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THE 
ASHBURIAN 




ASHBURY COLLEGE 

OTTA^VA 



VOL. XXV 



MICHAELMAS 
1941 



No. 1 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Ashbury College 



http://www.archive.org/details/ashburianmichael251ashb 



T H i: 
ASHBLRIAN 




ASHBURY COLLEGE 
OTTAWA 



VOL. XXV 



MICHAELMAS 
1941 



No. 1 



THE ASHBURIAN 



[3: 




iN M akCHDALE, M.A. 
Headmaster 



[4] 



THE ASHBURIAN 



StfF i^taff 



Headmaster 



N. M. ARCHDALE, MA, 
The Queen's College, Oxforc 

Senior Master and Housemaster 

A. D. BRAIN, B.A. (Toronto) 

Headmaster Junior School 

G. J. K. HARRISON, MA, 
Trinity College, Oxford 

REV. W. S. TIGGES, B.Sc. (Hvilon-Lund) REV. T. C. BOON, B.A., 

M.Sc, (Ultuna-Upsala) University of Manitoba 

Ph.D. (Halle-Wittenberg) 

B.D. (Heidelberg and Muenster) D. L. POLK, B.A., 

Dartmouth College 

L. JOHNSTON, 
M.A. (Haverford College) 
B.A. (Durham University) 



DR. R. REDLER 

H. B. MacKAY, B.A. 

Mount Allison 



MRS. E. B. HUNTER Miss E BARKER 

Nurse Matron Dietician 

MISS H. A. MacLAUGHLIN, R.R.C., R.N. MISS M. H. SLACK, B.H.Sc. 

Assistant Nurse Matron 

MISS I. C BRADY, R.R.C, R.N. 

Bursar Secretary 

F. HUNTER MISS D. LYON 

Organist 

H. HUGGINS, B.A., LLB. 



THE ASHBURIAN 



[5: 



S^rl|iml (dUittvB 



R. G. R. Lawrence 



M. J. Ney 



(£a;itaiii of thr iPrluuil 

G. R. Goodwin 

(Captain of tife Saii-iltaita 

R. B, Bailey 
9refetta 

J. McLaren H. J. MacDonald 

R. B. Heath R. C. Bourget 

^auae &aaitatB 

T. W, Spafford A. Lee 

(Ca&rt (Larps 
Corps Leader 

Cadet Major G. R. Goodwin 
Second-in-Command 

Cadet Captain H J. MacDonald 

Platoon Commanders 

Cadet Lieut. R. B. Heath Cadet Lieut. R. B. Bailey 

Cadet Lieut. R. C. Bourget 

Cadet Sergeant-Major 

T. W. Spafford 
Cadet Quartermaster-Sergeant 

J. C. McLaren 
First Aid 

Cadet Sergeant R. G R. Lawrence 
damtM (SatitainB 

Hocke}) Cricl{et 

R. B. Bailey R. B. Bailey 

Soccer 

R. G. R. Lawrence 
(BamtB 9trr-(!Iattta{nB 
Rugb^ Hockey 

G. R. Goodwin H. J. MacDonald 

Soccer 

R. B. Bailey 
ifonar (Saptabitf 



Rugby 

H. J. MacDonald 



Cric^e/ 

H. J. MacDonald 



Connaug/i/ 

R. G. R. Lawrence 



W oollcombe 

G. R. Goodwin 



[6] THE ASHBURIAM 

ASHBURIAN COMMITTEE 

General Editors Advertising Managers Sports Editors 

M. J. Ney G. R. Goodwin H. B. Heath 

D. N. Parson T. W. Spcfford A. J. MocDonald 



M. Barnes 



Ashbiirian Junior 

J. Turner D. Matthews 

M. Arlen R. West 



EDITORIAL 

ALMOST every school magazine writes an editorial from time to time 
asking for more co-operation and help from the boys in the school. 
After trying to produce' the last two issues, and trying to straighten out 
the mess in which the affairs of the Ashburian had been left lost year, we offer 
no apology for making this the subject of our editorial. 

What are the purposes of a school magazine? Firstly, to record all school 
activities; secondly, to provide scope for budding authors, artists, poets, journal- 
ists and sellers of advertising space to practise; thirdly, to let Old Boys know 
what the school is doing; fourthly, to give news of what Old Boys are doing. 
There are many other advantages and uses of a school magazine, but those are 
surely enough to show its essential values in any school. It is vitally important 
that it should be a co-operative effort, that Old Boys should send in news, that 
boys in the school should help in its production. We need more help, we need 
more articles, more photographs, more poems, more drawings, more news in 
general from members of the school. 

There are still too many armchair critics, who on receiving the magazine 
say: "Good Heavens, there's no news at all, there's nothing in it." They do 
not seem to realize that it is in part their fault. So, will all readers of the 
magazine please help us to make the Ashburian better by giving us news and 
thereby lightening the work of the Editorial Committee, who will always be 
ready to accept end look at, articles, stories, poems, photographs, and drawings 
suitable for reproduction. 

Put shortly, if Ashbury boys wont The Ashburian to be good or better, it is 
up to them to help to make it so. 



THE ASHBURIAN [7] 

CHAPEL NOTES 



w 



E wish to take this opportunity to congratulate Rev T. C B. Boon on 
his official appointment as Chaplain to the school by The Very Rev. 
Bishop Jefferson. 



The reading of the lessons in evening Chapel is nov^ done entirely by the 
Prefects and House Monitors. The reading has been surprisingly good and after 
the first nervousness even the Prefects admit that "It isn't so bad'" 

Mr Muggins as usual has been playing the organ every week-day morning, 
and Mr. Meredith has been playing on Sundays. 

SCHOOL HYMN 

By M. J. N. 

The hymn "He who would valiant be," has been chosen as the official 
school hymn. No choice could have been better, because, as well as being the 
Abinger Hill school hymn, it is also the hymn of the Empire Youth Movement. 
Since it has been chosen, it might be interesting to know something about it 
and it's author. 

John Bunyan was born in the little village of Elstow 4 miles from Bedford 
in 1628. He was not of a good family, and the little education he may have 
received, was very rudimentary. In 1644 he entered Cromwell's New Model 
ormy, and fought on the side of Parliament in the Civil War. In 1647 when 
he was discharged, he returned to Elstow and his trade of a tinker. A few years 
later he became one of the many travelling preachers who were going round the 
countryside at that time. In 1660 he was illegally arrested on the charge of 
preaching without a licence, and on being tried, was sentenced to 3 months 
imprisonment in Bedford gaol; he was, however, not released until 12 years 
later. After he was freed, he obtained a licence to preach, and in the years 
following, he became one of the foremost preachers of his time. In 1688 while 
travelling to London, he caught a chill and died there in August of that year. 

The hymn itself was included in the second part of "Pilgrim's Progress" 
which he started in prison, and it is about his only famous piece of poetry. In 
the original version, the words hobgoblin, foul fiend, and others occur, but these 
have been altered in the modern edition to make it more suitable for present- 
day use. The tune to which it is sung is an old Sussex folk-song, discovered 
and adapted by R. Vaughan Williams. 

Thus the school has adopted as it's hymn one of the greatest poems of all 
time, written by one of the greatest religious reformers of the 17th century. 
May the school long pattern itself on the words of this hymn, and may the 
career of the school be even more distinguished in the years ahead, than in 
the years now past. 



[8J 



THE ASHBURIAN 



jRnll 0f l|0U0ur 



Flying Officer M.D. MacBrien 
Lieutenant John Edwards 
Second Lieutenant A. W. L. MacDonald 
Flying Officer W. F. Tudhope 
Pilot Officer J. E. R. Wood 
Flying Officer F. A. H. Lambert 
Pilot Officer Lionel Emeno 
Midshipman T. N. K. Beard 
Flying Officer Alexander Angus 
Air Gunner Ian MacDonald 
Sergeant-Pilot Francis J. Hart 
Lieut. H. M. Baker 

•®l|ctr tiamc liurtli for vwtmnvt,'^ 



THE ASHbURIAS (9 I 

SCHOOL NOTES 

ON Satuiday, December 6th, Dr. Tigges took a group of boys to the 
Dominion Observatory. We were shown round the different rooms, and 
were given a lantern lecture on the Solar System, which was exception- 
ally interesting. We were all fascinated by the room where all the time- 
keeping machines for the whole of Canada are kept. The only depressing thing 
about the whole evening was that it was snowing, and we were not able to 
look at the stars as many of us would have liked. However, the evening was 
enjoyed by all, and we all went back much benefitted by the expedition. 

On November 10th, Viscount Halifax paid a surprise visit to one of the 
boys in the school. This was a very unexpected pleasure, and will be remem- 
bered by many of us for a long time. 

On Saturday, October 25th, a party of boys went to the Rockcliffe Airport, 
where they had a very interesting time. They were shown round the whole 
airport, and even sat in one of the planes. After they had inspected the airport, 
they were shown through the Photographic room, then into the main hall, where 
they were given a feast of hot-dogs, cakes, apples, and chocolate milk, which 
needless to say was enjoyed by all. This was a very entertaining trip, and the 
number of people there was large. 

Major McKeen came down to speak on Poppy Day, and Dr. Leggett cam3 
to talk on the subject of the Ottawa Community Chests. Both speakers wert 
introduced by G. R. Goodwin. 

Dr. Tigges also took a party to visit the Art Gallery. 

This year we have welcomed several new masters. Mr. Johnston we have 
to thank for the reorganization of our library, which badly needed it. Dr. 
Redler came to us in the Winter. Mr. Mackay has left to do war work, super- 
intending munitions in war factories. We wish him the best of luck in his new 
job. 

Better late than never' We are glad to congratulate Mr. and Mrs. 
Archdale on the birth of their sen, Audley. By all accounts he is very healthy, 
and IS to be seen taking the air in a pram in the afternoons. 

We have to thank Miss Slock in operating our new system of room working. 
The boys now do their sweeping and dusting in their rooms. We only hope the 
enthusiasm that has been shown won't lessen as time goes on. 

Amongst the many new activities this year two are particularly notable. 
The Debating Society was revived under the able leadership of Mr. Boon. 
Officers have been elected from among the boys and a very successful Winter- 
Spring season was held. The second society that was revived was the Inter- 
national Re'ations Club, chiefly sponsored by Mr. Johnston. Several meetings 
were held with success and some excellent speakers were kind enough to come. 



[101 



THE ASHBURIAN 



Now that the Club has found its legs, we hope it will continue to flourish during 
the next year. Fuller accounts of both of these will be found elsewhere. 

We have to thank Mr. Archdale on behalf of the Senior House for the con- 
tinuation of the very enjoyable House Dances. As these give considerable 
trouble to Miss Slack and Mr. Brain we should thank them also for their help 
in organization and courtesy. We hope they will continue. 

We congratulate the Masters on a record lack of sickness during the year. 
Except for a brief epidemic of ptomaine poisoning there has been virtually no 
illness. May this continue! 

The Abinger Privateers produced "Jack and the Beanstalk", at the end 
of the Spring Term. In spite of the technical hitch involving Jack and the 
Jolly Tar the show was a success. We look forward to more of them. 

This year a drive for the British War Relief Society was held. The cam- 
paign was run entirely by certain boys and a total of well over the $50 mark 
was reached. We hope this will be an encouragement to future efforts. 

We were much amused to find out that one of the prefects needed an 
escort of roughly 10 of his compatriots to convoy him to the dentist. It might 
be a good idea to institute lictors for the prefects' 

It IS rumoured that one of the boys in the Senior Wing puts his clothes on 
over his pyjamas so that he can get an extra 20 seconds sleep! 

We were wondering whether the great success of the Cadet Corps this 
year was due to the fact that the Headmaster now belongs to the local Militic 
or not. Or maybe it was the encouraging words that we may have new uniforms 
next year. 

But they say — and they seem to know: 

That Doctor Winter was not very successful in diagnosing the case of the 
hockey playoffs. 

That a certain member of the First Hockey Team, en route to Montreal, 
successfully ran through his chameleon act. 

That Lawrence is about to publish a new advanced Algebra text book. 

That Heaven is going into the barbering business quite seriously. 

That one strategist on the Connought bench, during the second House 
Match, urged McLaren I to "yank" his goaler in the final minute, with the 
team behind 6-0. 

That Lessonitus has become a common ailment. 

That Goodeve intends to turn some of his explosive inventions into secret 
wzapons. 



THE ASHBURIAN MM 

That Pilgri.n makes "simply delightful" company for lone splnster'^ m the 
dining car. 

That Fleishmann, until recently, was under the impression that the word 
"Heads'" was used only when a com was tossed. 

That McLaren I, the master of many dialects, made a faux pas on the 
conscription issue 

That Hammerhead does not engage m the practice of beating his skull 
against the wall. 

That a baseball mitt was seen for a bare instant upon the cricket field. 

That certain deciples of turns on two wheels, find themselves restricted 
nowadays. 

That Croil keeps in trim by lifting cars. 

That Mr. Brain made a thorough study of the Traffic Code, before taking 
the Senior School to the third House Match. 

That a certain resident of the canal zone is under the impression that 
no one has ANYTHING on him 



THE DEBATING SOCIETY 

ON September 26th, 1941, the Debating Society held it's first meeting of 
the 1941-42 season. Mr. Boon was in the Chair, and 27 people were 
present. 

At the meeting there were elected the two secretaries for the year, they 
were G. R. Goodwin and M. Ney. 

Mr. Ney moved that "It would be advantageous to the world if the U.S.A. 
entered the war at the present time." The motion was opposed by Mr. Barnes, 
and the following people spoke. Messrs Lawrence, P. Crump, Spafford, Shaw, 
Birchwood, Mr. Brain, Murdoch, T. Crump, Boutin, Parson, Montgomery and 
Howsam. 

The result of the ballot was: — For 7. Against: — 19. 

The Second meeting was held on 24th of October, members of form IV were 
present by invitation, and Mr. Boon was in the Choir. 

It was moved by Mr. Parson that— "That now would be the time for Britain 
to invade Germany." The motion was opposed by Mr. Shaw, and the following 
spoke. Messrs P. Crump, Birchwood, Lawrence, Barnes, T. Crump, Montgomery, 
Hurtley, Northcott, Murdoch, Enfield, W. Eliot and Thomson. 

The result of the ballot was: — Por: — 16. Against: — 25. 



[12] THE ASHBURIAN 

The Third meeting of the Debating Society wos held on November 28th. 
35 members were present. It was moved by Mr. Ney, that "That in the opinion 
of this House Classical Music is preferable to Swing." The motion was opposed 
by Mr. Spafford. The following spoke from the House. Messrs Barnes, Mur- 
doch, Goodwin, Howsam, Crump 1, Hurtley, Show, Crump II, Pilgrim, Boutin, 
Mr. Polk, Hardy, and Preston. 

The result of the ballot was: — For: — 13. Against: — 19. 2 votes 
were declared void. 

The House adjourned until next term. 



VISIT BY FOUNDER 

By M. J. N. 

DR. Woollcombe came to the school on Tuesday, December 16th, and when 
the boys had been assembled in the Gymnasium, he spoke to the school 
for about 15 minutes. The Headmaster in introducing him said that 
there was little need to introduce Dr. Woollcombe to Ashbury boys, as everyone 
knew him, the man who in 1891 founded the school, and was Headmaster there 
until 1933. 

Dr. Woollcombe spoke on the subject of selfishness, and said that nothing 
undermines one's character, or saps one's energy more than selfishness in the 
home and in the school. In closing he exhorted us to devote ourselves to the 
cause for which we are fighting, and in the New Year to strive to even greater 
efforts for the school and for the country. 

After Dr. Woollcombe had spoken, the Headboy talked to the school. He 
said that the Prefects and he had been discussing Ashbury's war effort, and on 
deciding that it was not very great they went to the Headmaster and asked 
him if there wasn't anything that the school could do as a body. They decided 
that the thing which was nearest to the means of the school, was a Bren gun. 

The school was then asked to give their contributions to the Prefects at an 
early date. It is hoped that the necessary funds will be collected in a short 
time, and that the Bren gun will be very soon presented to the Government. 





I & 2. Views in the Chapel 
4 Pre-Preppers. 



^' L^t^",^'^'" ° Chateau Launer window 
c I r- r- A , , -'• 'vIcKmley in o hurry. 
D L L C. V. Ashbury at hockey. 



141 



THE ASHBURIAN 




CRICKET-1941 

By R. B. Bailey (Copt.) 



COLORS- 



-First XI: 
R. B. Bailey 
C. R. Burrows 
H. J. MacDonald 



R. T. Holmes 
J. A. MacGowan 
R. G. Lawrence 



FOR a number of years now, Ashbury teams have been fortunate in having 
Mr. Brain as their coach. His able instruction was largely instrumental 
in our victory over L.C.C. this year, and it was not his fault that the 
school suffered defeat at the hands of B.C.S. 

Before meeting our old rivals, we played a number of exhibition games, 
winning two and losing three. Among the clubs we played were Defence C.C, 
New Edinburgh C.C., Ottawa C.C, and Cathedral CC 

Feeling fairly confident we journeyed to Montreal to play B.C.S., but after 
two innings of good cricket on the side of our opponents we found our con- 
fidence was unwarranted. 

Returning home we met, and lost to the Old Boys. Determined to avenge 
our defeats we waited for L.C.C. to visit us and, although we only had time for 
one innings, the school, in this match, was victorious. Thus we managed to 
win at least one of our two important matches. 

We would like to take this opportunity to thank the Staff for playing us, 
and we are indeed sorry that they lost!! 



THE ASH Hi' Rl AX [15] 

FIRST XI CHARACTERS 
By R. B. Bailey, Captain. 

C. R. BURROWS — Vice-coptain. 3rd year on team. A fine cricketer who 
played to great advantage at mid off. He batted well all year and his 
fielding was exceptional. 

R. T. HOLMES. First year on team. A good sportsman, he played a very steady 
game behind the wicket and saved many runs. His batting showed tech- 
nique, but at times was weak. 

J. A. MacGOWAN. 2nd year on team Could have improved his fielding to 
advantage with more speed. He batted well all year. 

R. G. R. LAWRENCE. 3rd year on team. A very able bowler who kept a good 
length. He should not try to vary his bowling too much. Batted steadily 
throughout the season. 

H. J. MacDONALD. 2nd year on team. His bowling accounted for many 
wxkets, his medium fast style proving effective against opposing batsmen. 
His batting was steady and his experience will be an asset next year. 

FISHER. 2nd year on team. His fielding was very good all season. His bat- 
ting was very strong and he made runs where they counted. 

McLAREN I. 2nd year on team. A steady field who played a fine game at 
third man. His batting was always dependable and his experience should 
prove a valuable asset next year. 

HUGHSON II. 2nd year on team. His batting and fielding could have been 
improved. As a bowler he was good at times. 

HUGHSON I. First year on team. Although he fielded well all year, his bat- 
ting was inclined to be slip-shod and he could have made more runs. 

THOMAS I. 2nd year on team. Played a very good game in the field. His 
batting was powerful but he threw away his wicket to easy bowling. 

COLE. 1st year on team. His fielding was slow but his batting should be a 
great asset to next year's team 

By A. D. Brain 

R. B BAILEY — Captain. 2nd year on team. A most efficient and enthusiastic 
captain, who placed his field skilfully, and kept the team well together 
His right-hand medium-pace bowling, always of good length, was the 
mainstay of the attack, and he contributed some useful innings. A brilli- 
ant field anywhere near the wicket. 

VERSUS BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL 
Played in Montreal 

B. C. S. Ashbury 

Wreog, c Lawrence, b Bailey 10 MacGowan, b Ramsey 6 

MacDDnold, I b w, Bailey .- 4 McLaren, b Ramsey ... ..- 

Dovis, c. Thomas, b. Lawrence 19 Burrows, c. Howard, b Ramsey .. 16 

Ramsey, c Thomas, b. Bailey 1 Bailey, c. Romsey, b. Sheppard 23 

Howard, not out 22 Holmes, c. Howard, b Wregg 15 

Landry, l.b.w, Bailey Hughson I, b. Blacklock . . I 

Childs, c. and b Bailey 8 Fisher, c. Sheppard, b. Wregg : 

Blacklock, c MacGowan, b. Bailey Thomos, c Landry, b. Wregg .. C 

MacForlone, b. Rnilpy Viets, b. Blacklock 

Sheppard, b Bailey Lawrence, b. Wregg 

Horniman, run out 18 MocDonald, not out 1 

Dovie, c. Lawrence, b. Bailey 4 Cole, b Blacklock 2 

Extras 7 Extras 6 

TOTAL 97 TOTAL 70 



[16] 



THE ASHBURIAN 



Second Innings 

Wregg, c. MacDonald, b. Lawrence 40 

MacDo'naid, c MacDonald, b. Hughson 1 14 

Dovis, l.b.w., MacDonald _ - — - 2 

Ramsey, b. Lawrence 22 

Howard, b. MacDonald _. - 

Landry c. Thomas, b. Lawrence -— 4 

Childs, c. wkt, b. Hughson I ...- 42 

Blacklock, c, Thomas, b. Hughson I — . 25 



MocFarlane, 
Shepherd, 
Horniman, 
Doyle, 
Extras ... 



I not out - 2 

S 5 

I did not bat 



TOTAL - - --- 161 



Second Innings 

MocGowan, b. Davis .-- 2 

McLaren, b. MacDonald _ 5 

Burrows, c. Sheppard 24 

Bailey, c. Doyle, b. MacDonald 6 

Holmes, not out 2 

Hughso.i I \ 
Fisher 
Cole 

Thomas y did not bat 

Viets 

MacDonald | 
Lrwrence I 
Extras _ 6 

TOTAL _ 45 



VERSUS LOWER CANADA COLLEGE 
Pioyed at Ashbury 



L. C. C. 

Kent, l.b.w, Bailey 1 

Gault, b. Bailey ..-. 

Mills, c. and b. Lawrence 70 

Wallace, c. wkt., b. Bailey 8 

Weston, c. Viets, b. Bailey 



Tisshaw, c. Viets, b. MacDonald 4 

Goldbloom, c Lawrence, b, MacDonald 

Stewart, b. Bailey 10 

Smith c. Lawrence, b. Bailey 

Greenbank, b. Lawrence 

Montifiore, not out 1 

Extras 8 



TOTAL 1 02 



Ashbury 

Hughson I, b. Gault 14 

MocGowan, hit wicket, b. Gault 21 

Burrows, c. Goldbloom, b. Kent 16 

Bailey, l.b.w., b. Gault 1 

Holmes, b. Tisshaw 21 

McLaren, l.b.w., b. Weston 12 

Fisher, c. Goldbloom, b. Gault 28 

Hughson II, b. Wallace 21 

Viets, b. Gault 4 

Lawrence, c. Gault, b. Wallace 1 

MacDonald, not out 25 

Extras 2 

TOTAL 1 66 



VERSUS OLD BOYS 
Played at Ashbury 



Old Boys 

Smart, b. Bailey C 

Grant, b. MacDonald 14 

D Maclaren, c. Hughson, b. Lawrence 3 

Wallace, b. Bailey 

Barclay, c. Burrows, b. Lawrence 1 

Burrows, b. Lawrence ..- 

Viets, b, Lawrence 4 

Weary, b. MacDonald 5 

Wilson run out - 7 

McKinley, c. wkt., b. MacDonald 7 

F. Maclaren, not out 9 

Show, c. Burrows, b. Hughson 4 

Extras 5 



Ashbury 

Hughson 1, c. Wilson, b. Barclay 11 

MocGowan, c. Maclaren, b. Barclay 

Burrows, b. Grant 14 

Bailey, c. Wallace, b. Grant 6 

Holmes, run out 

McLaren, c. Wallace, b. Grant 3 

Fisher, not out 9 

Hughson II, c. Maclaren, b. Barclay 

Thomas, b. Barclay 

Viets, c. and b. Barclay 

Lawrence, c. and b. Grant 

MacDonald, b. Barclay 1 

Extras 4 



TOTAL 



60 



TOTAL 



48 







AVERAGES 






Batting 








Times Highest 






Innings 


Runs Not Out Score Average 




Burrows 


11 


166 39 15 


MacDonald 


MocGowan 


10 


108 37 10.8 


Bailey 


Fisher 


10 


102 28 10.2 


Lawrence 


McLoren 


9 


73 1 25 8.1 


Also bow 


Holmes 


11 


77 2 21 7 




Bailey 


11 


70 30 6.3 




Also batted — MacDonald, Hughson II, Thomas, 




Hughson 1, 


Lawrence. 





Bowling 



Maiden 

Overs Overs Runs Wkts Average 

52.9 12 154 18 8 

80.1 13 311 35 8.8 

65 10 230 25 9.2 



HOUSE MATCH 



The annual cricket match between Connaught and Woollcombe was begun 
on June 5th. Connaught was retired in the first afternoon of play with a total 
of sixty-nine runs, Fisher, Thomas, and MacDonald being the only batsmen who 
had done at all well. Woollcombe enjoyed a long innings, and Burrows and 
Holmes batted exceptionally well, scoring seventy-four runs between them. The 
side declared with a total of ninety-three runs for nine wickets for a good win. 



THE ASHBURIAN 



ll'l 




FOOTBALL 

SEASON 1941 
By H. J. MacDonald, Captain. 



:OLOURS— First XII: 

H. J. MacDonald 
G. R. Goodwin 



H. B. Heath 
A. P. Lee 



THIS season, although only one Colour remained from last year, we had the 
nucleus of a team, in that several other members of the squad also re- 
turned. 

The turnout was not as large as usual, but nevertheless the will to learn 
was strong. 

After a few exhibition games we journeyed to Montreal for our annual 
matches with B.C S. and L.C C. We were unable to defeat either of them, but 
much valuable experience was gamed by everyone which will be a great asset 
to those of us returning next year, and the School will no doubt provide stiff 
competition for its old rivals. 

The excellent team-spirit of the squad was everywhere remarked on, and 
if this high spirit is maintained in future years, I believe that this season's 
team will have contributed something to the School. 

The team would like to thank our coach, Mr. Brain, for the many hours 
that he devoted to teaching plays and the playing of football itself to an in- 
experienced squad, and for his unstinted efforts and patience. 



181 



THE ASHBURIAN 



FIRST XII CHARACTERS 

G. R. GOODWIN: Vice-Captain. 3rd year on team. Middle. A fine plunger 
who only needs to gain a little more speed going through the line. A 
dependable catch on the tertiary, and a fine tackle. His high spirit kept 
the team driving. 

H, B. HEATH: 3rd year on team. Flying wing. Best plunger on the team, 
whose excellent cutting gamed many extra yards for us. His tackling on 
the secondary was consistently deadly. Made very good interference. 

A. P. LEE: 3rd year on team. Inside. His interference was always excellent. 
Tackled consistently well and also spoilt the opposition's interference. A 
hard worker. Will be a great asset to the team next year. 

McKINLEY: 2nd year on team. Half. Although inexperienced in the backfield 
his plunging was very good. His runbacks of kicks were good and he 
kicked well. Tackled and clipped well, but should learn to differentiate 
between the two. 

CROIL: 2nd year on team. Half, Plunged well. Tackled well on the secon- 
dary, but together with McKinley should learn when to tackle and when 
to clip. His kicking was always very good. His interference was hard 
to evade. 

BOUTIN: 1st year on team. Half. Is a beginner at football and has a great 
deal to learn. Tried hard and used his speed to advantage. 

NEY: 1st year on team. Middle. Although new to the game did very well all 
season. His plunging and interference were excellent. His placement- 
kicking was always dependable and his tackling very good. 

RE'NAUD: 1st year on team. Quarter. Kept the team moving all the time. 
Despite his lack of weight his tackling was very good. His broken-field 
running was very difficult to stop, and his passing was very accurate. 

WINTER: 3rd year on team. Snap. His snapping all year was consistently 
faultless. Made many hard-driving tackles and good interference. Should 
learn to size up a play before trying to break it up. 

MACLAREN II: 1st year on team. Inside. Made many excellent tackles. His 
interference was rather inconsistent, but will improve with experience. 

PRESTON: 1st year on team. Inside. Always drove hard and made many fine 

tackles. His interference was good. Must learn not to block out the 

secondary in sizing up an opponent's play. 
SPAFFORD: 1st year on team. Snap and Outside Despite inexperience made 

many fine tackles and good interference. His snapi^ing was very good 

when he was needed. Will improve with experience. 
HOWSAM: 1st year on team. Half. Plunged very well and his interference 

was good. Must learn to be decisive when making tackles. 
SOPER: 1st year on team. Half. Plunged well despite lack of weight. Was 

a plucky tackier and his interference will improve with practice. 



THE ASHBi'RIAN [\9] 

HOOPER I: 1st year on team. Spare lineman Although inexperienced made 
some excellent tackles and his interference was good. Will improve greatly 
with more experience. 

BRASS: 1st year on team. Outside. Is new to the game and has a great deal 
to learn. A plucky tackier, but must remember to keep outside his man 
on downfield tackling. 

THOMAS I: 1st year on team. Outside. Although new to football did very 
well. Despite his size he tackled very well and made good interference. 

Seldom missed a pass, and is a promising player. 

By A. D. Brain 

H J, MacDONALD: Captain. 3rd year on team. A fine captain who main- 
tained a splendid spirit in the team both on the field and off. His play at 
Outside Wing was outstanding in all departments of the game — tackling, 
blocking and pass-receiving. 



VERSUS LOWER CANADA COLLEGE, AWAY. LOST 0-19 

Lower Canada College played host to Ashbury this year on October 25th, 
for the annual football fixture between the two schools. The field was slow and 
a brisk wind favoured the home team during the first quarter. LC.C. kicked 
off and Ashbury's end of the field became the scene of action. Ground gains 
by the home team set up two singles, both kicked by Smith before the end 
of the first quarter. After the teams had changed ends LC.C. continued to 
press and were rewarded by an unconverted touchdown. Then Ashbury came 
to life. Two long forward passes from Renaud to MacDonald and Thomas were 
completed for a sixty yard gain which moved the play deep into Lower Canada 
territory. The attack fell short, however, as Heath fumbled on the five yard 
line )ust as the half time whistle sounded, and LC.C. led 7 - 0. 

Experience told in the second half. MacDonald and Lee were the only 
players on the Ashbury line who could cope with the LC.C ground attack as 
the home team swept down the field for a touchdown which was converted. 
Ashbury came back, however, and Heath went for a fifty yard gain which ad- 
vanced the ball to L.C.C.'s twenty-five yard line. The opportunity wag lost 
when a third down plunge failed to gain the necessary yardage for a first down 
and Lower Canada were in possession once more. L.C.C. scored their last 
touchdown in the fourth quarter when Wilson fell on a loose ball behind the 
goal line. The convert was the last point scored in the game, leaving L C C. 
the winners by a 19-0 score. 

The team : 

Ashbury — Flying Wing, Heath, Halfbacks, McKinley, Howsom, Soper; 
Quarterback, Renaud; Snap, Winter; Insides, Lee and Preston, Middles, Good- 
win and Ney; Outsides, MacDonald and Spafford Subs. — Boutin, Brass, Hooper, 
Maclaren, Thomas. 



f201 T^^^E ASHBURIAN 

VERSUS BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL, AWAY. LOST 6 - 17 

The B.C.S. game was scheduled for November 1st in Montreal, and Ash- 
bury made the trip without several regulars, including captain MacDonald. 
The day was cold and rain descended steadily upon the already muddy gridiron 
at Lower Canada. It was not the weather for any kind of open game, and both 
teams found that the only successful plays were through the line. 

Bishop's kicked off, Ashbury came back for a first down, and then it be- 
came a kicking duel. Late in the first quarter B.C.S. blocked a kick which gave 
them possession within striking distance, and after the teams changed ends 
Sewell punted for a safety. Two more singles in the second quarter gave B.C.S. 
a 4 - lead at half time. 

Ashbury scored in the first minute of the second half. Heath received the 
kickoff and ran seventy-five yards for a touchdown; Ney converted, and Ash- 
bury lead 6 - 4. B.C.S. tried to open up with some end runs, but soon learned 
the folly of such tactics and went back to punting. Early in the final quarter 
they tied the score at 6 - 6 and continued to press, taking a one point lead when 
McKinley was rouged while attempting to run on a third down kick formation. 
Then with time growing short Ashbury tried what Bishop's had failed to do, 
and the results were disastrous. On two occasions the purple team gained pos- 
session deep in the School's territory, and twice they went over for major scores 
with Lynn and Shuter carrying the ball. Both attempts at conversion failed, 
and the final whistle found Ashbury on the short side of a 17-6 score. 

The Team : 

Ashbury — Flying Wing, Heath; Halfbacks, McKinley, Howsam, Boutin; 
Quarterback, Renaud; Snap, Spafford; Insides, Lee and Maclaren; Middles, 
Goodwin and Ney; Outsides, Thomas and Hooper; Sub., Brass. 



EXHIBITION GAMES 

This year's football season was opened with Nepean Seniors paying us 
their annual visit. Fielding a well drilled team the visitors set a strong pace 
for the newly formed Ashbury squad, running up a total of twenty-nine points. 
Ashbury's only score came when McKinley intercepted a pass deep in Nepean 
territory and plunged over for a touchdown. Goodwin kicked the conversion 
from placement. 

The other exhibition game this season was played against a team from 
Lisgar made up of junior and senior players. Ashbury's ground attack func- 
tioned well but costly fumbles and failure to capitalize upon opportunities 
combined to nold us scoreless. Victory went to Lisgar by virtue of Blue's un- 
converted touchdown in the third quarter. 



THE ASHBURIAN 



[21 




Front Rcw: Bulpit, Nairn, Lawrence (Captain), McLaren, Bourget. Inset: Bailey 
Back Row — From left to right: Hurtley, Richardson, Soblin, Pegram, Cole, Berry. 

SOCCER 

Reviewed by J. C. McLaren. 

COLORS^First XI: 

R. G. Lawrence R. B. Bailey J. C. McLaren 

THE soccer season reached a new height this year and the successful results 
gave proof of this fact. The wide enthusiasm shown for the game was 
most encouraging and great spirit and initiative were shown in games 
and practice alike. If such enthusiasm continues, the prospects will be equally 
good for the next season. 

1st XI VERSUS LOWER CANADA COLLEGE, HOME. WON 2 - 0. 

On October 3rd, the first game of the season was played on the home 
ground against Lower Canada College. A fair wind blew across the field. At the 
start, the play was even, but towards the end of the first half, the Ashbury 
forwards made a rush and McLaren managed to send the ball past the Lower 
Canada goalie. In the second half the L.C.C. team rallied and several times 
threatened to tie the score. However, a well placed shot by Richardson ended 
any such hopes and Ashbury went into the lead 2-0. Both teams continued 
to fight hard, but the final score did not change. 

The line-up was as follows: Goal, Sablin, Backs, Bourget, Nairn; Half- 
backs, Cole, Lawrence, Pegram; Forwards, Bailey, Berry, McLaren I, Richardson, 
Bulpit. 



[22] THE ASHBURIAN 

1st XI VERSUS LOWER CANADA COLLEGE, AWAY, WON 3 - 2. 

On Sat. Nov. 8th, the school played it's return match against Lower Canada 
at the latter's grounds. The field was decidedly slippery. 

In the first half the LC.C. eleven was definitely superior and, in the play, 
which was almost entirely in the Ashbury end, two goals resulted against the 
school. One of these was a penalty shot. 

In the second half a remarkable change took place in the Ashbury play. 
Cooperation between half-backs, backs and forwards, brought numerous rushes 
into L.C.C. territory. McLa.en I shot in a goal on a pass from Bailey. Berry 
scored on a rebound and Richardson shortly after touched in the winning goal 
on a pass from Bulpit. 

Ashbury continued to dominate the play and when the whistle blew the 
score stood Ashbury 3, L.CC 2. 

The line-up was as follows: Goal, Sablin; Backs, Bourget, Nairn; Half- 
backs, Pegram, Lawrence; Forwards, Bailey, Berry, McLaren I, Richardson, 
Bulpit. 

VERSUS GLEBE COLLEGIATE, WON 7 - 0; WON 4 - 0; WON z - 0. 

A new opponent was found this season in the First XI squad of Glebe 
Collegiate of Ottawa. Ashbury proved greatly superior and more experienced 
in this series of matches and dominated the play in all three games. 

On Oct. 21st, the school First XI defeated Glebe 7 - 0. One week later, 
again on home grounds, a slightly younger team triumphed over Glebe 4-0, 
and, on Nov. 4th, at Cartier Square, our First XI once more was victorious. 

In these games Ashbury scorers were Bulpit, McLaren I, Berry and Rich- 
ardson. 

OTHER MATCHES 

In extra matches this year the First XI played the Staff and Rugby Team, 
respectively. 

Against the Staff we suffered our first and only defeat. The game was 
generally even throughout but the excellent combination of the elderly gentle- 
men resulted in a 3 - 4 loss. 

In another feature we managed to outpoint the Rugby team, who later, 
in an exciting match, were overcome by the Staff. 

THE HOUSE MATCHES 

Woollcombe and Connaught opened their annual series of games on the 
school's senior field. Within a few minutes of the opening whistle Connaught 
went into the lead on a goal by McLaren I. Shortly after, however, Woollcombe 
rallied and Bailey shot in a pass from Berry to tie the score. Richardson again 
put Connaught in the lead, through a passing play. The ball was shot against 
the Woollcombe goal post and Bulpit sent in the rebound. 

The final score stood 2 - 1 for Connaught. 

The second game was quite even throughout with each team succeeding 
in getting into the other's territory. Connaught scored first when Heath shot 



THE ASHBURIAN (23) 

in a pass from Bulpit and, with but a minute left in the second half, Berr/ 
managed to score on Bailey's pass to tie the score. The game ended in a 
I - 1 tie. 

The third game was filled with action and saw numerous rushes by both 
teams. While the first half of the game proved even in play, in the second 
half the Connaught team definitely dominated the play. However, repeated 
shots at Woollcombe's goal failed to alter the 2 - 2 tie, and the score remained 
unchanged at the final whistle. Berry, McLaren I and Bulpit scored for their 
respective houses in this game. 

The series went to Connaught House with one win and two draws. 
UNDER 15 SOCCER 
VERSUS L.CC, AWAY, DRAW 1-1. 

It was a very wet day but luckily there was no wind. Lower Canada won 
the toss and kicked off. Immediately they began to threaten, but by the 
excellent work of our backs they were prevented from scoring. Suddenly on a 
rush, the School forwards slipped the ball into the Lower Canada goal. Right 
from the kick-off the L.CC. forwards threatened, and this time they were re- 
warded by a goal. From then on neither team scored and the game ended 
with the score tied at 1 - 1. The Ashbury scorer was Threshie I. 

The line-up was as follows: — Goal, Sablin; Backs, Chapman, Harben I, 
Halves, Show, MacNabb II, Hurtley; Forwards, Prance, Pearson, Harben II, 
Threshie I, Eliot I. 

VERSUS SELWYN HOUSE. WON 2 - 0. 

It was a perfect day for soccer though the ground was still wet from the 
previous day's rain. Selwyn House won the toss and kicked-off. From the 
kick-off the School forwards carried the ball into Selwyn House territory and 
seldom allowed the ball to pass into their own half. At half time the score 
was 1 - in favour of Ashbury. — Scored by Threshie I. As soon as play was 
resumed Selwyn House made it their turn to force the play, and for ten min- 
utes the School's narrow margin seemed at stake, but a sudden break by our 
forwards resulting in a goal by Prance determined the outcome of the game. 
And though Selwyn House threatened dangerously, they were unable to score, 
and when the final whistle blew, the score was 2 - in Ashbury's favour. 

The line-up was as follows: — Goal, Sablin; Backs, Chapman, Harben I, 
Halves, Shaw, MacNabb II, Hurtley; Forwards, Prance, Pearson, Harben II, 
Threshie I, Eliot I. 

VERSUS SELWYN HOUSE. DRAW 1-1. 

A very heavy rain fell throughout the entire game, and the temperature 
was very low. Ashbury won the toss and kicked-off. After several minutes of 
play Richardson took a long shot that bounced over the Selwyn House goal- 
keeper. Several minutes later the opposing forwards scored. After half-time 
both teams narrowly missed scoring, and when the final whistle blew, the 
score remained 1 - 1 . 

The lineup was as follows --Goal, Sablin, Backs, Chapman, Harben I; 
Halves, Shaw, Hurtley, Read; Forwards, Mcnabb II, Pearson, Harben II, Rich- 
ardson, Threshie I. 



[24] THE ASHBURIAN 

GAMES V. ROCKCLIFFE PUBLIC SCHOOL 

As usual the Junior School soccer team played their rivals, the Rockcliffe 
Public School, winning and dividing a game with them, the two scores being 
3 -Oand 1 - 1. 

On a Monday afternoon the public school team came to Ashbury for the 
first game, in which the Home team was on the offensive most of the time. 
The match was won by the passing plays of the Ashbury team. The scorers 
were West II, Kenny and Gould; and the lineup was: Goal, Wilkins; Backs, 
Patterson and Spencer; Halves, Whitwell, Castle (captain) and DeWinton; 
Forwards, Shinner, Kenny, Gould, West II and Nesbitt. 

In the second game the Rockcliffe team with the aid of its greatly superior 
weight opened the scoring and it was not until the second half that Ashbury 
was able to drive its opponents from the goal-mouth. It was then that the 
Ashbury captain sent a shot from forty feet out, which was too high for the 
Rockcliffe goalie to reach, and tied the score. From then on Ashbury kept the 
ball in Rockcliffe territory but was not able to decide the game. The scorer 
for Rockcliffe was Michael Measures. 

Ashbury line-up: Goal, Wilkins; Backs, Patterson and Dixon; Halves, 
Whitwell, Castle (captain) and DeWinton; Forwards, Shinner, Kenny, Gould, 
West II and Arlen. 

ENGLISH RUGBY 

by L. H. Chapman 

THIS term under the very able guidance of Mr. Johnston and Mr. Harrison, 
the members of the middle and junior schools have played English Rugby 
on Friday and Saturday. 

The game was taken up willingly by the Canadian as well as the English 
boys. The opening game of the season was a great success, the members of 
the lower flat with Mr. Harrison's help made up "The Lower Flat 
Lions", challenging any team to a game, at this Mr. Johnston picked up 
a team calling them "The Carefree Casualties." It was a perfect day for the 
game, but the sides were rather uneven, as the ball was in the "Lions" end 
nearly all the time. The final score being "Casualties" 17, Lions 0. 

About half-way through the season a five-team league was formed, the 
teams being, Eagles, Scots, Tigers, Lions and Bears. Unluckily there were only 
two games put in before the snow came. But the snow had a short life and 
the games were continued with even more vigour than before. They were 
played either in thick mud under a blazing sky or on frozen ground with the 
snow falling. 

In spite of grazed legs, sprained ankles and dirty clothes, these gomes 
always ended well. 

We thank Mr. Johnston and all those concerned for the endless trouble 
they have taken in making these games possible, and hope that next year 
English Rugger will start earlier and be even more successful. 



THE ASIIBL'RIAN [251 

BASKETBALL 

BASKETBALL has at last come into its own. In previous years it was a 
game merely played in gym periods, but now it has taken on a wider scope. 
A league withm the senior school has been organized and six teams have 
entered. Valuable pointers given us by Mr. McAdam last year, and the know- 
ledge of the game that some of the new boys possess, has helped towards put- 
ting the style of play in a category above that of the first year player. Several 
pre-schedule games have been played and early next term actual league plav 
will begin. 





[26] THE ASHBURIAN 

OLD BOYS' NEWS 

WE have been asked to say that the Old Boys' Association Committee has 
decided to suspend operations for the duration of the War. It was 
felt that as so many Old Boys were either overseas or serving else- 
where in one capacity or another, and the few that were left were all so busy, 
there was little else that could be done. 

We print below the letter sent to all members of the Association explain- 
ing the matter: — 

December 1st, 1941. 
To Members of The Ashbury 
Old Boys' Association: 

Although there were still sufficient members left in Montreal last spring 
to hold a successful Annual Meeting and Old Boys' Dinner, it has become in- 
creasingly clear to your Committee that such would not be the case next year. 
With more and more Ashburians volunteering for Active Service, and with your 
Committee itself reduced in numbers from 5 to 2, we feel therefore that it will 
be impossible to continue our activities for the present. 

Naturally, we greatly regret having to take this step; but with a fair bank 
balance to our credit and with all the old school tradition behind us, we are 
certain that when this war is over, the Ashbury Old Boys' Association will con- 
tinue stronger than ever before. 

Those wishing to continue their subscription to the "ASHBURIAN" should 
forward their $2.00 directly to Ashbury College, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa. 



While we are sorry this had to be done, we feel that the Committee acted 
wisely, as formal activities and gatherings would have been impossible. How- 
ever Ashbury will continue to send out periodical news to Old Boys, so as to 
keep in touch, and it is hoped that informal meetings can be arranged from 
time to time in different cities. 

It should be unnecessary to say too, that any Old Boy will always be 
welcome at the school. If he can't come in person news of his doings will be 
welcomed. In this regard, please let us know of any Ashburian serving in the 
Army, Navy or Air Force, we want to publish as complete a list as possible in 
the next issue. 



Letter from Queens 
from Brock Mordy. 

As I promised to, longer ago than I care to admit, I have unearthed some 
of the Old Ashburians here, and am sending along these facts for what they 
are worth. 

Bert Lawrence is in his second year at R.M C , and expects to receive his 
commission next July, when he will go into camp at Petawawa with the R.C.E. 



THE ASH [if Rl AN \ 27 \ 

He also tells me that Robin Stedmcn went overseas in June, and is in an 
armoured division of the Imperial Army. 

Howie Borends is in Third Year Meds., and took his exercise this fall play- 
ing Interfaculty football. 

Eric Forde is one of those Artsmen who adorn themselves with the title 
"Sophomore", while there are five here who have done stretches at Ashbury. 

Fred Bronson, Digby Viets, and Bill Wardrope are in the first year of a 
general Arts course. Peter Berry is a Science freshman and can't forget it, 
while the undersigned is in Second Year Arts. 

Pete and I room together in this house which still stands, miraculously, 
after a year of occupancy by Ade Phillips and Bob Wilson. 

Ade by the way, is taking on engineering course at Dartmouth, while Bob 
Wilson IS in the R.C.A.F. 

A lot of this you may know, but I am submitting it, anyway — just in case. 

ASHBURY VS. OLD BOYS. LOST 17 - 6. 

On November 11th, as in past years, the school football team wound up 
its season by playing the Old Boys 

This year, however, the Old Boys were conspicuous by their absence owing 
to the exigencies of war and various other reasons, with the result that a number 
of outsiders were called in to complete the team, among whom was Johnny 
Fripp of the Rough Riders. 

Fripp although he did not try to overexert himself, impressed everyone by 
his end runs, and through the same, chalked up the first touch for the Old Boys, 
unconverted. The remaining twelve points were chalked up by Blair Gilmour 
on plunging plays that could not be checked by the stubborn and hard fighting 
school line. 

Ashbury came through when George Croil plunged for a touch, which was 
converted for six points. 

On the whole, the school fought a hard game and many of the Old Boys 
were brought down hard, endangering their aged brittle bones, but their over- 
whelming weight finally told the tale. 



There have been a number of weddings recently, one in Ashbury Chapel, 
when Sub-Lieutenant Lee Snelling, R.C.N.V.R., married Ann Ashton, on Satur- 
day, December 19th, 1941. 

On the same day Pilot-Officer Neville Spence was married to Dorothy 
Macpherson in All Saints Church, Ottawa, Dr. Woollcombe officiating. 



[28] THE ASHBURIAN 

On July 12th, Godfrey Greene, R.C.MP. married Eileen Ross in the R.C.M.P. 
Chapel, Regina. 

In August Lieutenant George Wodehouse, R C.A.M.C, married Jane Toller 
in Ottawa. 

On September 6th, in St. Matthews Church Ottawa, the marriage oc- 
curred of W. M. Marshall and Margaret Miller. 

Early in December, Second Lieutenant David Ghent, married Arlene 
Fleming in Knox Presbyterian Church, Ottawa. 

Charles Rowley Booth was married to Marjorie McKinnon in November in 
Ottawa. 

Early in the New Year, Sub-Lieutenant G. Clark married Angelie Campbell 
in Ottawa. 

Wing-Commander Bill McBnen, who has been Commanding Officer at 
Uplands Service Flying Training School for some time, married in Ottawa 
recently. 

We hear, too, that Corporal Arthur Balders recently married Norah Tobin, 
presumably in Halifax. 

We heartily cniujratuhiic all these and wish them the best of luek. If 
we ha7'e missed any that luri'e oeeiirred -ree'd be (/lad to know. 

Congratulations are in order to Dietrich Heuser, whose wife had a son some 
time ago in Los Angeles. Also to Ross McMaster who has again become a 
father, this time of a daughter, and to Jack LeMoine who has achieved a son. 

Jim Allen, expert from the Champion Spark Plug Co., has been touring the 
country, lecturing for the Government at Military Camps. Ned Allen, his 
brother, is a Captain in the Hussars, as is Vickers. .Garner Currie is a Captain 
in the Grenadier Guards. 

Jack Brown, Fred Heubach, Robert Wilson, Guy Fisher, Walter Soper, Gus 
Smart, Jack Neeld, Bob Borden, John McGurkin, are all in the R.C A.F. 

Augus Wilson is overseas with his unit. Ian Barclay is in the navy, Kirk- 
patrick with the Toronto Scottish, David Phillips and Jeffrey Earle are both in 
the Ordnance Corps. Blair Gilmour and Don Maclaren are in the 1st Ottawa 
Anti-Aircraft Battery. Pete Smellie was one of the troops Broadcasting from 
overseas not long ago. 

David Fauquier is a Captain in the Royal Canadian Dragoons. 

Walter Kingsmill has seen much action on a Corvette, while Fred Sher- 
wood was made 2nd in Command of a British Submarine recently. 

Congratulations to Guy Simonds, RCA. on his promotion to Brigadier. 
Pete Wilson was in charge of the Signals Section during the raid on Spitz- 
bergen. 



THE ASHBCRIAN 



[19 




Seme cf the 1929 Football Teom, nc^v distingjishmg themie;v:-s on ot.icr i.e. 



[30] THE ASHBURIAN 

Assistant Commissioner J. M. Tupper, R.C.M.P. is retiring from the Force 
and going to live in Vancouver. 

Pat Bogert, now a Lt. -Colonel, was one of three Canadians specially 
selected to go to the Near East some months ago. 

Edson Sherwood has relinquished his position as A. DC. at Government 
House and returned to service in the Navy with the rank of Commander, 

Douglas Weary has been playing goal with distinction for Clearpoint 
Hockey Team in Montreal. They were finally defeated by Montreal Royals 
Juniors. 

The engagement is reported in England of Alan Powell, R.C.N.V.R., to 
Diana Green, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Green of Portsmouth. 

David Mathios has a commission in the 2nd Montreal Regiment, R.CA., 
Surrey. 

Herbert H. Higgins is overseas in the army. 

Ian Blair of the Cameron Highlanders is overseas. 

Bill Ellis transferred to an Armoured Division and is at Camp Borden. 

Peter Viets was at Petawawa when last heard from. 

Bert Tremaine is in command at Petawawa, now as a Brigadier. 

We have little news from the Universities, except the letter from Queens 
printed below, but we gather that Max Hughson is having a good year at 
Varsity, and Charles Burrows, Pete Newcombe, Geoffrey Hughson, and Jim 
Wait, have mode a good beginning at McGill. 

M chael Curry and Charles Woodward are said to be at the University of 
British Columbia. 

An old boy visited the school and left this letter. We cannot reach him 
to get his permission so do not give his name. 

"Please excuse the informality of this note, early visit, and the necessity 
of my leaving before a hand shake. 

I was boarder here from 1927-32 and am pleased to soy that after putter- 
ing around all seems in excellent order and it has been very enjoyable to glance 
at old photographs and the College itself. 

I took the liberty of questioning one of the younger lads and he assures 
me that Ashbury is a grand school as of 1942. I was of the same opinion in 
1932 so there is reason to feel all will be well another 10 years hence " 



THE ASHBURIAN [M] 

THROUGH THE YEARS 

U'c rcpnut hcltnc sonic further cxtrmts from bade intiiibcrs of the 
Ashburiau. wliich will. :cc hof'c, f^nrrc liitcrrstliif/. 

vn\ 

Yes, Ashbury is steadily forging to the front among great Canadian schools. 
From a little private school on Wellington street twenty years ago, she grew to 
fill the more spacious premises on Argyle avenue. Slowly she outgrew this, and 
now with her present splendid "plant" has proved her efficiency on the play- 
ground as much as in the hardest exams. The motive force— the stimulus — • 
which has been constantly applied, the end she had ever in view, the high moral 
character which has always been her aim, and the steady pressure forward 
which has made her what she is now, is due, we think, solely to one fact. Ash- 
bury from her foundation has never lost the great influence of her founder. 
Mr, Woollcombe has guided her destinies for her twenty years of life — he has 
made her what she is, and he has moulded the characters of her sons and sent 
them out into the world, better and stronger for the struggle with the competing 
forces there to be met with. And this hundreds of old boys are ready to 
testify. 

1912 ///(• Ihikc and lUichcss of Connanijht visit Ashbury. 

The following notice of the Duke's visit was received from one of our 
"Shining Lights" in French, 

De Due de Connaught visito cette ecole le trente et un Janvier, II fit un 
discours dans le gymnase. II demonda un conge pour les eleves. Le principal 
repondit que demain serait un conge. Puis les ecoliers frapperent leurs 
crochets-d-pains. M, Wiggins chatouillc les ivoires, qui laisserent echapper 
"Vive le roi" en hail Ion-temps. 

The old boys have occupied a prominent place in hockey this year. Among 
them may be mentioned; with McGill Mnter-collegiate League^ Grey Masson, 
with R.M C. Firsts, Cuthbert Barwis; with Saskatoon, Donnie Blair, with Moose 
Jaw, Donnie Masson; with R,M,C, Seconds, Fernie Gendron; with Trinity College, 
Leigh Bishop; with the Bankers (City League), Douglas and St. Barbe Sladen; 
and with Portage du Fort, Herbie Reid. 

Orders have been sent to England for a large supply of the new school 
blazers — a dark green jacket bordered with the cardinal and white ribbon 
The cricket blazer has also been sent for. This is a white jacket with a cardinal 
and green border. When these arrive the play ground and cricket field will be 
enlivened by a touch of colour which will make our Sports' Day a much less 
sombre sight than it was last year. 

On December 8th, last, the football team held its annual dinner in honour 
of again winning the championship. Speeches were made by the Headmaster 



[321 



THE ASHBURIAN 



and the football Captain — Naismith; after which the team adjourned to the 
theatre where the amusing play "Dear Old Billy" was thoroughly enjoyed. 

After all, Ashbury seemed to have generally "cleaned things up" last year. 
The Football Championship fell to us, we made a strong bid for the Hockey Cup, 
we did as well as the execrable weather would allow us in Cricket, won the first 
place in the military district for the Cadet Corps, captured the Scout Rifle Cup 
for the district, got second place for indoor shooting in the whole of Canada, 
8th place in shooting on the ranges, won eight first class marksman's certifi- 
cates, had our Scouts commented upon as the "Smartest he had seen at Home 
or in Canada" by the Duke himself, and passed very nearly all who tried in 
the University entrance exams. 

Indeed with a steady "pull altogether" this year we ought to make 1912- 
13 the most all round successful school year that we have ever had. 

Do fillies cliaiujc I'cry much? 

One of our contributors, who is in the habit of going for walks :n Rock- 
cliffe Park every afternoon, has sent us the following; 

A great English poet has written of the "joy in widest commonalty spread"; 
and assuredly there ore simple, modest enjoyments even for those whose purse 
and leisure may be light and brief, if they but open their eyes to see, and their 
hearts to feel. 

At a vantage point in our great, natural playground, Rockcliffe Park, is a 
little, yellow pavilion — is it a hexagon?' — at which gentle refreshments and mild 
drinks may be procured at a reasonable price. No' this not an advertisement, 
but just a free appreciation of a little family picnic. The writer does not know 
the name of the proprietor or waiter behind these wayside counters, but if he 
could do so, would sing his praises in melodious lays, and will call to mind, on 
many a wintry evening, his cheery summer hospitality. 

Around the little refreshment booth, in its sunlight and soul-light, are 
magnificent shade trees, green sward and pleasing, restful scenes of land and 
sky. Our splendid driveway sweeps by, away down the bluffs the grand river 
flows, and beyond, across the river the Laurentians stretch afar. As our host 
remarks, people from the far countries wonder that Ottawa people do not flock 
to enjoy it more fully. It is a sample of nature's bounty; and our host, who 
delights to feed the neighboring squirrels, when unmolested by the thoughtless 
or cruel — seems to fit into the scene with his native hospitality. Here's to mine 
host, one of nature's gentlemen. God bless him' 

The writer must just have spent a dollar and have been feeling the ef- 
fects.— Ed. 

FoniKifioii of Old Hoys' Association. 

At Easter of this year — in response to the Headmaster's invitation — about 
twenty old boys of Ashbury assembled at a dinner in the school, and discussed 



THE ASHBURIAN [^M 

the question of forming some sort of organization by which the army of thoS2 
who have left the College might not be lost sight of entirely as has hitherto 
been done. 

It was decided to form an Old Boy's association and the necessary officers 
were elected for the year, viz: L White, Hon. Sec'y; P Chrysler, C. Fleming, 
and P. Woollcombe. 
1913 

The Editor has recently come across a newspaper clipping of the vintage 
of June 1895, which gives an account of the closing exercises of the "Ashbury 
House School" held in St. John's Hall in that month After naming the various 
prize winners, the account continues: "Afterwards an amusing French Comedy 
was presented. The pupils taking part were: E. Herbert, H. MacLean, V. Heron, 
M. Bate, S. Robertson, J. Symes and C. Tupper 

A recitation of Scene 2, Act 3, of Julius Caesar was given and greatly ap- 
preciated. H Maclean took the part of Brutus; C. Currier, of Cassius; R. 
Gormully of Marc Antony and 0. Dickey, Julius Caesar. The rest of the cast 
was represented by Masters A. Z. Palmer, C. Tupper, L. White, G. Chrysler, 
and D. Currier." 

Extracts from a letter from Mr. Hooper, a master, away on sick leave 
at the time. There Is a familiar rimj about his complaint. 

But enough of these fond memories — I did manage to see some of you at 
the LCC. football match here last fall, but I missed the great championship 
match at Ashbury. I should like to congratulate you on that, but I was dis- 
appointed that so little was made of it outside Ottawa. Everyone in Ottawa 
already knows Ashbury — what we want to do is to get it as well known in other 
places. 

When other schools win outside Championships they advertise it every- 
where. Everyone sends copies of the local papers with accounts of the match 
to their homes. These accounts are often copied into the papers there, and 
thus hundreds of people hear of the championship and of the lucky winning 
school. Otherwise these people would never have an opportunity of knowing 
anything about it, or that such a school existed. 

first Old Boys' I>iinier. 

About forty Old Ashbunons met at the Aylmer car at seven o'clock on 
Saturday evening, April 11th and thence proceeded to the Royal Ottawa Golf 
Club. It was the occasion of the first Annual Meeting and Banquet of the 
Ashbury Old Boys' Association and in view of this, the numbers present were 
most encouraging. 

Mr. Louis T. White the Secretary of the Association received the Old Boys 
at the Golf Club. 



[34] 



THE ASHBURIAN 



There were Old Boys from mony parts of- the Dominion. Some that at- 
tended Ashbury as far back as twenty-three years ago and others that left 
only last year It was decidedly a very representative gathering. 

I'/iis rather iiu/niioiis Utile story in symbols appealed to its. You iiutst 
know poiiinls. sliilliiK/s and peiiee to soli'e it. 

The following was handed to us by a motoring enthusiast. We hope that 
someone will be able to work it out. 

"Let M represent the Motorist; and V his velocity. Then if V be a positive 
quantity, M + V will presently approach PC. 

If the value of V be low enough, PC may be disregarded. 

If not, a circle should be described about PC. 

If this IS impossible, it will be necessary to square PC. 

Then PC + LSD = PC-. 

ButM + V + (PC -LSD) = JP. 

And here LSD = O, for JP- is an impossible quantity. 

Thus M + V -f ( PC - LSD 1 = M - I OL." 




THE ASHBURIAN 



[351 



LITERARY SECTION 



THE DREAM 

// seemed tlutt lie 2<'as onec lu/ain 

Out ill the world he loird so well, 
Whose beauty he had all forgot 

III the eoiifiiies of his f^rison eell. 

He -was walkiiu/ th rough a fragrant 7Cood, 
JVhcrc stately trees einbraeed the sky. 

Whilst thrushes sang — and o'er his head 
There flew a blue-winged butterfly. 

He stood beside a glassy pool. 

Fed b\ a eonstant babbling brook, 
Where hills and frees were mirrored clear 

As on it they were wont to look. 

Before him stretched the endless hills. 

And near them lay the spectrcd zvood ; 
While by the brook, all free from care. 
Some cattle grazing, always stood. 

He marvelled at the beauty there — 

And. looking o'er the grassy lea, 
Fie thanked God for these gifts of joy 

That live on through eternity. 

And then, poor sinner, he azcokc. 

The dream he hoped might still remain; 

But 'round him lay his dingy cell. 
And vanished was the country lane. 

— [. C. McLaren. 



[36 



THE ASHBURIAN 



THE CATHEDRAL OF RHEIMS 

By M. J. Ney 

ALL day long Rheims had been under fire, the German guns had ceaselessly 
and unmercifully pounded the town. The place was nearly empty now, 
most of the populace having left even before the shelling began; but a 
few of the simple townsfolk had taken shelter in the peacefulness of the ancient 
cathedral. Outside there was devastation. The fires which had been started 
last night by the air-raids were spreading quickly before a high wind. The air 
was hot, and full of flying sparks and billowing smoke. Occasionally there 
would be a crash from a falling shell, and in the distance machine gun fire 
could be heard. The streets were empty and full of debris, and' before me 
silent and serene stood the lofty cathedral; calm amidst the chaos, and firm 
while everything else fell. Thinking that some signs of life might be found 
there, I went in through the west door. 

In the cathedral of Rheims, all was quiet and peaceful, some bewildered 
townsfolk were sitting on the wooden chairs in the nave, and up by the high 
altar, I could see a service in process. Through a large hole in the roof the 
smoke and smell from outside came in, but even this did not disturb the gothic 
dignity of the Cathedral. I unconsciously tiptoed through the nave, and went 
up into the choir where most of the people were. There in the cold and dimly- 
light choir, knelt the last people of Rheims; their homes were in ruins, their 
soldiers had deserted them, and the Germans were coming, but these people, 
trusting in their instinctive belief in the church, turned in their hour of dis- 
tress to God. Here was faith, here was courage, while their country was being 
scorched by the flame of war, and their freedom, even their very lives were 
being threatened, these humble people knelt in prayer before God. 

Then above the dull roar of burning Rheims, came the coarse sound of tanks, 
and the equally coarse roar of motorcycles; and away back in the nave of the 
cathedral could be heard the sharp metallic noise of marching soldiers, and the 
frightened shriek of a woman. Then through the rood-screen leading from the 
nave to the choir came a German officer followed by half a dozen soldiers. 

"Stop", yelled the officer, pointing his revolver towards the altar, where 
the priest stood with his back towards him. 

He went on, and the people, after a moment's pause joined in. 

"Stop, or I shoot", repeated the officer, and still the priest kept on with 
the prayers, his voice quieter, but with firm conviction. 

Then the officer fired three shots, the priest tried to turn, staggered and 
fell, his hands grasping the altar-cloth, and as he fell the wine on the altar 
spilt over his body. 

The officer burst out laughing in a fiendish and hysterical way, and firing 
another into the air, turned round and left, his diabolical laughter echoing 
through the high vaulting of the church. 



THF. ASHBi'RIAN (371 

Somebody started to cry quietly, and the roar of tanks went on outside, 
end there, at the foot of the high altar, lay the dead body of the priest, his 
white surplice stained by his and Christ's blood. 

God had suffered too, and somebody started to say the Lord's prayer. 



WINSTON CHURCHILL 

By J. C. McL. 

THE people of the New World have taken Winston Churchill to their 
hearts. The man's singular personality was the principal cause of this 
but it was also from the fact that he represented the courage of the 
ordinary English folk, that his presence was so warmly felt. 

As he strode from the Ottawa station that first day of his visit, one could 
easily read, in one glance, his predominant characteristics. On his face were 
signs of determination, endurance, humor; and above all, his whole appearance 
spoke of confidence. You could picture him walking about in bombed British 
cities, shouting encouragement to his people and defiance to the enemy hordes. 
You could not help believing that this smiling, sturdy old fellow would live to 
see us through this struggle. 

This was the man who had taken over the reins of government in such a 
perilous time in it's history, had made his island an armed fortress and gave 
and is still giving the forces of freedom the dynamic leadership which eventually 
will bring victory. 

By his presence and his historic speech in this country, the Canadian people, 
and those over the entire world, were stirred from any complacency over the 
war and were urged on to greater sacrifices. And, Churchill, himself, having 
seen at first hand the loyalty and devotion of Ihe senior Dominion, undoubtedly 
has returned to his island with greater hope and confidence. 

May he, with God's help, guide us into a world, where the dark clouds of 
war have passed and where there is peace, freedom and a brotherhood of man. 

He staiids. the syiiihol of a initioii's ]iii(jlit, 

iriiosc fate lie yiildes o'er luittle's narrow ledf/e. 

A stroiuj-zeilled people are his spirit's streui/tli, 
World peaee and freedom are his soleiiui pledge. 



[381 ^^^ ASHBURIAN 

AN HOTEL FIRE 

By G. R. G. 

FIRE' The building's on fire' We'll all be killed' 
Thus was I awakened. I had been sleeping at an hotel in Chicago when 
my mind, dragging itself up from the depths of sleep, awoke. At first 
I heard the tramping of feet and a fire siren wailing like a lost soul in the 
distance, I knew it to be no dream. Quickly I got up and putting on some 
clothes I ran to the door, stumbling over a chair on the way. There absolute 
bedlam met me. The hall, filled with smoke and people, was a terrifying sight. 
A woman was standing by the wall screaming; a fat man, whom I had noticed 
earlier as a complacent businessman, was now rolling his eyes in a horrible 
manner while trying to smash his way through the mob; a child, struck still 
and dumb with terror, was knocked down and trampled on in the rush; another 
woman, with a baby clutched to her breast, was slowly and doggedly making 
her way toward the stairs. All flashed across my mind in a fraction of a second, 
and then I was one of them. I don't pretend that I kept my head; I don't 
pretend I let "women and children" go first; I don't pretend that I know how 
I got out — but I did. Once on the street I stood with the rest and watched the 
building being gutted by fire. 

Next morning the newspapers gave a nice coherent account of what hap- 
pened. I read it and found out how many had been killed, and how much money 
was lost, and how much damage was done, but I did not remember it. I re- 
membered the look on the fat man's face; I remembered the child being killed 
by his fellow-beings before my eyes; I remembered the woman with the baby. I 
had seen humanity stripped of its veneer of civilization. God, could I ever 
forget it. 



THE FLAG 

By M. J. N. 

Yrs. there flies the ni'ujhtx banner, 

That o'er the troubled seas so loiuj hath fUnvn ; 

There in that triple emblem stands. 

The wealth of wisdom, and the miyht of iKjes sho7\.'n. 

There is the flag that Nelson flew. 

7 he flag that Malboroiigh knew, 

.Ind earried to glory and to fame. 

Now all ye that British are in heart. 

Take up the standard to the battle eause. 

And fight now as you'-i'e never fought before, 

Shout around the earth, and let the Hea7'ens ring. 

"Cod Bless the noble eause, and Cod sai'e the King." 



THE ASHlli'RIAN 1^9 



THINGS I COULD DO WITHOUT 

By J. C. McLaren 

FROM a purely selfish point of view there ore monv things which I could do 
without and I will attempt to mention a few 
I could do without the yearly visit from Great Aunt Sophie. This indi- 
vidual arrives every winter along with the influenza and the snowdrifts The 
best chair in the warmest corner is always reserved for her and from there her 
voice may be heard denouncing all things modern and singing the praises of 
the good old days when Victoria was queen. 

I could easily do without the traditional Christmas tie from Aunt Lucie, 
Such an article is always relegated to the farthest end of the attic until next 
Christmas, when mother rescues it for the white-elephant table at the church 
bazaar. 

Periodical visits with my mother to the home of a family connection might 
definitely be eliminated. It has never appealed to me, on such visits, to sit, in 
a distant corner of the room, sip tea end gnaw at drop cakes, entirely remote 
from any human being, while the women carry on a most uninteresting con- 
versation in the middle of the room. 

I feel I could do without the cough lozenges which Uncle Dave sucks noisily 
at the church service. He sits directly in front of me and the noise (he makes^ 
drowns out the minister's voice and makes his sermons seem even more unin- 
telligible than they really are. 

I could do without such remarks as: "My how you've grown dear boy'" and 
"Give your own Cousin Bessie a big kiss," or "last time I saw you, you were just 
— so — high." 

This drivel usually emanates from the lips of careworn spinsters who drop 
in every decade and express bewildered surprise that I have grown in the 
interval. 

But then, perhaps the thing I could do without most of all, is writing an 
essay such as this. Whoever happens to read this will probably agree. 



'40] THE ASHBURIAN 



EXCHANGES 

The Editors gratefully acknowledge the receipt of the following Exchanges: — 

The Acta Ridlieana, Ridley College, St. Catherines, Ont. 

The B.C.S. Magazine, Bishop's College School, Lennoxville, P.Q. 

flic Argus, Sault Ste. Marie Collegiate, Ontario. 

The Blue and JVhife, Rothesay Collegiate, Rothesay, N.B. 

The College Times, Upper Canada College, Toronto, Ont. 

The Grove Chronicle, Lakefield Preparatory School, Lakefield, Ont. 

The Hatfield Hall Magazine, Hatfield Hall, Cobourg, Ont. 

The Lozver Canada College Magazine, Montreal, P.Q. 

Lux Glebana, Glebe Collegiate, Ottawa, Ont. 

Miss Edgar and Miss Crauif^'s, Montreal, P.Q. 

The Mitre, Bishop's University, Lennoxville, P.Q. 

Northland Echoes, North Bay Collegiate, North Bay, Ont. 

The Patrician Herald, St. Patrick's College, Ottawa. 

The Voyageur, Pickering College, Newmarket, Ontario. 

The Queen's Review, Queen's University, Kingston, Ont. 

The Record, Trinity College School, Port Hope, Ont. 

The R.M.C. Revieiv, R.M.C., Kingston, Ont. 

St. Andrew's College Revieiv, St. Andrew's College, Aurora, Ont. 

Samara, Elmwood School, Ottawa, Ont. 

The Shawnigan Lake School Magazine, Shawnigan Lake, B.C. 

South African College Magazine, S. A. High School, Cape Town M 

Trafalgar Echoes, Trafalgar Institute, Montreal, P.Q 

The Trinity College Magazine, Trinity College, Toronto, Ont 

The Trinity Review, Trinity University, Toronto, Ont. 



T M E 

ASHBtlRIAN 

JUNIOR 

in wliich is incorporated 

ABINGER HILL MAGAZIIVE 

No. 36 




ASHBIJRY COLLEGE 

OTTA>VA 



VOL. XXV 



MICHAELMAS 
1941 



No. 1 



[42] THE ASHBURIA?^ 

JUNIOR SCHOOL NEWS 

By R. West and M. Arlen 

THIS term has been one of the most successful ones in the Junior School 
for quite o long time. The work and games have been done with a real 
spirit, especially the latter. 

We were sorry to hear about the departure of Dr. Firth who was only with 
us for a week, but she was well succeeded by Miss Seeley. Also we were glad 
to announce the arrival of Dr. Reddler. 

There have been quite a few activities in the Junior School, especially in 
the way of Clubs. 

The largest and perhaps the most important of those clubs was the 
O.T.E.R.'S wh;ch was started by Mr. Polk, the Upper Flat Master. And one of 
their greatest feats was to collect 15 pounds of silver paper in a big box to 
which anybody could contribute. 

There was also at the end of the term a puppet show, which was produced 
by C. R. Macnabb and R. E. Hardy. 

It was a great success, and it had quite an audience. 

The producing and scenery was better than the acting itself, but the 
Ghost Scenes were greeted with great applause. 



THE LIFE OF A COIN 

By A. P. 

I WONDERED what that feeling was gushing through me. Then I remem- 
bered, I had been turned into a coin! Before, I remember, I had been part 
of a bar of gold in a dark place. I felt a thrill pass through me, I must 
be a gold sovereign, the most superior of coins. 

I looked around me and found many other coins around. I wondered which 
had been in the same bar of gold as I. This was the first five minutes of my 
life and I had many other days like them. 

I lay like this for a few weeks and as time went on I found it very dull. 
Suddenly I heard some footsteps coming towards me and before I knew what 
was happening I found myself bundled into a bag with a lot of my companions. 
Soon we were put down and I heard a man's voice saying, "What would you 
like it in, Mr, Winslow^ Pound notes or sovereigns?" "Sovereigns, please," 
replied the man called Winslow. "All right, sir" answered the man, and I and 
four other sovereigns were handed to Mr. Winslow. 



THE ASH BUR! AN [43] 

He took us home with him and put us in a purse where wc remained for 
two days. Then he took me out and put me in his pocket. He took me down 
to breakfast with him where I saw a small boy busily engaged in unwrapping 
parcels, and a lady watching him. "Here Joe", said Mr. Winslow, "here's my 
present", and he took me out and handed me to the boy. 

"Oh father," cried Joe, "thank you, its just what I've been wanting" 
After breakfast he took me upstairs and put me in a little purse where I Icy 
for a few weeks. 

One day, three weeks later, Joe came upstairs in great excitement. He 
put his purse in his pocket and hurried out. Then suddenly a black feeling 
came over me. I was going to be used to sell. 



T 



VISITING THE OBSERVATORY 

By D. Matthews 

WO trips were arranged to the Dominion Observatory by Dr. Tigges, one 
in early November and one in early December. Each time about 40 boys 
went. 



The first time the sky was clear, and we saw the moon through the fifteen- 
inch telescope. The mountains and craters could be seen very distinctly. We 
also saw Mars; however, it was rather disappointing. 

The second time there were clouds, and instead of using the telescope we 
saw lantern-slides. These showed enlarged pictures of some of the planets and 
constellations. After seeing these, we went to the time-room, where we saw 
how the time-signals, which are accurate to a few hundredths of a second, are 
produced and broadcast. We also sow a working model of the solar system, 
and a pendulum device for showing the rotation of the earth. 



"SUNSET" 

By M. B. W. 

TJic SKii goes down a fiery ball, 

Soo)i the last faint ticitteriiKjs eall 

Of a sleef'y bird . eallin;/ its mate. 

The s:li-ery moon :eill be roundiu;/ the distant hills. 

And the night's first ehrcc-like ehills 

Will steal thron</h silent 7coods and hills; 

And leith the loic moon's glimmer light, 

I ledl grof'e my i^'eary icay home to-night. 



[441 






THE ASHBURIAN 




UNBELIEVABLE FORM III 








By R.W. & M.A. 










Favorite 


Probable 






Nickname 


Expression 


Future 

Occupation 


Ambition 


ARLEN 


Bootlace 


Bags first 


Studying 


Trying to pass 






for correc- 


Maths 


in a Maths 






tions 




Test 


BEETON 


Early 


You Looney 


Salvaging 


To salvage the 




Christian 




canoes 


"Prince of 




Martyr 






Wales" 


BOAG 


Boagy 


Gor blimey 


Crashing 
aeroplanes 


To shoot down 
a Heinkel 


BREITHAUPT 


Popeye 


Gee-whiz 


Gangster 


Badminton 
Champion 


CASTLE 


Spitfire 


Funny guy eh 


Prof, of Maths 


Pilot of a 
Spitfire 


DIXON 


Bird 


1 don't know 


Scrubbing the 

"Warspite's" 

deck 


The Navy 


FAIR 


Ritzy 


Isn't that 


To use a whole 


Leader of 






just too bad 


exam book 


Cadet Corps 


GOULD 


Nanny-goat 


Have a 


Captain of 


To eat a 






banana 


Rough-Riders 


banana 


HARRISON 


Baby hippo 


Well It's 
like this 


Headmaster 


To follow after 
his father 


HOLMES 


Sherlock 


Look at this 


Detective 


Test Pilot 


MACKINTOSH 


Pete 


Not quite 


Trying to 


Boris 






sir! 


finish the 
Maths Test 


Karloff II 


NORTON 


Pill 


Oh well 


Sharpening 
rulers 


To throw a 
snowball at 
his brother 


RATHBONE 1 


Motor car 


Shut up 


Chauffeur 


Inventor 


THOMAS II 


Gerry 


1 dunno 


Slacking 


To get to 

Form IV 


WEBB 


Mousey 


Hey Look out' 


Pavement 
artist 


Cartoonist 


WEST II 


Minty 


Cave 


Trying to join 
the Navy 


Captain of 
soccer 


WHITWORTH 


Partridge 


1 can't think 


Photographer 


Electrician 


WILKINS 


Shorty 


Eh' 


Sea scouting 


Naval Officer 


WOODWARD 


Donkey 


Oh my good- 
ness me 


Groom 


Politician 



I 



THE ASHBL'R!AN 



[45 




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DIAMONDS 
WATCHES 

C.P.R. - C.N.R. - N.Y.C. WATCH INSPECTOR 



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MACDONALD'S 



SINCE 1858 



Compliments of 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STORES LIMITED 



65 SPARKS ST, 



2-5721 



OTTAWA 



Generations of satisfied sons 
and their parents have been 
shopping in our Young Men s 
Department for over 36 years! 



Ottazca's Leading Men's and Boys' 
Apparel Specialists Since 1903. 





THE AUDITORIUM 

Home of 
ASHBURY COLLEGE HOCKEY TEAMS 

CLARE M. BRUNTON. MANAGER 



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j A. H.SHOREY D.COWANS G. V. WHITEHEAD 

I THE E. A. WHITEHEAD CO, 

J INSURANCE BROKERS 

i 



Insurance Telephone 

Exchange Bldg., Montreal HArbour 8171 



j 

I University of Bishop's College 
j 

i Lennoxville, P.Q. 

I Founded 1843 Roval Charter 1853 

t 

i THE OxXLY COLLEGE L\ CANADA FOLLOWIXG THE 

i OXFORD AND CAMBRIDGE PLAN OF THREE LONG 

i ACADE:\IIC YEARS FOR THE B.A. AND B.Sc. DEGREES 

i 

! Complete courses in Arts. Science in Arts and Divinity. Post- 

[ graduate courses in Education leading to High School Diploma. 

! Residential College for men. \\'omen students admitted to lectures 
! desrrees. Vahtable Scholarships and Exhibitions. 

i 
j 
i 
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For infonnatioii. terms and calendars, apply to: 
THE REV. A. H. McGREER. D.D.. Principal, or 
I THE REGISTRAR, Lennoxville, Oie. 

i 



Higher marks are easy to get when you use at home a speedy 



i 

i 

I Personal Underwood 

' It Pe'pj you write better and faster. And 

I typewritten notes are so much easier to study! 

I After graduation, the abihty to type is a great 

asset in getting a good job. Show this ad to 

Dad — today! 
I UNDERWOOD ELLIOTT FISHER LIMITED 

I JOSEPH L. SEITZ. PRESIDENT 

' 203 Queen Street Ottawa 




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Tradition is an important factor in the 
selection of your College. 

In business it is also of immense im- 
I)ortance — making for prestige — character 
— and confidence. 

DEVLIN'S in Ottawa- 1869- 1942 



®rtttity (Sloiie^s 

in the 

lltttttprmtiT of ©nronlo 

Trinit'.i College, federated with the University, is one of the 
Arts Colleges of the University and includes: 

A Faculty of Arts providing instruction for students in classes of 
limited size in all subjects taught by the colleges. 

The full advantages of Federation with the University, instruction bv 
its professors, qualification for its scholarships and degrees, with its Library, 
Laboratories and athletic facilities and membership in Hart House. 

A Faculty of Divinity in which Trinity exercises its university powers 
of conferring degrees and prepares candidates for the ministry of the Church. 

A new residence for men students was opened in September 1941 at 
Trinity College. This and the new St. Hilda's residence, opened in 
September 1938. enable the College to offer excellent accommodation. 

The Scholarship offered by the College have recently been revised and 
largely increased. Full particulars will be supplied on request. 

For information concerning Fees, Scholarships, Exhibitions, Bursaries, 
etc., address 

THE REGISTRAR, TRINITY COLLEGE, 
TORONTO 5. 



4 



CUZNER HARDWARE CO. 

LIMITED 
521-523 SUSSEX ST. PHONE 3-6203 

GENERAL HARDWARE 
PAINTS and OILS ETC. 
HUNTINC; & FISHING SUPPLIES 



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RADIOS PIANOS VICTOR RECORDS 

FRIGIDAIRE REFRIGERATORS. FINE FURNITURE. 

Orme Limited 

175 SPARKS ST. 
2-4231 OTTAWA 

NORTHERN HAMMOND ORGANS 
CONNOR WASHERS. FRIGIDAIRE & GURNEY ELECTRIC RANGES 



VARSITY RUB 

LINIMENT 

RELIEVES 

SORE MUSCLES 

STIFFNESS 

BRUISES 

Excellent as a 
Rub-down 

and for 

Athlete's Foot 

MANUFACTURED BY 

National Drug & Chemical Co. 

of CANADA, LTD. 




Soothing. Healing. 
Antiseptic 



OUR BLUE AND GOLD DELIVERY 
SERVICE COVERS THE CITY 



LAUNDERERS 



SINCE 
1862 




CLEANERS 



QaniQ 



1A«V LX»*^ 



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COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



WOODS 

Manufacturing Company Limited 
OTTAWA 



Makers of Quality Clothing & Equipment 



for th( 



Outdoor Man 



FACTORIES: 
HULL - MONTREAL - TORONTO - WELLAND 



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'Tp Red Line 

A ~ 

X 

I 

Phone: 3-5611 



With Rates Low as the Rest. 
Why Not Ride in the Best ? 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



The Bronson Co*, 



OTTAWA 



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Compliments of 

"Stubby" 

Beverages 

OTTAWA 



Enjoy that added Zest . . 
Drink STUBBY 

Zip in every sip 



Ronalds 

Advertising Agency 

Limited 
MONTREAL - lORONTO 



A Complete Advertising 

and 

Merchandising Service 



® 



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COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



D. KEMP EDWARDS 

LIMITED 

OTTAWA 



"Over 74 Years of Unfailing Fuel Sercice" 

21 CONSUMER CONSULTANTS 

Twenty-one members of this organization have received their 
diplomas certifying that they are qualified to as as "Consumer 

Consultant". 

JOHN HENEY & SON LTD. 



COAL 

Head Office 
40-42 Elgin St. 



COKE FUEL OIL 

Phone 2-9451 

(6 Trunk Lines to Central) 



"Let Our Combustion Service Solve Your Heatinq Problems' 



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COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



i 

I Ottawa Dairy Co. 




SMART CLOTHES 
AND ACCESSORIES 

FOR YOUTHS AND BOYS 



Murphy-Gamble 



Limited 



STREET FLOOR 



BY APPOINTMENT TO 
THE LATE GOVERNOR-GENERAL AND LADY TWEEDSMUIR 

LEECH'S Drug Store 

131 CREIGHTON ST. PHONE 3-1122 

"EFFICIENT SERVICE' 



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! KENNETH A. GREENE I. PERLE Y-ROBERTSON 

GREENE & ROBERTSON 

j All Lines of Insurance f 

i Government & Municipal Bonds i 



Telephone 2-3576 



[ 

i GREENE-ROBERTSON BUILDING 

j 53 Metcalfe St. OTTAWA, CANADA | 



i I 

i I 

I COMPLIMENTS | 

i f 

I f 

I i 

I i 

1 OF j 

I 
i 

i 
i 
i 

I I 

I OTTAWA ELECTRIC RAILWAY I 

I CO. I 

I i 

i 



I j 

j BUSH, GAMBLE & CO. j 

I wholesalers and Importers i 

j Tobaccos, Confectionery, Pipes and Sundries f 

I Fountain Supplies | 

I PHONE 2-9471 465 GLADSTONE AVE. ! 

i —I 

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NEWCOMBE & COMPANY | 

BARRISTERS & SOLICITORS | 

i 

Registered Cable Address — Newcombe Ottawa s 

I 

Telephone 2-1383 Victoria Building. Ottawa \ 

I 



I 

i 
I 

TO OUR READERS j 

[ 

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You want the Ashburian to be good. We'd like 



it to be better. This costs money. The more adver- | 

tisers we can get the more money will be available for j 

the improvement of the magazine. Please then, first j 

give your custom to the advertisers, second, mention | 

the Ashburian when you do so, third, bring in new j 

advertisers for us. i 



ALLAN GILL & CO., LIMITED 

INSURANCE I 

1870 j 

Allan Gill, Ashbury 1892. i 

140 WELLINGTON ST. 2-4823 | 

^ _ _ I 

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j i 

j 

I iTItnrliunt v't Abluitt SitmitrD 

I [ 

I Booksellers .incl Si.itioncrs i 

j I 

I 115 Sparks Srrcct Ottawa \ 

\ Phone 2-6269 [ 

I i 



j I 

I i 

j Chas. L. McKinley i 

j i 

i PLUMBING. HEATING and TINSMITHING | 

j SERVICE i 

I OFFICE : I 

I 43 BESSERER ST. NIGHT CALLS | 

I OPPOSITE P O TER 4-8173 i 

! PHONE 4-0274 3-6198 i 



i I 

i i 

I DUSTBANE PRODUCTS LTD. | 

j CLEANING MATERIALS | 

i i 

I I 

! 200 H BANK ST. 2-5751 f 

I I 



j Expert Work at Lowest Prices. Furs Remodelled and Repaired | 

i j 

I THE NEW EDINBURGH } 

TAILORING and CLEANING j 

i I 

i We Call For and Deliver. i 

I 21 BEECHWOOD AVE. 3-6013 j 

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AutngrapljB 




"What's the most popular way to address an officer?'' 
"On a parcel of Sweet Capsl" 



SWEET CAPORAL CIGARETTES 

"The purest jorm in which tobacco can he smoked."