdiction  upon  the  sole  condition  thai 
no  interference  with  any  service  of  another  country  will  result  therefrom. 

(3)  It  is  agreed  that  each  Government  shall  use  Appendix  I  attached  hereto. 
as  a  general  guide  in  allocating  channels  to  the  various  services  specified  therein. 

(4)  Channels  are  divided  into  two  classes  (1)  common  channels  which  are 
primarily  assigned  to  particular  services  in  all  countries,  and  (2)  general  com- 
munication channels  which  are  assigned  for  use  in  specific  areas. 

(5)  With  regard  to  the  general  communication  channels,  it  is  considered  that 
at  the  present  stage  of  the  art,  the  use  of  radio  channels  below  3500  K/C  will 
not  normally  cause  interference  at  distances  greater  than  1,000  miles  and  such 
channels  may,  therefore,  be  used  with  freedom  from  interference  by  stations 
separated  by  such  distance.  It  is  further  recognized  that  stations  operating  on 
frequencies  above  3500  K/C  may  become  sources  of  interference  at  distances  in 
excess  of  1,000  miles,  particularly  at  night. 

(6)  The  Governments  agree  to  take  advantage  of  the  physical  facts  just 
explained,  and  by  suitable  geographical  distribution  of  these  two  classes  of 
channels  throughout  North  America  and  the  West  Indies,  to  make  available  for 
general  communication  services,  the  total  number  of  channels  set  forth  in 
Appendix  2  attached  hereto. 

(7)  Each  Government  shall  have  the  right  to  assign  to  stations  under  its 
jurisdiction,  in  the  manner  it  deems  best,  such  general  communication  channels 
as  are  allocated  to  that  Government  under  this  agreement,  as  set  forth  in  Appen- 
dix No.  2.  The  Governments  agree  not  to  assign  to  stations  within  their 
respective  jurisdiction  any  of  the  general  communication  channels  allocated  to 
other  Governments,  unless  it  can  be  accomplished  without  causing  interference. 

(8)  The  marine  calling  frequency  of  5525  K/C  shall  be  used  until  super- 
seded by  an  international  assignment. 

(9)  In  addition  to  the  frequencies  assigned  specially  for  experiments  (1604, 
2398  and  4596  K/C)  the  Governments  agree  that  experimentation  by  particu- 
larly qualified  experimenters,  may  be  authorized  on  any  other  channel  provided 
no  interference  is  caused  with  established  services,  as  provided  in  Regulation 
No.  11  of  the  International  Radio  Convention  of  Washington,  1927. 

(10)  The  Governments  agree  to  adopt  a  radio  frequency  standard  based  on 
the  unit  of  time,  and  to  compare  at  least  once  every  six  months,  the  actual  radio 
frequency  measuring  standards. 

(11)  The  Governments  agree  to  require  all  stations,  other  than  mobile  and 
amateur  stations,  under  their  jurisdiction,  to  tune  their  transmitters  with  an 
accuracy  of  0-025  per  cent,  or  better,  of  their  national  frequency  standard. 

(12)  The  Governments  agree  to  require  all  stations  likely  to  cause  inter- 
national interference,  other  than  mobile  and  amateur  stations,  to  maintain  their 
frequency  with  an  accuracy  of  0-05  per  cent,  or  better,  at  all  times. 


172  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

(13)  For  the  purpose  of  this  agreement  a  channel  shall  be  regarded  as  a 
band  of  frequencies  the  width  of  which  varies  with  its  position  in  the  range  of 
frequencies  under  consideration,  but  which  progresses  numerically  from  the  lower 
to  the  higher  frequencies,  as  shown  in  the  following  table: — 

Frequency  (K/C).  Channel  Width  (K/C). 

1500-2198 4 

2200-3313 6 

3316-4400 8 

4405-5490 10 

5495-6000 15 

(14)  The  Governments  agree  to  adopt  for  the  present  in  their  national 
plan  of  allocation  a  separation  of  0-2  per  cent  between  radio  frequency  chan- 
nels; and  to  permit  stations  under  their  respective  jurisdiction  to  occupy  the 
assigned  frequency  and  the  adjacent  frequencies  to  the  limit  permitted  by  the 
frequency  maintenance  tolerances  and  necessitated  by  the  type  of  emission  the 
station  may  be  authorized  to  use.  For  commercial  telephony  a  band  width 
of  six  kilocycles  shall  be  permitted.  For  the  present,  a  100  kilocycle  band  width 
shall  be  considered  standard  for  television. 

(15)  The  Governments  agree  to  require  stations  under  their  jurisdiction 
to  use  transmitters  which  are  as  free  as  practicable  from  all  emissions  (such 
as  those  due  to  harmonics,  decrement,  spacing  waves,  frequency  modulation, 
key  clicks,  type  of  keying,  mush,  etc.)  not  essential  to  the  type  of  communication 
being  carried  on  and  which  would  be  detrimental  to  communication  being  carried 
on  by  stations  in  other  countries. 

(16)  Appendices  numbers  1  and  2,  together  with  the  chart  showing 
graphically  the  distribution  of  the  frequencies,  which  are  attached  hereto,  shall 
constitute  a  part  of  this  agreement. 

(17)  This  agreement  shall  go  into  effect  on  March  1,  1929,  and  shall  remain 
in  force  until  January  1,  1932,  and  thereafter  for  an  indeterminate  period  and 
until  one  year  from  the  day  on  which  a  denunciation  thereof  shall  have  been 
made  by  any  one  of  the  contracting  parties. 


REPORT  OF* THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  173 

NORTH    AMERICAN    RADIO    CONFERENCE,    1929 

Appendix  No.  1 
ALLOCATION  OF  CHANNELS  TO  SERVICES  (ARRANGED  IN  ORDER  OF  KII  <><   YCLBB) 


Channels1 

Service 

NuinlxT 

of 

(  luinnels 

1504  to  1600 

Maritime  Mobile  Services(2) 

25 

12 

16 

72 

50 

16 

17 

12 

6 

16 

8 

16 

34 

9 

9 

8 

7 

40 

11 

62 

13 

12 

60 

5 

70 

13 

20 

1600  to  1648 

Air  Mobile  Services  (3) 

1648  to  1712 

Mobile  Services 

1712  to  2000 

Amateurs 

2000  to  2200 

Experimental  Visual  Broadcasting 

2200  to  2296 

General  Communication  Services  (4) 

(32) 

2296  to  2398 

Maritime  and  Air  Mobile  Services  (3) 

2398  to  2470 

Mobile  Services 

2470  to  2506 

Air  Mobile  Services 

2506  to  2602 

Maritime  Mobile  Services 

2602  to  2650 

Air  Mobile  Services 

2650  to  2746 

Maritime  and  Air  Mobile  Services 

2746  to  2950 

Experimental  Visual  Broadcasting 

2950  to  3004 

Maritime  and  Air  Mobile  Services 

3004  to  3058 

General  Communication  Services  (4) 

(18) 

3058  to  3106 

Air  Mobile  Services 

3106  to  3 148... 

Maritime  Mobile  Services 

3148  to  3412 

General  Communication  Services (4) 

(80) 

3412  to  3500 

Maritime  and  Air  Mobile  Services 

3500  to  3996 

Amateurs 

3996  to  4100 

General  Communication  Services  (4) 

4100  to  4196 

Maritime  and  Air  Mobile  Services 

4196  to  4745 

General  Communication  Services  (4) 

4745  to  4795 

Maritime  and  Air  Mobile  Services(3) 

4795  to  5495 

General  Communication  Services  (4) 

5495  to  5690 

5690  to  6000 

General  Communication  Services(4) 

(6) 

639 

(704) 

Notes 

0)  The  last  channel  in  each  group  is  assigned  to  the  service  indicated  immediately  abreast  the  group 

except  as  specially  noted  to  the  contrary. 
(2)  The  channel  1600  Kc/s  is  assigned  to  Mobile  Services. 
(*)  The  channels  1604,  2398  and  4795  Kc/s  are  assigned  to  Experimental  Services. 

(4)  For  details  regarding  General  Communication  Services,  see  Appendix  II. 

(5)  Taking  into  account  Articles  5  and  6  of  the  Agreement,  this  total  is  increased  by  65. 


174  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

DISTRIBUTION  OF  GENERAL  COMMUNICATION  CHANNELS 

United  States 

oir4  4260  5015 

3160  4268  5025 

ojee  4276  5035 

3172  4284  5045 

3J78  4292  5055 

3184  4300  5065 

3I9O  4308  5075 

3232  4316  5085 

3238  4364  5095 

3244  4372  5105 

3250  4380  5115 

3256  4388  5125 

3262  4396  5135 

3268  4405  5145 

3274  4415  5155 

3280  4425         *  5165 

3286  \?A  5 185 

S  4  ™5 

33°4  ffll  gg 

IS  SS  ii 

3324  4565  5235 

3332  4575  5245 

3340  4585  5255 

His  4595  5265 

3356  4605  5275 

3364  4615  5285 

337I  4625  5295 

3380  4635  5305 

3388  4645  5315 

3396  4655  5325 

3404  4665  5335 

3412  4675  5345 

4012  4685  5355 

4020  4695  5365 

4028  4705  5855 

4036  4715  5870 

4044  4725  5885 

4052  4735  5900 

4060  4745  5915 

J068  4925  5930 

4076  4935  5945 

1584  4945  5960 

4092  4955  5975 

4100  4965  5990 

4204  4975  

4236  4985  Total 146 

4244  4995  

4252  5005 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  175 


2206 
2212 
2218 
2224 
2230 
2236 
2242 
2248 
2254 
2260 
2266 
2272 
2278 
2284 
2290 
2296 
3010 
3016 
3022 
3028 
3034 
3040 
3046 
3052 
3058 

*  3154 
*3160 

*  3166 
*3172 
*3178 
*3184 
*3190 

3196 
3202 
3208 
3214 

Used  by  Newfoundland. 


2206 
2212 
2218 
2224 
2230 
2236 
2242 
2248 


2254 
2260 
2266 
2272 
2278 
2284 
2290 
2296 
3034 


Canada  and  Newfoundland 

3220 

4485 

3226 

4495 

3232 

4815 

3238 

3244 

3250 

1845 

3256 

3262 

3268 

3274 

4885 

3280 

4895 

3286 

4905 

3292 

5385 

3298 

5395 

3304 

5405 

3310 

5415 

3316 

5425 

3324 

5435 

3332 

5445 

*  3340 

5455 

*3348 

5465 

*  3356 

5475 

*3364 

5485 

*3372 

5495 

*3380 

5705 

*3388 

5720 

*  3396 

5735 

*3404 

5750 

*3412 

5765 

4324 

5780 

4332 

5795 

4340 

5810 

4348 



4465           Total 103 

4475 



Cuba 

3010 

4212 

3016 

4505 

3022 

5375 

3028 

5825 

3196 



3202           Total 20 

3208 



4004 

Other  Nations 

3040 

4356 

3046 

4455 

3052 

4515 

3058 

4805 

3214 

4915 

3220 

5840 

3226 



4220           Total 24 

4228 



SUMMARY 

Number 

Services  of 

channels 

Maritime  Mobile  Services  exclusively 47 

Air  Mobile  Service  exclusively 33 

Amateurs 134 

Experimental  Visual  Broadcasting 84 

Air  and  Maritime  Mobile  Services 81 

Experimental 3 

Mobile  Services 29 

General  Communication  Services 228 

Total 639 

Grand  Total 704 


Note. — The  Grand  total  is  obtained  by  adding  on  65  channels  made  available  through  the  application 
of  Articles  5  and  6  of  the  Agreement. 


176  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

GENERAL  SUMMARY 

(Not  part  of  document) 
Sub-division  of  -2%  Channels  in  Band  1500  to  6000  K/C 

Common  Channels 411 

(Article  4) 

Total  general  communication  channels  available  in  North  America 293 

(Articles  5  and  6)  

Total 704 


Allotment  of  Common  Channels  to  Services: 

Maritime  Mobile  Services  exclusively 47 

(Ship  to  Shore). 
Air  Mobile  Services  exclusively 33 

(Aircraft  to  ground). 
Air  and  Maritime  Mobile  Services 81 

(Shared  ship  to  shore  and  aircraft  to  ground). 
Mobiles  Services 29 

(Shared  ships,  aircraft,  railway  trains  and  any  other  non-fixed  stations) 
Amateur ;•••.• 134 

(Amateur  experimental  work  and  communications) . 
Visual  Broadcasting 84 

(Television  and  transmission  of  pictures). 
Experimental 3 

(Special  experimental  channels).  

Total 411 

Distribution  of  General  Communication  Channels 

Channels 

United  States 146 

Canada  and  Newfoundland 103 

Cuba 20 

Other  nations 24 


293 


Total  number  of  channels,  "common"  and  "general  communication'1  available  to  the  different  subscribing  nations 

Channels 

United  States 557 

Canada  and  Newfoundland 514 

Cuba • 431 

Other  nations 435 

THE  INTERNATIONAL  RADIOTELEGRAPH   CONFERENCE 

The  International  Radiotelegraph  Conference  of  Washington  was  ratified  by 
the  Government  of  the  Dominion  of  Canada  on  July  12,  1928,  with  the  exception 
of  the  supplementary  regulations  annexed  thereto.  The  provisions  of  the  Con- 
vention came  into  effect  on  January  1,  1929,  and  are  now  being  observed  by  the 
nations  of  the  world. 

THE  ROYAL  COMMISSION  ON  RADIO  BROADCASTING 

A  Royal  Commission  on  Radio  Broadcasting  was  appointed  by  Order  in 

Council  P.C.  2108  of  December  6,  1928,  with  the  following  terms  of  reference:— 

"To  examine  into  the  broadcasting  situation  in  the  Dominion  of  Canada  and  to  make 

recommendations  to  the  Government  as  to  the  future  administration,  management,  control 

and  financing  thereof." 

The  members  of  the  commission  are: — 

Sir  John  Aird,  President,  Canadian  Bank  of  Commerce  (Chairman), 
Toronto,  Ont. 

Charles  A.  Bowan,  Editor,  The  Citizen,  Ottawa,  Ont. 

Augustin  Frigon,  D.Sc,  Director,  Ecole  Poly  technique,  Montreal,  Quebec; 
Director-General,  Technical  Education,  Province  of  Quebec,  Mont- 
real, P.Q. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  177 

Secretary,  Donald  Manson,  Chief  Inspector,   Government    Radio   Service, 

Ottawa,  Ont. 
The  commission  has  commenced  its  inquiries  and  it  is  anticipated  that  itfl 
report  will  be  submitted  to  the  Government  about  the  end  of  June,  1929. 

THE  INTERNATIONAL  TELEGRAPH  CONFERENCE 

The  International  Telegraph  Conference  of  Brussels  opened  on  September 
10,  1928,  and  terminated  on  September  24,  1928. 

This  conference  was  convened  for  the  purpose  of  dealing  with  a  proposal 
for  revision  of  the  International  Telegraph  regulation  in  regard  to  the  counting 
of  code  and  cypher  messages  submitted  by  a  committee  established  at  the  Paris 
Conference,  1925.  Delegations  from  sixty-two  contracting  administrations, 
together  with  the  representatives  of  non-contracting  administrations,  interna- 
tional organizations  and  operating  companies  were  present. 

The  Dominion  of  Canada  is  not  a  party  to  the  International  Telegraph  ( in- 
vention, but  in  view  of  the  representations  of  business  organizations  that  their 
interests  were  materially  concerned,  it  was  deemed  advisable  to  send  representa- 
tives to  the  conference,  with  instructions  "  To  take  such  action  as  might  lie 
within  their  power  to  prevent  the  adoption  of  any  changes  which  would  involve 
an  increase  in  the  cost  of  cabling  to  the  Canadian  public." 

Similar  action  was  taken  by  the  United  States  Government,  which  also  does 
not  subscribe  to  the  Convention,  but  which  sent  a  strong  delegation  to  protect 
the  interests  of  cable  users  in  that  country. 

Order  in  Council  of  August  30,  1928  (P.C.  1596)  appointed  C.  P.  Edwards, 
Director  of  Radio,  Department  of  Marine,  Ottawa,  and  J.  R.  M.  Walker,  Depart- 
ment of  External  Affairs,  Ottawa,  as  representatives  for  Canada. 

The  history  of  the  case  is  as  follows.  The  International  Telegraph  Con- 
ference of  Paris,  1925  appointed  a  committee  of  the  representatives  of  fifteen 
administrations  to  consider  amendments  to  the  regulations  for  the  counting  of 
code  words  and  to  submit  recommendations  thereon.  This  committee  adjourned 
at  the  close  of  the  Paris  Conference  and  met  again  at  Cortina  dAmpezzo,  Italy, 
from  2nd  to  26th  August,  1926. 

Under  the  existing  regulations,  the  rules  for  the  counting  of  code  language 
were  as  follows: — 

Article  9.     (VIII) 

Code  Language 

1.  Code  language  is  composed  of  words  not  combined  in  intelligible  phrases 

in  one  or  more  of  the  languages  authorized  for  use  as  plain  language  in 
telegraph  correspondence. 

2.  The  words,  whether  real  or  artificial,  must  be  formed  of  syllables  which 

can  be  pronounced  according  to  the  ordinary  usage  of  one  of  the  fol- 
lowing languages,  German,  English,  Spanish,  French,  Dutch,  Italian, 
Portuguese  or  Latin.  Artificial  words  must  not  contain  the  accented 
letters  a,  a,  a,  e,  n,  6,  u. 

3.  Words  in  code  language  may  not  be  longer  than  ten  characters,  according 

to  the  Morse  alphabet,  the  groups  ae,  aa,  ao,  oe,  ue,  being  counted  each 
as  two  letters.  The  group  ch  is  also  counted  as  two  letters  in  artificial 
words. 

4.  Groups  which  do  not  fulfil  the  conditions  of  the  two  previous  paragraphs 

are  regarded  as  in  the  category  of  language  in  letters  with  a  secret 
meaning,  and  are  charged  accordingly.  Groups  formed  by  combining 
two  or  more  plain  language  words  contrary  to  the  custom  of  the  lan- 
guage are  not,  however,  admitted. 

88174-12 


178  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

With  these  rules  as  a  basis,  all  commercial  codes  such  as  Western  Union, 
Bentleys,  A.B.C.,  Marconi,  etc.,  have  been  constructed,  and  their  use,  particu- 
larly in  the  case  of  cables,  has  gradually  extended,  until  to-day  a  considerable 
proportion  of  all  fully  paid  cable  traffic  is  in  code. 

Code  builders  further  found  that  by  developing  their  codes  on  a  five-letter 
basis,  they  were  able  to  combine  two  five-letter  code  words  together  as  one  in 
a  message  without  violating  the  regulations. 

The  telegraph  and  cable  administrations,  on  the  other  hand,  were  dissatis- 
fied with  the  regulations  on  the  grounds  that: — 

(1)  The  transmission  of  a  ten-letter  word  imposes  much  more  nervous 
fatigue  on  an  operator  than  the  transmission  of  the  same  word  divided 
into  two  five-letter  groups; 

(2)  The  errors  in  handling  ten-letter  groups  are  more  numerous  than  in 
handling  groups  of  five; 

(3)  The  pronounceability  rule  being  unworkable  in  practice  is  the  cause  of 
continual  contention  between  the  sender,  the  counter  clerk  and  the 
receiving  office,  in  regard  to  whether  certain  words  are  or  are  not  pro- 
nounceable. 

This,  then,  was  the  legacy  left  by  the  Paris  Conference  to  be  dealt  with  by 
the  Cortina  Committee,  and  the  committee's  report  was,  according  to  the  terms 
of  reference,  to  be  "  submitted  to  the  examination  and  decision  of  the  first  tele- 
graph or  radio-telegraph  conference  following  the  conclusion  of  the  labours  of 
the  committee  ". 

The  Cortina  Committee  issued  a  majority  report  signed  by  fourteen  coun- 
tries, and  a  minority  report  signed  by  one  (Great  Britain). 

An  attempt  was  made  to  take  final  action  on  the  Cortina  report  at  the 
International  Radiotelegraph  Conference  of  Washington,  1927,  and  a  special 
committee  of  the  conference  was  appointed  to  deal  with  the  matter. 

This  special  committee  decided  the  first  day  that  action  on  the  report  was 
not  within  the  province  of  the  Washington  Conference,  and  that  it  should  recon- 
stitute itself  as  a  Special  Telegraph  Conference  for  the  purpose  of  acting  on 
the  report.  The  following  day  the  committee,  after  due  deliberation,  felt  it  could 
not  organize  itself  as  a  special  Telegraph  Conference.  The  result  was  a  resolu- 
tion referring  the  report  to  the  next  Telegraph  Conference  at  Brussels  and 
requesting  the  French  Administration,  as  managing  head  of  the  Telegraph  Union, 
to  take  up  the  matter  with  the  Belgian  Government  with  a  view  to  advancing 
the  date  of  the  Brussels  Conference  from  1930  to  1928. 

Accordingly,  the  Cortina  report  formed  the  subject  of  the  deliberations  of 
the  Brussels  Conference,  and  in  view  of  the  interest  and  concern  manifested  by 
Canadian  users  of  the  cable  service,  the  Canadian  delegation  devoted  itself  to 
the  task  of  endeavouring  to  secure,  in  so  far  as  lay  within  its  power,  an  equit- 
able solution  of  the  problem,  which  would  not  involve  an  economic  hardship 
through  an  increase  in  the  cost  of  cabling. 

Proceedings  of  the  Conference 

The  essential  features  of  the  Cortina  majority  and  minority  reports  with 
winch  the  conference  was  called  upon  to  deal  were  as  follows:— 

Majority  Recommendations — 

(1)  Code  words  to  be  limited  to  five  letters  without  restriction  as  to  pro- 
nounceability or  otherwise; 

(2)  A.  That  the  existing  rates  on  both  plain  language  and  code  messages 
be  reduced  by  a  percentage  X,  to  be  fixed  by  the  next  Telegraph  Con- 
ference, or,  as  an  alternative, 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  179 

B.  (i)  that  the  existing  rates  on  plain  language  be  retained,  and 
(ii)  that  the  existing  rates  on  code  be  reduced  by  a  percentage  Y,  to  In- 
fixed by  the  next  Telegraph  Conference. 

Minority  Recommendations — 

(1)  Applicable  until  January,  1932.  Retain  ten-letter  basis,  pronounce- 
ability restriction  and  a  minimum  of  two  vowels. 

(2)  Applicable  after  January,  1932.  Retain  ten-letter  basis,  abandon  pro- 
nounceability, but  require  a  minimum  of  four  vowel-. 

After  the  formal  opening  of  the  conference,  the  British  delegation  withdrew 
portions  of  its  minority  report,  leaving  the  same  equivalent  to  the  existing  regu- 
lations, viz.,  ten-word  minimum  with  pronounceability  as  the  criterion. 

Very  strong  opposition  to  any  change  in  the  existing  regulations  was  pui 
forward  on  behalf  of  the  users,  who  were  represented  in  the  commercial  field  by 
the  International  Chamber  of  Commerce. 

The  question  was  referred  to  a  committee  on  which  were  represented  the 
administrations,  operating  companies  and  the  users,  but  after  much  delibera- 
tion the  Committee  found  itself  unable  to  submit  a  recommendation,  whereupon 
the  representatives  of  the  International  Chamber  of  Commerce  announced  their 
intention  to  withdraw. 

This  juncture  was  deemed  opportune  for  the  submission  of  Canada's  views 
which  were  to  the  effect  that  no  major  change  should  be  made  in  the  existing 
regulations.  Similar  statements  were  made  by  the  delegations  of  the  United 
States,  Nicaragua  and  Venezuela.  An  impasse  having  been  reached,  a  petit 
committee  appointed  to  analyse  all  existing  proposals  submitted  a  compromise 
proposal  as  follows: — 

(1)  Retain  the  10-letter  minimum; 

(2)  Suppress  the  pronounceability  rule  and  substitute  therefor  a  restrict  ion 
that  each  10-letter  word  must  contain  3  vowels; 

(3)  Establish  a  new  class  of  code  message,  each  word  to  be  limited  to  five 
letters,  without  restriction,  such  traffic  to  be  handled  at  approximately 
two-thirds  of  the  full  rate  charged  for  plain  language  and  10-letter 
code  traffic. 

This  proposal  commended  itself  to  the  Canadian  delegation  and  in  general 
also  received  the  support  of  the  American  delegation. 

After  much  discussion  during  which  all  available  existing  commercial  codes 
were  examined,  also  a  number  of  typical  code  telegrams  passing  through  the 
central  telegraph  offices  of  certain  administrations,  sufficient  information  was 
obtained  to  indicate  that  the  number  of  10-letter  words  used  in  actual  practice 
which  would  not  meet  the  requirements  of  the  proposal  was  only  a  small  per- 
centage of  the  whole. 

Accordingly,  the  Canadian  delegation  after  careful  consideration,  reached 
the  conclusion  that  whatever  small  expense  might  be  caused  the  users  by  having 
to  pay  double  on  this  small  percentage  of  words,  or  whatever  temporary  incon- 
venience might  be  involved  in  changing  such  words  in  the  code  books  to  comply 
with  the  regulations,  would  be  far  more  than  offset  by  the  privilege  of  retaining 
the  10-letter  word  and  by  the  concession  of  a  reduction  of  one-third  in  the  rate 
on  5-letter  words,  and  decided  not  to  oppose  the  proposal. 

The  conference  then  proceeded  to  deal  with  this  compromise  proposal  and 
referred  it  to  a  drafting  committee.  It  was  finally  adopted  by  the  conference 
with  minor  alterations,  and  is  set  out  in  the  Final  Protocol,  a  synopsis  of  which 
is  as  follows: — 

(A)  The  10-letter  basis  for  code  words  is  retained. 

The  rule  prescribing  pronounceability  is  abandoned,  and,  instead,  it  is 

prescribed  that  10-letter  code  words  must  contain  not  less  than  three  vowels, 

88174-12^ 


180  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

at  least  one  in  the  first  five  letters  of  the  word,  one  in  the  second  five  let- 
ters of  the  word,  and  the  third  one  at  any  place  in  the  word. 

These  code  messages  and  plain  language  messages  will  continue  to  be 
handled  at  the  full  rate  now  charged  for  this  class  of  traffic. 

(B)  A  new  class  of  code  word  limited  to  five  letters  without  restriction  as 
to  vowels  or  pronounceability,  is  established. 

The  rate  on  this  class  of  message  (B),  for  the  extra  European  regime, 
is  fixed  at  two-thirds  of  the  regular  full  rate. 

A  minimum  charge  for  4  words  is  fixed  for  messages  of  Class  (B). 

(C)  Figures  or  groups  of  figures  are  not  admitted  in  category  (B).  They 
will  continue  to  be  charged  for  at  the  rate  of  five  figures  to  a  full  rate 
word. 

(D)  The  provisions  of  the  "  Final  Protocol  "  become  effective  on  the  1st 
October,  1929. 

It  will  be  seen  that  the  decisions  reached  at  the  Conference  are  not  con- 
trary to  the  interests  of  the  users  of  cable  and  radio  facilities. 

The  present  system  of  ten-letter  code  words  is  maintained  as  desired  by 
many  users  and  chambers  of  commerce.  No  increase  in  rates  for  the  ten-letter 
code  word  is  recommended,  and  the  only  change  made  in  connection  with  the 
same  is  in  the  suppression  of  the  former  unworkable  requirement  that  code 
words  should  be  pronounceable  in  one  of  eight  languages  and  the  substitution 
therefor  of  the  provision  that  code  words  of  ten  letters  shall  contain  at  least 
three  vowels. 

In  addition  to  the  present  ten-letter  system  the  conference  made  available 
to  the  user,  a  five-letter  system,  with  no  restrictions  as  to  the  composition  of 
these  code  words.  The  user  will  have  a  choice  between  the  present  ten-letter 
system  and  the  new  five-letter  system.  However,  if  the  five-letter  word  system 
is  employed  it  will  be  charged  for  at  only  two-thirds  of  the  full  rate  in  the  extra 
European  regime  and  at  three-fourths  of  the  full  rate  in  the  European  regime. 
Figures  and  groups  of  figures  will  not  be  allowed  in  these  five-letter  words  but 
commercial  marks  consisting  of  a  combination  of  figures  and  letters  will  be 
accepted  if  the  sender  can  show  that  they  actually  are  commercial  marks.  The 
minimum  payment  equivalent  to  the  charge  for  four  words  must  be  made  for 
any  telegram  consisting  of  the  five-letter  words. 

INDUCTIVE  INTERFERENCE  SECTION 


This  section  has  been  operated  along  the  same  general  lines  as  in  the  past, 
with  slightly  augmented  staff  and  equipment. 

Seventeen  cars  are  equipped  and  in  operation  investigating  interference,  with 
headquarters   at  Vancouver,   Calgary,   Rcgina,   Winnipeg,   London,   Hamilton,  I 
Kitchener,  Toronto,  Ottawa,  Montreal,  Quebec,  Saint  John,  N.B.,  and  Halifax. 

Seven  additional  cars  are  now  being  equipped,  which  will  be  located  at  Van- 
couver, Edmonton,  Saskatoon,  Moose  Jaw,  Windsor,  Toronto  and  Montreal, 
making  a  total  of  twenty-four  cars  in  commission  for  the  investigation  of  inter- 
ference. 

Each  car  is  manned  by  two  men  and,  in  addition  to  looking  after  inter- 
ference in  the  cities  in  which  they  are  based,  make  regular  tours  throughout  their 
allotted  sections  of  the  surrounding  country. 

In  addition  to  the  regular  tours,  special  trips  are  made  by  the  investiga- 
tors, either  with  a  car,  or  by  train,  to  points  where  special  interference  is  reported 
as  affecting  many  broadcast  listeners. 

"  Part-time  "  inspectors,  located  in  thirty-one  towns  and  cities,  are  pro- 
vided with  limited  equipment  for  the  investigation  of  radio  interference  and  ,1 


REPORt  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  181 

carry  out  preliminary  investigations  in  all  cases  of  interference  in  their  diet] 
If  they  are  unable  to  arrange  for  the  elimination  of  same,  with  the  facilities 
at  their  command,  an  investigator   is  sent  from  the  nearest  divisional    head* 
quarters. 

The  equipment  of  the  interference  cars,  as  a  result  of  our  experience*  has 
been  considerably  improved  during  the  year.  The  cars  now  carry  a  radio 
receiver  with  a  direction  finding  loop,  by  means  of  which  (he  investigator  is  able 
to  associate  the  interference  with  certain  particular  power  and  distribution  lines. 
They  also  carry  a  small  portable  receiver,  to  which  may  be  attached  exploring 
coils,  a  probe  antenna  and  other  devices  for  detailed  investigation  after  the 
district  has  been  patrolled  anc^the  probable  source  of  the  interference  lias  been 
narrowed  down  to  within  a  small  area.  Other  equipment  carried  in  the  cars 
includes  complete  sets  of  experimental  surge  traps  for  the  suppression  of  inter- 
ference from  many  kinds  of  electrical  apparatus  and,  also,  meters  and  test 
equipment  to  aid  in  locating  faults  and  suppressing  interference. 

It  frequently  happens  that  the  interference  reported  is  not  continuous  and 
that,  when  the  investigator  visits  the  town,  it  is  not  present.  In  such  cases,  he 
endeavours  to  produce,  artificially,  conditions  which  will  cause  it  to  start. 
With  the  permission  of  the  public  utilities  he  strikes  the  poles  carrying  trans- 
formers and  other  electrical  apparatus,  and  shakes  the  guy-wires,  causmg  the 
power  lines  to  swing  and  vibrate  as  they  would  in  windy  weather  or  when  heavy 
traffic  is  passing;  and,  should  it  result  that  the  interference  is  caused  by  the  dis- 
tribution system  or  apparatus  belonging  to  the  local  public  utility,  the  investi- 
gator obtains  the  assistance  of  a  lineman,  locates  the  exact  source  and  reports 
to  the  local  superintendent  of  the  utility,  who  invariably  takes  steps  to  repair 
the  fault  found  to  be  the  cause.  On  the  other  hand,  should  the  interference  be 
traced  to  some  privately  owned  electrical  apparatus,  the  owner  of  the  same  is 
requested  to  take  the  necessary  steps  towards  elimination.  When  the  interference 
is  caused  by  the  normal  operation  of  electrical  apparatus,  the  investigator  tries 
the  effect  of  surge  traps  and  preventive  devices,  which  are  carried  in  the  car. 
Where  it  is  possible  to  prevent  the  interference  by  such  means,  the  owner  of  the 
electrical  apparatus  may  purchase  the  necessary  suppressive  equipment  either 
from  the  department  or  from  other  sources. 

Local  radio  associations  are  instructed  how  to  deal  with  simple  sources  of 
interference  and  are  provided  with  circulars  outlining  tests,  to  assist  them  in 
locating  and  eliminating  the  interference  experienced. 

We  are  pleased  to  state  that  our  investigators  have  received  the  greatest 
co-operation  in  their  work,  in  practically  all  centres  visited,  particularly  from 
the  public  utilities;  many  of  the  latter  have  provided  themselves  with  portable 
radio  receivers  for  the  investigation  of  interference  caused  by  their  lines,  and  it 
is  gratifying  to  note  the  increased  interest  in  the  prevention  of  radio  interference 
on  the  part  of  most  of  the  utilities  throughout  the  country,  who  realize  the 
importance  of  eliminating  any  sources  of  interference  due  to  their  systems,  both 
for  the  sake  of  the  good-will  of  the  listening  public  and  to  ensure  that  their  lines 
and  apparatus  are  in  first  class  condition.  Frequently,  radio  interference  is 
the  first  warning  that  defects  are  present,  which,  if  permitted  to  continue,  may 
result  in  serious  damage  to  valuable  plant.  The  Radio  Branch  investigators 
advise  the  superintendents  and  linemen  of  the  public  utilities  with  regard  to 
means  of  dealing  with  the  interference,  and  supply  circulars  prepared  by  head- 
quarters describing  means  of  locating  and  eliminating  interference  radiating 
from  distribution  equipment. 

In  the  case  of  privately  owned  electrical  apparatus,  such  as  violet  ray 
machines,  farm  lighting  plants,  electrical  signs,  and  the  multitude  of  other  sources 
of  interference,  it  is  found  that  rarely  does  any  person  desire  to  be  regarded 


182 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 


as  a  cause  of  nuisance  to  his  neighbours  and,  in  nearly  all  cases,  they  agree  either 
to  cease  using  the  interfering  apparatus  during  the  broadcast  hours,  or,  if  the 
interference  is  preventable,  to  install  suppression  devices.  In  some  cases,  the 
local  listeners  affected  have  subscribed  the  cost  of  these  devices,  which  are 
usually  inexpensive  and  can  be  easily  installed  by  a  qualified  electrician. 

The  number  of  sources  of  radio  interference  investigated  during  the  year  is 
as  follows: — 


Sources  Investigated 

1927-28 

1928-29 

4,383 
901 
152 

4,271 
1,650 

356 

5,436 

6,277 

Action  Taken 

1927-28 

1928-29 

4,880 

465 

91 

5,273 

Number  of  sources  not  yet  reported  cured 

855 

149 

Total 

5,436 

6,277 

In  addition  to  the  sources  listed  above,  a  great  number  of  cases  have  been 
dealt  with  by  correspondence,  and  the  interference  successfully  eliminated  by  the 
owners  of  the  apparatus  by  following  our  advice.  Many  special  surge  traps 
have  been  designed  by  the  department  and  special  and  standard  surge  traps, 
not  yet  produced  commercially,  are  sold  by  us  to  owners  who  wish  to  suppress 
interference  from  domestic  and  commercial  electrical  apparatus. 

Many  of  the  855  sources,  which  are  listed  as  not  yet  reported  cured,  have 
probably  been  successfully  dealt  with  by  the  owners  of  the  apparatus  causing 
the  interference. 

The  sources  recorded  as  having  no  economic  cure  include  some  cases  of 
power  line  and  street  car  interference,  where  the  radio  receivers  are  close  to  the 
power  lines.  They,  also,  include  certain  electro-medical  and  other  types  of 
apparatus  where  all  known  means  have  failed  to  eliminate  the  interference. 
Research  on  these  problems  continues  in  an  endeavour  to  find  a  means  of  | 
suppression. 

The  increase  in  the  number  of  sources  investigated  during  the  year  is  due, 
partly,  to  the  slight  increase  in  staff,  but,  to  a  greater  extent,  to  the  improved 
methods  and  equipment,  as  well  as  greater  skill  on  the  part  of  the  investigators. 

The  fact  that  the  number  of  power  line  faults  located  has  not  increased  is 
due  to  the  improved  condition  in  which  many  of  the  public  utilities  are  main- 
taining their  lines.  The  lines  of  some  public  utilities  are,  however,  still  far  from 
satisfactory  from  a  radio  standpoint,  as  shown  by  investigations  in  cities  where 
ten  to  twenty  faults  have  been  located  by  the  radio  investigators  at  one  time. 

In  three  hundred  and  forty-three  cases  of  reported  interference,  investi- 
gations proved  that  the  interference  was  caused  by  defects  in  the  complainants' 
own  radio  receivers. 

As  an  illustration  of  the  widespread  interference  from  one  single  source,  the 
following  is  an  extract  from  the  report  of  one  of  our  investigators. 

"  A  very  severe  case  of  interference  was  reported  on  February  16,  1929, 
covering  practically  all  the  west  end  of  Toronto. 

On  investigation,  it  was  found  that  the  interference  was  radiating  from 
practically  all  the  distribution  and  communication  lines  in  the  district  and  the 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  183 

110,000  and  220,000  volt  lines  running  into  the  Leaside  Hydro  Station.    The 

various  public  utilities  and  the  Ontario  Hydro-Electric  Power  Commission 
assisted  in  the  investigation  and  it  was  found  that  the  interference  ceased  when 
the  section  of  the  110,000  volt  power  line  was  cut  between  Leaside  and  Daven- 
port Road  substation.  A  very  careful  inspection  of  this  line  showed  DO  apparent 
fault.  The  source  of  the  interference  was  finally  found  to  be  a  spark  discharge 
from  an  unused  telegraph  line  to  a  junction  box  connected  by  conduit  to  ground. 
This  unused  telegraph  line  paralleled  the  110,000  volt  power  line  for  a  distance 
of  two  and  one-half  miles  and,  in  this  way,  a  high  voltage  was  induced  on  the 
telegraph  line.  The  fact  that  the  13,000  volt  power  lines,  distribution,  street 
lighting  and  telephone  system  wires  paralleled  the  telegraph  line,  where  the 
source  of  the  interference  originated,  accounted  for  the  very  large  area  affected 
by  this  source  of  interference." 

Research  work  has  been  carried  out  both  at  Ottawa  and  on  many  trans- 
mission lines  and  industrial  plants  throughout  Canada,  as  well  as  by  several  of 
the  radio  inspectors  at  their  own  headquarters.  Types  of  apparatus  and  methods 
of  investigating  interference  have  been  developed  and  a  number  of  surge  traps, 
both  for  experimental  purposes  and  for  permanent  installation,  have  been 
designed. 

Several  manufacturers  of  electrical  apparatus  have  been  approached  regard- 
ing certain  features  of  their  products  which  cause  radio  interference,  and,  by  co- 
operation with  the  Radio  Branch,  the  designs  have  been  revised  to  eliminate 
the  objectionable  features.  Some  dealers  guarantee  their  products  not  to  cause 
radio  interference,  and  such  articles  as  electric  warming  pads  have  been  replaced 
by  dealers  free  of  charge  on  that  account. 

The  work  of  the  investigators,  besides  arranging  for  the  elimination  of 
radio  inductive  interference,  frequently  benefits  public  utilities  and  the  general 
public  by  locating  faults  on  electrical  lines  and  apparatus,  which,  if  not  repaired 
in  their  early  stages,  would  probably  develop  into  serious  faults  and  become  fire 
or  accident  hazards.  During  the  past  year  the  investigators  have  located 
hundreds  of  cases  in  which  guy-wires  have  come  in  contact  with  high  voltage 
power  wires,  thus  creating  a  hazard  to  any  one  wTho  might  touch  the  guy-wire 
above  the  insulator,  while  minor  faults  have  also  been  located  on  power  house 
apparatus,  which,  if  not  repaired,  would  be  likely  to  cause  interruption  in  the 
electric  service  or  material  damage  to  the  electrical  equipment.  The  following 
case  is  an  interesting  example  of  the  work  of  removing  dangerous  conditions: 
"  On  November  4,  1928,  our  electrician  investigated  a  report  of  interference  made 
by  a  broadcast  listener  of  Gatineau  Point,  P.Q.,  and,  by  following  the  power  lines 
a  distance  of  three-quarters  of  a  mile,  the  source  of  the  interference  was  traced 
to  an  unused  radio  aerial  which  had  accidentally  come  in  contact  with  a  twenty- 
two  hundred  volt  power  line.  The  owner  of  this  aerial  reported  that  it  had  not 
been  in  use  for  two  years  but  arrangements  had  been  made  for  a  radio  salesman 
to  install  a  set  the  next  day."  It  is  believed  that  the  location  of  this  fault  by 
radio  methods  probably  prevented  a  serious  accident. 

Broadcast  listeners  have  been  warned  against  the  practice  of  attaching  radio 
aerials  above  any  power  lines,  or  to  any  poles  belonging  to  public  utilities, 
without  the  approval  of  the  owners  of  the  poles. 

In  addition  to  the  interference  work,  the  investigators  do  other  work  required 
by  the  Radio  Branch  in  the  towns  they  visit.  Such  work  includes  the  sale  of 
licenses,  inspection  of  amateur  stations  and  the  examination  of  candidates  for 
operators'  certificates,  etc. 

The  net  result  of  the  year's  work  of  the  Inductive  Interference  Section  may 
be  summarized  as  follows: — 

(1)  Most  of  the  new  cases  of  interference,  which  have  been  brought  to  the 
attention  of  the  Department,  have  been  successfully  dealt  with. 


184  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

(2)  Many  cases  of  interference  of  long-standing  have  been  successfully 
dealt  with,  thus  materially  reducing  the  noise  level  of  the  interference 
in  many  districts.  It  has  been  the  hope  of  the  Department  to  further 
reduce  the  noise  level  to  an  extent  in  keeping  with  the  increased 
sensitivity  of  the  modern  radio  receivers.  So  far,  in  spite  of  our  efforts, 
the  great  increase  in  the  number  of  sensitive  receivers  of  the  battery- 
less  type,  now  in  use,  has  had  the  effect  of  giving  the  appearance  of  a 
rise  in  noise  level,  although,  as  previously  stated,  it  is  decidedly  lower. 

(3)  Practically  all  the  public  utilities  are  maintaining  their  lines  and 
apparatus  in  a  much  better  condition  from  a  radio  standpoint  and  doing 
everything  in  their  power  to  eliminate  interference  caused  by  their 
equipment. 

(4)  The  general  public  are  beginning  to  realize  that  it  is  necessary  for  them 
to  co-operate  in  order  to  reduce  the  interferenc  in  their  districts,  by 
avoiding,  during  broadcast  hours,  the  use  of  battery  chargers,  violet  rays 
and  other  spark  producing  apparatus. 

(5)  Development  work  by  the  Department  has  been  successful  in  pro- 
viding new  investigation  apparatus  and  means  of  locating  and  elimi- 
nating the  interference  from  many  types  of  electrical  equipment,  and 
we  hope  to  progress  still  further  along  these  lines. 


NEW    CONSTRUCTION,    ADDITIONS    AND    ALTERATIONS 

The  regular  maintenance  work  in  connection  with  the  existing  fifty-four 
stations  covering  painting,  repairs,  etc.,  was  carried  out  as  usual. 

On  the  Pacific  coast  the  Digby  Island  Station  was  completely  renovated,  a 
new  operating  house  was  built,  and  a  new  transmitter  with  emergency  power 
supply  installed  together  with  an  experimental  short  wave  transmitter  for 
communication  with  Victoria. 

The  two  old  wooden  masts  which  were  unsafe  were  scrapped  and  replaced 
by  new  steel  structures. 

On  Hudson  bay  and  straits  permanent  Direction  Finding  Stations  were 
installed  as  "  aids  to  navigation  "  at  Fort  Churchill,  Man.,  and  at  Cape  Hope's 
Advance  on  the  south  side  of  Hudson  straits.  The  temporary  station  at 
Nottingham  Island,  at  the  west  end  of  the  straits,  was  converted  into  a 
Direction  Finding  Station  and  the  buildings  fixed  up  so  that  they  would  be  good 
for  another  year  or  two  when  we  contemplate  building  the  permanent  station  on 
a  site  a  few  miles  away  which  would  be  suitable  for  the  establishment  of  a 
Lighthouse. 

A  site  for  the  permanent  Direction  Finding  Station  at  Resolution  Island, 
on  the  north  side  of  the  eastern  end  of  the  Straits,  was  located  and  plans  made 
for  the  building  of  station  during  the  coming  season. 

On  the  East  coast,  a  step  forward  in  our  radio  beacon  work  was  made  in 
the  installation  of  a  new  type  automatic  beacon  at  Seal  Island.  The  design 
possesses  a  good  many  new  features,  but  from  the  standpoint  of  the  navigator 
the  interest  lies  in  the  fact  that  they  function  automatically  once  an  hour,  day 
and  night,  the  year  round.  In  addition  they  function  continuously  during  fog, 
and  are  thus  always  available  for  bearings. 

Five  additional  beacon  units  of  this  type  have  been  received  from  the  manu- 
facturers, and  will  be  installed  during  the  coming  season. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  185 

West  Coast 

NEW    CONSTRUCTION,    ADDITIONS    AND    ALTERATIONS 

Alert  Bay. — An  addition  was  built  to  the  operating  house  to  accommodate 

a  CW  transmitter  and  interior  alterations  made  to  suit  the  new  arrangement, 
including  the  fitting  up  of  a  small  office  for  the  use  of  the  officer  in  charge.  A 
Matthews  generating  unit,  together  with  starting  battery,  were  installed  in  the 
engine  room. 

Bull  Harbour. — Electric  lights  were  installed  in  the  dwelling  houses, 
current  being  supplied  from  the  starting  battery  of  the  Matthews  generating 
unit.  A  new  gas  tank  and  Bowser  safety  pump  were  installed  to  replace  one 
of  the  storage  tanks  found  leaking.  The  old  wooden  tramway  rails  which  had 
decayed  were  replaced  by  steel  rails. 

Cape  Lazo. — A  new  water  cooling  tank  was  installed  in  engine  room.  An 
Edison  battery  was  installed  for  the  radiophone  transmitter,  replacing  the  lead 
battery  which  had  deteriorated.  A  new  aerial  was  erected  and  connected  to  a 
separate  standby  receiver  for  600  metres. 

Digby  Island. — The  whole  site  was  cleared  of  logs  and  underbrush,  trees 
and  brush  were  cleared  on  each  side  of  the  tramway  track  and  also  along  the 
new  pole  line  site  ready  for  running  the  new  power  line. 

The  tramway  track  was  completely  rebuilt  and  an  additional  hundred  feet 
of  track  was  added  to  enable  hauling  to  continue  to  the  site  of  the  new  operating 
house. 

The  hoist  house  and  hoist  were  moved  to  a  position  suitable  for  hoisting  to 
the  new  operating  house.  The  hoist  house  was  repaired  and  reshingled  and  the 
hoist  overhauled  and  again  set  up. 

All  dwelling  houses  were  completely  repaired  inside  and  outside,  and  the 
roofs  reflashed  and  reshingled.  Weeping  drains  were  put  dowrn  at  the  base 
of  the  foundation  walls. 

The  old  wooden  masts  were  taken  down  and  replaced  by  two  new  steel 
lattice  masts  200  feet  high  and  new  aerials  were  made  up  and  hoisted. 

Work  has  been  started  on  the  new  operating  house  and  is  now  well  advanced. 

An  experimental  short  wave  transmitter  was  installed. 

Estevan  Point. — A  good  amount  of  maintenance  work  was  done  on  the 
Estevan  Hesquiat  road,  corduroy  being  put  down,  new  drains  and  culverts 
built  and  gravel  spread  over  certain  parts.  A  rebuilt  Ford  truck  was  supplied 
to  speed  up  the  handling  of  material  over  the  road.  Twto  new  sets  of  stays  were 
fitted  to  masts. 

Gonzales  Hill. — The  interior  of  the  operating  house  was  repainted  and  alter- 
ations made  to  interior  of  dwelling  house.  Tests  were  carried  out  to  try  and 
adapt  the  1,600  watt  sets  for  short  wave  transmission. 

Pachena  Point. — A  Marconi  100  Watt  radiophone  transmitter  was  installed. 

Point  Grey. — An  experimental  short  wave  transmitter  was  installed  and  the 
radiophone  transmitter  rearranged.  The  Main  transmitter  was  overhauled  and 
tests  carried  out  to  reduce  interference  on  broadcast  wavelengths.  A  hot  air 
furnace  was  installed  in  the  dwelling-house. 

Great  Lakes 
Port  Burwell,  Ont. — A  type  M.S.  valve  receiver  was  installed. 


186  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

East  Coast 

Chebucto  Head,  N.S.,  Direction  Finding. — New  type  aerial  suspension  gear 
and  one  new  jury  mast  were  erected  and  the  ground  system  was  overhauled. 
The  station  with  the  assistance  of  the  C.G.S.  Acadia  was  re-calibrated. 

Canso,  N.S.,  Direction  Finding. — The  station  was  connected  up  with  the 
Canso  Town  Electric  Power  Company  and  an  A.C.  motor  and  automatic  starter 
installed.  The  power  line  runs  from  the  town  limit  to  the  station  on  the  existing 
telephone  pole  line.  Repairs  were  made  to  our  road  between  the  station  and  the 
main  highway. 

St.  Paul  Island,  N.S.,  Direction  Finding. — A  500-gallon  Bowser  tank,  together 
with  Bowser  pump  and  standard  equipment  were  installed  and  a  G-3  receiver 
was  installed  replacing  the  type  12A. 

Belle  Isle,  Nfld.,  Direction  Finding. — The  dwelling  was  lined  with  insulating 
material,  this  work  being  done  by  the  staff,  and  a  G-3  receiver  was  installed. 

Yarmouth,  N.S.,  Direction  Finding. — The  station  was  connected  with  the 
city  power  supply.  A  5-horsepower,  A.C.  motor  was  coupled  to  the  A.C.  gener- 
ator to  supply  power  to  the  transmitter. 

Red  Head,  St.  John,  N.B.,  Direction  Finding. — The  old  barn  situated  near 
the  office  building  was  demolished  and  a  four  car  garage,  ex-Barrington  passage, 
was  put  up  providing  accommodation  for  three  cars  and  good  storage  space  for 
coal.  Some  minor  alterations  were  carried  out  to  the  transmitter,  including  the 
installation  of  a  safety  switch  on  the  4  KVA  set. 

Seal  Island,  N.S.,  Radio  Beacon. — A  complete  new  beacon  transmitter  was 
installed,  this  being  the  first  installation  of  the  new  type  200  watt  automatic 
apparatus,  it  providing  satisfactory  communication  with  St.  John,  N.B.,  and 
has  a  reliable  range  of  75  miles  for  Direction  Finding.  This  beacon  functions 
automatically  every  hour  day  and  night,  and  continuously  during  fog. 

Radio  Beacons — General. — In  addition  to  the  general  inspection  and  over- 
haul of  radio  apparatus  at  Cape  Ray,  Newfoundland,  Cape  Bauld,  Newfound- 
land, Lurcher  Lightship  and  Halifax  Lightship  No.  24,  a  100  Watt  I.C.W.  set  was 
installed  on  the  Heath  Point  Lightship  No.  15. 

Hudson  Bay  and  Strait 

Amery,  Man. — A  temporary  station  was  erected  on  behalf  of  the  Depart- 
ment of  Railway  and  Canals  at  Mile  356  on  the  Hudson  Bay  railway.  A 
2-K.W.  automatic  gasoline  engine  driven  generating  unit  with  starting  battery, 
a  standard  100  Watt  valve  transmitter  and  Type  M.S.  receiver  were  installed. 
Two  80-foot  steel  masts  to  support  the  aerial  were  erected.  This  station  main- 
tains communication  between  the  end  of  steel  on  the  Hudson  Bay  railway  and 
Fort  Churchill,  Man.,  and  will  continue  in  operation  until  the  landline  is  in 
commission. 

Fort  Churchill,  Man. — The  temporary  station  erected  in  1927-28  on  behalf 
of  the  Department  of  Railways  and  Canals  was  closed  down  and  replaced  by  a 
complete  new  permanent  direction  finding  station.  The  plant  consists  of  a 
combined  power  and  operating  house,  a  dwelling  and  two  150  foot  steel  masts. 
The  buildings  are  properly  insulated  to  withstand  the  northern  climate.  The 
radio  equipment  consists  of  two  6  K.V.A.  gasolene  engine  driven  generating  Units 
with  32  volt  starting  battery,  standard  1600  watt  C.W.  and  I.C.W.  long  wave 
transmitter,  and  500  watt  short  wave  transmitter,  and  a  100  watt  radio  telephone 
transmitter.  The  receiving  equipment  consists  of  a  G-3  direction  rinding 
receiver,  a  type  M.S.  receiver,  and  a  short  wave  receiver. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  187 

Wakeham  Bay,  Hudson  Strait. — The  temporary  station  wae  olosed  down 
and  the  500  watt  short  wave  valve  transmitter,  also  one  5  K.W.  engine  driven 
generating  unit,  were  transferred  to  Cape  Hopes  Advance. 

Nottingham  Island,  Hudson  Strait. — The  temporary  station  erected  in  con- 
nection with  the  Hudson  strait  patrol,  1927,  was  converted  into  a  standard 
Direction  Finding  Station,  one  of  the  former  5  K.W.  gasolene;  engine  driven 
generating  units  being  replaced  by  a  new  5  K.W.  automatic  generating  unit  with 
starting  battery.  A  type  G-3  direction  finding  receiver  was  installed  and  one 
new  150-foot  steel  mast  erected.  The  temporary  buildings  were  fixed  up  and 
made  as  comfortable  as  possible. 

Cape  Hopes  Advance,  Hudson  Strait. — A  complete  new  permanent  Direction 
Finding  Station  was  established,  this  station  replacing  the  temporary  station  at 
Wakeham  Bay.  A  combined  operating  and  power  house,  dwelling  and  store- 
house were  built,  and  one  150  foot  steel  mast  and  shorter  pipe  masts  were 
erected.  The  equipment  consists  of  one  5  K.W.  gasolene  driven  generating  unit, 
transferred  from  Wakeham  Bay,  one  5  K.W.  automatic  gasolene  engine  driven 
generating  unit  with  lead  type  32  volt  starting  battery,  one  500  watt  standard 
long  wave  C.W.  and  I.C.W.  valve  transmitter,  one  500  watt  short  wave  valve 
transmitter,  transferred  from  Wakeham  Bay,  a  type  G-3  direction  finding 
receiver,  a  short  wave  receiver  and  type  M.S.  receiver. 

SPECIAL     ASSISTANCE     RENDERED     TO     SHIPS     DURING     THE     YEAR     BY     GOVERNMENT 

RADIO   STATIONS 

West  Coast — Bull  Harbour 

SS.  Redwood. — At  4.40  a.m.  on  August  31,  1928,  the  ss.  Redwood  reported  to 
the  Bull  Harbour  Station  that  she  had  run  ashore  at  4  a.m.,  thick  fog,  position 
uncertain.  At  5.20  a.m.  Redwood  advised  "Ashore  on  Hunt  rock  between 
Scarlett  point  and  Pine  island  please  stand  by  ".  At  5.15  a.m.  the  Alert  Bay 
Station  established  communication  with  the  ss.  Curacoa,  who  gave  position 
"Off  Bull  Harbour  Light  south  bound";  this  wras  amended  at  5.35  a.m.  to 
"  Boat  Harbour  Light ".  Efforts  were  made  to  raise  other  vessels  thought  to 
be  in  vicinity,  without  result.  At  5.45  a.m.  Bull  Harbour  gave  the."  Redwood  " 
the  position  of  the  ss.  Amur  at  8  p.m.  30th.  The  Amur  at  6  a.m.  w*as  signalled 
by  the  Redwood  and  communication  established.  The  Amur  stood  by  until 
Redwood  refloated  on  rising  tide  at  10  a.m.  The  Redwood  proceeded  on  voyage 
south  under  own  power. 

Cape  Lazo 

Launch  Vimy  3. — At  3.30  p.m.  on  December  6,  1928,  the  engine  of  the 
Vimy  3  failed  and  launch  ran  ashore  close  to  the  Cape  Lazo  Station.  The  owners 
were  notified,  but  on  account  of  adverse  weather  conditions  could  do  nothing 
in  the  matter  of  salvage,  and  launch  proved  a  total  loss. 

SS.  Aleutian.— At  23.40  on  February  23,  1929,  the  Cape  Lazo  Station 
received  a  distress  message  from  the  ss.  Aleutian  advising  aground  Maude  Island, 
Seymour  Narrows.  Cape  Lazo  endeavoured  to  get  in  touch  with  tug  by  radio- 
phone, but  without  success.  At  00.30  the  Aleutian  reported  afloat  again,  no 
assistance  required.    Vessel  proceeded  to  Seattle  under  own  powrer. 

Motor  Yacht  Greta  M.—At  19.40  on  March  12,  1929,  the  motor  yacht 
Greta  M  called  the  Cape  Lazo  Station  by  radiophone  and  advised  "  In  Green 
Point  rapids  broken  down  and  need  help,  send  someone  to  help  us  ".  Cape  Lazo 
communicated  wTith  the  St.  Faith  who  was  going  to  the  assistance  of  the  Greta  M. 


MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 


188 

but  was  advised  by  the  Cardero  Channel  Radiophone  Station  that  their  gasboat 
had  picked  up  the  Greta  M  about  22.00  and  no  further  help  needed.  The 
Greta  M  arrived  safely  at  Green  Point. 

Pachena  Point  Direction  Finding 

Gasboat  Gardiner  M.—At  13.40  on  May  15,  1928,  the  Pachena  Point 
Station  received  a  telegram  from  the  Government  telegraph  operator  at  Jordan 
River,  advising  boat  ashore  one  mile  east  of  Jordan  River.  At  13.50  Pachena 
notified  the  U.S.S.  Snohomish,  also  the  C.G.S.  Malaspina,  the  latter  being  then 
five  miles  north  of  Jordan  River,  proceeded  to  scene  at  full  speed.  At  13.65 
Pachena  notified  the  Bamfleld  Lifeboat.  Pachena  relayed  messages  exchanged 
between  Malaspina  and  Gardiner  M  re  putting  line  aboard,  etc.  The  Gardiner  M 
was  pulled  off  by  other  gasboats  later  on. 

Poiver  Boat  Fleur  de  Vie.— At  16  on  November  16,  1928,  the  lightkeeper 
at  Carmanah  advised  the  Pachena  Station  that  a  power  boat,  the  Fleur  de  Vie, 
was  reported  drifting  into  the  straits,  position  4  or  5  miles  off  Bonilla  point.  At 
16.07  Pachena  advised  the  Bamfleld  Life  Saving  Station.  At  16.20  Tatoosh 
was  requested  to  advise  the  Neah  Bay  coastguard.  The  Bamfleld  and  Neah 
Bay  lifeboats  proceeded  to  scene.  The  Fleur  de  Vie  was  towed  to  Port  Renfrew 
by  a  launch. 

Point  Grey 

Tug  Burrard  Chief.— At  21.10  on  May  11,  1928,  the  tug,  Burrard  Chief 
advised  the  Point  Grey  Station  by  radiophone  that  she  might  need  assistance, 
being  afraid  that  one  of  the  two  scows  in  tow  would  turn  over,  position  off 
Point  Grey,  bound  English  bay,  strong  westerly  breeze.  Point  Grey  broadcast 
this  information  on  radiophone.  The  Vancouver  Drydock  and  Salvage  Com- 
pany, who  were  advised  by  telephone,  said  would  send  tug  out.  At  21.20  the 
tug  Prospective  No.  2  came  into  Vancouver  Harbour,  and  the  Burrard  Chief 
immediately  established  communication  with  her,  and  advised  did  not  want 
assistance,  but  that  some  tug  should  be  prepared  to  come  to  assistance  if  scow 
turned  over.  At  22.15  the  Burrard  Chief  reported  in  cove  other  side  of  Point 
Atkinson  everything  all  right. 

Vancouver 

SS.  Hampholm  and  SS.  Princess  Adelaide. — At  11.15  a.m.  on  December  19, 
1928,  the  steamers  Hampholm  and  Princess  Adelaide  were  in  collision,  in  English 
bay,  dense  fog.  The  Vancouver  Station  immediately  notified  the  agents  of  both 
vessels  and  handled  messages  exchanged.  The  Princess  Adelaide  was  towed  to 
the  Wallace  Shipyards,  North  Vancouver. 

East  Coast — North  Sydney,  N.S. 

SS.  Callisto.— At  12.20  a.m.  on  April  29,  1928,  the  North  Sydney  Station 
received  a  distress  message  from  the  ss.  Callisto,  advising  "aground  off  Louis- 
burg"  no  further  information  or  exact  position  given.  The  CGS.  Montcalm  also 
picked  up  distress  message  and  endeavoured  to  get  position  of  Callisto,  without 
result.  Montcalm  left  North  Sydney  at  5.40  a.m.  to  search  for  Callisto,  but  up 
to  6.30  on  30th,  had  not  located  wreck.  At  2  p.m.  on  30th  report  received  that 
one  body  driving  ashore  at  Scatari.     Vessel  total  loss. 

SS.  Cairntorr.—kl  2.25  p.m.  on  October  23,  1928,  the  North  Sydney  Station 
received  a  distress  message  from  the  ss.  Cairntorr,  advising  "Ashore  abeam  outer 
island  rock,  Coacoacho  Bay,  P.Q.,  Lat,  50-08  N.  60-15  W.  taking  to  boats". 
JNorth  Sydney  immediately  broadcast  this  information,  and  reported  same  to 


REPORT  OF  THE  DBPUTY  MINISTER  18j 

Marine  Agents,  Sydney  and  Halifax,  N.S.,  and  Lloyds,  North  Sydney  and 
London.  The  broadcast  was  repeated  by  the  Grindstone  Island  Station.  At 
2.30  p.m.  the  ss.  Aggersund  was  in  communication  with  Cairntorr  and  pro- 
ceeding to  assistance,  position  fifty  miles  distant.  Up  to  4  p.m.  no  further 
particulars  received.  At  4.20  p.m.  ss.  Salacia  fifteen  miles  distant  proceeding 
to  assistance.  The  Aggersund  and  Salacia  stood  by  all  night.  The  Caimtarr 
was  a  total  loss. 

Sable  Island,  N.S. 

Trawler  Islande. — At  2.55  p.m.  on  June  6,  1928,  the  Sable  Island  Station 
heard  the  trawler  Islande  asking  assistance  of  the  trawler  Rayondor,  stating  she 
was  ashore.  At  3  p.m.  Superintendent  Henry  was  asked  to  have  the  Island  life- 
boat crew  in  readiness  in  case  required.  At  3.10  p.m.  Sable  Island  asked  the 
Islande  if  Lloyds  could  be  advised.  At  3.16  p.m.  the  Islande  replied  "Yes,  you 
can  send  out  the  report  we  are  ashore",  position  on  NE.  bar  Sable  island  about 
5  miles  ENE.  of  NE.  Light.  The  Islande,  with  the  assistance  of  trawlers 
Rayondor  and  Loubyrne  refloated  at  7.35  p.m. 

Cape  Race,  Nfld. 

SS.  Carlier.— At  19.30  EST.  on  February  18,  1929,  the  Cape  Race  Station 
received  a  distress  message  from  the  ss.  Carlier  advising  "Struck  submerged 
object  Lat.  44-30  N.  42-05  W.  tail  end  shaft  broken  in  stern  tube.  At  22-15  the 
Carlier  advised  "accepting  ss.  City  of  Winnipeg's  offer  of  assistance."  The 
Carlier  was  towed  to  the  Azores. 

SS.  Padnsay.— At  7.45  a.m.  EST.  on  February  16,  1929,  the  Cape  Race 
Station  was  advised  by  the  ss.  Vulcania  that  steering  gear  of  ss.  Padnsay  had 
broken  and  aerial  carried  away,  ss.  President  Harding  proceeding  to  assistance. 
On  February  17  the  Padnsay  was  still  lying  to,  but  later  procedeed  on  course 
without  assistance. 

SS.  Plasdinam.— At  11.30  EST.  on  June  23,  1928,  the  ss.  Baron  Garioch 
reported  to  the  Cape  Race  Station  that  the  ss.  Plasdinam  was  ashore  Freshwater 
point,  about  seven  miles  west  of  Cape  Race.  The  Baron  Garioch  stood  by. 
Crew  landed  safely.  The  Plasdinam  was  a  total  wreck,  vessel  not  equipped  with 
radio. 

SS.  Gydavore.— At  12.20  on  December  1,  1928,  the  Cape  Race  Station 
received  a  distress  message  from  the  ss.  Gydavore  advising  steering  gear  broken 
drifting  direction  Allen  Island  Light.  On  December  2,  the  Gydavore  reported 
damage  temporarily  repaired  proceeding  on  course. 

SS.  Kiruna.— At  04-30  GMT.  on  December  2,  1928,  the  Cape  Race  Station 
received  a  distress  message  from  the  ss.  Kiruna  advising  ship  half  capsized, 
50-05  N.  54-05  W.  cargo  of  lead  ore  melting.  The  Kiruna  returned  to  Botwood, 
Nfld. 

Point  Amour,  Belle  Isle 

Aeroplane  Bremen. — The  wreck  of  the  German  aeroplane  Bremen  on  Greenly 
island,  Labrador,  on  April  13,  1928,  was  promptly  reported  and  a  considerable 
amount  of  traffic,  including  press  matter,  was  handled  by  the  Point  Amour  and 
Belle  Isle  Stations. 

The  East  Coast  radio  stations  were  also  of  assistance  to  the  ss.  UOrient, 
Twickenham,  Glitra,  Michael  Lembiricos,  Rosecastle,  Aldebaran,  Innerton, 
Illingworth,  Queen's  County,  Framlington  Court,  Panaghis  M.  Hadoulis  and 
Hedrun. 


190  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 

Great  Lakes — Point  Edward  and  Tobermory,  Ontario 

SS.  Thousand  Islander. — On  November  21,  1928,  the  ss.  Collingwood  advised 
the  Point  Edward  Station  ss.  Thousand  Islander  adrift  in  sinking  condition  crew 
all  aboard.  Collingwood  position  about  north  sixty-five  west  from  Thunder  Bay 
island  twenty-five  miles  distant,  southwest  gale  with  snow.  At  1.50  p.m.  the 
Collingwood  advised  the  Tobermory  Station,  "One  ten  p.m.  anchored  middle 
island  Lake  Huron  position  of  Islander  when  last  seen  26  miles  south,  75  degrees 
east  from  Thunder  Bay  island".  At  request  of  marine  agent  this  information  was 
broadcast  as  a  warning  to  all  vessels. 

The  Great  Lakes  Radio  Stations  were  also  of  assistance  to  the  ss.  Renfrew, 
Huronic,  Canadoc  and  Collier  No.  1. 

EAST   COAST  VISUAL   SIGNAL   SERVICE 

Signal  stations  on  the  East  coast  are  under  the  administration  of  the  Radio 
Branch  and  under  the  direct  jurisdiction  of  the  Division  Superintendent  of  Radio 
at  Halifax.  All  radio  stations  report  ships  communicated  with  and  this  is 
supplemented  by  reports  of  ships  sighted  by  the  following  visual  signal  stations 
which  are  organized  to  tie  in  with  the  East  coast  radio  service: — 

Magdalen  Islands. — Including  Grindstone,  Amherst  Island,  Pleasant  Bay, 
Grosse  Isle,  and  Etang-du-Nord.     Wireless  to  Sydney. 

St.  Paul  Island. — Signal  agent  part-time.     Wireless  to  Sydney. 

Aspy  Bay. — Signal  agent  part-time.    Landline  to  Sydney. 

Scatari  Island. — Signal  agent  part-time.     Landline  and  telephone  to  Sydney. 

Flat  Point. — Signal  agent  part-time.     Private  telephone  to  Sydney. 

Point  Tupper. — Signal  agent  part-time.  Landline  to  Sydney ;  ice  reports  to 
Canso. 

Sydney,  C.B. — The  duties  of  signal  agent  are  undertaken  by  Captain  Mac- 
Kenzie,  Superintendent  of  Pilots,  who,  upon  receipt  of  reports,  analyzes  same  and 
forwards  to  central  offices  at  Halifax  and  Quebec  as  requisite. 

Halifax,  N.S. — This  station  is  located  at  the  Citadel  and  maintains  a  con- 
tinuous watch  day  and  night  and  is  in  direct  communication  with  Chebucto  Head 
Radio  and  Signal  Station  by  a  private  telephone,  which  was  installed  during  the 
present  year.  A  summary  of  ships  reported  by  the  Citadel  Station  appears  in  the 
department's  annual  repoit. 

Chebucto  Head. — This  station  is  situated  at  the  entrance  to  Halifax  Harbour 
and  reports  the  passing  of  all  vessels  to  the  Signal  Station  at  the  Citadel.  Two 
fulltime  signal  agents  are  maintained  for  visual  signalling.  The  Direction 
Finding  Station  situated  at  the  same  point  reports  all  vessels  communicated  with 
by  wireless,  giving  position  and  probable  time  of  arrival.  The  station  is 
organized  for  lamp  signalling  at  night  to  vessels  not  fitted  with  wireless. 

Sambro  Head  Light  Vessel. — This  lightship  keeps  a  lookout  and  reports  all 
passing  vessels  not  fitted  with  wireless  to  Chebucto  Head. 

St.  John,  N.B. — The  Signal  Station  at  Saint  John  is  situated  in  the  Customs 
building  and  is  connected  by  telephone  to  the  Red  Head  Direction  Finding 
Station.     Two  full-time  signal  clerks  are  employed. 

Lurcher  Lightship. — Reports  all  ships  spoken  or  sighted  by  wireless  to  Red 
Head,  Saint  John. 

Seal  Island. — A  signal  clerk  part-time  reports  by  wireless  to  Red  Head, 
Saint  John,  all  ships  spoken  or  sighted. 

Partridge  Island.— Signal  agent  part-time.     Telephone  to  Saint  John,  N.B. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  191 

SOREL  SHIPYARD 
Report  of  Fbed  Bridges,  Superintendent 

The  operations  of  the  Shipyard  consisted  chiefly  in  maintaining   the  fleet 
of  the  St.  Lawrence  Ship  Channel  Branch  in  good  order,  carrying  out  the  n< 
sary  repairs  and  the  building  of  new  constructions. 

Work  was  also  done  for  the  Dominion  Steamers,  Maintenance  of  Lights 

Department,  Maintenance  of  Buoys  Department  and  the  Signal  Service. 

With  respect  to  the  St.  Lawrence  Ship  Channel  fleet  I  beg  to  note  (hat  the 
maintaining  and  repairs  are  increasing  every  year,  which  is  principally  due, 
in  my  opinion,  to  the  greater  depth  and  the  harder  digging  that  is  being  done. 

NEW   CONSTRUCTIONS 

During  the  fiscal  year,  dredge  No.  8  was  completed  satisfactorily,  also  steel 
dump  scows  Nos.  91  and  92  and  wooden  dump  scows  Nos.  96  and  97.  Con- 
struction No.  95,  the  new  Frontenac,  work  was  continued  but  is  not  yet  completed. 
Constructions  Nos.  98  and  99,  the  designs  have  been  completed,  material  ordered 
and  delivered  and  considerable  progress  made  with  the  hulls.  The  Scotch  marine 
boilers  for  dredges  Nos.  3  and  4  were  completed,  and  those  for  dredge  No.  4  were 
placed  on  board  and  the  work  completed. 

The  following  are  some  of  the  outstanding  repairs  made  on  the  St.  Lawrence 
Ship  Channel  vessels  and  other  vessels: — 

The  following  vessels  were  hauled  up  on  the  slip: — 

Hopper  barge  No.  1,  tugs  Becancour,  Contrecceur,  Deschaillons,  Iberville, 
Laviolette,  Varennes,  C.G.S.  Argenteail  and  C.G.S.  Emilia. 

REPAIRS   TO   DOMINION   STEAMERS 

Repairs  were  carried  out  on  the  following: — Acetylene,  Argenteuil,  Berthier, 
Emilia,  Shamrock,  Lady  Grey  and  Mikula. 

BUILDINGS    AND   WHARVES 

The  shipyard  buildings  and'  wharves  were  kept  in  good  condition  and  some 
repairs  were  made;  some  work  was  begun  in  connection  with  the  reconstruction 
of  Wharf  No.  4. 

SHEERLEGS  AND   HAULING  WAYS 

Necessary  repairs  were  made  to  the  140-ton  sheerlegs  and  the  hauling  ways. 

The  force  employed  at  the  shipyard  during  the  fiscal  year  1928-29  varied 
from  a  minimum  of  671  at  June  25,  1928  and  a  maximum  of  737  at  March  11, 
17  and  25,  1929,  with  an  average  for  the  year  of  695. 

The  total  amount  expended  for  shipyard  operations  during  fiscal  year  1928-29 
was  $1,044,621.29. 


APPROPRIATION  AND  EXPENDITURE 

The  parliamentary  appropriation  for  the  Marine  Department  for  the  fiscal 
year  1928-29  was  $12,190,554.77;  the  expenditure,  $9,441,190.17;  leaving  an 
unexpended  balance  for  the  department  of  $2,749,364.60. 


192  MARINE  AND  FISHERIES 


CORRESPONDENCE 

The  number  of  letters  received  during  the  fiscal  year  1928-29  was  143,275. 

The  number  of  letters  sent  out  during  the  fiscal  year  1928-29  was  46,600; 
this  does  not  include  the  circular  le