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R. H. PERRY 

HEADMASTER 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2019 with funding from 
Ashbury College 


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PITTA WAY’S 
PHOTO STUDIO 

58 SPARKS ST. 

Ottawa’s Leading Photographer 


KAGAWONGCAMP 

(Balsam Lake) 

AFFILIATED WITH THE ROYAL 
LIFE-SAVING SOCIETY 
OF ENGLAND 

A CAMP OF NAUTICAL AND 
AQUATIC INSTRUCTION 
FOR SCHOOL BOYS 

Full instruction in Swimming, Sailing, 

Rowing, Life-Saving, Shooting, First Aid to 
the Injured, etc., etc. Excellent fishing, 
black bass and maskalonge. Canoe and sail¬ 
ing cruises. New 50 ft'dock and water chute. 

Large fleet of boats and canoes. Pure water. 

Good food. Wholesome environment. Fifth 
season. Careful supervision. Camp limited 
to 30 boys. For prospectus and further in¬ 
formation address. 

E. A. CHAPMAN, 

Gymnasium Director, St. Andrew’s College 

Toronto, Ont. 

N. B.—Special arrangements will be made for a party from Ottawa. Apply to 
Mr. C. H. H ooper, Ashb ury College. Ottawa. 


CLUB AND CLASS PINS 

Designs and Prices Submitted on Request 

HENRY BIRKS & SONS, Limited 

JEWELLERS 

99-101 Sparks Street, Ottawa 














SHOOTING TEAM, 1910-11. 

Standing —I). St. G. Lindsay, E. U. H. Boyd. 
Sitting —H. L. Raid, C. H. Hooper, Esq., E. J. Lowe. 




PITTA WAY’S 
PHOTO STUDIO 

58 SPARKS STREET 
Ottawa’s Leading Photographer 


KAGAWONGCAMP 

(Balsam Lake) 

AFFILIATED WITH THE ROYAL 
LIFE-SAVING SOCIETY 
OF ENGLAND 

A CAMP OF NAUTICAL AND 
AQUATIC INSTRUCTION 


Full instruction in Swimming, Sailing, 

Rowing, Life-Saving, Shooting, First Aid to 
the Injured, etc., etc. Excellent fishing, 
black bass and maskalonge. Canoe and sail¬ 
ing cruises. New 50-ft. dock and water chute. 

Large fleet of boats and canoes. Pure water. 

Good food. Wholesome environment. Fifth 
season. Careful supervision. Camp limited 
to 30 boys. For prospectus and further in¬ 
formation address. 

E. A. CHAPMAN, 

Gymnasium Director, St. Andrew’s College 
TORONTO, ONT. 

N. B.—Special arrangements will be made for a party from Ottawa. Apply to 
Mr. C. H. Hooper, Ashbury College, Ottawa. 


CLUB AND CLASS PINS 

Designs and Prices Submitted on Request 

HENRY BIRKS & SONS, LIMITED 

JEWELLERS 

99-101 Sparks St., Ottawa 


















! 


INTER-SCHOOL CHAMPIONS,. 1911. 

p Row —R. W. White, W. H. Thompson, W. G. Gibbs, A. St. Laurent, W. M. Irvin, J. B. L. Heney. 
Second Row —A. B. Bedkoe, W. H. Wickware, E. L. Sample, C. H. Hooper, Esq., A. M. Naismith, 

D. McCann, Esq., J. V. Thomas, D. F. Verner, W. H. Davis. 

Third Row —L. B. Carling, E. L. Bowie, J. A. Strubbe. 











The Ashburian 

dn 


Editorial Staff 

Editor-in-Chief — Mr. C. H. Hooper. 

Assistant Editors —R. Lethbridge, L. E. L. Koelle. 
Sports Editors — A. Naismith, J. V. Thomas. 

Scouts’ Page —E. D. H. Boyd. 

Rifle Shooting —E. J. Lowe. 

Artists —D. Verner, J. Harvey. 

Secretary-Treasurer — Mr. D. E. C. Wood. 


Editorial. 

In reopening the College this term—its second year in the 
new premises—a noticeable increase is apparent in both staff and 
boys. Some old faces are absent of course—as must be the case 
as each year goes by. First, our House Master for 1910-11, Mr. 
Pratt, has left us, and given up the profession altogether. We 
think that all his colleagues and every boy at Ashbury will wish 
him the best of luck and prosperity in his new walk in life. 

Mr. Hooper has taken his place in the house. Mr. Carey- 
Elwes and Mr. Wood are both with us again, but Miss Blanchet 
has gone. The new arrivals are Mr. Thomas, of London Univer¬ 
sity, who has had four years’ experience in teaching higher mathe¬ 
matics in Ireland, and Mr. Wiggins, from Oxford, who, for a short 
time taught at the great Wellington public school. The latter is 
a musician of great ability, and will prove an acquisition in our 
choir and orchestra, no less than in the class room. 

Mr. Gilbert, from Trinity University, Toronto, is the extra 
member of the staff this year. He has been at T. C. S. and Rothe¬ 
say, and thus comes to us with much practical experience to his 
credit. 

Of course, Captain Weston is still here—it is impossible to 
think of the school continuing without his genial presence. 

Miss Blanchet’s place is now taken by Miss Edwards, whose 
experience in English preparatory schools eminently fits her to ta 






2 


THE ASHBURIAN 


charge of the youngsters. Miss Clark, our nurse and matron, is 
with us again, to the great satisfaction of all. 

With the Head Master and a staff of seven, we feel confident 
that Ashbury will put in a better year's work in 1911-12 than ever 
before. 

We need this increased staff in view of the fact that our attend¬ 
ance has proportionately grown. The house is full and the class 
rooms show no vacant seats. The next step is only a matter of 
time—the formation of a waiting list—for Ashbury can contain 
no more. 

Our new draught of boys this year has been a very happy one. 
Some of them have shown good stuff already, both in games and 
in class. They are a good lot, and will be a credit to the College. 

Strange to say, we lost all our prefects of last year, and have 
now started with a new set. They are Naismith, Thomas, Heney 
and Boyd in the house, and Davis and Hughson among the day 
boys. From what we have seen so far the choice is a good one. 
The sense of responsibility and the appreciation of privileges 
among them is full}'' felt. The Ashburian congratulates them 
upon the good work which they have so far shown, and confidently 
expects them to prove the most efficient officers whom the College 
has yet had. 

Yes, Ashbury is steadily forging to the front among great 
Canadian schools. From a little private school on Wellington 
street twenty years ago, she grew to fill the more spacious premises 
on Argyle avenue. Slowly she outgrew thD, and now with her 
present splendid “ plant" has proved her efficiency on the play¬ 
ground as much as in the hardest exams. The motive force—the 
stimulus—which has been constantly applied, the end she has ever 
had in view, the high moral character which has always been her 
aim, and the steady pressure forward which has made her what she 
is now, is due, we think, solely to one fact. Other schools change 
their Head Masters at shorter or longer intervals. This incurs a 
change in method, a change of ideals, a change of tone, all more or 
less detrimental to the steady movement ahead. Ashbury from 
her foundation has never lost the great influence of her founder. 
Mr. Woollcombe has guided her destinies for her twenty years of 
life—he has made her what she is, and he has moulded the char¬ 
acters of her sons and sent them out into the world, better and 
stronger for the struggle with the competing forces there to be met 
with. And this hundreds of old boys are ready to testify. 

The Ashburian, the staff, and every boy in the College, trusts 
that our “Head” may be spared to us for many, many years to 
come. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


3 


Scouting. 


The first patrol has now been in existence just one year. The 
four survivors who constitute all that remains of the original 
seven, are now entitled to the one year’s “service star.” Those 
now wearing this decoration are:— 

Boyd, Scoutmaster... 3 Stars 

' Morris, Scout. 2 “ 

Sladen, Scout. 1 “ 

Price (I), Scout. 1 

Read, Leader. 1 “ 

Fleming, Corporal. 1 “ 

Much enthusiasm exists now among the patrols regarding pro¬ 
ficiency badges. At this time of going to press the wearers of pro¬ 
ficiency badges are as follows:— 

PROFICIENCY BADGES. 

Scoutmaster Boyd,—Marksman, Signaller, Missioner, Fireman, 
A. Scoutmaster Beddoe,—Signaller. 

1st. Patrol — 

Birkett I.,—Signaller, Cyclist, Musician. 

Read,—Marksman, Cyclist, Fireman. 

Sladen,—Red Cross, Fireman, Handyman, Missioner, Path¬ 
finder, Signaller, Cook. 

Maunsell,—Signaller, Cyclist, Fireman, Cook. 

2nd. Patrol —■ 

Bate II.,—Cyclist, Cook, Red Cross, Signaller. 

Blakeney I.,—Cyclist. 

Godfrey,—Signaller. 

Palmer,—Red Cross, Cook, Musician, Bugler, Cyclist. 
Robson,—Cook. 

Thoburn,—Cyclist, Musician, Cook. 

Ross,—Cyclist, Signaller, Musician, Cook, Fireman, Handyman 
In all 43 Proficiency Badges. 

While this desire to become proficient and useful is laudable, 
it is suspected that the acquisition of a good “arm” has something 
do do with it. What the writer would prefer to see would be a 








4 


THE ASHBURIAN 


first-class scout at Ashbury. It is “up to” the first patrol now to 
furnish the troop with this first first-class scout. Some of the vet¬ 
erans have worn the second-class badge for very nearly a year. 
The whole city of Ottawa has only some dozen scouts in the first- 
class. 

In the matter of recruits this year, some ten boys have applied. 
These, with Echlin (transferred from Ottawa troop), and Shipman 
(Winnipeg scout), supply two more patrols to our troop, making 
it consist now of five patrols. 

At a recent meeting of the full Council and patrols, it was 
decided to divide and reorganize the scouts under day boy and 
boarder patrols. This arrangement makes it easier for the leaders 
to get their scouts together for practices, field work, etc. 

On Saturday, September 23, the troop was taken to Fairy 
Lake, under Scoutmaster Boyd. While there, several Ottawa 
patrols were met with and some friendly games were indulged in 
with the strangers. 

The following Saturday all the scouts and ten recruits turned 
out in heavy marching order. A special car was chartered to 
Chelsea, the troop entrained at the Union, detrained at Chelsea, 
and marched in good order to a beautiful camp ground near Kings- 
mere. Here they bivouacked for the day. In less than ten min¬ 
utes from the time of their arrival the camp fires were blazing 
merrily. True, the recruits’ camp looked curiously chaotic, and 
their fire had to be lighted no less than five times before it would 
“go,” but they learned a lot, and, by the time that their uniforms 
arrive, will be a good deal smarter than they are at present. 

The afternoon was spent in manoeuvres on a large scale, a 
sham fight forming the principal feature of the day. 

Notes Gleaned from Private Sources. 

I. The Chelsea train newsboy has finally got rid of all his 
ancient stock, even to the last decayed peanut and musty choco¬ 
late. He will open business with a new stock (the second since the 
line was built), this week. 

II. The President of the Council tracked the special car home 
to the Union the next day. He reports that the line was strewn 
with empty chocolate boxes, orange skins, second-hand gum 
banana peel and lunch paper for a distance of exactly six miles. 

III. Tenders are hereby asked for on the contract for extract¬ 
ing the obstruction in the Troop Bugle. Various guesses have been 
made as to the nature of this obstruction, the majority favouring 
the chocolate theory. 

IV. In the sham battle the total casualties, after a three-hour 
engagement, were:— 


THE ASHBURIAN 


5 


Killed—None. 

Wounded—Various pieces of stockings and trousers. 

Missing--60 cents, a knife and two teeth. 

Caught—One cold. 

Such are the horrors of war. 

V. The Conductor on the Chelsea train is in the hospital this 
week. Hopes are entertained of his recovery. His malady has 
been diagnosed as “brain whirl.” 

VI. Mr. Wood has suggested that a bath chair be attached to 
the Troop, for the purpose of conveying those whose lunch has 
rendered them incapable of walking back to the station. 

VII. When the Duke of Connaught arrives there will be a 
turn out of Scouts in Ottawa to welcome him. Ashbury will be 
represented, and it is hoped that every scout will be at his smartest 
for that parade. 

Scoutmaster Boyd attended a lunch given to Scoutmasters 
at the King George Cafe, on Thursday, October 5. He accumu¬ 
lated many new ideas, as well as a good meal. 


Old Boy News. 


Ashburians Serving the King. 


Imperial Forces. 

Army Service Corps.Capt. O. B. R. Dickey. 

Capt. M. L. B. H. Lambert. 

Royal Field Artillery.Lieut. G. A. R. Spain. 

Royal Engineers (retired).Lieut. T. C. Keefer. 

* 

Canadian Permanent Forces. 

Royal Canadian Artillery.Major E. de B. Panet. 

Capt. A. Z. Palmer. 

Capt. L. W. S. Cockburn. 
Lieut. A. D. Irwin. 

Royal Canadian Regiment.Capt. G. G. Chrysler. 

Lieut. M. K. Greene. 

Royal Canadian Engineers.Capt. P. S. Benoit. 

Lieut. R. H. Irwin. 

Royal Canadian Dragoons.Lieut. F. H. M. Codville. 









6 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Capt. E. de B. Panet, of the Royal Canadian Artillery, an old 
Ashburian, has been promoted to the rank of major in that regi¬ 
ment. 

We are pleased to note the success of Melbourne O’Halloran 
and Herbert Reid, who passed the McGiU Matriculation Exam, 
held in June. 

Charles M. Anderson, who was at Ashbury in 1909-10, was also 
a successful candidate at’the same examination. 

Lieut. H. Willis O’Connor, of the Governor-General’s Foot 
Guards, an old boy, was an officer of the Canadian Coronation 
Contingent, 1911. 

Alex. Anderson and Eric Irwin graduated from McGill this 
year. Both received the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

On June 7th, the marriage took place of Mr. Wilfred C. W. 
Whitcher, manager of the Westport Manufacturing, Casting and 
Plating Works, and Miss Ethel Everett Hale. The groom will be 
remembered by many old boys as “Billy” Whitcher. 

St. Andrews Church, Toronto, was the scene of a pretty wed¬ 
ding on June 14th, when Mr. Spencer L. Dale Harris, Montreal, 
was married to Miss Margaret Cassels, daughter of Hamilton Cas- 
sels, K.C. Mr. Dale Harris is a former Ashburian, having entered 
the school in 1895. He later took both the Arts and Law courses 
at McGill, obtaining the degrees of B.A. and B.C.L. in 1902 and 
1905 respectively. In the latter year, he was called to the Bar of 
the Province of Quebec, and is now in active practice of his pro¬ 
fession in Montreal, 

The marriage took place at Toronto on June 13th, of Capt. 
P. S. Benoit, R.C.E., and Miss Bertha Kathleen Ince Warren. 
Capt. Benoit, who is one of Ashbury’s most promising graduates 
now serving in the Canadian permanent forces, entered the school 
in 1899, and at the age of 17 commenced his studies at R.M.C., 
Kingston. On graduation from that institution in 1904, after a 
successful course, he obtained a commission in the Royal Canadian 
Engineers. He was advanced to the rank of captain in 1910. For 
a short time after graduation Capt. Benoit held the position of Dir¬ 
ector of the Government Military Works at Quebec. At present 
he is stationed with the First Fortress Company of his regiment at 
Halifax, N.S. 

The marriage occurred on September 14th, at St. John, N.B., 
of Mr. Horace Arthur Dickey, barrister, of Edmonton, Alberta, 
and Miss Mary Catharine Macdonald. Horace Dickey is a former 
student at Ashbury, and after leaving the school took the law 
course at Dalhousie University, graduating with the degree of 
Bachelor of Law in 1905. 

The marriage of Mr. Frederick Hamilton Blackburn, of Winni- 


THE ASHBURIAN 


7 


peg, Manitoba (an “old boy”), and Miss Julia Irene Wilcocks, 
took place in the church of St. Mary Magdalene, Picton, Ont., on 
Wednesday, September 6th. 

The Reverend Dr. W. T. Herridge officiated at the marriage 
on September 30th, of Miss Helen Alberta McDougall and Mr. 
Elbert Newsom Soper, an old Ashbury boy, 

Cadets Jack Lewis, Frank Codville and Stanley Wright (all 
old Ashburians), graduated from R.M.C. this year. 

The Editor will always be pleased to receive any news of Old 
Boys for publication in the School Magazine. 


At tRe Ranges. 


After the steady enthusiasm displayed in rifle shooting 
throughout the winter of 1911 at the indoor range, and the great 
improvement in the scores which was noticeable towards spring, 
it was expected that when the ranges opened there would be a 
good turn out each Saturday morning and Thursday afternoon 
to enjoy the far more difficult and interesting sport of shooting at 
200 and 500 yards. This was not the case. Whether the superior 
attractions of Sparks street and the luxury of wandering thereon 
in one’s best clothes, occasionally enjoying a leisurely “sundae” 
or “David Harum” with a casual acquaintance, proved too great 
a temptation on Saturday mornings, is difficult to decide. Certain 
it is, that our best shots of the winter were never seen on the range, 
and were usually to be found patrolling the town instead. 

However, there were others, not perhaps the best shots at 
first, whose enthusiasm was of a more lasting character. Faith¬ 
fully they turned out to each practice, and, as a result, faithfully 
carried off all the prizes, with scores whieh the Sparks street 
promenaders could scarcely have equalled. 

This little band of enthusiastic riflemen arose early on Satur¬ 
days and spent the entire morning on the ranges, not only im¬ 
proving their shooting ability, but also deriving much benefit from 
the open air and incidentally doing something for their school. 

On Thursdays, disregarding the allurements of cricket and 
tennis, after school they would again seek the ranges, and rain or 
shine (a good deal of the latter), steadily seeking and gaining 
improvement in the manly, useful accomplishment of Rifle 
Shooting. 

As is generally noticed, those who were best in indoor shooting 
did not “show up” so well on the ranges, and vice versa. Among 


8 


THE ASHBURIAN 


the first in the indoor competition for the O’Connor Cup, were 
Sparks, Butterworth, Reid (I), Boyd, Barwis, Naismith and Russell. 
Of these, Sparks proved the best, and won the cup with the good 
total of 225 out of a possible 250. 

The full scores were as follows:— 

O’Connor Cup. 

Possible 250. 


Sparks, wins. 225 

Butterworth. 223 

Reid (I) \ 9n 

Boyd (I)/ . - U 

Barwis 

Naismith. 199 

Russell. 181 


A match between day boys and boarders was held on March 
20, with prizes consisting of neat gold tie pins, suitably engraved, 
presented by the Head Master. The result was:— 


Possible 25. 

Day Boys. Boarders. 


Sparks. 

23 

Barwis. 

21 

Butterworth. . . 

. . 21 

Reid (I) . . . . 

. . . . 21 

Irvin. 

. . 20 

Naismith. 

... 21 

Gravel. 

. . 20 

Parker. 

... 21 

Bate. 

9 

Boyd. 

... 20 


93 


104 


It is due to the day boys to explain that Bate is a junior, and, 
though his usual scores were in the neighborhood of 20, on this 
occasion nervousness overcame him. 

When the ranges opened, other names began to show promi¬ 
nently on the score sheets. Reid continued to hold straight and 
steadily, but “dark horses” such as Lindsay, a boy of 14; Lowe, 
whose scores indoors were very poor; Boyd, who soon gets dis¬ 
couraged; St. Laurent, and others, forged ahead and soon brought 
up the averages at the ranges to creditable figures. 

The four D. R. A. matches were entered with only five boys 
instead of ten on the team. This would make the highest possible 
score for them 1,400 instead of 2,800 if the team had been the pro¬ 
per ten. The total score of our five amounted to 1,030, giving each 

















THE ASHBURIAN 


9 


boy an average of 73.5 per cent., or an average of 26 out of 35 at 
each range. 

Averages, however, do not show the excellent individual scores 
which were made by some of the boys. 

The results of the Bate Cup competition (three matches at 
200 yards), proved as follows:— 



1 

2 

3 

Total 

H. Reid (wins). 

30 

27 

21 

78 

Boyd. 

26 

30 

19 

75 

Lindsay. 

28 

21 

22 

71 

Lowe. 

25 

22 

21 

68 


We tackled the R. M. C. match on June 3rd, under the handi¬ 
cap of the absence of our three best shots. It is doubtful, however, 
if the absentees could have done as well as the four who were left 
to uphold the honour of Ashbury. 

Our totals were:— 



200 

500 

Total 

Reid. 

30 

31 

61 

Lindsay. 

28 

28 

56 

Boyd. 

26 

28 

54 

Lowe. 

25 

28 

53 




224 


The results as published by the R. M. C. are as follows:— 

Highfield School.First 231 

Ashbury College.'.Fifth 224 

On the last afternoon at the ranges before the closing of school, 
remarkably good scores were made. The day was all that it should 
have been, cloudy, cool, and the light perfect. No wind bothered 
us, and the mosquitoes enjoyed themselves, even more than we. 

We had the whole place to ourselves, and at 200 yards put in 
the following scores:— 


Lowe. 


.... S-5-4-3-5-4-5 

31 

Boyd. 


.... 4-2-4-5-5-5-4 

29 

Lindsay... 


.... 5-5-4-3-4-3-5 

29 


Then a storm arose, and, as the rain rushed across the river, 
the signal for retreat to the trenches w*as sounded. This manoeu¬ 
vre, though carried out at the double, and in good order at first, 














10 


THE ASH BU 111 AN 


soon, on account of unseen pitfalls in the long grass, became a rout. 
“Sauve qui peut,” was the cry. First to go down was Boyd, his 
dramatic collapse, mixed up inextricably with his rifle and ammuni¬ 
tion bag, looked most realistic. McLaren fell second, rolling over 
like a rabbit, evidently shot through the heart. The artillery 
boomed behind us, and the pattering of the bullets grew thicker as 
three soaked survivors reached the cover of the trenches. The 
dead and wounded straggled in later. 

When the storm was over, shooting began again, at 500 yards. 
Here again good scores were made:— 

Lowe. 5—5—5—5—3-4-2 29 

Boyd.. 4-4-0-5-4-4-4 30 

Lindsay. 5-4-4-4-2-2-t 25 

The little party returned to the College through another de¬ 

luge, soaked to the skin, but satisfied with having finished the 
season with the best afternoon’s fun. 

For making a high average in the four matches of the Canadian 
Rifle League, the following will be granted First-class Marksman’s 
Certificates:— 


Reid (I). Total of 210 out of 280 

Boyd. “ 201 “ 280 

Lowe. 198 “ 280 

Lindsay. “ 192 “ 280 


Reid also gets the President’s Badge, given to the boy on each 
team who makes the highest score for his team. 

Tennis. 


About half way through the summer term, two tennis courts 
were made in front of the College, and the game became very popu¬ 
lar amongst the seniors and juniors. During the last fortnight of 
the term a tournament was held, consisting of four different events. 
The first of these was open singles for the seniors, played on the 
knock-out system. One of the best matches in this event was in 
the second round, between Mr. Wood and Barwis, which the former 
succeeded in winning after three hard sets. O’Halloran had several 
hard matches before he reached the final, in which he met Mr. 
Wood. After two very hard sets, in which he showed splendid 
form, Mr. Wood retired, leaving O’Halloran the winner. He most 
certainly deserved to win, as he played an excellent game of tennis 
throughout the tournament. 

Below is a table giving the results of this event:— 








THE ASHBURIAN 


11 


Open Singles—Seniors. 


1st Round 2nd Round Semi-Finals 


O’Halloran 1 O’Halloran 
Russell J 6-0,6-4 


Aylen 1 Gibbs 

Gibbs J 6-0,6-1 


* O’Halloran 
6-2, 4-6, 6-2 


Naismith Thomas 
Thomas J 6-2,6-0 

White 


• White 
W. O. 


J 


!' Final 


O’Halloran ] 

} 2-6, 6-3, 6-3 | O’Halloran 

I I 

I I 

J } 5-7,8-10 


Reid i 

Butter worth 

Mr. Wood 
Barwis 


] Reid | 

J 6-0,6-0 | 

► 

I Mr. Wood 
J 10-8,3-6,6-4 


Mr. Wood 
6-0, 6-0 


Mr. Wood 
(Retired) 


The second event for the seniors was “Singles, Handicap ;” 
This was played on the American system, each competitor playing 
eight games against all the others. There were ten seniors entered 
for this, so that each had to play 72 games. Below is given the 
final order, with the respective handicaps and the number of games 
won by each competitor. 

No. of Games 


1. Barwis, minus half 30. 59 

2. Mr. Wood, minus 30. 58 

3. Gibbs, minus half 30. 49 

4. O’Halloran, minus half 15 . 40 

5. Naismith, plus 15. 37 

6. White, scratch. 36 

7. Reid (II), scratch. 35 

8. Aylen, minus half 15. 23 

9. Russell, scratch. 17 

10. Butterworth, scratch. 6 


The third event was “Junior Doubles, Handicap.” This was 
also played on the American system, but owing to the number of 
entries, the boys were divided up into two divisions, six couples in 
each. Each couple played eight games against the other five in 
their division, and the final match was between the winning couple 
in Division A and the winning couple in Division B. 

Below are the scores:— 


Division A. Games Won. 

1. Howard & Sladen, plus half 15. 26 

2. Maunsell & Birkett (I), minus half 15. 24 

3. Maclaren (II) & Taschereau (II) scratch ... 21 

4. Maclaren (I) & Barwis (II), minus half 30. . 20 

5. Price (I) & Birkett (II), scratch. 19 

6. Morris & Price (II), plus half 30. 10 























12 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Division B. Games Won. 

1. Bowie & Hanna, plus half 15. 28 

2. Hennessy & Fleming, minus half 15. 24 

3. Jackson & Taschereau (I)> scratch. 23 

4. Reid (IV) & Montgomery (II), plus half 15. . 23 

5. Bate (II) & McConnell, scratch. 12 

6. Robson & Aylen, scratch. 10 

Final Match. 


Bowie 

Hanna 


v. Heward 
Sladen 


Winners —Bowie 
Hanna 


6-4, 6-1, 


The last event was “Junior Singles.” 

Here there were some very good matches, and several juniors 
should become good players in the future. Maclaren (I) was unlucky 
to be beaten by his small brother, but the latter fought his way to 
the final. The final between Maclaren (II) and Maunsell provided a 
most exciting match. But both players must learn not to hit the 
ball too high over the net; also they would tire themselves less, if 
they endeavoured to place the ball better and thus avoid never- 
ending rallies. 

Below are the scores:— 


1st Round 

Sladen 
Taschereau i 

Birkett 2 
Maunsell 

Birkett i 
Price i 

Barwis 2 
Price 2 

Heward 

Morris 

Bate iii 
Jackson 


2nd Round 

Sladen 

6-0 


Junior Singles. 

3rd Round Semi-Final 


Final 


Maunsell 

6-1 

Birkett i 
6-3 

Barwis 2 
6-2 

Heward 

8-6 

Jackson 

6-2 

Montgomery2 

Hanna 

Reid iv 
Aylen 

Robson 

McConnell 

Jones 

Taschereau i 

Maclaren 2 
Maclaren i 


• Maunsell 
6-0 


f Birkett i 
7-5 


Jackson 

6-4 

Hanna 

6-1 

Reid iv 
6-0 

McConnell 

6-4 

Taschereau i 
W. O. 

Maclaren 2 
8-6 


Maunsell 

7-5 


* Hanna 
6-2 


Reid iv 
6-4 


■ Maunsell 
6-3 


Maclaren ii 
6-1 


Maclaren ii 
7-5 


Maunsell 
6-2, 6-8, 6 l 



























THE ASHBURIAN 


13 


Football Prospects for 1911. 


Everything looks bright and rosy for a prosperous football 
season. Although the old colours are few and far between, there 
is some very likely new material, which makes the team fairly for¬ 
midable, and promises to make the season at least an interesting 
one to those who follow our games. 

I will now spend a few moments on the most likely looking 
crew for this year’s team. At fullback we have J. V. Thomas, who 
has condescended to lend his services. He is a good kick and plays 
his position well, but sometimes tackles high. 

Left half will be occupied by D. Verner, one of last year’s old 
colours. He is a beautiful tackle and a very steady man, who helps 
greatly (when he doesn’t miss trains). 

Centre half, A. Naismith. He makes an able and energetic 
captain, and is an example to the rest of his team. He is a judi¬ 
cious kick and fast runner, but a little slow in tackling. 

Davis will fill the right half’s position. He is the fastest man 
on the team, and can dodge through anything, but is a little weak 
on catching. 

Right outside will be filled by A. Becldoe, an old colour, who is 
one of the best tackles and most useful men on the team. His 
passing is a little slow yet. 

Left outside is rather doubtful thus far, as Irvin won’t train, 
and we need a well trained team, so unless things change there will 
have to be a new outside found. 

Right middle may be held by Wickware, who plays a fair 
game, but talks back a little too much. 

Left middle will be occupied by W. Thompson (brother of the 
famous Andy of last year’s aggregation). He is a good man on 
the line but his tackling is a little weak, but is improving. 

Sample is a sure fixture at right outside. He is our leading 
buck artist, and is like some pile driver when he gets going. He 
also is a good tackle. 

Left inside may be held by St. Laurent, who is very weak not 
listening to signals but may improve. 

R. White will most likely hold left scrimmage. He has just 
arrived from the village of Pembroke and his playing abilities are 
not as yet known to the general public. 

B. Heney is our right scrimmage. He is the heavy weight of 
the nobility, and an industrious sixth former. He has a few bad 
habits, such as gently taking an opponent by the hair, outside of 
that he is all right. 

Centre scrimmage will most likely be filled by Strubbe, our 
Frenchman, who says: “Trow de ball inside out to me, sometimes, 
maybe.” He gets very excited and forgets to heel the ball out. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


14 


W. G. Gibbs is our star quarter. He is a good man, but acts 
like a plough horse in distress when the signals get crossed. 

Hennessy, Carling I, and Lowe will be our trusted spares, who 
may be called upon to do great things before the season closes. 

Our coach is the famous Dave McCann, of the Ottawa Rough 
Riders, a man who knows every play and how to teach them. He is 
doing his best to make a championship team out of the aforesaid 
players, and we all wish him luck. 

A. Naismith. 

Ashbury College Intermediates v. Model School. 

This match was played at Ashbury College on September 23rd, 
and resulted in an easy win for the home team by 18 points to noth¬ 
ing. It was a very interesting game to watch, both sides displaying 
great keenness. In some cases the keenness was excessive, and 
led to uncomplimentary remarks about the referee, who displayed 
good judgment throughout the game. In fact, he is to be congratu¬ 
lated on the impartial way in which he controlled the match. I 
hope that in the next match both teams will express their gratitude 
to him by refraining from rude comments on his decisions. 

With this exception the match was most enjoyable, and some 
very good play was witnessed on both sides. The home team was 
considerably heavier, and both Reiffenstein and Carling(I) used their 
weight well. Bowie, the captain, had rather an off day; he made 
several useful runs but usually finished by fumbling and losing the 
ball. Carling (II) deserves special mention for several good runs, 
and a word of praise is due to Blakeney, who showed great tackling 
abilities. There is no doubt that there are several useful players 
amongst our intermediates, and in three or four years’ time we shall 
have a team representing the College which will carry everything 
before them, and which wifi in the worthiest manner possible up¬ 
hold the traditions of Ashbury College. 

The following were the two teams:— 

Model School. —Euquerhart (Capt.), Watson, May, Crain, 
Verner, Hodgins, Hain, Emol, Todd, Puddicombe, McDonald, 
Powell, Devlin. 

Ashbury College. —Bowie (Capt.), Carling (I), Carling (II), 
Reiffenstein, Masson, Patterson (II), Mongomery (II), Maclaren 
(II), Koelle, Thompson, Birkett (II), Blakeney (I), Jackson. 

At the time of going to press, we are able to record the results 
of two matches. 

Ashbury College v. Lower Canada College. Lost 11—0. 

Ashbury College Intermediates v. Model School. 

This match was won by Ashbury College by the narrow margin 
of ten points to five. 

A full account of the two matches will be published in the next 
number of the Magazine. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


15 


Cricket. 


Ashbury College y. Ottawa 2nd XI. 

We opened our season with a match against Ottawa 2nd XI. 
This was played on our ground on Wednesday, May 30th, and after 
an exciting finish resulted in a win for the visitors by the narrow 
margin of five runs. It was an ideal afternoon for cricket, as there 
was no sun and it was not too hot. The wicket was in good condi¬ 
tion, and the outfield was quite good. The facilities for cricket in 
our new playground should result in a great improvement in this 
game, and in two or three years’ time I hope we shall be able to 
challenge and beat Ottawa 1st. The cricket season is rather a 
short one, and we have only had about two weeks to prepare for 
our first match. The result, however, is very creditable. 

We won the toss and decided to send our opponents in. Capt. 
Weston and Barwis bowled throughout the innings and succeeded 
in putting them out for the small total of 75. Barwis was a little 
unlucky in his bowling, and deserved to get more wickets. Capt. 
Weston was rather erratic and sent down several loose balls, which 
were not punished as they deserved, but he came out with the best 
analysis. The fielding was fair, but there is room for improvement. 
The ball was not picked up smartly enough, nor did the fielders 
back each other up enough. 

We opened our innings with Mr. Elwes and Russell, but Mr. 
Elwes fell an easy victim in the first over. Barwis came in next 
and partnered Russell for a short time until the latter was caught. 
Things looked more hopeful when O’Halloran came in and quite 
a good stand was made. When the score was 25, O’Halloran was 
caught at the wicket and his place was taken by Thomas. The 
latter treated the spectators to some big hits, but was soon bowled. 
Another good stand was made by Mr. Wood and Barwis, and when 
the former was bowled the telegraph read 59. Only 17 runs to win! 
Wickets then fell rapidly, and although White made a valiant effort 
to stop in, we were all out for 70. Barwis was the last out, being- 
clean bowled by Welsby. His innings was an excellent one, and 
he never gave a chance. He was rather too cautious towards the 
end, but his score of 26 was the best in the whole match. We went 
out to field again, but after a few overs the light became so bad, 
that we decided to stop. 

It was quite refreshing to see so many spectators, most of 
whom showed a great interest in the game, especially towards the 
end, when it became most exciting. 



Sitting —Reid (IV), Sladen, Maclaren (I). 










THE ASHBURIAN 


17 


Innings of Ottawa 2nd XI. 


C. F. Cox, b. Capt. Weston. 4 

F. C. Campbell, b. Barwis. 8 

Q. M. Chesley, b. Capt. Weston. 5 

H. W. Brown, b. Capt. Weston. 4 

G. T. Chinn, b. Capt. Weston. 3 

A. Welsby, b. Barwis. 4 

T. C. Boville, b. Barwis. 22 

D. C. Campbell, b. Capt. Weston. 4 

J. F. Crowdy (Capt.), l.b.w., b. Barwis. 0 

Col. Ward, not out. S 

Dr. King, absent. 

Extras. 13 

Total. 75 

Innings of Ashbury College. 

Russell, c. Welsby, b. F. C. Campbell. 5 

Rev. C. Elwes, c. and b. F. C. Campbell.. . . 0 

Barwis, b. Welsby. 26 

O'Halloran, c. Brown, b. Welsby. 7 

Thomas, b. F. C. Campbell. 10 

D. C. Wood (Capt.), b. Welsby. 7 

Naismith, b. F. C. Campbell. 1 

Capt. Weston, c. and b. Welsby. 1 

Reid (I), b. Welsby. 0 

White, b. F. C. Campbell. 2 

Maunsell, not out. 0 

Extras. 11 

Total. 70 


Bowling Analysis. 


Innings of Ottawa 2nd. 



Wickets 

Runs 

Barwis. 

. 4 

30 

Capt. Weston. 

. 5 

32 

Innings of 

Ashbury College. 


Welsbv. 

. 0 

15 

F. C. Campbell . . 

. 5 

18 

C. F. Cox. 

. 0 

14 

Boville. 

. 0 

12 

































18 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Ashbury College y. Ottawa 2nd XI. 

The return match was played on the Rideau ground on Wed¬ 
nesday, June 14th. The result was a win on the stroke of time for 
Ashbury College by six wickets. The home team won the toss and 
we were sent out to field. But we did not stay there long. Owing 
to some good bowling by Barwis and some excellent fielding by the 
whole team, our opponents were dismissed for the modest total of 
39. However, when we went in to bat we discovered that it was 
not so easy to make runs, and with the exception of Mr. Elwes, 
who hit with great vigour, none played the bowling with any con¬ 
fidence. Wickets fell rapidly, and the whole side was out for 20 
runs. We went out to field again, and after dismissing four bats¬ 
men, we were called in by the captain of the other team, who de¬ 
clared the innings closed. He had left us half an hour in which to 
make 37 runs, and it was a very sporting thing to do. They might 
quite easily have continued their second innings, and so won the 
match on their first innings, but they wanted to give us a sporting 
chance, which we very much appreciated. 

Mr. Elwes and Mr. Wood opened our second innings, and both 
hit at everything. Mr. Elwes was soon run out, and his place was 
taken by Barwis. The runs continued to come at a great rate, 
until Mr. Wood was bowled by Dr. King. In the next over Barwis 
was dismissed by Campbell. O’Halloran and Parker remained 
together at the wickets until the runs were knocked off, the latter 
hitting the only boundary in the match. 

The weak point in our game is the batting, but this will be 
remedied next year when we have proper net practice. Nearly 
every one in the team must learn to play with a straight bat, and 
not make a wild swing at every ball. Our bowling was good. In 
the first innings, Barwis took six wickets for 13 runs. But this 
would not have been so good, if the fielding had been bad. The 
team is to be congratulated on its good fielding. Every catch was 
held, including one very good one by Gibbs in the out field. The 
ground work was excellent, and the brothers Reid distinguished 
themselves on several occasions. There was also a distinct im¬ 
provement in the wicket keeping, only three byes being scored all 
the afternoon. 

So long as we have good fielding we shall not lose many 
matches, and I hope every member of the team will bear this in 
mind. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


19 


Ottawa II—1st Innings. 

Dr. King, c. Reid (IV), b. Barwis. 5 

T. Chinn, b. Barwis. 1 

E. Chisley, l.b.w., b. Barwis. 1 

Commander Roper, run out... 8 

H. Brown, c. Gibbs, b. Parker. 0 

T. Rankin, b. Barwis. 2 

F. Campbell, c. Thomas, b. Barwis. 0 

—. Folger, c. Irvin, b. Parker. 2 

—. Hunter, b. Barwis. 5 

D. C. Campbell, not out. 4 

J. F. Crowdy, runout. 5 

Extras. 3 

Total. 39 

Ashbury College—1st Innings. 

Rev. C. Elwes, b. Campbell. 6 

O’Halloran, b. Rankin. 0 

Barwis, c. King, b. Campbell. 1 

D. C. Wood, b. Rankin. 5 

Parker, b. Rankin. 3 

Thomas, c. King, b. Cambbell. 0 

Gibbs, c. Crowdy, b. Campbell. 0 

White, not out. 1 

Reid (I), e. King, b. Rankin. 0 

Irvin, c. Folger, b. Rankin. 0 

Reid (IV), b. Rankin. 2 

Extras. 2 

Total. 20 

Ottawa—2nd Innings. 

Dr. King, run out. 4 

T. Chinn, b. Wood. 7 

G. Chisley, c. Thomas, b. Wood. 0 

Com. Roper, c. Reid (I), b. Barwis. 3 

H. Brown, not out. 2 

T. Rankin 

F. Campbell 
—. Folger ; 

—. Hunter I Did not bat. 

D. C. Cambpell 

J. F. Crowdy j — 

Total*. 

*Innings declared closed. 




































°0 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Ashbury College—2nd Innings. 

Rev. C. Elwes, run out. 2 

D. C. Wood, b. King . 12 

C. Barwis, b. Campbell. 9 

Parker, not out. 13 

O’Halloran, not out. 3 

Thomas ) 

Gibbs 

White [ Did not bat. 

Reid (I) 

Irvin 
Reid (IV) 

Extras. 2 

Total (3 wickets) . 40 

BOWLING ANALYSIS. 

Ottawa—1st Innings. 

Wickets Runs 

Barwis. 6 13 

Rev. C. Elwes. 0 5 

D. C. Wood. 0 4 

Parker. 2 14 

2nd Innings. 

Barwis. 2 6 

D. C. Wood. 2 10 

Ashbury College—1st innings. 

i 

Wickets Runs 

F. Campbell. 4 10 

T. Rankin. G 8 

2nd innings. 

J. F. Crowdy. 0 10 

F. Campbell. 1 3 

Dr. King. 2 25 





















THE ASHBURIAN 21 


Batting Averages. 




Runs 

Innings 

Averages 

1 . 

Barwis. 

59 

4 

14.75 

2. 

D. C. Wood . 

41 

4 

10.25 

3. 

O’Halloran . 

24 

4 

6 

4. 

Rev. C. Elwes 

19 

4 

4.75 

5. 

White. 

5 

3 

1.33 


Bowling Averages. 



Wickets 

Runs 

Average 

Barwis. 

20 

85 

4.25 

Rev. C. Elwes . 

7 

35 

5 

D. C. Wood. . . 

3 

16 

5.3 


Past v. Present. 

This match, between the College and the Old Boys, which had 
been looked forward to for such a long time, was played on Satur¬ 
day, June 17th. The old boys had a very representative team, 
and were captained by P. H. Chrysler. The College had a weak 
team, as neither Parker nor Thomas were able to play. Mr. Wood, 
for the third time in succession, lost the toss, and accordingly the 
College fielded first. Barwis and Mr. Elwes shared the bowling, 
and it was not long before six wickets were down for 22 runs. 
Sladenand Macpherson made a good stand, the former contributing 
17 to the score by careful play. The whole side was out for 56. 
Mr. Elwes came out with the best analysis, and his seven wickets 
only cost 24 runs. 

The College opened their innings with Mr. Elwes and O’Hall- 
oran, but the former retired in the first over. He was soon followed 
by Barwis, who gave up an easy catch to square leg. Runs came 
quickly when Mr. Wood joined O’Halloran, until the latter fool¬ 
ishly ran himself out. However, the score was only 51 at the fall 
of the eighth wicket, and things looked very black for the school. 
But a great partnership by Reid and Sladen saved the situation, 
and at the fall of the ninth wicket the score was 72. These two 
had added 21 runs, and by good sterling cricket. Reid treated the 
spectators to some excellent hitting, and in one over he punished 
Maynard to the extent of three boundaries. Altogether, he scored 
five boundaries, and his innings of 26, the highest during the after¬ 
noon, was quite the feature of the match. Sladen played a very 
cautious game, and although he only scored one run, his innings 
was equally meritorious. 





99 


THE ASHBURIAN 


In their second innings the Old Boys fared worse, and with the 
exception of a stand by Chrysler and Bishop, no one did very much. 
The whole side was out for 39. To win the match we required 24 
runs, and as there was only 15 minutes left for play, we had to in¬ 
dulge in some big hitting. Mr. Elwes and Barwis knocked off the 
runs without any difficulty, and the match was won on the stroke 
of time by nine wickets. It was a very creditable victory in every 
way, and speaks well for the progress of the game this season. Our 
fielding was not quite as good as usual, but perhaps this may be 
accounted for by the extreme heat. 

It was very agreeable to see so many people present, especially 
so many ladies, who all followed the game with great interest. Tea 
was provided under the trees for the visitors and the players, and 
the whole afternoon was most enjoyable. 

It is to be hoped this match will become a regular annual 
institution. 

This match was the last of the season. We have played three 
matches, won two and lost one, and below will be found the aver¬ 
ages of the leading batsmen and bowlers. Next year we shall have 
a bigger fixture card and matches will be arranged for the juniors. 
Below are the scores:— 


1st Innings. 

B. Bishop, b. Barwis .... 
M. Maynard, b. Barwis . . 
A. C. Pratt, 1). Elwes .... 
A. Williams, c. Barwis, b. 
Elwes. 

A. Maynard, b. Elwes. . . . 
P. W. Chrysler c. Reid, b. 

Elwes. 

B. Sladen, c. Sparks, b. 

Elwes. 

J. Macpherson, b. Elwes .. 
A. Lewis, b.Barwis. 

C. Butterworth, 1). Elwes. 

Russell, not out. 

Extras. 


Old Boys. 

2nd Innings. 


0 b. Barwis. 7 

1 Absent. 0 

1 l.b.w., b. Wood. 2 

6 c. Wood, b. Barwis. 0 

2 Run out. 0 

2 c. Elwes. b. Gibbs. 15 

/ 

17 b. Barwis. 5 

7 c. Woollcombe, b. Barwis. 5 

0 Absent. 0 

7 l.b.w., b. Barwis. 0 

1 Not, out. 0 

12 ... 5 


Total 


56 


Total 


39 




















THE ASHBURIAN 


23 


Ashbury College. 


1st Innings. 


O’Halloran, run out. 14 

Rev. C. Elwes, c. Maynard 

b. Williams. 0 

Barwis, c. Bishop, b. A. 

Maynard. 0 

D. C. Wood, b. A. May¬ 
nard. 17 

White, b. M. Maynard ... 2 

Gibbs, c. Pratt, b. M. May- 

nard. 1 

Woollcombe, b. M. May- 

nard. 0 

Sparks, c. Chrysler, b. M. 

Maynard. 7 

Reid iv, b. A. Maynard. . . 26 
Sladen, c. Lewis, b. Sladen 

Maclaren, not out.0 

Extras. 4 


2nd Innings. 


Run out. 0 

Not out. 11 

Not out. 23 


Extras 


Total 


. 72 Total (for 1 wicket) . . 36 

Bowling Analysis. 

Old Boys—1st Innings. 


Rev. C. Elwes 
Barwis. 


Wickets Runs 
7 24 

3 20 


1st Innikgs. 


Barwis. 

Rev. C. Elwes 
D. C. Wood. . 
Gibbs. 


o 

0 

1 

1 


16 

6 

12 

0 


Ashbury College—1st Innings. 

A. Maynard. 3 

A. Williams. 1 

M. Maynard. 4 

B. Sladen. 1 


39 

12 

15 

9 



























Ashbury College Annual Sports. 

The sports were held on the college grounds at Rockcliffe and were witness¬ 
ed by a great following of the student friends and relatives: 

C. W. Barwis won the all-around championship at the annual sports, 
scoring 37 points. He won the cricket throw, shot put, pole vault, broad 
jump, half mile run, and egg race, and was second in the high jump and 
hundred. 

SUMMARY: 

Long Jump (junior).—1, Montgomery; 2, Birkett; 3, Price. Distance, 
12 ft. 3^ in. 

Long Jump (intermediate).—1, Hennessy; 2, McLaren; 3, McConnell. 
Distance, 14 ft. 6 in. 

Quarter Mile. —1, Davis; 2, O’Halloran; 3, Smart. Time 1.05 1-5. 
High Jump (junior).—1, Montgomery; 2, Birkett; 3, Parker; Height, 
3 ft. 10 in. 

100 Yard Dash. —1, McLaren; 2, Hennessy; 3, Ross. Time, 13 3-5 sec. 
Putting Shot (senior).—1, Barwis; 2, Snetsinger; 3, Shaw. Distance, 
26 ft. 1 in. 

100 Yard Dash (junior).—1, Montgomery; 2, Birkett; 3, Taylor. Time 
14 4-5 sec. 

High Jump (intermediate).—1, McLaren; 2, Ross; 3, McConnell. Dis¬ 
tance, 4 ft. 1-4 in. 

Throwing the Cricket Ball (senior).—1, Barwis; 2, Shaw; 3, Russell. 
Distance, 110 yards 2 ft. 10 in. (Record). 

220 Yard Dash (jimior).—1. Montgomery; 2, Birkett; 3, Taylor. Time 
33 1-5 sec. 

100 Yard Dash (senior).—1, Shaw; 2, Davis; 3, Barwis. Time, 11 4-5 sec. 
Pole Vault (senior).—1, Barwis; 2, Shaw; 3, Verner. Height, 8 ft. 
Long Jump (senior).—1, Barwis; 2, Shaw; 3, Morgan. Distance, 18 ft. 

1 in. 

Quarter Mile (intermediate).—I, Hennessy, 2, McLaren; 3, Ross. 
Time, 1.10 1-5. 

High Jump (senior).—1, Verner; 2, Shaw; 3, Barwis; Distance, 4 ft. 9 in. 
Half Mile (senior).—1, Barwis; 2, Davis; 3, Gibbs. Time, 2.41 1-5 
Egg Race (open).—1, Barwis; 2, Parker; 3. Hennessy. Time, 18 2-5 sec. 
440 Yard Consolation. —1, O’Halloran; 2, Gibbs; 3, Reid. 









THE ASHBURIAN 


25 


THE NEW BOY. 


You doubtless find it very hard, 

When first you come to school, 

To know exactly what is barred— 

One hates to look a fool. 

Read then the wisdom that we write for you; 

Learn how to shape your ends—lest others do. 

Do not indulge the jaunty tie, 

The particoloured sock, 

Bright with the hues of many a dye, 

With here and there a clock. 

Black ones are quite as warm, and quite as neat; 

The dye does not come off upon the feet. 

Do not attempt to cultivate 
Acquaintances with ham, 

Nor struggle to appease the hate 
Of enemies with jam. 

Experience has shown they eat a lot, 

And grow to own whatever you have got. 

It is not good for you to talk 
To everyone you see: 

Oh imitate the silent cork, 

And conversation flee. 

Perhaps they’ll take to you, and talk a lot: 

Don't take to them—you’d really better not. 

Do not be over kindly to 

Those who have come before: 

They mostly are a surly crew— 

They’d very likely bore. 

They give themselves a fearful lot of airs, 

And think your ways inferior to theirs! 



26 


THE ASHB URIAH 


Take off your hat to masters, 

As it beseems you to: 

And if they wander past us, 

Absorbed in yonder view, 

Think how poetical their thoughts must be 
That render them unable e’en to see. 

And dust your master’s blackboard if 
You have’nt done your work; 

And if the Latin Grammar’s stiff 
Assume an oily smirk. 

Try to induce him to be sympathetic, 

And make amusing what is else pathetic. 

So shall your days within the pale 
Of Uppingham be jolly; 

Free from each wearisome detail, 

And quite devoid of folly. 

And if you cannot profit from our song, 

We cannot help it—it is you that’s wrong. 


VALETE—SALVETE. 


Valete. 

H. A. Aylen, Day boy, Prefect, Form VI, Assistant Editor. Pass¬ 
ed into Harvard University. 

C. W. A. Barwis, Boarder, Head Prefect, Form VI, 1st Team Foot¬ 

ball, Captain Hockey Team, Cricket XI, Shooting Team, 
Sports Editor. Passed into R.M.C. 

M. O’Halloran, Day boy, Prefect, Captain of the School, Form VI, 

ITockev Team, Cricket XI, Assistant Editor. Passed into 
McGill University. 

H. S. Parker, Boarder, Form VI, Hockey Team, Football Team, 
Cricket XI, Shooting Team. Passed into R.M.C. 

E. X. Reid, Boarder, Prefect, Form VI, Football Team. Passed 
into R.M.C. and McGill University. 

N. A. Sparks, Day boy, Form VI, Cricket XI, Shooting Team, 

Passed into R.M.C. 

P. Woollcombe, Day boy, Prefect, Form VI, Hockey Team, Foot 
ball Team, Cricket XI, Shooting Team. 

H. M. Bate, Day boy, Form V. 

D. I\. Maconnell, Day boy, Form V, 1st Team Football. 



THE ASHBURIAN 


27 


H. R. Morgan, Day hoy, Form V. 

H. L. Reid, Boarder, Form V, Cricket XI, Shooting Team. 

R. I. Russell, Boarder, Form V, 1st Team Football. 

A. L. Shaw, Boarder, Prefect, Form V, 1st Team Football, Hockey 
Team. 

W. G. Snetsinger, Boarder, Form V, 1st Team Football, Hockey 
Team. 


W. S. Logan, Boarder, Form IV B. 

L. E. Smith, Day boy, Form IV B. 

H. F. Smythe, Day boy, Form IV B. 
G. R. Graves, Day boy, Form IV A. 
G. M. Edwards, Day boy, Form III. 

A. H. Jones, Day boy, Form III. 

R. W. Maconnell, Dayboy, Form III. 

B. West, Boarder, Form III. 

J. Lewis, Day boy, Form II. 

W. H. Kingsmill, Boarder, Form I. 


Salve™. 


E. R. Lethbridge, Boarder, Form VI. 

L. E. Sample, Day boy, Form VI. 

G. A. Strubbe, Boarder, Form VI. 

A. J. Therien, Day boy, Form VI. 

H. E. Graham, Boarder, Form V. 

L. Koelle, Boarder, Form V. 

A. S. Wick ware, Day bov, Form V. 

R. G. Masson Day boy, Form IV B. 

W. Thompson, Boarder, Form IV B. 

J. C. Reiffenstein, Boarder, Form IV B. 

C. R. Ault, Boarder, Form IV A. 

J. H. Chanonhouse, Boarder, Form IV A. 
C. A. Forde, Day boy, Form IV A. 

J. B. Marshall, Boarder, Form IV A. 

W. P. Muirhead, Day boy, Form IV A. 

R. Stewart, Da}' boy, Form IV A. 

C. O’Connor, Day boy, Form IV. 

J. L. Gow, Day boy, Form IV. 

G. W. A. Hallick, Boarder, Form IV. 

E. E. Prince, Day boy, Form III. 

I. G. Cassels, Boarder, Form I. 

T. S. Crockett, Boarder, Form II. 


28 


THE ASHBURIAN 


V. R. T. Gill, Day boy, Form II. 

M. F. Gill, Day boy, Form I. 

G. Kingsmill, Day boy, Form I. 

G. Maconnell, Day boy, Form I. 

C. A. McLachlin, Day boy, Form II. 
E. Orde, Day boy, Form II. 

J. W. Pont, Boarder, Form I. 

C. B. Shipman, Boarder, Form II. 

B. Lennox-Smith, Day boy, Form II. 


Our Contemporaries. 


The Editor begs to acknowledge the receipt of the following 
contemporaries:— 

The Grove Chronicle, Lakefield. 

The Tonbridgian (2). 

The School Magazine, Uppingham (2). 

The Cheltonian (2). 

The Wykehamist (2). 

The Meteor (3). 

The Epsomian. 

Trinity College School Record (2). 

Bradfield College Chronicle. 

Blue and White. 

The Collegian. 


School Notes. 


A. M. Naismith has been elected captain of the 1st Football 
Team, 1911. 

J. W. Hennessy, has been elected captain of the 2nd Team. 
The following committee has been appointed:— 

Captain Weston A. M. Naismith 

P. Woollcombe Wm. Gibbs 

Head Prefect for 1911-12 will be A. M. Naismith. The others 
are: J. V. Thomas, W. Heney, E. D. H. Boyd, in the house; and 
W. B. Davis and J. L. Hughson, among the Day boys. E. D. H. 
Boyd has been appointed Librarian. 



The Ashburian 

Chv ( llACLO I l I 


Editorial Staff 

« 

Editor-in-Chief — Mr. C. H. Hooper. 

Assistant Editors — R. Lethbridge, L. E. L. Koelle. 
Sports Editors —A. Naismith, J. V. Thomas. 

Scouts’ Page —E. D. H. Boyd. 

Rifle Shooting —E. J. Lowe. 

Artists —D. Verner, J. Harvey. 

Secretary-Treasurer — Mr. D. E. C. Wood. 

Old Boys’ Correspondent —D. Morgan. 


Editorial. 

In presenting this Christmas number of The Ashburian to 
our readers, we make no apologies for a criticism which might 
easily be urged against it—that it deals too largely with one subject 
—Football. There is good reason for devoting much of our space 
to this sport. Since last September the football has loomed very 
large on the Ashbury horizon—the game has occupied our spare 
time to the exclusion of all other sport—our Saturdays have been 
entirely devoted to it—our conversation has reeked of it—it has 
occupied all our waking thoughts — and we have done nothing but 
make touches and rouges even in our dreams:— 

This season we have played more matches than in any pre¬ 
vious one—thus the season has been prolonged three weeks beyond 
the usual limit. When we should have been thinking of winter 
sports we were only in the thick of our schedule—and we were 
playing our final championship game when we should have been 
skiing. Beginning badly with the loss of our first two matches, 
we slowly worked up through the eight succeeding ones, until on 
the memorable 18th of November, after a heavy snowfall, and on 
ground that suggested hockey more than football—we completely 
vindicated our right to the title of Champions—at Ste. Annes de 














2 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Bellevue, Que. Yes, Football and Ashbury certainly, for the last 
few months have been synonymous terms. The game this year 
has probably advertised the College more widely than ever before. 
We played in two strange places, and we fancy the inhabitants of 
these places are not likely to forget the fact. At the Union and 
the Central—owing to the host of supporters accompanying the 
team in the last two matches—the Rooters (led by Boyce) gently 
impressed upon the crowds that a football team was returning home 
—that that team belonged to Ashbury College—that it had won 
something—that it was feeling fairly cheerful over the fact, and that 
it earnestly wished everyone to know it. 

Is it any wonder then, that we put that team’s picture in the 
most conspicuous place in the magazine, and that we devote several 
pages to its achievements? All honour to the team and to every 
member of it. Andy’s cool generalship, Jack’s fearless and terrific 
tackles, Rusty’s runs, Grandpa’s cunning touches, Dave’s faultless 
catching, Sample’s elephantine and irresistible bucks, Beddoe’s 
speedy rushes, and Lazarus’ independant gambolings—these have 
now all passed into history, but unlike most history will not be 
speedily forgotten. 

Now that the winter is with us, football really must be put aside. 
The skate and the hockey stick—the puck and the level ice—these 
are the subjects which engross us now. It is perhaps risky to proph¬ 
ecy at this time that the success which attended the football team 
will continue with us on the ice, at any rate the fact that this year 
we have the opportunity of winning the Carling Cup for good, should 
be sufficiently stimulating to insure a strong bid for success. 

Another subject which occupies some of our space in this issue is 
Scouting. As this sport is usually more actively followed in the spring, 
summer and autumn—its season is now pretty well over so that the 
notices herein form a sort of final record of the work done at Ashbury 
in 1911. True, there will be snowshoe tramps, but it is not necessary 
to be a scout to go snowshoeing. Above all the sports, however, 
loom the Christmas holidays—now so near at hand. The “exams.”, 
the Plays, the Hockey—they sink into the background when Christ¬ 
mas approaches. In a very short time we—the Boarders—will be 
scattered over the country, from Calgary to Quebec. For three 
weeks the School will be deserted—the halls silent. The Editor and 
Staff of the magazine take this opportunity of wishing every Ash- 
burian a Very Merrie Christmas and a Happy New Year. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


3 


Football Season 1911-1912. 


First Team : 

Played 10: Won 6; Lost 4. 

Points for—110. Points against—93. 


Oct. 7—Ashbury v. Lower Canada. 

“ 11—Ashbury v. Old Boys and Masters. 
“ 14—Ashbury v. Collegiate. 

“ 21—Ashbury v. St. Albans. 

“ 26—Ashbury v. Lower Canada. 

Nov. 1—Ashbury v. Collegiate. 

“ 4—Ashbury v. St. Albans. 

“ 11—Ashbury v. Brockville Collegiate. 

“ 14—Ashbury v. St. Alban’s. 

“ 18—Ashbury v. Lower Canada. 


Lost 11-0. 
Won. 10-8. 
Lo^t 24-0. 
Lost 16-15. 
Won 13-5. 
Lost 20-10. 
Won 31-3. 
Won 5-1. 
Won 18-0. 
Won 8-5. 


Home. 

Home 

Home. 

Away. 

Away. 

Home. 

Home. 

Home. 

Away. 

Awav. 


Intel'mediate: 

Sept. 23—Ashbury v. Model School. 
Oct. 6—Ashbury v. Model School. 

“ 13—4 B. v. 4 A. and 4 Forms. 

“ 24—Ashbury v. Cliffside. 


Win. 18-0. Home. 
Win. 10-5. Home. 
4 A and 4 Win. 17-0. 
Draw. 10-10. Home. 


SENIOR MATCHES. 

Ashbury vs. Lower Canada. 

The first football match of the season was played against Lower 
Canada College on October 7, a bright, sunny day. The field was 
in ideal condition, springy and neither too hard nor too soft; while, 
although the sun handicapped the defenders of the northern goal, 
a moderate breeze made up for it. 

The L.C.C. team won the toss and elected to start play against 
the sun. Ashbury kicked off at 12.45 minutes to one, a late hour 
owing to the distance the visiting team had to come. From the 
very beginning the visitors pressed Ashbury, holding them around 
their twenty-five yard line and marking their men so carefully that 
when the home team did get the ball there was no opening to be 
found. On the line the Montreallers were decidedly superior, their 
bucks getting through every time, on account of a distorted idea in 
the heads of the home line that it was better to seize their man’s 
hair than to go for his legs. 



4 


THE ASHBURIAN 


By quarter time the visitors had scored a rouge and a try 
which they failed to convert. At half-time the score was still the 
same, but in the last quarter they just managed to get over the 
line again making a final score of 11 to 0 in favor of the visitors. 
Towards the end of each half Ashbury seemed to wake up, and drove 
their opponents back to close on the goal line, but the whistle settled 
all doubts as to whether they would get across. 

The wearers of the red, white and green could have had the game 
all their own way if they had done what they did not do, viz., 
tackled low. No individual of the L.C.C.’s seemed particularly 
brilliant, all knew how to tackle and most were effective at it. Their 
kicking was not wonderful. 

The Ashbury representatives were: 


Full Back. 

.J. V. Thomas. 

Left Half.. . . . . 

. 0. Verner. 

Center Half. 

.A. M. Naismith. 

Right Half. 

,W. Davis. 

Right Outside. 

.A. Beddoe. 

Left Outside. 

. W. Irvin. 

Right Middle. 

.A. Wickware. 

Left Middle. 

. W. Thompson. 

Right Inside.r. 

. Sample. 

Left Inside. 

. Strubbe. 

Right Scrimmage. 

. B. Heney. 

Left Scrimmage. 

. R. White. 

Centre Scrimmage. 

. Hennessy. 

Quarter. 

. Gibbs. 

Spares—Bowie, Carling, Lowe. 



Of the forward line Beddoe deserves favorable mention for 
good tackling; Gibbs, at quarter did his work well. Bowie played 
on the half line during a part of the first quarter as Verner was late, 
and tackled well while he was on the field. Davis did not get a 
chance to exhibit his good running and dodging, and Naismith held 
himself in reserve, playing anywhere and everywhere that seemed 
weak. The full back was very erratic. He ran the balls out 
well and made some very good catches, and saved several rouges. 
When Naismith hurt his hip, Thomas was called upon to do the 
kicking, but here he was very erratic making several weak kicks. 

Sample as Right Inside played a remarkable game, he being 
the only man on the line able to stop the L.C.C. bucks. 


J.V.T. 
















THE ASHBURIAN 


5 


Ashbury Old Boys ys. Masters. 

This match was played on October 11th and resulted in a win 
for the College by two points. It was a great struggle from start to 
finish, and at half time, the score was 8-5, in favour of the 
Old Boys. There was no score in the second half until one minute 
before time, when Naismith worked a fake buck and scored a touch. 
Final Score: Ashbury 10; Old Boys, 8. 

Collegiate ys. Ashbury. 

On Saturday, October 14th, Ashbury College played their game 
with the Collegiate Institute, which resulted in a victory for the 
visitors by a score of 24-0. The Collegiate had a much heavier 
team, outweighing Ashbury man for man. At 11 o’clock the ball 
was kicked off by the visitors, who immediately forced the play into 
Ashbury Territory and after several downs the Collegiate secured 
the ball on the Ashbury twenty-yard line, Brophy their Center Half 
kicked, and Irvin was brought down for a rouge. After the quarter 
way kick, the visitors again forced the play, and in several minutes 
Brophy again kicked forcing Verner to rouge the ball. As quarter 
time was nearly up Brophy again kicked, the ball was fumbled and 
Collegiate secured it for a touch which they converted, making the 
score at quarter time 8-0. In the second quarter the visitors had 
things pretty much their way, securing another touch on a fumbled 
ball which they failed to convert making the score at half-time 13-0. 
After the intermission the play was a little better, the visitors still 
having the best of it secured a touch on a fumbled ball and a rouge 
making the total score at three-quarter time, 18-0. In the last 
quarter they secured another touch on a beautiful run by Brophy 
which they failed to convert, while Ashbury failed to score. Ash¬ 
bury played a much better game than on the previous Saturday. 
Their tackling had greatly improved. And the team playing in 
their new positions played much better. The Forward line played 
exceptionally well holding their men and breaking through their 
opponents line, while they stopped the bucks which had played havoc 
with them before. Thompson’s kicking at center half was a vast 
improvement over the previous games. Thomas as inside wing 
played well, making some very good gains. Beddoe at right outside 
played his usual good game making some very sensational tackles. 
Sample at right inside played a good game, stopping many bucks, 
and Verner at Left Half played well, while Naismith filled in on the 
line. For the visitors Brophy played a wonderful game, not only in 
kicking, but in his runs for big gains. The one thing that marred 
the game was the way the officials ruled in favor of Collegiate, chang¬ 
ing decisions and showing how little they knew about th? game. 


G 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Ashbury lined up as follows: 


Irvin. 

Naismith. 

Thompson. 

Verner. 

Bowie. 

Beddoe. 

Davis. 

Gibbs. 

White. 

Sample. 

Thomas. 

Heney. 

Strubbe and St. Laurent 
Wickware. 


Full Back. 

Right Half. 

Center Half. 

Left Half. 

Quarter. 

Right Outside. 
Left Outside. 
Right Middle. 

Left Middle. 

Right Inside. 

Left Inside. 

Right Scrimmage. 
Left Scrimmage. 
Center Scrimmage. 


Strubbe playing the first half and St. Laurent the second. 


Ashbury vs. St. Albans. 


A.M.N. 


Brockville, October 21. 

When the game commenced a heavy wind was blowing, and the 
field was slippery as it had rained the night before. St. Albans 
won the toss and decided to play with the wind and up hill. 

First Quarter. 

The ball was kicked off by Ashbury, returned by St. Albans, 
and after two scrimmages which took the ball to centre field, Thomas 
got away and went over the line for 5. Sample failed to convert. 
St. Albans kicked off and after several scrimmages Irvin got away 
and went over for a touch. Sample again failed to convert. 

Score 10-0. 

Second Quarter. 

Playing up hill made a great difference to Ashbury and St. 
Albans made a touch which was converted, and a rouge. Score 10-7. 

Third Quarter. 

St. Albans forced Ashbury back until about twenty yards from 
Ashbury’s line, then kicked. Thomas was caught behind the line. 
Ashbury held their own for a few minutes, but St. Albans forced 
them back by kicking and Ashbury getting offside. St. Albans 
bucked over the line, putting them in the lead. Before the end of 
the quarter St. Albans got a rouge. Score 10-14. 
















THE ASHBURIAN 


7 


Fourth Quarter. 

Ashbury forced St. Albans in this quarter from the kick off, by 
kicking, Ashbury got within fifteen yards of St. Albans goal. Irvin 
kicked, their backs fumbled and Naismith fell on the ball. In this 
quarter several times Ashbury got away, but were called back for 
offside interference. Morphy of St. Albans got away and ran half 
the length of the field, Thomas tackled bringing him down, it was 
five or six minutes before he was able to play. By repeated bucking 
St. Albans got within ten yards of Ashbury’s line. Ashbury got the 
ball, Irvin took it but ran behind his line, he was tackled and the 
referee gave St. Albans a safety touch. When the whistle blew Ash¬ 
bury was within a few feet of St. Albans’ line. Final score 16-15 
for St. Albans. 

The back division have greatly improved, Irvin’s catching 
being very good. The line held well, giving Irvin plenty of time to 
kick; not one kick was blocked. 

For Ashbury, Verner, Thomas and Naismith played good foot¬ 
ball. For St. Albans, Wilgress showed up well. 

Line Up. 


Full.Bowie. 

Halves.Thomas, Irvin, Verner. 

Quarter.Gibbs. 

Inside Wings.Sample, Thompson. 

Middle Wings.White, Naismith. 

Outside Wings.Beddoe, Davis. 

Scrimmage.Wickware, Strubbe, Heney. 

Spares.Carling I, Carling II, St. Laurent 


J.L.H. 

Ashbury vs. L.C.C. 

On Thursday, October 26th, the football team went to Montreal. 
Nothing worthy of mention took place on the way down. Among 
the nineteen who took the trip under Mr. Hooper’s supervision were: 
a poleholder, one spare, a reporter for The Ashburian (who left at 
half time and concocted an untruthful account of the second half 
of the match), and our worthy coach, Dave McCann. On arrival the 
contingent went straight to the Queen’s Hotel, where, after receiving 
lunch tickets, (entitling each person to one meal only) everyone did 
justice to a five course dinner. Several persons, at one table in par¬ 
ticular, had great difficulty in pronouncing the name of an iced dainty, 
called on the Menu Card 'Rirdiwasser Punch.’ Many and varied 
were the names which that dish received, until the opportune arrival 
of the waiter saved it from utter degradation. 










8 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Shortly after dinner we went out to Lower Canada College and 
at about 4 o’clock the historic match was started. L.C.C. won 
the toss and took the North End. The wind was blowing diagonally 
across the field. After a few moments, in which the backs exchanged 
kicks, Naismith credited himself with the first point of the match 
by scoring a rouge. After this the team settled down to hard 
steady work, which consisted principally of end bucks and line 
plunges. In the latter, Sample distinguished himself, mowing down 
his opponents like so many ninepins. Naismith succeeded in check¬ 
ing all attempts at bucking by our opponents. The next addition 
to the score was made by St. Laurent, who dropped on the ball 
which had been fumbled by one of the opposing backs, or rather 
rushed out of his hands by the terrific onslaught of Thomas’ nose. 
Sample was responsible for converting this touch. No further 
score was made before half-time. Lower Canada opened the scoring 
in the second half with a touch from an on-side kick. Bowie made 
a noble effort to avert this, but he was too light and the ball was 
knocked out of his hands. The touch was not converted, so that the 
score stood at 7-5 in favour of Ashbury. 

Shortly after this, Davis scored a rouge. Lower Canada wasted 
no time in kicking the ball off, while we were a little slow in getting 
back to our places. About five minutes before time, from our op¬ 
ponents’ five yard line, Naismith bucked Sample through for a touch, 
bringing our score to 13. No further score was made and when the 
whistle blew for time, Ashbury had won by 13-5. Two or three 
Old Boys who had watched the match, were the first to congratulate 
us on our victory. 

Both teams supped together at the College. Our Captain made 
an amusing mistake during this meal. After having poured out 
several cups of tea and added milk and sugar, he discovered that the 
jug contained “gravy” and not “tea.” Luckily it was discovered in 
time. 

Our return trip was as uneventful as our journey down. Any¬ 
one who happened to be on the platform when the 11.15 train came 
in, might have seen a tired, hot, dusty but happy crowd of Ashbury 
boys, because they had won a victory which was really due to them. 

HAV.D. 

Ashbury vs. Collegiate. 

This return match was played on Wednesday, November 1st, 
after school in the afternoon. It was a much better game than the 
first match, and we put up a much better fight. 

In the first quarter Collegiate scored a touch which was converted, 
but for the rest of the time we pressed them hard, and just towards 
the end Sample bucked over the line, but failed to convert. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


9 


In the second quarter the Collegiate with the wind behind them 
did most of the pressing. They increased their score by a touch 
which was converted, and a drop-goal. The score at half time was 
15-5. 

In the third quarter the play was very even and a good deal of 
kicking was indulged in. The score remained the same. 

In the last quarter it was hard to see owing to the bad light. 
The Collegiate following up a kick, scored a touch which they failed 
to convert. In the last minute of play, Naismith, taking advantage 
of the darkness, worked his moon-light stunt, the famous xyz signal. 
Gibbs taking off his helmet and putting it under his arm started a 
buck, meanwhile Thomas had the ball and making a magnificent run 
from the half-way line scored a touch. The final score was 20-10. 

The feature of the match was Sample’s magnificent display. He 
always seemed to be in the right place and he made some excellent 
tackles. A word of praise is due to Bowie who, in spite of his size, 
did a great deal of useful work. We shall expect him to do great 
things for Ashbury in the future. 

The line up was as follows:— 


Full back. 

.Bowie. 

Right Half. 

.Thomas. 

Centre Half. 

.Irvin. 

Left Half. 

.Verner. 

Quarter. 

.Gibbs. 

Right Outside Wing. 

.Beddoe. 

Left Outside Wing. 

.Davis. 

Right Inside. 

.Sample. 

Left Inside. 

.Thompson. 

Right Middle. 

.Naismith. 

Left Middle. 

.White. 

Right Scrimmage. 

.Heney. 

Left Scrimmage. 

.St. Laurent. 

Centre Scrimmage. 

.P. Woollcombe. 


Ashbury vs. St. Albans. 

The return game with St. Albans was played November 4th 
in our own grounds, and was probably the last game of the season, 
unless there occurs a three-cornered tie in the league. The St. 
Albans boys were rushed off their feet in one of the cleanest and 
fairest games of the season, resulting in the score of 31-3 in our 
favor. 
















10 


THE ASHBURIAN 


First Quarter. 

The game started at 11.15 with a large crowd of supporters on 
the side-lines, and attended by ideally crisp, cold weather. Captain 
Naismith won the toss, and decided to kick. St. Albans then gained 
the ball, and played with such a vim and dash that it seemed as 
though they had a winning streak. They evidently depended on 
their lacking for within two minutes they had kicked over the line, 
and, although Verner made a gallant effort to run the ball out of 
danger, the St. Albans ends tackled him behind the goal for a rouge. 
Ashbury kicked the ball far down the field but St. Albans by dint of 
clever dodging ran it back nearly to the quarter-way line. Again 
they kicked, and on a fumble they forced Ashbury over her own line 
for a safety touch. But this was the end of St. Albans’ scoring, and 
throughout the whole remainder of the game they were never very 
dangerous. However, the home team began to get its stride, and 
moved with machinelike precision down the field, although there 
was quite a little fumbling occasioned by numb fingers. Yards were 
gained again and again until Ashbury was at the twenty-five yard 
line on the third down. Irvin kicked, and himself tackled the man 
behind the goal-posts for Ashbury’s first point. St. Albans drop- 
kicked into Verner’s hands, and he ran it up to within thirty-five 
yards of the goal-line. The excitement was at its height, for a 
touch-down would more than even up matters with the Brockville 
fourteen. Yards were gained by sending the reliable Thomas into 
the scrimmage where they were not expecting him. Then, with a 
trick play, for which we must thank Mr. McCann, our heady coach, 
Capt. Naismith went across for a touch-down. After that there was 
but little playing before quarter time was up. 

Second Quarter. 

The teams changed sides with the ball in Ashbury’s possession- 
A long run from Verner brought it into close vicinity of the line, 
but on not making yards, Irvin kicked the ball over the line, and both 
St. Laurent and White got the man just as he was crossing the line. 
This made the score 7-3. St. Albans nearly caught us napping on 
the drop-kick from quarter way, but Gibbs got the ball and saved it 
for us. By using the criss-cross between Thomas and Verner, to¬ 
gether with end runs and bucks, Ashbury forced her way back to the 
twenty-five yard line. She was compelled to kick however, and Irvin 
tackled the man behind the posts so that Ashbury had one more point 
in her favor. She retained the ball on the drop-kick, and commenced 
to hammer her way down the field. Captain Naismith now recog¬ 
nized the value of the back formations, and was using them invari¬ 
ably to gain yards with great results until the goal-posts began to 
look very enticing for a drop-kick. So, failing to get yards, Captain 


THE ASHBURIAN 


11 


Naismith told Irvin to try one, in tones audible to some of those on 
the opposing side. (This seemingly insignificant incident was used 
by Gibbs later on for five points). Irvin, however, kicked into his 
own scrimmage and the ball went over to St. Albans. St. Albans 
tried a continuous pass between the backs but failed to gain yards and 
were compelled to kick out of danger. Thomas got the ball, and ran 
it back twenty-five yards. Ashbury gained yards and Gibbs, seeing 
an unusually large hole in the right wing slipped through it and over 
the line for a touch-down. This put Ashbury far ahead, but there 
was no let-up, and the football was as hard as ever. On the kick-off 
the backs ran the ball clear back to the twenty-five yard line, and 
after a few down there was an excellent chance for a drop-kick. 
Captain Naismith told Irvin to kick one in the same manner as 
before, but Gibbs, seeing that everyone on the St. Albans team 
was expecting a drop-kick and unsuspicious of an end run, took the 
ball himself, and stole through the right wing for another touch¬ 
down. The ball was put in play again, but the whistle blew for 
half-time before there was any playing. 

Third Quarter. 

The third quarter was full of kicking and bucking with the 
ball changing hands frequently in the first part. Ashbury, however, 
after gaining the ball in the middle of the field, hung on to it and 
gained her yards so invariably for a time that when Gibbs took the 
ball around right wing for twenty-five yards she had the ball within 
eight yards of quarter-way. Yards were not gained, however, and 
Ashbury kicked. The three backs placed on side, caused the St. 
Albans man to fumble and after the mix-up had cleared away, Ash¬ 
bury was seen to have the ball within fifteen yards of the goal line. 
Captain Naismith resorted to scrimmage plays, and on the third 
down the backs rushed Sample across for the fourth touch-down of 
the game. Ashbury kept the ball on the kick-off, and once more 
hammered her way down the field, aided by fine long runs from 
Thomas, until she was again far into the territory of the opposite 
team. Irvin kicked over the line, and tackled his man for another 
point. A long run from Verner brought the ball back twenty-five 
yards, and with end runs from Beddce and Davis, Ashbury came 
near enough to the line to kick over. The St. Albans man made a 
game effort to run out of danger but was tackled and brought down 
by three or four Ashbury players. This made the score 25-3, and 
so it remained through the few remaining minutes of the quarter. 

Fourth Quarter. 

This was a quarter varied by especially successful bucks, kicks 
and end runs. Until the middle of the quarter neither side was able 
to make its yards with any decided gain, but on a fine catch and 


12 


THE ASHBURIAN 


through clever dodging Verner ran the ball along the side line up to 
the twenty-five yard mark. Captain Naismith used bucks and 
scrimmage plays solely, to make yards, and although St. Albans 
made a stubborn resistance, Ashbury slowly and surely crept up to 
the goal. With eight yards to go and the goal to make, the buck 
formation was called, and again Sample was rushed over for a touch¬ 
down. Although time was nearly up Ashbury still made an at¬ 
tempt at another touch-down, and it is safe to say that, if the whistle 
had not blown to put a close to the game, there would have been some 
playing around the goal which would have been decidedly interesting. 

However one-sided the game was, nevertheless it was stirring 
and exciting. The fine tackling of Beddoe and Davis, the hard yard- 
gaining football of Thomas, the clever catching and running of 
Verner and Irvin, together with the heavy scrimmage mass plays, 
sufficed to keep the exultant band of supporters and rooters keenly 
interested. The game was clean and sportsmanlike although it was 
at times rough and hard. One serious hurt only was a cut head 
suffered by one of the St. Albans men. The college supporters must 
needs be thanked by us of the team for their large turn-out, their 
cheers, and their constant words of encouragement, with which they 
displayed the true spirit of sportsmen on Saturday morning. 

L.S. 

Ashbury College vs. Brockville Collegiate Institute. 

The day turned out fine, hardly any wind and the sun obscured. 
The game started at 11.20 our kick-off. By hard play B.C.I. pushed 
us back to our ten-yard line where we gained the ball on a fumble. 
We kicked and they returned, sending the pig-skin over our line and 
tackling our man before he could get out. The result, a rouge 
after ten minutes play. After the kick from quarter-way, Sample 
went off for one minute (cause unknown). This was the only 
penalty. They drove us back to our five-yard line where we got 
the ball, then Verner kicked a good one causing it to soar far down 
the field. First Quarter over. Score A.C.—0. B.C.I.—1. Before 
five minutes were up we had the ball again at centre and ran it to 
their twenty-yard line where Irvin missed an easy drop. Their^ball 
and the play went on. We got the ball and Davis ran to what 
looked like a touch, but owing to his running over the side line it 
only counted as a rouge (cheers subside). Again we got the ball, 
this time it was kicked over and Beddoe rouged it. The game con¬ 
tinued till half-time when the fussing members of the team rested 
themselves by talking to friends on the side lines. Score A.C. —2. 
B.C.I.—1. 

B.C.I. had the kick-off in second half at 5 minutes to 12. Then 
they carried the ball over our line, but owing to an off-side it was 


THE ASHBURIAN 


13 


not counted. We got the ball on our one-yard line and kicked to 
half way. When we had the ball again it was near the side line, 
Irvin kicked and put the ball nicely over the fence causing a delay 
while it was looked for in the corn field. B.C.I. ball, they duplicated 
the act by putting the ball over again. Our ball, Irvin thought 
he would try the trick again and succeeded (another delay). B.C.I. 
got the ball on their five-yard line, and sent it down the field about 
ten yards where we obtained it. We bucked through for a touch 
which was not counted on account of an off-side. Again Irvin was in 
fine position for a drop kick, but the ball was passed poorly and the 
best he could do was to drop on it. Third quarter over. Score 

A. C.— 2. B.C.I—1. 

The last quarter was a lucky one for us. Irvin kicked over the 
line and Beddoe followed up scoring a rouge. Five minutes later 
Davis followed up on a kick and scored another rouge. Then 
Beddoe landed on their 225 pound left half behind their line, making 
still another rouge. Now “Stonewall” Thomas made one of his 
spectacular tackles and got his man after having made a long run. 
The game ended with the ball in our hands at 12.30, and with credit 
due to Captain Naismith for his excellent team. Score A.C.—5 

B. C.I.—1. 

H.M.H. 

St. Albans Challenge Cup. 


DATE 

MATCH 

PLAYED AT 

WON 

SCORE 

Oct. 7 

Ashbury v. Lower Canada 

Ottawa 

Lower Canada 

.11- 0 

“ 14 

Lower Canada v. St. Albans 

Brock ville 

St. Albans 

17-10 

“ ’21 

Ashbury v. St. Albans 

Brockville 

St. Albans 

16-15 

“ 26 

Ashbury v. Lower Canada 

Montreal 

Ashbury 

VO 

1 

CO 

rH 

Nov. 4 

Ashbury v. St. Albans 

Ottawa 

Ashbury 

31- 3 

“ 11 

St. Albans v. Lower Canada 

Montreal 

Lower Canada 

22-12 


From the above table, it can be seen that each of the three teams 
in the League won two matches. The result was therefore a three- 
corner tie. The authorities, therefore, decided to play two more 
matches. The draw was made after the match on November 11th, 
and Lower Canada drew atye. Tuesday, November 14th was fixed 
for the match between Ashbury and St. Albans, and the winners 
were to play against Lower Canada College, on Saturday, November 
18th. 

Ashbury vs. St. Albans. 


At 5.00 a.m., on November 14th, lights began to twinkle in 
the windows of Ashbury College. From that time until 5.30 the 
House-Master employed every known device to arouse the members 
of the team and their supporters. The temporary occupant of No. 2 


14 


THE ASHBURIAN 


seemed to be in a state of coma; but persistent efforts finally 
persuaded him to take a languid interest in his surroundings, an 
interest which was maintained by frequent visitations at intervals 
of five minutes. 

Breakfast was taken in a more or less somnambulistic state and 
the crowd emerged into the bitter chill of a frosty November morning. 

At the Union a special car awaited the team, and here the Day- 
Boys swelled the crowd. Much groundless apprehension was enter¬ 
tained for a while regarding the possibility of certain members of 
the team not turning up in time. Owing, doubtless, to the constant 
calls for 4295 on the ; phone, even the most cronic misser of trains 
arrived on time. 

En route for the neutral ground where the game was to take 
place, the party hardly thawed out sufficiently to do more than 
practice a few yells. Upon arrival there, however, the forty odd 
members formed up and proceeded to take possession of the place. 
The advent of the St. Albans team some time before had apparently 
aroused the whole leisure population. It was now sitting on a fence 
post chewing a straw and staring at our party with great interest. 

Fearing trouble with such a vast addition to the floating population 
of the village, the entire police force had been turned out. It stood 
drawn up on the main street looking very formidable, occasionally 
exchanging views on the weather and the crops with its friends. 
The two hotels in the place were taxed to the uttermost to accommo¬ 
date the two football teams and their supporters. The erstwhile 
placid little hamlet was now indeed a bustling place. The thor¬ 
oughly excited population appeared at their windows and watched 
the surging multitude in the street. The village Schoolmaster dis¬ 
missed his scholars, not so much to honour the occasion, as from sheer 
inability to keep them at school. Fifty per cent, of his school, it 
appeared, had played hooky—and he had not the heart to keep the 
other boy at work. 

After changing at the hotel the Ashbury team met their rivals 
from St. Albans and, accompanied by the entire able-bodied male 
portion of the population, proceeded to what some of the inhabitants 
in moments of enthusiasm had referred to as “the football field”. 
After a mile through the country had been passed, a shed was dis¬ 
covered bordering a lately used pasture. The visitors were informed 
that the rugged landscape in the foreground was the “field” the 
shed, the “pavilion” and the “bleachers” represented by a rail- 
fence bounding a cedar swamp in the background. After the natural 
surprise of the visitors had subsided an inspection of the “field” was 
made. Of goal-posts there was of course no sign, the only suggestion 
of a touch line was a furrow made by a plough—apparently when the 
last crop cf mangles had been taken off. Owing to the geological 


THE ASH BUR IAN 


15 


formation of the soil the place seemed more suited for a stone-quarry 
than for anything else. 

At the end of thirty minutes hard work on the part of the offi¬ 
cials the “field” was pronounced ready. At one end, two cairns of 
native rock marked the goal—-at the other, a weird contrivance re¬ 
sembling a gallows. The valleys and depressions were filled with 
snow-drifts while the serrated pinnacles and plateaus remained wind¬ 
swept and clearly defined. 

The game which followed, however, was unexpectedly good con¬ 
sidering the high relief of the country. Ashbury “put it all over St, 
Albans” from the kick-off. 

The first quarter was marked by two rouges by Irvin (who played 
a faultless game throughout), and a brilliant touch by Verner. This 
was sensational enough, but the second quarter supplied an event 
compared to which any mere scoring paled into insignificance. An 
object appeared on the horizon in the direction of the village and 
approached at a speed almost equalling that of a funeral. In fact, 
as it grew larger the appropriateness of the above simile became 
more and more apparent. Some of the spectators hazarded the 
suggestion that the Deadwood Coach was coming—others were 
sure that it was a hearse. Both, as it proved, were wrong. The 
thing had been a cab. It appeared that when the late King Edward 
had visited Canada as a boy, the vehicle had been purchased by the 
village fathers for the proper conveyance of their Reeve in the 
procession. It had then already a considerable history attached to 
it—something about coming out on the Mayflower—but these 
more ancient traditions were now hardly credited. It lumbered 
into the “field”, stopped with a jerk that threatened to carry way 
the string-spliced harness, canted violently to starboard, and ejected 
its inmates in some confusion on the ground. These latter proved 
to be the elite of the village “Smart Set”—young and blooming, 
now in their most bewitching and fashionable costumes regardless of 
expense. 

At half-time therefore, with youth and beauty added to the 
festive scene, the game was resumed: 

“They reel, they roll in clanging lists, 

And when the tide of combat stands: 

Perfume and flowers fall in showers, 

That lightly rain from ladies’ hands.” 

Certainly the “perfume” was real enough, but the “flowers” con¬ 
sisted principally of “snowballs.” 

Two more touches were soon secured by Beddoe, and in the last 
minute of play Irvin scored another rouge—bringing up the score 
to 18-Love. 


16 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Irvin’s play throughout was always of a sensational character 
and, his nickname soon being caught up by the spectators, cries of 
“ There goes Rusty! Oh, do look at Rusty! Oh, the dear!” etc., 
as our hero bounded over pine stumps and fallen timber, continually 
resounded about the pasture. A satisfactory dinner at the hotel 
was served to the team as soon as the match was over, after which 
the Forty Thieves once more proceeded to find what entertainment 
the village afforded. 

It was soon discovered that the “Nickel” was not opened except 
in the evening. The Grand Opera House—occupying the same 
premises, had not been in use since the last stock company had 
“busted” there—during the Queen’s Jubilee Year. It was rumoured 
however, that an engagement with a Nigger Minstrel Show had been 
booked for Christmas 1912, to which event the inhabitants were 
eagerly looking forward. 

This being the case, Ashbury was compelled to find its own 
amusement. For an hour or two the Forty roamed the street, 
finding some small consolation in a disused wagon, in forming pro¬ 
cessions on the side-walks, and in other mild forms of entertainment. 
They were glad enough when the time to depart arrived. 

Returning to Ottawa, they made up for any shortcomings in 
the way of noise on the down trip, nor did the yells cease when the 
Capital was reached. As the Rockcliffe car passed through Sparks 
Street, the good citizens were electrified by gusts of explosive yells— 
to the effect that “WE PLAY FOOTBALL”, etc. Arriving at the 
College at 7.00 p.m. the crowd—speechless from long cheering— 
turned in early—dead-tired after a most enjoyable, and most exhaust¬ 
ing day. 


Ashbury College vs. Lower Canada College. 

This was the final match to decide the Championship. It was 
played at St. Anne’s on the ground belonging to Macdonald College, 
on Saturday, November 18th, and resulted in a win for Ashbury 
College, by eight points to five. It was the hardest game of the whole 
series, as the two teams were very evenly matched. Both sides 
were accompanied by a big number of rooters, and rival ‘ yells’ were 
very much in evidence. 

The ground was in a very sloppy condition, after the recent 
fall of snow, and the ball was very slippery to hold. Both teams 
indulged in kicking, but our backs were surer in their catching, only 
two fumbles being made in the whole match. 

In the first quarter we played with the wind behind us, and 
quickly put on two rouges. We kept the ball away from our goal, 
until just towards the end when from a bad fumble by Verner, Lower 
Canada scored a touch. In the second quarter, we had to work hard 


THE ASHBURIAN 


17 


to keep our opponents from scoring. Naismith distinguished him¬ 
self in stopping their bucks again and again. No score was made in 
this quarter, and at half time the score was: 

Ashbury 2; Lower Canada 5. 

In the third quarter we pressed our opponents, and after three 
minutes scored a rouge. Lower Canada worked hard to drive us 
back, but their efforts were in vain. We found ourselves one yard 
from the line on our first down. Naismith tried a trick which failed. 
He then tried a fake back and sent Gibbs round the other side. Our 
opponents were completely deceived, and Gibbs scored a touch. 

The last quarter was a strenuous one, but our team played up in 
great style. Lower Canada were only dangerous once, and then 
Irvin saved the situation by a spectacular run. When the whistle 
blew for time, the score was: 

Ashbury 8; Lower Canada, 5. 

It was a great fight, and a great victory. Great credit is due to 
the captaincy of Naismith, who worked his signals very well. The 
back division was once more in great form, Irvin being quite the best. 
Davis at outside left was the ‘star’ player. Again and again he made 
brilliant runs, and gained his yards on several occasions. The whole 
team played up well, however, especially in the last quarter, when 
excitement was intense. 

The losers played a great game all the time, and took their 
defeat in the most sporting fashion. The whole team with their 
‘rooters’ came to the station to see us off, and cheered us again and 
again. There are very few teams who would show such a sporting 
spirit as this. It is most enjoyable to meet boys who are such good 
losers. The match, although a hard one, was as clean as any of the 
series, and no one was sent off for rough play. 

Our line up was as follows: 


Half Backs.Thomas, Irvin, Verner. 

Quarter.Gibbs. 

Inside Wings.White, Naismith. 

Middle Wings.Thompson, Sample. 

Outside Wings.Beddoe, Davis. 

Scrimmage.St. Laurent, Iieney, Wick ware. 

Flying Wing.Carling. 










18 


THE ASHBURIAN 


INTERMEDIATE MATCHES. 


Ashbury Intermediates vs. Cliffside. 

This match was played on our ground on Tuesday afternoon, 
October 24th, and resulted in a draw, each team making two touches. 

In the first half Ashbury was much the stronger, and at half¬ 
time the score was ten points to nothing in their favour. The first 
of the touches was scored by Bowie, as the result of a trick on the 
third down, close to the Cliffside goal line. The second was scored 
by Bowie also, although the credit of it is due to Maclaren, who ran 
nearly the whole length of the field with the ball. In the second half 
the game was more even, and as a result of some bad fumbling by 
Carling, Cliffside scored their first touch through Tarrif. Their 
second touch was scored five minutes later, and was rather a lucky 
one. Reiffenstein kicked on the third down, and the ball rebounded 
towards the Ashbury goal. Watson secured it, and had a clear run 
to the goal line. 

During the last five minutes of the game, it was almost pitch- 
dark, and no further score was made. 

Our line up was as follows: 


Full.•. . . .Maunsell. 

Halves.Bowie, Carling I, Carling II. 

Quarter.Reiffenstein. 

Inside Wings.Hart, Wood. 

Middle Wing:.Blakeney, Cory. 

Outside Wing ..Reid, Maclaren. 

Scrimmage.Muirhead, Patterson, Graham. 

Spares.Stewart, Jackson, Birkett II. 


Gibbs and Davis managed the game very well, and are to be con¬ 
gratulated on the fairness of their decisions. It is agreeable to see 
two seniors give up their afternoon in such a good cause. 

IVB. vs. IVA. and IV. 

This match was played on October 13th, and resulted in a win 
for the Middle and Lower Fourth by seventeen points to nothing. 
The touches were made by Carling I (2), one of which he converted 
and Carling II. In addition to this, one rouge was scored. 

The game was rather a failure, as there was too much talking and 
very little play. Gibbs acted as referee and Heney as Umpire, but 
neither of them was severe enough. 










THE ASHBURIAN 


19 


The line up was as follows: 


IVB. 

IVA and IV. 

Reiffenstein (Captain) 

Bowie (Captain). 

Cory 

Carling I. 

Reid I 

Carling II. 

Maclaren I 

Muirhead 

Lindsay 

Patterson 

Slater 

Stewart 

Bate I 

Montgomery II 

Maunsell 

Jackson 

Masson 

Barwes 

Birkett I 

Hanna 

Godfrey 

Blakeney I 

Thompson II 

Chanonhouse 

Tashcereau II 

Hennessy II 

Morse 

Fleming. I. 


Characters of the Football Team. 

Bowie Full Back, the smallest man on the team, but one of the 
hardest workers and best tackles. He is the best man for following- 
down a kick on the team. 

Thomas, Right Half, one of the fastest men. A good tackle and 
a man that uses his head. He made some of the best runs, and was 
a great factor in making our bucks famous. 

Irvin, Centre Half, was very erratic at beginning of season, but 
settled down and played one of the best games at the end. His 
kicking is excellent and he is also one of the best runners. Ought 
to be a big help to next year’s team. 

Verner, Left Half, a sure catch, a good runner and is the hardest 
man to tackle on the team, he also helped a lot in the kicking. One 
of last year’s old colors. 

Beddoe, Right Outside, one of the best tackles a good runner, 
who follows down on kicks well and holds well on the line, also one 
of last year’s old colors. 

Davis, Left Outside, the fastest man on the team, was a little 
nervous at the beginning of the season, but settled down and made 
some great runs towards the end of the season, an old color. 


20 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Naismith, Captain Right Middle, is a good tackle and stops 
“bucks” very effectively. He made a very good captain, making 
the whole team work hard at practices, keeps his head well, during 
a match, and always calls the right play at the right time. A good 
man to break up an opponents line. 

White, Left Middle, a good man on the line and stops “bucks” 
well. Did nearly all the bucking on the right side. 

Sample, Right Inside, the biggest man on the team. One of the 
most effective “buckers” in the league. Nearly always making big 
gains. One of the best tackles. Stops “bucks” well and holds 
well on the line. 

Gibbs, Quarter, a heady player, and a man who can play the 
position to perfection. Never misses signals, and made the touch 
which won the championship. 

Thompson, Left Inside, new to the game, picked up a lot as 
the season progressed, ought to be a very effective man on next year’s 
line up. 

Heney, Right Scrimmage, a great scrimmage, holds well; tackles 
well; and did great work towards the end in breaking up the oppo¬ 
nents scrimmage and getting the quarter before he could pass the 
ball. Also an old color. 

St. Laurent, Left scrimmage, improved greatly as the season 
progressed. Plays best after he gets hit; did some good work in 
the last few games. 

Wickware, Center Scrimmage, very weak at the beginning, but 
turned out a great center scrimmage at the close, tackling well and 
getting the ball out fast and neatly. 

Carling I, played in several games, a hard worker and a good 
tackle, but rather light. 

Strubbe, played in three games too excitable, but a hard worker 
and a good runner if he could keep his head. 



THE ASHBURIAN 


21 


Ashbury College Football Team. 

1911-1912. 


daVis 

white 

Carling 

sTrubbe 

beddOe 

veRner 

thompSon 

bOwie 

heNey 

wiCkware 

samplE 

nAismith 
Gibbs 
thomAs 
irvln 
st. laureNt 


nAismith 
daviS 
tHomas 
Beddoe 
st. laUrent 
iRvin 
heneY 

wiCkware 

thOmpson 

carLing 

sampLe 

vernEr 

Gibbs 

whitE 

W.G.G. 


wiCkware 

wHite 

thomAs 

thoMpson 

samPle 

irvln 

beddOe 

heNey 

daviS 

nAismith 
carlinG 
st. lAurent 
glbbs 
verNer. 

w. H. D. 


p. w. 





A. M. Naismith, Captain of Football and Head Prefect 



THE ASHBURIAN 


23 


To Mr. Andrew Naismith, 

Ashbury College, Ottawa. 

Dear Andy,— 

In addressing this open letter to you, I have two aims in view. 
One is to recall a little of your own history to your mind, and the 
other to endeavor to allow your fellow students to see the person 
with whom they congregate as I do. 

You are as you know a product of the latter part of the Nineteenth 
Century, and your birth is, of course, the first important event of 
your varied life. Born in Bridgeport, N.S., you lived there and 
in various other parts of Eastern Canada until you were five years 
old, when, your father seeing fit to change his place of abode and 
move out to Lethbridge, in Western Canada, you followed his ex¬ 
cellent example and accompanied the family. 

There you lived a perfectly harmless life for about two years, 
meeting only with several minor accidents through ignorance of 
the habits of bronchos. At the end of that time, you were sent to 
our local public school, where, as you no doubt know, you were 
by no means the important person you now are. But it was then 
probably, that you laid the foundation of the esteem in which you 
are now held. 

You attended school in Lethbridge, more or less regularly, until 
you reached the fourth form, when, copying an elder brother you 
returned to the East. But not for good, oh no! the West and its 
attractions had too strong a hold on you for that. You came in 
search of learning. For two years you honored Upper Canada 
College, Toronto, with your presence, returning to the home of your 
choice to spend your holidays. 

And do you remember those holidays, Andy? How you used 
to ride all day long over the prairies, returning in the evening to 
eat ice cream, with a pleasant companion. Speaking of riding, do 
you remember your first attempt at it? How, for several years, you 
had such a difficulty in keeping your hand off the pommel which 
you now know is not made for that purpose, the many falls you had, 
and the great sport you afforded others before you became the 
accomplished horseman you now are. 

To continue, after you had been at Upper Canada two years, 
you decided you would benefit by a change, and in looking about 
for another school you found Ashbury. Coming here in January, 
1911, you straightway jumped into fame. Not on the football 
field, or in other sporting circles, however, but as a narrator of 
Western stories and as a heart breaker. 

Finding your sojourn here, between January and May a pleasant 
one, you decided to return for the next year. On your return, you 


24 


THE ASHBURIAN 


at once came into your own. Your head considered you worthy of a 
prefectship and your abilities as a football player were recognized 
by your fellow students when they elected you to the Captaincy 
of the team which you so ably led to victory. 

Well, as space is limited, I must begin to close now, but before 
doing so let me remind you of your ambition to go to R.M.C. and 
McGill before coming out into the world as a lawyer, and that such 
an ambition cannot be attained without hard work. If you ever 
realize it, please endeavor for your own sake to find a suitable life 
companion as soon as possible, for as you may not know, it is an 
utter impossibility to be a wife hunter and build up a successful law 
practice at the same time. 

I don't think I could close better than with this warning, so, 
for the present, Andy, 

Good-bye, 

E. R, L. 


Trials of an Amateur Motorcyclist. 

Mr.-a former student of our notable academy of learning, 

can tell us some very amusing incidents which have occurred while 
he was indulging in this alluring pastime. One of his most 
humourous adventures I will try to relate. 

Mr.-woke up on a Saturday morning and looking out of 

his window, immediately decided that it would be a fine day to try 
his new motorcycle. Hurriedly donning his clothing, he rushed 
down stairs; ate a couple of soda biscuits; drank a glass of milk; and 
went to look at his oily steed. Imagine if you can, his surprise and 
dismay to find that one of the pedals had dropped off in the night, 
and as pedals, you will see later, are a most necessary piece of equip¬ 
ment to a motorcycle. Mr.-waited till a couple of his friends 

were up and then persuaded them to shove the machine a few feet 
to crank the engine, so that he could run the machine to a black¬ 
smith shop to have the pedal repaired, assuring them that before 
they had shoved ten yards the engine would go. After shoving for a 
mile or so, the engine began to grunt and groan, then with a terrible 
noise and much smoke, the machine rushed down the street. The 

motorcycle ran to the machine shop, and Mr.-was very pleased 

to learn that all would be ready to start his trip by 2 p.m. 

At the appointed hour, Mr.-was at the machine shop, his 

pockets bulging with screw drivers, wrenches, tape, etc. He, like 
our friend Casey Jones, mounted to the cabin, or rather the seat, 
but instead of orders he had an oil can in his hand. The new pedal 
worked very well as Mr.-had occasion to note. After pedaling 




THE ASHBURIAN 


25 


up town as far as Bank Street, the machine started and for an hour 

or so Mr.-enjoyed himself greatly. When about four miles 

outside the city, the breezes gently wafted to our hero a faint grind¬ 
ing and squeaking from the engine. This grew worse and worse, 
finally the engine stopped altogether with one last heart-rending 

screech. Mr.-immediately got out his oil can, pincers, tape, 

etc.., and began looking for the trouble. He discovered that his friend 
and partner in the motorcycle, who by the way, knew more about 
electricity than motorcycles, had had the engine nickle-plated, which 
kept in the heat and the piston had seized. Some three hours later, 
a friend driving past saw the motorcycle leaning against a fence and 

Mr.-sitting beside it covered with dust and oil. About dusk, 

the engine was cool enough to start, and Mr. —— commenced his 
return trip to the city, but on reaching one of the main streets of 
the city the engine again stopped. About nine o’clock, a large 
crowd, which was steadily growing, gathered around the unfortunate 

Mr. —-—. The crowd increased greatly by 9.30, and Mr.-was 

very much dismayed to see a corpulent guardian of the law slowly 
ambling up the street. After a few minutes of argument, into which 
several words not to be found in a dictionary, were introduced by 

Mr.-, and some very unnecessary threats on the part of the 

representative of law, Mr.-was convinced that he was obstruct¬ 

ing the traffic, and that it would be necessary for him to move on. 

Mr.-, with the assistance of several small boys, and with a 

large crowd following, pushed the motorcycle to a nearby garage. 

Here the machine was left for the night, and Mr.-returned by 

car to his domicile, a sadder but a much wiser man on the subject 
of motorcycles. 

J. L. 


Intermediate Practice 3.45-5.30. 

Any Tuesday or Friday. 

3.45 The referee descends from the Common Room with a 
football in one hand and a whistle in the other. He 
is inwardly trembling, as he only knows one rule, and 
has never played the game in his life. 

4.0 After a few punts, one of the few things he can do fairly 
well, the referee blows the whistle. This is the signal 
for a general babel of voices. 

4.15 The noise has decreased to a certain degree, and the 
referee discovers that two teams are being picked. 



LO lO 


26 


THE ASHBURIAN 


4.25 


4.30 

4.31 


4.31-4.45 


4.45 


4.55 

5.0 

5.0-5.15 


5.20 


.25 

.30 


Three small boys are left unpicked. One boy, pre¬ 
sumably the Captain, exclaims: “We will have 
these two, and you can have the rest.” An act of 
great self-sacrifice, the referee thinks. 

The two teams are lined up. As only six boys are talking, 
the referee’s whistle is heard, and the game starts. 

First down. The referee watches carefully, and as soon 
as the ball is kicked out, blows the whistle for off¬ 
side. (This is the one rule he knows.) The solo 
on the whistle is followed by a general chorus, in 
which the referee hears several uncomplimentary 
remarks about himself. 

A fairly quiet period, in whiclTseveral good runs are made 
on either side. The only thing of importance is a 
small passage of arms between two husky new 
boys. After two rounds of three minutes each, the 
war horse emerges victorious. The referee blows 
the whistle, and the game resumes. 

A violent scene occurs at this point. Fourteen boys are 
lying on the ground on top of each other, the rest 
are clamouring at the top of their voices, and all 
the referee hears is: “Off-side interference”, “No 
Yards”, “Our Ball”, etc. Then a faint voice is 
heard from the bottom of the heap. “Whose ball 
is it, Sir?” The referee who wants to please both 
sides, decides in favour of “The Squirt”, and then 
gives it off-side. This brings on general warfare, 
during which the referee mops his brow and waits. 

A few mangled remains line up, and the game proceeds. 

A touch is scored. Loud cries of “Well played, Lazarus.” 

More fairly peaceful play. The feature of this period 
was a fine buck by “Cory”, who is playing in ordinary 
clothes. When he eventually freed himself from the 
hangers on, he was minus collar, stud, and the 
greater part of his shirt. 

Another touch is scored by the other side. The “Flea” 
with a fine wriggle is responsible for this. 

Score 5 all. 

Score unchanged. 

Lazarus side is pressing hard. Third and last down, one 
yard to go, ten seconds to play. The ball is heeled 
out. The signal is for a buck. What actually 
happens, the referee cannot say. So he blows the 
whistle for time, which no one hears, and retires 
discreetly. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


27 


5.45 He returns to the playground for a stroll and sees a few 
belated intermediates still discussing the point very 
forcibly. He shudders and returns to the Common 
Room. 

6.15 Tea. The referee hears all about it, with a full account of 
the wrong decisions he gave. 

8.30. The referee sees a row of boys waiting outside the Matron’s 
room for cough mixture and voice jujubes. 


Our Trip to Brockville. 

We started on Friday, October 20th, in the evening for Brock- 
ville, where we arrived at 9.30 p.m. The journey down was rather 
tedious, in spite of the efforts of our Football Glee Club, under the 
direction of Davis, who proved to be a veritable Sousa in disguise. 
They gave us some excellent selections from their repertoire, including 
a fine quartette, in which Irvin distinguished himself, and extin¬ 
guished all desire for music among the other members of the team. 
No delays were caused by cows stopping on the track, a not uncom¬ 
mon occurrence on this line, and with one exception the train usually 
stopped near a station. At every halt the whole team left 
the train and indulged in signal practice, in which several 
new stunts were invented. One alone deserves mention, as it dis¬ 
pelled any doubts in our minds about our Captain’s knowledge of 
French. I cannot remember it exactly, but it went something like 
this: Teront, Sankont, Carteravong, Scent. 

We were met at Brockville by Mr. Mannering, who introduced 
us to the referee, and we all walked up to the Strathcona Hotel, 
where we spent the night. The inmates of one room showed them¬ 
selves past-masters in the art of life-saving, in which pillows made 
splendid dummies. Mr. Wood discovered the whole police force of 
Brockville (one Sergeant and a Corporal) in the hotel, when he went 
downstairs, and they seemed prepared to bivouac there for the night. 
It may have been a coincidence, but the writer suspects that there 
was some connection between the life-saving up-stairs and the police 
force downstairs. 

After breakfast next day, we strolled round the town and the 
spares indulged in ice cream, for which Brockville is famous. The 
writer wishes to endorse this statement. About eleven o’clock, the 
members of the team donned their uniforms and drove up in a big 
bus to the St. Albans ground. 

After the match was over we returned to the hotel, all feeling 
very sore at the result of the match. We had to hustle to catch our 
train and dinner was a very hurried affair. At this meal we were 



28 


THE ASHBURIAN 


the guests of St. Albans; Mr. Mannering, supported by the referee 
and two of the senior boys, acting as host. We were given a warm 
send off from the station, and in due course we reached Ottawa, tired 
but well pleased with our trip. 

The writer has learnt several interesting things on this trip, 
and for the benefit of others, he has compiled the following list of 
achievements with the names of the boys who are most proficient in 
each. 

How to board a train going not more than five miles an hour.— 
L. Sample. 

How to eat a pork cutlet.— D. Verner. 

How to catch a train.— D. Verner. 

How to stir up cats, especially grey ones.— JV. Cory. 

How to buy cottonwool for nothing.— Mr. Wood. 

How to dance a cake-walk in pyjamas and bowler hat.— 

J. Thoynas. 

How to eat bananas in the same costume.— J. Thomas. 

How to talk about nothing.— S. Wickware. 

How to argue about everything.— A. Naismith. 

How to dress in two minutes.— R. White. 

How to use an old-fashioned fire escape.— The whole team. 

How to sleep for ten hours undisturbed by noise.— L. Bowie. 

How to play an impossible piano.— W. Strubhe. 

How to eat pea-nuts.— J. Carling. 

How to drink ginger-ale.— W. Heney. 

How to sing in one’s sleep.— R. Irvin. 

How to choose hats.— W. Thompson. 

How to mend electric lights.— L. Carling. 


Hockey Prospects. 

Now that football is over and the ground is covered with snow, 
our t,houghts»naturally turn towards hockey, the greatest of winter 
sports. We all hope we can gather together as successful a team 
as our football fourteen. 

It is hard to say at present those who will obtain a place. Only 
one of last year’s team is at the College now, Verner by name, and 
great things will be expected of him. But Jack Oliver, who played 
a splendid game all last winter at centre, is talking of coming back at 
Christmas. This would be a great help to us. 

Then from last year’s second team, we have Gibbs— a good 
checker and a fast skater. It is more than likely he will be tried out 
on the defence along with Naismith, who is a very hard man to pass. 
Hennessy will probably be played on one of the wings. He played 



THE ASH BUR IAN 


29 


one game for the seniors last year when they went to Brockville, and 
proved to be a very effective man. Irvin and White are two more 
members of last year’s second team. They are both good skaters and 
stick handlers, and should easily secure a position. Another second 
team player is Bowie, a very small, but excellent performer, who is 
able to hold his own against players twice his weight. There are 
sure to be one of two surprise packages from the new comers. If 
Sample can learn to play hockey as quickly as he learnt to play our 
Canadian game of football, he will be a certainty for the seven. 
Strubbe is another new arrival who has played hockey before he 
came here. It is likely he will surprise us. For goal, we have a 
large number to pick from. Davis, Hughson and Reid (brother of 
last year’s second team, goal-tend) are all very anxious to defend the 
nets. 

However, we will have to have two or three practices before we 
can say definitely who will play and who will not. The lucky boys to 
be chosen have our best wishes for a good season. It is up to them 
to secure the championship and the Carling cup for the third year 
in succession. 

D. F. V. 


Scouting. 

Field Day. 

On October 20th, in response to an invitation from the Commis¬ 
sioner to join the Ottawa troops in a Scout rally at Fairy Lake—- 
our Troop turned out in spite of the wretched weather conditions. 
The muster at the school was a small one—only sixteen scouts 
turning up. These, of course, were the scouts whom nothing can 
stop—those whose enthusiasm is not to be cooled by a little rain. 
It was noticeable that most of the Proficiency Badge winners were 
there. The troop marched to the Gatineau ferry, crossed the Ottawa, 
and tramped the rest of the w T ay over execrable roads to Fairy Lake. 
It was a hard tramp, and it rained steadily all the way. It was also 
uneventful save for a small incident en route. Thrift is No. 9. in the 
Scout Laws, but it is doubtful if a certain French-Canadian wireman 
appreciated this when he discovered all his glass insulators, laid 
carefully at the feet of each telepraph pole where he was working, as 
carefully gathered up and pouched in the haversack of a certain 
Scout. Certainly he did a record 100-yard dash after the retreating 
troop and, in broken accents, demanded the instant restoration of his 
property. It appeared that the thrifty scouts had recognized that 









r / _ • ' ‘ ' 07- ? ft • 

















By error the titles underneath the two outside pictures 

have been transposed. 

























THE ASHBURIAN 


31 


glass insulators make excellent drinking cups—and had acted ac¬ 
cordingly. The haversacks were opened—each man’s drinking cup 
being found in his sack’s mouth. (It is yet to be learned though, why 
one Scout needed three cups). 

At Fairy Lake each patrol started a roaring fire—strip’t, dried 
their clothes and proceeded to cook a hot meal. The day looked 
much brighter to the Scouts when with loosened belts and tired jaws 
they lounged about the fires—after disposing of enormous quantities 
of food. 

During dinner Scouts from the city arrived in large numbers. 
At 2.30 the Commissioner summoned all the troops together and 
announced that a tug-of-war and a relay-race were to take place. 
Owing to the large number of Scouts present, the preliminaries con¬ 
sumed much time. The events were well contested—the Y.M.C.A. 
Troop distinguishing itself particularly. Ashbury, however, gave 
them a tough fight in the tug-of-war. 

At 4.30 all the troops lined up. It is no betrayal of confidence 
to state that the concensus of opinion was that Ashbury Troop was in 
a class by itself in the matter of drill, discipline, and smartness. The 
most careless observer could not fail to notice that. There were 
Scouts there whose arms were covered with badges—there were 
King’s Scouts—there were Coronation Scouts—but among them all 
could be noticed a great lack of order in the ranks. This is the 
only criticism that can be justly made of the great body of Canadian 
Scouts. 


Another Field Day. 

Another very satisfactory outing was held on Thanksgiving 
Day, at a point about three miles west of Chelsea Station. The 
turn out was not particularly large—most of the boarders having 
betaken themselves to the bosoms of their families, and a number of 
day-boys evidently preferring the prospect of roast goose, etc., to 
that of a day under the blue skies of Quebec. 

Chelsea was reached at 9.45 a.m. All previous records for candy¬ 
eating having been broken on the journey. A brisk tramp of about 
forty-five minutes brought the troop to the appointed rendezvous— 
an advanced guard being sent by a shorter route to the south, while 
the main body approached from the north. 

After an early lunch prepared over good fires, the programme 
of events began with dispatch running—two of the three dispatch 
runners getting through without being challenged. This was fol¬ 
lowed by a spirited attack of the second patriot armed with apples, 
on the first patrol, who had gathered about their fire at an exposed 
point in the gully—the attacking party standing on the height above 
and hurling their missiles with disconcerting effect on the surprised 


32 


THE ASHBURIAN 


defenders below. The second patrol, however, charged up the slope 
in the face of the enemy’s fire and, though each man was killed many 
times, managed to drive the foe back to the woods. This was fol¬ 
lowed by ambulance practice, in which some of the wounded were 
rather roughly handled; and the field work for the day closed with 
a very successful rush up the face of a seemingly impregnable rocky 
hillside. 

R. Sladen has passed his first class examination, and is now a 
first class Scout. He deserves to be congratulated, as he is the first 
and only first class scout in the Ashbury troop. 

Blakeney II., Young, Tashcereau I, and Macoun have all passed 
their Tenderfoot examination. 


The Library. 

The following books have been presented to the Library by 
H. Gill, Esq.: 


Facing the World 
King of the Air 
Luke Walton 
Five Hundred Dollars 
The Young Musician 
Frank’s Campaign 
In a New World 


Alger. 


In Friendship’s Name—Phillips. 


Rose Boys—L. T. Meade. 


The Tiger of Mysore 
The Young Franc-Tireurs 
Jack Archer 


► Hentv. 

J 


The Punch Library of Humour—thirteen volumes—has also 
been added to the Library. 

Gifts of books to the Library (not necessarily new) will always 
be gladly received. A number of empty shelves have been asking 
for books for some time past, and it is hoped that the generosity of 
all who are interested in the School will fill them before the end of 
the School year. 






THE ASHBURIAN 


33 


News of the Blues of 1910. 

CHINIC.—No word has been received from the genial “Chi¬ 
nook/’ but it is nevertheless supposed that he is alive and flourishing. 

THOMPSON.—Big brother of the present Thompson was one 
of the best men on last year’s team. Could always be relied on, 
and was a very sensational tackle. He played for Ottawa II this 
season. Is studying privately for Toronto University and hopes to 
get through with flying colors. 

SKEAD.—Another recruit from Ashbury, into the ranks of the 
Ottawa II team. Gives evidence in his gridiron tactics of the train¬ 
ing he received at schcol. 

WOOLLCOMBE.—At present wrestling with complex legal 
problems in the City. Turned out to practice with the school and 
sat on the Committee. 

PARKER.—Serving the King now, at R.M.C. Is imbued with 
a very martial spirit and does not have much time to render any 
news concerning himself. 

SNETSINGER.—“Uncle Snet” is at McGill University at 
present. Still plays a good steady game. His beaming face was a 
familiar landmark to be discerned when down in Montreal this year. 

BEDDOE.—A blue of three years’ running, is still at Ashbury. 

VERNER.— Another of the very few “old guard” that remain 
this year. 

RUSSELL.—When last heard of, he was up North engaged in 
surveying. We wish him every success. 

SHAW.—“Big Bear” the sturdy middle wing is now lost to 
civilization in the pursuance of the lumber business. His absence 
was much felt on the wing line this year. 

MacDONNELL.—L eft outside wing, is in Ottawa this year 
preparing privately for McGill. He was a most enthusiastic specta¬ 
tor at most of the school’s matches this year. 

FLEMING.—Our hard working and popular captain is now in 
the Canadian Pacific Railway, wherein if the auguries portend 
aright, a successful career awaits him. “Here’s wishing him luck”. 
“Chas” played a masterly game at half back for Ottawa II this 
season. 

REID II.—“Electrical Ed” is at R.M.C. and is already famous 
for his large repertoire of songs. He intends to reorganize the 
artillery at the college, substituting the breach-loading cannon there 
for “gas-guns” of his own design. 


34 


THE ASHBURIAN 


BARWIS I.—The most brilliant centre half and kick the school 
has ever had. He is at R.M.C. where he made the second team, 
playing centre half thereon, and was retained as spare for the firsts. 
His kicking was greatly missed on this year’s team. 

MR. PRATT.—Old Boy, Sport’s Master and Coach. Is now in 
Montreal. The whole-hearted interest that he displayed in the 
team, coupled with his thorough knowledge of every detail of the 
game, will long be remembered and appreciated by Ashburians, 
past and present. 

P. W. C. 


Mark Antony’s Oration Over C.®sar. 

R. W. Gris well. 

(The Text from which Shakespeare wrote his Version.) 

Friends, Romans, countrymen! Lend me your ears; 

I will return them next Saturday. I come 
To bury Caesar, because the times are hard 
And his folks can’t afford to hire an undertaker. 

The evil that men do lives after them, 

In the shape of progeny that reap the 
Benefit of their life insurance. 

So let it be with the deceased. 

Brutus had told you Caesar was ambitious: 

What does Brutus know about it? 

It is none of his funeral. Would that it were ! 

Here, under leave of you, I come to 
Make a speech at Caesar’s funeral. 

He was my friend, faithful and just to me; 

He loaned me five dollars once when I was in a pinch 
And signed my petition for a post office. 

But Brutus says he was ambitious. 

Brutus should wipe off his chin. 

Caesar hath brought many captives to Rome 
Who broke rock on the streets until their ransoms 
Did the general coffers fill. 

When that the poor hath cried, Caesar wept, 

Because it didn’t cost anything, and 
Made him solid with the masses. (Cheers.) 

Ambition should be made of sterner stuff, 

Yet Brutus says he was ambitious. 

Brutus is a liar and I can prove it. 

You all did see that on the Lupercal. 

I thrice presented him a kingly crown 

Which thrice he did refuse, because it did not fit him quite. 

Was this ambitious? Yet Brutus says he was ambitious. 



THE ASHBURIAN 


35 


Brutus is not only the biggest liar in the country 
But he is a horse-thief of the deepest dye. (Applause.) 

If you have tears, prepare to shed them now. (Laughter.) 
You all do know this ulster. 

I remember the first time ever Caesar put it on, 

It was on a summer’s evening in his tent, 

With the thermometer registering ninety degrees in the shade, 
But it was an ulster to be proud of. 

And cost him seven dollars at Marcus Swartzmeyer’s. 

Corner of Fulton and Ferry streets, sign of the red flag. 

Old Swartz wanted forty dollars for it. 

But finally came down to seven dollars because it was Caesar 
Was this ambition? If Brutus says it was 
He is even a greater liar than Madame X! 

Look! in this place ran Cassius’s dagger through: 

Through this the son of a gun of Brutus stabbed, 

And when he plucked his cursed steel away, 

Mark Antony how the blood of Caesar followed it! 

(Cheers and cries of ‘ ‘ Give us something on the Silver 
bill!” “ Hit him again!” &c.) 

I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts, 

I am no thief as Brutus is, 

Brutus has a monopoly in all that business, 

And if he had his deserts, he would be 
In the penitentiary, and don’t you forget it! 

Kind friends, sweet friends, I do not wish to stir you up 
To such a sudden flood of mutiny. 

And as it looks like rain, 

The pall bearers will proceed to place the coffin in the hearse, 
And we will proceed to bury Cesar, 

Not to praise him. 


Old Ashburians at the L T niversities. 

At McGill University, Montreal, Que.: C. M. Anderson, D. 
Blair, G. D. Burn, S. C. Cooke, J. W. Hughson, J. T. Lewis, G. W. 
Masson, E. F. Newcombe, M. O’Halloran, R. V. C. Sinclair, W. M. 
Snetsinger. 

At the Royal Military College, Kingston, Ont.: C. W. A. Barwis, 
A. H. Bostock, J. F. E. Gendron, L. K. Greene, R. S. P. Maclvor, 
H. S. Parker, E. N. Reid, E. J. Renaud, N. A. Sparks 

At Trinity College, Toronto, Ont.: J. L. Bishop, R. J. Orde. 

At Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.: J. A. Aylen. 

At Toronto University, Toronto, Ont.: C. P. Cotton. 

The Editor would be pleased to receive any additions to or cor¬ 
rections in this list. 



36 


THE ASHBURIAN. 


Midshipmen Charles T. Beard and Trennick Bate, two old 
Ashburians serving in the Canadian Navy, have been transferred 
to serve on “Dreadnoughts” in the Royal Navy. 

Married. On August 9th, 1911, at the Church of Our Lord, 
Victoria, B.C., by the Rev. A. cle B. Owen, Capt. Lestock W. S- 
Cockburn, R.C.G.A. (an old Ashburian), eldest son of Dr. Lestock 
W. Cockburn, Hamilton, Ont., to Alma Dorothy Wynne Day, 
daughter of R. S. Day, Victoria, B.C. 

Mr. E. B. Eddy Bessey, an old boy who is achieving success as 
an advertising specialist, was recently * a prize-winner in a large 
advertising contest open to the world. This contest was to obtain 
slogans for the electric “Chariot Race” sign, the largest of its kind 
in the world, and situated on Broadway, New York City. 

Among those old boys who distinguished themselves on the 
football gridiron this year may be mentioned: with the Ottawa 
Seconds, Charlie Fleming, Eric Skead and Andy Thompson; with 
the McGill team: Grey Masson and Jack Lewis; with the R. M. C. 
Seconds; Cuthbert Barwis and Fernie Gendron; and with Trinity 
College, Leigh Bishop. 


Notes. 

This year we have four house prefects, two day-boy prefects 
and a library prefect. F. Graham—who has just rejoined the 
school—makes the fourth in the house. 

On Wednesday, October 25th, our President—Mr. W. H. Rowley, 
was married. In honour of the event the Head-Master gave us a 
half holiday. 

On November 11th, a lecture on India was given to the assembled 
school by Mr. Wharton. It was the first of our Saturday night 
entertainments for this term. 

On October 10th, the Ashbury Troop took part in the farewell 
to Earl Grey. They—in company with the other city troops— 
lined the approach to the Union Station, and saw the last of our late 
very popular Governor-General. The Ashbury contingent was easily 
the smartest on the parade—a characteristic which is apparent in no 
matter what company they are. 



THE ASHBURIAN. 


37 


On October 14th, they again took part in a public function— 
the welcome to the Duke of Connaught. On that day the city 
troops met at Cartier Square, and marched from there to the Parlia¬ 
ment Square where they lined the parapets. They were afterwards 
inspected by Mayor Hopewell, and marched back to the College. 
They were again the objects of many complimentary remarks. 

On the morning of the same day four new scouts were added to 
the troop: Marshall, Hallick, O’Connor and Moore. 


School Notes, 


The following boys have received First Team colors: Nai- 
smith, Thomas, Verner, Irvin, Sample, Beddoe, Davis, Heney, Gibbs, 
Thompson, Bowie, St. Laurent, White, Wickware, Carling I, Strubbe. 

The following boys have received Second Team colors: Mac- 
laren I, Carling II, Reid I, Lethbridge, Reiffenstein, Graham, Lowe I, 
Chanonhouse, Koelle. 

It has been decided that any member of a First Ashbuiy Foot¬ 
ball or Hockey team in past years is now entitled to wear the new 
First Team sweater by applying to the College for an order for the 
same. 


Our Contemporaries. 


The Editor begs to acknowledge the receipt of the following 
contemporaries:— 


Vox Lycei 
The Wykehamist 
The Epsomian 


The Cheltonian (2) 
The Black and Red 


Western Canada College Review 
Trinity College School Record 
The Meteor (2) 

Bradfield College Chronicle (2) 
The Collegian 





HIGHLAND INN 

ALGONQUIN PARK • ONT. 


DID YOU EVER GO NORTH IN WINTER? 

Have You Seen the Winter Forest; 

Breathed the Forest Air; 

Basked in the Forest Sunshine ; 

Tramped on Frozen Lakes; 

Followed the Game Trails; 

Fished Through the Ice; 

Know What It Means to be Really 

Hungry Three Times a Day? 

You may do all this and more. You may live all day 
long in the dry, cold, brilliant atmosphere of the forested 
mountains—stimulating beyond belief—tobogganing, skat¬ 
ing, skiing; and in the dusk returning to take your ease in 
your inn. Here excellent meals await your robust appetite, 
and in the evening, over a huge log lire, you may elevate 
your tired feet and smoke the pipe of perfect peace; while 
others discourse sweet music for your entertainment. 
Finally yon turn in—your bedroom steam heated and warm 
in spite of the open window—and you sleep—the deep, dream¬ 
less, refreshing sleep of the ozone-laden North. 










ASHBURY COLLEGE HOCKEY TEAM, 1912 . 

R. MacLaren R. W. White D. E. C. Wood, Esq. W. M. Irvin W. G. Gibbs 

H. M. Hughson L. Bowie D. F. Verner (Capt.) J. A. Stmbbe J. Hennessey 
























. 
























' 

















































- 








The Ash bur ian n c % ^ 


Editorial Staff. 

Editor-in-Chief — Mr C. H. Hooper. 

Assistant Editors —R. Lethbridge, L. E. L. Koelle. 
Sports Editors —A. Naismith, J. V. Thomas. 

Scouts’ Page —E. D. H. Boyd. 

Rifle Shooting —E. J. Lowe. 

Artists D. Verner, J. Harvey. 

Secretary-Treasurer — Mr. Wood. 


Editorial. 

The Christmas number of The Ashburian seemed to meet with 
general satisfaction. It was a big one for one thing, and it was 
filled with news and notices regarding that which is dear to the 
hearts of all healthy minded people—clean sport. Quite true—it 
did meet with some unfavorable criticism—to quote from our 
esteemed contemporary, at St. Andrews, it would have been “im¬ 
proved by short stories and skits”. The majority of our readers, 
however, thought otherwise—and said so. We agree with them. 
The average original story in a school magazine is interesting only 
to its author. A greater amount of much better stuff can be pur¬ 
chased at any news counter for the expenditure of the sum of ten 
cents. Good stories written by boys are rare, and our space here is 
too valuable to fill with anything but the best. When we do get 
something out of the ordinary we give it a deservedly prominent 
place. In the meanwhile, we return to our beloved sports. Rifle¬ 
shooting, this winter, is booming. We bewailed the loss of those 
whom we thought the best of our shots last year, only to find that 
even better were left behind. In the Canadian Rifle League matches 
for December and January, we made much better scores than for 
the same months last year. A Challenge Cup has now been kindly 
donated to encourage the sport among the Scouts. This will insure 
good shooting among the juniors. 











2 


THE ASHBURIAN 


The hockey season began sadly to be sure, but like the foot¬ 
ball season, it has improved. Considering the fact that we have 
just one member of last year’s team with us, we have not done so 
badly. We lost the cup, of course, but we put up a good bid for it— 
especially in the last match with St. Albans. The pity is that it 
will be three years now, before we can get the chance to win it again— 
“for keeps”. Hockey is now over—the intermediate season in 
which there is no recognized sport is with us. Cricket is still in the 
future—the immediate future we hope. The year so far has been a 
good one for Ashbury, and we hope that the summer term will be as 
successful. 


Hockey. 

Carling Cup Matches. 


Jan. 27 
Feb. 3 
“ 10 

“ 17 

“ 24 

Mar. 2 


Ashbury College v. Lower Canada at Montreal 
Ashbury College v. St. Alban’s at Brockville 
St. Alban’s v. Lower Canada at Brockville 

St. Albans 

Ashbury College v. Lower Canada at Ottawa 
Ashbury College v. St. Alban’s at Ottawa 
Lower Canada v. St. Alban’s at Montreal 


Lost 1-7 
Lost 3-9 

Won 4-1 
Won 4-1 
Tie 6-6 


The Carling Cup is therefore won by St. Albans and will lie 
held by them for this year. Below is given an account of the matches. 


Other Matches. 


Jan. 20 Ashbury College v. Old Boys 

27 Ashbury College 3rd v. Elgin St. Intermediates 
Feb. 14 Ashbury College .3rd v, Cliffsides 
Mar. 2 Ashbury College 2nd v. Y.M.C.A. 


Lost 10-11 
Won 6-2 
Won 3-2 
Lost 1-9 


ASHBURY vs. LOWER CANADA. 


This was the first of the Carling Cup matches and resulted in a 
win for Lower Canada by seven goals to one. Play started at 10.10 
a.m., and Ashbury immediately took the puck down the to Lower 
Canada end and kept it there until after about five minutes had 
elapsed, when Irvin scored on a shot from right wing; this seemed 
to wake up Lower Canada, and after that play was always at the Ash¬ 
bury goal. The locals tied the score after four or five minutes of play, 
and then went ahead in about a minute; Ashbury braced up again 
and play was kept around centre for the. rest of the period. 
i__ Half time : Lower Canada 2; Ashbury 1. 



THE ASHBU RIAN 


3 


Second Half. 

In this period Lower Canada had the play all their own way, 
and ran in three goals in quick succession. The Ashbury defence 
went all to pieces, Gibbs and Hennessey allowing the opposing 
players to get right in on Hughson whose magnificent work in goal 
saved Ashbury from a terrible defeat. At this stage of the game 
Irvin was put on the defence and Gibbs was sent to right wing. This 
strengthened the defence and Lower Canada were kept out for a 
time, but their weight soon began to tell on the light Ashbury for¬ 
wards, and they added two more goals to their total before the period 
closed. 

Hughson in goal was easily the pick of the Ashbury team; his 
place was a hard one to fill as the defence was bad and gave him no 
protection. Verner on the line played a fine game; he made several 
good rushes only to find there was no Ashbury man waiting for a pass 
when he got near the goal. Play was rough towards the end of the 
game, Judge of Play, O’Halloran not being strict enough. 

The Ashbury Team. 

% 

Goal .Hughson. 

Point .Hennessey. 

Cover Point. . . .Gibbs. 

Rover .Verner. 

Centre .White. 

Right Wing. . . .Irvin. 

Left Wing .Strubbe. 

W.G.G. 

ASHBURY vs. ST. ALBANS. 

On Friday afternoon, February 2nd, the Ashbury Hockey team 
went to Brockville with high hopes to play St. Albans. These 
hopes lasted till 1 p.m. Saturday, by which time St. Albans had 
run up a score of nine goals to our three. 

On arriving at Brockville the team proceeded to the hotel where 
they left their weapons, then down Main Street to view the inhabi¬ 
tants and the Nickel. After spending an hour or so in this interesting 
occupation, they returned to their temporary abode where Verner 
and Hughson held a reception in the bridal chamber. At 9 a.m., 
the boys went to breakfast, all but two sitting at one table. These 
two were lucky. 

Verner endeavored to play VAlexander’s Ragtime Band” on a 
piano which hadn’t been tutied for, 'at least, twenty years. Dear 
reader, you may imagine file result. 







4 


TI4E ASHBURIAN 


The rest of the morning passed quietly till twelve o’clock, 
when the game started. The ice was very slow, but to make up for 
that, all the youth and beauty of Brockville were present. From 
the face-off St. Albans brought the play to our end of the ice, 
the first three goals being put in by them. The scorers were: Fraser, 
Morphy, Evans. Then by a grand rush Bowie managed to score, 
then again Morphy of St. Albans, leaving the score: St. Albans, 4; 
Ashbury, 1, at half-time. 

In the second half we were able to hold St. Albans down a 
little, and at one time, near the end, we completely ran away from 
them, but only for a few minutes. The scorers, for the second half, 
were: St. Albans—Holmes, Hale Morphy, Hale, Fraser; Ashbury 
—Irvin and Verner. When the whistle blew the score stood: St. 
Albans, 9; Ashbury, 3. A few of the reasons for our not making a 
bigger score were: the forward’s inability to shoot straight; Gibb’s 
sore leg and Hennessey’s lack of wind owing to excessive laughter. 

At 2.30 p.m., it was a quiet hockey team that took the train 
for Ottawa. 

Line up: 

Ashbury. 

Goal .Hughson. 

Point .Gibbs. 

Cover .Hennessey. 

Rover .Verner (Capt.) 

Centre .White. 

Right Wing .... Irvin. 

Left Wing .... Bowie. 

Spare .MacLaren. 

H. M. H. 

L.C.C. vs. ASHBURY. 

On Saturday, the 17th of February, a large crowd of rooters wit¬ 
nessed the first home game on the schedule of the league, between 
L.C.C. and Ashbury resulting in a score of 4 to 1 in the favor of the 
latter team. 

The weather was fairly good, and the hockey excellent through¬ 
out, with the home team playing the more scientific game 
most of the time. Unfortunately the game started late, but when it 
finally did, it certainly made up for lost time. Parkins of L.C.C. 
netted the first goal, and it then seemed as though the visitors had 
things their own way. But Ashbury settled down, and by pretty 
combination and stick work Bowie soon shot a goal for the reel, 
white and green. A few minutes later Irvin got a good chance and 
scored with a long shot from right wing. Hennessey twice rushed 








THE ASHBURIAN 


o 


the puck from end to end, but had hard luck in getting a shot. On 
the second time, however, he passed cleanly to Verner who then 
netted Ashbury’s third goal. Then until the end of the half there 
was very clever rushing and checking on both sides, but no more 
scoring. 

Only a short respite was allowed and soon the teams were at it 
again. Both played with more vim, and the checking was rather 
severe; but although L.C.C. were heavier and used that advantage 
successfully, Ashbury could stick-handle all around them. The 
greater part of the work was done this half by the forwards, although 
both Hennessey and Gibbs were called on frequently to lend their 
services; this they did, often with such judgment and dispatch that 
L.C.C. wondered where the puck could have gone. But generally 
the puck was in L.C.C. territory and near the close of the half, White 
managed to shove one in on a mix-up around the nets, thus making 
the score 4 to 1. And so it remained to the end of the game; though 
L.C.C. made a valiant effort to pull ahead, and indeed kept the home 
team so busy as to cause worry to the spectators. Finally the 
whistle brought the game to a close, and a tired, but happy team 
wended its way in straggling groups up to the dressing room where 
everything was talked over exultingly. 

Clean and exciting play characterized the whole game, and 
happily no injuries were sustained. Only two minor fouls of one 
minute each were imposed for heavy bodying. The whole Ashbury 
team played well, and every man starred. Each of the forwards 
shot a goal, a showing which seems very creditable, and no doubt 
if the defence had been needed sufficiently and had had chances, they 
also would have had tallied their share. If the team can put up a 
little faster playing and keep to it throughout the game without let¬ 
ting up the pace, they certainly ought to win next Saturday’s struggle. 

L. E. S. 


ASHBURY vs. ST. ALBAN’S. 

The match between Ashbury College and St. Albans was played 
on Saturday, February 24th, at the Gladstone Avenue rink. The 
ice was good except for a few parts where the efforts of the freezer 
had been converted into heat. 

At the very beginning the St. Albans team seemed to have the 
game all their own way. They skated rings around the Ashbury 
representatives and made Wickware so nervous that he would jump 
straight at the puck every time it came his way. It had been de¬ 
cided to play two periods of 25 minutes each and by the time 20 
minutes of the first period had passed, the score was 4-0 in favour of 
the visiting team. 


6 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Just then Verner seemed to wake up, although he had been 
making himself useful before in helping the defence, and showed the 
visitors just what he could do by going through every man on their 
team and scoring a goal. From the face off he again went through 
and scored without allowing a single player except himself to touch 
the puck. 

Matters looked brighter for the home team when yet a third 
time Irvin landed the puck in the enemies nets, and half time was 
called with the score 4-3 for the visitors. 

The second half was noticeable for its lack of “go”, and the 
play was very slow. Ashbury put in three goals by Irvin and Verner, 
and St. Albans retaliated with two, leaving the score six all when 
time was called. 

Without waiting to hear what was to be done, the St. Albans 
players were hurried off the ice, rubbed with towels, and congratu¬ 
lated on the fine game they had played. Thus it was that when the 
officials decided that the game should be played off, of course every¬ 
body was undressed, and some ten of the fifteen minutes left were 
wasted. Then when both Teams were on the ice, the referee took 
three minutes more to find out how long they should play. The 
ensuing two minutes of play were quite uninteresting and the game 
remained a draw. 

Wickware is to be congratulated on the way he played, and 
Strubbe also was brilliant. The school suppoiters were as numerous 
as possible. 

There is a little quotation by Thomas Davidson which, with a 
little alteration, would be very appropriate. “If a thousand games 
were lost, be not disheartened; as long as your play is square, you 
have not failed.” 

The Ashbury line-up was as follows:— 


Centre .White. 

Right Wing .Irvin. 

Ijejt Wing .Strubbe. 

Rover .Verner. 

Point .Hennessev I. 

Cover Point .Gibbs. 

Goal .Wickware. 

Spares .Bowie and MacLaren I. 

J. V. T 


Ashbury College v. Old Boys. 

This match was played at Dey’s Rink on January 20th, and 
resulted in a win for the Old Boys by 10 goals to 9. The game was 
divided up into two periods of 20 minutes. In the first period the 










THE ASHBURIAN 


College had the best of the game and the score at half-time was 
4-2 in our favour. Verner, White, Gibbs and Irvin scored for the 
College, while Sladen and J. Fraser scored for the Old Boys. In the 
second period goals came more quickly, and Hughson was given 
plenty of work to do in goal. Goals for the Old Boys were scored by 
Carling, 3, Moore and J. Fraser, 2 each, Fleming 1. For the School 
Bowie scored twice, and Stubbs, Verner and Hennessey once each. 
For the School, Hennessey and Gibbs played well, while Carling and 
Sladen were the best of the Old Boys. 

G. Bryson acted as referee and Wickware was judge of play. 

The line up was as follows:— 

Ashbury College. Old Boys. 


Goal .Hughson H. Bate. 

Point .Hennessey. C. Fleming. 

Cover Point .Gibbs. A. Fraser. 

Rover .Verner (Capt.) T. Carling. 

Right Wing .Irvin and Stubbs. A. Moore. 

Left Wing .Bowie. J. Fraser. 


Ashbury College, 2nd Team v. Elgin St. Intermediates. 

This match was played on Dey’s rink on Saturday, June 27th, 
and resulted in a win for the College by 6 goals to 2. The game was 
a very fast one and both teams played up in great style. We opened 
the scoring with 2 goals in quick succession from Hennessey II and 
Birkett II; then Anderson who was rather too heavy for our boys, 
scored twice. Just before half time Jackson scored again. 

In the second half we did most of the attacking and both Hen¬ 
nessey II and Birkett II scored again. The last goal of the match 
was scored by Blakeney. 

Bowie refereed the game by himself and managed very well. 
There was very little rough play, and Jackson was the only boy to be 
penalized. Fleming gave a great exhibition of goal-keeping: with¬ 
out him the score would have been very different. Both Birkett II 
and Cory showed excellent form, although they had some difficulty in 
checking Anderson. 

The line up vas as follows:— 



Ashbury. 

Intermediates. 

Goa l . 

. Fleming. 

Taskey. 

Point . 

. . . Birkett II. 

Kidd. 

Cover Point. . . 

. . .Cory. 

Tinnas. 

Rover . 

. . .Birkett I. 

Hawes. 

Centre . 

. . . Hennessey II. 

Brosney. 

Right Wing.. . . 

... Blakeney. 

Anderson. 

Left Wing . 


Buche. 















8 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Ashbury Intermediates v. Cliffsides. 

This match was played on the School rink on Wednesday, 
February 14th, and resulted in a win for Ashbury by 3 goals to 2. 

The ice was rather soft and therefore the game was not a very 
fast one. In the first half goals were scored by Masson and Bowie 
for Ashbury, and by Smith for Cliffsides. In the second half Smith 
equalized, but in the last five minutes Masson put Ashbury ahead. 

Gibbs and Wickware managed the game, which was very 

clean from start to finish. 

The line up was a follows:— 

Goal .Fleming. 

Point .Cory. 

Cover Point .Birkett II. 

Rover .Masson. 

Lejt Outside .Blakeney I. 

Centre .Bowie. 

Right Outside .Maclaren I. 

Characters of Hockey Team. 

Verner (Capt.), rover, a magnificent stick-handler, but rather 
slow on his skates. Uses his brains well. Rather handicapped by 
his weight. An efficient captain. 

Hughson , goal, has a good eye and keeps his head, but needs a 
little more experience. 

Wickware, goal, stops almost anything but shouldn’t run out of 
the nets as much as he does. 

Gibbs, point, a very effective player who makes cyclone rushes 
and checks well. 

Hennessey , cover point,"the fastest man on the team and a very 
clever stick-handler. 

White, centre, a heady player and one who keeps his position. 
He is a good stick-handler and an accurate shot. 

Irvin, right wing, plays his position well and knows how to 
play the boards. He is a good shot but tries to shoot too often. 

Bowie, left wing, a very small man, but very effective; he handles 
his stick well and plays good combination. 

Strubbe, spare, played the last game. He is the hardest worker 
on the team, checks back well, and uses his body. 

Maclaren, spare, rather light, but a good skater and excellent 
stick-handler. 









THE ASHBURIAN 


9 


Lectures. 


WILD ANIMALS OF CANADA. 

“Wild Animals of the Canadian Wilds” was the topic of the 
second of our Saturday evening lectures delivered at the school here, 
Saturday, November 25, by Professor Prince of this city. In opening 
his lecture Mr. Prince said that as time was limited he would only be 
able to deal with a few of our animals and therefore he would speak 
of the larger fauna only. 

Before having any pictures shown Mr. Prince spoke of the 
animals generally and told us how the naturalists of all the other 
countries envied Canada her large beasts. The first one spoken of 
by Mr. Prince was the moose. He described this large animal 
very fully, comparing it to others of the deer family, and illustrating 
all his points with lantern pictures. In describing this animal he 
mentioned the extreme shyness of it and most other deer, and spoke 
of the very great difficulty in seeing them; and at the same time told 
us of the different times he had seen moose. 

Another very interesting member of the deer family that Mr. 
Prince spoke of was the caribou which frequents the country in the 
north. This animal is distinguished by the remarkable horns for 
such a small body. It has wonderful prehensile lips for gathering the 
moss which is its particular food. 

Mr. Prince then spoke briefly of the red and blacktail deer 
which are practically the same, but inhabit different regions. 

The next class of animals treated by the lecturer was the bear. 
This, he said, was a fun-loving beast who, however, was very fero¬ 
cious when attacked. Mr. Prince said he believed that the most of 
the stories of wanton savagery on the part of bears and wolves were 
exaggerated, and he thought that it was only under very particular 
circumstances that they would attack. As time was appoaching 
Mr. Prince had to hurry up a little and dealt in quick succession 
with the beaver, wolf, lynx and mountain sheep, accompanying his 
remarks with very fine photographs or pen pictures of the various 
animals. 

At the close of the lecture the Headmaster spoke a few suitable 
words of thanks and then called for an Ashbury cheer, which was 
given with zeal. The lecture was closed by “God Save the King”, 
and we adjourned to the dining room for refreshments. 


E. R. L. 


10 


THE ASHBURIAN 


AEROPLANES. 

On Saturday, December 2nd, we had the pleasure of listening 
to the third of the winter series of lectures. Colonel G. Stopforcl 
Maunsell, R.C.E., was the lecturer of the evening and proved to be 
as able a speaker as he is a a soldier. His subject, “Aeroplanes,” 
was one of so great interest and importance to the rising generation 
that it should have drawn a larger audience than was present. The 
expectation of those who did attend was fully gratified, for the 
Colonel is perhaps the greatest authority in Canada on aerial naviga¬ 
tion and was as much at home with his subject as Mr. Elwes is with 
the classics. He first interpreted the terms used in the navigation 
of the air, as set down by the Aeronautical Society of Great Britain, 
and then continued, with the assistance of many clear and well- 
chosen slides, to explain the several types of machines and to make 
clear the mysteries of their mechanism. After the lecture, we left 
the gymnasium with thoughts of the great possibilities of the future 
and respect for the dauntless men, who, through their bravery and 
perseverance have accomplished so much to further the complete 
conquest of the air, which now is a matter of time only. 

H. R. M. 


On December 5, 1911, the school had the pleasure and privilege 
of hearing an interesting and practical address by Mr. C. A. Mag-rath, 
one of Canada’s most ardent Imperialists. 

Mr. Magrath in the course of his address impressed upon his 
audience the great importance of the Immigration Question with 
reference to its effect upon the characteristics and national life of 
Canada. He pointed out the necessity for greater discrimination in 
the admission of the foreign element to our country, and our duty 
as Canadians in moulding the incomers to British ideals. Canadians 
are not sufficiently demonstrative in their loyalty; the place for the 
flag is on the flag-pole, especially here in Canada where the immi¬ 
grants are so cosmopolitan, and where they need the emblem of 
British ideals constantly before them. 

Lastly, he told us of the great responsibility involved in suc¬ 
ceeding to our great heritage; of our duty in fitting ourselves for 
positions in our country, a country with a glorious future and full of 
golden opportunities. Habit is the source of man’s uplift or down¬ 
fall. We must acquire those habits which will help us along the 
right path, and not indulge in “jollifications”, for by so doing we 
waste our vitality and if we “sow wild oats”, we shall surely reap 
them. 



THE ASHBURIAN 


11 


Canadians should be proud of and appreciate the honour and 
privilege of belonging to the British Empire which is our greatest 
possible heritage, as the history and glory of Britain stands for the 
advancement and uplift of mankind. 

F. D. G. 


WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY. 

On Saturday evening, February 24th, the school had the plea¬ 
sure of listening to a very interesting and instructive lecture on Wire¬ 
less Telegraphy by Mr. C. P. Edwards, chief of the Government 
Wireless stations in Canada. 

After a few introductory remarks, the Headmaster introduced 
Mr. Edwards, who proceeded to explain the theory of wireless tele¬ 
graphy. Mr. Edwards had with him a large number of excellent 
slides and diagrams of the early apparatus and of that in use in the 
present day, all of which he explained fully. Mr. Edwards made his 
lecture most interesting by weaving into it several amusing anec¬ 
dotes connected with his work in this very useful and interesting 
branch of Science. 

After the Headmaster had expressed his appreciation and that 
of the School to Mr. Edwards for his kindness in giving us such a 
pleasant evening, three hearty Ashbury cheers were given for the 
lecturer. The National Anthem was then sung, and refreshments 
were served in the dining-room. 

J. B. L. H. 


FRAGMENTS FROM THE GENERAL KNOWLEDGE PAPER. 

Duke of Wellington was Queen Victoria’s husband. 

Nelson was in the great battle of Waterloo with Wellington. 

Shelley was Governor of one of the colonies of North America, 
also an explorer. 

A rolling stone sweeps all before. 

P. C.—Perfectly correct. 

The three men in the fiery furnace were: Abeduego, Belshazzar 
and Daniel. 

A rolling stone is dangerous. 

Two of a trade repulse one another. 

It’s an ill wind that upset the ship. 

Dante was a shoemaker. 

Sir Christopher Wren was an Admiral of the Canadian fleet. 

A rolling stone often causes strife. 

General Cronje was the English General who was captured with 
his army by the Americans at Saratoga. 




12 


THE ASHBURIAN 



PREFECTS 1911-12. 

J. B. Heney A. M. Naismith H. M. Hughson 

J. V. Thomas W. H. Davis F D. Graham 

IT. M. S. Destroyer. 

There were several curious features about the ship; her cruise, 
for instance, began in the autumn, and only ended when she was 
broken up—towards Christmas—the vessel even in that short space 
of time having become quite obsolete. She was never launched, 
was never christened, never went to sea, and yet saw more action 
than the Canadian Navy is ever likely to see. 

Her Captain was also her owner—a state of affairs unusual 
even in the above mentioned navy. The Chief Engineer was also the 
cook. Other unusual features about the Destroyer will develop as 
we proceed, suffice it for the present to mention that she carried no 
armament, unless a collection of sticks and bludgeons could be 
classed as such. These served the double purpose of repelling 
boarders and assisting the Chief Engineer to get up steam in a hurry. 
Most things on the Destroyer fulfilled a double purpose. Some¬ 
times in one man would be combined the duties which usually are 
carried out by three. The Second Engineer, for instance, was 
obliged to walk to the nearest coaling station, bring the coal, and 








THE ASHBURIAN 


13 


attend to the duties which more regularly fall to the lot of a Second 
Engineer. Thus, he combined in one person the miraculous powers 
of St. Peter with the drudgery incident to acting as Stevedore. 
None of the officers, and none of the crew (if there had been a crew) 
received any pay, all being actuated apparently by only the highest 
sense of duty and loyalty. Our engines were of the latest pattern, 
being called, I think, the “ Jumbo Upright No. 9.” They—or it— 
was situated in the forward packing case, which consituted the 
bows of the Destroyer. The particular advantage in this pattern of 
marine engine lies in the fact that coal may be burned, if there is any 
coal to be had at the naval stations; in lieu of this, wood is just as 
good, and even the Second Engineer could generally manage to 
have a supply of fence-rails on hand. If the worst came to the 
worst, the craft could make steam with paper, dried leaves, straw, 
etc., old exercise books being the favourite fuel. 

A brave sight the Destroyer made as she steamed out of harbour, 
the black smoke rolling in thick curls from her stovepipe, set at 
an acute angle in the deck and giving the craft that peculiar rakish 
appearance inseparately associated in the nautical mind with speed. 
The Chief Engineer, having a turn for dramatic effect, always 
kept a handful of straw for these occasions and thoroughly “banked 
his fires” with it until he himself was often obliged to vacate his own 
engine room through sheer inability to breathe. It was at such 
moments as these that the Second Engineer—doing the duty of 
stoker for the moment—cursed his sad fate, and swore eternal 
vengeance upon his superior officer. 

Our “high-seas”, or Spanish Main, or whatever we wished it to 
be at the moment, was restricted in its boundaries by the Captain’s 
father’s back-yard fence—a narrow sea forsooth and requiring care¬ 
ful navigation. For this reason I had been chosen Chief Navigating 
Officer, also because I was fairly “chummy” with the Captain, 
having often treated him to his favourite “sundae” when I wished 
to obtain a favour. Our horizon being so limited the enemy fre¬ 
quently fell upon us almost before we could beat to quarters, and 
thus we lost in many spirited engagements. 

We had other trials not usually experienced in the Navy— 
shortage of fuel, occasioned by the Captain’s father’s rooted objection 
to the constant pilfering of his coal loin, being one. This was very 
serious as it entailed cold rations for the crew. No matter how 
much we might occasionally criticise the Chief Engiener’s apple¬ 
sauce and cocoa (the only things he could cook) we soon found that 
his worst experiments were at least hot, and preferable to frozen 
sandwiches. The locking of the coal bin was always followed by 
rank mutiny among the men. 

“All aboard” shouted the Chief Engineer, depositing a saucepan 
full of chopped apples on the starboard engine, kicking the drafts 


14 


THE ASHBURIAN 


open with one foot, and seizing a tin of cocoa. Thick smoke rolled 
from our funnels, making it particularly unpleasant for me who, as 
Navigator, paced the forward packing case, which served as the 
bridge. The Captain shouted a warning to an individual who was 
leaning against the stern, unconscious of the gathering speed of the 
moving battleship. This worthy, the Surgeon, swung himself on 
board with a skill born ol long familiarity with a congested street car- 
service, and disappeared into his cabin (packing case No. 3 star¬ 
board side) through a hole in the deck, after the manner of a fireman 
roused from his slumbers to attend a midnight call. Under his arm 
he carried some curious packages which I subsequently found to my 
sorrow to contain the latest and most searching patent medicines. 
Presently the Captain emerged from his lair and relieved me on the 
bridge. I immediately repaired to the “sick-bay,” complaining to 
the Surgeon of mysterious symptoms which required instant treat¬ 
ment. I recommended him to administer a peppermint-tabloid— 
knowing that a store -of these had been issued by the Admiralty, and 
that the Captain had not eaten them all yet. Being in a good 
humour he complied, and then reached for an awe-inspiring blue 
bottle from his shelves, the contents of which he dilated upon for 
some time, while I sucked my peppermint-tabloid and almost 
resolved to exchange my job of Chief Navigating Officer for the 
apparently facinating life of Ship’s Surgeon. I should be sick, I 
resolved, for just as long as a peppermint tabloid remained in the 
consulting room. Meanwhile the Surgeon approached me with his 
ominous bottle. I gazed upon it with the gravest suspicion. I knew 
something about the contents, having contributed to its various 
ingredients and been present at the dreadful compounding. It 
wasn’t perhaps quite as gruesome as the contents of the witches’ 
cauldron in Macbeth, but I knew that there were squashed raisins, 
pepper, flour, salt, sugar and ink in it, and that the Surgeon was 
dying to try it on some unfortunate patient. He now assured me 
that it would remove my most alarming symptoms, even restore lost 
hair, or mend a broken leg. Vainly, I protested that I would sooner 
have the symptoms; he advanced on me with a large spoon, and I 
noticed that the bottle had been labelled “POISON”. 

At this moment a cry of “Stand by to repel boarders!” rang out 
on deck. I dodged the Surgeon, neatly overturning the bottle by the 
luckiest accident, and literally with one bound gained the deck. A 
stirring scene greeted me. The enemy in large numbers were scramb¬ 
ling over the horizon and our noble Captain and his crew were fighting 
for their lives on the grassy sea that surrounded the ship. The 
Surgeon, having followed me with the blue bottle, still containing 
much of it horrid contents, discharged it in the manner of a hand- 
grenade with unerring aim into the waistcoat of the leader of the 
boarding party, who was thereby instantly rendered hors de combat , 


THE ASHBURIAN 


15 


and retired in tears to clean himself. I snatched up the mast and 
launched myself into the midst of the enemy, mowing them down 
in rows at a time. In spite of our utmost efforts the pirates—for 
such they proved to be—far outnumbering us, gained [possession of 
the deck. Soon the whole ship—to the farthest packing case—was 
in their possession. The Destroyer had been captured. We were 
not obliged to walk the plank, having wisely taken refuge behind 
the nearest horizon, but now we had the intense annoyance of 
watching the pirates demolish the ship’s rations for the day. With 
unholy glee they ate our oranges, throwing the skins derisively in 
our direction; apples disappeared in a twinkling, sandwiches were 
munched and ginger ale “swigged” until we boiled with helpless rage. 
Finally the enemy having eaten everything on the vessel, retired; 
then we sadly returned to restore order in our ship. The Surgeon 
now grew very busy patching up our imaginary wounds. Soon we 
were all bandages and splints, some even stumping bravely about 
the deck on wooden legs; others with empty sleeves thrust into 
pockets, in imitation apparently of Nelson. The unlucky Second 
Engineer was given orders to “coal ship”, broken leg or not, and 
ambled obediently away across the sea, carrying a coal-scuttle, to the 
basement of the Captain father’s stable—the place in which he was 
wont to keep his coal. I can only conjuncture as to the amount we 
burned in the Destroyer during a cruise, as no account was ever kept 
by the Admiralty, but when the Engineer was trying some unusually 
intricate experiment in the cooking line, and the Destroyer forgoing 
ahead under forced draught, the unlucky Second Engineer must 
have walked some miles. 

About three bells in the middle watch, as I was pacing the for¬ 
ward packing case intent only on the navigation of the ship, I noticed 
that the smoke was pouring from our funnel in ever increasing vol¬ 
ume. This I at first ascribed to some new culinary operation on the 
Engineer’s part—and I licked my chops in anticipation. The Second 
Engineer I knew had been encouraged by his Chief that afternoon 
with a few hearty kicks to bring in a little extra fuel. Presently, I 
was rudely disturbed in my reflections by a cry of “FIRE”! 
“Where” shouted I blissful unconscious of the roaring furnace under 
my very feet. I was quickly informed that the engine room was a 
seething mass of flames. I commenced scrambling down the ladder 
from the bridge with more haste than caution—slipping on its ice 
covered rungs and landing head foremost in the sea. The cry of 
“MAN OVERBOARD” now added horror to the situation, but 
realizing that none of the crew could well be spared to man the 
boats, I picked myself up and joined the excited company who 
were by this time pouring out of the ill-fated ship like rats. In 
extremities like this it is not always well to stick too closely to 
precedent, so, in spite of the fact that we had never read of such a 


16 


THE ASHBURIAN 


thing having been done before at sea, the Captain’s coachman was 
summoned. This individual lounged up with the stable hose and 
most unromantically turned it on the blazing vessel. When the fire 
was out, a solemn Court Marshal was held to investigate the cause. 
At this it transpired that the Chief Engineer had most culpably 
allowed paper and kindling to accumulate on the engine-room floor 
to the depth of six inches or more. The engines—stoked vigorously 
all day to cook some villianous looking mess (produced in the Court) 
and called by its inventor a ‘ ‘ Marine Pie”—had become red hot, and 
the rubbish under them had ignited. 

Clearly the Chief Engineer was to blame and the Court held a 
whispered conversation as to the punishment to be meted out to him. 
The culprit became very nervous during these proceedings and looked 
half inclined to bolt. The Court reflected that he had also been very 
cheeky to the Captain of late, regarding the apple sauce. In fact, 
he had been known to tell the Captain’s orderly to give his compli¬ 
ments to the Captain and to tell him to do something very unpleasant. 
It was decided to deal harshly with the prisoner, and we instantly 
clapped him into irons—rope answering the purpose. He resisted 
strenously—as indeed he might well do—having overheard our 
remarks regarding “rope’s ends, cat-o-nine tails, keel-hauling” etc. 
We outnumbered him, however, with the able assistance of his 
Second in Command, who seemed to enjoy thus getting even with his 
task-master. A flogging was decided on. It is not perhaps custo¬ 
mary in even the smallest navy for the Captain to undertake this 
painful task himself, but on the Destroyer many things were not 
customary. The three of us laid onto him with pieces of rope until 
he roared with mingled pain and anger, then he was released and told 
to run home before he got anything worse. He needed no second 
bidding and fled vowing vengeance, and muttering something about 
bringing a larger gang to get even with us. 

That night the Captain and I were assailed with remorse. Per¬ 
haps, we had been a little hard on him, especially as he had been 
cooking his blessed Marine Pie for our entertainment. Then, too, his 
threats regarding a larger gang made us a trifle apprehensive. We 
decided to forget and forgive and, being in a generous mood, we wrote 
apologies to the Chief Engineer. The Captain said something about 
arriving at a hasty conclusion, while I protested that I had been 
acting under orders only and quite against my own inclinations— 
all of which must have tended to soothe the wounded feelings and 
cuticle of the unfortunate victim. 

The Chief Engineer did eventually return, but he was never the 
same man again. Even now, when the Destroyer has long been a 
dream of childhood’s days, the two engineers are still very cool in 
each other’s company. 

When the winter began the Captain’s father—his patience now 


THE ASHBURIAN 


17 


exhausted—objected strongly to the disfigurement of his back garden 
and the constant pilfering of his coal bin. The decree went forth 
that the vessel should be broken up. The Destroyer soon was no 
more. From packing cases she had come—to kindling she returned. 

Sic Transit Gloria Mundi — 

L. E. L. K. 


EXCELSIOR. 

Now life is like a fret-saw, 

A-jigging up and down, 

With every turn as different 
As the hamlet from the town; 

It doesn’t matter very much 
Wherein you have been placed, 

If you haven’t got Ambition, 

Your life will go to waste. 

You may be an aristocrat, 

Or just a common “pleb”, 

If you haven’t got Ambition, 

Life’s tide is on the ebb. 

And once the backward flow begins, 
Dire results can soon be seen; 

And you’ll have to join that chorus 
Of “Alas, it might have been.” 

So let not fools deceive you, 

As they often try to do ; 

They cannot mould your future, 

For it’s solely up to you. 

So if you will not plod ahead 
Nor emulate the ant, 

You’ll soon be like the sluggard, 
Whose slogan is “I can’t”. 

ERGO. 

Dig in bright and early, 

Hang this motto on the wall, 

‘ ‘ I must obtain Ambition, 

If I hope to win at all.” 


P. W. C. 



18 


THE ASHBURIAN 



1st. ASHBURY TROOP: PATROL LEADERS. 

P. L. Read Scout Master Boyd 
P. L. Patterson P. L. Moore P. L. Ross 

Scouting*. 

A fourth patrol was started in December. Moore was elected 
Patrol Leader and Taschereau, Corporal. The patrol consists of: 

Moore Taschereau O’Connor Macoun 

Ecklin Shipman Young. 

Two more scouts, Ross and Maunsell, have passed their first- 
class examination. 


SCOUT BANQUET. 

The troop attended the Scout Banquet held in town at the 
Y.M.C.A. Building on the 19th December, 1912. The banquet was a 
great success, and every troop sat at a table of their own. There was 
great rivalry as to the decorating of the tables, but the Ashbury 
Scouts certainly had the best decorated table there. The decora¬ 
tions consisted of a small Xmas tree with the customary glass and 
tinsel hangings. Ribbons of the School colour reached from the tree 




• ' r E VSIIB r ■ n 


19 


to all four corners o ‘ ,y effect. The 

table was further dec v t me paper around 

the stand where the tree was, ^ i mury pennons hung con¬ 
spicuously all around. 

The troop, I must say, is to be congratulated on the splendid 
way they contributed for the decorations. 

The table was decked with three great vases of flowers presented 
by Miss Clark. The troop wishes to thank her very much for this 
donation; it caught the eyes of the Scout Council at once. We 
have to thank very much the Headmaster and the troop Chaplain 
Mr. Hooper, Mr. Wood and others for the interest they took 
in our banquet, and the way in which they backed it up with 
very munificent and generous contributions towards the decorating 
fund. Certainly the troop does not lack supporters and well wishers. 

The troop turned out 21 strong under the Scout-Master. The 
table after being congratulated by Col. Sherwood, gave three hearty 
cheers for the Council. Among the smart tables that caught our eye 
were those of the First, Second, Third and Fifth troops. The “Y” 
troop was there “with bells on 

The scouts were addressed by several prominent speakers and 
after “God Save the King” was sung, broke up about 11.30. 

E. D. H. B. 

FIELD WORK. 

The idea which was generally prevalent before Christmas that 
there would be little opportunity for scouting activity during the 
snowy months has, happily enough, been proved to have been false. 
A new phase of scouting has been introduced—a phase which must 
remain peculiar to Canadian Scouting—to wit, snow-shoe tramps 
and all-day outings in the bush, regardless of such details as zero 
weather and its accompanying difficulties—difficulties which are 
outbalanced by advantages and pleasures which cannot be enjoyed 
in summer. 

Four expeditions have been made. About the middle of Janu¬ 
ary some dozen members of the Ashbury troop made the first trip 
to Fairy Lake. The distance of about three miles from the Aylmer 
road, along the brow of a hill, partly across the wind-swept open 
and partly through the woods, to a sheltered spot on the high ground 
immediately to the north-east of the lake was covered on snow-shoes; 
the appointed spot being reached at about noon. The thermometer 
registered about zero. Two fires were lighted, and dinner was pre¬ 
pared in the usual way—and eaten with the usual relish. Snow- 
shoes laid about the fire served as seats. The experience of having 
to drink hot cocoa very quickly in order to prevent its freezing was 
a novelty to some of the scouts, while others who began to suffer lit¬ 
erally from cold feet as a result of moving about in the deep snow 


20 


THE ASHBURIAN 


without snow-shoes, were surprised to find that the fire would not 
warm their feet without burning their moccasins. After dinner the 
patrol leaders were sent out on snow-shoes and the remaining mem¬ 
bers of the troop were dispatched after them to find, each his own 
patrol leader, the only clue being the distinctive marks of the different 
shoes. While this was the only feature of the day which deserves 
to be considered as a scouting “manoeuvre”, the first outing was 
important as an initiation to many who had never before had the 
experience of cooking and eating a meal in the open in mid-winter. 
On the return tramp the troop visited a secluded spot about half a 
mile to the west of Fairy Lake where permission had very kindly 
been given by Mr. Maclean, the owner of the property, to carry on 
scouting operations and to build a shelter hut. 



On the following Saturday the troop turned out about twenty 
strong to build the hut. A protected spot was found in a frozen 
swamp closely wooded with cedar and spruce. After considerable 
time had been spent in cooking and eating dinner, the exact location 
of the hut was determined upon and the troop was told off into sec¬ 
tions to cut poles, to gather spruce boughs and to build. A heavy 
pole was tied in a horizontal position about eight feet from the ground 
between two trees about ten feet apart. Lighter poles were laid 

























































THE ASHBURIAN 


21 


up to this from the ground at an angle of about forty-five degrees. 
The high side, facing the most protected part of the bush, was to be 
left open to admit the heat from the fire to be kindled in front. Con¬ 
siderable time was lost owing to the poor condition of the scouts’ axes, 
most of which were dull, and many of which had a habit of losing 
their heads when used with any degree of vigour. The Assistant 
Scoutmaster had the misfortune to cut his knee with one of the 
sharper axes, and was obliged to walk the whole distance to the 
Aylmer Road in his wounded condition before securing a vehicle to 
convey him to a doctor. 

The turnout at the third trip was larger than before, and the 
shelter was practically finished. The pole-work was completed and 
the roof was covered with boughs, leaving only the ends to be filled in 
with lighter poles and woven with boughs. 

The following week, the shelter was slightly extended at one end; 
the last touches were added and the first fire was lighted in the imme¬ 
diate foreground. The temperature on this occasion was fifteen 
below zero. 

All is now in readiness for the grand finale—the fulfillment of the 
whole object of this undertaking. Some half-dozen of the more 
daring and hardier members of the troop are looking forward to 
spending a night under the friendly protection of this shelter—in the 
glow of a real camp fire, in a real bush, in real zero weather. Some 
are enthusiastic enough to regret that, owing to the nearness of the 
National Capital, thev are not likely to hear the howling of wolves. 

C. F. L. G. 


Debating Society 

The first meeting of the Ashbury College Debating Society was 
held on Wednesday, January 24, 1912, with the Headmaster in the 
chair. The attendance and interest displayed was most encourag¬ 
ing, and everything augurs well for a successful and beneficial series 
of debates. 

The Headmaster and Mr. Hooper expressed themselves as being 
very much in favour of a Debating Society, and offered some valu¬ 
able suggestions for its organization and management. 

Moved by the Headmaster, seconded by A. M. Naismith 
that Frank D. Graham be appointed Secretary of the Society. 

The motion was carried unanimously. 

Moved by W. H. Davis, seconded by A. St. Laurent that 
J. V. Thomas be appointed President of the Society. 

The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Headmaster suggested that F. D. Graham, Heney, 
Naismith, Morgan, Sample, and Thomas be appointed to form an 
Executive Committee for the purpose of arranging, subject to the 



22 


THE ASHBURIAN 


approval of the Society, debates and all detail in connection with the 
management of the same. 

Moved by Wickware, seconded by E. D. H. Boyd that the 
Headmaster’s suggestion be adopted. 

The motion was carried. 

The meeting then adjourned. 

TheHegular meeting of the Debating Society was held on Friday, 
February 2, 1912, in the Assembly Room with J. V. Thomas in the 
chair. The meeting was opened with a short speech by the President. 
The minutes of the previous meeting were read by the Secretary. 
Moved by F. D. Graham, seconded by Morgan that meetings of the 
Society be held fortnightly. 

The motion was carried. 

Moved by W. H. Davis, seconded by F. D. Graham that the 
Headmaster be appointed Honorary President of the Society. 

The motion was carried unanimously. 

The subject for debate was: “Resolved that Compulsory 
Military Service is a Necessity in Canada.” 

The Affirmative was supported by F. D. Graham and 
E. D. H. Boyd; the Negative, by Messrs. R. H. and E. J. Lowe. 

Cary-Elwes, C. H. Hooper, and D. C. Wood very kindly acted 
as judges. The judges awarded the debate to the affiimative. 

The motion, on being put to a vote of the meeting, was defeated. 

The critic’s remarks were then given by the Headmaster. 

Moved by Koelle, seconded by Lowe, that votes on debates 
be taken by ballot. 

The motion was carried. 

The meeting then adjourned. 

11 Resolved that Compulsory Military Service is a Necessity in 
Canada.” 

F. D. Graham opened the argument for the Affirmative:— 

“Since Canada is a nation,” he said, “and an important part of the 
great British Empire, and possessing a land of such boundless possi¬ 
bilities, it is an object of envy for less fortunate nations, and is con¬ 
stantly exposed to foreign aggression without an adequate system 
of defence; therefore it only remains to decide upon the best method 
of providing defence. The present force, valiant though it may be, 
is incapable of offering serious resistance to a highly organized force. 
The untrained citizen, as may be seen from dozen of examples in 
history, is useless on the battlefield. Compulsory Military Service 
would provide an adequate army; every citizen would become 
familiar with military discipline, and would be taught how to shoot. 
The defence of the country would be effectively carried out by a 
trained citizen-soldiery. A great benefit to the character and phys- 


THE ASHBURIAN 


23 


ique of the nation would be derived from a course of military training 
and rifle shooting.” 

R. H. Morgan replied, and opened the argument for the 
Negative. He maintained that it was possible to derive the same 
advantages as conscription would afford by the present scheme of 
voluntary training with induce T s. In conclusion, he read an 
xtn ct from the Canadian Mi Gazette, which illustrated his 

- very well. 

0. H. Boyd a<. 'in l he fodowiirg arguments in favour of 
ry Military Traim , that it would be the only way to 
ra.se an effective and efficient Militia, the Militia of the present day 
being far too small to defend the interests of Canada, as it is re¬ 
cruited on the volunteer system. That Canada is not thinking enough 
of her forces, engrossed as she is by opening up the country, and also 
that the young men do not take the necessary interest in it; that 
Canada needs a sufficient body of men to repel a probable foreign 
invasion; that Compulsory Military Training would settle the 
question of the unemployed; that Military Training should be made 
compulsory for the protection of Canada by a sufficient military 
force. 

E. J. Lowe closed the argument for the Negative. Although 
his speech did not show very great preparation or extensive knowl¬ 
edge of the subject, it was delivered extemporaneously, and he was 
quick to discover weak points in his opponent’s speeches, and was 
able to refute a few of their arguments. Mr. Lowe was commended 
by the critic for his attempt at impromptu speaking. 

F. D. G. 


Shooting. 

In spite of the fact that we have lost several of our best shots of 
last season, the shooting has greatly improved. We have lost 
Lindsay, who has passed into the navy, but we have gained a good 
shot in C. D. Boyce who comes to us from Trinity College School, 
Port Hope. The individual scores for the O’Connor cup are much 
better than those of last year. In the Canadian Rifle League series 
we have an excellent chance of getting a good place. Our first two 
matches in the above series resulted as follows:— 

December. January. 



50 


50 

Bate. 

. 49 

Read. 

. 49 

Butterworth. 

. 49 

Hennessey. 

. 47 

Boyd. 

. 48 

Nai smith. 

. 47 









24 


THE ASHBURIAN 


December 

50 


Lindsay. 47 

Boyce. 46 

Hennessey. 46 

Lowe. 45 

Read. 44 

Hughson. 43 

St. Laurent. 42 

Total. 460 


January 

50 


Boyd. 46 

Irvin. 46 

Lowe. 45 

Hughson. 42 

St. Laurent. 42 

Bate. 40 

Gibbs. 37 

Total. 441 


The total score for the second match would probably have been 
higher if Butterworth and Boyce had not been absent owing to illness. 
As an epidemic of colds made its appearance, it was impossible to 
shoot our third match in February, and special permission had to be 
obtained to allow it to take place on the first of March. This was 
granted, however, and, as regards light, the day proved all that 
could be desired. The colds were not in evidence and the result of the 
match was a record score. Hennessy is to be congratulated on 
making the first possible of the season. The individual scores were: 


Hennessey.5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5—50 

Boyd.5 55555555 4—49 

Naismith.5 55545555 5—49 

Boyce.5 5 5 5 4 5 5 5 5 4—48 

Butterworth.5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 4—48 

Hughson.5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 4—48 

Lowe.5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 4—48 

Read.5 55455555 4—48 

Davis.5 5 5 5 4 5 5 5 4 4—47 

St. Laurent.5 5 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 3—46 

Total. 481 


In the O’Connor Cup series the scores are very good. There 
are still several more matches to be fired and the scores may alter 
considerably before the season closes. The following is the present 
standing in this series:— 

250 


Boyd. 243 

Read. 240 

Boyce. 235 


































THE ASHBURIAN 


25 


250 


Lowe. 231 

Butterworth. 229 

St. Laurent. 217 

Hennessey. 212 


Steps are being taken at present with a view to arrange a match 
with Highfield School of Hamilton. 

R. J. L. 


The Duke’s Visit. 

\<\\V 

On Wednesday, January 31st, His Royal Highness the Duke of 
Connaught, Governor-General of Canada, accompanied by her 
Royal Highness the Duchess, Miss Pelly and two aides, paid Ashbury 
the very great honor of a visit. The Scout’s Troop under Scout- 
Master Boyd, which was out in force to welcome the Governor, was 
drawn up on both sides of the steps and on his arrival the Royal 
Salute was played. 

The party was met by the Headmaster and Mr. Orde, who con¬ 
ducted them in their inspection of the school. The Head's 
study and the office were first visited and then Forms IV, IVA and 
IVB, where classes were going on. In each case the Master in 
charge was presented to all the members of the party and the Duke 
made a few remarks on the work. 

Passing from the lower flat to the second, the party visited a 
few of the bed-rooms and the sick-room where Boyce was confined at 
the time. Their Royal Highnesses each spoke a few words to him 
before passing on. 

The party then went down to the gymnasium where all the 
boys were gathered and the scouts were again drawn up. The 
Duke and Duchess both shook hands with Scout-Master Boyd and 
the Duke complimented him on the excellence of his troop. When 
the party arrived at the front of the “gym” Naismith presented Her 
Royal Highness with a large basket of flowers in the name of the 
students of Ashbury. 

The Headmaster spoke a few words thanking the Duke and the 
Duchess in the name of the directors, the staff and the boys of Ash¬ 
bury for paying us such a great honor, greater he believed than had 
ever been paid a Canadian school. He expressed a wish that the 
visit be repeated in the spring when our Cadet Corps would be in 
commission, and the Duke might do us the honor of inspecting it. 







26 


THE ASHBURIAN 


His Royal Highness then gave us a short address which he began 
by saying that it gave him great pleasure, both officially and per¬ 
sonally to be present that day, and said that he would be very glad 
indeed to repeat the visit in the spring. He continued, speaking of 
our duty to our Empire and our school, and gave us some good advice 
as to our attitude towards them, both now and in the future. The 
Duke also repeated his praise of the Scout’s Troop and remarked on 
the excellence of our showing in musketry. He concluded his ad¬ 
dress by asking that we be granted a holiday in honor of his visit. 

The Headmaster again rose and said that he would take great 
pleasure in obeying the “ Royal Command” and as a result there 
would be no school on Thursday. He then called on Mr. Orcle to 
speak a few words on behalf of the directors. 

Mr. Orde again thanked their Royal Highness in the name of 
the directors for honoring Ashbury to such an extent and went on to 
explain that, unfortunately, Mr. Rowley, the President, was ill and so 
unable to attend at such a marked occasion in the school’s history. 
He went on to give a short account of the history of Ashbury and all 
the credit for placing the school in the position it now occupies was, 
he said, due to our Principal, Mr. Woollcombe, and concluded by 
again thanking their Royal Highnesses for the visit. 

The Headmaster then called for three cheers for their Royal 
Highnesses, and these being heartily given were followed by “God 
Save the King.” 

E. R.L. 


The following notice of the Duke’s visit was received from one 
of our “Shining Lights” in French. 

Le Due de Connaught visita cette ecole le trente et un janvier. 
II fit un discours dans le gymnase. II demanda un conge pour les 
eleves. Le principal repondit que demain serait un conge. Puis les 
ecoliers frapperent leurs crochets-a-pains. M. Wiggins chatouilla les 
ivoires, qui laisserent echapper “Vive le roi” en haillon-temps. 


Old gentleman : “So you think your rich Aunt the meanest of 
the lot”? 

Youngster : Yes and my LTncle is—a close second. 

VI Former : I have a picture in my mind of my great success in 
the coming Examination. 

Fresh Junior : I bet it will never be developed. 




THE ASHBURIAN 


27 


“The Play’s the Thinj§.” 

(Hamlet). 

When the project of putting on a couple of plays at the College 
just before the Christmas Holidays was first announced, no great 
enthusiasm was evinced. There seemed to be a certain amount of 
amusement felt at the very idea. Boys were also becomingly 
diffident about offering their services to fill the various roles. Es¬ 
pecially was this apparent among those approached in regard to the 
female characters. Finally, however, when little extra privileges 
were hinted at, a resolute band of mummers was got together, and 
rehearsals—behind closed doors—took place. The secrecy of the 
proceedings—and the peculiar sounds occasionally to be heard out¬ 
side the closed doors—stimulated the imaginations of the school. 
Gradually the interest grew, until a week before the “show”, ex¬ 
pectation was on tiptoe. 

Two plays—the notice ran, were to be put on—‘ c ICI ON PARLE 
FRANCAIS” and “OLD CRONIES.” The castes were to be as 

follows:— 

lei on Parle Frangais — 

Major Regulus Rattan... 

Julia (his wife). 

Mr. Spriggins. 

Mrs. Spriggins. 

Angelina (their daughter) 

Victor Dubois. 

Anna Maria. 

Old Cronies :— 

Dr. Jacks.Mr. Gilbert. 

Captain Pigeon.Mr. Thomas. 

There were to be two nights of it—a Friday and a Saturday. 
The tickets sold well, the proceeds going to the Chapel Fund, and the 
Gym. in which the entertainment took place was filled. The scenery, 
drop curtain, etc., kindly loaned by the Russell Theatre, quite trans¬ 
formed the place. 

The first play—Old Cronies—was a success, both actors being 
old hands at it as well as old cronies. Perhaps the dramatic interest 
in it was a little marred by the fact that Captain Pigeon’s whiskers 
persisted in coming loose and waggling on the supporting wires as he 
talked, but little incidents like these were kindly unnoticed by our 
audiences. The chief interest, among the boys, at least, was to 


.Mr. Wood. 

. D. MacMahon & W. Thompson. 
. Mr. Wiggins. 

. Reiffenstein. 

. L. E. L. Koelle. 

. J. V. Thomas. 

. C. Wood. 











Anna Maria Julia (Friday) Angelina Julia (Sat.) Mrs. Spriggins 

Victor Dubois 






THE ASHBURIAN 


29 


see their friends on the stage. When the curtain rose the second 
time Anna Maria was discovered—dusting. 

A delighted gasp of surprise greeted her—clothed in disreput¬ 
able garb, grimy, dishevelled occupying the centre of the stage, and 
airing her woes in unmistakable Cockney. Opposite her sat a fair 
creation in white—young, piquant, showing perhaps a too generous 
ankle—but altogether fascinating. This was Angelina, a budding 
blonde of some seventeen summers, “an image gay, to haunt to 
startle and waylay”—such was the daughter of the house of Spriggins. 
An air of domesticity was added to her appearance by the fact that 
she was discovered apparently sewing. It is quite true that she had a 
needle and thread, and was doing something intricate with them to a 
rag in her lap. As the play progressed, it transpired that sewing on 
curtain rings occupied her attention. There were no rings, and no 
curtain, for that matter, but such little omissions could be readily 
forgiven in one so altogether bewitching. To these two entered Mr. 
Spriggins—rotund, florid, bewhiskered, bearing a step-ladder. The 
delighted spectators instantly noticed the strong family resemblance. 
Planting his ladder firmly against the wall—which swayed uncertainly 
under the strain—he proceeded to dust the pictures, occasionally 
falling from his perch—to the huge amusement of the juniors. 

Mrs. Spriggins, entering presently, represented a complete 
picture of decayed gentility. Her costume betrayed the straits to 
which the worthy lady had been reduced; but in the classic lines of 
her mobile features one could easily discern the relics of that nobility 
inherited (as the good lady took pains to inform us) from the illus¬ 
trious family of Fitz Pentonville. 

It appeared that the entire female portion of the family were 
being inconvenienced by a mad scheme of Mr. SpriggiiTs to let lodg¬ 
ings and to learn French—both feats apparently equally impossible. 
The introduction of two other characters—a dapper Frenchman and 
a blooming young woman—his “ connaisance”, thickened the plot. 
We admired the Frenchman’s taste, for Julia appeared to be a buxom 
person indeed, and would have weighed, we estimated, well over 
ten stone. Some of the audience apparently preferred the gay 
insouciance of the budding Angelina, while others were inclined to 
fancy the riper charms of the voluptuous Julia. 

But the juniors were getting impatient for action—noise, any¬ 
thing lively. They soon got it. A “roaring Ogibway” burst upon 
the stage—announced himself “a retired Major” and representing 
that he was looking for his runaway wife, proceeded to wreck the 
house with a completeness and despatch that could have only been 
attained by many rehearsals and a natural aptitude for the role. Mr. 
Spriggins’ helplessness in the hands of the Major was pathetic and 
drew tears from many eyes. He was whirled about the stage, power¬ 
less to save his precious curtains, furniture and bric-a-bric, until, 


30 


THE ASHBURIAN 


with a final roar and crash the Major retired. The friction between 
the young Frenchman and the Major reached a dramatic crisis in the 
end—matters taking the form of a duel with miniature cannons at 
the range of three feet. Excitement was here at its highest pitch. 

Mr. Spriggins cowered under the table shrieking for “Police”, 
and the ladies—verging on hysterics—languished in each other’s 
arms—there not being enough men to go round. 

In the pathetic passages, the actors seldom forgot themselves. 
When Victor sank gracefully on one knee (after carefully pulling up 
his trousers), seized the lily-white hand of his adored one, and 
pressed it to his lips in the fervour of his passion—the effect could 
not have been more dramatic. It was hardly even marred by the 
fact that Angelina, at that moment, in a fit of maidenly abstraction 
thoughtfully scratched her leg. 

At the end of the second evening, the audience was kind enough 
to call upon the actors individually to present themselves on the 
stage. This proved rather trying to the “ladies” who had, perforce 
to courtesy—probably for the first time in their little lives. The 
accomplishment is not a regular part of the curriculum in the average 
boys’ school but they acquitted themselves very creditably never¬ 
theless. Angelina’s high blue heels nearly proved her undoing it 
is true, and almost caused her to give a dramatic representation of a 
beginner on skis on her first jump. Julia sank gracefully into her¬ 
self—always inclined to enbonpoint—finding only some small diffi¬ 
culty in recovering her equilibrium. Anna Maria executed a pro¬ 
fessional “bob” to the huge enjoyment of the spectators, while Mrs. 
Spriggins swept onto the stage with all the accumulated grace of a 
long line of illustrious Fits-Pentonvilles. 

Victor Dubois, of course, bowed himself off with inimitable 
aplomb; Mr. Spriggins bent as far as the unnatural rotundity of his 
figure would allow; the Major entered and left in his cyclonic fashion, 
and the Stage Manager, after a few incoherent remarks, found himself 
in the wings perspiring freely. 

Behind the curtain, after all was over, a snug supper was served 
to the caste on the stage. Then the bonds of conventionality were 
relaxed. It soon transpired that the occasion was the birthday of 
one of the members of the caste. His health was instantly proposed 
and drunk amid great eclat—Highland honours being observed. The 
ladies with one foot on the table, one on a chair, displayed great 
enthusiasm—embarrassing at times to the hero of the evening, 
who, after getting his breath and drying his wig, responded in a few 
neat sentences—punctuated by ladies’ fingers, discharged with singu¬ 
larly good aim at different portions of his anatomy. There were 
other unladylike acts that night too shocking to relate—suffice it to 
say that ice cream and cocoa were put to uses that their most san- 


THE ASHBURIAN 


31 


guine manufacturers could never suspect, while the uproarious mirth 
was continued to the wee sma’ hours of the following morning. 

A neat metal shield—suitably engraved—on a wooden base, 
was presented to each member of the caste as a souvenir of an 
evening’s enjoyment—which they are hardly likely to forget. 

C. H. H. 


Cricket Prospects. 

Soon after the publication of this magazine, our thoughts will be 
turning to cricket. There are only six boys left from last year’s 
team; Naismith, Gibbs, Maclaren I, Sladen, Thomas and White. Of 
these, Thomas should be useful both with bat and ball. He will be 
expected to capture the majority of wickets, and also to head the 
batting averages. Naismith, Gibbs, White and Maclaren I, should 
all be useful as change bowlers. Mr. Cary-Elwes, Capt. Weston and 
Mr. Wood will still, it is to be hoped, turn out in some of the matches 
and make a few runs, so that we should be able to put a very fair 
team in the field. Barwis will be missed, as he was a tower of strength 
last year. He headed both the batting and bowling averages, and 
was especially deadly on cocoanut matting wickets. A successor 
must be found to O’Halloran, who was quite an efficient wicket¬ 
keeper. However, there must be some undiscovered talent in the 
school, and these places should not be difficult to fill. Boyce has 
come from Port Hope with a reputation in the cricket world which 
may mean a good deal. 

We shall not lose many matches if our fielding is as good as it 
was last year. There was hardly any room for improvement in that 
direction. There will probably be more matches this year, and we 
are trying to arrange two games with St. Albans’. A practice game 
with Ottawa II once a week will get the team into good condition. 

Lastly, the new cricket blazers will be worn for the first time 
this summer, and what our team lacks in skill, it will make up in 
appearance. D. C. W. 


Cadet Corps Notes. 

The military season of 1912 will greet the School with many 
changes. Time changes everything, and this is especially applicable 
to a cadet corps. 

First and foremost of our losses will be that of Sergent-Major 
Carwardine, who, after having brought up the corps from its infancy, 
has been removed to Toronto. We are, therefore, anticipating with 
interest his successor, and are hoping that he may prove as successful. 




32 


THE ASHBURIAN 


All the officers from last year’s unit have left; and it is greatly 
hoped that those chosen to fill their places will take as keen an 
interest in their work as did Captain Barwis and his two Lieutenants. 

We hope to have a large batch of recruits this year, most of 
whom, will, unlike other years, possess an elementary knowledge of 
military drill and discipline; and will not prove a source of hin¬ 
drance to the general advancement of the corps, but rather will be 
able, after a few rigorous drills, to step into their places among the 
more seasoned veterans. 

There are two sources from which recruits will be chosen; the 
junior corps, and the divers troops of Boy Scouts. 

From the first source will be taken only a select few; those who 
can easily handle a rifle. But it is from the second source that by far 
the best recruits will be selected. All of these have a certain air of 
smartness about them and they are accustomed to obey with alacrity, 
while most of them possess an elementary knowledge of rifle-shooting 
and drill. 

It is also hoped that the non-commissioned officers will prove 
themselves efficient. There are about six or seven vacancies and it 
behoves the good men to try to fill them. 

If the corps will work strenously at the commencement of the 
season to master the intricacies of rifle-drill and company formation, 
much more time will be left for the more enjoyable field-work and 
manoeuvres. 

The corps will also be augmented by a signalling squad; Boyd 
has taken the matter in hand, and the necessary recruits have been 
enlisted. 

The squad will form uumber five section and is to be composed 
of the most highly qualified scouts of the scool patrols. 

All the various branches of signalling will be studied by section 
number five, as the surrounding country offers excellent chances 
for semaphore, helio, and night-lamp work. 

Under Boyd’s able management, this section should flourish 
and prove itself a most valuable addition to the corps. 

P. W. 


“You are a great orator; there is no mistaking that,” said 
Graham I to Heney about 1 a.m., after listening patiently to a 
ceaseless flow of talk for a couple of hours, ‘ ‘ But you remind me of a 
great many railways.” 

“How?” 

“You are sadly in need of terminal facilities.” 



THE ASHBURIAN 


33 


More Howlers. 

The tides are caused by the sun drawing the water out and the 
moon drawing it in again. 

A circle is a line which meets its other end without ending. 

An angle is a triangle with only two sides. 

St. Andrew is the patent saint of Scotland. The patent saint of 
England is Union Jack. 

An old soldier is called a vegetarian. 

A centipede is a French measure of length. 

The Home Office is where Home Rule is made. 

A bishop without a diocese is called a suffragist. 

In the houses of the poor the drains are in a fearful state, and 
quite unfit for human habitation. 


A Su^estion. 

“ Music hath charms, etc.” Then why not exercise them for 
the general benefit of those who would fain imitate Orpheus? 

There are, at present amongst us, a few musical geniuses, of 
instrumental and vocal fame; and there are also, undoubtedly, many 
whose talents are merely obscured by their lack of training and 
practice. 

If, however, a musical society were to be formed, whose object 
was to further musical interest and occasionally to give concerts, 
glees and instrumental selections, it would be conferring on the 
School no small blessing. 

At present the musicians, though enthusiastic, are greatly in 
need of practice; so also are those who are vocally inclined. If 
therefore, both should amalgamate and work in unison, much 
benefit would be derived thereby. Once incorporated, its member¬ 
ship would increase, until in time, we should have a well organized 
and harmonious body. 

It is proposed to elect to the office of President of the Society, 
Mr. Wiggins, and to the office of Vice-President, Mr. Gilbert. These 
two gentlemen would have charge of the business and financial part 
of the undertaking. 

If sufficient interest is shewn in this scheme, it is quite probable 
that the “Head” will encourage the project by allowing the Society 
one evening a week in which to pursue their studies. 

Lastly, in the event of success, semi-annual entertainments could 
be held for the purpose of defraying the expenses that will necessarily 
attend such an organization. 


P. W. 



34 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Old Boys’ News. 

“Charlie” Cotton, formerly artist on The Ashburian staff, was 
elected secretary-treasurer of the Toronto ’Varsity Hockey Club at 
its annual meeting. 

Jeffrey B. Macphail, an old boy, is making quite a name for 
himself in wrestling and swimming circles at McGill. 

We offer our congratulations to Howard E. Reid and Donald St. 
G. Lindsay on passing the Royal Canadian Naval Exam, held in 
November. We have now four representatives in the Royal Cana¬ 
dian Navy, Midshipmen C. T. Beard and Trennick Bate being the 
other two. 

E. F. (“Nixie”) Newcombe has been elected Speaker of the 
Mock Parliament at McGill. He was Prime Minister of the same 
body during its last session. 

Married. At St. Joseph’s Church, Montreal, on January 16th, 
1912, Eugene Ouimet (an old Ashburian), son of the Hon. J. A. 
Ouimet, to Berthe, daughter of the Hon. H. B. Rainville. 

“Tommy” Carling, an old boy who figured on the Stewartons 
in the Interprovincial Hockey League this season, acted as referee in 
our matches with St. Albans at Brockville on February 3rd; with 
Lower Canada at Ottawa on February 17th; and with St. Albans at 
Ottawa on February 24th. 

Mr. Owen C. Dawson of Montreal (1902-1906), has been ap¬ 
pointed Clerk of the Juvenile Court in that city. He is also the 
founder of the Nazareth Boys’ Club; a director of the Shawbridge 
Farm and Reformatory School; and Secretary of the Children’s Aid 
Society. Those old boys who remember “Doc” Dawson’s goal¬ 
keeping and drop-kicking will join with The Ashburian in wishing 
him every success in his new position. 

The old boys have occupied a prominent place in hockey this 
year. Among them may be mentioned: with McGill (Intercollegi¬ 
ate League) Grey Masson; with R. M. C. Firsts, Cuthbert Barwis; 
with Saskatoon, Donnie Blair; with Moose Jaw, Donnie Masson; 
with R. M. C. Seconds, Fernie Gendron; with Trinity College, 
Leigh Bishop; with the Bankers (City League), Douglas and St. 
Barbe Sladen; and with Portage du Fort, Herbie Reid. 


The Editor is always glad to receive information for publication 
in the Old Boys’ column. H. L. M. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


35 


School Notes. 

A silver challenge cup for Rifle Shooting among the Ottawa 
Scouts has been kindly donated by an anonymous person who is 
interested in the sport. This trophy ought to stimulate our boys to 
make a strong bid to secure the cup for Ashbury. 

A handsome terrestrial globe of large dimensions has been pre¬ 
sented to the College by Mr. E. C. Whitney of Ottawa. It should 
prove a great assistance to the inculcation of both physical and 
political geography in the class room. 

On February 8th, Mr. Leon French—an entertainer of great 
merit—amused the College for an hour with representations of 
various familiar street sounds, songs, recitals, and an exhibition of 
ventriloquism. The entertainment was much enjoyed by all pre¬ 
sent—the joke of the afternoon being an entirely unconscious one on 
the part of the entertainer. 

On Sunday, February 4th, the Archbishop of Ottawa visited us 
and preached an eloquent sermon at our regular evening service. 

Orders have been sent to England for a large supply of the new 
school blazers—a dark green jacket bordered with the cardinal and 
white ribbon. The cricket blazer has also been sent for. This is a 
white jacket with a cardinal and green border. When these arrive 
the play ground and cricket field will be enlivened by a touch of 
colour which will make our Sports’ Day a much less sombre sight 
than it was last year. 

On December 8th, last, the football team held its annual dinner 
in honour of again winning the championship. Speeches were made 
by the Headmaster and the football Captain—Naismith; after 
which the team adjourned to the theatre where the amusing play 
“Dear Old Billy” was thoroughly enjoyed. 


11 He is a Dublin man, isn’t he?” 

“Not wholly.” 

“Why not wholly.” 

“Because he has .a Cork leg.” 

“That tree there hasn’t borne a single pear for eight years.” 
“Why don’t you cut it down then?” 

“Because it is the best apple-tree that I’ve got.” 



36 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Our Contemporaries. 

The Editor begs to acknowledge the receipt of the following 
contemporaries:— 


The Wykehamist (3) 

St. John’s College Magazine 
The Meteor (2) 

Bishop’s College School Magazine 
The Cheltonian 
St. Andrew’s College Review 
The Collegian 

The School Magazine, Lower Can¬ 
ada College. 


The Tonbridgian 

The School Magazine, Uppingham. 
Acta Ridleiana 

Western Canada College Review 

The Black and Red 

Trinity College School Record. 

The Blue and White 

The Grove Chronicle, Lakefield 


PERTINENT AND IMPERTINENT. 

Ch-nh-se : Say, Andy have you had your hair cut by a Greek 
barber? 

Andy : No. 

Ch-nh-se : I did once and I think he tried to make deltas or 
something on my head. 

Andy : That’s nothing, you see some with deserts. 

Stupidity is the mother of detention. Ask St.-be 

Physics Master : Tell us something about Galileo. 

: He was the first total abstainer to discover the 
rotary motion of the earth. 

P-r-ly : What did you get in Geometry, Gr—m? 

Gr —m: Zero. 

P-r-ly : Oh! That’s nothing. 

Mr. C.-E.: “Who was Sidonius?” 

Boyd : “There were several of that name, Sir.” 

Mr. C.-E.\ “I mean the writer of history and Elegies.” 

Boyd : “Oh, that was Sidonius Apollinaris. His second name 
was conferred on him because he was a poet of the first water.” 

A . What did he get for riding that wild colt ? 

B. Three bucks. 

It is one of the curiosities of natural history that a horse enjoys 
his food most when he hasn’t a bit in his mouth. 



THE ASHBURIAN 


37 


Have you heard of the latest things in shoes? 

No. 

Feet 

Why does Brown always laugh up his sleeve? 

I don’t know. Why? 

Because his funny bone is there. 

Which is the faster, heat or cold? 

Heat. 

Why? 

You can catch a cold quite easily, can’t you? 

What do you charge for your rooms? 

Five dollars up. 

But I’m a student-” 

Then it’s five dollars down. 

On Field Day as the Cadet Corps, in khaki and puttees, were 
skirmishing near a farmhouse, the old farmer, who was quite inter¬ 
ested in the drill, suddenly remarked to his wife: 

“Well, Mary, how on earth do they get their legs into those 
twisted trousers?” 


MATHEMATICS. 

The angles in a circle and the tangents of a square, 

Are equal to each other plus the one that isn’t there. 

While the volume of a circle plus the surface of a line, 

Can be proved to be just equal to the tangent less the sine. 
Now please to bear in mind when you’re working at this sum, 
How very dangerous it is, to dare to chew some gum. 

But it is far more pleasant if you feel you have the strength, 
To postulate your axioms, with lines of equal length. 

And when you get the answer you must use that simple rule, 
Which every one is bound to know unless he is a fool, 

That every circle in the end must just become a dot, 

Which shows us all quite plainly that Maths are utter rot. 


Binns—At home in New York, a man fell off a building on 

Broadway a week ago- 

David—Oh my, was he killed? 

Binns—I don’t know, he hasn’t landed yet. 


38 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Tidy little Lewis 

He was not very tall 

To see his visage in a mirror 
Which was hanging on the wall. 

He climed up on a chair 
To reach the looking glass, 

For he wished to comb his hair, 

But that would not do, alas! 

So he jumped onto the dresser, 

On which was crockery ware, 

V J 

And on it stood right by the edge 
And felt quite proud while there. 

The sad, sad part I now relate, 

The dresser lacked a castor, 

So down came Lewis on his back, 

Thus began the sad disaster. 

Then over went the dresser, 

Dishes, bowls and water pitcher 

’Till one could hardly see the boy 
Among the dreadful mixture. 

But soon a shriek of laughter 
From beneath the debris came, 

Lewis soon found out his error 
And was not dead or lame. 

He only got a soaking, 

He only did get wet, 

This ridiculous predicament 
He will not soon forget. 

It was in a Latin class and a dull boy was wrestling with the 
sentence “Rex fugit.” With painful slowness, he rendered it as, 
“the king flees.” 

^ “But in what other tense can the verb ‘fugit’ be found?” 
asked the teacher. 

7 A long scratching of the head, and a final answer of “ Perfect 
Tense,” owing to a whispered prompting. 

Teacher—Then, how would you translate it? 

Pupil—Dunno. 

Teacher—Just put “has” in it. 

Triumphant Pupil—The king has flees. 


Safe and Sane Real Estate Investments 


These are the “best” in the world. They are the 
kind you find in REGINA. Prices on a par with 
the developments of the city and properties. 

These few reasons spell the rapid growth of 
REGINA both as a Business and Residential 
centre. 

Why keep money in a bank at 3 or 4 % when by 
safe investments in REGINA this money can 
make for you 25, 50 and in many cases 100% in 
a year. Doesn’t, that sound good? 

Give us a try—We can do it. 


PACAUD & REID 

Real Estate and Financial Brokers 

References —Bank of Ottawa 
Head Office: 

210 Simpkins Blk., Scarth St., Regina, Sask. 


WHEN MAKING SUMMER PLANS 

CONSIDER 

CAMP TEMAGAMI 

Established 1900 

There is nothing more delightful and 
invigorating than a vacation spent fish¬ 
ing, camping and exploring in the 
Temagami Forest Reserve. 

PROSPECTUS MAY BE HAD ON APPLICATION TO 

MR. C. H. HOOPER, MR. A. L. COCHRANE, 

Ashbury College or Upper Canada College, Toronto 









SHOOTING TEAM 1912. 

Standing —H. W. Davis; L. E. Sample; A. St. Laurent; E. Ii. Head. 

Sitting —E. J. Lowe; E. D. H. Boyd; C. H. Hooper, Esq.; H. M. Hughson; C. D. Boyce. 







The Ashburian 

<y^lr 


Editorial Staff. 

Editor-in-Chief — Mr C. H. Hooper. 
Assistant Editor —E. J. Lowe. 

Sports Editors —A. Naismith, W. H. Davis. 
Rifle Shooting —E. J. Lowe. 

Artist —D. Verner, 

Secretary-Treasurer — -Mr. D. E. C. Wood. 


Editorial. 

As year after year goes by, summer follows summer, and the 
cold weather again proclaims the approach of another winter—we 
look back and see the many changes that each revolution has made 
in our own lives. Can you not remember what took place each 
Fall for years back? It is because the Autumn seems the real 
starting point of our year, instead of Spring—as the poets would 
have us l3elieve. Two years ago the new School building was first 
occupied, with all the changes which that entailed. The Scout 
movement began that year. A much larger Staff was engaged. 
One year ago Mr. Pratt left us. That year also we won the Foot¬ 
ball Championship. This year we find ourselves assembled once 
more with a huge new addition to the building in the shape of a 
chapel and two new class-rooms, and as we look about us there is 
the same sprinkling of new faces and gaps left by those who have 
left. IPs the same always, and always will be. Changes, changes, 
changes. This is a good sign. The place or man who never changes 
must necessarily stand still, and to stand still is to stagnate, and 
to stagnate is to die. 

We welcome these changes as signs of sturdy growth. We 
never thought last year that we would have any material for a senior 
football team with so many seniors leaving us. We think so every 
year regularly. In spite of that we find ourselves with a huskier 
aggregation than ever before. The middle school has, almost un¬ 
consciously, grown to be seniors. Changes again you see. 











2 


THE ASHBURIAN 


We cannot see this year any change that is not for the better 
of the School—unless it is the weather—but the weather this year 
has been too well discussed to need any further comment here. 

It is hard to overestimate the importance of the great change 
it will make to us from now on in having our own chapel. There 
will be no more tiresome car journey to town, or walk through 
snow or mud on Sunday morning. We will have our own bright, 
pleasant service right here, in our own premises—made beautiful 
as the time goes on, with glass, brass and oak in memory of the old 
heroes of the playing field and the class-rooms who have left us to 
seek a larger sphere of usefulness in the world. If there is one 
spot in a chap’s school which should remain green in his memory 
with pleasant recollections, it is the chapel. Theie are no arduous 
tasks there, no unpleasant reminiscences of work undone—and the 
inevitable consequences—there, Staff and School meet on one footing 
and for one purpose—the rendering of thanks to the Giver of all 
good things for the manifold blessings which He has bestowed on 
all alike. 

Our only want now is a fine organ to complete the chapel. It 
seems a pity that we should have in our midst a brilliant organist 
and, so far, nothing for him to play on. Two thousand dollars 
would do the deed, but who will “put up” the necessary coin? Sir 
Frederick Bridge once said that members of his profession were 
hampered when travelling by not being able to emulate the Italians 
and carry their instruments on their backs. We don’t wish to be 
pessimistic but as far as we can see at present the Italian variety 
of instrument will be the only one with which we will be able to arm 
our organist. 

We congratulate the four candidates whom we sent in for 
R. M. C. last June on their success in passing the exams., and we 
wish them luck in the three strenuous years which they will now 
put in there. Those who passed their Matric. are equally deserving 
of our warmest praise and good wishes. 

After all, Ashbury seemed to have generally “cleaned things up” 
last year. The Football Championship fell to us, we made a strong 
bid for the Hockey Cup, we did as well as the execrable weather 
would allow us in Cricket, won the first place in the military district 
for the Cadet Corps, captured the Scout Rifle Cup for the district, 
got second place for indoor shooting in the whole of Canada, 7th place 
in shooting on the ranges, won eight first class marksman’s certifi¬ 
cates, had our Scouts commented upon as the “Smartest he had 
seen at Home or in Canada” by the Duke himself, and passed very 
nearly all who tried in the University entrance exams. 

Indeed with a steady “pull altogether” this year we ought to 
make 1912-13 the most all round successful school year that we 
have ever had. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


3 

It is with this wish, and with the determination to do all it 
can in its little way to furthering this end that The Ashburian 
presents the Autumn Number to its (let us hope) grateful readers. 


Since this number went to press, there have been some changes 
in the football team and also we have welcomed some more new 
boys. This will account for any apparent inaccuracies in the 
article on Football Prospects, and also in the Salvete List. 


Shooting. 

The season of 1911-12 was remarkable , not only for the excellent 
scores made, but also for the increased interest taken in shooting 
by the school as a whole. There is still, however, much room for 
improvement in this respect, and especially with regard to the ranges. 
There were plenty of candidates for the indoor competitions, but 
when it meant spending Saturday morning on the ranges it was 
an entirely different matter. This is the principal reason why 
we made a better showing in the miniature matches than in those 
at the longer ranges. It is to be hoped that in 1913 we will not 
have to send in our scores with only nine men on a team, as was 
the case on one occasion this year. 

The winter shooting was exceptionally good. The last match 
of the Canadian Rifle League series was shot on March 29th, and 
resulted as follows: 

50 


Lowe. 

Boyce. 

Butter worth 
Hughson. . . . 
Naismith... 

Read. 

Bate. 

Boyd. 

Perley. 

Hennessy.. . 


49 

48 

48 

48 

48 

48 

46 

46 

45 

44 


Total 


470 














4 


THE ASHBURIAN 


The totals of the four matches in this series were: 

December January February March Total 

460 441 ‘ 481 ‘ 470 1852 

This put us in second place, the series being won by Hamilton 
Collegiate, with a score of 1890. In the summer shooting at 200 
and 500 yards we were not so successful, coming seventh in the 
series. The President’s Badge was won by Cadet Corpl. H. M. 
Hughson. 

The O’Connor Cup series resulted in a win for Boyd, but by a 
very narrow margin. The full scores are given below: 

250 


Boyd. 

Read. 

Lowe. 

Boyce. 

Butterworth 
Hughson 
St. Laurent . 
Hennessy.. . 

Davis. 

Bate. 

Naismith. . . 

Perley. 

Sample. 

Koelle. 

Sladen. 


244 

243 

239 

237 

235 

231 

224 

220 

215 

214 

209 

194 

188 

161 

154 


The last event on the indoor range was a match between two 
teams representing the Day Boys and Boarders, on April 29th. 
This resulted in a tie, and was won by the Boarders on the “shoot-off.” 
The Headmaster presented each member of the winning team 
with a small medal as a trophy. The following are the individual 


scores: 

Boarders. 

25 

Day Boys. 

25 

Boyd. 

22 

Sample. 

... 23 

Read. 

.... 22 

Hughson. 

22 

Boyce. 

... 21 

Bate. 

.... 20 

Lowe. 

. . . . 21 

Davis. 

.... 20 

Hennessy. 

.... 19 

St. Laurent. 

.... 20 

Total. 

.... 105 

Total. 

. .. 105 





























THE ASHBURIAN 


o 


Early in May we began practicing at the Rockliffe ranges, 
and were able to make a fair showing in the four C. R. L. matches 
at 200 and 500 yards. Unfortunately we were one man short 
for our third match. The results of these matches are as follows: 

May 18th. 



200 

500 

Total 

Boyd. 

. 28 

33 

61 

Hughs on. 

. 30 

30 

60 

Boyce. 

. 25 

31 

56 

Sample. 

. 23 

30 

53 

Lowe. 

. 23 

29 

52 

Read. 

. 28 

23 

51 

St. Laurent. 

. 25 

24 

49 

Davis. 

. 26 

15 

41 

Irvin. 

. 25 

17 

42 

Maclaren. 

. 21 

9 

30 

Total. 



. 495 


June 1st. 



200 

500 

Total 

Lowe. 

. 28 

29 

57 

Read . 

. 28 

28 

56 

Sample. 

. 26 

29 

55 

Boyce. 

. 28 

27 

55 

Boyd. 

. 26 

28 

54 

Hughson. 

. 28 

26 

54 

Davis. 

. 26 

23 

49 

St. Laurent. 

. 24 

23 

47 

Bate . 

22 

13 

35 

Ross . 

. IS 

14 

32 

Total. 



. 494 


June 8th. 


200 500 Total 


27 30 57 
25 28 53 


Read. 
Lowe. 


































6 


THE ASH BUR IAN 


Davis. 

. 27 

24 

51 

Hughson. 

. 24 

26 

50 

St. Laurent. 

. 30 

19 

49 

Sample. 

. 22 

26 

48 

Boyce. 

. 25 

21 

46 

Maclaren. 

. 18 

26 

44 


Total. 450 


June 10th. 


200 500 Total 


Hughson. 

. 27 

35 

62 

Boyce. 

. 27 

30 

57 

Bovd. 

. 33 

23 

56 

Davis. 

. 29 

27 

56 

Lowe. 

. 26 

28 

54 

Read. 

. 30 

24 

54 

St. Laurent. 

. 27 

22 

49 

Bate. 

. 26 

15 

41 

Sample. 

. 19 

13 

32 

Ross. 

. 15 

9 

24 

Total. 



485 


Two teams were entered to compete for the R. M. C. Challenge 
Shield. The result? as announced by the R. M. C. place Ashbury 
1st and 2nd teams; sixth and ninth respectively. The winners — 
Halifax Academy—scored 240. The Ashbury scores are as below: 

1st Team. 2nd Team. 


Lowe. 

. 57 

Read. 

. 56 

Boyce. 

. 55 

Sample. 

. 55 

Boyd. 

. 54 

Davis. 

. 49 

Hughson. 

. 54 

St. Laurent. 

. 47 

Total. 

. 220 

Total. 

. 207 


The Bate Cup for scores at 200 yards was won by E. H. Read, 
a junior shot who has more than held his own in the season’s shooting. 
The following have been awarded first class marksman’s certificates 
by the Canadian Rifle League, for making the required totals in the 
four matches at 200 and 500 yards: 

































THE ASHBURIAN 


H. M. Hughson.. 
E. D. H, Boyd... 

E. H. Read. 

E. J. Lowe. 

C. D. Boyce. 

H. W. Davis. 

A. D. St. Lauiert 
L. E. Sample. 


226 

223 

218 

216 

214 

197 

194 

188 

E. J. L. 


It was a tavern where a newly-arrived commercial traveller 
was holding forth. “Til bet anyone $5,” he said, “that I have 
got the hardest name of anyone in this room.” 

An old farmer in the background shifted his feet to a warmer 
part of the fender. 

“Ye will, will ye?” he drawled. “Well, Fll take ye on. 141 
bet ye ten again’ your five that my name’ll beat yours.” 

“Done,” cried the commercial traveller, “I’ve got the hardest 
name in the country, it is Stone.” 

The old man took a chew at his tobacco. “Mine,” he said, 
“is Harder.” 


A Sunday school teacher more noted for eloquence than cor¬ 
rectness of behavior once rashly asked the boyish members of his 
class: 

“Now, boys, why do people believe me a Christian?” 

“Because they don’t know you,” was one lad’s disconcerting 
reply. 


Junior Tennis Tournament 

During the last fortnight of term a Junior Tennis Tournament 
was held. The number of entries was good, and great interest 
was shown in the matches. In the final, Patterson and Maclaren 
won by three sets to one after a keenly contested match, O’Halloran 
and O’Connor putting up a particularly good fight. 

The entrance fees provided cups for the winners, while the 
losers received prizes given by Mr. Wood and Mr. Wiggins. The 
score sheet was as follows: 











Crocket / O’Connor 

v. [ O’Halloran 


8 


THE ASH BUR I AX 






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THE ASHBURIAN 


9 


A Summer in Maine 


Of all the New England States I think that Maine is the most 
picturesque, both on the coast and inland. It has so many small 
rivers that flow into the Atlantic and around at the mouths of these 
rivers are the summer resorts that are noted far and near. There 
are many health resorts inland as well, but for the summer every¬ 
one wishes to get to the seashore. These rivers facilitate canoeing, 
and each resort has its boat-club and casino. All along this coast 
it is very safe and consequently innumerable yachts are seen. 

The Boston Yacht and the Eastern Yacht Club take their 
annual cruise along the New England Coast, anchoring in the various 
harbours over night or Sunday, whichever it may be. 

The Navy Yard at Kiltery helps to add to Maine’s many at¬ 
tractions. At any time, you may see two or three cruisers docked 
there for repairs. There is also the Naval Prison there, which is 
situated on a bleak point overlooking the sea; the training ships 
with their white awnings, and the various quaint houses where 
the officers reside; the naval cemetery with the little flags flying 
over each grave; the Magazine with its two awe inspiring canons 
on guard, one on each side of the door; the hospital, the life 
saving station and the wireless station; all that goes to make up- 
a perfect Naval Harbor. 

In August, the Cruisers Washington and North Carolina docked 
there for six months for repairs and various other things. They 
had just arrived from Cuba, where they had been with a squadron 
trying tc calm the Roubles. 

Across the river Piscataqua is Portsmouth, but that is in New 
Hampshire, suffice it to say that the sailors make frequent trips 
there because, as you know, Maine is a Prohibition State, or rather 
is supposed to be. 


Another interesting city or town in Maine is Pc rtland, where 
Longfellow’s home is still standing. If you feel extremely extrava¬ 
gant and pav the large sum of fifty cents you may go through his 
house, see his sitting room, bedroom, and the most interesting- 
part, his library. There is also a large fortress built on a rock 
that lisas sheer out of the water in Portland harbor. Then there 
is the Shakoi Village, Alfred, where these ( dd people weave their 
own cloth and sefl the cloaks at the different hotels. They are 
also noted for their sugwl oi-ange peels, which re all 7 are delicious. 

Maine is not only noted as a Si earner resort, in fact it is widely 
known for its industries and small factory towns, where leather 
is cured and tanned. 


10 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Another place worth mentioning and one of the fashionable 
inland resorts of Maine is Poland. There the famous Poland spring 
water is bottled, in a building that is built right over the spring 
itself. Another thing that Maine is noted for and that is its bad 
roads. Now that automobiles are becoming so numerous and 
also because complaints are becoming numerous, the American 
Automobile Association has commenced to repeir the old roads 
or build new roads, if necessary. Maine has not been honoured with 
a State road yet, but will be in the near future, on account of 
tourists from Boston and New York going to the White Mountains 
having to go through Maine. The State road extends from Boston 
to Kiltery, a distance of seventy-five miles or more; very soon it 
will be completed to Portland, at least. Thus it may be seen that 
Maine, though a dry state, as the Americans term it, is an excellent 
place to spend the Summer Vacation. 

H. W. D. 


Fisherman.—“I wonder if anybody ever caught anything in 
this blamed pond?” 

Native.—“Sure. A feller fell in here once, and caught a cold.” 

A school teacher who has passed her first youth asked a number 
of her class to name the Presidents. 

“When I was as old as you,” she encouraged the hesitating 
lad, “I could name all the Presidents in their order with ease.” 

“Of course it was easy for you,” the boy replied, with more 
•candor than politeness. “There were only a few Presidents then.” 

A nice, new mackintosh was little Bessie's birthday present 
from her father, and the seven-year-old was very proud of it. 

That very morning, as she set out for school proudly attired 
in the mackintosh, mother called after her: 

“You’ll be very careful of that nice cloak, dear, won’t you?” 

“Yes, mother,” said Bessie dutifully. 

On coming out of school, Bessie started in horror. It was 
pouring hard; great big drops of rain that spluttered on the pave¬ 
ment. Hastily rolling up the nice, new mackintosh, she thrust it 
under her little pinafore, and started for home. 

“Why, dearie, you’re drenched!” cried her mother, in surprise. 
“Whv didn’t you put on your mackintosh?” 

Bessie eyed her in sorrowful anger. 

“You—you told me to—to take ca-c-care of it!” she sobbed 
indignantly. 

1 D 



THE ASHBURIAN 


11 



Cricket 

Our first match was played on the college grounds against 
Ottawa 2nd on Thursday, May 16th. Unfortunately the weather 
made things very unpleasant, and it rained the whole afternoon. 
Each side had one innings, and the Ottawa 2nd beat us by 36 runs. 
We made a very creditable show, considering that our team con¬ 
sisted mainly of small boys. Some of these will become good cricket¬ 
ers, when they have a little more confidence. We won the toss, 
and decided to bat first. The result was not satisfactory, and 
in about half an hour we were all out for 26. Reiffenstein 
was the only boy to shape well, and he was undefeated at the close 
of the innings. It was pouring with rain when we went out to field, 
and it was quite impossible to hold the ball or secure a good foot¬ 
hold. Wickets fell fast at the beginning and Mr. Wood secured 
four in his first two overs. Aftr this the bowling honours fell to 
Boyce, who captured the remaining six wickets. Considering 
the greasy state of the ball, our fielding was excellent. Sladen 
made one fine catch which was followed by a brilliant effort by 
Maclaren. 

On the following page are given the scores and analysis: 













12 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Ashbury College. 

Rev. C. Elwes ct. Firth, b. Smith. 2 

B. Sladcn, b. Rice. 1 

L. Thomas, Esq., at Firth, b. Smith. 6 

C. D. Boyce, b. Smith. 2 

D. C. Wood, Esq., b. Craig. 0 

D. Macmahon, b. Craig. 0 

R. Maclaren, 1). Christie. 0 

V. S. Godfrey, b. Firth. 0 

P. C. Maunsell, b. Firth. 0 

J. C. Reiffenstein, not out. 4 

C. G. Wood, ct. King, b. Carter. 4 

Extras. 7 

Total... 26 

Ottawa 2nd. 

P. R. Rice, b. Wood. 0 

C. C. Carter, ct. Sladen, b. Wood. 0 

L. B. Plucknett, b. Wood. 0 

S. Firth, b. Boyce. 7 

T. N. Dick, l.b.w., b. Wood. 0 

L. Smith, ct. Maclaren, b. Boyce. 13 

G. R. Christie, b. Bo} r ce. 8 

P. Craig, ct. Sladen, b. Boyce. 0 

Major Beaudry, ct. Thomas, b. Boyce. 21 

D. Rankin, b. Boyce. 4 

Dr. King, not out. 3 

Extras. 6 


Total. 62 

Bowling Analysis. 

Wickets Runs 

C. D. Boyce. 6 30 

D. C. Wood, Esq. 4 26 

Ashbury College v. Ottawa 2nd. 

This return match was played in better weather on the Ottawa 
cricket ground on Monday, June 3rd. The game started at 3 o'clock, 
and stumps were drawn at 6.45. The school lost the toss and had 
to go out and field. Boyce and Mr. Wood bowled and Thompson 1 































THE ASHBURIAN 


13 


made his first appearance as a wicket keeper. We succeeded in 
dismissing them for 16 runs, thanks to some good bowling. Mr. 
Wood was irresistible and in 5 overs he took 7 wickets for 7 runs. 
When we went in to bat, we lost 4 wickets for 10 runs, but a good 
stand by Thompson and Mr. Wood enabled us to pass our opponents’ 
score. Thompson was eventually bowled for the good score of 10 
runs, all of which he thoroughly deserved. The Ottawa bowling 
was good, and we did well to make a score of 41. 

Our second appearance in the field was not so successful, and 
we allowed our opponents to make 53. This would have been less, if 
we had not dropped catches. Boyce still continued to bowl well, 
and took 6 wickets at a small cost. Time saved us from being beaten 
as we had lost 5 wickets for 5 runs at 6.45. However, we won on 
the first innings by 25 runs, and thus gained a well earned victory. 
The fielding was good on the whole, but there is room for consider¬ 
able improvement in the batting. Thompson was the only boy 
who seemed to show any confidence. 

Below are the scores and analysis: 

Ottawa 2nd— 1st Innings. 


Creig, b. Boyce. 3 

Hackett, b. Wood. I 

Firth, b. Bo} r ce. 2 

Dr. King (Capt.), b. Wood. 3 

Sinclair, ct. Boyd, b. Wood. 0 

Rice, b. Wood. 0 

Chater, not out. 2 

Carter, b. Wood. 4 

Mond, b. Wood. 0 

Campbell, b. Wood. 0 

Extras. 1 

Total. 16 


Ottawa 2nd—2 nd Innings. 


Creig, ct. and b. w. Boyce. 0 

Haskett, ct. Staden, b. Wood. 1 

Firth, ct. Slaclen, b. Boyce. 1 

Dr. King (Capt.), b. Elwes. S 

Sinclair, b. Boyce. 13 

Rice, b. Boyce. 3 

Chater, not out. IS 

Carter, b. Boyce. 3 

Mond, absent. 0 
























14 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Campbell, b. Boyce. 3 

Extras. 3 


Total 


53 


Ashbury College—1st Innings. 


Rev. C. Elwes, b. Greig. 0 

Reiffenstein, b. Creig. 1 

D. C. Wood (Capt.) b. Creig. 19 

Boyce, b. Haskell. 0 

Sladen, b. Haskell. 2 

Thompson, b. Haskell. 10 

Macmahon, b. Haskell. 1 

White, ct. and b. w. Craig. 0 

Maclaren, ct. Sinclair, b. Craig. 4 

Gibbs, ct. and b. w. Haskell. 1 

Hughson, run out. 0 

Extras. 3 


Total 


41 


Ashbury College— 2nd Innings. 

0 
1 
2 
0 
0 
1 
1 

Total (5 wickets). 5 


Rev. C. Elwes, run out. 

Reiffenstein, not out. 

D. C. Wood, (Capt.,) b. Craig 

Boyce, b. B. Haskell. 

Sladen, b. Haskell. 

Thompson, run out. 

Macmahon, run out. 


Bowling Analysis. 

1st Innings. 

Wickets 

Boyce. 2 

D. C. Wood. 7 


Runs 

8 

7 


2nd Innings. 

Boyce. 

D. C. Wood. 

Rev. C. Elwes. 

Macmahon. 


6 18 

1 12 

1 17 

0 6 
































THE ASHBURIAN 


15 


Ashbury College y. The Old Boys. 

This match was played on Saturday, June 8tlq and resulted 
in a win for the Old Boys by 10 runs. Last year the College won, 
thanks to the efforts of one of the younger members of the team. 
This year Maunsell, also one of the youngest players, did his best 
to save defeat. He was quite conspicuous the whole afternoon, 
as he caught tw r o catches, took two wickets in one over and made 
top score with the exception of Mr. Thomas. In fact, the Old Boys 
could not get him out. The Old Boys were two short, which was 
rather a pity. The weather, as usual, was unfavourable. It has 
done its best to spoil our cricket season. Luckily our ground dries 
up quickly, but a wet cricket ball is not a pleasant thing to handle. 

Thompson I again batted well for the school, and should 
be very useful next year. Our bowling was not so strong, and Boyce 
was less effective than usual. For the Old Boys, Bishop and Symes 
batted well, while Sinclair took most of the wickets. 

Below are the scores and bowling analysis: 

Ashbury College. 


Rev. C. Elwes (Capt.), run out. 0 

Thompson, run out. 6 

Reiffenstein, b. Sinclair. 13 

L. Thomas, Esq., b. Bishop. 22 

Maclaren, l.b.w., b. Bishop. 0 

Sladen, b. Sinclair. 0 

Boyle, b. Sinclair. 9 

Maunsell, not out. 14 

Gibbs, b. Sinclair. 0 

White, c. and b. Burn. 1 

Macmahon, b. Sinclair. 0 

Extras. 15 


Total. SO 


Old Boys. 


Sladen, b. Boyce. 9 

Graham, ct. Maunsell, b. Boyce. 0 

Skead, b. Gibbs. 1 

Bishop, ct. Thomas, b. Maunsell. 21 

Sinclair ct. Maunsell, b. Boyce. 12 

Burn ct. Elwes, b. Maunsell. 8 

Chrysler (Capt.) b. Maclaren. 9 

Svmos, b. Bovce. 18 

*/ 7 
























16 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Butterworth, not out. 0 

Extras. 12 

Total. 90 


Bowling Analysis. 


Ashbury College. 



Wickets 

Runs 

Boyce. 

. 4 

16 

Macmahon. 

. 0 

9 

Gibbs. 

. 1 

IS 

Maunsell. 

. 2 

20 

Maclaren. 

. 1 

15 


Old Boys. 



Wickets 

Runs 

Sinclair. 

. 5 

30 

Sladen. 

. 0 

14 

Bishop. 

2 

13 

Burn. 

. 1 

5 


A RETROSPECT. 

Looking back on our very brief cricket season, we feel bound 
to lodge a protest against the weather. Two out of three matches 
were entirely spoilt by rain and it was only owing to the kindness 
of the players that they were ever commenced at all. Otherwise 
our cricket season was very successful. There was much more 
interest taken in the game, especially on the part' of the seniors. 
The practice net was nearly always full in the afternoon, and some 
of the practice games were quite exciting. Boyce • was a great 
acquisition to the team and proved a very useful bowler. Thompson I 
has developed into a capable wicket keeper, and should be very useful 
next year. He has the makings of a batsman, but he takes some 
time “getting his eye in.” Reiffenstein also possesses a good deal 
of batting ability, and is a quick scorer. Maunsell should be useful 
next year. He was quite at his best against the Old Boys, both 
with the bat and ball. Although we lost two of the three matches, 
the standard of play was much higher. The fielding, in spite of the 
wet ball, was excellent. Our matches with St. Alban’s had to be 
abandoned,unfortunately. I hope we shall play them next year, 
as school matches are always the most exciting. Our team will 
be a very strong one indeed and will have, at least, S old colours. 
We missed the services of Captain Weston owing to his visit to 
the “Old Country”, but he is sure to turn out for us next summer. 














THE ASIIBURIAN 


17 


The arrival of the blazers was delayed until the last day of term; 
their appearance on ..Sports Day excited the admiration of several 
of the spectators. We are very grateful to Mr. Wiggins for having 
umpired in our matches. A word of thanks is due also to Koelle 
and Fleming, who scored in all the matches. It may be miserable 
to play cricket in the pouring rain, but it is far more wretched trying 
to hold an umbrella with one hand and score with the other. The 
photograph of the team in this copy was taken by Mr. Hooper, 
just before the Old Boys’ match. 


Old Boys’ News 

J. W. Hughson (1902-8) graduated from McGill this year 
with the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

R. V. C. Sinclair (1901-8) was also graduated from the same 
university, obtaining the degree of Bachelor of C. Law, with honours. 
He later passed the examination necessary for entrance to the 
Quebec bar. 

Lieutenant A. D. Irwin, R.C.A. (1896-1903), has been appointed 
an inspector in the Royal North-West Mounted Police. 

E. J. Renaud (1908-9) graduated from R.M.C. this year, 
qualifying for a commission in the Canadian Ordinance Corps. 

Brevet-Captain L. W. S. Cockburn, of the Royal Canadian 
Artillery (1899-1902) has been promoted to the rank of captain. 

Married. On June 12, 1912, at St. Matthew’s Church, Mon¬ 
treal, by the Rev. Iv. J. Macdonald, B.D., Margaret, eldest daughter 
of Oliver Mills, to Reginald B. Cockburn (1899-1902), son of Dr. 
L. W. Cockburn, Hamilton, Ont. 

Our congratulations are due to E. R. Lethbridge (1911-12), 
S. A. J. Therien (1911-12), G. A. Strubbe (1911-12) and A. M. 
Naismith (1910-12) for upholding Ashbury’s record on passing the 
R. M. C. entrance exam, held in May. 

Also to L. E. Sample, and W. G. Gibbs, on passing the McGill 
entrance exam, in Arts and Science, respectively. 


H. R, M. 



18 


THE ASHBURIAN 


The Consumptives’ Cruise 

Oh yes, a person can talk of the joys of camping, but camping 
in the rain is no fun, especially if the tent holds two and there are 
six in the party. 

Six of us started off the Saturday before Labor Day to go 
camping. We took three boats: the Opus I, Kelpie and Billiken, 
and everybody brought some sort, of grub. We made the run to 
the camp ground without any mishaps, in a time of 3-f hours, going 
through eight locks, averaging twelve miles per hour, although at 
the locks the Billiken was generally from 5 to 10 minutes late. 
We had supper about 7.30 p.m. then made up the beds, four sleeping 
in the boats and two in the tent. After frightening away all the 
ducks with our poor music we retired about 11.30, a tired, but happy 
bunch. 

Sunday, 7.15 a.m., sky overcast, some mist and every outlook 
for rain which set in about 9.00 a.m., and kept up all day. 

An inventory of the grub having been taken we found we had 
12 cans of beans, and 5f lbs. of bacon. Everybody brought the 
same thing, so for way of a change we all got into the largest boat 
and went up the river a little way to a hotel where we had a hot 
dinner and got a chance to dry our wet clothes. After dinner we 
“took to the boats” and went back to camp. 

6.00 p.m. still raining and no prospect of its clearing up. We 
had supper then went into the tent where we stayed until 10.30 p.m. 
when we went to bed with it very clear for that time of year, one 
star shining. 

Monday, 6.30 a.m. A dull day, but a chance of its clearing 
off. After breakfast the captain, engineer and deckhands of the 
Billiken being disgusted with the outlook filled his gasoline tank and 
turned on his switch. Nothing doing—crank, crank, crank and 
a chorus of, “What’s the matter,” from the shore. More crank 
still nothing doing, then the engineer remembered it was necessary 
to put the switch plugin the switch before starting. After that every¬ 
thing went fine until the Billiken ran on the dock at Manotick, 
and pulled all the calking out of her stern. After that she made 
the run to Ottawa with only a few minor delays. 

The rest of the fleet came down at night, having to tow the 
Fay, a cabin cruiser, down from James’ Island to Long Island locks, 
a distance of about 15 miles. 

One member of the expedition didn’t even get a cold. Every¬ 
body except the one got a cold; two the rheumatism, and one 
$3.20 worth of experience as well as said cold. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


19 


After all it was a good cruise, but bad weather, the blankets 
being wet both nights. 

Ducks i were plentiful, but the only weapon was a mere toy, 30- 
calibre revolver, so we lost a very good chance to go hunting. As 
it was we nearly had tame goose but the jelly was lacking, so 
we let it go until the next cruise of the consumptives. 

A. G. P * 


Inter-School Sports 


On Thursday, May 30th, an athletic team representing Ashbury 
journeyed to Montreal in order to compete in the athletic meet 
to be there on that day, between teams from Lower Canada College, 
St. Alban/s and Ashbury. The team which Ashbury entered con¬ 
sisted of Verner (Capt.), Gibbs, Hughson, Irvin, Maclaren I, Lowe I, 
Bowie, Birch and Morgan. The contingent was accompanied by 
Mr. Hooper, who acted as a judge at the meet. The team arrived 
in Montreal at 11.15 a.m. in a drizzling rain and went at once to 
Lower Canada College, where a light luncheon was partaken of. 
After lunch the team went to the M.A.A.A. grounds and prepared 
for the Sports. Owing to the rain, it was very difficult to obtain 
a footing on the ground except in spiked running shoes. Very 
few of the team had taken the precaution to provide themselves 
with these, and as a result of this and of a training of very short 
duration, our athletes were unable to make a very creditable show- 
ing. Irvin, however, saved the cardinal, white and green from 
total defeat by winning the 220 yard dash, and thereby scored 
Ashbury’s only two points. 

The results of the different events were: 


100 yds. 
440 yds. 
High jump 
220 yds. 
Long jump 
880 yds. 
One mile 


1st. St. Alban’s 
L.C.C. 
L.C.C. 
Ashbury 
St. Alban’s 
St. Alban’s 
L.C.C. 


2nd. 


120 yds. hurdle St. Alban’s 
Relay race L.C.C. 


St. Alban’s Time, 11 seconds. 

L.C.C. Time, 61 i seconds. 

St. Alban’s Height, 4 ft., lOf in. 
St. Alban’s Time, 26f seconds. 

St. Alban’s Distance, 15 ft., 4 in. 
L.C.C. Time, 2 min., 20 sec. 

L.C.C. Time, 5 min., 34 sec. 

L.C.C. Time, 17f seconds. 

St. Alban’s 


Total (points): 

St. Alban’s (winners). 13 

L.C.C. 12 

Ashbury. 2 

H. R. M. 






20 


THE ASHBURIAN 


The Sports 


The Ashbury College students held their annual field day 
sports on Tuesday afternoon, June 11th, on the school campus, 
Rockliffe. A large crowd was in attendance, and the boys far 
surpassed their last year’s showing in all the events. D. F. Verner 
won the cup which was given by Mrs. S. H. Fleming for the highest 
number of points. He had 29 to his credit. W. H. Davis came 
next with 18 points. 

Messrs. C. H. B. Weston, L. E. Sample, H. W. Davis, D. F. 
Verner and W. G. Gibbs composed the committee. The judges 
were L. 0. Thomas, Rev. H. Carey Elwes, D. C. Wood, and A. 
B. H. Wiggins. Mr. Philip Chrysler was timekeeper and Mr. C. H. 
Hooper was the starter. Mrs. J. W. Woods presented the prizes 
to the winners of each event. 

Long Jump (juinor).—1, M. W. Montgomery; 2, E. W. Birkett; 
3, E. P. Taylor; distance, 14 feet, 4% inches. 

Long Jump (intermediate).—1, J. C. Reiffenstein; 2, L. Bowie; 
3, T. G. Birkett; distance 14 feet, 9f inches. 

Quarter Mile (senior).—1, H. W. Davis; 2, D. F. Verner; 
3, H. R. Margan;time, 57i seconds. 

High Jump (junior).—1, M. W. Montgomery; 2, V. S. Parker; 
3, E. W. Birkett; distance, 3 feet, 8 inches. 

100 Yards (intermediate).—R. S. Montgomery; 2, R. B. 
Patterson; 3, T. 0. Blakeney; time, 13 seconds. 

Throwing the Cricket Ball. —1, L. S. Sample; 2, D. F. 
Verner; 3, W. M. Irvine; distance, 86 yards, 2 feet, 6 inches. 

100 Yards (senior).—1, IT W. Davis; 2, W. M. Irvin; 3, 

D. F. Verner; time 11 seconds. —— — 

100 Yards (junior).—1, E. P. Taylor; 2, H. M. McGiverin; 
3, F. E. Valleau; time 131 seconds. " 

High Jump (intermediate).—1, R. B. Patterson; 2, T. G. 
Birkett; 3rd was a tie, J. A. M. Fleming and J. C. Riffenstein 
clearing the same height; height, 4 feet, 6 inches. 

High Jump (senior).—1, D. F. Verner; 2, H. M. Hughson; 
3, L. E. Sample; 4 feet, 8^- inches. 

220 Yards (juinor).—1, M. W. Montgomery; 2, E. W. Birkett; 
3, C. B. Shipman; time, 2Si seconds. 

Pole Vault. —1, D. F. Verner, 7 feet. 

Hurdles. —1, D. F. Verner; 2, H. M. Hughson; 3, W. G. 
Gibbs; time, 18f seconds. 

Half Mile (senior).—1, W. G. Gibbs; 2, H. W. Davis; 3, 
D. F. Verner; time 2 minutes, 26f seconds. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


21 


Quarter Mile (junior).—1, M. W. Montgomery; 2, C. B. 
Shipman; 3, E. W. Birkett; time, 1 minute 5^ seconds. 

Long Juivfp (senior).—1, D. F. Verner; 2, W. M. Irvin; 3, L. E. 
Sample; 17 feet, 11| inches. 

Quarter Mile (intermediate).—1, L. Bowie; 2, T. L. Blakeney; 
3, J. F. Birch; time 64 seconds. 

220 Yards, (senior).—1, H. W. Davis; 2, W. M. Irvin; 3, D. 
F. Verner; time, 25 1 seconds. 

Consolation Race. — 1 , J. B. Marshall; 2, E. C. Thoburn; 
3, J. W. Pont. 


Scouting 

On April 21st, the Ashbury Troop of scouts joined in a big 
scout parade. After marching through the streets of Ottawa, 
they arrived at St. George’s Church, where they attended a special 
service, at which the Duke of Connaught was present. It was a 
lengthy service, and was not over until 5 o’clock. It was rather a 
pity that there were so many absentees from the Ashbury contingent. 

On April 27th the competition for the Challenge Cup for indoor 
rifle shooting among the scouts of the Ottawa District, took place. 
The cup has been kindly presented by Mrs. Read and the range 
chosen was the Ashbury College indoor range. 

Our best congratulations to Scout Read. Although the youngest 
scout in the competition, he came out with the highest score, and 
he has brought the trophy to the Ashbury troop, where we hope 
it will remain for many years. 

As this is the first time that such a competition has been held 
in Ottawa, the scores, though creditable, were not as good as they 
will be when regular practice takes place during the winter months. 
The following are the scores made by the various representatives 
of the different troops at 25 yards range. The possible was 50: 

Ashbury College troop, Scout E. H. Read, aged 14; score, 39. 

First Ottawa troop, Scout J. B. Ketchum, aged 16; score, 38, 

Fourth Ottawa troop, Scout G. J. Farnworth, aged 16; score, 33. 

Second Ottawa troop, Scout G. C. Wilson, aged 15; score, 31. 

Third Ottawa troop, Scout A. S. Fraser, aged 15; score, 29. 

Eleventh Ottawa troop, Scout E. G. Proudfoot, aged 16; score, 
29. 

First Westboro troop, Scout W. E. Houghtby, aged 14; score, 

26. 

The judge was fapt. A. A. Pinard, District Commissioner, Ottawa. 



22 


THE ASHBURIAN 


On May 24th and following days, our Scout Camp was held, 
an account of which will be found later. 

The scouts at Ashbury have sustained a great loss by the 
departure of E. D. H. Bovd, their Scoutmaster. He has been with 
us for two years and his services have been invaluable. He was 
very interested in signalling, and he saw to it that every member 
of the Ashbury troop knew something about the various codes. 
He was always ready to give up his Saturday afternoons in order 
to take the scouts out, and I do not think he missed a single parade 
of the scouts during his stay here. We wish him every success 
in his new career, and we hope we shall see him again soon. 

The scouts have lost another good friend in C. D. Boyce, 
Assistant Scoutmaster. These two places will be hard to fill up, 
but it is to be hoped that some of the older scouts will take care 
that scouting at Ashbury College does not die out. 


An Irish private was called before the adjutant of his regiment, 
who had received complaints that the Irishman had not written 
home for years. The common excuse, “Can’t write,” was offered. 

“Can’t write!” said the officer, seizing his pen. “Well, just 
dictate while I write your letter.” 

“We have the best commanding officer in the service,” dictated 

Pat. 

“H’m!” mused the adjutant, looking up. “Well?” 

“The major is like a father to the men.” 

“Anything else,” asked the adjutant. 

“Kindly excuse bad writing and spelling,” added Pat. 

Bell—“That man over there is staring straight at my nose.” 

Nell.—“They are supposed to keep their eye on everything 
that turns up, aren’t they?” 

11 Did vou hear that they were going to stop raising grain in 
the west?” 

“No, why?” 

“They are going to start raising frogs; they have it figured out 
that each frog has 480 hops, and they are going to save the hops 
to sell to the breweries to make beer with.” 

Teacher.—John, tell me the difference between the quick and 
the dead. 

John.—Tim quick are those that got out of the way of the 
auto and the dead are those that didn’t. . 



THE ASHBURIAN 


23 



Our Scout Gamp 

On the 24th of May last, our troop held its first c-amp—putting 
in three nights under canvas at a beautiful spot near Old Chelsea, 
Que. For a first attempt it was not too bad, but it taught us more 
about the things that we should not have done than it confirmed 
the things which we did. 

The tents, blankets, and camp outfit were sent up to the ground 
by team—the troop taking train as far as Chelsea, and completing 
the journey on foot. 

An impending thunderstorm hustled us in pitching camp— 
an operation just completed before the downpour began. Some 
of the tents had been sent up without inspection beforehand, and 
were found to lack guy-ropes, poles and pegs. Experienced scouts 
had not forgotten this precaution, and their tents were up in short 
time. Other scouts were quite helpless, having no idea of pitching 
a tent at all. 

Rain, that night, prevented any camp fire yarns—indeed the 
troop was ready enough to turn in and sleep. The next day real 
camp life began with reveille, prayers and breakfast—fatigue duty 
being handed out to those whose outfits would not pass muster. 

A paper-chase was the first item on the day’s programme, 
but the intense heat made it too trying to be greatly prolonged. 
All were glad to rest about the camp for the hour before dinner. 




24 


THE ASHBURIAN 


The afternoon was occupied with scout games and practice 
in first-aid. Night attacks enlivened the evening hours, after 
which camp yarns around a big fire kept us going till “lights out.” 
Of course we did sentry-go all night—each pair of scouts being on 
duty for an hour. Sunday dawned with tremendous heat. An 
expedition to the top of King’s Mountain was organized—the whole 
troop save one sentry, taking part. 

After the fatigue of climbing 1,200 feet above sea level, the troop 
engaged in a refreshing swim in Kingsmere on the return trip to 
camp. Dinner that day was a cold affair—no one wishing to increase 
the heat, by lighting fires. 

The cooking that took place at our meals showed up the old 
hands. While the tenderfoots contented themselves with cold 
breakfast foods, canned goods, and semi-cooked bacon—the others 
soon demonstrated that they could handle a frying pan and manage 
a cooking fire with rapidity and ease, and that it was not necessary 
to toast oneself and burn ones victuals at a bonfire big enough to 
supply heat on a winter’s day. 

Wo found that it would be more convenient in future camps 
to have a picked gang of cooks to act each day, instead of allowing 
each scout to cook for himself. This would allow the rest of the 
troop more time to practise scouting, and would reduce the number 
of fires, besides reducing the expense of the whole feeding bill. 

The ingenuity displayed by some of the scouts in fitting up their 
tents was very creditable indeed. In the daily inspection—the first 
place for neatness and ingenuity was won by the tent occupied by 
Ross, Blakeney and Thoburn, the second place by that inhabited 
bv Maunsell, Sherwood and Birkett II. 

Sunday afternoon was occupied partly by games; afterwards 
the scouts were dismissed to do what they pleased until tea. 

In the evening we sat round the fire amusing ourselves with 
yarns, songs, etc., turning in with a conviction that a night attack 
was imminent. It came about 2.00 a.m. and resolved itself into a 
pitched battle among- the tents. The carnage was fearful—dead 
and wounded being carted away in heaps by the ambulance corps. 
It was the scouts’ last night in camp, and the authorities snored 
obligingly in their tents through the whole affair. 

Next morning at 8.00 a.m. the camp was struck, packed up and 
the troop lined up for departure. A speech was delivered by the 
scoutmaster, three hearty cheers given and away we went on our 
return journey. 

NOTES ON THE CAMP. 

. Our next camp will not be like the last. We noticed several 
points in which we might improve on the first attempt— 


THE ASHBURIAN 


25 


1. The camp being inland—swimming could not be indulged 
in as often as was desirable. 

2. The scouts present were of too great a range in point of 
age—11 to 18 on this occasion. 

3. The individual cooking took up too much time. 

4. A regular programme for each day should be rigidly stuck 
to. This would keep all busy all the time. 

5. Only first and second class scouts should be taken into 
camp. The tenderfoots keep back the work and generally hinder 
the operation of the camp. 

6. A trek, or a canoe trip would be a pleasant change next 

year—it would mean harder work and more knowledge gained by 
the scouts . ~ l 

7. That parade drill, and even skirmishing drill, should not be 
indulged in in camp, but that more time should be devoted to wood¬ 
craft. 

8. That big games in which the whole troop are engaged are 
not as beneficial to the individual scout as small experiments and 
investigations by a few. 

NOTES. 


In commencing scouting this new school year a change in policy 
will be made. Last year under Scoutmaster Boyd and Assistant 
Scoutmaster Boyce drill and discipline were much emphasized. 

In consequence of this and the unflagging interest and enthu¬ 
siasm displayed by these two, a high state of proficiency was at¬ 
tained. Our troop was second to none—“The smartest which I 
have seen either at Home or in Canada” said H. R. H. Now that 
this has been accomplished the coming year will be devoted to the 
individual training of each scout in other things. Skill with the hands 
and cleverness with the head will be the policy followed in 1912-13. 

We already conduct our tests in knot-tying , etc., blindfolded, 
and otherwise make it as difficult foi the scouts to qualify as possible. 
This makes for the development of a very high efficiency among 
the scouts and this will be carried into every branch of scouting 
in 1912-13. The Ashbury Troop will be—not only the smartest, 
but also the most efficient troop in Canada. 


WHAT WE WANT, AND ARE 
IN THE COMING YEAR. 

1. The best rifle shot in Canada. 

2. “ signallers 

3. “ woodsmen 

4. “ trackers 

5. “ cooks 

6. “ buglers 

7. “ Troop in Canada. 


DETERMINED TO HAVE 


\ OR AT HOME. 




26 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Rockcliffe Park 

One of our contributors, who is in the habit of going for walks 
in Rockcliffe Park every afternoon, has sent us the following: 

A great English poet has written of the “joy in widest com¬ 
monalty spreadand assuredly there are simple, modest enjoy¬ 
ments even for those whose purse and leisure may be light and brief, 
if they but open their eyes to see, and their hearts to feel. 

At a vantage point in our great, natural playground, Rock¬ 
cliffe Park, is a little, yellow pavilion—is it a hexagon?—at which 
gentle refreshments and mild drinks may be procured at a reason¬ 
able price. No! this is not an advertisement, but just a free ap¬ 
preciation of a little family picnic. The writer does not know the 
name of the proprietor or waiter behind these wayside counters, 
but if he could do so, would sing his praises in melodious lays, and 
will call to mind, on many a wintry evening, his cheery, summer 
hospitality. 

Around the little refreshment booth, in its sunlight and soul- 
light, are magnificent shade trees, green sward and pleasing, restful 
scenes of land and sky. Our splendid driveway sweeps by, away 
•down the bluffs the grand river flows, and beyond, across the river 
the Laurentians stretch afar. As our host remarks, people from 
far countries wonder that Ottawa people do not flock to enjoy 
it more fully. It is a sample of nature’s bounty; and our host, 
who delights to feed the neighboring squirrels, when unmolested 
by the thoughtless or cruel—seems to fit into the scene with his 
native hospitality. Here’s to mine host, one of nature’s gentlemen. 
God bless him! 

The writer must just have spent a dollar and have been feeling 
the effects.— Ed. 


Cadet Corps Inspection 

During the last two or three years the keenness displayed 
by the Cadet Corps has been increasing rapidly. Boys have turned 
out for drill much more willingly than in the past. There has been 
great rivalry amongst the different sections to secure the cup pre¬ 
sented bv Col. Woods. This cup is to be held each year by the sec¬ 
tion which not only drills the best, but is the smartest on parade. 
This year the inspection took place on May 31st, when Capt. Clarke 



THE ASHBURIAN 


visited us. It was an ideal afternoon for drilling and the Cadet 
Corps was seen at its best. A new feature was provided this year 
by the Signalling Section under Sergeant Boyd. They performed 
very creditably, sending messages to each other across the play¬ 
ground. As Capt. Clarke came on to the ground the whole corps 
presented arms with a precision which would have done credit 
to a regiment of regulars. It was quite the best thing they did 
during the afternoon. After Capt. Clarke had marched down 
the lines accompanied by Capt. Honey, the Cadet Corps was put 
through company drill and extended order by the Captain and 
the Lieutenants in turn. Then the Sergeants drilled their sections 
separately. The inspection closed with the MARCH PAST. Capt. 
Clarke then addressed the corps. He began by congratulating 
the boys on the excellence of their drill: he said it was the best 
corps he had inspected this year. He went on to say that great 
credit was due to the officers, especially to Capt. Heney. He con¬ 
cluded his remarks with some wholesome advice for the future. 
Three hearty cheers were given for Capt. Clarke and then the Head¬ 
master said a few words. After thanking Capt>. Clarke for coming 
down he announced the result of the section competion. The cup 
for this year was awarded to No. 1 section under Sergt. White’s 
command. The decision was a very popular one as Sergt. White 
had taken a great deal of trouble with his section. The proceed¬ 
ings closed with three cheers for Capt. Heney, after which the Cadet 
Corps was dismissed. 

Below is a list of the officers: 


Captain .I. B. L. Heney. 

Lieutenants .J. V. Thomas; W. H. Davis. 

Colour Sergeant .F. D. Graham. 

Sergeants .W. G. Gibbs; A. M. Naismith; 

R. W. White; S. C. Bate. 
Signalling Sergeant .E. D. H. Boyd. 


Speech Day 

On Wednesday, June 12, a large number of people gathered 
for the annual distribution of prizes. The event took place in the 
gymnasium, where the platform was attractively arranged with 
large ferns and quantities of flowers. Promptly at four o’clock 
the Headmaster and Sir Sandforcl Fleming entered and took their 
places on the platform, and the proceedings began with the year’s 
report, a most gratifying and pleasing one, which was read by the 
Headmaster. In the absence of Lt.-Colonel Woods, Lt.-Colonel 







28 


THE ASHBURIAN 


A. P. Sherwood presented the trophies for shooting with a few 
very appropriate remarks, and then the prizes were in turn presented 
to the fortunate boys who had won them, by Sir Sandford Fleming. 

After the prize giving, a pleasant part of the proceedings was a 
presentation by the boys of a handsome clock to the Headmaster 
and a silver-mounted walking stick to the Senior Master, Mr. C. H. 
Hooper, Walter Davis making the presentation on behalf of the 
school, and both recipients received their gifts with much pleasure, 
which each expressed in a neat little speech, and then the guests 
moved off to the school dining-room for afternoon tea, where the 
long tables were arranged and prettily decorated with white roses 
and other flowers and ferns, the boys who were pupils at the school 
taking part in waiting upon the guests. 

The prize winners for general proficiency were: Form VI .— 
J. B. L Heney, W. G. Gibbs; Form V. —L. E. L. Ivoelle, E. J. Lowe, 
J. Harvey; Form IV.B. —A. R. Maclaren, J. C. Reiffenstein: Form 
IV.A. —W. P. Muirhead, C. E. Forde, E. C. Sherwood; Form IV.- 
L. W. Jackson, G. W. A. Hallick; Form III. —C. J. Watson, J. 
O’Halloran, A. P. Taylor; Form II. A. — E. Woollcombe, C. B. P. 
Shipman; Form II. —C. G. Kingsmill; Form I. —P. G. Fleming. 

For good conduct: Form V. —J. Harvey; Form IV.B. —P. 
Biggar; Form IV. A. —E. K. Davidson, Form II. —Lennox Smith. 

The Governor-General’s medal for highest average in Forms 
VI. and V. was won by L. E. L. Ivoelle. The Nelson shield, given 
to the boy whose attitude has been marked by the greatest atten¬ 
tion to duty, was won by J. B. L. Heney. 


Fj 

School Notes. 

On March 23rd, we listened to a very interesting lecture on 
“Woods” by Mr. Bell. This is the second occasion we have had 
the pleasure of hearing him and for the second time he had brought 
an excellent collection of slides. 

On March 30th, the last of our series of Winter Lectures took 
place in the gymnasium. The subject was “The Passion Play” 
and the lecturer, the Rev. A. W. Mackay. Some of the slides were 
magnificent and such a good account of the play was given us, 
that we were very sorry when the lecture was over. We hope 
Mr. Mackay will visit us again next year. 

On March 27th, all the boarders accompanied by three members 
of the staff paid a visit to the Family Theatre, where they saw some 


THE ASHBURIAN 


29 


excellent moving pictures of the Durbar. They were coloured by 
the Kinemacolor process, and gave us a very real idea of what the 
actual Durbar was like. 

On March 24th, our service in the evening took place in St. 
Bartholomew's Church instead of in the gymnasium. We took 
oui orchestra and our choir with us, and found a large congregation 
assembled. The church had never been so full before: there was 
not a vacant seat when the service began.- The orchestra and choir 
both performed well, and we left a very good impression behind us. 

On April 22nd, the Bishop of New Westminster paid a visit 
to the school. He addressed a few words to the boys after morning 
school, and gave them some sound advice. He stopped to school 
dinner, during which meal he entertained the boys at Mr. Hooper's 
table, with various anecdotes. 

On May 2nd, a presentation was made to Capt. Weston in the 
form of a travelling bag. For the first time in four years the Captain 
was returning to England’ and the boys wished to give him a small 
token of their affection. The Headmaster said several nice things 
about him, after which Naismith made the presentation. The Cap¬ 
tain made a short speech, after which three hearty cheers were 
given for him. 

On May 2nd, while the Cadet Corps was drilling in uniform, 
a serious fire broke out on Mr. Keefer's estate. We went over 
at the double and showed ourselves very efficient at bucket drill. 
The water supply was difficult to reach, but by passing buckets 
down a line we saved the house, which was in danger. The Head¬ 
master received a very nice letter from Mr. Keefer, thanking us for 
our services. 

On May 1st a half-holiday was granted in honour of the Duke’s 
birthday. 

On May 14th, the Cadet Corps was invited by Col. Woods 
to attend the Horse Show. About fifty marched off from school 
under the command of Capt. Heney. They spent a most enjoyable 
evening, and returned home about midnight. 

A. M. Naismith has been elected captain of the 1st Foolbaff 
Team 1912. We hope he will meet with the same success that he 
did last year. 

The following committee has been appointed: 

W. H. Davis; D. F. Verner; W. M. Irvin. 


30 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Football Prospects. 

The fall here once more, all thoughts turn to football. This 
year we have Dave McCann from the beginning for our coach, and 
everyone is doing his best to please Dave and help him to make a 
football team of ability which he, no doubt, will. We have a great 
number of old colours with us this year as well as numerous new 
faces who seem quite capable of filling those places now vacant. 
The first team is rapidly lining into form, the only difficulty arising 
is that a great number of the second team or players think it is 
useless to try for the team, and prefer to take walks rather than 
play football. 

Who’s who and why? (From Saturday Evening Past.) 

Full Back— 

C. W. Rivers, a new colour who will take L. Bowie’s place. He 
looks like him and plays like him. 

Right Half— 

J. Carling, one of last year’s spares; looks good and ought to be 
a very valuable man a little later in the season. 

Centre Half— 

W. M. Irvin, one o£ last year’s best players; ought to be one 
of the stars of the league this year if he only keeps his head and 
bores in. 

Left Half— 

D. F. Verner, an old colour, good in every respect except turning 
out to practices. An excellent tackle and a beautiful “ dodge” 
runner who has played on the team for some years. 

Quarter— 

T. L. Richardson, a new boy who looks as though he would 
be good with a little practice and coaching. 

Right Outside— 

R. Maclaren on last year’s seconds; a very fast runner; plays 
his position well; tackles well and will do great things this year. 
Left Outside— 

H. W. Davis, played the same position last year; a good heady 
player who runs well and follows down on kicks very well. 

Right Middle— 

A. M. Naismith. 

Left Middle— 

E. J. Lowe, played on seconds last year; tackles very well 
and ought to be very useful this year when he gets used to the 
new position. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


31 


Right Inside— 

W. M. Cory from last year’s thirds is playing well; tackles well 
and does some fine line plunging; ought to be very valuable+about 
mid-season. 

Left Inside— 

J. Rollit, last year with West mount Academy; is playing a bril¬ 
liant game; tackles well; bucks well and is an all round useful 
man who will help greatly to fill Sample’s place in the “ bucks.” 
Right Scrimmage— 

W. H. Thompson, left inside last year, a big man who ought 
to do great work in breaking up out opponents’ scrimmage. 

Left Scrimmage— 

A. St. Laurent, playing the same position last year; he has 
improved and ought to do good work this year. 

Centre Scrimmage— 

W. H. Wickware, a hard worker and a good runner, but gets 
a little too excited at times; will be good when he steadies down. 

Carling I played in several games last year and will probably 
do the same this; a good tackle and runner. 

Giant II is improving rapidly and may get a place in the scrim¬ 
mage yet; he will probably play some games. 

Patterson will, at least, be a spare and ought to be of great 
assistance to next year’s team. 

A. M. N. 

As the captain is too modest to write about himself, we feel 
it our duty to say something. It was largely due to Naismith 
that we won the cup last year. He is an excellent captain, and 
unless something unforeseen happens he ought to lead his team 
to victory again. He has plenty of weight and keeps several tricks 
up his sleeve with which to mislead his opponents. We wish him 
a very successful season. 


Valete-Salvete. 

VALETE. 

0 

J. V. Thomas. —Boarder, Prefect, Form VI, 1st Team Football, 
Sport’s Editor, Dramatic Society, 1st Lieutenant. 

J. B. L. Heney. —Boarder, Prefect, Form VI, 1st Team Football, 
Captain Cadet Corps, Passed into McGill. 

F. D. Graham. —Boarder, Prefect, Colour-Sergeant. 

H. M. Hughson. —Day boy, Prefect, Form VI, 1st Team Hockey, 
Shooting Team, Passed into McGill University. 


32 


THE ASHBURIAN 


E. D. H. Boyd. —Boarder, Scoutmaster, Signalling Sergeant. 

W. H. Gibbs. —Boarder, Form VI, 1st Team Football, Hockey, 
Cricket, Sergeant, Passed into McGill University. 

E. R. Lethbridge. —Boarder, Form VI, Passed into R.M.C. and 
McGill University. 

J. L. Macara. —Day boy, Form VI. 

D. Morgan. —Boarder, Form VI, Assistant Editor, Passed into 
McGill University. 

E. L. Sample. —Day boy, Form VI, 1st Team Football, Shooting 

Team, Passed into McGill University. 

G. A. Strubbe. —Boarder, Form VI, 1st Team Football, Hockey, 
Passed into R.M.C. 

A. J. Therien. —Day boy, Form VI, Passed into R.M.C. 

R. W. White.— Boarder, Form VI, 1st Team Football, Hockey, 
Cricket, 2nd Lieutenant. 

C. D. Boyce. —Boarder, Form V, Cricket XI, Shooting Team, 
Assistant Scoutmaster. 

G. Dupont. —Day boy , Form V, Passed into McGill University. 

J. Harvey. —Day boy, Form V, Artist to the Ashburian. 

L. E. L. Iycelle. —Boarder, Form V, Cricket XI, Dramatic Society, 

Passed into McGill University. 

J. Hennessy. —Boarder, Form IVB, 1st Team Hockev. 

A. B. Hennessy. —Boarder, Form IV. 

F. E. Arnoldi. —Day boy, Form II. 

H. S. Bostook.- —Day boy, Form II. 

P. G. Fleming. —Day boy, Form II. 

E. W. T. Gill. —Day boy, Form II. 

R. M. McConnell. —Day boy, Form II. 

C. B. Shipman. —Boarder, Form II. 

SALVETE. 

D. A. Grant.— Boarder, Form VI. 

M. Burns. —Boarder, Form V. 

J. M. Hazen. —Boarder, Form V. 

J. G. Rollit. —Day boy, Form V. 

A. E. D. Tremain. —Boarder, Form IVB. 

H. B. Billings. —Day boy, Form IVA. 

J. R. Stewart. —Day boy, Form IVA. 

H. H. Kuntz. —Day boy, Form IVA. 

C. W. Rivers.— Boarder, Form IVA. 

N. F. Hill. —Day boy, Form IV. 

C. H. Goldstein. —Boarder, Form IV. 

R. P. Ward. —Day bov, Form IV. 

C. D. Bate. —Dav bov, Form II. 

L. H. Burpee. —Dav bov, Form I. 

xJ xS / 


THE ASHBURIAN 


;; 


»> 

*> 


J. F. Crowdy.— Day boy, Form I. 

C. A. Hill.— Day boy, Form I. 

E. B. Johnston.— Day boy, Form I. 

R. B. C. RuterfoKd.— Day boy, Form IF 
T. L. Willson.— Boarder, Form I. 

S. E. Woods. —Day boy, Form I. 

H. Tamplet.— Boarder, Form I. 


Our Contemporaries. 

The Editor begs to acknowledge the receipt of the following 
contemporaries:— 

The Tonbridgian (2) 

The School Magazine, Uppingham (2) 

The Cheltonian (3). 

Acta Ridleiana. 

The Grove Chronicle, Lakefield (2). 

Bishop’s College School Magazine. 

The Meteor (3). 

The Wykehamist (3). 

The Epsomian. 

St. Andrew’s College Review (2). 

Bradfield College Chronicle. 

The Albanian. 

The College Times, Upper Canada College. 

The Blue and White (2). 

St. John’s College Magazine. 

The Black and Red. 

The Felstedian. 


Jokes Skits and Riddles, 

In response to an earnest appeal for the above, the Editor 
has been overwhelmed with contributions. We cannot vouch 
for the originality of all of them, but we will leave our readers to 
judge for themselves. We hope to receive another good collection 
of jokes for our Xmas number, which is issued before we break up 
for the holidays. 

In a recent English examination the following question was 
asked : “ Define and form a sentence with each of the following 

words: fathom, species and odorless.” 

One boy answered the question as follows: 

“A fathom is six feet. A fly has fathom. Species is kind. 
A boy should be species to his mother. Odorless, without scent. 
A man who is odorless cannot ride in a car. 




34 


THE ASHBURIAN 


The Doctor—‘‘How is the patient this morning?” 

The Patient’s Wife—“I think he’s better, but he seems to be 
worrying about something.” 

The Doctor—“Hum! Yes. Just tell him I won’t • send it 
for a month.” 

Two Englishmen were on their way across the continent and 
when they were crossing the prairie one saw a prairie chicken. 
“0! I say” said he, “Whatis that, a buffalo?” “No.” said the 
other ‘ ‘ It’s a bally gopher.” 

“I give you my word, the next person who interrupts the pro¬ 
ceedings,” said the judge strongly, “will be expelled from the 
Court and ordered home.” 

“Hurrah!” cried the prisoner. 

Then the judge pondered. 

What’s the difference between forms and ceremonies? 

You sit on one and stand on the other. 

What word contains the five vowels in order? Facetious. 

Why is I the luckiest of the vowels? 

Because it is the centre of bliss, while E is in earth and all the 
others are in purgatory. 

Why are buttons like great men’s birthday anniversaries? 

Because they are always coming off. 

Why is a fish merchant never generous? 

Because his business makes him selfish. 

Name the two longest English words. 

Smiles—there is a mile between the first and last letters, and 
beleagured, because there is a league between the first and last syl¬ 
lable s. 

Why have turkeys no fear of a future state ? 

Because they have their next world (necks twirled) in this. 

Why was Shakespeare a good broker? 

Because he furnished many stock quotations. 

Why is a child like flannel? 

Because it shrinks from washing. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


35 


A stranger steps up to a young man who is smoking, saying: 

“Friend, how many cigars do you smoke a day?” 

“Three.” 

“And how much do you pay for each cigar?” 

“Fifteen cents.” 

“Now, my friend, if you saved that money, by the time you 
are as old as I am you could own that building over there.” 

“Do you own it?” 

“No.” 

“Well, I do,” and the stranger departed abashed. 

A high-school teacher was slightly deaf and very sensitive 
about attracting attention to it. 

One day as her class in German was about to open, a girl in the 
back of the room raised her hand and asked, 

“Please, may I go into the hall and get my handkerchief?” 

Miss H-, with a puzzled air, looked over the class and said, 

“Can any one answer that question?” 

Margaret, aged eleven, had just returned from her first visit 
to the Zoo. 

“Well,” said her mother, smiling, “did you see the elephants 
and the giraffe and the kangaroos?” 

Margaret looked thoughtful. 

‘ ‘ We saw the elephant and the giraffe and the dang-ger-roos.” 

“What?” said Mrs. Blank. 

“The dang-ger-roos. It said These animals are D-a-n-g-e-r-o-u-s.’” 

Fate cannot be evaded. A Grand Vizier asked his master, the 
Sultan, for permission to depart at once for Smyrna. 

“Yes, you may go, Vizier,” the Sultan answered. “But 
why this sudden departure?” 

“Alas! sire,” said the Grand Vizier. I have seen the angel of 
death among the throng before your throne and he looked at me so 
long and strangely that I am sure he must come for me.” 

“Go, then. Go at once,” the Sultan said, and after the Vizier’s 
departure he backoned the angel of death to him and asked: 

“Why did you gaze so strangley at my Grand Vizier?” 

“I was only wondering,” the angel answered, “why the man 
was here, for I have orders to kill him late this afternoon in Smyrna.” 

“Wheah you goin’, Bill?” 

‘ 1 Nowheahs.” 

“You mils’ be goin’ somewheahs or you wouldn’t be heah.” 

“Youah foolish. Ah’m jes’ cornin’ back.” 


36 


THE ASHBURIAN 


A small girl, aged five, was studying intently a picture of the 
Garden of Eden. At last, she said in a perplexed voice, ‘'But, 
mother, where is the carriage?” 

“Carriage!” exclaimed her mother in great surprise. “What 
$an you mean, dear? Their was no carriage in the Garden of Eden.” 

“But,” remonstrated the child, “you told me that the Lord 
jlrove Adam and Eve out of the Garden.” 

He—Yes, I was going abroad, but I—aw—I changed my mind, 
fou know. 

She—Well, I do hope you get a better one in the change. 

Room 14. 

1. If IYB. took History would Edric Read? No, but Cecil Wood. 

2. If Mrs. Jones tried to get away, would the tie holder? 

3. if Archie Fleming went fishing would Pete Bate? 

4. If the rooms in the College were changed would the Chapel 
Altar ? 

5. If eggs are 20 cents a dozen, how much is Butterworth? 

6. If the bureau fell would the washstand? 

8. If the bed clothes fell would the pillow slip? 

Why is the root of the tongue like a dejected man? 

Because it is down in the mouth. 

Who was Jonah’s tutor? 

The whale, because it brought him up. 

SCHOOLBOY ERRORS. 

Women’s suffrage is the state of suffering to which they were 
born. 

The earth is an obsolete spheroid. 

Lord Raleigh was the first man to see the Invisible Armada. 

Shakespeare founded “As You Like It” on a book previously 
written by Sir Oliver Lodge. 

Tennyson wrote “In Memorandum” 

King Edward IV. had no claim by geological right to the Eng¬ 
lish throne. 

George Eliot left a wife and children to mourn his genii. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


37 


The capital of Russia is St. Petersburg on the Duma. 

The Test Act of 1673 was passed to keep Roman Catholics 
out of public houses. 

Henry I. died of eating palfreys. 

Louis XVI. was gelatined during the French Revolution. 

The Rhine is boarded by wooden mountains. 

Gender shows whether a man is masculine, femine or neuter. 

James I. died from argue. 

An angle is a triangle with only two sides. 

Algebraical symbols are used when you don’t know what you 
are talking about. 

Geometry teaches us how to bisex angels. 

Parallel lines are the same distance all the way, and do not meet 

7 

unless you bend them. 

The whale is an amphibious animal because it lives on land 
and dies in the water. 

A parallelogram is a figure made of four parallel straight lines. 

Horse power is the distance one horse can carry a pound of 
water in an hour. 

The magnesium salt in the sea creates the effervescence when 
the tide comes in. 

If the air contains more than 100 per cent, of carbolic acid 
it is very injurious to health. 

Gravitation is that which if there were none we should all fly 
away. 

The Press to-day is tlie mouth organ of the people. 

A vacuum is a large empty space where the Pope lives. 


38 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Martin Harvey invented the circulation of the blood. 

A deacon is the lowest kind of Christian. 

The isles of Greece were always quarrelling as to which was the 
birthplace of Homer: Chaos has the most right to claim him. 


SLANG FROM SHAKESPEARE. 

“As You Like It.” 

Well said: that was laid on with a trowel.—Act I., Scene I. 
Have you not conned them out of rings?—Act III., Scene IT. 
He writes verses like a goose.—Act III., Scene IV. 

“Henry IV.” 

Why, what a candy deal.—Act I., Scene III. 

Now, my honey, ride with us.—Act I., Scene II. 

Thou art so fat-witted.—Act I., Scene II. 

If he fall in, good night!—Act I., Scene III. 

I am soused.—Act IV., Scene II. 

There’s no more faith in you than in a stewed prune.—Act III., 
Scene III. 

“Julius Caesar.” 

Till then, chew upon this.—Act I., Scene II. 

' 1 Hamlet.” 

What, ho, such bugs!—Act V., Scene II. 

“Cymbeline.” 

He could not but think her quite cracked.—Act V., Scene V. 

“Coriolanus.” 

What, thou stiff—stand’st out.—Act I., Scene I. 

“All’s Well That Ends Well.” 


Con him.—Act IV., Scene III. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


“ Merry Wives of Windsor.” 

J11 make him dance.—Act III., Scene II. 

You cheese.—Act I., Scene I. 

Well, go to it.—Act I., Scene IV. 

Is he dead? Ha, bully!—Act II., Scene III. 

I cannot tell what the dickens his name is.—Act III., Scene II. 

'“Taming of the Shrew.” 

Our cake’s dough!—Act I., Scene I. 

Whom should I knock?—Act I., Scene II. 

I seemeth green.—Act IV., Scene V. 

“Antony and Cleopatra.” 

For not alone touches, but letters petition us.—Act I., Scene II. 
Say not so, Agrippa.—Act II., Scene II. 

0 Anthony! O thou bird!—Act III., Scene II. 



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ASHBURY COLLEGE FOOTBALL TEAM, 1912. 

Back Bow —E. J. Lowe; L. Grant; H. R. Richardson; W. Cory; J. G. Rollit; J. Carling. 

Middle Row —H. M. Graham; A. St. Laurent; W. H. Wickware; R. F. Patterson. 

'ont Row —W. M. Irvin; R. MacLaren; D. McCann (coach); A. M. Naismith (Capt.); H. W. Davis; D. Verner; L. F. Carling; C. W. Rive 














d\r\.^TV- 





The Ashburian 


Editorial Staff. 

Editor-in-Chief — Mr. C. H. Hooper. 
Assistant Editor —E. J. Lowe. 

Sports Editor —W. H. Davis. 

Rifle Shooting — E. J. Lowe. 

Artist — D. Verner. 

Secretary-Treasurer — Mr. D. E. C. Wood. 


Editorial 

By the time that this number of The Ashburian reaches our 
subscribers there will be only one subject engrossing the thoughts 
of boys and staff alike—the holidays. Already the summ'er is a 
thing of the remote past, the football season has gone, the first 
snow has come; visions of sheeted hill-sides, polished ice, and 
lofty chutes are fast taking the place of muddy fields and upright 
goal posts. The winter is here, the exams, upon us, and the three 
weeks rest (staff), and recreation (boys) about to begin. 

Football— 

Naturally one looks back at the term just ended. Sports 
do not stand out prominently. We lost the football cup. It 
would be easy to explain that a series of most regrettable accidents 
accounted for this. A broken leg, two cracked . ibs, wrenched hips, 
etc., made a great difference in our fighting strength it is true, but 
the best team won. We congratulate St. Alban’s on their victory— 
secured by hard and persistent effort. 

New Rooms — 

With the opening of the new wing on November 19th another 
•page in the history of the College was turned. The two new class 
rooms with the 'East word” in school furnishings, lighting, con¬ 
venience and comfort are admitted to be perfection. The acoustic 
properties of the big room are wonderful—as a music room it could 
hardly be improved upon. 














THE ASHBURIAN 


9 


The Chapel — 

Then comes the Chapel—almost altogether furnished ’by the 
generous gifts of old-boys, parents and friends of the College. At 
the time of going to press it is not yet opened, but hopes are enter¬ 
tained that upon the first Sunday of next term the interior will be 
finished and the dedication ceremony performed. Alas, our 
organist so far searches vainly in the chancel for any signs of the 
organ which sanguine hopes had led him to expect. His fingers 
itch for the manuals, his feet for the pedals. Already, in imagination 
he rolls harmonious volumes of melody through the edifice—the 
lights quivering, the windows rattling and the walls rocking to the 
reverberations of his thirty-two foot reeds. “In his hand the 
thing became a trumpet, whence he blew soul-animating strains— 
alas too few.” Or else in less bellicose humour, when twilight 
falls (always a sentimental hour) the place becomes. 

“A work of fine intelligence, where music dwells” 
“Lingering, and wandering on as loth to die.” 

At present, however, not so much as a solitary pipe gladdens 
the organist's longing eyes and he fain would exclaim in the words 
of the Psalmist “How long, oh Lord, how long.” 

The Holidays — 

Do what we will our thoughts inevitably revert to the coming 
holidays. We will all enjoy ourselves of course—we intend to, 
and, if we can bring a little more happiness to anyone else as well, 
that will be better still. It is with the earnest hope that every 
Ashburian, past and present, will realize this double pleasure that 
the Editor wishes all— 


A MERRIE CHRISTMAS and 

A HAPPY NEW YEAR. 


c c 


Johnny,” said the teacher, “what is an accident.” “Well” 
said Johnny, “it is a state when presence of mind is good, but absence 
of body a darn sight better.” 


The newly married pair had escaped from their demonstrative 
friends and were on their way to the depot when the carriage stopped. 
The bridegroom looked out of the window impatiently. 

“What's the matter, driver?” he called. 

“The horse has thrown a shoe, sir,” was the reply. 

“Great Scott!” groaned the bridegroom; “even the horse knows 
we’re j ust married.’ ’ 




Date. 



C?GQ? Qdffib 


St. Alban’s Challenge Cup. 


Match. 


Sat. Oct. 5th. Ashbury v. Lower Canada, 

“ “ 12th, Ashbury v. St. Alban’s 

“ 19th, St. Alban’s v. Lower Canada 

“ “ 26th, Ashbury v. Lower Canada 

“ Nov. 2nd, Ashbury v. St. Alban’s 
“ “ 9th, St. Alban’s v. Lower Canada 


Played at 

Won 

Score 

Montreal, 

Lower Canada 

13-11 

Ottawa 

St. Alban’s 

33-0 

Montreal 

St. Alban’s 

18-6 

Ottawa 

Lower Canada 

35-6 

Brockville 

St. Alban’s 

25-0 

Brockville 

St. Alban’s 

33-6 


St. Alban’s have therefore won the Cup for this year. We offer 
them onr heartiest congratulations on their success. They went 
through the season without a defeat- and there was never any doubt 
as to the result. This is the second time in three years that one 
of the teams has won out without a loss. In 1910, thanks to the 
coaching of Mr. Pratt and the excellent work of C. Fleming, the 
captain, the Ashbury team was undefeated at the end of the season. 
Let us hope that we shall repeat this performance next year. 


Other Matches 


Date 


Match. 


Played at Won Score 


Sept. 28th, 
Oct. 5th, 

“ 8th, 
“ 9th, 
“ 11th, 
“ 15 th 
“ 18th 
“ 19th 
“ 24th 
“ 26th, 
Nov. 9th, 


Ashbury v. Collegiate 
Ashbury II v. Lower Canada II 
Ashbury IV v. Models II 
Ashbury I v. Y. M. C. A. 
Ashbury II v. Cliffsides 
Ashbury III v. Beavers 
Ashbury IV v. Models II 
Ashbury IV v. Models II 
Ashbury V v. Renfrew Collegiate 
Ashbury III v. Models 
Ashbury II v. Lower Canada II 
Ashbury IV v. Sterlings 


Home Collegiate 33-0 

Montreal Lower Canada II 23-1 
Home Models II 11-5 

Home Y. M. C. A. 2-1 

Home Cliffsides 7—5 

Home Ashbury III 28-5 

Home Ashbury IV 8-1 

Home Ashbury IV 18-0 

Home Renfrew 9-6 

Home Ashbury III 5-0 

Home Lower Canada II 44-0 

Home Ashbury IV 26-0 


Below is given an account of some of the more important matches 
in the order in which they have been played. 





























4 


THE ASHBUR-IAN 


Ashbury College y. Collegiate. 

Our season opened with our yearly match against the Collegiate, 
on Saturday, September 28th. The Collegiate was as strong as 
ever, especially in the back division, where Brophy was always 
conspicuous. He was responsible for the most of the scoring, 
and without him the game would have been more even. As it 
was, we suffered a rather serious defeat by 33 points to 0. It was 
a clean game to watch, and was only marred by one small incident, 
which the referee quickly settled. There was quite a good attend¬ 
ance for the first match, which augurs well for our school matches, 
though there was no organized cheering to urge our team on. Our 
team did not shine on this occasion: our back division was very 
weak and seemed incapable of catching the ball. Verner had an 
off day and lost us several points. Irvin was good in the first quarter, 
and then collapsed for the rest of the game. Our forward line was 
the best as they were holding their opponents, who were very much 
heavier. Our signals did not work as well as was expected, but 
this was due to the fact that some of the players were not very 
regular in their attendance at practice. However, Naismith noted 
the weak points and the team is bound to make a better show in 
their next match. 

The game started at 11.05, when Ashbury kicked off towards 
the lower end of the playground. The game was soon near our 
goal. Brophy kicked on the 3rd down, and owing to a fumble by 
Verner, scored a touchdown, which was not converted. Nothing 
further happened in this quarter, the score at the end being 5-0 
in favour of Collegiate. The second quarter started with the ball 
very near our goal, and with a kick over the dead line. Brophy 
scored a point. Shortly after they scored a touchdown from another 
fumble by Verner which was not converted. The score at half-time 
was 11-0. 

The Collegiate kicked off in the third quarter and quickly scored 
a point from a big kick by Brophy. Soon after Irvin failed to hold 
a catch and Collegiate scored then- third touchdown: this was 
converted from a very difficult angle. Two more points were added 
from kicks over the dead line and the score at the end of this quarter 
was 20—0. The last quarter was a bad one for us. We lost 20 yards 
on 3 downs at the start, after which Collegiate scored a point. A 
muddled pass by the backs enabled Collegiate to score another 
touchdown which was converted. They finished up in brilliant 
style by scoring another touchdown from an onside kick just before 
time, which they converted, making the final score 33-0. 


THE ASH BUR IAN 


5 


The Ashbury team was as follows: 


MacLaren I.Right outside. 

Naismith.Right middle. 

Cory.Right inside. 

St. Laurent.Right scrimmage. 

Graham.Centre scrimmage. 

Lowe I.Left scrimmage. 

Rollit.Lelt inside. 

Patterson.Left middle. 

Davis.Left outside. 

Richardson.Quarter. 

Verner.Right half. 

Irvin.Centre half. 

Carling II.Left half. 

Rivers...Full back. 


Our Trip to Montreal 

On Friday, October 4th, we went down to Montreal. We were 
a large party, consisting of four members of the staff and about 
thirty boys, and the Grand Trunk officials decided that it would be 
more prudent to give us a special car to ourselves. Everyone was 
very cheerful on the way down and the newspaper boy did a roaring 
trade. We stopped at the Queen’s Hotel, as the Corona was full 
up. We turned in early on Friday, so as to be in good condition 
for our match on Saturday. The great day dawned at last. It 
turned out to be the most perfect day in the whole term, a little 
too warm if anything. We reached Lower Canada College about 
10 o’clock and our first match began at 10.45. A discription of 
the game will be found later. It was towards the end of this game 
that Irvin, in making one of his brilliant runs, fell and broke his 
leg. There was no doctor on the ground so after Mr. Hooper had 
patched him up he was taken down to the hospital in a motor car, 
the owner of which very kindly lent it. This accident cast a gloom 
over the whole proceedings and rather spoilt the match between 
the second teams, which was played immediately after the first game 
was over. We lost both our matches, unfortunately, although the 
championship game was a very close one. After the two games 
were over, we all had dinner at the College, where we were the guests 
of the head master. The afternoon was spent in various ways by the 
boys; some went to a matinee of “The Spring Maid”; the majority 
watched the football match between Montreal and the Argonauts. 
Several of the team visited Irvin at the hospital, and he was over- 

















6 


THE ASHBURIAN 


whelmed with gifts of candy, books and flowers. We all assembled 
at the hotel for dinner, after which we embarked on our homeward 
journey. Most of us were too tired to make much noise and some of 
us slept soundly until we reached Ottawa. The whole trip was a 
most enjoyable one, however, and with the exception of the accident 
to Irvin, who has all our sympathy, as his football season is ended, 
could not have been improved upon. 

Ashbury College I v. L. C. C. I. 

Ashbury College kicked off, and from the return kick, Irvin 
made a good run. This was followed by a good run by Davis, 
which brought the ball near the L. C. goal. Rivers followed up a 
kick on the 3rd down and we scored our first point. A muddle of 
signals by our opponents enabled Irvin to get away with the ball and 
he went over for a touchdown, which, for some breach of the rules, 
we were not allowed to convert. Soon after this Richardson made 
yards, and then the play changed hands. So far our signals had 
been working very well. Mitchell sprinted well and took the ball 
into our half. Good play by Woods enabled Harrower to score a 
touchdown which was converted. 

The end of the first quarter saw the score at 6-11. 

In the second quarter Irvin again played brilliantly. We forced 
the ball up into our opponents 7 half and thought we had scored a 
touchdown from an onside kick, but Rivers who scored it was de¬ 
clared offside. At this point Rivers retired to change his suit. 
Good runs by Carling II and Irvin brought the ball near the Lower 
Canada goal again. From a kick for a rouge, Davis secured the 
ball and went over for a touchdown. There was some doubt about 
his being onside, but the judge of play gave it as such and the score 
was 11-6 in our favour. 

Good kicking by L. C. C. brought the ball near our goal and 
after some very successful bucking they scored a touchdown which 
they converted. A muddle by Irvin gave them a rouge and when 
the whistle blew for half-time, the score was 13-11 against us. 

The third quarter saw no addition to the score. The play was 
very level, and for the most part in mid-field. Graham had one 
fine opportunity for scoring, but lost the ball when he was tackled. 

In the last quarter Verner opened with a fine run nearly half the 
length of the field, but dropped the ball when he was tackled. This 
dropping the ball was one of our great faults in the game. Irvin was 
again in great form during this quarter and Naismith called his signal 
again and again. It was in this quarter that he met with his terrible 
accident. There were two minutes left for play, after he had been 
taken off the field, but no further score was made and L. C. C. was 
left the winners by 13 points to 11. It was a nice clean game from 


THE ASHBURIAN 


7 


start to finish, and very exciting to watch. Their line up seemed 
heavier than ours and their bucks were certainly more effective. The 
star player in our team was Irvin, who was always conspicuous and 
made several useful runs in every quarter of the game. 

The team was the same as played against the Collegiate 


Ashbury College II vs. Lower Canada College II. 

This game was played immediately after the first game and 
resulted in a win for L. C. C. by 23 points to 1. The game was 
played in two halves. In the first half we scored our only point, 
which should have been a touchdown. Billings, with only five 
yards to go, kicked the ball over the dead line instead of running 
with it. 

Lower Canada scored two touchdowns and a rouge in the first 
half leaving the score 11 to 1 in their favour. In the second half, 
they still had much the best of the game, scoring two more touch¬ 
downs, which they converted, bringing their score to 23 points. 

Although our opponents were heavier than us, we should have 
done better. Irvin’s accident made our team feel rather nervous and 
very few seemed to tackle with any vigour. We hope they will 
make a better showing in their next match. 

The line up was as follows: 


Carling I. 

.... Right half. 

Burns. 

.... Centre half. 

Bate I. 

.... Left half. 

Birkett I. 

.... Quarter. 

Blakeney I. 

.... Right outside. 

Reiffenstein. 

.... Right middle. 

Grant. 

.... Right inside. 

Hazen. 

.... Right scrimmage. 

Muirhead. 

.... Centre scrimmage. 

Chanonhouse. 

.... Left scrimmage. 

Mac Mahon. 

.... Left inside. 

Perley (capt.) . . . . 

.... Left middle. 

Butterworth. 

Left outside. 


At half time Perley retired with a sprained thumb; his place 
was taken by Maunsell. 















8 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Ashbury IV v. Model School. 

This match was played at home on Saturday, October oth, 
weile the First and Second teams were doing battle at Mon¬ 
treal, and resulted in our defeat by 11 points to 5. 

Having won the toss Ashbury kicked off with the wind. Play 
ruled even until the Models scored a touchdown, which was 
not converted. The second quarter was remarkable by a brilliant 
run and touchdown by Crockett, which brought the scores level, 
the kick being again unsuccessful. In the latter half of the game 
the Models had the best of the play, and though Small tackled 
vigourously and B. Lowe several times ran the ball out successfully, 
they succeeded in bringing their total of points up to 11 by means 
of a touchdown due to a false kick, and later on a rouge. W. Thomp¬ 
son ably discharged the onerous duties of referee. 

The line up was as follows: 


Back.Lowe II. 

Half backs.Small, Crockett, Hill. 

Quarter.Moore. 

Outside wings.Valleau, Goldstein. 

Middle wings .Taylor, Southam. 

Inside wings.Woollcombe, Parker. 

Scrimmage.Pont, Tanrplet, Ward. 


Ashbury College v. Y.M.C.A. 

This match was played on the school grounds on Tuesday after¬ 
noon, October 8th, at 4:30. There were two changes on the school 
team, Carling I playing in Irvin’s place, and Grant II taking St. 
Laurent’s position. It was a very low-scoring game, as the final 
score of 2-1 shows. Only 3 rouges were scored altogether. In the 
second quarter we opened the scoring with a rouge, and in the third 
quarter our opponents replied with 2. The feature of the match was 
Graham’s play. He followed up all the kicks and rarely failed to 
tackle his opponent. Verner played a very good game and did 
most of the kicking. But it was evident that Irvin’s loss was felt 
in the back division and we shall have a hard task to beat St. Alban’s 
on Saturday. 

The line up was as follows: 


Back.Rivers. 

. Half backs.Verner, Carling II, Davis. 

Quarter.Richardson. 













THE ASHBURIAN 


9 


Outsides.Carling I, MacLaren I. 

Middles.Naismith, Patterson. 

Insides.Rollit, Cory. 

Scrimmage.Grant, Graham, Lowe I. 

Referee.D. McCann. 


Ashbury College II v. Cliffsides. 

This match was played on the school grounds on Wednesday 
afternoon, October 9th and resulted in a win for the visitors by 7 
points to 5. Owing to a late start, it was decided to play two halves 
of 20 minutes each. In the first half Cliffsides had the best of the 
game and did most of the pressing. They opened the scoring with a 
rouge. A bad fumble by Burns in trying to catch the ball gave them 
a touchdown which they converted. At half-time the score was 
7-0 against us. In the second half we played much better and a 
great effort by Billings secured us a touchdown, which we failed 
to convert. We were on the point of scoring again when the whistle 
blew for time. Billings gave a great display throughout the game, 
tackling well and bucking well. The whole team played up much 
better than in Montreal, and ought to win in the return match. 

The line up was as follows: 


Back.Rivers. 

Half backs.Bate, I. Burns, Richardson. 

Quarter.Birkett. 

Outsides.Butterworth, Blakeney I. 

Middle wings .Billings, Perley (Capt.) 

Inside wings.MacMahon, Reiffenstein. 

Scrimmage.Muirhead, Hazen, Chanonhouse. 

Referee.H. W. Davis. 


Judge of Play—E. J. Lowe. 


Ashbury College III vs. Beavers. 

This game was played on the school grounds on Friday afternoon, 
October 11th, and resulted in a win for the home team by 28 points 
to 5. The Beavers were a team from the Model School and con¬ 
sisted mainly of Boy Scouts. The home team was a little heavier 
and Sladen and Blakeney both made good use of their weight. In 
the first half we opened the scoring with 2 rouges. This was fol¬ 
lowed by a touchdown for which Godfrey was responsible, and before 
















10 


THE ASHBURIAN 


half time Maunsell scored a second touchdown. Neither of these 
were converted. 

In the second half, after a rouge Blakeney made a good run 
for a touchdown, which was not converted. The Beavers made up 
their minds to score and driving us back to our goal, they scored 
their first touchdown. This was their last effort, as with only a 
little time left Blakeney scored two more touchdowns neither of 
which were converted. It was quite the cleanest game the Inter¬ 
mediates have had this year. 

Our line up was as follows: 


Back.Maunsell. 

Halves.Birkett I, Masson, Blakeney (capt.) 

Quarter.S laden. 

Outside wings.Birkett II. 

Middle wings .Jackson. 

Inside wings.Godfry, LeLievre. 

Scrimmage.Echlin, Fleming I, Palmer. 


Ashbury College v. St. Alban's. 

This match, the second in the championship series, was played 
on our grounds on Saturday, October 12th, and resulted in a win 
for the visitors by 33 points to 0. 

Ashbury kicked off at 11:30 and the game was soon close to our 
goal. St. Alban's opened their score with a rouge. By means of 
some long passes, which they worked beautifully all through the 
game, they scored their first touchdown, which they converted. A 
fumble by Verner gave the visitors another rouge and at the end of 
the first quarter the score was 8-0. In the second quarter, we played 
up better, but were unable to score, as the St. Alban's backs were 
very safe with their catches. At half-time the score remained the 
same, 8-0. 

Early in the third quarter, Naismith was badly hurt, but after a 
short rest he continued playing. At this point we went to pieces, 
and the score mounted rapidly. Five rouges were marked and 
2 touchdowns, one of which was converted. This made the score 
24-0 against us. In the fourth quarter we tried kicking, but the 
St. Alban's backs nearly always succeeded in returning the ball. 
By this means they scored 4 more rouges, and they also bucked 
over the line for a touchdown, bringing the final score to 33-0. 

This was a bad defeat for us, but we were beaten by a fine team. 
We were severely handicapped by the loss of Irvin: with him we 
would have scored} a few points. Both Naismith and Davis were 










THE ASHBURIAN 


11 


badly hurt in the game and Carling II had a bad shoulder before dire 
game started, so by half-time we were rather a crippled team. Our 
opponents were much heavier than us, which had its effect in the 
second half. Both MacLaren and Rivers were conspicuous for their 
good tackling and never seemed to tire. The heavy rain which 
came on in the second-half spoiled the game for the spectators, and 
made the ball very greasy for the players. 

The line up was as follows: 


Back.Rivers. 

Halves.Carling, Verner, Davis. 

Quarter.Richardson. 

Outside wings.MacLaren I, Billings. 

Middle wings .Naismith, Rollit. 

Inisde wings.Cory, St. Laurent. 

Scrimmage.Lowe I, Graham, Grant II. 

Spares.Carling I, Wickware. 

Referee.Mr. P. Chrysler. 

Judge of Play.Mr. Mainwaring. 


Ashbury College v. Renfrew Collegiate. 

This match was played on Saturday morning, October 19th, 
and resulted in a win for Renfrew, by 9 points to 6. Owing to the 
late arrival of the visiting team, the game was limited to four 10 
minute quarters. Our team was strengthened by the addition of 
Brophy, Woollcombe and Beddoe. 

In the first quarter Woollcombe received a nasty kick on the 
head and had to lie carried off the field. Patterson came on in his 
place. Renfrew, with the wind behind them made two rouges. 
In the second quarter, we had the best of the exchanges, and Rollit 
bucked over for a touchdown, which Brophy converted. In the 
third-quarter we lost our lead, as Renfrew scored a touch down, and 
followed this up with two more rouges. In the last quarter the 
game was for the most part in mid-field, and no further score was 
made. 

The line up was as follows: 


Back.Verner. 

Halves.Carling II, Brophy, MacLaren I. 

Quarter.Richardson. 

Outside wings .... Davis, Beddoe. 

Middle wings .Naismith, Rollit. 

Inside wings.Carling I, Graham. 

Scrimmage.Lowe I, Woollcombe, Grant II. 



















12 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Ashbury College II v. Lower Canada College II. 

This match was played on Saturday morning, October 26th, 
on our grounds, and resulted in a win for the visitors by 44 points 
to 0. Our second team was in a very crippled condition, as all 
the best players had to play on the first team. However, the match 
was a good one, in spite of the uneven conditions. So as to have 
plenty of time for the championship match, the seconds played 
two 20 minute periods. 

In the first half L.C.C. scored three touchdowns, the last of 
which they converted. In the second half they were much too 
good for us and they added five more touchdowns, two of which 
they converted, and a rouge. 

The two Birketts, in spite of then* size played very well for 
Ashbury, while Reiffenstein was very good in the back division. 
Butterworth at outside wing followed up the kicks well, and made 
some good tackles. But with that exception our forward line was 
weak and quite incapable of stopping the bucks. 

The line up was as follows: 


Back.Perley. 

Half backs.......... Birkett II, Reiffenstein, Maunsell. 

Quarter.Birkett I. 

Outside wings.Butterworth, Lelievre. 

Middle wings .MacMahon, Hazen. 

Inside wings.Wood, Bate. 

Scrimmage..Fleming, Muirhead, Chanonhouse. 


Ashbury College v. Lower Canada College. 

This match followed immediately after our second team match 
and was won easily by Lower Canada College. Six of our first team 
were unable to play, and thir places had to be filled from the second 
team. The result was that neither team was at full strength and 
although everyone played his hardest, there was never any doubt 
as to the result. 

In the first quarter we were very bad, and were quite unable 
to stop our opponents’ bucking. They scored three touchdowns, 
two of which they converted. In the second quarter, with the 
wind behind us, we had a little more of the game and one opponents 
only scored one touchdown and a rouge, to which we replied with 
a rouge. The score at half-time was 23-1. 

We played up much better in the second half: we began the 
third quarter with a tremendous rush. Wickware started with a 










THE ASHBURIAN 


13 


fine 30-yard run and then MacLaren finished the movement by 
going over for a touch-down, a very fine performance indeed. Then 
L. C. C. took the offensive and scored two rouges. In the last quarter 
we were beginning to feel the effects of the struggle and we were 
unable to prevent L. C. C. from scoring two more touchdowns, 
bringing the final score to 35-6. 

Wickware played a great game for Ashbury, although he was 
only a reserve man. The catching by our half backs was much 
better and there was very little fumbling. Both MacLaren and 
Rivers were conspicuous for their tackling. Lowe I, Rollit and 
Cory were the pick of the forwards. 

The line up was as follows: 


Back.Carling. 

Half backs.Wickware, Verner, Rivers. 

Quarter.Davis. 

Outsides.Blakeney, MacLaren I. 

Middles.Patterson, Billings. 

Insides.Cory, Rollit. 

Scrimmage.Lowe I, Graham, St. Laurent. 


Ashbury v. St. Alban’s. 

The last match of the championship series was played in Brock- 
ville on Saturday, November 2nd, and resulted in a win for St. 
Alban’s by 25 points to 0. 

The ground was in very bad condition and enabled the home 
forwards to buck with great success. Nearly all their points were 
scored as the result of good bucking. Our team was nearly at full 
strength, there being only three absentees. Naismith was able to 
captain the team, although he was in rather a damaged condition.. 
Both Verner and Grant were able to play in spite of injuries received 
during the preceding fortnight. We put up a much better fight 
than was expected and in the first quarter we had the best of the 
game. In the second quarter St. Alban’s did some useful drop- 
kicking and scored 6 points. A rouge before half-time brought the 
score to 7-0 in their favour. 

In the second half MacMahon came on in place of Lowe I, who 
had been knocked about in the first half and strained his neck. In 
the third quarter our opponents scored a touchdown and a drop- 
kick. In the last quarter they pressed us very hard and the ball 
was nearly always near our goal. A converted touchdown and a 
safety touch and two rouges completed their score, making a total 
of 25. 










14 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Considering that our team had got up at 5:30 and had a long 
train journey, they did remarkably well, and everyone seemed quite 
surprised at the smallness of the score. The St. Alban's team, 
however, seemed to be stale, and to have lost some of the snap which 
they displayed on our ground. 

Our team was as follows: 


Back.Rivers. 

Half backs.Davis, Verner, Richardson. 

Quarter.Naismith. 

Wing forwards.Wickware, MacLaren. 

Middle wings .Rollit, Graham. 

Inside wings.Patterson, Billings. 

Scrimmage.Lowe, Reiffenstein, Grant II. 

Spares.MacMahon, Blakeney, Carling I. 


A Criticism 

In regard to the season that has just closed, we are indeed to be 
pitied. Despite last year's success in winning the Championship 
and the brilliant prospects we had at the beginning of this season 
the team was practically an utter failure. Of course the injury to 
Irvin was indeed a great draw-back, and was in a way responsible for 
our numerous defeats. Aside from this, however, we should have 
done a great deal better than we did, because our star centre half 
couldn’t play the whole game himself even when he was in uniform. 
Again Naismith sustained painful injuries to his ribs in the Renfrew 
game here. The question is, what was the entire cause for such poor 
showing by the team. It may be answered in quite a few ways, 
the principal of these being the lack of proper practice. Now^if 
the seconds had turned out in greater numbers and shown a decent 
sporting spirit the tale might be a very different one. They lacked 
sadly this aforesaid spirit however and spent most of their time 
in finding injuries of various natures that would give them an excuse 
from practising. For a proof of their indifference pause, and 
look at the scores that Lower Canada seconds piled up on them 
in both their matches. It may also be remarked that they were 
always willing to talk about the poor showing of the first team 
utterly disregarding their own brilliant showing. They, although in 
a great measure responsible for our defeats are not wholly to blame. 
There were members of the firsts who were equally indifferent towards 
the practices. These naturally were not very reliable in a game 
either through lack of condition, practice or determination. It 
is true the majority of our first team were young, but these steadied 











THE ASHBURIAN 


15 


down by the Old Colors should have made a very formidable aggrega¬ 
tion. Now Ashbury College has always had an excellent reputation 
in sports and it seems a pity that it should lose it. It is sure to 
do so if some of its members do not wake up and show a better spirit. 
We do not want our rivals to talk about us in an uncomplimentary 
manner. Let us buck up and show that we are far from being dead. 
Let us show them in Hockey that we are still good for a come back. 
If the same spirit is shown in hockey as was shown in football our 
Headmaster is going to withdraw the name of Ashbury College from 
the Inter School League. So let us wake up and do our best for the 
benefit of the Intermediates who in a few years will be representing 
the school in our League. I want to say before closing this lengthy 
criticism that we are very much indebted to the members of the 
staff who turned out so faithfully to all our practices. 

W. H. D. 


Hockey Prospects 

It is difficult to write much on this subject, as there are only 
three Old Colours, Verner, MacLaren I and Wickware, who will be 
able to play. Irvin’s accident at football will prevent his taking any 
part in the game and Bowie has not recovered sufficiently from his 
illness. 

Practices will take place as usual at Dey’s rink on Gladstone 
Avenue. The captain has not been elected at the time of going to 
press. We wish him, whoever it may be, every success in building- 
up a strong team. A more punctual attendance at practices and 
a little more keenness in donning uniforms will go a long way to¬ 
wards producing a good team. A boy cannot play his best in 
ordinary clothes. We refrain from making any suggestions as to 
who will make the team. There are rumours, as there always will 
be, of dark horses, who are going to do great things. We do want 
to show our opponents, that even if we are beaten in football, we 
can still win in hockey. Our best wishes, therefore, for the hockey 
team. 


School Notes 

On October 3rd, Mr. Barrington Kennett, formerly a master 
here, paid us a visit. He had been touring through the west and 
was on his way home to the Old Country, very much impressed with 
all he had seen. We were all very glad to see him again. After an 




16 


THE ASHBURIAN 


absence of two years, he had not forgotten a single boy’s face or 
name, a fact which greatly impressed the boys. 

On October 19th, the first of our winter lectures took place. 
The lecturer was Mr. Bowden and he gave us a very interesting 
talk on London. He illustrated his remarks with some excellent 
slides, some made from his own photographs. The Headmaster 
returned thanks to the lecturer and invited him to come again. 
The lantern was very successfully managed by Lowe I and Mac- 
Laren I. 

On November 13th, the Rev. J. Ditchfield visited us and 
talked to us in the gymnasium after morning school. He was on 
his way home after a tour round the world. His remarks were 
very much to the point and his talk was most interesting. Before 
he went he asked the Headmaster to let us off afternoon school. 

After the rugby season was over, we played “soccer” for about 
three weeks. This was quite an innovation and became very popu¬ 
lar. The only drawback was that we could find no team to play 
against. However, the Vth Form challenged the rest of the school: 
two matches were played, but the issue is still undecided, as no 
goal was scored in either game. Next year we hope some team 
in the neighbourhood will challenge us, as we shall be able to put 
quite a strong team into the field. 

On November 15th, Cadet Corps drill started. Captain Davis 
and the new Sergeant-Major have good material to work on and 
our review in the summer should excel all previous reviews. 
Irvin and Bate are the two new lieutenants. 

On November 18th roll call was held in the new school room. 
Not a boy was late, as everyone was anxious to see what it was 
like. It certainly is a magnificent room, very bright and well 
ventilated. 


Reflections on Soccer 

Our rugby fixtures having been concluded early, we decided to 
fill in the remainder of the season with a few games of soccer, so 
having obtained an able referee in Mr. Wiggins, and with a soccer 
ball at our disposal, we proceeded to acquire the rudiments of the 
game. Unfortunately, we had to content ourselves with practice 
games, rumours of our prowess having apparently reached the 



THE ASHBURIAN 


17 


teams we wished to play, causing them to be afflicted with cold feet. 
In spite of this there was no lack of enthusiasm and our games were 
fought out with vigour, particularly the two games between the 
Vth Form and the rest of the school, in which the determination 
of the respective defences prevailed over the wiles of the opposing 
forwards and prevented any scoring. 

Considering the short time we had for practice the improve¬ 
ment, noticeable in many of our players, was quite remarkable, 
* and once the desire to be continually on the ball was conquered 
and we were content to remain in our places, it became evident that 
we should have a useful team. MacLaren I developed into a capable 
back, being a hard man to get past and clearing well under diffi¬ 
culties; Lowe I, Cory, Bate, and Maunsell were all useful halves, 
whilst from Wood, Hazen, Carling I, Masson and Jackson for the 
inside positions and MacMahon, Rivers and Lelievre as outsides, 
a clever forward line could be chosen. In the responsible position 
of goal-keeper, Graham was rapidly acquiring a safe pair of hands. 

Altogether, we thoroughly enjoyed our games, and were only 
sorry that we could not find a rival combination against whom we 
might measure our strength. 


A Chat on our Gymnasium Work 

The foundation of a boy’s athletic life, is undoubtedly the 
important work of Physical Exercise and Gymnastics. 

Ashbury boys have shown themselves keen on all manly sports, 
and are now displaying that tenacity of purpose that the gymnast 
must have to make himself proficient in this necessary branch of a 
college boy’s education. 

There is, too, a fascination all its own in mastering the work, 
for in developing the muscles and increasing the stamina, it makes 
the boy self reliant and courageous. 

How we all long to be fit and strong, and yet we can be so if 
we will but work with a will, and put our heart and soul in our work. 

Parents and guardians can be assured that every boy can make 
himself physically fit if he will do this. 

The writer himself was a poor specimen of physique at fourteen 
years of age, but was induced by as high an authority as “Sir James 
Sawyer” to stick to the Gym. 

I am speaking truth when I say that I have never since had to 
be attended by a doctor. 

How much more do we enjoy life when we attain that perfect 
combination “Mens sana in Corpore sano”. The enthusiasm the 
Ashbury students have shown in the gym. this fall has been very 



18 


THE ASHBURIAN 


gratifing to the writer, and at a future early date the boys hope 
to give a demonstration of the progress they have made. 

A college medal is to be given this winter, to every boy gaining 
a certain proficiency in gymnastics, so it behoves our boys to strive 
for the honor. Let us hope that many will succeed. 



PROF. HEWITT 

Try this exercise for increasing your lung powers. In the 
fresh air, stand with the heels together, shoulders braced back, 
take hold of left wrist with right hand, breathe out through the 
mouth emptying the lungs, at the same time raising slowly the arms 
above head. 

Now close the mouth, and as you slowly breathe in through 
the nose, lower the arms slowly, and lifting the chest as high as 
possible. 

Repeat about twenty times. 


W. H. H. 














THE ASHBURIAN 


19 


Rifle Shooting 

Now that the football season is over, shooting is again to the 
fore. As usual we have lost some of our best shots, but we have 
gained others who, though perhaps not so good at present, show 
great possibilities for the future. The interest in shooting seems 
to be still on the increase and everything looks well for a successful 
season. 

The Canadian Rifle League have adopted a new method of 
scoring this year—the decimal system-—-and it is being used in the 
O’Connor Cup matches as well. Soon after the last Ashburian 
was published, we received from the Secretary of the League, a 
handsome Shield, for coming out second in the matches last winter. 
We have also got two new trophies; a beautiful Challenge Cup for 
Junior Shooting, presented by Mr. F. E. Cox, a former master; 
and a cup for shooting at five hundred yards, which was given by 
Boyd, who was captain of Uie shooting team last year, and who 
also won the O’Connor Cup last winter. 

At the time of going to press some four or five matches have 
been shot in the O’Connor Cup series, and Read appears to be in the 
lead so far. In the Junior Series, Panet is doing some very good 
shooting and evidently intends to capture the Cox Cup. However, 
there are several other juniors who show signs of becoming good 
shots and they will be valuable men on the various teams, in a few 
years. 

For this year’s team we will have six or seven who shot for the 
school last winter and there will be no difficulty about finding new 
shots to fill the remaining places. 

E. J. L. 


Old Boys' News 

Married. In St. Andrew’s Church, Ottawa, on October 16, 
1912, Norah, fifth daughter of the late G. W. McCullough, Ottawa, 
to George Bryson (1900-4), son of the Lion. George Bryson, Fort 
Coulonge, P. Q. 

Married. In Christ Church Cathedral, Ottawa, on October 9, 
1912, Miss Dorothy Gordon Brown, daughter of Arthur Gordon 
Brown, of Ottawa, to Louis Talbot White (1891-6) second son of 
Lieut.-Col. Fred. White, C.M.G., Comptroller of the Royal North¬ 
west Mounted Police, Ottawa. 



20 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Married. In St. Augustine’s Church, Winnipeg, on Septem¬ 
ber 18, 1912, Miss Hazel Gwendoline Richardson, eldest daughter 
of R. L. Richardson, Esq., Ex-M.P., of Winnipeg, to Kenneth Clarke 
Macpherson (1897-1906), son of Lieut.-Col. J. Pennington Mac- 
pliers on, Ottawa. 

It is always gratifying to record the promotions of Old Boys. 
The latest to be advanced in the Permanent Forces is Captain A. 
Z. Palmer (1891-8), who has received the rank of major in the 
Royal Canadian Artillery. Major Palmer, who is one of Ashbury’s 
fhvt pupils, was educated at R.M.C., Kingston and upon leaving 
there in 1900, entered the Imperial Forces as second lieutenant in 
the Royal Artillery. In 1902, he was promoted to the rank of 
lieutenant, in the same, and two vears later was transferred to the 
Royal Canadian Artillery. He received his captaincy in 1906. 

C. W. A. Barwis (1903-11), was one of R. M. C.’s representatives 
at the Intercollegiate Tennis Tournament held in Toronto in October. 
He had hard luck, however, and was defeated both in the singles and 
doubles. 

Ashbury had its usual number of Old Boys on the senior foot¬ 
ball organizations this year. Jack Lewis, who played outside wing 
on the McGill team, Intercollegiate Champions, was at Ashbury 
from 1900 to 1904. Grey Masson (1908-9) also played in several 
games with McGill. On the R.M.C. team, probable Intermediate 
Champions, we had two representatives, C. W. A. Barwis (1903-11), 
who starred on the half-line, and Fernie Gendron (1908-10), outside 
wing. Charlie Fleming (1902-11) played in some games with the 
Ottawas, runner’s-up in the Interprovincial. Leigh Bishop (1902-8) 
was in the scrimmage of the Trinity College team. 

Don Ellard has been playing for the Regina Team. 


Life on the Sea 

The following letter has been sent to the Headmaster by an 
Old Boy. 

H. M. S. Dreadnought, 
Portsmouth. 

Dear Mr. Woollcombe: 

Replying to your request re the way in which the mid¬ 
shipmen of the Royal Canadian Navy are spending their time on 
H.M.S. Dreadnought, it is really hard for me to give you more than a 
general idea, as the work varies so much and there are so many 
details and duties, but, whether it is “On watch”, “ Gun or Torpedo 



THE ASH BUR I AN 


21 


Coaling 




or 


just 


practise/’ “Navigation”, “Physical Drill”, 

“Shore leave”, it is all intensely interesting. 

When the ship is at sea, we are divided into four “Watches”. 
During the time you are on duty your station is on the bridge 
under the “Officer of the Watch”, who is directly responsible for the 
safety of the ship under the Captain. Every now and then we 
depart from the above schedule and give up a fortnight to the study 
of engineering, when the watches are kept in the engine-room 
instead of on the bridge: the time being given up to learning the 
duties of an Engineer. To any one who has Mechanical inclinations, 
this part of the work is very interesting. 

Generally speaking, when we are lying in harbor the routine of 
duties are: In the morning: Signal work and Drill. Forenoon: 
Navigation; and in the Afternoon: Lectures, etc., on the different 
subjects in connection with our work. 

As a rule, on Mondays (forenoon) we endulge in what are 
termed “General Drills”, in which the whole ship’s company takes 
part. These Drills or evolutions embrace such work as “Out Net 
Defence”, “Away all boats”, “Collision Stations”, “Out Bower 
Anchor”, “Away all Wire Howsers”, “Pull around the Fleet” and 
‘ ‘ Fire Stations.” 

You can really see by the above orders, that when the whole 
Fleet takes part, as they generally do, these Drills excite the keenest 
competition and the excitement always runs very high, and the 
ship executing the order first, gains for herself quite a reputation 
in the Fleet. 

Another delightful part of our life on board is visiting the 
different PORTS. Not alone in England, but in other countries; 
our last cruise being to Spain. 

In fact, I think this is just about the ideal life for a boy. 

Very sincerely yours, 


H. Trennick Bate, R.C.N. 


Scouting 

There is not very much to record in the scouting movement, 
as there has been nothing to do during October and November. 
There was an important meeting held at the beginning of the term 
to appoint successors to Boyd and Boyce. After discussing the 
matter at full length, the President put it to the vote. The result 
was an almost unanimous verdict in favour of Patrol Leaders Ross 
and Patterson. Both accepted this new distinction conferred on 
them and under their able guidance, scouting should forge ahead. 



22 


THE ASH BUR I AN 


On September 23rd there was no shooting in the afternoon on 
the indoor range. A considerable number came down to try their 
hand and some showed themselves very proficient . 

On October 8th there was a meeting of the scouts at which 
letters were read by the Secretary, from Boyd and Boyce. 

On October 12th there was another afternoon’s shooting for 
the scouts. 

On October 19th a cycle trip was planned to MacGregor Lake. 
About twelve able bodied scouts volunteered to go with Mr. Creeth, 
but unfortunately the outing had to be abandoned owing to rain. 
It will, however, be something to look forward to next year. 


Contemporaries 

The Editor begs to acknowledge the receipt of the following 
contemporaries: 

The Meteor (2). 

The Cheltonian (2). 

Bradfield College Chronicle. 

The Tonbridgian. 

St. John’s College Magazine. 

The Albaiiian. 

The School Magazine , Lower Canada (2). 

The Academy Bulletin. 

The Wykehamist. 

Trinity College School Record. 

The Western Star. 


His Speech to His Executioners. 

“If you would like to say a few words before we string you up,” 
said the spokesman of the vigilance committee, sternly, “you may 
have the chance.” 

“There is something I would like to say,” responded the con¬ 
demned horse thief, pale but self-possessed. “All I ask is that you 
will permit me to say it without interruption.” 

“Go ahead,” said the spokesman, laconically, “we’ll let you 
finish.” 




THE ASHBURIAN 


23 


‘‘Then, gentlemen,” began the condemned man with deep 
emotion, “I have a few words of solemn warning to utter. In the 
innocent and happier days of my young manhood, before I came to 
Arizona and fell into evil ways, I was engaged in a useful and honor¬ 
able calling. Had I never abandoned it I might have been still a 
respectable and upright citizen. Though I have become a bad man 
and am about to receive my just punishment, I have always kept a 
memento of those happier days. In my valise, gentlemen, you 
will find a copy of a little work entitled ‘The American Voter’s 
Text Book,’ of which I sold nearly 1,000 copies in one county in 
Pennsylvania alone. It is indispensable to every man who would 
keep himself thoroughly informed as to those questions concerning 
which it is the duty of every citizen to be fully advised. You will 
find in that little volume, gentlemen, full and accurate information 
as to the political platforms of all the parties, election returns from 
every state in the Union, names of members of congress, judges of 
the various courts, etc., with a mass of miscellaneous statistics and 
facts never before grouped together in one work. Bound in cloth 
or half cloth the price of this valuable book has always been” 

He paused a moment to wipe the scalding tears from his eyes. 
When he looked about him again his audience had vanished. He 
was saved! 


Jokes 

Benevolent Visitor—‘ £ And what are you going to be, my little 
man?” 

Little Boy (after a huge dinner)—“I’m going to be—sick.” 

Teacher—“Well, Tommy, you were not present yesterday. 
Were you detained at home in consequence of the inclemency of 
the weather?” 

Tommy—“No, ma’am, 1 couldn’t come ’cause of the rain.” 

First Farmhand—Now, what do you suppose that old hen is 
eating them tacks for? 

Second Farmhand—Perhaps she’s goin’ to lay a carpet! 

“Walter, did you give your brother the best part of the apple, 
as I told you to?” asked the mother. 

“Yes, mother,” said Walter, “1 gave him the seeds. He can 
plant ’em and have a whole orchard.” 




24 


THE ASHBURIAN 


“That Jones boy who used to work for you wants to hire out 
to me. Is he steady?” 

“Steady? If he was any steadier he’d be motionless.” 

The small boy was being reproved by his mother. 

“Why can’t you be good?” she asked. 

“I’ll be good for a nickel,” he said. 

“Ah!” responded the mother, “you want to be bribed. You 
should copy your father and be good for nothing.” 

Little James, while at a neighbor’s was given a piece of bread 
and butter, and politely said, “Thank you.” 

“That’s right, James,” said the lady. “I like to hear little 
boys say, ‘ Thank you.’” 

“Well,” rejoined James, “if you want to hear me say it again, 
you might put some jam on it.” 

Herbert stood on a chair. The chair stood in the pantry. 
The jam stood on the shelf. Herbert’s mother stood on the thres¬ 
hold. Herbert stood his ground. “My son,” said the mother, 
pointing at him with astonishment, “I am s-u-r-p-r-i-s-e-d! To 
think that my little boy would do a thing like that.” Herbert, 
resourceful and not at all abashed, looked his mother straight in 
the eye. “Please do not interfere with the minnuvers of a boy 
scout,” he said. “A boy scout?” “Yes, mother, after supplies.” 

“Howard,” said the visitor, “are you going to be a minister, 
like your father, when you grow up?” 

“No, ma’am,” answered Howard, “I am going to be a waiter.” 

“Why?” queried the surprised visitor. 

“’Cause papa says that all things come to him who waits,”' 
was the reply. 

A German farmer was in search of a horse. 

“I’ve got just the horse for you,” said the liveryman. “He’s 
five years old, sound as a dollar and goes ten miles without stopping.” 

The German threw his hands skyward. “Not for me,” he said, 
“not for me. I live eight miles from town, und mit dot horse I haf 
to valk back two miles.” 

Little Brother—“What’s etiquette?” 

Little Bigger Brother—“It’s saying ‘No, thank you,’ when you 
want to holler ‘ Gimme”! 


THE ASHBURIAN 


25 


The two small boys of the family were enjoying the first snow 
of the season, but their mother, who was watching them from her 
room, soon rapped on the window. 

“Johnny,” she called “why don’t you let your little brother 
have your sled part of the time?” 

‘ 1 1 do, ma. I take it going down-hill, and he has it going back.” 

The motorist emerged from beneath the car and struggled for 
breath. His helpful friend, holding an oil can, beamed on him: 

“I’ve just given the cylinder a thorough oiling, Dick.” 

“Cylinder?” howled the motorist, “That wasn’t the cylinder. 
It was my ear!” 


Spoonerisms 

What is a spoonerism ? It is a transposition of the initial letters 
of two or more words in the same sentence. Below are given a few 
examples to illustrate how ludicrous can be the effect of such a 
change. 

A clergyman, reading out the first line of a hymn, said: “Tin- 
quering tongs their kitles kake,” and then seeing his mistake corrected 
himself and said, “Kingquering kongs their titles take.” 

The same clergyman announced another hymn with the words: 
“From Iceland’s greasy mountains,” instead of “From Greenland’s 
icy mountains.” 

Another clergyman during his sermon said: “We all know what 
it is to hold a half-warmed fish in our bosoms.” 

Finding his seat taken in church an old man said to the offender: 
“Are you aware, sir, that you are occupying my pie?” 

It is a little awkward when at table to be asked to pass “some 
pigs’ fleas” or “some of that stink puff.” 

After dinner it is better “to snatch a hasty pipe,” than “hatch 
a pasty snipe.” 

‘ ‘ Don’t forget to boil your icicle” is good advice to a cyclist. 

After a long walk a man said he had walked “fifteen miles as 
the fly crows.” 



26 


THE ASHBURIAN 


An actor once said: 11 Stand back my lord, and let the parson 
cough.” 

A grocer came round for orders and asked whether he should call 
every day. The lady of the house surprised him by saying: “No 
thanks, I steal at the doors.” 

A FEW MORE HOWLERS. 

A renegade is a man who kills a king. 

In India a man out of cask may not marry a woman out of an¬ 
other cask. 

The Salic law is that you must take everything with a pinch of 

salt. 


The Zodiac is the zoo of the sky, where lions, goats and other 
animals go after they are dead. 

The Pharisees were people who liked to show off their goodness by 
praying in synonyms. 

An abstract noun is something you can’t see when you are looking 
for it. 

A little knowledge is a tangarine. 

La maison cpie Jean a batie: 11 The house of John the Baptist.” 

A man was asked what he thought absentmindedness was, and 
he made this answer. If a man who was hurrying to catch a train 
thought that he had left his watch at home, and, if he took the watch 
out of his pocket to see if he had time to go back and get it, I think 
I’d call him a little absentminded. 

Three Questions. 

If the wind blew, would the clothes reel? 

If theIVth Form played against theVth Form, would Small get 
Biggar? 

If Ashbury had beaten St. Alban’s, would it Lower Canada? 

1 ‘ Dont’ you find that rising in the army is rather slow?” 

* 1 Not in my case. I belong to the aviation corps.” 


THE ASHBURIAN 


The teacher in natural history had received more or less satis¬ 
factory replies to her questions, and finally she asked: 

“What little boy can tell me where the home of the swallow is?” 

Long silence, then a hand waved. 

“Well, Bobbie, where is it?” 

“The home of the swallow,” declared Bobbie, seriously, “is in 
the stummick.” 

The College boy had just returned home after a long spell at 
school, where, among other studies, the noble art of boxing had been 
frequently indulged in. 

Sister, gazing fondly at her big brother, “Oh Jack what lovely 
black eyes you have.” 

Jack (abstractedly), “Yes, sis, I’ve had them blacker than this.” 













NOTICE 


We call attention to the 
fact that Single Copies of 
this Magazine are 25c each. 
The Yearly Subscription 
is $1.00. 

We hope to see a long list 
of Old Boys among our 
subscribers and for our 
part promise, through this 
medium, to keep them 
well posted as to events 
at the Old School. 






HERE ARE THREE REASONS WHY YOU SHOULD ALWAYS 

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II. THEY ARE SAFE BECAUSE THEY WILL NOT IGNITE IF 
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III. EVERY STICK IS A MATCH. EVERY MATCH IS A 
SURE LIGHT. 


SILENTS, SAFETIES, SULPHURS, PARLORS AND 

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Designs and Prices Submitted on Request 

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Tha Chapel”—Ashbury College. 














































The Ashburian 


Editorial Staff. 

Editor-in-Chief — Mr. C. H. Hooper. 
Assistant Editor —E. J. Lowe. 

Sports Editor — W. H. Davis. 

Rifle Shooting — E. J. Lowe. 

Artists —D. Verner, W. Thompson. 
Secretary-Treasurer — Mr. D. E. C. Wood. 


EDITORIAL 

At the end of the summer holidays it is comparatively easy 
to write an editorial. There are the pleasant memories of a delightful 
summer to be enlarged upon; the general joy experienced by both 
masters and boys alike at once more assembling at the School; 
the pleasant anticipation of a successful football season just ahead; 
and the final admonishing remarks regarding a good term’s work 
before us all. 

Even before the summer holidays or the Christmas holidays, 
it is easy enough to expatiate on the excellence of the work just 
completed, and to review in imagination the pleasures to come— 
in the former case winding up with sage advice regarding the risks 
of drowning before school re-assembles, and thus losing the accu¬ 
mulated knowledge of a whole year; in the latter case pointing 
out the disadvantages of gluttony and thus losing—the Christmas 
dinner. 

At this time of year, however, the difficulties of finding suitable 
themes for the paragraphs of an editorial are many. We may 
look back and see only a detestable winter in which skating and 
skiing are rare, and tobogganing non-existent. Looking forward, 
we see a short breathing space at Easter—just sufficient to give 
one time to realize that the exams.—R. M. C. first—are almost 
upon us. There is little comfort in that thought. 

Again an editor is hedged about with rules, much as a king 
is with divinity. He must be : (1) impersonal; (2) impartial; 

(3) interesting, and above all things he must be—(4) original. While 







9 


THE ASHBURIAN 


interesting his readers with his originality, he must in no wise be 
frivolous; on the other hand while giving sound advice, he must 
not injure the sale of the magazine. 

Truly his lot is not an enviable one, but there is one consolation 
left to him—nobody ever reads the editorial anyway. Here is 
comfort at least—he speaks to empty benches, much as a wearisome 
M. P. does in the House of Commons. The other M.P.’s send out 
for newspapers to amuse themselves with until the bore has blown 
himself out; the weary magazine reader thankfully turns to the 
jokes (in the same way) as an antidote to the indigestible mass 
of good advice in the editorial. 


THE CHAPEL 

When some four years ago the plans were being prepared for 
our present school buildings, it was fully realized that a chapel 
ought to be included; but, alas, lack of funds compelled the Directors 
to strike out this important item, and to leave the realization of 
their wishes to a later date. In January 1912, the Headmaster, 
believing that if a determined effort were made the school could 
have the benefit of a chapel at practically no cost to the school 
authorities, made up his mind to appeal to the Patrons and friends 
of the school for donations towards a Chapel Fund. Obtaining 
the consent of the Directors, be at once set out upon an active cam¬ 
paign to raise the necessary money. The task while at first sight a 
difficult one, was made comparatively easy by the kind and sym¬ 
pathetic manner in which the great majority of those who were 
approached responded to his appeal. Patrons and friends of all 
religious denominations willingly contributed to the good work 
which they realized would not merely add to the prestige and use¬ 
fulness of the school, but also be a distinct help to the religious life 
of its members. 

By the beginning of May over five thousand dollars ($5,000) 
had been subscribed, of which no one donation was for an amount 
larger than two hundred dollars ($200), and the great majority 
for much smaller sums. Meanwhile, plans had been prepared by 
Mr. Allan Keefer an “Old Boy”, and early in that month the work 
was commenced upon the understanding that the Chapel would be 
ready for opening early in September. Bricklayers and cement 
workers, carpenters and painters worked faithfully and on time, 
and as far as they were concerned all would have been ready by 
September 1st, but as in so many building operations we “reckoned 
without our plumbers”, and thanks to an “unavoidable delay” 
by the representatives of that old and celebrated trade, the Chapel 



THE ASH BIT RIAN 


3 


was not ready for its opening ceremony, until just before Christmas: 
and the opening was- arranged to take place on January 19th 1913, 
the first Sunday after the Christmas Holidays. 

The Ashburian takes this opportunity on behalf of the school 
of publicly thanking all those friends—a list of whom is appended— 
who so kindly contributed towards the supply of a great need, and 
to the acquisition of a great help in our school life. It is a very 
gratifying feature that so many friends have shewn their interest 
in the school and in the work we are doing in so generous and practical 
a manner. 

The Chapel Building is a two-storied structure, simple yet 
ecclesiastical in appearance, and thanks to the skill and good taste 
of our architect, in harmony with the main school building to which 
it is attached. It is built of solid brick and, like the rest of the school 
is of fire-proof cnstruction. In the lower flat, which is entirely 
above grade, is a large assembly study room of which we have 
long felt the need, and a smaller room for the use of the sixth form. 
This part of the building is particularly well lighted and ventilated, 
fitted with the most modern system of steam heating and is arti¬ 
ficially lighted with the latest invention in what is known as indirect 
electric light. So whether by day or after sunset there is no strain 
on the eyes, and the hygienic conditions are such that it is a pleasure 
to work there. The Chapel forms the upper story and the approach 
to it by a short stairway leading from the main hall. When one 
enters one is struck both by its simplicity and by its beauty. The 
walls are finished in dark red pressed brick , and the seats and stalls 
are of dark stained ash. The roof is stained to match the seats, 
and the windows, ecclesiastical in design, are glazed with saffron 
coloured cathedral glass. The Chancel, which runs the whole 
width of the Chapel, is simply yet artistically furnished with reading 
desk, stalls and lectern, while the Sanctuary, separated by a neat 
brass railing, contains a handsome and finely carved altar with dorsal 
hangings and brass ornaments, a handsomely carved episcopal 
chair and clergy stalls. The whole effect is artistic and peaceful, 
and cannot fail to be helpful in promoting a spirit and attitude of 
reverent worship. One important and most necessary article of 
furnishing we yet lack, and that is an Organ. But we have faith 
that many of those who have so kindly helped us in the work of 
building our Chapel will be ready, when asked, to complete this 
good work by furthering an “Organ campaign” which we believe 
our Headmaster contemplates carrying on in the near future. The 
whole sum needed to defray the cost of the Chapel has, we are 
glad to state, been now subscribed, and with the exception of about 
$300 all paid in. 

The opening services were as stated above, held on January 
19th, the special preacher for the day being The Rev. Dr. Rexford, 


4 


THE ASHBURIAN 


late Rector of the Montreal High School, and at present Principal 
of the Montreal Diocesan Theological College. The first service 
held in the Chapel was a celebration of the Holy Communion at 8 
a.m., Dr. Rexford being the Celebrant. Morning Prayer followed 
at 11 a.m., when an excellent and very practical talk was given to 
the boys by Dr. Rexford. The Dedication Service was held at 7 
p.m., when the Chapel was crowded to the doors, every available 
seat, both permanent and temporary being occupied. The Clergy 
present were: His Grace The Archbishop of Ottawa, The Arch¬ 
deacon of Ottawa, Dr. Rexford (the Preacher), Dr. Voorhis of New 
York, The Rev. T. Garrett and the Headmaster. After choral 
Evensong, The Archbishop solemnly dedicated the Chapel to the 
service of God, and invoked the Divine Blessing on the work to be 
done there in the future. Dr. Rexford preached a most thoughtful 
and striking sermon, and the whole service was marked by a spirit 
of reverence and earnestness which will long be remembered by 
those who were present. 


Donors to Chapel Fund 

Allan, J. Roberts Esq. Chevrier, Miss. 

Ami, Mrs. Codville, J. J. Esq. 

Anderson, Col. W. P. C.M.G. 

Archbishopof Ottawa,His Grace theDevlin, R. J. Esq. 
Ault, C. S. Esq. Dickey, Capt. O. S. 


Bate, Sir H. N. 

Bate, H. B. Esq. 

Bate, J. M. Esq. 

Bate, T. C. Esq. 

Birkett, T. M. Esq. 

Bishop, L. Esq. 

Blakeney, H. Esq. 

Bostock, Hon. H. 

Boyce, A. C. Esq. K.C. M.P. 
Bronson, W. G. Esq. 

Bryson, Mrs. 

Burns, G. Esq. 

Burn, D. Esq. 

Butterworth, J. G. Esq. 

F ’ : 

Campbell, W. J. Esq. 
Garling, F. W. Esq. 
Cartwright, Capt. A. D. 
Cassels, Hon. Justice. 
Chanonhouse, Dr. R. H. 


Eastcott, W. Merrill, Esq. 

Eddy, E. B. Esq. 

Egan, H. K. Esq. 

Eliot, Lt. Col. C. 

Finnie, D. M. Esq. 

Fleming, Sir Sandford, K.C.M.G. 
Fraser, H. Esq. 

Fraser, J. B. Esq. 

Fraser, W. H. A. Esq. 

Garrett, Rev. Thomas. 

Gibbs, Mrs. 

Gill, R. Esq. 

Gilmour, J. Esq. The late. 
Gilmour, S. C. Esq. 

Gilmour, D. G. Esq. 

Graham, A. J. Esq. 

Greene, E. Kirk, Esq. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


5 


Harvey, J. B. Esq. 

Heney, F. A. Esq. 

Hennessy, J. W. Esq. 
Hughson, W. C. Esq. 

Inderwick, Mrs. 

Irvin, C. A. Esq. 

Irvin, J. S. Esq. 

Irwin, Col. D. T., C. M. G. 

Jackson, J. A. Esq. 

Johnston, R. A. A. Esq. 

Keefer, T. Esq. C.M.G. 

Keefer, C. H. Esq. 

Kingsmill, Admiral. 

Koelle, H. H. Vachell, Esq. 

Lambart, F. E. Esq. 
Lethbridge, J. E. Esq. 
Lindsay, Capt. St. G. 

Linton, E. Esq. 

MacCarthy, Dr. G. S. 
MacDonald, Gen. D. 
MacLaren, Albert, Esq. 
Maclvor, Mrs. 

MacMahon, Mrs.Darcy, 
Macpherson, Col. Pennington. 
Magrath, C. A. Eq. 

Masson, R. Esq. 

Mannsell, Lt. Col. Stopford. 
Montgomery, S. J. Esq. 

Moore, W. W. Esq. 

Morris, R. S. Esq. 

Mulligan, Dr. E. A. 

McGiverin, H. B. Esq. 
McLachlin, E. M. Esq. 
McLachlin, E. Esq. 

Naismith, P. L. Esq. 
Newcombe, E. L. Esq. K. C. 
Newcombe, E. L. Esq. 

O'Halloran, G. F. Esq. 

Orde, J. F. Esq. K. C. 


Palmer, Capt. A. 7. 

Palmer, L. Esq. 

Parker, A. G. Esq. 

Patterson, Capt. J. H. 

Perley, Hon. G. H. 

Powell, C. Berkley, Esq. 

Price, W. Esq. 

Reid, G. E. Esq. 

Renaud, E. J. Esq. 

Rivers, Mrs. V. B. 

Rogers, V. V. Esq. 

Ross, H. LeB. Esq. 

Rowley, W. H. Esq. J. P. 
Rutherford, Col. R. W. 

St. Laurent, A. Esq. 

Sherwood, Lt. Col. A. P., G.M.G. 
Shipman, C. S. Esq. 

Small, Dr. H. B. 

Smart, G. B. Esq. 

Smith, Rev. Lennox I. 

Soper, Warren J. Esq. 

Soper, Elbert N. Esq. 

Southam, Wilson M. Esq. 
Stewart, Mrs. A. 

Taschereau, R. Harwood, Esq. 
Taylor, Plunkett, Esq. 

Thoburn & Abbott, Messrs. 
Thomas, Mrs. J. 

Thompson, Lt. Col. A. 
Thompson, G. F. Esq. 

Tilley, V. D. Esq. 

Tupper, C. Esq. 

Verner, J. W. D. Esq. 

Ward, Lt. Col. W. R. 

Watson, J. F. Esq. 

White, Col. F., C.M.G. 

Whitney, E. C. Esq. 

Wicksteed, Miss L. C. 

Wickware, A. S. Esq. 

Woods, Lt. Col. J. W. 

Wright, Ruggles, Esq. 


6 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Donors of Furnishings for the Chapel. 


Bate, Mrs. H. G.Altar rails and Kneeling Mats. 

Carling, Mrs. F. W.. .Altar. 

Gill, Mrs. R.Altar Frontal. 

Fleming, Mrs. H-.Lectern. 

Fleming, Mrs. S. H.Bible. 

Heney, Mrs. F. A.Chancel Chair. 

Hooper, C. H., Esq. ) „ . 

Wiggins, A. B. H., Esq. \ Candlesticks. 

Lowe, Rev. J. J.Cross. 

Mackay, Rev. J. and Mrs.Altar Linen. 

Read, Mrs. C. E.Alms Dish. 

Weston, Mrs. H.Altar Linen. 

Woods, Mrs. J. W.Bell and Belfry. 

Wood, Mrs. Cecil.Book Markers. 

Woollcombe, Rev. G. P. and Mrs. Vases. 

Articles of furniture still required, for which requests are made: 


An Organ (Estimated cost about $1,800). 
Altar Frontal. 

Dorsals. 

Hymn Board and Numbers. 

Carpet for Centre Aisle. 

Altar Books and Stands. 


A friend of ours travelling in Ireland, stopped for a drink of 
milk at a white cottage with a thatched roof, and as he sipped his 
refreshment he noted on a center table, under a glass dome, a brick 
with a faded rose upon the top of it. 

“Why do you cherish in this way,” our friend said to his host, 
“that common brick and that dead rose?” 

“Shure, sir, was the reply, “there’s certain memories attachin’ 
to them. Do you see that big dent in my head? Well, it was made 
by that brick.” 

“But the rose?” said our friend. 

His host smiled quietly. 

“The rose,” he explained, “is off the grave of the man that 
threw the brick!” 

A little boy seeing an elephant for the first time, shouted: 

“0 pop, look at the big cow with her horns in her mouth eating 
hay with her tail.” 

















THE ASH BUR I AN 


3FaUrn 3fbote 

I came to where my soul abode 
A year ago. 

And call'd to mind how life then showed, 
But was not so. 

I saw in chambers bleak and bare, 

In shatter’d fragments past repair, 

Cast, down, forsaken, everywhere, 

Fallen idols. 

They came like gods with eyes of truth 
That blinded me: 

Or in the heyday of my youth 
I would not see. 

But Nemesis came swift and just, 

And all in which I put my trust 
Lay there dishonour’d in the dust, 

Fallen idols. 

And gladly then I cried: “ Defeat 
Brings strength anew— 

Henceforth I spurn the counterfeit 
And seek the true: 

Farewell, each desecrated shrine 
That held a promise hail’d divine— 

Not all in vain I made you mine, 

Fallen idols.” 

Always I shall return again 
At each year’s end, 

And find new fragments heap’d amain 
No skill can mend. 

There yearly shall I view a horde 

%j %j 

Of gods I crowned of free accord, 

Then left unhallow’d, undeplor’d, 

Fallen idols. 





8 


THE ASHBURIAN 


HOCKEY MATCHES 


Date. 

Match. Played at 


Score. 

*Feb. 

1st. 

Ashbury v. St. Albans 

Home 

Lost 

4-3 

a 

7th. 

Ashbury III v. Queens 

Home 

Lost 

3-1 

* « 

8 th. 

Ashbury v. Lower Canada 

Away 

Draw 

1-1 

u 

8th. 

Ashbury II v. Lower Canada II Away 

Lost 

5-0 

u 

14th. 

Ashbury v. Old Boys 

Home 

Won 

9-7 

u 

15th. 

Ashbury II v. Cliffsides 

Home 

Lost 

3-1 

a 

21st. 

Ashbury Intermediates v. 






Dominion Church Team 

Home 

Won 

4-2 

* « 

22nd. 

Ashbury v. St. Albans 

Away 

Lost 

8-5 

u 

22nd. 

Ashbury III v. The Stars 

Home 

Lost 

4-1 

*Mar. 

1st. 

Ashbury v. Lower Canada 

Home. 

Lost 

7-1 

u 

1st. 

Ashbury II v. Lower Canada 

II Home 

Draw 

2-2 


*Carling Cupj_Matches. 


CARLING CUP MATCHES. 

Ashbury y. St. Albans. 

This was the first match of the series, and was played in Ottawa 
on February 1st from 12-1:30. Both teams were at full strength 
and a very exciting game was witnessed, though the play was very 
ragged at times. It was decided to play two periods of thirty 
minutes, and as the ice was rather heavy most of the players had 
had enough when the whistle blew for time. The game was very 
even and although the score at half time was 2-0 in favour of St. 
Alban’s the home team had had just as many chances of scoring. 
Our chief fault in the first half was our inability to shoot. A few 
long shots at the start might have changed the issue of the game. 
Percy Lesueur our coach impressed this upon his players in the 
interval. And in the second half it was not long before Verner 
scored after a magnificent effort. Shortly after Rivers scored 
from a rebound, and the score was 2 all. At this point our defence 
suddenly failed. And St. Alban’s scored 2 goals in quick succession. 
We added one more before time, leaving St. Alban’s the winners by 
4 goals to 3. It was a fairly clean game only two players being sent 
off for a minute, and was well managed by T. Carling, an “Old 
Boy”, and Mr. Mainwaring. With regard to the individual play, 
Wickware’s display in goal deserves mention. He seemed to stop 
everything, and he made some wonderful saves. Cory played a 
great game on the defence, and his body-checking was useful. 
Hennessey, the captain, was off colour owing to a bad cold. Verner 



THE ASHBURIAN 


9 


and^Maclaren worked hard all the time, but Lelievre had a day off, 
andmever seemed to be in his place. Masson was handicapped by 
hisjWeight, and his place was taken at half time by Rivers. 


The line up was as follows: 


Goal. 

Point. 

Cover Point 

Rover. 

Left. 

Center. 

Right. 


Wickware. 

Cory. 

Hennessey. 
Verner. 
Maclaren. 
Masson, Rivers. 
Lelievre. 


Ashbury v. Lower Canada. 


This match was played at the Arena from 10-11 on Saturday, 
February 1, and after a tremendous struggle resulted in a draw, 
each side having scored one goal. It was a most exciting game to 
watch, and it was the wonderful performance of Wickware in goal 
which saved us from defeat. In the first half, he stopped shot 
after shot, and he remained perfectly cool and collected through 
it all. In the second half, he had less to do as we did most of the 
attacking. At half time there was no score. In the second half, 
we started off with a tremendous burst and after five minutes play 
Verner, with one of his spectacular efforts, scored with a beautiful 
shot. This spurred on the home team, and they bombarded our 
goal for a time, but Wickware was invincible. Both Hennessey 
and Maclaren had opportunities for-scoring, but they failed at the 
last moment. Three minutes before time Lower Canada scored. 
Desperate efforts were made by both sides in the last three minutes, 
but no further score was made. Cory was unable to play, as he 
was feeling very sick. His place was taken by Code, who performed 
very creditably. Verner played one of his best games, but the feature 
of the match was Wickware’s display in goal. 

The line up was as follows: 

Goal. 

Point. 

Cover Point 

Rover. 

Right. 

Centre. 

Left. 


Wickware. 

Henne sey. 

Code. 

Verner. 

Maclaren. 

Lelievre. 

Rivers. 

















10 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Ashbury y. St. Albans. 


Our return match was played at Brockville on Saturday Feb. 22, 
from 11-1, and resulted in a win for St. Albans by 8 goals to 5. It 
was a rough game and there was constant disagreement between the 
two officials. At half time the score was 2 all, Verner having twice 
netted the puck for Ashbury. Rivers opened the scoring in the 
second half and shortly after St. Albans equalised. Then 
Hennessey put in two more and gave Ashbury the lead. Verner 
added a third which the goal-judge gave but which was dis¬ 
allowed by the referee. St. Albans replied with three goals 
making the score 6-5 in their favour. The next goal was scored by 
St. Albans and before time one more was added by them. Our 
team played their best game this season and were very unlucky 
not to win: they certainly had the best of the game, with the ex¬ 
ception of the first ten minutes, when Wickware showed up promin¬ 
ently in goal. It would be hard to pick out any one player as being- 
better than the rest, as all performed well. 

The line up was as follows: 

Goal.Wickware. 

Point.Hennessey I. 

Cover Point.Cory 

Rover.Verner 

Right.Lelievre. 

Centre.Rivers. 

Left.Maclaren I. 

Spares. Code, Masson. 

Code took Lelievre’s place in the second half. 


OTHER MATCHES. 

Ashbury II v. Lower Canada. 

This match was played on the Victoria Rink and resulted in a 
win for the home team by 5 goals to nothing. Our second team 
had never played together before and they were rather handicapped 










THE ASHBURIAN 


11 


by having to play so soon after breakfast. We were very much 
lighter than our opponents who were quite a heavy team. Fleming 
was very good in goal, while Birkett II and Blakeney both worked 
hard. 

The line up was as follows: 


Goal. 

.Fleming 

Point. 

.Birkett 11 

C. Point. . 

. Davis 

Rover. 

.Hazen 

Right. 

.Carling II 

Centre. 

.Masson 

Left. 

. Blakeney I 


Ashbury III v. Queens. 

This match was played on the Gladstone Avenue Rink on Friday 
afternoon Feb. 7. o ur opponents were much heavier than us and 
outplayed us at every point. At half time the score was 1 all. 
They added 2 goals in the second half and beat us 3-1. 

Our line up was as follows: 


Goal.Hanna 

Point.Marshall 

C. Point.Kuntz 

Rover.Jackson (Capt.) 

Right.Montgomery II 

Centre.Davidson 

Left.Maunsell 


Our Trip to Montreal. 

We started on Friday evening with two teams to play against 
Lower Canada College. A new experiment was tried this year and 
we engaged a sleeper on the train leaving Ottawa at 4 o’clock in the 
morning and supposed to arrive in Montreal at 8 o’clock. After 
various delays we arrived on board the train at 11 o’clock and turned 

















12 


THE ASHBURIAN 


in but NOT to sleep. Sleep was out of the question for several hours. 
The heat in that car was beyond description and all efforts to reduce 
it were of no avail. Still there was comparative quiet in the car 
about 3 o’clock. The starting of the train about 4 o’clock deposited 
most of us on the floor. A series of violent jerks is not conducive to 
sleep. The next interruption was at 5 o’clock when the porter 
insisted on examining tickets. By this time we were becoming 
rather irritable and the reception given to that porter was not as 
cordial as it might have been. After that we were left in peace until 
7 o’clock when we got up. Unfortunately the train was late and 
when we disembarked on the platform at Montreal it was 8.30. We 
were due to play our first match at nine o’clock. However without 
delay we were escorted to the Castle Blend Tea Rooms, where a 
sumptuous breakfast awaited us, TOO sumptuous for the players but 
much appreciated by the spares. We certainly showed what we 
could do in the inatter of speed as we were on the ice at 9.20. After 
the matches were over a still more sumptuous dinner awaited us at 
the Corona where Mr. Fosbery was our host. After dinner we visited 
various nickel shows until 3.30, when we all assembled at the station. 
Eventually we reached Ottawa about 7 o’clock after a very pleasant 
trip. We were accompanied by our coach Mr. Percy Lesueur. 


RIFLE SHOOTING 


Soon after the last number of The Ashburian appeared, we 
received from the Militia Department, a consignment of six new 
Roes rifles of the latest pattern. They are fitted with “p ee P” sights, 
and are much more accurate than the ones we have used hitherto. 
The shooting has shown a distinct improvement since their arrival. 
Our first C.R.L. match in December resulted in a total of 933 points 
out of a possible 1000. This is one of the best scores we have ever 
sent in. 

We succeeded in obtaining permission to shoot our second match 
in this series on February 4th, instead of in January. Unfortunately 
several of our best shots were absent, and some of those who re¬ 
mained failed to shoot up to their usual standard. Moreover, we ran 
short of ammunition and were unable to do much practice shooting. 
The result was that we did not do nearly so well as we should have, 
and the total was some sixteen points less than in our first match. 
The individual scores in this match are as follows:— 



THE ASHUBRIAN 


13 


100 


Davis. 97 

Bate. 94 

Read. 94 

Grant I.*. 93 

Sladen. 93 

Lowe 1. 92 

Perley.:. 92 

St. Laurent. 90 

Hanna. 87 

Marshall. 85 


Total. 917 


In the O’Connor Cup series it is impossible as yet to give the 
correct standing of the various competitors. However, Butterworth 
is leading at present, with Read and Lowe tied for second place. 
Several of last year’s juniors, such as Hanna, Hallick and Birkett I 
have been doing some excellent shooting in this competition. 

In the Cox Cup series (Junior), Panet, Johnston and Valleau are 
probably the best and have been putting in very consistent scores. 

E. J. L. 


Notes and Comment. 

Now that the Hockey season is over our thoughts revert to the 
prospects of our Track Team. The Team that is to represent us in 
the Track meet this year should be and will be an infinitely better 
one than that which represented Ashbury last year. It is true 
indeed that the weather was anything but pleasant, still the other 
teams were subject to exactly the same conditions. Now the sole 
cause of all the trouble was the listless manner in which our boys 
went about their training. We had only about half a dozen to choose 
from, and the showing that they made will not be forgotten very 
easily. Now this year we are going to have a regular training camp 
and all boys from Intermediates to Seniors who have any idea of 
going in for track, at all seriously will be subject, one and all to the 
same rules. Let anyone who is able to run at all well give in his 
name to any member of the Sports Committee. After a few runs or 
outings he will be told whether there is any hope for him. We 
propose, as before mentioned, trying out the boys from Intermediates 
as well as the Seniors. Our idea is to have regular days, say three a 
















14 


THE ASHBURIAN 


week for training and practising. Running, hurdling, and jumping 
both high and long distance will be all taken in turn. We will start 
out easily at first. Perhaps only a few laps around the track for the 
first week. Practising starting will be an important part of the 
programme. In fact the most important thing in a short race is the 
start. If a person gets a good start he is almost sure to finish well. 
We will also have a few long runs to finish up with as a long distance 
run is the best possible thing to ensure good condition. There is 
also the “Rowley Cup” presented to the best long distance runner 
in the school to be competed for. So let every boy who intends to 
run in the sports think this matter over seriously and make up his 
mind to train his hardest, so that when the day of competition 
comes, every man on the team will be in the pink of condition and 
ready to do his utmost. Thus may we atone for the disgraceful 
defeat we received last year at the hands of our noted rivals. 

W. H. D. 
















THE ASHBURIAN 


15 


SCHOOL NOTES 

In the choice of Hennessey, I and Archie Fleming as captains of 
the first and second hockey teams respectively, the game played 
this year is superior to that of 1912. No more popular choice could 
have been made. 

The rink this winter has been practically useless owing to the 
weather. We have had particularly hard luck with it, for on the few 
occasions when the temperature was low enough to warrant flooding 
a snow fall always ruined the surface. It is to be hoped that next 
winter a covered rink at Ashbury will render us indifferent to such 
climatic conditions. 

On March 28th most of the school witnessed the moving pictures 
of wild game in East Africa taken by Mr. Paul Rainey and shown 
at the Russell Theatre. There have been few more interesting 
entertainments given in Ottawa and it was hard to believe that the 
living moving animals on the sheet had actually been photographed 
in their native habitat and at close range. 

On Sunday February 22nd, at the evening service in the Chapel, 
the sermon was preached by Dr. Voorhis. 

At the breaking up for the X’mas holidays a handsome travelling 
bag was given to the Headmaster by the members of the school. The 
presentation was made by Davis with an appropriate speech. 

On March 29th, the senior school attended a reproduction of 
Shakespeare’s “ Julius Caesar”—put on by the students of Ottawa 
LTniversity at the Russell Theatre. The performance was a spirited 
one, and the performers deserve much credit. Unfortunately the 
juvenile mind is prone to neglect the dramatic interest in an amateur 
performance and devote its time to the uncharitable criticism of 
friends and acquaintances among the caste. Thus, though the 
murder of Caesar was well acted—the costumes picturesque and the 
background more or less appropriate—the juvenile critic missed this 
in his wonder at Caesar’s enemies attacking with empty hands. 
Again—in the quarrel scene—the acting was animated and the lines 
rendered faithfully, but what cared the audience for that. Their 
unerring eyes had discovered Cassius’ dagger to be a diminutive 
weapon resembling a manicuring instrument. That this was thrust 
into a convenient fissure in his glittering cuirass and that it stubbornly 
stuck there when wanted, finally releasing itself with a metallic clang 
only heightened the enjoyment of a particularly interesting scene. 
Other trifling discrepancies such as a modern military tent and some 
drawing-room furniture on the field of battle were gladly hailed as 
additional sources of merriment. Boys can “make-believe” among 
themselves to any height of imagination; but when it comes to wit¬ 
nessing a performance on a stage there are no more merciless critics. 



16 


THE ASHBURIAN 


CRICKET PROSPECTS 

When this number appears, hockey will be practically over and 
we shall be looking forward to a successful cricket season. The 
rumours about the Ottawa Cricket Club had no foundation and we 
hope to have our usual matches with their second team. Last year, 
measles prevented us from playing St. Albans: it was a great pity as 
the school games are by far the moA exciting. May nothing happen 
this year to stop them. One more match completes our fixture card, 
our annual encounter with the Old Boys. They beat us last year, but 
we mean to have our revenge this year. We had another enemy last 
year in the weather, which quite spoilt our season, although we played 
one match in the pouring rain. Cricket is not a game to be played 
in the wet. One wants a nice hot afternoon with the sun shining and 
then one can enjoy one-self. With fine weather and no infectious 
diseases we may therefore look forward to a brief but successful 
season. Our team should be first class this year. It is true we have 
lost a fast bowler in Boyce, who on his day was very deadly. But 
we shall probably have the services of Capt. Weston, who went over 
to the old country last year, and he will fill the vacancy. Our other 
losses are White and Gibbs and there should be no difficulty in filling 
their places. Of the old colours Macmahon should develop into a 
good bat as he has a long reach, while Thompson I will make a very 
useful wicket-keeper. We shall expect Maunsell and Reiffenstein to 
get some wickets, as both are good bowlers on their day. We have 
two steady bats in Sladen and Maclaren. They are not run-getters, 
but they make a useful pair to wear down the opposition. Holland 
has come to the school with a reputation as a bowler: we shall anxious¬ 
ly watch his first appearance. Two other boys who may make the 
team are Jackson and Birkett II: they showed promise last year and 
seemed keen on the game. It would not be fair to bring these remarks 
to an end without mentioning our scorer. Fleming has acted in this 
capacity for the last two years and has never missed a match. Good 
practice games, keenness in fielding, and a desire to learn will go a 
long way towards helping our team to victory. We want to win all 
our matches and we have as good a chance this year as we shall ever 
have. 


Last night, Fd caught the soap for the second time in the bath 
tub; there came an insistent ring on the telephone, I was alone in the 
house, and as I was expecting an important telegram I dashed for the 
telephone in a cloud of silver spray. When I picked up the receiver 
all I got was: "Sorry; I rung you by mistake." Says I, "You 
didn't wring me at all; I'm still dripping." 



THE ASHBURIAN 


17 


OLD BOYS’ NEWS 


Ashburians who are Graduates of the Universities. 


Graduates from R. M. C., Kingston: A. A. Anderson (1909), 
P. S. Benoit (1904), F. H. M. Codville (1911), A. G. Gill (1905), T. C. 
Keefer (1901), A. C. T. Lewis (1907), J. T. Lewis (1911), E.deB. 
Panet (1902), C. E. Read (1909), E. J. Renaud (1912), H. L. Sherwood 
(1903), G. A. R. Spain (1908), and J. S. Wright (1911), 

From Mcgill University, Montreal: A. A. Anderson (B. Sc., 
1911), F. E. Bronson (B. Sc., 1909), G. H. Burbidge (B. Sc., 1909), 
S. L. Dale Harris (B. A., 1902; B. C. L., 1905), A. Dale Harris (B. A., 
1903; B. Sc., 1905), J. W. Hughson (B. Sc., 1912), R. H. Irwin (B. 
Sc., 1908), W. E. C. Irwin (B. Sc., 1911), )H. F. J. Lambart (B. Sc., 

1904) , A. C. Pratt (B. Sc., 1908), G. S. Raphael (B. Sc., 1908), C. 
Tupper (B. Sc., 1901). 

From Trinity College, Toronto: G. H. Burbidge (B. A., 

1905) . 

From Dalhousie University, Halifax, N.S.: H. A. Dickey, 
(L.L.B., 1905). 

From Mount Allison University, Sackville, N.B.: J. L. 
Godwin (B.A., 1911). 

From Bishop’s College University, Lennoxville: H. P. 
Wright (B.A., 1911). 

In the above list the figures represent the year of graduation, 
while the letters signify the degree or degree received. 

Married. In the sacristy of St. Joseph’s Church, Ottawa, on 
February 4, 1913, James Montague Bate (1892-7), eldest son of the 
late Lt.-Col. H. Allan Bate, Ottawa, to Marguerite, youngest daughter 
of the Rt. Hon. Sir Charles Fitzpatrick, Chief Justice of Canada. 


E. B. Eddy Bessey (1900-3), has been elected a fellow of the 
Royal Colonial Institute of London, England. Ezra, besides being 
at the head of the Eddy Advertising Services of Ottawa, is also well- 





18 


THE ASHBURIAN 


known as a writer of popular songs. He was also on the executive of 
the Ottawa Valley Motor Show held here in February. 

Grey Masson is playing on the forward line of the McGill team 
in the Intercollegiate Union. 

Congrats to V. S. Godfrey and E. C. Sherwood on passing the 
Canadian Naval exams. 

Phil. H. Chrysler (1893-1901) has recently become quite pro¬ 
minent as a figure skater. At the skating competitions held in Ottawa 
in February, he won the Minto Cup, emblematic of the individual 
championship of Canada, and was also a member of the team which 
won the Connaught Cup. 

C. W. A. Barwis (1903-11) is playing the cover-point position on 
the R. M. C. team, probable intermediate Intercollegiate champions. 

Capt. T. R. Caldwell (1905-8), of the 42nd Lanark and Renfrew 
Regiment, has been appointed adjutant of the regiment. 


OUR CONTEMPORARIES. 

The Editor begs to acknowledge the receipt of the following 
contemporaries: 

The Tonbridgian. 

The School Magazine, Lower Canada College. 

Stanstead College Magazine (2). 

The Blue and White. 

Trinity College School Record. 

The Wykehamist (2). 

The Felstedian (2). 

Bishop’s College School Magazine. 

The Black and Red. 

St. John’s College School Magazine . 

Bradfield College Chronicle (2). 

St. Andrew’s College Review. 

The Meteor (2). 

St. Margaret’s Chronicle. 

The Albanian. 

The Cheltonian. 

Acta Ridleiana, 

The School Magazine, Uppingham (2). 

Vox Lycei. 



THE ASHBURIAN 


19 


«5 o l i cS CL O 4 o rir. 


JOKES, SKITS, ETC. 

He met her on the crowded shore. She said: “Have we 
not met before?” And soon he was enraptured for she had such 
taking ways. 

He played the role of gallant beau; escorted her all o’er the 
show. It was expensive, but you know, she had such taking ways. 
With charming disregard for price, he paid for oysters, wine, and 
ice; and oh, he thought her awfully nice, she had such taking ways. 
Her face to his he gently drew, and vowed forever he’d be true; 
it broke his heart to bid adieu, she had such taking ways. But next 
day gestures quite insane accompanied angry words profane; for 
she had pinched his watch and chain, she had such taking ways. 

A Dutchman went out shooting with his dog and his gun; 
when he came back he was met by another Dutchman, and the 
following conversation took place: “Say, Ike, where’s the dog?” 

“I shooted him.” 

“What for did you shoot him? Was he mad?” 

“Well, he wasn’t darned pleased.” 

During one of the principal events at a race meeting, the cry of 
“Hats off in front” was raised and obeyed. When the horses had 
passed, the hats were of course replaced. A few minutes later a 
young man began wildly to lift the hats of the spectators around 
him replacing them with savage expressions of annoyance. On 



















20 


THE ASHBURIAN 


lifting the hat of one of the spectators, he was asked what he was 
up to. “Why,” he exclaimed, “I bet $5 with a bald-headed 
man, and I am trying to find him.” 

A young fellow had “popped the question” and anxiously 
awaited the answer that was to decide his fate. 

“Do you ever gamble at cards?” the fair one asked. 

“No”, he answered; “But if I did now would'be the time.” 

11 Why ?” she inquired. 

“Because”, he answered with a deep sign, “I hold such a 
beautiful hand.” 

A party of ladies on it being reported that a certain Captain 
Silk had arrived in town exclaimed with one exception: “What a 
name for a soldier!” 

11 The fittest name in the world,” rejoined a witty female: ‘ ‘ For 
silk can never be worsted.” 

He: 11 What do you call a real typical modern girl?” 

She: “One who prefers an heir in the castle, to a castle in the 

* )) 

air. , 

Pedestrian : ‘ ‘ Hey. You just missed me by an inch.” 

Chauffeur: “Be patient. Fm coming back again.” 

i 

r* 

H. K—tz, entered a restaurant and exclaimed with a roaring 
voice: “Waiter I have an appetite like an elephant.” The waiter, 
after thinking a moment brought him a pea-nut on a plate. 

11 Why, Harkins, where have you been ? You look like a wreck.” 
“I know it. My twin brother and I had a quarrel and I hired a 
bruiser to lick him, the man mixed us up—and here I am.” 

For a long time the visitor to the great museum stood gazing at 
the Egyptian mummy, swathed in bandages. 

“Tell me one thing”, he ventured. 

“What is it, sir?” asked the guide. 

“Was it a motor or aeroplane accident?” 

The boys of the Fifth Form were asked to write a two hundred 
and fifty word essay on a motor car. The bright hope of the Form, 
duly weighed in with this: “My uncle bought a motor car. He 
was riding in the country, and it broke down in going up a hill. 
My uncle tried to make it go , but couldn't, although he spoilt a 
new suit by trying. I reckon that is about forty words. The 
other 210 words are what uncle said as he was walking back to 
town; but they are not fit to write down.” 


THE ASHBURIAN 


21 


A small boy was asked by an old gentleman, how many com¬ 
mandments there were, and he answered correctly: “Ten.” 

“And what would happen, my boy” the old gentleman asked, 
“if you were tempted to break one of the commandments?” 

‘ ‘ Then, there would be nine,” was the prompt reply. Influenced 
apparently by the rhyme of the “Ten little nigger boys.” 

“Why”, said the American, “the first time I sang in public, 
the audience simply showered me with bouquets. Bless you, there 
were enough to start a flower shop.” 

“Faith, and I can beat you”, cried the Irishman. “The first 
time I sang was at an open-air concert, and begorra, the audience 
were that deloited they presented me with a house, they did.” 

“A house! You must be off your head,” interrupted the 
American. 

“Not at all,” answered Pat. “I tell ye, they gave me a house, 
but it was a brick at a toime.” 

“The cod-fish,” said the Professor, “lays more than a million 
eggs.” 

“It is mighty lucky for the cod-fish that she doesn’t have to 
cackle over every egg,” said a student who came from a farm. 

Griggs: “Lost money in that stock deal, did you? Say, 
let me give you a pointer.” 

Briggs: “No, you don’t. Ne more pointers for me. What 
I’m looking for now is a retriever.” 

Two Irishmen were working on the roof of a building one day 
when one made a mis-step and fell to the ground. The other leaned 
over and called: “Are yez dead or alive, Mike?” 

“O’im alive,” said Mike, feebly. 

“Sure you’re such a liar oi don’t know whether to belave yez 
or not.” 

“Well, then, oi must be dead,” said Mike, “for yez would 
never dare to call me a liar if oi wor aloive.” 

Kind Lady: “Oh, my poor man. I suppose you are often 
pinched by hunger, are you not?” 

Tramp: “Yes, marm and by the copper, too, sometimes.” 

The Swelltons seem to keep up an imposing establishment,” 
remarked the shopper. 

“You bet‘they do,” replied the groceryman, with a sigh long 
drawn out; “and I’m one of the fellows they impose on.” J , j . 


THE ASH BU RIAN 


22 

To be strictly accurate, it was not a smoking compartment at 
all, but the youth was puffing away at a chubby briar despite the 
pained expression on the old lady’s face. By-and-by the old lady 
who was the only other occupant of the carriage, began to get ex¬ 
cited. “ Young man,” she barked, so far as her coughing would 
permit her, “do you know that it’s wrong to smoke?” 

‘ ‘ Well,” replied the lad as he enveloped her in a wreath of smoke, 

11 1 use tobacco for my health.” 

“Health,” ejaculated the victim, in spluttering tones . “Non¬ 
sense. You never heard of anyone being cured by smoking.” 

“Yes, I have,” declared the youth. “That’s the way they 
cure pigs.” 

“Then smoke away,” cried the woman. “There may be hope 
for you, yet.” 

George Clarke a celebrated negro minstrel, was once being 
examined as a witness, and was severely interrogated by a lawyer. 

“You are in the minstrel business, I believe?” enquired the 
lawyer. 

“Yes, sir”, was the reply. 

11 Is not that rather a low calling?” 

“I don’t know, but what it is, sir,” replied the minstrel; “but 
it is so much better than my father’s that I am rather proud of it.” 

The lawyer fell into the trap. 

“What was your father’s calling”, he enquired. 

“He was a lawyer,” replied Clarke, in a tone that sent the 
whole court into a roar of laughter, as the discomfited lawyer sat 
down. 

“I’m satisfied,” said the young man, just home from college, 
“that the science of electricity was understood before the flood.” 

“Don’t be a fool,” snorted the old gentleman. 

“Beg pardon; but Noah must certainly have used some kind 
of an ark light.” 

l've found no nameless ocean, no brook, no rivulet; 

No planet have I brought to light, no asteroid; and yet 
The joy of great discovery rolls over me in floods— 

I’ve just unearthed a dollar in my 

last 

year’s 

duds. 

•“Muz, did you hear the stepladder when it tumbled over?” 
Mother (not rising from her lounge)—“No, darling, I hope papa 
didn’t fall.” ‘ ‘ Not yet; he’s still hanging on to the picture molding.” 


THE ASH BUR IAN 


23 


He’s a financial genius: Spilled a cup of coffee over a fellow’s 
light-colored trousers-” 

“And got out of paying for the trousers, eh?” 

“Why, he talked the other fellow into paying for the coffee!” 

A train slowed up at a busy country station, and a man was 
seen to put his head excitedly out of the window of a third-class 
carriage. 

“There’s a woman in here fainted,” he cried. “Has any one 
got any whisky? Quick!” 

Some one in the crowd on the platform handed him a bottle. 
He uncorked it frantically, put it to his lips, and took a noble pull. 
“Ah,” he sighed, “that’s better. It always did upset me to see a 
woman faint.” 

“Now, Nora,” said the departing physician to the Irish girl, 
who was nursing a bad case of fever, “if the patient sees snakes 
again, give him a dose of this medicine. I shall be in at six.” 

The hour for his return arrived. The physician once more 
visited the sick patient, and found him raving. “He has been so,” 
said the nurse, “for hours.” 

“And did you give him the medicine?” inquired the puzzled 
doctor. 

Nora shook her head. 

11 But didn’t I tell you to give it to him, if he saw snakes again ?” 
demanded the physician. 

“But he didn’t say he saw snakes this toime, dochter,” replied 
the nurse confidently. ‘ ‘ He said he saw red-white and-blue turkeys 
wid straw hats on!” 

Rook: “Taylor was always a fortunate F man, but doesn’t it 
seem wonderful that his luck should stay with him to the very last?’. 

Raleigh : ‘ 1 How was that ?” 

Rook: “Why, he was operated on for the removal of a pearl 
which he had accidently swallowed while eating oysters, and when 
the pearl was examined it was found to be valuable enough to pay 
for both the operation and the funeral.” 

The teacher had been reading to the class about the great 
forests. 

“And now, boys,” she said, “which one of you can tell me the 
pine that has the longest and sharpest needles?” 

Up went a hand in the front row. 

“Well, Tommy?” 

“The porcupine!” 



24 


THE ASHBURIAN 


‘' I call the people who run this boarding house a regular cutlery 
family.” 

“How so?” 

“Well, the daughter spoons, the father forks out the money, and 
the mother knifes the guests who ask for a second helping.” 

“All new arrivals are washed,” explained the governor of the 
prison. 

‘ ‘ And if they make a fuss ?” 

“Then they are ironed.” 

Fun in Advertisements. 

The following advertisements appeared in various papers some 
years ago: 

“Bulldog for sale; will eat anything; very fond of children.” 

“Wanted a boy to be partly outside and partly behind the 
counter.” 

“Widow in comfortable circumstances wishes to marry two 
sons.” 

“Animal sale now on; don't go elsewhere to be cheated, come 
here.” 

‘ ‘ A lady wants to sell her piano, as she is going abroad in a strong, 
iron frame.” 

“Lost near Highg^te Archway,, an umbrella belonging to a 
gentleman with a bent rib and a bone handle.” 

“Mr. Jones, furrier, begs to announce that he will make up 
gowns, caps, etc., for ladies out of their own skins.” 

“Wanted, an airy bedroom for a gentleman 22 feet long and 11 
feet wide.” 

Recently this line appeared in a daily paper: 

“A carload of bricks came in for a walk through the Park.” 

A quack doctor was holding forth about his “medicines” to a 
rural audience. “Yes, gentlemen,” he said, “I have sold these pills 
for over twenty-five years and never heard a word of complaint. 
Now what does this mean?” From a voice in the crowd came: 
“Dead mean tell no tale^.” 

“Jane”, said Bobby at the breakfast table, “did Mr. Julius take 
any of the umbrellas or hats from the rack when he went home last 
night?” “Why of course not, Bobby” laughed Jane, “why should 
he?” “That's what I'd like to know” said Bobby, “because when 

he wen out I heard him say: “I'm going to steal just one” and. 

Why what's the matter, Jane?” 



HERE ARE THREE REASONS WHY YOU SHOULD ALWAYS 


BUY 

EDDY’S MATCHES. 

I. THEY ARE CHEAP BECAUSE YOU GET FULL COUNT. 

II. THEY ARE SAFE BECAUSE THEY WILL NOT IGNITE IF 
STEPPED UPON. 

III. EVERY STICK IS A MATCH. EVERY MATCH IS A 
SURE LIGHT. 


SILENTS, SAFETIES, SULPHURS, PARLORS AND 

WAX VESTAS. 



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1st HOCKEY TEAM 

W. M. Cory H. W. Davis D. E. Wood Esq. C. W. Rivers 
W.A.Wickware D.F.Verner I.W.Hennessy A. L. Code A. A. Maclaren 

R. Lelievre R. G. Masson 










The Ashburian 


Editorial Staff 

Editor-in-Chief — Mr. C. H. Hooper. 
Assistant Editor —E. J. Lowe. 

Sports Editor — W. H. Davis. 

Rifle Shooting —E. J. Lowe. 

Secretary-Treasurer —Mr. D. E. C. Wood. 


EDITORIAL 

It is always with a sense of regret that we present the last 
number of The Ashburian before the long vacation. When the 
variable weather of the late fall settles clown to real winter just at 
Xmas,. we are glad the term is over and the winter amusements 
about to start. When the apology for a spring begins about March, 
we are heartily glad to say good-bye to another term and once more 
revel in warm sun and out of door sports. With this season, however, 
there is no such feeling. During the term we get all the “good 
things” of the school year. The hard work is over—if we don’t 
know our work at the beginning of this term, we won’t know it till 
next fall. It is a season of review in work, and of freedom in recre¬ 
ation. 

True, there is the hard physical work of training for the sports; 
there is cricket; there is tennis; and there is rifle shooting—all re¬ 
quiring hard work for the attainment of any proficiency in them— 
but there is also this term a good deal of clolce-far-niente—of loafing 
about in flannels doing nothing in particular, just enjoying the sense 
of freedom and the fresh air. 

It is a good term, and far too short for all the sports crowded 
into it. An all round boy cannot play cricket three afternoons a 
week, train for sports three afternoons a week, attend Cadet Corps 
drill two afternoons, shoot at the ranges two afternoons, and play in the 
tennis tournament every afternoon—without seriously interfering with 
his very natural desire to spend three afternoons on the water—canoe¬ 
ing. Hence, this year, the early rising movement has possessed the 
school. The day begins for many of us at 5 a.m. with a walk or paddle. 













9 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Between break fast and school—tennis; between dinner and school— 
tennis; between school and tea—any of the above mentioned sports— 
many of the boys being able and anxious to do all—and perforce limit¬ 
ing them selves to as many as they can crowd in. After tea—tennis 
till study. A full day—and getting worse every year, owing to the 
tendency of all Canadian schools to close earlier and earlier. 

The boys and staff of most schools would prefer to extend the 
summer term well into July—living as much as possible out of doors; 
and then start the vacation escaping the fly season in the summer 
resorts. By resuming school in October the best part of the year 
would be contained in the holidays—the weather would then be cool 
enough for football on our return—and we would prolong the shortest 
and best term and curtail the longest and most trying. Sapient 
reasons all—but, in view of the general exodus of families to summer 
resorts in June, quite thrown away upon the uninterested public. 

However, we have enjoyed this term much, in spite of its bre¬ 
vity. The whole year has been one of hard work and very satis¬ 
factory work, the standards of the different forms being now higher 
than at any other period in the school’s history. Ashbury can, 
we think, feel very complacent. We have worked hard, played hard, 
and have had no single case of sickness for a year. A good whole¬ 
some record—showing vigorous life. 

The year is over now though, and the inevitable good-byes must 
be said. To those who are leaving us for good, The Ashburian ex¬ 
tends its heartiest wishes of Godspeed and the best of good luck; 
to those who, after three months will reassemble here, our salutation 
takes the form of 'Hill we meet again”; to all of them we must say 
GOODB-YE. 


OLD BOYS CLUB 

At Easter of this year—in response to the Headmaster’s in¬ 
vitation—about twenty old boys of Ashbury assembled at a dinner in 
the school, and discussed the question of forming some sort of organ¬ 
ization by which the army of those who have left the College might 
not be lost sight of entirely as has hitherto been done. 

It was decided to form an Old Boy’s association and the necessary 
officers were elected for the year, viz: L. White, Hon. Secy; P. Chrysler, 
C. Fleming, and P. Woollcombe. During the discussion on the 
subject the objects of the association were defined. It was felt that this 
school, which has existed for nearly a quarter of a century, has 
turned out hundreds of young men ready to take their parts in 
the social, political, and commercial activities of Canada. In fact 
our Old Boys are more widely distributed than that. They can be 
found in many other parts of the British Dominions. It was rep- 



THE ASHBURIAN 


3 


resented that this large number of (now) representative men have 
no means of keeping in touch with their old school, that they do 
not even know—many of them—that our premises have been changed 
three times since their sojourn amongst us, that from a small be¬ 
ginning the College has now grown to sturdy proportions, and has 
taken its place among the leading educational institutions of Eastern 
Canada. They have no means of knowing of their old school's 
successes on the football field, the ice, in cricket, and her creditable 
position of second in all Canada in Rifle Shooting. That her Cadet 
Corps came first in the district last year is as yet unknown to them. 

They have lost sight of each other too. Many have no idea of 
where their old friends have gone to. They exist—scattered and 
individual—but as a unified body this small army of Old Boys has 
no existence. They have no voice—no knowledge of Ashbury of 
the present—and consequently little interest in it. To remedy this 
the officers and committee determined to work. The pages of The 
Ashburian were gladly put at their disposal for the purpose of ad¬ 
vertising as widely as possible the object of the Club and the where¬ 
abouts of its lost members. 

A list was prepared of the names of all boys who have left Ash¬ 
bury and the addresses of as many as could be found. This is publish¬ 
ed below. It is asked that every old Ashburian whose eye should 
fall on this list will be kind enough to send either to this magazine 
or to the secretary of the Old Boy's Club any addresses which we 
are unable to obtain. What The Ashburian wishes to do is to put 
the club into touch with the scattered numbers, that notice of their 
whereabouts may be published with any information about them 
which may interest the club. The Ashburian will esteem it a 
favour to be supplied with any information whatever regarding 
these “lost sheep", and will for its part promise to give prominence 
in its pages to all matters supplied it regarding our Old Boys. 

When we look at the strong Old Boy associations connected 
with other schools, and that most influential of them all—the R. 
M.C. club—we fail to see why Ashbury should not support and be 
supported by a like organization for the mutual benefit of Old Ash- 
burians and of the School. 


List of Old Boys 


Name. 

Entered. 

Name 

Entered 

Name 

Entered 

Allan, J . 

.1903 

Atkinson, R. E. .. 

.1909 

Beard, C. T . 

.1905 

Anderson, E . 

.1891 

Avery, R . 

.1894 

Beddoe, A. B. . . . 

.1909 

Anderson, C. M. . 

.1909 

Aylen, J. A. 

.1904 

*Belanger, J. B. . . 

.1905 

Anderson, P . 

.... :1891 



Benoit, P. S. 

.1899 

Anderson, A. 

.1903 

*Babington, F. . . . 

.1903 

Bishop, L. 

.1902 

^Armstrong, D. . . 

.1899 

Barwis, C. W. A. . 

.1903 

Blackburn, F. H. 

.1894 

Arnoldi, P . 

.1896 

Bate, M . 

.1892 

Blair, D . 

.1898 

Arnoldi, E . 

.1899 

Bate, H. B. 

.1905 

Bell, G . 

.1900 

Arnoldi, F. E. . . . 

.1910 

Bate, T. 

.1905 

Bostock, H. S.... 

.1911 

*Aumond, C . 

.1898 

1 Bate, H. N. 

.1904 

Bourinot, S. 

.1907 































4 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Name Entered 

Bowie, G. G.1909 

Bronson, C.1905 

Bronson, F.1896 

Brooke, W.1907 

Burbidge, G.1899 

I Burbidge, G. H.1900 

| Butterworth, C. W.1902 

Bryson, G.1900 

Burn, G. D.1902 

Brabazon, C. H.1904 

Caldwell, T. R.1902 

♦Castle, N.1900 

Campbell, B. B.1904 

Campbell, E. A.1908 

♦Campbell, J.1899 

Carling, F.1902 

Carling, G.1894 

Chinic, J. E.1910 

Chipman, C C.1907 

Chrysler, P. H.1S93 

Chrysler, G. C.1894 

Clarke, A.1907 

Codville, F. H. M .1906 

Cockburn, L. W. S.1899 

Cockburn, R.1899 

Cooke, S. C.1908 

Cotton, C. P.1908 

Critchley, O_-.1908 

Critchley, S.1908 

Cunningham, F.1907 

Currier, C.1894 

Currier, D.1894 

•‘Cuthbertson, C. 1906 

♦Dagger, F. G.1905 

Dale-Harriss, S. L.1895 

Dale-Harriss, A.1895 

♦Dalton, S.1896 

Davies, D.1891 

Davies, L.1904 

♦Davis, R. H.1903 

Dawson, O. C.1902 

Deville, G.1899 

Devlin, R. P.1892 

Dickey, H. A.1895 

♦Dickey, O. B.1895 

Donaldson, J. B.1S96 

♦Durie, W.1906 

♦Dupont, G.1909 

Ecksten, C. G. W.1905 

Ellard, D.1901 

Ellard, R.1900 

Eliot, J.1902 

♦Fellowes, C.1896 

Ferguson, F.1909 

♦Ferris, G.1895 

Fleming, C. S.1903 

Freming, N.1896 

♦Forbes, N.1900 

♦Forbes, S.1900 

Foster, H.1893 


Name Entered 

Fraser, A. G .1899 

Fraser, G. W. B.1909 

Fraser, H. N.1895 

French, G. N.1903 

Fleming, A.1907 

Gamble, D.1908 

♦Gays, W.1899 

Gendron, F. E.1908 

Gill, A. G.1893 

Gilmour, A.1892 

Gilmour, D. G.1896 

Gilmour, J.. F.1892 

Gilmour, H. L.1896 

Gilmour, K.1891 

Gilmour, S. C.1896 

Gisbourne, F. H.1903 

♦Godwin, II.1891 

Godwin, J. L.1898 

♦Gordon, C.1903 

Gorman, E. F.1909 

Gorman, F.1903 

Gormully, R.1891 

Graham, F.1910 

Graham, J.1905 

Graves, P.1910 

Greene, M. K.1903 

Greene, L. K.1906 

Gravelle, C. A.1910 

Gibbs, W. G.1908 

Godfrey, V.1908 

♦Henderson, A.1895 

♦Herbert, E. J. B.1893 

Heron, V. W. S.1892 

Higman, C. G.1903 

♦Howard, B.1899 

Hughson, J. W.1902 

Hughson, H.K06 

Harvey, J.1910 

Heney, B.1905 

Inderwick, C.1908 

Ingall, O.1894 

Irwin, W. E. C.1900 

Irwin, R. H.1896 

Irwin, A. D.1896 

Keefer, A.1895 

Keefer, T. C.1895 

Keeling, C. H.1904 

Kudle, L. E. L.1911 

♦Lambert, M. L. B.1891 

Lambart, H. F. J.1891 

Langford, W.1908 

♦LeMesurier, A.1902 

Lewis, A. C. T.1896 

Lewis, J. T.1901 

Lindsay, J. A.1907 

♦Low, K. O.1899 

Lindsay, O. St. G .1910 

Logan, W. S.1907 

Lethbridge, R.1911 


Name Entered 

MacCormack, P.1906 

MacDonnel, D. K.1906 

Maclvor, R. S. P.1908 

♦MacLean, H.1893 

Macphail, J. B.1904 

MacPherson, J. A. C. . . . 1892 
MacPherson, K. C...... . 1897 

♦Maloney, P.1907 

Magee, C. D.1892 

Matthews, S.1901 

May, A.1908 

Maynard, M. A. H ... .1902 

Maynard, L. M.1898 

Masson, D.1907 

Masson, G. W.1907 

Masson, G.1908 

McDougall, W.1891 

♦McGrath, B.1898 

McLachlin, E.1901 

McLachlin, E. H.1909 

McLachlin, J.1898 

McKeil, B.1896 

Lord Melgund.1902 

♦Mereweather, C.1900 

♦Meyer, W. A.1898 

Millen, W. H.1894 

♦Mitchell, G.1897 

Moore, C.1896 

Moore, A. N.1908 

♦Moore, D.1896 

♦Moore, J.1896 

Moore, R.1893 

Morgan, R.1902 

♦Nelson, J. M.1893 

Nelson, II.... ,.1908 

♦Nelson, L.1896 

New r combe, E. F.1898 

Nutting, J. K.1905 

Naismith, A.1910 

O’Connor, II. W.1902 

O’Halloran, M..1902 

Orde, R. J.1902 

Oliver, J. S.1909 

♦Ouimet, A.1899 

Orr, G. 

Ouimet, E.1893 

Ouimet, P.1893 

Palmer, A. J.1891 

Panet, Ede B.1898 

Parker, H. S .1908 

Phillips, A. J. R.1906 

♦Phyfe, H. R. E.1899 

Pratt, A. C.1903 

♦Prior, B.1896 

Pei ley, G.1902 

♦Raphael, G. S.1S98 

♦Raphael, II.1898 

Read, C. E..1898 

Reid, H. L.1906 

Reid, H. E.1910 








































































































































































THE ASHBURIAN 


Name Entered 

Reid, E. N.1907 

Renaud, E. J.1908 

Ritchie, D. V.1891 

Ritchie, W. G.1891 

* Robertson, S.1894 

♦Ross, R.1901 

Ross, B.1900 

Rothwell, H.1907 

Russell, R. 1.1910 

♦Rutherford, G. C.1906 

♦Sal ton, H.1904 

Sherwood, H. L.1899 

Sherwood, L. P.1894 

Sherwood, E.1909 

♦Simpson, J.1898 

Sinclair, C.1901 

Skead, E.1907 

Shaw, A. H.1909 

Sladen, D.1900 

Sladen, St. B.1900 

Slater, J.1894 

Slater, L. D.1894 

Slater, K.1903 


The names marked with an 
do not know. 


Name Entered 

Smart, G. S.1903 

Smart, E. G.1903 

Smart, L. B.1908 

♦Smith, A.1895 

Smith, H. F.1907 

Smith, E.1909 

Smythe, A. E.1907 

Smythe, H.1907 

Soper, E. N.1895 

Snetsinger, W. L.1910 

Spain, G. A. R.1903 

Sparks, N. A.1904 

Spencer, G.1903 

Steele, C. J.1904 

Stewart, E.1895 

Symes, A. W.1896 

Symes, J.1892 

Strubbe, G.1911 

Sample, L.1911 

♦Thompson, P.1891 

Thompson, A. R.1910 

Tilley, V.1895 

Toller, P. B.1893 


Name Entered 

Trenholme, W. S.1901 

Tupper, C.1891 

Tupper, J.1896 

Therien, F.1910 

Thomas, J. V.1911 

♦Watson, J.1904 

♦Watters, R.1891 

♦West, W. B.1910 

Whitcher, W. C. W.1901 

White, C. T.1906 

White, F. W.1891 

White, L. T.1891 

White, R. L.1904 

White, R. W.1905 

White, W.1907 

Williams, A.1897 

Wooding, H. B.1894 

Woods, J. R.1903 

Wright, H. P.1903 

Wright, P. H.1905 

♦Wright, P.1899 

♦Wright, S.1906 

Woollcombe, P.1900 


” whose addresses we 


asterisk are the names of ‘ ‘ Old Boys 


Who will furnish the school with a new FLAG? 


HOCKEY 


Date 

Mar. 

4 

U 

6 

a 

8 

u 

10 

u 

11 

Feb. 

1 

a 

8 

u 

15 

u 

22 

Mar. 

1 

U 

8 


Supplementary list of matches 
Played after the Easter issue of The Ashburian. 
Match 


House 

Ashbury College v. Old Boys 


CARLING CUP MATCHES. 


Albans. 


Played at 

Score 

Home, 

Lost 

5-3 

Home, 

Lost 

3-2 

Home, 

Lost 

3-2 

Away, 

Won 

5-2 

Home, 

Lost 

8-4 

I. 

Home, 

Lost 

4-3 

Away, 

Draw 

1-1 

Draw 


1-1 

Away, 

Lost 

7-5 

Home, 

Lost 

7-1 

L. Canada 


6-1 








































































6 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Our heartiest congratulations to Lower Canada on winning the 
cup, which they thoroughly deserve. They were the best team in 
the league without any doubt and showed the best combination. 

Ashbury College v. Lower Canada College. 


This match was played at the Gladstone Rink from 12 o’clock to 
1, Saturday, March 1st and resulted in an easy win for Lower Canada 
by 7 goals to 1. The start was considerably delayed by the non¬ 
arrival of our goal-keeper, Wickware, and in consequence only 
twenty minute periods could be played. We held our own fairly 
well in the first half and at half-time the score was 1-0 against us. 
But in the second half, although Verner equalised in the first half min¬ 
ute, we were completely outplayed. The good combination of the 
Lower Canada forwards was too much for us. Wickware had an 
off-day in goal and gave a very poor display in the second half. 
Verner was troubled by a sore knee and Cory had not recovered 
from his attack of “grippe”. Hennessey and Code were the only 
two who seemed capable of taking the puck down to our opponents’ 
goal and putting in an occasional shot. Our whole team seemed 
quite off colour in the second half and there was never any doubt 
about the result. The officials.gave universal satisfaction and there 
were no unpleasant incidents in the game. 

Our line-up was as follows: 

Goal.Wickware. 

Point.Code. 

C. Point.Hennessey. 

Rover.Verner. 

Right..Cory. 

Centre.Rivers. 

- Left.Maclaren 

Spare.Masson. 

Ashbury II v. Lower Canada II. 


This match followed immediately after the first match and 
resulted in a draw, each side scoring two goals. It was a rough 
game from start to finish and several penalties were handed out. 
The roughness was due, not to ill-feeling, but to keenness on the part 
of the players to win, and all grievances were forgotten as soon as 
the game was over. It certainly was a strenuous game and pro¬ 
vided any amount of excitement to the spectators. Lower Canada 
scored two goals in the first half and at half-time the score was 
2-0. Hennessey II scored for Ashbury at the beginning of the 
second half and Birkett II shortly after equalised. No further 
score was added although five minutes overtime was played. Bir- 










THE ASHBURIAN 


7 


kett II and Blakeney played well, while Fleming was safe in goal. 
There was much more combination in the second team than in the first 
and they are to be congratulated on putting up such a good game. 


The line-up was as fullows: 

Goal. 

Point. 

C. Point. 

Rover. 

R. Wing. 

Centre. 

L. Wing. 

Spare. 


Fleming 

Davis. 

Hazen. 

Birkett II. 

Blakeney. 

Masson. 

Hennessey. 

Macmahon. 


Ashbury College v. The Old Boys. 


This match was played on the Gladstone Avenue Rink on 
Tuesday March 4th and resulted in a win for the Old Boys by 5 
goals to 3. The game was played eight a side and was fast through¬ 
out. The weight of the Old Boys was an important factor, as Rivers 
and Masson discovered. There were few penalties handed out, 
only two Old Boys being sent off. One of them showed an inclin¬ 
ation to come back on the ice too soon, but eventually he remained 
off his three minutes. Otherwise the game was fairly clean and 
most enjoyaRle. In the first half the Old Boys scored twice, Bowie 
and Oliver netting the puck in turn, while Rivers scored for Ashbury. 
In the second half Code ecpialised and then the Old Boys put on 
three goals, Bowie scoring again and Fleming and Carling each 
scoring one. Code added one more for the school before time, 
making the final score 5-3. 

The line up was as follows: 



School 


Old ILoys 

Goal . 

.. . Wick ware 

Goal . 

. . . P. Woollcombe 

Point . 

. . . Hennessey 

Point . 

. . . C. Fleming < 

C. Point. . 

...Code 

C. Point. . 

. . . 8 . McCullogh 

Rover. . . . 

. . . Verner, Lelievre 

Rover. . . . 

. . . W. Oliver, T. Carling 

Centre . 

. . . Masson 

Centre. . . . 

.. . L. Bowie 

Right . 

. . . Rivers 

Right . 

. . .H. Fraser 

Left . 

. . . Maclaren 

Left, . 

. . . D. Sladen 


Ashbury College v. Old Boys. 

The final Old Boys’ match was played on Tuesday the 11th 
March and resulted in a win by 8-4 for the Ashbury veterans. 
It was a hotly contested game from start to finish and the play was 
featured by numerous whirlwind plays and lightning rushes. 
























8 


THE ASHBURIAN 


The School Team was a very aggressive aggregation, nearly 
all the regular team being out with the exception of Wickware and 
Verner. Their places were filled by Fleming in goals, who played 
a brilliant game and Masson in centre, whose stick handling was 
one of the redeeming features of the school play. 

On the Old Boys’ side a very representative lot of old time 
stars had assembled and, arrayed in various uniforms of different 
colors, they lined up and eagerly awaited the signal to commence play. 

During the first few minutes of play the School had rather the 
better of the play and by some neat manoeuvring succeeded in 
scoring three goals. Two of these were due doubtless to the diffi¬ 
culty experienced by the Old Boys in working together, while the 
other goal was due to Fraser and the goal-keeper getting in front 
of one another and thus leaving an open goal. After the next 
face-off, the Old Boys recovered from their slight discomforture 
and with a combined sweep by Carling, Bowie and Oliver they 
succeeded in scoring. 

The school then got the puck from the face-off and by an un¬ 
supported rush by Hennessey, managed to score 4-1. 

From this time on the play was principally in front of the School 
nets, into which Oliver and Carling both succeeded in placing the 
puck; and finally, just prior to the end of the first half, Fraser, a 
star of the first team of 1907 got the puck and with a startling speed 
bored through the school ranks and tallied the fourth goal for the 
Old Boys. 4-4. 


Second half 

Excitement was now at fever heat and when the second half 
commenced the Old Boys, now thoroughly recovered from any lack 
of breath they might have experienced, started off at a furious pace 
which they maintained throughout the entire half and during which 
period they scored four more goals. 

The playing of Fleming and Alex. Fraser on the Old Boys side 
was very noticeable in view of the fact that this was only their second 
time on skates within the last two years; but notwithstanding this 
handicap their playing was excellent and without their services 
it is a matter of doubt if the score would have ended as happily as 
it did. 

Of more recent years were Bowie, Slaclen, Carling and Oliver. 
These were more or less in fair condition and therefore showed at 
times something of their old time fire and ginger. Woollcombe 
in goals was playing in a position entirely foreign to him. 

At the conclusion of the match the Old Boys were driven away 
*'en motre” amid cheers from the assembled multitude. 

Old Boy. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


9 



2nd HOCKEY TEAM 

A. B. Hennessey T. Blakeney 

W.H.D MacMahon A. W. Davis D E C. Wood A. Fleming (capt) J. M. Hazen 

E. W. Birkett 

HOCKEY CHARACTERS 
First Team 

Hennessey I (captain). Point. Good defence man, but 
inclined to stray from his goal. Handicapped by bad colds in two 
matches. Worked hard always and used his weight well. As 
captain he set an excellent example to his team. 

Maclaren I. Left wing. An old colour, a fast skater and a 
good stick handler. Was a great help to this year’s team. 

Rivers. Centre. New colour, a heavy body check. Keeps 
his head and plays his position well. 

Verner. Rover. An old colour. The best all round player 
on the team. Was handicapped towards the end of the season by 
a sore knee. 







10 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Cory. Right wing. Very heavy but not at all slow. An 
excellent stick handler. Can play defence when needed. 

Code. Cover point. A good skater and stick handler, also a 
very good defence man. Will be a great help to next year’s team. 

Wickware. Goal. An old colour. An excellent goal tend, 
although rather excitable. Was our only mainstay in Montreal. 

Lelievre. Played in our first two matches. A good skater but 
rather light. Apt to lose his head and wander from his position. 

Masson. Spare. An excellent skater and stick handler, but 
too light. 


Characters of the Second Team. 

Fleming (captain). Excellent goal keeper and keen captain. 
Played his best game in Montreal. A nasty accident in the middle 
of the season spoilt his nerve and he did not get the form afterwards 
which he had shown earlier in the year. 

Davis. A reliable defence man, who uses his body well. Lack¬ 
ed pace and lost many opportunities in consequence. 

Hazen. Another useful defence man who should improve next 
year. He possesses one sterling quality—he never loses his temper. 

Blakeney I. A very useful forward, with any amount of speed. 
One of the best goal getters on the team. 

Birkett II. A fast skater and good stick handler, who has im¬ 
proved considerably during the season. Combines well with the 
other forwards. Lacks weight. 

Hennessey II. A fair stick handler. He has one fault which 
he must try and control next year—he is too selfish. He was better 
in this respect towards the end of the season. 

Carling II. The best stick handler on the team but too slow. 
With more pace he would be really good. 

MacMahon. Spare defence player. Rather clumsy with his 
stick and too slow. Uses his weight well. 


OUR CONTEMPORARIES 

The Editor begs to acknowledge the receipt of the following 
contemporaries:— 

The Albanian; Vox Lycei; Bradfield College Chronicle ; The 
Tonbridgian ; (2); Arbor (2); The Wykehamist (4); The Meteor (4); 
The Cheltonian (3); The Felstedian (3); Stanstead College Magazine; 
The Blue and White; St. John’s College Magazine (2); St. Mar¬ 
garet’s Chronicle; The School Magazine, Uppingham; The Black 
and Red; Acta Ridleiana. 



THE ASHBURIAN 


11 


RIFLE SHOOTING 

Our last match in the indoor series took place in March, and 
resulted in the best score of the season. The individual scores were 

as follows:— 

100 


Bate....98 

St. Laurent.96 

Sladen.95 

Davis.•.94 

Lowe.94 

Irvin. 94 

Hallick.94 

Burns.93 

Hennessey 1.91 

Grant.91 

Total.940 


Our total score for the four matches in the series was 3723. 
As a result of this we again obtained second place in the league, being 
beaten only by Calgary Collegiate. 

The matches for the O’Connor Cup were keenly contested and 
furnished some close competitions. Right up to the end of the season 
it was impossible to say who would win out. However, Bate fin¬ 
ally won the cup with a lead of eight points. The general average 
of the scores in this competition was considerably better than those 
made last year. The standings of the various competitors is given 
below: 

500 


Bate. 

Lowe. 

Hallick. 

Hanna. 

Davis. 

Sladen. 

Graham. 

Grant. 

Hazen. 

Reiffenstein. . 
Birkett I.... 
Thompson II 


.461 
.453 
.451 
.448 
.442 
. 433 
.429 
.402 
. 393 
.391 
.373 
.372 


The Cox Cup was a source of great interest among the juniors. 
This cup corresponds to the O’Connor Cup in the senior school, and 

























12 


THE ASHBURIAN 


was won by Parker with the very good score of 446. The full scores 
in this series will be published later. 

The Ranges opened recently and a considerable number of boys 
(chiefly boarders) have been turning out, and putting in very good 
scores. The difficulty has always been to induce our good shots to 
spend their Saturday mornings at the Range. The boarders usually 
turn out in force—especially if they have detention to keep, but 
the day-boys are few and far between. Last year our score was 
spoilt because we were short one man in one of our matches. It is 
to be hoped that the same thing will not occur again. 

Our prize list for shooting on the Ranges is an exceptionally 
large one this year. Besides the Canadian Rifle League matches, 
with the various individual prizes offered to this series, we have the 
Bate Cup for the 200 yards range, and the Boyd Cup at 500 yards. 
There is also the R.M.C. Shield for a team of four—perhaps the high¬ 
est prize open to cadets, and we have been presented by the Daugh¬ 
ters of the Empire with a rifle, to be given to the winner of a match 
at 200 and 500 yards. On the whole it will be well worth getting 
up an hour earlier on Saturday mornings and we hope to see a good 
attendance each week.—E.J.L. 


CRICKET 


Matches Played up to Date. 


May 1 Ashbury College v. Mr. Johnson’s XI 
5 Ashbury College v Militia Dept. 

7 Ashbury College v Ottawa 
12 Ashbury College v Militia Dept. 

17 Ashbury College v Old Boys 


Won by 42 runs. 
Lost by 4 runs. 
Lost by 37 runs. 
Lost by 31 runs. 
Won by 31 runs. 


Matches to be Played 


May 21 1st. XI v 2nd XVI. 

May 26 Ashbury College v Militia Dept. 
May 31 Ashbury College v Ottawa “A”. 
June 7 Ashbury College v Mr. Crowdy’s XI. 


Ashbury College v Mr. Johnson’s XI. 

Our cricket season opened on Ascension Day with a match 
against Mr. Johnson’s XI. No less than five of Ottawa’s first team 
were playing and they looked a strong side. After a most interesting 
struggle however the College proved victorious in their first match 
and they are to be congratulated on their success in every depart¬ 
ment of the game. The match started at 3 o’clock and stumps 




THE ASH BUR I AN 


13 


were drawn at 6.45. Mr. Ackland who was captaining Mr. John¬ 
son’s XI won the toss and put us in. We were at the wickets for 
about an hour and a half and put together the useful score of 76, 
thanks to the good innings of Mr. Creeth and MacMahon. The 
latter was decidedly lucky, but he batted well all the same and should 
make many more runs during the season. After the tea interval, 
when both teams were the guests of the Headmaster’s wife, we went 
out to field. The bowling was shared by Mr. Wood and Holland, 
the former starting. Mr. Wood took a wicket in his first over and 
then Holland started in. He was in excellent form and captured 
eight wickets for ten runs, a fine performance considering the bats¬ 
men he dismissed. They were all out for 28. On resuming we 
scored fast, Mr. Creeth again punishing the bowling unmercifully 
and being undefeated for a score of 38, when the innings was declared 
closed. Our opponents had an hour in which to score 108 and 
they started in a very promising manner. Both Capt. Weston and 
Holland were punished severely and it was not until a double change 
in the bowling was effected that wickets fell. Mr. Wood and Mac¬ 
Mahon were the new bowlers and the former soon broke up a danger¬ 
ous partnership. Altogether he took four wickets for one run, while 
MacMahon took three for 17. The last wicket fell five minutes 
before time, leaving the College the winners by 42 runs. A noticeable 
feature of the game was our fielding which could not have been 
improved upon. Several fine catches were made in both innings, 
Capt. Weston and Holland being responsible for one each in the 
first innings and Code for two in the second. Burns made a ver}^ 
creditable first appearance as wicket keeper and let very few byes, 
also making one good catch. A word of praise is due to Cory and Morris 
who played for the visitors and who also fielded well. Mr. Hooper 
and Mr. Wiggins kindly acted as umpires, while the scoring was 
entrusted to Thompson II, Ault, and Parker. 

Below are given the scores and bowling analyses:— 

Mr. Johnson’s XI. 


1st Innings. 2nd Innings. 


D. Clunn, b. Wood. 0 

H. Blizzard, b. Holland. 0 

L. Craig, ct. Weston, b. Holland. 10 

H. Ackland, ct. and b. Holland. 0 

L. Frick, b. Holland. 4 

Rev. C. Elwes, b. Holland. 0 

H. Mackenzie, ct Burns, b. Holland. 5 

B. Johnson, b. Holland. 1 

T. Birkett, ct. Creeth, b. Holland. 0 

Cory, ct. Holland, b. Wood. 0 

Morris, not out. 1 

Extras. 7 


Total. 28 


b. Holland. 4 

ct. Maunsell, b. Macmahon. I 

l.b.w.,b Weston. 21 

ct. Macmahon, b. Wood. 24 

ct. Code, b. Macmahon. O 

b. Wood. O 

ct. Code, b. Weston. 0) 

b. W T ood. 0> 

b. Macmahon. O 

Not out. O 

Extras. 41 


Total. 65 





























14 


THE ASHBURIAN 


. Ashbury College. 

1st Innings. 2nd Innings. 


Sladen, ct. Frick, b. Clunn. 1 

Maclaren, ct. Ackland, b. Frick. 0 

C. Wood, b. Frick. 9 

N. A. Creeth, ct. Ackland, b. Blizzard .... 19 

Holland, b. Blizzard. 10 

Capt Weston, b. Frick.'. 3 

Macmahon, b. Frick. 14 

Burns, b. Craig. 5 

Maunsell, ct. Clunn, b. Frick. 2 

Reiffenstein, b. Frick. 3 

Code, not out. ] 

Extras. 9 

Total. 76 


ct. Mackenzie, b. Craig 
ct. Ackland, b. Frick. . 
ct. Birkett, b. Craig . . 

Not out. 

b. Craig. 

b. Johnson. 


• Did not bat. 


Extras. 7 

*Total. 59 


winnings declared closed. 


BOWLING ANALYSIS. 

Mr. Johnson’s XI. 

1st Innings. 2nd Innings. 



Wickets. 

Runs. 


V ickets. 

Runs. 

Holland. 

. 8 

10 

Holland. 

i 

. 1 

25 

D. C. Wood. . . 

2 

11 

D. C. Wood. . . 

. 4 

1 




Capt. Weston. 

. 2 

17 




Macmahon . . . . 

. 3 

17 


Ashbury 

College. 



1 

st Innings. 



2nd Innings. 



Wickets. 

Runs. 


Wickets. 

Runs 

L. Frick. 

. . . . 6 

23 

L Frick 

. . l 

24 

D. Clunn_ 

. 1 

20 

L. Craig. 

. 3 

3 

H. Blizzard. . . 

. 2 

17 

H. Ackland. . . 

. 0 

14 

L. Craig. 

. 1 

7 

B. Johnson. .. . 

. 1 

11 


Ashbury College y Col. Ward’s XI. 


This match was played here on Monday, May 5th and resulted 
in a win for the visitors by 4 runs. The game started at 3 o’clock, 
Col. Ward winning the toss and deciding to bat first. Wickets fell 
fast before the bowling of Mr. Wood and Holland, the former, being 
especially deadly. Seven wickets were down for 16, but then a 
stand was made and 13 runs were added for the next wicket. The 
whole side was out for 33, a very moderate score as it seemed then. 
Mr. Wood came out with the best analysis, taking four wickets 
for five runs. Our innings opened badly, the first two wickets 
falling for four runs. At the fall of the fourth wicket we collapsed 
completely, four wickets falling without any addition to the score. 
Carpenter took three wickets with successive balls and thus did the 
hat trick, a very rare occurrence. When the ninth wicket fell the 
score was only 20, but the tenth wicket put on 9 runs and at one 
time it looked as if we might make the necessary runs. Our de¬ 
feat was due to the excellent bowling of Carpenter, who took 6 


O CI O CO iO N 







































THE ASHBURIAN 


15 


wickets for 14 runs. In the second innings we tried our change 
bowlers as the match was finished and the visitors scored freely. 
We were left with about ten minutes to bat in which time we lost 
4 wickets for 9 runs. Perhaps one reason for our defeat was a 
falling off in the fielding, which was not good. Several easy catches 
were missed and runs were thrown away by fielders not backing up. 
However we hope to avenge this defeat in our return match. 

Below are the scores and bowling analyses:— 

Col. Ward’s XI. 

1st Innings. 2nd Innings. 


Pte. Giles, b. Wood. 0 

A. G. Lewis, ct. Weston, b. Wood. 2 

Sgt. Vergette, b. Holland. 0 

H. E. Brown, b. Wood. 0 

Sgt. Stegman ct. and bid. Holland.6 

Sgt. Orbinski, b. Holland. 1 

S-Sgt. Watts, ct. and bid. Wood. 1 

Corp. Carpenter, ct. Maunsell, b. Holland 11 

S-Sgt. King, b. Holland. 5 

Pte. Warren, not out. 1 

Col. Ward, b. Holland. 0 

Extras. 6 


Total. 33 


ct. bid. Weston. 3 

ct. Creeth, b. Macmahon. 4 

Not out. 30 

ct. Maclaren, b. Maunsell. 6 

l.b.w. b. Wood. 6 

Not out. 21 


Did not bat. 


Extras. 6 

*Total. 76 


winnings declared closed. 


Ashbury College. 

1st Innings. 2nd Innings, 


Sladen, b. Giles. 

3 

b. Giles. 


1 

N. Creeth b. Carpenter. 

3 

ct. Ward, b. Stegman. . . 


2 

D. C. Wood, b. Carpenter. 

0 




Holland, ct. Watts, b. Stegman. 

4 

ct. King, b. Giles. 


0 

Maclaren, b. Carpenter. 

0 




Capt. Weston, b. Carpenter. 

0 




Burns, ct. Stegman, b. Carpenter. 

0 




Macmahon, not out. 

6 

Not out. 


4 

Code, ct. Orbinski, b. Stegman. 

0 




Reiffenstein, b. Carpenter. 

1 




Maunsell, ct. and bid. Giles. 

7 

b. Giles. 


0 

Extras. 

5 

Extras. 


2 

Total. 

. . . 29 

Total (4 wickets) . . 


9 

BOWLING 

ANALYSIS. 




Col. Ward’s XI. 



1st Innings. 


2nd Innings. 


Wickets. 

Runs 


Wickets. 

Runs. 

Holland. 6 

22 

Holland. 

0 

23 

D. C. Wood. 4 

5 

D. C. Wood. 

1 

6 

Capt. Weston. 


Capt. Weston. 

1 

12 

Macmahon. 


Macmahon. 

1 

13 

Maunsell. 


Maunsell. 

1 

16 

Ashbury 

College. 



1st Innings. 


2nd Innings. 


Wickets. 

Runs 


Wickets. 

Runs 

Carpenter. 6 

14 

Carpenter. 

0 

2 

Giles. 2 

5 

Giles. 

3 

2 

Stegman. 2 

5 

Stegman. 

1 

0 































































16 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Ashbury College v Ottawa. 

This match was played on our grounds on May 7th and re¬ 
sulted in an easy win for the visitors. Owing-to the fact that it 
was rather early in the season, the Ottawa Club was unable to send 
a second team. We therefore had to do battle with most of the first 
team. The visitors batted first and we soon saw that it would be 
a difficult task to get them out. After an hour we had dismissed 
four batsmen and their captain closed the innings. Rankin and 
Ackland were the top scorers, although the former was very lucky. 
Their total score was 90 and we had an hour in which to beat them. 
Our innings again opened disastrously and wickets fell fast before 
the bowling of Anderson, a new member of the club. A very fast 
bowler with a good length, he quite demoralized the boys. He was 
taken off when 9 wickets were down, which gave Mr. Wood and 
Cory an opportunity of adding 29 to the score, bringing the total 
to 53, before the latter was run out. This was a great pity as Cory 
was batting in fine shape and might have saved the game. The 
fielding was again quite good and Burns as wicket keeper has im¬ 
proved tremendously. It was a very cold afternoon for both the 
umpires and the scorers and we feel very grateful to them for 
stopping out in the playground so long. 

Below are the scores and the bowling analyses:— 

Ottawa. Ashbury College. 


H. Ackland, ct. Burns, bid. Holland ... 29 

L. Frick, bid. Wood. 0 

F. Campbell, ct. Wood, bid. Holland.... 0 

T. Rankin, not out. 39 

M. Clunn, lbw., bid. Wood. 3 

Kinross, not out. 13 


W. Mackenzie. 

Rev. C. Elwes. 

Iv. B. Anderson. 

M. O’Halloran, did not bat 
D. L. Plucknut. 


Extras. 6 

Total. 90 


Innings declared closed. 


Sladen, bid. Frick. 2 

Macmahon, bid. Anderson. 2 

Holland, bid. Anderson. 0 

Maclaren I, bid. Anderson. 0 

N. Creeth, bid. Frick. 0 

Capt. Weston, bid. Anderson. 5 

Burns, bid. Frick. 5 

D. C. Wood, not out. 23 

Maunsell, bid. Anderson. 0 

Code, bid. Campbell.<. . 2 

Cory, run out. 7 

Extras. 7 


Total. 53 


BOWLING ANALYSIS 

Ottawa. Ashbury College. 


Holland. 

Wickets. 

2 

Runs 

27 

Anderson. 

Wickets. 
. 5 

Runr. 

8 

U. C. Wood. 

. 2 

37 

Frick. 

. 3 

24 

Capt, Weston. 

. 0 

20 

Campbell. 

. 1 

13 


Ashbury College v Militia Department, 

(12 a Side) 

The second match of this series was played on Monday, May 12th 
and again resulted in a win for the visitors by 31 runs. The scores 
were very much higher than in the first game and there was only 
time for one innings on each side. Mr. Wood with his usual luck 


































THE ASH BUR IAN 


17 


lost the toss and we had to bat first. Six wickets down for ten looked 
bad, but then a stand by Mr. Creeth and Mr. Wood raised the score 
to 38. However, ten wickets were down for 50 and all thought the 
innings was over. A new player in Morris came to the rescue and 
with Mr. Wood added 50 runs for the last wicket. He kept up his 
end while Mr. Wood made the runs. Morris’ performance was most 
praiseworthy and he ran several almost impossible runs to enable 
Mr. Wood to have the bowling. The latter was in a happy scoring 
vein and made 14 boundaries, one of which was a colossal hit over 
the fence. He was finally bowled by Stegman for 75, a record 
score for the ground. The visitors then proceeded to treat our 
bowling with contempt and Pte. Giles ran up a good score. He 
was twice missed in his innings, but he played well and also succeeded 
in sending one over the fence. When he was out the telegraph read: 
Two for 68. Wickets then fell faster and there were seven down 
for 98. The next man in making the winning hit and the whole 
side was out for 131, the Colonel carrying his bat for 10 runs. Mr. 
Wood was the most successful of the bowlers, taking 7 wickets for 
32 runs, while Maunsell came next with 3 for 35. Holland had a 
day off with both bat and ball. On the whole the fielding was good 
and good catches were made by Code, Holland and Cory. There 
is still room for improvement in ground work and backing up. 
Below are the scores and analyses:— 

Militia Department. Ashbury College. 


Sgt. Stegman, bid. Holland. 0 

Pt. Giles, ct. Creeth, bid. Maunsell. 57 

Mr. Pitman, bid. Maunsell. 12 

H. W. Brown, bid. Wood. 11 

Stg. Vergette, bid. Wood. 1 

Corp. Carpenter, ct. Holland, bid. Maun¬ 
sell .,. 8 

St.-Sgt. King, ct. Cory, bid. Wood. 13 

Sgt. Orbinski, lbw., bid. Wood. 0 

Sgt. Watts, ct. Code, bid.Wood. 8 

Sgt. George, bid. Wood. 0 

Mr. Cragg, bid. Wood. 0 

Col. Ward, not out. 10 

Extras. 11 

Total. 131 


Sladen, bid. Carpenter. 1 

Macmahon, bid. Carpenter. 0 

Holland, bid. Giles. 3 

Maclaren, bid. Carpenter. 0 

Burns, bid. Giles. 2 

Maunsell, bid. Giles. 1 

N. A. Creeth, ct. bid., Carpenter. 9 

D. C. Wood, bid. Stegman. 75 

Code, ct. King, bid.Carpenter. 0 

Cory, bid. Giles. 0 

Reiffenstein, bid. Giles. 2 

Morris, not out. 1 

Extras. 6 


Total. 100 


BOWLING ANALYSIS. 


Militia Department. 


Ashbury College. 



Wickets. 

Runs. 


W ckets. 

Runs 

D. C. Wood. 

. 7 

32 

Carpenter. 

. 5 

34 

Holland. 

. 1 

32 

Giles. 

. 5 

38 

Maclaren. 

. 0 

21 

Stegman. 

. 1 

13 

Maunsell. 

. 3 

35 

George. 

. 0 

9 


Ashbury College v The Old Boys. 

This match was played here on Saturday, May 17th and re¬ 
sulted in a win for the school by 31 runs after a most exciting game. 







































18 


THE ASHBURIAN 


An early start was made and there was time for two innings by 
both sides. Heavy scoring was the order of the day and the honours 
were carried off by Chrysler who made 71 in the second innings, 
a most brilliant display of batting. The Old Boys were all out for 
35 in their first innings, as they were out of practice. O’Halloran 
was undeafeated for 15 at the end. The school replied with 102, 
of which Holland made 36 by a vigorous batting display. He was 
well supported by Irvin, who scored 15 not out. The Old Boys 
did better in their second venture and made 123, leaving the school 
57 to make to win. This seemed an easy task but wickets fell so 
fast that when Mr. Wood, the last man came in, there were still 15 
runs required. However Morris, the other batsman, played his usual 
stonewall game and the runs were scored soon, after which Mr. 
Wood proceeded to hit everything. In ten minutes he scored 43 
runs, while Morris was not out 15 at the end. It was a most en¬ 
joyable game, although it was a pity that the Old Boys were unable 
to raise a full team. Capt. Weston and two or three boys kindly 
played for them, but it is hoped that next time they will have a 
full team. There was a change in the wicket and we were able for 
the first time to play on the grass without using the matting. 

Below are the scores and bowling analyses:— 


Ashbury College. 

1st Innings. 2nd Innings. 


Burns, bid. Burn. 2 

Sladen, ct. Woollcombe, b. Burn. 6 

Holland ct. O’Halloran, b. Weston. 36 

Macmahon, ct O’Halloran, b. Burn. 6 

Maclaren, lbw. b. Burn. 0 

Morris, run out. 7 

Reiffenstein, ct. and b. Weston. 5 

Irvin, not out. 15 

N. A. Creeth, ct. Weston, b. Burn. 12 

D. C. Wood, ct. Chrysler, b. Burn. 9 

Extras. 4 


bid. Weston. 17 

ct. Woollcombe, b. Weston. 0 

bid. Burn. 4 

bid. Weston. 0 

ct. sub. bid. Burn. 0 

not out. 15 

ct. Chrysler, b. Weston. 0 

ct. Chrysler, 1). Weston. 1 

bid. Burn. 1 

st. O’Hallonan, b. Burn. 43 

Extras. 6 


Total 


102 Total 


87 


1st Innings. 


The Old Boys 


2nd Innings. 


P. Woollcombe, bid Maclaren. 0 

Capt. Weston, bid. Maclaren. 4 

P. Chrysler, run out. 7 

D. Burn, ct. and bid. Maclaren. 5 

M. O’Halloran, not out. 15 

V. W. Thompson, ct Holland, b. Mac¬ 
mahon . 1 

R. G Wood, ct. Sladen, b. Maclaren. 0 

H. Graham, bid. Maclaren. 0 

J. Hazen, ct. Sladen, b. Macmahon. 1 

R Patterson, ct. Madaren, b Macmahon 2 

R. G Buttervvorth, b. Macmahon. 0 

Ext r as. 0 


Tota'. 35 


ct. and b. Irvin. 0 

ct. Sladen, b. Maclaren. . .. 12 

bid. Wood. 71 

runout. 6 

ct. Wood, b. Burns. 12 

ct. and b. Reiffenstein. 5 

Not out. 1 

bid. Maclaren. 1 

ct. Sladen, b. Holland. 3 

ct. Wood, b Bums. 1 

b. Wood. 0 

Extras. 11 


Total. 123 






















































I 


THE ASH BURIAN 


19 




BOWLING 

ANALYSIS. 




The Old Boys. 



1st 

Innings. 


2nd Innings. 



Wickets. Runs. 


Wickets. 

Maclaren. . . 


. 5 19 

Maclaren. . . 

. 1 

Macmahon. . 


. 4 16 

Macmahon. . 


Burns. 



Burns.. 

3 

Reiffenstein. 



Reiffenstein. 

. 1 

Irvin. 



Irvin. 

1 

Holland.... 



Holland. . . . 

. 1 

Wood. 



Wood. 

9 



Ashiiury 

College. 



1st 

Innings. 


2nd Innings. 



Wickets. Runs. 


Wickets. 

Burn. 


. 6 58 

Burn. 

. 4 

Weston. 


. 2 40 

Weston. 

. 5 


Runs. 

30 

26 

18 

19 

11 

0 


Runs. 

48 

33 


Who will furnish the school with a new FLAG? 


TENNIS 

Tennis is flourishing and there are three courts in constant use. 
At the time of going to press, there are three tournaments in full 
swing. They include (1) Open Singles (2) Double Handicaps, senior 
and junior. As the handicap events are being played on the Am¬ 
erican system, by which everyone plays against everyone, it is im¬ 
possible to make any prophecies about the result. The winner of 
the open singles will be presumably the best player in the school. 
One of the candidates for this honour is certainly Maclaren II, who 
has improved considerably and is a very steady player. 

Mr. Wiggins has his work cut out to finish all these tournaments 
as they entail an enormous amount of labour, but we wish him the 
success he deserves. Tennis has become under his supervision one 
of the most popular games at the school. 


OUR OUTING TO GOVERNMENT HOUSE 

On Monday, Feb. 1 Oth, we were delighted to learn that the Duke 
of Connaught had very kindly invited the whole school to spend the 
afternoon at Government House, what time the Aides shoidd en¬ 
gage our hockey team in friendly rivalry on the ice. So at the 
conclusion of afternoon school we all repaired to the vice-regal 
home, where we were welcomed by His Royal Highness and Princess 
Patricia, in the regrettable absence of the Duchess who was unfortun¬ 
ately indisposed. 

After tea. and conversation—chiefly the former in many cases—- 
we took up positions to watch the match and applaud the efforts 
of the two teams. A very enjoyable game ensued, and there were 
many exciting moments round both goals before the School team 
was eventually declared victorious by 5 goals to 2. 























20 


THE ASHBURIAN 


The sounds of laughter from the toboggan-slide testified to the 
fact that those of us who were not watching the game, were 
enjoying the exhilirating trip on the toboggans kindly provided for 
our use, and the occasional spills only seemed to increase the pleasure 
(we refer to those in which we played the part of spectator). 

It was not till after 6 o’clock, though the time seemed all too 
short, that we finally took our leave. Davis expressed our thanks 
to Their Royal Highnesses in a few well-chosen words, and the rest 
of us endorsed his remarks with three hearty cheers followed by a 
deafening “ tiger”. So ended a very enjoyable afternoon. 


CADET CORPS 

There have been drills twice a week since Easter and the corps 
is now beginning to look very smart. The inspection will take place 
soon and there is no reason why we should not make as good a show 
as last year. 

* \ On April 17th in the evening there was a march out, in which 
our cadets took part. They were highly complimented on their smart 
appearance and the efficient way in which they drilled. 



cadet corps 









THE ASHBURIAN 


21 


CHAPEL NOTES 

From time to time we are favoured on Sunday evenings with 
special preachers. On March 2nd we had the pleasure of listening 
to a very earnest address from the Rev. W. M. Loucks M.A., rector 
of St. Matthew’s Church, Ottawa, and again on April 2nd The Rev. 
Dr. Yorhis, late headmaster of St. John’s Choir School, New York, 
preached to us a most practical and helpful sermon. 

Our annual Confirmation Service was held on the evening of 
May 4th, when His Grace The Archbishop of the Diocese, adminis¬ 
tered the rite of Confirmation to thirteen of the boys. We shall 
not soon forget the earnest words of our much beloved Archbishop 
who for so many years past has been a very warm friend of Ashbury. 

The following boys were confirmed:— 

G. Barwis J. Marshall 

A. Bate W. Morris 

L. Carling R. Mullkins 

J. Carling R. Patterson 

C. B. Hallick V. Thompson 

L. Jackson B. Tremain 

R. Kuntz 

On Sunday May 11th, The Rev. A. Hall, Senior Chaplain to 
the British and Foreign Sailors’ Society in Canada, gave us a most 
interesting sermon on seafaring men and the debt we owe them. 

The singing at our evening service on Sundays has been much 
improved and on two occasions we were favoured with solos during 
the Offertory, by Wood who has a fine falsetto voice. The songs 
chosen were “There is a green hill” and “The Holy City.” 

Donations to the Chapel. 

The following were inadvertently omitted from the list published 
in our last issue. 


Mrs. W. W. Cory.White Chalice Veil 

Mrs. Codville.Red Chalice Veil 

Mrs. J. W. Woods.Green Chalice Veil 

? ea n c l‘-.<( Purple Chalice Veil 

Miss McLachlin.\ 1 

The Rev. A. M. & Mrs. Mackay.. .Fair Linen Cloth 

Miss Holt.Linen Purificators 

Late Donations. 

Mr. W. Merrill Eastcott.Hymn Board 

We are still in need of a good PIPE ORGAN! 

Who will help? 









99 


THE ASHBURIAN 


OLD BOYS NEWS 

Fred. B. Carling (1902-6) is now manager of the Try-Me-Tire 
Company, Ottawa, and is numbered among the Capital’s progressive 
and successful young business men. 

C. P. Cotton (1908-1909) figured on the hockey team of the 
School of Science, Inter-faculty Champions of Toronto University 
for 1913. 

C. W. 4 Barwis (1903-11) received all sorts of cofnmendary 
notices from the press for his work on the R.M.C. team in the Inter¬ 
mediate Intercollegiate hockey finals with the McMaster University 
the Toronto Star calling him “the choice of the Cadets.” 

Those Ashburians who tackled the R.M.C. exams here recently 
had to face an old Ashbury boy, Major P. S. Benoit, R.C.E. (1899- 
1901) as one of the local examiners. 

Our own Henry Newell Bate, in our midst from 1904 to 1911, 
and now a lieutenant in the 5th Princess Louise Dragoon Guards, 
is beginning to win a wide reputation for himself as a horseman. 
Although one of the youngest riders in competition at the National 
Horse Show held in Toronto, he managed to carry off the Inter¬ 
national Cup presented by H.R.H. the Duke of Connaught and 
open to officers of all nations. At the Montreal and Ottawa Horse 
Shows a like success attended his riding. The Duke of Connaught’s 
Cup was one of the most coveted trophies at the National Show, 
and Lieutenant Bate opened the eyes of all with his fine exhibition 
of horsemanship. 

The Ashburian owes its congratulations to John Travers 
Lewis (1900-4), on being graduated from McGill with the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering. Jack is also a 
graduate of R.M.C. in the class of 1911. 

Another old Ashburian to graduate this year from McGill is 
Edmund Freeman Newcombe (1898-1907) perhaps better known to 
the old boy fraternity as “Nixie”. Besides the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts which he has already received, Nixie is now entitled to the 
letters B.C.L. after his name, having received that degree (with 
second class honours) and at the Convocation in May. It is pro¬ 
bable that he will be called to the bar and become a full-fledged 
lawyer this summer. 

The engagements of several Old Boys are announced, and ’ere 
this number of The Ashburian reaches its subscribers, it is ex¬ 
pected that two or three more of the old guard will have become 
benedicts. 

The Editor is always ready to receive information concerning 
the doings and whereabouts of Old Boys for publication in this 
column.—H.R.M. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


23 


THE NAVY—AND HOW TO BECOME ONE OF 

ITS OFFICERS 

“Si vis pacem, para bellum.” 

There is, I suppose, no phrase (except possibly the well-worn 
‘Balbus murum aedificabat’) which has come into the limelight 
so much of late as that which heads this article, and which any be¬ 
ginner in Latin can translate for himself. It was always a well 
known saying in the Old Country, but recently, owing to the wide¬ 
spread interest which is being taken in the Naval and Military 
preparations of the Great Powers of the World, every Canadian 
recognises it for the text of the sermon of all the Powers of Europe. 

The two means of carrying the above warning into effect are, 
of course, the Royal Navy and the Army, and of course the former 
has, from time immemorial, occupied a place in the hearts of the 
Anglo-Saxon youth, quite distinct from that of the Army. This 
is natural, for less is known of the Navy: the inhabitants of the 
floating citadels seem to be denizens of another world altogether, 
and the very ships of the Navy themselves seem to diffuse an at¬ 
mosphere of mystery, an atmosphere pregnant with traditions of 
glorious deeds and wonderful happenings. It is, then, to explain 
away some of the fog of ignorance which seems to permeate this 
atmosphere, that I am taking up a couple of pages of The Ashburian. 

' There is no need—nor is there space here—for me to give a most 
curtailed history of the Navy—every schoolboy knows that its 
deeds speak louder than any words, and that, while names like 
Blake, Nelson, Rodney, Howe, Hood, and a hundred others, live 
in the annals of history, there will be no need for anyone to go about 
and “crack up” the Service. It is not so generally known, however, 
that the parent service is begetting a family: that there are being- 
founded, all over the British Empire, younger navies, born in, and 
fostered on, the glorious traditions of the British Navy. Naturally, 
being but newly-born, the child is very small, but still, even a giant 
is small at birth, and the mightiest results often arise from very 
small beginnings. One of these “child Navies,” then, is the Canad¬ 
ian Navy—which, though jeered at by many, may one day prove 
to be the strongest link in the chain connecting up the British Empire. 

To join this Canadian Navy, then, how should one proceed? 
The answer is simple. Write to the Department of the Naval 
Service: if you don’t get all the information you want, write again— 
and again—until you are completely satisfied. The applicant will 
find, then, that he has to pass an examination which is held under 
the auspices of the Civil Service Commission every May. 

This exam, is not hard, and even if it were, the prize to be 
obtained (in the shape of a Cadetship) is so very well worth some 
extra hard work, that the proud Cadet will find himself amply 


24 


THE ASHBURIAN 


repaid for having got up early in the morning to struggle with the 
vagaries of x, or to flatten out the difficulties of the French language. 

Having passed the exam,, then the Cadet receives instructions 
as to joining the Royal Naval College of Canada, at Halifax, which 
he will do about the beginning of August. There he at once notices 
the Naval atmosphere; first of all he is in uniform; then there is the 
discipline which, inculcated in the Naval Officer while young, remains 
one of his fetishes for ever. There is plenty of hard work at the 
College, but the body shares it as well as the mind, for physical 
exercise and development is always sought after. 

The day’s routine is something like this in summer:— 

A.M. 6.35—Turn out. Baths. Dress. Cocoa. 

7.00—Assembly. Physical drill and boat drill. 

7.50—Return to College. Make beds. 

8.05—Breakfast. 

8.55— Assembly. Studies. 

1 f . 00—Stand easy. 

11.15—Resume studies. 

P.M. 1.00—Dismiss studies. 

1.10— Dinner. 

2.10— Assembly. Studies. 

4.15—Dismiss studies. Shift into flannels. Recreation. 

Punishment drill. 

P.M. 6.40—Return to College. 

7.00—Assembly. Tea. 

7.55— Evening studies. 

0.00—Dismiss studies. Turn in. 

9.30—Rounds. 

No afternoon studies on Wednesdays. Neither evening nor 
afternoon studies on Saturdays. 

At first glance, this does not seem to differ very much from the 
ordinary school routine—but when we look into it we find several 
points of difference; for instance “Studies” is not all book work, 
but includes Carpentering and Engineering—theoretical and prac¬ 
tical; also Navigation, Seamanship and Pilotage, both practical 
and theoretical. For this purpose several boats are attached to 
the College, both pulling and sailing, in the largest of which the 
“DIANA”, the Cadets make short cruises to neighbouring ports, 
whilst the “CANADA” is always available for instruction in Engin¬ 
eering, etc. Thus much of the “Studies” is not what the average 
boy would call “ work”, as there is nothing dearer to the heart of 
the “genus puer” than “messing about” with tools or boats (es¬ 
pecially when the “messing about” is being done on a properly 
laid out plan with some definite object in view). Then “ Recrea 
tion” does not mean fooling around in an aimless kind of way—but 
all tends to develop the Cadet in mind and body. 






THE ASHBURIAN 


Thus early, too, is authority given to those who have proved 
themselves most fitted for it, for those Cadets who are most pro¬ 
mising all round, in work and games, and general conduct, are 
promoted to “ Cadet Captain” and enjoy several privileges which 
are denied to the mere “ Cadet” : they have more leave, their bounds 
are not so restricted—and they have authority over the rest of the 
Cadets in College, besides receiving more pocket money than the others. 

Enough for the work of the College; now for a word about the 
leave. Long leave (six weeks) is granted twice a year; at Christmas 
and in the summer; in addition a short break of from Friday to 
Monday inclusive occurs in the middle of each term, so that all the 
complement of the College may get a breathing space. 

Having been in the College for two years, the Cadet passes his 
“Passing-out Examination” and goes to sea as a Cadet for one 
year in a proper full-fledged man-of-war. Under present arrange¬ 
ments the British Admiralty have agreed to embark these Cadets 
on board one of their own ships, where they will receive exactly the 
same training as the Imperial Cadets. Now, too, the Canadian 
Cadet begins to feel that he is in the service of the King, for he 
receives pay at the rate of $2.00 per diem from the date of embarkation; 
here, also, is where the Cadet begins to see some of the world—and 
to see it under the most favourable conditions, for the following 
programme shows that a cruise such as these young officers generally, 
enjoy:— 

Leave Plymouth; call at St. John, N.F.; Charlottetown, P.E.I.; 
Halifax; St. Kitts; St. Lucia; Barbadoes; Martinique; Bermuda; 
Gibraltar; Algiers; Malta; Plataea; Corfu; Villefranche; Gibraltar; 
Arosa Bay and back to Plymouth. 

Such a cruise occupies about six months, thus giving the Cadet, 
plenty of time to find their sea-legs, and accustom themselves to 
life on board ship. The remaining six months are spent in short 
cruises on Home Waters, and at the end of the year another ‘ 1 Passing- 
out Examination” takes place, to determine the seniority of the 
Midshipmen, to which rank the Cadets are promoted after the 
examination. They then leave the Cruiser and undergo various 
courses on shore, to enable them to pass for Acting Sub-Lieutenant, 
when the way is then clear to the much desired “Flag” rank—he., 
to the rank of Admiral, promotion to which, all the way up, depends 
solely and entirely upon the personal merit and efforts of the Officer 
himself. 

This will, I hope, serve to show the sort of life a Cadet, leads— 
and may possibly be the means of inducing some waverer, who is 
hesitating between the sea and life on shore, to throw his lot in with 
the Navy, than which there can be no finer life, and on which, to 
an almost incredible degree, rests the future of the British Empire, 
and possibly that of the whole Anglo-Saxon race. 


26 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Perhaps in the next issue of The Ashburian I may be 
permitted to give a short account of the various ranks on board 
ship, and what the work of each branch is, and show how a Medical 
Officer is to be distinguished from an Executive Officer, etc., so 
that my readers will know exactly “what is what/’ when they have 
the good fortune to go on board one of the Ships of the Empire’s 
“First Line of Defence”.—F. E. C. 

INTER SCHOOL SPORTS 


1. 100 yards.(1) Davis, Ash. (2) Brown, L.C.C. (3) Harrower, LCC Time: 10$ sec. 

2. 880 yards.(1) Woods, L.C.C. (2) Alford, L.C.C. (3) Lowe, Ashbury Time: 2, Ilf sec. 

3. 220 yards.(1) Brown, L.C.C. (2) Davis, Ash. (3) Harrower, L.CC Time: 24f sec. 

4. Long Jump.(1) Verner, Ash. (2) Pope, L.C.C. (3) Gray,St.Albans Distance, 17ft 8£in 

5. 440 yards.(1) Woods, L.C.C. (2) Symons, LCC. (3) Bate, Ashbury Time: 56 sec. 

6. One Mile.... *. ... (1) Brown, L.C.C. (2) Alford, L.C.C. (3) Graham, Ash. Time: 5mins.5$s. 

7. 120 yards hurdles(l) Maclaren, Ash.(2) Farthing LCC.(3) Gray, St.Albans Time: 16$ sec. 

8. Relay Race ... .(1) L.C.C. (2) Ashbury (3) St. Albans. Time:3min. 55$ sec 

9. High Jump.(1) Campbell LCC (2) Maclaren, Ash.(3) 

Merritt, L.C.C, 


The number of points gained by each school was as follows: 
Lower Canada 21 Ashbury College 10 St. Albans 0 

The Cup was therefore won by Lower Canada. 

These sports took place after the magazine had gone to press 
A detailed account of them will be given in the next issue. 



A DUEL TO THE DEATH 





















THE ASHBURIAN 


27 


AN ADVENTURE IN FRANCE 

I was at this time only thirteen years old and was staying with 
friends in the north of England. It was approaching Xmas and I 
was anxiously awaiting the return of my parents from the south 
of France. One day about noon a message arrived with a telegram 
saying that it was impossible for them to come up to England but 
that I was to join them in M—. I was greatly surprised but rather 
pleased at the idea of a trip by myself. I caught the 6.30 express 
that evening and was soon on my way to London. My first diffi¬ 
culty arose at the station where I was supposed to change into a 
sleeper, but on enquiring I found there had been no car provided 
and so I was forced to sit up all night in a day coach. The train 
arrived in town about 7.30 a.m. Tuesday morning and I went to 
get a good wash and some breakfast. After breakfast, having ex¬ 
pressed my baggage right through to my destination, I took a seat 
in the Dover express. When I arrived at Dover it was a beautiful 
day and the English Channel was as smooth as glass. On the way 
over a light lunch was served, in which I participated although quite 
a number were unable to do so. When I arrived at Calais I found 
an inteipreter (I knew only about two words of French) who put 
me safely on the Paris express. When I reached Paris at half past 
four on Tuesday afternoon I was quite unsuccessful in finding an 
interpreter and so was alone in a strange city. Knowing that my 
train left another station on the other side of Paris I took a taxi 
and drove across. I was very startled to see the meter going up 
80, 90 centimes etc., but when I got to my destination I handed the 
driver a large silver piece and he very kindly gave me back some 
change which I afterwards found to be correct. It was now about 
5.30 p. m. and my train did not leave until 9 oclock. I sat down 
in the station for about two hours and then began to feel hungry. 
Although there was a large restaurant just above where I was sitting, 
I did not possess nerve enough to go up as I could not speak French. 
I then started to walk around, looking for a Cook’s travelling- 
agent, but my search was in vain, and when I sat down again I was 
feeling tired as well as hungry. About 8.30 I thought I had better 
have another look and after a few minutes’ walking I found my 
man who at once put me on the train without even looking at my 
ticket. I found again that this was another day coach, so I looked 
forward to another restful (?) night. We left Paris at 9 o’clock 
and I settled down to get some rest. About 5.30 a.m. Wednesday 
I was asked for my ticket (not in English, but in French, helped 
out with many signs) which I gave to the guard. I have never 
seen a man go so nearly crazy as he did. He looked first at the 
ticket and then at me and commenced a kind of war dance, mean¬ 
while spluttering and gesticulating wildly and it was quite a few 


28 


THE ASHBURIAN 


minutes before lie recovered. When he was a little more composed 
than before he made me understand with a lot more spluttering 
that I was on the wrong train, and what was worse, not even in France 
but in Switzerland. When the train got to the next stop I got off 
and he led me into a shack (It could not be called a station as it 
was only 4 feet by 6 feet with a bench in the middle.) The train 
pulled out and I was left utterly alone with the directions to take 
the first train the other way. I got the first train as I was told and 
about ten that morning when the train stopped, some man who 
spoke a few words of English told me that I descended here and 
waited till 10.35 for a train for the south. I sat down on a bench 
and Weary Willie waited again for two hours by this time, almost 
famished. At last I could stand it no longer. Seeing a small shop 
I managed after a good deal of pointing to get a small package of 
chocolate. It was now about 11 o’clock and I had to wait till 2.30 
before a train pulled in with placards on it marked M—. I got on 
board and took a seat in an empty compartment. The train was 
just starting when the door was hastily opened and a man jumped 
in. He was a very foreign looking man with a black beard and 
moustache and dark eyes. I at once had visions of anarchists, 
murderers etc. The next moment however my fears were allayed 
as he spoke English to me and you cannot imagine how glad I was 
to hear English spoken again after two days of a foreign tongue. 
He asked me where I was going, and when I said I was going to M—, 
he said I would get in about 7 o’clock. The afternoon passed and 
at a quarter to seven I began fixing my grip and putting my coat on. 
I soon received another shock when my companion told me that I 
did not arrive until 7 a.m next morning. I was now quite resigned 
to my fate and this last bit of news did not surprise me much. I 
asked my companion if it would be possible to get something to eat 
but he said that there was no buffet car. I sat up again that night 
talking at intervals to my friend. However we arrived in good time 
and I went straight to the hotel. After much questioning and a 
few sleepy answers, I retired to bed. I arose in time for dinner 
and I did full justice to the meal. When I look back on my experi¬ 
ences, it all seems rather funny, but it will be a long time before I 
forget my trip of three and a half days to the south of France. 

W. H. D. M. 


Who will furnish the school with a new FLAG? 



HERE ARE THREE REASONS WHY YOU SHOULD ALWAYS 

BUY 

EDDY’S MATCHES. 


I. THEY ARE CHEAP BECAUSE YOU GET FULL COUNT. 

II. THEY ARE SA^E BECAUSE THEY WILL NOT IGNITE IF 
STEPPED UPON. 

III. EVERY STICK IS A MATCH. EVERY MATCH IS A 
SURE LIGHT. 




SILENTS, SAFETIES, SULPHURS, PARLORS AND 

WAX VESTAS. 



PITTA WAY’S 
PHOTO STUDIO 

58 SPARKS STREET 
Ottawa’s Leading Photographer 


A “Birds’” Fountain Pen 

Will prove a source of pleasure and can be put to 
the following uses: 

“For writing your exercises.” 

“Writing home to Mother.” 

“Notifying Father that allowance is exhausted, &c.” 

Prices—$1.00 and upwards 

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The Ashburian 


Editorial Staff 

Editor-in-Chief -— Mr. C. H. Hooper. 

Sports Editors — R. Maclaren, J. W. Hennessey. 
Rifle Shooting —H. P. Graham. 

Secretary-Treasurer — Mr. U. E. C. Wood. 


EDITORIAL 

Since the last issue a school year has come to an end and a new 
one has opened. And with the beginning of a new year there has 
come home to us once again the realisation that “The old order 
changeth giving place to new”. Many familiar faces are missed, 
many new ones have taken their places. Perhaps the most missed has 
been that of our active and popular House master, Mr. Hooper. 
In obedience to medical orders he is resting his vocal cords grown 
temporarily weary in ministering to the mental needs of his pupils. 
We are truly glad to state that after Xmas he expects to be with us 
again with all his old time vigour and activity. Meantime the 
temporary gap in the staff is being filled by our much esteemed 
Mr. Cary-Elwes, who kindly agreed to postpone his departure from 
Ashbury until Xmas time. 

We welcome to our midst Mr. H. G. Rhoades who in September 
last joined the staff as Classical master. He has come to us with a 
long experience gained at Highfield School, Hamilton, that “seat of 
learning” that some few years ago sent us Mr. Hooper. 

The members of last year’s VI form have all left- us, and are 
now, we are glad to learn, “making good” at the various higher 
institutions to which they have attached themselves. We are 
glad to note a particularly promising set of new boys. They are 
mostly juniors, but this fact has the great advantage that they 
will grow up in the school and will catch, we trust, the true Ash- 
burian spirit. 

We have this year set before us a high ideal as regards both our 
work and our sports. In the former, we have set out to beat all our 
past records in the entrance exams, to the R. M. C. and the Uni¬ 
versities: while in the latter we have determined to capture all the 
three Championships of our Inter-School Athletic League— viz. Foot¬ 
ball, Hockey, and Field Sports. The first of these three has already 
been won, and we believe that the other two can in due time be 
ours, if we continue to cultivate that “spirit” that has marked each 










2 


THE ASHBURIAN 


member of our Senior team during the football season just closed. 
But whatever Fortune may hold in store for us, we shall do our 
very best to win her favour. And if effort and persistency can 
bring about success, we believe that this present school year will 
prove a record one as regards the work both of the class room and 
of the Campus. 


FOOTBALL 

ST. ALBAN’S CHALLENGE CUP. 


Date Match 

Oct. 4 Ashbury v. St. Albans 
Oct. 11 Lower Canada v. St. Alban s 
Oct. 18 Ashbury v. Lower Canada 
Oct. 25 Ashbury v. St. Alban’s 
Nov. 1 Lower Canada v. St. Alban’s 
Nov. 8 Ashbury v. Lower Canada 


Played at 

Won 

Score 

Brockville 

Ashbury 

67-0 

Montreal 

Lower Canada 

116-2 

Montreal 

Tie 

13 all 

Ottawa 

Ashbury 

68-0 

Brockville 

Lower Canada 

19-7 

Ottawa 

Ashbury 

4-3 


St. Alban’s were rather badly handicapped by losing practically 
the whole of their last year’s team, a team which played great foot¬ 
ball. They were very light on the line and in their first two matches 
they were without the services of Skinner, their best player. Both 
Ashbury and L. C. C. scored the same number of points against 
them, but St. Alban’s were unable to score against us, whereas 
they made 9 points against L. C. C. This was due to the fact that 
L. C. C. were a little weak on the defence at times. By a one point 
victory, therefore, we have won the cup and we offer our heartiest 
congratulations to Maclaren, the captain of one of the best teams 
ever produced at Ashbury. 


OTHER MATCHES. 


Date 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Nov. 


Match Played at 

27 R. M. C. & McGill v. The Rest Home 
9 R. M. C. & McGill v. The Rest Home 
11 Ashbury v. Renfrew Collegiate Renfrew 
11 Ashbury III v. Hodgett’s Team Home 
15 Ashbury IV. v. Ottawa College Home 
18 Ashbury III. v. Hodgett’s Team Home 
25 Ashbury V v. The Camerons Home 

29 Ashbury III v. Ottawa College Home 

30 R. M. C. & McGill v. The Rest Home 

31 Ashbury IV. v. The Sterlings Home 
1 Ashbury 1. v. Brock ville 

1 Collegiate Home 

Ashbury V v. Models II Home 


Won Score 

R. M. C. & McGill 20-10 
The Rest 19-8 

Renfrew 25-7 

Hodgett’s Team 22-6 

Ottawa College 47-0 

Hodgett’s Team 6-4 

Ashbury V 22-0 

Ottawa College 9-0 

R.M.C. & McGill 31-6 

Sterlings 17-1 

Ashbury 8-0 

Ashbury 14-5 


Below is given an account of all the first team matches in the 
order in which they have been played. 



THE ASH BUR I AN 


3 


Ashbury College y. St. Alban’s College. 

Our football season opened with this match, which was played 
at Brockville on Saturday, October 4th, and which resulted in an 
overwhelming victory for the visitors. We went down to Brock¬ 
ville on Friday night in the best of spirits, eager to revenge our defeat 
of last year. The journey down was uneventful and a little mild 
passing was indulged in at Smith Falls, where our judge of play, 
Beddoe, was nearly left behind. Hazen had some difficulty in trying 
to presuacle the conductor that he was his father, and eventually 
failed in his purpose to the tune of $2.20. However, he succeeded 
on the homeward journey, owing to the force of his arguments and 
a fine flow of rhetoric. We arrived at Brockville at 9.30 and made 
straight for Wright’s where we all consumed a deadly concoction, 
called a “Buster Brown”. As we were out for a win and the team 
meant business, we turned in early and lights were out by 11 o’clock. 
Our slumbers were disturbed by the trains which kept up a con¬ 
tinuous ringing of bells throughout the night. It would be wiser to 
draw a veil over the events which took place between 7 and 8 o’clock 
in the wing which we had reserved for us in the hotel. Perhaps, 
Hazen and Graham could throw a little light, (and nothing else, 
please) on the terrible catastrophe which overtook Mr. Wood and 
which delayed his appearance at breakfast. But accidents will 
occur even on out matches and in future a change of raiment will be 
taken for the benefit of anyone who may need it. We put on our 
uniforms after breakfast and started in the brake about 10 o’clock. 
It was the most perfect day with a very hot sun shining and over¬ 
coats were left behind. The match itself needs little description. 

It was a walk over for us. We were much heavier than our 
opponents and although their open passing was good, they were 
always too well marked to make any headway. The scoring was 
very even in the four quarters. In the first we made three touch¬ 
downs, two from bucks by Patterson, supported by Plazen and the 
third from a run by J. Carling. None of them were converted. In 
the second quarter Maclaren opened with a touchdown which was 
converted by Graham. Our next touchdown was a near thing. 
We only had a yard to make on our second down, which we failed 
to do. Then Graham managed to find the goal line with a buck on 
the third down. Just before half time Rivers made a beautiful 
run finishing up between the posts. The score was 31-0 at half 
time. 

In the second half we opened with a rouge. Maclaren followed 
this up with a fine run from over half way, ending in a touchdown. 
Yet another brilliant run by Carling and another by Reiffenstein 
both ending in the same way, the latter being converted by Code. 
In the last quarter the ball was always near the St. Alban’s goal. 


4 


THE ASH BUR I AN 


First Thackray bucked over for a touchdown, being rather damaged 
in his effort. Then Patterson and Hazen scored their third touch¬ 
down of the match and then Maclaren finished up in brilliant style 
by putting over three drop kicks, bringing the final score to 67-0. A 
colossal score against any team. Everyone played well: our 
forwards were too eager in the first half and were often offside. 
Reiffenstein was rather shaky with his signals at the start, but im¬ 
proved towards the end. 

Our drive back to the hotel was a noisy affair, as each member 
of the team was cheered in turn. A good dinner at which we were 
the guests of St. Alban’s was followed by one last visit to Wright’s 
and then the return journey to Ottawa. A most enjoyable trip 
was the verdict of everybody. Four old boys saw the match, 
amongst whom was Naismith, last year’s captain. Stuart Bate 
acted as timekeeper and Beddoe very kindly judged play. 

The line up was as follows: 

Back —C. Rivers. 

Half Backs —T. Blakeney, J. Carling, W. Thackray. 

Quarter —J. C. Reiffenstein. 

Scrimmage —D. MacMahon, W. P. Muirhead, J. C. Chanonhouse. 

Insides —A. L. Code, J. Hazen. 

Middles —R. Patterson, W. Graham. 

Outsides —R. Maclaren, L. B. Carling. 


Ashbury College v. Renfrew Collegiate. 

Our trip to Renfrew began in sunshine under the most favour¬ 
able conditions and ended in pouring rain and disaster. There was a 
curious coincidence with regard to the disaster. Last year in the 
same match on our ground P. Woollcombe was badly hurt in the 
first two minutes of the match. This year L. Carling was stunned 
while tackling in the first minute of the game. A doctor had to be 
sent for and he was taken to the hotel. He recovered sufficiently 
to get back to Ottawa with the rest of us in the evening. Simulta¬ 
neously with the accident came the rain and players and umpires 
were drenched. The ball was greasy and difficult to hold, so that 
there was a considerable amount of fumbling. The Renfrew team 
was heavier than ours and they bucked with deadly effect, especially 
in the second half. There was a good deal of offside interference, 
which the referee allowed, and they should never have been allowed 
to count their last touchdown. They had a very fine player in their 
centre half, who made yards for them over and over again. The 
first, half was evenly contested, the score being 10-7 at half time. In 
the first quarter each side scored a touchdown, J. Carling being 



THE ASHBURIAN 


o 


responsible for ours with a fine run. In the second quarter we scored 
two rouges and Renfrew a second touchdown. In the second half, 
we did no scoring at all, while Renfrew put on three more touch¬ 
downs, making the final score 25-7. The three players who starred 
for Ashbury were: J. Carling who made several good runs, Graham, 
who tackled in magnificent style and Rivers, who was always in the 
right place at the right time. Before the match in the morning 
Hennessey very kindly took most of us for a ride in his car, so that 
we had an opportunity of seeing the sights of Renfrew. We all 
had to cross Suicide Bridge, on the other side of which we found the 
car awaiting us. 

The line up was as follows: 

Back —C. Rivers. 

Halves —T. Blakeney, J. Carling, A. L. Code. 

Quarter —J. C. Reiffenstein. 

Scrimmage —U. MacMahon, W. P. Muirhead, J. Chanonhouse. 

Insides —H. Graham, J. Hazen. 

Middles —R. Patterson, J .Hennessey. 

Outsides —R. Maclaren, L. Carling, (replaced by Wood). 

Ashbury College v. Lower Canada College. 

This match was played in Montreal on Saturday, October 18th, 
and resulted in a tie, each team scoring 13 points. We journeyed 
down to Montreal on Friday night, accompanied by several sup¬ 
porters and put up at The Queen’s Hotel. We were up at Lower 
Canada College by ten o’clock and the game was started at 10.45 in 
cloudy weather, with a fair amount of wind. Maclaren lost the 
toss and had to play the first quarter against the wind. At the last 
moment he decided to play Holland instead of Blakeney on the half 
back line. Lower Canada were on the offensive at the start and 
they made several yards by bucking. It was not long before they 
scored a rouge. A minute later they scored a touchdown, one of 
their forwards intercepting a bad pass from Holland to Carling. 
This rather demoralised us for a time and Lower Canada finding 
themselves close to our line, bucked over for another touchdown, 
which they converted. The score at the end of the first quarter 
was 12-0, a useful lead for our opponents. In the second quarter, 
we gave a better display, and Holland did some useful kicking. We 
opened with a rouge, which was followed by the best touchdown 
of the match. Hennessey, getting the ball in the open, made a 
sensational run of thirty yards through at least ten of the opposing 
side and finished up by placing the ball between the posts. This 
effort was greeted with tremendous applause by the spectators. 
Carling failed to convert it. Before half time, we added another 
rouge, and at half time the score was 12-7. Then it began to rain. 


6 


THE ASHBURIAN 


and the second half was fought out with a greasy football on a 
slippery surface. The third quarter was a most important one for 
us. If we could hold our opponents against the wind, we might 
win the match. We played our best in this quarter. Lower Canada 
could make no impression on our line with their bucks and every 
time they kicked, either Thackray or Carling would catch the ball 
and run it out about twenty or thirty yards. Lower Canada only 
succeeded in scoring one rouge. About five minutes before quarter 
time, Holland wishing to retrieve his error in the first quarter made a 
brilliant run and scored a touchdown. Carling again failed to con¬ 
vert. Lower Canada were unlucky to lose two good players in this 
quarter from injuries. The last quarter was a grim struggle. We 
only had to make one point to tie the score. Both sides made des¬ 
perate efforts. Maclaren only failed by inches to score a drop goal 
on one occasion. There was only a minute to play when Holland 
tied the score with a rouge. This was the last score in one of the 
best matches ever seen. 

The game was a perfectly clean one and was well handled by 
two old boys, one from Lower Canada and one from Ashbury. Mac¬ 
laren deserves to be congratulated on his team. Lower Canada had 
not lost a match and had a great reputation. And yet we succeeded 
in pulling down that lead of 12 points, in a way which will long be 
remembered in Ashbury. It is impossible to single out any one 
player, as the whole team played well. 

We were all entertained to dinner by Mr. Fosbery in his new 
dining room at the College, after which we returned to Ottawa, 
thoroughly satisfied with a very pleasant trip. 

The line up was as follows: 

Back —C. Rivers. 

H. Backs —H. L. Holland, J. Carling, W. Thackray. 

Quarter —J. C. Reiffenstein. 

Scrimmage —D. MacMahon, W. P. Muirhead, J. C. Chanonhouse. 

Insides —A. L. Code, J. Hennessey. 

Middles —H. Graham, R. Patterson. 

Outsides —R. Maclaren, L. B. Carling. 

Ashbury College v. St. Alban’s School. 

The return match with St. Alban’s was the first game on our 
own ground and resulted in another overwhelming victory for us by 
68 points to nil. The field was in excellent condition in spite of the 
recent rain and a good, though rather one-sided game was witnessed 
by a large number of spectators. We were lucky to have the services 
of Mr. P. Chrysler as referee, who handled the game with his usual 
success. He was ably assisted by Mr. James, one of the St. Alban’s 
masters. In the first quarter we played against the wind and in 


THE ASHBURIAN 


7 


less than five minutes Maclaren had crossed the line twice. Just 
before quarter time Blakeney scored from an onside kick. None of 
these three touchdowns were converted. In the second quarter with 
the wind behind us, we scored 21 points. Graham, Carling I, Pat¬ 
terson, and Maclaren scored touchdowns, none of which were con¬ 
verted. A fifth should have been scored, but the quarter signalled a 
kick with only a yard to go and the result was a rouge. The score 
at half time was 36-0. The third quarter opened with a rouge. 
Our bucks were irresistible in this quarter and the honours fell to 
Patterson, who scored twice and Graham, who scored once. Once 
again we failed to convert any of these. In the last quarter the same 
two boys were responsible for all further scoring. Patterson again 
scored twice and Graham once. Our thirteenth and last touchdown 
was converted by Reiffenstein. Our failure to convert is our weak 
point and there really should be no difficulty in converting, when the 
touchdown is between the posts. In this match nine touchdowns 
were scored between the goal posts and only one converted. The 
game needs no further comment. The team was in splendid condi¬ 
tion and everyone worked hard. 

The line up was as follows: 

Back —C. Rivers. 

Halves —T. Blakeney, J. Carling, W. Thackray, A. Hennessey. 

Quarter —J. C. Reiffenstein. 

Outsides —R. Maclaren, L. Carling. 

Middles —J. Hennessey, A. Code. 

Insides —W. Graham, R. Patterson. 

Scrunmage —J. Chanonhouse, D. MacMahon, W. P. Muirhead, 
W. Cory. 

Spares —C. Wood, J. Hazen. 

Ashbury College v. Brockville Collegiate. 

This match was played on our ground on November 1st, and 
resulted in a win for Ashbury by 8 points to nothing. As the Brock¬ 
ville team wanted to get away early, the game was played in two 
periods of twenty minutes each. In the first period there was no 
score and the ball was for the most part in mid field. L. Carling 
made one fine run to within ten yards of the goal line, but we failed 
to score. In the second half, we had the wind in our favour and 
Holland rouged in the first minute. Soon after we got possession 
close to their line and Cory bucked over for a touchdown, which we 
failed to convert. Two more rouges were added before time, making 
the total score 8 points. The Brockville line was a heavy one and 
in the first half we could make little impression on it. But they 
were slow and we outpaced them several times for gootl runs. Hol¬ 
land made one good run in the second half and his kick-in was useful 


8 


THE ASHBURIAN 


to his side. There were no accidents and the game was clean through¬ 
out. We were without the services of Hennessey I, Patterson and 
Code, which made a difference on our line. The game was handled 
by Beddoe and the captain of the Brock ville Team. 

The line up was as follows: 

Back —C. Rivers. 

H. Backs —J. Carling, T. Blakeney, W. Thackray, H. Holland. 

Quarter —J. C. Rieffenstein. 

Outsides —R. Maclaren, L. Carling. 

Middles —J. Hazen, J. Chanonhouse. 

Insides —H. Graham, C. Wood. 

Scrimmage —D. MacMahon, W. Muirhead, W. Cory. 

Ashbury College v. Lower Canada College. 

This match, the most important one of the season, was played on 
Saturday morning, November 8th, under the most perfect conditions 
and resulted in a one point victory for Ashbury College. Great 
interest was attached to the game, because we played a tie game with 
Lower Canada College in Montreal. As both teams had easily de¬ 
feated St. Albans, the third school in the series, this match was going 
to decide who would hold the St. Alban’s Cup for this year. It was 
an ideal day with some sunshine and hardly any wind. A squad 
of boys had marked out the ground and roped it off to give the players 
enough room, and everything was in readiness for the great battle. 
Several prominent people in the football world were present, including 
Father Stanton, the Ottawa coach, who was loud in praise of our ground. 
The President of the school, Mr. Rowley, came down, accompanied 
by Col. Woods. Mr. Carling, Mr. Maclaren and Mr. Cory were also 
present to see their boys play and several other visitors, in fact one 
of the largest crowds that has ever been seen on the ground. We 
had a rooters’ club organised for the occasion, and Irvin the leader 
deserves to be congratulated on the efficient way he coached them. 
The various yells were one of the features of the match and the 
cheering towards the end, when the score was tied, was deafening. 
Mr. Ackland was kind enough to come down and referee and his task 
was no easy one. As both teams wore very much the same kind of 
stockings, he had some trouble until half time, when our line donned 
sweaters. Even then he made one mistake, when he mistook 
Maclaren for a L. C. C. boy, and ruled him off side. 

L. C. C. won the toss and played with the wind, what little 
there was of it. They had much the best of the game in the first 
quarter and frequently made yards by their bucks. But no score 
was made. In the second quarter we played better and the game was 
in the centre of the field most of the time. Still no score was made 


THE ASHBURIAN 


9 


and at half time neither team had made a point. At half time 
Hazen took the place of MacMahon. 

We opened the scoring in the third quarter with a rouge. Shortly 
after Cory was hurt, and had to retire for repairs. But he returned 
and played brilliantly for the rest of the game. Before the end of 
the third quarter L. C. C. scored a rouge and the last quarter was 
started with the score at 1 all. Thackray made a muff from a L. C. C. 
kick in the first minute of this quarter and L. C. C. nearly scored a 
touchdown. The ball luckily rolled over the line and it was a touch 
in goal. Three minutes later Holland was held for a rouge. 3-1 
against us and six minutes to play. The rooters cheered, the team 
played hard, and Holland started to do some brilliant kicking. 
We got possession near the L. C. C. goal and Maclaren tried a field 
goal. He failed but the ball went to the dead line. Shortly after 
Holland kicked to the dead line. A minute to play and the score 
was 3 all. Holland kicked but a L. C. C. player smothered it. 
Carling fell on the ball and Holland kicked again. With the aid of 
the wind which had increased, the ball sailed over the dead line and 
we had won on the stroke of time. 

Maclaren was carried shoulder high to the school and Eddie 
Phillips received congratulations from everybody. It was a truly 
magnificent game and one which will be long remembered. 

It is always difficult to pick out individual players, but for the 
L. C. C. team Symons played a wonderful game. He made several 
30 yards runs and his catching was superb. For us Code on the line 
was best. He seemed to know where the buck was coming every 
time. J. Carling was the best of the backs. Both Holland and 
Thackray muffed badly once or twice, the latter not feeling well 
apparently. The L. C. C. team relied on their bucks a good deal, 
while we depended largely on our kicking, at which Holland ex¬ 
celled. But the two teams were so evenly matched, that there was 
never the slightest chance of a touchdown being scored and the low 
score testifies to the excellent character of the football. Another 
feature of the game was its cleanness. This was commented on by 
all the papers. There was not the slightest suspicion of dirty work 
at any period of the game, and no one was ruled off. 

The line up was as follows: 

Back —C. Rivers. 

Halves —H. Holland, J. Carling, W. Thackray. 

Quarter —J. C. Reiffenstein. 

Outsides —R. Maclaren, L. Carling. 

Middles —-R. Patterson, J. Hennessey. 

Insides —H. Graham, A. Code. 

Scrimmage —W. Cory, W. P. Muirhead, D. MacMahon, J. Hazen. 


10 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Football Characters. 

C. Rivers (back). —The trickiest player in the team. Always 
on the look out for an opening. A beautiful tackier. 

H. Holland (r. half). —A disappointing player. Has a safe 
pair of hands. The fastest runner in the team, when he likes. Has 
a tendency to slow down, when about to be tackled. Inclined to 
succumb to small injuries. A really first-class kick. 

J. Carling (c. half).- —Rarely muffs a catch, even on the coldest 
days. Runs the ball back well, nearly always gaining ground. 
Possesses a deadly straight arm, which makes him difficult to tackle 
A good kick. 

W. Thackray (l. half). —Rather slow in getting started after 
catching the ball. Plenty of speed when he is under way. A good 
tackier. 

J. C. Reiffenstein (quarter). —Improved considerably during 
the season with the signals. Does not use his head enough. Fair 
tackier. Rather slow when he runs through with the ball himself. 

R, Maclaren, Capt (r. outside). —Follows up kicks well. Fear¬ 
less tackier. Very fast, when he gets away with the ball. A safe 
drop kick within 30 yards of the goal, at almost any angle. An 
excellent captain, who has always kept his team in good condition. 

J. W. Hennessey (r. middle). —Rather slow, but goes straight 
ahead and a difficult player to stop, when he is under way. Fair 
tackier. Good at stopping bucks. 

R. W. Patterson (r. inside). —Leads bucks well. One of the 
heaviest men on the team. Strong tackier. Hampered by injuries. 

D. MacMahon (r. scrimmage) .—Holds his man well. A poor 
tackier, but follows up well. 

W. P. Muirhead (c. scrimmage). —Heels the ball out well. 
Never lets the opposing centre scrimmage through. A very steady 
player and good at stopping bucks. 

W. M. Cory (l. scrimmage) .—Only played a few matches as he 
was late coming back. Lacked condition at first. A hard tackier, 
follows up kicks well. Good at stopping bucks. 

H. F. Graham (l. inside). —A dangerous line plunger. Uses his 
weight well. A good tackier, who works hard from start to finish. 
Always on the ball. 

A. L. Code (l. middle). —Hampered by a sore knee. Has done 
good work in matches following up well and tackling well. 

L. B. Carling (l. outside). —One of the best tacklers in the team. 
Very fast when he is away with the ball. Not very good at taking 
passes. 

T. Blakeney (r. half). —Played in most matches. A good 
catch and a fair tackier. Would be more useful if he had more 
weight. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


11 


J. Hazen (spare ).—Has filled any vacancy on the line. A 
steady player. Fair tackier, but rather slow. 

J. Chanonhouse (l. scrimmage ).—Played for the team until 
Cory came. A fair tackier. Works hard, but lacks speed. 

C. Wood (spare ).—Played in two matches. Rather light. A 
fearless tackier and always works hard. 


PRIZE GIVING 

The annual distribution of prizes took place on June 11th, 
before a large and distinguished audience. Among the visitors were 
Lady Pope who represented “The Daughters of the Empire”, and 
who presented the rifle to Davis, and Mr. W. H. Rowley who oc¬ 
cupied the chair and gave away the prizes. For the first time the 
ceremony took place outside on the lawn in front of the school and 
the weather was all that could be desired. Some of the ladies were 
worried by the caterpillars, which fell from the trees in large num¬ 
bers, in spite of all the precautions which had been taken. After 
the prizes had been given away Mr. Rowley addressed the boys in a 
short speech, which was very much to the point. Lady Pope also 
said a few words about the shooting, which were received with much 
applause. After the ceremony there was tea for everybody in the 
dining room. 

The following is a complete list of prize winners: 


Cover) 

wr-GeneraVs Medal . 

. .. . P. 

E. Biggar. 

The Nelson Shield . 

.. .. W 

. H. Davis. 

F orm 

VI . 

. . . .E. 

J. Lowe. 

F orm 

VA . 

. . . . P. 

E. Biggar. 



J. 

Hazen. 

Form 

V . 

.... R, 

Lelievre. 



H. 

M. Holland. 

Form 

IV B . 

. . . . W 

. P. Muirhead 



R. 

G. Sladen. 



R. 

S. Morris. 

Form 

IV A . 

....J. 

N. Maclaren. 



C. 

H. Goldstein. 



T. 

S. Crockett. 

Form 

IV . 

.J. 

O’Halloran. 



J. 

Watson. 



E. 

P. Taylor. 

Form 

IIA . 

. . . . F. 

E. Valleau. 



C. 

J. Kingsmill. 

F orm 

II . 

. . . . E. 

B. Johnston. 



L. 

H. Burpee. 

Form 

I . 

. . . .T. 

L. Willson. 


Special prize for Church Catechism E. Woollcombe 














12 


THE ASHBURIAN 



CRICKET XI. 

Front Row (left to right)—C. Wood, R. Maclaren, D. MacMahon, M. Burns, W. M. Cory. 

Back Row (left to right)—J. C. Reiffenstein, G. Sladen, T. Maunsell, B. Morris, H. Holland, A. L. Code. 


CRICKET 

Ashbury College y. Militia Department. 

This match, the fourth and last of the series and also the last of 
the season was played here on June 5th, and resulted in a win for the 
visitor by 65 runs. We batted first and made 45 all out. This 
would have been much less, but for a good stand by Wood and Irvin 
who put on 17 for the last wicket. Capt. Weston played a good 
innings of 14. At one time, it looked as if we were going to have a 
good chance, as wickets fell fast, but a fine innings by Mr. Brown 
soon settled this. In our second innings we did better and Irvin 
again scored freely in a rather unorthodox manner. MacMahon and 
Holland also batted well, while Mr. Creeth added a few boundaries. 

Below are the scores: 

Military Department. 


Carpenter, bid. Wood. 9 

Stegman, run out. 12 

Craig, ct. Cory b. Holland. 0 

Brown, ct. Code b. Weston. 47 

Vergette, bid. Holland. 4 












THE ASHBUHIAN 


13 


Watts, ct. Weston b. Wood. 
Millward, ct. Code, b. Wood 

Strange, not out. 

Warren, bid. Weston. 

Cattrall, ct. Wood b. Cory. . 
Extras. 


Total. 110 

ASHBURY COLLEGE. 


1 

16 

7 

4 

1 


1st Innings. 


D. C. Wood, bid. Carpenter. 2 

Burns, bid. Carpenter. 0 

Holland, bid. Craig. 0 

N. A. Creeth, ct. Carpenter b. Craig 0 

MacMahon, bid. Craig. 5 

Capt. Weston, ct. Carpenter, b. 

Stegman. 14 

Morris, ct. Stegman, b. Carpenter. . . 0 

Code, ct. Catrall b. Carpenter. 4 

Cory, ct. & bid. Vergette. 0 

Irvin, not out. 8 

Wood, ct. Stegman, b. Carpenter. . . 3 

Extras. 9 


Total. 45 


2nd Innings. 


bid. Vergette. 4 

bid. Carpenter. 4 

not out. 8 

ct. & bid. Stegman. 16 

bid. Carpenter. 11 

ct. Stegman, b. Carpenter. 3 

bid. Vergette. 1 

ct. Catrall, b. Carpenter. 0 

ct. Brown, b. Carpenter. 8 

ct sub, b. Carpenter. 3 

Extras. 7 

Total (9 wkts). 67 


1st XI v. 2nd XVI. 


On May 21st, a half holiday was given by the Headmaster in 
honour of his birthday, and a match was played between the first 
team, consisting of boys only, and sixteen of the rest with the assist¬ 
ance of masters. The result was an overwhelming victory for the 
first team. They batted first and made the huge score of 195. Of 
these runs Holland was responsible for 116, being undefeated at the 
end of the innings. This is the first century made on the ground 
and Holland is to be congratulated on his performance. Code and 
Sladen also batted well for 13 runs each. The rest were all out in 
their first innings for 29, no one being able to play Maunsell, who 
took 8 wickets for 21. They did a little better in their second in¬ 
nings, the total score being 77, of which P. Woollcombe made 22. 
Maunsell bowled well and took 6 wickets for 27. Maclaren took 5 
wickets for 11 runs in the second innings and also made one fine 
catch with which he dismissed Mr. Wood. It is to be hoped that 
this match will become an annual fixture. 


Ashbury College v. Ottawa “A”. 

This match was played on the Rideau grounds on May 31st, and 
resulted in a win for the home team by 8 runs on the first innings. 































14 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Ottawa batted first and made 38 runs, not a very large score. The 
wickets were captured by Capt. Weston and Mr. Wood, thanks to some 
excellent fielding. We replied with only 30 runs, most of us falling 
victims to the insidious slows of Kinross, the Ottawa Professional. 
In their second innings Ottawa made a big score, Gerard of football 
fame making 35. We were feeling the effects of the heat and our 
fielding was bad in this second effort. Owing to a misunderstand¬ 
ing, we were not given a second chance, as Ottawa finished out 
their innings and then stumps were drawn. 

Below are the full scores: 


OTTAWA “A”. 


1st Innings. 


A. J. Odan, ct. Weston, b. Wood . . 3 

Mackenzie, ct. MacMahon, b. Wood 0 

Race, bid. Weston. 2 

Mackle, bid. Weston. 1 

Parry, run out. 0 

Stroud, bid. Wood. 4 

Gerard, bid. Wood. 10 

Snelling, not out. 11 

Plucknett, ct. Maclaren, b. Wood 0 
Kinross, ct. Wood, bid. Weston. ... 0 

W. J. Odan, bid. Wood. 2 

Extras. 5 


2nd Innings. 


bid. Wood. 2 

lbw. b. Maclaren. 1 

ct. Creeth, b. Weston. 3 

bid. Weston. 3 

ct. Code, b. Wood. 1 

bid. Cory. 8 

bid. Weston. 35 

Run out. 7 

ct. Code bid. Maclaren. 0 

not out. 7 

bid. Cory. 0 

Extras. 2 


Total 


38 Total 


ASHBURY COLLEGE. 

1st Innings. 

Burns, ct. Mackenzie, b. Gerard. ... 2 


Holland, bid. Gerard. 6 

D. C. Wood, bid. Kinross. 8 

Maclaren, bid. Kinross. 0 

N. A. Creeth, bid. Kinross. 0 

Capt. Weston, run out. 6 

MacMahon, bid. Kinross. 0 

Morris, ct. & bid. Kinross. 1 

Code, bid. Kinross. 2 

Code, bid. Kinross. 2 

Cory, ct. & bid. Gerard. 0 

AYood, not out. 0 

Extras. 5 


T otal 


30 


69 


Cricket Characters 

Maclaren 1.—A disappointing batsman: rather unlucky. 
Useful change bowler with deceptive action. Good Cover Point. 

Holland— A good bowler—varies his pace well. Useful bat, 
but too anxious to score. The best field in the team. 





































THE ASHBURIAN 


15 


MacMahon —Began the season well with both bat and ball. 
Failed towards the end. Weak in the held. 

Reiffenstein. —Too inclined to treat every ball as a half 
volley. Fair change bowler, but a weak fielder. 

Sladen. —A left hand batsman with good forward strokes. 
Slow in the held. 

Maunsell. —Improved considerably as a bowler. Safe pair of 
hands in the slips. 

Burns. —A left handed batsman with a pretty style. Im¬ 
proved as a wicket keeper, making several catches. 

Code. —An unorthodox batsman with a good eye. Made several 
catches in the deep held. 

Wood. —Steady bat, but slow scorer. A useful fielder. 

Cory. —A batsman with a style of his own. Fair change bowler. 
Should be useful with more practice. Fair fielder. 

Morris. —-A very steady bat, difficult to dismiss. A poor 

fielder. 


THE LIBRARY 

The Library has taken a new lease of life this term in its new 
quarters, and business has been very brisk. Seventy-five new books 
have been added, of which fifty were presented by the school, twenty 
by the Librarian, and five by two of the boys. 

The Librarian will always be glad to receive presents of books— 
not necessarily new—and donors may now be quite sure that the 
books will only be used for reading purposes, and not for football or 
hockey. 


ATHLETIC SPORTS 

The Annual Athletic Sports were held on Tuesday, June 10th, 
when we were again fortunate in having fine weather. A large 
number of friends and relations was present to witness the events, 
which were well contested and produced some excellent performances. 
If a comparison is made between the results of the Inter-school 
sports and these given below, it will be seen that many of the records 
then made were beaten, in some cases by a considerable margin. 
This was chiefly noticeable in the sprints—the 100 yards and 220 
yards being run in excellent time—and the Long Jump, some good 
performances being put up by those who were not eligible for the 
Inter-school contest. This is very gratifying and makes us con¬ 
fident of our ability to win the cup next year, provided that the same 
keenness in practising is shown. 




THE A8HBURIAN 


16 


The prizes were very kindly given away by Mrs. Rowley. The 
cup given to the most successful competitor will be held jointly by 
A. R. Maclaren and H. L. Holland, each of whom won two firsts and a 
second. 

Below are the results: 


100 yds. A. R. 

220 yds. H. L. 

440 yds. H. W 

880 yds. A. L. 

High Jump D. F. 
Long Jump H. L. 
120 yds. Hurdles 


ls^. 
Maclaren 
Holland 
. Davis 
Code 
Verner 
Holland 
A. R. Maclaren 


Senior Events: 
2nd 

H. L. Holland 
H. W. Davis 
S. C. Bate 
E. J. Lowe 
A. R. Maclaren 
D. F. Verner 
D. F. Verner 


3rd. 

H. tV. Davis Time 10.f sec. 

“ 23J sec. 

“ 56! sec. 

“ 2 m. 23 sec. 
Height 4ft., 11* in. 
Distance 18 ft., 9 in. 

Time 17 sec. 


Intermediate Events: 

1st. 2nd. 3rd. » 

100 yds. R. S. Montgomery M. W. Montgomery T. S. Crocket Time 12. sec. 

440 yds. M. W. Montgomery A. B. Hennessey 

High Jump E. W. Birkett F. H. Beard Height, 4 ft., 4 in. 

Long Jump T. S. Crocket R. Small M. W. Montgomery Distance 14t 9in. 


Junior Events. 

100 yds. (scratch) F. E. Valleau E. B. Johnston E. Gill Time 131 sec. 

100 yds. (h’dc’p-) E. Gill F. E. Valleau “ 131 sec. 

440 yds. F. E. Valleau E. B. Johnston “ 79s sec. 

High Jump F. E. A'alleau E. Gill Height 3 ft. 4^ ins. 

Open Events. 

100 yds. Handicap—H. W. Davis, S. C. Bate 

Relay Race—S. C. Bate, A. L. Code, J. R. Stewart, E. J. Lowe. 

Three-legged Race—1st D. F. \ T erner and W. M. Cory 

2nd G. B. Ross and R. LeLievre. 

Mr. Phil Chrysler kindly officiated as starter, whilst Judges and Timekeeper 
were supplied by the Staff assisted by J. F. Crowdy, Esq. 


SCHOOL NOTES 

Birkett II was elected Captain of the second team in football. 
Unfortunately, he broke a bone in his wrist early in the season and 
was prevented from playing in any matches. 

Gisborne was elected Captain of the Senior Intermediates, and 
Crocket of the Junior Intermediates. The Juniors were under the 
captaincy of Wright . 

On Wednesday, October loth, nearly the whole of the senior 
school paid a visit to the Russell Theatre, where they saw a very 



THE ASH BUR I AN 


17 


fine representation of “The Merchant of Venice”. The play was 
performed by Benson’s Company and Benson himself took the part 
of Shylock. 

On Friday, October 24th, the Sixth Form attended a very inter¬ 
esting lecture on Macbeth by Prof. Griggs. He has been giving a 
series of lectures on the plays of Shakespeare. Macbeth is one of 
the special works prescribed for examination, so that the lecture was 
both interesting and useful. 

On Tuesday, November 4th, the Sixth Form had another most 
enjoyable outing to the theatre. There was no educational 
object in this visit, the play in question being “Robin Hood”, one 
of the best comic operas in existence. Not only were the songs 
excellent, especially in the second act, but we were all convulsed 
by the antics and remarks of the Sheriff of Nottingham. 

Our appeal in the last number of the magazine met with a gener¬ 
ous response. Before the end of the term Col. Woods presented 
the school with a magnificent flag, a Union Jack, which we used on 
Sports Day and Speech Day and which was flying on the day of 
that historic football match, when we wrested the cup from U C. C. 
We take this opportunity of thanking Col. Woods for his most 
acceptable gift. 

As soon as the soccer season is finished, the indoor shooting will 
commence under the supervision of the Sergeant Major. This will 
give the seniors an opportunity of getting their eye in, before Mr. 
Hooper comes back. 

The inspection of the Cadet Corps took place near the end of the 
summer term and was an unqualified success. We had a new in¬ 
specting officer this year, who did not devote much time to the 
section drill. The cup, given by Col. Woods to be held each year 
by the best section, was won by Section 4, under Sergeant Wickware. 

We were indeed lucky to secure the services of Mr. E. Phillips, 
popularly known as “Eddie”, as our football coach. During the 
short period he has been with us, he has become very popular. On 
the football held he made the team work and there was no talking, 
when he was around. The success of the football team is in a very 
high degree due to his coaching and the whole school appreciates 
his untiring efforts. 

We have all of us missed the presence of Mr. Hooper amongst 
us. He has been in Montreal ever since the beginning of the school 


18 


THE ASHBUKIAN 


year, where he is indulging in a rest cure. There is every reason to 
believe that lie will be with us again after Xmas: this is the sincere 
wish of everybody. The shooting will suffer without him and even 
The Ashburian will not be quite the same without an editorial 
from his pen. 

The Dramatic Society is hard at work rehearsing two plays 
for an entertainment to be given before the Xmas holidays. The 
first “ Done on both sides” has five characters, all of which are taken 
by boys in the school; the second “Box and Cox” has three char¬ 
acters, two of which are taken by members of the staff. There will 
be probably two performances and it is hoped that several of the 
parents will come and see the entertainment. 

Owing to the outbreak of Mumps, this entertainment has been 
postponed. 


IIUMOUR FROM THE SCHOOL ROOM 


A class had been accustomed to sing a short grace beginning 
with the line: 1 1 Weak and sinful though we be.” 

On a new mistress being appointed she noticed that some of the 
children did not sing the words of this line distinctly and found that 
nearly half the class were innocently rendering the line as: “We 
can sing, full though we be.” 


On a teacher asking children to reproduce the New Testament 
narrative containing the phrase, “Whose image and superscription,” 
one girl wrote “And Christ took up the penny and said to them, 
‘ Whose is this miserable subscription ?’ and they answered ‘ Caesar’s.’ ” 


Asked to give an example of the termination “ette”, meaning 
little, one boy said, “Suffragette”, a little sufferer. 


“A pilgrim,” said a boy to an inspector, “is a man who goes 
about from place to place.” “Well,” said the inspector, “I am 
always doing that.” “But am I a pilgrim? ” “No, sir.” “And 
why not?” “ Because, a pilgrim is a good man.” 


“Hypocrisy” was defined once as 
liar to the scribes and Pharisees.” 


11 a sort of skin disease pecu- 



THE ASHBURIAN 


19 



SHOOTING GROUP. 

E. J. Lowe, H. Irvin, M. Burns, C. H. Hooper, Esq., H. Graham. 


SHOOTING 

It is our custom to give in the Xmas number of The Ashburian 
the results of our shooting at the ranges. However, most of the 
scores have been lost and it has been rather difficult to collect any 
information about them. The Secretary of the magazine wishes to 
apologise for any errors or omissions and will do his best to rectify 
them in the next issue. First, we have lost the services of E. Lowe, 
who has gone to McGill. He not only was an excellent shot, but 
also he was responsible for all the shooting notes and scores during 
the last two years in the school magazine. Graham, one of last 
year’s team has very kindly consented to take his place on ihe 
Editorial Staff. 





20 


THE ASHBURIAN 


The shooting at the ranges was on the whole successful and 
thanks to Mr. Hooper’s coaching, some excellent scores were achieved. 
Many more boys took advantage of the facilities offered for shooting 
and there was always a large contingent on Saturday mornings. 
Quite a number of day boys turned up and are to be congratulated 
on their enthusiasm. 

The most important match was the one which took place to¬ 
wards the end of the term for the R. M. C. shield, in which we came 
out 6th with a score of 230. Our team for this was: 

Corp. Graham 
Serg. Lowe 
Lieut. Irvin 
Pte. Burns. 

In this match we were 30 points behind the winners. 

In the four matches, in which we compete for prizes given by the 
Canadian Rifle League, we came out 3rd. Our prize was a magnifi¬ 
cent silver shield. Our scores in these matches were: 


1st match .418 

2nd “ 503 

3rd “ 524 

4th “ 545 


making a total of 1990. It is very encouraging to notice our steady 
improvement in each of these matches. 

The President’s badge given for the best total score in these four 
matches was won by Graham ; 1st class certificates were won by 
Davis, Graham, and Thompson ; 2nd class certificates were won 
by Lowe, Hazen and Maclaren I. 

Besides these competitive matches with other schools, there 
were three other matches of importance. First, was the match for 
the rifle given by the Daughters of the Empire. This resulted in a tie 
between Davis and Graham, each scoring 62. In the deciding- 
match Davis won. 

Secondly, there was the match for the Bate Cup, given for the 
best score at 200 yards. This again was won by Davis. Lastly, 
in the match for the Boyd Cup, given for the best score at 500 yards, 
Davis again proved himself to be the best shot. To win all three 
contests is a great test of shooting ability and Davis deserves to be 
congratulated on his fine performance. Unfortunately, he has left 
us and we shall miss him at the ranges next year. We have also 
lost a good shot in Burns. 

Our indoor shooting commences as soon as the football is over 
and the Sergeant Major is going to take charge until Mr. Hooper 
returns. Our first match will take place probably in January. 






THE ASH BUM AN 


21 


HOCKEY PROSPECTS 

Now that winter is approaching and the successful football 
season is over, our thoughts once more turn to hockey. We shall 
have five of our regular team as we have only lost Verner and Wick- 
ware. Our forward line will be intact, Maclaren on the left, Rivers 
in the centre, and Cory on the right. It is probable that Code will 
develop into a better rover than point, because last year he showed 
a strong partiality to wandering all over the place. We are lucky 
in having our captain Hennessey for another season. This is his 
third season on the team, an honour which he shares with Maclaren. 
He was handicapped last year by ill health, as he always developed a 
bad cold before the Carling Cup matches and was unable to do his 
best. But this year, he will take all the precautions necessary to 
avoid these colds. Maclaren has just led his football team to victory, 
and we hope Hennessey will do the same with his hockey team. He 
will never have a better chance. He has any amount of material 
from which to choose. Such players as Lelievre, Birkett, Blakeney 
and Hazen will all be candidates for the vacant place at point, while 
Irvin is going to try and develop into a goalkeeper. If there is any 
truth in rumour, Malcolm may make the team. He comes from 
St. Andrew’s with a great reputation. We must not forget also 
Thackray, who will make the team if he is as good at hockey as he 
is at football. There will be no difficulty about getting enough 
boys for the practice games: if anything there will be too many 
and the second team should reach a very high standard of excellence 
this year. It depends on the weather largely, whether we shall have 
any practices before the holidays, but in any case serious work will 
not commence before January. 

The serious question of coach will arise then and already rumour 
has been busy. There is one person, whom everybody would like to 
have, and who has become very popular down here lately, but The 
Ashburian dare not divulge his name. We can only hope that he 
will be able to find time to help us, for with his assistance we have a 
very good chance of success. Our strongest opponents will be L.C.C., 
and they will try their hardest to atone for their defeat in the foot¬ 
ball. They also have five old colours and will be a strong combina¬ 
tion. We cannot do better than close this article by wishing Hen¬ 
nessey every success. May he bring his career at Ashbury to a 
glorious close. He was on the winning team at football: may he be 
the victorious captain at hockey. Even if we do not win the Carling 
Cup, he can count on the loyal support of every member of the team. 


99 


THE ASHBURIAN 


TENNIS 



J. N. M ACLAREN 

Winner of Open Singles and 
Junior Doubles. 


The tennis season this year has been 
a particularly successful one, the 
enthusiasm for the game being greater 
than ever before. All the courts were 
in constant use at every possible 
moment during the day-—after break¬ 
fast, in the dinner hour, after school 
and after tea. The three tournaments 
sustained the interest right up to the 
end of term, and the American system 
with everyone playing the same num¬ 
ber of games pleased everyone. The 
Juniors had the most games to play, 
there being no fewer than seventy- 
eight matches in this tournament. The 
Singles were fairly uneventful until 
the final. Code and Maclaren II having 
had things pretty much their own way. 
But the final provided one of the finest 
matches we have ever seen. In the first 
set Maclaren was evidently nervous, 
doubtless owing to the large and distinguished company of spectators, 
and Code had not much difficulty in taking the first set at 6-3. In 
the second set Maclaren’s length was still a little shaky, and with 
Code at 5-4 and 40-love the spectators were almost leaving for 
home. However, Maclaren made a great effort and after several 
exciting rallies, he took the game and made it 5 all, eventually 
winning the set at 10-8. Both players were showing signs of fatigue, 
but the third set was again a well fought one, each player winning- 
alternate games. After Code had won the ninth game and was 
leading at 5-4, Maclaren with the help of some beautiful placing 
took the next three games and won the set and match. The chief 
features of the game were Maclaren’s placing and Code’s back¬ 
hand drives. Code has improved enormously since the beginning of 
term and it was a great performance for a boy of 14 to stand up 
against him and beat him. The Senior Doubles produced very 
even results except for the winners, Sladen and Jackson, who were 
“dark horses” and might have been put a good deal further back in 
the handicap. The Junior Doubles produced a keen struggle for 
first place, but Maclaren II and Birkett II played a great game in 
their last match and eventually came out four games ahead. 

Handsome cups were presented to the winners, Code receiving a 
second prize in the Singles. 

The following are the score sheets in each tournament: 






















THE ASHBURIAN 

i 

SENIOR DOUBLES 


Handicap 

Names 

Maclaren I and 

MacMahon 

Code and 

Lelievre 

Morris and 

Davidson 

Sladen and 

Jackson 

Wood and 

Burns 

Irvin and 

Hazen 

Lowe I and 

Blakeney I 

Graham and 

Maunsell 

Patterson and 

Birkett I 

Total 

Owe 15 . 

Maclaren I and MacMahon 

2 6 4 4 

5 5 3 

5 34 

Owe half 15 . 

Code and Lelievre. 

6 3 2 5 

3 3 5 

5 32 

half 15. 

Morris and Davidson . . . 

2 5 17 

3 4 2 

5 29 

Scratch. 

Sladen and Jackson . 

4 6 7 7 

7 7 7 

6 51 

Scratch. 

Wood and Burns. 

4 3 11 

3 5 5 1 2 

6 3 1 

4 4 

1 OQ 

■+- half 15 . 

Irvin and Hazen. . . . 

Zo 

4 28 

-4- half 15 . 

Lowe I and Blakeney I. . . . 

3 5 4 1 5 

4 5 

3 30 

Owe half 15 . 

Graham and Maunsell 

5 3 6 1 7 

4 3 

7 36 

Owe half 15 . 

Patterson and Birkett I 

3 3 3 2 4 

4 5 1 

25 


Prelim. Round 1st Round 
Marshall 1 


v. 


Code 

Taschereau I 
v. 

MacMahon 


Burns 

v. 

Tremain 

Bate I 
v. 

Davis 


f Code 

I 6-4 


MacMahon 

6-4 


OPEN SINGLES. 

2nd Round Semi-Final 


Cod 

6-0 


Tremain 

8-6 


Bate I 
6-3 

Goldstein 

v. 

Crocket 

Reiffenstein 
v. 

Lowe I. 

Lelievre 

v. 

Maclaren II 

Irvin 

v. 

G raham 

Wood 

v. 

Birkett II 

Sladen 

v. 

Montgomery I 


Tremain 

6-2 


[ Goldstein 
9-7 

1 

j- Reiffenstein 

J 6-1 

1 

[> Maclaren II 
6-0 


1 


Irvin 

6-4 


Birkett II 
J 6-2 


Sladen 

6-4 


Code 
6-0 
6 2 


Reiffenstein 
6-4, 7-5 


Maclaren II 
6-4. 6-2 


)■ Birkett II 

8 - 6 , 6-2 


Final 


\ Code 
6-1,5-7,6-1 


Maclaren II 

6-1, 6-2 


Maclaren II 
3-6, 10-8 7-5, 
















































JUNIOR DOUBLES 


24 


THE ASHBURIAN 


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THE ASHBURIAN 


O 


O 


THE SOCCER SEASON 

The rugby season having reached its climax with the defeat 
of Lower Canada and the consequent acquisition of the Challenge 
Cup, we repeated last year’s experiment and took up soccer, the 
Seniors turning out for the first practice on November 10th. A 
good game took place and it soon became evident that the leavening of 
last year’s players was resulting in more scientific play. A further 
practice was followed on November 13th, by a match against the 
Naval Department, who were strengthened by the inclusion of the 
Rev. W. H. Bayley, the Ottawa centre forward. An excellent game 
resulted in our defeat by 3 goals to nil, but though defeated we were 
by no means overwhelmed, and had the luck been with us the score 
might have been much more even, as the Ashbury forwards seemed 
to have a penchant for shooting at the posts and cross-bar rather 
than the opening between them. All things considered, the team 
may be congratulated on a very successful first appearance under 
soccer rules as our opponents were most of them seasoned players, 
though of course somewhat out of practice. 

Line up: 

Goal —Carling II. 

Right hack —Cory. 

Left —Maclaren I. 

Right Half —Ross. 

C en tre —Mac M ahon. 

Left —Wood. 

Provided the Clerk of the weather grants us a few more weeks’ 
respite from the rigours of winter, we hope to play a return match 
with the Naval Department on November 18th. Matches between 
the Sixth Form and the “ Rest” and a game with the Britannia R.C. 
are also contemplated. 

Of the players, Graham has confirmed last year’s estimate and is 
now a very safe goal keeper, whilst Carling II has been a successful 
understudy. Maclaren I and Cory, last year’s backs, also show 
marked improvement; they get through plenty of work and tackle 
well, whilst their kicking is improving. MacMahon, Wood, Ross 
and Reiffenstein are all useful halves, though MacMahon is the only 
one who seems to kick systematically to his forwards. Rivers has 
come on tremendously at outside left and now realizes the advantages 
of passing, whilst Carling I at outside right is extremely fast, but 
needs to learn control of the ball and is still weak at centreing. 
Hazen, Code, Malcolm, Jackson and Montgomery II have been 
playing in the inside positions; they would increase their usefulness 
very much if they learned to shoot harder and more frequently. 


Outside Right —Carling I. 
Inside —Hazen. 

Centre —N. A. Creeth. 
Inside Left —D. C. Wood. 
Outside Left —Rivers. 


26 


THE ASHBURIAN 



TRACK TEAM. 

Back Row (left to right)—H. Graham, J. Hennessey, E. J. Lowe, D. Verner, C. 

Wood. 

Front Row (left to right)—R. Maclaren, M. W. Montgomery, W. H. Davis, G. B. 

Ross, S. C. Bate. 

INTER SCHOOL SPORTS 

The Annual Athletic contest between the three schools took 
place this year at Ashbury on Friday, May 23rd, and, though the 
actual results were published in our last number, it may not be amiss 
to enter into greater detail than was then possible. Splendid weather 
conduced not only to the comfort of the spectators, but also to the 
advantage of the competitors, and some excellent performances 
resulted. 

Lower Canada placed a very good team in the field and we heartily 
congratulate them on their victory; at the same time it must be 
said that Ashbury put up a very creditable display, due largely to 
systematic training and regular practice under Prof. Hewitt’s direction. 

To refer to individual performances, Davis ran finely in the 
sprints, winning the 100 yards race in 10 4-5 seconds, ami running 
second to L. C. C. in the 220 yards, in which he unfortunately had 
the outside berth—a considerable handicap. R. Maclaren accom¬ 
plished a fine performance in winning the 120 yards, Hurdles (34 






THE ASHBURIAN 


27 


feet) in 16 4-5 seconds, whilst he cleared 4 feet, KB inches, and 
secured us second place in the High Jump, in which Wood also ac¬ 
quitted himself creditably. The Long Jump went to Verner in his 
final effort, but Bate, our first string in the 440 yards could only 
gain third place, though it must be said that the race was run in 
excellent time. Our efforts in the longer distances were not so 
successful—Graham in the Mile, and Lowe in the Half-mile securing 
third places, L. C. C. having the first two men home in each. In the 
Relay race our representatives—Davis, Maclaren, Bate and Verner— 
ran well, but were again forced to yield first place to the L. C. C. four. 


VALETE—SALVETE 

Valete 

•S. C. Bate. —Boarder, Form V, Shooting Team, Track Team. 
First Lieutenant. 

C. A. Billings, Dayboy, Form V, First Team Football. 

H. B. Billings, Dayboy, Form. IVA. 

M. C. Burns. —Boarder, Form V, Shooting Team, 1st Team Cricket. 
R. S. W. Butterworth. —Boarder, Form V, Shooting Team. 

H. W. Davis. —Dayboy, Form VI, Prefect, 1st Team Football, 2nd 
Team Hockey, Track Team, Shooting Team, Sports’ Editor. 
Captain, Cadet Corps. 

A. M. Fleming. —-Boarder, Form IVB , 2nd Team Hockey. 

D. A. Grant. —Boarder, Form VI, Passed into II. M. C. 

D. Hanna. —Boarder, Form IVA, Shooting Team. 

W. F. Heward.- —Davbov, Form IVB. 

E. J. Lowe. —Boarder, Form VI, 1st Team Football, Shooting Team, 

Track Team, Assistant Editor. 

J. B. Marshall. —Boarder, Form IVA, Shooting Team. 

R. G. Masson. —Dayboy, Form V, 1st Team Hockey. 

T. S. Maunsell. —Dayboy, Form V, 1st Team Cricket. 

V. S. Parker. —Boarder, Form IV. 

A. G. Perley. —Boarder, Form VI, 2nd Team Football. 

G. B. Robson. —Dayboy, Form V. 

R. B. C. Rutherford. —Dayboy, Form II. 

A. St. Laurent. —Boarder, Form VI, 1st Team Football, Shooting 
Team. 

D. G. B. Smart.— Dayboy, Form V . 

W. R. Stewart. —Boarder, Form IVA. 

W. H. Thompson. —Boarder, Form V, Passed into McGill. 

D. F. Verner. —Hayboy, Form VI, 1st Team Football, Hockey, 
Track Team. 




28 


THE ASHBURIAN 


R. S. Ward.— Dayboy, Form IV. 

W. H. W ickware.— Dayboy, Form TV, 1st Team Football, Hockey, 
Passed into McGill. 


Salvete 


W. Thackray.— Form VI. 

A. J. Edward.— Form V. 

R. L. Hill. — Form V. 

J. E. Malcolm.— Form IVB. 

G. B. Brown.— Form IVB. 

L. A. Gisborne.— Form IVA. 

J. W. H. Burstall. — Form IVA. 
C. H. Hamilton.— Form III. 


A. M. Murphy.— Form III . 
R. K. Dunnet.— Form, III . 

E. B. Burstall.— Form II. 
H. R. Hampson.— Form, II . 

F. W. Ritchie.— Form II . 

G. P. Sladen. — Form I. 

H. F. Fitz-Hugh.— Form I . 
G. E. Rhoades.— Form I . 


OUR CONTEMPORARIES 

The Tonbridgian (2); The Bradfield College Chronicle (2); 
The Felstedian (3); The School Magazine , Uppingham (3); The 
Meteor (4); The Cheltonian (5); The Wykehamist (3); The Mitre; 
The Blue and White; The Black and Red; The Albanian; The St. 
Andrew's College Review; The St. John’s College Magazine; The 
Stanstead College Magazine; The Lower Canada College Magazine (2); 
Trinity College Record (2). 


TONGUE TWISTERS 

Bill had a bill board. Bill also had a board bill. The board 
bill bored Bill, so Bill sold the bill board to pay his board bill. So 
after Bill sold his bill board to pay his board bill, the board bill no 
longer bored Bill. 

Here is a description of a duel between two men, whose names 
are Shot and Not. Shot shot the first shot, and the Shot shot shot 
not Not, and the shot Not shot shot not Shot, so Shot shot again, 
and again the shot Shot shot not Not, but the shot Not shot shot 
Shot, so Not won notwithstanding. 

The following should be read slowly, remembering that, a railway 
sleeping-car is often called a “sleeper”: A sleeper is one who sleeps. 
A sleeper is that in which a sleeper sleeps. A sleeper is that on which a 
sleeper runs while the sleeper sleeps. Therefore, while the sleeper 
sleeps in the sleeper, the sleeper carries the sleeper over the sleeper 
under the sleeper, until the sleeper which carries the sleeper jumps 
the sleeper and wakes the sleeper in the sleeper by striking the 
sleeper under the sleeper on the sleeper, and there is no longer any 
sleeper sleeping in the sleeper on the sleeper. 




THE ASH BUR IAN 


29 


ASHBURIAN OLD BOYS SUPPLEMENT 

Editors : 

Mr. P. H. P.Woollcombe, Ashbury College, Iiockliffe. 

Mr. H. R. Morgan, 639 Aylmer St., Montreal, P.Q. 

Secretary Old Boys Association : 

Mr. Louis T. White, 4 Rideau Appartments, Ottawa, Ont. 

Editorial 

It is with feelings of humility that we launch this editorial. We 
do not profess to be scribes, and even if we did, our efforts would 
quickly disprove our contention; therefore, if this attempt does 
not draw forth your commendation, at least remember that we are 
doing the best we can and accordingly be lenient in your judgment. 

With the starting of the Old Boys Association was born the 
idea of an Old Boys section in the magazine. Previously, any 
Old Boys news was put in The Ashburian among the School notes, 
on a page by itself. Now, however, a change is taking place. We 
are going to run our own section, which will contain Old Boy edi¬ 
torials, Old Boy news, and Old Boy contributions. Here is where you 
come in ; for in order to keep this idea alive, we must have news and 
contributions. These can be supplied by those budding aspirants 
to literary fame, that must now be among our widely scattered 
numbers. Nothing could give the Editors greater joy than to 
receive each month floods of letters, stories, poems, reminiscences 
and accounts of old hard fought games, of general interest to us all; 
and so we are asking you Old Boys to write and tell us what you are 
doing; and how you are getting on; for you may be sure that there 
are many of us who will lie deeply interested. If we can give you 
any information about any school chum of yours, we will do so to 
the best of our ability. 

There certainly is no better way of keeping in touch with the 
Old School than by taking The Ashburian. Modesty, as you 
know, forbids our praising our own efforts; but, as regards the 
school section of this magazine, we cannot say too much in its praise. 
In it you get all sorts of news and get. it first hand. OBVIOUS 
MORAL: Read The Ashburian. Before our next issue, the 
Editor wishes to have a long list of subscribers to this magazine. 

The Old Boys Association hopes to hold its first Annual Meeting 
and Dinner some time about next Easter; for after weighing the 
“pros and cons”, this time would seem to be the most convenient 


30 


THE ASHBURIAN 


for the majority. The officers of the Association will then be elected 
for the year. 

Seeing that we do not propose to emulate the Brook, let us, in 
closing, wish to every old Ashburian, far and near, the merriest of 
Christmases and a New Year of increased success and prosperity. 


MORE BENEDICTS 

Since the last issue, several Old Boys have taken the important 
step. Below we give the wedding announcements of the fortunate 
gentlemen, to all of whom we extend our heartiest congratulations. 

Carling-McCullough. —In All Saints’ Church, Ottawa, on 
June 4th, 1913, by Rev. A. W. Mackay, B. D., Phyllis Hough, 
youngest daughter of the late G. W. and of Mrs. McCullough, Ottawa, 
to Frederick Burleigh Carling (1902-1906), son of Mr. and Mrs. F. 
W. Carling, Ottawa, and grandson of the late Sir John Carling, 
K. C. M. G., London, Ontario. 

Fleming-Ward. —On June 9th, 1913, at Napanee, Ontario, by 
the Rev. Dr. Hoffman, Grace Collins Tremaine, daughter of the late 
Dr. G. C. T. Ward and of Mrs. Ward, to Noel Sandford Fleming 
(1896), grandson of Sir Sandford Fleming, K. C. M. CL, Ottawa. 

Raphael-Learmonth. —On June 11th, 1913, at the residence 
of the bride’s parents, 126 St. Louis Road, Quebec City, by the Rev. 
G. H. Cobbledick, B.D., Janet Pearl, second daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. A. J. Learmonth, to Howard McLaren Raphael, M.D., (1898- 
1904), of Cainsville, Ontario. 

French-MacDermott. —In the Sacristy of St. Joseph’s Church, 
Ottawa, on June 10th, 1913, by the Rev. AY. J. Murphy, Anna Mac- 
Dermott, daughter of the late Martin MacDermott, and of Mrs. 
MacDermott, Aylmer, Que., to Guy Merrifield French (1903-1904), of 
Ottawa. 

Greene-Smith.— On September 10th, 1913, by the Venerable 
Archdeacon Armitage, in St. Paul’s Church, Halifax, N. S., Helena, 
eldest daughter of Howard H. and Mrs. Smith, Halifax, to Lieut. 
Mui 'ray Kirk Greene (1903-1906), of the Royal Canadian Regiment, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. E. Kirk Greene, Montreal. 

Smith-Lyon.— On September 10th, 1913, at St. Stephen’s 
Church, Swift Current, Sask., by the Rev. John Smallwell, Matilda 
Hinton, third daughter of the late John G. Lyon, Ottawa, to Louis 
Eldon Smith (1908-1911), only son of Lieut-Col. and Mrs. L. A. 
Smith, Ottawa. 

McLachlin-Herridge. —On September 24th, 1913, at Ottawa, 
Gwendolyn, younger daughter of the Rev. Dr. and Mrs. AAL T. 
Herridge, Ottawa, to Eric Harrington McLachlin (1909-1910), son 
of the late Claude McLachlin, Arnprior, Ont. 



THE ASHBURIAN 


31 


MR. LOUIS T. WHITE 

Probably no better choice could have been made for Secretary 
of the Old Boys Association, than that of Mr. Louis White. 

Our energetic Secretary was one of the very first boys to enter 
Ashbury on its opening day, and we think that in view of the fact 
that he has kept in touch with so many of the Old Boys since that 
time, that the secretarial side of the Association is in good hands. 

Mr. White is in himself a regular mine of information concerning 
ex-pupils, addresses, etc., and will be very glad to hear from anyone 
and receive subscriptions for the Association and Magazine. 

The Ashburian, on behalf of all its readers, takes this opportun¬ 
ity of congratulating Mr. and Mrs. White on the birth of a son and 
hopes that before many years have passed, the “wee laddie” will be 
one of the “boys” as was his popular father some twenty-two years 
ago. 


OLD BOYS FAR AWAY 

Captain O. B. R. Dickey (1895-1898) is now stationed with his 
company of the Army Service Corps at Bloemfontein, South Africa; 
while the other Old Boy holding a commission in the A. S. C., Captain 
M. L. B. H. Lambert (1891-1898) is at Cyprus. 


THE R. M. C. ENTRANCE 

We wish to extend our heartiest congratulations to Donald 
A. Grant (1912-1913) on passing the R. M. C. entrance examination 
this year. 


DOINGS AT THE R. M. C. 


Old Ashburians attending R. M. C. last year were quite promi¬ 
nent among the prize-winners, both as regards scholarships and 
sport. H. S. Parker (1908-1911), and N. A. Sparks (1904-1911), 





32 


THE ASHBURIAN 


passed the second class; and E. N. Reid (1907-1911), E. Ross Leth¬ 
bridge (1911-1912), and F. J. A. Therien (1911-1912) passed the 
third class. The two last mentioned captured the only two prizes 
available in their class, Lethbridge securing that awarded for Eng¬ 
lish; and Therien that for French. Sparks was a member of the 
successful revolver team representing R. M. C., which shot a match 
with Sandhurst College, England, and came out victorious. L. 
K. Greene (1906-1909) was the big noise in tennis circles at the 
Kingston military institution last season. He captured the tennis 
singles Challenge Cup, won the Singles Handicup, the Open Doubles 
(with another), and the Handicap Doubles (with Barwis). C. W. A. 
Barwis (1903-1911) took a leading part in the tennis and billiard 
championship and is this season again playing centre half for R.M.C. 


THIS YEAR’S R. M. C. GRADUATES 

R. S. P. Maclvor (1908-1910), who captured first place at his 
entrance to R. M. C. from Ashbury in 1910, graduated this year with 
numerous honours, ranking third in the class. 

He secured a commission in the Indian Army. Besides this 
“Bunny” was awarded the Governor-Generals Bronze Medal, the 
first class prize for proficiency in artillery; the Silver Medal pre¬ 
sented by It Alliance Francaise for proficiency in drills and exercises; 
the second prize in the Quebec Musketry Corps Competition; the 
Challenge Cup for artillery presented by the Ontario Artillery Asso¬ 
ciation; the Musketry Challenge Shield presented by the Province of 
Ontario; and the Mounted Patrol Challenge 1 Cup, presented by the 
Earl of Dundonalcl. 

Maclvor is one of the most successful students that Ashbury has 
ever sent forth, and his high standing throughout his course at 
R. M. C. and the many honours which he won at his graduation, 
reflect great credit on himself and his old school. 

Two other old Ashburians also graduated this June. These 
are: A. H. Bostock (1909-1910), who ranked fifth with the Hooper 
Riding Challenge Cup; and J. F. E. Gendron (1908-1910), who is 
now taking a year at McGill and who played on the first team this 
fall. 


H.R.M. 



THE AS HR UKI AN 


33 



A NEEDED ASSET 

The time has now arrived, when 
the school should possess Graduat¬ 
ing Tablets, on which would be 
inscribed the names of those who 
have passed each year into the 
R. M. C. and the Universities. 

These Tablets, made of some 
nicely finished wood, would hang in 
the School Dining-Hall; and would 
serve as records of the successes of 
the School from the time of its 
founding. 

Here is a chance for some 
R. M. C. and McGill ex-Ashburians 
to present these boards and so help 
to keep green the pleasant 
memores of themselves and others 
in these halls of learning. WHO 
WILL HELP? 


OLD BOYS RACE 

One of the most interesting events of the Sports meet last .June 
was the Old Boys- race. 

This was the first race of its kind to be run in the annual track 
meets of the school and in consequence not a little enthusiasm was 
displayed by the many onlookers and friends of the boys. 

The race was a 440 yards event and two very handsome prizes 
were donated to the winners. 

When the pistol shot sounded, the following gentlemen were 
seen to bound lightly away from the mark: Messrs. Harry Wright, 
Douglas Sladen, John Allan, Guy Bowie, Leigh Bishop, Reginald 
Orde, Melbourne O’Halloran and Philip Woollcombe. 

Melbourne O’Halloran started off with a rush and took the 
lead which he maintained throughout the whole course although 
the finish was a neck to neck one in which he just finished a close 
foot ahead of Philip Woollcombe, who qualified for second prize. 







34 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Among some of the contestants, there was a more or less appar¬ 
ent lack of wind; but all things considered, a very creditable speed 
was kept up throughout the race. 

It is to be hoped that at the next Sports Meet, more Old Boys 
events will lie on the programme and that the Old Boys will present 
the prizes attendant thereto. 

“COMBE.” 


A STAR FOOTBALLER 

Ashburians take more than an ordinary pride in the wonderful 
work of Cuthbert Barwis (1903-1911) on the R. M. C. back division 
this season. His magnificent kicking, which brought victory to 
Ashbury on so many occasions, has been doing great service for the 
Cadets and has resulted in most of their scoring. His kicking and 
playing have been a matter of universal comment by the Press, and 
he has been termed everything from “The Human Icicle” to the 
“Greatest Kicking Half in Canada”. 

Should Barwis decide to proceed to McGill after leaving R.M.C., 
we may anticipate another year of Gridiron Brilliancy on his part 
with the McGill Team. Barwis received all his football training at 
Ashbury, which was his first and last school. 


HATS OFF TO ALEC 

In the royal and ancient game, old Ashburians seem to be holding 
their own. 

The Royal Ottawa Golf Club numbers among its members 
several Old Boys and the leader of them now is, of course, Alec. G. 
Fraser (1899-1908), the club champion, who won the title in a spec¬ 
tacular manner last September. Alec carried off the honours by 
one up, after carrying his game with Mr. Gerald Lees, champion for 
the previous three years, to the thirty-seventh hole. The match is 
said to have been one of the best ever played on the Ottawa course. 
Alec is perhaps the youngest player that ever won the championship 
of the Royal Ottawas. He has been a member of the club for the 
past five or six years and was runner up to Mr. Lees in the Cham¬ 
pionship Finals of 1912. He should be heard from in next year’s 
Canadian Championship Tourney. 


“DICK.” 




THE ASHBURIAN 


35 


AN OLD BOY REMINISCENCE 


To put some recollections into cold type, 1 


of memories of bygone days. It carries one to the 


>rings back 


a host 
time when the 

school was quartered in a single room in the Victoria Chambers; 
when we played leap-frog on the side walk in front of the Western 
Block every day during recess; when we wore blue and white caps 
perched on the back of our heads; and when we were generally and 
popularly known as the “Woollcombe Boys”. Rather ancient his¬ 
tory, the boys of the present day will doubtless think; but, while 
we were small in numbers, we had known one another since child¬ 
hood and were a happy family. But as he has been asked to confine 
himself to one particular recollection, the writer thinks it might Ire of 
interest to the readers of The Ashburian to hear of the time we 
“put on” the Trial Scene from the Merchant of Venice, in St. John’s 
school house at the close of the spring term. Bob Gormully was 
Shylock; Harry McLean, the Duke; Charlie Tupper, Bassanio; Billy 
Palmer, Antonio; Louis White, Gratiano; while the writer made a 
valiant effort to put Ellen Terry out of business by appearing as 
Portia. He distinctly remembers his annoyance when the Head 
pinched his ear with great vigour and informed him that owing to 
his red cheeks he was to play the part of Portia. He was greatly 
disgusted with his female part, but for the good of the school sank 
any personal feelings, principally because, in those days, when we 
were told to do a thing, we had to do it. The rehearsals were the 
best part. We got out of all kinds of mental tortures in the shape 
of Algebra, Euclid, etc., and with our stage manager, Rev. Prof. 
MacMeekin, spent many an hour in being licked into shape. Rev. 
MacMeekin taught us writing and elocution, and was a continued 
joy. How we did look forward to his lesson. He was an aimiable 
old gentleman with a snow white beard, large spectacles and ultra 
clerical attire. Pronunciation was his strong point, and woe betide 


(( 


the boy who dispensed with his final “gs” or slurred his " rs 
He occasionally would recite for us, much, the writer is ashamed to 
say, to our wild and ill-concealed amusement. He made a striking 
figure though, with his flowing locks, flashing eyes, one hand dramati¬ 
cally pointing to the ceiling and the other placed in the folds of his 
long frock coat. However, to return to the performance: Gor¬ 
mully made a blood-thirsty Shylock; McLean a stately Duke; 
while Tupper, White and Palmer were all excellent in their parts. 
The winter’s recollection of his own performance as Portia is very 
faint; but he can never forget the agony of remembering the long 
“ Quality of Mercy” speech and the intense heat of the heavy judicial 
wig which he wore. The “Gentle Dew” lines were made quite 
realistic as the heat and excitement caused copious* beads of sweat 
to roll down his cheeks; quite worthy of Belasco at his best! The 


36 


THE ASHBURIAN 


writer wonders if the Ashbury boys still have theatricals—if so, 
and they produce the “Trial Scene”, his heartfelt sympathy will 
go out to the victim selected to play Portia—particularly if he wears 
a heavy wig on a hot June night. 

V. W. S. Heron (1892). 


HOCKEY PROSPECTS 

The hockey season is now rapidly approaching and as in pre¬ 
vious years, The Old Boys vs. Ashbury annual match looms up on 
the horizon. 

Last year the Old Boys presented a strong team and defeated 
Ashbury twice after two very hard fought games. We, of course, 
hope to repeat this performance this year and so we warn the school 
to anticipate two good games. 

We shall, we hope, have several good players available. We 
hope to procure the services of O’Halloran for goal. Then among 
others there are Barwis, Oliver, Bowie, Shaw, Gendron, Sladen, 
Verner, Blair, Fraser, Masson, Carling and Fleming from which 
to make up a winning team. 

P.W.C. 


NOTES FROM Me GILL 

Former Ashburians attending McGill University are: J. R. 
Allan (1903-1907); C. M. Anderson (1909-1910) ; H. N. Bate 
(1904-1911); D. Burn (1902-1910); W. H. Davis (1907-1913); J. 
F. E. Gendron (1908-1910); W. G. Gibbs (1907-1912); J. B. L. 
Heney (1905-1913); L. E. L. Kcelle (1911-1912); E. J. Lowe (1905- 
1913); J. B. Macphail (1904-1909); G. W. Masson (1908-1909); 
H. R, Morgan (1902-1912); M. O’Halloran (1902-1912); W. L. 
Snetsinger (1910-1911); H. P. Wright, B.A. (1903-1906). 

J. B. Macphail (Senior partner of he celebrated “Firm”) is 
again president of the Fencing, Boxing and Wrestling Club. 

Melbourne O’Halloran is quite prominent at McGill this year. 
Besides being an officer of his class, he is Sporting Editor of the now 
well known and much read McGill Daily , the organ of the Under¬ 
graduate body. While at Ashbury, Happy was assistant editor of 
The Ashburian. 




THE ASHBURIAN 


37 


Grey Masson, a football and hockey standby of McGill for the 
past few seasons, this year dropped out of the rugby limelight. He 
still takes an active part, however, in winning championships for 
McGill, being cheer-leader of the Rooters Club, an all important 
feature at the gridiron contests. 

Several Old Boys have joined the detachment of the Canadian 
Officers Training Corps stationed at McGill, with a view to con¬ 
tinuing their military education, which had its beginning in the 
Cadet Corps here. 


IN THE MOTORING WORLD 

A little magazine entitled The Accelerator has recently made its 
appearance in Ottawa. The Accelerator is devoted to the interests 
of motoring both by land and by water and is published under the 
editorial direction of an Old Boy, E. B. Eddy (Bessey) (1900-1903). 
So far the magazine has met with warm receptions from all lovers of 
motoring in the Ottawa district. 


LOOK, WHO’S HERE 

(ex. Rideau Record.) 

“Mr. Walter Wickware of Ottawa had a narrow escape from 
drowning in Rideau lake last Monday when the boat in which he was 
sailing tipped over. He is an excellent swimmer, but in some way 
he got his feet tangled in the ropes and could not free them. He 
shouted for help, but the strong breeze carried the sound the wrong 
way. Fortunately Mrs. J. Washburn and Mr. Smart of Brockville 
were out fishing and saw him. They hurried to his rescue and took 
him to shore. He was pretty well exhausted and would surely have 
been drowned had he not been seen when he was, as he was so en¬ 
tangled that he could not save himself/’ 

We should advise Mr. Walter Wickware (1910-1912) to take in a 
few reefs in his mainsail the next time he goes out sailing.—Ed. 




38 


THE ASHBURIAN 


WHO REMEMBERS HIM? 


A marriage of peculiar interest to old Ashburians took place at 
Ottawa when, on July 19th, Miss Lucy Winnifred Robinson, daughter 
of the Rev. J. Cooper Robinson of Nugata, Japan, and Mr. George 
Pardon Bryce, one time assistant master here, of the Central Neigh¬ 
borhood House, Toronto, were united at St. Bartholomew’s Church. 
We extend our heartiest congratulations to Mr. and Mrs. G. P. Bryce. 


OLD BOYS NOTES 

Word comes from George W. Mitchell (Mike), (1897-1905), 
in which he begs to be kindly remembered to everybody. He is 
now across the “pond” and is living in London, Eng. 

About a month after the last issue of The Ashburian, we re¬ 
ceived a very pleasant shock at the appearance of Ben Howard 
(1899-1904), and his wife, who paid the school a flying visit. This 
was especially so in view of the fact that we had completely lost 
touch of him and worse still, believed him dead. His class mates 
will therefore be very glad to know that he is a flourishing benedict 
and is now living in New York. 


Lieut. H. N. Bate (1904-1911) was one of the team of three 
Canadian Officers sent by the Department of Militia and Defence to 
ride at the International Horse Show at Olympia this year. Lieut. 
Bate added to his laurels as a horseman by gaining fourth place in 
the Duke of Connaught’s Cup Competition with his horse ‘ £ Lans- 
downe” in a field of one hundred and forty-two entries. It is also 
interesting to note that the three Canadian Horses were among the 
first six. 

Allan Dale-Harris (1895-1898) was recently gazetted as Lieu¬ 
tenant in the 9th Mississauga Horse. 

Recent advices from Hamilton state that Errol I). H. Boyd 
(1910-1912;, has jumped into the limelight as a newspaperman. 
Rumour has it that he now sports a moustache, and is considered as 
one of the rising lights in the newspaper world of the little town by 
the Mountain. 



THE ASHBURIAN 


39 


Write it “J. L. Bishop, B.A.,” and “R. J. Orde, B.A.”, now. 
These two old boys, at Ashbury (1902-1908), graduated at 
Toronto Varsity last summer. We predict two very successful 
careers await Messrs. “ Tweedledum and Tweedledee.” 

Andrew Naismith (1911-12) football captain and senior prefect 
is now engaged in the difficult pursuit of Legal Knowledge in Toronto, 
where he expects to be for the next five years. We feel convinced 
that if there is one man who will make a successful lawyer, it will be 
our loquacious “Andy”. 

Austin Pratt (1903-05 and later in 1909-11), esteemed house¬ 
master and successful football coach, is at present living in Winnipeg, 
where he expects to remain for some time. 

Capt. Thomas R. Caldwell (1902-1908) paid the school a visit 
on his return from the West this fall, where he has been for several 
year?. “Spots” wee sma’ slipper will doubtless be remembered by 
some of us—eh, what! 



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The Ashburian 



Editorial Staff. 

Editor-in-Chiej -—Mr. C. H. Hooper. 

Sports Editors — R. Maclaren, J. W. Hennessy, 

I). MacMahon. 

Rifle Shooting — H. P. Graham. 

Secretary-Treasurer—M r. D. E. C. AVood. 


EDITORIAL 

“Time is short, but Art is long”, is a proverb that some of us 
may have come across in our classical reading—certainly it is a 
saying of which one realizes the truth when attempting to write an 
editorial, particularly when one has no very definite idea about what 
to write. 

The proverb is also applicable to the present school year. The 
half-way post has already been passed, and we still have so much to 
do and so short a time in which to do it. In a little over a month 
the -R.M.C. and Naval Examinations will be upon us, and the strenu¬ 
ous life that for many of us marks the latter part of the year is al¬ 
ready sounding its summons. The present season of the year is one 
that lends itself to an increased pressure of intellectual work—It is 
a period of “marking time” as regards sport. Hockey is over, and 
the time for track sports, cricket, and tennis has not yet come. 
The Gymnasium and the Cadet Corps offer practically the only 
opportunities for physical training. “AAkdks” of course do so 
nominally, but actually for very few of us walks are really exercise, 
the half mile stroll being far more attractive than the six mile tramp. 

AA r e are more than pleased with the results of the hockey season 
just closed. AAdiile it has not brought to us the Inter-School Cham¬ 
pionship yet it has increased the school’s reputation for clean and 
manly sport—and this may be a greater possession than a champion¬ 
ship. Captain Hennessey is to be congratulated upon the spirit 
that has characterised his whole team, a spirit to the development of 
which his own example and personality has contributed not a little. 

Our sincere thanks are due to Mr. E. Phillips, whom we now 
regard as an old friend, for the time and trouble he has so willingly 
given in acting as honorary coach to the team. AA r e are very fortunate 








































9 


THE ASHBURIAN 


in having a coach in whom the true spirit of sport is so strongly 
marked. 

The Old Boys’ section of the magazine will be read with interest 
by present as well as by past boys. We are glad to know that, in 
the case of not a few old boys, it has already been the means of 
drawing them nearer to their old school. We look for still greater 
results. “Time is short”—and within a few months a considerable 
number of present Ashburians will have joined the list of “Old 
Boys”. May these last few months with us be among the best and 
happiest periods of their school course. 


HOCKEY 

HOCKEY MATCHES 


Date. 

Match. 

Played 


Score. 

*Jan. 31 

Ashbury v. St. Alban’s. 

. . Brockville 

Won 

8-2 

*Feb. 7 

Ashbury v. Lower Canada. 

Home 

Lost 

5-0 

Feb. 9 

Ashbury IV v. Models III. 

Away 

Lost 

7-1 

*Feb. 14 

Ashbury v. St. Alban’s. 

Home 

Won 

6-3 

Feb. 16 

Ashbury III v. Models II . 

Away 

Draw 

4-4 

*Feb. 21 Ashbury v. Lower Canada . 

Away 

Lost 

2-1 

Feb. 23 

Ashbury III v. Models II. 

Away 

Won 

4-1 

Feb. 28 

Ashbury v. Ottawa Collegiate . 

Home 

Lost 

2-1 

Mar. 3 

Ashbury v. Old Boys. 

Home 

Draw 

4-4 

Mar. 7 

Asbbury III v. Models II. 

Home 

Lost 

3-1 


*Carling Cup Matches. 


Ashbury College v. St. Alban’s. 

Our first match was played in Brockville on Saturday, January 
30th, and resulted in a win for us by 8 goals to 2. It was a clean 
game from start to finish, and there were no penalties. The match 
was played in three periods of a quarter of an hour each. 

1st Period. 

Code opened with a rush, passing to MacLaren, who missed the 
goal by inches. St. Alban’s retaliated with a rush, checked by 
Code, who again made an ineffectual attempt to score, passing every 
man but the goalkeeper. After some play in central ice, Rivers 
poked the puck past the defence and scored. We continued to 
press around our opponents’ goal and in a few minutes Rivers scored 
again. St. Alban’s had several shots at this point, but their shooting 












THE ASHBURIAN 


3 


was erratic. A shot by Malcolm hit Smith in the eye and caused a 
short delay. From the face off after this interruption MacLaren 
came around the goal and scored. Soon after the period ended with 
the score 3-0 for Ashbury. 

2nd Period. 


Code opened again with a rush but failed to pass the goalkeeper, 
who was playing a wonderful game. Hennessey netted the puck, 
but it was not given. The ice was soft and we had considerable 
difficulty to keep our feet, as our skates were too sharp. Hennessey 
II replaced Malcolm, whose knee was hurting him. Code and Hen¬ 
nessey made repeated rushes, but could not pass Shelton in goal. 
At the end of the period Lily put in a good shot and then scored from 
the rebound. 

3rd Period. 

Code opened with a good rush, ending in a goal. This was 
followed by a strong attack on our goal, but the defence played well 
and did some useful checking. Hennessey made a good rush and 
Rivers scored from an excellent pass in the mouth of goal. From 
the face off Birkett scored with a long shot. MacLaren followed this 
up with another goal after out-skating his opponents. St. Alban’s 
shewed signs of tiring, although their captain was putting up a good 
game. Code scored again after a brilliant individual effort. St. 
Alban’s finished up the scoring with an excellent goal, after some fine 
stick handling by Saddington. 

The St. Alban’s team was smaller than ours and our defence was 
much faster than theirs. But they played a good game all the time 
and kept us working in every period. The line up was as follows: 


St. Alban’s 


Ashbury 


Skelton. 

Smith. 

Annesley. 

Boreham (Capt.) 

Lily. 

Jones. 

Saddington. 


. . . Goal. Reiffenstein. 

. .Point.J. Hennessey (Capt.) 

C. Point. Code 

. . RoY T er. Birkett 

.Centre. Rivers 

. L. Wing.MacLaren 

. R. Wing. Malcolm 


Substitutes : Adair for Jones. 

A. Hennessey for Malcolm. 


Referee : Mr. White, Brockville. 

Judge of Play. Mr. Chrysler, Ottawa. 
















4 


THE ASHBURIAN 


L. C. C. v. Ashbury College. 

4 . | 

The second match in our league was played on Saturday, Feb¬ 
ruary 7th in Ottawa, and resulted in a win for the visitors by 5 goals 
to nothing. There was some delay at the start owing to a dis¬ 
cussion on the number of periods to be played. In the end it was 
decided to play three periods of 15 minutes in Ottawa, and two of 
20 minutes in the return game in Montreal. 

1st Period. 

The game in this period was very fast indeed and there were 
some brilliant rushes by both teams. Code opened with a great 
burst of speed, but lost the puck near the goal. The game was very 
even and in consequence there was a considerable amount of dirty 
work on both sides. Birkett was benched for two minutes for 
tripping, during which time L. C. C. scored with a lucky shot which 
went into the goal off Hennessey’s stick. Soon after Flannigan was 
put off for five minutes for hitting Malcolm on the head, a regrettable 
incident in a school match. Rivers joined him almost immediately. 
Malcolm nearly scored and for a few minutes we were raining in shots 
on MacLagan who was doing some good work. We had two or three 
open goals, but seemed to hit the goalkeeper every time, Birkett 
doing this twice. The period ended with the score 1-0 for the 
visitors. 

2nd Period. 

The game recommenced as fast as ever, but rather in favour of 
the visitors. A short delay was occasioned by MacLaren hurting 
his elbow. A good deal of tripping was overlooked by-the referee in 
centre ice, Hennessey and Code being the victims. A long shot by 
L. C. C. passed Reiffenstein, who was not ready for it. This had a 
disheartening effect on us and in less than three minutes they had 
added two more goals. Flannigan was again sent off for rough 
work and the second period ended with the score at 4-0. 

3rd Period. 

We did most of the pressing in this period, but we failed to score, 
chiefly owing to the fact that there was no combination amongst our 
forwards. From a good piece of passing L. C. C. scored their last 
goal. Then Slater was put off for tripping. Code after a good 
rush scored a goal, but it was disallowed by the referee, who had 
apparently blown his whistle for an offside. A brilliant save by 
Reiffenstein prevented the visitors scoring a certain goal. At this 


THE ASHBURIAN 


o 


stage three of the visitors were off the ice, each serving sentences of 
various lengths for rough work. We were unable, however, to score. 
Birkett retired again for fighting with Slater and while they were 
off the whistle blew for time. It was not such a clean game as one 
ought to see between two school teams and the officials should have 
been much stricter. The line up was as follows: 

L. 0. C. 

Mac Lagan.Goal. . 

Farthing.Point. . 

Svmonds.C. Point 

Slater.Rover. 

Beverley.Centre. 

Bailey.L. Wing 

Flannigan.A. Wing 

Referee : P. Chrysler. 

Judge of Play. B. Thomas. 

Ashbury v. St. Alban’s. 

The return match was played in Ottawa on Saturday, February 
14th and resulted in a win for the home team by 6 goals to 3. The 
game was played in two periods of twenty minutes. MacLaren 
started off with a rush, but his shot was blocked by the St. Alban’s 
defence and it failed to reach the net. St. Alban’s then got the puck 
and in a scrimmage in the goal mouth put the puck in. This was 
not seen by the goal judge, who did not hold up his hand. Ashbury, 
however, gave the visitors the benefit of the doubt. From the face 
off MacLaren again skated down, and coming round from behind the 
nets scored, making the score one all. St. Alban’s retaliated with a 
good rush, but an excellent save by Reiffenstein prevented them 
scoring. Malcolm scored the next goal entirely on his own after a bril¬ 
liant piece of work. Thackray had been doing some good checking 
and had been using his body well up to this time, but he did not have 
an opportunity of taking the puck down. The next goal was the 
result of some good work by Hennessey and Birkett, the former 
taking the puck down and shooting, the latter netting from the re¬ 
bound. The game was in neutral territory for a few minutes and 
then Blakeney added to our score with a beautiful shot, which gave 
the goalkeeper no chance. A scrimmage in front of goal gave the 
visitors their second goal, for which Lily was responsible. Just 
before half time, Hennessey was hit in the wind by the puck and 
there was a short delay. There was no further score and when the 
whistle blew for half time the score was 4-2 for Ashbury. In the 


Ashbury. 

. . . . Reiffenstein 
Hennessey ( Capt .) 

. Code 

. Birkett 

. Rivers 

.MacLaren 

. Malcolm 
















THE ASHBURIAN 


(5 

second half LeLievre replaced MacLaren, who had hurt his foot, 
while Rivers and Code replaced Blakeney and Thackray respec¬ 
tively. The game opened with a brilliant rush by Hennessey and an 
equally brillant save by Skelton. After a few rushes by St. Alban’s, 
Hennessey again went down the ice, but failed to pass the goal¬ 
keeper, who was putting up a good game. A delay was caused by 
Code, who broke his skate, but he continued to play, although he 
was rather hampered by it for the rest of the game. The next goal 
was scored by LeLievre from a good pass from Code. Code made 
the next rush, but his shot was saved in brilliant style. Good passing 
by the Ashbury forwards took the puck down, but Malcolm missed 
an open goal. Some good work by the visitors kept the puck near 
the Ashbury, but they failed to score. Hennessey went through the 
whole team and with a splendid shot scored our last goal. St. 
Alban’s added one more, Boreham fooling Reiffenstein with a long 
shot. Soon after the whistle blew for time. The game was excep¬ 
tionally clean, no penalties being handed out to either team, although 
the display of hockey was a poor one, neither team doing themselves 
justice. For the visitors Boreham and Shelton starred. The line 
up was as follows:— 


St. Alban’s 
S kelton. 

.Goal. 

Ashbury. 

. Reiffenstein 

Smith. 

.Point. 

... Hennessey ( Capt .) 

Annesley. 

.C. Point . . 

. Thackray, Code 

Boreham ( (dipt ). 

.Rover. . 

.Birkett 

Lily. 

.Centre. 

. Blakeney, Rivers 

Adair, Mac Ken ;i . 

.L. Wing.... 

. . . . MacLaren, LeLievre 

Saddington. 

.R. Wing. . . . 

. Malcolm 


Referee : F. B. Carling, Esq. 

Judge of Play : M. James, Esq. 

Ashbury v. Lower Canada College. 

Our last game in the Carling Cup series was played in Montreal, 
c n Saturday, February 21st, from 10-11. The start of the game was 
delayed owing to the non-arrival of our Judge of Play, the face off 
taking place at 10.15. It was a very fast game all the time and we 
made a much better showing than on our own rink. For the first 
ten minutes neither side had much advantage, until Malcolm on a 
nice pass from MacLaren scored the first goal of the match. The 
goalkeeper should have stopped it, but he was suffering from stage 
fright and made no attempt at it. This stirred us to further efforts 
and both Hennessey and Code tried hard to increase the score. Mac- 















THE ASH BUR I AN 


Laren nearly scored on one occasion, his shot hitting the post and 
rebounding. Our checking back was much better than usual and 
Reiffenstein hardly had a shot to stop in this period. Rivers was 
conspicuous for hard work and brilliant play. The first period 
ended with no change in the score and our chances seemed good. 

L. C. C. started off the second period with a rush and it was 
only the stellar work of Hennessey and Code which prevented several 
goals. The players were tiring and the pace was not so fast as 
before. Owing to an accident no nets were supplied for the goal 
and there was no cross bar. The duties of the Goal Judge were 
rendered rather difficult and there was some doubt about the L.C.C. 
first goal. Our own Goal Judge gave it and several spectators in 
the vicinity agreed with him. It rather disheartened our team and 
Reiffenstein was called upon to save several shots. The excitement 
among the spectators was at fever heat, as it was nearly time, and 
every opportunity for an individual rush was loudly applauded. 
At last about two minutes before time L. C. C. scored with a good 
shot by Flannigan and all our efforts to tie the score were of no avail. 
A minute before time there was an unpleasant incident, when Bever¬ 
ley hit Hennessey on the head. It, was no accident, and it was 
difficult to understand why he was not given his marching orders. 
In school matches such incidents should be dealt with severely and 
it was a pity that the boy went unpunished. It was a worthy 
struggle between two good teams, very evenly matched, and L. C.C. 
thoroughly deserved to win. There was not a weak spot in their 
team and they should not have any difficulty in beating St. Alban’s 
and securing the cup. The line up was as follows: 


L. C. C. 

Catton. 

Symonds. 

F arthing. 

Slater. 

Beverley. 

Flannigan. 

Bailey. 

Rejeree : J. Gallery. 


. . Goal. . 
. Boint. 
C. Boint 
. Rover. 
Centre.. 
R. Wing 
L. Wing 


Ashbury. 

.Reiffenstein 

Hennessey ( Capt ) 

.Code 

. Birkett 

. Rivers 

. Malcolm 

. MacLaren 


Judge oj Play. U. Brophy. 


Ashbury v. Collegiate. 

This match was played on Saturday morning, February 28th, 
and resulted in a win for the Collegiate. The ice, as was only natural 
at this time of year, was soft and slushy. Owing to the indisposition 
of MacLaren, Ivuntz started out at left wing for the first period. 
















s 


THE ASH BUR IAN 


The Collegiate were inclined to be rough from the beginning and K. 
Urquhart was benched for 3 minutes. Soon after his brother was 
sent off to keep him company. Play was in centre ice for about ten 
minutes, during which time K. Urquhart was off for 3 and 5 minutes. 
Rivers was playing a wonderful game at centre and causing the 
Collegiate defence a considerable amount of trouble. On a scrim¬ 
mage in the goal Watson put through the puck for the Collegiate and 
gave them the lead. A minute later Hennessey was hurt and had to 
retire. The time that he was off was counted as the regular half 
time interval and on his reappearance the game was resumed. 

In the second half Hennessey opened the score, in spite of a 
vigorous protest from the Collegiate. The referee supported the 
Goal Judge, who was changed, but not before he had received some 
pretty hard treatment from the brothers Urquhart. Soon after A. 
Urquhart was benched again. He was followed by his brother with a 
sentence of five minutes. Wilson scored again for the Collegiate 
with a good cross shot. At this stage the game was very ragged on 
both sides, both teams feeling the effects of the heavy ice. Two 
minutes before time Coach E. Phillips removed our team, on account 
of a bad decision by the Judge of Play, who ordered MacLaren off 
for 3 minutes, when it was really a Collegiate player, who was at 
fault. 

AVe were very lucky in securing the services of an excellent 
referee in Mr. Harry Ackland, who did his best to stop the rough 
play, but who received no support from the Judge of Play. 


The line up was as follows:— 
Collegiate 


Cavenagh.Goal. . 

Powell.Point. 

Proudfoot.C. Point 

AAatson.Rover. 

Wilson.Centre. 

K. Urquhart.R. Wing 

A. Urquhart.L. AA 7 ing 


Referee : Mr. Ackland. 


Ashbury. 

. Reiffenstein 

.Hennessey 

. Code 

. Birkett II 

.Rivers 

. Malcolm 

Kuntz, MacLaren I 


Judge of Play. Mr. Kirby. 


Ashbury v. Old Boys. 

This match was the last played between the school team and 
the “Old Boys”. This game was to be the final struggle for suprem¬ 
acy between two generations. The game started promptly and from 
the start a thrilling game was witnessed, as both sides were deter¬ 
mined to win. Hennessey pierced the “Old Boy” defence and 
















THE ASH BUR IAN 


9 

passed neatly to Birkett, who scored the first goal of the match. 
Fleming then retaliated, but failed to pass Reiffenstein, who made a 
brilliant save. The play was fast and furious for the next few 
minutes and Oliver breaking away from centre ice went through and 
scored the first goal for the “Old Boys”. Soon after Carling put 
the “Old Boys” ahead but the school equalised matters just before 
half time, when Code passed Wickware with a good shot. Soon 
after half time Bowie added another goal and a few minutes later the 
same player added yet another. The “Old Boys” now had a good 
lead, and as the ice was none too good, the outlook was bad. Mal¬ 
colm was knocked out for a minute as the result of a heavy body 
check. Ashbury now pressed hard and the game was for most of 
the time round the “Old Boys” goal where Wickware was showing 
all his old skill. A bad collision between Rivers and Fleming caused 
a little delay, as both players were cut. They continued to play 
and were stitched up after the game. After consistent worrying 
Code managed to poke the puck past Wickware, making the score 
4-3. Hennessey took a long shot soon after and fooled Wickware, 
making the score 4 all. All further efforts to score were of no avai 1 
and the game ended in a draw. The line up was as follows: 


Old Boys 


School. 

Wickware. 

.Goal. 

.Reiffenstein 

Fraser. 

.Point. 

.Hennessey 

Fleming. 

.('. Point. 

.Code 

Oliver. 

.Rover. 

.Birkett II 

Bowie. 

.Centre. 

.Rivers 

Cory. 

.L. Wing. 

. Thackray 

Carling. 

.R. Wing. 

.Malcolm 

Referee: Mr 

. E. Phillips. 



Hockey Characters. 


Hennessey 

(Capt.)— Point. An excellent 

stick-handler with 


any amount of pace. An untiring worker: always in perfect con¬ 
dition. He never lost his temper and was quite the cleanest player 
on the team. It was largely due to his captaincy that the whole team 
played such clean hockey. 

Reiffenstein — Goal. Quite a brilliant player in practice 
games, but did not always shine in matches, although he played a 
fine game in Montreal. He was rather inclined to be slow in the 
nets at the beginning of the season, but he improved in this point 
towards the end. 

Code— C. Point. The best stick-handler on the team and a 
very strong skater. A very difficult player to get on hard ice when 
once under way. A valuable asset to the team. 

Birkett — Rover. A very good stick-handler and a hard worker. 
Always to be found where he is most needed and consequently he 
















10 


THE ASHBURIAN 


was responsible for several goals. With a little more strength next 
year, he will be a great addition to the team. 

Rivers— Centre. A strong skater and a hard shot. Always 
very useful in checking back. In spite of being handicapped by his 
size he used his body well. 

Malcolm — L. Wing. Weak at the start, but improved as the 
season went on. Fast skater but should learn to check back more. 
Rather light, but will be useful next year. 

MacLaren — R. Wing. Played his usual brilliant game this 
season. He is a very fast skater and clever stick-handler, but 
should learn to use his body more. 

Thackray (spare). A player who improved wonderfully during 
the season both in stick-handling and pace. He checked well and 
used his body to great advantage. 

LeLievre. (spare). A good skater who would be more useful 
if he were more aggressive. He should learn to keep himself in 
training, so as to be able to last a whole game. 

Intermediate Hockey. 

Before we leave the subject of hockey, a few words must be said 
about the junior hockey. Neither the second team nor the Senior 
Intermediates have played any outside matches, so that it is difficult 
to criticise them. The second team did their duty nobly in playing 
against the first team at the beginning of the season, and then their 
place was taken by the “Old Boys”. The senior intermediates 
played together on one of the open air rinks at the school nearly 
every afternoon, but never formed a team. This was a pity, as for 
two reasons, matches are a good thing, They show up the weak 
points of a team and also they teach the players to control their 
tempers. Besides, next year, some of these very boys will be trying 
for a place on the first two teams. The junior intermediates, how¬ 
ever, have shewn the wildest enthusiasm for the game and have 
been lucky enough to have a series of three matches with the ModePs 
2nd team. The first two games were played on the Model open air 
rink before a large number of spectators. The first match was a 
thrilling one, and ended in a tie, after playing twenty minutes over¬ 
time. The second one ended in a victory for us, while the third 
match, played on the Gladstone Avenue rink, was won by the Models. 
They were all clean games and thoroughly enjoyed by all who took 
part in them. The boys who played a prominent part in these 
games were: O’Halloran in goal, who was tried out with the first 
team, and who will make that team one day, MacLaren, brother of 
the captain of football and the most promising of all the interme¬ 
diates, and Barwis, who will follow in his brother’s footsteps. 
Other boys who played on this team are: Crocket, Echlin, Gis¬ 
borne, Lowe, Van Meter, Moore. 


THE ASH BUR IAN 


11 


SHOOTING 

The indoor shooting for the season of 1913-1914 has not been 
quite so successful as last year. We have lost several of our best 
shots and although there have always been a good number of boys 
shooting at the afternoon practices, they have not had time yet to 
reach the high standard of their predecessors. We hope, however, 
to see some of them distinguish themselves at the ranges under the 
careful tuition of Mr. Hooper. Our four matches in the Canadian 
rifle league have taken place our whole total being 3,674, 42 points less 
than in the previous year. As the third team last year only obtained 
3,624 points, we still stand a good chance of again coming second. 
Our first match, in which we only scored 905, does not compare well 
with the corresponding one of last year, but there was a good reason 
for this. The outbreak of mumps, which sent us all home early for 
the Xmas holidays, also interfered with our December match. We 
obtained special permission to shoot this match in January, but we 
were at a disadvantage because it was at the beginning of the term 
before there was much time for practice. The 2nd and 3rd matches 
were better, but still below last year. The last match, however 
beat all our previous records and was one point better than our best 
score last year. In the absence of Mr. Hooper the shooting has been 
under the supervision of Sergeant-Major Turner, who has shewn 
great keenness and who has been largely responsibleAor the excellent 
scores sent in. A word of thanks is due to Graham, who has done a 
good deal to help the sergeant in getting things ready and in cleaning 
the rifles, an unpleasant task a t the best of times, and also in keeping 
the scores for the various practices and matches. Before we give the 
scores of the C. R. L. matches, mention should be made of a wonder¬ 
ful target sent in by Bate in one of the matches. He put his five 
shots right through the bull, only making one small hole in the 
target. So improbable did it appear at first that all five shots could 
have gone through the same hole, that the target had to be certified 
by three witnesses and the sergeant. It was a brilliant performance 
and Bate is to be congratulated upon it. 

The following were the scores in the four matches: 


1st Match—January 14th. 


Sladen. 94 

Read. 94 

Graham. 91 

Morris. 91 

Thompson. 90 

Hallick. 90 


2nd Match—January 28th. 


Bate. 95 

Graham. 94 

Hennessey. 92 

Read. 91 

Beard. 90 

Holland. 90 














12 


THE ASHBURIAN 


1st Match—January 14th. 


2nd Match—January 28th. 


Beard. 

90 

Chanonhouse. 

90 

Reiffenstein. 

89 

Edward. 

90 

MacLaren. 

89 

Thompson. 

89 

Edward. 

87 

Reiffenstein. 

88 

Total. 

905 

Total. 

909 

3rd Match February 26th 

. 

4th Match March 4th. 


Bate. 

95 

Holland. 

96 

Read. 

94 

Sladen. 

96 

Graham. 

93 

Bate. 

95 

Sladen. 

93 

Ross. 

95 

Reiffenstein. 

92 

Reiffenstein. 

94 

Thompson. 

92 

Chanonhouse. 

94 

MacMahon. 

91 

Read. 

94 

Holland. 

91 

Graham. 

92 

Chanonhouse. 

91 

Morris. 

91 

Beard. 

91 

Irvin. 

90 

Total. 

923 

Total. 

937 


Owing to the numerous practices for the senior indoor rifle 
shooting, the juniors have had little opportunity so far of showing 
what they can do. During the next month they will have several 
afternoons for practice, but it is difficult to forecast at present what 
boys will be in the running for the Cox Cup. 

Since going to Press, the results of the O’Connor Cup have been 
announced. Sladen is the winner with a score of 464. Other scores 
will be published in the Summer Number. 


OUR CONTEMPORARIES 

r 

The Editor begs to acknowledge the receipt of the following- 
contemporaries : 

The Wykehamist (4); Vox Lycei ; The Cheltonian (3); The Fel- 
stedian (2); The Tonbridgian (2); The School Magazine , Uppingham 
(2); Bradjield Chronicle (2); St. John’s School Magazine (2); The 
Meteor (3); Bishop’s College School Magazine ; St. Andrew’s College 
Review ; St. Margaret’s Chronicle ; The Lower Canada College Maga¬ 
zine ; The Mitre , Lennoxville; Trinity College School Magazine ; 
The Blue and White) The Black and Red) Acta Ridleiana. 








































FOOTBALL BANQUET 


The school closed on Friday, December 12th at noon, when the 
majority of boys went home. A few seniors still lingered about the 
place and in the afternoon there was great hammering in the dining 
room. Had anyone looked in, he would have discovered the reason 
for the noise. He would have seen boys in their shirt sleeves, bal¬ 
ancing themselves on chairs placed on rather unsteady tables an 
nailing up banners, in preparation for the football banquet. Al¬ 
together about two hundred were used and the room looked really 
gay, when they had finished. The more important table decorations 
were carried out by Mrs. Woollcombe, who performed wonders with 
the aid of several yards of ribbon, green, red and white. Five cups 
were on the table: in the centre w r as the important cup on this 
occasion, The St. Alban’s Cup, in front of which was the football used 
in that famous match between Ashbury and Lower Canada, the 
result of which gave us the Championship. We sat down to dinner 
at 6.30, twenty-three in number. There were several absentees, 
unfortunately, owing to the mumps. Both Capt. Weston and Mr. 
Creeth were in bed, much to their regret: Muirhead and Chanonhouse 
were at their respective homes, also in bed. Our visitors included 
our coach, Eddie Phillips, our trainer, Prof. Hewitt and Mr. P. 
Woollcombe, an old footballer. We must not forget Irvin, who 
though not on this year’s team, was present. He played last year 
and it was his accident only, which prevented his playing this year. 
He did the best he could for the team by organising and leading a 
most efficient rooters’ club. The dinner needs no special description; 
it was all that could be desired and the boys did justice to it. After 















14 


THE ASHBURIAN 


the coffee, the Headmaster rose to propose the toast of the evening! 
He compared the Captain of the team to a maker of a bridge wlicf 
overcame all obstacles and he called on all present to drink to th4 
health of Roy MacLaren, as representing the team. The toast wa4 
drunk with enthusiasm and everyone joined in singing “For he’s a 
jolly good fellow”, etc. AlacLaren was cheered loudly, when he 
rose to reply. His speech if: a little short was very much to the point. 
He called attention to t lie'’fact that victory‘was largely due to the 
excellent coaching of Mr. Phillips and the systematic training of Mr. 
Hewitt. He closed his remarks by hoping that the school would win 
the hockey cup, the most prized of all. The Headmaster then 
arose and thanked Mr. Phillips warmly for all his help. He had 
made himself so popular with all the boys that they wished to show 
their appreciation of his kindness. Then he called upon MacLaren to 
make the presentation. This took the form of a tie pin, in emeralds 
and diamonds and a framed photo of the team which he had coached. 
When Mr. Phillips rose to reply the cheering was deafening and it 
was some time before he could say a word. He thanked everyone 
for the gifts, which he said he would value very much. Nothing had 
given him greater pleasure than coming down and taking charge of 
the team. There were two things which had struck him very forci¬ 
bly during the season. First, he liked the way masters and boys 
played together, especially as the boys took no advantage of it in 
the classroom. Secondly, he never remembered seeing cleaner foot¬ 
ball played than by the boys and this was most noticeable in that 
historic game, which closed the season. After he had resumed his 
seat, the Headmaster again arose and said that he could not forget 
the part played by Mr. Hewitt. He worked behind the scenes, 
but the boys knew what he had done and they also had a present for 
him. MacLaren then gave him a mounted photo of the team and 
also a case of pipes. Mr. Hewitt seemed quite overcome by this 
present, but after recovering himself, he thanked the boys very much. 
He went on to say that he would always do everything he could for 
Ashbury, where he was so well treated. He hoped that Mr. Phillips 
would be able to coach the hockey team and he would try to help 
him in every way. This question had been discussed freely during 
the evening and Mr. Phillips said that he would if he possibly could 
The Head then rose once more and asked everybody to drink to the 
absent friends, after which “God Save the King” was sung. This 
was followed by a great surprise, as the door opened and a photog¬ 
rapher came in and took a flash light photo of the whole proceedings. 
After the photo was taken there was a general rush for hats and coats 
and we all went to the Dominion, where we foregathered in four 
boxes and enjoyed an excellent vaudeville show. After the per¬ 
formance we all said goodbye to each other, vowing that we had 
spent a very pleasant evening. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


15 



Mr. E. Phillips, Coach. 


ATHLETICS. 

After our creditable showing in the Inter-School Sports of last 
year and the still better performances in our own contests, we may 
perhaps be justified in predicting a successful year. One lesson has, 
however, to be learned: last year’s experience showed us that the 
number of boys who trained for the Inter-School competition was 
quite insufficient, so that too much was left to a few individuals. 
This year we hope to see a much larger number turn out to serious 
practice, for, though only a limited number may represent the 
School, still, the greater the competition for these places, the more 
likelihood of a high standard being attained; and even from a selfish 
point of view the opportunities for practice and the training in 
methods under Mr. Hewitt are not to be despised. 

Of last year’s seniors A. K. MacLaren and Holland ought to 
give a good account of themselves in the 100 and 220 yard sprints 



16 


THE ASHBURIAN 


which were both run in excellent time in our own sports last year, 
whilst, to judge by his speed on the football field, L. B. Carling ought 
fully to extend them. The first two look to have the best chances in 
the High and Long Jumps respectively, though Wood, Hart and 
Patterson in the former and J. W. Hennessy in the latter may spring 
surprises. In the longer distance we have Code, who won a well-judged 
race in the Half-Mile in our own sports, and Graham who represented 
the School in the Mile. Of the others, J. W. Hennessy and Ross are 
both good; the latter has a good action and is apparently untiring— 
if he can increase his speed a little he will certainly have to be reckoned 
with. The 440 yards looks to be a fairly open event, as Davis and 
S. C. Bate have both left us, and while some of those already men- 
tioned may compete in this event, we will probably have to search 
for some new talent. There is some useful material among last 
year’s intermediates and they may have a say in the matter—A. B. 
Hennessy ought to train on and make a good showing in the longer 
distances, and W. Birkett, Beard and Montgomery are all useful 
athletes. 

Of last year’s juniors, Gill Valleau and Johnston will probably 
win a few more prizes—they put up some very good performances 
last year. 

Our Track team will probably include most of the seniors we 
have mentioned, though Code and Holland will not be eligible. In 
any case others will be required, so we apologize to those we have 
omitted to mention, and express the hope that they will train so 
diligently that their places will not long be in doubt. 

It is intended to keep a book of records made in our own sports, 
so let those who are making their last appearances see to it that they 
set up performances which will stand for some time and help keep 
their memory green. 


COMING EXHIBITION OF GYMNASTICS. 

Ashbury has always been to the forefront in this most important 
branch of Athletic work and, we feel sure, everyone will be delighted 
to hear we are preparing to give an exhibition of work, which will 
compare with any of the school’s previous efforts. Most of us saw 
the magnificent display the Swedish gymnasts gave at the Russell 
Theatre, and as our work has been modelled on similar lines for the 
past two seasons, we feel sure of giving a good account of ourselves 
and hope a large audience will grace the Exhibition with their pres¬ 
ence. In return we will promise to give you 75 minutes real inter¬ 
esting enjoyment. 

The boys will demonstrate Swedish exercises, Indian Club 
swinging and Pyramid building, Show work upon the Parellel Bars 



THE ASHBURIAN 


17 


and Rings, Running Horse, etc. In addition an exceptionally good 
jumping team will be right out for indoor school records and there 
will probably be a tug of war contest between the school team and- 
shall we say the “Old Boys”, if they will consent to a match. We 
want our friends on no account to miss this Exhibition. It is going 
to demonstrate to you the splendid system of exercise the boys are 
all going through. We are not going to pick out a chosen few for 
the work, our object is to have the whole school taking part and we 
hope every boy in the school will feel he is a necessary unit, to the 
success of the Exhibition. 

The Display will take place on April 28 in St. Patrick’s Hall, 
our own gymnasium being inadequate to both seat our friends and 
give the show too. His Royal Highness the Governor-General has 
graciously promised to be present. 

Our best wishes, therefore, for the success of this event which is 
being carried out entirely by a committee of Ashbury boys under the 
direction of our Physical Instructor. 


THE THOUGHT MACHINE. 
A.D. 1 


Yes, it was the big Assembly Room without a doubt. But alas, 
how changed. All the dear old well-whittled desks and forms were 
gone, and in their place were comfortable chairs, arranged in a semi¬ 
circle round a large rostrum which replaced the old table. 

“It’s changed a bit since your time,” said a voice at my elbow. 
I turned and saw a little nervous man who had the indescribable air 
of being a mechanic. He seemed half bashful, half self-assertive, and 
he spoke very quickly. “O progress, sir, progress” he went on. 
“Who would have thought thirty years ago that we should be 
teaching by machinery in another three decades?” 

“I’m afraid I don’t understand”, I ventured. 

“What, not heard of it?” he exclaimed. “Extraordinary, 
it’s there on the desk”. 

I then became aware of a large machine, resembling a gramo¬ 
phone, on the rostrum. “The Master”, he went on, “puts this disc 
against his forehead. The funnel is then directed towards the heads 
of the assembled pupils, and the machine does the rest. No words, 
no risk, no worry. By simply concentrating his mind on the subject 
the master can explain the most abstruse information to the most 
obtuse class.” 

‘ * But I should have thought that a clear concise statement in 
words- 





18 


THE ASHBURIAN 


c ‘ Oh”, he cried , 11 Now you have hit on the point of the invention. 
Speech is a most clumsy and unscientific mode of communication, a 
mere relic of the barbarous past. In the old days they used to teach 
by beautiful phrases. The Master could say for instance ‘ The French 
Revolution struck a great blow for liberty of thought.’ The pupil 
very justifiaby forgot the phrase. But now by means of this ap¬ 
paratus the master can project into the minds of his own sense of 
the truth of the remark, and his reasons for believing it. What is 
the result? The pupils’ minds are left with an indelible impres¬ 
sion.” 

“But do you find it answer?” 1 asked. 

“Answer. Mv dear sir, do you remember what IVB was like 
when you were at school”? 

I sighed. 

“Quite so. Now you would not have thought it possible that 
boys of that age could receive instruction in Ethics, Psychology, and 
the principles of Aerial Flight. Yet, I assure you that such is the 
case. Education now proceeds very rapidly. A week usually 
suffices for the mastery of Latin, another week or ten days for Greek, 
and the pupils can then spend the rest of their time on the more 
important subjects. Latin and Greek are still useful for naming the 
new chemicals which our pupils are always discovering.” 

“What a marvel the Headmaster must be.” 

“The Headmaster? Bless me, I was forgetting, you’re used to 
the old sort, of course. Oh, nowadays the Headmaster, as you call 
him, is little more than a brain. You see”, he went on, lowering his 
tone confidentially, ‘ 1 we manipulators are the important people now. 
I’m the Head Manipulator.” I bowed. 

“We work the apparatus, we manage the boys, we do every¬ 
thing. The masters as you call them, do nothing but instruct 
through the machine: they can’t do anything without me. Their 
enormous mental development has told on them physically, indeed 
they have no bodies to speak of, and are only kept alive by frequent 
applications of electricity.” 

“But,” I stammered, “does everything depend on you?” 

‘ ‘ Everything. We manipulators are the most important people 
now. If you have read Bernard Shaw’s play “Man and Superman” 
you will remember that he makes the chauffeur, Enry Straker, the 
man of the future. Well, his prophecy has come true Most of us 
are out of work chauffeurs.” 

“And don’t the brains, the Masters, count for anything?” 

“Of course,” he replied, “they are an indispensable part of the 
system but then, so are we. And whereas we serve a variety of use¬ 
ful purposes, and perform numerous duties which the masters used 
to do, the masters now are helpless outside the schoolroom. In 
fact, we keep them in the cupboard with the rest of the apparatus.” 


THE ASHBURIAN 


19 


He walked to the old cupboard in the corner and opened the 
door I just caught sight of a large egg-shaped object, bald, white 
and waggling feebly, and then I fainted. 


TENNIS PROSPECTS. 

Although the snow is still with us and we are promised “30 
below” before the end of the month, the tennis season will soon be 
here. This year we are hoping to get the heavy roller on the courts 
earlier than last year, so that there will be less possibility of the 
game being spoilt by the eccentricities of the ground. There will then 
be a good chance of having an even more successful season than last 
year. 

Most of last year's tournament players are still with us, and 
there is every prospect of a great fight for the Open Championship. 
MacLaren II will have to work hard to retain his title, as we hear 
great things of last year’s “runner-up”, Code. During last summer 
holidays he was said to be rapidly approaching Davis Cup standard. 
MacMahon is another who improved vastly during the summer, but 
the uncertain ground here seems to worry him. MacLaren I should 
be persuaded to enter this year, and other promising players are 
Reiffenstein, Morris and Birkett II. The latter must not attempt 
too many drives before he has had a little more experience. In the 
senior doubles we hope the handicapper will be able to spot any 
“dark horses” and avoid another runaway victory: if Jackson and 
Sladen enter together again they must expect to be put a good deal 
further back in the handicap. It is difficult at the time of writing 
to know how many of last year’s juniors will have become seniors: 
but there are sure to be numerous entries in the junior tournament. 
As last year, the open singles will be played on the English system, 
by which a competitor retires as soon as he is beaten: the senior 
and junior doubles will be played on the American system, by which 
every couple plays against every other couple. In addition to the 
school tournament it is to be hoped that it will be possible to arrange 
a match or matches with Lower Canada. We ought to He able to 
select six players good enough to put up a fight against our rivals, 
and competition for these places should be very keen. 


CRICKET PROSPECTS. 

By the time this magazine is published, the snow will have gone 
and we shall be thinking of the summer and summer sports. At the 
time of writing this article it is rather difficult to think about cricket. 
As a matter of fact preparations for the cricket season have com¬ 
menced already in the shape of oiling cricket bats once a week. Of 




20 


THE ASHBURIAN 


these we have a good supply and all in very good condition. Of last 
year’s team we have lost the services of Burns, a batsman with a 
pretty style and our wicket keeper, Maunsell and Cory who were use¬ 
ful change bowlers. There will be a good opportunity for someone to 
develop into a wicket keeper and thus make the team. It is an im¬ 
portant position and one requiring a quick eye. There are four 
boys, who have been on the team for two years, namely MacMahon, 
MacLaren, Sladen and Reiffenstein. These four should make 
several runs between them this season, if they turn out regularly to 
practice. In Holland we have a good bowler, who captured many 
wickets last year, and an excellent fielder. If the fielding of the 
whole team maintains its high standard of excellence, we ought to 
win the majority of our matches. Last year we suffered from a lack 
of variety in our matches. We always seemed to be playing against 
the Militia Department and they beat us on every occasion. This 
year we are trying to arrange matches with Government House, The 
Bank of Montreal and The ‘‘Old Boys”. Now that the “Old Boy 
Society” is in such a flourishing condition, they should have no 
difficulty in raising a team. Last year only five “Old Boys” turned 
up for the annual encounter and the match was a failure. It would 
not be right to conclude this article without expressing a hope that 
we shall again have the services of Capt. Weston and Mr. Creeth, 
both of whom rendered valuable assistance to the team on several 
occasions last year. Mr. Hooper will be able, we hope, to umpire 
for us together with Mr. Wiggins, and there will not be much diffi¬ 
culty in finding a scorer. If the weather is propitious, we may be 
able to play some of our matches on grass, but if the ground is too 
hard we shall have to use matting. The former is preferable, but the 
latter is safer. 


SCHOOL NOTES. 

Owing to an outbreak of mumps near the end of the Xmas 
term, the examinations were postponed untl the middle of February. 
For the same reason the school closed down early for the Xmas holi¬ 
days, but this unfortunately meant coming back early, so that we 
started our term on January 7th. 

The soccer season came to an abrupt close, owing to a heavy 
fall of snow, which made football impossible. We had two more 
matches with the Naval Department, both of which we lost. The 
match arranged with the Bank of Montreal on November 25th, had 
to be cancelled on account of the snow. There is a possibility that 
we shall be able to play it before the summer begins. 



THE ASHBURIAN 


21 


Boxing classes have been taking place in the gymnasium twice 
a week during the winter, in which several of the seniors have been 
taking part. It is to be hoped that an opportunity will be afforded 
to all the boys of seeing some exhibition encounters. The art of 
boxing is most useful to all boys and the sight of a good bout be¬ 
tween two evenly matched contestants may have the effect of per¬ 
suading more boys to join the classes next year. 

Before the ice was ready, cadet corps drill was started, and a 
little elementary work was indulged in for the benefit of the recruits. 
The drills will be resumed twice a week as soon as the hockey season 
is over. 

On January 23rd in the evening, all the boarders visited the 
theatre and saw a performance of “Twelfth Night”, in which Mar¬ 
garet Anglin was taking part. As the play had been read by nearly 
all the forms, as part of their school work, the outing was especially 
interesting. Probably the funny characters appealed to the junior 
forms more than the serious ones, but the company was a strong one 
and there was little room for improvement. 

The seniors have been to all the professional hockey matches, 
which have taken place on a Saturday, most of which have been very 
exciting. The best game was the last match between Ottawa and 
the Canadians, in which Ottawa won after playing overtime. They 
also saw the match between Princeton and Ottawa College, and that 
between Ottawa and Vancouver. 


Our practices at the Gladstone Avenue Rink have taken place 
three times a week. At the afternoon practices on Tuesday and 
Thursday, we have been greatly assisted by the “Old Boys”, who 
have rarely failed to put a full team on the ice. The following “ Old 
Boys” have on different occasions turned out: A. Fraser, G. Bowie, 
T. Carling, J. Oliver, C. Fleming, J. Woods, D. Verner, W. Wick- 
ware, W. Cory, S. Cook, F. Fergusson. 

The following officers were appointed in the Cadet Corps: 

Captain , W. M. Irvin Colour-Sergeant , J. Hennessey 

1st. Lieutenant , U. MacMahon 2nd. Lieutenant , R. MacLaren 
Sergeants , H Graham, G. Sladen, P. Biggar 
Corporals , J. Hazen, L. Carling, C. Wood, G. Ross. 
Lance-Corporals , J. Carling, R, LeLievre, J. Malcolm, J. Reiffenstein 


The Cadet Corps received a kind invitation from Capt. O’Con¬ 
nor to see a display of Swedish drill at the Russell Theatre, on Thurs¬ 
day evening, December 11. A finer display of drill and gymnastics 


THE ASHBUBIAN 


22 

has not been seen before in this city. The precision and accuracy 
with which the squad performed the various exercises excited the 
admiration of all who saw the exhibition. Prof. Hewitt who was 
present, has introduced several of the exercises into the school. 

At the final assembly before the breaking up for the Xmas 
holidays, a presentation was made to Mr. Elwes, who unfortunately 
had decided to give up teaching and devote himself entirely to 
parish work. The presentation, which took the form of a hand¬ 
some case of pipes, was made by MacMahon, on behalf of the sixth 
form, with a suitable speech. Mr. Elwes, in returning thanks, took 
the opportunity of addressing a few farewell words to the boys. 
We take this opportunity of wishing him every success in his parish 
in Florida. 


An exhibition of gymnastics is to be given by the school at the 
end of April. In another part of the magazine will be found details 
of this. A committee has been formed under the direction of Prof. 
Hewitt. The following boys are on the committee: 

U. MacMahon (sec.), J. Hazen, L. Carling, H. Holland, H. 
Graham, R. MacLaren, W. Irvin, C. Wood. 

In this magazine will be found a photograph of Mr. E. Phillips, 
our popular and much esteemed coach. It was with the greatest 
difficulty that he was persuaded to “sit” for his portrait, but the 
annual record of school sport as given in the Ashburian would not 
be complete without it. He has been with us both for the football 
and the hockey and he has performed wonders with both teams. It 
is early to think of next year, but the school will be highly flattered 
if Mr. Phillips can find time to give us a few afternoons. Most of us 
know that he will occupy a prominent position in the football world, 
as he has been elected President of the “ Big Four”. If he does con¬ 
sent to take charge of our football team, not only will it be a great 
honour for the school, but also we shall have a good chance of re¬ 
taining the Challenge Cup. 


SCHOOLBOY MISTAKES 

Finally James II gave birth to a son and so the people turned him 
off the throne. 

After twice committing suicide, Cowper lived till 1800 when he 
died a natural death. 

When the last French attack at Waterloo proved a failure Napo¬ 
leon turned very pale, and rode at full gallop to St. Helena. 



THE ASHBURIAN 


23 


The mineral wealth of a country is ginger-beer and lemonade. 

The imperfect tense is used in French to express a future action 
in past time which does not take place at all. 

Much butter is imported from Denmark, because Danish cows 
have greater enterprise and superior technical education to ours. 

In the British Empire the sun always sets. 

Wolfe declared that he would rather repeat Gray’s “ Elegy” than 
take Quebec. 

The Three Estates of the Realm are Buckingham Palace, Wind¬ 
sor and Balmoral. 

The courage of the Turks is explained by the fact that a man 
with more than one wife is more willing to face death than if he had 
only one. 

Milton was called the father of English poetry because he was 
blind and his daughter did the writing for him. 

James I, claimed the throne of England through his grand¬ 
mother as he had no father. 

Genre puel re formosse sunt.—Beautiful girls are cheeky. 

Petit maria.—Little Mary. 

Fulminantis magna manus Iovis.—The thundering big hand of 
Jove. 


HAMLET. 

To trot, or not to trot, that is the question. 
Whether ’tis nobler on the floor to gyrate 
In peacock glide, fish walk, or just plain tango 
Diluted into sound respectability, 

And most immensely popular. To dance, to sleep, 
To dance again, and by this round to gain 
The headaches of that dreary morning after 
That flesh is heir to,—’tis a consummation 
Devoutly to be avoided. To dance, to sleep; 

To sleep; perchance to dream, aye there’s the rub; 
For in that deathlike sleep what dreams may come 
When we have shuffled off that polished floor 
Must give us pause: there’s the respect 
That makes calamity of so much trot; 

But who would bear the whips and scornful smiles 
Of fashionable people, who do tango? 

The pang of being out of style, old-fashioned. 

The insolence of trotters, and the spurns 
That ultra moderns of the unworthy take 
When he himself might his quietus make 
With a few lessons? 

















Editors'. 


Mr. H. H. P. Woollcombe, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa. 

Mr. JR. H. Morgan, Brockville, Out. 

Artist : 

Mr. A. B. Beddoe, 311 Stewart St., Ottawa. 

Secretary Old Boys Association: 

Mr, Louis T. White, 4 Rideau Apartments, Ottawa. 

EDITORIAL. 

“The Editor sat in his sanctum, his countenance furrowed with care, 
His mind at the bottom of business, his feet at the top of a chair, 

His chair-arm an elbow supporting, his right-hand upolding his 
head, 

His eyes on his dusty old table, with different documents spread”- 
Whew! Now you know what we felt like. If there is anyone 
who really needs “sympathy” it is the striving, struggling Editorial 
We-Us-&-Co. You may think it is an easy job but we know better. 
Did you ever hear the old saying, “Charity suffereth long”? We 
hope you have. 

This is now our second issue of the “Old Boys Supplement" 
and if you are as pleased with it as we are, why then everyone will be 
satisfied;—No, but seriously speaking, our first effort last October 
was an experiment, the inception of an entirely new idea. Probably 
more by luck than good management, it seemed to meet with uni¬ 
versal favour. That gave us courage to renew our efforts. If we 





























































26 


THE ASHBUKIAN 


can get one number out successfully, we can get any number of num¬ 
bers out. All we need is some help from you in the form of Con¬ 
tributions. 

A word here will not be out of place regarding the Old Boys 
Association. It has progressed quite favourably since last issue, 
for there are now about hfty-two “Old Boys” enrolled as members. 
This fact, however, should only form a beacon light to guide it on its 
onward recruiting march. Why shouldn’t we All join? Most of 
us will eventually. It isn’t that we don’t Want to; it is just that we 
keep putting it off—An old but favorite line to be given in Detention 
some years ago at Ashbury was ‘ ‘ Procrastination is the thief of time” 
-We believe it now, though we didn’t then— Why Not Join Now? 
The Ashburian firmly believes that most of the success the Associ¬ 
ation has had to date is due to the untiring energy of Mr. Louis 
White, the Secretary. In years to come, when the Association is 
a mighty unit— and we are grey haired old cronies—we will think 
fondly and with pride of Mr. White;—and he will deserve it too. 

Everybody hopes you have all made arrangements to come to 
Ottawa for Easter. This will be the big event of the year—Our 
Old Boys Dinner— We hope to hold it on Easter Saturday and are 
looking forward to seeing all the old faces, rubbing up old friend- 

Mr. Louis White is the man to give 
Drop him a line immediately, if not 
Forget to Come. 

We have recently received an “open letter” from our old friend 
the Headmaster, and are publishing it in this issue. A great number 
of us can very easily and effectively comply with his requests, and 
we owe it to Ashbury to do so. We think we can assure Mr. Wooll- 
combe of the Old Boys’ Aid in this important matter. 

As we have now finished our little say, we in retiring, make our 
sweeping yet, mark you, modest bow, and bid you all “auf Wieder- 
sehen”. 


ships, and yarning old yarns, 
you full information about it. 
and above all. Don’t 


sooner 


“DOC” DAWSON AND HIS WORK. 

Ov r en C. Dawson (1902-6)is rapidly acquiring a name for himself 
in connection with his work as clerk of the Montreal Juvenile Court; 
and as leader in boy’s work in Griffintown, the section of Canada’s 
Metropolis, south of Notre DameStreet from McGill Street westward. 

In an address delivered not long ago before the Montreal Charity 
Organization Society, he gave an interesting insight into the condi¬ 
tions which surround the poor children of Montreal’s slums. The 
necessity of employing young boys in some useful work, rather than 
allowing them to run the streets was emphasized; and a “big bro¬ 
ther” movement advised in connection with the Juvenile Court. 



THE ASHBURIAN 


27 


After leaving Ashbury, Mr. Dawson was for some time at McGill 
University, and it was in his undergraduate days there that he com¬ 
menced his work among the Griffintown boys. In his address he told 
of the founding and growth of his boys’ club, now one of the most 
successful of its kind in Canada. 11 The first meeting held five years 
ago”, says a writer in the “McGill Daily” was most informal. Mr. 
Dawson and the first six members met on the street corner, where the 
leader outlined his plan for a boys’ club, and asked the audience to 
try to interest their friends in the movement. A little later, the six 
boys plus nine friends, met in a room and further discussed the plans 
of the club. Each of the fifteen was asked to bring one other boy 
to the next meeting, so that at the next gathering, there were thirty 
boys present. These elected a President and other officers. Since 
then the club has been very successful. The boys now own their own 
clubhouse, a remodelled grocery store, which is fitted up like a gym¬ 
nasium, with horizontal bars, dumb-bells and shower baths. 


N.B.—Since this article was written, the Griffintown Boys Club 
has opened an extension, which includes a reading room and billiard 
room for the older boys. The membership of the club now amounts 
to over one hundred boys, and the club was recently granted a Civic 
Charter by the Board of Control. 


Don’t Fokget the Dinner at Easter. 


Particulars later. 


THEATRICALS IN 189 . 5 . 

The Editor has recently come across a newspaper clipping of 
the vintage of June 1895, which gives an account of the closing 
exercises of the “Ashbury House School” held in St. John’s Hall in 
that month. After naming the various prize winners, the account 
continues: “Afterwards an amusing French Comedy was presented. 
The pupils taking part were: E. Herbert, H. MacLean, V. Heron, 
M. Bate, S. Robertson, J. Symes and C. Tupper. 

A recitation of Scene 2, Act 3, of Julius Caesar was given and 
greatly appreciated. H. MacLean took the part of Brutus; C. 
Currier, of Cassius; R. Gorrr.ully of Marc Antony and O. Dickey, 
Julius Caesar. The rest of the cast was represented by Masters A. Z. 
Palmer, C. Tupper, L. White, G. Chrysler, and I). Currier.” 

Any information regarding this entertainment from any Old 
Boy, whether a participant or not, will be welcomed.— Ed. 




2S 


THE ASHBURIAN 


OPEN LETTER. 

We print below a letter addressed to all Old Ashburians and 
earnestly request you to carefully consider same. 

"My Dear Boys: 

I address you thus, because, though many of you are bearded 
and married men, by me, your old Headmaster, you will always be 
thought of as ‘ ‘ my boys”. 

You are, I know, deeply interested in your Old School and 
would, I am sure, like to help it. Don’t be afraid, I am not going to 
ask you for money,—at any rate not at present. I want, however, 
your help in another direction. As you know, we have now one of 
the best and most modern school buildings in Canada; and grounds 
that cannot be surpassed for beauty and convenience. We have 
done and are doing a splendid work, and there is no school in the 
country, where boys receive greater care; yet, while this is so, we 

HAVE NOT THAT NUMBER OF BOYS IN THE SCHOOL THAT WE OUGHT TO 
HAVE OR THAT ENABLES US TO RUN THE SCHOOL WITHOUT FINANCIAL 

loss. I am convinced that if the school were better known outside 
of Ottawa, we should very soon have a waiting list. Will you 
therefore, each one of you, try and add to the number of boys at¬ 
tending Ashbury from outside points. 

This coming June we are, in the ordinary course losing a large 
number of our boys. Will you try and fill their places before next 
September? A recommendation from an Old Boy is worth more 
than many lines of Newspaper Advertisement. A very little trouble 
taken, a word in season, and an eye open to possibilities will do 
great things. May I count on your help? With all best wishes for 
your continued success, I am, 

Your sincere friend and Headmaster, 





THE ASHBURIAN 


29 


ATTENTION! PLEASE 

Please Remember that without the 
kind aid of the various business men who 
advertise in this paper, it would be im¬ 
possible to conduct it in a financially suc¬ 
cessful manner. Therefore, we owe it to 
our Advertisers, to see that, as far as 
possible, we patronise them. 

MEMORIES. 

That Sparks would fly should 
Drummond Burn, 

I think you’ll all concede; 

But since we oft see Stanley 
Wright, 

Why shouldn’t Edgar Reid? 

If Randy White washed Leslie 
Greene, 

’Twould make poor Greene feel 
Lowe; 

And if you walk in Woods of Birch, 

You’ll find the Nutting slow. 





’Tis just a year since Eric Skead 
And nearly lost his Hart; 

And Lindsay must be Aylen when 
He thinks that Sinclair’s Smart. 


A Heron walked beside the Brooke 
Orr flew beside the Graves, 

Till Fellowes from the Castle took 
His life;—The naughty knaves. 

The wind did Russell o’er the Moore, 
As it often does in May; 

And Cuthbert brought his Dagger out, 
And Shaw his Phyfe, to play. 

The Toller tolled his Sample Bell; 

The cornets made a Blair. 

And Mereweather on the earth 
Was Wright in evidence there. 



THE ASHBU.RIAN 


30 



REPORTING. 

There are few other callings which bring one into such close con¬ 
tact with life as Journalism. Seeing that the sole ends of Journalism 
are news, accuracy and speed, it is necessary to go everywhere and 
at all times to obtain a “ story” before another paper gets wind of it. 
Reporting consists of ordinary routine work flavoured with excite¬ 
ment and sometimes adventure at the most unexpected times. 

In the morning the reporters of an Evening Paper attend the 
Courts, Municipal Meetings and such public business as is carried on 
by the City throughout the day. In connection with this routine 
work there is “district work” in which each of the reporters, a junior 
generally, is given some part of the suburbs to “cover” in search of 
news, or given city districts such as the Police Stations, (not the 
Police Courts however) the water front, the Hospitals and the Rail¬ 
way Stations. Next there is the “free lance” man, who with no 
appointed district goes everywhere in search of “copy”. He is 
always one of the most efficient and experienced reporters on the 
paper and usually returns before press time with some “scoop” or 
other. The Police Court and High Court are covered by senior men 
and concentration on every word is absolutely necessary in the latter, 
since the reporter is expected to get a clear view of the case in order 
to write it intelligently. Each newspaper employs outside cor¬ 
respondents who furnish some news every day, usually of an un¬ 
interesting nature, but now and again a big story turns up in an out- 


















































THE ASHBURIAN. 31 

of-the-way place, and it is their duty to cover it until a “star” re¬ 
porter arrives from headquarters. 

Evening and morning papers are the two classes of newspapers. 
On the former, the reporters commence work in the morning, working 
until press time in the afternoon, or covering important meetings 
after, as well as any meetings that take place in the evening. They 
must also hand in their “copy” as soon as possible after it is ob¬ 
tained. On the latter class of newspaper, the reporters commence 
work in the afternoon and work until about three o’clock in the 
morning, covering everything that comes along. When game is 
afoot and a big story is waiting, then all hours are forgotten and the 
reporters of each paper who are sent to cover it strive to see who 
will have it first; and as a rule this sort of story is published as an 
‘ ‘ extra”. 

In every city newspaper office there is telegraph connection and 
by this means, the news is obtained from elsewhere, sent by the Asso¬ 
ciated Press or the Canadian Press Syndicates. Over this wire all 
the news of the outside world comes to the office. 

Reporters in many cases develop a talent for writing short 
articles, and often long stories to magazines, etc. The training is 
excellent, since the reporter is brought by his- calling into contact with 
all sorts of people in every walk of life. 

On the whole, reporting is a calling requiring energy, promptitude 
and literary ability, as well as self-reliance and concentration.- 
“Scoop”. 

Remember the Dinner on the Saturday before Easter. 


A WINTER PATROL IN LESSER SLAVE LAKE 

DISTRICT. 

In the winter of 1913, I had charge, as Inspector of R.N.W.M. 
Police of that portion of Northern Alberta known in police parlance, 
as Lesser Slave Lake Sub-District. 

This district comprises roughly an area of about 848 square 
miles and may be said to be bounded to the West, by the Grouard- 
Peace River Trail, to the North by the Peace River, from P. R. 
Landing to Dunvegan, to the West by the Dunvegan-Grand Prairie 
trail, and to the South by the Grand Prairie-Sturgeon Lake, Grouard 
trail. 

It consists of police posts, at Grouard, on Lesser Slave Lake, 
Peace River Crossing, Prairie City, Lake Saskatoon, and Sturgeon 
Lake, and a temporary post at the settlement of Sawridge, at the 
eastern end of Lesser Slave Lake. 




32 


THE ASHBURIAN 


By Rules and Regulations, these posts are required to be in¬ 
spected monthly by the Sub-District Commanding Officer, but un¬ 
fortunately the condition of the trails seldom permits of this being 
done, save when the winter has well set in and the snow trails are 
well established, and packed down. 

On the occasion of which I write, we had had several months of 
steady cold anti snow, the temperature having reached as low a 
point as -60 deg., and the trails having been well travelled by nu¬ 
merous freighters, all conditions pointed to a speedy trip. 

Accordingly on Monday, March 3rd, accompanied, on this occa¬ 
sion by my Commanding Officer Supt. Wroughton, Commanding the 
Athabasca District, and one constable, I set forth on the monthly 
patrol from Grouard the headquarters of the sub-district. 

The team we had selected for the trip, “ Darkey” and “Blue”, 
were a sturdy pair of western horses, with a strong strain of the cay- 
use or Indian pony in them, and were noted for their speed and en¬ 
durance. 

We used a strong double seated cutter sleigh, and the light, but 
strong harness of the country. 

Our outfit consisted of the indispensable “Grub-Box”, and 
blankets, with the addition of stable-kit, feed, a lantern, bucket, and 
the axe, without which latter no northern trail party is complete. 

The temperature when we started at about 8 a.m. was-40 deg. 
but the air was perfectly still, with a glorious sun and bright blue 
sky, so a few minutes drive at a brisk trot served to dispel any 
suggestion of chilliness. 

After passing through the settlement of Grouard, with its few 
stores still shuttered, for they are by no means early risers in the 
north, we crossed the Heart River, which flows into L. S. Lake at its 
western extremity, and plunged into the low scrub and Juniper 
bushes on High Prairie. The country hereabouts is gently undulat¬ 
ing, with frequent clearings and homesteads, and towards noon, the 
ravages which the powerful March sun had commenced on the snow, 
began to be noticeable. 

At noon, after a run of about 25 miles, we halted at the stopping- 
place of Simon Walker, a half-breed Cree, for the mid-day “spell”. 

Walker’s stopping-place is one of the most picturesquely situated 
on the Sturgeon Lake trail, and is a fairly typical one. 

It is situated on the high, wooded banks of a small creek, and 
consisted of the family dwelling house, a long stable, and bunk-house, 
the latter an empty log building, not over clean, containing a dilapi¬ 
dated cook stove. 

As the average freighter usually does not make a longer run in 
the morning than 10 miles, we were lucky in having the stopping 
place to ourselves, and lost no time in unharnessing and watering 
our team, and preparing our meal of beans and bacon. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


33 


The sun was now so strong that we were glad to lay aside our 
heavy fur coats, and substitute rubber boots for moccassins, especial¬ 
ly while working about the stables. 

At 1.30 p.m. we resumed our journey, and now plunged into a 
thickly wooded country of cottonwood and Jack-pine. We passed 
occasional freighters with their ox teams, who had evidently started 
from Simon Walker’s that morning. 

In the few open spaces we found that the trail had worn very 
thin and as the sun declined in vigor, the slushy portions quickly 
froze in icy patches, making the negotiation of any steep ascents, or 
descents, an exceedingly difficult one. 

So difficult was the latter that, being ill-provided with brakes of 
any description, we were obliged upon two occasions to unhook the 
team and lower the sleigh by hand. Upon a third occasion, we were 
able to borrow a length of chain, from a friendly freighter, which by 
being thrown under the rear runners acted as a brake. 

With the exception of occasional prairie chicken and innumer¬ 
able rabbits, we saw very little traces of game en route, due probably 
to the frequency with which the trail is travelled. The chicken 
proved excellent targets for occasional revolver practice, although we 
did not add to our larder to any great extent. 

Between 4.00 and 5.00 p.m. we arrived at Snipe Lake, a very 
pretty body of water, about 6 or 8 miles long by H miles broad. 

To our disgust the trail crossing the lake was thickly dotted 
with the teams of half-breed freighters, which was a promise of cold 
comfort and scant stable room, should they succeed in reaching the 
stopping place at the other side of the lake before us. 

Having a much faster team and lighter load than any preceding 
us, we found little difficulty in passing them however, and arrived at 
the Snipe Lake stopping place about 5.00 p.m. 

When freighters are travelling in any numbers, as their rate of 
progression is usually a walk, it is their custom to desert the smaller 
sleighs and congregate in one of the larger ones, where a game of 
11 Black Jack” can be indulged in, their deserted teams being al¬ 
lowed to proceed along the well-known trail at their own sweet will. 

We were therefore amused by seeing several of these driverless 
teams in evident emulation of our speed in passing them, dash out 
from the line, and race at a clumsy gallop across the lake, pursued by 
their drivers. 

An investigation of the stopping-place proved that, although we 
could obtain shelter for our team in the very dilapidated stables, 
further accommodation was impossible. 

The bunk-house, a log building containing a single room about 
10 by 12 feet, being occupied by a squaw with two papooses, three 
freighters as well as a cook-stove, not appealing to us as being partic- 


34 


THE ASHBURIAN 


ularly desirable, we decided, as the weather had grown considerably 
milder, to make our camp in the open. 

Accordingly, having built a large fire, we spread our rugs and 
blankets in front of it and having made tea and cooked our supper, 
turned in at an early hour. 

The weather continued to grow milder throughout the night 
and towards morning, snow began to fall, with the result that we 
found ourselves covered with a heavy wet blanket of it upon our 
uprising. 

We left Snipe Lake at about 8 a.m. and pursuing our course 
through the woods arrived at the H. B. Coy’s post at about 2 p.m. at 
Sturgeon Lake. 

Upon our arrival we found, as well as the constable in charge of 
the detachment at this point, Segt. Clay, in charge of the detachment 
at Lake Saskatoon, who had arrived at Sturgeon Lake with his team 
the previous day. 

The remainder of the afternoon of March 4th we spent in exam¬ 
ining the books, returns judicial, and otherwise, on charge at this 
detachment, as well as the saddlery, arms ammunition and equip¬ 
ment. In the evening we paid a visit to the Roman Catholic Mis¬ 
sion, which maintains adarge Indian School and saw-mill here. 

There were about 30 or 40 children in residence, who sang cho¬ 
ruses for us in English and Cree. 

The instruction is, I understand, mainly given in English, al¬ 
though the sisters in charge were from Quebec and of French-Canadian 
extraction. 

Close to the Mission is a large Indian burial-ground with its 
graves characteristically covered with small wooden houses, to prevent 
their being ravaged by coyotes. 

Upon our return to the post, we were treated to a series of rem¬ 
iniscences by Tom Kerr the post trader, who has had an experience in 
this district, and further north, of over 30 years. 

We decided to leave our team “ Darky” and “Blue”, at Stur¬ 
geon Lake until our return, and continued our journey on Wednesday, 
March 4, to Grand Prairie, with Sergt. Clay and his team. 

The temperature on Wednesday had regained its customary 
level of about zero, and we found the 2^-mile trail across Sturgeon 
Lake in excellent condition. 

The country between Sturgeon Lake and the Big Smoky River 
being mostly wooded, there are few settlers, and consequently few 
complaints to be investigated, and our journey to Deep Creek where 
we intended to “spell” for noon was without incident, save for fre¬ 
quent encounters with submerged stumps along the partially cleared 
trail, which tended to break the monotony. 

In the afternoon about 4.30 p.m. we reached the valley of the 
Big Smoky where a magnificent though grim panorama met our eyes. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


35 


The banks on either side of the river are between 300 and 400 feet 
high, and as the descent is exceedingly precipitous, one is obliged to 
make it by means of an exaggerated corkscrew trail down the bank. 
The latter are thickly wooded and the river although deep, has an 
exceedingly swift current, so swift indeed that in its flooded condi¬ 
tion in the spring of this year, it tore the ferry-boat from its overhead 
cable, and swept it, with the ferryman, into the Peace River, which it 
joins some 20 miles northwards, thus closing the summer trail for 
some weeks. 

The stopping place is on its eastern bank in the midst of a pine 
forest, and as it is kept by two white men was an exceedingly clean 
and comfortable one, our only discomfort on the night of the 5th being 
caused by numerous bands of coyotes, who congregated as close to 
the camp as they dared, and made the night hideous with their howls. 

After crossing the river on the morning of the 6th, we began with 
a long climb up the western bank of the river, and as we had now en¬ 
tered the chinook belt, found our difficulties increased by the fact 
that, a chinook which had lately been blowing, had taken the snow 
pretty well off the trail leaving us only the bare earth for our run¬ 
ners. 

The air grew gradually milder as we approached Prairie City 
and when we arrived there at about 2 p.m. we found a chinook blow¬ 
ing, the thermometer at about 40 deg. and a light rain falling. In 
spite of its name, Prairie City is little more than a collection of log 
shacks, boasting a hotel, blacksmith’s shop, and general store. 

Its Real Estate values however, like all western settlements, have 
been greatly boomed, and it seems to be rapidly being settled in 
spite of its inadequate water supply, which is furnished by a small 
creek running through the centre of the village, and which in summer 
is almost dry. 

We spent the afternoon inspecting the detachment and in¬ 
vestigating various cases which had cropped up since the last in¬ 
spection. 

Thursday night was spent in the detachment building, which con¬ 
sisted of a 2-roomed log hut, and on Friday morning at 8 a.m., we 
set out for Lake Saskatoon. 

Lake Saskatoon is situated about 25 miles to the north west of 
Prairie City, and the trail leads over gently rolling country, well 
cleared, and fairly well settled. We crossed several small lakes or 
sloughs en route, which in spring and autumn are the halting places 
for innumerable geese, swan and duck, and arrived at Lake Saska¬ 
toon, at noon. 

The settlement here is situated on the shores of a small but deep 
lake, which is chiefly remarkable, from the fact of its being abso¬ 
lutely devoid of fish of any description, owing to its being fed by 
springs in the lake itself. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


36 


Flie settlement is a very pretty and flourishing one, containing 
trading posts of the H.B.Company’s, and Revillon Bros, stores. 

The rain of yesterday, having continued steadily all day, Supt. 
Wroughton began to fear that the mild weather was extending over 
the whole province, and in that case would affect the ice on the 
Athabasca River, over which he must return to his headquarters at 
Athbasca Landing, from Grouarcl. 

He accordingly decided to cut short the patrol at this point and 
to return to lesser Slave Lake by the way by which we had come, 
instead of returning via Dunvegan and Peace River Crossing, as we 
had at first intended. 

We therefore returned to Prairie City that afternoon, and left 
there on our return journey on the morning of Saturday March 8th. 

We had a resumption of extremely cold weather after leaving 
Prairie City, and made the trip from there to the Big Smoky without 
incident. 

We spent the night of Sunday the 9th at the Big Smoky, and 
while here were fortunate enough to obtain a supply of Moose steak. 
I, being in charge of the commissariat, was deputed to cut this 
up into smaller steaks for cooking purposes, but not anticipating any 
such extreme cold as we were to get , unfortunately did not cut it into 
small enough portions, with the result that on Monday the mass 
froze to such an extent that even the axe proved insufficient to dis¬ 
integrate it, or to do more than shave it into fine dust, and as placing 
it in boiling water served only to make it soft and soggy, we were 
glad to trade it off at Deep creek for a supply of Bannock, of which 
commodity we had run rather short. 

The remainder of our journey to Lesser Slave Lake proved un¬ 
eventful. We changed teams again at Sturgeon Lake, and returned 
to Grouard on Tuesday, March 11th, being accompanied the last three 
miles to the settlement by a large timber wolf, who loped along 
parallel to our team unconcernedly about 300 yards distant. 

Supt. Wroughton’s fears proved groundless as the cold weather 
held steadily until the end of the month and the Athabasca River 
did not begin to break up until about April 11th. 


A.D. Irwin. 


The Dinner’s The Thing: Old Boys’ Association. 

EASTER SATURDAY. 



THE ASHBURIAN 


37 



-AS YOU WERE!” 

Charles T. Beard (1905-7) is among the three first cadets of the 
Canadian Naval Service, who have completed their course in the 
naval training school at Greenwich. He has been assigned for duty 
to the Fourth Cruiser Squadron, with the rank of Sub-Lieutenant. 
Lieut. Beard is a son of Mr. Charles T. Beard, Ottawa, and was born 
here in 1890. He left Ashbury in 1907 for the training ship Conway, 
where he afterwards distinguished himself in the athletic line. Be¬ 
sides capturing the first football XV and obtaining his racing-gig 
colours, he was champion heavyweight boxer, and captain of the 
w inning tug-of-war team. 

* * * 

Major A. Z. Palmer (1891-8) has been gazetted an assistant 
Adjutant General at Headquarters. 

* * * 

Major P. S. Benoit (1899-1901) has been gazetted Staff Officer 
to the O. C. the Royal Canadian Engineers, 6th Division. 

* * * 

Lieut. V. W. S. Heron (1892) who is an officer in the 10th 
Royal Grenadiers, Toronto, has been elected Secretary-Treasurer of 
the Canadian Military Institute, Toronto. 




















THE ASHBURIAN 


38 


Capt. Willis O’Connor (1902-04) of the Governor-General Foot 
Guards, lias been detailed as organizer and inspector of cadets in 
connection with the supervision of military and physical training in 
the public schools, and especially employed at Ottawa under the 
Director of Cadet Services. 

* * * 

Erroll D. H. Boyd (1910-12) is taking up his class as provisional 
Lieutenant in the 2nd Dragoons. 11 Ersie” writes that his regiment is 
one of the oldest in the Hamilton district; and saw service at Queens- 
ton Heights. It was then known as the “Gore Dragoons” and was 
an independant troop. 

* * * 

Cadets Howard E. Reid and Donald St. G. Lindsay of the Royal 
Naval College, Halifax, N.S. are now attached to the Fourth Atlantic 
Cruiser Squadron, stationed in the West Indies. They have com¬ 
pleted their two years course at the Naval College. 

* * * 

John Russell Woods has been gazetted Lieutenant in the Gov¬ 
ernor-General’s Foot Guards, Ottawa. 

* * * 

The 5th Princess Louise Dragoon Guards is another military 
unit in the Capital which has drawn several of its Officers from Old 
Boys. The following are noticed: Major L. P. Sherwood, Lieuts. 
H. N. Bate, E. S. Skead, and E. H. McLachlin. 

4 

* * * 

Lieut. E. J. Renaud is Ordnance Officer at Ottawa and Inspecting 
Ordnance Officer for Central Canada. 

* * * 

We are in receipt of a letter from Lieut. Dick Spain who sends 
his regards to all and regrets that he will be unable to be with us at 
the First Annual Meeting of the Old Boys Association this year. 
Dick is now stationed with the Mahratta Light Infantry, t 

India, and would like to hear from some of the “ Old Timers” oc¬ 
casionally. 

* * * 

Cuthbert Barwis captained the champion R. M. C. hockey team 
this year. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


39 


OLD BOY NOTES. 

Phil. H. Chrysler (1893-1901) was again a member of the Minto 
Skating Club’s team this winter. He competed in the Canadian 
Championships at Ottawa, and also at Boston, Mass., against the 
Skating Club of Boston. 

* * * 

A Montreal Old Boy Paul Ouimet, has recently joined the ranks 
of the Benedicts. He was married to Miss Emma Marie Tyo, of 
Ogdensburg, N. Y., last summer. The Ashburian wishes them 
every happiness. 

* * * 

C. W. A. Barwis received high praise from the press this winter 
for his work on the defence of the IT M. C. team. 

* * * 

Charlie Cotton played left wing on the Toronto Varsity Hockey 
team. 

* * * 

Walter Wickware is now an energetic Insurance Agent. He is 
connected with the Imperial Life Assurance Co. in Ottawa, and 
judging by the pursuasive line of arguments he advances, it is doubtful 
if manv of us will die un-insured. 

j 

* * * 

“Holy” Ellard is now living up the Gatineau at his home near 
Graced eld. 

* * * 

Entirely accidental was the fact that, in the last issue of the 
magazine, we omitted to announce the wedding of awell known Old 
Boy, Herbie Reid. Herbie was married to Miss Minnie Timmins, a 
popular Regina girl. The happy couple are now living in Regina, 
where Herbie is managing a Real Estate Co. We extend our con¬ 
gratulations, late but nevertheless hearty, to Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Reid. 

* * * 

Maurice Burns is in the Canadian Bank of Commerce, Hamilton. 

* * * 

“ Don” Ellard is in Regina, where he is quite prominent in local 
football and hockey circles. 

* * * 

From Vancouver, B.C., come tidings of Clifford G. Moon, who is 
now a member of the firm of Moon and Silverton, in successful prac¬ 
tice there as municipal engineers. Clifford was for a time City En¬ 
gineer of Prince Albert, Sask. 


40 


THE ASHBUKIAN 


Alta. 


Donny” Masson is ranching very successfully at Carnforth, 

^ ^ ^ 


J. L. M. Macara is at Trinity College, Toronto. 

* * * 

"Fernie” Gendron is Vice-President of his class, Science Ho, 
McGill. 

* * * 

Grey Masson figured in several games on the line-up of the McGill 
team. 

* * * 


M. O’Halloran was one of the stalwarts of the Liberal party in 
the Mock Parliament at McGill, and took Cabinet Rank as Post¬ 
master General in the Mathewson administration. 


* * 

The Political Economy Club is one of the newer senior organiza¬ 
tions at McGill. Holding the office of Secretary is found D. G. Burn. 
He is also a member of the McGill Daily staff. 

* * * 

Jeffrey B. Macphail (Mick) although in his senior year in Arts, 
McGill, still finds time for wrestling, his pet recreation and pastime. 
This year he again heads the Boxing, Wrestling and Fencing Club; 
and finds a place on the McGill Wrestling team. He is the inter- 
faculty 158 lb. Wrestling Champion and was the winner in this 
weight at the Assault-at-Arms held with the M.A.A.A. in February. 
“Mick” also took part in the meet with Cornell University held at 
Ithaca, N. Y., some weeks ago. 

* * * 

What with his record as a big-game hunter and “cub” reporter 
the name of L. E. L. Kcelle is becoming quite celebrated around 
McGill. It seems that he spent the Christmas Holidays hunting in 
Northern Quebec, far up the valley of the St. Maurice and as proof of 
his skill with .the rifle, brought back to civilization a fine bull moose. 
He has also recently become attached to the McGill Daily staff as a 
“cub” reporter, and is not without experience in writing, having 
been an Assistant Editor of The Ashburian while at Ashbury. 

When to all these achievements is added the fact that he is the 
youngest member of Architecture T7, one can see that he has some 
claim to distinction. 


Don’t Forget the First Annual Meeting and 
Ashbury Old Boys Association. Be Sure to Come. 

Full information from Mr. Louis T. White. 


Dinner of the 


THE ASHBURIAN 


41 


“1909 A. D.” 

By kind permission of 

“W. A. Snorewich , Esq.” 

Oh what a night; saith William T. 

Put out the rope, quoth Cuthbert B. 

And from their beds on the strict Q-T 
Creep the three occupants of “ Dormitory B”. 

The night is still; the moon is bright. 

The master has put out the light. 

Quickly and without afright 
They dress for their impending flight. 

The rope is lowered without a sound; 

The hook hauled up and the steel ring found; 

Then over the rain-trough with a bound 
They seize the rope; and slide to ground. 

Across the lawn they quickly go 
With stealthy steps, all bending low, 

Dodging swiftly to and fro, 

Until they reach the street below. 

Along the pavement then they glide; 

In the shadows of trees they often hide; 

Though it grates against their youthful pride; 

Yet they fear perchance they might be spied. 

And the beautiful moon, with her light serene, 

Looks coldly down upon the scene; 

And shadows spring up to intervene, 

As if those prowlers, they would screen. 

In Indian File good speed they make; 

Townwards their way they quickly take; 

And into a run they smartly break; 

Though inwardly their hearts do quake. 

And when at length they reach Sparks Street, 

Eager of mind, yet sore of feet, 

A Dairy Lunch they quickly seek; 

And there demand a bite to eat. 


42 


THE ASH B UK IAN 


Some cheese and crackers on the sly, 

Followed by a piece of pie; 

While a doughnut or two they bravely try, 

And they masticate these with a satisfied sigh. 

With beating hearts and anxious thought, 

They wonder if they have been caught; 

But just as if they cared for naught, 

They start upon their homeward trot. 

Then into the grounds they quickly creep; 

And clear the fence with a silent leap. 

They scale the rope in the darkness deep: 

And then-WE SHOULD WORRY! 

The rest of this story was really too sad to ever be told.— Ed. 


In closing, ONCE AGAIN 

let us remind you to re¬ 
member not to forget 

THE DINNER 

COME ONE! 

COME ALL! 

Good-bye till then. 







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use in the home and many other Kinds 
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THE ASHBURIAN 


Editorial Staff. 

Editor-in-Chiej — Mr. C. H. Hooper. 

Sports Editors — R. Maclaren, J. W. Hennessy. 

D. MacMahon. 

Rifle Shooting — H. E. Graham, 
Secretary-Treasurer — Mr. D. E. C. Wood. 


EDITORIAL 

Since our last issue we have finished an unusually long hockey 
season and have now reached the time of year when everyone’s 
interests are centred in outdoor sports. 

That hardy annual the “ Tennis Tournament” is in full swing 
with a record number of entries and, if possible, increased keenness 
among the members of the school from Forms I to VI. 

The Gymnastic Exhibition, which is dealt with fully elsewhere 
in this number, was a great success from every point of view and our 
thanks are due to that indefatigable trio Messrs. Wood and Hewitt 
and MacMahon, whose efforts ensured the smoothness and precision 
which characterised the whole performance. Incidentally “ Des” 
ought to be fully qualified to set up a “Sports Outfitting” establish¬ 
ment. 

All the other summer activities are in full swing, and the only 
difficulty is to find time to fit them all in. The Track Team are hard 
at work preparing for the Inter-School Meet which takes place on 
May 23th at Brockville. We hope to make a good showing and look 
to “Mac” to carry off at least a couple of events. 

It is with regret that we announce that this will be the last 
issue under the able management of Mr. I). 0. Wood who is leaving 
us to t-ake up more responsible work in the old country. The Ash- 
burian will miss Mr. Wood’s zealous and energetic assistance, as 
will also the school as a whole. We all join in wishing him the best 
of good fortune in the future. 

For several of our readers this will be their last term at the old 
School: and to these who are passing out into the wider sphere of 
the University, the .R. M. College or other walks of life we heartily 
wish “Godspeed” and the best of luck in the New Venture. 

To all those returning we say “au revoir” coupled with the wish 
that their summer holidays may prove to be most pleasant ones. 


























' Excelsior Pyramid" 

GYMNASTIC DISPLAY 

On Tuesday, the 29th of April, the strenuous practice in gym¬ 
nastics, which had been in evidence during the preceding weeks, cul¬ 
minated in a Display held in St. Patrick’s Hall. 

Punctually at 8.30 the boys were drawn up in a hollow square, 
whilst H. K. H. The Duke cf Connaught and Princess Patricia and 
their party were escorted to their seats. With them on the plat¬ 
form were His Grace The Archbishop cf Ottawa, the Hon. J. 1). 
Hazen, AY. H. Rowley, Esq., Col. J. W. Woods, and J. F. Orde, K.C., 
whilst the body of the hall was occupied by “nearly four hundred of 
Ottawa’s most distinguished people” (vide The Evening Journal). 
After the playing of the National Anthem, accompanied by the 
trooping of the colours the Headmaster made a short speech wel¬ 
coming the visitors. The boys then marched out and the actual 
programme commenced with a display of Swedish Drill by Forms 
IVA and Ill, which was very well done indeed as may be gathered 








THE ASHBUBIAN 


3 

from tlie accompanying photograph. Other concerted movements 
were a very fine exhibition of intricate figure-marching, also by the 
Junior school, and Bar-bell movements by a squad of twenty Seniors 
both carried out very successfully. 

The apparatus work was confined to the Vaulting Horse and 
the Parallel Bars, varied by an exhibition of high jumping. A large 
number of boys participated in the exercises on the horse, vaults 
and jumps of various sorts, long and short-arm balances being 
creditably executed, but perhaps the most spectacular event was 
the lengthways vaulting in which, after the whole squad had been 
over, several of the boys “ piled up” on the horse until finally four 
boys, one on top of the other, formed an imposing addition to the 
height of the obstacle; nevertheless half-a-dozen boys had no diffi¬ 
culty in negotiating the leap. 

The high-jumping proved an attractive feature and evoked 
many rounds of applause as the height of the lath increased and still 
was cleared by nearly everyone. Nothing like record was attempted 
as the floor was rather slippery, but Irvin, Hazen, Holland, Boss, 
M acMahon and Patterson cleared 4 feet, 9 inches, with ease and 
could doubtless have gone higher. 

The most difficult work of the evening and that which perhaps 
reflected greatest credit on the participants was an exceedingly 
clever display given by various boys who, at intervals throughout 
the evening, performed “voluntaries”—singly and in pairs—on the 
parallel bars. Graham, Hart, Irvin, Bivers, Hazen, Morris, Boss, 
Edward, Davidson, Thompson, Birkett II and Beiffenstein all gave 
evidence of much careful practice and many really difficult feats 
were performed, particularly those by the first four. Davidson 
caused much laughter by a display which would have done credit to a 
professional contortionist. Mention must also be made of Mr. 
Hewitt’s display, a performance which for grace, skill and strength 
ranked very high indeed. 

The many “Pyramids” built up by both Seniors and Juniors 
during the evening were very attractively arranged, an example of 
this kind of work being shown in the accompanying photograph of 
the Excelsior pyramid. Two pyramids were staged by junior boys 
—a Kneeling pyramid, four stories high, and a more pretentious 
structure referred to distinctively as the Big pyramid, which consisted 
of twenty-five boys. Form IVB were also responsible for a pyra¬ 
mid, and others were the End pyramid, the Lily pyramid and the 
Human Span. With the exception of the last, these were carried 
out with the aid of the Parallel bars. The Excelsior, as its name 
implies, reached a very imposing height, the superstructure con¬ 
sisting of Valleau who occupied an elevated position on the sh udders 
of Boss and Beiffenstein. The End pyramid consisting of fifteen 
boys proved a very effective tableau, whilst the Lily pyra nid was 


4 


THE ASHBURIAN 


very prettily done, the opening and shutting of the flower being 
very successfully simulated. The Human Span was built up en¬ 
tirely without apparatus, the foundation consisting of Graham, who 
bore without apparent effort the bulk of the weight. 

The fnal item was a Tug-of-war between teams representing 
Past and Present students; the former looked a formidable team, 
but the Present were doubtless in better condition and eventually 
proved successful by two pulls to one. 

The boys then marched in again and took up their former 
positions to listen to a short speech by the Duke of Connaught, who 
very kindly expressed his pleasure in witnessing the whole perform¬ 
ance. His meed of praise coming from such an authority should be 
highly gratifying to the school and in particular to Mr. Hewitt, 
whom the Duke personally complimented, and to whose skill and 
boundless enthusiasm the evening's success was very largely due. 
The Duke concluded his remarks in a way that appealed to us all, 
by requesting that we should have a whole holiday; this was granted 
for the next day, and we are sure the rest was appreciated by all. 

In conclusion, the thanks of all must be extended t) Mr. Wig¬ 
gins, who so ably officiated at the piano, He not only accompanied 
all the drills, marching and bar-bell exercises but also entertained 
us with popular selections throughout the evening. Thanks are 
also due to those boys who, under the able direction of Hennessy, 
acted as ushers, and to whose unremitting efforts was due much of 
the smoothness with which everything passed off. 












TENNIS 

As we go to press, we are in the midst of several tourna¬ 
ments, and Mr. Wiggins has his hands full looking after them. This 
year he has added a fourth court on the big playground and there is 
rarely a minute during the day, when the four courts are not being 
used. The number of entries in these tournaments, which com¬ 
prise senior and junior doubles, handicaps and open singles for the 
school championship, is considerably larger than last year, and it 


has been found necessary to run 
each of the double tournaments in 
two sections. The winner of the 
school championship will have his 
name engraved on the handsome 
challenge cup, which has been kindly 
donated by Mr. Wiggins. He will, 
also, receive a miniature replica cf 
the same. The final results will not 
be known until after the publication 
of the magazine and a full schedule 
of the tournaments will be pub¬ 
lished in the Xmas number. There 
are rumours of a tennis match 
between the staff and the boys 
consisting of four single matches 
and four doubles. This would be 
a good thing, as there have been 
some very exciting friendly games 
played already between them. 



The Wiggins Cup 


CRICKET 

Owing to the unusually cold weather this year, the season opened 
late and at the time of going to press we have only had one practice 
and played one match. The match was played on Wednesday 
afternoon, May 13th against our usual opponents, the Militia De¬ 
partment. It was not an ideal day for cricket, as there was no sun 
and the wind was cold. Notwithstanding the cold, the number of 






































6 


THE ASHBURIAN 


dropped catches was small and the fielding was quite creditable. 
The Militia Department won the toss and decided to put us in to bat. 
We opened with Reiffenstein and Sladen, who started with con¬ 
fidence. Sladen lost his wicket first and Mr. Wood took his place. 
Then there was a collapse and several wickets fell in quick succession. 
Captain Weston made a few lusty hits and then retired, clean bowled. 
Mr. Creeth started in at his usual pace and knocked up 26 runs in 
ten hits, most of which were boundaries. In the meantime Mr. 
Wood was keeping up his end and adding a few here and there. 
Neither Mr. Rhoades nor Graham lasted a long time, but Irvin scored 
15 in five hits, before he was bowled. It was during his innings that 
Mr. Wood was caught in the outfield after making 29. The total 
score was 96, a very creditable one for our first match and we went 
out to field more hopeful than usual, after having refreshed our¬ 
selves with lemonade and biscuits. Capt. Weston and Mr. Wood 
took charge of the bowling and in about half an hour disposed of our 
opponents for the modest score of 51. The former was unlucky, 
having three catches missed off his bowling. The latter after a bad 
start found his length and took eight wickets, clean bowling seven, 
for 16 runs only. The last wicket fell to a magnificent catch by 
MacMahon at square leg and we were left winners by 45 runs. This 
is the first time that we have beaten the Militia Department, since 
we have played them. We were without the services of both Hol¬ 
land and Code, which makes our victory all the more creditable. 
The fielding was up to its usual high standard, but special praise 
must be given to Keiffenstein for his wicket keeping, which was 
really first class. 

We hope to play a return match next Wednesday on our ground. 
Other matches in view are against Navy Department, The Old 
Boys, and Ottawa II. Below are the scores: 

Militia Department. 


Serg. Johnson bid. Wood. 7 

Sergt. Vergette bid. Weston. 16 

Q. M. Sgt. Brown bid. Weston. 0 

Corpl. Giles bid. Wood.. 4 

Sergt. Forrester lbw. bid. Wood. 0 

St. Sgt. Millward bid. Wood. 1 

Sergt. Stegman bid. Wod. 0 

Sergt. Craig bid. Wood. 2 

Q. M. Sgt. Parker, not out. 6 

Capt. Sitwell bid. Wood. 2 

Sgt. King ct. MacMahon, bid. Wood. 1 

Extras. 12 


Total. 51 
















THE ASHBURIAN 


Ashbury College. 


Sladen bid. Stegman. 5 

Reiffenstein ct. Vergette bid. Giles. 3 

D. C. Wood ct. Stegman bid. Forrester. 29 

Morris bid. Giles. 0 

N. A. Creetli ct. Craig bid, Forrester. 26 

MacMahon ct. Vergette blcl. Giles. 0 

Capt. Weston bid. Giles. 8 

Graham ct. Johnson bid. Forrester. 0 

H. G. Rhodes bid. Forrester. 2 

Irvin bid. Giles. 15 

MacLaren not out. 

Extras. 8 


Total 


BOWLING ANALYSIS. 

Militia Department. 

Wickets. 

Giles. 5 

Stegman. 1 

Forrestei. 4 

Ashbury 

Weston. 2 

Wood. 8 


SHOOTING 

There is not much to say about the shooting in this number. 
The indoor shooting competition for the seniors and the juniors came 
to a close just after the Easter number had gone to press. The 
senior competition for the O’Connor Cup was won this year by 
Sladen, who sent in the ten best scores and who had an average of 
46.4. On the next page are given the scores of the other com¬ 
petitors. The standard is a little higher than last year, when Bate 
was the winner with an average of 46.1. The lowest score last 
year was 372 as against 420 this year. Possible 500. 


Runs 

39 

21 

28 


23 

16 
























8 


THE ASHBURIAN 



The Woods Cup 


Sladen. 464 

Graham. 462 

Bate. 458 

Holland.. 456 

Chanonhouse. 453 

Edward. 449 

Reiffenstein. 447 

Morris. 445 

Irvin. 442 

Beard. 442 

Thompson. 441 

Hallick. 440 

MacMahon. 426 

Ross. 420 


The junior competition for the Cox Cup was won this year by 
O’Halloran, with an average of 41.4. The juniors did not have so 
much time for practice this year and the scores were not so high as 
last year, when Parker won with an average of 44.6. But there was 
a tremendous increase in the number of boys, who wanted to shoot, 
which promises well for the future. The following are the leading 
scores in this competition. Possible 500. 


O’Halloran. 414 

Johnston. 408 

Fitzhugh. 396 

Panet. 390 

Mulligan. 382 

Hamilton.) 

Valleau. ) 380 

Tashcereau 1. 358 

Burstall II. 352 

Armstrong./ 

Goldstein. S 

Prince. 338 

Burstall 1. 316 



The Cox Cup 


































TH E ASHBURIAN 


9 


At the time of going to press, the outdoor shooting at the 
ranges is in full swing. Every Tuesday afternoon and Saturday 
morning the seniors have an opportunity of practice. There are yet 
enough boys, who take advantage of this and day-boys especially 
do not show enough enthusiasm. It only means getting up a little 
earlier in the morning and surely to become a good shot is worth a 
little discomfort. Some of the best shots in the indoor range com¬ 
petition have not attended one practice at the ranges. There is a 
prize list for competitions at the ranges, the results of which will 
not be known until after the publication of this magazine. First, 
there are the Canadian Rifle League matches with individual prizes 
offered in this series. Besides these there are the Bate Cup, and 
the Boyd Cup. There are also the R. M. C. matches for that much 
coveted shield, which we have never yet won. Lastly there is the 
rifle, which was presented to us last year by The Daughters of The 
Empire. With all these competitions, prizes and matches in view, 
there ought to be more than ten boys turning out ,at the granges, of 
which two only are day-boys. 






On Thursday evening, March 26th, all the boarders paid a visit 
to the Russell Theatre, to hear the lecture on the South Pole Expedi¬ 
tion, given by Commander Evans. The lecture was most inter¬ 
esting, some of the slides being really magnificent, and everyone 
spent a very pleasant evening. The theatre was decorated with 
flags in honour of the lecturer, and the lecturer was introduced by 
Col. Sam Hughes. 

On March 31st, Cadet Corps drills started again in preparation 
for the Inspection, which will lie held soon after the publication of 
this magazine. The number of cadets is above the average this 
year and there seems to be a higher standard of efficiency than last 
year. This is due in a large measure to the keenness of the officers. 

On May 17th, His Royal Highness the Duke of Connaught came 
to morning service in our school chapel. He was accompanied by 
Her Royal Highness the Duchess and also by Princess Patricia and 
a party from Government House. This is the first time he has 
honoured us with a visit to one of our services, although he has on 
several occasions shewn his interest in our school. 

On the same day at the evening service, His Grace the Arch¬ 
bishop conducted a Confirmation Service at which 6 boys were con¬ 
firmed. This is the last service of this kind that His Grace will 
conduct in this chapel, as he is retiring in September. 

On May loth, by the kind invitation of His Royal Highness 
the Duke of Connaught, the members of the cadet corps visited 
Rideau Hall in the evening and saw some very interesting moving 
pictures, showing the work done by the British army. The pictures 
were in six reels and illustrated every branch of the army, including 
the Engineers, the Royal Artillery, the Highlanders, etc. We also 
saw the latest arm in the form of the aeroplane and the part it will 
play in future warfare. After the entertainment, we partook of 
light refreshments and then returned home, having spent a very 
pleasant evening. 

On one of the pages of this issue will be found photos of three 
cups, presented by Col. Woods, Mr. Cox, and Mr. Wiggins. The 
first was presented two years ago to the cadet corps, to be held for a 
year by that section which in the opinion of the inspecting officer 





























THE ASHBURIAN 


11 


performed the best at the annual inspection, marks to be given both 
for neatness and drill. 

The second was presented a year ago by a former master of 
the school to increase the interest in shooting among the juniors. 
The increase in the number of juniors who have availed themselves 
of the opportunities for shooting this winter shows that his object is 
meeting with the success it deserves. The cup, called the Cox 
Cup, is to be held for a year by the boy who has the highest average 
in shooting at the indoor range. A miniature cup is also given, 
which the boy keeps. The third cup has just been presented this 
year bv Mr. Wiggins for tennis and is also a challenge cup, to be 
held for a year by the winner in the open singles. Since Mr. 
Wiggins took charge of the tennis, there has been increased interest 
taken in this game and his recent gift will be appreciated by all 
the boys, who play tennis. 


OUR CONTEMPORARIES 

The High School Times , Chatham (2); The Meteor (3); Brad- 
field College Chronicle ; The Wykehamist (3); The Lower Canada 
College Magazine ; The Felsted.ian (3); The Tonbridgian (2); The 
Cheltonian (2); Acta Ridleiana ; The St. Andrew’s College Review ; 
The Albanian ; The School Magazine , Uppingham; The Mitre ; 
The St. John’s College Magazine ; The Black and Red ; The Collegiate 
Outlook , Moose Jaw. 




DOLCE FAR NIENTE ■ 



My dear Boys: 


I must begin by apologizing for this somewhat elderly form 
of salutation. It reminds one of a grandfather addressing his 
juvenile relatives; but I could not think of anything better. The 


only 

and 


other forms that occurred to me were 
Countrymen”. 


Friends, Romans 


and “Dearly Beloved Bretheri”,—neitherr of 


which seemed to be an improvement on the one I have used. So I 
was rather like the old woman who said she knew the Latin names 
of only two plants—-“Aurora Borealis”, and “Delirium Tremens”. 


Pleasures of Idling. 


No doubt you know that since last September I have been 
“resting”. 1 was told not to work, so, like the House of Lords,— 
“ I did nothing in particular, and did it very well”. 

At hrst the idea of a long loaf did not seem very unpleasant. 
To lie in bed late in the morning and think of you all turning out 
at 7.30; to breakfast in a dressing-gown when I should be taking 
roll-call; to read the morning papers in an easy chair before the 
fire instead of discussing the “British Empire” with the R. M. C.- 
form; and to take a gentle stroll in the sun instead of listening to 
—“Odd numbers one pace forward, even numbers one pace to the 
rear—march—Hennessey, what number were you?” in the gym., 
all seemed an attractive sort of picture, and promised a programme 
easy to carry out. 

Then, when I thought of the splendid opportunity of improving 
my mind by steady reading-—I concluded that the time would not be 
altogether wasted. 

Disappointment. 


That was eight months ago, and in that time I have learned 
much. I discovered to my disgust that just because I was told to 
loaf, I didn’t want to. The more I rested, the more energetic I 
became. To do nothing proved the hardest thing in the world to do. 
After a month or two of “hard resting” 1 began to think that taking 
a class in English Literature wouldnT lie so bad after all. After 
four months, an evening study would have been a luxury: and 
after eight months, a full detention would have proved a treat. In 
the mornings, instead of lying snug and listening to an imaginary 

























THE ASHBURIAN 


13 


chapel bell, or, like the sailor, dreaming of sending my compliments 
to the admiral, I found it impossible to stay in bed. 

When I thought of you all hustling down to breakfast, fastening 
collars and braces on the stairs, I only felt aggrieved at not being at 
the bottom to watch for a pair of boots. 

The Well Filled Mind. 

As to steady reading—that was another disappointment—I dis¬ 
covered that my mind was apparently incapable of further im¬ 
provement—the only literature which interested me being light 
novels and the Montreal Star. Once in a while a little serious read¬ 
ing came my way. Mr. Wood sent me a copy of The Ashburian, 
and some of you boys wrote me letters which afforded intellectual 
entertainment for a moment. 

Music Hath Charms. 

I soon realised that ten years of schoolmastering does not fit 
one for a year of semi-solitude. I missed the sweet music of a 
hundred and fffty fresh young voices yelling together in as many 
keys. (Mr. Wiggins will remark that there are not a hundred and 
fifty different keys). I ceased to hear the stimulating stampede 
along the halls and corridors, and the crashes and concussions from 
the basement. I sniffed in vain for the delicate aromas wafted from 
the chemistry class. In the evening I could no longer sit in my 
room and enjoy the spirited conversation of the bathers as they 
tossed chunks of soap from bath to bath to an accompaniment of 
“Cheese it, he’s coming”, and violent splashes. On Sunday morn¬ 
ings there was no longer a scheming crowd outside my door, each 
member endeavouring to “touch me” for as much cash and “leave” 
as his proposed visit to his aunt would justify. 

The Feast of Reason. 

At meals my sole companion was a book—a poor exchange for 
the cheerful circle of intelligent faces, and the constant sparkle of 
intellect that always distinguished table number two. 

But if I missed the stimulating influence of you boys so much, 
what words can convey my sense of loss of that higher, more ethereal 
atmosphere of the Common Room. 

Advertising. 

But enough of these fond memories—I did manage to see some 
of you at the L. C. C. football match here last fall, but I missed the 


14 


THE ASHBURIAN 


great championship match at Ashbury. I should like to congratu¬ 
late you on that; but I was disappointed that so little was made 
of it outside Ottawa. Everyone in Ottawa already knows Ash¬ 
bury—what we want to do is to get it as well known in other places. 

When other schools win outside Championships they advertise 
it everywhere. Everyone sends copies of the local papers with 
accounts of the match to their homes. These accounts are often 
copied into the papers there, and thus hundreds of people hear of 
the championship and of the lucky winning school. Otherwise 
these people would never have an opportunity of knowing anything 
about it, or that such a school existed. 


Battle of Smith Falls. A. D. 1911. 

Don’t you remember the furore we created at Smith Falls, and 
the very liberal notice that their paper gave us? I am quite sure 
that through that one outside paper alone hundreds of people learned 
for the first time three important things i. e. 

1. That there is a game called Rugby. 

2. That there are two schools—Ashbury and St. Alban’s. 

3. That the said Ashbury can play circles round the said St. 
Alban’s at the said Rugby. 

If a few more papers in these small towns—and in big ones too— 
were stimulated in a like fashion—by having the information sent 
to them in the shape of copies of the Ottawa papers—an enormous 
number of people would become aware, for the first time in their 
lives, that Ashbury occupies a fairly prominent position on the map 
of Canada. 


Where Ignorance Is Bliss. 

Down here, if you meet a man who even knows what L. C. C. 
stands for, you may consider yourself fortunate. When I mention 
our last great win they say “What championship, never heard of 
Ashbury—is it a school?” I suppose they think it’s a fertilising 
works. 

When the Duke was here not long ago, the people all wondered 
what in the world the Royal Standard was which they saw over the 
City Hall. In my brother’s office—just opposite—the whole staff 
were guessing what it was until he came in. The office boy said he 
thought it was the Quarantine Flag. 



THE ASHBURIAN 


15 


Ragtime Rugby. 

Of course it sounds immodest to blow one’s own trumpet, but 
remember we live in a country where it requires the assistance of a 
brass band or two, a rooters’ club, a street parade, half a dozen mas¬ 
cots, and gifts to each member of the team of diamond rings and 
watches—to win one big football match. One must advertise a 
school victory a little amid all this frantic excitement or no one will 
ever hear of it or of the school that came out on top. We root for 
our team on the held—we also have to root outside the school for 
the school itself. These are the days of fervid partisanship. 

A Light under a Bushel. 

Ashbury has been steadily developing in the twenty years of 
its existence —and yet it is hardly known outside Ottawa. Other 
schools—mushroom-like, have sprung up in Ontario in the last ten 
years, and, by advertising and loyal “boosting” by a few Old Boys, 
have already become more widely known. 

Loyalty. 

I met an Old Boy of Port Hope the other day—he had left 
there twenty-five years ago—and he told me that he considered it 
his duty to steer all the boys he could to his old school, no matter if 
there were better ones now. I call that loyalty—to the school— 
though, if he knew of better ones, it did not show much consideration 
for the boys. But his love for the old school was solid. 

We “Deliver the Goods”. 

A few such Old Boys of Ashbury knocking about the country 
could do just as much for their old school. Moreover—as we have 
the latest equipment and are scoring success after success in every 
branch of Sport and Work—such Old Boys need not look for a better 
place—for none exists. We can, and do, “deliver the goods”. 

One in a Thousand. 

From recent statistics I find that in Ontario only one man in 
every thousand sends his boy to such a school as Ashbury. The 
nine hundred and ninety-nine use the free schools and never know 
of the existence of anything else—except through the notice in a 
newspaper of some championship, or of a lucky place won on the 
Bisley Team. 




16 


THE ASHBUKIAN 


Crazy Notions. 

But this ignorance is pardonable compared to the insane ideas 
I have heard as to how such schools should be conducted. Of late 
I have talked to a lot of people-—but I will give you just one instance 
of what I mean. 


My Lady Nicotine. 

What do you think of a mother who wanted a period each day 
in school for the boys to smoke? Now that is a delicate subject as 
some of you know. I told her that no school in the Empire con¬ 
ducted on the lines of an English Public School allowed smoking. 
“I think it’s a great shame” she said “that they are not allowed 
if they want to”. I pointed out that, though smoking is not a 
crime-—I thought that every sensible parent would be sorry to see 
it allowed at school. She got angry then (she had two sons herself) 
and concluded—“Well you might just as well let them, for they 
will when they grow up.” It was no use pointing out that we for¬ 
bade smoking so that the boys might have a chance of growing up. 
She knew better. Her boys had gone to St. John’s school—but 
I am sure that no such crazy notion ever came from that good old 
place. 


A Dream. 

But I couldn’t get that idea of hers out of my head for a long 
time. I dreamed about it. In my dream, I found myself back at 
Ashbury, but all was changed. The place reeked of smoke, burnt 
matches strewed the floors, cigar lighters had been installed on each 
flat near the filters, the library was converted into a smoking-room, 
and a tobacco shop had been opened in the basement for the con¬ 
venience of the boarders. Advertisements for Old Chum, Navy 
Cut and Wig-Wag flamed on the dormitory walls. 

At Kecess the juveniles strolled about puffing cigarettes; the 
intermediates pulled at pipes; and the seniors chewed fat cigars- 
all but the K. M. C., who swaggered about with huge calabashes. 

At dinner—with the dessert—cigars were handed round by the 
maids and the room grew as thick as a London fog. 

In the evenings smoking concerts were held in different dormi¬ 
tories. Sports of all kinds had ceased—the football field, now use¬ 
less, supported a flourishing crop of tobacco. The sick room was 
doing a roaring business—but we will draw a veil over this. 


17 


THE ASHBURIAN 
A Nightmare. 

Then, in my sleep, came a further suggestion from my lady 
friend, I dreamed that she said “But you are only allowing them 
to smoke, I call it a shame, perhaps some of them want to chew.” 

But at the lurid pictures that this disgusting suggestion gave 
rise to, I awoke with a yell—and found myself in a cold perspiration. 

Vade in Pace. 

But I must bring this rambling epistle to a conclusion before it 
occupies the whole magazine. I am sorry I shall miss umpiring 
your cricket matches this term. Mr. Wiggins and I were so fond of 
standing on one leg for hours in the sun watching you lick the visitors 
—or watching the visitors etc. I shall miss the shooting at the 
ranges too, badly. Let me take this opportunity of wishing the best 
of luck to those who—alas—are leaving this term. I know we shall 
hear much to their credit during the next three years at the uni¬ 
versities. To those whom I am looking forward to meeting again 
next term—an revoir, till September. 

To you all—I wish a long, happy, healthy, holiday. 

Your sincere friend and Housemaster, 

C. H. HOOPER. 

Note. —When Mr. Hooper was asked to write this letter, he 
was under the impression that he was not coming back to the school 
this year. Since going to press, his plans have undergone a sudden 
change, and by the time this magazine is in the hands of our readers, 
Mr. Hooper will be with us. It was too late to change this letter 
and it was decided to let it stand. 










Editors : 


Mr. P. H. P. Woollcombe, Ashbury College, 
Rockcliffe, Ottawa, Ont. 

Mr. R. H. Morgan, IS Chislett St., Brockville, Ont. 


Artist : 


Mr. A. B. Beddoe, 311 Stewart St., Ottawa, Ont. 

Secretary Old Boys Association : 

Mr. Louis T. White, 4 Rideau Apartments, Ottawa, Ont. 

EDITORIAL 


“The third time's the charm". But,—does it apply in this 
case? If perchance you feel charmed, tell others; if not, DON'T 
tell us. 

If we are to judge from remarks that have from time to time 
filtered into our ears, our literary venture is meeting with that suc¬ 
cess which, we think, it deserves. 

The good ship “Old Boys’ Supplement" has safely sailed its 
first two voyages, and now we feel that in embarking on this its 
third, it has weathered the hardest part of its little sea of troubles, 
and now has a fairly prosperous horizon to which to look forward. 

The Ashburian is publishing some interesting news items this 
issue. The Old Boys Dinner; The Tug-of-War; The New Associa¬ 
tion Pin; and several other subjects which will doubtless be of 
interest to all who peruse these pages. 






























































20 


THE ASHBURIAN 


The Dinner came up to our expectations in every respect. There 
were about forty present, which, considering the time of year, was 
very satisfactory. A very nice banquet was served. Everyone 
was jolly; and everyone enjoyed himself. We feel sure that when 
the next Annual Banquet is held in January, 1915, a gathering 
about twice as large will be present. 

The new Old Boys Association Pin is another innovation intro¬ 
duced in this issue. It is without doubt a very handsome and 
artistic pin, and reflects great credit on Mr. A. B. Beddoe, its de¬ 
signer. Every member of the Association, will, we feel sure, wear 
one. 


Several Old Boys have promised Cups and Mugs for the Old 
Boys Races at the Sports this year; and we think that the addition 
of the one or two Old Boy events to the already attractive program, 
will cause an added interest in the sporting spirit of Ashbury. 

We wish to welcome to our numbers those boys that are this 
year leaving the Old School. At the end of June, they will have an 
opportunity of joining our Old Boys’ Association, one of the objects 
of which, is to further the interests of a common interest,—Ashbury. 

“Before we gang awa”’ we ask you to remember that letter 
from the Headmaster, which appeared in the Easter Number of The 
Ashbukian. During the Summer vacation is the best time to 
“boost” Ashbury to out-of-town parents, friends, etc., of intending 
pupils. Just a few remarks in the right place, and the results will 
be a large and creditable waiting list in the School Office. 


SPORTS DAY 


The Annual Ashbury Sports will be held this year on Tuesday, 
9th June at the College Grounds. 

The Old Boys’ race last year was such a successful feature of 
the Sports, that it has been decided this year to have two races, a 
440 yards race, and a 100 yards dash. 

We want a large gathering on hand to represent the Old Timers. 
All those who run, or think they can, are heartily invited. If you 
can’t compete, be on hand to applaud those that do. 

If any Old Boy wishes to present any cups or mugs, as trophies 
for these sports, please notify Mr. Louis T. White, immediately. 
This is a good opportunity for Old Boys to show a lively interest in 
Ashbury. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


21 


BENEDICTS’ COLUMN 

Matthews-Irvine: On April 22nd, 1914, Samuel George 
Matthews (1901) of Montreal, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Matthews, 
Ottawa, to Marjory Elizabeth, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. J. 
Irvine, Ottawa, in St. Paul’s Presbyterian Church, Ottawa. 

McLachlin-Pinhey: In All Saints Church, Ottawa, on April 
23rd, 1914, by the Revrend A. W. Mackay, B. D., Florence Rita, 
only child of Mr. and Mrs. Horace Pinhey, Ottawa, to Daniel Mc- 
Lachlin (1896) of Arnprior, Ont., eldest son of the late H. F. Mc- 
Lachlin, of the “Hill”, Arnprior, and Ottawa. 

Read-McLachlin: In All Saints Church, Ottawa, on May 
6th, 1914, by the Rev. A. W. Mackay, B. D., assisted by Rev. Geo. 
P. Woollcombe, Charles A. Read (1898) eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. 
C. A. Read, Ottawa, to Mildred, younger daughter of the late Claude 
and Mrs. McLachlin, Arnprior, Ont. 


OLD BOYS’ BANQUET. 

About forty Old Ashburians met at the Aylmer car at seven 
o’clock on Saturday evening, April 11th and thence proceeded to 
the Royal Ottawa Golf Club. It was the occasion of the first Annual 
Meeting and Banquet of the Ashbury Old Boys’ Association and in 
view of this, the numbers present were most encouraging. 

Mr. Louis T. White the Secretary of the Association received 
the Old Boys at the Golf Club. 

There were Old Boys from many parts of the Dominion. Some 
that attended Ashbury as far back as twenty-three years ago and 
others that left only last year. It was decidedly a very representa¬ 
tive gathering. 

About eight o’clock Mr. White informed those present that 
were they to give him their undivided attention, he would be pleased. 
This was accordingly given. Mr. White then opened the proceed¬ 
ings with a short but businesslike report on the work of the Old 
Boys’ Committee for the past year. He told how the number of 
members now reaches about 70, and how the committee is in posses¬ 
sion of about 90 per cent of the addresses of all Old Boys. 

He then went on to tell how for the coming year it was the in¬ 
tention to elect a president of the Association from among the num¬ 
bers of the Old Boys. Rev. Mr. Woollcombe had kindly consented 
to act in that office for the past year; but, on his own solicitation 
and counsel it was deemed best to elect an Old Boy to the office for 
the coming year. 

Mr. Woollcombe was then unanimously elected Hon. President. 
As his last official act as President of the Association, Mr. Wooll- 


29 


THE ASHBURIAN 


combe moved a hearty vote of thanks to Mr. Louis T. White for his 
successful energies on behalf of the Association. This was seconded 
and carried with enthusiastic gusto. Mr. White depreciated his 
own efforts and stated that the credit was due to others; This state¬ 
ment however was only due to his natural modesty as it is generally 
conceded that to him is largely due the success of the association. 

The election of a President and committee then took place, and 
the following gentlemen were chosen. For the office of President, 
Mr. Willis O’Connor (1902); For the office of Vice-President, Mr. 
Chas. Fleming (1902); For the committee, Mr. Louis T. White 
(1891), Mr. Phil. Chrysler (1893), Mr. Philip Woollcombe (1900), 
Mr. J. A. C. Macpherson (1892), For Montreal Member, Mr. E. 
Newcombe (Nixie) (1898), For Toronto Member, Mr. V. W. S. 
Heron (1892). 

After a short disci ssion on the plans for the coming year, it 
was moved, seconded and carried—Nem. Con., that an adjournment 
to dinner be made. They adjourned. 

The table was tastily arranged in a large square, with palms 
and floral decorations in the centre which formed a very pleasing 
picture to the eye. One of the features noticeable was the Menu 
and Toast Lists. These were designed and (hand) colored by the 
Old Boy Ashburian Artist, Mr. Beddoe (1909). They were very 
artistically arranged and the get up of them was commented upon 
very favourably. 

As guests tf the Association were: Mr. K. G. Smith, who for 
some years was a resident master at Ashbury and who, judging by 
the welcome accorded, was very popular, and Captain Weston, the 
genial Secretary of the School. The “Cap” has during his connec¬ 
tion with Ashbury made himself popular with every Old Boy with 
whom he has come in contact. 

A very dainty and appetizing dinner being concluded, Cadet 
Barwis (R.M.C.) with a few well chosen words proposed a health to 
his Majesty, The King. This was responded to enthusiastically. 

The Vice-President, Mr. Chas. Fleming (who presided at the 
table owing to the unavoidable absence of the newly elected Presi¬ 
dent, Mr. O’Connor) then arose and with his usual pleasant manner, 
asked the gathering to rise with him and one and all drink to the 
object of their common affections—Ashbury; and ipso facto, its 
esteemed and honoured headmaster, Mr. Woollcombe. 

After a very good health had been toasted, “For lie’s a jolly 
good fellow” was sung with great vigour. Three hearty cheers and 
a ringing tiger were given. When the deafening din had subsided, 
Mr. Woollcombe arose and in words that sank deep into the ears of 
his hearers, thanked them for their demonstrations. 

He opened his remarks by noticing that there were Old Boys 
present from four periods in the School’s History, from the one room 


THE ASHBURIAN 


23 


in the Victoria Chambers; from the School on Wellington Street; 
from the Ashbury on Argyle Avenue; and from the School at present. 

He told them that it was occasions of re-union like these that 
more than recompensed a schoolmaster for the many vicissitudes of 
scholastic life. He was very pleased to see such a large gathering 
of Old Faces present and he hoped that next year there would be a 
still larger one. (Cries of Hear, Hear, Sir!) He then told how an 
Old Boys’ Association can so greatly help a school; and asked that 
in the case of the Ashbury Association it should help the school by 
sending boys thereto from points outside of Ottawa. He was con¬ 
vinced, he said, that a recommendation from an Old Boy was better 
than anything else, and he hoped for results from the Association. 

He then thanked everyone once again and concluded by wishing 
them one and all a very prosperous year. 

Mr. George R. Smith (Smithie) then arose and stated that he 
really couldn’t adequately express in words his feelings. He said 
he felt very honoured to be a member of the happy gathering, and 
stated that for all the years since he left his native shores, he had 
always maintained a very warm spot in his heart for Ashbury. It 
was his honour to-night, said he, to be allowed to propose a hearty 
toast to the Ashbury Old Boys Association. This was responded 
to with vigour, and during the drinking of the Toast, ‘ ‘ We’re here 
because we’re here” was sung with might and main. 

Mr. Charles Read (1898) replied to the toast in a graceful speech. 
He thanked Mr. Smith for his kindly words and keen interest in the 
Association and assured him on behalf of everyone how very welcome 
he was. He then moved that he, Mr. Reginald Smith be elected an 
Hon. Member of the Association. This motion was quickly seconded 
and unanimously carried. 

Mr. Chas. Fleming spoke a few words of general interest to 
all and on sitting down moved that Mr. Louis T. White should speak. 
Mr. White arose, but as is his usual wont, he was the soul of modesty 
and declined to speak in public. He said, he knew there were others 
more qualified to speak than he (cries of “not on your life Louis”) 
and that therefore he must decline the honour. He said that he 
thought that Mr. Philip Woollcombe (1900) had something to say. 

Somewhat in astonishment, Mr. Philip Woollcombe arose and 
told the gathering that he felt rather at a loss for words. However, 
as he was Old Boy’s Editor, he felt he had a message; (cries of hear, 
hear!) He said he was always hungry—(laughter)—for news for 
the magazine. He asked everyone to write to him and tell him about 
themselves. He assured them he didn’t mind. If any of them entered 
the happy state of matrimony; he would be tickled to death to hear 
of it and publish it in the pages of The Ashburian. He also wanted 
contributions; while he was not averse to financial ones (laughter), 


24 


THE ASHBURIAN 


still what he chiefly wanted were those of a literary order. Having ' 
delivered himself of a few more remarks, he sat down. 

Mr. Phil. Chrysler, on being asked to speak, said that he noticed 
that there were several fathers present. (Shouts of “you bet”, 
hear, hear!) He felt certain that they would in time be sending 
their sons to the school, but he just wanted to remind them in lots 
of time. Mr. Chrysler appealed to the gathering to all to be present 
for the Ashbury-Old Boys Cricket Match. He was sure that if 
everyone were to come down, a fine and winning team could be 
assembled (loud applause). 

Mr. J. Macpherson then arose and begged to make a suggestion. 
“The time has come” he said, “when the Association Members 
should have some emblematical pin to wear on the coat, or in the 
buttonhole”. This idea was received with applause and Mr. Beddoe 
thereupon promised to shortly take steps to design one. 

Mr. W. Trenholme (Billy) (1904) was urged to say a few words, 
but modestly declined. He said he felt incapable of speech (laughter) 
but he heartily wished everyone success. He said that there were 
others who could speak better than he—(cries of 11 Don’t believe it, 
Billy”), and so amid protests of a loud nature he sat down. 

Several other speakers entertained the assembly for a while 
after which the Head arose and asked to propose one more toast; 
The Absent Old Boys. This was responded to with fervour, after 
which the National Anthem was sung. 

Everyone then adjourned to the smoking room where the re¬ 
mainder of the evening was spent in a very enjoyable manner with 
“My Lady Nicotine”. Many old reminiscences were re-told and 
old acquaintances revived. 

About half past eleven, the party returned to Ottawa, Songs 
and impromptu speeches were indulged in on the car, and after 
everyone wishing everyone else Au Revoir the meeting broke up. 

E.R.L. (1911). 



A Vi 



A LONG PULL, A STRONG PULL 

When the arrangements were being made for the Exhibition of 
Gymnastics and Physical Culture, which was given recently before 
H. R. H. the Duke of Connaught, by the boys of Ashbury College, 
the idea was hit upon of introducing into the programme a “stunt” 
in which the Old Boys could take part. At last after much con¬ 
sideration, it was decided that, as many of the Old Boys seemed to 
have gained in pounds avoirdupois since they had gone out into 
the world, a tug-of-war between the present pupils and those who 
had in years gone by attended the school, would be the means of 
providing much amusement, and also, of giving the Old Boys a 
chance of distinguishing themselves. 

Mr. Philip Woollcom.be, after carefully going over the list of 
available Old Boys, (“available” in this case meaning that the Old 
Boy must tip the scales at 160 lbs. at least) was able to secure a 
fairly heavy team to pull against the School. We say fairly heavy, 
for as results showed, that is about all that can be said in their 
favour. 

A practice was held and the seven Old Boys, who had consented 
to try their prowess, turned up. We were told how to march into 
the Hall and how to take our places. We were to do this to create a 
favourable impression for ourselves; and fortunately for us we 
carried this part through creditably. Perhaps if we had been shewn 
how to PULL in a tug-of-war, we might have succeeded better in 
the real business of the performance. 

After we had chosen a Captain, in the person of Mr. Philip 
Woollcombe, a discussion arose as to what costume we should 
wear. White sweaters, blue trousers and white running shoes 
eventually were agreed upon, as tending most to conceal the 
fact that more than one of us measured several inches more around 
the belt than around the chest. 

As we dressed for the contest, much excitement was noticeable 
among us, as, for the most of us it was our first public appearance 
before Royalty; and we were also just a little bit nervous as to the 
outcome of the encounter with the present Ashburians. In fact 










26 


THE ASH BHUTAN 


one of our number nearly escaped, but fortunately his absence was 
noticed and his intended flight foiled. 

After watching the snappy way in which the different classes 
went through their exercises, we had a slight idea that we were not 
going to have things all our own way. 

When we marched out on the floor, led by our gallant captain, 
our chances looked fairly bright, for we seemed somewhat more bulky 
than our opponents. In fact some people were heard to express 
anxiety about whether the rope (which was only an inch and a 
half thick) would be able to stand the strain, when we exerted our 
strength. A coin was tossed, sides chosen and the two teams marched 
to their places. 

We picked up the rope, took a firm hold and at the given word 
started to pull; but unfortunately, pull as hard as we might, not an 
inch could we budge our opponents. We tugged and strained, but 
it was quite evident that it was going to be a close fought struggle. 
It is rumoured that our leader in trying to get another hold on the 
rope, advanced until he unthinkingly stepped across the mark 
anyway the School won the first pull. We still had hope, however 
as the best two out of three was the way the contest was to be de- * 
cided. 

We changed ends, and by resorting to foxy methods, and by 
using our superior wisdom, outwitted the School by a change of 
tactics and won the second pull. 

We took our places for the final pull, full of the “do or die” 
spirit. For the first few seconds of the last pull, neither side seemed 
to have any advantage, but soon, owing to an unforseen circum¬ 
stance, namely the dragging of our anchor, we set a course which took 
us directly acrcss the mark and gave the third pull to the School, 
incidentally giving them the victory; and the Old Boys fell before 
superior condition and training. 

However though beaten in this contest, we have not given up 
hope and are already making preparations for the tug-of-war, we 
hope to have at the Annual Sports Day in June. We are also hoping 
that in the Old Boys’ Cricket Match, some of our lost glory may be 
regained. 

The personnel of the team, which represented the Old Boys 
was as follows: 

P.^Woollcombe ( Capt .) (1900). 

W. Cory (1905). 

D. Blair (1898). 

M. O’Halloran (1902). 

D. Burn (1902). 

Iv. Slater (1903). 

A. Thompson (1910). 


H. Appy Esq., (1902). 


27 


THE ASHBURIAN 

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: 

During the last three years, many expressions of admiration 
and approval have been passed by quite a few Old Boys with regard 
to the new white first team sweaters and blazers. 

When in 1911, it was decided to change the colors from Red 
and Blue to Cardinal , White and Green, the decision was made that 
any Old Boy, who had ever been on the first football, hockey or cricket 
team, was entitled to have one, and could, if he so desired, obtain same. 

These sweaters and blazers can be had by placing an order with 
the Secretary Old Boys Association, giving the size required, and 
also the year of the team on which he played. 

In regard to the first team cricket blazer, The Ashburian begs 
to offer its opinion that this is one of the most handsome blazers in 
Canada. It has a white body; cardinal, white and green silk fac¬ 
ings, over the lapels, and edges and pockets, and the left breast 
pocket has the School Crest worked in colors, in silk. It is without 
doubt an ideal coat for boating or canoing. 

As these coats are made in England, they have to lie ordered 
early, so it would be well for intending purchasers thereof to crder 
at an early date.—Ed. 

“AMONG THE BEAUTIFUL PICTURES THAT 
HANG ON MEMORY’S WALL” 

At the Banquet, a suggestion was made by one of the Editors 
of The Ashburian which was apparently a good one. It met with 
favour on all sides. 

Someone asked the question, “how are we to keep ourselves, the 
boys of the past, in touch with the boys of the present? Lots of them 
know us only by name or vague tradition. This is not as it should be. ” 

It was in answer to this that the said suggestion was made. 
11 Have a tablet erected in the Dining Room of the College, with the 
photos of every member of the Association framed thereon. Place a 
neat little plate underneath with his name and the year he attended, 
marked on it.” 

This plan is successfully worked at the R.M.C. and while it will 
be a big task, we are confident that it can be accomplished here too. 

It is greatly to be hoped that every member of the Old Boys 
Association will send us his photograph. It neendn’t be a very 
large one. 

Don’t be backward in coming forward. We want to have this 
tablet, with the 77 names and photos of all the members of the first 
year of the Association, ready to hang up by the time Ashbury opens 
in the fall. 

Please send photo to either the Secretary Mr. Louis T. White 
or to Mr. Philip Woollcombe and a receipt in the form of a letter 
will be sent vou—WE ARE COUNTING ON YOU. 


28 


THE ASH BERLIN 


ASSOCIATION PIN 



Above is produced the design, in black, of the new pin. 

The main body is divided into two divisions with a broad band 
running between them. The upper one is in cardinal; the lower 
in green; and the band running between these, is in white. 

In the centre of the main body is set a shield with the School 
Crest worked in red and white. Inserted in the cross bars of the 
crest, are the letters 0. B. A. in gold. 

The crest proper, main body and broad band are bordered in 

gold. 

This will be the Association Emblem in the future. It was 
designed by The Ashburian Artist, Mr. A. B. Beddoe, and at the 
first meeting of the new r committee, amid others, was submitted for 
approval, It was moved, seconded and unanimously carried that 
this v r as the most effective design and that it be adopted. 

Quotations on these pins, are being sought, and the committee 
should be in possession of them shortly. 

All members who wish for one of these pins, will please notify 
Mr. Louis T. White AS SOON AS POSSIBLE, and he will give them 
an order on the Jeweller, who makes them. This precaution of getting 
an order, is only taken to prevent anyone but Association members 
from acquiring one. 



















































































THE ASHBURIAN 


29 


AN EQUATION 

The following was handed to us by a motoring enthusiast. We 
hope that someone will be able to work it out. 

“Let M represent the Motorist; and V his velocity. Then 
if V be a positive quantity, M + Y will presently approach PC. 

If the value of V be low enough, PC may be disregarded. 

If not, a circle should be described about PC. 

If this is impossible, it will be necessary to square PC. 

Then PC+LSD=PC 2 . 

But M +V + (PC-LSD)=JP. 

And here LSD=0, for JP 2 is an impossible quantity. 

Thus M + V + (PC-LSD) = M-10 L. ” 

OLD BOY NOTES 

Stanley Wright (1906) is at present living in the City of Calgary. 

* * * 

It was quite like old times to see “Pink” Blair (1898) in an 
Ashbury Sweater again. “Pink” was on hand at the Gymnastic 
Exhibition in April and pulled like a war-horse for the Old Boys. 

* * * 

After an absence of seven years, Lieut. Murray Greene (1903) 
and his wife, visited Ashbury. Murray is now stationed in Kingston. 
He has not changed a bit, and is still the same old Murray that used 
to occupy the celebrated Dormitory E. 

* * * 

The Ashbubian wishes to offer its hearty congratulations to 
Mr. (1903) and Mrs. Guy French, on the birth of a daughter. 

* * * 

J. B. Macphail (1904) graduated this year from McGill with 
Honours in Mathematics. Besides being of a mathematical turn of 
mind, “Mick” is an ardent wrestler and agriculturist. He was 
runner up for the Montreal Middle and Heavyweight Wrestling 
Championships; and Captain of the McGill Wrestling Team. He 
is also a specialist in potatoes. During the summer he manages a 
modern potato farm, the products of which reflect great credit on 
himself and on the little island of Prince Edward, which is the scene 
of his labours. 

* * * 

Old Boys of later years will be glad to hear from their old friend 
and classical master, The Rev. Cary-Elwes. He is at present rector 
of a church in Melbourne, Fla. His address is Box 106, Melbourne. 


30 


THE ASHBURIAN 


"Andy” Naismith (1910) was among the many Old Boys who 
visited Ottawa at Easter. 

* * * 

"Rosy” (1904) and "Randy” (1905) White were also in town 
spending the Easter Holiday. 

* * * 

"Art” Shaw (1909) made a Hying visit to town, where,he met 
many of his old school chums. 

* * * 

Douglas B. Smart (1908) is on the staff of the Evening Journal, 
Ottawa. 

^ ^ ^ 

Major E. de B. Panet, (1898) of the Royal Canadian Artillery, 
has passed the Staff College, Camberley, England. 

* * * 

The death of the Earl of Minto, former Governor-General of 
Canada, brings to mind the fact that his successor in the earldom, 
formerly Lord Melgund, (1902) was a pupil at Ashbury. The new 
Earl of Minto was born in 1891, and is a lieutenant in the Scots 
Guards. He was previously attached to the Lothians and Border 
Horse Yeomanry. 

* * * 

Capt. J. Clark Macpherson, (1892) of the Governor-Generals 
Foot Guards, and a member of the Old Boys Association Committee, 
is in command of the team of Canadian Cadets, which is visiting 
England this summer. 


DON’T FORGET 

SPORTS 

DAY 


JUNE 9th 1914 




BY SPECIAL APPOINTMENT TO HIS EXCELLENCY 
THE GOVERNOR GENERAL 



B. SLATTERY 

IMPORTER AND MANUFACTURER OF 

FINE TABLE DELICACIES 


By Ward Market, Phone Q 107 
Windsor Market, Phone Q 890 
Primrose Market, Phone Q 433 


Wellington Market, Phone Q 143 
Residence, Phone Q. 131 

Excelsior Market, Phone Q 107 


Modern Dancing 

PROF. B. LAING is teaching tha Popular Dances 
Brazilian Maxixe, One Step, Hesitation Waltz, etc., as 
danced by Vernon Castle. 

Private lessons daily at any hour by appointment. 

Open all Summer. 

P rn f T A T (A St. Patrick’s Hall, Laurier Ave., W. 

—————- Phone Q. 2036 - Residence R. 563 


MUSIC AND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 

We carry one of the largest and best assorted stocks of Sheet Music, 
Music Books, Musical Instruments, Strings and all accessories in 
Canada. A new stock received in September of Violins, Violincellos, 
Mandolins, etc., from Europe. 

Agents:—Gibson Mandolins, Laube, Clarinets, Boosey Band Instru¬ 
ments. Anything and everything in Music. 

McKECHNIE MUSIC COMPANY 

Orme Limited Premises 
175 Sparks Street - Ottawa 











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THE ASHBURIAN 




Editorial Staff. 

Editor-in-Chiej— Mr. C. H. Hooper. 

Sports —R. Maclaren, D. MacMahon. 

Shooting —R. S. Morris. 

Secretary-Treasurer —Mr. A. B. H. Wiggins. 

EDITORIAL. 

THE WAR. 

When this humble magazine last went to press, in June, the 
Editorial Staff little suspected that every event, even in our shelt¬ 
ered lives at the college, recorded in the next number, would be in 
some way influenced by a world wide war. 

We did not know, that we should have to record the roll of 
honourable names of “Old Boys’" volunteering for the front. 
We could not have even guessed that two of our own staff would 
have their names in this list. We never expected that our own 
Cadets would be called upon to serve in camp; that our Sergeant- 
Major would go; that the rifle shooting, practised for years here, 
would so soon be practically tested; that our signallers would 
be sending real messages, that every one of us would have 
friends or relation^ in actual danger of their lives. 

And yet, it has all happened; and this copy of The Ash- 
burian will some day become of historic value because it tells 
how the college is affected by the war, and what the college is 
doing and has done to help the Empire. 

THE WORK. 

It is not the good fortune of many to have to record such a 
school success as was scored by the College last May. In the 
R. M. C. entrance exam. Ashbury succeeded in securing first 
place, besides three others in creditable standing. The whole 
school is proud of this success, the second time for Ashbury in four 
years, and is proud of Biggar, our successful candidate for the 
top place. 

Of those candidates for the coming year, we have little doubt 
that they will follow the excellent of Biggar, Hazen, Holland and 
Thackray. 

In the University Matriculation we did fairly well—the 
trouble being that many candidates for this exam, have no in¬ 
tention of going to the university if successful. The necessary 
stimulus is lacking. 










































2 


THE ASHBURIAN 


THE STAFF. 

Mr. Wood’s place in the college has been taken by Mr. E. 
L. Sellwood, B. A., of Keble College Oxford. . 

The post of classical master, occupied last year by Mr. 
Rhoades, is now filled by the Rev. Dr. Voorhis, late Headmaster 
of the Cathedral Choir School, New York. The Ashburian 
takes this opportunity of welcoming the two new members to 
the staff of the college. 


SPEECH DAY. 

In spite of the absence of the Head-Master, owing to illness, 
a large gathering of parents of boys, friends and visitors assem¬ 
bled at the School, on June 10. The weather was most delightful, 
and the fact that both work and sports prizes were presented 
together made the event even more popular and interesting 
than usual. 

Perhaps the outstanding feature of the afternoon was the 
announcement that again this year an Ashbury College student 
P. E. Biggar, stood in first place among the list of successful 
candidates for the Royal Military College and that three other 
students, making four in all, had succeeded in passing the exam¬ 
inations for entry to the college. 

Class Presentations. 

The presentations of the books to the boys who took 
first, second and third places in their respective classes for good 
work done throughout the year, were made by Mr. W. H. Row- 
ley, president of the college. Lady Egan presented the prizes for 
shooting which were mostly handsome cups, but included the 
rifle donated annually by the Laurentian Chapter of the Daugh¬ 
ters of the Empire. The trophies and other prizes won by the 
boys at the annual sports on Tuesday and the cups for the win¬ 
ners in the spring tennis tournament were presented by Mrs. 
J. B. Fraser. 

The Governor-General’s medal, donated by H. R. H. the 
Duke of Connaught, to be won by the student doing the best 
all-round work in the college during the year, was presented by 
Mr. Rowley to P. E. Biggar. This is the second occasion upon 
which the same boy has been awarded the Governor-General’s 
medal. 

The Nelson Shield. 

To Ward Irvin the Nelson Shield was presented. This 
trophy was the donation of Lord Strathcona and is won by the 
boy with the best record of good conduct and general de- 
neanour towards maintaining the tone of the school, for a school 
year. 



THE ASHBURIAN 


3 


Mr. Rowley before presenting the boys with the prizes 
for class work delivered a short address in the course of which 
he very warmly commended the work the boys accomplished 
during the past year. He particularly referred to the harmonious 
spirit of co-operation which it was quite evident existed between 
the entire staff of masters and the boys. He gave figures showing 
the high percentages made in each of the different forms, pointing 
to these to show the efficiency of the boys’ work. The fact 
that the school had won the Intercollegiate Championship in 
football, that it had taken second place in the results for the 
hockey and track team work at the Intercollegiate school meets 
and that it had won three of the matches out of four during the 
season in cricket, made it quite apparent that the boys were hold¬ 
ing their own in the field of sport. He referred to the high scores 
made in shooting matches during the year and was quite satisfied 
with the results achieved in the other branches of the college 
work including the spring tennis tournaments. 


Masters Retiring. 

The announcement was made by Mr. Rowley that Mr. 
Cecil Wood and Mr. H. G. Rhoades, two of the masters at the 
college, had expressed their intention of retiring. The former 
was going to England, he said, and Mr. Rhoades was going to 
take up a position in the Civil Service in Ottawa. 

Following the presentation a vote of thanks was tendered 
Lady Egan and Mrs. Fraser for their kindness in attending the 
closing exercises and making the awards after which the guests of 
the afternoon were entertained to tea. 


Class Prizes. 

The class prizes were presented as follows: 

6th Form —R. M. C. Form, P. E. Biggar; matriculation form 
J. C. Reiffenstein. 

5 th Form —1, R. S. Morris; 2, R. L. Sladen; 3, W. P. Muir- 
head. 

4 th b Form— B—1, G. B. Brown; 2, C. H. Goldstein; 3 
C. D. G. Barwis. 

4 th a Form —A—1, C. J. Watson; 2, J. O’Halloran. 

3rd Form —1, E. K. Dunnet; 2, C. H. Hamilton; 3, F. F. 
E. Valleau. 

2nd Form—A —G. P. Sladen. 

2nd Form —1, H. R. Hampson; 2. J. C. Brennan; 3, E. 
B. Burstall. 

1st. Form —H. Fitzhugh. 


4 


THE ASHBURI AN 


RIFLE SHOOTING. 



R. S. Morris. J. C. Reiffenstein. 

H. L. Holland. Sgt.-Major Turner. H. E. Graham. 

“ R. M. C. SHIELD ” TEAM, 1914. 

Under the able guidance of Sgt.-Mjr. Turner, the rifle shoot¬ 
ing for 1914, both indoor and on the ranges held its usual high 
standard of excellence. 

The only criticism that can be justly levied at the boys was 
in regard to the small attendance at the ranges on Saturday 
mornings. This led to our having an incomplete team for one 
of the four C. R. A. matches, and the consequent loss of a good 
place for the school in the final total. 

The different cups were won as follows: 

Daughters of the Empire Rifle, donated annually by the 
Laurentian Chapter of the Eaughters of the Empire, for the best 
outdoor shot, at 200 and 500 yards. —H. E. Graham. Score, 66. 

Bate Cup, offered by Mr. H. G. Bate, for the best outdoor 
shot, at 200 yards.—H. E. Graham. Score, 32. 

O’Connor Cup, given by Capt. Willis O’Connor, for the best 
senior indoor shot of ten scores.—R. L. Sladen. Score, 464. 

Cox Cup, donated by Mr. F. E. Cox, for the best junior 
indoor shot of ten scores.—J. O’Halloran. Score, 414. 


CRICKET. 

The second match of the season took place on May 20th, 
when the Ottawa C. C. 2nd XI came to play us. The visitors 
arrived with only nine men, and were soon dismissed for forty- 
three runs. 

Mr. Wood and Sladen then proceeded to score freely and the 
Ottawa total was soon passed, the Ashbury score eventually 
reaching eighty-two for the loss of five wickets. Score: 








THE ASHBURIAN 


5 


Ottawa 2nd XI. 


G. Webber, ct MacMahon b Holland. 0 

R. Plucknett c and b Holland . 3 

A. J. Mackle b Holland.. 0 

H. Parry b Wood. 3 

A. G. Cox b Wood 5 

H. Travers b Wood 0 

A. Pereire, not out. 21 

F. E. Cox, did not bat 

A. N. Other b Weston 0 


Extras. 10 

Total. 42 


Ashbury College. 

Reiffenstein ct Pereira b Plucknett. 

Sladen b Plucknett 

Holland ct Cox b Plucknett. 

D. C. Wood, Esq., st Cox b Plucknett.... 

Code, not out. 

N. A. Creeth, Esq., lbw. b Plucknett. 

MacMahon, not out. 

Capt. Weston 

Morris. did not bat. 

H. G. Rhoades, Esq. f 

Graham . I 

Extras. 


0 

23 

0 

27 

8 

2 

1 


21 


Total 


82 


Ashbury v. Navy Department. 

This match was played on Wednesday afternoon, May 27th, 
and resulted in an easy win for the college. This was the first time 
that we had received a visit from the Navy Department during 
the cricket season. They had previously inflicted two defeats on 
us at soccer during the fall, so that we were quite pleased to show 
our superiority over them in the summer. Mr. Cox was captain¬ 
ing the visitors' team and after winning the toss he sent us in to 
bat. Sladen and Reiffenstein made a good start, which was 
followed up and maintained by the rest of the team. Holland 
played a good innings, and was out to a good catch. Code and 
Thackray also made several runs mostly on the leg side, in a 
rather unorthodox fashion, but still very useful to the team. Our 
total came to 75, a large score on our ground. When the visitors 
went in to bat, Holland and Mr. Wood were the bowlers. In 
the first over, Chrysler was run out without scoring and in the 
















































6 


THE ASHBURIAN 


same over Cox was clean bowled. Wickets fell fast, Holland 
claiming most of them. The whole side was out for 27, Holland 
taking six wickets for 8 runs. The fielding was extremely good, 
and Graham’s catch,which closed the innings, was quite a fine 
effort. We gave the visitors a second innings, as it was quite 
early, and they did much better at their second venture, scoring 
52. This was due largely to the number of byes. Holland again 
was bowling in irresistible style and captured five wickets for ten 
runs. Capt. Weston took four wickets for twelve, and MacMahon 
finished up the innings by clean bowling Sneyd. The fielding was 
still better in this innings, several good catches being made. 

Below are the full scores: 


Ashbury College. 


Sladen ct. Edwards b. Rush 5 

Reiffenstein ct. and bid Cox 4 

D. C. Wood b. Rush. 4 

Holland ct. and bid. Cox 19 

MacMahon b. Cox. 3 

Code b. Rush. 12 

Capt. Weston ct. Townsend b. Cox 4 

Morris ct. Logsdail b. Cox. 2 

Thackray ct. Logsdail b. Cox 12 

Graham b. Robson 0 

Tremain, not out. 2 

Extras. 8 


Total . 75 


Navy Department. 



1st innings 


2nd innings 


Rush 

ct Code b Wood .... 

7 

ct and bid Holland . 

3 

Townshend 

b Holland. 

2 

bid Holland 

6 

Chrysler 

run out. 

0 

bid Weston. 

0 

Cox, F. E. 

bid Wood. 

0 

bid Holland. 

3 

Logsdail 

bid Holland. 

2 

bid Holland. 

8 

Williams 

lbw b Wood. 

0 

ct and bid Weston. 

0 

Cox, A. G. 

b Holland. 

2 

ct and bid Weston. 

3 

Edwards 

b Holland. 

4 

ct Code b Weston. 

7 

Robson 

b Holland. 

2 

b Holland.. 

2 

Sneyd 

ct Graham b Holland 

1 

b MacMahon. 

0 

Goodey 

not out. 

0 

not out. 

0 


Extras. 

7 

Extras. 

. . . 20 


Total. 

27 

Total .... 

. . . 52 














































THE ASHBURIAN 


7 


Ashbury Present v. Past. CtfiCKE i 

This annual fixture took place on Saturday afternoon, May 
30th, and ended in an easy win for the college by an innings and 
thirty-four runs. It was a perfect day for cricket, and the “Old 
Boys” had quite a strong team. Unfortunately Phil Chrysler 
who was supposed to captain the team did not put in an appear¬ 
ance, but Crocket kindly took his place and proved very 
useful as a fielder. Capt. Weston played for the “Old Boys”, 
and proved a valuable asset to the side, taking seven wickets for 
thirty-seven runs, and also making thirteen runs in their second 
innings. The school team was nearly at full strength, only Code 
and Graham being absent, their places being taken by Tremain 
and Burstall. We won the toss and put the “Old Boys” in first. 
Mr. Wood started the bowling with Holland, and the first four 
wickets fell very quickly. Then a long stand was made by Burn 
and Maunsell, who ran some short runs and rather demoralized 
the fielding. The former was out to a good catch by Morris 
while Tremain caught the latter. Maunselks innings was the 
best for his side and he played with great confidence. After his 
departure Holland finished off the innings, the total coming to 
forty-four. We opened our innings with the same pair, but they 
were both out in the first over and Mr. Wood fell a victim to the 
Captain soon after. Holland and Mr. Creeth stopped the col¬ 
lapse, both hitting out well. Holland played in his best style, 
and made thirty-one, before he was out to a brilliant catch by 
Maunsell. Mr. Creeth was also caught by Maunsell, who al¬ 
together made four catches during the innings. The next big 
stand was made by Mr. Rhoades and MacMahon, who put on 
about fifty runs. MacMahon scored at a great pace and nearly 
every ball he hit went to the boundary. Mr. Rhoades batted 
steadily, and was unlucky in getting out. Morris and Thackray 
did not stay long, but Tremain followed MacMahon’s example 
and hit at everything, scoring eleven before he was bowled by 
Cox. MacMahon was the last out, bowled by Cox. His score was 
forty-two, and he thoroughly deserved the ovation he received. 
He has never played a finer innings on the school ground. Our 
total came to 137, the highest score made in a match by one 
team. It was not a “one man score” as no fewer than five bats¬ 
men double figures. During the innings there was an interval for 
tea and refreshments, which were served under the trees, and 
were most acceptable. The “Old Boys” batted again to the 
bowling of Thackray and Mr. Rhoades. The former quickly 
captured two wickets, but was unable to bowl to a left-hand 
batsman, and he resigned in favour of MacMahon. He was 
tired after his innings and Holland took his place, and with Mr. 
Rhoades finished off the innings just on the stroke of time. Capt. 
Weston who was scoring freely fell a victim to a brilliant catch 
in the out field by Mr. Creeth. Reiffenstein ran two men out 
and stumped another, so that he played an important part 
in the second innings. Mr. Hooper and Mr. Wiggins kindly 
umpired all the afternoon, while Panet, O’Halloran, Pont and 
Burstall II kept the score and telegraph. Following are thescores: 


8 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Old Boys 


1st innings 

O’Halloran bid Holland. 0 

Woollcombe ct and bid Wood. 4 

Weston bid Holland. 0 

Bishop ct Thackray b Wood. 1 

Burn ct Morris b Wood. 9 

Maunsell ct Tremain b Holland ... 17 

Davis ct Reiffenstein b Holland 1 

A. Cox b Holland. 3 

F. Cox run out. 3 

Crocket ct Sladen b Wood. 1 

Butterworth not out. 0 

Extras. 5 


Total. 44 


Ashbury 


2nd innings 

ct and bid Thackray 

ct and bid Thackray. 

ct Creeth bid Rhoades .... 

run out. 

b Rhoades. 

run out . 

st Reiffenstein b Holland. . 

b Holland. 

b Holland. 

not out.. 

b Rhoades. 

Extras. 

Total . 


4 

0 

13 

3 

1 

6 

0 

8 

0 

0 

0 

17 

59 


Sladen ct. Cox b. Weston. 0 

Reiffenstein b. Weston. 0 

D. C. Wood ct. Crocket b. Weston 1 

Holland ct. Maunsell b. Weston. 31 

N. A. Creeth ct. Maunsell b. Cox. 12 

MacMahon b. Cox. 42 

H. G. Rhoades ct. Maunsell b. Weston 18 

Thackray ct. Maunsell b. Weston. 0 

Morris b. Weston 0 

Tremain b. Cox. 11 

Burstall, not out 0 

Extras . 22 

Total. 137 


“THE CAPTAIN 


» 9 


it was with very mixed feeling that the school said “good¬ 
bye” to our “Captain”. We all realized that a soldier’s place is 
at the front at this critical time, and we wished him God speed, 
and a happy return, but it was hard to part with him. He, more 
than any other member of the Staff, in the seven years that he has 
been with us, has made himself a part of Ashbury. He has be¬ 
come the warm friend and confident of all—men and boys alike— 
and he has identified himself with every activity, in sport and 
work that has distinguished the school. 

In 1894, the Captain left Sandhurst and was gazetted in the 
Sixty-sixth Regiment, now the Royal Berkshires. In 99, he 
volunteered for South Africa in the Twenty-third Mounted In¬ 
fantry. At the end of the war the Captain returned to England 
with five bars to his medal, i. e. South Africa 1901, South Africa 

1902, Cape Colony, Orange River Colony and Transvaal. In 

1903, he came to Canada, and joined our staff five years later as 
Secretary-Treasurer. 

Outside the school the Captain has hosts of friends who will 
join with us in wishing him speedy distinction in the field of 
honour to which he has so gallantly gone. To Mrs. Weston, 
whose harder lot is that of staying at home, we extend our sin¬ 
cere sympathy; and we are confident that her well known cour¬ 
age and fortitude will now stand her in good stead. 












































THE ASHBURIAN 


11 


CADET CORPS INSPECTION. 

Number three section, under Cadet Sergeant J. C. Reiffen- 
stein, was awarded the cup for the best drilled section at the 
annual inspection of the Cadet Corps, by Col. Gwynn, director of 
cadet services for Canada, and Capt. Willis O’Connor. The cup 
was donated by Lt.-Col. J. W. Woods. In making the award the 
judges were very warm in their commendation of the efficiency 
of the entire corps. Their drilling was up to a very high stan¬ 
dard, and it was with difficulty that they made the decision. 
The corps was commanded by Cadet Captain W. M. Irvin, and 
the other officers were Cadets Lieuts. D. MacMahon and R. 
MacLaren. Great credit for the success of the organization in 
its inspection test is due to Sergt.-Major A. G. Turner, the drill 
instructor of the college. 


VALC ARTIER. 



VALCARTIER CONTINGENT. 

Back Bow: W. P. Muirhead. G. Birkett. C. G. Wood. A. L. Code. 

Front Row: R. Maclaren. G. Ross. R. L. Sladen. R. S. Morris. 

September 1914.—We are not likely to forget it. When we, 
the lucky eight cadets from Ashbury were picked to go—we re¬ 
joiced—and felt sorry for the poor beggars left behind. Sub¬ 
sequent experiences often made us wonder if we or they were the 
fortunate ones. The camp itself is high and windswept—hot by 
day and freezing by night. We slept on the ground—four in a 
tent—three blankets apiece and a blessed Balaklava bonnet. We 
dressed to go to bed and undressed to get up. That is—in the 



12 


THE ASHBUEIAN 


day we wore our uniforms—at night our uniforms plus every 
other available rag in the tent. Then we were fairly warm, but 
the turning out on a black wet midnight to deliver telegrams 
through three miles of tents—roads deep in mud well, these 
were the occasion for wondering why the mischief we had come. 

The meals too were something we could never quite forget. 
It was curious to see the cook tenderly fingering a piece of meat, 
sling it on a dish, and throw both at you. But it tasted good 
just the same. After every meal we always besieged the ice¬ 
cream tent and (in spite of the fact that we had been frozen 
the night before) guzzled to our hearts’ content. 

We were always undecided whether to salute an officer or 
not. We had a vague idea that we should, but whenever we saw 
one coming our way, we found a convenient boot-lace to tie up, 
or a particularly interesting object to look at. One of our fel¬ 
lows had to take some telegrams to Col. Hughes. When there, 
he discovered half a dozen officers on the verandah. Our chap 
thought he would be very soldiery, so he saluted. Unfortunately 
in his ardour he knocked off his hat, to the no small amusement 
of the officers. He vowed that never again would he salute. 

We fondly imagined when we left Ashbury that we should 
have a cinch at the camp, but we were wrong. From 9 a. m. 
till 10.30 p. m., we were on duty. No football team in training 
worked harder. At 10.30 p. m., we turned in—selecting the 
softest rocks on the tent floor on which to sleep. But someone 
always managed to find an amusing story to keep us awake, till 
all hours. We were expected to get up at 5.30, but usually slept 
through Reveille. It was then that we envied the fellows at 
school in their warm beds with an hour and ahalf still to enjoy. Our 
portion was a wash in water at about 32° F. So much for the 
hardships and inconvenience. The whole affair impressed us 
much. To see some thirty-five thousand men under canvas at 
one place was impressive. To notice that perfect order pre¬ 
vailed in this vast camp wes impressive. To realize that the 
whole human machine could be directed and controlled by one 
man was more impressive than all. The inspections on Sundays 
by the Duke, of the whole force helped us to realize the magnitude 
of the effort that Canada is making in doing her share towards 
Imperial defence. Thirty-five thousand men on the move to¬ 
gether past a given point give one an idea of the force and impact 
of an army corps thrown against the ranks of the enemy. 

We had the advantage of seeing most of the troops leaving 
the camp for Quebec. When nearly all were gone, the day ar¬ 
rived for our own departure. We had spent just two weeks in 
camp, and had enjoyed experience immensely. We would not 
have missed it for worlds, at the same time two weeks was long 
enough. In the event of another Canadian Contingent being 
sent others at Ashbury are only too anxious to go through the 
same experience, endure the same hardships, and learn the same 
useful lessons, as we— 


The Lucky Eight. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


13 


FOOTBALL, PROSPECTS. 

Though by the time this magazine appears, we shall be half 
way through the football season, it is perhaps not entirely useless 
to comment on our prospects. 

Whilst the practices during the first fortnight of the season 
were considerably interfered with by the absence of our Val- 
cartier contingent, the past week has seen all our players in uni¬ 
form, and it is now possible to form an estimate of those who are 
likely to find places in the first team. 

Of old colours, we still have MacLaren I, our Captain, 
Carling I, Carling II, Code, Rivers, Muirhead, Blakeney I and 
Wood, and whilst we have lost such stalwarts as Graham, Cory, 
Patterson, Chanonhouse and Hazen in the line, and Holland, 
Thackeray and Reiffenstein in the back division, still the array of 
talent that makes itself increasingly evident with every practice 
enables us to feel very optimistic with regard to our chances of 
retaining the football cup. It must be remembered, too, that 
Mr. Phillips is again coaching the team and his skill in making 
the best of the material at his disposal is sufficient in itself to 
inspire confidence. 

To begin with the back division, Carling II will doubtless 
fill the centre-half position and do most of the kicking. He runs 
more strongly then ever, and with his powerful hand-off, is a 
most difficult man to tackle when well under way—we look to 
him for many points. For the positions on either side of him, 
we have Edward, Hennessy, Blakeney I and Birkett II, and it 
will be a difficult matter to determine who must be left out. 
Perhaps, the difficulty may be partly solved by moving Hennessy 
up into the line. He runs strongly, tackles lustily and is bound 
to be useful in almost any position. Edward has improved 
tremendously since last year, and with a little more practice in 
catching and passing ought to be one of the finds of the season. 
At flying-wing Rivers is his old elusive self, and his tackling is 
as vigorous and as certain as ever. Birkett I promises to be a 
distinct success at quarter as he is quick with the ball, and dis¬ 
plays intelligence in the calling of signals. Coming to the line, 
we have last year’s wing men in MacLaren I and Carling I 
with their speed and tackling ability, we hope to see but few of 
our opponents half-back plays allowed to develope. Code will, 
doubtless retain his place at right-middle—he tackles hard and 
stops bucks well—but it is difficult at present to say who will get 
the corresponding position on the left. Wood who played several 
times last year, and Thoburn, who is light but tackles finely, look 
to have the best chances. The insides are likely to be Muirhead 
and MacMahon, two heavy men who ought to prove useful suc¬ 
cessors to Graham and Patterson, the leaders of the bucks for last 
year’s team. Hart has been playing in the centre scrimmage 
position so far, and seems certain to retain it, but the right and 
left positions look fairly open. Bate, Sladen I, Morris, Bryson 
and Colpman have all claims to be considered. 


14 


THE ASHBURIAN 


A very good game was played on Saturday, October 3rd, 
between the Day-boys and Boarders, Though the former won 
by the large score of 39 points to 5, still the game was by no means 
so one-sided as this would seem to indicate. The Boarders, how¬ 
ever, seemed unable to stop Carling II who was in great form, 
whilst Blakeney I scored a touch-down after a fine run through 
broken field. 


TENNIS. 



J. N. Maclaren, 
Champion, 1914. 


Tennis "boomed” more than ever in Ashbury this year, the 
amount of keenness shown being even greater than that of last 
year. The number of courts was increased from three to four, 
and these were always in constant use—in fact sometimes double 
that number could easily have been filled. Mr. Wiggins began 
to get used to the never-ending "May I have a court, Sir ?” before 
the term ended, but when this question was one day asked him 
when he was indisposed and had retired to bed he began to show 
signs of irritation—the velocity of the questioner’s exit is not 
recorded. 

The standard of play this year was considerably higher than 
than usual, some of the intermediates especially showing signs of 
making really good players. In addition to the three usual tourna¬ 
ments a handicap singles tournament was played on Ascension 
Day, in which some members of the staff tcok part, and for which 
Mr. Woollcombe very kindly presented a cup. Mr. Wood did 
well to score 17 games with the rather alarming handicap of 
"owe 50”, and Crocket accomplished an excellent performance 








THE ASHBURIAN 


15 


in being the only competitor to beat him. As usual, Code and 
MacLaren II were the finalists, and an excellent match was won 
by Code after he had lost the first set. MacLaren is too young, 
at present, to stand the strain of a hard final after playing tourna¬ 
ment games all the afternoon. 

The Open Singles, for which a Challenge Cup was presented, 
produced some good matches, that between MacMahon and 
Irvin being, perhaps, the closest. But like last year, Code and 
Maclaren II had no difficulty in making their way to the final, 
and a repetition of the splendid match of last year was eagerly 
anticipated. Code, however, appeared to be indisposed and 
the outcome of the match did not seem of enormous consequence 
to him, with the result that Maclaren II won in a canter. Mac- 
laren’s name has been engraved on the Challenge Cup for 1913 
and 1914, as it was last year that the tennis started with Mr. 
Wiggins presiding. Should he again be successful for the next 
two years, he will keep the cup, according to the conditions under 
which the cup w'as donated. 

Open Singles. 


• Maclaren II 
7-5, 6-2. 


J 


The Senior and Junior Doubles were each played in two 
sections, owing to the large increase in the number of entries. 
It was satisfactory to see the back-markers win in each case, 
Code and Maclaren doing especially well to win from ‘"owe 40”, 
the following are the score sheets. 


Prelim. Round. IV. Round. 2nd Round 


nprri L-i 1 tria i . 


Montgomery II 
v. 

Reiffenstein 

Jackson 

v. 

Balfe 


Montgomery II 
7-5 


[- Jackson 
6-2 

Birkett II 
v. 

Barwis 

Maclaren II 
v. 

Graham 

Morris 

v. 

Goldstein 


Code 

v. 

Treinain 

Crocket 


v. 

Sladen 

MacMahon 

v. 

O’Connor 

Davidson 

v. 

Irvin 


j- Jackson 

I 6-0 


Barwis 

6-3 


Maclaren II 


I' Barwis 
| 8 - 10 , 6 - 2 , 
I 6-3 


J 6-2 

1 

Morris 
J 6-3 


Code 

6-3 


• Crocket 
6-3 


Code 

6 - 1 , 6-1 


1 


MacMahon 1 
6-2 


1 


Irvin 

6-4 


[■ MacM ,yioii 
| 5-7. d-6, 
6-4 


f Maclaren I 
6-0, 6-2 


}■ Maclaren II 
6 - 2 , 6-2 


Code 
6 - 0 , 6 - 











16 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Handicap Singles 

Handicap Names Total 

Owe 50 Mr. Wood . 17 

Owe 30 Mr. Wiggins. 10 

Owe 15 MacLaren II. 19 

Scratch MacMahon . 11 

Scratch Crocket. 11 

15 Graham . 6 

15 Barwis. 10 

Owe 30 Mr. Creeth. 11 

Owe 15 Mr. Rhoades. 10 

Owe 15 Code. 18 

3 2 15 Morris . 11 

15 Tremain. 11 

15 Reiffenstein. 13 

15 Hazen. 10 

Final: Code beat MacLaren: 4-6, 6-3, 6-3. 

Handicap Senior Doubles 

Handicap Names Tota 

Owe 40 Code and MacLaren II. 28 

Owe 15 Reiffenstein and Crocket. 13 

Owe 3^ 15 MacMahon and Graham .. 22 

Owe Y 15 Goldstein and Barwis. 19 

15 Irwin and Hennessy I . 21 

15 Chanonhouse and Holland. 17 

Owe 30 Jackson and Sladen. 14 

Owe Y 15 Carling II and Birkett II . 27 

Owe Y 15 Morris and Davidson. 12 

Yi 15 Birkett I and O’Connor. 24 

3^ 15 Tremain and Echlin. 24 

15 Palmer and Aylen. 19 

Final : Code and MacLaren II beat Carling II and Birkett II 7-5, 6-4. 

Handicap Junior Doubles. 

Handicap Names Total 

Owe 1^40 Taschereau I and O’Halloran. 30 

Owe 30 Lowe and Van Meter. 17 

Owe Yi 15 Kingsmill and Smith. 27 

Scratch Burstall I and Hamilton. 9 

3/2 15 Dunnet and Dickinson. 22 

15 Burnstall and Tamplet. 15 

Semi-final: Panet and Moore beat Armstrong and Woollcombe I, 6-4. 

Handicap Names Total 

Owe 30 Blackeney II and Small... 23 

Owe 15 Mulligan and Gill. 17 

Owe Yz 15 Panet and Moore. 26 

Owe 3^ 15 Taylor and Murphy. 15 

Scratch Armstrong and Woollcombe I . 26 

Yi 30 Brennan and Ritchie. 13 

Final: Taschereau I and O’Halloran beat Panet and Moore, 6-4, 6-1. 










































ATHLETICS 





TRACK TEAM, 1914. 

H. Ivuntz. J. W. Hennsssy. D. MacMahon. W. P. Muirhead. H. E. Graham 
L. B. Carling. R. Maclaren. J. B. Carling. J. M. Hazen. 

INTER SCHOOL TRACK MEET. 

The third meet of the League, consisting of Lower Canada 
College, Ashbury College and St. Alban's School took place this 
year at Brockville. 

In spite of the fact that the grounds were not perhaps all 
that might have been desired for the purpose, the events were 
keenly contested, and the times, heights and distances made 
very creditable. 

Below follows a list of the events and winners: 

Events. 

100 Yards 

1st. MacLaren— Ashbury College. 

2nd. Miller—St. Albans. Time: 10 3-5 Seconds. 
















































18 


THE ASHBURIAN 


High Jump — 

1st. Merrit— Lower Canada College. 

2nd. Hazen—Ashbury College tied with Wells—Lower 
Canada. Time: 4 Minutes, 10 1-4 Seconds. 

880 Yards — 

1st. Flanagan— Lower Canada College. 

2nd. Symonds—Lower Canada College. Time: 2 Min¬ 
utes, 14 3-5 Seconds. 

220 Yards — 

1st. MacLaren— Ashbury College. 

2nd. Millar—St. Albans. Time: 24 Seconds. 

Long Jump — 

1st. Farthing— Lower Canada College. 

2nd. Molson—Lower Canada College. Time: 19 Min¬ 
utes, 1 3-4 Seconds. 

440 Yards — 

1st. Symonds—L. C. .C 

2nd. Miller—St. Albans. Time: 55 Seconds. 

1 Mile — 

1st. Flanagan.— Lower Canada College. 

2nd. Scaife.—Lower Canada College. Time: 5 Min¬ 
utes, 37 3-5 Seconds. 

Hurdles — 

1st. Farthing.— Lower Canada College. 

2nd. MacLaren.—Ashbury. Time: 18 Seconds. 

Relay — 

1st. Lower Canada College. 

2nd. St. Albans. 

Thus Lower Canada won the Cup presented by C. S. 
bery Esq., Ashbury coming second, and St. Albans third. 


SPOR1S DAY. 

Three boys divide the title of Ashbury College champion for 
1914, A. L. Code, H. L. Holland and A. R. MacLaren, all three 
scoring eight points in the school sports. 

Fine weather attracted large numbers of the relatives and 
friends of the boys, and also a number of the “Old Boys”. The 
events were all keenly contested as the result for the senior cham¬ 
pionship will show. 

The intermediate honours went to R. B. M. Small, and the 
Junior to F. Valleau. Code captured the mile after a spirited 
battle with W. P. Muirhead, and also beat the school record by 
going the distance in 5 minutes, 16 seconds. 

Two of the most remarkable times ever recorded in any 
school sports were run by Roy Maclaren and Holland, the former 
winning the 220 yard dash in 22 seconds, and the latter the 100 
yard dash in 10 1-5 seconds. The high jump also went to Mac¬ 
laren with a record jump of 5 feet, 1 inch. 

The result of the events were as follows: 






THE ASHBURIAN 


19 


Seniors. 

100 Yards — 

1. H. L. Holland. 2. A. R. Maclaren. Time: 10 1-5 Seconds. 
Pole Vault — 

1. A. L. Code. 2. H. L. Holland. Height: 8 feet, 6y 2 in. 
One Mile —■ 

1. A. L. Code. 2. W. P. Muirhead. Time: 5 Minutes, 
16 1-5 Seconds. 

220 Yards — 

1. A. R. Maclaren. 2. H. L. Holland. Time: 22 Seconds. 
880 Yards — 

1. A. L. Code. 2. H. Kuntz. Time: 2 Minutes, 19 3-5 Sec. 
High Jump — 

1. A. R. Maclaren. 2. H. E. Graham and W. M. Irvin. 
Height: 5 Feet, 1 Inch. 

440 Yards _ 

1. A. L. Code. 2. H. L. Holland. Time: 58 1-5 Seconds. 
Long Jump — 

1. H. L. Holland. 2. A. R. Maclaren. Distance: 17 Feet, 
6 Inches. 

19f) Vnrr 1 <i PIiiTfllp _ 

1. A. R. Maclaren. 2. H. L. Holland. Time: 16 1-5 Sec. 


Intermediate. 

Long Jump — 

1. R. B. M. Small. 2. B. J. Lowe. 14 Feet, 9^2 Inches. 
100 Yards — 

1. R. Small. 2. B. J. Lowe. Time: 12 1-5 Seconds. 

High Jump — 

1. R. Small. 2. K. M. Hill. Height: 4 Feet, 4}A Inches. 
220 Yards _ 

1. B. J. Lowe. 2. C. H. Goldstein. Time: 26 2-5 Seconds. 
440 Yards — 

1. C. H. Goldstein. 2. E. Taylor. Time: 65 3-5 Seconds. 


Junior. 

High Jump — 

1. F. Valleau. 2. E. T. Gill. Height: 3 Feet, 10 Inches. 
220 Yards _ 

1. F. Valleau. 2. E. T. Gill. Time: 28 4-5 Seconds. 

440 Yards — 

1. F. Valleau. 2. B. H. Dickinson. Time: 72 1-5 Seconds. 
100 Yards — 

1. F. Valleau. 2. B. H. Dickinson. Time: 13 3-5 Seconds. 
Three-Legged Race (Open)— 

1. Gill and Valleau. 2. Maclaren and Graham. 

Old Boys’ Race (440 Yards)— 

1. D. F. Verner. 2. P. Woollcombe. Time: 62 2-5 Seconds. 
Old Boys’ Race (100 Yards)— 

1. H. Bate. 2. H. W. Davis and J. Woods. Time: 11 3-5 
Seconds. 



SCHOOL NOTES 



Acting upon the advice of his physician, the Headmaster 
submitted himself to a serious operation during the close of the 
Summer Term. For this reason, for the first time in the history 
of the school the closing exercises took place without his presence. 
It is with the greatest satisfaction that we again find him back 
amongst us—better and stronger than ever before. 

May 21st last, being the Headmaster’s birthday, the school 
was given a half-holiday in honour of the occasion. A handicap 
singles tennis tournament took place, the result of which will be 
found on another page. 

On September 17th, the week of the Ottawa Exhibition, the 
school was given an opportunity of visiting this ever attractive 
Fair. A joyous afternoon was spent among the various side¬ 
shows and midway. Enjoyment—if not instruction—was derived 
by all. 

While in the vicinity of Montreal this summer Mr. Hooper 
had the luck to discover a German wireless in operation, in a 
secluded part of the country. For weeks the movement of ship¬ 
ping in the harbour had been relayed to the Germans. This 
station was one of four that were found, and dismantled by the 
authorities. 

His many friends will be pleased to learn that Sgt.-Mgr. 
Huggins, musketry instructor at the Ottawa Collegiate, formerly 
of Highfield School and the 13th Royal Regiment, Hamilton, is 
sailing with the Canadian forces with the rank of adjutant. 

Sgt.-Mjr. Turner, of the Governor-General’s Foot Guards, 
our own instructor, also goes to the front as assistant adjutant, 
with the rank of Lieutenant. 

It is not curious that amongst our “Old Boys” at Valcartier 
and at the front are to be found the experts of their years in rifle 
shooting. 

The names of Parker, Sparks, Barwis, Woollcombe, etc., 
suggest that the enemy may find our shooting uncomfortably 
good. 

After a year’s leave of absence Mr. Hooper has returned to 
his duties as House Master. 

Mr. Wiggins proceeded to the degree of M. A., at Oxford 
during the summer. 

The suddenness of Captain Weston’s departure for the front 
prevented the school from carrying out their wish of making him 
a present as evidence of their warm friendship before he left. 
Some of the seniors, however, on their own initiative hurried to 
Birks, and secured for him a beautiful gold wrist-watch. This 










































THE ASHBURIAN 


21 


was engraved suitably at lightning speed, and the determined 
band of Seniors pursued and captured the Captain just before he 
left for New York. The presentation was made on behalf of the 
school, and the Captain was delighted. 

In response to a hurry-up call from the Minister of Militia 
for eight recruits from Ashbury to serve as bicycle messengers at 
big Quebec Camp, every member of our Cadet Corps (that is, 
more than half the school) instantly volunteered for service. 
The difficulty was to choose the lucky eight. However, the re¬ 
jected ones took their disappointment well; and our warriors 
departed with the best of good wishes from every other boy in 
the school. 

Probably, nothing that the Minister has yet done could have 
pleased the Cadets more than did this call to camp. They have 
not seen actual warfare, but they have learned an immense 
amount about a real military mobilization. 


VALETE-SAL VETE. 

Owing to the new regulations made by the Directors with 
regard to day-boys, the following lists apply only to Boarders. 

Valete. 

W. M. Irvin .—Came September, 1907. Football Team,1911-12. 
Hockey Team, 1912. Track Team, 1912. Captain Cadet 
Corps, 1914. 

J. W. Hennessy. Came Sept. 1910. Hockey Team 1912-13-14, 
Captain 1913-14. Football Team 1913. Colour Sergeant 
Cadet Corps 1914. Track Team 1914. 

H. E. Graham. Came Sept. 1911. Football Team 1912-13. 
Track Team 1913-14. Cricket Team 1914. Shooting Team 
1914. Winner of Bate Cup and Daughters of the Empire 
Rifle 1914. 

J. C. Reiffenstein. Came Sept. 1911. Football team 1913. 
Hockey Team 1914. Cricket Team 1913-14. Shooting 
Team 1914. Passed into McGill (applied science) 1914. 
J. M. Hazen. Came Sept. 1912. Football Team 1913. Track 
Team 1914. Passed 16th into R. M. C. 1914. 

H. L. Holland. Came January 1913. Joint Holder Athletic 
Championship 1913 and 1914. Football Team 1913. Shoot¬ 
ing Team 1914. Passed 21st into R. M. C. 1914. 

R. W. Patterson. Came Sept. 1909. Football Team 1912-13. 
J. H. Chanonhouse. Came Sept. 1911. Football Team 1913. 

A. J. Balfe. Came January 1914. 

B. J. Lowe. Came September 1908. 



22 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Salvete. 

F. L. Campbell. Matric Form. 

G. F. Benson. R. M. C. Form. 
W. D. Bepson. R. .M C. Form. 
K. C. Bryson. Form V. 

J. H. Gibbs. Form V. 

J. W. McLimont. Form V. 

E. A. G. Gorman. Form IV. 

W. H. Colpman. Form IV. 

E. McL. Fowler. Form IV. 

G. E. Scott. Form IV. 

P. Fleming. Form III. 

V. Parker. Form III. 

W. G. Graham. Form. I. 


OUR CONTEMPORARIES 

The editor acknowledges with thanks the receipts of the fol¬ 
lowing magazines: 

Meteor (3); Wykehamist (3); Cheltonian (3); Tonbridgian; Up¬ 
pingham School Magazine(2); Felstedian; Bradfield College Chron¬ 
icle; T. C. S. Record (2); St. Andrew’s College Review; High School 
Times; Albanian; Vox Lycei; Black and Red. 


Bryson-Graham 

Limited 

At the Corner of Sparks and O’Connor Sts. 


Of Great Interest and Significance 
Is The Wonderful Variety and 
Evident Reliability of The 
Merchandise in this Store 

Buy it at the Bryson-Graham Store is both an 
invitation and a guarantee. Pay us a visit 

MEN’S AND BOY’S CLOTHING 
BOOKS AND STATIONERY 
SCHOOL SUPPLIES 
PENNANTS 
BOOTS AND SHOES 
HATS AND CAPES 
GROCERIES AND CANDIES 
GLOVES AND SOCKS 
SHIRTS AND TIES 
TRUNKS AND BAGS 

All Ottawa Street Cars Pass Our Store Doors 


Bryson-Graham Limited 










-|)L 

ifmiJjtim faff 

1-3-4 

SparKs St. 

College iimtt# 

'pHIS store stands for a 
definite ideal in clothes 

for young gentlemen. 

Q Let us show you how 
long years of effort have 
this the clothing home of 

Ottawa’s better dressed 

young men. 


1 

Jf tier’s 



ASHBURY COLLEGE 
IS HEATED WITH 

CORNELL’S COAL 

OFFICE: 

THE CORNELL ANTHRACITE 
MINING CO., LIMITED 

121 BANK ST. QUEEN 4275 

MINES: BERNICE, PA. 




















Editors: 


Mr. P. H. P. Woollcombe (1900), Ashbury College, 
Rockliffe, Ottawa, Ontario. 

Mr. R. H. Morgan (1902), 18 Chislett Street, 

Brockville, Ontario. 

Artist: 

Mr. A. B. Beddoe (1909), 311 Stewart Street, 

Ottawa, Ontario. 

Secretary Old Boys Association: 

Mr. Louis T. White (1891), 4 Rideau Apartments, 
Ottawa, Ontario. 

EDITORIAL. 

One Year's work Completed. 

Three issues of the Old Boys' Ashburian have passed 
through the press and this section now seems firmly rooted as a 
supplement to the school magazine. With this, the fourth issue, 
our first year's work is completed. 

Whatever may be the real facts of the case, the Old Boys' 
Ashburian has been given every reason to believe that its efforts 
to form a link connecting former Ashburians with the old school 
and old associates have met with a gratifying success. If the 
praise which has from time to time greeted the appearance of the 
Old Boys' Ashburian bears any weight, then the members of 
staff feel fully recompensed for their labour of love, and that the 
establishment of this as a separate section of the school magazine 
has been amply justified. The Old Boys' Ashburian has come 
— and come to stay. 






































































24 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Whether the same success will attend the publication of this 
issue is yet to be seen. Although the staff has suffered a serious 
depletion through the war, and the issue of this section becomes 
largely a one-man job for this session at least, “Business as Usual” 
has been adopted as our slogan, and it is to be hoped that matters 
will run with the same smoothness as heretofore. 

As opposed to this, however, it must also be borne in mind 
that the activities of Old Boys in this time of war have provided 
an abundance of “copy”, and “copy” is what the Old Boys' 
Ashburian wants. To tell who former Ashburians are and what 
they are doing is the mission of the Old Boys’ AshburIan, and 
this mission is being fulfilled to the best of out ability. A certain 
amount of co-operation from the Old Boys themselves is, however, 
necessary for its complete accomplishment. Old Boys are again 
reminded that contributions, whether of personal experiences or 
of the doings of other Old Boys, are always most welcome upon 
the editorial copy-hook or in the hands of the secretary of the Old 
Boys Association. News-gathering when the news-owners are 
scattered from one end of the Dominion to the other, is not the 
easiest or most encouraging of tasks. 

Ashburians At The Front. 

Old Ashburians showed the stuff they are made of in their 
ready response to the colours when Canada was called upon to do 
her share in the defence of the Empire. It must indeed be most 
encouraging and at the same time a source of considerable grati¬ 
fication to those who have had charge of the training of successive 
groups of Ashburians to know that in the hour of the Empire’s 
trial, Ashbury’s sons were not found wanting and were ready to 
take part in fighting the battles of Right against Might. 

Several Old Boys saw service on the veldt of South Africa 
at a time when the school may be said to have been in its childhood, 
and those who have now voluntered for overseas service may be 
depended to render an equally good account of themselves. 

The best wishes of every old Ashburian are with them. 

EDITORIAL NOTES 

Every Old Boy must join with the Old Boys’ Ashburian 
in congratulating the Headmaster upon his recovery from his 
recent illness. That renewed strength and vigor may be his is 
the earnest wish of all. 

It is to her Old Boys that Ashbury looks for her most valuable 
advertising. It would be well for them to remember this. One 
word from an Old Boy at the proper time may do more to promote 
Ashbury’s interests that a column of newspaper or magazine 
advertising. 

The Olb Boys’ Ashburian believes that it but voices the 
sentiment general among Old Boys of the past few years when it 


THE ASHBURIAN 


25 


says that none more than they sincerely regret the severance of 
Mr. Wood’s connection with the school. The relations of the 
Old Boys’ Ashburian with him, both as secretary-treasurer of 
the Ashburian and as a member of the teaching staff were always 
most cordial. 


Old Ashburians Fighting For Their Country 


J. Allan 

P. Woollcombe 

H. Bate 

J. Arnoldi 

A. B. Beddoe 

Trennick Bate 

C. A. Billings 

C. T. Beard 

D. Blair 

P. S. Benoit 

G. H. Burbidge 

W. Brooks 

G. C. Chrysler 

C. Chipman 

C. P. Cotton 

F. H. Codville 

C. Critchley 

L. W. S. Cockburn 

S. Critchley 

J. Eliot 

G. Carling 

H. N. Fraser 

C. S. Fleming 

M. K.Greene 

F. E. Gendron 

E. Gorman 

A. U.Gilmour 

R. S. Maclvor 

V. W...S Heron 

H. W. O’Connor 

D. St. G. Lindsay 

H. S. Parker 

J. B. Macphail 

L. P. Sherwood 

F. G. Orde 

R. Spain 

E. Panet 

S. Wright 

E. Sherwood 

N. A. Sparks 

D. Sladen 

0. R. Dickey 


Members of the Staff. 

C. H. B. Weston 

D. E. C. Wood 

V. Barrington-Kennet 


Potato-Farming to Soldiering. 

Fresh from his potato farm in Prince Edward Island, ‘'Micky” 
Macphail (1904) hurried to Kingston on the outbreak of war 
and joined the Queen’s Engineering Corps. This prompted the 
following in a Kingston newspaper: 

“Jeffrey MacPhail, son of Dr. Andrew MacPhail, of McGill 
university, spending the summer in Orwell, P. E. I., came up to 
Kingston to join the Fifth Canadian Engineers. This corps, of 
180 men, is composed of engineering students of Queen’s univer¬ 
sity, and is commanded by Prof. Alexander MacPhail, uncle of 
the young man. 


26 


THE ASHBURIAN 


His Anxiety to Enlist. 

The following paragraph has gone the rounds of the news¬ 
papers in Ottawa and elsewhere. Lieut. Bate is, of course, 
Henry Bate (1906). 

“So anxious to go to the front that he had his appendix re¬ 
moved so as to obviate the only objection raised to his enlisting. 
Lieut. H. N. Bate of Ottawa, is now convalescing in a local 
hospital. 

“Lieut. Bate who is a son of Mr. T. C. Bate, went down to 
Valcartier to enlist but was rejected because he had at one 
time been troubled with appendicitis. Lieut. Bate promptly 
returned to Ottawa and had the offending organ removed. He is 
now convalescing and when recovered will go to the front.” 

Herbert or Howard? 

The following appeared as a news item in a Renfrew paper 
recently. The combination “H. Reid, Portage du Fort”, so 
strangely familiar, aroused the editorial curiosity to so great 
n n extent that the shears were brought into instant use. The 
Hem speaks for itself and is reproduced here simply for what it is 
worth. 

“To paddle across the Ottawa river near Portage du Fort 
with one forearm torn by a shotgun wound, was the painful 
experience of Mr. H. Reid of that place on Tuesday of this week. 

“The young man had been trolling in the river and had 
brought a shot-gun with him in the canoe. He attempted to land 
on the Ontario shore and took hold of the gun by the muzzle to 
pull it out of the canoe, when in some manner the hammer fell, 
exploding the charge in one barrel. The shot lacerated the under 
part of his arm, but at the time he did not think he was badly hurt. 

“He decided to paddle across the river and reach home if pos¬ 
sible. Twice on the way he was seized by weak turns and was 
forced to lie down in the bottom of the canoe. On landing at the 
Portage side, he bound up his arm as best he could with a piece 
of his shirt and then started to walk home. A lady met him and 
drove him to his house. The same evening he was brought to 
Renfrew and then removed to the hospital in Ottawa. 

“The wound will not prove dangerous, it is said, unless blood 
poisoning sets in.” 

We Wonder. .. 

If Boyd still writes poetry. 

If Eckstein remembers the egg-smashing incident. 

If he could a tale unfold as to those missing detention books. 

If the score at that Ashbury-Lennoxville match has ever 
been accurately determined. 

If anyone recalls the Court of Star Chamber, which held its 
sessions daily from twelve to one o’oclock. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


27 


IftHarolf Gooch has seen his little revolver since its confisc¬ 
ation by Mr. Monti.bert. 

Whether a certain would-be secret society known as the 
B. C. S. is still in existence and who walked off with the funds. 

If Wallace Logan has developed into a Grand Opera star, 
and if he remembers the Chemistry Choir. 

Why the electric bells at the Argyle avenue school were alway 
getting out of order, and if that enterprising firm of contractors, 
Messrs. Macphail, Combe and Reid had anything to do with it. 

What has happened to “Towser”, beloved of “Tubby” Bate. 
And if Palmer Wright’s equally celebrated canine is still in exist¬ 
ence. 

What last resting place Mr. Hartly Stanfield’s gramophone 
has found. 

If “warble” continues to be popular at Ashbury. 

If Captain Weston cherishes any fond recollections of de¬ 
tention drill in the old gymnasium. 

If the identity of the ghost in the cupboard of the old fifth 

form has ever been firmly established. Did Charlie FI-g 

know anything about it. 

If Charlie Anderson now buys pencils for himself or still 
relies upon the generosity of his classmates. 

Just how many “me aunts” and “me uncles” Herbie Reid 
had in Ottawa. 

If the curio-hunters are still hot-foot after Randy White’s 
little red waistcoat and Murray Greene’s multi color ties. 

How many day boys used to come to the closing for the sole 
purpose of seeing how much ice cream they could devour. 


OLD BOYS’ NOTES. 


That Ashbury will be well represented upon the home de¬ 
fence companies which are being organized throughout the 
Dominion composed of business men and others seems assured. 
A glance through the lists of members of these organizations 
reveals many names familiar to old Ashburians. 

Old Ashburians promise to be as conspicuous as usual upon 
the football field this season. Several of those who built up a 
reputation in the great autumn game in Canada have, however, 
gone to the front. 

Thd Old Boys’ Ashburian is looking forward to the re¬ 
ceipt of some interesting communications from the Old Boys 
at the front. 





28 


THE ASHBURIAN 


The colony of Old Boys at McGill will be augmented this 
year by the addition of J. C. Reiffenstein (1912), and H. C. Gooch 
(1908), who enter Science ’18, and L. E. Sample (1911) who be¬ 
comes a med. “freshie”. Both passed their matriculation exam, 
in June. 

Lieut. Murray Greene (1903) was in charge of the classes of a 
physical .culture and military training course for school teachers 
and others at Kingston this summer. At the close of the course 
the students with whom he was very popular presented him with a 
handsome souvenir of the occasion. 

Spencer L. Dale Harris (1895), who is in successful practice 
as an advocate in Montreal, is also lecturer in Commercial Law 
in the Department of Commerce at McGill. 

Married. On June 10, 1914, at St. James Church, Hull, 
Quebec, by the Rev. Canon Smith, Clifford R. Mereweather 
(1900), to Rosa, eldest daughter of Sheriff and Mrs. C. M. Wright, 

Born. At Kingston, on September 16, 1914, to Mr. (1896), 
and Mrs. Noel Sandford Fleming, a daughter. 

When war broke out, the Royal Canadian Regiment was in 
camp near Toronto with Lieut. Victor W. S. Heron (1892), of the 
10th Royal Grenadiers attached to the Regiment for training. 
When the R. C. R. went to Valcartier, Lieut. Heron accompanied 
it, and also proceeded to Bermuda with it to relieve the British 
garrison there. It is expected that the R. C. R. will ultimately 
reach the scene of conflict in Europe, as despatches indicate that 
after a time it will in turn be replaced in Bermuda by another 
Canadian Regiment. 

Included in the names of those receiving degrees at McGill 
this year are found three Old Boys, J. B. Macphail (1904) took 
his B. A., with second rank honours in Mathematics and Physics; 
H. P. Wright, B. A., (1903) received the degree of M. D., C. M., 
with honours in Pathology; while Grey Masson (1908), is now a 
full-fledged B. Sc. Dr. Wright is now a member of the medical 
staff of the Montreal General Hospital. 

Old Ashburians who graduated from R. M. C. this year are: 
Corporal Leslie K. Greene (1906) who passed fifth, securing a 
diploma with honours; Sergeant C. W. A. Barwis (1903), fifteenth; 
Lance-Corporal N. A. Sparks, (1904) twenty-seventh; and 
Lance-Corporal H. S. Parker (1908), twenty-ninth. “Bug” 
Greene was successful in capturing the Alliance Francaise French 
prize, and the handicap squash racquet and tennis singles chal¬ 
lenge cups. Barwis, who has proved a tower of strength to the 
Cadets' football team during the past few seasons, obtained 
commission in the Indian Army. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


29 


The splendid showing made by the R. M. C. matriculation 
candidates at the examinations held last term cannot pass with¬ 
out some mention being made in the Old Boys’ Ashburian, 

inasmuch as those who were successful-P. E. Biggar (1910), 

J. M. Hazen (1912), H. L. Holland (1912), and W. C. Thackray 
(1913) must now be counted among the Old Boys. The much- 
coveted first place secured this year by Biggar has only once 
before fallen to the lot of an Ashburian, R. S. P. Mclvor (1909) 
being the lucky one in 1910. It must also be remembered, 
however, that the first place at graduation was obtained in 1909 
by Charles E. Read (1898) another old Ashburian. 

Married. On September 29, 1914, at the Basilica, Mon¬ 
treal, Major Edouard de B. Panet (1898), of the Royal Canadian 
Artillery, to Marguerite, youngest daughter of the late J. J. P. 
Fremont, M. P., Quebec. As we go to press, Major Panet’s name 
is mentioned in a prominent way in connection with the com¬ 
mand of the French-Canadian Regiment which is to be formed to 
proceed to Europe. 

After several months’ silence as to his activities, Ezra B. 
Eddy, probably better known to the Old Boy fraternity as Ezra 
Bessey (1900) bobs up again, and this time in yet another role. 
Heretofore Ezra has confined his attention to advertising spec¬ 
ialties, and song writing, with magazine publishing as a sideline, 
but now he comes upon us as a playwright. His first work, a 
comedy in three acts, is to be produced in New York during the 
coming season. Only Ezra’s most intimate friends knew that he 
was working upon a play since November last, we are told by an 
Ottawa newspaper, as most of the writing was done in California. 
Truly, Ezra is a man of many parts. 

Probably the first taste of active service to fall to the lot of 
old Ashburians, in the present war, was experienced by the three 
old boys who are serving as cadets on H. M. S. Berwick, one of 
the vessels of the Atlantic fleet which is attending to the safety of 
British shipping in the North Atlantic. Up to the time of writing 
the captures of the Berwick are the Hamburg-American liner 
Spreewald and two colliers. The Canadians on the Berwick 
include Cadets T. S. Critchley (1909), D. St. G. Lindsay (1910), 
and H. E. Reid (1910). The Spreewald was fitted out as an 
armed cruiser, while the colliers carried 2,000 tons of coal and 
100 tons of provisions for German cruisers in Atlantic waters. 

Six years of almost constant attention to his duties in con¬ 
nection with boys’ work in Montreal has spelt ill health for Owen 
C. Dawson (1902) the popular old boy, who has held the post of 
clerk of the Montreal Juvenile Court for the past few years, and 
who is most prominent in other lines of work among the youth of 
that city. To prevent a serious breakdown in health, he has been 
ordered to leave his work in Montreal and take the rest cure in 
the country. “Doc” as he is familiarly known to many old boys, 
has devoted a great deal of attention to the Griffintown Boys’ 


30 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Club, as well as to the Boys’ Home at Shawbridge, Quebec. 
That his recovery may be a matter of only a short time is the 
wish of all Old Boys. 

Recent militia orders contain the following of interest to 
Old Ashburians: 

Fifth (The Princess Louise) Dragoon Guards-Lieutenant 

(supernumerary) E. H. McLachlin (1909), is absorbed into the 
establishment. To be Lieutenant, Palmer Howard Wright 
(1905). 

The Governor-General's Foot Guards-To be Lieutenant: 

Captain G. G. Chrysler (1894) from the Reserve of Officers; to 
be provincial lieutenant, Stuart Cameron Bate (1906); to be 
provincial lieutenant (supernumery), Charles Sandford Flem¬ 
ing (1902). 

Eighth Artillery Brigade, Ammunition Column-To be 

lieutenant, Harry Scott Parker (graduate Royal Military Col¬ 
lege) ( 1908.) 


Ashbury’s “Newspapers.” 

The Third Form at Ashbury, in the year 1907 A. D., had 
a reputation all its own, and one which the other forms said it 
might keep. This may easily be imagined when it is remembered 
that its rollcall contained the names of such celebrities as Don 
Ellard, Jack Eliot, Doug Sladen, St. Barbe Sladen, Charlie 
Eckstein and Ed. Reid, not to speak of Tubby Bate, Randy 
White and “Micky” Macphail. Besides being the largest form 
in the school numerically, the Third gained distinction in a score 
of other ways, and in The Ashburian of December, 1907, I 
find that in comment upon the institution of boxing lessons by 
Mr. Emery, it recommends them to the members of the Third 
Form, who “with their almost abnormal argumentative powers, 
backed by a practical knowledge of the useful art of self-defence 
should be able to take care of themselves.” A number of ex¬ 
masters will probably agree with me when I say that the Editor 
never wrote truer words than these, for the Third was considered 
the most troublesome form, and at the same time the least in¬ 
clined towards hard work of any description, in the school. More 
original methods of doing the least work, in the greatest possible 
time, more plans of annoying the masters were conceived and put 
into force in this form than in any other to which the writer be¬ 
longed while at Ashbury (and he spent ten years there.) 

Bower Heney and Hugh Hughson (will they smile when they 
read this ?) who occupied a desk at the rear of the classroom near 
the wall, used to keep themselves well supplied with pen nibs, at 
no cost to themselves, by the sale of a species of cement for filling 
up crevices in the desks which might catch the watchful eye of 
the master. This cement was manufactured by a unique process, 
and one which has probably not yet been registered in the Patent 
Office. Here was the Heney-Hughson recipe: 




THE ASHBURIAN 


31 


From the blackboard purloin two or three pieces of chalk, 
which, when ground into a powder, mix well with a corresponding 
quantity of plaster scraped from the wall. This mixture then 
place in an inkwell, half full of ink, the whole being thoroughly 
stirred until the ink has all been absorbed and the finished pro¬ 
duct left a light blue colour. 

This “cement” was distributed on paper throughout the 
class on payment of one pen nib and resulted quite profitably 
for the proprietors of the business, who, from their occupancy of 
the only desk in the room which was so near the wall, were en¬ 
abled to pursue their trade without opposition. 

Perhaps G. Reginald now understands why there was so 
continual a scarcity of chalk in the Third Form room. I 
should not advise any present-day Third former to tackle the 
proposition, even if the product might be made without plaster. 

It was in this Third Form, I believe, that the first “news¬ 
paper” outside The Ashburian, which first appeared in Decem¬ 
ber, 1905, was established. A certain society known as the 
B. C. S. existed among some of the younger Ashburians at that 
time, and indeed until after the move was made to the new school 
at Rockliffe. Who its members were, it would, I suppose be 
infra dig. for me to mention. Suffice to say that it was com¬ 
posed of some of the more turbulent spirits of the Third and 
held its meetings in a cave burrowed out of the ground in the 
back-yard of one of the members who lived near the school. 
This pioneer paper was at first published in connection with the 
B. C. S., and at that time was known as the B. C. S. Globe. After 
a few issues, the Globe branched out in more general lines, be¬ 
coming the Stewarton Star (Stewarton is the name of that section 
of the city of Ottawa in which the school was at that time located). 
The subscription at the commencement of publication was one 
pen nib (for some reason, best known to the members, pen nibs 
became the accepted currency of the B. C. S.). Several masters 
were known as subscribers to the Star , which in turn gave place 
to the Stewarton Eye Opener. The Eye Opener received high 
praise from The Ashburian. Here is some of it: “A volume of 
the Stewarton Eye Opener with detailed accounts of dog fights and 
baseball matches will be given in exchange for anything freakish.” 

Of course such prosperity could not go unchallenged, and by 
the fall of 1908 contemporaries began to make their appearance. 
Most noteworthy of these was a paper edited by Gordon Ruther¬ 
ford, a most ambitious sheet, which, however, enjoyed but a 
brief existence. But this paled into insignificance beside the 
Ashbury Chronicle, which appeared when Messrs. Heney and 
Morgan joined forces. Everything went swimmingly for two 
or three issues when an editorial dispute arose, in consequence of 
some hasty speech of one of the proprietors, and the result was 
that Heney broke away from the Chronicle and formed a new 
paper, the News, while Morgan continued the Chronicle. For 
some time there was the deadliest of rivalry between these papers, 
and I am afraid that the schoolwork of each editor suffered to no 


32 


THE ASHBURIAN 


small extent. Gradually, however, the News began to lose 
ground, then to skip issues and finally dropped out of the race 
altogether. The Chronicle then remained in sole possession of 
the newspaper field at Ashbury. After a time the press of duties 
became so heavy that a partner proved a necessity. Gordon 
Perley was selected and the firm became Messrs. Morgan and 
Perley. Perley had had some months’ experience as office boy 
with the celebrated “Firm” of Macphail, Combe and Reid, 
known to all Ashburians at the time, and at once took over the 
mechanical end of the Chronicle, besides acting as business 
manager, subscription solicitor, account collector and office boy. 
This partnership continued with considerable success until the 
paper discontinued publication early in 1911. 

Some of the early issues of the Chronicle make interesting 
reading to the Old Boy and would, no doubt, serve to recall 
numerous incidents in his school life which may have escaped 
his memory. The complete file of the paper, the only one, 
I venture to say, in existence, lies before me as I scribble. So far 
as I know the Chronicle was the pioneer paper of its kind at 
Ashbury, and no other has since appeared. 


Mufti. 


BY SPECIAL APPOINTMENT TO HIS EXCELLENCY 
THE GOVERNOR GENERAL 



B. SLATTERY 

IMPORTER AND MANUFACTURER OF 


FINE TABLE 

By Ward Market, Phone Q. 107 
Windsor Market, Phone Q 890 
Primrose Market, Phone Q 433 


DELICACIES 

Wellington Market, Phone Q 143 
Residence, Phone Q. 131 

Excelsior Market, Phone Q 107 


Established 1870 Telephone Rideau 2152 

GEO. E. PRESTON & SONS 

MERCHANT TAILORS 
The Young Man’s Tailor 

217-219 Rideau St. 
Ottawa 


MUSIC AND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 

We carry one of the largest and best assorted stocks of Sheet Music, 
Music Books, Musical Instruments, Strings and all accessories in 
Canada. A new stock received in September of Violins, Violincellos, 
Mandolins, etc., from Europe. 

Agents:—Gibson Mandolins, Laube, Clarinets, Boosey Band Instru¬ 
ments. Anything and everything in Music. 

McKECHNIE MUSIC COMPANY 

Orme Limited Premises 
175 Sparks Street - Ottawa 









Football Team, 1914 

















t 


Hsfjbunan 


Editorial Staff. 




Editor-in-Chief —Mr. C. H. Hooper. 

Sports —D. MacMahon, A. L. Code, T. S. Crocket. 
Shooting —R. S. Morris. 

Secretary-Treasurer —Mr. A. B. H. Wiggins. 


EDITORIAL 

With events of world-wide importance taking place, as it 
were every day; at a time when catastrophies involving the loss 
of thousands of lives through convulsions of nature hardly attract 
more than a passing attention; at moments when without warning 
we may hear of the loss of those who are dear to us- is it surprising 
that a chronicle of the sheltered lives which we lead at the College 
here should appear a little trivial, a little uninteresting. And yet 
all events are of but relative importance. There is no reason why 
the death of one hundred men should be any greater catastrophy 
than the death of one. That which affects us most is to us the 
more important event. 

In looking back at the school term which closed just before 
Christmas, one cannot help being struck by the uneventful 
steadiness of it. Only two half-holidays broke the even tenour 
of its course, not a single evening study was disturbed for any 
reason whatsoever. Nothing was allowed to interfere with the 
steady grind of work. Sports had their hours—and kept to them. 
Now this sort of thing must tell in the long run. It has. We 
are well settled in our work, and the fact that the home-stretch 
looms in front, with the exams just thirteen weeks away should 
hold no terrors for us now. We “got away to a good start” and 
will reap our reward in being able to “romp in at a canter.” 

In other things—sports for instance—we were perhaps less 
fortunate; we played good football but we lost the cup. There 
were reasons of course—some of which are humorously hinted 
at in this number—but we don’t complain. Possibly we will 
make it up in hockey. Anyway whatever we play will furnish 
the necessary health-giving exercise to keep us fit and strong 
for our work—and after all what other use is there for games. 
We come here to do certain things, to acquire certain knowledge, 
to render ourselves mentally and physically efficient for the next 
step—the University. If we accomplish this object—all our 
work, all our games, all our rewards and all our punishments are 
just so many means to an end. 




m jflemortam 

William Horsley Rowley 
Obit Jan. 12th, 1915. 

It is with very deep regret we have to record the 
sudden death of Mr. William Horsley Rowley, who 
for the past fourteen years has been President of 
the school. Mr. Rowley was largely responsible 
for the establishment of the school in Ottawa over 
twenty-three years ago, and from the day of its 
opening to the day of his death, he never ceased to 
take a practical, personal interest in its welfare. 

In the many times of difficulty and stress that 
the school passed through he was always ready to 
help, always optimistic, always full of faith in the 
ultimate success of the then struggling Institution. 
And in the last few years when the school has been 
reaping the benefit of her early struggles, his wise 
and judicious advice has always been cheerfully 
given and has again and again been to us a source 
of strength and a very material help. 

All of us had learnt to look upon him as “a 
strong man who was our true friend,” and on the 
occasions—and they were not few—when he visited 
the school he was always given a most enthusiastic 
welcome. 

It seems hard to realize that we shall see his 
face and hear his voice no more. But while we 
mourn his death, we thank God for his life. By 
his magnificent energy, his clear judgment, his 
refusal to consider defeat, he worked his way from 
the lowest to the highest rung of the ladder of 
success. But while, as the result of his great 
abilities and strenuous work, worldly wealth came 
to him, yet he never lost his large-hearted sym¬ 
pathies for others. 

Only those who knew him intimately were 
aware of how much he did to help his fellow-men. 
“Let not thy left hand know what thy right hand 
doeth” was with him a rule of life, that he constantly 
put into practice. 

While we and very many mourn the loss of a 
real friend, the sense of bereavement must neces¬ 
sarily be felt most keenly by his immediate relatives, 
and to them in their hour of sorrow we extend our 
deepest and heart-felt sympathies. 











ST. ALBAN’S CHALLENGE CUP. 


Date 

Match 

Played at 

Won 

Score 

Oct. 3rd 

Lower Canada vs. St. Alban’s 

Brockville 

L.C.C. 

126-2 

Oct. 10th 

Ashbury vs. Lower Canada 

Montreal 

L.C.C. 

52-2 

Oct. 17th 

Ashbury vs. St. Alban’s 

Ottawa 

Ashburv 

106-6 

Oct. 24th 

St. Alban’s vs. Lower Canada 

Montreal 

L.C.C/ 

65-0 

Oct. 31st 

Ashbury vs. Lower Canada 

Ottawa 

L.C.C. 

22-13 

Nov. 7 th 

Ashbury vs. St. Alban’s 

Brockville 

Ashbury 

39-5 


We have therefore to congratulate Lower Canada College 
on winning the cup this year. They went through the season 
without a defeat, either in our league or in the Montreal league, 
and thoroughly deserved their success. Perhaps we may console 
ourselves for the loss of the cup by the fact that we were the only 
team to cross their line this year. 

THE OPENING GAME 

L.C.C. vs. Ashbury 
51 2 

On Oct. 9th, the senior team made its annual pilgrimage to 
Montreal. The veterans, on the team knowing this trip pretty 
well now, expected the usual sort of journey, the usual sort of 
conditions and the usual sort of game. That we should win 
went without saying—by how many points was the only matter 
in doubt. 

The trip down proved as monotonous as ever—same old 
train—late as usual—same station—same crowd. Montreal 
looked just the same as it always does. The car service was 
just as congested as ever—the Corona was just as comfortable 
even the genial fat proprietor smiled upon us the identical fat 
genial smile as of yore. Would we ever get a new sensation out 
of this trip ? We yawned and sighed and went to bed. 

Saturday morning saw us toddling up to L.C.C.—placidly, 
unsuspectingly, trustingly. Never went sheep more innocently 
to the shambles. We changed leisurely, conversed languidly, 
and waddled on to the field confidently. 

























4 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Then we were lined up and given a lecture by the referee. 
We knew all these rules long ago—we paused contemplatively, 
looked on lazily and listened indulgently. Presently we woke up. 
What was this he was saying ? We pinched ourselves and rubbed 
our eyes. Either we still slept—with a nightmare, or the man 
was joking. He was telling us RULES—such rules, weird rules, 
mad rules, rules from the great and glorious republic to the 
south—evolved during the Civil War. And these had come to 
Canada—and we were to play by them. We listened, dazed. 

We learned that “interference” was now a virtue. We 
wondered. We were told that “offsidedness” should be the 
chronic state of any winning team. We marvelled. 

We gathered that “yards” for a kick was an antiquated 
custom fit only for competitions between homes for incurables. 
We gasped. Finally we were told that within the 25 yard line 
the ball could not be forfeited for an offence short of the assassina¬ 
tion of the entire opposing team. We fainted. 

When we came to, the referee was warning us that axes were 
not allowed. This surprised us. 

Now, we bitterly regretted that we had not enlisted against 
the Germans at once—at least we would have had rifles. 

Then the whistle blew—it might have been the “Charge” on 
the bugle judging from the result. 

Nobody could describe what followed. It was a mad turmoil 
of heavy forces—a chaos of offside—a phantasmagoria of inter¬ 
ference—a maelstrom of meaningless meanderings. 

On the rare occasions when we got the ball, the referee 
always seemed to take it away—because the man we had got it 
from had not been killed cleanly enough, or some other fanciful 
distinction. 

At half time—ten minutes allowed to bury the dead—we 
learned that some thirty points had been scored against us—but 
we had laid out more men than they had, and this gave us a sort 
of savage comfort. 

We were getting used to the Rules now—fast sinking to the 
state of primitive warfare of the Stone-Age. Indeed we looked 
about for rocks or handy fence-rails, but owing to some oversight 
none had been supplied. Then our Captain—exasperated at 
this—waxed Classic and, shouting “I will arise and slay them with 
my hands”—rushed once more into the fray. The issue after 
that was no longer in doubt. Ashbury raged over the field, and 
L.C.C. men went down for the count with monotonous frequency. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


5 


The final tally stood:— 

L.C.C. scored eight Touches. 

Ashbury laid out nine Men. WE HAD WON!!!!!! 
The Ashbury line-up was as follows:— 


Flying Wing Rivers 

Halves.Hennessy, Carling I, Edward 

Quarter.Birkett i 

Outsides.Mac Bare n I, Carling I 

Middles.Code, Thoburn 

Insides.Mac Mali on, Muirhead 

Scrimmage.Morris, Hart, Bate 


Ashbury IV vs. Models. 

8 — 1 

On Saturday morning, the 16th of October, the Ashbury IV’s 
lined up against the Model School on the Ashbury play-ground. 
Models won the toss and Ashbury kicked off with the wind at 
their backs. The score at half-time was 8-0 in Ashbury’s favour, 
but in the second half Models scored one point while Ashbury 
did not score again. Van Meter was the star of the game, his 
kicking being chiefly responsible for Ashbury’s win. On a 
fumbled ball behind the Model line, Armstrong distinguished 
himself by falling on it for a touch which Gorman failed to convert. 
McLimont played a fine defensive game. The Ashbury line-up 
as as follows:— 


Full-back Mulligan 

Halves.Gorman, Van Meter, Hamilton 

Quarter.Panet 

Outsides.Armstrong, Prince 

Middles.Murphy, McLimont 

Insides Burstall I, Johnston 

Scrimmage Woollcombe I, Jones, Gibbs 


Ashbury vs. St. Alban’s 
106 6 

On Wednesday afternoon, the 21st of October, the St. Albans’ 
team of Brockville lined up against the Ashbury fourteen in a 
league match. Mr. Woollcombe kindly gave the whole school a 
half holiday for the occasion. The playing-field was in perfect 
condition and a large number of people came down to Ashbury 
to see the match. 



















6 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Ashbury won the toss and kicked off with the wind. It 
was not long before Ashbury scored, Muirhead bucking over 
the St. Albans’ line for a try, which was not converted. It 
would be hard to pick a star on the Ashbury team, as every man 
played a fine game after the first few minutes, when they were 
a little nervous. Carling II, Birkett II, MacLaren, Muirhead, 
and Rivers showed up splendidly. 

Muirhead and Carling II went over their opponent’s line 
for five touches each, Birkett II and Rivers each scored three 
touches, Carling I scored two, and MacLaren and Birkett I each 
went over for one. 

In all Ashbury scored twenty touches which is a new inter¬ 
school record. Of these only four were converted, MacLaren and 
Birkett II each converting two By intercepting a pass with a 
clear field before him, Jones scored the only try for St. Albans’. 
This was not converted. MacLaren made a fine attempt to 
catch him, but when he got him on a flying tackle the ball was 
over the Ashbury line by inches. Ashbury scored two rouges 
and St. Albans’ one. 

The feature of the game was Birkett II’s second touchdown. 
He got away one of the longest punts of the game, and following 
it up himself got possession of the ball and went through for a try. 

There were no serious injuries during the game. Although 
several of the St. Albans’ players were slightly hurt they were 
all able to continue playing. The game was clean throughout, 
not one player being penalized. Although the odds in weight 
were against them, St. Albans’ played a very plucky game. It 
is interesting to note that the Ashbury line played so well that 
not one of the opponents was successful in getting past it. Messrs. 
P. Chrysler and A. G. Mainwaring looked after the game in a 
manner which was appreciated by all the members of both teams. 

The score at half time was 37 to 6, and the final score 106 to 6. 
The line-up was as follows 

Ashbury Position St. Albans’ 

Rivers. Full Back Miller 

Birkett II Right Half.Annesley 

Carling II Centre Half.Vrooman 

Blakeney I.Left Half.Lilly 

Birkett I Quarter Adair 

MacLaren (Capt.).Right Outside. Jones (Capt.) 

Code.Right Middle.Bidwell 

MacMahon.Right Inside.Watson 


















THE ASHBURIAN 


7 


Wood 

Bate 

Morris 

Muirhead 

Malcolm 

Carling I 


Right Scrimmage.Rogers 

Centre Scrimmage. Edwards 

Left Scrimmage.McGregor 

Left Inside.I .am be 

Left Middle.Skelton 

Left Outside.Connolly 


Ashbury II vs. Beavers. 

16 2 

This match was played on Friday afternoon, the 23rd of 
October. As the game was late in starting it was decided to 
play two twenty-minute periods. The Ashbury team was the 
winner by a score of sixteen to two, it being the first time that 
the Beavers have ever been beaten by an Ashbury team. Edward 
was easily the best player on the field and scored the first touch 
in the first few minutes of the game; it was a splendid run of more 
than half the field through the whole Beaver team. Hart made 
yards on his bucks on several occasions, once breaking away for 
a touch which Colpman converted. A fake buck on which Tho- 
burn made an end run was responsible for the last try. Barwis, 
Davidson and Thoburn played fine tackling games, while Benedict 
starred for the Beavers. 

The Beavers obtained their points by a rouge and a kick 
by Benedict that went into touch. 

The Ashbury line-up was as follows:— 


Full Back. Thoburn 

Halves O’Connor, MacLaren II, Edward 

Quarter Jackson 

Outsides.Ross, Barwis 

Middles. Davidson, Tremain 

Insides. S'aden, Hart 

Scrimmage. Bryson, Colpman, Read 


Ashbury vs. Brockville Collegiate (Oct. 24th) 

7 — 43 

Having beaten the Collegiate team in three successive seasons 
on our ground, we were persuaded to meet them this year on their 
own soil. The word “soil,” however, must not be taken too 
literally, as the playing surface contained a considerable ad¬ 
mixture of rock, fragmental and well distributed. This we take 
as one of the reasons for our defeat, as we wished to avoid injury 
in view of the forthcoming game with L.C.C. Other causes 




















8 


THE ASHBURIAN 


which may have militated against our success were firstly our 
early start (we were awakened at 5.15 a.m.) followed by a tedious 
train journey, and secondly the fact that our opponents were an 
exceptionally heavy team, and were able to break through our 
line for big gains on many occasions. We were credibly informed 
by some spectators that the team did, however, contain several 
players who were then, or had been, members of the school. 

The game itself does not call for much comment. Playing 
with the wind a kick by John Carling was fumbled and Thoburn 
fell on the ball for a try, which was not converted. We were not 
to retain this lead for long as Brockville forced their way through 
and bucked over for a try, the kick being successful. 

In the second quarter our opponents increased their lead with 
two kicks to the deadball line, followed by a try, making the half¬ 
time score 13-5 against us. Shortly after the resumption of play 
John Carling kicked twice to the dead-line, but any prospect of 
snatching a victory was spoilt by the retirement of Roy MacLaren 
with an injured knee, his place being taken by Edward. Brock¬ 
ville crossed our line once again in this quarter, whilst in the last 
period they made a habit of it and scored four more tries, three 
of which were converted. These with two rouges completed the 
scoring and we retired defeated. In the last period Wood was 
injured in a tackle and was replaced by Barwis, who performed 
very creditably. 

The line-up was as follows:— 


Flying Wing W. Birkett 

Halves Hennessy, J. Carling, Blakeney 

Quarter G. Birkett 

Outsides R. MacLaren, L. Carling 

Middles Thoburn, Malcolm 

Insides MacMahon, Muirhead 

Scrimmage Bate, Wood, Morris 


Ashbury Juniors vs. Model Seconds. 

0 — 17 

On Saturday morning, October 24th, the Ashbury juniors 
played the Model Seconds and were beaten by a score of 17 to 0. 
The Models were very much heavier than the Ashbury boys, 
who put up a plucky game, considering this fact. Gill was the 
star of the Ashbury team, which lined up as follows:- 









THE ASHBURIAN 


9 


Flying Wing. Gill 

Halves Brennan, Orde, Sladen I 

Quarter. Woollcombe II 

Outsides. Kingsmill, Hampson 

Middles . Woods I, Burstall II 

Insides. Pont, Burpee 

Scrimmage Ritchie, Tamplet, Woollcombe I 


Ashbury IV’s vs. Models. 

8 — 10 

Ashbury’s junior Intermediates were defeated by a score of 
ten to eight by the Model School on Friday afternoon, the 30th 
of October. 

As the field was in a slippery condition, the brand of football 
played was not up to the usual standard. Both teams fumbled 
the ball frequently. Prince played a fine game on the Ashbury 
line, and Taschereau also played well in the last half. He kicked 
a pretty field goal and also got Ashbury’s only touch. Woods 
starred for the Models, going over for both their tries. 

The Ashbury team was as follows:— 


Flying Wing Gorman 

Halves Mulligan, Van Meter, Taschereau I 

Quarter Panet 

Outsides Prince, Armstrong 

Middles McLimont, Murphy 

Insides.Kingsmill, Burstall I 

Scrimmage Gibbs, Woollcombe I, McLachlin 


Ashbury vs. Lower Canada College. 

13 — 22 

This match was played on the Ashbury ground on Saturday 
morning, the 31st of October, and resulted in a win for L.C.C. by 
a score of twenty-two to thirteen. By winning this match Lower 
Canada cinched the Inter-School Championship and won the St. 
Albans’ cup for the first time since it has been given—seven 
years ago. 

Playing under Inter-Provincial rules, the Lower Canada team 
did not show that superiority which has been so evident this 
season in Montreal. Still, they clearly proved themselves the 
best team in Eastern Ontario. Ashbury played their best game 
of the season, and but for a fluke touch favouring Lower Canada 
the final score would have proved the champions superior to us 
by about three points. 




















10 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Carling II was easily the star of the game. He made two 
touches for Ashbury, both of them coming from brilliant runs 
for more than half the length of the field. He also kicked ex¬ 
ceedingly well, both with and against the wind, kicking to the 
dead-line twice, and once he kicked and the ball rolled out in 
touch. Thus he scored every point Ashbury got. 

The whole Ashbury team played fine football with Roy Mac- 
Laren, Lewis Carling, and Rivers the stars, while Code and Barwis 
also did excellent work. 

Among the Lower Canada boys, Flanagan and Baillie showed 
up well, the former’s kicking being responsible for five points, 
and in addition he bucked over the Ashbury line for a try. 

Ashbury kicked off against the wind and Lower Canada 
started a kicking game which they kept up during the entire 
match. In the first quarter they scored ten points, four of these 
coming from rouges, five from Flanagan’s touch, and one from 
Lyall’s convert. Ashbury failed to score in this period. In the 
second quarter, Ashbury started in earnest and it was not long 
before Carling II kicked to the dead-line and immediately after 
he kicked a touch in goal. Then came his first touch-down 
which was a splendid run through the whole Lower Canada team. 
In this play he used his straight arm to tremendous advantage. 
The score at half-time was therefore ten points to seven against 
Ashbury. 

In the next quarter, Ashbury played the best football they 
have displayed all the season and more than held their own 
considering the wind; however Slater got a touch-down, which 
appeared to the spectators to be offside. 

In the last quarter Carlingll again scored a touch after a 
run similar to his first, and he also kicked to the dead-line again. 
However Lower Canada succeeded in getting another try, Lyall 
bucking over the Ashbury line after one of the Ashbury halves 
had fumbled within a few feet of his own line. The work of Dr. 
Shirreff and “Happy” O’Halloran as officials could not be im¬ 
proved upon. They quickly stopped any interference that was 
attempted by either team. 

We were gratified to see so many parents and friends of 
Ashbury present, amongst whom we noticed Mr. Albert Mac- 
Laren, Mr. Carling, Mr. Birkett, Mr. Palmer, Dr. Echlin, Mr. 
Magrath, Mr. and Miss Thoburn, the Misses Thackray, Mrs. 
Weston and a large number of Old Boys. 

The Ashbury Rooters’ club was out at full force under the 
leadership of Tremain and Palmer, aided by some impromptu 
conducting by an Old Boy. 


THE AS HBURIAN 


U 


Following are the line-ups of both teams:- 


Ashbury 

Position 

L.C 

Rivers 

Flying Wing 

Molson 

Birkett II 

Right Half 

... Lyall 

Carling II 

.Centre Half 

Flanagan 

Blakeney I 

Left Half 

McLagan 

Birkett I 

Quarter 

Baillie 

MacLaren I 

Right Outside 

Slater 

Code 

Right Middle 

Ambridge 

Mac Mahon 

Right Inside 

Nichol 

Wood 

Right Scrimmage 

Snowdon 

Barwis 

.Centre Scrimmage 

...*Brown 

Morris 

Left Scrimmage. 

Blackader 

Muirhead 

Left Inside 

Skelton 

Malcolm 

Left Middle 

Peverley 

Carling I. 

Left Outside 

Gilmour 


* Replaced Durnford, who was injured in the first quarter. 

Ashbury IV’s vs. Collegiate Juniors. 

3 — 1 

This match was played on the Ashbury grounds on Friday 
afternoon, the 6th of November. The Ashbury team won by a 
score of three to one. 

For the Ashbury team Scott and McLimont were the stars 
with Taschereau running them a close second. With the score 
at one to nothing, the latter kicked a pretty drop-goal which 
won the game. 

The Ashbury line-up was as follows:— 


Full Back McLimont 

Halves.Parker, Van Meter, Taschereau I 

Quarter.Panet 

Outsides.Scott, Prince 

Middles.Murphy, Hamilton 

Insides. Gorman, Armstrong 

Scrimmage Jones, Woollcombe I, Burstall I 


OUR TRIP TO BROCKVILLE. 

Ashbury 39 — St. Alban's 5. 

The Ashbury Football team left Ottawa on Friday evening, 
the 6th of November for Brockville, where they played the St. 
Albans’ team the next morning. 





































12 


THE ASHBURIAN 


The Ashbury boys were victorious by a score of thirty-nine to 
five, and it looked as if the score could have been increased, 
had it been at all necessary. In this match all the Ashbury 
spares were given a chance. 

As usual, John Carling was the star of the game, while 
Muirhead and Code also did some useful work on the line. The 
former crossed the St. Albans’ line twice, while MacMahon, 
Edward, Malcolm and Birkett I also scored touch-downs. 

Out of Ashbury’s seven touch-downs only one was converted, 
Code doing the trick. Perhaps the outstanding feature of the 
game, besides Carling’s running was a drop kicked by Birkett I. 
He got the ball out of the scrimmage, ran back and kicked a 
pretty drop himself. 

St. Albans’ managed to force Edward over his own line and 
down him for two points. Their other three were obtained by 
rouging Carling II and Blakeney, and by a kick by Lilly that 
rolled out in touch. For St. Albans’ Miller, Jones and Lilly 
played the best football. 

Only two periods were played, each of twenty minutes. The 
score at half-time was 26-3 in Ashbury’s favour. 

After the match the Ashbury team drove back to the “Revere 
House,” where St. Albans’ kindly entertained us to lunch. A 
visit to the “Brock” theatre passed away the time till the train 
left for Ottawa. 

Ashbury lined-up as follows:— 


Flying Wing. MacLaren I 

Halves Edward, Carling II, Blakeney I 

Quarter Birkett I 

Outsides. Wood, Carling I 

Middles.Code, Malcolm 

Insides MacMahon, Muirhead 

Scrimmage Thoburn, Barwis, Morris 


At half-time MacLaren I and Malcolm were replaced by 
MacLaren II and O’Connor. 

The St. Albans’ team was the same as in our first match with 
them. 









THE ASHBURIAN 


13 


HOCKEY PROSPECTS 

Now that Christmas festivities are over and we are all back 
at school, hockey practices have started in earnest. Some of us 
have made resolutions and promises to be kept during the hockey 
season, but whether they will be kept or not remains to be seen. 
We were very fortunate this year in securing the services of Mr. 
Alf. Smith as coach, and even now we can see the difference in 
our team-work which was sadly lacking last year. 

This season we are without the services of Hennessy, last 
year’s captain, and we miss him very much. Reiffenstein, our 
goalkeeper, is also missing from the line-up. There have been 
several goalkeepers tried out this year, of which MacMahon and 
Barwis seem to be the pick. On the defence we have MacLaren 
and Rivers, the latter being moved back to that position from 
centre. Malcolm at left wing is showing up very well this year 
and has improved greatly over last season. Blakeney is holding 
down centre and is doing well. Birkett was a great help to last 
year’s team and if he can turn out will play at right wing. 

Note .—As the captain is too modest to say anything about 
himself, we may add that he has moved from cover-point to 
rover, and is playing a brilliant game there, being much faster 
than last year. He is making a good captain and the example 
of his enthusiasm is being well followed by the rest of the team. 

The following is the schedule of games for the Carling Cup:- 


Jan. 23rd L.C.C. at St. Albans’ 

“ 30th St. Albans’ at Ashbury 

Feb. 6th.Ashbury at L.C.C. 

“ 13th St. Albans’ at L.C.C. 

“ 20th Ashbury at St. Albans’ 

“ 27th L.C.C. at Ashbury 


HOCKEY MATCH. 

Ashbury Intermediates vs. Model School. 

0 — 4 

This match was played on the Model School rink on Wednes¬ 
day afternoon, the 20th of January. The game was late in start¬ 
ing so only two fifteen-minute periods were played. The Models 
succeeded in winning by four goals to nothing, but the Ashbury 
boys put up a far better game than the score indicates. Woods 








14 


THE ASHBURIAN 


was largely responsible for Models’ win, while Mulligan and Van 
Meter played the best hockey on the Ashbury team. Drummond 
also played well in goal. The Ashbury team was as follows 


Goal 

Point. 

Cover Point 
Right Wing. 
Left W ing . 
Centre 


Drummond 
Van Meter 
Panet and Mulligan 
Parker 

Burstall I and Scott 
Crocket 


4 * •}<? 


CADET CORPS 

The outlook for the cadet corps is indeed very promising this 
year; the officers and non-coms, have all been with us for a long 
time, and we look to them as well as to the rank and file to make 
this year a record one in regard to the corps. 

It is only right that our corps should be the best we have 
had, especially because it is a time when every Britisher wants 
to do his best to preserve the freedom enjoyed within our Empire. 

Although individually we cannot do a great deal, we can 
learn self-restraint and discipline, the latter an indispensable 
quality in an army. 

As we all know, there are a lot of old Ashburians now at the 
front who learnt the rudiments of their drill as we are doing now 
at school. If this War drags on and more men are needed, we 
hope that the training we received here may help us when we 
receive the call to join the Colours. 

We have to welcome Sergeant Major Morgan as our 
instructor this year, and we consider ourselver very lucky to 
have so able a man at a time when we most need one. 

The following officers and sergeants have been appointed for 
this year:— 


Captain W. H. D. MacMahon 

1st Lieut. A. R. MacLaren 

2nd Lieut.. R. L. Sladen 

Sergeants C. G. Wood, R. S. Morris, 

A. L. Code, G. leB. Ross 










THE ASHBURIAN 


15 


SHOOTING 

The shooting this year has been very satisfactory although 
we ha\e not had the practice we would like to have had, as 
several of the best shots have not turned up on the majority of 
shooting afternoons. We have been forced to use 22 calibre 
rifles, as the Government has stopped issuing gallery ammunition, 
on account of the War. 

These light rifles handicap the seniors considerably; however 
we are now getting more used to them. Probably because of 
having to use 22 rifles the Canadian Rifle League has changed 
the range from 25 to 20 yards. On account of the rifles and 
range being different it is hard to compare this year’s shooting 
with last year’s; but some very good scores have been made and 
they are getting better every practice. We are hoping before 
long to get a couple of heavier rifles, which would undoubtedly 
make a great improvement. 

Sladen, last year’s winner of the O’Connor Cup, has not yet 
come up to his standard of last year, but no doubt he will improve. 
Bate, Ross, Barwis and Taschereau have all done good shooting 
recently and it is to be hoped that they will keep it up. 

The Juniors have done some splendid shooting—in many 
cases making better scores than the Seniors. So far the scores 
are very close and it looks as if there would be a very close race 
this year for the Cox Cup. 


•}? *bt<* *&• 


THE COMPLETE HERO 


A hitherto unpublished story by G. A Henty 


It was a fine frosty afternoon and the boys of the Old School 
were frantically cheering the efforts of their football team in their 
annual match against the much-vaunted opponents from the 
grammar school at Highfather; the game had begun at the pre¬ 
cise moment fixed (for such was the custom of the school), even 
though one member of the team was still missing, and many were 
the anxious looks directed towards the entrance to the ground; 
for the Highfather boys, elated by the smaller numbers of their 
rivals, were already carrying everything before them, and by 
their good shots had quickly secured two tries and several corner 
kicks. At length, Lachanon, the captain, fearing that the truant 
must have left his boots at home addressed a small boy whose pale 
but anxious face showed how deeply he felt the impending defeat 
of his comrades. 


16 


THE ASHBURIAN 


“Here, Walter,” he cried, “off with your coat, and come and 
play centre.” 

A murmur ran through the crowd as Walter, though he was 
known to be plucky, could scarcely hope to stand up against the 
giants on the other side; yet by the business-like manner in 
which he at once tripped up their biggest forward, it was seen 
that his captain's confidence had not been misplaced. Still High- 
father pressed the school hard and their biggest man having only 
one between him and the coveted goal, knocked him over violently 
and sped away: and now he is almost in front and a try seems 
certain. But stop! Whose is that light figure speeding deter¬ 
minedly down the ground ? It is Walter. In a moment, before 
the giant is aware, the thin but sinewy arms are around his legs, 
and he falls heavily to the ground amidst loud applause, in which 
even the umpires could not forbear to join. And now half-time 
is called and the players and umpires change ends: fast and 
furious waxes the battle: the giants are tiring: even the school 
team feel the strain of the struggle: yet Walter is here, there and 
everywhere: if a ball is stopped it is by HIS hand, or HIS foot: 
the goalkeeper braces up his courage, knowing that Walter is at 
his side and takes heart to use his hands too. 

And now, when the time of play is nearly gone, Walter, 
seeing that it was the moment for action, slipping unperceived 
past the opposing full-backs and awaiting his opportunity, is 
soon rewarded by a ball, which, directed high in the air, falls 
beyond them, and at his feet: in a moment he speeds away and 
nearing the goal, seizes the ball and carries it triumphantly past 
the goalkeeper. The whistle immediately sounds and a huge 
roar of pent enthusiasm bursts from the spectators, for as my 
young readers know, in the Association game, one goal counts 
more than ever so many tries and the Old School would have 
nothing to do with the broken time and broken legs of the rough 
Rugby game. 

But suddenly the shout of triumph was turned into a cry of 
alarm; hard by the school ground ran a stream ,very deep and 
fast as a Swiss mountain torrent. Into this one of the junior 
masters, Mr. Margin, had fallen from his skiff and being no 
swimmer, was being rapidly carried away; everyone gazed in 
helpless alarm; in a moment, Walter, hot as he was from his 
recent exertions and fearless of a cold in his head, leaped into 
the icy flood; twice he came up with nothing in his hands, but 
the third time a great shout showed that he had achieved his 
purpose and carried his preceptor safely to the water's edge. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


17 


That night Walter was the hero of the school, and many were 
the cups of cocoa he had to drink; then, though tired out, he wrote 
his daily letter home (omitting all reference to his adventure) and 
went to bed. The next morning his class-master, a man of un¬ 
usually kind disposition, seeing that Walter had no book (he lent 
it to a friend to save him from an imposition) would have ab¬ 
stained from putting him on to translate; then Walter, seeing the 
difficulty, at once rose modestly and said, “I have no book, Sir, 
but I have learnt the French as well as the English.” Then with 
unfailing accuracy he repeated the chapter of Caesar word for 
word, while his Master, who was a distinguished scholar, could 
only gasp in astonishment. 

It is needless to say that, after a school career such as this, 
Walter grew up into a distinguished politician, and soldier, that 
his life was written and now occupies a prominent place on the 
fiction shelves of the dear Old School. 

4* 4* 4* 


SCHOOL NOTES 

His many friends—both in and outside the School—will be 
delighted to hear that our former Secretary—Captain Weston- 
has been raised to the rank of Major. 

Mr. D. E. C. Wood who left our Staff last June and enlisted 
in Kitchener’s new army during the summer has spent the last 
few months as drill instructor, with the rank of Sergeant-Major. 
We expect to hear at any moment that he has received a com¬ 
mission. 

At a meeting of the 6th and 5th Forms held in December, 
A. L. Code was elected as Captain of the senior hockey team. 


Vale. 

A. B. Hennessy.—September, 1910. 

Salvete. 

P. C. Drummond. Form IV. 

C. Fowler. Form I. 

E. Sommer. Form I. 


18 


THE ASHBURIAN 


A FOOD WAR 

(From London Punch). 

Some folks believe that wars commence 
From greed of gain or self-defence; 

But Austrian sages have divined 
Incitements of a different kind. 

The Servian army (so Tis said) 

Has run completely out of bread, 

And every day the hungry souls 
Fight Austria for Vienna rolls. 

The Austrian battles with the Tsar 
Because he dotes on caviare, 

And must that monarch's realm invade 
Because he likes it freshly made. 

The Russians connot do without 
The soul-sustaining sauerkraut, 

And march their armies to the West 
Because Berliners make the best. 

The German confidently thinks 
That absinthe is the prince of drinks, 
And therefore must attack the land 
That keeps the most seductive brand. 

The Frenchman, tired of his ragouts, 
Covets the meat that Teutons use, 

And charges like an avalanche 
For German sausage, not revanche. 

The Briton, vexed by rules austere 
Has heard the fame of German beer, 
And naught his onward march can stop, 
While Munich holds a single drop. 

The bold Italian stands prepared 
With rifle loaded, sabre bared, 

And to a questioning world replies, 
'‘Who touches my spaghetti, dies!" 


THE ASHBURIAN 


19 


OUR CONTEMPORARIES 

The editor acknowledges with thanks the receipts of the 
following magazines: 

The Cheltonian (3), Cheltenham College, England 

The Felstedian (2), Felsted School, Essex, England 

The Meteor (3), Rugby School, England 

The Tonbridgian (2), Tonbridge School, England 

The Tonbridge School War List 

The Wykehamist (2), Winchester College, England 

The Lily, Magdalen College School, Oxford, England 

The Mitre, Bishop’s College, Lennoxville 

The Ottawa Ladies' College Echoes, Ottawa, Ont. 

The St. Margaret's Chronicle, St. Margaret’s College, Toronto 

The St. Andrew's College Review, Toronto 

The Blackand Red, University School, Victoria, B.C. 

The Acta Ridleiana, Ridley College, St. Catherine’s, Ont. 
The Albanian, St. Alban’s School, Brockville, Ont. 

The St. John's College Magazine; 

The Langarian, Langara School, Vancouver, B.C. 

The Collegian, St. Thomas, Ont.; 

The Grove Chronicle, Lakefield, Ont. 



Bryson-Graham 

Limited 

At the Corner of Sparks and O’Connor Sts. 


Of Great Interest and Significance 
Is The Wonderful Variety and 
Evident Reliability of The 
Merchandise in this Store 

Buy it at the Bryson-Graham Store is both an 
invitation and a guarantee. Pay us a visit 

MEN’S AND BOY’S CLOTHING 
BOOKS AND STATIONERY 
SCHOOL SUPPLIES 
PENNANTS 
BOOTS AND SHOES 
HATS AND CAPES 
GROCERIES AND CANDIES 
GLOVES AND SOCKS 
SHIRTS AND TIES 
TRUNKS AND BAGS 

All Ottawa Street Cars Pass Our Store Doors 


Bryson-Graham Limited 













jfisfjnr 

[f (Hire of 

jfosljtim (Slrafl 

1 - 3-4 

n SparKs St. 

College Hunts 

'J'HIS store stands for a 
definite ideal in clothes 

for young gentlemen. 

Q Let us show you how 
long years of effort have 
made this the clothing home 

of Ottawa’s better dressed 

young men. 


| 

jf i#\)t r’s 

_j 


ASHBURY COLLEGE 
IS HEATED WITH 

CONNELL’S COAL 


OFFICE: 

THE CONNELL ANTHRACITE 
MINING CO., LIMITED 

121 BANK ST. QUEEN 4275 

MINES: BERNICE, PA. 























Editors: 

Mr. P. H. P. Woollcombe (1900), with the Canadian 
Expeditionary Force. 

Mr. H. R. Morgan (1902), 18 Chislett Street, Brockville, 
Ontario. 

Artist: 

Mr. A. B. Beddoe (1909), with the Canadian Expeditionary 
Force. 

Secretary Old Boys’ Association: 

Mr. W. R. Butterworth, 225 Maclaren Street, Ottawa. 


EDITORIAL 

THE OLD BOYS PART. 

Ashburians, both past and present, have every reason to 
refer with pride to the part which former pupils of their school 
have taken or are taking in aiding the Empire in this War of Wars. 

We doubt if there is another school in Canada which can 
point to so large a percentage of its “Alumni” now in training to 
fit themselves to take their place on the firing line. Of the six 
representatives which we have in the British Army, two have 
already been mentioned for bravery. Viewed from the stand¬ 
point of comparison with other Canadian schools, the record of 
the Asbury Old Boys is one which has few duplicates. All 
honour to our overseas representatives. 


































































THE ASHBURIAN 


21 


GOOD ACCOUNTS. 

Confirmation of the “good accounts” which we ventured to 
prophecy in the October issue of the Old Boys’ Ashburian 
in connection with our overseas representatives is already being 
received. Elsewhere in this section of the school magazine will 
be found details of Lieutenant “Jack” Eliot’s gallant conduct on 
the field in carrying a wounded comrade to safety while under 
heavy fire; while Captain Oliver Dickey, another former Ash¬ 
burian, has been mentioned in despatches. 

Old Ashburians must thrill with pride in reading accounts 
of what their former classmates are doing, fighting the battles 
of the Empire. Such exploits as have already been related 
speak well for the devotion to duty which moves those young 
Canadians who, by reason of connection with the Imperial forces, 
are already in action. Each gives a splendid example of true 
British pluck and grit and of the indomitable spirit which has 
provoked so magnificent a response from our young Canadian 
manhood since the call was sent out to the Dominions Beyond 
the Seas. 

4 ? 4 * 4 * 


WITH THE FORCES 


Below will be found the names of those former Ashburians 
who are with the Canadian Overseas Forces. We are fully aware 
of the fact that the list which is given is incomplete, and would 
request that anyone possessing additional information would for¬ 
ward the same to the Secretary of the Old Boys’ Association. 


J. Roberts Allan, jr 
J. Arnoldi 
H. Bate 

S. C. Bate 

Trennick Bate (Royal Navy) 

C. T. Beard (Royal Navy) 

A. B. Beddoe 
C. W. A. Barwis 
P. S. Benoit 

C. A. Billings 

D. Blair 

E. D. H. Boyd 
W. Brooks 

G. H. Burbidge 

T. R. Caldwell 


D. A. Grant 
J. L. Godwin 
V. W. S. Heron 
A. D. Irwin 

A. C. T. Lewis 
J. Travers Lewis, jr. 

E. Ross Lethbridge 
J. B. MacPhail 

R. S. P. Maclvor 
R. Moore 
E. F. Newcombe 
R. G. Orde 
H. W. O’Connor 
H. S. Parker 
E. DeB. Panet 


22 


THE ASHBURIAN 


G. Carling 

C. E. Read, jr. 

C. Chipman 

G. A. R. Spain 

G. G. Chrysler 

E. C. Sherwood (Royal Navy) 

C. P. Cotton 

D. Sladen 

C. Critchley 

L. P. Sherwood 

S. Critchley 

N. A. Sparks 

F. H. M. Codville 

K. Slater 

L. W. S. Cockburn 

A. W. Symes 

H. W. Davis 

S. Wright 

0. B. R. Dickey 

P. Woollcombe 

J. H. Eliot 

P. H. Wright 

C. S. Fleming 

H. P. Wright 

J. Fraser 

H. E. Reid (Royal Navy) 

F. E. Gendron 

D. St. G. Lindsay (Royal Navy) 

A. U. Gilmour 

H. N. Fraser 

M. K. Greene 

M. L. B. H. Lambert 

E. Gorman 



r>f* 4* 4* 


THE OLD BOY’S DINNER 


The second annual dinner of the Ashbury Old Boys Associa¬ 
tion was held at the Chateau Laurier, Ottawa, on Saturday 
evening, January 2, with E. F. Newcombe presiding, and the 
Rev. G. P. Woollcombe and Mr. G. Reginald Smith as guests 
of the Association. The following old boys were present: 


Gilmour, K. F. 
MacPherson, Capt. K. C. 
Anderson, Lt. A. A. 
Graham, J. 

Bowie, G. G. 

Cory, W. M. 

Fraser, A. G. 

Keeling, G. H. 

Macara, L. J. 


Sladen, St. B. 
Butter worth, W. R. 
Chrysler, P. H. 
Wickware, W. 
Biggar, Percival 
Skead, E. S. 
Sherwood, Edson 
White, L. T. 


The large number of Old Boys who are with the Canadian 
forces was brought home in a striking manner to those present 
by the absence of so many familiar faces. Among the absentees 
were Capt. Willis O’Connor, president of the Association, C. S. 
Fleming, vice-president and Philip Woollcombe, editor of the 
Old Boys section of the Ashburian. 

After the Royal toast had been proposed and drunk, P. H. 
Chrysler proposed the health of 'The School,” which was re¬ 
sponded to by the Headmaster. Mr. Woollcombe referred with 


THE ASHBURIAN 


23 


pride to the large percentage of former pupils who were with His 
Majesty’s Army and Navy. The record was one of which any 
school might well be proud, and Mr. Woollcombe expressed his 
confidence in the ability of the Old Boys to uphold the honor of 
the school and uttered his fervent wishes that those who had joined 
the Forces would be spared to return to those who were doing 
their duty at home. Mr. Woollcombe expressed his deep sense 
of gratitude tq the secretary of the Association, Mr. Louis T. 
White whose efforts the success of the dinner was due. 

The toast of the “Old Boys” was entrusted to Mr. Smith, who 
testified to his pleasant associations with Ashbury College during 
the last ten years. Lieut. E. F. Newcombe, who is training at 
Kingston for service with the second contingent, made a suitable 
reply, a feature of which was the expression of his confidence in 
the ability of Ashburians to ‘‘play the game” whether in success 
or adversity. The toast to old boys serving with His Majesty’s 
forces was received with fitting enthusiasm. The toast to the 
staff, past and present, brought from the guests of the evening 
some interesting reminiscences of bygone days at Ashbury. A 
discussion relative to the advisability of commemorating the 
prowess of Ashbury boys in the fields of scholarship and athletics 
was held; the question of a suitable motto for the school was also 
raised and a committee appointed to deal with this matter. 
Officers were elected for the year, and the singing of the National 
Anthem brought the evening to a close. 

At a meeting previous to the dinner Capt. H. W. O’Connor 
was re-elected President and Mr. C. S. Fleming, Vice-President, 
Mr. W. R. Butterworth, Hon. Secy., and the following Committee 
for 1915: Newcombe, E. F., Wickware, W. R., White, L. T., 
Woollcombe, P., Morgan, H. R. 

•f? 4* *i?c* 

MARRIAGES 

LEWIS-ROBERTSON—On November 27, 1914, at St. 
Andrew’s church, Westmount, Muriel Grace, only daughter of 
the late J. M. H. Robertson, and of Mrs. Robertson, Westmount, 
to Lieut. John Travers Lewis (1901), of the Canadian Engineers, 
Second Army Division, second son of Travers Lewis, K.C., 
Ottawa. 

DAVIES-CHAPLIN—On November 7,1914, at St. Andrew’s 
church, Toronto, by the Revd. T. Crawford Brown, assisted by 


24 


THE ASHBURIAN 


the Revd. Dr. G. H. Smith, of St. Catherines, Ontario, Charlotte 
A., daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. William Chaplin, of St. 
Catherines, to Dalton Davies (1891), of the Canadian Bank of 
Commerce, Toronto. 

ORR-TURNER—At Ottawa, on November 28, 1914, 

Katherine Doretta, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Turner, of 
Rockland, Ontario, to R. Guerney Orr (1907), eldest son of Mr. 
and Mrs. W. A. Orr, Ottawa. 

WRIGHT-BDAKE—In the chaple of St. Paul's church, 
Bloor street, Toronto, on December 26, 1914, by the Revd. 
Professor George M. Wrong, uncle of the bride, Norah Hume, 
only daughter of Hume Blake, to Harry Pulteney Wright, M.D., 
C.M., (1903), eldest son of the late Dr. H. P. Wright, Ottawa. 

•}<• rf? •§? 

GOOD FOR YOU CHARLIE 

According to a press despatch, Christmas Day at Salisbury 
Plain saw an interesting incident when Charles S. Fleming (1902), 
of the 2nd Battery of the First Brigade, Canadian Field Artillery, 
was paraded at Camp Headquarters and presented with the medal 
of the Royal Humane Society for saving two lives at Fernbank, 
near Brockville, Ontario, in 1907. Lt.-Col. E. W. B. Morrison, 
brigadier, pinned the medal on the young man amid applause. 
Charlie had previously been awarded the medal of the Ottawa 
Humane Society for his bravery on the same occasion in saving 
the lives of the Revd. Hugh and Mrs. Pedley, of Montreal, who 
were drowning in the St. Lawrence at Fernbank. 

It is interesting to note that two other grandsons of Sir 
Sandford Fleming, both former Ashburians, have become members 
of the hero order. Noel Fleming (1896), some years ago saved 
a mounted policeman from drowning in the Northwest, and in 
1909, Archie Fleming (1905), saved Mrs. Sibbald, of Brockville, 
from drowning in the St. Lawrence. 


•t? «*» 


SAVED WOUNDED COMRADE 

In the October issue of the Askburian, our correspondent, 
“Mufti” had occasion to refer to “Jack” Eliot as one of the 
worthies of the Third form of 1907. Since then it has been 
learned that Jack has been fighting the battles of the Empire in 


\ 


THE ASHBURIAN 25 

Belgium, and, if we are to judge from reports received of his 
cond ict, doing it rather well. A casualty list issued on November 
6, gives the name of “Lieut. Eliot, 3rd Hussars’’ among the 
officers wounded, but it remained for an English newspaper, the 
SheTeld “Independent” to tell of Jack’s bravery in carrying a 
wounded trumpeter two hundred yards through heavy fire to 
safety. 

The article reads:—“Trumpeter Newman of the 3rd King’s 
Hussars said they were at Compiegne when they surprised a 
patrol of ten Germans, of whom they killed six, wounded two, 
and two escaped. These, strange to say, were 3rd Hussars of 
the German Army. Our men later chased another patrol.” 

“When our men got to the sky-line,” said the trumpeter, 
“we found three companies of infantry, who jumped up and 
fired at us. We got a bit of a shock, and thought it best to retire. 
As soon as I turned, I got hit and jumped in the air like a buck, 
beating all my previous records. A bullet passed clean through 
me. All I could think about at the time was my wife, and I 
shouted to the other trumpeter to look after her. He had just 
shouted back ‘All right’ when I heard another shot and he had 
been killed. I was in such pain that I prepared for death.” 

“I don’t know how long I lay there but eventually I heard a 
voice say: ‘Can’t you get along, Newman,’ and saw it was 
Lieutenant Eliot. When he found how I was, though there was 
heavy firing, he picked me up and carried me for about 200 yards 
to a farmhouse, where he had to leave me as the Germans were at 
hand. About ten minutes afterwards a German officer came to 
the door and pointed a revolver at the orderly, one of my own 
regiment, a bandsman named Browning. A sergeant was hidden 
in the roof and when he found it safe to do so he came out and 
escaped. He showed me six cartridges and said ‘Good-bye, 
Stickitt,’ (using my nickname) five for the Germans and one 
for myself before they get me.’ Three weeks later I heard that 
a sergeant had been caught just outside this place. He must 
have picked up a rifle, for he had killed nine of them before they 
got him. They shot him and cut him across the face and then 
two days later made some peasants bury him. Judging by the 

description I feel certain it was Sergt.-. He was a great 

favorite among us, our comic singer and a jolly fellow.” 

Trumpeter Newman said that this German officer treated 
him well but later the German doctor, evidently resenting being 
awakened from sleep to treat an Englishman, punched him in 
the stomach. Newman spoke of the ki id treatment received at 



26 


THE ASHBURIAN 


the hands of the French Sisters of Mercy and said that eventually 
when the Germans were leaving they said they would blow up 
the hospital but French troops came to the relief and captured 
the place before the Germans could carry out their threat.” 

Later reports tell of Lieut. Eliot’s improved condition in a 
hospital at Boulogne and of his eagerness to be again on the firing 
line. 

rj* r|» *j» 

OLD BOYS' NOTES 

Born. At Danville, Ill., on Monday, November 2, 1914, to 
the Revd. H. B. Wooding (1894), and Mrs. Wooding, a daughter. 

R. V. C. Sinclair (1901), is now connected with a Montreal 
law firm and is in charge of the legal work of the Bell Telephone 
Company in the Province of Quebec. 

Donald A. Grant (1912), who was in his second year at R. 
M. C., Kingston, has been granted his discharge and has since 
been appointed to a commission in the Royal Canadian Dragoons. 
He will leave with the Overseas troops. 

Dr. Harry P. Wright (1903), announcement of whose marriage 
is made elsewhere and who has since his graduation from McGill 
last summer been connected with the medical staff of the Montreal 
General Hospital, will go to the front with the Montreal Field 
Ambulance. 

Militia orders contain the following of interest to Old Boys: 
The Royal Canadian Regiment—to be lieutenant, Victor William 
Synge Heron, gentleman. Lieut. Heron (1892), is with the R.C.R. 
at Bermuda. 42nd Lanark and Renfrew Regiment—to be 
lieutenant, R. W. White (1906). No. 3 Company, C.A.S.C.—to 
be lieutenant (supernumerary), Lieut. A. C. T. Lewis (1896), 
from the 8th Brigade, C.F.A. 2nd Ottawa Battery, C.F.A.—to 
be Major, Lieut. A. de la C. Irwin (1896), from the Reserve of 
Officers; to be provisional lieutenant, John Lockhart Godwin 
(1898). 

Palmer Howard Wright (1905), has been gazetted a lieutenant 
in the 5th (the Princess Louise) Dragoon Guards. 

H. Walter Davis (1907), has been gazetted a provisional 
lieutenant in the Governor-General’s Foot Guards and is at 
present attached for a period of provisional service to the Royal 
Canadian Regiment stationed at Bermuda. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


27 


E. F. (Nixie) Newcombe (1898), leaves with the Second 
Contingent as a lieutenant. 

Stuart C. Bate (1906), has been granted a commission in 
the Royal Canadian Regiment and is at present with that Regi¬ 
ment doing garrison duty in Bermuda. 

Lieut. Cuthbert W. A. Barwis (1903), of the Indian Army, 
has been attached to the 3rd Battalion, Yorshire Regiment, and 
has been in France since the close of October. 

Among the officers whose names are mentioned in Sir John 
French’s “historic” despatch is Capt. 0. B. R. Dickey (1895) of 
the Army Service Corps, an Old Boy who also served with distinc¬ 
tion through the South African War. He entered the British 
Army in 1900 and has been a captain since 1906. 


McGILL NOTES 

The Old Boys at McGill this year are as follows: 

In Arts—M. O’Halloran, D. G. Burn, H. R. Morgan, and 
W. L. G. Snetsinger. 

In Applied Science—L. K. Greene, W. G. Gibbs, J. B L. 
Heney, L. E. L. Koelle, E. J. Lowe, E. N. Reid, H. C. Gooch and 
J. C. Reiffenstein. 

In Medicine — L. E. L. Sample and C. M. Anderson. 

M. O’Halloran and D. G. Burn, who will be graduated in 
Arts this spring are both prominent around the college. “Happy” 
is president of his class and Burn is treasurer. 

“Bug” Greene (1906), was a member of the McGill Tennis 
Team, intercollegiate champions for 1914. He has also created 
a name for himself as a brilliant player in the Union tourney. 

Ashbury is represented on the Staff of the “McGill Daily” 
by H. R. Morgan and L. E. L. Koelle. The former is managing 
editor and Koelle is one of the assistant editors. 

E. N. Reid (1907), formerly known as “Rorny” and a 
partner in the notorious “firm”, is now a member of second year 
Science at McGill. He was noted while at Ashbury for the in¬ 
vention of a “gas gun” of peculiar construction, and also for 


28 


THE ASHBURIAN 


nearly smothering a junior on one occasion, during the progress 
of some rather original experiments with “laughing gas” in the 
chemistry room. 

There is absolutely no foundation for the report that Messrs. 
Snetsinger, Koelle and Reiffenstein have been interned as alien 
enemies. Snetsinger also denies that he has been asked to join 
the Maccabean Circle. 

. - - - .it' ' Ji— 

9ffi jo;:. 

As Freshmen, Messrs. Sample and Reiffenstein took part in 
the Sports Day festivities on October 17 and received their full 
share of boot blacking, antique eggs and other favours of a 
similar nature. “Leon” in particular, conspicuous in a once- 
white Ashbury sweater, was observed towards the end of the 
proceedings in the act of rounding up a stray pair of boots which 
appeared to have found their way into a barrel of whitewash in 
company with a few hundred others. 


Monteregio. 

i L 


A PSALM OF LIFE 

(Or what the Freshman said to his Alarm Clock) 
(After Longfellow—a long way after!) 

Tell me not in mournful numbers 
It is time to rise and dress; 

Leave me to my peaceful slumbers; 

What's a minute more or less ? 

Yet professors all remind us 

We must reach our class on time; 

For two “lates” are as an absence 
And that “one-eighth” rule's a crime. 

So I must be up and dressing 
To avoid a sorry fate 
Or I shall be fired at Christmas— 

That's what comes of being late. 


E. J. L, (1905), in “The McGill Daily.” 


THE ASHBURIAN 


29 


NEWS OF WILL WHITE 


The following communication has been received from a well- 
known Old Boy by the secretary of the Old Boys’ Association. 
The letter speaks for itself: 

jM 


Sir: 


St. Charles Hotel, 

Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., Nov. 3, 1914. 


Your circular re Old Boys Association and The Ashburian 
received and I beg to state that it gives me pleasure to have my 
name enrolled as an Old Boy of Ashbury College. 


I often look back upon the pleasant days spent at the old 
school and think about the many friends I made there, both among 
the boys and masters. I often wonder what has become of them 
all, how each one is doing in his walk of life. Occasionally I 
come across one or two of them during my travels through the 

Dominion and the'United States.^ j! . 

vnu-hnn. 3T: an c j jo- 1 

When I mention “travels” you will, I suppose, at once jump 
to the conclusion that I belong to that order known as the Knights 
of the Grip—commonly known as commercial travellers. Well, 
No. I am not one, although I am on the road twelve months of 
the year. My occupation is A that of Travelling Immigration 
Inspector. Yes, one of those “horrid men,” who are so inquisitive 
and want to know your past, present and future, etc. We have 
also the honour to serve our country during this present time of 
stress by detaining all Germans, Austrians and Hungarians, who 
attempt to leave Canada or attempt to pass through, en route 
for a seaport either in Canada or the United States, to sail for 
their Homeland to aid their brothers fight against our brave boys. 
Up to the present we have sent many hundreds to the Military 
Prison at Old Fort Henry, Kingston. I have taken many prisoners 

of war myself, some very peacefully, others-well, they didn’t 

like the idea in the least and consequently had to be forced to 
appreciate the point. 

Ashbury College has surely sent many boys to the front and 
we no doubt will hear good accounts from each and every one. 
Nearly all of them have had many years of military training and 
know what is expected of them. Here’s good luck to each of 
Our Boys. 

If luck runs my way and God willing I hope to be with the 
boys before long. I would have been with the first lot, but am 
sorry to say was disappointed. It wouldn’t have been so bad if 
the cause had been other than what it was—my teeth. It seems 


30 


THE ASHBURIAN 


very small. Yet they claim that it is very important. That is 
why it hurts so. 

My address for the present is the above. From time to 
time I will notify you of any change. 

With best luck and good wishes to all, 

Yours truly, 

Will J. White, Jr. 

OLD BOYS’ PINS 

The pins for the Old Boys' Association, the orders for which 
were placed some time ago have reached here, and may be obtained 
by any of the Old Boys who apply to W. R. Butterworth for the 
sum of fifty cents. The pins are handsome in design, and reflect 
great credit not only upon the manufacturers, but also upon the 
designer, A. B. Beddoe, who is now with the Canadian Expedition¬ 
ary Forces. Some of the pins have been made in the form of 
safety pins and some into that of buttons. Their arrival has 
been delayed through the outbreak of the War. 

•ft* rjfc* 

THE CANADIAN CADETS 

To Capt. J. A. Clark Macpherson (1892), we are indebted 
for the following interesting account of the trip of the Canadian 
Cadet Rifle team to England last summer. Capt. Macpherson 
was in command of the team which achieved such extraordinary 
success in competition at the matches of the Imperial Cadet 
Association at London. The following is a copy of Capt. Mac- 
pherson’s report to the Department of Militia and Defence:— 

Sir:— 

I have the honour to report that in accordance with your 
instructions I proceeded from Ottawa to Quebec on the 27th 
April last and assumed command of the contingent of 12 cadets 
that had been selected to take part in the Imperial Cadet Rifle 
Meeting, London, England, all of whom were present and accom¬ 
panied by Sergeant Major Ferguson, were quartered at the 
St. Ursule House. 



• ^ 

<0 








N 

,«3 


§ 

p I 


■s I 

























THE ASHBURIAN 


33 


No time was lost in having the boys fitted out from stores, as 
authorized, and when the uniforms were altered they presented 
a very smart appearance. 

The .22 Ross Rifle served out did not, at first, give satisfaction 
but the faults which impaired their efficiency were eliminated at 
the factory and, with some special ammunition kindly provided 
by Colonel Harston, execellent results were obtained. 

Every attention was shown the team during our stay in 
Quebec, Major Hill especially giving most valuable assistance, 
and when we embarked on the Royal George, on May 5th, we 
were escorted to the boat by the High School Cadets who gave us 
a warm send off. 

During the voyage the boys were daily put through an hour’s 
drill and physical training on the upper deck by Sergeant Major 
Ferguson and arrived at Avonmouth in excellent condition on the 
night of the 13th of May and proceeded at once to London where 
we were met by Colonel Hanson, Sir Charles Wakefield, Colonel 
Dunfee and other officers. The first named took Sergeant Major 
Ferguson and the boys to his residence where they were billetted 
during their stay in England. 

On May the 14th, the day following our arrival, I visited the 
cadets and found they were comfortably quartered in two rooms, 
with a small one for the Sergeant Major, and had received an 
issue of bedding, tables, chairs, dishes, etc. Under the super¬ 
intendance of the Sergeant Major, they performed all duties 
during their residence here the same as if they were in camp, 
the actual cooking only excepted. I append hereto a copy of 
the orders which I issued for the occasion. In the afternoon we 
called upon the Mayor of Kensington and left a card at White¬ 
hall for the D.O.C. London district, went to see Buckingham 
Palace, Trafalgar Square, The Mall, etc., and in the evening 
were the guests of Colonel Dunbar at the annual dinner of the 
officers of The City of London National Reserve at the Trocadero 
and were cordially welcomed by General Sir Alfred Gazalee who 
occupied the chair. 

The officers of this organization having kindly placed their 
range at Blackfriars Bridge at our disposal I arranged for a daily 
practice from 10 A.M. until noon. 

Major Wilkinson, adjutant of the Army and Navy Military 
Tournament, at Olympia, having thoughtfully sent tickets to me 
for the whole team we went there on the 16th and thoroughly 
enjoyed the wonderful exhibition of skill shown by all branches 
of the service and were afterwards Major Wilkinson’s guests at 
tea. 


34 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Sunday the 17th. The contingent attended Divine Service 
at St. Paul’s Cathedral. 

Monday the 18th. I took the boys to the Zoological Gardens 
in the afternoon and in the evening we were the guests of Colonel 
Carlsbach and Captain Fletcher at the Coliseum and afterwards 
at their club for supper. 

May the 20th. In the afternoon we went to the Mansion 
House and were received by the Lord Mayor who addressed the 
team. After an interesting tour through the various rooms a 
light lunch was served after which we left to attend the pre¬ 
sentation of prizes for the Civil Service Rifle Corps by Sir Francis 
Ward at Somerset House and were afterwards entertained at tea. 

May the 21st. The final rifle practice was held this morning. 
The result of the steady work was most encouraging and clearly 
foreshadowed the success which followed. 

May the 22nd. The individual matches of the Imperial 
Cadet Rifle Meeting were fired today and the Canadians prac¬ 
tically carried everything before them; the English Cadets only 
winning two second places and one third place in the four matches 
fired. Cadet MacWilliams also won the Championship Gold 
Medal presented by Prince Arthur of Connaught. 

May the 23rd. The three teams matches were fired today. 
In each case the fire unit consisted of four cadets and a fire leader. 
The Canadians again achieved extraordinary success, winning first 
and second prizes in the first two matches and first and third in 
the last one. I enclose a detail statement of these eight matches. 

May the 24th. In the morning we attended Divine Service 
at the Chapel Royal, St. James Palace, and had the pleasure of 
listening to a sermon delivered by the Archbishop of York, at the 
conclusion of which he addressed a few kindly words of welcome 
to us. In the afternoon I took the boys to the British Museum. 

May the 25th. We left London at 4 p.m. for Portsmouth 
arriving there at 6.45 and were met at the station by a company 
of the ‘‘Officers Training Corps” who escorted us to the Town Hall 
where we were formally welcomed by the Mayor and prominent 
citizens of Portsmouth. All the cadet corps of the Town paraded 
in front of the Town Hall, forming a square, we being in the centre 
on the steps leading up to the Town Hall. After the Mayor’s 
address of welcome I presented each boy to him and he had a 
few nice words for each. The mayor entertained us at dinner 
in the Banquet Hall and, later, we were his guests at the Theatre 
Royal. Arrangements had been made for us to camp at Lumps 
Fort. Five tents were waiting for us when we arrived about 


THE ASHBURIAN 


35 


11 o'clock, with lots of bedding. The thought of camping pleased 
the boys immensely. 

May the 26th. Reveille sounded at 6.30. Soon the boys 
were up and out playing football to get warm, as it was very 
chilly. Breakfast was served in the Barrack-room at 7.45. At 
8.45 we moved off for the docks. Here an Admiralty tender 
met us and took us to visit the Victory Nelson's old flagship. 
We spent an interesting hour on board and then pushed off for 
Cowes on the Isle of Wight. We had a very nice run up the 
Solentand landed at Cowes about 11.30 arriving just in time to 
see Gordon England make a flight in a hydroplane. The Rev. 
Mr. McElwee met us at the dock and very kindly acted as our 
guide during the day. We visited The Royal Naval College, 
Osborne House, and the Town of Newport where the Mayor 
formally welcomed us and entertained us at lunch. After lunch 
we visited Carisbrooke Castle and then drove back to Cowes 
where the tender was waiting to take us back to Portsmouth. 
We just got back in time for tea and then went to the Apollo 
Theatre, the guests of Colonel Holbrook. 

May the 27th. Reveille 6.39. Breakfast 7.30. Left camp 
for the dockyards at 9.15. Lieut. Edwards of the Royal Naval 
Barracks met us at the gate and acted as our guide. We were 
taken through a first class cruiser and shown everything. The 
working of the 13-inch guns was very interesting. We saw two 
dreadnoughts in the course of construction, visited the torpedo 
sheds and saw how they were made and went through the barracks 
and training schools, finishing up at the officers’ mess where we 
had lunch, the guests of Commander Paton. After lunch a 
launch took us to Fort Blockhouse where the submarines are 
kept, and we were shown over one of the latest types of these 
wonderful boats. Whale Island, where gunnery is taught, was 
next visited. Every kind of naval gun is here from a quick firing 
maxim to 13-inch. About 4.30 we returned to Lumps Fort to 
take part in a match with the local cadets. We fired three 
matches corresponding to tests 1, 2 and 3 of the Imperial Cadet 
Matches. The prizes were for the best aggregate and we took 
the first six places. U.M.C. ammunition was used for these 
matches as we had run out of Dominion. It gave very good 
satisfaction. After the shooting, tea was served on the lawn, 
the Mayoress being present. At the request of some of the 
citizens we attended a meeting later in the Town Hall, for the 
purpose of organizing a new battalion. 

May the 28th. Left Portsmouth at 9.30 in four automobiles 
for Winchester accompanied by Colonel Holbrook and Captain 
Pittard. Had a very nice run of thirty-five miles, arriving at 


36 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Winchester at 11 o’clock. The Mayor received us formally at 
the Guildhall and gave a very nice address to the boys. Re¬ 
freshments were then served. Mr. Cowan head of the department 
of education for the county and Mr. Nesbitt, an architect, then 
took us out sight-seeing. We visited the old Cathedral, Win¬ 
chester, where we had lunch, the guests of the Head Master, St. 
Cross Hospital (founded 1136 as an Almshouse for “Nobility 
Poverty”), The Bishop’s Palace, the rifle depot (where we were 
entertained to tea at the officers’ mess), and Winchester Castle. 
We left Winchester about 6 o’clock and got back to camp at 7.30. 
It had been raining steadily since noon and when we got back we 
found all the bedding moved into the barrack room and made up 
there to avoid the danger of the boys catching cold in the damp 
tents. 

May the 29th. Left Portsmouth at 11 A. M. for London 
arriving at 1 o’clock. We were met by Colonel Hanson who 
rushed us off in taxicabs to the Guildhall where Sir Charles Cheers 
Wakefield entertained us to a lunch. There were about 50 
present, including some of the Imperial Cadets. The boys were 
content to take .the rest of the day to rest up; they had been 
pretty much on the go. 

Sat., May 30th. Left London from King’s Cross station at 
9 a.m. for Cambridge where we arrived at 10.30. Some of the 
officers of the O.T.C. met us and took us to the quarters arranged 
for us, the boys in the Grammar School, Colonel Hanson and 
myself in rooms at Trinity College. We stayed at Cambridge 
until Monday morning visiting some of the famous and beautiful 
colleges and enjoying some boating and swimming. On Sunday 
we attended Divine Service at Trinity Chapel. 

Monday, June 1st. Arrived back at London at 10.15 a.m., 
and proceeded out to Twickenham for the matches of the London 
Society of Minature Rifle Clubs held at the Ham and Petersham 
ranges. These are outdoor ranges. When we arrived we found 
that our rifles had not come, missing connections at Portsmouth. 
After some time we managed to borrow two from Colonel Winter 
and with these the whole team had to shoot, and had to hurry as 
they would be required by the English Cadets later. Considering 
how we were handicapped the boys did wonderful work. In the 
individual, Henderson tied for first place with 99 out of 100. 
He lost by one point in the shoot off getting 96. In the team 
match we came second, 20 points behind the winners. In this 
match, which was called deliberate shooting, we did not under¬ 
stand there was a limit of 5 minutes to complete a score. Mac- 
Williams took his time and only got six shots off before the whistle 
blew to cease fire, losing 40 points. In his six shots fired he only 


THE ASHBURIAN 


37 


dropped 3 points, so it is reasonable to believe that in the other 
4 shots he would not have dropped 20 points. 

Tuesday, June 2nd. The boys spent the morning in swim¬ 
ming and resting. In the afternoon I met them at the White 
City. After seeing all the sights we had tea with Sir John Broad- 
bent at the Garrison Club. We returned about 8 P.M. 

June 3rd and 4th. The boys played tennis in the morning 
and had a swim. In the afternoon I took them to the Tower of 
London. We had special tickets and saw everything. At 9 P.M. 
we left Charing Cross station for Dover, en route to visit the 
famous field of Waterloo. We crossed from Dover to Ostend 
arriving at 3 a.m. and at Bruges at 4.30 A.M. We walked around 
the town until 6.30 when we had breakfast at the hotel and left 
for Brussells at 7.20 arriving at 9.30. Here we had nearly 3 
hours before our train left for Waterloo so we got motors and 
had a look around the town. We arrived at Waterloo in time 
for lunch. After lunch we got a very interesting old soldier as 
a guide and went over the battlefields. This took the rest of 
the day. When we returned to the hotel every one was pretty 
tired and ready for bed. 

Fri. June 5th. Left Waterloo at 8.30 arriving at Ostend in 
time for dinner. It was pouring rain and continued to do so for 
the rest of the day. This rather spoilt things as there is nothing 
at Ostend except the beach. Our boat left at 10.30 P.M. and we 
arrived the next day at London at 6.30 A.M. 

June 6th. Went in a motor bus with Colonel Hanson to 
Windsor, where we were invited to spend the day. H.S.H. 
The Prince of Teck and H.R. the Princess of Teck met us and 
showed us all over the grounds, through the King’s cattle sheds, 
conservatories, fruit houses. Everything was looking very 
beautiful and had been specially prepared for the King who 
was expected in a few days for Ascot Week. After we had been 
all over the grounds and to Frogmore where Queen Victoria is 
buried we went back to tea with Their Royal Highnesses to 
King HenryVII Tower where they live and left for home about 
6 o’clock. Before leaving H.S.H. presented each with an auto¬ 
graphed photo of himself and the Princess. They were both 
most gracious and took a keen interest in everything relating 
to Canada, and evidently look forward with anticipation to 
their sojourn amongst us. 

June 7th and 8th. These two days were uneventful. The 
strenuous life was telling on the boys and I thought it best for 
them to take a rest. 


38 


THE ASHBURIAN 


June 9th. Lord Roberts had lunch at Colonel Hanson’s 
and afterwards addressed the boys and presented each with a 
copy of his book “Forty-one Years in India” and an autographed 
photo of himself. A photograph of the group was then taken 
with Lord Roberts as the central figure. He expressed regret 
that he was unable to have us down at his own place at Ascot. 
In the afternoon some of the boys went to the horse-show, others 
to see the Houses of Parliament. In the evening I allowed some 
of them to go to the theatre. 

June 10th and 11th. The 10th was spent quietly and on 
the 11th we left London for Southhampton at 1.35 P.M. and 
embarked on the Ascania about 4.30. We found everything 
very comfortable on board. 

The voyage was uneventful. We had a very good passage 
but slow and didn’t arrive in Montreal until the 22nd June at 
10.30 P.M., too late to land. Cadet Carr-Harris remained behind 
with relatives. 

June 23rd. Transportation was received at Montreal and 
all left for their respective homes on the morning trains. 


General Orders for the Canadian Cadets while in 
quarters at Kensington Park Gardens. 


Reveille— 

6.00 a.m. Air and fold bedding. 

6.10 a.m. A-Section—Physical training. 

B-Section—Bathing. 

6.30 a.m. A-Section—Bathing. 

B-Section—Physical training. 

Note.— The 6.10 a.m. and 6.30 a.m. routine alternates daily 
for each section and each section leader). 

6.50 a.m. Dress and clean equipment. 

7.05 a.m. Cadet orderly sergeant and cadet orderly corporal 
prepare messroom and report to the housekeeper. 

7.20 a.m. Breakfast. 

7.50 a.m. Orderlies clear Messroom. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


39 


8.00 A.M. 

Flag and prayers. 

8.05 a.m. 

Prepare for A.M. musketry. 

9.15 A.M. 

Parade on terrace (if fine). 

Parade in upper hall (if wet). 

9.30 a.m. 

March off. 

10.12 A.M. 

Musketry practice. 

12.15 p.m. 

Return to quarters. 

12.50 p.m. 

Cadet orderlies report to housekeeper. 

1.00 P.M. 

Dinner. 


2.08 P.M. Stand easy. Daily orders will be issued, including 
sightseeing, expeditions to the country, etc. (Any cadet 
who requires tea in quarters must notify the orderly sergeant 
of the fact at 2.00 P.M.) 


7.50 P.M. 

Orderlies—slate orders. 

8.00 p.m. 

Supper. 

9.00 p.m. 

Turn in. Fold and stow tables, beds and chairs. 


9.15 P.M. Lights out. 

The Cadet Orderly Sergeant must notify the housekeeper at 
9.00 A.M., if the contingent will be absent from dinner or requires 
late supper. Orderlies next on duty to be posted over-night. 

(Signed) J. A. Clark Macpherson, 

Captain. 


40 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Winnings of The Canadian Cadet Rifle Team at the matches of 
the Imperial Cadet Association, London, May 22-23-24. 

Test 1. Deliberate Fire. 

For teams of four Cadets 10 shots each, 25 yards, figure 
target, time allowed 4 minutes to complete score, hits in figure 
count 4, in first circle 3, in outer circle 2, possible 40 for each Cadet. 

Prizes.—“The Onehunga Challenge Cup." Presented by the 
Duchess of Marlborough. 

A Gold Medal to Fire Leader. 

A Match Rifle to each member of winning team. 

Won by Canada “A" Team score 136, 

2nd Canada “B” “ “ 134. 

Members of “A" team, Cadets McWilliams 28, Louden 36, 
Baker 36 and Comer 36. 

Members of “B” team, Cadets Carr-Harris 39, Harvie 31, 
Henderson 35, and Gratz 29. 

Test 11. Rapid Fire. 

For teams of four Cadets 25 yards, figure target, time allowed 
45 seconds, number of shots unlimited, count the same as Test 1. 

Prizes.—“The Natal Cup." Presented by the Duke of Wellington 
A Gold Medal to Fire Leader. 

A Match Rifle to each member of team. 

Won by Canada “A" Team score 96. 

2nd Canada “B" “ “ 89. 

Members of “A" team, McWilliams 28, Louden 24, Baker 24, 
and Gratz 20. 

Members of “B" team, Comer 33, McCamon 18, McJanet 20, 
and Sinclair 18. 

Test VI. Rapid. 

Individual Match. Target head and shoulders of man. 

25 yards, a hit to count 1 point, time allowed 45 seconds, 
number of rounds unlimited. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


41 


Prizes.—“The Polhill Gully Cup” (New Zealand). Presented by 
the late Sir Francis S. Hanson. 

A Gold Medal and a Match Rifle. 


Won by Cadet Baker (Canada) 
3rd ‘ “ McWilliams “ 

4th “ Comer 

5th “ Henderson “ 

6th “ Carr-Harris “ 


10 hits. 

8 “ £1: ls:0d 

8 “ 10s 

7 “ 10s 

7 “ 10s 


Test VII. Snap Shooting. 


Individual Match. Target figure of a man. 25 yards, a hit 
to count 1 point, target exposed 6 seconds for each snap, 10 shots. 

Prizes.—“The Rockcliffe Cup.” Presented by the late Lord 
Strathcona and Mount Royal. 

A Gold Medal and a Match Rifle. 

Won by Cadet Mac Williams (Canada) 8 hits 

3rd “ Louden “ 7 “ £1:1s :0d 

4th “ Huggins “ 7 “ 10s 


Test VIII. Grand Aggregate (Individual Championship) 
for aggregate of Tests V, VI, VII. 

Prize.—“The Empire Day Gold Medal” presented by His Royal 
Highness Prince Arthur of Connaught. The “Graphic” Empire 
Day Challenge Cup and a .303 Match Rifle. Won by Cadet 
MacWilliams, score 26 hits. 3rd place won by Cadet Louden 
(Canada). Prize.—“The Sir Robert W. Inglis Bronze Medal 
and Match Rifle.” 


Six-other Canadian Cadets were within the first ten and won 
5 shillings each. 


Test III. Snap Shooting. 

For teams of four Cadets, 25 yards, 10 shots, figure target, 
time allowed 6 seconds each exposure, count the same as tests 1 
and 2. 

Prizes.—“The Randwick Cup.” Presented by Lady Watts. 

A Gold Medal to Fire Leader. 

A Match Rifle to each member of team. 

Won by Canada “A” team score 149. 

2nd England “ 139. 

3rd Canada “B” team “ 133. 


42 


THE ASHBURIAN 


Members of “A” team, MacWilliams 39, Louden 37, Baker 36, 
and Comer 37. 

Members of “B” team, Henderson 33, Harvie 33, Huggins 32 , 
and Gratz 35. 


Test IV. Fatigue Match. 

Individual Match. 10 shots in 4 minutes, a march of a mile 
and then 10 shots in 4 minutes, 30 minutes allowed to complete 
the match, count same as previous tests. Possible 80 points. 

Prize.—‘The Booysens Cup.” Presented by The National 
Service League. 

A Gold Medal and a Match Rifle. 

Won by Cadet Baker (Canada) score 75 
2nd ^ “ MacWilliams “ “ 74 £1: ls:0d 

3rd “ Louden “ “ 72 15s 

4th “ McCamon “ “ 72 5s 

Test V. 

Individual Match. 10 shots, target head and shoulders of 
man. 25 yards, a hit counts 1 point, possible 10 hits, time allowed 
4 minutes. 

Prizes.—“The Toowong Cup” (Australia). 

A Gold Medal and a Match Rifle. 

Won by Cadet Comer (Canada) 10 hits. 

2nd “ MacWilliams “ 10 “ £ L 

Test IX. Rapid. (Extra Series). 

Individual. Unlimited entry. 25 yards, Solano target, 
(triangular), time 45 seconds, unlimited number of rounds. 

Cadet Comer (Canada) tied with Cadet Mills (England) 
score 38, for the “Fessenden Cup.” 

The following also won prizes: 

3rd Cadet Gratz (Canada). 

4th “ MacWilliams “ 

5th “ Carr-Harris “ 

6th “ McCamon “ 


THE ASHBURIAN 


43 


Total winnings at Imperial Cadet Meet. 

8 Silver Cups. 

8 Gold Medals. 

1 Bronze Medal. 

17 Match rifles (.22 calibre). 

1 “ rifle (.303 “ ) 

16 Cash prizes £ 8-3-0. 

5 Prizes in Kind. 

At Portsmouth we had to use U.M.C. ammunition as we ran 
out of Dominion. We took the first six places in the aggregate of 
the three matches. 

At the London meet of the Society of Miniature Rifle Clubs, 
owing to our rifles not arriving in time we had to borrow some and 
we again used U.M.C. ammunition with the result that in the 
team match we came second and in the individual tied for first 
place, Cadet Henderson making 99 out of 100. 

The ammunition that Col. Harston gave us at Quebec gave 
very good satisfaction. During the matches we had very few 
misfires. The grouping was very good. 



44 


THE ASHBURIAN 


B. C. S. 

Being an Account of the Activities and Administration of the 
Ancient Society of the Black Cat. Better Known to History as the 
B.C.S. 

We are indebted for the following contribution to a well- 
known Old Boy who prefers to remain anonymous: 

The reference made in the October issue of The Ashburian to 
the B.C.S., that mysterious and little-known society which existed 
at Ashbury some years ago, has prompted me to disclose some 
facts concerning it, which may be of interest to Ashburians of 
the present time, and serve to recall some amusing incidents to 
the former members of the society. Having access to most of 
the original documents connected with the society, I am in a 
position to undertake this, though by so doing I shall break some 
of the most cherished laws of the B.C.S. and incur all the penalties 
so ably set forth in the copy of the “Laws and Customs'’ which 
lies before me. 

Just where, or how the B.C.S. had its inception, I am unable 
to say, but it appears to have been formed through the efforts of 
certain members of that notorious Third Form which received 
attention in the last issue of The Ashburian. Its purpose was as 
vague as its origin, but it undoubtedly served as an outlet for all 
the misguided energy of its members, and the mischievous exploits 
of the Society were numerous and frequent. So far as I know, 
no master in the school at that time knew of the Society’s existence 

According to the somewhat dilapidated minute book which 
is still preserved, the first meeting recorded was held on September 
29, 1907; the members present being E. J. Lowe, J. K. Nutting, 
H. R. Morgan, A. G. Perley and W. M. M. Cory. There seems 
to have been no definite date set for any meeting, and these were 
apparently held whenever they happened to fall in line with the 
officers’ inclinations. I suspect that detention classes also affected 
the days and hours of meetings in no small degree. In regard to 
officers, it was rather difficult to find a member of the society who 
did not happen to possess at least one or two offices. There was 
a president, vice-president, secretary, treasurer and goodness 
knows what else. Occasionally, officers were elected by ac¬ 
clamation, though for the higher posts there was often a spirited 
contest, with a campaign of perhaps twenty-four hours duration. 
Bribery and corruption were prevalent and were conducted almost 
as openly as in real politics. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


45 


As time went on there came an expansion in the membership 
of the B.C.S. and we find a number of new names on the roll. F. 
G. Avery was initiated November 26,1907; H. C. Gooch, February 
9, 1908; J. A. Lindsay, January 13, 1908; Neil McAllister, April 14, 
1908; G. C. Rutherford and B. H. Roth well, September 29, 1908; 
E. K. Davidson, April 23, 1909; George Graves, April 27, 1909; 
A. R. MacLaren, March 31, 1910; W. B. West, September 20, 
1910; H. E. Reid, December 15, 1910. 

Now a few words as to these initiation proceedings. They 
were usually harmless and occupied but a short time. The 
society met at a point near the school in the large back yard of 
one of the members and here the new member was required to 
pass a series of tests. One of these consisted in “walking the 
plank,” the said plank being supported off the ground by a small 
block of wood at each end. The nerve racking part of the ordeal 
lay in the fact that the blind-folded victim had previously 
been shown a similar plank spanning a pit about six or eight feet 
deep, and naturally supposed that this was the one he was trying 
to cross. His hesitating and extremely careful progress across 
the imaginary pit was very entertaining to the members of the 
society, most of whom had been over it themselves. After their 
ingenuity in the invention of tests had been exhausted, the new 
member (likewise exhausted) was led to the council chamber 
where he was required to sign the register, make sundry de¬ 
clarations and promises and pay his respects to the sacred Black 
Cat, the emblem of the society. 

Occasionally, difficulty was found in getting a new member 
to undergo initiation, but the B.C.S. after having selected those 
who were wanted in their circle, insisted on their joining the 
Society and took measures to see that their desires in the matter 
were carried out. From the Archives of the society, I take an 
envelope neatly labelled “MacMahon vs. B.C.S.” and find 
documents which trace the different steps in a case such as I 
have just mentioned. First there is the application for member¬ 
ship of one Desmond MacMahon signed by him and witnessed 
by E. J. Lowe. The document appears to have received hard 
usage and bears evidence of having been torn and then pasted 
together again. It bears the official stamp of the society. Next 
is the proclamation of the society, signed by the president, H. C. 
Gooch and the other officers and commanding “the aforesaid 
Desmond MacMahon” to appear at the Council Chamber for 
initiation. Apparently Micky had heard rumours of what was 
in store for him and objected to undergoing initiation, for the 
next document is a “warrant” for his apprehension, granting 


46 


THE ASHBURIAN 


authority to the bearer to bring “said D. MacMahon to said 
Council Chamber and if necessary to use force. And moreover, 
all members of the B.C.S. are commanded to help him.” Micky 
appears to have regarded these orders, etc., as mere “scraps of 
paper,” to have offered resistance, and to have made good his 
escape, from the evidence presented in the final document in the 
envelope. This is a report from the officers who served the 
“warrant,” to the effect that “the said Desmond MacMahon did 
resist the officers of the Black Cat Society, and also, did in my 
presence utter remarks insulting to the B.C.S.” There is no 
record of his initiation and just what reasons he had for refusing 
to join the society I cannot remember. Perhaps if you ask him 
yourself he may tell you. 

“Rothwell vs. B.C.S.” reads the label on another envelope, 
ushering one into the story of one of the most stormy episodes in 
the whole history of the society. To properly understand the 
situation, it must be remembered that Rothwell was at the head 
of a rival concern, known as the “Delawares” and organized on 
the lines of an Indian tribe—so, at least its members fondly 
imagined. The statesmen in control of the B.C.S. decided to 
absorb the Delawares in the former society and in accordance 
with this plan, requested, or rather demanded, applications for 
membership from some of the Delawares. The correspondence 
in this envelope is written for the most part on small scraps of 
paper and was probably passed across the room in school hours. 

The first note reads: 

“To B.C.S., 

It has been reported that some Delawares have been 
molested and that the B.C.S. have tried to force Delawares into 
their club. 

This has got to be stopped or trouble will be made. After 
this no Delaware must be molested or made to join the B.C.S. 

By order, 

Chief Wa-Wa-Taysee.” 

This note of so high handed a character probably prompted 
a suitable reply from the B.C.S., for here is Rothwelks answer. 

“The B.C.S. will have to take those words back or you will 
receive something. Answer before three o’clock. 


Wa-Wa-Taysee.” 


THE ASHBURIAN 


47 


There is nothing in the records to indicate how this ultimatum 
was replied to, or whether the “something” materialized, but I 
have a vague recollection of throwing up hasty barricades under 
a heavy fire of sticks and stones from the Delawares' expeditionary 
force. However, peace was finally concluded, and Rothwell him¬ 
self joined the B.C.S., while the Delawares were disbanded. He 
seems to have been regarded with suspicion by the older members 
of the society, for soon after we find him accused of telling out¬ 
siders about the transactions of the B.C.S.—a very serious offence 
and severely punished. A formal charge was made, and a trial 
ordered. The accused seems to have objected to the proceedings 
and what transpired at the trial is best explained by Rothwell's 
note to the society. He says: “After your rotten meeting today 
I want never to be mentioned as in the B.C.S. The trial was to 
be at 3.45 and I was going on then and I had a perfect right to do 
what I liked until that time. 

Gordon Perley was gentleman enough to come and shake 
hands with me and I think a good deal of him for doing so. But 
Dick and the others acted like savages. 

I am not in the B.C.S. now and don't want to be, so I don’t 
care what I say about it. The B.C.S. can always consider itself 
an enemy of 

Rothwell.'' 

It may be mentioned that Perley was the leader of the 
minority in the society and upheld Rothwell on general principles 
as opposed to the party in power. This incident with so much 
correspondence connected with it closes with Rothwell's re¬ 
signation dated April 22, 1909. 

The great event of the year in the B.C.S. was the annual 
banquet held on September 29, Foundation Day, and this curi¬ 
ously enough was usually the best attended meeting of the year. 
In fine weather, meetings were held in a cave, dug into the ground 
in the yard where the B.C.S. held sway. This excavation which 
had been roofed and covered over with earth by the members 
was a remarkable piece of work, and was spacious enough to 
hold all members of the society and to admit of their walking 
about. The entrance was at one end of a passage running from 
the cave itself, and was closed by a wooden box turned upside 
down over a sort of man-hole, in order to keep out the snow in 
the winter. At the other end of the cave was a fire-place hollowed 
out of the earth, in which it was possible to cook a certain amount 
of food in a certain way. At the first annual banquet there was 
a spirited debate as to who should have the post of cook. After 


48 


THE ASHBURIAN 


prolonged argument, Perley was chosen, but his efforts were so 
little appreciated that it was unanimously decided to abolish the 
office, and after that supplies for the banquets were bought ready 
to eat. 

These banquets were financed by public subscription and 
each year notices were posted by the Banquet Committee (on 
which the writer had the misfortune to serve for two years) calling 
on the members to give liberally. The sum of two dollars was 
considered adequate to provide all necessaries but it may be 
remarked in passing that the committee considered itself lucky 
if the subscriptions totalled over the dollar mark. The program 
on these occasions consisted of the election of officers for the 
following year and of speech making by the various officers. 
As I have said before, bribery played no small part in the elections, 
and in one case the successful candidate owed his office to the 
banquet committee. There were two candidates nominated for 
president—Gooch and Perley. The first held out to the com¬ 
mittee as a reward for their “votes and influence/’ a bottle of 
raspberry vinegar, while Perley offered a pineapple. After due 
consideration, the members of the committee decided that Gooch’s 
offer would best suit their needs, and he was accordingly elected. 

I could write almost indefinitely of the different activities 
which occupied our attention in the B.C.S.; of its banking system, 
library, post office, stock exchange and secret service; of our 
experiments in asphyxiation and resuscitation; of our engineering 
works, foundry and explosive factory; but the space at my 
command is limited. In closing I should like to draw attention 
to a fact which may be of interest to such Old Boys as were 
formerly members of the society. There has been no meeting 
of the B.C.S. since the early part of 1911, but the society has 
never been officially disbanded and I have recently heard rumours 
that the old B.C.S. may be revived in the near future—no doubt 
in a somewhat modified form. In the meantime, the foregoing 
account is a fairly accurate, though incomplete, history of the 
society, and if any of my readers still feel curious concerning 
it, 1 would fain follow the example of the scriptural writer and 
say: “Now the rest of the acts of the B.C.S. which it did, are 
they not written in the book of the chronicles of that society.” 


VlGGERSTAFF. 


THE ASHBURIAN 


49 


MR. BRYCE IN BOMBAY 

Letters received by the Ottawa Y.M.C.A. from Mr. George 
P. Bryce, its representative in India, will prove of exceptional 
interest to old Ashburians, when it remembered that he was a 
master at the old school on Argyle Avenue for some time. Mr. 
Bryce’s letters give in graphic style his impressions of India 
upon his arrival there, and also glimpses of the work which he 
and his wife are undertaking. The following is a portion of one 
of the letters: 

“This is a hill-station, of the sort beloved of the European 
in India. It is really the summer resort of Bombay, which is 
four hours away and 2,500 feet down hill. Matheran is a bit 
like Muskoka, with its rocks and trees and ozone, except for the 
water. All we get of that comes in large and picturesque water¬ 
skins brought by patient bullocks; but from a rocky crag we get 
a view of the Indian Ocean shimmering away to the horizon.” 

In further describing Bombay, Mr. Bryce writes: “Bombay 
was sighted Friday night. It is a large place, in parts very fine. 
Conspicuous among the miles of shorelights stood out those of 
the Taj Mahal hotel, the dome of which recalls its more splendid 
namesake, the great Mohammedan temple tomb at Agra. We 
were met at the docks on Saturday by Mr. Cranna, General 
Secretary at Bombay, and taken to the City Association building, 
where two much-appreciated meals were served us after the 
Indian style; late breakfast and tiffin, or lunch. We missed 
afternoon tea and had had dinner at Matheran. You will see 
that we are quite getting into un-Canadian ways and surviving 
multiple eating sessions daily. Don’t know whether we could 
manage it in Great Britain; but this Bombay schedule developes 
patience which is necessarj^ to health in the Orient; for, after all, 
India is much like Japan. 

‘The land of approximate time, 

Where the overcharged West 
May learn how to rest, 

The land of Inconsequent Now.’ 

“Bombay gives a good introduction to the Orient. It is 
highly Europeanized for India; but in the panorama spread out 
before us, in the multitude walking its well-paved streets, or 
riding its electric cars, in the keen business men managing its 


50 


THE ASHBURIAN 


modern stores, or the railroad men despatching trains at the 
beautiful Victoria Terminus—the world’s finest in exterior archi¬ 
tecture; in all these groups we had a chance to see India as she is, 
European, Eurasian and native; Hindu and Mohammedan, Jainist 
and Parsee; the babu and the coolie, the Brahman and the Sudra. 

There were drivers of huge bullock carts, incessantly calling 
Hai! Hai! at unwary foot passengers. There were men, women 
and children carrying all manner of burdens on their heads. 
There were prosperous Parsee merchants with patent leather hats 
and Prince Albert coats; loungers or beggars sitting in the sun, 
with the paint spot on the forehead to show recent attendance 
at the temple; wearers of turbans of brightest hue, with costumes 
of drapery most simply and ingeniously arranged; toothless age 
and careless childhood—a stream of life that captivated the eye, 
but brought home to the heart some sense of the seething, suffering 
multitudes of this India, and one realizes a little of the need of 
the Christ who had compassion ‘because they were as sheep not 
having a Shepherd.” 

In a later report on the “1st quarter of 1914,” Mr. Bryce 
explains after spending the first few days at Matheran, where the 
Secretarial Conference for India and Ceylon was in progress, he 
and his wife went on to their future field of labor in Bangalore. 
Their first business was studying the language, he states, and he 
and Mrs. Bryce had an Indian teacher for three hours a day. 
Mrs. Bryce was appointed as a joint honorary secretary of the 
Y.W.C.A. for Bangalore, owing to the lady secretary’s absence 
for the year in England. Mr. Bryce was engaged in teaching two 
educational groups at the City Branch of the Y.M.C.A., while at 
the Bourdillon Branch he was leading a Bible study class. In 
addition to giving numerous addresses and illustrated lectures 
he had been to one of the branches practically every night playing 
tennis or football and thus getting to know the men. The most 
recent communication received, tells something of the Y.M.C.A. 
training school for India, of which Mr. Bryce was appointed vice¬ 
principal. The course is one year for men of B.A. standing. 

Altogether, Mr. Bryce is having a busy time of it, but from 
the tone of his letters throughout both he and Mrs. Bryce appear 
to be thoroughly enjoying their work. A still later report by 
cablegram to Dr. Bryce, in Ottawa, announces the arrival of a son 
and heir to Mr. and Mrs. Bryce in Bangalore. 


BY SPECIAL APPOINTMENT TO HIS EXCELLENCY 
THE GOVERNOR GENERAL 



B. SLATTERY 

IMPORTER AND MANUFACTURER OF 

FINE TABLE DELICACIES 

By Ward Market, Phone Q 107 Wellington Market, Phone Q 143 

Windsor Market, Phone Q. 890 Residence, Phone Q. 131 

Primrose Market, Phone Q. 433 Excelsior Market, Phone Q 107 


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LI M ITED 

EVERYTHING IN SPORTING GOODS 
SHELF AND HEAVY HARDWARE 
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MUSIC AND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 

We carry one of the largest and best assorted stocks of Sheet Music, 
Music Books, Musical Instruments, Strings and all accessories in 
Canada. A new stock received in September of Violins, Violincellos, 
Mandolins, etc., from Europe. 

Agents:—Gibson Mandolins, Laube, Clarinets, Boosey Band Instru¬ 
ments. Anything and everything in Music. 

McKECHNIE MUSIC COMPANY 

Orme Limited Premises 
175 Sparks Street - Ottawa 







^d 

d 


Hockey Team 

A. C. Thoburn The Headmaster G. F. Benson 

Malcolm T. L. Blakeney 

G. Barwis T. G. Birkett A. L. Code, Capt. A. R. MacLaren L. Palmer 

J. N. MacLaren 











Hsfjtnuum 


Editorial Staff. 

Editor-in-Chief —Mr. C. H. Hooper. 

Sports — D. MacMahon, A. L. Code, T. S. Crocket. 

Shooting — R. S. Morris. 

Secretary-Treasurer —Mr. A. B. H. Wiggins. 

EDITORIAL 

Easter 

With the advent of Easter, marking as it does the last part 
of the home stretch before the exams, masters and boys alike heave 
sighs of relief. The former know the work has been conscien¬ 
tiously covered and that only revision remains; that they have 
done their work thoroughly, and now feel a pleasant self- 
satisfaction thereat. The latter have a vague impression of 
months of more or less intelligent effort to understand what has 
been put before them, and a very vivid realization that it is 
time to let up on the pressure and enjoy the spring weather. 

Most of the fun of the school year is crowded into the next 
two months—the mere fact of being out of doors at all hours 
after the confinement of the winter, is in itself a prolonged treat. 
The difficulty is to force oneself to come into evening study. 

Easter is a landmark also in bringing to an end the “sick 
season/’ All the coughs, colds, and other juvenile disorders are 
always crowded into the period between Christmas and Easter. 
This year we were singularly fortunate in having no cases of 
anything worse than colds during the whole period. Possibly 
the mild weather had something to do with it. A generation ago 
Easter had other associations in juvenile minds besides the 
religious ones. It was connected with eggs. Eggs of every 
colour of the rainbow appeared on that day, and the colouring 
of them beforehand afforded much amusement and not a little 
mess. Today outside of the decorations in a few shop windows 
there is little to remind children of the symbolism contained in 
in this old custom. You can buy coloured eggs today—just as 
you can buy everything else—the making of which used to give 
pleasure to the rising generation. But there is another and 
more striking symbol of the return of life which coincides with 
the festival of Easter—the flowing of the sap. For months the 
trees have stood dry and bare, creaking in the wind, dead things. 
Then without warning, in the twinkling of an eye, through 
every fibre flows the sap and that which yesterday was dead, 
today is pulsating with mysterious life. 



2 The Ashburian 

HOCKEY 


CARLING CUP MATCHES 


Date 

Match 

Won by 

Score 

Jan. 23rd 

L.C.C. at St. Alban’s 

L.C.C. 

5-4 

“ 30th 

St. Alban’s at Ashbury 

Ashbury 

4-2 

Feb. 6th 

Ashbury at L.C.C. 

L.C.C. 

12-1 

“ 13th 

St. Alban’s at L.C.C. 

L.C.C. 

15-1 

“ 20th 

Ashbury at St. Alban’s 

Ashbury 

7-2 

" 27th 

L.C.C. at Ashbury 

Tie 

1-1 

We have 

therefore to congratulate 

L.C.C. once 

more on 


winning the cup—for the third year in succession. This entitles 
them to keep the cup. It is now up to Ashbury to win the 
Athletic Cup—we must not allow all the cups to repose in Mont¬ 
real. 


Ashbury vs. St. Alban’s. 

This match was played at the Gladstone Avenue rink on 
Saturday, January 30th, and resulted in a win for the Ashbury 
boys with a score of four goals to two. The ice was hard and the 
play remained fast throughout the whole match. 

St. Alban’s, although light, have a very fast team and they 
never gave up until the final whistle had blown. Code was easily 
the best player on the ice, and his stickhandling and checking was 
very largely responsible for Ashbury’s win. Barwis played an 
excellent game in goal, while Adair and Lilly were the most 
prominent of the visitors. 

Ashbury secured an early lead which they held for the whole 
game. They scored three goals in the first eight minutes, and 
St. Alban’s also scored one in the first period. 

St. Alban’s played their best hockey in the second period, 
scoring one goal, while Ashbury were unable to increase their lead. 

In the last period Ashbury did most of the pressing and added 
one to their total. Blakeney, Code, Rivers and Malcolm con¬ 
tributed Ashbury’s four goals, while Lilly and Adair accounted for 
those of St. Alban’s. 

The game was clean throughout, there being only one penal¬ 
ty. Adair of St. Alban’s was the only player hurt, and he was 
able to continue after a few minutes’ rest. 

Mr. Phillips very kindly refereed for us. 


The Ashburian 


3 


The line-up of 


the two teams was a follows: 


Ashbury 
Barwis 
Rivers 
MacLaren I 
Code 

MacLaren II 


Position 

Goal 

Cover Point 
Point 
Rover 


St. Alban’s 
Skelton 
Vrooman 
Annesley 
Lilly 


& Birkett II 


Right Wing 
Left Wing 
Centre 


Jones 


Malcolm 
Blakeney I 


Watson 

Adair 


Ashbury vs. Lower Canada College. 


On Friday February 5th the hockey team journeyed to 
Montreal to try conclusions with L.C.C., the game being arranged 
to start at 10.45 on Saturday morning. The early hour, added to 
darkness of the rink, put the Ashbury boys entirely off their game, 
with the result that they were overwhelmed by a score of twelve 
goals to one. 

L.C.C., were certainly a considerably superior team, but had 
Ashbury played as they did against Westmount the following 
week, the score would have been much more even. 

The game itself does not call for much comment; L.C.C. 
scored twice in the first two minutes and continued to score at 
regular intervals during the rest of the game. In the first period 
Malcolm deceived their goal-keeper with a good shot from mid-ice. 
Palmer had a lively time in goal, and acquitted himself very 
creditably. 

Roy MacLaren had the misfortune to break his skate in the 
last period, and he was replaced by Blakeney I. 

The following was the Ashbury line-up:— 


Palmer 
MacLaren I 
Rivers 
Code 

MacLaren II 
Birkett II 
Malcolm 


Goal 

Point 

Cover Point 
Rover 
Right Wing 
Centre 
Left Wing 


Ashbury vs. Westmount High School. 


The Westmount High School hockey team came to Ottawa 
and were defeated by the Ashbury boys on Saturday, February 
13th at the . Gladstone Avenue Rink. The final score stood: 
Ashbury 3—Westmount 1. 


4 


The Ashburian 


The match was clean and fast, and their was only one penalty 
during the whole game. Code was the star of the game as usual. 
He scored one goal after a fine individual rush of more than half 
the length of the ice. After he had passed the Westmount 
defence, he drew the goalkeeper out of his net and put the puck in. 

Outside of Code, it is hard to distinguish between the playing 
of the Ashbury team, although Roy MacLaren, Wren Birkett and 
Malcolm did excellent work, while both Palmer and Barwis 
played well in goal. For Westmount McBoyle played the 
best hockey. 

Ibbotson succeeded in scoring for Westmount after about 
five minutes play. Then Ashbury started in earnest and played 
their best hockey of the season. It was not long afterwards that 
Birkett II slipped the puck past Stewart into the Westmount net 
from a mix-up. Then Code gave us the lead with his brilliant 
rush, and this ended the scoring in the first half. In the second 
half the play was very even and there was only one goal, Roy 
MacLaren doing the trick. Westmount worked hard to overcome 
the lead, but the Ashbury boys did their work well and held 
their opponents scoreless for the rest of the match. 

We were again indebted to Mr. Phillips for refereeing with 
his usual skill. 

The following were the line-ups:— 

Ashbury Position Westmount 


Palmer and Barwis 

Rivers 

MacLaren I 

Code 

Birkett I 

Malcolm 

Birkett II 


Goal 

Cover Point 
Point 
Cover 

Right Wing 
Left Wing 
Centre 


Stewart 

Ibbotson 

Lee 

Fullerton 

Wallace 

McBoyle 

Buchanan 


Ashbury vs. Independents. 

This match proved an exciting one from beginning to end, 
with plenty of hard checking and very little rough play. It was 
played on the Gladstone Avenue rink on Thursday, February 
18th. 

Ashbury showed themselves to be the best team, winning by 
a score of four to nothing. Code, as usual, starred for Ashbury 
and score two of his team’s goals, both after brilliant end to end 
rushes. 

Birkett II accounted for our other two scores. On one of 
these occasions the whole Ashbury forward line went up the ice 
with perfect combination and they did not give the Independents’ 


The Ashburian 


5 


goalkeeper a chance to stop the puck. Both Palmer and Barwis 
played well in goal. 

For the Independents Watson showed up well, while their 
goalkeeper also saved a goal a number of times. 

Two twenty-minutes periods were played, and Ashbury 
scored two goals in each. Mr. Smith took charge of the game, 
and there was only one penalty. 

The Ashbury team was as follows:— 


Goal 

Point 

Cover Point 
Rover 
Left Wing 
Right Wing 
Centre 


Palmer and Barwis 


Rivers 
MacLaren I 
Code 

MacLaren II 
Birkett I 
Birkett II 


Ashbury vs. St. Alban’s. 


The Ashbury Hockey Team left Ottawa to play St. Alban’s on 
Friday evening the 19th of February. The team had a good 
night’s rest at the Revere House, and were ready for anything in 
the morning. As St. Alban’s usually only have the rink for an 
hour, it was decided to play three fifteen-minutes periods. When 
two of these were over it was learned that we could play for a full 
hour, so we eventually played four periods of fifteen minutes 
each. 

Ashbury got away with a flying start and Code scored the 
first goal in about five minutes. Three others quickly followed 
and then the first period ended. In the second period both 
teams scored once and in the third Ashbury got two goals and 
St. Alban’s one. There was no scoring in the final quarter so that 
Ashbury won the match by a score of seven to two. Code con¬ 
tributed his usual brace of goals; Malcolm followed suit while 
MacLaren I, Benson I and Blakeney each scored one. 

For St. Alban’s Vrooman played the best hockey. He and 
Lilly scored their goals. 

There was not one penalty during the whole match. In the 
last period Malcolm hit the post no less than four times. The 
St. Alban’s goalkeeper distinguished himself and stopped many 
scores. 

The ice was soft after the first period, and considering this 
fact the game was very fast. 

St. Alban’s kindly entertained us to lunch at the hotel, after 
which we just caught our train for Ottawa. 


6 


The Ashburian 


The line-ups were as follows: 


St. Alban’s 

Skelton 

Annesley 

Vrooman 

Lilly 


Position 

Goal 


Ashbury 


Bidwell 

Jones 


Adair 


Right Wing 
Left Wing 


Defence 

Defence 

Rover 

Centre 


Barwis and Palmer 
MacLaren I 
Rivers 
Code 

Blakeney I 
BensonI & Thoburn 
Malcolm & MacLaren II 


Ashbury vs. Lower Canada. 


On Friday evening February 26th, the Lower Canada 
Hockey team came to Ottawa for the final game of the season, and 
were a little surprised on Saturday morning to see our boys 
holding their own. The Match was a tie, the score being one 
all, and although five or six minutes overtime were played neither 
team could forge ahead and we had to give up the ice. The game 
was fast and clean with plenty of good bodychecking. The 
Ashbury defence played as they never have before, and checked 
the Lower Canada forwards to a standstill. Barwis made some 
wonderful stops in goal and saved his team many times. 
McLagan in goal for L.C.C., also saved his team time after time. 
Of the forwards it is impossible to pick a star, as everybody 
played splendid hockey. 

The Ashbury score came as the result of a perfect combination 
rush between Code, Birkett II, MacLaren I and Malcolm. The 
latter made a hard shot which completely fooled the Lower 
Canada goalminder. Our opponents got their goal through a 
rush and shot by Slater. 

As the Montreal boys had to catch their train, only three 
fifteen-minute periods were played. In the first of these neither 
team scored but both had narrow escapes. 

It was in the second period that Ashbury secured their score, 
and Lower Canada evened it up in the third. 

There were only a few penalties, and these were all for minor 
offences. Mr. Phillips handled the game faultlessly, and both 
teams appreciated his work very much. 

At the end both teams were showing the effects of a hard 
struggle, with the Ashbury boys a shade the fresher. During the 
match the play was in the L.C.C., half for the majority of the 
time. 


The Ashburian 


7 


The following were the line-ups: 


L. C. C. 

Position 

Ashbury 

McLagan 

Goal 

Barwis 

Nichol 

Defence 

MacLaren I 

Lyall 

Defence 

Rivers 

Dawes 

Rover 

Code 

Slater 

Centre 

Birkett II 

Flanagan 

Right Wing 

Birkett I 

Baillie 

Left Wing 

Malcolm 



Intermediate Hockey Team 

J. W. McLimont, de M. Taschereau, R. Van Meter, 

P. C. Drummond, T. S. Crocket (capt.), C. A. Mulligan, 

E. Gill. 

Ashbury Intermediates vs. models. 

On Ash Wednesday, after much wrangling with the street-car 
conductor about two transfers, which we got in the end, the 
Ashbury Intermediates arrived at the Model School rink to face 
the Models for the third time this season. The ice was soft along 
one side of the rink but the rest was in fine condition. 

The result was given as a victory for the Models by two 
goals to one, though the Ashbury team were not altogether satis¬ 
fied with the Models' second goal. 

Van Meter and Crocket starred for Ashbury, the former 
scoring our one goal after a fine individual rush. 













8 


The Ashburian 


The Ashbury team lined up as follows: 


Goal 

Point 


Drummond 
Van Meter 

Parker, Scott & McLimont 

Mulligan 

Panet 

Crocket 


Cover Point 
Left Wing 
Right Wing 
Centre 


Ashbury Intermediates vs. Edward's Team. 

These two teams had two very close matches at the Gladstone 
Avenue rink after the Senior league was over. In both games the 
Ashbury boys came out victorious after exciting though not 
spectacular matches. 

The score of the first game was 2 to 1. In the first period 
there was no scoring, but in the second Taschereau scored after 
a fine rush of more than half the length of the rink. In the 
third period Gill, who had just started playing, scored in about 
two minutes. This was the best play of the game, and it certainly 
proved that weight is not everything in a hockey game. Edward's 
team managed to get one goal before the end, but after that the 
Ashbury boys played four men on the defence. 

In the second game the only score came in the second period, 
after a brilliant individual effort by Crocket. Drummond saved 
this game by his excellent goalkeeping. 

We are indebted to MacMahon for refereeing, and we take 
this opportunity of thanking him. 

The Ashbury line-up for these games was as follows:— 


Goal 

Point 

Cover Point 
Rover 
Left Wing 
Right Wing 
Centre 


Drummond 

Panet 

Taschereau I 
Van Meter 
McLimont 
Murphy and Gill* 
Crocket 


*Gill played the third period of the first game and all of the 
second. 


HOCKEY CHARACTERS 


Barwis—one of our many goal-tenders. He was the one of 
the finds of the season. Under the coaching of Alf. Smith he 
developed rapidly into a first-class net-guardian. 

Palmer—also a goal-tender. He began the season with very 
little experience, but improved so rapidly that it was very difficult 
to tell which was the better, he or Barwis. 



The Ashburian 


9 


MacLaren I—dropped back from his old position at right 
wing to right defence. Here he showed up to great advantage, 
his speed enabling him to carry the puck from end to end repeate¬ 
dly. After a little practice in the gentle art of body-checking he 
became quite proficient and was able to thumble them over 
with ease. 

Rivers—last year’s centre, held down left defence. Used his 
body to suit even Alf. Smith—as Flanagan will testify—and 
rushed well. Formed a stonewall defence along with MacLaren. 

Birkett II—played centre and did it well. Was responsible 
for a number of goals and worked in well with the other forwards. 
Skates fast and is an excellent stick-handler. Checks back and 
uses his weight to good purpose. 

Malcolm—one of the old guard. Played left wing and 
showed heaps of speed when he cared to let loose. His strongest 
point was his shot which was very wicked indeed. 

Birkett I—played right wing the greater part of the season. 
Could play boards well, take a pass and was not selfish with the 
puck. Also had a good shot. 

Blakeney I—started the season at centre. A trifle slow in 
shooting, but a good stick-handler and not selfish. 

MacLaren II—utility man. Very useful at right wing. 
Checked back constantly and never let his man get away. Stick- 
handled and passed well. 

Thoburn—a useful man who developed rapidly during the 
season. 

Benson I—A handy man, rather slow, but could take a pass 
and shoot. 

A. L. C. 

Code—made an excellent captain and played a brilliant game 
all the season, being always conspicuous on the ice. Is to be 
heartily congratulated on the splendid fight the team put up 
in the final game against L.C.C. 


SHOOTING 

After the first of the series of the D. R. A. matches had been 
shot, it was found that the rules under which we had been shooting 
were different to those somewhat vaguely specified in the regula¬ 
tions. Consequently the first match was cancelled and shot over 
again. The result of the first three matches are as follows:— 



10 


The Ashburian 


1st Match. 


2nd Match 


3rd Match 


Jones 

94 

Ross 

92 

MacMahon 

95 

Malcolm 

93 

MacMahon 

89 

Morris 

95 

Bate I 

91 

Barwis 

89 

Benson I 

93 

Taschereau I 

90 

Benson II 

89 

Malcolm 

92 

Armstrong 

88 

Scott 

88 

Jones 

92 

Drummond 

88 

Burstall I 

88 

Bate I 

91 

Small 

86 

Davidson 

87 

Taschereau 

90 

MacMahon 

85 

Colpman 

86 

Small 

90 

Goldstein 

85 

Drummond 

86 

Scott 

90 

Average 89% 

Average 

88.2% 

Average 92.1% 


The result of the junior shooting for the Cox Cup given below 
shows a marked improvement over last year’s scores. Jones, the 
winner, did very creditable shooting, while Scott and Panet were 
very close seconds 

Possible—250 


Jones 

229 

Kingsmill 

208 

Scott 

228 

Brennan 

207 

Panet 

228 

Murphy 

205 

Hamilton 

224 

Gill 

205 

Mulligan 

218 

Hampson 

202 

Burpee 

211 

Johnston 

199 

Burstall I 

210 

Woollcombe I 

189 

Fowler I 

210 




The result of the last D.R.A. match and that of the senior 
shooting for the O’Connor Cup will be given in the next number of 
the Ashburian. 


ATHLETICS 

The Interscholastic Track meet will be held in Montreal 
this year about the end of May. We have lost two or three of 
last year’s team, but the addition of Code will help us a great deal. 
We look for great things too from the Carlings and MacLaren— 
the latter carried off the sprints last year, and we hope he will add 
the High Jump this year. 

Our own school sports will be run this year in four divisions 
instead of in three as in previous years. The divisions will be:— 

Open events. 

Senior Intermediates—Open to boys 15 & 16 years old. 

Junior Intermediates—Open to boys from 12 to 14 years. 

Juniors—Open to boys under 12 years. 



The Ashburian 


11 


A boy may complete in any division senior to his own. In 
each of these divisions there will be at least one handicap event, 
so there will be no excuse for so many boys to stand around instead 
of running. 

The school sports are naturally for every boy in the school, 
and by this new arrangement everyone will have a good chance. 


TENNIS PROSPECTS 

By the time this magazine is published the tennis nets should 
have appeared again, though at the time of writing spring seems 
very loath to come. Last year we were late in starting—the first 
game was played on the first of May—but in the five or six weeks 
of term that remained we thoroughly wore out six courts. 

The prospects for the season seem brighter than ever this 
year. All the stars of last year are still with us, and another 
year’s experience ought to raise the standard considerably. Code 
and MacLaren II have now been finalists in the open champion¬ 
ship for two years, and it is extremely probably that they will 
try conclusions again this year. MacLaren—increased in size 
and strength—should be able to hit a little harder this year, 
though he must not allow it to interfere with his excellent placing. 

Morris has some excellent strokes, and with a little more 
accuracy would make a very good player; while MacMahon, 
Barwis and Crocket are all likely to worry their opponents a good 
deal. We hear great things of Bryson—perhaps he will spring a 
surprise upon us. 

The doubles will be handicapped as usual: If Code and 
MacLaren II enter together again they must expect to owe about 
three figures—at “owe 40” they were six games ahead last year. 

The Juniors will probably be as keen as ever; we heard two 
of them arranging to be partners last fall, so there should be no 
lack of entries. We hope to follow last year’s example on Ascen¬ 
sion Day, and play a handicap singles tournament in which the 
masters are included. The date this year is May 13th. 


A cyclist had just got the best of a tremendous race by a foot, 
after which he had fallen off his machine dead beat, and lay to all 
appearances dead. 

“Oh! I hope there is nothing serious the matter,” remarked 
one fair spectator to another, “I wonder what it can be?” 

“I think I know”, replied her friend with a superior know¬ 
ledge. “I expect he’s broken his record, but I never heard of a 
fatal case”. 




12 


The Ashburian 



Lt.-Col. J. W. Woods 




The Ashburian 


13 


OUR NEW PRESIDENT 

We extend a warm welcome to our new President, Col. 
James W. Woods, and at the same time we offer him our heartiest 
congratulations upon his election to this position. For while the 
Presidency of a comparatively speaking small school may not at 
first sight seem a position of any very great importance, yet, if 
we consider how real a national asset a good boarding school is, 
the President of such an institution is to be congratulated as much 
as the Head of some large financial corporation engaged in a 
wold-wide commerce. 

Ashbury, we believe, has influenced the future career of 
hundreds of young Canadians, and has sent them out into the 
world with a moral equipment that is the real foundation of 
national greatness: and as long as she continues this good work, 
she will remain a very important asset in the country’s national 
wealth. Our new President very strongly realizes this fact, as he 
has shown by the active and generous support that he has given 
to the School for many years past. We are sure that in his new 
position his interest in our welfare will be even greater than has 
been, and that under his leadership the School will continue to 
become more and more a power in the land. 


14 


The Ashburian 


WAR NOTES 

It was with much pleasure that we learned a short time ago 
that our late French master, Mr. D. E. Cecil Wood, had received 
a commission in Kitchener’s army. Mr. Wood left our staff last 
June intending to return to work in England, but when the war 
broke out he joined the colours instead. Mr. Wood was Secretary- 
Treasurer of the Ashburian during his four years’ stay at Ashbury. 

We are also very glad to hear that Mr. Eddie Phillips, who 
has so kindly coached our football team for the last two seasons, 
has received a commission in the Army Service Corps. We shall 
miss him very much indeed next fall—we can only hope that the 
war will be over before then. 


THE LIBRARY 

The Headmaster has added the foliowirg books to the school 
Library:— 

The Mystery of the Second Shot— Gillmore. 

The Beacon— Philpotts. 

The Joyous Adventures of Aristide Pujol— W. J. Locke. 

The Long Arm— Oppenheim. 

Idonea— Wallis. 

The Princess Virginia— C. N. & A. N. Williamson. 

The Red Revenge— Pearce. 

In the wake of the Eighteen-Twelvers— Snider. 

November Joe —Hesketh Pritchard. 

The Turnstile— Mason. 

South Sea Tales— London. 

Hands Up— Nevin. 

A Romance of Billy-Goat Hill — Rice. 

An affair of State— Naith. 

The Price of Lis Doris— Maartens. 

Bar 20 Days— Milford. 

Skipper the Skipped— Day. 

Grey Friars Bobby— Atkinson. 

In Jacobite Days— Plenty. 



The Ashburian 


15 


The following have also been donated:— 

Tom Sawyer—Presented by E. Scott. 

The Search Party—Presented by W. McLimont. 

The Second form Master of St. Cyrils—] 

The King’s Scouts— [ Presented by 

Cedar Creek— ( W. H. D. Mac- 

The air Scout— j Mahon. 

Frank before Vicksburg—Presented by E. T. C. Orde. 

Frank on a Gunboat—Presented by E. T. C. Orde. 

By Sheer Pluck—Presented by G. F. Benson. 

Tom Swift and his Submarine—Presented by E. A. Gorman. 
Palm Tree Island—Presented by R. S. Morris. 

St. Neville’s Scholarship Boys—Presented by R. S. Morris. 
The Boy Bondsman—Presented by R. S. Morris. 

Young Lord Stranleigh—Presented by R. S. Morris. 

The Prisoner of Zenda—Presented by E. L. Sellwood, Esq. 
Rupert of Hentzau—Presented by E. L. Sellwood, Esq. 

King Solomon’s Mines—Presented by E. L. Sellwood, Esq. 
The Gorilla Hunters—Presented by R. Van Meter. 
Adventures in India—Presented by E. M. Woollcombe. 

The Chronicles of Quincy—Presented by E. M. Woollcombe. 
Adams Sawyer —Presented by E. M. Woollcombe. 

The Ice desert—Presented by E. M. Woollcombe. 

Chris Willoughby—Presented by F. L. Campbell. 


MOTTOES TO MEASURE 

The School —“Such a Ev’nly place” Dickens 

The Hall Clock —“I’ll give thee a wind”.. Shakespeare 

Masters’ Common Room —“Everything within that cot 

Was wondrous neat and clean” 

The School Bell— “I go on for ever”. Tennyson 

R. M. C. Form —“Work! for the night is coming” . Coghill 

Form V —“Glad hearts, without reproach or blot, 

Who do their work and know it not” (Ac).Wordsworth 

Form II—“Who think too little, and who talk too much” Dryden 

Detention Class —“In durance vile here must I wake and weep” 

Burns 








16 


The Ashburian 


W. H. D. M.—“It is not growing like a tree, 

In bulk, doth make man better be”. Ben Jonson 

A. R. M.—“I see you stand like greyhounds in the slips, 

Straining upon the start”. Shakespeare 

C. G. W.—“For I am nothing, if not critical”. Shakespeare 

A. L. C.—“Of all the girls that are so smart, 

There’s none like pretty Sally”. Carey 

R. S. M.—“Where be your gibes now? your gambols? 

your songs ? your flashes of merriment that 

were wont to set the table in a roar?”. Shakespeare 

F. L. C.—“He is the very pineapple of politeness’. Sheridan 

R. H. T.—“I never knew so young a body with so old a head” 

8 a.m.—“Bread is the staff of life”. Swift 

9.01 a.m.—“Too late, too late! ye cannot enter now”.... Tennyson 
10.30 p.m.—“And the wicked cease from troubling, and 

the weary are at rest” . Tennyson 

School Rules—“M ore honoured in the breach than the obser¬ 
vance”. Shakespeare 

Ottawa River—“S limy things did crawl with legs 

Upon the slimy sea”. Coleridge 

G. B. B.—“A progeny of learning”. Sheridan 

J. M.—“Isn’t he a handsome man ? Tell me that! A genteel man ? 

A pretty figure of a man” Sheridan 

J. B. C.—“Absence of occupation is not rest, 

A mind quite vacant is a mind distress’d”. Cooper 

J. H. G.—“And still the wonder grew, 

That one small head could carry all he knew”. Goldsmith 
T. S. C.—“I would the gods had made thee poetical”., Shakespeare 
G. A. B.—“Confound that boy! He’s gone to sleep again ”.Dickens 
J. P.—“A very valiant trencher-man” Shakespeare 

E. B. B.—“And thereby hangs a tale”. Shakespeare 

E. J. S.—“When that I was a little tiny boy”. Shakespeare 

The “Dominion”—“V ariety’s the very spice of life”. Cowper 

M. E.—“Them a hunting we will go” Fielding 

E. L. S.—“Cleanliness is indeed next to godliness”. Bacon 

N. A. C.—“His only flame was a Bunsen burner” Thorpe 

A. B. H. W.—“That strain again! It hath a dying fall” 

Shakespeare 

The Easter Holidays—“F or this relief, much thanks” 

Shakespeare 

The Ashburian —“Books cannot always please, however good” 

Crabbe 

The Writer—“F ull of wise saws and modern instances” 

Shakespeare 






















The Ashburian 


17 


THE SIXTH FORM 

CAMPBELL 

WOOD 

macmAhon 

maclaRen 

coDe 

bEnson 

tRemain 

MORRIS 


THE FIFTH FORM 

Lewis Carling is popular —this we all know, 

But he spends all his time in his own nickel-show. 

Next comes brother John— with puns he is full, 

So most of his time he is shooting the bull. 

To George Basil Brown we propose a toast; 
He’s first in the class, so of him we boast. 

Keith Davidson is the next on our list; 

He can do the upstart with a twist of the wrist. 

The next that we come to is laughing John Gibbs, 
If you look at him cross-eyed he’ll wiggle his ribs. 

Jack Malcolm is one we must not forget, 

In hockey he’s proved he can bulge out the net. 

Ken Bryson’s the one that we notice now, 

For between him and Carling there’s many a row. 

Norman MacLaren of great tennis fame, 

Is often seen flirting with many a dame. 

Our friend Ranald Stewart cracks many a joke, 
And the rest of us laugh as if we could croak. 

Clarence H. Goldstein ’s the next that we see, 
The way that he works will win a degree. 



18 


The Ashburian 


G. Aldous Bate is our ladies’ man, 

And if this keeps up well give him the can. 

Charlie O’Connor is our only dude, 

We hope he wont take this as awfully rude. 

Edric Read in geometry excels, 

Sometimes he works, but only in spells. 

Leo D. Palmer is so often sick, 

And that is the reason he’s thin as a stick. 

Wingate McLimont hails straight from Quebec, 

Like most of his clan he can swallow a peck. 

Geoffrey Barwis comes from the coast, 

Of all his school chums he travels the most. 

De Montreville Taschereau —as we near the end— 
Gets poor marks in History, but we hope he will mend. 

T. Stanger Crocket with nonsense is full, 

As he has just proven by shooting this bull. 


NEW BOOKS 

The following books have not been added to the school 
library: 

Actresses I have known —by F. L. C.—mpb—11. 

A useful little hand-book for those intending to adopt the 
stage as a profession. 

Harmonies for the Hurdy-gurdy —selected and arranged by 
Ashbury’s eminent musician, C. G. W-d. 

On Punctuality— a reprint of one of a series of dissertations by 
W. P. M-rh-d, which have for their theme the advantages of 
forming good habits during boyhood. 

Mathematics adapted to the Kindergarten —The author of this useful 
little book conceals his identity behind a nom-de-plume, but 
the book is appropriately dedicated to A. E. D. Tr-m-n. 

Meanderings in Madawaska —A series of stories telling of some of 
the experiences of the author, E. A. G-rm-n, in his own home 
town. 



The Ashburian 


19 


My Beauty Secrets —A useful adjunct to the toilet table. Well 
written by Ashbury’s eminent beauty, R-ss-11 V-n M-t-r. 

The good qualities of Algebra —A heart-breaking tragedy in twenty- 
seven chapters, by H-nry Bl-k-n-y. 

Laugh and grow fat —A nice little novelette by H-r-ld C-lpm-n. 

The Art of Inattention —By the only person who has ever com¬ 
pletely mastered it, de L. P-n-t. 

Rowing in Sommer on the Rivers in the Hart of Shirley Woods—By 
one who has Orde. 


MY FIRST SONNET 

When Belgium, land of promise and of joy, 

Was devastated by a cunning foe, 

With snake-like tactics, crafty, base and low, 

Did Germany her peaceful friend decoy. 

Then mighty Britain vowed she would destroy; 
And down from Russia volunteers did flow, 

From lofty mountains ever capped with snow; 
And then from India came the brave sepoy; 

They met and vowed they’d keep the Empire free 
As long as men and money still remained 
And Britain yet was ruler of the sea. 

Then next was heard of myriads of slain, 

The French retired in front of Germany; 

But on we’ll push till all our lost is gained. 

W. D. B. 


Next—to—Skin. 

A good recruiting story, told by an officer at Seaforth, shows 
how prone is a simple mind to be confused by the elaborate 
cross-questioning which the new recruit has to undergo. 

This officer was entrusted with the collection of particulars 
necessary for the allotment of allowances to the soldiers’ depen¬ 
dants. He was interrogating a young fellow who did not seem 
to have a very clear idea what it was all about. 

“Next-of-kin ?” he asked in a sharp, business-like way. 

The young soldier dropped his voice and became confiden¬ 
tially apologetic ’’I’m only wearing a jersey,” he replied, “my 
shirt’s getting washed.” 




20 


The Ashburian 



The rising bell! It seems to be 
A source of great distress, 

For when I hear it calling me 
Methinks that I must dress. 

But tarry yet a little while, 

Tis very early yet, 

So with a most contented smile 
Back into bed I get. 

But as I slumber peacefully 
The time goes fleeting by, 

And now at seven fifty-three 
Still sleeping there I lie. 

At eight o’clock I wake up Bill 
What is that sound I hear ? 

The rising bell is ringing still ? 

No, Tis not that, I fear. 

What is that sound of running feet 
Along the corridor ? 

Now this bad luck you could not beat 
For we are late once more. 




The Ashburian 


21 


“ME UND GOTT” 

Said Willie to little Bill one day, 

I’m tired of seeing my army play, 

I’ll have a war inside a few weeks 
’Tis I the Lord of all that speaks. 

The Belgian King I’ll try to bluff, 

And if I find that’s not enough 
I’ll march my army through his land 
Destroying it on every hand. 

And then in Paris I will dine 
On Frankfurters and Rhenish wine. 

The Paris chefs are good, you’ll find, 

But that’s not all that’s in my mind. 

Those Englishmen they say they’re brave, 
With German “Kultur” they’ll behave, 

I’ll blow their cities in the air 

And how those brave men I will scare. 

The Russian Bear, I like him not 
And I will fill him full of shot. 

In Petrograd I’ll reign supreme 
And of my might I’ll nightly dream. 

The Japanese I’ll straightway freeze 
And feed them on Limburger cheese. 

So over all the flag unfurled 

And me und Gott will rule the world. 


Leo Palmer. 


22 


The Ashburian 


ATTENTION. 

Will anyone possessing a copy of No. 10 (about March 1911) 
of the Ashburian kindly forward it to the Secretary-Treasurer? 
It is needed to complete a set, which will be bound and placed in 
the School Library. 


OUR CONTEMPORARIES. 

The editor acknowledges with thanks the receipt of the 
following magazines:— 

The Meteor (2), 

The Tonbridgian, (2), 

The Felstedian, (2), 

The Cheltonian, (2), 

The Wykehamist, (2), 

The St. Andrew's College Review, 

The Langarian, 

The Bradfield College Chronicle, 

The Albanian, 

The Blue and White. 




Bryson-Graham 

Limited 

At the Corner o£ Sparks and O’Connor Sts. 


Of Great Interest and Significance 
Is The Wonderful Variety and 
Evident Reliability of The 
Merchandise in this Store 

Buy it at the Bryson-Graham Store is both an 
invitation and a guarantee. Pay us a visit 

MEN'S AND BOY'S CLOTHING 
BOOKS AND STATIONERY 
SCHOOL SUPPLIES 
PENNANTS 
BOOTS AND SHOES 
HATS AND CAPES 
GROCERIES AND CANDIES 
GLOVES AND SOCKS 
SHIRTS AND TIES 
TRUNKS AND BAGS 

All Ottawa Street Cars Pass Our Store Doors 


Bryson-Graham Limited 














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Canada 

Clothes for 
Young Men 

Note th clever designing of the 
two models illustrated. Fashion 
Craft hand=tailored clothes cost 
no more than other ready-mades 
— but, oh, so different—$ / 5 & 
$18. Finished to your order in 
two hours. 

E. R. Fisher 

The Sh p of Fashion Craft 
134 Spares Street 


ASHBURY COLLEGE 

i a— —aili—r— ■■mi am—y 

IS HEATED WITH 

CONNELLS COAL 


OFFICE: 

THE CONNELL ANTHRACITE 
MINING CO., LIMITED 

121 BANK ST. QUEEN 4275 

MINES: BERNICE, PA. 



























































The Ashburian 


23 


3&oU of honour 


OLD BOYS WITH THE COLOURS 

1903—ALLAN, JOHN ROBERTS, Gunner, 2nd Battery, 1st 
Brigade, C.F.A. 

1903—ANDERSON, ALEXANDER ALDERSON, Lieutenant, 
Canadian Engineers, 2nd Division. 

1897— ARNOLDI, J., Gunner, 2nd Battery, 1st Brigade, C.F.A. 

1906—AVERY, FREDERICK GRAEME, Lieutenant, Royal 
Engineers. 

1903— BARWIS, CUTHBERT WILLIAM ARTHUR, Lieu¬ 
tenant, 3rd Battalion, Yorkshire Regiment. 

1904— BATE, HENRY NEWELL, Lieutenant, 8th Canadian 
Mounted Rifles. 

1906—BATE, STUART CAMERON, Lieutenant, Royal Can¬ 
adian Regiment. 

1905— BATE, H. TRENNICK, Royal Navy. 

1905—BEARD, CHARLES TASCHEREAU, Royal Navy. 

1909—BEDDOE, ALAN B., Private, 2nd Battalion, C.E.F. 

1900—BELL, GORDON G., Lieutenant, 38th Battalion, C.E.F. 

1899— BENOIT, PAUL SOUMANDE, Major, Royal Canadian 
Engineers. 

1911—BILLINGS, CHARLES A., Army Service Corps. 

1898— BLAIR, DONALD, Lance-Corporal, Auto Machine Gun 
Brigade No. 1. 

1909— BOSTOCK, ALEXANDER HEWITT, Lieutenant, Lord 
Strathcona’s Horse, C.E.F. 

1911—BOYCE, CYRIL DELAMERE, Lieutenant, 19th Battal¬ 
ion, C.E.F. 

1910— BOYD, ERROLL DALZELL HAMILTON, Lieutenant. 

1908—BROOKE, W., Private, 2nd Battalion, 1st Brigade, C.E.F. 

1900— BURBIDGE, G. H., 

1905—CALDWELL, THOMAS RICHEY. Capt. 21st Battalion. 


24 


The Ashburian 


1894—CARLING, GORDON, Private, Princess Patricia’s Can¬ 
adian Light Infantry. 

1907—CHIPMAN, CLIFFORD C., Gunner, 2nd Battery, 1st 
Brigade, C.F.A. 

1894—CHRYSLER, GEOFFREY GORDON, Captain, 2nd 
Battalion, C.E.F. 

1899—COCKBURN, LESTOCK WILSON SWINTON, Captain. 
Royal Canadian Regiment. 

1906— CODVILLE, FRANCIS HILARY MacDONELL, Cap¬ 
tain, Royal Canadian Dragoons, C.E.F. 

1907 COTTON, CHARLES P., Gunner, 5th Battery, 2nd 
Brigade, C.F.A. 

1910—CRITCHLEY, C., Royal Navy. 

1910—CRITCHLEY, S., Royal Navy. 

1894— CURRIER, D., Lieutenant, 3rd Contingent, C.E.F. 

1895— DALE, HARRIS ALAN, Lieutenant, 23rd Division, Royal 
Field Artillery. 

1907— DAVIS, H. WALTER, Lieutenant, Royal Canadian 
Regiment. 

1895— DICKEY, OLIVER BARRY RUPERT, Captain, Army 
Service Corps, B.E.F. 

1901— ELIOT, JOHN HAMILTON, Lieutenant, 3rd Hussars, 

B. E.F. 

1902— FLEMING, CHARLES SANDFORD, Gunner, 2nd 
Battery, 1st Brigade, C.F.A. 

1896— FLEMING, NOEL SANDFORD, Lieutenant, 39th 
Battalion, C.E.F. 

1899— FRASER, ALEXANDER G., Lieutenant, 38th Battalion, 

C. E.F. 

1895—FRASER, HUGH N., Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, C.E.F. 

1900— FRASER, J. D., Captain commanding Machine Gun 
Section, 8th Canadian Mounted Rifles. 

1908— GENDRON, JOSEPH FERDINAND EDOUARD, Lieu¬ 
tenant, No. 1 Field Company, Divisional Engineers, 1st 
Contingent, C.E.F. 

1892—GILMOUR, A. U., Auto Machine Gun Brigade No. 1. 
1898—GODWIN, JOHN LOCKHART, Lieutenant. 


The Ashburian 


25 


1912— GRANT, DONALD A., Lieutenant, jRoyal Canadian 
Dragoons. 

1906—GREENE, LESLIE KIRK, Lieutenant, 5th Canadian 
Mounted Rifles. 

1903— GREENE, MURRAY KIRK, Captain and Orderly Officer, 
2nd Infantry Brigade, C.E.F. 

1892—HERON, VICTOR WILLIAM SYNGE, Lieutenant, 
Royal Canadian Regiment. 

1913— HILL, R., Army Field Ambulance Corps. 

1896—IRWIN, ARTHUR DE LA CHEROIS, Captain and 
Adjustant, 6th Brigade, C.F.A. 

1900— IRWIN, WILLIAM ERIC CROMMELIN, Lieutenant, 
38th Battalion, C.E.F. 

1891— LAMBERT, MARIE LOUIS BENJAMIN HECTOR, 
Captain, Army Service Corps, B.E.F. 

1911— LETHBRIDGE, E. ROSS, Lieutenant, Strathcona Horse. 

1912— LELIEVRE, R., 22nd Battalion, French-Canadians, 
Cpf 

1896— LEWIS, ALLAN COLLINGWOOD TRAVERS, Captain 
and Adjutant, Divisional Ammunition Park, 2nd Con¬ 
tingent, C.E.F. 

1901— LEWIS, JOHN TRAVERS, Jr., Lieutenant, Canadian 
Divisional Engineers, 2nd Contingent, C.E.F. 

1910—LINDSAY, DONALD ST. GEORGE, Royal Navy. 

1909—MacIVOR, ROBERT SANDEMAN PAISLEY, Lieu¬ 
tenant, Indian Army. 

1904— MacPHAIL, JEFFREY BURLAND, Corporal, No. 2 
Company, Divisional Engineers, 1st Contingent, C.E.F. 

1892— MacPHERSON, J. A. CLARK, Captain, 38th Battalion, 
C E F 

1897— MacPHERSON, KENNETH C., Lieutenant, Divisional 
Engineers. 

1908—MASSON, W. GREY, Private, Borden Armoured Battery. 

1898— McLACHLIN, J., Captain, Army Service Corps. 

1893— MOORE, P. R., Private, Borden Armoured Battery. 

1898—NEWCOMBE, EDMUND FREEMAN, Lieutenant, 21st 

Battalion, C.E.F. 

1902— O’CONNOR, HENRY WILLIS, Captain and Adjutant, 
2nd Battalion, C.E.F. 

1902—ORDE, REGINALD G., Lieutenant, Royal Field Artillery. 

1908—PARKER, HARRY SCOTT, Lieutenant, Ammunition 
Column, 3rd Brigade, C.F.A. 


26 


The Ashburian 


1898—PANET, EDOUARD de BELLEFEUILLE, Major and 
Deputy Assistant Adjutant-General, 1st Contingent, 
C E F 

1898— READ, CHARLES EDWIN, Jr., Captain, C.A.S.C., 
Shorncliffe. 

1910—REID, HOWARD EMERSON, Royal Navy. 

1908—RENAUD, ERNEST JAMES, Lieutenant, C.A.S.C. 
1910—SHERWOOD, EDSON CRAWFORD, Royal Navy. 

1899— SHERWOOD, HENRY LOUIS, Lieutenant, C.P.Ry. 
Corps of Construction Engineers. 

1894—SHERWOOD, LIVIUS PETERS, Lieutenant, Royal 
Canadian Dragoons, C.E.F. 

1900— SLADEN, J. DOUGLAS, Lieutenant, 9th Leicestershire 
Regiment. 

1903—SLATER,' ROBERT KENNETH, Lieutenant. 

1903— SPAIN, GRANVILLE ALARIC RICHARD, Lieutenant, 
Roval Field Artillery. 

1904— SPARKS, NICHOLAS ARTHUR, Lieutenant and 
Machine Gun Officer, 9th Battalion, C.E.F. 

1896—SYMES, A. W., 21st Battalion, C.E.F. 

1910—THOMPSON, ANDREW R., Lieutenant, No. 5 Company, 
C.A.S.C. 

1906—WHITE', RANDOLPH W., Lieutenant. 

1904— WOODS, JOHN RUSSELL, Lieutenant, 4th Battalion 

( 01 f] TY1 ( 

1900—WOOLLCOMBE, PHILIP H. P., Sergeant, 2nd Battalion, 
CEE 

1903—WRIGHT, HARRY PULTENEY, Cpatain, No. 6 Field 
Ambulance, C.A.M.C. 

1906—WRIGHT, JOSHUA STANLEY, Lieutenant. 

1905— WRIGHT, PALMER H., Lieutenant, 8th Mounted Rifles. 

TO MY OLD BOYS AT THE FRONT 
My Dear Boys, 

I send you my very best wishes. I am indeed proud of 
Ashbury's contribution to our Empire's defence. My thoughts 
are so often with you. You will, I know, bring credit to your 
country and to your school. May God be with you, and, when 
your work is successfully over bring you safely home. 

Your sincere friend and Headmaster, 

Geo. P. Woollcombe. 


The Secretary of the O. B. A. will appreciate it very much 
if Old Boys at the Front would acknowledge receipt of Ashburian. 




















































































































































































R. H. PERRY 
HEADMASTER