Skip to main content

Full text of "Bellini's opera I puritani : containing the Italian text, with an English translation and the music of the principal airs"

See other formats


* 



4? 



* 



Oliver Ditson Company's Standard Edition of Opera Librettos. 




COMPOSED BY BELLINI, 



WITH ENGLISH AND ITALIAN WORDS, 



AFRICAINE (V) 
AH) A 

ANNA BOLENA 

BALLO (Un) IN MASCHERA (Masked Ball) 
BARBIERE (II) M SIVIGLIA (Barber of Seville) 

BOHEMIAN GIRL (La Zingara) Balfe 

CARNIVAL OF "V FNICE Petrella 

CARMEN Bizet 

CENERENTOLA (La) (Cinderella) Rossini 
CRISPINO E LA COM ARE (The Gobbler and the Fairy) Ricci 

DER FREYSCHUTZ Weber 

DINORAH (La Pardon de Ploermel) Meyerbeer 

DON BUCEFALO Cagnoni 

DON CARLOS Verdi 

DON GIOVANNI (Don Juan) Mozart 

DON PASQUALE Donizetti 

ELISIRE (L') D'AMORE (Elixir of Love) Donizetti 

ERNANI Verdi 

ETOILE tL') DU NORD (Star of the North) Iffevwbeer 

FAUST Gounod 

FAVORITA (La) Donizetti 

FIGLIA (La) DEL REGGIMENTO Donizetti 

FRA DIAVOLO Auber 

GAZZA (La) LADRA- (The Thieving Magpie) . Rossini 

GIOCONDA (La) Ponchielli 

GUIRAMENTO (II) (The Oath) Mercadante 

HUGUENOTS (Les) Meyerbeer 
I CAPULETTI E MONTECCHI (Romeo and Juliet) Bellini 

IL PIRATA Bellini 

IL FLAUTO MAGICO (Magic Flute) Mozart 

I MARTIRI (PrUuto) Donizetti 

IONE Petrella 

JUIVE (La) (The Jewess) Halevy 



ITALIAN AND ENGLISH WITH MUSIC. 

Meyerbeer 
Verdi 
Donizetti 
Verdi 



LIFDA DI CRAMOUNIX 


Donizetti 


LOHENGRIN 


Wagner 


LOMBARDI (I) 


Verdi 


LUCIA DI LAMMERMOOR 


Donizetti 


LUCREZIA BORGIA 


Donizetti 


LUISA MILLER 


Verdi 


LURLINE 


Wallace 


MARIA DE ROHAN 


Donizetti 


MARRIAGE OF FIGARO 


Mozart 


MARTHA 


Flotow 


MASANIELLO 


Auber 


MEFISTOFELE 


Boito 


MIGNON 


A. Thomas 


MIRELLA 


Gounod 


MOSES IN EGYPT 


Rossini 


NORMA 


Bellini 


OMBRA (L') (The Shadow) 


Flotow 


OTELLO 


Verdi 


OTELLO 


Rossini 


PROPHETE (Le) 


Meyerbeer 


PURITANI (I) 


Bellini 


RIGOLETTO 


Verdi 


ROBERT LE DIABLE 


Meyerbeer 


ROMEO AND JULIET 


Gounod 


SAFFO 


Pacini 


SEMIRAMILE 


Rossini 


SICILIAN VESPERS (I Vespii Siciliani) 


Verdi 


SONNAMBULA (La) (The Somnambulist) 


Bellini 


TRAVIATA (La) 


Verdi 


TROVATORE (11) 


Verdi 


WILLIAM TELL 


Rossini 


RUSTIC CHIVALRY 


Mascagni 



Boston: OLIVER DITSON COMPANY. 



NEW ymrk: 
C. H. Ditson & Co. 



CHICAGO : 

Lyon & Healy. 



BOSTON : 
John C. Haynes & Co. 



PHIL a : 
J. E. Ditson & Co. 




Opera Singers 



By GUSTAV KOBBE 



(FOURTH AND REVISED EDITION 




SERIES* of costume and other portraits of the grand opera singers 
best known to American opera-goers of to-day. To these pic- 
tures are added authentic biographic sketches of some of the most 
famous, the data for them being furnished by the singers themselves. 

The new edition pictures not only the forces of the Metropolitan 
Opera House, but the chief singers of the new Hammerstein Com- 
pany, the Henry W. Savage Company, and the new San Carlo Opera 
Company, making it beyond question the most complete as well as the 
most artistic pictorial souvenir of the opera published. The book of 
100 pages contains 153 illustrations, of which number 140 are por- 
traits, 28 of them full page in size. 

Printed on heavy coated paper and handsomely bound in cloth. 
Size of page, 9 inches by 12. 



Price, $1 .50 net, post-paid 



Boston, OLIVER DITSON COMPANY 



BELLINI'S 



OPERA. 



I PURITAN I, 

JONTAININO THE 

ITALIAN TEXT, WITH AN ENGLISH TRANSLATION, 

/ 

%\t Htnsit of all % Jrintipl %m. 

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 




MUSIC L1DRARY 



♦ 

BOSTON: 

PUBLISHED BY OLIVER DITSON & CO., 



DRAMATIS PERSONS. 



ELVIRA. Daughter of Lord Walton. 



SOPRANO. 



HENRICHETTE. (Henrietta.) Widow of Charles I., under 
the name of Madame Villa Forte, 



SOPRANO. 



ARTURO. (Lord Arthur.) A Knight, and partisan of the 
Stuarts. 



TENOR. 



BRUNO. An Officer, and a Puritan. 



TENOR. 



RICCARDO. (Sir Richard Forth.) A Colonel, and a Puritan. BASS. 



Soldiers of Cromwell— Heralds and Men at Arms of Lord Arthur. 
Puritans, Peasants, Servants, Pages, and Country Girls. 



THE SCENE IS LAID IK ENGLAND, AT THE TIME OF THE STUARTS. 



THIS OPERA WAS WRITTEN FOR THE ITALIAN OPERA IN PARIS IN 1884, AND WAS 

THE LAST WORK OF BELLINI. 



WALTER. (Lord Walton.) Governor General, a Puritan. 



BASS. 



GEORGIO. (Sir George Walton.) His Brother— A Colonel on 
half pay, a Puritan. 



BASS. 



A. B. KIDDER^ MU9I0 TTPOGRAFHT, BOSTOW. 



ARGU 



M E N T 



In this opera, a love story is grafted on the warfare be- 
tween the Royalists and the Puritans, in the time of the 
Stuarts. The principal incidents are supposed to take place 
in a Fortress in the neighborhood of Plymouth, of which 
Lord Walter Walton is the Governor-General. He has a 
brother, Sir George, a Colonel on half pay, and a Daughter, 
Elvira. All these are of the Puritan party; and Lord Wal- 
ton is desirous of bestowing the hand of Elvira on Sir 
Richard Forth, also a Puritan, and a Colonel in the army. 
But Elvira's affections have been won by a partisan of the 
Stuarts, Lord Arthur Talbot, and, through the intercession 
of her uncle, Sir George, her father is induced to forego his 
own preference for Sir Richard, and to consent to her mar- 
riage with Lord Arthur. There is another important per- 
sonage in the drama, a lady who is a semi-prisoner at the 
Plymouth fortress, being suspected as an adherent of the 
Stuarts; and not without very good reason, for she is no 
less a personage than Henrietta of France, the widow of 
Charles I., who has thus sought concealment and security, 
under the name of Madame Villa Forte. 

At the rise of the curtain, soldiers are discovered on the 
ramparts of the fortress, relieving guard, and singing their 
matins as the day dawns. In subsequent scenes we find 
Sir Richard Forth bewailing the loss of Elvira, and vowing 
vengeance against his apparently more successful rival; 
and the uncle of the lady announcing to her the success of 
his intercession with her father, in favor of the lord of her 
affections. Preparations are accordingly made for the nup- 
tials; a procession of Esquires, Pages and Damsels arrives, 
with suitable presents; amongst which is a magnificent 
white veil. While this is going on, Lord Walton has re- 
ceived instructions from the Parliament to arrest Henrietta, 
and send her prisoner to London. He charges his soldiers 
to keep steadfast watch over her, and places the order for 
her arrest in the hrads of Lord Arthur, the pledged adher- 
ent of her cause I In the meantime, the wedding arrange- 



ments are completed, and Elvira re-enters, attired for the 
ceremony; but, bearing the nuptial veil in her hand, she 
playfully throws it over Henrietta, remarking that, " With 
this veil o'er thy beauties flowing, thou'lt seem the chosen 
bride, to the altar going." Arthur is struck with the sud- 
den idea; and when, after Elvira has retired, Henrietta at- 
tempts to remove the veil, he conjures her to desist; for, 
" thus attired, the vigilant guard thou'lt baffle, who'll take 
thee for the bride!" He then somewhat forcibly leads her 
off, and Elvira re-enters with the bridal party, just in time 
to see them pass the drawbridge. Of course, this abrupt 
departure can bear no other construction than an elope- 
ment. Elvira becomes motionless in astonishment and de- 
spair; — with a fixed stare she raises her hand to her dis- 
tracted head, and it is discovered that the sudden shock 
has driven her mad! 

Little now remains to be told. The Second Act is occu- 
pied almost wholly with the mad scenes of the heroine; 
but a hint is given that her reason may be restored by some 
joyous emotion as sudden as that which had occasioned the 
malady. The Parliament, on being informed of the escape 
of Queen Henrietta, confiscated the estates of Lord Walton, 
but afterwards restored them to him, in the conviction that 
he had not knowingly been a participator in the escape. 
Lord Arthur, however, was condemned to death, and large 
rewards were offered for his capture. Hunted by the sol- 
diers of Cromwell, the luckless knight nevertheless gets 
access to his beloved, when he for the first time becomes 
cognizant of her sad condition, and the cause of it. This 
meeting, and consequent explanation, constitute the joyous 
excitement which restores her to reason ; but it is only to 
hear of the price set on the head of her betrothed. At this 
crisis, however, news arrives that the Stuarts are finally 
discomfited, and that Cromwell, considering the peace of 
England thus re-established, had granted a free pardon to 
all captives and political offenders. 



I PURITANI 



(THE PURITANS.) 



ATTO I. 

SCENA I. — Spazioso terrapieno nella Fortezza. — Si veggono 
alcune cinte, torri ed altre opere di fortificazioni con ponti, 
levatoj, ec. — Da lontano si scorgono assai pittoresche mon- 
tagne, che fanno bellissima e solenne veduta, mentre il sole, 
che nasce, va gradatamente illuminandole, siccome poi rischi- 
ara tutta la scena. — Sopra li baluardi si vegono scambiare le 
Sentinelle. 

Sentinelle fuori e dentro la Fortezza. 

1 Sen. All' erta ! 

2 Sen. Sto all' erta. 
Tutti. Gia 1' alba appari. 

\Il tamburo e le trombe suonano la sveglia. 

1 Sen. La tromba — 

2 Sen. Rimbomba — [11 sole rischiara la scena. 
Tutti. E nunzia del di. 

Entra Bruno e Coro di Soldati, che a poco a poco escono con 
attrezzi militari — puliscono ed acconciarno le armi. 

Quando la tromba squiila, 

Ratto il guerrier si desta, 

L' armi tremende appresta, 

Alia vittoria va ! 
Pari *del ferro al lampo 

Se 1' ira in cor sfavilla, 
Degli Stuardi il campo 

In cenere cadra. 
[Odessi un preludio di armonia religiosa entro la fortezza. 
Bru. Oh, di Cromvel guerrieri, 
Peighiam la mente e il cor 
A' mattutini eantici, 
Sacri al divin Fattor ! 
[77 Soldati s' inginocchiano. — Core di Puritani dentro la 
Fortezza. — La campana suona la Preghiera. 
La luna, il sol, le stelle, 
Le tenebre e il fulgor, 
Dan gloria al Creator 
In lor favelle ! 
La terra e i firmamenti 
Esaltano il Signor ! 
A lui dian laudi e onor, 
Tutti le genti ! 

1 Sol. Udisti 1 

2 Sol. Udii. 
Tutti. Fini. 

Bru. Al re che fece il dl. 

L' inno dei puri cor 
Sail sui venti 1 



ACT I. 



SCENE I. — A Fortress, with the draw-bridge raised, war- 
like outworks, Src. — Picturesque mountainous scenery in the 
distance, which the rising sun illumines by degrees. — On the 
rampai-ts the Sentinels are being relieved. 

Sentinels within and without the Fortress. 

1 Sen. Arouse thee ! 

2 Sen. I have risen. 

All. The sun is now rising. 

[Drums and trumpets sound the reveille. 

1 Sen. The trumpet — 

2 Sen. Is sounding — [ The sun breaks over the scene. 
All. It heralds the day. 

Enter Bruno and Chorus of Soldiers, with military equip- 
ments — they polish and prepare their arms. 

Whene'er the trumpet soundeth, 

Up swift the warrior springeth, 

His dreaded arms he bringeth, 

And to the battle goes ! 
Like to his bright sword's flashing, 

His eager spirit bounding, 
O'er fall'ii Stuarts dashing, 

In dust he treads his foes. 
[From the fortress a prelude of sacred music ts heard. 
Bru. Oh, warriors of Cromwell, 

Humble each mind and heart 
To morning's solemn canticles, 
Praising the Holy God ! 
[The Soldiers sink on their knees. — Chorus of Puritans 
in the Citadel. — The bell sounds for Prayers. 
Moon, sun, and starry regions, 
Night's shadow and day's splendor, 
In their own language render 
All praise and glory ! 
The earth and heaven above it 
Do magnify the Lord ! 
To him, from ev'ry nation, 
Be praise and homage ! 

1 Sol. Didst hear thou 1 

2 Sol. I did hear. 
All. 'Tis finished. 

Bru. Unto the day's High God 
Devotion from the heart 
On the winds wafting ! 



6 



I PURITANI. 



hntrd Coro di Castdlane e Castellane, che reeano castellini 
di Jiori. 

1 Cos. A festa ! 

2 Cos. A festa ! 

Tutti A festa ! [Invitando i Scidati a cantare. 

Bru. Almo giolr s* appresta ; 
A tutti rida il cor ! 
Cantate un casto amor. 
[Bruno fa cenno di adesione, e i Soldati ti mischiano co* 
Castellani, ec ripetendo i canti di nozze. 
Garzon, che mira Elvira 

La bella verginella, 

L' appella la sua stella I 
Regina dell' amor. 
E il riso e il caro viso 
Belta di Paradiso ; 
E rosa in su lo stel, 
E un angelo del ciel ! 
Sincero un Cavaliero 

In pianto a lei d' accanto,— 

Ha il vanto altero e santo 
D' innamorar quel cor. 
Elvira allor sospira, 

Gli chiede eterna fede ; 

Ed oggi da mercede 
A un si fidato, ardor. 

1 Cas. A festa ! 

2 Cas. A festa! 
Tutti. A festa! 

Almo gioir s* appresta I 
A tutti ride il cor, 
Se a nozze invita amor ! 
[Tutti partono il solo Bruno, volgendo il capo e vedendo 
Riccardo, che esce disperatamente qfllitto, si ferma in 
disparte. 

Entra Riccardo. 

Ric. Or dove fuggo io mai ? 

Dove mai celo gli orrendi affanni miei t 

Come quei canti rispondono 

Al mio cor funerei pianti 1 

O, Elvira ! 0, Elvira ! o mio sospir soave, 

Per sempre io ti perdei ! Senza speme ed amor, 

In questa vita, or che rimane a me ? 
Bru. La Patria e il Cielo ! 
Ric. Qual voce ? che dicesti ? 

E vero— e vero ! 
Bru. Apri il tuo core intero 

All' amistk, n' avrai, conforto. 
Ric. E vano ! ma pur t' appagherb. Sai che d* Elvira 

II genitor m' acconsentia la mano, 

Quando al campo volai. 

Ieri alia tarda sera, 

Qui giunto con mia schiera, 

Pien d' amorosa idea, 

Vo al padre. 
Bru.- Ed ei dicea ? 

Ric. " Sospira Elvira a Talbo Cavaliero, 

E sovra il cor non v' ha paterao impero. M 

Bru. Ti calma, o amico. 

Riz. II duol, che al cor mi piomba. 

Sol calma avra nel sonno della tomba. 



Enter Chorus of Villagers, with baskets of 
flowers. 

1 Vil. To pleasure! 

2 Vil. To pleasure ! 

All. To pleasure ! [They invite the Soldiers tc sine. 
Bru. A joyful day is near ; 

Let hearts to joy be giv'n ! 
Sing of some honest love. 
[Making a sign of approval, the Soldiers blend with the 
Villagers, and sing a bridal chorus. 
A youth beholds Elvira 

All bright in virgin beauty, 

His star of hope and duty ! 
His Queen of faith and truth ! 
There is heaven in her glances ! 

From its light stalk full bending, 
Less blush of rose entrances, 

Or angel's glowing youth 1 
And the faithful Cavalier, 

Now in bis fond tears kneeling,— 
He can boast of having found 

In her heart a mutual feeling. 
And she, with maiden sighing, 

Asked and- found his true heart's aim ; 
And on this day she yields him 

The prize of pure love's claim. 

1 Vil, To pleasure ! 

2 VU. To pleasure ! 
All. To pleasure ! 

A joyful day is near ! 
Let hearts be full of cheer, 
Love to the wedding leads ! 

[Exeunt all but Bruno, who sees Richard approaching m 

dejection, and steps aside. 

Enter Richard. 

Ric. Ah ! where's my refuge now ? 

Where may I hide my terrible affliction ? 

Oh, how these revels seem to vibrate 

Like funeral dirges to my bosom ! 

Elvira, Elvira ! sweetest hope, 

For ever have I lost thee ! Love and hope, 

Deprived of these, what now remains to me ? 
Bru. Thy Country and Heaven ! 
Ric. Who spoke there ? what saidst thou ? 

'Tis true — 'tis true ! 
Bru. Lay open thy bosom 

To friendship, and thence draw comfort. 
Ric. 'Tis useless ! but I'll yield to thy wish. 

Thou know'st Elvira's sire gave me her hand, 

Consenting she should be mine. 

To the camp I then hastened, 

Which, late at night caching, 

My warriors with me, and with heart o'erflowing, 

I went to him. 
Bru. And then what said he ? 
Ric. " Elvira sighs for Talbot, and I, her sire, 

Have no power o'er her affections." 
Bru. My friend, be tranquil. 

Ric. The grief that's weighing heavy on my heart 
No calm will find save in the sleep of death. 



AH! PER SEMPRE 10 TI PERDEI — AH ! TO ME FOR EVER LOST NOW. Air. Riccardo. 




Ah! per sem-pre 
Ah ! *o me 



io ti per 
for ev - er 



de - 
lost.... 



now, 



Fior d'a - mo - re fior d'a-more, o mia spe- 
Flow'r of love, fiow'r of love and hope tJu 



I PURITANI. 



7 



* i * f 



ran 

dear 



Ah, la 

Zf(/e, to 



vi - ta— ah! la vi - ta che m' 
life, to me, thou now ap 



van 
pear • 



za. 
est, 







5= 


— B— 













-3- 





£?iotf now ap - pear -est 



na di do - lor. 
Gloo - my and with tern - pests cross' d. 



Quando errai per anni ed anni 

Al poter della ventura, 

Io sfidai sciagura e afFanni 

Nella speme del tuo amor — 

Oh qual sogno ingannator ! 
[Sentesi una breve Marcia. — / Soldati trapassano la 
scena per andare alle rassegne. 
Bru. T' appellan le schiere a lor condottier. 
Ric. Di gloria il sentiere m' e chiuso al pensier. 
Bru. A patria e ad onore non arde il tuo cor 1 
Ric. Io ardo — e il mio ardore e amore, e furor 1 
Bru. Deh poni in obblio 

C eta, che fioriva nei sogni d' amor. 
Ric. Mi e in mente ognor viva, 

Mi accresce il desio, m' addoppia il dolor. 

Bel sogno beato d' amore e contento ! 

0, cangia il mio fato ! o, cangia il mio cor I 

0 come e tormento nei di del dolore 

La dolce me memoria d' un tenero amor. 

[Partono. 

SCENA II. — Le jinestre Gotiche sono aperte, si vedono le 

fortificazione, ec. 

Elvira e Sir Georgio. 

Elv. O, amato zio ! oh, mio secondo padre ! 
Sir G. Perche mesta cosi 1 m' abbraccia, Elvira. 
Elv. Deh chiamami tua figlia ! 
Sir G. O, figlia! 0, nome, 

Che la vecchiezza mia consola e alletta. 

Pel dolce tempo ch' io ti veglio accanto, 

E pel soave pianto, 

Che in questo giorno d' allegrezza pieno, 
Piove daT ciglio ad innondarmi il seno, 
O, figlia, mia diletta, oggi, sposa sarai ! 
Elv. Sposa ! — no mai ! 



Year by year, as wild I wander'd, 
By the whirl of fateful changes toss'd, 
To no torture did I bow, 

For hope would cheer me, though banish'd now. 
Delusion ! where's the vision fled 1 

[A March. — Soldiers pass over the stage. 

Bru. The army requires thee to be its chief. 

Ric. The high path of glory is barr'd to my thoughts. 

Bru. For country and honor does not thy heart warm ? 

Ric. My soul is on fire — but 'tis with love ! 

Bru. Bury in oblivion that time 

Which enwreathed thee with love and flow'rs. 
Ric. It is an ever present memory, 

Spurring desires, and doubling every woe. 

Oh, happy and lovely dream of peace and joy ! 

Oh, change thou my fate, or change my heart ! 

Ah, what a keen torment, in the day of grief, 

Becomes the mem'ry of ajl vanish'd love ! 

[Exeunt. 

SCENE II. — The Apartment of Elvira. — Gothic windows, 
through which the fortifications are perceived. 

Elvira and Sir George. 

Elv. Oh, my lov'd uncle ! my fond, my second father ! 

Sir G. Why art sorrowful ? Embrace me, Elvira. 

Elv. Ah, call me thy daughter ! 

Sir G. My daughter ! A name tis, 

That bringeth consolation to my old age. 
By the sweet time spent washing o'er thy life, 
By the sweet tears that on this joyous day 
Pour from my eyes upon my breast — this day, — 
This day, dear daughter, thou a bride shalt be. 

Elv. Bride ? Alas, never ! 



SAI COME ARDE — WELL THOU KNOWEST. Air. Elvira. 



Sai co - me ar - de 
Well thou know - est 



~i tr" — ^ h*- 



in pet - to mi - o, 
how, in thy bo - sorn, 



Bel - la flam - ma on 
Love's all pow'r - - - fut 



ni pos- 

iume is 



?-0 




- te, Sai ch' e pu - ro 
■ ed, That ne'er pur-er 



il mio de - si - o, 

were plighted 



Che in - no - cente e ques 
By more o • pen or.. 



■ ro 

fond 



Sai ch' e pu - ro il mio de - si - o, Che in-no - cen te 
That ne'er pur - er vows were plighted By more o - pen 



e ques - to 
or fond 



8 



I PUKITANI. 



cor. 
heart. 



Se, tre - man - te all' a - ra in - nan - te Stras - cin - a - ta tm di sa- 
If, in tre - mor, to the al - tar They e'er drag the limbs that 



m 



ro 

fal-ter. 



For-sen - na - ta in quell' is - tan - te Di do - lo- re io mo - ri - ro! For-sen- 
Mad-ness seiz - - ing me that mo -ment, Grief will con - quer, life de-partl Madness 



na - ta in quell' is 
seiz - - ing me that 



tan 
mo 



- te Di. 

ment Grief. 



do - lor 

will con 



- di do 
quer, life de- 



lor 

part ; 



10 mo - n ro,. 
Mad • • ness seiz 



in quell' 
ing me . . 



is - tan 
that mo 



te Di do- 

ment, Grief. . . . will 



lor 

con 



di do - lor, 
quer life de - part — 



si di do - lor mo - ri - rbl 
life de - part, life de - part t 



Sir G. Scaccia ormai pensier si nero ! 
Elv. Morir si ! sposa no mai — 
Sir G. Che dirai, se il Cavaliero 
Qui vedrai, se tuo sara ? 
Elv. Ciel ! repeti chi verra. 
Sir G. Egli stesso ! 
Elv. Egli chi 1 
Sir G. Arturo. 
Elv. E fia vero 1 
Sir G. Oh, figlia, il giuro ! 
Elv. Desso ? Arturo ? 
Sir G. Arturo. 
Elv. Oh, gioja ! 

Sir G. ) X t v 0 ^„„ rt Oh Arturo, A , om ,. 
Elv. \ Non h s °S no Oh Elvira, 0h > amor! 

[Alvira s' abbandona tra le braccia dello Zio. 



Sir G. Ah, such gloomy thoughts dispel thou ! 

Elv. I shall die ! but never marry — 

Sir G. Should the warrior thou here shalt see 

Prove thine own, what wouldst thou say ? 
Elv. Heav'ns ! oh, say that he cometh. 
Sir G. It is he ! 
Elv. Is this true ? 
Sir G. 'Tis Arthur. 
Elv. Can it be 1 
Sir G. My child, I swear it ! 
Elv. Himself ? dear Arthur? 
Sir G. 'Tis Arthur. 
Elv. Oh, rapture! 

|; G -(lti 8 nodream!A«h- 0)love , 

[Elvira throws herself into Sir George's arms. 



P1ANGI, 0 FIGLIA— ON MY BOSOM, DAUGHTER. Air. Giorgio. 

Pian-gi, o fig - lia, sul mio se - no, Piangi, ah pian - gi di con - ten - to, Ti can- 
On my bo - som, daughter, weep-ing — Thus in tears our sor - row steep - ing, Thus with 




eel - li o - gni tor - men - to Ques - ta la - gri - ma d'a - mor. E tu 

grief a - way for ev - er With of - fee • tion's fond en - deavor. And, ye 




mi - ra O Dio pie - - to - so, L'in - no - cen - za in u - man ve - lo; 
Heav - ens, that be - - hola her, Let your ben i - - zon en fold her; 



I PURITAN!. 



9 



Be - ne - di - ci tu dal cie - lo, Qucs - to gi - glio di can - - dor! 
Not the U - ly in its white - ness Can ex - eel her soul's pure brightness. 



Elv. Quest' alma al duolo avvezza, 

Si vinta e dal gioir, che ormai non puo capir 
Si gran dolcezza ! 

Chi mosse a' miei desir ? il genitor t 
Sir G. Ascolta. 

Torgea la notte folta, 

Tacea la terra e il ciel, — 

Parea natura avvolta 

D' un fosco e mesto vel ! 

L' ora propizia a' miseri, 

II tuo pregar, tue lagrime, 
. M' avvalorar si 1' anima, 

Ch' io corsi al genitor. 
Elv. Oh, mio consolator ! 
Sir G. Ineominciai, — " Germano" — 

Ne piii potei parlar, 

Allor bagnai sua mano 

D' un muto lagrimar ; 

Poi ripigliai, tra gemiti : 

L' angelica tua Elvira 

Al prode Artiir sospira - 

Se ad altre nozze andra, 

La misera ! morra ! 
Elv. Oh, spirito di pieta, sceso dal ciel per me ! 

[Con ansieta.] E il padre — 
Sir G. Ognor tacea. 
Elv. Poscia — 
Sir G. Sclamo, " Riccardo 

Chiese e ottenea mra f e ; 

Ei la mia figlia avra !" 
Elv. Ciel ! sol a udirti io palpito ! 

E tu? 

Sir G. "La figlia misera," 
Io ripetea, " morra !" 
"Ah, viva," ei mi dice, 
E stringemi al cor. 
" Sia Elvira felice, 
Sia lieta d' amor !" 
[Mentre Elvira nuovamente corre fra le braccia dello zio, 
e vuol parlare, odesi fuori della fortezza un suono di 
cornfda caccia. 
Elv. Odi ! qual suon si desta ? 
Sir G. Ascoltiam — ti rassicura. 
Elv. Vien lo suon dalla foresta. 
Sir G. E il segnal di gente d' arme, 

Che dal vallo nelle mura chiede forse penetrar. 

Armigeri, fuori della Fortezza. 

Viene il prode e nobil Conte, 
Artur Talbo Cavalier ! 
Sir G. Non tel dissi ? 

Elv. Ah, padre mio ! [Abbracciando Sir Giorgio. 

Sir G. Pago alfin e il tuo desio. 

Armigeri, dentro la Fortezza. 

Lord Arturo varchi il ponte ! 

Fate ca mpo al pro guerrier ! 
Sir G. A quel suono, al nome amato, 

Al tuo core or presta fede. 

Questo giorno venturato ! 

D' ogni gioja e bel forier ! 
Elv. A quel nome, al mio contento. 

Al mio core io credo appena 1 

Tanta gioja, oh, Dio, pavento, 

Non ho lena, a sostener ! 



Elv. Ah ! my soul, to grief accustom'd, 

Is so o'ercome by jcy, that it scarcely can sustain 
This unexpected bliss ! 

But who has forestall'd my hopes? was it my sire ? 
Sir G. Just listen. 

The night was growing dark, 

And heav'n and earth were silent, — 

Enwrapp'd appear'd all nature 

As in a sombre veil ! 

Favorable the sad hour, 

Thy pray'rs gave courage to my soul, 

And to thy sire I went. 

Elv. Oh, my consoler dear ! 

Sir G. Thus I began, — " My brother" — 

Beyond I could not speak, 

Till, having bathed his hands 

In silent tears awhile, I then went on 

Amid my sobs, — " your angel-like Elvira 

For the valiant Arthur pining — 

Should she another wed, 

Oh, wretched, wretched one! she dies !" 

Elv. Oh, angel of mercy, come to earth for me ! 

[Anxiously.] And my father — 
Sir G. Was mute a while. 
Elv. And then — 

Sir G. And then said, " Richard ask'd 

And obtained my promise : 

He must have my child !" 
Elv. Heav'ns ! thou mak'st my sad heart palpitate. 

And thou ! 

Sir G. " Thy unhappy child," repeated I, " will die." 
" Oh ! say not so," he cried, 
And pressed me to his heart. 
" Ah ! let Elvira live, — 
Ah ! may she be happy — 
Let her live in love !" w 

[Elvira again embraces her Uncle, trying to speak. — A 
hunting-horn is heard. 

Elv. Listen ! what sound can that be ? 

Sir G. Let us hear — what means it 1 Assure thyself. 

Elv. 'Tis from the forest sounding. 

Sir G. 'Tis the sound of men at arms, 

Who by that signal to the fortress ask admission. 

Men at Arms, from without the Fortress. 

See the brave and noble warrior, 
Count Arthur Talbot, comes ! 
Sir G. Ah, said I not so ? 

Elv. Oh, my dear father ! [Embracing Sir Gtorge. 

Sir G. Now all thy hopes are crowned. 

Men at Arms, within the Fortress. 

Lord Arthur traverses the bridge ! 

Room for the valorous warrior ! 
Sir G. On that beloved name, that blissful sound, 

Let thy heart's faith be ever fixed solely. 

This day precursor of joy will prove ! 

Fair Fortune has this day crown'd ! 
Elv. In that beloved name is my content. 

Yet, my heart ! how bear a joy thus holy ! 

Beneath the weight of unthought blisses bent, 

Strength of soul and frame is spent ! 



10 



I PURITANI. 



Coro d' Armigeri, Araldi e Castellane dentro le scene, dal lato 
per we si crede che Arturo faccia il suo ingresso nella for- 
tezza. 

Ad Arturo, tiV Cavalieri, 

Bel campione in giostra e amor, 

Le donzelle ed i guerrieri, 

Fanno festa e fanno onor ! [Partono. 

SCENA III. — Sola d' Arme con logge vaste, eve t' architet- 
tura Gotica mostra la intera sua pompa — il fondo della 
scena e aperto. — Fra le colonne si veggono sempre alcune troc- 
cie delle fortificazioni, ec. — Dal lato destro esce Lord Ab- 
ttjro con alcuni scudieri e paggi, li quali recano varii doni 
nuziali, e tra questi si vedra un magnifico veto bianco. — Dal 
lato sinistro escono Elvira, Valton, Sir Giorgio, Dami- 
gelle con Castellani e Castellane che portano festoni di Jiori 
e gV intrecciano alle colonne. — Dal fondo della scena escono i 
Soldati guidati da Bruno che Janno corteggio e danno corn- 
pimento al decor o della festa. 

Uom. Ad Arturo — 
Don. A Elvira — 
Eh. Onor ! 

Tutti. Coroniam belta e valor ! 
Damigelle. Ella e fior di verginelle, 

Bella al par di primavera ; 

Come 1' astro della sera 

Spira all' alma pace e amor. 
Scudieri. Bello egli e tra* cavalieri, 

Com' e il cedro alia foresta, 

In battaglia egli e tempesta ; 

E campione, in giostra e amor. 



Chorus of Men at Arms, Heralds, frc, Villagers 
within. 

To Lord Arthur, of all brave Knights, 

The most mighty in love and battle, 

Ye fair maidens and ye warriors, 

Songs of praise and homage make. f Exeunt. 

SCENE III. — A vast Armory of splendid Gothic architec- 
ture — the back of the scene opens, and fortifications seen 
through the columns. — From the right, enter Lord Arthur, 
attended by Esquires and Pages bearing nuptial presents, 
amongst which is a magnificent white veil.^-Frorn the left, 
enter Ladies and Villagers with garlands, which they wreathe 
around the columns. — From the back of the scene Bruno 
leads in a procession of Soldiers. 

Men. To Arthur— 
Worn. To Elvira— 
Elv. Honor ! 

All. _ Let us crown valor and beauty ! 
Ladies. She's the fairest flower of virgins, 

She's as beautiful as spring-time ; 

Like the evening star she fills 

Souls with peace and joy and love. 
Esquires. He 'rnongst warriors is distinguished 

As the cedar amongst the trees, 

When in battle's fiercest tempest ; 

When in tourney soft as love. 



ARTHUR. 



ATE 0 CARA — OFTEN, DEAREST. 



mor ta - lo - ra, 
thy sweet pres - ence, 



or mi gui - da, 

Now he guides me, 




a - mor ta - lo - ra mi gui - do fur - tivo e in 
to thy sweet pres-ence, Love hath led me sad and 



a te d'ac - can - to, 
e - late and cheer - ful, 



te 
late 



d'ac- 
and 



Mm 



-0-*- 



ia tra la gio - ia e Te - sul tan tra la 
ings, mid re - joic - ings to thy side, mid re 



gio - ia e 
joic - ings 



l'e - sui- 
te thy 



Senza oc - ca - so ques-ta au-ro - ra mai null' om-bra o duol vi - dia santa in voi la fiam - ma 
May no set -ling close this dawn-ing, No dark shad-ow fall be - fore them, May love's flame, still shining 

. ELV. ART. 




•no*;; 



si - a pace og - nor v*alli - e-ti il cor! 
•*er them, Ev - er bright, ttill be their guide 
ELV. ART. 





or son tu - a 
Now I am thine love I 



si mia tu se - i 
Yes thou art mine love I 




cielo ar - ri - dia vo - - ti 
Heav'n will smile up - on our 



I PURITAN1. 



11 



miei be - ne - dici 
vows, Bless our love 



a - tan 
and be- 




be - ne - di - ci a tan - to a-mor. 
bless our love and be our guide. 



Sir G. | Senza occaso questa aurora ! 
Vol. ) Mai null' ombra o duol vi dia ! 

Santa in voi la fiamma sia ! 

Pace ognor v' allied il cor ! 
Elv. Oh, mio Arturo ! 
Art. Ah, Elvira mia ! 
Elv. Or son tua ! 
Art. Si, mia tu sei ! 
Tutti. Cielo arridi a' voti miei, 

Benedici a fede e amor ! 

Entra Valton. 

Vol. [Dopo avere piano detto un motto a Bruno, che $' inchina 
e parte.] 

Tu m' intendesti : fia mortal delitto 

A chi s' attenta escir da queste mura 

Se non abbia il mio assenso, — oh, cari figli, 

Si compia senza me 1' augusto rito : 

Merce di questo scritto 

Voi, sino al tempio, aperto passo avrete : 

[A Arturo, cut da un foglio. 
[A Sir Giorgio.] Tu gli accompagnerai. 

Bruno giunge con Enrichetta. 

Vol. Oh ! nobil Dama, 

1/ alto Anglican Sovrano Parlamento 

Ti chiama al suo cospetto ; — io ti son scorta. 
Enr. (Ahime, che sento !) 

E che da me si chiede % 
Vol. A me solo s' addice — 

[Esitando, poi colla figlia s' accosta ai doni nuziah guar- 
dandoli, ec. 

Obbedir e tacer. Altro non lice. 
Art. [A Sir Giorgio in disparte.] 

E de' Stuardi arnica ? 
Sir G. [Ad Arturo in disparte.] E prigioniera 

Da molte lune, e fu da ognun creduta 

Arnica de' Stuardi e messaggiera, 

Sotto nfentite spoglie. 

[Valton gh fa cenno colla mano e gli parla all' orecchio. 
Art. Oh. Dio ! che ascolto ? E deciso il suo fato : 
Essa e perduta ? oh sventurata ! 

[Da s4, ma guardando pietosamente Enrichetta. 
Enr. \Accorgendosi del guardar pietoso di Arturo,] 

Qual pieta in quel volto ! 
Vol. O figli : al tempio, e alle pompose feste, 
AccOrra ognun — la nuziale veste 
Va, o diletta, indossar. Ite voi seco— 

[Ad Elvira, poi alle Damigelle. 
Fuori del vallo i miei destrier sien presti : [A Bruno. 
Che in breve io qui saro. — La nostra andata 

[Ad Enrichetta. 
Ci e forza d' affrettar ! Com' io v' unisca 
E a voi sorrida il Cielo, o coppia amata ! 
[ Valton unisce nuovamente le destre di Elvira e di Arturo, 
li benedice e parte colle Guardie. — Giorgo ed Elvira 
partono colle Damigelle. — Arturo fa sembiante di par- 
tirsi, ma guarda attentamente all' intorno, quasi per 
assicurarsi che tutti sono andati. 
Unr. Pieta e dolore 

Ha in fronte e fanno sicurta del core. 
[Guardando attentamente Arturo.] Cavalier ! 



Sir G. | May this dawn be ne'er o'ercast ! 
Wal. ) May gloom or grief ne'er veil me ! 

Holy" be the flame you feel ! 

Peace and gladness in your hearts ! 
Elv. Oh, my dear Arthur ! 
Art. My own Elvira ! 
Elv. Now am I thine ! 
Art. Yes, thou art mine ! 
AU. Heaven smiles upon our vows, 

Blesses constancy and love ! 

Enter Walton. 

Wal. [After speaking in a whisper to Bruno, who bows and 
retires.] 

Thou'st understood me : all attempts to pass 
The walls, with my consent unask'd, 
A mortal penalty shall visit, — you, 
Dear children, to the altar go 
Without me : this 

[Addressing Arthur, and presenting a paper to him. 
will gain admittance there. 
Thou [To Sir George] accompany them. 

Enter Henrietta, conducted by Bruno. 

Wal [To Henrietta.] Oh ! noble lady, 

The English Parliament cites thee before it ; — 

I'm to escort thee. 
Hen. (Ah, me ! what hear I ?) 

What seek they with me ? 
Wal. My only duty is — 

[Hesitates, goes to his Daughter, and examines the wed- 
ding presents. 

To be silent and obey. I must submit. 
Art. [Aside, to Sir George.] 

Is she a friend to the Stuarts ? 
-Sir G. [Aside.] She's been imprisoned for many months, 

And was thought their emissary, 

And with a name assumed. 

[Walton converses aside with Sir George. 

Art. Oh, Heavens ! what say'st thou ? Ah, yes, I see it ! 

Is she then doom'd 1 her lot is cast ! " 

[Aside, looking compassionately at Henrietta. 
Hen. [Perceiving Arthur's sympathizing looks.] 

There's pity in those features ! 
Wal. And now to the temple — after to the feast ! 

Go, child, attire thyself in nuptial vestments ; — 

ITo the Ladies.] Attend you on her — and thou, 
Addressing Bruno.] Have my horses 
n readiness in the valley. — I shall return 
In a short space — but I must hasten now. 
Even as I do, thus may Heaven unite 
And bless this pair beloved ! 

[Walton unites anew the hands of Elvira and Arthur, 
bestows his benediction, and departs with his Iruards. 
— Sir George and Elvira go out, attended by the La- 
dies. — Arthur is apparently retiring, but glances 
around, to see that all have departed. 
Hen. Pious compassion 

Sits on that forehead, portrays the heart. 
[TFi7/i an intense look at Arthur.] Cavalier! 



I PURITANI. 



Art, S' or ti e d' uopo di consiglio, 

[Arturo torna ad Enrichetta. 
Di soccorso e d' aita, in me t' affida ! 

[ Con franchezza leak. 
Enr, Se mi stesse sul capo alto periglio 1 

[ Con mistero e Jiducia. 
Art. Deh, parla — Oh, Dio ! che temi ? 
Enr. Breve ora, e sarb spenta ! [Arturo fa un segno, 

di fremito.] Ah, tu ne fremi ! 
Art. Si, fremo — io fremo, 

Per te, per me, pel padre mio, che spento, 

Cadea fido a' Stuardi. 

[Con risoluzione.] E tu, chi sei 1 

[Con entusiasmo.] 0 chi tu sii, ti vuo' salvar. 

Enr. E tardi ! figlia a Enrico, 

E a Carlo sposa — pari ad essi avro la sorte ! 
Art. [S' inginnochia.] Oh, Regina ! 
Enr. Attendo morte ! 
Art. [Alzandosi.] Taci ! ah taci per pieta ! 

Fuor le mura, a tutti ascosa 

Ti trarro per vie sicure ; — 

Tu n' andrai di qui : — 
Enr. Di qui alia scure ! scampo e speme ! — 

Oh, Arturo, non v' ha ! 
Art. No, Regina, ancor v' e speme ! 

0 te salva, c spenti insieme. 
Enr. Cangia, o Arturo, il pio consiglio : 

Pensa al tuo mortal periglio ; 

Pensa a Elvira, il tuo tesoro — 

Che ti attende al sacro altar ! 
Art. Non parlar di lei che adoro, 

Di valor non mi spogliar. 
Enr. Sventurata prigioniera, 

II mio fato io seguiro, — 

Giunse a me V estrema sera, 

Per te 1' alba incomincio. 
Art. Sarai salva, o sventurata, 

0 la morte incontrero, 

E la vergin mia adorata 

Nel morire invocherb. 

Entra Elvira, ha il capo coronato di rose : ha un bellissimo 
monile di perle al collo. — Si vede per altro che le manca il 
compimento della pompa nuziale. — Entra in iscena avendo 
nelle mani il magnijico velo bianco regalatole da Arturo. 



Art. If aid or counsel may avail thee, 

[Turning towards Henrietta 

In me you may confide. 

[ With an air of frankness. 
Hen. Suppose a great danger hung o'er my head — 

[With a mysterious and confidential air. 
Art. Speak freely — Oh, Heav'ns ! what fear you ? 
Hen. A brief hour, and I must die ! [Arthur shudders. 

Ah, you shudder ! 
Art. For you — 

For myself, I tremble for my father's memory, 

Who died for the Stuarts. 

[Resolutely.] But say, who are you 1 

Be whom you may, 

[Enthusiastically.] You shall be sav'd. 
Hen. 'Tis too late ! Henry's daughter 

And Charles's wife — like their fate will be my o^n ! 
Art. [Kneeling.] Oh, my lov'd Queen ! 
Hen. 'Tis death I look for ! 

Art. [Rising.] Silence ! for pity's sake, say not so. 

Behind these walls awhile concealed, 

By sure ways I will lead you ; — 

You from here shall go : — 
Hen. Ah, yes, to the scaffold ! — Oh, Arthur, 

No hope is left me ! 
Art. Yes, my Queen, there is still hope ! 

I'll preserve thee, or with thee perish. 
Hen. Arthur, renounce this kind intention : 

Think what danger may ensue ; 

Think also of your dear Elvira at the altar — 

At the altar awaiting you. 
Art. Nay, speak not of my ador'd one, 

From my heart thou'lt drive the courage. 
Hen. A hapless captive, I submit to fate — 

To me the evening of life is come, 

Thy day has hardly dawned. 

Art. Unhappy Queen ! thou shalt be saved, 
E'en should my life be the price : 
While dying, I will murmur low 
The cherish'd name of her I love. 



Enter Elviba, who wears a crown of roses and a pearl 
necklace. — Something appears incomplete about her wed- 
ding array. — In her hand she carries the veil presented to her 
by Arthur. 



SON VERGIN VEZZOSA—I AM A BLITHESOME MAIDEN. Air. Elvira. 

Son ver - - gin vez - zo - - sa - in ve - - sta di spo - - sa, Son 

I am a blithe - some maid - - en, bri - dal pride ar - ray'd in, Like 

bian - ca ed u - mi - - le, Qual gig - - li - o d'A-pril; Ho chio - - me o- do- 
U • ly pure and white, That looks up in A - pril light ; Ah, fra - grant is my 

ro - - se, Cui cin - ser tue ro se tu 

hair With rose...* o - dors scatter' d there 

ro se Ho il se, no gen - ti - le del bel tuo mo - nil. 

scat - - ter'd there, And on my heav ■ ing breast the pearls as spotless rest. 



I PURITANI 



13 



Enr. Se miro il suo candor, 
Art. > Mi par la luna, allor 
Sir G. > Che tra le nubi appar, 

La notte a consolar. 

Se ascolto il suo cantar, 

Un angelo mi par, — 

Che intuoni al primo albor. 

Inni al superno amor. 

Elv. Dama, s' e ver che m' ami — 
Enr. Dimmi, o gentil : che brami ? 
Elv. Qual muttutina Stella 
Bella vog-1' io brillar ! 
Del crin le molli anella, — 
Mi giova ad aggrazziar. 
Enr. Elvira, mia dilette, son presta al tuo pregar. 

[Elvira si accosta ad Enrichetta invitandola ad insegnarh 
di acconciare il velo. 
.\rt. ) Fanciulla e semplicetta, 
Sir G. > Ognor desia scherzar ! 
Seusare a te s' aspetta 
Suo troppo vezzeggiar. 
[Ad Enrichetta quasi scusando la infantile preghicra di 
Elvira. 

Elv. A illeggiadrir mia prova, 
Deh, non aver a vil ! 
II velo in foggia nova 
Sul capo tuo gentil ! 
[Elvira vuol porre il velo sul capo d' Enrichetta. Arturo 
nol varrebbe ; ma la Regina gli fa cenno <F allonta- 
narsi, e risponde scherzando ad Elvira. 
Enr. II vezzo tuo m' alletta 
Mi e caro a secondar. 
Elv. 0 bella, ti celo, 

Le -anella del crin, 
Com' io nel bel velo, 
Mi voglio celar. 
Ascosa, o vezzosa, 
Nel velo divin, 
Or sembri la sposa, 
Che vassi all' altar. 
[Arturo nel ritornello delV aria d' Elvira alle parole " Or 
sembri la sposa," fa un gesto rimarchevole, e quasi d* 
idea che gli corre per la mente. 
Enr. Ascosa in bianco vel, 

Or posso, oh, Dio, celar 
L' affanno, il palpitar, 
L' angoscia del mio con, 
Deh, tu pietoso Ciel, 
Raceogli con favor 
Da pi ece di dolor 
Ch' osai a te levar ! 
Art. Oh, come da quel vel, 
Che le nasconde il crin, 
Veggio un splendor divin 
Di speme a balenar. 
Deh tu, pietoso ciel, 
M' avviva il tuo favor, 
Mi fa da un reo furor 
La vittima salvar ! 
Sir G. Elvira col suo vel, 
Un zeffiretto appar, 
Un iride sul mar, 
Un silfo, in grembo ai fior. 

[ Guardandola con paterna compiasenza. 
T" arrida, o cara, il Ciel 
Col roseo suo favor, 
Tal ch' io ti veggio ognor 
Tra' vezzi a giubbilar ! 
[Valton dentro la scena, e Coro di Damigelle, che com- 
pariscono sidle soglie degli appartamenti, ripetendo le 
parole di Valton. 



Hen. \ Her frankness shines before me, 
Art. f Like moonbeams which restore me, 
Sir G. ) Through clouds that darken o'er me, 

Calm gladness of the night. 

And when her voice steals on me, 

An angel's tongue has won me, — 

An angel who above 

Hymns the supernal love, 

When day is dawning bright. 
Elv. Lady, if you love me truly — 
Hen. Speak, what is't you wish 1 
Elv. Oh, I would shine as brightly 

As the morning star ! 

Ah ! touch these tresses lightly,— 

I wish to grace my hair. 
Hen. Elvira, my delight, how gladly I obey ! 

[Elvira motions Henrietta to arrange her veil. 

Art. ) A child with spirits innocent, 
Sir G. > How natural her play ! 
You will look indulgent 
On her frolic gay. 
[To Henrietta, as if excusing the infantile freedom of 
Elvira. 

Elv. Ah, if my effort fail now, 

Do not the action scorn ! 

With what a grace the veil 

Might be in this way worn ! 
[Elvira proceeds to put the veil over Henrietta, which Ar- 
thur would prevent, but the Queen makes a sign to him 
to desist, and answers Elvira playfully. 
Hen. In your pleasant sporting 

I am pleas'd to share. 
Elv. In this veil I hide, 

Sweet one ! your fine hair, — 

As I would e'en myself, dear, 

Be closely hidden there. 

And with this veil so lovely, 

O'er thy beauties flowing, 

Thou'lt seem the chosen bride, 

To the holy altar going. 

[Arthur appears struck with a sudden idea by the words 
" Thou'lt seem the chosen bride." 

Hen. Now hidden in this veil, 

Unseen by other" eyes, 

The cares upon my face are graven still . 

The tortur'd bosom sighs ; 

And, oh, most pitying Heaven, 

Receive indulgently 

The prayers which in my grief 

I offer up to thee ! 
Art. Yes ! from the veil 

That is her beauty's prison, 

Rays of joyful gladd'ning hopes 

Within my heart have ris'n. 

Be thou propitious, Heav'n ! 

And lend me gracious aid, 

That she, the destined victim, now 

Oppression may evade ! 
Sir G. Elvira with her veil 

Comes shining like a zephyr, 

Like a rainbow o'er the sea, 

Or a sylph amid the flowers. 

[He surveys her toith fatherly complacency. 

May Heaven still look on thee 

With richest, rosiest smiles ! 

And may ever thee behold 

In mirth and harmless wiles. 

[ Walton in the side scene, and Chorus of Ladies at tht 
door of the apartment repeating his words. 



L4 



I PHRJTANI. 



[ Con vezzo semplice. 



Vol. { Elvira, Elvira ! 
Cho. ) II di T ore avavzi ! 
Elv. Se il padre s' a lira, 

Io volo a mia stanza ! 

Ma poscia, oh, fedel, 

Tu posami il vel 1 
Art. ) Se il padre s' adira 
Sir G. q Ah riedi a tua stanza ! 
Enr. j Sara il tuo fedel, 

Che t' orni del vel ! 

[Elvira parte colle Damigelle e con Giorgio. 
[Arturo, guarda con grande sospetto all* intomo nuoua- 
mente, a trae dalla cintura il foglio avuto da Valton. 
Enr. Sulla verginea testa d' una felice 

Un bianco vel s' addice, a me non gia. 

[Da se, stessa in atto di deporre il velo. 
Art. [Correndo a lei, e trattenendola.] T' arresta ! 

E chiaro don del ciel ! cosi ravvolta, 

Deluderai la vigilante scolta, — 

Tu mia sposa parrai. 

[Con risoluzione.] Vieni ! 

Enr. Che dici mai 1 tu corri a tua ruina, 

A orribil sorte ! 
Art. [Le afferra la mano, in atto diforzarla a partire.] 

Vieni, ah, vieni per pietk — T' involo a certa morte ! 

Entra Riccardo con spada ignuda, e con aspetto e accento 
disperato. 

Ric. Ferma ! invan rapir pretendi 

Ogni ben ch' io aveva in terra. 

Qui ti sfido a mortal guerra— 

Trema, ah trema del mio acciar ! 
Art. Sprezzo — o audace, il tuo furore, 

La mortal disfida accetto : 

Questo ferro nel tuo petto, 

Sino all' elsa io vub piantar. 

[Per battersi : Enricketta sifrappone—U vdo si acompont, 

e il suo volto si scuopre. 

Enr. Pace ! pace ! 

Ah v' arrestate, per me sangue non versate ! 

Ah che fai ? 

Bic. [ Con stupore, e appoggiandosi alia spada.] 

La prigioniere ? 
Enr. Dessa io son. 

Art. [A Riccardo.] Tua voce altera. Or col ferro sosterrai 

— vien. 
Ric. [Freddamente.] 

No : con lei, tu illeso andrai. 
Art. Con lei ? E fia ver ? 
Enr. Qual favella ? 

Bic. Piu non vieto a voi 1' andar. [Freddamente da se. 

Art. Se il destino a te m' invola, 

O mia Elvira, o amor mio santo, 

Un sospiro a te sen vola, 

E ti dice in suon di pianto : — 

" Ti consola !" io lungi e in guai 

T' amero com io t' amai ! 
Ric. Parti, o stolto ! e prova intanto 

Quel dolor che a me serbavi ; 

Tu vivrai deserto e in pianto 

Giorni ascuri, eterni e gravi. 

Patria e amor tu perderai, 

Fia tua vita un mar di guai ! 
Enr. Sogno 1 a avrb conforto al pianto, 

Avro tregua a di si gravi ? 

Sogno ? o andrommi al figlio accanto 

Tra gli amplessi suoi soavi ? 

Tanto ben, se, oh Dio, sognai, 

Non mi far destar giammai ' 



Wal. 
Cho. 
Elv. 



Art. 
Sir G 
Hen. 



\ Elvira, Elvira ! 
I The day is advancing \ 
If my father is angry, 
In my room I'll eonceal me ; 
But then, thou, oh dearest, 
To veil me wilt come ? 

}If thy father is angry 
In thy room, then, conceal thee ; 
And thither thy lover 
To veil thee will come. 



[ With simplicity. 



[Elvira goes out attended by Bridemaids and Sir George. 
[Arthur, looking cautiously about him, takes from, his belt 
the paper given to him by Walton. 
Hen. Upon the head of youthful happy maiden 
Well suits a white veil, but not on mine. 

[Aside, and attempting to remove the veil. 
Art. [Hastening towards her.] Desist thou ! 
It e'en was HeavVs will 
To veil thee thus : — for, thus attired 
The vigilant guard thou'lt baffle, 
Who'll take thee for the bride. 
[Resolutely.] Come, then ! 
Hen. What is't thou say'st ? thon rushest upon ruin ! 

To fate most dreadful ! 
Art. [Seizing her hand, to induce her to follow him.] 
Come, come — in mercy, come ! 

Enter Richard, his sword drawn, and with an aspect of 
despair. 

Ric. Stay ! nor vainly think to steal 

My sole treasure priz'd on earth. 

To mortal combat I here challenge thee — 

Tremble, tremble at my sword ! 
Art. I despise-— despise, bold man, thy fury ! 

And thy mortal challenge take I : 

To the hilt, within thy bosom, 

I'll bury deep my sword ! 
[The combat is commencing when Henrietta throws herself 
between the combatants — her veil is deranged, and her 
face discovered. 
Hen. Peace ! 

Sheathe your weapons ! be no blood shed for me. 
Art. What hast thou done ? 
Ric. [Amazed, and leaning on his sword.] 

See I the pris'ner 1 
Hen. Yes ; 'tis I. 

Art. [To Richard.] Come, let thy weapon sustain thy words 
so lofty. 

Ric. [ With apparent indifference.] 

No : thou mayst go in safety with her. 
Art. What say yt>u ? Is it true ? 
Hen. What mean these words ? 

Ric. I shall not stop your going. [Coldly — aside. 
Art. If fate should tear thee from me, 

My Elvira sweet, my own, 

One sigh I send unto thee, 

That will say in plaintive tone : — 

" Console thyself !" afar, in woe, 

I shall love as now I do. 
Ric. Go, thou madman ! be it thine 

To feel pangs reserved for me ; 

Lonely shalt thou live and pine, 

Long hours wasting drearily. 

From both love and country torn, 

Thou shalt only live to mourn. 
Hen. Do I dream 1 can time have won 

My heart from sorrow's hold ? 

Do I dream 1 or yet my son 

Will these fond arms enfold ? 

If I dream, may nothing break 

The spell — Oh, may I ne'er awake ! 



I PURITANI. 



15 



Coro. 

Art. ) 
Enr. S 
Ric. 
Art. 

Ric. 
Art. 
Ric. 
Tutti. 



[Dentro le scena.] Genti, a festa ! 
Al tempio andiamo ! 

Gente appressa, oh, ciel fuggiamo ! 

SI fuggite — il vuole un Dio ! 

Pria che siam oltre le mura parlerai ? 

[Per partire poi si volta. 

No : t' assecura. 
Tu lo giura 1 
Si : il giuro ! 

Addio ! [Partono. 



-Elvira getta un grido. 



Entra Kiccardo, Sir Giorgio, Bruno, Valton, Elvira, 

con Damigelle in pompa di nozze, indi Soldati, Puritani, 
CasteUani e Casteltane. 
Ric. [Con estrema ansieta guarda dalle hggie, e quasi segue 

coll' occhio i passi dei due fuggiasch. 

E gia al ponte- — passa il forte— 

E alle porte — gia n' ando ! 
Coro. [Escendo.] Al tempio, al tempio ! 

A festa ! 
Eh. Dov' e Artur ? 
Ric. Dianzi fu qui. 
Elv. Ove sei, 0 Artur ? 
Ric. Parti ! 

[Suono di tamburo neUa fortezza . — Tutti guardano fuori 

delle loggie. 

Ej?' I Gia mor delle mora, 
Sir G J £§> m pi anura * 

1 Cho. [A Valton.] La tua prigiouiera, 

La rea messaggiera, 
Col vil cavaliero ? 

2 Cho. Ciascun su un destriero ! 

Spronando, volando. 
Tutti. Mirate cola ! 

[Quadro gent 
Vol. Soldati accorrette, coi brouzi tuonate, 
All' arme appellate, correte, volate ! 
Pel crin trascinate i duejraditor ! 
[Si vede gran movimento di Soldati e di gente. — Poi, dopo 
il grido all* arme che si ripete dentro la scena, si sente 
battere la generale. — La campana del forte suona a 
stormo: il cannone spara a lenti intervalli. — Elvira 
fa alcuni passi rneccanicamente, poi resta immota dopo 
qualche doloroso grido. 
Tutti. All* arme ! 
Vol. [A Bruno..] T' affretta. 
Tutti. [Di dentro.] All' arme ! 

S.( Vendetta! 

[Valton gridando vendetta, snuda la spada e alia testa d 9 
un drapello di Soldati parte. 
Ric. Oh, come si pasce, d' affanni e d' ambasce 

L' ardor di vendetta, che m' ange e m* alletta ! 
Oh, come nel seno, si mesce il velono 
Di sdegno e d' amor, di speme e dolor ! 
Elv. La dama d' Arturo e a bianco velata. 

La guarda e sospira, sua sposa la chiama 1 
Elvira e la dama ? non sono piu Elvira ? 
[Elvira e immobile, con gli occhi fissi e spalancata, si 
tocca la testa quasi per verifkare se ha il velo—tutto 
in lei indica una subitanea follia. — Grida"No!" 
con voce disperata, poi resta immobite e mesta come 
prima. 

\ Elvira, che did f 

Elv. Io Elvira ! ah no— no, no I 
Uom. La misera e pallida ! 
Don. E immobile e squallida ! 
Uom. Le luci no gira. 
Don. Sorride e sospira — 
Uom. Demente si fa. 



Cho. [Behind the scenes.] Friends, to the feast ! 
Haste to the temple ! 

Art ) 

Hen I -^ eo P^ e approach us, let us fly quickly ! 
Ric. Fly, then, quickly — Heav'n commands it! 
Art. Wilt thou speak before we pass these walls ? 

[He turns to depart. 

Ric. No : rest assured. 
Art. Wilt thou swear it ? 
Ric. Yes : I swear it ! 

All. Farewell ! [Exeunt. 

Enter Richard, Sir George, Bruho, Walton, and El- 
vira, with Ladies arrayed for the marriage festival ; then 
Soldiers, Puritans, and Peasantry. 

Ric. [Appearing at a balcony, whence he observes the fugi- 
tives.] 

The bridge they reach — they pass the fort — 

Now the gates — they are gone ! 
Cho. [Coming on the stage.] Friends, to the feast 1 

Haste to the temple ! 
Eh. Where is Arthur ? 
Ric. Just now, he was here ? 
Elv. Arthur, where art thou ? 
Ric. He's fled ! 

[A Drum heard within the fortress. All look out. 

^Ric ^R e y° n< l tne wa lls e'en now, 
Sir G S"^ wa y Devon d tne plain! 

1 Cho. [To Walton.] E'en with your fair pria'ner, 

The emissary vile, 

And the knight unworthy ! 

2 Cho. All quickly to horse ! 

Mount, spur, and fly ! 
AU. Behold ! look there ! 

[The Characters form a tableau — Elvira shrieking 
Wal. Haste, soldiers, — no time lose ; 

Quick, sound the alarum, and delay not ! 
To arms ! but bring the traitors quickly ! 
[ There is a general movement among the Soldiers and peo- 
ple, ana a cry of "to arms,' which is repeated be- 
hind the scenes. — The alarm bell of the citad< i sounds 
— the cannon are fired at intervals. — Elvira n-alks a 
few paces mechanically, remains motionless for an 
instant, then utters a piercing shriek. 
AU. We'll arm us here ! 
Wal. [To BrunoA Hasten ! 
AU. [Within.] We'll arm us. 

^ For vengeance ! 

[ Walton draws his sword, and rushes out at the head of a 
band of Soldiers. 
Ric. Oh, how the hunger grows fiercer and stronger 
Of vengeance that grieves over what it achieves ; 
How mix'd are the feelings, how strange the revealings 
Of love and disdain, of wild rapture and pain ! 
Elv. The lady of Arthur a white veil has o'er her. 

He looks and he sighs, his bride her he calleth 1 
Is Elvira this lady ? and am not I Elvira ? 

[Elvira becomes motionless, with a fixed stare, and puts 
her hand to her head, feeling for the veil — all indi- 
cates approaching madness. — She cries " No /" des- 
pairingly, and remains motionless and melancholy. 

*@lJ*' \ Elvira, what say'st thou 1 

Elv. Elvira ! Ah, no, no ! 

Men. How sadly pale ! Unhappy one ! 

Worn. And motionless as colorless 1 

Men. The light has left her eyes. 

Worn. Smiling and sighing^ — 

Men. Reason deserts her. 



16 



I PURITANl. 



Tutti. Oh Cieli, pieta ! 

[Elvira nel sua delirio crede vedere Arturo, e dice questi 
versi con la piii grande mestiza e delirante passions — 
poi torna immobile come prima. 
Elv. Arturo, ah gia ritorni ? 

Dunque sei fido ancor ! 

Ah, vieni al tempio, fedel Arturo ! 

Eterna fede, mio ben, ti giuro ; 

Come oggi puro sem pre avro il core 

Vivrb d' amore, raorro d' amor ! 
Don. Si crede all' ara. 
Uom. Giura ad Arturo ! 
Don. Ella si tenera. 
Uom. Ei si spergiuro. 
Don. Ella si Candida. 
Uom. Ei traditor. 

Tutti. Misera vergine, morra d' amor ! 

Ric. f Oh, come ho 1' anima trista e dolente, 

Coro. ) Udendo i gemiti dell* innocente ! 

Oh, come perfido fu il traditore, 

Che in tanti spasimi lascib quel cor ! 
Sir G. Dio di clemenza, t' offro mia vita, 

Se all' innocenza giovi d' aita. 

Deh, sii clemente a un puro core ! 

Deh, sii possente sul traditor ! 
Sic. Piii la miro, ho piii doglia profonda, 

E piii 1' alma s' accende in amor ! 

Ma piu innaspra ed avvampa il furore, 

Contro chi tanto ben m' involo ! 
Sir G. La mia prece pietosa e profonda, 

Che a te vien sui sospir del dolore ; 

Tu clemente consola, o Signore, 

Per la vergin cui V empio immolo ! 
[Elvira fa un moto quasi tornando a vedere Arturo the 

Jugge. 

Elv. Ti veggo — gia fuggi ! 0 ingrato ! abbandoni 

Chi tanto t' amb ! Arturo — 

Oh, Dio ! no ! 
Coro. Ahi, dura sciagura, ahi lutto e dolor ! 

Si bella, si pura del Ciel creatura 

Nel di del diletto schernita tradita, 

Andra maladetto il vil traditor ! 
Elv. Qual febbre vorace m' uccide, mi sface ? 

Qual fiamma, qual' ira mi avvampa e martira ! 

Fantasmi perversi fuggite dispersi ! 

O in tanto furor sbranatemi il cor ! 

Coro di Maledizionb. 

Tutti. Maledizione ! 

Non caso, non spiaggia raccolga i fuggenti ! 
In odio del cielo, in odio a' viventi ! 
Battuti dai venti, da orrende tempeste, 
Le odiate lor teste non possan posar ! 
Erranti, piangenti in orrida guerra 
Col cielo, la terra, il mar, gli dementi, 
Ognor maledetti in vita ed in morte ; — 
Sia eterna lor sorte, eterno il penar ! 

FINE DELL' ATTO PRIMO. 



ATTO II. 

8CENA I. — Gran Sola con porte laterali; vedesi per una di 
esse il Campo Inglese e sempre qualche Fortijicazione. 

Castellani e Castellane, Puritani, e Bruno. 

Tutti. Ahi ! dolor ! piangon le ciglia — si spezza il cor ; 
L' inferrna figlia — morra d' amor ! 



All. Have mercy, oh Heaven ! 

[Elvira in her madness sees Arthur, and repeats the fol- 
lowing words with passionate sonow — then again be- 
comes motionless. 
Dear Arthur, then, returned 
Still faithful unto me ! 
Come to the temple, Arthur, my dearest ! 
And there I will pledge to thee endless faith ; 
A heart unchanging — pure in the love 
It but lived for, — will cling to in death ! 

Worn. She thinks she's at the altar ! 

Men. Swearing to Arthur faith ! 

Worn. She is so loving. 

Men. And he so perjured. 

Worn. She is all truth. 

Men. And he all treachery. 

All. Poor hapless maiden, she'll die of love. 

Ric. f 0, 'tis o'erwhelming to see such sadness, 

Cho. I To hear these sighs of innocence pure ! 

Base is the traitor who wrought the madness, 
And brought affliction thus intense ! 

Sir G. Oh, God of Mercy ! I'd my life offer, 
If the innocent it might avail. 
Look on this pure heart with grace divine, 
And let thy power against the false prevail. 

Ric. The more I look on her the more I grieve me, 
And far greater grows my love, 
With hate of him who dared bereave me 
Of treasure which the world not elsewhere knows ! 

Sir G. The pious prayer, profound, sincere, 
Ascends to thee, for maiden's woes ; — 
Oh, bounteous Lord ! wilt thou not hear, 
When borne on hapless sorrow's sigh ? 
[Elvira imagines that she beholds Arthur again flying 
from her. 

Elv. I see thee — thou fliest ! Ingrate ! that deniest 

One who loved thee so much ! 

Dear Arthur ! Oh, Heaven ! oh ! 
Cho. Oh, bitter misfortune ! Oh, mourning and gloom ! 

Favor'd creature of Heav'n, can this be thy doom — 

Thus crushed on the morning that promis'd thee joy ? 

But curses shall follow who thus could destroy ! 
Elv. What fever devouring my brain is o'erpow'ring ! 

What passion and rage all my bosom engage ! 

Oh, phantoms perverse ! hurry from me — disperse ! 

Or break whilst you sadden the poor head you madden! 

Chords op Malediction. 
All. Malediction ! 

Shore receive not, and no house shelter, 
Fugitives base whom Heaven gives over ! 
May hate of brave men and storms pursue them ! 
Shelterless, desolate, may winds pierce thro' them ! 
E'en with themselves, and with all in anger — 
With heaven, with earth, and sea, and all the clangor 
Of dark elements, their deadly strife be ; — 
Eternal their fate, and eternal their woes ! 

END OP THE FIRST ACT. 



ACT II. 

SCENE I. — A vast Chamber with side doors, one of which 
opens upon the English Camp and Fortijieatiom. 

Villagers, Puritans, and Bruno. 

AU. Ah! what grief! her eyes are weeping; — 
Her heart is broken — of love Elvira dies ! 



I PURITAN!. 



17 



1. II duol 1' invase. 

2. t La vidi errante tra folte piante. 

3. * Or per sue case 

Gridando va "pieta," "pieta!" 

4. Piangon le ciglia ; si spezza il cor 
L' inferma figlia — morra d' amor ! 

Entra Sir Giorgio, dagli Appartamenh d' Elvira ; poi 
Riccardo, con foglio. 

Coso. 

Don. Qual novella ? 

Sir G. Or prende posa. 

Tutti. Miserella ! 

Don. E ognor dolente ! 

Sir G. Mesta e lieta. 

Don. E senza tregua * 

Sir G. Splende il senno, or si dilegua 

Alia misera innocente. 
Tutti. Come mai ? 
Sir G. Dir lo poss' io 1 

Se nel duol che m' ange il seao, 

Ogni voce tremft e muor ! 
Coro. Deh favella ! 
Sir G. Mi lasciate. 
Com. Ten preghiamo ! 
Sir G. Ah no, cessate ! 

[Per partire, e li Castellani to trattengono. 
Bru. ^ Deh ti muova quell' ambascia 
Cho. ) Che ci aggrava al tuo dolor ! 
Sir G. Siate paghi. Y* appresate ! 

[Tutti fanno cerchio intorno a Giorgio. 



1. Deep grief o'erwhelms her. 

2. And wandering goes she, amid the forest. 

3. And when at home, 

Her cry is " pity," " pity \" 

4. Her eyes are weeping ; her heart is broken ; — 
Of love Elvira dies ! 

Enter Sib George, from Elvira's Room, followed by Rich- 
ard, with a paper in his hands. 

Chorus. 
Worn. Say, what tidings ? 
Sir G. She reposes now. 
All. Ah, poor maiden ! 
Worn. And ever mournful ? 
Sir G. Sad now, then joyous. 
Worn. Has she no rest 1 
Sir G. Sense returns, to leave as quickly : 

The poor maiden appears insane. 
All. Ah ! what say you ? 
Sir G. Can I depict it 1 

Grief so sadly now oppresses, 

That all my words die on my lips. 
Cho. Speak in mercy ! 
Sir G. Ah, pray leave me. 
Cho. We entreat thee ! 
Sir G. Ah, desist ! 

[He is retiring, but is stopped by the Villager: 
Bru. ) Ah, be movM by the affliction 
Cho. S That we now all share with thee. 
Sir G. I will grant your wish. Approach. 

[All form a circle round Sir George. 



CINTA DI ROSE E COL BEL — ROSES ENWREATH'D AROUND. Air. Georgio. 
Andante. 

Cin-ta di ro • se e col bel crin dis - ciol - to, Ta-lor la ca - ra vergi-ne s' ag-gi - ra; E chiede all' 
Moses enwreath'd a - round dis - ordered hair, Now roams a wander - er the maiden fair ; With looks all 

au ra, e ai fior con mes - to vol - to, " Ove an-db El - vi - ra? Ove an - do El-vi-ra?" 
sad-ness, of the fiow'rs de - mand - ing, " Where is El - xfi • ral Where is El - vi - ra f" 



Bianco vestita e qual se all' ara innante, 

Adempie al rito e va cantando, 

II giuro, Poi grida, per amor tutta tremante, 

" Ah, vieni Arturo." 
Coro. Ahi, figlia misera ! delira amor, — 

Quanto fu barbaro it sedduttor ! 
Sir G. Geme talor, qual tortore amorosa, 

Or cade vinta da mortal sudore ; 

Or 1' odi al suon dell arpa lamentosa — 
Cantar d' amore ! 

Or scorge Arturo nell' altrui sembiante, 

Poi del suo inganno accorto e di sua sorte, 

Geme, piange, s' afFanna e ognor piu amante, 
Invoca morte ! 

Coro. Ahi, figlia misera ! morra d' amor,— 
Scenda una folgore sul traditor ! 

[Atte ultime parole, entra Riccardo, eon un foglio. 

Rie. Di sua folgore il Ciel non sara lento : 

A scure infame e Artur Talbot dannato 
Dali' Anglican Sovrano Parlamento ' 

Coro. E giusto fato ! 



Then clad in white, as at the altar standing, 
The rites performing, the vow now utter'd, 
She cries aloud, her spirit passion flutter'd, 
" Come to me, Arthur,— oh, come to me." 
Cho. Ah, miserable girl ! by love o'erthrown, — 

Merciless, indeed, was he who betray'd ! 
Sir G. At times she sigheth like the amorous dove, 

Or 'neath her sorrows' great oppression sinketh ; 
Or with her harp she sings sad songs of love — 

Of love she singeth ! 
Sometimes she sees her Arthur in another, 
Then feels at once her error and her fato. 
And sighs and weeps — love growing yet more great 
Woe, and yet mightier passion, leave no other 
Desire but death ! 
Cho. Ah, miserable girl ! love has destroy'd, — 

Ah, heav'n ! let thy lightning strike down the traitor. 
[At the last words Richard comes forward, holding a paper 
in his hand. 

Ric. Yet not long will Heav'n withhold its lightning, 
Doomed is Arthur to die the death of a traitor ! 
For know, the Parliament of England so decrees ! 

Cho. The doom is righteous ! 



18 



I PUKITANL 



Ric. ) Quaggiu, nel mal che questa valle serra, 
Coro. ) A' buonne a* tristi e memorando esempio. 
Coro. Se la destra di Dio tremenda afFerra 

II crin dell' empio ! 
[Riccardo scorre coll' occhio il foglio che time aperto. — - 
Segue a proclamare li Decreti del Parlamento. 
Ric. Di Valton 1' innocenza a voi proclama 

II Parlamento, e a' primi onor lo chiama. 
Coro. Qual doglia, Valton, 

Se vedrai tua figlia insana ancor ! 

La tua diletta figlia ! 
Ric. Ed essa ? infuria ognor ? 
Sir G. Sol quando 

Un suon marzial misera sente 

FiU ricorda il raggir del caro amante 

E allor fossi farente. 
Ric. E non v' ha speme alcuna ? 
Sir G. Medic' arte n' assicura 

Che una subita gioja, o gran sciagura 

Potria sanar la mente sua smarrita. 
Coro. Qual mai t' attende, o Artur, pena infinita ! 
Ric. In me duce premier, parla Cromvello, 

II vil, ch' e ognor in fuga, 

E di sangue civil macchio Inghilterra, 

Cercate or voi. E se sua rea fortuna, 

0 malizia lo tragga a questa terra, 

Non abbia grazia, ne pietade alcuna. \Il Coro parte. 
Elv. [Di dentro.] O, rendetemi la speme, 

0 lasciatemi morir. 
Sir G. Essa qui vien — la senti 1 

0 come e grave, il suon de' suoi lamenti. 

Entra Elvira, scapigliata e in veste bianca. — H vdto, il 
guardo, ed ogni passo ed atto di Elvira, palesano la sua 

pazzia. 



Ric. | To earth, abounding in all evil doings, 
Cho. J It comes, a warning for both good and bad. 
Cho. When God's right hand on impious man 
In vengeance falleth ! 

[Richard glances at the scroll, and continues. 

Ric. The Parliament pronounces Walton guiltless — 
Gives back his honors, and also his high rank. 

Cfu>. What grief for Walton, 

Thus to find his child a witless maid ! 
His much-lov'd darling child ! 

Ric. Is she unchanged ? still frenzied ? 

Sir G. Let a sound 

Of martial music reach her, and it brings 
To memory her lover's absence ; and all 
Is storm and tempest in her mind. 

Ric. Is hope abandoned 1 

Sir G. The learn'd in healing science testify 
That a great sudden joy, or equal woe, 
Might re-establish reason. 

Cho. Arthur, what endless agony awaits thee ! 

Ric. I, Colonel of Cromwell, in his name make known, 
That you must seek the fugitive who stain'd 
The soil of England with her children's blood ; 
And, if his fatal star or evil aims 
Bring him back hither, let it be to find 
Nor pardon nor pity ! [Exit Chorm 

Elv. [Within.] O, restore me hope once more, 
Or let life itself be o'er ! 

Sir G. This way she comes — thou hearest ? — how sad 
And grievous the language of her misery. 

Enter Elvika, with disordered looks. 



ELV. 



QUI LA VOCE SUA— IT WAS HERE IN ACCENTS SWEETEST. 



Qui la vo - ce sua so - a - ve 
It was here in ac - cents sweet-est, 



ma chia-ma - va 
He would call me, 



e poi spa - ri 
he calls no more. 



qui gin- 

Here af- 



-0 — 

ra - va 

fee - tion 



es - ser fe - de - le, qu'il giu-ra - va 
swore he to cher-ish, here af-fec-tion 



qu'il giu-ra - va e poi cru-de - le poi cru- 

he swore to cherish, That dream so happy, that dream so 



0 ,/ a _ (— 1 -t 



de - le ei mi fug - gi! 
hap-py, a - las! for me is o'er I 



ah! mia piu 
We no more 



qui assor-ti in - sie - me, ah ! mai 
shall be u - ni - ted, I'm in 



piu qui assorti in-sie-me nel - la gio-ja dei so-spir 
sor - row doom'd to siyh, I'm in sorrow doom'd to sigh, 



ah! ren-de - te - mi la spe - me, o la- 
Oh, to hope once more re -store me, or in 



scia-te la-scia-te mi mo - rir; 
pi - ty, oh let me, let me die ; 



+1 

o ren-de-te-mi la gpsr-tne o la-scia te la-scia - te-mi mo-rir. 
Oh to hope once more restore me, or in pi-ty, oh in pi - ty let me die. 



I PURITAN!. 



19 



Sir 6 
Elv. 



Ric. 
Sir G. 
Elv. 
Ric. 



Sir G I Quanto amore e mai raccolto 
Ric. I In quel volto e in quel dolor ! 
Elv. Chi sei tu ? 

[Oopo una pausa a Sir Giorgio, U quale per consolarla fa 

una fisonomia ridente. 
Non mi ravvisi ? 

Padre mio ! mi chiami al tempio ! 
Non e sogno, oh Arturo, oh amor 
Ah, tu sorridi, asciughi il pianto ! 
A Imen mi guidi — al ballo, al canto 
Ognun s' appresta a nozze, a festa, 
E meco in danza esultera. 

[Si volta, e vede Riccardo : lo prende per la mam, 
Tu pur meco danzerai ! 
Vieni a nozze ! 

Elv. Egli piange !! egli piange ! ei forse amb. 

[A Sir Giorgio in disparte e sotto voce — poi torna a Jis- 
sare Riccardo poi gli afferra la mano, e tornando ad 
atteggiarsi dolorosamente. 

| Chi frenar il pianto pub ! 

M' odi e dimmi, amasti mai ? 
Gli occhi affisa in sul mio volto, 
Ben mi guarda e lo vedrai. 
Elv. Ah, se piangi ! 

Ancor tu sai che un cor fido nelT amor, 
Sempre vive di dolor ! 

[Si abbandona al pianto, e si pone la mano sul volto— Sir 
Giorgio V abbraccia — essa lo lascia, e passeggia. 

Sir G. Deh ! ti acqueta, o mia diletta, 

Tregua al duol dal tempo aspetta. 
Elv. Mai ! 

[Sempre passeggiando per la scena, nk badando mai ai 

due che parlano. 

SirG i Clemente 11 ciel ti fia * 
Ely. Mai ! 

Sir G I m S rato ormai obblia. 
Elv. Ah ! mai piu ti rivedro ! 
Ric. I Si fa mia la sua ferita 
Sir G. ) Mi dispera e squarcia il cor. 
Elv. 0 toglietemi la vita, 

O rendetemi il mio amor ! 
[Elvira siwolge in atto di furente verso Riccardo e Gior- 
gio. — Poi v' e una pausa generale. — Dopo un poco 
Elvira sorride, e atteggia il volto aUegramente alia 
maniera dei pazzi. 
Ric. ) Torno il riso in sul suo 
Sir G. > Qual pensiero a lei brillo ! 
Elv. Non temer del padre mio — 

Co' miei pianti il placherb ? 

Ogni affanno andra in obblio, 

Tanto amor consolerb ! 
Sir G. Essa in pene e abbandonata, 

Sogna il gaudio che perde ! 
Ric. Qual bell' alma innamorata 

Un rival rapiva a me ! 



Sir G. ? How much love is there depicted 
Ric. S Through her grief and in her face. 
Elv. Who art thou ? 

[To Sir George, who, to gratify her, looks at her smil- 
ingly. 

Sir G. Do you not know me ? 

Elv, Yes, — my father : thou call'st me to the temple ? 
'Tis no dream, my Arthur, oh, my love ! 
Ah, thou art smiling — thy tears thou driest, — 
Fond Hymen guiding, I quickly follow ! 
Then dancing and singing, 
All nuptial feasts providiug. 

[Dancing towards Richard, whom she takes by the hand. 
And surely you shall dance with me — 
Come to the wedding ! 



SirG. 
Ric. 



O, Heaven ! 



Elv. He's weeping ! he weeps ! he may have loved. 

[To Sir George, aside — then looking at Richard, she clasp* 
his hand, and becomes abstracted. 



Who can now refrain from tears * 



fTo Richard.] Listen to me— hast ever lovM ? 
To Elvira.] Look thou well upon these features, 



Ric. 
SirG. 
Elv. 
Ric. 

And thou soon wilt know the truth. 
Elv. Ah, thou weepest ! 

And I perceive thou knowest the loving 
Faithful heart is with sorrow ever wed ! 
[Elvira is overcome with sorrow, and covers her face with 
her hands. — Sir George embraces her — she leaves him, 
and traverses the stage. 
Sir G. Calm thyself, my dearest love ! 

Time will all thy grief dispel. 
Elv. Never ! 

Still traversing the stage, 

J Kind Heaven will give thee solace. 
. Never ! 

q J Forget this traitor false. 

. Ne'er again shall I behold thee. 

) Every pang is made my own, 
G. y And rends in twain my inmost heart 
, Either let my life depart, 
Or restore my love to me ! 

[Turning fiercely to Richard and Sir George. — A general 
pause ensues, she almost instantly smiles, and her face 
assumes a peaceful expression. 

J Now her aspect is serene, — what thought, 
G. J What sweet thought, her mind revives ! 
. Have no fear of my dear father — 
By these tears appeas'd he'll be ; 
All our woes will soon be over, 
And our love claim its reward ! 
G. She's bewilder'd by her sorrows, 
And lost happiness creates ! 
What a beautiful fond spirit 
Did a rival from me take ! 



Ric, 
Sir 
Elv 
Ric, 
Sir 
Elv, 
Ric. 
Sir 



Ric. 
Sir 
Elv 



Sir 
Ric 



V1EN D1LETTO — COME, DEAREST, COME. Air. Elvira. 





Allegro Moderato. 

&5|L#Sl 





















Vien di - let - to, e in ciel la lu - - na, Tut - to ta - - ce in - tor - no in- 
Come, dear - est, come, the skies se - rene Are bright, and all is 



so 



I PURITANI. 




tor - no, Fin-che spun - ti in cie-Io il gior - no, 
peace and rest ; Un-til dap in Heav'n is seen, 



vien, vien ti 

Come, come, thy 




po-sa, vien ti po - sa sui mio corl 
couch shall be my breast, shall be my breast! 



Deh t'af-fret - ta, 
I con-jure thee, 



O Ar - tu - ro mi 
oh, Ar-thur dear 




y. 



o, Rie - di o ca - ro al - la tua El - vi - 
est, To re - turn, re - turn to her who weeps 



for 



ra; Es - sa pian - ge e ti sos- 
thee ; Whose bo - som heaves, with 



pi-ra; Vien,.... o ca - ro, al l'a-mo-re, Vien 

love oppressed; Come to thy first love, — oh, come to me! Come 





i mm 



mo-re al l a - - mor ah 

first love,— Oh, - come to thy 



vie-ni. Vien. 
first love, — Oh, come, . 



all' 
come to 



mor! 
me! 



i 



Ric. ) Possa un di, bella infelice, 
Sir G. ) Merce aver di tanto affetto. 
Possa uri giorno nel diletto, 
Obbliare il suo dolor ! 
Sir G. Ah ! ricovrarti ormai t' addice. 
Bru. Stende notte il cupo orror. 

[Elvira e abbattuta dal delirio. — Sir Giorgio e Riccardo 
V invitano a ritirarsi. — Sir Giorgio osserva all' in' 
torno ; poi afferra pel braccio Riccardo, come una che 
parlando mostra sapere un suo grave segreto. 
Sir G. II rival salvar tu devi — 

II rival salvar tu puoi. 
Ric. II nol posso. 
Sir G. Tu non vuoi. 
Ric. No ! 
Sir G. Tu il salva ! 
Ric. Ei perira ! 

Sir G. Tu quell' ora ben rimembri 
Che fuggi la prigioniera ? 

Ric. Si. 

Sir G. D' Artur fu colpa intera 1 

Ric. Tua favella ormai — [Quasi sdegnandosi. 

Sir G. E vera. [Con dignita patema. 

Ric. Parla aperto ! I Come sopra. 

Sir G. Ho detto assai ! [Come sopra. 

Ric. Fu voler del Parlamento 

Se ha colui la pena estrema, 

Dei ribelli l* ardimento 

In Artur si domera. 

Io non 1' odio, io nol pavento ; 

Ma 1* indegno perira. 



Sir 
Ric 



Sir 
Ric 



Sir 

Ric 
Sir 
Ric 
Sir 
Ric 
Sir 

Ric 
Sir 
Ric 
Sir 
Ric 
Sir 
Ric 



G. ) May, one day, forsaken beauty, 

S Thy fond love be yet requited. 

May, one day, in love abounding, 

Thy great woe to joy give place. 
G. Ah ! now it were well thou shouldst go. 

Night's gloomy shades already fall. 
[Elvira is lost in delirium. — Sir George and Richard per- 
suade her to withdraw. — Sir George, having cast 
around a cautious glance, seizes Richard's arm, with 
the air of one possessed of an important secret. 
G. It is you must preserve your rival — 

You've the pow'r, and needs must use it. 

Nay, I cannot. 
G. Say that you will not. 

No! 

G. Thou wilt save him ! 

No he shall fall ! 
G. Dost thou not the hour remember 

Of the prisoner's escape ? 

Ay. 

G. And was it, then, all Arthur's fault 1 



This bold language now — 
Is true, Sir ! 
Speak, then, freely. 
I've said enough. 
'Tis the will of Parliament 
That the sentence be enacted ; 
That the daring of the rebels 
Shall, in Arthur's fate, be avenged. 
I nor fear him, nor do I hate him ; 
But the traitor surely dies. 



[ Waxing angry. 
[ With dignity. 
[Bowing. 
[Bowing. 



I PURITAN1. 



21 



Sir G. Un geloso e reo tormento 

Or t' invade e acceca ; — ah, trema ! 

II rimorso e lo spavento 

La tua vita straziera. 

Se il rival per te fia spento 

Un altr' alma il seguira ! 
Ric. Ah ! 

Sir G. Due vittime farai, 

E dovunque tu n' andrai, 

L' ombra lor ti seguira ! 

Se tra il bujo un fantasraa vedrai 

Bianco lieve, che genie e sospira 

Sara Elvira, che mesta s' aggira, 

E ti grida : io son morta per te. 

Quando il cielo e in tempesta piu scuro 

S' odi un' ombra affannosa che freme, 

Sara Artur che t' incalza, ti preme, 

Ti minaccia de' morti il furor ! 
Ric. Se d' Elvira il fantasma dolente, 

M' apparisce e m' incalzi e s' adiri, 

Le mie preci, i singulti, i sospiri, 

Mi sapranno ottenere merce. 

Se T odiato fantasme d' Arturo, 

Sanguinoso surgesse d' Averno, 

Ripiombarlo agli abissi in eterno, 

Lo farebbe il mio immenso furor! 
[Sir Giorgio dopo una pausa lo abbraccia piangendo, e 
con affetto paterno. 
Sir G. II duol che si mi accora 

Vinca la tua bell' anima. 
Ric. Han vinto le tue lacrime ! 

Mira — ho bagnato il cigli. 
A. 2. Chi ben la patria adora 

Onora la pieta ! 
Ric. Se inerme ed in periglio, 

Salvo ei per te sara. 
Sir G. Si, il salva. 
Ric. E dall' esiglio, 

Contro la Patria libera 

Se armato ei qui verra ? 
Sir G. Mia man non e ancor gelida 

Con te il combattera. 
Ric. Forse dell' alba al sorgere [Con mistero. 

L' oste ci assalira ! S' ei vi sara ! 
Sir G. Morra ! 

Sia voce di terror Patria ! Vittoria ! Onor ! 



Sir G. A jealous guilty vengeance 

Invades thine inmost soul ; — but, tremble ! 

Remorse and apprehension 

Shall wear thy wretched life out. 

If he's doom'd, and that by thee, 

Then he will not fall alone. 
Ric. Ah ! 

Sir G. Thou makest die two victims, 
0 And, wherever thou shalt go, 

Their shades will surely follow thee ; — 

If a phantom thou see'st in the night, 

Pale and ghastly, moan shall pursue thee ! 

'Tis Elvira ! whose tones shall affright, 

As she cries, " Thou causedst my death." 

When the storm shall be wildest in heaven, 

If a shadow disturb thy faint breath, 

And follow thy course, vengeance-driven, 

It is Arthur who dooms thee to death ! 
Ric. If Elvira's sad phantom appear, 

If it come with reproaches and wrath, 

Grief shall move it with penitent prayer, 

Tears and sighs, till full pardon it hath. 

But if, from Averno's dark shore, 

Arthur's horrible shadow arise, 

The spectre I'd hurl back forever, 

My fury's abhorr'd sacrifice ! 
[After a pause, Sir George affectionately embraces Rich- 
ard, and with tears. 
Sir G. The grief which now I feel 

May touch thy soul so noble. 
Ric. Thy tears have surely triumph'd ! 

Look — I also weep. 
Both. True lovers of their country 

Must always mercy feel. 
Ric. If helpless and in peril, 

For thy sake he is sav'd. 
Sir G. Yes, save him ! 
Ric. If from exile 

He come in hostile arms 

Against his country's freedom ? 
Sir G. My blood is not yet frozen — 

Against him both will fight. 
Ric. [Mysteriously.] Perhaps, by the break of day, 

The foeman will attack, if he be among them ! 
Sir G. He dies ! 

The terrible cry — Our Country ! Victory ! Honor ! 



SUONI LA TROMBA E IN TREPIDO — SOUND, SOUND THE TRUMPET BOLDLY. 

Maestoso. 

mmm. 



Trt f M f T i i-aH»i r " i j g g | 



Suo -ni la tromba e in-tre - pi - do! 
Sound, sound the trumpet loud • lyl 



Io pug-ne - ro 

Brave-ly we'll meet 



da 

the 



for - te, 

foe - men, 



Bel - lo e af-fron-tar 
Bravely we'll meet the 




te, 



Gri - dan - 
'Tis sweet 



do li - ber - tal 

af - front-ing death I 



A - mor di pa - tria im-pa - re - do, 
Bold love of coun - try aid - ing us, 



Mie - ta i san-guig-ni al - lo 
The vic-tor's wreath un - fad 



- n, 
ing, thus, 




Poi ter - ga i bei su 
Will un - to us be 



do - 
proud 



Ei pian - ti la pie- 
Bestow'd by Love and 




ta, all' al - ba! 
Faith: at dawn, 



Bello e affrontar la 
Brave-ly we'll meet the 



mor - te, Gri - dan - do 11 - ber - tal 
foe - men, — 'Tis sweet af -front-ing death ! 



I PURITANI. 



Alba ! xie sorgi a un popolo, 

Che a hberta s' affidi, 

Giuliva a lui sorridi — 

Nunzia d' eterao Sol. 

Alba, che sorgi ai perfidi. 

Tiranni dalla terra, 

Sii nunzia a lor di guerra, 

Alba d' eterno duol ! 
[Stanno per separisi — Nel fondo detta scena Giorgio si 
rivotge a Riccardo, e lo prende per mono. 
Sir G. H patto e gia fermento. 

Se Artur e inerme o vinto— 
Ric. Avra pieta e conforto. 
Sir G. Se vien ascoso e armato — 
Ric. Ei sara avvinto e morto ! 

FINE DELL* A.TTO SECOND©. 

: • f 



ATTO III. 

SCENA I. — Loggia in un giardino e boschetto vicinoaUa casa 
di Elviba, questa casa ha la porta e le Jinestre con vetri 
assai trasparenti. — Da lontano si vedono, sempre alcune for- 
tifkazioni, ec. — II giorno commincia ad oscurarsi. — Si leva 
un oragono, e mentre piu imperversa, sentonsi dentro le scene 
e da lontano alcune grida d' attarme ed un colpo di archibu- 
gio. — Poco dopo Arturo comparisce awolto in un gran 
mantello. — A poco, a poco esce la luna. — La casa interna- 
mente vedesi da vane tampade illuminata. 

Entra Arturo. 

Art. Son salvo, alfin son salvo— I miei nemici 

Falliro il colpo, e mi smarrir di traccia. 

Oh, patria ! oh amore, onnipossenti nomi ! 

Quant' io vi sento e adoro ! ap ogni passo 

Mi balzo il cor nel seno e benedico 

Ogni tronco, ogni fronda ed ogni sasso 

Oh, com* e dolce a un esule infelice 

Dopo il misero errar di riva in riva, 

Toccar alfin la terra sua nativa ! 

Vedere ed obbracciar colei che in core 

Gli fu scolpita per la man d' amore ! 
[aS? intrawede fra i vetri del palazzo Elvira vestita di 
bianco. — Essa non vista da Arturo trapassa sola e 
cantando. — La sua voce va perpendosi a mono mono, 
che essa intemasi ne' suoi appartamenti. 



Mora ! rising on a nation, 
Whose only trust is freedom — 
Whose only trust is freedom — 
Bring us eternal fame ! 
Earth's tyrants who dissemble, 
At thy war-message tremble, 
Midst the world's execration 
They sink in endless shame ! 
[When separating , Sir George takes Richard by the 
hand. 

Sir G. All is now concluded. 

If Arthur is defenceless — 
Ric. He'll find support and succor. 
Sir G. If he in arms return — 
Ric, He comes to shame and vengeance ! 

END OF THE SECOND ACT. 



ACT III. 

SCENE I. — A Lodge, with a Garden and a Grove, near 
the house of Elvira, of which the door and windows are 
perceptible. — In the distance, military outworks are seen. — 
The air becomes darkened, and the sky lowers with an 
impending storm. — Cries and the discharge of arms are 
heard. — The moon rises gradually. — The house become* 
lighted up. 

Enter Arthur. 

Art. I am savM, at last I am saved — my desp'rate foes 

Have miss'd their aim, nor close they on my foot- 
steps. 

My country ! my love ! O, sweet and potent names, 
How leaps my heart to your commingled claims I 
At every step my spirit, stranger grown, 
Blesses each tree, each flower, and every stone. 
How sweet, to hapless exile, who from shore 
To shore has fled, to reach his home once more ! 
To see and to embrace, with joyous start, 
The form whose image love graveth on his heart ! 
[Elvira, in white, unseen by Arthur, is observed to pass 
the windows — she sings, and her voice gradually sub- 
sides as she enters her apartment. 



A UNA FONTE—&AD AND LONELY. Air. Elvira. 




Andante. 



-0—0-0—0- 



A un-a fon-te afflit-to e so - lo, S'as-sie-de - va un tro-va-dor; E a sib-gar l'immenso duo - lo Sciol - se un 
Sad and lonely, by a fountain, A trou - badour was seen ; And Ms harp he swept, but sorrow Was all its 

d'a mor. Ah I 



can - ti - co d'a-mor, sciolse un can to 

strings, its strings could glean, all its strings could glean Ah I 



Art La mia canzon d'amore ? Ah, Elvira — ah, Elvira ! I Art. My own fond song of love ! Elvira, oh say, where art 
Ove t' aggiri tu ? Nessun risponde ! thou ? 

A te cos io cantava No one responds. 'Twas thus to thee I sasg 

Di queste selve tra la dense fronde, Under the shady branches of this grove ; 



I PURITAN!. 



E tu allor facevi eco al cantar mio i 

Deh ! se ascoltasti 1'. amoroso santo— 

Odi un esule afflitto, odi il mb pianto 

A una fonte afflitto e solo 

S' assiedeva un trovador, 

Tocco T arpa, e suono duolo ; 

Sciolse un canto e fu dolor ! 

Corre a valle, corre a raonte, 

L' esiliato pellegrin : 

Ma il dolor gli e sempre a fironte, 

Gli e compagno nel cammin. 

Brama il sole, allorch' e sera ; 

Brama sera, allorch e sol ; 

Gli par verno primavera, — 

Ogni riso gli par duol. 

[Sentesi un sordo batter e di tamburo entro le $cene. 

Qual suon ? gente s' appressa ! 
1 Coro. [Sommessamente entro le scene.] Agli spaldi. 
t Coro. Alle torri sara. 
Tutii. Si cherchera — non sfuggira. 
Art. Ove m' ascondo % Ah ! 1* orde di Cromvello 

Sono ancor di me in traccia. 
[Arturo si ritiria e vedesi un drappello d'armigeri traver- 
sare, il fondo dalla scena : appena che sono passati, 
Arturo esce e guarda lor dietro. 

Vanno i furenti, perche mai non oso, 

Porre il pie dentro le adorate soglie ? 

Dire a Elvira il mio duol, la fede mia 1 

Ah, no ! — perder potrei 

Me stesso e lei. — Tentium di nuovo il canto ! 

A me forse vorra, se al cuor le suona, 

Quasi a richiamo de' bei di felice 

Quando uniti dicemmo ; io t' amo, io t' amo ! 

Cerca il sonno a notte scura, 

L' esiliato pellegrin, 

Sogna e il desta la sciagura — 

Delia patria e il suo destin. 

Sempre eguali ha i luoghi e V ore 

1/ infelice trovador ; 

L' esiliato allor che muore, 

Ha sol posa al suo dolor. 
[Si vede dietro le vetriate Elvira che ritorna, poi essa 
accostasi alia porta — e sentendosi questo piccolo ru- 
more dalla parte del palazzo Arturo si ritiro— Elvira 
esce con un andare smarrito, poi si fema quasi in 
atto di starre in ascolto. 
£h>. Fini — me lassa ! — Oh, come dolce air alma 

Mi scendea quella voce. — Oh, Dio fini ! 

Mi parve — Ahi rimembranze, ahi vani sogni ! 

Ah mio Arturo ; dove sei ? 



Art. A piedi tuoi ! 

Elvira, ah mi perdona ! 
Elv. Arturo ! e desso. [Gettandosi neUe sue braccia. 

Sei pur tu 1 or non m* inganni % 
Art. Ingannarti 1 Ah no, giammai 1 
Elv. Io vacillo ; temo affanni. 
Art. Non temer, finero i guai, 

Ove alfin unisce amor. 
A 2. Nel mirarti un solo istante, 

Io sopiro e mi consolo 

D' ogni pianto, d' ogni duolo 

Che provai lontan da te. 

Ch' ei provb lontan da me ! 
[Dice il primo verso da se stessa, e precisamente, coll' ac- 
cento di persona che ha la mente confusa per meste 
ricordanze. 

Quanto tempo ! Io rammenti ? 
Art Fur tre mesi. 
Elv. Ah, no— tre secoli, 

[Con entusiasmo delirante di passione. 

Fur tre secoli d' error ! 



Thou rnad'st then a lovely echo. 
If once my song of love thou heard'st, 
Hear now an exile's sorrows, hear now his plaint. 
Sad and lonely, by a fountain, 
A young troubadour reclin'd, 
And, for solace to his sorrow, 
Freely breath'd a love-song to the wind. 
Through the valley, o'er the mountain, 
The banish'd pilgrim strayeth, 
' And grief by his side, for ever 
His sole companion, stayeth. 
When 'tis day, for sable night he longeth , 
When 'tis night, he wisheth for the day ; 
He mistaketh spring for winter, — 
Not e'en mirth to him is gay. 

[Drums heard in the distance. 
What sounds ? some one approaches ! 

1 Cho. [Within.] To the rampart. 

2 Cho. He is near the tower. 

All. We'll strictly search — he can't escape. 

Art. Where can I hide me ? the troops of Cromwell 

Are e'en now close upon my track. 
[He withdraws behind the curtains, when armed soldiers 
cross the stage ; after they have passed, he again comes 
forward. 

They take that road : 

O, why am I forbidden to set foot 

Within the palace of my ador'd, and tell 

My perils and my truth to her ? — Ah, no ! 

It might endanger both. — The song once more — 

The tone may reach her heart, and bring her to me. 

It may remind her of pass'd days of bliss, 

When all our language was " I love, I love thee !" 

In the night-time's glooiny silence, 

When the exiled wand'rer sleeps, 

Dreams present him his misfortunes — 

For his home and fate he weeps. 

Every spot all times are equal 

To the hapless troubadour ; 

Only kind repose he findeth, 

When fate bids him feel no more. 

[Elvira is seen coming towards Arthur— he hears her ap- 
proaching step, and retires — she enters hesitatingly, 
and seems to listen. 

Elv. 'Tis o'er — unhappy me ! — How softly 

And sweetly that voice touched my soul. — Oh, 
Heaven, 

'Tis gone ! It seem'd — ah, sweetest meni'ry ! vain 
delusion ! 

My own Arthur ! alas ! where art thou ! 
Art. [Kneeling.] At thy feet kneeling, 

Elvira, I crave thy pardon. 
Elv. Dear Arthur, 'tis he ! [Falling into his arms. 

Is it thyself ? dost thou not deceive me ? 
Art. I deceive thee ! — Never ! never ! 
Elv. Yet I tremble ; other woes seem near. 
Art. Oh, dread them not, my dearest, 

Now love is smiling again. 
Art. ) Now once more thy love beholding, 
Elv. ) I breathe freely, and resign 

Ev'ry murmur, ev'ry sorrowing. 
Art. i That I proved afar from thee. 
Elv. I That I proved afar from thee. 

[She sings this line aside, in a pointed manner, and like 
one embarrassed by melancholy recollections. 

What a time ! canst say how long ? 
Art. Three months. 
Elv. Ah, no — it is ages ! — three ; 

[Enthusiastically and ^kissionateiy. 

Yes, three ages of agony and horror. 



I PURITANI. 



Ti chiamava ad ogni istante. 

Riedi. o Arturo. e mi consola, 

E rompava ogni parola 

II singulti del dolor ! 
Art Deh perdona ! Ella era misera> 

Prigioniera, abbandonata, 

In periglio. 
Elv [Con rapidita.] E 1' hai tu amata ? 
Art Io ? Colei. 
Elv Non e tua sposa ? 
Art Chidirl'osa? 
Elv Io il chiedo, Oh Arturo. 
Art. Mi credevi si spergiuro ? 



I exclaim'd at each sad moment, 
" Return, Arthur, to console me 
While each word remain 'd unfinished, 
Stifled, broken, by my sobs. 

Art. Ah, forgive me ! she was most wretched, 
A sad prisoner, by all abandon'd, 
And in peril. 

Elv. [Eagerly.] And dost thou love her? 

j^rt. I love her * 

Elv. Hast thou not wed her ? 

Art. Who dare say that ? 

Elv. I who ask it, Arthur. 

Art. Didst thou believe me so forsworn ? 



DA QUEL DI CHE TI MIRA1 — FROM THE DAY I FIRST BEHELD THEE. Air. Arturo. 

r Andante. 



Da quel di 
From the day 



che 
I 



ti 
first 



mi • ra - i 

be - held thee, 



Pal - pi - tai per te 

One on-ly feeling fill'd my heart, 



d'a - mo - re; 
ah, fill'd my heart 



Da quel giorno all' 
Where 'twill burn for 



ul 

ev 



tim' 
er 



o - re, 
ho - ly, 



Si ques - to cor, 
And changeless till, 



ra. La mia vi-ta la mia 

smart. Life to thee, life to 



Si per te sol pal - pi 

and changeless till death's fi 



te- 
nal 



— — V — }/- 



vi-taio ti sa - era - i E la Mor-te per a -mo -re, 
thee I offer' d whol - ly, All its glad or sad e • mo - 1 ion, 



Si fin la 
And to 



1 



morte in ques-to a - mo - re, 
die with such de - vo - Hon 



Dol - ce e ca - ra a me sa - ra, 
Were a calm and bliss-ful part, 



a me, a me 
a calm and bliss 



V- 
sa - ra. 
ful part. 



Elv. Oh, parole d' amor ! lieta son io ! 

Ei non l'amava adunque ; Oh, Arturo mio ! 

Da quel di che a te giurai, 

Solo appresi aver il core ; 

E a te fido infin che muore 

Questo cor palpitera. 

La mia vita io ti sacrai — 

Nell a gioia e nel dolore ; 

E la morte per amore 

Cara e santa a me sara. 

[Si danno scambievolmenta la destra, e si volgono al 

Cielo. 

Art. Tua crudel dubbiezza amara, 

Deponesti, e paga or sei ? 
Elv. Di, se a te non era cara, 

A che mai seguir colei ? 
Art. Or t' infingi, o ignori ch' ella, 

Presso a morte. 
Elv. Chi? favella! 
Art. La ? Regina ! 
Elv. La? Regina! 
Art. Un indugio ? e la meschina, 

Su d' un pal co a morte orribile ! 
Elv E fia ver ? qual lume rapido, 

Or balena al mio pensier ? 

Dunque m' ami ? 
Art E puoi temer ? 



Elv. O, words of love ! I now am happy ! 
And didst thou ever love her ? 
O, my own Arthur ! 
Till the day of love's fond pledging, 
I was unconscious of a heart ; 
Since that day 'tis thine, and will be, 
Until stern death tear us apart. 
Life to thee I all devoted — 
Its pleasure and its melancholy ; 
And to die for such devotion 
Will be a death serene and holy. 
[Each taking the hand of the other, they look up to 
heaven. 

Art. Thy bitter doubts dispelling, 

Is thy bosom now at peace ? 
Elv. If she was not dear to thee, 

Why wast thou her follower ? 
Art. Dost thou feign ? or is't thou know'st not 

Her doom was death ! 
Elv. Who ? speak quickly ! 
Art. Who ? the Queen. 
Elv. What ! the Queen ! 
Art. Yes : delay were certain death ; — 

She'd have perish'd on the scaffold ! 
Elv. Can this be so ? what light so sudden 

Breaks in on all my thoughts ? 

Then thou lovest me ? 
Art. Thou fearest not ? 



I PURITANI. 



Elv. Dunqae vuoi — 

Art. Star teco ognor 

Tra gli amplessi dell' amor. 

Vieni, fra le mie braccia, 

Amor, delizia e vita ! 

Non mi sarai rapita, 

Or che ti stringo al cor ! 

Ansante, ognor tremante, 

Ti chiamo— e ognor ti bramo ;— 

Vien, mi ripeti io t' amo, 

T' amo d' immenso amor. 



Elv. Then thou wishest — 

Art. Still to abide 

Ever loving, ever faithful. 
Come, come to my arms, 
Thou my life's sole delight ! 
And, thus press'd to my heart, 
We'll no more disunite ! 
Thrill'd with anxious love and fear, 
On thee I call — for thee I sigh ; — 
'Come, and say the love is dear 
That soars a boundless height. 



CARO NON HO PAROLA — ALL WORDS, MY LOVE, MUST FAIL ME. Aib. Elvira 

Moderate. 



Ca - ro non ho pa - ro - la Ch' es - prima 
All words, dear love, are want - ing, To this 



il mio con - ten - to; 
sweet con - sum - ma - tion ; 



33 



,'al - ma e - le - var mi sen - to, In e 
and yet my soul is mount - ing With in 



sta - si d'a - mor. 



spi - ra - tion 



higher. 



L'al - ma, 
And yet, 



Ad 

Breath - less 



9- 

Og - ni is 



tan-te an - san 
still and trem 



te, 
bling, 



Ti chiamo e te sol bra - mo ! ah ! 
For thee J call and sigh, — Yes, 



ca - - ro.' 
dear - est ! 



v- 

My 




3=E 



vien ti n 
heart, with 



pe - to Ta - mo, 
fer - vent yearn - ing, 



t'a - mo d'im - men - so a - mo - re! 
Pour - eth its lone love • cry. 



[Elvira si pone sul core la mono d' Arturo. Odesi ancora 
il suono del tamburo. 

Art. Ancor quel suon funesto, i miei nemici ! 

Elv. Si, quel suon funesto. 

[La sua testa cominicia a vacillare, 

10 cono*co quel suon ma tu non sai. 

Che piii nol temo ormai nella mia stanza ; — 
Squarciai il vel di che s' orno sua testa — 
Calpestai le sue pompe — ed all aurora 
Con me tu ancora, 
Verrai a festa e a danza. 

Art. Oh, Dio ! che dici ? 

[Arturo si ritira un'passo e la guarda con stupore e spa- 
vent o fissamente nel volto. 

Elv. Cos! come tu guardi 

Mi guardan essi, e intender mai non sanno 

11 mio parlar, il mio riso, il duol, 1' affanno ! 

[Elvira si tocca la testa e il cuore. 
Art. Oh, ti scuoti. Tu vanneggi ! 

[Sentesi da parti opposte dentro il bosshetto le voci di varii 
drappelli d' Armigeri, che incontrandosi ci scambiano 
il motto di fazione. 

1. Alto la? 

2. Fedel drappello. 

1. E chi viva ! 

2. Anglia e Cromvello ! 

1. Viva ! 

2. Viva ! 

Tutti. Vincera ! 

Art. Vien, ci e forza ormai partir ! 



[Elvira presses Arthur's hand to her heart. — A Drum is 
heard. 

Art. Again that warlike sound so dreadful ! 

My enemies are near ! 
Elv. It is that sound so hated. 

. [Again becoming delirious. 

I Know well that sound. 

But thou know'st not that I no longer dread it ; — 
In my own chamber did I tear the veil 
That one day grac'd her head — I trod upon 
Her finery ; and, at the dawning, with -me once more, 
Thou shalt come to the feast and dance. 
Art. O, God ! what say'st thou 1 

[Gazing at her with alarm. 

Elv. Just as thou now look'st at me, 

So e'en do they, and cannot understand 

My words of grief, my laughter, or my sorrows. 

[Putting her hand to her head and heart. 

Art. Recall thy thoughts. Thou'rt raving ! 

[ Voices of Soldiers heard within. 



1 . Who goes there 1 

2. Band of the faithful. 

1. Give the pass-word. 

2. England and Cromwell. 

1. Viva! 

2. Viva ! 

All. The conqueror 

^4/^. Come, we must awhile retire. 



I PUR 



ITANI. 



Elv. Ah. tu vuoi fuggirmi ancor ? 
No colei pill noa t' avra ! 
[ Arturo prende per mano Elvira che h guarda e infuria 
delirando. Essa gettasi ai piedi di Arturo, e gli 
abbraccia le ginocchia, a gridar soccorso. 
Art. Vien. 

Elv. T' arresti il mio dolor. 

Art. Taci ! 

Elv. 0 genti, ei vuol fuggir ! 

Art. Taci ! 

Elv. Aiuto, per pieta ! 

Art. Ah ! 

Entra Riccardo, Gioboio, Bruno, Armigeri, con facelle, 
Castellani, e CasteUane. 

Sir G. E qui Arturo ! 

[Arturo che s' awede della demenza di Elvira resta impie- 
trito di dolore guardandola immoto. Elvira $ invece 
instupidita per tutto quel che vede. Riccardo a cut 
fanno eco li Puritani, s' avanza ad intimare la sen- 
tenza del Parlamento. Alle parole " Morte," vedesi 
che Elvira cangia aspetto, ed ogni suo moto ed atto 
palesa che questo avvenimento tremendo produsse una 
commozione net cervello, ed un totale cambiamento 
intelletuale. 

Bic. Arturo ! 

Tutti. Arturo! 

Bic. Cavalier, ti colse il nume 

Punitor de* tradimenti. 
Armi. Pera ucciso fra tormenti 

Chi tradiva patria e onor. 
Sii G. i Oh, infelice ! Un destin rio 
Donne. ) A tal spiaggia or ti guido. 
Bic. | Talbo Artur, la Patria e Dio 
Armi. ) Te alle morte condannb. 
Elv. Morte ! 
Armi. A morte ! 
Donne. Ahi, qual terror ! 
Armi. Dio raggiunge i traditor ! 
Elv. Che ascoltai 1 
Donne. Si tramutb ! 

[Le donne guardando Elvira e circondandola osservano 
tutti li mutamenti, che simo strano sulla Jisonomia di 
Elvira. 

Sir G. ) Se avra il senno 1 avra piu lacrime, 
Ric. j Nel mirar chi per lei muor. 
Elv. Qual mai funerea 

Voce funesta, 

Mi scuote e desta 

Dal mio martir? 

Io fui si barcara — 

Lo trassi a morte 

M' avra consorte 

Nel su morir. 
Ric. Quel suon funereo, 

Ch' apre una tomba, 

Cupo rimbomba, 

M' infonde orror. 

Lor sorte orribile 

Spense gia 1' ira, 

Mi affanna ed inspira 

Pieta e dolor. 
Armi. Qual suon funereo, 

Ch' apre una tomb», 

Cupo rimbomba 

Infonde orror. 

E Dio terribile, 

In sua vendetta, 

Gli empii ei saetta, 

Sterminator. 
Art. Credeasi misera 

Da me tradita ; 



Elv. Thou wouldst again desert me, 

But she shall never call thee hers ! 

[He takes her hand — she throws herself frantically at his 

feet, and cries for succor. 

Art. Come. 

Elv. Let my grief retain thee. 
Art. Speak not ! 

Elv. , My friends, he now would fly J 
Art. Speak not ! 
Elv. Help, for pity ! 
Art. Ah! 

Enter Sir Richard, Sir George, Bruno, Soldiers with 

torches , and Villagers. 

Sir G. Where is Arthur ? 

[Arthur, who sees the madness of Elvira, stands almost 
unconscious of what is passing around him. Elvira 
is motionless. Richard, seconded by the Puritans, 
reads the sentence of the Parliament — at the word 
" Death " Elvira's countenance becomes deadly pale, 
and her actions and appearance indicate a total pros- 
tration of intellect. 

Ric. What! Arthur! 

All. Ah! Arthur! 

Ric. Cavalier, the sword of justice 
On the traitor's head shall fall. 

Sold. Yes : in torment he must perish ! 
The betrayer of his King. 

Sir G. ) Unhappy Arthur ! a fatal doom 

Worn. S To this place thy steps bath led. 

Ric. ) Arthur Talbot, thy God and country 

Sold, i Have decreed that thou shalt die. 

Elv. To die ! 

Sold. To die! 

Worn. Oh, horrid doom ! 

Sold. God the traitor will overtake. 

Elv. Ah ! what hear I ? 

Worn. [Observing Elvira.\ 

What sudden change ! 

Now she's deathlike^ — now all fire ! 

Sir G. ) If she e'er recover reason, 

Ric. ) She will shed more tears for him. 

Elv. What sounds funereal 

Strike on my ear, 

And drown recollection 

Of all former care ? 

Ah ! I was barbarous — 

To hasten his death ; 

But with my lov'd one 

I'll share the grave. 
Ric. That sound so fatal, 

Cold death proclaiming, 

With awe most dreadful, 

Harrows my heart. 

Such cruel fortune, 

My anger subduing, 

My soul is inspiring 

With pity and grief. 
Sold. The sound funereal 

That opens a grave, 

Our hearts now nlleth 

With woe most profound. 

Heaven is terrible in its just vengean< e 

Striking the impious, 

Destroying their works. 

Art. Oh ! the forlorn one 

Thought I betrayed her; 



I PUHITANI. 



Sir G. 




Art. 
Elv. 
Art. 
Bru. 
Men. 
Sir G, 
Ric. 
Donne. 
Elv. 
An. 
Tutti. 
Armi. 

Art. 



Traea sua vita 
In tal martir. 
Or sfido i ful mini, 
Disprezzo il fato, 
Se a lei d' allato 
Potrb morir. 
Qual suon funereo 
Feral rimbomba, 
Nel senmi piomba 
M' agghiacca il cor ? 
Sol posso, ahi, misero, 
Tremar e fremere, 
Non ha piia lacrime 
II mio dolor ! 

Coro — di Donne. 

Qual suon funereo, 

Feral rimbomba, 

Al cor ci piomba, 

Gelar ci fa ! 

Pur fra le lagrime, 

Speme ci affida, 

Che Dio ci arrida, 

Di sua pieta. 
Dio comanda a' figli suoi, 
Che giustizia alfin si rendi ! 

Sol ferocia or parla in voi ; — 
La pietade Iddio v' apprenda. 

Deh ritorna a sen si tuoi. 

Qual mi cade orribil benda 1 

0 mia Elvira ! 

E viva ancor. 

Teco io sono. 

Ah il tuo perdono ! 

Per me a morte, o Arturo mio. 

Di tua sorte il reo son io. 



Un amplesso ! 
Avvampo e fremo ! 

Io gelo e tremo ! 



Un addio ! 
L' estremo ! 

Cada alfin V ultrice spada 
Sevra il capo al traditor. 
Arrestate — Vi scostate 
Paventate il mio furore ! 
Ella e tremante, 
Ella e spirante ! 
Anime perfide 
Sorde a pieta ! 
Un sole istante, 
L' ire affrenate 
Poi vi saziate 
Di crudelta ! 

Coro — di Puritanni. 
1 st Sold. A vendetta sui ribaldi ! 
2nd Sold. A vendetta ! 

[All improvvisi tutti si fermano perche odesi un suono di 

Coma da caccia. Van Armigeri Puritanni escono 

ad esplorore, e tornano guidando un mesaggiero. 

Questi reca ana lettera a Giorgio che in compagnia di 

Riccardo la scvrre : entrambi si volgono ai circon- 

stante, con faccia rinente. 
Tutti. Suon d' Araldi ! 

E un messaggio ? 
Donne. Un Divin raggio 

Esploriam ! 



All her days pass'd she 
Anxious and sad. 
Now fate I challenge, 
Braving its thunder, 
If we together 
Calmly may die ! 
Sir G. The sound funereal 
That opens a grave, 
Fills my sad heart 
With woe most profound 1 
Woe overwhelming ! 
Mingled grief and rage ! 
And no more tears, alas ! 
Pain to assuage. 

Chorus — of Women. 
Those sounds funereal, 
That open a grave, 
Fill our sad hearts 
With woe most profound ! 
But, 'midst affliction, 
A hope is still shining, 
That God in his mercy 
Will with pity look down. 
| God commands that all His children 
I Should to the traitor render justice ! 

)Thou but speakest in thy fierceness ; — 
May kind Heaven teach thee pity ! 

Art. [To Elvira.] Ah ! recall thy recollection. 
Elv. How strange a mask has fallen from me t 
Art. 0, my Elvira ! 
Elv. Thou livest yet. 
Art. I am with thee. 
Elv. Alas, forgive me ! 

Oh, Arthur dearest, I've caused thy death. 
Art. And I have eaus'd all thy misfortunes. 

| One embrace ! 
Bru- I wi ta ra g e i» m burning ! 



Sold. 
Bru. 
Ric. 
Sir G. 
Worn. 



Ric. £ I fear and tremble ! 
Worn, j 

^ £ One farewell! 
All. Th^e final ! 

Sold. Now the fatal sword of justice 

Falls on the vile traitor's head. 
Art. Stand aside there — do not move ye ! 

Or my vengeance you shall know ! 

Terror shakes her ! 

Life forsakes her ! 

Oh, monsters, nurs'd 

In crimes accurs'd, 

One moment only 

Restrain your vengeful hate ; 

Then fully satiate 

Your cruel thirst ! 

Chorus— of Puritans. 
1st Sold. Now for vengeance ! 
2nd Sold. Ay, for vengeance on the traitor ! 

[Trumpets sound — some Soldiers go out, and return with 
a Messenger brimiiuLJl—teite r, which Sir George 
reads apart witm Q^^d^^^tfi look 
around. 



All. 



Worn. 



The herald's tnj 
Is 't a message) 
A ray divine .' 
Let us see ! 



i pet 



EDWARD JOHNSON 



28 



I PURITANl. 



Tutti. Che mai sara ? 

Sir G. Esultate, ah s\ esultate ! 

Gia i Stuardi or vinti sono— 
I captivi han gia perdono 
JJ Anglia terra ha liberty ! 

Ric. ) A Crombello Onore e gloria ! 

Puri > La vittoria — il guiderk ! 

Elv. ) Dall' angoscia al gaudio estrerao 

Art. ) Par quest' alma al Ciel rapita ! 
Ben so dir che sia la vita 

Or che \ *™ j 1' amor mi fa. 

Coro. Siate liete alme amorose, 

Qual d' amor foste dolenti ! 
Lunghi di per voi ridenti 
Quest' istante segnera. 

Elv. | Ah ! sento, o mio bell' angelo, 

Art. ) Che poca e intera, 

Per esultar nei giubilo, 
Che amor ci done a. 
Benediro le lacrime ! 
L' ansia, i sospir i gemiti 
Vaneggero nel palpito 
D' un' ebbra volutta ! 

Goro Amor pietoso e teneao, 
Coronera di giubilo 
L' ansia, suspin, i palpiti 
Di tanta fedelta. 



All. What can it be ? 

Sir G. Let exultation fill the hearts of all ! 

The power of the Stuarts is o'ercome — 
Pardon has been to all captives granted 
In England — liberty's supreme ! 

Ric. I Honor and glory be to Cromwell ! 

Sold. ) Vict'ry now his banner waves ! 

Elv. ) From mis'ry deep to joy celestial, 

Art. ) Seems this soul convey'd to Heav'n ! 
Now alone is life of value, — 
Now that love has made thee mine. 

Cho. May that love now form your joy, 

Which has made your former sorrow, 
And may this moment be a sign 
Of days in store for you serene. 

Elv. j Ah ! I feel, 0 charming angel ! 

Art. I How truly pow'rless is my heart, 
To deserve all this great joy, 
Which love bestows on us, 
I now shall bless e'en tears, 
My fears and fond anxieties, 
And in extatic pleasure 
I shall enraptur'd be ! 

Cho, Love, most merciful and tende», 
Will crown with blissful feeling 
The throbbings and the sighingu 
Of these two loving hearts 



THE SND. 




iff THE t 

j/TVUSICIANS llBRARY 



'HE MOST IMPORTANT SERIES OF VOLUMES of the master- 
pieces of song and piano music ever issued. Eighteen volumes 
have already appeared under this title, to be followed by others at fre- 
quent intervals, until the whole range of music of living interest (ex- 
cluding the choral and orchestral) has been covered. 

Each volume is independent, complete in itself, and sold by itself ; and contains 
a portrait, elaborate introduction, bibliography and music in full folio size. 

Each volume is edited by an authority. Among the editors of volumes 
already published, and those about to be issued, are the following: — 



EUGEN d'ALBERT 
WM. F. APTHORP 
CARL ARMBRUSTER 
S. COLERIDGE-TAYLOR 
FRANK DAMROSCH 
M. ESPOSITO 
HENRY T. FINCK 
WM. ARMS FISHER 
DR. PERCY GOETSCHIUS 
PHILIP HALE 
W. J. HENDERSON 
HELEN HOPEKIRK 
RUPERT HUGHES 



JAMES HUNEKER 
HENRY E. KREHBIEL 
MORITZ MOSZKOWSKI 
ERNEST NEWMAN 
IS1D0R PHILIPP 
DR. EBENEZER PROUT 
CARL REINECKE 
XAVER SCHARWENKA 
OTTO SINGER 
AUGUST SPANUTH 
BERTHA FE1RING TAPPER 
THOMAS TAPPER 
DR. CHARLES VINCENT 



No expense has been spared to insure perfection in every detail. 
The volumes are beautifully bound in paper, made expressly for The 
Musicians Library, and also in cloth, gilt. 

In editorship, accuracy, typography, engraving, binding ; in every- 
thing that contributes to artistic ensemble and a reliable text, The 
Musicians Library is an EPOCH-MAKING SERIES in the history of music 
publishing. 

Send for our Musicians Library Booklet giving full particulars 

OLIVER DITSON COMPANY. BOSTON 



if THE x 

AuSIClANSllgRARY 



No lover of noble music can possibly do without these matchless volumes. 

In editorship, comprehensiveness, engraving, printing, binding, they represent the 

high-water mark of music publishing. 



VOLUMES 

FIFTY MASTERSONGS 

Edited by HENRY T. FINCK 

JOHANNES BRAHMS 
FORTY SONGS 

Edited by JAMES HUNEKER 

FREDERIC CHOPIN 
FORTY PIANP COMPOSITIONS 

Edited by HUKEKER 

ROBERT FRANZ 
FIFTY SONGS 

Edited by WILLIAM FOSTER APTHORP 

FRANZ LISZT 
TWENTY ORIGINAL PIANO 
COMPOSITIONS 

Edited by AUGUST SPANTJTH 

FRANZ LISZT 
TWENTY 
PIANO TRANSCRIPTIONS 

Edited by AUGUST SPANUTH 

FRANZ LISTZ 
TEN HUNGARIAN 
RHAPSODIES 

Edited by AUGUST SPANUTH and JOHN ORTH 

ROBERT SCHUMANN 
. FIFTY SONGS 

Edited by W. J. HENDERSON 

WAGNER 
LYRICS FOR SOPRANO t 

Edited by CARL ARMBRUSTER 

WAGNER LYRICS FOR TENORt 

Edited by CARL ARMBRUSTER 

MODERN FRENCH SONGS 
VOL. I 
BEMBERG TO FRANCK 

Edited by PHILIP HALE 



ISSUED 

MODERN FRENCH SONGS 
VOL. II 
GEORGES TO WIDOR 

Edited by PHILIP HALE 

SONGS BY THIRTY 
AMERICANS 

Edited by RUPERT HUGHES 

FRANZ SCHUBERT 
FIFTY SONGS 

Edited by HENRY T. FINCK 

SELECTIONS FROM THE 
MUSIC DRAMAS OF 
RICHARD WAGNER 

Arranged for the Piano by OTTO SINGER 

ROBERT SCHUMANN 
FIFTY PIANO COMPOSITIONS 

Edited by XAVER SCHARWENKA 

TWENTY-FOUR NEGRO 
MELODIES 

Transcribed for the Piano by 
S. COLERIDGE-TAYLOR 

SEVENTY SCOTTISH SONGS 

Edited with accompaniments by 
HELEN HOPEKIRK 

GEORGE FRIDERIC HANDEL t 
VOL. I, SONGS AND AIRS 
FOR HIGH VOICE 

Edited by EBENEZER PROUT 

GEORGE IFRIDERIC HANDEL t 
VOL. II, SONGS AND AIRS 
FOR LOW VOICE 

Edited by EBENEZER PROUT 



All Song Volumes, excepting those marked (f) are issued in editions for High aud Low Voice. 

Price of each volume, paper, cloth back, $1.50; full cloth, gilt, $2 . 00. Prices include postage 



OLIVER DITSON COMPANY, Boston 



THE MUSIC 
STUDENTS LIBRARY 

A series of educational text-books suited to the requirements of the average student 
These books are bound in cloth. Copies of any will be sent for examination. 



EAR TRAINING FOR TEACHER AND PUPIL By C. A. Alchin* Not to take the place 

of a text-book or harmony, hut designed rather, through training the sense of hearing, to teach the 
pupil to think in tones, go that he may sing, name, write, and play what he hears. 

Price, post-paid, $1.00 

INTERVALS, CHORDS, AND EAR TRAINING. By Jean Parkman Brown. A simple and 
yet thorough set of exercises and examples in rudimentary harmony and ear training for use in conjunc- 
tion with the study of the piano. .. Price, post-paid, $1.00 

HARMONY. By Sir John Stainer, Mus. Doc. A new edition of a standard text-book which 
presents the principles of harmony with conciseness and lucidity. Price, post-paid, 75 cents 

HARMONY SIMPLIFIED. By Francis L. York, M. A. A practical text-book presenting to 
the student in a concise manner the fundamental principles of harmony, with non-essentials omitted. 

Price, post-paid, $1 00 

HARMONIC ANALYSIS. By BenjanVn Cutter. This book teaches one to analyze the har- 
monic structure of both classic and modern music and to hear with greater understanding, to read at 
sight with more facility, and to play or sing with more intelligence. Price, post-paid, $1.25 

LESSONS IN MUSIC FORM. By Dr. Percy GoetschlUS. A manual of analysis of all the 
structural factors and designs employed in musical composition, explaining thoroughly each design or 
form from the smallest to the largest ; intended for the general music lover or student. 

Price, post-paid, $1.25 

BURROWES' PIANO PRIMER. Edited and Revised by Frederic Field Bullard. A new 

and enlarged edition of a well-known work. The editor has preserved the original text and contents, 
as far as possible, corrected faultv terminology and replaced old-fashioned terms by modern ones. The 
pronunciation of each foreign word is given in the text as it occurs. Price, post-paid, 50 cents 

HOW TO STUDY KREUTZER. By Benjamin Cutter. By putting in book form what every 
teacher discusses and illustrates in the lesson room, the writer explains to all violin players those prin- 
ciples which have made the studies of Kreutzer so justly famous. Price, post-paid, 75 cents 

ENGLISH DICTION FOR SINGERS AND SPEAKERS. By Louis Arthur Russell. While 

this book is put forth by the author especially for the guidance of singeis, it is also intended to meet 
the needs of public speakers, and, in fact, all who pretend to refined or artistic use of the English 
language. Price, post-paid, $1.00 

THE TRAINING OF BOYS' VOICES. By Claude Ellsworth Johnson. A thorough and 
practical guide to the correct "placing" and training of boys' voices. A noteworthy feature of the book 
is an extensive list of sacred and secular music especially written for, or adapted to, the uses of boy 
choirs and schools. Price, post-paid, 75 cents 




Boston: OLIVER DITSON COMPANY 



15 

a 


Stye Mwuvxn 


£1.50 
a 


iffar Stearic, i^fititentjs, anb Unfa^ra MtxBit 



What will The Musician do for YOU? 

You will find it an indispensable help to yourself and your pupils. 
It will answer any question for you about music and its masters. 
It will suggest study plans, reading courses, programs for pupils' 

recitals, or any similar help. 
If you desire to continue your music study alone or in a small club 

it will plan the work for y on. 
It invites correspondence on any question in your music life. 

What can you do for The Musician? 

Tell us what features you think may be added to it with advantage. 
Send your programs to the editor. 

Suggest what help you would like to find in its pages. 
Make it your bureau of information. 
Show it to your friends. 

Send in to it short, practical articles based on experience. Liberal 
payment is made for those we find acceptable. 

FULL OF PRACTICAL ARTICLES, BEAUTIFUL ILLUSTRATIONS. 
WITH 24 PAGES OF MUSIC IN EVERY ISSUE. 



(Ehotr nnh Choral Mn$nz\n? 

Stttartpttott, #1.00 a !>ar. BmnpU (Hapy, 10c 

Each number contains several pagea of alioir and choral music, printed from 
engraved plates, full octavo size, portrait and biographical sketch of 
a composer, articles of interest, and news of the choir, church, and 
school. ' 



Stye HJuatriatt, 150 Srommf Bt, loatott 



Standard Opera Librettos 

PUBLISHED BY 

OLIVEfi DITSON COMPANY 

These librettos, with words of the Opera, and music of the principal airs, are reliable and 
authoritative, and are the same as those used by all the leading opera companies. 



Aida 


Italian and English 


Verdi 


Manon 


French and English 


A^assen et 


Barber of Seville 


Italian and English 


Rossini 


Maritana 


English 


Wallace 


L>tlIC IICICIIV) L_*cl 


French and English 


Offenbach 


Marriage of Figaro 


Italian and English 


Moza rt 


Bells of Corneville 


English 


Planquette 


Martha 


Italian and English 


Flotoiv 


Bohemian Girl 


Italian ard English 


Balfe 


Masked Ball 


Italian and English 


Verdi 


Carmen 


Italian and EnglisL 


Bizet 


Masaniello 


English 


A uber 


Cavalleria Rusticana 


Italian and English 


Mascagni 


Mastersingers of Nuremberg, The 




Damnation of Faust 


French and English 


Berlioz 




German and English 


W agner 


Dinorah 


Italian and English 


Meyerbeer 


Mirella 


Italian and English 


Gounod 


Don Giovanni 


Italian and English 


Mozart 


Mefistofele 


Italian and English 


Boito 


Don Pasquale 


Italian and English 


Donizetti 


Merry Wives of 
Windsor 


English 


Nicolai 


Elaine 


French and English 


Bemberg 


Mignon 


Italian and English 


Thomas 


Ernani 


Italian and English 


Verdi 




Italian and English 


Bellini 




Norma 


Fatinitza 


English 


Suppe 




English 


Gluck 


Orpheus 


Faust 


Italian and English 


Gounod 


Orpheus 


French and English 


Offenbach 


Favorita, La 


Italian and English 


Donizetti 


Otello 


Italian and English 




Fidelio 


German and English 


Beethozieu 


Otello 


Italian and English 


Rossini 


Fille de Madame Angot, La 




Parsifal 


German and English 


Wagner 




French and English 


L ecocq 


t^agliacci 


Italian and English 


Leoncavallo 


Fille du Regiment, La 


Italian ard English 


Donizetti 


Perichole, La. 


French and English 


Offenbach 


Flying Dutchman 


German and English 


Wagner 


Poliuto 


English 


Donizetti 


Fra Diavolo 


Italian and English 


A uber 


Prophete, Le 


Italian and English 


Meyerbeer 


Freischiitz, Der 


German and English 


Weber 


Puritana, I 


Italian and English 


Belli 11 1 






Queen of Sheba 


German and English 


Gold mark 


Freischtitz, Der 


Italian and English 


Weber 


Rhinegojg, The 
Rigoletto 


Wagner 




German and English 


Giaconda, La 


Italian and English 


Ponchielli 


Italian and English 


Verdi 


Girofle-Girofla 


French and English 


Lecocq 


Roberto il Diavolo 


Italian and English 


Meyerbeer 


Gotterdammerung 


German and English 


Wagner 


Romeo and Juliet 


Italian and English 


Bellini 


Grand Duchess of Gerolstein 




Romeo and Juliet 


Italian and English 


Gou nod 




French and English 


Offenbach 


Rose of Castile 


English 


Balfe 


Hamlet 


English 


Thomas 


Samson and Delilah 


French and English 


Saint-Saens 


Huguenots, Leg 


Italian and English 


Meyerbeer 


Semiramide 


Italian and English 


Rossini 


Jewess, The 


Italian and English 


Halevy 


Siegfried 


German and English 


Wagner 








Sonnambula, La 


Italian and English 


Bellini 


Lakme 


Italian and English 


Delibes 










Stradella 


English 


Flotow 


L'Africaine 


Italian and English 


Meyerbeer 


Tannhauser 




German and English 


Wagner 


Lily of Killarney 


English 


Benedict 


Traviata, La 


Italian and English 


Verdi 


Linda di Chamounix 


Italian and English 


Donizetti 


Tristan und Isolde 


German and English 


Wagner 


Lohengrin 


Italian and English 


Wagner 


Trovatore, 11 


Italian and English 


Verdi 


Lucia di Lammermoor 


Italian and English 


Donizetti 


Walkure, Die 


German and English 


Wagner 


Lucrezia Borgia 


Italian and English 


Donizetti 


William Tell 


Italian and English 


Rossini 


Mc<dc Flute 


Italian and English 


Mozart 


Zampa 


Italian and English 


Herold