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Vol. XV SUMMER TERM No. 2 




ASHBURY COLLEGE 

OTTAWA 

1932 



m^\^'t9i\smQ':^yQi:^y^^^ 



FRITHS FLOWER SHOP % 

69 Sparks St. Phone Queen 1156 "^ 



ALSO AT BEECHWOOD GREENHOUSES 

Phone Rideau 1100 



^ rnone Kideau I lUU X 

v^ Cur Flowers — Potted Plants — Artistic Designs 

% BONDED MEMBER 

X Florists Telegraph Deli\'ery Association 



JAMES HOPE & SONS, Limited 





BOOKSELLERS, STATIONERS 
BOOKBINDERS & PRINTERS 



CANADA 




THE CRABTREE CO., LIMITED I 

228 ALBERT STREET 
OTTAWA 

ARTISTS AND DESIGNERS— BLUEPRINTERS— ENGRAVERS 

COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS 

PHOTO-LITHOGRAPHERS 



Compliments of 



I OTTAWA FRUIT SUPPLY CO. 





Phone R. 4000 



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RED LINE TAXIS 

I 

are at your service at any time 

SEDANS 

and 

METER CABS 

RIDEAU 4200 

OPERATED BY RED LINE LIMITED 

R. McGIFFIN, LIMITED 

MEN'S CLOTHING. HATS AND 
FURNISHINGS 

Telephone Queen 760 ^2 

HOLBROOK BUILDING 102 SPARKS STREET < 

Compliments of ^ 

VAIUS I 

Liiunderers and Dry Cleaners \ 

PHONH QUELN 2000 | 



*'>-;►<?< 




i '^Ji 



The Sir John A. 

Carried in stock in Navy Blue Twill 
and Grey herringbone Tweed, this 
Suit IS designed specially for the 
Young Gentleman attending College 
and has the reputation of our years 
of experience behind it. 

Ages, II to 19 years from $20.00. 

Suits individually tailored to special 

measures from $31.50. 



VV^.^-'5t^5^«i^<5^»^t^»§^§.^$^$:$^^$:§^r^1^ 



Ashbury College students are 
invited to avail themselves of 
the service we are enabled to 
give them at our Ottawa 
Branch. As well as the special 
College effects, a complete 
stock of sizes in Clothing and 
Furnishings is carried at all 
times and orders will receive 
immediate attention. 

PHONE QUEEN 1008. 



1444 ST. CATHERINE STREET WEST 

MONTREAL 
9 O'CONNOR STREET 

OTTAWA 



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CLOTHING 



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Where Quality and Styles are Featured at Moderate Prices. 



We clothe Hundreds of Ottawa 
students — come in and see why — 




1 10 — 1 12 

SPARKS 

STREET 



Phone: Rideau 2 41 to 47 Clarence Street ^% 

PROVOST &> ALLARD \ 



WHOLESALE GROCERS :^ 

AND \ 

IMPORTERS I 

OTTAWA ^^ 

Wholesale Distributors of '*v 

"SALADA TEA"— "PAX" OLIVE OIL ^J 

"DIAMOND CRYSTAL" SALT— Vichy Water "AGREABLE" 'J 

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"FUL-0-PEP" for Poultry— "CANUCK" for Horses >: 






Telephone Rideau 566 AM Kinds of Floral Work Promptly Executed \ 

CHAS. CRAIG, FLORIST 



WHOLESALK AND RETAIL 



1^ SUNNYSIDE GREENHOUSES 

\ RIDEAU TERRACE, OTTAWA, ONT. 

A Ferns, Flowering Plants for Holiday Season, Bedding Plants of all 
A kinds. Choice Cut Flowers, Asparagus. 



I Ottawa's Largest Sporting 
I Goods Store 

I George Bourne 

t 149-151 RIDEAU ST. OTTAWA 



V? 



^ 



Phone Rideau 753 



AGENT for CCM. COLUMBIA BICYCLE and 
ACCESSORIES 

SPALDING DISTRIBUTORS in Ottawa District 



IMPERIAL BARBER SHOP 

OLTAWA'S LEADING TONSORIAL PARLOR 
Popular Prices Satisfaction Guaranteed 

TORONTO TRUST BUILDING 

COR. SPARKS 8t ELGIN STREETS 

PHONE QUEEN 4960 



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SHOES 



and 

HOSIERY 

OUR POLICY OF QUALITY FIRST HAS BEEN MAINTAINED | 
FOR OVER FORTY-FIVE YEARS 

R. MASSON & SON LTD. 



i 

QUEEN 809 73 SPARKS STREET "> 



INTRODUCING 

THE SPORT SHOP 

(Successors to Ketchums Ltd.) 

193 SPARKS STREET 

New Staff— New Stock— New Policies $ 

I 
$ 

THE SPORT SHOP extends a standing invitation to >^ 

ASHBURIANS to drop in at any time. ;^ 

PERSONAL ATTENTION WILL BE ACCORDED THEM BY ;. 
MR. JOE MILLAR AND MR. CECIL BROWN . $ 




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Phones Q.726— 727— 728 

M. LANDREVILLE 

TAXI AND TRANSFER SERVICE 
Day and Night Service 
82 ALBERT ST. 



OTTAWA 



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Lumber and Factory Work 



D. KEMP EDWARDS 



Limited 



Cor. Bayswater Ave. 
& Somerset St., Ottawa 

Phones Sher. 4064, 4065, 4066 



30 Victoria St.. 
Eastview, Ont 

Phone Rideau 183 

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When you think of Lumber 
Think of Edwards 



Ottawa Artificial Ice Co., Limited | 

MAKERS OF GERM PROOF ICE 
387 Nicholas St. Phone R 568 

also distributors for 
KELVINATOR ELECTRIC REFRIGERATORS 
250-2 Bank St. Phone Q 380 



BROWNES TEA STORE f 

Established 1869 ^ 

PURVEYORS OF TEAS AND COFFEES I 

of the Highest Quality v 

345 LISGAR ST. - - - OTTAWA i 

PHONE— QUEEN 132 # 



Serve Good Milk and More Good Milk 

TT'OR growing boys whose time is spent between study and 
* play — milk is the best all round food. One glass of good 
fresh Ottawa Dairy Milk at every meal is none too much — 
it means bone and sinew — a brighter future — longer life and 
better life. ,, 

^^ "" THE KIND YOU GET AT THE 

COLLEGE 



THE KIND FOR YOU 



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SWEATERS 




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WRIGHT a 


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Choose your new racket from one of the many models 
buih for fast, smashing play. Confidence in your racket 
will help you win your game. All the popular makes 
and models are described in our new sports catalogue. 
Write for a copy. 

The HAROLD A. WILSON 

COMPANY LIMITED 

299 YONGE ST TORONTO, ONT. 



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"On the carpet." No, thank you! 

On one of our rugs made from old carpets? 

Yes, please. 

Ashbury polish. A good thing. 

So is our work at polishing and renovating furniture, shampooing rugs 
repairing rugs or carpets 

THERIEN COMPANY LIMITED 

Cor. St. Andrew & St. Joseph Sts. : : OTTAWA 




LIMITED 
OTTAWA PHONES R. 1127.-1128 





grlionl mticnB, 1931-32 



SUMMER TERM 



PREFECTS 
D. C. SouTHAM (Head Prefect)}. Magor 
N. R. Gillies R. W. Coristine 

R. L. Stanfield R. Rowley 

D. Fauquier F. Heubach 

GAMES COMMITTEE 
R. Rowley D. C. Southam N. B. Gillies 

y. Magor F. Heubach L. R. Thomas 



R. Stanfield 



TENNIS COMMITTEE 

J. Magor D. C. Southam 



Captain of Cricket 
Vice-Captain 



N. R. Gillies 
T. Reauclerk 



SENIOR LIBRARY COMMITTEE 

J. Magor V. Vickers J. G. MacCarthy J. Galt 

G. Ferguson M. MacRrien I. Macorquodale T. Eittle 

L. H. Roberts 



JUNIOR LIRRARY COMMITTEE 
j. R. Reynolds I. Dixon 



COXTl-:XTS 



The Prefects Frontis])iece 

Kditorial 1 

Cha])cl Notes 2 

School Notes 3 

The Old Boys News 5 

Old Boys Dinner ' 8 

Branch of O.B.A. in Toronto 9 

Contemporaries 9 

The Literary and Dramatic Society 10 

The Cadet Cor])s Inspection 14 

Hockey ...-. 17 

Hockey Characters 18 

Junior Hockey 24 

Cross Country Races 25 

Ski-in w 26 

Cricket -- 27 

The Eighth Annual Boxing Tournament 28 

Sports 30 

Wise and Otherwise 31 




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I"' 



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o2 



(!.ltf Aaltburtau 

> k 

Editor .1/;-. B. K. T. HozL'is 

Committee /. Magor. R. L. Stanficld. G. U^odchoitse 

Adz'ertising Editor and Treasurer Mr. W. H. Hez^'itt, 

Britannia-on-the-Bay (Box 3). 



EDITORIAL 

Two interesting events of outstanding importance, each in its 
own sphere — one to do with Work, and the other with Play — are 
scheduled during the Summer Holidays. We refer to the Imperial 
Conference to be held in Ottawa and the visit of the Australian 
Cricket Team, including Don Bradman. With regard to the first. 
we cannot do better than offer a humble welcome to the Delegates 
from Overseas and trust that the efforts of the Conference to foster 
Inter-Empire Trade will meet with every encouragement and 
success. 

The second item lies more within our scope, and it is up to 
every past, present and future Ashburian to find out when and 
where the Australians will be playing, and to make every effort to 
go and see them. Whether interested in Cricket, or not, it will 
be an Education in itself to see the Game as it should be played, 
and much will be learned about Batting, Bowling, placing the men 
in the Field and the all important art of Backing-up. It is well to 
bear in mind that the greatness of a Cricketer does not altogether 
depend on the number of runs made, nor on the number of wickets 
obtained. It is his example, manner and influence that really 
matter. These Inter-Dominion Matches will prove this. Do 
not miss this golden opportunity, for who knows when the Aus- 
tralians may pass this way again? 

We commend to your notice a new Magazine, produced by the 
leading Schools in Great Britain, entitled "The Gate". The Senior 
Library has subscribed to it and has found it extremely interesting. 
Its contributors are Boys only. Here is an opportunity for an 
Ashburian to gain distinction both for himself and his School by 
sending in a Contribution worthy of publication. Further infor- 
mation can be obtained from the Editor of the "Ashburian." 

\'ery happy Holidays to you all. and may kindly weather 
shine upon you. 



THE ASHHURIAN 




CHAPEL NOTEC 

The Preacher at the closing' Service on Sunday Evening. Dec. 
13th, was Archdeacon Fleming, who is in charge of the Arctic 
Regions of Canada. He gave a forceful and interesting Sermon 
from the text. "What manner of person ought ye to he?" (I. St. 
Peter II.3). The offertory was devoted to the Arctic Mission. 

Christmas Carols were sung and were much appreciated by the 
large Congregation. 

On Sunday, Feb. 7th, the Lord Bishop of Ottawa preached 
the sermon at Evensong, from the text. "Lord. I believe ; help Thou 
mine unbelief." (St. Mark 9.22). It is interesting to note that a 
contribution from the School Ofifertories in Chapel is given annu- 
ally to the Bishop, which money is devoted to the further help of 
the Church Army Missioners who work on the Ottawa Diocese 
some hundred and forty miles up the Ottawa River. 

On Palm Sunday, at Evensong, a very creditable rendering of 
"The Crucifixion", by Stainer, was given by the Choir, with the 
help of Mr. Johnson and Mr. Morris, who sang the Bass and Tenor 
solos respectively. Mr. Wright and the Choir had done much hard 
work and the result was worthy of hearty congratulations. It may 
not be out of place to mention here that the Singing in Chapel has 
improved tremendously under Mr. Wright. The Psalms are now 
sung daily at the short Morning service. For this jiurjKise. the 
New Cathedral Psalter has been introduced. 



THE ASHBURIAN 



While coiigratulatini^" the Rev. J. Dixon on his ajjpointnient to 
Grace Church, Toronto, we are sorry that he is leaving' St. Barth- 
olomew's. Ottawa. He has often visited us here, and preached in 
Chai)el. Our best wishes go with him in his work in Toronto. 

( )ur Annual Confirmation service was held in the Chapel on 
the evening of Sunda}', Aj)ril 24th. The Lord Bishop of Ottawa 
confirmed the candiflates and gave one of the best addresses of the 
manv we have had the privilege of hearing from him. 

The newly confirmed boys made their First Communion on the 
next Sunday morning. The following were confirmed : 

Graham Wilson Ferguson, 
John Ross Ferguson, 
Russell Cowans. 
George James Hyman, 
Edwin Ross Allen, 
Charles \\'illiam Fullerton, 
Michael Desmond MacBrien, 
Ralph Cyrus Smith. 
Howard Arthur Barends, 
Robert Keith Davidson. 
Ernest George Henrv Rex, 
Lawrence Hamilton Roberts, 
William Henry Hurd, 
John Gait Weldon. 



SCHOOL NOTES 

On Wednesday. April 13th, a party of boys were taken to the 
House of Commons to hear a Parliamentary Del^ate. Other out- 
ings included a visit to the Parliamentary Buildings. The Junior 
School also visited the Museum and Eddy's Paper Mills. 

On Saturday. March 21st. the Junior School was entertained 
by Mr. Evearie. (conjuror), and by "Our" Mr. Oliver, (ventrilo- 
quist). We express our grateful thanks to each of them. 

On Sunday, Dec. 13th. Mr. and ]\Irs. Barott and Peter Barott 
had the honour of lunching with Their Excellencies, Lord and 
Lady Bessborough at Ciovernment House. 

A most interesting Lecture was very kindly given by Mr. J. H. 
Wright in the Assembly Room on "Fire Weather," illustrated with 
Films, Slides and Instruments. 



THE ASHBURIAN 



On Saturday, January 30th. Mr. Thomson, of Montreal, gave 
an illustrated Lecture on "The New Beauharnois Works". At each 
Lecture there was a large number of Boys present and all were 
deeply interested in what the Lecturers had to tell tlu-m. 

Moving Pictures were shown at various intervals through the 
Autumn and Spring Terms, and all were keenly appreciated. 

We received an unpleasant shock on the morning of Tuesday. 
April 26th, when we learned that Miss Lewis, our Matron, had had 
to be rushed off to Hospital with acute appendicitis. She was 
operated on almost at once, and we are glad to say she is now com- 
pletely convalescent. 

A cricket net has been supplied for the use of the Junior 
School. 

We oiifer our sympathy to Mr. Myers, on the death of his 
Father in April. 

The following Old Boys have visited the School since our last 
issue : — J. Rowley, P. Smellie, R. Leatham, E. Sherwood, J. David- 
son, M. Turner, A. Clarke. L. Bates. A. H. MacCarthy. A. Fauquier. 
G. Southam, C. Hart, H. Thornton, J. A. C. Macpherson, R. Cam- 
eron, E. C. Elwood, B. Robinson. 

On Tuesday, May 10th, a "Half" was granted to members of 
the Choir, Library. Band, Book-room and Signallers, and on May 
31st to the Dramatic Society. 

Mr. Brodie played one of the leading roles in "The Truth 
about Blayds" at the Little Theatre. Mr. Howis appeared in "In- 
terference" and "The Swan". In the latter play O. Whitby and K. 
Stevenson had small parts. 



VISIT TO THE NEW FILTRATION PLANT 

Accompanied by Mr. Johnson, some of the Upper Forms paid 
a visit to the new Civic Filtration Plant from which Ottawa and its 
vicinity now obtain what is probably the purest water in Canada. 

An Essay on the New Plant was written by all boys who were 
taken over it, and the winner of the 1st place in the competition 
was George Wodehouse and of the 2nd place Norman Gillies. Fred 
Heubach and Donald Thompson were bracketed third. 



THE ASHBIJRIAN 




OLD BOYS NEWS 
Peter Smellie used his spare time to good advantage last win- 
ter. He played Hockey with the Bank of Montreal Hockey Team 
in which he proved himself quite a star. 



Shirley Wood's home was recently visited by the stork and 
the new offspring was christened "Norman Guthrie Woods". Some 
dav in vears to come, he should be a new bov at Ashburv. 



Aldous (Pete) Bates home was increased by one recently. 
Th-?: new little Bate will take the nickname his father received at 
Ashbury and will be known as "Peter". 



Arthur Lambart was one of the engineers on the northern de- 
velopment road work this winter. 



Lew Bates has been spending the greater ])art of the winter 
placing pucks in nets of teams from nearly all the capitals of 
Europe. He was a member of the Ottawa All-Star Amateur 
Hockey Team that was on a tour f)f Europe. 



Bernard Low'e, who has a farm near Metcalfe, is a Lay Reader 
and helps Mr. Vincent in his Parish Church. It was his Father 
who presented the Cross on the Altar in our Chapel. 



Eardley A. C. Young is now cashier in the Bank of Montreal, 
Rideau Street Branch. 



Eraser Macorquodale has been elected President of the Mc- 
Gill Universitv Players Club. 



W. R. Bell is moving to England in July, but "intends coming 
back to Canada as soon as possible." 



Herbert Hammond is entering the Eaculty of Architecture at 
McGill next September. 



THE ASHBURIAN 



David Mathias was on one of the Inter-College Soccer Teams 
of Boston Tech. last season. 

The engagement has been announced of W. Angus and Miss 
Caro Molson. The marriage will probably take place in September. 

Bob Bowman was Sports Editor of the "McGill Daily" last 
year. 

C. G. Eliot has had several of his paintings on Exhibition both 
in Toronto and Montreal. 

Barclay Robinson was playing goal for the "Senior Vies" 
hockey team during the Winter. 

Percy Cowans acted with the Montreal Repertory Theatre this 
year. 

R. Leathem has appeared in two productions by the McGill 
Players Club, viz : — "From Morn to Midnight" and "The Road to 
Rome." 

Eric Beardmore had a position in New York with an Engineer- 
ing Firm last Winter. 

We offer our Congratulations to David A. \\'anklyn (Sept. T5 
— June '18) and to his Wife on the Birth of a Son. 

Campbell Merritt graduated from McGill last year with high 
honours. He also won the Bronze Medal and the T. Robertson 
Prize, which carries with it a small honorarium. He went through 
tile five year's course without a Supplementary. He has been granted 
a travelling Scholarship of $1,200 a year, renewable for a full period 
of three years. We offer him our heartiest congratulations. 

On Sunday. January 10th. Marie-Elisabeth Roy to John David 
Southam, at A.\\ Saints Church, Ottawa, by the Rev. C. G. Hepburn. 
The Bride is the daughter of Hon. Dr. Philippe Roy and Madame 
Roy, and the Bridegroom is the elder son of Mr. and ]Mrs. Wilson 
M. Southam (jf Lindenelm. Rockcliffe. W'e offer our congratulations 
and best wishes to the happy pair. 

On Tuesday. February 23rd. at the Church of St. James the 
Apostle. Montreal, by the Rev. Canon Shatford, assisted by the Rev. 
Dr. Woollcombe : 

Margaret, daughter of Colonel W. Barnard Evans to Arthur 
Cassils, (Sept. 1915-June, 1918). son of Mr. Alfred B. Evans." 

All Ashburians wish tlie young couple many years of very 
happy days. 

Congratulations to Lawrence W. Jackson (May. LUl-Jnne. 
1916)) on the birth of a daugliter. 



THE ASH BUR I AN 



W'f record with deej) regret the sudden death of Lind- 
say C. Mickles ( Nov. '23-june '27). He was a general 
favourite and a good sport, and his sudden passing is a real 
sorrow to all of us who knew him. We extend our deepest 
sympathies to his family in their bereavement. 



W'e also extend our sincere sympathies to the parents 
of Gerald Stanfield. who was with us from Januan,^ to May. 
1927, and who passed away a short time ago after a long 
illness. A voung life of promise has been cut short at the 
threshold of manhood. 



Jack McMahon (Sept.. 1918-june. 1921) has our sin- 
cere sympathies in the sudden death of his father, one of 
Winnipeg's most respected and successful business men. 



To Pearson McCurdy (Sept.. 1916-June. 1922) and his 
family, our sincere sympathies are extended in the sudden 
death of his young wife. 

The tragic death of Brian Burstall came as a great 
shock to all old Ashburians who knew him. Burstall met 
his death in a fire at Stony Rapids. Saskatchewan. He was 
a member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and was 
in his twentv-ninth vear. 



Two Ashburv "Old Boys" have been bereaved by tho 
loss of their fathers. They are Blair Gilmour and E. F. 
Xewcombe. Blair Gilmour's father was also an old A'ih- 
burian. 



THE ASHBURIAN 



THE OLD BOYS DINNER 

Tlie annual dinner (jf the Association was held in Montreal on 
Friday evening, April the first. This year it was decided to hold 
the annual meeting- of the Association before our dinner, and the 
idea seems to have been a good one, since it was the means of 
making known to many of the members exactly what the Committee 
had done during the past year. 

We were again very fortunate in having as our guest of honour 
Doctor Woollcombe, whose presence is so essential to the success 
of the evening. The retiring president, Ted Lyman was in the 
chair ; the other members of the Committee completed the number 
seated at the head table. 

After the toast to the King had been drunk, the chairman pro- 
posed a toast to Ashbury. He took this opportunity of telling the 
Old Boys something of conditions at the School, and expressed a 
hope that the Old Boys Association would continue to flourish, as 
it has done since its reorganization. 

The Head in replying stated that he was always pleased to be 
with his Old Boys on the occasion of their annual dinner, and to 
renew old acquaintances. He asked that the school should not be 
forgotten when parents were discussing the educations of their 
sons ; and added that, on these occasions the recommendations of 
an Old Boy carry much weight. 

Allan Code, who always comes down from Perth for our 
dinner, in a short speech, stated that an Ashburian learned to "p^ay 
the Game" and that this was an essential part of the education of 
all boys. 

During the remainder of the evening we were entertained by 
selections on the accordion by Professor Marazza. The evening 
was voted by all a great success. 



COMMITTEE OF THE 

ASHBURY COLLEGE OLD BOYS ASSOCL-XTION 

1932-33. 

President : j. W. Ritchie 
Secretary Treasurer: C. j. (i. Molson 
Committee Members : T. W. Lvman 
H. S. Bo'gert 
Eric Beardmore 
S. F. H. Lane 
Shirley Woods, Ottawa 
Gordon T. Southam, Ottawa 
J. Armstrong, Toronto. 



THE ASHBURIAN 



BRANCH OF OLD BOYS' ASSOCIATION TO BE 
ESTABLISHED IN TORONTO 

Thanks very largely to the efforts of James Armstrong (Dec, 
1914-June. 1918) ahout twenty Old Boys met together on the even- 
ing of May 14th at a dinner held at the University Cluh, Toronto, 
and a Toronto Branch of the Ashhury Old Boys' Association was 
inaugurated. The Head, who was the guest of honour, received a 
most enthusiastic greeting from his Old Boys, some of whom he had 
not seen for a great number of years. At a short business meeting 
held after the dinner, J. P. Armstrong was elected President, and 
Harry Tamplet, Secretary, and the following as members of the 
Committee : Laurence Jackson, E. P. Taylor, E. T. C. Orde and 
C. A. Thorburn. The Head in his address gave a short resume of 
the history of the School and of its success both in University ex- 
aminations and in the various Sports. 

A most enjoyable evening was spent and it is expected that at 
the next Annual Dinner of this Branch of the O. B. A. a much larger 
number will be present. 

Some thirty-five Old Boys have been located as at present living 
in Toronto and its vicinity, and any Old Boy in this district with 
whom contact has not as yet been established is asked to send his 
name and address to Harry Tamplet, Secretary of the Toronto 
Branch of the Ashhury Old Boys' Association, 34 King St., Toronto. 



CONTEMPORARIES 

We acknowledge with thanks the following : — The Albanian, 
The Marlburian, The Meteor, The St. Andrew's College Review, 
The Tonbridgian, The Trinity College School Review and The 
Trinity University Review ; The Upper Canada College Times, The 
Collegian, W'anganui, New Zealand ; The Mitre, The High School 
Magazine of Quebec ; Selwyn House School Magazine, St. Thomas' 
College Magazine, Ceylon ; St. Helen's School Magazine, Dunham ; 
The Samara, Elmwood ; The Tower, The Oracle, The Blue and 
White, Trafalgar Echoes. The Lantern, The Grove Chronicle, 
King's Hall Magazine, The Tallow Dip, The Windsorian, The 
\\'estmount High School Annual. 



10 THE ASHBURIAN 



THE LITERARY AND DRAMATIC SOCIETY 

The third annual production of the Literary and Dramatic 
Society was staged, as in past years, at the Little Theatre. On 
Friday. March 11th, a Special Matinee was given, which His Ex- 
cellency the Governor General honoured by his presence. The 
regular evening performance took place on March 12th. There 
was a good attendance at both performances, but the sale of tickets 
was not as large as we had hoped. There are certain fixed and 
essential expenses which cannot be avoided, and the Society relies 
entirely on the sale of tickets to meet these. So far expenses have 
been covered, but the net result does not leave any surplus to olTset 
a lean year. 

The Play itself calls for little comment. It is a pity that His 
Excellency was unable to attend the evening performance, as this 
was considered, by those who have witnessed all the performances 
of the Society, the best we have done so far. In every case the 
parts were well known, and, for the most part, well acted. Calder 
was undoubtedly the outstanding success ; his portrayal of Shy- 
lock was exceptional and elicited the very warm approval of both 
audiences. H. Southam. as Gratiano. showed distinct histrionic 
ability, and the female parts taken by O. Whitby. Sharp. Stevenson 
and G. Ferguson were well sustained throughout, especially the 
very exacting role of Portia. 

C. Southam recited the Prologue, specially written for the 
occasion by the Producer, Mr. C. W. Thompson. 

As usual the staging was as nearly Shakespearian as possible ; 
but the custom of former years was adhered to in the matter of 
costumes which were appropriately sixteenth century Venetian in 
design. 

It will not be out of place here to draw the attention of our 
readers to the fact that all rehearsing, with the exception of the 
final dress rehearsal, was done out of school hours — a point which 
shows clearly the keenness and interest of all those who took part; 
in fact there were not parts for all those who came up for voice 
trials and spent time in preliminary rehearsals. 

Miss Edwards gave valuable assistance in making up. parti- 
cularly the female characters, an-d in accompanying the song and 
playing the music in the casket scene — for all of which help we 
offer our most sincere thanks. Mr. Crowson and his class made 
])eriod caskets, and the art work on these and other stage proper- 
ties was effectively carried out by H. Thomson. The furnishings, 
though few, were rich and in keeping with the period : they were 
lent by Stewart & Co. and added greatly to the attractiveness of 
an otherwise plain stage. 



THE ASHBURIAN 11 



Early in April the Cornj>any held their annual dinner at the 
Chateau Laurier. and afterwards attended a 'movie'. 

At the beii^inning^ of this term a meeting was held to ajiprove 
some alterations and additions to the existing constitution and 
rules. The same meeting elected C. Southam, President of the 
Society, vice Mr. C". \\\ Thompson, resigned. 



DRAMATIS PERSONAE 



The Duke of X'exice rL. Sherwood 

The Prince OF Morocco. .) „ . „ G. Wodehouse 

_ . rbmtors to rortia .. 

The Prince of Ark.vcon.) .\. Spence 

Antonio (7 Merchant of Venice C. Southam 

Bassanio his friend, suitor like^vise to Portia J. Magor 

.Sai.anio. .1 L. Roberts 

i J. ]\IacLaren 

*- fr:e);d<; fo Antonio and Bassanio 



Gratiano. H. Southam 

Salerio. . .^ J. MacLaren 

Lorenzo i)i love z^'itJi Jessica G. Hyman 

Shvlock a rich Jezc J. Calder 

Tubal a Jew. his friend G. MacCarthy 

Launcelot Gobbo. .the cloun, servant to Shylock A. Powell 

Leonardo servant to Bassanio ^L MacBrien 

Baltiiasar servant to Portia E. Rex 

Portia a rich heiress . O. \\ hitby 

Nerissa her 7vaiting maid J. Sharp 

K. Stevenson 

Jessica daitcjJiter to Shylock G. Ferguson 

Servant to Antonio R. Smith 

Clerk of the Court at Venice J. Ferguson 

Attendants on the Prince of Morocco E. Sherwood and 

L. Roberts 

Pages to the Prince of Morocco J. Ferguson, R. Cowans 

Friend to Shylock R. Smith 

A CRITICLSM by MR. E. W. DE\'LIX 

Shakespear is more alive to-day, in two senses of the word, 
than most modern dramatists ! This being so, it is a great pity 
that the people of Canada have had so little opportunity to see him 
on the stage, where, despite the opinions of pedants, he is at his 
best. 



12 THE ASHBURIAN 



For that reason I am in great sympathy with the undertaking 
of the Ashhury College Literary and Dramatic Society to present 
one of his plays each year. This year the play was "The Merchant 
of Venice." 

The simplicity of the settings was a very virtuous necessity ; 
and the scenes before the curtain proved beyond a doubt that 
Shakespear is not improved by the use of elaborately realistic 
scenery. His words impart reality to both actor and setting, while 
the reverse is true of most other playwrights. The scenes in 
Portia's house, while conceding more to naturalism, were made 
very beautiful by the placing of period furniture and richly col- 
oured costumes against black curtains. 

G. Wodehouse as the Prince of Morocco invested his role with 
great dignity and reserve. His indefinite movements while specu- 
lating on the caskets detracted from the efifectiveness of his speech ; 
otherwise his movements were very good. N. Spence presented a 
sprightly and slightly florid Prince of Arragon, which was just as 
it should have been. C. Southam as Antonio looked well, bore 
himself with ease, but did not make as much of the part as he might 
have done. J. Magor as Bassanio was excellent in presence and bear- 
ing, but his playing lacked flexibility and incisiveness. H. Southam 
played Gratiano lightly, with exactly the right touch of flippancy. 
J. Sharp was very good as Nerissa and in the trial scene was un- 
commonly successful in portraying a girl disguised as a boy ; a 
difficult task, and well done. 

I have reserved for the last the two characters that were at once 
the best and the most difficult — Portia and Shylock. O. Whitby 
played the Lady of Belmont with a grace and a sureness most un- 
usual, considering both the nature of his part and the difficulties 
of the role itself. His make-up and gestures were excellent; he 
delivered his lines in a quiet voice, yet every word was distinct ; 
and he sustained even the longest speeches, giving them conviction 
and grace ; his whole performance shewed the results of careful 
study and delicate appreciation of the part. 

J. Calder played the awe-inspiring part t)f Shylock remarkably 
well. It was the old, twisted, vengeful Shylock that he presented ; 
and while my conception of the part includes neither such decrepi- 
tude nor such blood-thirstiness as are commonly attributed to the 
Jew, yet the character allows of so many interpretations, that no 
two conceptions can be alike, and any one is as good as another. 
Calder gave a completely convincing performance, admirably re- 
strained, with the single exception of the oft-repeated "Three 
thousand ducats." There is a great temptation to make Shylock 
cringe, snarl, rant and rave, which was in this case successfully 
resisted. Although we saw an old, embittered man, with hatred of 



THE ASHBURIAN 13 



Christians twisting his face and giving virnlt-nce to his speecli. 
yet we never lost sight of a character that is essentially noble. 
Shylock was a wealthy Jew of high rank; if his talk was so much 
of money, that is because money was his trade. That he had 
tender and sensitive feelings we know — from his replies to the 
taunts of Antonio and Bassanio ( who appear very ignoble in their 
.scenes with him) — and in his references to his wife Leah and to 
his daughter. This Calder made plain ; and he handled the old 
man's momentary triumph and subsequent disgrace in the court- 
room with skill. His movements and the use of his hands were 
particularly good ; and the Hebraisms in his speech were not over- 
done. A fine performance. 



"Strong men do things ; 
Weak men talk about them." 



'Men do less than thev ous^ht, unless thev do all thev can." 



"Success is not an accident. It comes to the man who does his 
work a little better than the other fellow." 



"The greatest mistake you can make in this life is to be con- 
tinually fearing you will make one." 



"A Friendly act. 

A kindly smile, 
A helpful word 

And Life's worth while." 



"When there is nothing more to l)e said, some fool always 
says it." 



"It is always better to be silent and be thought a fool than to 
open your mouth and remove all doubt about it." 



"If vou want work well done, select a busy man — the other kind 
has no time." 



14 



THE ASHBURIAN 




THE CADET CORPS INSPECTION AND DISPLAY OF 
GYMNASTIC TRAINING. 

The above events were held on May 5th. in bright but cool 
weather. The Corps was inspected bv Major-General A. H. Bell, 
C.M.G., D.S.O., assisted by Col. \V. G. Beeman, D.S.O., and Capt. 
M. Isbester. At the saluting base were Lieut. -Col. S. H. Hill, and 
Sergt. -Major Stone. Lieut. -Col. R. M. Courtney was among the 
visitors. 

Under Company Leader X. Gillies the events were carried out 
with marked precision and much applause greeted the Cadets at 
the conclusion. The Platoon winning the Woods Cup (No. 2) was 
under Platoon Leader D. Fauquier, No. 1 being commanded by R. 
Stanfield. 

The Corps Band, under J. Allen, deserves a special word of 
praise for its very fine efforts. 

At 3.30 p.m. the Gymnastic Display was given, first by the 
Juniors followed bv the Seniors. The Connaught Cup was won by 
R. L. Stanfield. 

The presentation of the prizes was made by Mrs. W. H. Row- 
ley, who was assisted by the Headmaster and Sergt. -Major F. W. 
Stone. 

The following boys received j)rizes : — 

O'Connor Cup — 

R. Coristine. 

Scott Cup — 

R. Davidson. 



THE ASHBURIAN 15 



Cox Cup — 

A. Powell. 

Humphry Cup — 
D. Ghent. 

Hig^hest aggregate medal in the D.C.R.A. Competition — 
R. Coristine. 

Second Class Medal in the D.C.R.A. Competition — 
R. Davidson. 

District Cadet Officers silver medal for obtaining the highest 
aggregate score in the Laura Secord match — 
D. C. Southam. 

Winning platoon in the Woods Cup competition (platoon drill) 
Platoon Xo. 2. Commander D. Fauquier. 

Senior cross country race — 
J. Allen. 

Junior cross country race — 
J. Weldon. 

For completing the senior cross-country race in the fastest 
time — 

J. Allen. 

For completing the junior cross country race in the fastest 
time — 

J. Weldon. 

Senior skiing competition — 
C. D. Thompson. 

Following the presentation of prizes, the guests were enter- 
tained to tea by the Headmaster and Mrs. Woollcombe. 

Sergt-Major F. W. Stone was warmly congratulated at the 
conclusion of the Inspection on the splendid manner in which he 
had trained the corps in their military tactics. 



16 



THE ASHBURIAN 




THE ASHBL'RIAN 



17 




HOCKEY 

Again we are able to record a most successful season, and 
there is no doubt that the high standard, which has prevailed for 
some years now. is being" well maintained. Two old "Colours" 
were left, but there was a number of recruits available, and they 
were gradually welded into a really sound combination. The team 
showed promise from the first but were a little slow in striking 
their best form, and it was rather unfortunate that sickness neces- 
siated the scratching of one or two school games at the end of 
the term, when the team was playing with marked ability. 

We were very fortunate this season in securing the services of 
jack Dunn as coach. His enthusiasm and ability were very in- 
fectious, and he succeeded in getting a marked response from the 
team. 

This year the Old Boys' Association very generously provided 
a cup for competition between Bishop's College School, Lower Can- 
ada College and ourselves. 

For the first time two fixtures were arranged with Bishop's 
College School, one in Lennoxville and the other in Ottawa. This 
is a welcome improvement on the arrangement of previous years 
by which one game was played in Montreal, and it is to be hoped 
that this will become an established practice. As Lower Canada 
could only play one game this year with each of the other two 
schools, we tossed with Bishop's to decide which game was to 
count for the cup. Fortunately we won the toss so the game in 
Ottawa counted. We were beaten 4 - 2 at Lennoxville. on very 
heavy ice. which was somewhat of a handicap. The return game 
in Ottawa resulted in a tie. but Ashbury showed better staying 
power in the overtime periods and put on three goals without 
response. We beat Lower Canada in Montreal. 2-0. and so won 
the Cup in the first vear of its historv. 



18 THE ASHBURIAN 



We brought our school matches to a close by defeating West- 
mount High School at the Auditorium 4-3, and this was the team's 
best performance of the season. Our opponents were again win- 
ners of the Interscholastic League in Montreal. 

Heubach was very efficient as manager and set a high standard 
in everything that he did. 

The following were awarded their colours : — 
L. R. Thomas (capt.), J. B. Allen, T. W. Beauclerk. R. L. 
Stanfield, D. Fauquier, J. Symington, R. W. Coristine, E. R. Allen. 

HOCKEY CHARACTERS 

L. R. Thomas. Captain. R. Wing. 3rd year on the team. An 
excellent captain who always gave of his best in the interests 
of the side. Very hard worker, though rather slow. An ex- 
cellent shot. 

J. B. Allen. Vice-captain. R. Defence. 2nd year on the team. 
Good puck carrier, but apt to overdo his attempts to split the 
defence. Should learn to use his body more effectively. Fast 
skater and accurate shot. 

T. W. Beauclerk Coal. 1st year on the team. A really sound 
goalkeeper, who was at times brilliant. 

R. L. Stanfield. L. Defence. 1st year on the team. Sound defence 
man with an excellent knowledge of the game. Although 
handicapped by lack of weight and speed, he used his head 
well. A most unselfish player. 

D. Fauquier. R. Wing. 2nd year on the team. Has a good shot 

and checks well. Inclined to be lazy. 

J. Symington. Centre. 1st year on the team. Beautiful stick 
handler, with a very sure shot. Has an excellent poke check, 
but should remember to pass more often. 

R. W. Coristine. L. Wing. 2nd year on the team. Played hard 
and covered his man well. A good though sometimes erratic 

shot. 

E. R. Allen. L. Wing. 1st year on the team. A. good stick 

handler with a hard and accurate shot. Could pay more atten- 
tion to his cover. Inclined to forget that there are others who 
might score. 

J. McGuckin. Defence. 1st year on the team. Improved con- 
siderably since last year. A difficult man to pass and a good 
puck carrier. 



THE ASHBURIAN 19 



J. G. MacCarthy. Centre. 1st year on the team. .\ neat skater 
with some ahility to shp throiig"h the defence, (iood check. 

G. StanfiekL Centre. 1st year on the team . Shows considerable 
promise. Good stickhandler who knows when to pass. Checks 
well. 

J. S. Gait. L. \\ ing". 1st year on the team. Useful in anv position. 
Good stickhandler who should be valuable next year. 

F.E.B.W. 

SCHEDULE OF RESULTS 

Goals 

Date Opponent Result For Against 

Nov. 26 B. tiilmour's \'l Won 4 1 

Dec. 6 Bank of Montreal Tie 2 2 

Jan. 18 R. Winter's VI Won 2 1 

'* 25 Bank of Montreal Won 5 

•' 28 B. Gilmour's \T Lost 1 2 

Felx 1 R. Winter's \T Lost 1 

3 Ottawa University Lost 1 5 

4 Bank of Commerce Won 4 1 
8 R. Winter's VI Lost 1 3 

10 Ottawa University Won 5 2 

13 Bishop's Colleg-e School Lost 2 4 
15 Scorpions Won 1 
22 Bishop's College School Won 6 3 

" 25 B. Gilmour's VI Won 4 1 

27 Lower Canada College Won 2 

Mar. 5 Westmount High School A\'on 4 3 

14 Bank of Montreal Won 2 1 

Played 17; Won 11 ; Lost 5; Drawn 1. 
Goals for 46; goals against 30. 

ASHBURY vs. BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL 

Plaved at Lennox ville, Saturdav. Februarv 13th. 
Lost 2 - 4. ' 

The game was played on natural ice, which was rather heavy 
owing to the thaw. 

Three twenty minute periods were pla\ed. 

Bishop's settled down at once to a strong game and seemed to 
adapt themselves much better to the condition of the ice. They 
set up several strong attacks and a shot from just inside the blue 



20 THE ASHBURIAN 



line went into the corner of the net. Ashbury made several deter- 
mined attempts to get on terms, but most of their attacks were 
broken up at centre ice by Grant, who was using- his poke check 
with great efifect. Bishop's came down the ice with a good passing 
run and one of their forwards beat Beauclerk from close in. Some 
give and take play followed, and then Thomas slipped his man on 
the right wing and as he reached the l)lue line shot for the corner 
of the net, beating the goalkeeper with the pace of his shot. Ash- 
bury kept up the pressure and some few minutes later E. Allen 
followed in and secured his rebound as the goalkeeper fell, shoot- 
ing over his back into the net. The period ended with the score 
tied. 

The second period opened quietly but Bishop's soon set up a 
strong attack ; there was some loose marking near goal and Bis- 
hop's scored twice in quick succession. Ashbury made determined 
efforts to reduce the deficit, but they were stopped by Grant, who 
broke up attack after attack in centre ice. The period ended with 
Bishop's leading 4-2. 

The third period was scoreless, but produced some fast and in- 
teresting hockey. The ice had improved since the beginning of the 
game and this tended to speed up the play. Ashbury made strenu- 
ous efforts to score l)Ut could not penetrate the defence and time 
was called with Bishop's winners of an interesting game. 4-2. 

Ashbury : — 

Goal — Beauclerk. 

Defence — J. Allen, R. Stanfield. 

Centre — MacCarthy. 

Wings — Fauquier, Coristine. 

Spares — Thomas. McGuckin, E. Allen. G. Stanfield. 



ASHBURY vs. BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL 

Played at the Auditorium. Monday. February 22nd. 
Won 6 - 3. ' 

Three twenty minute periods were played. 

The game was very even at first, and both goalkeepers were 
well tested. Some ten minutes after the start, the Bishop's for- 
wards came away in a good combined movement ; the puck was 
passed to Glass who scored with a hard shot from the left wing. 
Ashbury made strenuous efforts to equalise but Grant was once 
more checking very effectively at centre ice and for some time was 
chiefly instrumental in holding the Ashbury forwards in check. 
With four minutes of the period left, the puck was passed to Coris- 



"1 

[ 



THE ASHBURIAN 21 



tine just outside of the blue line; he stickhandled his way through 
the defence, was partially checked, but recovered and went right in 
to tie the score with a shot into the left corner of the net. The 
period ended shortly afterwards with the score 1-1. 

Ashbury attacked as soon as the game was restarted and 
Thomas hit the post with a hard drive. Bishop's soon retaliated 
and some loose work by the defence near goal left Glass with the 
puck, and he had no difficulty in putting his side ahead. Five 
minutes later there was a melee close to the boards inside our blue 
line from which (irant emerged with the puck; he eluded the de- 
fence and put Bishop's further ahead with a shot that gave Beau- 
clerk no chance. The next few minutes were very exciting as Ash- 
bury made attack after attack in an effort to reduce the deficit. 
They met with no success until three minutes before the bell, when 
Coristine received a pass from MacCarthy close in and scored his 
second goal. The period ended with Ashbury behind, 2 - 3. 

The third period witnessed some even hockey, but the pace 
had grown appreciably slower ; neither side seemed al)le to keep up 
the speed of the tw-o opening periods, but it looked as if Ashbury 
were lasting rather better. Al)out half way through the period, 
Symington was given the puck just over the half way line ; he 
passed one man and as he passed him shot hard for the corner of 
the net. The goalkeeper had no chance and it is doubtful if he 
even saw the puck. It was an excellent piece of opportunism. 
Both sides worked hard for a deciding goal but the period ended 
with the score tied 2) - 2). 

It was decided to play two extra periods of five minutes each. 
Ashbury went off with a rush and now fully had the measure of 
their opponents. Their forwards swept down the ice in attack 
after attack, and soon went ahead. Thomas and E. Allen took the 
puck right down the ice in a good passing movement and Allen 
had no difficulty in scoring. From the face off the Ashbury for- 
wards came right away and though they were held oft' for a few 
minutes, they were not to be denied. Again they came down the 
ice, passing the puck with a speed that seemed tu h:iffle the defence; 
the final pass left G. Stanfield in possession a few yards out and 
he gave the goal keeper no chance. The period then ended with 
Ashbury leading 5-3. 

The second overtime ])eriod opened with Bishop's sending four 
men up the ice in a desperate attempt to score, but all their eft'orts 
were held oft' by the Ashbury defence. Ashbury continued to have 
rather the better of the play and another combined rush by the 
forwards gave Symington a chance of which he availed himself by 
shooting into the corner of the net. The end soon came with Ash- 
bury victorious, 6- 3. in a hard fought and alwavs interesting game. 



22 THE ASHBURIAN 



Ashbury : — 

Goal — Beauclerk. 
Defence — J. Allen. R. Stanfield. 
Centre — G. Stanfield. 
Wings — Thomas, E. Allen. 

Spares — Fauquier, MacCarthy, Coristine, McGuckin. Sym- 
ington, Gait. 

ASHBURY vs. LOWER CANADA COLLEGE 

Played at the Forum, Montreal, Monday, February 29th. 

Won 2-0. 
Three fifteen minute periods were played. 

The first period did not produce very good hockey. Play was 
very scrappy for some time and both sides seemed a little more 
anxious to play the man rather than the puck. Ashbury did more 
than their share of the attacking but their combination was not so 
good as usual, and there were too many individual attempts to split 
the defence. The period was scoreless, 0-0. 

Ashbury attacked strongly at the opening of the second period, 
but some bad passing among the forwards and close checking by 
the Lower Canada defence prevented any scoring. Lower Canada 
made one or two sporadic raids and twice got right in but Beau- 
clerk was very safe in goal. Towards the end of the period the 
Ashbury forwards began to improve their combination, and after 
R. Stanfield had led two raids which looked promising, the for- 
wards broke away together in a good passing movement : Syming- 
ton shot for the corner, secured his own rebound, then delaying his 
shot for a second or so. scored a clever goal. The period ended 
with the score 1 - in favour of Ashbury. 

Lower Canada attacked strongly on the resumption of play 
but the Ashbury defence held them at bay, although some loose 
work near goal gave Lower Canada an opportunity of which they 
did not avail themselves. About midway through the period Ash- 
bury delivered several determined attacks and one passing run 
among the forwards sent the puck to Thomas, who made no mis- 
take with his shot, putting Ashbury further ahead. In the last 
few minutes of the game the Lower Canada goal had several nar- 
row shaves, but there was no further scoring and Ashbury was left 
winners of a rather scrappy game, 2-0. 
Ashbury : — 

Goal — Beauclerk . 

Defence— J. Allen. R. Stanfield. 

Centre — Symington. 

Wings — Fauquier, Coristine. 

Spares — Thomas, (i. Stanfield. F. Allen, ( lillies. 



THE ASHBURIAN 23 



ASHBURV vs. WESTMOUXT HKill SCHOOL 

Played at the Auditorium, Saturday, March 5tli. 

Won 4-3. 

Three fifteen minute periods were played. 

The first period produced some very good hockey ; the orame 
was played at a fast pace and both defences were hard put to it to 
keej) their goals intact. Five minutes after the start a splendid 
movement by the W'estmount forwards took them through the 
defence and their left wing scored with a well directed shot. Ash- 
bury played up strongly and several good combined movements 
threatened danger, but their shooting was a little wild. Three 
minutes before the bell R. Stanfield secured the puck behind his 
own net, stickhandled his way through the defence and gave Sym- 
ington a perfect pass. The latter went right in and tied the 
score with a good shot. The period ended with the score tied, 1-1. 

Ashbury attacked on the resumption and Thomas hit the post ; 
G. Stanfield secured the rebound but the goal keeper managed to 
save his net by falling on the puck. Ashbtiry made several more 
attacks in close succession, but did not succeed in scoring. Then 
the game suddenly changed and for the next seven minutes W'est- 
mount held the tipper hand. They swept down the ice, using their 
combination and speed to great effect, and put on two further goals 
in as many minutes. The adverse score did not seem to afifect the 
Ashbury side as they fought back well, and just before the period 
ended Symington took a pass, beat two men and scored a good 
goal. The period ended with Ashbury still a goal down, 2-3. 

Again Ashbury started the period with a strong attack, but 
lost the puck behind the Westmount net ; one of their defence men 
took it up the ice and broke right through but Beauclerk effected 
a great save. The play was rather quiet for a few moments after 
that, but Ashbury soon got going wnth another passing movement 
and Thomas sent the puck across to E. Allen, who had no dif^culty 
in tieing the score. Ashbury played up hard and after several 
futile attacks Symington secured the puck, went clean through 
the defence, and put Ashbury ahead for the first time. The last 
few minutes were very exciting, but there was no further scoring 
and iA.shl)ury were left winners of a splendidly contested game, 4-3. 

Ashbury : — 

Goal — Beauclerk. 
Defence — J. Allen, R. Stanfield. 
Centre — G. Stanfield. 
Wings — Thomas, E. Allen. 

Spares — Fauquier, Symington, MacCarthv, Gait, (jillies. 

F.E.B.W. 



24 THE ASHBURIAN 



SECOND TEAM 

The School played S. Alban's First \T at Rockville on February 
16th. and a well contested game resulted in a win for Ashburv 2-1. 
Unfortunately illness prevented the return game being plaved at 
Ottawa. McGuckin scored both goals for Ashbury. 

The following represented Ashbury : — 
Goal — Boyd. 

Defence — McGuckin ; Rowley. 
Centre — Stanfield II. 
Wings — S}-nu'ngton ; Gait I. 
Spares — Thompson I ; Gillies ; Calder. 

THIRD TEAM 
The School played S. Alban's 2nd \T at Brockville on February 
16th. immediately after the conclusion of the 2nd Team game. The 
match was well contested but Ashbury showed rather more finish 
and eventually won 3-1. 

The following represented Ashbury : — 
Goal — Ferguson I. 
Defence — X'ickers ; Wilson I. 
Centre — MacBrien. 
Wings — Fullerton ; Powell. 
Spares — Cooke ; Smith ; Hyman ; Little. 

F.E.B.W. 

JUNIOR HOCKEY 

Under 15 vs. Selwyn House. Played at the Coliseum, Montreal, 
on Tuesday, Feb. 23rd. Lost, 3-1. 

Again we were handicapped by the size of the huge rink and also 
by lack of practice together as a team. There was very little puck 
control and far too many quite ineffectual long shots. Powell scored 
our one goal. Davidson was ver\- good and MacBrien worked hard. 
Lavvson, Sharp and Ferguson II showed much promise. The Selwyn 
Hoiise Team played sound Hockey, with excellent combination in 
the Forward line. 

Team — Davidson II ; Kirkpatrick, (Capt.) ; Ferguson II ; Powell, 
MacBrien, Lawson. Spares : — Whitby, McCormick, Sharp, Yuile. 

Mr. Pattisson refereed. 

The return match was plaved at the Auditorium. Ottawa, on 
Saturday, March 19th. Lost, 3-2. 

Team, as above, except that Stannard I and Roberts played in- 
stead of Whitby and Yuile. Powell scored the two goals for 
Ashbury. B.K.T.H. 



THE ASHBURIAN 



jC.i 



CROSS COUNTRY RACES 

The Senior and junior races were run oft on Wednesday, April 
27th, rather later than usual owing to the continued cold weather. 

The Seniors were started at 12 o'clock from the Elm Tree in 
front of the School, and the Juniors from a mark on Mariposa five 
minutes earlier. In each case the course followed was identical with 
that of the past three years, and thus a real comparison of times may 
be secured. This year the course was very heavy and in bad condi- 
tion generally, so that it is not surprising to find that the times were 
considerably slower than those of last year. 

One noticeable feature of this race during the past few years has 
bc^en the gradually dwindling number of entries, and in view of this 
fact it is open to question whether the first few men home do not 
score a greater number of points in the inter-House Competition 
than the entry warrants. It is a matter to which the Games' Com- 
mittee might well give their attention during the year. 

Ten competitors started in the Senior Race, eight of whom fin- 
ished, while six scored points for their respective houses. Allen 11, 
the winner, ran a well judged race. Running with a long easy stride 
he was well up all through the race, but did not take the lead until 
past the turn by the Aerodrome, when he forged m front, overtaking 
Thompson I, who had held the lead over the greater part of the 
course. Thompson stuck to him well but could make no impression 
and Allen spurted in a winner by some 300 yards. Thompson, Calder, 
Snell, Park and Sherwood all scored points for their houses. Men- 
tion should be made of Park's running. He started at scratch, over a 
minute behind the man immediately in front of him, but ran strongly 
all through and overhauled all but the first four, finishing the course 
a little over a minute behind the winner. Allen H also won the 
medal for the fastest scratch time. 

The Junior race was won by W'eldon and this was distinctly a 
meritorious performance, as he started last. Settling down at once 
to a long raking stride he judged the race well and, gradually over- 
hauling each man, took the lead about a mile from home, and refusing 
to be hustled, romped in 150 yards ahead of Powell, last year's 
winner. He also won the medal for the fastest scratch time. Eight 
started and all finished, seven of them scoring points, which was a 
most creditable performance. 



26 



THE ASHBURIAN 



SENKJR RACE 

Actu'il 'i'ime. Handicap. Elapsed Time. Place 

Allen II 31.45 0.57 30.48 1 

Thompson I 32.13 0.42 31.31 2 

Calder 32.44 1.12 31.32 3 

Snell 32.53 1.09 31.44 4 

Park 34.57 2.24 32.33 5 

Sherwood 35.07 1.39 33.28 6 

Wilson I and Smith also completed the course. 



i 



JUNIOR RACE 

Actual Time. Handicap. 

Weldon 21.47 0.39 

Powell 22.05 0.24 

McCormick 22.55 0.24 

Davidson II 23.34 0.33 

MacBrien 24.47 0.30 

Wood 26.27 0.00 

Yuile 26.31 0.39 

Sharp 26.50 0.18 



HOUSE POINTS 



Football 

Badminton 

Boxing 

Hockey 

Ski-ing 

Cross Country 

Gym. 

Sports 

Tennis 

Cricket 



Elapsed Time. 


Pla> 


21.08 


1 


21.41 


2 


22.31 


3 


23.01 


4 


24.17 


5 


26.27 


6 


25.52 


7 


26.32 


8 



F.E.B.W 



Ottawa. Montreal. Dominion. 
— — 15 



/ 
7 


16 


7.5 


7.5 


2 


10 


10 


10 


12 


— 



{ 



SKI-ING 

The cross country races were held on February 24th. 

The senior race .started as usual from the hut near Pink I>ake 
and ended on the edge of the hill overlooking Fairy Lake. The 
juniors also covered the same course as last year, finishing up at the 
Senior winning post. The Senior Race was again won by Thompson 
1, who ski-ed very well. 'Hie junior race went to L. Snelling. 



THE ASHBURIAN 



27 



The Juinj)ing Competition was lield on a built up jump at Rock- 
liffe this year and proved very close. MacBrien was the ultimate 
winner with Thompson I a ver}- good second. The ski-ing cup was 
won bv Thompson. 

The weather again precluded any attempt to hold the turning 
competition. F.E.B.W. 




CRICKET 1932. 

Old Colours: X. B. Gillies. T. \V. Beauclerk, D. Fauquier. 

Gillies was elected Captain and Beauclerk \'ice-captain. 

We have lost most of last season's team but there are a number 
of candidates for the vacant places and we hope to be able to place 
a sound XI in the field by the time that the School games come 
round. 

ASH BURY vs. OTTAWA C.C. 

Played at Ashbury on April 23rd. Won by 90 runs. 



1st Innings of Ashbury 

T. Beauclerk, b. Taylor 20 

J. Gall, b. Taylor 2 

D. Fauquier, run out 5 

J. Syming-ton, b. McFarlane 9 

Mr. Whitfield, not out 68 

Mr. Morris, b. McFarlane 

N. Gillies, b. Coles 15 

Mr. Cossar, b. Taylor 4 

F. Heubach, b. Coles 2 

G. MacCarthy, c. Coles, b. Taylor . 9 
R. Parks, not out 1 

Extras 8 



Total (9 wickets) 

Inning's declared closed. 



,143 



1st Innings of Ottawa 

C. M. Coles, b. iNlr. Cossar 8 

G. F. Currie, b. Gillies 5 

A. J. Crerar, b. ]Mr. Cossar 

A. G. Taylor, b. Gillies 5 

J. Richardson, b. Mr. Cossar 

R. W. McFarlane, b. Mr. Cossar . . 2 

H. Currie, c. Gillies, b. Fauquier . . 7 

A. L. Taylor, run out 11 

J. Rug-gles, c. & b. Park 

D. Snipper, not out 

C. Ade, c. Symington, b. Gillies ... 5 

Extras 10 

Total 53 

Bowling Analysis 

Mr. Cossar, 4 for 25; Gillies, 3 for 8; 
Park, 1 for 5: Fauquier, 1 for 5. 



28 



THE ASHBURIAN 



ASHBURY vs. NEW EDINBURGH C. C. 
Piayecl at Ashbury on April 30th. Drawn. 



1st Innings of Ashbury 

T. Beauclerk, b. Craig 44 

Mr. Morri.s, b. Clark 2 

D. Fauquier, b. Craig 7 

N. Gillies, b. Craig 7 

Mr. Whitfield, not out 55 

G. MacCarthy, b. Craig 3 

Mr. Howis, l.b.w., b. Clark 

Mr. Cossar, l.b.w., b. Craig 

R. Stanfleld, b. Craig 

G. Hyman, b. Brassington 11 

G. Stanfleld, not out 4 

R. Park, did not bat 

Extras 5 



^otal (9 wickets) 

Innings declared closed. 



1st Innings of New Edinburgh 
C. Greaves, c. G. Stanfleld, b. Mr. 

Howis 18 

\V. Craig, c. R. Stanfleld, b. Mr. Howisl7 

A. L. Taylor, b. Mr. Howis 8 

T. Bee, b. Mr. Cos.sar 

F. Boucher, not out 6 

E. Donaldson 

H. S. Graham 

M. Pettifor 

C. V. Craik 1^ did not bat 

C. Brassington 

G. Clark 
P. Brodrick 

Extras 4 



Total (4 wickets) 



53 



Bowling Analysis 
Mr. Cossar, 1 for 27; Mr. Howis, 3 for 
17; Gillies, for 5. 



ASHBURY vs. DEFENCE C. C. 
Plaved at Rideau Hall on May 7th . Lost by 128 runs. 



1st Innings of Ashbury 

T. Beauclerk, b. Aldridge 

N. Gillies, b. Taylor 1 

D. Fauquier, b. Tavlor 1 

Mr. Wright, l.b.w., b. Edwards 18 

Mr. Whitfleld, b. Aldridge 

J. Symington, c. Aldridge, b. T\'icoll 7 

Mr. Cossar, not out 5 

G. MacCarthy, b. Seager 1 

Mr. Howis, b. Seager 6 

R. Stanfleld, st. King, b. Seager ... 

R. Park, l.b.w., b. Seager 2 

Extras 3 



Total 44 



1st Innings of Defence 
R. Edwards, c. Gillies, b. Mr. Wright 4 4 

A. E. Heatley, b. Fauquier 7 

D. Nicoll, c. MacCarthy, b. Mr. 

Whitfield 64 

J. Seager, b. Mr. Wright 32 

G. Southam, c. Fauquier, b. Sym- 
ington 6 

W. H. Stevens, not out 8 

T. Carpenter, c. Beauclerk, b. Mr. 
Cos-sar 5 

A. G. Taylor 

B. Lloyd 

H. W. King f did not bat 
F. Aldridge I 

Extras 6 

TPotal (6 wickets) 172 

Bowling Analysis 

Mr. Cossar, 1 for 20; Fauquier, 1 for 
30; Mr. Howis, for 19: Park, for 10; 
Gillies, for 26; Mr. \Vright, 2 for 34' 
Mr. Whitfield, 1 for 25; Symington, 1 

for 2. 



8th ANNUAL BOXING TOURNAMENT 

There was a large number of visitors present, amongst whom 
we were delighted to see Mr. Alfred B. Evans, who has been Gover- 
nor of Ashbury for many years. Some excellent Boxing was wit- 
nessed and the standard was undoubtedly above that of previous 
occasions. We congratulate the Winners (and Losers). The Head- 
master spoke at the conclusion of the {)rogramme and Mr. Evans 
delighted us all by asking for a whole Holiday, which the Head- 
master said he wt)uld be happy to grant, by adding an extra day to 
the Easter Vacation. 

Refreshments were afterwards served in the Dining Hall. 



THE ASHBURIAN 29 



OFFICIALS 

Referee ---- - George E. Glossop, Esq. 

(W. M. Anderson, Esq. 
judges ---------- ^v. Campbell. Esq. 

liuie Keeper -------- \V. H. Brodie, Esq. 

Official Recorder ------- F. E. B. Whitfield. Esq. 

M. C. ---------- Sergt.-Maj(;r V .\\ . Stone. 



RESULTS 



JUNIOR SCHOOL 

1. — Final Junior Lightweight. 
Barott beat Grant. 

2. — Final Junior Heavyweight. 

Magor II. beat Snelling. 

UPPER SCHOOL 

3. — Semi-Final Intermediate Heavyweight. 
Symington beat Stannard I. 

4. — Semi-Final Intermediate Heavyweight. 
Allen III. beat Heuser II. 

5. — Final Intermediate Lightweight. 

^lacBrien beat Davidson II. 

6. — Final Intermediate Middleweight. 
Fullerton beat Black. 

7. — Final Intermediate Heavyweight. 
Symington beat .A-llen HI. 

8. — Final Senior Lightweight. 

F'auquier I. beat W'odehouse. 

9. — Final Senior Heavyweight. 
Heubach beat Park. 

Symington was awarded the prize for Ring-craft. 



30 THE ASHBURIAN 



SPORTS 

Tlie Athletic Sports were held this year on May 24th, instead 
of on Closing Day, as has been the custom f(jr some years past. 

After a somewhat threatening morning, we were favoured with 
ideal weather, which enabled us to have the Prize giving on the 
front lawn. The meeting was a very enjoyable one for all concerned 
and we had the usual muster of Old Boys whom we are very glad 
to welcome on this, as on other occasions. 

One record was broken this year, that for the Long Jump, and 
J. B. Allen is to be congratulated on his performance, and we hope 
that next year he will go even better and improve on his own record. 
It was fitting that .the record should be broken by him as he also 
succeeded in winning the Senior Challenge Cup, the Fleming, by a 
large margin. T. Cooke also succeeded in equalling the record for 
the Intermediate Hurdles. The Intermediate Challenge Cup, the 
Stanley Wright, went to E. R. Allen. The xAylwin Cup, awarded to 
the winner of the Junior Championship was this year confined to 
the Junior School, and was won easily by L. Magor. who shows great 
promise as an athlete. 

This year the Mile was revived after a lapse of many years and 
will now, it is hoped, be an annital event. Several events, which had 
been previously run on a handicap, were thrown open for the first 
time. This is undoubtedly a good thing as it makes the competition 
for the Championships much more open. In addition there were 
several new events both for Intermediates and the Junior School. 

SENIOR SPORTS 

100 Yards I. B. Allen 11". 

440 Yards D. Thompson, _59 4/5". 

Long Jump .__]. B. Allen 19'. 

High Jump k. Rowlev 5' 2 3/4". 

M,ile__ G. MacCarthy_.5' 42". 

120 Yard Hurdles___I. B. Allen 16". 

220 Yards [. B. Allen 24 3/5". 

880 Yards 

( Beardmore Cup)_J. B. Allen 2' 25". 

Throwing the 

Cricket Ball N. B. Gillies___95 yards, 1 foot, 8 inches. 

Obstacle Race F. Heubach (for the third year in 

succession). 

Relay Race Dominion 2'53"_1). Thompson; F. Heubach; 

X. (billies; D. Heuser. 
Old Bovs' Race R. Ross 



THE ASHBURIAN 31 



Tug of War Dominion N. Gillies; C Southrun ; \). 

Fauquier ; F. Sherwood ; 
J. Stannard ; G. Wodehouse 
H. R. Park; D. Heuser. 



IXTFRMFDIATE SPORTS 

High lump A. Yuile 4' 10 1/2". 

440 Yards E. R. Allen 63 2/5". 

100 Yards E. R. Allen 11 1/5". 

120 Yards, Hurdles_T. Cooke 17 1/5". 

Long lunij) V. Vickers 17'. 

220 Yards E. R. Allen 25 2/5". 

JUNIOR SPORTS 

100 Yards L. Magor 13 1/5". 

Obstacle Race E. Macdonald__ 

100 Yards (under 12)W. Grant 13 2/5". 

220 Yards L. Magor 

Long Jump L. Magor 14'. 

50 Yards L. Magor 7". 

Throwing the 

Cricket Ball E. Macdonald__62 yards 7 inches. 

High Jump L. Magor 4' 5 1/4". 



F.E.B.W. 



WISE AND OTHERWISE 

'T've added those figures ten times Sir." 

"Good." 

"And here are the ten answers." 



"You don't know when the Seven Years' War began?" 
"No. but I know how long it lasted." 



The farmer met one of his new employes coming towards the 

h(Aise in a drip])ing condition. 

"Say. l^jill. he asked, "what have you been doing?" 

"Oh." was tile re]^ly, "I've just been having a game of Cricket 

with the old bull by the pond. I won the toss and went in first." 



32 THE ASHBURIAN 



They gave tlie Duke of Wellington a lovely funeral. It t(jok 
six men to carry the beer. 



King John ground the i)eople down under heavy taxis. 



Crematorium — h>ench for a dairy. 



The Gorgons were three sisters that lived in the islands of 
Hesperides somewhere in the Indian Ocean. They had long snakes 
for hair, tusks for teeth, and claws for nails, and they looked like 
women, only more horrible. 



The steam hammer ])unches holes in ships by steam. 



Sentiment is the mud brought down by a river. 



There were no Chrisians among the early Gauls ; they were 
mostly lawyers. 



"My punishment is greater than I can bear." was said by Agag 
when Samuel was hewing him in pieces. 



The Chiltern Hundreds are the things you see with a miscros- 
cope in a cheese. 



Tn the eighteenth century travelling was very romantic ; most 
of the highroads were only bridal paths. 



An herbaceous border is a lodeer who does not eat meat. 



Oliver Cromwell had an iron will and a large red nose, but 
underneath were deep religious feelings. 



The home of the swallow is the stomach. 
LXXX, means "Love and Kisses." 



The mineral wealth of a country is ginger beer and lemonade. 



A problem is a figure which you do things with which are 
absurd, and then you ])rove it. 



THE ASHBURIAN 33 



Air usuall\- has no weight, hut when plaeed in a haronieter a 
square inch of it is found to weigh ahout fifteen ])ounds. 



Genae puellae formosae siiiif — Beautiful girls are cheeky. 
// lie faisai'f rien sans but — He did nothing without a drink. 



ALGEBRAICAL LOVE 

A. drives a car at speed V. If V. exceeds a certain amount the 
factor P.C. comes in. To restore positive value to V.. P.C. must 
be squared, but if this is not done term J. P. has to be dealt with. 
It is now impossible to restore positive value to V. because J. P. 
cannot be squared. 

O.W. 



The L'pper I\' is unsurpassed; 

The members of it are below 
To spell the name — the best we know, 

Ashlniry in Ontario. 

clArke 
stevenSon 
sHarp 
Black 
fUllerton 
robeRts 
parrY 

Cowans 
wOod 
aLlen 
newLands 
fauquiEr 
ferGuson 
barEnds 

dennisOn 
davidsoN 

sTannard 



J. S. 



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©rtnitg (UnlUgie 

in tlye 

Hniu^rfittg xxt olavatxtst 



Trinity College, federated with the University and now removed 
to Queen's Park, is one of the Arts Colleges of the University and 
includes: 

1. A Faculty of Arts providing instruction for students in classes 
of limited size in all subjects taught by the colleges. 

2. The full advantages of Federation with the University — in- 
struction by its Professors, qualification for its Scholarships and De- 
grees, use of its Library, Laboratories and Athletic facilities and mem- 
bership in Hart House. 

3. A Faculty of Divinity in which Trinity exercises its University 
powers of confering degrees, and prepares candidates for the ministry 
of the Church. 

4. Residences under College regulations for men — "Trinity 
House;" and for women students — "St. Hilda's;" — also for members 
of the academic staff. 

5. The scholarships offered by the College have recently been 
revised and largely increased. Full particulars will be supplied on 
request. 

For information concerning scholarships, Exhibitions, Bursaries, 
etc., address — 

THE REGISTRAR, TRINITY COLLEGE, 
TORONTO 5. 



PROPERTY OF 
ASHBURY COLLEGE 



^ DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 




Moritez^umas Day 

Cocoa Beans were used asMoney 



THE value of the cocoa bean was 
appreciated in Mexico long before 
the discovery of America. The 
Spaniard found there a beverage, known 
in Aztec as "chocolate" — from choco 
(cocoa) and lath (water). The Emperor 
Montezuma was exceedingly fond of it 
and is said to have consumed many jars 
or pitchers daily himself and his house- 
hold 2,000 jars. 

Cocoa beans in sacks containing a speci- 
fied number were used as currency for 
the payment of taxes, purchase of slaves, 
etc. In fact the Aztecs valued the cocoa 
beans even more highly than gold. 



Chocolate was introduced to Spain which 
country long tried to hold it from other 
nations, but of course failed, and by the 
17th century its use had spread through 
Europe. 

Cocoa beans are grown in West Africa, 
the West Indies, Ceylon and other coun- 
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VtWitxia 

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